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Full text of "The home advisor"

CoipghtN^_ 



COPmiGHT DEPOSni 




Olivet M, E. Church 






THE 

Home Adviser 

NEW EDITION 

Price, 50 Cts. By mail 55 Cts. 




9 



PUBLISHED BY THE 



LADIES' AID SOCIETY 

OF 

Olivet M.E. Church 



COATESVILLE, PA, 
1911 



The Times Printing Co., Coatesville, Pa. 



^1. 



Copyrighted 1911 
by 

MRS. MARY C. HUGHES 



©CI.A303750 

NO, ! 




Foreword 



HE kitchen of the old-fashioned farm house was 
the really comfortable and ultra sacred precinct 
of the entire establishment. If you were on 
terms of real friendship with the farmer and his 
wife, you were admitted to the kitchen. To sit around a 
good fire in the kitchen of a farm-house, with a raging snow 
storm snarling at the doors and windows, with plenty of 
nuts on hand in the garret, with apples from the cellar on 
broad-brimmed plates, and with cookies or doughnuts to 
fill any stray abdominal crevice, is to enjoy life. The mod- 
ern kitchen is the ultra sacred center of the home. She 
who presides there is queen over her own household. Bishop 
Berkley when he wrote his beautiful verses upon our West- 
ern World, and penned the lines, "Time's noblest offspring 
is the last," described not so nearly our prophetic future as 
the last and best creation of the Almighty — woman — whom 
we both love and worship. A distinguished French philoso- 
pher answered the narrative of every event with the ques- 
tion, "Who is she?" Priscilla uttered the sentiment which 
gave the Yankee the keynote of success, and condensed the 
primal elements of his character when she said to John 
Alden, "Prythee, why don't you speak for yourself, John?" 
That motto has been the spear in the rear and the star in 
the van of all progress. Just because of that sentiment it 
has made the descendants of Priscilla and John the most 
audacious, self-reliant and irrepressible members of the hu- 
man family. Out from the pages of this little volume, filled 
with recipes to bring good cheer and fellowship to all, comes 
the answer to the question, "Who is she?" and the only 
answer is, "She speaks for herself." 

You must follow closely the instructions given, and when 
you reach the lastly, let your doxology be praise for those 
whose names and works are herein enrolled. 

Henry Hess. 

November, igii. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



SUGAR 

A common sized tumbler equals half a pint. 

Two level teacupfuls of granulated sugar equal one pound. 

Two heaping- teacupfuls of A cofifee equal one pound. 

Two level coffeecupfuls of powdered equal one pound. 

Two and one-half level teacupfuls of best brown equal one 
pound. 

Two and three-quarters level teacupfuls of powdered equal 
one pound. 

One and one-half le\el coffeecujjfuls of g;rannlated ecjual 
one pound. 

One pint of A coffee equals twelve ounces. 

One heaping pint of granulated equals fourteen ounces. 

One quart of powdered equals one pound and seven 
ounces. 

One quart of granulated equals one pound and nine 
ounces. 

One quart of any kind equals four teacupfuls. 

One teacupful equals one-half pint or two gills. 

One heaping tablespoonful equals one ounce. 

Two heaping tablespoonfuls of powdered equal one ounce. 

FLOUR 

Two hea])ing tablespoonfuls equal one ounce. 

Five heaping tablespoonfuls equal one teacupful. 

Five teacuj)fuls sifted flour equal one pound. 

One quart of sifted flour equals one pound. 

Three and one-half teacuj^fuls of corn meal e(|ual one (|uart. 

BUTTER 

One even tablespoonful of soft butter equals one ounce. 

Size medium egg equals two ounces. 

Four heai)ing tablespoonfuls of soft butter eciuals nne tea- 
cui)ful. 

i'wo teacupfuls of packed soft butter equal one j)ound. 

One pint of well packed soft butter equals one pound. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



SOUPS 



Fresh, lean, uncooked meats make the best materials for 
soups, and this is one of the most important items. 

In making soups of fresh meat, always put it on in cold 
water. As the water l)oils away add more from the teaket- 
tle, which should be boiling. A quart of water to a pound 
of meat is proper proportion. The best soup is made by 
cooking the meat the day ]:)revious. Remove all scum as 
soon as it rises to the surface; and when cold, skim off the 
fat. The meat should l)e boiled slowly and long for soup so 
as to extract all the juices. 

Soup should be seasoned very lightly, as more seasoning 
can l)e added to suit the taste when served. If a vegetable 
soup is desired these can be added to suit the taste to the 
already prepared stock. If barley is needed, this should be 
cooked separately, then added to the soup. 

Sometimes the meat juices form a thick jelly ; this can be 
diluted wath water if not wanted so strong. 

Jf soup is to be colored, use scorched flour or burnt sugar. 

For flavoring soups: — Sweet majoram, thyme, parsley, 
celery tops, etc., may be used. Celery seed being an excel- 
lent substitute for the latter and is always obtainable. 

Two or three eggs well beaten and added just before ])(^ur- 
ing into the tureen makes a nice thickening. 

Lean meats for soups are preferaljle to joints or bones of 
any sort, and make the stock more nourishing. 

In making soups, always use fresh ingredients, clean uten- 
sils, and skim carefully. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP 

Take tender ends of a bunch of asparagus, boil until ten- 
der in salt water. Add one pint of milk, butter size of a 
walnut. When it comes to a boil add dumplings and l;oil 
fifteen minutes. — Mrs. H. Thome. 



6 THE HOME ADVISER 

CREAM SOUP 

One pint boiling water, half teacupful of cream; pour ihe 
water on the cream; add broken pieces of toasted bread, and 
a little salt. cREAM OF chicken soup 

One quart of chicken broth, place upon the stove where 
it will boil slowly ; add two tablespoonfuls of rice and let it 
cook three quarters of an hour. Rub together one table- 
spoonful of butter and one of flour, and stir into the soup 
until it thickens. Season with salt and pepper. Scald a pint 
of fresh milk and add, when it will be ready to serve. 

MOCK TURTLE OR CALF'S HEAD SOUP 

Have butcher trim the head ready for use; let it stand 
one hour in cold water, wash well, put on to boil in plenty 
of water, add salt to taste; boil three hours, remove head to 
cool, cut all the meat fine, add six potatoes cut in dice, a 
small onion, one can of corn. Add force meat balls and 
dough balls if desired. Take one pound minced veal, add 
salt and pepper to taste ; the yolks of two eggs added to 
make it stick together. Form in small balls, flour the balls, 
then fry in butter. To make the dough balls take a little 
flour, salt, a little shortening and baking powder ; mix with 
a little water, form into balls, flour well, add to soup; boil 
twenty minutes. Season to taste. 

NOODLE SOUP 

Take three eggs and flour enough to stififen it. Roll verv 
thin, spread on a cloth till dry enough to roll without break- 
ing; cut very fine. Boil piece of beef, or soup bone; when 
done add noodles and let it boil thoroughly. 

—Mrs. C. E. Binklcx. 
OYSTER SOUP 
To one quart boiling water add one quart rich sweet milk. 
(Use milk entirely if desired.) Stir in half teacupful rolled 
cracker crumbs; season with pepper and salt. When it 
comes to a boil add one quart oysters and their liquor. Stir 
well to keep from scorching. Add butter the size of an egg ; 
let it boil up once, remove from fire and serve immediately. 

—T. S. Gilbert. ' 



THE HOME ADVISER 7 

OYSTER SOUP FOR FOUR 

Chop one stalk of celery, put on in cold water and cook- 
half hour, drain and mash ; add to water celery was boiled in 
one pint of milk. When hot stir in one tablespoonful each 
of flour and butter rubbed together, season ; drain two dozen 
oysters, drop into the soup. When boiling remove from 
fire and serve. — M. C. Hughes. 

PEA SOUP 

One pint of canned peas, one quart of milk, one large 
tablespoonful of butter and one of flour. Salt and pepper to 
taste. Press the peas through a colander (reserving half a 
cupful). Boil the milk, add the peas, then the butter and 
flour which has been rubbed together and made smooth and 
thin with some of the boiling milk; season with salt and pep- 
per; then add the half cupful of whole peas and cook until it 
thickens. Serve with hot toasted crackers. — M. IV. Mast. 
POTATO SOUP, NO. 1 

Boil until soft, in sufficient water to well cover them, six 
medium sized potatoes, one small onion, one or two stalks 
of celery and sprig, of parsley. Put all through a press or 
colander, add one quart of milk, season with salt and 
pepper. Let it come to a boil, then add a tablespoonful of 
butter and one of flour, rubbed together, and cook until it 
thickens. — M. W. Mast. 

POTATO SOUP, NO. 2 

Pare potatoes and cut in dice shape. Boil in salt water 
until soft. Add piece of butter size of an &gg, one quart of 
milk, pepper to taste, and just before removing from fire 
add one well-beaten ^gg. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

SOUP STOCK 

Use one quart of water to each pound of meat and bones 
(beef, veal or chicken) ; cut in small pieces, cover closely and 
let it simmer three or four hours. Put no salt in the water ; 
do not skim it; strain through a cloth and place it where it 
will cool rapidly. When cold take off the grease. This may 
be made in quantities, kept in a refrigerator for weeks, and 
soup made easily at any time. 



8 THE HOME ADVISER 

TRIPE SOUP 

One quart of milk, one and one-half cupfuls of tripe — pre- 
viously boiled, cut in small pieces, lump of butter size of a 
walnut; salt and pepper to suit the taste. Let the milk come 
to a boil; and then add the tri])e and other ingredients. 
Soon as boiling hot serve. 

TOMATO SOUP, NO. 1 

One quart can of tomatoes or its equivalent of fresh toma- 
toes. Pour on one (|uart boiling water and boil twenty min- 
utes. Strain through sieve and stir in half teaspoonful soda 
until thoroughly dissolved. Then add one pint hot milk (half 
cream), and let it come to a boil. Butter the size of an egg, 
pejjper and salt. Roll tine four crackers and place in tureen, 
then pour soup over them. This makes enough for six per- 
sons. — T. S. Gilbert. 

TOMATO SOUP, NO. 2 

One pint of well stewed and strained tomatoes with whicl: 
has been stirred while boiling a third of a teaspoonful of 
soda ; season with salt, pepper and a half tablespoonful of 
sugar. Cook in a double boiler one c|uart of milk, one small 
onion and a sprig of parsley; let boil, then add a large table- 
spoonful each of butter and flour rubbed together. When 
ready to serve pour through a sieve into the strained toma- 
toes. Serx'e with toasted crackers. — M. //'. Mast. 

VEGETABLE SOUP 

Three carrots, four onions, four ])otatoes. one pint of 
cabbage, cut hue. Put on to stew, with just enough water 
to cover, until ingredients are tender, then fill with boiling- 
water, and twenty minutes before serving add dumplings 
niade from a pint of milk, one tablespoonful of l)utter. two 
eggs well beaten, a little baking ])owder. flour to thicken. 

EGG DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP 

One-half pint of milk, two well-beaten eggs and as much 
w^heat flour as will make a smooth, thick batter free from 
lumps; drop a teaspoonful at a time into I)oiling soup. 



THE HOME ADX'JSER 



9 



FORCEMEAT BALLS FOR SOUP 

One cupful of cooked \'eal or fowl meat (cut fine) mixed 
with the following:, One-half cupful of fine l)read crumbs, 
the }-olks of four hard-boiled egs^'s, rubbed smoothl}' togeth- 
er with a tablespoonful of milk, season with j^epper and salt. 
Add half a teaspoonful of Hour, binding all together witli 
one beaten egg'. Flour the hands and form into balls about 
the size of a nutmeg; dro]) into the sou]) about twenty min- 
utes before serving. — Mrs. Binklcy. 

EGG DUMPLINGS 

Beat one eg'g light, add half cupful cold water, a little salt, 
one teaspoonful baking" powder, fiour till stiff enough ; drop 
in boiling salt water, brown butter and bread crumbs pour 
over top before sending- to table. — Mrs. Binklcy. 



10 THE HOME ADVISER 

FISH and OYSTERS 



Fish should be scaled and cleaned as soon as they come 
from market ; sprinkle a little salt on the inside and put in a 
cold place until wanted. The best method for cooking fish 
ii broiling; baking is next, boiling being considered the 
poorest way of any. Whatever method employed they 
should be cooked thoroughly to be palatable and wholesome. 

Fresh mackerel spoil quicker than any other fish, all fresh 
fish should be cooked the day they are purchased. To soak 
a salt fish, lay in cold water, in an earthen vessel, skin side up. 

To remove the muddy taste from fish, soak in strong salt 
water a short time before cooking. 

Never use butter to fry fish, lard is much better and plenty 
of it. 

Oysters are considered in season only from October first 
until April first. 

RIFE'S CLAM CHOWDER 

Four medium^-sized onions chopped fine and fried a nice 
brown in the kettle in which the chowder is to be made, fry 
in lard and butter each the size of an Ggg; after they have 
been nicely fried add two quarts of boiling water, one pint 
can of tomatoes and one-quarter peck of potatoes, peeled 
and sliced thin as for Saratoga chips ; allow them to boil 
soft before adding the clams; take thirty clams, strain off 
the water and save it, wash the clams and chop fine, add 
clams and clam water, and season with salt and pepper to 
taste ; let it come to a boil and remove from the fire. Serve 
hot with crackers, butter and pickle. 

DEVILED CLAMS. NO. 1 

Twenty-five clams, s three hard-boiled eggs, a little onion, 
parsley and celery; chop all fine, then add a little cream, 
melted butter, salt, pepper and either table sauce or catsup; 
thicken with bread crumbs, mix, put in clam shells and fry 
in hot fat. —Mrs. C. E. Binklcv. 



THE HOME ADVISER ii 

DEVILED CLAMS, NO. 3 

Twenty-five clams chopped, one cupful bread crumbs, half 
cupful of melted butter, half cupful of cream, two eggs, an 
onion, salt, pepper and parsley to taste. Mix, put in clam 
shells and bake twenty minutes. — Mrs. Ivison. 

CLAM FRITTERS 
Twelve clams cut fine, one pint of milk, three eggs, adding 
liquor from clams to the milk; beat the eggs and add to milk 
with salt, pepper and flour enough for a thin batter. Lastly 
add the chopped clams. Fry in hot lard. Notice if the lard 
is hot enough to form a nice brown color quickly. One 
tablespoonful makes a fritter of moderate size. 

— Mrs. Clara E. Binkley. 

BAKED FISH 

Fill the fish with a nice bread and butter filling, seasoned 
with half a small onion chopped fine ; pepper, salt and pars- 
ley; bake until thoroughly done, which will take from an 
hour to an hour and a half, according to size. 

BOILED FISH 

Wash, wipe and rub with a little salt ; wrap it in a cloth 
just large enough to envelop the fish, sew the edges ; put it 
in a fish kettle if you have one, if not lay it on a platter and 
tie both together and place in a shallow pan ; cover with boil- 
ing water and a little salt, simmer gently ten minutes to 
every pound of fish. When done remove the cloth carefully, 
put on hot plate and garnish with lemon and parsley ; serve 
with drawn butter or cream sauce. 

Cream Sauce. — One tablespoonful of butter and one table- 
spoonful of flour, cook until bubbles, add pepper, salt, a 
cupful of rich milk or cream. Cook until it thickens, then 
add a teaspoonful lemon juice and one hard-boiled egg chop- 
ped fine. — Member. 

FISH CAKES 

Carefully remove the bones and skin from any fish, pre- 
viously cooked, and let soak for a short time in luke warm 
water; take out, press dry and add to it an equal quantity of 



12 THE HOME ADVISER 

iTiashed potatoes, and heat to a fine paste; season to taste. 
Alake u]) mass into round flat cakes, sift a little flour over 
each, fry in lard until hrown. — M. C. Hughes. 

OYSTER PIE 

Cover hottom of haking dish with white potatoes thinly 
sliced, then a layer of oysters with the liciuor until you have 
two layers of each; season each with salt, pepper, butter 
and a dredging- of flour; co\'er with a rich ])ie crust; bake 
in oven about three-fourths of an hour. — Gordon. 

CREAMED OYSTER RECIPE FOR CHAFING DISH 

After heating the ])an of the chafing dish, melt in it a piece 
of butter the size of a large e^g, add to it a half cupful of 
finely chopped celery, let them cook together about two 
minutes. Add fifty large fat oysters which have been drain- 
ed in a colander and let them stew with the dish covered 
until the gills begin to curl. Then remove the oysters and 
to the juice remaining add a tables])oonful of flour and a 
pint of cream ; salt and cayenne to taste. Let come to a 
boil ; put oysters back to cook a few minutes longer. When 
done, extinguish lamp and ser^'e at once. 

OYSTER CROQUETTES 

Aiix a ((uart of oysters with one cupful of mashed pota- 
toes, cut the mass u]) fine with a knife ; add half i)ound of 
rolled crackers, season with butter, salt and pepper, and add 
the oyster liquor, adding milk if more moisture is needed. 
Make into small rolls, dip in beaten egg, then in powdered 
cracker and fry. — Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 

OYSTER STEW 

To fifty oysters take one pint of milk, a gill of water, two 
lablespoonfuls of flour, half teaspoonful of salt, fourth cup 
of butter and a little cayenne pepper; boil licpior of ovsters, 
mix butter and flour, steam until soft enough to beat to a 
froth, then stir into liquor and add other ingredients ; let 
come to a boil and serve. 



■JHE HOME ADVISER 13 

OYSTER OR CLAM FRITTERS 

Strain twenty-five clams or oysters thoroughly from the 
jnice, chop fine; season with pep])er and salt, add two eggs, 
a little cream, sift in Hour enough to make a soft hatter, 
(hep in spoonfuls into hot fat. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

Place a layer of oysters in hottom of pudding dish and 
k.yer of hread crumhs with salt, pe])per and hits of hutter 
alternately until dish is full, adding the litpior of oysters; 
hake twenty or thirty minutes. — Mrs. M. P. H. Gordon. 

MACARONI AND OYSTERS 

Steam one large teacupful of macaroni hroken in small 
jjieces, until tender. Drain twenty-five oysters and place 
niacaroni and oysters in alternate layers in a pudding disli 
with hutter size of walnut, and season with salt and pepper 
Grate cheese over top. Take liquor from oysters, add a little 
milk, pour over; hake until brown. — Mrs. Hoz<.'ard Tlionic. 

OYSTER SALAD 

Parboil one pint of oysters, when plump, drain and set 
away to cool. Mix one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, a ])inch 
of cayenne, five drops of onion juice, two tablespoonfuls ot 
olive oil and one tablespoonful of lemon juice ; pour over the 
oysters when cold. Wash and slice thin, enough of celery 
to make twice as much as you have of the oysters, and 
sprinkle with salt ; cut the oysters if large, mix the two to- 
gether and cover with mayonnaise dressing; garnish with 
yellow celery tops. — Mrs. Isaac Rife. 

PIGS IN BLANKET 

Make a nice pie dough, roll, cut in squares; wrap a thin 
slice of bacon around an oyster and then in the square of 
dough, pin with tooth pick, lay in pan and bake. Make a 
dressing with the liquor from the oysters, butter, salt and 
pepper: pour over before or after baking. — Mrs. E. Criifith. 



14 



THE HOiME ADVISER 



BROILED OYSTERS 



Select larg-e oysters, dry, then place them on a fine wire 
broiler, turning- often ; have some toast prepared, butter the 
oysters, season with salt and pepper, place on toast, put in 
the oven for a moment to heat, then serve. 

— Airs. L. S. Shainline. 

DEVILED OYSTERS 

Twenty-five nice fat oysters, half pint of cream, one table- 
spoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of flour, one table- 
spoonful of chopped parsley, yolks of two eggs, salt and 
pepper to taste; drain and chop oysters fine, drain again, 
put cream on to boil, rub the butter and flour together until 
smooth, stir into the cream; as soon as it thickens, remove 
from the fire, add other ingredients, beating the yolks be- 
fore adding-; place in shells, sprinkle with egg and bread 
crumbs; bake in quick oven five minutes. — Mrs. Albert Long. 

FRIED OYSTERS 

Put the oysters in a colander, pour water over them, tl^en 
take out and wipe dry, have some crackers and bread crumbs 
rolled fine, season each with salt and pepper; beat an egg 
and add a little milk; dip oysters in cracker dust, then egg 
and milk, lastly in bread crumbs ; fry in hot lard until brown ; 
serve at once. — Mrs. L. S. Shamiinc. 

CREAMED OYSTERS 

One pint of milk or cream, one tablespoonful of corn 
starch or flour, twenty-five nice fat oysters, one tablespoon- 
ful of butter, salt and pepper to taste. Put the oysters on 
to boil in their own liquor; as soon as they boil drain them, 
put the cream on to boil in a farina boiler; rub the flour 
and butter together until smooth ; add to the boiling milk 
or cream. Stir until it boils ; add pepper and salt, and lastly 
the oysters. Put in patties. — Mrs. Albert Long. 

CREAM SALMON 

One can salmon, one cupful of cream, half cupful of milk, 
two teaspoonfuls of corn starch, one tablespoonful butter. 



THE HOME ADVISER 15 

pinch of soda, pepper and salt. Drain off liquor, pick sal- 
mon into small flakes, heat milk, add corn starch, then sal- 
mon ; let heat, cover with cracker crumbs and brown in 
oven. — Mrs. F. H. Holland. 

SALMON SALAD 
Drain oil off of a can of salmon. Beat two eggs very light 
and pour over half cupful of boiling hot vinegar, and set on 
stove until it thickens; add one teaspoonful of butter, some 
mustard and cayenne pepper, set away to cool, when ready 
for table add four tablespoonfuls of sweet cream ; pour over 
salmon, dress with lettuce. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 
One can salmon, six potatoes, boiled and mashed ; one 
tablespoonful butter; season with pepper and salt; mould 
into shape, dip into beaten ^gg, then in cracker crumbs, and 
fry in hot lard or butter. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 

One can of salmon, one large cupful of mashed potatoes, 
two hard-boiled eggs, one fresh o-gg, two tablespoonfuls of 
cream, a little each of onion, parsley, salt and pepper. Mix 
all together thoroughly, form, dip in tgg, roll in cracker- 
dust and fry in hot fat. — Mrs. M. A. Woodzvard. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



MEATS 



Meat wlien used for soup shoiikl l)e put on to cook in cold 
water. 

When used as boiled meat, it should be put on in boilin.^" 
water so as to retain the juices and should always be kept 
under the water when boiling-. 

Remove all scum as it rises and allow twenty nnnutes to 
a j3ound ; when wanted rare allow fifteen minutes to the 
pound. 

Never salt meat when cooking-, as it draws out the juices 
and makes it tough. 

When roasting meat in the oven, it should be freciuentlv 
basted, unless a roaster is used, which saves the trouble. 

All meats should be cooked with a steady fire. 

In boiling or frying meats, the utensils should be hot be- 
fore putting it on. As soon as it sears, turn it. 

Frozen meat should be placed in cold water to thaw. 

To keep ham from becoming rancid after slicing, rub corn 
meal on the cut side; this can be easilv rubbed off when 
needed again. 

If smoked ham is rubbed with molasses and s]:)rinkle(l well 
with black ])ei)per it will keep much nicer. The ham should 
be well dried. 

Mutton and \-eal will keep fresh in warm weather with'uit 
salt or ice, if kept in a vessel and well covered with sour 
nn'lk. The milk should be changed when commencing to 
mould. Wash well in cold water before using. 

In broiling meats, if the dripi)ings take fire, remove from 
the range to cool ; do not try to blow it out. for fear oi burn- 
ing the face. 

A i)erforated' tin to cover your dri]:)ping pan while frying 
meat prevents the fat from flying over the stove and the 
llax-or of the meat will be improved cooked in this wav. 



THE HOME ADVISER 17 

Sausages well fried may be kept for several months if 

placed in crocks and melted lard poured over until quite 

thick. This lard can be utilized for frying- after the sausage 

is used. 

CREAMED FRESH BEEF 

One pound of beef, from the round, chopped, one table- 
spoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of flour, one cupful of 
cream. Put l^eef in a very hot pan and turn quickly with a 
fork until it is all seared, add the butter ; when melted dredge 
the flour in and stir until it is well browned, add cream ; boil 
for a minute or two, season with salt and pepper and serve 
on hot toast. — Wearer. 

BAKED BEEFSTEAK 

Score the steak well; put it in a dripping pan. If not very 
fat add bits of butter to it, season with salt and pepper and 
sprinkle bread crumbs over it. To keep from sticking put 
a little water in the pan. Bake twenty minutes or until well 
done. — T. S. Gilbert. 

VEAL OR BEEP ROAST 

Wipe the meat with a damp cloth, place in a roasting pan 
and sear over under gas blaze or brown over in a very hot 
oven ; add a little hot water around the meat ; salt and pep- 
per to taste. Baste the meat by dipping the water from 
around the roast with a large spoon every ten minutes. Add 
hot water as often as it dries away. 

FRENCH BEEF STEW 

Select lean beef, cut in small pieces, and stew with onions; 
when done thicken with flour, season and serve. A tea- 
si)oonful of vineg'ar may be added if desired. 

BROILED BEEFSTEAK 

Have steak about three-quarters of an inch thick ; some 
prefer to beat the steak, thinking it makes it tender. Lay 
it on a hot well greased gridiron or broiler, put it over live 
coals to cook. If wanted rare cook only ten minutes ; if 
well done allow fifteen minutes. Lay it on a hot platter, 
season with salt and pepper and with bits of butter or a 
. little sweet cream. 



l8 THE HOME ADVISER 

STUFFED STEAK 

One pound of round steak, one cupful of bread crumbs 
scalded in one cupful of milk, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one tablespoonful of parsley, one chopped onion, half a tea- 
spoonful of salt, half teaspoonful of pepper, lay steak fiat, 
spread filling on, roll steak, tie with string, dust with fiour; 
put in oven with two ounces of drippings, add one teacupful 
cf water, cook one hour, baste frequently. — Mrs. Finnigan 

FRIED BEEFSTEAK 

Cut suet from steak, cut up and put in pan and fry out the 
fat ; when smoking hot put in the steak ; when browned on 
one side turn over and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook 
until about two-thirds done ; put on a hot platter and put a 
very little hot water in the pan; s^lt a little and pour this 
over the steak. 

MEAT CROQUETTES 

Two cupfuls of finely chopped cooked meat, one cupful 
milk or dressing from meat; two tablespoonfuls of chopped 
parsley, one tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of 
flour, one ^gg; season to taste. Scald the milk if used, rub 
flour and butter together until smooth; add to the scalded 
milk until it thickens. Mix in the parsley and seasoning, 
as well as the meat. Mix thoroughly and then dip in ^gg 
and bread crumbs and fry in hot fat. — Mrs. L. S. Shainline. 

MEAT HASH ON TOAST 
Take the remains of any kind of meat, remove all bones 
and fat, mince fine ; add a tablespoonful or two of celery or 
without (celery is the best with chicken or turkey) ; put into 
a pan with a little water to moisten, heat thoroughly, season 
with a little butter, salt and pepper. Put this on slices of 
toasted bread, previously buttered. — T. S. Gilbert. 

BOILED HAM 

Wash clean, put in a boiler and cover with cold water, 
bring to the boiling point and boil gently three or four 
hours, or till tender so as to stick a fork in it. Turn the ham 
once or twice in the water. When done take out, put into 



THE HOME ADVISER 19 

a baking pan. Peel, set into a moderate oven and bake one 
hour. To glaze a ham, sprinkle with sugar and pass a hot 
knife over it. or brush over with the yolk of a well-beaten 
egg- 

BAKED HAM 

Ham is much better baked than boiled ; soak for an hour 
or two in clean cold water, wipe it dry. Spread all over with 
a thin batter, and then put in a deep pan, with sticks under 
to keep it out of the gravy. When done remove the batter 
and skin, set away to cool. It will require from six to eight 
hours to bake it. 

DEVILED HAM 

Take lean, boiled ham, and chop it very fine, season well 
with black and red pepper and dry mustard, press it solid, 
and slice thin. Boiled beef's tongue may be served in the 
same manner. 

HAM TOAST 

Remove the fat from some slices of cold boiled ham ; chop 
fine. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a saucepan on 
the stove; add the chopped ham and half a teacupful ot 
sweet cream, or rich milk ; season with salt and pepper, and 
vhen hot remove from the stove and stir in quickly three 
well-beaten eggs. Pour the mixture over thin slices of toast 
and serve at once. 

HAM AND POTATO CROQUETTES 

Four cupfuls mashed potatoes, two cupfuls chopped boiled 
ham, both fat and lean ; mix together and moisten with two 
beaten eggs. Make into balls, dip into white of beaten 
^gg, then roll in bread crumbs and fry in deep hot fat. 

— -T. S. Gilbert. 

BAKED LIVER 

Take a whole calf's liver, have a pocket cut in it, fill with 
bread filling, baste with bacon and bake in oven. 

— Miss M. Finnigan. 



20 JHE HOME ADVISER 

ITALIAN CHEESE 

Wash a j)ound of liver, scald and wipe dry, chop with 
half a pound of veal and half a pound of ham, season with 
sag-e, parsley, minced onion, pepper and salt; press in 
greased mold, cover and steam four hours. Drain off the 
liquor, put in small pan ; dissolve one ounce of gelatine, pour 
aver meat in mold ; let get cold and slice. 

— Mrs. Max StcijiwacJis. 

PIG'S FEET 

Wash in hot water and scrape well. Lay in salt water to 
remove blood. Put on to cook in cold water with a little 
salt, and cook until very tender. Remove the meat from 
the bones, cut in small pieces. Place the meat in dishes and 
strain the liquor in which the feet were boiled, season with 
salt, pepper and vinegar to taste, and pour over the meat. 

BROWNED FRICASSEE OF SHEEP'S TONGUES 

The day before the fricassee is to be served, wash the 
tongues carefully, put tkem into enough boiling water to 
cover, and simmer them for two hours. When cool take 
tl'cni from the water, rid them of their roots and cut them 
in two lengthwise. Season with salt and pepper, and put 
in a cool place. Put upon a plate two tablespoonfuls of 
flour and roll the tongues in it ; put three tablespoonfuls of 
!)utter into a frying ])an, and when it gets hot put in vhe 
tong-ues and a teaspoonful of chopped onion. Cook until 
the meat gets browned on all sides, add what flour remains 
on plate and stir until the flour is smooth, then add a pint of 
stock, stirring all the while. Season with salt and pepper; 
then add a teaspoonful of lemon juice, and send the dish to 
tbe table. — Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

GERMAN SWEETBREADS 

Boil them in water with a little salt ; take off all the fat ; 
cut in small pieces. J\lake sauce with one tablespoonful of 
flour, butter the size of walnut, moisten with the water the 
sweetbread is cooked in, make as thick as cream, flavor with 



THE HOME ADVISER 21 

lemon juice. Put in the sweetbread and let it just boil ; stir 
in a well-beaten eg"g', with a little water in it to keep from 
curdling, just before sending to table. 

FRIED SWEETBREAD 

Wash the sweetbreads, trim carefully of fat and boil an 
hour in water seasoned with salt and a dash of vinegar ; when 
perfectly cold split each lengthwise, pepper them and roll 
in cracker dust. Fry in butter till a nice brown and serve, 
garnished with thin slices of lemon, cut in quarters. 

—Mrs. J. JV. Heck. 

BREADED VEAL CUTLET 

Beat one egg; dip cutlet on both sides and then cover 
with very fine bread crumbs. Put in your frying pan on 
stove butter or lard, then place cutlet in the hot fat. Let 
cook very slowly for a half hour. 

BLANQUETTE OF VEAL 
Take two pounds of lean veal cut in pieces about an inch 
square, soak in cold water; take out, dr^^ with a cloth, put 
one and a half tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan with a 
tablespoonful of flour. When hot stir half a minute, add the 
veal, stir again, cover with water, add salt and pepper to 
tctste ; cook slowly two hours, stirring occasionallv ; beat one 
Ggg with a teaspoonful of water, stir in and serve. Should 
the gravy be too thick add a little water. 

VEAL LOAF. NO. 1 

Three pounds veal, three eggs, one-quarter cupful butter, 
one teaspoonful black pepper, two teaspoonfuls salt, one tea- 
spoonful onion juice, one-half pound ham, three tablespoon- 
fiils cream, one-half teaspoonful allspice, two teaspoonfuls 
summer savory, one-half cupful fine bread or cracker crumbs. 
Chop the veal and ham ^'ery fine. Beat the eggs without 
separating, and melt the butter; mix veal, ham, eggs and 
seasoning together ; add cream and melted butter. Press 
into a mould previously wet with cold water and turn out 



22 THE HOME ADVISER 

carefully into a flat baking pan. Bake for two hours in a 
h(A oven, basting occasionallv with melted butter. 

— Mrs. ]Vm. R. Jackson. 

VEAL LOAF, NO. 2 

Four pounds veal uncooked put through a grinder, three 
eggs, beaten light; two tablespoonfuls cream, one and one- 
half of stale bread crumbs, a little salt, red and black pepper 
to suit taste, one-quarter teaspoonful mustard, one-quarter 
cupful butter, melted, and a little parsley. Make in two 
loaves; put in a pan with a little water and a little butter; 
baste the same as a roast, one and a half hours. 

— Mrs. I. I^annan. 

VEAL WITH DUMPLINGS 

Get a knuckle of veal, put in a stewing kettle, nearly cover 
with boiling water; simmer slowly until tender; season with 
salt when nearly done. Take out the liquid and thicken 
with flour to make the gravy ; season with pepper ; add 
dumplings to the liquor and cook a few minutes, then pour 
around the meat in a large platter. 

The Dumplings. — Make a good baking powder biscuit, cut 
out the same; place in a perforated pie tin; put in a steamer 
and cook over a pot of boiling water; steam tw^enty to thirty 
minutes. Do this in time to be served with the stewed veal. 

VEAL LOAF 

Three pounds of uncooked veal, run through a meat chop- 
per; eight tablespoonfuls fine bread crumbs; six tablespoon- 
fuls cold water, two eggs well beaten, two tablespoonfuls 
butter ; salt, pepper and parsley to taste. Mix well together 
with the hands and then form into one large or tw'o small 
oblong loaves. Cover with bread crumbs and bake about 
two hours. Baste occasionallv. — Gordon. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



POULTRY and GAME 



Wild game should be first fried in butter before boiling, 
as it improves the flavor. 

Onions cooked with wild game will remove the fishy taste 
that is so objectionable to many. 

Be sure your poultry or game is well done before serving; 
keeping a pan of water in the oven will keep fowls from 
scorching. 

CHICKEN OR MEAT CROQUETTES 

To each pint of finely chopped meat take one-half pint of 
milk, one large tablespoonful butter, two heaping table- 
spoonfuls flour, one tablespoonful chopped parsley, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-fourth teaspoonful pepper, one-fourth 
teaspoonful grated nutmeg, one teaspoonful of onion juice. 
Put the batter in a pan on the stove, when melted stir in 
the flour, then add the milk and boil until thick, stirring all 
Ihe time. Take from the fire, add meat, stir well, set away 
to cool, then mould into croquettes ; when ready to fry, dip 
them in beaten egg, roll in cracker dust. Put in frying pan 
some butter or lard and fry them a nice brown. Do not 
allow them to swim in fat. — Mrs. John T. Blest. 

DEVILED CHICKEN 

One pint of picked meat, one cup of stale bread crumbs, 
soaked in one and one-half cupfuls of milk. Put all together 
and add a generous ])iece of butter; salt and pepper to taste. 
Put over fire and l)ring to a boil. Have two hard-boiled 
eggs chopped fine. Take from fire and stir the eggs well 
through the mixture. Turn into baking dish, sprinkle lightly 
with bread crumbs and brown in oven. — ^frs. H. Taggart. 



24 J" HE HOME ADX'ISEK 

FRIED CHICKEN 
Have the chicken cut up and well drained, dust tiie ])iccos 
with flour and put in a pan to fry with hot fat, part lard and 
part butter; season; brown well on both sides, being- careful 
not to burn ; add a little hot water, cover closely ; nio\e 
toward the back of the stove to steam a few minutes. Take 
out the chicken and make a gravy of cream or rich milk. 

CHICKEN PIE 

Cut up a chicken, boil for three-quarters of an hour. Make 
a dough, the same as for biscuits, and cover the bottom of 
the dish with a layer, ])our in the chicken and water in which 
it was cooked; season with salt and |)epper; then put on the 
upper crust and bake. 

ROAST TURKEY WITH OYSTERS 

Prepare a dressing of one quart of bread crumbs and haif 
cup of butter, and enough water to moisten; drain twentv- 
five oysters and mix with the dressing; season; fill the tur- 
key with the above, put butter over the outside and some 
water in the dripping pan, and bake until done, basting" fre- 
quently. Cut up the giblets, boil and add to the gravy. 

CHICKEN OR VEAL CROQUETTES 

Two cupfuls of finely chopped cooked meat, one cupful 
milk, one tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of 
chopped parsley, two tablespoonfuls of flour; season to 
taste. Scald the milk; rub butter and flour together until 
smooth, add to the scalded milk and stir until it thickens. 
Mix the parsley and other seasoning with the meat, add to 
the thicKcned milk, mix thoroughly, cool, then form into 
cone shaped croquettes ; cover with egg and read crumbs, 
then fry in smoking hot fat. — Mrs. Win. R. Jackson. 

POTATO FILLING FOR FOWLS 

A dozen medium-sized potatoes, one plate of bread 
crumbs, one small onion, parsley, salt and pepper to taste, 
three eggs. Boil and mash potatoes, brown onion and pars- 
Icy slightly in butter, and mix ; then break eggs over all and 
stir well. — Mrs. Jas. R. Paiclinc. 



THE HOME ADVISER 25 

TO COOK RABBIT OR SQUIRREL 

Wash the meat well and let stand in salt water a few min- 
utes; rinse, wipe dry w'ith a cloth, put fat in frying pan, let 
get smoking hot and put the meat in; keep turning until it 
i? a nice brown all over, then pour hot water in with it. 
Place a cover on the pan and let cook slowly until it is ten- 
der; add more water if necessary. Make a gravy; serve. 



^6 THE HOME ADVISER 

VEGETABLES 



Asparagus will boil in three-quarters of an hour ; use cold 
water. 

Corn vyill boil in twenty minutes, drop in boiling water 
without salt. 

Cauliflower will boil in twenty minutes and should be tied 
in a net and served with rich drawn butter. Throw in salt 
water and let stand a while before putting on to cook, to re- 
move insects. 

If dried corn is soaked over night it will cook in one and 
a half hours. 

Onions will boil in from one to one and a half hours ; use 
hot water, changing it two or three times; cook without 
cover to prevent disagreeable odor. 

New potatoes will boil in three-quarters of an hour. 

Summer beets will boil in one hour, while it will require 
two to three hours to cook winter beets. 

Spinach will boil in twenty minutes ; use hot water. 

Lima beans will cook in three-quarters of an hour. 

Early peas will require half an hour to cook ; salt when 
nearly done. 

Cook summer squash three-quarters of an hour ; press 
water out well before seasoning. 

If turnips are cut thin they will cook in an hour or so. 

Winter beans will take from two and a half to three and 
a half hours to cook, but may be hurried a little by the ad- 
dition of a pinch of soda. 

Cabbage should be boiled from one to one and a half hours 
in plenty of water; salt while boiling. Cook without lid, to 
prevent the disagreeable odor arising therefrom. 

When sprouts appear on potatoes, they should be re- 
moved as they exhaust the starch and render tli^^m less 
nutritious. 

Pare sparingly, as the nutritious part of the potato lies 
i>ear the skin. 



THE HOME ADVISER 27 

ASPARAGUS OMELET 
Boil fresh cut asparagus in very little water and a little 
salt. When tender, chop fine, mix with four well-beaten 
eggs, add two tablespoonfuls of sweet cream; fry in hot 
butter. 

BEAN POLENTA 

Cook dried beans until soft and mealy. To one quart of 
boiled beans add one and a half tablespoonfuls molasses, half 
tablespoonful each of salt, mustard and butter, and a table- 
spoonful of vinegar, a quarter of a tablespoonful pepper; 
stir and cook thoroughly ten minutes; when done should 
be dry. — M. C. Hughes. 

BEAN SALAD 

Cold baked or boiled beans make a very nice salad, with 
any good salad dressing. 

BAKED BEANS 

One quart of beans, soaked over night; in morning pour 
water off and put in the pot ; add two tablespoonfuls of mo- 
lasses, salt to taste, put on top half pound of salt pork, fill 
with water and bake all day ; refill several times during the 
day, and put the last water on about four o'clock. — Iz'isou. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS 

One quart of soup beans, one pound of pickled pork, two 
tablespoonfuls of molasses, half teaspoonful of mustard, salt 
and pepper to taste. Put beans on in enough cold water to 
cover deeply ; let them boil until the skins crack open, when 
a few are taken out and gently blown upon. Then drain the 
water all off, put about half of them into a bean pot with 
the molasses, mustard, salt and pepper. Take rind all off 
the pork, which should be very fat, cut into the pork deeply 
both ways; put it in the bean pot. add the remaining beans, 
fill with hot water, cover and bake all day, adding water 
•often to keep the bean pot full, until an hour or two before 
serving time; allow the water to boil away, till only enough 
i.« left to make sort of a srravv over then. — Mrs. Pond. 



28 J'HE HOME ADX'ISER 

LIMA BEANS 
Stew in water, in which a pinch of sochi has l)een added. 
When done drain off the water and pour in milk ; season 
with salt and butter; boil uj). Serve hot. 

BAKED BEETS 

Beets retain their delicate flavor to perfection if they are 
baked instead of boiled. Turn frequentl)- while in the oxen, 
using a knife, as the fork allows the juice to run out. When 
done, remove the skin and ser\-e with butter, salt and ])ep- 
per, in slices. 

CANNED BEETS 

Cook and peel young beets, as for immediate use; slice 
and pack in fruit jars ; be sure that rubber and tojis are in 
good order. Boil good cider vinegar, that is not too strong, 
adding pepper, salt and sugar to taste. While boiling jxmr 
over the packed beets in the jars, fill to overflowing and im- 
mediately screw down the tops tight. Wrap in Ijrown paper 
and put in a very dark place. — Airs. JViii. R. Jackson. 

COLE-SLAW, NO. 1 
Cut cabbage fine and season with salt. Dressing: One 
tablespoonful each of flour and sugar, one egg; beat to- 
gether Until smooth, stir in half cupful of cream or milk, 
three tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one tablespoonful of butter 
and a pinch of mustard. Put in farina kettle and boil until 
it thickens. Pour over cabbage and mix thoroughlv. if 
the dressing is too thick, thm with a little cream. — (Jordo)?. 

COLE-SLAW, NO. 2 

One small head of cabbage, cut fine, one tgg, one-half tea- 
cupful of vinegar, butter size of hickory nut, one-quarter tea- 
spoonful of celery seed, a little flour, salt to suit the taste ; 
sprinkle flour and salt over the cabbage. Warm the butter 
and vinegar in a skillet. Put the cabbage in it ; beat the egg, 
and pour over all ; mix well together, and cook two minutes; 
add the celery seed. Let it get cold before serving. If sugar 
is used, .sprinkle on cabbage with flour and salt. 

—M. C. Hushes. 



THE HOME ADVISER 29 

SAUER KRAUT 

Cut the cabl)age fine, as for slaw. Place some clean cab- 
bage leaves in the bottom of a strong vessel — oak is the 
best — then a layer of table salt, and alternate layers of cab- 
bage, until full; cover top with cloths, and place on top a 
board with weights on. — Mrs. Andric. 

TO COOK SAUER KRAUT 

Soak half hour or so, and wring out of water; cook an 
hour, with lard or a small piece of salt pork. If the latter is 
used, the meat should be partly cooked before the kraut is 
put on to boil. 

CAULIFLOWER 

After cleaning, lay head downwards in cold, salt water, to 
draw out insects. Cook in plenty of boiling water, with a 
little salt, until tender. Take two cups of the boiling water, 
stir into it a batter made of a little flour and a little milk, 
and the yoke of an o-gg. Let boil until thick as cream ; add 
a piece of butter, salt, pepper and some nutmeg; serve with 
the cauliflower while hot. 

CORN PUDDING 

One dozen ears corn, grated, three egg"S beaten separ- 
ately, one teaspoonful of salt and one tablespoonful of 
sug^r, piece of butter size of an egg. Bake three-fuurths 
of an hour. — Ivison. 

CORN FRITTERS, NO. 1 

Take six large ears of corn, grated, and three well-beat- 
en eggs, a little salt and pepper, a tablespoonful of flour; fry 
i": hot lard and butter. — Mrs. Grier Hoskins. 

CORN FRITTERS, NO. 2 

Two cups corn, grated, three eggs, beaten sei)arately, 
three tablespoonfuls of milk, one tablespoonful melted Imt- 
ttr, one heaping tablespoonful of flour. Fry in lard. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 



30 



THE HOME ADVISER 



CORN PUDDING, NO. 1 

One can corn, or its equivalent amount of grated corn 
from ears, three eggs, two teaspoonfuls flour, salt to taste. 
Beat corn and yolks of eggs, then add sugar and flour. Beat 
whites and fold in last. Bake twenty minutes in a moderate 
oven. — Mrs. H. E. Russell. 

CORN PUDDING. NO. 2 

Two cups of grated corn, one cup of sweet milk, three 
eggs beaten separately, tablespoonful of butter, two table- 
spoonfuls fiour, salt and a small teaspoonful of baking pow- 
der. Bake in agate basin, three-fourths of an hour. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

CARROTS STEWED 

Cut lengthwise; boil until tender, then slice very thin; 
place in saiicepan, with two tablespoonfuls of butter and a 
cup of cream or rich milk ; season and stew a few minutes. 

STEWED CELERY 

Clean thoroughly, discard all of green ; cut in small pieces 
and stew in a little water or broth ; when tender, add a piece 
of butter size of hickory nut. a teaspoonful of flour, salt, 
pepper, and three-fourths cupful of sweet cream ; if milk is 
used, add more butter. A small onion may be cooked with 
the celery, if agreeable to the taste. 

DUTCHED LETTUCE 

Wash carefully two heads of lettuce, tear each leaf in two 
or three pieces ; cut a quarter pound of ham or bacon into 
dice, and fry until brown. While hot, add two tablespoon- 
fuls of vinegar. Beat one egg until light, add to it two 
tablespoonfuls of sour cream ; then add to it the ham ; stir 
over the fire one minute, until it thickens, and pour boiling 
hot over the lettuce; mix carefully with a fork, and serve 
immediately. 

WILTED DANDELIONS 

Cut off the roots and wash thoroughly ; cut the leaves in 
sn all pieces. Beat one egg until light, add to it a half npfiil 



THE HOME ADVISER 31 

of cream and stir over the fire until it thickens; then add a 
piece of butter size of a walnut, two tablespoonfuls of vine- 
gar, salt and pepper to taste; put dandelions into this and 
stir over the fire until all are wilted. Serve hot. 

FRIED EGGPLANT 

Cut the egg plants in slices, a fourth inch thick, and soak 
half hour in cold salted water. Drain off the water, lay on a 
napkin ; dip them in crumbs, then in beaten egg, then again 
i': crumbs, and fry in butter until light brown. Have fat hot 
before putting in the slices. Keep in the water till ready to 
fry them, or they will turn black. 

CREAMED ONIONS ON TOAST 

Slice six medium-sized onions, cook in butter and water 
until tender, add one cupful of milk and one tablespoonful 
of butter, season with salt and pepper, and thicken quite 
thick with flour. Drop the creamed onions on slices of toast 
and lay slices of hard-boiled egg on top ; serve hot. 

— Mrs. C. B. Conner. 

PEAS STEWED WITH MEAT 

Cut in small pieces one pound, or more, of veal or lamb 
Cook in water with peas until well done ; season with salt 
and pepper, add a lump of butter, one teaspoonful of flour, 
and four tablespoonfuls of sweet cream. 

FRIED POTATOES WITH CHEESE 

Slice raw potatoes and fry in hot lard ; when tender, chop 
fine and add a small quantity of gratered cheese. Season to 
taste ; stir until cheese is melted. Serve. — Mrs. Andrie 

CREAMED POTATOES 

Rub a tablespoonful of butter and the same of flour to- 
gether; stir this into half pint of milk. When hot, add about 
one pint of cold boiled potatoes, cut in dice. Season with 
salt and penper, being careful not to break the potato while 
stirring. Serve hot. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 



32 THE HOME ADVISER 

POATOES WITH GRAVY 

Quarter medium-sized potatoes, steam until tender, and 
pour over a gravy made with butter, brown flour and onions; 
season to taste ; or the gravy may l)e made without brown- 
ing the flour, or a small quantity of vinegar may.be added, if 
liked. — .1/;-^. Andric. 

BOULETS 

Two cups mashed potatoes, yolk of one egg, small piece 
of jjutter. Alake into balls while warm, and when cold dip in 
egg and cracker. Float in hot fat. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

BAKED POTATOES 

Choose large potatoes; bake until mealy; take off top, 
scoop meat out, season with salt, pepper, and add a little 
butter and cream; beat all together, return to the cases, and 
place in oven until brown. — Mrs. H. Thome. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 1 

Boil six large potatoes (not too soft), when cold cut in 
small pieces ; cut whites of three hard-boiled eggs, one stalk 
of celery, cut flne, sprinkle a little salt over. Make a dress- 
ing of three yolks mashed fine, one raw yolk, and a little 
m.elted butter, and last, vinegar, added slowly, making it the 
thickness of sweet cream. — Mrs. C. E. Binklcy. 

POTATO SALAD (FRENCH). NO. 2 

Boil potatoes with skins on, and peel while hot. Place in 
a bowl with onion, cut fine. Season with salt and pepper. 
Pour over a dressing in proportion of one teaspoonful of 
olive oil or two teaspoonfuls of vinegar. To be eaten while 
hot. — Mrs. Andrie. 

POTATOES AU GRATIN 

Grease a pudding dish with butter, and put in the bottom 
a layer of bread crumbs, from bread that has l)een browned 
in the oven, a little grated cheese, and part of an onion, 
chopped fine, with alternate layers of potatoes, sliced, until 
pan is full, having the crumbs, with a little butter, on top ; 
bake in the oven, and serve in the dish in which it is baked. 

— Mrs. Andric. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



33 



ESCALLOPED SWEET POTATOES 

Boil and peel the potatoes, and slice about half inch thick, 
butter a dish and put a layer in bottom, sprinkle with sugar 
and bits of butter alternately until dish is full, add boiling 
water to almost cover. Bake an hour or until a nice syi"up 
is formed. Use one and a half cupfuls of sugar to a medium 
sized dish. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES 

Peel and slice thin raw potatoes ; butter a baking dish, put 
in a layer of potatoes and season with salt, pepper and but- 
ter, (a bit of onion, chopped fine, if liked), sprinkle on a Httle 
flour, put another layer of potatoes and seasoning, and con- 
tinue until dish is filled. Pour a quart of hot milk over it, 
and bake three-quarters of an hour. Cold boiled potatoes 
may be used the same way, but require less time to bake. 

— T. S. Gilbert. 

POTATO PUFF 

Two cups of mashed potatoes, two tablespoonfuls of melt- 
ed butter; stir these, with the yolks of two eggs, to a cream, 
add six tablespoonfuls of cream ; beat all together, adding 
the beaten whites of the eggs last, a little salt, form in a dish, 
bake quickly until a light brown. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

POTATO CROQUETTES 

Two cupfuls of mashed potatoes, one tgg, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, flour to handle. Form into balls, 
cover with bread crumbs and fry brown in boiling hot lard. 

— Gordon. 
SARATOGA CHIPS 
Cut nice potatoes into very thin slices, put them into cold 
water, with a small bit of alum added, to make them crisp ; 
let them stand a few hours or over night ; rinse in cold water 
and dry them with a crash towel ; fry them a light brown in 
boiling fat ; when done, sprinkle with salt. —T. S. Gilbert. 
POTATO FRITTERS 
One eg'g, beaten light, two cupfuls mashed potatoes, one- 
half cupful milk, a little flour, salt and baking powder. Drop 
in hot lard. — Gordon. 



34 



THE HOME ADVISER 



POTATOES AND BACON 

Pare and slice raw potatoes as for frying. Place in pud- 
ding dish with half cup or so of water, salt and pepper to 
taste ; place thin slice of breakfast bacon all over top ; bake 
in moderate oven ; serve hot. Lima beans are good pre- 
pared in the same way, only boil until almost tender before 
adding bacon, and put in oven.' — M. C. Hughes. 

CREAMED SWEET POTATOES 

Boil potatoes until tender, make a cream dressing with 
butter, tiour and milk, salt and pepper to taste; pour over 
potatoes and serve hot. — Weaver. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. NO. 1 

Six medium-sized sweet potatoes, boil and mash, season 
with salt, pepper and nutmeg to suit the taste. Add two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, a few drops of onion juice, one-half 
cup of cream, one tablespoonful of parsley. Make into cro- 
Cjuettes, dip in tgg, then in bread crumbs, and fry in deep 
fat. —Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES, NO. 2 

Eight potatoes, four tablespoonfuls of butter, four table- 
spoonfuls cream, salt and pepper to taste. Bake the pota- 
toes with skin on ; scoop out and mash tine, adding, while 
hot, the butter and other ingredients. Beat all together, 
form into croquettes, roll in beaten egg and bread crumbs. 
Fry in boiling lard. — Mrs. J. W. Heck. 

GLAZED SWEET POTATOES 

Pare and boil six sweet potatoes in salted water until 
nearly tender ; mix one-half cupful of brown sugar with one 
cupful of hot water and butter the size of a large walnut. 
Put the potatoes in a pan and pour some of the mixture 
over them. Put into a hot oven, basting frequently with 
the rest of the mixture until they are a rich brown glaze. 
Table molasses can be used instead of the sus:ar. — Mast. 



THE HOME ADVISER 35 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES 

Boil potatoes with skins on, peel and slice enough to fill 
a medium-sized baking dish; put a large tablespoonful of 
butter in a pan, melt, add one and one-half tablespoonfuls 
of flour ; stir until smooth, then add a pint of rich milk ; boil 
a little, add salt and pepper to taste. Pour this dressing 
over the potatoes and brown in oven. — Mrs. Jas. C. Barton. 

TO COOK SPINACH . 

Wash thoroughly, put in boiling water, boil twenty min- 
utes; drain off water, cut and season with salt and pepper. 
Cut hard-boiled eggs and lay over the top. 

Another way : Boil a piece of breakfast bacon ; when 
nearly done, add potatoes and spinach. 

SUCCOTASH 

One quart of lima beans, small piece of salt pork ; when 
beans are nearly done add one dozen ears of corn, half 
dozen cut from the cob, the other half dozen grated. Just 
before serving add a pint of cream; salt to taste. — Ivison. 

ESCALLOPED TURNIPS 

Pare, cut into dice, and boil in salted water until tender. 
Drain and put into a baking dish. Cover with cream^ sauce, 
then with bread crumbs. Dot generously with butter, and 
bake in quick oven. — M. W. Mast. 

CREAM TOMATO 

One-half can tomatoes, heated and seasoned with salt and 
pepper. Sugar and butter and thickened slightly with flour 
just before turning on to slices of hot, buttered toast add 
one scant cupful of cream (the thicker the better), into 
which has been stirred a small pinch of soda. Serve imme- 
diately. — M. W. Mast. 

STUFFED AND BAKED TOMATOES 

Select firm, ripe tomatoes, and cut off a slice from the 
stem end ; remove the green core, and fill them with onion, 
chopped fine, a small piece of butter, pepper, salt and a tea- 



36 THE HOME ADVISER 

spoonful of bread crumbs; arrange them in a baking- pan, 
add a little water, and bake in a slow oven. Serve them hot, 
in side dish. — Mrs. L. Shainline. 

TOMATO FRITTERS 

Scald and peel the tomatoes in the usual way. Then chop 
fine (tomatoes will be nearly half water) ; season with pepper 
and salt to suit the taste ; stir in flour to make a thin batter, 
with one-half teaspoonful soda in it. Fry over a quick fire, 
in butter or lard, and serve hot. ' — M. C. H. 

JELLIED TOMATO 

Put one pint of strained tomatoes in a saucepan, with one 
bay leaf and a slice of onion, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
one saltspoonful of pepper; bring to boiling point; cover 
one-half box of gelatine with one-quarter cup of cold water ; 
let stand while tomato is heating, then add. Pour into small 
moulds or cups, and set on ice. Serve on lettuce leaves with 
mayonnaise dressing. — M. W. 

TOMATO DRESSING, NO. 1 

Two eggs (yolks), one tablespoonful sugar, one-third cup 
milk, one teaspoonful mustard, one-half cupful vinegar, one 
tablespoonful butter. Heat vinegar slightly, to which has 
been added the sugar; mix together the other ingredients, 
and stir into the vinegar, constantly, until it reaches the boil- 
ing point. Remove at once from the fire. — M. P. Gordon. 

TOMATO DRESSING, NO. 2 

One tablespoonful of ground mustard, one tablespoonful 
of salt, and one tablespoonful of sugar, three eggs, and one 
teacupful of vinegar, and one cupful of milk. Mix all to- 
gether, boil, and when cold is ready for use. 

— Mrs. Rodney Martin. 



THE HOME ADVISER 37. 



EGGS, BREAKFAST 
AND TEA DISHES 



If eg-gs are to be boiled, they should be put on in cold 
water; as soon as the water boils they will be soft, three 
minutes more they will be hard. Boiled in this way they are 
very easily digested, even by a weak stomach. 

Egg shells if saved can be used for settling coffee. 

All foreign eggs should be broken separately, to be sure 
they are perfect. 

A little vinegar may be added to the water in poaching 
eggsi to set the whites; also a little salt. If the large end 
of an egg turns up when they are put in water, they are not 
fresh. This is a simple rule, but it is said to be infallible. 

Many persons pack eggs in coarse salt, small end down, 
not allowing the eggs to touch each other. Holes should be 
bored in the vessel to drain off the moisture. 

Slack lime as for whitewashing; place eggs in vessel and 
pour over. Keep covered with lime water. 

— Mrs. Mary Dunlap. 



When boiling mush, if the salt is added just a few minutes 
before taken off of the stove, the boiler will wash much 
easier, as less will adhere to the vessel. 

Cornmeal kept in a muslin bag in a dry, cool place is not 
apt to get heated and sour. 

In making buckwheat cakes, if desired, a little batter can 
be saved for another time. When light and ready to bake, 
add a small quantity of soda dissolved in a little warm water. 

All grains are said to be much better if cooked in a double 
boiler; this is more economical. 

To preserve rice and homin}^ in the whole grain, they 
should be steamed ; this will require much longer time than 
boiling. Rice, one and a half to two hours ; hominy, three 
to four hours. 



38 THE HOME ADVISER 

EGG CROQUETTES, NO. 1 

Boil three eggs very hard, remove shells, dry and roll in 
flour; take two cupfuls of ground beef, two cupfuls of bread 
crumbs and two teaspoonfuls of chopped parsley, two beat- 
en eggs, salt, pepper and a little mustard; mix all together 
thoroughly. If not moist enough to mould easily, add a 
little milk. Wrap each egg separately with this mixture and 
roll in cracker dust. Have ready a pan containing enough 
smoking hot lard to cover ; drop in one at a time and brown. 
When all cooked, cut the eggs in half lengthwise and place 
on a platter and serve with the following sauce : Half can 
tomatoes, two onions cut fine, a piece of butter; salt and 
pepper to taste and thicken to the consistency of cream. 
Pour this around the eggs and garnish with parsley or 
watercress. Hamburg steak orjsausage meat may be used 
instead of the beef. — Mrs. Ella W. Lozvry, 

EGG CROQUETTES, NO. 2 

Six hard boiled eggs, one cupful of bread crumbs, three 
ounces of grated cheese ; mix together and season with 
salt, then add one well-beaten egg to make the ingredients 
stick together ; mold, roll in egg, then cracker dust ; fry in 
hot lard. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS, NO. 1 

To six well-beaten eggs add one tablespoonful of butter, 
pinch of salt and six tablespoonfuls of cold milk, melt one 
ounce of butter in a chafing dish and when hot stir in the 
egg, stir constantly until done. Serve at once. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS, NO. 2 

Pour half cupful of cream in a frying pan ; when hot pour 
in six eggs, previously broken in a dish; cook slowly, stir- 
ring constantly, so that the eggs will be evenly done. Sea- 
son with salt and pepper. Serve hot. 

DEVILED EGGS 

Boil eggs hard ; when cold, remove shells, divide into 
halves, take out the yolks and rub smooth in bowl; adding 



THE HOME ADVISER 39 

to taste salt, pepper, mustard and a little melted butter. 
Cut a small piece off of each half lof the whites to form a 
cup. Into these cavities place the mixture and serve. 

FRIED EGGS., WITH HAM 

Have plenty of hot fat in the pan, break the eggs in a 
saucer and slide them gently into the pan ; when the white 
begins to set tip up the pan a trifle and baste the eggs with 
the hot fat by pouring it over them with a spoon; this will 
cook the eggs on top, so it will not be necessary to fry them 
tough : remove from the pan one at a time with a pancake 
turner. Serve with fried ham. 

OMELET, NO. 1 

Three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one cup- 
ful of milk, one cupful of fine bread crumbs, salt and pepper; 
this may be either baked in the oven or in a frying-pan, cov- 
ered until turned. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

OMELET, NO. 2 

Six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, add one tea- 
spoonful of flour and a little salt, one cupful of milk to the 
yolks, then stir in the beaten whites, pour into a hot pan in 
which has been melted a tablespoonful of butter, cook on 
top of stove until set, then brown in oven, fold over, turn 
out onto a hot platter. — M. W. Mast. 

HAM OMELET 

One slice of ham cut in small pieces, one ounce of butter, 
fry ham in the butter until a light brown ; make an omelet of 
six eggs, one pint of milk and one teaspoonful of flour; 
mix and pour over ham ; when brown turn, and serve at 
once. — Mrs. Laurence Shainline. 

APPLE OMELET 

Separate four eggs, beat whites separately to a stiff froth, 
then add yolks; beat again, adding gradually twO' table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Have ready an omelet pan 
in which has been melted a tablespoonful of butter. Put in 
the mixture, bake, and when it begins to thicken, spread 



40 THE HOME ADVISER 

over it a layer of apple sauce. Fold and serve with pow- 
dered sugar immediately. Any omelet may be spread with 
jelly, grated cheese, ham, etc., to taste. 

CHEESE OMELET 

Half pound of cheese, one pint of milk, two eggs, small 
lump of butter and one cupful of bread crumbs. Heat the 
milk and stir in the cheese. After cutting in small pieces, 
when dissolved, add the butter, a little salt and bread 
crumbs, then yolks of eggs, add the whites beaten to a 
froth. Mix well and Bake in a buttered dish fifteen or twen- 
ty minutes. — Ivison. 

CHEESE PUDDING 

Put layers of bread crumbs and cheese in pudding dish; 
pour over custard of two eggs and a pint of milk, and bake 
until custard is set. — Mrs. VanOrmer. 

CHEESE FONDU 

Put in a small saucepan one tablespoonful of butter and 
one of flour; stir over the fire until they bubble, then add a 
gill of milk or cream, which must be stirred well to prevent 
from burning; when smooth stir intO' it three ounces of 
finely grated cheese, a scant saltspoonful of salt, small pinch 
of cayenne pepper; turn it into a bowl and stir into it the 
btaten yolks of two^ eggs. Thoroughly whisk the whites of 
three eggs solid; stir them in gently the last thing. Put 
into a well-buttered dish which should be only half full. 
Bake into a quick oven a golden brown ; serve immediately. 

— Miss Beatrice Mast, Dover, Del. 

HASH CAKES 

Take two cupfuls of cold mashed potatoes, one cupful of 
cold chopped meat, one small onion chopped fine, salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix all together thoroughly and make 
into small round flat cakes. Fry in hot butter and lard in 
skillet, turning so as to brown on both sides. Remove to 
platter; stick point of salted almond in top of each cake; 
garnish with parsley and serve hot. — Nebr. 



THE HOME ADVISER 41 

FRENCH RAREBIT 

111 a well-buttered agate dish put a layer of well-buttered 
bread, alternating with layers of grated cheese until the 
dish is full, the last layer of cheese on top; pour over this 
one cupful of milk into which two well-beaten egg"s are 
mixed. Bake twenty minutes. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

RAREBIT 

Put in the chafing dish half pound of good, rich cheese, 
which has been grated, add a pinch of salt, a dash of pep- 
per and four tablespoonfuls of rich cream ; stir until melted 
and pour over crackers which have been previously steamed. 

RICE PONE 

Take a cupful of boiled rice, put it in a pint of milk, let it 
come to a boil to dissolve the rice ; take a small bowl of corn 
meal, a piece of butter size of an Qgg and a little salt, pour 
boiling milk and rice over all, let stand until almost cool, 
then add the yolks of two eggs, beat the whites, mix, bake 
in a pudding dish three-quarters of an hour ; eat with butter 
while hot. —Mrs. J. W. Heck. 

RICE CROQUETTES 

Wash one cupful of rice and boil for one hour in one quart 
of milk, beat until smooth, add yolks of four egg's and cook 
ten minutes ; take from the fire, add one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley, a little salt and white pepper; turn out to 
cool, form, dip in tgg and bread crumbs; fry in boiling fat. 

— Ivison. 

RICE AND MEAT CROQUETTES 

One cupful of boiled rice, one cupful of finely chopped 
cooked meat, any kind ; one teaspoonful of salt, a little pep- 
per, two tablespoonfuls of butter, half cupful of milk, one 
tgg. Put the milk on to boil and add the meat, rice and 
seasoning. When this boils add the &gg well beaten ; stir 
one minute. After cooling, shape, dip in Qgg and in crumbs ; 
fry in boiling fat. Drain and serve. 



42 THE HCMF. ADVISER 

RICE GRIDI>LE CAKES 
One cupful of cold boiled rice, one cupful of flour, half 
teaspoonful of sugar, a little salt, one teaspoonful of baking- 
powder, an egg and a scant cupful of milk ; sift flour, sugar, 
salt and powder, add rice diluted with beaten egg and milk, 
mix well into a smooth batter. Bake on hot griddle. 

—M. C. H. 

RICE AKD CHEESE 

Steam rice until tender, then add a small quantity of milk, 
small piece of butter, and grated cheese, and salt to taste, 
set on back of stove until cheese is melted. Serve. 

— Mrs. Asdrie. 

^ ICE 

An excellent substitute for potatoes at dinner is rice, cook- 
ed in milk and well salted, put into a dish and browned in 
the oven; remove from the oven, make a hot lemon sauce, 
and pOur over just before serving. 

STALE BREAD GRIuDLE CAKES 

Soak stale bread in sufiicient milk to well cover the quan- 
tity of bread used; do this after dinner; when ready to mix 
for baking mash the soaked bread with a spoon until fine, 
add a little more milk if dry ; twO' eggs well beaten, two table- 
spoonfuls baking powder and a little salt; add sufficient flour 
to make a thin batter. Bake on hot griddle. — Gordon. 

POTATO DROP ("4.KES 

Two cupfuls of mashed potatoes, add two cupfuls of warm 
m.ilk, a tablespoonful of melted butter, two beaten eggs, 
half a cupful of prepared flour and half a teaspoonful of salt. 
Beat all together thoroughly and drop in spoonfuls on a 
greased griddle. Serve as soon as baked. 

FLANNEL CAKES 
Take four tablespoonfuls of flour, half teaspoonful of salt, 
a pinch of cream of tartar, half teaspoonful of soda, dis- 
solved in a little hot water, one egg, yolk and white beaten 
separately, and one cupful of thick milk; sufficient to make 
twelve cakes. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 



THE HOME ADVISER 43 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES 

Take two-thirds Avater and one-third milk, add salt, hall 
cupful of yeast, use enough buckwheat flour to make a bat- 
ter, at night ; in the morning when ready to bake add quarter 
teaspoonful of baking soda dissolved in a little hot water. 
If all water is used add a tablespoonful of molasses ; this is 
to make them brown nicely. 

CORNMEAL PANCAKES 

Two cupfuls of meal, a teaspoonful of salt, pour over boil- 
ing water to make a batter ; stand until cool, then add yolks 
of three eggs, beat in flour to proper consistency, one and 
one-half teaspoonfuls baking powder. Just before baking 
add the whites beaten stiff. — M. C. Hughes. 

BREAD AND MILK PANCAKES 

Soak a pint of stale bread crumbs in a quart of rich milk, 
Vv'hip in a tablespoonful of melted butter, a teaspoonful of 
salt, three well-beaten egg's, and enough of flour to make a 
griddle cake batter. — Mrs. J. W. Heck. 

QUICK WAFFLES 

One pint of milk, three cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful 
of salt, three eggs, one tablespoonful of butter and two 
heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder; beat yolks of eggs 
until light, add milk, then flour and salt, beat well, add but- 
ter, melted ; lastly the whites beaten stiff' and the baking 
powder; mix thoroughly. — Ivison. 

CORN PONE, NO. 1 

One quart of sour milk, one quart of corn meal, one cup- 
ful of flour, three eggs, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, butter 
size of walnut (melted), one teaspoonful of soda, one and 
one-half of cream of tartar, salt to taste. Bake twenty or 
thirty minutes, in quick oven. — Mrs. H. E. Russell. 

CORN PONE. NO. 2 

Scald two cupfuls of corn meal, let cool, add one cupful 
of wheat flour, half cupful of fine white sugar, one teaspoon- 
ful salt, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one egg, one 
tablespoonful of melted butter and two. cupfuls of sweet 
milk. —C. E. B. 



44 THE HOME ADVISER 

APPLE FRITTERS 

Pare and slice around the apple in rather thin slices, re- 
move core, dip in a batter made with one egg, milk and 
flour with a little salt. Fr}^ in hot fat. 

SOUFFLE 
One pint of chopped left-over meat, one pint of milk, one 
tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of flour, one-half 
cupful of bread crumbs, one tablespoonful of chopped pars- 
ley, three eggs. Take the butter and melt it, stir into it one 
tablespoonful of flour, adding your milk, let come to a boil, 
add the bread crumbs and allow to cool about one minute ; 
add the meat, the yolks, and last the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth. Grease your baking pan and bake 
about twentv minutes. — Gordon. 



THE HOME ADVISER 45. 



BREAD, BISCUITS, Etc. 



A Stone crock is considered the best vessel in which to 
set bread. 

The sponge or dough should be kept at as even a tem- 
perature as possible and never allowed to stand uncovered 
or in a draft. 

Flour should never be added after moulding it the first 
time, and this is the proper time to knead it thoroughly. 

In recipes given for bread, rusk, etc., when brewers' yeast 
is given, if it is more convenient to use an yeast cake, 
enough of water must be added to make the same quantity- 
of liquid. 

When it is moulded the last time, g-rease the top with a 
little melted lard; this keeps a hard crust from forming 
when baking. 

Much of the success depends on the temperature of the 
oven, and it is important to have it steady before placing 
the bread in. 

Grease the bread on top as soon as it is removed from the 
oven, and let uncovered and slightly elevated, so the air can 
pass underneath. 

After taking out the bread, the oven is in the right con- 
dition for rusk, rolls, etc. 

Patent flours, the kind used these modern times, require 
a great deal more moisture than the old time flours, conse- 
quently it must be kneaded soft and not dry and hard. 

The present methods of milling removes the necessity of 
making sponge for white bread, especially when compressed 
yeast is used. 

Whole wheat bread requires less kneading than ordinary 
wheat bread. The oven should be just about the same tem- 
perature and it should be baked quite as long. 

Bread should never be kept in a damp cellar or a damp 
closet. 



46 THE HOME ADVISER 

Flour should always be sifted before using. 

In making baking powder biscuit the dough should be as 

soft as can be handled and never should be rolled thinner 

than an inch. 

BREAD 

At noon, soak three-fourths of a cake of dry compressed 
yeast in a teacupful of lukewarm water; boil two or three 
medium-sized potatoes until soft, put potatoes in a crock, 
add one teaspoonful of sugar and a little salt, mash well, add 
the cupful of yeast and a cupful of water ; let stand until bed- 
time, then add three cupfuls of warm water, then stir 
enough flour in to make a batter, beat hard ten minutes 
until smooth. In the morning add salt and enough sifted 
flour to stiffen so it will not stick to the hands; knead well, 
let rise until light, make into loaves, grease top with a little 
lard, let rise again. When light, bake nearly an hour. Suf- 
ficient for four good-sized loaves. — M. C. Hughes. 

RYE BREAD 

Make a sponge of ordinary white flour and thicken with 
rye. Thus : Scald a pint of milk, add a pint of water, when 
lukewarm add to it one compressed yeast cake dissolved, 
stir in sufficient white flour to make a batter that will drop 
from a spoon, beat five minutes, cover and stand in a warm 
place until light ; then stir in sufficient rye flour to make a 
soft dough that can be handled, knead until elastic. Rye 
flour is more or less sticky, so you cannot knead it dry ; when 
it arrives at the stage of easy handling put at once into pans, 
when very lig-ht bake in moderate oven forty-five minutes. 

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD 

Scald a pint of milk, when it is lukewarm add one pint of 
cool water, a teaspoonful of salt, one compressed yeast cake 
dissolved in one-fourth cupful of lukewarm water; stir in 
slowly sufficient whole wheat flour to make a batter that 
will drop from the spoon ; beat thoroughly, cover and stand 
ir- a warm place until light — twO' hours and a half to three 
hours. Then add sufficient flour to make a dough. Knead 
this lightly until it loses its stickiness for ten minutes or so. 



THE HOME ADVISER 47 

Make it at once into loaves, put in greased pans, cover and 
stand in warm place until light. Brush with water and bake 
in a moderately quick oven three-quarters of an hour. 

GRAHAM BREAD, NO. 1 

Half cupful of New Orleans molasses, half cupful of sugar 
(white or brown), one egg, two cupfuls of sour milk, one 
rounding spoonful of baking soda, one scant tablespoonful 
of salt, four cupfuls of Graham flour. Dissolve soda in milk, 
beat sugar, egg and molasses well, add other ingredients, 
turn in well-greased pans, and bake in moderate oven at 
once for half hour with pan over it, the other half uncov- 
ered. — Mrs. Caszvell. 

GRAHAM BREAD, NO. 2 

One cupful of white flour to four cupfuls of Graham flour, 
wetting the same as wheat bread, one tablespoonful of sugar, 
stir in the Graham flour first and knead in all the flour till 
it does not stick; put into pans to rise for baking; when 
lig"ht bake in a slow oven about an hour. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD 

Two cupfuls of sour milk, thick, one cupful of sweet milk, 
three-fourths cupful of molasses, two teaspoonfuls of soda, 
two cupfuls of corn meal, one cupful of Graham flour, salt to 
taste. Stir molasses, soda and salt into the milk, then add 
meal and Graham flour; pour into buttered dish, cover and 
steam steadily for three hours. — Mrs. Pond. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD 

Two cupfuls of yellow meal, three cupfuls of rye flour, one 
teaspoonful of salt, one cupful of molasses, one teaspoonful 
of baking soda, dissolved in a pint of boiling water. Mix 
all together, put in tin buckets, boil twO' hours, then put in 
the oven for half an hour. This will make two loaves. 

— Mrs. Jas. C. Barton. 

MUSH BREAD 

Add half cupful of lukewarm water to one and one-half 
cupfuls of warm mush, just boiled, half cupful of yeast, salt 
to taste; beat all together, stir in wheat flour with a spoon 



48 THE HOME ADVISER 

to make a stiff dough ; remove the spoon, let stand over 
night or until light, and scrape in a well-greased pan, bake 
in a moderate oven nearly an hour. — M. C. H. 

SARATOGA BREAD 

One pint of milk, piece of butter or lard size of an tggy 
two eggs, one cupful of )^east; make a stiff batter; let rise 
from noon until time for tea, and bake quickly. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

CORN BREAD. NO. 1 

One and one-half cupfuls of flour, one and one-half cup- 
fuls of corn meal (sift together), one cupful of sugar, two 
cupfuls of butter milk or sour milk, a little salt, two eggs, 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one teaspoonful of 
soda. — L. B. I. 

CORN BREAD. NO. 2 

One cupful of corn meal, one cupful of flour, one &gg, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, milk to make batter. 

— Mrs. Hoivard Thome. 

BISCUIT 

Dissolve one tablespoonful of butter in one pint of hot 
milk, when lukewarm stir in one quart of flour and one beat- 
en ^gg, a little salt and a teacupful of yeast ; work into a 
smooth dough ; in cold weather set in a warm place to rise, 
but if warm set in a cool one ; in the morning work softly ; 
roll out half inch, cut into biscuits ; let rise thirty minutes ; 
bake. Delicious. —Mrs. C. E. B. 

LITTLE TEA BISCUIT 

To make twenty-four little tea biscuits use one cupful of 
milk, one heaping tablespoonful of lard, one teaspoonful of 
salt, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; sift cupful of flour 
and rub in the lard and salt ; stir in the baking powder and 
theni the milk, adding flour enoug-h to handle easily. This 
dough must not be stirred or moulded very much as the 
biscuits are better if baked while the baking powder is ef- 
fervescing. Roll the dough half an inch thick and cut with 
a sharp cutter about an inch or two in diameter. Bake in a 



THE HOME ADVISER 49 

well-buttered tin in a quick oven about twenty minutes, or 
until a g-olden brown; turn out on a soft cloth and cover 
v/ith a napkin until ready to serve. — Mrs. Harry Walker. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT 

Three and a half pounds of sifted flour, half pound of best 
Inrd, a good quantity of salt, one and one-fourth pints of ice 
cold water; make a very stiff doug-h, beat hard half an hour 
or longer with the sharp edge of a hatchet ; make into small 
cakes and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. 

—Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR BISCUIT 

One teacup of yeast, one tablespoonful of sugar, butter 
size of walnut, one pint of milk, salt to taste and flour in pro- 
portion to one-third white and two-thirds whole wheat flour; 
scald milk, add butter, when lukewarm add yeast and sugar; 
stir; in white flour to make a sponge, beat, then cover and 
stand in a warm place to rise ; when light add sufficient flour 
to make a dough stiff enough to handle ; knead thoroughly, 
let rise ; mould into biscuits and place in well greased gem 
pans ; when light bake in a moderately quick oven. 

— M. C. Hughes. 

POTATO BISCUIT, NO. 1 

One cupful of fresh mashed potatoes, three-fourths cupful 
of butter, or butter and lard mixed, one cupful of brewers' 
yeast, a little salt; mix the above 8.30 or 9 o'clock in the 
morning ; let rise two or three hours ; then add three eggs 
beaten light and enough flour to stiffen ; let rise again and 
when light turn out on board and roll without kneading; cut, 
let rise again and bake half hour. — Mrs. Rodney Martin. 

POTATO BISCUIT, NO. 2 

Pare six large potatoes, boil and when soft rub through 
the colander; when cool stir in a cupful of yeast ; when raised 
very light take a quart of warm milk, small cupful of white 
sugar, little salt, three tablespoonfuls of lard and one of but- 
ter; mix all with the potatoes, sift flour and work middling 



50 THE HOME ADVISER 

stiff, roll thin and cut in cakes; stand half an hour; bake in 
quick oven. These put to rise in the morning will be ready 
for tea in the evening-. — Mrs. Gricr Hoskins. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS 

Pour a pint of scalded milk over a tablespoonful each of 
butter and lard, and teaspoonful each of salt and sugar. 
When sufficiently cool, add one cake of yeast that has been 
dissolved in half cupful of lukewarm water, flour enough to 
make thin batter. Do this at 8.30 in the morning, stand 
away until i o'clock, then knead enough flour to make a 
soft dough; stand in warm place until 4.30 o'clock; roll out. 
cut with small round cake cutter; set in warm place until 
very light, then bake. — Mrs. S. IV. Finnigaii. 

CRESCENT ROLLS 

Half pint of scalding milk, two ounces of butter, half tea- 
spoonful of salt, one tablespoonful sugar, one yeast cake 
dissolved in two tablespoonfuls of lukewarm water. Mix 
all together and add suf^cient flour to make soft dough, beat 
well. Knead until it looses its stickiness ; put in a bowl and 
let rise until it is twice its bulk ; turn out on board, roll care- 
fully (do not knead), shape ; put in pans, let rise, bake in hot 
oven fifteen minutes. — Mrs. S. 

GRAHAM GEMS 

One pint of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one tablespoon- 
ful of melted butter, three cupfuls of Graham meal, three 
egg's, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; beat yolks of 
eggs and add to milk, salt, meal and butter; give the whole 
a vigorous beating-; add whites of eggs, beaten stiff, and 
baking powder. Bake in gem pans in a quick oven thirty 
minutes. — Ivison. 

GRAHAM CRACKERS 

One cupful of sugar, one-third cupful butter, white of an 
^gg; beat all together until light; one teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar and half teaspoonful of soda, half cupful of water, 
add Graham flour to make stifl' enough to roll. Roll very 
thin, cut in squares, pick witli fork and bake. 

— Mrs. S. Jones. 



THE HOME ADVISER 51. 

PLAIN BUNS 

Three eggs beaten light, one teaspoonful o>^ salt, one-half 
cupful of powdered sugar, one pint of scalding milk, three 
ounces of melted butter ; pour the milk very slowly over the 
eggs, sugar and butter, beating all the time, then add the 
flour till it is a thick l^atter ; one cake of yeast dissolved in 
lukewarm water; add flour until stiff enough to mould. 
Bake in small round biscuits or rolls. Brush over with melt- 
ed butter before baking. 

"WATER GAP HOUSE" MUFFINS 

Half pound of powdered sugar, half pound of butter, one 
quart of milk, six eggs, two and a half pounds of flour, four 
heaping tablespoonfuls of baking powder ; cream sugar and 
butter together; add milk, eggs and flour. This makes forty 
muffins. — Ivison. 

MUFFINS 

Two eggs, two cupfuls of milk, one tablespoonful of melt- 
ed butter, a pinch of salt, two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, three and a half cupfuls of flour and a teaspoonful of 
sugar. — Miss M. Finnigan. 

POPOVERS 

Two eggs, twO' cupfuls of milk, two cupfuls of flour and 
one teaspoonful of baking powder, little salt ; rub salt and 
powder through the flour; stir milk and eggs gradually into 
the flour; beat a little, bake in gem pans in a quick oven; 
serve hot. —Gordon. 

RUSK 

At night : Take two small or one large potato, boil, mash, 
and mix with half cupful of sugar ; let cool sufficiently and 
add half yeast cake dissolved in one cupful of warm water, 
add a little salt; keep warm. In the morning: Add half 
cupful of sugar with one tablespoonful of lard mashed in 
and one egg slightly beaten and enough flour to make it 
stiff, not quite as stiff as for bread. Let rise very light, 
ti'Ould in biscuit; let rise and bake in a moderate oven. 

— Mrs. H. Taggart. 



52 



THE HOME ADVISER 



CINNAMON BUNS 
Take part of the rusk doug-h (made as described above)^ 
when very Hght roll out on board about a fourth of an inch 
in thickness ; spread with very soft butter, brown sugar and 
cinnamon, dried currants if desired ; roll and cut in buns 
about one and one-half inches wide; have baking pans well 
greased, put brown sugar in about a fourth of an inch deep, 
then buns. When very light bake in moderate oven. When 
baked, run knife around sides of pan, tiu'n out on plate with 
bottom side up. — A^rs. Howard Taggart. 

MORAVIAN SUGAR CAKES 

One pint of sweet milk, one cupful of sugar, two eggs, 
one cupful of yeast, one cupful of* melted butter and lard 
mixed, salt to taste ; take milk and yeast and add flour 
enough to make a sponge about 5 o'clock ; before retiring 
add the sugar, salt, butter, lard and beaten eggs ; knead to 
a stiff dough. On the following morning roll out, put it in 
a pan, let rise; when light make holes on top by pinching 
with end of thumb and forefinger, fill with butter ; mix sugar, 
light brown, cinnamon, a very* little flour, sprinkle over; 
bake in a quick oven twenty minutes. ^ — Mrs. C. E. B. 

CHEESE STRAWS 

One teaspoonful of butter, one ^gg, one-half cupful of 
flour, three tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, pinch of salt 
and a tiny pinch of cayenne pepper; work the butter in the 
flour, add cheese and seasoning ; make into a paste with the 
^gg', roll into a thin sheet, cut in strips four inches long and 
one-fourth inch wide; bake in a moderate oven until light 
brown. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 



THE HOME ADVISER 53 



PIES, PUDDINGS, Etc. 



The secret in making good pies is to use as little water as 
possible to get the dough in shape ; second, to have the oven 
at the right temperature. 

The under crust should be the thicker. 

In making fruit pies, better results may be obtained by- 
sprinkling the flour and the sugar on the bottom before put- 
ting in the fruit. 

Pastry is improved by being kept on ice a few hours be- 
fore using, and for convenience may be kept this way for 
several days, to be used as needed. 

Puff paste is much better made with butter only. 

If the juice of a fruit pie is thickened with a little flour or 
cornstarch it will help to keep it from boiling over. 

To prevent the juice from soaking through the bottom, 
brush the white of an egg' over the lower crust. 

By the addition of baking powder to the flour in making 
pie dough, it will make it nice and flaky, and less shortening 
will be required. 

Pies, when baked on tin plates, should be transferred as 
soon as removed from oven. If the plates are heated first, 
this will prevent them from becoming soggy on the bottom. 

The mold should be well greased before the mixture is 
put in before steaming a pudding, and if the pudding is to 
be boiled the bag should be rung out of hot water and well 
floured, and be sure to have the water boiling before drop- 
ping it in. 

Much longer time is required to steam a pudding than to 
boil it, but the former method is preferred. 

•In making puddings eggs should always be beaten sep- 
arately. 

In fruit pudding always dredge the fruit well with flour 
before stirringf it in. 



54 



THE HOME ADVISER 



Plunge the mold into cold water for a few seconds and 
turn the pudding out immediately, and thus prevent from 
sticking. 

PIE CRUST, NO. 1 

One cupful of flour, one tablespoonful of lard, pinch of 
salt ; moisten with enough ice water to roll out. Sufficient 
for one crust. — Miss Fimiigan. 

PIE CRUST, NO. 2 

Four cupfuls of flour, one cupful of lard, half teaspoonful 
of baking powder, half teaspoonful of salt. Rub well togeth- 
er and add enough cold water to make a stiff dough ; roll very 
thin. Sufficient for two pies. — Mrs. Rodney Martin. 

CHICKEN PIE CRUST 

Take a quart of flour and mix with it two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, a little salt and one teacupful of lard ; mois- 
ten with sweet milk sufficient to roll. Roll out once, spread 
with butter, lap over and roll again ; ready to put on pie. 

APPLE MERINGUE PIE 

Line a pie plate with crust and fill with stewed apples ; 
bake until crust is done, then cover with a meringue made 
of the whites of eggs and powdered sugar, using one table- 
spoonful of sugar to each white. Two whites will be re- 
quired for each pie. Return to oven to brown. 

BUTTERMILK PIE 

One pint of buttermilk, one pint of sweet milk, three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, 
two eggs, nutmeg to taste. — Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 

CRANBERRY PIE 

Take a heaping cupful of ripe cranberries and with a sharp 
knife split each one; put them in a vegetable dish; add one 
cupful of white sugar, half a cupful of water scant, a table- 
spoonful of sifted flour; stir it all together and put into the 
crust, cover with crust and bake slowly in a moderate oven. 

—M. C. H. 



THE HOME ADVISER 55 

CREAM PIE, NO. 1 

One pint of sweet cream, one cupful of sugar, half cupful 
of fiour, yolks of two egg-s ; bake with under crust ; spread 
over top a meringue made of the whites of the eggs and 
brown in oven. — Mrs. E. P. Dickinson. 

CREAM PIE, NO. 2 

Three eggs beaten separately, one cupful of sugar, one 
cupful of flour, three tablespoonfuls of milk, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder; beat yolk and sugar light, add the 
whites, then the flour and last the baking powder. Bake in 
two pie tins fifteen minutes. When cool split and put the 
following cream between: 

Cream. — One small cupful of sugar, two eggs, two tea- 
spoonfuls cornstarch dissolved in one-half cupful of milk; 
stir this in one pint of boiling milk, teaspoonful of vanilla, 
boil two minutes; when cold use. Sprinkle sugar over top. 

CREAM CUSTARD PIE 
Bake the crust first ; one cupful of milk, two teaspoonfuls 
of cornstarch, half cupful of sugar, yolks of two eggs, flavor 
with vanilla. Cook and let cool, put in the crust and make 
a meringue of the whites of two eggs and two tablespoon- 
fuls of pulverized sugar; place on top and brown. 

— Mrs. Howard Ash. 

ORANGE PIE 

Juice and grated rind of two oranges, one pound of sugar, 
butter size of an egg, one cupful of boilng water, one table- 
spoonful of cornstarch, four eggs. Cook all together, cool 
and bake with two crusts. SulTficient for two small pies. 

— Mrs. Howard Ash. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE 
Beat thoroughly the yolks of two eggs, with one-half cup- 
ful of sugar; add one heaping tablespoonful of flour, one 
even tablespoonful of cornstarch dissolved in milk, pour into 
one pint of boiling milk and let cook about three minutes ; 
let cool and flavor with extract of orange and pour into a 



56 THE HOME ADVISER 

baked crust. Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, add 
one-half cupful of sugar; flavor with extract of orange, 
spread on top, put into the oven and let brown slightly. 

— Mrs. George. 

CUSTARD PIE 

Beat the yolks of three eggs thoroughly ; mix well one 
tablespoonful of sifted flour into three tablespoonfuls of 
sugar; add to the yolks a pinch of salt and flavor to suit 
taste; add the well-beaten whites of the eggs and lastly a 
pint of milk that has been scalded and cooled ; mix in slowly 
and pour into a deep pie dish that has been lined with paste; 
bake half an hour. 

COCOANUT CUSTARD 

Three eggs, half cupful of sugar, half cupful of cocoanut 
soaked in a pint of milk; bake with an under crust. 

— Mj's. Rodney Martin. 

DRIED PEACH FLORENDINES 

Stew peaches in as little water as possible ; put them 
through the colander and thin with cream or milk ; sweeten 
to taste and flavor with nutmeg or lemon. For every pie 
beat one egg very light and add just before filling the crust. 
Beat the white of one egg, one tablespoonful of sugar and a 
little lemon juice for each pie and spread over top and brown 
in oven. Dried apples may be used in the same way. 

GRAPE PIE 

One egg, one teacupful of sugar, one tablespoonful of 
flour, one heaping teacupful of grapes; beat the egg, add 
sugar, beat together, then add grapes and flour ; bake with 
two crusts. Rhubarb is good used in the same way. 

—M. C. Hughes. 

LEMON PIE 

Grated rind and juice of one lemon, one cupful of sugar, 
one cupful of water, one egg, one tablespoonful of corn- 
starch, a little grated nutmeg; bake with two crusts. The 



THE HOME ADVISER 57 

foregoing recipe, using the yolks of two eggs, reserving the 
whites for the meringue, and a small piece of butter, will 
make a good custard. — Mrs. IV. R. Hughes. 

LEMON MERINGUE, NO. 1 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls of water, yolks of three 
eggs, juice and grated rind of one lemon, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch; boil and 
pour into baked crusts; make ;a frosting of the whites and 
bro\\n in o\en. — Mrs. IVm. Frit:: Russell. 

LEMON MEiilNGUE. NO. 2 

Beat the yolk of three eggs until light, add one table- 
spoonful of butter and one cupful of granulated sugar, beat 
again ; mix together two tablespoonfuls of flour with the 
juice and rind of one lemon, and pour over one large cupful 
of boiling water; steam this all together in a double boiler 
until quite thick ; bake your crust first, then pour in the cus- 
tard. 

Meringue. — Whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, add 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar, brown hi oven. Sufficient for 
one large pie. — Mrs. J. IV. Heck. 

LEMON CUSTARD 
One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, squeeze the juice of 
one lemon over it, grate the remainder of the lemon, then 
stir together; add one tablespoonful of butter, yolks of four 
eggs and one heaping tablespoonful of flour; beat all to- 
.gether, same as for a cake ; than add one and one-half pints 
of l)oilingmilk; when cool, stir in whites of four eggs beaten 
stift", put in pastry shells and bake. Sufficient for two pies. 

— Mrs. Herbert C. Prague. 

MONTGOMERY PIE 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of table molasses, little 
less than a pint of water, two tablespoonfuls of flour, juice 
and grated rind of one lemon, and an egg. Mix well to- 
gether and fill in the pie crust. Make a batter of two 
■cupfuls of granulated sugar, one egg, one cupful of thick 



58 THE HOME ADVISER 

milk, half cupful of lard and butter mixed, two cupfuls of 
flour, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in milk, and drop 
this mixture over the lemon filling and bake. Sufficient 
for five crusts. — Mrs. Jos. R. Paivling. 

MOLASSES PIE 

Put into a pan one and a half cupfuls of molasses, one- 
half cupful of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of flour mixed 
v»'ith a little water, a little lemon juice and grated peel or 
nutmeg and an tgg well beaten. Mix well together ; line two 
dishes with plain paste and pour the mixture in ; cut narrow 
strips of the paste and cross over top of the pie. 

TAYLOR PIE 

Yolks of three eggs, one cupful of sour cream, one cupful 
of sugar, flavor with essence of lemon ; make an icing with 
the whites of three eggs, one cupful of powdered sugar and 
flavor with essence of lemon. Sufficient for two pies. 

—Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 

WASHINGTON PIE 

One egg, one cupful of sugar, one-third of a cupful of but- 
ter, half cupful of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar, half teaspoonful of soda, one and one-third cupfuls of 
flour; mix and bake on three round tins; when done spread 
jam, jelly or any kind of fruit between and eat with corn- 
starch sauce. 

SHOO-FLY PIE 

Make a crust and line your pie plates; rub together fine, 
three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sugar and one cupful of 
butter and lard mixed; then mix together one cupful of New 
Orleans molasses, one cupful of hot water, one tablespoonful 
of soda scant ; pour this last mixture into the crust and sprin- 
kle the crumbs over it until they are all used. Sufficient for 
one large or two small pies. — Mrs. H. Taggart. 

MINCE MEAT. NO. 1 
Three pounds of shoulder clot beef well cooked and chop- 
ped exceedingly fine; cook without salt, one-half peck of 



THE HOME ADVISER 59 

apples chopped fine, two pounds of raisins, one pint of New 
Orleans molasses, sugar, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and salt to 
suit taste; moisten with vinegar when ready to use. Keep 
in air-tight jar. — Gordon. 

MINCE MEAT. NO. 2 

Four pounds of beef, one pound of suet, half peck of ap- 
ples, two pounds of raisins, one pound of currants, half 
pound of citron, rind of three lemons, chopped fine, and 
juice, cinnamon, mace, nutmeg to taste, one quart of mo- 
lasses, four pounds of sugar; thin with juice of any kind of 
fruit and mix thoroughly. — Mrs. J. IV. Heck. 

APHEL KUCHEN 

Mix together one pint of flour, two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
irg powder, one tablespoonful of lard, one teaspoonful of 
butter, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, 
one cupful of milk and water, one ^gg- Press out flat in 
pan with hands and cover with sliced apples, lumps of butter 
and a little cinnamon. — Miss M. Finnigan. 

APPLE KOKER 

Mix well one-half teaspoonful of salt and one teaspoonful 
baking powder with two cupfuls of sifted flour ; beat one 
eg-g light, add three-quarters of a cupful of sweet milk and 
stir it into the flour; use more milk if needed to make dough 
soft enough to spread half an inch thick on a shallow baking 
pan. Pare and quarter tart apples and lay in parallel rows 
on top of the dough and press into the dough slightly. Sprin- 
kle two tablespoonfuls of sugar over the apples ; bake in hot 
oven twenty minutes. Remove to platter and serve with 

Lemon Sauce. — Mix well three teaspoonfuls of cornstarch 
with three-fourths cupful of sugar; add cupful and a half of 
boiling water; stir well and cook ten minutes; add the grat- 
ed rind and juice of one lemon and a small piece of butter. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS 

One pint of flour sifted into a bowl of one teaspoonful of 
baking powder, lard and butter mixed, size of an egg; a 



6(, THE HOME ADVISER ^Hi^llllll 

l')inch of salt ; then mix all tog^ether and use milk enough to 
make a soft dough. Divide the dough into six equal parts, 
loll out into long strips three inches wide, have the apples 
sliced into thin pieces and roll them up as you would cinna- 
mon buns; place them in a deep dish. Then take half cupful 
of white sugar, one teaspoonful butter, one cupful of boiling 
water; pour this over the dumplings; bake in a quick oven 
to a lig"ht brown. — Mrs. H. S. Conner. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS, POTATO CRUST 

Boil six large potatoes, mash, add a little milk, one Q^g, 
little salt; beat all together thoroughly, then add a tea- 
spoonful of baking powder; add enough flour to roll out; 
form around tart apples and pin each dumpling in a cloth to 
boil or steam. — Ivison. 

APPLE PUDDING 

One pint of flour, one cupful sugar, butt^er size of a small 
*igg; rub well together; dissolve scant half teaspoonful of 
baking soda in a pint of thick milk ; mix all well together. 
Slice apples, put in pudding dish, sprinkle with sugar, and 
pour the mixture over it. Bake in moderate oven. 

— Mrs. Clara E. Binkley. 

BROWN BETTY 

Grease a pudding dish, put into this a layer of nice cook- 
ing apples (sliced), then a layer of bread crumbs with sugar 
and cinnamon sprinkled over and small bits of butter; for 
three large apples use one cupful of bread crumbs, half cup- 
ful of sugar and a piece of butter size of an &gg, and put a 
layer of bread crumbs on the top ; bake. To be eaten with 
■ cream. — Mrs. Gricr Hoskins. 

CHERRY OR HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING 

Two cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sugar, one cupful of 
sweet milk, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one pint of berries ; bake one 
liour ill a moderate oven. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 



I 



THE HOME ADVISER 6t 

COTTAGE PUDDING 

One egg, one cupful of sugar, one cupful of milk, butter 
size of an egg, one pint of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking- 
powder, salt to taste. 

Soiice. — One egg, one cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
llour, small lump of butter, add boiling water, let come to a 
l)oil; flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. [P;/;. Fr{t.z Russell. 

BATTER PUDDING 

One cupful of milk, two tablespoonfuls of flour, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter and four eggs; let the cupful of milk 
come to a boil in the double boiler, adding sugar before it 
boils ; rub flour and butter together to a smooth paste ; then 
add to this a little at a time of the milk and sugar until it is 
all thoroughly mixed together. Then turn back into the 
boiler and cook ten minutes, stirring all the while. Now 
add yolks of eggs well beaten and set aside to cool. Do this 
half hour before time to bake. Just before baking add 
whites of eggs beaten very light; bake thirty minutes in a 
moderate oven. Serve with the following sauce : 

Sauce. — One cupful of powdered sugar, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, whites of two eggs, three-fourths of a cupful 
of boiling water, flavoring; cream, butter and sugar until 
light ; add boiling water, stirring all the while. This must be 
in a vessel over a kettle of boiling water; add whites beaten 
stifT. Serve immediately. — M. C. HugJu\<;. 

BREAD PUDDING 

Two cupfuls of grated bread crumbs, one quart of milk, 
juice and rind of one lemon, one cupful of sugar, yolks of 
three eggs, small piece of butter ; beat whites to a stiff froth 
and spread on top. — Mrs. F. H. Holland. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING 

Place a layer of stale bread or cake, rolled fine in the bot- 
tom of a pudding dish ; then a laver of any kind of fruit, 
sprinkle with a little sugar, then repeat until the dish is full; 
the top layer being crumbs. Make a custard as for pies; 
add a pint of milk, mix ; pour over top of pudding and bake 
until the fruit is cooked. — Miss H. Rhodes. 



62 THE HOME ADVISER 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

One pint of milk, three eggs, half cupful of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of cornstarch, two tablespoonfuls of choco- 
late; dissolve the cornstarch in a little of the milk; heat re- 
mainder to almost boiling; remove from fire, add the dis- 
solved cornstarch and pour over the yolks of the eggs beat- 
en light with the sugar and grated chocolate ; return to fire, 
boil till thick; just before it is done add the whites beaten 
very light. Flavor with vanilla and pour into molds. Serve 
cold with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with va- 
nilla. — Mrs. J. H. Hcrshey. 

BAKED CHOCOLATE PUDDING, NO. 1 

One cupful of grated bread crumbs, two cupfuls of sweet 
milk, one ounce of chocolate, half cupful of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of butter, two eggs, half cupful chopped nut 
meats of any kind. Soak the crumbs into half of the milk ; 
melt the chocolate over hot water, add sugar, remainder of 
milk, butter. Mix well and pour over the beaten yolks of 
tlie eg'gs ; add bread, little cinnamon and vanilla, then the 
nuts. Turn into a buttered pudding dish, bake half hour, let 
cool. Serve with meringue sauce, as follows: Boil half a 
cupful of sugar and one-fourth cupful of water until it 
threads ; pour over the stitifly beaten whites, beat several 
minutes; flavor with vanilla. Serve at once. — M. C. H. 

BAKED CHOCOLATE PUDDING, NO. 2 

Beat two tablespoonfuls of butter, one cupful of sugar and 
the yolks of two eg'gs until light ; add two ounces of melted 
chocolate, beat again ; one gill of milk, one and one-half cup- 
fuls of flour, one heaping- teaspoonful of baking powder and 
tb.e whites of two eggs well beaten; bake in moderate oven 
forty minutes. Serve with Sauce or cream, warm or cold. 

CARAMEL PUDDING 

Contents of half a box of gelatine dissolved in half pint 
of cold water, whites of eight eggs beaten very stiff ; melt to 
a syrup two cupfuls of granulated sugar, then add half pint 
of water; stir constantly. When all is melted add gelatine; 



THE HOME ADVISER 63 

beat all of this in the whites, beat fifteen minutes ; add last- 
ly half a teaspoonful of vanilla. Put in mold and place on ice. 

Sauce. — One pint of milk, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
two eggs. Cook in a double boiler ; flavor with vanilla. 

— I vis on. 
FRUIT PUDDING 

Three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of molasses, one cupful 
of suet chopped fine, one cupful of sweet milk, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking- soda dissolved in a little hot water, half tea- 
spoonful of salt, one and a half teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 
one teaspoonful qf cloves, a little nutmeg, half pound each 
of raisins and currants, washed and dried ; mix, put in a 
mold, steam four hours. Serve with hard sauce. 

Sauce. — One pound of pulverized sugar, white of an egg 
beaten light, three-fourths of a cupful of butter ; flavor with 
vanilla. — Mrs. I. J^amian. 

SUET PUDDING 

One cupful of raisins, chopped fine ; one cupful of brown 
sugar, one cupful of sour milk, one cupful of suet, chopped 
fine; one cupful of flour, one teaspoonful of nutmeg, one 
teaspoonful of cinnamon and one teaspoonful of soda ; mi>: 
all together ad steam three hours. Serve with sauce. 

— Mrs. A. Long. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING 

One pound of raisins, one pound of suet, three-fourths of 
a pound of stale bread crumbs, one-fourth of a pound of 
brown sugar, one-fourth of a pound of flour, one pound of 
currants, half of a nutmeg, grated rind of one lemon, four 
eggs, one-half pint of milk, half a pound of citron, one tea- 
spoonful of baking- powder; beat eggs, add to milk; mix all 
dry ingredients together and stir in. — Mrs. IT. iW. Grant. 

STEAMED RAISIN PUDDING 

Two cupfuls of sour milk, one cupful of molasses, half cup- 
ful of sug-ar. one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of 
salt, spices as preferred, one heaping cupful of raisins, seed- 
ed ; add flour to stir ver)- stift'. Steam three hours and serve 
with sour sauce while hot. — Mrs. Nettie M. IVeai'er. 



64 THE HOME ADVISER 

PLUM PUDDING 

One cupful of New Orleans molasses, one cupful of sweet 
milk, one cupful of raisins, one cupful of currants, one cup- 
ful of suet chopped fine, three cupfuls of flour, a little nut- 
meg, half a teaspoonful of baking powder and a little salt ; 
mix and put in a well-greased pudding mold and steam three 
hours. Serve with lemon sauce. 

Sauce. — One cupful of sugar, Initter size of an egg, one 
egg- beaten light, juice and grated rind of one lemon, half 
cupful of boiling water; cook in double boiler until thickens. 

— Miss Moi^gic A. Scott. 

INDIAN PUDDING 

Add to one quart of l)oiling milk two well-beaten eggs,, 
three tablespoonfuls of Indian meal, one heaping tablespoon- 
ful of flour, a little salt. Bake three-c|uarters of an hour. 
Serve with sugar and cream. — .1/. C. Hughes. 

KANSAS PUDDING 

Half cupful of butter, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, one 
cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful 
of soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, two eggs, one 
cupful each of raisins and currants, nutmeg; beat butter and 
sugar; add yolks of eggs; dissolve soda in milk, add cream 
of tartar with flour and a little salt, mix; sprinkle a little 
fiour on fruit, add lastly the whites of the eggs beaten to a 
froth; steam three hours. Serve hot with sugar and cream 
or sauce. Cherries, blackberries or any kind of fruit is de- 
licious Avith this mixture. — A Member. 

LEMON CUSTARD PUDDING 

Juice and grated rind of two lemons, one heaping cupful 
of sugar, one heaping tablespoonful of flour, one teaspoon- 
ful of corn starch, butter size of walnut, two eggs, three cup- 
fuls of hot water, a little salt. Mix sugar, flour, cornstarch, 
and salt well together; add to the beaten yolks and lemons, 
add butter; pour the boiling water on and boil in double 
boiler; beat the stififly beaten whites into the hot mixture, 
or make a meringue and brown. Serve cold with or with- 
out sugar and cream. — M. C. Hughes. 



f THE HOME ADVISER ' ^ 65 

MAHSflMALLOW PUDDING 

Dissol\^se two ireaspoonfuls of powdered gelatine in a half 
«aapful of iboiling- water, set aside to cool ; beat the whites 
dCff three eggs very stiff; add to this one cupful of granulated 
SiUg"ar, flavex to taste ; add slowly the dissolved gelatine and 
bteai: constantly for fifteen or twenty minutes, or until quite 
thick. Put iato molds or' in a dish and set in a cold place. 

Smtce. — Ptftt two' cupfuls of milk in a boiler and heat to 
near boiling ptoint ; add the beaten yolks of three eggs, to 
Avhicfe has been added a teaspoonful of corn starch dissolved 
in a Kttle cold water and half cupful of sugar, flavor and 
stir coaistantly, removing from fire at first as soon as it 
reaches the boiling- point. — Mrs. Ella M. Lowry. 

MERINGUE PUDDING 

Soak one pint of bread crumbs in a quart of milk until 
soft, yolks of four egg's beaten light, piece of butter size of 
walnut and the grated rind of a lemon or an orange. Mix 
all together and b^ake, not too long or will be watery. Beat 
the whites of the <egg to ;& .stiff froth with a large teacupful 
of pulverized sugar and tjie jiiice of the lemon or orange 
to form the icing. Put on top of pudding and brown in 
moderate oven, To be eaten cold^ . — Mrs. C. B. Conner, 

ORANGE PUDDING 

Cut five sweet oranges in a dish with one cupful of sugar; 
take one pint of milk, one tablespoonful of cornstarch and 
the yolks of four eggs ; let it come to a boil and pour over 
the oranges. Beat the whites of four eggs with two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar; spread over the top and brown. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

PEACH OR APPLE PUDDING 

Fill a buttered baking dish with sliced apples, pour over 
top a batter made with one teaspoonful of butter, half cup- 
ful of sugar, one egg, half cupful of milk, one cupful of flour, 
one teaspoonful of 1)aking po^^der ; l)ake in a moderate oven. 
Serve with sauce. — M. R. Finnigan. 



66 THE HOME ADVISER 

PEACH PUDDING 

Six large peaches, one ])int of flour, one egg, three-fourths 
of a cupful of milk, half teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of baking- powder, butter size 
of an tgg; rub butter into flour, add salt, sugar and baking 
powder ; beat the egg until light, then add milk and stir this 
into the flour mixture. Beat thoroughly and pour into 
greased baking dish. Have batter about an inch thick. 
Pear peaches, cut in half, put over the batter and fill the 
holes with sugar. Bake in- a moderate oven. Serve with 
sugar and cream. — Mrs. H. Taggart. 

STRAWBERRY OR PEACH SHORT CAKE 

One quart of sifted flour, two heaping teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one teaspoonful of salt, three teaspoonfuls 
of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of butter; add enough water or 
sweet milk to make a soft dough ; bake in two layers, butter 
and spread fruit between, previously sprinkled with pulver- 
ized sugar. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS 

Soak one pint of bread crumbs in one quart of new milk, 
when quite soft add the yolks of four eggs, beaten ; sweeten 
with a cupful of white sugar; flavor with the grated rind oi 
one lemon; bake until firm, like custard. Beat the whites 
of the eggs to a stiff froth, stirring in gradually four table- 
spoonfuls of granulated sugar. Spread over the top of the 
pudding a layer of tart jelly and over this the meringue; 
bake in a slow oven until a light brown. The addition of 
raisins, currants and fig's make it even more delicious. 

— Iz'isoii. 
RASPBERRY TAPIOCA 

One cupful of tapioca, soaked over night; put one pint of 
boiling water in a porcelain kettle, add tapioca and simmer 
slowly until tapioca is perfectly clear; stir in one quart of 
raspberries while boiling; sweeten to taste; remove from 
fire, turm into dish in which it is to be served. Serve cold 
with sugar and cream. — Mrs. F. H. Holland. 



THE HOME ADVISER 67 

TAPIOCA AND RICE 

Three tablespoonfuls of rice, two tablespoonfuls of tapi- 
oca, four tablespoonfuls of sug"ar, small piece of butter, a 
little nutmeg', a pinch of salt and a quart of milk ; soak tapi- 
oca until soft; add rice and proceed as for rice pudding; stir 
occasionally while baking'. — A Member. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING 

One quart of milk, one heaping cupful of tapioca, c.fter 
being- soaked, yolks of two eggs, and one scant cupful of 
sugar. Mix, place in pudding basin, stir until it begins to 
boil ; remove from the stove and flavor with vanilla. Make 
a meringue of the whites of the eggs ; put on pudding and 
brown in oven. — Mrs. C. B. Conner. 

SNOW PUDDING 

Moisten the contents of half box of gelatin in half cupful 
of cold water; add to it a hot syrup made from half pint of 
water, rind of one and juice of two lemons and three-fourths 
of a cupful of sugar; strain and let it remain until nearly 
cold and beginning to set; add the beaten whites of two 
eggs ; beat ten minutes. Pile high in a glass dish and serve 
with a thin custard sauce. — Mrs. CJiarlcs Jones. 

YELLOW AND WHITE PUDDING 

JVhitc. — One pint of boiling milk, three eggs (whites beat- 
en to a froth), three tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, three 
tablespoonfuls of sugar; pour in mold to cool b.efore serv- 
ing. Pour over the following sauce: 

Yellow.- — One pint of boiling milk, three tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, yolks of three eggs ; flavor with vanilla ; let come to a 
boil. — Mrs. IVm. Fritz Russell. 



68 THE HOME ADVISER 



SAUCES 



STRAWBERRY SAUCE 

Beat to a cream two ounces of butter, add gradually one 
cupful pulverized sugar, beating all the while ; mash twelve 
or more nice ripe strawberries, add one at a time to the 
mixture ; beat thoroughly, then add one unbeaten white of 
egg; beat well; add another white, beat again; put on ice 
until wanted. Make raspberry sauce the same way. 

— Interested. 

WHIPPED CREAM SAUCE 

One large cupful of sweet cream, whites of three eggs, 
three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar ; have the cream 
previously set on ice to get chilled, then whip and return to 
a cool place. Beat the whites to a stiff froth ; add the sugar, 
then the cream, beating all together; flavor. Very nice for 
fruit pudding or to serve with cake. 

HARD SAUCE 

Beat one-fourth of cupful of butter and one cupful of pul- 
verized sugar to a cream, whisk the whites of four eggs to 
a stiff froth, add slowly to the butter and sugar ; beat all until 
light ; add a teaspoonful of vanilla ; set in a cool place until 
ready for use. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

DARK PUDDING SAUCE 

One Ggg, one cupful of granulated sugar, one tablespoon- 
ful of butter, one cupful of boiling water, a little nutmeg, 
lemon juice to taste. Beat yoke of egg, with sugar and 
batter; when light and foamy add the boiling water in a thin 
stream, beating constantly. Set on fire to cook until the 
custard coats the spoon ; when withdrawn add nutmeg,lemon 
juice, then pour the mixture on the stiffly-beaten white of 
the egg. Serve in warm sauce dish. — M. C. H. 



THE HOME ADVISER 69 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE, NO. 1 

Heat one large cupful of rich milk in a double boiler, add 
two squares of chocolate melted, and a half cupful of sugar. 
Cook until it is a thick cream and add one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, if desired, just before serving. — Pa. 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE. NO. 2 

Half cupful of sugar, one cupful of water, boil, strain, and 
add four tablespoonfuls chocolate dissolved in half cupful of 
milk, one tablespoonful of arrowroot dissolved in half cup- 
ful of water, dash of salt ; boil the mixture five minutes ; add 
a teaspoonful of vanilla. — Mast. 

VANILLA SAUCE 

One pint of milk, yolks of three eggs, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, two tablespoonfuls of sugar ; ' boil milk in double 
boiler, beat yolks and sugar until light ; stir into the boiling 
milk, stir for a few minutes over fire, add vanilla, cool. 

— Mrs. C. E. B inkle y. 



70 THE HOME ADVISER 

CAKES, COOKIES, Etc. 



Measure everything carefully, a spoonful means as much 
rounded over top as the spoonbowl underneath. 

Pow^dered sugar makes a lighter cake, but some prefer 
granulated ; after creaming sugar with butter or eggs if the 
mixture stands for a short time the sugar will dissolve and 
the result will be most satisfactory. 

Flour differs in thickening qualities ; too much has been 
used when the cake rises, cracks and remains so. 

The oven can wait for the cake, but the cake can never 
wait for the oven. 

Cake will sometimes be heavy if the sugar and butter are 
not sufficiently well creamed ; they should be partially liqui- 
fied. 

Cakes without butter require a quick oven ; never move 
the cake or shake the oven before the center is set, and dc 
not remove it from oven unless surely done ; run a broom 
splint through the center; if no dough adheres it is done, or 
. put your ear to the cake ; if it ticks loudly put it back ; if very 
faint, it is done ; turn out very gently on a cloth or sieve to 
cool. 

Do not open oven door, at least until fifteen minutes have 
elapsed after putting the cake in. 

Creaming the butter makes the cake more delicate than 
melting it. 

Always cream the butter and sugar together first, add the 
beaten yolks, then the milk, the flavoring, the flour, then 
beat vigorously, and lastly stir in the whites, unless other- 
wise directed in recipe. 

Fine grained cake can only be made by long beating. 

Baking is more important than the mixing; too cool an 
oven makes the cake coarse ; too much baking the effect 
will be the same. 

Layer cake requires a hotter oven than a loaf cake. 



THE HOME ADVISER 71 

Sponge cake requires a cool oven. A piece of wrapping 
paper should turn a golden brown in five minutes for a loaf 
cake, then slightly increase the heat after the cake is well 
risen. 

For layer cake, the paper should brown in four minutes, 
and for angel food or sponge cake in seven minutes. 

If the cake seems to be baking too fast, place some brown 
paper over it ; a small dish of hot water placed in the oven 
will prevent it from scorching. 

Grease the pan with lard, then dredge it wnth flour, shake 
it out so as to leave a thin coating. 

Never grease the pan for angel food, but place a piece of 
paper in the bottom of the tin ; the oven should be just warm 
at first, then increase the heat after the cake has risen to top 
of pan. 

Cake pans should be filled nearly two-thirds of their space. 

Sweet milk and baking powder go together, when sour 
milk or cream is used always use soda. In using soda the 
proportion is one of soda to two of cream of tartar; if de- 
sired to substitute baking powder the quantity of soda and 
cream of tartar combined will be the proper quantity of 
powder. 

Cake should be beaten, not stirred, and for this a wooden 
spoon should be used and not the hand, as the latter imparts 
too much heat. 

Cakes should be allowed to cool before icing; pour on a 
small quantity at a time, spread with a knife, dipping fre- 
quently in hot water to prevent sticking. 

Use cups of the same size to measure all materials. 

Place a piece of paper over loaf cake to protect the cake 
fromi forming a top crust at first, which prevents the cake 
from raising; remove as soon as the cake is well raised. 

Many small cakes such as meringues, kisses, macaroons, 
require drying rather than baking; they need to be crisp 
and an oven at a low temperature will cook them thorough- 
ly; this is also true of wafers. Cakes containing molasses 
also require a slow oven. 



72 THE HOME ADVISEK 

Fruit cakes are said to be much better steamed for tliree 
hours, then baked slowly for one hour. 

In making fruit cake a good method is to prepare yodir 
fruit the day previous; wash thoroughly and let stand in. a 
warm room over night, dredge with flour and stir into the 
mixture last. 

When a less expensive article than butter is desired for 
shortening, fresh beef suet, rendered, is a better substitute.- 
than lard, and can be used liberally when recipes call for, 
molasses and spices. 

Bitter almonds give a very desirabl«L macaroon flavor to < 
cookies. 

Pastry flour is a soft flrst bolting flour, being rich • in. 
starchy matter makes fine pastry; any other can not be well, 
substituted for it. 

ANGEL FOOD 

Whites of ten eggs beaten stift", one cupful of flour and' 
one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, sifted six times, one and! 
a half cupfuls of sugar, sifted six times, one teaspoonful of; 
vanilla. Place in ungreased pan and bake in moderate oven! 
fifty minutes. — Mrs. .L H. Hershey. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE 

One cupful of unsweetened apple sauce, one-half cupful of 
butter and lard, one and one-quarter cupfuls brown sugar, 
one cupful seeded raisins, one-half teaspoonful of baking 
soda, two cupfuls flour, one teaspoonful each of cinnamon 
and cloves. Mix soda with apple sauce ; mix shortening and 
sugar together, then add spices and apple sauce, then flour, 
with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted in it,, lastly 
the raisins sprinkled with a little flour. Bake in a moderate 
oven. It is better baked in a dish with a funnel. 

— M. C. Hughes. 

CORN STARCH CAKE 

Whites of four eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, two-thirds of 
cupful of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, one cupful of 
cornstarch, two cupfuls flour, two and a half teaspoonfuls of 



THE HOME ADVISER 73 

baking powder, and one teaspoonful of extract of lemon. 
Bake in a loaf three-fourths of an hour in a steady oven. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

Two cupfuls of soft A sugar, half cupful of butter, half 
cupful of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two and 
a fourth cupfuls of fiour, two eggs, nearly half a cake of 
Baker's chocolate, grated; one teaspoonful of vanilla. Pour 
half cupful of boiling water on grated chocolate and stir well 
before adding to the mixture, which must be added the last 
tiling; bake in cake tins and use white icing. — Mrs. Vannan. 

COCOANUT CAKE 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of but- 
ter, three egg's, reserve the whites of two for icing; scant 
cupful of milk, two and a half cupfuls of flour (before sift- 
ing), two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. — M. R. Finnigan. 

COFFEE CAKE 

One cupful each of brown sugar. New Orleans molasses 
snd coffee, scant cupful of butter and lard, two eggs and 
two teaspoonfuls of baking powder or one of soda, spice to 
tc.ste. Mix and flour one cupful of currants and stir in the 
1 matter. — Mrs. S. Jones. 

DATE CAKE 

Two cupfuls of A sugar, one cupful of butter, three cup- 
fuls of flour, one cupful of cold water, four eggs, two tea- 
si^oonfuls of baking powder, two cupfuls of hickory or wal- 
nut kernels, whole, one pound each of raisins and dates. 
whole, one-half pound of citron, cut in small pieces. Bake 
two and a half hours. — Ivisoii. 

DEVIL'S FOOD, NO. 1 

Filling.- — Almost half a cake of grated chocolate, half cup- 
ful of milk, heat and stir until smooth, sweeten to taste, 
while hot. Do not put in cake until entirely cold. 

Cake. — Cream one cupful of sugar, half cupful of butter 
and yokes of two eggs; add half cupful of milk, two small 



74 THE HO-ME ADVISER 

cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfiils' leaking powder, then [)oiir 
in the chocolate filhng- and lastly add the well-beaten whites 
of the eggs. — Mrs. Stitclcr. 

DEVIL'S FOOD, NO. 2 
Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one-half cupful of butter and 
lard mixed, four eggs, reserving the white of one for icing, 
one cupful of sour milk, three tablespoonfuls of cocoa with 
one teaspoonful of soda in a little hot water, and two and a 
half cupfuls of flour. Mix in order given and bake in a 
quick oven. — Mrs. Jas. C. Barton. 

DEVIL'S CAKE 

Two eggs, two cupfuls' of dark brown sugar, half cupful 
of butter, two cupfuls of flour, half a cupful of sour milk, one 
teaspoonful of soda, one-half cupful of boiling water, one- 
third of a cake of chocolate. Grate the chocolate and pour 
the boiling water on it, and mix with the soda dissolved in 
a little hot water, cream butter and sugar, add the well- 
beaten eggs, then sour milk, chocolate with soda, etc. ; lastly 
the flour. Bake in moderate oven. 

Icing. — Five tablespoonfuls of milk and one cupful of 
granulated sugar, boil five minutes ; remove from stove and 
add one teaspoonful of vanilla. — Mrs. JVni. R. Jackson. 

FUDGE CAKE 

One and three-fourths cupfuls of granulated sugar, one- 
fourth cupful of butter, two eggs, one-half cupful of milk, 
two cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
and one tablespoonful of vanilla. Mix in order given, then 
add one-fourth cupful of grated chocolate melted in one-half 
cupful of boiling water. This will make two layers. Ice with 
thick white icing. — M)'s. J. G. Hagee. 

FEATHER CAKE 

One egg, one cupful each of sugar and sweet milk, one 
large tablespoonful of butter, two cupfuls of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, pinch of salt, flavor to taste. 
Beat egg, butter and sugar until quite light before adding 
other ingredients; bake in moderate oven. — Mrs. S. Jones. 



THE HOME ADVISER yK 

FRENCH CAKE 

Two cupfuls of sugar, three eggs, three cupfuls of flour, 
one-half cupful of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoonful of soda ; flavor 
to taste. — T. S. G. 

FRUIT CAKE 

Eight eggs, two cupfuls of butter, three cupfuls of brown 
sugar; beat well together, then add one cupful of sweet 
milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, sifted, with five 
cupfuls of flour, add two pounds each of seedless raisins and 
currants, half pound of citron, one-fourth pound of candied 
orange and lemon peel, mixed ; three teaspoonfuls of cin- 
namon, two teaspoonfuls of ground cloves and two nutmegs. 
Bake in a moderate oven. Sufficient for two cakes. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

LIGHT FRUIT CAKE 

One cupful of butter, three cupfuls of white sugar, three 
eggs, one cupful of milk, four cupfuls of flour, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking pow^der, one pint shellbark kernels, one pound 
of currants, one pound of seedless raisins and one-fourth 
pound of citron. — Mrs. E. 0. Heck. 

» DARK FRUIT CAKE 

One pound of browm sugar, one pound of butter, ten 
^fegs, one pound of flour, two pounds of currants, two 
pounds of raisins, half pound of citron, cut fine, one nut- 
meg, one tablespoonful of ground cloves, one tablespoonful 
of ground allspice and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

— Mrs. D. Kauffman (Lititz). 

GRANDMOTHER GROVE'S FRUIT CAKE 

One cupful of brown sugar, one cupful of butter, one cup- 
ful of New Orlean molasses, one cupful of sweet milk or cof- 
fee, two eggs, one and a half teaspoonfuls soda, three cup- 
fuls flour, to which has been added one and a half teaspoon- 
tuls of cream of- tartar. Mix in order given above, then 
add one pound of seeded raisins, one pound of seedless rais- 



76 THE HOME ADVISER 

ins, one pound of currants, one cupful each of shellbark ker- 
nels, cream nuts, almonds, figs and dates until you have a 
veg'etable dish full. After washing the fruit very carefully, 
drain thoroughly and sift over them some flour, taking the 
same from the amount given above. Add some grated nut- 
meg and one teaspoonful of cinnamon. 

ICE CREAM CAKE, NO. 1 

One and a half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
two cupfuls of flour, one-half cupful of milk, whites of five 
eggs, two level teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one-half 
teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat butter and sugar to a cream, 
then add vanilla, then milk, then whites of eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth; stir in flour and baking powder (sifted together). 
Bake in moderate oven thirty-five minutes. 

Icing. — Two cupfuls of sugar, half cupful of boiling water, 
boil gently ten minutes and pour on whites of two eggs 
beaten stiff". — Mrs. J 'an Onner. 

ICE CREAM CAKE, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of white sugar, three-fourths cupful of but- 
ter, whites of five eggs, one cupful of sweet milk ; flavor with 
vanilla ; three cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of leaking 
powder. 

Icing. — Two cupfuls sug'ar, one-half cupful of water, boil 
until brittle, or like cream candy, beat whites to a stiff froth ; 
add one small tablespoonful of vanilla, then beat the boiled 
sugar into the eggs, then beat until cool enough to spread 
on cake. — Mrs. Isaac Rife. 

JAM CAKE 

Three egg's, one-half cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, 
three tablespoonfuls of milk, two cupfuls of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, half teaspoonful of cloves, one cup- 
ful of jam, one teaspoonful of baking powder; strawberry 
JLim is preferable. — Mrs. Frank Holland. 

JELLY ROLL 

One cupful of white sugar, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, mixed in one cupful of flour, one teaspoonful soda in 



THE HOME ADVISER -^j 

three tablespoonfuls of milk, three well-beaten eggs. Bake 
111 long pan, jelly and roll up ; wrap in cloth until cold. 

— Mrs. S. IV. Finnigan. 

LOAF CAKE 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, one-half pound 
of butter, four eggs, one cupful of cold water, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder. Beat sugar and butter to a cream, 
then yolks of eggs, then add water and flavoring; add whites, 
well beaten, last. Bake in a moderate oven about one hour. 

— Mrs. S. W. Finnigan. 

LEBANON CAKE 

Two cupfuls of sugar, four eggs, two cupfuls of flour, one 
cupful of sweet milk, piece of butter size of walnut and two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; flavor with almond or or- 
ange ; beat eggs and sugar together until very light ; boil 
milk and dissolve butter in it and pour boiling hot slowly 
over eggs and sugar, beating all the time, then add flour and 
baking powder, flavoring. — Mrs. J. W. Heck. 

MRS. MILLER'S FAVORITE CAKE 

One cupful butter, two cupfuls pulverized sugar, three 
cupfuls of flour, five eggs, one cupful sweet milk, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder; beat butter and sugar until 
light ; add well-beaten 5^olks, then the milk ; sift baking pow- 
der into flour, then add, beat whites to a stiff froth : then add 
to the other ingredients. Can be baked in loaf or layer. 

MINNEHAHA CAKE 

Two cupfuls of pulverized sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
one cupful of milk, two and a half cupfuls of flour, whites 
of three eggs, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake in 
three layers. 

Icing. — Boil two cupfuls of granulated sugar and four 
tablespoonfuls of boiling water until it spins a thread : add 
to the whites of two eggs; beat to a cream, then add one 
cupful each of raisins and hickory nuts and half cupful of 
almonds, all chopped fine. — Mrs. J. R. Pazvling. 



78 THE HOME ADVISER 

MOCK LADY CAKE 

Three cupfuls of flour, two cupfuls of sugar, half cupful of 
butter, one cupful of sweet milk, whites of four egg's, one- 
half teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar 
or two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. — Mrs. Grier Hoskins. 

MARBLE CAKE 

Dark. — Yolks of four eggs, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of molasses, one cupful of brown sugar, one cup- 
ful of sour cream, one teaspoonful each of cinnamon, all- 
spice and cloves, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper, one tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda and 
three cupfuls of flour. 

White. — Whites of four eggs, one cupful of sugar, one- 
half cupful of butter, one-fourth cupful of milk, one and 
three-fourths cupfuls of flour, and half a teaspoonful of bak- 
irg powder. — Mrs. Win. Fritz Russell. 

NUT CAKE, NO. 1 

Three eggs, one and a half cupfuls of su^ar. one-half cup- 
ful of butter, one-half cupful of milk, two and a half cupfuls 
of flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls of baking powder and 
one cupful of meats of anv kind of nuts, chopped fine. 

—M. C. Hughes. - 

NUT CAKE, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, three-fourths 
of a cupful of sweet milk, three and a half cupfuls of flour, 
four eggs, two teaspoonfuls of baking- powder, one cupful 
of raisins, one cupful of currants, one cupful of shelll)arks, 
one cupful of walnuts, or any kind of nuts, except peanuts; 
dust the nuts (chopped) and fruit with flour before stirring 
in, mix well together. Bake slowly an hour and a half. 

— Mrs. Rodney Martin. 

ORANGE CAKE, NO. 1 

One-half cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, five eggs, 
one pint of flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, one cupful of milk, one teaspoonful of extract of or- 



THE HOME ADVISER 79 

aiige. Rub butter and sugar to a cream, add the eggs, two 
at a time, beating five minutes between each addition ; add 
the fiour sifted with the powder, then the milk and extract. 
Bake in moderate oven. — Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

ORANGE CAKE. NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of pulverized or granulated sugar, one-half 
cupful of butter, one cupful of milk, four eggs beaten sep- 
arately, three scant cupfuls of tiour, two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder, juice and grated rind of one orange, cream 
sugar and butter until smooth ; add milk, the yolks well beat- 
en and two of the well-beaten whites ; add orange, then sift 
ir the flour gradually, to which the powder has been added, 
add the remaining two whites. 

Icing. — One and a half cupfuls of granulated sugar, six 
tablespoonfuls of water, whites of two eggs; boil sugar and 
water until it will spin a thread ; add gradually to the whites, 
beaten to a stiff froth. l:)eat until smooth; add the grated 
rind of one orange (no juice) to the beaten whites previous 
to beating in the boiled sugar. — Gordon. 

ONE EGG CAKE 
One egg, one cupful of sug'ar, three tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, one-half cupful of sweet milk, two heaping 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one and one-half cupfuls 
of flour. Flavor to suit the taste. — C. E. B. 

PECAN CAKE 
One cupful of sugar, one cupful of butter, one-half cup- 
ful of milk, one cupful of pecan nuts, one-half cupful each of 
raisins and currants, two eggs, one and three-fourths cup- 
fuls of flour, and one teaspoonful baking powder. Cream 
butter and sugar, add volks, milk, thin flour, fruit last. 

— Iz'iso)!. 
BERWICK SPONGE CAKE 
Six eggs, three cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls baking powder, one cupful of cold water, pinch 
of salt, one teaspoonful extract of lemon. Beat eggs and 



8c' THE HOME ADVISER 

sugfar together five minutes; add flour, sifted with salt and 
powder, water and extract. Bake in shallow square cake- 
pan, in quick, steady oven thirty-five minutes ; when re- 
moved from oven ice it with clear icing. Half this quantity 
makes a large cake. — Mrs. Hughes. 

BUTTER SPONGE CAKE 

One cupful of granulated sugar, three yolks beaten into- 
it, add gradually six tablespoonfuls of warm water; stir un- 
til very smooth ; add one cupful of flour and one tablespoon- 
ful of cornstarch. Beat until verv thick. Add the whites 
(stiffly beaten) gradually, one teas]ioonful of baking powder,, 
butter size of walnut, melted, flavor to suit taste. This will 
make two layers and may l)e iced to suit the fanc}-. 

— A Monhcr. 
HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE 

Six eggs, one pound of sug'ar, three cupfuls of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, sifted with flour. Scald su- 
gar with half a cupful of hot water; let cool. Beat eggs in 
the sugar and water until light. — Mrs. Diinlap. 

MRS. MILLERS SPONGE CAKE 

Six eggs, one cupful of flour, one cupful of pulverized su- 
gar, flavor to taste. Beat eggs separately, then add sugar 
to eggs, beat and stir flour in very gently. Bake in a mod- 
el ate oven. * 

SPONGE CAKE, NO. 1 

Two cujjfuls of pulverized sugar, four eggs, one-half cup- 
ful of boiling water, one teaspoonful of baking powder and 
two cupfuls of flour. Thoroughly sift sugar and flour. Beat 
yolks of eggs and sugar until very light ; add w^ater. Then 
add one-half of the flour with baking powder and one-half 
whites of eggs and flavoring; beat this thoroughly before 
adding remainder of flour and eggs. Bake in a moderate 
oven one hour. — Mrs. Book. 

SPONGE CAKE. NO. 2 

Six eggs, six tablespoonfuls of water, two cupfuls of su- 
gar ; boil the water and sugar, pour slowly on the eggs ; keep 



THE HOME ADVISER St 

beating all the time until perfectly cold, then sift in two 
cupfnls of flour with one-half teaspoonful of baking powder. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

HOT MILK SPONGE CAKE 

Four eggs, two cupfuls sugar, two cupfuls of flour, one 
cupful of boiling milk and two small teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Beat eggs and sugar twenty minutes, then flour 
and baking powder, lastly the hot milk. — Mrs. W. J. Smith. 

SPONGE CAKE 

Six eggs, two cupfuls of flour, two cupfuls of sugar, twelve 
tablespoonfuls of water, one good teaspoonful of baking 
powder; beat the whites of eggs stiff, then sprinkle sugar 
slowly, then beat in yolks, two at a time, add water, the 
juice of one lemon or teaspoonful of extract of lemon, and 
lastly flour and baking powder sifted together. — Mrs. S. 

SPONGE CAKE 
Six eggs, one and three-fourths cupful of granulated su- 
gar, grated rind of one lemon and juice of half of it, one-half 
cupful of boiling water and two cupfuls of sifted flour; put 
one cupful of sugar into the yolks of the eggs and beat until 
light and foamy, then add the remainder of the sugar, with 
the lemon, beat, then add half of the boiling water, beat, 
then remainder of water, beat, then stir in the flour lightly, 
then the whites of the eggs beaten stiff; fold in just enough 
to mix. Have the oven warm and increase the heat gradu- 
ally until hot. Bake in a turk's head, one hour. 

— Mrs. Jas. C. Barton. 

SPANISH BUN 

One quart of flour, two eggs, one cupful of butter and 
lard mixed, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
currants, one cupful of milk, pinch of salt and two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder. Rub butter and lard into flour, same 
as for pie crust, add sugar and ;baking powder, salt and cur- 
rants, beat up 'eggs, add to the milk, then to the other mix- 
ture. — Mrs. S. IV. Fi}ini(ian. 



82 THE HOME ADVISER 

SILVER CAKE 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one-half 
cupful of milk, two cupfuls of tiour, whites of live eggs and 
two teaspoonfuls of bakmg- powder. — Mrs. E. 0. Heck. 

SPICE CAKE, NO. 1 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, two cupfuls of flour, one-half 
cupful of butter, one-half cupful of sour milk, four eggs (re- 
serve the whites of two for icing), one nutmeg, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of cloves, one tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in milk. 

SPICE CAKE, NO. 2 

Rub to a cream three-fourths cupful of butter, two cup- 
fuls of brown sugar and the yolks of four eggs, then add 
one-half cupful of sweet milk, one nutmeg and two tea- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, mix two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder in two cupfuls of flour, sift 
into the mixture; add the beaten whites of two eggs, reserv- 
ing two for the icing. Bake in three layers or a loaf. 

— Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

GOLDEN SPICE CAKE 

Take the yolks of seven eg'gs and one whole egg, two 
cupfuls of brown sugar, one cupful of molasses, one cupful 
of butter, one large coffee cupful of sour milk, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda, five cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of ground 
cloves, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of 
ginger, one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg and a small pnich 
of cayenne pepper; beat egg'S, sugar and butter until light, 
then add molasses, flour and milk and other ingredients ; 
beat all well together. Bake in a moderate oven. Currants 
and raisins mav be added if desired. — Miss H. Rhodes. 

SUNSHINE CAKE.. NO. 1 

Separate carefullv ele\'en eggs, using- the whites of the 
vdiole number with the yolks of four; measure one and a half 
cupfuls of granulated sugar and sift it ; put a level teaspoon- 
ful of cream of tartar into a cui)ful of pastry flour and sift 



THE HOME ADVISER 83 

five times; now l)ecit the whites of the eggs to a very stiff 
froth ; beat yolks and stir in ; sprinkle over carefully the su- 
gar, mixing lightly but thoroughly, and last the flour. Beat- 
ii"g to be done with an egg-beater and very lightly. Turn 
into an ungreased ])an. Bake in a moderate oven forty-five 
minutes. — Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. NO. 2 

Seven eggs, one cupful of granulated sugar, one cupful of 
flour, half teaspoonful of cream of tartar ; beat whites of the 
eggs until light ; add cream of tartar, then sugar, then yolks 
beaten well, then stir tiour in lightly. Put a greased paper 
over top, when you put in oven, for it browns quickly. Bake 
in moderate oven forty to" forty-five minutes. — A Member. 

VELVET CAKE 

Two cupfuls of sugar, six eggs, reserve whites of two for 
icing; beat fifteen minutes; two and a half cupfuls of flour, 
two teaspoonfuls 1)aking powder, one cupful warm water; 
flavor with lemon. — Mrs. Isaac Rife. 

WHITE CAKE, NO. 1 

Tw^o cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one cup- 
ful of water, three cu])fuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder and the whites of four eg"g's; cream the butter 
and sugar, then add water and flour, mixing in the baking 
powder before sifting into the batter; beat thoroughly, then 
fc'ld in the beaten whites of eggs; flavor to taste. Bake in 
layers. — Mrs. R. B. Daniels. 

WHITE CAKE, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of sugar, scant cupful of butter, one cupful 
of sweet milk, three cupfuls of sifted flour, three teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, whites of five eggs, cream sugar and 
butter; add milk, the flour and baking powder sifted to- 
g'ether, then the whites beaten stiff; flavor with any pre- 
ferred extract and l:)ake in la vers or loaf. — Mrs. fan Ornier. 



84 THE HOME ADVISER 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, half pound of 
butter, six eggs, one cupful of sour cream, one teaspoonful 
of soda, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar. Dissolve the 
soda in the cream and sift the cream tartar with the flour. 
Bake in loaf. — Mrs. B. F. Jones. 

WHITE PERFECTION CAKE 

One-half cupful of butter rubbed with one and a half cup- 
fuls of sugar to a cream, one-half cupful of sweet milk, one- 
half cupful of cornstarch dissolved in the milk, one and one- 
half cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of baking powder, 
whites of six eggs. Bake in slow oven forty minutes. 

—Mrs. D. H. Weaver. 

VELVET CAKE 

One-half pound of pulverized sugar, one-fourth of a pound 
of butter, three eggs, one and a half cupfuls of flour, one- 
half teaspoonful of baking powder, one-fourth of a cupful 
of milk. Beat butter and sugar to a cream, add the well- 
beaten yolks, milk, flour, with baking powder sifted in, then 
the stififliy beaten whites; flavor to taste. — Mrs. B. F. Jones. 

COOKIES 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, four eggs, half 
teaspoonful of soda ; flour to roll. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

CHOCOLATE DROPS 

Quarter of a cake of chocolate, one pound of pulverized 
sugar, four eggs, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, pinch of all- 
spice, seven tablespoonfuls of flour. — Mrs. E. Jiamilton. 

SMALL CHOCOLATE CAKES 

Quarter of a pound each of chocolate, white sugar and 
brown sugar, two tablespoonfuls each of butter and lard, 
two eggs, one teaspoonful each of soda, cinnamon and 
cloves; flour to make a very soft dough; roll thin and cut in 
small cakes. — Mrs. J. R. Pazvling. 



THE HOME ADVISER 85 

COCOANUT DROP CAKES 

One-half cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, two eggs, 
two cupfuls of sifted flour, one-third of a cupful of milk, one 
scant teaspoonful of vanilla, one heaping cupful of grated 
cocoanut, one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder and a 
little salt ; cream butter and sugar together, add the beaten 
yolks of the eggs, then milk and flour alternately, salt, va- 
nilla and cocoanut, the whites beaten stifif, and baking pow- 
der; beat well together, drop in spoonfuls on a well-greased 
pan. Add more flour if not stiff enough. — M. C. H. 

COCOANUT CRUMBS 

One and one-fourth pounds of grated cocoanut, one 
pound of pulverized sugar, whites of two eggs, and one-half 
cupful of flour. Mix cocoanut, sugar and flour well togeth- 
er, then fold in the whites, beaten stiff. Drop on tins and 
bake. — Mrs. Jas. R. Pawling. 

CRULLERS 

One cupful of sugar, four and a half tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, two eggs, one cupful of sweet milk, four cup- 
fuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, half tea- 
spoonful salt; flavor with nutmeg. — Mrs. A. I. Rubincam. 

DOUGHNUTS 

One pint of milk heated with one cupful of shortening; 
when cool add two cupfuls of sugar, three eggs beaten, a 
little cinnamon, one yeast cake dissolved in a little luke- 
warm water ; put in enough flour to knead ; let rise over 
night ; add a little flour, enough to roll out ; let rise again 
and boil in hot lard. — Ivison. 

DOUGHNUTS 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of water, one cupful of 
mashed potatoes, one cupful of yeast ; add flour to set to 
raise at night; in the morning add two eggs, one cupful of 
sugar, one cupful of lard and butter mixed, salt, knead soft, 
■when light roll, cut, raise, fry. — Sara J. Stern. 



86 THE HOME ADVISER 

DUTCH DOUGHNUTS 

Four eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of lard, two 
Gupfuls of sour cream and milk together, one tablespoonful 
of soda ; flour enough to roll ; boil in hot lard. — Mrs. S. Jones. 

DROP CAKES 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
cupful of thick milk, two eggs, one-half teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling 
water, two and a half cupfuls of flour; flavor with nutmeg or 
lemon. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

GOAT ISLAND CAKES 

Two cupfuls of granulated sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
then add yolks of five eggs, well beaten, one-half cupful of 
cold water, two cupfuls of flour and a pinch of salt, two tea- 
spoonfuls of fcbaking powder; add whites of five eggs; lieat 
well and flavor to suit the taste. Bake in small tins. 

— Mrs. E. P. Dickinson. 

HERMITS 

Two eggs, one-half cupful of butter, one cupfui of sugar, 
two-thirds of a cupful of seeded raisins, chopped, a very 
little citron chopped fine, a half teaspoonful each of cloves, 
nutmeg and cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoonful of baking 
soda and two heaping cupfuls of flour. Beat sugar and but- 
ter, add eggs, beat until light; add soda dissolved in a little 
hot water, then flour and spices ; lastly the fruit, well floured. 
Mix stiff, form in small balls size of hickor}' nut, place in well 
greased pans a distance apart. — Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 

HICKORY NUT CAKES 

One pound of sugar, one pound of kernels, three eggs 
and three tablespoonfuls of flour ; beat all together and drop 
on buttered pan with teaspoon. — Mrs. Herbert C. Prague. 
CHOCOLATE JUMBLES 

Half cupful of l)utter. one cupful of sugar, one and a half 
cupfuls of flour, one cupful of grated chocolate, two eggs 
and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; add more flour if 
necessary, to stiffen ; roll thin ; bake in moderate oven. 



THE HOME ADVISER 87 

JUMBLES 

One teaciipful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one-half 
cupful of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, three 
cupfuls of flour, one egg. Mix and roll about one-half inch 
in thickness. — Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 

MRS. PAULING'S JUMBLES 
Two and a half cupfuls of white sugar, one cupful of but- 
ter, half cupful of sweet milk, three eggs, two and a half tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder and a little nutmeg; flour 
enough to roll. 

MACAROONS 

Whites of three eggs beaten stifl:", one cupful of granulated 
sugar or a half pound of pulverized, one pint of picked nuts, 
or half pound of prepared cocoanut, one and a half table- 
S])oonfuls of flour; mix in order given and drop on greased 
tins and bake slowly until light brown. — Mrs. H. Toggart. 

NUT KISSES, NO. 1 

One pound of pulverized sugar, whites of six eggs, six 
heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, one pound of chopped nuts, 
shellbarks preferred. — Mrs. Win. Fritz Russell. 

NUT KISSES, NO. 2 

The whites of six eggs beaten to a froth, add one pound 
of pulverized sugar, beat twenty minutes ; add one pound of 
nuts when picked. Grease pans and bake in a moderate 
oven. — Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

OATMEAL COOKIES 

Cream together one cupful of butter and lard mixed, add 
one cupful of sugar, two eggs well beaten, three-fourths of 
a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in eight teaspoonfuls of 
milk, two cupfuls of uncooked oatmeal, two cupfuls of sifted 
flour, two cupfuls of raisins (ground), one-fourth teaspoon- 
ful each of cinnamon and cloves. Mix all together, roll 
thin, cut in squares. — Mrs. J. G. Hagee. 



8i; THE HOME ADVISER '' 

PINWHEELS 

Into one quart of flour mix thoroughly one-half teaspoon- 
ful of salt, two rounding- teaspoonfuls of baking powder and 
one tablespoonful of butter ; beat two eggs without separat- 
ing, add a cupful of milk, then add this to the flour; roll into 
a thin sheet, spread with butter, dust with sugar, cinnamon 
and currants. Roll up, cut into pieces half an inch thick, 
stand on end and bake in quick oven. — Mrs. IV. J. Landis. 

PEANUT COOKIES 

Two tablespoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls sugar, 
two tablespoonfuls of milk, two eggs well beaten, one cup- 
ful of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, one level teaspoonful of 
baking powder, and one cupful of finely chopped nuts. 
Cream the butter, add sugar, milk and eggs; sift together 
thoroughly flour, baking powder and salt, and add to the 
mixture lastly the peanuts ; drop by teaspoonfuls on but- 
tered tin half inch apart ; place half peanut on each and bake 
in a slow oven. — Mfs. ]V. J. Smith. 

LITTLE POUND CAKES 

One and one-fourth cupful of flour, one cupful of sugar, 
one-half cupful of butter, four eggs, beaten light; one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder, three teaspoonfuls of cream ; 
mix and make in gem pans. — Mrs. J'aunan. 

PEPPERNUT CAKES 

One pound white sugar, three-fourths of a pound of but- 
ter, one cupful of thick milk, five eggs, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; add flour until 
stiff enough to roll; flavor with nutmeg or lemon. Mix and 
let stand in a cool place over night. — Mrs. C. E. Binklc\. 

SCOTCH CAKES 
Six ounces of butter, two and a half pounds of brown 
sugar, one pint of New Orleans molasses, half teaspoonful 
of soda, one grated cocoanut, one and a half pounds of flour ; 
boil molasses, when cool mix all together, let stand over 
night, or longer, in a cool place ; when ready to bake take a 



THE HOxME ADVISER 89 

i- cce the size of a silver dollar, flatten with the hands, well 
11. Aired; put in baking pan far apart, bake in moderate oven 
a-'-d remove from pan just as cakes begin to cool. Fine. 

— Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

SAND TARTS, NO. 1 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, three cupfuls 
cf flour, two eggs and a half teaspoonful of baking powder; 
mix, roll out very thin; make a paste with the yolk of an 
egg. one teaspoonful of milk, sugar and a little cinnamon, 
brush over top ; sprinkle sugar and put nuts on each. 

— Mrs. Rodney Martin. 

SIAND TARTS, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls of flour, one cupful of 
butter, three eggs; mix, roll very thin and sprinkle a mix- 
ture of cinnamon and sugar over the cakes. 

— Mrs. Herbert C. Pagne. 

SUGAR CAICES 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful butter and lard mixed, 
four eggs, one-half cupful sour milk, two teaspoonfuls of 
■cream of tartar and one teaspoonful of baking soda; flavor 

V. ith lemon ; flour to roll. — Mrs. Howard Ash. 

WAFERS 

Quarter of a pound of butter, one-half pound of sugar, 
one-half pound of flour, three eggs, flavor to taste; beat but- 
ter and sugar, add yolks beaten light, then add flour, whites 
well beaten, use enough of sweet milk to make consistency 
cf cake batter. Bake in wafer irons ; roll over knife or stick 
while hot. If you have no irons, cover flat pans with but- 
tered paper and drop mixture on in small spoonfuls a dis- 
tance apart. 

WALNUT WAFERS 

One cupful of brown sugar, one cupful of walnut meats, 
broken, but not chopped; three even tablespoonfuls of flour, 
one-quarter of a teaspoonful each of baking powder and 
salt, and two eggs; beat the eggs, add the sugar, salt, sifted 



90 THE HOME ADVISER 

liour and baking- powder, lastly meats. Drop small sj^oon- 
fuls on buttered pans, a distance apart ; bake until 1)rown. 

— Fifth Avomc. 

SOFT GINGER CAKE 

One and one-half cupfuls of baking- molasses, one-half 
cupful of melted lard, one-half cupful of lukewarm water, 
one-half cupful of granulated sugar, two eggs, two cupfuls 
of flour, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water, one 
and one-half teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful 
of cloves, a little nutmeg. — Mrs. I. 1 ^auiuni. 

GINGERBREAD 

One cupful of New Orleans molasses, one cupful of sugar, 
one cupful of shortening (butter and lard), three eggs, three 
cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot 
water, one heaping teaspoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful 
of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, one teacupful of 
very hot water put in last. — Mrs. ran Oriiicr. 

MOLASSES GINGER CAKE 

One cupful of New Orleans molasses, one cupful of sugar, 
one-half a cupful of butter and lard, one cupful of cold water. 
two eggs, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water, 
one tablesi)Oonful of ginger, one tablespoonful of cinnamon 
and one quart of flour. Flour one cupful of currants and 
stir th^m in the mixture. — Mrs. S. ]V. Fiiniigan. 

MOLASSES CAKES 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of molasses, one cupful 
of lard and butter mixed, two teaspoonfuls of soda dissolved 
in half a cupful of hot water, five cupfuls of flour, one table- 
spoonful of ginger, one tablespoonful of cinnamon, two 
eggs and a little salt ; mix and drop on tins. Bake in mod- 
erate oven. 

DROP GINGER CAKES 

One cupful of lard, one pint of molasses, one pint of thick 
cream or milk, one-half cupful of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of 
cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoonful ginger, one-quarter tea- 



THE HOME ADVISER 91 

spoonful of cloves, two tablespoonfuls of soda ; flour to 
make a soft dough ; mix in order given and do not fail to 
use the required amount of soda. — Gordon. 

GINGER CAKES 
Two pounds of brown sugar, one pint of lard, one pint of 
buttermilk, one quart of molasses, two tablespoonfuls of 
soda dissolved in boiling water, two tablespoonfuls of gin- 
ger; mix stiff, let stand over night; roll, sprinkle with granu- 
lated sugar; bake. — Mrs. H. Tlwrnc. 

SNAPS 
One larg-e cupful of butter and lard, one large cupful of 
sugar, one large cupful of molasses, one-half cupful of cold 
water, one teaspoonful each of ginger, cinnamon, soda and 
cloves; add flour enough to roll. — M. R. Finnigan. 

GINGER SNAPS. NO. 1 
One cupful of brown sugar, two cupfuls of molasses, one 
large cupful of butter, two teaspoonfuls of soda, two tea- 
spoonfuls of ginger, three pints of flour to commence with : 
lub shortening and sugar into the flour; dissolve soda in 
one tablespoonful of boiling water; mix all tog'ether and add 
sufficient flour to roll very smooth and thin ; the more flour 
that can be worked in and the smoother they can be rolled, 
the more 1)rittle they will be. — Miss H. Rhodes. 

GINGER SNAPS, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of New Orleans molasses, one cupful of su- 
gar, one and one-half cupfuls of shortening, one teaspoonful 
each of ginger and cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of soda dis- 
solved in a little hot water, salt, flour enough to roll. Roll 
thin. — Sara J. Stern. 

GINGER SNAPS 

One and one-half cupfuls ol New Orleans molasses, one 
cupful each of sugar and lard ; boil these together five min- 
utes after coming to the boiling point ; let cool a little, then 
add a teaspoonful each, of ginger and soda; stiffen with 



92 THE HOME ADVISER 

flour and handle as little as possible, as rehandling toug^hens 
it. Use small quantities so as not to roll any of it twice, 
ll requires considerable flour to stiffen. Roll thin and bake 
in quick oven. — Gordon. 

GINGER CAKES 
One cupful of sugar, one cupful of lard, two cupfuls of 
New Orleans molasses, one tablespoonful of ginger, one 
tablespoonful of baking soda dissolved in a cupful of boiling 
v.ater. Flour enough to mix and roll out soft. 

— Mrs. J. G. Hagee. 



THE HOME ADVISER 95 

ICINGS 



CARAMEL ICING 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one-third of a cupful of 
cream, butter size of an egg, one teaspoonful of vanilla ; boil 
until thick. — Mrs. IVm. R. Jackson. 

GELATINE ICING 

Cover a tablespoonful of g-elatine with four tablespoon- 
fuls of cold water, soak for half an hour and then dissolve 
over hot water; strain into a bowl, add a teaspoonful of 
lemon juice and as much powdered sugar as it will hold to 
pour nicely. 

CHOCOLATE ICING 

Four tablespoonfuls grated chocolate, eight tablespoon- 
fuls (or more) confectioner's sugar, one teaspoonful melted 
butter, four tablespoonfuls boiling water; mix chocolate and 
boiling water, add sugar and butter, beat thoroughly. 

— Mrs. Shirey. 

LEMON ICING FOR CAKE 

Three-fourths cupful of sugar, one egg, juice and grated 
rind of a lemon ; stir (don't beat) all together ; cook until 
clear. 

LADY BALTIMORE ICING 
Three cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of water, boil until it 
spins a thread, add to whites of three eggs beaten stiff, then 
add one cupful of chopped raisins, one cupful of hickory 
nuts and five shredded figs. — Jvison. 

BOILED ICING 

One and a half cupfuls of granulated sugar, six table- 
spoonfuls of water; boil until it drops from prong of fork; 
pour gradually on the whites of two eggs which have been 
beaten stiff on a large platter, beating until it forms without 
running. Spread at once between the layers of the cake 
and on top. — Gordon. 



94 THE HOME ADVISER 

ORANGE ICING 

One pound of pulverized sugar, one tablespoonful of hot 
water, juice and grated rind of an orange and a lemon. 

— Ivison. 

MAPLE SYRUP ICING 

Three-fourths of a pound of maple sugar, one-half cupful 
of water ; boil until it spins a thread ; beat the whites of two 
eggs very stiff; pour the syrup on and beat until stiff. 

— Ivison. 

CARAMEL ICING, NO. 1 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one cupful of white sugar, 
one-half cupful of cream, one-half cupful of butter, one or 
two tablespoonfuls of New Orleans molasses; melt butter, 
add cream, then sugar; cook until real thick, then add mo~ 
lasses and vanilla ; let cool before spreading on cake. — Ivison. 

CARAMEL ICING, NO. 2 

Two cupfuls of brown sug'ar, one-third of a cupful of 
cream, small piece of butter; flavor with vanilla; cook until 
it will stiffen in water; let cool a little before spreading on 
the cake. — Mrs. H. Ash. 

BOILED CHOCOLATE ICING 

One cupful of powdered sugar, quarter of a cake of choco- 
Ir'.te (shaved), two tablespoonfuls of boiling water, the white 
of an ^gg; cook one-third of the sugar, the chocolate and 
the water together, until smooth;. have the &gg and the re- 
mainder of the sug'ar beaten tog-ether and pour into this the 
hot chocolate. Beat well and spread over the cake at 
once. — Mrs. C. E. BinkJcy. 

GERMAN FILLING 

Put tliree ounces of chocolate in a (loul)le boiler, when 
melted add three-fourths cui)ful of milk, one-half cupful of 
sugar; when smooth and hot. remove from the fire, add the 
yolk of one egg* and a teaspoonful of vanilla ; when cool 
spread between lavers of chocolate cake. 



THE HOME ADVISER 95 

ORANGE FILLING FOR CAKE 

Put one-half pint of milk into a double boiler, moisten two 
tablespoonfuls of tiour with a little cold milk; add it to the 
hot milk; stir and cook until smooth and thick; add one-half 
a cupful of sugar and the grated rind of half an orange. 
Beat the yolks of three eggs until creamy ; add them to the 
mixture, cook just a moment and take from fire ; add gradu- 
ally two or three tablespoonfuls of orange juice and stand 
as'de to cool. For one thick layer between two layers of 
sponge cake. 



96 THE HOME ADVISER 



CUSTARDS, DESSERTS, ICES, &c. 



In making custards the great art lies in stirring briskly 
until it commences to thicken, and if this is continued until 
cool this will prevent crust from rising to the top; this may 
be applied to all creams made with custard. 

In baking custard, always have a moderate oven, as too 
much Jieat will turn it to whey. 

Custards are nice baked in cups to serve to each person. 

Mix custard, set cups in hot water, place in oven to bake. 

If eggs are used for ice cream, always cook them with the 
milk or cream. Scalding milk or cream (not boiling) is not 
necessary, but the ice cream will l)e much the richer by so 
doing. 

If part milk is used, for convenience, the ice cream will be 
improved if the cream is whipped. 

The best quality of ice cream is made by scalding half the 
cream ; this prevents excessive swelling. 

If cream is to be flavored with fresh fruits, mash fruit fine ; 
if fruit is sour, add after cream is frozen. 

To heat milk without scorching, stir in sugar intended to 
use in the recipe, like for custards, creams, etc., before put- 
ting on to boil when not using a double boiler. 

Flavorings such as oils, lemon, orange, etc., may be cook- 
ed with the cream. 

In making ice cream, chip the ice into fine pieces, the finer 
the better, as it freezes more rapidly if packed closely. 

In the preparation of ices, the sugar and water should be 
boiled, the scum that arises should be removed and syrup 
strained while hot through a cloth. The mixture is sweeter 
before it is frozen than afterwards, and it requires longer to 
freeze than ice cream. 

In making sherbets stir constantly while freezing; after 
the dasher is removed, stir in the meringue, which is made 



THE HOME ADVISER 97 

in the proportion of the white of one agg to one tablespoon- 
ful of pulverized sugar. This addition to frozen sherbet- 
makes it smooth. 

FRAPPES, PARFAITS AND MOUSSES 

Frappe is a partly frozen water ice, frozen without stir 
ring; like wet snow. Parfaits and mousses are frozen whip- 
ped creams. A nice parfait is made by stirring whipped 
cream into ice cream at serving time. 

GRAPE JUICE FRAPPE 

One pint of grape juice, one cupful of orange juice, juice 
of two lemons, two cupfuls of granulated sugar, four cupfuls 
of water, boil sugar and water fifteen minutes and add the 
fruit juice ; strain, add a pint or more of cold water and more 
sugar if necessary. Do not freeze too hard. — "Miriam." 

MAPLE PARFI 
One quart of cream, one pint of milk, six eggs, four cup- 
fuls of maple syrup; boil syrup until it threads, beat egg's 
separately and put syrup in the yolks, add whites, cream and 
milk, freeze. This will make four (juarts. — Mulkin. 

CAFE MOUSSE 
One quart of cream (wdiipped), one-fourth pound pulver- 
ized sugar, four eggs, one tablespoonful of vanilla, one cup- 
ful of strong cofTee ; mix yolks of eggs with sugar, add cof- 
fee, very hot; then vanilla, beat with whites until cold, and 
whipped cream; stir and freeze. — Ivison. 

CHERRY MOUSSE 
Stem and pit, sweet, perfectly ripe red cherries; cook in a 
syrup until tender, rub through a sieve, making a thick 
puree; when cold add one and one-half pints of whip]ied 
cream to the pulp of two pounds of cherries. Turn into 
molds and pack in ice and salt for four or five hours. 

SHERBET 

Two cupfuls of water, two cupfuls of sugar, juice of five 
oranges, juice of five lemons, strain; when nearly frozen add 



98 THE HOME ADVISER 

the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Freeze in" 
freezer. — Gordon. 

CANTON SHERBET 

Quarter of a pound of Canton ginger, cut in smaU pieces, 
add four cupfuls of water and one cupful of sugar; boil fif- 
teen minutes, flavor with one-half cupful of orange juice and 
one-third of a cupful of lemon juice ; cool, strain and freeze. 
Sufficient to serve twelve people. 

ORANGE SHERBET 

Two cupfuls of orange juice, two tablespoonfuls of gela- 
tine, two cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of water, soak the 
gelatine an hour in a little cold water; boil sugar and water 
together five minutes, add gelatine, cool ; when cold add the 
orange juice and strain through a cloth. Freeze and add a 
meringue. — "Our Favorite." 

PEACH ICE CREAM 

One and one-half pints of cream, one pint of milk, one 
tablespoonful of flour, twelve ounces of sugar, yolks of two 
eggs, one quart of sliced peaches, add six ounces of the 
sugar to the peaches, mash fine, make a custard with milk, 
eg"gs, flour and remainder of sug"ar, let stand until cold, 
freeze ; when nearly frozen add fruit and the whites of the 
eggs beaten stiff; finish freezing. — "Miriam.'' 

VANILLA ICE CREAM 

One quart of cream, one-half pound of sugar and two 
tablespoonfuls of extract of vanilla. Put half of thecream' 
and the sugar on to boil in a double boiler, stir constantly 
for ten minutes ; take from the fire ; when cold add the re- 
mainder of the cream, the vanilla, and freeze. — (/. 

FIVE THREES 

Three oranges, three lemons, three small bananas, three 
cupfuls of sugar and three cupfuls of water. Mash bananas, 
add juice of oranges and lemons, mix well with sugar and 
water; freeze. — M. 



THE HOME ADVISER 99' 

ICED CURRANTS 

Crush red ripe currants with a silver fork, sugar well and 
stand on ice; seive in sherbet glasses with a spoonful of 
shaved or crushed ice on each glass. Good. — "Miriam." 

FROZEN CHERRIES 

Two quarts of red sour cherries, seeded, or one quart can 
of unsweetened ones, two pounds of sugar and one and a half 
pints of water, one tablespoonful of lemon juice; chop cher- 
ries, add sugar and let stand one hour, add water and lemon 
juice, put in freezer ; turn until frozen. — "Miriam." 

FROZEN CUSTARD 

Four cupfuls of milk, four eggs, one cupful of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of vanilla and two tablespoonfuls of corn- 
starch; put milk in farina boiler over fire, moisten corn- 
starch with little cold milk, then add to hot milk; stir until 
It begins to slightly thicken ; add the eggs well beaten to the 
hot milk, cook one minute; remove from fire, add vanilla; 
when cold freeze same as ice cream. — Gordon. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE 

Soak prunes all night, then bring to the boiling point, re- 
move the skins by pressing through a colander ; have the 
consistency of mashed potatoes ; add the beaten whites of 
eggs and l3ake. — H. 

ORANGE SOUFFLE 

Peel and slice six oranges, put in a dish in alternate layers 
with sugar, let stand two hours ; make a soft boiled custard 
with one pint of milk, yolks of three eggs, sugar to taste, 
with a grating of orang^e peel for flavor; pour over oranges 
when cool ; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth ; add 
pulverized sug"ar and put over top. 

QUEEN VICTORIA'S FAVORITE DESSERT 

One small box of gelatine dissolved in half a pint of cold 
water, then add half a pint of boiling water and at the same 
tnne two cupfuls of sugar and the juice of two lemons ; also 
two bananas, two oranges, six figs and ten Engiish walnuts. 
Serve with cream. Eleo-ant. — H. 



100 THE HOME ADVISER 

SPANISH CREAM 

Soak half a box of gelatine in one pint of milk for one 
hour, add one pint more and let come to a boil, beat one 
cupful of sugar, yolks of four eggs, until very light, add to 
the milk and again bring it to the boiling point ; remove 
from stove and add well-beaten whites; flavor and stir brisk- 
ly until well mixed. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

FRENCH CARAMEL CUSTARD 

Into a good pudding dish melt four tablespoonfuls of 
granulated sugar to a clear bright brown, stirring carefully 
until it is thoroughly carmelized, then pour on it gradually 
one pint of scalding milk, which must be fresh, then pour 
this liquid on two beaten eggs; return to pudding dish, bake 
in slow oven with asbestos plate underneath until custard 
is set. Caramel which has hardened on the pan will dissoh-e 
in the baking. — M. C. Hughes. 

CUP CUSTARD 

One pint of sweet milk, three eggs, three tablespoonfuls 
of sugar, flavoring to taste ; put in cups and stand in a pan 
of hot water and bake. — Mrs. C. E. Binklcy. 

TAPIOCA CUSTARD 

Soak three tablespoonfuls of tapioca over night in a jiint 
of cold water ; then add one quart of milk, boil, then add 
one-half cupful of sugar and four eggs; let boil until thick 
custard. — Mrs. Gricr Hoskins. 

CORN STARCH CUSTARD 
One quart of milk, four heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
three eggs, reserve whites of two, one tablespoonful of corn- 
starch ; heat the milk, stir cornstarch into a little cold milk, 
mix with the eggs and sugar, stir into the hot milk, cook 
until thickens, flavor with vanilla. Take the whites of two 
eggs, l)eat lightly and add three tal)lespoonfuls of confec- 
tioner's sugar, flavor with vanilla, and put on pudding in 
tciblespoonfuls, brown in oven. — Mrs. J. H. Hcrshey. 



THE HOME AD\'1SER TOI 

STRAWBERRY CHARLOTTE 

Alake a boiled custard with one quart of milk, yolks of six 
egg-s, and three-fourths of a cupful of sugar. Line a berry 
dish with slices of sponge cake or lady fingers dipped in 
sweet cream; lay on them ripe strawberries alternately with 
the cake ; when the custard is cold pour over. Beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add a little sugar, put over 
top, ornament wnth ripe strawberries. — A Member. 

CHOCOLATE JUNKET 

One quart of milk, one-half cupful of sugar, one square 
of chocolate or two rounding tablespoonfuls of cocoa, one 
junket tablet, flavor with vanilla ; add milk and sugar, melt 
chocolate, add one-half cupful of the milk; boil one minute; 
add this and the flavoring to the remainder of the milk ; if 
not lukewarm heat to that temperature. Stir in the junket 
tablet dissolved in a tablespoonful of cold w^ater; mix thor- 
oughly and pour into glasses or bowl ; cover with a clean 
cloth ; when set remove to a cool i)lace. Serve with whipped 
cream piled on the glasses. — Mrs. J^aii Ornier. 

FLOATING ISLANDS 

One quart of milk, five eggs, five tablespoonfuls of sugar; 
scald the milk, then add the beaten yolks and one of the 
whites together with the sugar. First stir in a little of the 
scalded milk, to prevent curdling, then all of the milk. Cook, 
remove from fire and flavor; cool, pour into dish. Beat the 
four whites to a stiff froth and beat into them three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar and drop by spoonfuls over the custarfl. 
so the little islands will not touch each other. A little jelly 
may be dropped on each island if desired. — A Member. 

LEMON FOAM 

Two cupfuls of hot water, one small cupful of sugar, two 

tablespoonfuls cornstarch, juice of one lemon, whites of two 

co-g's; boil sugar and water and add cornstarch dissolved in 

cold water, stir well while boiling; after boiling five minutes 



102 THE HOME ADVISER 

add lemon juice, then set away to cool, whip the eggs and 
add to the cornstarch; when almost cold make a custard 
with one pint of milk, two spoonfuls of sugar and yolks of 
two eggs ; pour custard over lemon foam. Sufficient quan- 
tity for five persons. — Miss H. RJiodcs. 

LOG CABIN 

Split lady fingers in halves, spread with jelly, build log 
cabin fashion on fancy glass dish, pour over a cold soft cus- 
tard made from yolks of four eggs, one-half cupful of sugar 
and a pint of milk ; when ready to serve beat whites of eggs 
to a stiff froth, garnish edge of dish or put around "cabin." 
Use flat dish, so lady fingers will stand above custard. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE 
Half box of gelatine, one cupful of milk, one pint of cream, 
one cupful of pulverized sugar, whites of two eggs, one 
large teaspoonful of vanilla ; soak gelatine in milk one hour ; 
heat in double boiler; while heating whip cream and the 
whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, then add sugar slowly, 
then vanilla; when gelatine is cool stir slowly into cream. 
Pour into mold lined with lady fingers or stale sponge 
cake. — M. 

CREAM PUFFS 

One cupful hot water, one-half cupful of butter, boil to- 
gether and while boiling stir in one cupful sifted flour (dry). 
Take this from stove and stir to a smooth paste ; after this 
cools, stir in three eggs (not beaten), stir it five minutes; 
drop from tablespoon on a buttered tin and bake in a quick 
oven twenty-five minutes, being careful not to open oven 
door oftener than is absolutely necessary. This makes 12 
puffs. Do not allow them to touch each other in the pan. 

For the Cream. — One cupful of milk, one-half cupful sugar, 
one ^gg, three tablespoonfuls of flour; flavor with vanilla. 
When both this and the puffs are cool, open the puffs with 
a sharp knife and fill them with the cream. These never fail 
to puff. — Mrs. T. S. Gilbert. 



THE HOME ADVISER 



103 



APPLE FLOAT 

To one pint of sweetened ice cold apple sauce, beat the 
whites of two eg'gs to a stiff froth, add two heaping table- 
spoonfuls of sugar; add apples and beat all lightly together 
and serve ice cold with cream. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

MOONSHINE 

Beat very stifif the whites of three eggs, add three table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar, cut fine six ripe peaches, add 
to whites without much stirring. Serve with sugar and 
cream. 

CHERRY JELLY 

Add the juice of two lemons and half a cupful of cold 
water to two ounces of granulated gelatine, let stand five 
minutes then dissolve in a pint of boiling water; to a quart 
of canned sour cherries add one quart of cold water; strain 
the gelatine, etc.. into this and if necessary sweeten; stand 
in a cool place to harden; cut in squares and turn into a glass 
bowl. Serve v/ith plain or whipped cream. This will be 
more attractive if a little red coloring is added to the jelly. 

— Mrs. Van Ormcr. 



104 '^HE HOME ADVISER 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 



SALAD 

Take a head of lettuce, mecHum size, break apart, rinse. 
lay aside the inside leaves to line salad bowl or saucers, cut 
the remainder fine, dice three medium-sized tomatoes and 
two onions; add this together with two hard-boiled eggs 
cut fine to the lettuce; make a dressing- with vinegar, salt, 
pepper and sugar to taste. If vinegar is too strong dilute 
with water; pour this over the mixture placed on the leaves 
in the salad bowl ; over the top slice very thin small red rad- 
ishes, unpared. — Mrs. Ella M. Loivry. 

FRUIT SALAD 

Half dozen of oranges, half idozen of bananas, one pine- 
apple, cut in small pieces, sugar if necessary; drain off the 
juice before adding the dressing. Mix and serve on lettuce. 

Dressing. — Yolks of three eg"gs, saltspoonful of salt, one 
heaping tablespoonful of flour, one cupful of sugar ; beat all 
together until smooth, then add one and one-half cupfuls of 
cream and enough vinegar to taste. — ll'cai'cr. 

WHITE GRAPE SALAD 

Cut in quarters and remove the seeds from one pint of 
v/hite grapes, add one cupful each of chopped apples, chop- 
ped celery and one-half cupful of English walnuts. Alix in- 
gredients and moisten with mayonnaise. 

CHICKEN SALAD, NO. 1 
Prepare chicken same as for roasting, jjut in a kettle of 
boiling water, add a small chopped onion, a bav leaf (if you 
like it), one-half teaspoonful of whole ])e])per corns, and one- 
third teaspoonful celery seed ; allow the chicken to boil rap- 
idly for five minutes, then simmer slowly until tender. This 
will make the dark meat almost as white as the white. Re- 
move the chicken, and when cold take the pieces in large 



THE HOME ADVISER 105 

])ieces from the bones, rejecting" all fat and skin; cut the 
meat into dice, measure it, and then cut into same sized 
]iieces ; sufficient celery to make one-half the ciuantity. If 
the salad is not to be served immediately, keep the chicken 
and celery apart until serving time, then mix together and 
to each quart add a level teaspoonful salt and one-half tea- 
spoonful pepper, and sufficient mayonnaise dressing to cover 
every piece; toss with two forks until each piece is covered 
then turn into a salad bowl that has been garnished with let- 
tuce leaves ; pour over a little extra dressing and sprinkle 
over a tablespoonful of capers that have been drained dry, 
or garnish with olives and celery tips. 

Moyomiaisc Dressing. — Put the yolks of two eggs into a 
clean cold soup dish, add a quarter teaspoonful salt and a 
dash of cayenne pepper ; work these well together and then 
add drop by drop one-half cupful of olive oil; stir rapidly 
and steadily while adding the oil, and after the first half cup- 
ful has been added, alternate occasionally with a few drops 
of vineg'ar. A cup of oil will make sufficient dressing for 
the above salad. At serving time stir in half the quantity 
(or more) whipped cream. This softens the dressing and 
makes it more palataljle. — Boston. 

CHICKEN SALAD, NO. 2 
Boil chicken until very tender; when cold remove skin and 
cut the meat in pieces, half inch cubes. If the salad is to be 
very nice, use white meat only, leaving the dark for cro- 
([uettes; cut celerv in pieces, one-half inch long; to each pint 
of chicken use two-thirds of a pint of celery and one and 
one-half cupfuls of mavonnaise dressing. Sufficient to serve 
cig"ht or ten persons. — ■Iz'isoii. 

CHICKEN SALAD, NO. 3 
One four pound chicken, two poimds of veal, same quan- 
tity of celery. Mix and cook the following and pour over 
when cold, yolks of five eggs, small tablespoonful of fiour. 
small tablespoonful of sugar, teaspoonful salt, half teaspoon- 
ful mustard, cup and a half cream, half cup of vinegar and 
one tablespoonful butter. — Mrs. Jas. R. Pawling. 



io6 THE HOME ADVISER 

TOMATO AND CELERY SALAD 

Peel medium-sized tomatoes ; cut off stem end, and with 
a spoon handle scoop out some of the centre. Fill with 
finely chopped celery and green pepper; (a little cucumber 
and onion may also be added). Place on lettuce leaves and 
serve with mayonnaise. — M. Jl\ Mast. 

TOMATO AND SWEETBRBEAD SALAD 

Take tomatoes, uniform in size, peel, and cut a small slice 
off the top and take out the inside ; then set on ice to chill ; 
have one pair of sweetbreads boiled and cut into small 
pieces, add a little chopped celery; mix with mayonnaise, 
and fill the chilled tomatoes ; put a teaspoonful of dressing 
on each one, and place on lettuce leaves to serve. 

—M. IF. Mast. 

WALNUT SALAD 

One cup of walnuts, chopped fine, cut some celery and add 
to nuts. Pour over mayonnaise dressing, and place on let- 
tuce leaves. — Mrs. E. P. Dickinson. 

WALDORF SALAD 

One cupful chopped apples, one cupful chopped celery, 
half cupful of chopped walnuts ; mix with mayonnaise dress- 
ing and serve. 

SALAD DRESSING 

Half cupful of vinegar, one teaspoonful of sugar, a little 
salt and pepper, two eggs, butter size of walnut, three table- 
spoonfuls of sweet milk. Beat the yolks of the eggs, add 
the milk, then the seasoning, butter, then vinegar; set on 
stove; stir constantly, and as soon as it comes to a boil, re- 
move from stove ; add whites, beaten to a stiff froth. When 
cool, ready for use. — Mrs. T. R. Toomey. 

FRENCH DRESSING 

One tablespoonful of vinegar, three tablespoonfuls of 
olive oil, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth of a tea- 
spoonful of pepper or praprika. — Ivison. 



THE HOME ADVISER 107 

MAYONNAISE 
Beat yolk of one egg into the following: Half teaspoonful 
of salt, half teaspoonful of mustard, pinch of red pepper. 
Work into this four tablespoonfuls (or a gill) of oil, alternate 
with vinegar, using a few drops of each at a time. 

— Mrs. M. R. Fiiiuigan. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING 
Yolks of two eggs beaten, add salt and red pepper to 
taste, also a little mustard if desired; work in this drop by 
drop a half pint of olive oil, add last a little vinegar or lemon 
juice. If the dressing is too stiff thin with cream ; more 
oil may be added, according to the quantity of dressing re- 
quired. — Ivison. 

AUNT JANE'S COLE SLAW DRESSING 

Yolk of one tgg, a very small teaspoonful of mustard, one 
tablespoonful of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, two or 
three tablespoonfuls of vinegar, according to strength ; rub 
tgg. mustard and sugar together, melt butter in vinegar, stir 
all together, put on back of stove and stir until it thickens, 
then put away to cool ; add salt to taste and three table- 
spoonfuls of cream when ready to pour on cabbage. 

— Mrs. Van Ormer. 



io8 THE HOME ADVISER 



PICKLES, JELLIES, PRESERVES 



Always use cider vinegar for pickles, and if too strong 
dilute it or it may eat up the pickles. 

It is a much safer plan to have pickles tightly sealed to 
prevent the air from reaching- them. 

In makmg- brine for pickles, use coarse salt, and make 
strong enough to bear an egg. 

Scald the vineg'ar and ])our o\'er, put in bottles, seal while 
hot. 

Keep in a cool place, but always above the freezing point. 

Add a peck of grape leaves to half a barrel of pickles in 
brine to prevent from getting soft. 

Pickles may be clarified by adding a piece or two of horse- 
radish in each jar; this will sink to tire bottom, taking the 
scum with it. 

Alum helps to make pickles crisp ; horseradish and nastur- 
tium-seeds prevent the vinegar from becoming- mouldy. 

If pickles are kept in stone jars, invert a plate oxer them 
to keep them under the vinegar. 

In selecting" tomatoes for catsup be sure they are perfect, 
this is true of all of the ingredients to insure best results. 

To prevent mould from forming- on the top of catsup do 
not fill the bottles quite full with the catsup, then hll up with 
hot vinegar. 

After opening a bottle, if it commences to ferment before 
used scald it, if too thick a little vinegar may l)e added. 

All fruits may be canned with or without sugar. 

In canning fruits, the jars must be sterilized ; to be so they 
n-iust be thoroughly heated and the general directions for 
the canning of one will answer for all kinds of fruits, thus: 

Wash the fruit carefully, taking great care to discard all 
that is imperfect ; pack in clean jars, put on the rubbers and 
fill with cold water or cold syrup; lay on the lids, but do not 
fasten. Put a wooden or wire rack on the bottom of a wash 



THE HOME ADVISER 109 

boiler, stand in the jars, surround them half way up or a 
little more with cold water, put lid on boiler, boil rapidly the 
given time. Remove a jar at a time, screw lid on tightly 
without removing from jar. 

The fruit will keep whether the jar is full or not ; thus it 
ii*' best not to^ meddle w^ith the lid lest in some way the fruit 
may be contaminated. 

Small fruits, such as strawberries, etc., do not require 
water, but may be treated as directed above ; after reaching 
the boiling point the lids may be lifted and take the fruit of 
one jar or more to fill u]) with ; fasten lids, return to boiler 
and boil five minutes longer. 

Small fruits, such as berries, should be cooked about ten 
minutes at first and five minutes more after they have been 
refilled. ■ 

In making jelly, try to use the fruit before it is too ripe, if 
possible; it is not only a much better flavor, but the jelly is 
much easier made. 

The juice can be much easier extracted if the fruit is heat- 
ed gradually and not allowed to l)oil too much; the jelly will 
be much clearer by this method. 

Place the fruit in a jar, set jar in a vessel with water in and 
let the fruit cook in this manner until soft; place in a bag. 
let hang over night and drip. This process may seem slow, 
but it is sure; strain again to have perfectly clear. A flan- 
nel bag is the best for this second straining. 

The juice should be measured accurately as well as the 
sugar; let juice boil a few minutes while the sugar is heat- 
ing, which can be placed in a pan and put in oven. 

Never undertake to make jelly on a damp day; if the juice 
has been prepared the day previous, set it on the stove until 
heated through; it will keep and will require less cooking 
when made. 

After putting it into glasses set it in the sun to cool ; when 
perfectlv cold melt paraf^ne and pour over top. 



no THE HOME ADVISER 

CHOW CHOW. NO. 1 
Quarter of a peck of green tomatoes, one dozen peppers, 
four stalks of celery, one peck of small onions, three large, 
heads of caulitiower and one dozen of pickles ; cut all in small 
pieces, add one-quarter pound of yellow mustard, one-half 
ounce of tumeric, two quarts of cider vinegar, salt to taste ; 
let stand twelve hours ; then boil ten minutes and bottle. 

—Ivison. 

CHOW CHOW, NO. 2 

Four quarts of vinegar, one pint of little onions, two 
quarts each of lima beans, sweet corn, and string beans, two 
green peppers, one pound of brown sugar, one-half tea- 
spoonful or so of tumeric, one-quarter pound each of mus- 
tard-seed and ground mustard, two dozen of small cucum- 
bers and two tablespoonfuls of salt ; boil the corn and beans 
until tender, drain ; soak the onions, peppers and cucumbers 
over night in strong salt water ; mix tumeric and mustard 
v.-ith one pint of vinegar, then add to the remainder of the 
vinegar when nearly boiling; boil all together twenty min- 
utes. — Mrs. IVni. R. Jackson. 

CHOW CHOW, NO. 3 

Two heads of cabbage, four peppers, one pint of lima 
beans, two quarts of corn, three tablespoonfuls of whole 
m.ustard, one-half tablespoonful ground mustard, two table- 
spoonfuls celery-seed, two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, two 
cupfuls of white sugar; cook beans and corn, chop cabbage; 
salt and let drain before adding other ingredients ; boil two 
quarts of vinegar with the mustard, previously dissolved in 
a little vineg'ar; pour while hot, not l)oiling". over all. 

— Mrs. H. Tliornc. 

CHOW CHOW, NO. 4 

One peck of green tomatoes, one larg-e head of cabbage, 
four large onions. larg"e bunch of celery, twc^ red and th'"ee 
green peppers, one dozen small ears of corn, two pounds of 
sugar, two tablespoonfuls of yellow mustard-seed and one 
tablespoonful of celery-seed and one tablespoonful of ground 



THE HOME ADVISER in 

cinnamon; cut the tomatoes and cabbage, salt and let stand 
over night; drain, chop and add the other ingredients; cover 
\vith vinegar and boil slowly two hours. 

— Mrs. Clara E. Binklcy. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE 

Twelve green sour apples, two green peppers, six green 
tomatoes, four small onions, one cupful of raisins, one quart 
of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of mustard seed, two table- 
spoonfuls of salt, one tablespoonful of powdered sugar and 
two cupfuls of brown sugar. Remove the seeds from raisins 
and peppers, add tomatoes and onions, chop all fine; put 
vinegar, sugar and spices on to boil, add the chopped mix- 
ture ; simmer one hour, add apples, pared and cored, and 
cook slowlv until soft. Keep in small bottles well sealed. — C. 

BORDEAUX SAUCE 

One gallon of chopped cabbage, one gallon of sliced green 
tomatoes, one dozen onions, one ounce each of tumeric, cel- 
ery-seed, whole allspice, gTound ginger and whole cloves, 
one-quarter pound of white mustard-seed, one gill of salt, 
on€ and three-fourths pounds of sugar, one gallon vinegar ; 
boil all together twenty minutes. — Mrs. H. E. Russell. 

CHILI SAUCE 
Chop fine nine large ripe tomatoes, one green pepper and 
two onions, one cupful of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of 
sug'ar, one teaspoonful each of salt, cloves and celery-seed. 
Boil half an hour; bottle and seal. — Mrs. JViit. R. Jackson. 

SHIRLEY SAUCE 

One-half peck of ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped very 
fine, four green peppers chopped fine, and if desired four 
onions; mix and add six tablespoonfuls of sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls of salt, two tal)]espoonfuls of ground cloves, a lit- 
tle cayenne pepper and one pint of vinegar; boil slowly until 
thick enough, then Inittle. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

PICKLED CABBAGE 

Take one gallon of chopped cabbage, sprinkle with two 
heaping tablespoonfuls of salt ; let stand two hours, then 



112 THE HOME ADVISER 

mix with two gills of mustard-seed, one teaspoonful of all- 
spice, one-half pound of sugar, one tablespoonful of black 
pepper, one tablespoonful of cloves, one pint of chopped 
onions and two tablespoonfuls of celery-seed. Cover with 
good cider vinegar. — R. H. P. 

PEPPER CABBAGE 
Cut fine three small heads of caljbage. two s'^alks of cel- 
ery, one-half dozen pep])ers ; rub a handful of salt through 
the cabbage ; add celery and pep])ers and one pound of 
sugar; mix all well together and add one quart of vinegar. 

—Mrs. C. E. B. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE 

Three pints of ripe cucum1)ers, chop])ed size of chestnuts, 
four onions, chopped ; salt and drain over night ; place in 
earthen vessel and cover with vinegar ; boil until tender ; 
while boiling add one teaspoonful each of brown mustard 
seed, white mustard seed, celery seed, tumeric and corn- 
starch (the latter two dissolved in vinegar), a little black 
pepper; put in glass jars. — Mrs. H. E. Russell. 

CUCUMBER RELISH 

Chop fine three dozen of large cucumbers and four large 
onions, add three-fourths cupful of salt and drain over night ; 
then add one-half cupful of white mustard-seed, one-half 
cupful of black mustard-seed, two tal^lespoonfuls each of 
celery-seed and whole pepper. Pack in glass jars, cover with 
Ijoiled vinegar, cooled ; keep in a dark place. 

—Mrs. H. E. Russell. 

SOMETHING NICE PICKLE 

Remove the seeds of green tomatoes and cut into small 
])ieces to amount of six pounds; seed and cut fine five pep- 
l^ers, green and red ; two and one-half pounds of sugar, one 
(|uart of vinegar, a few drops each of oil of cloves and cin- 
namon. Boil all together one hour. — Mrs. J. C. Ha^i^cc 

HIGH TONED PICKLE 

One (juart of onions, one head of cabbage, one quart of 
lima beans (well cooked), four green peppers, one c|uart of 



THE HOME ADVISER T15 

corn (boiled), to cupfuls of sugar, mustard and celery-seed 
to suit taste, three tablespoonfuls of salt ; chop all fine, then 
pour over two quarts of vinegar. Cook five minutes, then 
bottle; seal while hot. — Mrs. J. P. Yot*ng. 

PEPPER HASH 

One small head of cabbage, chopped, one stalk of celery, 
one red or green sweet pepper, a pinch of red pepper, one 
good-sized tablespoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt 
and cold vinegar enough t(^ moisten it ; made just before 
serving. — Mrs. drier Hoskifis. 

PICKLED ONIONS 

Peel and boil small white onions in equal quantities of 
sweet milk and water, twelve or fifteen minutes. Drain and 
pour spiced vinegar, scalding hot, over them immediately. 
Do not use allspice, or they will be dark. 

TO CAN LITTLE PICKLES 

Make a brine to bear an egg, make boiling hot and pour 
over pickles, let stand a half day, then pack in jars. To' four 
quarts of vinegar add two cupfuls of granulated sugar, one 
ounce of mustard-seed, one ounce of cloves, tied in a cloth, 
a little cayenne pepper and alum size of walnut. Heat to 
boiling, set jars in pan of hot water and pour over. 

—Mrs. C. E. Binkley. 

TOMATO CATSUP, NO. 1 

One-half bushel tomatoes, one-half cupful of salt, two 
ounces of cloves tied in, a cloth, one-fourth pound of whole 
black pepper, one-half ounce cayenne pepper, ten onions, 
two pounds of brown sugar, one handful of peach leaves; 
boil all together three hours, stirring to keep from burning ; 
when cool strain through a fine sieve, then add one quart of 
vinegar and boil one hour more. — Mrs. C. E. Binkiey. 
TOMATO CATSUP, NO. 2 

One peck of ripe tomatoes, one teaspoonful of fine salt, 
one-half teaspoonful of ground black pepper, two table- 
spoonfuls each of cloves and allspice, two large red peppers 



114 THE HOME ADVISER 

chopped fine, four onions, one-half cupful of celery-seed, 
one-half pound of brown sug"ar ; .peel tomatoes and boil all, 
except celery-seed, an hour or more in a porcelain kettle, 
then press through a sieve ; add celery-seed, boil half an hour 
longer; add one quart of good vinegar, let come to boil; 
bottle and seal while hot. — Ivison. 

TOMATO CATSUP. NO. 3 

One can of tomatoes, boil and strain; add one-half cupful 
of sugar, one cupful of vinegar, pne-half teaspoonful of salt, 
the same of cayenne pepper and one tablespoonful each of 
cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; boil anjiour; bottle. If juice 
is saved from canning tomatoes a quart can of this may be 
substituted for the can of tomatoes. — C. 

COLD CATSUP 

One-half peck of ripe tomatoes, chop fine and drain, two 
peppers, two cupfuls of celery, chopped, two cupfuls of on- 
ions, chopped, one tablespoonful of pepper, twO' tablcspoon- 
frls of salt, one cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of mus- 
tard-seed, two tablespoonfuls of horseradish, one quart of 
vinegar; mix all together; put in air-tight jars. — Airs. George. 

GRAPE CATSUP 

Stew five pounds of grapes (Concord preferred) until soft, 
then press through a sieve ; add two and one-half pounds of 
sugar, one tablespoonful each of cinnamon, allspice, cloves 
and pepper, half tablespoonful of salt and one cupful of vine- 
gar. Boil until thick, then bottle. An excellent sauce for 
cold meats. — A Member. 

ELDERBERRY JELLY 
Pick l)erries from the stems, wash well, put into porcelain 
lined kettle, add a little water, about a pint to four quarts 
of berries, cover and cook slowly until juice is well extracted ; 
strain twice ; put juice into kettle and cook twenty minutes ; 
add a third as much apple or grape juice, preferably apple, 
prepared as for jelly, and let stand over night. To' every 
pint of juice allow one pint of granulated sugar; add sugar 



THE HOME ADVISER 115 

after juice has once more come to a boil. Boil two pints in 
kettle and cook rapidly until it jellies when tested. 

MRS. THORNES CURRANT JELLY 

Cover currants with water, cook until soft, strain, mea- 
sure to one pint of juice, take the same of sugar; put juice 
on stove, bring to the boiling point, heat sugar until hot in 
oven, and dissolve in the juice and pour in glasses. 

CRANBERRY JELLY 

One quart of fresh, firm cranberries, a generous pint of 
water and pound of sugar; cook all together, in a porcelain 
kettle ; five minutes after they start to boil, press through a 
sieve and return to the stove and let come to a boil ; turn 
into molds. — "Miriam." 

JELLIED CRANBERRIES 

One quart of berries, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, 
one cupful of water; boil berries in water until soft, press 
through a sieve, add sugar; boil ten minutes. 

— Mrs. Wm. Fritz Russell. 

LEMON BUTTER 

Two fresh lemons, remove seeds, grate, quarter pound 
butter, one pound of sugar, two well-beaten eggs; mix to- 
gether and let come to a boil. — Mrs. E. L. Branson. 

LEMON BUTTER 

Juice of three lemons, two and one-half cupfuls of sugar, 

one-half cupful of cold water, one tablespoonful of butter, 

four eggs, well beaten ; put all together in a farina kettle 

and boil about three minutes, stirring constantly. — Gordon. 

RHUBARB, CANNED 

Slice, pack in jars, fill up with cold sterilized water; fasten, 
keep until ready for use. This requires no cooking, con- 
taining sufficient oxalic acid to preserve itself without. 

GINGER PEARS 

Four pounds of pears, sliced thin, four pounds of granu- 
lated sugar, two ounces of green ginger root, two lemons 
sliced thin, three-fourths of a pint of water ; soak ginger root 



Il6 THE HOME ADVISER 

in water, scrape, put in cloth, pound until it shreds, then add 
pears ; cook one hour. — Mrs. W. R. Hughes. 

SPICED PEARS 

Five pounds of pears, two pounds of sugar, one pint of 
vinegar; melt sugar in vinegar and cook about ten minutes; 
following day, boil syrup down, add fruit, cinnamon bark, 
mace and cloves. — Mrs. IV. R. Hughes. 

EUCHRED PEACHES 

Three pounds of whole peaches, one and one-half pounds 
of granulated sugar, one glassful of cold water, one glassful 
of vinegar ; mix sugar, water and vinegar ; let come to a boil ; 
put peaches in syrup, let boil until soft, take out peaches, 
place in jars and boil syrup until thick, then pour over 
peaches. 

GRAPE CONSERVE 

Pulp three pounds of grapes, boil skins and pulp separ- 
ately; mash pulp through colander, add to skins, then add 
three pounds of sugar, boil twenty minutes, then add chop- 
ped nuts, either English or black walnuts. — Ivison. 

GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADE 

One large grapefruit, one large orange and one large 
lemon ; wash and chop fine, using all but the seeds ; soak in 
an equal amount of water twenty-four hours ; boil ten min- 
utes, let stand another twenty-four hours. Measure, bring 
to the boiling point, and add an equal amount of sugar. 
Cook about half an hour or until it jellies. 
EUCHARED CHERRIES 

Remove seeds from red sour cherries, cover with vinegar, 
let stand two or three days, drain off vinegar and add to the 
cherries their weight in sugar; let stand again nine days, 
stirring each day until sugar is dissolved, when they are 
ready for use. Do not cook. Tlie vinegar may be used for 
making cherry vinegar. 

PINEAPPLE MARMALADE 

One quart of pineapple, one pint of water and three pints 
of sugar; grate the pineapple, then boil all together to de- 
sired consistency. — Mrs. Van Ormer. 



THE HOME ADVISER 117 

QUINCE HONEY 

Two cupfuls of grated quinces, one quart of water, three 
pounds of sugar; boil quinces and water three minutes; add 
sugar and boil fifteen minutes or until stiff as desired. 

— Mrs. Rodney Mart in. 

SEEDLESS JAM 

To one box of currants take two boxes of red raspberries; 
cook until soft, in water, then press through a sieve ; cook a 
few minutes and use an equal quantity of heated sugar ; boil 
until stiff. Gooseberries may be substituted for currants. 
Pour into glasses and when cold cover with paraffine. 

CANNED PEACHES 

Pare your peaches and pack as tightly as possible in jars; 
to every quart jar of peaches ahow one cupful of sugar and 
one pint of water; let this boil and then pour while warm 
over peaches ; put the lid on tight ; when all are ready, place 
in the bottom of a wash boiler, racks on which to set the jars 
of peaches, cover with cold water to rim of jars; place on 
boiler lid and let boil twenty minutes after reaching boiling 
point; lift boiler from stove and allow jars to remain in the 
water until it has entirely cooled. — Gordon. 

SPICED PEACHES OR PEARS 

Seven pounds of fruit, five pounds of sugar, three-fourths 
pint of vinegar, one-eighth ounce of mace, one-fourth ounce 
each of cinnamon and cloves ; put the spices in a bag and 
pound them; boil sugar, spices and vinegar together, pour 
over fruit, let stand twenty-four hours; then boil syrup and 
fruit together, until fruit is tender ; let stand another twenty- 
four hours, then pour off syrup and boil until thick and rich, 
then pour over fruit and put in stone jars. — Georgia. 

APPLE BUTTER 

Three gallons of cooked apples, one quart of cider vinegar 
and five pounds of brown sugar. Boil this down to about 
two gallons and season Avith cinnamon or any spice desired. 



Ii8 THE HOME ADVISER 

STRAWBERIES OR CHERRIES, PRESERVED IN THE SUN 

To each pound of fruit add one pound of sug'ar, melt 
sugar, let come to a boil, add the berries and let boil three 
minutes; spread on large platters, cover with glass and put 
in sun for three days ; put in jars. Raspberries may be done 
in same way. — Gordon. 



THE HOME ADVISER iiq 



CANDY 

In making candy the state of the weather is to be consid- 
ered, as this work should not be undertaken on a damp or 
rainy day, as it retains the dampness and will be sticky. To 
obtain best results, the weather should be clear, and the 
room free from steam or boiling- water. 

Candy should not be stirred while boiling; stir only until 
the sugar melts. Cream of tartar should not be added until 
syrup begins to boil. 

The proper time to add the butter is shortly before remov- 
ii:g from the fire, unless otherwise designated in the instruc- 
tions.- 

The flavoring should not be boiled, but stirred in, the last 
thing before pouring out to cool. 

BOILED FONDANT 

Two cupfuls granulated sugar, one-half cupful of cold 
water, one-fourth teaspoonful of cream of tartar; stir all to- 
gether until partly dissolved ; boil until it forms a soft ball in 
cold water, boil about three minutes ; set aside to cool about 
half an hour; stir until it gets creamy; add flavor and make 
at once into desired shapes. — -Gordon. 

UNCOOKED FONDANT 

Break into a bowl the whites of two eggs ; add to them an 
equal quantity of cold water; stir into it (do not beat) con- 
fectioners' sugar until it is stiff enough to mold into shape 
with the fingers. Use any flavoring desired ; form into balls, 
cones, or any desirable shape; put on waxed paper or but- 
tered plates to dry. The cones can be dipped into melted 
chocolate for cream chocolates. English walnuts, pressed 
on either side of the balls, for cream walnuts, etc. 

BUTTER SCOTCH 

One cupful sugar, one-fourth cupful molasses, one table- 
spoonful vinegar, two tablespoonfuls boiling water, and one- 



120 THE HOME ADVISER 

half cupful butter ; boil all together until when tried in cold 
water mixture will become brittle ; turn into a buttered pan 
and when slightly cool mark into squares. A small piece of 
vanilla bean cooked with the ingredients is an improve- 
ment. — M. 

BUTTER SCOTCH 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of water, piece 
of butter size of an egg; boil, without stirring, until it hard- 
ens on a spoon ; pour out on buttered plates to cool. — C.E.B. 

CARAMELS 

One pound of brown sugar, one-half cake of chocolate, 
one cupful of milk, one-half cupful of molasses, one-half cup- 
ful of butter, one teaspoonful of vanilla; cook until it hard- 
ens in cold water. — Mrs. S. IV. Finnigan. 

EASY CARAMELS 

Use equal quantities of milk, sugar, molasses and choco- 
late, with a generous piece of butter; boil half an hour and 
pour on buttered plates; mark off in squares. 

— Mrs. H. Taggarf. 

CREAM TAFFY 

Three cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of water, one-half 
cupful of vinegar ; stir before placing on stove, but not after ; 
vdien partly done add three teaspoonfuls butter; just before 
taking from stove stir in half teaspoonful of soda dissolved 
in a few drops of hot water; when cool enough to handle, 
pull until white. — Mrs. W. J. Landis. 

CREAM CANDY 

Two cupfuls of granulated sugar, three-fourths cupful of 
cold water, dessertspoonful of vinegar ; boil all together until 
it breaks in cold water, (do not stir), pour on buttered plate; 
as soon as cool enough to handle, butter the hands and pull 
until white and creamy, flavor while pulling. — Miss Banks. 

CREAMED DATES 

One^pound of confectioners' sugar, white of one tgg, one- 
half egg shell of water, fresh grated cocoanut ; flavor with 



THE HOME ADVISER 121 

vanilla or orange; mix thoroughly; remove seeds of nice 
<iate5, fill with the cream and roll in granulated sugar. 

— Mrs. Shaiuline. 

PARISIAN CREAMS 
]\lake the uncooked fondant ; divide into three equal parts ; 
leave the one white, color one by mixing a little grated cho- 
colate or cocoa ; the third color with a little cranberry juice, 
or any kind of fruit juice to give a pink color; roll each color 
out separately, and lay one on top of each other, the pink in 
the middle; press together and cut out in squares or dia- 
monds. 

FUDGE, NO. 1 

One and one-half pounds of pulverized sugar, one-half 
^•ake of chocolate, one cupful of cream, butter the size of a 
walnut, one-quarter teaspoonful of vanilla ; stir constantly ; 
boil until soft mass when dropped in water; beat with an 
egg-beater until nearly cold, then pour into a pan, and when 
cool enough cut in squares. — C. E. B. 

FUDGE, NO. 2 

One pound of brown, or two cupfuls of granulated sugar, 
three-fourths cupful of milk, one-half cake of grated choco- 
late or one cupful of cocoa, butter the size of an e^gg, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla; stir all the time while cooking; let 
cook until it will congeal in cold water; beat until flaky; put 
in shallow buttered pan. — Mrs. S. W. Finnigan. 

COCOANUT FUDGE 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one-half cupful of milk, two 
ounces of butter, one-half teaspoonful of flavoring extract, 
one cupful of shredded cocoanut; put sugar and milk over 
fire to boiling- point, add butter and cook until it nearly 
strings ; take from fire, add extract and cocoanut, and stir 
until it snaps; pour into buttered tin, cool and cut into 
squares. -^Mrs. Charles Jones. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE 

Three squares of chocolate, three cupfuls of sugar, one 
c<nd one-half cu])fuls of milk, 1)iitter si;^e of an tgcr; cook 



122 THE HOME ADVISER 

until quite thick; drop a small quantity in cold water; if it 
can be rolled between the fingers without sticking, remove 
from fire and beat until very thick ; pour onto buttered tins. 

—Mrs. F. H. Holland. 

SULTANA FUDGE 

Melt one-fourth cupful of butter and stir into it two cup- 
fuls of sugar, one-fourth cupful of molasses, one-half cupful 
of milk; boil four minutes, stir in two squares of unsweet- 
ened chocolate scraped fine ; boil four minutes, add one-half 
of a teaspoonful of flavoring extract; remove from fire and 
beat until it will spread ; stir in two-thirds cupful of chopped 
English walnuts and one-third cupful of Sultana raisins; pour 
in buttered tin, cool and cut in squares. — Mrs. Charles Jones. 

SEA FOAM FUDGE 

One and one-half pounds of brown sugar, one-fourth cup- 
ful of boiling water, whites of two eggs and one cupful of 
pecan nuts ; boil sugar until it hairs, then pour into the well- 
beaten whites, whip well, add the nuts, pour into tins ; cut 
ii.'to squares when cool. — Mrs. Alcna K. Moss. 

SEA FOAM 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of hot water, one- 
half cupful of table syrup, whites of two eggs, one cupful of 
chopped nuts, teaspoonful of vanilla ; dissolve sugar in hot 
water, then add syrup, boil all together until a little will 
harden in cold water; pour this boiling syrup a little at a 
time on the stiffly-beaten whites, beating all the time; add 
the nuts, then vanilla, beat until a little dropped on a plate 
will shape, then drop by small spoonfuls on platter. 

—Mrs. M. A. Woodward. 

MORAVIAN MINT CAKES 
One pound of confectioners' sugar, one large tablespoon- 
ful of boiling water; mix sugar and water, and boil twelve 
seconds; add twelve drops of pepper-mint; pour out quick- 
ly on plates. — Mrs. H. Kanifman, Litits. 



THE HOME ADVISER 123 

MOLASSES CANDY 

One cupful of molasses, one cupful of granulated sugar, 
one tablespoonful of butter ; flavor with vanilla ; cook until it 
hardens in water; dissolve a pinch of soda in a little vinegar, 
stir in ; pour on a well-buttered plate. Peanuts or walnuts 
may be added to this for a change. — Mrs. JV. R. Hughes. 

PEANUT CANDY 

Take one pound of granulated sugar, and stir constantly 
over a hot fire ; when melted, add a pint of rolled peanuts. 
Mix and roll out, or pour into a well-greased pan ; cut into 
squares when cold ; break apart for a peanut brittle. 

PEANUT CANDY, CLEAR 

Five-eighths cupful of vinegar, one-fourth cupful of water, 
one pound of granulated sugar ; boil until brittle ; flavor with 
vanilla ; pour over peanuts. 

PEANUT BRITTLE 

Take one cupful of New Orleans molasses, and one and 
one-half cupfuls of granulated sugar; boil until hard when 
dropped in cold water; add butter size of walnut, and a pinch 
of soda ; stir thoroughly, and pour over a pint of hulled pea- 
nuts, in buttered pan. — Mrs. Shainline. 

COUGH CANDY 

Soak a gill of whole flaxseed in half pint of boiling water ; 
in another dish put a cupful of broken bits of slippery-elm; 
cover this also with boiling water; let stand for two hours; 
strain both through a muslin cloth, into a saucepan contain- 
ing one and one-half pounds of granulated sugar ; extract all 
liquor possible; boil until it turns candy; pour out on greas- 
ed platter. The juice of two lemons may be added to im- 
prove taste. 



124 THE HOME ADVISER 



MISCELLANEOUS 



UNFERMENTED GRAPE JUICE 

To ten pounds of Concord grapes use one and one-half 
pounds of granulated sugar and one, pint of water; boil 
grapes until soft, strain, return juice to kettle, add sugar, let 
come to a boil, put up air-tight. — Airs. C. E. Binkley. 

RED RASPBERRY VINEGAR 

Six quarts of raspberries, add two quarts of vinegar; let 
stand for three or four days, then press and strain ; to every 
pint of juice add one pound of white sugar ; boil twenty min- 
utes, skim well and bottle. — Ivispn. 

CHERRY VINEGAR 
Six quarts of cherries, mashed in one quart of vinegar, let 
stand three days, then press the juice through a jelly bag ; to 
one pint of juice add three-quarters of a pound of sugar. 
Boil ten or fifteen minutes, skim and bottle. — Ivison. 

ICED TEA 

For this use a mixture of black and green tea. Make the 

Hjfusion rather strong and a little over sweet; when cold 

freeze to the consistency of soft snow. Serve in sherbet 
glasses. ■ — C/. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES 

Yolk of one hard-boiled egg, one-half cupful of grated 
cheese, salt and pepper to suit the taste, two tablespoonfuls 
salad dressing; mash yolk of egg and cheese into a paste 
before adding to the dressing. Spread between wafers. 

— Weaver. 

NUT SANDWICHES 

Mix one cupful of finely chopped peanuts, one cupful of 
chopped walnut meats, with two heaping teaspoonfuls of 
rnavonnaise dressing, v'^pread l)etween 1)uttered slices of 
l>'()wn bread --M. C. Uu^hes. 



THE HOME ADVISER 125 

STRAWBBERRY OR RASPBERRY COCKTAIL 

Slice some large fresh berries and set on ice to get cold, 
put in glasses and pour over them a mixture of one table- 
spoonful of orange juice and a tablespoonful of sugar. 

—M. W. M. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS 

For the dressing use a tablespoonful each of horseradish^ 
vinegar, tomato catsup and Worcestershire sauce, a salt- 
spoonful of salt and one-half teaspoonful of tobasco sauce ; 
chill on ice. Sufficient for twenty o}'sters. — M. IV. M. 

BANANA FRITTERS 

Three-fourths of a cupful of milk, one o-gg, flour enough 
to make a thin batter; cut banana in two. lengthwise; dip in 
batter, fry in hot fat; sprinkle with pulverized sugar and 
serve while hot. — Gordon. 



126 THE HOME ADVISER 



INVALID COOKERY 



That well-prepared foods are essential to the invalid's 
care, is unquestionable. All materials used must be of the 
best quality, as this is absolutely necessary. The amount 
and kind of food should be prescribed by the physician, but 
in all probability he will have no idea of the recipes to be 
used, but with a little knowledge and a good deal of care is 
all that is necessary to avoid any mistakes. 

After quality, quantity is to be considered. If it can be 
managed, it is a better plan to cook only enough for one 
serving, unless it is some material which will not suffer if 
kept over or to be served later on ; thus in making broths 
if the convenience of keeping will permit, etc. Often a small 
quantity of food daintily served stimulates the appetite, but 
if too much is set before the patient it has quite the opposite 
effect — thus it is better to serve twice than to risk to large 
a quantity at first. 

Pastry, rich preserves and cakes, fried or greasy foods 
should never be served to invalids. 

Buttered toast is rarely admissable, as all melted oils are 
difificult of digestion. 

Neither tea nor coffee should be given to a patient with- 
out the doctor's consent or instructions. 

BEEF TEA 

One pound of lean beef, cut very small and put into a wide 
mouthed bottle or fruit jar, cork tight and set into a kettle 
of water and keep boiling two hours ; strain the liquor and 
season. Chicken can be prepared in the same way. 

RAW BEEF TEA 

Only a small quantity of this should be made at a time, as 
it sours quickly. Take one ounce of beef at a time and as 
soon as one cupful is used prepare the next. Take beef 
from top part of tlie round, cut across the grain, shred down 



THE HOME ADVISER 127 

with a knife. For each ounce allow two tablespoonfuls of 
cold water. Let soak fifteen minutes, then the water will be 
colored with the juice. This should be given cold; it may 
be warmed, but on no account should it boil, for this de- 
stroys the albimien. 

BARLEY GRUEL 

Boil barley three or four hours in plenty of water, when 
the water is white and glutinous strain ; add a little loaf 
sugar and a very little salt. Very nourishing and good for 
infants. 

Pour boiling water on a fresh egg in a tea cup, cover with 
a saucer. This plan prevents the coagulation of the white 
and is very deHcate. 

DRIED FLOUR 

Tie one cupful of tiour in a bag and boil three or four 
hours in water, adding more when necessary. Take out, dry 
and remove the outer skin and grate ; when perfectly dry it 
is ready for use. This is used J:o thicken milk. Wet the 
floui^ with cold water, stir into the hot milk, boil five min- 
utes, add salt to taste. Especially g-ood for children suffer- 
ing- with summer complaint. 

BAKED MILK 

Put two quarts of milk in a crock, cover and tie down with 
v/riting paper; let stand in a moderate oven from eight to 
ten hours, when it will then be like cream, the water of the 
milk having been evaporated. This is excellent for con- 
sumptives and invalids generally. 

CHICKEN BROTH 

Cut up a chicken, an old one ])referred, and place in an 
agate kettle with two quarts of water, one onion, two table- 
spoonfuls of rice and salt ; boil two hours and strain. 

CLAM BROTH 

Twelve small, hard-shell clams, drain and chop fine, add 
one-half pint of clam juice or hot water, pinch of cayenne 
pepper and butter the size of a walnut ; cook slowly for half 
an hour, then add one gill of hot milk ; let boil, strain and 
serve. An excellent broth for a weak stomach. 



128 THE HOME ADVISER 

FLAXSEED LEMONADE 

One c(uart of boiling water poured on four tablespoonfuls 
of whole flaxseed, juice only of two lemons, sweetened to 
taste; steep three hours in a covered pitcher. If too thick 
put in cold water with the lemon juice and sugar. Good for 
colds. 

FRESH BUTTERMILK 

Is an excellent drink for kidney trouble and a weak 
stomach. 

HOP TEA 

Simmer one tablespoon-ful of hops in one i)int of water, 
until strong, strain and add sugar to suit the taste. 

INFANT'S FOOD 

Twenty grains of Coxe's gelatine, soaked in a little water 
to dissolve it, one teaspoonful of arrowroot dissolved in a 
little milk; stir gelatine into a quart of water, then arrow- 
root, add one pint of milk ; let come to a boil, then add three 
teaspoonfuls of sugar. — Mrs. f. H . Holland. 

JELLY WATER 

One large teaspoonful of currant or cranberry jelly in a 
goblet of ice water, beat well; for fever patients. Black- 
berry or wild cherrv prepared in the same way is used for 
summer complaint. 

KOUMISS 

One Cjuart of buttermilk, two quarts of sweet milk, four 
teaspoonfuls of sugar ; mix buttermilk and sweet milk to- 
gether, add sugar, stir until melted, let stand near fire cov- 
ered with a cloth twelve hours, then bottle, tie cord down 
and keep bottles on sides ; use as soon as opened. 

LIME WATER 

Pour two quarts of hot water over fresh unslaked lime, 
size of an ^gg; let stand, when clear bottle. Used with milk 
to neutralize acidity of the stomach. 

MUTTON BROTH 

Put four pounds of mutton (not lamb), neck piece pre- 
ferred, in cold water enough to cover; simmer (not boil) 



THE HOME ADVISER 129 

nearly all day, or until the meat is in shreds; strain, place 
liquor in ice box over night; carefully remove all grease; 
keep on ice and when required for use take one tablespoon- 
ful to one-half cupful of boiling water, salt to taste before 
serving. This is excellent for those suffering from dysen- 
teric troubles. 

MULLIED JELLY 

One tablespoonful of currant or grape jelly, beat with it 
the white of one egg and a little loaf sugar; pour on this 
one-half pint of boiling water, break in a slice of dry toast 
or two crackers.. 

OYSTER TOAST 

Toast nice slices of dry bread, butter and lay on hot dish; 
put in a granite basin six oysters, one-half teacupful of their 
own liquor and one-half cupful of milk ; boil one minute, sea- 
son, pour over toast and serve. 

RICE JELLY 

Mix one heaping tablespoonful of rice flour with cold 
Vv-ater until it is a smooth paste, add a scant pint of boiling 
water, sweeten with loaf sugar ; boil until quite clear. If in- 
tended for a patient with fever, flavor with lemon juice and 
mold. Rice water is made in the same manner by using 
twice the quantity of boiling water. 

SOUP FOR INVALIDS 

Boil two pounds of lean veal, onc-cfuarter pound of pearl 
barley in one quart of water very slowly until it becomes the 
consistency of cream ; press through a sieve, add salt to 
taste, flavor with celery seed, or use fresh celery in season. 
A small quantity will suffice. This soup is very nourishing. 

— Mrs. L. Shoinliiir. 

TOAST 

Cut thin slices of bread into strips, toast evenly without 
breaking and serve immediately on a hot plate, slightly but- 
tered, if admissable. This may also be served with the juice 
from roast beef or mutton poured over, or milk may lie 
scalded and poured over. 



130 THE HOME ADVISER 

TOAST WATER 
Two slices of stale bread toasted brown on both sides; cut 
in pieces and pour on one pint of boiling water; let cool. It 
may be sweetened or flavored if desired. 

TAPIOCA CUP PUDDING 

An even teaspoonful of tapioca soaked nearly two hours 
in almost a cupful of new milk ; stir into this the yolk of a 
fresh egg, a little sugar and a grain of salt ; bake in a cup 
for fifteen minutes. A little jelly may be eaten with it. Very 
delicate for invalids. 



THE HOME ADVISER 131 



HOUSEHOLD HELPS 



TO SWEETEN RANCID LARD 

Boil a potato in it until the potato is tender. 

STOVE LINING 

To common potter baker's clay add one-sixth its bulk of 
calcined plaster and about the same quantity of wood ashes; 
niix all together with water until thick cement is made ; 
plaster thickly where back lining is needed and let it dry. 
Fire may be made in a few hours. If there are cracks in a 
day or two, fill them with a little cement made in the same 
way, and a durable brick lining to your stove will be the 
result. 

PREPARATION FOR CLEANING CARPET ON THE FLOOR 

Ten ounces of sal soda, four ounces of borax, eight ounces 
of Fuller's earth, one cake of Ivory soap dissolved ; mix all 
together, add four gallons of hot water ; shave the soap and 
put to dissolve the night before in a little hot water. When 
cold, ready for use. Scrub carpet hard, scrape and rinse with 
hot water. — Mrs. Rodney Martin. 

FURNITURE POLISH 

Mix together two parts crude oil and one of turpentine, 
one tablespoonful of salt to the gallon ; rub in well with soft 
llannel ; cover to exclude the dust, and three hours later pol- 
ish with soft chamois skin. 

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM MARBLE 

Make a paste with vinegar and whitening, spread over the 
surface and let remain for twenty-four hours, When rubbed 
off the stains will have disappeared. 

TO REMOVE RUST FROM STEEL 
Rub with sweet oil, sprinkle with fresh slaked lime while 
it is warm ; let stand for two days, then rub off and polish 
with dry powdered and slaked lime. 



132 THE HOME ADVISER 

TO REMOVE MACHINE OIL 

When black machine oil gQts upon cloth, rub it with lard : 
let stand for a few minutes, then wash with cold water and 
soap. 

TO WASH STRAW MATTING 

Wash with a cloth dipped in salt and water, then dry 

quickly. 

TO TAKE OUT MILDEW 

Wet the cloth and rub on soap and chalk, mixed together, 
and lay in the sun ; or lay the cloth in buttermilk for a short 
time, exposed to hot sun ; or use lemon juice and treat in 
same way. 

TO PREVENT FREEZING 

When hanging out clothes during the freezing weather, 
try putting a handful of salt in the last rinsing- water, and 
the clothes will not freeze until after they are hung on the 
line. They are also easier to remove from the line. 

— Housekeeper. 

TO REMOVE MOLD IN CELLARS 

Unslaked lime is best for this purpose ; it is blown in the 
shape of a fine powder on the walls of the cellar and into 
the crevices ]:)y means of bellows, or may be thrown on .with 
the hand. If the walls are dry they should be well moistened 
previously. The lime slakes with the adhering water and 
kills all org"anisms. In a day or two the w'alls may be washed 
off, and as experience has proved, the cellar will remain free 
from mold for at least two years. — 6". A. 

TO CLEAN STOVE PIPE 

A piece of zinc put on the live coals in the sto\'e will clean 
soot out of the pipe. 



INDEX 



SOUPS. 

I'afte 

Aspaiapis Soup 5 

t'roain Soup <5 

Cieaiii of Cliickfii Simp '' 

Mock Turtle or t'alf'^ llca.l SoU). (> 

Ndocllo Soup '' 

Oj-stcr Soup (i 

Oyster Soup for Four 7 

Pea Soup " 

Potato Soup, No. 1 "i 

Potato Soup, No. 2 " 

Soup Stock " 

.Tripe Soup ^ 

Tomato Soup, No 1 8 

Tomato Soup, No. 2 S 

A'egetable Soup 8 

Egg Dumplings for Soup 8 

Forcemeat Balls for Soup 9 

Egg Dumplings 9 

FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Kite's Clam Chowder 10 

Deviled Clams, No. 1 10 

Deviled Clams, No. 2 H 

Clam Fritters H 

Baked Fish H 

Boiled Fish H 

Fish Cakes il 

Oyster Pie 1'' 

Creamed Oyster Recipe for Chafing Dfsh. 12 

( )yster Croquettes 12 

Oyster Stew l'^ 

Oyster or Clam Fritters 13 

Scalloped Oysters 13 

Macaroni and Oysters 13 

Oyster Salad 13 

Pigs in Blanket 13 

Broiled Oysters 14 

Deviletl Oysters 11 

Fried Oysters H 

Creamed Oysters ll 

Cream Salmon 11 

Salmon Salad 1'5 

Salmon Croquettes 11 

Salmon Croquettes 11 

MEATS. 

Creamed Beef 1^ 

Baked Beefsteak IJ 

Veal or Beef Roast 1" 

French Beet Stew 1^ 

Broiled Beefsteak 1" 

Stuffed Steak 18 

Fried Beefsteak 18 

Meat Croquettes 18 

Meat Hash on Toast 18 

Boiled Ham 18 

Baked Ham 1'-' 

Deviled Ham I*' 

Ham Toast 19 

Ham and Potato Croq\iettes 19 

Baked I.iver 1^ 

Italian Cheese -0 

Pig-s Feet 20 

Browned Fricassee of Sheep Timgues 20 

C.erman Sweetbreads 20 

Fried Sweetbread 21 

Breaded Veal Cutlet 21 

Blanquette of Veal 21 

Veal Loaf, No. 1 21 



Page 

Veal Loaf, No. 2 22 

Veal with Dumplings 22 

Veal Loaf 22 

POULTRY AND OAMK. 

Chicken or Meat Croquettes 2:! 

Deviled Chicken 2;! 

Fried Chicken 24 

Chicken Pie 21 

Roast Turkey with Oysters 24 

Chicken or A'eal Croquettes 24 

Potato Filling for Fowls 24 

To ( ^ook Rabl)it or Squirrel 25 

VEGETABLES. 

Asparagus Omelet 27 

Bean Polenta 27 

Bean Salad 27 

Baked Beans 27 

Boston Baked Beans 27 

Lima Beans 2S 

Canned Beets 28 

Baked Beets 28 

Cole-Slaw, No. 1 28 

Cole-Slaw, No. 2 28 

Sauer Kraut 29 

To Cook S;iuer Kraut 29 

Cauliflower 29 

Corn Pudding 29 

Corn Fritters, No. 1 29 

Corn Fritters, No. 2 29 

Corn Pudding, No. 1 30 

Corn Pudding, No. 2 30 

Carrots Stewed 3u 

Stewed Celery 30 

Dutched Lettuce 30 

Wilted Dandelions 30 

Fried Eggplant 31 

Creamed Onions on Toast 31 

Peas Stewed with Meat 31 

Fried Potatoes with Cheese '.il 

Creamed Potatoes 31 

Potatoes with Gravy 32 

Boulets •. 32 

Baked Potatoes 32 

Potato Salad, No. 1 32 

Potato Salad (French) No. 2 32 

Potatoes au Gratin 32 

Escalloped Sweet Potatoes 33 

Scalloped Potatoes 33 

Potato Puff 33 

Potato Croquettes 33 

Saratoga Cliips 33 

Potato Fritters 33 

Potatoes and Bacon 34 

Creamed Sweet Potatoes 34 

Sweet Potato Croquettes, No. 1 34 

Sweet Potato Croquettes, No. 2 34 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes 34 

Esca Hoped Potatoes 85 

To Cook Spinach 35 

Succotash 35 

Escalloped Turnips .35 

Cream Tomato 35 

Stuffed and Baked Tomatoes .35 

Tomato Fritters 36 

Jellied Tomato 30 

Tomato Dressing, No. 1 36 

Tomato Dressing, No. 2 36 



EGGS, BREAKFAST AND TEA DISHES. 

Page 

Kgg Croquettes, No. 1 38 

Egg Croquettes, No. 2 38 

Scrambled Eggs, No. 1 38 

Seranibled Eggs, No. 2 38 

Deviled Eggs 38 

Fried Eggs, with Ham 39 

Omelet, No. 1 39 

Omelet, No. 2 39 

Ham Omelet 39 

Apple Omelet 39 

Cheese Omelet 40 

Cheese Pudding 40 

Cheese Fondu 40 

Hash Cakes 40 

French Rarebit 41 

Rarebit 41 

Rice Pone 41 

Rice Croquettes 41 

Rice and Meat Croquettes 41 

Rice Griddle Cakes 42 

Rice and Cheese 42 

Rice 42 

Stale Break Griddle Cakes 42 

Potato Drop Cakes 42 

Flannel Cakes 42 

Buckwheat Cakes 43 

Cornmeal Pancakes 43 

Bread and Milk Pancakes 43 

Quick Waffles 43 

Corn Pone, No. 1 43 

Corn Pone, No. 2 43 

Apple Fritters 44 

Souffle 44 

BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 

Biread 46 

Rye Bread 46 

Whole Wheat Bread 46 

Graham Bread, No.' 1 47 

Graham Bread, No. 2 47 

Boston Brown Bread 47 

Boston Brown Bread 47 

Mush • Bread 47 

Saratoga Bread 48 

Corn Bread, No. 1 48 

Corn Bread, No. 2 48 

Biscuit 48 

Little Tea Biscuit 48 

Maryland Biscuit 49 

Whole Wheat Flour Biscuit 49 

Potato Biscuit, No. 1 49 

Potato Biscuit, No. 2 49 

Parker House Rolls 50 

Crescent Rolls 50 

Graham Gems 50 

Graham Crackers .■)i1 

Plain Buns .')! 

"Water Gap House" Muffins 51 

Muffins 51 

Popovers 51 

Rusk 51 

Cinnam( m Buns 52 

Moravian Sugar Cakes 52 

Cheese Straws 52 

PIES, PUDDINGS, ETC. 

Pie Crust, No. 1 64 

Pie Crust, No. 2 54 

Chicken Pie Crust 54 

.Apple Meringue Pie 54 

Buttermilk Pie 54 



Page 

Cranberrj- Pie 54 

Cream Pie, No. 1 55 

Croam Pie, No. 2 55 

Cream Custard Pie 55 

Orange Pie 55 

Orange Cream Pie 55 

Custard Pie 56 

Cocoanut Custard 56 

Dried Peach Florendine 56 

Grape Pie 56 

Lemon Pie 56 

Lemon Meringue, No. 1 57 

Lemon Meringue, No. 2 57 

Lemon Custard 57 

Montgomery Pie 57 

Molasses Pie 58 

Taylor Pie 58 

Washington Pie 58 

Shoo-Fly Pie 58 

Mince Meat, No. 1 58 

Mince Meat, No. 2 59 

Aphel Kuchen 59 

Appel Koker 59 

Apple Dumplings 59 

Apple Dumplings, Potato Crust 60 

Apple Pudding GO 

Brown Betty 60 

Cherry or Huckleberry Pudding 60 

Cottage Pudding 61 

Batter Pudding 61 

Bread Pudding 61 

Bread and Butter Pudding 61 

Chocolate Pudding 62 

Baked Chocolate Pudding, No. 1 62 

Baked Chocolate Pudding, No. 2 62 

Caramel Pudding 62 

Fruit Pudding 63 

Suet Pudding 63 

English Plum Pudding 63 

Steamed Raisin Pudding 63 

Plum Piidding 64 

Indian Pudding 64 

Kansas Pudding 64 

Lemon Custard Pudding 54 

Marshmellow Pudding 6,') 

Meringue Pudding 65 

Orange Pudding 65 

Peach or Apple Pudding 65 

Peach Pudding 66 

Strawberry or Peach Short Cake 66 

Queen of Puddings 66 

Raspberry Tapioca 66 

Tapioca and Rice 67 

Tapioca Pudding 67 

Snow Pudding 67 

Yellow and White Pudding 67 

SAUCES. 

St ra wherry Sauce 68 

Wliipj)od Cream Sauce 6S 

Hard Sjuice 68 

Dark Pudding Sauce 68 

H.it ChdCdlate Sauce, No. 1 69 

Hot Chocolate Sauce, No. 2 69 

Vanilla Sauce 69 

CAKES, COOKIES, ETC. 

.Vngel Food 72 

.\pple Sauce Cake 72 

Corn Starch Cake 72 

Chocolate Cake 73 

Cocoanut Cake 73 

Coffee Cake 73 



Page Page 

Date Cake .T 73 Scotch Cakes 88 

Devil's Food, No. 1 73 S;md Tarts, No. 1 89 

Devil's Food, No. 2 74 Sand Tarts, No. 2 89 

Devil's Cake 74 Sugar Cakes 89 

Fudge Cake 74 Wafers 89 

Feather Cake 74 Walnut Wafers 89 

French Cake 75 Soft Ginger Cakes 90 

Fruit Cake 75 Gingerbread 9() 

Light Fruit Cake 75 Molasses Ginger Cake 90 

Dark Fruit Cake 75 Molasses Cakes 90 

Grandmother Grove's Fruit Cake 75 Drop Ginger Cakes 90 

loe Cream Cake, No. 1 76 Gingsr Cakss 91 

Ice Cream Cake, No. 2 70 Snajis 91 

.Tam Cake 76 Ginger Snaps, No. 1 91 

.Telly Roll 76 Ginger Snaps, No. 2 91 

Loaf Cake 77 Ginger Snaps 91 

Lebanon Cake 77 Ginger Cakes 92 

Mrs. Miller's Favorite Cake 77 

Minnehaha Cake 77 ICINGS. 

Mock Lady Cake 78 Caramel Icing 9:j 

Marble Cake 78 Gelatine Ising 93 

Nut Cake, No. 1 7S Chocolate Icing 93 

Nut Cake, No. 2 78 Lemon Icing for Cake 93 

Orange Cake, No. 1 78 Lady Baltimore Icing 9:j 

Orange Cake, No. 2 70 Boiled Icing 93 

One Egg Cake 79 Orange Icing 94 

Pecan Cake 79 Maple S\Tup Icing 94 

Berwick Sponge Cake 79 Caramel Icing, No. 1 94 

Butter Sponge Cake 80 Caramel Icing, No. 2 94 

Hot Water Sponge Cake 80 Boiled Chocolate Icing 94 

Mrs. Miller's Sponge Cake 80 German Filling 94 

Sponge Cake, No. 1 80 Orange Filling for Cake 95 

Sponge Cake, No. 2 80 

Hot Milk Sponge Cake 81 CUST.VUDS, DESSERTS, ICES, ETC. 

Sponge Cake 81 

Sponge Cake 81 Frappes, Parfaits and Mousses 97 

Spanish Bun 81 Grape Juice Frappe 97 

Silver Cake 82 Maple Parfl 97 

Spice Cake, No. 1 82 Cafe Mousse 97 

Spice Cake, No. 2 82 Cherry Mousse 97 



Golden Spice Cake 82 



Sherbet 97 



Sunshine Cake, No. 1 82 Canton Sherbet 98 

Sunshine Cake, No. 2 83 Orange Sherbet 98 

Velvet Cake S3 Peach Ice Cream 98 

Wiite Cake, No. 1 83 Vanilla Ice Cream 98 

White Cake, No. 2 83 Five Threes 93 

AVhite Mountain. Cake 84 Iced Currants 99 

^^^^ite Perfection Cake 84 Frozen Cherries 99 

Velvet Cake 84 Frozen Custard 99 

Cookies 84 Prune Souffle 99 

Chocolate Drops 84 Orange Souffle 99 

Small Chocolate Cakes 84 Q"e«n Victoria's Favorite Dessert 39 

Cocoanut Drop Cakes 85 Spanish Cream 100 

Cocoanut Crumbs 85 French Caramel Custard 100 

Crullers 85 Cup Custard 100 

Doughnuts 85 Tapioca Custard 100 

Doughnuts 85 Corn Starch Custard 100 

Dutch Doughnuts 86 Strawberry Charlotte 101 

Drop Cakes 88 Chocolate Junket 101 

Goat Island Cakes 86 Floating Islands 101 

Hermits 86 Lemon Foam 101 

Hickory Nut Cakes 86 Log Cabin 102 

Chocolate Jumbles 86 Charlotte Russe 102 

.Tumbles 87 Cream Puffs 102 

Mrs. Pauling's Jumbles 87 Apple Float 103 

Macaroons 87 Moonshine 103 

Nut Kisses, No. 1 87 Cherry Jelly 103 



Nut Kisses, No. 2 87 

Oat Meal Cookies 87 



SAL.VDS AND DRESSINGS 



Pinwheels 88 Salad 104 

Peanut Cookies 88 pruit Salad 104 

Little Pound Cakes 88 white Grape Salad 104 

Peppernut Cakes 88 Chicken Salad, No. 1 104 



Chicken Siihi.l, No. 2 11)5 

Chicken Salad, No. 3 105 

Tomato and Celery galad IW 

Tomato and Sweetbread Salad IfHi 

Walnut Salad KKi 

Waldorf Salad 106 

Salad Dressing 10« 

P'l'ench Dressing 106 

Mayonnaise 107 

Mayonnaise Dressing 107 

Aunt Jane's Cole Slaw Dressing 107 

I'ICKLES, JKLLIES, PRp:SEnVKS. 

Cliow Chow,' No. 1 110 

Chow Chow, No. 2 110 

Chow Chow, No. 3 110 

Chow Chow, No. 4 110 

( 'hiitney Sauce IH 

Bordeaux S;ui(>o Ill 

Chili Sauce Ill 

Sliirley Sauce Ill 

Pickled Cabbage Ill 

Pepper Cabbage 112 

Cucumber Pickle 112 

Cucumber Relish 112 

Something Nice Pickle 112 

High Toned Pickle 112 

Pepper Hash 113 

Pickled Onions 113 

To Can Little Pickles 113 

Tomato Catsup, No. 1 113 

Timiato Catsup, No. 2 113 

Tomato Catsup, No. 3 114 

Cold Catsup 114 

Grape Catsup 11 4 

Elderberry' Jelly 114 

Mrs. Thome's CuiTant Jelly 11.5 

Cranberry Jelly 115 

Jellied C'ranbcrries 115 

Lemon Rutter 115 

Lemon Rulter 115 

Rhubarb, Canned 115 

(;ingor Pears .' 115 

Si)iced Pears 116 

Euchred Peaches 116 

Grape Conserve 116 

Grapefruit Marmalade 116 

Euchred Cherries 116 

Pinea])i)le Marmalade 116 

Quince Honey 117 

Seedless Jam 117 

Canned Peaches 117 

Spiced Peaches or Pears 117 

.\pplo Butter 117 

Strawberries or Cherries, Preserved in 

the sun 118 

C.\NDY. 

Boiled Fondant 119 

Uncooksd Fondant 119 

Butter Scotch 119 

Butt?r Scotch 120 

Caramels 120 

Easy Caramels 120 

Cream Taffy 120 

Cream Candv 120 



DEC 28 1S1I 

F'age 

Creamed Dates 120 

Pai'isian Creams 121 

Fudge, No. 1 121 

Fudge, No. 2 121 

Cocoanut Pudge 121 

Choc date Fudge 121 

Sultana Fudge 122 

Sea Foam Fudge 122 

Sea Foam 122 

Moravian Mint Cakes 122 

MoIa-5ses Candy 123 

Peanut Candy 12.'! 

Peanut Candy, Clear 12.1 

Peanut Brittle 12." 

Cough Candy 123 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Unfer'nented Grape Juice 124 

Red Raspberry Vinegar 124 

Cherrj' Vinegar 124 

Iced Tea 124 

Cheese Sandwiches 124 

Nut Sandwiches 124 

Strawberry or Raspberry Cocktail 125 

Oyst.n- Cocktails 125 

Banana Fritters 12."i 

INVALID COOKEKY. 

Beef Tea V>G 

Raw Beef Tea 126 

Barley Gruel 127 

Dried Flour 127 

Baked Milk 127 

Chicken Broth 127 

Clam Broth 127 

Flaxseed Lemonade 12S 

Fresh Buttermilk 128 

Hop Tea 128 

Infant's Food 128 

Jelly Water 128 

Koumiss 128 

Lime AVater 12S 

Mutton Broth 128 

Mulliod JeViy 129 

Oyster Toast 129 

Rico Jelly 129 

Soup for Invalid 129 

Toast 129 

Toast Wat or 130 

Tapioca Cup Pudding 130 

HOUSEHOLD HELPS. 

To Sweeten Rancid Lard 131 

.Stove Lining 131 

Preparation for Cleaning Carpet on the 

Floor 131 

Fmniture Polish 131 

To Remove Stains from Marble 131 

To Remove Rust from Steel 131 

To Remove Machine Oil 132 

To Wash Straw Matting 132 

To Take Out Mildew 132 

To Prevent Freezing 132 

To Remove Mold in Cellars 132 

To Clean Stove Pipe 132 



^H 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



JAN fi !9U: