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Full text of "Homes of family names in Great Britain"

HAHOLO B.LEE LIBRARY 

BRiGHAM YOUNG UNiVERblTY 

PROVO, UTAH 



JUL 2 



HOMES 

OF 

FAMILY NAMES 

IN 

GREAT BEITAIN. 



BY 



HENEY BEOUGHAM GUPPY, M.B. Edin., 

Fellow of the Royal Society of Udinhurgh, Felloiv of the Royal Scottish 
Geographical Society, Member of the Victoria Institute. 



LONDON : 
HAREISON AND SONS, 59, PALL MALL, 

^ookscUas lo t^c ^uccn anb Xj.^.X). tljt ^riiuE of ii^laks. 

1890. 

CTAH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL 
, >i^Mi tliSTORlCAL SOCIETY 



lONDON : 

HAEEISOW AND SONS, ST, MAETIN's LANE, 

PBINTEES IN OBDINAET TO HEE MAJESTY. 



9„,^,., TH!; LIBRARY . 
fiR/feHAM YOUNG UN(VFPc,.v. 
PROVO, UTAH 



^ CORRECTIONS. 



5U. Under PayiU'. For •" Pagan I.' rt-ad '" Pag'an, I ". 

152. Under Dennis. For '■ Barnstale '' read '• Barnstaple ". 

186. Under Fairhead. For '' Fairlieird '" read " Fairhevid ". 

381. Under Fenemove. For '" Wendebarv " read " Wendle- 

bnrv "". 

448. For • AlkL-idge '" read " Aldvido-e ". 
4.^ 



tol. 1 
J38. J 



^ , For "Back" read '• Bach •". 
338. J <- 

452. Under Barks add "' Staffordshire, lU "'. 

459. Under Boulton add '' Staffordshire 22 ". 

461. Under Briddon read " Derbyshire, 9 '". 

491. Under Goddard add "Middlesex, 15". 

512. For " Kino-ley " read '" Kingsley ". 

529. For " (U-nabell "" i-ead " Nornabell "". 

517. 1 For " Lonsley " I'ead " Lonsloy "" and the same in 

72. J Index. 

535. Under Pickering. For ''West Riding" read "'North 

and East Ridings '". 
53(3. Under Piatt add '■ Berkshire. 7 "". 
538. Under Pritchard add "South Wales, lUO ". Both 

Prichard and Pritchard characterise South Wales ; 

they should, therefore, be included in the District 

Names on page 441. 
546. For " Sandbank "" i-ead ■ Sandbnch "". 
563. For '• Unworth "" read " Unsworth "". 
565. Under Walker add " Kent, 9 ". 
567. Under Watorhouse add "Yorkshire, West Riding. 12:"" 

and place this surname in the County Names on 

page 422. 
567. Under Way era.se " Kent. 15 ". 



TO THE READER. 



I.\ tlie liopt- that tliis work may lead to a far more extensive 
investigation of the homes of family names, the author invites 
communications from his i-oaders. An immense amount of 
information, hitherto not avaihihle, must be in the possession 
of thousands and tlionsands of families, and especially of those 
old families of gentry and yeomen that have been long connected 
with particular localities. 

In the event of sufficient materials being obtained, the author, 
who i-eserves to himself full discretion in the matter, will publish 
a supplementary volume. A perusal of this work will guide the 
I'eader an to the kind of information required : and, where possible, 
parish-registers and old deeds and wills should be consulted. 

In sending such communication.s, the following points should 
l)e borne in mind: — 

(1) Neither acknowledgment nor reply must be expected, 
and no papers can be returned. 

(2) No document of any kind, nor any paper of value to 
the sender, must be enclosed. Where necessary, copies 
only should be sent. 

(3) Every communication will be regarded by the author 
as intended for publication, subject to his discretion. 

(4) All communications should be addressed to the 

Misses Ciuppy, 

17, Wood Lnne, 
Falmouth, 

Cornwall. 

(.5) The author will announce his intentions in the matter 
in the second column of the "London Standard," for 
July 2nd. 1891. 



DEDICATED 



TO 



MY BROTHEES 



PREFACE, 



Most books have a history attached to their inception, and, 
although strongly tempted to inform my readers as to how I came 
to write this work, I prefer to follow the advice of a certain 
little attendant demon or sprite, call him what you will, that 
hangs, metaphorically speaking, to my coat-tails, and brings me 
up shai'ply with a prohibitive pull. It will be enough for the 
author to crave the generous judgment of his readers, and there 
are few men in this world on whom kindly appreciation and a 
little timely encouragement are altogether thrown away. 

When, some thirteen years ago, whilst a young naval surgeon, 
I measured the water discharge of the Yang'tse, one of the largest 
rivers of the world, I little thought that it would be my future 
lot to be intimately concerned with problems of such widely 
different natures as the origin of coral islands and the distribution 
of names in Great Britain. The first of these problems I hope 
still to work at for many years to come, and particularly because 
in this matter English geologists have abandoned the safe road 
of observation and research for the doubtful track of airy specula- 
tion under the shadow of a name. A solution of the second 
complicated problem I now present to my readers, and I await 
their verdict with no inconsiderable anxiety. Their approval 
will encoui'age me in another work of a very different character, 
on which I am at present engaged, namely, on the homes of the 
oceanic races of men ; but for the prosecution of this and my other 
works means are necessary, and, failing other aid, I appeal in these 
pages to the English people. 



VI PREFACE. 

It may be thouglit by some tbat the investigation of the dis- 
tribution of names is an idle amusement, productive of no utility 
to man. I have come to think, however, after much wearisome 
handling of the subject, that it is a matter of much importance to 
the antiquarian, the historian, the ethnologist, and also to the 
more practical politician. These pages will at once explain the 
bearing of this subject on the antiquities, the history, and the 
racial divisions of Great Britain. In this preface I will refer 
briefly and suggestively to some of the uses that the student of 
politics may make of these materials. For instance, in most 
legislative matters concerning Wales it is certainly of primary 
importance to inquire whether Wales political corresponds in its 
extent and limits with the Wales of the Welsh people. Then, 
again, if, as seems probable, it becomes necessary on account of the 
failure of the present Parliamentary system to divide Great 
Britain into a number of sub-kiugdoms, each to control the affairs 
peculiarly its own, it becomes obvious that the divisions of the 
peoples should be on a natural and not on an artificial or a 
political basis. The existing frontier lines of Scotland and 
Wales, for example, have little or no relation to their respective 
race boundaries ; and there exist between difEerent regions of 
England race-distinctions as sharp as v/e find when comparing 
Wales and East Anglia. 

If the distribution of names were to be the only test in the 
matter, and it is at all events a criterion that should be carefully 
considered, we should restore the Heptarchy in our land. Though 
such a sub-division would be scarcely comparable with the old 
Saxon system, yet in many cases we could fittingly retain and 
extend the names in those early times of the seven Saxon king- 
doms and of the other parts of Great Britain. Thus, beginning 
at the north, we should divide Scotland according to the distribu- 
tion of Scottish names into two parts — Caledonia, north of the 
Forth and the Clyde, and Lothian, between those boundaries and 
the English border. Strictly speaking, we cannot by the family 
names separate southern Scotland from northern England in this 



PREFACE. Vll 

fbitrary fasliion, but here many other considerations, such as 
lat of the inconvenient size of a sub-kingdom, would weigh 
■avily with the politician. Southern Scotland, therefore, would 
»rm a separate sub-kingdom, to which the name of Lothian, the 
Qcient designation of the eastern portion of it, coald be very 
ppropriately applied. 

Crossing the English border we should come into the sub- 
ingdom of North umbria, extending south to the Humber and the 
[ersey so as to include Yorkshire and Lancashire within its area, 
outh of Noi'thumbria would lie the great sub-kingdom of the 
lidlands, the Mercia of the Saxon Heptarchy, and it might well 
ear the same name in our own day. It is a region, as a rule, 
Dnspicuously defined by its family names, but within its limits 
heshire and Lincolnshire would be included. A line drawn from 
18 Wash to the Solent cuts ofE the south-eastern quarter of 
Ingland, which would form, as far as the distribution of names 
5 concerned, a very distinct sub-kingdom, to which the name of 
LUglia might be fittingly applied. Then there would be the large 
nb-kingdom of the south-west of England, inclusive also of 
Wiltshire and Gloucestershire, to which the name of Devonia 
aight gracefully be given, in lieu of that of Wessex, which, in the 
ime of the Saxon Heptarchy, was the name of only a small part 
f it. Lastly, we should have Wales itself, and here, taking the 
amily names as our guide, we should have to extend the Welsh 
oundary so as to include Monmouthshire, Herefordshire, and 
hropshire. 

Thus, the modern Heptarchy, on the basis of the distribution 
f names, would be composed of the seven sub-kingdoms of 
/aledonia, Lothian, Northumbria, Mercia, Anglia, Devonia, and 
Vales. These conclusions are intended to be only of a suggestive 
ature ; the data on which they are founded occur abundantly in 
hese pages. This method, however, of aiding the solution of 
sgislative and political diflficulties might be followed in many 
imilar cases. For instance, if some disinterested person were to 
lake a study of the distribution of family names in Ireland on 



Vlll PREFACE. 

the lines adopted in this work, he would provide the legislature 
with information of practical value. Then again the same method 
might be employed in fixing the boundaries between two con- 
tinental nations ; and in truth the vexed question of Alsace and 
Lorraine might be more easily settled by a study of the family 
nomenclature than by the manufacture of smokeless powder. 

It should, however, be remembered that this is but one of 
other tests of nationality, such as those of race and language, 
concerning which it is hard to say which is the most important, or 
again which is the most likely to lead us astray. It seems to me, 
after carefully considering the subject, that the application of the 
test of family names is the safest way to determine the extension 
of any particular nationality. It will often guide us where the 
tests of language and race-characters fail. 

H. B. GUPPY. 




WS:iK.Jolinston,KdinbuT& and London 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 



INTEODUCTORY. 

The Old English Yeomen, 1 Their "Wills, 2 But little affected by 

oreigu Immigrants, 3 The most stable section of the community, 4 As 

class best suited for the investigation of the distribution of family names, 5. 

Mode of attacking the problem by proportional numbers, 6 The 

jcending and descending scale, 9 The classification of English family 

ames, 11 Hints to pedigree-hunters, 11 The Hundred Rolls, 12 The 

istribution of Peculiar Names, 12 Ravenstein's theory of the Laws of 

ligration, 13 Berkshire, to wit, 14 Camden on Surnames, 15 Wei- 

!rian Orthography, 17 Causes of the lesser variations of names, IS The 

James of the Cloth Trade, 18. 



CHAPTER II. 

Che Distbibution in Alphabetical Oeder of General, Common, and 
Regional Names, pp. 21-6G. 



ENGLAND. 

Chaeactebistio Family Names of the English Counties, with 
AccoMPAKXiNO Notes. 

Bedfordshire, 67. Derbyshire, 121. 

Berkshire, 71. Devonshire, 141. 

Buckinghamshire, 76. Dorset, 168. 

Cambridgeshire, 82. Durham, 177. 

Cheshire, 88. Essex, 183. 

Cornwall, 101. Gloucestershire, 194. 

Cumbcrlaad, 117. Hampshire, 204. 



CONTENTS 



Herefordshire, 209- 
Hertfordshire, 214. 
Huntingdonshire, 222. 
Kent, 224. 
Lancasliire, 235. 
Leicestershire, 253. 
Lincolnshire, 268. 
Middlesex, 281. 
Monmouthshire, 435, 442. 
Norfolk, 283. 
Northamptonshire, 298. 
Northumberland, 306. 
Nottinghamshire, 319. 
Oxfordshire, 327. 
Rutlandshire, 258. 



Shropshire, 336. 
Somersetshire, 344. 
Staffordshire, 357. 
Suffolk, 365. 
Surrey, 375. 
Sussex, 379. 
Warwickshire, 387. 
Westmoreland, 117. 
Wiltshire, 392. 
Worcestershire, 402. 
Yorkshire — 

North Biding, 408. 

East Biding, 408. 

West Biding, 421. 



WALES. 

The Boundaries of Wales, 435 As defined by Statute, Eace, Language 

and Surnames, 436 The Advance of Welsh Surnames into England, 43^ 

The Character of Welsh Surnames, 439 North Wales, 440 Soutl 

Wales, 441. Monmouth sliire, 442 Notes on some of the Welsh and 

Monmouthshire Surnames, 443. 



THE HOMES OF ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 

Alphabetical List of Names, pp. 447-575. The numbers represent the 
proportion per 10,000. 



THE APPENDIX. 

Scottish Names. 

Five geographical groiips, 576 The Intermingling of English and Scottisl" 

Names, 580 The Middle Land, 582 Points of difficulty, 583 Alpha- 
betical List of the most frequent of Scottish Names, 586 Notes on Scottish 

Names, 596 Border Names, 581. 



GENERAL INDEX OF FAMILY NAMES. 



!fOTE,- 



-The asterisk refers tlie reader to the list of corrections at the 
beginning of this work. 



binett, 447. 

bott, 447. 

ha, 285, 447. 

ell, 260, 447. 

ney, 127. 

•raham, 223, 271, 447. 

res, 215, 447. 

ton, 90, 447. 

lam, 586. 

tarns, 23, 141, 447. 

lamson, 23, 447, 586. 

Icock, 447. 

Idems, 143, 447. 

Idington, 447. 

Idis, 447. 

Idison, 447. 

Idy, 422, 447. 

Ikins, 24, 298, 447. 

Qington, 321, 447. 

Inams, 447. 

Ishead, 90, 447. 

?ar, 411, 447. 

Mlie, 313, 586. 

insworth, 239, 422, 447. 

rey, 119, 447. 

tchison, 586. 

itken, 586, 596. 

kehurst, 381, 448. 

kers, 215, 448. 

Ibutt, 448. 

Icock, 360, 448. 

Ider, 312, 448. 

Idersey, 91. 



Alderson, 411, 448. 

Aldous, 367, 448. 

Aldrich i 

Aldridge } 363,367,448.* 

Aldworth, 329, 448. 

Alexander, 226, 395, 448, 586. 

Alford, 146, 448. 

Alker, 239, 448. 

AUan, 23, 448, 586, 596. 

Allaway, 196, 448. 

AUbutfc, 448. 

Allcock, 360, 448. 

Allcorn, 381, 448. 

Allcot, 211, 448. 

Allen, 23, 124, 448, 596. 

AUin, 448. 

Allington, 448. 

Allinson t 

Allison } 411' ^^8. - 

AUman, 448. 

Allsop T 

Alsop } 125,127,418. 

Almond, 448. 
Alston, 448. 
Alton, 127, 448. 
Alty, 448. 
Alvey, 322. 
Alvis, 448. 
Alway, 196, 448. 
Ambler, 424, 448. 
Ambrose, 83, 448. 
Amery, 448. 
Amesbury, 347, 448. 



xu 



INDEX. 



y. 



Amey, 205, 448. 

Amies n 

Amis I ^85,322,443. 

Amos, 226, 449, 
Amphlett, 404, 449. . 
Amyas, 285, 322. 
Anderson, 24, 449, 586. 
Anderton, 239. 
Andrew, 23, 449. 
Andrews 23, 168, 449. 
Angus, 449. 
Ankers, 91, 449. 
Annable, 321, 449. 
Annett, 449. 
Anning, 143, 449. 
Anstey -i 
Anstie } 146,395,449. 

Antell, 449. 

Anthony, 443, 449. 

Anyan, 271, 449. 

Aplin, 347, 449. 

Aport, 395. 

Apperley, 211, 449. 

Appleby, 127, 449. 

Applegarth, 179, 216, 449. 

Appleton, 73, 239, 411, 449, 

Appleyard, 215, 424, 449. 

Arch, 449. 

Archer, 125, 449. 

Ardern, 91, 449. 

Aris, 299, 449. 

Arkell, 196, 449. 

Arkle, 312, 449. 

Armistead -i 

Armitstead j 

Armitage, 424, 449. 

Armstrong, 118, 309, 312, 449, 586. 

Arnatt, 329, 450. 

Arney, 346, 450. 

Arnold, 24, 450. 

Arrowsmith, 197. 

Arscott, 146, 450. 

Arthur, 101, 450, 586. 

Arthurton, 450. 

Arundel, 15, 106. 

Ash, 450. 

Ashby, 300, 450. 



Ashcroft, 450. 

Ashford, 450. 

Ashley, 338, 450. 

Ashman, 450. 

Ashmore, 450. 

Ashton, 125, 127, 239, 450. 

Ashwell, 215, 450. 

Ashworth, 239, 450. 

Askew, 450. 

Askwith, 412. 

Aspinall ■\ 

Aspinwall j ^39, 450. 

Astbury, 91, 450. 

Aston, 91, 450. 

Atherton, 239, 450. 

Atkins, 24, 357, 450. 

Atkinson, 24, 450. 

Attenborough, 185, 321, 450. 

Atthow ■) 

Attoe I 285,450. 

Attrill, 205, 450. 
Attwood, 404, 450. 
Austen n 

Austin I 24,451. 
■ Averill, 360, 451. 
Avery, 146, 381, 451. 
Aves, 366, 451. 
Awdry, 395, 451, 
Ayles, 205, 451. 
Ayling, 381, 451. 
Aylwin, 381, 451. 
Ayusley, 313, 451, 586. 
Ayre, 142, 262, 451. 
Ayres, 262, 451. 



Eabbage, 146, 451. 

Baber, 347, 451. 

Bach, 338, 451.* 

Backhouse, 119, 180, 451. 

Bacon, 185, 260, 451. 

Badcock, 146, 451. 

Badger, 389, 451. 

Badman, 451. 

Bagg, 348, 451. 

Baggalley t 

j 272, 451. 



INDEX. 



XIU 



Bagnall, 360, 451. 

iJagshaw, 128, 451. 

Baguley, 321, 451. 

Sailey, 24, 124, 451. 

Baillie, 25, 586, 596. 

Baines, 451. 

Bainbridge, 119, 179, 411, 451. 

Baird, 586, 596. 

Baker, 25, 451. 

Bakewell, 361, 452. 

Balch, 348, 395, 452. 

Baldock, 226, 452. 

Baldry, 368, 452. 

Baldwin, 25, 197, 452. 

Balfour, 586, 596. 

BalkwiU, 143, 452. 

Ball, 25, 146, 368, 452. 

Ballam, 452. 

Ballantyne, 586, 596. 

Ballard, 227, 404, 452. 

Ballinger, 196, 452. 

Balls, 25, 286, 368, 452. 

B ilman, 452. 

IJalmforth, 452. 

Balsdon, 143, 452. 

Bamber, 240, 452. 

Bamford, 240, 452. 

Bamforth, 452. 

r.iH pfield, 146. 

i I itibury, 334, 452. 

Bancroft, 91, 125, 128, 452. 

Banfield, 452. 

Banham, 286, 452. 

Banks, 452. 

Bannister, 240, 382, 452. 

Banwell, 348, 452. 

Barber, 452. 

Barbour, 586. 

Barclay, 586, 596. 

Barcroft, 241. 

Barfoot, 206, 452. 

Barford, 300, 452. 

Bargh, 125, ]28, 452. 

Barham, 382, 452. 

Bark I 

Barks } 125, 128, 452.* 

Barker, 26, 452. 



Barling, 226, 453. 

Barlow, 240, 453. 

Barnard, 453. 

Barnes, 26, 453. 

Barnett, 453. 

Barnsley, 453. 

Barnstable, 346, 453. 

Baron, 453. 

Barr, 586, 596. 

Barraclough, 453, 

Barratt t 

Tj . . y 26, 88, 283, 453. 

Barrett J > j > 

Barren, 211, 367, 453. 

Barrington, 348, 453. 

Barritt, 453. 

Barron, 453. 

Barrow, 240, 453. 

Barrowcliff, 453, 

Bartholomew, 26, 227, 453. 

Bartle, 26, 453. 

Bartlett, 26, 453.^ 

Barton, 453.' 

Bartram, 322, 454. 

Bascombe, 454. 

Basford, 91, 454. 

Basham, 185, 454. 

Baskerville, 91, 360, 454. 

Baskeyfield, 15, 91, 360, 454. 

Basnett, 91, 454. 

Bass, 185, 454. 

Bassett, 104, 226, 360, 454, 

Bastable, 454. 

Bastin, 454. 

Batchelor, 454. 

Bate, 26, 101, 454. 

Bater, 143, 454. 

Bates, 26, 454. 

Batey, 454. 

Bath, 454. 

Bather t 

Batho } 328,454. 

Batkin, 17, 454. 
Batt, 454. 
Battams, 68, 454. 
Batten, 105, 146, 454. 
Batterham, 454. 
Battersby, 240, 454. 



XIV 



INDEX. 



Batting, 105, 146, 454. 

Batts, 26, 454. 

Batty T 

Battye j ^6, 424, 454. 

Baty, 454. 

Baugh, 339. 

Baverstock, 454. 

Bawden, 454. 

Baxter, 454, 586, 596. 

Baylis, 402, 454. 

Bayly, 451. 

Baynes, 451.) 

Bays, 454. 

Bazely n 

Bazley } ^00, 454. 

Beach, 454. 
Beacliam, 269, 454. 
Beadle, 454. 
Beak, 454. 
Beal 1 
Beale } ^^^^ 
Beales, 454. 
Beamand, 454. 
Beanes, 454. 
Bearcroft, 404. 
Beard, 128, 454. 
Beardall, 320, 454. 
Beardmore, 360, 455. 
Beardsley, 455. 
Beattie t 
Beaty } ^^5, 586. 

Beaumont, 424, 455. 

Beavan i 

Beaven } 210,455. 

Bebb, 455. 
Bebbington, 91, 455. 
Beck, 286, 455. 
Beckett, 92, 455. 
Beckwith, 425. 
Beddall, 455. 
Beddoes, 338, 455. 
Bedford, 455. 
Beeby, 260, 455. 
Beech, 455. 
Beecham, 269, 454. 
Beecroft, 320, 455. 
Beedell, 143, 455. 



Beer, 143, 348, 455. 
Beesley, 455. 
Beeson, 455. 
Beeston, 339, 455. 
Beerer t 
Beevers J 
Belcham, 185, 455. 
Belcher, 78, 329, 455. 
Belfield, 358, 455. 
Belgrove, 455. 
Bell, 26, 117, 455, 586. 
Bellairs t 
Bellars } ^00. 455. 

Bellamy, 271, 321, 455. 

Belle w, 147. 

Bellingham, 312. 

Bellis, 455. 

Bellot, 106. 

Belsey, 227, 455. 

Belton, 455. 

Bemand, 454. 

Bemrose, 455. 

Benbow, 338, 455. 

Bendall, 185, 3G8, 455. 

Benjafield, 455. 

Bennett, 27, 71, 124, 319, 455. 

Bennetts, 27, 101, 456. 

Benning, 456. 

Benniou, 338, 456. 

Bennison, 456. 

Benny, 456. 

Benson, 119, 456. 

Benstead "i 

Bensted / ' 

Bent, 237, 456. 

Bentall, 185, 455. 

Bentham, 425, 456. 

Bentley, 168, 456. 

Benton, 456. 

Bere, 348, 456. 

Beresford -\ 

-D • . 1 ^ 128, 360, 456. 

Berrisrord J ' ' 

Berridge, 260, 456. 

Berrow, 210, 456. 

Berry, 27, 141, 456. 

Berryman, 102, 456. 

Besent, 456. 



INDEX. 



XVll 



Brain, 196, 460. 

Braitlnvaite, 119, 412, 460. 

Brake, 460. 

Bramall, 424, 460. 

Brainley, 424, 469, 

Bramwell, 118, 460. 

Brand, 186, 460. 

Branson, 260, 460. 

Brasnett, 460. 

Brasington "I 125, 129, 358, 361, 

Brassington J 460. 

Braund, 143, 460. 

Brawn, 300, 460. 

Bray, 460. 

Brayley, 148, 460. 

Brazier, 460. 

Brazington, 460. 

Breach, 460. 

Breakspear, 329, 461. 

Break well, 461. 

Brear -i 

R.oa~ r 425, 461. 
ijrears J ' 

Breary, 69, 461. 

Breayley, 460. 

Breese t 

Breeze j 287,443,461. 

Brenchley, 227, 461. 

Brendon t 

Brenton } ^^^' 461- 

Breretoii, 92, 337, 339, 461. 

Bretherton, 241, 461. 

Brett, 322, 461. 

Brewer, 461. 

Brewis, 461. 

Brewster, 461. 

Brice, 227, 461. 

Brickell, 4-61. 

Briddon, 461.* 

Bridge, 461. 

Bridger, 381, 461. 

Bridges, 395, 461. 

Bridgman, 148, 461. 

Briggs, 319, 421, 461. 

Brigham, 461. 

Bright, 461. 

Brightman, 69, 461. 

Brimacombe, 461. 



Brimble, 346, 461. 

Brindle, 241, 461. 

Brindley, 360, 461. 

Brine, 170, 461. 

Brisbourne, 461. 

Bristow, 149, 461. 

Britten, 299, 461. 

Brittou, 461. 

Broad, 105, 461. 

Broadbent, 425, 461. 

Broadberry, 461. 

Broadhead, 425, 461. 

Broadhurst, 92, 461. 

Broadley, 227, 461. 

Brock, 461. 

Brocklelmrst, 89, 461. 

Brocksopp, 461. 

Broderwick, 73. 

Brodie, 313, 461, 581, 587, 59" 

Bromage, 461. , 

Bromh ead, 1 ^9. 462. 

Bromley, 339, 461. 

Bromwich, 300, 461. 

Brook T 

Brooke } ^^' ^^l. 

Brooker, 462. 

Brooking, 148. 

Brooks T 

Brookes } 27. 462. 

Broom, 148, 462. 

Broomfield, 206, 462. 

Broomhead, 129, 462. 

Broster, 92, 462. 

Brough, 129, 462. 

Broughall, 339, 462. 

Brougham, 120. 

Broiighton, 271, 462. 

Brown, 27, 462, 587. 

Browne, 462. 

BrowDiiig, 197, 462. 

Brownlow, 271, 462. 

Bruce, 462, 581, 587, 597. 

Brudenell, 260. 

Brumby, 462. 

Brumitt, 322. 

Brunt, 462. 

Bryan, 260, 462. 



XVIU 



INDEX. 



Bryant, 463. 

Brydges, 395, 461. 

Bubb, 196, 463. 

Buchanan, 587, 597. 

Buck, 287, 463. 

Buckeridge, 73. 463. 

Buckingham, 148, 463. 

Buckley, 92, 463. 

Buckmaster, 463. 

Bucknell, 463. 

Buckston, 129. 

Budd, 206, 463. 

Budden, 170, 463. 

Budge, 105, 463. 

Bugg, 170, 463. 

Bugler, 463. 

Bulcock, 463. 

Bull, 125, 463. 

Buller, 463. 

Bullman i 

Bulman } 1^^' ^^^^^ 

Bullmore, 463. 

Bullock, 88, 194, 463. 

Bulmer, 412, 463. 

Bumpus, 829. 

Bunbury, 73. 

Bunce, 463. 

Bunker, 463. 

Bunn, 287, 463. 

Bunt, 105, 463. 

Bunting, 129, 287, 463. 

Burbidg-^, 389, 463. 

Burch, 463. 

Burchnall t 

Burchnell J 

Burden, 463. 

Burdett, 463. 

Burdikin, 463. 

Burdon, 180, 463. 

Burge, 463. 

Burgess, 463. 

Burgoin t 

-R [ 148, 463. 

Burgoyne J ' 

Burkill, 269, 463. 

Burkinshaw, 457. 

Burkitt, 463. 

Burman, 389, 463. 



Bum, 463. 

Bumaby, 261, 463. 

Burnard, 105, 464. 

Burnell, 464. 

Burnett, 357, 464, 587. 

Burnham, 464. 

Burns, 463, 587. 

Burrell, 272, 464. 

Burridge, 464. 

Burrough t 

T, ^ ^ 143, 241, 395, 

Burrow J > j > 

Burroughs, 464. 

Burrows, 464. 

Burston, 349, 464. 

Burt, 170, 464. 

Burton, 28, 283, 464. 

Bury, 27. 

Busby, 329, 4€4. 

Bush, 284, 464. 

Bushby, 308, 464. 

Bushell, 349, 412. 

Buss, 464. 

Buswell, 301, 464. 

Butcher, 464. 

Butler, 28, 204, 464. 

Butlin, 301, 464. 

Butt, 464. 

Butterfield, 425, 464. 

Butters, 464. 

Butterworth, 241, 464. 

Buttery, 321, 465. 

Button, 465. 

Buxton, 129, 465. 

Byard, 126, 465. 

Byford, 465. 

Byrd, 27, 457, 465. 

Byron, 322, 465. 



Cacbepoll, 212, 369, 466. 
Cade, 272, 465. 
Cadle, 198, 465. 
Cadwallader, 465. 
Csesar, 376, 465. 
Caine, 382, 465. 
Caines, 173, 465. 



464, 



INDEX. 



XIX 



Cairns, 465, 587. 
Cake, 465. 
Calcutt, 330, 465. 
Caldecott, 330, 465. 
Calder, 587, 597. 
Caldwell, 465, 587, 597. 
Callander, 465. 
Callow, 465. 
Callwood, 465. 
Calver, 465. 
Calverley, 426. 
CalTert, 412, 465. 
Cameron, 587, 597. 
Camm, 198, 465. 
Cammack, 272, 465. 
Camp, 130, 216, 465. 
Campbell, 587, 597. 
Campion, 272, 465. 
Campkin, 216, 465. 
Candy, 345, 465. 
Cane, 382, 465. 
Cann, 149, 287, 465. 
Cannell, 287, 465. 
Canning, 389, 465. 
Cannon, 216, 465. 
Cant, 184, 465. 
Cantilupe, 340. 
Cantrell i 
Cantrill } 361,465. 

Capes, 272, 465. 

Capon, 369, 465. 

Capstick, 465. 

Carbonell, 340. 

Cardell, 102, 465. 

Cardew, 120. 

Cardwell, 465. 

Careless, 404, 465. 

Carew, 149. 

Carey, 349, 465. 

Carless, 405. 

Carlyon, 106, 465. 

Carmichael, 313, 465, 587, 597. 

Carne, 106, 405. 

Carpenter, 465. 

Carr, 379, 465. 

Carrington, 466. 

Carruthers, 120, 466, 587, 597. 



Carter, 28, 466. 
Cartmell, 242, 466. 
Cartridge, 403, 466. 
CartwrigUt, 466. 
Carver, 466. 
Carretli, 106, 466. 
Cary, 349, 465. 
Case, 288, 466. 
Cash, 93, 466. 
Cass, 93, 466. 
Cass well, 211, 466. 
Castle, 466. 

Catchpole, 212, 369, 466. 
Caterbanck, 361. 
Catling, 369, 466. 
Catlow, 242, 466. 
Caton, 186, 466. 
Catt, 368, 382, 466. 
Catterall, 242, 466. 
Cattermole, 466. 
Cattell, 17, 390, 466. 
Caudwell t 
Cauldwell } 3^3' ^'^S- 
Caunce, 237, 466. 
Caunter, 149. 
Cave, 466. 
Cawrse, 106, 466. 
Cawsey, 466. 
Chadaeld, 126, 466, 
Chadwick, 242, 361, 466. 
Chaffe, 143, 466. 
Chalkley, 466. 
Challand, 322, 466. 
Cliallen, 382, 466. 
Challis, 186, 466. 
Chalmers, 587, 597. 
Challiner i 
Chaloner J ' 

Chamberlain t 

nu u ^ r 28, 258, 466. 

Chamberlayne J ' 

Chambers, 28, 466. 

Chamings, 467. 

Champion, 467. 

Chandler, 467. 

Channing, 143, 467. 

Chantler, 225, 467. 

Chaplin, 467. 

b 2 



XX 



INDEX. 



Chapman, 28, 82, 467. 

Chap^f } 1^9,323,467- 
Chard, 349, 467. 
Charlesworth, 467. 
Charlton, 309, 313, 467. 
Charlwood, 376, 467. 
Charman, 376, 467. 
Charuley, 237, 467- 
Charnock, 242, 467. 
Charsley, 467. 
Chase, 206, 467. 
Chattaw8,y, 467. 
Chatterton, 273, 467. 
Chaundy, 467. 
Chave, 150, 467. 
Checkley, 330, 467. 
Cheesman, 228, 4J7. 
Cheetham, 467. 
CheU, 361, 467. 
Cheney, 223, 467. 
Chennells, 467. 
Chenoweth, 467. 
Cheriton, 150, 467. 
Cherry, 330, 467- 
Cheshire, 467. 
Chesman, 228, 467. 
Chester, 198, 467. 
Chesters, 467. 
Cliettle, 322, 467. 
Chew, 301, 304, 468. 
Cheyney, 223, 467. 
Chilcott, 170, 468. 

Child -> 

,,,.,, )■ 340, 468. 

Chiiae J 

Childs, 468. 

Chinn, 198. 

Chittenden, 468. 

Chitty, 383, 468. 

Chivers, 83, 468. 

Chowen i 

fu Y 468. 

Chown J 

Chri^p, 468. 

Christie, 587. 

Christmas, 84, 468.. 

Christy, 184, 468. 

Chubb, 150, 468. 



Chugg, 143, 468. 
Church, 186, 468. 
Churches, 349, 468. 
Cliurchill, 170, 468. 
Chui'chouse "i 
Churchus / 
Churchman, 468. 
Chuter, 377, 468. 
Chynoweth t 
Chenoweth J 
Clack, 330, 468. 
Clapham, 425, 468. 
Clapp, 468. 
Clapton, 33^, 468. 
Clare, 330, 468. 
Claridge, 69, 468. 
Clark 1 
Clarke } ^8. 468. 587. 

Clarkson, 235, 469. 

Claxton, 288, 469. 

Clay, 323, 469. 

Clayden, 186, 469. 

Clayton, 125, 469. 

Clear, 83, 469. 

Cleave, 469. 

Cleeton, 340, 469. 

Clegg, 242, 469. 

Clement "i 

Clements J 

Clemow, 106, 469. 

Cleverdon, 143, 469. 

Clewlowe, 469. 

Clews, 126, 469. 

Cliff 1 

Clifte } ^^• 

Clifford, 228, 469. 

Clift, 2U6, 469. 

Clifton, 269, 469. 

Clinch, 228, 469. 

Clinton, 216, 469. 

Clothier, 469. 

Cloudesley, 383. 

Clough, 425, 469. 

Clowes, 359, 469. 

Cluett, 469. 

Clulow, 469. 

Clutterbuck, 197, 216, 469. 



INDEX. 



XXI 



106, 469. 



Clyma 

Clymo 

Coad, 106, 469. 

Coaker, 150, 469. 

Coate, 469. 

Coates, 327, 469. 

Coatsworth, 180, 469. 

Cobb, 469. 

Cobbett, 469. 

Cobbledick T 

Cobeldick J *''"^- 

Cobbold, 369, 469. 

Cobden, 469. 

Cobley, 261, 469. 

Cochrane, 587, 597. 

Cock, 470. 

Cockburn, 313, 470. 

Cockerell t 

Cockerill } 301.4/0. 

Cocking, 470. 

Cockram t 'n fn 

Cockeram J ' 

Cockshott, 425, 470. 

Codd, 470. 

Code, 106. 

Codling, 470. 

Coe, 84, 186, 288, 369, 470. 

Coffin, 150. 

Cogan -I 

p ° y 216, 349, 470. 

Coggan J 

Coggin 1 

p °^ I 216,470. 

Coggins J 

Coker, 150. 

Colclough, 361, 470. 

Coldicott, 198, 465. 

Cole, 28, 141, 470. 

Colebateh, 340. 

Coleman, 470. 

Coles, 28, 470. 

Coley, 470. 

Collard, 228, 349, 470. 

Collen, 84, 470, 

CoUett, 198, 330, 470. 

Colley, 261, 470. 

Collier, 470. 

Collin ge, 470. 

CoUingham, 323, 470. 



Ceilings T 

Collins } 29,470. 

CoUingwood, ISO, 471. 
Collinson, 29, 236, 471. 
Collishaw, 272, 471. 
Collison, 471. 
CoUyer, 470. 
Colson, 366, 471. 
Colwill, 471. 
Combes, 392, 395, 471. 
Comely, 471.' 
Comer, 471. 
Common, 471. 
Compton, 471. 
Condy, 107. 
Coney, 272, 47L 
Congdon, 471. 
Connibeer, 143. 
Constable, 471. 
Conybeare, 150, 471. 
Cook 1 
Cooke } 29,471. 

Cookson, 236, 471. 
Cooling, 272, 471. 
Coombe, 143, 471. 
Coombes i ,. ,.., 

Coombs } 390,471. 

Cooper, 29, 88, 471. 
Cope, 361, 472. 
Copeman, 472. 
Cope stake, 472. 
Copledyke, 273. 
Copleston, 150. 
Copp, 150, 472. 
Coppard, 383, 472. 

^^P!'^^ I 369,472. 
Coppm J 

Corbefcfc, 17, 340, 472. 

Corbishley, 359, 472. 

o:r. } *'- 
o:!':; } '^-^^ 

Corfield, 472. 
Corke, 472. 
Corner, 472. 
Cornea, 89, 472, 



INDEX. 



Corney, 472. 
Coriiford, 472. 
Cornish, 150, 345, 472. 
Cornock, 198, 472. 
Comwell, 216, 383, 472. 
Corp, 346, 472. 
Corringham, 472, 
Cory, 106, 472. 
Cosens, 473. 
Cosh, 395, 472. 
Cossey, 288, 472. 
Costellow, 383. 
Cottam, 243, 323, 472. 
Cotterill -i 
Cottrell J '^'^'^' 
Cotfcmgham, 273, 472. 
Cottle, 394, 472. 
Cotton, 261, 361, 472. 
Couch, 107, 472. 
Coulson, 472. 
Coulthard, 120, 472. 
Coidtrip, 225, 473. 
Counsel!, 349, 473. 
Coupe, 243, 473. 
Coupland, 273, 473. 
Court, 473. 
Courtice, 473. 

Cousens i 

r, )■ 344, 473. 

Cousins J ' 

Coveney, 228, 473. 

Coverdale, 412, 473. 

Cowan 

Cowen 

Coward, 473. 

Cowell, 243, 473. 

Cowing, 313, 473. 

Cowley, 301, 473. 

Cowhng, 106, 473. 

Cox, 29, 473. 

Coxall, 473. 

Coxon, 125, 473. 

Cozens, 344, 473. 

Crabtree, 425, 473. 

Cracknell, 366, 473. 

Craddock i 
Cradduck}228, 473. 



473. 



1 313, 473, 587. 



Crago 1 

Cragoe J 

Craig, 313, 473, 587, 597. 

Cranfield, 69, 473, 

Crang, 143, 473. 

Cranidge, 269, 473. 

Crapper, 425, 474. 

Craven, 425, 474. 

Crawford, 313, 474, 581, 587, 597. 

Crawley, 69, 474. 

Crawshaw, 426, 474. 

Craze, 474. 

Creaser, 474. 

Creasey, 273, 474. 

Creber, 142, 474. 

Creed, 198, 350, 474. 

Crees t 

Creese} 350.474. 

Cressey, 273, 474. 

Cresswell, 474. 

Crews, 151. 

Crichton, 587, 597. 

Crimp, 474. 

Crisp, 84, 288, 474. 

Critchley, 474, 

Critchlow, 358, 474. 

Crocker, 150, 474. 

Crockford, 474. 

Crocombe, 151, 471. 

Croft, 474. 

Crofts, 474. 

Crompton, 243, 474. 

Cromwell, 323. 

Crook, 474. 

Crookes, 126, 474. 

Croom T 

Croomej 198,350,474. 

Cropley, 474. 
Cropper, 243, 474. 
Crosbie, 243. 
Cross, 29, 82, 474. 
Crosland t 

Crossland} ^^6. 474. 
Crossley, 243, 474. 
Crossman, 110, 346, 350, 474, 
Crouch, 383, 474. 



INDEX. 



XXIU 



474. 



Crow -1 
i Crowe J 
Crowhurst, 228, 474. 
Crowle, 475. 
Crowles, 475. 
Crowther, 426, 475. 
Croxon, 475. 
Crozier, 309, 313. 
Cruicksliank, 587. 
Crump, 198, 211, 475. 
Cruse, 151. 
Cruwys, 151. 
Cubitt, 288, 475. 
Cudlipp, 151. 
Cuilen, 475. 
Culley, 288, 475. 
Cullimore, 198, 475. 
Culshaw, 237, 475. 
Cumberland, 475. 
Cumberledge, 475. 
Cuming, 151, 475. 
Gumming, 587, 597. 
Cundall i 
Cundell I *12, 475. 

Cundy, 107, 475. 
Cunlike, 243, 475. 
Cunningham, 587. 
Cupit, 475. 
Cupper, 341. 
Cureton, 475. 
Curling, 228, 475. 
Curnow, 103, 475. 
Currall, 475. 
Currie, 587, 597. 
Curry, 180, 350, 475. 
Curson, 288, 475. 
Curtis, 29, 76, 475. 
Cuss -I 
Cusse } 395,475. 

Cussans t 
Cussins I ^'^3- 
Cutforth, 475. 
Cuthbert, 273, 475. 
Cutting, 369, 475. 
Cutts, 126, 475. 

Daft, 273, 475. 



130, 475. 



Dagge, 107. 

Dagger, 244, 475. 

Dainty, 302, 475. 

Dakin 

Daking 

Dalby, 262, 475. 

Dale, 210, 475. 

Dalgleish, 587. 

Dallimore, 69. 

DaUyn, 143, 475. 

Dal ton, 475. 

Dalzell ■) 

Dalziell} 120,475,537,597. 

Damerell, 151, 475, 
Dampier, 350, 475. 
Danby, 413, 475. 
Dancer, 78, 475. 
Dand, 475. 

Daniel, 29, 151, 289, 476. 
Daniels, 29, 228, 289, 476, 
Dannatt, 273, 476. 
Darby, 405, 476. 
Darbyshire, 476. 
Darch, 143, 476. 
Dare, 143, 476. 
Dark, 228, 476. 
Darling, 476. 
Darlington, 89, 476. 
Darnell, 261, 476. 
Darrington, 69, 476. 
Dart, 476. 
Darvell ~\ 
DarviU } 7«' 47<5. 

Darwin, 323, 476. 
Daubney, 273, 476. 
Davenport, 476. 
Davey 1 
Davy } 30,476. 

David, 476. 

Davidson n 

-n ■ ^30, 118, 476, 588. 

Davison J > > > 

Davies, 30, 476. 
Davis, 30, 476. 
Daw 1 
Dawe } 17.477. 

Dawkins, 17, 261, 477. 
Dawson, 30, 177, 477, 58^. 



XXIV 



INDEX. 



I 31, 392, 477. 



Day, 30, 224, 477. 
Daykin, 130, 475. 
Daymenfc, 477. 
Deacon, 236, 477. 
Deakin, 362, 477. 
Deakins, 477. 
Dean 
Deane 
Dearden, 244, 477. 
Dearlove, 477. 
DeaviUe, 125, 477. 
Debell, 107. 
Debenham, 369, 477. 
Deck, 369, 477. 
Dee, 477. 
Deeble, 107, 151. 
Decks, 186, 477. 
Deeley, 477. 
Delbridge, 153. 

Demain t 

-n • y 426, 477. 
Demaine J ' 

Denby, 426, 477. 

Denison, 426, 477. 

Denman, 477. 

Denning, 477. 

Dennis, 107, 152, 186, 477.* 

Dennistoun, 426. 

Denny, 289, 369, 478. 

Densem t 

Denshamj 1^2,478. 

Dent, 180, 412, 478. 
Derbyshire, 476. 
Den-ick, 350, 478. 
Derriman, 478. 
Derry, 152, 323, 478. 
Desborougli, 478. 
Desforges, 478. 
Devenish, 171. 
Dererell, 78, 478. 
DeviUe, 125, 477. 

Dew 1 

r, y 73,478. 

Dewe J ' 

Dewar, 588, 597. 

Dewell, 395. 

Dewhurst, 244, 478. 

Dexter, 261, 478. 

Dibb, 478. 



Dibben, 171, 478. 
Dibble, 350, 478. 
Dick, 588. 
Dicken -i 
Dickin } 478. 
Dickens t 
Dickins / 4'^^- 
Dicker, 478. 
Dickie, 588. 
Dickenson t 
Dickinson / ^'^^■ 
Dicks, 346, 478. 
Dickson, 478, 588. 
Dillamore, 69, 478. 
Dilnot, 228, 478. 
Diment, 478. 
Dimmock t 
Dimock } 85,478. 

Dimond, 143, 478. 
Dimsdale, 216. 
Dingle. 103, 478. 
Dinning, 313, 478. 
Dinsdale, 413, 478. 
Diplock, 383, 478. 
Dix, 478. 
Dixon, 31, 478. 
Dobbs, 198, 479. 
Doble, 152, 479. 
Dobson, 235, 479. 
Dodd, 309, 313, 479- 
Dodds, 479, 588. 
Dodgson, 479. 
Dods, 588. 
Dodwell, 77, 479. 
Doel, 395, 479. 
Doggett, 85, 479. 
Doidge, 152, 479. 
DoUamore, 69. 
Dominy, 479. 
Dommett, 143, 479. 
Donald, 479, 581, 588, 59: 
Donaldson, 588. 
Doncaster, 320, 479. 
Done, 17, 93, 479. 
Doning, 198. 
Dook, 479. 
Dooley, 93, 479. 



INDEX. 



479. 



Doolittle, 479. 

Dore, 171. 

Dorey, 171, 479. 

Dormer, 73, 479. 

Oorrell, 479. 

Dorrington, 216, 479. 

Ooubledar, 262, 479. 

Oouglas, 313, 479, 588, 598. 

Dorer, 479. 

Dowdeswell, 198, 479. 

Dowding, 198, 479. 

Dowell, 262, 479. 

Down, 479. 

Downing, 370, 479. 

Downs 

Downes 

Dows 1 

Dowse } 273. 479. 

Dowsett, 479. 

Dowson, 479. 

Drabble, 130, 479. 

Drackley, 262, 479. 

Drage, 299, 479. 

Drake, 152, 171, 289, 479. 

Drakeford, 93. 

Drakes, 269, 480. 

Dniper, 480. 

Draycott, 262, 480. 

Drew, 142, 480. 

Drewery i 

Drewry } ^74, 480. 

Drewitt, 480. 
Dring, 273, 480. 
Drinkall, 480. 
Drinkwater, 93, 330, 480. 
Driver, 85, 198, 480. • 
Dronfield, 480. 
Druce, 302, 480. 
Drudge, 205, 480. 
Drumraond, 588, 598. 
Drury, 274, 480. 
Dry den, 480. 
Drysdale, 588. 
Duee, 340, 480. 
Duck, 480. 

Duckett, 350, 426, 480. 
Duckham, 153, 480. 



Diickmanton, 480. 
Duckworth, 244, 480. 
Dudding, 480. 
Duff, 588, 598. 
Duffield, 289, 480. 
Dufly, 480. 

Dugdale, 244, 426, 480. 
Duggan, 480. 
Duggleby, 413, 480. 
Duke, 383, 480. 
Dumbrell i 
DumbriU } ^^S, 480. 

Duncan, 588, 598. 

Dunch, 73. 

Duncombe, 69, 480. 

Dunderdale, 244, 480. 

Dunford, 480. 

Dungey, 480. 

Dunkley, 302, 480. 

Dunlop, 588, 598. 

Dunn, 17, 31, 141, 480, 588. 

Dunning, 31, 171, 390, 413, 430. 

Dunsford, 153. 

Dunstan, 103, 480. 

Durden, 244, 480. 

Durham, 4S0. 

Durose, 359, 480. 

Durrant, 289, 383, 480. 

Durston, 350, 480. 

Dutton, 93, 481. 

Duxbiiry, 244, 481. 

Dwight, 481. 

D\ball -. 

D:vbell } 290.431. 

Dye, 290, 481. 
Dyer, 20, 141, 481. 
Dyke, 481. 
Dykes, 588. 
Dyment, 478. 
Dymond, 143, 478. 
Dyson, 426, 481. 

Eade, 370, 383, 481. 
Eades, 481. 
Eagle, 481. 
Eames, 481. 
Eai-dley, 362, 481. 



XXVI 



INDEX. 



481. 



Earl 1 

Earle / 

Earnshaw, 426, 481. 

Easlea, 481. 

East, 481. 

Eastabrook t 

Easterbrook J ^^^' 

Eastbam, 481. 

Eastwood, 422, 481. 

Eaton, 93, 130, 481. 

Eatwell, 395, 481. 

Eaves, 481. 

Eayrs, 262, 481. 

Eecles, 244, 481. 

Eckley, 211, 481. 

Eddison, 481. 

Eddowes, 338, 481. 

Eddy, 481, 

Ed3, 481. 

Eden, 481. 

Edgar, 588. 

Edge, 125, 131, 481. 

Edgecumbe, 107 

Edginton, 481. 

Edkins, 481. 

Edmans, 481. 

Edmonds 

Edmunds 

Edmondson -i 

Edmundson / 

Edney, 206, 481. 

Edward, 588. 

Edwards, 31, 481, 588. 

Eggins, 482. 

Eggleton, 482. 

Eggleston, 180, 483, 

Eglinton, 290, 482. 

Ekius, 223, 482. 

Elbourn, 83, 482. 

Eldridge, 384, 482. 

Eley, 482. 

Elford, 482. 

Elgey 

Elgie 

Elkington, 389, 482. 

Ellacott I 

Ellicott } 153,482. 



481. 



481. 



481. 



482. 



Ellaway, 482. 

Ellerby, 413, 482. 

EUiot 1 32, 124, 309, 313, 

Elliott J 588, 598. 

Ellis, 32, 482. 

Ellison, 482. 

EUwood, 120, 309, 482. 

Elmitt, 274, 482. 

Else, 131, 482. 

Elsmore, 482. 

Elson, 153. 

Elston, 153, 482. 

Elvidge, 269, 482. 

Elwood, 482. 

Elworthy, 153, 482. 

Ely, 483. 

Embleton, 314, 483. 

Embrey, 483. 

Emery, 290, 302, 483. 

Emmersoa t _, 

■p y 18171274, 483. 

±.mer8on J ' ' 

Euimott, 426, 483. 

Empson i 

-P ^ y 274, 483. 

i.m8on J ' 

Endacott, 143, 483. 

England, 223, 351, 427, 483. 

English, 483. 

Ennion, 271, 338. 

Ensor, 171, 483. 

Eutwistle 1 

Entwisle J ' 

Enyon, 271, 338. 

Epton, 483. 

Erlam, 93, 483. 

Errington, 181, 314, 483. 

Esam, 323, 483. 

Essex, 4S3. 

Estabrook, 153, 481. 

Estbury, 73. 

Etchells, 89, 93, 483. 

Etheridge, 483. 

Etherington, 121. 

Eva, 483. 

Evans, 32, 437-439, 483. 

Eve, 186, 483. 

Eveleigb 

Evely 



48 



153, 483, 



INDEX. 



XXVll 



rerall, 337, 483. 
reratt, 483. 
rered, 483. 
rerett t 
feritt J 

yershed, 384, 483. 
rison, 483. 
wer, 483. 
wing, 588. 
yre, 131, 483. 



igg, 229, 483. 

iiles, 483. 

lirbairn, 314, 483, 588. 

lirbanks, 483. 

iirchild, 153, 483. 

lirclough, 245, 484, 

lirey 

liry 

iirhead, 186, 484.* 

iirthorne, 73, 484. 

illows 1 

allowes J 
ine, 484. 
arey, 484. 
armer, 141, 484. 
arns worth, 484. 
irquhar 



484. 



484. 



irqunar t 

arquharson} ^^S, 598. 

arr, 210, 217, 484. 

arrall, 484. 

arrant, 142, 484. 

arrar t 

arrer } 69,427,484. 

arrow, 284, 484. 
arthing, 351, 481. 
aulder, 118, 484, 
aulkner, 88, 484. 
awcett, 41.S, 484. 
awkes, 484. 
ay, 205, 484. 
ayrher, 427. 
azackerley, 245, 484. 
ear, 34C, 484, 
earn, 131, 362, 184. 
"earon, 484. 



Feather, 422, 484. 
Featherstone, 181, 413, 484. 
Feaveryear t 
Feaviour } 366,484. 

Felgate, 186, 48 1. 

Fell, 484. 

Felton, 341, 484. 

Fenemore i 

Fennimore} ^^l, 484.* 

Fenner, 187, 484. 

Fensom, 484, 

Fentoa, 323, 484, 

Fenwiek, 309, 311, 314, 484. 

Ferguson, 484, 581, 588, 598. 

Fern, 362, 484. 

Ferneyhough, 362, 484. 

Ferrar, 427, 

Ferris, 154, 396, 484. 

Fetherstonhaugh, 314. 

Fetiplace, 73. 

Few, 393, 485, 

Fewings, 485. 

Fidler, 89, 485. 

Field, 485. 

Fielden t 

Fielding / ^^^• 

Fifett, 171, 485, 

Filbee, 485, 

File, 225, 485, 

Fibuer, 229, 485. 

Finbow, 366, 485. 

Finch, 217, 485, 

Fincham, 370, 485. 

Findlay t 

Finlay I 588, 598, 

Finlayson J 

Finn, 229, 485. 

Finney, 131, 362, 485, 

Finnimore, 331, 484. 

Firkins, 485. 

Firth, 427, 485. 

Fish, 485. 

Fisher, 32, 485, 588. 

Fisk, 370, 485, 

Fitch, 187, 485. 

Fitchett, 131, 485. 

Fitt, 206, 485. 



xxvni 



INDEX. 



Fitter, 390, 485, 

Fitton, 93, 245, 485. 

Fladgate, 485. 

Flanders, 83, 485. 

Flatman, 870, 485. 

Flatt, 485. 

Fleming, 120, 483, 588, 598. 

Fletcher, 32, 124, 485. 

Flint, 485. 

Flintoff, 413, 485. 

Flinton, 413- 

Flook, 199, 486. 

Florey, 486. 

Flower, 351, 393, 396, 486. 

Flowers, 486. 

Floyd, 486. 

Fluck T 

Flux } 199,486. 

Foale, 486. 

Fogden, 380, 483. 

Fole, 69. 

Foliot, 206. 

Folkard, 187, 486. 

Foil, 69, 486. 

FoUett, 206, 486. 

Follows, 486. 

Fooks, 171, 486. 

Foot, 171, 486. 

Footitt, 486. 

Ford, 33, 486. 

Foljambe, 131. 

Forbes, 588, 598. 

Forman, 274, 486. 

Forrest, 237, 486, 588. 

Forrester, 486. 

Forryan, 262, 486. 

Forshaw, 245, 486. 

Forster, 33, 306, 486. 

Forsyth, 588. 

Fortescue, 302, 486. 

Fortnam t 

-p . y 331, 48G. 

iortnum J ' 

Foss, 154, 486. 

Foster, 33, 486. 

Fothergill, 487. 

Foulke, 171, 486. 

Foulkes, 486. 



Fountain, 78, 486. 

Fowke, 171, 486. 

Fowle, 486. 

Fowler, 33, 486. 

Fowles, 486. 

Fownes, 154. 

Fox, 33, 131, 319, 327, 487. 

Foxton, 487. 

Fraiupton, 172, 487. 

Francis, 392, 487. 

Frank, 487. 

Frankcombe t 

T. , y 199, 396, 487. 

irankcome J ' 

Frankham, 396. 

Frankland, 427, 487. 

FrankUn, 331, 487. 

Franks, 487. 

Fraser, 581, 589, 598. 

Frearson, 263, 487. 

Freebody, 487. 

Freegard, 393, 487. 

Freeman, 33, 365, 487. 

Freer, 263, 487. 

Freestone, 263, 487. 

Freeth, 393, 487. 

Freethy, 107, 487. 

Fremliu, 229, 487. 

French, 34, 154, 487. 

Frethorne, 73. 

Fretwell, 132, 487. 

Frewen, 263. 

Friend, 143, 487. 

Frisby, 274, 487. 

Frith, 89, 132, 487. 

Froggatt, 132, 210, 487. 

Frogley, 487. 

Frohock, 85, 487. 

Frome, 73. 

Froome, 73, 488. 

Frost, 290, 351, 488. 

Frow, 269, 488. 

Fry, 34, 351, 396, 4^J8. 

Fryer, 263, 488. 

Fulcher, 370, 488. 

Fulford, 154, 488. 

Fullard, 488. 

Fullarton, 589, 598. 



INDEX. 



XXIX 



aller, 19, 62, 48S. 

alton, 589. 

annell, 488. 

urber, 93, 488. 

ameaux, 154, 4S8. 

arness t 

y 132, 4SS. 
urniss J 

urse T 

)■ 154, 488. 
iirze J 

ydeU, 274. 

yson, 488. 



abb, 488. 
adsbj, 132, 488. 
adsden, 78, 488. 
agg, 323, 488. 
albraitb, 589, 598. 
ale, 141, 488. 
allimore. 94, 488. 
allon, 314, 488. 
alloway, 488, 589, 598. 
alpin, 171, 488. 
altej, 488. 
amble, 290, 488. 
ammon, 154, 488. 
•amul, 95. 
ander, 384, 488. 
■anderton, 405, 488. 
ape, 217. 
app, 290, 488. 
apper, 351. 
-arbutt, 488. 
ardiner t 
Gardner } 3^' ^^S, 5 

■are, 488. 

rarlick, 396, 488. 

rarman, 488. 

rame, 489. 

larner, 489. 

-arnett, 120, 245, 489. 

famham, 370, 489. 

Garrard t 

larrod } ^^^- 

larratt t 

larrett } 125,489. 

irarrood, 489. 



Garside, 489. 
Gaskell t 
GaskUl } 48^- 
Gastrell, 73. 
Gatehouse, 489. 
Gates, 489. 
Gaunt, 274, 489. 
Gay, 489. 
Gajfoi-d, 489. 
Gazard, 489. 
Gaze, 284, 489. 
Geacb, 489. 
Geake, 489. 
Geary, 263, 489. 
Geddes, 589, 598. 
Gedge, 290, 489. 
Gee, 489. 
Geering, 73. 
Geldard i 
Gelder } ^^V, 489. 

Gell, 132. 
Gelsthorpe, 489. 
Gemmell, 589. 
Genge, 489. 
Germ, 107, 428. 
Gent, 132, 489. 
George, 34, 489. 
German, 155, 489. 
Gerrard, 94, 245, 489. 
Gerrish, 489. 
Gerry, 108, 489, 
Ghey, -J 89. 
Gibb, 589. 
Gibbard, 489. 
Gibbings i 
Gibbh.: } 17,489. 

Gibbon, 489. 
Gibbons, 344, 489. 
Gibbs, 34, 194, 489. 
Gibby, 490. 
Giblett, 351, 490. 
Gibson, 34, 490, 589. 
Giddings, 490. 
Giddy, 107. 
Gidley, 154, 490. 
Gifford, 351, 490. 
Gilbert, 35, 141, 298, 490. 



XXX 



INDEX. 



GQchrist, 589, 598. 
Giles, 396, 490. 
Gilhespy, 314, 490. 
Gilks., 331, 390, 490. 
GUI, 101, 428, 490. 
Gillard, 490. 
Gillbard, 490. 
Gillespie, 314, 589, 598. 
GUlett, 275, 332, 490. 
Gilliart t 
Gmiatt } 274,332.490. 

Gillingham, 172, 490. 

Gilman t 

GUlman } 1^2, 490. 

Gilmour, 589, 598. 

Gilpin, 121. 

Gimson, 263, 490. 

Ginger, 78, 490. 

Girling, 370, 490. 

Gisborne, 133. 

Gittins, 341, 490. 

Gladwin, 199. 

Glanville, 107, 154, 490. 

Glass, 154, 396, 490. 

Glasson, 103, 490. 

Gleave, 94, 490. 

Gledhill, 428, 490. 

Glegg, 95. 

Glen, 589. 

Glendenning, 490. 

Glendinning, 314, 490, 589, 598. 

Glover, 490. 

Gloyn, 491. 

Goacher. 384, 491. 

Godbehere, 491. 

Godber, 323, 491. 

Goddard, 74, 172, 206, 371, 397, 491.* 

Godden, 229, 491. 

Goddier, 94, 491. 

Godfrey, 85, 344, 491. 

Godsall T 

Godsell } 199,212,491. 

Godson, 491. 
Godwin, 17, 396, 491. 
Goff, 302, 491. 
Golby, 491. 
Golden, 491. 



Golding, 491. 

Goldsmith, 491. 

Goldstraw, 491. 

Goldsworthy, 491. 

Gomm, 78, 491. 

Gooch, 491. 

Goodacre, 491. 

Goodall, 125, 491. 

Gooday, 491. 

Goodcbild, 184, 491. 

Goode, 302, 491. 

Gooden, 351, 371, 491. 

Gooderham, 491. 

Goodbew, 229, 491. 

Goodier, 94, 491. 

Gooding, 351, 371, 491. 

Goodknap, 275. 

Goodman, 491. 

Goodrich, 491. 

Goodridge, 155, 491. 

Goodson, 491. 

Goodwin, 491. 

Goodwin, 35, 491. 

Goodyear, 94, 275, 492. 

Goose, 492. 

Gordon, 589, 598. 

Goring, 384. 

GornaU, 237, 492. 

Gorringe, 384, 492. 

Gorst, 237, 492. 

Gorwyn, 143, 492. 

Gosden, 492. 

Gosling, 492. 

Goss, 78, 492. 

Gott, 428, 492. 

Gough, 79, 492. 

Gould, 125, 357, 492. 

Goulder, 492. 

Goulding, 492. 

Goulter, 492. 

Gow, 589. 

Gower, 229, 492. 

Gowing, 291, 492. 

Gowlett, 492. 

Grace, 492. 

Graham, 118, 309, 492, 589, 599 

Grainger, 492. 



INDEX. 



XXXI 



Grange, 217, 492. 

Granger, 492. 

Grant, 390, 492, 589, 599. 

Gratrix, 133, 492. 

Gratton, 126, 133, 492. 

Grevenor, 217. 

Grares, 83, 492. 

Gray, 35, 492, 589. 

Grayson, 428, 492. 

Greatorex -, ^^^ 

Greatnx J 

Greares, 405, 492. 

Grebble, 384. 

Greed, 493. 

Green, 36, 493. 

Greenacre, 493. 

Greenawav, 493. 

Greenfield, 15, 493. 

Greenhalgh, 246, 493. 

Greenhill, 493. 

Greenslade, 155, 493. 

Greenwell, 181, 493. 

Greenwood, 493. 

Gregory, 125, 133, 298, 493. 

Gregson, 246, 493. 

Greig, 589. 

Grendon, 155, 493. 

Gresty, 493. 

Greves, 405. 

Grey, 35, 314, 493. 

Gribble, 384. 

Grierson, 589. 

Grieve, 589. 

Griffin, 36, 76, 344, 493. 

Griffith 1 

Griffiths } 36, 210, 437, 493. 

Grigg, 103, 494. 
Grills, 108, 155, 494. 
Grimes, 494. 
Grimeey, 494. 
Gnmshaw, 246, 494. 
Grimwood, 494. 
Grindey t 
Grindy } 494. 
Grinfield, 397. 
Grist, 494. 
Groom, 494. 



Grose, 108, 494. 

Ground t 

^ -, y 85,494. 

Grounds J ' 

Grove, 494. 

GroTes, 336, 494. 

Growcott, 494. 

Grummitt, 275, 494. 

Grundy, 246, 494. 

Grylls, 108, 155. 

Guest, 405, 494. 

Guilding, 494. 

Gulliver, 302, 494. 

Gunn, 494. 

Gunning, 199. 

Gunter, 71, 74, 199, 443, 494. 

Guppy, 172, 397, 494. 

Gurney, 79, 494. 

Guthrie, 589, 599. 

Gutteridge, 263. 

Guy, 494. 

Gwilliam "i 

Gwillim J 

Gwilt, 494. 

Gwynne, 443, 446, 494. 

Gynn, 107, 217, 494. 

Gyte, 494. 



Hack, 494. 

Hackin, 246, 494. 

Haddon, 390, 494. 

Hadfield, 133, 494. 

Hadingham, 371, 494. 

Hadland, 494. 

Hadley, 405, 494. 

Haffenden, 384, 494. 

Haggar i 

„ ='° y 85, 494. 

Hagger j 

Haggett, 346, 494. 

Hague, 133, 428, 494. 

Haigh, 428, 494. 

Haine, 494. 

Haines, 494. 

Hainsworth, 239, 422, 494. 

Hakin, 246, 494. 

Hakluit, 212, 261. 



XXX 11 



INDEX. 



Hale, 495. 
Hales, 302, 495. 
Haley, 495. 
Halfacre, 495. 
Halford, 405, 495. 
Hall, 36, 124, 495, 589. 
Hallam, 125, 324, 495. 
Hallett, 351, 495. 
Halliday, 589. 
Halliwell, 246, 495. 
Halls, 36, 495. 
Hallworth, 495. 
Halsall, 246, 495. 
Halse, 155, 495. 
Ham, 155, 345, 495. 
Hamav, 337, 495. 
Hambleton, 362, 495. 
Hauibly, 108, 495. 
Hambrook, 495. 
Hames, 495. 
Hamilton, 589, 599. 
Hamlyn, 155, 495, 
Hariimersley, 495. 
Hammond, 37, 495. 
Hampsliire, 495. 
Hampson, 495. 
Hampton, 405, 495. 
Hancock, 133, 495. 
Hancorn, 496. 
Hand, 496. 
Handcock, 133, 495. 
Handford, 133, 4'J6. 
Hands, 390, 496. 
Hanham, 351, 496. 
Handley, 428, 496. 
Hankej, 94, 496. 
Hankin, 217, 496. 
Hanks, 199, 496. 
Hanley, 428, 496. 
Hann, 172, 496. 
Hannaford, 156, 496. 
Hannam, 351, 496. 
Hannibal, 321, 449. 
Hansford, 173, 496. 
Hanson, 428, 496. 
Harber, 496. 
Hard, 496. 



496. 



Hard acre "i 
Hardaker j 
Hardcastle, 428, 496. 
Harden, 496. 
Hardicker t 
Hardiker / ^^^• 
Hardie, 37, 589, 599. 
Harding, 17, 37, 141, 496. 
Hardman, 237, 247, 496. 
HardstafP, 324, 496. 
Hardwick, 125, 351, 496. 
Havdy, 37, 258, 496. 
Hargreaves, 247, 422, 496. 
Harker, 409, 496. 
Harkness, 589. 
Harlaud, 413, 496. 
Harle, 314, 496. 
Harmer, 496. 
Harper, 496, 589. 
Harpham, 324, 496. 
Harradine, 70, 496. 
Harris, 37, 497. 
Harrison, 37, 497. 
Harrod, 497. 
Harry, 497. 
Hart, 38, 194, 497. 
Hartland, 199, 497. 
Hartle, 497. 
Hartley, 236, 428, 497. 
HartneU i 

HartnoU } 156,497. 
Hartop, 69, 497. 
Hartridge, 230, 497. 
Harvey, 38, 141, 283, 

599. 
Harwood, 247, 497. 
Haslam, 236, 247, 497. 
Hasler, 497. 
HassaU i 

Hassell } 94.497. 
Hatch, 346, 498. 
Hatfield, 498. 
Hatherell, 498. 
Hatbway, 498. 
Hatt, 332, 498. 
Hatten, 498. 
Hatton. 498. 



357, 497, 589 



INDEX. 



XXXUl 



! Havilaiid, 174. 
' Hawes, 83, 498. 

Hawke, 108, 498. 

Hawken, 498. 

Hawkes, 390, 498. 

Hawkey, 108, 498. 

Hawking, 498. 

Hawkings, 498. 

Hawkins, 38, 194, 344, 498. 

Hawley, 498. 

Haworth, 40, 247, 498. 

Hay, 498, 589, 599. 

Hayden, 498. 

Haydock, 247, 498. 

Haydon, 142, 498. 

Hayes, 498. 

Hayhurst, 498. 

Hayman, 498. 

Hayne, 103, 498. 

Ilaynes, 332, 498. 

Hay ter, 173, 498. 

Haythorntliwaite, 237, 498. 

Hayward, 39, 498. 

Haywood, 498. 
, Bead, 498. 
I Heading, 499. 

Headington, 499. 

fJeadon, 499. 

fleale} 156,345,499. 

Health, 499. 

'Iraley " 

ll.uly . 

lieaman, 143, 499. 

Heap, 247, 499. 

I lid, 156, 499. 

I irle, 108, 499. 
tfearn, 499. 
fleath, 357, 499. 
Icathcote, 134, 499. 

I.atley, 499. 

Laton, 247, 499. 

i .ver, 38*, 499. 
.100,409, 429,499. 
litch, 346, 499. 

. ron, 499. 
Ueddon, 156, 499. 



79, 499. 



Hedges, 79, 499. 
Hedley, 307, 314, 499. 
Heggadon, 143, 499. 
Heighway, 337, 499. 
Hele, 156. 
Heler, 499. 
Hellier, 499. 
Helliwell, 429, 499. 
Hellyar -i 
Hellyer j 
Helmer, 143, 499. 
Helmsley, 324, 384, 499. 
Hembrow, 352, 499. 
Heming, 499. 

Hemming t 

XT ■ y 405,499. 

Hemmmgs j ' 

Hempsall, 499. 
Hemsley, 324, 384, 499. 
Hemus, 403, 499. 
Henderson, 307, 499, 590. 
Hendy, 102, 499. 
Henley, 499. 
Henshall, 94, 499. 
Henson, 263, 499. 
Henstock, 499. 
Henwood, 109, 499. 
Heppell 1 

Hepple } 181, 500. 
Hepworth, 429, 500. 
Herbert, 443, 500. 
Herdman, 500. 
Hem T 
Heme } ^91, 500. 

Herrick, 263, 324, 500. 
Herries, 590. 
Herring, 275, 291, 500. 
Herrod, 320, 500. 
Hervey, 38. 
Heseltine, 413, 500. 
Hesketh, 247, 500. 
Heslington, 413. 
Heslop, 314, 500. 
Hesmondbalgh, 237, 500. 
Hetberington, 121, 309, 500. 
Hewer, 195, 500. 
Hewett T 
Hewitt } 500. 



IN'DEX. 



Hewitson, 500. 
Hewlett, 500. 
Hewson, 275, 500. 
Hext, 156, 500. 
Hey, 429, 500. 
Heyes, 500, 
Heygate, 500. 
Heyrick, 263. 
Heyward, 500. 
Heywood. 143, 500. 
Hiatfc, 199, 332, 500. 
Hibbard -i 
Hibberdj 398.500. 

Hibbert, 500. 
Hick, 500. 
Hacken t 
Hickin J 
Hickling, 500. 
Hickman, 500. 
Hickmott, 225, 500. 
Hicks, 500. 
Hickson, 500. 
Hickton, 320, 500. 
Hide, 500. 
Hides, 500. 
Hiett, 199, 500. 
Higginbotbam t 
Higginbottom _| ' 

Higgins, 501. 
Higginson, 501. 
Higgs, 501. 
Higham, 248, 501. 
Higman, 501. 
HigneU, 501. 

Higson, 501. 

Hilder, 384, 501. 

Hildred, 501. 

Hill, 38, 141, 501, 590. 

Hillier, 501. 

Hills, 38, 501. 

HiUson T 

HUson } 1^3.501. 

Hilton, 121, 236, 248, 501. 

Hincbcliffe, 429, 501. 

Hind, 501. 

Hindle, 501. 

Hindmarsh, 315, 501. 



Hine, 358, 501. 
Hingley, 501. 
Hinton, 341, 501. 
Hioms T 
Hirons } 3^2, 501. 

Hird, 413, 501. 

Hirst, 501. 

Hiscock, 173, 501. 

Hitchcock, 501. 

Hitcben .^ 

Hitchin I 502. 

Hitchon J 

Hitcbings t 

ffitchins } 109.502. 

Hoadley. 384. 502. 

Hoar 1 

Hoare j 

Hoatb, 384, 502, 

Hobart, 291. 

Hobbs, 502. 

Hobby, 212, 502. 

Hobden, 384, 502. 

Hobgen, 502. 

Hobley, 502. 

Hobson, 502. 

Hobye, 74. 

Hocken, 102, 502. 

Hock enh all i 

Hockenbull } 94,502. 

Hockey, 502. 

Hockin -i 

Hocking } 102,502. 

Hockley, 187, 502. 
Hocknell, 94, 502. 
Hockridge, 143, 502. 
HoddeU, 502. 
Hodder, 156, 502. 
Hoddinott, 341, 352, 502. 
Hodge, 103, 109, 142, 502. 
Hodges, 502. 
Hodgetts. 502. 
Hodgkins, 502. 
Hodgkiuson, 125, 502. 
Hodgson, 181, 502. 
Hodnett, 341, 352, 502. 
Hodson, 502. 
Hogarth, 121, 502. 



INDEX. 



XXXV 



=°Sj^° I 230,503. 
Hogbin J 

Hogg, 315, 503, 590. 
Hoggarth -. ^^^ g^g 
Hoggard J ' 

Holborrow, 109, 503. 
Holbrook, 324. 503. 
Holbrow, 199, 503, 
Holcott, 74. 
Holcroft 1 
Holdcroft } 248,358,503. 

Holden t 

Tj ,.. y 248, 503. 

Holding J ' 

Holder, 503. 

Holdom, 79, 503. 

Holdsworth, 423, 503, 

Hole, 503. 

Holgate, 248, 503. 

Hollamby, 503. 

HoUand, 94, 230, 503. 

Hollands, 230, 503. 

Hollick, 390, 503. 

Hollidaj, 503. 

Hollier, 263, 503. 

Hollingsworth i 

Hollingworth } 134,362,503. 

Hollington, 405, 503. 
Hollins, 362, 503. 
HoUinsliead, 95, 503. 
Hollis, 206, 503. 
Hollow, 103, 503. 
Holloway, 503. 
Hollyoak, 503. 
Holman, 503. 
Holme, 503. 
Holmes, 39, 503. 
Holness, 230, 503. 
Holroyd, 429, 503. 
Holt, 79, 248, 503. 
Holtom, 79, 504. 
Holton, 302, 504. 
Holjday, 503. 
Holyoak, 390, 504. 
Home, 341, 504. 
Homer, 173, 504, 
Homewood, 504, 
Hone, 332, 504. 



Honess, 230, 503, 

Honey, 504. 

Honeyfield, 504. 

Honeysett, 504. 

Honniball, 143, 504. 

Honour, 504. 

Honywood, 187. 

Hood, 504, 590. 

Hook, 504. 

Hooker, 230, 504. 

Hookway, 504. 

Hooley, 95, 504. 

Hooper, 101, 504. 

Hope, 504, 590, 

Hopkin T 

Tj ^, . y 82, 504, 

Hopkms J ' 

Hopkin son, 125, 504, 

Hopley, 95, 504. 

Hopper, 85, 413, 504. 

Hopps, 504. 

Horn, 291, 504. 

Hornby, 248, 414, 504. 

Horner, 414, 504, 

Hornsby, 504. 

Horobin "i 

Horrobin j 

Horrocks, 248, 504. 

Horsey, 504. 

Horsfall, 429, 504. 

Horsley, 414, 504. 

Horton, 95, 141, 390, 504. 

Horwood, 79, 504. 

Hosegood, 352, 504. 

Hosier, 341. 

Hosken "j 

Hoskin > 102, 504. 

Hosking J 



Hoskings t 
Hoskins J 



504. 



Hotchkiss, 341, 504. 
Hotten, 103, 505. 
Hough, 249, 505. 
Houghton, 249, 505. , 
Houlbrook, 505. 
Houldcroft, 248, 358, 503. 
Houlden, 503. 
Houldsworth, 423, 503. 



XXXVl 



INDEX. 



Hounsell, 173, 505. 

Housden, 505. 

House, 352, 397, 505. 

Houseman, 505. 

Housley, 134, 505. 

Howard, 17, 39, 247, 283, 505. 

Howarth, 40, 247, 505. 

Howe, 125, 345, 505. 

Howell, 291, 445, 505. 

Howells, 505. 

Howes, 505. 

Howey 1 

Howie I ^05, 590. 

Howett T 
Howitt I ^^^• 
Howlett, 505. 
Ho worth, 40, 247, 505. 
Howse, 352, 398, 505. 
Howson, 505. 
Hojes, 275, 505. 
Hoyland, 95. 
Hoyle, 429, 505. 
Hoyles, 505. 
Huband, 405, 505. 
Hubbard, 291, 505. 
Huddleston, 249, 505. 
Hudson, 40, 124, 408, 505. 
Huggins, 291, 505. 
Hughes, 40, 505. 
Hugill, 414, 506. 
Hulbert, 398, 506, 
Hull, 173, 506. 
HuUand, 134, 506. 
Hulme, 95, 249, 358, 506. 
Humble, 506. 
Humbley, 506. 
Humfrey, 506. 
Humphrey, 40, 506. 
Humphreys T ^^^ g^g 
Humphries J 
Hunloke, 134. 
Hunt, 40, 319, 402, 506. 
Hunter, 506, 590. 
Huntley, 199. 
Hurd, 506. 
Hurford, 352, 506. 
Hurley, 352, 506, 



Hurrell, 143, 506. 
Hurren, 506. 
Hurry, 85, 208, 506. 
Hurst, 249, 506. 
Hurt, 324, 506. 
Huskinson, 324, 506. 
Hussey, 352, 397, 506. 
Hutchings, 40, 352, 506. 
Hutchinson, 40, 181, 507, 590. 
Hutley, 507. 
Hutt, 332, 507. 
Hutton, 275, 507. 
Huxham, 507. 
Huxley, 95, 507. 
Huxtable, 143, 507. 
Hyatt, 199, 500, 
Hyde, 405, 507. 
Hyslop, 314, 590. 



Ibbotson, 507. 

IbisoD, 507. 
Iddon, 237, 507. 
lies, 199, 507. 
Illingworth, 429, 507. 
Ince, 95. 
Incledon, 156. 
Ing, 80, 507. 
Ingall, 275, 507. 
Ingate, 366, 507, 
Inge, 80, 230, 507. 
Ingham, 429, 507, 
Ingle, 275, 507. 
Ingleby, 430, 507. 
Inglis, 590, 599. 
Ingram, 292, 507. 
Inions, 341, 342, 507, 
Innes, 590, 599. 
Inns, 507. 
Inskip, 70, 507. 
Instone, 341, 507. 
Ireland, 249, 507. 
Irish, 155, 507. 
Irons, 332. 
Irvine, 590, 599. 
Irving, 118, 507, 590, 599. 
Isaac, 156, 507. 



INDEX. 



XXXV u 



Isaacs, 507. 
IsabeU, 292. 
IsbeU, 292. 
iBgar, 199, 346, 507. 
Isted, 384, 507. 
Ivatt, 86, 507. 
Irens, 388, 507, 
Ives, 284, 507. 
Iveson, 414, 507. 
Ivey, 109, 507. 
Ivory, 217, 507. 
Izaard, 507. 



Jack, 590. 

Jackman, 507. 

Jacks, 507. 

Jackson, 40, 507, 590. 

Jacob I 

Jacobs } 292.352.508. 

Jagger, 508. 

James, 41, 508. 

Jameson, 41, 508. 

Jamieson, 41, 508, 590. 

Jane, 109, 508. 

Janes, 508. 

Jaques, 414, 508. 

Jardine, 590. 

Jarrett, 508. 

Jarrora, 264, 508. 

Jarvis, 508. 

Jasper, 508. 

Jay, 212, 377, 508. 

Jeavons, 362, 508. 

Jeffcoate "i 

Jeffcote / ^^^• 

Jefferies t 

Jeffreys } 41,508. 

Jeffery, 41, 142, 508. 

Jefferson, 41, 118, 508. 

Jeffs, 41, 508. 

Jelbart -> 

Jelbert | 10^,508. 

Jellis, 508. 

Jenkin, 41, 444, 508. 

Jenkins, 41, 444, 446, 508. 

Jenkinson, 41, 509. 



Jenner, 385, 509. 
Jennings, 509. 
Jephcott, 508. 
Jepson, 509. 
Jeremiah, 509. 
Jerman, 155. 
Jerram, 135, 509. 
Jervis, 509. 
Jesson, 264, 509. 

Jessop T 

-r h 230, 509. 

d essup J ' 

Jesly, 509. 

Jevons, 362, 508. 

JeweU, 109, 156, 509. 

Jilliugs, 509. 

JobUng, 315, 509. 

Jobson, 509. 

Jocelyn, 187. 

John, 509. 

Johns, 509. 

Johnson, 41, 509. 

Johnston, 42, 121, 509, 590, 599. 

JoUiffe, 206, 509. 

Jolly, 292, 371, 509. 

Jonas, 509. 

Jones, 42, 437-439, 444, 509. 

Joop, 385, 398. 

Jopling, 315, 509. 

Jordan, 414, 510. 

Jordison, 414, 510. 

Jose, 510. 

Joseph, 510. 

Joshu 1 

Josling J ' 

Joule, 135, 510. 

Jowett, 510. 

Joy, 187, 510. 

Joyce, 70, 510. 

Joyes, 70, 510. 

Jubb, 430, 510, 

Juby, 371, 510. 

Judd, 207, 398, 510. 

Judge, 510. 

Judkins, 303, 510. 

Judson, 414, 510. 

Julian 

Julyan 



510. 



510. 



.,A 



XXXVUl 



INDEX. 



Jupe, 385, 398, 510. 
Jupp, 385, 510. 



Earn, 510, 
Karslake, 157. 

Kaye } ^^^' ^^> ^^^' ^^^ 

Keast, 510, 

Keble, 371. 

Xeeble, 371, 390, 510. 

Keedwell, 510. 

Keel, 352, 510. 

Keeling, 362, 510. 

Keen i 

Keeoe } ^6, 510. 

Keep, 510. 

Keetley n 

Keightley } ^59, 510. 

Keevil, 398, 510. 

Keirl, 353, 510. 

Kellaway, 173, 510. 

Kellett, 249, 510. 

Kelly, 157, 510, 590. 

Kelsall, 95, 249, 510. 

Kelsey, 230, 510. 

Kemball, 510. 

Kemble, 398, 510. 

Kemp, 275, 511, 

Kempson, 511. 

Kempthorn, 157- 

Kemsley, 511. 

KendaU, 511. 

Keudrew, 409, 511. 

Kendrick, 74. 

Kennard, 511. 

Kennedy, 590, 599. 

Kennerley, 511. 

Kent, 207, 511. 

Kenward, 380, 511. 

Kenworthy, 423, 511. 

Kenyon, 250, 511. 

Kerkin, 103, 511. 

Kerr, 590, 599. 

Kerrich, 371. 

Kerridge, 371, 511. 

Kerrison, 511. 



Keriy, 511. 
Kersey, 371, 511. 
Kershaw, 250, 511. 
Keralake, 157, 511. 
Kestle, 109, 511. 
Ketley, 511. 
Ketteil, 17, 390. 
Kettlewell, 414, 511, 
Kettley, 511. 
Kevem, 103, 511. 
Key, 102, 125, 511. 
Keynes, 173, 511. 
Keys, 511. 
Keyte, 390, 511. 
Keyworth, 324, 511. 
Kibble, 371, 390, 511. 
Kidd, 511, 590. 
Kiddell T 
Kiddle } 345,511. 

Kidman, 511. 
Kidner, 511. 
KUbey, 332, 511. 
Killick, 385, 511. 
Kilminster t 
Kilmister } 199.511 
Kilshaw, 511. 
Kilvington, 415, 511. 
Kimber, 74, 511. 
Kinch, 511. 
Kinchin, 511. 
King, 42, 392, 511, 590. 
Kingham, 80, 512. 
Kingman, 512. 
Kingsley, 218, 512.* 
Kingsman, 187. 
Kingsnorth, 231, 512. 
Kingston, 303, 512. 
Kingwell, 144, 512. 
Kinsey, 95, 512. 
Kipling, 415, 512, 
Kirby, 408, 512, 
Kirk, 512, 590. 
Kirkby, 512. 
Kirkham, 512. 
Kirkland, 512. 
Kirkman, 264, 512. 
Kirkpatrict, 591. 



INDEX. 



XX XIX 



} 415, 



512. 



Kirkup, 512. 

Kirtou, 181, 512. 

Kisby, 512. 

Kitchen 

Kitcliing 

Kitchener, 218, 512. 

Kitto 1 

Kittow } 103, 109. 512. 

Knaggs, 415, 512. 
Knapman, 157, 512. 
Knapp, 398, 512. 
Kneebone, 109, 512. 
Knibb, 512. 
Knifton, 135, 512. 
Knight, 42, 512. 
Knights, 42, 513. 
Kniveton, 135. 
Knott, 126, 135, 513. 
Knowles, 513. 
Kynaston, 341, 513. 



Lacey, 264, 513. 
Ladds, 223, 513, 
Lagden, 184, 513. 
Laidlaw, 315, 591, 599. 
Laidler, 315, 513. 
Lain, 285, 513. 
Laing, 591. 
Laity, 109, 513. 
Lake, 157, 283, 513. 
Lakin, 362, 513. 
Lamb, 42, 513. 
Lambert, 415, 513. 
Lambourn t 
Lamburn } ^0, 513 
Lambshead, 513. 
Laming 
Lamming 
Lamont, 591, 599 
Lamplough 



513. 



iiamplougli T 

Lamplugh } 121.415,513. 

Lancaster, 513. 
Land, 292, 513. 
Lander, 109, 513. 
Lane, 43, 513. 



} 43, 



231, 514. 



Lanfear, 75, 513. 

Lang, 513, 591. 

Langdon, 110, 513. 

Langley, 385, 513. 

Langman, 144, 514. 

Langridge, 231, 514. 

Langston, 514. 

Langworthy, 157, 514. 

Lanyon, 109, 514. 

Lapidge, 415. 

Larcombe, 514. 

Large, 514. 

Larkia 

Larking 

Larwood, 292, 514. 

Laslett, 514. 

Last, 514. 

Latham, 95, 250, 514. 

Lathum, 188. 

Laughton, 514. 

Laurie, 514, 517, 591. 

Laver, 353, 514. 

Laverack t 

Laverick J ' 

Lavington, 207, 514. 

Law, 43, 236, 514, 591. 

Lawes, 514. 

Lawley, 342, 514. 

Lawrence, 43, 344, 514. 

Lawrenson, 43, 514. 

Lawry, 43, 110, 514. 

Laws, 43, 514. 

Lawson, 43, 181, 514, 591. 

Lawton, 96, 514. 

Lay, 514. 

Laycock, 430, 514. 

Lea, 43, 88, 5J4. 

Leach, 142, 514. 

Leadbeater t 

Leadbetter _| 

Leah, 96, 514. 

Leak t 

Leake } ^^^' '^^^- 

Lean, 514. 

Leaper, 415, 514, 

Lear, 514. 

Leather, 514. 



264, 514. 



xl 



INDEX. 



Leaver, 250, 515. 

Leavers, 515. 

Leckenby, 515. 

Ledbrook, 515. 

Ledger, 515. 

Lee, 43, 88, 141, 319, 515. 

Leech, 88, 515. 

Leeder, 292, 515, 

Leeds, 515. 

Leeming, 515. 

Lees, 43, 515. 

Leese, 515. 

Legg, 174, 515. 

Leggett T ^ 

Leggott ; ^^°- 

Legh, 96. 

Le Grice t 

LeGrys } 293,371,515. 

Leigh, 43, 96, 250, 515. 
Leightou, 515. 
Leivers, 515. 
Lemmon, 515. 
Lemon, 515. 
Leney, 515. 
Lennox, 591, 600. 
Lenton, 223, 515. 
Leonard, 83, 515. 
Leppard, 385, 515. 
Lerwill, 144, 515. 
Leslie, 591, 600. 
Lethbridge, 158, 515. 
Letheren, 515. 
Lever, 250, 515. 
Leverton, 324. 
Levett 
Levitt / 
Lewell, 293, 515. 
Lewin, 303, 515. 
Lewis, 43, 444, 515. 
Lewry, 515. 
Ley, 158, 516. 
Libby, 158. 
Liddell, 315, 516. 
Liddicoat, 110, 516. 
Liddle, 516. 
Lidstone, 144, 516. 
Light, 516. 



1 231, 385, 515. 



Lightfoot, 88, 516. 
Lill, 275, 516. 
Lilley, 275, 516. 
Limb, 126, 516. 
Limbrick, 200, 516. 
Limer, 363, 516. 
Lincoln, 516. 
Lindley, 324, 516. 
Lindop, 363, 516. 
Lindsay, 591, 600. 
Lines, 218, 516. 
Ling, 293, 345, 371, 510. 
Lingard, 516. 
Linnell, 303, 516. 
Lister, 20, 516. 
Litchfield, 516. 
Lithgoe, 518. 
Little, 516, 591. 
Littleehild, 516. 
Littlejohn, 516. 
Littlejohns, 144, 516. 
Littler, 96, 516. 
Littleton, 103, 516. 
Littlewood, 516. 
Liversedge, 416. 
Livesey, 250, 516. 
Livesley, 516. 
Llewellyn, 516. 
Lloyd, 43, 437-439, 516. 
Lobb, 110, 516. 
Lock, 204, 516. 
Lockett, 516. 
LockwooJ, 430, 516. 
Lockyer, 345, 516. 
Loder t 
Lodder } 174, 516. 

Lodge, 430, 516. 
Lofthouse, 416, 422, 516. 
Loftus, 416. 
Logan, 591. 
Lomas, 135, 517. 
Loraax, 517. 
Long, 44, 517. 
Longbottom, 517. 
Longden, 517. 
Longley, 517. 
Longman, 517. 



INDEX. 



xli 



144, 517. 



Longstaff, 181, 517. 
Longton, 250, 517. 
Longworth, 250, 517. 
Lonsdale, 250, 517. 
\A>ns\ej, 517.* 
Look, 517. 
Looker, 517. 
Loosemoor t 
Loosmoor J 
Loosley, 332, 517. 
Lord, 250, 366, 517. 
Lory, 517. 
Loseby, 517. 
Louch, 332, 517. 
Love, 231, 385, 517. 
Lovatt, 264, 363, 517. 
Loregrove, 517. 
Lovell, 303, 385, 517. 
Lovelock, 517. 
Loveridge, 142, 200, 517. 
Levering, 158, 517. 
Loverock, 517. 
Lovett T 
Lovitt } 264,363,517. 

Loveybond t 

Lovibond J 

Low, 44, 591. 

Lowe, 44, 96, 517. 

Lowes, 44, 135, 517. 

Lowish, 44, 517. 

Lowndes, 358, 517. 

Lowry -, 

Lowrey / ^^^• 

Lowther, 121. 

Loxton, 353, 518. 

Lucas, 86, 518. 

Luck, 231, 518. 

Luckett, 518. 

Lucking, 188, 518. 

Lucksford, 518. 

Ludlam, 135, 518. 

Luff, 385, 518. 

Lugg, 110, 518. 

Lumb, 423, 518. 

Lumley, 416, 518. 

Lumsden, 315, 518, 591, 600. 



Lund 1 

Lunt [• 250, 518. 
Liinn J 

Luscombe, 158, 518. 
Lush, 174, 518. 
Lusty, 518, 
Lutley, 353, 518. 
Luxford, 385, 518. 
Luxton, 144, 518. 
Lybby, 158. 
Lyford, 75, 518. 
Lyle, 110, 518. 
Lymer, 363, 518. 
Lynam, 518. 
Lyne, 110, 518. 
Lynn, 518. 
Lyon, 518, 591. 
Lythgoe, 518. 



Mably, 103, 518. 

McAdam, 591, 600. 

Me Arthur, 591. 

Macaulay, 264, 518. 

McCallum, 591, 600. 

MeCulloch, 591. 

McDonald, 591, 600. 

McDougall, 591. 

Mace, 332, 518. 

McEwan t 

-^ „ [ 591. 

McEwen J 

McFarlane, 591. 

McGregor, 591, 600. 

Machin, 201, 325, 518. 

Mcintosh "I 

Mackintosh j 

Mack, 285, 518. 

Mackaness, 299, 518. 

Mclntyre, 591. 

Mackinder, 518, 580. 

McKay 

Mackay 

McKenzie t 

Mackenzie J 

Mackie J 
Mackley, 264, 518. 



591. 



591. 



xlii 



INDEX. 



592. 



592. 



592. 



592. 



592. 



, 212, 444, 519. 



McLaren -i 
Mackren | ^l^, 592 
McLean i 
Maclean J ^' 
McLeod "] 
MacLeod J 
McMillan -i 
MacmiUan J 
McIS^ab -1 
Macnab J 
McNaugliton, 592. 
McNeQl, 592, 600. 
McPherson 
Macpherson 
McKae i 
Macrae / ^^''^^ 
Maddaford -i 

Maddaver I j^j^j gjg 
Maddiver J 

Maddi^on, 181, 519. 

Maddock 

Maddocks 

Maddox 

Maddy, 212, 519. 

Madeley, 519. 

Maden, 519. 

Madge, 144, 519. 

Magor, 111, 519. 

Maidens, 270, 519. 

Maidment, 519. 

Maile, 223. 

Mailes, 519. 

Main, 519. 

Mainwaring, 213, 231, 519 

Mair, 592. 

Maitland, 592, GOO. 

Major, 519. 

Makens, 519. 

Makins, 293, 519. 

Makepeace, 519. 

Malbon, 96. 

Malcolm, 592, 600. 

Maiden, 70, 519. 

Malin, 332, 519. 

Malkin, 519. 

Mallam, 179, 519. 

Mallett, 293, 519. 



Mallinder, 126, 519. 

Mallinson, 519. 

Maltby, 324, 519. 

Manisty, 218. 

Manley, 519. 

Mann, 82, 142, 158, 293, 390, 519. 

Manners, 399, 519. 

Manning, 142, 188, 519. 

Mannington, 519. 

Mansell, 342, 519. 

Mansfield, 332, 519. 

Manwaring, 213, 231, 519. 

Mapstone, 519. 

Marchant, 385, 519. 

Marchington, 136, 519. 

Mardell, 218, 519. 

Marfell, 210, 519. 

Marfleefc, 276, 519. 

Margerison ■. 

Margison I 519^ 

Marginson J 

Marke, 519. 

Markham, 276, 519. 

Marks, 158, 519. 

Marples, 135, 519. 

Marriage, 188, 519. 

Marriott, 125, 519. 

Marsden, 125, 136, 250, 430, 520. 

Marsh, 44, 520. 

Marshall, 44, 520, 592. 

Marsland, 96, 520. 

Marson, 520. 

Marston, 430, 520. 

Martin, 44, 520, 592. 

Martindale, 122, 520. 

Martland, 238, 520. 

Mash, 223, 520. 

Mashiter, 520. 

Maskell, 188, 520. 

Maskery "i 

Maskrey J 

Maslen, 520. 

Mason, 45, 520. 

Massey, 96, 521. 

Masters, 353, 521. 

Mastin, 521. 

Matcham, 231, 521. 



INDF.X. 



xliii 



Mather, 251, 521, 592. 
Mathieson t ^ . , ,^„ 
Mathison I 45.521,592, 

Matthams, 521. 

Matthew, 45, 521. 

Matthews, 45, 71, 392, 521. 

Matthias, 521. 

Matti3on i 

Matterson I 45, 416, 521. 

Matson J 

Matts, 45, 521. 

Maudsley, 251, 521. 

Maugham, 521. 

Maughan, 521. 

Maule, 303. 

Maunder, 158, 521. 

Maundrell, 399, 521. 

Maw, 270, 275, 521, 

Mawdsley, 251, 521. 

Mawer, 276, 521. 

Mawle, 303, 521. 

MawsoD, 521. 

Maxted, 521. 

MaxweU, 521, 592, 600. 

May, 45, 521. 

Maje, 521. 

Mayer, 521. 

Mayes, 521. 

Mayhew, 371, 522. 

Maylaru, 522. 

Maynard, 110, 158, 522. 

Mayne, 110, 522. 

Mayo, 174, 522. 

Mayor, 251, 522. 

Mead t 

L 50.7 

Meade J "''' 
Meaden, 522. 
Meadmore, 522. 
Meadows, 522. 
Meaker, 346, 522. 
Meakin, 522. 
Mealor, 522. 
Measures, 522. 
Meatyard, 174, 522. 
Medforth, 522. 
Medland, 522. 
Medlicott, 342, 522. 



Meech, 174, 522. 

Meek, 522. 

Meen, 522. 

Meeson, 189, 522. 

Megginson -> 

Meggison I 417, 522. 

Megson J 

Meikie, 592. 

Melhuish i 

Melluish } 159, 522. 

Mellings, 522. 
Mellor, 136, 522. 
Mellors, 522. 
Melsome, 399, 522. 
Menzies, 592, 600. 
Mercer, 231, 522. 
Meredith, 212, 437, 522. 
Merrell, 522. 
Merrett, 200, 522. 
Merrick, 213, 522. 
Merrikin, 270, 522. 
Merrills, 522. 
Merriman, 399. 
Message, 522. 
Messenger, 522. 
Messinger, 298, 522. 
Metcalf 1 
Metcalfe } ^l^, 522. 

Metherall -1 
MethereU / l^^' 5^^- 
Metson, 523. 
Mew, 523. 
Meynell, 136. 
Meyrick, 213, 523. 
Micheli, 101, 523. 
Middlemas ~. 
Middlemiss j 
Middleton, 45, 523, 592. 
Midgley, 430, 523. 
Midwinter, 332, 523. 
Milbank, 188, 523. 
Milburn, 309, 315, 523. 
Mildmay, 188. 
Mildon, 144, 523. 
Miles, 45, 194, 523. 
Milk, 285, 523. 
Mill, 523. 



xliv 



INDEX. 



Millar, 46, 592. 
Millard, 523. 
Millbank, 523. 
Milledge, 523. 
Millen, 523. 
Miller, 46, 523, 592. 
MiUican, 523. 
Millichamp, 342, 523. 
Milligan, 528, 592. 
Millikin, 523. 
Millington, 325, 523. 

Millman t 

TVTi Y 523, 

MiLman J 

MiUs, 46, 523. 

Millward, 136, 524. 

Milne, 524, 592. 

ililner, 125, 408, 524. 

Milnes, 136. 

Milsham, 399. 

Milsom, 399, 522. 

Milton, 524. • 

Milward, 136, 386, 524. 

Minchin, 200, 524. 

Minett, 200, 524. 

Minns, 293, 524. 

Minshall t 

MinshuU } 96,524. 

Minta, 270, 524. 

Minter, 225, 524. 

Mintey t 

Mint/ } 399' 524. 

Minton, 337, 342, 524. 

Miskin, 225, 524. 

Missing, 524. 

Mitchell, 46, 101, 524, 592. 

Mitford, 315. 

Mody, 276, 353. 

Moffatt, 122, 524, 592, 600. 

Mogford, 144, 524. 

Moggeridge, 353. 

Mohun, 16, 353. 

Moir, 592. 

Molyneux, 524. 

Monk, 524. 

Monkman, 524. 

Monnington, 213, 524. 

Montgomery, 303, 524. 



Moody, 276, 358, 524. 

Moon, 16, 236, 353, 524. 

Moore, 46, 82, 524. 

Moorhouse, 430, 525. 

Morcom, 525. 

Mordecai, 525. 

Moreton, 88, 525. 

Morgan, 46, 444, 437-439, 525. 

Morgans, 525. 

Morkam, 525. 

Morley, 136, 525. 

Morphett, 231, 525. 

Morrell, 430, 525. 

Morris, 47, 204, 525. 

Morrison, 47, 525, 592. 

Morse, 399, 525. 

Mort, 251, 525. 

Mortimer, 525. 

Mortimore, 144, 525. 

Mortin, 136, 525. 

Morton, 82, 96, 525, 592. 

Mosely, 525. 

Moses, 47, 525. 

Mosley, 125, 525. 

Moss, 47, 402, 526. 

Mossman, 526. 

Mossop, 118, 526. 

Mott, 188, 526. 

Mottershead, 96, 526. 

Mottram, 363, 526. 

ilould, 264. 

Moule, 405, 526. 

Mounfield ■» 

Mountfield J ' 

Mounsey, 122, 526. 

Mountain, 526. 

Mountford, 363, 526. 

Mowbray, 276, 526. 

Moyle, 111, 526. 

Moxon, 526. 

Mudd, 276, 371, 409, 526. 

Mudge, 159, 526. 

Mudy, 276. 

Mugford, 144, 524. 

Muggeridge, 353, 526. 

Muggleston, 189, 526. 

Muir, 593, 600. 



INDEX. 



xlv 



Muirhead, 593. 

Mullengcr t 

„ „• [ 526. 

MuUiDger J 

MuUins, 174, 353, 52G. 

Mullock, 97, 526. 

Mumford, 80, 102, 526. 

Munckton, 174, 526. 

Munday -i 

Mund/ } 207,526. 

Munn, 406, 526. 

Munro, 593. 

Munslow, 342, 526. 

Murcott, 390, 526. 

Murdoch, 581, 593. 

Murfin, 126, 526. 

Murfitt, 526. 

Murgatroyd, 431, 526. 

Murray, 526, 581, 593. 

Murton, 526. 

Musgrave, 122, 276, 309, 526. 

Musson, 264, 526. 

MustiU, 86, 526. 

Mutimer, 526. 

Mutton, 111, 406, 526. 

Myatt, 526. 

Mycock, 125, 358, 526. 

Myers, 526. 

Myhill, 526. 

Mytton, 406, 526. 



Nadin, 137, 526. 
Nance, 111, 526. 
Nancekeville t 
Nankivell j 1^9,526. 

Napper, 75, 526. 
Nash, 80, 201, 212, 526. 
Naylor, 137, 526. 
Neal -I 
Neale } ^7, 527. 

Neame, 232, 527. 
Neave. 232, 293, 527. 
Needham, 137, 527. 
Neeve, 527. 
Negus, 70, 527. 
Neighbour, 328, 527. 
Neil, 593. 



Neild, 527. 

Neilson, 593. 

Nelmes t 

Nelms } 200,212,527. 

Nelson, 122, 251, 527. 

Nesling, 527. 

Netherway, 527. 

Neve, 232, 293, 527. 

Nevell, 332, 527. 

Nevin t 

Kevins J 

New, 527. 

Newall, 97, 527. 

Newberry -i 

Newbery J ' 

Newbold t 

Newbould } 137,431,527. 

Newby, 251, 527. 

Newcombe, 159, 527. 

Newey, 527. 

Newington, 385, 527. 

Newitt, 527. 

Newman, 47, 527. 

Newport, 528. 

Newsholme t 

T^ y 431, 528. 

JNewsome J ' 

Newson, 528. 

Newth, 528. 

Newton, 47, 408, 528. 

Niblett, 201, 528. 

Nichol, 48, 628. 

Nicholas, 48, 528. 

NiclioUs T 

Nichols } ^^'^28. 

Nicholson, 48, 528, 593. 

Nickels, 528. 

Nickolls, 528. 

Nickless, 528. 

Nicx)l T 

Nicoll } 48,528,593. 

Nicols, 528. 
Nicolson, 48, 528, 593. 
Nield, 528. 
Nightingale, 528. 
Nisbet, 593, 600. 
Nix, 86, 377, 528. 
Nixon, 48, 357, 523. 



xlvi 



INDEX. 



Noakes, 232, 528. 
Noble, 528. 
jSTock, 342, 528. 
Noden, 97, 528. 
Norbury, 97, 528. 
Norgrove, 213, 528. 
Norman, 48, 528. 
Nomabell, 529.* 
Noms, 160, 251, 529. 
Norrish, 160, 529. 
North, 265, 529. 
Northara, 160, 529. 
Northcott, 160, 529. 
Northey, 529. 
Nortbmore, 529. 
Norton, 529. 
Norwood, 529. 
Nosworthy, 160, 529. 
Nott, 160, 529. 
Nottage, 189, 529. 
Nottingham, 529. 
Nourse, 294. 
Nunn, 372, 529. 
Nurse, 293, 529. 
Nuttall, 251, 529. 
Nutter, 251, 529. 



Oakden, 126, 529. 

Oakes, 97, 529. 

Oakey, 529. 

Oakley, 363, 529. 

Gates 1 

^ , [ 103, 111, 529. 

Oats J ' ' 

Obbinson, 276. 
Ockey, 529. 
Oddie, 251, 431, 529. 
Odell, 70, 529. 

^'^^^'^ 1 529 
Odgers J 

Odling, 276, 529. 

Ody, 400, 431, 529. 

Offen, 529. 

OgUvy, 593. 

Ogle, 529. 

Okell, 529. 

Old, 529. 



Oldacres, 529. 

Oldfield, 137, 294, 529. 

Oldham, 529. 

Oldreare i 

Oldreive J 

Oliphant -i 

OliTant J 

Oliver, 48, 529, 593. 

Ollerenshaw, 89, 137, 530. 

Ollerton, 530. 

Olney, 70, 530. 

Olver, 49, 530. 

Onions, 342, 530. 

Opie "1 

Oppyi ^^^'''^- 

Oram, 530. 

Orchard, 218, 530. 

Ord, 315, 530. 

Orford, 284, 530. 

Organ, 200, 530. 

Orgar, 218. 

Orgee, 530. 

Ormerod, 251, 530. 

Ormond, 530. 

Ormslon, 316, 530. 

Orpe, 530. 

Orpen i 

Orpin J 

Orr, 593, 600. 

Orson, 259, 530. 

Orton, 265, 530. 

Osborn i 

Osborne } 49,124,344,530. 

Osmond, 530. 
Oulton, 97, 530. 
Outhwaite, 417, 530. 
Outram, 137, 325, 530. 
Overell, 219, 530. 
Overton, 276, 530. 

Owen 1 

r, Y 530. 

Owens J 

Oxenham, 160. 

Oyler, 530. 



Packer, 201. 



INDEX. 



xlvii 



Packham, 385, 530. 
Padbury, 333, 530. 
Paddock, 530. 
Paddon, 530. 
Padfield, 346, 530. 
Page, 49, 327, 530. 
Paget, 265, 531. 
Paige, 530. 
Pain 1 
Paine I 50,204.531. 

Painter, 112, 531. 
Paletliorpe, 277, 531. 
Palfrey, 160, 531. 
Palfreyman, 531. 
Paling, 531. 
Palk, 160, 531. 
Pallister, 531. 
Palmer, 49, 82, 141, 531. 
Paniers > 
Panniers _| ' 

Pankhurst, 385, 531. 
Pannell, 189, 531. 
Pantall, 531. 
Panther, 303, 531. 
Papwortli, 86, 531. 
Paradine, 70. 
Paramore, 265. 
Pardee, 406, 531. 
Parham, 399, 531. 
Parish, 531. 
Park, 531, 593. 
Parke, 531. 
Parker, 49, 531. 
Parkes, 531. 
Parkhouse, 531. 
Parkin, 532. 
Parkins, 219, 532. 
Parkinson, 532. 
Parkyn, 532. 
Parminter, 160. 
Parnaby, 532. 
Parnell, 161, 532. 
Parr, 252, 277, 325, 532. 
Parrish, 531. 

Parrott, 80, 333, 354, 532. 
Parry, 439, 444, 532. 
Parslow, 200, 532. 



Parsons, 50, 168, 392, 532. 

Partington, 252, 405, 532. 

Parton, 532. 

Partridge, 142, 532. 

Pascoe, 111, 532. 

Pasmore t 

Passmore / ^^^' '^^'^^ 

Patchett, 277, 532. 

Paterson, 593. 

Pafcmore, 532. 

Paton, 593. 

Patten, 219, 532. 

Patterson, 532, 593. 

Pattinson, 122, 532. 

Pattison, 532. 

Paty, 161. 

Paul T 

Paull } 1^*' 353 532. 

Paiilson, 532. 

Pavey, 532. 

Paxman, 533. 

Paxton, 333, 533. 

Payling, 531. 

Payne, 50, 204, 532. 

Paynell, 189. 

Paynter, 112, 531. 

Peach, 174, 533. 

Peachey, 385, 533. 

Peacock, 399, 417, 533. 

Peake, 161, 363, 533. 

Pearce, 50, 210, 533. 

Pearcey, 161, 533. 

Peard, 161. 

Pearman, 219, 533. 

Pearn, 533. 

Pearse, 50, 533. 

Pearson, 50, 533. 

Pease, 181, 533. 

Peat, 533. 

Peatfield, 533. 

Peck, 86, 219, 533. 

Peddar t 

Pedder J 533- 

Pedlar -i 

Pedler | 533- 

Peek -1 

Peeke } ^6, 161, 219, 533. 



xlvJii 

Peel, 423, 531. 
Peet, 531. 

PeSe } '''■ '''■ 

Pegler, 200, 534. 

Pegrum, 531. 

Peirson, 533. 

Pell, 534. 

Petnberton, 252, 534. 

Pendell -| 

Pendle / ^^*- 

Pender, 112, 534. 

Pendleburj, 252, 534. 

Penfold, 385, 534. 

Pengelly t 

PengiUy } 112,534. 

Penna, 534. 

Pennifold, 385, 534. 

Pennington, 252, 534. 

Penny, 353, 534. 

Penrice, 40R, 531. 

Penrose, 112, 534. 

Penson, 534. 

Pentelow, 534. 

Penwarden, 141, 531. 

Pepper, 265, 277, 372, 534. 

Percival, 534. 

Perham, 353, 534. 

Periam, 353. 

Perkin t 

Perkins } ^1, 531. 

Perks, 51, 534. 

Perretfc t 

Perrott } 333,353.534. 

Perriam, 353. 

Perrin, 534. 

Perry, 51, 344, 534. 

Pescud, 534. 

Petch, 534. 

Peter, 534. 

Peters, 534. 

Pether, 531. 

Petherbridge, 144, 534. 

Petherick i 

Pethick } 112,162,534. 

Petit, 189, 534. 

Pettipher, 81, 220, 333, 534. 



INDEX. 



535. 



Pettit ■) 

Pettitt} 189.534. 

Petty, 535. 

Phelps, 51, 354, 535. 

Phillimore, 201. 

Philippo, 294, 535. 

Philips, 51, 593. 

Phillips, 51, 535. 

Phillipson, 51, 303, 535. 

Philp, 51, 535. 

Philpot T 

Philpott I 52, 204, 212. 232, 535. 

Phil pots -| 

Philpotts ; 52, 

Phippen t 

Phippin} 52,354,535. 

Phipps, 51, 194, 535. 

Pibus, 418. 

Pick, 86, 219, 277, 535. 

Pickard, 142, 399, 535. 

Pickering, 417, 535.* 

Pickersgill, 417, 535. 

Pickett, 399, 535. 

Pickford, 535. 

Pickin, 535. 

Pickles, 535. 

Pickup, 252, 535. 

Pickwell, 535. 

Pidduck, 232, 535. 

Pierce, 50, 533, 535. 

Pierson, 533. 

Pigg, 86, 219, 316, 535. 

Piggott 1 

Pigott } 86,219,220,535. 

Pike, 207, 535. 
Pilcher, 232, 536. 
Pile, 161, 536. 
Pilgrim, 190, 536. 
Pilkington, 252, 536. 
Pilling, 252, 536. 
Pimblett, 252, 536. 
Pimlott, 97, 536. 
Pinch, 536. 
Pinclibeck, 278. 
Pinches, 536. 
Pinchin, 399, 536. 



INDEX. 



xlix 



Pindar 



Pindar t 

Pinder } 277,325,536. 

I 536. 



536. 



Pinhaj 
Pin hey 
Pinniger i 
Pinnegar J 
Piper, 277, 386, 536. 
Pitcher, 536. 
Pitchford, 337, 536. 
Pither, 536. 
Pitman, 174, 354, 536. 
Pitt, 536. 
Pittock, 232, 535. 
Pitts, 536. 
Plackett, 126, 536. 
Plaistowe, 536. 
Plant, 363, 536. 
Piatt, 75, 89, 536.* 
Platts, 125, 536. 
Pledger, 190, 536. 
Plews, 536. 
Plo Wright, 320, 536. 
Plumhly, 536. 
Plummer, 536. 

Plumptre i 

■D, : y 325, 536. 

Plumtree J ' 

Pochin, 265, 536. 

Pocklington, 278, 536. 

Pocock, 399, 417, 536. 

Podmore, 536. 

Pointer, 162. 

Polkinghorn, 112, 536. 

Poll, 294, 536. 

Pollard, 87, 536. 

Pollitt, 252, 536. 

Pollock, 593, 600. 

Pomeroy, 174, 536. 

Pomfret, 536. 

Ponder, 303. 

Ponting, 201, 400, 536. 

Poole, 200, 536. 

Pooley, 536. 

Poore, 207, 537. 

Pope, 201, 537. 

Popham, 207. 

Pople, 346, 537. 

Popplewell, 431, 537. 



Popplewick, 278. 

Porrett i 

Porritt } ^1«'537. 

Porter, 52, 183, 537. 

Portsmouth, 207, 537. 

Poskitt, 537. 

Postle, 537. 

Postlethwaite, 252, 537. 

Pottenger, 537. 

Potter, 52, 537. 

Potticary, 207, 537. 

Potts, 316, 537. 

Pounde, 207. 

Povey, 537. 

Pow, 346, 537. 

Powell, 53, 292, 439, 444, 537. 

Powlesland, 144, 537. 

Pownall, 97, 537. 

Poynter, 162. 

Poyntz, 190. 

Poyser, 125, 358, 537. 

Pratt, 53, 537. 

Prebble, 537. 

Precious, 537. 

Preece, 53, 439, 537. 

Prentice, 537. 

Prescott, 253, 537. 

Preston, 537. 

Pretty, 537. 

Prettyjohn, 144, 538. 

Price, 53, 437, 439, 445, 538. 

Priday, 201, 538. 

Pride, 342. 

Pridmore, 265, 538. 

Priest, 538. 

Priestley 

Priestly 

Priestner, 90, 538. 

Prince, 125, 538. 

Pring, 144, 538. 

Pringle, 316, 538, 593, 600. 

Prior, 102, 538. 

Prisk, 103, 538. 

Pritchard t ^„„ ^ 

Prichard } *39, 538.* 

Probert, 56, 439, 538. 



538. 



1 



INDEX. 



538. 



Procter t 

Proctor J ' 

Prodger, 439. 

Prodbam, 417, 538. 

Prole, 538. 

Prosser, 439, 538. 

Prothero, 538. 

Proud, 182, 538. 

Proudham, 417, 538. 

Prout, 195, 538. 

Prouse T 

-D [ 102, 162, 538. 

Prowse J 



417, 538. 



102, 538. 



Prudames "i 

Pnidom J 

Pryce, 538. 

Pryde, 342. 

Pryer 

Pryor 

Puckeridge, 539. 

Puddephatt, 80, 220, 333, 539. 

Puddifoot, 220, 539. 

Puddy, 346, 539. 

Pugh, 439, 539. 

Pugsley, 162, 539. 

Pullan -| 

Pullen I 194^ 539, 

Pullin J 

Purcell, 80. 

Purdy, 294, 539. 

Purkis, 87, 539. 

Purser, 539. 

Pursglove T 

■D 1 Y 539. 

Purslove J 

Purslow, 200. 

Purssell, 80, 539. 

Purvis, 539, 593. 

Puttock, 377, 539. 

Pyatt, 363, 539. 

Pybus, 418, 539. 

Pye, 113, 225, 253, 539. 

Pyke, 207. 

Pyle, 161, 539. 

Pym, 161. 539. 



Quance, 144, 539. 
Quelch, 182, 539. 



Quenby, 539. 
Quested, 232, 539. 
Quibell, 325, 539. 
Quick, 102, 162, 539. 
QuUter, 539. 
Quinney, 539. 



Rabbetts, 539. 
Rabjohns, 141, 539. 
Eaby, 102, 253, 539. 
Eackbam, 539. 
Radcliffe, 540. 
Raddall i 
Eaddle I ^^^• 
Eadford, 125, 539. 
Eadley, 539. 
Eadway, 202, 539. 
Eae, 316, 593. 
Ragg, 140. 
Raikes, 418. 
Eain, 539. 
Rainbow, 539. 
Eaine, 182, 418, 539. 
EainfoKl, 253, 539. 
Rains, 126, 539. 
Ramsay, 593. 
Ramsbottom, 253, 539. 
Eamsden, 431, 540. 
Eanby, 278, 540. 
Eand, 81, 316, 540. 
Eandall "» 
EandeU J ^^^• 
Eankiu, 593, 601. 

Eansom t 

-p y 540. 

Eanson J 

Eapley, 386, 540. 

Rapson, 540. 

Rasbleigli, 540. 

Ratcliffe, 540. 

Ratbbone, 97, 540. 

Raven, 190, 540. 

Ravenscroft, 97, 540. 

Ravensbaw, 540. 

Raw, 410, 540. 

Rawcliffe, 253, 540. 

Rawdon, 431. 



INDEX. 



401, 540. 



144. 540. 



} 



} 

I 190, 540. 



316, 540. 



Eawle, 540. 

Rawlings i 

Eawlins J 

Rawlinson, 253, 540. 

Ray, 316, 540. 

Kaymont 

Kaymount 

Kayner 

Baynor 

Bea 

Beay 

Bead, 53, 540. 

Beading, 391, 540. 

Readman, 122, 431, 540. 

Beakes, 540. 

Reddaway, 144, 540. 

Reddicliffe, 162, 540. 

Bedfearn i 

Bedfern | ^- 

Bedgate, 325, 540. 

Bedman, 122, 431, 541. 

Bedmayne, 122, 431, 541. 

Beece, 53, 541. 

Reed, 53, 541. 

Rees, 53, 541. 

Reeson, 270, 541. 

Reeve, 55, 541. 

Reeres, 55, 541. 

Reid, 53, 541, 593. 

Rendall t 

RendeU I 541. 

Rendle J 

Rennie, 593. 

Rennison, 541. 

Renshaw, 137, 138, 541. 

Renton, 316, 541. 

Renwick, 316, 541. 

Retallack t 

EetaUick / ^■*^- 

Better, 144, 541. 

BeviU } 138,541. 
Eew, 144, 541. 
Reynolds, 55, 82, 283, 541. 
Rhoades, 278, 541. 
Rhodes, 236, 278, 432, 541. 
Bice, 445, 541. 



542. 



Rich, 354, 393, 541. 
Eichards, 55, 141, 541. 
Kieliardson, 55, 117, 542, 593. 
Eichens, 542. 
Eielies, 284, 542. 
Eichmond, 421, 542, 593. 
Eickard, 542. 
Eickett, 190, 542. 
Eicketts, 201, 542. 
Eidd, 144, 542. 
EiddeU t 
Eiddle } 316' 5^2. 

Eider, 542. 

Eidgeway 

Eidgway 

Eiding, 542. 

Eidler, 345, 542. 

Eidley, 307, 316, 542. 

Eidout, 175, 542. 

Eigby, 253, 542. 

Eigden, 233, 542. 

Eiggall, 278, 542. 

Eighton, 202, 542. 

Eiley, 138, 542. 

Eimell t 

Eimmell J > "■ 

Eimmer, 238, 542. 

Einger, 542. 

Ripley, 432. 

Eippon, 542. 

Eisdon, 162, 542. 

Eistworth, 432, 542. 

Eising, 294, 542. 

Eitchie, 593. 

Eitson, 543. 

Eivett, 294, 543. 

Eix, 295, 543. 

Eoach, 543. 

Eoadley, 543. 

Eoads, 77, 432, 543. 

Eoake, 543. 

Eobb, 593. 

Bobbins, 543. 

Eoberts, 56, 101, 543. 

Eobertsbaw, 543. 

Eobertson, 316, 543, 593, 601. 

Eobins, 543. 

d2 



hi 



INDEX. 



Kobinson, 13, 56, 543. 

Kobson, 56, 309, 316, 543, 594, 

Kodda, 103, 543. 

Koddam, 317, 543. 

Eoddis, 543. 

Eodenbui-st, 342, 543L 

Kodes, 432. 

Rodger, 5&4, 

Rodgers, 56^ 544, 

Rodmell, 543. 

Roe, 345, 543. 

Roebuck, 544. 

Eofe "I 

Eofie J ^^• 

Rogers, 56, 101, 544- 

RogeusoQ, 544. 

Rolfe, 17, 544. 

Rolph, 17, 365, 544. 

Rood, 354, 544. 

Roofe, 285, 544. 

Rook •> 

Rooke J 

Boose, 113, 544. 

Root, 190, 544. 

Roper, 544. 

Rosbotbam n 

Rosbottom J 

Rose, 56, 544. 

Roseveare, 103, 544. 

Rosewarne, 103, 112, 544i. 

Roakelly i 

Roskilly} 112,544. 

Ross, 175, 544, 585, 594, 601. 

Rossall-) 

Rossell} ^'^''^^- 

Rosser, 544. 

Rossiter, 544. 

Rotbwell, 253, 544. 

Rountbwaite ^ 

Routhwaite J ' 

Rouse, 113. 

Routledge, 544. 

Routley, 544. 

Row, 544. 

fiowarth, 126, 544. 

Rowbotbam i 

Rowbottom) "8.544. 



544. 



Eowe, 102, 163, 544. 
Rowell, 142, 544. 
Rowland, 163, 545. 
Rowlands, 545. 
Rowlatt 1 
Rowlettj 266,304,545. 

Eowles, 328, 545. 
Rowley, 220, 363, 545. 
RowlingsoD, 545. 
Rowntree, 545. 
Rowse, 113, 545. 
Royce, 545. 
Eoyle, 97, 253, 545. 
Eudd, 343, 354, 545. 
Ruddle, 399, 400, 545. 
Rudge, 202, 213, 406, 545. 
Ruegg, 354. 
Ruffle, 190, 545. 
Eugg, 354, 545. 
Eugman, 545. 
Rumbold, 208, 545. 
Rumming, 545. 
EundeU t 
Eundle } 113' ^5. 

Eunnalls, 103, 545. 
Euscoe, 545. 
Eush, 372, 545. 
Eusbden, 220. 
Eusbton, 363, 545. 
Eusb worth, 432, 545. 
^ss, 175, 400, 545, 585. 
Eussell, 57, 82, 545, 594. 
Euston, 87, 545. 

Eutberford, 309, 317, 545, 594, 601. 
Eutter, 97, 545. 
Eyder, 545. 
Eyding, 542. 
Eyle, 97. 
Eymer, 201, 545. 



Sabin, 333, 545. 
Sadler, 375, 545. 
Sagar, 254, 545. 
Sage, 163, 354, 545. 
Saint, 545. 



INDEX. 



mr 



Sale, 220, 545. 
Salisbury, 253, 546. 
Sallis, 83, 546. 
Salmon, 546. 
Salt, 363, 546. 
Salter, 163, 546. 
Saltern, 163. 
Salthouse, 253, 546. 
Sampson, 546. 
Samways, 175, 546. 
Sandbach, 98, 546.* 
Sandercock, 103, 546. 
Sanders, 57, 546. 
Sanderson, 57, 307, 546. 
Sandry, 103, 546. 
Sands, 546. 
Sankey, 343, 546. 
Sansome, 326. 
Sardeson, 546. 
Sare, 81, 546. 
Sargeanfc t 
Sargent } 102,546. 

Sargisson, 546- 
Saunders, 57, 546. 
Saunderson, 57, 546. 
Saundry, 103, 546. 
Savage, 202, 546. 
Sarary, 295. 
Savery, 295. 
Savile, 191. 
Savill, 190, 546. 
Sarin, 333, 546. 
Savory, 295, 546. 
Sawyer, 366, 546. 
Say, 354, 445, 547. 
Sayce, 445, 547. 
Sayer, 191, 295, 418, 547. 
Sayers, 221, 386, 547. 
Scales, 295, 547. 
Scantlebury, 103, 547. 
Scarborougli, 547. 
Scarlett, 213. 
Scarth, 547. 

Schofield, 254, 432, 547- 
Scholes, 547. 
Scholey, 547. 
Scholfield, 254, 547. 



Scobie, 113. 

Scoley, 547. 

Seoones, 547. 

Scott, 57, 547, 583, 594. 

Scotton, 266, 547. 

Scragg, 98, 547. 

Scrimshaw i 

o ■ T \- 278, 547. 
Serimshire J ^ 

Scriven, 304, 547. 

Serireaer, 70, 547. 

Scroggs, 547. 

Scruby, 19L, 547- 

Scrymgeour, 278. 

Seudaiaore, 213, 547, 

Scune, 279. 

Scutt, 57, 175, 547, 584. 

Seabrook, 191, 220, 547 

Seaborne, 255, 

Seal, 138, 547, 

Sealey i 

Seal/ I ^*6,547, 

Seaman, 58, 372, 547. 

Sear, «1, 547. 

Searle, 87, 102, 547. 

Sears, 221, 386, 547. 

Searson, 547. 

Seath, 547. 

Seaward, 163, 547. 

Seccombe, 547. 

Secum, 255. 

Seddon, 547. 

Sedgwick, 547. 

Sedman, 547. 

Seed, 237, 547. 

Sefton, 254, 547. 

Segaj", 254. 

Selby, 325, 547. 

Seldon, 163, 547, 

Self 1 

Selfe } 296,401,547. 

Sellars i 

Seller. } ^1^548- 

SeUek, 163, 548, 
Selwyn, 201, 548, 
Semmens, 101, 550. 
Senior, 175, 432, 548. 
Sephton, 254, 547. 



lir 



IXDEX. 



Sercombe, 548, 
Sergeant, 278, 518. 
Serera, 548. 
Severs, 418, 548. 
Seward, 17, 163, 548. 
Sewell, 295, 548. 
Seymour, 81, 548. 
.Seys, 445, 54», 
Shackel, 548. 
Slmcklady t 
Shakelady } ^54, 54S. 
ShackletoD, 548. 
Shacklock, 138, 548, 
Shackshaft, 548. 
Shakerley, 254, 
Shakeshaff, 548, 
Shanks, 317, 548, 594, 601. 
Shapland, 144, 543. 
Sharland, 163, 548. 
Sharraan, 548. 
Sharp 1 
Sharpe } ^7, 548, 594. 

Sharpies, 238, 254, 548. 

Sliarpley, 548. 

Sharratt, 359, 363, 548. 

Sharrock, 254, 548. 

Sharrod, 548. 

Shave, 548. 

Shaw, 58, 124, 319, 357, 548, 594. 

Sheale, 317. 

»>heard, 549. 

Shears, 549. 

Shebbeare, 163. 

Sheen, 549. 

Sheffield, 549. 

Sheild, 317. 

Sheldon, 138, 549. 

Sheldrake i 

Sheldrick / ^■*^- 

Shelley, 364, 549. 

Shelton, 266, 319, 549. 

Shemilt, 549. 

Shenton, 364, 549. 

Shepherd -i 

Sheppard, etc. | 58,177,549,594. 

Shepperson, 549. 

Sheringham, 295, 549. 



345, 549, 



550. 



Sherman, 163. 

Sherratt, 359, 363, 549. 

Sherrill, 163, 549. 

Sherrin 

Sherring 

Sherwill, 163, 549. 

Sherwin, 138, 549. 

Sherwood, 549. 

Shield, 317, 549. 

filiields, 549. 

fihillitoe, 432, 549. 

Shipley, 549. 

Shipman, 259, 549. 

Shipp, 549. 

Shipton, 549. 

Shipway, 202, 549. 

Shirley, 364, 549, 

Shirt, 126, 549. 

Shoebotham t 

Shoebottora J 

Shone, 98, 550. 

Sliopland, 550. 

Shore, 98, 550. 

Shorland, 548. 

Shorrock, 254. 

Short, 163, 550. 

Shorter, 233, 550. 

Shotton, 182, 550. 

Shreeve, 285, 550. 

Shrimpton, 334, 550. 

Shufflebotham -i 

Shufflebottom J ^^®' ^^^• 

Shuker, 337, 550. 

Shute, 175, 550. 

Shuttleworth, 254, 422, 550. 

Siddall 1 

Siddell I 138, 255, 418, 550. 

Siddle J 

Siddons, 550. 

Siddom, 550. 

Sidebottom, 550. 

Sidford, 394, 550. 

Sidgwick, 547. 

Siicock, 550. 

Sillitoe, 432, 550. 

Silverlock, 191. 

Silvester, 550. 



IXDEX. 



Iv 



1 550. 



650. 



Sim 

Simm 

Simkin 

Simpkin 

Simpkins 

Simmonds i 

o. [ 58, 101, 550. 

Simmons J ' ' 

Simonds i 

o- [ 58, 557. 

Simons J ' 

Simpson, 59. 357, 550, 594. 

Sims, 393, 550. 

Simson, 550. 

Sinclair, 551, 594, 601. 

Sinden, 551. 

Singer, 346, 551. 

Singleton, 254, 551. 

Sirett, 81, 557. 

Sirrell, 551. 

Skeels, 551. 

Skeggs, 223. 

Skelton, 278, 551. 

Skerrett, 551. 

Skewes, 113, 551. 

Skidmore, 138, 551. 

Skinner, 142, 551. 

Skipwith, 267. 

Skrimsliire, 278. 

Skrine, 354. 

Skiymsher, 278. 

Skutt, 175. 

Skyrme, 213, 551. 

Slack, 98, 118, 138, 551. 

Slade, 354, 551. 

Slader, 163, 551. 

Slater, 125, 551. 

Slatter, 333, 551. 

Slaughter, 551. 

Slee, 551. 

Sleeman, 113, 142, 551. 

Sleightholme, 409, 551. 

Slinger, 432, 551. 

Slipper, 295, 551. 

Sloan, 594. 

Slocock, 551. 

Sloman, 142, 551. 

Sloper, 400, 551. 

Sluggett, 144, 551. 



Smale, 144, 551. 

Small, 551. 

Smallbridee i 

„ -J ^ 144, 551. 

bmandge J ' 

Smart, 304, 551. 
Smedlej, 551. 
Smerdon, 164, 551. 
Smith, 59, 551, 594. 
Smithers, 552, 
Smithin, 552. 
Smithson, 418, 552. 
Smjth, 552. 
Snaith, 279, 307, 552. 
Snape, 372, 419. 
Snead, 99. 
Sneath, 279, 552, 
Snell, 102, 164, 552. 
Snelson, 98, 552. 
Snook, 400, 552. 
Snow, 164, 552. 
Snowball, 552, 
Suowdon, 182, 552, 
Soame, 296, 552. 
Soby, 552. 
Sollev 1 
Solly' } 233,552. 

Solomon, 552. 
Somers, 552. 
Somerville, 15, 594, 601, 
Soper, 164, 552. 
Sorrell, 191, 552. 
South, 552. 
Southgate, 372, 552. 
Southon, 552. 
Southwell, 552. 
Sowerby, 178, 418, 552. 
Spackman, 237, 400, 552. 
Spalton, 552. 
Spargo, 552. 
Sparke -i 

Sparks I 164, 386, 55i. 
Sparkes J 
Sparrow, 372, 552. 
Speakman, 237, 400, 552. 
Spear, 552. 

Spearman, 309, 311, 317. 
Speecliley, 552. 



Ivi 

Speed, 355, 552. 

Spence, 552. 

Spenceley i 

Spensley j 

Spencer, 16, 59, 124, 298, 553. 

SpendioTe, 139, 553. 

Spen-ing, 355, 553. 

Spicer, 175, 553. 

Spiers, 553. 

SpiUer, 142, 355, 553. 

Spink -[ 

Spinks } 296, 553. 

Spoffortli, 433. 
Spokes, 304, 553. 
Spotterswood, 122, 553. 
Sprake, 553. 
Spratt, 553. 
Spriggs, 553. 
SpringaU, 333. 
Sproston, 98, 553. 
Spry, 113, 164, 5.53. 
Spurgeon, 191, 553. 
Spurle T 
Spurrell / 164,553. 

Spnrrett, 553. 

Spurrier, 175. 

Sqnance, 553. 

Squire i 

c . y 164, 553. 

bqmres J ' 

Squirrell, 553. 
Stace, 233, 553. 
Stacey, 164, 553. 
Stafford, 139, 553. 
Staines, 191, 553. 
Staite, 202, 553. 
Stainthorpe, 553. 
Staley, 553. 
Stallard, 553. 
Stamp, 278, 553. 
Stanbra, 334, 553. 
Stanbridge, 70, 553. 
Stanbury, 164, 553. 
Stan den i 

Standing } ^86. 553. 
Stanford, 372, 386, 553. 
Staniforth, 553. 
Stanley, 553. 



INDEX. 



554. 



Stannard, 372, 553. 

Stansfield, 432, 553. 

Stanton, 554. 

Stanwortb, 238, 554. 

Staples, 325, 554, 

Stares, 554. 

Starkie, 254, 554. 

Starling, 296, 554. 

Starre, 278. 

Stavely, 419, 554. 

Stay, 386, 554. 

Stead, 432, 445, 554. 

Stebbing 

Stebbings 

Stedman, 233, 554. 

Steeds, 346, 554. 

Steel T 

Steele | '^' '^^ 

Steer, 142, 377, 554. 

SteggaU, 372, 554. 

Steight, 202. 

Stelfox, 554. 

Stendall, 554. 

Stephens i „ , ij 

SteLs } 59,554,594. | 

Stephenson -. ^ ^^^ 5 g^ J 

bteyenson J 7 r > 

Steward, 555. 

Stewart, 555, 594. 

Stickles, 555. 

Stidston, 144, 555. 

Stiles, 555. 

Stimpson, 296, 555. 

Stinchcombe, 202, 555. 

Stinton, 406, 555. 

Stirling, 594. 

Stobart ■> 

Stobert J ^^• 

Stobbs, 555. 

Stock, 191, 555. 

Stockdale, 83, 555. 

Stocker, 223. 

Stockhill -1 

StockUl / ^^^ 

Stockton, 98, 555 

Stoddard, 555. 

Stoddart, 594. 



IXDEX. 



Ivii 



Stokell, 555. 

Stokes, 266, 304, 319, 555. 

Stone, 60, 71, 555. 

Stonehouse, 555. 

Stoneman, 555. 

Stones, 433, 555. 

Stoppard, 555. 

Stops, 555. 

Storer, 139, 555. 

Storey -i 

Stoiy / ^•*^' ^'^^■ 

Storr, 279, 555. 

Storry, 343, 555. 

Stotherd -i 

Stothert | ^^^• 

Stott, 255, 345, 555. 

Stovin, 279. 

Stowe, 279, 555. 

Strachan, 594, 601. 

Strange, 175, 556. 

Stratford, 556. 

Straiten, 400, 556. 

Straughan, 308, 556. 

Straw, 325, 556. 

Strawson, 556. 

Street, 393, 556. 

Strelley, 137. 

Stretton, 139, 266, 556. 

Strickland, 122, 237, 409, 556. 

Stride, 208, 556. 

Strode, 355. 

Strong, 142, 556. 

Struthers, 594. 

Strutt, 192, 556. 

Stuart, 556, 594. 

Stubbins, 325, 556. 

Stubbs, 88, 364, 556. 

Stubley, 279, 556. 

Stuckey, 355, 556. 

Studley, 175, 556. 

Stunt, 233, 556. 

Stupples, 556. 

Sturdy, 419, 556. 

Sturgeon, 372, 556. 

Slurry -i 

Stury } 343. 

Sturt, 386, 556. 



Stuttard, 555. 

Stursacre t 

> ^55 
Sturzacre / 

Styles, 556. 

Sudall, 255. 

Suddaby, 419, 556. 

Sugden, 432, 556. 

Suggelt I ^ , 

CI -i-i- r 372, 556. 
buggitt J 

Sully, 355, 556. 

Summerfield, 15, 556. 

Sumnierhayes, 556. 

Summers, 142, 556. 

Sumner, 556. 

Sunderland, 556. 

Sunter, 410, 556. 

Surman, 202, 378, 556. 

Surtees, 182, 556. 

Sutcliffe, 422, 556. 

Suter, 556. 

Sutherland, 594. 

Suttaby, 419. 

Sutton, 60, 556. 

Swaffer, 225, 556. 

Swaffield, 175, 556. 

Swain, 17, 142, 279, 556. 

Swales, 419, 557. 

Swan T 

« }■ 557, 594. 

bwann J ' 

S wanton, 557. 

Swai'briek t 

Swarbrook / ^^^' ^^''• 

Swayne, 556. 

Sweet, 355, 557. 

Sweeting, 192, 557. 

Swetenbam i 

Swetnam ) ^^^' ^'^'^■ 

Swift, 139, 255, 557. 

Swinburne t 

Swinbourne } 1^3, 317, 557. 

Swindell "i 

<a . , ,1 ^98, 557. 

Swindells J ' 

Swinton, 99, 557. 

Sworder, 557. 

Swyft, 139, 255. 

Sykes, 433, 557. 

Symes, 176, 557. 

d-6 



Iviii 

Sjmonds-, ^g 
Svmoris J ' 

Syratt -\ 
Syrett I "'' '•'^- 



Tabberer, 139. 

Taber t 

Tabor I 192,557. 

Tabley, 99. 

Tagg, 139, 557. 

Tailby, 266, 557. 

Tait, 557, 594. 

Talbot, 17, 355, 557- 

Tamblyn, 114, 557. 

Tame, 75, 557. 

Tancock, 557. 

Tandy, 406, 557. 

Tanner, 26, 401, 558. 

Tanton, 142, 558. 

Tapley, 99, 558. 

Tapp, 558. 

Tapping, 558. 

Tarn, 558. 

Tarr, 558. 

Tassell, 233, 558. 

Tatcbell, 558. 

Tate, 178, 558. 

Tatham, 433, 558. 

Tattam, 81, 558. 

Tattersall, 255, 55& 

Taunton, 394, 558. 

Taverner, 144, 558. 

Taylor, 60, 558, 594. 

Tazewell, 346, 558. 

Teague, 558. 

Teal T 

Teale } ^5«- 

Tealby, 266. 

Teasdale, 118, 558. 

Tebbitt t 

Tebbutt } 298,304,558. 

Teek, 558. 
Telfer -» 
Telford} 308,558,594. 

Temperley,. 558^ 



INDEX. 



Temple, 558. 

Templeman, 326, 558. 

Templeton, 594. 

Tennant, 559, 594. 

Tennison, 410, 559. 

Terrell, 75. 

Terry, 233, 559. 

Tester, 380, 559. 

Tew, 304, 559. 

Thackery -i 

Thackray I 433, 559. 

Thackwray J 

Thatcher, 71, 559. 

Theyer, 559. 

Thirgood, 192, 560. 

Thirkell, 234, 373, 559. 

Thirkettle, 234, 296, 373, 559. 

Thirtle, 296, 373, 559. 

Thoday, 559. 

Thorn, 594. 

Thomas, 60, 101, 559. 

Thomason t 

Thomasson / 89,559. 

Thomhnson, 118, 559. 

Thompson, 61, 559. 

Thomson, 61, 559. 

Thompstone, 90, 559. 

Thorington, 192, 559. 

Thorley, 559. 

Thorn t 

Thome } 142. 559. 

Thornber, 433, 560. 
Thornhill, 90, 560. 
Thornley, 560. 
Thornton, 178, 317, 560. 
Thorowgood, 192. 
Thorp n 
Thorpe } 125. 560. 

ThrelfaU, 255, 560. 
Throppe, 99. 
Thrower, 296, 560. 
Thurgood, 192, 560. 
Thurkettle, 234, 296, 373, 56a 
Thurlby, 280, 560. 
Thurlow, 373, 560. 
Thurman, 560. 
Thurston, 373, 560. 



INDEX. 



lix 



TJ-^f I 296,560. 

Thurtle J 

l^""^'' \ 409,433,434,560. 

Thwaites J 



560. 



560. 



182, 309, 317, 560. 



Tibbett 

Tibbit 

Tibbetts 

Tibbitt.3 

Tice, 560. 

Tickle, 99, 560. 

Tickner, 560. 

Tidy, 560. 

Tilbrook, 192, 560. 

Till, 195, 560. 

^[y^ } 355,356,560. 

Timberlake, 70, 560. 

Timmis, 560. 

Timms t . ,„„ 

[ 334, 560. 
Tims J 

Timperley, 99, 560. 

Tindale 

TindaU 

Tindell 

Tindle 

Tingej, 560. 

Tinker, 560. 

Tinkler, 560. 

Tinney, 560. 

Tinsley, 256, 560. 

Tippett, 114, 560. 

Tipping, 560. 

Tipton, 343, 560. 

Tirrell, 75. 

Titcombe, 401, 561. 

Titley, 343, 561. 

Titmas t 

Tittmuss } 70,221,561. 

Titterton, 358, 561. 
Tobitt, 561. 
Todd, 178, 561, 595. 
Tofield, 561. 
Tofts, 192, 561. 
Toll, 561. 
ToUer, 165. 
Tolley, 406, 561. 
Tom, 561. 



561. 



Tomblin, 561. 
Tombs, 561. 
Tomes, 561. 
Tomkin, 81, 561. 
Tomkinson, 561. 
Tomlin, 561. 
Tomlinson, 125, 561, 
Tompkins, 81, 561. 
Tompsett, 561. 
Toms, 561. 
Tongue, 407, 561. 
Tonkin, 114, 561. 
Toogood, 561. 
Tooley, 296, 561. 

^'^'^'^ j 267, 561. 
Toone J 

Toovey 

Tovey 

Tope, 561. 

Topham, 419, 561. 

Toplady, 326. 

Topp, 176, 561. 

Topping, 123, 256, 561. 

Terr, 364, 561. 

Tothill, 165. 

Towes "I 

Towse J 

Towndrow -i 

Townrow I 139, 561. 

Townroe J 

Townend, 561. 

Townsend, 561. 

Townson, 256, 561. 

Tozer, 165, 561. 

Trafford, 561. 

Travis, 279, 562. 

Treadwell t 

Tredwell } 328,334,562. 

Treasure, 356, 562. 
Trebilcock, 114, 562. 
Tregear, 114, 562. 
Tregellas, 114, 562. 
Tregian, 110, 115. 
Tregoning, 562. 
Treleaven, 562. 
Treloar, 103, 562. 



Ix 



INDEX. 



Tremain t 
Tremayne } 1^*' ^63. 
Trembath, 104, 562. 
Tremlett, 165, 562. 
Trerise, 104, 562. 
Tresidder, 562. 
Trethewey, 114, 562. 
Trevail, 562. 
Treweeke, 562. 
Trewhella, 114, 562. 
Trewicke, 309, 317. 
Trewin, 562. 
Tribe, 386, 562. 
Trice, 223. 
Trick, 562. 
Tricker, 562. 
Trickett, 99, 562. 
Trickey, 142, 356, 562, 
Trigg, 203, 326. 
Tripcony, 115, 562. 
Tripp, 356. 
Trippas, 388, 562. 
Trotman, 202, 562. 
Trott, 165, 562. 
Trotter, 419, 562. 
Trounson, 562. 
Trowbridge, 176, 562. 
Trade, 562. 
Trudgen -i 

Trudgian } ^^^' ^62. 
Truelove, 562, 
Trueman t 
Truman } ^0, 562. 

Truewicke, 309, 311, 317. 

Truscott, 115, 562. 

Trussell, 305. 

Truswell, 326, 562. 

Tryce, 223. 

Tubb, 208, 562. 

Tuck, 297, 401, 562. 

Tucker, 19, 20, 62, 165, 562. 

Tuckett, 562. 

Tudge, 562. 

Tudor, 562. 

Tuff, 562. 

Tuffin, 169, 562. 

Tuffley, 203, 562. 



TuUy, 562. 

Tunnicliff, 562. 

TurnbuU, 309, 317, 562, 595. 

Turnell t 

Turnill } 562. 

Turner, 61, 562, 505. 

Turnock, 563. 

Turpin, 165, 193, 563. 

Turrill, 334, 563. 

Turton, 139, 563. 

Turvill, 208, 563. 

Tustain, 334, 563. 

Tuthill, 165. 

TweddeU ^ 

Tweddle } 182,317.563. 

Tweedle, 317, 563. 

Tweedy, 420, 563. 

Tween, 563. 

Twentyman, 326. 

Twidale, 318, 563. 

Twigg, 139, 563. 

Twitchin, 208, 563. 

Tyack i 

Tyacke | ^^^' '^^■ 

Tyerman, 419, 563. 

Tyler, 563. 

Tyley, 563. 

Tym 1 

Tymm } ^26, 563. 

Tyndal, 560. 
Tyreman, 419, 563. 
Tyrer, 563. 
Tyrrell, 75, 563. 
Tysoe, 563. 
Tyson, 563. 



Udall, 139, 563. 
Uglow, 142, 563. 
Ullyatt, 279, 563. 
Umpleby, 563. 
Underhay, 563. 
Underbill, 563. 
Underwood, 305, 563. 
Unicume, 563. 
Unsworth, 256, 563.* 
Unwin, 193, 342, 563. 



INDEX. 



Ixi' 



Upton, 564. 
Fren, 104, 564. 
Urmston, 99, 564. 
Urquhart, 595, 601. 
Urry, 208. 
Urwin, 564. 
Usher, 318, 564. 
Usherwood, 564. 
Usticke, 115. 
Utting, 297, 564. 
Uttley, 564. 



Yachell, 75. 

Vale, 213, 564. 

Vallance, 564. 

Vanner, 564. 

Vanstone, 144, 564. 

Yarcoe, 102, 564. 

Vardon, 100. 

Varley, 564. 

Vamej, 564. 

Taughan, 343, 438, 439, 445, 564. 

Vaudrey i 

Taudry } 334. 

Vawser, 87, 564. 

Veal -I 

Vealej 115,564. 

VellenowetL, 564. 
Venables, 99, 343, 564. 
Venn, 165, 564. 
Venner, 165, 564. 
Vennimore, 331. 
Venning, 115, 564. 
Ventress \ .„. 
Ventris J 
Vercoe, 564. 
Vergette, 305, 564. 
Verity, 564. 
Vernon, 89, 358, 564. 
Verrall, 386, 564. 

Verrin} l^^' ^64. 
Vioary, 564. 
Viccars, 564. 
Vick, 203, 564. 
Vickere, 126, 178, 564. 



Vickery, 564. 
Vidler, 564. 

Yigars I 356, 564. 
Vigors J 
Yimpany, 564. 
Yince, 373, 564. 
Yincent, 284, 564. 
Yine, 564. 
Yiner, 564. 
Yines, 564. 
Yinson, 564. 
Yinter, 280, 564. 
Yirian, 17, 115, 564. 
Yoaden t 
Yodden J 
Yoice, 564. 
Yooght, 144, 564. 
Yosper, 115, 564. 
Yowles, 346, 564. 
Yyse, 221, 564. 



WacKer, 565. 
Waddell, 595. 
Waddingliam, 280, 565. 
Waddington, 256, 434, 565. 
Wade, 565. 
Wadland, 165, 565. 
Wadley, 565. 
Wadsley, 279, 565. 
Wadsworth, 434, 565. 
Wager, 565. 
WagstafP, 326, 565. 
Wain, 358, 565. 
Wainwright, 565, 
Waite, 565. 
Wakefield, 565. 
Wakeford, 565. 
Wakeham, 166, 565. 
Wakelin, 193, 565. 
Wakely, 169, 565. 
Walburn, 565. 
Walby, 221, 565. 
Walden, 565. 
Walder, 565. 
Waldron, 75, 565. 



Ixii 



INDEX. 



Walford, 565. 

Walker, 19, 20, 61, 124, 565, 595 * 

WaU, 565. 

Wallace, 318, 566, 58i, 595. 

Wallbank, 256, 566. 

Waller, 566. 

Wallej, 100, 566. 

Wallis, 87, 566, 584, 

Wallwin, 126, 566. 

Walpole, 297, 566. 

Walrond, 17, 356, 566. 

Walsh, 566. 

Walmsley, 256, 566. 

Walter, 142, 566. 

Walters, 566. 

Walton, 62, 117, 182, 566. 

Wanlace t 

Wanless } 3^8,566. 

Warburton, 99, 256, 566. 
Ward, 62, 82, 124, 258, 566. 
Warden, 566. 
Warden, 388, 566. 
Warder, 337, 566. 
Wardle, 358, 566. 
Ware, 566. 
Wareham, 176, 567. 
Wareing i 
Waring j 



567. 



Warne, 567. 

Warner, 567. 

Warnes, 285, 567. 

Warr, 77, 567. 

Warren, 62, 141, 567. 

Warrilow, 567. 

Warrington, 364, 567. 

Warry, 356. 

Warwick, 567. 

Wass, 2S0, 567. 

Waterfall, 139, 567. 

Waterliouse, 139, 567.* 

Waterman, 234, 567. 

Waters, 393, 567. 

Watkins, 445, 567. 

Watkinson, 434, 567. 

Watson, 63, 117, 124, 567, 595. 

Watt, 595. 

Watts, 63, 141, 567. 



Waugh, 318, 567, 595. 

Way, 567.* 

Waycott, 567, 

Wayman, 567. 

Wayne, 567. 

Wearmouth, 182, 567. 

Wearne, 567. 

Weatherall, 326, 568. 

Weatlierhead, 434, 568, 

Weaver, 20, 568. 

Webb, 19, 20, 63, 568. 

Webber, 19, 20, 142, 568. 

Webster, 19, 20, 63, 568, 595. 

Weddell t 

Weddle } 317,318,568. 

Weeks, 345, 401, 568. 

Weetman, 568. 

Weighell i 

Weigbill I 419,568. 

Weigbtman, 568. 

Weil-, 595, 601. 

Welburn t 

Wellburn } ^^^' '^^^ 

Welch, 568. 

Welford, 267, 410, 568. 

WeUer, 377, 568, 

Wellings, 568, 

Wellington, 568. 

Wells, 64, 568. 

Welsh, 595. 

Welson, 568. 

Wenden i 

Wendon } ^^^' ''^• 

Went, 569. 

Were, 144, 569, 

Werrett, 203, 569. 

Wescott, 166, 346, 569. 

West, 64, 569. 

Westacott i 

Westcott } 166,346,569. 

Westaway, 569. 
Western, 145, 569. 
Westgate, 569. 
Westlake, 166, 569. 
Westley, 305, 569. 
Westerby 
Westoby 



569, 



INDEX. 



Ixiii 



Weston, 569. 
Westren, 145, 569. 
Westwood, 569. 
Wetherall -| 
Wetheriu} ^26, 569. 

Wetton, 140, 569. 

WhalebeUy, 569. 

WhaUey, 100, 256, 569. 

Wharton, 297, 569. 

Wlifttley, 569. 

Wheatcroft, 140, 569. 

Wheatley, 569. 

Wheaton, 166, 569. 

Wheatyear, 208. 

Wheeldon i 

Whieldon } 126,364,569. 

Wheeler, 569. 
Wheelton, 90, 569. 
Whetter, 569. 
Whinnett, 569. 
Whipp, 569. 
Whitaker, 569. 
Whitbread, 234. 
Whitcher, 208, 569. 
White, 64, 569, 595. 
Whiteaway, 166. 
Whitebread, 234, 570. 
Whitehead, 570. 
Whitehouse, 570. 
Whitehurst, 570. 
Whitelegg, 100, 570. 
Whiteley, 570. 
Whiteman, 570. 
Whiteside, 257, 570. 
White way, 166, 570. 
Whitfield, 71, 336, 570. 
Whiting, 570. 
Whitley, 434, 570. 
Whitloek, 193, 393, 570. 
Whitlow, 570. 
Whitmore, 373, 570. 
Whitney, 305, 570. 
Whitsed, 570. 
Whittaker, 257, 434, 570. 
Whittingham, 140, 570. 
Wliittington, 570. 
Whittle, 176, 258, 570. 



Whittleton, 285, 570. 
Wliitton, 305, 570. 
Whitwell, 419, 570. 
Whitworth, 570. 
Whityer, 208. 
Whyddon, 166. 
Whyte, 64, 595. 
Wibberley, 570. 
Wickens, 386, 570. 
Wickett, 570. 
Wickham, 386, 571. 
Widdicombe, 166, 571. 
Widdison, 571. 
Widdop T 
Widdup} 434,571. 

Widdows, 334, 571. 
Widdowson, 140, 571. 
Wiggins, 334, 571. 
Wigley, 140, 571. 
Wilberforce, 419, 571. 
Wilcock -| 

Wilcox [■ ^>ji 

Willcocks, etc. J 

wnd T 

Wilde } 64,319,571. 



571. 



WUday 
Willday 
Wildbore, 326. 
Wilder, 75, 571 . 
Waes, 571. 

Wilford, 267, 410, 571. 
Wilkes 1 
Wilks I ^'1- 
Wilkie, 595. 
Wilkins, 17, 65, 571. 
Wilkinson, 65, 571. 
Willets -1 
Willetts ; ^'^^■ 
WiUey, 270, 572. 
Williams, 65, 572. 
Williamson, 65, 572, 595, 
WilHng, 166, 572. 
Willis, 572. 
Willison, 572. 
Willou^Jjfcy, 572. 
Willows, 280, 572. 
Wills, 142, 572. 



XIV 



INDEX. 



Wilmer, 81, 572. 

Wilmofc T 

Wilmott } 1^.221,572. 

Wilsdon.. 572. 

Wilshaw, 572. 

Wilshere, 221. 

Wilson, 65, 572, 595. 

Wiltshire, 221, 393, 572. 

Wilton, 126, 573. 

Winder, 257, 573. 

Windsor, 573. 

Winfield, 573. 

Wingfield, 140, 573. 

Winn, 280, 573. 

Winnall, 407, 573. 

Winslade, 346, 573. 

Winson, 573. 

Winstanley, 257, 573. 

Winstone, 573. 

Wint, 364, 573. 

Winter, 573. 

Winterton, 267. 

Wintle, 203, 573. 

Wintour, 203, 573. 

Winwood, 573. 
Wisdom, 334. 
Wise, 116, 573. 
Wiseman, 193, 297, 573. 
Witchell, 203, 573. 
Withecombe t 
Witheycombe j ' 

Witherden, 234, 573. 
Witheridge, 573. 
Withers, 208, 573. 
Withey 
Withy 

Witney, 573. 
Witt, 208, 573. 
Witter, 573. 
Witty, 573. 
Woffenden, 573. 
Wolfenden, 257, 422, 573. 
WoUey, 574. 
Wolton, 573. 
Wombwell i 
Woombill I ^2^' ^'^^■ 
Wonham, 378, 573. 



573. 



Wonnacott, 145, 573. 

Wood, 65, 124, 573, 595. 

Woodall, 573. j 

Woodcock, 102, 336, 573. i 

Wooddisse, 573. j 

Woodhams, 386, 573. 

Woodhead, 423, 573. 

Woodhouse, 140, 213, 574. 

Woodings, 574, \ 

Woodland, 574. \ 

Woodley, 574. | 

Woodman, 574. | 

Woods, 66, 574. 

Woodward, 66, 124, 402, 574. i 

Wookey, 574. 

Woolcock, 116, 574. 

Woolfenden, 257, 422, 573. 

Woolgrove, 574, 

Woolhouse, 305, 574. 

WooUam -j 

Woollams / ^'^'^• 

Woolland, 574. 

Woollard, 374, 574. 

Woollatt, 221, 574. 

Woolley, 140, 574. 

Woolston, 285, 574. 

Wooster, 574. 

Woottou, 70, 574. 

Workman, 574. 

Wormington, 407, 574. 

Wormleighton, 267, 574. 

Worsley, 257, 574. 

Worth, 100, 574. 

Worthington, 100, 257, 574. 

Wortley, 574. 

Wotton, 167, 574. 

Wragg, 140, 574. 

Wrathall, 574. 

Wray, 316, 420, 574. 

Wrayford -| 

Wreford | 1^^' ^'^^^ 

Wren -i 

Wrenn | =^^0, 574. 

Wright, QG, 574, 595. 
Wrighton, 575, 
Wrightson, 575. 
Wrixon, 575. 



INDEX. IxV 

Wroot, 190, 280, 575. Yamold, 407, 575. 

Wroth, 167, 575. Yarrow, 575. 

Wyatt, 345, 575. Yarwood, 575. 

Wych, 100, 575. Yates, 125, 575. 

Wyer, 575. Yeandle, 575. 

Wyles, 571. Yeardley, 575. 

Wylie, 595. Yeend, 575. 

Wylshere, 221. Yeiland, 104, 575. 

WymaB, 305, 575. Yeo, 167, 575. 

Wynne, 446, 575. Yeoman, 575. 

Yeomans, 575. 

York, 575. 

Young, 66, 177, 575, 595. 
Yapp, 575. Younger, 575. 

Tarde, 167. Youngman, 575. 

Yardley, 364, 575. Youngs, 575. 

purse Vcrks Iti/t . (J^es<^- Pt-cW) 









CHEONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



1042-1066. 

1066. 

1066-1087. 

1087-1100. 

1100-113.5. 

1135-1154. 

1154-1189. 

1189-1199. 

1199-1216. 

1216-1272. 

1272-1307. 

1307-1327. 

1327-1377. 

1377-1399. 

1399-1413. 

1413-1422. 

1422-1461. 

1461-1483. 

1483. 



Edward the Confessor. 

Harold. 

William I. 

William II. 

Henry I. 

Stephen. 

Henry II. 

Eichard I. 

John. 

Henry III. 

Edward I. 

Edward II. 

Edward III. 

Eichard II. 

Henry IV. 

Henry V. 

Henry VI. 

Edward IV. 

Edward V. 



1483-1485. Eichard III. 
1485-1509. Henry VII. 
1509-1547. Henry VIII. 
1547-1553. Edward VI. 
1553-1558. Mary I. 
1558-1603. EUzabeth. 
1603-1625. James I. 
1625-1649. Charles I. 
1649-1660. The Commonwealth. 
1660-1685. Charles II. 
1685-1688. James II. 
1689-1702. William III. and Mary I 
1702-1714. Anne. 
1714-1727. George I. 
1727-1760. George II. 
1760-1820. George III. 
1820-1830. George IV. 
1830-1837. William IV. 
1837.-|tlot Victoria. 

^1(0 -113c Ocorj, (/ 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



CHAPTER I. 

Introductory Remarks. 



Since this book is concerned chiefly with the lineage of the 
masses of the English people, it will be profitable to occupy a 
page or two with a consideration of the position and mode of life 
of our yeomen ancestors between two and three centuries ago ; 
and I should first observe that my remarks will relate mainly to 
the yeomen proper of those times rather than to the humbler 
order of peasantry subservient to them, or, in other words, to that 
well-to-do class of which plain John Ridd, the Somerset j^eoman of 
"Lorna Doone," may be taken as a type, rather than to the 
simpler peasantry, of whom Fielding's characters of Gaffer and 
Gammer Andrews may be considered as in some degree typical. 
I allude, in fact, to " the great body of freeholders, the yeomanry 
of the Middle Ages, a body which, in antiquity of possession and 
purity of extraction, was probably superior to the classes that 
looked down upon it as ignoble."* In the time of which I write, 
the yeomen class had been " strengthened by the addition of the 
body of tenant farmers, whose interests were very much the same 
as those of the smaller' freeholders, and who shared with them the 
common name of yeomen."j , 

The English yeomen in the past were a stay-at-home people, 
passing uneventful lives on their own acres, which frequently 
remained in the hands of the same family for five or six 
generations, and were handed on from father to son with a 
regularity that betokened long life and but natural decay. Each 
died, as a rule, well stricken m years, piously bequeathing in his 
last will and testament his soul to God, his body to the earth from 
whence it came, and his lands to his descendants. In nearly every 

* Stubbs' " Constitutional History of England " : 1884 : iii, 569. 
t Ibid. 

B 



2 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

county there are yefc to be found several families of jeomen living (! 
in tlie same quiet and remote parishes in which their ancestors 
resided two centuries or more ago. Each family is represented in the 
church register by an uninterrupted succession of entries of births, 
inarriao-es, and deaths, in which the same Christian names occur 
over and over again in a manner very confusing to the genealogist. 
These reo-isters, however, do not usually commence at an earlier 
date than the sixteenth century, and, as a rule, therefore, are not 
of much service in throwing light on the origin of a family. 

From the wills of the yeomen of 250 or 300 years ago we can 
extract much that throws an interesting light on their ways of life, 
and a little, too, that in the musty parchment still preserves its 
pathos. They supply us often with the only information we 
possess of many an unhistoric line, and their somewhat monotonous 
ciiaracter is eminently suggestive of peaceful and contented lives. 
The usual bequests to the church and to the poor, and the promise 
of twelve or twenty pence to the ringers for the ringing of their 
knells indicate the simple faith and religious practice of our 
yeomen ancestors. The well-to-do yeoman bequeathed to his 
eldest son his principal belongings, his house, his acres, his 
" waynes and plough geare," his live stock, and a few hundred 
pounds ; to his wife a home, a feather-bed furnished, and 
10 pounds a year, 50 shillings to be paid quarterly ; to his other 
sons two kine apiece ; to his daughters, a silver spoon and a cow 
apiece, to be delivered into their own hands and not into their 
husbands' ; to his grandchildren, a sheep apiece ; to a favourite 
niece, a black heifer or a white ewe ; 20 shillings to the poor, and 
20 shillings to the church, and " 20 pence to the ringers for the 
i-inging of my knell." 

Usually, these ancient yeomen were but little affected by the 
wars and political factions of their times. They were not troubled 
with ambition, and few cared to wander far from the vicinity of 
their birthplace. It was the boast of a wealthy old Devonshire 
yeoman, 150 years ago, that he had never crossed the borders of 
his native county, and I cannot believe that in this respect he 
differed greatly from his fellows. From the stationary conditions 
iif their lives, and from the nature of their pursuits and sur- 
roundings, they acquired a solid mediocrity of character, to which 
the long persistence of families in the same locality and in the 
same station is mainly due. England, in truth, owes much to 
tlieir lack of aspiration and to their home-loving ways. It is, 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 3 

however, remarkable that the rise of a family into a condition of 
opulence is, as a rule, shortly followed by its dispersal, until, 
within a generation or two, the home of the name for centuries 
knows it no more. 

The agricultural population, as indicated by the permanent 
location of the sui-names, has experienced but little effect from the 
immigration of foreigners, which during the last three centui'ies has 
so largely influenced the population of the Metropolis. Our yeomen, 
as we know now, are truly sons of English soil, if an uninterrupted 
abode of at least five or six centui-ies can entitle them to the name. 
They have not received any accessions of note since the period 
comprised in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries, 
during which numbers of Flemings were introduced into the 
west of England and into South Wales, partly for establishing the 
woollen manufacture in England and partly to assist in the coloni- 
zation of Wales. Since the time of the early Flemings the English 
yeoman population has, on the whole, maintained its stability. 
Although in the last two or three centuries the Jews, the Walloons, 
and the Huguenots have found a home in the land, their numbers 
have almost entirely gone to increase the populations of our towns 
and cities. Trade and commerce have absorbed them in their 
ranks, and it is only in rare instances that the foreign immigrants 
have assumed the status of an English farmer. I will not, how- 
ever, content myself with these general statements, but will refer 
briefly to the evidence on which they are based. 

In the first place, with reference to the Jews, it should be 
remarked that after the persecutions of the Middle Ages they were 
readmitted into England by Cromwell. They laboured, however, 
under many serious disabilities until the present century. In 
Germany, where the Jews are nine times as numerous as in Great 
Britain, they have been true to the business instincts of their race, 
and only a few of them have become farmers and sailors. And, 
in fact, we may say the same of those who have been for several 
generations in our own land. It is true that several names 
suggestive to some people of Jewish descent occur in the 
alphabetical list of names, a list mainly referring to the yeoman 
population; but in most of these instances it will be found, on 
referring to the notes on the characteristic names of the counties, 
that they have been the names of English yeomen, English clergy- 
men, and English squires, for at least six centuries, and in not a 
few cases we find them in the Domesday Book. 

B 2 



4 HOMES OF FAJIILY NAMES. 

The Walloon and Huguenot immigrants of the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries require but little consideration, since their 
well-known industrial habits and their comparatively recent arrival 
amongst us are circumstances that would render any extensive 
intermixture with the agricultural classes improbable, a pre- 
sumption strongly confirmed by the absence (with but few! 
exceptions) of Huguenot and Walloon names from my list.* 
In Kent, Sussex, Norfolk, and other counties, Avhere these settle- 
ments were made, the energies of the refugees were in the main 
directed towards industrial pursuits. Thus, to take the Kentish 
town of Sandwichf as an example, we learn that after the adventl 
of the Walloon refugees in 15G1 the trade and population greatly 
increased. As cloth-makers, smiths, potters, &c., the foreign | 
immigrants gave new life to the town ; but only a few of themi 
became engaged in agricultural pursuits, not, however, as general; 
cultivators of the soil but as vegetable gardeners. Their names 
still linger in and around Sandwich, though the prosperity of thel 
place has to a large extent disappeared ; but they are lost amongst 
the mass of Kentish names, and are destined to finally disap})c;ir 
either through extinction or by being Anglicised. 

It is estimated that after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
in 1685, between 40,000 and 60,000 French Protestants, or 
Huguenots, settled in Great Britain. A large number of tht m 
found their home in the Metropolis, and many new industries were 
established in this city and in other parts of the country by the 
refugees. Our yeoman population, however, was but little afi'ected 
by the immigration. 

In truth, we may conclude that our farmers may confidently lay 
claim to be considered as English amongst the English. For li\ e 
or six centuries at least they have beeia thorough Englishmen, and 
it is to this class that we naturally look if we wish to ascertain the 
general characters of the population of a county or of a district. 
Concerning this subject, Dr. Beddoe, in his work on the "Races of 
Britain," speaks in no doubtful tone when he says that " the small 
farmers are still the most Saxon or Anglian part of the popula- 
tion in the south-east and east of England, and the most British 
or Celtic in the south-west." Generally speaking, however, in 



* Tliere are in my list several good old English or old Norman names v.hich 
Lave been considered as of Huguenot origin. Those interested in the subject 
may easily satisfy themselves on this point. 

■f See Boys' " History of Sandwich." 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 5 

every part of the country the farmers represent the most stable 
section of the community, both in the present as well as in the 
past. 

This brings me to the point towards which I have been 
endeavouring to guide my readers since the commencement of this 
chapter, namely, the suitability of the yeoman class, as regards 
their stationary habits and their purity of extraction, for the 
investigation of the distribution of English family names. It is 
a snbject, however, beset with peculiar difficulties, and one which, 
as far as T know, has hitherto received but little systematic atten- 
tion. Since Camden's quaint essay on surnames, which was 
written about 300 years ago, the world has seen numerous books 
on the meaning of family names, and in fact during the last 
quarter of a century the matter has been almost treated ad 
natiseam. Indeed, Bardsley, Ferguson, Lower, and Taylor, have 
thrown much light in their recent works on the signification of 
these names, but concerning their distribution I have not been 
able to obtain much information. Mr. Lower, in his " Patronymica 
Britannica " (p. xxvii.), laments the deficiency of our knowledge 
concerning this subject, and points out that since the locomotive 
character of the present age is doing much towards fusing all 
provincial peculiarities and distinctions, it would be advisable for 
" competent observers in various parts of the kingdom to record 
the habitats of particular names, ere the opportunity now existing 
shall have passed away." This, however, would be a lengthy, 
complicated, and a rather impracticable method, and one probably 
the fruits of which would more likely be reaped by our grand- 
children than by ourselves. At the best, however, the undertaking 
would be immense, especially when we remember that there are 
80,000 surnames or more amongst a population of 26 millions. I 
therefore have attempted to cut the Gordian knot by a method, to 
be subsequently described, which has enabled me to make a pre- 
liminary survey of the subject that for its complete handling 
would reouire a lifetime of antiquarian and historical research. 

I have been much impressed in my investigations wdth the 
manner in which surnames, scattered apparently indiscriminately 
over the country, fall into order and disclose in their arrangement 
a method and regularity which render their distribution a subject 
of curious interest both for the antiquarian and the historian, and 
sometimes, I may say, for the ethnologist. It might appear to 
some of my readers, as it once did to myself, that the family 



6 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

nomenclature of Englishmen was for the most part in a confused 
jumble, and that on account of the rapid means of inter-commu- 
nication, which we enjoj in the present century, most of the dis- 
tinctions that existed in the past would have been lost in the whirl 
and bustle of the industrial era in which we live. It might have 
seemed to them that chance had played such a part in the inter- 
mingling of the inhabitants of different counties and districts, 
that it would be a hopeless task to endeavour to unravel the 
entangled skein. In such lights as these did these matters appear 
to me, until, by pursuing a particular line of research, I found that 
it was yet possible to pick up the threads. By this means I have 
found order where often I expected disorder, and method where I 
only looked for chance. Yet so extensive is the subject that I can 
only honestly claim to have performed the functions of a pioneer, 
and must leave to others, more capable than myself, the further 
working out and elucidation of the distribution of family names. 

Now, what has been my mode of attacking this problem ? I 
at once put aside the idea of investigating the distribution of the 
names of 26 millions of people, being staggered by the greatness 
of the task, and scarcely thinking that my lifetime would be long 
enough to obtain satisfactory results from such a complicated 
problem. Since, however, my object was to ascertain the homes 
of familiar surnames and to ascertain the characteristic surnames 
of each county, I selected after mature deliberation those of the 
most stay-at-home class of the country, namely the farmers, and 
checked my results by means of the lists of gentry, so that the 
results may be regarded as usually of general application. A 
preliminary examination, also, soon assured me that the farmers, 
who vary in number in each county between 1,000 and I0,0U0, 
formed a class sufficiently numerous for my purpose. 

I then set to work to run through the lists of farmers given in 
Kelly's Post Office Directories for all the English counties, only 
noting down under each county the names that exceeded, in their 
relative frequency, a rate of about seven per ten thousand amongst 
the farmers of that county. Thus, I attacked the problem by a 
system of proportional numbers, and my readers will soon perceive 
my reasons for so doing. Let us suppose, for instance, that I 
wanted to ascertain the frequency of the Smiths in any two 
counties, and that, as was actually the case, I counted 200 in the 
West Riding of Yorkshire, and 100 in Staffordshire. Viewed 
absolutely, these numbers have very little value, but considered 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 7 

relatively they may be made to tell their tale ; and in fact we find 
that the Smiths are better represented in Staffordshire than they 
are in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the proportion in Stafford- 
shire being 100 Smiths to 5,000 farmers, and in the West Riding 
200 Smiths to 12,500 farmers, from which we obtain for Stafford- 
shire a propoi-tional number of 200 Smiths for every 10,000 
farmers, and for the West Riding only 160 Smiths for the same 
number of farmers. If we now look under Smith in the alpha- 
betical list in the latter part of this book, we shall find 200 for 
Staffordshire and 160 for the West Riding. I will take another 
case. There are, or were recently, 23 farmers named Booth in 
Derbyshire and 26 in Lancashire. But since Derbj'shire possesses 
scarcely half as many farmers as Lancashire, the Booths in Derby- 
shire are, relatively speaking, far more frequent. In Lancashii-e 
we find a proportion of 24 in 10,000, and in Derbyshire 44 per 
10,000, and by referring to " Booth " in the alphabetical list we 
shall find the number 24 under Lancashire and 44 under Derby- 
shire. This, therefore, is the true meaning of the numbei-s 
employed in the alphabetical list. They are proportional 
numbers per 10,000 of the farmers in any particular county. 

I was occupied about three weeks in making this list. Then 
followed the much more laborious process of arranging the names 
(between 5,000 and 6,000 in all, and perhaps half as many again if 
we include the variations) so that I could see at a glance the dis- 
tribution of a name over the length and width of England and 
Wales. This took up some months and was accomplished by the 
graphic plan, familiar to most of my readers in the case of a 
weather-chart, the counties being placed at the heads of the 
columns and the names at the side. In those instances, however, 
where a name occuiTed in ten or more counties, it was a little 
difficult to carry in the mind's eye the relative position of all the 
counties, and the respective proportional numbers belonging to 
them. I therefore devised what I called the "button system," 
which is another instance of the gi-aphic method. Take the case 
of the Chapmans, who are to be found established in more than 
twenty counties. By grouping the counties into three classes, the 
fir-st, including those containing more than 35 Chapmans (per 
10,000) ; the second, those with numbers between 20 and 35, and 
the third, those with numbers less than 20, and by then taking 
buttons of three different sizes to indicate the different groups, 
we can at once perceive, by placing these buttons on a map of 



8 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

England, the peculiar distribution of this name. This is an 
amusement which I recommend to my readers. 

But as yet I had only entered a little beyond the threshold ot 
my task. I had in fact to prove ray method, or, in other words, to 
show that my conclusions were in accordance with the uneventful 
records of the country village, with the commercial and municipal 
history of the town, with the parochial history of the district, 
with the laborious chronicles of the antiquities of the county, 
with the story of the rebellion of the province, with what is known 
of the intermingling of two kindred and adjacent peoples, and 
lastly with the habits and peculiarities of the nation. This was 
the task that lay before me, and I have accomplished it in much 
the same way that a tea-taster samples his cargo of tea, or a 
microscopist reckons his billions. Thus, my reader may contrast 
in this work the family names of the three nationalities united in 
Great Britain. He can here follow the migration eastward of the 
Welsh, and the intermingling of the Scottish and English peoples. 
He will be pleased to learn that we still have the descendants of 
the martyrs of Monmouth's rebellion, in 1685, amongst the stout 
Somersetshire yeomen. He will find almost every county illus- 
trated by the comparative permanence of its names, whether 
amongst its gentry or its yeomanry ; and finally, such other 
matters will be here presented to him as may guide him in 
following the history of a name in those uncertain times when 
surnames were scarcely knoTNTi. 

Taken at its best, however, this work cannot be regarded as 
other than a preliminary exploration, or as the exemplification of 
a method. There are many objections that could be urged in 
advance against the plan, but the proof of the pudding is in the 
eating ; and, in fact, if the method had been false, I could not 
have obtained my notes on the characteristic names of each 
county, the prominent feature of this book, and I should have 
been beset on all sides with contradictions and absurdities. 
Throughout I have kept fair and square with the original plan, 
and the results have been far more satisfactory than I at first 
expected. Serious difficulties have not baffled me, except, perhaps, 
in the case of two or three of the smaller counties possessing only | 
a few hundred farmers, and there it is obvious that the method 
lequired some modification. It would be absui'd, for instance, to 
consider, for the purposes of this work, that three Barnards in 
Bedfordshire, with its 1,000 farmers, represented the same rate per 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. » 

10,000, as fifteen Barnards in another county possessing 5,000 
farmers. Three farmers of a name may spring np within a single 
generation at any place, whilst the occurrence of fifteen in a 
district represents the work of centuries. Hence, in a few of the 
smaller counties I have had to frequently reduce the proportional 
numbers, and often to exclude them when not able to find corrobo- 
ration in the county and parochial histories. 

My readers should be cai*eful not to draw too largely on their 
own experience in respect of the distribution of names in their 
neighbourhood ; a name which is numerously represented in a 
town may be almost lost in a county, and its home may exist in 
some distant part of the land. 

It may be objected that the farmers are too exclusive a class to 
afford a clue for working out the distribution of names, and that 
their names are rather characteristic of a class than of a people. 
A little reflection will soon convince the reader that such a view 
has no foundation. The yeomanry in the past were the backbone 
of the nation. Men rose from their ranks and assumed the arms 
of the gently, and from thence passed upward into the order of the 
nobility, or, as was naturally far more frequently the case, they 
descended in the scale and became the hinds and the menials of 
the country and the town, whilst an intermediate number preserved 
their position and maintained the proud boast of the British 
yeoman that they were the true sons of the soil. In those early 
times, town-life formed in fact but a secondary feature in the ways 
of the English people. 

The ascending scale, or the rise from the state of the ignoble 
to the condition of the noble, has been a frequent theme for the 
historian and biographer, but we are very apt to forget that this 
ascent involves a descent in the social ladder. The rise of some 
families into honour and fame implies the fall and gradual 
degradation of others. The existence of this ascending and 
descending current throughout society prevents the exclusiveness 
or caste, seeing that plebeian blood flows in the vein of every noble, 
and that a royal strain is to be found in the blood of many an 
English yeoman. Greatness, even though it attains a throne, has 
always commenced in the field ; and the wheel of time will bear a 
family name pitilessly along until it completes the cycle of its 
existence in the gutter. When Cowley remarked in his esssay on 
Agriculture that " a plough in a field arable," would be the most 
noble and ancient of arms he stated but one side of the matter, 



10 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



4 



and we may say tlie same of the vaunt of the Lords of Douglas — 
"You may see us in the stream, you cannot trace us to the 
fountain." We are very apt to overlook the descent of a great 
name. Where are those numerous powerful families that centuries 
ago lield the sway in many an English county, but whose names 
are now not to be found in the peerage ? Too frequently will the 
answer be found in the pages of this work. In the vicinity of 
many a ruined castle still linger, in cottages, the descendants of 
the baronial family that once possessed it. 

Take the case of a noble w^ho was the parent of a numerous 
progeny three centuries ago. At a very moderate computation his 
descendants would now be not less than 300 in number. But 
where are they to be found ? 

A single representative in the House of Lords retains the 
ancestral honours of the senior branch of the family. Where, 
however, are all the other 299 descendants who bear this name r 
A few are directly related to the reigning peer, whilst the rest, 
combining in their persons a thousand other family strains, 
are to found amongst the rank and file of the nation, in the pro- 
fessions, in the trades, and amongst our yeomen and our labouring 
classes. 

I have almost said enough to show the changing fortunes of a 
family name, but my remarks would scarcely be complete without 
a i-eference to Gibbon's well-known sketch of the noble French 
house of Courtenay. After noting its rise from a plebeian root and 
its subsequent connection with the royal line of France, the 
historian describes in measured language its gradual decay — " The 
splendour of the princely lords of Courtenay," thus he writes, 
" was clouded by poverty and time : . . . . they descended 
from princes to barons; the next generations were confounded 
with the simple gentry: .... the more adventurous em- 
braced without dishonour the profession of a soldier: the least 
active and opulent might sink, like their cousins of the branch 
of Dreux, into the condition of peasants. Their royal descent in a 
dark period of four hundred years became each day more obsolete 
and ambiguous ; and their pedigree, instead of being enrolled in the 
annals of the kingdom, must be painfully searched by the minute 
diligence of heralds and genealogists . . . ." Thus we can 
perceive how, when an ancient house becomes extinct, it is only 
the honours that have passed away, the family remains, though 
Its ramifications are lost amongst the masses of the people. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 11 

I corae now to consider the classification I of English family 
names adopted in this work. It has necessarily been arranged 
on a geographical basis, and includes the six following classes : — 



1. General names, occurring in fi'om 30 to 40 counties. 

2. Common names, „ ,, 20 to 29 ,, 

3. Regional names, ,, ,, 10 to 19 ,, 

4. District names, ,, ,, 4 to 9 ,, 

5. County names, which are established ia 2 or 3 counties, and 

have usually their principal home in one of them. 

6. Pectdiar names, which are mostly confined to one county, 

and generally to a particular parish or division in that 
county. 

The list of the names in the first three classes will be found in 
Chapter 11., where their distribution will also be found. Notes on 
the other classes of names will be found under those counties they 
particularly characterise ; but my readers should bear in mind 
that these notes are intended merely to illustrate the relative 
permanence of names in a county, and that they are in no sense 
whatever of an exhaustive nature. In some cases 1 have had great 
difficulty in collecting information, since so many county histories 
are nothing more than manorial records or chronicles of the landed 
families. In other instances, 1 have been overwhelmed with 
materials, as in those of Lancashire, Devonshire, Kent, and 
Norfolk, but this has only happened when the numerous county 
and parochial historians have condescended to record the existence 
of other classes than those of the landed nobility and gentry. 
Many of the characteristic names of a county are not referred to 
in the accompanying notes, but by following np the references 
there given some information will in all probability be found, and 
even in the case of those names specially mentioned in the notes 
much more may still be found by following up the authorities 
given. There are a few general works which may provide a clue 
in case of a failure, such as Sims' " Manual for the Genealogist," 
Anderson's "British Topography," Hotten's "Topography and 
Family History of England and Wales," and the works of Marshall, 
Nichols, and others. A British Gazetteer, such as Bartholomew's, 
or, better still, a county gazetteer, if there is one, may often afford 
a valuable hint, since a large proportion of County and Peculiar 
names are derived from places. Failing everywhere, the reader 



12 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

had better try and obtain a cine by looking througb the alpha- 
betical lists of gentry and farmers given in Kelly's Connty 
Directories. 

It will be noticed in my notes on the characteristic names of 
each county, that I have made free use of the Hundred Rolls, 
which contain lists of the tenants and landholders of several 
counties in the reigns of Henry IH. and Edward I., the counties of 
Lincoln, Norfolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, and Oxford being 
dealt with at considerable length, whilst those in the south-west 
and those in the north of England are, as a rule, very imperfectly 
referred to. The circumstance, that the Hundred Rolls deal 
largely with the eastern counties, must always be remembered by 
the reader, and that is why so many of the East Anglian surnames 
may appear to be more ancient than those of many other counties. 
Very often, in fact, the reference to a west country name as 
occurring in the Hundred Rolls in connection with an eastern 
county, mainly signifies that the name has been some 600 years at 
least in England. The great value of the Hundred Rolls can only 
be appreciated when we are dealing with the counties most fully 
dealt with in their pages. 

And now, a word with regard to the so-called peculiar 
names. When we come to consider the distribution of "peculiar" 
names, that is to say, of names which are confined mostly or 
entirely to one county, we at once observe that counties vary 
greatly from each other in this respect. Cornwall and Devon, in 
the south-west of England, comprise a region that stands pre- 
eminently before other parts of the country as a factory of family 
names, the peculiar names there forming at least forty per cent, of 
the total. Next come Lincolnshire and the North and East 
Ridings of Yorkshire with about thirty per cent., and after them 
the West Riding, Lancashire, Kent, Dorset, and Somerset, with 
not less than twenty-five per cent. The other counties vary 
usually with reference to their peculiar names between seventeen 
and twenty per cent., and the minimum is reached in Wales and 
Monmouthshire, where we find from seven to ten per cent. The 
last-named little county — English in predilection, and English i]i 
its later history — is, in the matter of its family names, almost 
more Welsh than Wales itself ; and, in truth, it would appear that 
the main track of the immigrants from the Principality has lain 
through the county of Monmouth. The other border counties of 
Herefordshire and Shropshire have been much less affected by 



INTRODUCTOEY REMARKS. 13 

the invasion, thougli they contain a very considerable number of 
Welsh intruders. The effect upon Cheshire has been compara- 
tively slight. This is a subject, however, that will be found more 
fully considered when speaking of Wales. 

In an interesting paper on " The Birthplaces of the People and 
the Laws of Migration,"* Mr. Ravenstein, taking as his guide the 
census of 1871, cleai'ly shows that the more distant a county is 
from the great industrial and commercial centres, the greater is 
th.e proportion of native-born inhabitants. Thus, he points out 
that whilst not much more than half of the population of Surrey 
and Middlesex may be termed native-born, the number of the 
inhabitants born in the surrounding counties is relatively much 
larger, and in the counties yet further removed from the metropolis 
the proportion of the native population is still greater. There is 
in this manner a constant migration toward the metropolis. The 
inhabitants of the counties immediately adjacent to a large city 
flock into it, and their place is taken by immigrants from more 
distant counties, a process which goes on until, to employ the 
words of Mr. Ravenstein, "the attractive force of one of our 
rapidly inci'easing cities makes its influence felt in the most 
i-eraote corner of the Empire." 

It will be best for me to illustrate Mr. Ravenstein 's remarks 
on migration by taking the "general" and "common" names, 
since the varying proportions of " peculiar " names in difi'erent 
counties afford no safe guidance in the matter. Let me, therefore, 
take the instance of a name like "Robinson." It has its great 
home in the north, and, like so many other north-country names, 
invades the midlands on its way to the metropolis, making 
scarcely any attempt to reach the south-west of England. The 
struggle between the Harrisons of the north and the Harrises of 
the south for the mastery of the midland counties, which is 
described in Chapter II., well illustrates the great southward 
movement that is taking place amongst our northern population. 
The Welsh invasion affords many examples of a national migration 
eastward, and it is to be noted that the main lines of advance of the 
Northmen and the Welshmen converge on the metropolis. Very 
many other good examples of the migration of names will be found 
in the chapter in which the distributions of the " general," " com- 
mon," and "regional" names are described. The "regional ' 

* " Geographical Magazine" (Reprint). 



14 HOMES OF FAMII.Y NAMES. 

and " district " names will probably be found the best suited to 
exemplify the attractive effects of the large provincial towns and 
cities on the populations of the surrounding counties ; but, as I 
indicated above, the great attraction of the metropolis can only be 
well illustrated by selecting names having a very wide distribution, 
such as those classed as " general " and " common." 

Few of the shires have experienced the effect of proximity to 
the metropolis in such a marked degree as Berkshire. Whilst 
making my notes on the antecedents of the present characteristic 
names of this county, I found considerable difficulty in my task, 
since most of the old Berks family names of the 15th, 16th, and 
17th centuries, such as Ashmole records in his history of the 
county, are, for the purposes of my work, practically extinct. 
The result is that my notes on the Berkshire names largely consist 
of references to names that characterised the county in the past. 
This process of change, however, is by no means one of recent 
origin. Situated as it is on the main line of migration London- 
wards from the west of England, Berkshire has been for centuries 
an area in which property has been ever changing hands, and in 
which ancient families have been successively dispersed. Fuller, 
in his " Worthies," more than 200 years ago, lamented over the 
fact that the Berkshire gentry, sown thick in former ages, came 
up so thinly in later times. Writing of the families that resided 
in the county during the first quarter of the present century, 
Mr. Clarke, in his account of the Hundred of Wanting, speaks of 
the mutations of property as so frequent that but few of the 
landed gentry had possessed their estates for many generations. 
My investigations, however, show that the yeomanry, comprising 
in early times the smaller freeholders, and in later times including 
also the tenant farmers, experienced the same successive changes 
both as regards their lands and their surnames. The old families 
of the Berkshire gentry and yeomanry have, in fact, to a large 
extent disappeared from their native county. The change, as we 
observe it in operation at the present day, proceeds very rapidly. 
Thirty years ago, as pointed out by Lord Wantage before a Select 
Committee of the House of Commons,* the yeoman farmers of 
Berkshire Avere prosperous and well-to-do, many of them cultivating 
their own land ; but at the present time "we can hardly point to a 
single case of a yeoman farmer holding his own land." Berkshire, 

* fciclect Committee on " Small Holdings," May 10th, 1889. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 15 

as I liave shown, lias been for centuries an area possessing a shifting 
yeoman population. It would now, however, appear, as observed 
bj Lord Wantage, that foreign competition is bringing about the 
extinction of the class. 

A work of this kind will not be complete without some refer- 
ence to the origin and nature of family names. Unfortunately, 
however, these are subjects which have afforded such a scope for the 
free play of the imagination that a perusal of the works of different 
modern writers tends rather to bewilder one. And, in fact, no safer 
course can we folloAv than to go back some 300 years to the time 
when William Camden, the celebrated antiquary, wrote upon this 
subject.* Camden lived in times much nearer to that age Avhen 
surnames were first adopted, a cii^cumstance which, independently 
of his fame, would lead us to prefer him as our guide. 

Surnames were not in use in England and Scotland before the 
N^orman Conquest, and they were first to be found in the Domes- 
day Book. Many surnames, such as Mortimer, Warren, Mowbray, 
Clifford, Arundel, etc., etc., which are " accounted names of great 
fintiquity," were first assumed at the time of the Conquest. The 
employment of a second name, a custom introduced by the 
Normans, who themselves had not long before adopted it, became 
in course of time a mark of gentle blood, and it was deemed " a 
disgrace for a gentleman to have but one single name, as the 
meaner sort had." It was not, however, until the reign of 
Edward II. that the practice became general amongst the common 
people. 

Coming to the origin of surnames, we learn from Camden that 
those most ancient and of best account were derived from places 
in Normandy, or in the neighbouring parts of France, and that, in 
fact, there was no village in Normandy that gave not its name to 
some family in England. Such names were usually preceded by 
De, Bu, Des, or De la, and began or ended with Beau, Saind, Mont, 
Aux, Eux, Vail, Court, Champ, Vill, etc. The last named is one of 
the commonest terminations of names of Norman origin ; but it 
has often been corrupted into Feld or Field, as Baskey field for 
Baskervil, Somerfield for Somervil, Greenfeld or Greenfield for 
Greenvil, and others, which are still nineteenth century surnames. 
However, a far greater number of family names originated from 
places, there being, as Camden observes, scarcely a town, village, 

* This essay is contained in "Kemaines concerning Britain." 



1(5 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

hamlet, or place in England whicli has not afforded names to 
families. The ancient manors gave their names to their lords, and 
the numberless small estates similarly gave their names to their 
possessors. Naturally, however, in the great majority of cases, a 
man took the name of the village or hamlet where he had been 
born. These place-names were often preceded by De ; but such 
great changes have many surnames undergone, at the hands often 
of their illiterate possessors, that it is frequently very difficult and 
not uncommonly impossible to trace their origin. Thus, it would 
at first sight seem very absurd to regard the Somersetshire name 
of Moon as a corruption of De Mohun or De Moiun, the name of a 
great landed family in Somerset and adjacent counties in the 
thirteenth century. Yet this curious change can be proved to 
have occurred. Then, again, men often took the names of the 
most conspicuous natural featui-e near their residence, such as a 
hill, or a wood, or a moor, and thence arose Hill, Atte-Wood 
(Atwood), Atte-Moor (Atmore), and many others. Also, 
strangers fi'om other countries took the name of their native land, 
as Picard, Scot, Fleming, French, etc. In fact, it becomes very 
evident that only in a very few cases, as in those of Melton- 
Mowbray, Minster-Lovell, etc., have the surnames of families been 
attached or adjoined to places. In the great majority of instances, 
as Camden well remarks, the place bore its name before the family 
did its surname, and the old antiquary becomes a little wrathful 
with those men who " think that their ancestors gave names to 
places." In truth, my readers will frequently learn from these 
pages that a good county gazetteer is of primary importance in 
ascertaining the origin of names, and he will pay little heed to the 
suggestion that men have been wont to give their names to their 
properties or to their native villages. He will receive yet further 
help in perusing the index of place-names of the thirteenth cen- 
tury given in the Hundred Rolls, and also the indices of places 
contained in the county histories of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. 

"After these local names," writes Camden, "the most names in 
number have been derived from occupations or professions, as 
Taylor, Smith, Walker, i.e., Fuller, Sadler, Spicer, Wright, 
Baker, Baxter, Webster, Chapman, Wheeler, etc., etc., and moso 
which end in er." Some of such names have been assumed from 
offices, as Chamberlain, Spenser, i.e, Ste^vard, Latimer, i.e., Inter- 
preter, Reeve, Parker, Clark, Proctor, Woodward, Bishop, Dean, 



J 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 17 

Deacon, etc., etc. Men also took their names from their mental or 
physical characteristics, as Sharp, Good, Strong, Little, etc., or 
from their complexion, as White, Brown, etc., or from the animal 
and vegetable kingdoms, as Lamb, Bear, Fox, Beech, Ash, Rose, 
etc., etc. Christian names have given rise to a great number of 
surnames, especially those Christian names in use at the time of 
the Norman Conquest, as Alan, Corbet, Done, Godwin, Harding, 
Herward, Kettell, Osborne, Rolph, Siward, Swain, Talbot, Vivian, 
Walaraud, etc., etc., besides those of other origin, as Lewis, Owen, 
James, Thomas, etc. Many such names have an s affixed, to them, 
and then we get Peters, Rogers, etc., or they have the full termi- 
nation of son, as Williamson, Richardson, etc. 

Nicknames, or nursenames, have given rise to many surnames, 
as Will, from William, which forms Wills and its diminutive 
Wilkins ; Bat, from Bartholomew, which gives rise to Bates, Batts, 
Batson, and the diminutive Batkin ; Gib, from Gilbert, which 
forms Gibbs, Gibson, and Gibbings ; and. many other similar 
examples, such as Daw, from David, from which comes Dawes, 
Dawson, and Dawkins (little David). 

Camden then refers to the several causes of the changes of 
names in the early centuries after the Conquest, before surnames 
became stable. It was a common practice in the case of the landed 
families for only the heir to take the father's surname, whilst the 
younger sons took their names from the estates allotted to them or 
from some personal characteristic. It was not until the thirteenth 
century, in fact, that such names as Thomson, Richardson, Wilson, 
etc., began to be permanent ; previously they had varied according 
to the Christian name of the Father. The surnames of the masses 
of the people during those early times were frequently changed. 
Many dropped their father's surname for the name of the occupa- 
tion they had chosen, and became Taylors, Bakers, etc. Many 
again took their masters' names. There can, however, be no 
doubt that in later centuries, when surnames were so-to-speak 
permanently appropriated by a family, and neither changed with 
occupation nor at each new generation, they were still subjected to 
great variations at the hands of our illiterate forefathers. 

The principle of spelling with a V advocated by the immortal 
Mr. Weller for the orthography of his name has, in truth, been 
largely practised since Camden's time. Thus we have three or 
four ways of spelling such a simple name as Gardener ; we have 
Garratt and Garrett, Procter and Proctor, Rogers and Rodgers, 

G 



18 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

■Rdmonds and Edmunds, and scores of other similar instances 
might be cited. Sucli names as Willcocks and Shepherd have 
various forms, and there are certain privileged names such as 
Cousens or Cussins, where the "spell it as you like" method 
seems to have been generally adopted. Then there is tliat curious 
termination of an e, by which Brown becomes Browne and Cook 
becomes Cooke, an affix usually significant of a rise in the social 
scale, or, as it perhaps might be more correctly expressed, of a 
transference from the Trade to the Court Directory. To many of 
these changes it is not always easy to assign a difference in 
locality; but there are some, such as the triple forms of Read, 
Reed, and Reid, where the variation is chaiacteristic of large 
regions and even of a particular nationality. These matters, how- 
ever, are more fully treated in Chapter II. 

The causes of the lesser variations are principally to be found 
in the circumstance that such an unimportant matter as the ortho- 
graphy of a name was often decided by the clerk or the attorney 
of a country parish. The clerk, when making his entries in the 
parish registers, exercised his own judgment with but little regard 
to the practice of his predecessors, and thus it is that in these old 
records the principle of variation in a name is very particularly 
exemplified. Then, again, when the small country gentleman and 
the well-to-do-yeoman came to make their wills we can easily 
understand their air of indifference in the matter when they 
affixed their mark, and the readiness of the attorney to write their 
names wrongly. The spread of education has done much to fix 
the spelling of family names ; but few of us reflect that the small 
diHerences to which we attach so much distinctive importance were 
either framed in the brain-pan of a parish clerk or originated from 
the phonetic orthography of a country attorney or were due to the 
Wellerian perverseness of our ancestors. 

It will soon become obvious to my readers that the facts in this 
work might have been much farther elaborated, but I prefer to 
remain true to my method, if only to avoid getting beyond my 
depth. As a suggestive example let us take the Names of the 
Cloth Trade. No industry has left a more permanent mark on 
our family nomenclature than that connected with the cloth trade. 
Until near. the middle of the fourteenth century almost all the 
English wool was exported into Flanders to be wrought into cloth: 
but by the Statutes of Edward III. its further exportation was 
forbidden, the foreign staples or markets were abolished and the 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 10 

cloth maimfacture was encouraged, in England, However, it was 
soon found that the English weavers could not make sufficient 
cloth for the nation, and foreign cloth-workers were invited over, 
many Flemings acceding to the King's invitation. Hence sprang 
the woollen manufacture of England, and staple or markets were 
established at various towns to take the place of the foreign staples, 
of which only that of Calais was at times revived. The two 
ancient Corporations, that of the Merchants of the Staple and 
that of the Merchant Adventurers, the one trading in the raw 
material, the other in the cloth, began to decay as the home- 
manufacture increased. The Merchants of the Staple were the 
capitalists of the wool trade ; they accumulated large fortunes, 
built churches, established alms-houses, and often formed nob!e 
connections. By the middle of the sixteenth century they gave 
place to or were rather merged into the Clothiers, a community, 
perhaps, less distinguished, but none the less important in our 
commercial annals.* 

With this short notice of the history of the cloth trade, I pass 
on to consider the general distribution of the principal surnames 
connected with it. In my description of the distribution of the 
Walkers (Chapter II), I refer to the circumstance that Tucker, 
Fuller, and Walker have the same signification, all representing 
the fullers of the cloth manufacture. Each has its own area, but 
collectively they represent the fulling trade all over our land. 
The Tuckers are the fullers of the south-west of England, and, in 
fact, of all the southern counties as far east as Hants and Wilts, 
being especially numerous in Devon and Somerset. The Fullers, 
proper, are confined mostly to the eastern and south-eastern coast 
counties, being at present best represented in Sussex, Kent, and 
Norfolk, but also occurring in Bucks and Oxfordshire, and 
encroaching in the last three counties on the area of the Walkers. 
The rest of England is occupied by the Walkers, who are well 
represented in the midlands, especially in Derbyshire and Notts, 
and are also very numerous in Yorkshire and Durham. 

The names of the weavers, like those of the fullers, are spread 
in one form or another over the whole of England. They are 
represented by the Webbs, the Webbers, the Websters, and the 

* In Volume IX. of the " Wilts Archaeological and Natural History 
Mngazine" there is an interesting paper on this subject, by the Rev. W. H. 
Jones, which I have chiefly consulted. 

c2 



20 ho:mes of family xames. 

Weavers. The Webbs, who bear the commonest name, are con- 
fined south of a line drawn from the Wash to the Dee ; they aie 
most numerous in the south and west of England, especially in 
Somerset, Wilts, and Hants, but are also well established in 
Suffolk, in the eastern counties, and in Northamptonshire, 
Worcestershire, etc., in the midlands; in Devonshire their place 
is taken by the Webbers, and in Somerset tbey are supplemented 
by both Webbers and Weavers, whilst in Worcestershire and 
Gloucestershire their number is greatly increased by the Weaver.s. 
The weavers north of the Wash and the Dee have their repre- 
sentatives in the Websters, the original female weavers, who, 
when the cloth manufacture was established on a large scale in 
this country, surrendered both their occupation and their names 
to the men. The Webstei's have their principal home in Derby- 
shire, but are also numerous in Lancashire and Yorkshire. They 
supplement the Webbs in most of the eastei'n counties between 
the Wash and the Thames. 

The dyers are represented by the surnames of Dyer and Lister. 
The Dyers are mostly confined to the three south-western counties 
of Somerset, Devon, and Cornwall, but they have also an inde- 
pendent home in Suffolk. The Listers are most numerons in 
Cambridgeshire and in the West Riding, and afterwards in 
Lincolnshire and Norfolk. 

When we come to consider the individual counties, we find that 
the following are particularly noted for their representatives of the 
cloth-trade : Cambridge for its Listers ; Devon for its Tuckers, 
Webbers, and Dyers; Derby for its Walkers and Websters; 
Durham, Notts, Stafford, etc., for their Walkers ; Lanca3hire for 
its Websters ; Norfolk and Sussex for their Fullers ; Somerset for 
its Tuckers, Webbs, Webbers, Weavers, and Dyers ; Suffolk for 
its "^V^ebbs and Dyers; Wilts for its Tuckers and Webbs; Wor- 
cester for its Weavers ; and Yorkshire for its Walkers, Websters, 
and Listers. 

If we turn to the histories of the counties just named, we 
obtain in neai-ly all the cases an easy explanation of the prevalence 
of these surnames. Many of the counties named above were for 
centuries noted for their cloth manufactures. This is, however, a 
matter which lies beyond the limits I have prescribed for this 
work. 



i'. 



21 



CHAPTER 11. 



The First Three Classes of English and Welsh N'ames. 



Gejjbeal Names (30-40 counties) . 



Allen 
Brown 
r Clark 
L Clarke 
Cook 
Green 



HaU 


Taylor 


Harris 


Turner 


Johnson 


White 


Martin 


Wilson 


Robinson 


Wright 


Smith 





Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Adams 


Hunt 


Richardson 


Andrews 


Jackson 


Roberts 


Bailey 


James 


Rogers 


Baker 


Jones 


f Sanders 
1 Saunders 


Bennett 


King 


Brooks 


■Lea 
.Lee 


f Shepherd 
1 Sheppard 


Carter 


Chapman 


Mason 


f Stephens 

L Stevens 


Cole 


Matthews 


Cooper 


Mitchell 


Thompeodi 


Davies 


Moore 


Walker 


Davis 


Morris 


Ward 


Edwards 


Palmer 


Watson 


Ellis 


Parker 


Webb 


Foster 


Phillips 


Williams 


Harrison 


("Read 
LEeed 


Wood 


Hill 


YouDg 



22 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Regionai Names (10-19 counties). 



Arnold 


Hammond 


Parsons 


Atkins 


Harding 


r Pajiie 
1 Payne 


Atkinson 


Hardy 


Austin 


Hart 


Pearce 


Sail 


Harvey 


Pearson 


Barker 


Hawkins 


Perkins 


Barnes 


Holmes 


Perry 


Barrett 


Howard 


Porter 


Bates 


Hudson 


Potter 


BeU 


Hughes 


Powell 


Berry 


f Humphrey 
L Humphreys 


Pratt 


Bird' 


Price 


Bishop 


r Hutchings 
L Hutchinson 


Proctor 


Burton 


r Eeeve 
LEeeves 


Butler 


r Jeffery 


Chambers 


-< Jefferies 


Reynolds 


Collins 


L Jeffreys 


Richards 


Cox 


Jenkins 


Rose 


Cross 


Knight 


Russell 


Curtis 


Lamb 


Scott 


f Daniel 
L Daniels 


Lane 


Sharp 


Lawrence 


Shaw 


Dawson 


Lewis 


Simmons 


Day 


Lloyd 


Simpson 


Dean 


Long 


Spencer 


Dixon 


Lowe 


J Stephenson 
L Stevenson 


Dunn 


Marsh 


/Elliot 
L Elliott 


Marsliall 


Stone 


May 


Sutton 


Erans 


Middleton 


'' Symonds 
L Simonds 


Fisher 


Miles 


Fletcher 


Miller 


Thomas 


Ford 


Mills 


Walton 


Fowler 


Morgan 


Warren 


Fox 


/Neal 
".Neale 


Watts 


French 


Webster 


Freeman 


Newman 


Wells 


Gardner 


Newton 


West 


George 


NichoUs 


Wild 


Gibbs 


Nicholson 


Wilkinson 


Gibson 


Norman 


Williamson 


Gilbert 


Oliver 


Woodward 


Goodwin 


Osborne 




Gray 


/Owen 
I Owens 




Griffin 




Grifiiths 


Page 





ENGLISH AND ^^^]:LSH NAMES. 



The Distribution of General, Common, and Kegional 
Family Names.* 

Adams. — Rare in the eastern and northern counties. In the 
north, however, its place is sometimes taken by Adamson and 
Addison, as in the county of Durham. It is at present best 
represented in Bucks, Devon, Hants, and Staffordshire, and in 
the counties on the Welsh border, Shropshire and Monmouth- 
shire. This name, according to Lower, was more frequent in the 
Middle Ages. Adamson is found in the north of England and in 
the south of Scotland. 

Allen. — From Alan, a common personal name at the time 
of the Norman Conquest. Widely distributed, but, excepting 
Northumberland, rare in the northern counties beyond the 
Humber and the Mersey, and infrequent also in the four south- 
western counties of England. The principal centres of this name 
seem at present to be in Derbyshire, Hants, Leicestershire, 
Rutlandshire, Lincolnshire, and Suffolk. Allan is a frequent 
form across the Scottish border, and is especially characteristic 
of the south of Scotland ; it extends into Northumberland, wheie 
Allen also occurs. 

Andrew — Andrews. — In England these two names have their 
pi'incipal homes in the south-western counties, namely, Cornwall, 
Devon, Dorset, Hants, and Wilts. They are rare in the northern 
counties beyond the Dee and the Humber, where their place is 
taken by Anderson, at present best represented in Northumber- 
land. Anderson, however, is a common name across the border, 
and, in fact, is frequent over the greater part of Scotland, north- 
ward to Aberdeenshire Andrew is the rarest form of the simple 

name, being most numerous in Cornwall, where it usurps the place 
of Andrews. 

We have here a good example of those erroneous beliefs con- 
cerning the distribution of names which have been founded on 
general impressions rather than on exact evidence, Mr. Bardsley, 



* I have made extensive use of Lower's " Patronymica Britannica," for tlie 
meaning of names, but Bardsley's " English Surnames " and Camden's 
" Kemaines concerning Britain " have been also employed for this purpose. 



24 ho:mes of faimily names. 

in his "English Surnames " (second edit., p. 94), observes that 
Andrew, Andrews, and Anderson nearly all belong north of the 
Tweed; and it would seem that the Patron Saint of Scotland is 
held mainly responsible for this result. I have shown, however, 
that, though Anderson is a common Scotch name, it has made a 
very successful invasion southwards across the English border. 
Andrew and Andrews, however, can scarcely be termed Scotch 
in any sense of the word. In the directories for Glasgow and 
Edinburgh, as well as in the county directories for Scotland, we 
find that whilst Anderson has a relative frequency of about 
100 per 10,000, Andrew is represented only by about 8, and 
Andrews by 2. In truth, if I had treated Scotch names in the 
manner I have done in the case of Euglisb names, Andrew and 
Andrews would have been probably excluded from my list ; and, 
in fact, they are absent from the list of characteristic Scottish 
names given in this work. 

Aknold. — Introduced by the Kormans. Though widely scat- 
tered, it is confined south of a line from the Wash to the Mersey. 
It is at present most frequent in Warwickshire and Leicestershire, 
In the time of Edward I. it was numerously represented in Cam- 
bridgeshire (Hundred Rolls). 

Atkins — Adkins. — A characteristic surname of the midland and 
eastern counties, being at present most relatively numerous in 
Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, and 
Lincolnshire. Its place is taken in the north of England by 
Atkinson. These names are regarded as diminutives of Adam. 

Atkinson. — Essentially a north country name, prevailing in 
the counties north of the Wash and the Mersey, and having its 
principal home in the counties of Durham, Cumberland, and West- 
moreland. It is scantily represented across the border. 

Austin — Austen. — An old English and French abbreviation of 
Augustine. It is confined for the most part to the central and 
eastern counties of the south of England; and does not extend in 
aii}^ frequency north of Derbyshire or west of Dorset, The counties 
of Kent and Oxford contain the greatest numbers of Austins. In 
the thirteenth century it was a common name in Cambridgeshire 
(Hundred Rolls). 

Bailey.^AI though several explanations of the origin of this 
surname are usually given, its wide distribution renders it pro- 
bable that in the great majority of cases it is a form of "bailiff." 
With the exceptions of the northern counties of England and of tlie 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAJJES. 25 

four soutli-western counties, its distribution is pretty general. 
The principal centres or homes are now found in Hants, Glouces- 
tershire, and Staffordshire. Baillie is the Scottish form of the 
name. I should have mentioned that the bailiffs of the old days 
were often municipal officers, and performed the duties of the 
more modern mayors. 

Baker. — Speaking generally, this surname is most numerous 
in the south of England, and diminishes rapidly in frequency as 
we proceed northward, until we reach the counties bordering 
Scotland, where it meets its extinction within sight of the Cheviot 
Hills. Baker is a name which prefers the coast ; and the manner 
in which it abounds in almost all the coast counties of southern 
England (excluding Cornwall and Dorset), from Monmouth round 
to Suffolk, is very remarkable, and not at first sight intelligible. 
The counties of Monmouth, Somerset, Sussex, and Surrey stand 
foremost amongst those containing the greatest number of 
Bakers. 

Ball. — Confined to the west side of England, being at present 
most numerous in Lancashire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, and 
Gloucestershire. This surname must be distinguished in its dis- 
tribution from Balls, which is restricted to the opposite or east 
side of England, in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex. 
The idea that these names originated from bald-headed ancestors 
is, I think, absurd. Camden, in his remarks on surnames, written 
some 300 years ago, informs us that Banl and Bald were then 
nicknames or nursenames for Baldwin, and it was evidently from 
this source that Mr. Lower borrowed the suggestion that Ball was 
a nickname of Baldwin (a Norman personal name occurring in 
Domesday, and frequent as a family name in the thirteenth cen- 
tury). This explanation is supported in a singular manner by the 
distribution of Baldwin at the present day. This Norman name 
includes in its distribution the areas where Ball and Balls are now 
most frequent. (See the Alphabetical List of Names.) We learn 
from the Hundred Rolls that even in the thirteenth and fourteenth 
centuries, Ball, Balls, and Baldwin were for the most part charac- 
teristic of the eastern part of England ; Balle in Hunts, Cambridge- 
shire, and Norfolk; Balls in Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, 
Sussex, and Kent; Baldwin in Cambridgeshire, Hunts, and 
Oxfordshire. It is remarkable that after the lapse of six centuries 
Balls remains doggedly in the same part of England, whilst Ball 
and Baldwin seem to have extended their areas westward. In 

BIAH COUNTY GENEALOGiCAL 
, ^'Am HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



2G HO-MES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Norfolk three centuries ago Balls was sometimes spelt Balles oi* 
Ballis (Blomefield's "Norfolk"). 

Barker. — The old name for a tanner. It is confined to the 
northern half of England and to the eastern counties north of the 
Thames. It is very frequent in Yorkshire, and is also well repre- 
sented in the counties of Derby, Lincoln, and Norfolk. Tanner, 
its substitute in the south of England, has its home in Wilis, 
Oxfordshire, Gloucestershire, and Hants. 

Barnes. — An ancient name of pre-Domesday times. Its wide 
area of distribution includes two principal homes ; one in the south 
of England in the contiguous counties of Dorset, Hants, and Wilts, 
the other in the north of England in Cumberland, Westmoreland, 
and Lancashire. 

Barratt — Barrett. — Baret was a personal name of Teutonic 
origin, occurring in England in pre-Domesday times. This sur- 
name is scattered irregulai^ly over the country, and is at present 
best represented in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Dorset, Essex, 
Norfolk, and Northamptonshire. 

Bates. — A derivative of Bartholomew. This surname has two 
pinncipal centres, one in the counties of Leicester, Rutland, and 
Warwick, and the other in Kent. From these centres it has 
extended to the adjoining counties ; bat it is essentially a midland 
and eastei-n county name. In other parts of England its place is 
supplied by other forms of the name, or by other derivatives of 
Bartholomew, Thus, in Cornwall we find Bate, in Dorset and 
adjacent counties we have numbers of Bartletts, in Yorkshire 
Batty, in Northumberland Batey, in Oxon Batts, in Notts 
Bartle, etc. The original name of Bartholomew is now mostly 
found in the counties of Kent and Lincoln ; but in its numerous 
derivative forms it is scattered over the land. 

Bell. — This surname probably, in most cases, has been derived 
fi'om the Norman name Le Bel (the handsome man), which is to 
be found in the Hundred Rolls of the thirteenth century, mostly 
in Oxford.shire, and is at the present time well represented in the 
neighbouring counties of Northampton and Bucks. Its habitation 
in the Midlands is, however, of small importance, in comparison 
with the great home of the Bells in the English and Scottish 
counties on and near the border, namely, in Northumberland, 
])urham, Cumberland, Dumfriesshire, and the neighbouring 
Scottish counties, where they have herded for more than three 
ceuturies, as we are informed bv Lower. 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 27 

Bennett. — Differently derived from the early personal name of 
Benedict and from " benet," a minor order of priests. In the 
Hundred Rolls for Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire, in the reign 
of Edward I, it occurs frequently in the form of Beneyt. At 
present it is rare or absent north of Lincolnshire and Lancashire, 
but is well dispersed over the rest of England, being be.st repre- 
sented in Cornwall, Derbyshire, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Hereford- 
shire, Notts, etc. It is singular that Bennetts is for the most part 
confined to Cornwall, the combination of the two varieties of the 
name placing this county at the head of the list. 

Berry. — Scattered disconnectedly over England. It is most 
numerous in Lancashire, and afterwards in the counties of North- 
ampton, Warwick, and Devon. Probably it is usually derived 
from places. Berry being the name of a Devonshire parish, whilst 
Bury is the name of towns and localities in Lancasliire, Suffolk, &c. 

Bird. — Its principal home is in the east of England, south of 
tbe Wash, especially in Norfolk. It is scattered about the midland 
counties, and is also represented in Somerset and Dorset. In other 
parts of England it is absent or rare, but in the county of 
Worcester its absence is supplied by Byrd. 

- Bishop. — Confined south of a line drawn from the Wash to the 
Dee. It is at present most numerous in the western half of this 
area, the county of Dorset containing the greatest number. 

Brook — Brooks. — Brooks, or Brookes, is the most numerous of 
the two names ; but the fact that Brook, or Brooke, is frequently 
found in those counties where Brooks, or Brookes, is absent or 
uncommon, renders it necessary to consider the distribution of the 
two names together. They are well distributed over England, 
except in the counties north of Lancashire and Yorkshire. Their 
principal centres are in the West Riding and in Somerset. 

Brown. — This name may be said to be universally distributed 
over England, but in very varying degrees in different counties. 
The north of England is especially remarkable for the number of 
Browns, and the name extends with equal frequency across the 
border, being found, over a large part of Scotland, though most 
characteristic of the counties south of the Forth and the Clyde. 
In the rest of England it is more numerous in the eastern half 
than in the western half; but in the midland and inland counties 
its distribution is often capricious, and we may find it in very 
different proportions in adjacent counties, as in those of Stafford 
and Warwick, or in those of Oxford and Wilts. However, in the 



28 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

south-west of EnglaBd and in the counties bordering South "Wales 
■we find as a general rule a diminished number of Browns. Wales 
is the death-ground of the name. 

BuRTOx. — Confined mostly to tbe midland counties and to the 
eastern half of England. Singularly rare or absent in the west of 
England. Burton is the name of not less than forty parishes and 
places. 

Butler. — This name is widely scattered, but its principal home 
is in the south, of England in the adjacent counties of Wilts, 
Hants, and Berks. 

Carter. — Well distributed over England. It is best represented 
in Cheshire and Essex, and afterwards in Cambridgeshire, Devon, 
and Sussex. 

Chamberlaix — Chambers. — As these names have much the 
same signification, I will consider them together. They are scarce 
or absent in the north and in the south-west of England ; but are 
scattered over tlie rest of the country, and evidently the one 
supplies the place of the other, since they rarely occur in any 
frequency in the same county. Chamberlain occurs most com- 
monly in Leicester.shire and Rutlandshire ; whilst Chambers is 
best represented in Suflblk, Worcestershire, and Notts. 

Chapmax. — This common surname, if we except its curious 
resuscitation in Cornwall, is essentially an east of England name. 
From Kent to the North Riding the descendants of the ancient 
travelling merchants, or " cheap-men " (Anglo-Saxon Ceapman) 
occur in singularly constant numbers. Their preference for the 
coast counties would seem to show that their travels were some- 
times on the seas ; yet it would also appear that the attractions of 
the great metropolis brought them together in numbers in the 
south-eastern counties, Kent stands foremost as their present, 
abode. 

Clark — Clarke. — Universally distributed over England, but 
most numerous in its centre. Absent in Wales, and scarce in most 
of the counties on the Welsh border. Not frequent in most of the 
south-we.st great counties. Best represented in Bucks, Essex, 
Leicestershire, Rutlandshire, and Notts. As in the counties of 
Notts and Shropshire, it would sometimes appear that the terminal 
e signifies a transference from the Trade to the Court Directory, 
Clark is found over a large part of Scotland, but is rare in the 
northern part. 

Cole — Coles. — Essentially south of England names, especially 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 29 

in the south-west, rai'ely occurring north of a line drawn west from 
the Wash. Cole is best distributed and has its principal homes in 
Devon and Wilts. Coles is most numerous in Somerset. Both 
names, strangely enough, are rare in Cornwall. Cole was a very 
ancient Teutonic name ; there are places of the name in Somerset 
and Wilts, a circamstance that may perhaps explain the frequency 
of both nam.es in Somerset and of Cole in Wilts. 

COLLINGS — Collins. — Probably a diminutive of Cole, and like 
it a south of England name, being most frequent in the adjacent 
counties of Kent and Sussex. In the north of England its place is 
taken by Collinson. 

Cook — Cooke. — Most frequent in the south-central counties of 
England and in the eastern coast counties from Lincoln to Kent 
(excluding Essex). Compp^'atively scarce in the north and in the 
south-west of England. The counties most chai-acterised by the 
name are Beds, Cheshire, Gloucester, Kent, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, 
Northamptonshire, Notts, Oxfordshire, Shropshire, Suffolk, Surrey, 
and Worcestershire. 

Cooper. — Distributed over the greater part of England, but 
rare or absent in the northern and south-western counties. It 
seems to have three principal centres, one in the northern midlands, 
including Cheshire, another in Sussex and Hants, and a third in 
Suffolk. The counties especially notable for Coopers are Cheshire, 
Derbyshire, Hants, Leicestershire and Rutland, Notts, Suffolk, 
Sussex, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire. 

Cox. — Though also scattered about the midland counties. Cox 
finds its great home in the south of England in the contiguous 
counties of Dorset and Somerset. It is fairly numerous in the 
counties of Gloucester, Oxford, and Warwickshire. Rare or absent 
in the north of England and in the eastern coast counties. 

Ckoss. — Rare or absent in the northern counties, and in the 
south coast counties. Mostly confined to the east centre of Eng- 
land and to the adjacent coast counties between the Wash and the 
Thames. 

Curtis. — Characteristic of the south, and east of England south 
of the Humber. Best represented in Bucks, and afterwards in 
Notts. This is an ancient English name, occurring, as it does now, 
in Bucks, Essex, and Lincolnshire in the reign of Edward I. ; it was 
also at that time numerous in Cambridgeshire and Huiits 
(Hundred Rolls). 

Danikl— D.\NIELS. — Rare in England north of Norfolk and 



30 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Worcestershire. At present most numerous in South Wales, and 
in the counties of Gloucestershire, Beds, and Norfolk. A common 
surname in the reign of Edward I. in the southern half of England 
(Hundred Rolls). 

Davies — Davis. — Treating these two varieties together, we 
find that this surname is exceedingly numerous in Wales, and after 
Wales in the English counties on the Welsh border. Following it 
into England, we perceive that it diminishes rapidly in frequency, 
dying out in the north of England and in the eastern coast counties, 
and beinf comparatively infrequent in the southern and south- 
western counties. The migration into England has been more to 
the south and south-east than to the north, owing evidently in part 
to the attraction of the metropolis. It is interesting to notice that 
the place of this name in the north of England, and over a large 
pai't of Scotland, is taken by Davidson or Davison ; whilst its 
diminished frequency in the south-west of England and its absence 
in the eastern coast counties are to some extent compensated for 
by Davey and Davy.* When we come to compare the dis- 
tributions of the two varieties, we find that Davies is essentially 
the Welsh form, and Davis the English form. Whilst in the 
counties immediately bordering Whales, the Welsh form is much 
the most numerous, we find that in the next line of English 
counties, especially in those of Worcester, Gloucester, and Somer- 
set, Davis is far in excess. Taking England and Walea together, 
we find that Davies is much the most frequent. Calculating from 
the results given by the Registrar- General in his report for 1856, I 
find that every ten thousand of the population contained 62 
persons of the name of Davies, and 23 persons of the name of 
Davis. 

Dawson. — A north of England name, mostly found in Cum- 
berland and Westmoreland, Durham, West Riding of Yorkshire, 
Lincolnshire, and Cheshire, and extending into central Scotland ; 
Daw or Dawe is confined to the west of England. 

Day. — Excepting a few representatives in Lincolnshire, this 
name is confined to the southei-n part of England, south of a line 
drawn west from the Wash. It is crowded together in the eastern 



* Other derivatives of the name are Daw or Dawe of the vrest of England, 
and Dawson of the north of England. David, the original form of all these 
names, is mostly confined to South Wales. 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 31 

counties, especially in the contiguous counties of Beds, Cambridge 
and Hunts. It is also numerous in Kent, Berks, and particularly 
ill Somerset. Camden regards it as a derivative of David. More 
probably, however, as Bardsley points out, it is the " dev " or 
" deye," or "daye,"the dairyman in the reign of Edward III. 
and in Chaucer's time. (Hence also Dayman.) The prevalence 
of the name in the agricultural counties above enumerated sup- 
ports Bardsley's view. 

Deax — Deane. — This name has two principal areas of distribu- 
tion, one in Cheshire, Staffordshire, and in their vicinity, the other 
in the south of England, especially in Wilts and in the counties 
adjacent. There are numerous parishes of the name in the south 
of England, a circumstance that explains the prevalence of the 
name in that region. 

Dixon.— Very frequent in the English counties on the Scottish 
border. It is fairly represented in the midland counties and in 
the south-east of England, but is rare in the south-west counties. 
Dickenson is also a north-country name. Dickson, the Scottish 
form of the name, characterises central and southern Scotland. 

Ddnn. — This ancient name has three separate homes, the prin- 
cipal one in Northumberland and in the North and East Ridino-s 
in the north of England, whence it extends into southern Scotland, 
another in the midland counties of Warwick and Worcester, and 
a third in the south of England in Dorset and Devon. In the 
reigns of Edward I. and Henry III. the surname of Dun was 
particularly frequent in the east of England, especially in Essex. 
There are three or four different explanations of the name, all of 
which may be in some regions correct. Thus it may refer to the 
dark complexion of the person in one locality, or it may be derived 
from Dun or Dunne, an Anglo-Saxon personal name in another 
or it may have a local signification fi'om the Saxon "dun," a hill 
in a third locality, since De Dun occurs in the Hundred Rolls. It 
is, however, possible that it may also be a contraction of Dunning 
seeing that in the four counties in which Dunning occurs it is 
always associated with several Dunns. Dunning has, like Dunn 
the same three centres of distribution — in the north, in the North 
and East Ridings, in the Midlands, in Warwickshire, and in the 
south of England in Dorset and Devon. 

Edwards. — A name exceedingly numerous in North and South 
Wales and in the adjacent English counties of Shropshire, Here- 
ford, and Monmouth. Outside this area, its frequency diminishes 



■eii 



k 



32 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

very suddenly ; it may be said, however, to be fairly distributed 
through England south of a line drawn from the Wash to the 
Mersey, not one of the counties north of this line occurring in 
my list. Strangely enough, however, it reappears in Scotland 
north of the Forth and the Clyde. Lower says that this surname, 
though now so numerous in Wales, was probably not generally 
assumed by Welshmen until within the last two or three centuries, 
after the prejudices against the early Edwards had passed away. 

Elliott — Elliot. — This name has three principal centres — 
one in the north of England, in the counties of Durham and||iie 
Northumberland, and over the border in Roxburghshire and the 
neighbouring Scottish counties, another in Derbyshire, and the 
third in Bucks, Berks, and Sussex, whence it has extended into 
the other south-coast counties, excluding Kent. The scanty 
representation, or the absence of this name in the eastern coast 
counties from Kent northward to the borders of Durham, is 
remarkable. 

Ellis. — Fairly well distributed over England and Wales, 
excepting in the four northern counties, where its place may be 
taken by Elliott. It is represented in Wilts and Lancashire by 
Ellison. It is at present most numerous in Devon, Cambridge- 
shire, Essex, Kent, and the West Riding. 

EvAXS. — Exceedingly numerous in North and South Wales 
and in the adjacent English counties of Shropshire and Mon- 
mouth. Thence it has spread, but in rapidly diminishing numbers 
to the midland counties and to the south-west of England. It is 
absent or singularly rare in the northern counties, a line from the 
Humber to the Mersey sharply defining its northward extension. 
Not one of the coast counties, from Norfolk round to the borders 
of Devon, is represented in my list. It would, therefore, appear 
that the invasion of England by the Evanses is by no means a 
complete one, though their advance on the metropolis is indicated 
by their scanty outposts in Beds, Bucks, and Berks. 

Fisher. — This name is irregularly distributed over England, 
being however absent or infrequent in that part lying south of a 
line joining the mouths of the Thames and the Severn. It is at 
present most numerous in Cumberland and Westmoreland, Lanca- 
shire, Nott^, and Norfolk. It is also established in Scotland. ^ 

Fletcher. — This name has its principal home in the adjacent ^ 
counties of Derby and Notts. It is, however, also fairly distributed 
over England, except in the southern counties south of a liue|({ 



*Bt 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 33 

joining the moutlis of the Thames and the Severn, and in the east 
coast counties between the Thames and the Wash. Though, in 
all probability, the modern Fletchers usually represent the bow- 
makers of the Middle Ages, it is also likely that they include 
some of the original " fleshers " or butchers, such transformations 
being very easily made in the days of uncertain orthography, 
especially when inclination led the way. 

Ford. — Characteristic of the southern and western counties. 
Absent or singularly rare north of a line drawn from the Wash to 
the Mersey. It is at present most numerous in Devon, Dorset, 
Gloucestershire, Hants, and Cheshire. In almost all the counties 
where this name is at all frequent we find it in one form or another 
as a place-name. 

FoRSTEB — Foster. — This surname, in its two forms, is widely 
distributed over England, being however absent or rare in the 
three eastern counties of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex, and in the 
south-west of England. Forster is essentially the north country 
form, being especially numerous in Northumberland. Foster is 
the form characteristic of the rest of England, being particularly 
frequent in Notts. The north of England, however, is the prin- 
cipal home of the name, the two varieties occurring in Northum- 
berland in the proportion of 107 per 10,000 of the population. 
Curiously enough, it has found no permanent home in Scotland. 

Fowler. — This name is irregularly distributed in most parts of 
England. It is, however, best represented in the counties of 
Gloucester and Dorset, and is scattered over the midlands, being 
rare or absent in the south-east quarter of England as defined by 
a line drawn from the Wash to the Solent. 

Fox. — This name has its home in the midlands, being particu- 
larly numerous in Derbyshire, and afterwards in Notts, Leicester- 
shire, and Oxfordshire. It is not represented in my list in the 
south-west of England. When we examine the Hundred Rolls 
of the time of Edward I., we find that this name occurred then in 
Notts, Worcestershire, and Oxfordshire — counties whei-e it is 
established in our own time ; it was also found in that reign in 
Cambridgeshire and Beds. 

Freeman. — This name is confined to the centre of England and 
to the adjoining eastern and western counties. Two lines drawn 
west from the Wash and the Thames to the Welsh border will 
roujjhly include the principal ai'ea of this name, which for an area 
of its size is remarkably well defined. It is at present must 

D 



34 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

namerous in Suffolk and in Worcester; and likely enough the 
Freemans of the west and of the east may owe their surname to 
different events in the history of our country. Not improbably 
" Freeman " early appeared as an appellation in the counties 
bordering Wales, since we learn that in the 10th century the 
Welsh captives, reduced to slavery, were so numerous in the 
English shires on the border that the proportion of slaves to 
freemen would seem to have been unusually large.* It is singular 
that the surname of Fry (Old English for Free) is confined to the 
south of England, occurring chiefly in Wilts. 

French. — Excluding the county of Durham, this name is con- 
fined to the southern half of England. It is at present best 
represented in Devonshire, Essex, and Oxfordshire. 

Gardiner — Gardner. — Most characteristic of the midland 
counties, and of the eastern counties south of the Wash, Sin- 
gularly rare in the south-west, and in the north of England, 
excepting Lancashire. At present best represented in Essex, 
Lancashire, and Warwickshire. Both forms occur in southern 
and central Scotland, especially in Perthshire. 

George. — A name at present most numerous in Monmouthshire, 
and after that in South Wales. Rare in the south coast counties, 
excepting Cornwall, and in the north of England, north of the 
Wash and the Dee. 

GiBBS. — Confined to the southern half of England. In the 
northern counties its place is taken by Gibson. Its principal 
homes are in Gloucestershire and Warwickshire. (See under 
" Gibson " and " Gilbert.") 

Gibson. — A north of England name, best represented in the 
counties of Cumberland, Westmoreland, Durham, and Northumber- 
land. The Gibsons are also very frequent across the Scotch 
border in the counties of Berwick and Dumfries, and they are well 
established in the counties south of the Forth and the Clyde. Its 
area also extends to and includes Notts and Staffordshire, where 
it abuts on the area of Gibbs. The distribution of these two 
names in England affords a remarkable example of the separate 
occupation by two similar names, or more correctly speaking, by 
two forms of the same name, of two contiguous but distinct 
regions. Derbyshire, which is on the neutral ground between the 
northern area of the Gibsons and the southern area of the Gibbses, 



• Freeman's " Norman Conquest," vol. 1, p. 3G5 (1867). 



ENGLISH AND \\T:LSH NAMES. oO 

possesses both names, but in no great numbers. (See under 

" GiLBEKT.") 

Gilbert. — This name has its principal home in the midland 
counties of Leicester and Rutland, Northampton, Warwick, and 
Worcester. It is for the most part a name of the midlands, being 
absent in the north beyond Staffordshire and Lincolnshire. It 
has, however, a secondary and independent home in Cornwall and 
Devon. 

If we regard Gibbs and Gibson as derivatives of Gilbert, then 
we find that Gilbert in its original shape, or in the foi'm of either 
of its two commonest derivatives, is generally speaking absent or 
rare in the south-east quarter of England. Thus it is to be 
observed that the counties of Beds, Berks, Cambridge, Essex. 
Hants, Herts, Hunts, Middlesex, Suffolk, and Sussex are not men- 
tioned in my lists ; whilst in Kent and Norfolk the names are not 
very numerous. It will also appear from the lists that the name is 
not very frequent in Wales, and is absent or rare in all the English 
counties on the Welsh border (Cheshire, Shropshire, Herefordshire, 
and Monmouthshire). Warwickshire ranks far above all other 
counties as the home of Gilbert, or its derivative, Gibbs. Next 
come Gloucestershire and Worcestershire ; and the counties on 
both sides of the Scotch border, which form the main stronghold 
of the Gibsons. It would therefore seem that the two great 
centres of this name and its principal derivatives are in the north 
of England and adjacent part of Scotland and in the western 
midlands. 

Goodwin. — The principal home of this name is in Staffordshire, 
and in the adjacent counties of Derby and Cheshire. Besides its 
home in the midlands, it has a less important centre in Kent. 

Gray — Grey.— Gray is, generally speaking, confined to the 
whole length of the eastern coast of England from Northumber- 
land to Kent and to the inland counties immediately adjacent ; 
and it advances in force across the border into southern Scotland. 
It also extends along the south coast of England, excepting Sussex, 
to Hants and Dorset. The manner in w^hich this nanie is restricted 
in England to the coast and its vicinity is particularly remai'kable. 
It is mingled in the counties of Northumberland and Durham w'ith 
Grey, of which the former county may be considered the home. 
The peculiarities in the distribution of these names are but little 
explained when we refer to the Hundred Rolls of the reign of 
Edward I. At that time both names were numerous, but Grey 

D 2 



36 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

had the pre-eminence. Strange to say, at that time Grey was 
numerous in Kent, whilst Gray Avas particularly frequent in 
Lincolnshire, where it was also associated with Grey. The two 
names were also well represented in Oxfordshire, Bucks, Cam- 
bridgeshire, and adjacent counties, and probably also in some other 
parts of England that are scantily referred to in the Hundred 

Rolls Coming back to the present distribution of the names, 

I notice the circumstance that the Graysons are confined to York- 
shire. 

Green. — Pretty well distributed all over England, but par- 
ticularly numerous in the east of England in the adjacent counties 
of Cambridge, Lincoln, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex; also in 
Worcestershire, Somerset, Wilts, and the West Riding. Very 
rare or absent, in Devon and Cornwall. 

Griffin. — Most numerous in the contiguous counties of Bucks 
and Warwick, and afterwards in the counties immediately around, 
also extending westward to Devon and Somerset. Not found in 
the northern half of England. In Domesday this name occurs in 
Cheshire, Hereford, and Cornwall. In the reign of Edward I. it 
occurred in Shropshire, Oxfordshire, and Hunts, etc. (Hundred 
Rolls.) 

Griffith — Griffiths. — These names are very numerous in 
Wales, which, in fact may be regarded as their home. In the 
English counties on the Welsh border (Shropshire, Hereford, and 
Monmouth), though only half as frequent, they are, however, to 
be found in considerable numbers. In the next line of counties, 
represented by those of Gloucester and Worcester, their frequency 
has rapidly decreased. Northamptonshire represents the limit of 
their migration eastward, no substantial advance having been 
made into other parts of England. The circumstance that these 
two names possess only half the relative frequency of Evans and 
Davies in their common home in Wales explains in a great 
measure why they have not obtained such a hold in England as 
has been obtained in the instances of the more common Welsh 
surnames. 

Hall. — Distributed all over England. Two principal areas of 
greatest frequency : one in the north of England in the counties 
of Northumberland and Durham, where it attains the greatest 
i-elative frequency, extending, however, in moderate numbers 
ncross the border into central Scotland ; the other in the midland 
counties, especially in Derbyshire. Rarest in the south-east and 



ENGLISH AXD WELSH NAJIES. 37 

Ronth-west of England, and in Wales. In Essex its place is taken 
by Halls. 

Hammond. — This name has two principal areas : one in the 
.south-eastern and eastern coast counties of England soath of the 
Humber, Kent, Suffolk, and Norfolk containing the name in the 
greatest frequency ; the other, a less important area, situated 
in the counties lying on and in the vicinity of the Welsh bordei*, 
Cheshire possessing the largest number. Evidently this surname 
has characterised the eastern coast counties of England for several 
centuries. Derived from Hamo, a well-known Domesday personal 
name, we find it in the form of Hamo, Hamon, Haniond, Ham- 
mund, etc., during the reign of Edward I. in the same eastern 
coast counties where it is now established, namely in Norfolk, 
Kent, and Lincoln ; it also occurred at that time as Hamon in the 
county of Cambridge. (Hundred Rolls.) The circumstance of 
this name having been established in the same part of England 
since the thirteenth century is one of considerable interest. 

Harding. — Mostly confined to the south-west of England, being 
at present best represented in Somerset and Wilts. Its dis- 
connected occurrence in other parts of England is, however, 
noticeable. 

Hardy. — This name has its principal home in the adjacent 
counties of Leicester, Rutland, Notts, Lincoln, and Derby. Its 
further distribution is mostly confined to the east coast counties 
from the Scottish border to the mouth of the Thames. We learn 
from the Hundred Rolls that six centuries ago, Hardi or Hardj 
was also an east country name, occuri-ing then in the counties of 
Norfolk, Beds, Cambridge, Hunts, etc. Hardie is the Scottish 
form of the name, but it is neither a common nor a characteiistic 
name in Scotland. 

Habrfs — Harrison. — These names, considered together, are 
distributed over England and Wales. Each, however, has its 
own area of fi-equency, Harrison in the north and Harris in the 
south, whilst they wage a sharp contest for supremacy in the 

midlands A line drawn aci'oss England through the cities 

of Lincoln and Chester will define the northern border of the 
area of Harris. This name is at present most numerous in 
Monmouthshire and South Wales, in the southern midland 
counties of Oxford, Northampton, Warwick, and Worcester, and 
in the west of England, especially in Cornwall and Devon. It is 
less frequent in the eastern portion of its area, that is to say, from 



38 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Lincolnshire south to Kent HaiTison is most numerous in 

Westmoreland, Lancashire, Yorkshire, and Lincolnshire. Further 
south we find it invading in numbers the area of the Harrises 
and fighting for the supremacy in the midland shires, victorious 
in some, as in those of Derby and Stafford, waging an equal 
contest in others, as in the county of Notts, and completely out- 
numbered in the advance southward into the counties of 
Warwick and Worcester. Pushing on, however, in greatly 
diminished numbers, the Harrisons have established outposts on 
the borders of the English Channel. 

In this struggle between the Harrises and the Harrisons, it is 
evident that the former have been worsted. The Harrises, in 
iact, have been entirely on the defence. Not only have they 
been unable to make any successful inroads into the northern 
tei-ritory of the Hari-isons, but they have not prevented their 
foes from forcing a way through their ranks and reaching the 
south coast. 

Hart. — This name is found in the centre and east of England, 
as, for instance, in Leicestershire, Cambridgeshire, and Suflblk. 
It is isolated in the north of England in the county of Durham, 
and in the North and East Ridiugs; also frequent in Gloucester- 
shire, and to a less extent in Wilts. The name has evidently had 
different origins. Probably the numerous Harts who are said to 
have come over into England from Germany may explain the 
origin of the Harts in the counties on the east coast of England. 
Many Jewish families ))ear the name. 

Harvey. — Well distributed over England south of a line drawn 
from Hull to Chester. North of that line its frequency abruptly 
ceases. It is best represerited in Essex, Hants, and Kent, and 
then in Corwall, Devon, Staffordshire, Notts, Norfolk, and Suffolk. 
Its preference for the coast counties, especially those in the south- 
east of England from Kent to Norfolk, is to be remarked. This 
name in the reign of Edward I. took the form of Hervey and 
Hervi, and was found in London and Cambridgeshire. (Hundred 
Rolls.) Herve was an ancient Norman personal name. Harvey 
is also found in many parts of Scotland. 

Hawkins.— Characteristic of the west of England, being best 
represented in Somerset, Gloucestershire, Wilts, and adjacent 
counties, but not extending north of Staffordshire. 

Hill.— Pretty generally distributed over England, except in 
the counties north of Yorkshire and Lancashire. Relatively 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 39 

scarce in the south-eastern counties, where its place is taken by 
Hills. At present it is densest in the midlands and in the south- 
west of England, being most numerous in Derbyshire, Leicester- 
shire, Rutland, Staifordshire, Worcestershire, and Lincolnshire, 
and in the counties of Devon, Somerset, Gloucester, and Oxford. 
It reappears in Scotland, especially in the southern half. 

Holmes. — Widely distributed over England, but rare in the 
south, especially in the south-west. The northern half of England 
evidently possesses its home, or rather its homes ; in the counties 
of Durham and Derby, in the West Riding, and in Lincolnshire, 
occur the greatest numbers of the name. 

Howard. — This name has its principal home in the eastern 
counties south of the Humber, being best represented in Norfolk, 
Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, and Notts. It has anothtr 
home in Lancashire, Cheshire, and adjacent counties. There is 
considerable difference of opinion concerning its origin. Lower 
and Ferguson consider it as of Norwegian origin, Havard or 
Haavard having been a common personal name amongst the 
Northmen. Bardsley similarly thinks that it is a corruption of 
Harvard or Here ward. Laing, as quoted by Lower, also regards 
the name as left by the Northmen in East Anglia and Northum- 
berland. The explanation given by Taylor in his "Words and 
Places," is less romantic. He regards Howard as, like Hayward, 
a corruption of Hogwarden, the title of the officer in charge of the 
swine in the common forest pastures or " dens." The Howards, 
according to Taylor, first came to notice in the Weald (Kent and 
Sussex), though we also know that they existed in Norfolk before 
the thirteenth century, when they first rose to eminence. Camden, 
the most important witness of all, places Howard amongst the 
names in use in Eug'land at the time of the Conquest. In all 
pi'obability this name has had more than one origin. Its 
derivation from Hogwarden appears a little far-fetched ; but it 
seems very likely that in a few localities it is a corruption of 
Hayward, a south country name, though whether Hayward is 
derived from Hogwarden is quite another question, concerning 
which I express my doubts, there being a more probable explana- 
tion in the very sound of the word. Howard and Hayward are 
not often associated, but it is especially noticeable that in Suffolk, 
where both names are frequent, the intermediate form of Haward 
occurs. The establishment of the Howards in the east coast 
counties and in their vicinity makes it probable that, as suggested 



40 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

by Ferguson, Lower, Bardsley, and Laing, they may be in most 
cases, in that part of England, the representatives of the ancient 
Havards, Harvards, and Haavards, of the Northmen. The Howards 
of Lancashire and Cheshire have had probably a different origin, 
it being singular that Haworth, Howarth, and Howorth, are also 
Lancashire names, being, in fact, almost confined to that county, 
where they are very numerous. The explanation of the origin of 
the Lancashire Howards will have to include that of the Lan- 
cashire Haworths, Howarths, and Howorths. (See under 
"Lancashire," in the case of Haworth, etc.) 

Hudson. — The principal centres of this name are in Norfolk, 
Derbyshire, and Yorkshire, whence it has spread to adjaceut 
counties. It is absent, or conspicuously rare, in the south of 
England, south of a line drawn through the cities of London and 
Worcester. 

Hughes. — Very frequent in North Wales and fairly numerous 
in South Wales, Herefordshire, and Shropshire. Advancing into 
England in a south-east direction towards the metropolis, it has 
obtained a firm hold in Wilts, whilst Hants and Oxfordshire con- 
tain its outposts. 

Humphrey — Humphreys. — Rarely found north of a line drawii 
from the Wash to the Dee. Humphrey is confined to the eastern 
half of the area, in Berks, Norfolk, Surrey, Sussex, etc. Hum- 
phreys characterises the western half, being most numerous in 
North Wales, and after that in Shropshire, Gloucestershire, Wilt- 
shire, etc. Both are rare or absent in the four south-western 
counties. 

Hunt. — Well distributed through England, except in the 
north, where its place is supplied by Hunter, which has the same 
signification. It is best represented in the south of England, 
especially in the county of Dorset, and after that in those of 
Wilts and Somerset. It has also more than one stronghold in the 
midlands, as in the counties of Worcester, Derby, Notts, and 
Leicester. 

HuTCHiNGS— Hutchinson.— Hutchings is found mostly in the 
south-west of England, especially in Somerset. Hutchinson is 
confined to the north, being most numerous in the county of 
Durham, and also frequent in Northumberland, Cumberland, and 
in the North and East Ridings. Hutchison occurs over a large 
part of Scotland, but is rare in the north. 

Jackson. — Although found nearly all over England, it is best 



ENGLISH AND WEL^H NAMES. 41 

represented in tlie north beyond the H umber and the Dee, 
especially in Caniberland and Westmoreland, Lancashire, York- 
shire, and Cheshire. It is also characteristic of the midlands, 
though less numei-ous there than in the northern counties, Derby- 
shire, Leicestershire, Rutlandshire, Notts, Staffordshire, Warwick- 
shire, and Worcestershire containing several of the name, and I 
should here add Lincolnshire. Further south its frequency 
lessens rapidly, and it is of rare occurrence in the south coast 
counties. The Jacksons have also advanced into the southern 
part of Scotland from the English border, and are well established 
in Renfrewshire and the neighbouring counties. 

James. — The principal home of this name is in South Wales 
and Monmouthshire. Lower tells us of a very ancient Pembroke 
family possessing an estate successively held by thirteen persons 
bearing the name of William James. The name is also frequent 
in Shropshire and Herefordshire on the Welsh border, and in the 
neighbouring counties of Gloucester and Stafford. It is also 
numerous in the south-west of England, especially in Somerset, 
Dorset, and Cornwall. In the eastern coimties it nearly dis- 
appears, but it reappears in the north, though in no great 
numbers.. The affix of " son " is rarely foundv in England in 
connection with James, except in the northern counties, as in 
county Durham. Jamieson is a widely-spread Scottish name, but 
is rare in the north of Scotland. 

Jeffeey — Jefferies — jFFFREYS.-^These are essentially south 
of England names, Wilts being their principal home. It is 
remarkable that Jeffery is most numerous in the four south-west 
counties; whilst Jefferies and Jeffreys are most prevalent in the 
other parts of the area of distribution. The place of these names 
in the north of England is taken by Jefferson. Jeffs is a Cheshire 
variety. 

Jenkixs. — This name has its home in South Wales and Mon- 
mouthshire, where it is very numerous. Like other Welsh names 
it has spread itself to the southward and eastward, though not 
nearly to the extent of some of the other common names of the 
Principality. In Cornwall it occurs in numbers, generally in the 
form of Jenkin. Its isolated appearance in Kent is somewhat 
remarkable. In the northern part of England, especially in 
Lancashire and Yorkshire, its place is supplied by Jenkinson. 

Johnson. — With the exception of the south-western counties, 
where it is absent or conspicuously rare, this name is distributed 



42 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

all over England, but in much less numbers in the south than in 
the midlands and in the north. The counties most conspicuous 
for the number of Johnsons are Cambridge, Cheshire, Derby, 
Durham, Lancashire, Leicester and Rutland, Lincoln, Norfolk, 
Northumberland, Notts, Stafford, Warwick, and Yoik. It is 
suggested by Lower that this name has often been confounded 
with the Scottish name of Johnston or Johnstone, which is very 
common south of the Forth and the Clyde, especially in the 
border counties of Dumfries and Berwick. This suggestion is 
probably coi-rect ; for, bearing in mind the very extensive inter- 
change of names that has occurred between the two countries, it 
would otherwise be difficult to explain why the Scottish Johnstons 
and the English Johnsons should meet abi'uptly at the border in 
such numbei-s. ]t is evident, therefore, that in the majority of 
cases Johnston is the Scottish form of Johnson, though a few may 
have taken the name from parishes in Dumfriesshire, etc. 

Jones. — It is needless to remark that Jones is the most 
characteristic of Welsh surnames, being especially frequent in 
North Wales, where one out of every seven persons is thus named. 
Having occupied the English counties on the Welsh border in 
great force, the Joneses Lave advanced on the metropolis from 
their home in North Wales, and after founding colonies en route, 
in Northamptonshire and Bucks, they have pushed on to 
the shores of Essex and Kent. In the counties north of 
Lincolnshire and Lancashire Jones has not been able to obtain a 
footing. 

King. — Mostly confined south of a line drawn from the Wash 
to the southern border of Shropshire. North of this line the name 
rapidly diminishes in frequency, being absent from my list in 
nearly all the counties thus marked off. It is rare also in the 
extreme south-west, in Devon and Cornwall. It is best represented 
m Beds, Bucks, Suffolk, and Wilts. The name is sparingly 
represented in Scotland. 

Knight. — Well distributed over England south of a line drawn 
from the Humber to the Dee. In the northern part of England 
it is singularly rare. Sussex stands foremost for the number of 
its Knights, and after it come, in their order, Hants, Leicester- 
shire and Rutland, and Gloucestershire. In Norfolk and Suffolk 
we have the form of Knights. r. \',;.^lf\ . ' I 

Lamb.— Pretty well dispersed over England, except in the 
south coast counties from Devon to Kent, in which it is un- 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 43 

represented in my list. At present it is most numerous in tlie 
north of Engrland, in the counties of Northumberland and 
Durham, 

Lane. — Absent or rare in the north and south-east of England, 
Most numerous in the adjacent counties of Gloucester, Hereford, 
and Worcester, and to a less extent in Dorset. 

Lawrence, — Characteristic of the southern half of England, 
especially numerous in the south-west, where it is best represented 
in 8omei'set, and then in the neighbouring counties of Dorset and 
Gloucester. Lawrenson is a Lancashire name. Amongst the 
derivatives of Lawrence are included Law, Lawes, Lawson, 
Lawi'ie, Larkin, etc. In one form or another this ancient name is 
scattered over England. 

Lea — Lee,— Taking the two names collectively we observe 
that they are distributed over the greater part of England, though 
they are infrequent in the south-eastern counties south of the 
Wash, and are rare or absent in the counties on the south coast, 
excluding Devon. They are most numerous in the contiguous 
counties of Shropshire and Cheshire. When we come to consider 
their separate distribution we find that Lee is the most widely 
dispersed and by far the most common of the two names. Lea is 
confined to a limited and well-defined area, having its home in 
Cheshire, Shropshire, and Warwickshire, and spreading only to 
the counties immediately adjacent. On the other hand, Lee is 
found over the larger part of England, possessing independent 
centres in the counties of Northumberland and Durham in the 
north, in Notts and the adjacent counties in the midlands, in 
Shropshire on the Welsh border, and in Devonshire in the south- 
west of England. Probably in counties such as Cheshire, where 
Leigh is a frequent place-name, as well as a surname, it has often 
been confounded with Lea and Lee. Lees is a midland name, 
especially numerous in Staffordshire. 

Lewis. — This name has its chief centre in South Wales and in 
the adjacent county of Monmouth. It is next most frequent in 
North Wales, Shropshire, and Herefordshire. Its main line of 
migration from its Welsh home has been to the south-east, and 
Berks and Hants represent the limits of its advance in that 
direction. Its sporadic occurrence in Norfolk is to be remarked; 
here likely enough it has had an independent origin. 

Lloyd. — Its home is in North and South Wales ; but it is also 
frequent in the adjacent English counties of Shropshire, Here- 



44 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

ford, and Monmoutli. Its farther advance into England has been 
small. 

Long. — This name is confined south of a line drawn west- 
south-west from the Wash. It has evidently more than one home, 
the principal one being in Wilts and the neighbouring county of 
Gloucester; there is a second in Kent, and a third in Norfolk 
and SufFolk and their vicinity. According to Camden, the Wilt- 
shire Longs are descended from a very tall attendant of Lord 
Treasurer Hungerford. However, we know that the Longs have 
been established in this part of England for many centuries, since 
we learn from the Hundred Rolls that the name was numerous 
in Oxfordshire, as well as in Cambridgeshire, in the reign of 
Edward I. 

Lowe — Lowes. — Essentially a name of the midlands and 
adjacent north-west counties, being most numerous in Derbyshire, 
Warwickshire, and Cheshire. Lowes is the north of England 
form, occurring in Northumberland and Durham, and in the 
North and East Ridings in the form of Lowish. In Scotland 
Low has an independent home in Aberdeenshire. 

Marsh. — Distributed over the greater part of England, but 
rare or absent north of Notts and Lancashire. It has several 
centres, namely, in Cambridgeshire and Kent in the east, in 
Lancashire in (he north, in Shropshire in the west, and in Wilts, 
Dorset, and Somerset in the south. Mnrsh is the name of a 
parish both in Shropshire and Kent. Lower says that the 
surname has existed in Kent since the 14th century. 

Marshall. — Distributed over England, its great home being in 
Notts and Lincolnshire, whilst there are less important homes in 
Northumberland in the north and in Somerset in the south. The 
name is of foreign origin. It was originally " Marechal," or 
" Mare-schalks," the old name for a horse-groom or farrier, in 
which sense it is still used in France. The post became dignified, 
and with it the name; but, as Lower remarks, it is probable that 
the great majority of Marshalls derived their name from the 
humbler occupation. The name has extended from the north of 
England into central and southern Scotland. 

Martin.— Distributed over the whole of England and possess- 
ing several homes, the two principal being in the south-west, in 
Cornwall, and in the south-east, in Sussex and Kent. Less im- 
portant centres are in Worcestershire and Staffordshire, where the 
Martins of the midlands mainly reside, and in Northumberland, 



I 

I 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 45 

■which is the home of the north country Martins, who also extend 
across the border into the southern half of Scotland. 

Mason. — Scarcely represented, or absent, in the south ccast 
counties and in the counties north of Lancashire and Yoikshire, 
but common in most of the rest of England, its principal home 
being in Cambridgeshire, and afterwards in Chesliire, Lancashii-e, 
and Yorkshire. 

Matthews — Matthew. — A line drawn across England from 
the Humber to the Dee will mark the northern boundary of the 
area of distribution of these names. Matthews is by far the 
most frequent form of the name. It is found in varying 
numbers in most of the counties south of this line, being less 
common in the eastern half of the area, and having its principal 
homes in the western portion in Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, 
Monmouthshire, Wiltshire, and Cornwall. Matthew is mostly 
characteristic of Suffolk. These names are but scantily repre- 
sented in the noi*th of England by the Mathisons, Mattisons, and 

Matsons of Yorkshire Matts is a curious contraction found in 

Leicestershire and Rutland. Matheson and Mathieson are found 
in Scotland, but in inconsiderable numbers and with apparently 
no definite distribution. 

Mat. — This is a characteristic South of England name. Its / 
principal home is in Devon and Cornwall. Less important j 
centres are in Kent, Essex, Oxfordshire, and Berks. In the 
Hundred Rolls of the time of Edward I. we find that in the form 
of Le May it was numerously represented in Oxfordshire and 
Cambridgeshire, and less so in Kent. 

MiDDLKTON. — Excepting a few in Devon, this name may be 
said to be practically unrepresented in the south of England. Its 
principal home is in Warwickshire ; but it is also fairly numerous 
in Derbyshire, Northamptonshire, the West Riding, and Norfolk. 
In nearly all the counties in which the surname occurs in any 
numbers, Middleton is the name of parishes, townships, etc. The 
Scottish Middletons have their home in Aberdeenshire. 

Miles. — This name has a characteristic distribution in the 
south of England, though absent, or rare, in the three south-west 
counties of Cornwall, Devon, and Somerset. It has its principal 
homes in Kent, Essex, Sussex, Dorset, Wilt.«, Gloucestershii-e, 
and Monmouthshire, the northern limit of its area being in 
Norfolk and Shropshire. It has been suggested by Bardsley and 
Lower that this name is sometimes derived from Milo, a Norman 



46 HOMES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

personal name in Domesday. Lower thinks that it may be also 
often a corruption of Michael. Judging, however, from the dis- 
tribution in both cases, I should say that it has had little or no 
connection with Mitchell as representing Michael. Rather I 
■would hold that it is connected with Mills, which has a similar 
distribution ; and it is remarkable that in the three south-west 
counties where Mills is absent or infrequent, being i-epresented in 
two of them by Mill, Miles is also absent or rare. 

Miller. — There are three gi-oups of Millers in England, the 
Millers of the south, who have their principal home in Dorset, 
where they are very numerous ; the Millers of the north, who 
are found mostly in Lancashire, Durham, and Northumberland, 
and the Millers of the east, who frequent Essex and the adjacent 
counties. This name, often in the form of Millar, is distributed 
over a large part of Scotland, but is rare north of Aberdeenshire. 

Mills. — This name is mostly confined to the southern half of 
England. Its chief homes are in Essex, Kent, Sussex, Hants, and 
Warwickshire. It is rare or infrequent in the south-west of 
England, where, in Cornwall and Devon, its place is to some extent 
supplied by Mill. 

Mitchell. — Distributed over England, bat far more frequent 
in the south. Its home, ^^ar excellence, is in the county of Cornwall, 
where in nearly half the instances it is written Michel 1, though 
the pronunciation is the same. Its other homes are in Sussex, 
Wilts, and in the West Riding. Its prevalence in Cornwall is 
due to the fact that several parishes and places in the county bear 
the name of St. Michael in one form or another. Mitchell is also 
a name numerous in most parts of Scotland, but is rare north of 
Aberdeenshire. 

MooiiE. — This name is distributed, all over England excluding 
the south coast, where, with the exception of Devon and Kent, it 
is absent or singularly uncommon. Its principal homes ai-e in 
East Anglia, in Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire; in the 
north, in Cheshire and Yorkshire ; in the western midlands, in 
Worcester and adjacent counties ; and in the south-west of England, 
in Devonsliii-e. 

Morgan. — South Wales and Monmouthshire are the great 
homes of this name. North Wales and Herefordshire stand next 
in the order of its frequency. This ancient Welsh name, in com- 
parison with some other names of the Principality, has advanced 
but little into England. It has obtained no footing in the north, 



EXGIJSH AND WELSH NAMES. 47 

whilst the counties of Worcester and Gloucester represent 
the limit of its advance into the midlands. It has, however, 
firmly established itself in Hampshire, and to a less extent in 
Somerset 

Morris. — This name has evidently had more than one centre 
of origin. Its principal home is in the counties bordering Wales 
(excluding Cheshire), namely, Shropshire, Herefordshire, and 
Monmouthshire, and afterwards in the Welsh counties themselves. 
Thence it has spread over most of the midland counties, though it 
may be doubted whether it has not had a partially independent 
origin in Bucks, Leicestershire and Rutland, and Notts. How- 
ever, an important and evidently an independent home has been 
founded in Hampshire, where it is very numerous. According to 
Lower, Morris, when found in Wales and in the adjoining 
p]nglish counties, is derived from Mars, the God of War (Welsh 
form Mawr-rwyce). In England it is undoubtedly often a cor- 
ruption of JMaurice, a name partly of N^orman introduction. 
Probably Moss, which, judging from its distribution, is more 
often in England a corruption of Morris than a Jewish conti'action 
of Moses, should be included here. It is priucipally found in 
Staffordshire, Worcestershire, and Essex. Morrison is a name 
almost peculiar to Scotland, being only scantily represented in 
England in Northumberland. 

Neal — Neale. — This name is not found in the north of 
England, but is scattered about the rest of the country. Its 
chief homes are in Sussex and Warwickshire ; but probably also 
the adjacent counties of Norfolk and Lincolnshire are more worthy 
of being considered as homes than their numbers would imply. 
In the reign of Edward I., the surname of Neel occurred in Beds, 
Bucks, and Hunts. (Hundred Rolls.) 

Newman. — Confined to the southern half of England and not 
occurring in any numbers north of a line drawn west from the 
Wash. It has evidently several homes, and is at present most fre- 
quently found in Essex, Wilts, Gloucestershire, and Worcestershire. 
This name signifies "a stranger." According to Lower, it is written 
Nieuweman in Sussex documents of the 13th century. In 
the same century it was of frequeut occurrence, as Neweman, 
in Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire, and as Neuman it was also 
then comm(m in Norfolk and Essex (Hundi'ed Rolls), in which 
two counties it has been ever since established. 

Newtox. — This surname has a disconnected distribution iu 



48 HOilES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

different parts of England, being nearly always derived from 
the names of parishes, townships, and other localities in the 
same county. It is best represented in the northern half of 
England. 

NiCHOLLS — Nichols. — Distributed over the greater part of 
England except in the north, where its place is supplied by 
Nicholson and Nichol. The great home is in Cei'nwall. It is 
afterwards frequent in Essex, Northamptonshire, Wilts, Devon, 
Gloucestershire, and Norfolk. If we include Nicholas, in most 
cases the original form of the name, Monmouthshire is especially 
distinguished by its frequency. Although in the majority of 
instances this name is, as just stated, evidently derived from 
Nicholas, the name of the patron saint of boys, sailors, and parish 
clerks in the early times (Bardsley), still it would seem probable 
that in the eastern part of England, as in Norfolk and Essex, it 
takes its rise from Nincole or Nicole, the Norman pronunciation 
of Lincoln. Lower, quoting Sir F. Palgrave, gives this explana- 
tion. This view is to some extent supported by the circumstance 
that, in the 13th century, Nicoll in various forms occurred com- 
monly in this part of England — in Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge- 
shire, and Lincolnshire (Hundred Rolls). Nicol and Nicoll are 
names found over a large part of Scotland, though rare or absent 
in the north. 

NiCHOLSOK. — "With few exceptions confined to the northern half 
of England, being most frequent in Cumberland and Northumber- 
land, and afterwards in Durham and in the adjacent parts of 
Yorkshire. It is noticeable that Nixon, a contraction of this name, 
is also restricted to the northern half of England, being most 
numerous in Cheshire and Northumberland. From the north of 
England the Nicholsons and Nicolsons have extended into the 
Scottish border counties, especially into Dumfriesshire. 

Norman. — This name has a disconnected distribution in dif- 
ferent parts of England. It has evidently three or four indepen- 
dent homes, the two principal being in Cambridgeshire in the east 
and in Somerset in the west. It is remarkable that in the 1 3th 
century this surname was very numerous in Cambridgeshire, 
just as it is now ; then, also, it was similarly established in the 
neighbouring county of Norfolk, and in the not far distant cne of 
Bucks (Hundred Rolls). 

Oliver. — Distributed over the greater part of England. Its 
principal homes are as follows: — In the north, in Northumberland 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 49 

and Durham, whence it extends into the Scottish border counties ; 
in the west, in Herefordshire ; in the east, in Lincolnshire ; in the 
south-west (including the contracted form of 01ver),in Cornwall ; 
and in the south-east, in Kent and Sussex. The personal name 
occurs in Domesday ; and as a surname it was represented in 
Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire in the reign of Edward I. 
(Hundred Rolls.) 

OsBOEN — Osborne. — This name occurred in England before the 
Norman Conquest. It is confined south of a line joining the 
Humber and the Mersey, and its principal area of distribution takes 
the form of a belt crossing central England from East Anglia to 
the borders of Wales. Though well represented also in the 
south-west of England, especially in Somerset and Cornwall, 
it is rare or absent in the other south coast counties, excepting 
Sussex. 

Page. — Characteristic of the southern half of England, Notts 
and Shropshire representing its northernmost limits. It is most 
aumerous in the eastern part of its area, especially in the counties 
if Essex and Sussex, and afterwards in Norfolk and Suffolk. 
Oxfordshire is .also conspicuous for the frequency of the name. 
[n the south-western counties, excluding Devon, it is rare. 

Palmer. — With the exception of a scanty representation in 
Cumberland and Westmoreland, this name does not occur in my 
ist in the counties north of a line joining the Humber and the 
3ee. The modern representatives of the ancient pilgrims (the 
)almers of the Crusades, who carried a staff of palm-wood in 
heir hands) are, however, pretty generally distributed over the 
est of the country, having their principal home in the east of 
']ngland, especially in Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, and Kent, where, 
s we learn from the Hundred Rolls, they were numerous as far 
[•ack as the 13th century, particularly in Norfolk and Hunts. 
L'he midland home of the name is in Warwickshire and Worcester- 
hire, whilst in the south-west of England they are best repre- 
ented in Devon and Somerset. 

Parker. — Distributed almost all over England, but absent or 
onspicuously rare in the extreme south-western counties of Devon 
nd Cornwall. Its principal centres are in the northern half of 
ae country, the first in the West Riding and in the adjacent 
Dunties of Lancashire, Derby, and Lincoln, and the second in 
orthumberland, but it does not extend across the border. It has 
so additional homes in the south of England, in Essex on the 

E 



50 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

east coast, in Monmoutlishire and Gloucestershire in the west, and 
in Hampshire on the south coast. 

Parsons. — A striking example of a purely south of England 
name, not to be found in my list north of a line drawn west from 
the Wash. It is represented in most of the southern counties, but 
its great home is in Wilts, whilst it is also numerous in most of 
the counties around this centre, namely, in Somerset, Dorset, 
Hants, Oxfordshire, and Monmouthshire. 

Payne — Paine — Pain. — Excepting Lincolnshire, where it is but 
scantily represented, the different forms of this name do not occur 
in England north of a line drawn west from the Wash.* They are 
rare or absent in the south-western counties and in the western 
midlands, excluding Herefordshire ; and are mostly crowded 
together in the south-eastern quarter of England, especially in 
Essex, Kent, Sussex, Hants, Cambridgeshire, and Bucks. Lower, 
following other authorities, derives this name from Paganus or 
Paganel, a common Norman personal name, which during the 
Norman dynasty assumed the forms of Pagan, Paynel, Payen, and 
Pain, and was then one of the commonest names in England. In 
the 13th century it was well represented as Pain and Payn in 
Cambridgeshire, Oxfordshire, and Suffolk, and as Payn alone in 
Norfolk (Hundred Rolls), so that it would seem that Lowers 
statement that the Norfolk Paynes have kept together in that 
county since the 15th century does not go far enough. We 
learn also from the same source that one of the greatest colonies of 
the Paynes is at East Grinstead, in Sussex, where for several 
centuries they have been very abundant. The permanence of this 
name in the south-east quarter of England is especially note- 
worthy. It was numerous six centuries ago in counties where 
it is still established, namely, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Noi-folk 
and probably also Sussex. For an ingenious explanation of th« 
origin of this name through Paynel, Paganel, and Pagan,I^ mus1 
refer the reader to an extensive footnote in Chapter XXI. o1 
Gibbon's " Roman Empire." 

Peakce — Peakse — Pierce — Pearson. — Considering these name; 
together as different forms of the same surname we observ« 
that, although they are pretty numerous all over England, the^ 
are decidedly less frequent in the eastern counties between th 



* It is. however, remarkable that a colony of Paynes lias been establishe. 
across the bcottish border in Dumfriesshire. 



EXGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 51 

Wash and the Thames. The gi-eat home of this surname is in 
the south-western counties of Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, and 
Gloucestershire. The principal centre in the north is in the 
North and East Ridings ; whilst in the south-east of England, 

in Kent, there is an important and independent home When 

we consider separately the distribution of the Pearses, Pearces, 
and Pierces, and the distribution of the Pearsons, we find that the 
usual geographical distinction prevails between the forms of the 
name that have and have not the Scandinavian termination of 
" son." Excluding the singular exception of Kent, Pearson is, 
generally speaking, characteristic of the north of England and 
of the midlands, being most frequent in the North and East 
Ridings of Yorkshire, and afterwards in Warwickshire, North- 
umberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland. On the other hand, 
the Pearces, Pearses, and Pierces are confined to the part of 
England south of a line joining the Humber and the Dee. 
Although well scattered about, they are by far the most frequent 
in the south-west, Cornwall possessing the greatest number, whilst 
Devon, Somerset, and Gloucestershire are next distinguished. Of 
the different varieties, Pearce, which much is the most common, is 
generally distributed. Then comes Pearse, which is generally 
characteristic of Devon and Somerset, whilst Pierce, which is 
comparatively rare, is found mostly in North Wales and Sussex, 
Pearcey being peculiar to Devon. 

Peekins — Perkin — Perks. — Confined mostly to the southern 
half of England, being most numerous in Warwickshire, Worcester- 
shire, and South Wales. 

Perry. — Restricted to the southern half of England. It has 
two principal homes, one in the south-west, especially in Somerset, 
Cornwall, and Gloucestershire, the other in the south-east, in 
Essex. 

Phillips — Phipps — Phelps — Philp — Phillipson. — Limiting 
our attention in the first place to the distribution of Phillips, the 
ommonest form of Philip, we observe that it is confined to Wales 
ind to the part of England south of a line drawn from the Humber 
bo the Mersey, being by far the most numerous in the western half 
of this area, including Wales, and being much less frequent in the 
astern part. Its great home is in South Wales and Monmouth- 
shire, but it is also frequent in Herefordshire, Staffordshire, 

Cornwall, and Devonshire If we include the several other 

orms of the name, we find that Philip in its various shapes is still 

£ 2 



52 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

mainly confined sonth of the line above given, the Phillipsons of 
Northumberland being the only representatives of the name in tlie 
north of England* It will also be remarked that the mam 
features of the distribution are the same, its comparative scantiness 
in the eastern half of its area and its frequency in the western half, 
including Wales. In some counties the contractions and corrup- 
tions of Philip often take the place of Phillips, the commonest and 
least altered form, and are associated with it in others. Thus, the 
frequency of the name of Phelps gives Somerset a pre-eminence 
that it would not have obtained from Phillips alone. Phelps and 
Phipps similarly raise the counties of Gloucester and Worcester 
considerably in the scale. The absence or rarity of Phillips in 
Warwickshire and Northamptonshire is supplied, or compen- 
sated for, by Phipps; and Cornwall receives from Philp a 
further lift in position. Taking all the forms of the name of 
Philip together, we find that they distinguish difi'erent regions 
and counties in the following order : first comes South Wales and ■ 
Monmouthshire, then Cornwall and Gloucestershire, then Here- ; 
fordshire and Worcestershire, then Staffordshire, and after it ' 

Devon and Somerset There are a few distant derivatives of 

the names of Philip, which I think should be separately treated, to 
wit, Philpot and Philpots, which are chiefly south of England 
names. Phippen or Phippin is a Somerset form. However, I am 
now entering into debatable ground, and can only here remark 
that the more distant derivatives of Philip do not affect the main 
features of its distribution already discussed. The Philippos of 
Norfolk and Suffolk I have not included, there being something 
suspicious, indicating an independent origin, in the terminal o. 

Porter.— Not found in my list north of Lancashire and 
Lincolnshire, but scattered irregularly over the rest of England, 
being best represented in Somerset, Oxfordshire, Leicestershire, 
Rutlandshire, Essex, Norfolk, and Lancashire. This name was 
numerous in Cambridgeshire, Hunts, and Norfolk in the reign of 
Edward I (Hundred Kolls). 

Potter. — Mostly confined, in the first place, to the midlands, 
where it is especially characteristic of Derbyshire and North- 
amptonshire ; and, in the second place, to the east coast counties 
between the Wash and the Thames, particularly in Essex and 
Norfolk. Not found in my list in the north of England, excluding 



Philips is not an uncommon name in different parts of Scotland. 



EN^GLISH AND WELSH XAMES. 53 

the North and East Ridings, and absent or uncommon in the 
counties on the south coast. 

Powell. — Its great home is in Herefordshire, but it is also 
verj frequent in Monmouthshire, Shropshire, aud South Wales. 
Thence it advances across England, reaching the counties of 
Sussex and Norfolk, and establishing itself also in Dorset aud 
Berks. Powell is the contraction of Ap-Howel, the son of Howel 
or Howell, a common narue in Wales. It is, in truth, remarkable 
that the names of Howell and Howells have, in a general sense, 
the same distribution as Powell. They mostly characterise South 
Wales and Monmouthshire, and to a less extent Shropshii'e, 
Herefordshire, and, strangely enough, Norfolk. The isolated 
colony of the Norfolk Howells and Powells invites some further 
explanation. (See under " Howell " in Norfolk.) 

Pratt. — Excluding the North and East Ridings, where it has 
an independent but less important home, this name is most 
characteristic of the south-eastern quarter of England and of 
the counties adjoining. It is most frequent in Sussex, Suffolk, 
and Oxfordshire, and in the neighbouring counties, such as 
Cambridgeshire, Essex, etc. Prat w^as a very common surname 
in the 13th century in much the same part of England as 
that in which we now find it, particularly in Cambridgeshire, 
Oxfordshire, and Hunts. Praet in Anglo-Saxon signified cunning. 

Price, etc. — This name has its great home in Herefordshire, 
and afterwards in South Wales, Monmouthshire, and Shropshire. 
Rees, Reece, and Ap-Rees in the form of Preece (hence also 
Price) have much the same distribution. The possessors of these 
names have advanced but little into England beyond the Marches, 
Wilts representing, in the number of its Prices, the limit of their 
substantial progi'ess towards the metropolis. 

Procter — Proctor. — This surname does not occur in my list 
south of a line joining the mouths of the Thames and the Severn. 
Though scattered about in most of the other parts of England, 
it is eminently characteristic of Lancashire and the West Riding. 

Read — Reed — Reid. — I will first treat of the different forms 
of this name. Of these. Read and Reed are by far the most 

frequent, the first having somewhat the advantage Read does 

not occur north of a line di-a-wn from the Huniber to the Mei'sey. 
Though it is irregularly scattered about the rest of England, its 
principal homes are in the east in the adjoining counties of 
Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridge, and in the south in Wilts and 



54 H05IES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Dorset Beed compensates for the absence or rarity of Read in 

different counties in a remarkable manner. Thus, its principal 
home is in Cornwall and Devon, where Read is scantily repre- 
sented. In the same way it takes the place of Read in the north 
of Eng-land, being especially well represented in the counties of 
Northumberland and Durham. It is rare or absent in East 
Anglia, where Read has one of its most important homes, and 
for a similar reason it is uncommon or absent in Wilts and 
Dorset. In counties where it is not very numerous, it is often 

associated with its rival Beid i^ associated with Reed in the 

north of England in the counties of Durham and Northumberland, 
but is much less numerous. It finds its principal home across 
the border, and is very common over a large part of Scotland, but 
not north of Aberdeen. It is remarkable that, whilst in the 
" Northumberland Court Directory for 1879 " there are more 
Reids than Reeds, in the list of farmers there given the Reeds 
are twice as frequent as the Reids. Perhaps the difference in the 
spelling may sometimes signify a rise in the social scale. More 
probably, however, it may be explained by the supposition that 
most of the Scottish Reids that cross the English border would 
belong to the gentry and not to the more stay-at-home Scottish 

yeomen We thus see that Read is most characteristic of the 

East Anglian group of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire, and 
also of Wilts and Dorset. Reed has its principal homes in 
Cornwall and Devon, and in the counties of Northumberland and 
Durham; whilst Reid is a Scottish] immigi-ant in the two last- 
named northern counties. 

Taking the three varieties of the name together, we observe 
not only that they are far more characteristic of the southern half 
of England than of the northern half, but that those of the north 
are separated from those of the south by a neutral region, where 
the name is absent or rare, a region comprising a large area of 
the midlands. Taking Derbyshire as its centre, this neutral region 
includes the surrounding counties of Lancashire, the West Riding, 
Notts, Leicester and Rutland, Oxford, Warwick, Worcester, and 
Shropshire, none of which occur in my list, whilst Staffordshire 
can scarcely be excepted, since its representatives of the name are 
comparatively few. Assuming that in the vast majority of casesi 
this name is the old English form of "Red," we can here comd 
upon an interesting ethnological point, the elucidation of which 
I prefer to leave to those who have specially studied this question 



ENGLISH AND ^VELSH NAMES. 55 

of the races of Britain. Dr. Beddoe, in his work on the subject, 
supplies an explanation of this peculiar prevalence of the Red 
Men in tlie southern lialf of England : " the natives of South. 
Britain," as he informs us, " at the time of the Roman Conquest 
partook more of the tall blond stock of Northern Europe than of 
the thickset, broad-headed, dark stock," established in other parts 
of Great Britain. (See under " Russell.") 

Reeve — Reeves. — Confined to tlie southern half of England, 
and not extending north of a line drawn from the Wash to the 
Mersey. Best represented in Wilts, Kent, Sussex, Suffolk, Nor- 
folk, and Northamptonshire ; but infrequent in the southi-westei-n 
counties. 

Reynolds. — Its area of distribution is confined, for the most 
part, to the central part of England extending to the eastern, 
counties between the Wash and the Thames. It is rare or absent 
in the south coast counties, excluding Coi-nwall. and excepting a 
scanty representation in Lancashire it does not occur north of a 
line drawn from the Humber to the Mersey. Shropshire, Norfolk, 
Wilts, and Cornwall are its principal homes. This name takes its 
origin from Rainhold, a Teutonic personal name of great antiquity. 
As Reynald it was well represented in the reign of Ed\vard I. in 
Oxfordshire, Norfolk, and Suffolk (Hundred Rolls), in which last 
two counties the name is still established. 

RiCHAEDS. — Not found in the north of England beyond Notts, 
and also rare or absent in the east coast counties, in both of which 
regions its place is supplied by Richardson. Thus restricted, it is 
mostly crowded into the western half of England, and is very 
common also in Wales. Its great centres are in Cornwall, Wales, 
and Monmouthshire 

Richardson. — Essentially a north of England name, extending 
across the border into Dumfriesshire, and also, but to a less extent, 
characteristic of most of the east coast counties as far south as 
Kent and Sussex. The counties of Cumberland, Westmoreland, 
Durham, Northumberland, and the North and East Ridings of 
Yorkshire contain the greatest number of the name ; and the 
frequent occurrence of the contracted form of Ritson in the three 
first-named counties gives greater accentuation to its northern 
home. Next distinguished for the name of Richardson are Notts, 
Lincolnshire, and Essex. This name takes the place of Richards 
in the north of England, and compensates for its absence or its 
rarity in nearly all the counties on the eastern coast. Excepting 



56 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Notts, wliicli may be regarded as lying between the two areas, 
the names are never associated in any numbers in tbe same county. 
Their combination in Notts gives tbat county further pre-eminence 

in respect of tlie different varieties of Richard as a surname 

The distributions of the various forms of Dick, the nickname of 
Richard, such as Dicks, Dixon, Dickens, Dickenson, etc., etc., 
require a separate treatment. 

Roberts. — A name rare or absent in the northern counties, 
where it is partially represented by that of Robertson, of North- 
umberland, a name very numerous over the most part of Scotland. 
The great home of Roberts is in North Wales, and next in order 
come South Wales, Shropshire, Monmouthshire, and Cornwall. 
It is scattered over the rest of England, but is least common in 
the eastern counties. The Proberts (Ap-Robert) increase its 
frequency in Monmouthshire and Herefordshire, and, to a less 
extent, in South Wales. 

Robinson. — Distributed all over England, except in the south- 
west, where it is either absent or extremely rare. Its great home 
is in the northern half of the country, the numbers rapidly 
diminisliing as we approach the south of England. Northamp- 
tonshire may be characterised as the most advanced stronghold 
of the Robinsons on their way to the metropolis. Robson, which 
is, I suppose, a contraction of this name, is essentially a north of 
England name, being very numerous in Northumberland and 
county Durham, and extending in diminished numbers across the 
border into the shires of Roxburgh and Dumfries. 

Rogers. — Rare or absent in England north of a line draAvn 
from the Humber to the Mersey. Scattered over the rest of 
England and also Wales, but generally infrequent in the eastern 
counties, being by far the most numerous in the western half of 
its area. It is most common in Herefordshire and Shropshire, 
and also in Cornwall. The counties next distinguished are Bucks 
and Sussex. Its only representatives in the north of England are 
tlie Rogersons of Lancashire.* Lower says that there is an ancient 
family of Rogers in Shropshire dating back to the time of 
Edward II. 

Rose. — This name has at least two centres : one in the south 



* Rodger is the Scotch form, it has no definite distribution. In England we 
only find it occasionally, as in the case of Rodgcrs in Derbyshire. 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 57 

in Dorset, Oxfordshire, and Wilts, the other in the northern 
midlands in N^otts. It was common in Oxfordshire as far back 
as the 13th century (Hundred Rolls). 

Russell. — With the exception of the Russells of the ]!^orth 
and East Ridings of Yorkshire, this name is confined to the 
southern half of England. Its principal centres are in the 
south-east quarter of the country, especially in Cambridgeshire, 
Kent, Sussex, and also in Hants. In the 13th century tbis was 
a very common surname, being numerous in Cambridgeshire, 
Oxfordshire, and Hunts, and also well represented, in Shropshire, 
Wilts, Gloucestershire, Devon, and Lincolnshire (Hundred Rolls). 
Lower and Bardsley speak of this name as originally borne by 
pei'sons having a red (fair) complexion. However, it is not 
improbable that the Russells of Dorset, Somerset, and Hants 
may derive their name from Hugh de Rosel, who came over with 
the Conqueror, and was granted possessions in Dorset (Lower). 
Russell is a common name over a large part of Scotland, except 
in the north. 

Sanders — Saunders. — The two varieties of this name are con- 
fined south of a line drawn from the Humber to the Dee, being 
well scattered over the part of England thus defined. The name 
is best represented in Devon, and after that in Dorset, Bucks, and 
Cambridgeshire. In the north of England its place is taken by 
Sanderson, which is most numerous in the counties of Durham 
and Northumberland. 

Scott. — Irregularly scattered over England. Though the 
Scotts are permanently established in the south coast counties, as 
in Devon and Kent, and, including the Scutts, in Dorset, their 
great home is in the counties on either side of the Scottish border, 
in Northumberland and Cumberland on the one side, and in the 
counties of Berwick, Roxburgh, and Dumfries, on the other side, 
and they are also numerous in southern Scotland south of the 
Forth and the Clyde. (See under " Scotland " in the Appendix.) 

Sharp — Sharpe. — This name is rare or absent in the south- 
west of England and in the south coast counties, excluding Kent. 
It is also, generally speaking, infrequent in the north, except in the 
West Riding and in Cumberland and Westmoreland. It is mostly 
crowded into Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutlandshire, and 
Notts, extending also into the adjacent counties ; but it is also 
fairly numerous in Kent. In Scotland it finds its home in Perth- 
shire in the form of Sharp. 



58 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Shaw. — The great home of this name is in the West Riding, 
Cheshire, and Lancashire, aud in the neighbouring northern 
midland counties of Derby, Stafford, and Notts. It is rare or 
absent in the south of England, excepting Sussex, and is similailj 
infrequent in the eastern coast counties south of the Wash. " Shaw " 
in Anglo-Saxon signified a small wood. In counties where the 
surname is numerous, as in Lancashire and Yorkshire, the name is 
attached to places. The Shaws are fairl j represented in Scotland, 
but not in the northern part. 

Shepherd— Sheppard, etc. — This name is distributed over the 
greater part of England ; but is absent or infrequent in the 
eastern counties south of the Humber. Its chief centres in the 
north are in Westmoreland, Lancashire, and the North and East 
Ridings; in the midlands, in the counties of Warwick, North- 
ampton, and Notts ; and in the south-west of England in the 
contiguous counties of Somerset and Gloucester. It is remarkable 
that its deficiency in the eastern counties is to some extent 
supplied by the Sheppersons of Cambridgeshire. Shepherd also 
is established in Scotland, but has no definite distribution, and is 
by no means numerous. 

SiMMONDs — Simmons — Simonds — Simons — Symonds — Symons. — ■ 
This name in its various forms has evidently two origins. 
Generally, it would seem to be derived from Simon, a name of 
Norman introduction and represented by Simund in Domesday ; 
but there is much to support the opinion of Mr. Lower that it is 
in not a few cases a corruption of Seaman which, as Seraan, is very 
common in the records of the Cinque Ports, and other places on 
the coasts of Kent and Sussex. The instance is adduced by him 
of a Sussex family of Simmons resident at Seaford for three-and-a- 
half centuries, in which we can trace all the changes of the name 
from Seaman and Seman, its earliest forms in the sixteenth 
century, to Simmons, as it is now spelt : they are as follows : — 
Seaman, Seman, Seamans, Semons, Simons, Simonds, Symonds, 
Simmonds, Symmonds, Simmons. It is also remarkable that 
at the present day Seaman is a name mostly restricted to 
Norfolk and Su ffolk, in which two counties Symonds is also well 
represented. 

The several varieties of the name arrange themselves readily 
into two groups, Simmonds and Simmons being most numerous 
in Cornwall and Sussex, and afterwards in Bucks, Oxfordshire, 
Berks, and some of the adjacent counties ; whilst Simons, Symons, 



ENGLISH AND WEI.SH NAMES. 59 

Sjmonds, etc., have their great home in Cornwall, but are also 
fairly numerous in Devon, Dorset, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, and 
in some of the neighboiiring counties. The localities of the various 
forms of the two groups are noticed in the alphabetical list. 

When we come to consider the combined distribution of all the 
forms, we find that this name is essentially characteristic of the 
southern half of England and especially of the coast counties. It 
has three centres, the principal being in the south-west in Corn- 
wall, the second being in Sussex, the third in Suffolk and Cam- 
bridgeshire, from v^hich centres it has spread to the counties 
adjacent. 

Simpson. — Characteristic of the northern half of England. 
Yorkshire is its great home, it being very numerous in the N^orth 
and East Hidings. In the surrounding counties of Durham, 
Lancashire, Cheshire, Stafford, and Derby, it is also well repre- 
sented. Though it has established itself in some measure in 
Suffolk and Essex, it is with these exceptions eminently a name of 
the northern counties and northern midlands. It is represented 
over a large part of Scotland, but is rare in the north. 

Smith. — This familiar name is universally distributed, but its 
relative frequency varies greatly in different parts of England. 
It is least frequent in the three south-west counties of Cornwall, 
Devon, and Somerset, where, it may be truly said, the Smiths do 
not flourish. It is also similarly infrequent in Wales. Its great 
home is in Worcestershire and in the adjacent counties of 
Gloucester, Warwick, and Stafford. It is also very numerous in 
Essex, in the east of England. In the extreme north it is rather 
less frequent ; but it extends in numbers aci'oss the border, and is 
established o%-er the greater part of Scotland, being most numerous 
in the counties south of the Forth and the Clyde. If we divide 
England into three parts by two lines, joining the Thames with 
the Severn, and the Wash with the Dee, we shall observe that the 
Smiths are most numerous in the middle division, less frequent in 
the northern division, and least numerous in the south. 

Spencer. — Absent or rare in the north and south of England. 
Most numerous in the midlands, especially Warwickshire, and 
afterwards in Northamptonshire, Derbyshire, and Notts. 

Stephens — Stevens. — Mostly confined south of a line drawn 
west from the Wash, being represented in the counties north of 
that line by Stephenson and Stevenson. Its great home is in 
Cornwall, and there are secondary centres in Sussex, and in South 



60 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Wales and in the adjoining English county of Hereford. The 
name is said to haye been introduced after the Conquest. In 
Cornwall it is of very ancient date, as is evidenced by the family of 
Stephens of Tregeuna, -who, according to Lower, are the descend- 
ants of the Stephyns of St. Ives in the, reign of Edward IV., their 
name being written then in the singular. 

Stephenson — Stevenson. — Confined for the most part to the 
northern half of England, being especially frequent in county 
Durham, and afterwards in the North and East Ridings and North- 
umberland. It is also well established in Lincolnshire, and has made 
a substantial advance into the midlands as far as Warwickshire. 
Strangely enough it has an independent home in Sussex and Berks, 
where Stevens is also common. Generally speaking, however, it 
is absent or rare in the southern part of England, where its place 
is supplied by Stephens and Stevens. The Stevensons extend in 
force across the Scottish border, but do not usually reach beyond 
the Forth and the Clyde. 

Stone. — Excepting its establishment in Derbyshire, this name 
is mostly restricted to the south of England and is especially at 
home in Berks and Bucks, and in the south-western counties of 
Somerset, Dorset, and Devon. It has probably in most cases a 
local origin, as in Somerset, Bucks, Kent, etc., where there are 
parishes and villages thus called. 

Sutton. — Scattered about in different parts of England, and 
best represented in Cheshire, Lancashire, Staffordshire, Norfolk, 
Kent, Wilts, etc. Sutton is a very common name of parishes, 
villages, etc., and probably the surname has been in nearly every 
case in the first place thus derived. We learn from the Hundred 
Rolls that six centuries ago the surname was numerous in Notts, 
Shropshire, Somerset, and also in Lincolnshire and Kent. 

Taylor. — Distributed all over England, but comparatively 
scarce in all the south coast counties, excluding Kent. In the 
Engli.sh counties, near and on the Scottish border, it is also rela- 
tively infrequent, yet it extends in fair numbers across the border, 
and is found over most of Scotland. In Wales it is rare or absent. 
Its principal homes in England are to be found in the great 
industrial counties of Lancashire, Derbyshire, Notts, and Warwick- 
shire, and in the West Riding. It is also numerous in Lincolnshire. 
Six centuries ago this surname occurred in various forms, as 
Taylir, Taylur, Tayllour, etc. (Hundred Rolls). 

Thomas. — The great home of this name is in Wales, more 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 61 

especially in South Wales, whence the name has spread in num- 
bers into the adjacent English county of Monmouthshire, and to 
a less extent into Herefordshire and Shropshire. In the English 
counties forming the next line, it has, if we exclude Gloucester- 
shire, obtained but little hold. Its further advance into England 
has been on a small scale, and it is probable that its isolated 
occurrence in the distant counties of Essex, Yorkshire, etc., may 
be explained on independent grounds. It has, however, a secon- 
dary but evidently an original home in Cornwall, where the name 
abounds. 

Thompson. — This name is distributed over the greater part of 
England, but is rare or absent in the south (south of a line joining- 
London and Bristol). Its great home is in the north, in the region 
north of a line connecting the Humber with Morecambe Bay, and 
Northumberland in particular is pre-eminent for the number of its 
Thompsons. It extends in force in its Scottish form of Thomsd|ji 
across the border into Dumfriesshire, Roxburghshire, and is very 
numerous over a large part of Scotland, but particularly in the 
region south of the Forth and the Clyde. As we trace it south- 
ward from its northern home, we find its numbers rapidly diminish- 
ing. It is, however, well represented in the midlands. Further 
south, again, as above remarked, it becomes rare or dies out 
altogether. 

Turner. — This name is distributed over the greater part of 
England, but is infrequent or absent in the north beyond Lanca- 
shire and Yorkshire. It is well represented in the midlands, 
especially in Derbyshire, Notts, and Staffordshire, and is also 
numerous in Lancashire. In the eastern counties it has its great 
centre in Suffolk and afterwards in Norfolk. In the south of 
England it is less frequent, but has two independent homes in 
Sussex and Devonshire. The prevalence of this name may pro- 
bably be explained, as Bardsley suggests, by the circumstance that 
until the close of the 16th century, the "turner" made most 
of the best household vessels, such as mugs, jugs, etc., only those 
in rough and common use being made of clay. Since this name 
often prefers to gather in industrial counties, we are not surprised 
to find that it has its Scottish home in the Greenock and Glasgow 
districts, though it is not numerous. 

Walker. — This name is mainly characteristic of the midlands 
and of the north of England. It is comparatively infi'equent in 
the counties between the Wash and the Thames. It is absent or 



62 HOMES OF FAMILT NAMES. 

rare in the soutliern part of England soufh of a line joining the 
mouths of the Thames and the Severn. Its great home in the 
midlands is in the counties of Derby and Notts. In the north it 
is most frequent in Durham and Yorkshire. It crosses the Scottish 
border, not by way of Northumberland, where it is infrequent, but 
through Cumberland into the county of Dumfries, and it is fairly 
represented over Scotland, except in the extreme north. In 
Chapter I. I have referred to the general distribution of names 
connected with the cloth trade. Walker, which is derived from 
the Anglo-Saxon word " wealcere," a fuller, is synonymous with 
Tucker. In a statute of Elizabeth, a person of this occupation is 
referred to as " Clothe-Fuller, otherAvise called Tucker or Walker " 
(Bardsley). The early fashion was to tread out the cloth; and 
even now in the north of England fuller's earth is called 
" walker's clay." It is remarkable that the absence or rarity of 
Walker in the south of England is supplied by Tucker and 
Fuller. Tucker takes its place in the south-west, and, in fact, 
in almost all the southern counties as far east as Hants and Wilts. 
Fuller takes its place in the south-eastern counties of Kent and 
Sussex. 

Walton. — Usually a north of England name, especially charac- 
teristic of Cumberland and Westmoreland, Durham, and Northum- 
berland. It is in most cases derived from the names of places in 
the county. 

Ward. — This name, though scattered over a large part of 
England, is gathered together in greatest numbers in Yorkshire, 
Lincolnshii'e, and in the midland counties, especially those of 
Leicester and Rutland, Notts, Derby, Stafford, Warwick, North- 
ampton. Cambridge, etc. It is infrequent in the four northernmost 
counties of England, and is similarly absent or relatively uncommon 
in the southern counties to the south of a line joining Bristol and 
London. The name signifies a ward or keeper, and we find it with 
this meaning in such compound names as Woodward, the old title 
of a forest-keeper. 

Warren. — This name is mostly confined to the southern half 
of England, more especially to Dorset and the south-western 
counties and to Cambridgeshire and the adjacent eastern counties. 
Tt thus possesses two principal homes, one in the west of England 
and the other in the east. It also occurs sporadically in Cheshire 
and Staffordshire. Six centuries ago the name, in one form or 
another, was frequent in the east of England. We learn from the 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 63 

Hundred Rolls that in those ancient times Warin was charac- 
teristic of Cambridgeshire, and. that Warenne was very common in 
Norfolk, in both of which counties the name is still well repre- 
sented. Warenne was then also very frequent in Lincolnshire, 
and was also represented in Sussex. The present east country 
Wari'eos possess the name, if not the blood, of the Norman family 
of de Warene, the members of which in the time of William the 
Conqueror received great possessions in the east of England in 
Sussex, Siu'rey, Suffolk, Norfolk, etc. Probably also the west 
country name of Warren has a similar origin, though it has been 
suggested that it may sometimes be a contraction of "warrener," 
a keeper of a rabbit-wari-en, an improbable suggestion, since 
occupative names ending in " er," as Tanner, Skinner, Barber, 
Tayler, etc., etc., are not subject to such abbreviations. 

Watson. — The principal home of this name is in the north of 
England, especially in the county of Durham and in the North 
and East Ridings. It is also fairly numerous in the northern 
midlands, as in Dei'byshire and Notts. Further south it rapidly 
diminishes, though it lias several representatives in Cambridge- 
shire ; and in the southern counties it is absent or rare, excepting 
Sussex, where it has obtained a hold. In the south and west of 
England its place is supplied by Watts. It extends in force across 
the Scottish boi'der, and is found over a large part of Scotland, 
but is more especially characteristic of the region south of the 
Forth and the Clyde. 

Watts. — A name confined south of a line drawn west from 
the Wash, but especially characteristic of the three south-western 
counties of Somerset, Gloucester, and Wilts, and of the counties 
adjacent to them. It is represented by Watson in the northern 
half of England. Singularly enough, it reappears in the north of 
Scotland in Aberdeenshire and its vicinity. 

Webb. — This name is confined south of a line drawn from the 
Wash to the Dee. It is most numerous in Somerset and Wilts, 
in the west of England ; but is also well represented in Suffolk 
in the east of England and in Northamptonshii'e in the midlands. 
{See Chapter I. for the general distribution of the names connected 
with the cloth, trade.) 

Webster. — The Websters have their principal home in Derby- 
shire and afterwards in Yorkshire and Lancashire. They are also 
fairly represented in the eastern counties between the Humber 
and the Thames. {See Chapter I. for the general distribution of 



64 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

the names connected with tlie clotli trade.) "Webster is also a 
scattered but not a very frequent Scottish name. 

Wells. — This is an ancient English name which was repre- 
sented commonly by Welles in the counties of Oxford and Cam- 
bridge in the reign of Edward I. (Hundred Eolls.) It is at 
present most numerous in the south of England, in Oxfordshire 
(as of old), Wilts, Berks, Sussex, and Kent. It has, however, an 
independent home in Lincolnshire, and extends northwards into 
Yorkshire and Lancashire. 

■y^EST. — This name is scattered about in different parts of 
Eno-land, both in the west and in the east, and its distribution 
gives only a slight support to the suggestion that it was originally 
given to persons who came from the west. At all events, such 
an explanation can scarcely apply to the Wests of Cornwall. It 
is, however, noticeable that the counties in which the name is 
perhaps best represented, namely, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, North- 
amptonshire, and Sussex, occur in the eastern half of England. 

White. — Distributed over the greater part of England, but 
relatively infrequent in the extreme north and in most of the 
eastern counties, and mostly crowded together in the south-west 
and in the midlands. The south-west of England is, however, the 
principal home of the name, the counties of Devonshire, Somerset, 
Dorset, Wilts, and Hants being especially remarkable for the 
number of Whites. Derbyshire and Worcestershire are the chief 
centres of the midland Whites, but the name is also well repre- 
sented in Warwickshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, and Bucks. 
There would appear to be also secondary centres in the North 
and East Ridings and in Kent. Although comparatively infre- 
quent in the extreme north of England, it has established itself 
in fair numbers in Scotland south of the Forth and the Clyde ; 
and there the Whytes have their home, being half as numerous 
as the Whites. It is probable that in the great majority of cases 
this name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon " hwit," referring to 
the fairness of the complexion ; and, in fact, we find it Latinized 
as Albus in the Hundred Rolls of six centuries ago. It should 
not, however, be forgotten, as Lower also points out, that it may, 
in some instances, have taken its origin from the Anglo-Saxon 
" hwita," an armourer or swordsmith, of Canute's time. 

Wild — Wilde. — This ancient English name is mostly confined 
to the northern midlands, its principal homes being in Derbyshire, 
Notts, and the West Riding, whence it has spread to the counties 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 65 

around. Ulric Wilde was tlie name of a Domesday tenant ; and 
the surname similarly spelt was represented in Hunts in the reign 
of Edward I. 

Wilkinson. — This name is almost entirely confined to the 
northern half of England, as defined by a line drawn west from 
the Wash. It is best represented in Northumberland, Durham, 
Yorkshire, and Lancashire, and is also faii'ly numerous in Notts, 
Lincolnshire, and Cheshire. Its absence or scarcity in the south 
of England is but poorly compensated for by Wilkins. 

Williams. — The great home of this name is in Wales and 
Monmouthshire. Thence it has extended in considerable numbeis 
into Herefordshire, Shropshire, and Gloucestershire. Its place in 
the northern half of England is to some extent supplied by 
Williamson, but much more commonly by Wilson. It has an 
independent home in Cornwall, whei'e it exists in nnmbers. As 
we cross England eastward from the Marches we find that the 
name rapidly diminishes, though it has succeeded in reaching the 
counties on the east coast as well as those in the south-easit angle 
of the country. 

Williamson. — This name is for the most part confined to the 
northern half of England, though it has an isolated centre in the 
southern half in Bucks. It is at present most numerous in 
Cheshire. Extending across the Scottish border it is found over 
a large part of Scotland, though in no great numbers. 

Wilson. — Distributed over the whole of England, except in 
the region south of a line joining the mouths of the Thames and 
the Severn, where it is absent or rare. It is most crowded in the 
northern half of the country, being thej'e numerous in all the 
counties, especially in the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire,* 
and in Cumberland and Westmoreland ; but it has two centres in 
i the southern half of the country, in Worcestershire and Cam- 
bridgeshire. It extends in force across the Scottish border, and is 
very numerous in the region south of the Forth and the Clyde. 

Wood. — This name has established itself in the greater number 
of the English counties ; but its home, par excellence, is in the 
region comprised, by Yorkshire, Cheshire, and the northern mid- 
land counties of Derbyshire, Notts, Staffordshire, and Leicester- 
shire. It has, however, also an independent and important home 

* The Wilsons, of Broomliead, in the West Hiding, resided there from the 
13th to the 18th century (Lower). 

F 



C)C) HOIMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

in the soutli-east of England in Kent and Sussex. Except in 
Devonshire, it cannot he said to be at all frequent in the south- 
western counties. In the extreme north of England it is fairly- 
represented ; but it has crossed the border in scanty numbers, 
and though scattered about Scotland it has obtained no great 
hold. It is supplemented by Woods in Lancashire, Norfolk, 
Suffolk, etc. 

Woodward. — This ancient name is mostly confined to the 
midlands, being best represented in Worcestershire, Derbyshire, 
and also, but to a less extent, in most of the counties adjacent 
to them. It is absent or rare in southern England, south of a line 
joining the mouths of the Thames and the Severn; and it is 
similarly infrequent or not permanently established in northern 
England, north of Yorkshire. The Woodwards, or "forest- 
keepers," the Wodewards of the Hundred Eolls, were, in th.e 
reign of Edward I., numerous in Essex and Oxfordshire, where the 
surname still remains, and they were also at that time represented 
in Bucks. 

Wright. — This name is distributed over England, but is com- 
paratively infrequent in the counties on the south coast, and in 
the northern counties north of Yorkshire. It exists in densest 
numbers in the counties lying between the Wash, and the Thames, 
being especially numerous in Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex, and 
also, but to a less extent, in Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire. 
In the midlands it is nearly as crowded, and has its chief centres 
in Warwickshire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire, etc. It is also 
very frequent in Lincolnshire and Cheshire, and is somewhat less 
numerous in Lancashire and Yorkshire. The Wrights have 
established themselves in Scotland, though in no great numbers, 
and not usually north of Perthshire. 

Young. — Distributed over the English counties, but most 
numerous in the south of England, especially in Gloucestershire, 
Somerset, Dorset, Hants, and Kent. Its centre in the north is 
in Northumberland and Durham. In the midlands it is scattered 
about in no great numbers; and in Norfolk and Suffolk it is 
supplemented or represented by Youngs. Over a large part of 
Scotland, but especially south of the Forth and the Clyde, Young 
is numerously to be found. 



ENGLISH AND WELSH NAMES. 



67 



SIOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NAMES 
OF THE ENGLISH AND WELSH COUNTIES. 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 

'^OTE. — The asterisk before a name indicates that tliougli it is 
cliaracteristic of the county the name is more numerous else- 
where. 



*Brown 



General Names (30-40 counties). 

*Cook *Smitli 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



*Bailey 


King ^ f Sanders 
l Saunder 


♦Cooper 




Regional Names (10-19 counties). 


/ Daniel 
I Daniels 


*George *Payne 


^ r Osborn *Pratt 
I Osborne 


*Day 




DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 


*Anstee 


*Gibbons *LoTell 


•Barnard 


* Godfrey *Peck 


•Bradshaw 


•Hopkins 'Piggott 


*Croucli 


* J eff e rie 3 * Wooton 


^ f Dickens 
'■Dickins 


*Judd 





P 2 



68 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 
CotTNTT Names (2-3 counties). 



*Attwood 


*Eame3 


♦Mayhew 


*Blundell 


*Farrar 


Odell 


*Bo8worth 


♦Gadsden 


Olney 


*Crawley 


*Jane8 


*Titmas 


♦Draper 


Joyce 




Peculiab Names (confined mostly 


to this county). 


Battams 


Fensom 


Negus 


Breary 


Foil 


Quenby 


Brightman 


Hallworth 


Scrivener 


Buckmaster 


Harradine 


Scrogus 


Claridge 


Hartop 


Stanbridge 


Cranfield 


Inskip 


Stanton 


Darrington 


Kempson 


Timberlake 


Dillamore 


Maiden 


Whinnett 


Dmicombe 


Mossman 





NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTEEISTIC BEDFORDSHIEE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 
H. R. indicates Hundred EoUs. 



Coll. 

H. 

L. 

M. 

Sp. 



" Collect. Topogr. et Gen." (Nichols) 
Harrey's " Hundred of Willey." 
Lower's " Patronymica Britanuica." 
Matthiason's " Bedford." 
" Contributors to the Defence of the Country at the time 
of the Spanish Invasion in 1588 " (B. M. B 474). 



A— D. 



At the end of last century Mr. Thomas Battams owned Stays 
more, in the parish of Carlton, where the family still remair 
Mr. T. Battams was a churchwarden of Turvey in 1815 (H.) 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 69 

Blundell is also a Lancashire name, and reference to it will be 
found under that county. The Blundells of Caidington and else- 
where in the county of Bedfordshire were an influential family 
during last century ; and one of them served as high sheriff in 

1731 (H.) The BoswoRTHS possess the name of more than one 

Leicestershire parish The Crais^fields derive their name from 

a manor or a parish in Bedfordshire The name of Claridge 

is probably a form of the ancient name of Clarice, which was 
represented in the Dunstable district of Beds, as well as in 
Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire, in the 13th century (H. R.). 

The Breaeys were York merchants in the 17th century, 

and filled the office of lord mayor in 1611, 3623, and 1669 

(Drake's " Eboracum ") Brightman was the name of the 

vicar of Hawnes in the reign of James 1. (Coll.) The 

distinguished family of Crawley lived at Nether- Crawley, 

Luton, in the 17th century (" Bibl. Topog. Brit.") The 

DuNCOMBES of Beds and Bucks in the 16th and 17th centuries 
were gentry of note and position, whose names occur among 
the list of contributors to the fund collected at the time of 
the expected invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). 
Those of Bedfordshire lived at that time at Battlesden and other 
places, and served as sheriffs for the county (H.). The Dun- 
combes or Doncombes of Bucks lived in the l6th century at Great 
Brickell, Barliende, Wingrave, Dinton, and East Claidon (Lips- 
comb's "Bucks") Darrington is the name of a Yorkshire 

parish The Dillamores of Bedfordshire are probably connected 

with the Dallimores or Dollimores of Watford and St. Stephens, 
Herts (Cussan's "Hertfordshire"). 



E— P. 

The West Riding of Yorkshire would seem to be the principal 
home of the Farrars or Farrers, though the name has long been 
known in this county. There was a gentle family of Farrar at 
Harrold in the 17th century (H.). Frauncis Farrer was a 
Bedfordshire gentleman who contributed £25 for his country's 
defence at the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish 

Armada in 1588 (Sp.) The present representatives of the 

name of Foll probably possess an ancestor in Robert Fole, whose 
name occurs on one of the bells of Pavenham Church as church- 
warden in 1663 (H.) Hartop, or Hartopp, is an old east 



70 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

country name going back to the 14th century: more than one 

line of baronets bore the name (L.) Tnskip is the name of a 

township in Lancashire Joyce, a name also established in .1; 

Essex and Somerset, has long been found in Beds. In the 
17th century the name of Joyce or Joyes occurred in Felmersham 
and Renhall (H.). Thomas Joyce was vicar of Hawnes in the 

reign of Charles II. (Coll.) The Maldens evidently derive 

their name from Maulden, a Bedfordshire parish Odell is the 

name of a Bedfordshire parish, the seat of the ancient barony of 
WodhuU or Wahull, and, in fact, the parish is also called 
Woodhill. As a surname it has long been known in the county. 
There was a family of the name in Stagsden in the 17th 
century, and W. Oddell was a parishioner of Turvey in the reign 
of Anne (H.). Stephen Odell was a Bedford gentleman who, in 
1788, gave his estate in Goldington, with his house and premises 
in Mill Lane, Bedford, for the benefit of the minister of the Old 

Meeting and the poor of the congregation (M.) Paradine was 

the name of a gentle family of Bedford in the 17th century; 
the name is now rare, but its memory is perpetuated in the 

charitable bequests of that borough (M.) Harradine is a 

scai'ce Bedfordshire name Olnet is the name of a town iu 

Bucks. It is an ancient Bucks surname, occurring in that county 
as well as in Oxfordshire, as Olnei and Olneye in the 13th 
century (H. R.). The personal name of Olnei is found in Domesday 
lor Bucks (L.). There are representatives of the name in Hert- 
fordshire Several of the bailiffs of Godman Chester, Hunts, last 

century, bore the name of Negus (Fox's " Godmanchester"). 



R— Z. 

A gentle family of Scrivexer resided last centary at Potters 

pury , Northamptonshire (Baker's ' ' Northamptonshire ") 

Stanbridge is the name of a Bedfordshire village. Hugo Stan 
bridge was rector of Campton in the reign of Elizabeth (Coll.). 

TiTMAs is an ancient name in this part of England. It occurs 

as Tittmus in the adjacent county of Hertfordshire. Tytemers, 
a name found in the adjoining county of Cambridgeshire in the 
13th centuij (H. R.), is evidently the early form of Titmas 

or Tittmus Timberlake was the name of a family of King's 

Langley, Herts, in the seventeenth century (Cussan's " Hertford- 
^•^^^e ") WooTTON is the name of a Bedfordshire parish. 



BERKSHIRE. 



71 



BERKSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name indicates that though charac- 
teristic of this count J the name is more relatively numerous 
elsewhere. 

General Names (30-40 counties). 
*Smith 





Common Names (20- 


29 counties). 


♦Bennett (Wantage) *Cooper 


♦Matthews (Newbury) 


*Chapman 


♦Kmg 


♦.Stevens 




Regional Names (10 


-19 counties). 


♦Butler 


* Lawrence 


♦Stone (Abingdon) 


*Day 


♦May 


♦Wells 


♦Elliott 


„ r Simmonds 
♦ "\ 

L Simmons 










DiSTBicT Names (4-9 counties). 


♦Blake 


♦Heath 


♦Piatt 


Bonyer (Bracknell) ♦Hedges 


♦Pullen 


♦Cliurch 


♦Hobbs 


♦Thatcher (Newbury) 


Dewe 


Humfrey 


♦Whitfield (Faringdon) 


♦Dodd 


^/Piggott 
I Bigot 


Willis 


Goddard 






County Names (2- 


3 counties). 


Ayres 


♦Clack 


Lovelock 


Baverstock 


♦Cornish 


Richens 


Beesley 


; Fidler 
(Steventon) 1 Vidler 


♦Tubb 


Betteridge 


♦Waldi'on 


r Cdudwell 
L Cauldwell 


♦Gunter (Newbury) ♦Wiggins 


♦Hickman 





72 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



PECniAB Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Adnams 


Frogley 


Lyford 


Benning 


Froome 


Maslen 


Buclieridge 


Halfacre 


Napper 


Bunee 


Headington 


Pither 


r Corderoy 
L Corderev 


Izzard 
Keep 


Povey 
Shackel 


Crockford 


Kimber 


Tame 


Domier 


Lanfear 


Tyrrell 


Fairthome 


Lay 


Wilder 


Freebody 


Lonsley 





NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC BEEKSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



AutJiorities indicated hy ihefollmoiny abbreviations : — 

A. indicates Ashmole's " Berkshire." 

CI. ,, Clarke's " Hundred of Wanting." 

Co. „ Coate's " Beading." 

H. E. „ Hundred EoUs. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

Sp. „ "List of Contributors to the Spanish Armada Defence 
Fund in 1588 " (Brit. Mus. B 474). 



A— F. 

Blake is a south of England name, found most frequently 
in Wiltshire, Cornwall, Berkshire, and Oxfordshire. It was long 
known and is still found in Reading ; the mayors of that town 

in 1683, 1710, and 1720 bore the name (Co.) The name of 

Br)WYER, which is also established in other counties, finds its 
present home in this county in the district of Bracknell. Robert 
Bowyer, who was mayor of Reading in 1558, also represented that 



BERKSHIRE. 73 

town in Parliament (Co.) The name is still in the town John 

BucKERiDGE of this connty contributed £25 towards the fund 
collected in 1588 for the country's defence ag^ainst the Spanish 

Armada (Sp.) Beoderwick is an old Berks name, now rare or 

extinct in the county. A gentle family of this name resided at 

Langford in the 17th century (A.) The Bunburts, a family 

now scantily represented, played an important part in the 

history of Reading during the 17th century (Co.) Amongst 

the ancient Berks families of distinction no longer represented in 
the county are the "Fetiplaces of Childrey and Appleton, and the 

EsTBURTS of Lambourne in the 14th and 15th centuries (A.) 

The notable family of DuNCH of Little Wittenham in the IGth 
century (A.) possess few, if any, descendants in our own 

time The Dewes, however, are an exception to this rule. 

A gentle family of Dewe lived at Ardington in the 17th 

century (A.). The name is also found in other counties 

The CoRDEROTS were a gentle family numerously represented in 
Chute, Wilts, in the 16th and 17th centuries; and those of 
the name who had settled elsewhere often found their resting- 
place in the church of their Wiltshire home. Edward Corderoy 
of Andover, for instance, w^as buried there in 1635, and William 
Corderoy of Clatford, was buried there in 1636 (Coll. Top. et Gen.). 
Robert Corderoy was mayor of Devizes, Wilts, in 1592 (Bull's 

"Devizes"). Cowderoy Park is a seat in Sussex The present 

Froomes are probably connected in their descent with the Fromes, 

a Reading family early last century (Co.) The Fairtbornes 

may be descendants of the ancient family of Frethorne, the 
possessors of an estate in Childrey from the 13th to the 15th 
century (CI.). There is a place named Fairthorne in Hamp- 
shire The Dormers were landed gentlemen in Oxfordshire in 

the time of Elizabeth, and the family was ennobled in 1615, 
Peterley House, Bucks, being in its possession in the 17th century 
(Napier's " Swyncombe " and Wing's "Steeple Barton"). A 
Leicestershire family of Dormer in the 17th century settled after- 
wards in Ireland (Nichols' "Leicestershire"). 

G— K. 

The Gastrells, an ancient family of gentry holding the manor 
)f East Garston in the 16th and 17th centuries (A.), have 
ipparently but few descendants in the present day Geerino 



74 HOMES OF FAMILY NA:\rES. j 

i 
is the name of another old family now rarely represented in | 
the county. There was a family of gentry of this name at H 

Denchworth in the 17th and Ibth centuries (CI.) The ancient . 

name of Goddard, which was represented by Godard in Domesday 
(L.), is, with the exception of its representatives in Derby- 
shire, now mostly confined to the southern half of England. It is 
most numerous in Berks, Suffolk, Hants, and Dorset, and is also 
established in Norfolk, Middlesex, and Wilts. In the 13th 
century it occurred as Godard in Bucks, Middlesex, Cambridge- 
shire, and other counties (H. R.). Probably some of the Berkshire 
Goddards are of Wiltshire origin. The father of a gentle family of 
this name, who was buried in Hungerfoi-d Church in the middle of 
the 17th century, came from Standen Hussey, Wilts (A.). Suffolk 
has been for centuries the principal home of the name in East 
Anglia (see under "Suffolk," "Dorset," "Wilts," and "Hamp- 
shire.") GuNTER is a name that was represented in Oxfordshire 

in the 13th century (H. R.), and two centuries earlier there were 
tenants named Gunter and Gonter mentioned in Domesday. In 
Berkshire the name has long been known. It is now found at 
Newbury. Nicholas Gunter was mayor of Reading in 1618, 1626, 
1627, and 1628 (Co.) ; and in 1624 a gentleman of this name was 
buried in Kentbury Church (A.). Farther back still, in the reign 
of Henry VI., the Gunters were Berkshire gentlemen (CI.). 
Colonel Gunter, who was a zealous adherent of Charles II., 
belonged to a family living at Racton, Sussex, in the 16th and 
17th centuries, and hailing from Gilleston in Wales before that time 
(Lower's "Sussex). (/See under "Wales.") The name also occurs 
in Gloucestershire, and a reference will be found to it under that I 

county The ancient families of Hobye of Bisham and Holcott 

of Buckland (A.), seem to have left but few descendants at the 

present day John Kimber, senior alderman of Newbury, died 

in 1793 at the age of 85; pursuant to his will twelve almshouses 
were built in Newbury at an expense of nearly £2,000 ("History 
of Newbury"). Kimber is still a Newbury name. Nicholas 
Kimber was mayor of Marlborough, Wilts, in 1711 (Waylen's 
"Marlborough "). In 1818 died Mr. John Kimber, an old farmer 
of Chailey, Sussex, who was noted for his expensive tastes in the 
purchase of costly books and scientific instruments (Lower's 

"Sussex") Kendrick is the name of an old Berkshire family 

of influence, now scantily represented in the county. The Kendricks 
played an important part in Reading history in the 16th and 17th 



BERKSHIRE. 75 

centuries, and in 1682 Sir "William Kendrick was high sheriff 
for the county (A. and Co.). 

L— Z. 

Lanfear is a name that was represented by De Lanfar, or 

De Lanfare, in London in the reign of Edward 1. (H. E,.) 

Lyfoed is the name of a Berkshire hamlet. Thomas Lyford was a 

Berkshire gentleman living in the reign of Henry VI. (CI.) The 

name of Napper may find its explanation in similar names that 
occur in the Hundred Rolls; in the 13th century John le 
Naper lived in Essex, and Jordan le Nappere in Oxfordshiie 

(H. R.) The name of Piatt was represented in the county 

250 years ago (A.) Tame is a name that was represented 

by De Tame in Bucks and Oxfordshire in the 13th century 

(H. R.). As De Thame, it occurs in Domesday The name of 

Tyrrell in one form and another was in early times much more 
common than it is at present. As Tyrel and Tirel it occurred in 
Norfolk, Cambridgeshii'e, Oxfordshire, and Devonshire in the 
reign of Edward I. (H. R.). In the 16th and 16th centuries the 
distinguished families of the Tyrrels of Bucks and the Tyrells 
of Suffolk seem to have been the two principal stocks. Those of 
Suffolk, who resided at Gipping, were descended from Sir John 
Tyrell of Heron, Essex, in the reign of Henry VI., and they claimed 
also to be the descendants of Sir Walter Tyrrell or Tiril, who 
accidentally shot William Rufus. The Tirrells or Terrells were a 
Heading family in the 17th and 18th centuries, and tilled the 
office of mayor in 1668, 1680, 1699, and 1712. The name is 
still in the town (Lipscomb's " Bucks," HoUingsworth's " Stow- 

market." Coate's "Reading") Waldron, a name also established 

in Wiltshii'e and Worcestershire, was a well-known name in Win- 
chester last century; ten mayors of that city between 1727 and 

1754 bore the name (Milner's "Winchester") The ancient 

family of the Vachells, of Colley and Warfield, is now but 
scantily represented ; during the 17th century the Vachells were 

important citizens of Reading (A. and Co.) Wilder is an 

old Reading name; William Wilder was mayor in 1651, and a 
second William Wilder held this office in 1714 (Co.). The name is 
still in the town. 



76 



HOiviES OF fa:\iily names. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 



r Clark 
1 Clarke 



Geneeai Names (30-40 counties). 



*Smith 



*Taylor 
*White 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Adams 




•Jones 




r Sanders 
^ Saunders 


*Brooks 




King 




*Chapinan 




•Morris 




•Stevens 


*Hill 




Rogers 




•Young 




Eegional Names 


[10-19 counties). 


Curtis (Aylesbury) 


^ r Paine 
I Payne 




•Eose 


Elliott 






•Stone 


Griffin (Aylesbury) 


•Perkins 




Williamson 


*Hawkins 




•Beeves 








DiSTEiCT Names 


(4-9 


counties). 


•Anderson 




•Franklin 




/Keen Henley-on- \ 
L Keene ^^ThameSjOxon' 


*Baldwin 




•Garrett 




*Bennett 




Gee 




•Kirby 


*Coates 




Goodman 




Mead 


Crook (Thame) 




•Greaves 




Mumford 


Crouch 




•Gough 




Nash 


r Dickens 
I Dickins 




Harper 




•Sharman 




Hedges 




•Townsend 


*East 




Higgins 






•Faulkner 




Hobbs 







BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 



CoTTNTY Names (2-3 counties). 



Batclielor 


Guy 




Puddepbatt 




Beeson 


*Ha-sves 




(Cliesham) 




Belcher 


'Healy 
'L Heley 




Rand 




Biggs 




*Keading 




Bliss 


Holt (Aylesbury) 


*Ridgway 




Dalton 


Judge 




Seymour 




Deverell 


J Lambourn 
L Lambiirn 




^ r Toovey 
L Tovey 




Podwell (Tliame) 






Eggleton 


Lines 




*Treadwell 




Gadsden 


Parrott (Aylesbury) 


*Weller 




G088 


Pitcher 




Whiting 




Gurney 


Priest 




this county). 




Pecuiiae Names (confined mostly to 




Belgrove 


Horwood 


(Tring) 


Tapping 




Boughton 


Ing 




Tattam 




Brazier 


Kingham 


(Ayles- 


Tofield 




Dancer (Winslow) 


hury) 




Tomes 




■ DarveU 
. Darvill 


Plaistowe 




Tompkins 




Purssell 




Varney 




Dover 


Eoads (Aylesbury) 


Viccars 




Dwight 


rSare 
1 Sear 




Warr (Buckingham) 


Edmans 




WiUison 




f Fountain 
L Fountaine 


Slocock 




"Wihner 




Stratford 




Wooster 




Ginger 


r Syratt 








Gomm 


^ Syrett 








Holdom 


L Sirett 









NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC BrCKINGHAM- 
SHIRE NAMES. 
(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy thefolloioing abbreviations : — 
H. R. indicates Hundred RoUs. 



Lips. 
Sp. 



w. 



„ Lipscomb's " Buckinghamshire." 

„ " Names of the Nobility, Gentry, and others who contri- 
buted to the defence of this country at the time of the 
Spanish Invasion in 1588 " (Brit. Mus., B 474). 
„ Willis's " Buckingham." 
Lower's " Patronymica Britannica " has been also employed. 



78 HOMES OF FA5IILY NAMES. 

A— F. 

Belcher is a name also found in Oxfordsliii'e and Berks. The 
mayor of CambridjOfe in 1732 was thus named (Carter's " Cam- 
bridgeshire ") Bliss also occurs in the counties of Oxford and 

Northampton, immediately adjacent. There was a John Bliss n 

Bucks as far back as the time of Edward I. (H. R.) Boughtox 

is a common name of places, especially in the eastern counties 

The Dancers of "Winslow and its vicinity are probably connected 
in their descent with the mayors of Buckingha,m in 1669, 1687, 

and 1693, all of whom bore the name of George Dancer (W.) 

The name of DaUvell or Darvill was to be found in the 
county in the 17th century. There was a Thomas Darvall, of 
Wendover, in 1656 (Lips.), and a William Darvell in Langley in 

1699 (Gyll's " Wraysbury ") The Deverells, who are also 

represented in Oxfordshire, possess an ancient Bucks name. 
There was a William de Deverell in the hundred of " Segelawe," 
in the reign of Henry III. (H. R.) ; and the Deverells were 
landed gentry in Swaubourne in the 17th and 18th centuries 

(Lips.) Fountain or Fountaine is another old Bucks name. 

John Fountaine, gent, of this county, contributed £25 to the 
fund collected for his country's defence at the time of the 
expected invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). The 
rector of Little Woolston in 1649 was also called John Fountaine. 
An old family of the name long resided in Stoke Hammond, 
several of the members being buried in the church between 1650 
and 1709 (Lips.) ; the name is still represented in that parish. 

G— H. 

The old family of the Gingers, of Hampden Parva, were 
numerously represented there two centuries ago, and probably had 
been established there long before, the registers previous to 1672 

having been lost (Lips.) The Gadsdens evidently came 

originally from the neighbouring county of Hertford, where there 

are places of the name. The surname also occurs in Beds 

Gomm is an ancient name in this part of England, and, as Gom, 
occurred in Cambridgeshire six centuries ago (H. R.). There was 
a James Gomme in Rowsham, Bucks, in 1 724 ; and another James 
Gomme, an eminent antiquarian, of High Wycombe, in this 
county, died in 1825. The wife of Sir William Maynard Gomme, 
K.C.B., who was himself probably of this stock, was buried at 
Stoke Poges in 1837 (Lips.) The name of Goss is now best 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 79 

represented m the Aylesbury district. In the 13th century 
Gosse was a common Bucks name, occurring in Stoke Goldington, 
Ravenstone, and in other parts of the county (H. E,.)....."The 
GuRNEYS are also established in the neighbouring counties of 
Beds and Herts : but Bucks has long been the prindpal home of 
the name. De Gurney, or De Gournay, or De Gorney, was the 
name of a powerful titled Bucks family that flourished during 
the 12th and 18th centuries. Stone- with - Bishopstone has 
been for many generations a residence' of the name. In 1470 a 
Gurney was buried in the church, and in 1620 a Gorney was also 
buried there ; w-hilst the name was still well represented in 
the locality at the end of last century. Two centuries ago 
some gentlemen of the name of Gurney owned property in 
Stewkley (Lips.). In the 13th century Norfolk was also noted 
for the number of Gurneys or Gumays there resident; and 
the name at that time was also well established in Somerset, in 

the west of England (H.R.) The Gol^ghs, of Steeple Barton, 

Oxfordshire, were one of the oldest landed families in that county 

(Wing's "Steeple Barton") Hedges is a name that has at 

present its principal home in Bucks, though it also occurs in the 
surrounding counties of Berks, Hertford, and Oxford. Last 
century a family of gentry bearing this name resided at Cub- 
Hngton, in Bucks, and there were then others of the name in 
Stewkley and Whitchurch (Lips.). The name still occurs in 

^*^^k^^^ HoRWOOD, which is a very old Bucks surname, being 

originally derived fi'om parishes thus called in the county, is found 
there as far back as the 1-lth century. During the last 200 
years there have been several of the name in Buckland (Lips.). 
The Horwoods are at present most numerous in the vicinity of 

'^^^^S Healt is a name that was represented last century in 

Leicestershire, particularly in Melton Mowbray and in the neic^h- 
bouring part of the county (Nichols' " Leicestershire "). In our 
own day it is mostly found in Bucks, and also in Lincolnshire 

There is a place thus called in Yorkshire Holdom is an ancient 

name that occurred in Norfolk in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) 

Holtom now occurs in Worcestershire The Holts, of Bucks 

are, for the most part, gathered together in and around Aylesbury.' 
The name occurred as Le Holt in the county six centuries ago, 
and also in the eastern counties of Norfolk, Essex, and K^nt 
(H. R.). Lancashire is also another gi-eat home of the name of 
Holt, which also extends into Cheshire, 



80 HO:HES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

I— P. 

Ing is an ancient clerical name in the county. Roger Inge 
was rector of Maid's Moreton in 1291 ; and John Inge was vicar 

of Stanton-Barry in 1425 (Lips.) The Kinghams of Aylesbury 

and its vicinity possess the name of a parish in the neighbouring 
county of Oxford; and the Lambourns, or Lamburiss, similarly 
derive their name from a town in the adjacent county of Berks, 
where representatives of the name still occur ; we find Lambourns 

also in Oxfordshire The name of Mumford, which is also to be 

found in Essex and Warwickshire, and in the distant county 
of Cornwall, occurred as De Mumford in Bucks in the 13th 
century. Simon de Mumford, or Manfort, then lived in Twyford 

(H. R.) The old Bucks county family of Plaistowe during the 

17th century owned much property in Wendover, Lee, and 
other places. Many of the family were buried at Wendover and 
Lee, from 1672 until the present century (Lips). There are 

places of the name in Essex, Kent, and Sussex Ayleslmry, or 

its vicinity, is the present home in Bucks of the name of Pareott. 
Joseph Parot, who was for fifty years principal land-steward of 
the Grenville family, died in 1810 (Lips.) (see under " Oxford- 
shire ") PuRSSELL is one of the oldest of Bucks names. From 

1350 to 1373, Robert de Pursele owned property in Warmsfcon 
and Haddenham ; and in the early part of the following century 
a family of Pursel or Pui'cel held property in Bierton. In 1606 
there was a John Pursell in Oving, and in 1634 there was a Roger 
Pursell in Padbury (Lips.). Edward Purcell was mayor of 
Buckingham in 1687 and 1697 (W.). During the early pai't of 
last century several of the name of Pursell or Purcell were buried 
in Burnham Church, including the family of Richard Pursell, 

gent (Lips.) Nash is another ancient Bucks name, probably 

derived originally from the township of that name in the county. 
Hugh atte {at or of) JSTash was the rector of Wexham in 1397 ; 
R. Nasshe owned land in Haddenham in 1487; and Thomas 
Nasshe possessed land in Kingsey in 1445 (Lips.). The name is 
now also found in Surrey and Herts, as well as in Gloucestershire. 

(/See under "Gloucestershire.") The origin of the name of 

PuDDEPHATT is also referred to under " Hertfordshire." Ches- 
ham, in Bucks, is the great home of the Puddephatts in our own 
time. Walter Podefat lived at "Tomb'ge," Bucks, in the 
13th century (H. R.). The name is probably a corruption of 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 81 

Pertever or Pettyplier, the name of mayors of Wycombe in the 
16th and 17th centuries (Langley's " Des borough Hundred"). 



R— Z. 

The name of Rand occurred in Lincolnshire 600 years ago 

(H. R.) The name of Sear or Sake has long been in the county. 

At the beginning of last century there was a family of Sare in 
Oving. Richard Seare, of Great Missenden, and previously of 
Hawridge Court, was high sheriff of Bucks in 1712 ; he evidently 
belonged to an old gentry family of Hawiidge two centuries ago 

(Lips.) The Setmours were a very old and distinguished 

historical Bucks and Wilts family Those who bear the name 

of Syratt, or Syrett, or Sirett, possess a name that was found in 
the county before the Nor man Conquest. Siret or Syred, a thane 
in the time of Edward Confessor and a " man of Earl Harold," 
owned the manor of Stoke Puges, whilst his retainers held land in 
Little Missenden. Siuert was a thane who at that time possessed 
land in Clifton Reynes (Lips.). Syryt was also a Norfolk name 
in the 1.3th century (H. R.). Coming to modern times, I should 
remark that the present representatives of the name in the county 
may be connected in their descent with Mr Thomas Sirett, who, 
whilst in the employment of Mr. Westcar, of Creslow, Whit- 
church, in 1811, was accidentally killed by a cow (Lips.) A 

family named Tattam has resided at North Marston since last 

century (Lips.) The name of Tompkins occurred in Soulbury in 

the 16th century. Nathaniel Tomkins, Esq., who married a Miss 
Waller in 1624, attained notoriety from his connection with the 
Waller plot ; Thomas Tomkins, chaplain to Archbishop Sheldon, 
was I'ector of Monks Risborough in 1671 ; John Tomkins was 
rector of Wolston-Parva in 1734; and in 1782, Henry Tompkins, 
Esq., of Weston Turville, was deputy-lieutenant of Bucks 

(Lips.) Cartwright Wilmek was rector of Ellesborough in 1686 

(Lips.). The Wilmers of London, who were merchants of last 
centuiy, were descended from the Wilmers of Northamptonshire ; 
they owned the manor of North Bemflet, Essex (Morant's 
" Essex "). The Wilmers of Sywell, Northamptonshire, in the 
17th centary, one of whom received the honour of knighthood, 
came, in the time of James I., from the Wilmers of Riton or 
Ryton, Warwickshire (Bridges' " Northamptonshire "). 

G 



82 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 






CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name denotes that, though charac- 
teristic of this countj, it is more relatively numerous 
elsewhere. 



Geneeai Names (30-40 counties). 



Brown 


Green (March) 


Smith 


r Clark 
L Clarke 


*HaU 


*Wilson (Wisbech) 


Johnson 


*Wright 




Common Names (20-29 counties] 


. ■ 


♦Carter (St. Ives) 


Mason 


Saunders 


*Chapman (Cambridge) *Moore (Cambridge) 


*Ward (Wisbech) 


EUis 


Palmer (Ely, Soham) 


*Watson 


*King 


Bead 






Eegioxal Names (10-19 counties). 


*Barrett 


*Marsh 


♦Reynolds (Cambridge) 


*Cross (Cambridge) Norman 


Eussell (Wisbech) 


*Day 


L Payne 




*Howard 






DiSTEiCT Names (4r-9 counties) 




* Bland 


^ r Hopkin 1 
*iHopkins;(Ely) 


Peck 


BuU 


Pigott (Cambridge) 


Christmas 


Kent 


Pollard 


*Coe 


*Lister 


Prior 


*Fitch 


Lucas 


r Tebbit 


*Gee 


*Mann (Soham) 


< Tibbett 


*Gifford 


Morton (March) 


LXibbit 


Godfrey (Wiebc 


ch) *Peacock 


Wall=« (Cambridge) 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 



83 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Ambrose (Cambrid^ 


je) Flanders (Ely) 


Nix 


Askew 


Golden 


Oakey 


Benton 


Graves (Cambridge) 


Papworth. 


Blunt 


Hawes (Sobam) 


Peek 


♦Collet 


Hopper (Whittlesey) 


Pentelow 


Crisp 


Kidman 


Searle 


Driver (Ely) 


Kisby 


*Wakelin 


Few 


Leouard (Soliam) 


Westley 



Pecttliae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Chivers (Cambridge) 
Clear (Royston) 
Collen (Soham) 
Coxall 

f Dimmock 

I Dimock 
Doggett (Cambridge) 
Elbourn (Royston) 
Frohock 
FuUard 



Fyson 

{Ground 
Grounds 
J Haggar 
I Hagger 

Hurry 

Ivatt (Cambridge) 

Jonas 

Maxwell 

Murfitt 

Mustill (St. Ives) 



Purkis 

Eiuston (Chatteris) 

SalUs (Ely) 

Shepperson 

Skeels 

Stockdale (Wisbech) 

Thoday 

Vawser (March) 

Wayman 

Yarrow 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC CAMBRIDGESHIEE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following ahhreviations : — 

Blom. indicates Blomefield's " Collectanea Cantabrigiensia." 
Carter „ Carter's " Cambridgeshire." 
Cooper „ Cooper's " Cambridge." 
H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 
Watson „ Watson's " Wisbech." 

G 2 



84 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

A— C. 

Blunt is an ancient English name that in the forms of Le Blnnt 

and Le Blund was represented in this county, as well as in Norfolk, 

Lincolnshii-e, Oxfordshire, and Wiltshire, in the 13th century (H.R.). 

It is now also established in Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, 

and Rutlandshire Coe is a characteristic East Anglian name, 

and reference will be found to it under " Norfolk," " Suffolk," 
and "Essex." It may, however, interest the Cambridgeshire Goes 
to learn that in 17C6, the wife of Henry Coe, shoemaker, of 
St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge, was safely delivered of two sons and 
two daughters ; the father, midwife, nurses, and sixteen gossips, 
went to the church in procession to attend the baptism, and were 
accompanied by " an incredible number of people " : three of the 
children died within twenty months, but the fourth was alive in 

1808 (Cooper) Collen is a name established in the Soham 

district. The name of De Collen occurred in Hunts in the 13th 

century (H. R.) Christmas is a name also found in Hunts, 

Surrey, and Hants. It is an ancient name in the eastern counties, 
and in the 13th century it was still established in the form 
of Cristemasse in Cambridgeshire and Hunts, and there were a 
few of the name in Essex (H. R.). In 1433 John Crystmasse was 

a gentleman of Morden-Steeple in this county (Carter) Crisp 

is an ancient East Anglian name. It occurred commonly in 
Cambridgeshire and Hunts in the loth century, Crysp being 
then a rare form of the name (H. R.). In Norfolk, where it is 
still established, it was represented as far back as the 14th 
century, and further reference will be found to it under that 
county. There was a gentleman of Connington, Cambridgeshire, 
bearing the name of Thomas Crispe in 1433 (Carter). However, 
in later times, an important family of Crispe established itself in 
Kent. The Crispes, of Quekes, in Birchinghon, Kent, who possessed 
the manor of Quekes in the 16th and 17th centuries, filled the 
office of high sherifE of Kent in the reigns of Henry VIII. and 
Elizabeth, and Nicholas Crispe of this family about those times 
received the honour of knighthood ; there were several branches 
of this family, of which that of West Ham, Essex, in the 17th 
century, was said to be one ; the Crispes of Quekes are said to 
have descended from an ancient family of Stanlake, Oxfordshire 
(Hasted's " Kent "), In the 17th centuiy a gentle family of Ci-isp 
resided at Marshfield, Gloucestershire (Bigland's " Gloucester- 
shire ). 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 85 

D— G. 

The DniMOCKS or Dimocks of this county possess the name of 
an ancient and distinguished family of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire. 
The Dymokes of Scrivelsby held the office of Champion of England 
from the time of Richard II. until the present centnry (Allen's 

"Lincolnshire") The name of Driver is well represented in 

the district of Ely. It is also established in Lancashire and 
Yorkshire. In the ] 7th century a gentle family of the name 
resided at Avening, Gloucestershire (Rudder's " Gloucestershire "). 
The DoGGETTS of Cambridge possess a name that has charac- 
terised the county since the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). Its 
early form is Doget. In 1500 John Dogget was provost of King's 
College, Cambridge (Blom.). Lower says that it is an old London 
name ; but Cambridgeshire is evidently its original home, as it 
was commonly represented there in the 13th century (H. R.). 
From Cambridgeshire the Doggetts have extended to adjacent 
counties. John Doggett was the registi'ar of Sudbuiy, Suffolk, in 

1658 (Whitley's " Sapcote ") Frohock was the name of a 

Cambridge alderman in 1688 (Cooper) and of the mayor in 1703 

(Blom.) Thomas Ground, of Whittlesea, was high sheriff in 

1790 ; and Thomas Grounds was one of the trustees of the public 
charities of March, near Wisbech, early this ceutuiy (Watson). 

The Godfreys have one of their principal homes in the east 

of England, in Cambridgeshire, Beds, Herts, Leicestershire, etc. ; 
and it is remarkable that six centuries ago the name in one form 
or another was still common in Cambridgeshire, and also occurred 
in the adjoining counties of Norfolk and Lincoln (H. R.). Wisbech 
is the residence of the name in this county. The Godfreys of 
the west of England are gathered together in the counties of 
Somerset and Gloucester. 

H— N. 

The Haggars or Haggers are probably connected in their 
descent with the Hagars, who were lords of the manor of Bourn 
in the 17th and 18th centuries (Carter). In the 13th century 
this name occurred as Hacgard in Suffolk, and as Hagha in 
Lincolnshire (H. R.) The Hoppers are at home in the Whit- 
tlesey district. Le Hopper was a Cambridgeshire surname in the 
reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Hurry is at present a Cambridge- 
shire name ; but a family of Urry resided in Lincoln in the 16th 



86. HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and 17tli centuries, members of Tvliich on three occasions filled 
the ofiBce of sheriff of the city (Stark's "Lincoln"). There was 
a Simon Urri in Oxfordshire in the 13th century (H. R.), {See 

Hampshire, under "Urry.") The Ivatts are now established 

in the Cambridge district. William Ivatt was churchwarden of 
Hardwick in the reign of Charles I. (Carter). The name of 
Ivette occurred in the adjoining county of Hunts in the 13th 

century (H. R.) LrCAS is a name established in various parts 

of England. It was represented in this county as well as in 

Norfolk in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The name of 

Mdstill has its present home in the St. Ives district on the 
borders of Cambridgeshire. The name of Mustel occurred in the 
hundred of Stowe in this county in the 13th century (H. R.). 

The mayors of Nottingham in 1617, 1630, and 1636, bore the 

name of Nix (Thoroton's " Notts ") ; and Nix was one of the early 
bishops of Norwich. This name occurred in Oxfordshire in the 
reign of Edward I. {See under " Sdkeey.") 

P— R. 

Papwobth is the name of parishes in Cambridgeshire and 
Hunts, and these are the two counties to which the surname is 

mostly confined The name of Peck is not only established in 

Cambridgeshire, but in the surrounding counties of Norfolk, 
Suffolk, and Beds, and also in Notts. Pick is the Lincolnshire 
form of the name, and Pigg is its form in Herts.* In the 
13th century Peck occurred in Lincolnshire, Hunts, and Bucks, 
and Pick, Picke, and Pik in Cambridgeshire, Oxfordshire, Wilts, 
and Shropshire (H. R.). Peck was the name of the church- 
warden of Long-Stow, Cambridgeshire, in 1643 (Carter) Peek 

is evidently in most cases another form of Peck or Pick. It occurs 
as such also in Devonshire, and as Peake in Norfolk and Stafford- 
shire. The Peekes were a Cambridge family 200 years ago 
(Blom.), Peke was a Cambridgeshire and a Wiltshire name 
in the 13th century (H. R.) Pigott is a name also repre- 
sented by Piggott in Herts, Beds, and Berks, in which last county 
Pigot also occurs. In the 13th century Pikot was a common 
name in Cambridgeshire, and Pigot and Pieot were frequent in 

* See remarks vinder Pigg in "Hertfordshire." 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 87 

Lincolnshire, whilst Pigot also occurred in Shropshire. Lower 
says that the Pigotts of Edgmond, Salop, came from Prestbury, 
Cheshii'e, in the 14th century. According to the same autho- 
rity Picot occurred as a personal name in Domesday times in 
Cambridgeshire and Hants. There was a John Pigot, gent., of 
Aviton, Cambridgeshire, in 1443 (Carter). At present the Pigotts 

of this county have their home in and around Cambridge 

Pollard is a name established in different parts of England. It 
has been in Cambridgeshire for several centuries, and was nume- 
rous in the county in the reign of Edward I., when there were 
also a few of the name in Lincolnshire, Kent, and Essex (H. R.). 

There is a memorial to Mary Purkis in "Wisbech church, 

bearing the date of 1734 (Watson). Purkace was a Lincolnshii^e 

name in the 13th century (H. R.) The Rustons are mostly 

found around Chatteris. They bear the name of a IS'orfolk parish. 
There was a De Ruston residing in Cambridgeshire 600 years 
ago (H. R.). 

S— Z. 

The Seaeles have long been a Cambridge family. Edward 
Searle was a common councillor in 1749 (Carter), and Heniy 
Serle was mayor in 1562 (Blom.). Serle was a Cambridgeshire 
name as far hack as the 13.th century, when it was also re- 
presented in Oxfordshire and Wiltshire (H. R.). The Searles 

have also an independent home in Cornwall and Devon 

Vawseb is a name well represented in and around March, where 
it has probably been established for a considerable time. Early 
this century Robert Vawser was one of the trustees of the March 

public charities (Watson) Wallis, a name established in 

various parts of England, has its home in this county in and 
around Cambridge, where it has long been known. The mayor 
in 1596 and an alderman in 1611 bore this name (Cooper). 



HOMES OF FA:\ULY NAMES. 



CHESHIRE. 



Note. — The asterisk indicates that, thongli characteristic of this 
county, the name is more relatively numerous elsewhere. The 
places in brackets are the districts in which a name is most 
frequent, and in some cases the district extends into the next 
county. 

Geneeal Names (30-40 counties). 

Johnson *Taylor 

*Eobin«on Wright 



J Bailey 
I Bayley 

Carter 

Cooper (Macclesfield) 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

Jackson *iIason 

r Lea (Middlewich, Moore 



< Nantwich) 
LLee (Chester) 



*Wood 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 
Barratt (Sandbach) *Howard Sutton 



Dawson 
Ford 



Newton 
*Shaw 



♦Wilkinson 
Williamson 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



Barber 

Biirlow 
*Beard 

Booth 

Buckley (Manchester) 
♦Bullock (Macclesfield, 
Stockport) 

Burgess 

Clayton (Stockport) 

Dale 
*Dodd 

Eaton 

Faulkner (Whitchurch) 
♦Fryer 



♦Gee 

Hewitt 

Holland (Northwich) 

Horton (Northwich) 

Latham 
f Leach 
I Leech (Knutsford) 

Lightfoot (Chester) 

Lomas 

Lowe 

Maddock (Chester) 

Massey 
/ Moreton (Northwich) 
L Morton 



Nixon 
♦Pickering 

Ivutter (Tarporley) 

Slack (Macclesfield) 
♦Slater 
^ r Steel 
1 Steele 

♦Stubbs (Knutsford) 
♦Wade 

Wainwriglit 
♦Whittaker 
♦Willis 
♦Woolley 

Worthington 



CHESHIRE. 



89 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Bancroft 

Beckett 

Beecli 
*Billington 

Bostock (Cougleton) 

Brereton 

Brocklehurst (Stock- 
port) 
r Challoner 
L Challiner 

Cheetham 
r Cliff 
l Cliffe 
*Cookson 

Comes (Nantwich) 

Darbyshire 

Darlington (Chester) 

Drink water 



Fidler (Stockport) 
*Fitton 

Frith (Northwich) 

Garner 
*Garnett 

Gerrard 
*Heathcote 

Hitch in 

Hough 

Hulme 
*Kelsall 

Lawton 

Leigh 
J Neild 
L Nield 

Newport 

Ollerenshaw 
(Stockport) 



Percival 

Piatt (Knutsford) 
*Eigby 

Eoyle 

Swindells (Stockport) 
r Thomason 
I Thomasson (Nant- 
wich) 
/ Thorley 
I Thornley 

Venables 
*Vernon (Nantwich) 
^ rWalley 
L Whalley 

Warburton 

Windsor 

Worth (Crewe) 



Peculiae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Acton 
Adshead 
All man 
Ankers 
Ardern 
Astbury 
Aston 
Basford 

Baskerrille (Chelford) 
Basnett 

Bebbington (Nantwich) 
Birtles 
Blackshaw 
Boffey (Nantwich) 
Bolshaw 

Bracegirdle (Knntsford) 
Braddock (Maccles- 
field) 
Broadhurst 
Broster 
Callwood 
Cash 
Chesters 



Done 


Hopley 


Dooley 


Houlbrook 


Dutton (Nantwich) 


Huxley 


Eden 


JefPs 


Erlam 


Jepson 


Etchells (Macclesfield) 


Kennerley 


Furber (Nantwich) 


Kinsey 


Gallimore 


Leah 


Gleave (Northwich) 


Leather 


r Goddier 
L Goodier 


Littler 


Major 


Gresty 


Marsland (Manchester) 


Hankey 


r Minshall 
I Minshull 


/ Hassall 
L Hassell 


Mottershead 


Henshall 
Hickson 


fMounfield 1 /^ ^ 
< Y (Crewe) 
I Mount field >• ^ 


r Hockenhall -i 


Mullock 


j Hockenhull U^f^^^*: 
l Hocknell J '''"'^ 


Newall 
Noden 


Hollinshead (Middle- 


Norbury 


wieh) 


Oakes 


Hooley 


Okel 



90 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Oulton 


Siddorn 


Tricketfc 


Pimlott 


Snelson 


Trueman (Macclesfield) 


Pownall 


Sproston (Nantwich) 


Urmston 


Priestner (Altrincham) 


Stelfox 


Wheelton (Maccles- 


Katlibone 


Stockton 


field) 


Eavenscroft 


Snmmerfield 


Whitelegg 


Eowliugson 


Swinton 


Whitlow 


Euscoe 


Tapley 


Witter 


Sandbach 


Thompstone (Maccles- 


Woodall 


Scrngg 


field) 


' Woollam 
\ WooUams 


Sheen 


Thornhill (Crewe) 


Shone (Whitchurch) 


Tickle 


Wych 


Shore 


Timperley (Manchester) Yarwood 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTEEISTIC CHESHIEE 

NAMES. 

(The names are aiTanged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Avthorities indicated hy the following ahhreviations : — 
E. indicates Earwaker's " East Cheshire." 



H. 

H.E. 

M. 

O. 

Y. 

Sp. 



Hemingway's " Chester." 
Hundred EoUs. 

Mortimer's " Hundred of Wirral." 
Ormerod's " Cheshire." 
Yates' " Congleton." 

" Contributors to the Defence of this Country at the time of 
the Spanish Invasion in 1588 " (Brit. Mus., B- 474). 



A— B. 

Tbe Actons, who are common in east Cheshire, take their 

name from a township in the county The Adsheads oi 

Adsheds were established in Prestbury parish during the 16th 
and 17th centuries (E.) The name of Ankers was repre- 



CHESHIRE. 91 

sented by Anker iu Titherington in the reign of Edward III. (E.). 

There is a river called Anker in north-east Warwickshire 

Alderset, an old Chester municipal name, is now rare in the 
county. Several of the mayors and sheriffs of this city dur- 
ing the 16th and I7fch centuries bore the name (H.) The 

Ardeenes are a very old and distinguished Cheshire family 
dating back to the 13th century : there are several branches, the 
Ardernes of Aldford, Alvauley, and Harden, being the main stock 
(0.). The name of De Ardern or De Arderne was in the 13th 
century dispersed over many parts of England, occurring in 
Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Warwickshire, Leicestershire, Oxfordshire, 

Essex, and Somerset (H. R.) The Cheshire Astons and 

AsTBURTS derived their names from parishes in the county : two 
ancient families, thus named, carried their descent back to the 

12th and 14tli centuries respectively (0.) The Cheshire 

Ba\crofts have their principal homes in Cheadle, Stockport, and 
Marple, in which last place they have held land since the time of 
Elizabeth; in Cheadle, Bancroft is an ancient name, the rector of 
the parish in 1449 being thus called ; there were yeomen of 
the name there in the 17th century (E.), The Bancrofts are 
also established in Derbyshire and the West Riding. (See under 

"Derbyshire ") The Basfords take the name of a township in 

the county A branch of the very ancient and distinguished 

family of Baskerville, which claims royal descent, possessed 
the manor of Old Withrington from the 13th to the 18th 
century (0.). The Herefordshire stock, members of which were 
high sheriffs of that county in the 15th and 16th centuries, 
carries its pedigree back to the reign of Edward I. (Dun- 
cumb's "Herefordshire"). The Baskervilles were repre- 
sented in Shropshire in the 13th century (H. R.). In 
Staffordshire the name has been corrupted to Baskeyfield. In 
Cheshire the Baskervilles are now mostly found in the Chelford 

district William Birch Basnett, Esq., resided at Llanwarne, 

Herefordshii-e, about 1770 (Duncumb's " Herefordshire ") : Will. 
Basnet, the faithful servant of President Bradshawe who con- 
demned Charles I., and presumably a Stockport, or at least a 
Cheshire man, received £30 according to his master's will (E.) 

The BebbixCiTOXS derived their name from a Cheshire parish. 

The ancient family of De Bebington held the manor of that name 
for several generations up to the time of Richard II. ; a younger 
branch settled at Nantwich, and one of its members lost six sons 



92 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

on the field of Flodden in 1513 (M.). The Bebbingtons Have still 
their principal home in the Nantwich district, where they are 

numerously represented Beckett is an old name in the county. 

Captain George Becket, of Nantwich, was born in 1644. The Rev. 
George Becket was vicar of Eastham in the reign of Charles II. 

(0.). There are also Becketts in Norfolk and Notts Bietles 

is the name of a Cheshire township, with which an ancient family 
of the name was connected as far back as the reign of Edward I. 

(0.) The Booths, of whom there are many distinct and ancient 

families, those of Dunham, Mollington, Mottram, TAvemlow, etc., 
have played a great part in the history of the county (0.). The 
name is also numerous in Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and the West 

Riding The BosTOCKS, who are best represented in the Congle- 

ton district, derive their name from a Cheshire township. The 
ancient family of Bostock, that held the manor of the same name 
during the 15th century, bvanched off into different lines which 
were scattered over the county in the ranks of the minor gentry 
and substantial yeomen (0.). There was a gentle family of 
the name in Farndon during the 17th century (Coll. Top. et 

Gen.) The Bracegirdles were an old Cbeadle family, one of 

the members being rector of Billing, Northamptonshire, in the 
reign of Elizabeth ; in 1749, Thomas Bracegirdle was a Cheadle 
churchwarden (E.). The name is at present most at home in the 

Knutsford district, but is still to be found in Cheadle The 

very ancient and distinguished family of Brereton held the 
Brereton estates in the place of that name from the 13th to the 

18th century (0.). (See under "Shropshire.") The Broad- 

HDRSTS have long been inhabitants of Prestbury and Gawsworth 

(E.) The Brosters were long connected with Macclesfield and 

the neighbouring township of Bosley. The mayors of Maccles- 
field in 1543, 1587, and 1608, bore this name. John Broster was 
a Bosley yeoman in 1615 (E.). The Brosters were mayors of 
Chester in 1662, 1752, and 1791, the mayor in 1791 being Peter 

Broster (H.) The Buckleys of Cheshire have been for probably 

200 years in the parish of Mottram-in-Longdendale (E.). The name 
is at present best represented on and near the Lancashire border 
in the vicinity of Manchester, but it is also established in the 
counties of Derby, Lancashire, Stafford, Worcester, and in the; 
West Riding. 



CHESHIRE. 93 



C— F. 



The family of Cash or Cashe was represented in Gawsworth 
in the middle of the 15th century. The name was established in 
Wilmslow at a later date (E.). In the West Riding the name 

takes the form of Cass The name of Chaloxer or Challiner 

in different forms has long characterised this part of England. It 
is now best represented in Cheshire and Staifordsbire. Last 
century it was a common Derbyshire name, as, for insta;ice, 
in Brimington (Glover's " Derbyshire.") In the loth century, 
as Le Chalouner, Le Chaluner, and Le Chalunner, it occurred iu 

Derbyshire, Shropshire, and Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The 

ancient and very distinguished family of Done possessed the manor 
of Utkinton from the time of King John to the reign of Clmrles I. ; 

it was afterwards established at Flaxyards and D addon (0.) 

Stockport was long, and is yet, the home of the Dooleys (E.) 

The Drinkwaters* have their pi'incipal home in Cheshire; but 
they are also established in Derbyshire and Gloucestershire. Peter 
Drinkwater was a Chester alderman in 1631 (0.). There was 
a John Drinkewat in Shropshire in the 13tli century (H. R.). 

(See under "Oxfordshire.") The Dottoxs of Dutton were a 

very old and distinguished family, and were associated with the 
township of that name from the time of William the Conqueror to 
the reign of Charles II. (0.). John and Rowland Dutton, evidently 
of this family, were two Cheshire gentlemen who contributed £25 
a-piece to the Spanish Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.). The Duttons 

are now numerous in the Nantwich district The Cheshire 

Eatons take their name from townships of the name in the county. 
The Eatons of Eaton, a very old and distinguished family, are 

probably the parent stock (O.) The Erlams evidently hailed 

originally from Irlam, a village in Lancashire Etchells is the 

name of a Cheshire township Fitton, once a very frequent 

Cheshire name, is now more numerous in Lancashire. The Fittons 
of Gawsworth carry their pedigree back to the 14th century (E.). 

(See under "Lancashire.") The Fdrbers have their home 

in the Nantwich district. In the form of Le Farbur the name 
occurred in Northumberland, Oxfordshire, and Cambridgeshire 
iu the 13th century (H. R.) Drakeford is one of those 

* Camden, writing 300 years ago, explained Drinkwater a» a corruption of 
Derwentwater. 



94 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Cheshire names which are now rare in the county. Several of the 
mayors of Congleton in the 17th century bore this name (Y.). 



G-K. 

Marton has long been the home of the Gallimokes (E.) 

The Gerrards were an ancient and titled Cheshire family. The 
Lords Gerard of Gerards Bromley from the 16th to the 18th 
century were descended from the Gerards of Ince in Lancashire ; 
the Gerards of Kingsley and Crewood came from Hawarden in 
riintshire in the time of Edward I. [0.) (See under " Lancashire "). 

The ancient family of Gleave or Gleyve held a freehold in 

High Legh from the 13th to the 17th century ; one of the family, 
William Gleave, a London alderman, bequeathed £600 in 1665 
to the parish of Woodchurch for the building and endowment 
of a school (0. and M.). The Cleaves are at present at home 

in the Northwich district The name of Goddier or Goodier 

has long been in the county. In 1525, James Goodier of Barnston 
gave a sum of money for the purchase of 20 yoke of oxen for the 
use of the poor of "Woodchurch (0.). The name was represented 
in Northenden early in the 16th century, and Wilmslow and 

Etchells have also been among its principal homes (E.) The 

name of Hankey was represented in Churton in the beginning of 

the 16th century (E.) The ancient family of Hassall or 

Hassell possessed the lordship of the manor of the name as far 
back as the reign of Edward II. ; in later times a branch has 

established itself in N'antwich (0.) Henshall was the name of 

a tenant at Bramhall in the reign of Charles I. (E.). Hensall is 

a township in the West Riding The Hockenhulls or Hocken- 

HALLS, an ancient knightly family, were lords of the manor of 
Hockenhull from the reign of Henry III. to the beginning of 
last century, when they removed to Shotwick (0.). Richard 
Hockenel was sheriff of Chester in 1491 (H.). The name, which 
is sometimes contracted to Hocknell, is now best represented in 

the Nantwich district Cheshire is the great home of the 

HoLLAN'DS, who are especially numerous in the Northwich district. 
The name occurs in several parts of England, as in Staffordshire, 
Worcestershire, Oxfordshire, Notts, etc., and in all the east coast 
counties from Lincolnshire to Kent; in the last-named county 
it takes the form of Hollands. A gentle family of Holland that 



CHESHIRE. 95 

resided at Denton, Lancashire, in the 16tli and 17tli centuries, 
owned property in Cheshire, and some of them in the reign of 
Charles II. were buried at Nether Peover (0.). (See under 
"Kent.") Holland is the name of parishes and districts in 
Lincolnshii'e and Essex, and Hoyland of parishes and townships 
in the West Riding. De Hovland and De Hoylaund were 

common Lincolnshire surnames in the 13th century (H. R.) 

The HoLLiNSHEDS, who were in possession of Hollinshed, an estate 
in Sutton, from the 13th to the 16th century, are evidently the 
principal family stock (0.). The present Holhnsheads are most 

numerous in the Middlewich district Randle, son of Mr. John 

HoPLEY of Farndon, was baptized in the parish church in 1790 
(Coll. Top. et Gen.). Samuel Hopley, poet, of Duckington and 
Malpas, "left this life in hope of a better" in 1769 (0.), and 
the name is still in the district The Hoolets were a Maccles- 
field family last century, John Hooley being mayor of that town 
in 1748 (E.). The name is still, or was very recently, in the town. 
Hoole is the name of places in Cheshire, Lancashire, and York- 
shire. Hooley Hill is a village in south-east Lancashire The 

Cheshire Hortons take their name from a toAvnship in the county. 

They are best represented in the Northwich district The 

Cheshire Hulmes take their name from a parish in the county 

(See under "Lancashire") The ancient family of Huxley 

owned the manor of Huxley during the 13th and 14th centuries 

(0.) The Kelsalls of Cheshire take their name from villages 

in the county. A family of Kelsall resided at Bradshaw Hall, 
Cheadle, from 1550 to 1817 (0.). (See under "Lancashire") 

The KiNSEYS possessed part of the manor of Blackden from 

the 16th to the present century (0.) Amongst old Cheshire 

names now rai-e in the county are those of Gamul, Glegg, and 
Ince. The Gamuls were mayors of Chester during the 16th and 
17th centuries (H.). The Gleggs of Gayton were an ancient and 
distinguished family, now mostly represented amongst the gentry 
(M.). The Inces, who derived their name from the Cheshire 
parish, were mayors of Chester in the 17th century (H.). 

L— M. 

The Lathams are a very old and distinguished Cheshire 
and Lancashire family, that took its name from Lathom in 
Lancashire. Their Cheshire home was at Astbui-y from the 



96 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

14fch to the 16th ceotury; afterwards they resided at Con- 
gleton (O.). For six centuries they presided with little inter- 

raptiou over the civil government of Lancashire (Lower) 

Lawtox is a Cheshire parish which gave its name to an ancient 

family in the county (E. or 0.) Samuel Leah was an alderman 

of Macclesfield in 1688 (E.) The Leighs or Leghs are old and 

often distinguished Cheshire families that carry their pedigrees 
several centuries back ; amongst the principal stocks are those of 
Lyme, Adlington, and High Leigh (0.). The Leghs of Lyme are 
connected with those of Haydock in Lancashire, an ancient 
knightly family. (See under " Lancashire.") High Leigh and 

Little Leigh are Cheshire villages The Littlers possessed 

Wallerscote Manor in the IGth century; John Littler was 
mayor of Chester in 1603, and the name is still in the city ; the 
name of Litler was represented in Tarven at the beginning of the 

17tli century (0.) A family of Lowe has been settled in 

Upton for several hundred years (M.) Malbon, a name now 

rare in the county, was the name of several mayor.s of Congleton 
between 1685 and 1720 (Y.), and there have been Malbons in the 

town in the present generation Cheadle has long been the 

home of the Marslands; there was a Stockport family of this 
name last century (E.). At present the name is established on and 
near the Lancashire border in the neighbourhood of Manchester, 

The Masseys have their principal home in Cheshire, whence 

they have spread to the neighbouring counties. There are many 
families, often distinct, as, for instance, the Masseys of Grafton, 
Poole, Backford, Puddington, Sale, etc., who carry their pedigrees 
back three centuries and moi'e (0.). The name of Massey is 
frequent in the list of the mayors and sheriffs of Chester from the 
loth to the 19th century (H.). 

The Cheshire Mortons take their names from townships in 

the county. An ancient family of the name lived in the county. 

MiNSHULL is the name of parishes and townships in Cheshire. 

The Minshulls of Minshull were an influential family as far back 
as the time of Edward IV. (M. and 0.). Geffrie Minshull of this 
county contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada fund in 1588 
(Sp.) John Minshull was the name of the mayor of Chester in 
1657 and 1711 (H.), and the name is still in that city. Minshall 

is also a common form of the name The parent stock of 

the Mottersheads took its name from the family estate in Mot- 
tram St. Andrew in the 13th century : branches subsequently 



CHESHIRE. 97 

settled in Prestbury and Macclesfield (E.), in which last locality 

the name is now mostly found The Mullocks possess an 

ancient name, which in the form of Mulloc occurred in Cambridge- 
shire in the 13th century (H. R.). 

N— R. 

The Newalls take their name from Newhall a Cheshire town- 
ship Hugh NODEN was a merchant taylor of London to whom 

James II. granted land in Bermuda (Hotten's "American Emi- 
grants") The NoBBURTS, who possess the name of a Cheshii-e 

township, have principally been established in Alderley parish (E.) 

Oakes is an old Cheshire name. Its chief homes are in 

Marton and Siddington (E.) The manor and township of 

Oulton gave a name to some ancient Cheshire families (0.). 
Oulton was the name of the mayor of Chester in 1665, 1686, 

and 1700 (H.) Prestbury and Marple were the principal 

homes of the Pimlotts- in the 17th and 18th centuries (E.), 
and Prestbury still has the name. Pimblett is the present 
Lancashire form of the name. However, during the first half of 
last century a family of Pimlot owned the house .qnd demesne of 

Barcroft, Lancashire (Whitaker's "Whalley") The Pownalls 

have long been gathered together in the parish of Wilmslow, which 
contains Pownall Hall and its demesne, whence the ancient family 
of Pownall of the 18th century derived its name (E. and O.) 

There were Rathbones in Pi^estbury 200 years ago (E.). 

Richard Rathbone was mayor of Chester in 1598, and Thomas 
Rathbone was sheriff of that city in 1790 (H.) The Ravens- 
crofts have assumed the name of a Cheshii-e township The 

RoYLES were in the parish of Prestbury in the l6th century (E.). 
Ryle was the name of a very ancient Stockport family ; Ryles 
was the name of a family that held the Styall estate, Wilmslow, 
in the 16th century (O.). Royle is still a Prestbury and a 

Stockport name. {See under " Lancashire ") Rutter or Roter, 

is the name of an ancient and influential family of Kingsley, 
where they owned considerable estates from the 13th to the 
17th century (0.). The name of Rutter is now best repre- 
sented amongst the farmers around Tarporley, which is only some 
seven or eight miles fi"om Kingsley, so that we may repeat the 
remark made by Ormerod about 70 years ago " that the descendants 
are still living {as yeomen) and day labourers within the precincts 

H 



98 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

of the feudal power of their ancestors." The name is also 
eslablished in the counties of Northumberland, Durham, and 
Lincoln, and in the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire. As 
Rotar, Rotur, and Ruter, often preceded by " Le," it occurred in 
Shropshire, Oxfordshire, Hertfordshire, and in other counties in 
the 13th century (H. R.). Rutter is the old German word for 
a soldier (L.). 



S— T. 

The township of Sandbach gave its name to an ancient Cheshire 
family which floui'ished up to the 13th centui-y (O.). Richard 

Sandbach was curate of Congleton in 1772 (Y) John Scragg 

was mayor of Congleton in 1579 (Y.). In 1624 there was a Thomas 

Scragge of Wilmslow and Withington (E.) The name of Shonk 

has its present home in the Whitchurch district. Robert Shone 

was sheriff' of Chester in 1676 (H.) George Shore was one of 

the Royalist delinquents of Macclesfield who were fined or had 

their properties sequestrated in the time of Cromwell (E.) The 

present Slacks of this county have their principal home in the 
Macclesfield district. In 1662 Nicholas Slack held an estate 
called Dunge in Kettleshulme ; Mr. Hewitt Slack was a Stockpoi-t 
surgeon in the first half of last century (E.). The Slacks are also 
established in Derbyshire, Cumbeiland, Staffordshire, and Notts, 
and further reference will be found to them under one or more of 
those counties. This is an ancient name ; it designates the site of 
a Saxon royal residence in the north division of the West Riding, 
and as a surname it was represented by Adam Slacli in Cambridge- 
shirs in the time of Edward I. (H. R.) Snelson, a Cheshire 

township, gave its name to an ancient family which held land 

there in the 14th century (E.) The Sprostons derived their 

name from a township in the county. Their present home is 
in the Nantwich district. Robert Sproston was mayor of Chester 

in 1638 (H.) The Stocktons take their name from a Cheshire 

township The name of Swindklls in this county has mostly 

been confined to Stockport parish, and especially to the townships 
of Marple and Disley, from the reign of Henry VIII. to the present 
day ; Swindells wastlie name of a sergeant in Colonel Bradshawe's 
regiment (raised in tlie Macclesfield Hundred) at the battle of 
Worcester in 1651 (E.). The name of Swindell is characteristic of 
Derbyshire, and both varieties occur in the intermediate county of 



CHESHIRE. 99 

Stafford SwiNTON is the name of a town both in Lancashire 

and Yorkshire Amongst the old names now rare in the 

county is that of Snead or Snetd. During the 15th and 16th 
centuries there was a Chester family of this name, members of 
which frequently filled the office of mayor and also represented the 

city in Parliament (H.) Taplet is another form of Tabley, the 

name of Cheshire townships. There was an ancient family of the 

name of Tabley (0.) The Tickles probably derived their name 

from Tickhill, a town in the West Riding. Richard de Tickhill 
was bailiff of York in 1325, and William Tickill filled the same 
office in 1379 (Drake's " Eboracum "). In the 13th century 
there were persons of the name of De Tikil or De Tichil in Notts 

(H. R.) The TiMPERLEYs, who are now established on and near 

the Lancashire border in the vicinity of Manchester, derive their 
name from the neighbouring township of Timperley. They were 

long resident in Cheadle (E.) Trickett is an ancient name. As 

Triket it was repi*esented in the 13th century in Bedfordshire 

and Norfolk (H. R.) Throppe is one of those old Cheshire names 

that are now rare in the county. Some of the maj^ors of Chester 
bore the name in the 17th century (H.). 

U— Z. 

The Urmstons, who derived their name from a Lancashire 
township, owned a small estate in Wilmslow during the 16th 
and 17th centuries; Geoffrey Urmeston, gent., possessed Winkle 

Grange in Winkle in the reign of Elizabeth (E.) The ancient 

and notable family of Venarles is now established, as it has been 
for ages, in Cheshire and Shropshire, and it also occurs in North 
Wales. The parent stock seems to be that of Kinderton in 
Cheshire, of which the family possessed the lordship from the time 
of William the Conqueror to the end of the 17th century; Gilbert 
de Venables was the Norman founder of this family (0.). The 
Shropshire representatives were probably derived originally from 
the Cheshire stock. Thomas Venables was a Cheshire gentleman 
who contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Sp.). 

(See under " Shropshire ") The Warburtons derived their 

name from the Cheshire parish. Warburton is one of the most 
frequent of characteristic Cheshire names. One of the families 
carries its pedigree back to the times of Edward VI. (0.). In the list 
of Cheshire contributors to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 we 

H 2 



ItO HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

find the name of Peter Warburton for £21, and that of the Ladie 
Warburton for £25 (Sp.)- Probably the Lancashire Warburtons 
hailed originally from Cheshire. John Warburton, the antiquary 
and Somerset Herald, who died in 1759, was born at Bury in 

Lancashire (" Baines' "Lancashire") The Whallets and the 

Wallets evidently derive their name from the Lancashire parish 

of Whalley, and the Cheshire township of Whaley The name 

of Whitelegg has been repi'esented in Northenden ever since the 

reign of Henry VIII. ; it is also an old Cheadle name (E.) 

The ancient family of Worth, which derived its name from the 
village of Worth, owned estates in Titherington from the 14th to 

the 17th century (E.) The Worths of this county are now best 

represented in the Crewe district. The name is also established in 
Lincolnshire. There are villages thus called in Kent and Sussex. 

The WoRTHixGTONS, who possess the name of a Lancashire 

township, belong to an old and wide-.spread Cheshire family. They 
have been represented in Xorthenden for nearly three centuries 
(E.). The Lancashire Worthingtons have long been associated 
with Manchester and its vicinity. Dr. AVorthington, a noted 
divine of the 17th century, was born in Manchester in 1G17; 
Samuel Worthington, Esq., was a Salford boroughreeve in 1750 

(Baines' "Lancashire") Wtch is a very old and a sometimes 

distinguished Cheshire name. The original family of Wyche 
owned property in Davenham from the 14th to the IGth century, 
when it came into possession of estates in Alderley, where the 
family found a home until the middle of last century, and their 
descendants continue to reside in the neighbourhood as small 
farmers and farm labourers (E.). Wyche is the name of parishes 

in Worcestershire Vardon is an old Congleton name which is 

now rare in the county. Several of the mayors of Congleton 
during last century bore this name (Y.). 



CORNWALL. 



101 



CORNWALL. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name indicates that, though it is 
characteristic of this county, the name is more numerous 
elsewhere. The names of places in brackets refer to the 
districts where the surname is most common, and in some 
cases a district mav be in two counties. 



General Names (30-40 counties). 
♦Harris Martin 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Andrew 
f Bennett 
L Bennetts (Penzance) 

Chapman 
*HiU 
*James 



Matthews 
r Michel! (Hayle and 
< Grrampound Road) 
L Mitchell (Truro) 

Pliillips 

Reed 



. '^v./W'- 



Roberts (Helston and 

Penzance) 
Rogers (Helston and 

West Connvall) 
Stephens 
Williams 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Gilbert 


May 


Richards 


Harrer 


NichoHs 


r Semmens (Penzance) 
L Simmons (Redruth) 


r Jenkin 
L Jenkins 


Oliver 


♦Osborne 


Symons 


♦Knight 


Pearce 


Thomas (Helston and 


♦Lawrence 


♦Perry 


Penzance) 


♦Marshall 


Reynolds 





District Names (4-9 counties). 



Arthur (Grampound 


Cock 


Road) 


Daniel 


ItafJ.'-C-R'^'^""^) 


Davey 


Blake (Wadebridge) 
Bowden 


/Daw 
I Dawe 


lircwer 


♦Dennis 



♦GiU (Truro) 

Goodman 
♦Hancock 

Hellyar 

Hicks 
♦Hoope)' (Liskeard) 



102 



ho:mes of family names. 



r Jeffery 

L Jeffrey 




Pollard 


*Vincent 




Pryor (Helston) 


*Walli8 


Jolms 




Row (Penryn) 


Warne 


*Kent 




Eowe (Helston and 


r Wilcock 


Key (Wadebridge) 


West Cornwall) * 


< Wilcocks 


Mumford (S 


3illy) 


Sampson 


Lwillcocks, etc. 


r Parkin 
L Parkyn 




Sargent (Liskeard) 


Woodcock (Scilly) 




\jL/V\/^r.^^y^ 








^ AA^v-V ^--^^^^ 








County Names (2-3 coimties) 




Bassett 




Hitchins 


*Prowse (Penzance) 


*Batten 




r Hocken 


Quick (Penzance) 


Best 




-< Hoekin 


Raby (Liskeard) 


Blewett 




L Hocking (Helston) 


Roach 


Blight 




j Honey 


Robins 


Box 




rHosken 


Searle (Grampound 


Bray 




-< Hoskin 


Road) 


Broad (Liskeard) 


LHosking (Penzance) 


Sleeman 


♦Cann 




Jewell 


Snell (Liskeard) 


Cory 




Kelly 


Spear 


Creber 




*Langdon 


Spry 


Downing 




Lyne 


Uglow 


*Ede 




*Maynard 


Varcoe (St. Austell) 


GlanTiUe(Gi 


ampound *iVortlicott 


Veal 

".Veale 


Eoad) 




Northey 


Grills 




Parnell 


Willoughby 


*Haslam 




Paull 


*Wills 


Hendv (Helston) 


*Prout 


Wise 











Pecttliar Names (mostly confined to this county). 



Benny 
r Berriman 
LBerryman (Hale) 

Bice 

Biddick 

Blarney (Grampound 
Road) 

Boaden (Helston) 

Boase 

Bolitho 



Borlase 

Brendon 

Brenton 

Budge 

Bullmore 

Bunt 

Burnard 

Cardell (St. Columb) 

Carlyon (Helston) 

Came 



Carveth 

Cawrse (Liskeard) 

Chenoweth 

Clemow 
f Clyma 
L Clymo 
*cJad 
r Cohbledick 
I Cobeldick 

Congdon 





CORmVALL. 


103 


Couch 


Kestle 


Peter 


Cowling 


Kevern (Helston) 


Pethick 


Crago 


f Kitto (Launceston) 
L Kittow 


Philp 


Cragoe 


Pinch 


Craze 


Kneebone 


Polkinghorne (Ri'd- 


Crowle 


Laity (Marazion) 


ruth) 


Cundy 


Lander 


Prisk (Redruth) 


Cuj-now (Penzance) 


Lanyon 


J- Raddall 
'^Raddle 


Dingle (Callingtou) 


Lawry 


Dunstan (Truro )l 


Lean 


Rapson 


Dunstone <Penryn) 


Liddicoat 


r Retallack 
t Retallick 


Eva ■ • ■' ' 


Little John 


^ Littleton (Bodmin) 


Rickard 


Freethy 


;w Lobb 


Rodda (West Corii- 


Galtey 


Lory 


^^aU) 


Gesich 


Lugg (Helston) 


Roose (Camelfoi-d) 


Geake 


Lyle 


Rosevcare (Devon- 


Gerry 


Mably (Wadebridge) 


port) 


GiUbard 


f Maddaford 
I Maddiver 


Rosewame (Haylc) 


Glasson (Helstou) 


r Roskelly 
1 Roskilly 


Goldsworthy 


Magor 


Grigg (St. Austell) 


Mayne 


r Rouse 
\ Rowse 


Grose 


r Morcom 
L Moikam 


Gynn (Launceston) 


Rundle (St. Colunib) 


Hambly 


Moyle (Helston) 


Runnalls (Bodmin) 


Hawke 


Mutton (Liskeard) 


Sandercock (Stratton) 


Hawken 


Nance (Scilly) 


Sandry (St. Issey) 


Hawtey 


r Gates (Helston) 
t Oats 


Scantlebury (Lo»t- 


Hayne (Camelford) 


withiel) 


Hearle (Truro) 


r Odger 
L Odgei'8 


Seccombe 


Henwood 


Skewes 


Higman 


Old 


Spargo 


Hodge (Helston) 


Olver 


Tamblyn (Liskeard) 


Hollow (Penzance) 


r Opie (Redruth) 


Tinney 


Hotten (Grampound 


\ Oppy (Perranarwor- 


Tippett 


Road) 


L thai) 


Toll 


Ivey 


Pascoe (Truro and 


Tom 


Jar.e 


towns near) 


Tonkin (Penzance) 


Jasper 


Paynter 


Trebilcock 


' Jelbari (Penzance) 


Psarii- 


Tregear 


. Jelbert 


r Pedlar 
I Pedler 


r Tregellas 
L Tregelles 


Jenkin 


Jose 


Pender (Scilly) 


Tregoning 


r Julian 


jPengelly (Penzance) 
LPengilly (Helstou) 


Treleaven 


L Julyan 


Treloar (Helston) 


Keast 


Penna 


r Treniain 
I Tremayne 


Kerkin (St. Austell) 


Penrose 



104 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



'I'renibath (Penzance) 
Treripe (Helston) 
Tvesi elder 
Tretb ewey (Grain- 

pound Boad) 
Trevail 
Treweeke 
Trewliclla (Harlc) 
Trewin 

Tripcony (St. Kerern) 
Trounsou 



r Trudgen -. 

< Trudgeon )■ ^ 

„, , . zance) 

I Irudgian J ' 

Truscott (Grrampound 

Eoad) 

f Tyack 

L Tyacke 

Uren (Lelant and 

Eedruth) 

Vellenoweth 

Venning (Launceston) 



Verran (Gwennap) 
Vivian 

Vosper (La uuceston 
Wearne 
Wellington 
Whetter 
Wickett 
Woodley 
Woolcock 

Yelland (Grampound 
Road) 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC CORNISH NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alpliabeti«al gronps, but not necessarily in 

alphabetical order in each group.) 

Authwities indicated htf the followiri'g ahhreviatlons .- — 

A. indicates Allen's " Liskeard." 
G. „ Davies Gilbert's " Cornwall." 
L. „ LoAver's " Patronymica Britannica." 
M. ,, Maclean's " Deanery of Trigg Minor." 
P. ,, Polwliele's " Cornwall." 

Sp. ,, Contributors to the fund collected for the national defence 
in 1588 (Brit. Mus., B. 474). 



A— B. 

The ancient and distinguished family of Bassett was repre- 
sented in the county as far back as the reign of Edward III., when 
Sir William Bassett, a gallant officer in the French wars, owned 
the estate of Tehidy and the town of Redruth, the men of Redruth 
being his vassals. The ancient Bassetts of Cornwall, Devonshire, 
and Staffordshire were of the same stock, and were connected on 
the female side with the Plantagenets ; in fact, in the reign of 



CORNWALL. 105 

James I. one of tlie Devonshire family made some pretensions to 
the English crown (P.). (/See under "Kknt" and "Staffordshire ") 

Batten is an estate in the parish of North Hill, Cornwall, 

where an ancient gentle family of the name once resided (Gr.)- (See 

under " Devonshire ") The Blewetts were wealthy Maraziou 

merchants last century. The Bluetts of Little Colan last century 
belonged to the ancient knightly family of Bluet or Blewet of 
Holcombe, Devon, in the reign of James I., a Devonshire family 
dating back to the 14-th century (Westcote's and Polwhele's 

"Devonshire") The well-known Cornish family of Bolitho 

of Penzance has long been represented in West Cornwall. In 
1640, Alexander Bolytho was a member of the Helston corpo- 
ration (C). William Bolithoe was sheriff of Exeter in 1693 

(Izacke's "Exeter") Blight is the name of an old Bodmin 

family that resided thei-e as far back as the beginning of the 
16th century; Bligh or Blighe was the early form of the name. 
There were Bodmin mayors of the name during the 16th, 17th, 

and 18th centuries (M.) Borlase is the name of another old 

and distinguished Cornish family for ages resident at Pendeen. 
Sir Walter Borlase was made a knight-banneret by Edward IV. 
after the battle of Barnet (P.). Dr. Borlase, author of "The 
Antiquities of Cornwall," was born at Pendeen, St. Jnst, in 1695 

(G.) Brendon was the name of an ancient family of the 

Brendon estate, St. Dominick (L.) Henry Brenton, weaver, of 

St. Wenn, died in the reign of George I. at the age of 103 (P.). 

Broad, though established in other parts of England, as in 

Dorset and Cheshire, has long been a Coi-nish name. Brode is its 
early form. In 1588, John Brode of this county contributed £25 
to the National Defence Fund collected in anticipation of the 
invasion of the Spanish Armada (Sp.). John Broad owned 
Menkee in St. Mabyn in 1758 (M.). In 1806, Robert Broad, a 
pupil at Truro School, delivered one of the customary orations at 
the annual prize-giving (P.). The name is now best represented 

around Liskeard There lived a family of Budge, at Darley, in 

Linkinhorne, early in the 17th century (M.) ; the name is still in 

the district Robert Bunt owned a tenement in Lancarfe manor, 

Bodmin parish, in 1653 (M.), and his name still occurs in the 
district. The name of Bount occurred in the parish of Egloshayle 

in 1569 (M.) The Burnards were a Blisland family in the 

reign of Elizabeth, when they owned the 300 acres comprised in 
the moor called Hawkestor and Druglett; there are still yeomen 



10(3 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

of the name in Blisland (M.) The old Cornish families of 

Bewes are now scantily represented in the county. For more 
than 200 years they possessed considerable estates in St. Neot, 
Daloe, and other localities, and from this stock are derived the 

Plymouth families of the name (A.) Amongst the ancient and 

distinguished Cornish names now scantily found in the county are 
those of Arundel and Bellot. 

C— D. 

Carne is an old Cornish name. Tn the 17th century there was 
a gentle family of the name in St. Austell, and at the same time 
there was a yeoman family in St. Kew (M.). It is also an old 
Bodmin name (M.). ; and it was represented in St. Bury an last 
century (P.). There was an old family of Carne at Camborne in 
the 16th century, said to be a branch of the Carnes of Glamorgan- 
shire ; they came into possession of Tresilian, in Newlyn, by 

marriage (G.) Carlyon is the name of an old Cornish family 

of distinction. There was a gentle family of Carlyon at Mena- 
guins in the 17th century, and the name has been established in 
the parish of Bodmin since the reign of Henry VI. (M.). At 
present the name is best represented in the neighbourhood of 

Helston The name of Cawrse is established in Liskeard and 

its neighbourhood. John Cawse was mayor of Plymouth in 1()37 

(Worth's "Plynioath ") The old family of Carveth of the 16th 

and 1 7th centuries resided on its estate of Carveth or Carverth in 

Mabe parish (G.) Clymo and Clemow are old Cornish names. 

There was a Richard Clemowe in Redruth in 1500 (G.) ; and a 
Mcholas Climo, cordwainer, at Bodmin, in 1748 (M.) ; the name 

still occurs in both these towns Coad is another old Cornish 

name. The Codes of Morval in the 16th century belonged to an 
ancient family (P.). In 1588, John Coade, a gentleman of Corn- 
wall, contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada Fund (Sp.) There 

were two of the members of the Helston corporation in 1640 of the 
name of Cock (G.). The name was repi'eseuted in Penryn last 

century (P.) Coet is an old Bodmin name ; during the 16th and 

17th centuries there were mayors of the name (M.) Cowling, 

of which the early forms are Coulin and Coulyng, is a very ancient 
name in the parish of Bodmin, going back as far as the reigns 
of Edward I. and Edward II., when members of the family sat in 
parliament as burgesses for the borough (M.). As Cowlyng, 



CORNWALL. 107 

we find the name in Egloshayle (where it is still represented) 

in the reigns of Henry VITI. and Elizabeth (M.) COOCH was 

the name of an old family of gentry of Lawhitton in the 16th and 
1 7th centuries ; they also owned the manor of Pendavy in Eglos- 
hayle parish (M.) Cuxdy is another old Bodmin name. 

Cundye and Condy were the names of mayors of that town in the 
lt)th century (M.) In the 17th century thei'e was a gentle family 
of the name at St. Goran, a member of which, Richard Cundy, left 
an annual Christmas gift for the poor of Bodmin (M.) In the 17th 
and 18th centuries the Condys were Tavistock merchants (Worth's 

"Tavistock Records") Dagge and Deeble are old Cornish 

names now scantily represented in the county. The Dagges were 
well known in Bodmin in the 17th century, when four of the 
majors bore the name (M.). In the 17rh centuiy the Deebles of 
Quethiock and the Debells of Longco, near Looe, two numerous 

families, joined the Society of Friends (A.) The old Liskeard 

family of Dennis, hailing originally from Devonshire, supplied 
twelve mayors to the town between 1680 and 1732, and its repre- 
sentative in parliament in 1733 (A.). (See under " Dennis '* in 
Devonshire.) 

E— a. 

The Edgecumbes, of Cotele in Calstock, and pf Mount Edge- 
cnmbe in Maker, have a very distinguished history, and were 
sixteen times sheriff of Cornwall and Devon from 1487 to 1640 
(G.) In the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, the Edgecombes were 

Tavistock merchants (Worth's " Tavistock Records '') Freathy, 

a farm in St. John's parish in the hundred of East, was probably 
the original home of the family of Freetht (G.) Thomas Frethy, 
of Perranuthoe, emigrated to St. Christophers in the West Indies 
in 1633 (Hotten's " American Emigrants "). James Freethy was a 

member of the corporation of Marazion in 1768 Gidd\, an old 

Truro name, is now rare in the county Genn is a rare Cornish 

name (L.). Genefer Genn held part of the Barton of Helland in 
Blisland parish in 1758 (M.). (See under "West Riding of York- 
shire.") There is a name of Gynn well represented around 

Launceston. (See under "Hertfordshire") Glanville is a 

name that has now its Cornish home around Grampound Road. 
The Glanvils were a very ancient and distinguished Tavistock 
family. Sir John Glanville, of Tavistock, was one of the first 



103 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

lawyers in the reign of Charles I. John Glanvill, of Catchfrench, 
was on the Commission of the Peace for the county of Cornwall at 
the death of George I., and Francis Glanville held the same office 

in 1803 (P.). (See under "Devonshire ") Grose was a name 

Avell known in the county in the 16th and 17th centuries. The 
family of Grose or Grosse hailed originally from Liskeard, but 
resided afterwards at Camborne and Budock, whei-e they flourished 
for five generations (A.). Ezekiel Grosse, gent., of Trelodevns, 
Camborne, bought the manor of Rosemodres in the reign of 
Elizabeth for £700 (P.). Ezekiel Grosse, attorney-at-law, of 
Golden, Camborne, and of Rosewarne, in the reign of Charles I,, 
was a commissioner for the county in Cromwell's time (P. and G.). 
Edward Grose was mayor of Truro in 1674 (P.). Grose is also an 
old Bodmin name, the earliest form being Le Gros, which was the 
name of one of the burgesses for the borough in parliament in the 

reign of Edward I. (M.) Gerry is a name now found in the 

border districts of Callington and Launceston. In the 17th 
century a gentle family of Gerry resided across the border in 

Tavistock (Worth's "Tavistock Records") There was an old 

and distinguished family of Grylls of Tavistock (Devon) and 
Lanreath (Cornwall) in the 17th century; two high sheriffs of 
the county then bore the name (P.)- A branch of this family 
settled at Helston last century (G.). Benallack, in Constantine 
parish, came into the possession of a family of Grylls in 1671. 

H— J. 

Hambly is an old name of the 17th century in the parishes 
of St. Breward, Egloshayle, and Bodmin ; in the last two 
localities it is still represented (M.). Giles Hambley, Esq., was 
one of the commissioners for the county in the time of Cromwell 

(P.) Mr. Joseph Hawkey was an attorney-at-law of St. Columb 

in the reign of Charles II. Just two centuries ago there was 
Reginald Hawkey, of Trevego, attorney-at-law (G.). The 
Hawkeys were also old families of Lostwith'el and Liskeard..., 
Richard Haw^ke was one of the Cornish commissioners in the time 
of Cromwell (P.) Hearle is a name that has long been con- 
nected with Truro and Penryn, and is now especially well 
represented in Truro and its vicinity. Henry Herle was the 
name of the mayor of Truro in 1690, and in 1704 ; Thomas Hearle 
was mayor in 1747 and in 1763 (P.). The Hearlcs of Peiiryn were 



CORNWALL. 109 

influential people ; Thomas Hearl, of this town, Avas on the 
Commission of the Peace for tlie count j at the death of George I. ; 
and David and John Hearle held similar offices in 1803 (P.)- A 
younger branch of this family settled at Prideaux, in Luxulyan, 
and at Trelawney, in Pelynt (G.)- Trelissick for a time came into 
the possession of a Mr. Hearle, of Penryn, by marriage, last century 
(G.). This is a very old Cornish name. John Herle was sheriii 
of Cornwall in 1425, and Edward Herll held the same office 
in 1647 (P.)- If) as Gilbert says, the Hearles came originally 
from West Hearle, in JS'orthumberland, they must have come into 

Cornwall at an ancient date Henwood was a name in 

St. Endellion in the middle of last century (M.). Hugh Henwcod, 

Esq., of Levalra, St. Ewe, died in 1733 (G.) Hitchings was 

the name of one of the commissioners of the county in the time of 

Cromwell (P.) Hodge w as, for a long time a Bodmin name; 

there were mayors of the name at the end of the 17th cen- 
tury (M.) Jewell was the name of a member of the Truro 

corporation about the middle of last century, and of a com- 
missioner of the cou.nty in the time of Cromwell (P.). The name 

is still in the town Ivby is a name that has been represented 

in Egloshayle, in the forms of Ivy and Ivye, as far back as the 

reign of Henry VIII. (M.) Jane was the name of the rector of 

Truro a century ago, and of one of the county commissioners in 
Cromwell's time (P.). Both these personages belonged to the 
notable Liskeard family of the 17th century, members of wliich 
represented that town in parliament in the reign of Charles I. (A.). 

K— L. 

The Kestells of Kestell, in the parish of Egloshayle, were an 
ancient and influential family that held their estate from the reign 
of Edward I. until 1734 (M.). John Kestell was mayor of Bodmin 
in 1549 (M.). The name now is often written Kestle Knee- 
bone was the name of a part owner of the manor of Pencarrow, 

Egloshayle, in 1585 (M.) Kinow was an old Egloshayle name 

(M.) The Laitys, who are numerous in the district of 

Marazion, evidently derive their name from Laity, a part of 

Wendron parish Christopher Lander held Higher Pengelly, 

Blisland, in 1758 (M.). The Landers, well known as African 
explorers in the early part of this century, were born at Truro of 
humble parentage Lanyon is an old Cornish name of distinction. 



no HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

The Lanyons of Lanyon, in the parish of Gwinear, a seat which 
they held as late as last century, are probably one of the oldest 
families of the name. Their ancestors are said to have come 
over from Lannion, in Brittany, and to have settled in Cornwall 
in the reign of Edward IT. (G.). It is strange, however, that 
the Lanyons should have given their name to their estate, when 
so many Cornish family names can be proved to have been 
derived from the family estate or from the locality of the family 
residence. Lanihorne is another old place-name in the county 

Lawrt is a name found in different parts of the county. A 

Liskeard family of the name during last century supplied three 

mayors to that town (A.) St. Columb has been the home of the 

LiDDicoATS during the last 300 years. John Liddicott, of 
St. Columb, emigrated to St. Christophers, in the West Indies, 

in 1633 (Hotten's " American Emigrants ") The name of Lobb 

was represented in St. Kevern parish a century ago, and a gentle 
family of Lobb resided in Kenwyn 200 years ago (P.), where the 
name still remains. In 1584, William Lobb, of Cardinham, 
Bodmin, leased for 999 years West Downe, part of the manor of 

Lancarfe, to the Crossman family (M.) John Lylk was one of 

the same six men who rang the bells in Launcells tower both at 

the coronation and at the jubilee of George III. (G.) The 

Ltnes have been connected for more that 200 years with Liskeard 
One of the family was rector of Liskeard last century, and the 
Lynes, father and son, were at that time masters of the school in 
the town. Philip Lyne, LL.D., was in the Commission of the 

Peace for the county in 1803 (A. and P.) The Langdons were 

represented in Keverell in the 17th century (A.). The Langdons 
of Langdon, in the parish of Jacobstow, Cornwall, are referred to 

by Gilbert as an ancient family The LuGGS are now established 

in the Helston district. There w^as a Barnstaple family of this 
name in the 17th century, to which the mayors of that town in 
1614 and 1661 belonged (Gribble's "Barnstaple "). 

M— 0. 

Matnaud was originally a Devonshire name, and it is still 

established in that county. {See under "Devonshire") 

Ciithburt Maynk, a Cornishman, who was chaplain to Francis 
Tregian, Esq., was executed as a papist at Launceston in 1577 
Tregian escaped with his life, but not with his freedom, and his 



CORNWALL, 111 

estates were sequestrated, and his family ruined (P.). Tlieir 
descendants can only blush for the bigot's act of three centuries 
ago. Zacharj Mayne, a noted Cornish divine, died at Exeter, the 

place of his birth, in 1694 (P.) During the latter part of last 

century there was a Captain Magoe, of Chacewater (P.) 

MoYLE was the name of a distinguished family of gentry residing 
at Biike, near St. Germans, during the 16th, 17th, and 18th 
centuries. John Moyle, of Bake, was high sheriff for the county 
in 1737, and Sir Walter Moyle held the same office in 1671 
(G. and P.). The name is at present numerous in the neighbour- 
hood of Helston More than one family of IS'ance has taken the 

name of the place of its residence. Nans of Nans was a Cornish 
gentleman in the reign of James I. (P.). Nance is the name of 
an estate in lllogan parish, the seat last century of an old family 
of the name (L.). The name was also represented in St. Kew 
during last century (G.). John Nance, of Grampound, was a 
justice of the peace in 1703 (P.). The name is now well repre- 
sented in the Scilly Islands, and it also occui-red there in the 17th 
century, when Mr. Nance introduced in 1684 the making of help, 

for glass manufacture Opie, or Oppy, is an old Cornish name, 

the first having its present home in the neighbourhood of Redruth, 
and the latter in Perranarworthal. John Opie, the great historic 
painter, was a St. Agnes man; he was born there in 1761, and 
his mother died there in 1805 at the age of 94 (P.). Opye was 
the form of the name in the 15th century, and Oppie at a later 
date. Opy was a name well known in Bodmin during the 16th 
and 17th centui-ies, when several mayors bore the name (M.). 
Richard Opie was mayor of Plymouth in 1699 (Woi-th's 

"Plymouth") The name of Mutton has its present home in 

the district of Liskeard. In the latter part of last century 

Mr. Richard Mutton resided at Falmouth (P.) Oats is an old 

name in Perranzabuloe ; there were wealthy farmers of the name 

there in the 17th and 18th centuries (G.) Maddaford was a 

common name amongst the yeomen of Tavistock: in the 17th and 
18th centuries (Worth's " Tavistock Records "). It is now 
established as Maddaver across the Cornish border in Lauuceston 
and Callington, and in their neighbourhoods. 

P— R. 

Pascoe is an old and distinguished Penzance name. Erasmus 
Pascoe, of Trevassick, Phillack, was sheriff of the county 



112 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

in 1720 (G. and P.). William Pascoe was mayor of Traro in 
1758, and Thomas Pascoe was on the Commission of the Peace for 
the county in 1803. William Pascow, of this county, contributed 
£25 to the National Defence Fund at the time of the expected in- 
vasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). The name is at present 

established around Truro and in the neighbouring towns One 

of the most ancient families of the name of Penrose resided at 
Penrose, Sithney, in the loth, 16th, and 17th centuries ; members 
of this family were sheriffs of the county in the 16th century (G.). 
There was a gentleman of the name at Lefeock in the reign of 
Charles II. (G.) There are other places and other distinct 

families of the name in the county There were several old 

Cornish families of the name of Paynter; one of them held 
Trelissick 200 years ago, and there is a more recent family of 
Boskenna (G.). John Paynter was mayor of Plymouth in 1498, 

1508, and 1516 (Worth's "Plymouth") Pender is an old 

Cornish name. Pendre is an estate in St. Bnryan, where the 
family of Pender or Pendre resided until the reign of Henry VI. 
(G.) The Pendars were seated at Trevidar, in the same parish, 
for upwards of five centuries, and were traditionally of the same 
stock as the Penders or Pendres (G.). Benjamin and Francis 
Pender were on the Commission of the Peace for the county in 
1803 (P.). One of the present homes of the names is in the 

Scilly Islands The name of Pethick, or, as it was occasionally 

written, Pethek, was established in the I6th century and in later 
times in the parishes of St. Tudy, Trevalgar, and Tintagel (M.). 
There is a village called Little Petherick, near Padstow... 
Pengellt is the name of an estate in the parish of St. Neot, 
anciently the property of the family of Pengelly (L.). There is a 
hamlet of the name in St. Teath. The Pengellys are now mostly 
found around Penzance, and the Pengillys around Helston. In 
1797, Honor Pengelly, aged 90, was buried at St. Hilary (P.) ; 
and the name of Pengelly was represented in Penzance last 

century. Polkinghorne is the name of an estate in the parish 

of Gwinear, where the old gentle family of Polkinghorne resided 
from the 13th to the 17th centuries (G.). Redruth is still the 

post-town of their descendants Roskilly is the name of an 

estate in the parish of St. Keveru, the ancient residence of the 
Roskillys (L.). The name was represented in this parish a 

century ago (P.), and still remains The Rosewarnes were a 

Truro family last century, Henry Rosewarne being mayor of the 



CORNWALL. 113 

town in 1774 (P.) Rouse or Rowse is the name of an ancient 

Cornish family of Halton. Antony Rouse or Rowse, of Halton, 
was high sheriff in the reign of Elizabeth, and Sir Anthony Roas 
was I'ecorder of Launceston in 1620. There was a Robert Rowse, 
gent., of Wntton, in the time of James 1. Captain Rouse was 
governor of St. Mawes Castle in Cromwell's time (G. and P.). 

Roo.'je is a name now found around Camelford Ruxdle is an 

ancient Cornish name. Hole in St. Neot has been for eight 
generations the residence of a family of this name (G.). At 
present the Rundles are best represented in the neighbourhood of 
St. Columb. The name has also been long established across the 
Devonshire border. William Rundell was mayor of Plymouth in 
the reign of Henry Vlll. (Worth's "Plymouth"), and the 
Rundles were Tavistock churchwardens in the time of William 
and Mary (Worth's "Tavistock Records "). A family of Rundle 
held Willestrew Manor, Lamerton, in the reign of Heni-y VIII. 
(Worthy's " Devonshire Parishes "). 

S— T. 

Amongst the old Cornish families now scantily represented is 
that of ScoBLE. The Scobles or Scobells have flourished in Corn- 
wall and Devon, both in knightly and gentle degree, since the 13th 

century (L.) Seccombe was the name of a gentleman who 

owned Pelrew in St. Ewe parish early last century (G.) The j 

ancient family of Skewts resided at Skewys, a manor in the parish 
of Cury, in the reign of Henry VIII. ; and about that time a 
member of the family held the office of sheriff of the county 
(G.). A family of Skewys owned Penalmicke manor, Stithians, 
in the 16th and 17th centuries (G.) One of the com- 
missioners for the county in Cromwell's time bore the name of 
Sleeman (P.). Thomas Sleman, of St. Hilary, emigrated to the 

West Indies in 1634 (Hotten's " American Emigrants ") The 

Cornish families of Spry hail originally from Devonshire, and came 
-nto the county of Cornwall in the reign of Henry VII. (M.). (See 
mder "Devonshire.") They found a home in Blisland, and a 
branch of the family established itself at Place, near St. MaAves. 
The Sprys and the Pyes sided with Cromwell and made themselves 
n consequence unpopular amongst the Cornish Royalists, who 
were wont to exclaim, after the style of the Litany, " From 

i;he Pyes and the Spryes, good Lord, deliver us!" (M.) 

I 



114 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Tamblyn is a name at home in the Liskeard district. The name of 
Tamlyn occurred in Widec(jmbe near Ashburton, Devon, in the 

leth and 17th centuries (Dymond's " Widecombe ") The 

TippKTTs were represented in St. Wen during the 17th century by 
the family of Tippet or Tebbot (G.). There was a Truro family 
of Tippet during last century, Stephen Tippet being mayor in 

1749 (P.). The name is still in the town Tonkin is an old 

Cornish name now best represented in the district of Penzance. 
The Tonkins of Trevaunance, who carried their pedigree back to 
the 14th century, possessed a distinguished member of their family 
in Thomas Tonkin, at one time member of parliament for Helston, 
whose extensive manuscript collections concerning the parochial 
history of the county have been largely used by Polwhele and 
Davies Gilbert in their histories of Cornwall : he died in 1742 
(C and P.). Tonkin was a common name in St. Kevern parish a 
hundred years ago (P.)- ^ branch of the Trevaunance family 
was long connected with MuUion, where the name yet remains 

(Harvey's " Mullion") Tregeare, in the parish of Crowan, was 

the seat of the ancient family of Tregeare : Richard Tregeare was a 
sheriff of the county in the reign of Anne (G.). The name is still 

found around Penzance Tregellas or Tregelles was a name 

well represented in St. Agnes a centuiy ago (P-)- ^^ has obtained 

some note in later times One of the oldest and most distinguished 

families of Tremayne is that of Heligan (P.)- This name recalls 
more than one deed of daring in which the Cornish Tremaynes 
have taken part. During the siege of Pendennis, in Cromwell's 
time, Lieutenant-Colonel Tremayne of Heligan escaped by swim- 
ming through the enemy's fire from one of the blockhouses to 
Trefusis Point (P.). A branch of the Tremaynes of Cornwall 
has been seated in Lamerton, Devon, for many centuries (Worthy's 

" Devonshire Parishes ") There is a slab in Bodmin church to 

Nicholas Trebilcock, who died in 1724 (M.) The ancient name 

of Trewhella is now best represented in the district of Hayle. 
For seven generations before 1620 the family of Trewolla resided 
at Trewolla, in Gorran parish ; and in 1688, Christopher and John 
Trewhella and James Trewhelow resided in Towednack parish 
(G.). Trewolla was the name of the mayor of Truro in 1683 (P.) 
Teeth ewey is a name now found in the neighbourhood of Gram- 
pound Road. In the reign of Charles II., John Trethewey, Esq., 
together with the Earl of St. Albans, Lord Berkeley, and others, 
received a grant of territory in America (Hotten's " American 



^gm 



CORNWALL. 115 

Emigrants") Truscott is a nnmerous name in the district of 

Grampound Road. A family of Truscott resided in Tavistock in 

the reign of Elizabeth (Worth's "Tavistock Records") The 

name of Tripcoxy was well represented at Polspriden and Port- 
hallow in St. Kevem parish a century ago (P.), and it is still 
established in the parish. In the 16th century a family of gentry 
of this name had possession of the manor of Laneseley in Grulval 

(G.) The wealthy and flourishing Cornish family of Tregiax, 

or Trugeon, or Teudgex, as it was variously spelt, owned extensive 
estates in Cornwall, Devon, and Somerset, in the 16th century. 
Their estates, including those at Golden, Probus, and at other 
places in this county, were confiscated in the reign of Elizabeth, 
and the family ruined (P.). (See under " Mayxe.") It would 
seem that persecution did not banish their name from the country ; 
and let us trust that their kindred is also preserved in the 
Trudgians, Trudgeons, and Trudgens of the neighbourhood of 
Penzance Tyacke is the name of a Cornish family of con- 
siderable antiquity : their name is to be found amongst the 
gentry in 1573 (L.). William Tyack was escheator of the 
Leeward Islands in the reign of James II. (Hotten's "American 
Emigrants "). 

U— Z. 

UsTiCKE is now a rare name in the county. Botallack was the 
home of the family for centuries ; but the mineral wealth of the 
estate seems to have been for the most part developed by the 
Boscawen family, the subsequent possessors of the property : in 
thej 17th century there was a family of the name at Lea, in St. 

Bnryan (G.) Richard Vealb was mayor of Truro in 1679 ; and 

in 1797 Richard Yeall, aged 88, was buried in St. Hilary (P.). 
A family of Yeale resided at St. Stephens, in this county, in the 

time of Cromwell (Worth's " Tavistock Records.") The ancient 

and distinguished family of YiviAX has many branches : that of 
Trelowarren has been established in the county for seven centuries. 
...The Yenxixgs are best represented in the district of Launces- 
\X)n. Richard Yenning was one of the same six men who rang 
ihe bells in Launcells tower, both at the coronation and at the 

ubilee of George III. (G.) The name of Yosper is now^ 

jstablished in the neighbourhood of Launceston, Mr. Yospar, or | 
i/^ospur, owned Trewoofe in Buryan in the reign of Charles I. : 

I 2 



116 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

John Vosper was the name of the mayor of Liskeard in 1601, 1611, 
and 1625 (A.). The name was also to be found across the 
border in Tavistock in the 17th and 18th centuries : Henry Yosper 
was a Tavistock churchwarden in the time of Cromwell, and 
Henry Vosper was a gentleman of the same town in the reigu 

of Anne (Worth's "Tavistock Records") Woolcock is an 

old Cornish name that was represented in St. Hilaiy and Redruth 
in the 16th century (C). One of the underleaders of the Cornish 
rebellion in 1549 bore the name (P.)- In 1805 there was yet living 
at Nantablan, near Bodmin, an old lady of the name of Elizabeth 
Woolcock, who, at the age of 105, " rode single to Bodmin Church, 

a distance of three miles, and back again to dinner" (P.) 

The ancient knightly family of WtSE of Mount Wise in Stoke 
Damerel (Devonport) was one of the oldest families in the west 
of England : one of this family was high sheriff of Devonshire in 
1612 (Worthy's "Devonshire Parishes"). The name is now 
common on the Cornish border in the Launcestou district. 



kjiu^ ( i( i/<t^ ■'/a 



''^^t^:^ 



CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORELAND. 



117 



CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORELAND. 



Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous in other parts of England. 

S. implies that a name is found over a large part of Scotland, but more 

particularly in the southern half. 
S.F. implies that it occurs south of the Forth and the Cljde. 
C. S. „ „ in central Scotland. 

B. „ „ in the Scottish border counties. 

Or.S. ,, „ general in Scotland. 

N. S. ,, ,, in northern Scotland. 



Gexbbal Names (30-40 counties). 



r Brown, S. 

L Browne (Windermere) 



*Clark 


*Smith, S. F. 


Bobinsou 


Wilson, S. F 


<• 





Harrison 

Jackson, S. F., C. S. 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

Richardson (Carlisle), B. 
Shepherd, G. S. 



Thompson, S. 
Watson (CarHsls), S. 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Atkinson 
Barnes 

*BeU(CarUsle),S. F., B. 
Dawson, C. S. 



Dixon 

(Dickson, C. S., S. F.) 
Fisher, G-. S. 
Gibson, S. F. 



Nicholson, B. 
*Scott, S. F., B. 

Walton (Carlisle) 
♦WilUamson, S. 



118 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



DiSTBiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



*Archer 

Armstrong (Carlisle), B. 
*Baiubridge (Burton-in- 
Xendal) 

Benson 
*Braithwaite 
*Carr (Carlisle) 

Davidson (Carlisle), S. 
*Fawcett 



Grraham (Carlisle), 

S.F., C.S. 
*Hodgson 
♦Hutchison 

(Hutchison, S.) 
J Kitchen 
* L Kitchin 
Lancaster 
*Lightfoot 



Little, B. 

Nelson 

Eeay 
*Slack (Carlisle) 

Sowerby 
r Steel, S. F. 
I Steele 
*Teasdale (Carlisle) 

Todd, S. F. 



County Names (2-3 counties) . 



Airey 
Backhouse 
Bowman 

Bownass (Carnforth) 
♦Bramwell (Carlisle) 
Coulthard (Carlisle) 
(Coulthart in "Wigtown- 
shire) 
Dodgson 
Ell wood 



Fell 

Ferguson, Gr. S. 
*(>arnett 

Hetherington (Carlisle) 
*Hilton 

Hogarth (Kendal) 

Irving (Carlisle), B. 

• Jefferson (Wigton) 
r Millican 
I Milligau, B. 



r Moffat, B. 
L Moffat 

Musgrave 

Park 

Ritson 
fEook 
l Rooke 
Strickland 

Swinburn 

Tyson 



PECtriiAB Names (confined mostly to this county). 



f Beattie, B. 
L Beaty 

Burns, C. S. 

Carruthers, B. 
I' Dalzell 
LDalziel, S. F. 

Donald, G. S. 



Faulder (Carlisle) 

Fearon 

Fleming, S. F., C. S. 

Johnston, S. F., B. 

Martindale 

Mossop (Carnforth) 

Mounsey 



Pattinson (Carlisle) 

Boutledge 
rSim 
I Simm 

Spotterswood 

Thomlinson (Carlisle) 

Top^.ing 



CUIIBERLAXD AND WESTMORELAND. 119 



NOTES ON SOME OP TEE CHARACTERISTIC NAMES OF 
CUMliERLAND AND WESTMORELAND. 

(Tlie names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alplia- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

F. indicates Ferguson's " Estates and Families of Cumberland." 

H. „ Hutchinson's " Cumberland." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

J. ,, Jefferson's " Carlisle." 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

N. „ Nicholson's " Kendal." 

N.B. ,, Nicholson's and Bui-n's " Westmoreland and Cumberland." 



A— D. 

AiREY is an old Cumberland name (L.) The Arm- 
strongs are referred to under Northumberland BACKHOCSfc: 

was the name of the majors of Carlisle in 1738, 17-iJ^, 1748, 
and 1758 (J.), (See under " Durham.") The Baixbridges 
of Westmoreland have their present home in the district 
of Burton-in- Kendal. In the reign of Henry VIII., Arthr.r 
Bainbrigge had a grant of land in Westmoreland of the value 
of £4,000 per annum (Glover's "Derbyshire"). (See under 

"Durham" and "Yorkshire, North and East Ridings.") 

Benson was the name of the Mayor of Kendal in 1644 (N) 

Braithwaite is a characteristic north of England name, occurring 
in Westmoreland, Cumberland, Yorkshire, and Lancashire. A 
Cumberland parish and West Riding hamlets are thus called. An 
ancient Westmoreland family of Brathwaite or Braithwaite 
resided at Ambleside, near Kendal, in the 16th and 17th cen- 
turies, and afterwards at Warcop and Burneside; to this family 
belonged Richard Brathwaite, the poet, who was born in 1588 
(N. and N. B.). The mayors of Kendal in 1746, 1791, 1820, and 
1825, bore the name (N.), which is still represented in the town. 
Chrisropher Braithwaite was mayor of Ripon in 1711 (Gent's 
"Ripon"). De Bratwayt was a Yorkshire surname in the 



120 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

13th century (H. E,.) The name of Bownass has its present 

home in the Carnforth district. Bowness is a Cumberland parisli, 

and a Westmoreland town The Scottish name of Carkuthers 

was originally derived from a hamlet in Dumfriesshire.... 
Cardew, a family name now rare in these counties, was the name 
of an ancient manor in Ualston, Cumberland, of which the De 
Cardews, or Cardews, were the lords as far back as the 12th cen- 
tury (H.) Brougham is one of the most ancient of names in 

these parts, but is not now suflBeiently numerous to be inserted 
in my list. The Broughams have owned for ages in the West- 
moreland parish of Brougham the manor and seat of that name. 
De Burgham was the usual form of the family name until the 16th 
centnry ; after that we find it more often written Browham and 
Brougham ; the name occurs frequently in the list of the sheriffs 
of Westmoreland and Cumberland from the 14th to the present 
century, but there were Broughams in Brougham before the Con- 
quest (H.). The lineage and distinction of the race are still 
preserved in this region in the noble house of Brougham and Vaux, 

founded by Henry Brougham, the famous Lord Chancellor 

The Coulthards of Carlisle, and those of the county of Durham, 
probably hail from the ancient Scottish family of Coulthart, of 
Coulthart, in Wigtownshire, the home of the family for many 
centuries (L.). During last century several of the mayors of 
Carlisle bore this name (J.). Dalzell or Dalziel is the name of 
an ancient Scottish family, of which the Earl of Carnwath is 
chief; the name occurs in the south of Scotland, and was originally 

taken from the barony of Dalziel, on the Clyde (L.) Amongst 

old Carlisle names now rare in this region is that of Blexner- 
HASSETT. Between 1.375 and 1623 several of the representatives 
and mayors of Carlisle bore this name (J. and L.). Blennerhassett 
is a Cumberland township. 

E— J. 

Elwood or Ellwood was the name of a border clan in the 

reign of Elizabeth (L.) Fleming was the name of a well-known 

Kendal family in the reigns of Elizabeth and James 1. ; they left 
bequests for the town, and filled the office of mayor in 1588 and 
1607 (N.). The Flemings held Beckermet and Kotington in the 

16th century (F.). Scotland is the present home of the name 

Garkett is an old Kendal name ; the recorder in 1610 and the 



CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORELAND. 121 

mayor in 1689 were thus called (N.). The name is still in the 

town. There are Garnetts also in Lancashire and Cheshire 

Gilpin, a name now rare in the county, though still lingering in 
Kendal and Carlisle, was the name of a family of Scaleby Castle 
during last century, long honourably connected with Carlisle ; to 
this family belonged the famous Bernard Gilpin, in the reign of 
Elizabeth, who refused the Bishopric of Carlisle ; Sir J. D. Gilpin 
was mayor of Carlisle in 1806 and 1820 ; the Gilpins of Kendal, 
in the 16th and 17th centuries, filled tlie office of mayor 

(N. H. J.) The HETHER[NCrroNS, who have their present home 

in Carlisle and its neighbourhood, belong to an ancient border- 
family that often produced persons of note ; in the reign of 
Henry Vlll. George Hethrington, as king's bailiff, " kept watch 
and ward" in the parish of Kirklinton, on the west marches (H.)- 
Ambrose Hetherington was vicar of Keudal in the , reign of 
Elizabeth (N.). Four mayors of Hull (Yorkshire) last century 

bore the name of Etherington (Tickell's "Hull ") The Hiltons 

are now best represented in Westmoreland and Lancashire. The 
baronial family of Hilton Castle, in the county of Durham, 
flourished in the 14th century (L.). There are places of the name 

in Westmoreland, Yorkshire, Shropshire, Durham, etc The 

HorxAETHS of Kendal take their name from a place in the county. 
The name is also represented in ^Northumberland, and also in the 
North and East Ridings of Yorkshire, where it usually takes the 
form of Hoggart. Hoggard was the name of three of the mayors 
of Beverley, in the East Riding, last century (Poulson's 
"Beverlac"). Hoggard was the name of several Notts free- 
holders 200 years ago (Harl. MS., 6846) Johnston, a common 

family name in the south of Scotland and on the Scottish border, 
is the name of a town in Renfrewshire and of a parish of Dum- 
friesshire. 

L— Z. 

The two notable Cumberland families of Lowther, of Lowther, 
and Lamplugh, of Lamplugh, are amongst the oldest in that 
county ; their names frequently figure in the list of sheriffs of 
Cumberland from the 14th to the 16th century (H.). The 
Lowthers, however, are not now numerous enough to be placed in 
my list, but Lowther Castle is still in the family ; whilst the Lam- 
plughs, who are now rare in their early home, have their present 



122 nOMES OF FAMILY X-OIES. 

abode in the Hull district of Yorkshire, and are referred to under 
that county The Moffats or Moffatts, who are best repre- 
sented on the Scottish side of the border, derive their name from 

a parish on the borders of Dumfriesshire and Lanarkshire \ 

Martindalb is the name of an old Cumberland family dating back 
to the 14th century, and holding much property in that shire up 
to the 17th century and later (F.). An ecclesiastical district in 
Westmoreland is thus called MocxsEV was the name of a well- 
known ancient family of Patterdale, Westmoreland, owning con- 
siderable possessions there ; the representative of the family in 
the middle of last century was known as the " King of Patter- 
dale " (H.) The MusGRAVES, of Musgrave, in Westmoreland, 

were a fine old border race, dating back to the time of John, and 
frequently supplying sheriffs of Cumberland and Westmoreland 
from the 14th to the 16th centui-y (H. and L.). The Musgraves 
of Lincolnshire, who are referred to under that shire, may be 

derived from this ancient family The Pattinsons, who have still i 

their home in Carlisle and its neighbourhood, on several occasions 
during the first half of last century held the office of mayor of 

that city (J.) Nelson is a name found in Cumberland and 

Westmoreland, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Lincoln, and Norfolk. The 
naval hero of the name was son of a Norfolk rector. Nelson is a 

Lancashire town Redman, an ancient name in Westmoreland 

and Cumberland, originated from Redmain, part of a township in 
West Cumbei'land. From the 14th to the iGth century members 
of the family were frequently sheriffs of these counties. De 
Redman, De Redeman, and De Redmain were usually the early- 
forms of the name ; Redman, of Redman, was sheriff of Cumber- 
land in the reign of Richard II. ; between 1649 and 1760 six 
mayors of Kendal bore the name of Redman (N., N. B., and H.). 
The name is now infrequent in these counties. The Redmans and 
Redmaynes of the West Riding, and the Readmans of the North 
and East Ridings, who are referred to under those regions, 

evidently hailed originally from the ancient Cumberland family 

The name of Sowekby is mentioned under the North and East 

Ridings of Yorkshire The Spotterswoods derived their name 

originally from the barony of Spottiswoode, in Berwickshire, 

where the ancient family of the name had its seat (L.) West- 

moreland has been for ages and is yet the home of the Stricklands, 
an important knightly Catholic family resident at Sizergh, near 
Kendal, since the 18th century. The Stricklands of Sizergh Hall 



CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORELAND. 123 

were zealous Catholics in the I6th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The 
mayors of Kendal, in 1764 and 1773, belonged to this family. 
Great Strickland, a Westmoreland parish, in very early times gave 
a home and a name to this race ; but the ancient spelling was 
Stirklaud or Styrkland, and we read of a Sir Walter de Stirk- 
land in Morland parish in this county in the reign of Henry III. 
(L. N. Whitaker's " Richmondshire "). The name is now well 
represented in the Preston district of Lancashire, and in the North 

and East Ridings Swinburne Avas the name of an old gentle 

family of Huthwaite, Cumberland, in the 16th century, and long 
before (F.)- 1'^® Cumberland Swinburnes were perhaps deinved 
from the Northumberland Swinburnes, an ancient knightly family 
owning the township of Swinburne, in that county, as far back as 
the 13th century (L.). A few of the name of Swinbourne now 

ocoar in Essex Topping was a Norfolk name in the 13th century 

(H. R.). 



124 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



DERBYSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that, though the name is character- 
istic of the county, it is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 
The district in which the name is most frequent is sometimes 
stated ; but where the district is on the border it may take 
the name of a town in the next county. 



Genebai Names (30-40 counties). 



Allen (Derby)- 

Hall (Derby, Sheffield) 
♦Johnson 
♦Eobinson (Sheffield) 



Smith (Derby) 

Taylor 

Turner (Chesterfield) 



♦White 

♦Wilson (Sheffield) 

♦Wright (Derby) 



Common Name.s (20-29 counties). 



♦Bailey (Derby) 
Bennett (Stockport) 
Cooper 

♦Harrison 



Hill 
♦Jackson 
Walker (Derby) 



♦Ward (Sheffield) 
♦Watson (Derby) 
♦Wood (Derby) 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 



♦Barker 

♦Elliott (Sheffield) 

Fletcher (Chapel-en- 
le-Frith) 

Fox 

Goodwin 

Holmes 



♦Hudson (Stockport) 

♦Lamb 

♦Osborne (Derby) 

Potter 

Shaw (Chesterfield, 
Derby) 



♦Spencer (Derby) 
♦Stone 

Webster 

WUd 

Woodward (Derby) 



DERBYSHIRE. 



125 



DisTEiCT Names (4r-9 counties). 



*Appleby (Ashborne) 

Archer (Derby) 

Ashton (Sheffield) 
*Barber 

Beard 
*Bland 

Booth (Derby, Man- 
chester) 
*Bradshaw 

*Biill (Burton-on-Trent) 
*Clayton (Chosterfiekl) 
*Coxon (Derby) 
JDakin (Buxton) 
LDaykin (Alfreton) 
*Eaton 

Flint 

Frost 



Garratt (Derby) 
Goodall (Derby) 
Gould (Ashborne) 
Gregory (Sheffield) 
Hancock (Chesterfield) 

*Hardwick (Chesterfield) 
Hodgkinsou (Derby) 
Howe (Sheffield) 

*Key (Chesterfield) 
Lomas (Stockport) 
Lowe (Cliesterfield) 
Marriott (Stockport) 
Mellor 

Milner (Chesterfield) 
Morley (Derby) 
Naylor 



Needham (Sheffield) 
*Newbold 

Radford (Derby) 
*Riley (Derby) 

Sheldon (Derby) 

Sims 

Slack (Derby) 

Slater (Derby) 

Swift (Chesterfield) 

Thorpe (Sheffield) 

Tomlinson (Derby) 
J Wain 
I. Wayne 
*Wain Wright 

WooUey 

Yates (Derby) 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



J^^"««P"l(Derby) 
L Alsop J 

Bagshaw (Sheffield) 

* Bancroft (Derby) 
*Bargh (Chesterfield) 
*Beresford 

Bingham (Sheffield) 

* Booker 

Bower (Chesterfield) 
Bowler (Derby) 
Bown 
Bramwell 

Brassington (Derby) 
Brough (Derby) 
Bunting (Ashborne) 
Buxton (Derby) 
Camp (Derby) 
Carrington 
Clay 

Critchlow 
*Cro88land 
rOeaTille-l (j)^^^ ) 
LDeville J ^ ^^ 



J Horobin 

L Hoi'robin 
Littlewood 

Marsden (Chesterfield 
Mill ward (Ashborne) 
Mosley (Buxton) 

*Mycock (Buxton) 
Oldfield 
*011erenshaw 

JPegg 



Edge (Derby) 

Eyre (Sheffield) 
*Finney 

Frith 

Froggatt (Chesterfield) 
r FurnesB t 
iFurniBsl^S^-ffi^^'l) 

Gads by 

{Gillman 
Gilman 
Greatorex 
r Grindey 
l Grindy 
*Hague 

*Hallam (Sheffield) 
Heathcote 
Hibbert 

Higginbottom (Man- 
chester, Stockport) 
J HoUingsworth \ /j\ ^ \ Slack (Derby) 
1 HoUingworth J Spendlove (Dc 

Hopkinson (Chester- Stafford 

field) 



lPegge}(^-by) 
Platts (Sheffield) 

*Poyser (Derby) 
Prince (Derby) 
Redferii 

r Rowbotham 

I Rowbottom 

*Salt (Derby) 

*Siddall 

)er' 

(Derby) 



DIAH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL 
"^ rAMn urcTriDinAi ^nriFTY 



126 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Stretton (Derby) 

Swindell 
I Twigg 
I Twigge 

Unwin (Sheffield) 



*Vickers (Sheffield) 
Wheeldon (Derby) 
Widdowson (Chester- 
field) 
Wilrnot 



Wilton (Ashborne) 
r Wiadeld 
L Wiugfield 

Woodhouse (Derby) 

Yeomaus 



Peculiae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Alton (Belper) 

Bark 

Barnsley 

Beardsley 

Biggin (Sheffield) 

Beam (Derby) 

Bowmer (Derby) 

Briddon 

Brocksopp 

Broomhead 

Burdikin 

Byard (Derby) 

Ciiadfield (Ashborne) 

|^;;«-'^n(Derby) 
L Clews J 

Copestake 

Crookes (Chesterfield) 

Cupit 

Cutts (Chesterfield) 

Drabble (Chesterfield) 

Dronfield 

Eley 

Else 

Fearn CDerby) 

Fitcbett 
r Foulke 
I Fowke 

Fretwell (Chesterfield) 

Gent (South Normau- 
ton) 

Gratton (Derby) 

Gyte 

Hadfield 

Handford 



Hartle 

Hawley 

Henstock 

Hoiisley 

Hulland 

Jerrara (Derby) 

Joule 

Knifton (Derby) 

Knott (Maneliester) 

Limb (Alfreton) 

Litchfield 

Longden 

Ludlam 

Lynam 

MalHnder (Chesterfield) 

Marchington 

Marples (Chesterfield) 
J Maskery 
L Maskrey 

Mortin 

Murfin (Derby) 

Nadin 

Oakden (Derby) 

Outram (Sheffield) 

Peat 

Plackett (Derby) 
r Pursglove 
l Purslove 

Rains (Derby) 

Eenshaw 
rReveU 
L ReviU 

Eowarth (Sheffield) 



Saint 

Seal (Derby) 

Shacklock (Chester- 
field) 

Sherwin 

Shirt (Buxton) 

Sidebottom 

Skidmore 

Smedley 

Spalton 

Staley 

Staniforth 

Stoppard 

Storer 

Tagg 
r Towndrow 
< Townrow 
L Townroe 

Turton 

|^y°^ } (Sheffield) 
L lymm ' 

Udall (Ashborne) 

Wager 

Wallwin (Bakewell) 

Waterfall 

Waterhouse 

Wetton 

Wheatcroft 

Whittingham 

Wibberley 

Wigley (Ashborne) 

Winson 

Wragg 



DERBYSHIRE. 127 

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTEEISTIC DERBYSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the foUoiinng ahhreviations : — 

Gr. indicates Grlover's " Derbyshire." 

H. „ Hall's " Chesterfield." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

P. „ Pilkington's " Derbyshire." 

Sp. " List of Contributors to the Spanish Armada Fund 

in 1588" (Brit. Mus., B -IT-i). 
W. „ Wood's " Eyam." 



A— C. 

The ancient and distinguished family of Alsop were seated at 
Alsop-in-the-Dale, in the parish of Ashbourn, at the time of the 
Norman Conquest, and there they continued for 19 or 20 gene- 
rations (L.). Of this family there are numerous branches, of 
which the Allsopps of Burton form one (G.). There was a 
Richard de Alsop of Shropshire in the 13th century (H. R.). 
The name is also found in the surrounding counties, but Derby- 
shire is its great home The Applebts of Derbj-^shire, who have 

their home in the Ashbourn district, take their name from a 

parish on the Leicestershire border The Ashtons of this 

county, who are numeroiTS on the Yorkshire border, similarly 

derive their name from places in Derbysliire The Altons, who 

are now represented in the Belper district, possess the name of 

a Staffordshire parish Amongst the old Derbyshire names now 

rare is that of Abney, which is taken from a place in the county. 
Willesley, or Wilsley, was for some centuries the seat of this 
family, and there they resided as far back as the reign of 
Henry VI. ; one of the family was high sheriff of the county 
in 1656 (P.). The Abneys of Leicester in the 17th century, 
who on four occasions filled the office of mayor (Throsby's 
" Leicester "), probably hailed originally from the Derbyshire 



128 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. . 

stock Derbyshire is the great home of the Bagshaws, who 

have pi-eserved a distinguished name since the 15th century, when 
they resided at Abney and Wormhill (G.). John Bagshaw of 
Hiicklow was high sheriff in 1696, and Richard Bagshaw of 
Castleton held the same office in 1721 (P.). During last century 
the home of the principal family was in Chapel-en-le- Frith, but 
the name was also then established in Bakewell (G.). The 
Bagshaws are now most numerous near the Yorkshire border in the 
vicinity of Sheffield. In the 13th century the name of De Bagge- 

soure occurred in Shropshire (H. R.) The well-to-do family of 

the Bancrofts of Chellaston resided in that village for more than 
300 years, and from this stock came Bancroft the poet, who floui'ished 
in the reign of Charles I. (G.). In the early part of the present 
century the descendants of the Chellaston Bancrofts were consider- 
able freeholders at Sinfin and Barrow (G.)., and the name still 

occurs in those localities. (See under " Cheshire.") Bargh and 

Bark are two allied Derbyshire names. The former is found in 

the vicinity of Chesterfield The Derbyshire Beards possess the 

name of a hamlet in the parish of Xew Mills The Beresfokds 

of Derbyshire are a branch of a very ancient and distinguished 
Staffordshire family, to which reference will be found under that 
county. Amongst the principal Derbyshire branches are those of 

Ashbourn and Broadlow Ash (G.) The Biggins take their name 

firom a parish in the county The Binghams, who derive their 

name fi'om a town in Notts, are characteristic mainly of the 
adjacent counties of Derbyshire and Notts. In Derby, the 
Binghams have long been members of the Corporation, and their 
name is familiar in the commercial history of that town ; the 
mayors of Derby in 1750, 1757, and 1760 bore this name (G.). 
Derbyshire is the principal home of the Bowers, and Chester- 
field is the particular locality in which they have long resided. 
Going back to the 17th century, we find that the Bowers were 
then numerous and well known in Chesterfield ; about 200 years 
ago one of the aldermen bore the name (G.). The name is also 
represented in the neighbouring counties of Cheshire and Notts 

The BowNS have independent homes in the counties of Derby 

and Somerset. In the 13th century they were represented in Sussex 
and Beds... ..Bradshaw Edge is a township in the parish of Chapel- 
en-le-Frith, and this seems to have been one of the principal homes 
of the Bradshaws in this county ; but the name has been associated, 
and often in a distinguished manner, with the county ever since the 



DERBYSHIRE. 129 

15tli century, when Roger and Thomas Bradshaw represented 
Derb^'sliire in Pai^iament. Amongst the other branches in the 
county are the Bradshaws of Brampton and the Bradshaws of 
Marple (Gr.). In the list of high sheriffs of the county occur the 
names of Bradshaw of Marple in 1701, Bradshaw of Brampton in 
1717, and Bradshaw of Holbrook in 1777 (P.)- The name is more 
numerous in Lancashire and Northamptonshire, and further refei'- 

ence will be found under those counties Although Derbyshire 

was originally the home of the Brassingtons, where they derived 

heir name from a township near Wirksworth, the name is now 

more numerous across the Staffordshire border in the district 

of Stoke-upon-Trent The Broomheads or Bromeheads resided 

at Bubnell Hall in Baslow in the 17th century, and there Robert 
Broomhead died in 1698 at the age of 60 (G.)- Robert Broomhead 
of Bretton Clough, who died in 1764 at the age of 95, and was 
buried at Eyam (W.)., may or may not have been his son. 
Broomhead w^as a common name in Notts in the 17th century 
(Thoroton's " Notts''). Bromhead is an estate in Hallamshire in 

the West Riding The name of Brough, which has long been 

established in Derby and its neighbourhood, is derived from town- 
ships in the county. Nathaniel Brough, gent., was churchwarden 
of St. Werburgh's church, Derby, in 1699; and in 1723 Theodosia 
Brough left a bequest for ten poor widows of St. Werburgh's parish 
(Gr.). The name is also established in the adjacent county of Stafford. 
Brough was also an ancient Lincoln name, and it is probable that 
the Lincoln Broughs originally hailed from Brough, a township in 
the East Riding. De Brough was the name of the sheriff of Lincoln 
in 1390 ; Robert Brough was mayor of that city in 1400 ; and the 

sheriff in 1656 also bore this name (Stark's "Lincoln") 

Borrow was a common Derbyshire name in the 17th century, and 
was then well represented in the town of Derby (Gr.). It is now 

scarce in this form, but Borough is still a Derby name The name 

of Bunting, which now has its home in the Ashboum district in 
this county, is also established in Norfolk and Essex. In the 13th 
century this name occurred, usually as Bunting or Buntyng but 
sometimes as Buntig or Buntyg, in Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, 
Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, and Sussex (H. R.). It still 

remains in Norfolk, and occurs also in Essex The Booths of 

Derbyshire, who have their homes in the Derby district and in the 
north-western corner of the county, take their name from hamlets 

in the shire Buxton, or Buckston, was the name of an ancient 

K 



130 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

gentle family in the ISth century, of Buxton or Bawkestone, and 
afterwards of Brassington, and then of Bradbourne, where they 
have resided for 200 years (G.)- ^ family of the name lived in 
Eyam in the times of Charles II. (W.). Jedediah Buxton, the 
renowned calculator, was born at Elmton, near Chesterfield, in 
the reio'n of Anne. The Buxtons are now mostly found in the 
Derby district. The name is also to be found established in the 
neighbouring county of Staffordshire. A Norfolk parish isj^lso 

thus called The Derbyshire Camps are now established in the 

Derby district. (See under " Hertfordshire.") 

D— F. 

The Dakins of Buxton and the Daykins of Alfreton possess an 
ancient Derbyshire name. The family of Dakeny or De Akeny 
followed William the Conqueror into England, and in the 13th 
century they were settled in Cambridgeshire, JN'orfolk, and Bedford- 
shire, whei'e they held possessions ; in the 15th century they were 
established in Herts, Derbyshire, and Yorkshire ; and in Derby- 
shire the Dakins owned lands in Chelmorton, Fairfield, and 
Wollow in the reign of Edward IV. (G.). The ancient motto 
of this widely-spread race was " Stryke Dakeyne, the Devil's in 
the Hempe," an allusion to an incident in a sea-fight prior to 
the reign of Edward VI. (L.). In the 17th century a family of 
Dakeyne resided in Stubbing-Edge, and another family of Dakin 
then lived in Castleton ; the name was also established in Chester- 
field last century (G.). Daking is a Suffolk form of the name. I 
am inclined to think that the name of Le Dekene (The Deacon ?), 
which occurred in Lincolnshire, Noi'folk, and Suffolk in the 13th 
century (H. R.), may have sometimes given rise to the name in 
East Anglia and elsewhere. At all events, it is remarkable that 
Deakin, a name now peculiar to Staffordshire, should be associated 
in that county with Dakin, and that the (apparently Latinised) 
form of Daykenus occurred in Hunts in the 13th century (H. R.) 

Drabble is a name now found around Chesterfield. Last 

century it was represented in Eyam (W.). In the forms of Drabel, 
Drabil, and Drapol it occurred in Warwickshire and Cambridge- 
shire in the 13th century (H. R.) The name of Eaton, which in 

Derbyshire is taken from villages in the county, has long been 
represented in Derby. For several generations the Batons of that 
town were engaged in the wool-combirg and dyeing trade, and 



DERBYSHIRE. 131 

lived in tlie Bridgegate ; during last century ttej filled the offices 
of mayor and alderman of Derby, and held the post of keeper 

of the county jail (G.) William Else was a copyholder of 

Bonsall in the reign of James I. (G.). John Elus lived in the 

wapentake of Wirksworth in the time of Edward I. (H. R.) 

The Etees, who are now most numerous on and near the Yorkshire 
border of the county in the vicinity of Sheffield, bear an ancient 
Derbyshire name. The wide-spreading and often distinguished 
family of Le Eyre were settled at Hope in the reign of Edward I. 
Padley was afterwards their home, and in the 17th century one of 
the principal branches was seated at Holme Hall, from which the 
Eyres of Notts took their origin. Newbold was afterwards a home 
of the family (H.). In the list of high sheriffs of Derbyshire 
occur the names of Robert Eyre of Highlow in 1658, William Eyre 
of Holme in 1691, and Henry Eyre of Rowter in 1723 (P.). In 
the 13th century the name of Le Eyre was also represented in 

Cambridgeshire and Essex (H. R.) The name of Edge is well 

represented in the Derby district. Several of the boroughreeves 
of Manchester bore this name last century (Baines' " Lancashire") 

The Fearns are most numerous in the Derby district. Henry 

Feme was the name of a Bonsall copyholder in the time of 
James I., of a gentleman of Kniveton in the 17th century, and of 
a gentleman of Snitterton who was Receiver-General of the 
Customs in the reigu of George 1. (G.). The name is still to be 

found in Bonsall The Finxeys have their principal home on 

the Staffordshire border in the Ashbourn district. Edward Finey 
of Coates Park was high sheriff of Derbyshire in 1690 (P.). Last 
century a gentle family of this name resided at Fulshaw, Cheshire; 
Samuel Finney of Fulshaw, who died in 17^8, was enamel-painter 
to the Queen (Ormerod's "Cheshire"). (See under '" Stafford- 
shire.") The name of Fitchett was represented by Fichet in 

Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, and Devon in the 13th century (H. R.) 
Amongst the ancient knightly families now scantily repre- 
sented in the county is that of Foljambe. The Foljambes of 
Walton, in the parish of Chesterfield, frequently served as high 
sheriffs of Derbyshire in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries; in 1633 
Walton Hall and its estate passed out of the family (H.). Early 
this century the Foljambes came into the possession of the Broad- 
low Ash estate (G.) The noted family of Fox of Derby came 

originally from Grete in Warwicksliire, where the parent family 
resided during the 15th and 16th centuries; they settled in Derby 

K 2 



132 HOllES OF F.OIILY NAMES. 

about 200 years ago (Gr.) The Fretwells are now represented 

in the Chesterfield district. Mrs. Fretchvile of Stanley was one 
of the Derbyshire contributors to the fund collected for the 
defence of the country at the time of the Spanish invasion 
in 1588, her donation being £25 (Sp.). Fritwell is the name 
of an Oxfordshire parish, and a family of De Fretewelle or De 

Fretewell resided in that county in the 13th century (H. R.) 

Amongst the Eyam families who suffered heavily during the 
plague in 1666 was that of Frith (W.). Samuel Frith, of Bank 
Hall, was high sheriff of Derbyshire in 1781 (P.)- The name is 
also established in the IS'orthwich district of Cheshire, and in the 

county of Somerset The Froggatts, who derive their name 

from a hamlet in the village of Curbar, are principally represented 
in the Chesterfield district. Eyam possessed a family of the name 
in the last century and in the early part of the present century 
(W.). Thomas Froggatt, of Calver, yeoman, died in 1710 (Gr.). 

The name is also established in Herefordshire Furness is a 

name which has been established in Eyam since the reign of 
Charles II., and probably from an earlier date : in the present 
century it has attained some note : Richard Furness, the poet, was 
born at Eyam in 1791, and the distinguished engineer of the 
Thames Embankment hails from tlie Eyam stock (W.). The 
name occurred as De Fumes, De Furneys, and De Furueus, in 
Lincolnshire, Xorfolk, and Cambridgeshire in the 13th century 
(H. R.). In Derbyshire it is more usually written Furniss than 
Furness, and we find it most numerous on and near the Yorkshire 
border in the vicinity of Sheffield. 

G— H. 

The Gadsbts take their name from a parish in the adjoining 

county of Leicester The Gells, a distinguished Derbyshire 

family of Hopton, honoured with a baronetcy by Charles I., and 
frequently serving as high sheriff of the county, have resided at 
Hopton from the time of Elizabeth to the present century (P.). 
The name has long been known in Derby (G.), but it is not now 

common in the couuty The name of Gent is now represented in 

South Normanton. The Gents of Moyns Park, Essex, have been 
in that county since the 14th century (L.). The name occurred 

in Hunts in the 13th century (H. R.) The name of Gilman or 

GiLLMAN is also estabhshed in the adjacent county of Stafford. 



DERBYSHIRE. 133 

Gilmin or Gilmvn occurred in. Oxfordshire and Canabridgesliire in 
the l;ith centmy (H. K..). The Gillmans are said to have come 
over with the Conqueror, and to hare originally settled in Essex 

(L.) Amongst the old Derby names that are now scantily 

represented, is that of the distinguished family of the Gisbornes, 
who traced their lineage back to John Gisborne, mayor of Derby 
in 1G59, and were resident in that town for about 150 years (G.) 

The Grattons take their name from a Derbyshire township. 

John Gratton was a copyholder of Bonsall in the reign of James I. 

(G.), and the name is still established there The Derbyshire 

name of Greatorex is evidently derived from Great Rocks, a 
hamlet in the parish of Wormhill. Greatrix and Gratrix are now 
Lancashire forms of the name. James Greatrex was a borough- 
reeve of Manchester in 1758 (Baines' "Lancashire"). The name 

is also found in Staffordshire Derbyshire is the great home of 

the Gregorys, who, however, are also established in different parts 
of the country, Northamptonshire ranking next to Derbyshire in 
this respect, but they are rare or absent in the east of England and 
in the northernmost counties. In Derbyshire they have been 
established for many centuries ; the Eyam family of Gregory carry 
their descent back to the times of Edward II. (W.). A Warwick- 
shire family of the name begin their pedigree with John Gregory, 
lord of the manors of Fresely and Asfordby, Leicestershire, in 
the 13th century (L.) ; and about that time the name was also to 

be found in Bedfordshire and Bucks (H. R.) The Hadfields 

take their name fi'om a Derbyshire parish The Hagues of 

Derbyshire probably hail from Stavely Hague. Robert Hague 

was mayor of Derby in 1746 (G.) Hakdford, or Hoxford, is a 

town in Cheshire where there lived in the 15th and 16th centuries 
the knightly family of Honford of Handford (Ormerod's " Che- 
shire "). A Staffordshire chapelry is also thus called The 

Hancocks are now confined to the western half of England, south 
of the Mersey, and characterise most of the counties from the 
Land's End in Cornwall to the Peak in Derbyshire. They seem to 
attain a greater frequency in the south-west of England and in 
Derbyshire than in other parts of their area. On referring to the 
Hundred Rolls we find that six centuries ago, namely, in the 13th 
century, Hancock was represented in Shropshire in the forms of 
Hancoc and De Hancoc. Robert Hancock was lord mayor of 
York in 1488 (Drake's "Eboracum"). Coming to Cheshire, we 
learn from Earwaker that a Richard Hancok resided in East 



134 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Cheshire in the reign of Hemy VI. [n Derbyshire it is most 
numerous in the Chesterfield district, and was established in Eyam 
in the reign of Charles II. (W.). We find the name in Glouces- 
tershire in the 17th century (Atkyn's "Gloucestershire ") ; and I 
have not found it in Wiltshire before the 16th century. Hancock 
■was the name of the mayors of Salisbury in 1606, 1639, and 1644 
(Easton's "Mayors of Salisbury"). The name was in Westbury, 
Wilts, in the 17th century, and in Warminster in the same county 
during last century (Hoare's "Wiltshire"). Hancock was a 
Glastonbury name in the 17th century, but it has probably 
characterised the county of Somerset for several centuries ; it was 
represented in Taunton a hundred yeai'S ago, and is still found in 
that neighbourhood. North Devon has long been a home of the 
name ; a gentle family of Handcock resided at Combmartin in the 
16th and 17th centuries (Westcote's "Devonshire"); Edward 
Hancocke represented Barnstaple in parliament in 1602 (Cribble's 
"Barnstaple"). In 1573 John Hancocke was mayor of Poole, 

Dorset (Sydenham's " Poole ") The ancient and distinguished 

Chesterfield family of the Heathcotes, who have received more 
than one baronetcy, have held property in that locality since the 
reign of Edward IV. ; they resided in Chesterfield from the 16th 
to the 18th century, and frequently served as mayor of the town ; 
one of the family was lord mayor of London last century (G.). A 
family of Heathcott or Heathcote resided in Bakewell last century; 
to this family belonged Michael Heathcott of Petersburg, Virginia, 
who was buried at Bakewell in 1792; Mr. Heathcote, who died in 
1828, had been a Bakewell churchwarden for forty years (G.). A 
family of the name resided in Blackwell last century (G.). The 
name still survives in Chesterfield and Bakewell. Heathcote is a 
hamlet in the parish of Biggin. The name is also established in 

Cheshire The name of Hollingsworth or Hollingworth, which 

now has its home in the Derby district, is derived from a manor in 

Cheshire The Derbyshire name of Housley would seem to be 

a form of Ouseley, the name of a family of considerable antiquity 
in this part of England, the original home of the principal stock 
being in Shropshire, whilst the line of baronets of this name hail 

from Northamptonshire (L.) The Hollands take their name 

from places in the county Hdnloke was the name of an 

ancient and distinguished line of baronets resident at Winger- 
worth Hall for more than 300 years (H.). The name is not now 
frequent in the county. 



DERBYSHIRE. 135 

J— L. 

Jeream is a name found in Derby and its vicinity. Charles 
Jerrani gave £100 in 1715 for the use of the poor of Breaston 

(G.) The Derbyshire name of Joule may perhaps be a form 

of Youle, a name well known in connection with the Chesterfield 
corporation 200 years ago (G.). De Jule was a Cambridgeshire 
name in the 13th century (H. R.) Knifton, a name now repre- 
sented in the Derby district, is a form of Kniveton, the name of a 
Derbyshire parish. The Knivetons were a distinguished knightly 
family in the county for many centuries. The Knivetons of 
Bradley, the senior branch of the family, owned the manor of 
Bradley for centui'ies, and as far back as the reign of Edward I. ; 
in the reign of James I. this manor was in the possession of the 
junior branch, the Knivetons of Mercaston, who served as high 
sheriffs of the county in I-IQO and 1614, and were rewarded with 

a baronetcy (G.) Knott is a name which was represented in 

the 13th century, as Knotte and Knot, in Shropshire, Hunts, and 

Norfolk (H. R.) Lomas is a name very numerous on the 

Cheshire border and in the vicinity of Stockport in that county. 

It was represented in Bonsall last century The principal home 

of the Lowes is in Derbyshire and Cheshire, whence they have 
extended to the adjacent counties of Lancashire and Shropshire, 
and they are also established in many of the midland counties, as 
in Warwickshire, Staffoixlshire, Notts, etc. In Derbyshire, they 
are numerous in the Chestertield district. An old Denby family 
of the name, to whom has belonged a considerable estate in Denby 
since the 15th century, are said to have come in the reign of 
Henry VI. from Macclesfield, in Cheshire, where the name is still 

numerous (G.) Robert Lddlam was a Roman Catholic priest 

of this county, who suffered martyrdom for his religion at Derby 
in 1588 (W.). Ludlam was the name of a Barlborough family in 
the 17th century (G.). Thomas Ludlam, of Whirlow, was a 
Roman Catholic priest in the reign of Elizabeth (W.). 

M— 0. 

The name of Mauples, which may be taken from the East 
Cheshire town or township of Marple, is now best represented in 
the Chesterfield district. In 1 784, John Marples rented a farm at 
Stavely Hague of the Chesterfield Corporation (G.), and his name 



J 35 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

is still represented there. Thomas Marple was a copyholder of 
Bonsall in 1620 (G.). The name of Marples occui-s in the list of 

Kotts freeholders in 1698 ("Harl. MS.," 6846) The Derbyshire 

]\1aksdens are numerous in the Chesterfield district. There are 
townships of the name in Yoikshire and Lancashire, where the 

suraame is also established The Marchixgtons take their name 

from a Staffordshire township The Mellors of Derbyshire 

take their name from a township in the county. The Mellors 
of Ideridgehay, where the family were represented from the 15th 
to the ]8th century, have been for centuries connected with the | 
borough of Derby ; and on the occasion of the election, in 1637, i 
of Henry Mellor as the first mayor of Derby, Bancroft, the Derby- ) 
shire poet, complimented him in an epigram, which thus con- ; 
eludes: — "As Mel or manna shall your name be sweete " (G-)- | 
There are still Mellors in Derby. The name is very numerous in I 

the adjacent county of Stafford Among.st the ancient and t 

distinguished Derbyshii'e families now scantily represented in e 
the county is that of Metxell. The De Meignell's of Langley, j 
in the 13th and 14th centuries, were descended from De Mesnil, } 
a Normau of the 11th century (G.). The Meynells of Bradley, \ 
who claim to hail originally from Yorkshire, are descended from a ^ 
London alderman, who bought Bradley in 1655 (" History of * 

Ashbourne") Milxes is another Derby.shire name, once more ; 

frequent than it is at present. It has been an Ashover name for i 
nearly 200 years ; and it was the name of well-known gentlemen 
and merchants of Chesterfield in the 17th and 18th centuries 

(G.). It still occurs in the Chesterfield district The name 

of MiLLWARD is best represented in the Ashbourn district. The 
Milwards of Snitterton filled the office of high sheriff of the 
county in 1635 and 1680 (P.). Henry Milward of Sinfin, gent., 
who died in 1615, and left a large family, had a tablet erected 
to him in St. Werburgh's church, Derby; John Milward was 
buried in the same church in 1689. Robert Milward died at 
Alsop-in-the-Dale in 1711, at the age of 60 (G.). The name of 
Millward also occurs in Staffordshire. Like Woodward it is a 
name of occupation. Le Milleward was a Hunts name in the 

13th century (H. R.) The Morlets of Derbyshire, who take 

their name from a parish in the county, are established in the 

Derby district Mortin is a very ancient Eyam name. A 

family of Mortin suffered heavy losses during the prevalence of 
the plague in Eyam in the reign of Charles II.: as far back 



DERBYSHIRE. ] 37 

as the reigns of Henry III. and Edward I., the family of De 

Morteyne, or De Moretien, were lords of Eyam (W.) The 

present Derbyshire name of Napix was represented by Nadon, in 

Cambridgeshire, in the 13th century (H. R.) Some of the 

Naylors of Derbyshire are probably connected in their descent 
with Christopher JJ^ayler of Derby, who, in 1666, left bequests 
for the poor of the parishes of St. Alkmiind and St. Michael in 

tliat town (G.). The name is still in Derby The Derbyshire 

Newbolds have taken the name of a parish in the county. There 
were Newbolds in Beighton two centuries ago (G,). The 
Needhams of Derbyshire, who are best represented on the 
Yorkshire border in the vicinity of ShefiB.eld, probably take their 
name from Needham in that county, whence also the Earls of 
Kilmorey take their name (L.). John and Thomas Needham 
were Bonsall copyholders in 1620 (G.)- The name is also fre- 
quent in Lincolnshire. A Norfolk parish and a Suffolk town are 

thus called The Of-dfields of Derbyshire take the name of a 

Cheshire township. De Oldfield was the name of a Cheshire 
family, that owned Oldfield manor in the 14th century, and were 
originally of Fi'ench extraction. There are also representatives 

of the name in Norfolk Ollerenshaw, like Renshaw, also a 

Derbyshire surname, is derived from Renishaw, a township in the 
county. The name occurs in the annals of Derby, and is still 

found in the district The Outrams are I best represented in 

North Derbyshire, and on the Yorkshire border in the vicinity 
of She^sld, Joseph Outram was mayor of Hull in 1775 (Tickell's 
" Hull "). {See under " Notts.") 

P— S. 

The name of Pegg or Pegge is now mostly represented in the 
neighbourhood of Derby, and but scantily in Ashbourn, which was 
the home of the name in the early part of the 17th century, when 
the Pegges were a prosperous gentle family of that place. In 
1669, Christopher Pegge, Esq., of the Middle Temple, left by will 
his house in Ashbourn, together with lands in Ashover and Win- 
gerworth, for the erection of almshouses in Ashbourn ; and in 
1666 Edward Pegg, of this place, left a bequest for the poor (G.). 
To this Ashbourn family belonged Edward Pegge, who in the 
reign of Charles II. came into possession of the Beauchief estate, 
near Norton, by marrying the heiress of the Strelley family, and 



138 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

there his descendants lived during last century (G.). The PeggeB 
of Beauchiffe served as high sheriffs of the county in 1667 and 
1739 (P.). The Rev. Samuel Pegge, of Whittington, was a 
Derbyshire antiquarian a century ago (P.). Pegg and Peggi were 
Oxfordshire names in the 13th century (H. R.). Pegg is also a 

Norfolk name The Renshaws take the name of a Derbyshire 

township John Revell was a Chesterfield alderman in the 

early part of last century (H.). George Revill, of Normanton, 
was a gentleman who contributed £25 to the Armada fund in 1588 
(Sp.). Robert Revell, of Carnfield, was high sheriff of Derbyshire 
in 1700 (P,). The name is still to be found in Chesterfield, 
Revel was a name found in Cambridgeshire, Somerset, and Wilts 

in the 13th century (H. R.) The Rileys of Derbyshire are 

numerous in the Derby district. It is an old Eyam name, and was 

represented there in the reign of Charles II. (W.) Rowbottom 

was an Eyam name in the reign of Charles II. (W.) The Seals 

of the Derby district may hail originally from Seal, a Leicester- 
shire parish close to the Derbyshire border The Shacklocks 

have their present home in the Chesterfield district. Hamo 
Shakeloc lived in Cambridgeshire in the 13th century (H. R.) 

The Sheldons of this county, who are numerous in the Derby 

district, take their name from a village in the shire. The 
Sheldons of Eyam were a family of some substance in the reign of 
Charles II. (W.). Sheldon Hall is a seat in the Warwickshire 
parish of Sheldon, where an ancient family of Sheldon once 

resided (L.) Sherwin was a well-known name in Nottingham 

two centuries ago. Between 1623 and 1716, five mayors of that 
town bore this name (Deering's "Nottingham"). Sherewind was 

a Cambridgeshire name in the 13th century (H. R.) The 

SiDDALLS of this county were represented in Eyam in the 17th 

and 18th centuries (W.) Skidmore may or may not be a form 

of Scudamore, an ancient Herefordshire name. The Skidmores 
were established in Eyam in the 17th and 18th centuries, where 
several of them were killed by the plague in 1666 (W.). De 
Skidemore and Skidemore were Wiltshire names in the 13tb 

century (H. R.) The Slacks of Derbyshire are numerous in 

the Derby district. In 1674, Arthur Slack gave £40 to the town 
of Buxton (G.) ; and about the same time Robert Slack resided at 
Hayfield in this neighbourhood (Earwaker's " East Cheshire "). 
The name is still represented in the Buxton district on the 
Staffordshire border. Slack is the name of a place in the parish 



DERBYSHIRE. 130 

of Ashover. Thomas Slack was rector of Bolton, Yorkshire, in 

1680 (Whitaker's " Craven"). (,See under" Cheshire.") Spend- 

LOVE has been a Derbyshire name for six centuries and more. 
There was a William Spendelove of Essebourn (Ashbourn) in this 
county in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). The name is still mostly 
found in the Derby disti'ict. Suckling Spendlove, attorney, was 
mayor of Beverley, in the East Riding in 1745 and 1760 (Poul- 
son's "Beverlac"). In the time of Edward I. Spendelove was a 
name also found in Cambridgeshire, Hunts, and Oxfordshii'e 

(H. R.), and the name still occurs in Northamptonshire 

Stafford was the name of an ancient and wealthy Eyam family 
resident at the Hall from the time of John to the reign of Eliza- 
beth (W.) S.'tmuel Storer was churchwarden of St. Alkmund's 

church, Derby, in 1624 (G.), and the name is still in the town 

The Strettons, of Derbyshire, take their name from a parish in 
the county, and the Strettons of Leicestershire similarly derive 

their name from a place in that county The Swifts of this 

shire are best represented in the Chesterfield district. William 
Swyft lived in Derby town 600 years ago (H. R.). The Rev. J. 
Swift, minister of Baslow, died in 1766 (G.). (See under " Lanca- 
shire.") 

T— Z. 

Tabberer is an old Derby name (G.), now rare in the county 

Tagg was an Oxfordshire name in the 13th century (H. R.). 

Samuel Towndrow, of Chesterfield, died in 1779 (G.). The name 
is still in the town. Thomas Townrow was mayor of Lincoln in 

1671 and 1693 (Stark's "Lincoln") The Turtons take their 

name from a town in the south-east part of Lancashire The 

Twigges, of Holme, were a distinguished family last century. 
John Twigge, of Holme, near Bake well, was high, sheriff of the 
county in 1767 (P.). Nicholas Twigge, of Holme or Holme Hall, 
who died in 1760, purchased in 1754 tlie estate of Broadlow Ash, 
where his descendants resided till early in this century, when it 
passed into tlie hands of the Foljambe family, their kinsmen (G.). 

Udall is a name now found in the Ashbourn district. A 

family of Udall, or Wedalle, owned the manor of Chingford 
Comitis, Essex, in the reign of Elizabeth (Morant's "Essex") 

The Waterfalls are named after a Staffordshire pai-ish 

The source of the name of Waterhodse is a little doubtful. 
Waterhouses is the name of a place in the neighbouring county of 



140 HOMES OF FAIWILT NAMES. 

Stafford, and of a village in the county of Durham. De "Watenhou 
was a Notts family name in the 13th century (H. R.). An ancient 
Lincolnshire family of Waterhouse traced their descent from Sir 
Gilbert Waterhouse, of Kirton, in the reign of Henry III. (L.). 
Another ancient family of Waterhouse lived at Halifax in the 
West Riding ; a branch, to which belonged, the vicar of Bradford 
in the middle of the 17th century, was located at Tooting, Surrey, 

in the time of James I. (James' " Bradford ") The Wettons 

posstss the name of a Staffordshire parish, the Whittinghams that 
of a Lancashire township, and the Whbatcrofts that of a hamlet 
in the Derbyshire parish of Crich. Wheatcroft was a name 
represented in Ashover in the reign of George I. (G.). The name 

is still in the district The WIDDOWSONS are now found in the 

Chesterfield district. In Domesday times, William Wido's-son 
(Wido being probably a personal name) was a tenant-in-chief in 

Wilts, Somerset, and Gloucestershire (L.) The Wigleys are 

now found in the Ash bourn district. Richard Wiglie was a copy- 
holder of Bonsall in the reign of James I. (G.), and his name still 

occurs in the district For 350 years, the Derbyshire Wilmots, 

who have been honoured with three baronetcies, have been settled 
at Derby or at Chaddesden in its neighbourhood (G.). Robert 
Wilmot, of Osmaston, was high sheriff of Derbyshire in 1689 (P.). 
There were Wilmots in Cambridgeshire in the 13th century 

(H. R.). {See under " Hertfordshire ") The Winfields, or 

WiXGFiELDS, take their name from Derbyshire parishes. The 
Wingfields, of Wingfield in Suffolk, were a very distinguished 
family in the 14th and loth centuries (L.). The surname also 

occurs in Herts The Derbyshire Woodhouses are named after 

hamlets in the county. A gentle family of the name resided in 
Crich last century (G.). The Woodhouses are now at home in the 
Derby district. The surname also occurs in Herefordshire and 
Shropshire, and there are villages and hamlets of the name in 

Shropshire, Staffordshire, aud the West Riding TheWooLLETS 

take the name of a Derbyshire township. William and Edward 
Woolley were copyholders of Bonsall in the reign of James I. (G.). 

George Wragg repaired the bell-frame of St. Alkraund's 

church, Derby, in 1627 (G.). Wragge and Ragge were the names 
of Eyam families in 1666 (W.). Jonathan Wragg was a tanner of 
Chesterfield in the middle of last century (G.) : and his name 
occurs still in the town. Ragge was a sarname found in the 
neighbouring county of York in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). 



DEVONSHIRE. 



141 



DEVOI^SHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk denotes that a name, though characteristic of 
the county, is more relatively numerous elsewhere. Tlie 
district-homes of the names are placed in brackets, and in 
some cases, where they lie on the border, the districts may be 
named after a town in the next county. 



* Harris 



Geneeal Names (30-40 counties). 

♦Turner Wliite 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Adams (Kingsbridge) 
!&aker 
*Brooks 
Carter 
Cole (Tavistock) 



Ellis 

Hill (South Molton) 
Lee (Crediton) 
*Moore 
Palmer (Liftoii) 



♦Phillips 
Reed 
, / Sanders 
L Saunders 



Eerry (Barnstaple) 
Dunn (Barnstaple) 

♦Elliott 

Ford 

French (Ashbiu'ton) 
♦Gilbert (iiolsworthy) 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 

♦Richania^ (Barn- 



Harding (Barnstaple) 
♦Harv^ey (Exeter, More- 
ton Hampstead) 
♦Hawkins 

May 
r Pearce 
1 Pearse 



staple) 
♦Stone 
♦Symons 

♦Warren (Honiton) 
♦Watts (Barnstaple) 



District Names (4-9 counties). 



Anstey 
♦Bond 

Bowden 
♦Coles 

♦Daniel (Hulsworthy) 
» r Davey 
I Davy 



^ ("Daw 
LDavre 

Dennis (Barnstaple) 

Dra&e" 
♦Dunning (Okehampton) 
♦Dyer (Barnstaple) 
♦Farmer (Honiton) 



♦Gale (Tiverton) 
JHellier. 
iHellyer 

Hancock 

Hooper 

Horton (Ivy bridge) 
♦Hutchings 



142 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



*Jeffery (Bideford) 
Lake 

Leach (Morclaard 
Bishop) 
*Mann (Ashburton) 
Manning (Cimlmleigh, 

South Molton) 
*Nott 

Partridge (Morchard 
Bishop) 



*Pike 
*Rowe 

Short 

Skinner (Barnstaple) 
*Stacey (Holdsworthy) 

Summers (Honiton) 

Swain (Axminster) 
[Thorn [(Barnstaple, 

Thornel^'^^-^'^^"'^ , 
L L South Molton) 



Tucker .(Barnstaple) 
♦Waller 
* Walter (Bideford) 

WeFber (Chumleigh, 
South Molton) 
*Weeks 
r'AVillcock 
\ Willcocks 
*\^yatt ' 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*Avery y//^',,. 

Ay re (South Molton) 

Badcock 

Banbury 
("Batten (Honiton) 
(.Batting (Exeter) 
, J Beare 
L Bere 

Blackmore (Honiton) 

Brock 

Buckingham (South 
Molton) 

Cann 
*Cl)apple 

Cleave 
*Cornish (Newton 

Abbott) 
*Cory 

Creber (Horrabridge) 

Crocker 

Down 
*Drew (Okeham itou) 

Farrant (Wellington) 
♦Ferris (Totnes) 

Fulford 

Glanville 

Gibbings 
*Glas3 (Exbourne) 

Goodridge (Totnes) 

Goss 

Greenslade (Ti<ferton, 
South Molton) 

Grills 
*liallett 



Haydon (Exeter) 
/Heal 
L Heale 
J Heara 
l Hern 

*Hodder (Kingsbridge) 
*Hodge (Newton 
Abbott) 

Hurford 

Isaac 

* Jewell (Bideford) 
*KelIy 
*Langdon 

Loveridge (Axminster) 

Marks (Honiton) 

Maynard 

Mediaiul 

Mortimer 
J Newberry (Honiton) 
iNertbery 

Nortbcott . 
*Parnell (Totnes) 

Passmore (South 
Molton) 
[Peek 
I Peeke "^^A 

Pickard (Bidefordj ■ 
/Pile 
i Pyle (Exeter) 

Pitts 

J Prouse 

L Prowse 

♦Quick 

♦Risdon 



Kowell (Newton 
Abbott) 

Rowland 

Sage (Ottery St. Mary) 

Salter (Exeter) 
♦Searle 

Shears 
♦Sleeman (Holsworthy) 

Sloman (North Taw- 
ton) 

Snell 

Snow 

Sparks 
♦Spear 

Spiller (Axminster) 

Spry 

SaiuTfi (Bamsfca^lf) 

Steer (Ivybridge, 
Kingsbridge) 

Strong (Exeter) 
♦Tanton (Great Torring- 

ton) 
♦Tapp 

Trickey (Exeter) 
♦Turpin 
♦Uglow (Launceston) 

Venn 
r Vicary 
L Vickery 

Westlake 
♦Wickett 

Wills (Newton 
Abbott) 

Yeo 



iaA- 



DEVONSHIRE. 



l-i3 



Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Addems (Exeter) 

Alford 

Amery 

Anning (Starcross) 

Arscott 

Babbage (Cbulmleigb) 

Balkwill (Kingsbridge) 
' Balman 

Balsdon (Higli Hamp- 
ton) 

Bastin 

Bater (Chulmleigh) 

Beedell (Tiverton) 

Beer (Barnstaple) 

Besley (Tiverton) 

Bickle 

Blatcbford 
f Blowey 
I Bloye 

Bolt (Ottery St. Mary) 

Boundy 

Bovey 

Bradridge (Ivybridge) 

Bra^gg 

Braund (Brandis 
Corner) ' 'f'^t«-.^_ 

{Brayley 
Breayley 

Bridginan (High 
Hampton) 

Brimacombe 

Broom (Honiton) 

Bucknell 
r Burgoin 
I Burgoyne 
f Burroiigh (Honiton) 
L Burrow 

Cawsey 

ChafPe (Plympton) 

Chamings 

Chammings 
rChannin | (Ti^e,t,„) 
L Chauning J 

Cbave (Tiverton) 

Cheriton 



{ 



{Chowen 
Chown 

Cliubb 

Chugg (Ilfracombe) 

Cleverdon (Bideford) 

Coaker (Horrabridge) 
r Cockram 
I Cockei'am • ' ' ' ^ 

Colwill 
r Coneybeare 
J Conybear 
I Connibeer )' p , 

Coombe (Crecfiton) > •■ 

Copp (Great Torrington) 

Courtice 

Crang (Barnstaple) 

Crimp 

Crocombe (Barnstaple) 

Cuming (Exeter) 

Dallyn (Barnstaple) 

Damerell 

Darch (Barnstaple) 

Dare (Axminster) 

Dart 

Dayment 
f Densem 
I Densham 

Dicker 
f Dimond (Honiton) 
I Dym ond 

Doble (Cullompton) 

Doidge (Tavistock) 

Dommett (Axminster) 

Dufty 
fEarl 
I Earle 

f Easterbrook 
I Estabrook 

Eggins 
/ Ellacott 
L Ellicott 

Elston 

Elworthy (South 
INfolton) 

Endacott (Exeter) 



J Eveleigh 
l Evely 

Fairchild 

Eewings 

Foale 

Foss (Kingsbridge) 

Friend (Exbourne) 

Furneaux 

{Furse 
Furze 

Gammon (Ilfracombe, 
Barnstaple) 

German 

Gidley 

Gillard 

Gioyn 

Gorwyn (Exeter) 

Grendon 

Halse 

Hamlyn (Ashburton) 

Hannaford (Kings- 
bridge, Ashburton) 
J Hartnell 
1 Hartnoll 

Hayman / 

Headon j 

Health 

Heaman (Dolton) 

Heard 

Heddon (Stratton) 

Heggadon (Lew Down) 

Helmer (Kingsbridge) 

Hext (Ashburton) 

Heyward 

Hey wood (Bideford) 

jliil^_«"l(Ivvbridge) 
I Hilson J ^ • ^ ' 

Hockridge (Bideford) 

Honniball (Honiton) 

Hookway 

Hurrell (Ivybridge, 

Kingsbridge; 
Huxham 
Huxtable (Barnstaple, 

Ilfracombe) 



144 



HO.MKS OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Irish 
Isaacs 
Jackman 
Kerslake 

Kingwell (Ivvbridge) 
Xnapman (Exeter) 
Lambshead 
Lang 

Laagman (Roborougli) 
Langwortbj 
Lear 

Lerwill (Barnstaple) 
Lethbridge 
JLetheren 

Ley (South Molton) 
Lidstone (Kingsbridge) 
Littlejohns (Eideford) 
r Loosemoor 1 (South 
L Loosmoor J Molton) 
Lovering (Barnstaple) 
Lusconibe (Ivybridge, 

Kingsbridge) 
Luxton (Wembworthy, 

Winkleigh) 
Madge (Exbourne) 
Mauley 
Maunder 
JMelbuish 
L Melluish 
J MetheraU 
L Metherell 
Mildon (Tiyerton) 
Mill 
J Millman 
L Milman 

r Mogf ord (Soutt Molton) 
L Mugford 
Mortimore (Exeter) 
Mudge 
Nancekivell 
Nancekeville 
Xankevil 
Xetherway 
Newcombe 
Norrisli (Crediton) 
Nortbam 
Nortbmore 



Nosworthy (Exeter) Slader (North Molton) 

Oldreave Slee 

. Oldrcive Sluggett (Brandis 

Paddon, Corner) 

Palfrey Smale (Exbourne) ' 

Palk i^Smallbridge ' 

Parkliouse J Smallridge (Barn- 

Pavey | staple) 

Pearcey (Honiton) ^Smaridge 
Penwarden (Holsworthy) Smerdon (Ashburtou) 
Perkin ii^ ir-e^(^/f^ Smyth 
Perrin Soby 

Petherbridge (Barn- Soper (Kingsbridge 
staple) Newton Abbott) 

Petherick (Holsworthy) f Spurrell 



r Pinliay 
I Pinhey 
Powlesland (Okehanip 
ton) 
J Prettejohn 
L Pretty John (Kingsbridge) Tancock 



I Spurle 
Squance ^ 
St anbury 

Stidston (Kingsbridge) 
Stonenian ^, • / 1 . 



J 



Pring (Honiton) 

Pugsley (Barnstaple) 

Pym (Honiton) 

Quance (Great Torring- 
ton, Barnstaple) 

Rabjohns (CuUonipton) 
J Raym ont (Winkleigh) 
I Raymount 

Reddaway (Okehamp- 
ton) 

Reddicliffe 

Retter (Ottery St. Mary) 

Kew (Exeter) 

Ridd (Barnstaple) 

Routley 

Seldon (Barnstaple) 

Sellek (Ottery St. Mary) 

Serconibe 

Seward (Exet<?r) 

^hapland (South Mol- 
ton) 
r Sharland 
L Shorland 

Sherrill (Ivybridge) 

Slierwill (Ivybridge) 

Shoplaud 



Taverner (Exeter) 

Toms — r , 

Tope / ^'^7^ 

Tozer 

Tremlett (Crediton) 

Trick 

Trott (Honiton, 
CuUompton) 

Trude 

Tuckett 

Tully 

Underhay 

L'nderhill 

Vallance 

Vanstone (Bideford, 
High Hampton) 

Venner 
r Voaden 
L Vodden 

Yoogbt (Newton 
Abbott) 

Wadland 

Wakeham (Ivybridge) 

Ware 

Waycott 

Were (Tiverton) 



V 



DEVONSHIRE. 



145 



Westacott (Barnstaple) fWhiteaway 

Westaway Iwhiteway 

"Westcott (North Widdicombe (Totnes) 

Molton) Willing (Kingsbridge) 

r Western 1 (Barnstaple) J Withec ombe 

I Westren i (Ilfracorabe) I Witheycombe 

Wheaton Witheridne 



Wonnacott (Brandis 

Corner) 
Woolland 
Wotton 

{Wrayford 
Wreford 
Wroth (Kingsbridge) 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC DEVONSHIRE 

NAMES. 

.(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in 
aljjhabetical order in each group.) 



/ 



jtuthorities indicated hy the foUoiving abbreviations : — 

" Parish of Ashburfcon in 15th and 16th Centuries." 

Dunsford's " Tiverton," 

Dymond's " Widecombe." 

Grribble's " Barnstaple." 

Harding's " Tiverton." 

Hundred Rolls. 

Izacke's " Exeter." 

Lower's " Patronymica BritaDnica^" 

Polwhele's " Devonshire." 

Prince's "Worthies of Devon." 

List of Contributors to the National Defence Fund at llie 

time of the Spanish Invasion of 1588 (Brit. Mus., B iT-i). 
Wesfccote's " Devonshire iiJ_i63Q-" 
Worthy's " Ashburton." 
Watkins' "Bideford." 
Webb's " Exmouth." 
Wortliy's " Devonshire Parishes." 
Worth's " Plymouth." 
Worth's " Tavistock Records." 



A. indicates 


D. 


Dy. „ 


G. 


H. 


H. R. „ 


I. 


L. 


P. 


Pr. 


Sp. „ 


W. 


W. A. „ 


Wat. „ 


Webb „ 


W.D. „ 


W. P. „ 


W. T. „ 



!fOTE. — Such old works as Pole's "Description" and Risdon's "Siu-vey" of 
Devon are largely digested in many of the works above quoted. I have 
only space to treat the county in sample fashion. There are numerous 
other valuable works on Devonsliire which the reader might consult. 



146 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

A— B. 



\ 



The Alfords take their name from a Somerset parish, and the 
Anstets are named after parishes in the north division of Devon- 
shire Arscot or Arscott was the name of several gentle 

families in the county in the 16th and 17th centuries. There 
were the Arscots of Hols worthy, Annery, Tidwell, and Tetcot (W.). 
Arthur Arscott, a Devonshire gentleman, contributed £25 to the 
Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.)- Arscot was the name of a church- 
warden of Ashburton in 1500 (A.) Robert Avery, of Devon, 

gave £25 for the defence of his country against the Spanish 

Armada in 1588 (Sp.) The name of Babbage is now best 

represented in the Chulmleigh district. Charles Babbage, the 
celebrated mathematician, was born near Teignmouth in 1792... 
The Rev. Samuel Badcock, the eminent divine, was born at South 
Molton in 1747, the son ot a butcher, and the name still belongs 
to that trade in the town. There was a William Badecok in 

Cambridgeshire in the 13th century (H. R.) The Devonshire 

Balls now occur mostly in the Bridestow district. The Balles ol 
Higher Harcombe, Chudleigh, where they resided up to the 17th 
century, were amongst the most ancient and influential families of 
the district : from them sprang the Balles of Mamhead and Ash 
combe, several of whom were buried in Ashcombe churchyard in 

the 17th and 18th centuries (Jones' " Chudleigh ") Amongst 

the old Devonshire families now scantily represented are those oi 
Bampfield or Bampfylde. Those at Poltimore and Hestercombe 
in Devon and Somerset were amongst the most distinguished, and 
the knightly family of Poltimore, Devon, in the 17th century, 
held that estate as far back as the reign of Edward I. (W.) (Col- 
linson's " Somerset "). Richard Bamfield, a Devonshire gentle- 
man, contributed £25 to the Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.). Thomat 
Bamfield was chamberlain of Exeter in 1654 (I.), and Bamfielc 
was an Exmouth name in the time of Charles I. (Webb). Westo 

Bampfylde is a Somersetshire parish The Battens are no"w 

established in the Honiton district, and the Battings in the Exete] 
district. There was a Joel Batin in the hundred of Wonford ai 
far back as the 13th century (H. E.). The name also occurs h 
Cornwall, and is referred to under that county. Somersetshire 
however, would appear to be the ancient home of the name, anc 
for six centuries the name has been established there, thougl 
now scantily represented : the original De Beteyns or Batyns o: 



DEVONSHIRE. 147 

Somerset, deemed to be of Flem.ish origin, were amongst the 
leading merchants of the county in the reign of Edward I. (L.) 

Bellew is an old, though now a rare, Devonshire name. 

When Polwhele wrote his history of the county nearly a century 
ago, the Bellews had been lords of the manor of Stockleigh- 
English for more than 150 years, John Bellew being then in posses- 
sion. William Ballew was steward of the city of Exeter in 1720 
(I). Henry Bellew was mayor of Barnstaple in 1805 (G.), and 

the name is still in that neighbourhood The Besleys were a 

well-known Tiverton family during last century, and the name 
still has its home in that town and its neighbourhood. John 
Besley was mayor in 1783, and the name occurs several times in 

the list of Tiverton churchwardens of the 18th century (D.) 

The name of De Bickel was established in the Teignbridge hundred 
600 years ago (H. R.), and the Bickles are yet found in the 
neighbouring Tavistock hundred. Bykehille was in the 13th 
century a place in the hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, Somerset 

(H. R.) Blatchford, or rather Blackford, was a common name 

in Littleham, Exmouth, in the 17th century (Webb) The 

Blackmores are now numerous in Honiton and its neighbourhood. 
There is (or was) an epitaph in the Middle Temple church to 
Mark Blackmore, son of Mark Blackmore, of Harpford, in the 
county of Devon, gent. (Dugdale's " Orig. Jur."), which cannot 
bear a later date than the early part of the 17th century. A 
family of the name lived in Exmouth last century: in 1746 
Mr. Blackmore " leaded ye tower ;" and in 1771 and 1811 William, 
and John Blackmore were clerks of Exmouth Chapel (Webb). 
Blackmore and Blackmoor are places in Essex, Wilts, and other 
counties. Blakemore is now a Shropshire surname. Blakema and 
De Blakemor were surnames in Bucks, Oxon, and Essex six 

centuries ago (H. R.) Blagdon was the name of an important 

old Tiverton family of the 17th and 18th centuries, now scantily 
represented : the mayors of that town in 1683, 1701, and 1740, bore 

ohis name (D.). Blagdon is a place in Somersetshire Boundy 

s an old Ashburton name. Bounde was the name of two Ash- 
)urton churchwardens in the reigns of Henry VIII. and Elizabeth 
A.). John Bounde, of Plymouth, left in 1642 a bequest for the 

)oor of Ashburton (W. A.) The Boveys originally took their 

larae from parishes in the county. Nicholas Bovey was mayor 
»f Barnstaple in 1451 (G.). The mayors of Plymouth in 1466 
Lud 1523 bore this name (W. P.). Edward Bovey, of London, 

L 2 



148 ho:mes of family names. 

merchant, left a bequest in 1709 for the poor of Staverton (W.A.). 

The Bradridges are found in the district of Ivybridge. 

Thomas Bradi-idge, of Kingston House, left a bequest for the poor 

of Staverton in 1805 (W. A.) At the close of last century, 

John Bragg, or Bragge, Esq., held the manor of Thomcombe,* 
which, with the demesne of Sadborow, the family of Bragge had 
held as a barton since the reign of Elizabeth (P.). The Bragges 

are still seated at Sadborow John Brayley, or Brailey, was a 

Tiverton churchwarden in 1756 (D.) John Bridgeman, bishop 

of Chester in the 17th century, was born at Exeter: his father 
was high sheriff of Exeter in 1578 (Pr.). The Bridgmans are 

now established in the High Hampton district The Brookings, 

a family now scantily represented in the county, were established 
in Plymouth in the 16th century: the mayors in 1511, 1573, and 

1684 bore this name (W. P.) The Brooms are numerous in 

the Honiton district The Buckinghams are well represented in 

the South Molton district. There was an old Exeter family of 
Buckenham, members of which three times filled the office of 
mayor in the reign of Henry Vlll. (1.). The name is sfcill well 

established in this city The name of Burgoyne, or Burgoin, has 

been represented for centuries in the county. William Burgoyn 
was chamberlain of the city of Exeter in 1496, and William 
Burgoyn was sheriff of that city in 1587 (I.). In the 16th and 
17th centuries a gentle family of Burgoin resided at Bideford 
(W.) ; and in the reign of George 1., Thomas Burgoyne was a 
Bideford gentleman (Wat.). In fact, as far back as the time of 
Henry VIII., Jeofterie Burgin was a Bideford townsman (Wat.). 
During the 16th and 17th centuries a gentle family of Burgoin 
flourished in the hamlet of Zeal near South Tawton (P. and W.). 
Robert Burgoine, Esq., Avas a Tiverton churchwarden in 1654 
(D.). In the I3th century this name, in the forms of Burgoyn 
and Burgoyne, occasionally preceded by " De," occurred in Bed- 
fordshire, Cambridgeshire, Gloucestershire, and Somerset (H. R.). 
The Burgoyns in the east of England were at that distant period 
important families, and it is stated by most of the Devonshire 
antiquarians and historians that the Devonshire stock hailed 
originally from Bedfordshire. If this is true, the migration must 
have occu?Ted at a very early date, since not only, as I have 
— 



* Thorncombe was originally a Deyonshire parish, but now it is included i 
Dorset. 



DEVOXSHIRE. 149 

observed above, were high official positions in the city of Exeter 
held by the Burgoyns in the reigns of Henry YII. and Heuiy VIII., 
a circumstance itself not indicative of recent immigration, but as 
far back as the reign of Edward I. the name was represented in 
the west of England in the counties of Somerset and Gloucester 
(H. R.). According to Lower, the signification of the name 

implies the origin of the family in Burgundy Bristowe is an 

old, though a rare, name in Devonshire, It is probably a corruption 
of Bridestow, a place in the county. One of the Ashburton church- 
wardens in the reign of Henry VII. bore this name (A.). The 
name is now established in Lincolnshire. 

C. 

The Canns may have originally taken their name from Cann, 
a parish in Dorset. Jasper Cann was vicar of Tavistock in 1682 
(W. T.). William Cann was mayor of Bristol in 1648, and Sir 
Robert Cann was mayor of that city in 1662 and 1675 (Barrett's 
" Bristol ") . The name is also represented across the border in Corn- 
wall, and is also established in JSTorfolk The Carews were one 

of the most ancient and distinguished of Devonshire families, but 
the name is now uncommon in the county, and, therefore, does not 
occur in my list. The first Carews, said to be of Norman blood, 
came into the county from Wales in the 13th century (H. R.) 

Caunter is one of those old Devonshire names, now rather 

scantily represented in the county, which, since it has for the most 
part received slight notice in the county histories, deserves more 
particularly my attention. In the 16th and 17th centuries the 
Caunters were numerous in the county. John Caunter was one 
of the Ashburton churchwardens in 1577 (A.). Thomas Caunter 
of Stannerton (evidently Staverton), who contributed £25 to the 
Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.), was probably the Thomas Caunter of 
Gulwell in Staverton, who in 1592 left a bequest for the poor of 
Ashburton (W. A.). Robert Caunter, gent., was buried at Ash- 
burton in 1643 (W. A.). In the 16th and 17th centuries, the 
Caunters were also established in Tavistock (W. T.) and Wide- 
combe (Dy.). The name is still to be found in Ashburton and 

Widecombe In the 16th century the Chappells were an Exeter 

family, the mayors of that city in 1569, 1579, and 1588, bearing 
the name (I.), Last century there was a well-known Barnstaple 
family of Chappell, and in the reigns of the first three Georges not 
less than six of the mayors bore this name (G.). The Chappells 



150 H(DMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

ure still represented in Barnstaple and Exeter Chave is an old 

Tiverton name, and the Chaves still have their home in that town 
and its neighbourhood. In the list of Tiverton churchwardens, 

the name of Chave occurs for the years 1738 and 1747 (D.) 

The Cheritons take their name from parishes and hamlets in 

Devonshire and Somerset Robert Chubb was mayor of Exeter 

in the reign of Henry VII. (I.). William Chubb was a Tavistock 
" vitteler " in the time of Cromwell (W. T.) ; and the name is still 

in the Tavistock district The Coakers are now numerous in 

the Horrabridge district. There are Somerset parishes called 
Coker, with one of which a family of the name was associated as 

early as the 13th century (L.) Robert Cockram was mayor of 

Barnstaple in 1520 (C), and the name is still well established in 

ISTorth Devon in the South Molton district Amongst the old 

and distinguished knightly families now scantily represented in 
the county is that of Coffin. The principal stock, of which there 
were many branches, owned the manor of Alvington from the 12th 

to the 17th century (Pr.) The Conetbears were an Ashburton 

family last century ; Samuel Coneybear was a clockmaker there 

in 1790 (W. A.); and the name is still in the district The 

Coplestons or Coplestones, amongst the oldest of notable Devon- 
shire families, now, however, scantily to be found, possessed tbeir 
principal stock in the Coplestons of Copleston and Warleigh ; in 
the 17th century there were several branches, namely, those of 
Bow, Bicton, Otterham, Bideford, etc. (W.). When a national 
fund was being collected at the time of the expected invasion of I 
the Spanish Armada in 1588, three Devonshire gentlemen of this 

name contributed £100 between them (Sp.) The Devonshire 

families of Cornish are now best represented in Newton Abbot and 
its neighbourhood. George Cornish was commander of one of the 
Bideford ships engaged in the Newfoundland trade in the reign of 
William HI. (Wat.). Richard Cornish was mayor of Barnstaple 
in the reign of Anne (C). William Cornish, a Welshman, whc 
settled at St. Issey, Cornwall, in the reign of Mary, is said to have 
been the ancestor of the St. Issey family of the name (Gilbert's 

"Cornwall") The Copps have now their home in the Greal 

Torrington district. Coppe was a common name in Littleham 
Exmouth, in the 17th century (Webb), and even now the name is 

not uncommon in the town By tradition, Crocker is one o 

the most ancient of Devonshire names. An old Devonshire sav 
runs thus : 



DEVONSHIRE. 151 

" Crocker, Cruwys, and Coplestone, 
When the Conqueror came, were at home." 

During the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, the Crockers of Lynham 
in Tealmpton were a knightly family, and filled the office of high 
sheriff of the county (W. and Pr.). The name was established in 
Tavistock and Ashburton in the 15th and 16th centuries (W. T. 
and A,), Sir Hugh Crocker was mayor of Exeter in 1641 (I.). 

The name is also established in Dorset and Somerset The 

Crocombbs, who are now represented in the Barnstaple district, 

possess the name of a Somersetshire parish Crttse or Cruwys 

(sometimes modernised as Crews) was the name of a very ancient 
and distinguished Devonshire family of Netherex, now scantily 
surviv^ing in the county, as at Ashburton (W. A.). The name is 
associated with those of Crocker and Coplestone in the old saw 

before mentioned Cudlipp is another old Devonshire name that 

is not so numerous in the county as it once was. From the 15th 
to the 17th century the name was very common amongst the 
gentry, merchants, and yeomen of Tavistock and its vicinity 
(W. T.) The CuMiNGS have their home in Exeter audits neigh- 
bourhood. Comyn.is the early form of the name, and as such it 
was repi'esented in Tiverton in the 16th century (D.). Comyns 
was the name of an old gentle family of Huish Champflower, 
Somerset, in the 17th and 18th centuries. Comyn was a name found 
in Wiltshire and Gloucestershire in the 13th century (H. R.). 

D. 

Damerell is said to be a corruption of D'Albemarle, the name 
of an ancient family owning the manor of Milton, in Marytavy, 
from the 11th to the 13th century, from whom the parishes of 
Milton Damerel and Stoke Damerel, in part derived their names 

(W. D.) In the 13th century the name of Daniel or Danyel 

occurred in Kent, London, Hunts, Oxfordshire, Devonshire, and 
Derbyshire (H. R.). In our own time it is established, either 
as Daniel or Daniels, in Cornwall, Devonshire, Gloucestershire, 
Worcestershire, South Wales, Kent, Norfolk, and Bedfordshire. 
In Devonshire the name of Daniel is now best represented in the 
Holfiworthy district. There was a John Daneyll, of " Brighe 
broke," in the hundred of Wonford, Devon, in the 13th century 
(H. R.) Deeblb is an old name in the west of England. 



152 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Edward Deeble was mayor of Plymouth in 1727 and 1739 (W.P.). 

(,S'ee under " CoENWALL.") Densham is an old Tiverton name, 

and it still occurs in that neighbourhood. Two Tiverton church- 
wardens, in 1686 and 1725, bore the name of Richard Densham, 
and in 1734 Richard Densham was mayor of the town (D.). To 
this family belonged Thomas Densham, an old and much respected 

Bampton lawyer, lately deceased Dennis is an ancient name in 

Devonshire. In the reign of Henry II. an influential family of 
Le Deneis resided at Pancrasweek, in the hundred of Black 
Torrington, and from them sprang the knightly family of Dennis, 
of Blagdon and Manaton, and the families of Dennis of Holcomb- 
Burnell, Colliscombe, etc., in the 16th and 17th centuries (W. A. 
and W.). Dennis was a Bideford name in the IGth and 17th 
centuries, Anthony Dennis, of Orleigh, being mayor in the reign 
of James 1., whilst Robert Dennis was a Bideford alderman 
somewhere about this period (Wat.). Thomas Dennys was mayor 
of Barnstale in the time of Cromwell, and Nicholas Dennys was 
deputy -recorder of that town in the reign of Charles II. (G.). 
The principal home of the name in this coanty is still to be found 

in Barnstaple and its neighbourhood Dkrky is a rare name in 

the west of England. John Derry was mayor of Plymouth in 1557 
and 1563 (W. P.), and the name is still prominently connected 

with that town The name of Doble now has its home in the 

Cullompton district. Dobil and Dobel were Norfolk names in the 
reign of Edward I. (H. R.). In the same reign De Dobel was a 
Sussex name, and in the 16th century the family ranked with the 

gentry of the county (L.) The name of Doidge, which still has 

its principal home in Tavistock and its neighbourhood, has long 
been connected with that town. Two churchwardens of Tavis- 
tock, in 1670 and 1671, bore this name. In 1705, Richard 
Doidge, gent., resided at Whitchurch, near this town ; and Thomas 
Doidge was a gentleman of Tavistock in 1733 (W. T.). Doidge 
is the name of an old gentle family of Milton Abbot, dating back 
to times before the 16th century, and still represented (W. D.) 

The name of Drake has long been associated with this county. 

Sir Francis Drake, the Elizabethan hero, was born at Crowndale, 
Tavistock, in 1541. He was the first of the line of baronets of 
Buckland-Monachorum, but the baronetcy became extinct about 
1736 (P.). Westcote refers to the ancient gentle family of Drake 
of Ash-in-Musbury, in the 16th and 17th centuries. In the 17th 
century a gentle family of Drake resided at Spratshayes, 



DEVOXSHIRE. 153 

Exmouth (Webb). Henry Drake was mayor of Barnstaple in 
1679 (Gr.)' Drake is also found numerously represented in tbe 
neighbouring county of Dorset. Further reference to this name 

will be found under " Norfolk." Amongst old Tiverton names, 

now scantily to be found in the county, but still surviving iu 
this town, are Duckham* and Dunsford. The Duckhams were 
Tiverton churchwardens in 1691, 1703, and 1743. The Dunsfords, 
who derived their name from a parish in the county, were well 
known in Tiverton last century ; one of them was mayor in 1737, 
and their name occurs frequently in the list of churchwardens 

for that century (D.) Tbe present home of the Devonshire 

DuNNiNGS is iu Okehampton. John Dunning, the first Lord 
Ashburton, took his title from his native town, where he was bom 

in 1731, the son of an attorney (W. A.) Amongst the rare old 

Barnstaple names is that of Delbridge. Some of the Bai'nstaple 
mayors bore this name in the reign of James I. (G.). 

E— G. 

Amongst tbe martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion of 1685 was 
Henry Easterbrook, who met his death on the scaffold at Chard 

("Western Martyrology ") Ellacott or Ellicott was the 

name of a gentle family of Exeter in the 16th and 17th centuries 
(W.), members of which held the office of sheriff of that city in 
1578 and 1601 (I.). Henry Ellicott, who was sheriff of Exeter in 
1578, and Henry Ellacott, a Devonshire gentleman who con- 
tributed £25 towards the Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.), were 
probably one and the same. The name yet survives in this city 

John Elston was sheriff of Exeter in 1718 (I.). Elson was 

a common name in Exmouth in the 17th century (Webb), and 

the name of Elston is yet there The Elworthys, who are 

now at home in the South Molton district, probably take their 

name from a Somersetshire parish The Eveleighs or Evelts 

may be connected in their descent with the old gentle families of 
West Evelegh, Clist St. Lawrence, and Holcomb, in Ottery 
St. Mary, in the 16th and 17th centuries (W.). The name still 

survives in Ottery St. Mary Fairchild is an old Barnstaple 

name, still represented in the neighbourhood. The mayors of that 
town in 1678, 1718, and 1725, bore this name (G.) The name 

* Iliis name is now established in Monmouthshire. 



154 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

of Feeeis is now best represented in the Totnes district. There 
Avas an old Barnstaple family of this name in the 17th century, 
members of which served as mayor of the town in 1632, 1638, 
and 1646 (G.). Richard Ferris (the mayor in 1632) and his 

descendants owned the Middleton estate in Parracombe (G.) 

Foss is now a Kingsbridge name. Robert Foss owned lands in 

Barnstaple in 1674 (G.) The Devonshire home of the name 

of French is in the Ashburton district The Fulfords of 

Fulford, in the parish of Dunsford, are a very ancient and dis- 
tinguished Devonshire knightlj^ family, dating back to the 12th 

century (W. and P.) Furneaux was originally a Somersetshire 

name. The knightly family of De Furneaux, of Norman extrac- 
tion, were lords of Ashington, Somerset, in the 13th and 14th 
centuries, and served as sheriffs of that county (Collinson's 
"Somerset"). Thomas Fuineaux was vicar of Ashbui-ton in 
1501 (W. A.), and Thomas Furneaux was an Ashburton church- 
warden 1532 (A.) The name of Fdrse or Furze is taken from 

hamlets in the county. In the reign of Richard I. a family of 
this name owned the Furse estate in the parish of Spreyton (L.). 
A gentle family of Furse, now extinct, resided in Dean Prior 

in the 16th and 17th centuries (W. A.) Amongst the names 

now rare in the county is that of FowNES. The mayors of 

Plymouth in 1596 and 1610 bore this name (W. P.) Gammoit 

is now a common name in North Devon, in the- districts of 
Ilfracombe and Barnstaple. Two Tiverton churchwardens, in 

1720 and 1751, bore this name (D.) The Gidleys of Gidleigh, 

an ancient and an honourable family, came into the possession of 
the manor of Holcombe^ Winkleigh, in the 17th century, and 
there they have since resided or held property. Bartholomew 
Gidley was a prominent supporter of Chailes II. before the 

Restoration (Worthy's "Winkleigh") The Glanvilles were 

an ancient and distinguished knightly family of Halwel House, in 
Whitchurch, near Tavistock, where they resided for 300 years. 
They have been familiarly connected with Tavistock for more than 
four centuries (W. T. and Pr.). The name still occurs in the 
town and neighbourhood. A branch of the family has long 
established itself in Cornwall, and further reference to the name 

will be found under that county The present home of the 

name of Glass in this county is in the Exbourne district. 
Nicholas Glass was the name o£ the mayor of Barnstaple in 1787 
and 1804 (G.). Glass was the name of two Tiverton churchwardens 



DEVONSHIRE. 155 

in 1723 and 1724 (D.). The name is also established in Wilt- 
shire The GooDRiDGES are now represented in the Totnes 

district. In 1588, Nicholas Goodridge, of this county, sub- 
scribed £50 towards the fund collected for the defence of his 

country against the Spanish A.rraada (Sp.) The mayors of 

Exeter in 1395 and 1407 bore the name of Grexdon (1.). Thomas 
Grendyn was one of the Ashbnrton churchwardens in 1482 (A.). 
There are places of this name in Bucks, and De Gi'endon was a 

Bucks surname in the 13th century (H. 11.) William Green- 

8LADE was mayor of Barnstaple in 1695, and Philip Greenslade 
was mayor in 1703 (G.). The name is now most numerous in 
Tiverton and South Molton, but is still scantily to be found in 
the Barnstaple district ; there are also Greenslades in Somerset. 

During the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Grills or Grylls 

was a notable name amongst the gentry and merchants of 
Tavistock and its neighbourhood (W. T.). The Cornish branch 

is referred to under that county Sampson Jerman left a 

bequest for the poor of Widecombe-in-the-Moor in 1669 (W. A.). 
The name of German is now to be found amongst the farmers of 
South Molton, and that of Germon amongst the gentry of Newton 
Abbott. 

H— K. 

Halse was the name of an eminent family of Kenedon in 
Sherford parish, near Kiugsbridge, during the 15th, 16th, and 
17th centuries; to this family belonged a Justice of the Common 
Pleas and a Bishop of Lichfield, both of whom lived in the reign 
of Henry VI. (Pr.). Matthew Halse was a churchwarden of 
Littleham, Exmouth, in 1730 (Webb), and the name still occurs 
in the town. Halse is a Somerset parish, and an old Taunton 
family bore the name in the 16th century (Toulmin's "Taunton"). 

The Hamlyns are numerous in the Ash burton district, where 

they have long been located, especially in the parish of W^idecombe. 
In the 16th and 17th centuries Hamlyn was a common name in 
Widecombe; in the 17th and 18th centuries a family of Hamlyn 
owned the manor of Dunstone and the farm of Blackslade ; and 
Chittleford, also in Widecombe parish, was the home of a family 
of the name in the reign of Charles 1. (W. A. and Dy.). Hamlyn 

was the name of the mayors of Exeter in 1468 and 1499 (I.) 

Ham is a " west-country " name, most numerous in Somerset, but 
also found in Devon and Cornwall. William Ham, gent., was 



156 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

buried in the south aisle of Tiverton Church in 1534 (D.) 

Hannaford is a common name in the neighbouring districts of 
Kingsbridge and Ashburton. It was a frequent name in Wide- 
combe in the 16th and 17th centuries (Dy.). Henry Hanniford 

was baihff of Exeter in 1485 (I.) Hartnell or Hartnoll is 

an old Tiverton name. George Hartnoll, gent., left a bequest 
for the poor of Tiverton in 1G62 (H.). For the years 1621, 1627, 
1665, and 1746 we find the name of Hartnoll in the list of 
Tiverton churchwardens (D.). Mr. Nicholas Hartnoll, butcher, 

was burnt to death in Tiverton in the fire of 1591 (D.) Heard 

is an old Bideford name of the 16th and 17th centuries, still 
represented in that town and its neighbourhood. William Heard 
was a Bideford alderman in 1610, John Heard was mayor in 

1619, and Walter Heard was mayor in 1627 (Wat.) The 

Heddons, who are to be found in the Stratton district, have taken 

the name of a Devonshire hamlet The ancient gentle family of 

Hele, or Heale, of South Hole, in the parish of Cornwood, gave 
rise to most of the numerous families of Hele that flourished 
in the 16th and 17th centuries at Wembury, Newton Ferrers, 
Holbeton, Fleet, Exeter, etc. ; some of them possessed knightly 
honours, and supplied high sheriffs to the county (W.). The 

name usually occurs now in the forms of Heal and Heale The 

name of Hext is now established in the Ashburton district. A 
gentle family of this name resided at Kingston early in the 17th 

century (W.) Hodder was a frequent name in Exmouth in 

the 17th century (Webb.) The name is now represented in the 

Kingsbridge district Incledon, aname now scantily represented 

in the county, was a Barnstaple name in the reigns of Anne and 
George 1. ; Robert Incledon was mayor of that town in 1712 and 

1721 (G.) Thomas Irish, who died in 1627, was "Vicarius 

Presbyter Choralis " of Exeter Cathedral (P.) Isaac is also 

an old Exeter name still represented in that city. Isacke 
or Isack was the name of the mayor of Exeter in 1665, and 
of two chamberlains of the city in 1653 and 1693 (I.) In the 
reign of Edward I. John Isaak lived in Wiltshire and Walter 
Isaac in Oxfordshire (H. R.), and the name occurs in Domesday. 
Devonshire is now the great home of the name, Isaacs being a rare 
form found in this county, but the name is also represented in 

Gloucestershire Jewell was the name of a gentle family of 

Bowden in the parish of Berry-Narbor or Berryn-Arbor, near 
Ilfracombe, in the 16th and 17th centuries ; to this family belonged 



DEVONSHIRE. 157 

John Jewell, the noted Bishop of Salisbury, who was born at 
Berrjn-Ai'bor in 1522 fW. and Pr.). The name is now well 
represented in the Bideford district, but still occurs in Berrv- 

Narbor. It has also long been a Cornish name Kerslake is 

an old Tiverton name, and it is still to be found in the town. 
Burgesses of that town bore this name in the reign of James I. 
(H.), and Abraham Kerslake was a Tiverton churchwarden in the 
time of Charles II. (D.). Christian Kerslake left a bequest for 

the poor of the town in 1620 (H.) The Kellts are one of the 

oldest of West of England families. They have been seated in 
the Devonshire parish of Kelly near the Cornish border, since the 
12th centmy, and have held the manor and advowson since that 
time (L. and P.). In the 13th century John de Kelli held the 
manor of Hevetruvve or Heavitree (H. R.), which was sold by 
Mr. Kelly in 1773 (Risdon's "Devonshire"). The surname is 
also established in Cornwall where we find an estate named Great 
Kelly in the parish of Egloshayle ; whilst Kelly Bray is a Cornish 

village The Knapmans are well represented in the Exeter 

district. Alexander Knapman of this county contributed £25 for 
the defence of his country at the time of the expected invasion of 

the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.) Kempthorn was the name 

of an old gentle family of T^nacombe, Morwenstow, on the 
Cornish border, in the 16th and 17th centuries; a celebrated 
Admiral of the 17th century belonged to this family (Pr.). The 
Kempthornes of Mullion, Cornwall, whose descendants still reside 
in that parish, belonged to a branch of the same stock; they settled 
in Mullion in the 16th century (Harvey's "Mullion"). 

L— M. 

The Lakes of Devonshire may take their name from a hamlet 
near Okehampton. In the 17th century the name was established 
in Bideford. There was a John Lake of Bideford in the reign of 
James I., and Thomas Lake in the time of William III. com- 
manded one of the Bideford ships engaged in the Newfoundland 
trade (Wat.). The name is still in the neighbourhood. A certain 
Roger de la Lake resided in the reign of Edward I. in the ancient 
Clifton Hundred of Devon (H. R.). This name will be found in 

other counties. Lake is a Wiltshire parish The Langwoethys 

were established in Ashburton and its neighbourhood in the 16th 
and 17th centuries. Alexander Langworthy was an Ashburtcn 



158 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

churchwarden in 1563 (A.) ; and the name was represented in 

Widecombe in the 16th and 17th centuries (Dy.) Christopher 

Lethbridge, mayor of Exeter in 1660, was a wealthy merchant of 
that city ; he was bom at Walston, in the parish of Clansburgh, 

near Okehampton (Pr.). Lethbridge is still an Exeter name 

The Leys are at home in the South Molton district. An old gentle 
family of Ley resided at Trehill iu Dunchideock in the reign of 
George I. ; but in 1735 most of the Leys were carried ofP by 
an epidemic, and but one son, who was at Exeter School, escaped 

to perpetuate the name (P.) TheLovERiNGS are now represented 

in the Barnstaple district, and 300 years ago they were still to be 
found in this part of North Devon. Tjiere was a John Levering of 
Bideford in the reign of Elizabeth, and in the reign of William 
HI. John Lovering commanded one of the Bideford ships 
engaged in the Newfoundland trade (Wat.). Loveringe was 

a common name in Exmouth in the 17th century (Webb) 

The LuscoMBES, who are now numerous in the neighbouring 
districts of Ivybridge and Kingsbridge, probably in most cases 
in the first place derived their name from a hamlet in Harberton 
parish, near Totnes. Luscombe is also an estate near Dawlish, 
that belonged to an ancient family of the same name, and there 
they resided in the reign of Henry V., and probably much earlier, 
since there was a Hugh de Luscombe in the county in the reign 
of Edward 1. (L.). Henry Luscombe of this county contributed 
£25 to the Spanish Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.). Ashburton 
possessed a family of Luscombe in the reign of Henry VIII. ; 
the name occurs twice in the list of Ashburton churchwardens 
of that reign (A.). Chudleigh also owned a family of the name 

in the time of George I. (P.) Lybbe is a name that was 

represented in Tavistock in the 15th and 16th centuries (W. T.). 

Libby is a rare Cornish name Mann was an old and numerous 

Widecombe name in the 16th and 17th centuries, and it still has 
its principal home in the county in that neighbourhood (Dy.). 

Marks was the name of a family of Bideford merchants in 

the 17th and 18th centuries; John Marks was a noted Bideford 
surgeon in the reign of Anne (Wat.). At present, however, 

Honiton is the principal Devonshire home of the name There 

was a Thomas Maunder of Calverleigh in 1684 (H.) Maynard 

is an ancient and distinguished Devonshire name. In the reign 
of Edward HI. John Maynard of Axminster was appointed 
governor of Brest Castle, in Brittany : Sir John Maynard, born 



DEVONSHIRE. 159 

at Tavistock in 1602, was one of the greatest lawyers of his time ; 
the name was represented in Laraerton, near Tavistock, in the 
reign of Edward IV. (W. T.). The Maynards had considerable 
property in Devonshire, and intermarried with several important 
families in the West of England (Polwhele's " Cornwall "). The 

name is also established in Cornwall Melhuish or Melluish 

is a very ancient Devonshire name. In the Hundred Rolls we 
read of Elenora de Melhywys, of Melhywjs, a seat in the barony 
of Okehampton. Thomas Melhinche of this county (evidently 
a misprint for Melhuishe) contributed £25 for the defence of his 
country at the time of the invasion of the Spanish Armada in 
1588 (Sp.). A gentle family of Melhuish resided at Witheridge 
in the 16th and 17th centuries (W.). Richard Melhuish was 
a Tiverton churchwarden in 1656 (D.). Richard Melhuish was 
mayor of Barnstaple in 1708 (C). The name still occurs in 

Witheridge and Tiverton Metherell is an old manor in 

Staverton (W. A.). Richard Metherell was mayor of Barnstaple 

in 1797 (G.), and the name is still in the district Mr. Zachary 

MuDGE was master of the Bideford grammar school in the reign 
of Anne (Wat.). 

N— P. 

Naxcekivell, or Nancekeville, or Nankevil, is at present an 
established Devonshire name ; but last century there was a 
Cornish family of the name. Two of the Cornish Nankivells 
filled the office of mayor of Truro in 1785 and 1787; the incum- 
bent of Piranzabulo in 1783 was the Rev. Edward Nankivell ; 
Dr. John Nankivell of this Cornish family practised in London 
about a century ago : writing of the family some 85 or 90 jears 
since, Polwhele remai-ked that " quiet good sense and social 
good humour seem to characterise the Nankivells " (Polwhele's 

" Cornwall") Newcombe is an old Devonshire name. Richard 

Newcomb was twice mayor of Barnstaple in the reign of Henry 
YI. (G.). In the 16th and 17th centuries, a gentle family of 
Newcombe resided at Great Worthy, in Teignton-Drew (W.). 
The name was well known in Exeter from the 16th to the 18th 
century, and I'^'ewcomb was the name of the I]xeter mayors of 
1612, 1703, and 1713 (1.). Ashburton also possessed a family 
of the name in the 16th century, Newcombe being the name of 
the Ashburton churchwardens of 1550 and 1569 (A.). The name 



1(;0 HOMES OF FAMILY NAVIES. 

still survives in Exeter and Barnstaple NoRRlSH is a name 

well represented in the Crediton district. Richard Norris was 

major of Barnstaple in 1442 (G.) The Noethams take their name 

from a parish in the county The Northcotts of Devonshire 

orio-inally took theii' name from several hamlets in the county. 
The principal family is that of the very ancient and distinguished 
house of Xorthcote of Pynes (P.), which received its baronetcy 
in 1620, and was lately ennobled in the person of Sir Stafford | 

Northcote. The name is also established in Cornwall The 

KoswORTHYS are now at home in the Exeter district. John 
Nosworthy was mayor of that city in 1521 (I.). Nosworthy is ; 
also an old name in the Ashburton district, Notsworthy being 
a manor in Widecombe (Dy.). John Noseworthy was an Ash- 
bui'ton churchwarden in 1503 (A.), and John Nosworthy was 
rector of Manaton 200 years ago (W. A.). This was also an old 
Cornish name in the 16th and ITth centuries: it was borne by 
a justice of the peace of the county in the reign of Elizabeth, 
by a mayor of Truro in the reign of Charles I., and by a high 

sheriff in the time of Cromwell (Polwhele's " Comwall ") 

The Notts have been established as gentry and substantial 
jeomen in Swimbridge for more than 300 years (Kelly's " Devon- 
shire Dii-ectory ") The OxENHAMS were an old South Tawtou 

family (P.). Here belonged John Oxenham, one of the Eliza- 
bethan navigators and the companion of Drake. The name is 

now scantily represented Palfrey was a common Exmouth 

name in the 17th century (Webb) Palk or Palke was for 

centuries a common name amongst the yeomen of Ashburton, 
Little Hempston, Staverton, and that neighbourhood, and from 
the Ashburton Palkes sprang the line of Devonshire baronets of 
the name (W. D.). Palke was an old Widecombe name in the 
16th and 17th centuries (Dy.) (Widecombe being near Ash- 
burton). The name still occxu's in Staverton and Ashburton. 
In the 13th century, Palke was also a Cambridgeshire name 
(H. R.) Amongst old Devonshire names now scantily repre- 
sented in the county is that of Parmixter. It was long connected 
with Barnstaple. Richard Parminter was mayor in 1498, and 
Richard Parminter was deputy recorder of the said town in 1755. 
J. Parminter was a substantial Barnstaple townsman in 1727 
(G.). The name is still to be found in Barnstaple and its neigh- 
bourhood. According to Lower, Parmentier is the old French 
word for a taylor ; and in the Hundred Rolls it takes the forms 



DEVONSHIRE. 1 61 

of Parmentar and Parmenter, occasionally preceded by " Le," and 
occurring in Cambridgeshii-e, Oxfordshire, Norfolk, Kent, etc. 

In this county the Parnells have their home in the Totnes 

district. William Parnell Avas a well-to-do Barnstaple townsman, 
in the reign of Charles I, (G.). The Paraells are now principally 
seated in Devon and Cornwall, but there are a few in Cambridge- 
shire The Passmores are now mostly found in the South 

^lolton district. For ages the name has been mainly confined to 
the area including Tiverton and South Molton. There was a 
Robert Passemer in the hundi-ed of Tiverton in the reign of 
Edward I. (H. R.) In the 16th and 17th centuries there lived 
an ancient and gentle family of Passemore, of Passemere-Hays, 
Tiverton, and of Sutton in Halberton (W.). John Pasmore was 
a Tiverton churchwarden in 1655 (D.). Passmore was also a 

common Exmouth name in the 17th century (Webb) Paty 

was the name of Ashburton churchwardens in 1500, 1541, and 
1566 (A.). Two Tiverton churchwardens, in 1?16 and 1745, 
bore the name of Pate}"- (D.). It is now scantily represented 

in the county Peake was an Exmouth name in the 17th 

century: Simon Peake was vicar of Littleham, Exmouth, in the 
time of James I. (Webb). In the forms of Peek and Peeke the 
name still occurs in the county. East Peek is a part of the 

l)arish of Tetcott The Peaeceys are now mostly established 

in the Honiton district. A knightly family of Pearcehay held 
part of the manor of Talaton in this neighbourhood in the reign 
of Edward IV. (P.) ; so it may be said that, in (me form or 
another, the name has characterised the disti-ict for at least four 

centuries Peard is an old, though a rare, Devonshire name. 

Oliver Peard was the name of the mayors of Tiverton in 1721, 
1743, and 1755 (D.). During the loth and 17th centuries several 
«)f the mayors of Barnstiiple bore this name, and the Peards also 
represented that town in Parliament in the reigns of James I. and 

Charles I. (G.) Pile or Pyle is a name that has long been 

associated with Exeter and its neighbourhood. George Pyle was 
sheriff of Exeter in 1620 (I.). Pile was a common name in 
Exmouth in the 17th century (Webb). The name still mostly 

gathers round Exeter and its district John Pym was bailiff of 

Exeter in 1688 (I.). The Pyms are now represented in the 
Honiton district. John Pym, the noted republican in the time 
of Charles I., was born in 1584, of a well-to-do Somersetshire 
family, that traced its pedigree back to Philip Pym, of Bi-ymmore, 

M 



Iir2 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. Cf^'h^K 

.Somerset, in tlie reign of Edward IV. (L.) The Pethericks, 

of Holsworthj, have taken the name of a Cornish village. In 

Cornwall the surname is usually contracted to Peihick 

Amongst the old Tavistock families now scantily represented is 
that of Pointer, or Poyxter. From the 16th to the 18th century 
this name occurred frequently amongst the gentry and merchants 

of that town (W. T.) Prouse or Prowse is a very ancient 

Devonshire name. In the reign of Edward I., Le Prouz was the 
name of a resident in the barony of Plympton (H. R.). The 
ancient knightly family of Prouz, of Chagford, was still surviving 
in the 17th century (W.). In the 16th and 17th centuries a 
gentle family of Prouse, or Prowse, resided at Exeter, and 
supplied more than one mayor to that city (W. and I.). Prowse 
was a name well established in Tiverton in the 16th and 17th 
centuries : in 1598, Edward Prowse, of Pilyv/ell, in the parish 
of Tiverton, gave £20 to the poor (H ). Prowse is a frequent 
name in the list of burgesses and churchwardens of Tiverton 
during the 17th century (D. and H.). During the 17th and 
18th centuries a distinguished family of Prowse resided at 
Axbridge, Somerset; one of the family last century was five 
times elected knight of the shire for the county of Somerset 
(Collinson's "Somerset"). Prowse is also a name established 

in Cornwall, in the Penzance district Pugsley is a very 

ancient Barnstaple name : John Pugsley was the name of three 
of the early mayors — namely, in 1355, 1468, and 1474, and the 
name occurs in the annals of the town for the 17th century (Gr.). 
liarnstaple is still the home of the name, although some fifteen 
generations have passed away since the stirring days of Cressy 
:ind Poictiers, when John Pugsley was mayor. 

Q-S. 

Quick is a name better represented in Cornwall than in this 
county. In the 17th century this name occurred amongst the 
burgesses and churchwardens of Tiverton (D.)., and it is still 
established in the town. John Quick was a commander of one of 
the Bideford ships engaged in the Newfoundland trade 200 years 

ago (Wat.) Peter Reddicliffe, yeoman, held the manor of 

Cudlipptown in the parish of Petertavy for a few years about a 
century ago (W. D.). The name is still in that part of the parish. 
RiSDOX was the name of an old gentle family of Bableigh, 



DEVONSHIRE. 163 

Pavkham, in the IGth and 17th centuries (W.). ; it still occurs in 
tbis part of North Devon Though Rowe is a niimerons Devon- 
shire name, it is far more numerous in Cornwall. It should, 
however, be noted, that the Rowes of Lamertou are reputed to be 
one of the most ancient stocks of Rowe in the west of England 

(W. D.) Nathaniel Rowland was an Exeter merchant in the 

i-eign of George I. (P.)- The nauie is still in the city Sage is 

a name found in the district of Ottery St. Mary in this county. 
It is also found in Somerset. Le Sage was an Oxfordshire name 

ill the 13th century (H. R.) Salter is a common name in the 

E.x:eter district The Salterns, now scantily represented in the 

county, were an old Bideford family in the 16th and 17th centuries 

(Wat.) The Seldons are still at home in the Bai-nstaple district, i 

The mayors of that town in 1664 and 1692 bore this name (G.) ' 

The name of Seller is now represented in Ottery St. Mary 

and its neighbourhood. In the early part of the 17th century 
there was a Tiverton family of Sellake, and we find this name in 

the list of Tiverton churchwardens for 1612 and 1634 (D.) 

Seward is a numerous name in the Exeter district. In the 17th 
century there was an old Exeter family of Seaward : to this 
family belonged Sir Edward Seaward, formerly mayor of Exeter, 
who died in 1703 at the age of 70 (P.). A knightly family of 
Seaward, perhaps the same, resided at Clyst S. George Court in 

the 17th century (Ellacombe's "Clyst S. George") Shabland 

was a well-known Tiverton name in the 17th and 18th centuries, 
and occurs frequently in the list of Tiverton churchwardens for 
those times (D. and H.). It is still represented in the town. 

Shebbeare was an old Bideford name in the 16th and 17th 

centuries (Wat.), It is now scantily represented Sherman is 

another old North Devon name, now somewhat rare. John and 
Richard Sherman were Bideford aldermen in the reign of Charles I. 
(Wat.). Gabriel Sherman held lands in Barnstaple in the reign 
of Charles II. (G.) A family of the name lived at Neiston, in 

Ottery St. Mary, in the 17th century (Pr.) The Sheuwills and 

Sherrills, who are in both cases established in the district of 
Ivybridge, take the name of a Devonshire parish. Nicholas 

Sherwill was mayor of Plymouth in 1637 (W. P.) Short is an 

old Bideford name. John Short was a Bideford churchwarden in 
1575, and John Short was a Bideford alderman in 1610 (Wat.). 

The name is still in the town The Sladers are now established 

in the North Moltun district. In the reign of James I. there wa.'j 

M 2 



y/iyi^ 



164 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. "^ '^ ^^ 

a gentle family of this name in Bath in North Tawton parish, 
hailing recently, according to Westcote, from Barondown in Kent. 

The Smerdons are still mainly to be found in Ashburton and 

the neighbourhood, a district they have frequented for many 
generations. A family of this name resided in Widecombe in the 
16th and 17th centuries (Dy.). The Rev. Thomas Smerdon was 
master of the Ashburton grammar school in the middle of last 
century (W. A.). There were Smerdons in Tavistock in the 
15th century (W. T.) Snbll is a characteristic west of Eng- 
land name, having its home in Devon and Cornwall. John 
Suell, vicar of Heavitree, and formerly resident canon of Exeter 
Cathedral, died in 1679, at the age of 70 ; his son, John Siiell, 
who died at an advanced age in 1717, was three times mayor of 
Exeter, and represented that city in Parliament (P.). There are 
Snells still in this city. Oliver Snell was sheriff of Bristol in 
1623 (Barrett's "Bristol "). The Cornish Snells are represented 
in the district of Liskeard. Snel was a name found in Oxford- 
-"hire, Derbyshire, and Shropshire in the 13th centm-y (H. R.), 

There are a few Snells in Suffolk The Snows are now found 

in Devon, Essex, and Staffordshire. In the 13th century the name 
was represented in the form of Snou ifn Wilts, Bucks, Oxford- 
shire, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The Sopers are 

now found in the districts of Kirigsbridge and Newton Abbott. 
John Soper was an Ashburton churchwarden in the reign of 
Henry YII. (A.). Peter le Sopere lived in Cambridgeshire in the 

13th century (H. R.) Sparke was ihe name of a gentle family 

of Plymouth in the 16th and 17th centuries : John Sparke was 
mayor of Plymouth in 1583 (P. and W. P.). Sparke was the 
name of two Ashburton churchwardens in the reign of Elizabeth 
(A.). Sparks is now the usual form of the name in Devon and 

Somerset The Sprys were established in Tavistock in the 17th 

and 18th centuries (W. T.), and they still occur in the district. 

(See under "Cornwall.") The Spurrells, or Spurles, may 

have originally taken their name from Spurwell in the parish of 

Wembury Sqqire is a numerous name in Barnstaple and its ^ 

neighbourhood. The mayors of that town in 1353 and 1471 bore 
this name (G.) The Stacets are represented in the Holds- 
worthy district. The name occurred in Tavistock in the 13th and 

in the 14th century (H. R. and W. T.) Joan Stanbury gave 

£20 to the poor of Barnstaple in 1772 (G.). The Stanburys are 
still established in this neighbourhood. 



DEVOXSHIRE. 165 



The Tollers were Tavistock mercbants in the 17th and 18th 

centuries (W. T.). Toller is a Dorset village Tothill or 

TuTHiLL is a name now rare in the county. The mayors of 
Exeter in 1552, 1668, and 1677 bore this name (I.). In 1755 
Thomas Tothill, Esq., of Dolbeare, aged 60, was buried at Ash- 
burton (W. A.). A few of the name still reside in Exeter. Tothill 

is a Lincolnshire parish The Tozers hav^e been established in 

Ashburton for more than two centuries (W. A.). Moses Tozer 
was an Ashburton tradesman 200 years ago : a family of the name 
lived there last century, and the name is still to be found there. 
(W. A.). Henry Tozar, native of North Tawton, was an eminent 

17th century divine (Pr.) The Tremletts are now found in 

the Crediton district. Nicholas Tremlett, a Tiverton clothier, who 
was a churchwarden in 1623, left in 1652 a bequest for the poor 
artificers of Tiverton (H. and D.) The Tkotts are now estab- 
lished ill the neighbouring districts of Honiton and Cullompton. 
John Trott, one of the martyrs of Monmouth's rebellion in 1685, 
died on the scaffold at Bridgewater (" Western Martyrology "). 

Tucker is a very characteristic west of England name. Its 

great home is in Devonshire, and it is especially numerous in the 
Barnstaple district. It is also found in numbers in Somerset, and 
occurs too, but much less frequently, in Cornwall, Dorset, Hants, 
and Wilts. Tucker was the west of England name for a fuller as 
recently as the 17th century, and in some places in the west 
f nlliug-mills are still called tuck-mills or tucking-mills. Tucking- 
mill, a village near Camborne, in Cornwall, thus dei'ives its name. 

TuRPiN was a common name in Exmouth in the 16th and 17th 

centuries. William Turpin was churchwarden of Littleham in 
1575 (Webb). Turpin is also an ancient east of England name ; 
further reference to it will be found under " Essex." 

Y— Z. 

Charles Venn was mayor of Barnstaple in 1761 (G.). Venn 
is a Devonshire place-name. There are a few Venns in Somerset. 

William Vennee was a Crediton gentleman in the time of 

Cromwell (P ) ; the name is still in the town The Wadlands 

were an ancient family of Bideford merchants of the 16th and 
17th centuries. Mr. Thomas Wadland was six times mayor of 



16(5 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Bideford in the reigns of James I. and Charles I. Eichard 
Wadlaad commanded one of the Bideford ships engaged in the 
Newfoundland trade in the reign of William III. (Wat.). This 
branch of the family, according to Watkins, became extinct a 
century ago. The name, however, still survives in Barnstaple and 

other places around The Wakehams, who are numerous in the 

district of Ivybridge, possess the name of a village in the neigh- 
bouring county of Dorset The Westcotts are now established 

in the North Molton district. Westcote was the name of an 
old gentle family of Shobrook that dated back to the reign of 
Henry VIII. (W.). The Westacotts are at home in Barn.staple 
and its vicinity. Martin Westacot was a Barnstaple man in the 
reic^n of Anne (G.) Westacott is the name of hamlets in North 
Devon. There are also hamlets named Westcott in the county. 
In fact, Westcott and Westcote are common place-names in the 
south of Eno-land. Wescott is the Somerset form of the surname. 

Westlake is an old Barnstaple name. Thomas Westlake was 

mayor in 1618; and in 1636 Katherine Westlake of Barnstaple, 
widow, left a yearly bequest for the poor artificers of the toAvn 

(G.). There is a place thus called in Ermington parish 

Wheaton was a frequent Exmouth name in the 17th century 

(Webb), and it still occurs in the town Amongst the old 

Devonshire knightly families now scantily represented in the 
county is that of Whtddon of Chagford in the 16th and in the 

17th century (P.) The Whiteways or Whiteawats bear an 

ancient Devonshire name. John de Wyteweye, of the Teignbridge 
hundred in the reign of Edward I., is referred to in the Hundred 
Rolls. An ancient estate in Kingsteignton, near Chudleigh, is 
called Whitew^ay, and a family of White way resided in Chudleigh 
in the 16th and 17th centuries (Jones' "Chudleigh" and West- 
cote's " Devon "). The name was established in Ashburton in the 
16th century, Whytewaye being the name of Ashburton church- 
wardens in 1539 and 1578 (W. A. and A.). The name is still 

represented in Chudleigh and Ashburton The Willings are 

represented in the Kingsbindge district. Willing was a Bucks 

name in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The Widdicombes and 

Withecomes or WiTHETCOMBES have taken the names of parishes 
and villages in the county. Lawrence Wethecombe was an Ash- 
burton churchwarden in 1538 : there was a John Wideycombe in 
Ashburton in 1729 (W. A.). The names still occur in this neigh- 
bourhood and in the Totnes district The Wkefords possessed au 



DEVONSHIRE. 1()7 

estate in the parish of Hennock in the 16th century (P.). Wrey- 
ford was tbe name of Ashburton churchwardens in 1507, 1544, 
and 1575 (A.). The name is now well represented in the adjacent 

district of Newton Abbott The Wottons were a landed family 

of Inglehourne, in the parish of Harberton, in the 16th and 17lh 

centuries (Dj.) Weoth is at present a Kinysbridge name. 

AVroth was the name of a line of baronets of Petherton Park, 

Somerset, in the 17th century (Collinson's " Somer.^^et ") 

Amongst the ancient Devonshire gentle families that still linger 
in the county are those of Yarde. The Yards of Bradley in High 
AVeek were considered an ancient family 250 years ago (W.). The 
Yardes of the Whiteway estate in Kingsteignton, and of Culver 
House, Chudleigh, belong to one of the most ancient of Devon 

families (Jones' " Chudleigh ") The Yeo family have lived on 

the estate of the Duke of Bedford in Swimbridge for the last 800 
years (Kelly's "Devonshire Directory "). 



Y^-i 



/7 



^te^L-^- 



168 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



DORSETSHIRE. 

jq-QTE. — The asterisk indicates tliat a name, thougjli characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 

GrENERAL Names (30-40 coiinties). 
*Sm;th White 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Andrews (Blandf ord) J Cole 
Bennett I Coles 

Hunt 



*Ilead 

*Saunders 

*Young 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Barnes 
*Bishop 

Cox 
*Cross 
* Curtis 
f Dean 
I Deane 



*Ford 


Miller 


*Fowler 


*Par8on8 (Sherborne) 


*Lane 


Eose 


*Lawrence 


*Stone 


*Mar.-'h 


*Symond8 


*Mile8 


Warren 



District Names (4-9 counties). 



Abbott 


*Gale 




Norton 


Bartlett 


*Godnarcl 




*Perrett 


Bentley (Chard 


*Gould 




*Pike 


Burt 


Groves 




^ r Randall 
* I Eandell 


Cave 


Hiscock 


(Shaftesbury) 


Drake 


*Hodges 




Whittle 


Franipton 


Jeffeiy 







DORSETSHIRE. 



169 



Baverstock 

Budden (Wimborne) 

Churchill 

Cobb 

Crocker 

Dibben 

Dimning 

Galpin 



County Names (2-3 counties). 

*Guy *Pitinan 

*Hibberd f Randall 

Hoare I- Rendell 

*Laver Roper 

Lush Senior 

Mullins Strange 

Paul *Vine 



Pecvliae Names (confined mostly to this 


county). 


Antell 


Gillingham 


Munckton 


Ballam 


Guppy 


Peach 


Bastable 


Hames 


Pomeroy 


Besent 


Hann 


Rabbetts 


Bowditch 


Hansford 


Ridout (Blandford) 


Brickell 


Hayter 


Ross 


Brine (Shaftesbury) 


Homer (Dorchester) 


Rossiter 


Bugg (Sherborne) 


Honeyfield 


Samnays 


Bugler 


Hounsell 


Scutt 


Caines 


Jesty 


Shute (Gniinghani) 


Cake 


Kellaway 


Spicer 


Chilcott 


Keynes 


Spiiike 


Cluett 


Kingman 


Studley 


Dominy 


Larcombe 


Swaffield 


Dorey 


Legg 


Symes (Dorchester) 


Dunford 


f Lodder 
I Loder 


fopp 


Burden 


Trowbridge 


Ensor 


Mayo 


TufEn (Shaftesbury) 


Fifett 


Meaden 


Wakely (Beaminster) 


Eooks 


Meatyard 


Walden 


Foot 


Meech 


Wareham 


Gatehouse 


Milledge 


Wrixon 


Genge 







NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC DORSETSHIRE 

NAMES. 
(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Aidhorities indicated hy the folloiving abbreviations : — 

E. indicates Ellis' " Weymouth and Melcombe Regis." 

H. „ Hutchins' " Dorsetshire." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

S. „ Sydenham's " Pcole." 



170 HO-AIES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

A— C. 
The family of Bowditch anciently held in part a manor and 
farm in Chardstock, which bore their name. John Bowditch, of 
Cbardstock, gent., had property there in the time of Elizabeth 

(H.) The Brines of the neighbourhood of Shaftesbury had a 

representative of their name in Marnhull 300 years ago The 

BuDDENS owned property in Holwell, Cranbourne parish, in the 
reign of Elizabeth ; and in the middle of last century there was a, 
family of the name in the neighbouring village of Ashmore (H ). 
At present the home of the name is in and around Wimborne, so 
that it would seem that it has only shifted some seven or eight 

miles in three centuries The family of BuGG, of the vicinity of 

Sherborne, have probably an ancestor in John Buggo, who owned 
land in We.st Tynehani some time in the 16th century (H.). Both 
Bugg and Bugge were not uncommon names in Oxfordshire in the 
reign of Edward T. (H. R.) ; and Lower suggests, with the great 
probability of his surmise being correct, that this name is a form 
of the Saxon names Bucge and Bogue. This explanation is also 
advanced by Ferguson in his " Surnames as a Science." He refers 
to Anglo- S.ixon landholders named Buga and Bugga, and tells us 
that these names, together with Bucge, are also ancient German 
names. In fact, at the present day we find Bagge as a surname 
both in Germany and Scandinavia. To return, however, to the 
English representatives of the name, we learn from Deering's 
"• Nottingham," that in the reign of Mary I., the Bugges, as 
Merchants of the Staple, were persons of considerable note in the 
town of Nottingham. The Rev. H. Bugg was incumbent of 

Bleasby, Notts, in 1751 The Burts owned the estate of Worths 

in Catstock from the time of Charles II. to the end of last century, 
when they sold it. There was a gentle family of Burt in Poor- 
stock last century (H.) In the troublous year of 1645, there 

were sequestrated in this county an estate in Whitchurch Canoni- 
corum belonging to Mr. William Chilcot, and the impropriation 
called St. Luke's, in the parish of Burton Bradstock, belonging to 
Lieutenant-Colonel Chilcott; this last fell into the hands of a Mr, 
Chilcott in 1650, who afterwards sold it (H.). Chilcott is the 
name of a tithing in Somerset, and there are places named Chilcote 

in Derbyshire and Staffordshire The distinguished Dorset 

family of Churchill, whence sprang the Duke of Marlborough, 

resided at Mintern in the I6th and 17th centuries For Caixks 

see under " Keynes." 



DORSETSHIRE. 171 



D-G. 



The DiBBENS, of Manston, flourished in the 17th and 18th 
centuries. Thej were patrons of the living' of Pontmel between 
1700 and 1812, and the rectors were members of the family. Early 
last centuiy they also held a farm in Beaminster (H.) Through- 
out the 18th century the family of Dore, the ancestors, I conclude, 
of the present family of Dorey, held the Povington estate in West 
Tyneham ; in 1722 there was a Robert Dore of Limingtou, Somer- 
set (H.) Devenish is an old Dorset name, though not now 

sufficiently frequent to be placed in my list. A gentle family of 
Devenish resided at Gillingham in the 17th century (H.). Deven- 
ish was the name of a Weymouth chief magistrate in 1828 (E.) 

Drake is a characteristic Dorset name. A gentle family of 

Drake owned Childhay manor. Broad Windsor, in the reign of 
Charles 1. ; and John Drake was a West Chelborough gentleman 

in the reign of Charles 11. (H.) The ExsORS, of Dorset, may 

be descended, like the Ensors of Rollesby Hall, Norfolk, from the 
Edensors of Staffordshire, who derived their name from a Derby- 
shire parish (L.) In the reigns of Elizabeth and James 1., a 

Dorset family of Dunning held land in Brockhampton, Buckland; 
the Dunnings of Beaminster in the last century owned Chaple 
Marsh farm; Henry Dunning, M.D., of Beaminster, died in 1762 
(H.). The Dunnings are also established in Devon, Warwickshire, 

and Yorkshire The Fifetts, of Dorset, are evidently descended 

from the ancient family of Fif-hide, that held land in the present 
parish of Fifehead Neville in the reign of Edward 111., and owned 
the patronage of the living, A century ago this parish was more 
correctly spelt Fifehide Nevil, as indicating the number of hides 
it contained. In 1781 died John Fifed, of West Orchard, in Great 
Fontmel (H.). In mediaeval times we find the surname of Fifhide 
or Fifhyde in Oxfordshire and Wilts, as at the close of the 13th 

century (H. R.) The family of FoOKS probably descend from 

the family of Foukes, to whom was leased during the 17th century 
a part of the manor of Simondsbury, which passed out of their 
hands in 1694. This old Dorset family, says Hutchins, derived 
their descent from "gentlemen of good esteem in Staffordshire." 

The name of Foot was represented by a family in Mapouder 

parish in the latter half of last century; and at the same time 
there lived Joseph Foot, M.D., in Castleton, near Sherborne (H.), 
There were Galpins in Marnhull, Obberton, and Blandford, 



172 HO.MES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

during last century ; and a vicar o£ Portisham in the time of 

Charles II. bore this name (H.) ; the name is still in Mamhull 

The GiLLiNGHAMS evidently derive their name from the Dorset 
town thus called. In 1695 Roger Gillingham, Esq., of the Middle 
Temple, founded a school and almhouse in Wimborne Minster; 

and the name was represented last century in Holwell (H.) 

GoDDARD was tlie name of a Gillingham family in the 17th century 
(H.). Richard Goddard was mayor of Poole in 1559 (S.). The 

name is still in Gillingham. (See under " Wilts," etc.) For 

nearly four centuries, in fact as far back as the parish registers 
enable us to trace the name, the principal home of the Guppys has 
been in Dorset, close to the Somerset and Devon borders, as shown 
by the wills in Somerset House ; several families of well-to-do 
yeomen bearing this name resided in Halstock, South Perrott, 
Cheddington, and Frampton, during the 16th and 17th centuries. 
Pick3'eate, Pykeyeate, or Picket, in South Perrott, was the 
residence of a family of Guppy or Guppie as far back as the reign 
of Elizabeth, and the name has since been frequent in the South 
Perrott registei's until within the last twenty years. From Dorset 
the name extended into the surrounding counties of Somerset, 
Devon, and Wilts, in the last two of which it is now very rare or 
extinct. A family of Guppy resided at Farway, Devon, from the 
beginning of the 17th century (perhaps earlier) until a generation 
ago ; to this stock belonged the Guppys of Sidbury Castle in the 
early part of this century. Somerset has long known the name. 
Amongst the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685 were 
William and Justinian Guppy, of Taunton, who were transported 
to Barbadoes, and died both of them on the voyage ; whilst Roger 
Guppey was executed at Bridgwater (Hotten's " American Emi- 
grants;" "Western Martyrology "). A gentle family of Guppy 
resided at Chard last century, and to the Somersetshire Guppys 
belonged the founder of the present engineering firm at Naples. 
It is remarkable that after nearly 400 years the name yet lingers 
around its old Dorset homes in Halstock and South Perrott ; a few 
of the name are still to be found in Somerset. The extinct Wilt- 
shire family is referred to under that county. 

H— K. 

The Hanns of Dorset may find an ancestor in Robert Hann, 
gent., of Corfe, Somerset, who owned a farm in Worth Maltravera 



DORSETSfflRE. 173 

pi'obably early last century (H.) Hugli Hansford, who died in 

Loders in 1677, made a benefaction of four acres for the poor of 
the parish ; Robert Hansford was churchwarden of Loders in 

1786 (H.). The name is still in Loders The family of Hayter 

had an estate and seat in East Creech, Knolle parish, in the 17th 
and 18th centuries ; but in 1770 it passed out of their hands. 
During the latter half of last century there were two well-known 
Shaftesbury squires of this name, and the name is still in that 
town. The great tithes of Sydling St. Nicholas, in the first 
quarter of last century, were held by a Mr. Hayter. John Hayter, 
son of the rector of Sutton Mandeville, Wilts, lived for half a 
century in Melbury Abbas, and died in 1770 ; his son (apparently) 

was churchwarden of Melbury Abbas, Dorset, in 1786 (H.) 

The Dorset Hiscocfcs are mostly gathered around Shaftesbury. 
The name, which is still well represented in Wilts, occurred in the 
parish of Berwick Saint John in that county in the middle of the 

17th century (Hoare's "Wilts") The Homers of Dorchester and 

its neighbourhood possess an ancient Dorset surname. According 
to Lov/er, there was a Thomas de Homere in 1838 who held lands 
in this county ; Homer is also the name of an ancient Staffordshire 
family, and there is a hamlet thus called in the adjoining county 
of Shropshire Giles Hounsell was chief magistrate of Wey- 
mouth and Melcombe Regis in the reign of Charles I. (E.). 

Hounsell is still a Weymouth name The Kellawats pi-obably 

take their name from a parish in Wilts. The Kelways or Kella- 
•ways were an ancient family of Chilfrome, vshere they lived during 
the first half of the 16th century, and at the same time one of the 
name owned land in Long Bridy and AUington (H.). In the 
latter part of the 15th century, William Kelway, gent., held land 
in Sherborne parish, and " seems to have been ancestor to a family 
after seated at Lillington " (H.). Through last century there was 
a well-to-do family at Piddle Hinton bearing this name (H.). 
Joseph Kelloway, one of the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion in 
1685, met his death on the scaffold at Somerton in Somersetshire 

(■' Western Martyrology ") The ancient family of Keynes 

owned the manors of Stoke Wake, Candel Wake, and Hull, as 
well as estates in Wilts, during the 15th and 16th centuries. 
Still further back, they owned part of the manor of Combe Keynes 
during the 14th century (H.). This name was usually spelt 
Keynes, but sometimes Kaines, so that probably the present Caines' 
of this county hail from the same stock The Dorset Hulls 



174 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

])robably derive their name from a place in the county Havv- 

i,AXD was the name of fifteen mayors of Poole from 1494 to 15ti9 
(S.)- The name is now rare in the county. 

L-Q. 

The name of Lego was represented in Stourminster last century ; 
and a gentleman named Henry Bilson Legge owned property 

at the same time in Chilfrome (H.) The family of LoDDtR 

or LoDER probabh' takes its name from Loders, a Dorset parish. 
About the middle of the 17th century, Andrew Loder, of Dor- 
chester, gent., came into possession of the Osehill estate in 
Wotton Glanvile, and it remained in the family until 1728. There 
was a family of Loder in Stourton Candel about the middle of 

last century (H.) Some well-known merchants of Shaftesbury 

in the last century bore the name of Ldsh ; and in ] 796 one of 

tliem was mayor of that town (H.) The name of Mayo was 

represented in Great Fontmel in the latter half of last century. 
About the same time, Mr. George Mayo, of Lower Compton, 

owned the West Holway estate in Catstock (H.) Ihe name of 

Meatyard, in the form of Meatyeard. occurred in Gillingham in the 
lieginning of last century (H.). According to Lower, Mete-yard 

was the mediaeval name for a measuring stick In 1780, Thomas 

Meech, M.D., came into possession of the manor of Little Bridy : 
(hiring last century the same family held estates in Charminster 
and Straiton, and were patrons of the living of Long Bridy (H.). 

In 1645 a family of Mullins or Mullens, still repiesented in 

the locality, owned land in Wimborne Minster; and during the 
latter half of the 16th century the family of Mullens or Molyns 

possessed the manor of West Hall in Folke (H.) The Dorset 

McNCKTONS may find a kinship with the Rev. C. Monckton, master 
of a school at Liskeard, in Cornwall, in the early part of last 

century (Polwhele's "Cornwall") John Pittman was a pro- 

minent Poole townsman in the reign of Charles IL (S.)., and the 

name is still in the toAvn Last century Mr. William Gaisford 

Peach owned Hide farm in Bere Regis (H.) The name of 

Paul, in the form of Paull, was represented in the 17th century in 

Drempton and iS'etherway in Broad Windsor (H.) Pomeroy 

is an ancient Devonshire surname, and the name of a parish (Berry 
Pomeroy) in that county. From the Conquest to the reign of 
Edward VI. the powerful and ennobled family of De Pomeroy 



DORSETSHIRE. 1 7 

owned the manor of Berry Pomeroy and mach other property in 
that county (Worthj-'s "Ashburton"). There are still a few of 
tlie name in Devonshire. 

R— Z. 

The present family of RiDOUT, of the vicinity of Blandford, 
possess namesakes or kinsmen in the Rideouts of Shrowttm of last 
century. About a hundred years ago the Rev. P. Rideout, of 
Hooks Wood, Famham, owned a farm in Ewern Minster (H.). 

The Dorset name of Ross is probably a variation of Russ. a 

name that has characterised the adjacent county of Wilts for 

many centuries Samways is an old Dorset name. There seem 

to have been two or three principal stocks. In the first place, 
there was a gentle family of the name in Beaminster 200 years 
ago; and there was a family of Samways of Broadway in the 17th 
century that attained some note, and spj-ang from Henrv Samways 
of Bincombe, who lived about the beginning of the lOth century 
(H.). The family of Samways, of I'oUer Fratrum and Winter- 
bourne St. Martin, in the 17th century, claimed descent from 
John Samways, of Dorchester, who lived in the middle of the 
previous century (H.). Robert Samwise was chief magistrate of 
Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in 1517 (E.). Samways is still 

a Weymouth and a Dorchester name The Dorsetshire SCUTTS 

may represent the Somersetshire Scotts, but the name as such has 
long characterised Dorsetshire. Skutt was the name of eleven 
mayors of Poole from 1621 to 1742 (S.)., and as Scutt it still 

occurs ill the town The Shutes of Gillingham bear the name 

of an old Devonshire family and of a Devonshire parish A 

family of Senior lived in Marnhull last century (H.), and still 

reside there The Spicers lived in Bishop's Candle or Cauiidle 

liishop last century (H.), and still reside there. Several of the 
mayors of Exeter bore this name from the 16th to the 18th 

century (Izacke's "Exeter") Several of the mayors of Bide- 

ford, Devon, in the 17th century, bore the name of Strange 

(VVatkins' " Bideford ") Spurrier was the name of seven 

mayors of Poole during last century (S.). It is now rare in the 

county Joseph Swaffield was the name of the chief magistrate 

of Weymouth in 1745, 1752, and 1764 (E.) In 1588, John 

Studley of Petersham, gent., gave £2o to the fund collected for 
the national defence against the Spanish Ai-mada. A family of 



176 ho:mes of fajmily x.urES. 

this name osvned Wantsley farm in Broad Windsor two centuries 
ao-o (H.), and the name is still in the district. Studley is the 

name of places in the counties of Wilts, Oxford, etc Stmes, 

which is at present well represented around Dorchester, is an old 
Dorset name. In the 17th century a family of Sjmes resided at 
and owned property in East Melplash in J^etherbury ; bat last 
century the family lived also in Beaminster, one of them, Richat-d 
Symes, barrister-at-law, who died in 1783, beiug a great lover of 
antiquities (H.). The name is still in Netherbury and Beaminster. 

The Dorset family of Topp probably belong to the ancient 

Wiltshire family of Topp, now extinct, that held the manor of 
Stockton in Wilts from before the R'^formation until the close of 
last century, when it passed by marriage into the possession of 
Robert Balch, Esq., of St. Audries, Somerset (Hoare's "Wilts"). 

The Tkowbeidges evidently took their name from the well- 

kuown Wiltshire town ; whilst the Warehams similarly derived 
their name from a toAvn in Dorsetshire. Hutchins gives the 

pedigree of an ancient family of Warham of Osmington A 

family named Whittle lived in Stourton Candel last century : 
Juhn Whittle was a churchwarden there in 1786 (H.). 



DURHAM. 



177 



DURHAM. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates tliat a name, though characteristic 
of this county, is more numerous elsewhere. The capital 
letters following a name are explained under the list of 
Cumberland names. 



*Brown, S. 
*[Iall, S. 
* Johnson 



Geneeal Names (30-40 counties). 



Robinson 
*Smith, S. F. 



*Taylor, S. 
•Wilson, S. F. 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



f Foster 

I Forster 

*Harrison 

*Jackson, S. F., C. t<. 

*Lee 

*Paiker 



Reed 

(Reid in Scotland, S.) 

Richardson, B. 
*Shepherd (Darlington), 

G. S. 
*Thompson, L. 

(Thomson in Scotland, S.) 



Walker, S. 

Watson, S. 
♦Wood, S. 
*Young (Durham), S. 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Atkinson 
*Bell, S. F., B. 
*Dawson (Darlington), 

C.S. 
♦Dixon 

(Dickson in Scotland, 
C.S., S. F.) 
*Dunn, S. F. 

Elliott, B. 

Gibson, S. F. 



*Hardy 
(Hardie in Scotland, 
G.S.) 
*Hart 
*Holmes 
*Lamb 
*Miller, S. 
*Newton 
♦Nicholson, B. 



♦Oliver, B. 
*Scott, S. F., B. 
♦Simpson, S. 

Stephenson (Darling- 
ton) 

Stevenson, S. F. 

Walton (Darlington) 

Wilkinson 
♦Williamson, S. 

N 



178 



HOMES OF FAiULY X A:\IES. 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



♦Anderson, G-. S. 
Bainbridge (Darling- 
ton) 
*Coulson 

{Crow 
Crowe 
Davison 

(Davidson in Scot- 
land, S.) 
Dobson 
*Dodds, S. F. 
f Emmerson (Darlington) 
L Emerson 



*Grabam, S. F., C. S. 

Hodgson 

Hull 

Hunter, G-. S. 

Hutchinson 

(Hutchison in Scot- 
land, S.) 

Lawson, S. 

Parkin 
*Peacock 
*Pickering 
*Robson, B. 

Rutter 



Sanderson 

Snowdon 
*Sowerby (Darlington) 
^ J Storey 
I Story 

♦Thornton (Darlington) 
*Todd (Darlington), S. F. 

Tweddell 
*Wade 

Whitfield 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Adamson, S. F. 


Gibbon 


♦Potts 


r Allinson 
\ Alhson 


♦Hedley 


Eaine 


♦Henderson, S. 


♦Ridley 


♦Angus, S. 


♦Heslop 


♦Ritson 


Blackett 


♦Jobson 


Snowball 


♦Blair, S. F. 


♦Laws 


♦Stobbs 


Blenkinsop 


LongstafP 


♦Swinburne 


Collingwood 


Lowes 


Tate (Sunderland) 


Coll in son 


Lowrey 


(Tait in Scotland, B.) 


Curry 


Maddison 


r Tindale 
L Tyndal 


(Currie in Scotland, 


J Maugham 
I Maughan 


S. F.) 


♦TurnbuU, B. 


Dent (Darlington) 


Meek 


Vickers (Darlington) 


Dowson 


♦Milburn 


♦Wallace, S. F., C. S. 


♦Drvden 


♦Nixon 


♦Waugh, B. 


Errington 


Pattison 


Wheatley 


♦Featherstone 


(Patterson in Scot- 


♦Winter 


♦Fothergili 


land, S.) 





Peculiab Names (confined mostly to this county) . 



Applegarth 
Beadle 


Bui-don 
Callender 


Bruce, S. 


Coatsworth 


f BuUmaa 
I Bulman 


ton) 
Eggleston 



(Darling- 



Greenwell 
J Heppell 
I Hepple 

Hewitson 

Hopps 





DURHAM. 




/ Jameson 
1- Jamieson, S. 


Mallam (Sunderland) 


Surfcees 


Pallister 


Tarn 


Kirkup 


Pease 


Tinkler 


Kirtoa 


Proud 


Walburn 


MacLaren, C. S. 


Queleh 


Wearmoutli 


Makepeace 


Shotton 





179 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC DURHAM 
NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarilj in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



A.uthorities indicated hy the following abbreviations .- — 

B. indicates Brewster's " Stockton-on-Tees." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymioa Britannica." 

Long. „ Longstaffe's " Darlington." 

S. „ Surtees' " County of Dui'bam." 

Note. — Hutchinson's " County of Durham" would be a most useful work 
if it possessed an index. 



A— C. 

Applegarth, a woi*d signifying " orcliard," was probably at 
one time a more generally distributed surname than it is at 
present. As Appelgar and Le Appelgart it occurred in Bucks and 

Essex in the 13th century (H. R.) Bainbridge is a name that 

is also well represented in one form or another in the neighbour- 
ing counties of Yorkshire and Westmoreland. (See under those 
counties.) The old family of Bainbrigg of the county of Durham 
dates back to the 15th century; and last century several mayors 
of the city of Durham bore the name of Bainbridge (S.), which is 
yet represented there. At present the name is mostly established 
in the Darlington district. In fact Bainbridge has been a 
Darlington name since the time of Elizabeth (Long.). It has also 

N 2 



\ 



180 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

been establislied in Stockton-on-Tees since tlie middle of the 16th 
century, when John Baynbridge was mayor (B.). There is a seat 

called Bainbridge in the county The name of Backhouse has 

been notably connected with Darlington both in the past and in 

the present century (Long.)- (See under " Cumberland") In 

the reio-n of Henry VIII., the name of Bulman occurred in Black- 
well, Darlington, and in Ripon (Long.) Blackett is a name 

that was represented in the county as far back as the reign of 
Edward III., when Richard de Black-heved or Blackhead was 
forester of Stanhope, near Darlington (L.). The name is also to 

be found amongst the existing Northumberland gentry Blen- 

KiNSOP is the name of an ancient border family, and there is a 
township thus called in Northumberland. At present, however, 
the principal home of the name is in the county of Durham, where 
a family of Blenkinsop held the manor of Birtley during the 15th 
and 16th centuries (S.). Blenkinsop was a Darlington name last 

century (Long.), and is still represented there Burdon is the 

name of two townships in the county. From the end of the 15th 
to the close of the 18th century eighteen mayors of Stockton-oU' 
Tees bore this name (B.), which is still represented in the town 
Darlington also has possessed the name ever since the 14th 

century, when it was written " De Burdon" (Long.) The old 

gentle family of Brackenburt, of Gainford, in the 16th and 17th 
centuries (Walbran's " Gainford") is now scantily represented in 

the county. (See under " Lincolnshire ") The Collingwoods 

belong to an ancient Northumberland family that flourished at 
Eslington for centuries (L. and S.). During the last 300 years, 
however, the Collingwoods have formed an important family in the 
county of Dui'ham, which may now be considered the home of the 

name (S.) Curry is a name that was represented by Corry in 

the adjacent county of Cumberland in the 13th century (H, R.) 

There was a Ralph Coatsworth in 1613 in Darlington 

(Long.).^ and Darlington is still the home of the name. 

D— H. 

The Dents have been established in Darlington since the reigu 
of James I. (Long.). The name is also represented in Yorkshire 
:md in Herefordshire ; and there are places thus called in the 

West Riding and Northumberland Eggleston is a name which 

was represented by Eggliston or Egleston in Northumberland ir 



II 



DURHAM. 181 

the reign of Edwai'd I. (Inquisitions). There is a town thus called 

in the county of Durham The Emersons, who lived at Hill 

Close House, Darlington, for centuries (Long.), are still repre- 
sented in that town and its neighbourhood The Erringtons 

held property in the parish of Elton as far back as the reign of 
Elizabeth (S.). The name is also established in Northumberland. 

Erringden is the name of a place in Yorkshire Greenwell is a 

very ancient Durham surname. According to Lower, the Green- 
wells belong to a wide-spread and ancient family descended from 
Gulielmus Presbyter, who in 1183 held the lands of Greenwell in 
the parish of Walsingham in the county of Durham. The Green- 
wells of Stobilee, who carry their pedigree back to the beginning 
of the 16th century, seem to have been one of the principal stocks 
in modern times ; the property of Broomshields has been for four 

centuries in the possession of a branch of this family (S.) 

Heppell or Hepple is the name of two townships in Northumber- 
land In the 17th century the Hutchinsons held property 

around the city of Durham ; at that time they were the most 
numerous and respectable of the yeomanry of the village of Bishop 
Middleham, but in the 18th centui'y many of them migrated to 

Stockton and Whitton in the same county (S.) The Hodgsons 

are at present most numerous in this county and in the adjacent 
parts of Yorkshire. As far back as the 15th century they were 

more numerous in Northumberland than they are at present 

The Featherstones have been for ages one of the principal Wear- 
dale clans (Denham's " Slogans of the North "), 

K— Z. 

The KiRTONS were numerous in Lincolnshire in the 13th 
century (H. R.), deriving their name from a place in that county. 
At present they are comparatively rare in their original home, and 

are mostly found in the county of Durham The Lawsons of 

Nesham Abbey in this county trace their pedigree four centuries 
back (S.) ; but the name is also established in the other northern 

counties The Maddisons were an old county family of influence, 

and to them the punning epithet of the Mad Maddisons was once 
applied. Those of Saltwellside trace back their descent for three 

centuries (S.). The name is also established in Lincolnshire 

LoNGSTAFF has been a Darlington name since the reign of James I. 
(Long.) The notable family of Pease, which has been con- 



182 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

nected with Darlington since the last century, hailed originally 

from the vicinity of Wakefield in the West Riding (Long.) In 

1780, a pateut was granted to Thomas Proud, of Darlington, for a 
drill for sowing turnips (Long.). The name is still in the town. 

Raine, a name known all up and down Teesdale, has long 

been connected with Darlington ia this county and with New- 
castle in Northumberland ; it has been established in Darlington 

since the 16th century (Long.) Thomas Snowdon was mayor of 

Hartlepool in 1699 (Sharp's " Hartkpool ") The name of 

QuELCH occurs only in my list for the county of Durham. The 
rector of Hackford, Norfolk, in the reign of James I., bore this 

name (Blomefield's "Norfolk") Sdrtees is the name of an 

ancient family in the county that rJBckons amongst its ancestors 
Barons of the Palatinate, as far back as the 12th century, the name 
signifying " on the Tees " The name of Tweddell is also estab- 
lished in Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and the 
northern part of Yorkshire ; but its form varies considerably. 
{See under "Northumberland.") The Tweddellsof Thorpthewles 
in the county of Durham, and of Threepwood in Northumberland, 

carry their descent three centuries back (S.) Northumberland 

is the original home of the Tindales or Tindalls, and reference 
will be found to them under that county Shotton and Wear- 
mouth are the names of places in the county Walton, a name 

now numerous in the Darlington district, has characterised Wear- 
dale forages (Denham's " Slogans of the North "). 



ESSEX. 



183 



ESSEX. 

Note. — An asterisk before a name denotes that, though, character- 
istic of the county, the name is more relatively numerous 
elsewhere. 



Brown 
J Clark 
I Clarke 



GrENEBAL Names (30-40 CO unties). 

*Q-reen 
Smith 



Wright 



Common Names (20-29 counties) . 

*Baker *Chapman *Ellis 

Carter *Cole »Parker 



Kegional Names (10-19 counties). 



♦Arnold 


Harvey 


*Payne 


Barritt 


*Mill8 


Perry 


*Bird 


Newman 


♦Porter (Colchester) 


*Cros8 


*Nicholl8 


Potter 


French 


Page 


♦Richardson 


Gardiner 







District Names (4-9 counties). 



Attenborough 


Fitch 


♦Partridge 


Bacon 


J Garratt 
l Gai'rett 


Pettitt 


Barnard 


Eayner (Halstead) 


Bright 


*Hicks 


Salmon 


Church 


Manning 


♦Welch 


*Cock 


*M0S8 


Willis 


Deunis 







184 



HOMES OF FAMILY NA:\1ES. 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



, r Blomfield 
1 Bloomfield 
Blyth (Colchester) 
Brand 
Chaplin 
Clayden 
Cowell 
*Deek8 



Eagle 


*Snow 


♦Goodchild (Halstead) 


Thurgood 


Hearn 


Turpin 


f Joslin 


Unwin 


I Josling 


*Wag8taff 


Jov 


Wakelin 


*Nunn 


Westwood 


Seabrook (Kelvedon) 


Wiseman 



Peculiab Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Basham 


r Ketley 
I Kettley 


Raven 


Beddall 


Eickett 


Belcham 


Lagdea (Brentwood) 


Root 


Bentall (Chelmsford) 


Littlechild 


Ruffle 


Byford 


Lucking 


Savill 


Cant (Colchester) 


Marriage 


Scruby 


Caton 


Maskell 


Shaye 


Chalhs 


Matthams 


Sorrell 


Christy (Chelmsford) 


Meeson 


Spurgeon 


Dowsett 


Metson 


Staines 


Eve 


J Milbank 
L Millbank 


Stock 


Fairhead 


Strutt 


Felgate (Colchester) 


Mott 


Sweeting 


Fenner 


Muggleston 


r Taber 
L Tabor 


Folkard (Colchester) 


Nottage 


Gowlett 


Pannell 


Thorington 


Halls 


r Parish 
IPai-rish 


Tiibrook 


Hasler 


Tofts (Bishop's Stort 


Hockley 


Patmore 


ford) 


Housden 


Pegrum 


Tween 


Hutley 


Pilgrim 


J Wenden 
L Wendon 


Kemsley 


Pledger 




Quilter 


Whitlock (Halstead) 



ESSEX. 185 

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC ESSEX NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the following abbreviations : — 

C. indicates Cromwell's " Colchester." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

J. „ Johnson's " Great Totham." 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

M. „ Morant's " Essex." 

P. „ Palin's " Stifford." 

Sp. ,, Contributors to Armada Fund in 1588 (Brit. Mus., B 474). 

W. „ Wright's " Essex." 



A— D. 

The Attenboroughs possess the name of a parish in Notts, in 

whiich county the surname also h.as a home Bacon is a very 

ancient surname in this county. Knig'htly families of Bacon or 
Bacune held manors in the l;3th and 14th centuries in the parishes 
of Dengie and Mountnessing, manors which seem to have taken in 
each case the name of Bacon from their early lords (M.). Bacon 
was the name of the mayor of Colchester in 1657 and 1695 (C). 
Probably the original Bacons of Essex branched off long ago fi'om 
the great Suffolk family of Bachun, Bacun, or Bacon, itself 
descended from a Norman stock in the 11th centnry (L.). In the 
13th century, Bacun was a common name in Suffolk and Oxford- 
shire, and less so in Norfolk and Gloucestershire (H. R.). Bacon 
is now also established in Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, and Derby- 
shire Basham is the common pronunciation of Barsham, the 

name of parishes in Norfolk. De Basham was a Noifolk surname 
in the 13th century (H. R.)...Bass is also a Leicestershire name. 
Basse occurred in Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire in the 13th 
century (H. R.). Edward Bashe held the manor of Botelers 

in Prittlewell parish, Essex, in the reign of Elizabeth (M.) 

The Belchams take their name from Essex parishes named 
Belchamp. Daniel and John Belsham occupied the Lofts estate 
in the parish of Great Totham between 1738 and 1781 (J.), and 

the name is still in the district The Bentalls are numerous in 

the Chelmsford district. Benhall is the name of a parish in 
I 



18G HOMES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

Suffolk The Rev. Thomas Beand, rector of Leaden Roding, 

who died in 1654, was the ancestor of Timothy Brand, Esq., of the 
Hide, Ingatestone, who was high sheriff of the county in 1721 
(M. and W.). A gentle family of this name, of Polstead Hall, 
Suffolk, in the 17th and 18th centuries, also owned in Essex the 
estates of Netherliall in West Bergholt and Mevaromes in Frating 
(M.). The name was represented in Lincolnshire and Oxfordshire 
in the 13th century (H. R.). There is a Lincolnshire parish 

thus called. The surname also now occurs in Herts The 

Catons of Essex are probably a branch ol' the ancient family 
of Caton or Catton of Norfolk, where they were located from 
time immemorial until the middle of last century (L. : Blome- 
field's "iNorfolk"). Catton is a Norfolk parish, in which lies 

Catton Hall Thomas Challis occupied the Sawns estate in 

Great Totham a hundred years ago (J.). De Challes and De 
Challers were Cambridgeshire names in the 13th century (H. R.) 

In the l()th century the family of Church or Churche held 

the manor of Wood ham-Mortimer ; and in the 17th century, Mr. 
William Church owned part of the Arnolds estate in Lamborn 

parish (M.) The Claydens po-ssess the names of parishes in 

Suffolk and Bucks Jn 1728, Charles CoE occupied the estates 

of Osey Island and Chigboroughs in Great Totham (J.). Further 
references to this ancient East Anglian name will be found under 

"Norfolk," "Suffolk," and "Cambridgeshire" Cornelius 

Deeks or Deekes held the Stockhall estate in Ulting in the reign 

of George I. (M.). Suffolk is also a home of the name Hugh 

Deunys, Esq., held estates in Maldon in the 16th century (M.). 
The name of Dennis occurs still in Maldon. 



E— J. 

The name of Eve has long been known in Roding. John Eve 
held the manor of Keeres or Caros in that parish in the time of 
Charles I. ; Richard Eve held land in Roding in the middle 
of last century (M). Richard Eve was buried at Bulphan in 
1785 (P.). Six centuries ago there were Eves in Suffolk, and the 
name was also then found in Norfolk, Beds, Cambridgeshire, and 

Hunts (H. R.) The Fairheads were represented in Hunts in 

the 13th century, when William Fairh^ird lived in that county. 

The Felgates arc now represented in the Colchester district. 

In the time of Edwat-d the Confessor, Felaga was the name of 



ESSEX. 187 

a bolder of half a hide of land in Ashwell in Fincbingfield parish. 

(M.) The Fenners in past time seem to have been more 

numerous on the south side of the Thames. The owners of Fenn 
Place, Worth, Sussex, were called Atte Fenne for several genera- 
tions before the time of Henry VI., when they took the name 
of Fenner; a Kentish branch took the name of Fenour (L.). For 
a short time, either in the reign of Elizabeth or in that of 
James I., Sir George Fenner owned Virles and Newick-house 

in Thurstable hundred (M.) The name of Fitch has long been 

established in Essex. In the 16th century, the Fytche or Fitche 
family, originally of Widdington, resided at Little Canfield and at 
Brason-head in Lindsell ; they owned the manor of Canfield, and 
a member of the family was afterwards knighted (M.). Jobn 
Fitch occupied the Rook Hall estate in Great Totham in 1788 
(J.). Thomas Fytch of Danbury was high sheriflF of Essex 
in 1767 (M.). Fitche was a Norfolk name in the 13th century 

(H. R.) The FoLKARDS are now established in the Colchester 

district. Folcard, an eminent Flemish scholar, was abbot of 
Thorney, Cambridgeshire, in the 11th century (L.). There was a 

John Folkard in Bucks in the 13th century (H. R.) The 

HoCKLETS take their name from an Essex parish Amongst the 

old Essex names now rarely represented in the county is that 
of HoNTWOOD. The ancient and disting-uished Kentish family of 
Honywood took its name f i om Henew<x)d or Hunewood in the 
parish of Postling in Kent, where they lived in the reign of 
Henry II. ; the Essex branch dates from early in the 16th 
century, and was located at Marks' Hall, near Coggeshall, in the 
17th centuiy ; the wife of the founder of this branch died in 1620 

at the age of 93, having lived to see 367 descendants (J.) 

JosLiN or JosLiNG is a corruption of Jocelyn, Josceline, or Josselyn, 
the name of an ancient knightly Essex family of Hyde Hall that 
held the manor of Higrh Rodingf and other extensive estates in this 
and the surrounding counties as far back as the 16th century (M.). 
The name is also established in the adjoining county of Suffolk. 

The Essex name of Jot was represented by Joye in the 

13th century in Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Hunts, Bucks, and 
Oxfordshire (H. R.). 

K— M. 

KiNCiSMAN is the name of an old Essex gentle family, now 
scantily represented in the countj-, as at Rochford (P.)- For 



188 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

three centuries tlie Kingsmans resided at Burnliam, and at Ardern 
Hall in Horndon, and in the reigns of George I. and George II. 

they served as high sheriffs of the county (P.) The Lathums 

of Stifford, in the 16th and 17th centuries, were an old gentle 

family, now rarely represented in the county (P.) Lucking 

is another form of the ancient Essex name of Luckyn. Amongst 
the Essex gentlemen who contributed to the fund collected for 
the defence of the country at the time of the expected invasion 
of the Spanish Armada in 1588 were Henry Luckyn, a donor of 
£25, and William Luckyn, a donor of £50 (Sp.) Mashbury 
manor was in the possession of this family in the 16th century, 
and Lukyn was then an occasional form of the name (M.) The 
Luckyns of Messing Hall, and of Little Waltham and Chicknall- 
Smeley, in the 17th century, possessed a baronetcy and served 
as high sheriffs of Essex ; from them sprang the ennobled house 

of Grimston (M.) The Mannings were, in the 13th century, 

represented by the Manings in Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, 
Lincolnshire, etc. (H. R.). Now they have their principal homes 
in Essex and Devon, and are also established in Cheshire, North- 
amptonshire, and Gloucestershire William Marriage of Brom- 

field, where the name is still represented, owned the manor of 
Fulbornes, in the parish of Great Lees, in the early part of last 

century (M.) Maskell is probably a contraction of Mascherel, 

the name of an ancient family that possessed much property in 
the county in the 11th century: from tlie Essex Mascherels 
sprang the noble family of De Hastings (M.). We find the name 
as Maskerel in the adjoining county of Suffolk in the 13th 
century (H. R.). It has been suggested that Mascall, a com- 
paratively rare name in Kent and Sussex, was originally Marscal, 
since, in a family deed of the 16th centuiy, it occurs as Marscal 
(L.). In the 13th century, Le Marscal was a common name in 
Norfolk and Cambridgeshire (H. R.), and not improbably Marscal 
is an intermediate form between the modern Marshall and the 
mediaeval Mareschal, but as to its being the original form of 

Maskell in Essex, I must express a decided doubt Milbank 

was the name of the mayor of Colchester in 1661 (C.) 

Amongst the oldest and most distinguished of Essex families is that 
of Milumay, now scantily represented in the county, where it has 
been established since the 15th century: during the 16th, 17th, 
and 18th centuries the Mildmays were frequently high sheriffs of 
Essex (M.) The Motts have found a home in this county for 



ESSEX. 189 

at least 600 years. In the 13th century the name of Motte 
occurred in Bi^adfield in this county (H. R.). From the 14th 
to the 17th century there resided a notable gentle family of 
Mott at Shalford ; some of the members lived at Braintree, in 
the same neighbourhood, in the 16th and 17th centuries; Sherne 
Hall, Shalford, was in the possession of the family in the 17th 
century (M. and W.). Robert Mott, an Essex gentleman, con- 
tributed £25 towards the defence of his country at the time of 
the expected Spanish invasion of 1588 (Sp.) Robert Mott was 
an alderman of Colchester in 1583 (M.) Samuel Mott was mayor 
of Colchester in 1686 and 1693 (C.) The name is still in 
Braintree. Motts and Mote are old manorial estates in the 
county (M.). In the 13th century, Motte, sometimes written 
Mot, was a common Cambridgeshii-e name, but it also occurred 
then in Essex, Hunts, Kent, Bucks, and Oxfoi'd^hire (H. R.) 

The Meesons possess the name of a Shropshire parish, and 

the MuGGLESTONS have a name which suggests that of a township 
(Mucklestone) on the borders of Statfordshire and Shropshire, 
but whether these are mere coincidences or not I cannot say. 

N— P. 

NoTTAGE is another form of Nottidge, the name of a Bocking 
family of note, one of whose members was high sheriff of Essex 

early in this century (W.) An ancient family of Panxell, or 

Paynell, held the estate of Pannells-Le-Hill in Redgwell, from 
1385 to 1613 (M.), and the name is still in the parish. Paynel 
was a name found in most parts of England in the 13th century 

(H. R.) The name of Pettitt, or Pettit, in one form and 

another, is now found in Suffolk, Essex, Kent, Beds, and Sussex. 
As Petit and Petyt, occasionally preceded by '" Le," it was 
established in much the same part of England six centuries 
ago, though its area was then more extended, the name being 
then represented in Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge- 
shire, Beds, Herts, Essex, and Oxfordshire — Suffolk and Oxford- 
shire containing the greatest number (H. R.). George Pettyt 
was mayor of Hertford in 1652 and 1661 (Tumor's '"Hertford"). 
John Pettit occupied the Rook Hall estate in Great Totham 
parish, Essex, in 1728 (J.). David Pettyt, Esq., of Wanstead, 
Essex, who died in 1745, aged 75, was the youngest son of George 
Pettyt, of Ottford, Kent (M.). In Kent the name has long been 



a 



190 HOilES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

established. Petyt was a common clerical name in the connty in 
the loth century, and at that time a family of Petyte owned 
property in Stockbury ; in the 16th and 17th centuries the 
Pettits owned the Dandelion estate in Thanet (Hasted's " Kent ") 
In the 15th century Petit was a clerical name in Norfolk: f 
Norwich family bore this name in Queen Mary's reign, and a 
family of Petit lived in Diss in that county last century (Blome- 

field's "Norfolk") Pilgrim is an ancient East Anglian name, 

which was represented in Norfolk and Suffolk in the 13th century 

m R.) The Pledgers may, perhaps, derive their name from 

Pledgen, an Essex hamlet Amongst the old and distinguished 

knightly families of Essex now rarely represented in the county 
is that of PoTNTZ, of North Ockendon, in the 16th and 17th 
centuries (P-)- 

R— S. 

Six centuries ago, the Ravens were represented in the neigh- 
bouring counties of Cambridge, Bedford, and Huntingdon (H. R.). 

The Ratnees have characterised the East Anglian and 

adjacent counties for 600 years and more. At present they are to 
be found in Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, and Notts. In the 13th 
century the name occurred in the form of Reyner, and occasionally 
of Rayner, in Essex, Norfolk, Hunts, Lincolnshire, and also 
Oxfordshire (H. R.). The Halstead district is their present home 
in Essex. John Rayner held 50 acres of land in Stanway in the 
middle of last century (M.). John Rayner was mayor of Colchester 
in 1678 (C). Several of the Norfolk clerics bore this name in 
the 14th and 15th centuries ; Walter Rayner was a member of 
the Common Council of Norwich in 1687 : Richard Rayner lived 
in Hevingham in the same county in the reign of Elizabeth 

(Blomefield's " Norfolk ") Rickett is probably a corruption 

of De Ricote, a name that occurred in Hunts and Oxfordshire in 

the 13th century (H. R.) Root is evidently another form of 

Wroot, a Lincolnshire surname, and the name of a Lincoln.shire 

parish Geffrey Ruffle was tenant of Wickham Hall in the 

middle of last century (M.), and the Ruffles are still in the parish. 

The name of Savill has been for a long time established in 

Essex. Savil or Savel was the name of an Essex gentleman in 
the reign of Charles I. (Farmer's "Waltham"). The Savilles 
owned Stisted Hall during last century, Samuel Saville residing 



ESSEX. 191 

there in 1762 (M. and W.). The Essex family may pei-haps have 
been a branch in the past of the Yorkshire Saviles, one of the 
most illustrious of the East Riding families, where they have 

existed since the 12th century (L.) Sayer was the name of 

an old Colchester family of wealth and municipal consequence 
in the 16th century (C). Duiing the 14th century tlie Sayer 
family of Coppeford held of the King 82 acres of land in the 
village of Lachingdon (M.). The name is now scantily represented 

in the county. (See under " Sayers " of Sussex.) The Scrubys 

perhaps hail originally from Scrooby, a parish in Notts The 

Seabrooks of Essex are at present numerous in the Kelvedon 
district, and the name was represented in that part of the county 
200 years ago, when there was a Colchester family of the name, 
one of its members being mayor of the town in 1691 (C). A 
family of Seabrooke lived in Aveley in the reign of James 1. (P.). 
The Uphall estate, Barking, was in the possession of a family of 
Seabrooke in the 17th and 18th centuries, but before the present 
century the estate passed into other hands (W.). (See under 

"Hertfordshire") Silverlock was the name of a gentle 

family of Stifford in the 16th and 17th centuries (P.). The name 

is now rare The Sorrells belong to an old Essex family. A 

family of Sorrel or Sorell possessed Hide Hall, Great Waltham, 
and other properties in that parish from 1650 to 1738, when the 
estates passed out of the direct male line ; to this family belonged 
the living of Stebbing (W.). William Sorrell was an Essex 
gentleman who contributed £25 for the defence of his country 
at the time of the Spanish invasion of 1588 (Sp.). The name still 
occurs in Great Waltham. In the 13th century the name of 
Sorel occurred in Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Bucks, Oxfordshire, 

and Devon (H. R.) The name of Spurgeon maybe a corruption 

of Spigurnel, the name of an ancient family owning the manor 
of Stondon, Essex, in the 13th and 14th centuries (W.). 
Spygurnel and Spigurnel were Norfolk names in the 13th century, 
and Spugin occurred in Cambridgeshire at the same period 
(H. R.). According to Camden, a "spigurnel" was a sealer of 
writs, an office hereditary for a time to the Bohuns of Midhurst, 
Sussex. John Spurgeon was mayor of Yarmouth in 1698, and in 
1762 Mr. Spurgion lived at Anmere in the same county of 

Norfolk (Blomefield's "Norfolk") Staines is the name of a 

town in Middlesex The Stocks take the name of an Essex 

parish. Mr. Stock, gent., owned Philpots farm in Roding-Murell 



192 HOMES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

ia the middle of last century (M.) Strutt is an old and often 

distinguished Essex name. The Strutts held lands in Wickham 
St. Pauls in the 15th, loth and 17th centuries (M.). Sir Denner 
Strutt, baronet, of Little Warley Hall, in 1641 owned the manor 
of Little Warley (M.) ; Mr. John Strutt, of Biley Mills, in 1743 
came into the possession of an estate in Snoreham parish (M.), 
which his descendants have held up to recent times (W.). 
Maldon was represented in Parliament in the middle of last 
century by John Strutt of Terling and by his son early in the 
present century, a family since ennobled (W.). John Strut of 
Hadley, Suffolk, held the manor of Picotts in Ardley parish, 
Essex, in the 17th century (M.). Strutt was a common name in 
Derbyshire last century, especially in Blackwell ; the Strutts of 
Derby then obtained eminence for their inventions in connection 
with the weaving trade (Glover's "Derbyshire"). In the 13th 
century the name of Strut or Strutt was represented in Cambridge- 
shire, Norfolk, and Wilts (H. R.) The Sweetings were 

represented in Norfolk in the 13th century by the Swetynes 
(H. R.). 

T— Z. 

William Tabor, Doctor of Civil Law, who died in 1611, held 

considerable property in Alresford parish (M.) The Thoring- 

'lONS possess the name of parishes in Essex and Suffolk 

A family of Thurgood held the Sawcemeres estate in Manuden 
parish during Elizabeth's reign, but shortly afterwards the estate 
passed out of the family (W.). Edward Thorowgood held the 
manor of ]VJaylerds, Havering, in the reign of Charles II. ; and in 
the same reign Sir Benjamin Thorowgood, lord mayor of London, 
owned the manor of Woodford ; Catlyn Thorogood of Daweshall, 
Lambourn, was high sheriff of Essex in 1729: Selby Thorowgood, 
Esq., had an estate in Alresford in the middle of last century 
(M.). A Herts family of Thorowgood obtained a grant of arms 
last century (L.), and the name of Thirgood or Thurgood 
is still found in that county. Alice Thurgod lived in Bedford 

shire in the 13th century (H. R.) Tilbrook is the name of a 

Bedfordshire parish. There was a William de Tilbroc in Lincoln 

shire in the reign of Edwai'd I. (H. R.) The name of Tofts is 

now best represented in the district of Bishop's Sbortford. Tofts 
is a Norfolk parish, and De Toftes was a Norfolk surname in the 



ESSEX. 193 

13th century (H. R.). Two parishes in Cambridgeshire and 
Lincolnshire are called Toft The name of Turpin was repre- 
sented in Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, Oxfordshire, and Wilts, 
in the 13th century (H. R.). In the reign of Mary, George 
Turpin, Esq., bought the manor of Claybrook, Leicestershire, from 
Thomas Lacey, Esq., of Charlecote, Warwickshire (Macaulay's 
" Claybrook"). The name is also now represented in Devonshire. 

Unwik, in the forms also of Unwine, Unwyne, and Unwyn, 

occurred in Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, and Lincolnshire, in 
the 13th centurj (H. R.). Besides occurring in Essex, the name 

is now established in Derbyshire Wakelin or Wakeling is an 

ancient East Anglian name, now found in Essex, Suffolk, and 
Cambridgeshire, and occurring 600 years ago in Norfolk and 
Lincolnshire (H. R.). John Wakling was parish clerk of Great 

Totham, Essex, in 1742 (J.) The Whitlocks are now best 

represented in the Halstead district. In the 17th century 
Bulstrode Whitelock, one of Cromwell's commissioners, owned 

the manor of Blunts-hall, Witham (M.) The Wendons and 

Wendens derive their names from parishes in the county The 

Wisemans of Essex, belonging to the distinguished families of 
Rivenhall, Northend, Great Baddow, Pelstead, etc., played an 
important part in the county in the 16th and 17th centuries, and 
frequently served as high sheriffs. Amongst the Essex gentlemen 
who contributed towards the Armada Fund in 1588 were Ralph 
Wiseman, a donor of £100 ; William Wiseman of Brodokes, a donor 
of £50; and John Wiseman of Stisted, who contributed £25 (Sp.). 
The name of Wisman occurred in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk in 
the 13th century. After a lapse of six centuries, the Wisemans 
have still their home in much the same part of England, namely, 
in Norfolk and Essex. (See under " Nobfolk.") 



IH 



HOJIES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. In the case of 
border-names the home may extend into the next county. 



*AJlen 
r Clark 
1 Clarke 



Genebal Names (30-40 counties). 

Cook *White 

Smith 
♦Taylor 





Common Names 


20-29 counties). 


*Bailey 


♦James 




r Shepherd 
L Sheppard 


Bennett 


Matthews 




Davis 


♦Parker 




♦Williams 


Hill 






Young 




Eegional Names 


(10-19 counties). 1 


*Cox 


Hawkins (Gloucester) 


♦Newman 


Ford 


♦Knight 




Pearce 


Fowler 


Lane 




♦Perry 


aibbs (Chipping 


3od- ♦Lawrence 




♦Stephens 


bury) 


♦Long 




Watts 


Hart (Nevmham) 


♦Miles (Coleford) 


♦Woodward 




DiSTEiCT Names 


(4-9 counties). ■ 


Anstey 


Hale 




♦Pope 


Baldwin 


♦Handcock 




f Pullen (Chippenham) 
LPulHn 


Barton 


♦Hobbs 




♦Bullock (G-lcucester) Holloway 




♦Katcliffe 


- Burroughs 
\ Burrows 


♦Hooper 




Savage 


♦Hopkins 




♦Tanner 


Butt 


♦Keen 




r Weekes 
\ Weeks 


Chandler 


♦Macliin 




Cnunp 


♦Nash 




♦Wilcox 


Daniels 


Phipps (Stroud) 




Dowding 


♦Poole 







GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



195 



CoTJNTY Names (2-3 counties). 



Alvis 


Herbert 


r Nelmes 
[ Nelms 


Alway 


Hewlett 


Blackwell 


/-Hiatt 


*Ponting 


Boulton 


Hiett 


Prout (Stonehouse) 


Brain 


Hyatt 


Brimell 


/Cam 
LCamm 


'-Hyett 


*Rudge 


Holborow 


Sparrow 


Coldicott 


Loveridge 


Stanley 


Drew 


*Mace 


Surman 


Gunter 


Meadows 


Teague 


Hartland 


Merrett (Stonehouse) 


Warner 



Peculiae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Arkell 


Hanks 


Eugman 


Ballinger 


Hatherell 


Eymer (Chepstow) 


Biddle 


Hewer (Fairford) 


Selwyn 


Blandford 


Hignell 


Shields 


Browning 


Holder 


Shipp 


Bubb 


lies 


Shipway 


Cadle 


f Kilminster 
L Kilmister 


Staite 


Clutterbuck 


Stiiichcombe 


Comely 


Limbrick 


Theyer 


Cornock 


Lusty 


Till (Thornbury) 


Croome 


Minchin 


Trotman 


Cullimore 


Minett 


Tuffley 


Dobbs 


New 


Vick (Stonehouse) 


Dowdeswell (Stroiid) 


Niblett 


Vimpany 


Fawkes 


Organ 


Wadley 


r Flook 


Parslow 


Werrett 


-1 Fluck 


Pegler 


Wintle (Gloucester) 


I Flux 


Penson 


Wintour 


Game 


Priday 


Witchell 


Gazard 


Radway 


Yeend 


Goulding 


Eicketts 




Goulter 


Eighton 





2 



196 HOMES OF fa:mily names. 

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC aLOUCESTERSHIEE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the foUoiving abbreviations: — 

A. indicates Attyns' "Gloucestershire." 
Bar. „ Barrett's " Bristol." 
Bigl. „ Biglaud's " Gloucestersliire." 
F. „ Fosbrooke's " Gloucester." 

H. E. „ Hundred EoUs. 
L. „ Lower's " Patrouymica Britannica." 

E. „ Euddei*'s " Gloucestershii-e." 

Sp. „ Contributors to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Brit. 
Mus., B. 474). 



A— B. 

Alwat and Arkell are Gloucestersliire names. Alway was 
the name of a family of gentry in Hawkesbnry in the 17th and 
18th centuries (Bigl.) ; whilst Ai-kell, a surname numerous in the 
county, was the name of the patron of the living of Bodington a 

century ago (R.) The Bubbs have for centuries frequented 

this part of the country. Bubbe was a Wiltshire name in the 
reign of Henry III. (H. R.). A Bubb was sheriff of the city of 
Gloucester in 1653 (R.) ; and the mayor of Bristol in 1697 bore 
this name (Bar.) . A family of gentry thus called lived in Staple- 
ton 200 years ago (R.). Bubb is still a Gloucester name 

A family of Brain held lands in the parish of Little Dean from 
the time of Elizabeth up to last century (A.), and the name still 
occurs there. The Brains also owned the manor of Stanton 
300 years ago (R.). This is an ancient English name: it was 

represented in Hunts in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The 

Ballingers have lived in Charlton King's for two centuries 

(Bigl.) During the last centuiy the Biddles were numerous 

in Caudle Green (Bigl.). Two Staffordshire gentlemen, named 
Biddall or Biddull, gave £25 apiece to the Spanish Armada fund 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 197 

in 1588 (Sp.) BroWxN'ing is an old and often distinguished 

county name : there was an ancient family of this name at Cowley, 
where they long i-esided (A.) Blackwell is an old Gloucester- 
shire surname, perhaps originally derived from the parish of 

Blackwell in the neighbouinng county of Worcester The 

Blandfoeds may take their origin from one of the Dorset 
parishes of that name Amougst the names that once charac- 
terised this county, but are now rare, I may refer to that of 
Arrowsmith : there was a Cirencester family thus called durirg 
the 17th and 18th centuries (Bigl.) ; and in the same century 
several of the mayors and churchwardens of Tetbury bore this 

name (Lee's " Tetbury ") The Baldwins are now established 

in Gloucestershire, Bucks, Lancashire, Warwickshire, Herts, 
Norfolk, and Suffolk. In the loth century they were numerous 
in Cambridgeshire, Hunts, and Oxfordshire, and there were a few 
in Shropshire. The Baldwins of Shropshire were for several 
centuries connected with Shrewsbury and Ludlow (Wright's 
"Ludlow," etc.). 

C— D. 

Lower says that the family of Clutterbtjck settled in England 
from the Low Countries at the time of the Duke of Alva's per- 
secution of the Protestants during the reign of Elizabeth. How- 
ever this may be, there was a Thomas Cloerterbooke, sheriff of 
Gloucestershire in 1586 (R. or L.) ; and two Gloucestershire 
gentlemen of the name of Clutterbuck, resident at Kingstanley 
and Alkerton, contributed £25 apiece towards the defence of 
their country at the time of the expected Spanish invasion in 
1588. We go yet further back and find a Clowterbuck mayor of 
Gloucester city in 1545 (R.) ; whilst Clutterbuck was the name 
of the incumbent of Stanton in 1571 (A.). In truth the Clutter- 
bucks have been a distinguished Gloucestershire family for three 
centuries and more ; Stroud, Stanley, Frampton, and Cirencester 
having been their principal homes (R.). There was a mayor of 
Gloucester of this name in 1646 (R.)j a-^d there was a mayor of 
Bristol named Stephen Clutterbuck in 1739 (Bar.). The Clut- 
terbucks of Punchknoll, Dorset, during last century, were said to 
hail originally from Devonshire, their ancestor having been a 
sea officer in the reign of William III. (Hutchins' "Dorset"). 
In Gloucestershire the name is still represented in Gloucester 



198 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and Strond. (See under "Hertfordshire.") The Cornocks 

(anciently Cnrnocks) belong to families that were resident at 
Goldwick, Berkeley, and Nibley during the 17th and 18th cen- 
turies (Bigl.). The name is still in Berkeley The Cables 

may find an ancestor in Christopher Cadle, who made a bene- 
faction to the poor of Abston in 1662 (R.)- Cadel was a surname 
in Oxfordshire and Sussex at the close of the 13th century 

(H. R.) The COLDICOTTS bear a name that in different forms 

belongs to several parishes in this part of the country Cam, 

or Camm, a surname in Acton last century, and in Newport in 
the previous century (Bigl.), is evidently derived from the parish 

of that name in the county Two hundred years since, a 

Bristol alderman, who was also member of Parliament for that 
city, bore the name of Crump (Bar.). The Crumps were mayors 
of Gloucester during the first half of last century (R.), and 
about the same time the name was represented in Chedworth 
and Oldbury (Bigl.). Crump is still a Bristol and a Gloucester 

name The name of Croome was common in Cromhall and 

Horsley during last century, and there was at the same time a 
family of gentry of that name in Cirencester (Bigl.). In the 
form of Croume we find it in the adjacent county of Oxford, at 

the end of the 13th century (H. R.) Dowding was the name 

of a sheriff of Bristol in 1690 (Bar.) The Dowdeswells of the 

vicinity of Stroud bear the name of a Gloucestershire parish or 

township DoBBS was the name of a Gloucester citizen in 1642, 

whose corn was seized by the Roundheads.* Amongst the 

names now extinct or rare in the county 1 should refer to Collet, 
which was numerous last century ; but the neighbouring county 
of Oxford has evidently long been one of the principal homes of 
the name. The following gentle families have also become rare 
or extinct, the Chinns of JSTewnham, the Chesters of Almonds- 
bury, both of whom flourished during the 17th and 18th centuries, 
together with the Donixgs of Pyrton and Nursehill (Bigl.). 
Most of the Creeds seem to have returned to their original home 
in Somerset : at all events, they are not so common as they were 
in the county of Gloucester. Driver was also a common name 
amongst the gentry of Avening during the last and the previous 

century (Bigl. and R.) Thomas Cullimore was a Tetbury 

churchwarden in 1679 (Lee's " Tetbury "). 

* Washbourne's " Bibliotheca Gloucestrensis." 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 199 

E— K, 

The Flooks, or Flucks, are probably descended from a family 
of Fluck that lived at the Oak, Deerhurst, 200 years ago (Bigl.), 

in which locality the Flucks yet remain Qunter was a name 

represented in Almondsbury last century. It has been found 
for many centuries in this part of England. We find it in the 
adjacent county of Oxford at the close of the 13th century 
(H. R.) ; and early in the 18th century a family of this name 
owned the Priory, Abergavenny, in the neighbouring county of 
Monmouth (Duncumb's "Herefordshire"). {See under "Berk- 
shire " and " Wales.") The Hartlaxds possess aname sugges- 
tive of their origin in North Devon. The surname, however, 
has been long in Gloucestershire. It was borne by a bailift' of 
Gloucester in 1474, and by a mayor of the city in 1517 (R.)- 
It has also crossed the border, and established itself in Hereford- 
shire The HiATTS, Hyetts, etc., who seem to revel in the 

various spellings of their name, descend from forefathers well 
known in the county during the last century. Hyett was the 
name of a mayor of Gloucester in the reign of Anne (F.), and 

the name is still in that city Hanks was the name of a family 

possessing an estate in the parish of Church Down in the reign of 

Elizabeth (R.) Holborow is a name that was well represented 

in Boxwell last century : there were two surgeons of the name of 
Holbrow, one at Newington Bagpath, and the other at Minchin 

Hampton, early in the same century (Bigl.) Iles is an old 

Gloucestershire surname. Thomas Iles, a clothier of IVlinchin 
Hampton, died in 1686; and a family of gentry of this name 
lived at Chalford, in the same parish, during the early part of 
last century (Bigl.). The incumbent of Salperton in the middle 

of last century was thus named (A.) The name of Kilmister 

was represented in Alderley last century (Bigl.) Amongst the 

old families of gentry now scantily represented, I should refer 
to the Gladwins of Naunton (Bigl.), the Gunnings of Cold 
Ashton, during last century (Bigl.), and the Huntlets of Boxwell 

(Bigl.) IsGAR is an old Gloucestershire name (Bigl.) 

Godsell, a name now rare in the county, but represented by the 
Godsalls and Godsells of the neighbourhood of the city of 
Hereford, was an established name in Kingswood (co. Gloucester) 
during the 17th and 18th centuries, where a family of clothiers 
thus called resided (Bigl.) Frankcomb is an old Gloucestershire 



200 HOMES OF FAMILY NiUlES. 

name, now mostly confined to the adjacent county of Wilts. 
(See under " Wiltshire.") Tlie mayors of Gloucester in 14GI 
and 1574 bore this name (F,), which, however, is now rare in 
the county. 

L— P. 

Sir Richard Liii brick was taken prisoner at the battle of 
Wakefield in 1460 and beheaded at Pontefract (Tickell's " Hull "). 

Nurse, a name rare in the county, has been established in 

Gloucester ever since the reign of Charles I., when Luke Nurse 
was mayor of the city (P.) The name of Loveridge was repre- 
sented by Loverich in the adjacent county of Oxford in the reign 
of Edward I. (H. R.) The Merretts, now numerous in Stone- 
house and its vicinity, were represented in Haresfield early^last 
century (Bigl.). A Gloucestershire gentleman of the name of 
Merritt contributed £25 towards the defence of his country at 
the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish Armada in 

1588 (Sp.) MiNCHiN was a name well represented in Bar- 

rington Magna during last century (Bigl.) : it was probably 
derived in the first place from the parish of Minchin Hampton in 

the county Mixett is at present mostly a Gloucestershire name ; 

but in 1698 there were freeholder named Minitt in Notts (Harl. 

MS., 6846) Nelmes and Nelme were common names in Berkeley 

during the 17th and 18th centuries (Bigl.) ; an old family of gentry 
bearing the first name then resided in that parish (A.). Nelnie 
was the name of a sheriff of the city of Gloucester in 1635 (R.) 
and of a Bristol distiller early last century (Bar.) : daring the 
last century it was represented in Newent and in Abbenhall 

(Bigl.) There was a family named Organ in Horfield early 

last century (Bigl.). Waylen, in his "History of Marlborough, 
Wilts," mentions Katharine Organ of that town in 1532. John 
Organ was a Berkshire gentleman who contributed £25 for the 
defence of his country at the time of the expected invasion of 

the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.) The Parslows are probably 

connected with the Purslows in Uley parish during last century 

(A.) The present Peglers were represented by a family called 

Peglour in the parish of Uley 200 years ago (A.). Pegler was a 
name in Stroud parish in the middle of last century (R.), and 

the name is still there PoOLE was the name of a prominent 

Gloucester citizen in the loth century (R.) Between 1872 and 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 201 

1407, eight of the bailiifs of Grloucester bore the name of Pope 

(F.). The name is still in that city The Poxtings were once 

numerous in this county, but they are now found in the adjacent 

county of "Wilts (Bigl.) Amongst the families, now scantily 

to be found in the county, but well established during the l7th 
and 18th centuries, are those of Phillimoee and Packer: the 
Phillimores were engaged iu the cloth-trade in Cam parish, 
where the name still survives ; whilst the Packers resided in the 

parish of Kempsford (Bigl.) Nash is an old Worcestershire 

name, the family of Nash of St. Peter's, Droitwich, dating back 
to the 16th century. Nash was the name of a Worcester alderman 
in 1590 and of the mayor of that city in 1633 (Nash's " Worcester- 
shire ") NiBLETT is a name not so common now as it was last 

century ; there were then several families thus called in Hai-esfield 

(Bigl.), where the name still remains Machin, a name at 

present most numerous in Notts, was a well-known Gloucester- 
shire name in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries ; there were then 
families of gentry of the name in Gloucester, Bicknor English, 

and Acton (P. R. and Bigl.) The Pridays of Gloucestershire 

are probably connected with the old Evesham family of Preedy, 
across the Worcestershire border, which supplied nine mayors to 
that town between 1716 and 1825 (May's "Evesham "). 

R— S. 

During the 17th and 18th centuries a family of the name of 
RiCKETTS resided in North Leach (Bigl.) The Rymers of Chep- 
stow and its vicinity are probably connected with a family of 
clothiers, called Rimer, who lived in Minchin Hampton early last 

century (Bigl.) The Ruiells bear an ancient name: there 

was a De Rimel in Essex in the reign of Edward 1. (H. R.) 

Selwtn is another ancient name which has been established for 
more than three centuries in this county. The Selwius or Selwyns 
were lords of the manor in the parish of Matson from the IGth to 
the 18th centuiy (A.). William Selwyn of Kingestanley and 
Richard Selwyn were two Gloucestershire gentlemen who con- 
tributed £25 apiece to the fund raised at the time of the expected 
invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588. Selwyn was the name of 
the mayors of Gloucester in 1675, 1727, and 1736 (F.). During the 
16th and 17th centuries the Selwyns of Sussex owned the parish of 
Friston (Lower's " Sussex "). In the form of Selveyn the name was 



202 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

represented in Cambridgeshire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). 

The SuRMAifs were the owners of an estate in Tredington in 

the middle of last century (A.) ; and abont the same time a family 
of gently of the name resided in Cheltenham (Bigl.). William 
Packer Snrman, Esq., was biiliff of Tewkesbury in 1759 (Dyde's 
"Tewkesbury"). The name is still in Tredington and Chelten- 
ham. {See under " Subset. '") The Staites were established 

in Tewkesbury in the 17th century, and the name is still in the 
town. William Steight was bailiff of Tewkesbury in 1699 and 
1707 (Dyde's "Tewkesbury"). Thomas Staite of Aston Somer- 
ville died in 1720 (Bigl.). During last century the name of 
Steight occurred in Ashton-under-Hill, and at the same time a 
family of gentry thus called lived at Pannington, Ashchurch 

(Bigl.) Savage is an ancient Gloucestershire name, which was 

represented as Savage or Sauvage in this county as well as in 
Wilts, in the reign of Edward I. In that reign it was also nume- 
rous in one fonn or the other in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk, 

where it is still established (H. R.) Shipwat is a name that 

occurred in the 17th century in Beverstone, and in the 18th 
century in Chai-field (Bigl.). Shipweye was a Kentish name in 
the 13th century (H. R.; Stixchcombe is an ancient Gloucester- 
shire surname evidently derived in the first place from the parish 
of that name in the county. There was a yeoman thus called in 
Hawkesbury 200 years ago ; and last century the name occurred 
in Acton and Cromhall (Bigl). There are still Stinchcombes in 

Cromhall and Hawkesbury The Rui-GES of Micheldean have 

resided in that locality since the 17th century (Bigl.). The name 

is now more numerous in Herefordshire and Worcestershire 

The Radwats may derive their name from a parish of that name 
in the adjacent county of Warwick; and the Rightoxs perhaps 
from a Yorkshire parish so called. 

T— Z. 

Teotmas is the name of an ancient family of gentry established 
in the parish of Cam during the 16th, 17th, and 16th centuries 
(Bigl.), and still represented there. Three Gloucestershire gentle- 
men of this name contributed £25 apiece towards the national 
fund collected at the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish 
Armadji in 1588 (Sp.). Mr. Throgmorton Trotman, a London 
merchant 20C* years ago, belonged to the Cam family; Samuel 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 203 

Trotman was patron of the living of Siston last centtiry (A.). 

The name was represented in Xibley last century TBigl.) The 

TuFFLETS may derive their name from a place of that name near 

Gloucester The Wintles of Gloucester and its neicrhbourhood 

probably possess an ancestor in Christopher Windle, who was 
incumbent of the parish of Side in 1592 (A.). TheTVintles were 
influential Gloucester citizens last century (R.) ; at the same time 
there was a family of the name in Long Hope (Bigl ). This 
surname may hail originally from the north, Windle being the 
name of a Lancashire township and Windhill of a district in 

the West Riding The Wixtocrs belong to a distinguished 

Gloucestershire family. Sir William Wintour, who was a famous 
admiral in the reign of Elizabeth, owned the manor of Lidney 

or Lydney (A.), where the name still remains Wi-iKP.KTT and 

WiTCHELL are ancient surnames : the first occurred in Cambridge- 
shire in the reign of Edward I., and at the same time ther« was 

a Roger de Witchele in Oxfordshire TH. R.) The Ticks of 

Stonehouse were represented in Minchin Hampton and Berkeley 

early last century (Bigl.) Amongst the names once common 

in the county but now rare I should mention that of Tbigg. 



I 



I 



204 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



HAMPSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 

Genebal Names (30-40 counties). 

Allen (Basingstoke) *HaU White 

*Brown *Smitli 



*Adams 
Andrews 
Bailey 

*Baker 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



^ rCole 
L Coles 
Cooper 
*Hunt 
*Xiug 



Morris (Newport) 
*Parker 
*Webb 
*Young 



EEaioNAL Names (10-19 counties). 



*Arnold 


Harvey 


Barnes 


Knight 


Butler (Wiuchfield) 


*Mills 


*rord 


*Parsons 



# J Pain (Micheldever) 
I Payne 
Russell 



District Names (4^9 counties). 



*Crook 


Judd 


*North 


*Gale 
Goddard 
*Hull 


Kent 
*Lock (Newport) 
r Munday 
L Muudy 


*Plulpot (Southampton) 
Way 





HAMPSHffiE. 




County Names (2-3 counties). 


Bone 


r Canning *Hillier 
I Cannings HoUis 


f Bojes 


iBoys 


Chase BUvester 


*Bridger 


FoUett (Basingstoke) Tubb 


*Cane 


Gosling Withers 



205 



Pecuiiae Names (confined mostly to this coimty). 



Abbinett 


Drewitt 


Potticary 


Amey (Petersfield) 


Drudge (Newport) 


Eumbold 


AttriU (Godshill) 


Edney 


Seaward 


Ayles (Ringwood) 


Fay (Romsey) 


Southwell 


Barfoot 


Fitt 


Stares 


Blackman (Bishop's 


Jolliffe 


Stride (Southampton) 


Waltham) 


Lavington 


Turvill 


Broomfield 


Light 


Twitchin 


Budd 


Mew 


Whitcher 


Clift (Basingstoke) 


Poore 


Witt (Fordingbridge) 


Cobden 


Portsmouth 





NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHABACTEEISTIC HAMPSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the following ahhreviations : — 

H. R. indicates Hundred Rolls. 

Long. „ Longcroft's " Hundred of Bosmere." 

M. ,, Milner's "Winchester." 

W. „ Woodward's " Hampshire." 



206 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

A— H. 

Barfoot is an old Hampshire name. Five mayors of Win- 
cliester between 1691 and 1743 bore the name of Barfoote or 
Barefoote or Barefotte (M.). Barfot or Barefot was a Cambridge 
name in the 13th century (H. R.) The Budds were a well- 
known Winchester family in the early part of the 17th century ; 
they filled the office of mayor and made bequests for the poor (M. 
and W.). Winchester still has the name. In the forms of Bud, 
Budd, and Badde, the name occurred in Oxfordshire and Somerset- 
shire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The Broomfields 

possess the name of parishes in Somerset and Kent The Clifts 

are now established in the Basingstoke district. Mr. Clift owned 

I^etley early last century (W.) The mayor of Winchester in 

1464 was named William Chase (M.). A gentle family of 
Chase resided at Yartee, near Chard, in Somerset, in the 17th 

century (Peirce's "Bath ") Richard Ednet was elected mayor 

of Marlborough, Wiltshire, in the reign of Anne (Waylen's 
"Marlborough"). Amongst the martyrs of the Monmouth 
rebellion in 1685 was Henry Edny, who was executed at Porlock 

("Western Martyrology ") FiT'ris a name that was represented 

by Fitte in Suffolk and Cambridgeshire in the 13th century 

(H. R.) The FoLLETTS of the Basingstoke district possess the 

name of the notable family of Foliot, or Fullet, or Foillet, that 
flourished in Hants, Devon, and Herefordshire, from the 12th 

to the 14th centuries (W.) Goddard was the name of two 

representatives of Southampton in Parliament in the reign of 
Elizabeth. Henry Goddard, gent., resided at Battramsley in the 
reign of Charles II., and at the same time a gentle family of the 
name lived in Winchester; there was a Goddard in Strathfieldsaye 
in the reign of Edward III. (W.). Edward Goddard, gent., resided 
at Eastwood Hay, Hants, in the beginning of the 17th century 
(Ashmole's "Berkshire"). Further particulars concerning the 
Goddards of other counties will be found under "Berks," 

"Suffolk," "Wilts," etc Denzill Hollis, Esq., of Dorsetshire, 

was a prominent supporter of Cromwell; Daniel Hollis lived in 
Cowes in the reign of Anne (W.), and the name is still in that town. 

J— P. 

The well-known Petersfield family of Joliffe were lords of 
that manor from 1737 (W.), until the present century (W.). 



HAMPSHIRE. 207 

The Isle of Wight is now the home of the name. John JolifPe 
of Petersfield was in the middle of last century the mortgagee 
of "the Home Farm and the disparked park" in the manor 

of Harting, Havant (Long.) Hampshire is at present the home 

of the JuDDS, but there are a few of the name in the adjacent 
county of Wiltshire. In the 13th century Jud was a name well 
represented in Oxfordshire and Lincolnshire (H. R.). (See under 

"Wiltshire.") Richard Kent was bailiff of Lymington in 

1508. The Kents were a well-known Romsey family 200 years 
ago, of which town they were considerable benefactors ; the name 
was also established in Winchester last century, and in the early 
part of the same century a customary tenant of Cranbury bore the 

name (W.) The original Lavingtons probably took their name 

from parishes in the adjoining counties of Sussex and Wilts. 
Lavington was the name of one of the customary tenants of 
Cranbury early last century ; George Lavington, Bishop of 
Exeter in the middle of last century, was educated at Win- 
chester College (W.) In the beginning of the 17th century 

Andrew Mundt or Munday owned the manor of Nursling, which 

shortly passed out of the family by marriage (W.) George 

PoTTiCART, gent., lived at Southampton in the reign of Charles 11. 
(W.). Jeffry Poticary, gent., was married to Mistress Mary Pyke, 
at Bedwyn Magna, Wilts, in the reign of Charles I. (Coll. Top. et 
Gen.) PouNDE is the name of an old family of Drayton posses- 
sing much property in the county in the 15th and 16th centuries 

(Long.). The name is now rare in the county Henry Poets- 

JIODTH, a Hampshire gentleman, was in 1737 one of the trustees 

under the Roads Act for the county (W.) A record of the 

sterling qualities of Robert Poore, gent., who died in 1640, is 
preserved in an epitaph in the church of St. Bartholomew Hyde, 
Winchester, which thus runs : — 

" Let men detracte, 
Say what they can, 
Hee livd and dyed 
An honest man." 

John Poor held land in Andover in 1702; about 300 years ago 
Philip Poore lived at Devington, Wilts (W.). Poore is still an 

Andover name The Pophams of Popham in this county were 

an ancient knig'htly family, going back to the time of Edward I. 
(Collinson's "Somerset"). They are now scantily represented. 



208 HOMES OF FAMILY NAIVIES. 

E-Z. 

RuMBOLD is an ancient name. As Rumbold and Rumbald 
it occurred in Bucks and Cambridgeshire in the 13th century 

(H. R.). Rumbolds-Wyke is a Sussex parish The name of 

TuBB is also represented in Berkshire. Tubbe was a Somerset 

name in the 13th century (H. R.) Turvill is another ancient 

Hants name. In 1398 the Turvyles held land in Botley, Hants, 
from the Earl of March (W.). There was a De Turvill in 
Wiltshire in the reign of Henry III. (H. R.). In the 16th 
and 17th centuries a gentle family of Turyile resided at Aston 
Flamvile, Leicestershire (Biblioth. Topogr. Brit.). Turvile or 

Turville is a parish and a seat in Bucks The Strides are now 

established in the Southampton distinct. John Stride lived at 
Fawley in 1340, and the Strides were numerous in Nursling 

parish last century (W.), where the name is still represented 

The TwiTCHiNS were represented by Andrew Twichin, who owned 
South Barnard Field, Southampton, in the reign of George I. 

(W.). Twitchen is a Devonshire parish Whitcher was a 

common name in N^ursling last century. The Whitchers, origi- 
nally the Wheatears or Whityers, came into the county early in 
the 17th century ; for 200 years and more they maintained the 
position of wealthy Hampshire yeomen, and their descendants are 
now landowners around Winchester ; now and then some of the 
name entered the professions (W.) James Withers, a trades- 
man of Alresford, gave £20 to the poor in 1G80 ; in 1648 the 
manors of Bentley and. Alverstock were sold to George Wither 
for £1,185; L. B. Wither was a Nevvnham justice a century 

ago (W.) The Witts are at present well represented, in the 

district of Fordingbridge. De Witt was an Oxfordshire name 

in the 13th century (H. R.) Urry is an old Isle of Wight 

name not so common there now as it was in the 17th century, 
when several of the gentry and farmers bore the name (Worsley's 
" Isle of Wight "). The name of Hurry is now found in Cam- 
bridgeshire. There was a Simon Urri in Oxfordshire in the 
13th century (H. R.). 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 



209 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name indicates that, thongli cliarac- 
teristic of the countj, the name is more relatively numerous 
elsewhere. 



*HaU 



Gbnbbaii Names (30-40 counties). 

Smith ♦Taylor 



Bennett 
Davies 
Edwards 
♦Hill 
*Jame8 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

Jones Rogers 

Matthews * f Stephens 

Morris I Stevens 

Phillips Williams 



Regional Names (10-19 counties), 

*Hughes *Lloyd Powell 

Lane *Morgaii Price 

♦Lewis Oliver 



Barnett 
r Beavan 
1 Bevan 
*Crump 
♦Dale 
♦Griffiths 

Hodges 



Addis 

Barrell 

Baylis 

/ Beam an 

1 Bemand 

r Bonner 

L Bonnor 

Farr 



District Names (4-9 counties). 

♦Maddoi *Pritchard 

Meredith Preece 

Nott Prosser 

♦Parry Watkins 

» / Philpott 



*WaU 



I Philpotts 



NTY Names 


(2-3 counties). 


♦Froggatt 


Norgrove 


♦Grough 


Pitt 


f Gwilliam 
l Grwillim 


♦Probert 


Prothero 


♦Jay 


Rudge 


Merrick 


Woodhouse 


r Nelmes 
1 Nelms 


♦Yapp 





210 



HOMES OF FAMILY NA3IES. 



PECtriiAE Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Allcott 


Han corn 


' Paniers 
L Panniers 


Apperley 


Hobby 


Banfield 


Hoddell 


Pantall 


Berrow 


Maddy 


Scudamore 


Bodenham 


Mailes 


Sirrell 


Bounds 


Mainwaring 


Skcrrett 


Bromage 


Marfell 


Skyrme 


Callow 


Meadmore 


South 


Eckley 


Monnington 


Tudge 


Embrey 


Oekey 


Vale 


; Godsall 
\ GodseU 


Orgee 


Wclson 


/iit>ft>n^T^ 


Went 



In the ease of a few of the abore names I am able to give the neighbour- 
hoods in which they are most frequent. Tlius : Apperley, Berrow, Dale, 
Godsall or GodseU, Paniers or Panniers, Pearce, and Skyrme are found mostly 
around Hereford. Marfell and Scudamore occur in the district of Koss, 
Farr in that of Pontrilas, Froggatt in that of Tenbury, and Griffiths in and 
around Leominster. The Beavaiis are numerous around Hereford, and the 
Bevans around Leominster. 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC HEREFORDSHIRI 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily iu 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

D. indicates Duncumbe's " Herefordshire." 

H.R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

P. „ Price's " Hereford." 

T. „ Townsend's " Leominster." 



!l 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 211 



A— J. 



Apperley is an old Herefordsliire surname, probably derived 
from the hamlet of that name in the neighbouring county of 
Gloucester. There were Apperleys in Linton 200 years ago, and 
during the reiga of Charles II. Thomas Apperley, gent., lived at 
Eaton Tregose. In the last century, a gentle family of Apperley 
resided in Withington (D.). At present the Apperleys are mostly 
gathered together in the vicinity of Hereford, but there a,re still 

representatives of the name in Withington From the i^eign of 

Henry VI. to that of Charles II., the Bodenhams, who take their 
name from the parish of that name, were county squires and filled 

on more than one occasion the office of sheriff (D.) Allcott is 

an ancient surname on the Welsh border. During the reign of 
Edward I., the name of Alecot or Allecot was represented in 

the hundred of Conede in Shropshu-e (H. K.) Boxnor was a 

common Herefordshire name. A family of gentry of this name 
resided during the last century at Woodends and Eccleswall Court, 
and early in this century at Hereford (D,), where the name yet 
remains. Two centuiies ago, there was a family of gentry named 
Bonner in Combe St. l!^icholas, in the county of Somerset (Collin- 
son's "Somerset"). Bonner, the noted Bishop of Queen Mary's 
I'eigTi, was born of humble parentage, at Hanley, Worcestershire. 

(See under " Surrey.") The Barrells of Herefordshire were in 

the 13th century represented in the adjoining county of Shropshire 

by the Barels or Barells (H. R.). (See under " Suffolk.") The 

name of Caswell only occurs in my list for Lincolnshire in the 
form of Casswell. Dui'ing the 17th and 18th centuries, however, 
Caswell or Caswall was a very notable name in Leominster in this 
county: this Leominster family supplied several bailiffs or mayors 
to the town as well as representatives in Parliament : Sir George 
Caswall, who represented this town in 1720, lost his estates through 
the South Sea Scheme (T.). Caswell is the name of a Somerset 

tithing and of a Dorset hamlet Thomas Crump was mayor of 

Hereford in 1610 (P.), and the name is still in the city. The 
Crumps are also established in Gloucestershire, Woi-cestershire, 
and Monmouth shii-e, and further reference to them will be found 

under one or more of those counties Eckley was the name of 

the sheriff of the county in 1740 (D.) Amongst the many 

names of note during the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries, which 
have since become rare or extinct in the county, mention shonid 

P 2 



212 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

be made of Cache poll and Hakluit. The Hakluits were pro- 
mineiitly connected with Leominster during the 16th century, 
filling the ofE.ce of mayor and ^representing that town in Parlia- 
ment : they lived for 2D0 years at Eaton Hall near the town: 
their ancestors were sheriffs of Herefordshire in the reign of 
Edward I., and Richard Hakluyt, prebendary of Westminster, but 
better known as the chronicler of the early voyages, was of this 
stock (T.). In the reign of Edward I., Walter Hakelutel was 
connected with the adjoining county of Shropshire (H. R.) ; and 
in the time of Edward II., John Hekelut was connected with 
Rutland (Wright's "Rutland "). In the 14th and lotb centuries, 
a family of Hakluyt held the Duchy or Hakluyt manor in Hallaton, 
Leicestershire (Curtis' "Leicestershire"). The name was also 
in those early times connected with Hampshire (Woodward's 
"Hampshire") Hobby or HoBiE was the name of a dis- 
tinguished Leominster family in the reign of Henry VIII. , itself 
a branch of the Hobys of Badland, Radnorshire : from the 
Leominster family sprang a line of baronets that became extinct 

in 1766 (T.) Jay was the name of the bailiff or mayor of 

Leominster in 1602 and 1674 (T.). The name is still in the town. 

The GODSALLS or Godsells of Hereford and its vicinity maybe 

connected in their descent with a Gloucestershire family of 
Godsell engaged in the cloth trade at Kings wood during the 17th 
and 18th centm4es (Bigland's "Gloucestershire"). 

K— Z. 

Maddox and Maddt are at present Hereford names, associated 
in the past with the history of the corporation of that city; 
Maddox was the name of four mayors during the first half of last 
century, whilst Benjamin Maddy was mayor of the city in 1790 

(D.). (See under "Wales.") Herefordshire is the principal 

home of the Merediths, who are also to be found in North and 
South Wales, Shropshire, Monmouthshire, and Gloucester.shire. 
Several of the mayors of Hereford in the 16th and 17th centuries 

bore this name (P.) Nelmes was the name of the bailiff or 

mayor of Leominster in 1652 and 1721 (T.). (See under 

" Gloucestershire.") Nash is now an uncommon name in the 

county. In 1651, 1676, 1716, and 1722, the bailiff or mayor of 
Leominster bore this name (T.), and the name is still in the town 

(See under " Gloucestershire.") Philpott and Philpotts were 

the names of five mayors of Hereford between 1587 and 1673 (P.) 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 213 

These names are still in that city. They are well established in 

other counties, as in Shropshire, Kent, Hants, etc The founder 

of the Mainwaring family is said to have come over with the 
Conqueror; and his descendants, who spread themselves over 
Cheshire and the adjacent counties, often included persons of 
eminence (L.). During the 17th and 18tli centuries, the Main- 
warings were lords of the manor of Annesley, in the parish of 

Rolleston, CO. Stafford (Shaw's " Staffordshire ") The Merricks 

or Meyricks have long been established in this county as well as 
in the adjacent county of Shropshire. Chai-les Merrick of Weston 
(Heref.) contributed £25 toward the fund raised in 1588 to resist 
the invasion of the Spanish Armada. Richard Meyrick was 
bailiff or mayor of Leominster in 1558 (T.). In 1742, Thomas 

Meyrick was buried in Hope Mansell church (D.) The MoN- 

NINGTONS, who probably derive their name from the parish of that 
name, were a distinguished family in the county during the 15th 
and 16th centuries, when they occupied the position at different 
times of sheriff : a Monnington was mayor of the city of Hereford 

in the reign of Edward IV. (D.) Norgrove was a name 

represented m Bromyard more than 200 years ago (D.) The 

family of Paniers or Panniers of Hereford, or its vicinity, bear 
an ancient English name : there was an Edith Panier in Cam- 
bridgeshire during the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Daring 

the 17th and 18th centuries there were tradesmen of the name of 
RuDGE in Dean Michel, in the adjoining county of Gloucester 

(Bigland's " Grioucestershire ") Sktrme is also an ancient 

English surname : the Skyrmes of Hereford may find ancestors in 
the Skermes of Oxfordshire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). 

Isaac Sktrme was mayor of Hereford in 1772 (D.) The 

Scudamoees for centuries were a distinguished and powerful 
county family, occupying at intervals the office of sheriff during 
the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, and representing the city of 
Hereford in Parliament for many years during the last century. 
They appear as county gentry in the reign of Edward I. (D. & L.). 

Ross is the locality in which the name is now most fi^equent 

The Scarletts were a Leominster family in the 17th century, and 
bailiffs or mayors in 1618, 1635, and 1664 were thus named (T.). 

The name is now rare in the county Woodhouse is a name 

that was represented by a gentle family in the county in the reign 

of James II. (D.) Vale is an old Leominster name. The 

bailiffs or mayors in 1611, 1780, 1800, and 1826, bore this 
name (T.). 



214 



HO.MES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



BEETFORDSHIRE. 

^OTE. — The asterisk denotes that, though characteristic of the 
county, the name is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 



Clark 



Geneeal Names (30-40 counties) . 

Smith * l?7right 



Bailey 



Co: 


MMON Names 

Chapham 
*Davi8 


(20- 


-29 


counties). 

*Saunders 



Kegional Names (10-19 counties. 
* Atkins *G-ray 





Dl! 


sTEiCT Names 


(4-9 


counties) . 


*Aldridge 




*Giddins 




*Nash 


*Dickinson 




*Mead 




Prior 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



♦Batchelor 


Grange 


Camp 


Janes 


Cannon 


*Line8 


Childs 


Pearman 


Coggin 


Pigg 


*Cornwcll 


Piggott 


Dorrington 


# r Puddephatt 
1 Puddifoot 


*rarr 


Finch 





*Rowley 

Sale 
*Seabrook 
*SilTester 
Sworder 
*Thirgood 
:^ r Wilhnott 
I Wilmot 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 



215 



Peculiab Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Acres 


Haukin 


Parkins 


Ash well 


Ivorv 


Patten 


Bonfield 


Kingsley 


Sears 


Campkin 


Kitchener 


Tittmufis 


Chalkley 


Mardell 


Vyse 


Chennells 


Orchard 


Walby 


Clinton 


Overell 


Woollatt 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC HERTFORDSHIEE 

NAMES, 

( The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

Ch. indicates Chauney's " Hertfordshire." 

CI. „ Clutterbuck's " Hertfordshire." 

Cus. „ Cussans' " Hertfordshire." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

T. ,, Turner's " Hertford." 



A— D. 

Acres is an old name in Ayot St. Lawrence (Cus.) The 

AsHWKLLS, who derived their name originally from, the Herts 
parish thus called, liave been for many centuries represented in 
this county. William Ashwell owned land in Stapleford in the 
reign of Richard II. (CI.) ; and a monk of St. Albans in the time 
of Henry VI. bore also the name of William Ashwell (Ch.). 
Charles Ashwell, Esq., of (Grenada, and formei'ly of Ayot St. 
Lawrence, died in 1798 (Cus.). The name of George Ashwell, 
Esq., occurs on the slab of a family vault in the church of St. 

^Michael's, but without a date (Cus.) Appleyaed is now a rare 

name in the county. The Appulyards or Apleyards were an old 



21G HOilES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

knightly family of Bigrave in the loth and 16th centnries, where 
they owned both the manor and the living (Cus.). Applegarth is 

at present the north of England form of this name Bonfieli> 

is an old name in St. Paul's, Walden (Cus.) Camp is a name 

that has heea for six centuries characteristic of this part of 
England. It was represented in the adjoining counties of Bedford, 
and Cambridge in the 13th century (H. R.). In the county of 
Herts, Camp is an old Sandon name (Cus.). John Camp was 
thrice Mayor of Hertford in the middle of last century (T,). 
There are also Camps in Derbyshire. Campkin is an old Clothall 
name ; there have been also Campkins at Datch worth during thefl 

last and the present century (Cus.) Cannon is an old name infl 

this county, both at Jfast Hyde in St. Peter's and at Clothall ; 
there was a John Canon of Ware or Shenley in the time of Henry 
VI. (Cas.). In the 13th century the name occurred, usually in 
the form of 'Canon, in Oxfordshire, Hunts, Cambridgeshire, etc, 
(H. R.). There are a few representatives of the name in Somerset. 

In the 14th and loth centuries the Earls of Huntingdon, who 

bore the family name of Clinton, owned the manor of Linsey, 
Herts. In the reign of Henry VIII. John Clynton of Yardley 
held some land in that parish ,- and there was a Robert Clinton of 

C<»ttered, in the reign of James I. (Cus.) The Clutierbucks of 

this county dui-ing last century hailed from Hinton, Gloucester- 
shire, in the previous century (Cus.). To the Clutterbucks of 
Herts belonged the antiquary who wrote the history of the county 

quoted in this book. (See under " Gloucestershike.") The 

name of Goggin was represented by Coggin and Cogan in the 
adjacent county of Cambridge in the 13th century (H. R.). 

Cogan or Coggan is now a Somei-set name The Cornwells of 

this county may be connected in their descent with John Coi-nwall, 
Esq., of Yardley, Herts, and Stebbing, Essex, in the 16th century 
(CI.). Early in the 15th century, John Cornwall was a gentleman 
of Willesden, Middlesex (Cus.). The name of Cornwell also 

occurs in Cambridgeshire and Sussex. (See under " Sussex.") 

The DoREiNGTONS were an old gentle family of Kelshall in the 17th 
century (Cus.). There is a parish of the name in Lincolnshire, 

and a township in Shropshire is thus called Dimsdale, a name 

now rare in the county, is an old Hertford name ; the Dimsdales 
frequently filled the office of mayor from the reign of Charles II. 
to that of Anne; a member of this family, distinguished as a 
physician and as an advocate of inoculation, was made a Baron 



H RRTFORDSHIHE . 217 

b7 the Empress of Russia. Dimsdale is a name tliat lias its home 
at Bedale in Yorkshire (T.). 

E— I. 

Farr is an old Hatfield name (Cus.). The name is also now 

represented in Herefordshire and Lincolnshire The family of 

Finch of Redheath, Watford, during last century, had been in that 
neighbourhood since the reign of Henry Vill. (Cus.). The name 
of Finch was well represented in the eastern counties of Norfolk, 
Lincoln, Cambridge, and Bedford, in the reign of Edward I., and 
there were at that time a few of the name in Shropshire (H. R.). 

It now occnrs also in Gloucestershire and Worcestershire GtAPR 

is an old St. Albans name, now rare in the county though still in 
that town ; several mayors of St. Albans bore the name in the 

16th, 17th, and 18th centuries (CI.) Geange is an ancient 

English surname. It is also represented in the West Riding and 
in Bucks. Two centuries ago John Grange was patron of the 
living of Widford, Herts, and Francis Grange was the incumbent 

(Cus.). This is a common place-name in England Gravenor 

was a Hertford name in the 16th and 17th centuries; several of 
the mayors in the reigns of Elizabeth and James L bore the name 

(T.). It is now rare in the county Gynne was the name of a 

Stevenage family in the 16th and 17th centuries, the source of 
several bequests to the poor of the parish (CI.). The name is now 

rare in the county. (See under " Cornwall.") Hankix has been 

a Hertfordshire name for sevei^al centuries, and is an old name in 
Baldock, Sandon, and Ashwell ; Hugh Hankyn was placed on an 
Inquisition in the parish of Clothall in the reign of Edward III. 
(Cus.). In the 17th century a family of Hankin resided in 
Harwich, Essex ; and in 1603, 1609, 1 644, and 1655, the mayor of 

Harwich bore the name (Taylor's "Harwich") Ivory is an 

ancient name in this county. It has been represented at Harpenden 
three centuries and more (Cus.). In the first half of last century 
there was a Watford family of this name ; and Thomas Ivory held 
land of the Dean of Westminster in Wheathampstead in the reign of 
Anne (Cus.) About 1650, Robert Ivery was receiving £80 a year 
from Thomas Willshire, incumbent of Welwyn, " to serve the 
cure " ; the mayors of St. Albans in 1631, 1653, and 1664, were 
named Robert Ivory (CI.). John Ivorie was rector of Ayot St. 
Peter in 1630, Edmund Ivoi'ie of Henslow being the patron ; 



218' HOMES OF FAMn.Y NAVIES. 

Robert Ivory was owner of the manor of Brooks, Stevenage, for a^ 
short time in the reign of Elizabeth ; he may have been the 
Robert Iverj who was an Offley freeholder in that reign (Cus.). 
Probably this name is a modern form of Ivri or De Ivery, the 
name of a Norman family that held the manor of Ambrosden, 
Oxfordshire, in the 11th century (L.) ; and concerning this early 
family we also learn from Warton's " History of Kiddington " that 
ample possessions in Oxfordshire were granted by William the 
Conqueror to Robert De Iveri, a Norman adventurer. 

J— 0. 

The KiNGSLEYS have been long established in this county. A 
family of this name held the patronage of the living of Willian 
in the reign of Anne, and a person of the name filled the living 
in 1725 (CI.). There were Kingsleys in Hitchin in the 17th 
century ; and the Kingsleys held the estate of Rose Hall in the 
parish of Sarratt in the 16th and 17th centuries (Cus.). The 
name is still represented in Hitchin. There are places of this 

name in Cheshire, Hampshire, and Staffordshire There was a 

family of Kitchener at Chells in Stevenage parish last century 

(Cus.), and the name is still in the parish Lines was the name 

of an old family of Harpenden in the 17th century, and the name 
still occurs in that locality. Joseph Lines held land of the Dean 
of Westminster in Wheathampstead in the reign of Anne (Cus.). 

Manisty or Manesty, a name now rare in the county, was the 

name of a Hertford family which supplied two mayors to that 

town in the reign of James I. (T.) Mardell or Mardall is an 

old Wheathampstead name (Cus.). Mardele is a Hertfordshire 

manor Orchard is an ancient name in this county. William 

Ordgor held land in Hatfield in the reign of Edward I., and Adam 
Orgar held land in Stevenage in the time of Charles I. (CI.). 
The arms of Orchard are quartered on a memorial in Aldenham 
church that bears the date of 1650; in 1811 Thomas Orchard 
made a small annual bequest for the oldest widow of Sawbridge- 
worth " not being a dissenter " (Cus.). In the reign of Edward I., 
Orchard and Oregare were Oxfordshire names, Orgar was found in 
Cambridgeshire, and De la Orcharde occurred in Somerset (H. R.). 
If it were not that Appleyard was an old Herts name and that 
Applegarth, its synonym, was represented in the 13th century in 
the surrounding counties of Essex and Bucks (H. R.), I should 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 219 

be inclined to think that the name of Orchard might have had 
more than one origin. It is, however, remarkable that Prince, in 
his " Worthies of Devon," speaks of Orgar as Duke of Devon- 
shire in the 9th century Overall or Overell is an old Ardeley 

name (Cus.). John Overell or Ovei'hall who was rector of Cley 
Hull in 1603, was afterwards Bishop of Litchfield and then of 
Norwich (Ch.). 

P— R. 

In 1778 William Parkins, son of Richard Parkins of Xewing- 
ton Butts, Surrey, came into the possession of the manor of Chis- 
field; Sir William Parkins, of Bushey, Herts, was noted for his 
opposition to William of Orange. Parkyns is an old name in 

Great Berkhampstead (Cus.) A family of Patten or Patine 

resided near Chelmsford, Essex, in the 12th century, and the 
Pattens of Bank Hall, Lancashire, claim to be from this origin 
(L.). James Patten held the Woodwicks estate in Rickmans- 
Avorth, Hei'ts, apparently some time during last century (Cus.). 
Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester in the reign of Henry VI., is 
said to have changed his name from Patten to Waynflete, after his 
birthplace in Lincolnshire, a common practice in those days, 

according to Holinshed, amongst learned and spiritual men 

Pearmax is an old Weston name ; thei-e are memorials to a family 

of Pearman in Sandridge churchyard (Cus.) PiGGOrr isa name 

that has been represented amongst all classes in this county for 
many centuries, its early form in the 14th century being some- 
times Picot or Picote. Further particulars concerning the past 
and present distribution of this ancient name are given under the 

Pigotts of Cambridgeshire The singular Herts name of PiGG 

is evidently of the same origin as Peck, an ancient east country 
name, which is represented by Pick in Lincolnshire and Pigg in 
Herts. In the loth century, Peck, Pick or Picke, Pik, Peke, 
Peeke, Pig or Pigge, were frequent names, especially in the 
east of England. Under the Pecks and the Peeks of Cambridge- 
shire, I have referred to all these varieties, excepting the last. In 
the 13th century, Pig was a Berkshire and a Norfolk name, and 
Pigge occurred in Northamptonshire (H. R.). I regard all the 
varieties enumerated above, from Peck to Pigg, as east-country 
abbreviations of Piggott or Pigott, itself a form of Picot or 
Pikot, an ancient personal name, which, according to Lower, was 



2-20 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

repre-^ented in Cambridgeshire and Hants in Domesday times, and 
whicli existed as a surname in later times. With regard to Pigg, 
it is very noticeable that it is established in a county like Herts, 
which has been a home of the Piggotts for many centuries. It is 
also remarkable that in the 13th and 14th centuries the names of 
Pik, Pick, and Pigot, were associated in Shropshire (H. R. and 
L.). Pigg is also a Northumberland name, especially characteristic, 

T believe, of the vale of the North Tjne PuddephattIs an ancient 

Herts and Bucks name, that at present is most numerous across 
the Bucks border in the neighbourhood of Chesham. It was a 
fi'equent name in Abbots Langley and in Sarratt, both in Hert- 
fordshire, dui'ing the l(5th and 17th centuries (Cus.), and it still 
occurs in Sarratt. In Pnddifoot, also a Herts name, it possesses a 
modern corruption, whilst it is itself probably an altered form of 
Pedefer (as suggested by Cussans), an Ippolitts name in the reign 
of Edward HI. (Cus.). The similar name of Pettipher is still 
found in Oxfordshire, and further reference to this subject will 

there be found The family of Rowley owned the manor of 

Rush den in the beginning of the 17th century; Francis Rowley, 
a gentleman of Brent Pelham, died in 1686, at the age of 89 
(Cus.). 

s— z. 

Sale is a name that has been represented for ages in this 
county. About the time of Edward I., Thomas, son of William 
De la Sale, held twelve acres of land in Ickleford (Cus.). There 
was a Robert De la Sale of St. Albans, in the reign of Edward III. 
(CI.). George Sale, the translator of the Koran, was son of a 
London merchant; he died at Great Marlow, Bucks, in 1737 
(CI.). According to Cussans, the Hertfordshire Sales hailed from 
Scotland nearly two centuries ago, and he mentions Francis Sale, 
a gentleman who was married at Ashwell in 1694. Their early 
origin, however, may more probably be found within the limits of 
this county. The present Sales hold extensive estates in Odsey 
Hundred (Cus.). Sale is also a Derbyshire and a Staffordshire 
name ; in the former county it has probably often been confounded 

with Seal. Sale is a Cheshire township Seabeook is also an 

Essex name, but it has been long established in Herts. Edward 
Sebrok was a freeholder of Hitchin in the reign of Elizabeth 
(Cus.). The name of Edward Seabrook figures in the list of the 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 221 

mayors of St. Albans as major for 1687, 1701, and 1729 (CI.). 
Thomas and William Seabrooke lield land of the Dean of West- 
minster in Wheathampstead in 1705 (Cus.). In the middle of last 
century there was a gentle family of Seabrook at St. Peter's 
(Cus.). The name is still in St. Albans and Wheathampstead. 

The family of Sears, or Sayers as it was sometimes spelt in 

early times, for many centuries up to the close of the last century 
possessed landed estates in the adjoining county of Essex (L.). 

TiTTMUss is an old name in Stevenage and Ippolitts (Cns.). 

It is represented by Titmas in the adjoining county of Bedford, 
and as Tytemers it occurred in Cambridgeshire in the 13th 

century (H.E.) Walby is an old Hatfield name, and Woollatt 

is an old Knebworth name (Cus.) Vyse is the name of an old 

Elstree family (Cus.). John Vyse was vicar of Willian in the 

reign of Henry VIII. (CI.) The Wilmots, who once possessed 

Long Marston, were the ancestors of the Earls of Rochester (CI.). 
An old gentle family of Willy mot owned the manor of KeLshall in 
the 17th century (Ch.). There is a tablet in All Saints' Church, 
Hertford, to Sheirecliffe Willymott, gent., who died in 1723, at 
the age of 24 (T.). Two Hertfordshire clerics bore the name of 
Wilmot last century, a rector of Stapleton and a rector of 
Digswell (CI.). This name is also established in Derbyshire and 

Somerset One of the most ancient of Herts names is that of 

WiLSHEKE or Wylshere, now rare in the county. There have 
been Wilsheres of the Frythe, Welwyn, from the 14th to the 
present century (Cus.) ; and we find them there in our own day. 



222 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 

Note.- The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is better represented elsewhere. 

General Names (30-40 counties). 
♦Smith 



Kegional Names (10-19 counties). 
Newton 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*Abraham 


♦England 


*Tumill 


Bedford 


*Fairy 


*Whiteman 


Blott 


*Pentelow 




Brawn 


Topliam 






Pecttliar Names (mostly 


confined to this county). 


Achurch 


Humbley 


Mash 


Bletsoe 


Jellis 


Speecliley 


Cheney 


Ladds 


Spriggs 


Corney 


Lenton 




Ekins 


Looker 





NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC HUNTINGDON- 
SHIRE NAMES. 

(The letters H. R. indicate the Hundred Rolls.) 



HUXTIXGDOXSHIRE. 223 



A— Z. 



The name of Abraham has been represented in this county 
since the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) (See under " Lincolk- 

SHIRE.") Cheney or Cheyxet is an ancient name in the east of 

England, but it is not of frequent occurrence now. In the loth 
century it was established in most of the eastern counties in the 
forms of De Cheney, De Chenee, Le Cheny, etc., in Suffolk, 
Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Norfolk, Beds, etc. (H. R.). The Cheyneys 
of Boston, Lincolnshire, were well-known merchants of last 
century, and frequently filled the office of mayor of the town 
(Thompson's "Boston "). Cheney was an old Herts name in the 
16th century, when Sir Thomas Cheney owned the manor of 

Willian (Cussans' "Herts") Ekixs was the name of a gentle 

family owning, in the 17th and 18th centuries, Favell manor and 
other properties in ^Northamptonshire, which were sold in 1814 

for £23,970 (Cole's "Weston Favell") The name of England 

was represented in this county six centuries ago by Engelond 

(H. R.). (See under "Yorkshire, West Riding.") During 

the last half of the 17th century several of the bailiffs ot Godman- 

chester boi-e the name of Ladds (Fox's " Godmanchester '") 

Lenton is the name of parishes in Lincolnshire and Notts. As a 
surname it occurred in Hunts and Notts 600 years ago (H. R.). 

Mash is a name that was represented six centuries ago in the 

form of Masse, in the hundred of Norman Cross, in this county 

(H. R.) Several of the bailiffs of Godmanchester, in the 17th 

and 18th centuries, bore the names of Maile, Skeggs, Stocker, 
and Trice or Tryce (Fox's " Godmanchester"). 



224 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



r 



,-. ^ 



KENT. 

j^OTE. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of this county, is moi-e numerous elsewhere. 



"Brown 
*Cook 



Geneeal Namks (30-40 counties). 



*Martin 
Smith 



*Tajlor 



Chapman 
*£Uis 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Palmer 

*Rogcr3 



Wood 

* Young 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Austen 


Harvey 


* Pearson 


* Bates 


*Long 


Reeves 


CoUins 


Marsh 


* Russell 


Day (Maidstone) 


*May 


* Sharp 


Goodwin 


Miles 


Sutton 


r Hammon 
I Hammond 


Mills 


*Wells 


Paine 





District Names (4-9 counties). 



Alexander 


Hills 


Sampson 


' Barten 


Jarvis 


Skinner 


L Barton 


*Jenuer 


*Walter 


Bourne 


*Kemp 


♦Waters 


Butclier 


f Monk 
LMunk 


Weeks 


Champion 


Wootton 


Coleman 


Philpott 




*Daniels 


*Rolfe 





KENT. 



225 



County Names (2-3 counties) . 



Amos 


Cornes 


Levett 


Baldoek 


Cradduck 


Marchant 


Bartholome-s' 


*auest 


Mercer 


Bassett (Seveuoaks) 


Hickman 


Neve 


Bath 


*Hilder 


*Noakes 


Brooker 


Homewood (Asliford) 


Pje (Rochester) 


Cheesman 


Hooker 


Sloman 


Clifford 


Jessup 


*Standen 


Collard 


Kelsey 


*Stedman 


Collison 


Kennard 


Tanton 


Constable 


Ledger 


Terry 



Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Ballard 
Barling 
Belsey 

{Benstead T (Sitting- 
Bensted J bourne) 
Bing r 

Boorman L 

Boulden f 

Brenchley L 

Brice (Canterbury) 
Broadley (Hy the, Dover) 
Buss 

Chantler (Staplehurst) 
Clinch (Sittingbourne) 
Coultrip (Sheerness) 
Coveney f 

Crowhurst L 

Curling (Faversham) 
Dark 
Dilnot 
Dungey 
Pagg 

Pile (Canterbury) 
Pilmer 
Pinn 

Premlin J 

Grodden I 

Goodhew (Sittingbourne) 



Gower 




Miskin (Rochester) 


Hambrook 




Missing 


Harden 

Hartridge 

Hickmott (Staplehui'st) 

Hogben 


Morphet t 

Murton 

Neame (Faversham) 

Offen 


Hogbin 
Holness 
Honess 
HoUamby 




r Orpen 
[ Orpin 
Oyler 
J Pidduck 
1 Pittock 


Hollands 




Inge 




Pilcher 


Jarrett 




Prebble 


Kingsnorth 
Langridge 


(Ashford) 


Quested 
Rigden 


Larkin 




Scoones 


Larking 




Seath 


Laslett 




Shorter 


Leney 
Love 




SoUey 
Solomon 


Luck 




Southon 


Manwaring 
Matcham 


(Staplehurst) Stace 

Stickles 


Maylam 
Maxted 
Millen 
Milne 




Stunt 
Stuppies 

Swaffer (Ashford) 
Tassell 


Minter (Favershara) 


Thii-kell 






Q 



26 


HOMES OF FAMILY 


NAMES. 


Tickner 


Uiiicume 


Whitebread 


Tomkin 


Yinson 


r Wiles 
IWjles 


Tompsetfc 


Wacher 


Tuff 


Waterman 


Witlierden (Staplehurs 


Usherwood 







NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC NAMES OF KENT. 



Authorities indicated by the following abbreviations : — 

H. indicates Hasted's " Kent," a work sufficiently exliaustive for the piu*- 

pose of this work. 
H. E. „ Hundred EoUs. 



A— B. 

The present family of Amos, established in the Faversham 
district, probably can claim an ancestor in Thomas Amos, a 
well-to-do yeoman of Ospringe, who in 1769 bequeathed £100 for 
the poor of Molash (H.) The Alexanders of Kent were repre- 
sented a hundred years ago by John Alexander, who owned Upper 

Golsdon Farm, in Ash (H.) Baldock is an old Kent name 

The vicar of Reculver in 1594 was thus called, and the name was 
represented in Aylesford at the end of the 17th century. During 
the last century there were memorials to the Baldock family ir 
Lenham Church, and a hundred years since there were Baldock; 
in Canterbury (H.) ; the name is also represented in Notts 

Baldock is a parish in Herts The Barlings belong to a verj 

old family in this county, who, when Hasted wrote in 1790, ha( 
been in possession of Barlings, a manor in Egerton parish, fron 
the year 1600, and even before. There was a Mr. Barling who h 
1670 left legacies to Cogan's Hospital, Canterbury. The nam 
was in Faversham a century ago (H.). Perhaps this old famil 
came centuries ago from the Essex parish which bears the sam 
^ame The Bassetts were an ennobled family in mediaeva 



KENT. 227 

time ; th.ej held the posts of constable of Dover and lieutenant of 
Dover Castle in the reigns of John and Edward III. The rector 
of Tunstall in 1368, and the rector of Lnddenham in 1580, bore 
this name ; and in Elizabeth's time a Bassett held a messuage in 
the village of Cowdham, in Dartford deanery (H.). The Kentish 
Bassetts are now mostly gathered around Sevenoaks. (See under 

" Cornwall " for an account of the Cornish Bassetts.) Ballard 

is another old Kent name. The Ballards owned Sapinton manor 
from the time of Henry IV. until that of Philip and Mary. 
Robert Ballard, butler of Richard II., received from his Sovereign 
the manor of "West Combe. In the reign of Henry VI., Thomas 
Ballard, of Horton Parva, was one of the sheriffs of Kent (H.). 

Bartholomew was the name of two county families of 

Addington and Oxenhoath last century (H.) The BiXGS held 

property in Wrotham in the time of Elizabeth, and one of this 
family was sheriff of Kent in the same reign. In the time of 
James I. the Bings also owned property in Tunbridge, where the 
name still remains ; and in this reign George Bing was mayor of 
Dover, and also the representative of the city in Parliament. 
There are several memorials of Bings in the church of St. John, 
Margate, erected in the latter half of last century ; and in 1782 

Mr. H. Bing owned Yokes Court, in Frinsted (H.) The family 

of Belsey came into possession of Boswell Banks in 1777 (H.). 

The Bensteads or Bexsteds of Sittingbourne bear an ancient 

Kent name; and we learn from Hasted that Merston in the reign 
of Henry III. belonged to John de Banstede, Benstede being a 
parish in Hunton parish. In 1486, Andrew Bensted was rector 
of Stonar, Thanet ; and in 1511, Andrew Benstede was vicar of 
Herne (H.). Binsted is also the name of places in Sussex and 

Hants Brice was a Kent name in the reign of Edward I. 

(H. R.). The name is at present best represented aroond 
Canterbury. In 1677 a Mr. Brice presented a small amount of land 
to the corporation of Dover for the relief of the plague-affected ; 
and early last century John Brice purchased property in Eleham 

(H.) Broadlet was a Dover name during last century. John 

Broadley, a surgeon there, died in 1784, aged 79 ; his heirs 
possessed the estate of Upper Hales, at the close of the century 
(H.). The family still have their principal home in the same 

locality, namely, in and around Dover and Hythe The 

Brenchlets belong to an old and distinguished Kentish family, 
possessing property in Brenchley in the time of Heniy VT. In 

Q 2 



228 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

the same reign Sir "WilHam Brencliley, chief justice of the King's 
Bench, owned the manor of Benenden. The vicar of Ash in 1660 
was thus named (H.). 

C— D. 

The Cliffords of Bobbing were an ancient Kentish family who 
held the manor of Shome during the 15th century; they were 
descended from the Herefordshire Cliifords of Clifford Castle, who 

are still represented in the county of Gloucester (H.) The 

family of Clinch, now best represented in and around Sitting- 
bourne, resided in Hernehill in this county during the 17th 

century (H.), where the name still remains The Curlings of 

Faversham bear an old Thanet name ; we find a William Curlyng 
in that locality in 1513 (H.). A century ago there was a Mr. 
John Curling of Ham, who bought the Betshanger estate (H.). 

The CoLLARDS of Kent may find an ancestor in Simon Colard, 

who represented Dover in Parliament in the reign of Edward III. 
Christopher Collard was rector of Blackmanstone in the time of 

Charles I. (H.) In the reign of Henry VIII., Richard Coveney 

owned property in Maidstone parish ; and in the time of Mary, 

Nicholas Coveney possessed property in Boxley (H.) The 

Cradducks may claim connection with a gentle family of Cradock 
in Luddesdowne in the middle of the 17th century ; Cradock was 

the name of the vicar of Tong in 1672 (H.) The Kentish 

Cheesmans date back to the 16th century. In the reign of Henry 
VIII., John Cheseman held for a time the manor and parsonage of 
Lewisham (H.), and Chiesman is still a Lewisham name. In 
Elizabeth's time he represented New Romney in Parliament and 

filled the office of mayor (H.) The Crowhursts derive their 

name from parishes of that name in the adjacent counties of 

Surrey and Sussex William d'Arques, lord of Folkestone, who 

came to England with the Conqueror, may, according to Lower, 

have given rise to the Kentish name of Dark Dilnot was a 

Sandwich name in the middle of last century ; and the name is 
still in the district, John Dilnot of Sandwich a hundred years 

ago owned Brook-house in Ash (H.) The name of Daniels was 

represented 600 years ago by Daniel in the hundreds of Maidstone 
and Worth (H. R.). 



KENT. 229 

E— G. 
Fagg is a very old Kentish name. Tlie Fagges of tlie 16tli and 
17tli centuries were a family of influence and position, and had 
their principal home at Chartham (H.). Lower, however, says 
that they Avere also long connected with Rye in the adjacent 
county of Sussex. Further back we have the Fagges at Willes- 
borough in the 14th century (H.). A member of this family was 
created a baronet by Charles II., and Sir John Fagg was vicar of 
San'e a hundred years ago ; during the first half of last century, 
several of the family were buried in Ham church (H.). Fagg is 
an ancient English name ; we find it six centuries since in Oxford- 
shire and Somerset (H. R.) Fremlin is another old Kent 

surname. Henry VIII. granted to John Fremling and his heirs 
2^ acres of land in Great Dawfield, Kerasing ; and in the reign of 
Elizabeth, Gilbert Fremlin owned the mansion of Croffc in Hartlip 

(H.) The FiLMERS belong to a distinguished Kentish family 

tliat had its home at East Sutton during the I7th century ; some 
of its members were baronets, and others were sheriffs of the 

county (H.) The present family of Fixu may be connected 

Avith John Finn of Chilham in 1702 (H.) Goodhew, a name 

now well represented around Sittingbonrne, has long been found 
in Kent. In the time of Henry VIII., John Goodhewe held pro- 
perty in Seasalter and Hernehill, and in 1511 John Godhew was 
master of Wye College; in Elizabeth's reign, a Goodhngh owned 
a manor in Sturry (H.). Richard Goodhugh of Tunbridge was 
sheriff in 1697 ; and the family possessed the manor of Sheldhurst 

in the reign of George I. (H.) Gower was the name of the 

vicar of St. Stephen's in 1457 ; and John Gower had property in 
Hollingborne in the time of Edward III. (H.), The noble family 

of this name has been connected with this county Godden is 

an ancient Keiit surname. The vicar of Reculver in 1663 was 
thus named, and in Folkestone church there is, or was, a memorial 
to a Godden of the date of 1636 (H.). The Goddens held the 
manor of Leyborne and much other property in the county during 
the 16th century ; and back in the 14th century we find a family 
of De Godden holding the manor of Godden in Tenterden parish 
(H.), where the surname yet remains. This is in fact an early 
English surname, being represented in the forms of Godin and 
Goding in the adjacent county of Sussex during the 13th century, 
ind occui-ring at the same time in the counties of Bucks, Oxford, 
Cambridge, Somerset, etc. (H. R.). 



230 HOLIES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

H— J. 

The Haetridges of Harfcridge, CranTbrook, were an ancient 
family, one of the name occurring amongst the Conservators of 

the Peace in the reigns of Edward III. and Eichard II. (H.) 

During last century the Hookeks held properties in the parishes of 
Biddenden and Great Chart. John Hooker of Little Peckham, 
who was sheriff of Kent in 1712, belonged to the Hookers of Tun- 
bridge, who came originally from Hants. In 1595 Hooker, the 

ecclesiastical writer, held the living of Kingston (H.) Mr. 

HoGBEX, who owned the Copthall estate in Aldington parish about 
two centuries ago, may be an ancestor of the present Hogbens and 
Hogbins. In 1712, Thomas Hogben of Aldington left bequests to 
the poor; and in 1737 IMr. John Hogben of Ash (where the 
surname still remains) owned property in Wimlingswold parish 

(H.) The noble house of Hollais'd was connected with Kent 

during the last two centuries. Long before this, however, in the 
reign of Richard II., the Holands were the lords of Kent (H.). 

In 1554, Andrew Holness, of Seton in Ickham parish, left 

small bequests to the poor; and in 1667 Edward Holness was 

lessee of Bramling manor in the same parish (H.) Inge is an 

ancient Kentish name. In the reign of Edward II., William de 
Inge, a justice of the Common Pleas, held Ightham (Ickham) 
manor ; and John Inge was a justice in the same court in the time 
of Edward III. (H.). The vicar of Petham in 1627 was thus 
named; and in 1790 Mr. Peter Inge lived in the callage of Little- 
borne (H.). In the reign of Edward I. this surname occurred in 
Hunts and Oxfordshire (H. R.) ; and we learn from Lipscomb that 
Inge was a clerical name in Bucks in the 14th and 15th centuries 

The Kentish family of Jessup, a name also represented in 

Essex, may possess a namesake, if not an ancestor, in Jessuppe, 
the vicar of Preston church in 1579 (H.). There were two free- 
holders of the name of Jesopp living at Mattersey, Notts, in 1696 
(Harl. MS. G846). 

K^L. 

The Kelseys bear an old Kent name. The ancient Kelsey.' 
possessed Kelsey, Beckenham, in the 13th and 14th centuries. Ii 
1659 Colonel Kelsey represented Dover in Parliament, and wa; 
lieutenant of Dover Castle (H.). A hundred years since, then 



KENT. 231 

were Kelseys in Hawking parish (H.) The Kingsnorths of 

Ashford and its vicinity bear the name of a Kentish parish ; 
whilst the family of Kexxard may have a namesake or an ancestor 

in the rector of Fordwich in 1619 (H.) Langridge is the name 

of an ancient manor in Hailing. However, Lower remarks that 
the Langridges of Sussex appear to be indigenous to that county, 

the name of De Landrigg occurring there in the 14th century 

A hundred years since, the principal family of Larkin lived 
at Grove in Wickham parish, and there were then several 
memorials to the family in the church ; the name was also repre- 
sented last century in the parish of Bredhurst (H.) The 

Levetts were the patrons of the living of Brenset in the time 
of Elizabeth, and they also held it as incumbents (H.). In the 
middle of last century, Francis Levett, Turkey merchant, died at 
Nethersole in the parish of Wimlingswold (H.). This is also a 

Sussex name. (/See under that county.) Love is an ancient 

Kentish surname. Reginald Love held property around Chatham 
and Rochester in the reign of Henry V. ; and in the time of 
Henry VIII., Giles Love was a gentleman of Dover; John Love 
was rector of Woodchnrch in 1685 (H.). The Loves have long 
been an old Staplehurst family of gentry ; a hundred years since 
there were several inscriptions to this family, some of them 

obliterated, in the church and churchyard (H.) Luck was the 

name of the rector of Sevington in 1727 ; and in the reign of 
Elizabeth, Richard Luck owned Newhall manor, Sheppey (H.). 

M— N. 

The Manwarings of the vicinity of Staplehurst may be con- 
nected with the family that owned the manor of Waltham in the 
time of Elizabeth: in the same reign one of this family was 

vicar of Petham (H.). (See under "Herefordshire.") The 

Mercers were another old Staplehurst family. In 1730 the 
Mercers of Hawkhurst bought the Newsted estate in Staplehurst, 
which they still possessed when Hasted wrote in 1790. Mercer 
was the name of one of the representatives for Canterbury in the 

reign of Edward III. (H.) The Matchams may possess an 

ancestor in Mrs. Catherine Matcham, to whom a memorial was 

erected in Wye Church, dated 1713 (H.) The Morphetts may 

be connected with Thomas Morphett, who was rector of Newenden 
and Rolvenden in 1790, and with William Morphet, the rector of 



232 HOMES OF FAMILY XA3IES. 

St. Andrew's, Canterbury, in the time of Elizabetli (H.) The 

Neames are still established in Faversham. A century ago there 
was a vault in Birchington church coutaining the remains of 

several members of the family of jNTeame of Gore-end (H.) 

Keve is a very ancient name in this county, as well as in other 
counties. Robert le N'eve held Woldham Hall in the reign of 
Edward I. (H.) In the first half of last century, Gabriel Neve, 
attorney-at-law, lived at Hayes, near Bromley (H.). It is remark- 
able that this surname, which is now usually spelt Neave in 
Norfolk and Suffolk, has been for six centm-ies confined to the 
same area. The Hundred Rolls inform us that during the reign 
of Edward I. it occurred in the form of Le Neve in Norfolk, 
Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire ; and, as shown above. Hasted alludes 
to its being in Kent during the same reign. Even towards the 
close of the 19th century its home is still in Norfolk, Suffolk, 

and Kent The name of Noaees a century since was represented 

in the parishes of Goudhurst and Faversham (H,). 

0— R. 

Philpott, a name occuri'ing in several other counties, has long 
been found in Kent. Philipotts is the name of an estate in Tun- 
bridge, which, in the reign of Edward I., gave its name to the 
family possessing it. Sir John Philipott, who was lord mayor 
in the reign of Richard II., owned The Grange in Giliingham. 
Henry Philpot represented Hythe in the time of Henry IV. 
John Philipott, the Somerset Herald, and the author of " Kent 
Illustrated and Surveyed," lived in the time of Charles I., and 
was born at Folkestone. Robert Philpott was vicar of Bobbing 
in 1690 ; and there were several Philpots in the parish of Crundal 

early last century (H.) The Kentish Piddccks and Pittocks 

may hail originally from Norfolk. Blomefield, in his history of 
that county, mentions a gentleman named Piddock, of Brisingham, 

200 years ago Swingfield chui'ch, a century ago, contained 

several memorials to members of the family of Pilcher, who were 
tenants of St. John's (H.). Last century there flourished a New 
Romney family of this name, a member of which, Stephen Pilcher, 
gent., who died in 1768, was four times bailiff of the Marsh (H.). 
The names of Pilcher and Pilchere occurred in Cambridgeshire 

n the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) In the past century, the 

QuESTEDS held Elverden manor and Battle Hall, in Leeds parish 



KENT. 233 

(Kent) ; and in the time of Charles I. Mr. Mark Quested, of tlie 
Company of Fishmongers of London, owned the manor of Pen 

Court, Hollinj^liorne (H.) The Rigdens bear an ancient Kentish 

surname. Robert Rigden owned the manor of Morton, Canter- 
bury, for a short time in the reign of Henry VI. ; and during the 
16th and 17th centuries the Rigdens owned part of the manor 
of JSTorth Court or Lower Hardres (H.). John Rigden, a native 
of Canterbury, was incumbent of St. Mildred's church in that 
city in the early part of last century ; and William Rigden was 
the name of a Canterbury brewer in 1771 (H.). A hundred years 
since, there were Rigdens in Faversham, Wingham, etc. (H.). 
The name is still in Canterbury and Faversham, and in other 
places in the county. 

S— Z. 

The Shoetees have long been known in Kent. In 1688, the 
ancient seat of Bybrooke, in Kennington, became the property 
of Sir John Shorter, lord mayor of London : the family held it 
until the middle of last century; but in 1790 it was uninhabited 

and in rains (H.) Sollet or Solly is an ancient Kentish 

surname. John Solley owned Linacre manor, Whitfield, in the 
reign of Edward III. : Podding in Ash was the residence of this 
family from the time of Elizabeth until 1748, and from them the 
Sandwich Sollys have sprung (H.). Richard Solly, who was 
thrice mayor of Sandwich in the early part of last century, owned 

the estate of Great Poulders, Woodnesborough (H.) The 

Stages are an old Tenterden family, resident thei-e as far back 
as the beginning of the 17th century: Stace was the name o£ a 
parliamentary representative for Hythe in the time of Edward 

IV. (H.) The Stedmans may possess an ancestor in Canon 

Stedman of Canterbury Cathedral ia 1739, afterwards Archdeacon 
of Norfolk (H.) ; and the Stunts may claim kinship with the 
rector of Eythorne in 1569, who bore the name of Stynte (H.). 

Tassell was the name of a gentle family in Linsted in the 

early part of last centux'y (H.) The Teeeys or Terreys include 

an old Thanet family of gentry, several of whom were buried in 
Monckton church in the latter half of the 17th century (H.). 
In Elizabeth's time the Terrys held the manors of Bicknor and 
Swanton Court ; and in the same reign there lived a family of 
yeomen of the name in Heme, and in the time of Charles I. in 



234 HOMES OF FAMILY NAIMES. 

Shoreham. Mnch property was held by the Terrys in the early 
part of last century, when there were Terrys or Terreys o£ 
FavershatQ, Brookland, Ospringe, Staplehurst, Trapham, etc. 
(H.), It was also an old clerical name in the county. The 
incumbents of Petham in 1664, of St. Mary church. Sandwich, 
in 1622, and of Goodneston in 1736, were thus named (H.). 
Terry is a name now also represented in Bucks and the "West 
Riding; and it is remarkable that, as far back as the reign of 
Edward I., it occurred still in Yorkshire, and also in the counties 
a,djacent to Bucks, namely those of Oxford, Northampton, and 

Hunts (H. R.) Thirkell is a contraction of Thirkettle, an 

ancient Scandinavian name, now found in Norfolk and Suffolk. 
{See under " Suffolk.") Thurkil and Thurkill were Norfolk and 

Cambridgeshire names in the 13th century (H. R.) The family 

of Waterman owned property during last century in Rucking, 
Halden, and Otham (H.). In 1696, Edward Waterman was vicar 

of Hollingborne (H.) The Whitebreads possess the name, if 

not the blood, of Samuel Whitbread, who purchased an estate in 

Woodnesborough in 1783 (H.) The Witherdbns were an 

ancient family of gentry, holding the manor of Eytchden, in 
Betliersden, from the time of Henry VIII. until the close of last 
century, when Hasted wrote. The present representatives of the 
name are mostly confined to Staplehurst and its -neighbourhood. 
Withernden is the name of a Sussex manor. 



LANCASHIRE. 



23- 



LANCASHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



* Green 

*Hall 

*Johnson 



General Names (30-40 counties). 



*Robinson 
*Smith 
Taylor 



*Turner 
*WLlson 
*Wright 



Harriaon 
Jackson 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Mason 
Parker 



Shepherd 
♦Thompson 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Atkinson 


*Fisher 


J Procter 
L Proctor 


BaU 


G-ardner 


*Barne3 


Howard 


*Shaw 


Berry 


*Marsh 


*Spencer 


*Cross 


*MiUer 


*'Webster 


*.Dixon 


*Porter 


Wilkinson 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



*Ashton 


*Bond 


*Clarkson (Preston) 


f Baines 


*Booth 


Crook 


I Baynes 


Bradley 


Dickinson 


*B aid win 


Bradshaw 


Dobson (Presto r.) 


Banks 


*Braithwaite 


r Fielden 
1 Fielding 


*Barlow 


*Briggs 


Blackburn 


*Buckley 


Glover 



236 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



* Greenwood 
Grundy (Mauchester) 

/ Hayes 
L Heves 
*Hodgkinson 
*Hodgson 

Holden 

Houghton 

* Hunter 
*Kirkham 

* Kitchen 
Knowles 

*Lancaster 



*Latham 

Law (Manchester) 
*Leach 

Lund 

Lunt 
*Moon (Chorley) 

Nelson 

Norris 

Parkinson 
* Pollard 

Preston 

'Rhodes (Preston) 
-Riley 



*Sanderson (Preston) 

Slater 

Stott (Manchester) 

Sutton 

Swift 

*Tonilin9on 
*Whitehead 
r Whitaker 
L Whittaker 
*Whittle 
*Wilcock 

Wood8 

Yates 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Ainsworth (Blackburn) 
*Appleton 
j Armistead 
'- Armitstead 

Ashcroft 

Ashworth 

Bamford 
/ Banister 
L Bannister 

Bargh 
r Baron 
L Barron 
*Barrow (Ambleside) 

Beesley 

Billington (Preston) 

Birchall 

Birkett 

Blundell 

Boardman 

Bolton 
4^ r Bownass 
I Bowness 

Bridge 
*Burrow 

Chad wick 

Clegg 
*Cliff 
*Collin8on (Blackburn) 

Cookson (Preston) 



f Cotham 
I Cottam 

Coupe 
*Cowell 

Crabtree 
*Crossley * 

*Deacon (Preston) 
*Dodgson 

Draper 

Dugdale 
J Edmondson 
L Edmimdson 

Ellison 

Eitton (Bury) 

Garnett 
J Gaskell 
I Gaskill 
*Gerrard 
*Grace 
(, f Gratrix 
t Greatrix 
rHardacre 
] Hardaker 
.1 Hardiker 
^Har dicker 

Hargreaves 
*Hartley (Burnley) 

Harwood (OrerDarwen) 

Haslam (Bolton) 



Heap 

Heaton 

Higham 

Hilton (Oldham) 

{Hitchen 
Hitchin 
Hitch on 
*Hodge 

*Holcroft (Ormskirk) 
*Holgate 

Holt 

Hornby (Preston) 
*Hough 

Howarth 
*Hoyle 
*Hulme 

Hurst 

Ireland 

Jenkinson 

Jolly 

Kay 

Kelsall 

Kershaw 
*Leeming 
*Leigh 

Lord 

Marsden 

Mather 

Mercer 



LANCASHIRE. 



237 



Mort 

Nightingale 

Nuttall 
*Oddie 
/ Ormerod 
I Ormrod 
*Park 

Parr 

Partington (Manchester) 

Peet 

Pennington ^ 

Prescott 

Pye 



Raby 

Eigby 

*Royle 

*Rushton 

Salisbury (Preston) 
*Schofield 

Seed (Preston) 

Shuttleworth 
*Slinger 

Speakman (Wigan) 
. r Stothert 
1 Stuttard 



^Strickland (Preston) 

Sumner 

Tinsley 

Travis 
*Tyson 
*Waddington 
*Warburton 

Whalley 
, J Wolf enden 
L Woolfenden 
*WorthiDgton 



Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Alker (Wigan) 

Almond 

Alty 
J Aspinall 
'y- Aspinwall 

Atherton 

Bamber (Preston) 

Battersby 

Bent (Manchester) 

Bibby 

Bleasdale (Preston) 
r Bleazard 
"{ Blezard 
^ Blezzard 

Bonney 

Bretherton (Preston) 

Brindle 

Bulcock 

Butterwortli 

Caldwell 

Car dwell 

Cartmell 

Catlow 

Catterall 

Caunce (Ormskirk) 

Charnley (Preston) 

Charnock (Ormskirk) 

Collinge 

Coward 

Critchley 

Crompton (Bolton) 



Cropper 

Culshaw (Ormskirk) 

Cunliffe 

Dagger (Preston) 

Dearden 

Dewhurst 

Drinkall 

Duckworth 

Dunderdale (Garstang) 

Duxbury 

Eastham 

Eaves 

Eccles (Preston) 
J Entwisle 
L Entwistle 

Fairclougli 

Fazakerley (Ormskirk) J 

Eish ' I 

Forrest (Preston) r 

Forshaw (Ormskirk) 1 

G-ornall (Preston) 

Gorst (Garstang) 

Greenhalgh (Middleton) 

Gregson 

Grimshaw j 

f Hacking . I 

L Hakin 

HalliweU , 

Halsall (Ormskirk) J 

Hardman (Preston) | 

Haworth *■ 



Haydock (Blackburn) 

Hayhurst 
Haythornthwaite 

(Lancaster) 
Hesketh 

Hesmondhalgh (Preston) 
Higson 
Hindle 
Horroeks 
Huddleston 
Ibison 

Iddon (Preston) 
Kellett 

Kenjon (Blackburn) 
Kilshaw 
Lawrenson 
Leaver 
Lever 
Livesey 
Livesley 
Longton 
Lougworth 
Lonsdale 
Lyon 
Lythgoe 
Lithgoe . 
Maden 
•Margerison 
Margerson 
Marginson 
■ Margison 



238 



HOMES OP FAMILY NAMES. 



Martland (Ormskirk) 

Mashiter 
f Maudsley 
l Mawdsley 

Mayor 

Molyneux 

Newby 

Nutter 

Ollerton 

Pemberton 

Pendlebm'y (Bolton) 

Pickup 

Pilkington 

Pilling 

Pimblett 

Pollitt 

Pomfret 

Postlethwaite 

Rainford 

Ramsbottom 

Eawcliffe 

Rawlinson 



f Riding 
1 Ryding 

Rimmer (Ormskirk) 

Rogerson 

{Rosbotham 
Eosbottoni 
Rosebotliam 
f Rossall 
l Rossell 
Rothwell 

I ^'^g^^l (Burnley) 
L Segar J 

Salthouse 

Scholes 

Seddon 
r Sefton 

LSepliton (Ormskirk) 
J Sliacklady 
I Sbakelady 

Sharpies (Blackburn) 
J Sharrock 
L Sliorrock 



Silcock 

Singleton (Preston) 

Stanworth (Burnley) 

Starkie (Burnley) 

Stuart 

Swarbrick 

Tattersall (Burnley) 

Threlfall 

Topping 

Townson 

Tyrer 

Unwortli 

Wallbank 

Walmsley (Preston) 

Walsh 
J Wareing 
I Waring 

WhijDp 

Whiteside 

Winder 

Winstanley 

Worsley 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC LANCASHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the following abbreviations : — 
A. indicates Abram's " Blackbvirn." 



B 

B 

E 

E 

P, 

H. 

Har. 



H. L. 
H. R. 

L. 
W. W. 

Sp. 



Baines' "Lancashire." 

Baines' " Liverpool." 

Fishwick's " Rochdale Parish Registers." 

Fishwick's " Grarstang " ~l Chetham Society's 

Fishwick's " Kirkham " J " Remains." 

Hardwick's " Preston." 

Harland's " Manchester Court Leet Records." Chetham 

Society's "Remains." 
" History of Lancaster." 
Hundred Rolls. 

Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 
Whitaker's " Whalley." 
"Contributors to the Defence of this Country at the 

time of the Spanish Invasion in 1588 " (Brit. Mus., 

B. 474). 



LANCASHIRE. 239 



The AmswOETHS, who derive their name from a Lancashire 
township, are at present most numerous in the Blackburn district. 
The Ainsworths of Plessington, an ancient family, came into the 
possession of the manor of Plessington in the reign of Henry VI. 
Another ancient family of the name lived in the vicinity of Bolton. 
Henry Ainsworth, the eminent biblical scholar of the 16th and 
17th centuries, belonged to the Plessington family: whilst Robert 
Ainsworth the celebrated lexicographer of the 17th and 18th 

centuries hailed from the Bolton stock (B.) Alker, a name 

evidently derived fi'om the Lancashire parish of Altcar, is now 

best represented in the district of Wigan Anderton is an old 

Lancashire name now scantily represented in the county. The 
Andertons took their name from a Lancashii^e township and 
estate, which last they possessed in the 16th century (L.). The 
Andertons of Anderton in the time of James I. branched off into 
two gentle families, those of Euxton and Lostock (B.). Richard 
Anderton, a York surgeon, died in 166G, aged 59 (Drake's 

"Eboracum"). A Cheshire township also bears this name 

The Appletons of Lancashire have taken the name of a village in 
the county. The surname is better represented in the Xorth and 

East Ridings of Yoi'kshire The Ashworths are named after 

a township in the county Aspinall or Aspinwall occurs in 

various forms as an old Clitheroe and Standen name of the 16th 
and 17th centuries. Aspenhalgh, Aspinhaugh, Aspinall, Aspin- 
wall, such are the principal forms and gradations of a name 
originally signifying " an aspen mead." Standen Hall has been in 
the possession of a family of the name since last century (W. W.) 
There were Aspinalls of Royshaw, Blackburn, in the 17th century. 
(A.). A gentle family of Aspinwall that once resided at Aspin- 
wall, a house in Aughton parish, lived at Hale during last century 

(B.). The name is still in Aughton and Blackburn Ashton is 

also a Lancashire place-name. The Asshetons belonged to a 
notable family that for many centuries played a conspicuous part 
in the county ; the Asshetons of Downham and Midleton, going 
back to the 15th and 16th centuries, were amongst the oldest 

branches (W. W.) Atherton is still the name of a Preston 

family, members of which several times filled the oflfice of mayor 
during last century (H.). There is a Lancashire township of this 
name. 



240 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

B, 

The Bambers have their present home in the Preston district. 

Bamber-bridge is the name of a Lancashire village In the I7th 

century there was an old family of Bamfoed of Bamf ord House ; 
there was also another family of Bamford Hall (B.). Jerome 
Bamford held land in the JVIealegate in the manor of Manchester 
during the reign of Elizabeth (Har.). The name was well estab- 
lished in Rochdale parish in the 16th century (F.), and still occurs 
there. There is a Lancashire village thus called The Banis- 
ters or Bannisters, who have been for ages in the Burnley 
district, possess a very ancient Lancashire name. Bank Hall was 
for centuries the manorial residence of the Banastres or Banisters, 
an ancient and distinguished family possessing the lordship of the 
manor of Bretherton as far back as the reign of Edward III. (B.). 
They are said to have come from Prestatyn in North Wales in the 
reign of Henry II. (Hill's " Langton "). The Banisters of Bank 
retained their eminence in the 16th and 17th centuries, and served 
at times as high sheriff of the county (B.), Heniy Bannester and 
Nicholas Banester of Lancashii^e contributed £25 apiece to the 
national fund collected at the time of the expected invasion of the 
Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). Banastre was the name of two 
bailiffs and a mayor of Liverpool in the reigns of Elizabeth and i 
James I. (B. L.). Christopher Banister was one of the Lancashire 
men who were included by Charles II. in his list of " intended 
Knights of the Royal Oak," an Order, however, never instituted ; 
his estate was valued at £1,000 per annum (B.). (See under 
" Sussex.") There was an influential family of Banastre at 
Hadnall and Smethcott, Shropshire, from the 12th to the 14th 

century (Byton's "Shropshire") The Lancashire Barlows 

included an ancient knightly family of Barlow Hall, near Man- 
chester, in the 16th and 17th centuries, and carried their pedigree 
back to the reign of Edward I. ; the Bishop of Lincoln in the year 

1610 belonged to this family (B.) The Lancashire Barrows, 

who are named after a borough in the county, are best represented 

in the Ambleside district The Baitbrsbys derive their name 

either from an estate or fi-om a township in the county of York, 
the former of which was long in the possession of the family (L.). 
Thomas Battersbee was one of the Manchester boroughreeves in 

1760 (B.) BiBBY was the name of a tenant in Over Darwen 

before the reign of Henry VIII. (W. W.) The Billingtons of 



LANCASHIRE. 241 

Preston possess the name of a Lancashire township ; they are also 

represented in Cheshire and Staffordshire The Bleasdales of 

Preston are named after a chapelry in the county. Lawrence 
Bleasdale was master of the Clitheroe grammar-school in 1748 

(W. W.) The Bluxdells were an ancient and distinguished 

family of Crosby Hall in Sefton parish two centuries ago; they 
held extensive property in that parish as far back as the reign of 
Henry III. (B.). They are still seated in the parish of Sefton, but 
reside now at Blundell Hall in Ince Blundell. Richard Blundell 
of this county contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada Fund in 
1588 (Sp.). Bryan Blundell was mayor of Liverpool in 1721 and 
172S (B. L.). Blundel is an ancient name in other parts of 
England, having been represented in Shropshire, Oxfordshire, and 
Bucks, in the 13th century (H. R.). The name is also now repre- 
sented, though scantily, in Beds. Blundellsands is a place in 
Lancashire There was a yeoman family of the name of Board- 
man in Livesey during last century (A.). John Boardman, Esq., 
was a boroughreeve of Salford in 1799. Thomas Boardman wa^ 
a Manchester constable in 1764, and another of the name held tlie 

same office in 1796 (B.) The Lancashire Boltoxs derive their 

name from_ parishes of the name in the county Bradshaw is 

the name of a township in this county where the Bradshaws, an 
ancient and knightly family, have floui'ished since the time of the 
Saxons ; the Bradshaws were lords of Haigh in the 14th century, 
and to this county belonged the notable President Bradshaw of the 
time of Cromwell (B. and L.). Reference to the Bradshaws of 
Derbyshire and N'orthamptonshire will be found under those 

counties The Brethertoxs of the Preston district are named 

after a Lancashire township Brindle is the name of a parish 

in the county Burrow is a Lancashire township The 

Bdtterworths were an ancient knightly family of Belfield in 
Spotland from the loth to the 17th century ; they were lords of 
the manor of Butterworth as far back as the reign of Henry II., 
and from it they derived their name (W. W.). There Avere several 
representatives of the name in Rochdale in the 16th cantury (F.), 
and it still occurs there. Butterworth is a Lancashire township. 

Amongst the old Lancashire families now j-arely represented 

in the county is that of Barcroft. There were Barcrofts of 
Barcroft in the parish of Whalley from the 15th to the 17th 
century (B.). A branch of this family held an estate in Black- 
burn in the reign of James I. (A.) Bickersteth is an old 

R 



242 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Liverpool name. From the 15th to the 17th century the name of 
Bykersteth or Bicksteth or Bixteth occurs several times in the 
list of the mayors and bailiffs of the town (B. L.)- Though rare 
in the county, Bickersteth is still a Liverpool name. 

C. 

Cartmell was the name of four tenants in Garstang in the 
reio-n of James I. (F. G.). There is a Lancashire parish thus 

called Catlow is the name of an old manor, which gave its 

name to the ancient family of De Catlowe or De Cattelowe in 

Whalley parish during the 13th and 14th centuries (W. W.) 

The Catteealls, who are now represented in Preston, derive their 
name from a Lancashire township, Henry Catterall was guild- 
mayor of Preston in 1602 (B.). In the list of Lancashire Roman 
Catholics registered after the rebellion of 1715 occurs the name 

of Catterall, a small estate-holder (B.) The Chadwicks of 

Chadwick in Rochdale parish are a very old and distinguished 
family dating back from the present to the 14th century; the 
hamlet of Chadwick has been in their possession since the family 
was founded : Healey Hall has been for many centuries a seat of 
the family (B. and L.). The name is common in the Rochdale 
parish registers of the 16th century (F.), and still occurs in the 
town. There are also Chadwicks of Staffordshire and Derbyshire ; 
and there are places of the name in Worcestershire and Warwick- 
shire The Charnocks, who have their present home in the 

Ormskirk district, take their name from Lancashire townships. 
Roger de Chernock was mayor of Liverpool in 1437 (B. L.). 
Robei't Charnocke was a Lancashire gentleman who contributed 
£25 to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Sp.). A family of 
Charnocke held land in Garstang in 1604 (F. G.). In the list of 
the Roman Catholics of Lancashire registered after the rebellion 
of 1715 occurs the name of Charnock in the case of a small land- 
owner (B.). The knightly family of Charnock of Sharnbrook, 
Beds, in the 16th and 17th centuries (Harvey's "Willey"), 
pi'obably sprang from the Lancashire stock; Richard Charnock 
of Bedfordshire, armiger, contributed £40 to the Spanish Armada 

Fund in 1588 (Sp.) Clegg was the name of a very ancient 

family of Clegg Hall near Rochdale ; but the estate passed out of 
the family by marriage in the reign of Edward Vl. (B.). The 
name is common in the Rochdale registers cf the 16th century 
(F.), and it is still in the town. Richard Clegg was vicar of 



LANCASHIRE. 243 

Kirkham, 1666-1720 (F. K.). Joshua Clegg was mayor of Liver- 
pool in 1748 (B. L.). John Clegg was elected a Manchester 
constable in 1781 (B.). Clegg is a Lancashire hamlet. The 

surname is also established in the West Riding of Yorkshire 

The CoTTAMS take their name from a Lancashire township. John 
Cottam was a Lancashire Catholic who gave up his life for his 
religion in 1582; Cottam was the name of a small estate-holder in 
the county who was then included in the register of Papists after 

the rebellion of 1715 (B.). (See under "Notts.") Coupe is 

the name of a Lancashire township. Cowhope or Couhope or 
Cuhope was the name of an enclosure in Rossendale forest, and 
was also adopted as a surname in that district in the 15th century 
(W. W.). Coupe was an Oxfordshire surname in the 13th century 

(H. R.), and it also now occurs in Notts The Cowells of 

Lancashii'e probably take their name from Cowhill, a district and. 

seat in Lancashire The Cromptons are best represented in the 

Bolton district. They derive their name from more than one 
township in the county. They were well established in the parish 
of Rochdale during the 16th century (F.), and still occur there. 
Peter Crompton was one of the constables of Manchester in 1767, 
and Nathan Crompton filled the office of boroughreeve of that town 
in 1791 (B.). Samuel Crompton, a weaver of Hall-in-the-Wood 
near Bolton, made his family and his fortune by his invention 
of the mule spinning-frame in 1775 (B.). The Derbyshire 
Cromptons, a distinguished family of last century, were descended 
from Abraham Crompton of Brightmet, Lancashire, in the reign of 

James I. (Glover's "Derbyshire") Cropper was a common 

Rochdale name in the 16th century (F.), and it yet remains in the 

town Crosslby is the name of an ancient gentle family of 

Todmorden during the 14th and loth centuries and of Scaitcliffe 
.since the reign of Elizabeth (B.). The name was well established in 

the parish of Rochdale during the 16th century (F.) The 

CuNLlFFES belong to an ancient and a notable family originally of 
Cunliffe Hill, but for the last 250 years of Wycoller Hall, in the 
parish of Whalley (B.). Foster Cunliffe was mayor of Liverpool in 
1716, 1729, and 1735; and Robert Cunliife held the same ofiice in 
1758 (B. L.). Besides the seat, there is a Lancashire village of this 

name Amongst the names now rare in the county is that of 

Crosbie which was well known in connection with the Liverpool 
mayoralty during the latter half of last century (B. L.), and is still 
represented in that city. 

R 2 



244 HOMES OF FAJIILY NAMES. 

D— E. 

The Daggers are best represented in the Preston district. 
Daggard was a Cambridgeshire name in the 13th century (H. R.). 

Deardex, in one form or another, is an old name in the parish 

of Rochdale, where it was well established during the 16th 
centuiy (F.) and where it still remains. In 1823 Rochdale manor 
came into the possession of James Dearden, a Rochdale man, who 
was descended from Elias de Duerden in the reign of Henry VI. 
(W. W. nnd L.). Abel Deui'den was a Rochdale lawyer in the 
time of Charles II. ; and Robert Deardend was chui'chwarden of 
Holme in 1793 (W. W.). In the 13th century Duredent or 
Durdent was a Derbyshire name, and there were a few of the 
name in Bucks (H. R.). Dearden is- a place near Eden6eld, Bury, 

in Lancashire (L.) The Dewhursts were copyholders of 

Beardwood Green and Billinge CaiT, Blackburn, in the 16th and 
17th centuries : William Dewhurst was the first governor of the 
Blackburn grammar-school, in 1567 (A.); the name is still in 
Blackburn. John Dewhurst was a " Lancashire gentleman who 
contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada Fund, in 1588 (Sp.). 
Robert Dewhurst was a divine of Nevvchurch, in Rossendale, in 

1650 (W. W.) Duckworth is the name of a seat in Whalley 

parish. John Duckworth was minister of Haslingden in 1681 
(W. W.). A family of Duckworth resided at Empingham, 
Rutlandshire, in the 16th and 17th centuries : the vicar in the 

reign of Elizabeth bore this natne (Blore's "Rutland") 

DuGDALE was the name of a Clitheroe family in the reign of 
Elizabeth, to which belonged Sir William Dugdale, the celebrated 
antiquary of the 17th century, whose father settled with his family 
at Shustoke, Warwickshire (B.). There were Dugdales of Great 
JIarwood, Blackburn, last century (A.). The name is still iu 
Clitheroe and Blackburn. Dugdale is a North Staffordshire 

hamlet. {See under the "West Riding of Yorkshire") 

DuxDERDALE has been a Garstang name for the last three centuries. 
John and Richard Dunderdale were Garstang tenants in 1604; 
and in 1734, John Dunderdale was gentleman sidesman for the 
Bamaker Quarter of Garstang parish (F. G.). Dunnerdale is a 

Lancashire township The Duxburts take their name from a 

township in the county Eccles is the name of a Lancashire 

parish. The surname is most numerous in the Preston district. 
The Entwistles or Entwisles originally derived their name 



LANCASHIRE. 245 

from the Lancashire township. The Eutwisles of Entwisle were 
an ancient and very distinguished family : Sir Bertine Entwisell, 
one of the heroes of Agincourt, and high sheriff of Leicestershire 
and Warwickshire in 1483, belonged to this family : the later 
representatives have been seated at Foxholes since the 16th 
century (B.). The name was represented in Manchester a hundred 
years ago (B.). 

F— G. 

Fairclough has long been, and is still a Liverpool name. 
Thomas Fayerclough was mayor of Liverpool in 1544 (B. L.). 
There was a gentle family of Fairclough of Fairclough Hall, 

Herts, in the 17th century (Clutterbuck's " Hertfordshii-e ") 

The Fazackerleys or FAZAKERLEYS,who are at present at home in the 
Ormskii'k district, have taken the name of a Lancashire township. 
Roger Fazakerley was mayor of Liverpool in 1530 (B. L.). Robert 
Fazakerley was a Lancashire Catholic of the early part of last 
century, whose estate was valued at £187 (B.). Nicholas 

Fazackerley represented Preston from 1735-1767 (H.) Fitton 

is an ancient Lancashii'e name now mostly characteristic of the 
district of Buiy. The Fittons were lords of Great Harwood in 
the 12th and 13th centuries ; and in fact in that eai'ly period the 
name occurred in various forms in the extensive parish of 
Whalley, such as, Fittun, Fitun, Fitton, Fyton, Phiton, Phitun, 
etc. : Roger Fitton of IMartholm, Harwood, gave a bell to Stanlaw 
Abbey, appai^ently in the 16th century (W. W. and A.). The 

Cheshii'e Fittons are referred to under that county The name 

of FoRSHAw is best represented in the Ormskirk district. There 
was a William de le Forsire of Shropshii-e in the 13th centmy 

(H. R.) Alexander Garnett was mayor of Liverpool in 1559 

(B. L.). An ancient family of Gernet held the manor of Hey sham 
in the loth centiuy (B.). The name is also represented in West- 
moreland and Cheshire Gerrard or Gerard is a very old 

Lancashire name. The Gerards of Bryn were lords of the 
manor of Brindle from the 14th to the 16th century : this dis- 
tinguished family stands amongst the foremost of the Lancashire 
families, both in early and in more recent times, and received a 
baronetcy from James I. : the Gerards of Gerard Hall, Aughton. 
in the 16tli and 17th centuries, were probably a branch of the 
Gerards of Bryn (B.). Miles Gerrarde of this county contributed 



246 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

£25 to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Sp.). Sir George 
Gerard represented Preston in Parliament in 1628 (H.) The 
Cheshire Gerrards are referred to under that county. In the 13tli 
century, Gerard was a name much more widely distributed than 

it is at present (H. R.) The Greenhalghs, who are best 

represented in the Middleton district, derive their name from a 
Lancashire township. During the 15th century, the Grenehalghs 
of Brandlesome were hereditary bailiffs of Tottington, and during 
the two succeeding centuries the}" gained and retained the position 
of gentry (W. W.). The name of Thomas Greenhalgh occurs in the 
list of intended Knights of the Royal Oak, amongst those of other 
Lancashire gentlemen, the annual value of his estate being there 
placed at £1,000 : this Order, however, which Charles II. intended 

as a reward for his followers, was never founded (B.) Gregson 

was a Preston name from the 16th to the 18th century : Josiah 

Gregson was guild-mayor of that town in 1702 (B.) The 

GitiMSHAWS take their name from a Lancashii^e township. The 
family was once widely spread in Pendle Forest, one branch of it 
dates back to Nicholas Grimshaw of Heyhouses in the time of 
Elizabeth, and his descendants resided at Oakenshaw, Clayton-les- 
Moores ("W. W.), Some of the mayors of Preston during the 
latter half of last century, and the eai-ly part of the present 

century, also bore the name of Nicholas Grimshaw (H.) 

Grundy is a common name in the Manchester district. The name 
is also found in Herefordshire, Lincolnshire, and Notts. There 
were Grundys in Leicestershire last century (Nichols' " Leicester- 
shire"). Grindy and Grindey are Derbyshire and Staffordshire 



H 

Hacking is the name of a seat in Whalley parish which was in 
the possession of the ancient family of Del Hacking in the 13th 
and 14th centuries (W. W.). The surname is sometimes now 

corrupted to Hakin An old family of Halliwell once lived at 

Pike House, Spotland; W. Halliwell was minister of Holme in 

1793 (W. W.). There is a Lancashire township of the name 

The Halsai.ls, who are most numerous in the Ormskirk disti-ict, 
take their name from the parish of Halsall, where they once 
resided and where they still reside. The Halsalls of Halsall were 
connected with Liverpool in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I., 



LANCASHIRE. 247 

Edward Halsall being mayor in 1579, Avhilst Sir Cutliberfc Halsall, 
previously sheriff of Lancashire, was mayor in 1615 (B. L. and 

W. W.) Hardman was a Rochdale name in the 16th century 

(F.), and it still remains there. Joseph Hardman was a 

Manchester boroughreeve iu 1796 (B.) Hargreaves is an old 

Lancashire name (W. W.). It is also common in the West 
Riding, particularly in the Leeds district. There are two Cheshire 

hamlets called Hargrave Haslam is an old Rochdale name of 

the 16th century (F.) It also occurs in Derbyshire. Several 
mayors and aldermen of ISTewai-k, Notts, in the 16th, 1 7th, and 18th 

centuries bore this name (Shilton's " Newark ") The Harwoods 

have their home in the Over Darwen district, and derive their 
name from townships in the county. The name has probably 

an independent home in Oxfordshire and Warwickshire 

The Haworths or Howarths are very characteristic of Lanca- 
shire, HowoRTH being of less frequent occurrence. The Haworths 
of Great Haworth, a very old gentle family, have resided in that 
place for many centuries ; the Haworths of Higher Croft bi'anched 
off from them in the middle of the 17th century ; w^hilst those of 
Sale in Cheshire belong to a still later branch (W. W.). Haworth 
was a common Rochdale name in the 16th century (F.). Abraham 
Hawarth was a Manchester boroughreeve in 1746 (B.), Haworth 
is a place or a seat in the county, but I scarcely think that this is 
a sufficient explanation of the frequency of a name which, in one 
form or another, is borne by nearly one in every hundred of Lanca- 
shire m.en. It is remarkable that Howard is a name neai'ly as 
frequent in the county. The significance of this fact is referred 

to in Chapter II., under " Howard " The Haydocks, who are 

most numerous in the Blackburn district, take their name from 
the township of Haydock. An old gentle family of this name 
held the manor of Hesandford or Pheasantford in the 16th, 17th, 
and 18th centuries ; there were four generations of Simon Hay- 
docks (W.W.). James Haydock was a Liverpool bailiff in 1507 
(B. L.) ; and there was a Sir Gilbert de Haydock of this county 

in the time of Hemy V. (B.) Heap and Heaton are Lancashire 

townships. The Heatons of Heaton gave rise in eai-ly times to 

the North Welsh family of the name (L.) The distinguished 

family of the Heskeths of Rufford Hall carry their pedigree back 
to the 13th century (B.). Probably to this family belonged 
Robert Heskeith, a Lancashire gentleman who contributed £50 to 
the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Sp.). Hesketh is a Lancashire 



248 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

parish The Highams take their name from a hamlet in the 

county The Lancashire Hiltons are best represented in the 

Oldham district (See under " Westmoreland ") For centuries, 

Holcroft Hall, near Leigh, was the abode of the Holcrofts, a dis- 
tinguished family, of wiiich the Holcrofts of Hurst Hall in the 
same neighbourhood in 1692 were a branch ; the old residences 
were, fifty years since, occupied as farmhouses ; in the reign of 
Henry YIIL, the Holcrofts were noted traffickers in monastic 
property (B.). Thurstan de Holcroft was mayor of Liverpool in 
1425, and John Holcroft filled the same office in 1644 (B. L.). 
This name, how^ever, in different forms is more characteristic of 
Staffordshire. In Lancashire it is now best represented in the 

Ormskirk district Lancashire is the great home of the Holdens. 

The ancient gentle family of the Holdens, of Holden, Haslingden, 
dates back to the 13th century ; from it there branched off in the 
16th century the Holdens of Todd Hall in the same parish (W. 
W.). The Holdens of Ewood, Livesey, date back to the reign oi 
Henry VIII. (A.). The Holdens of Aston, Derbyshire, who go 
back to the beginning of the 17th century (Glover's " Derbyshire"), 

may hail from the Lancashire stock The name of Holgate 

probably has its home in the West Riding, where it is now also 
established, and where the township of Holgate occurs. There is 

also a Shropshire parish of the name The name of Holt has 

been for centuries associated with dignity and opulence in the 
parish of Rochdale. Stubley House was an early residence of the 
family, but from 1640 to 1713, when they were warm adherents of 
the Stuarts, the Holts lived at Castleton Hall ; the Holts of Holt 
Farm, Standish,in the 17th century, may have been a branch (B.). 
Thomas Holt and Robert Holte, whose respective estates were 
valued at £1,000 per annum, Avere amongst the Lancashire gentle- 
men selected for the Knighthood of the Royal Oak by Charles II., 
an Order, however, that was never founded (B.). The Holts of 
Bucks are referred to under that county. Holt is a common place- 
name in England, especially in the midland counties The 

Hornets, who take the name of a Lancashire township, are best 
represented in the Preston district. The surname is also well 

established in the North and East Ridings John Horrocks 

from Horrocks Hall, minister of Colne, died in 1667, at the age of 
77 (W. W.). Jeremiah Horrox, the eminent astronomer of the 
17th century, was born in 1619 at Toxteth near Liverpool; John 
Horrocks founded the muslin manufacture in Preston in 1791, and 



LANCASHIRE. 249 

afterwards represented the town in Parliament (B.). In the 13th 

century there was a John Horroc in Backs (H. R.) Hough is 

the name of a seat and a place in this county, but the surname is 

more characteristic of Cheshire The Houghtons are most 

numerous in Lancashire, though they have been established in 
several other counties, the name being evidently a place-name. 
One of the principal stocks of the Lancashire Houghtons is that of 
Little Pendleton, which dates back to the loth century (W. W.). 
....The HuLMES of Huhne date back to the reign of Henry II. ; 
the Hulmes of Halsall were lords of the manor of Maghull in the 
16th and 17th centuries (B.). There was an old Manchester 
family of this name in the reign of Elizabeth. Hulme Hall near 
^Manchester was a seat of the family (Har.). James Hulme was 
constable of Manchester in 1752 ; Dauntsey Hulme, Esq., was a 
Salford boi'oughreeve in 1797 (B.). The name is more charac- 
teristic of Cheshire and Stafford.shire Hoddlesden Hall, in the 

ancient parish of Whalley, was probably the residence of the 
Hoddlestons or Huddlestons of former times (B.). An old family 
of Huddleston owned the manor of Westhall, Whittington (Whit- 
taker's " Richmond ") . Huddlestone was a well-known name in 
Lincoln from the 14th to the 16th century, during which period 
six maj^ors and one sheriff of the city bore the name (Stark's 

" Lincoln ") The Lancashire Hursts have taken the name of a 

townin the county. 

I— L. 

The ancient and knightly family of Ireland were lords of the 
manor of Hutte in Halewood in the time of John ; in the reign of 
Elizabeth the family held this and other manors from the Earl of 
Derby (B.). George and Lawrence Ireland were two Lancashire 
gentlemen, evidently of this family, who contributed £25 apiece 
to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588 (Sp.). The name is also 
found in Sussex and in the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire. 

Kay is an old name in this county. It was well established 

in Rochdale in the 16th century (F.) Kay was the name of the 
rector of Mitton in 1604, and of the second founder of Bury 
School early last century (W. W.). John Kay of Bury invented 
the fly-shuttle in 1738 (B.). {See under the "West Riding of 
Yorkshire.") The Kelletts take their name from townships 
in the county The Kelsalls probably hail originally from 



250 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Chesliire, where there are villages of the name and where the 
surname is also established. Thomas Kelsall was mayor of Liver- 
pool in 1717 (B. L.) The Kentons of Kenyon, a Lancashire 

township, were lords of Kenyon in the 13th and 14th centuries 
(B.) The name now has its home in the Blackburn district...;.. 
Kershaw was a Manchester name in the reign of Elizabeth ; 
Richard Kyrshaw was elected town " wayte " (musician) in 15G2 
(Har.), Kirshaw was a Rochdale name in the 16th century (F.) 
and it still survives there. James Kershaw was minister of New 
Church, Rossendale, in 1598 (W. W.). John Kershaw bequeathed, 
in 1701, two estates forfounding a free school at New Church (B.). 
The name is still in New Church. Kirkshaw was an old form of 
the name in the 15th century (W. W.). The name is also estab- 
lished in the West Riding The Lathams are referred to under 

"Cheshire" The Leavers or Levers derive their name from 

Lancashire townships. The Levers of Alkrington have been 
seated at Alkrington Hall since the middle of the 17th century; 
Sir Ashton Lever of this family attained note as a naturalist 
last century (B.). The Leavers were established in Rochdale 

parish in the 16th century (F The Leighs take their name 

from the Lancashire town. The ancient and knightly family of 
Legh, of Haydock, Lancashire, and of Lyme, Cheshire, carries 
its pedigree back to the 15th century (B.). The name is frequent 

in Cheshire The Liveseys of Livesey Hall held the manor of 

Livesey for 500 years (A.), and their name is still in the parish. 
There was a Thomas de Livesey of Fenescholes in the 15th 
century (W. W.). Robert Livesey was a Manchester boroughreeve 

in 1750 (B.) LoNGTON, LoNGWORTH, and Lonsdale are the 

names of townships and parishes in the county Lancashire is 

the northern home of the Lords. The name was numerous in 
Rochdale parish in the 16th century (F.). The Lords of the east 

of England have their home in Suffolk The Lunds or Lunts 

have their principal home in the West Riding, but they also occur 
in Cheshire as well as in this county. John de Lunt and 
Nicholas Lunt were bailiffs of Liverpool in 1402 and 1433 (B. L.). 

M— 0. 

The Marsdens take their name from Lancashire townships. 
William Marsden was mayor of Liverpool in 1725 (B. L.). The j 
name is equally frequent in Dex-byshire and in the West Riding 



LANCASHIRE. 251 

..Richard and Samuel Mather, father and son, natives of 
Jowton, were two noted Lancasliire Nonconformist divines of 

he 17th century (B.) The Mawdesleys of Ma wdesley possessed 

he demesnes of Mawdeslej from the 12th to the 17th century 

B.), and the name still occui's there William Mayor was 

ilected a Manchester constable in 1791 (B.) Mayer is a Stafford- 
hire name The noble and very ancient lioiise of Molyneux, 

>f Sefton, has been for several centuries one of the most powerful 

^nd most distinguished of Lancashire families (B.) Mort is 

-Iso a Shropshire name. Adam Morte, the intrepid Royalist 
nayor of Preston, was killed at the storming of that town in 

642 (B.) The Fairhurst Nelsons, who owned Fairhurst Hall, 

llecleston, dui-ing the last and in the present century, belong to 
.11 ancient family, a branch of which held lands in Mawdesley 
oS far back as the reign of Richard II. Nelson is a Lancashire 
own. Richard Nelson was mayor of Lancaster in 1512 (H. L.). 

See under "Cumberland" and "Westmoreland.") Newby is 

he name of a Lancashire village Norris is a name that has 

low its principal homes in Lancashire and Somerset. In the 
3th century it was frequent in the forms of Noreys, Norreys, 
15'orries, and Norrays, often preceded by " Le," in Notts, Oxford- 
hire, Norfolk, Yorkshire, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Bucks, etc. 

H. R.) NuTTALL was a common name in Rochdale parish in 

he 16th century (F.), and it still occurs there. There was a 
;-entle family of the name at Newhall-hay, in Rossendale, in the 
.7th century : Robert Nuttall was the name of a Bury gentleman 
ast century (it is still a Bury name), and of the owner of Hollins 
n Accrington in 1734 : Nuttall is a place in the county, originally 
vritten Nuthalgh (nut-field), and often corrupted to Nutto and 

"^uthow in old charters (W. W.) Nutter has the same 

)rigin, from Nuthalgh, through Nuthow and Nutto. The Nutters 
vere master foresters and keepers of the Chace of Trawden in 
he 15th century : in the time of Elizabeth one of the family was 
teward of Pendle : Ellis Nutter was for 33 years master of 

Burnley School during last century (W. W.) The master 

f the Blackburn grammar-school in 1670 bore the name 
Dddie (A.). The name is also established in the West Riding. 

..The ancient gentle family of Ormeeod resided at Ormerod 
iouse, Whalley parish, fi'om 1311 to 1793 : amongst the branches 
)f this family are the Ormerods of Bury during last century, and 
,he Ormerods of Gambleside : Oliver Ormerod, of the parent 



252 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

stock, was a noted polemical writer in the reign of James I. (B.). 
(See under " Cheshire.") 

P. 

Parr is the name of a Lancashire township and manor whei-e 
the Parrs have been settled since the 13i-h century (L.) They 

are also represented in Notts and Lincolnshii-e The Part- 

INGTONS ai'e best represented in the Manchester district. There 
is a Cheshire township thus called. There are also Partingtons 

in Worcestershire Pemberton is the name of a Lancashire 

township The Pendleburys, who possess the name of a town- 
ship in the county, are now mostly found in the Bolton district. 
In J 588 William Pendleburie of Wichford, Warwickshire, con- 
tributed £12 to the Armada Fund (Sp.) The ancient and 

influ.ential knightly family of the Pbnningtons were lords of 
Pennington from the 11th century to the reign of Henry VI., a 
monarch Avho numbered Sir John de Pennington amongst his 
most trusted adherents (B.). In the first quarter of the 17tli 
century there Avas a gentle family of the name at Mitton Magna 

(W. W.). The name is also established in Cheshire The 

Pickups derive their name from Pickup Bank, or Piccopbanke, a. 
village in Whalley parish. In the 16th century the Piccopps 
lived at Lower Darwen, a family with which the Piccops of 
Eccleshill in the succeeding century were connected : from early 
in the 17th century the Pickops have held tbeir own estate on 

the borders of Livescy and Tockholes (A.) The Pilkingtons 

originally took their name from the Lancashire township. The 
Pilkingtons of Pilkington, from whom the Yorkshire Pilkingtons 
are derived, were a distinguished Lancashire family during the 
15th century : the Pilkingtons of Rivington, a powerful knightly 
family of considerable antiquity, traced their pedigree back to 
the reign of Henry I. ; they lost much of their possessions after 
the battle of Bosworth (B.). There was a gentle family of this 

name in Manchester in the reign of Elizabeth (Har.) Pilling 

is the name of a Lancashire township It would seem that the 

Lancashire name of Pimblett is a corruption of the old Cheshire 

name of Pimlot, which is referred to under "Cheshire" The 

POLLITTS may possess an ancestor in John Pollett, minister of 

Butterworth in 1660 (W. W.) Postlethwaite is still an old 

Lancaster name: four of the mayors during last century bore 



LANCASHIRE. 253 

this name (H. L.) The Prescotts take their name from a 

Lancashire parish; they are also represented in Cheshire 

Lancashire is the home of the Pyes of the north of Engfland, 
whilst Kent is their home in the south. Li the 13th century the 
name was represented in Norfolk, Suffolk, Hants, etc. (H. R.). 

R— S. 

Raby is also a Cornish name. Adam Rabye was parish clerk 
of Blackburn in 1683 (A.). There was a Thomas Rabi in 
Bedfordshire in the 13th century (H. R.). In Cheshire and 

Durham there are townships of this name Rainfoed and 

Rawcliffe are Lancashire townships Ramsbottom is a place 

in Clitheroe and a hamlet near JBury : in the 16th century Sir 
Henry Ramsbottom was a priest of Haslingden : in the loth 
century Margaret Remesbothome held land in Rossendale Forest 

(W. W.) Rawlixsox is an old name of note in the county. 

The principal family of the name resided at Greenhead, Coulton, 
in the reign of Henry VII., and came into possession by marriage, 
in the 17tli century, of Moreside and Cark Halls in Cartmel; 
another branch lived at Toddilbank House, Coulton, in the time 

of Henry VII., and a third at Rusland Hall (B.) Rigby, a 

characteristic Lancashire name, is also established in Cheshire. 
Harrock Hall, in Eccleston parish, has been the residence of a 
distinguished family of the name from the 15th to the present 
century (B.). Edward Rigby was mayor of Liverpool in 1751 

(B. L.) RossALL is an old Lancashire seat. Rosshall was r.n 

ancient Shropshire manor, which gave its name to the knightly 
family of De Rosshall or De Rossall, of the 13th century. (Eyton's 

"Shropshire.") Richard Rothwell, the exorcist, was born 

at Bolton in 1563 (B.). There is a Yorkshire parish of this 

name Royle is the name of an ancient mansion in Whalley 

parish (B.). (See under "Cheshire.") The Salisbdrys of 

the Preston district take their name from Salisbury in the adjoin- 
ing parish of Blackburn, where lived the old family of Salesbury 
or Salebury, of Salesbury Hall, in the 13th centur}'- (B. and ^Y. W.). 

The . Derbyshire Salisburys probably hail from Lancashire 

Salthouse is a name now mostly confined to Lancashire. De 
Salthus was a Norfolk name in the 13th century (H. R.) ; there 
is a parish of Salthouse in that county, and De Salthouse was 
a common clerical name in that county in the 14th century 



254 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

(Blomefield's " Norfolk ") . Salthouse is a Norfolk parish The 

old family of Schofield, of Schofield Hall, Spotland, is now extinct 
in the direct line (W. W.). Scolfeld was a common name in 
Rochdale parish in the 16th century (F.). Abdie Scholfield was 

churchwarden of Prestwich in 1645 (B.) Sefton or Sephton 

is the name of a Lancashire parish; the Sephtons are mostly 

found in the Ormskirk district Sagar, or Segar as it is 

infrequently spelt, is a name characteristic of the Burnley district. 
The Rev. Charles Sagar was master of Blackburn School in 
1655 (A.). In the 13th century Segar or Sigar was a name 
found in Bucks, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Wilts, etc. (H. R.). 
Shacklady or Shakelady is known in Lancashire as a cor- 
ruption of Shackerley, a township in the county (L.). The 
Shakerleys were a gentle family of Standish parish in the reign 
of Henry VIII. Robert Shakerley held the Clitheroe mills from 

the Crown in the reign of Edward IV. (W. W.) The ancient 

family of Sharples once lived at Sharpies in Bolton parish (B.). 
There was a Freckleton family of the name in the 17th century 

(F. K.) Sharrock and Shorrock are old Lancashire names. 

Thomas Shorrocks, Esq., was a Salford boroughreevein 1771 (B.). 
John Shorrock was minister of Newchurch in Rossendale in 
1767; De Shorrok and De Schorrock were names characteristic 
of the original parish of Whalley in the 13tli and 14th centuries 

(W. W.) Shuttleworth is the name of a Lancashire village. 

Shuttleworth Hall, in the parish of Whalley, was the original 
seat of the family of the name before their removal, in the reign 
of Richard II., to Gawthorpe, where they still resided in the 
17th century; fifty years ago the early seat of the family was 
occupied as a farmhouse ; the Shuttleworths of Hacking, who 
flourished from the 13th to the 1 6th century, were a branch of 
this family (B. and W. W.). In 1588 Serjant Shuttleworth 
contributed £25 to the Armada Fund (Sp.). The Shuttleworths 
represented Preston in Parliament at different times during the 
17th and 18th centuries (H.). The name is also established in 
the Leeds district of the West Riding. There is also a Derbyshire 

village thus called The Singletons are numerous in the 

Preston district. An ancient family of the name owned the 
manor of Brockholes in the 16th century (B.). There are town- 
ships thus called in the county The Starkies, who are prin- 
cipally represented in the Burnley district, have not wandered 
far from the ancient home of their name. The Starkies of 



LANCASHIRE. 255 

Huntroyde, in the parish of Whalley, have a distinguished family 
history, going several centuries back ; the Twiston branch dates 
from the 17th century (W, W.). During last century there was 

a well-to-do Manchester family of the name (B.) The Stotts 

were established in the parish of Rochdale in the 16th century 
(F.), and still occur there; but they are now mostly found iu 
the Manchester district. Thomas Stott was elected a Manchester 
constable in 1768, and John Stott was a Manchester boroughreeve 
in 1741 (B.). The name is also represented in Northumberland, 

the West Riding, and Somerset The Swarbricks may possess 

kinship with Mr. Swabrick, an eminent organ maker of Warwick 
in the middle of last century. (Deering's " Nottingham.") 
Swarbrick or Swarbrook has been a Chester name during the 

last and the present century. (Hemingway's "Chester.") 

The name of Swift is also established in Derbyshire, the West 
Riding, and Notts. In the 13th century there were Swifts and 
Swyfts in Derbyshire, Bucks, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, and 

Suffolk (H. R.) Sbacome or Secum, Sturzaker or Stursacre, 

and Sudall or Sudell, are old Lancashire names now rarely 
represented in the county. Seacome and Secum were the names 
of mayors and bailiffs of Liverpool in the 16th and 17th centuries 
(B. L.). The Sturzakers or Stursacres were a numerous and 
well-to-do Garstang family, from the 16th to the 18th century; 
they lived at Kirkland in the reign of Elizabeth (F. G.), and 
still reside there. During the 17th and 18th centuries the 
Sudalls or Sudells were at different times mayors and aldermen 
of Preston ; they may have sprung originally from the same stock 
as the present Siddalls or Siddells of Derbyshire and the North 
and East Ridings. 

T— Z. 

The Tattersalls, who are now numerous in the Burnley district, 
owned the Holme estate in the ancient parish of Whalley in the 
14th century : in the reign of Henry VIII. there was a family of 
this name at Rigge in the same parish (W. W.). In the 1.3th 
century Tatsalle and Tatsal were characteristic Lincolnshire names, 
and were evidently derived from Tattershall, a town in that county. 
In Norfolk and Suffolk they were then represented mostly by De 

Tatishale and De Tateshal (H. R.) The family of Threlfall 

resided at Threlfall in the Fylde from the reign of Edward VI. to 



256 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

that of James I. (B.)- John de Threfalle held Crumbilholme, 
Bow]and, in the time of Henry YI. (W. W.). Cuthbert Threlfall, 
a Eoman Catholic, was a small estate-holder in the county in the 

early part of last century (B.) Probably both the Lancashire 

and the Lincolnshire Tixsleys derive their name from a township 

in the West Riding The Toppings maybe connected in their 

descent with William Toppyng, who held six acres of land in 

Clivio-er during the reign of Edward II. (W. W.) John and 

Auo-ustine TowNsox, two Lancashire men of eminent learning, 
were associated in the 17th century with the Westphalian monas- 
tery of Lamspring (W. W.). The Toulnsons were an old Lancaster 
family, members of which filled the office of mayor in 1630, 1650, 
and 1676 (H. L.). Townson is still a Lancaster name. Clement 
Towlson held land in Bowland in the early part of the 17th 

century (W. W.) Unsworth is the name of a Lancashire 

district. It was a common Rochdale surname in the i6th ceiitur}^ 

(F.) The Waddingtons have their principal home in the West 

Biding, where there are a seat and a village of the name 

Wall BANK is an ancient Lancashire name. Walbonk was the 
name of an hereditaiy tenant of Billington in the 14th century : 
Adam de Walleboncke was vicar of Blackburn from 1317 to 1320 
Richard del Wallebonck held land in Church, also in the 14th 
century ; the Walbanks were a gentle family in Whalley parish in 
1618 ; William Walbancke was headmaster of the Clitlieroe school 
in 1608 (W. W.). William Wallbank of Pleasington, M^as governor 
of the Blackburn grammar-school in 1716 (A.). The occurrence 
of this name in the same neighboui^hood for centuries is remark- 
able The Walmsleys, who derived their name originally from 

a Lancashire township, are now very numerous in the Preston 
district. There was an old and distinguished family of this name 
at Dunken Haigh or Dunkenhalgh, Blackburn, during the 16th 
and 17th centuries : Sir Thomas Walmsley, of Dunkenhalgh, was 
a judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of Elizabeth. Walmesley, 
of Dunkenhalgh, was one of the intended Knights of the Royal 
Oak, an Order, however, the institution of which by Charles 11. 
was never accompliohed (B.). The Walmesleys of Coldcotes 
branched off from the Dunkenhalgh stock in the 17th century 

(W. W.) The Waebuetons are referred to under " Cheshire," 

the home of the name The Whalleys take their name from 

the Lancashire parish : they are also established in Cheshire. 
Thomas Whalley was elected a Manchester constable in 1745 (B ). 



LANCASHIRE. 257 

Whiteside is an aucient name. Whitside or "WTiytside was 

a Cambridgesliii'e name in the 13th. century (H. R.) The 

Whittakers or Whitakers are numerous in Lancashire. From 
the ]4th to the IGth century a gentle family of this name lived 
at High Whitaker or Whitacre in the vills of Simonstone and 
Padiham, in the parish of Whalley : the Whitakers of Holme and 
those of Henthorn branched off in the 15th century and those of 
Healy about 1620 (W. W.). The name was fi-equent in the parish 
of Rochdale in the 16th century (F.). During last century the 
Whittakers were well-to-do Mauchester townsmen (B.). The name 
is just as frequent in the West Riding and less so in Cheshire. 

The home of the Winders is still in the northern part of the 

county, in Garstang and Lancaster. The Wynders were tenants 
in Garstang in the reign of James I. (F. G.). Robert AVinder 
was the name of the mayor of Lancaster in 1726, 1737, 1754, 

and 1762 (H. L.) The Winstanleys, who take their name from 

a Lancashire township, have long been known in Liverpool, and 
still reside there. John Winstanley was mayor in 1553, and 
Henry Winstanley filled the same office in 1752 (B. L.). There 
was a Robert de Wynstanleghe of Rishton in the 14th century 
(W. W.) ; and a gentle family of Winstanley lived at Branston, 

Leicestershire, in the 17th and 18th centuries (L.) The 

WoLFENDENS Or WooLFENDEXS, who are more numerous in the 
West Riding, derive their name from a Lancashire township. The 
Wolfendens were established in Rochdale in the 16th century (F.). 
Although the Worthingtoxs take their name from a Lanca- 
shire township, they are more numerous and have been longer 
established across the Cheshire border, and will be referred to 

under that county The Worsleys of Worsley, a distinguished 

family, carry their pedigree back to the times of the Crusades, 
when they possessed the manor of Worsley. In the reign of 
Hemy VIII. there was a branch of the family at Worsley Meyne, 
Wigan, and another branch at Manchester, from which ai'e 
descended the Worsleys of Withington : Sir Robert Worseley was 
deputy-lieutenant of the county in the reign of Elizabeth (B.). 
James and Richard Worseley were two Lancashire gentlemen 
who contributed £25 apiece to the Armada fund in 1588 (Sp). 



258 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name denotes that, though 
characteristic of these counties, the name is more relatively 
numerous elsewhere. 



General Names (30-40 counties). 



*Allen (Leicester) 
Brown 



r Clark 
1 Clarke 
•Green 



* Smith 
Wright 



* Brooks 

* Chapman 
Cooper 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Hill 
*Moore 
♦Morris 



{Leicester 
Melton Mow- 
bray 
*Wood 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 



•Arnold (Atherstone 


) *Freeman 


•Knight 


Bates 


Gilbert 


Porter 


Burton 


•Hardy (Leicester) 


^ r Sharp 
1 Sharps 


Cross 


Hart 


•Fox 








District Names (4-9 counties). 


*Bacon 


Fryer (Oakham) 


North 


Bryan 


Goodman 


•Stokes 


Chamberlain (Oak- 


Hatton 


Swain 


ham) 


•Haywood 


•Whittle (Melton Mow 


Farmer 


•Eendall 


bray). 


V 


County Names (2-3 counties). 


Abell 


Bosworth 


•Clements 


•Black 


Burchnall 


Cotton 


* Blunt 


•Chester 


Deacon 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 



259 



Doubleday (Melton 

Mowbray 
Freer 
Groodson 
*Hubbard 
Herrick (Leicester) 



{Lovett 
Lovitt 
Orton 
*Pepper 
Pridmore 
Rowlett 



Shelton 
Simpkin 
*Stretton 
Tailby 
Tomblin 
Tyler 



PECULiAtt Names (confiTied mostly to these counties). 


Beeby 


Freestone 




Matts 


Berridge (Lutter- 


Geary 




Musson 


worth) 


Gimson 




Oldacres 


Branson 


Hack 




Orson (Melton Mow. 


Biu'naby 


Henson 




bray 


Cobley 


HoUier 




Paget 


Dalby 


Jarrom 




Pochin 


Darnell 


Jesson 




Pretty 


Dawkins 


r Keetley r 
1 Keightley \ 


(Lough- 


Eoyce 


Dexter 


borough) 


Scotton 


Dowell 


Kirkman (Leicester) 


Sheffield 


Drackley (Leicester) 


Lacey 




Shipman (Melton Mow- 


Draycott 


r Leadbeater 
\ Leadbetter 




bray) 


Eayrs 




-Toon 
\Toone 


Eayres 


Loseby 




Forryan (Leicester) 


Macaulay 




Wilford 


Frearson 


Maekley 




Wormleighton 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NAMES OF THE 
COUNTIES OF LEICESTER AND RUTLAND. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abhremations : — 

B. indicates " Bibhotheca Topographica Britannica." 
Bl. „ Blore's "Rutland." 

C. „ Curtis' " Leicestershire." 
H. L. „ Hill's " Langton." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

M. „ Macaulay's " Claybrook " (Leicestershire). 

N. „ Nichols' " Leicestershire." 

T. „ Throsby's " Town and County of Leicester." 

s 2 



260 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



A— B. 

Abell has long been a Leicestershire name. John Abel resided 
at Staunton Harold in the reign of Edward III. ; John Abell was 
rector of Xewbold Verdun in the time of Elizabeth ; John Abell 
of Desford, owned 30 acres of Leicester forest in the reign of 
Charles I. ; Matthew Abell held part of the manor of Manceter in 
the reign of George I. (X.)- ^^^ Abell, aged 21, was buried at 
Sutton Chavnell in 1784 (B). This name is also established in 
the neighbouring county of Derby. In the 13th century it 
occurred as Abel in Beds. Bucks, "Wilts, and Cambridge.shire 
(H. R.). The Abells of Fordham and West Bergholt, Essex, 
fi-om the 14th to the 16th century, obtained their wealth in the 

cloth trade (Moraut's "Essex") The old Leicestershire family 

of Bacox of Hinckley went back to the time of Elizabeth (N.). 

(See under " Es.SEX.") The Beebys originally took their name 

from a Leicestershire parish. In the i-eign of Henry III., Hugh de 
Beby was rector of TVilloughby Waterless, and William de Beby 
was rector of Claybrook (X.). Between the reigns of Edward III. 
and Henry V., four mayors of Leicester bore the name of Bebye, or 
Beebye, or De Beby (T.). William Beeby was a Gaddesby free- 
holder in the time of Charles I. ; Richard Beeby and Elizabeth 
Hubbert were married in Belgi-ave church in the reign of Charles 
If. ; in the middle of last century Fi-ancis Beeby was a proprietor 
of land in Fleckney and a family of the name then lived at 

Shenton (N.). The name is still in the city of Leicester The 

Bekridges are now best represented in the Lutterworth district. 
In the reign of Elizabeth, Dr. Berridge held the manor and the 

advowson of the living of Kibworth Beauchamp (C.) The 

BoswoRTHS derive theii' name from Leicestershire parishes 

The son of Clement Bkaxsox was baptised in Woodhouse church, 
Leicestershire, in 1623 ; John Branson was master of the 

Osgathorpe Free School at the beginning of this century (X.) 

There was a family of Brtax in Husband's Bosworth, Leicester- 
shire, last century (X.). Bryon was the usual form of the name 
in the 13th century; it then occurred in Cambridgeshire, Hunts, 
Bucks, and X^orfolk (H. R.). In addition to Leicestershire, the 
Biyans now characterise Derbyshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire, 

and Oxfordshire Amongst the old Leicestershire names now i-are 

in the county is that of Brudexell. The Brudenells were a very 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 2(>1 

flistinguislied family in the IGth. and 17th centuries, and from 

them sprang the noble house of Cardigan (IS^. and H. L.) 

BuRNABY is an old Leicestershire name. From the 13th to the 
I5th century the Burnebys were an influential county family; in 
the 17th century the Burnebys or Burnabj's possessed a family 
vault in Asfordby church; Burnaby was a well-known and some- 
times a distinguished clerical name in Leicestershire during last 
century (N.). The name of De Burneby was repi-esented in 
Northamptonshire and Bedfordshire in the ISth century (H. R.). 
liurnby is a parish in the East Riding, and there ai^e parishes and 
townships called Barnby in Yorkshire, Notts, and Suffolk. 

C— D. 

The name of Cobley was represented in Hallaton, Leicester- 
shire, last century ; in 1786, Sarah Cobley, of this place, fell into 

a trance, and remained so for 24 hours (N.) The Colleys of 

Glayston, Rutland, were a knightly family in the 16th and 17th 
centuries (H. L.). The name is now rare in this part of England, 
but is represented by Coley in Worcestershire, and by Colley in 

North Wales There are several old and sometimes distinguished 

jjeicestershire families of the name of Cotton. Staffordshire 
appears to have been the principal home of the name, where the 
De Cotons of Ridware of the 14th and loth centuries were known 
in more modern times as the Cottons; the following Leicestershire 
families of the Cottons, those of Laughton, Dadlington, and 
Broughton Astley, all claim descent from Thomas Cotton of 
Staffordshire, in the reign of Henry VII. (N.). Other families 
doubtless originated in Leicestershire. The name also occurs in 
Herefordshire. In the 13th century there were De Cottons in 
Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, and Shropshire (H. R.). There are 
several parishes and townships called Cotton and Coton in the 
midlands, especially in Staffordshire, and afterwards in Shrop- 
shire, Leicestershire, Cambridgeshire, and also in Suffolk 

DAKNEfif,, or rather Darnel, was a characteristic east-country name 
in the 13th century, especially in Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge- 
shire, and Hunts (H. R.) Edward Dawkixs owned some land in 

Burstall in 1759; Michael Dawkin was a Thurnby freeholder in 

1630 (N.) Dexter is an old Leicestershire name. William 

Dexter held the Datchy or Haklayt Manor in Hallaton in the 15th 
century (C). A gentle family of the name owned property in 



262 HOMES OF FAMILT NAilES. 

Thedin^worth in the reign of Elizabeth. William Dexter lived at 
Woi-thington in the reign of Charles I. ; there were families of 
the Dexters in Wartnaby and Abkettleby in the 17th and 18th 

centuries (N.) The Dalbts, who originally derived their names 

from Leicestershire parishes, have long been known in the counties 
of Leicester and Rutland, In the 14th century, when several of the 
clerics of these counties bore this name, William Dalby founded Oak- 
ham Hospital ; Dalby was the name of the prior of Ulvescroft in the 
reign of Henry VIII. (N.). There was a Loughborough family of 
this name in the reign of Charles II. (Fletcher's "" Loughborough '"), 
and there are Dalbys still in that place. John Dalby was mayor 

of Leicester in 1789 (T.) The Doubledats have now their 

liome in the Melton Mowbray district. Doubleday and Dubbleday 
Avere the names of Notts freeholders 200 years ago (Harl. MS., 
6846). The name is also established in Norfolk, and Doubleday 
was the name of the bailiff of Yarmouth in 1507 and 1521 

(Blomefield's "Norfolk") Dowell was the name of the vicar of 

Melton Mowbray in 1690 ; John Dowell, a Leicestershire man, was 
a scholar of Cambridge University in the time of Cromwell (N.). 
Henry Dowell had proper+y in Ullesthorpe in the parish of 

Clay brook a century ago (M.) The Drackleys are now best 

represented in Leicester and its neighbourhood. William Drakely 
was a freeholder in Sutton Cheynell in the reign of Charles I. 

(N.) The Draycotts were represented in the county of 

Leicestershire in the time of Cromwell, when John Draycot was 
minister of Beby (N.). In the 13th century this name occurred 
as De Draycote in Leicestershire, Oxfordshire, Somersetshire, and 
Wiltshire. There are parishes, towns, and villages of the name in 
Berks, Bucks, Somerset, Staffordshire, Wilts, and Warwickshire- 

E— H. 

The name of Eayrs or Eayres is probably a form of Ayre, 
also an old Leicestershire name. Thomas Eayre, of Kettering, 
Northamptonshire, a century ago was one of the founders of the 
church bells of Norton (N.). Thomas Ayre was the name of the 
mayor of Leicester in 1723 and 1744 (T.). Ayres is now a Berks 

name, and Ayre is found in Devon The Forryans have their 

home in the Leicester district. During the 17th and 18th 
centuries a family of Foryan resided at Sketchley, Burbach or 
Burbage. Richard Forryan was churchwarden of Burbach iu 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 263 

1774 (N^.). It may be that this name is an altered forni of 
Frewex, the name of an old and distinguished family of Leicester- 
shire and Sussex, but originally hailing from Worcestershire 

(Whitley's " Sapcote ") William Fkearsox lived in Worth- 

ington about a century ago (N.) The name of Freestone was 

represented in Tugby in the reign of Elizabeth (N.). Freiston 

is a parish in South Lincolnshii*e Thomas Freer was 

incumbent of Whitwell, Rutlandshire, in the reign of Charles I. 
(Bl.). There were gentle families of the name in Great Wigston 
and Blabj, Leicestershire, during last century. John Freer was 
rector of Knossington in the reign of Anne (N.). One of the 
name was mayor of Leicester about a century ago (T.). The 
name also occurs in Yorkshire. Since Leicestershire, Rutland- 
shire, and Yorkshire are all of them homes of both the Freers 
and the Fryers, the two names are probably different forms of the 

same name The Fryers of these parts are now best represented 

in the Oakham district ; the name is also established in Cheshire, 

Yorkshire, and Notts Geary was the name of the rector of 

Swepston in the middle of the 17th century. Thomas Geary, 
prebendary, was patron of the chapelx-y of Knighton in 1734. 
There was a Lindley family of this name last century. William 

Geary, an opulent farmer of Old Hays, died in 1795 (N.) 

William Gimson owned land in Sharnford at the commencement 

of this century (N.) Gutteridge is an old Leicester name. 

Two mayors of that town last century bore the name (T.). The 

name is now rare in these counties The name of Herrick or 

Heyeick is, in one form and another, one of the most ancient of 
Leicestershire names. The Heyricks have been represented in 
Leicester and its vicinity for several centuries ; there are many 
branches of the family. Some of the mayors of Leicester in the 
15th and 16th centuries bore the name of Heyrick. Mrs. Heyrick, 
whose son became mayor of Leicester, died in 1611 at the 
advanced age of 97, " having lived to see 142 children, children's 
children, and their children." This Leicestershire family 
descended from the Ericks, who were lords of Stretton after the 
Conquest, and as far back as the reign of King John owned much 
land near Leicester (T.). In Notts the name usually takes the 

form of Herrick The Hensons were a Stamford family during 

last century, Gregory Henson being the rector, and Robert 
Henson, gent., the retui-ning officer (N.). Robert Henson of 
this town was married in 1708 (Bl.) James Hollier was a 



264 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

landowner in Hinckley at the commencement of this century 
(N.). 

J— M. 

Jarrom is a name that was represented in the forms of 
De Jarom, De Jarum, and De Jarun, in the adjoining county of 

Lincoln during the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Jesson was 

the name of a minister of Prestwold in the reign of Elizabeth. 
Two centuries ago Sir William Jesson resided at Burleigh Park, 
Loughborough. Last century there was a Frisby family of the 

name (N.) The Kirkmans have now their home in the 

Leicester district. Richard Kirkman was rector of Little Ashby 

in the reign of Henry VI. (N.) The Laceys bear a very old 

Leicestershire name. Lacy was the name of an ancient and 
powerful ennobled family in the county ; there was an old gentle 
family of Lacy at Melton Mowbray (N.). The De Lacys were 
numerous in Lincolnshire in the 13th century, and the name also 
occurred then in the form of De Laci in Cambridgeshire, 

Oxfordshire, and Shropshire (H. R.) The Leadbeaters or 

Leadbetters were represented in Leicestershire in the time of 
Charles II. by Thomas Leadbeter, the vicar of Hinckley. The 
name of Leadbetter was represented in Knossington and Barkston 
a century ago (N.). Gonnilda le Ledbete lived in Bucks in the 

13th century (H. R.) The Lovbtts or Lovitts of Leicestershire 

are probably offshoots of the distinguished Bucks family of the 
name, to whom Liscombe has belonged since the 14th centui-y. 
The Norman ancestor of the Liscombe Lovetts had grants of 
lands in Berks, Beds, Leicestershire, and other counties (L.). 
The name was represented in Lincolnshire, l^orthamptonshire, 
Bucks, Devon, and other counties in the 13th century (H. R.). 

Mackley and Macaulay are peculiar Leicestershii-e names. 

De Makkeley was the name of a priest in the county in the 14th 
century (N.). In the latter part of last century Aulay Macaulay 
was rector of Rothley, and Angus Macaulay was the incumbent 
of Clay brook (N.). Dr. Macaulay owned an estate in Gretworth, 

Northamptonshire, in 1750 (Baker) Mould was the name of 

an old and numerous gentle family of Appleby from the 16th to 
the 18th century, in whose patronage lay the living of that place 

(N.) MussON is an old Leicestershire name. In the reign of 

Charles I. Hugh Musson was a freeholder in Great Ashby, and 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 265 

"William Musson was a freeholder in Rotherby. The rector of 
Bottesford in the time of James I. bore this name. John Musson 
was a gentleman of Woodhouse in the reign of Charles II. There 
was a Burbach family of this name last century ; the incumbent 
of Stretton Parva in 1774 was thus called. Mr. Musson held 
property in Smockington early this century (N.). During the 
last century there was a gentle family of this name at Little 
Wigston, in the parish of Claybrook (M.). Two centuries ago 
the name was represented in the adjacent county of Notts by 
freeholders of Bingham, Hickling, and other places in that county 
(Hari. MS., 6846)^ 

N— P. 

North was the name of a distinguished Leicestershire family 
of the 17th century. Several of the clerics of the county last 
century bore this name (N.). The Norths are also repi'esented 

in Hants, Lincolnshire, and Oxfordshire Orton is the name of 

old Leicestershire gentle families. Those of Reresby date back 
to the 16th century, and in the 16th and 17th centuries a family of 

the name owned Lea Grange, near Twycross (N.) The name of 

Paget has been for centuries connected with Leicestershire. Besides 
the ennobled family of the name, there is the branch of Barwell, 

which goes back to the 16th century (N.) The Paramores, an 

old gentle family of Bagworth, Leicestershire, in the Kith and 
17th centuries, are now rarely represented in the county (N.). 
Richard Paramor of this family contributed £25 for the defence of 
his country at the time of the expected Spanish invasion in 1588 
(Sp.). Paramor was the name of very old Kentish families of 
Ash, St. Nicholas-in-Thanet, Pordwich, Eastry, etc., now mostly 
extinct (Hasted's "Kent"). In the 13th century the name of 
Param'r occurred in Lincolnshire, and that of De Porremore in 

Devonshire (H. R.) Pochin is the name of an old and often 

very distinguished Leicestershire family. The Pochins of Barkby, 
who date back to the 15th centiiry, were on several occasions 
during the 17th and 18th centuries appointed high sheriffs of the 

county and knights of the shire (N.) The Peppers of Thur- 

maston were an old and gentle family of the 16th and 17th 

centuries (N.) Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name. 

The Pridmores held property in the parish of Claybrook in the 
last and in the present century (M. and N.). There lived a 



266 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

family of tliis name at Desford last century (B.). William 
Pridmore held property in Sharnford in 1811 ; Thomas Pridmore 
was a Billesdon freeholder in 1775; John Pridmore was a free- 
holder in Horninghold in 1630 (N.). John Pridmore of 
Stockerston was mari-ied at Glooston in 1703 (H. L.). 

R— Z. 

Sir Ralph Rowlett or Rowlatt owned property in Leicester- 
shire in the time of Henry VIII. (N.), and in the same reign 
Ralph Rowlet. perhaps the same person, held Whetstone Manor 
(C). In 1775, John Rowlatt was a Drayton freeholder, and 
Thomas Rowlatt was a Welham freeholder (N.). The name is 

also established in the adjacent county of Northampton John 

ScOTTOX owned property in Sharnford parish in the first decade of 
this century (N.), and John Scotten, perhaps the same person, 
had property in Ullesthorpe, in the parish of Claybrook, about a 
hundred years ago (M.). The name is still in the parish of 
Claybrook. The Scottons probably derive their name from a 
Lincolnshire parish, but there are Yorkshire townships thus 
called. De Scotton was the name of a Lincolnshire resident in 

the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The Sheltons evidently derive 

their name from a parish in the adjoining county of Notts, in 
which county the Sheltons are also established. Rowland Shelton 

held land iu Seale in the reign of James I. (N.) Stokes is a 

name which has been for many centuries connected with this 
county (N.). It is remarkable that in all the counties mentioned 
in the alphabetical hst as containing this name there are parishes, 
townships, or hamlets called Stoke. (See "Northamptonshire.") 

The name of Steetton was established in the parish of 

Claybrook two centuries ago, when Thomas Stretton held land in 
Wibtoft, and William Stretton, yeoman, held property in Great 
Claybrook (M.). De Stretton was the name of a very ancient 
Leicestershire family, dating back to the 12th century (N.). 
There are places thus called in Leicestershire. The name is 
also represented around Derby, and in Derbyshire there are 

also places of the name In the 17th and 18th centuries Tailby, 

sometimes v/ritten Tealbt, was a common name amongst the 
yeomen and gentry of Slawston (N.). The gentle family of 
Tailby, of Sketiington Hall, Leicestershire, are descended from 
George Tailbye of Slawston in the middle of the 17th century 



LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLANDSHIRE. 267 

(H. L.). Tealby is a Lincolnshire parish Toone was the name 

of an ancient Leicestershire family of Belton and Osgathorpe that 
branched off at the end of the 16th centuiy from the Toones of 
Barton-on-Trent, in the neighbonrlng county of Stafford (N.). 
Six of the heirs of the Osgathorpe and Belton Toones in the 17th 
and 18th centuries bore the Christian name of Hamlet (N.). At 
the beginning of this century William Toone owned a farm in 

Merill Grange (N.). The name is still in Belton The 

WiLFORDS take their name from a parish in the adjoining 

county of Notts The Wormleightons take their name from 

a Warwickshire parish. In 1675 Humphrey Wormeleighton was 
granted by the master and poor brethren of Wigston's Hospital a 

tenement in Walton (N.) Amongst the ancient Leicestershire 

names now rare in the county is that of Winterton, which is 
derived from a Lincolnshire town. The Wintertons of Wibtoft 
were an old gentle family holding property in Wibtoft, in the 
parish of Claybrook, for 200 years, namely, during the 17th and 

18th centuries (M.) Another name now rarely represented in 

the county is that of Skipwith. The Skipwiths wei'e for several 
centuries a very distinguished Leicestershire family (N.). 



268 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 

Note — The asterisk denotes that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 



Allen 
Brown 
r Clark 
I Clarke 



Geseeai Names (30-40 counties). 



♦Johnson 
Robinson 
•Smith 



Taylor 
Wright 



Brooks 
Chnpmaii 
♦Foster 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Harrison 
♦Parker 



♦Richardson 
Ward 



♦Atkinson 
Dawson 
East 
Hardy 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



♦Holmes 

Marshall 
r Sharp 
L Sharpe 



f Stephenson 
I Sterenson 

Wells 
♦Wilkinson 



District Names (4-9 counties). 



♦Briggs 

Cartwright 

Croft 
^ r Davey 
IDavy 
r Emerson 
-< Emmerson 
L Empson 



r Everatt 
I Everett 

Gibbons 

Gosling 
♦Grant 
♦Graves 

Kemp 

Key 



Kirk 
J Kitchen 
I Kitching 

Naylor 
♦Needham 

North 

Swain 

Winter 



1 



LINCOLXSHIRE. 



269 



Abraham 



Bartholomew- 
Baxter 

Beecham (Boston) 
Bellamy 
Belton 
*Benton (Boston) 

{Blanchard 
B Ian shard 
Burkinshaw 
r Burrell 
L BurrUl 
Campion 

Clifton (Wisbech) 
*Oravea 



CoTTNTT Names (2-3 counties). 

f Creasey *Parr 

I Cressey *Pepper 

Daft (Boston) f Pindar 

*Dalton I Binder 

Franks Priestly 

*Grodson Eoe 

Goodacre Skelton 

*Grreenfield Smithsoii 

Hand *Sykes 
*Hind Tinsley 

Kirk by J T raves 

Lingard L Travis 
*Lockwood Twidale 

*Moody Whit worth 

*Mountain * Wortli 

Musgrave 



Pbculiae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Anyan 


Cottinghara 


Graupt 


Bemrose 


Coupland 


r Gilliart - 


Bett (Wragby) 


Cranidge (Doncaster) 


< Gilliatt (Boston) 


Blades 


Cropley 


L Gillyatt 


Blankley 


Cutforth 


Goodyear 


Border 


Cuthbert 


Goose 


Boruian 


Dannatt 


Grummitt (Bourn) 


Bowser 


Daubney 


Hay 


Brackenbury 


Desforges 


Herring 


Bristow 


Dook 


Hewson 


Broughton 


r Dows 
I Dowse 


Hides 


Brownlow 


Hildred 


Brumby 


Drakes (Market Rasen) 


Hoyes 


Burkill (Brigg) 


J Drewery 
L Drewry 


Hoyles 


Biirkitt 


Hutton 


Butters 


Dring 


J Ingall 
L Ingle 


Cade 


Drury 


Cammack 


D adding 


r Laming 
L Lamming 


(-•apes 


Elmitt 


Cass well 


Elvidge (Lincoln) 


r Leggett 
1 Leggott 


Chatterton 


Epton 


Codd 


E vis on 


LiU 


Collishaw 


Forman 


LiUey 


Coney 


Frisby (Peterborough) 


Lynn 


Cooling 


Frow (Boston) 


Mackiuder 



270 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Maidens (Boston) 

Marfleet 

Mai'kham 

Mastin 

Maw (Rotherham) 

Mawer 

Merrikin (Great 

Grimsby) 
Minta (Grantham) 
Mc^bray 
Odhng 
Overton 
Palethorpe 
Patehett 
Pick 
Pick well 
Pocklington 
Ranby 



Eeeson (Boston) 

Rhoades 

Riggall 

Rippon 

Sardeson 

Sargisson 

Scarborough 
J" Scholey 
L Scoley 
j Scrimshaw 
L Scrimshire 

Searson 

Sergeant 

Sharpley 

Sneath 

Stamp 

Storr 

Stowe 



Strawson 

Stuble 

Temple 

Thurlby 

Trafford 

Ullyatt 

Vinter 

Waddinghain 

Wadsley 

Wass 
r Westerby 
L Westoby 

Whitsed 

Willey (Great 
Grimsby) 

Willows 

Winn 

Wroot 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC LINCOLNSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 
A. indicates Allen's " Lincolnshire." 



H.R. 
O. 
L. 
P. 

Sp. 



St. 

Sto. 

T. 



Hundred Rolls. 

Oldfield's " Wainfleet." 

Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

Peck's " Annals of Stamford." 

" Names of the Nobility, Gentry, and others who contributed 

to the Defence of this Country in 1588" (Brit. Mus., 

B. 474). 
Stark's " Lincoln." 
Stonehouse's " Isle of Axholme." 
Pishey Thompson's " Boston." 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 271 



A— B. 



The name of Abraham, which now occurs mostly in Lincoln- 
shire and Hunts, was found in these counties and in the counties 
immediately adjacent to them in one form or another six centuries 
ago. As Abraham it then existed in Lincolnshire, Hunts, and 
Cambridgeshire ; as Abbraham, Abraha, Abrahe, and Abrahee 
in Suffolk; and as Abraam in Beds and Wilts (H. R.). Its 
occurrence in Wilts is suggestive of its existence then in other 
counties not so well illustrated in the Hundred Rolls. Stephen 
Abraham possessed land in Skirbeck, Lincolnshire, in 1521} (T.). 

Antan is evidently a corruption of Enion or Enyon, the name 

of a distinguished family of Flore, ^Northamptonshire, who came in 
1623 from Honingham, in Warwickshire (Baker's " Northampton- 
shire ") Bellamy is a name that has long been establislied in 

Notts. It occurred in the adjacent county of Cambridge in the 
reign of Edward I. (H. R.), and is at present to be found 

ia Hunts. (See under "Nottinghamshire.") The name of 

Blanchard or Blaxshard, which also occurs in the North and 
East Ridings of Yorkshire, has long been in the county of 
Lincoln. John Blauncherde of Lowthe gave £25 for the defence 
of his country at the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish 
Ai-mada in 1588 (Sp.). Long before this, in the reign of Edward I., 
we find the name of Blaunchard in the county (H. R.) ; in the reign 
of Henry III. the name also occurred in Wilts (H. R.), and, in 
fact, Blanchard or Blaunchard is also an old Wiltshire name, 
occurring in the hundred of Warminster in the 16th century 

(Hoare's "Wiltshire") Bracebridge, a name now rare or 

extinct in the county, was a Lincoln name in the 17th century, 
when there were mayors and sheriffs of the city thus called (St.). 

Bracebridge is a Lincolnshire village The distinguished noble 

family of Brownlow of Belton came first into the possession of 
that estate in 1620 (A.). Two centuries ago there were free- 
holders of the name in Thurgarton hundred in the adjacent 

county of Notts (Harleian MS., 6846) The Brackenburts 

evidently take their name from the Lincolnshire parish of 
Brackenborough. John Brackenbury was mayor of Boston in 
1719 (T.), and the name is still in the town. (See under 

"DuRHAii.") Thomas Bowser resided at Fishtoft in the 

reign of Charles II. (T.) John Broughton was mayor of 

Boston in 1796 and 1808 (T.) ; the name is still in Boston 



272 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

There was a family of Bagley in Friskney last century (0.) 

Bdrrell has long been a Lincolnshire name. In Cromwell's time, 
Sir John Bui'i-ell of Dunsby and Redman Burrell, Esq., of Fulbeck, 
compounded their estates for £687 and £77U respectively (0.)- 
The name is also now found in Norfolk. Burrell was the name of 
a noted family of Kent and Sussex during the 15th, IGth, and 17th 
centuries, and one of the Burrells of Beckenham, Kent, was high 
sheriff of Kent in 1722 ; Northumberland is stated to have been the 
home of the family in the reign of Edward I. (Hasted's " Kent"). 
In 1748 Peter Burrell, Esq., of St. John's College, Cambridge, pre- 
sented a statue of Glory to the University (Cooper's "Cambridge"). 



C. 

There were Cades in Freiston in the reign of Richard TI. (T.), 
hut the name of Cade occurred in this county at a still earlier 
date, namely, in the reign of Edward I., when it was also 
represented in the adjacent counties of Cambridge and Norfolk 
as well as in Bucks (H. R.). Though at present it has still 
its home in Lincolnshire, it has been, as Lower informs us in 
his " English Surnames," for several centuries a common name 
about Mayfield and Heathfield, Sussex ; and this author supplies 
good reasons for his belief that the notable Jack Cade, the rebel of 

the reign of Henry VI., was a Sussex man The Cammacks have 

long been in the county. Four mayors of Boston bore the name of 
Cammock in the reign of James I. (T.). We find it also represented 
in Stamford in the 17th century, Cammocke being the name of 
Stamford aldermen in 1033, 1G42, 1643, and 1649 (P.). Robert 
Cammok of Sleeford contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada 

fund in 1588 (Sp.) Campion was a common name in the 

adjacent county of Cambridge in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). 

Capes was an Epworth name in the IGth century (Sto.), and it 

still occurs there. There was a Thomas de Capes in Northampton- 
shire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Two centuries ago 

there were freeholders of the name of Collisfiaw at Hickling 

in the adjacent county of Notts (Harleian MS., G846) John 

Cooling of Newark, Notts, was a freeholder in 1698 (Harleian 

MS., 6846). There is a Kentish parish of the name In the 

16th century Richard and Thomas Coney, father and son, who 
were Merchants of the Staple of Calais, owned the manor-house, 
Basingthorpe (A.) ; the same Thomas Coney, who accumulated a 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 273 

sreat fortune and was liigh sheriff of Rutland in 1573 (A.), gave 
£100 towards the national fund collected for the defence of the 
country at the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish 
Armada in 1588 (Sp.). Another contributor was William Conj, 
of Hunts. Sir Snetton Coney, of North Stoke, Lincolnshire, 
compounded his estate in Cromwell's time for £2,648; there 
was a William Coney, Esq., of Walpole, Norfolk, in 1630 (0.). 

CoTTiNGHAM is the name of parishes in the counties of York 

and Northampton Creaset, or Cresset as it is spelt in a few 

instances, is an ancient Lincolnshire name. As Cressy it occurred 
in this county, as well as in Norfolk and Kent, in the 13th century. 
It is evidently derived from Crecy or Cressy in Normandy, but 
was established in this country long before the famous victory of 

Edward III. in 1346 Copledyke was the name of an old and 

distinguished family of Harrington in this county during the 14th, 
15th, and 16th centuries (A.). The name is now rare or extinct, 
but it was one of considerable antiquity. In the 13th century, 
De Cupeldick was a Lincolnshire name, and was represented then 

in the wapentake of " Kykketnn," Hoylaund (H. R.) In the 

16th century there was a gentle family of Chattertox at Lichfield, 
Staffordshire, its members often serving as bailiff or mayor of that 

city (Harwood's " Lichfield") George Cuthhert was mayor of 

Boston in 1712 (T.) William Coupland was lord mayor of 

York in 1553 (Drake's "Eboracum"). 

D— F. 

The principal home of the name of Daft is now to be found 
in Boston and its neighbourhood. The name was represented in 

the adjacent county of Notts in the 13th century (H. R.) 

Dannatt is a slightly altered form of a Stamford name in the 17th 
century ; Richard Dannalte or Danalt was an alderman of that 
town in 1645 and 1655 (P.) Daubney is a very ancient Lincoln- 
shire name. In the forms of Daubini and de Aubini it occurred in 
the wapentake of Ness in the reign of Edward I., and as Aubeny 
and Aubeney at the same time in other parts of the county 
(H. R.) ; in the same reign we find Daubeney or Daubeny in Bucks 

(H. R.) Dowse was a name represented in Freiston in 1544 

and in Wrangle in 1642 (T.) Drixg was the name of the mayor 

of Nottingham in 1651 and 1658 (Deering's "Nottingham"). 
As Dreng, it occurred in Notts and Yorkshire in the 13th century 



274 HOMES OF fa:mily names. 

(H. R.). There was a family of Bring in Marlborough, Wilts, in 

the 17th century (Waylen's "Marlborough") Drury, Drewry, 

or Drewery, is an ancient Lincolnshire name. As Drary, and 
occasionally as Drewery and Druery, it was established in this 
county and in the adjacent counties of York and Cambridge in the 
13th century (H. R.). Drewry was the name of the mayors of 
Lincoln in 1548, 1754, and 1761 (St.). There were Drewrys in 
Leake in the reign of Charles I. (T.). The name is still estab- 
lished in Lincoln and Leake. Thomas Drewree was rector of 
Wroot in 1504 (Sto.) During the 17th century four or five of the 
mayors of Nottingham bore the name of Drury (Deering's 
'• Nottingham "). There was an old and distinguished family of 
Drury, of Rongham and Hawsted, Suffolk, in whose possession the 
family estate had continued for 600 years (L.). ; this Suffolk 
family apparently gave rise to the Drurys of Besthorp, Norfolk, 

four centuries ago (CuUum's " Hawsted ") The name of Elmitt 

was represented by Elmet in Yorkshire in the 13th century (H. R.). 

The Empsons were a Boston family in the 17th century; the 

mayor in 1646 bore the name (T.) The name of Forman was 

represented in Skirbeck in the reign of Richard II. (T.). The 
Forraans of Lincolnshire may possess an ancestor in William 
Foreman, of Gainsborough in this county, whose sou William was 

lord mayor of London in 1539 (P.) The Frisbys, whose 

market town is Peterborough, probably hail originally from 

Leicestershire, where there is a parish of the name Fydell was 

the name of several Boston mayors in the 17th and 18th centuries 
(T.). It is now rare in the county. 

G— L. 

Gatjxt is an ancient Lincolnshire name, which had its principal 
home in the county six centuries ago, when it was very frequent ; 
at the same time there were also a few of the name in Cambridge- 
shire, Somerset, and other counties (H. R.). The Lincolnshire 
Gaunts were a powerful family from the 11th to the 13th century 

(T.) The name of Gilliart, Gilliatt, or Gillyatt is at present 

mostly to be found in the neighbourhood of Boston. Thomas 
Gilliat was one of those who made an inventory in 1671 of the 
goods of Sir John Anderson, of Bronghton, in this county (Stark's 
'•Gainsborough and Lea"). Gylliot or Gilliot was the name of 
tho lord mayors of York in 1464, 1474, and 1503 (Drake's 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 27 5 

' •' Eboracum "). In the 13tli century, Gillot, Gillote, and Gilot 
i were names found in Cambridgeshire and Hants (H. R.). Gillett 

1 is now found in Oxfordshire and Kent Goobknap, a name now 

j rare in the county, was a well-known Lincoln name in the 17th 
k century, when there were mayors and sheriffs of the city that bore 

the name (St.) Goodyear, which is now a Lincolnshire name, 

was represented 600 years ago by Godyer in the adjacent county of 

Hunts (H. R.) The Grummitts are now established in Bourn 

and its neisrhbourhood. John Grimmitt was mayor of Boston in 
1705 (T.)- There was a Vincent Grumet in Wiltshire in the reign 

of Edward I. (H. R.) Hbwison was a Freiston name in 1877 

(T.), and it still occui-s there Herring was a common Norfolk 

name in the time of Edward I., when it was written Hering 
(H. R.). (/See under " Hern " in Norfolk.) The Rev. Richard 
Herring, who died in 1712, was vicar of the parish of Haxey in 

this county for nearly forty years (Sto.) The Lincolnshire 

name of Hoyes was represented by that of De la Hoyse in Norfolk 

in the 13th century (H. R.) Hutton is the name of 26 parishes 

and townships in England, several of which occur in Yorkshire. 

The ancient name of Ingall or Ingle was represented by 

Ingel and Ingal in the neighbouring county of Huntingdon in the 

reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Kemp is a name for the most part 

confined to the eastern coast counties of England, especially those 
of Lincoln, Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Kent, and Sussex. It was 
well represented as Kempe in the same part of England, particu- 
larly in Norfolk and Suffolk, in the 13th century (H. R.). It has 
secondary and less important homes in the south-western counties 

and in Cheshire Lilley and Lill are ancient Lincolnshire 

names. There was a Hugh Lilly in the wapentake of " Asward- 
hurn," South Lincolnshire, in the reign of Edward I. ; at the 
same time the names of Lille and Lilie occurred in Oxfordshire 
(H. R.). 

M— 0. 

The numerous and ancient families of Maw have been estab- 
lished for the last 350 years, as snbstantial freeholders, in all the 
principal places in the Isle of Axholme (the part of Lincolnshire 
west of the Trent), and Epworth has long known the name (Sto.). 
A family of gentry bearing the name resided in Epworth last 
century, and as far back as 1478 a Robert Maw held one of the 
chantries of Epworth church (Sto.). Three yeomen of the name 

T 2 



276 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

took part in a riot of the commoners of Epvvorth in the time of 
Cromwell against the commissioner appointed to collect the nevf 
land-taxes (Sto.). Richard Maw, farmer, lost buildings valued at 
£126 in a destructive fire at the village of Haxey in 1744; and 
another Richard Maw, who was buried in Haxey in 1816, was an 
alderman of the neighbouring town of Doncaster (Sto.). Maw, 
Bishop of Bath and Wells, who died in 1629, was a Lincolnshire 
man (Sto.). In the 13th century the name of Mawe was confined 
to much the same part of England, more especially to Norfolk and 

SufFolk (H. R.) Mawer was the name of a family that held 

much ^iroperty in Winthorpe and in other places in the county 
300 years ago (0.). There were Mawers in Freiston in the reign 

of Elizabeth (T.) The Markhams belong to an ancient family 

of Markhara, Notts (L.). Sir Robert Markham represented 

Grantham in 1677 (A.) Moody is an ancient name that was 

represented in the reign of Edward 1. by Mody and Mudy in 
Norfolk, and by Mody and Modi in Oxfordshire and Wilts (H. R.). 
Probably the Suffolk and Yorkshire name of Mudd or Mudde is 
another form of this name. {See under " Mudd " in Suffolk.) 
Moody is a name that has also a home in the south and west of 
England in Hampshire and Somerset. William Moody possessed' 
29 acres in Partney, Lincolnshire, in 1616 ; and there was a John 

Moody, Esq., of Scremby, in this county, about 1750 (0.) The 

very distinguished house of Mowbray, to which the dukedom of 
Norfolk belonged in the reign of Henry VI., dates back in this 
county to the 12th century (Sto.). We find the name in the 
county in the Hundred Rolls. Mark Mowbray was sheriff of the 
city of Lincoln in 1744 (St.), and Henry Mowbray was mayor of 

Boston in 16-56 (T.) The family of Mcjsgrave originated at 

Musgrave in Westmoreland where the name occurs as early as 
King John ; the Musgraves formed a fine old border race from 
which sprang a barony and three lines of baronets (L.). Less 
than a century after the time of John, in the reign of Edward I., 
we find this name in the forms of Musegrave, Masegave, and 

Mosegave, in the county of Oxford (H. R.) The name of 

Odling was represented by Odeline in Shropshire in the 13th 

century (H. R.) Marfleet and Overton are the names of 

Yorkshire parishes. Colonel Overton was governor of Hull in 

Cromwell's time (Tickell's "Hull") Obbinson is an old Lincoln 

name, but is now rare or extinct; several mayors and sheriffs of 
the city bore the name in the 17th and 18th centuries (St.). 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 277 



Patchett was a common clerical name in the neighbouring 
county of Leicester in the 16th and 17th centuries (J^ichols' 

"Leicestershire") There were freeholders of the name of 

Palethorpe at Newark and other places in Notts in 1698 (Harleian 

JMS., 68-i6). Palethoi'pe is a chapelry in Notts Parr was a 

common name in Leverton between 1600 and 1650 (T.) 

I'cppER is an ancient name in the east of England. It is now at 
liome in Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, and Suffolk ; and six 
centuries ago it occurred as Pepir and Peper in Lincolnshire, 
( ambridgeshire, Hunts, and Norfolk (H. R.). In the churchyard 
of St. John the Baptist, Stamfoi'd, there is the following singular 
inscripdon on the tomb of William Pepper, who died in 1783 at 
the age of 46 (A.) : — 

" Tho' hot mj name, yet mild my nature, 
I bore good-will to every creature ; 
I brewed fine ale, and sold it too, 
And unto each I gave his due." 

I do not think that Richard Pepir (a namesake, if not an 
ancestor, of William Pepper), who resided in the wapentake of 
Ness in the county of Lincolnshire during the reign of Edward I. 
(H. R.), would have accepted this interpretation of his name. In 
truth, the Pipers of Essex might with almost equal reason claim 
to possess a hot name, since they possess it in its Latin form ! 
Probably Pepper and Piper, in the east of England at least, have 
a common origin ; but mere similarity in sound with modern 
words will not aid us in finding it: we must trace the diffei*en 
forms of the same name as it occurs in the old parish registers 
and in the historical records of a still earlier date. {See under 

"Leicestershire.") Pick is another ancient name, which, as 

Pick, Pieke, and Pik, was represented in the adjacent county of 
Cambridge, as well as in Oxfordshire, Wilts, and Shropshire, iii 
the 13th century (H. R.). (See "Peck" under "Cambridge- 
shire.") Pindar or Pixder has been a characteristic name of 

Lincolnshire and Notts for at least six centuries, Le Pinder being 
the ancient form of the name in Notts and in Glentham, Lincoln- 
shire, in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). Pynder and Pindar 
were Leake and Benington names in the reign of Edward III. (T.). 
A family of gentry named Pindar resided at Owston in the 17th 



27» HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and ]8tli centuries (residing at Brumby Wood Hall last century), 
one of the ancestors being JoKu Pindar, attorney, who lived in 
the time of Charles II. (Sto.). (See under "Nottinghamshire.") 

The POCKLINGTONS derive their name from a town in Tork- 

shire Popplewick is an old Lincoln name, now rare or extinct: 

during the 16th and 16th centuries some of the mayors and sheriffs 

of the city bore the name (St.) Pinchbeck was a Boston name 

in the 17th century, the mayor in 1661 bearing the name (T.). 
It is now rare in the county, though still found in Boston. A 
Lincolnshire village is thus called. 

R— S. 

Raxby was a Benington name in Elizabeth's reign (T.) 

The RiGGALLS derive their name from Riccall, a Yorkshire village 

on the left bank of the Ouse The name of Scrimshaw or 

ScEiMSHiRE is probably a corruption either of " skirmisher " or 
of its old English form of " scrymgeour." In the reign of 
Edward I. there was a Henry le Eskyrmessur in Yorkshire, and 
at the same time there was a William Eschirmisur in Bedford- 
shire (H. R.). Skrymsher was the name of an old Staffordshire 
family that owned the manor of Xorbury in that county from 
the 16th to the 18th century (Nichols' " Leicestershire ") : two 
Staffordshire gentlemen of this family contributed £25 apiece for 
the defence of the country at the time of the expected invasion 
of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). Two centuries ago there 
were freeholders of the name of Scrimshire at North Muscombe 
and Newark in the county of Notts (Harleian MS., 6846). There 
is a memorial in Wisbech church, Cambridgeshire, to William 

Skrimshire, who died in 1814 (Watson's " Wisbech ")... Thomas 

Serjeant was a Moulton gentleman in Elizabeth's reign (T.) 

Skelton is an old Lincoln name, and. still occurs there : the mayor 
of the city in 1697 and the sheriffs of 1417 and 1691 bore this 
name (St.). One of the first ministers of Salem, Massachusetts, 
was Samuel Skelton, a nonconforming minister of Lincolnshire, 
who went to America in 1629 (T.). There are Yorkshire parishes 

and townships thus called More than one mayor of Boston in 

the 17th century bore the name of Rhodes (T.). (See under the 

"West Riding.") Stamp is at present chiefly a Lincolnshire 

name ; but a family of the name has resided at Boxgrove, Sussex, 
for three centuries (L.) Richard Starre, a Boston man in the 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 279 

reign of Mary I. (A.) may be an ancestor of those who at present 

bear the name of Store William Stowe of Holbiche (Holbeach) 

contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada defence fund in 1588 

(Sp.). Stow is a parish in Lincolnshire The name of i)e 

Stublegh occurred in Essex in the 13th century (H. R.). At 
present the surname of Stubley is mostly confined to Lincolnshire. 

The ancient name of Swain, which is now best represented 

in Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, and Devonshire, was 
established in the form of Sweyn, rarely of Sw^ayn, during the 
13th century in Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, and Oxford- 
shire, being most numerous in the last two counties (H. R.). In 
the east of England it is probable that Swain is but the old Danish 
name of Sweyn. In the time of the English Harold, his elder 
brother bore the name of his maternal uncle, Sweyn, King of 

Denmark Scune and Stovin are two old Lincolnshire names 

that are now rare or extinct. The Scunes were a Louth family 
of master-masons al the beginning of the 16th century.* The 
Stovins were an old Tetley family, attaining great position and 
note during last century, and hailing originally from the neigh- 
bourhood of Shefiield (Sto.) William Sneath was a Boston 

gentleman who was on the side of the Parliament iu Cromwell's 
time (T.). Snaith is still a common name in Boston. 

T— Z. 

Traves or Travis is an old Lincolnshire name, which, as 
Travcrs, was represented in this county, as well as in Bucks, in 
the 13th century (H. R.). Travis is also found in Derbyshire 

and Lancashire The name of Ulltatt was represented in 

Derbyshire last century : Ann Dean Uleyate left a large estate 
in 18U2 f(U' the support of Sunday schools in Chesterfield in that 
county (Glover's "Derbyshire"). There was a gentle family 
named Ulyat, of Parson Drove, Cambridgeshire, early in this 

century (Watson's "Wisbech") The Wadsleys may possess 

an ancestor in John Waddesley, a Boston householder in the 
reign of Mary I. (A.) Wadsley is the name of a district in the 

West Riding of Yorkshire Thomas and Henry Wass were 

freeholders of Warsopp and North Muscombe, Notts, in 1698 



• '• Exti-acts from au old book referriug to Louth Steeple " (Brit. Mus., B. -J 74), 



280 HOilES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

(Harleian MS., 6846). Joseph Wasse was rector of Ajuho, North- 
amptonshire, in 1711 (Baker's " Northamptonshire "). Christopher 
Wase was mayor of Hertford in 1680 (Tumor's "Hertford"). 
Wass was a common name in Northallerton, Yorkshire, in the 17th 
and 18th centuries (Ingledew's "Northallerton"). In the 13th 
century this name in one form and another was much more widely 
distributed than it is at present : as Was and Waz it then occurred 
in Oxfordshire and Wiltshire ; as Wase and Waze, in Norfolk ; as 
Le Wase, in Bucks; and as De Was, in Northumberland (H. E.). 

The present name of Willows was represented in the county 

in the reign of Mury I. : Walter Willowe then held seven acies 

of land in Wraugle, near Boston (A.) Wixx has long been 

a Liucoln name : a sheriff of the city bore the name in the 
reign of Charles II., and there was another sheriff called Winn in 
1807 (St.). The name was represented in Wrangle as far back as 
the reign of Edward III. (T.). There are stiil Wiuns in Lincoln. 

The names of Thuelby, Waddixgham, and Wroot are taken 

from parishes in the county Several of the bailiffs of Godman- 

Chester, Hunts, in the 17th and 18th centuries, bore the name of 
ViXTEE (Fox's " Godmanchester "). 



MIDDLESEX. 



28 L 



MIDDLESEX. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, thougli characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 

General Names. 
•Brown *Smith 



•Cole 



Common Names. 
♦Hunt 

Kegioxal Names. 
*Newman 



*Kmg 



DiSTEicT Names. 
^Gregory *Goddard 





County Names. 




♦Churchill 


*Merrick 


Whitlington 


*Ive8 


*Priest 


Woodman 


♦Lawrence 







Peculiae Names. 
Ewer Woodland 



I cannot pretend that the names given above give any ade- 
quate idea of Middlesex family names. In the first place, the 
great metropolis has appropriated, through its ever-extending 



282 HOMES OF FAMILY NA:MES. 

subur'bs, a large proportion of the connty. In the next place, 
it must be remembered that the population of this great city and 
its suburbs has had a very motley origin, and that though, as 
shown by Mr. Bardsley in his interesting " Romance of the 
London Directory," it possesses a peculiar element of old London 
surnames, it must be largely composed of materials drawn from 
the provinces and, to a not inappreciable extent, from abroad. 
Then, the number of farmers. 400 in all, is so small that we have 
but an uncertain basis on which to found any conclusions as to 
the family names that have been attached to the soil of Middlesex 
in past centuries. Still, however, I do not think it wise to 
exclude my list of surnames for the agricultural part of this 
county, and principally because I wish to avoid the appearance 
of excludiog anything seemingly inconsistent with the general 
character of this work. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE. 

(See under " Wales.") 



NORFOLK. 



283 



NORFOLK. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, thoug-Ti chai'acteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



*Allen 
*Brown 
r Clark 
1 Clarke 



Geneeal Names (30-40 counties). 



rcook 

I Cooke 


*Johnson 


Smith 


Green 


Turner 


*Hall 


Wright 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

* Chapman Moore 

*King Palmer 



*Read 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Barker 

Barrett (Norwich) 

Bird 
*Burton (Norwich) 
*Cvoss 
*Fisher 



*Hammond 
*IIar\'ey (Norwich) 

Howard (Norwich) 

Hudson 
*Long 
*Middleton 



*Nichols 

*Page 

*Potter 

Reynolds (Norwich) 

Sutton 
*West 



District Names (4-9 counties). 



Betts 
*Bond (Yarmouth) 

Coe 

Crowe 

Daniels 
♦Drake (Attleborough) 



Durrant 
f Everett 
L Everitt 


^ / Hewett 
L Hewitt 
*HoweU 


Frost 
*Fuller 


*Humphrey 
Lake (Dereham) 


*Goddard 


Mann 



284 



HOMES OF FxVMILY NAMES, 



*Nelpon 
Norton 
*Kayner 
*Keeve 



»Eolfe 

Self 

Sewell 
*Sliarman 



* Skinner 

*Vincent (Dereham^ 

♦Waters 



CorxTT Names (2-3 counties). 



*Balls 


Horn (Wisbech) 


*Pegg 


Beckett 


*Howlett 


Philippo 


Blomfield 


Hubbard 


J Porrett 
L Porritt 


*Bljih 


Ives (Norwich) 


J Breese 
L Breeze 


r Jacob 

1- Jacobs 


Kackliam 


Kice 


Buck (Norwicli) 


fJoUey 
L Jolly 


Eiches (Norwich) 


Bunting 


Rudd 


Bush (Dereham) 


Knights 


Saver 


Cann 


J Lc Grice 
I Le Grys 


Seaman 


Chaplin 


Steward 


Colman 
Crisp 


J Lemmon 
I Lemon 


*Thirkettle 
r Thirtle 
I Thurtle 


Denny 


Lincoln 


*Doubleclay 


*Ling 


*Tingey 


Emery (Dereham) 


Makins 


Tuck 


Farrow (Norwich) 


Mayes 


Walpole 


*Girling 


Myhill 


Wharton 


*Golding 


Ncave 


Wiseman 


Go wing 


Oldfield 


Youngman 


/Hern 
L Heme 


Orford (Diss) 


Toungs 







Peculiae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Abbs (Norwich) 
/Amies (Norwich) 
L Amis 

Arthurton 
r Atthow 
L Attoe 

Banham 

Batterham 

Beales 

Beanes 

Beck (Norwich) 

Bettinson (Wisbech) 



Boddy 
Brasnett 
Bunu 
Cannell 

Case 

Claxton 

Copeman 

Cossey 

Cubitt (Norwich) 

Culley 

Curson (Dereham) 

Duffield 



DybaU 

Dye 

Eglinton (Norwich) 

Failes (Lynn) 

Flatt 

Gamble 

Gapp 

Gayford 

Gaze (^Norwich) 

Gedge (Norwich) 

Gooch 

Goulder 





XORFOLK. 


28 


G-reenaere 


Miuns 


Shreere (Norwich) 


Heading 


Midlinger 


Slipper (Norwich) 


Howes 


Nurse 


Soame 


Huggins 


Plumblj 


f Spiuk 
I Spinks 


Ingi'am 


Poll 


Kerrison 


Piirdy 


StarUng 


Lain (Wymondham) 


Einger 


Stimpsou 


Land 


Eising 


Thrower 


Larwood 


Kivett 


Tooley 


Leeder 


Eix 


Uttiug 


Leeds 


Eoofe (Ljnu) 


Warnes (Yarmouth) 


Lewell 


Sands 


Whalebelly 


Mack (Dereham) 


Savory 


Whittleton (Norwieli) 


Mallett 


Scales 


Woolston (Yarmouth) 


Milk (Dereham) 


Sheringham 


Wortley 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC NORFOLK 

NAMES. 

Blomefield's " History of Norfolk " (Bl.) has supplied me with almost 
eufScient materials. Lower's " Patronymica Britannica " (L.) and the Hundred 
Rolls (H. R.) have also been employed. 



A— B. 

The family of Abbs is now best represented around N'orwicli. 
The name has not strayed far during four centuries, since ^^■e 
learn that an old Buxton family of Abbys or Abbes possessed 
the manor of Levishagh in that parish, from 1480 to the end of 

the following century (Bl.) The present families of Atthow 

and Attoe are probably the descendants of the Athows of Beecli- 

amwell, an important family 300 years ago (Bl.) Amies and 

Amis are different forms of an ancient Norfolk name, which at 
present has its home in and around Norwich, where the name has 
been represented since Mary's reign, at which time it was spelt 
Amys. John Aniyas was a Norwich surgeon in the commence- 
ment of last century ; and about this time Matthew Amyas was 
a doctor and John Amyas an attoi*ney in Hingham. Peter Amyes 



286 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

was rector of Castor in 1601 : and there was a Thomas Amys of 
Barton Turf, who died in 1511. Edmund Amys was prior of 
Mount joy, Heverland, in 1401, and in the 14th century Walter 
Amvas was a Suffolk parson (Bl.)- The name of Amys occurred 
in the adjoining county of Cambridge at the close of the 13th 

century (H. R.j Balls is an ancient Xorfolk name, being of 

common occurrence in the county in the reign of Edward I. ; it 
was also then common in Lincolnshire, and less so in Suffolk, 
Sussex, and Kent (H. E.). (See under " Sutfolk," where the 

name is also now numerous.) Baxham is the name of a Xorfolk 

parish The Becks, who live now in numbers in the neigh- 
bourhood of Norwich, possess a very ancient name. The earliest 
mention, as far as I know, is that of a Flemish family of Bee that 
held the manor of Eresby in Lincolnshire in the time of Domesday 
(L.). We find the name as Bee in Lincolnshire in the 13th 
century (H. R.). when the knightly family of Bee held property 
also in Friskney and Scremby (Oldfield's " TTaiiLfleet "') ; and 
the bishops of Lincoln and Xoi-wich in the early part of the 
14th centurr, who were two brothers of the name of De Beck 
or Bek or Beke. are said to have descended from the Becks of 
Eresby (BL). The original home of the Norfolk Becks was 
probably at Beck or Beck Hall, a village in Bellingford parish, 
where the family of De Bek or De Beck were lords of the manor 
from the 12th to the 14th century (Bl.). It should, however, be 
mentioned that the parishes of East and West Beckham in this 
county may have been also homes of the name. We find 
reference in the Hundred Rolls to the name of Bee in this 
county in the 13t'i century. In 1349 the rector of Thorpe-by- 
Haddiscoe was a De Bek (Bl.). Coming down to much later 
times, we find that the Xorfolk Becks or Beckes owned property 
in Castleacre, Mintling, Geyton, and Flitcham at the beginning 
of the 17th century; whilst Benjamin Beck was rector and 

prebend of Xorwich in 1708 (Bl.) One of the principal stocks 

of the old and characteristic Xorfolk name of Bett.s included the 
family that possessed, in the loth and 16th centuries, the manors 
of Hastings Hall and Whitefoot in Irmingland (BL). This name 
is also well represented in Lincolnshire, where it usually takes 
the form of Bett ; it is also present, though less numerous, in 

the other east coast counties of Suffolk and Kent Bettixsok 

is at present a Xorfolk surname occurring mostly in and around 
Wisbech. There were freeholders named Bettison in Notts in 



NORFOLK. 287 

1698 (Harleian MS., 6846.) Blomfield has long been a Norfolk 

name. A family of gentry who resided in the parish of Fersfield 
from the 16th to tlie 18th century, and who placed their origin 
another century back in their pedigree, seem to have been one of 
the principal stocks ; the learned author of the " History of 
Norfolk," a work to which I am so greatly indebted, was rector 

of Fersfield in 1736 (Bl.) Boddy is a Norfolk surname, said 

to be derived from " boda," the Anglo-Saxon word for "mes- 
senger " (L.). Two incumbents of Buckenham Parva and 
Hemlington, in the beginning of the 15th century, were named 
Body (Bl.). The name of Body occurred in Cambridgeshire, 
Hunts, and Oxfordshire in the 13th century (H. R ). In its 

early form of Body it is also now represented in Cornwall 

The Bonds are now represented in the Yarmouth district. This 
is also an old Norwich and Walsinghani name (Bl.). In the 13th 
century it occurred as Bond and Le Bonde in Norfolk, Suffolk, 
Lincolnshire, etc. (H. R.). Besides Norfolk and SufFolk, where 
the name has been established for some 600 years at least, Devon, 
Somerset, and Lancashire are now important homes of the name. 

(iS'ee under " Somerset.") Bunting or Buxtyng was a common 

name among the Norfolk clergy in the 15th century ; at that time, 
also, a family of the name lived at Framingham, near Norwich 
(Bl.). In the 13th century it was still represented in Norfolk 
(H. R.). The Buntings, according to Kemble, were an Anglo- 
Saxon clan. Further particulars concerning the past and present 

distribution of the name will be found under " Derbyshire " 

The name of Breesb or Breeze was represented in this county in 
the reign of Henry VIII. by a parishioner of Hackford called 
Breze (Bl.). The Norfolk name has probably not a common 
origin with the North Wales name of Breese, which is a con- 
traction like Preece, of Ap Rees The incumbent of Hedenham 

in 1501 bore the name of Bunn; and the rector of Bereford in 

1637 was called Bun (Bl.) The name of Buck is now most 

numerous around Norwich ; but it was represented in the county 
as far back as the 13fch century (H. R.). It also occurs now in 
Suffolk and Notts. 

C. 

Cann was the name of a gentle family of Diss in the ITth 
century (BL). The Cannells may possess an ancestor in Sir 



288 HOMES OF FAMILY NA:\IES. 

John Canel, who was rector of Wramplingham and pafcron of the 

living in the reign of Henry V. (Bl.) There was a family of 

Case in Swaffham 200 years ago, and the name is still in the 
town; the rector of Erpingham in 1628 bore this name. Philip 
Case was mayor of Lynn in 1764; and early last century, Mr. 
Case, attorney, of Mildenhale, Suffolk, held property in Holm-by- 
the-Sea (Bl.). This name occurred in Suffolk in the time of 

Edward I. (H. R.) The Claxtoxs bear the name of a Norfolk 

parish COE is an ancient Norfolk name. There was a Beatrix 

le Coe in the county in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). A family 
of Coe owned property in Ashill and Saham at the beginning of 
the 16th century (Bl.). The name is also now represented in 

Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, and Essex. (See under " Suffolk.") 

Cosset is an old Norwich name. In 1472, Henry Cossey, who 
was afterwards rector of Wilby, was a noted friar of the Dominican 
convent in Norwich ; and there w^ere then others of the name in 
that city. About the same time John Cossey was rector of 

Congham (Bl.) Ceisp is an ancient Norfolk name. In 1388, 

Richard Crispe was patron of the living of Cockthorp, to which he 
presented one of the family ; another Richard Crispe was buried 
in Frenze church in 1517 (Bl.) In 1648, the daughter of the 
"Worshipfull Mr. Nic. Crispe, Marchant Adventurer of London," 
was buried at Norwich (Bl.). Nicholas Crisp, Esq., was one of 
the county commissioners for Cornwall in the time of Cromwell 
(Polwhele's "Cornwall"). See under " Cambridgeshire," where 

the name has been for six centuries The Cubitts of Norwich 

and its neighbourhood bear an ancient name which has been 
represented in that city since the 17th century. At the end of 
the 15th century, Robert Cubit was abbot of Horning; and abont 
the same time the name of Cubet occurred in the adjacent parish 
of Neatishead. In 1405, John Cubet was rector of Thorp-by- 
Norwich ; and the name of Cubit occurs in the list of the ring- 
leaders of the rebellion of the Norfolk " levellers " in 1382. This 
name has long been a familiar clerical name in the county, several 
benefices being held by Cubits in the early part of last century 

(Bl.) In the reign of Elizabeth, Thomas Culley was mayor 

and Joshua Culley was sheriff of the city of Norwich, where the 
name yet remains ; in 1630, James Culley was curate of Surlingham 

(Bl.) The CuRSONS of Dereham bear one of the oldest of 

Norfolk names. The ancient family of this name held large 
estates in the county from the 13th to the 15th century (Bl.). 



NORFOLK. 289 



D— F. 



Dakiel or Danyel was the name of a Norwicli family of 
merchauts in the loth century, members of which filled the office 
of mayor (Bl.). Daniell and Daniels are still J^Torwich names. 

The Dennys have resided in Norfolk and Suffolk for centuries. 

The JN^orfolk Dennys obtained considerable distinction in the 16th 
century. Sir Anthony Denny, a favourite of Henry YIII., and 
one of the characters of the play of Shakespeare which bears that 
name, was son of Edmund Denny, baron of the Exchequer; Sir 
Anthony was not only in possession of much property in the 
county, in Ling and elsewhere, but he had a lease of the demesnes 
of Waltham Abbey, Essex, and Sir Edward Denny of \\''altham 
Abbey was high sheriff of Herts in the last year of Elizabeth's 
reign; the Dennys of Tralee Castle, Ireland, who have been 
established in Ireland since the reign of Elizabeth, are descended 

♦ from Sir Edward Denny, grandson of the above Sir Anrhony 
Denny and uncle of Edward Denny, Earl of Norwich, a title long 

1 since extinct; the Tralee Dennys received a baronetcy in 1782; 

i Sir William Denny was recorder of Norwich in the reign of 

^ Charles I., and in the reign of William III. a gentle family of the 
name lived at Raveningham, Norfolk (Bl. ; Cussans' "Hert- 
fordshire ; " Clutterbuck's " Hertfordshire ; " Morant's " Essex ;" 
Lodge's "Baronetage"). The name is still in Norwich. (See 

under " Suffolk.") The Norfolk Drakes are now well established 

in Attleborough and Norwich. The name was connected with the 
municipality of Norwich as far back as the loth century, and a 
gentle family of Drake lived at Hardley in the time of Elizabeth 
(Bl.). The name now occurs also in Dorset, Devon, and m the 
West Riding. In the 13th century it was established in Lincoln- 
shire, Hunts, and Cambridge.=hire (H. R). ( (See under " Devon- 
shire " and "Dorset" for further particulars.) Duffield is a 

very old clerical name in this county. It was borne by the rectors 
of Blofield and Crimplesham in 1369 and 1397 and by the official 
of the archdeacon of Sudbury in 1455, etc. (BL). At the beginning 
of the 17th century, there was a family of Duffield in Attleborough 
(Bl). The name occurred in Lincolnshire in the 13th century 
(H. R.). There are parishes and townships thus called in Derby- 

;bire and in the East Riding of Yorkshire Durrant has been 

or ages a Norfolk name. In the reign of Henry VI., the Durants 
>r Duraonts held Hall Place Manor in South Lynn, and the name 

U 



290 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

is still in Lynn. A Norwich family of Durrant was buried in St. 
Bennet's church in that city between 1684 and 1706; and there 
were marbles in Scothowe church to another family of Durrant 
bearing dates between 1697 and 1723 (Bl.). This is an ancient 
pre-Domesday name (L.), though according to Ferguson it came 
with the Normans, It was represented by Darant and Duraunt 
in this county, as well as in Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, Bucks, 
Kent, and Oxfordshire, in the time of Edward I. (H. R.). It also 

occurs now in Suffolk, Sussex, Bucks, and Dorset The Dyballs 

were a Norwich family 200 years ago, and the name has evidently 
long been known in that city (Bl.), where it still remains. In 
1611, Margaret Dybald was crushed to death with thirty-two other 
persons in a panic occurring during a display of fireworks at 

Norwich in celebration of the election of a new mayor (Bl.) 

The Norfolk family of Dye may find an explanation of its name in 
the existence during the reign of Charles I. of Mr. D'Eye of Eye 
in Suffolk. The ancient family of D'eye of Scoulton, Norfolk, 
claimed a descent of 300 years. Deye was once a common old 
Norfolk name, bat it is now scarce. We find the name of Dye in 

Bucks in the time of Edward I. (H. R.) The Eglintons of 

Norwich and its vicinity bear the name of the rector of Baldeswell 
in 1644, and of the rector of Sharington in 1758 (Bl.) ; and in the 
same manner the Emerys of the neighbourhood of Dereham have 
a namesake or an ancestor in the vicar of Rushall, Norfolk, in 1581 
(Bl.). Emery is a form of the ancient personal name of Amory. 

The name of Frost has been established in Norfolk ever since 

the 13th century, when the Frosts resided here in numbers. In 
the loth and 16th centuries Frost was a common name amongst the 
Norfolk clerics (BL). The name also occurs now in other parts of 
England, particularly in Derbyshire and Somerset. In the 13th 
century it not only characterised Norfolk but also Cambridgeshire 
and in a less degree Suffolk (H. R.). 

G— H. 

Thomas Gamble was vicar of Wroxham in 1719 ; and John 

Gayford was bailiff of Yarmouth in 1689 (Bl.) Gapp is a name 

that has been represented in Norfolk as far back as the 13th 
century (H. R.). During the 14th and 15th centuries the Gappes 
of Yarmouth frequently filled the offices of bailiff and may«jr 
(Bl.) Gedge has been a Norwich name for centuries ; and at 



NORFOLK. 291 

the present day it still finds its home in this city and its vicinity. 
There was a fuller of this name buried in one of the Norwich 
churches in 1467 ; William Gedge was a philanthropic Norwich 
citizen in 1693 ; and Ambrose Gedge was a common councillor of 
the city in 1742 (Bl.). Three centuries ago there was a family of 

Gedge in Denton (Bl.) The family of GowiXG may possess a 

kinsman in Jeremiah Go wen, the rector of Shimpling in 1642 

(Bl.) Hern or Hernb has long been a Norfolk name. For 

centuries the Hernes or Hirnes were a Norwich family ; one of 
the name was mayor early in the 17th century, and about the same 
time a member of the family was knighted (BL). The name is 
probably a contraction of Herring, an Anglo-Saxon clan-name 
(according to Kemble), which, though found in Norfolk in the 
past, is now mostly confined to Lincolnshire, Hurren is the 
present Suffolk form of the name. It is also probable that the 
Norfolk and Kentish name of Horn or Home has had in some 
cases a similar origin. In Norfolk, Suffolk, Dorset, Durham, etc., 
there are place-names beginning with Herring, and Heme is the 

name of places in Kent, Hants, Hunts, etc The name of Horn 

or HoRNE, at present well represented around Wisbech, is also 
found in Kent. It was also I'cpresented in these two counties 
in the 13th century, as well as in London, Suffolk, Sussex, Ox- 
fordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Northamptonshire, and Wilts 

(H. R). (See under "Hern.") Hubbard is a characteristic 

Norfolk name. The early form of the name in this and the neigh- 
bouring counties, both in Domesday times and in the centuries 
immediately following, was Hubert, occasionally written Huberd 
(H. R.) ; and we find that Robert Hubert or Hoberd was rector 
of Scarning at the close of the 14th century (Bl.) Thence, the 
transition to Hubberd, and on to Hubbard is an easy one. In the 
16th century the living of Witton was in the gift of the family 
of Hubbard or Hubberd (Bl.) ; and two Norfolk gentlemen of the 
name (Hubbard and Hubberd) contributed £25 apiece towards 
the Spanish Armada fund in 1588. The old distinguished Norfolk 
family of Hobart, going back to the time of Henry VIII. , similarly 
derived their name from Hubert or Huberd ; but their name is at 
present but little represented in Norfolk, where Hubbard, as above 
remarked, occurs in numbers The name of Huggins was repre- 
sented in the reign of Elizabeth by Robert Huggins, gent., of East 

Bradenbam (Bl.) Howell is an ancient name in this county. 

By the prefix of Ap it has in Wales given rise to Powell : but 

U 2 



292 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

both Howell and Powell are ancient East Anglian names. William 
Howell held land in Wifton, Norfolk, in the reign of Edward III. ; 
and in the following reign of Richard II. Margarj Howel was 
prioress of Flixton nunnery (Suffolk) (BL). In the time of 
Henry VI. John Howel was vicar of Newton ; and in the reign 
of Henry VII. John Ap Howel was prebend of Norwich (BL), 
After this date the name of Powell, sometimes corrupted to 
Powle, occurs in the county (Bl.) Powel, however, is an ancient 
East Anglian name ; it occurred in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk in 
the 13th century, whilst Howel was a Bedfordshire surname at 
the same time (H. R.). Howell is a parish in the neighbouring 
part of Lincolnshire, and very probably the East Anglian Howells 
in many cases thence derived their name. Nor do I think that 
the East Anglian Powels of the 13th centuiy hailed from Wales, 
though it is singular that John Ap Howel was prebend of Norwich 
in the reign of Henry VII. Powell has only been a Welsh name 
some three centuries. (See " Wales.") 

I— L. 

Ingram was the name of a vicar of Narburgh two centuries 
ago ; and much further back, in 1433, John Ingram was patron of 

the living of Hempstead, where he owned property (Bl.) 

IsABELL, occurring also in the different forms of Isabelles, Isbells, 
etc., was a Norwich name in the 16th century (BL). Isbell is fl 
now found in East Dereham and Attleborough. The name was m 
represented as Isabell and Ysabell in the same county in the 13th 
century, as well as in Kent, Cambridgeshire, and Lincolnshire. 

It is now rare or extinct in its early homes Nicholas Jacob i 

was rector of Burgh in 1419; and William Jacob was a cavalier \ 
of Mendham in 1642 ; the name was also represented in Greeting j 
in Suffolk in 1648 (BL). Sir John Jacob was a Cambridgeshire 
baronet in 1739 (Carter's "Cambridgeshire"). In the reign of 
Edward I, we find this name in Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, and 

Oxfordshire (H. R.) Jolly was the name of a Brisingham 

gentleman in 1580 (B. L.) Land was the name of the rector 

of Honing in 1630 ; and in the forms of Land, Lande, and Landa, 
we find it in Essex and Lincolnshire in the 13th century (H. R.). 
......The Larwoods were Norwich merchants from about 1650 to 

1750; and Abraham Larwood, one of the family, was sheriff of 
the city in 1739 (Bl.) Leeder was the name of the rector of 



NORFOLK. 293 

Hale church in 1566 (Bl.) Lewell, perhaps a contraction of 

Llewellyn, was a name represented in Oxfordshire and Shropshire 

in the 13th century (H. R.) The Lings derived their name 

several centuries ago from the parish of Lyng in this county, one 
of the fii'st of the name having^ been a John de Linsr of Norfolk in 
the I3th century (H. R.). These ancient De Lyngs or De Lings 
were influential people ; one of them was chancellor of the diocese 
in 1349, and another was bailiff of Norwich in 1370. Thomas Lyng 
was rector of Catfield in 1506 ; and in the 16th and 17th centuries 
Lyng and Ling were frequent clerical names in the county. I 
omitted to mention that Jeff, de Ling, who combined the accom- 
plishments of the antiquarian and historian with his duties as a 
friar of the Franciscan convent in Norwich, was born at Lyng, 
and died in 1390 (BL). The name is at present best represented 

in the adjoining county of Suffolk Le Grys or Le Gbice is a 

very old Norfolk name : Sir Robert Le Grys of Langley, equerry 
to Richard I., was the ancestor of the family of Le Grice of 
Brockdish in the 1 6th century : Charles Le Grys was lord of the 
manor of Helmingham last century (BL). 

M— 0. 

Makins was the name of the rector of Clippesby in 1513 (BL) 

Mallett is a slightly altered form of a very ancient name in 

Norfolk, where it has remained ever since the time of William the 
Conqueror, when Roger Mallet or Malet, lord of Eye in Suffolk, 
received an extensive grant of lands. The name of Malet was 
common in the adjoining county of Lincoln as well as in the 

distant county of Somerset in the reign of Edward 1. (H. R.) 

The Manns have found a home in Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridge- 
shire for at least six centuries, Man being the early form of the 
name (H. R.). There was a family of Mann in Norwich at the 
beginning of last century, and the name is still in the city. {See 

under "Warwickshire.") The name of Minns was in the 

county in the 16th century, when a widow bearing the name 

married into the L'Estrange family of Hunstanton (Bl.) The 

Norfolk name of Neave, or Neve, as it is written in a few 
instances, was represented in this county, and also in the adjacent 
counties of Cambridge and Suffolk, by Le Neve during the 

13th century (H. R.). (See under " Kent.") Edmund Nurse 

was a member of the corporation of Thetford in the middle of last 



294 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

century; and Clement Nurse was vicar of Tottington in 1616 
(Bl.). Nurse is still a Tlietford name. Nowers or De Nowers 
was the ancient form of the name, and as such it occurred in the 
loth century in Lincolnshire and Bedfordshire (H. R.). However, 
it is probable, as Lipscomb points out, that the principal early 
home of the name was in Bucks, where the family of De Nowers 
possessed great influence in the 12tU and 13th centuries, being 
now represented in that county by the later names of Nourse and 

Nurse The name of Oldfield is now established in Norfolk 

and Derbyshire, and there are places thus called in Cheshire, 
Herefordshire, and Worcestershire. James Oldfield was rector of 
Stratton, Norfolk, in the reign of James II., and there was a Sir 
John Oldfield of Spalding, Lincolnshire, in the reign of Anne (Bl.) 
{See under " Derbyshire.") 

P— R. 

The name of Powell will be found referred to under Howell. 

There resided at Norwich a distinguished family of Philippo 

two centuries ago, which is still represented in the city. A certain 
Ely Philippo had two sons, Elisha and Onias, of whom Elisha was 

high sheriff of the county in 1675 (Bl.) Six centuries since, 

the Norfolk family of Poll had representatives named Polle in the 

county as well as in Cambridgeshire and Kent (H. R.) Purdy 

is an ancient Norfolk name, which was also represented in Cam- 
briageshire by Purde as far back as the 13th century. In 1610, 
Edmund Purdye owned part of the manor of Stoke; in 1479, 
John Purdy was rector of Catfield ; and in 1471, the widow of 
R<jbert Purdy was buried beside her husband in Aylesham church 
(BL). A family of Purdey, holding property in Rockland St. 
Andrew in the beginning of the 16th century, came from Bury in 
Hertfordshire at the end of the previous century (Bl.). The 
Purdys are still represented in Rockland St. Andrew and Ayle- 
sham Rising was originally the name of Wood Rising, a parish 

near Hingham, where the family of De Rising exercised the rights 
of lordship in the 13th and 14th centuries (Bl.) The same family 
held property in Greatmelton in the 13th century (Bl.) Rising 

is also the name of a parish near Lynn Rivett is a very old 

Norfolk name, belonging to an ancient family that held in the 14th 
century the property known as Rivett's Manor in West Newton. 
In 1570 John Rivet of Brandeston was patron of the Hvings of 



NORFOLK. 295 

Moulton Magna and Wacton and owned property there ; and Sir 
Thomas Rivet, of Norfolk, was a London merchant about the 
same time (Bl.) Thomas Revet was mayor of Lynn in 1649 (Bl.) 

Henry Rix was rector of Depham in 1713 ; Mc. Rix, master 

of St. Giles' Hospital, Norwich, who died in 1675, was preceded 
as steward or keeper of the same hospital by Nic. Rix, evidently 
his father, who died in 1643 ; Rixe was the name of the rector of 
Bodney in 1554 (Bl.). The name is still in Norwich. 

S. 

Scales is an ancient Norfolk name, being common in the 
county as far back as the 13th century, in the form of De Scales 
or Le Scales (H. R.). In fach, from the 13th to the 15th century 
the titled family of De Scales owned great possessions and held 

a high position in the county (Bl.) Savory is now a Norfolk 

name. In the 13th century, Philip Savery lived in Leicestershire, 
and John Savary in Wiltshire (H. R.). A family of Savery held 
property in Rawreth parish, Essex, in the 14th century (Morant's 
" Essex "). Another family of Savery has long been established 
in Devonshire, having settled at Totnes early in the 16tli century ; 
in the 17th and 18th centuries this family resided at Shilston in 
Modbury, and took an active part in the troubled times of the 
Commonwealth and of the Revolution of 1688 ; one of the family 
was high sheriff of Devon in 1619, and another member, Captain 
Thomas Savery, F.R.S., who flourished at the end of the 17th 
century, was the inventor of the first working steam-engine ; the 
Devonshire Saverys are said to have come from Normandy 
(Cotton's " Totnes "). Savary was also the name of a Huguenot 
family established at Greenwich at the end of the 17th century, 
hailing originally from Perigord, in the south of France, and still 

represented by the Tauzia Savarys (Smiles' "Huguenots") 

Sayer is a very ancient name in this county. As Sayer and Sayere 
it occurred in Norfolk, Beds, and Hants in the 13th century 
(H. R.) The Sayers of Pulham, Norfolk, an ancient family, from 
which the Sayers of Eye, Suffolk, are derived, were lords of the 
manor of Pulham in the 17th and ]8th centuries (Bl.). Sayer 
is also an ancient Essex name, {See under " Essex," " Yorkshire, 

N. R.," and " Sussex.") Sewell is a very old Norfolk name, 

going back to the 14th century Sheringham is the name of 

a Norfolk parish The Slippers, of Norwich and its vicinity, 



296 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

bear the name of the old "sword slypers," the designation 
employed in the Acts of James VI. for those whose occupation 
-was to whet swords (L.). Samuel Slipper was rector of Reydon 
and Rising, and chaplain to the Duke of Norfolk, in the reign 

of Charles II. (Bl.) Soame was a familiar name in Lynn during 

the 16lh and 17th centuries; and six mayors of the town bore 
the name between 1514 and 1629. Soame was a distinguished 
Norfolk name in the 17th century, in the early part of which 
Sir Stephen Soame, lord mayor of London, owned Depedale and 
Polsted Hall manor, in Burnham. Two hundred years since, 
Colonel Edmund Soame owned Derham Grange, in West Derham. 
About the same time lived Sir William Soame, of Thirlow Hall, 

Suffolk (Bl.) Spink and Spinks are still Norwich names. 

Thomas Spink or Spynk was a notable Norwich citizen in the 
14th century, and sat as one of its buigesses in Pai-liament. 
Richard Spynk was another Norwich citizen in 1342, Spink 
was the name of the vicars of Attlebridge and Wroxham in 1445 
and 1472 (BL). The name of Spink occurred in Bedfordshire 

and Northamptonshire in the 13th century (H. R.) In the 

chui"ch of St. Peter, Mancroft, Norwich, there was a monument 
to four persons, named Richard Starling, who died between 
1690 and 1729; two of them were carpenters and one an attorney- 
at-law (Bl.). Starling is still a Norwich name. Starlinc, accord- 
ing to Lower, was a pre-Domesday personal name The present 

family of Stimpson may possess an ancestor in John Stimpson, 

who lived at Burston, in Diss, in 1742 (Bl.) Lower, quoting 

Ferguson, states that the name of Sewlf (sea-wolf) occurs in a 
charter of Canute. It is probably the original form of the name 
of Self. {See under " Wiltshire.") 

T— Z. 

Tbietle, Tuurtle, and Thurtell, also found in Suffolk, are 
contractions of Thirkettle or Thurkettle, an ancient Scandinavian 
name, still represented in Norfolk and Suffolk. (See under 

"Suffolk.") The name of Thrower is said to be the masculine 

form of "throwster," a woman who winds or throws silk (L.) 
A person of this name was buried in St. Edmund's church, 
Norwich, in 1681, and the name is still in that city ; the mayor of 
Yarmouth in 1650, and the bailiff of the same town in 1582, were 
thus named (Bl.) ToOLEY-was a familiar name in Norwich in the 



NORFOLK. 297 

16t]i, 17tli, and IStli centuries, and it still occurs there. Richard 
Tooly was sheriff of the city in 1594, John Tooley was mayor in 
1638, and there was a Norwich minister of the name of Tooley in 
1677 ; Bernard Tooley, gent., was buried at St. Michael's church 
in this city in 1706 (Bl.), There were Tooleys in Boston, 
Lincolnshire, in the 17th century; the mayor in 1653 bore this 

name (Thompson's "Boston") Tuck is an ancient I^orfolk 

name, which was represented in this county as well as in Lincoln- 
shire in the 13th century (H. R.) Utting is another ancient 

Norfolk name. A Norwich alderman who bore this name was in 
1643 a prominent member of the cabal which led to the city 
declaring for the Parliament against the King ; however, when 
Mr. Utting filled the office of mayor in 1647 he seems to have 
changed his opinions, since he was imprisoned by his old friends 
the Roundheads ; he was buried in Brandon church in 1658 
(Bl.). The name is still in Norwich. Shottesham church 
contains the mortal remains of John Utting, who died in 
1688, and also of his family; Henry Utting, gent., was buried 
in Belaugh church in 1715 (BL). In the 13th century the 
name of Uttyng occurred in Hunts (H. R.). It is said to 

have been a personal name in early English times Walpole 

is the name of parishes and villages in Norfolk. In the 13th 
century the surname of De Walpol was represented in this 

county, as well as in Suffolk and Cambridgeshire (H. R.) 

Whaeton is also a Suffolk name ; there is a Lincolnshire hamlet 
thus called, and there were several freeholders of the name in 

Notts in 1698 (Harleian MS., 6846) The name of Wisbmax 

was represented by Wisman in Noi-folk in the 13th century 
(H. R.). The Wisemans in the 16th and 17th centuries were 
gentle families, owning considerable property in the county 
(Bl.). (See under "Essex.") 



298 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name indicates that, though char- 
acteristic of the county, the name is more numerous elsewhere. 



General Names (30-40 counties). 



♦Allen 
Brown 
Clarke 



Ciiapman 



rCook 
L Cooke 
*Harri8 




Eobinson 

Smith (Northampton) 


Common Names 

« f Shepherd 
1 Sheppard 


(20- 


-29 coimties). 

♦Webb 





Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Adkins (Banbury) 
r Barratt 
1 Barrett 
♦Berry 


♦Bird ♦Nichols 
^ J Gardener ♦Potter 

L Gardner *Spencer (Northampton) 
Gilbert (Rugby) West 


Ashby (Rugby) 
Bradshaw 
Cowley (Rugby) 
Dickens 


DiSTHiCT Names (4-9 counties). 

♦Gregory (Baubui-y) Stokes 

r Sargeant J Tebbitt (Rugby) 

L Sargent I Tebbutt (Northampton) 

*Savage Weston 


Bonser (Oxmdle) 
♦Brawn 
♦Cockerill 

Druce 
♦Emery 

Fortescue 


CouNTT Names (2-3 counties). 

Hadland ♦Rowiatt 
♦Hawkes Smart 
Lewin Tew 
Lovell Thomason 
Messinger (Towcester) Underwood 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 



299 



Peculiae Names (confined mostly to lliis county). 



Aris 


GofE 


Newitt 


Barford (Towcester) 


G-olby 


Pantlier 


r Bazeley 
L Bazley 


Goode 


Roddis 


Grulliver 


Scriven 


f Bellairs 
L Bellars 


Hales 


Siddons 


Heygate 


Spokes 


Borton 


Holton 


Stops 


Brafield 


Hornsby 


Turnell 


Britten (Northampton) 


Judkins 


Vergette (Deeping) 


Bromwich 


Kingston 


Warwick 


Buswell 


Linnell 


Westley 


Butlin 


Mackaness (North- 


Whitton 


Chew (Oundle) 


ampton) 


Whitney 


Dainty 


Main 


Woolhouse 


Drage (Northampton) 


Mawle 


Wrighton 


Dunkley (Northampton 


Measures 


Wyman 


Gibbard 


Montgomery 


York 









NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NORTHAMPTON- 
SHIRE NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

B. indicates Baker's " Northamptonshire." 

Cy. „ Cypher's " Rothwell " or " RoweU." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britanniea." 

Wh. „ Whalley's " Northamptonshire " of Bridges. 



A— B. 

Aeis is the modern form of an old Northamptonshire name 
which has suffered by the change. In the reign of King John, 
William of Arras, Advocate of Bethune, held the manor of 



300 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Rotherstliorp (WL.). Jolm Arras was incumbent of Whiston in 
1506 (Wh ). Joseph Aris was a gentleman of Aclson or Adstone, 
who owned property in Blakesley about 200 years ago (B. and 
Wh.j. The name is still in the parish. In the 13th century 

De Araz Avas a London name (H. R.) The Ashbts and the 

Barfords derive their names from parishes in the county. The 
former name has its present home on the Warwickshire border in 
the Rugby district ; whilst the Barfords are found in the vicinity 
of Towcester The name of Bazeley or Bazley was well repre- 
sented in the county in the 17th and 18th centuries. In Upton 
church there is a memorial slab to Richard Baslee who died 
in 1729; and at the commencement of last century there was 
a family of Bazlee in Daventry (B.), where the name still 
occurs. Members of the family of Basely of Sywell were buried 

in one of the Northampton churches early last century (Wh.) 

The ancient family of Belers or Bellers held property in Brampton 
and Cranford in the 14th and 15th centuries (Wh.). This family 
came originally from Kirkby Bellers, Leicestershire, and some of 
the members were sheriffs of Derbyshire and Notts, in the time of 
•Edward III. (" Bib. Topog. Brit."). The modern form of the name 
is Bellairs or Bellars The Bortons possess an ancient sur- 
name which in the form of De Borton occurred in Lincolnshire, 

Norfolk, and Dorsetshire during the I3th century (H. R.) 

The name of Bradshaw has been established in Northamptonshire 
since the 15th century (Wh.). The rector of Cosgrave in 1600 
bore the name (B.). Further reference to this name will be 

found under " Derbyshire " and " Lancashire." The Brafields 

are named after a parish in the county. On a tomb in Blisworth 
churchyard occurred the following inscription concerning Mary 
Brafield, who died in childbirth in 1662, leaving a family of six 
children behind her (Wh.) : — 

" Thus I who strove to give my babe a birth, 
Euter agaj ne my mother's womb, the earth." 

Brawn is a name also found in the adjacent counties of Hunts 

and Beds, as well as in Staffordshire ; it has long been known in 
this county. John Brawne and his wife were buried in Towcester 
church in 1740; John Brawne was also the name of an incumbent 

of Brafield in the 15th century (Wh.) Bromwich is the name 

of an old Daventry family. Mrs. Bromwich of that town held the 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 301 

1 g-reafc tithes in the reign of Henry YIII. (Wh.) ; and the town 
clerk of Daventrj at the beginning of last century bore this name 
(B.). The name is still in the town. Probably the family 
origiiially hailed from the parish of Bromwich, in the adjacent 

county of Warwick Buswell is now a Clipston name, and it 

was the name of an old and distinguished Clipston family during 
the 17th and 18th centuries (Wh.). Sir George Buswell of 
Clipston was created a baronet in 1660 (B.). The Buswells of 
Westcot Barton, Oxon, were an iraportant family last century 

(Wing's "Westcot Barton") Bdtlin is a name with a curious 

origin. From the 12th to the 15th century, the powerful 
Northamptonshire family of Boutevilein or Butevilein held the 
lordship of Cotesbrook. One of the earliest mentioned members 
of the family is Sir William Boutevilein, the founder of Pipwell 
Abbey in the reign of Henry II. (Wh.). Butvilleyn and 
Botevileyn were other early forms of the name. After passing 
through the shapes of Butvelin and Butellyn, the name appears 
as Butlin in the 17th century. " Francis ButveKn, alias Butlin," 
of Hollowell, gent., died in 1680 (Wh.) During the 17th and 
18th centuries there "were gentle families of Butlin residing at 
Ravensthorp and Whilton (B.), and the name still occurs in 
Ravensthorp. The name of Butevileyn also occurred in Somerset- 
shire in the reign of Edwai"d I. (H. R.). 

C— F. 

The name of Chew has its present home in the Oundle 
district. The Chews of Dunstable, in the neighbouring county 
of Bedfordshire, were a notable family in the 17th century; some 
of them, who attained high position as London merchants, 
preferred to be buried in the town of their birth. One of the 

family was sheriff of Beds ("Bib. Topog. Brit.") Cockerill is 

a name that probably has its original home in Yorkshire. During 
last century a numerous family of the name resided in Wappen- 

ham, Northamptonshire (B.) Cowley is the name of an ancient 

Northamptonshire family that held Slyford manor in Yelvertoft, 
and other property, during the 15th century (Wh.). The 
incumbent of Holdenby in 1505 bore this name (Wh.). There 
were families of Cowley living in Harpole and Kilsby in the 17th 
and 18th centuries (B.). Thomas Cowley founded a school at 
Donington, Lincolnshire, in 1718 (Allen's "Lincolnshire"). The 



302 HOMES OF FAlVriLT NAMES. 

name has its present home in this county on the Warwickshire 

border in the Rugby district, and still remains in Kilsby 

Dainty is evidently a form of Daintree, which represents the 
popular pronunciation of Daventry, a Northamptonshire town. 
The name was in Harleston at the end of the 17th century 
(B.), and a family of Dainty resided at Orton, near Rowell, 

from the 17th to the present century (Cy.) Druce is a 

corruption of Drueys or Le Drueys, a name occuri'ing in the 
adjacent county of Bucks, as well as in Wilts, in the 13th century 
(H. R.) The DuNKLEYS have their present home in North- 
ampton and its vicinity. A family of the name held property in 
Brington in the 15th century ; and a family of Dunckley resided 

at Dodford last century (B.) Emery was the name of the 

incumbent of Tiffield during the reign of Elizabeth (Wh.) The 

name of Fortescue, which is also found in the adjacent county of 
Hunts, had its origin with the distinguished Devonshire family of 
the name that resided at Winston in that county as far back as 
the reign of John (L.). The Northamptonshire Fortescnes owned 
part of the living of Pateshull in the time of Elizabeth, and last 
century they owned the living of Rothwell (Wh.). 

G— K. 

In the reign of Elizabeth, Christopher Goff was part-owner 
with the Earl of Lincoln of Rodeston rectory (Wh.). There was 

a Roger Goffe in Cambridgeshire in the 13th century (H. R.) 

Henry Goode was rector of Weldon in 1684; William Good 

claimed part of the manor of Kettering in 1652 (Wh.) 

Gulliver was apparently a name of more frequent occurrence in 
the past than it is in the present. In the 13th century it wa.s 
established in the form of Golafr' in the neighbouring counties 
of Oxford, Buckingham, and Cambridge ; as GolafFre and Gulafre 
in Norfolk; and as Gulafr' in Gloucestershire (H. R.). There 
was a knightly family named Golafre in Oxfordshire during the 

1-ith and 15th centuries (Kennett's " Ambrosden," etc.) Hales 

i.s a very ancient name in this county, going back to the 13th 
century (Wh.). Hale is the name of a manor on which the family 

of De Hale resided in the 13th and 14th centuries (Wh.) 

HoLTON was the name of the owner of the manor of Flore in 
the 15th century (B.), and of the incumbent of Potterspury in 
1568 (Wh.). There are parishes of the name in Oxfordshire, 



y 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, 303 

Lincolnshire, etc William Judkins was bailiff of Daventry in 

1778 (B.). A family of Judkin resided at Upper Heyford in the 
17th and 18th centuries, and held land there as far back as the 

reign of James I. (B. and Wh.) Kingston is an ancient and 

often a distinguished name in this county. 



L— P. 

Lewin is a name also found in the adjacent county of Hunts. 
It has been established in Northamptonshire since the reign of 
Edward the Confessor (Wh.). John de Leune was incumbent 
of Brington in the 14th century, and two incumbents of Sibertoft 
and Maidwell in the following century bore the name of Lewin 
(Wh.). In the forms of Lewin, Lewine, and Lewyn it occurred 
in Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, and Lincolnshire in the reign of 

Edward I. (H. R.) The name of Linnell has long been 

established in this county. Nathaniel and Richard Lynnell held 
land in Whilton in the reign of James I. ; and John Lynnell was 

rector of Tiffield in the reign of Edward VI. (B.) Lovell 

is a name scattered about the southern half of England, but 
Northamptonshire seems to have been one of its principal homes. 
The Lord Lo veils of Titchmarsh and Snoscombe were distinguished 
Northamptonshire noblemen from the 13th to the 16th century ; 
there are, however, several branches of the family, which include 
the Lovells of Preston Capes, going back to the 16th century, and 
the Lovells of Harleston, to which branch belonged Sir Salathiel 
Lovell, baron of the Exchequer in the reign of Anne (B.). In the 
form of Lovel this name was frequent in the 13th century in 
Oxfordshire and Wiltshire, and it also occurred then in Kent, 

Essex, Yorkshire, etc. (H. R.) A gentle family of Moxtgomeky 

resided in Daventry last century ; the ancient distinguished family 
of De Montgomery held extensive estates in Ecton between the 

13th and the 16th centuries (B.) The present representatives of 

the name of Mawle are probably connected in their descent with 
Mr. Maule, who had a farm in Ecton in the eai'ly part of last 

century (Wh.) Panther is a form of " pantler," the old title 

of master-baker, in old times a position of importance (L.) 

Ponder, now rare in the county, was a Rowell name during last 
century (Cy.). 



5U4 HOMES OF FA3JILT NAMES. 

R— T. 

RowLETT {see tinder " Leicestershire ") was the name of the 

incumbent of Sudboroagh in 1648 (Wh.) Scriven is an old 

clerical name in the county. Two rectors of Hai'pole bore the 
name in the first half of last century and at the close of the 
previous century (B.), and one of the rectors of Twywell during 
the past century was similarly named (Wh.). There is a memorial 
in Rowell church to Samuel Scriven, gent., who died ia 1713 at the 

at^e of 23 (Cy.) Smart is an ancient name in this part of 

England. It was well i-epresented in Oxfordshire in the 13th 
century (H. R.). and was a common name in Leicestershire in the 
17th and 18th centuries. The Smarts of Ashby de la Zouche, 
Leicestershire, are descended from Ithiel Smart, vicar of that 
place in the reign of Charles 11., whose father resided at Preston 
in Northamptonshire (Xichols' " Leicestershire "). The name was 
represented in Great Claybrook, Leicestershire, 200 years ago, 
and there were Smarts of Hancote in the same county daring the 
i-^iona of Charles I., and Smarts of Thurleston, also in that county, 
in the past century (ibid.). Smarte was the name of a rector of 
TVardon in Northamptonshire in tae loth century (B.). There 

are also representatives of the name in Wiltshire Edmund 

Spokes was incumbent of Brackley in 154^3 (Wh.) Stokes is an 

ancient name in this county. An old family of position bore the 
name as far back as the 13th centary, when there was a Peter de 
Stokes of Dallington. Thomas Stokes, " armiger," and some, if 
not all, of the members of his family, which included four sons 
and twelve daughters, were buried in the church of Ashby Ledgers 
during the 15th century. Adrian Stokes by right of his wife 
owned, the living of Tiffield in 1575 (B.). The name is also estab- 
lished in Leicestershire, Notts, Shixtpshire, Staffordshire, and 
Worcestershire, and there are also a few of the name in Essex, but 
it is for the most part now confined to the midlands. In the 13th 
century it occurred in the form of De Stokes in Oxfordshire, 

Bucks, Hunts. Suffolk, Yorkshire, and Lincolnshire (H. R.) 

Tebbitt or Tebbttt is a name also found in the surrounding 
counties. In Northamptonshire the name is best represented on 
the Warwickshire border in the vicinity of Rugby and in the 
Northampton district. Samuel Tebbutt left in 1730 an annual 

bequest of nix Bibles for the poor children of Rowell (Cy.) 

Tew is a name that has probably been confounded with Chew, ako 



NORTHAilPTONSHIRE. 305 

a Northamptonsliire name. George Tew was rector of Lodington 
200 years ago, and Jolin Tewe was the inctanbent of Collingtre 

in the reign of Henry VI. (Wh.) Tecssell is the name 

of a distinguished Northamptonshire family of the 14th and 
15th centuries, now rarely represented in the county, that bailed 
originally from Billesley, Warwickshire, in the 12th century 
(Wh.). 

U— Z. 

Northamptonshire is at present the principal home of the 
Underwoods. Mr. Underwood of Higham, attorney, owned a 
manor in Irtlingborongh last century. Richard Underwoode was 
the incumbent of Barton Segrave in the reign of Heniy VI. f Wh ). 
The name also occurs in the neig'hbourino' counties of Beds and 
Bucks. In the 13th century Underwod or Under wode was a 
common name, being mostly found in Oxfordshire, Hunts, Cam- 
bridgeshire, Essex, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, etc. (H. R.). There is 

a Derbyshire township thus called Vekgette, a name that now 

has its home on the Lincolnshire border in the Deeping district, 
was a well-known name in the city of Lincoln in the 16th, 17th, 
and 18th centuries, during which period members of the family 
held at different times the offices of sheriff and mayor of the city 

(Stark's " Lincoln ") Francis Westley lived at Edgcote early 

last century (B.). Roger Westelye was incumbent of Etton in 
1559 (Wh.). There are parishes of the name in Cambridgeshire, 
Suffolk, and other counties Whitney is the name of a Here- 
fordshire parish John Whitton held land in Famingho in the 

reign of Elizabeth (Wh.). There are parishes of the name in 

Lincolnshire, Suffolk, etc Woolhouse was the name of an 

ancient family of gentry of Bolsover, Derbyshire, during the 15th, 
16th, and 17th centuries (Glover's "Derbyshire") The North- 
amptonshire Wymans are probably connected in their descent with 
the Wyments, a Daventry gentle family in the 17th and 18th 
centuries. Thomas Wyment was bailiff of Daventry in 1700 (B.). 
Wimund was an Anglo-Saxon personal name (L.). Wymond and 
Wymund occurred as surnames in Oxfordshire, Bucks, Gloucester- 
shire, and Norfolk during the 13th century (H. R._) 



306 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name indicates that, though the 
name is well established in this county, it is more numerous 
elsewhere in England. 

S. after a name implies that it is found over a large part of Scotland, but 

more particularly in the southern half. 
S. F. implies that it occurs south of the Forth and the Clyde. 
C. S. „ ,, in central Scotland. 

B. „ ,, in the Scottish border counties, 

G. S. „ „ generally throughout Scotland. 

N. S. „ „ in northern Scotland. 

The places in brackets after the names are their homes in Northumberland, 

except in one or two cases where the home lies between two counties. 





Genebal Names (30-40 counties). 


Brown, S. 


*Martin, S. F. (Lang- *Snuth, S. F. 


* Green 


ley-Mills) *Taylor, S. 


Hall, S. 


*Eobinson *Wilson, S. F. 


Johnson 






Common Names (20-29 counties). 


r Foster J Eeed Thompson, S. 

I Forster (Allendale) L*Eeid, S. (Thomson is the Scottish 


*Lee 


*Eichard8on, B. form) 


*Parker 


*Watson, S. 




*Young, S. 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Atkinson 
Bell, S. F., B. 
Dixon 
(Dickson in Scotland, 

C. S., S. F.) 
*Dunn, S. F. 
/ Elliot, B. 
I Elliott 



*Gibson, S. F. 
f Gray, S. F. 
I Grey 
*Harri8on 

Lamb 
♦Marshall, S. F., C. S. 
♦Nicholson, B 



Oliver, B. 
♦Pearson 

Scott, S. F., B. 
♦Stephenson 
♦Stevenson^ S. F. 
♦Walton 
♦Wilkinson 



I 



XORTHUMBERLAND. 



307 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



Anderson, G-. S. 


Dodds, S. F. 


Short 


" (Newcastle) 


*Emnierson 


Storey 


Appleby 


English 


rSwan, S. F. 
1 Swann 


Armstrong, B. (Halt- 


*Graham, S. F., C. S. 


whistle) 


*Hunter, G. S. 


Teasdale 


Arthur, S. F. 


*Hutchinson (Hutchi- 


Thornton 


Carr 


son in Scotland, S.) 


Todd, S. F. 


Charlton 


*Little, B. 


r Tweddell 


Coulson 


Nixon 


< Tweddle 


Coxon 


Pickering 


I Tweedle 


J Davidson, S. 
L Davison 


Robson, B. 


r Wardell 
I Wardle 


*Rutter 


Dickinson 


*Sanderson (Berwick- 


*Whitfield 


Dodd 


on-Tweed) 




CorNTT Names (2-3 counties). 


Angus, S. 


*Jobson 


/Rea 
\ Reay 


J Batey 
iBaty 


J Laurie, S. F. 
I. Lowry 


/ Riddell 
'l Riddle 


*Birkett 


Laws 


Black, Q. S. 


r LiddeU 
i Liddle 


Ridley (Carlisle) 


Blair, S. F. 


Robertson, G. S. 


Blenkinsop 


*Lowes 


RoweU 


Bum 


*Mather, B. 


Rutherford, B. 


Crawford, S. F. 


Maughan 


Snaith (Otterburn) 


Douglas, B. 


Milburn 


Stobbs 


Dryden 


*Moffatt, B. 


J Stotherd 
LStothert (Stoddart in 


*Errington 


Murray, S. 


Fenwick 


Nichol, S. 


Scotland, S. F.) 


*Fergu8on, G. S. 


Ord 


r Tait, B. 
t Tate 


Hedley (Otterburn) 


r Patterson, S. 
L Pattison 


Henderson (Allen- 


Turnbull, B. 


dale), S. 


Pigg 


Urwin (form of the 


Heslop (Hyslop in 


Potts 


Scottish Irvine) 


Dumfriesshire) 


Purvis, B. 


WaUace, S. F., C. S. 


*Hetherington 


Eand 


Waugh, B. 


Pectjliae Names 


(confined mostly in England to this county) . 


Alder 


Arkle (Morpeth) 


Bewick 


Allan, S. F. 


Aynsley (Ainslie in 


Bolam 


Arinett 


Scotland, S. F.) 





X 2 



308 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



/ Borthwick, B. 
I Bothwick 

B re wis 

Brodie, S. F. 

Bushby (Haltwbistle) 

Cairns, S. F. 

Carmichael, S. 

Cockbiirn 

Common 
r Cowan, S. F. 
< Cowen 
L Cowing 

Craig, S. F. 

DancI 

Dinning 

Embleton 

Fairbairn, B. 

Gallon 

Gilhespy (Newcastle) 
(Grillespie in South 
Scotland) 



Glendinning, B. 
Harle 
Herdman 
Hindmarsh 
Hogg, B. 
J Howey 
1 Howie, S. F. 
Jobling 

Laidler (Laidlaw on 
Scottish border, 
especially in Kox- 
burghsliire) 
Lumsden, N. S. 
f Middlemas 
l Middlemiss 

Moi-rison, G". S. 
r Nevin 
L Nevins 
Ormston 
Phdlipson (Allendale) 



Pringle, S. F. 

Benton 

Eenwick 

Koddam 

Shanks, S. F. 

Shield 

Stewart, G. S. 
f Stobart 
"l Stobert 

Straughan (Alnwick) 
(Stracban in Nortli 
Scotland) 
fTelfer, B. (Falstone) 
1 Telford 

Usher 
J Wanlace 
I Wanless 
rWeddell 
L Weddle 

Younger 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC NORTHUMBEELAND 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Avfhorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

B. indicates Brand's " Newcastle." 

C. „ Charlton's " North Tynedale and its Four Surnames." 

D. „ Denham's "Slogans of the North of England." 
H. „ Hodgson's " Northumberland." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

E. „ Eaine's " North Durham." 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 309 

Border Surnames. — Many of tlie Nortlmmberland family 
names are intimately connected with the history of the Border ; 
and for this reason a brief reference to some of the border-clans 

may" be here appropriate Until the reign of James I., when 

the two kingdoms were united and the border feuds ceased for 
ever, the English and Scottish Borderers were hereditary foes, 
each clan often matching itself with a particular opponent ; thns 
the Fenwicks or Fenwykes of Northumberland were constantly at 
war with the Elliotts on the other side of the Border, whilst the 
Robsons of North Tyne in Northumberland were the old foes of 
the Armstrongs of Liddisdale in Roxburghshire. The Robsons, 
the Charltons, the Dodds, and the Milburns, were in the 16th 
century the four principal graynes or clans that ruled in North 
Tyne. Amongst the other Northumbrian clans were the Bewicks 
of Bewick, the Tindales, the Spearmans, the Bowmans, the Blen- 
kinsops of Blenkinsop, the Traewickes or Trewickes, and several 
others. On the Cumberland side of the Border flourished the 
Elwoods and the Musgraves, whilst the Hetheringtons were the 
Warders of the western marches. Across the Border there wei'e 
also the Grahams of Netherby, the Rutherfords of Rutherford, 
the Turnbulls, the Croziers of Liddisdale, and many others. 
Most of the clans had their slogan or gathering-cry. That of the 
Fenwicks — " A Fenwyke ! a Fenwj-ke ! a Fenwyke ! " — was never 
heard in vain. Each clan, in truth, boasted of its readiness for 
the fray, and on either side of the Border the same signal of 
alarm, a wisp of burning straw raised aloft on the point of a 
spear, spread far and wide its intelligence of an advance of the 
Borderers. No other signal could so effectually arouse the 
population of the Border : to quote the lines of Scott : — 

" Ye need not go to Liddisdale, 

For when they see the blazing bale, 
Elliots and Armstrongs never fail." 

Lay of the Last Minstrel. 

During the reign of Henry VIII., as we learn from Dr. 
Charlton's interesting paper on North Tynedale, there was almost 
constant war upon the Borders, even when the monarchs of 
England and Scotland were seemingly at peace with one another. 
It was a war of reprisals, and was conducted in the most merci- 
less fashion. In 1523, at the suggestion of the English King, a 



310 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

tremendous raid was made into Scotland from all parts of the 
marches. The Earl of Northumberland, writing to the King 
at that time, promises " to lett slippe secretlie them of Tindaill 
and Riddisdaill for th' annoyance of Scotland. — God sende them 
all good spede ! " However, they soon found that they had set 
loose forces which they could not restrain, and during the reign 
of Elizabeth the men of Tynedale, Redesdale, and Liddisdale, 
made the Border a constant scene of rapine and confusion. We 
cannot wonder, therefore, that the Borderers were regarded as a 
lawless race prone to robbery and sacrilege and reverencing neither 
church nor king; yet it is somewhat remarkable that amongst 
men so akin in their race-history, in their dialect, and in their 
manners, there should be such bitter feuds. What we might 
reasonably have expected in the Welsh Marches seems a little 
inexplicable on the Scottish Border, since true Scotland termi- 
nated at the Forth and the Clyde, whilst southern Scotland (as 
we now know it) and northern England constituted for ages the 
two kingdoms of Northumbria and Cumbria or rather of Strath- 
clyde. Even after the 12th century, when the political boundary 
received the limits which it has since in the main retained, southern 
Scotland in great part preserved its English character in its laws, 
language, and manners. 

This subject, however, will be found further examined in the 
remarks on Scottish names forming the Appendix to this work. 
Here, however, I may briefly point out that it would seem that 
tlie old border warfare arose rather from political than from racial 
antij^athies ; and that it was too often fostered by the intrigues of 
monarchs and the jealousies of the great northern chieftains. 
Yet it cannot be doubted that circumstances greatly favoured the 
independent spirit of the Borderers. Removed far from any 
centre of government and but little affected by the civilisation of 
large towns, living in a middle region often the scene of warfare 
between two kindred nations, they may well have doubted as to 
the side on which their allegiance lay. Their surroundings, also, 
their bleak moorlands, their wild uncultivated dales, their broad 
and often fenceless pasture lands, their glens, their burns, their 
heather-covered fells, preserved an independence of character in 
a people but little given to regular agricultural pursuits. In their 
traditions and in their minstrelsies they were scarcely likely to 
forget the deeds of their fathers; deeds often associated with 
particular localities, so that even now in these regions, which have 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 311 

not altered much in their appearance in the lapse of centuries, 
many a glen still preserves a legend, and almost every burn yet 
babbles forth, to a Borderer's ear, its startling story. 



" GATHERmG ODE OF THE FEXWICK." 

By William Richardson (1816), Published in Denham's 
" Slogans of the North." 

Pipe of Nortliumbria, sound ! 

War pipe of Alnwieke ! 
Wake the wild hills around. 

Summon the Fenwicke : 
Percy at Panim* war; 

Fenwicke stands foremost ; 
Scots in array from far, 

Swell wide their war host. 

See, fierce from the border, 

Wolf-hke he rushes ; 
Drives southward the Warder. 

Gore-stream forth gushes : 
Come Spearman, come Bowman, 

Come bold- hearted Truewicke ; 
Repel the proud foe-man ; 

Join lion-like Bewicke.f 

From Fenwicke and Denwicke, 

Harlow and Hallington : X 
Sound bugle at Alnwieke, 

Bag-pipe at Wallington : 
On Elf hills th' alarm Wisp § 

Smoulders in pale ray ; 
Maids, babes that can scarce lisp, 

Point trembling the bale-way. 



* Referring to the Crusades. 

t The Spearmans, the Bowmans, the Truewickes or Trewickes, and the 
Bewickes were clans adherent to the interests of the Percys, and they are all, or 
were recently, still represented. 

t Four hamlets in Northumberland. 

§ A wisp of burning straw on the point of a spear. 



313 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Leave the plough, leave the mow, 

Leave loom and smithie ; 
Come with your trusty yew, 

Strong arm and pithy 
Leave the herd on the hill, 

Lowing and flying ; 
Leave the vill, cot, and mill, 

The dead and the dying. 

Come clad in your steel jack, 

Your war gear in order, 
And down hew or drive back 

The Scot o'er the border ; 
And yield you to no man. 

Stand firm in the van-guard, 
Brave death in each foe-man, 

Or die on the green-sward. 



A— D. 

Ai.DER was the name of proprietors in Prendwick, Ailnham, 
and South Weetslade in 1663 ; early last century, George Alder, 

Esq., resided at Prendwick (H.) Arkle is a very ancient name 

in Northumberland. Arkil was the name of a great Noi'thum- 
bvian baron in the 11th century (L.). Robert Ai'kle was a 
proprietor in Earsdon in the reign of Charles II, (H.). The name 
is now established in Morpeth and its neighbourhood. There are 

hamlets thus called in the North Riding The Armstrongs, a 

well-known border clan, had two homes, one on each side of the 
border, namely, at Eskdale, in Cumberland, and at Liddisdale, in 
Roxburghshire (L.). Their great home in the north of England 
is in the Haltwhistle district, in Northumberland, but they are 
also well represented in Cumberland, and occur in fair numbers in 
the county of Durham. Newcastle has known the name for some 
300 years (B.). The name is established still in the Scottish 
border counties, especially in Dumfriesshire. The small colony 
of Armstrongs in the south of England, especially in Kent, may 

require a different origin Bellikgham was the name of a 

powerful North Tyne family that took its name from the place 
thus called in that district; the name is now rare or extinct (C). 

The Bewicks, an old border clan, flourished for ages at Old 

and New Bewick, in North Northumberland (L.). The name is 
still in those districts. Robert Bewick, who died in 1641, was a 



NORTHUMBEKLAND. 313 

Tnerchant- adventurer of Newcastle, and was twice major of the 
town (B.) The Blairs, of Northumberland, are probably- 
derived from the Blairs of Ayrshire, who are of great antiquity 
(L.) ; and in a similar manner the Atnsleys probably bail from 

the south of Scotland The Blenkixsops, of Blenkinsop Castle, 

Blenkinsop, Northumberland, were an ancient family, celebrated 
for their border feuds (L.). In the 16th century there were two 
principal branches, the senior branch being seated at Blenkinsop 
and the junior branch at Bellister (H.). The name is now rather 

more numerous in the adjacent county of Durham Bowman was 

the name of a border clan of Northumberland (C.) now scantily 

represented in the county Bolam is a township in South 

Northumberland. The De Bolams, an influential family of the 

13th century, were lords of the manor of Bolam (H.) The 

BoRTHWiCKS, an ancient Scottish family, took their name either 
from a district in Selkirkshire or a parish in Edinburghshire (L.). 

They held high office in ScotJand a century ago Beodie is an 

ancient Scottish name that has its principal home at Nairn (L.) 

Carmichael is the name of a very ancient Lanarkshire family, 

and of a parish in that county Craig is a common Scottish 

surname found mostly south of the Forth and the Clyde 

CocKBURN is a local name in Berwickshire The Cowans, 

CowENS, or CowiNGS of Northumberland, are represented by the 
Cowans in the south of Scotland, particularly in Dumfries- 
shire Crawford is an old Scottish surname now common in 

the south-west quarter of Scotland The Charlions belong to 

an ancient North Tynedale clan that has been seated at Hesleyside 
and Charlton ever since the 13th and 14th centuries (C. and 

L.) The Croziers, now rarely represented, belonged to an 

old border clan seated at Liddisdale, Roxburghshire, in the 16th 

century (D.) Dinncng and Dining were the names of proprietors 

in Corbridge, Newbiggin, and in other places in the county during 

the reign of Charles II. (H.) Dodd was the name of an ancient 

clan of North Tyne (C), still represented in the district 

Douglas was the name of one of the oldest and most powerful of 
the Scottish noble families. The principal home of the name is 
now in the Scottish border counties. 

E— J. 

The Elliots or Elliotts of the north of England and the 
Scottish border counties belong to an old Scottish border clan, 



314 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and in fact the name still has its principal home in the Hawick 
district of Roxburghshire Embledon is the name of a North- 
umberland township. An ancient family bore this name (H.) 

Errington was the name of a very old Northumberland family 
that took its name from the hamlet of Errington, the home of 
the family as far back as the 13th century (H.). (See under 

"Durham.") The Fairbairns are also established in the 

Scottish border counties The Fenwicks or Fenwtkes, an old 

border clan, took their name from their ancient fastness near 
Stamfordham, in Northumberland. This powerful clan was the 
constant ally of the Percies (D. and L.). For four centuries 
the Fenwicks were frequently represented amongst the high 

sheriffs of Northumberland The Fetherstonhaughs of Fether- 

stonhaagh Castle, an ancient family dating back to the 13th 
century, and now scantily represented in the county, held the 
manor of Fetherstonhaugh for twelve successive generations, when 

their name and interest in it disappeared (H.) Gallon is an 

old name in this county. The family of Galon or Galoun held 
much property in Trewhitt and Pespole in the 14th, 15th, and 
16th centuries ; Hugo Galon resided at Trewhitt or Tirwhite 
Castle in the reign of Henry VI. ; and a hundred years before, in 
the reign of Edward III., we hear of a Hugo Gallon of Pespole ; 
Giles Gallon, Esq., lived at Trewhitt in the reign of Elizabeth 

(H.) GiLHESPT, the Northumberland form of the Scottish 

Gillespie which has its home south of the Forth of the Clyde, is 

a name now found in the Newcastle district The Glendinnings, 

who have their home in the Scottish border counties, derive their 

name from an ancient estate in Dumfriesshire The Greys of 

Northumberland mostly belong to two ancient stocks, the distin- 
guished family of Grey of Heaton and Chillingham, and the Greys 
of Kyloe, both dating back to the 13th century and connected 

with each other (R.) Harle of Kirkharle was the name of an 

ancient and influential family (H.). In the 13th and 14th centuries 
the family of De Herle, as the name was then written, owned much 
jjroperty in the county ; Thomas Harle was a proprietor in East 
Matfen in the reign of Charles II. (H.). Kirkharle is a parish in 
Northumberland, and Harle is the name of two townships in the 

county Hedley is a township in Northumberland Heslop 

was the name of several proprietors in the Hexham division in the 
17th century (H) ; the name is still numerous in the Hexham 
district. Hyslop is the form of the name in Dumfriesshire 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 315 

HiNDMARSH is an ancient name in this county. There was a 
Walter Hindmers of Mitford in the 13th century ; Hindmers was 
the name in the 17th century of proprietors in Little Benton, 
Wallsend, and Burradon; John Hindmarsh was a N'ewcastle 
gentleman two hundred years since ; Edward Hindmarsh held 
a farm at Nafferton, on the Derwentwater estate, in 1723; 
Joshua Hindmarsh, constable of Comb Hill, obtained notoriety in 
opposing the militia laws in the riotous year of 1761 ; the name 
was in Elsden last century (H.) HoGG was the name of pro- 
prietors in Greenhead and Acomb in the reign of Charles II. 
(H.). In the 13th century the names of Hog and Le Hog 
occurred in Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, and Oxfordshire (H. R.). 
The Northumberland Hoggs, however, are evidently connected in 
their origin with the Hoggs of the Scottish border counties. 
Hocg, according to Ferguson, is an Anglo-Saxon man's name, 
and from it have been derived the two kindred names of Hogg 

and Hodge In the reign of Charles II., Andrew Jobling or 

JoPLiNG held property in Shotley and Newlands (H.). 

K— P. 

Laidler is the ITorthumberland form of Laidlaw, a common 
surname in the Scottish border counties, especially in the Hawick 
district of Roxburghshire. Laidlaw is a place-name in Selkirk- 
shire LiDDELL is a well-known Northumbrian name. For the 

last two centuries the Liddells have frequently filled the ofiices of 

high sheriff of the county and of mayor of Newcastle (B.) 

LuMSDEN was the name of an ancient Berwickshire family that 
took its name from an old manor in Coldingham parish, where they 
lived until the 14th century, when they removed to Blanerne in the 

same county (L.) Milburn was the name of an ancient family 

^hat took its name from a township in the county and give rise to 
the clan of the Milburns, one of the four principal clans that ruled 
in North Tynedale in the 16th century (C). Milburn is still a 

North Tynedale name Mitford was the name of an old 

Northumbrian family that took its name from a place in the 

county. The Mitfords are now scantily represented The Ords 

have been connected with Northumberland for ages. The Ordes 
of Orde were lords of the township of Orde as far back as the 
12th century; from this main stock there branched off the Ords 
of Newbiggin in the 15th century, the Ords of Longridge in the 



316 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

IGth century, the Ords of Grindon in the 17th century, and the 
Ords of Holy Island in the 17th and ISth centuries (R.)- The 

Ords of Grindon are still represented in that locality Ormston 

or Ormiston is the name of a parish in Haddingtonshire, and of a 

seat in Roxburghshire Richard Pigg was proprietor in Haydon 

Bridge in 1663 (H.), where the name still remains Potts was 

the name of an old Northumbrian clan (L.) The Peingles 

have their principal home in the south of Scotland. 

R— S. 

The Rands possess the name of a Lincolnshire parish Reay 

and Rea are the Northumberland forms of a name confined mostly 
to the north of England and the Scottish borders. Wray is its 
form in York and its vicinity. In Cumberland we find Reay and 
Ray ; in the Scottish border counties Rae is the characteristic 
form ; and in the distant county of Worcester there are a few of 
the name of Rea. The Reays or Rays, who have held the Gill 
estates in the parish of Bromfield, Cumberland, from the 13th to 
the present century, are believed by Lower to be the ancient stock 

of all the English Rays, Wrays, and Wreys The Rentons 

possess the name of a town in Dumbartonshire and of seats in 

Berwickshire and Haddingtonshire The Renwicks are named 

after a parish in Cumberland The Riddells or Riddles have 

long been established in Northumberland. Daring the 16th and 
17th centuries several of the mayors and sheriffs of Newcastle bore 
the name of Riddell (B.). The Riddells of Tillmouth were an 
important family in the 13th and 14th centuries. An ancient 
family of Riddell once lived at the seat of that name in Roxburgh- 
shire (L.). Riddells-Quarter is a township in Northumberland. 
The Cornish name of Riddle has evidently had an independent 

origin Ridley is an ancient and an eminent Northumbrian 

name. The line of baronets thus called belong to a Northumber- 
land family that c?n trace its pedigree four centuries back. The 
name is of frequent occurrence in the lists of the parliamentary 
representatives and mayors of Newcastle (B.). Ridley is a 

township in South Tyne The Robertsons of Northumberland 

are probably derived from the Robertsons of Scotland who 

are especially numerous in the Scottish border counties 

Northumberland is the great home of the Robsons, particularly 
the district of North Tyne, where they have been established since 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 317 

the 12th or 13th century (C). They formed one of the four 
]irincipal clans of North Tyne in the 16th century, and were the 
hereditary foes of the Armstrongs of Liddesdale on the Scottish 
side of the border (C). Though scattered over N^orthumberland, 
the Robsons are still numerous in North Tyne ; and in the parish 
of Fal stone, where as " lairds " they have held property for some 
4«00 years, they are yet well represented. The name has obtained 
but little hold across the border, but it has extended southward 
in force into the county of Durham ; it reaches Yorkshire in 

diminished numbers, and dies out in Lincolnshire Roddam is a 

Northumberland township which gave its name to an ancient 
landed family in the county. Two mayors of Newcastle bore this 
name at the close of the 17th century (B.), and the name is still in 

that town Rutheeford is the name of an ancient border clan 

seated for many centuries at Rutherford in Roxburghshire (L.). 
The Rutherfords are still well represented in the Scottish border- 
counties The name of Shanks has also a home across the 

border in Lanarkshire A family of Sheild or Sheale held land 

in the Hexham division in 1663 (H.). The present Shields are 

still to be found in Hexham Spearman is the name of an old 

border clan (D.) now scantily represented in the county The 

SwiNBURNES for centuries possessed lands at Chollerton (C). (See 
under " Cumberland.") 

T— Z. 

Thornton is the name of a Northumberland parish. A 
merchant- prince of Newcastle in the reign of Henry V. bore this 

name The Tindales or Tyndales were a great border family, 

dating back to the reign of Henry II., their early ancestors being 

barons of Tynedale, a district in Noi'thumberland (L.) The 

Truewickes or Trewickes were an old border clan (D.) now 

scantily represented in the county Numerous as the Turnbulls 

are still in Northumberland, they are yet better represented across 
the border in Roxburghshire, especially in the Hawick district ; 
and the name is also well established in the county of Durham. 
Turnbull was the name of a champion of great stature, who was 
killed at the battle of Halidou, where he fought under David Bruce 

(L.) TwEDDELL, TwEDDLE, and TwEEDLE are corruptions of 

Tweed-dale, of which Weddell and Weddle, also Northumbrian 
names, are fui-ther contractions. In Cumberland we find T weddle 



318 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. / 

and Tweedle ; in Durham, Tweddell ; in Yorkshire, Tweddle and 
Twidale; and in Lincolnshire and ISTotts, Twidale. {See under 

"Durham.") Samuel Weddell held property in Swinhoe in 

the reign of Charles II., and John Weddle resided at Morpeth in 

the reign of Henry VIII. (H.) Wanlace and Wanless are 

names peculiar to Northumberland. There was a John Wanles of 
the Bvrkheds in 1523 ; Thomas Wanless was a tanner of Morpeth 
in 1578 ; and a family of Wanlesse had property in Birkenside 
and Makedon in 1663 (H.). These names are still established in 

Morpeth Ussheb or Uscher was the name of a family owning 

property in Morpeth parish in the 14th and 15th centuries (H.). 

Wallace is a name common in the south of Scotland The 

Waughs, who are now established in England in the counties of 
Northumberland and Durham, probably hail originally from the 
Waughs of the Scottish border counties, where the name still has 
its home, especially in Roxburghshire and Dumfriesshire. The 
Waughs of Heip, in Roxburghshire, held those lands from the 
13th to the 17th century (L.). 



NOTTINGHAMSHHIE. 



8iy 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, thouofli characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



G-ENEEAL Names (30-40 counties). 



♦Brown 


♦Johnson 


/Clark 
'L Clarke 


Smith 


Taylor 


♦HaU (Nottingham) 


♦Turner 



Wilson 
♦Wright 





Common Names (20-29 counties). 


♦Bailey ♦Hunt (Newark) 
♦Bennett (Newark) ♦Jackson 


Walker 
♦Ward 


♦Cooper 
Foster 


Lee (Newark) 
♦Richardson 


♦Watson 
♦Wood 




Regional Names (10-19 counties). 


Burton 
♦Chambers 

♦Curtis 


♦Hardy 

♦Harvey 

♦Holmes 


♦Shaw (Nottingham) 

Shelton (Nottingham) 
♦Spencer 


Fisher 
♦Fletcher 


♦Howard 
♦Marshall 


# fWild 1 
1 Wilde J (Nottingham) 


♦Fox (Retford) 
♦Gibson 


♦Rose 
♦Sharp 


♦Wilkinson 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



Attenborough 

Baines 
♦Barlow 
♦Bradley 

Briggs (Newark) 
♦Burrows 
♦Gill 



♦Greaves 
♦Houghton 

Kirk 
J Kitchen 
I Kitchiug 

Machin (Nottingham) 

Meakin 



♦Marriott 
♦Naylor 

♦Stokes (Nottingham) 
♦Tomlinson 
# f 'Welsh 
IWesh 
♦WooUev 



320 



HOMES OF FAJMILY NAMES. 



CoTTXTY Names (2-3 counties). 



Adlington 


Cocking 


r Allcock 
\ Alcock 


*Cottam 


Cullen 


Baguley (Nottingliam) 


Godber 


Bartle 


Godson 


*Bellamy 


Goodacre 


Bingham 


Greenfield 


Brett 


Hallam 


Caudwell 


Hatfield 


Chappell 


^ f Helmsley 
1 Hemsley 


*Cheetham 


Clay 


Hickling 



JHind 
I Hinde 

*Hopkinson 

Kirkland 

Maltby 

Parr 
*Pinder (Newark) 

Plowriglit (Notting- 
ham) 

Wagstaff 
* Weather all 



Pectjliae Names (confined mostly to tliis county). 



Annable 

BarrowcliflF 

Bartram 

Beardall (Nottingham) 

Beecroft( Nottingham) 

Billjard 

Binge 

Bingley (Ketford) 

Blatherwick 

Broadberry 

Buttery 

Byron 

Carver 

Challaud 

Cheshii'e 

Cliettle 

CoUingham 

Corringham 

Cumberland 

Darwin 

Der ry 

Doncaster (Newark) 

Duckmanton 

Eddison 

Esam (Newark) 



Farnsworth 

Fenton 
r Footitt 
I Footit 

G-agg 

Gelsthorpe 

Gunn 

Hard staff 

Harpham 

Hempsall (Newark) 

Herrick 

Herrod (Newark) 

Hickton (Mansfield) 

Holbrook 
J Howett 
1 Howitt 

Hurt 

Huskinson 

Keyworth 

{Leavers 
Leivers 
Lindley 
Merrills 

Millington (Notting- 
ham) 



Norwood 

Ogle 
r Oliphant 
\ Olivant 
r Paling 
L Payling 

Paulson 

Peatfield 

PeU 

Pickin 

Plumtree(NottiDgham) 

Quibell 

Kadley 

Eedgate 

Roadley 

Selby 

Staples (Nottingham) 

Stendall 

Straw 

Stubbins 

Templeman 

Truswell 

Weightman 
r Wombwell 
1 Woombill 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 321 

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 

NAMES. 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

D. indicates Deering's " History of Nottingham." 

Harl. „ Harleian MS. 6846 (Brit. Mus.). 

S. „ Shilton's " Newark." 

Th. „ Thoroton's " History of Nottinghamshire." 

H. R. „ Hundred RoUs. 

Lower's " Patronymica Britannica " may be consulted where the authority 
has not been given. 



A— B. 

Attenborough is the name of a Notts parish The origin of 

the name of Annable is a little obscure. Although it may be 
a form of Hannibal, of which one instance occurs in the county, 
it may, on the other hand, have been originally derived from 
Annables, a place in Herts. There was an ancient family of 
Annabull at Harpenden, Herts, in the 15th century (Cussans' 
" Hertfordshire"). Annable was the name of the vicar of Hem- 
lington, Norfolk, in 1401 ; and Blomefield also informs us, in his 
history of that county, that Sir Simon Anable was rector of St. 

Bartholomew's, Norwich, in 1415 In the list of the freeholders 

of this county in 1698 occur the names of Bellamy, Buttery, and 
Blatherwick ; the Bellamys, of whom there were several on the 
list, lived then in East Retford, and in other places in the county, 
and Bellamy is still an East Retford name. (See under " Lincoln- 
shire.") Robert Buttery of Widmerpool, and John Buttery of 
Sutton are there mentioned ; and there was at that time a Joseph 
Blatherwick of Lamley (Harl.). Blatherwick, it should be noted, 

is the name of a parish in Northamptonshire Several Notts 

surnames are derived from places in this and in the neighbouring 
counties. Thus, Adlington and Baguley are the names of towns 
in Cheshire, the first occurring also in Derbyshire as a surname, 
and the last as a surname in Cheshire, where there are several 
persons thus called. The Baguleys of Notts are at present mostly 
gathered in and around the town of Nottingham. Bingham, which 

Y 



322 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

is an old Notts surname, is the name of a town in the county. 

(See under "Derbyshire.") Bingley is the name of a Yorkshire 

parish : Retford, or its vicinity, is now the chief home of the 

Eingleys Barteam is an ancient English name, occurring in 

Bucks and Norfolk in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The 

Bretts of Notts probably possess their principal stock in a gentle 
family seated at Broughton two hundred years ago (Harl.) and 
still represented in that parish. Brett is also a Sussex surname 

The Byrons belong to a very ancient and distinguished family 

of Nottingham, ennobled by James I. ; and, as we also learn from 
Deering, Sir John Byron was constable of Nottingham castle in 
the reign of Henry VIII. Byron is still a Nottingham name. In 
1698 there were several freeholders of the name of Byron in the 
South Clay division of the county (Harl.). As far back as the 
reign of Edward I. there was a Hugh de Byron in Notts ; but at 
that time the name was also to be found, as Byrun and Birun, in 
the neighbouring counties of York, Lincoln, and Norfolk, and as 

Biron in Oxfordshire (H. R.) Amongst the ancient names of 

the town of Nottingham, still represented there, though now rare 
in the county, are those of Amyas and Alvey. In the 14th century 
there were Merchants of the Staple of the name of Amyas, one of 
whom was mayor in 1334 (the name now takes the form of Amies); 
and more than one mayor of Nottingham in the 16th century bore 

the name of Alvey (D.) Brumjtt and Billiatt or Billiott are 

also old Notts names, now rare in the county. In the 17th 
century there were several freeholders bearing these names in the 
county, the Brumitts being mostly resident at Treswell or Truswell 
(Harl.). It is probable that the existing Notts name of Billyard 
is an altered form of Billiatt or Billiott. 

C— D. 

Chettle was a Bingham name a hundred years ago (Th.). 
There is a Dorset parish thus called ; and an ancient family of 
Chettle held property in Blandford St. Mary, Dorset, during the 

16th and 17th centuries (Hutchins' "Dorsetshire") Challand 

is an old Notts name. John Challand was a freeholder of Rufford 
in 1698 (Earl.). Mrs. Chalands or Challands, who during the 
early part of last century was noted in the town of Nottingham f 
for her skill in boue-setting, died at Edwalton near that town in f' 
1744, having lived to see the sixth generation (D.). The name is 



I 



ri 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 323 

still in Xottingliam Clay has long been a Notts surname. It 

was represented in the parish of Hayton in the time of Henry VII. 
(Th.). Hercules Clay was a mayor of Newark in the reign of 
Charles I. (S.), and Clay is still a Newark name. The Clays of 
Southwell during last century carried their pedigree back 200 
years (Rastall's " Southwell"), and their name is yet in the town. 
Six centuries ago Clay was a common name in the east of 
England, especially in E^sex, Lincolnshire, Hunts. Cambridgeshire, 
and Beds (H. R.). It is still well established in Lincolnshire, as 

well as in Notts and Derbyshire In the 17th century there 

were several freeholders in the county bearing the name of Cottam 
(Harl.). Lancashire is also the home of this name. There are 
townships and hamlets of the name in Notts, Lancashii^e, Lincoln- 
shire, and the East Riding Chappell was a common and 

appropriate clerical name in the county during last century. The 
rector of St. Peter's, Nottingham, in 1725, and the incumbents of 

Barnby, Elston, and Thorp, in 1751, were thus named (D.) 

CoLLiNGHAM is the name of a parish in this county, whilst 
Caudwell is derived from the name of a Derbyshire township. 
..Cromwell, though now rare in the county, was a name borne 
by several of the gentry and freeholders of Notts during the 17th 
century (Harl.). De Crumwell was a Notts surname in the 13th 

century (H. R.) The Derrys lived in Nottingham and Newark 

during last century (D. and S.), and still reside there The 

family home of the Darwins in the 17th century was at Cleaton 
in Lincolnshire, and at Elston in Notts. From this stock sprang, 
last century, the noted Derbyshire Darwins, to which branch 
Charles Darwin, the great naturalist, belonged (Glover's " Derby- 
shire "). Darwen is the name of some Lancashire parishes and 
townships. 

E— H. 

The name of Esam is at present at home in and around 
l^ewark. John Esam was a freeholder of Norwell in 1698 (Harl.). 

..Fexton was a Notts surname six centuries ago (H. R.). 

There is a hamlet of the name in the county Thomas Gagg 

vas a freeholder at Misterton in 1698 (Harl.), where the name 
et remains. Gag and Gagge are ancient English names, 
ccuiTing in Hunts, Cambridgeshire, and Wilts, in the reign of 
Edward I. (H. R.) Godber, which is also a Derbyshire name, 

y2 



324 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

is evidently a contraction of Godbehere, of wliich there is an 
instance in the Notts Court Directory. Two centuries since there 
were two Notts freeholders, named Godbear and Godbar, in 
Warsopp and Arnold (Harl.), Godbehere was a Sussex surname 
in the reign of Henry III Hallam, which is a common place- 
name in the "West Riding of Yorkshire and in Derbyshire, is a 
surname also well represented on the Derbyshire border in the 
vicinity of SheflEleld. Humphrey Hallam was a freeholder of 

Blyth, Notts, in 1698 (Harl.) Harpham is the name of a 

Yorkshii'e parish; whilst Hardstapf is a Sherwood Forest 

surname Two centuries ago there were several freeholders 

bearing the name of Hemslbt resident at Misterton, Willoughby, 

East Leake, and at other places in the county (Harl.) 

Hereick is an old Leicestershire name, and reference must be 

made to that county Ho L brook is an ancient surname in the 

east of England. As Holebrok we find it six centuries ago in 
Notts, Lincolnshire, Suffolk, and also in Northamptonshire 
(H. R.) ; and as Houlbrook it now occurs in Cheshire. There 
are parishes, etc., named Holbrook in the counties of Derby, 

Warwick, Gloucester, Dorset, and Sussex Hurt is an ancient 

Nottingham name. Richard Hurt was mayor in 1595, 1602, and 
1609 ; and John Hurt was vicar of St. Mary's church in 1461 
(D.). Hurt is still a Nottingham name. An ancient and 
distinguished opulent family of this name resided at Ashbourne, 
Derbyshire, from the 15th to the 17th century. The Hurts of 
Kniveton, Casterne, and Alderwasliley, in that county, were 
younger branches of the same ("History of Ashbourne," and 
Glover's "Derbyshire"). In the reign of Edward I. Hurt was a 
common name in Oxfordshire, and it was also represented then 

in Lincolnshire and Devonshire (H. R.) The Hdskinsons were 

freeholders in the county two centuries ago, and resided at 
Cropwell Bishop and other places (Harl.). 

I— P. 

Ketwobth is the name of a Notts parish, but the surname has 
long been known in the county, and two centuries ago there were 

freeholders thus called in Cottam and South Leverton (Harl.) 

The LiNDLEYS and the Norwoods possess the names of places in 

Yorkshire There was a Maltbt, a freeholder of Newton, in 

1698 (Harl.) ; in Derbyshire and Lincolnshire the surname also 






NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 325 

occurs, and in the last county, and also in TorksLire, Maltby is the 

name of parishes and townships The Millingtons, who at 

present are mostly gathered in and around Nottingham, may 
possess an ancestor in Gilbert Millington, gent., who was a fi'ee- 
holder of Felley in 1698 (Harl.) ; there is a Yorkshire village of 

this name The Machins of the neighbourhood of Nottingham 

have representatives of their name in other midland counties. We 
find the name amongst the freeholders of Notts in 1698 (Harl.) ; 
it was well known in Gloucestershire in the 16th and 17th 

centuries (Rudder's "Gloucestershire") The Parrs of Notts 

are probably connected in their descent with three freeholders of 
the name of Par who lived in Owthorpe two hundred years ago 

(Harl.). (See under " Lancashire.") Pinder has been a 

characteristic name of Notts and Lincolnshire for six centuries, 
and occurs in both counties as Le Pinder in the reign of Edward I. 
(H. R.). In the 17th century there were several Notts freeholders 
named Pinder, residing at Awkley, Misson, Akering, and other 
places (Harl.). At present they are mostly to be found around 

Newark, and are still represented at Misson Plumptre, a name 

now rare in the county, though still occui'ring as Plumtree in 
Nottingham, was one of considerable note in that town from the 
14th to the 16th century, when it was borne by merchants of the 

staple, doctors of medicine, and mayors (D.) Robert Outram 

was a Newark alderman in 1625 (S.), and the name is still in that 
town. (See under " Derbyshire.") 

James Quibell was a freeholder of East Markham in 1698, 
and in the same year John Redgate was a freeholder of Calverton 

(Harl.) There was an octogenarian named Lydia Selbt living 

in Nottingham in 1744 (D.), and the name still occurs there. 
Selby is the name of a town in the West Riding ; it was a common 
Yorkshire surname, especially as Seleby, in the reign of Edward I. 

(H. R.) John Straw was mayor of Lincoln in 1800 (Stark's 

"Lincoln") In St. Nicholas church, Nottingham, a century 

ago, there was a memorial inscription referring to ten children of 
the name of Stubbings, eight of whom died as infants, whilst the 
oldest was not more than nine years old. This is still a Notting- 
ham name Staples is still a Nottingham name; four mayors 

of the town bore this name in the 17th century (D.) Another 



326 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

name, now but little represented in the county, is that of Sansome 
or Sansum ; there were Xotts freeholders of the name in the 17th 
century (Harl.). •» 

T— Z. 

James Templeman was a freeholder of Worksopp in 1698 
(Harl.). This was a common Cambridgeshire sarnarae in the reign 

of Edward I. (H. R.) The Truswells derive their name from a 

parish in the county. There was a freeholder of the name in 

Littleborough in 1612 (Th.) Several mayors of Newark bore 

the name of Twentymax in the 17th and 18th centuries (S.). The 

name is now rare in the county Wagstapf is an old English 

name that six hundred years ago occurred as Wagestaf and 
Waggestaf in Norfolk and Oxfordshire (H. R.). Since those early 
times one of the principal homes of the name has been in 
Warwickshire, the WagstafPes of Tachebrooke being a distin- 
guished family in the 16ch and 17th centuries ; but probably they 
had been much longer in the county of Warwick, since an epitaph 
relating to one of this family, who died in 1681, informs us that 
he was "descended from the ancient family of the Wagstaffes of 
Harbury," a place also in Warwickshire (Dugdale's " Warwick- 
shire "). There was a family of the name in Boddington, Noi'th- 
samptonshire, in the 17th century (Baker's "Northamptonshire"). 
At present the name is also established in Derbyshire and Essex. 

"WoMBWELL is the name of an estate in the West Riding. In 

lf)i)8, three Notts freeholders, bearing the name of Wombell or 
Woombell, lived at Ollerton, Warsopp, and Welhagh or Wellow, 
respectively (Harl.). The present bearers of the name in Notts 
spell it as Wombwell or Woombill. As Wombell, it occurs in 
the old registers of Haughley, Suffolk (Hollingsworth's " Stow- 

mai'ket) " The Weatheralls of Notts are probably derived from 

the old Lincoln family of the name, members of which were mayore 
and shei-iffs of that city in the 17th and 18th centuries (Stark's 

"Lincoln") Topladt and Trigge are two old Nottingham 

names that are now but little represented in the county. The 
mayors of 1653 and 1682 bore the name of Toplady ; whilst eight 
mayors bore the name of Trigge dui-ing the half century inter- 
vening between 1693 and 1747 (D.) Wildbore is another Notts 

name novv rare in the county. There were freeholders of the name 
at Misterton and at other places in the county in 1698 (Harl.). 



OXFORDSHIRE. 






OXFORDSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that, though characteristic of the 
county, the name is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 

Genebal Names (30-40 counties). 



Cook 
*HaU 
Harris 



*Smith 
*Taylor 



*Turner 
* White 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



* Bennett 

*Davis 

*Hill 



*Kiiig 

*Mattliews 

*Rogers 



Saunders 
* Walker 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Adkin8 


*May 




^ J Simmonds 
L Simmons 


*Austin 


Page (Banburj) 


*Cox 


*Parsons 




*Walton 


*Fox (Banburj) 


Porter 




* Watts 


*Erench 


Pratt 




Wells 


*Crardner 


*Rose 




*West 


*G-riffin 









DisTHiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



*Bartlett 


Franklin 


*Blake (Oxford) 


Uaynes 


*Carpenter 


*Painter 


*Coates (Oxford) 


Robbins 


*(Joles 


Salmon 



*Tanner 
Townsend 
"Wheeler 
Whitfield 



328 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*Bad£;er 


*Gilks 


Malin 


*Belcher 


Gillett 


Mansfield 


Busby 


Harwood 


Mountain 


Castle 


fHiatt 


Parrott 


Checkley 


\ Hyatt 


Slatter 


Cheny 


r Hiorns 
L Hirons 


J Timms 
LTims 


Clack 


Collett (Oxford) 


Kilby 


Ti-edwell (Oxford) 


Feneinore 


Mace 


Wiggins 


Fortnum 






Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 


Akers 


Florey 


Paxton 


Aldworth 


r Hatt 
LHutt 


Pether 


Arnatt 


Petlipher 


Batts 


Hobley 


Rowles (Bicester) 


Blencowe 


Hone 


J Sabin 
L Savin 


Breakspear 


Honovir 


Buller 


Loosley 


Shrimpton 


Calcutt 


Louch 


Spurrett 


Chaundy 


Lovegrove 


Stanbra (Banbury) 


Clapton 


Luckett 


Turrill 


Clare 


Midwinter 


Tustain 


Coggins 


Neighbour (Tetsworth) 


Widdows 


Deeley 


Nevell 


Wilsdon 


Edginton 


Padbury 


Witney 


Filbee 


Paxman 


Woolgrove 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC OXFORDSHIRE 

NAMES. 
(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the following abireviations : — 
B. indicates Beesley's " Banbury." 



Bu. 
D. 

a. 

H 

J. 

K. 
L. 
Wi. 
Wo. 



R. 



Burn's " Henley-on-Thames." 

Dunkin's " Oxfordshire." 

Giles' " Bampton." 

Hundred Rolls. 

Jordan's " Enstone." 

Kennett's " Ambrosden, Burcester," &c. 

Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

Wing's " Steeple Barton and Westcot Barton." 

Wood's and Peshall's " Oxford." 



OXFORDSHIRE. 329 



A— B. 



Aldworth is the name of a Berkshire parish. Henry 
Aldworth, Chancellor of the Diocese of Oxford, died in 1699 
(Wo.). The mayor of Bristol in 1592, 1609, and 1642 bore this 

name (Barrett's "Bristol.") A family of Aenatt resided at 

Lew, near Bampton, during the last and the present century 

(G.) Belcher has long been an Oxfordshire name. It was 

established in Enstone in the 16th and 17th centuries (J-)- 
William Belcher, yeoman, of Steeple Aston, presented his son, 
Thomas Belcher, to the incumbency of Westcot Barton in 1640 
(Wi.). Samuel Belcher, apothecary, died at Deddington in 1668 

(Marshall's "Deddington.") The Blexcowes of Oxfordshire 

are probably descended from the ancient family of the name 
that resided at Marston or Merston, Northamptonshire, for many 
generations, as far back as the reign of Henry VI. ; to this family 
belonged Sir John Blencowe, a Judge of the Common Pleas, in 
the early part of last century (Whalley's "Northamptonshire"). 
The name has long been established in Banbury ; John Blincoe 
was an as.sistant- burgess of that town in the reign of James I., 
and in 1718 Thomas and John Blencowe, Esqs., were similarly 
appointed assistant-burgesses (B.). In 1611 Anthony Blinkoe was 
Chancellor of the Diocese of Oxford (K.). Blencowe is the name 
of hamlets in Cumberland. The Blencowes of Blencowe were an 
ancient Cumberland family, going back to the 14th century 

(Hutchinson's "Cumberland.") The Breakspears of Henley 

are evidently connected with Mr. Robert Brakspear, who was 

mayor of Henley-on-Thames in 1804 (Bu.) During the 16th, 

17th, and 18th centuries the Busbys of Kadford and Gagingwell 
were well-to-do Enstone yeomen, who frequently tilled the office of 
churchwarden and other places of trust (J.). William Busby was 
one of the trustees for Lady Le Strange of Middleton in the reign 
of Henry YI. (K.). William Busby, gent., was an assistant- 
burgess of Banbury in 1718 (B.j, in which town the name still 
occurs. Busby is the name of a parish in the North Riding of 
Yorkshire. I think, however, an explanation of the name will be 
found nearer home, and the same remark applies to the Blencowes. 

Amongst the names now rare in the county is that of Bumpus, 

which was represented in Enstone parish in 1758 (J.). 



330 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



C~E. 

Calcutt is evidently a contraction of Caldecott, Avhich in one 
form and another is common as a place-name in this part of 
England and is represented as a surname in Worcestershire, 
Gloucestershire, etc. William Callcott of Williamscot left bequests 
for the poor of Banbarj in the 16th century (B.). The name was 
represented in Enstone in the reign of Chai'les II. (J.). Anne 
Calcot, a Quaker, was buried at Steeple Barton in 1706 (Wi.), 

Checkley is the name of places in Staffordshire and Cheshire. 

The jsurname of Checkley or Cheekley was represented in the 
hundred of Wardon, Northamptonshire, in the 1 7th centuiy 
(Baker's " N^orthamptonshire ") Cherry is also a Northampton- 
shire name. In the early part of the 17th century there was a 
family of the name in ISlaidenhead, Berks (Ashmole's " Berk- 
shire"). Benjamin Cherry, who died in 1785, was four times 
mayor of Hertford, and left bequests for the poor ; Benjamin 
Cherry, his son (as I infer), who was town clerk of Hertford for 

twenty years, died in 1817 (Tumor's "Hertford") ClxVCK is 

a hamlet in North Wiltshire Clapton is a common place-name 

in the south of England Clake is an ancient Oxfordshire name. 

In feudal times the De Clares were a very powerful family in 
southern England (L.). In the 13th century the name of 
De Clare or De Clar' was established in Oxfordshire, Norfolk, 
Suffolk, Somerset, etc. (H. R.). A liberty in Pjrton parish, 
Oxfordshire, a m.arket town in West Suffolk, and a Devonshire j 

district bear the name of Clare The Colletts of this county 

are mostly found in the Oxford district. The name of Collet 
w^as represented in Oddington in the reign of Elizabeth (D.). 
Collet was a common name in Gloucestershire during last century 
(Bigland's "Gloucestershire"). There are now also Colletts in 
AYiltshire and Collets in Cambridgeshire. In the 13th century 
Colet was an Oxfordshire, Shropshire, and a London name. The 
"colet" was the old English form of "acolyte," a church servant, 
and it is remarkable that, as a rule, the homes of the Colletts 

are, or have been, in the vicinity of ecclesiastical centres 

The Dbinkwatees have resided, as well-to-do Enstone yeomen, 
at Gagingwell and Neat Enstone for about 30U years, namely, 
during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries (J.). (See under 
" Cheshire.") 



OXFORDSHIRE. 331 

F— H. 

The Fenemores have characterised Oxfordshire and Bucks for 
at least six centuries. Thomas Fynnamore was a burgess of 
Henley-on-Thames in the reign of Henrj VIII. (Bu.). There 
were several Fennimores or Vennimores in Wendiebury in the 
reigns of James I. and Charles I. (D.). In the time of William 
III. there was a Ffennimore in the parish of Enstone (J.). 
Fjnnemore or Fynmore or Finnemore was a Reading name in the 
16th and 17th centuries ; two mayors of Reading bore this name, 
namely in 1577 and 1586 (Coates' "Reading" and Ashmole's 
"Berkshire"). In the 18th century we find it as De Finemor in 
Wilts, as De Finemere in Bucks, as De Fineme in Oxfordshire, as 
Fynamnr in Norfolk, and as Vinemer and Winemer in Cambridge- 
shire (H. R.). Fennemere is a Shropshire hamlet, and De Fenne- 
mere or De Fennemare was a Shropshire surname in the 18th 
century (Eyton's " Shropshire "). Finnimore was the name of an 
ancient township in or near Wetwang parish in the East Riding 
of Yorkshire. Simon Fyniraer was vicar of Hooton Paynel, 
Yorkshire, in 1349 (Hunter's "South Yorkshire"). This name 
well illustrates the variation of surnames ; I have mentioned it 
eighteen times and it has been spelt in seventeen different ways. 

During the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries the name of 

FoRTNUM, or Ffortnam as it used to be spelt, was established in 
Enstone parish, both at Lydston and Neat Enstone (J.). The 
Ffortnams, in fact, have been well-to-do yeomen since the time 

o£ Elizabeth (J.). Fortnam is also a Worcestershire name 

Oxfordshire has been for ages one of the principal homes of the 
Franklins. The name, which in early times, as well as in those of 
Shakespeare, often signified a freeholder, is also established in 
Bucks, Berks, Beds, Herts, Esses., and Northamptonshire, so that 
it may be said to occupy a somewhat circumscribed and continuous 
area. In the 13th century its usual forms were Frankelayn, 
Frankeleyn, Fraunkelayn, Fraunkeleyn, sometimes preceded by 
"Le" and " De," Frankelin being rare (H. R.) ; it was then 
especially numerous in Oxfordshire, and also in fair numbers in 
Bucks and Wilts (H. R.), so that it would appear that in those 
early times, as in our own day, Oxfordshire and Bucks stood fore- 
most amongst the English counties for their proportion of the 

Franklins (see Alphabetical List) The name of Giles is now 

rather more numerous in Warwickshire, and reference is made to 



332 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

it under that county Oxfordshire is now the principal home of 

the GriLLETTS, but the name is also found in Kent. In Lincoln- 
shire the name is represented by Gilliart, Gilliatt, and Gillyatt. 
In the 13th century the name took the forms in Cambridgeshire 

and Hunts of Gillot, Gillote, and Gilot (H. R.) Hatt and 

HuTT may be in most cases a contraction of Hiatt, also an Oxford- 
shire name. In the 13th century we find Hat in Oxfordshire and 
Wilts, and Hut in Oxfordshire, where it is associated with LeHurt 

(H. R.) Haynes is an old Oxfordshire surname The name 

of HiORNS or HiRONS was represented by Hyarne in Enstone 

parish during the reign of Elizabeth (J.) In the early part 

of last century the name of Irons occurred in the parish of 
Kidlington, and at that time Master Irons was a noted character 
in Merton (D.) The name of Hone occurred in Oxford- 
shire, in the reign of Edward I., and also at that time John 
Hone lived at Wallingford, Berks (H. R.). 



K-P. 

KiLBT is the name of a Leicestershire parish Looslet is the 

name of a village in Bucks LoucH is an ancient Oxfordshire 

name. It was represented during the 13th and 14th centuries in 
Radford, Iffley, and other places in the county by De Louch, De 
Louches, De Louchis, De Leuches, and De Lusches (H. R., J., K.) 

(Marshall's " IflBey.") Mace, now represented in Chipping 

Norton, was an Oxfordshire name in the reign of Edward I. 
(H. R.). Robert Mace of Bampton died in 1682 (G.). The name 

is also established in Gloucestershire Mansfield is the name 

of a town in Notts Midwinter has long been an Oxfordshire 

name. In the 13th century, Gonnild Midewynter and Roger 
Midewynt lived at Aston and Burton in this county (H. R.). The 
name of Midenter occurred in Enstone about a hundred years ago 
(J.). William Midwinter resided at Marlborough, Wilts, in the 
reign of Henry VIII. (Waylen's "Marlborough"). The name 
existed in North Leach, Gloucestershire, two centuries ago 

(Bigland's "Gloucestershire.") The Oxfordshire Malins may 

perhaps derive their name from Mailing, a Kentish as well as a 

Sussex parish The Nevells of Oxfordshire may perhaps be 

connected in their descent with the De Neviles or De Nevills, who, 
in the reign of Edward I., were very numerous in the adjoining 



OXFORDSHIRE. 333 

county of Wilts as well as in Lincolnshire (H. R.) Padburt is 

the name of a parish in Bucks. Simon de Padebur resided in 
Oxfordshire, and Robert de Padeburi in Bucks in the 13th century 

(H. R.) The name of Parrott, probably a form of Perrett or 

Perrott, a common Somersetshire name, is better represented in 
Bucks, and is referred to also under that county. Robert Perrot, 
gent., of Oxford, who was buried in St. Peter's church in 1550, 
was a son of G. Perrot of Haverford-West, Pembi'okeshire. Simon 
Parret, a proctor of Oxford University, died in 1584 (Wo.). 
There was a gentle family of Parratt in the parish of Enstone 
during the reign of Elizabeth (J.) The connection between the 
present Perretts and the Parrotts is referred to under Somerset- 
shire Paxton is the name of parishes in Hunts. De Paxton 

was a common family name in Hunts in the 13th century (H. R,). 

Pettipheb is an ancient Bucks and Herts name, and further 

allusion to it will be found under those counties in reference to 
Puddephatt, which is probably a corruption of it. There was a 
Bampton family of Pettifer last century (G.). The name of 
Pettipher occurred amongst the labouring classes of Culworth, 
Northamptonshire, a century ago (B.). The Rev. John Pettyfer, 
or Pettifer, was vicar of Blakesley, Northamptonshire, early 
last century (Baker's "Northamptonshire"). Cussans, in his 
" Hertfordshire " suggests that in that county the name of 
Pedefer (Pied-de-Fer ?), which occurred in Ippolitts, Herts, 
in the reign of Edward 111., was the original of Puddephatt, 
a Bucks as well as a Herts name. This is probable, but at 
any rate his suggestion is still more applicable to the origin 
of Pettipher. 

R— Z. 

Sabin or Savin is an ancient name that was represented by 
Sabin, Sabine, and Sabyn, in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk in the 
13th century (H. R.). At that time, also, Le Saven and Le 
Savener were Cambridgeshire names (H. R.). Bardsley suggests 
that the last of these names is a corruption of Le Savonier (the 

soap-seller); but concerning this I am doubtful Slatter, the 

early form of which was The Slatter, was an Enstone name, from 
the 14th to the 17th century, and in our own time Slater is a 

common name in the parish (J.) Amongst the old Oxfordshire 

names now rare in the county is that of Spkingall. During the 



334 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

17th century there was a family of this name at Henley-on- 
Tliames, members of which filled the office of mayor of that toyfn 

ia 1611, 1(590-94, and 1697 (Bu.) The name of Stanbra, 

which is probably derived from a hamlet in Herts, is best 
represented in the Banbury district Shrimpton was a well- 
known name in Wycombe, Bucks. From the reign of James I. 
to that of George III. sixteen mayors of Wycombe bore this 
name ; six of these during the early portion of last century were 

called Ferdinando (Langley's " Desborough Hundred.") 

TiMMS or Tims is an old Banbury name, which has long been 
connected with the corporation of that town. Sarah Timms, a 
Quakeress of Banbury, lay in prison for six months in 1655 for 
" exhorting the priest to fear the Lord " (B.), a circumstance 
characteristic of the fanaticism of those " good old days." The 
name was represented in the parish of Enstone 150 years ago (J.) 

The TuRRiLLS were represented in this county, as well as in 

Cambridgeshire, six centuries ago by the Torels (H. R.) The 

TusTAiNS, who are now represented in the Banbury district, 
evidently derive their name from Taston or Tastan, a hamlet in 
Spelsbury parish : De Torstan was the name of an Enstone family 
in the 14th century (J.). The Tustians, a family of Puritans 
residing in Banbury during the 17th century, refused, on religious 
grounds, in 1629 to pay taxes for His Majesty's Household (B.). 

The Tredwells or Tkkadwells are also represented in Kent. 

The name of Treadwell occurred in Enstone parish 200 years 

ago (J.). T. Treadwell was mayor of Oxford in 1758 (Wo.) 

Richard Wydhose, of Essex, in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.), 
may be an ancester of the Oxfordshire families named Widdows. 
Widdowes was an Enstone name as far back as the reign of 

James I. (J.) Wiggins is an old Bampton name: William 

Wiggins was buried there in 1758; Mr. and Mrs. Wigiugs, both 
well advanced in years, were buried at Shifford in 1727 and 1729 
(Gr.) Amongst the old Oxfordshire names that are now com- 
paratively rare in the county are those of Vaudry and Wisdom. 
The Vaudry s, or Vaudries, or Vadries, or Fawdreys, were well- 
to-do Enstone yeomen of Radford and Clevely, with a record of 
300 years, since the 15th century, in those localities ; the Wisdoms 
were old families of Enstone and Burford, dating back to the 
15th century (J.). Both these names are rare in these localities 
now. Speaking of the origin of the name of Vawdrey, Lower 
says, that the Cheshire Vawdreys are sprung from Sir Claud de 



RUTLANDSHIRE. 335 

Vaudrai, who had lands in that county in the latter part of the 
12th century (Vaudrai or Vaudrey is a place in France). The 
name is not now frequent enough in Cheshire to be placed in 
my list. 



RUTLANDSHIRE. 

(See under " Leicrstershire.") 



336 



jaOilES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



SHROPSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name denotes that, though 
characteristic of the county, the name is more relatively 
numerous elsewhere. 

G-ENEEAL Names (30-40 counties). 
Brown *Cook 





Common Names 


(20-29 counties). 


Adams 


f Lea 
L Lee 


Rogers 


Edwards 


*Ward 


♦James 


Moi-ris 


Williams 


Jones 


Roberts 





Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Evans 


Lloyd 


Price 


Griffiths 


Marsh 


Reynolds 


*Hughe8 


*Morgan 


Thomas 


*Lewis 


Powell 






DiSTEicT Names 


(4-9 counties). 


Bourne 


*Howell3 


^ / Philpott 
I Philpots 


Bo wen 


*Humphreys 


*Bradley 


f Jarvis 
L Jervis 


*Preece 


Bright 


*Pugh 


Cartwright 


* J Maddock 
L Maddocks 


*Stoke8 


Corbett 


Vaughan (Shrewsbury) 


Downes 


*Massey 


*Wainwright 


Farmer 


*Meredith 


Wall 


Gough 


*Mosely 


Whitfield (Whitchurch) 


*Groves (Shrev 


•sburj) *Owen 


Woodcock (Shrewsbury) 


Hayward 


*Parry 


* Yates 


Higginson 







SHROPSHIRE. 



S37 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*Ainswort]i 


G-ittins (Slirewsbury) 


*Pardoe 


r Beaman 
- Beamand 


Grroom 


Eudd 


*Gwilliam 


Shakesliaffc 


Beeston 


r Hamar (Clun) , 
L Hamer 


*Timmis 


Bennion 


*Venables 


*Brerefcon (Bishop's 


Hampson 


*WaUey 


Castle) 


/ Hodnet 
l Hodnett 


Whiteman 


Bromley (Shrewabui-y) 


Wilkes 


Chester 


*Marston 


*Windsor 


Childe 


Medlicott 


*Woodliouse 


/ Dicken 
L Dickin 


^ J Merrick 
L Meyrick 


Wyer 


*Wynne 


*Dorrell 


*Mort 


Yapp 


*Frank 


KorgroTe 





Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Ashley 


Felton 


Mellings 


Back 


Fowles 


Millichamp 


r Bather 

L Batho (Whitchurch) 


Growcott 


Minton (Shrewsbury) 


Gwilt 


Munslow 


Beddoes 


Heatley 


Nock 


Benbow 


Heighway (Shrews- 


Onions 


Blakemore 


bury) 


Paddock 


Boughey 


Hinton 


Pinches 


Bowdler (Shrewsbury) 


Home 


Pitchford (Shrewsbury) 


Breakwell 


Hotchkiss (Church 


Podmore 


Brisboume 


Stretton) 


Eavenshaw 


Broughall 


Inions 


Eodenhurst 


Cadwallader 


Instone 


Sankey 


Cleeton 


Jacks 


Shuker (Shrewsbury) 


Corfield 


Xynaston 


Tipton 


Cureton 


Lawley 


Titley 


Duce 


Madeley 


Warder (Bridgnorth) 


Eddowes 


Mansell 


Wellings 


Everall (Shrewsbury) 







338 HOIMES OF FAIVIILY NAMES. 

NOTES ON SOME OP THE CHARACTEEISTIC SHEOPSHIKE 

NAMES. 

The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

E. indicates Eyton's " Shropshire." 
L. „ Lower's " Patronvmica Britannica." 
O. „ Owen's and Blakeway's " Shrewsbury." 
P. ,, Phillips' "Shrewsbury." 

W. „ Wright's " Ludlow." 
H. E. „ Hundred Eolls. 

Sp. „ " Contributors to the Spanish Armada Fund in 1588.' 
(Brit. Mus., B. 474.) 



A— B. 

The ASHLEYS possess tlie name of a StafPordshirs parisli 

The name of Batho or Bather, which now has its home in the 
Whitchurch district, may be a form of the 13th century name of 
De Bathon, which at that period was common in Somersetshire, 
and also occurred then in Gloucestershire and Devonshire (H. R.) ; 
the early form was, as I infer, originally derived from the city of 
Bath Several of the bailiffs or mayors of Leominster, Hereford- 
shire, in the 17th and 18th centuries, bore the name of Ba 
Back is the usual Shropshire form (Townsend's " Leominster "). 

Beddoes, which is a common Shropshire name, is evidently a 

form of Ab-Eddoes or Ap-Eddoes, which in the shape of Eddowes, 
without the prefix, is also a Shropshire name. Eddose was the 
name of a Shrewsbury burgess in the reign of Henry ITI. (0.) 
Ellis Beddoe was twice bailifi of Ludlow in the reigns of James I. 
and Charles I. (W.) Benbow is the name of an ancient Shrop- 
shire family, to which belonged Colonel Benbow, a zealous Royalist, 
who met his death at Shrewsbury in 1651 for corresponding with 
the King ; from this stock also came Admiral Benbow, who was 

born at Cotton Hill, Shrewsbury, in 1650 (P.) Bennion is an 

ancient Shrewsbury name, and is the contracted form of Ab-Ennion 
or Ap-Ennion, Enion being an old Welsh personal name. Robert 



SHROPSHIRE. 339 

ap Egnlon was one of the bailiffs of Shrewsbury in 1475 (P.)- 
During the 17th century the Benyons were well-to-do Shrewsbury 
townsmen, Charles Benyon being the name of the bailiff or the 
I mayor in 1625, 1634, 1644, and 1651 ; in the beginning of last 
century, Dr. Benion was one of the leading ministers of the 
Shi'ewsbury dissenters (0. and P.). The name is still in the 

town The Shropshire Blakemores probably derive their name 

from Blakemere, a parish in the adjoining county of Herefordshire. 
Blakemore was the name of a Shrewsbury painter, to whom the 
town paid one shilling in 1502 for a view of Shrewsbury intended 
to be presented to Henry VII. (0.). Reference to the similar 

name of Blackmore will be found under "Devonshire." The 

BowDLERS, who are now best represented in Shrewsbury and its 
district, possess a very ancient Shi'opshire name. Ashford Bowdler 
is the name of a parish and a seat near Ludlow, the seat being 
held in the 12th and 13th centuries by the influential family of 
De Budler or De Bowdler or De Boilers, lords of Montgomery and 
of many places in Shropshire (W. and E.). In more recent times 
the Bowdlers have been long connected with the corporation of 
Ludlow, and persons of the name tilled the office of bailiff of that 
town in 1468, 1665, 1684, 1694, and 1712 (W.). Thomas Bowdler 

was mayor of Shi-ewsbury in 1705 (P.) The Shropshire 

Breretons, who were represented in Oswestry in the reign of 
Elizabeth (0.), include an old family of position in the county : 
they are probably a branch of the Breretons of Cheshire, which 

is the home of the name. (See under " Cheshire.") The name 

of Bromley, which is common amongst all classes in Shropshire, 
■is probably in most cases derived from the place thus called in the 
county, but there is also a Staffordshire township of Bromley. 
De Bromleye held estates in Leaton in the 14th century, and the 
name of Bromeley was represented in Broughton in the 16th 
century (E.). The Bromleys are now most numerous in the 

Shrewsbury district The Shropshire Beestons possess the 

name of more than one Cheshire parish : they are also repre- 
sented in Derbyshire and Stafford. It is, however, noticeable 
that Beetlestone is also a Shropshire surname, though of infrequent 

occurrence The Broughalls take the name of a parish in the 

county. Amongst the old Shropshire names which are now rare 
in the county is that of Baugh. During last century there was a 
gentle family of this name in Ludlow (W.). 

z2 



340 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

C— D. 

Le Childe, or Le Chyld, was the name of an old Shropshire 
family of position : the name was represented in Penwardine in 
1256, and there was a Richard le Childe in Diddlebury in 1318 
(E.). Nicholas le Child was a bailiff of Shrewsbury in 1314 
(0.). William Childe was a bailiff of Ludlow in 1758 (W.)- 
Childe is the present Shropshire form of the name : in Sussex, 
Child and Childs are found. This was a common name in the 
13th century in different parts of England. It was not only at 
that time established in Shropshire, as I have above remarked, but 
as Child and Le Child it was then frequent in Norfolk, Cambridge- 
shire, and Oxfordshire, and in other counties (H. R.) There 
was an old gentle family of Childe at Enstone, Oxfordshire, in 

the iGth century (Jordan's "Enstone") Cleeton is the name 

of a Shropshire district Shropshire has been for centuries the 

principal home of the Corbetts. Corbet was a common name 
there in the 13th century, and, in fact, in the Hundred Rolls of 
that date this county includes almost all of the name. The 
ancient and powei-ful Shropshire family of Corbett dated back to 
the time of Edward I. (L.). In the list of Shropshire contributors 
to the fund collected at the time of the expected Spanish invasion 
in 1588, occur the names of Jerom Corbett (£30), Edward Corbett 
of Longmore (£25), and Alice Corbett of Stoke, widow (£50), 
(Sp.). Since the reign of Henry V., the Corbetts or Corbets have 
at various times filled the office of bailiff or mayor of Shrewsbury, 
one of the mayors of last century being Sir Richard Corbett, 
baronet (P.). After the lapse of many centuries the name is 
still confined to counties adjacent to that of its early home, 
namely, to Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Gloucestershire, and 

Warwickshire The Shropshire name of DuCE is probably a 

corruption of Dews, a name which, as Dew (deprived of the 
final s), occurs now in the neighbouring counties of Hereford 
and Monmouth, and elsewhere. It is, however, noteworthy that 
the name of Duce occurred in Hunts in the 13th century (H. R.). 
In such a work as Eyton's " Antiquities of Shropshire," which 
contains minute details of the powerful Shropshire families of 
the 12th and 13th centuries, we find several names, such as 
Carbonell and Caxtilupe, scarcely represented now as family 

names in the county Amongst Shi'opshire names at present 

rare in the county are those of the Ludlow families of Colebatch 



SHROPSHIRE. 341 

and Cupper, both of which families during the 17th century- 
supplied bailiffs to the town (W.). The ancient family of De 
Colebatch took its name from a Shropshire hamlet (E.). 

E— K. 

The Feltons take their name from a Shropshire parish 

GiTTiNS is a characteristic Shropshire name at present most 
numerous in Shrewsbury and its district, and associated with the 
past history of that town. John Gryttyns was thrice bailiff of 
Shrewsbury towards the close of the 15th century : Gittins was 
the name of a master of the Free School of that town in the reign 

of James I. (P.) Hinton is the name of a town and of hamlets 

in the county. Thomas Hinton was a bailiff of Ludlow in 1708 

(W.) The HoDNETS, or Hodnetts, derive their name from the 

Shropshire parish of Hodnet. During the 13th century there was 
a powerful family in the county that took the name of De Hodenet 
from either the manor or the parish of the name (E. and H. R.) 

Home was an Oxfordshire name in the 18th century (H. R.) 

The Hosiers, who are now scantily represented, were anciently 

connected with the corporations of Shrewsbury and Ludlow, both 

as bailiffs and mayors (P. and W.) Hotchkiss is a characteristic 

Shropshire name, and one especially numerous in the district of 
Church Stretton. A headmaster of the Free School of Shrewsbury 
during the reign of Queen Anne bore this name : Moses Hotchkies 
was a corporal who was taken prisoner by the Parliament forces 

at the capture of Shrewsbury in 1645 (0.) Inions is evidently 

a form of Bnion, a Welsh personal name The Instones may, 

perhaps, derive their name from Enstone, an Oxfordshire parish. 

The ancient Shropshire family of Kynaston derived its name 

from a village in the county. The Kenestons or Kynastons of 
Shropshire were so deeply implicated in the sanguinary struggle 
between the Houses of York and Lancaster, that in 1487 an Act 
of Parliament was passed against them (W".). ^Francis and 
Roger Kynnaston of this county contributed £25 apiece to the 
fund collected for the defence of the country at the timo of the 
expected Spanish invasion in 1588 (Sp.). The Kynastons of 
Otely Park, Ellesmere, had an altar tomb in Ellesmere Church, 
bearing the date of 1590 (Collect. Top. et Gen.), and the family 
still hold property in that district. During the 17th century the 
Kynastons or Kinastons frequently filled the office of bailiff or 



342 IIOilES OF FAillLT NAIIklES. 

mayor of Shrewsbury (P.)- The gentle family of this name that 
resided at Farndon, Cheshire, 200 years ago, was probably an 
offshoot of the Shropshire stock (Coll. Top. et Gen.). 

L— P. 

Lawley is the name of a Shropshire district Mansell is the 

name of two Herefordshire parishes. Edmund Mansell was a 
member of the Common Council of Shrewsbury in the reign of 
Charles II. (0.), and the name is still common in the town. 
Mansel or Maunsel was a much more common surname in the 
13th century than it is at present. It was then established in 
Shropshire, Yorkshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Bucks, Hunts, 

Cambridgeshire, etc. (H. R.) The ancient Shropshire family 

of Medlicott, which took its name from a manor, flourished in 
the 13th century (£.). The Medlycott family of Ven House, 
Milbome Port, Somerset, origmally came from Shropshire (Phelps' 

"Somersetshire.") The Millichamps have transformed their 

name from Millichope, the name both of a seat (Millichope Hall) 
in Munslow parish, and of an ancient Shropshire family of the 
12th and 13th centuries ; there was a Thomas de Millichope in the 
county in the reign of Henry II., and in the time of Edward I. 
there was a Roger de Milligehop, also in Shropshire (E. and H. R.). 

The MiNTONS and the Munslows take their names from parishes 

in the county Nock is an ancient Shropshire name. There was a 

Richard Noc in this county in the 13th century, and at the same 
time there was a William Noc in Oxfordshire (H. R.). Noke is 

an Oxfordshire parish Onions is probably another form of 

Inions, also a Shropshire name and above referred to. It is, 
however, probable that away from the Welsh border this name, 
as Lower suggests, may be a corruption of Unwin or Onwen, an 
old personal name, which was represented in Cambridgeshire and 
elsewhere in the 13th century by the surnames of Onwinne and 

Onoiun (H. R.) Amongst the old Shropshire names now 

scantily represented is that of Pride or Pryde. Bailiffs and 
wealthy burgesses of Shrewsbury in the 13th and 14th centuries 
bore this name (E. and 0.). 

R— Z. 

John Rodenhurst lived at Aston Rogers in the reign of Henry 
VI. (E.), There was a Peter de Rodehurst in Wiltshire in the 



SHROPSHIRE. 343 

time of Edward I. (H. R.). The Roden is a Shropshire river 

RuDD is an ancient English name which is now represented as such 
in Shropshire and Norfolk, and by Rood in Somerset. In the 
13th century Rud was a Derbyshire name; Rudde occurred in 
Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, and Leicestershire, Rude in Shrop- 
shire, and De Rude in Wiltshire (H. R.) The Shropshire 

Sankbts may be descended from the ancient Lancashire family of 
this name that dated back to the time of John (L.). There are 

villages in Lancashire thus called Tipton is the name of a 

Staffordshire town Titley is the name of parishes in Cheshire 

and Herefordshire Amongst old Shropshire names now rare in 

the county is that of Stury, or occasionally Sturry, a frequent 
name amongst the Shrewsbury bailiffs from the 13th to the 

16th century (P.) The ancient and influential family of Db 

Venables or Venables was represented in the county in the 13th 

and 14th centuries (E. and H. R.). (See under "Cheshire.") 

The Vaughans, who are now well represented in Shrewsbury and 
its neighbourhood, are referred to under " Wales." 



344 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



Baker 



Gbneral Names (30-40 counties). 

•Grreen White 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



*Bennet« 


Hill 


*Palmer 


/Brook 
I Brook? 


*Hunt 


Webb 


♦James 


Young 


Davis- 


•King 





Ubgioital Names (10-19 counties). 



Cox 

Day 

♦Griffin (Bristol) 

Harding 
f Hawkings (Bumham) 
L Hawkins 

♦Jefferies 



Jeffery 

Lawrence (Crewkerne) 
♦Marsh 
♦Marshall 

Norman 

Osborne (Crewkerne) 

Parsons 



♦Pearce 

Perry (Wincanton) 
♦Porter 

Sheppard 

Stone 
♦Watts 



DisTEicT Names (4-9 counties). 



♦Bartlett 


♦Cock 


Bond (Taunton) 


Coles 


Brewer 


r Coombes 
\ Coombs 


Bryant 


♦Butt 
Carpenter 


r Cousins 1 
i Cozens /(Taunton) 


Champion 


♦Dowding 



Dyer 
♦Francis 

Frost (Bridgewater) 
♦Fry 
♦Gibbons (Bath) 

Gifford 

Godfrey (Bridgewater 



SOilERSETSHIRE. 



345 



*GouId 
*Hancock 

Hardwick 

Hajes 
r Helliar 
* LHellier 
*Hick3 

Hoddinott 
*Hodge8 

Hooper 

Howe (DulTerton) 
*Hurford 

Hutchings (Bridge- 
water) 

Jennings 
*Keen 



Lock 
*LoTell 
# J Mead 
I Meade 

Millard 

Moon 

Norris 

Perrett (Bridgewater) 

Pickford 
*Pike 
("Pool 
l Poole 

Rioh (Bridgewater) 
r Somers 
I Summers 



*Stacey 

Stott (Wells) 

Talbot 

Thatcher 
, r Thorn 
L Thome 
*Tucker 

Yincent 

Wall 
*Wallis 
*Webber 
*Week3 (Wells) 

Wilcox 
*Wilkins 

Wyatt (Charcr 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Balch (Bath) 

Bawden 

Beacham 

Bere 

Body 

Bown (Bath) 

Boyce 

Bradford 

Brake 
J Burdge 
1 Burge 

Candy (Bath) 

Chappell 
*Collard 

Cornish (Taunton) 

Creed (Glastonbury) 

Crees (Frome) 

Curry 

Darby 

Duckett (Weston- 
super-Mare) 

Dyke 

Eames 

England 
*nower 



r Gooden 
I Gooding 
*Greenslade 
r Haine 
\ Haines 
Hallett 

Ham (Weston-super- 
Mare) 
{Hanham 
Hannam 

Heal (Bridgewater) 
♦Hewlett 
Hodder 
Hosegood 
*Hoskin3 
House (Bridgewater) 
*Hussey 

r Jacob 
■ J 
L Jacobs 

Joyce 
J Kiddell 
L Kiddle (Bridgewater) 

Langdon 

Layer 
*Ling (Bridgewater) 



Lockyer (Taunton) 

Longman 

Masters 

Moody 
*Midlins 

Osmond 
*Paun 

Penny 

Peters 

Phelps (Wells) 

Pitman 
r Kendall 
tEendell 

Eidler (Minehead) 

Kisdon 

Eoe (Bridgewater) 



Sherrin (Langport) 
Slade 
Small 
Sparks 

SpiUer (Taunton) 
Tapp 
Westlake 
*Yeoman 



346 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Pecultae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Amesbury (Bridgewater) 

Aplin (Chard) 

Ashman 

Arney (Bridgewater) 

Baber (Bristol) 

B adman 

Bagg (Bridgewater) 

Ban well 

Barnstable (Bridge- 
water) 

Barrington (Taunton) 

Batt 

Bicknell 

Binning (Yatton) 

Bisdee 

Board 

Bowering 

Brimble (Bristol) 

Burch 

Burston (Bridgewater) 
r Carey 
LCary 

Chard 

Churches (Wells) 

Clapp 

Clothier 

Coate 
J Cogan 
I Coggan 

Corner 

Corp (Glastonbury) 

Cosh 

Counsell 

Croom 

Crossman (Bridgewater) 

Dampier 

Demnan 

Denning 

Derrick 

Dibble (Bridgewater) 



Dicks (Taunton) 
r Diment 
L Dyment 

Durston (Bridgewater) 

Evered 

Farthing 

Fear (Bristol) 

Floyd 

Gare 

Giblett (Glastonbury) 

Greed 

Haggett (Shepton 
Mallet) 

Hatch (Weston-super- 
Mare) 

Hebditch (Ilminster) 

Hembrow 

Hockey 

Horsey 

Hurd 

Hurley 

Isgar (Bridgewater). 

Keedwell 
J Keel 
L Keirl (Bridgewater) 

Kidner 

Look 
f Loveybond 
I Lovibond. 

Loxton 

Lutley 

Mapstone 

Meaker (Bridgewater) 

Oram 

Padfield (Bath) 

Perham 

Phippen 

Pople (Weston-supef- 
Mare) 

Pottenger 



Pow (Bath) 

Puddy (Bridgewater) 

Kawle 

Reakes 

Rood 

Rugg 

Say 
r Sealey "1 (Wells and 
LSealy J Bridgewater) 

Singer (Frome) 

Speed 

Sperring 

Spratt 

Scallard 

Steeds (Bath) 

Stuckey 

Sully 

Summerhayes 

Swantou. 

Sweet 

Tarr 

Tatchell 

Tazewell (Bridgewater) 

Teek 

Tilley (Bridgewater) 

Toogood 

Treasure (Bath) 

Tyley 
r Vigar 
\ Vigors 

Vowles (Bristol and 
Bridgewater) 

Walrond 

Wescott (Dulrerton) 

Winslade (Bridgewater) 

Winstone 
r Withey 
1 Withy 

Wookey 

Yeandle 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 347 

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC SOMERSETSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the following abbreviations : — 

B. indicates Barrett's "Bristol." 

C. „ CoUinson's " Somerset." 

H. „ Hotten's " American Emigrants." 

H.R. „ Hundred RoUs. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

P. ,, Phelps' Somersetshire." 

Sp. „ Contributors to National Defence Fund in 1588 (Brit. Mus., 

B. 474). 

T. „ Toulmin's " Taunton." 

W. „ " The Western Martjrology." 



A— B. 

The Amesburts, wlio are mostly represented intheBridgewater 
district, have taken the name of a town in the neighbouring 

county of Wilts The Aplins, who are now well established in 

the Chard district, were represented in Glastonbury and other 
parts of the county 200 years ago. John Aplin was mayor of 
Glastonbury in 1706 (P.)i and William Aplin was high sheriff 
of Somerset in 1721 (C). A gentle family of the name resided 
in Taunton last century (T.). There were also Aplins in Sutton 
Walrond and Ewern Minster, in Dorset, during the 18th century 

(Hutchins' "Doi-set.") The Babers, who have now their home 

in the Bristol district, have long been represented in that part 
of the county. Benjamin Baber was mayor of Bath in 1677, 1687, 
and 1700 (C). Francis Baber was an eminent physician of Chew 
Magna, Somerset, about 200 years ago (Hoare's " Wiltshire "). 
In Gloucester Cathedral there is an epitaph referring to " Francis 
Baber, armiger, of the ancient family of Baber, in the county of 
Somerset, who died in 1669 " (Bigland's " Gloucestershire "j. 
There was a Baber married in 1628 in Oddington Church, Oxford- 
shire (Dunkin's "Oxfordshire"). Francis Baber, chandler, 
evidently of this Somerset family, embarked at Weymouth, in 



348 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

1635, for New England (H.). Since the Babers were considered 
an ancient family in the county in 1669, they must rank amongst 

the oldest of Somersetshire families The Baggs are now 

established in the Bridge water district. John Bagg, of Thorn- 
comb, on the Devonshire border, was transported to Barbadoes, 
for participating in the Monmouth rebellion in 1685 (H.). He 

suffered in a cause which has since prevailed The name of 

Balch is now established in the Bath district. Probably the 
Wiltshire branch of this family dates from Robert Everard Balch, 
Esq., of St. Audries, Somerset, who, about a century since, came, 
by marriage, into possession of the ancient estate of the Topp 

family of Stockton, Wilts (Hoare's "Wiltshire") The 

Banwells take their name from a parish in the county, and the 
BiCKNELLS from either Bickenhall or Bicknoller, two Somerset- 
shire parishes Beke is not a very common Somerset name. 

It is also found in Devon, together with Beere. Beer is a 
Somerset tithing. In the 14th and 15th centuries the De Beres, 
or De la Bei"es, were important families in the west of England, 
the De Beres of Somerset serving as knights of the shire (P.)- 
The De la Beres of Dorset held large properties in that county 
in the reign of Edward III. (Hutchins' " Dorset "), and in the 
reign of Henry VI. the De la Beres Avere knights of Herefordshire 
(Duncumb's "Herefordshire"). Richard Beere was abbot of 
Glastonbury in the reigns of Henry VII. and Henry VIII. (P.). 
In the 13th century this name, in the form of Le Bere and 
occasionally of De Bere, was commonly represented in Cam- 
bridgeshire, Norfolk, Hunts, Oxfordshire, etc. (H. R.) The 

Barringtons take the name of a parish in the county. They 

are best represented in the Taunton district Body has been 

a west of England name for six centuries or more. In the 13th 
century it was represented in Devonshire by William Body of 
Aspton (H. R.), and now it is still established in the neighbouring 
counties of Cornwall and Somerset. Amongst the martyrs of the 
Monmouth rebellion none behaved more courageously on the 
scaffold than Henry Body, a native of Lyme Regis, Dorset, who 
had fought as a seaman in the naval battles of the time of 
Charles II. (W.). In Cornwall the name has long been known. 
Last century there was a Mr. Michael Body at St. Agnes : Body 
was the name of the commissioner for the destruction of images 
in the Corni.sh churches who was murdered, whilst thus employed, 
at Helston, in 1549 (Polwhele's "Cornwall") The Bonds 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 349 

have their principal homes in the west of England in Devon 
and Somerset, and in the east of England in Norfolk and Suffolk ; 
they are also established in Lancashire and Staffordshire. Six 
centuries ago the name was still to be found in numbers in Norfolk 
and Suffolk, as well as in the neighboui^ing counties of Lincoln, 
Hunts, and Cambridge, and also in Oxfordshire, in the forms of 
Bond and Bonde, often preceded by " Le " (H. R.). The Bonds 
of Somerset are numerous in the Taunton district. {See under 

"Norfolk.") The Burstons are now represented in the 

Bridgewater district. John Buston, of Milverton, was transported 
to Barbadoes for participating in the Monmouth rebellion in 1685 

(H.) BusHELL is a name now scantily represented in the 

county. Two hundred years ago there was a Bath family of this 
name, members of which, on various occasions, filled the office of 
mayor (Warner's " Bath "). The name is still in that city. 

C— D. 

The ancient and distinguished Somersetshire and Devonshire 
families of Gary apparently, in most cases, hailed from the Carys 
of Castle Cary, a knightly Somersetshire family of the 14th 
century (Westcote's " Devonshire "). In the reign of Edward I. 
De Cari and De Cary wei'e still Somersetshii'e names (H. R.), 
and evidently their first representatives took the names of places 

in the county The Chards take their name from a town in 

the county Churches is a name established in the Wells 

district ; it is on the face of it a corruption of Chui'chhouse, a 
rare Somersetshire name, Churchus being an occasional inter- 
mediate form CoGAN or Coggan is an ancient west of England 

name. There was a John de Cogan, of Hunispull, Somerset, in 
the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) ; and in the reign of Richard II., 
William Cogan was sheriff of the county (C). De Cogan was 
a name found also in different parts of Devonshire in the time 
of Edward I. (H. R.), and it has long been an old Tiverton 
name, Humphry Cogan being a Tiverton mercer in the time of 
Elizabeth (Harding's " Tiverton "). John Cogan, of Somerset, 

contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada fund in 1583 (Sp.) 

Collard is a name which has long been known in Taunton and 
the neisrhbouring: district. John Collard was a Taunton clothier 

in the reign of James I. (T.) Edward Counsell, of Allerton, 

was transported to Barbadoes for participating in the Monmouth 



350 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

rebellion of 1685 (H.), a punishment prononnced by history to be 
no disgrace. Mr. John Counsel, of Mark, gave, in 1730, a sum 
of £10, the interest to be distributed amongst the " second poor " 
on Christmas Day for ever (C.)- A family of Counsel lived at 
Stoughton, in "Wedmore parish, last century (C). The name is 

still represented in the parish of Mark The Creeds now have 

their home in the Glastonbury district. A family of this name 
resided at Castle Cary last century : John Creed, who died in 
1740, was vicar of that parish for fifty years; Cary Creed, gent., 
died there in 1751, at the age of 88 (P.). The name is still in 
Castle Cary. The Creeds are also established in Dorsetshire, and 
they were numerous in Gloucestershire. Creed is a parish in 

Cornwall The name of Crees is well represented in the district 

of Frome. As Crees and Creese it is also numerous in Wiltshire, 
and Creese similarly occurs in Worcestershire. In the 17th 
century there was a gentle family of Crees in the town of Derby 

(Glover's " Derbyshire ") The CroOMES take their name from 

parishes in Worcestershire A family of Crossman resided in 

Lympsham last century (C). {See under " Lobb " in " Cornwall.") 

The name of Currt occurred as Curri in Oxfordshire in the 

reign of Edward I. (H. K.) The Dampiers are said to have 

hailed originally from Dampierre in Normandy. Dampier, the 
famotis navigator, was bom in 1652, the son of a tenant-farmer 
of East Coker, near Yeovil, Somerset ; and the name is still to be 
found in the district of Chard. Henry Dampier was mayor of 
Bristol in 1755 (B.). At the end of last century Mr. John 
Dampier, of Wareham, Dorset, owned the greater part of the prin- 
cipal manor of Swanwich in that county (Hutchins' "Dorset"). 
There was a Richard de Damper in Lincolnshire in the 13th 

century (H. R.) The name of Derrick was represented in 

the 13th century by Derk, in Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The 

name of Dibble is now represented in the Bridgewater district. 
Thomas Dible, husbandman, embarked at Weymouth in 1635 for 
New England (H.). Thei'e was a William Dibel in London six 

centuries ago (H. R.) The Somersetshire Ducketts have their 

home in Weston-super-Mare. William Duckett, Esq., lived at 
Hartham, Wilts, in the reign of Charles II. (C). The name of 
Duket occun^ed in Oxfordshire and in London in the 13th century 
(H. R.). The name of Duckett or Duckitt is also established 

around Doncaster, in the West Riding The Duestons, who 

take their name from a parish in the county, are numerous in the 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 351 

Bridgewater district. Amongst the martyrs of the Monmouth 
rebellion in 1685 were Thomas and William Durston, who were 
executed at Wells (W.). 

E— J. 

Jonathan England, one of the martjrs of the Monmouth 
rebellion in 1685, was executed at Taunton (W.). (See under 

the "West Riding.") In 1808, Mrs. Jane Farthing died at 

Taunton, aged 62 (T.) The Frosts are now numerous in the 

Bridgewater district. (<See under "Norfolk.") Although the 

Frts hare their great home in Wiltshire, they are numerous in 

Somersetshire Flower was the name of a gentle family at 

Nunney early last century (C.) Amongst the old Somerset 

names is that of Gapper of Wincanton, now scantily represented 
in the county The Gibletts are still established in the Glas- 
tonbury district. In the first half of last century a gentle family 
of Giblet resided in the parish of Mark in the same neighbour- 
hood (C). Gibelot was a Cambridgeshire name in the 13th 

century (H. R.) The name of Gifford is now established in 

Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Dorset, and Somerset. In the form of 
Giffard it was common in the 13th century in Cambridgeshu'e, 
Norfolk, Suffolk, and Oxfordshire (H. R.). The early Giffards 
were descended from the Giffards of Normandy, their fi.rst ancestor 
in this country having received from William the Conqueror over 
a hundred manors in different parts of England : there were four 
principal families last century, those of Devon, Hants, Bucks, and 
Staffordshire, the last named only now existing (L.). In the 17th 
century there were old established gentle families of the name in 
Devonshire, residing at Brightlegh, Weare, and Tiverton (West- 
cote's "Devonshire.") One of the oldest families of Gooden in 

this part of England is that of the Gooddens of Compton, just 
over the Dorset border of Somerset, who are descended from John 
Goodwyn of the time of Edward YI. (L.). Mr. John Goodden of 
Bowerheaton, in the beginning of last century, belonged to the 

same stock (C.) Edward Hallett was high sheriff of the 

county in 1741 (C.) John Hannam, Esq., held the manor of 

Goathill in the time of Elizabeth (P.). Hanham is a hamlet in 

the adjoining county of Gloucester The Hardwicks are 

established in various parts of England, and in most cases they 

have taken the name of a place in the county The surname 

of De Hembury occurred in the adjoining county of Gloucester 



352 HOMES OF fajMily names. 

in the IStli century (H. R.). Broad-Hembury is a Devonshire 
parish, and perhaps the Somerset name of Hembrow is thus 

derived Amongst the characteristic west of England names is 

that of HoDDiNOTT, which has its principal home in Somerset, but 
is also found in Worcestershire, Wilts, Dorset, Hants, etc., and 
in the form of Hodnett in Shropshire. In Somerset it is an old 
Nunney name : last century, there were graves belonging to the 
family in the churchyard (G.), and the name is still in the parish 

House is a very common name in the Bridgewater district. 

Howse is the Wiltshire form of the name, and reference to its 

origin will be found under that county Hussey is an ancient 

name in Somerset and Wilts, and further particulars concerning 
its origin will be found under " Wiltshire." Lauranee Hussey of 
Wellington was one of the sufferers in the Monmouth rebellion of 
1685 : he was .transported for ten years to Barbadoes (H.), and 
let us hope that he returned to witness the triumph of the Pro- 
testant cause Thomas Hurford, one of the martyrs of the 

Monmouth rebellion in 1685, was executed at Yeovil (W.) 

The Rev. James Hurlt, master of Taunton grammar school, and 
incumbent-curate of Taunton St. James, died in 1783, at the age 
of 70, leaving six surviving children : he was born at Crowcombe 

(T.) HosEGOOD is an ancient west of England name. At 

present it occurs in Somerset and Devon. Six centuries ago it 
was represented by Hosgod, Hosegod, and Osegod, in Gloucester- 
shire, Wilts, and Oxfordshire, and in the eastern counties of 

Norfolk and Essex (H. R.) Hutchings is a west of England 

name, best represented in Somerset and Devon, A Wiveliscombe 
gentleman bore this name three centuries ago (C). It is now at 

home in the Bridgewater district Jacob and Jacobs are now 

Somersetshire names ; but these names have long been known in 
the west of England. John Jacob, gent., was chui-chwarden of 
Ta\dstock in 1662 (Worth's "Tavistock"). Two vicars of 
Collingbourne-Kingston, Wilts, between 1675 and 1703, bore the 
name of Jacobs (Coll. Top. et Gen.), and as Jacob it v^as 
represented in Oxfordshire in the 13th century (H, R.). (See 
under " Norfolk.") 

K— P. 

Keel and Keirl are Somersetshire names, the Keirls being at 
home in the Bridgewater district. Amongst those who took up 
the cause of their religion in the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 353 

were John and Greorge Keele of Chilton, who were transported to 

I Barbadoes, the first named not surviving the voyage (H.) The 

! Layers bear an ancient name, and are now established in Somerset 
I and Dorset. In the 13th ceatury Le Laverd was an Oxfordshire 

name, and Laver occurred in Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The 

LoxTONS take their name from a village in the county. John 
Lockstone, one of the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685, 

was executed at Stogumber (W.) Lutley is a township in 

Worcestershire. The De Luttleys of Luttley, Staffordshire, 
flourished in the time of Edward I. : fi*om them sprang the 

Luttleys of Shropshire and Herefordshire (L.) From the time 

of Cromwell to the reign of George I. several of the mayors of 

Bath bore the name of Masters (C.) Moggeridgb is a rare old 

Somerset name. William Moggeridge, one of the martyrs of the 
Monmouth rebellioa in 1685, was executed at Bridgewater (W.). 

The name of Moody was represented by Mody or Modi in the 

neighbouring county of Wiltshire 600 years ago (H. R.). (See 

under " LmcoLNSHiRE.") Moon is a corruption of De Mohun, 

a distinguished Norman name, occurring in Somerset, Wilts, and 
Devon, in the 13th century (H. R.). The De Mohuns were great 

landed families in the west of England (L.) Greorge Mullins 

of Taunton, and Robert Mullins of this county, were transported 
to Barbadoes, for taking part in the Monmouth rebellion in 1685 

(H.). {See under "Dorset.") Several of the Somersetshire 

Pauls were implicated in the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, and 
were transported to Barbadoes ; one of them was Robert Paul of 

Ilton (H.) .'Perham is an ancient name in the south of England. 

I'he De Perhams were represented in AVilts and Sussex in the 
]3th centuiy (H. R.). John Periam, gent., of Milverton, died in 
1711, and John Periam was high sheriff of the county in 1737 
fC). Several of the mayors of Exeter in the 16th century bore 
the name of Perriam ; a member of this Exeter family was chief 
baron of the Exchequer in the reign of Elizabeth (Westcote's 

"Devonshire.") In the reign of Anne, John Penny, Esq., lived 

at Charlton Musgrove, and at the same time a burgess of Glaston- 
bury bore this name (P.) The Perretts and Perrotts are 

most numerous in Somerset, and are also well established in the 
surrounding counties of Dorset, Wilts, and Monmouth. They 
take their name for the most part, as their distribution shows, 
fi-om the parishes of North and South Perrott, which lie on 
the banks of the river Parret on either side of the boundary 

2 A 



354 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

between Somerset and Dorset. Robert Perrot, one of the martyrs 
of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685, lost his life on tbe scaffold at 
Taunton (W.). The name is now numerous in the Bridgewater 
district. An ancient Pembrokesbire family of Perrot, to whom 
belonged a lord-deputy of Ireland in the reign of Elizabeth, 
derived their name from a place in Normandy, whence their 
ancestor, as they believe, originally hailed (Fenton's " Pembroke- 
shire"). However, I feel doubtful about this descent, as I have 
already pointed out the home of this name in the west of England. 
The Parrotts of Oxfordshire and Bucks, who are referred to under 
those counties, probably also hail, in the first place, from the same 

home on the borders of Somerset and Dorset The name of 

Phelfs is now numerous in the Wells district. It is also an old 

Porlock name (Savage's " Carhampton.") The Phippens were 

represented in Wedmore la.st century (C). William Phippen of 
High Church, was transported to Barbadoes for participating in 

the Monmouth rebellion of 1685 (H.) Pitman is a Somerset and 

a Dorset name. Amongst the Somerset and Dorset men who were 
transported to Barbadoes for espousing the cause of Monmouth 
and the Protestant religion in 1685 were Henry and William 
Pitman (H.). 

R— S. 

Rich is a characteristic west of England name, being most 
frequent in Somerset and Wilts. Those of Somerset are most 
numerous in the Bridgewater district, whilst those of Wilts are 
most frequent in the Malmesbury district. Le Rich was the name 

of a Hampshire family of the 14th century (L.) The name of 

Rood was represented by De Rude in the adjacent county of Wilts 
in the 13th century and by Rude at the same time in Shropshire 

(H. R.) The name of Rogg was represented six centuries ago 

by Le Rug and Le Rugge in Oxfordshire and Kent (H. R.). 

Ruegg is an occasional form of the name The Sages were 

established in Pen.sford last century (C.) The Says bear a 

very ancient name. There flourished in Shropshire from the 11th 
to the 14th century a powerful and ennobled family of De Say 
(Eyton's "Shropshire'). Le Say and De Say were common 
names in Cambridge, Suffolk, Kent, and London in the 13th 

century (H. R.) The old family of Skrixe of Bath-Ford is 

now rarely represented in the county The Slades of Somerset 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 355 

tate the name of a liamlefc in tlie county In " The Western 

Miirfcjrology " we learn that Mr. Joseph Speed of Culliton 
( Colyton in East Devon), one of the martyrs of the Monmouth 
rebellion of 1685, met his death on the scaffold with Christian 

fortitude The Speruings have probably an ancestor in "William 

Spearing, who owned land in South Brent 200 years ago (C.) 

Spiller was the name of a Taunton family last century (T.), and 

the name is still represented in the town and district Amongst 

the old Somerset names now scantily represented in the county is 
that of Strode. The Strodes were numerous in the parishes of 
Shepton Mallet and Piltou in the 17th and 18th centuries (C). 

James II. granted the rectory and church of Dunkeswell, 

Devon, to William Stuckt : a gentle family of Stuckey resided 
at Abbot's Kerswell in East Devon early in the 17th century 
( Polwhele's " Devonshire.")... Sl'LLT is an ancient west of England 
name. In the 13th century it occurred as De Sully in Devon- 
shire and as De Sulleye in Wilts, Gloucestershire, and Worcester- 
shire (H. R.). Sir Raymond de Sully had lands in Huntspill, 
Somerset, in the 14th century (C ). William Sully, one of the 
martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, met his death on the 

scaffold at Danster (W.) Richard Sweet, another martyr of 

the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, was executed at Minehead (W.). 
■~^wete was the name of an ancient gentle family of Trayne, 
3.[odbury (Devon), from the 16th to the 18th centur^^ (Polwhele's 
"Devonshire"). In the 16th and 17th centuries there was an 
Exeter family of Sweet, members of which frequently served as 
mayors and bailiffs of the city (Izacke's " Exeter"). 

T— Z. 

The Talbots are now chiefly established in Somerset, Dorset, 
Lancashire, and Notts. The ancient and illustiious family of the 
Talbots, dating back to Domesday times, were originally settled 
in the Welsh Marches, and afterwards in Shropshire and Stafford- 
shire, and then in Yorkshire (L.) The Tillets or Tillts have 

been established in the county ever since the reign of Richard I. 
From the 12th to the loth century the Tyllys or TiUys of Harptree 
owned the manor of West Harptree, and in the reign of Henry VI. 
they owned also the manor of Salty or Salthay (C). In 1588, 
George Tilly of Pointingdon, gent., contributed £25 to the national 
fund for the defence of the country at the time of the expected 

2 A 2 



i556 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

invasion of the Spanish Armada (Sp.). Tilly was the name of a 
family of Bristol merchants at the close of the 17th century (B.). 
At present the Tilleys are most numerous in the Bridgewater 
district. Since Tylly was an ancient form of the name, it is 
probable that the Tyleys of Somerset hail from the same stock. 
Harptree Tilly is an ancient Somerset tithing : Tilly is also the 
name of a town in Normandy. The name has also long been 
represented in Cornwall, where it may have had an independent 
origin. James Tilly or Tillie of Pentilly or Pentillie was high 
sheriff of Cornwall in 1734 (Polwhele's "Cornwall"), and the 

name still occurs in Falmouth and its vicinity The name of 

Tkeasure has its present home in the Bath district. In the 13th 

century Tresor was a Wiltshire name Tripp is an old Somerset 

name now rarely represented in the county. Isaac Tripp was one 
of the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion of 1685 (W.). There 
was a family of Tripp at Dilton last century (Hoare's "Wilts"). 

John Trickey, another martyr of the Monmouth rebellion in 

1085, met his death on the scaffold at Taunton (W.) The 

Somerset names of Vigar and Vigars or Vigors were represented 
in Oxfordshire in the 13th centnry by that of William Vigerus 

(H. R.) Walrond is an ancient and notable name in the south 

and west of England. In the 13th century it was common, in the 
forms of Walrand, Walraund, Walerond, etc., in Wilts, and was 
also represented in Somerset, Oxfordshire, Dorset, Devon, and 
other counties (H. R.). Henry Walrond was high sheriff of 
Somerset in 1594 (C). William Walrond, Esq., was buried in 
Wells Cathedral in 1662 (P.). James Walrand, one of the martyrs 
of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685, was executed at Ilchestei- 
(W.). An ancient gentle family of Walrond resided at Childrey, 
Berks, from the 14th to the 16th century (Ashmole's " Berk- 
shire"). The Walronds of Bradfield in Uftculm, Devon, from 
the 13th to the 17th century, and probably later, were a powerful 
baronial family in the reign of Henry III. : from them sprang the 

Walronds of Bovey (Westcote's "Devonshire.") Warky is a 

name scantily to be found in the county. Thomas Warry was 
vicar of Littleham, Exmouth, in the county of Devon, during the 
roign of Anne (Webb's "Exmouth"). 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 



3o7 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 

NoTK. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the connty, is more numerous elsewhere. 



Allen 
Brown 
*HaU 



Genbbal Names (30-40 counties). 



*Johnson 
•Robinson 
Smith 



♦Taylor 
♦Turner 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



Adams 


Hill 


♦Thompson 


Bailey 


•Jackson 


•Walker 


*Cooper 


•James 


•Ward 


•Foster 


•Phillips 


•Wood 


•Harrison 







Begiokai. Names (10-19 counties). 



Attins (Stafford) 


Goodwin 


•Simpson (Stoke-on 


BaU 


•Harvey (Rugeley) 


Trent) 


•Bates 


•Shaw (Stoke-on- 


•Sutton 


•Burton 


Trent) 






DiSTEiCT Names (4^9 counties). 


•Beard 


•Dale 


•Meakin 


Bentley 


Gloyer 


Mellor 


•Booth 


Gould (Stoke-on- 


1 Moreton 
L Morton 


Bourne 


Trent) 


Buruett (Stoke-on 


Heath (Stoke-on- 


Moss 


Trent) 


Trent) 


•Nixon (Stoke-on- 


•Charlesworth 


•Holland 


Trent) 


Cotterell 
. (Jotterill 


Kirk ham 


RatcliSe 


Lees 


•Rilej 



358 



ho:mes of family names. 



Slack (Buxton) 
r Steel 
' 1 Steele 



Stubbs 
*Tomlm8on 
*VVain (Ashbourne) 



Wardle (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
*Woolley 



Alcock 
Barks 
Bassett 
^ r Beach 
I. Beech 
Belfield (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
*Bennion 

{Beresford 
Berrisford (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Bestwick (Ashbourne) 
r Bloor 
1 Bloore 
Bonsall (Ashbourne) 
Bradbury 

Brassington (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
*Broiigh 
*Btisby 
•Buxton 
*Chadwick 
*Challiner 

Cope (Stoke-on-Trent) 
Corden 



County Names (2-3 counties). 

Critehlow (Ash- 
bourne) 
Deaville 
Fairbanks 

{Ferneyhough 
Fernihough 
Finney (Ashbourne) 



Gilman 
Grindey 
♦Hand 
Hine (Stoke-on-Trent) 
rHoleroft -i (Stoke- 
-< Holdcroft > on- 
L Houldcroft J Trent) 
*Horobin 
Hulme (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Jervis 
Loekett 

Lowndes (Ashbourne) 
*Millward 
Mountford 
Myeock (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Oakley 
Peake 



Plant (Eccleshall) 
Poyser (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Prince 
^ f Kowbotham 
I Rowbottom 
Rowley 
Rushton (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Salt (Ashbourne) 
Shufflebotham (Mae- 
clesfield) 
r SilHto 
I Sillitoe 
^ f Swindell 
I Swindells 
Timmis 

Titterton (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 
Vernon (Eccleshall) 
Warrington 
f Wheeldon 
■< Whieldon (Stoke-on- 
L Trent) 
Yardley 



Pecttliar Names (confined mostly to this county). 

Boulton 
Bowers 
Brindley 
Brunt 
f Cantrell 
I Cantrill 
CheU 






Ash 


Batkin 


Averill (Stoke-on- 


Beardraore 


Trent) 


Bickford 


Bagnall (Stoke-on- 


Boden 


Trent) 


Boon 


Bake well 


Bott 


Baskeyfieldl 


Bouldl 



STAFFORDSHIRE, 



350 



r Clewlow 
u Clulow 

Clowes (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 

Colclough 

Corbishley (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 

Cumberledge 

Deakin 

Durose (Uttoxeter) 

Eardley (Stoke-on- 
Trent) 

Elsmore 

Fallows 

Farrall 

Fern 

Forrester 

Gold straw 

Hambleton 

Hammersley 

Heler 

Hodgkins 



Hollingsworth 


Pyatt 


Hollins 


Sharrntt 


Howson 


Sherratt (Stoke-on 


f Jeavons 
L Jevons 


Trent) 


Shelley 


Keeling 


Shemilt 


Kidd 


Shenton 


Lakin 


Shirley 


Leese 


J Shoebotham 
I Shoeboitom 


Leighton 


Lindop 


Stoddard 


Lovatt 


Swetnam 


Loverock 


Tomkinson 


r Lymer 
L Linier 


Torr 


TunnicliflP 


Malkin 


Turnock 


Marson 


Warrilow 


Mayer 


Whitehurst 


Mottram 


Wilshaw 


Myatt 


Wint 


Orpe 


Wooddisse 


Parton 


Woodings 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC STAFFORDSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Avthorities indicated hy the follotoin g abbreviations : — 



E. indicates Erdeswick's " Staffordshire." 
H. „ Harwood's " Lichfield." 



H.R. 
L. 

S. 

w. 



Hundred Rolls. 

Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

Shaw's " Staffordshire." 

Ward's " Stoke-upon-Trent." 



360 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

A— B. 

Alcock is an ancient English surname. There was an Alcoc in 
Cambridgeshire in the reign of Edward I., and in the same reign 
there was a John de Alcock of London (H. R.). In the middle of 
the 17th century Egerton Alcocke lived in the parish of Hanbury, 

Staffordshire (S.). The name is also represented in Notts 

The Ayerills of Stoke-on-Trent possess a namesake in Hugh de 

Averle, who lived in Hunts in the 13th century (H. R.) The 

Bagnalls, at present best represented in the district of Stoke- 
on-Trent, were an ancient family of Newcastle-under-Lyme, 
members of which filled at various times the office of mayor ; 
the family came into possession of the manor of Hanley 150 years 

ago (W.). Bagnall is the name of a Staffordshire village The 

Bassetts belong to an ancient and distinguished Staffordshire 
family, members of which frequently occupied the office of high 
sheriff in the 15th and 16th centuries (S.). Bassett is the name 
of places in Leicestershire and Notts. Basset is, however, an old 
English surname, and was represented in the 13th century in 
Devonshire, Wiltshire, Oxfordshire, Essex, Leicestershire, Notts, 
etc. (H. R.). The ancient Bassetts of Staffordshire are said to 
come from the same stock as the Bassetts of Cornwall and Devon. 

(/See under " Cornwall.") The Bkerisfords or Beresfords, at 

present best represented in the district of Stoke on- Trent, are the 
descendants of an ancient noble family that carried its pedigree 
back to the 11th century, and possessed the manor and township 
of Beresford in this county for several centuries (L.). There are 

several branches of this family, one of which is in Derbyshire 

Baskeifield is evidently a corruption of Baskerville, the name of 
an old distinguished Cheshire family. (See under " Cheshire.") 

Book is an old English name, represented in Cambridgeshire 

in the 13th century (H. R.) There was a family of gentry of 

the name of Bott in Dunstall 200 years ago (S.). The name 
of Botte occurred in Norfolk, Lincolnshire, and Oxfordshii-e 

in the 13th century (H. R.) Bbardmore is a characteristic 

Staffordshire name. Berdmore was the name of three vicars 
of St. Mary's, Nottingham, in the first half of last century 

(Deering's "Nottingham.") William Brindley, of Bradeley, 

was tenant of "the Lady Stafford" in 1644 (E.). James 
Brindley, the famous engineer of last century, was born at 
Wormhill, Derbyshire, in 1716. A Staffordshire village and a 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 361 

Cheshire town bear the name Boulton, Bakewell, Bras- 

SINGTON, and Bonsall are the names of towns, townships, and 

parishes in the adjacent county of Derby The Blooes or 

Bloores similarly derive their name from Staffordshire townships. 

The Bestwicks, who are now mostly gathered together in the 

Ashbourne district, bear the name of townships in Lancashire and 
Yorkshire. 

C— D. 

Caterbanck is an old Lichfield name, now rare in the county. 
Several bailiffs or mayors of that city in the 17th century bore the 

name (H.) Cani'rell was the name of the Chancellor of the 

Diocese of Lichfield in 1503 (S.) There was a gentle family 
of Cantrell at Wokingham, Berks, 200 years ago (Ashmole's 

"Berkshire.") The Chadwicks belong to one of the most 

ancient and eminent of Staifordshire families, known as the 
Chadwicks of Ridware in this county, and of Callow in Derby- 
shire, in which county they are still represented ; they carry 
their pedigree back for more than three centuries (Glover's 
" Derbyshire "). There are hamlets of the name in Lancashire, 
Worcestershire, and Warwickshire. In Lancashire the Chadwicks 

have another, and probably an independent, home There are 

two hamlets of the name of Chell in North StafforfS shire. In 
the 13th century there were persons of the name of Chelle in 
Warwickshire, and of the names of Chel and Chele in Norfolk 

and Lincolnshire (H. R.) Colclough is the name of an ancient 

family that resided on the estate of their name at Wolstanton as 
far back as the reign of Edward III. ; the Colcloughs were lords 
of the manor of Hanley in the 17th century, and members of 
the family received the honour of knighthood and possessed a 

baronetcy (W.) The name is still in Hanley Cotton is a 

very ancient Staffordshii-e name. The De Cotons of Ridware 
during the 14th and 15th centuries spelt their name Cotton 
in more modern times (Nichols' "Leicestershire"). The 
Leicestershire Cottons came from this family. {See under 
"Leicestershire.") The name is also represented in Hereford- 
shire Staffordshire is the home of the Copes, who are most 

numerous in the district of Stoke-on-Trent. In the reign of 
Charles II., Jonathan Cope, of Ranton Abbey, was high sheriff 
for the county. The name is also represented in Cheshire and 



362 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Derbyshire. The ancestors of the lice of baronets of this name 
seem to hail originally from Oxfordshire. In the 13th century 
the name was established in Backs, Beds, London, Suffolk, 

Norfolk, Lincolnshire, etc. (H. R.) Deakin is an old Lichfield 

name. Between 1728 and 180-5 five mayors of that city bore the 
name (H.). In 1631 Mr. Deakin of Lichfield left an annual 
bequest of ten shillings for a sermon at St. Maiy's, on the 
Wednesday after Ash Wednesday (S.). The name still occurs 
in the city. 

E— L. 

The Eardlf.ys, who possess the name of a Staffordshire village, 

are best represented in the district of Stoke-on-Trent The name 

of Fern has its home in Derby and its neighbourhood, where it is 
nearly always spelt Fearu, but anciently Feme. It has, however, 
been long established in Staffordshire. There was an old and 
distinguished family of the name at Crakemarsh (F.). John 
Fern was mayor of Lichfield in 1775 and 1784 (H.), and the name 

is still in that neighbourhood Finney is a name established on 

the Derbyshire border in the Ashbourne district. Edward Fynney 
was bailiff of Lichfield in 1619 and 1627, and Edward Ffinney was 
sheriff of the city in 1641 (H.). The name was represented in 

Burton-on-Trent 300 years ago (S.) Feknthodgh is the name 

of a Staffordshire estate long held by a family of the name (E.). 
A curate of Stoke-on-Trent bore this name about a century ago 
(W.), and it is in this locality that the Ferneyhoughs are now 
mostly gathered. The name is also represented in Cheshire... 
HoLLiNS was the name of a firm of potters a century ago in 
Stoke-on-Trent, whei-e the name still remains (W.). Copwood 
Hollins, Esq., resided at Mosslee in the early part of last century 

(Pilkington's "Derbyshire.") Hollingsworth is the name of 

places in Cheshire and Lancashire, and Hambleton of townships in 

the West Riding and Lancashire Jeyons is an old name in the 

adjacent couaty of Shropshire. Samuel Jevon was mayor of j 
Shrewsbury in 1672 (Phillip's "Shrewsbury"). Jevans was the] 
name of the bailiffs of Ludlow in 1538 and 1593 (Wright's' 

"Ludlow.") The Keelikgs were a Staffordshire family in the] 

17th century (E.). The name of Kelin or Kelyng was represented'! 
in Cambridgeshire and other counties in the 13th century (H. R.). 
There was a Mr. Joseph Lakin of Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, in] 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 363 

1784 (W.). Peter de Lakyng lived in Oxfordshire in the reign of 

Kdward I. (H. R.) The Lovatts of Clayton were an ancient 

family owning ranch property in that township in the 17th century 
(W.). Mrs. Elizabeth Lovatt of Lichfield gave in 1631 the yearly 
rent of an acre of land to pay for an annual sermon on the First 
Sunday in Lent for ever (S.). The similar name of Lovett or 
Lovitt occurs in Leicestershire and Herts. In the 13th centuiy 
the name of Lovet was established in Northamptonshire, Lincoln- 
shire, Oxfordshire, and Devonshire (H. R.) The name of Lymf.r 

or LiMER was represented by that of De Lymar in Northamptonshire 

in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) There was a family of 

LiNDOP in Shrewsbury during the first half of last century (Owen 
and Blakeway's " Shrewsbury "), and there was a Robert Lyndop 
of Shropshire in the 13th century (H, R.). 

M— Z. 

In the 16th century the distinguished family of Mountford 
owned the manor of Aldrich (E.). The name is also represented 

in Herefordshire Oakley is the name of a Staffordshire 

manor The Peakes of Staffordshire were represented in 

Shropshire in the loth century by the Piks and Pickes (H. R.). 

{See under "Cambridgeshire.") Pyatt was the name of an 

old family of gentry of Streethay, in the reign of Charles I. (S.). 
Pyott was often the early form of the name. Richard Pyott, 
whose father was a London alderman, was high sheriff" of the 

county in 1636 (E.) Mottram is the name of a town in 

Cheshire The Plants are very numerous in the Eccleshall 

district. The name of Plente oocui-red in the 13th century in 
Hunts and Oxfordshire (H. R.). There are also now a few 

representatives of the name of Plant in Suffolk and Shropshire 

Salt, an ancient and a very common Staffordshire name, is 
exceedingly numerous in the Ashbourne district, on the borders 
of Derbyshire, in which county also it is well represented. Salt 
• is the name of a Staffordshire village and district ; and Salte of 
Salte was the original ancestor of the family (S.). The Saltes 
of Yoxall were a family of gentry 300 years ago ; in 1600 Mr. 
Walter Salt left a bequest for the poor tradesmen of Lichfield 

(S.), and the name is still in that city Rowley and Rushton 

are the names of places in the county. The Rushtons are well 
represented in the district of Stoke-on-Trent John Sheekat 



3()4 HOMES OF FAJIILY NAMES. 

was mayor of Lichfield in 1776 (H.), and his name is still there. 

A family of Shirley possessed large estates in Hanbury, 

Staffordshire, in the 16th century (S.). The Shirleys of Eatington, 
Warwickshire, have an ancient pedigree (L.). There were also 
old distinguished families of the name in Leicestershire (S.)- 
There are parishes and villages thus called in Warwickshire, 

Derbyshire, etc Shelley is also an old Staffordshire name, 

possibly in some instances confoanded with Shirley. Richard 
Shelley was incumbent of Wolstanton in 1643 (E.). John Shelley 
of Ranton, yeoman, was one of the Roman Catholics and non- 
jurors of Staffordshire, who refused on religious grounds to take 
the oath to George I. in 1715 (S.). Shelley is the name of a 

town in the West Riding of Yorkshire Shbnton is the name 

of a Leicestershire township, and Warrington of a Lancashire 

town Stubbs is a name also well represented in Cheshire, and 

fairly represented in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, and Hants. In the 
13th century the name of De Stubbes or De Stubbis occurred in 

Yorkshire (H. R.) Swetnam or Swetenham is an ancient name. 

There was a family of Swetinam in Bucks in the reign of 
Edward I. (H. R.) Probably the family of To RR came origi- 
nally from the adjacent county of Warwickshire. The ancient 
and honourable family of Torre or De Turre, that resided for 
many generations at Westwood, near Haxey, Lincolnshire, came 
in the reign of Henry IV. from Warwickshire (Stonehouse's 
" Isle of Axholme.") The Wrieldons or Wheeldons of Stafford- 
shire are mostly gathered together in the district of Stoke-on- 
Trent. Francis Wheeldon, gent., was an opulent farmer of 

Hounhill, Hanbury, in the latter half of last century (S.) 

Wint is an ancient name represented in Oxfordshire and Cam- 
bridgeshire in the 13th century Yardley was the name of a 

family of gentry of Farndon, Cheshire, in the 17th century (Coll. 
Top. et Gen.). 




SUFFOLK. 



365 



SUFFOLK. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates tliat a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



♦Allen 
., r Clark 
I Clarke 



Genebal Names (30-40 counties). 



*Cook 

*Green 

*Smitli 



*Taylor 

Turner 

* Wright 



*Baker 
*Cooper 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 



King 
* Moore 



Bead 
*Webb 



Regional Names (10-19 counties). 



Chambers 


*Hammond 


Chapman 


*Hart 


Freeman (Stonham) 


* Harvey 



*Howard 

*Pratt 

*Symond3 



DiSTEiCT Names (4^9 counties). 



r Aldrich 


Goddard 


L Aldridge 


Harper 


*Coe 


Hayward 


*Dennis 


*Hm8 


*Durraut 


Morley 


Dyer 


Partridge 


r Everett 
t Everitt 


*Peck 





Pettit 
*Reeve 
r Rolfe 

L Eolph (Brandon) 
*Wainwright 

"Woods 



366 



HOMES OF FAMILY XAilES. 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Ealls 


Grooding 


Mudd 


Barrel! 


Groom 


Nunn 


Bloomfield 


J Fatten 


Peddar 


*Back 


L Hatton 


Pepper (Wangford) 


Capon 


Howlett 


Rush 


Catchpole 


*Hubbard 


*Seaman 


Catt 


♦Jolly 


♦Stanford (Wickham 


f Coppen 


*Knights 


Market) 


L Copping 


# r Le Grice 
L Le Grys 


Stedman 


Deeks 


Thirkettle 


* Denny 


Ling 


Thurlow 


Downing (Ipswicli) 


*Lord (Bury St. Ed- 


Thurston 


Eade 


munds) 


Tingey 


♦Farrow 


Makeus 


Vinee 


G-arrard 


Matthew 


*Wakelin 


Grirling 


Mayhew 


Waller 


Groodchild 


Mutimer 





Peculiar Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Aldous (Harleston) 


Fincham 


Meen 


Alston 




JFisk 
LFiske 


Nesling 


Aves (Soham) 




Newson 


Baldry 




Flatman 


r Pendell 
l Pendle 


Bendall 




Fulcher 


Blowers 




Garnham 


Sawyer (Wickham 


Borrett 




Gooderham 


Market) 


Button 




Grimsey 


r Sheldrake 


Calver 




Grim wood 


1 Sheldrick 


Catling 




Hadiugham 


Southgate (Needham 


Cattermole 




Haward 


Market) 


Cobbold 




Hitchcock 


Squirrell 


Colson (Bury 


St. Ed- 


Hurren 


Stannard 


munds) 




Ingate (Halesworth) 


Steggall 


Cracknell (Wickham 


Jillings 


Sturgeon (Bury St. 


Market) 




Juby 


Edmunds) 


Cutting (Ipswich) 


Keeble 


Thurman 


Debeuham 




Kemball 


Tricker 


Deck 




Kerridge 


Whitmore 


r Feaveryear \ ( 
L Feaviour J 


Harles- 


Kerry 


Wolton 


ton) 


Kersey 


WooUard 


Finbow (Stowmarket) 


Last 





SUFFOLK, 3(3' 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHAEACTERISTIC SUFFOLK 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha 
betical oi'der in each group.) 



Atlthorities indicated ly the following ablreviations : — 

Gr. indicates Gage's " Suffolk." 

H. „ HoUingsworth's " Stowmarket." 

H. E. „ Hundred Rolls. 

Lansd. ,, Lansdowne MSS., 5 and 7. 

I^' .1 Lower's " Patronyiuica Britannica." 

^- » Page's " Supplement to the Suffolk Traveller." 

S- ,, Suckling's " Suffolk." 

Sp. „ Contributions to Armada Fund in 1588 (Brit. Mus., B. -474) , 

W- „ Wodderspoon's " Ipswich." 



A-B. 

Aldous is an ancient east countiy name wLich at present Las 
its principal home in and around Harleston in this county, though 
still found in Ipswich and Stowmarket. Aldus was the name of 
an Ipswich bailiff in 1654 (W.), and the name of Aldhuse was 
established in Stowmarket in the reign of Elizabeth (H.). In the 
forms of Aldus and Alduse it occurred in the reign of Edward I. 
in Norfolk, Notts, Lincolnshire, and Oxfordshire (H. R.). We 
learn from Blomefield's " Norfolk " that Aldous was the name 
of the rector of Wreningham in that county in 1393, and that 
Thomas Aldous of Starston, Norfolk, died in 1740 at the age of 

100: Aldhouse is also an old Norfolk name Aldrich and 

Aldbidge are, for the most part, east country names, and they haAe 
been so for six centuries and more. At present they occur mostly 
in Suffolk, Norfolk, Surrey, Herts, and Berks, with a few in 
Gloucestershire. In the 13th century they occurred in the forms 
of Aldrich and Aldric in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire (H. R.). 

Aldrich is an ancient personal name Baerell is still a 

Stowmarket name. The Barrells were business people in that 



368 H03IES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

town in the reign of Charles I. (H.). Barrell is an ancient name 
that is now mostly confined to Suffolk and Herefordshire. In the 
form of Bai'el it occurred at Blakeburn, Suffolk, in the 13th century, 
and as Barel or Barell at the same time in Shropshire (H. R.). Six 
centuries aeo, thei'efore, this name had much the same distribution 

as it has at present Blowkrs is a name that was represented in 

the hundred of Bljthing in this county by Le Blowere in the 13th 
century (H. R.). The Baldeys of Ips\vich possess a very ancient 
Sutfolk name, which was well known in Ipswich and Stowmarket 
in the 15th and 16th centuries : some of the name served as bailiffs 
or mayors of Ipswich in the reigns of Heniy VI. and Henry VIII. 
(H. and W.). Sir Thomas Baldiy, lord mayor of London in 
1523, was the son of Richard Baldiy of Stowmarket (P.). The 
name of Baldri was represented in the neighboui-ing county of 

Hunts in the 13th centui-y (H. R.) The Bexdalls may derive 

their name from the Suffolk parish of Benhall. De Benedhal was 

a Shropshire name in the 13th century (H. R.) Balls, an 

ancient name now confined to Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex, was also 
well established six centuries ago in the eastern counties, particu- 
larly in Norfolk and Lincolnshire, and also in Suffolk, Kent, and 
Sussex (H. R.). (See under " Ball " in Chapter II.) Bloom- 
field or Blomfield, also a Norfolk name (see under "Norfolk"), 
has long been found in Suffolk. Bailiffs of Ipswich in the reigns 
of Edward IV,, Henry VII., and Charles II., bore the name of 
Blomfield (W.). William Blomfield was a gentleman of Little 
Stonham, Stowmarket, in 1653 (H.). The name is still in Ipswich 
and Stowmarket. In the reign of James I. the name of Bloomfield 
occurred in the parish of Westley (G.). Robert Bloomfield, son 
of a tailor, and author of the " Farmer's Boy," was born at 

Honington, near Bury St. Edmunds, in 1766 One of the Suffolk 

freeholders in 1561 was Borrett of Buddymyn (?) (Lansd.). The 
name occurs on a mooument in Cratfield church, bearing the date 
of 1698 (S.). A family cf Borrett, originally of Irish extraction, 
resided in the 16th and 17th centuries in Stradbrook parish and 
owned Stadhaugh in Laxfield (P.) . The name is still in Stradbrook. 

C— D. 

Catt is an ancient east country name. It occurred in Norfolk 
and Essex in the 13th century and remained a Norfolk name until 
the 15th century and probably later (H. R., L.) (Blomefield's 



SUFFOLK. 369 

" Norfolk "). Cat, Le Catt, and De Cat were its early forms. An 
old Kent family bore the name of De Cat (L.). The name of Catt 

is also now established in Sussex Catchpole, a name also found 

in Norfolk, signified a petty constable. It has been long in the 
county of Suffolk. In the list of Suffolk freeholdei-s in 156 1 occurs 
the name of Robert Catchpoll (of Hempstow ?) (Lansd.). Catch- 
poole was the name of the vicar of Bramfield in 1695 (S.). 
Cachepoll was a Hereford name in the 14th century, a mayor 
and a representative of the city being thus called (Dnncumb's 

"Herefordshire") Capon and Catling are tiwo Suffolk names 

that were represented in the immediately adjacent counties as far 
back as the 13th century, Capoun occurring in Cambridgeshire 
and Capon in Norfolk, and Catelyn and Catoline in Cambridgeshire 
(H. R.). Richard Catelyn was lord of the manor of Woolver- 
stone Hall, Suffolk, in the reign of Elizabeth ; an alderman of 
Norwich in 1556 and the sheriff of that city in 1531 belonged to 
a family, afterwards knighted by Charles I., that owned Wingfield 

Castle (P.) CoBBOLD occurred as Corbold and Coebold in the 

list of Suffolk freeholders in 1561 (Lansd.) Coppen or Copping 

was represented in the 13th century in the counties immediately 
adjacent, as Copping in Norfolk and Copin in Cambridgeshire 
(H. R.). There was a George Copping in Ipswich in the middle of 

the 16th century (W.), and the name is still in that town CoE, 

an ancient name also now found in the surrounding counties of 
Cambridge, Essex, and Norfolk, has long been found in this 
county. James Coe of Orford, Suffolk, conti-ibuted £25 towards 
the defence of the country at the time of the expected invasion of 
the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). Coe was a common name in 
Shere, Surrey, in the middle of last century (Manning's " Surrey "). 

The Cuttings are at present at home in Ipswich and 

its neighbourhood. Edward Cuttinge held land in Haughley, 

Stowmarket, iu the reign of Edward IV. (H.) Debenham is the 

name of a Suffolk town ; but it is also an ancient Suffolk surname. 
Two bailiffs (mayors) of Ipswich bore the name in the 15th 
century (W,). In the 13th century there was a De Debenham 

residing in Hunts (H. R.) The Suffolk name of Deck was 

represented as Dec in Cambridgeshire six centuries ago (H. R.). 
...Denny has long been a Suffolk name. In the reign of 
Edward III., Roger le Denney held the manor of Denneys in 
Coddenham parish, which remained in the family for several 
generations (P.). In 1541 Thomas Denny, Esq., owned Mells (P.) ; 

2b 



370 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and in 1562 the Dennys lield estates in Bramfield (S.). John 
Denye resided at " Lakyngh " in the hundred of Lackford in the 

13th century (H. R.). (See under "IS'orfolk.") The Downikgs 

of Speckshall in the 17th century were a branch of the very 
ancient Essex family of the name, a member of which was made 
a baronet in 1663, whilst another was founder of Downing College, 
Cambridge (P.)- The Downings have their home now in Ipswich 
and its neighbourhood. In South Elmham church there is, or was, 
a monument to Dorcas Downinge, bearing the date of 1638 (S.). 

E— G. 

Eade is an ancient Suffolk name. In the form of Ede it 
occurred in this county, as well as in Norfolk, in the reign of 
Edward I., and in this form it was, at the same time, numerous in 
the neighbouring county of Hunts (H. R.) Under " Sussex " 
reference will be found to this name in that county. Eades is a 
name now found in Bedfordshire, whilst Ede is found in Cornwall 

The FiSKES or Fisks are probably connected with the Fiskesof 

the parish of Cratling in the 17th century : a monument to one of 
the family in Cratling church bore the date of 1640 (S.). Rattlesden 
was the home of an ancient family of Fiske, owning much property 

in the county last century (P.) The Fixchams of Fincham 

Hall, Xoi-folk, owned property in Brantbam, Suffolk, in the 16th 

century (P.) Fulcher, a Norman, owned much property in the 

county at the time of the Conquest (P.). The name of Fulcher 

occurred in Lincolnshire in the 13th century (H. R.) The name 

of Flatsian probably originates from " flotmann," an Anglo-Saxon 
word meaning "sailor." Floteman was a tenant in Yorkshire in 

pre-Domesday times (L.) Garxham is an old Suffolk name. 

Thomas Garnham of "Westley in 1587 evidently possessed the 
courage of his own beliefs. He was then deemed to be " one of the 
fro ward soarte," misled by seditious ministers, and was excommu- 
nicated for offences against the Church (G.). We might regard him 
now as a reformer. Robert Garnham was the name last century 
of a rector of Hargrave (G.) and Nowton, and of a master of 
Bury School (P.). John Garnham was a Stowmarket clothier in 
the reign of Charles 1. (H.) The name of Girling was repre- 
sented in St. Andrews in this county in the beginning of the 17th 
century. It has also long been established in Norfolk, and was 
prominently associated with the municipal affairs of Lynn from 



SUFFOLK. 371 

the reign of Elizabeth to that of Charles I., Gurlyn being the 
name of five mayors during that period. There were also Grirlings in 
JSTorwich in the 17th centtuy (Blomefield's "Norfolk"). The name 
also oecnrs as such in Essex, and in Kent in the form of Curling 

Gooding was a Stowmarket name 300 years ago (H.), and the 

name is still in the town Goddaed has been for centuries a 

characteristic Suffolk name. In the reign of Elizabeth several 
freeholders in the county bore this name (Lansd.). In the 18th 
century it occurred as Godai'd in the adjoining county of 
Cambridge. (See under " Berkshire," etc.) 

H—N. 

The Hadinghams probably derive their name from a Cambridge- 
shire parish Jolly was the name of a South wold merchant 

200 years ago. (See under "Norfolk.") The name of Juby 

was represented in the county in the 13th century, by Elias Jubbe 

of "Donewey," in Blything hundred (H. R.) Kersey is the 

name of a Suffolk parish Kerridge was the name of a mayor 

of Ipswich and of a rector of Horningsherth about a century ago 
the name of Kerrich occurs in the records of Dimwich for 1299 
(G., L., and W.). Thomas Kerrich owned Shelley manor in 1627 

(P.). Kerridge is still an Ipswich name Fi-om the 15th to 

the 17th century, Keeble, in the forms often of Keble, Kebill, 
and Kebyll, was a common name amongst the gentry and trades- 
men of Stowmarket (H.). Keeble is still a Stowmarket name. 
William Keeble, a native of Newton, was rector of Ringshall in 
1644 (P.). In the 13th century, Kibel, Kibbel, and Kebbel were 
names found in the adjacent counties of Cambridge and Hunts, 
as well as in those of Lincoln and Oxford (II. R.). There are 

Kibbles now in Bucks and "Warwickshire A family of Le 

Grice or Le Grys formerly resided at the Hall, Browston (P.). 
Further reference to this name will be found under " Norfolk," 

its original home Ling also is essentially a Norfolk name, 

and further reference to it will be found under that county 

Mayhew was the name of the rector of Buxlow about 1500 (S.). 
There are also Mayhews in Bedfordshire. Mehew was the name 
of several bailiffs of Godmanchester, Hunts, last century (Fox's 

" Godmanchester.") Mudd, a name found also in the Noi-th and 

East Ridings of Yorkshire, is said to be derived from the Anglo- 
Saxon " mod," signifying force, etc. Henry Mudde was a Suffolk 

2 b2 



372 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

freeholder in the reign of Elizabeth (Lansd.) ; and in the same 
reign Simon Mudd was a townsman of Loughborotigh, Leicester- 
shire (Fletcher's "Loughborough"). (See under "Moody," in 

"Lincolnshire.") Nunn is an old Anglo-Saxon personal name. 

In the reign of James I. the Nunns had property in Southwood 
(G.). Simon N"unne of Ringsfield owned Wryngeys in Beeston 
in the reign of Henry VIII. (P.). Four centuries ago there was 
a George Nunne in Hawsted (Cnllum's "Hawsted"). The 
Nunns are also now represented in Essex. 

0-S. 

The name of Pepper, which is further referred to under 
" Lincolnshire," has its present Suffolk home in the Wangford 

district Rush was the name of a distinguished family owning 

much property in the county last century (P.) Snape, a family 

name now rare in the county, is the name of a Suffolk village, 
where an ancient family of De Snape once resided. In the 13th 
century the De Snapes were established in Norfolk and Suffolk, 
and Henry de la Snape lived in Sussex (H. R.). (See under 
"Yorkshire.") Stanford is now a Wickham Market name- 
Last century a gentle family of Staniforth lived at Norton (P.). 

Stannard, an ancient baptismal name, has been associated 

as a family name with this county since the time of Edward the 
Confessor; a bailiff of Ipswich in the reign of Henry VII. (W.), 
and the rector of Lackford in the reign of James II. (G.), bore 

the name. It is still an Ipswich name The Sparrows have 

been associated with the corporation of Ipswich from the 16th to 
the present century, several of the name occurring in the list of 
the early bailiffs and the modern mayors (W.). The name is still 

in the town Seaman was the name of a Mendlesham yeoman in 

1557 (H.) Southgate, a name that now has its home in the 

district of Needham Market, and in Stowmarket, was represented 
by Sowgate and Suggat in Stowmarket in the reign of James I. 

(H.) Stbggall was the name of the rector of Hawsted a 

century ago The old Suffolk family of Sturgeon held, the 

manor of Manston, Whepstead, from the beginning of the 16th to 
the close of the last century (G.). "Maister John Sturgeon" was 
governor of the company of Merchant Adventurers, when they 
gave a princely reception to Philip of Spain on the occasion of 
his taking possession of the Low Counti-ies in 1640 (Allen's 



SUFFOLK. 373 

" Lincolnshire "). At present the name is best represented in and 
around Bury St. Edmunds. An estate in Writtle parish, Essex, is 
called Sturgeons or Turges Cassus (Wright's "Essex"). John 
Sturgeon, or Strogeon, of Hitchin, Herts, was twice sheriff of 
Hertfordshire and Essex in the reign of Edward IV. (Salmon's 
"Hertfordshire"). 

T— Z. 

The name of Thirkettle, as such and in its various contracted 
forms of Thirtle, Thurtell, Thurtle, etc., is mainly characteristic 
of Suffolk and Norfolk; but Thirkell is at present peculiar to 
Kent. In one form or another it was common in the county 
of Suffolk in the 16th century (S.) ; and the name was still 
established in the eastern part of England six centuries ago, when 
Thurkill and Thurkil were Cambridgeshire and Norfolk names 
(H. R.). (See under "Norfolk.") This name came over with 
the Danish Conquerors in the 9th and 10th centuries, when 
several Danes thus called settled in this country. It was a 
Danish Thurkill, lord of Kingston, Berks, who fell by the side of 
the English Standard at the battle of Hastings. Thurcytel, an 
English thane of Danish descent, behaved treacherously at a 
battle in East Anglia, about the same time that Earl Thurkill 
or Thurcytel, in 1009 headed a Danish invasion of the eastern 
counties. The same Danish earl was afterwards made by Canute 
Earl of East Anglia. Thirkill was the sacrist who witnessed the 
miracle of the holy rood in Waltham Minster when Harold made 
his vow before the battle of Hastings (Freeman's "Norman 

Conquest.") The ancestors of the noble family of Thurlow of 

Ashfield, Suffolk, lived in the 16th century at Bumham, Norfolk 

(P.). Thurlow is a Suffolk parish The Thurstons belong to a 

very ancient Suffolk family seated at Thetford at the time of the 

Conquest (P.). Thurston is a Suffolk parish The Rev. Samuel 

ViNCE, a noted Cambridge professor of last century, was born at 

Fressingfield (P.) "Whitmore is a name occui-ring only in my 

list for this county, and probably the Suffolk Whitmores are 
derived from the family of Sir G. Whitmore of Ramsey Hall, in 
Ramsey parish, Essex (in the time of Charles I.), who was the son 
of a London merchant and a grandson of Richard Whitmore of 
Charley, Shropshire (Morant's "Essex"). The Whitmores of 
London, as we learn from Taylor's " Harwich," were prominent 
citizens, and one of them was lord mayor in 1631. Their Shropshire 



374 HOMES OP FAMILY NAMES. 

ancestors had been seated at Whitmore or Wliittimere, in 
Claverley parish, as far back as the reign of Henry III., and from 
this stock sprang the Whitmores of Apley, also in Shropshire (L.). 
Another family of Whitmore lived for centuries at Thnrstanton 
Hall in Thurstanton parish in the adjoining county of Cheshire 
(Mortimer's "Wirral"). Richard Whitmore of Caunton, Notts, 
contributed £25 towards the defence of his country at the time of 

the expected invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.) 

WooiiLAED, according to Lower, is a form of Willard, the name of 
a family that has been established in Kent and East Sussex since 
the 13th century. 



SURREY. 



375 



SURREY. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that, though the] name is charac- 
teristic of the county, it is more numei'ous elsewhere. 



*Brown 
*Cook 



GrENEBAL Names (30-40 counties). 

♦Martin *3mith 



*Baker 

♦Ellis 



Common Xajies (20-29 counties). 

♦King *MitcheU 

Lee *Young 



♦Goodwin 
♦Howard 



Eegioxal Names (10-19 counties). 

♦Knight ♦Stone 



♦Chandler 

CoUyer 



DiSTEiCT Names (4-9 counties). 

Hmnphrey 

♦Nash 



Sadler (Godalming) 

Stacey 



CorxTY Names (2-3 counties). 



♦Bonner 


Muggeridge 


Steer 


Charman (Dorking) 


♦Nix 


Weller (Dorking) 


Jay 







376 HOIMES OF FASIILY NAMES. 

Peculiab Names (confined mostly to this county). 

Caesar Gosden Tice 

Charlwood Puttock Wonham 

CHuter Smithers 



NOTES OX SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC SUEREY NAMES. 



Authorities indicated hy the folloioing abbreviations : — 

A. indicates Aubrey's " Surrey." 

H. R. „ Hundred Soils. 

M. „ Manning's and Bray's " History of Surrey," 

Nic. „ Nichols' " Collec. Topog. et Geneal." 



A— P. 

BoNKER is an aBcient name also represented in Herefordsliire. 
As Boner and Bonere, it occurred in Oxfordshire and Hunts in tlie 

reign of Edward I. (H. R.). (See under "Herefordshire.") 

In the registers of Croydon, Surrey, are found the names of 
Susanna Cssar, daughter of John and Rebecca Caesar, born in 
1695, and of John Caesar, vicar of the parish, -who was buried in 
1719. There were also other Caesars at Waddon in this parish 
early last century (Nic). Probably the Ciesars of Surrey were 
originally connected with the distinguished knightly family of that 
name of Benington, Herts, in the 17th and 18th centuries. The 
Benington Ceesars, originally named Adelmar, after their ancestor 
the Count of Genoa, in the 9th century, subsequently adopted the 
name of the mother of their Italian ancestor, a daughter of the 

Duke de Cesarini (Salmon's "Herts.") The Charmans of 

Dorking and its neighbourhood have representatives of their name 
in the adjacent coujity of Sussex. They may, however, be con- 
nected in the past with the ancient family of Charman of Risby, 
Suffolk, that carries its pedigree back to the reign of Edward III. 

((cage's "Suffolk.") Charlwood was the name of the town 

clerk of Bangston-on-Thames in 1688 (M.). A Surrey parish is 



SURREY. 377 

thus called Chute R was tlie name of one of the churchwardens of 

Byfleet in 1786 (M.) Jay is an old Farnham name of the 16th 

century. Memorial plates belonging to this family, one of them dis- 
playing the date of 1597, occur, or once existed, in Farnham church. 
Thomas Jay of Middlesex, Commissary-General in the troubled 
times of the first half of the 17th century, was buried at Richmond. 
Probably enough he belonged to the Farnham Jays. The name is 
also at present represented in Herefordshire and ^Norfolk (A.). 

Nix was the name of a Newington tradesman in 1669 (M.). 

It is likely that this family came originally either from Cambridge- 
shire or Notts. {See under "Cambridgeshire.") Puttock is a 

very old English name ; and probably it is now to be found in 
other eastern counties besides Surrey. It has, however, been long 
ia the county, since we learn that in 1687 Jane Puttock, of the 
pai'ish of Alfold, received a certificate from her vicar to be touched 
for the evil (M.). Six centuries ago we find this name still in the 
east of England, occurring as Pnttoc and Pattock in Cambridge- 
shire, and as Puttak in Kent (H. R.) ; and in truth Florence of 
Worcester, writing in the 11th century, speaks of an Anglo-Saxon 
named Puttoc. 

R— Z. 

The Steers or Steeres were a Newdegate family of gentry of 
the 17th and 18th centux-ies; and one of the members was rector 
of Newdegate from 1610-1660. The Steeres of Wootton parish in 
the 17th century were evidently connected with them, and a 
hundred years ago, Lee Steere, Esq., of Jayes, Wootton, owned 
property in Newdegate. Steere was the name of a Southwark 
tradesman in 1667 and of a churchwarden of West Clandon just 
a century since. In 1750 there were Steeres in Guildford. (M. 
and A.) This is an old east and south of England name. As 
Le Ster it occurred commonly in the counties of Norfolk and 
Cambridge during the reign of Edward I, as well as in Oxford- 
sliire ; and at the same time the name was represented in Sussex 

and Somerset (H. R.) TiCE was the name of the vicar of West 

Clandon in 1470 (M.). The name was to be found in Bucks in 
the reign of Edward I., and at the same time as Tyse in the 

county of Hunts (H. R.) The Wellbrs of Dorking and its 

neighbourhood possess an old Surrey name. Andrew Weller was 
a Putney tradesman in the middle of the 17th century; and there 



378 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

were Wallers in tte parishes of Horley and Cheam in the middle 
of last century (M.)- Weller, the mayor of Guildford in 1778, 
had a namesake and probably a relative in his contemporary the 
rector of Guildford and East Clandon (M.). It may be that the 
SuiTey Wallers are connected with or descended from the members 
of the old Kentish family of the same name who owned Kingsgate 
House, Rolvenden, in the reign of Charles I. and for several 
generations afterwards (Hasted's "Kent"). Probably to the 
Kentish Wellers belonged the Rev. Samuel Weller, rector of 
Sandridge, Kent, who after being a pupil at Reading school 
obtained a scholarship at St. John's College, Oxford, in 1700 
(Coates' "Reading"). Tunbridge owned a family of the name 
last century (Hasted). In our own time the name of Weller is 
also found in Bucks. Burn, in his account of Henley-on-Thames, 
mentions a Mr. Hugh le Veller who resided in that town in the 
reign of Edward III., a circumstance which suggests the grave 
reflection that the dictum of Mr. Weller, senior, concerning the 

orthography of his name, was historically correct! Wonham 

is the name of a manor in the county Though the Surmans 

are at present scantily represented in Surrey, they formed a 
numerous family in Christchurch in this county, in the 17th and 
18th centuries ; Mr. John Surman was a London merchant who 
died in 1712 (A.). At present the name is found in Gloucester- 
shire and Oxfordshire. (See under " Gloucestershire.") 



SUSSEX. 



379 



SUSSEX. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



Martin 



Q-ENEEAi. Najies (30-40 counties). 

*Smitli *Turner 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

Baker *Mitcliell *Steven9 

*Cooper Eogers *Wood 



REGI0^'AL Names (10-19 counties). 



*Collin8 


Ifeale 


*Pratt 


♦EUiott 


(■Page 
L Paige 


*EusseU 


Knight 


J Simmons 
L Simmonds 


^Miles 


r Paine 
I Payne 


*Mills 


*Wells 



DiSTEiCT Names (4r-9 counties). 



Avery 


*Crouch 


*Lovell 


Bourne 


*Durrant 


Moon 


r Brook 
1 Brooke 


Field 


Eeere 


Fuller 


Upton 


*Burgess 


Jenner 


Walter 


*Carr (Uckfield) 


Kemp 


*Weston 


♦Coleman 







380 



HOMES OF FAMHiY NAMES. 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



Bannister 


Farrant 


LufE 


Barrow 


Goldsmith 


Luxford 


Booker 


* Greenfield 


*Marchant 


Bridger 


Hampton 


*Muggeridge 


f Caine 
-Cane 


Hard 


Noakes 


Harmer 


Peachey 


Catt 


Hemsley 


Piper 


r Child 

'LChUds 


Hilder (Hawkhurst) 


Stanford 


Holman 


r Standen 
L Standing 


f Cornwall 
L Comwell 


*Iveland 


Jupp 


J Styles 
I Stiles 


Duke 


Kenward (Uckfield) 


; Eade 
"l Eede 


Langley 


Westgate 


Lemmon 


Wickham 


Eldridge 


^ r Lerett 
I Levitt 









Peculiae Names (confined mostly to this counly). 



Akehurst 


Gates 


r Penf old 
I Pennifold 


AUcorn 


Goacher (Horsham) 


Ayling 


Gorringe 


Rapley 


Ay 1 win 


Haffenden (Heath- 


Sayers 


Barham 


field) 


Sinden 


Bodle 


Head 


Sparkes 


Boniface 


Heaver 


Stay 


Botting (Billinghurst) 


Hide 


Sturt 


Boumer 


Hoadley 


Suter 


Challen (Midhurst) 


Hoath 


Tester (Hayward' 


Chitty 


Hobden (Hailsham) 


Heath) 


Churchman 


Hobgen 


Tobitt 


Coppard 


Honeysett 


f Towes 
L Towse 


Corke 


Hook 


Comford 


Isted 


Tribe 


Diplock 


Joyes 


Verrall 


J Dumbrell 
\ Dumbrill 


KiUick 


Wakeford 


Leppard 


Walder 


Etheridge 


Longley 


Wickens (Tunbridge 


Evershed 


Mannington 


Wells) 


Fogden (Chichester) 


Message 


Woodhams 


Funnell 


Newington 


r Wren 
L Wrenn 


Gander (Hayward's 


Packham 


Heath) 


Panklaurst 





I SUSSEX. 381 

) NOTES ON SOME OP THE CHARACTEEISTIC SUSSEX NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



\ Authorities indicated by the following abbreviations : — 

C. indicates Cooper's " Winchelsea." 

D. „ Dallaway's "West Sussex." 
H. C. „ Hay's " Chichester." 

H. L. „ Horsfield's " Lewes." 

Hoi. „ HoUo-way's " fiye." 
! H. E. „ Hundred EoUs. 

! H. S. „ Horsfield's "Sussex." 

! L. ,! Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

L. S. „ Lower's " Sussex." 
j M. ,, Moss' " Hastings." 

i Sp. „ " Contributors to the National Fund at the time of the 

invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 " (Brit. Mus., 
B. 474). 



A— B. 

John Akbhurst was mayor of Hastings in 1614 (M.), and the 

name is still in the town The Allcorxs probably possess an 

ancestor in Thomas Alchorn, who leased an estate in Albourne 

in 1620 (D.) The family of Atlixg has been established in 

Tillington and its neighboni'hood for 800 years (H. S.). "William 
Ayling was in possession of part of the manor of Woolbeding in 
the reign of Elizabeth, and in the reign of Henry VIll. Robert 
Ayling was prior of Pyneham Priory (D.), Ayline was an 

Oxfordshire name in the 13th century (H. R.) Avery is a 

name also represented in Backs, Devon, and Somerset. It 
occurred as Averey in Oxfordshire in the reign of Edward 1. 

(H. R.) The ancient name of Atlwix, or Eylwin, as it was 

at times written in the middle ages, occurs in Domesday as a 
personal name, and was represented as a family name six centuries 
ago in Kent, Oxfordshire, Hunts, and Cambridgeshii^e (H. R.). 
It has long been known in Sussex. In 1474 Henry Aylwin held 
Chilgrove Manor fi^om the Crown. The West Sussex family of 
the name has been at home in the parish of Treyford since the 



382 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

latter part of the 16tli centurj : in 1535 John Aylwin held the 
property of Canons in West Dean (D.). John Aylwin was mayor 
of Chichester in 1654 (H. C), and the name is still in the town. 

In the reign of Edward Yl. the Bannisters or Banisters held 

an estate in Beeding, West Sussex (D.). Thomas de Banastre, 
apparently a Sussex man, distinguished himself in a naval fight 
off Winchelsea in 1350 (C). The name is far more characteristic 

of Lancashire The Sussex Barhams are probably connected 

with the ancient Kentish family of Barham. In the 13th century 

Baham was a Suffolk name (H. R.) Bodle is the name of 

an ancient Sussex family, formerly called Le Bothel (L.) 

Boniface is an old Sussex name that has characterised the county 

since the 15th century (L.) John Booker was the principal 

proprietor in Worthing in the reign of Anne (D.). The name 

also occurs in Dei'bysliire The Bournes of Sussex derive their 

name from a parish in the county Bridger is the name of an 

ancient and influential family in the county that held property 
in Ashurst and Warminghurst ; one of the family was high 
sheriff 100 years ago (H. S.). The name is also established in 

the adjacent county of Hampshire The family of Botting has 

its present home in the district of Billinghurst. There was a 
Nicholas Bottynge in Winchelsea in the reign of Elizabeth (C). 

C— D. 

Cane or Caine is one of the most ancient of Sussex names, 
having been represented in the parish of Ripe from the time of 
Edward the Confessor to the jiresent day (L.). Cane appears in 
Domesday for Sussex as a baptismal name (L.), and as a family 
name Cane was also to be found in the 13th century in Oxford- 
shire, Hunts, and Lincolnshire (H. R.). The vicar of Findon in 
1725 bore the name of Cane (D.). It is also to be found in the 
adjacent county of Hants ; whilst in Dorset it takes the form of 

Caines The Sussex family of Catt may very probably be 

connected with the old Kentish family of De Cat (L.). The name 
has been established for many centuries in the eastern counties, 
and further reference to it will be found under " Suffolk," in 

which county it still occiu's The name of Challen has its 

present home in Midhurst and its neighbourhood. The Challens 
were landed gentry of Selsey and Shermanbury in the 17th 
and 18th centuries ; Stephen Challen owned property in Selsey 



SUSSEX. 383 

in the reign of William III,, which ^his descendant, the Kev. 

J. G. Challen of Shermanbuiy, sold in 1797 (D.) Accordino- 

to Manning's " Surrey," Chittt was a common name in God- 
aiming in the 17th and 18th centuries. In Sussex it was 
represented as far back as the reign of James I. by Henry Chitt}', 
who rented from Lord Berkeley the extensive demesnes of the 

manor of Bosham (D.) Cloudesley and Costellow are old 

Chichester names that are now rare in the county. Between the 
reigns of Charles II. and Anne several of the mayors of the town 

bore these names (H. C.) Cornwell is a name also found in 

Cambridgeshire and Herts. Robert Cornwelle was vicar of N^ew 

Shoreham in 1440 (D.). (See under "Herts.") Thomas 

Crouch was mayor of Rye in 1693 (Hoi.) The Dumbrells 

or DcMBRiLLS are probably connected in their descent w4th 
Thomas Dumbrill of Horsham, in the reign of Charles II. ; there 
is a slab to his memory in Horsham Church, bearing the date of 

1678 (D.) The principal home of the Durraxts in the past 

was in the eastern counties, and further reference to the name 
will be found under " N'okfolk." The name was represented 
in the adjacent county of Kent in the 13th century (H. R.). 
Three mayors of Hastings, Sussex, in the 16th century, bore 

this name (M.) Between 1727 and 1754 Coppard was the 

name of five mayors of Hastings (M.) Duke was the name 

of an old influential Sussex family dating back to the reign of 
Henry VI. (D.). There are also a few of the name in Dorset. 
Duke is also a widely-spread name amongst the gentry of the 
south of England, many of the families being connected and 
bearing the same arms. From the Dukes of Power Hayes and 
Otterton, Devon, sprang the Dukes of Wiltshire, who were 
implicated in the rebellion of 1655, and are still represented 

in Wiltshire and the neighbouring counties (Burke) The 

DiPLOCKS are represented by the Duplocks and Du Placs in the 
old parish registers of East Stissex. Du Plac, the earliest form 
of the name, is evidently of French origin, and was probably 
borne by one of the many ironworkers from France who settled in 
the county in the 16th century (L.). 

E-I. 

The ancient name of Fade has long been in the county. In 
1203 John Eade bought half a messuage for twenty shillings 



384 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

in the parish of Steyning (D.). (See under "Suffolk.") 

Between 1669 and 1697 four mayors of Hastings bore the name 
of Hide (M.), which is still represented in that town. Gander 
is a name that has its present home in the district of Hayward's 
Heath. It was also a Hampshire name. John Gander was twice 
mayor of Winchester in the reign of Henry VII. (Milner's 

"Winchester.") The Goachers of Horsham may possess the 

altered name of Francis Goater, mayor of Chichester in 1695 

(H. C.) The name of Gorringe maybe derived directly from 

the Snssex parish of Goring, or from the influential old Sussex 
family of Goring, to which evidently belonged Henry Goringe 
and George Goring, both of this county, who contributed £100 
apiece for the defence of their country at the time of the expected 
invasion of the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Sp.). In 1617 there 
lived respectively at Amberley, Piddinghoe, and Rottingdean, 
three brothers named Goringe, but in a humbler condition of 

life (L. S.) Grebbell or Gribble is the name of an old and 

influential Rye family, now rare, members of which frequently 

filled the office of mayor in the 17th and 18th centuries (Hoi.) 

The family of Evershed, with those of Eldridge and Hobden (of 

Hailsham) had representatives in the county a century ago 

The Haffendens of Heathfield belong to a branch of an old 
Kentish family of the name ; Heathfield has been their home for 

a series of generations (L.) The family of Heaver takes its 

name from the Kentish parish of Hever Notts is also the 

home of the Hemsleys. The Rev. W. Helmsley was vicar of 

Patching, Sussex, in 1475 (D.) Hilder, which is a Kentish 

as well as a Sussex name, has its home in Hawkhurst. Hildare 

was a Steyning name in the reign of Henry V. (D.) The 

names of Hoath and Hoadley are evidently derived from the 
Sussex parishes of East and West Hoathly. Dr. Benjamin 
Hoadley, Bishop of Winchester, was the champion of the Low 

Cbui'ch in the reign of George II. (Milner's "Winchester.") 

The Isteds belong to an old Sussex family conjectured to have 
come from Eysted, in Sweden, and to have settled in Sussex 
in the reign of Edward III. (L.). Thomas Isted was town clerk 
of Winchelsea in 1610 (C). Ambrose Isted, citizen of London, 
who died in 1692, was the son of Richard Isted, of Lewes, and 
owned Ecton Hall, Northamptonshire, which his descendants 
have held to the present century (Cole's " Ecton"). 



SUSSEX. 385 



J— L. 



Sussex is the principal home of the Jenners ; but the name 
is also established in Kent, Wilts, and Gloucestershire. The 
Jenners were " freemen " of Rye in the time of Chai-les II. (Hoi.), 

and the name is still in the town Jupp is a Surrey as well as 

a Sussex name. The name of Joop occurred in the parish of 
Clapham in the reign of Henry IV. (D.). Just as Joop in this 
part of England has been transformed into Jupp, so Joop and 
Joope anciently in Wiltshire have been transformed into the 

modern Jupe. (See nnder "Wiltshire.") The north-east 

border of East Sussex has long been the great habitat of the 

KiLLiCKS (L.) The Levetts or Levitts belong to an old Sussex 

family of influence. In the reign of Elizabeth, Lawrence Levitt 
held an estate in Anningt;On (D.) ; and in 1588 John Levett, a Sussex 
gentleman, subscribed £40 towards the fund collected during the 
scare of the Spanish Armada (Sp.). Livett was the name of four 
mayors of Hastings between 1506 and 1552 (M.). Reference to 

the Levetts of Kent will be found under that county Langley 

is a place-name in the county John Luffe was incumbent of 

Bury in 1723 (D.). Luff is probably a corruption of the Kentish 
name of Love. The name of Luffe occurred in Bucks in the 13th 

century (H. R.) The Luxfords belong to an old Sussex family 

(L.). Thomas Luxford of this county gave £25 to the fund 
collected at the time of the expected invasion of the Spanish 

Armada in 1588 (Sp.) Leppard was the name of a family that 

held the manor of Bolney last century (L. S.) In the 17th and 

18th centuries, eighteen mayors of Hastings bore the name of 
Lovell (M.). (See under "Northamptonshire.") 

M— S. 

Peter Marchant was Constable of Lewes in 1724 (H. L.). 

The name is also found in Kent The Newixgtoxs have been 

established in East Sussex since the 15th century (L.) 

Packham is also an old Kentish name, and is evidently derived 

from the Kentish parish of Peckham The Pankhitrsts take 

their name from an estate in East Sussex The Peachets 

belong to a notable family, to which Baron Selsey belonged, that 
held considerable estates in North Bersted and West Dean as far 

back as the early part of the 17th century (D.) Penfold or 

2C 



386 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Pexxifoli) is an old Sussex name. Stephen Penfold was twice 
mayor of Chichester in the reign of Charles II. (H. C), and the 
name is still in the town ; at that time the Penfolds held large 
estates in the parish of Angmering (D.) : Hugh Penfold owned 

the Cissbury estate, Findon, in 1794 (L. S.) Piper was a 

Sussex name in the 13th century (D.) Rapley was a Warnham 

name in the 17th century : there is a memorial slab to one of the 

name in the church, bearing the date of 1668 (D.) Sayers, 

represented in Hertfordshire by Sears, is the name of an ancient 
Essex family of landed gentry going back to the reign of 

Edward II L (L.) The name of Stay occurred in Kingston 

Bowsey in the reign of Edward II. (D.) Standen is also a 

Kentish name. Standean is a Sussex hamlet. Abednigo Standen 
was a " freeman " of Winchelsea in 1610 (C), and the name is 

still in the town Sparkes was the name of the incumbent of 

Middleton in the reign of Charles II. (D.) Sturt is a name 

that was at one time more common in the southern counties than 
it is at present. It occurred in Devonshire in the 13th century 
(H. R.). There were Sturts in the parish of Angmering, Sussex, 

two centuries ago (D.) Stanford is the name of a patish in 

the county Milward is now a rare Sussex name; but between 

1G86 and 1824 it was borne by about fifty mayors of Hastings (M.). 

T— Z. 

The name of Tribe was represented in the parish of Shipley 

in 1650 (D.) Verrall is an old East Sussex name well known 

in Lewes in the 17th and 18th centuries, and still represented 
there. Between 1686 and ] 779 the Verralls held on eight occa- 
sions the office of Constable of Lewes, the last holder of the post 

being Araunah Verrall in 1779 (H. L.) The farm of Lullington 

manor was held by the family of Woodhams for many generations 
(L. S.). Woodhams is the name of parishes in Essex and Bucks. 

Wren or Wrenn is at present a Sussex name; but in the 

13th century it occurred in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire (H. R,). 

WiCKHAM is the name of a Sussex hamlet The name of 

Wickens is numerously represented on the Kentish border in the 
district of Tunbridge Wells. 



1 



\YARWIOKSHIRE. 



\S1 



WARWICKSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a Bame, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 

Geneeal JS^AiiES (30-40 counties). 



•Clark 

*Hall 

•Jiarria 



•Johnson 
Smith 



Tavlor 
Wright 



Common Names (20-30 counties). 



•Cooper 
•Jackson 



•Palmer 
•Thompsoa 



•Walker 
•Ward 



Regional Names (10-20 counties). 



Arnold 


Gibbs 


rNeal 
\ Neale 


BaU 


Gilbert 


•Bates 


•Griffin 


•Pearson 


•Berry 


Middleton 


Perkins 


•Cox 


Mills 


Spencer 


Gardner 







DiSTEiCT Names (4-10 counties). 



Ashford 


f Garratt 
L Garrett 


•Lowe 


•Bull 


Mann 


f Cotterill 
1 Cotterell 


Grant 


*Mumford 


•Greaves 


Richmond 


•Corbett 


* Heath 


Riley 


Croft 


Horton 


•Townsend 


Dunning 


Lea 


Whitehead 



2c2 



388 



HOMES OF FAMn.Y NAMES. 



CotrsTY Names (2-4 counties). 



Adcock 


Gilks 


Kibble 


Badger 


Haddon 


Newbery 


*Boinford 


Hawkes 


Oldliam 


Biirman 


r Hollyoak 
\ Hoyoak 


Parkes 


Canning 


Beading 


Cattell 


Ivens 





Pecttliae Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Arch 


jHicken 
L Hickin 


Murcott 


Boddington 


Kainbow 


Burbidge 


Hollick 


Tibbetts 


Chattaway 


Ibbotson 


Tidy 


Crofts 


■ Jeffcoate 
Jephcott 


Trippas 


Currall 


Truelore 


Edkins 


Keyte 


Warden 


Elkington 


Knibb 


Weetman 


Fitter 


Led brook 


r Wilday 
\ Willday 


Grimes 


Moxon 


Hands 







In the case of a few of the above names we are able to give the districts in 
which they are most common. Thus, Barman, at Tanworth, near Birmingham ; 
Cattell, around Birmingham ; Hands and Ivens, around Rugby j Trippas and 
Warden, around Coventry. 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTEEISTIC WARWICKSHIRE 

NAMES. 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations 



D. indicates Dugdale's " Warwickshire." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

K. „ Kemble's " Saxons in England." 



WARWICKSHIRE. 389 



A— E. 



Badger was a Warwickshire name in the reign of Henry VIIT. 
(D.). There was a Thomas le Baggere in the adjoining county of 

Oxford in the 13th century (H. R.) The Burmaxs, who are 

also represented in the adjacent counties of Northampton and 
Worcester, have long been established in Warwickshire, and are 
now mostly represented at Tanworth, near Birmingham, from 
which latter place they may perhaps derive their name. More than 
two centuries since they held property in the village of Wolscote : 
William Bnrman, of that parish, who was a London woollen 
draper, died in 1654 (D.). In St. Paul's church, Granborough, 
there is, or was, an epitaph to Thomas Burman, of the Middle 
Temple, late of Woolscot, who died in 1658 : his accomplishments 
and pious living are thus I'ecorded (D.) : — 

" The love of God, of CLurcli, and King, 
Of country, parents, friends, and poore, 

The bookes of law, the golden ring 
Of arts and sciences, and more 

Than epitaphs or poetts can 

Express, lyes buried in Buruian." 

In 1709 the Rev. Richard Barman was buried in the church of 
Bourton-super-Dunsmore (D.). The name was represented in the 

adjacent county of Oxford in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) 

Amongst the numerous immigrants from sun'ounding counties, 
who have assumed the names of their native parishes or of the 
homes of their birth, there are the BoDDiNGTONS,»who hail from 
either Gloucestershire or Northamptonshire ; the Burbidges from 
Burbage, either in Leicestershire or Wilts ; the Elkingtons from 
Northamptonshire, and others. The Elkingtons of Elkingtou, 
Northamptonshire, were an ancient gentle family, and from them 
branched ofP the Elkingtons of Shawell, Leicestershire, in the 
16th, 17th, and 18th centuries (Nichols' "Leicestershire "). John 
Elkington, a Leicestershire gentleman, contributed £25 for the 
defence of his country at the time of the expected invasion of the 

Armada The Cannings bear the name of an Anglo-Saxon clan 

that originally had its home in Wilts and Somerset (K.). The 
name of Canning is still fairly represented in and near the original 
home of the clan in Hants and Wilts. The Warwickshire Cannings 
held property in Foxcote from the time of Henry VI. down to 



390 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

recent times (D.) Dunning is another Anglo-Saxon clan name ; 

and Dunnington, a Warwickshire hamlet, was probably the home 
of the clan in this county (K.). The name was well represented 
in Cambridgeshire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.). (See under 

" Yorkshire, N. and E. R.") The name of Cattell is now well 

established around Birmingham : it is also found in the contiguous 
county of Oxford. Six hundred years ago it occurred as Catel 
and Katel in Bucks, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Norfolk, and Lincoln- 
shire (H. R.). 

F - K. 

The name of Fitter, according to Mr. Toulmin Smith (" Memo- 
rials of Old Birmingham"), is a corruption of Vyterre, a name 

that occurs in a Birmingham charter dated 1494 Hawkes, as 

we learn from the authority just quoted, is an old Warwickshire 
name, which was well represented in Birmingham during the 16th 
century. The name of Gilks was common in the adjacent part of 
Oxfordshire early last century, and it is still found in that county. 

The family of Hands, now numerous in Rugby or its vicinity, 

bear an ancient name, probably of Flemish origin, as for instance 
front Hans : the name of Hande occurred in Beds and Bucks in 
the reign of Edward 1. (H. R.) Hollick is an evident corrup- 
tion of Hollyoak or Holyoak, a name that occurs also in this 
county as well as in Leicestershire. We learn from Dugdale that 
Francis Holliok, incumbent of St. James' church, Southam, was 
instituted in 1604 ; and that Fisher Holyoake, gent., and attorney- 

at-law, was buried in this church in 1720 Grant is not always 

a name that hails from the Scotch side of the border. There are 
English Grants as well as Scotch Grants. To the former belong 
those of Warwickshire, Lincolnshire, Dorset, and Devon, who 
evidently are the present representatives of the numerous Le 
Graunts occurring in the 13th. century in the counties of Oxford, 
Wilts, Lincoln, Notts, Norfolk, Essex, etc. (H. R.). The name of 
Grant occui-red in Warwickshire in the reign of Richard HI. (D.). 

Haddon is the name of parishes in,the neighbouring counties 

of Northampton and Hunts, in the former of which the surname 
also occurs. In the 18th century it was a common surname in 

Hunts and Oxfordshire (H. R.) Horton is also a local name 

in Cheshire, Northamptonshire, and elsewhere The Keyts or 

Kbytes were originally a county family of considerable antiquity 



WARWICKSHIRE. 391 

in Gloacestershire. Throus^h not taking the oaths to Williara and 
Mary, the Rev. Thomas Keyt, rector of Binton (co. Warwick), was 
deprived of his living in 1690. He was succeeded by Richard 

Keyte (D.) Kibble, a name at present also found in Bucks 

and as Keeble in Suffolk, is an ancient name represented 600 
years ago in different forms in the Hundred Rolls for Hunts, 
Cambridgeshire, Oxfordshire, etc. {See under the " Keebles " of 
Suffolk.) . 

L— Z. 

MuRCOTT is an old Warwickshire name. Henry Murcott, of 
Cubbingtou, gent., was buried in Southam church in 1686 : 
Abraham Murcot, one of His Majesty's coi-oners, was buried in 
the same church in 1718 (D.). This surname had originally a 
local origin, being, in fact, taken from parishes and hamlets of 
the name in the neighbouring counties of Northampton, Oxford, 

and Wilts Mann, though well represented in this county, has 

its ancient and present home in the eastern counties. {See under 

" Norfolk.") The Readings, who have their principal home in 

this county, being also now found in Bucks and Oxfordshire, are 
probably the modern representatives of the Raedings, a Saxon 
clan, that gave their name to their settlements in Derbyshire and 
in the eastern counties (K.). 



392 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



WILTSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, thougli characteristic 
of this county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



Geneeal Names (30-40 counties). 



*Brown *Green 

♦Clark (Malmesbury) * Smith 



'Taylor 
White 



* Carter 
♦Hunt 
*King (Salisbury) 



Common Names (20-29 counties). 

Matthews (Chippen- *Mitchell 
ham) Webb 



Eegional Names (10-19 counties). 



•Andrews 


♦Harding 


Parsons (Salisbury) 


Barnes 


♦Hawkins 


Bead 


Butler 


♦Lewis 


Reeves 


*Cole 


Long 


Eeynolds 


*Collins 


♦Mai-sh 


♦Sutton 


^ Dean (Heytesbury) 


♦Miles * 


Watts 


L Deane 


Newman 


♦WeUs 


♦Francis (Trowbridge) 


♦Nicholls 




DisTEiCT Names (4r-9 counties) 




Alexander 


♦Cave 


G iles (Devizes) 


Anstey 


'Combs (Salisbury) 
L Coombs 


♦Goddard 


Blake (Chippenham) 


Godwin 


Bourne 


♦Crook 


♦Gough 


*Bryant 


Fry (Chippenham) 


Hayward 


♦Carpenter 


Gay 


♦Hobbs 



WILTSHIRE. 



393 



r Jefferies 
L Jefferys 
*Judd 

Painter 
*Perrelt 
Pike (Shaftesbury) 
^ r PuUeu 
* L Pullin 



*Eich (Malmesbury) 
Sargent 

Sims (Trowbridge) 
Snook (Devizes) 
Street (Salisbury) 
Taoner 

*Tucker 



♦WaUis 

*\Vaters (Salisbury) 

Weeks 

Welch 
*Wheeler 

Wilkins 
* Willis 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*Balch 
Bowles 
Bridges 
Burrough 

{Crees 
Creese 
Ellison 
Ferris 

Few (Devizes) 
Flower (Salisbury) 
Fulford 
Glass 
Golding 



r Hibbard 
iHibberd 

Higgs 

HilUer 
*Hiscock 

Hitchings 
f Holborrow 
L Holbrow 

Hussey 

Large 
*Lyne 

Maidment 

Pickard (Trowbridge) 
♦Pile 



Pinniger 

Plummer 

Poeock (Melkshani) 

Pouting 

Eawlings (Calne) 

Redman 

Simpkins 

Spackman 

Stratton 

Tuck 

Tines 
*VValdron 
*Whitlock (Salisbury) 

Wiltsliire (Devizes) 



Pectliab Names (mostly confined to this county). 



Awdry 

Beak 

Bracher 

Breach 

Compton 

Cottle 
f Cuss 
I Cusse 

Doel 

Eatwell (Calne) 
r Frankcombe 
L Frankcome 



Freegard (Chippen- 



Hulbert (Malmes- 



ham) 


bury) 


Freeth (Cricklade) 


Jupe 


GarUck 


Keevil 


Ghey 


Kemble 


Greenaway 


Xinch 


Greenhill 


Knapp 


Grist 


Manners 


Hathway 


Maundrell (Calne) 


Henley 


r Melsome 
L Alilsom 


Howse 



394 



HOLIES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



f Mintey 
1 Mintv 




Piclvetfc 


Sidford (Salisbury) 




Pinchin 


Sloper 


Morse 




Puckeridge 


Taunton (Salisbury) 


^ewtli 




Euddle 


Titcombe 


Ody (Swindon) 


Bumming 


Whatley 


Pariiaui 




E.U83 





NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC WILTSHIRE 

NAMES. 

(The names are arranged in alpliabetical groiips, but not necessarily in 
alphabetical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations : — 

A. indicates Aubrey's " Wiltshire" (Topographical Collections). 

B. „ Bull's " Devizes." 

E. ,, Easlon's " Mayors of Salisbury." 

H. ,, Hoare's " Wiltshire." 

H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

L. „ Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

W. „ Waylen's " Marlborougli." 

C. T. G-. „ " CoUect. Topogr. et Geneal." 



A— D. 

Amongst the old established Wiltshire families I may refer 
to that of Blake, which is at presenb best represented around 
Chippenham. There were Blakes in Warminster in the reign of 
Elizabeth, and they are still to be found there, and the name has 
been represented in Ludgershall since the begiiming of the 17th 
century (H.). An influential family of this name owned Pinhill 

House in Calne in the 17 th century Bowles is an old Wilts 

name. The mo.st influential families bearing this name are said to 
have come from Bristol during the 15th century. In the following 
century they were resident in Burcombe, and during the 18th 
century they supplied sheriffs and members of parliament for the 

county (H.) The present representatives of the name of Cottle 

are evidently descended from the ancient Wilts family of Cottel, 



ESi 



WILTSHIRE. 395 

whicli originally owned much property, especially in tlie parish of 

Atford in the 13th century (A.) The family of CussE held land 

at Berwick Saint John in the 17th century, and last century they 
held property in Winterbourn Gnnnes (H.), where the name is 

still found. A family of Cus lived in Swindon in 1610 (A.) 

The old county name of Awdrt is not at present represented 
amongst the fai^mers, but is to be found amongst the gentry. The 
Awdrys of Seend were resident landowners in that parish for 
more than 200 years. The earliest known ancestor was vicar of 

Melksham in 1601 (A.) A family of gentry of the name of 

Bracher have resided at Semley since the middle of last centurj-. 
The name has been represented in the parish of Tisbury during 
the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Edward Bracher of Walmead, 

gent., died in 1754 (H.) The ancestor of the present family of 

Balch may be Robert Everard Balcb, Esq., of St. Audi^ies, 
Somerset, who, about a hundred years since came by marriage into 

the estate of the ancient Topp family in Stockton Alexander 

is an old Wilts name which is now mostly to be found in the Court 
Directory. The name was represented in this county in the Hundred 

Rolls about 600 years ago Digges is an old Wiltshire name, 

now rarely to be found in the county The cui'ious surname of 

DoEL is evidently a corruption of de Dourle, which is found in an 
old Malmesbury deed (A.). Probably also the Doels are connected 
with the ancient family of Dewell or Dewale, the possessors of 
property in Bremelham during the 14th and 15th centuries (A.). 

Roger Dewell was a yeoman in Norton Bavent in 1609 (H.) 

The Burroughs formed a numerous family in Laverstock during 

last century (H.) During the 16th century the family of 

Bridges or Brydges occupied an influential position in Wilts, one 
of their number being created Baron Chandos (A.). Michael 
Bridges was the incumbent of Sedgehill and Berwick Saint John 

in 1774 (H.) The names of parishes and places in Wilts 

probably gave rise to the surnames of Coombe, Comptox, Combes, 

AxsTET, etc Some of the mayors of Salisbury in the 14th and 

1 5th centuries bore the names of Betterltght and Aport : both 
these names are now rare or extinct (E.). 

E— G. 

Amongst the singular surnames of this county is that of 
Eatwell, which is at present best represented in and around 



39fi HOUES OF FAMILY XJLMES^ 

Cmbte. There lias a William Enrallricar of Chiite,irho died iiiin6 
C. T. G.). Bistwelle is an ancient Oxfordshire sBxname of the 13tb 

centDiy (H.. R.) Of the old Wihs families of jeomen, few cau 

boast a greater antiquity, and few have shown niore love of their 
coontj' br rcmainii^ in it, than those bearing the name of Frt. 
XnmenMts as thej now are, especialhr around Chippenham, we find 
that as fwt back as in the reigns of Hecrjr IIL and Edward L, ike 
Fi^ee or Fries found, in Wiltshire iheir main abode (H. £L). The 
Frrs of Aal^rove, in the parish of Donhead St. Maij, appear to be 
one of the parent stods ; thej gave the barial ground for Quakers 
in that parish, whidL has been used for this purpose ever mux the 
Societj' <rf Fnends was fiist established in Kngland ; to this stock 
bdonged the husband of ^Mrs. Ftt, the philanthropist (H.)^... 
GiASS is an old Mariborough name. Thomas Glass lost property 
to tihe extent of £711 in the great fire of 1653 in that town (W.) : 

his name is still rqspeaented there William Gasucc was one of 

the HarflKKongh bugesses in 1711 (W.). This is also an ancient 
name in the east of England. In the 13th ooitury it oecnrred as 
Gariec in Camfaddgeshire and as Garlek in Norfolk (H. R.). 
I^idifdas Gailid^ a Roman Catholic priest of Dinting, Derbyshire. 
snffieved uaitjidom for his religion at Derby in 1588 (Wood's 

'^Eyam.") Feskis is an old Wilts name^ An influential fami] 

thns called, resided at Blnnsdon in the 16th oentuiy (A.), am 
Fenris was also the name of the ricar ai Sutton Benger in 164^ 
and of a WannineiEr family in the middle of last century (H.) 

Flowsb was the name of the mayor of Salisbury in 1701 (E.) 

and idbe name is still re p tn s en ted in that city. Bertreen 1604 anc 
1787 not less than foute^ <^ tiie mayoRS of Derizes were thnjj 
called (B.). Three hnndrBdjeazs ago there were Flowers in Bowd 
and Steeple-Asfatxm (A.), and the name still occuis in Bowde 

Fkjlsecomb and Fklskooxe, at present found in Wiltsbire 

were Gloucesta-shire wmj^^ some five or six o^turies back. Ij 
the Hnndaed Bolb of the IStli ceatniy we find Fiaonchonune an 
FnuBciiDme. Tbe name has been cuiiously modifited in moder 
times, and dms it is that Fmnkcomb, Frankcome, Frankcum, an 
F^ankham n yret n ai t the earfyS^Ksh appeflatiiMi of a Fiencfamaz 

The name of Gobwdt cxsenrred in Wilts 600 years ago, and r 

that time the nunc was also frequent in the adjacent county 
Oxford, where it is stiH to be found in fair numbers (H. B>.) . . . 
Thoa^ not p***— K—* to WiUn, Giles is an old surname in th 
conni^ ; it is at pn is cMl mostly to be found in Derizes and i 



' 



WILTSHIRE- 397 

neighbotirTiood. One of the leading participators in the Penmddock 

rising in Wilts of 1655 bore this name (H.) Wiltshire has Ion? 

been one of the principal homes of the Goddaeds. The ancestors 
of the Goddards of Cliff e and Swindon are said to hare been 
seated in the county before the reign of Richard 11. (L.) ; and 
Hoare refers to a John Goddard of Swindon, who lived 200 years 
ago The name was in Donhead St. Mary, Wilts, in the reign of 
Anne. A family of Goddard, hailing originally from Southampton, 
possessed the Birchenwood estate, Bramshaw, Dorset, from 1588 
to 1714 (H.). The past and present dis'-ribntion of the name 
is given nnder Berks. (See also "Suffolk," "Doej-et," and 

" Hajipshiek.") Gelsfield is an ancient Wiltshire name ni.w 

rare in the county The Guppts, already referred to under 

" DoEsET," were long established in Wilts, where the name is 
now extinct. Concerning this Wiltshire family I learn from the 
Probate Registry that about 250 years ago the Guppys of Wilts were 
connected with the Gnppys of Halstock, Dorset, where the name 
still remains. Richard Guppey, gent., died in 1639 possessed of 
Sandridgehill Park, Melksham, Wilts, and of other property in 
Halstock, Dorset. His descendants last century continued, to live 
in and around Melksham, Corsham, and Seend, and some engaged 
in the cloth trade. Gupphey or Guphay, or Gapphey, was the 
me of an estate in the Wiltshire parish of Mere, which was in 
the possession of a family of the same name in the 1-ith century 
rCollinson's "' Somerset," Hoare's " Wilts," etc.J. Writing rather 
■re than 200 years ago, Aubrey speaks of the Wiltshire Guppys 
or Goupys as probably Walloon cloth-makers introduced by 
Henry VII. Early last century a family of this name settled in 

iJNew England as cloth-manufacturers, and I learn from Judge 
^'' ;ppey (of Portage. Wisconsin), who hails from this stock, that 
-.c-ir descendants have ever since "herded" in that part of the 

jUmted States. 

i H-K 

1 HussET is a very old surname both in Wilts and Somerset, 
"'iving been represented in those counties in the 13th century by 
_ isey and Huse (H. R.). From the mediaeval Huse probably 
X)me the Wiltshire name of Howse and the Somerset name of 
House. However, the Husseys of Wilts were a powerful family 
luring the 1-lth century, and traced their ancestry back to the 
Husees, of whom it is said that the original ancestor came over 



398 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

"vvith the Conqueroi*. In Collinson's " Somerset " it is stated that 
in the beginning of the 17th century a family of gentry of the 

name of Hussey lived at Edmondham in Dorset Ho^vsE, as I 

have just stated, corresponds to House, a common Somer>set name, 
both of which, as I have above remarked, may be forms of Huse, 
a name characteristic of these counties in the middle ages. (^See 
"Hussey.")* Richard Howse was churchwarden of Westbury 

in 1661 (H.) HiBBERD was the name of an old Wilts family 

of Wilton in the last century, to whom the living of Sutton 
Mandeville belonged (H.). Waylen informs us that Nicholas 
Hibbert, senior and junior, both of Marlborough, lost property 
valued at £690 in the great fire that occurred in this town in 

1653 The HuLBERTS of Malmesbury may be able to trace their 

pedigree back to Thomas Hulbei't, the pious clothier of Corsham, who, 
as we learn from a brass in Corsham Church, " Christianly finished 
his course with powerfull prayer to God upon Tuesday, being the 

16 October, 1632" (A.) The Jdpes have long been established 

in this county. Walter Joop was a reeve of the borough of 
Marlborough in 1388 (W.). James Joope was incumbent of 
Grutlyngton (Grittleton) in 1441 (Phillipp's " Wiltshire Institu 
tions"). On one of the bells of Mere Church occurs the name o^ 
Giles Jupe, churchwarden in 1747 (Wilts Arch, and Nat. Hist 

Mag. IV, 158), in which district the name still remains Knapj 

is an old south of England name. In the 14th century ai 
influential family of Bristol citizens bore tbis name (Barrett',! 
"Bristol"). Knapp was the name of an ancient gentle famib 
of Berks, a branch of which two centuries ago came into th 
possession of the manor of Little Lmford, Bucks (Lipscomb' 
" Buckinghamshire "). However, we learn from the Hundred Roll 
that the name of Kuappe occurred in Bucks six centuries ago — 
Amongst the Wiltshire family names derived from parishes in th 

county are Keevil and Kemble The Judds are now bettff 

represented in Hampshire ; but Judd is an old Wiltshire namiit 
John Judd was mayor of Salisbury in 1424 (E.), and the name 
still to be found in that city. One of the early Wiltshire Judds i 
the 16th century was Lord Mayor of London (A,). (See undi 
" Hampshire.") M^ 



* It should, however, be noted that Howe is also a Somerset name. 



ffril 

'OPJO; 

( 



WILTSHIRE. 399 

L— P. 

The Maundrells of Calne evidently belong to an ancient Wilts 
family, whose members in the 16th century were " Farmers of 
the Manor " of Rowde, the last of whom, E-obert Maundrell, w^as 
living in 1584; in 1656 John Maundrell, son of Robert Maundrell 
of Rowde, suffered martyrdom at the stake at Salisbury (A.). 
To this family very probably belonged Maundrell, the eastern 
traveller, who owned in 1779 Blackland manor in Calne, a parish 
which is at the present day the home of the Maundrells. The 
mayors of Devizes in 1575, 1601, and 1606, bore this name (B.). 

The name of Melsome or Milsom is undoubtedly a corruption 

of Melksham, a town in Wilts. The name of Milsham occurred 
in Allington two centuries ago ; and we also learn from Aubrey 
that Adam Milsham was " an old wealthie batchelour " of Kino-ton 

St. Michael, where he died in 1642 PococK is an old Wilts 

name, at present best represented in the neighbourhood of 
Melksham. In the 13th century it was found in Cambridgeshire 
and Norfolk (H. R.), and is said to be the semi-Saxon form of 

Peacock The Wilts family of Manners may be able to find 

their origin in the circumstance that the House of Rutland once 

owned land in different parts of the county, as in Rowde 

Camden says that Edward IV. commanded a member of the 
PiCKAUD family to change his name to Ruddle after his birthplace. 
Strange to relate, both these names are either confined to or are 
most characteristic of this county, though I can find no place 
called Ruddle in W^ilts. Probably Rudhall, the nam.e of places in 
Herefordshire and Staffordshire, was the name of the birthplace 
of this person. The Pickards are said to hail originally from 

Picardy. Trowbridge is their present home in Wilts The name 

of Pickett may be a corruption of Pickard, though we must 
tie remember that tliere is an estate of this narue in the parish of 

South Perrott, Dorset Merriman is an old Wilts name now 

?irare in the county Pinchin was a Marlborough name in the 

si 17th century, when Lawrence Pinchin was amongst those who 
ide signed a petition to the Committee of Parliament sitting in that 

town in 1646 (W.) The family of Morse resided at Hill 

Deverill during the whole of last century (H.) Mintet takes 

its origin from the parish of that name. Throughout the last 

century a family of this name resided in Corsley (H.) The 

family of Parham was represented in the early part of this 



400 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

century in Semlej and Broad Chalk : in the reign of Edward III. 
John de Parham owned a large part of the village of Alvediston 

(H.). Parham is also the name of a Suffolk parish Ody was a 

Christmalford name in the 17th century (A.) ; it is now well 

represented around Swindon Ponting is also an old Gloucestei'- 

shire name (Bigland). 

R— S. 

Russ is a very ancient Wilts name ; its early form of Rus 
occurred in the 13th century in this county, as well as commonly 
in Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire (H. R.). William Russ was 
a member of the town council of Marlborough 1714-1716 (W.) ; 
and rather over a hundred years ago the Reverend John Russ was 

lord of the manor of Chicklade (H.) Spackman is another 

ancient Wilts name. There was a John Spagman in Westbury 
in the reign of Richard II. (H.) ; and Aubrey mentions a William 
Spackman of Bushton in the reign of Charles II. Thomas Spack- 
man, a Marlborough burgess in the time of Queen Anne, was a 
member of the town council in 1714-1715 (W.) ; in 1785 there 
was a Thomas Spackman buried at Cliff Pipard (A.). This is 
evidently a very old English name, since we find the name of 

Spakeman in Kent in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) The 

name of Ruddle, as I have already indicated when speaking of the 
Pickards (see above), is probably a corruption of Rudhall, a name 
that occurs on two of the bells of Warminster Church that we e 

cast about the middle of last century (H.) Stratton is the 

name of a parish in this county The Snooks of Wiltshire are 

gathered around Devizes, but the name also occurs now in Somerset, 
Dorset, and Berks, and was represented by a family of Snooke in 

Sussex in the early part of last century During the 17th 

century the Slopers were gentlefolk and well-to-do tradesmen in 
and around Marlborough, where the name still remains ; there was 
a John Sloper of Monkton, gent., early in the same century (W.), 
and a family of the name resided in Winterbourne Monkton dui'ing 
the 17th century, to which belonged Walter Sloper, attorney (A.) ; 
Jeremiah Sloper was one of the Marlborough tradesmen, who, 
rather over 200 years ago, issued their own farthings and half- 
pence (W.). John Sloper was vicar of Broad Chalk in 1685 (H.) ; 
and Walter Sloper was Rector of West Dean in the beginning of 
last century (H.). Hoare also refers to the Warminster Slopers, 

I 



WTLTSHIRE. 401 

a family of gentry residing there in the early part of the 17th 
century. Between 1658 and 1840, at least eight of the mayors of 
Devizes bore this name (B.), which is still represented in that 
town. Two centuries ago, a gentle family of Sloper resided in the 
parish of Hartpury in the adjacent county of Gloucester (Bigland's 

" Gloucestershire") The name of Rawlings occurred in Wilton 

and Warminster during the reigns of Henry VIII. , Mary, and 
Elizabeth (H.). At present the neighbourhood of Calne is the 

home of the name, but as Rawlence it still occurs in Wilton 

Selfe, an ancient Wilts name for several generations connected 
with the cloth trade, is now only scantily represented amongst the 
gentry and yeomen ; but most of those bearing the name linger 
around Melksham, which has been for centuries the home of the 
Selfes. One of the earliest was Isaac Selfe of Melksham, a 
" wealthie cloathier," who died in 1656, aged 92, leaving behind 
him, as Aubrey informs us, 83 offspring. His son came into the 
possession of Bineger or Beanacre, which passed by marriage out 
of the family early last century, Hoare refers to the benefactions 
of Anthony Self to the poor of Westbury and Dilton in 1679. 
{See under " Norfolk " for reference to the Selfs of that county.) 

T-Z. 

The TiTCOMBES evidently derive their name from Tidcombe, a 
place in the county. There was a John de Tidcombe in Warmin- 
ster in the reign of Edward III. (H.) ; and in 1689 Edward 
Tidcombe was buried in Atworth Church, Bradford- on- Avon (A.) 
Tanner has been a name long known in Wilts ; it was repre- 
sented in Clarendon Forest two centuries ago (H.) Though 

also characteristic of Norfolk, Tuck has been a Wilts name for 
many generations. Two hundred years ago there was a Captain 
Tuck in the county, apparently resident in Corsham (A.) ; and 
early last century Richard Tuck of Rowdford, Bromham, also 

owned property in Westbury (H.) Weeks is an ancient name 

in Newton, Whiteparish, going back to the time of Elizabeth ; 
there was a family of gentry of the name of Weekes in Donhead 
St. Mary in the 17th century (H.). 



,ei«, 



2 D 



402 



HOMES OF FA]MILY NAMES. 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of the county, is more numerous elsewhere. 



rCoot 
\ Cooke 
Green 



Genebai, Names (30-40 counties). 



*Hams 

*Martin 

Smith 



*Taylor 

*White 
*Wil8on 



COMMOK Names (20-29 counties). 



*AUen 


*Hunt (Redditch) *Morri8 


*Cooper 


♦Jackson *Sanders 


Davis 


♦Jones *Walker 


*HiU 


Moore 




Regional Names (10-19 counties). 


♦Bishop 


♦Lewis ♦Powell 


Freeman 


♦Newman Woodward (Worcester) 


*Griffin 


♦Osborne 


*Lane 


♦Perkins 



DiSTBiCT Names (4-9 counties). 



Baylis (Droitwich) 


♦ Farmer 


Bullock 




Greaves 


r Caldecott 




♦Hancock 


1 Coldicott 
♦Chambers 




rHeming j (Evesham) 
1. Hemming J 


♦Corbett 




# r Hoddinott 
I Hodnett 


♦Crump 




♦Edmonds 




Mosely 



♦Moss (Droitwich) 

♦Nott 

♦Phipps 

Pope 

Eandell 
♦Wall 
♦ Weaver 
♦Wheeler 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 



403 



CorxTY Names (2-3 counties). 



AsTimore 


Darby 




Partington 




Attwood 


Dee 




*Rudge 




Ballard (Worcester 


DorreU 




Sherwood 




and Evesliara) 


*Fortnam 




Shipton 




Bomford (Evesham) 


Guest 




Small 




Boyce 


Hampton 




Thurston 




Court 


Hodgetts 




Tovey 




*Cree8e 


Pardoe 




Whitehouse 




Cresswell 


*Parkes 




*Wyer 




Peculiar Names (confined 


mostly 


bo this county). 




r Albutt 


Guilding 




r Quinney 
I Quinny 




L Allbutt 


Hadley 






Allington 


Halford 




Smithin 




Amphlett 


Harber 




Spiers 




Blakeway 


Hemus (Worcester) 


Stinton 




Boucher 


Hingley 




Tandy 




Boulter 


HoUington 




Tipping 




Byrd 


Holtom 




ToUey 




Careless (Eresham) 


Huband 




Tongue 




Cartridge (Worcester) 


Hyde 




r Willets 
L Willetts 




Doolittle 


Merrell 






Essex (Worcester) 


Moule (Droitwich) 


Winnall (Droitwich) 


Firkins 


Munn 




Winwood 




Follows 


Mytton 




Workman 




Gabb 


Newey 




Wormington 




Ganderton 


Nickless 




Yarnold 




Granger 


Pen rice 








Grove 


Pui-ser 









NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC WORCESTERSHIRE 

NAMES. 
(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alplia- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated by the foil oiving abbreviations : — 
G. indicates Green's " Worcester." 
H. R. „ Hundred Rolls. 

M. „ May's " Evesham." 

N. „ Nash's " Worcestershire.'' 

T. ,, Tindal's " Evesham." 



2 D-J 



404 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

A— B. 

Amphlrtt is an old name in the county. In 1669 Richard 
Amphlett sold certain lands in King's Norton to Daniel Greves 
to hold for 2,000 years. John Amphlett founded a free school 

in Clent in 1704 (N.), and the name is still in Clent The 

Attwoods belong to a very ancient Worcestershire family of 
position. In the reign of Richard III. John Attwood, Esq., 
was the principal tenant of Northwick. Anthony Attwood was 

buried in Claines church in 1611 (N.) The Ballards of 

Worcester and Evesham bear an old Worcestershire name. 
Philip Ballard, who was mayor of Evesham in 1664, was buried 
in Evesham church in 1670 (N., M., T.). Martin Ballard was 
mayor of the same town in 1676 (M. and T.). The mayor of 
Worcester in 1723 was William Ballard (Gr.). This is an ancient 
English name that was represented six centuries ago in Cam- 
bric! geshii-e, Hants, and other counties (H. R.). It has now 

also a home in Kent (see under " Kent ") The Bouchers were 

well-known Bristol merchants in the 16th and 17th centuries, 
and frequently filled the offices of mayor and sheriff of the city ; 
they were intrepid Royalists, and suffered death in the cause 
(Seyer's and Barrett's " Bristol"). Bowshire was the name of a 
Marlborough family in the early part of last century (Waylen's 

"Marlborough") Boulter was the name of the vicar of 

Kemsey a century ago ; he was a native of Worcestershire (N.) 

The name of Boyce was in the county two centuries ago. 

De Boys is a much older form of the name. In the reign of 
Edward III. Christina de Boys held two and a half hides of land 

in Thorndon (N.) Bearcroft is an old Worcester name, now 

i-arely represented. Several mayors of the city bore the name in 

the 17th century (G.) Bomford is a name now numerously 

represented in the Evesham district Blakeway is also an 

ancient Shropshire name. Nicholas de Blakeway was clerk of 
West Felton, Shropshire, in the reign of Edward III. Roger 
Blakeway was bailiff of Shrewsbury in 1615, and James Blake- 
way was mayor of that town in 1714 (Eyton's " Shropshire," 
Phillips' " Shrewsbury "). 

C— L. 

Careless is at present an Evesham name, and Carless is still 
a Worcester name. In 1795 Walter Careless was a member of 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 40") 

the Coramon Council of "Worcester (G.). The name is said to 

be a corruption of Carlos The Gandertons were in old times 

inhabitants of the parish of Elmley ; and many of them were 
liuried in the parish church, one stone bearing the date of 

1688 (N.) Guest was the name of the rector of Churchill at 

the commencement of last century (N.). The Guests, of Dowlais, 
Glamorganshire, came from Shropshire in the middle of last 
century (Lodge's "Baronetage") Greayes, which is a charac- 
teristic name of the midland counties, has long been a Worcester- 
shire name. The old family of Greves held some position in the 
county. Daniel Greves, probably a member of this family, 
bought certain lands in King's Norton of Richard Amphlett in 

1669 (N.) John Darbt was buried in Fladbury church in 

1667; Darby was the "beloved servant" of the Governor of 

Worcester during the siege in 1646 (N.) The Hadlets derive 

their name from places in the adjacent counties of Staffordshire 
and Shropshire, the Hamptons from a Worcester parish, and the 

HoLLiXGTONS from places in Derbyshire and Staffordshire 

Halford was a Devonshire surname in the reign of Edward I. 

(H. R.). There is a Warwickshire parish of the name 

Hemming or Heming, a name having its present home in the 
Evesham district, is an Anglo-Saxon clan name. It was well 
known in Worcester in the 17th century, Richard Heming being 
the name of the mayor of the city in 1627 and 1657, and John 
Heming in 1677 (G.) ; the name is still in that city. One of the 
name was buried in Tenbury church in 1691 (N.). It is also 
now represented in Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, and Warwick- 
shire, sometimes in the form of Hemmings. Last century there 
was a Gloucestershire family of the name in Barrington PHr\a 

(Bigland's "Gloucestershire") The family of Huband was of 

" great consequence " in the county in the reign of Edward IV. ; 
Sir John Huband was lord of the manor of Cudeley (N.). The 
name of Huband occurred in Bucks in the reign of Henry III. 

(H. R.) The Htdes were an ancient distinguished family of 

Dench worth, Berks, from the 14th to the 17th century (Ashmole's 
"Berkshire"). 

M— S. 

MouLE is a name at present found around Droitwich. In the 
form of Moul it occui-red in the neighbouring county of Oxford 



406 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Thiere are parishes and 

hamlets in the county from which the Myttons derive their name. 
The Myttons have been connected with the municipality of 
Shrewsbury, in the adjacent county of Shropshire, for several 
centuries, De Mutton being the earliest form of the name. The 
De Muttons were bailiffs of that town in the 13th and 14th 
centuries ; after those times the name changed to Mytton, the 
Myttons frequently filling the office of bailiff of Shrewsbury in 
the 15th and 16th centuries (Phillip's " Shrewsbury "). Sir 
Thomas Mytton was sheriff of Shropshire at the close of the 

15th century (Wright's "Ludlow") Mdnn is said by Lower 

to be an old Kentish family name Walter Pardoe was mayor 

of Worcester in 1687 ; in 1794 Christian Pardoe was still living 
in St. Andrew's parish, Woi'cester, at the age of 103 (Gr.). 

Pardoe is still a Worcester name The old Worcestershire 

family of Peneice resided in the parish of Crowle in the first 
half of the 17th century ; the name was probably taken from 

Penrice, a manor and castle in Glamorganshire (N.) The 

Partingtons have representatives of their name in Lancashire. 

Partington is a town in Cheshire The family of Rudge was 

well known in Evesham in the 17th century, and the Rudges 
have remained influential Evesham townsmen up to the present 
time ; no less than five mayors bore the name of Rudge between 
1661 and 1713, and of these four bore the Christian name of 
William (M. and T.) John Stinton was a Worcester alder- 
man in 1621 (C). The name is still in that city. The name 
of Stineton occurred in Yorkshire in the reign of Edward I. 
(H. R.). 

T— Z. 

Tandy is an old Worcester (?) name. It is sa.id of Roger 
Tandy, of the parish of Tibberton, who held lands of the dean 
and chapter in the reign of James I., that on one occasion he 
caught up a hogshead full of beer and, " having drank out of the 
bung-hole, set it down again without resting it on his knee or 

elsewhere" (N".). Tandy is still a Tibberton name In the 

reign of Elizabeth, Mr. George Tolley owned extensive house 
property in Evesham (M.). The name was represented in the 
parish of Upton Snodsbury a century ago (N.). Toly was a 
comm-^n name in Cambridareshire in the reis'n of Edward I. 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 407 

(H. R.) The family of Tongue probably hailed originally from 

Tong, a parish, in Shropshire It is likely that the Wormingtons 

oiiginally came from the parish that bears their name in tbe 
adjacent county of Gloucester. They have, however, long been 
established in the parish of Wichenford, Worcestershire, where, 
a century ago, there were tombstones bearing the name of 
Wormington (N.) The family of Winnall, of the neighbour- 
hood of Droitwich, may be connected in their descent with John 

Winnoll, who was mayor of Evesham in 1612 (M.) There was 

an Evesham gentle family of the name of Yarnold in the latter 
half of the 17th century, when members of the family more than 
once held the office of mayor ; they were also influential townsmen 
daring last century (M. and T.). A century ago, the name of 
Yarnold occurred in a window in Oddingley church (N.). Yarnold 
is still an Evesham name. 



408 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



'■-■'^ 



x^^v^ 



YORKSHIRE, NORTH AND EAST RIDINGS. 

Note. — The asterisk indicates that a name, though characteristic 
of this part of Yorkshire, is more numerous elsewhere 
The home of a border name may extend into the "West Riding 
or into the adjoining county. 



* Brown 
*Hall 



G-ENEBAL Names (30-40 counties). 



Johnson 
Eobinson 



♦Smith 
Wilson 





Common Names (20-29 counties). 


♦Chapman 


♦Mason *Walker 


♦Foster 


♦Moore Ward 


Harrison 


Eichardson Watson 


Jackson 


Thompson 




Regional Names (10-19 counties). 


Atkinson 


Hudson (York) Stephenson 


Barker 


♦Newton (Whitby) ♦Webster 


♦Dixon 


Pearson Wilkinson 


Dunn (Hull) 


Simpson 



District Names (4-9 counties). 



Bainbridge (Darlington) 
♦Beal 
♦Bradshaw 
♦Bi'aithwaite 

Clark son 

Coatea 

Dale 
♦Dennis 

Dobson 



Dunning 

Fawcett 

Hodgson 

Hutchinson 

Jordan (Hull) 

Kirby (York and HuU) 
♦Kirk 

J Kitchin "I Northaller- 
L Kitchin g J ton 



Lambert (Bedale) 

Lawson 

r Metcalfe; ^g^^^^^) 
LMetcalf J ^ ' 

- Milner (York and Hull) 

Peacock (Richmond 
and Northallerton) 

Pickering 

Sowerby 



YORKSHIRE. NORTH AND EAST RmiNGS. 



409 



County Names (2-3 counties) . 



Alderson (Richmond) 
r Allinson 
l Allison 

Appleton 
*Boves 

Calvert (Richmond) 
f Cockerell 
I Cockerill 
*Craven 
r Cundell 
L Cundill 

Dent 
*Dowson 

Featherstone 

Flintofe (Yarm) 
*Frankland 
*Hebden (Bedale) 



*Hird 

{Hogarth 
Hoggard 
Hoggart 

Hopper 

Hornby 

Horner 
*Jeiferson 

Lofthouse 

Lowisb 

Lumley 
*Mudd (Bedale) 

Porritt 
*Raine (Darlington) 

Sayer 
*Sherwood 

Shipley 



r SiddaU 
< SiddeU 
L Siddle 

Sleightholme (York) 
*Smithson 

Spence 
*Strickland 

Swales 

Thwaite (Bedale) 

Tindall 

Topham 

Trotter 
rWeatherill 
I Wetherell 
Lwetherill 

Wise 

Yeoman 



Pecuiiae Names (confined mostly to these Ridings). 



Agar 

Blenkin 

Blenkiron 

Bosomworth (Thirsk) 

Botterill (York) 

Bowes (York) 

Brigham 

Bulmer 

Codling 

Coverdale 

Creaser 

Danby 

Dinsdale (Bedale) 

Duck 

Duggleby 
TElgey 
I Elgie 

EUerby 

Foxton 

Galloway 

Garbutt 

Goodwill 

Grainger 



Harker (Richmond) 

Harland 

Hawking 

Hebron 

Heseltine 

Hick 
r Holliday 
L Holyday 

Horsley 

HugUl 

Iveson 

Jacques 

Jordison 

Judson 

Kendrew (York) 

Kettlewell 

Kilvington 

Kipling (Darlington) 



fLamploughj^jj^^^^ 
L Lamplugh J 
J Laverack 
L Laverick 



r Leak 

L Leake 
Leaper 
Leckenby 

{Matson 
Matterson 
Mattison 
Medforth 
r Megginson 
< Meggison 
L Megson 
Monkman 
Nornabell 
Nottingham 
Outhwaite 
Parnaby 
Petch 
Pickersgill 
I'lews 
r Porrett 
L Porritt 

Precious 
J Prodham 
I Prudom 



410 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Pybus 

Kaw (Richmond) 

Eeadman 

Eennison 

Eider 

Kodmell 
r Rounthwaite 
L Routhwaite 

Rowntree 

Scarth. 

Sedman 
/ Sellars 
I- Sellers 

Severs 



{Speneeley 
Spensley 

Stainthorpe 

Stavelj 
r Stockhill 
< Stockill 
Utokell 

Stonehouse 

Sturdy 

Suddaby 
f Suggett 
1- Suggitt 

Sunter (Bedale) 

Tennison (Hull) 

Tweedy 



r Tyerman 

L Tyreman 

f Ventres s 

L Ventris 

r Weigliell 
t Weighill 

/ Welburn 

I Wellburn 
Welford (Whitby) 
Whit well (York) 

{Wilberforce 
Wilberfoss 
Witty 

Wray (York) 
Wrightson 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NAMES OF THE 
NORTH AND EAST RIDINGS OF YORKSHIRE. 

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy thefollotving abhreviations : — 
D. indicates Drake's " Eboracum." 



^■ 


Fisher's "Masham." 


a. 


Grant's " Ripen." 


L. 


Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 


O. 


Ord's " Cleveland." 


P.B. „ 


Poulson's " Beverlac." 


Sp. „ 


Contributors to Armada Fund in 1588 (Brit. Mus., 




B. 474). 


T.H. „ 


Tickell's " Hull." 


W.R. „ 


Whitaker's " Richmondshire." 



YORKSHIRE, NORTH AXD EAST RIDINGS. 411' 

A— B. 

The Agars, an old York family of the 17th and 18th centuries, 
gained considerable estate by trade and founded a hospital in that 
city. Thomas Agar, tanner, was lord mayor of York in 1618, 
and the same office was filled by Thomas Agar, woollen draper, in 

1724 (D.). Agar is still a York name Alderson is a name of 

very fi*equent occurrence in the Richmond district of the North 
Riding. John Alderson was sheriff of the city of York in 1709 
(D.). The name is also established in the adjacent county of 

Durham Allinson was a name well known in York in the 

17th century. William Allenson. draper, who received the honour 
of knighthood and represented that city in Parliament, was lord 
mayor of York in 1633 and 1655 (D.) Yorkshire and Lanca- 
shire have been for ages the principal homes of the Appletons, 
who derive their name in this part of England from several 
townships in the North Riding and from a Lancashire village 
John de Appelton represented York in the parliament in the reign 
of Edward II. William Appleton was sheriff of that city in the 
reign of James II. (D.). The Appletons were a well-known 
Beverley family during the 17th and 18th centuries ; and on six 
occasions they filled the office of mayor, being originally mercers 
and afterwards gentlefolk (P. B.). Henry Appleton was an 
alderman of Hull in the time of Cromwell (T. H.). The 
Appletons are still represented in York, Beverley, and Hull, 
There was an old family of this name at Deddington, Oxfordshire 
(Marshall's "Deddington"), that probably derived its name from 
a parish or village of this name in the adjacent county of Berks. 

The Bainbridges of northern Yorkshire probably derive their 

name from a village in the North Riding. They are best repre- 
sented on the Durham border of the county in the Darlington 
district. Bainbrigg, or Bainbrige, was the name of a high sheriff 
of York in the time of Henry Y., and of an archbishop of York 
and a primate of England in the time of Henry VIII. (D.). The 
Bainbrigge family of Derbyshire came from Wheatley, in the 
West Riding, in the 16th century; they represented Derby in the 
parliament during that century (Glover's "Derbyshire"). (See 

under "Durham" and "Westmoreland.") The Blexkirons 

may derive their name from a Cumberland estate known as 

Blenkarne Bowes is a name evidently taken from the North 

Riding parish thus called. The family of Bowes of Aske, in the 



412 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Worth Riding, played a notable part in the county during the 
16th and 17th centuries (W. R.). The name has long been 
prominently connected with York, and it is in that locality that 
it is now best represented. Lord mayors of York and the repre- 
sentatives of the city in parliament during the 15th century bore 
this name (D.), A gentle family of Bowes has been connected 
with Darlington since the 17th century (Longstaffe's "Dar- 
lington") BuLMER is the name of a North Riding parish. 

From the 12th to the 16th century the ancient family of De 
Bulmer, or Bulmer, were lords of Wilton, and they frequently 
filled the office of high sheriff of the county of York (D. and 0.). 

The Bkaithwaites of the north of England will be found 

generally referred to under "Cumberland" Amongst the old 

Yorkshire names that do not figure in my list are those of 
AsKWiTH, BoLLAND, and Bushel. Robert Askwith, draper, was 
lord mayor of York in 1580; and Sir Robert Askwith was lord 
mayor in 1606 and 1617 (D.). The Bollands, a Mash am family 
in the 17th and 18th centuries, came originally from Craven, in 
the West Riding ; William Bolland, of this family, was made a 
baron of the Court of Exchequer in 1829 (F.). Bolland and Bow- 
land are West Riding townships. The Bushels were mayors of 
Hull in the 15th and 16th centuries (T. H.). 

C-G. 

Calvert is a characteristic Yorkshire name, and is at present 
best represented iu the Richmond district, but still survives in 
York. The Calverts, of Danby Wiske, were an old North Riding 
family. Sir George Calvert, the first lord of Baltimore and the 
first planter in Maryland, was from this stock (W. R.). Sheriffs 
of the city of York in the reigns of James I. and Charles I. bore 
this name ; and as far back as the time of Edward II., Henry 
Calvehird was a bailiff of this city, whilst Henry Calvert, probably 
the same person, represented York in the parliament of that 
reign (D.). Calvert House is a North Riding hamlet Cover- 
dale is the name of a place in the North Riding. Miles Coverdale, 
bishop of Exeter, who made a translation of the Bible in the reign 

of Henry VIII., was a Yorkshire man The Cundalls, or 

CuNDELLS, or Cundills, derive their name from a North Riding 
parish. During the 17th and 18th centuries the Cundalls were 
well known in Ripon, and frequently filled the office of mayor (G.). 
Ihe Dents probably derive their name from a township in the 



YORKSHIRE, NORTH AND EAST RIDIN^GS. 413 

nortli division of the West Riding. (-See under " Durham.") 
^The Danbys are named after pai'ishes, etc., in the JSTorth Ridincr. 
The Danbys of Swinton Park, a very ancient and distino-uished 
knightly family, dating back to the 11th century, were lords 
of Mashamshire from the 16th to the 18th century ; of this 
family there are many branches, one of the oldest being that 

of the Danbys of Kirkby Knowle (F.) The Dijjsdales, who 

are named after parishes in the North Riding and in South 
Durham, are now best represented in the Bedale district. There 

was a Leeds family of this name in the 17th centurv (G-) 

The DuGGLEBYS are named after a township ia the East Ridino- 
The DuNNmGS of Yorkshire possess the name of an Anglo- 
Saxon clan, which may have had its home at Dunningley in this 

county. (See under " Warwickshire " and " Dorsetshire.") 

The Ellerbys take the name of townships in the North and 
East Ridings. John Ellerby was an alderman of Hull in the 

reign of Henry VIII. (T. H.). Ellerby is still a Hull name 

The Fawcetts have their home in Yorkshire and Westmoreland. 
There was a Ripon family of this name in the reign of Elizabeth, 
members of which on two occasions filled the ofl&ce of mayor (G.). 
Forcett is the name of a township and a hamlet in the North 
Riding ; whilst Fawcet Forest is the name of a township in West- 
moreland Featherstone is the name of parishes and townships' 

in Yorkshire, Northumberland, and Staffordshire It is singular 

that the Fltntoffs, who have their home in the Yarm district, are 
associated in the same part of Yorkshire with the Flintons. 
Walter Flinton was mayor of Hull in 1565 (T. H.) ; the name is 
now rare in the county. 

H— J. 

The Harlands, who are still represented in Ripon, bear the 
name of the wakeman (the modern mayor) of Ripon in 1596 (G.). 

The Heseltixes probably corrupted their name in early times 

from Heslerton, an East Riding parish. Heselton is a rare form 
of the name. Heslington is also an East Riding parish from 
which the surname of Heslington, of occasional occurrence in 
Yorkshire, has been derived. There was an inscription in Howlden 
church, in the East Riding, referring to William Hesletine, who 
died in 172B (G.) An old family of Hird once resided at Wood- 
house Grove, Rawdon, in the West Riding (Slater's " Guiseley ") 
...The name of Hopper is also established in Cambridgeshire 



414 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

and Devonshire. In tlie 13th century it occurred as Le Hoppere, 
or Le Hopper, in Lincolnshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, 

Suffolk, etc The Hornbts of the North and East Ridings 

take their name from townships in the North Riding Horner 

is a characteristic Yorkshire name. The Horners, a family of 
York merchants in the 17th century, on three occasions held the 
office of lord mayor of that city (D.). Nicholas Horner, a Roman 
Catholic of Giantley, preferred death to the abandonment of his 
religion in 1589 ; the Rev. John Horner was curate of Masham in 

1696 (F.). The Horners are still found in York William 

HoRSELET of this county contributed £25 for the defence of his 
country at the time of the expected Spanish invasion in 1588 

(Sp.) The HuGiLLS derive their name from a township in 

Westmoreland. Thomas Hugill was overseer of the poor of Great 

Ayton about a hundred years ago (0.) Anthony Iveson was 

mayor of Hull in 1690 (T. H.), and the name is still in that town. 
Henry Iveson was high sheriff of the county in 1708; the 
Ivesons owned Bilton Manor, York, last century (D.). Between 
1773 and 1838 about fifteen mayors of Holderness bore the name 

of Iveson (Poulson's " Holdei-ness ") Sir Roger Jaques, who 

was lord mayor of York in 1639, was one of a family of pros- 
perous merchants of Elvington, York, who flourished in the 17th 

and 18th centuries (D.) Jordan is a name established in many 

other parts of England besides the North and East Ridings, for 
instance, in Bucks, Derbyshire, Devonshire, Essex, Gloucestershire, 
Oxfordshire, etc. In the 13th century it was common as Jordan 
and Jurdan in Oxfordshire, and was also represented in Lincoln- 
shire, Norfolk, Suffolk, etc. (H. R.). The Jordans of Enstone, 
Oxfordshire, have been resident in that parish since the 14th 
century (Jordan's "Enstone "). This surname is a form of Jour- 
dain, an early Norman baptismal name (L.) Jordison, signify- 
ing Jordanson, and Judson, its contracted form, are both of them 
names peculiar to Yorkshire. It is said that most of the Judsons 
in England and America trace their origin to the neighbourhood 
of Leeds (L.). 

K— L. 

The Kettlewells, who derived their name originally from a 
parish in the north division of the West Riding, were represented 
by a prosperous family in Ripon during the 16th and 17rh 



YORKSHIRE, XORTH AND EAST RIDINGS. 415 

centuries, members of which were elected wakemeu and mayors of 

the city (G.) The Kilv^gtons take their name from townships 

in the North Riding. John Kilvington was sheriff of the city of 

York in 1643 (D.), and the name is still in that city The 

KiPLiNGS, who take their name from a North Hiding township, 
are best represented on the Durham border in the district of 

Darlington Kitchix or Kitchixg has its present Yorkshire home 

in the Northallerton district. Nicholas Kitcbin was mayor of 
Ripon in 1658 (Gr.), and Kitchin is still a Ripon name. Kitchen is 
a common form of the name in other counties, but it should be 
noted that this name is not established in the counties south of the 
Wash. Besides Yorkshire, it characterises Lincolnshire, Notts, 

Lancashire, and Westmoreland Knaggs, an old Gisborough 

name, is still to be found in that locality (0.) The Lamberts 

have their principal home at the present time in Yorkshire, but 
they are also to be found in the eastern counties of Kent, Essex, 
and Norfolk, and also in Notts. In the 18th century the name 
occurred as Lambert, Lamberd, and Lambard in Yorkshire, 
Hunts, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, and Bucks (H. R.). 
One of the Yorkshire centres of the name is now in the district 

of Bedale The Lamploughs or Lamplughs, who are now best 

represented in the Hull district, possess the name of a Cumberland 
parish. Thomas Lamplugh, who was Archbishop of York exactly 
two centuries ago, was descended from a very ancient family in 
Cumberland, where the Lamplughs had flourished for many 
centuries with knightly honours. George Lamplugh, merchant, 
was lord mayor of York in 1662 (D.), and the name is still in that 

city The Laveracks or Laveeicks were represented in Ponte- 

fract in the early part of last century (G.) and still occur there. 
Richard Laverock resided in Notts in the reign of Edward I., and 
at the same time William Laverokhere dwelt in Oxfordshire 

(H. R.) Lapidge is a rare Yorkshire name that was represented 

in Pontefract in the reign of Chai-les II. (G.) The Leaks or 

Leakes possess the names of parishes in the North Riding, 
Lincolnshire, and Notts. The Leakes of Leake in Lincolnshire are 

an ancient family (Thompson's "Boston") There was an 

inscription in Holden church in the East Riding referring to 
Mr. T. Leaper, of Barnby, who died in 1710 (G.). Leaper has 
also been a well-known Derby name for two centuries ; it occurs 
frequently in the list of the mayors and aldermen of Derby during 
the last and the present century (Glover's " Derbyshire "). Richard 



416 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

Lea.por was a noted minister of the Calvanistic baptists at Rode, 
Northamptonshire, in the reign of George I. ; Mrs. Leaper, of 
Brackley, in the same county, published books of poems in the 
middle of last century (Baker's "Northamptonshire") Liver- 
sedge, a surname now rare in the county, though still represented 
in Hull, is the name of a township in the "West Riding. John 
Liversege was twice mayor of Hull about five centuries ago (T. H.). 
Liversage was the name of an old family of Macclesfield, Cheshire, 
in the 15th century, members of which filled the office of maj^or 

(Earwaker's "East Cheshire") Lofthouse, of which Loftus is 

a rare and contracted form, is a characteristic Yorkshire name. 
Lofthouse or Loftus, a town in the North Riding, gave the name of 
Loftus to a family of great antiquity in the county (L.). There 
are also places called Lofthouse in the West Riding. The present 
home of the Lofthouses of the West Riding is in the Ripon 

district The Lumleys, an ancient and ennobled family of 

Lumley Castle, co. Durham, have been seated in that county since 
the time of the Conquest (L.). The North Riding knightly family 
of De Lumley, evidently a branch of that of Lumley Castle were 
lords of Kilton from the 14th to the 16th century (0.). There 
was a gentle family of this name in York in the reign of 
Henry VIII. (D.), and a Leeds family in the time of George I. 
bore this name (Thoresby's " Leeds "). In the county of Durham 
there are villages thus called. Lumley is still a York name. 

M— P. 

Mattison was the name of several of the mayors of Hull in the 

16th century (T. H.) The Metcalfes are a Yorkshire family of 

great antiquity, and so numerous ai'e they that there is scarcely a 
town or village in the North Riding which cannot own an inhabitant 
of the name ; in ti'uth, in 1607 the Metcalfes were accounted the 
most numerous family in England ; even in 1555 it is recorded 
that Sir Christopher Metcalfe, of Nappa Hall, near Askrigg, being 
high sheriff of Yorkshire, was attended by 300 horsemen, all of 
his own family and name, to meet the judges of assize and conduct 
them to York (Fuller's "Worthies" and Ingledew's "North- 
allerton"). The Metcalfes, who settled in York, flourished there 
as prosperous merchants from the 15th to the 18th century ; John 
Metcalf was lord mayor of that city in 1498, Richard Metcalfe in 
1674, and Sir Gilbert in 1695 ; and Miles Metcalfe represented 



YORKSHIRE, NORTH AND EAST RIDINGS. 417 

York in the parliament of Edward IV. (D.). The district of 
Bedale is that in which the Metcalfs or Metcalfes now most 
abound. From the North Eiding they have spread in numbers 
into the other parts of Yorkshire, and they have also established 
themselves in the bordering counties of Lancashire, Westmoreland, 

and Durham The Megsons have contracted their name from 

Megginson, another name characterising this part of Yorkshire. 
On the tombstone of the wife of Francis Megson, who was buried 
in St. Olave's churchyard, York, in 1718, there is, or was, the 
following inscription : — 

" Under this stone, crammed in a hole, does lye 
The best of wives that ever man laid by." 

Odthwaite was the name of a Ripon family in the 17th 

century, two members of which were buried in the minster yard in 
the reign of Charles II. (G.). Thomas Outhwaite was a well-to-do 

Bradford townsman a century ago (James' "Bradford") The 

Pickerings take their name from a town in the North Riding. 
William Pickering was sheriff of the city of York in 1681, and 
Thomas Pickering, attorney, was lord mayor of York in 1711 (D.). 
The name is still in that city. With the exception of a few 
representatives in Leicestershire, this name is confined to the 
north of England, being found in all the counties north of the 
Dee and the Humber. The Leicestershire Pickerings, in fact, 
originally come from the north, since we learn from Hill's 
" Langton " that they are derived from the knightly family of 
Pickering of Titchraarsh, Northamptonshire, in the 17th and 18th 
centuries, a family hailing fi*om Cumberland. Picering, according 

to Kemble, was an Anglo-Saxon clan name Peacock is a name 

found in several parts of England, but its great home is in the 
North Riding, especially in the districts of Richmond and 
Northallerton. It was represented as Pocok, Pokoc, Pokok, 
and Pecock in the 1.3th century in Lincolnshire, Oxfordshire, 
Cambridgeshire, and Norfolk (H. R.) ; in the last two counties it is 
still well established. Speaking generally, this name characterises 

the eastern half of Engrland Pickersgill was a name known in 

Ilton and Masham in the 16th and 17th centuries. Chi-istopher 
Pickersgill was one of the Masham churchwardens in 1638 (F.). 

The name is still in the parish of Masham Pkodham, Proudham, 

Prudom, and Prl^dames, are different forms of a name now peculiar 

2 E 



418 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

to this part of Yorkshire. We find its original in a name, which, 
in the varying shapes of Prodhonirae, Prodome, Prodham, 
Prudhomme, Prudhome, etc., was especially characteristic of 

Hunts in the 13th centnry (H. R.) Leonard Ptbus of lltou, 

was married in Masham church in 1723. John Pibus, a Roman 
Catholic priest and 'a native of Thirsk, suffered death for his 

religion in 1601 (P.) Between 1699 and 1619, six mayors of 

Hartlepool, in the neighbouring county of Durham, bore the name 
of PoRK£TT (Sharp's "Hartlepool"). 

R— S. 

Raikes, a name now uncommon in the county, was a name 
known in Hull in the 17th century, when Thomas Raikes, in the 

reign of Charles I., was thrice mayor of the town (T. H.) The 

Raines of the North Riding and of the county of Durham appear 
to be most at home in the Darlington district lying between the 
two counties. Dr. Matthew Raine, who was incumbent of Kirby 
Wiske, in the North Riding, last century, had a son who became 
headmaster of the Charterhouse School (W. R.) (See under 

"Durham.") The Rounthwaites or Routhwaites have taken 

the name of a Westmoreland hamlet Sayer has long been 

a North Riding name. There was a John Sayer of Worsall, 
Northallerton, in the reign of Henry VIII. (Ingledew's " North- 
allerton"). Francis Sayer, of Marrick Parkin the North Riding, 
was one of the Yorkshire Roman Catholics who lost their estates 
in 1605 (F.). The name has been represented in Norfolk for 
many centuries, and further reference to it will be found under 

that county Edward Seller was sheriff of the city of York 

in 1731 (D.). The name is still in that city The name of 

Severs may originate from Severs-hill or Severs-ho, a place near 
York (D.) The Siddalls or Siddells or Siddles were repre- 
sented in York in the 1 7th century : William Siddall was sheriff 
of that city in 1652 (D.). They are also to be found in Derby- 
shire. (See under "Sddall" in "Lancashire.") The Smithsons 

of Stanwick Hall in the North Riding were a distinguished 
Yorkshire family in the 17th century (W. R.). The name has 

also a home in Lincolnshire Sowerbt is the name of parishes 

and townships in the North and West Ridings, in Lancashire, and 
Cumberland. Between the reigns of Charles II. and George I. 
three Thomas Sowerbys were buried in the minster yard, Ripon 



YORKSHIRE, NORTH AND EAST RIDINGS. 419 

(G.). Soureby was a Torkshire surname in the reign of Edward I. 
(H. R.). The Sowerbys are also represented in the counties of 

Cumberland, Durham (around Darlington), and Lincoln There 

was a gentle family of Stavely in Ripon during the 15th and 
16th centuries, members of which were elected wakemen, an office 
afterwards supplanted by that of mayor (G.). There are parishes 

of this name in the West Riding and in Westmoreland The 

name of Sturdy was represented by Sturdi in Hunts and Oxford- 
shire in the 13th century (H; R:) The Yorkshire Suddabys 

may be connected in their descent with an old Lincoln family of 
Suttaby, a member of which was - mayor of that city in 1659 

(Stark's "Lincoln") Swales is a characteristic Yorkshire 

name, the North Riding being its original home. Swale was the 
name of a very ancient and distinguished North Riding family of 
I Swale Hall, Swaledale : they suffered much by their loyalty in 
f the civil wars, but were rewai'ded with a baronetcy by Charles II. : 
the Swale Hall estate passed out of the family just a century ago 
(W. R.). William Swailes was mayor of Hull in 1526 (T. H.). 
-Tohn Swales was buried in St. Peter's churchyard, Leeds, in 1710 

(G.) Amongst the rare old Yorkshire- names is that of Snape, 

which in this county was derived from a village and a seat in the 
North Riding : Snape Hall was once the property of Lord Latimer 
(W. R.). Sir Robert Snape was vicar of Masham in 1534 (F.) 
(See under "Suffolk.") 

T— Z. 

Thomas Topham was mayor of Ripon in 1627 (G.), and 
Christopher Topham, merchant, was lord mayor of York in 1660 
(D.) The name of Robert Teottee occurs in the list of York- 
shire contributors to the fund collected at the time of the expected 

Spanish invasion in 1588 (Sp.) Tyerman is a form of Tyreman, 

a name of occupation also found in this part of Yorkshire. Henry 

Tyreman, draper, was lord mayor of York in 1668 (D.) John 

Weighill was mayor of Hedon in 1569, and eleven years after- 
wards John Wighell, apparently the same person, held this office 

(Poulson's " Holderness ") The Whitwells, who are now best 

represented in the York district, have derived their name from a 

village and a township in the North Riding John Welburn 

was sheriff of the city of York in 1697 (D.) Wilberforce, or 

Wilbeefoss is a name taken from the East Riding parish of 

2 e2 



420 HOMES OP FAMILY NAMES. 

Wilberfoss. The family of tlie name resided there from the earl j 
Norman reigns to the middle of the 16th century (L.). In the 
13th century this name took the forms in this county of Do 
Wilberfos, De Wilbfos, and De Wilbfosse (H. R.). It was for 
many generations prominently connected with the city of York, 
where it is still to be found ; Allen Wilberfoss was sheriff in 1476, 
Roger Wilberfoss was sheriff in 1678, and Leonard Wilberfoss was 
lord mayor in 1686 ; Thomas Wilberfoss, who died in 1682, was a 
York attorney (D.). Wilberforce was also the name of a family 
of Beverley merchants in the 17th and 18th centuries ; and in 
1643, 1674, and 1712, a Wilberforce held the office of mayor 
(P. B.). William Wilberforce was mayor of Hull in 1722 (T. H.). 

The Wrats have their present home in the York district. 

John Wray was sheriff of Hull in 1790 (T. H.). There are 

villages of this name in North Lancashire The name of Tweedy 

has its present English home in the North and East Ridings. It 
is also a Scottish name, though not very common there. There 
are now a few of the name at Bromley, Kent, perhaps descendants 
of a gentle family of Twedye, or Twedy, that resided at Boreham, 
Essex, in the reign of Elizabeth, having come from Scotland two 
generations before (Wright's "Essex"). 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDING. 



421 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDING. 

Note. — The asterisk before a name denotes that, though charac- 
teristic of the county, it is more relatively numerous elsewhere. 



*Green 
*Robinson 



GrENKEiL Names (30-40 counties). 

*Smifc]i *Wilsoa 

Taylor 



*Foster 

*Harrison 

♦Mitchell 



CoaraoN Names (20-29 counties). 



Moore 
Parker 
♦ThompsoQ 



Walker 
Wood 



Begional Names (10-19 counties). 



*Barker 


Hudson 


♦Simpson 


* Barrett 


*Jackson 


*Webster 


*Dawson 


^ r Procter 
\ Proctor 


*Wild 


*Elli8 


Wilkinson 


Holmes 


Shaw (Huddersfield) 





District Names (4-9 counties). 



*^tkinson 


^ J Fielding 
L Fielden 


r Metcalf 
L Metcalfe 


*Booth 


*Bradley 


GiU 


Naylor 


Braithwaite 


Greenwood 


J Xewbold 
I Newbould 


*Briggs (Bradford) 


Knowles 


Brook 


Lambert 


r Pullan 
\ PuUen 


*Carr 


*Law 


Charlesworth 


*Lawson 


Rhodes 


Drake 


♦Lister 


♦Richmond (Ripen) 


*Fawcett 


rLund 
LLunn 


J Whitaker 
I Whittaker 





422 



HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



County Names (2-3 counties). 



*BaiJ croft 
*Baxter 

Beaumont 
f Birkenshaw 
I Birkinshaw 

Bramley 
♦Calrert 
*Crabtree 

Craven (Leeds) 

{Crosland 
Crossland 
Crossley 
Crowther 
*Cundall 
* Driver 
r Duckett 1 
1 Duckitt ; (I^oncaster) 

Dugdale 

Eastwood (Hudders- 
field) 

England 
f Farrar 
1 Farrer 

Erankland 



Grayson 

Hague 

f Handley 

L Hanley 

^ J Hardacre 

1 Hardaker 

Hargreaves (Leeds) 

Hartley 

Heaton 

Hebden 

Holgate 
*Horner 

Hoyle 

lllingworth 

Ingham 
*Jenkinson 

Kaye (HuddersBeld) 

Leeming 

Lockwood 

Lofthouse (fi-ipon) 
*Luniley 

Marsden 

Marston 

Morrell 



J Oddie 
toddy 

Pickles 

Priestley 

Redman 

Schofield (Huddei's- 
field) 

Senior 

Shillitoe 
*Shuttleworth (Leeds) 

Slinger 

Stead 

Stones 

Sutcliffe (Halifax) 
*Swale3 

Sjkes (Huddersfield) 
*Tlawaite 

Waddington 

Waite 
/-Wolfenden 
I Wolfeden 
I Woffenden 
^Woofenden 



PECrLlAE Names (confined mostly to this county). 



Addy (Huddersfield) 

Ambler 

Appleyard 

Arraitage 
J Balmf orth 
l Bamf orth 

Barraclough 
r Batty "I (Hudders- 
l Battye J field) 

{Beever 
Beevers 
Beevors 

Bentham (Sedbergh) 
Binns 
Blakey 
Bottomley 



Bramall (Sheffield) 
r Brear 
L Brears 

Broadbent 

Broadhead 

Butterfield 

Capstick 

Clapham 

Clough 

Cockshott 

Crapper 

Crawshaw (Sheffield) 

rDemain 1 

i -n ■ r (Stipton) 
L Demaine J ^ ^ ' 

Denby 

Denison 



Dibb 

Dyson (Huddersfield) 

Earnshaw 

Emmott 

Feather (Keighley) 

Firth 

Garside 
r Geldard 
I Gelder 

Gledhill 

Gott 

Haigh (Huddersfield) 

HainsTvorth (Leeds) 

Haley 

Hampshire 

Hanson 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDIXG. 



423 



Hardcastle 

HeUiwell (.Sheffield) 

Hepworth 

Hey 
fHinelieliff \ (Hud- 
L Hinchcliffe J dersfield) 

Hirst 

Hobson 
J Holdsworth 
I Houldsworth (Keighlej) 

Holroyd 

Horsfall 

Houseman 

Ingleby (Ripon) 

Jagger 

Jowett 

Jubb 

Kenworthy (Manclies- 
ter) 

Layeock (Leeds) 

Lodge 

Longbottom 

Lumb (Halifax) 

Mallinson 

Mawson 



Midgley 

Moorhouse (Hudders- 
field) 

Murgatroyd 

Myers 
r Newsholme 
\ If ewsome 

Noble 

Peel (Leeds) 

Petty 

Popplewell 

Poskitt 

Ramsden 

Redmayne 
r Rishworth 
L Rushwortli 

Robertsliaw 

Roebuck 
J Sedgwick 
L Sidgwick 

Shackleton 

Sheard 

Stansfield 

Sugden 

Sunderland 



Tatham 
/Teal 
t Teale 
r T hackery 
■s Thackray 
l-Thackwray 

Thomber 

Thwaites 

Tinker 

Townend 

Umpleby 

Uttley 

Tar ley 

Verity 

Wads worth (Manches- 
ter) 

Watkinson 

Weatherhead 

Whiteley 

Whitley 
/ Widdop 
IWiddup 

Woodhead (Hudders- 
field) 

Wrathall 



NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC NAMES OF 
THE WEST EIDINa OF YORKSHIRE. 

(Tlie names ai'e arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in aljDha- 
betical order in each group.) 



Authorities indicated hy the following ahhreviations : — 
D. indicates Drake's " Eboracum." 

G-. „ Gent's " Kipon." 

G-a. „ Gatty's " Ecclesfield." 

H. H. ,, Hunter's " Hallamshire." [ 

H. E. „ Hundred Rolls. 

H. Y. ,, Hunter's " South Yorkshire." 

L. ,, Lower's " Patronymica Britannica." 

M. ,, Miller's " Doncaster." 

S. G. „ Slater's " Guiseley." 

Sp, „ " Contributors to Armada Fund in 1588" (Brit. Mus.,B. 474). 

Th. „ Thoresby's " Leeds." 

W. „ Watson's " Halifax." 

Wli.C. „ Whitaker's " Craren." 



424 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



A— B. 



Ambler is an old Yorkshire name, now best represented in the 
West Riding, There were several of the name in Arnley about a 
century ago (Th.). William Ambler was mayor of Doucaster in 
1717 (M.), and one of the sheriffs of York in 1727 bore this name 
(D.). In 1665, Captain Thomas Ambler gave £30 to the poor of 
Leeds (Th.). Ombler was the name of the; mayor of Holderness, 
in the East Riding, in 1618, 1G38, 1655, and 1821 (Poulson's 
" Holderness"). The name occurred amongst the yeomen of East 
Hasterton in the reign of Edward VI. (D.) ; and going much 
further back we find Amblurs in the East Riding and in Lincoln- 
shire in the reign of Edward I. (H. R.) Appleyard is another 

old Yorkshire name. Sir Nicholas Applyai'de fought at Flodden 
in 1513 (Wh. C). Thomas Appleyard was lord mayor of York in 
1551, 1563, and 1584 (D.). John Appleyard, Esq., of Burstwick 
Garth, was mayor of Holderness in 1585 (Poulson's " Holderness "j. 
The name of Apylyard occurred in Norfolk in the 13th century 

(H. R.) Armytage or Armitage has been a West Riding name 

since the time of Stephen (L.). A district in the West Riding 
and a parish and a seat in Staffordshire are thus called. The 
Armitages of Kirklees are an old and influential Yorkshire family, 
dating back to the time of Henry VIII. ; a baronetcy was granted 
to the family by Charles I. (Th.). The Armitages of Doncaster 
tiace their pedigree three centuries back (H. Y.) ; a member of 
this family was mayor of that town in 1663 (M.). John Armytage 
was a Yorkshire gentleman who contributed £25 to the Spanish 
Armada fund in 1588 (Sp.) The Battys or Battye.s are now- 
numerous in the Huddersfield district. The Batties of Warms- 
worth trace their pedigree two centuries back (H. Y.). Early last 
century there was a gentle family of Batty at Thorp in Burnsall 

(Wh. C). William Batty was mayor of Ripon in 1622 (G.) 

The Beaumoxts belong to an ancient and once powerful Yorkshire 
family. Major Beaumont was lieutenant-govei'nor of Sheffield 
Castle in 1643 (H. H.). The name is also established in Suffolk. 

Bixxs wa.s a Lincolnshire name in the 18th century. More 

than 200 years ago, Richard Binns, gent., lent £50 to the city of 

York (D.) The Yorkshire Bramleys derive their name from 

two townships in the West Riding The Brajialls, who are best 

represented in the Sheffield district, derive their name from 
Bramhall, a township in the adjoining part of Cheshire. John 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDING. 425 

Bramltall was major of Pontefract in 1602 (M.). Bramall was 
the name of tlie mayor of Lichfield, Stafiordshire, in 1781 

(Harwood's "Lichfield") Breres, the name of an ancient 

family originally of Hammerton and afterwards of Leeds (Th.), is 

the early form of the Yorkshire name of Breaks Broadbent 

was a common name in the parish of Ecclesfield during the reigns 
of Elizabeth and James I.; its early form was Broadbent (Ga.). 

Broadhead was also an Ecclesfield name in the reign of 

Elizabeth, when it was often written Brodheade (Ga.). Brodheved 

was a Cambridgeshire name in the 13th century (H. R.) The 

Benthams, who are best represented in the Sedbergh district, take 
their name from a West Riding parish. Thomas Bentham, Bishop 
of Lichfield in the 16th century, was born at Sherburn in the West 

Riding BuTTERFiELD was the name of a freeholder in the city 

of York during the reign of Elizabeth (D.). There was a Lan- 
caster family of this name during last century, members of which 
filled the ofiice of mayor five times between 1722 and 1779 

("History of Lancaster") Amongst the old West Riding 

names, now less frequently represented, is that of Beckwith, which 
was originally derived from a hamlet in that division of the 
county. The Beckwiths were a very numerous race, the main 
stock being settled at a very early period at Clint in Ripley, where 
it flourished until the close of the 16th century ; the Beckwiths of 
Aldborough during the 17th and 18th centuries, who belonged to 
the Clint stock, received a baronetcy (Fisher's " Masham "). 

C— E. 

The Claphams were a very ancient family of West Riding 

gentry (Th.), who took the name of a West Riding parish The 

CJloughs belonged to an old gentle family of Thorp Siapleton, a 
member of which was a justice of the peace in the reign of 

James L (Th.). Clough is a West Riding hamlet Crabtree 

is also a Lancashire name. Crabtree was the name of a distin- 
guished astronomer and mathematician of the 17th century, who 

was born in the parish of Halifax (W.) Cockshot is a hill in 

Cumberland, whilst Cockshutt is a Shropshire district The 

name of Crapper was i-epresented by Crapere in Norfolk ni the 

13th century (H. R.) The Cravens of the West Riding are best 

represented in the Leeds district. The name is also established in 
the other divisions of Yorkshire, as well as in Lincolnshire. A 



426 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

West Riding district is thus called The Crawshaws are now 

best represented in the district of Sheffield. They take the name 
of a Lancashire village, from which thej originally hailed, but 
they were well established in the parish of Ecclesfield in the reign 
of Elizabeth (Ga.), and in the time of Cromwell in the parish of 

Arksey (H. Y.). The name is still in Arksey The Crowthers 

have long been established in the district of Halifax : Brian 
Crowther, who died in 1607, left many bequests for <he poor of 

that town (W.) Calverxey is one of the old Yorkshire names, 

now uncommon in the county. The Calverleys of Oalverley, a 
knightly family, came into possession of Esholt Hall, Graiseley, in 

the reign of Charles I. (S. G.) The Denbys derive their name 

from a township in the West Riding Dematn or Demaine is a 

name now best represented in the Skipton district. John Demaine 
of West End, Horsforth, died in 1821 at the age of 110 (S. G.). 

Thomas Denison, one of the Society of Merchant Adventurers, 

was buried in Leeds parish church in 1708 (Th.). The English 
Denisons are said to have sprung from the Scottish Dennistouns 
(L.). Since, however, Denny has long been a Norfolk and a 
Sntfolk name, its change to Denison in the north of England is 
the same as that which a multitude of English family names 
have undergone in the northern counties, and a great number of 

examples of this change are to be found in this work Dyson 

is a name now numerous in the Huddersfield district. It was 
well established in the parish of Ecclesfield during the reign of 

Elizabeth (Ga.) An ancient gentle family of Emmott long 

lived at Emmott Hall, near Burnley, in Lancashire : Richard 
Emmott, Esq., the last male heir, died at the family seat in 1819 
(Baines' "Lancashire"). A rector of Bolton during the reign of 

Elizabeth bore this name (Wh. C.) Crosland is the name of a 

township in the West Riding. Thomas Crosland of Crosland 

was rector of Bramwith 200 years ago (H. Y.) The Ducketts or 

DuCKiTTS are now principally represented near the Lincolnshire 
border in the Doncaster district. The Ducketts of Fillingham, 

Lincolnshire, were resident there in the 13th century (L.) 

The family of Dugdale long resided in Lancashire (L.), and 
further reference will be found under that county. John Dugdale 
was rector of St. Dyonis in the city of York in the reign of 

Charles II. (D.) Joshua Earnshaw, merchant, who was lord 

mayor of York in 1692, was the son of a yeoman of Holme in the 
parish of Kirkburton : he founded a school at Holme, and worthily 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDING. 427 

endowed with social position and good fame his family and their 
descendants (Morehouse's " Kirkburton "). The Earnshaws are 

still in Kirkbui'ton The Englands of the West Riding belono- 

to a very ancient family of Scot Hall, Potter-Newton, in Leeds 
parish, in which parish the name still occurs (Th.). The name 
also occurs in Hunts and. Somerset. In the 13th century it was 
represented by Engelond in Hunts, Bucks, and Norfolk (H. R.). 
New England is a Northamptonshire hamlet. 

F— G. 
Farrar or Farrer is a very old West Riding name. The 
Farrers of Halifax were an ancient gentle family, possessing the 
Eawood estate in that parish in the 16tli century (W.) ; and 
^Villiam Farrer was a Halifax gentleman in the reign of Charles II. 
(D.). The Farrers of Leeds were an old family of Wortley in 
that parish, and were lords of the manor at the beginning of last 
century : in 1694, Miles Farrer was master of the Free School, 
Leeds ; one branch of this family trace their pedigree to the time 
of Elizabeth (Th.). The name is still numerous in the Halifax 
and Leeds districts. John Farrar was one of the Yorkshire gentle- 
men who in 1642 endeavoured to prevent the civil war extending 
to the county (D.). The origin of the name is somewhat uncertain. 
A Norfolk incumbent of the 16th century was called John 
Fayrhawr, alias Farrar (L.) ; and in the 13th century the name 
of Fayrher occurred in the adjoining county of Cambridge, whilst 
De Ferar or De Ferrar was then found in Derbyshire, Devonshire, 

Oxfordshire, etc. (H. R.) Robert Firth was the name of two 

mayors of Doncaster in the reigns of Henry VII. and Henry VIII. 

(M.),and the name is still in the town The name of Frankland 

has long been established in the western part of the West Riding, 
as at Giggleswick (Wh. C). Hugh Francklande was a Yorkshire 
gentleman who contributed £50 for the defence of his coimtry at 
the time of the expected Spanish invasion of 1588 (Sp.). The 
name of Franklan occurs in the Hundred Rolls, and it seems 
probable that Frankland is sometimes a corruption of Franklin. 
There is a Frankland Hall in the North Riding, and the surname 
is also established there Geldard or Gelder is an old York- 
shire name. William Geldart was wakeman of Ripon in 1435, an 
oflBce corresponding to that of the mayor of later date (G.). The 
name is still in Ripon. John Geldart, merchant, was lord mayor 
of York in 1645 and 1654, and Bartholomew Geldart was sheriff 



428 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

of the same city in 1699 (D.). The name is still in York The 

principal home of the Gills at the present day is in the West 
Eridino: of Yorkshire. The Gills of Norton trace their pedigree 

300 years back (H. H.) Gledhill is the name of an ancient 

family of Barkisland Hall, Halifax, where they resided until 
towards the middle of the 17th century; they date back to the 
14th century (W.). Their name still survives in Barkisland and 

in Halifax The West Riding name of GOTT was represented 

by Gotte in Lincolnshire and Norfolk during the 14th century 

(H. R.) Grayson is a characteristic Yorkshire name. A vicar 

of St. Martin's, York, during the reign of Elizabeth, bore this 
name (D.) Amongst the old West Riding names now un- 
common in the county is that of Genn or Genne. It was 
established at Hullock and other places in the parish of Eccles- 
field during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I. (Ga.). (See 
under " Cornwall.") 

H. 

The Hagues are also established in Cheshire and Derbyshire. 

Hague is a place in the pai-ish of Leeds The somewhat similar 

name of Haigh is now numerously represented in the Huddersfield 
district. Henry Haigh. held an estate in the adjoining parish of 

Halifax in the 1 Tth century (W.) The Handlets or Hanlets 

are also represented in Derbyshire and Norfolk. Handley is the 
name of parishes and hamlets in Cheshire, Derbyshire, etc., and 
Hanley is the name of places in Staffordshire and Worcestershire. 

Hartley is a very common West Riding name. It is also 

established in Lancashire. There are hamlets and townships of 
the name in the West Riding, Westmoreland, Northumberland, 

etc The Hansons have for a long time resided in the parish of 

Halifax (W.). A rector of Thornton two centuries ago bore this 
name (Wh. C). Richard Hanson, who was three times mayor of 
Hull in the reign of Henry VL, died heroically at the battle of 
Wakefield in 1460 (Tickell's '^Hull"). Captain Hanson, who 
was taken prisoner in the same battle, was executed at Pontefract 

(D.) Habdcastle was the name of an old and influential East 

Riding family of Masham, Kirkby-Malzeard, and Nidderdale, 
where they were possessed of considerable landed estates ; during 
the civil wars they suffered for their warm espousal of the cause 
of King Charles (Fisher's "Masham"). John Hardcastle was 
mayor of Hull in 1573 (Tickell's "Hull"). Thomas Hardcastle 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDIXG. 429 

was minister of Bramham in the reign of Charles II. (Th.). 
Hardcastle Craggs is the name of a locality near Hebden Brido'e 

in the West Biding The Hebdens, who derive their name from 

more than one West Riding village, are probably for the most 
part descended from an ancient gentle family of Ripon dmnno- the 
loth, 16th, and 17th centuries, where they frequently filled the 
office of wakeman and afterwards of mayor (G.). William de 
Hebden was rector of Burnsall in the reign of Edward III. (Wh. 
C.)- Baker Hebdon was warden of Hull in 1761 (Tickell's 
"Hull"). The Hebdens are now numerous in the district of 

Bedale, and they are still represented in Ripon The Helliwells 

who are now numerous in the district of Sheffield, may derive 
their name, like the Halliwells of Lancashire, from a Lancashire 
township. The name of Helwell occurred in Lincolnshire in the 

I3th century (H. R.) The Hepworths are named after a West 

Riding village. Their name was well established in the parish of 

Ecclesfield during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I. (Ga.) 

Het is a characteristic West Riding name. Samuel Hey was mayor 

of Leeds in 1702 (Th.) The Hinchcliffes are well repi-esented 

in the Huddersfield district. The name was established in 

the parish of Ecclesfield in the reign of Elizabeth (Ga.) 

HoBSON is a characteristic West Riding name. It was well 
represented in Ecclesfield parish in the reign of Elizabeth (Ga.) 

HoLROTD was the name of a gentle family of Halifax early last 

century (W.), which is still represented in the town. Howroydes 
is a seat near Elland in the West Riding. William de Howroyde 
or Holroyd, ancestor of the Earl of Sheffield, flourished in the 

reign of Edward I. (L.) A family of the Hoksfalls, said to 

have come originally from Mankenholes, Halifax, resided at 
Storthes Hall, Kirkburton, from the 16th to the present century; 
Storthes Hall was previously the home of the ancient and now 
extinct family of Storthes (Morehouse's "Kirkburton"). Richard 
Horsfall of this county contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada 

fund in 1588 (Sp.). The name is still in Halifax The old 

family of Hotle of Hoyle House date back about three centuries 
(W. and L.). Thomas Hoyle, merchant, was lord mayor of York 
in 1632 and 1644 (D.). 

I— N. 

The Illingwoeths derive their name from a village in the 
West Riding Ingham is the name of parishes in Lincolnshire, 



430 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

N'orfolk, and other counties The Inglebts, who take their name 

from parishes and townships in the North Riding, are now best 
represented in the Ripon district. The pedigree of one family of 
this name bsgins with Sir Thomas Ingleby, one of the justices of 

the Common Pleas in the reign of Edward III. (Th.) Kay or 

Kaye is the name of an ancient and distinguished family of 
Woodsome in the West Riding, one of whose members received a 
baronetcy from Charles I. (L., Wh. C, and H. H.). The Kayes 
are now best represented in the Huddersfield district of the West 
Riding, whilst the Kays are more numerous in Lancashire. As far 
back as the 13th century we find this name, both as Kay and 
Kaye, in Lincolnshire, Hunts, and Cambridgeshire (H.R. )..,... 
JuBB Avas the name of a deputy-registrar of the Archbishop of 
York in the early part of last century (D.). As far back as the 
reign of Edward I. we fihd this name represented as Jubbe in the 

wapentake of Osgoldcross (H. R.) The Lockwoods were well 

established in Ecclesfield parish during the reign of Elizabeth 
(Ga.). Lincolnshire is another home of the name. Lockwood is 

a parish near Huddersfield The Laycocks have been resident 

for many generations in the district of Leeds, and it is in that 
locality that they are now most numerous. Westrope Laycock, 
gent., was buried in Leeds parish church in 1685 (Th.), and 
Westerop Lacock was a Leeds gentleman in the reign of Anne 

(G.). Laycock is the name of a Wiltshire parish The Lodges 

were much respected merchants of Leeds in the 17th and 18th 
centuries ; in the parish church there is, or was, a brass plate to 
" Maister William Lodge, the best of men," who died in 1648 

(Th.). The name is still well represented in Leeds The 

Marsdens are also well represented in Lancashire and Derbyshire. 
A town and two townships in the West Riding and a Lancashire 

township bear this name The Yorkshire Marstoxs take their 

name from a place in the West Riding The Midgleys have the 

name of a town and a village in the West Riding. In the 16th 
century a family of this name resided at Bradford Dale, Derby- 
shire. Dr. Midgeley was a Leeds physician about two centuries 

ago (Th.) The Mookhouses are numerously repi-esented in the 

Huddersfield district The West Riding is now the principal 

home of the Morrells, but they are also to be found in the other 
divisions of the county. In the 13th century they were repre- 
sented by the ^lorels in Norfolk, Hunts, Cambridgeshire, Oxford- 
shire, etc. (H. R.) Yorkshire has long been the home of the 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDING. 431 

MuRGATROTDS. In tlie ITtli Century the family owned for a time 
: the Riddlesden estate in Biiigley parish (Wh. C.) : the name is 
still in Bingley town. James Murgaitroit was a Yorkshire o-entle- 
man who subscribed £25 for the defence of his country at the time 
' of the expected Spanish invasion in 1588 (Sp.). The name was 
represented in York in the 17th and 18th centuries, and in the 
early part of last century a monumental inscription in the parish 
church of St. Michael in that city bore this name (D.). Michael 
Murgatroid or Murgetrode was Archbishop Whitgift's secretary 
in the time of Elizabeth (Brayley's " Surrey," etc.). John Murga- 
troyd was twice mayor of Evesham, Worcestershire, in the middle 

of last centary (May's " Evesham ") Newbold or Newbould is 

: a common place-name in the midlands. The surname is also 

established in Derbyshire, Notts, and Worcestershire The 

Newsholmes or Newsomes take their name from an East Ridino- 
hamlet. 

0— S. 

William Oddy was buried in St. Peter's churchyard, Leeds, in 

1731 (G.). The Oddys are numerous still in Leeds Popplewell 

was the name of a distinguished family of Temple Bel wood 
Lincolnshire, last century, to which belonged the sheriff of 

Lincolnshire in 1739 (Stonehouse's " Axeholme ") Ramsden is 

an ancient Yorkshire name. An old gentle family of Ramsden 
resided at Crawstone, Halifax, in the 16th century ; and the vicar 
of Halifax, early in the 17th centurj^, bore this name (W.), 
Ramsden was the name of two mayors of Pontefract in the middle 
of the 17th century (M.). John Ramsden was high sheriff of the 
county of York in 1636 and 1672. William Ramsden, merchant, 
was lord mayor of York in 1675, and the sheriff of that city in 
1637 bore the same name (D.). Ramsden was the name of three 
mayors of Hull in the reigns of James I. and Charles I. (Tickell's 
"Hull"). The name is still in Pontefract, Halifax, York, and 
Hull. Ramsden is a place in Lancashire... ...Rawdon is a name 

now rare in the county. The Rawdons of Rawdon were a power- 
ful family in the middle ages (S. G.) The Roebucks were an 

old Sheffield manufacturing firm that existed as far back as the 
beginning of last century (H. H.). The name is still in the town. 

Redmak and Redmayne in the West Riding, and Readman in 

the North and East Ridings, represent in Yorkshire the ancient 
Cumberland and Westmoreland name of Redmain, Redman, or 



432 HOilES OF FAMILY XAMES. 

Redeman, which is referred to under those counties. Charles 
Redman, was lord mayor of York in 1705 and 1722, and William 
Redman held that office in 1714 (D.) Richard Redman was high 
sheriff of York early in the loth century (D.). During the 17th 
century the Redmaynes were a knightly family of Thornton-in- 

Lonsdale in the West Riding (Whitaker's " Richmondshire ") 

The RiSHWOETHS were an old Halifax family (W.). The name is 

still in the town The Riplets were mayors of Ripon in the 

loth, 16th, and 17th centuries (Gr.). The name is now scarce. 

Ripley is a parish in the West Riding Rhodes is a name 

principally represented in the West Riding, but it is also estab- 
lished in Lancashire, Notts, and Derbyshire, and it occurs as 
Rhoades in Lincolnshire. Roads is a numerous Bucks name. 
There are hamlets and villages called Rhodes in Lancashire and 
the West Riding. A family named Rodes or De Rodes flourished 
for 500 or 600 years in Lincolnshire, Notts, Yorkshire, and Derby- 
shire : they were descended from Gerard de Rodes, a distinguished 
baron of the 12th century. The Derbyshire branch was a knightly 
family of Barlborough in the 17th and 18th centuries, rewarded 

with a baronetcy in 1641 (Pilkington's "Derbyshire") 

ScHOFiELD, a name also established in Lancashire, under which 
county further reference will be found, is now numerously 
represented in the Huddersfield and Leeds districts. Joseph 
Scholfield, haberdasher, of Hats, was buried in St. John's church, 

Leeds, in 1688 (Th.) The Seniors or Seniers were well 

established in Ecclesfield parish in the reigns of Elizabeth and 
James I. (Gra.). There is a Derbyshire estate of this name. The 

Seniors are also to be found in Dorset Shillttoe was the name 

of four mayors of Pontefract between 1643 and 1693 (M.). The 
name occurs, usually as Sillitoe, in Staffordshire and Shropshire. 

The Slixgers were represented in the parish of Linton in the 

rei^n of Charles I. (Wh. C). The name also occurs in Lancashire. 

Stansfield is the name of a township and a seat in the parish 

of Halifax. The Stansfields of Bradford purchased in 1755 Esholt 
Hall in Gruiseley parish (S. G.) ; they are a very ancient West 

Riding family (L.) Stead is usually a characteristic Yorkshire 

name. A family of Steade owned More Hall in Bolsterstone 

during the greater part of last century (H. H ) Sugden was 

an Ecclesfield name in the reign of Elizabeth (Ga.). A gentle 
family of this name resided at Eastwood House in the parish of 
Keighley early this century (Wh. C). The name is still in 



YORKSHIRE, WEST RIDIXG. 433 

fvMgbley. John Sugdon, woollen draper, was mayor of Beverley 
ill the East Riding in 1077 and 1695 (Poulsoa's "Beverlac"). In 
the church of Howlden (Howden ?) in the East Riding, there is 
an inscription referring to William Sugden of Laxton, bearing the 
date of 1728 (G.). William Sugdon was a bailiff of Shrewsbury 

(Salop) in 1479 (Phillips' "Shrewsbury") Stones was the 

name of a gentle family of Braithwaite in Bramwith parish during 

last century (H. T.) Stkes is a very characteristic West Riding 

name. Though it also occurs in Lincolnshire, it is there much less 
frequent. The Yorkshire representatives of the name are very 
numerous in the Huddersfield distric-t. Its ancient home was in 
Cumberland and Yorkshire, and probably there were different 
parent stocks. One of the early Yorkshire families possessed land 
at Flockton in the reign of Henry II. ; and from the Flockton 
stock the Sykes family of Driglington branched off in the time of 
Edward YI. (James' "Bradford"). The wealthy Leeds merchants 
of this name in the 17th century, who were lords of the manor of 
Leeds, and who filled the offices of mayor and alderman of the 
town, belonged to a' family that in the beginning of the 16th 
century hailed from the Sykes family of Sykes-dyke near Carlisle 
(Th.). Sykehouse is the name of a West Riding township and 

village. Sykes is still a common L?eds name The ancient 

family of Spofforth is now scantily represented in the county. 
A parish and two seats in the West Riding bear the name. 
Thomas Spofford, or De Spofforth, was Bishop of Hereford in the 
15th centui'y (D.). Robert Spofforth was an alderman of Hull in 
the reign of Edward IV. (Tickell's " Hull"). In Domesday times, 
Gamelbar de Spofforth held lands in Spofforth (L.). Spofforth 
was long the home of the family (L.). 

T— Z. 

Tatham is the name of a Lancashire parish. The Tathams of 
Pontefract, during the 17th century, frequently filled the office of 

mayor (M.) Thackeay, or Thackwray, or Thackert, is a name 

that has its present home in the West Riding. Lower says that 
these names ai-e forms of Thacker or Thatcher, just as Vicary is a 
form of Vicar. Thomas Thackeray was mayor of Hull in 1604 

and 1624 (Tickell's "Hull") The name of Thorxber was 

represented by Thornbur in Gloucestershire in the 1 3th century 

(H. R.) Whilst Thwaites is usually found in the We.st Riding, 

2 F 



434 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 



Thwaite is more characteristic of tlie North Riding, especially 
in the district of Bedale. Members of a Doncaster family of 
Thwaites filled the office of mayor of that town in 1561, 1582, 
1583, 1584, 1587, and 1652 (M.). In the 16th and 17th centuries 
there was a family of Thwaits in Pontefract which supplied 
mayors to that town in 1530, 1590, 1597, and 1611 (M.). A Leeds 
family of Thwaites had property in Allerton-Glerlhow in that 
parish during the 16th and 17th centuries, the last owner of this 
name being a Leeds alderman in the time of Cromwell (Th.). 
Colonel Thwaites was deputy -governor of the city of York in the 
stirring times of 1644 (D.). A family of Thwaites held part of 
the manor of Shirecliffe in the reign of Elizabeth (H. H.) ; and 
as far back as the times of Edward II. Marston was in the posses- 
sion of a family of this name (D.). Thwaites is still a Doncaster 

name The Waddixgtons, who are also established in Lancashire, 

have their principal home in the West Riding, where occur a 
village and a seat of the name. The Waddingtons of Doddington, 
Cambridgeshire, were an important family during last century, 
and the high sheriff of that county in 1732 belonged to that house 
(Watson's "Wisbech"); they probably took their name from 

Waddington, a parish in Lincolnshire The Wadsworths, who 

are best represented on the Lancashire border in the vicinity of 
Manchester, take their name from a West Riding township, where 
an ancient family of the name once resided (L.). Richard Wades- 
w^orth was a Yorkshire gentleman who contributed £25 for the 
defence of his country at the time of the expected Spanish 

invasion of 1588 (Sp.) Watkixson was the name of a sheriff 

of York city in the reign of Elizabeth (D.). The Watkinsons of 
Leeds trace back their pedigree to the times of James I. ; during 
the 17th century a member of this family was mayor of Leeds 
and another was chancellor of York (Th.). Watkinson was also a 

Sheifield name in the 17th century (H. H.) Whitaker, or 

Whittaker, is a common West Riding name. An eminent 
minister, named Whitacre, who flourished in the 17th century, 
was born at Wakefield (Mag. Brit.). The Whittakers are more 

fully referred to under "Lancashire " Weatherhead was the 

name of the vicar of Thorp Arch, in the city of York, early last 

century (D.) In 1666, William Whitley was buried in the 

graveyard of St. John's church, Leeds (Th.) Samuel Widdop 

lived in Bradford in the middle of the 17th century (James' 
"Bradford"). The name is still in the town. 



I 



WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. 435 



WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. 



The boundary hetiveen Enjland and Wales. — It was not until 
the 17th centniy that Wales was limited by its present frontier. 
Previous to those times the boundaries were subject to constant 
changes on account of the disturbed condition of the English and 
Welsh border shires. Freeman, in his "Historical Geography of 
Europe,"* gives a concise account of these changes. After 
Harold's great Welsh campaign in 1063, the English frontier, 
previously defined by the Dee and the Wye, was extended west- 
ward, reaching to the Conway in the north and to the Usk in 
the south, and including, therefore, the present Welsh shires of 
Denbigh and Flint and a large part of Monmouthshire. Part of 
this territory was afterwards recovered by the Welsh princes, and 
part passed into the great March district of England and Wales 
under the rule of the Lord Marchers. In the reign of Henry I. 
South Wales was finally subdued ; and in some places, e.specially 
in South Pembrokeshire, the Welsh were almost driven out and 
preserved a partial independence in the mountains, whilst Flemish 
colonists settled on the level country, and the Norman lords with 
their numerous followers occupied the towns. In North Wales, 
native princes ruled as vassals until 1288, when the conquest was 
completed by Edward I. But the final incorporation of the 
Principality and its Marches did not occur until the reign of 
Henry VIII., when Wales was divided up into thirteen shires, 
including that of Monmouth. Previous to that time, the English 
border counties were but imperfectly defined towards Wales, and 
their constantly shifting frontiers well illustrate the disturbed 
condition of that region. 

I have referred above to the circumstance that Monmouthshire 
was included in Wales in the reign of Henry VIII. In the time 
of Charles IT. this county was added to the Oxford Circuit and 
returned two knights to Parliament instead of one, as in the case 
of the other Welsh shires. It has since been politically reckoned 



See also Freeman's " Norman Conquest." 

2f2 



436 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES. 

as an English county; jet at the time of its final admission within 
the English frontier, Welsh was the common language of the 
people.* Even now in the matter of its surnames Monmouthshire 
is almost more Welsh than Wales itself. 

This brings me to observe that the question of the Welsh 
boundary may be considered fi"om at least four different points 
of view. There is the political or statute frontier ; there is the 
frontier defined by race ; there is the frontier marked off by 
language ; and lastly there is the frontier of Welsh surnames. Of 
the political border 1 have already spoken. Concerning the limit 
defined by race I cannot do better than appeal to the high 
authority of Dr. Beddoe. In his work on the " Races of Britain," 
this author plainly shows that the racial boundary has advanced 
into the English border shires and therefore does not coincide 
with the political frontier. The population of the English Marches 
was to some extent Welsh even in the 11th century; and in our 
own time, as we may infer from the physical characters of the 
inhabitants of the English border counties, a large proportion of 
the population, in some parts as large as a third, has descended 
from Welsh immigrants. f Coming to the frontier marked off by 
language, we learn from the work of Dr. Beddoe that in the 
11th century not only was Welsh the prevailing tongue in Mon- 
mouthshire and in all the region south and west of the Wye, but 
that it was spoken in the country between Upper Wye and Upper 
Severn. As late as the 17th century, as I have already remarked, 
Welsh was the common language of Monmouthshire men. Now 
the boundary of language is falling far back from the Usk. The 
limits of this work, however, do not allow me to do much more 
than touch in a suggestive manrer on these matters, and I recom- 
mend them to my readers as fields of future inquiry. We have 
seen, however, that whilst the boundary of race lies on the English 
side of the political frontier, the boundary of language is being 
pushed well back into Wales. The Welsh race, in truth, has been 
extending eastward, whilst the English tongue has been advancing 
to the west. 



* Fuller's "Worthies." 

t Unlil tlie 16th centurj "Welsh rames are of rare occiirrerce in the lists of 
the bailiffs and mayors of Shrewsbiirj, Leominster, and Hereford, a cireum- 
etance indicating that in Shropshire and Herefordshire the towns long retained 
their English character. 



WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. 437 

Coming to the frontier of Welsh surnames, a subject more 
connected with the present work, we find the eastward mioration 
of Welshmen indicated in a very marked degree. Let us take first 
the case of the name of Jones. Its great home is in North Wales ; 
but it is also very numerous in South Wales and Monmouthshire, 
both of which possess it in the same relative proportion, and it 
is almost as frequent in Shropshire, and is well represented in 
Herefordshire. Its numbers rapidly diminish in the next line of 
Kiiglish counties, but a comparison of the figures given in the 
alphabetical list points to the conclusion that the area of the 
Jmieses, or rather their area of frequency, is limited by the Severn 
and the eastern border of Shropshire, and includes a small porticn 

(of Cheshire. Proceeding on the same plan we find that the area 
of Evans, a name uniformly distributed throughout Wales, includes 
]Monraouthshire, Herefordshire, and Shropshire. Taking the case 
of a much less frequent, though an equally characteristic, Welsh 
name, that of Lloyd, we find that it is uniformly distributed in 
AVales, but that its area of frequency also includes Monmouthshire, 
Herefordshire, and Shropshire. Then there is the instance of the 
Prices, who are more numerous in some of the En