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Full text of "Hopi the cliff-dweller"

HOP 

THE CLIFF DW 



MARTHA JEWETT 



HOPI 



THE CLIFF-DWELLER 



BY 



MARTHA JEWETT 



EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING CO. 

Boston New York Chicago San Francisco 



Copyright, 1909 

BV 

EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 



T 



O the smaU travelers whose 



hands are knocking at the 
doors of the lands of the un- 
known, this volume is dedicated, 
with the sympathy of one who 
has passed that way before, and 
the hope that they may be led 
into larger realms of thought. 



26115G 



SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS 

"Hopi the Cliff-Dweller" is designed for children of 
the second primary grade. Reading, Language, and Liter- 
ature go hand in hand ; one cannot be taught without the 
other. It may be used as a basis for language work in 
the hands of the teacher, then as a reader in the hands of 
the children. 

Extensive work in language should precede, having 
children reproduce orally. Let them express by means of 
charcoal or water color, or work out concretely on the sand 
table. 

When the children have " lived " with these Cliff- 
dwellers; when they have learned all about their life and 
habits, and can reproduce in substance; then they are pre- 
pared to read. 

The vocabulary may be found at the back of the book. 
All new words should be developed on the blackboard, be- 
fore the reading lesson, either by phonics or word-building, 
according to the judgment of the teacher. 



6 




HOPI THE CLIFF-DWELLEK 



HOPI THE CLIFF-DWELLER 




Here is a Cliff-dweller. 
The Cliff-dwellers were Indians. 
They lived hundreds of years ago. 
The Cliff-dwellers lived in this country 
before Columbus came here. 



8 

Would you not like to visit the homes 
of the Clifif-dwellers? 

They lived in the far West. 

The land there has hills like tables. 

These high hills are of red sandstone. 

The sides of these table-lands are 
called cliffs. 

The sun shines bright and hot on them. 

The Cliff-dwellers lived on these cliffs. 

The cliffs looked down into canyons. 

Canyons are the deep hollows between 
the table-lands. 

There are some very deep hollows. 

Many cool springs flow from them. 

You may drink from these springs. 



9 




The Cliff-dwellers' houses were on the 
high cliffs. 

They also had farms. 

The farms were down in the valleys. 

But the houses were high up on the 
mountains. 

There were no trees near. 



10 




The Cliff-dwellers built their houses of 
rock. 

The walls of rock were put together 
with a plaster made of mud. 

Openings were left in the walls. 

Stones were placed against these holes 
to keep out enemies. 



11 




HOPI 

Hopi was a little Cliff-dweller. 

He was an Indian boy. 

He had dark skin and coarse, black 

hair. 

His head was flat, because he had been 
tied to a board when he was small. 



12 

His teeth were hard and white, and 
were worn oflf from munching corn. 

Hopi's mother hiid him up against the 
rocks when he was little. 

She pounded the corn for dinner. 

His father was often away from home. 

He hunted with his bow and arrows. 

He wore a shirt woven from strips of 
the bark of the basswood tree. 

Around his neck was a string of bright- 
colored beads. 

In winter he wore loose trousers of 
buckskin, which came just below his knee. 

He wore leggings, too, and moccasins 
made of skin. 



13 

Hopi had thick, coarse hair. 

He made a brush of leaves of stiff grass 
tied together. 

He brushed his hair with this brush. 

Then he stuck a turkey feather in his 
hair. 

The Cliff-dwellers were not a very 
clean people. 

They had very little water. 

They sometimes went to far off streams 
for water. 

Hopi's home was built high upon the 
cliffs. 

It was made of rocks brought from the 
sides of the mountains. 



14 




The walls of Hopi's home were plastered 
with mud. 

His mother plastered these walls. 

She left the mark of her palm on the 
soft plaster. 

There were steps cut into the rock. 



15 

Long ladders were also used for climb- 
ing up and down. 

These ladders were made from trees, 
which grew far away on the rocky slopes. 

With stone axe and knife they chopped 
down these trees and trimmed their tops. 

They cut cross-pieces and bound them 
with green bark. 

In Hopi's house there were four rooms 
with small, round openings. 

At the back was a granary. 

This granary was a store-room high up 
in a nook of the rocky wall. 

Here were the large water jars filled 
with water, and bins of corn and beans. 



16 




There was no furniture in this house. 
There was only a stone bench. 
This stone bench was all around the 
room. 

It was often used for a table. 
There were stone boxes, too. 



17 




Hopi's father was a potter. 

He made oUas, or water jars, from the 
wet clay. 

He put the jars in the hot sun, and 
baked them. 

He painted pictures on them. 

He painted them in bright colors. 



18 

Hopi's father was a hunter. 

He hunted the wild deer, that his 
family might have meat. 

He hung the deer meat in the store- 
room. 

He killed the deer with his bow and 
arrows. 

He skinned it with a stone knife. 

Hopi's father was a warrior. 

A warrior is a soldier. 

He fought the wild Indians with his 
tomahawk of stone. 

He had a bow and stone-tipped arrows. 

He fought with stone knives and 
wooden clubs. 



19 



/■ i .j.j.ui;.l.vj,w»^UJJA.>tilk-Ji->.^^^^^ 






5?;7^v^™7Ti55rrT5!;?rj!T!srT7;!«!r^^ 




Hopi's father was a farmer. 

He planted the corn on the rough 
mountain sides between the rocks. 

He planted the beans in the dirt on 
the cliffs. 

Hopf s father was a weaver. 

He wove baskets of dried grass. 



20 

He plaited the corn husks which he had 
torn into strips. 

He made sandals out of them. 

He wove shirts from strips of the bass- 
wood bark. 

Hopi's father herded the turkeys. 

Hopi had a turkey for a pet. 

He had a blanket made from its 
feathers. 

He put a feather in his hair. 

Hopi's father made stone arrow heads 
and si3ear heads. 

He made axes and hammers of stone. 

He tied them to wooden handles with 
strips of bark. 



21 




Hopi'8 mother cooked the dinner. 
She gathered an armfnl of cedar twigs. 
She took a piece of steel and a flint. 
She struck them together to get a 
spark of fire. 

This spark lighted the brush. 
Now she had made the fire. 



22 

Hopi's mother cooked in the baskets. 

She wove these baskets from dried 
grass. 

She filled the baskets with water. 

Then she dropped hot stones into the 
water. 

The stones made the water hot. 

Hopi's mother pounded the corn with a 
stone. 

She mixed the pounded corn with 
water. 

Then she poured this mixture on a hot 
stone. 

This is the way she made the piki or 
paper bread. 



23 



-^•^ 




Hopi's house had a store-room. 
In this store-room was kept the meat. 
Bins filled with corn and beans were 
here. 

The water jars were put in here, too. 
Back of this room was a reservoir. 



24 







This reservoir was a place sunk in the 
rocks for holding water. 

When it rained, the water came down 
and filled it. 

In the dry season it was empty. 

The water was used for cooking and 
drinking. 



25 

There was a ledge before the door of 
the house. 

This ledge was the yard. 

Hopi played hi the yard. 

His brother Ninah played with him. 

Hopi loved his brother. 

His dog Lobo played with them. 

Hopi loved his dog. 

Lobo was a yellow dog. 

He had white spots. 

He was a wolf dog. 

Let us play we are Cliff-dwellers. 

We will build our house of rocks on a 
high place. 

We will plaster the walls with wet clay. 



26 

We will plant corn between the rocks 
on the hillside. 

We will tend the garden. 

We will herd the turkeys. 

We will plant the grain. 

Then we shall be farmers. 

Let us make water jars of wet clay. 

We can put them in the sun and bake 
them. 

Then we shall be potters. 

Would you like to be a weaver? 

We will weave baskets as the Cliff- 
dwellers did. 

We will weave the baskets from the 
dried grass. 



27 

HOPI IN PEISON 

Hopi grew into a large, strong boy. 

He was as old as we are — just six 
years old. 

He played on the rocks with his 
brother. 

They played together just as all little 
boys do. 

The little Indian boy made strings of 
beads. 

The beads were of many colors. 

He wore these beads around his neck. 

Hopi and his brother were very happy. 

They laughed and talked together in 
their language. 



28 

The Cliff-dwellers spoke the Hopi lan- 
guage. 

They understood each other just as we 
do when we talk to one another. 

We Avould think their language a very 
strange one. 

We could not understand them. 

Do you think you would like to string 
beads with Hopi on the high cliffs? 

Hopi would always greet you by say- 
ing, "Lolami." 

"Lolami" means "Good morning" in 
the language of the Cliff-dwellers. 

Hopi always said "Lolami" to all 
whom he met. 



29 




When Hopi was six years old, he and 
his brotlier Ninah were playing on the 
cliffs outside their rocky house. 

They were playing in the door yard on 
the ledge. 

They were making necklaces out of 
red berries. 



30 

They laughed and were very happy. 
Their dog Lobo was with them. 

All at once the children heard terrible 

« 

noises down the cliffs. 

The air was full of yells. 

The wild Indians had come to fight and 
kill them. 

To their home up on the cliff came 
the wild Indians. 

They scaled the high rocks. 

They climbed up the niche stairway, 
cut in the side of the cliff. 

These wild men had painted faces, with 
feathers in their hair, and tomahawks in 
their hands. 



31 




The quiet Cliff-dwellers fought with 
them, for they had come to kill them. 

The war-whoops sounded again and 
again, up and down the canyon. 

They were all fighting for their lives. 

Ilopi's father pushed one wicked Indian 
over the ledge. 



32 

He fell far down to the bottom of the 
deep valley and was killed. 

Another Cliff-dweller threw the Indian's 
brother like a war club over the ledge, to 
lie by the dead Indian. 

Before Hopi could think, his mother 
rushed out and took him in her arms. 

She thrust him into the granary and 
put the large stone against the door. 

This store-room was at the rear of the 
house. 

Now, she thought, the wicked Indians 
cannot get him. 

In the next room, he heard his dear 
mother scream. 



33 

She screamed when one of the wild 
Indians folloAved her to kill her. 

Frightened almost to death, little Hopi 
scarcely dared to breathe. 

He listened. 

He was very much afraid. 

What should he do? 

Did he hear his mother's voice calling 
her boy, "Hopi," "Hopi"? 

O why did his mother not come to 
him? 

He could hear nothing. 

All was still, so terribly still, that his 
heart gave a jump, then almost stopped 
beating. 



34 




He called "Mother!" "Father!" 
Then he called "Indian!" "Anyone!" 
No mother's voice answered the little 
boy. 

Where were they? 

Had they all been killed? 

Poor little Hopi! 



35 

He cried until, tired out, he sank upon 
the floor, asleep. 

He dreamed sweet dreams. 

In these dreams he and his brother 
Ninah were stringing berries for neck- 
laces. 

His mother was cooking dinner. 

His father was down in the valleys 
tending the gardens. 

At last he awoke. 

How long ago it seemed since he had 
been a happy little boy, playing on the 
rocks ! 

He was alone, now, shut up in this 
room. 



36 

He could not get out. 

Against the opening his mother had 
put a stone. 

This stone was so heavy that he could 
not move it. 

Happily, for him, in this granary were 
corn and beans piled high. 

There were boxes of dried meat. 

This meat was pomided fine. 

Hopf s father had put the meat here. 

He had laid it between melted tallow. 

There were rolls of piki or paper bread, 
which his mother had cooked. 

In one corner were hi^ winter leggings 
and trousers. 



37 

In the reservoir, over the wall, there 
was water. 

Stout wooden pegs were fastened in 
the wall 

Hopi could climb to the top by these 
pegs, and reach the small opening above. 

This opening led into the reservoir. 

Hopi was a very hungry boy. 

He ate the piki and buffalo meat. 

Then he drank the water that he found 
in the water jar. 

When he was satisfied, he sat on a pile 
of buffalo robes to think. 

How strange it was! 

Do you not feel sorry for Hopi? 



38 

What would you have done? 

He knew that his mother and father 
must be dead. 

If not, they would have come to him. 

They would not have left him alone 
through the long, dark night. 

No sound came to him, yet he listened. 

He listened and waited. 

Should he cry? 

No, he would be brave. 

Besides, who could hear him? 

But the tears would slip out of the 
corners of his eyes. 

Down his cheeks they came, faster and 
faster, until he cried as hard as he could. 



39 




Just then he heard the howl of a wolf. 
The wolf was calling to his mate. 
Hopi was not afraid. 
He felt that he was not alone. 
He climbed up to the hole that opened 
into the reservoir. 

He could see the wolf. 



40 

He sat for hours looking across the 
water. 

He wished he could get out into the 
air and sunshine. 

The water in the jar was gone. 

How could he get any water from tlie 
reservoir ? 

It was so near and yet so far. 

He could not reach down to the water. 

He would bring the water to him. 

He took the leather thongs off the ends 
of the meat boxes. 

He used one for a rope. 

He drew up water in his mug. 

In this way he filled the jar. 



41 

As the days passed, he looked upon this 
room as his home. 

He pounded his corn. 

He ate it uncooked, as he did not know 
how to make a fire. 

He sat on one box and used the other 
for a table. 

One day he heard a noise in the house 
like scratching. 

He knew it was his dog. 

"Lobo! Lobo!" he cried, "Lobo!" 

"My dear dog Lobo!" 

He was answered by a joyful bark. 

The dog ran hither and thither, trying 
to reach Hopi. 



42 




He ran around the house. 

He ran to the shelf of the reservoir. 

Hopi climbed up and saw him looking 
at him across the water. 

He jumped from the hole down into 
the opening. 

Oh, how happy they were! 



43 

Hopi hugged him, and Lobo barked 
with joy. 

Now Hopi was not so lonesome. 

Lobo went in and out, bringing Hopi 
rabbits to eat. 

Hopi talked to him in his own lan- 
guage. 

Lobo understood him. 

One day Lobo went away. 

He did not come back. 

Hopi waited and waited. 

No Lobo came back. 

Several days and nights followed, but 
he did not come. 

Poor little Hopi! 



44 

He would sit in the opening and watch 
the sunlight come and go. 

He drew up the water in the basket. 

He felt very lonely. 

He looked again and again for Lobo. 

Where was he? 

Had he been killed? 

Had he forgotten his little friend 
Hopi? 

One night an owl flew down into his 
room. 

He welcomed him gladly. 

How happy he was to see some one. 

He fed him with pieces of buffalo meat. 

They grew to be great friends. 



45 




The owl's night is the day, you know. 
He can see better at night. 
They were happy companions. 
When a long time had passed, whom 
do you think came to Hopi? 
His dog Lobo. 
What do you think he brought to Hopi? 



46 

His mother's shoe. 

He barked and wagged his tail. 

Hopi would never know what had hap- 
pened to him. 

Now Hopi began to notice that the 
supply of meat, corn, and beans would 
soon be gone. 

He must get out of this place or he 
would starve. 

The water, too, in the reservoir was 
almost gone. 

What should he do? 

He sat in the opening and looked down 
into the reservoir. 

A thought seemed to come to him. 



47 

Lobo was with him as usual. 

He filled the baskets with the few 
beans and grains of corn that were left. 

He tied the strips of leather on the 
baskets. 

All this time, Lobo jumped up and down, 
barking joyfully. 

He seemed to understand when Hopi 
told him that he was going out into the 
world with him. 

He ran backwards and forwards. 

Hopi threw the leather strips through 
the hole into the reservoir. 

Then he climbed up and cast a long, 
loving glance at the room below. 



4:8 




49 

He felt sorry to leave this room that 
had sheltered him so long. 

It had been his home for two long 
years, although he did not know this, for 
he could not keep account of the time. 

He, Lobo, and the owl had lived, for the 
most part, a pleasant life. 

Lobo was calling to him from the cliff 
outside the reservoir. 

He must go! 

He jumped into the reservoir. 

What a long jump it was! 

But he landed safely on his feet. 

He pulled the baskets carefully into the 
reservoir. 



50 




51 

Now how could he get upon the ledge 
that ran around the reservoir? 

First, he stood on top of the baskets, but 
they all tumbled to the floor. 

He looked hard at the straight wall. 

Lobo was at his feet barking, talking to 
him in his dog language. 

Oh! he would get on Lobo's back. 

So he stood up on Lobo's back, and 
threw the strips over the ledge. 

In this way he could pull the baskets 
to him when he was on the other side. 

He climbed up slowly. 

Lobo gave one loud bark. 

Hopi was safe! 



52 

HOPrS ESCAPE FEOM PRISON 

When Hopi was safely upon the ledge, 
Lobo jumped up after him. 

Hopi pulled up his baskets. 

Away these two would now go into the 
great world. 

Hopi had at last made his escape from 
his dark prison. 

He walked around the house. 

He found a stone knife and a ladder. 

His father had made this ladder. 

He climbed the ladder and went into 
the front rooms. 

There was nothing to be seen. 

Everything was gone. 



53 

Hopi was thirsty. 

He and Lobo must go in search of 
water. 

Side by side they climbed up and down 
the cliffs and canyons. 

How good it was to breathe the fresh 
air and walk in the sunshine! 

How good it was to be free! 

Soon they would go and find Hopi's 
mother. 

Hopi knew that Lobo would surely 
find her. 

How the little boy longed to see her! 

They had not gone far, when they spied 
the gleam of water. 



54 




vV«i- ^V'k 






It was a small stream, which was fed 
by a cold spring. 

Hopi and Lobo took a refreshing drink. 

Hopi then retraced his steps toward his 
old home. 

In another storehouse he found corn, 
beans and meat. 



55 

He tied the legs of his trousers tightly 
around the bottom. 

He filled one leg with corn and the other 
with beans. 

He bound a piece of deer meat on Lobo's 
back. 

Lobo had a basket in his mouth. 

This basket was for water. 

Hopi said "Good-bye" to his old home. 

He would go far west and hunt for his 
people. 

He and Lobo started on the journey. 

They drank from the little streams. 

They slept together under the stars. 

They traveled for many days. 



56 




At last they saw houses in the distance. 

Lobo barked joyfully. 

He tried to tell Hopi something. 

Hopi wondered what he meant. 

As they approached these houses on 
the cliffs, Hopi saw that they looked like 
his own that he had left behind. 



57 

People came running out to him. 

They were his own people. 

One woman rushed forward and gath- 
ered him to her bosom. 

It was his long-lost mother! 

She kissed him, and cried, "My son 
Hopi!". 

The wicked Indians had taken his 
mother prisoner. 

She had run away from them and 
found her people. 

They had been driven away from their 
homes. 

They had settled here. 

She had often longed for her son Hopi. 



58 

She thought he had been killed by the 
wicked Navahos. 

Now Hopi and Lobo were truly happy. 

Hopi told all his people how he had 
escaped from prison. 

They prepared a great feast for him. 

Hopi understood now where I^obo had 
been those weeks, when he had missed 
him so much. 

Now he knew where he had gotten his 
mother's shoe. 

Good old Lobo! 

How all the people loved him for his 
kindness to Hopi! 

Do you think Lobo was a good friend? 



"LOLAMI" 

" Lolami," call the springs among the 
foot-hills, 
" Lolami," gleam the peaches in the sun. 
As brown-limbed lads do bravely breast 
the swift rills 
And merry maidens up the niche 
stair run. 
While daring fathers boldly hunt the 
wild deer 
And loving mothers weave their 
baskets bright; 



59 



60 

Or happy farmers glean their grain, the 
home near, 
And potters mold their clay before 
the night. 
"Good morning," to the dwellers of the 
cliff-land. 
Fleet morning passing all too soon 
away. 
And leaving but a memory of the brown 
band. 
That fought and lived and conquered 
in its day. 

— Margaret Randolph Jewett 



AN INDIAN LEGEND 

In the heavens there are seven little 
stars. 

These stars are called the Pleiades. 

They look as if they were quite close 
together. 

Sometimes people call them the Little 
Dipper. 

The Indians tell a story about these 
stars. 

There were once seven little Indian 
boys who were great friends. 



Cl 



62 

Every night they used to come to a 
little mound to dance and feast. 

They would first eat corn and beans, 
and then one of their number would sit 
upon the mound and sing, while the others 
danced around the mound. 

One time they thought they would have 
a much grander feast than usual, and 
each agreed what he would bring for it. 

But their parents would not give them 
what they wanted, and the lads met at 
the mound without their feast. 

The singer took his place and began 
his song, while his companions started to 
dance. ' 



63 

As they danced they forgot their sor- 
rows and "their heads and hearts grew 
lighter," until at last they flew up into 
the air. 

Their parents saw them as they rose, 
and cried out to them to return; but up 
and up they went until they were changed 
into the seven stars. 

Now one of the Pleiades is dimmer 
than the rest, and they say that it is the 
little singer, who is homesick and pale 
because he wants to return, but cannot. 



64 



VOCABULAKY 



Page 7 


visit 


them 


Hopi 


homes 


looked 


Cliff-dweller 


far 


down 


here 


West 


into 


is 


land 


canyons 


were 


there 


deep 


Indians 


has 


hollows 


lived 


hills 


between 


hundreds 


tables 


some 


years 


these 


very 


ago 


high 


many 


this 


are 


cool 


country 


red 


springs 


before 


sandstone 


flow 


Columbus 


sides 


from 


came 


called 


may 


Page 8 


cliffs 


drank 


would 


sun 


Page 9 


you 


shines 


houses 


not 


bright 


also 


Uke 


hot 


had 



65 



farms 


keep 


off 


valleys 


out 


from 


but 


enemies 


munching 


mountain 


Page 11 


corn 


trees 


little 


mother 


near 


boy 


laid 


Page 10 


dark 


him 


built 


skin 


up 


their 


coarse 


she 


rock 


black 


pounded 


walls 


hair 


dinner 


put 


his 


father 


together 


head 


often 


with 


flat 


away 


plaster 


because 


hunted 


made 


tied 


bow' 


mud 


board 


arrows 


openings 


when 


wore 


left 


small 


shirt 


stones 


Page 12 


woven 


placed 


teeth 


stripe 


against 


white 


bark 


holes 


worn 


basswood 



66 



around 


grass 


stone 


neck 


tied 


axe 


string 


stuck 


knife 


bright-colored 


turkey 


chopped 


beads 


feather 


trimmed 


winter 


very 


tops 


loose 


clean 


cross-pieces 


trousers 


people 


bound 


buckskin 


water 


green 


which 


brought 


four 


came 


Page 14 


rooms 


just 


mark 


back 


below 


palm 


granary 


knee 


soft 


store-room 


leggings 


steps 


nook 


too 


cut 


large 


moccasin 


Page 15 


jars 


skin 


long 


filled 


E 13 


ladders 


bins 


thick 


used 


beans 


brush 


climbing 


Page 16 


leaves 


grew 


furniture 


stiff 


slopes 


only 



67 



bench 


wild 


pet 


boxes 


tomahawk 


blanket 


I»AGE 17 


stone-tipped 


heads 


potter 


wooden 


spear 


oUas 


clubs 


hammers 


wet 


Page 19 


handles 


clay 


farmer 


Page 21 


baked 


planted 


cooked 


painted 


rough 


gathered 


pictures 


sides 


armful 


Page 18 


between 


cedar 


wild 


dirt 


twigs 


deer 


weaver 


took 


that 


wove 


piece 


family 


baskets 


steel 


might 


dried 


flint 


have 


Page 20 


struck 


meat 


plaited 


spark 


bring 


husks 


fire 


skinned 


torn 


lighted 


warrior 


into 


now 


soldier 


sandals 


Page 22 


fought 


herded 


mixed 



68 



poured 


played 


neck 


mixture 


brother 


brother 


piki 


Ninah 


happy 


paper 


loved 


laughed 


bread 


dog 


language 


Page 23 


Lobo 


Page 28 


kept 


yellow 


understood 


back 


white 


another 


reservoir 


spots 


think 


Page 24 


wolf 


strange 


place 


Page 26 


would 


suuk 


hillside 


greet 


holdiug 


tend 


" Lolami " 


rained 


garden 


whom 


dry 


grain 


Page 29 


season 


Page 27 


outside 


empty 


large 


rocky 


cooking 


strong 


making 


drinking 


old 


necklaces 


Page 25 


just 


berries 


ledge 


played 


Page 30 


door 


colors 


heard 


yard 


around 


terrible 



69 



noises 


thought 


Page 36 


yells 


cannot 


heavy 


scaled 


dear 


move 


niche 


scream 


happily 


stairway 


Page 33 


melted 


painted 


almost 


tallow 


faces 


death 


Page 37 


PaCxE 31 


scarcely 


stout 


quiet 


dared 


pegs 


fought 


breathe 


reach 


war-whoop 


listened 


fastened 


pushed 


jump 


hungry 


sounded 


beating 


satisfied 


wicked 


Page 34 


buffalo 


Page 32 


anyone 


sorry 


bottom 


answered 


Page 38 


valley 


Page 35 


knew 


threw 


sank 


slip 


rushed 


dreamed 


corners 


thrust 


sweet 


cheeks 


granary 


shut 


faster 


store-i-oom 


awoke 


until 


rear 


opening 


hard 



ro 



Page 39 


trying 


Page 46 


howl 


lonesome 


shoe 


mate 


Page 43 


wagged 


alone 


rabbits 


tail 


Page 40 


away 


happened 


hours 


Page 44 


notice 


across 


watch 


supply 


sunshine 


sunlight 


place 


reach 


drew 


starve 


bring 


lonely 


thought 


thongs 


forgotten 


Page 47 . 


ends 


friend 


usual 


boxes 


night 


jiuuped 


rope 


owl 


joyfully 


mug 


flew 


world 


Page 41 


welcomed 


backwards 


passed 


gladly 


forwards 


uncooked 


pieces 


Page 49 


scratching 


great 


felt 


joyful 


Page 45 


leave 


bark 


better 


sheltered 


hither 


companion 


although 


thither 


passed 


account 



71 



pleasant 


Page 53 


drank - 


outside 


thirsty 


slept 


landed 


search 


under 


safely 


breathe 


traveled 


pulled 


fresh 


Page 56 


carefully 


air 


joyfully 


Page 51 


free 


tried 


stood 


surely 


wondered 


tumbled 


longed 


meant 


straight 


spied 


approached 


barking 


gleam 


behind 


pull 


Page 54 


Page 57 


slowly 


refreshing 


people 


loud 


retraced ^ 


running 


Page 52 


toward 


woman 


escape 


another 


rushed 


prison 


Page 55 


forward 


two 


tied 


bosom 


great 


legs 


kissed 


world 


tightly 


wicked 


dark 


good-bye 


prisoner 


walked 


started 


driven 


found 


journey 


settled 



72 



Page 58 


Page 60 


grander 


killed 


glean 


usual 


Navahos 


mold 


each 


truly 


night 


agreed 


told 


passing 


parents 


prepared 


fleet 


place 


feast 


memory 


Page 63 


weeks 


band 


forgot 


kindness 


conquered 


sorrows 


friend 


Page 61 


heads 


Page 59 


heavens 


hearts 


peaches 


seven 


lighter 


brown-limbed 


stars 


rose 


lads 


Pleiades 


return 


bravely 


quite 


changed 


breast 


close 


dimmer 


swift 


Dipper 


homesick 


rills 


story 




merry 


Page 62 




maidens 


mound 




daring 


dance 




boldly 


number 




wild 


sing 





14 DAY USE 

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NOV 1^1958LU 



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UNiVhRSilYof CALIFGR^! 

BERKELEY 



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>3.'9 



lOffnr SEP 1 5 75 



OCT 2 9 1977 



(6889sI0)?76B 



General Library 
University of California 
Berkeley 



U,C. BERKELEY LIBRARIES 



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261156