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Full text of "Hortus Veitchii : a history of the rise and progress of the nurseries of Messrs. James Veitch and sons, together with an account of the botanical collectors and hybridists employed by them and a list of the most remarkable of their introductions"

For Private Circulation only 



HORTUS VEITCHII 







THE ORIGINAL NURSERY AT CHELSEA 



A HISTORY 



OP THE 

RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE NURSERIES OF MESSRS. JAMES 

VEITCH AND SONS, TOGETHER WITH AN ACCOUNT 

OF THE BOTANICAL COLLECTORS AND 

HYBRIDISTS EMPLOYED BY THEM 

AND A LIST OF THE MOST 

REMARKABLE OF THEIR 

INTRODUCTIONS 



BY 

JAMES H. VEITCH 



With fifty 3Uu0tratioit6 



Konfeon 

JAMES VEITCH & SONS LIMITED, CHELSEA 

190G 



\/4- 



MAIN LIBRARY AGRK 




PREFACE 

I AM indebted in this work for help to Mr. Harry J. Veitch, 
Mr. P. C. M. Veitch, Mr. J. G. Veitch, Dr. Maxwell T. 
Masters, Editor of the Gardeners' Chronicle, Mr. George 
Nicholson, the late Curator of the Royal Gardens, Kew, who 
revised the nomenclature ; to Sir William T. Thiselton-Dyer, 
the late Director of Kew, for permission to photograph various 
plants in the Royal Gardens, and to Baron Sir Henry Schroder 
and other owners of large estates for similar kindness ; to 
various members of the staff, past and present, and to my 
assistant, Herman Spooner. 



721235 



INTEODUCTION 

THE following pages contain a record of continuous work for 
over three-quarters of a century in the field of Horticulture 
by one family, work which justly may be claimed to have 
permanently benefited every garden. 

The good fortune to usually find the right assistants for 
both home and foreign service, and the signal loyalty and 
capability of those selected, largely contributed to success, and 
the names of several are well known to all with any knowledge 
of plants. 

To the representatives seeking unknown plants at one 
period or another in almost every clime, fortune has not 
invariably been kind, but the work of such men as Thomas 
Lobb, William Lobb, the late John Gould Veitch, Charles 
Maries and E. H. Wilson, has been a gain in every way ; 
whilst the efforts in hybridizing and selecting of John Dominy, 
John Seden, V.M.H., and John Heal, V.M.H., have given a 
wider interest to all cultivators. 

It would be strange if results were not forthcoming when 
such practically virgin lands as California, certain parts of 
South America, Japan and Central China were offered to 
men of the calibre of the Lobbs in the early forties of the last 
century, the late John Gould Veitch in the early sixties, and 
Wilson but recently ; or when such hybridists as those named 
devoted their life efforts to the improvement of many now 
well-known garden plants. 

It is difficult to realize the gardens of this and other 

7 



INTRODUCTION 

countries without many of their now ordinary inhabitants, 
yet it is within the memory of living men that Lilium 
a.uratum and .Ampelopsis Veitchii (Vitis inconstans) were 
Unknown- t'd : ame but two of many hundreds of plants, and 
knt "sjxt j years ;since Conifers with certain few exceptions 
were little more than rarities. 

Gardening, as understood to-day, in its broadest aspects, 
was not possible : the material was not available. 

The commencement of the nursery business of the firm of 
Veitch was on a limited scale, but records exist that Mr. John 
Veitch, who came from Jedburgh, Scotland, to enter the 
employ of Sir Thomas Acland at Killerton, Devon, held land, 
presumably for nursery purposes, in 1808. 

His work, as well as that of his son Mr. James Veitch senior, 
seems to have been entirely in the neighbourhood of Exeter. 

There may be read in the Cottage Gardener of January 9th 
1855 the following notice of Mr. James Veitch, the son of 
the founder : 

" The history of botany furnishes us with several instances 
of enterprising men, who devoted a large measure of their 
means, or personal enterprise, to the enrichment of the botani- 
cal collections of this country with the vegetable products 
of foreign regions. To such men the present generation is 
greatly indebted ; and thus it is that the names of the 
Tradescants, Peter Collinson, Dr. Anderson, John Frazer, 
James Lee and the Loddiges are so familiar to the minds and 
the memories of all true lovers of botanical science. 

" For nearly half a century, however, that spirit of private 
enterprise has, except in a few instances, given way to the 
united efforts of corporate bodies and government officials ; 
and it was not till the bold and energetic course which has 
been pursued by a provincial nurseryman, of England was 

8 



INTRODUCTION 

adopted, that a new era in botanical discovery was begun 
which has placed the name of ' Veitch of Exeter ' among the 
worthies of science in our own times. 

" The father of Mr. James Veitch was a native of Jedburgh, 
in Scotland, and towards the close of the last century he came 
to England, where he acted for many years as land-steward 
on the property of Sir Thomas Acland, at Killerton, and there 
the subject of the present notice was born on the 25th of 
January 1792. 

" The success which attended the formation of the Killerton 
nursery was so great, that, in course of time, Mr. James 
Veitch found the distance of eight miles from Exeter disad- 
vantageous to the interests of the establishment, as it prevented 
him from competing with those which were nearer the city ; 
and accordingly, in 1832, he purchased that large extent of 
ground formerly called Mount Radford, but now converted 
into what is better known by the name of the ' Exeter 
Nursery,' an establishment which, by the industry and energy 
of Mr. Veitch and his son, has attained such a position as to 
be justly regarded as the finest of the kind ever known in 
England. 

"In the year 1837 there were, in the Killerton nursery, two 
young men named William and Thomas Lobb, who were 
gardeners, and who were remaining there with a view to 
inprovement in their profession. 

"In this same year, Mr. William Lobb was sent by Messrs. 
Veitch as gardener to Stephen Davey, Esq., of Redruth, in 
Cornwall, and after remaining there for three years, he was 
appointed by Mr. Veitch to proceed to the Brazils as a 
botanical collector, and he accordingly left England in 1840. 

" The singular success which rewarded his researches is, 
perhaps, unparalleled in the history of botanical discovery ; 

9 



INTRODUCTION 

the labours of David Douglas not even forming an exception. 
In the first parcel sent home were those two justly popular 
plants, Dipladenia splendens and Hindsia violacea ; and from 
these, down to the later arrivals, including the wonderful 
Wellingtonia gigantea, what a mass of interest and beauty has 
been added to the gardens of Great Britain ! 

" About three years after Mr. William Lobb left, his brother, 
Thomas Lobb, who was then in the Exeter nursery, was sent 
by Mr. Veitch to Java, and the success which attended his 
efforts were not short of that of his brother. 

" In the first parcel he sent home was that magnificent 
orchid Phalaenopsis grandiflora, not before known in England, 
Vanda suavis, and numerous others. 

" To enumerate all the plants that these gentlemen have 
discovered, or which Mr. Veitch has been the means of 
introducing, would occupy more space than we can afford to 
devote ; but we shall furnish a list of some of the most remark- 
able of these introductions, showing to what an extent the 
country is now indebted to the enterprise of Mr. Yeitch. 

" It may be worth recording that all these new introductions, 
whether in the shape of seeds or living plants, are on their 
arrival taken under Mr. Veitch's care. He sows all seeds 
with his own hands, watches and tends them, and it is not 
until they are beyond all danger that they are committed to 
the management of others. 

" In April 1853 the old establishment of Messrs. Knight & 
Perry, of the King's Road, Chelsea, being about to be relin- 
quished, was offered to Messrs. Veitch & Son of Exeter, who 
shortly afterwards became its possessors ; and now in this 
wonderful establishment may be seen one of the most extensive 
and valuable stocks of exotic plants which is to be met with 
in any private establishment in this country. 

10 




SEQUOIA GIGANTEA 

POLTIMORE, DEVON 



INTRODUCTION 



" The following is a list of a few of the most remarkable 
plants introduced to this country by Messrs. Veitch & Son : 



Abutilon vitifolium. 
^Brides Lobbii. 
^Eschynanthus Lobbiana. 

pulcher. 

Anectochilus Lobbii. 
Befaria aestuans. 

coarctata. 
Begonia coccinea. 
Berberia Darwinii. 
Bulbophyllum Lobbii. 
Calanthe vestita. 

curculigoides. 
Cantua dependens. 
Ceratostemma longiflora. 
Collinsia heterophylla. 
Cryptomeria Lobbii. 
Cypripedium barbatum superbum. 

caudatum. 

Dendrobium albo-sanguineum. 
chrysotoxum. 

Farmerii. 

Kuhlii. 

tortile. 

transparens. 

Veitchianum. 

Desfontainea spinosa. 
Deutzia gracilis. 
Dracaena indivisa. 
Echites atropurpurea. 

splendens. 
Escallonia macrantha. 
organensis. 
Eschscholtzia tenuifolia. 
Eugenia Ugni. 
Fitzroya Patagonica. 
Fuchsia macrantha. 
serratifolia. 
spectabilis. 
Hexacentris lutea. 

mysorensis. 

Hindsia longiflora. 

violacea. 
Hoya bella. 

campanulata. 
fraterna. 

11 



Impatiens Jerdoniae. 
Ixora javanica. 
Lobbii. 
salicifolia. 
Lapageria rosea. 
Lardizabala triternata. 
Laurus aromatica. 
Leptosiphon aureum. 
luteum. 

Lilium giganteum. 
Limatodes rosea. 
Lomaria magellanica. 
Lomatia ferruginea. 
Magnolia fragrantissima. 
Mahonia Leschenaulti. 
Manettia coccinea. 
Medinilla magnifica. 

speciosa. 
Mitraria coccinea. 
Nepenthes albo-marginata. 
laevis. 
lanata. 
Phyllamphora. 
sanguinea. 
Pernettya mucronata speciosa. 
Phalsenopsis grandiflora. 
Lobbii. 

rosea. 

Philesia buxifolia. 
Picea bracteata. 
Pleione humilus. 
lagenaria. 
maculata. 
Pleroma elegans. 
Podocarpus nubigena. 
Quercus segrifolia. 
Rhododendron californicum. 
jasminiflorura. 
javanicum. 
Rubus japonicus. 

leucodermis. 
Saccolabium Blumei major. 
curvifolium. 

miniatum. 

Saxe-Gothea conspicua. 



INTRODUCTION 

Sobralia dichotoma. Tropseolum speciosum. 

Sonerila margaritacea. Vanda cserulea. 
Telipogon obovatus. suavis. 

Thuya gigantea. tricolor. 

Torreya myristica. Veronica salicifolia. 

Tropseolum azureum. Viola lutea. 

Lobbii. Wellingtonia gigantea. 

Smithanum. Whitlavia speciosa." 

The son of Mr. James Veitch, Mr. James Veitch junior, 
conducted the nursery at Chelsea for some years, and created 
that at Coombe Wood. In reference to his death, the Gar- 
deners' Chronicle contains the following notice in the issue of 
September 18th 1869:- 

" In the person of Mr. Veitch, whose sudden death it was 
last week our melancholy duty briefly to announce, we have 
lost another of the horticultural notabilities of the last two 
decades ; and though placed in a somewhat different sphere of 
action from such men as Lindley, Paxton, or Thompson, for 
example, it will be found that James Veitch the younger, as 
he was till quite recently best known, has left his mark upon 
the garden history of our time. 

"James Veitch was born on May 24th 1815, in the neigh- 
bourhood of Exeter, where his grandfather (of Scotch ex- 
traction) and his father were at that time carrying on the 
business as nurserymen. When about eighteen years of age he 
was sent to London for two years for the purpose of acquiring 
that experience which in those days could only be gained in a 
London establishment. One year of this period was passed in 
the nursery of Mr. Chandler of Vauxhall, and the other in 
that of Messrs. Rollisson of Tooting. Returning again to 
Exeter, and resuming his routine of duties there, he at the 
same time, impelled by the new ideas and impulses acquired 
in London, devoted his energies to the gradual extension and 
improvement of the establishment at Mount Radford, making 

12 



INTRODUCTION 

it eventually one of the first nurseries of the day. All this 
time he was acquiring the mastery over the mysteries of the 
nursery trade, in which, first (since 1838) as a partner in the 
firm of James Veitch & Son, and subsequently, on the death of 
his father, as the head of that of James Veitch & Sons, he was 
destined to raise himself to one of the very foremost positions. 
This prominent place amongst his compeers was won not less 
by his untiring Zealand energy, his keen perception, his clear- 
headed business habits, and his great personal influence, than 
by his thorough practical acquaintance with all professional 
details. It was on his return to Exeter from Tooting that, 

o 

taking with him a collection of the Orchid gems of those days, 
he first started in the cultivation of those favourite plants ; a 
taste which he always cultivated with the greatest possible 
zest, and which came in time to be ministered to by the 
introductions of his own collectors, and by his intimate personal 
friendship with men like Mr. G. Ure-Skinner and Colonel 
Benson, who had made acquaintance with orchids in their 
native homes. It should here be stated that Messrs. Rollisson, 
with whom young Veitch had been placed for the purpose of 
acquiring a knowledge of his business, declined to receive any 
adequate remuneration for the benefits conferred by them on 
their pupil ; and the only method of acknowledgment open 
to the father of the subject of our notice was to commission 
the son to purchase orchids from the Messrs. Rollisson. These 
orchids became the nucleus of the collection for which Messrs. 
Veitch are now, and have for so long been renowned. It may 
be interesting to mention, as an instance of versatility, that 
about the year 1839 Mr. Veitch entered with great spirit upon 
the growth of Dahlias for competition, the Exeter Dahlia 
Shows, open to all England, furnishing at that period one of the 
most tempting arenas for the display of horticultural prowess. 

13 



INTRODUCTION 

"In 1853, while still a partner in the nursery business at 
Exeter, which had then become famous as the first English 
home of multitudes of new plants, introduced directly by the 
agency of Messrs. Veitchs' collectors the brothers Lobb, Mr. 
James Veitch removed to London, and took possession of the 
once famous establishment of Messrs. Knight & Perry at 
Chelsea. Here he was more directly brought into contact 
with all the leading horticulturists ; and his estimable personal 
qualities, his sound sense, and his energetic manner, soon 
lifted him into a very influential position in the gardening 
world which he maintained for many years, until, as we may 
suppose, the foreshadowings of his fatal malady induced him 
gradually to withdraw from active participation in what may 
be called public life. All this time, however, the establishment 
at Chelsea, which still bore the name of the Royal Exotic 
Nursery, was being remodelled and improved, and a gigantic 
business, one of the most prominent in England, perhaps in 
Europe, was being worked up, sufficient of itself to form a 
striking monument of successful commercial skill and enterprise. 

" Were we to attempt to show how far our gardens are 
indebted to the herculean and unflagging labours of Mr. 
Veitch, we should have to write a history of most of the new 
plants introduced during the last thirty years ; for it was to 
his active superintendence of their importation, and to his 
discriminative choice of collectors, that we may largely 
attribute the success which was realized in this department. 
The later explorations of Pearce, Hutton and others, by which 
also many fine novelties have been acquired, were even more 
directly under his control ; while in order to form some notion 
of all the services rendered to horticulture by Mr. Veitch in 
this direction, we must add to the foregoing the results of the 
two journeys of his eldest son, Mr. John Gould Veitch, to 

14 



INTRODUCTION 

Japan and the South Pacific, which have proved so prolific of 
first-class novelties. The pages of the garden periodicals bear 
witness to these facts in the number of first-class plants intro- 
duced through his intervention, such as Wellingtonia gigantea, 
Lapageria rosea and alba, LiKum auratum, Maranta Veitchii, 
Vanda suavis, tricolor, coerulea and insignis ; Phalsenopsis 
grandiflora, Cypripedium caudatum, Rhododendron jasmini- 
floruin, Pleroma elegans, Nepenthes (numerous species), 
Desfontainea spinosa. Thuya Lobbii, Abies bracteata, Begonia 
Veitchii, Masdevallia Veitchiana, Tropaeolum azureum and 
speciosum, Calanthe vestita, Medinilla magnifica, Dipladenia 
splendens, Berberis Darwinii, cum multis aliis. 

" It is, however, not only as an introducer and a dispenser 
of plants that Mr. Veitch's name must be boldly inscribed in 
the annals of horticulture, for he occupied a no less worthy 
position as a cultivator and exhibitor. Indeed Mr. Veitch was 
a thorough cultivator, as those who have seen the fine specimens 
sent from Exeter to Chiswick Shows will acknowledge when 
we say that many of them Heaths and Orchids to wit were 
the fruits of his own cultural manipulation, aided by his 
devoted and faithful servant and friend Dominy. Thus, when 
he desisted from the laborious task of potting his own plants, 
few knew better how to direct the labours of others. Then, 
as an exhibitor, Mr. Veitch has had a large share in making 
our shows the glorious monuments of cultural skill which they 
really are, despite all the grumbling concerning them. For 
many years he has been in the constant habit of bringing 
forward materials, the most excellent in quality, and these 
have been so abundant in quantity, and arranged with so much 
skill and taste, that it has been rare indeed to see the name of 
Veitch either absent from or occupying a secondary place in 
the award sheets. In all this, as well as in business transactions, 

15 



INTRODUCTION 

he has for the last few years been ably assisted by his sons, 
Mr. J. G. Veitch and Mr. H. J. Veitch, who were admitted to 
partnership in 1865, and by whom the business will now be 
continued. 

" We should not omit to state that Mr. Veitch was one of 
the best and most hard-working friends of the Gardeners' 
Royal Benevolent Institution, of which he was also a trustee. 

"For several years from 1856 to 1864 Mr. Veitch was a 
member of the Council of the Royal Horticultural Society, and 
took a very active part in the administration of its affairs. 

" At his own hospitable board the interests of horticulture 
were often the subjects of a very free commentary ; and 
many schemes which had been discussed or concocted there, 
were in due time realized. In particular it may be stated 
that the idea of the Fruit and Floral Committees of the 
Royal Horticultural Society had its origin in a happy thought 
of Mr. Veitch's, which was first broached and talked over, 
even into the small hours, in the parlour at the Royal Exotic 
Nursery, and at a subsequent gathering of a few kindred 
spirits was so thoroughly discussed as to smooth away the 
difficulties which at first seemed to stand in the way of its 
being realized. On the basis thus obtained a scheme was 
drawn out, virtually that adopted by the Council, which has 
not only worked well, but proved the horticultural mainstay 
of the Society. In Mr. Veitch's parlour, too, the particular 
mode in which the Great International Show of 1866 should 
be presented to the public was agreed to, and action taken 
thereupon. There had at that period sprung up amongst a 
small section of horticulturists a most unaccountable feeling 
antagonistic to the gentleman who afterwards so efficiently 
filled the office of chairman, and whose loss we have since 
had to deplore ; and this feeling was battled with and over- 

16 



INTRODUCTION 

come, chiefly by the influence of Mr. Veitch, and of a few 
others who supported him. In all movements for the advance- 
ment of horticulture he was ready to take a foremost part. 
Latterly, however, owing to his failing health, he has been 
less active in matters of this kind, but even so late as the 
occasion of the organization of the English Committee of the 
Hamburg International Show, those who attended the pre- 
liminary meetings were assisted by his advice. 

" Some two years ago, owing to premonitory symptoms of 
heart disease, which have proved but too well founded, Mr. 
Veitch ceased to take so active a part as he had been wont, 
either in horticultural affairs or in matters of business ; but 
latterly he had been in better health and spirits than usual, 
and even on the day before his decease had greatly enjoyed a 
visit from his old friend and collector, Thomas Lobb, so that 
his death on the morning of the 10th instant, at Stanley 
House, Chelsea, at the age of 54, came suddenly on his family 
and friends, although, under the circumstances, it can scarcely 
be said to have been wholly unexpected. His mortal remains 
have been deposited in the Brompton Cemetery, and there lie 
peacefully in the immediate vicinity of the scenes of the most 
active portion of his life. That he himself was not unprepared 
for the change that was to befall him is shown by the fact that 
only a few days before his death he selected, without the 
knowledge of any member of his family, a site for a family 
grave ; and in its selection and attendant negotiations mani- 
fested those business habits so characteristic of him. 

" Little remains for us to add. We have said enough to 
show that this was no ordinary man. Zeal and energy per- 
vaded his every action. A quick temper and impatience of 
opposition were natural adjuncts to such a character ; but at 
the same time it must be added there was thorough conscien- 

17 



INTRODUCTION 

tiousness and straightforwardness, a disgust to all semblance, 
even, of meanness or underhandedness, and a warmth of 
friendly feeling that can be adequately gauged only by those 
who knew him." 

In October 1869 a general movement throughout the 
country indicated the propriety of in some way perpetuating 
the memory of Mr. James Veitch junior, and resulted, 
after much discussion and many suggestions, in the Veitch 
Memorial Medal. For this purpose, after payment of ex- 
penses, the sum of 890 18s. 4cZ. was available, and was 
invested in the names of Trustees, the annual interest thereof 
being devoted to prizes for the advancement of horticulture. 
At the same time, through the liberality of Robert Crawshay, 
Esq., a portrait of the late Mr. James Veitch junior was 
hung in the Council Chamber of the Royal Horticultural 
Society. 

Until August 1870 the two eldest sons of Mr. James 
Veitch junior Mr. John Gould Veitch and Mr. Harry 
James Veitch continued the work, when the death of the 
first-named had also to be recorded. 

In reference to this unhappy event, the Gardeners' Chronicle 
of August 20th 1870 contained the following: 

" Scarcely twelve months have elapsed since we had to 
record the decease of Mr. James Veitch, the late indefatigable 
head of the firm, Veitch & Sons, of Chelsea, and one of the 
foremost horticulturists of our day. We have now the 
mournful task of chronicling the death of his eldest son, Mr. 
John Gould Veitch, who was, like his father, a devoted 
horticulturist, and who, although he has been taken from 
amongst us at an early age, will long be remembered as an 
intrepid voyager, and one to whom we are greatly indebted 
for many contributions to the enjoyment of our gardens in 

18 



INTRODUCTION 

the introduction of valuable plants discovered in the course 
of his travels, and also as a young man full of zeal and enter- 
prise in his profession a worthy representative of his father's 
and grandfather's name. 

"John Gould Veitch was born at Exeter in April 1839, 
and had, therefore, only reached his 32nd year. He was at 
an early age initiated in the mysteries of the nursery trade, 
and took an active part in the management of the establish- 
ment at Chelsea. It was in April 1860, almost as soon as he 
had attained his majority, that he started on his voyage to 
Japan and China, whence he proceeded to the Philippine 
Islands. The result of this journey was the enrichment of 
our collections with many choice plants, amongst which the 
lovely Primula cortusoides amoena would of itself form no 
mean monument to his memory. Various handsome Conifers, 
as Abies firma and Alcoquiana, Cryptomeria elegans, and 
other plants, as Lilium auratum, Ampelopsis tricuspidata 
(Veitchii) and japonica, &c., were, however, also obtained as 
the fruits of that first journey, and our volumes for 1860-1861 
contain from his own pen the interesting records of his 
journeyings and discoveries during the two years which 
elapsed previously to his returning in the spring of 1862. 

" The spirit of enterprise and the desire of making dis- 
coveries, which prompted him at first to set sail for Japan, 
then lately made accessible to Europeans, did but slumber for 
a season, for in 1864 we find him again en route, this time 
bound for Australia and the South Sea Islands, whence he 
returned in February 1866, after an absence of some eighteen 
or twenty months, bringing with him some of the most 
beautiful plants of modern introduction : witness the numerous 
richly-coloured forms of Croton and Dracaena which are only 
now becoming known. Of the Crotons alone no fewer than 

19 



INTRODUCTION 

twenty-three distinct kinds (described in our volume for 1868, 
pp. 843, 943) were obtained ; and of Dracaenas, regina, mag- 
nifica, Mooreana, Chelsoni, Macleayi, and several others. To 
these must be added such distinct and popular subjects as 
Acalypha Wilkesiana (tricolor), Amaranthus melancholicus 
ruber, Coleus Veitchii, and Gibsoni ; the more choice and 
valuable Pandanus Veitchii, Aralia Veitchii, and many others. 
During this journey Cape York in Northern Australia was 
visited, and here was obtained a new Palm, which has since 
been dedicated to his honour, under the name of Veitchia 
Johannis. 

" The record of this second journey, specially interesting 
as referring to many little known and rarely visited islands, 
will be found in our volume for 1866. 

" In the early part of 1867, Mr. Veitch, then recently married, 
was taken seriously ill with an affection of the lungs, and for 
some time his life was despaired of. He, however, rallied, 
under careful treatment and the potent aid of his indomitable 
spirit, and though subsequently obliged to winter in a warmer 
clime, his friends were not without hope that his life might 
have been for some time spared to them. But this was not 
to be. On the 9th inst. haemorrhage from the lungs, under 
which he gradually sank, set in, and he expired on the evening 
of the 13th inst. at his residence at Coombe Wood, leaving 
behind him a widow and two boys. On Thursday last he 
was laid beside his father in the Brompton Cemetery, having 
been borne to his grave by the same trusty workmen : some 
of whom had, moreover, assisted to carry his grandfather to 
his last resting-place. 

"So we part sorrowing from one of the most gifted and 
promising of our younger commercial horticulturists, one who, 
if his life had been spared and his health had permitted, would 

20 



INTRODUCTION 

have worthily filled a prominent position in the world of 
horticulture ; one, moreover, whose memory will continue to 
be cherished by those who had the pleasure to know him 
intimately as that of a manly, straightforward, single-hearted, 
earnest and sincere friend. The Veitch Memorial will now, in 
most people's minds, possess a double interest, as it will be 
henceforth impossible to dissociate the memory of the son 
from that of the father." 

From 1870 for thirty years the responsibility of successful 
guidance has rested with Mr. Harry J. Veitch, for some few 
years assisted by his brother the late Mr. Arthur Veitch, and 
to his ceaseless watchfulness and ability is due the steady 
progress of the business. 

The direct control Mr. Harry J. Veitch relinquished some 
few years since, when advantage was taken of the Company 
Law to convert the business into a Limited Liability Company, 
with Mr. James H. Veitch as Managing Director and Mr. 
John Gould Veitch as Secretary, the whole of the shares 
remaining in the hands of the family. 

Amongst other efforts in the interests of Horticulture are a 
Manual of Coniferae, the first edition long since exhausted, 
the Manual of Orchidaceous Plants, and various papers in the 
Journals of the Linnean and the Royal Horticultural Societies. 
The material for the following 422 plates in Curtis' 's Botanical 
Magazine is attributed by the editors to Messrs. Veitch : 



1. Gloxinia speciosa, var. ma- 

crophylla . . . t. 3934. 

2. Alstrcemeria nemorosa . t. 3958. 

3. Primula denticulata . t. 3959. 

4. Habranthus pratensis, var. 

quadriflora . . . t. 3961. 

5. Echites (Dipladenia) 

splendens . . . t. 3976. 

6. Rondeletia loqgiflora . t. 3977. 

7. Tropseolum azureum . t. 3985. 



8. Begonia coccinea . . t. 3990. 

9. Gesneria polyantha . . t. 3995. 

10. Echites hirsuta . . . t. 3997. 

11. Passiflora Actinia . . t. 4009. 

12. Stigmaphyllon heterophyl- 

lum . . . . t. 4014. 

13. Canavalia ensiformis. . t. 4027. 

14. Hypocyrta strigillosa . t. 4047. 

15. Clematis montana, var. 

grand iflora . . . t. 4061. 
21 c 



INTRODUCTION 



16. Gomphrena pulchella 

17. Houlletia Brocklehurst- 

iana .... 

18. Tropseolum Lobbianum . 

19. Asclepias vestita 

20. Hindsia violacea 

21. Barbacenia squamata 

22. Calceolaria floribunda 

23. Calceolaria alba 

24. Sida(Abutilon)paeonia3flora t. 

25. Fuchsia serratifolia . . t. 

26. Siphocampylos coccineus 

27. Tacsonia mollissima . 

28. Hebecladus biflorus . 

29. Cuphea cordata 

30. Sida (Abutilon) vitifolium t. 

31. Fuchsia macrantha . 

32. Cypripedium barbatum 

33. JSschynanthus purpuras- 

cens .... 

34. Tropseolum crenatiflorum . t. 

35. Collania andinamarcana 

36. Clematis smilacifolia 

37. ^Eschynanthus Lobbianus t. 

38. Pleroma elegans 

39. ^Eschynanthus pulcher 

40. Scutellaria incarnata 

41. Escallonia organensis 

42. Nepenthes Rafflesiana 

43. Calceolaria amplexicaulis 

44. Liebigia speciosa 

45. j32schynanthus speciosus 

46. Medinilla speciosa . 

47. Tropseolum speciosum 

48. JSschynanthus longiflorus t. 

49. Rhododendron javanicum t. 

50. Tropseolum umbellatum 

51. Hoya cinnamomifolia 
62. Ceropegia Cumingiana 

53. Fuchsia spectabilis . 

54. Tropseolum Smithii . 

55. Cantua pyrifolia 

56. Sonerila stricta . 

57. Hoya bella 

58. Dipladenia urophylla 

59. Heterotrichum macrodon 

60. Macleania punctata . 

61 . Loasa picta 

62. Vauda tricolor . 



t. 4064. 


63. Lapageria rosea . . t. 4447 
64. Mitraria coccinea . . t. 4462. 


t. 4072. 


65. Escallonia macrantha . t. 4473. 


t. 4097. 
t. 4106. 


66. Dendrobium tortile . . t. 4477. 
67. Oxalis elegans . . . t. 4490. 


t. 4135. 
t. 4136. 


68. Dipteracanthus spectabilis t. 4494. 
69. Lardizabala biternata . t. 4501. 


t. 4154. 
t. 4157. 
t. 4170. 


70. Hoya coriacea . . . t. 4518. 
71. Hoya purpureo-fusca . t. 4520. 
72. Ixora salicifolia . . t. 4523. 


t. 4174. 
t. 4178. 


73. Rhododendron jasmini- 
florum . . . . t. 4524. 


t. 4187. 
t. 4192. 
t. 4208. 
t. 4227. 
t. 4233. 
t. 4234. 


74. Stylidium saxifragoides . t. 4529. 
75. Bolbophyllum Lobbii . t. 4532. 
76. Medinilla magnifica . . t. 4533. 
77. Hoya campanulata . . t. 4545. 
78. Didymocarpus crinita . t. 4554. 
79. Thibaudia macrantha . t. 4566. 




80. Cantua buxifolia . . t. 4582. 


t. 4236. 


81. Berberis Darwinii . . t. 4590. 


t. 4245. 
t. 4247. 
t. 4259. 


82. Fitzroya patagonica . . t. 4616. 
83. Eugenia Ugni . . . t. 4626. 
84. Berberis wallichiana . . t. 4656. 


t. 4260. 


85. Calanthe vestita . . t. 4671. 


t. 4262. 


86. Rubus biflorus . . . t. 4678. 


t. 4264. 
t. 4268. 


87. Hoya fraterna . . . t. 4684. 
88. Dendrobium cretaceum . t. 4686. 


t. 4274. 


89. Cantua bicolor . . . t. 4729. 


t. 4285. 
t. 4300. 


90. Gilia (Leptosiphon) lutea . t. 4735. 
91. Philesia buxifolia . . t. 4738. 


t. 4315. 


92. Abies bracteata . . . t. 4740. 


t. 4320. 
t. 4321. 
t. 4323. 
t. 4328. 
t. 4336. 
t. 4337. 


93. Wellingtonia gigantea . t. 4777. 
94. Cerastostema longiflorum . t. 4779. 
95. Torreya myristica . . t. 4780. 
96. Desfontainia spinosa . t. 4781. 
97. Hexacentris mysorensis . t. 4786. 
98. Ceanothus floribundus . t. 4806. 


t, 4347. 


99. Ceanothus Lobbianus . t. 4810. 


t. 4349. 


100. Eschscholtzia tenuifolia . t. 4812. 


t. 4375. 
t. 4385. 
t. 4386. 


101. Whitlavia grandiflora . t. 4813. 
102. Ceanothus papillosus . t. 4815. 
103. Befaria sestuans . . t. 4818. 


t. 4394. 
t. 4402. 
t. 4414. 
t. 4421. 


104. Dipladenia Harrisii . . t. 4825. 
105. Escallonia pterocladon . t. 4827. 
106. Dipladenia acuminata . t. 4828. 
107. Crawfurdia fasciculata . t. 4838. 


t. 4426. 


108. Embothrium coccineum . t. 4856. 


t. 4428. 


109. Rhododendron californi- 


t. 4432. 


cum . . . . t. 4863. 



22 



INTRODUCTION 



110. Leptodactylon calif orni- 


152. ( 


cum . . . . t. 4872. 


153. ( 


111. Gilia dianthoides . . t. 4876. 


154. ] 


112. Phygelius capensis . . t. 4881. 


155. < 


113. Delphinium cardinale . t. 4887. 


156. ] 


114. Ccelogyne speciosa . . t. 4889. 


157. 


115. JEschynanthus fulgens . t. 4891. 


158. ' 


116 Tecoma fulva . . . t, 4896. 


159. ] 


117. Aphelandra variegata . t. 4899. 


160. : 


118. Rhododendron rnoulmain- 


161. , 


ense . . . . t. 4904. 


162. 


119. Correa cardinalis . . t. 4912. 


163. ' 


120. Coffea benghalensis . . t. 4917. 


164. 


121. Ribes subvestitum . . t. 4931. 


165. 


122. Rhododendron Brooke- 


166. 


anum . . . . t. 5935. 


167. : 


123. Hypericum oblongifolium . t. 4949. 




124. Adhatoda cydoniaefolia . t. 4962. 


168. 


125. Hoya coronaria . . t. 4969. 


169. 


126. Sonerila elegans . . t. 4978. 


170. 


127. Befaria Mathewsii . . t. 4981. 


171. 


128. Rhododendron Veitchia- 


172. 


num . . . . t. 4992. 




129. Forsythia suspensa . . t. 4995. 


173. 


130. Viola pedunculata . . t. 5004. 


174. 


131. Azalea occidentalis . . t. 5005. 




132. Sonerila speciosa . . t. 5026. 


175. 


133. Cosmanthus grandiflorus . t. 5029. 


176. 


134. Eugenia Luma . . . t. 5040. 


177. 


135. Calanthe Dominii (hybri- 




da) . t. 5042. 


178. 


136. Pentstemon Jaffrayanus . t. 5045. 


179. 


137. Clianthus Dampieri . . t. 5051. 


180. 


138. Gesneria Donklarii . . t. 5070. 


181. 


139. Coelogyne Schilleriana . t. 5072. 


182. 


140. ^sculus californica . t. 5077. 


183. 


141. Nepenthes villosa . . t. 5080. 


184. 


142. Thunbergia natalensis . t. 5082. 


186. 


143. Fuchsia simplicicaulis . t. 5096. 


186. 


144. Sonerila margaritacea . t. 5104. 


187. 


145. Nepenthes ampullaria . t. 5109. 


188. 


146. Ceanothus Veitchianus . t. 5127. 




147. Dendrobium albo-sangui- 


189. 


neum . . . . t. 5130. 


190. 


148. ^Eschynanthus cordifo- 


191. 


lius . . . . t. 5131. 




149; Dendromecon rigidum . t. 5134. 


192. 


150. Spraguea umbellata . . t. 5143. 


193. 


151. Calceolaria flexuosa . t. 5154. 


194. 



Ceanothus velutinus . . t. 6165. 

Chamsebatia foliolosa . t. 5171. 

Richardia hastata . . t. 5176. 

Ceanothus oreganus . . t. 5177. 

Pteris quadriaurita . . t. 5183. 

Phalsenopsis grandiflora . t. 5184. 

Vanda gigantea . . t. 5189. 

Pentapterygium rugosum . t. 5198. 

Phalsenopsis rosea . . t. 5212. 

Stenogaster concinna . t. 5253. 

Mutisia decurrens . . t. 5273. 

Verticordia nitens . . t. 5286. 

Ceropegia Gardner! . . t. 5306. 

Limatodes rosea . . t. 5312. 

Saccolabium miniatum . t. 5326. 

Nolana (Sorema) lanceo- 

lata . . . . t. 5327. 

Philadelphia hirsutus . t. 5334. 

Ourisia coccinea . . t. 5335. 

Lilium auratum . . t. 5338. 

Berberidopsis corallina . t. 5343. 

Plumbago rosea, var. coc- 
cinea . . . . t. 5363. 

Lycioplesium pubiflorum . t. 5373. 

Calanthe Veitchii : hybri- 

da t. 5375. 

Calceolaria punctata . t. 6392. 

Homoianthus viscosus . t. 5401. 

Eranthemum tubercula- 

tum . . . . t. 6405. 

Miconia pulverulenta . t. 5411. 

Trichantha minor . , t. 5428. 

Canscora Parishii . . t. 5429. 

Alstroemeria Caldasii . t. 5442. 

Corylopsis spicata . . t. 5458. 

Urceolina pendula . . t. 5464. 

Cypripedium caricinum . t. 5466. 

Eranthemum Cooperi . t. 6467. 

Genethyllis fimbriata . t. 5468. 

Linum Macraei . . . t. 5474. 

Mimulus luteus, var. cu- 

prea . . . . t. 5478. 

Proustia pyrifolia . . t. 6489. 

Manettia micans . . t. 5495. 

Aglaonema marantaefo- 

lium, var. fol. mac. . t. 5600. 
Cypripedium leevigatum . t. 5508. 
. Arum palfestinum . . t. 5509. 
. Hypcestes sanguinolenta . t. 5511. 



23 



INTRODUCTION 



195. Marianthus Drummondia- 

nus . 

196. Bertolonia guttata . 

197. Primula cortusoides, var. 

amoena .... 

198. Alstroemeria densiflora 

199. Calathea Veitchiana . 

200. Dendrobium Tattonianum 

201. Dendrobium Johannis 

202. Calathea tubispatha . 

203. Begonia Pearcei 

204. Peperomia marmorata 

205. Cymbidium Hookerianum 

206. Ancylogyne longiflora 

207. Fremontia californica 

208. Sanchezia nobilis 

209. Nierembergia Veitchii 

210. Bolbophyllum reticulatum 

211. Nierembergia rivularis 

212. Vanda Bensoni . 

213. Cattleya Dowiana 

214. Curcuma Australasica 

215. Angrsecum citratum . 

216. Myrtus Cheken . 

217. Amaryllis pardinam . 

218. Stemonacanthus Pearcei . 

219. Dendrobium macrophyl- 

lum Veitchianum . 

220. Gloxinia hypocyrtiflora 

221. Begonia boliviensis . 

222. Begonia Veitchii 

223. Lilium Leichtlinii 

224. Cymbidium Huttoni . 

225. Calceolaria pisacomensis . 

226. Dendrobium Bensonise 

227. Begonia rosseflora 

228. Saccolabium Huttoni 

229. Thunia Bensonise 

230. Begonia falcifolia 

231. Eranthemum aspersum 

232. Nasonia punctata 

233. Epidendrum paniculatum 

234. PuyaWhytei . 

235. Masdevallia Veitchiana 

236. Aphelandra nitens . 

237. Agalmyla staminea . 

238. Thibaudia acuminata 

239. Coalogyne (Pleione) Reich- 

enbachiana . 



t. 5521. 


240. Vanda insignis . . . t. 5759. 
241. Dendrobium crassinode . t. 5766. 


t. 5524. 


242. Saccolabium bigibbum . t. 5767. 
243. Palava flexuosa . . t. 5768. 


t. 5528. 
t. 5531. 
t. 5535. 
t. 5537. 
t. 5540. 


244. Odontoglossum Krameri . t. 5778. 
245. Dipladenia boliviensis . t. 5783. 
246. Aphelandra acutifolia . t. 5789. 
247. brides japonicum . . t. 5798. 
248. Blandfordia aurea . . t. 5809. 


t. 5542. 


249. Vanda Denisoniana . . t. 5811. 


t. 5545. 
t. 5568. 
t. 5574. 


250. Dendrobium lasioglossum t. 6825. 
251. Orthosiphon stamineus . t. 5833. 
252. Vanda ccerulescens . . t. 5834. 


t. 5588. 


253. Vanda Cathcarti . . t. 5845. 


t. 5591. 
t. 5694. 
t. 5599. 
t. 5605. 
t. 5608. 
t. 5611. 


254. Cymbidium canaliculatum t. 5851. 
255. Beloperone ciliata . . t. 5888. 
256. Begonia crinita . . t. 5897. 
257. Darlingtonia californica . t. 5920. 
258. Epidendrum pseudepiden- 
drum . . . . t. 5929. 


t. 5618. 


259. Gilia achillesefolia . . t. 5939. 


t. 5620. 
. t. 5624. 
t. 5644. 
t. 6645. 


260. Ccelogyne lentiginosa . t. 6958. 
261. Restrepia elegans . . t. 5966. 
262. Dendrobium amethysto- 


. t. 5648. 

. t. 5649. 
. t. 5665. 


263. Phajus Blumei, var. Ber- 
naysii . . . . t. 6032. 
264. Odontoglossum vexilla- 
rium . . . . t. 6037. 


. t. 5657. 
. t. 6663. 


265. Rhododendron malay- 
anum . . . . t. 6045. 


. t. 6673. 


266. Sonerila Bensoni . . t. 6049. 


. t. 5676. 
. t. 5677. 
. t. 5679. 
. t. 5680. 


267. Caraguata Zahnii . . t. 6059. 
268. Campsidium chilense . t. 6111. 
269. Blumenbachia (Caiophora) 
contorta . . . t. 6134. 


. t. 5681. 
. t. 5694. 


270. Blumenbachia chuquiten- 
sis t. 6143. 


. t. 5707. 
. t. 5711. 
. t. 5718. 


271. Odontoglossum maxillare . t. 6144. 
272. Epidendrum syringothyr- 
sis . . . . . t. 6145. 


. t. 5731. 

. t. 5732. 


273. Wahlenbergia tuberosa . t. 6155. 
274. Masdevallia Peristeria . t. 6159. 


. t. 5739. 
. t. 5741. 


275. Odontoglossum (Miltonia) 
Warscewiczii . . . t. 6163. 


. t. 5747. 


276. Hemichsena fruticosa . t. 6164. 


. t. 6752. 


277. Balbisia verticillata . . t. 6170. 


. t. 5763. 


278. Cypripedium Argus . . t. 6175. 
279. Masdevallia Davisii . . t. 6190. 



INTRODUCTION 



280. Calathea leucostachys 

281. Pescatorea Dayana, var. 

rhodacra 

282. Viburnum dilatatum 

283. Episcia erythropus . 

284. Bouchea pseudogervao 

285. Hypoestes aristata . 

286. Allium anceps . 

287. Odontoglossum prsenitens t. 

288. Calceolaria tenella . 

289. Monopyle racemosa . 

290. Pescatoria lamellosa . 

291. Leucothoe Davisise . 

292. Lilium phillipinense . 

292. Lycaste lasioglossa . 

293. Begonia Davisii 

294. Masdevallia inocharis 

295. Masdevallia triaristella 

296. Monardella macrantha 

297. Masdevallia attenuata 

298. Oncidium cheirophorum . 

299. Cordia decandra 

300. Boronia elatior . 

301. Cypripedium Haynaldia- 

num .... 

302. Haplopappus spinulosus . 

303. Lycaste Linguella 

304. Notylia albida . 

305. Dendrobium crystallinum t. 

306. Oncidium Euxanthinum . 

307. Arthropodium neo-caledo- 

nicum .... 

308. ^Echmea (Chevalliera) 

Veitchii .... 

309. Calceolaria lobata 

310. Lilium neilgherrense 

311. Alloplectus peltatus . 

312. Stenospermatium Wallisii t. 

313. Eranthemum laxiflorum 

314. Pleroma Gayanum . 

315. Crossandra guineensis 

316. Dendroseris macrophylla 

317. Spathoglottis Petri . 

318. Ardisia Oliver i . 

319. Magnolia stellata 

320. Eurygania ovata 

321. Watsonia densiflora . 

322. Burbidgea nitida 

323. Calceolaria deflexa . 



t. 6205. 


324. 


t. 6214. 


325. 


t. 6215. 




t. 6219. 


326. 


t. 6221. 


327. 


t. 6224. 


328. 


t. 6227. 


329. 


t. 6229. 


330. 


t. 6231. 


331. 


t. 6233. 


332. 


t. 6240. 


333. 


t. 6247. 


334. 


t. 6250. 




t. 6251. 


335. 


t. 6252. 




t. 6262. 


336. 


t. 6268. 


337. 


t. 6270. 


338. 


t. 6273. 


339. 


t. 6278. 


340. 


t. 6279. 


341. 


t. 6285. 


342. 




343. 


t. 6296. 


344. 


t. 6302. 


345. 


t. 6303. 


346. 


t. 6311. 


347. 


t. 6319. 


348. 


t. 6322. 


349. 




350. 


t. 6326. 


361. 




352. 


t. 6329. 


353. 


t. 6330. 




t. 6332. 


364. 


t. 6333. 


355. 


t. 6334. 




t. 6336. 


356. 


t. 6345. 


357. 


t. 6346. 


358. 


t. 6353. 




t. 6354. 


359. 


t. 6357. 


360. 


t. 6370. 


361. 


t. 6393. 


362. 


t. 6400. 


363. 


t. 6403. 


364. 


t. 6431. 


365. 



Cypripedium Lawrence- 
anum . . . . t. 

Pachystoma Thomsoni- 
anum . . . . t. 

Conandron ramondioides . t. 

Cypripedium Spicerianum t. 



6482. 

6471. 
6484. 
6490. 
6496. 
6510. 
6521. 
6525. 
6531. 
6559. 



Mormordes Ocanse . . t. 
Chionographis japonica . t. 
Stelis Briickmiilleri . . t. 
Crinum purpurascens . t. 
Wormia Burbidgei . . t. 
Jasminum gracillimum . t. 
Schismatoglottis cris- 

pata . . . . t. 6576. 
Primula proculiformis (ob- 

conica) . . . . t. 6582. 
Drosera capensis . . t. 6683. 
Abelia spathulata . . t. 6601. 
Zephyranthes citrina . t. 6605. 
Globba atro-sanguinea . t. 6626. 
Columnea Kalbreyeri . t. 6633. 
Celmisia spectabilis . . t. 6653. 
Utricularia Endresii . . t. 6656. 
Hamamelis japonica . . t. 6659. 
Fraxinus Mariesii . . t. 6678. 
Saxifraga cortusifolia . t. 6680. 
Hoya linearis . . . t. 6682. 
Rogersia podophylla. . t. 6691. 
Cephselis tomentosa . . t. 6696. 
Eranthemum Borneense . t. 6701. 
Sarmienta repens . . t. 6720. 
Medinilla Curtisii . . t. 6730. 
Rhododendron multicolor t. 6769. 
Berberis congestifolia, var. 

hakeoides . . . t. 6770. 
Corylopsis himalayana . t. 6779. 
Caryopteris mastacan- 

thus . . . . t. 6799. 
Eucomis bicolor . . t. 6816. 
Odontoglossum O3rstedii . t. 6820. 
Rhododendron javanicum. 

var. tubiflora . . . t. 6860. 
Ixora macrothyrsa . . t. 6853. 
Myrmecodia Beccarii . t. 6883. 
Tillandsia chrysostachys . t. 6906. 
Amasonia calycina . . t. 6915. 
Pleurothallis insignis . t. 6936. 
Phalfenopsis Maries . . t. 6964. 
Anthurium Veitchii , . t. 6968, 



25 



INTRODUCTION 



366. Heloniopsis japonica 

367. Masdevallia gibberosa 

368. Styrax Obassia . 

369. Sarcochilus luniferus 

370. Licuala Veitchii 

371. Enkianthus campanula- 

tus 

372. Eucryphia pinnatifolia 

373. Heliamphora nutans . 

374. Zamia Wallisii . 

375. Abies brachyphylla . 

376. Caraguata angustifolia 

377. Nepenthes Curtisii . 

378. Scaphosepalum pulviri- 

are 

379. Musa Basjoo 

380. Impatiens mirabilis . 

381. Didymocarpus lacunosa . 

382. .JSschynanthus obconica . 

383. Dendrobium atroviola- 

ceum . 

384. Trochodendron aralioides . 

385. Angrsecum Kotschyi . 

386. Scutellaria formosana 

387. Hypocyrta pulchra . 

388. Celmisia Munroi 

389. Didymocarpus malayana . 

390. Zamia obliqua . 

391. Odontoglossum retusum . 

392. Rhododendron yunnan- 



t. 6986. 


393. 


t. 6990. 




t. 7039. 


394. 


t. 7044. 


395. 


t. 7053. 


396. 




397. 


t. 7059. 


398. 


t. 7067. 


399. 


t. 7093. 


400. 


t. 7103. 


401. 


t. 7114. 


402. 


t. 7137. 


403. 


t. 7138. 


404. 




405. 


t. 7151. 


406. 


t. 7182. 


407. 


t. 7195. 


408. 


t. 7236. 


409. 


t. 7336. 


410. 




411. 


t. 7371. 


412. 


t. 7376. 


413. 


t. 7442. 


414. 


t. 7458. 


416. 


t. 7468. 


416. 


t. 7496. 


417. 


t. 7526. 


418. 


t. 7542. 


419. 


t. 7569. 


420. 




421. 


t. 7614. 


422, 



Rhododendron rubigino- 

sum . . . . t. 7621. 

Elseagnus macrophylla . t. 7638. 

Dryandra calophylla . t. 7642. 

Rhododendron dilatatum . t. 7681. 

Corylopsis pauciflora . t. 7736. 

Lhotskya ericoides . . t. 7753. 

Coelogyne Veitchii . . t. 7764. 

Manettia bicolor . . t. 7776. 

Rubus palmatus . . t. 7801. 

Corydalis thalictrifolia . t. 7830. 

Astilbe Davidii . . . t. 7880. 

Hamamelis mollis . . t. 7884. 

Senecio clivorum . . t. 7902. 

Senecio tanguticus . . t. 7912. 

Lysimachia crispidens . t. 7919. 

Corydalis Wilsoni . . t. 7939. 

Dicentra chrysantha . t. 7954. 

Lysimachia Henryi . . t. 7961. 

Loropetalum chinense . t. 7979. 

x Zygocolax Veitchii . t. 7980. 

Jasminum primulinum . t. 7981. 

Dendrobium bellatulum . t. 7985. 

Nepenthes Rajah . . t. 8017. 

Lycaste Locusta . . t. 8020. 

Meconopsis integrifolia . t. 8027. 

Primula tangutica . . t. 8043. 

Sciadopitys verticillata . t. 8050. 

Primula Veitchii . . t. 8051. 

Lonicera pileata . . t. 8060. 

Lonicera tragophylla . t. 8064. 



26 




JAMKS VEITCH 



JAMES H. VEITCH 



JAMES VEITCH, JUNIOR 



JOHN VEITCI1 
HARRY J. VEITCH 



FAMILY TREE 



John Yeitch. 

Born 1752, at Jedburgh, Scotland. 
Died 1839. 

Rented land at Lower Budlake, near 
Killerton, near Exeter, in 1808. 
Acquired additional land in 1810. 
Moved to Mount Radford in 1832. 
Succeeded in 1837 by 



James Veitch. 

Born 1792. 
Died 1863. 

Nurseryman at Mount Radford. 
Jarnes Veitch and James Veitch junior, as 
James Veitch & Son, of Exeter, ac- 
quired the business and rented the 
land of Messrs. Knight & Perry, 
Chelsea, in 1853. 
James Veitch remained at Mount Radford, 

Topsham Road, Exeter. 
James Veitch junior moved to Chelsea in 
1853. 



James Yeitch junior. 

Born 1815. 
Died 1869. 

Nurseryman at Chelsea, Coombe 
Wood, &c., as James Veitch 
& Son. 

Ceased all interest in the Exeter 
firm in 1864. 



Robert Toswill Yeitch. 

Born 1823. 

Died 1885. 

Nurseryman at New North Road and 
High Street, Exeter, in 1864, on 
the death of James Veitch in 
1863, as Robert Veitch & Son. 



Peter C. M. Yeitch. 

Nurseryman at Exeter as Robert 
Veitch & Son. 



Yeil 



John Gould Yeitch.* Harry James Yeitch.* Arthur Yeitch. 

Born 1839. *Nurserymen at Chelsea, Coombe Wood Born 1844. 
Died 1870. and Langley, as James Veitch Died 1880. 

& Sons. 



James H. Yeitch. John Gould Yeitch. 

Nurserymen at Chelsea, Coombe Wood, 
Langley and Feltham, as James 
Veitch & Sons, Ltd. 



27 




JOHN OOfLD VEITCH 



ARTHCK VEITCH 



ROBERT T. VEITCH 



P. C. M. VElTCil 
JOHN G. VEITCH 



CONTENTS 



PA OF 

PREFACR 5 

INTRODUCTION 7 

FAMILY TREE 27 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 31 

LIST OF EEFERENCES 33 

LIST OF TRAVELLERS 36 

LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 37 

LIST OF HYBRIDISTS 98 

LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 99 

ORCHID SPECIES Ill 

ORCHID HYBRIDS 161 

STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 221 

INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 299 

EXOTIC FERNS 311 

CONIFEROUS TREES 335 

TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS AND CLIMBING PLANTS .... 351 

TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN AND CLIMBING PLANTS .... 389 

HERBACEOUS PLANTS 413 

BULBOUS PLANTS 443 

BEGONIAS 455 

HIPPEASTRUMS 465 

ORCHID HYBRIDIZATION ... 473 

NEPENTHES 483 

GREENHOUSE RHODODENDRONS 493 

STREPTOCARPUS 503 

FRUITS 509 

VEGETABLES . . 513 

INDEX 517 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



THE ORIGINAL NURSERY AT CHELSEA . 
SEQUOIA ("WELLINGTONIA) GIGANTEA 

FAMILY PORTRAITS 

DITTO DITTO 

MESSRS. VEITCHS' GOLD MEDALS . 

THUYA GIGANTEA (LoBBii) .... 

CYPRIPEDIUM VILLOSTJM 

EUCRYPHIA PINNATIFOLl 4. . 

SCIADOPITYS VERTICILLATA .... 

ODONTOGLOSSUM CRISPUM VEITCHIANUM . 

ANTHURIUM VEITCHII 

NEPENTHES BICALCARATA .... 

ABIES VEITCHII 

CYPRIPEDIUM CURTISII .... 

SENECIO CLIVORUM 

RHODODENDRON BALSAMIN^FLORUM 
CYPRIPEDIUM LAWRENCEANUM 
MASDEVALLIA VEITCHIANA .... 
ODONTOGLOSSUM URO-SKINNERI 
CYPRIPEDIUM x " JAMES H. VEITCH " 
DENDROBIUM x ILLUSTRE .... 

LuELIOCATTLEYA DOMINIANA IiANGLEYENSIS . 

PHAL^ENOPSIS x "JOHN SEDEN" 

AMASONIA PUNICEA 

CANTUA DEPENDENS 

CROTON CAUDATUS TORTILIS .... 

LAPAGERIA ROSEA 

OUVIRANDRA FENESTRALIS .... 
RHODODENDRON VEITCHIANUM 

31 



Frontispiece 
To face page 10 
27 
28 
33 
39 

v 42 
46 
52 

60 
63 
76 
83 
86 

94 
107 
., 123 
,. 140 
144 
177 
19 
201 
.. 214 
226 
238 
245 
270 
276 
286 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

HELIAMPHORA NUTANS .... ... To face page 299 

SARRACENIA x COURTII 307 

PLATYCERIUM VEITCHII 327 

ARAUCARIA IMBRICATA 337 

PICEA POLITA 342 

THUYOPSIS DOLABRATA 346 

CLEMATIS MONTANA RUBENS ....... 360 

MAGNOLIA STELLATA 370 

CEANOTHUS VEITCHIANUS 394 

OLEARIA HAASTII ... 404 

ARTEMESIA LACTIFLORA 414 

MECONOPSIS INTEGRIFOLIA 424 

LlLIUM AURATUM 447 

BEGONIA PEARCEI . . 456 

HIPPEASTRUM "EGLAMOR" ... . . . 466 

DENDROBIUM x EUOSMUM EXCELLENS 478 

NEPENTHES x MIXTA 488 

EHODODENDRON JAVANICO-JASMINIFLORUM "NE PLUS ULTRA" 494 

STREPTOCARPUS ACHIMENIFLORUS 503 

GOOSEBERRY " GOLDEN GEM" 509 

CAULIFLOWER " AUTUMN GIANT" . 513 



32 




liu'SSIA 



ITALY 

ENGLAND 

FRANCE 



BELGIUM 

MESSRS. VEITCHS' GOLD MEDALS 



LIST OF REFERENCES 



NAMB IH FULI, 

Curtis's Botanical Magazine 

Dictionnaire Iconographique des Orehidees, Bruxelles 
Die Gartenwelt, Leipsig. 
Flora and Sylva. 

Floral Magazine 

Florist and Pomologist 

Garden and Forest 

Gordon's Pinetum. 

Hooker's Icones Plantarum 

Hooker's Species Filicum 

Journal of Horticulture . . . 
Journal of the Linnean Society of London 
Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society 

La Belgique Horticole, Liege 

La Flore des Serres et des Jardins de 1'Europe, Gand. 

1'Illustration Horticole, Gand 

Lindenia, une Iconographie des Orchidees . 

Lindley's Botanical Register 

Lindley and Paxton's Flower Garden 

Loddige's Botanical Cabinet 

1'Orchidophile. 

London's Encyclopaedia of Plants .... 
Nicholson's Illustrated Dictionary of Gardening 
Orchid Review. 

Paxton's Magazine of Botany 

Plantse Delavayanse. 

Proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society 

33 



ABBREVIATION 

Bot. Mag. 

Diet. Ic. des Orchidees. 



Fl. Mag. 
Fl. and Pom. 
Gard. and For. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. 
Hooker's Sp. Fil. 
Jour, of Hort. 
Jour. Linn. Soc. 
Jour. R.H.S. 
La Belg. Hort. 
Fl. des Serres. 
PIllus. Hort. 
Lindenia. 
Lindl. Bot. Reg. 
Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 
Lodd. Bot. Cab. 

Loudon's Ency. PI. 
Nich. Diet. Gard. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. 
Proc. R.H.S. 



LIST OF REFERENCES 



NAME IN FULL 

Hegel's Gartenflora, Erlangen. 
Reichenbachia, Orchids Illustrated and Described 
Reichenbach's Xenia Orchidacea .... 

Revue Horticole, Paris 

Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, Illustrations of New or 
Little-known Ligneous Plants, &c., Boston, U.S.A. 

The Gardeners' Chronicle 

The Orchid Album 

The Orchid Grower's Manual 

Veitchs' Manual of Coniferee 

Veitchs' Manual of Orchidaceous Plants 
Veitchs' Catalogue of New and Rare Plants 
Veitchs' Catalogue of Trees and Shrubs 

Warner's Select Orchidaceous Plants . 



ABBBKVIATION 

Reichenbachia. 
Rchb. Xen. Orch. 
Rev. Hort. 

Sargent's Trees audShrubs. 

Gard. Chron. 

Orchid Album. 

Williams' Orch. Man. 

Man. Con. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

Irees 

and Shrubs. 
Warner's Selec. Orch. 



34 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 



LIST OF MESSRS. VEITCHS' TRAVELLERS 



WILLIAM LOBB 
THOMAS LOBB 
KICHARD PEARCE . 
JOHN GOULD VEITCH 
DAVID BOWMAN 
HENRY BUTTON 
CARL KRAMER 
GOTTLIEB ZAHN 
GEORGE DOWNTON . 
J. HENRY CHESTERTON 
A. E. ENDRES 
GUSTAVE WALLIS . 
WALTER DAVIS 
P. C. M. VEITCH . 
GUILLAUME KALBREYER 
CHRISTOPHER MUDD 
F. W. BURBIDGE . 
CHARLES MARIES . 
CHARLES CURTIS 
DAVID BURKE 
JAMES H. VEITCH . 
E. H. WILSON 



18401857 

18431860 

18591866 

18601870 

1866 

18661868 

18671868 

18691870 

18701873 

18701878 

18711873 

18721874 

18731876 

18751878 

18761881 

1877 

18771878 

18771879 

18781884 

18811897 

18911893 

18991905 



36 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

WILLIAM LOBB. 

COLLECTOR IN CALIFORNIA AND SOUTH AMERICA. 
18401857. 

WILLIAM LOBB was born in the eastern division of Cornwall. 
The place is unknown, nor is anything known of his early life. 
When a young man he applied himself to gardening, and was 
in 1837 employed in the nursery of Mr. James Veitch senior 
at Exeter. In this same year Mr. Veitch sent him to be 
gardener to Mr. Stephen Davey, of Redruth, whose horti- 
cultural establishment appears to have been on a modest 
scale, but which, under Lobb's management, became 
thoroughly efficient. 

For a long time William Lobb had cherished an ardent 
desire for travel and adventure : he was quick of observation, 
ready in resources, and practical in their application ; he had 
devoted much of his leisure to the study of botany, in which 
considerable proficiency had been acquired. Accordingly, 
after three years in Mr. Davey's service, he gladly accepted 
the proposal of Mr. James Veitch senior to go on a mission to 
various parts of South America for the purpose of collecting 
plants, and he sailed from Plymouth in 1840 for Rio Janeiro. 
On his arrival in Brazil he first proceeded to ^tne' Orgaos 1 
Mountains, and met with several beautiful and notable orchids 
at that time extremely rare in English gardens ; he then left 
for Chili, crossing the great Pampas of the Argentine 
Republic and the Chilian Andes. Continuing his journey 

37 D 



southwards, Lobb penetrated the great Araucaria forests, where 
he collected a large quantity of seeds of Araucaria imbricata, 
and was thus instrumental in bringing this remarkable 
Conifer into general use for ornamental planting. 

He returned to England in 1844, renewed his engagement, 
and sailed again for Brazil in April of the following year. 

After sending home from Rio Janeiro a consignment of 
plants collected in Southern Brazil, he proceeded to Valparaiso 
for the purpose of exploring Southern Chili, at that time but 
little known to Europeans, except along the coast. Here a 
rich harvest awaited him. 

Amongst his earliest successful introductions from this 
region were Lapageria rosea, Escallonia macrantha, Em- 
bothrium coccineum, Philesia buxifolia, and Desfontainea 
spinosa. 

Following up these brilliant achievements, he continued 
explorations in Valdivia, Chiloe, and Northern Patagonia, 
where he collected seeds and plants of Libocedrus tetragona, 
Fitzroya patagonica, Saxe-Gothaea conspicua, and Podocarpus 
nubigena, " four most interesting Conifers for this country, 
after Araucaria imbricata, that South America produces." 
Nor must mention be omitted of Berberis Darwinii, first 
introduced to British gardens during this interesting 
expedition. Lobb returned to England in 1848. 

The wonderful Conifers discovered by Douglas in California 
and Oregon, w-ei-e then still very scarce in England, and young 
plants of most of the species could scarcely be bought : it was 
it'^rtafo'rfc decided- that Lobb should proceed to California with 
a view of obtaining seeds of all the most important kinds 
known, and, if possible, discover others. 

He landed at San Francisco in the summer of 1849, and at 
once made arrangements for exploring Southern California. 

38 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

One of the first fruits of the expedition was the successful 
introduction of Abies bracteata. 

During the years 1850-1851 consignments were sent 
home of cones and seeds of Pinus radiata, P. muricata, P. 
Sabiniana, P. Coulteri and P. tuberculata ; and also of many 
shrubs and flowering plants, quite new to British gardens. 

In the autumn of 1851 his operations were pushed further 
north, and cones and seeds collected of the Redwood (Sequoia 
sempervirens), Pinus Lambertiana, P. monticola, and others. 

In 1852 Lobb made an excursion to the Columbia River 
and Oregon, where he succeeded in obtaining seeds of 
Abietia (Pseudotsuga) Douglasii and Abies nobilis, still rare 
at that time in England, and the beautiful Thuia provisionally 
named after him. 

Returning through North California, Lobb collected seeds 
of Abies grandis, A. magnifica, which he sent home under 
the name of A. amabilis, believing it to be the A. amabilis 
of Douglas, A. concolor Lowiana, the first received in 
England of that fine Fir, Juniperus californica, and of 
Pinus ponderosa. 

In 1853 the Sierra Nevada was explored, the traveller 
tempted by the reports of the discovery of trees of 
extraordinary magnitude, which he had the good fortune to 
find, and to secure the first cones and seeds of Sequoia 
gigantea received in England. 

Lobb brought these home at the end of the year, and with 
them two living plants, afterwards planted out at Exeter, 
where they survived but three or four years, nor was there 
at any time much hope of their living. 

Lobb returned to California in the autumn of 1854, and 
from that time up to the end of 1856 continued to send home 
consignments of plants and seeds. 

39 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

In 1857 his engagement with Mr. Veitch terminated. He 
remained, however, in California, and sent collections of seeds 
to England from time to time. In 1863, seized with paralysis, 
Lobb lost the use of his limbs ; he died at San Francisco 
in the autumn of the same year, and was buried in Lone 
Mountain Cemetery. 

Eeference : Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 243. 



THOMAS LOBB. 

COLLECTOR IN INDIA AND MALAYA. 
18431860. 

THOMAS LOBB was a native of Cornwall, but scarcely anything 
is known of his early life till he entered the nursery of Mr. 
James Veitch senior, of Exeter, by whom he was engaged as a 
collector. From an agreement dated January llth 1843 it 
appears that " Thomas Lobb agrees to proceed to the British 
Settlement of Singapore, in the employ of James Veitch & Son 
as botanical collector, to make collections of living plants, 
seeds, and dried specimens of plants, and to collect for the 
said James Veitch & Son and for no other person. The 
understanding of this agreement is that the said Thomas 
Lobb's principal destination is to be China, should that country 
be open to admit a botanical collector, and in the absence of 
any definite instructions from James Veitch & Son, Thomas 
Lobb is to use his own discretion and be guided by existing 
circumstances as to what parts of China he proceeds to, and if 
on arrival at Singapore he finds circumstances are not favour- 
able for his proceeding to China, he shall be at liberty to 
proceed to such of the oriental islands as may appear to him 
most desirable ; but next to China the island of Java appearing 
to offer the greatest advantages to a botanical collector (if 
facilities offer for exploring the same with safety), he is directed 
to proceed thither, but it is left to his own discretion." 
Apparently Lobb did not find China ready to receive a 

41 



botanical collector, and he adopted the alternative, and visited 
Java and the adjacent islands. 

By a second agreement Thomas Lobb agreed to go to India 
to collect plants, seeds and other objects of Natural History 
for three years, and left England for Calcutta on December 
25th 1848. During the twenty years or upwards he travelled 
for the Veitchian firm he visited the Khasia Hills, Assam, 
and other parts of North-East India, and subsequently 
Moulmein and parts of Lower Burmah, sending home from 
those districts most of the finest Orchids found there, many 
previously known to science, but introduced by him to 
cultivation for the first time. 

Worthy of mention among these are Vanda ccerulea, 
Coelogyne (Pleione) lagenaria, C. maculata, Aerides Fieldingi, 
A. multiflorum Lobbii, A. m. Veitchii, Dendrobium infundi- 
bulum, Calanthe (Limatodes) rosea, and Cypripedium villosum. 

Lobb afterwards visited the southern parts of the Malay 
peninsula, North Borneo (Labuan and Sarawak) and other 
Eastern Isles, when he discovered and introduced the ancestral 
forms of the superb and useful race of Rhododendrons, 
known in gardens as the Javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids ; 
the original forms being Rhododendron javanicum, R. Lobbii, 
R. jasminiflorum and R. Brookeanum. 

From this region, too, he successfully introduced some of 
the first Nepenthes cultivated in British gardens, including 
Nepenthes Rafflesiana, N. Veitchii, N. sanguinea, and 
N. ampullaria ; and among the very many Orchids he sent 
home were Vanda tricolor and its variety suavis, of which he 
was also the discoverer ; Coelogyne speciosa, Calanthe vestita, 
Cypripedium barbatum, and others. Lobb subsequently 
went to the Philippine Islands, and collected the best Orchids 
found in the neighbourhood of Manila, among the Phalsenopsis 

42 




CYPRIPEDIUM VILLOSUM 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

being P. intermedia, the first natural hybrid subsequently 
proved by artificial means. 

It was greatly in Lobb's favour that much of the region 
explored was virgin soil for a collector, but his discrimination 
equalled his energy, and he sent home but few plants that 
proved unworthy of cultivation. It is not saying too much to 
assert that during the long period Lobb collected in the East, 
British gardens were enriched with more beautiful plants of 
Indo-Malayan origin than by any single collector of his own 
or any other time. 

Lobb also collected many herbarium specimens, a list of 
which is given by Planchon in Hooker's London Journal of 
Botany, 1847-1848, vols. vi., vii., where the following notice 
appears regarding them : 

" Mr. Reward, Young Street, Kensington, is charged with 
the distribution of the sets of the exquisitely beautiful and rare 
specimens of the mountains of Java, collected by Mr. Thomas 
Lobb. The number of sets is but small, and the amount of 
species in each varies from 100 to 200, or nearly so. 

" More perfect specimens have never been offered for sale." 

And again in another volume : 

" The early numbers of this valuable collection were made 
by Mr. Thomas Lobb in Java. The beauty and variety of the 
specimens gave such satisfaction to the subscribers that 
Mr. Lobb has extended his researches : some of the present 
list are from Singapore (a very large collection having been 
lost by shipwreck) ; and we are now happy to say that a 
further addition has arrived of extremely interesting and 
beautiful specimens from Moulmein, which are placed in the 
hands of Mr. Reward for distribution. 

" This set contains, amongst others of great rarity and novelty, 
the singular Barclay a longifolia, Wall. (Linn. Trans, v. 15, 

43 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

p. 443, t. 18), with flowers resembling in structure those 
of Euryale, and the leaves in shape like those of Scolopendrium 
vulgare ; a plant so scarce that Dr. Wallich is not aware that 
a good specimen is to be found in any herbarium." 

The genus Lobbia, of the order Aristolochiacese, founded 
by Planchon on a specimen collected by Thomas Lobb in 
Singapore, was named by him Lobbia dependens, the generic 
name being given to commemorate the labours of the two 
brothers, Thomas and William Lobb. 

In manner Lobb was modest and retiring, of few words, and 
it was difficult to get him to describe a plant, but if he 
ventured on calling it " very pretty," it was quite sufficient 
to induce extra care. 

As the result of exposure in his work, he had the misfortune 
to lose one of his legs, a circumstance which induced him to 
settle at Devoran in Cornwall, where he remained for the 
rest of his life, and it is rather remarkable that the only time 
he was induced to leave his home was to pay a visit to his last 
employer, Mr. James Veitch junior, with whom he was 
staying on the occasion of his sudden death in 1869. 

Thomas Lobb died on April 30th 1894, at Devoran in 
Cornwall, at a very advanced age. 

References : Hooker's London Journal of Botany, 1847-1848, p. 145 ; 
Journal of Botany, 1894, vol. xxxii. p. 191 ; Cottage Gardener, xiii. 
p. 274 ; Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 636. 



RICHARD PBARCE. 
COLLECTOR IN CHILI, PERU AND BOLIVIA. 
18591866. 

THE name of this collector is indissolubly connected with the 
history of the Tuberous Begonia, for it was to his energy and 
daring as a traveller that we are indebted for the introduction 
of the early species from Bolivia and Peru. 

Richard Pearce was born at Stoke Devonport, and was first 
employed in the nursery of Mr. Pontey in the town of 
Plymouth, where he stayed till about the year 1858, when he 
entered the nursery at Mount Radford, near Exeter. 

It appears by an agreement drawn up between James 
Veitch & Son, of the Mount Radford Nursery, Exeter, and 
Richard Pearce, -in February 1859, that the latter agreed to 
go out to South America for three years as collector of plants, 
seeds, land-shells and other objects of Natural History. 

Pearce was instructed to proceed to Valparaiso in South 
America, and collect in Chili and Patagonia. His particular 
attention was directed to the collection of seeds of Libocedrus 
tetragona, at that time supposed to be the tree which 
produced the famous Alerze timber ; the Lapageria rosea and 
L. alba ; the Chilian Pine (Araucaria imbricata), and other 
hardy trees and shrubs ; secondly, to procure such plants as 
require a greenhouse temperature ; and thirdly, Orchidaceae 
and stove and greenhouse flowering plants. 

Pearce carried out these instructions, and besides the above- 

45 



HORTUS VETTCHII 

named plants obtained and introduced Prumnopitys elegans, 
Podocarpus nubigena, Eucryphia pinnatifolia, several 
Bomareas, Thibaudia acuminata, Ourisia coccinea, 0. Pearcei 
and quantities of Ferns. At the same time, through his 
researches, the true Alerze-producing tree was found to be 
Fitzroya patagonica and not Libocedrus tetragona as had been 
generally supposed. 

During 1860 Pearce made many journeys to the Cordilleras 
and the interior of the country, to Los Bafios, the Baths of 
Chilian, and to Los Luganos, the Lakes. 

Of the scenery of that part of the Cordilleras which he 
explored he writes : " It is of the most charming description 
gently undulating meadows covered with a carpet of short 
grass, placid lakes reflecting from their smooth surface the 
mountains around, foaming cataracts and gentle rivulets, 
deep gorges and frightful precipices, over which tumble 
numerous dark, picturesque waterfalls reaching the bottom 
in a cloud of spray, high rocky pinnacles and lofty peaks, 
surround one on every side. 

" Nor is the vegetation less beautiful and interesting. At 
an elevation of 4,000 ft. the vegetation exhibits a totally 
different character from that of the coast. Here one finds 
Antarctic Beeches (Fagus antarctica and F. betuloides), which 
constitute with Fitzroya patagonica the large forest trees. 
The Embothrium coccineum, Desfontainea spinosa, Philesia 
buxifolia, three species of Berberis, Pernettya and Gaultheria 
are the most abundant of the flowering shrubs, whilst the 
numerous pretty little rock-plants meet one at every step with 
their various forms and colours." 

Early in 1862 Pearce left Chili, travelled north to Peru and 
Bolivia in search of stove and greenhouse plants, and plants 
with fine foliage, From Cuenca he sent a good number of 

46 







- 



'S-* 

" ""v^ ' iX 



EUCRYPHIA PINNATIFOLIA 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

seeds, including Befaria ledifolia, Lisianthus magnificus, 
Calceolaria ericoides, and several good Tacsonias, and from 
Guayaquil despatched some six large cases of plants, amongst 
which was the handsome Maranta Veitchii. 

It appears from a second agreement drawn up between 
James Veitch & Son, of the Mount Radford Nursery, Exeter, 
and Richard Pearce, in January 1863, that the latter again 
agreed to go to South America for three years to collect 
plants, seeds and other objects of Natural History. He was 
to proceed to Lima, thence to Muiia and Veloc, and after- 
wards to such parts of South America as by written instruc- 
tions to him should be determined. Particular attention 
was to be directed to the Province of Teukamon, should 
there be facilities for reaching that country. 

Amongst other fine additions from Muna were Aphelandra 
nitens, Gymnostachys Pearcei, and Sanchezia nobilis three 
well-known and much-prized stove plants. 

Pearce succeeded in reaching Teukamon, where he collected 
Nierembergia rivularis and N. Veitchii, Begonia boliviensis, 
Palava flexuosa, Mutisia decurrens and several Peperomias. 

The next journey was to La Paz, and in November 1865 
were sent home, Begonia Pearcei, B. Veitchii, a number of 
good Hippeastrums, such as H. pardinum and H. Leopoldii, 
the progenitors of that magnificent race of garden varieties 
(Amaryllis) so general to-day, and two or three excellent 
species of Ecremocarpus subsequently lost. 

On returning from La Paz in 1866 Pearce's engagement with 
James Veitch & Son terminated, and he returned to his home 
at Plymouth, where he married. 

In 1867 he came to London and entered into an engagement 
with the late Mr. William Bull to travel in South America. 

On arrival in Panama, he was taken ill on July 13th, 

47 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

and died on the 17th of that month, of a bilious remittent 
fever. 

As a botanical collector Pearce was one of the best, and his 
untimely death was a great loss to the world of Horticulture. 

References : " The Tuberous Begonia," by W. Wynne, ed. 1, 1888, 
with sketch of Pearce's travels and portrait ; Journal of Botany, 
1868, pp. 320, 134 ; Gard. Chron. 1868, pp. 874, 893. 



48 



JOHN GOULD VEITCH. 

COLLECTOR IN JAPAN, SOUTH SEA ISLANDS, AND AUSTRALIA. 

18601870. 

JOHN GOULD VEITCH was born at Exeter in 1839. He was at 
an early age initiated in the working of the nursery business, 
and took an active part in the management of the Veitchian 
establishment after its removal to Chelsea in 1853, at that 
time rapidly acquiring prestige through the introduction of 
new plants, a prestige it was determined to maintain, and if 
possible enhance. 

His majority scarcely attained, an opportunity offered by 
the opening of the ports of Japan to foreigners, and in 
April 1860 John Gould Veitch started on a voyage to the 
Far East, arriving at Nagasaki in the July following. 

He remained in Japan about a year, collecting plants, 
many previously unknown in British gardens. 

Attached to the suite of Sir Rutherford Alcock, the 
British Envoy to Japan, he was enabled to make the ascent 
of Fujiyama, and was one of the first Europeans to reach 
the summit of the " sacred mountain." 

After despatching the collections to Europe he proceeded 
to the Philippine Islands on a similar mission, but with 
the especial object of obtaining plants of various species 
of Phalaenopsis, natives of the islands, at that period 

49 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

extremely rare in European gardens. The mission proved 
successful. 

The result of the voyage to Japan was the enrichment of 
European gardens with many choice coniferous trees, several 
beautiful evergreen and deciduous trees and shrubs, various 
herbaceous and other plants and bulbs. Amongst the first 
named are Abies firma, A. microsperma, Cryptomeria japonica 
elegans, Cupressus obtusa varieties, Juniperus chinensis aurea, 
Larix leptolepis, Picea Alcockiana, P. ajanensis, P. polita, 
Pinus densiflora, P. parviflora, P. Thunbergii, Tsuga diversi- 
folia, and the introduction in quantity of the rare Sciadopitys 
verticillata ; among the latter especial mention should be made 
of several beautiful forms of Acer palmatum, Ampelopsis 
Veitchii (Vitis inconstans), Lilium auratum, Primula japonica 
and P. cortusoides. 

The spirit of enterprise and the desire of further important 
discoveries induced him again to undertake a long voyage 
to the East, and in 1864 John Gould Veitch sailed for 
Australia and the South Sea Islands, returning to England 
in February 1866. 

Among the most enduring results of the second voyage 
was the introduction of many richly coloured Crotons and 
Dracaenas (varieties of Codiseum and Cordyline), the fore- 
runners of the handsome races now so constantly in request 
for decorative purposes ; the beautiful Pandanus Veitchii, the 
elegant Aralia Veitchii, and other plants of merit were also 
added to our stoves. 

In the early part of 1867 this most successful traveller 
was taken ill with an affection of the lungs, from which, 
however, under careful treatment he rallied for a time, but 
in August 1870 haemorrhage set in, and he died shortly 
afterwards, at the early age of thirty-one. 

50 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

In reference to the introduction of several of the most 
distinct Japanese conifers the following letter appeared in 
the Times from Mr. Veitch junior : 

"To THE EDITOK OF THE Times. 

" SIR, A paragraph under the head of ' Expeditious 
Journey to Japan ' appears in your paper of to-day, 
which, by inference, gives the credit of first finding and 
forwarding to England seeds of the Sciadopitys verti- 
cillata, or umbrella pine, to Mr. Robert Fortune. 

" I have not the slightest desire to detract from Mr. 
Fortune in any way, and I hope his researches in China 
and Japan will prove valuable to the botanical public, 
but as Mr. John Gould Veitch arrived in Japan on the 
20th of July last (which was before Mr. Fortune had left 
England), and obtained and forwarded seeds of that 
magnificent tree, and of the scarcely less beautiful one, 
Thuiopsis dolobrata, on the 22nd of September, nearly 
a month before Mr. Fortune reached Japan, I feel bound, 
in simple justice to Mr. John Gould Veitch, to state the 
fact, that he may have the full credit due to him of first 
introducing into England so fine a tree : and I shall 
therefore be obliged by your inserting this letter in your 
paper of to-morrow. 

" Mr. John Gould Veitch has also discovered and sent 
home seeds of numerous other fine trees and shrubs, one 
of which, a beautiful new fir, he has named Abies Alcock- 
iana, in compliment to Mr. Rutherford Alcock, Her 
Majesty's Minister at Jeddo, to whose kind assistance he 
has been much indebted ; and another entirely new pine 
has been named by Professor Lindley Abies Veitchii, in 
compliment to the discoverer. 

51 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

" These seeds, with a number of others forwarded by 
Mr. John Gould Veitch, are now being raised at our 
establishments at Chelsea and Exeter. 

" Full particulars of Mr. J. G. Veitch's arrival in 
Japan, with the particulars of his first collection sent 
home, have appeared in the Gardeners Chronicle, of 
which I enclose you extracts. 

" The fact of Mr. John Gould Veitch being my son will 
plead my apology for troubling you. 

tl I am, Sir, your most obedient servant, 

"JAMES VEITCH JUNIOR. 

" Royal Exotic Nursery, King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 
" February 12th 1861." 

References : Gard. Chron. 1860-1862, passim, " Extracts from Mr. John 
Gould Veitch's Letters on Japan"; id. 1866, passim, "Extracts 
from the Journal of Mr. John Gould Veitch during a Trip to the 
Australian Colonies and the South Sea Islands ; " Man. Con. 1900, 
ed. 2, p. 543. 



52 




SCIADOPITYS VERTICILLATA 

THE DELL, EGHAM 



DAVID BOWMAN. 

COLLECTOR IN BRAZIL. 

1866. 

DAVID BOWMAN was born at Arniston near Edinburgh, 
where his father was a gardener in a small position, on 
September 3rd 1838. 

His gardening career commenced at Arniston under the 
father, and subsequently he went to the gardens at Dalhousie 
Castle, Archerfield, and Dunmore Park, in Scotland, coming 
later to England to enter the gardens of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society at Chiswick as foreman. 

Bowman left England early in 1866 on our behalf for 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, whence he sent, with other plants, 
Dieffenbachia Bowmani, which perpetuates his name, and 
Paullinia thalictrifolia, a pretty stove climber with beautiful 
fern-like foliage. 

He subsequently sent home plants to the Royal Horticul- 
tural Society, to Mr. Wilson Saunders, and other amateurs, 
but when, having collected a large number in the vicinity of 
Bogota, and preparing to sail for England, he suffered heavy 
losses through robbery, and his stay had to be prolonged. 

Shortly after this Bowman contracted a violent attack of 
dysentery, from which he died on June 25th 1868. 

He is buried in the British cemetery at Bogota. 

References : Gard. Chron. 1868, pp. 924, 942. 

53 E 



HENRY BUTTON. 

COLLECTOR IN JAVA AND THE MALAY ARCHIPELAGO. 

18661868. 

HENRY BUTTON, a son of a former head-gardener to Lord 
Houghton, already, in young days, an ardent student and 
promising explorer, was sent on a collecting mission to the 
East in 1866. 

After twelve months' residence in Java, when it was hoped 
he had become sufficiently inured to the climate to extend his 
explorations, his health broke down and he fell a victim to his 
enthusiasm. 

In commemoration of his zealous services and early death, 
his name is associated with a new species of Cymbidium* 
he was the means of introducing to this country from Java, 
together with Saccolabium (Aerides) Huttoni from the same 
country, and Dendrobium Huttoni, which he sent from the 
island of Timor in the Malay Archipelago. He rediscovered 
and successfully introduced the very rare Vanda insignis. 

* Cymbidium Huttoni, Hook. f. Bot. Mag. t. 5676. 



CARL KRAMER. 

COLLECTOR IN JAPAN AND COSTA RICA. 
18671868. 

CARL KRAMER, son of the late Herr Kramer, gardener to 
Senator Janisch of Flotbeck near Hamburg, the well-known 
possessor of a once fine collection of Orchids, was sent on a 
collecting mission to Japan to supplement the collection made 
there by the late John Gould Veitch, but his mission was a 
failure. 

He was afterwards sent to Costa Rica and Guatemala for 
Orchids, but he again sent home little of note. Kramer 
proved entirely unsuitable for the work he had undertaken, 
and apparently had not that adaptability and resource essential 
to successful exploration. 

His name is associated with a species of Odontoglossum* 
allied to 0. citrosmum, introduced from Costa Rica in 1868. 

* Odontoglossum Krameri, Bchb. f. Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 98. 



55 



GOTTLIEB ZAHN. 

COLLECTOR IN CENTRAL AMERICA. 
18691870. 

A GERMAN who collected during 1869 and 1870 in Central 
America, sending several consignments of plants, for the most 
part Orchids and Ferns. 

The main object of Zahn's journey was the introduction of 
the rare Odontoglossum Warscewiczii (Miltonia Endresii), 
discovered by Warscewicz about the year 1849, but which 
hitherto had resisted all attempts at introduction ; Zahn also 
failed, and it was left for Endres (q.v.) two years later to 
accomplish this often attempted task. 

Zahn arrived in Panama in September 1869, collected in the 
neighbourhood of Chiriqui, and was proceeding to Costa Rica, 
when he perished by drowning. 

In gardens his name is perpetuated by the beautiful Bro- 
meliaceous plant, distributed as Tillandsia Zahnii, but now 
correctly named Caraguata Zahnii. 

Reference : Bot. Mag. sub t. 6059. 



56 



GEORGE DOWNTON. 

COLLECTOR IN CENTKAL AND SOUTH AMERICA AND THE 
ISLANDS OF JUAN FERNANDEZ. 

18701873. 

GEORGE DOWNTON received part of his early training in Horti- 
culture in the gardens of Wilton House, Salisbury, under 
Mr. T. Challis, V.M.H., and afterwards in the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society's Gardens at Chiswick, where he distinguished 
himself as a student, winning in 1870 both the Royal 
Horticultural Society's and the Society of Arts' first prizes 
for Floriculture and Fruit and Vegetable culture. 

In 1870 he was engaged as a plant- collector, and sent for 
Orchids to Central America, whence he forwarded several 
consignments to Chelsea ; he was subsequently instructed 
to join Endres, plant-collecting on our behalf in Costa Rica. 

Downton succeeded in joining Endres, and brought to 
England shortly afterwards the result of their joint enterprise, 
principally Orchids, and a few plants (the bulk, unfortunately, 
succumbed en route) of the long-desired and much-sought-for 
Odontoglossum Warscewiczii (Miltonia Endresii). 

In October 1871 he started on a mission to Chili, to 
collect a further supply of seed of Embothrium coccineum, 
Tropaeolum azureum, T. tricolor, and other plants of horti- 
cultural interest, and to introduce any new plants he might 
be fortunate enough to discover. 

57 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Downton visited the little-known islands of Juan Fernandez 
in 1873, and sent home many fine ferns, including Dicksonia 
berteroana, several half-hardy shrubs, such as Tricuspidaria 
dependens (Crinodendron Hookeri), and various species of 
Berberis, Eugenia, and Citharexylon. 

On the termination of his engagement in 1873 he entered 
the service of an English firm of coffee-planters, and con- 
tinued to reside in Central America until his death, which 
took place suddenly about 1895. 



58 



J. HENRY CHESTERTON. 
COLLECTOR IN SOUTH AMERICA. 
18701878. 

VERY little is known of the early life of this traveller, who 
was afterwards such a very successful orchid-collector over a 
wide area in South America. 

When this collector first came to notice he was serving as 
valet to a gentleman who travelled much in foreign lands, and 
as Chesterton wished to bring home with him some of the floral 
treasures that he met with during his travels, he applied to 
Messrs. Veitch for information as to the best means of packing. 

Such information and advice as was likely to prove useful 
was readily given, and opportunities offered him of seeing 
plants packed for long journeys, and of examining those newly 
imported, by which he was enabled to form an idea of the 
great care required to safely convey living plants thousands 
of miles by sea and through various climates and greatly 
varying temperatures. 

Nothing more was heard of Chesterton for some time, until, 
on arriving in England from a visit to South America, he 
came to Chelsea with a collection of Orchids, so carefully 
packed and well looked after, that they arrived in the best 
possible condition. 

In return for the information given, he made Messrs. 
Veitch the first offer of purchase, which was accepted, 
and the collection passed into our hands. Subsequently he 

59 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

entered our service as a traveller, and made several journeys 
to South America in search of Orchids. 

The special object for which Chesterton was engaged was the 
introduction of the much-talked-of and long- desired " scarlet 
Odontoglossum " (Miltonia vexillaria), the existence of which 
was made known through Bowman, afterwards by Wallis 
and Roezl, all of whom made unsuccessful attempts at its 
introduction. 

Provided with but the scantiest information as to the native 
habitat, long kept secret and shrouded in mystery, Chesterton 
started, and not only succeeded in discovering the plant, 
but safely introduced it to Chelsea, where it flowered for the 
first time in 1873. Some of the finest forms of Odonto- 
glossum crispum were sent home by Chesterton, one named 
Chestertonii by Professor Reichenbach in compliment to its 
discoverer : some fine Masdevallias were also sent home, 
including the beautiful Masdevallia coccinea Harryana. 

After his engagement with us terminated Chesterton 
continued to collect plants on his own behalf and for several 
other firms until his death, which took place in South America 
in 1883. 

The following obituary note was contained in the Shipping 
List of January 30th 1883 : 

"Mr. J. H. Chesterton, the botanist, died at Puerto Berrio 
on the 26th. He had been quite ill, but left the hotel 
' San Nicholas,' thinking that he had sufficiently improved 
to be able to make his trip up the river. Sad mistake ! 
He continued to decline, and was barely put on shore at 
Puerto Berrio ere he died. Poor Chesterton's reckless spirit 
rendered him very efficient as a plant- collector." 

Reference: " Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI." pt. viii. p. 113. 

60 




en 
en 

O 
.4 
O 
O 
H 
^ 
O 
O 
O 



A. R. ENDRES. 

COLLECTOR IN COSTA RICA. 

18711873. 

THIS traveller was a half-caste named to us by Mr. James 
Bateman, who had employed him to collect Orchids in 
Guatemala through Mr. G. Ure- Skinner. 

On the untimely death of Zahn by drowning, Endres, at 
that time in Costa Rica, was engaged to continue Zahn's work 
and search for rare plants known to exist in that country, 
more especially Odontoglossum Warscewiczii (Miltonia En- 
dresii), Cattleya Dowiana, and Anthurium Scherzerianum, 
all at that time valuable plants. 

Endres commenced collecting in 1871, and was later joined 
by Downton (q.v.), who brought the collection to England. 

Many Orchids were subsequently sent home, but few of. 
horticultural merit, with the exception of Cattleya Dowiana 
and Miltonia Endresii ; the mission, which terminated in 
April 1873, was expensive and scarcely a success. 

Epidendrum Endresii, Odontoglossum Warscewiczii (Mil- 
tonia Endresii) and Utricularia Endresii commemorate this 
traveller's name. 

References : Bot. Mag. sub tt. 7855 and 6656. " Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI." 

pt. viii. p. 101. 



61 



GUSTAVE WALLIS. 

COLLECTOR IN BRAZIL, NEW GEENADA, AND VARIOUS PARTS 
OF TROPICAL SOUTH AMERICA. 

18721874. 

GUSTAVE WALLIS was born on May 1st 1830, at Liineburg, 
Hanover, where his father was an advocate. 

Deaf and dumb until he was six years of age, it was not till 
1836 that he could articulate. About this time the father 
died, leaving the mother a widow with six children. Her 
means of support gone, she was compelled to leave Liineburg 
and retire to Detmold, her native town. In this romantic 
and picturesque country, surrounded by mountains and 
forests, young Wallis spent his schooldays, and developed 
that love of Nature and of Botany which excited in maturer 
years such a strong desire to see foreign lands, and above all 
the tropics. 

The youth possessed an indomitable energy, and in spite 
of his defective speech acquired considerable proficiency in 
foreign languages, an accomplishment which always stood 
him in good stead during his career. 

At the age of sixteen Wallis was apprenticed to a gold- 
smith, but, disliking the work, it was abandoned, and he 
became apprenticed to a gardener at Detmold. 

After the term of apprenticeship had terminated he obtained 
employment at Munich, and during this period he made 
several excursions to the Alps, for the purpose of collecting 

62 




ANTHURIUM VEITCHII 

PALMEN GARTEN, F R AN KF U RT- AM-MAIN 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

and studying in their native habitats the plants belonging to 
those rugged regions. 

In 1856 Wallis went to Southern Brazil, and in connection 
with a German house started a horticultural establishment, 
but owing to the failure of the parent firm the branch ceased 
to exist, and Wallis was left practically penniless. 

In 1858 he offered his services as a plant-collector to the late 
M. Linden of Brussels, who accepted them, and Wallis then 
commenced his remarkable journey across the continent of 
South America, from the mouth to the source of the Amazon, 
exploring that great river as well as some of the more 
important tributaries. 

In 1870 he entered Messrs. Veitchs' service and proceeded 
to the Philippines to obtain as his principal object plants of 
various species of Phalaenopsis known to inhabit the Islands. 

Seyfarth, a young German, was sent to Manila to bring 

the collection home. 

The mission proved very expensive, was practically a 
failure, and Wallis had to be recalled. 

In December 1872 he was sent to New Grenada, a 
country already known to him, and returned in 1874, with 
many fine tropical plants, including Anthurium Veitchii, 
A. Warocqueanum, and several interesting Orchids. 

After his engagement terminated he still continued to collect 
plants in South America, and commenced his last journey at 
the end of the summer of 1875, when he left to explore the 
north and central regions of South America. 

Wallis was next heard of at Panama, dangerously ill 
with fever, from which he, however, recovered, and again 
commenced work, but a second attack of the malady, com- 
bined with dysentery, soon proved fatal. His last letter 
was dated Cuen^a, March 24th 1878, where, according to 

63 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Mr. Edward Klaboch, he died in the hospital on June 20th 
of that year. 

The specific names of the following plants were given at 
various times by botanists in commemoration of his services 
to Botany and Horticulture : 

Anthurium Wallisii, Batemannia Wallisii, Curmeria Wallisii, 
Dieffenbachia Wallisii, Epidendrum Wallisii, Maranta Wallisii, 
Masdevallia Wallisii, Stenospermation Wallisii. 

References : " La Belg. Hort." 1879, p. I, with portrait ; " Hamburger 
Garten und Blumenzeitung," 1878, p. 433. 



WALTER DAVIS. 

COLLECTOR IN SOUTH AMERICA. 
18731876. 

WALTER DAVIS was born at Amport, a small village in the 
county of Hampshire, and inherited from his father a taste 
for Natural History and outdoor pursuits, which later took the 
form of a love of gardening. 

Davis began his horticultural career in the gardens of the 
Marchioness of Winchester at Amport House, at a time 
when these were being remodelled. From Amport House 
he was sent to Wilton Park Gardens, where he stayed 
four years, ultimately becoming departmental foreman, and 
thence he went to the gardens of C. Ryder, Esq., Slade, 
and to those of the late T. W. Evans, Esq., at AUestree Hall, 
Derby. 

In 1870 Davis came to Chelsea, served under John Dominy 
in the New Plant Department, eventually becoming foreman 
of the Nepenthes and Fine Foliage Plants. 

In 1873 an opportunity occurring to send a collector to 
South America, Davis was selected, and he sailed on August 
2nd 1873, with the special object to secure a quantity of 
Masdevallia Veitchiana, introduced to this country in 1867 
by Pearce, but still very scarce. 

In this undertaking Davis was successful, and in addition to 
Masdevallia Veitchiana met with several other species of this 

65 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

interesting genus, one of which* was named by Professor 
Reichenbach in compliment to the discoverer. 

During his stay in South America Davis crossed the 
Cordilleras of the Andes in Peru and Bolivia no less than 
twenty times, at elevations of 14,000-17,000 ft., and he 
traversed that vast continent from one side to the other, along 
the whole length of the Amazon valley. 

On his return to England in 1877 he was selected to conduct 
the botanical analysis of the herbage on the experimental plots 
at Rothamstead, and, returning to Chelsea on the termination 
of this engagement, is still in the employ of Messrs. Veitch. 

* Masdevallia Davisii, Echb. in Gard. Chrori. 1874, vol. ii. p. 710. 



66 



PETER C. M. VEITCH. 

COLLECTOR IN AUSTRALIA, SOUTH SEA ISLANDS, AND BORNEO. 

18751878. 

PETER C. M. VEITCH, for some years the chief of the firm of 
Robert Veitch & Son, of Exeter, travelled in the service of 
the Chelsea house for several years in Australia, the Fiji and 
the South Sea Islands, Borneo and the neighbouring islands, 
and he sent several new plants, as well as many rare in the 
British Isles at that time. 

P. C. M. Veitch's earliest connection with Chelsea commenced 
in 1867, when he entered Coombe Wood as an assistant, to 
acquire a knowledge of Trees and Shrubs and of the working 
of that intricate branch of the nursery business. Subse- 
quently transferred to the New Plant Department at Chelsea, 
he stayed till 1869, when he was sent to a seed-growing 
establishment in Germany. 

From Germany he proceeded to a seed-house in France for 
some six months, and again returned to Chelsea. 

In the spring of 1875, deemed advisable he should take 
a sea-voyage, it was arranged that he should visit, on behalf 
of the firm, the clients in Australasia, and, at the same time, 
introduce to England any plants likely to be of value for 
horticultural purposes. 

With this object P. C. M. Veitch left England in 1875 for 
Sydney, by the long sea route, and almost immediately after 

67 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

landing left for the Fiji Islands, having an offer to sail in 
H.M. cruising schooner Renard. 

Several months were spent in visiting the various islands of 
the Fiji group and in collecting plants. 

In February 1876 a trading vessel having called at Fiji, 
P. C. M. Veitch secured a passage and proceeded to the South 
Sea Islands, where he remained until the following September. 
The whole of the collection of plants made in the Fiji Islands 
was lost in a gale, but that from the South Sea Islands was 
despatched to England in 1877. 

From September to December 1876 excursions were made 
to various parts of the Australian Colonies, and useful plants 
found in cultivation in gardens sent home, amongst these 
Lomaria discolor, L. bipinnatifida and Microlepia hirta 
cristata. 

During the early part of the year 1877 a visit was made 
to New Zealand, and a special journey to Mount Cook, 
where seeds of the beautiful Ranunculus Lyalli (or, as it 
is more commonly called in New Zealand, Mountain Lily 
or Rookwood Lily) were gathered and sent to Chelsea, 
from which plants were raised and flowered. From other 
parts of New Zealand several species of Celmisia, Vero- 
nica and the beautiful and somewhat difficult Notospartium 
CarmichaeliaB were introduced. 

In June 1877 P. C. M. Veitch again visited Australia, but 
in August, as he was making his way to New Guinea, had 
the misfortune to be shipwrecked off the north coast of 
Australia, and for a second time the collections were lost 

Instructed to join F. W. Burbidge, plant-collecting for us 
in Borneo, he started for that 'country, stopping in Penang, 
Sumatra and Singapore en route, and arriving at Labuan in 

November 1877. 

68 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

During his stay in Borneo he accompanied Burbidge on 
several excursions to the mainland and adjacent islands, and 
also undertook the journey to Kina Balu, the Sugar Loaf 
Mountain of Borneo. 

In the spring of 1878 P. C. M. Veitch returned to Chelsea, 
and with him the collection made in Borneo in company with 
Burbidge. In 1880 he left for Exeter, to enter the firm 
of Robert Veitch & Son, of which he is now the head. 



GUILLERMO KALBREYER. 

COLLECTOE ON THE WEST COAST OF AFRICA AND COLOMBCA, 

S. AMERICA. 
18761881. 

GUILLERMO KALBREYER, a promising young man, twenty-nine 
years of age, entered Messrs. Veitchs' service as a plant- 
collector in 1876, and his first trip was to the West Coast of 
Africa in search of tropical flowering and foliage plants, very 
popular at that time. 

Kalbreyer left Liverpool in November, arrived at Fernando 
Po on Christmas Eve, and reached Victoria a week later. 

He proceeded to Old and New Calabar, Bonny, and the 
Cameroon Mountains and River, collecting many plants, 
sent to Chelsea. 

At that time travelling in Africa was difficult, and, owing 
to the hostility of native traders, foreigners were unable to 
penetrate far into the country. 

In July 1877 Kalbreyer returned to England, bringing 
with him a small collection of plants obtained on the 
West Coast, including five species of Mussaenda, Gardenia 
Kalbreyeri, and two new Orchids: Brachycorythis Kal- 
breyeri, a terrestrial species named by Reichenbach in 
compliment to its discoverer, and Pachystoma Thomsoniami, 
an epiphyte, named, at Kalbreyer's request, in honour of a 
Rev. George Thomson, for many years an earnest missionary 
in that unhealthy region. 

70 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

The great heat endured and the frequent attacks of malaria 
from which he suffered on the West Coast seriously affected 
Kalbreyer's health, and it was decided to send him to a more 
healthy country to collect. 

The next journey was to Colombia, where the climate is 
delightful on the highlands and mountain-slopes, though 
in the lowlands and along the coast almost as hot as in parts 
of Africa. 

He left England in October 1877, collected in the Eastern 
Cordillera near Ocana, La Cruz and Sierra Palado, the 
results being principally Odontoglossum Pescatorei and 
0. triumphans. 

In February 1878 he left Ocana to proceed to England, 
but owing to the River Magdalena being very low, the 
passage to the coast was difficult, and a journey which usually 
occupies from seven to ten days required nearly a month, 
so that by the end of April, when Kalbreyer arrived in 
England, more than half his collection was useless. 

The third trip was again to Ocana, but further east. A 
start was made in July 1878, and he proceeded to the Eastern 
Cordillera, through the towns of San Pedro, Salazar and 
Pamplona ; here he again met with some extraordinary forms 
of Odontoglossum Pescatorei, including 0. P. Veitchii, and 
0. triumphans, 0. tripudians, 0. hastilabium, 0. coronarium, 
0. crocidipterum and 0. blandum, a difficult species to 
import alive, and, until Kalbreyer's consignment arrived, 
rare in this country. After sending several very fine 
consignments of orchids, Kalbreyer returned to England, 
bringing with him a large and choice collection. 

The fourth journey was commenced in September 1879, 
when he again left England for Colombia, on this occasion 
travelling down the River Magdalena to the Central and 

71 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Western Cordillera, and as far west as the Valle de Atrato or 
Llanos de Murry. Passing from the water-shed of the Atrato 
to the plains, he was particularly struck by the richness of 
the vegetation. Here Anthurium Veitchii, with leaves over 
6 ft. in length, climbed trees more than twenty yards in 
height, and growing luxuriantly were a great many palms, 
of which he collected specimens of more than 100 species, and 
seed of many. Kalbreyer traversed the towns of Rio Negro, 
Medellin, Antioquia, Sopetran, Frontino, Rio Verde, and many 
others, and, later on, to the north, he passed Santa Rosa 
Amalfi, and on the south, Concordia. 

Orchids were the principal plants collected, amongst 
others Odontoglossum ramosissimum, 0. sceptrum, Miltonia 
vexillaria, Cattleya aurea, 0. gigas, Cypripedium Roezlii, 
C. Schlimii alba, and several species of the curious large- 
flowered Masdevallias. 

Several consignments of these were sent to Chelsea, and 
in September 1880 Kalbreyer returned to England, bringing 
with him many living plants and a great collection of dried 
Ferns, comprising some 360 species, of which eighteen were 
new to science. These were described by Mr. Baker in the 
Journal of Botany for July 1881. 

The last journey as a plant-collector was commenced by 
Kalbreyer in December 1880; on this occasion he again 
proceeded to Ocana, where he arrived in January 1881, and 
sent home a consignment of Orchids. Leaving Ocana at 
the end of the month, he went southwards to Andinamarca 
and Bogota, on the high plains of the Eastern Cordillera 
In this neighbourhood he made a collection of Orchids, con- 
sisting principally of Odontoglossum crispum, brought safely 
to England in June of the same year. His engagement 
with Messrs. Veitch then terminated, and after a short stay 

72 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

he returned to Columbia, commenced business in Bogota as 

7 o 

a nurseryman and exporter of Orchids, in which occupation 
he is still engaged. 

The following new Ferns were discovered by Kalbreyer 
in New Grenada during the summer of 1880, and were 
determined by Mr. Baker of Kew : 

Acrostichum (Polybotrya) botryoides. 
(Gymnopteris) suberectum. 

,, polybotryoides. 

juglandifolium. 

Alsophila podophylla. 
hispida. 
,, ? late-vagans. 

Asplenium (Euasplenium) filicaule. 
(Diplazium) longisorum. 
Danaea serrulata. 
Dicksonia pubescens. 
Gymnogramme vellea. 
Nephrodium (Lastrea) longicaule. 
valdepilosum 

(Sagenia) antioquoianum. 

Polypodium (Phegopteris) sylviculum. 

(Eupolypodium) antioquoianum. 

Trichomanes Kalbreyeri. 
Selaginella longissima. 



73 



CHRISTOPHER MUDD. 

COLLECTOR IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
1877. 

THIS collector, son of a former curator of the Cambridge 
Botanic Gardens, went on an expedition to South Africa in 
1877, and great things were expected to result from the 
undertaking. These expectations, however, were not realized, 
for Mudd, who seemed to have no special aptitude for collect- 
ing, and entirely lacked the explorer's instinct, sent home 
little of horticultural value, and the mission, which was 
practically a failure, had to be recalled. 

Mudd subsequently settled in New Zealand. 



74 



F. W. BURBIDGE. 

COLLECTOR IN BORNEO. 
18771878. 

F. W. BURBIDGE, a native of Wymeswold, Leicestershire, 
undertook in our service a collecting expedition in Borneo 
during the years 1877 1878, the special object, the intro- 
duction of certain Pitcher Plants known to inhabit that island, 
and to be accessible. 

Burbidge was well equipped with both practical and 
scientific knowledge to undertake such a mission : he had 
distinguished himself as a student in the Royal Horticultural 
Society's Gardens at Chiswick and in the Royal Gardens at 
Kew, and had journalistic experience. 

The story of his travels and adventures is told in his book, 
The Gardens of the Sun, written on his return from Borneo, 
from which the following particulars are abstracted. 

The object of the journey was the collection and introduction 
of beautiful new plants, as well as of birds and other objects 
of Natural History, and he was fortunate in adding about fifty 
new species of Ferns to the list of those already collected in 
Borneo, and of this number about twenty were new to science. 

Perhaps the greatest good fortune which attended Bur- 
bidge's work was the introduction of the Giant Pitcher Plant 
of Kina Balu Nepenthes Rajah. 

This wonderful plant and its geographical allies were dis- 
covered in 1851 by Sir Hugh Low, who made repeated 

75 



HORTUS VEITCH1I 

journeys from Labuan to Kina Balu, but failed in his endea- 
vours to introduce specimens to European gardens. 

Thomas Lobb, the most successful of all Eastern plant- 
hunters, also endeavoured to find the habitat of these plants 
in 1856, and had actually reached the foot of the mountain on 
which they grew, but was prevented by the hostility and 
extortion of the natives from completing the ascent. Burbidge 
was successful in introducing living plants and seeds, but 
unfortunately Nepenthes Rajah has proved of such very 
difficult culture that few specimens exist in gardens. 

Another curious species also discovered and introduced by 
Burbidge is Nepenthes bicalcarata, remarkable in having two 
long spurs projecting over the mouth of the pitcher. 

The three native courts of Jahore, Brunei and Sulu were 
visited, and Burbidge was enabled to make extended excur- 
sions into the interior of Sulu itself. 

The collection made on the last-named island comprised new 
Ferns, rare Mosses and several beautiful Orchids, including 
PhalaDnopsis Marise, Dendrobium Burbidgei and Aerides 
Burbidgei, all rare plants at the present day. 

The first expedition to Kina Balu, the Sugar Loaf Mountain of 
Borneo, was made in company with P. C. M. Veitch (q.v.), who 
joined Burbidge on his return from an extended tour through 
Australia and the Fiji Islands. 

This journey was a critical and tedious one, and the entire 
route from Gaya Bay to the mountain and back to the coast 
through the villages of Kuong, Kalawat and Bawang, had 
to be accomplished on foot. 

These labours were rewarded by finding all the large species 
in one locality, and in addition a distinct form of Nepenthes 
Edwardsiana not previously collected. 

On his return from Borneo in 1879 Burbidge was appointed 

76 




NEPENTHES BICALCARATA 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

Curator of the Botanical Gardens at Trinity College, Dublin, 
and in 1894 became keeper of the College Park. 

In 1889 he had conferred on him, honoris causa, the degree 
of Master of Arts of Dublin University, and in 1897 was a 
recipient of the Victoria Medal of Honour granted by the 
Eoyal Horticultural Society in recognition of his services to 
Horticulture. 

His much-lamented death, of a serious heart trouble, 
occurred in Dublin on Sunday, December 24th 1905, in his 
fifty-eighth year. On the 27th day of that month the Times 
had the following appreciation : " Mr. Burbidge had the 
academic as well as the horticultural mind ; he filled his 
office with distinguished success, and made many important 
contributions to the literature of his subject, on which he was 
a recognized authority." 

Burbidge was the author of several works on gardening, 
probably the most important his Cultivated Plants and 
The Narcissus, whilst the Gardens of the Sun already 
mentioned contains an account of his travels as a plant- 
collector. 

The sixty-sixth volume of The Garden, to the editorial 
staff of which he was attached from the year 1873 to 1877, is 
dedicated to him by the Editor. 

The following is a list of Ferns discovered by Burbidge in 
the neighbourhood of Labuan and Kina Balu, and which 
were first described by Mr. Baker of Kew from Burbidge's 
specimens : 

Alsophila Burbidgei. 
Asplenium (Diplazium) porphyrorachis. 
( ) xiphophyllum. 
Davallia Veitchii. 
Lindsaya crispa. 

77 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Lindsaya Jamesonioides. 
Nephrodium (Sagenia) nudum. 
Polypodium (Eupolypodium) minimum. 

( ) Burbidgei. 

. ( ) strep tophyllum. 

( ) taxodioides. 

(Phymatodes) stenopteris. 

( ) holophyllum. 

In the Sulu Archipelago, a group of small islands lying off 
Borneo and the Philippines, Burbidge discovered the following 
new species : 

Cyathaea suluensis. 
Pteris Treacheariana. 
Polypodium (Phegopteris) oxyodon. 
(Eupolypodium) Leysii. 

Of the plants introduced at the same time, probably the 
following are the best known : 

Alocasia guttata, A. pumila, A. scabriuscula, Aerides 
Burbidgei, Bulbophyllum Leysianum, B. mandibulare, 
Burbidgea nitida, the type of a new genus ; Cryptocoryne 
caudata, Cypripedium Dayanum, C. Lawrenceanum, Den- 
drobium Burbidgei, D. cerinum, Jasminum gracillimum, a 
beautiful stove plant with fragrant white flowers ; Nepenthes 
Rajah, N. bicalcarata, a species new to science ; N. Raffle- 
siana nivea. Phalaenopsis grandiflora, the Bornean variety, 
P. Maria?, Pinanga Veitchii, Pothos celatocaulis, and Wormia 
Burbidgei, a new species named in compliment to the 
discoverer by Sir Joseph Hooker. 

Reference : Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 460, obituary note and 

portrait. 

78 



CHARLES MARIES. 

COLLECTOR IN JAPAN AND CHINA. 

18771879. 

CHARLES MARIES was born at Stratford-on-Avon in the county 
of Warwick. He was educated at the Grammar School at 
Hampton Lucy during the years 1861 to 1865, where the 
present Professor Henslow was Head -master, and to whom 
Maries was greatly indebted for his knowledge of Botany. 

From school Maries proceeded to Lytham in Lancashire, 
where his brother had a small nursery, in which he worked for 
the next seven years, afterwards obtaining employment in the 
houses at Chelsea. He proved to be an industrious and steady 
workman and was eventually selected to undertake an exploring 
expedition to the Far East, the object of which was to obtain 
seeds of the coniferous trees of Japan, and to explore the great 
Yangtsze valley of China, rightly believed to possess a rich 
arboreal vegetation, and many plants that would prove hardy 
in this country. 

Maries left London on February 1st 1877, visiting Hong 
Kong, Ningpo, the snowy mountains of which he explored, 
and Shanghai in China, arriving at Nagasaki, Japan, on 
April 20th. Remaining a short time to note the various 
cultivated plants, many of which had been introduced to 
Western gardens by Fortune, he left Nagasaki, for 
Shimenosiki, and, by way of the Inland Sea, Ozaka and 
Kioto, reached Yokohama. 

79 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

At Yokohama he visited the nurseries of which Fortune 
had written in such glowing terms, but, disappointed with 
what he saw, yet found several plants rare in cultivation. 

From Yokohama and Tokio Maries proceeded overland to 
Nikko, the great shrine of Japan, and thence to Awomori, 
the northernmost port of the main island. Whilst waiting 
at Awomori for a steamer to convey him to Hakodate, 
Maries noticed a Conifer new to him growing in a garden, 
and learnt that it could be found in quantity on a neigh- 
bouring mountain. He went in search, and had reached 
a height of 3,500 ft., when it became obvious that the 
bamboo scrub formed an impassable barrier on that side of 
the mountain, and he reluctantly had to turn back, although 
the object of his search could plainly be seen. The following 
day he again made the ascent, but this time from the north 
side, and he succeeded in procuring cones of a new species, 
since named by Dr. Masters, Abies Mariesii. 

On the same .trip, what was at first thought to be a 
variety of Abies Veitchii, but which eventually proved to 
be A. sachalinensis, Mast., was re-discovered. It had 
previously been met with by one Friedrich Schmidt, a 
German botanical traveller, in the island of Saghalien in 
1866, but not introduced. 

Leaving Awomori, Maries arrived in Hakodate, in Yezo, the 
northern island, on June 20th, and was much struck 
with the beauty of Azalea Rollisoni (Rhododendron indicum 
balsaminseflorum) found growing in masses of Kaempfer's 
Iris on the banks of streams. He was able to procure seed 
which he sent to Chelsea. From this district he also sent 
Styrax X obassia, common on the volcanic slopes of that island, 
the racemes of pure white flowers and very large light-green 
leaves objects of great beauty. 

80 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

Continuing the journey, Maries reached Sapporo, passing 
through swamps swarming with wild-fowl, and swollen rivers, 
noting by the way large masses of Platycodon grandiflorum 
Mariesii and Lilium Thunbergianum. From the thickly 
wooded and mountainous districts in the neighbourhood 
of Sapporo Maries sent home seeds of Abies sachalinensis, 
A. yessoensis, Daphniphyllum glaucescens, many Maples 
and climbers, including Schizophragma hydrangeoides and 
Actinidia Kolomikta, the " Cat's Medicine " of the Japanese. 
From Sapporo he travelled by way of Chitose and Yubetsu, 
visiting Uragawa and Shamani, to Horidzumi : near Shamani 
in a sandy plain he met with masses of the pretty little 
Dracocephalum Ruyschiana, and obtained seed. 

Making Horidzumi, on the south-west cape, his head-quarters, 
Maries stayed in the country from June to October 1877, 
exploring the mountains and making extensive entomological 
and botanical collections. These collections were shipped in a 
vessel laden with sea- weed bound for Hakodate, but which 
was wrecked the following morning ; the sea- weed, wet and 
swollen, had burst open the vessel and the captain ran her 
ashore. The box containing the seeds was rescued and put 
into another boat which immediately capsized and sank. 
It was not too late, however, to still gather seeds of the 
Conifers, and Maries lost no time in replacing the loss by 
a fresh collection. He left Yezo by H.M.S. Modeste, 
arrived at Niigata, 011 the south-west coast of the main island, 
in December 1877, and travelled overland to Yokohama. 
On Christmas Day 1877 Maries left Yokohama for Hong Kong, 
arrived on January 2nd 1878, and sailed a few days later 
for the island of Formosa. 

He landed at Sia-wau-fu on the 16th, left shortly after- 
wards for the interior, but did not penetrate far into the 

81 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

country. After a distant view of Mount Morrison he returned 
to the port, having obtained, amongst other material, seed of a 
new species of Lilium. 

An attempt to enter the island from the north side met with 
a like failure and he returned to Shanghai. 

In the spring of 1878 Maries visited Chin-kiang and Kui- 
kiang, collecting en route the pretty Daphne Genkwa, found 
growing in quantity with Exochorda grandiflora, Spirseas, 
Hypericums, Deutzias, Weigelas and the stunted Pinus 
sinensis, and, in more sheltered situations, Forsythias, 
Loniceras, Akebias and Wild Cherries were common. 

On the Looshan Mountains a white form of Daphne Genkwa 
with Rhododendron Fortunei and Loropetalum sinense were 
discovered, seeds of all being obtained and successfully 
introduced. 

On an excursion to the " Teen Cha " Temple, known also 
as the "Yellow Dragon" and "Heavenly Pool" Temple, 
Maries saw magnificent trees of Larix Ksempferi, Cryptomeria 
japonica, and the Chinese form of Liriodendron tulipiferum, 
as well as that beautiful Lily since named by Baker, Lilium 
lancifolium formosanum. 

On this trip Maries suffered severely from sunstroke and 
returned to the coast. 

The summer of 1878 he again spent in Japan, collecting 
seeds of plants, especially of Conifers, of which he had made 
notes on his former trip. 

In December he left Japan and went to Han-kow on the 
Yangtsze, starting early in the spring of 1879 for Ichang, 800 
miles higher up the river. 

Amongst the gorges of Ichang, where the Great River 
rushes out of the mountains, Maries found Primula obconica, 
and sent seed to Chelsea. 

82 




ABIES VEITCHII 

PKNCARROW, CORNWALL 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

With the natives of China Maries did not succeed so well as 
with the Japanese, he was not sufficiently gentle, and was 
often threatened and occasionally robbed of his baggage ; in 
the summer of 1879 he returned to Japan. 

On this trip seeds of many Japanese Oaks were gathered and 
the beautiful dwarf Bamboos, including the square Bamboo, 
which he successfully introduced. Altogether about 500 living 
plants were sent home, and large quantities of seed of various 
Conifers and other fine trees ; thirty-eight new plants are 
recorded by Bretschneider as being first discovered in China 
by Maries. 

In British gardens he will always be remembered by the 
following, which he was fortunate to be able to introduce 
to this country : 

Abies Veitchii, A. sachalinensis, Daphniphyllum glaucescens, 
Acer polymorphum varieties, several new and distinct forms 
of Hydrangea rosea, Styrax obassia, Lilium auratum glorio- 
soides, L. a. platyphyllum, Spiraea palmata alba, Conandron 
ramondioides, Primula obconica, Platycodon grandiflorum 
Mariesii, Iris Kaempferi (many varieties), Davallia Mariesii, 
Osmunda japonica corymbifera, and many others hitherto 
very scarce in Europe. 

Maries returned to England in February 1880, when his 
herbarium was sent to Kew, the Conifers brought from Japan 
being dealt with by Dr. Masters, Conifers of Japan, Linn. 
Soc.'s Jour, xviii. 1881, 473-541, and in Veitchs' Manual 
of Conifer se, ed. 2, 1900. A collection of insects was accepted 
by the British Museum. 

In 1882 Maries was recommended by Sir Joseph Hooker 
for the post of Superintendent of the gardens of the Maharajah 
of Durbhungah, in India, where he laid out the very extensive 
grounds which surround the palaces. 

83 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Subsequently entering the service of the Maharajah Scindia 
of Gwalior, he again laid out the palace gardens, of which, 
and of the Gwalior State Gardens, he remained superintendent 
until his death, which took place in India on October llth 
1902. 

Maries had enthusiasm, but lacked " staying " power : he 
was musical, much to the delight of the Japanese peasants, 
and doubtless this must often have helped the work : he was a 
skilled shot, as the buck on the domains of the Maharajah 
Scindia learnt to their cost when Maries was living in the 
country of the Mahrattas. 

Maries was a Fellow of the Linnean Society, an original 
recipient of the Victoria Medal of Honour, granted by the 
Royal Horticultural Society in recognition of his services to 
Horticulture, and a frequent contributor to the Horticultural 
Press. 

References : Bretschneider's " History of European Botanical Discoveries 
in China," vol. ii. p. 741 ; Maries in The Garden, 1881-1882, vols. 
xx. xxii. passim; " Eambles of a Plant Collector"; Burbidge in 
The Garden, 1883, vol. xxiv. p. 444, with portrait ; Gard. Chron. 
1902, vol. xxii. p. 360, obituary note and portrait. 



84 



CHARLES CURTIS. 

COLLECTOR IN MADAGASCAR, BORNEO, SUMATRA, JAVA, 
AND THE MOLUCCAS. 

18781884. 

CHARLES CURTIS had been employed some four years at 
Chelsea when, in 1878, an opportunity occurring for sending 
a plant-collector to the East, he was selected to undertake 
the important mission. 

The first trip was to Mauritius and Madagascar, whence he 
sent the handsome Pitcher, Nepenthes madagascariensis, and 
various tropical plants. This occupied rather over a year. 
In 1879 Curtis returned to England, and was sent in 1880 to 
Malaysia, where he explored Borneo, Sumatra, Java and the 
Moluccas, and collected many interesting Stove plants, Palms, 
and Orchids, subsequently sent to Chelsea. The special object 
of the journey was to collect specimens of Miss North's 
Pitcher-plant (Nepenthes Northiana), the existence of which 
had been made known through a drawing by that lady in 
Borneo, now in the North Gallery at Kew. The precise 
locality where this plant grew was unknown, but after much 
search Curtis was successful and introduced it. 

A full description of Nepenthes Northiana is given in this 
work in the special chapter devoted to Nepenthes: there is 
no Pitcher more striking. 

On the trip to Borneo Curtis was accompanied by the young 
gardener, David Burke, who returned with the collection 

85 G 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

made in Sarawak, and who himself afterwards became a 
plant-collector. 

The plants brought home by Burke on this occasion included 
large consignments of Cypripedium Stonei, C. Lowii, many 
Vandas, Rhododendrons, and the beautiful Stove-foliage plant, 
Leea amabilis, was also found. 

After seeing Burke and the collection safely shipped at Sin- 
gapore, Curtis proceeded to Pontianak in Dutch Borneo, with 
the special object of obtaining a consignment of Phalsenopsis 
violacea, known in England but still rare. In this again 
successful, but, owing to a mishap with the boat, a month's 
collections and all his clothes and instruments were lost, and 
he narrowly escaped with life. 

The beautiful Rhododendron Teysmanni and R. multicolor, 
with the red variety Curtisii, were introduced through 
Curtis: in themselves most gorgeous plants, they are quite 
eclipsed by the valuable hybrids which have since been 
derived from their cross fertilization. 

On terminating his engagement early in 1884, Curtis was 
appointed Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens at Penang, 
a post which he held until December 1903, when retirement 
was necessary, and he returned to England, settling in his 
native town of Barnstaple, in the county of Devon. 

The following plants received the specific name of Curtis 
in commemoration of his services to Botany and Horticulture : 
Nepenthes Curtisii, Cypripedium Curtisii, Medinella Curtisii, 
Gastrochilus Curtisii, Rhododendron multicolor Curtisii, and 
several others, enumerated in the body of this work. 



86 




CYPRIPEDIUM CURTISII 



DAVID BURKE. 

COLLEOTOE IN THE EAST INDIES, BURMAH AND COLOMBIA. 

18811897. 

THIS traveller crossed a greater area of the earth's surface 
and covered more miles in search of plants than any other 
Veitchian collector, with the possible exception of the two 
brothers Lobb. . 

Born in Kent in 1854, Burke entered the houses at Chelsea 
as a young gardener, and, having a wish to travel, was sent 
on a trial trip to Borneo with Curtis, and brought home a 
collection of plants, the result of their joint work. 

His next mission, commenced in 1881, was to British 
Guiana, where he re-discovered the interesting insectivorous 
plant Heliamphora nutans, which had not been seen since 
its discovery on Mount Roraima in 1839 by the two brothers 
Schomburgk, and successfully introduced it to England. 
Amongst Orchids from British Guiana was the rare Zygo- 
petalum Burkei which perpetuates his name, and from that 
country he also sent the handsome Amasonia punicea 
(calycina), the brilliant scarlet bracts of which are so effective 
in stoves during the winter months. 

Subsequent journeys included two to the Philippine Islands 
for Phalsenopsis, two to New Guinea, and one in 1891 to the 
then newly annexed provinces of Upper Burmah for Orchids. 
During the years 1894 to 1896 he made three trips to 

87 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Colombia for Cattleya Mendelii, C. Schroderae, C. Trianse 
and Odontoglossum crispum (Alexandra), and finally in 1896, 
having spent a short time in England, Burke left for the 
Celebes Islands and the Moluccas, and in the island of 
Amboina, belonging to the last-named group, he died on 
April llth 1897. 

Burke was one of those curious natures who live more or 
less with natives as a native, and apparently prefer this mode 
of existence ; his early death is partly due to this cause, and 
there is little doubt that this sad event occurred in a lonely 
hut far from any European settlement, and, had it not been 
for information sent by a German commercial traveller, 
apparently the only white man in that part of the island 
at the time, Messrs. Veitch would not have -heard of Burke's 
ultimate fate. 



JAMES HERBERT VEITCH. 

TRAVELLEE THROUGH INDIA, MALAYSIA, JAPAN, COREA, THE 
AUSTRALIAN COLONIES AND NEW ZEALAND. 

18911893. 

JAMES H. VEITCH sailed from Naples at the end of October 
1891 on a somewhat extended tour, passing through Ceylon to 
Cape Tuticorin, the most southern port of India, and north- 
wards overland to Lahore ; southwards from Calcutta to 
the Straits Settlements and to Java to visit the very noble 
gardens at Buitenzorg : and to eat the Mangosteen. It is 
necessary to eat the Mangosteen grown within three or four 
degrees of latitude of the equator to realize at all the attractive 
and curious properties of this fruit. 

From Java he proceeded north to Japan, where several 
months were spent in the woody districts of that very extended 
country, the district of Nikko and the neighbourhood of 
Sapporo offering the widest field of interest, and possessing, of 
their kind, the richest flora known. 

From Japan to Corea, by way of the Sea of Japan, is a short 
voyage, and several weeks were spent in Cho-sen, " the Land 
of the Morning Calm." Prior to the Japanese- Chinese War, 
the isolation of the country and of the people was remarkable, 
and a journey of 600 miles on two occasions crossing the 
peninsula from coast to coast proved unusually interesting. 

The land is thinly populated ; there is no scattered peasantry, 

89 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

and the people congregate in villages and towns the only 
means of communication a limited and sorry lot of ponies. 

On approaching a village or small town, uniformed runners 
from the local Yamen were sent to meet the traveller, and woe 
betide any unfortunate pedestrian who did not make way on 
the public road for the officially recognized personage. 

The official gates of the Yamen were opened for the 
inevitable reception, held in spacious courtyards, with build- 
ings barbaric in design flanking the boundary walls. The lesser 
officials were much interested in the general accoutrements, 
and apparently now saw most of these for the first time- 
women, when met, turned their heads away, and enveloped 
the face and hands in the long, loose, spotlessly white cotton 
robes which the entire nation wear ; children, in the outlying 
districts, fled as the white man rode down the village street. 

There is no rice in the Far East to equal the rice of the 
Coreans, the seed is larger and has more weight than the 
varieties Japan produces ; nor can Japan grow sufficient for 
her own population, and is dependent for much of her supply 
on Corea. 

It was known that the flora of the peninsula was of little 
value, that the nature of the country and climatic conditions 
were such, that it would not be possible to find any plants new 
and suitable to English gardens ; hill-slopes covered with 
Platycodon grandiflorum Mariesii were pretty, and solitary 
specimens of Pinus koraiensis, never found wild in Japan, of 
interest. 

This pine was introduced to Europe from a Japanese nursery 
in 1861 by the late John Gould Veitch. 

Continuing the journey, James H. Veitch sailed southwards, 
spent several months in Australia and New Zealand, and 
returned to England in 1893. 

90 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

The chief results to gardens from this long tour were, the 
distribution of the large-fruited Winter-cherry (Physalis 
Francheti), the variety of Cerasus pseudo-cerasus known as 
James H. Veitch, and the re-introduction of the large- 
leaved Vine (Vitis Coignetiae) from Japan. 

Rhododendron Schlippenbachii, discovered some forty years 
earlier on the Corean coast by a Russian collector, was also 
introduced, and other plants rare in cultivation. 

References : Gard. Chron. 1892-1894, vols. xi. xvi. passim, " A Traveller's 
Notes " (these notes were collected, revised and fully illustrated from 
photographs by the author, and published in 1896 under this name) ; 
Sargent's "Forest Flora of Japan," 1894; Bretschneider's "History 
of European Botanical Discoveries in China," 1898, p. 767; Man. 
Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 335. 



91 



E. H. WILSON. 

COLLECTOE IN CENTKAL AND WESTERN CHINA AND ON THE 
TIBETAN FRONTIER. 

18991905. 

E. H. WILSON, the most recent of our successful travellers and 
collectors, was born in Birmingham, and received part of his 
early training in Botany and Horticulture in the Botanic 
Gardens of that town. 

He afterwards entered the Royal Gardens at Kew as a 
young gardener, and when an application was made to Sir 
W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, the late Director of the Gardens, for a 
man likely to prove suitable to undertake a prolonged journey 
in China, the late Director suggested Wilson for the post. 

The object in sending a traveller to Central China was to 
obtain seed of species likely to prove hardy in Great Britain, 
and living representatives of certain plants only known to 
exist from dried specimens in the herbaria of various 
European countries. 

Wilson sailed from Liverpool in April 1899. Travelling 
by way of America, he visited Professor Sargent, the well- 
known authority on ligneous plants at Boston, and consulted 
him respecting the trees and shrubs likely to be found in China. 

The desired information obtained, Wilson proceeded, and 
arrived at Hong Kong on June 3rd 1899. 

Before leaving for the interior it was considered advisable 

92 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

that "Wilson should consult Dr. Henry and benefit by his 
unrivalled knowledge of the Chinese flora. 

Dr. Henry was at that time in the Chinese Customs Service, 
stationed at Szemao in the south-west corner of the province of 
Yunnan, and Wilson, who left Hong Kong on June 14th to find 
him, travelled via the French colonial settlement of Tonkin. 

At Laokai he was detained owing to a native rising at 
Mengtsze, which made it dangerous or impossible for 
Europeans to travel in the interior. 

After several weeks' delay, during which Messrs. Veitch 
had lost hope of his being able to proceed, the disturbance 
quieted down, and Wilson was allowed to continue his 
journey unmolested. 

Szemao was reached on September 24th, and a cordial 
welcome from Dr. Henry awaited the young traveller. 

That gentleman freely imparted important information 
regarding the plants Wilson was in search of, and the ways 
and means of reaching them. The information was valuable, 
as the district Wilson was instructed to explore was practically 
a closed book to all but a few, amongst whom was Dr. Henry. 

On his return from Szemao Wilson collected plants of the 
beautiful Jasminum primulinum, afterwards successfully intro- 
duced, and which flowered for the first time in this country 
at Coombe Wood in October 1901. 

Returning to Hong Kong again in December, he left 
immediately for Shanghai, made at once preparations for a 
journey to Ichang in the Yangtsze valley, and left fully 
equipped in February 1900. 

In the usual type of house-boat of the Yangtsze, a 
dwelling-house and a conveyance at the same time, many 
months were spent. On arrival he commenced exploring the 
mountain-ranges south and south-west of Ichang, and in 

93 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

April 1900 discovered the wonderful Davidia involucrata, 
the principal object of the journey. 

The country generally was disturbed by a revolt in the 
north, known in England as the " Boxer " rising, but after 
an anxious period of several months the trouble subsided and 
the work of plant-collecting continued uninterruptedly. 

As a result of this year's work Wilson obtained seeds of 
671 different species of plants, herbarium specimens number- 
ing 1,764 species, and great quantities of bulbs and roots of 
herbaceous plants. 

During the year 1901, the third of his mission, Wilson 
explored the high mountain-ranges on the Hupeh-Szechuan 
boundary, north-west and south of Ichang, and collected 
quantities of seed, though the season was exceptionally wet 
and cold. 

Davidia involucrata was again met with, growing in large 
quantities ; a striking feature in the landscape. 

The collection this year consisted of 305 varieties of seeds, 
of many herbs, trees and shrubs, and of herbarium specimens 
numbering 906 species, in addition to thirty-five cases of bulbs 
and living roots and rhizomes of herbaceous plants, all shipped 
to England. 

Among the best finds collected on this, his first mission, 
and successfully introduced to our gardens, are : 

Davidia involucrata, Astilbe Davidii, Clematis montana 
rubens, Senecio clivorum, Buddleia variabilis Veitchiana, 
Brandisia racemosa, Actinidia chinensis, numerous Vines, 
Acers, Viburnums, Spiraeas, Roses, and Magnolias. 

On the whole, Wilson succeeded remarkably well with the 
natives, and, though the country was disturbed by political 
risings and riots, met with no serious mishap, and lost no 
part of his collection. 

94 




SENECIO CLIVORUM 



.. 2 o c -'" * 

J c << e ^ 

*,* Of 4 * ,. 



LIVES OF TRAVELLERS 

Wilson returned to England in April 1902, spent the 
summer at Coombe Wood, and left for the second journey 
to the extreme west of China, to the border of Tibet, 
a thousand miles further west beyond the former field of 
exploration, in January 1903. 

On arrival at Shanghai he followed the former route as far 
as Ichang, reaching Kiating, which was to be his base, on 
June 19th 1903. 

The mountainous country west of the Min river to the 
Yalung river, about 100 miles west of the border town ol 
Tatien-lu, was explored, as was Mount Omi, a sacred moun- 
tain of the Chinese. Specimens of the flora were obtained 
and some few seeds. 

In the neighbourhood of Tatien-lu was discovered the prin- 
cipal object of the search the magnificent yellow Poppy, 
Meconopsis integrifolia, and Wilson was successful in securing 
seeds from which plants were raised and flowered at Langley 
in September 1904. 

In July 1904 Wilson left Kiating for Sungpan in the 
extreme north-west corner of Szechuan, a trip which occupied 
some fifty-two days. The experience was arduous, owing to 
the severity of the weather, the bad roads and the scarcity of 
food, but on the whole, from the plant- collector's standpoint, 
a brilliant success. The country is very mountainous and 
possesses a rich flora. Ranking next to the truly magnifi- 
cent Rhododendrons, are several species of Primula, one 
of the most beautiful, P. vittata, growing in enormous 
quantities in moist Alpine meadows, and by the sides of 
streams. 

Besides securing a further supply of seeds of Meconopsis 
integrifolia, Wilson discovered the scarlet-flowered species, 
M. punicea, and, from seed successfully introduced, plants 

95 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

were raised and flowered at Langley in September 1904. 
Another remarkable find was a new, striking, and most 
promising Tncarvillea. 

This ended work for the season, and Wilson at once 
commenced preparations for his return home. Leaving 
Kiating on December 8th, he arrived at Chung-king on 
the 14th, and early in 1905 reached Ichang. The collec- 
tions were here repacked, and with them he finally left China 
in January of that year, arriving in England in the month of 
March. 

The five years' collections comprised some 25,000 dried 
specimens, representing some 5,000 species : these were 
distributed amongst the principal herbaria in Europe and 
America ; and in addition seeds of 1,800 species, some 
30,000 bulbs of new and rare species of Lilium, and living 
roots and rhizomes of various herbs and shrubs were sent to 
Messrs. Veitch. 

Wilson was unusually sympathetic to the Chinese tempera- 
ment, always prepared to yield a point, but firm when 
necessary, a contrast to his predecessor, Charles Maries, who, 
when in the Tchang region of the Yangtsze valley in 1879, 
could have sent many plants, subsequently found by Wilson, 
and which even at that time were undeniably accessible. 
Maries was difficile ; and the natives, naturally resenting this, 
destroyed the collection, and he returned to the coast reporting 
the people hostile. 

References: James H. Veitch in Jour. E.H.S. vol. xxviii. pt. i. ; Gard. 
Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 113, with portrait ; id. " Leaves from 
my Chinese Note-book," passim. 



96 



LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 



LIST OF MESSRS. VEITCHS' LEADING 
HYBRIDISTS 

JOHN DOMINY. 
WILLIAM COURT. 
JOHN SEDEN. 
JOHN HEAL. 
GEORGE TIVEY. 



LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 

JOHN DOMINY. 

JOHN DOMINY was born at Gittisham, Devon, in 1816, and 
early in life adopted gardening as a profession. In 1834, after 
completing his term of apprenticeship in a private garden, he 
entered the nursery of Messrs. Lucombe, Pince & Co., of 
Exeter, where he stayed for two or three months ; he then 
joined Messrs. Veitch, who at that time possessed only the 
Exeter establishment. 

Here Dominy remained until 1841, in which year he 
accepted an appointment as head gardener to J. P. Magor, 
Esq., of Redruth, with whom he stayed nearly five years, after 
which he again entered the nursery at Exeter, and continued 
with the firm, both at Exeter and Chelsea, till 1880, when 
failing strength compelled retirement. 

Dominy was an excellent cultivator of Stove and Green- 
house Plants, but it was his skill as a hybridizer of Orchids 
and Nepenthes that won for him the high position his name 
holds in the list of practical horticulturists of the last century. 

Mr. John Harris, a surgeon of Exeter, who possessed 
an acquaintance with Botany, first suggested to Dominy 
the possibility of obtaining hybrid orchids, and explained to 
him the structure of the orchid flower and the process 
of pollination. As soon as an opportunity presented itself 
Dominy lost no time in turning the suggestion to practical 
account, and Calanthe X Dominii,* which flowered in 1856, 
was the first of his successes. This resulted from crossing 

* Bot. Mag. t. 5042. 
99 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

Calanthe Masuca with the pollen of C. furcata, and the seedling 
took two years to flower. 

Considered a great cultural feat by the gardeners of the 
day, botanists were less enthusiastic in welcoming the new 
plant, and the exclamation of Dr. Lindley, the leading 
botanist and systematist of his time " You will drive the 
botanists mad," is well known, and expressed the feelings of 
many scientists regarding hybrids, or, as they were then 
called, " mules." 

Calanthe X Dominii was soon followed by others, an account 
of which will be found in other portions of this work, but 
mention may here be made of some of the more important 
hybrid orchids, which, in spite of the great advance made in 
Orchid culture since Dominy's day, still hold a favourable 
position in collections. 

Laeliocattleya exoniensis, Dominy's principal success from 
a cultivator's point of view ; Calanthe X Veitchii, long since 
recognized as one of the handsomest and most useful of winter- 
flowering hybrids, and a potent agent in the production of 
many new and beautiful forms of recent times ; Phaiocalanthe 
irrorata, a bigeneric hybrid, the first to be raised ; and Cypri- 
pedium X vexillarium, the forerunner of a group of handsome 
Cypripedes in which the beautiful Cypripedium Fairieanum 
has participated in the parentage, are all due to Dominy. 

It was not, however, to orchids alone that Dominy devoted 
his attention ; Nepenthes and Fuchsias gained much from his 
efforts, and some very successful results were obtained in these 
two genera, notably Nepenthes X Dominii, N. X hybrida and 
Fuchsia X Dominiana. 

To the high estimation in which John Dominy was held 
in horticultural circles the following testifies : On leaving 
Devon in 1864 to accompany the late James Veitch to Chelsea, 

100 



LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 

the Exeter Horticultural Society presented him with a piece 
of plate " in recognition of the value of his experiments in 
hybridization carried on by him whilst a member of their 
association." 

On his retirement in 1880 the Council of the Royal 
Horticultural Society presented the famous hybridizer with 
the Gold Flora Medal " for his successful labours as a raiser 
of hybrid Orchids, Nepenthes, and other garden plants," 
and a few years later his friends presented him, through the 
President of the Society, Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., with a 
handsome gold watch and a purse of 200 guineas. 

The twenty-first volume of The Garden is dedicated by the 
founder to " John Dominy, of Exeter and Chelsea, in recog- 
nition of his long and useful work in the improvement and 
hybridization of garden plants, especially Orchids, and his 
general excellence as a cultivator." 

After his retirement Dominy still retained an interest in 
horticultural pursuits, and was a constant attendant at 
the meetings of the E.H.S. Floral and Orchid Committees, of 
which he was a member. ' \ ' 

He died on Thursday, February 12th 1891, after a sliprt 
illness, and was buried at Exeter on the 17th of that month. 

References : Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 752 ; id. vol. xiv. p. 112 ; id. 
1881, vol. xv. p. 728, vol. xvi. pp. 405, 509; id. 1891, vol. ix. pp. 240, 
278, obituary note, portrait p. 277 ; The Garden, 1882, vol. xxi. portrait 
frontispiece ; id. 1891, vol. xxxix. p. 179, obituary note ; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. x. 



101 



WILLIAM COURT. 

WILLIAM COURT, well known during the seventies of the past 
century as a talented propagator and cultivator of stove 
plants, was born at Alphington, near Exeter, in 1843, and 
commenced his gardening career in the nurseries of Messrs. 
Lucombe & Prince, of that city. 

In 1863 he entered the Exeter branch of the Veitchian 
firm, and shortly afterwards was transferred to Chelsea. 

A successful hybridizer of Nepenthes and Sarracenias, 
Court raised several fine hybrids as a result of his experi- 
ments, some of the best being Nepenthes x Mastersiana, 
N. X intermedia, N. X Courtii, N. X rufescens, Sarracenia 
X melanorhoda, S. X Chelsoni, S. X Courtii, and several 
others. 

: ; ,;Co'urt made several journeys to North America, and intro- 
duced- to that country many novelties sent home by our 

' it * * * 

collectors from various parts of the world. 

He died at Chelsea on September 17th 1888, after a short 
illness, and is buried in Brompton Cemetery, where a 
monument is erected to his memory by his American friends. 

Beferences : Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 338, obituary note; The Garden, 
1888, vol. xxxiv. p. 287, obituary note. 



JOHN SEDEN. 

JOHN SEDEN is probably the best known of all hybridizers, 
and in connection with his retirement in 1905 the Gardeners 
Chronicle of December 31st 1904 contains the following 

notice : 

"JOHN SEDEN, V.M.H. 

" To every lover of Orchids the name of Seden is familiar, as 
probably no other person now living has enriched our collec- 
tions with so many fine hybrids or practised in so wide a field. 

" John Seden was born at Dedham in Essex, July 6th 1840, 
and early in life commenced his career as a gardener, working 
in several private gardens before he came to Chelsea in 
January 1861. In the autumn of 1861 he was transferred to 
Exeter, under Dominy, amongst the Orchids and stove plants, 
and it was here that he was first initiated into the practice of 
hybridization, which he has since so persistently followed with 
such good results. The autumn of 1862 saw Seden again at 
Chelsea in charge of the Orchids, some of the stove plants, and 
the Nepenthes, and amongst these he commenced experiments 
in hybridization and cross-fertilization. 

" Caladium X Chelsoni, Alocasia x Sedeni (which received 
a Gold Medal from the Horticultural Society), A. X Chelsoni, 
A. X intermedia, Nepenthes X Sedeni, N. X Chelsoni, Ama- 
ryllis (Hippeastrum) Brilliant, Chelsoni and maculata, the 
three first seedlings to be raised at Chelsea, are some of the 
results obtained from his early experiments. 

" About a dozen varieties of Gloxinia, progenitors of the fine 
strain since developed at Chelsea, were distributed from seed- 
lings raised by Seden from intercrossing the best existing forms. 

103 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

" In 1867 the tuberous Begonia was taken in hand, several 
of the original species being then available through introduc- 
tions of the firm's collector Pearce and, later on, of Davis. 
For a number of years hybrids and varieties were regularly 
distributed, and these laid the foundation on which have been 
built the fine strains existing at the present day. The first 
variety with pure white flowers was raised at this period, 
originating in a batch of seedlings of Begonia rosseflora, and 
the first double-flowered variety was obtained by fertilizing a 
flower of B. X Sedeni with its own pollen. 

"About the same time Seden commenced hybridizing 
Orchids. Since his first hybrid, Cypripedium X Sedenii, 
flowered in 1873, Seden has raised 150 hybrid Cypripediums, 
140 Lselio-Cattleyas, 65 Cattleyas, 40 Dendrobiums, 25 
Lgelias, 16 PhalaBnopsis, 20 Epidendrums, 12 Masdevallias, 
9 Calanthes, 8 Sophro- Cattleyas, 5 Phaio-Calanthes, 6 Disas, 
4 Zygopetalums, besides miscellaneous hybrids, such as 
Chysis x Chelsoni, C. X Sedenii, C. X langleyensis, Thunia 
X Veitchii, Sobralia X Veitchii, Cymbidiuni X eburneo- 
Lowianum, Phaius X amabilis, P. X maculato-grandifolius, X 
Epilselia radico-purpurata, E. X Eros, Leptoleelia Veitchii, 
Angraecum X Veitchii, Miltonia X Bleuana splendens, Odonto- 
glossum X excellens, Anguloa X intermedia, and many others. 

"The following hybrids other than Orchids have also 
been obtained : Echeveria glauca metallica, from E. secunda 
glauca and E. metallica; Veronica Purple Queen, from 
V. Hendersoni and V. Traversii ; Escallonia X langleyensis, 
from E. philippinensis and E. macrantha sanguinea, a very 
valuable gain; Althaea Primrose Queen, from A. ficifolia 
and A. rosea; Hemerocallis X luteola, from H. Thunbergii 
and H. aurantiaca majus ; Rose Queen Alexandra, from 
Crimson Rambler and Rosa multiflora simplex ; Electra, from 

104 



LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 

R. multiflora simplex and W. A. Richardson ; Myra, from 
Rosa Wichuriana and Crimson Rambler. 

"In 1889 Seden was transferred to Langley, and since that 
time has devoted much of his attention to the improvement 
of hardy fruit. Amongst other varieties raised by Seden, 
most of the following have been distributed : Strawberry 
Veitchs' Perfection, obtained from Waterloo and British 
Queen ; Veitchs' Prolific, from Empress of India and British 
Queen ; Lord Kitchener, from British Queen and Waterloo ; 
The Khedive, from Lord Suffield and British Queen; 
President Loubet, from Waterloo and Lord Napier; the 
Alake, from Frogmore Late Pine and Veitchs' Perfection. 
Apple Langley Pippin, from Mr. Gladstone and Cox's Orange 
Pippin ; Mrs. John Seden, from Transcendent Crab and King 
of Pippins ; Mr. Leopold Rothschild, from John Downie and 
Cox's Orange Pippin ; Middle Green, from Frogmore Prolific 
and Blenheim Pippin ; Rev. W. Wilks, from Peasgood's Non- 
such and Ribston Pippin ; Crab The Langley, from John 
Downie and King of Pippins ; Veitchs' Scarlet, from Red 
Siberian Crab and King of Pippins ; Bullace The Langley, 
from Damson Farleigh Prolific and Plum Black Orleans ; The 
Mahdi, the product of a cross between the common Blackberry 
and Raspberry Belle de Fontenay ; Gooseberry Langley 
Beauty, from the varieties Railway and Yellow Champagne ; 
Langley Gage, from Pitmaston Green Gage and Telegraph ; 
Golden Gem, from Whitesmith and Antagonist; Raspberry 
Yellow Superlative, from Superlative and Autumn Yellow ; 
November Abundance, from Catawissa and Superlative ; and 
Queen of England, from Superlative and Rubus laciniatus. 

"In 1897 Seden was chosen as one of the original recipients 
of the Victoria Medal of Honour by the Royal Horticultural 
Society." 

105 



JOHN HEAL. 

BOEN at Barnstaple in North Devon, this well-known culti- 
vator and hybridizer commenced his gardening career in the 
Westacott nurseries near that town, and was trained in the 
usual routine work of a country nursery. In 1863 sent to 
Coombe Wood, he was after two years transferred to the 
houses at Chelsea. 

His first charge at Chelsea was a large and representative 
collection of Ferns, but he afterwards had the care of the New 
Plant department, and, from 1873 onwards, of the houses 
devoted to Greenhouse Florists' Flowers. 

Since 1873 Heal has devoted much attention to the im- 
provement of various races of garden plants by hybridization 
and selection, with notable results. The Hippeastrum or 
Amaryllis has been greatly improved and a strain of high 
merit obtained, the Royal Horticultural and Royal Botanic 
Societies having awarded no less than 200 certificates to 
meritorious varieties. 

The Streptocarpus hybrids, first produced by Mr. "W. 
Watson, Curator of Kew, have been further improved, and 
entirely new forms and colours created, of which the 
achemeniflorus strain is a noteworthy example. 

The gorgeous-flowered Phyllocacti, so much in favour 
with our forefathers, have also had attention, and by cross- 
fertilization and selection new colours and forms obtained. 

Good work has also been done with the Greenhouse 
Rhododendrons, the fine modern varieties being derived from 
some seven species, natives of Java, Malaya and adjacent 

106 




RHODODENDRON BALSAMINJBFLORUM 



LIVES OF HYBRIDISTS 

islands, most of them introduced through Messrs. Veitchs' 
travellers Thomas Lobb and Curtis. 

George Taylor, who had charge of these species prior to 
Heal's day, commenced their hybridizing, and raised several 
fine varieties ; Heal continued the work and produced a large 
number of excellent forms remarkable for the pure, rich and 
varied colours of their flowers, the increased size of the 
individual blooms, and the large compact trusses in which they 
are produced. 

A distinct race in this section of the genus was created 
by self-pollinating a flower the stamens of which showed a 
tendency to petaloidy. 

The flowers produced by the varieties of this race, known as 
the balsaminseflorum hybrids, are double, of great substance, 
and have the same rich colours characteristic of the javanico- 
jasminiflorum hybrids. 

The latest class of plants evolved by this skilful hybridizer 
are the winter-flowering Begonias. These valuable green- 
house plants were obtained by crossing varieties of the 
summer-flowering tuberous-rooted Begonias with Begonia 
socotrana, a species from the island of Socotra, discovered by 
Professor Balfour of Edinburgh. A dozen or more forms are 
now in cultivation, some with single, others with double or semi- 
double flowers of bright rose or rose-carmine shades of colour. 

Useful work has also been done amongst the Olivias (Imanto- 
phyllums), Kalanchoes, Cinerarias, and fine-foliage Begonias. 

The Veitch Medal was awarded to Heal in 1892 by the 
Veitch Memorial Trustees in recognition of his services to 
Horticulture, and in 1897 he received the Victoria Medal of 
Honour from the Royal Horticultural Society. 

Reference : Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 812, with portrait. 

107 



GEORGE TIVEY. 

GEOEGE TIVEY has had unusual success in the hybridization 
of Nepenthes, and has for many years, and to an exceptional 
degree, thoroughly understood their culture. 

The first notable result was Nepenthes x Chelsoni excellens, 
followed by N. X mixta, N. X Tiveyi, N. X Balfouriana, 
N. X cylindrica, N. X Sir William T. Thiselton-Dyer, 
N. X picturata, and the very bold, striking N. X F. W. 
Moore, all of which are improvements on the species or 
varieties from which they were derived. 



108 



ORCHID SPECIES 



ORCHID SPECIES 

A LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL OECHID SPECIES 
INTRODUCED BY MESSRS. VEITCH 

ACANTHOPHIPPIUM CURTISII, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. rv. p. 169. 

Introduced from the Malay Archipelago through Curtis, after whom it 
is named. 

The five keels between the side laciniae distinguish the species from 
Acanthophippium bicolor and A. sylhetense, to which it is closely allied. 

AERIDES FIELDINGI, Lindl. 

Orchid Album, vii. t. 309 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 69. 

Introduced through Thomas Lobb in 1850, and named in honour of 
Colonel Fielding, an officer in the Indian army. It is known as the "Fox 
Brush " Aerides, a name evidently given in reference to the appearance 
of the inflorescence. 

AERIDES FIELDINGI, Lindl, var. WILLIAMSII. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 69 ; Warner's Selec. Orch. i. t. 21. 

This variety of the type was also introduced through Thomas Lobb, and 
is extremely rare. 

AERIDES JAPONICUM, Lindl. $ Echb. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5798; 1'Illns. Hort. 1883, t. 461 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 70. 

Aerides japonicum was originally introduced from Japan by Mr. Linden 
of Brussels in 1862 and subsequently by ourselves. From a plant flowering 
at Chelsea in June 1869 the plate in the Botanical Magazine was prepared. 

AERIDES MULTIFLORUM, Boxb., var. LOBBII, Veitch. 

Syns. A. Lobbii, Hort. Veitch. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 75, fig. ; 1'Illus. Hort. 1868, xv. t. 559. 

This variety, the handsomest and most generally cultivated of all the 
multiflorum forms, was introduced from Moulmein through Thomas Lobb. 
As compared with the type the stem is shorter, the leaves much crowded, 

111 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

almost lying one upon the other, and the flowers, produced on longer 
peduncles, are more numerous and more richly coloured. 

AEEIDES MULTIFLOEUM, Eoxb., var. VEITCHII, Morren. 
La Belg. Hort. 1881, p. 123; Les Orchidees, t. 4; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 75. 

A form closely resembling the variety Lobbii, but with less crowded 
leaves, and flowers lighter in colour : the sepals and petals are white 
dotted with rose and the lip light rose-purple. It was introduced from 
Moulmein through Thomas Lobb with the variety which bears his name. 

AEEIDES PACHYPHYLLUM, Echb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 230. 

A fine species imported from Burmah in a consignment of Aerides 
crassifolium, but now apparently lost to cultivation. The leaves are short, 
thick, fleshy and unequally bilobed at the apex ; the flowers, in short 
racemes, are light crimson-lake, with white spur and column and lip 
painted with purple. 

ANGE^ICUM CITEATUM, Thouars. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5624; 1'Illus. Hort. 1886, xxxiii. t. 592; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. 

p. 125, fig. 

First discovered by the French botanist Du Petit Thouars towards the 
end of the eighteenth century in Madagascar, but subsequently lost sight 
of until a plant, which we believe we obtained through Mr. Ellis, flowered 
at Chelsea in 1865. 

At that time Angraecum citratum was exceedingly rare in British orchid 
collections, and continued to be so till the opening of the Suez Canal 
afforded facilities for the more rapid transmission of plants from Mada- 
gascar. 

ANGE^ECUM FALCATUM, LindL 

Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 283; Bot. Mag. t. 2097; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 128; 

id. Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 23. 

An unpretending little orchid of great botanical and horticultural 
interest from the fact that it was the first Angraecum cultivated in the 
glass-houses of Europe, and one of the earliest of the Japanese orchids 
ever introduced. It was first sent to this country about the year 1813 by 
Dr. Eoxburgh, but probably lost to cultivation until we re-introduced it 
from Japan about the year 1868. 

ANGE^ECUM HYALOIDES, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 264; 1'Orchidophile, 1889, p. 347, col. pi.; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. vii. p. 132. 

Introduced in 1879 through Curtis, who discovered it in North-East 

112 



ORCHID SPECIES 

Madagascar growing on small shrubs, which form the undergrowth of the 
dense forest along the swampy coast. 

The small white flowers of a delicate semi-transparent texture 
suggested the specific name, which is from the Greek, meaning " crystal." 

ANGR^CUM KOTSCHYI, Rchb. f. 

Bchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. pp. 456 and 693, fig. ; id. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 712 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 133 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7442. 

Discovered in 1838 by Theodor Kotschy, after whom it is named, and 
subsequently met with by several other travellers. 

In 1876 it was found by the German Hildebrandt on the coast of Zan- 
zibar, and three years later living plants were sent by Sir John Kirk, the 
British Consul at Zanzibar, to Mr. Gerald Walker, from whom we acquired 
them. It flowered for the first time at Chelsea in the autumn of 1880. 

ARACHNANTHE CATHCARTII, Benth. 

Syns. Vanda Cathcartii, Lindl. ; Esmeralda Cathcartii, Rchb. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5845 ; Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1409, with fig. ; PI. Mag. n.s. t. 66; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 7, fig. opposite p. 8. 

A native of shady valleys in the Eastern Himalayas, where it was first 
detected by Sir Joseph Hooker, by whom it was sent to the Calcutta 
Botanic Gardens. Repeated attempts were made to introduce plants to 
England with more or less success, and it flowered the first time in this 
country in our houses in March 1870. 

The species is dedicated to the memory of Mr. James F. Cathcart, of 
the Indian Civil Service, an ardent amateur naturalist, and one of the 
earliest explorers of the rich flora of the Eastern Himalayas. 

ARACHNANTHE LOWII, Benth. 

Syns. Vanda Lowii, Lindl. ; Renanthera Lowii, Echb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1858, p. 175 ; id. 1847, p. 239; Bot. Mag. t. 5475; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 
pt. vii. p. 12, fig. ; Orchid Review, 1904, vol. xii. p. 283. 

Discovered in Sarawak by Sir Hugh Low, in whose honour it was 
named by Dr. Lindley, but first flowered in this country from specimens 
sent by Thomas Lobb in 1858. It was later collected by Curtis in the 
low swampy forests near the coast of Sarawak. 

The plant is remarkable for the enormous length of its racemes and for 
the occurrence of two kinds of flowers on the same inflorescence. 

BRASSIA ARCUIGERA, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 389. 

A Peruvian orchid described by Professor Reichenbach from material 
introduced by us : an insignificant species of botanical interest only, and 
apparently not now in cultivation. 

113 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

BEASSIA THYESODES, Echb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 842. 

Introduced from Peru, and apparently not now in cultivation. The 
flowers are greenish-yellow with purplish spots, borne in panicles. 

BULBOPHYLLUM LOBBII, Lindl. 

Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1847, sub t. 29; Bot. Mag. t. 4532 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iii. p. 97. 

Sent from Java by Thomas Lobb in 1846, and one of the few members 
of the genus that have flowers sufficiently showy to gain admission into 
the orchid collections of amateurs. 

BULBOPHYLLUM MANDIBULAEE, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 366 ; Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 293, fig. 99. 

Introduced from North Borneo through P. W. Burbidge, and first 
flowered at Chelsea in 1882. 

The flowers are curious, of botanical interest only. The sepals and 
petals are greenish-yellow striped with brown, and the curious lip has a 
mass of purple hairs on a pale ground. 

BULBOPHYLLUM EETICULATUM, Batem. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5605 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iii. p. 97. 

Discovered in North Borneo by Thomas Lobb, and through him intro- 
duced to Exeter about the year 1852. 

Its handsome leaves and singular flowers render it a very interesting 
species. The former are pale-green reticulated with deep-green veins ; the 
whitish flowers striped with red-purple are sometimes spotted. 

CALANTHE CUETISII, Echb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 262. 

One of the many plants sent from the Sondaic regions by Curtis and not 
now in cultivation. The flower is interesting, but more curious than 
pretty. 

CALANTHE LABEOSA, Echb. f. 

Syns. Limatodes labrosa, Rchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 44 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 63 ; Gard. Chron. 

1879, vol. xi. p. 202. 

A fine species with rose-purple flowers, sent to us by a correspondent 
from Burmah, the precise locality being unknown. 

It appears to be fast disappearing from cultivation, but is of importance 
as having produced a distinct race of hybrid Calanthes Calanthe 
X porphyrea, C. X lentiginosa, and varieties. 

114 



ORCHID SPECIES 

CALANTHB PLEIOCHEOMA, Rchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 938 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 65. 

Introduced from Japan and flowered for the first time at Chelsea in 
May 1871. 

It is possibly only a geographical form of Calanthe sylvatica, a native of 
Mauritius and Bourbon, a species not now in cultivation in this country. 

CALANTHE PKOBOSCIDEA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 476. 

Imported from the Sunda Islands, this species is nearest to Calanthe 
furcata, Bat., but has a distinctive feature in that the anterior part of the 
column is bent down in a curve, like the snout of certain insects. 

CALANTHE EOSEA, Benth. 

Syns. Limatodes rosea, Lindl. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 65 ; Lindl. in Paxt. PL Gdn. 1852, vol. iii. t. 81 ; 
Bot. Mag. t. 5312 ; Fl. des Serres, xxii. t. 2294. 

First discovered by Thomas Lobb in Moulmein early in the year 1850, 
and sent by him to Exeter, where it flowered in the winter of that year. 
It has now been superseded in gardens by the beautiful Calanthe x Veitchii 
and other hybrids, in the parentage of which it participated largely to 
their benefit. 

CALANTHE TEXTOEI, Miquel. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 67. 

Introduced from Japan through Charles Maries in 1877, and probably 
only a form of the widely distributed Calanthe veratrifolia. 

CALANTHE TEICAEINATA, Lindl 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 67. 

First discovered by Wallich in Nepaul and later by Maximowicz in 
Japan, it was introduced from the latter country with Calanthe Textori in 
1879. The absence of a spur to the flowers distinguishes it from the 
other members of the genus in cultivation. 

CALANTHE VESTITA, Wall. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4671 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. i. p. 106, fig. 72 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. 
p. 71, fig. ; FL des Serres, 1858, torn. iii. 2me serie, p. 33 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 
vol. xvi. p. 129. 

First introduced into European gardens by Dr. Kane, who sent the type 
species and a variety from Moulmein to Exeter in 1848. 

Shortly after Thomas Lobb sent the same two forms, with another 
variety since named Turneri, from the same locality. 

115 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

It has entered largely into the production of artificial hybrids, the best 
known being Calanthe x Veitchii, one of Dominy's earliest efforts, and one 
of the most largely cultivated of all hybrid orchids. 

CALANTHE VESTITA, Wall., var. TUBNEEI, Veitch. 

Syns. C. Turneri, Hort. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 71, fig. 

A very charming variety introduced with the type from Moulmein 
through Thomas Lobb. 

The flowers resemble those of the variety rubro-oculata, having a red- 
purple blotch on the disk of the lip, but they appear later in the season. 

It was named in compliment to Mr. J. A. Turner of Pendlebury, near 
Manchester, one of the most ardent orchid amateurs of his time. 

CATASETUM SACCATUM, LindL, var. PLICIFEBUM, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1182. 

Imported from Peru in 1869, but long since lost to cultivation. It is 
described by Beichenbach as having sepals and petals dull olive-green 
marbled with numerous brown spots and a green lip with numerous 
cinnamon-brown blotches. 

CATTLEYA BOWEINGIANA, Hort. Veitch. 

Syns. C. autumnaUs, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 683 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. pp. 31, 32, with 
figs. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1886, p. 10, figs. p. 3. 

Sent to us in 1884 from British Honduras in Central America, by a 
correspondent who stated that the plant grows on cliffs by a rapid stream 
flowing over a succession of waterfalls, where the atmosphere is always 
highly charged with moisture. As a species Cattleya Bowringiana is 
close to C. Skinneri, but differs in its flowering season, which is during 
the dull months of October and November. 

It is dedicated to the late Mr. J. C. Bowring of Forest Farm, near 
Windsor, for many years a well-known amateur. 

CATTLEYA DOWIANA, Batem. 

Syns. C. Lawrenceana, Warsc. ; C. labiata, var. Dowiana, Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 922 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5618 ; Fl. des Serres, tt. 1709-1710 ; 1'Illus. 
Hort. t. 525 ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xii. t. 99; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 16. 

This superb orchid flowered for the first time in this country at Chelsea 
in the autumn of 1865. The plants were obtained through Mr. G. 
lire-Skinner, whose collector Mr. Arce, a zealous naturalist, had obtained 
them in Costa Bica. Plants had previously been sent to this country in 
1850, but arriving in a bad condition, had all died without flowering. 

116 



ORCHID SPECIES 

It was the wish of Warscewicz, the original discoverer, that his plant 
should bear the name Lawrenceana, in compliment to Mrs. Lawrence 
of Baling, a generous patroness of Horticulture, but as his specimens mis- 
carried, this fact was not made known until after Bateman had named it 
in compliment to Captain J. M. Dow of the American Packet Service, to 
whose kindness orchidists and men of science owe so much. It has 
proved potent as a parent for hybridizing, many fine seedlings now in 
cultivation being due to its influence. 

CATTLEYA IEICOLOE, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 162; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 40; Orchid Review, 1893, 

vol. i. p. 63. 

The only known plant of this interesting orchid was obtained at one of 
the orchid sales at Stevens' s Eooms, where it was sold without any specific 
name or intimation of its origin. 

Flowered at Chelsea in 1874, the flowers proved cream-white in colour 
with W-shaped yellow markings, on the lip on either side of which are 
maroon-purple stripes. 

CATTLEYA SKINNBBI, Bat&ni., var. ALBA, Bckb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 810 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 47. 

Discovered in Costa Kica by Endres, and sent to us. 

It has ever since its introduction been acknowledged one of the 
loveliest white orchids in cultivation ; the pure white flowers, with a 
yellowish blotch on the disk of the lip, are produced in the same manner 
as those of the type. 

CIEEHOPETALUM EETUSIUSCULUM, Bchb.f. 

Syns. Bulbophyllum retusiusculum, Rchb. f . 
Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1182. 

Introduced through Colonel Benson, by whom it was discovered in 
Moulmein. A botanical species not now in cultivation. 

CIEEHOPETALUM EOBUSTUM, Bolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 771, fig. 116 ; Veitcha' Catlg. of PL 1896, p. 4, fig. 

reproduced. 

This Cirrhopetalum , probably the largest species known, and one of the 
most remarkable yet introduced, was sent from New Guinea by David 
Burke. 

The flowers are produced on a short scape, almost sub-umbellate. The 
sepals are yellowish -green, tinged with red in the centre, and have a 
varnished surface; the petals are small, brown-coloured, whilst the 
mobile lip is reddish chocolate. 

117 i 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CCELOGYNE DAYANA, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 826 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 37 ; 

Orchid Album, t. 247. 

Imported from Borneo through Curtis, and dedicated by Prof. Keichen- 
bach, at our request, to Mr. John Day, of Tottenham. 

It flowered for the first time in this country at Chelsea in 1884. 

As a species it resembles Coelogyne Massangeana in its long pendulous 
racemes, but in the colour of the flowers and more especially in the 
vegetative organs is abundantly distinct. 

CCELOGYNE FLAVIDA, Hook. f. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 39. 

Discovered by Thomas Lobb on the Khasia Hills, and afterwards by 
Cathcart on the Sikkim Himalayas. 

Closely allied to Ccelogyne barbata and C. elata, it is inferior in a 
horticultural sense to both these species. 



CCELOGYNE (PLEIONE) HUMILIS, Lindl 

Bot. Mag. t. 5674 ; Paxt. PI. Gdn. vol. ii. p. 65, t. 51 ; Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. 
p. 46 (in W. B. Hemsley's List of Garden Orchids) ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 
pt. vi. p. 55, figs. 

Originally discovered by Dr. Buchanan Hamilton, and afterwards by 
Griffiths, this plant was first introduced into British Gardens in 1849 
through Thomas Lobb, who found it at Sanahda on the Khasia Hills. 

The lip is beautifully fringed and the flowers vary much in colour. 



CCELOGYNE (PLEIONE) LAGENAEIA, Lindl 

Bot. Mag. t. 5370 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 56, fig. ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 1851, 

vol. ii. t. 39. 

Introduced through Thomas Lobb, who sent plants from the Khasia 
Hills, Northern India, to Exeter in 1849, and always a great favourite 
with orchid amateurs on account of its beautiful flowers, freely produced 
in October and November. 

CCELOGYNE LENTIGINOSA, Lindl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5958; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 43. 

Introduced in 1847 through Thomas Lobb, who discovered it in 
Moulmein. 

There are two forms, that figured in the Botanical Magazine above 
quoted being inferior in the beauty of its flowers. It has been imported 
at various times from the same locality. 

118 



ORCHID SPECIES 

CCELOGYNE (PLBIONE) MACULATA, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1850, p. 710 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4691 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. ii. p. 5, t. 39, fig. 1. 

Introduced from the Khasia Hills in 1849 by Thomas Lobb, who sent 
plants to Exeter. In 1852 it was sent from Assam to the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, by Simons, and from this plant was made the figure which appears 
in the Botanical Magazine. It was exhibited by us November 5th, 1850. 

CCELOGYNE (PLEIONE) MACULATA, var. AETHUEIANA, Veitch. 

Syns. C. (Pleione) Arthuriana, Rchb. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 57 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 40. 

The variety Arthuriana was sent in 1881 by a correspondent at 
Eangoon, and dedicated by Professor Eeichenbach to the memory of the 
late Mr. Arthur Veitch. 

CCELOGYNE PELTASTES, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 296 ; Lindenia, vi. t. 258. 

Introduced from Borneo, this remarkable Coelogyne has peculiar pseudo- 
bulbs, produced at different levels on the rhizome ; these are somewhat 
crescent-shaped, flattish, convex on one side and concave on the other, 
closely pressed against the surface over which they grow, forming 
reservoirs for water. 

CCELOGYNE (PLEIONE) POGONIOIDES, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1896, p. 196 ; Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 291. 

Introduced from the province of Hupeh, Central China, through Wilson, 
and cultivated at Chelsea, but not flowered at the present date. 

The bulbs are used by the Chinese as a drug, under the name of 
"Pei-mu." 

It is closely allied to Coelogyne (Pleione) humilis, which it resembles in 
the flowering stage when the leaves are partly developed. 

CCELOGYNE (PLEIONE) EEICHENBACHIANA, Moore. 

T. Moore in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1210 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5753 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

pt. vi. p. 59. 

Discovered by Colonel Benson, of Eangoon, on the mountains of 
Arracan, and by him introduced to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, and to 
Chelsea, but now very rarely seen in collections. In both places the 
plants flowered simultaneously for the first time in November 1868. 

CCELOGYNE SCHILLEEIANA, Bchb.f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5072 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. xxii. t. 2302 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. 

p. 49. 

Introduced through Thomas Lobb from Moulmein in 1857, and dedicated 

119 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

by Professor Eeichenbach to Consul Schiller of Hamburg, at that time one 
of the most prominent amateur orchidists in Europe. 

CCELOGYNE SPECIOSA, Lindl. 

Syns. C. salmonicolor , Rchb. f. 
Bob. Mag. t. 4889; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1847, t. 23 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 50. 

Imported from Java through its discoverer Thomas Lobb, and first 
flowered in 1846. 

The hairs that fringe the crest of the lip are among the most beautiful 
microscopic objects possible. 

CCELOGYNE VEITCHII, Bolfe. 

Kolfe in Kew Bulletin, November 1895, p. 282 ; Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 248 
(Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896, p. 6, fig.; 
Bot. Mag. t. 7764. 

A very distinct little species, introduced from Western New Guinea 
through David Burke. 

The flowers, of the purest white, are produced in racemes almost as 
long as those of its near allies, the beautiful Ccelogyne Dayana and 
C. Massangeana. 

CBYPTOPHOKANTHUS GEACILENTUS, Bolfe. 

Syns. Masdevallia gracilenta, Rchb. f. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. p. 693; id. Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 304; Rchb. in 
Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 98. 

One of the Costa Eica discoveries of M. Endres, a curious " window- 
bearing" species, the flowers of which are closed at the apex, the only 
access to the interior being by slits or " windows " at the sides. 

CYCNOCHES PENTADACTYLON, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1842, p. 190 ; id. 1843, p. 319 ; Lindl. in Bot. Reg. 1843, vol. xxix. p. 18 
(misc.) ; id. t. 22 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. iii. sub t. 75 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. ix. 
p. 143, figs. ; Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 188, fig. 26 ; Gard. Mag. 
1893, p. 77, with plate ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 74. 

Introduced from Eio de Janeiro to Exeter through William Lobb in 1841, 
this species produced a seven-flowered raceme in March 1842, from which 
material Dr. Lindley wrote his description. 

The flowers of the two sexes differ much in size and appearance and 
offered considerable difficulty to the botanist before the phenomenon was 
thoroughly understood. 

It is a handsome species, the flowers greenish-yellow, sometimes white, 
barred and blotted with chocolate brown ; parts of the lips are white, 
spotted with red. 

120 



ORCHID SPECIES 

CYMBIDIUM CANALICULATUM, E. Br. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5851 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 12. 

This species was first discovered by Robert Brown in the beginning of 
the last century, near Cape York, in North-East Australia, where in 

1865 it was re-discovered by the late John Gould Veitch and by him 
introduced to our gardens. 

It flowered at Chelsea for the first time in April 1870, and from this 
plant, the figure in the Botanical Magazine was prepared. 

CYMBIDIUM GEANDIFLOEUM, Griff. 

Syns. 0. Hookerianum, Rchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 267, with fig. ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 18; 
Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 7 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5574. 

Introduced to Exeter through Thomas Lobb, the first plant flowering in 

1866 at Chelsea. 

Eeichenbach at once described it, and named it in compliment to Sir 
Joseph Hooker, who had just succeeded his father as Director of the Eoyal 
Gardens, Kew. The plant had, however, previously been named by Griffith 
its discoverer, a fact overlooked by Eeichenbach at the time. 

CYMBIDIUM HUTTONI, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5676; Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 232 ; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. 

p. 63, figs. 21, 22. 

A rare and remarkable species sent from Java by the unfortunate Henry 
Hutton, in commemoration of whose labours and early death it is named. 
Apparently it was soon lost to cultivation, until re-imported to Kew, and 
flowered in the Gardens in 1900. 

The flowers, densely spotted all over with dusky brown on a light 
yellow ground, are almost purple at the apex of the petals and lip. 

CYMBIDIUM WILSONI, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 157, with fig. ; The Garden, 1904, vol. Ixv. p. 189, with 
fig. ; Orchid Review, 1904, vol. xii. p. 79. 

A remarkable species introduced from the province of Yunnan, South 
China, through E. H. Wilson in 1901, and first flowered at Chelsea in 
February 1904. 

The species is allied to Cymbidium giganteum, but differs in being much 
smaller in all its parts. 

The fragrant flowers have brownish-green sepals and petals obscurely 
marked with reddish dots at the base, the lip is cream-white with 
irregular reddish-brown blotches and markings, and the tip of the rostellum 
maroon purple. 

121 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) AEGUS, Bchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 608 ; id. 1874, p. 710 ; PI. Mag. t. 220 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 6175 ; La Belg. Hort. xxxii. (1882), p. 241 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 11. 

Discovered by Gustav Wallis in 1872 in Luzon, one of the Philippine 
Islands, and introduced through him immediately afterwards, this 
Cypripedium flowered for the first time in Europe in April 1873. 

It was named Argus by Professor Eeichenbach in allusion to the warty 
eye-like spots on the petals, which form its most striking characteristic. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) BAEBATUM, Lindl 

Lindl. Bot. Eeg. 1842, t. 17 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4234 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 12, fig. 

Discovered by Cuming in 1840 on Mount Ophir, near Malacca in the 
Malay Peninsula, and sent by him to Messrs. Loddiges of Hackney, with 
whom it first flowered. 

Thomas Lobb collected it three years later in the same locality, and 
from his importation the plant became generally distributed. 

CYPEIPEDIUM BOISSIEEIANUM, Echb. 

Syns. C. (Selenepedium) reticulatum, Rchb. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 143, fig. ; id. vol. xviii. 1882, p. 620 ; Veitchs' 

Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 57. 

This first became known in British gardens through Walter Davis, who 
found it, unknown to himself at the time, with Cypripedium caudatum, 
near Muna in the Huanuco district of Peru in 1875-1876, in the same 
locality in which the latter had been collected by William Lobb in 1847. 
Presumably both species were found here by Euiz and Pavon sixty years 
previously. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PHEAGMOPEDILUM) CAEICINUM, Lindl. 

Syns. C. Pea/rcei, Batem. 

Lindl. in Paxt. PI. Gdn. 1850, vol. i. t. 9 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5466 ; PI. des Serres, torn. xvi. 
t. 1648 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 59, fig. 

Introduced in 1863 through Pearce and flowered for the first time in this 
country at Chelsea in May of the following year. The specific name, from 
carex, "a sedge," is in allusion to the sedge-like leaves. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PHEAGMOPEDILUM) CAUDATUM, Lindl 

Lindl. in Paxt. PI. Gdn. 1850-1851, i. p. 37, t. 9; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 60, fig. ; 
Orchid Eeview, 1895, vol. iii. p. 355, frontispiece (the variety Wallisii). 

Although previously known to science, Cypripedium caudatum remained 
unknown to Horticulture till introduced by William Lobb in 1847, from 
the Huanuco district of Peru, where thirty years afterwards it was 
collected by Davis, who at the same time sent the variety Wallisii. Pearce 
also sent a few plants to Chelsea in 1862, having met with them in the 
Caupolica district, on the Andes of Ecuador, at 5,000-6,000 ft. elevation. 

122 



ORCHID SPECIES 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) CUETISII, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 8 ; Orcliid Album, iii. t. 122. 

Discovered in Sumatra in 1882 and introduced by Curtis, whose name 
it bears. It inhabits the great mountain range that stretches almost 
through the entire length of the island, at elevations of 3,000-4,000 ft. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) HAYNALDIANUM, Rchb. 

Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 272 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6296 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. 

p. 28. 

Introduced in 1893 from the Philippine Islands, through Gustav Wallis, 
who had discovered it at San Isidro near Manila, and dedicated to Cardinal 
Haynald, Archbishop of Kaloesa in Hungary. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) JAVANICDM, Ewdt. 

Lindl. in Paxt. PI. Gdn. 1850-1851, vol. i. p. 38 ; PI. des Serres, 1851, vol. vii. t. 703 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 35. 

First discovered by the Dutch botanist, Eeinwardt, on the mountains of 
Eastern Java in 1826, though not introduced to European gardens till 
1840, when Thomas Lobb sent plants to Exeter. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) LAWEENCEANUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ii. p. 748 ; id. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 780, fig. 134 ; Bot. 
Mag. t. 6432 ; Fl. des Serres, torn xxiii. t. 2372 ; 1'Illus. Hort. 1883, vol. xxx. t. 478 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 36, fig. opposite. 

Discovered by F. W. Burbidge in 1878 on the left bank of the Lawas 
Eiver, near Meringit, North Borneo, at an altitude of 1,000-1,500 ft. 
above sea-level, growing in company with the dwarf palm, Pinanga 
Veitchii. 

It was dedicated by Professor Eeichenbach to Sir Trevor Lawrence, the 
President of the Eoyal Horticultural Society, and the owner of a very rare 
collection of orchids. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PHEAGMOPEDILUM) LINDLEYANUM, Schomb. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 262 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, 
vol. xxv. p. 680 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 64. 

First discovered by Schomburgk. during his exploration of British 
Guiana, on the southern slopes of the Eoraima mountain at 6,000 ft. 
elevation, it was re-discovered in 1881 by David Burke, who brought plants 
to Chelsea in the autumn of that year. None flowered till January 1886. 

In the meantime it had been sent to Kew, where it produced its flowers 
for the first time in 1885. 

123 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPBDILUM) NIVEUM, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1038 ; id. 1883, vol. xix. p. 16, fig. ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 5922 ; The Garden, 1876, vol. ix. t. 23 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 39, 
fig. ; Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 273, fig. 44. 

The first appearance of Cypripedium niveum was a surprise. In 1868 
we received from Moulmein a consignment of plants of a Cypripedium, 
supposed to be C. concolor, but which, on flowering in the spring of the 
following year, proved to be the very beautiful white species now known 
as C. niveum. 

It is not a native of Moulmein, but of the Tambilan Islands, situate 
midway between Singapore and Sarawak and the Langkawi Islands, 
a few miles north of Penang, from which locality our plants were 
presumably obtained. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) PHILIPPINENSE, Bchb. 

Syns. C. Icevigatum, Batem. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5508 ; Fl. des Serres, tt. 1760-1761; La Belg. Hort. 1867, t. 6; Gard. Chron. 
1865, p. 914; Rev. Hort. Beige, 1881, p. 121; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. 
p. 43, fig. 

This species, discovered by the late John Gould Veitch in the Philippine 
Islands and by him sent to Chelsea in 1861, bloomed for the first time in 
March 1865. 

It was found established on the roots of Vanda Batemanni, to obtain 
which was the object of the voyage, and for which the traveller long 
sought in vain, but once happily running the boat ashore in a bay of 
a small island, he was delighted and astonished to find the neighbouring 
rocks covered with the plant of which he was in quest. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) SUPEEBIENS, Echb. f. 

Fl. des Serres, 1861, vol. xiv. p. 161, t. 1453 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 51, fig. 

Only two plants of this species have ever been introduced, and all now 
growing in orchid collections have been derived from the two originally 
imported. 

Messrs. Eollison introduced the first plant either from Java or Assam, 
and sold it in 1855 to Consul Schiller of Hamburg. 

The second plant appeared in an importation of Cypripedium barbatum 
collected in 1857 by Thomas Lobb on Mount Ophir, near the southern 
extremity of the Malay Peninsula. 

CYPEIPEDIUM TIBETICUM, King. 
Orchid Review, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 194. 

A hardy species introduced from Western China through Wilson. 
The flowers resemble those of the Siberian Cypripedium macranthon 
but are larger ; the sepals and petals have numerous broad blackish-purple 

124 



ORCHID SPECIES 

lines on a greenish-yellow ground ; the pouch is large, blackish-purple in 
front with a greenish area at the base and a purplish reticulation where 
the two colours meet. 

Plants flowered for the first time at Coombe Wood in June 1905. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) TONSUM, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 262 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 53. 

Discovered in the mountains of Sumatra by Curtis, who collected it, 
mixed with Cypripedium Curtisii. 

The specific name, tonsum, " shorn," refers to the absence of black 
marginal hairs that fringe the petals of closely allied species. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (PAPHIOPEDILUM) VILLOSUM, Lindl 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 135 ; 1'Illus. Hort. iv. (1857), pi. 126 ; Fl. des Serres, xiv. 
t. 1475; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 54; The Garden, 1891, vol. xxxix. 
p. 568, pi. 810. 

First discovered by Thomas Lobb on the mountains near Moulmein 
at 4,000-5,000 ft. elevation, and introduced through him in 1853, 
Cypripedium villosum has proved to be one of the most potent of hybrid- 
izing agents, and has entered largely into the composition of some of the 
finest seedlings yet raised. 

DENDEOBIUM ACEOBATICUM, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 802. 

Introduced from Moulmein, and named acrobaticum by Professor 
Eeichenbach on account of the peculiar growth of the pseudo-bulbs, 
which reminded him of acrobatic contortions. 

DENDEOBIUM ALBOSANGUINEUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Paxt. PI. Gdn. vol. ii. t. 5 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5130 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. vii. p. 209 ; 
Veitchs' Man, Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 16. 

Introduced in 1851 through Thomas Lobb, who found it on the hills 
near the Atran river. It occurs in several parts of Burmah, always on the 
tops of the highest trees. The flowers are white with a reddish maroon 
blotch on the sides of the lip. 

DENDEOBHJM AMETHYSTOGLOSSUM, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 109; Bot. Mag. t. 5968; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

pt. iii. p. 16. 

Introduced in 1872 from the Philippines through Gustave Wallis, who 
sent a single plant mixed with Dendrobium taurinum. Though since 
imported in restricted numbers, it still remains a rare species in collections. 
The specific name is in allusion to the rich amethyst-purple of the lip. 

125 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

DENDROBIUM ANNULIGEEUM, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 675 ; Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 625 (W. B. Hemsley's List of 

Garden Orchids). 

Introduced from Marisa. The limits of the internodes along the 
attenuated stems are marked with obscure bars, from which peculiarity 
the specific name was derived. 

DENDEOBIUM ANTELOPE, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 656. 

A curious species sent from the Moluccas by Curtis, and named 
antelope by Professor Eeichenbach, from a fancied resemblance between 
the erect antenniform petals and the straight horns of such antelopes 
as Antelope Oreas. 

DENDROBIUM ARACHNOSTACHYUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 334 ; id. 1877, vol. viii. p. 38. 

Sent to Chelsea by Peter C. M. Veitch. The flowers were thought by 
Professor Reichenbach to resemble green spiders ; hence the specific name. 
Of botanical interest only, it does not now appear to be in cultivation. 

DENDROBIUM ATRO-VIOLACEUM, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 512 ; id. 1894, vol. xv. p. 113, f. 12 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 7371 ; Orchid Album, t. 444 ; Jour, of Hort. 1894, vol. xxviii. p. 65, f. 10 ; 
Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 305, fig. 12. 

Introduced from Eastern New Guinea, and flowered for the first time in 
Europe in April, 1890. 

Sir Joseph Hooker writes of this species in the Botanical Magazine as 
follows : 

" Of all Dendrobes known to me I cannot recall amongst recent dis- 
coveries one so strikingly unlike its congeners in coloration, and at the 
same time so beautiful in this respect, as Dendrobium atro-violaceum." 

The sepals and petals are primrose-yellow with numerous dusky brown 
spots, and the lip inside deep violet-purple, with a few paler radiating 
lines near the margin. Outside the lip is green, with a large dark violet 
irregular blotch on either side. 

DENDROBIUM BELLATULUM, Bolfe. 

Orchid Review, 1903, p. 103 j id. 1904, vol. xii. p. 135 ; Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. 
p. 258 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7985. 

This beautiful little plant, much like a miniature Dendrobium formosum, 
was originally discovered by Dr. A. Henry in Yunnan, and afterwards 
introduced to cultivation through Wilson, who sent home living plants in 

126 



ORCHID SPECIES 

1900. The sepals and petals are white, and the front lobe of the lip 
reddish-orange. 

It flowered for the first time in this country in the Royal Gardens, Kew 

DENDBOBIUM BENSON^, Bchb. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5679 ; Fl. Mag. t. 355 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iii. p. 22, with fig. ; 
Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 241, fig. 40. 

Sent to us in 1866 from British Burmah by Colonel Benson, and named 
after Mrs. Benson at the Colonel's request ; one of the best white- 
flowered Dendrobes in the section to which it belongs. 

There are several varieties referable to this species, differing mainly in 
robustness of habit, size of flower, and lip-marking. 

DENDEOBIUM BIGIBBUM, Lindl., var. SUPEBBUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 748 ; Fl. Mag. n.s. pi. 229 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. iii. p. 23. 

A variety, with larger flowers more brightly coloured than those of the 
type, discovered by the late John Gould Veitch, in 1865, on Mount 
Adolphus, near Torres Strait, and through him introduced. It flowered 
for the first time in December 1878. 

At the same time the discoverer sent the first large importation of 
Dendrobium bigibbum ever received in this country. 

DENDBOBIUM BINOCULABE, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 785 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 24. 

Sent to us from British Burmah in 1868 by Colonel Benson, who found 
plants growing on hills eastward of Prome : it is now but rarely seen in 
British collections. The specific name refers to the two " eyes " or 
blotches on the labellum. 

DENDBOBIUM CANALICULATUM, B. Br. 

Syns. D. Tattonianum, Batem. 
(Jard. Chron. 1865, p. 890 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5537 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 26. 

Introduced in 1865 by the late John Gould Veitch, who discovered it at 
Endeavour Creek, York Peninsula, in North-East Australia, and very 
noticeable on account of its pseudo-bulbous stem, its deep-coloured lip, 
and the fragrance of its flowers. 

DENDBOBIUM CEBINUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 554. 

Collected in the Malayan Archipelago and introduced to cultivation by 
F. W. Burbidge. 

127 



Flowered in July, 1879, for the first time it was described by Professor 
Keichenbach from material supplied by us. 

The Professor says of it, " The lip is just alarming, it mimics that of 
Dendrobium sanguinolentum, but is oblong not three-lobed, and shows 
numerous minute teeth on its anterior edge. The whole flower is of 
very firm texture and shining as if made of wax." 

It is not now in cultivation. 

DENDEOBIUM CEASSINODE, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 164 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5766 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. 

p. 31. 

Sent to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, and to Chelsea, by Colonel Benson in 
1868, from the mountains of Arracan, near Moulmein, India, it flowered 
simultaneously in both establishments in January 1869, but had previously 
been made known to science by the Eev. C. Parish, who sent a sketch 
of it to Sir W. J. Hooker, of Kew, prepared from material obtained in 
the Siamese province of Kiong-Koung. 

The specific name refers to the swollen joints on the pseudo-bulbs, 
by which this specimen can be readily distinguished. 

DENDEOBIUM CEETACEUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1847, t. 62 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4686 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 33. 

Sent to Exeter in 1846 by Thomas Lobb, who detected it in the 
Moulmein district. 

The specific name, from creta, " chalk," refers to the colour of the 
flowers, which appear in May and June. 

DENDEOBIUM CEYSTALLINUM, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 572; Bot. Mag. t. 6319; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 34. 

Discovered on the Arracan Mountains near Tongu, in British Burmah, 
by Colonel Benson, through whom it was introduced, and flowered for the 
first time in Europe at Chelsea in the spring of 1868. 

The specific name was given in allusion to the crystalline papillae with 
which the anther case is covered. 

DENDEOBIUM CUMULATUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 756; Rchb. id. 1868, p. 6; Bot. Mag. t. 5703; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 35. 

Eeceived at Kew and Chelsea from Moulmein through Colonel Benson 
in 1867. 

It had previously appeared in the collection of Mr. P. Coventry, at 
Shirley, near Southampton, as early as 1855, but its native country 
was then unknown. 

128 



ORCHID SPECIES 

DENDEOBIUM GLOMEEATUM, Rolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 653, fig. 80; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 169. 

A species imported from New Guinea, producing in small bunches from 
unpromising-looking pseudo-bulbs flowers of a warm rosy purple tint, with 
an orange-coloured labellum. 

This species is without doubt the finest of the Pycnostachyate or 
" cluster-flowered " Dendrobes yet introduced. 

DENDBOBIUM GOULDII, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 901. 

One of the numerous Polynesian introductions of the late John Gould 
Veitch, in honour of whom it was named by Professor Eeichenbach, but 
now unfortunately lost to cultivation. 

DENDEOBIUM HUTTONII, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 686; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 49. 

Discovered in Timor, one of the islands of the Malay Archipelago, by 
Henry Hutton in 1868, and an exceedingly rare, beautiful species with 
pure white sepals and petals, now seldom to be found. 

DENDEOBIUM INFUNDIBULUM, Lindl., var. JAMESIANUM. 

Syns. D. Jamesianum, Rchb. f. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 50 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 554 ; PL and 

Pom. 1869, p. 187. 

Introduced through Colonel Benson, by whom it was discovered in 
British Burmah, and dedicated by Eeichenbach as a distinct species to the 
late Mr. James Veitch junior. 

The type species was collected by Thomas Lobb when travelling for 
us in British Burmah, but was not introduced on that occasion. 

DENDEOBIUM JOHANNIS, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1865, p. 890; Bot. Mag. t. 5540. 

A peculiar species having brown twisted sepals and petals, and a bright 
yellow lip, discovered in 1865 in North-East Australia by the late 
John Gould Veitch, who sent plants to Chelsea, where it flowered in 
August of that year. 

DENDEOBIUM JOHNSON!^, F. Muell. 

Syns. D. Macfarlanei, Rchb. f. 
The Garden, 1897, vol. li. p. 262, pi. 1113 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 59, fig. 

Ee-introduced in 1889 through the Eev. S. M. Macfarlane, who sent 
plants from New Guinea, in which country he laboured as a missionary. 

129 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

DENDEOBIUM KUHLII, Lindl. 

Lindl. Bot. Eeg. 1847, t. 47. 

Introduced from Java by Thomas Lobb, but does not appear to have 
lived long in cultivation, or to have excited much interest. 

DENDEOBIUM LASIOGLOSSUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 682 ; id. 1869, p. 277 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5825; Veitchs' Man. 

Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 52. 

Discovered in the forests of Burmah by Colonel Benson, and sent to 
Chelsea and to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, where it flowered for the 
first time in February 1868. 

The specific name refers to the hairy lip or labellum. 

DENDEOBIUM LEUCOLOPHOTUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xviii. p. 552 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iii. p. 53. 

Introduced through Curtis from the Malay Archipelago, the precise 
locality being unknown. 

Its chief value is the habit of flowering during November and December, 
when few other Dendrobes are in bloom. 

The specific name is from the Greek, " a tuft of long white hair," 
and refers to the long onersided racemes of white flowers, which bear 
a fancied resemblance to a horse's mane. 

DENDEOBIUM LINEALE, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 381. 

A species introduced from New Guinea, and flowered for the first time in 
October 1889 : the name lineale, " consisting of lines," was suggested by 
the numerous lines on the lips of the flower. 

DENDEOBIUM MACEOPHYLLUM, A. Bich., var. HUTTONI. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of New PI. for 1869, p. 24. 

A white variety of the type, now rare in cultivation. The plants were 
sent from the Moluccas by Hutton, after whom it was named. 

DENDEOBIUM MACEOPHYLLUM, A. Bich., var. VEITCHIANUM. 

Syns. D. Veitchianum, Lindl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5649 ; Lindl. in Bot. Reg. 1847, sub t. 25 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. 

p. 60. 

Sent to Exeter in 1846 by Thomas Lobb, who found it in the hottest 
jungles in the island of Java. 

130 



ORCHID SPECIES 

DENDEOBIUM MESOCHLOEUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Bot. Reg. 1847, t. 36 ; Paxt. PI. Gdn. vol. i. p. 63, fig. 43 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. iii. p. 61. 

This very desirable plant bearing flowers with a violet-like perfume was 
introduced from India, through Thomas Lobb, who gave no locality. 

DENDEOBIUM MOOEEI, F.Mwill. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 139; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 61. 

A small white-flowered species sent to us in 1878 by Mr. Charles Moore, 
Director of the Botanic Gardens at Sydney, New South Wales, to whom 
it is dedicated. A native of Lord Howe's Island, it was discovered in 1869 
by Mr. Fitzgerald, author of an illustrated work on the Australian 
Orchids. 

DENDEOBIUM PALPEBE^E, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Jour. Linn. Soc. x. p. 33 (1849) ; Paxt. PI. Gdn. 1850-1851, i. p. 48 ; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 67. 

Introduced in 1849 from Moulmein through Thomas Lobb. 

The specific name Palpebrae, " eye-lids," refers to the fringe of long 
hairs like eye-lashes near the base of the lip. It is found sparingly in 
Burmah, varying in colour from white to dark rose. 

DENDEOBIUM PETEI, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 107. 

Introduced by Peter C. M. Veitch, who discovered it in Polynesia, in a 
locality not recorded, and after whom it was named by Dr. Eeichenbach : 
probably now lost to cultivation. 

DENDEOBIUM POLYCAEPUM, Echb. /. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 492. 

This species, introduced from the Sondaic area by Curtis, does not 
appear to be now in cultivation. The flowers are often self-fertilized, 
and an abundance of seed-capsules produced ; hence the specific name. 

DENDEOBIUM PE.ECINCTUM, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. iii. p. 750. 

A small species of botanical interest only, introduced with an impor- 
tation of Dendrobium Devonianum, and apparently not now in cultivation. 

DENDEOBIUM SUBCLAUSUM, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, October, 1894 ; Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 655 (Report of 
R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

A brilliantly coloured and remarkable species introduced from the 

131 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

Malay Archipelago, with bright cinnabar-orange-coloured flowers which 
opened for the first time in July 1894. 

DENDEOBIUM SUPEKBIENS, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 515 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 76. 

One of the most striking of the Australian Dendrobes, a native of York 
Peninsula and some of the islands in Torres Strait, whence it was 
introduced by us in 1876, through the late Sir William MacArthur of 
Sydney, New South Wales. 

DENDEOBIUM SUPEEBUM, var. ANOSUM, Rchb. f. 

(a) Hutton's var. 

(b) Burke's var. 

Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 306 (Burke's var.) ; Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1206 
(Hutton's var.) ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 77. 

The variety anosum was introduced to this country by the collector 
Cuming, and is remarkable for the almost entire absence of the rhubarb- 
like odour which characterizes the species. 

Burke's variety is a very beautiful one, introduced in 1883 by the 
collector whose name it bears. The flowers are large, of a pure white 
colour, with the throat of the lip delicately pencilled with pale purple. 

Hutton's variety was sent home in 1869 from one of the islands in the 
Malay Archipelago, and resembles Burke's variety, but the throat of the 
lip is deep purple. 

DENDEOBIUM TAUEINUM, Lindl, var. AMBOINENSE. 

Orchid Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 304. 

A form of the Philippine " Bull's Head " Dendrobe, introduced through 
David Burke from the island of Amboina, and first flowered at Chelsea 
in 1897. 

The colour of the flowers differs from that of the type, the sepals 
being greenish-yellow suffused with bronzy brown ; the petals are deep 
purple-brown, as are the side lobes of the lip, the front lobe more 
nearly resembling the sepals in colour. 

DENDEOBIUM TETEACHEOMUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 712. 

Introduced from Borneo through Curtis, and named tetrachromum 
by Professor Eeichenbach from the " four colours " of its flowers. 

DENDEOBIUM TIPULIFEEUM, Rchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 72. 

A species, of botanical interest only, introduced from the Fiji Islands 
through Peter C. M. Veitch, and apparently lost to cultivation. 

132 



ORCHID SPECIES 

DENDKOBIUM TOBTILE, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1847, p. 797, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4477 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 
pt. iii. p. 81 ; Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 201, fig. 33. 

Introduced through Thomas Lobb in 1847 from the Mergui district in 
Tenasserim, British Burmah. 

The twisted sepals and petals of the flowers suggested the specific name. 
In colour they are rosy lilac, with a pale yellow lip blotched with purple 
at the base. 

DENDEOBIUM TEANSPAEENS, Wall. 

Paxt. PI. Gdn. vol. i. t. 27 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4663 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iii. p. 81. 

Discovered by Dr. Wallich in the early part of the last century, but not 
introduced to European gardens till 1852, in which year Thomas Lobb 
sent plants to Exeter. 

It was shortly afterwards sent to Kew, by Simons, from Assam. 

DENDEOBIUM XANTHOPHLEBIUM, Lindl. 

Syns. D. marginatum, Batem. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1857, p. 268; Bot. Mag. t. 5454; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. 

p. 84. 

Introduced from Moulmein through Thomas Lobb, and later by the 
Eev. C. Parish. It is now rarely seen in gardens. 

EPIDENDEUM BICAMEEATUM, Echb.f. 

Syns. E. Kwrwinskyi, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 710; id. 1871, p. 1194; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. 

p. 90. 

A native of Mexico in the neighbourhood of Oaxaca, where it was first 
discovered by Karwinsky, and subsequently by Galcotti and others. 

It was introduced in 1868, amongst an importation of Epidendrum 
vitellinum. 

EPIDENDEUM CNEMIDOPHOEUM, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1864, pp. 292 and 364 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5656 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL 

pt. vi. p. 92. 

Discovered in Guatemala by Mr. G. Ure-Skinner, who sent a few plants 
to some of his personal friends, and to Chelsea in 1864. The plant, rare 
in its native country, attains a height of 6 ft. or more, and the strongly- 
scented flowers are among the handsomest of the genus. 

EPIDENDEUM CEINIFEEUM, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1291 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6094 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL 

pt. vi. p. 95. 

Introduced through Endres, by whom it was discovered in Costa Eica 

133 K 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

in 1870. The specific name, from crinis, " a lock of hair," and ferre, " to 
bear," relates to the hair-like side lobes of the lip. 

EPIDENDEUM LINDLEYANUM, Bchb. /., var. CENTERS. 

Syns. Barkeria Lindleyana Centerae, Rchb. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 105 ; Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1597 ; The Garden, 1885, 

vol. xxvii. p. 396, pi. 490. 

Introduced from Costa Eica through Endres in 1873, and dedicated to 
Mrs. Center, wife of the then superintendent of the Panama Eailway. 

The flowers are larger than those of the type, purplish-lilac in colour, 
with a number of large blotches about the column. 

EPIDENDEUM PHYSODES, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 289. 

Sent from Costa Eica by Zahn. 

A small-flowered species with whitish-brown flowers, of botanical 
interest only, and apparently not now cultivated. 

EPIDENDEUM PSEUDEPIDENDEUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. Xen. Orch. i. p. 160, t. 53 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 763 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 5929; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 113, figs. 

Specimens of this species were orginally collected by Warscewicz, who 
presented them to Professor Eeichenbach, and from this material the 
description and plate in the Xenia were prepared. For twenty years no 
more was heard of the plant till Zahn sent home specimens, which flowered 
for the first time at Chelsea, in July 1871. 

The colouring of the flowers is peculiar, the sepals and petals being 
bright frog-green, and the labellum bright scarlet. 

EPIDENDEUM SYEINGOTHYESIS, Bchb. /. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6145 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. p. 121. 

Introduced to Chelsea by Pearce in 1868, and flowered for the first time 
in May of the following year. It is a native of Bolivia, and had previously 
been gathered in the neighbourhood of Sorata, and also in the Andean 
valley of Challasuya by Man don, who sent specimens to Professor 
Eeichenbach. 

The great size of the dense-flowered raceme, and its general resemblance 
in form and colour to the Lilac, suggested the specific name. 

EPIDENDEUM THEOMBODES, Bchb. f. 

Linnea, xli. p. 79; Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 606 (W. B. Hemsley's List of 

Garden Orchids). 

A species allied to Epidendrum aromaticum with yellow flowers 

134 



ORCHID SPECIES 

blotched with purple-brown introduced from Peru in 1883. Of botanical 
interest only, it is now lost to cultivation. 

EPIDENDBUM WALLISII, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, p. 66 ; id. 1878, p. 462 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vi. 

p. 126. 

Introduced through Gustav Wallis (after whom it is named) in 1874 from 
New Grenada, where it grows in light situations at an elevation of from 
4,000-7,000 ft. 

It is of value horticulturally on account of the flowers which are large for 
species of this genus, and continue to be produced almost throughout the 
year. They measure some 2 in. across, are of a yellow colour with 
spots of purple, and streaks of the last-named colour are prominent on the 
spreading whitish lip. Epidendrum Wallisii is also the parent of several 
very interesting hybrids, equally valuable for the long period over which 
they remain in bloom. 

EBIA CUBTISII, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 685. 

Sent from Borneo by Curtis. The flowers are yellowish white, equal to 
those of Eria Ibera and similar species ; the oblong bracts are unusually 
developed, in the way of those of E. bractescens, Lindl. It does not 
appear to be now in cultivation. 

EBIA IGNEA, Rchb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 782. 

Imported from Borneo. The flowers are chrome-yellow, but the large 
bracts are almost vermilion in colour, from which feature the plant takes 
its specific name. 

GALEANDBA BABBATA, Lem. 

Lem. in 1'Illus. Hort. iii. pp. 86, 89 ; id. vol. vii. t. 248 ; Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1892, 

vol. xii. p. 431. 

An Amazonian species introduced about the year 1856 and flowered 
shortly afterwards. 

Its specific name is derived from the beard or tuft of hair on the disc of 
the lip. 

GOODYEBA (GEOBCHIS) MACBANTHA, Maxim. 

Fl. des Serres, 1867-68, torn. vii. p. 113 ; Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 1022, fig. 

Brought to this country by the late John Gould Veitch on his return 
from Japan. The foliage is prettily marked as in certain Ancectochili, 
and renders the plant worthy of cultivation for that feature alone. 

135 



HOULLETIA BEOCKLEHUESTIANA, Lindl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4072; Paxt. Mag. Bot. ix. p. 49; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 121. 

This species first flowered in the collection of Mr. Brocklehurst of the 
Firs, near Macclesfield, in the year 1841, but remained scarce in gardens 
until William Lobb detected it on the Organ Mountains, and sent plants 
to Exeter in 1842. It is now found in many collections. 

L^LIA ANGEPS, Lindl, var. VEITCHIANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 274; The Garden, 1884, vol. xxv. p. 534, pi. 446, fig. 7 ; 
Orchid Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 53. 

A light form found in an importation of the type. The sepals and petals 
are white with sometimes a faint tint of rose, and the largely developed 
lobes of the lip are of a soft lilac tint delicately pencilled with purple. 

LIPAEIS FORMOSANA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 394. 

Discovered in Formosa by Charles Maries, by whom seeds were sent to 
England, and flowered for the first time in March 1880. 

The sepals and petals of the flowers are very light purple with green 
borders ; the lip dark brown with a similar green border, and the peduncle 
a beautiful purple. 

LYCASTE LASIOGLOSSA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 215 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6251 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. 

p. 90. 

Introduced from Guatemala in 1871, this most interesting member of 
the genus has flowers somewhat dull in colour, differing from all others in 
its shaggy lip, resembling the Paphinias, which suggested the specific 
name. 

LYCASTE LINGUELLA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 738 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6303. 

Introduced from Peru about the year 1870 ; a green-flowered species 
remarkable for the structure of the lip, which protrudes from the centre of 
the flower in the form of a little tongue. 

LYCASTE LOCUSTA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 524 ; Orchid Review, 1898, p. 136 ; Bot. Mag. 

t. 8020. 

An interesting species remarkable for its dull green flowers and the 
white fringe which extends all round the front of the lip. 

Found by Walter Davis in Peru, it flowered for the first time at Chelsea 
in 1879. Subsequently apparently lost sight of, it has during recent years 

136 



ORCHID SPECIES 

been re-introduced, and is now cultivated in Botanic Gardens on account 
of its very curious flowers. 

LYCASTE SKINNEEI, Lindl., var. SUPEEBA. 

Fl. Mag. 1861, pi. 24. 

A superb variety sent to us with several other distinct forms by Mr. 
G. Ure-Skinner from Guatemala, and flowered for the first time in April 
1860. 

MASDEVALLIA ATTENUATA, Bchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 834 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6273. 

A species from Costa Eica of little horticultural value, but of interest 
botanically as a white-flowered species, a rather rare occurrence in this 
genus. The sepals are elongated into long yellow tails. 

MASDEVALLIA BAEL^IANA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 170 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 25. 

Discovered by Walter Davis on the Andes of Peru, near Cuzco, and 
introduced in 1875. 

It was dedicated to Senhor J. B. Barla, at that time Brazilian Consul at 
Nice, well known for his orchidologic works, as well as for his special 
knowledge of the Floras of Liguria and Sardinia. 

MASDEVALLIA COCCINEA, Lindl., var. HAEEYANA. 

Syns. M. Hwrryana, Echb. f. ; M. Lindenii, Andre, var. Harryana. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 34, fig. opposite ; Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1421 ; 
Fl. Mag. 1871, t. 555 ; Fl. and Pom. (1873) p. 169 ; La Belg. Hort.1873, t. 21 ; Fl. des 
Serres, torn. xxi. t. 2250 ; 1'Illus. Hort. 1873, p. 167, t. 142 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5990. 

There are many varieties of the typical and very fine Masdevallia coccinea 
to which the one under notice is far superior from a horticultural point of 
view. 

It was discovered by Chesterton in 1871 on the eastern side of the 
Cordillera near Sogamosa, where it has a vertical range of from 7,000- 
10,000 ft. 

The flowers are extremely variable in colour, almost every shade, from 
deep crimson-purple, through magenta-crimson, crimson-scarlet, orange, 
yellow to cream-white being represented ; the lighter shades of yellow are 
the rarest. 

MASDEVALLIA DAVISII, Bchb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. vol. ii. pp. 710, 711 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6190; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL 

pt. v. p. 38, figs. 

This species, remarkable for its size and the colour of its flowers, was 
discovered by Walter Davis near the City of Cuzco on the eastern Cordil- 

137 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

lera of Peru, and flowered for the first time in this country in August 1874. 
It is found in the crevices of rocks on the slopes of the mountains at an 
immense elevation, probably not less than 10,500-12,000 ft., but within 
a restricted area, extending a few miles only along the flanks of the 
mountains, and within the vertical limits above mentioned. 

MASDEVALLIA GAKGANTUA, Echb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 516 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 43. 

Introduced in 1874 from the Frontino district in New Grenada through 
Gustav Wallis. When first expanded the flower emits a strong fetid 
odour. It is closely allied to Masdevallia elephanticeps, and by some 
authorities considered only a form of that species. 

MASDEVALLIA IONOCHAEIS, Echb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 388 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6262 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

pt. v. p. 48. 

A pretty free-flowering species introduced by us in 1874 from Peru 
through Walter Davis, who discovered it in the Andean valley of Sandia, 
in the province of Caravaya, at 9,000-10,000 ft. elevation. The flowers 
are white blotched with violet-purple, the " tails " yellow, spreading, and 
slender. 

MASDEVALLIA LATA, Echb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 653. 

A two-flowered species with dark reddish-brown sepals and yellowish 
tails, introduced from Central America through Zahn, but not now in 
cultivation in this country. The name lata was given by Professor 
Eeichenbach on account of the broad basis of the sepals. 

MASDEVALLIA MACEODACTYLA, Echb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 571. 

Imported from New Grenada, and flowered in April 1872. The flowers 
are small, greenish-yellow with purple markings, and there are two brown 
nerves on the petals. The tails are long and the peduncles warty. 

MASDEVALLIA PEEISTEEIA, Echb.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 500 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6159 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. xxii. 
t. 2346 ; 1'Illus. Hort. s. 3, t. 327 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 57. 

One of the handsomest coriaceous Masdevallias, introduced from New 
Grenada in 1873 through Gustav Wallis, who met with it in the province 
of Antioquia. 

It derives its specific name Peristeria from the resemblance of its 
column and petals to the same organs in the Dove Plant Peristeria elata. 

138 



ORCHID SPECIES 

The labellum is singularly coloured, and covered with numerous 
amethystine papillae. 

MASDEVALLIA POLYSTICTA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1874, vol. i. p. 338, 290 ; id. 1875, vol. iii. p. 656, fig. ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 6368 ; Veitchs' Man. Oroh. PI. pt. v. p. 58. 

This species, flowered for the first time in England at Chelsea in the 
spring of 1875, is a native of Peru, and is said by Eeichenbach to have 
been imported thence to the Botanic Gardens of Zurich by Mr. Ortiges. 

The specific name, meaning "much spotted," refers to the spotted 
perianth. 

MASDEVALLIA BADIOSA, Rchb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 684 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 59, fig. 

opposite. 

Introduced from New Grenada in 1873-1874 through Gustav Wallis, by 
whom it was discovered near Prontino at an elevation of 8,000 ft. The 
flower is remarkable, tawny yellow in colour, densely spotted with 
blackish-purple, while the tails, 2 to 3 in. in length, are dull blackish- 
purple, paler towards the tips. 

MASDEVALLIA EEICHENBACHIANA, Endres. 

Syns. N. Normani, Hort. Norman. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 257; id. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 230; Lindenia, vi. 
t. 250 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 60. 

Introduced from Costa Rica through Endres in 1873 and named at his 
request in compliment to Professor Beichenbach of Hamburg. 

The nodding flowers are purple-brown above, yellowish -white beneath, 
and the three yellow tails reflex. 

MASDEVALLIA SIMULA, Rchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, p. 8 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 63. 

Introduced in 1874 from New Grenada through Chesterton. 

It is a minute csespitose plant, with gem-like flowers not more than 
| in. in diameter, but of surprising beauty when closely examined or seen 
through a magnifying glass. 

MASDEVALLIA TBIABISTELLA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. pp. 226, 559, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6268 ; Veitchs' 

Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 66. 

Introduced through Endres, by whom it was discovered in Costa Bica 
in 1875. 

It is the type species of Beichenbach's section of the genus, called 
TriaristellsB, which approach in their structure the genus Bestrepia. 

They are of value as botanical curiosities. 

139 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

MASDEVALLIA VEITCHIANA, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Ckron. 1868, p. 814; Bot. Mag. t. 5739; Fl. des Serres, torn. xvii. 
t. 1803 ; Fl. Mag. t. 481 ; Fl. and Pom. 1873, p. 169, fig. 1 ; Veitchs' Man. 
Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 67, fig. 

Masdevallia Veitchiana was discovered in the lofty Andes of Peru by 
Pearce in 1866, and successfully introduced by him. 

A few years later it was re-discovered in the same locality by Walter 
Davis, who states that it grows in the crevices and hollows of the rocks 
with but little soil, at an altitude of 11,000-13,000 ft. 

It is a variable plant, the flowers differing in size, colour, and in 
the manner in which the papillae is spread over the inner surface of the 
sepals. A large-flowered form, grandiflora, may be distinguished by 
having the upper sepal densely and uniformly covered with purple papillae, 
while in the lateral two this covering is confined entirely to the outer 
half, the inner being of the purest orange-scarlet and destitute of papillae. 

MAXILLAEIA CTENOSTACHYA, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 39. 

Imported from Costa Eica, but not now in cultivation. The tails of the 
yellow flowers are so long as to resemble the Brassias. 

MILTONIA ENDEESII, Nicholson. 

Syns. Odontoglossum Warsceiviczii, Rchb. f. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. ii. p. 368 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, p. 270 ; Bob. Mag. 
t. 6163 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 101. 

Originally discovered by Warscewicz in 1849, in restricted numbers, 
growing in only two localities on leguminous trees, it was twenty-two 
years later re-discovered by M. Linden's collector, Wallis, who tried 
unsuccessfully to introduce it. In 1873 it was found by Endres in 
Central America, and through him, after several attempts, we succeeded 
in introducing it. The first flowers were produced by a plant at Chelsea 
in 1875. 

MILTONIA VEXILLAEIA, Benth. 

Syns. Odontoglossum vexillarium, Rchb. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. ii. p. 369 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 901 ; id. 1872, p. 667 ; 
id. 1873, pp. 580, 644, fi s s. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6037; Fl. Mag. n.s. t. 73; 1'Illus. Hort. 
xx. t. 113 ; Rev. Hort. 1876, p. 390 ; La Belg. Hort. xxx. p. 257 ; Fl. des Serres, 
xx. t. 2058 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 110. 

This well-known orchid was probably first discovered by the unfortunate 
Bowman, when collecting in New Grenada. 

Subsequently found by Wallis, and again later by W. Eoezl; both 
sent home plants which arrived dead or in a dying condition. With 
scanty information Henry Chesterton undertook, at our request, to 

140 




MASDEVALLIA VEITCHIANA 



ORCHID SPECIES 

endeavour to bring a consignment home, in which he succeeded, and the 
first flowers opened at Chelsea in June 1873. 

There are several natural varieties, and many in cultivation, that differ 
from the species in colour only. 

MOEMODES FEACTIFLEXUM, Echb. f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 141. 

Imported from Costa Eica. 

Professor Eeichenbach says of it (loc. cit.), " It would be Mormodes 
Buccinator if only it had a strict and compact raceme." The sepals and 
petals are of a whitish-green with purplish streaks and dots, the lip white 
with radiating purple streaks. 

MOEMODES OC AISLE, Rchb. f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. pp. 582 and 178, figs. 133, 134 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6496; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 137, fig. p. 138. 

Originally discovered by Schlim on the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, 
near Ocana. Professor Eeichenbach described it in Walper's " Annales 
Botanices," from his specimens. 

Subsequently gathered by Kalbreyer in the same region, it was success- 
fully introduced, flowering for the first time in October 1879. 

The flowers are of a peculiar shape, orange-yellow in colour, closely 
speckled with red-brown spots. 

MOEMODES SKINNEEI, Echb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 50. 

An interesting species obtained from Central America through the 
late Mr. G. Ure-Skinner, to whose memory it is dedicated. 

The sepals and petals are honey-coloured with five longitudinal bars or 
lines of a dragon's blood colour. The lip is deep yellow with red spots 
and white hairs. 

MOEMODES WENDLANDI, Echb. f. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 22. 

A singular orchid, native of New Grenada, introduced through 
Kalbreyer. 

The flowers are delightfully fragrant, and bright yellow in colour. The 
lip is peculiar and not inaptly described as resembling a cocked hat ; the 
column has the characteristic twist of all species of Mormodes. 

NASONIA PUNCTATA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5718. 

A curious little orchid of botanical interest only, originally discovered 

141 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

by Hartweg in the mountains of El Sisme in Peru, and flowered for the 
first time at Chelsea in April 1868. 

NOTYLIA ALBIDA, Klotzsch. 
Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 987; Bot. Mag. t. 6311. 

A native of Central America, first introduced to this country by 
Warscewicz, who sent plants to the gardens of the Horticultural Society. 

Ee-imported by us, it flowered for the first time in April 1872, dense 
racemes, producing white flowers some 6 in. or more in length. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM BAPHICANTHUM, Bchb.f. 

Syns. 0. odoratum, var. baphicanthum, Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 260; id. 1883, vol. xix. p. 310; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. i. p. 55. 

This originally appeared in one of our importations from New Grenada, 
and is probably of hybrid origin, and possibly a natural hybrid between 
Odontoglossum crispum and O. gloriosum. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM BLANDUM, Bchb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1342 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 14, fig. opposite. 

Odontoglossum blandum was first discovered by Mr. Blunt in 1863-1865 
in New Grenada, but the plants perished during transmission to Europe, 
and several subsequent consignments met with a similar fate. Its first 
appearance in a living state was at Stevens's Eooms, where plants were 
purchased by the Koyal Horticultural Society, which flowered at Chiswick 
in 1871. It was still very scarce till Kalbreyer sent us a moderate 
importation of plants in 1879 ; it is still uncommon in collections. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM BBACHYPTEBUM, Bchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 552; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 71. 

Believed to be a natural hybrid of which Odontoglossum nobile or 
O. Pescatorei is one, and O. luteo-purpureum the other parent, and sent 
by Kalbreyer from New Grenada. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM COEONAEIUM, LindL, var. DAYANUM. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 226. 

Introduced from Peru. The sepals and petals are yellow, marbled with 
brown, and are distinct from the type not only in colour but in having 
three conical acute warts each side of the crest. Flowered for the first 
time in September 1875 with Mr. Day of Tottenham. 

142 



ORCHID SPECIES 

ODONTOGLOSSUM DELTOGLOSSUM, Rchb. f. 

Syns. 0. odoratum, var. deltoglossum, Hort. Veitch. 
Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 202 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 56. 

This supposed natural hybrid between Odontoglossom crispum and 
0. gloriosum appeared in an importation of these two species. 

It is distinguished from 0. Andersonianum, of similar origin, by a more 
deltoid lip, and the floral segments are sulphur-yellow blotched with 
brown. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM DENISON^l, Hort., var. CHESTEKTONII. 

Syns. 0. crispum, var. Chestertonii, Rchb. f. 

Rolfe in Orchid Review, 1899, vol. vii. p. 361, fig. 18; Gard. Chron. 1876, p. 374; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 26. 

A beautiful Odontoglossum introduced through Chesterton, whose name 
it bears. It was formerly considered a variety of 0. crispum, but is now 
thought to be a natural hybrid between O. luteopurpureum and O. 
crispum, the flowers being exactly intermediate in shape between those 
of the two species named. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM KEAMEEI, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 98, fig. ; Fl. Mag. t. 406 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5778 ; Fl. dea 
Serres, t. 2469 ; 1'Illus. Hort. t. 562. 

A native of Costa Eica, where it was discovered by Carl Kramer, and 
introduced through him in 1868. 

A rare plant, said to be restricted to a single locality on the mountain 
slopes near the Pacific Coast, it is now well nigh exterminated owing to 
the destruction of the forests for agricultural purposes. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM LEEANUM, Rchb. f. 

Syns. 0. odoratum, var. Leeanum, Kent. 
Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 525. 

This variety appeared in an importation from Columbia, and was named 
in compliment to Mr. W. Lee of Leatherhead, a leading amateur of orchids 
in his day. 

It is supposed to be a natural hybrid between Odontoglossum gloriosum 
and 0. crispum. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM COEADINEI, Rchb. f. 

Syns. 0. Lindleyanum, var. Coradinei, Hort. Veitch. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 1068, fig. ; Orchid Album, ii. t. 90 ; Gard. Chron. 1896, 
vol. xix. p. 233 (Rolfe on Natural Hybrids) ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 43. 

Introduced in an importation of Odontoglossum crispum in 1872. 

143 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Keichenbach, in naming the plant, suggested it was probably a natural 
hybrid between 0. triumphans and some species of the odoratum group. 
It is now recognized, however, that 0. crispum and O. Lindleyanum are 
the two parents. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM (EBSTEDII, Bchb.f. 

Kchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 302 ; The Garden, 1884, vol. xxvi. t. 454 ; Bot. 
Mag. t. 6820 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 57, fig. 

Professor Eeichenbach believed that Warscewicz was the first to dis- 
cover this plant, as a sketch in his possession made by Warscewicz seemed 
to be referable to this species. 

It was afterwards found by Dr. CErsted, and later by Kramer and 
Endres, the last-named sending plants to us in 1872. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM PESCATOREI, Lindl., var. VEITCHIANUM. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 588 ; The Garden, 1884, vol. xxvi. t. 452 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 59-60 (frontispiece). 

A superb variety which appeared in one of our own importations of 
the type. 

The flowers, which opened for the first time in this country in March 
1882, are larger than the type and richly blotched with magenta-purple. 

It is probable the whole stock of the plant is in the unrivalled collection 
belonging to Baron Sir Henry Schroder at The Dell, Egham. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM PR^NITENS, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 524 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6229 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. i. p. 62. 

A rare species introduced in 1874 through Gustav Wallis, by whom it 
was discovered on the eastern Cordillera of New Grenada in the province of 
Pamplona. 

Only a few plants were received from the discoverer, and it has probably 
not since been re-imported. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM EETUSUM, Lindl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7569. 

A rare species discovered hy Hartweg in 1841 on rocks in the 
mountains of Saraguru, near Loxa, Ecuador, and first flowered at Chelsea 
in 1882. In habit and inflorescence it resembles Odontoglossum Edwardii, 
but the flowers are orange-red in colour with a green line at the base of 
the sepals and petals. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM UROSKINNERI, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1859, pp. 708, 724 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. i. p. 69, fig. 

Sent to Chelsea from Guatemala by Mr. Ure- Skinner, in 1854, but not 

144 




ODONTOGLOSSUM URO-SKINNERI 

THE ROYAL GARDENS, KEW 



ORCHID SPECIES 

flowered till 1859, a delay due to the defective treatment cool orchids then 
received. 

The fairly large flowers, chestnut-brown mottled with green with a white 
lip, are produced usually during the months of July and August when but 
few species of the genus are in bloom. 

ONCIDIUM ANTHOCEENE, Bchb.f. 

Orchid Album, ix. t. 392 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 9. 

Originally discovered by Gustav Wallis while collecting in New 
Grenada in 1872-1873, and subsequently by Chesterton through whom it 
was introduced. 

The specific name, a " fountain of flowers," is a fanciful one. 

ONCIDIUM BEYOLOPHOTUM, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 738. 

Introduced from Central America. A dimorphous species bearing large 
panicles of greenish flowers among which appear bright yellow ones with 
purplish streaks, the whole inflorescence compared by the author of the 
name to a German Christmas Tree. It does not appear to be in cultivation 
at the present time. 

ONCIDIUM CHEYSODIPTEEUM, Veitch. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 23, fig. 

A species acquired by us at an auction sale and flowered for the first 
timein the spring of 1891. The specific name, literally " golden wings," 
refers to the exceptionally bright and attractive yellow petals, contrasting 
strongly with the chestnut-brown of the remainder of the flower. 

ONCIDIUM CUETUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Bot. Beg. 1847, t. 68 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. pi. viii. p. 33. 
Introduced from the Organ Mountains, Brazil, through William Lobb in 
1841-1842. The flowers are variable in colour and sometimes resemble 
those of Oncidium praetextum, but O. curtum may be easily distinguished 
by the very different crest on the lip. 

ONCIDIUM EUXANTHINUM, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1158 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6322. 

Imported from Brazil in 1869 ; the plate in the Botanical Magazine 
was prepared from a plant which flowered at Chelsea in 1871. 
It has now become very scarce, if not quite lost to cultivation. 

ONCIDIUM GLOSSOMYSTAX, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii.p. 489. 

A species of little interest horticulturally, introduced from New Grenada 
through Kalbreyer. 

145 



HORTUS VEITCH1I 

The flowers although small are interesting to the botanist, light yellow 
in colour with a few brown blotches, with the distinguishing feature of two 
pairs of keels on the disk of the lip, each keel being covered with very 
many white hairs. 

ONCIDIUM METALLICUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 394. 

Introduced from New Grenada, where it was discovered by Wallis. 

The flowers are of a rich chestnut-brown colour with a distinct metallic 
hue, the borders of the superior sepal and smaller petals being blotched 
with rich yellow. 

ONCIDIUM PEJETEXTUM, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1206 ; id. 1881, vol. xv. p. 720 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6662 ; 
Rolfe in Orchid Eeview, 1904, vol. xii. p. 293. 

This Brazilian Oncidium was first known in 1873 from specimens 
collected in the province of San Paulo by Mr. B. D. Jones, by whom they 
were sent to Mr. John H. Wilson of Liverpool. 

Four years later we introduced plants from Eio de Janeiro, and 
exhibited them in flower before the Royal Horticultural Society in August 
1878, when a First Class Certificate was awarded. 

ONCIDIUM SUPEEBIENS, Bchb.f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5980; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pfc. viii. p. 81, fig. 

A native of the forests of Venezuela and New Grenada, where it was 
discovered at about the same time by Fiinck and Slim, in 1847, and by 
Purdie in the province of Ocafia. It was introduced to this country in 
1871, and first flowered at Chelsea in the spring of 1872. 

ONCIDIUM TECTUM, Bchb. /. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 780; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 82. 

Introduced from New Grenada, through Gustav Wallis in 1874, this 
Oncidium is of little horticultural value, and seldom seen outside a 
Botanic garden. 

The peculiar zigzag branching of the inflorescence, common to the 
Oncidia, is very strongly pronounced in this species. 

ONCIDIUM WAESCEWICZII, Bchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 560, 1874, p. 48; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 91. 

Originally discovered by Warscewicz on Chiriqui, in Veragua, in 1852, 
but lost sight of until re-introduced from Costa Eica in 1870. 

It is one of the most distinct of the many species of Oncidium, and 

146 



ORCHID SPECIES 

although somewhat resembling O. bracteatum is very different in the 
colour of its flowers. 

PACHYSTOMA THOMSONIANUM, Bchb. f. 

Syns. Ancistrochilus Thomsonianus, Rolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. pp. 582 and 625, fig.; Bot. Mag. t. 6471; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 4, fig. ; The Garden, 1888, vol. xxxiii. p. 175, fig. ; Rolfe 
in Orchid Review, 1904, vol. xii. p. 297, fig. 43. 

Introduced through Kalbreyer, by whom it was discovered on the 
mountains of Old Calabar, West Tropical Africa, and dedicated at his 
request to the Eev. George Thomson, for many years a missionary in that 
part of the world. 

It is remarkable for its beauty and that the nearest allies are Asiatic, 
connecting the floras of those widely sundered regions. 

PHAIUS BLUMEI, LindL, var. BERNAYSII. 
Syns. P. grandifolius, var. Blumei, sub-var. Bernaysii, Veitch ; P. Bernaysii, Row. MSS. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 77; Bot. Mag. t. 6032; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

pt. vi. p. 11. 

Flowered in March 1873, and described by Professor Eeichenbach 
(loc. cit.) from material supplied by us, and by Dr. Hooker in the 
Botanical Magazine. 

It is possibly a form of the variety Blumei, differing only in the colour 
of the flowers, which are primrose -yellow, and of little value horti- 
culturally on account of the blooms being often self-fertilized before they 
expand. 

PHAIUS CALLOSUS, LindL 

Syiis. Limodorum callosum, Blume. 
Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 287, with fig. ; Rchb. Xen. Orch. t. 122. 

A native of Java, first flowered in March 1848, the specific name, 
"thick-lipped," being derived from the prominent callus which passes from 
the lip down the tube. The flowers are reddish-brown in colour, tipped 
with dingy-white. 

PHAIUS PHILIPPINENSIS, N. E. Br. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 239 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 13. 

Discovered by David Burke on the slopes of the hills at 3,000-4,000 ft. 
elevation, in the Island of Mindanao, and interesting as being the first 
species of the genus Phaius to be discovered in the Philippines. 

It flowered for the first time at Chelsea in 1889. As a species it is 
remarkably distinct, especially in the structure of its lip, which is truncate 
and slightly frilled. 

147 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

PHAL^NOPSIS AMABILIS, Blume. 

Syiis. P. grandiflora, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 39, with woodcut; Bot. Mag. t. 5184; Veitchs' Man. 
Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 23, figs. ; Kolfe in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 168. 

Introduced into British gardens by Thomas Lobb, who sent plants from 
Java to Exeter in 1846, which flowered for the first time in this country 
in September of the following year. All collectors in that region since 
Lobb mention Phalaenopsis amabilis, and agree in reporting it as growing 
near the sea-shore, sometimes high up on the trees and sometimes lower 
down. Burbidge found it in Labuan and North Borneo, Curtis detected it 
in North Celebes, and Burke met with a small-flowered variety in South- 
West New Guinea. 

The species was known as early as 1750, in which, year Kumphius 
figured it in his Herbarium Amboinense. 

PHAL^ENOPSIS COENINGIANA, Echb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 620. 

Described by Professor Eeichenbach from materials supplied by us, 
and dedicated to Mr. Erastus Corning, the pioneer of orchid-growing in 
America, whose collection at Albany, New York, was so famous in 
its day. 

PHAL^ENOPSIS INTEEMEDIA, Lindl. 

Syns. P. Lobbii, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1852, p. 230 (notice of exhibit) ; Lindl. in Paxt. PL Gdn. 1853, vol. iii. 
p. 163, fig. 310; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vii. p. 44, fig.; Gard. Chron. 
1886, vol. xxvi. p. 169 ; id. 1896, vol. xix. p. 106. 

Introduced by Thomas Lobb in 1852 among an importation of Pha- 
lasnopsis Aphrodite. 

Later a French traveller, named M. Porte, brought two more plants 
from the Philippine Islands, after which thirteen years elapsed before a 
further addition was made by Messrs. Low & Co. 

Lindley was the first to surmise the existence of natural hybrids on 
seeing a flower of Phalaenopsis intermedia, which combined the characters 
of P. Aphrodite and those of P. rosea. 

In 1886 Seden flowered a hybrid at Chelsea, which had as parents 
P. Aphrodite and P. rosea, which proved to be identical with the P. inter- 
media of Lindley, and confirmed the supposition. 

PHAL^NOPSIS MACULATA, Echb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 134 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. vii. p. 31. 

Introduced from Sarawak in Borneo in 1880, through Curtis, by 
whom it was discovered growing on the limestone hills at an altitude of 

148 



ORCHID SPECIES 

1,000-1,500 ft., on damp almost bare rocks, under the shade of trees. It 
is one of the smallest of the genus, the flowers being only some | to f in. 
in diameter. 

PHAL^INOPSIS MABLEJ, Burbidge. 

Burbidge in Orchid Album, ii. t. 80, et sub t. 87 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6964 ; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 32 ; Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 277. 

Discovered by Burbidge when in the Sulu Archipelago in 1878, and 
dedicated by him to his wife. It was subsequently detected by David 
Burke on the hills near the south-east coast of the island of Mindanao, 
plentiful on the trunks and branches of trees in dense shade. It is a hand- 
some species, allied to Phaleenopsis Lueddemanniana and P. sumatrana. 

PHAL^INOPSIS EOSEA, Lindl 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 671, fig. ; Paxt. PI. Gdn. 1852, t. 72 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 5212 ; PI. des Serres, torn. xvi. t. 1645 ; Veitchs 1 Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 34. 

Introduced from Manila through Thomas Lobb in 1848, it is one of the 
commonest of the Philippine Islands' Phalaenopses, and is found in 
abundance in the hot valleys and along the streams in the neighbourhood 
of Manila. 

Under cultivation it has helped in the production of many fine hybrids, 
of which Phalaenopsis X Artemis (P. amabilis x P. rosea) ; P. X Cassandra 
(P. Stuartiana x P. rosea) ; P. x Hebe (P. Sanderiana x P. rosea) ; 
P. x Vesta (P. rosea leucaspis x P. Aphrodite), are the most noteworthy. 

PHAL^NOPSIS SUMATEANA, Echb. /., var. PAUCIVITTATA. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 628 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 40. 

PHAL^NOPSIS SUMATEANA, Bchb. /., var. SANGUINEA. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 782 j Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 40. 

Both these varieties occurred in an importation of the species sent by 
Curtis from Borneo. 

The former variety has fewer and paler markings on the sepals and 
petals, whilst in the variety sanguinea they are suffused with red-brown. 

PHALJENOPSIS x VEITCHIANA, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 935; id. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 270; PI. Mag. n.s. t. 213; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 47. 

A supposed natural hybrid, one of the rarest and most distinct, between 
Phalaenopsis Schilleriana and P. rosea, which appeared as a solitary 
specimen amongst our importation prior to 1872. 

PHAL^NOPSIS VIOLACEA, Teijsm. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 234; id. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 145, fig. j PI. Mag. 
1879, n.s. t. 342 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 41, figs. 

Originally discovered by Teijsman near Pelambang, in Sumatra, in 

149 L 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

1859, and by him sent to the Botanic Garden at Leyden, where it first 
flowered in Europe in 1861. 

Nothing more was heard of the plant until Mr. Murton, of the Botanic 
Garden of Singapore, sent plants to Mr. M. H. Williams, of Tredrea, in 
Cornwall, and to Chelsea, in both of which establishments it flowered 
in 1878. 

It remained rare in European collections until 1880, when Curtis sent a 
consignment from Sumatra, where it was discovered growing under the 
same conditions as Phalasnopsis sumatrana. 

PLEUEOTHALLIS INSIGNIS, Rolfe. 

Syns. P. glossopogon, Nicholson, non Rchb. f. 
Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 477 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6936. 

A curious orchid of botanical interest only, the native country of which 
is not recorded, but is in all probability Venezuela. 

In growth something like a Masdevallia, the flowers are remarkable for 
their acuminate sepals and long bristle-like petals. 

POLYCYNIS GEATIOSA, Endr. & Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1451. 

Discovered in Costa Eica by Endres ; closely allied to Polycynis lepida, 
but differing from that species in slight structural details of the lip. 

EENANTHEEA MATUTINA, Lindl. 

Syns. Aerides matutinum, Blume. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 85 ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1847, misc. 

First discovered by Blume in 1824, growing on trees at the foot of 
Mount Salak, Java, from which locality it was introduced twenty years 
later through Thomas Lobb. For a long time subsequent to its introduc- 
tion it remained very rare, but subsequent importations caused it to be 
more generally distributed. The flowers are some 2 in. in diameter, 
bright reddish- crimson toned with yellow, changing with age to orange- 
yellow. 

EESTEEPIA ELEGANS, Karst. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5966. 

A lovely little orchid, first cultivated in Europe by Messrs. Linden of 
Brussels, and first flowered in this country by us in February 1872. 

It is a native of Caraccas, where it inhabits mossy tree trunks at eleva- 
tions of 5,000-6,000 ft. The flowers are too small to be of any horticultural 
value, but are of great interest to the botanist. 

150 



ORCHID SPECIES 

EODBIGUEZIA LEOCHILINA, Rchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 970. 

Introduced from Costa Eica and flowered at Chelsea in July 1871. It 
is closely allied to Kodriguezia maculata, from which species it differs 
in its even white lip. 

SACCOLABIUM BIGIBBUM, Rchb. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5767 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 113. 

Discovered by Colonel Benson in Upper Burmah and sent to us in 
1868. 

It is still occasionally imported amongst Burmese orchids. 

The plant is of dwarf habit, the flowers small, of a yellow colour, with a 
triangular whitish fringed lip. 

SACCOLABIUM GIGANTEUM, Lindl 

Bot. Mag. t. 5635 ; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 1194; PI. des Serres, torn. xvii. t. 1765; 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 25 ; id. Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 114, fig. 

First discovered in the early part of the last century by one of Dr. 
Wallich's collectors near Prome in Lower Burmah. In 1859 it was next 
heard of, having been sent to Dr. Sumner, Bishop of Winchester, in whose 
garden at Farnham Castle it flowered in the autumn of 1862. 

Plants continued to be extremely rare until re-introduced through 
Colonel Benson in 1866 from Prome and Thayetmayo. 

SACCOLABIUM HUTTONI, Hook. 

Syns. Aerides Huttoni, Hort. Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 23; Bot. Mag. t. 5681 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. 

p. 70. 

Introduced through Henry Hutton in 1866, and received only shortly 
after his early death in the Eastern Archipelago. 

The exact locality whence Hutton introduced his plants is not known, 
and the plant remained scarce until again found by Curtis in 1882 in 
North Celebes, growing on mangrove trees near the sea-shore. 

SACCOLABIUM MINIATUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Bot. Reg. 1847, sub t. 26; id. t. 58; Bot. Mag. t. 5326; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 
PI. pt. vii. p. 117 ; Orchid Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 178. 

Introduced from Java by Thomas Lobb in 1846, but now rarely seen in 
orchid collections in this country. The racemes of small but richly 
coloured flowers are produced in May and continue a long time in perfec- 
tion. According to The Orchid Eeview, above quoted, there is probably an 
error in recording Java as its home, as it has not since been collected in 

151 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

that country and does not appear in the earlier herbaria. It has since 
been met with by Dr. Watt on the Naga Hills east of Khasia, and as 
Lobb visited that locality, there is a probability that the plants were 
collected there in the first instance. 

SAECANTHUS CHEYSOMELAS, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 662. 

Introduced from Moulmein through Colonel Benson, by whom it was 
discovered. This species has handsome foliage and gold and purple 
flowers. 

SAECANTHUS FLEXUS, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 492. 

A botanical curiosity imported from Borneo : the flowers are yellowish- 
brown tipped with reddish-brown, and slightly larger than those of 
Sarcanthus paniculatus, Lindl. 

SAECOCHILUS LUNIFEEUS, Benth. 

Syiis. Thrixspermum luniferum, Kchb. f. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7044 ; Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 786. 

A curious plant of great botanical interest introduced in 1868 through 
the Eev. Mr. Parish, from near Moulmein in Tenasserim, British Burmah. 

It is remarkable in that the leaves are seldom developed, and when 
produced rarely last any length of time. 

The flowers are small, yellow spotted with red, with a white lip, which 
latter from its shape as seen in a front view suggested the specific 
name. 

SCAPHOSEPALUM BEEVE, Bolfc. 

Syns. Masdevallia brews, Rchb. f. 
Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 588. 

Imported from Demerara. The flowers are small, the upper sepals 
brownish with the expanded portions orange-yellow and purple : the lower 
sepal yellow spotted with purple and the tail dark purple. It is of great 
botanical interest. 

SCAPHOSEPALUM GIBBEEOSUM, Bolfe. 

Syns. Masdevallia gibberosa, Rchb. f . 
Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 8; Bot. Mag. t. 6990. 

A singular species, a native of New Grenada, whence it was introduced 
through Gustav Wallis, having highly curious and botanically interesting 
flowers, of little value horticulturally on account of their small size. 

152 



ORCHID SPECIES 

SPATHOGLOTTIS AUEEA, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Jour. Hort. Soc. London, 1850, p. 34; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. 
p. 92, with fig. ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 7, fig. reproduced. 

Originally introduced in 1849 from Mount Ophir in Malacca through 
Thomas Lobb, who discovered it growing near Nepenthes sanguinea and 
Ehododendron jasminiflorum. 

Only a few plants arrived, and these gradually died out after once 
flowering. 

Nothing more was heard of it in a living state until 1886, when it 
appeared in an importation of orchids offered for sale at Stevens's rooms. 

SPATHOGLOTTIS PETEI, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 392 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6354 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 

pt. vi. p. 8. 

Discovered in the Fiji Islands in 1876 by Peter C. M. Veitch, after 
whom it is named ; sent by him to Chelsea, where it flowered for the first 
time in the following year. 

The species is remarkable for its deciduous "bracts, organs, in all other 
members of the genus persistent, remaining even long after the ripening 
of the fruit. 

STANHOPEA GIBBOSA, Rchb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 1254. 

A species from South America closely allied to Stanhopea Wardii. The 
flowers, often 6 in. in diameter, are yellow, barred and spotted with 
crimson, darkest on the petals. 

STANHOPEA XYTEIOPHOKA, Rchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 842. 

A pitcher-bearing species with yellow flowers introduced from Peru, 
distinct from other known species, approaching rather the Coryanthes. It 
does not appear to be in cultivation. 

STAUEOPSIS GIGANTEA, Benth. 
Syns. Vanda gigantea, Lindl. 

Benth. in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 331; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 2; 
Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1858, p. 312; Bot. Mag. t. 5189. 

First discovered by Wallich in Moulmein in 1826, and later in the same 
locality by Thomas Lobb, through whom it was introduced. 

The plant flowered for the first time in this country in the then famous 
collection of the late Mr. Eobert Warner at Broomfield, in April 1858. 

The specific name must be assumed to refer to the large size of the 
flowers and leaves rather than to the habit of the plant, which under 
cultivation does not exceed moderate dimensions. 

153 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

STELIS BEUCKMULLEEI, Echb. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6521. 

A quaint little orchid of botanical interest, introduced from the Mexican 
Andes, with minute flowers of a purple colour, hairy inside. 

STELIS GLOSSULA, Echb. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1373. 

A curious little orchid of botanical interest only, imported from Costa 
Eica, with brownish flowers in two transverse rows, and bracts larger than 
the whole of the flower. 

STELIS ZONATA, Bchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 556. 

A botanical curiosity introduced from Demerara, allied to Stelis muscifera 
of Lindley, but smaller in all its parts, and interesting from its coloured 
zone. 

STENIA GUTTATA, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 134. 

A species closely allied to the rare Stenia pallida, but the sepals and 
petals are blunt and shorter, and spotted with Indian-purple on a straw- 
coloured ground. 

It was found in Peru by Walter Davis, and flowered at Chelsea in Ju 
1880. 

THUNIA BENSONLE, Hook. f. 

Syns. Phaius Bensoniee, Hemsley. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5694 ; Orchid Album, ii. t. 97. 

Discovered by Colonel Benson in the neighbourhood of Eangoon in 
1866, and flowered for the first time in this country in the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, and Chelsea in July 1867. 

The flowers are amethyst purple in colour, the lip frilled at the edges 
and marked in the centre with numerous longitudinal frilled keels. 

TEICHOCENTEUM PINELI, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 772. 

Discovered near Eio by Chevalier Pinel, who collected specimens, and 
after whom it was named. It flowered for the first time in this country 
at Chelsea in 1854. 

TEICHOCENTEUM PUEPUEEUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 772. 

A plant of botanical interest only, described and named by Dr. Lindley 
from a plant which flowered in 1854, and which we believe came from 
Demerara. 

154 



ORCHID SPECIES 

TEICHOGLOTTIS COCHLBAEIS, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 142 ; Jour, of Hort. 1886, vol. xii. p. 194, 
fig. 34 ; id. 1893, vol. xxvi. p. 233, fig. 47. 

A rare species, introduced in 1882 through Curtis, who met with it in 
the Island of Sumatra. 

The flowers are white with purple bars inside and outside the sepals 
and petals ; the lip is spoon-shaped, very thick with a few purple blotches. 

TEICHOPILIA GEATA, Bchb.f. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1338. 

Introduced from Peru in 1868. The flowers are sweetly scented as are 
those of Trichopilia fragrans to which species grata is allied ; they are 
yellowish-green with a white expanded lip, the free end being orange colour. 

TEICHOPILIA MAEGINATA, H&nf., var. LEPIDA. 
Syns. T. coccinea, Warsc., var. lepida; T. lepida, Veitch. 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 183 ; PI. Mag. n.s. t. 98. 

This variety appeared amongst an importation of the species from Costa 
Eica in 1873. It is a very rare form with flowers larger than those of the 
type, and the margin of the lip more crisped. 

VANDA BENSONI, Bat&m. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5611 ; Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 180, fig. ; PI. des Serres, torn. xxii. t. 2392 ; 
Veitcha' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 89. 

This Vanda was sent to us by Colonel Benson, who discovered it in 
Lower Burmah in 1866. 

It flowered shortly after its arrival at Chelsea in the summer of the 
same year, and proved closely allied to Vanda Eoxburghii and V. concolor, 
but the absence of all tessellation and the spotting and yellow colour of the 
inside of the flowers are distinguishing features. 



VANDA C^EEULEA, Griff. 

Lindl. in. Paxt. PI. Gdn. vol. i. t. 36 ; PI. des Serres, 1853, vol. vi. t. 609 ; 1'Illus. 
Hort. 1860, t. 246 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 90, fig. ; Orchid Album, vi. t. 282. 

First discovered by William Griffith, the Indian botanist and explorer, in 
November 1837 on the Khasia Hills, in which locality it was later re- 
discovered by Sir J. D. Hooker and Dr. Thomson, but was not introduced 
to cultivation. 

Thomas Lobb sent home plants from the Khasia Hills to Exeter, where 
one of them flowered for the first time in December 1850, and was 

155 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

exhibited at a meeting of the Horticultural Society of London, held in 
Eegent Street, and received with marked favour. 

The large flowers of soft light blue, tessellated with azure blue, are of 
great beauty. 

VANDA CCEEULESCENS, Griff. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 529, fig. 97 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5834; Fl. Mag. n.s. t. 259; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 92. 

Discovered near Bhamo in Burmah in 1837 by Griffiths, who collected 
specimens of the plant, but nothing more was heard of it until Colonel 
Benson re-discovered it in 1867, and sent plants the following year to 
Chelsea, where it flowered for the first time in February 1869. 

Although by no means comparable either in size or colour with the 
beautiful Vanda caerulea, it is a very elegant plant, and the pale lilac-blue 
flowers cause it to be well worthy of cultivation. 

VANDA DENISONIANA, Benson & Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 528 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5811 ; 1'Illus. Hort. 1872, t. 105 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 94, fig. 

Discovered by Colonel Benson on the Arracan Mountains and sent to 
Chelsea in 1868, where it flowered for the first time in this country in 
April 1869. 

It is named in honour of Lady Londesborough in appreciation of Lord 
Londesborough's great love of orchids. 

The flowers are ivory-white in colour with five longitudinal greenish - 
white lines on the lip. 

VANDA HOOKEBIANA, Bchb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 488 ; The Garden, 1883, vol. xxiii. t. 370 ; 
1'Illus. Hort. 1883, t. 484 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 96, fig. opposite. 

This lovely Vanda was seen by several travellers, including Thomas 
Lobb, and was known in herbaria for some time previous to its introduc- 
tion. In 1879 a correspondent in Labuan sent us living plants which 
were immediately acquired by Lord Eothschild. 

One of these plants flowered for the first time at Tring Park in 
September 1882, and Since that time the flowering of Vanda Hookeriana 
has been of frequent occurrence in that great garden. 

VANDA INSIGNIS, Blume. 

Lindl. in Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. ii. p. 19, fig. ; Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1259 ; 
Bot. Mag. t. 5759 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 97. 

Introduced to Chelsea from the Moluccas by Hutton in 1866, and 
flowered for the first time in 1868. 

It continued very rare in British collections until 1882, when it was 
re-imported through Curtis, at that time collecting in the Malay Archi- 

156 



ORCHID SPECIES 

pelago. The flowers are tawny -yellow in colour with dark brown oblong 
spots, and the lip is bright rose-purple. 

VANDA INSIGNIS, Blume, var. SCHEODEEIANA, Rchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 392 ; The Garden, 1884, vol. xxv. t. 429. 

This variety, which is remarkable for the colour deviation from the 
type, was introduced in Curtis's consignment. 

VANDA SUAVIS, Lindl 

Syns. V. tricolor, var. suavis, Veitch. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 351, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5174 ; Paxt. PI. Gdn. t. 42, fig. 3 ; 
PI. des Serres, 1862, tt. 1604-1605 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 107, fig. 

Introduced from Java through Thomas Lobb, and for many years one of 
the rarest Vandas in cultivation ; it was first exhibited in flower on April 
4th 1848. 

Always associated with Vanda tricolor in its native home, it was 
imported mixed with the latter, although in small quantities. 

The flowers are fragrant, produced in racemes in the axils of the leaves ; 
they are white in colour spotted with red-purple, and the basal half of the 
lip is deep purple. 

VANDA TEICOLOK, Lindl. 

Bot. Eeg. 1847, sub t. 59 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4432, PI. des Serres, 1850, torn. vi. t. 641 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 106. 

Vanda tricolor was introduced from Java in 1846 through Thomas Lobb, 
who discovered it in the western part of the island, at 1,500-2,500 ft. 
elevation, growing chiefly on large trees. 

Eesembling V. suavis in foliage, habit and inflorescence, it may be 
distinguished by the ground colour of its pale yellow flowers, which is 
white in V. suavis. 

ZYGOPETALUM BUEKEI, Rchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 684; Orchid Album, t. 142; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 44. 

Introduced in 1881 through David Burke, by whom it was discovered 
on Eoraima in British Guiana. 

It inhabits rocks in the swamp, in which Cypripedium Lindley- 
anum and Heliamphora nutans have their home, at elevations of about 
6,000 ft. 

The colouring of the parts of the flower is very striking ; the sepals 
and petals are green with seven to nine longitudinal chocolate-brown 
stripes, which sometimes become broken up into dots ; the lip is milk 
white, irregularly dentate along the margin, with about thirteen violet 
purple ribs, and the column is yellow streaked with purple. 

157 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

ZYGOPETALUM BUETII, Benth. 

Syns. Batemannia Burtii, Echb. 
Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 1099; Bob. Mag. t. 6003. 

Originally discovered by Endres in 1867 in Costa Eica, and shortly 
afterwards imported from that country. A plant obtained from us flowered 
for the first time in Great Britain in the collection of the late Mr. Burnley 
Hume, at Winterton, Norfolk, in the summer of 1872. 

The flowers are fleshy, 3 to 4 in. in diameter, white at the very base of 
the segments, then yellow, and the apical half red-brown with some yellow 
spots. Comparatively few plants have been introduced. 

ZYGOPETALUM DAYANUM, Benth. var. 
Syns. Pescatorea Dayana, Echb., var. rhodacea. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 575; id. 1874, p. 226; Bot. Mag. t. 6214; Veitchs' Man. 

Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 50. 

Discovered by Gustav Wallis in New Grenada, introduced in 1873, and 
named in honour of the late Mr. John Day of Tottenham. 

The flowers, 3 in. in diameter, are coloured cream-white and green on 
the sepals and petals, and the lip white stained with crimson. 

ZYGOPETALUM LAMELLOSUM, Benth. 

Syns. Pescatorea lamellosa, Echb. f. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. p. ix. p. 54 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6240 ; Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, 

vol. iv. p. 225. 

Introduced from New Grenada through Gustav Wallis, who gave no 
precise locality, and flowered for the first time in August 1875 ; it is long 
lost to cultivation. 

The flowers, about 2f- in. in diameter, are of a nearly uniform yellow 
colour with a yellowish-white lip marked by an orange and brown crest. 



158 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 

A LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS RAISED 
BY MESSRS. VEITCH SINCE 1853 

ANGR^ECUM x VEITCHII. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 31 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. p. 35, 
fig. 10 ; Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 37. 

Obtained by Seden from Angraecum sesquipedale and A. eburneum, and 
the first hybrid between two species of this remarkable genus. 

A plant bearing three open flowers was exhibited for the first time on 
January 10th 1899. The Orchid Committee recommended the plant a 
First Class Certificate, and the raiser a Silver Flora Medal. The flowers 
are ivory-white with a long green spur. 

ANGULOA x MEDIA, Bchb. f. 

Syns. A. X intermedia, Rolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 38; Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 798; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 102 ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 40. 

The offspring of Anguloa Clowesii and A. Ruckeri, the latter being the 
pollen parent ; a similar hybrid had previously been raised by Mr. J. C. 
Bowring, of Forest Farm, Windsor, which died shortly after flowering, and 
it also occurs in a wild state. An imported plant flowered in 1893 in the 
collection of R. N. Measures, Esq., of Streatham, and proved identical 
with Seden's artificially raised plants. 

ANCECTOCHILUS (GOODYERA) x DOMINII. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 531 ; Williams' Orch. Man. 7th edt. p. 410. 

Raised by John Dominy from Goodyera (Haemaria) discolor, and 
Anoectochilus Lowii (Dossinia marmorata). The leaves are dark mottled 
olive green with five to nine flesh-coloured ribs, and the plant is probably 
not now in cultivation. 

CALANTHE x BELLA. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 234; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 73; 
Reichenbachia, 1893, p. 31, t. 63, fig. 2. 

Raised from Calanthe vestita Turneri and C. x Veitchii ; the flowers, 
delicate light rose suffused with white, with a deep maroon blotch on the 
lip, are as large as the best forms of C. X Veitchii. 

161 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CALANTHE x DOMINII, LindL 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1858, p. 4; Bot. Mag. t. 5042; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. 
p. 76; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Calanthe, hybr. pi. 2. 

This cross, interesting as the first hybrid orchid to bloom, although not 
the first seedling to be raised by hand, flowered for the first time at Exeter 
in 1856, and was named by Dr. Lindley in honour of John Dominy, the 
foreman who effected the cross and raised the seedlings. 

The parents used were Calanthe falcata and C. masuca. 

CALANTHE x GIGAS. 

Orchid Eeview, 1893, vol. i. pp. 61, 86 ; Jour, of Hort. 1893, Feb. 16th, p. 129, fig. 24 ; 
The Garden 1893, vol. xliv. p. 236, pi. 926. 

A very beautiful hybrid raised by Seden from Calanthe vestita gigantea 
crossed with the pollen of C. Eegnieri Sanderiana. 

The flowers, borne on a strong spike, are nearly 3 in. across ; the sepals 
milk-white, the petals faintly tinted with rose, and the lip a bright rose 
striated with white and a deep red-crimson blotch at the base. 

CALANTHE x HAEBISII. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 721 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Kaised by Seden from Calanthe Turneri and C. X Veitchii ; pure white 
handsome flowers. 



CALANTHE x LENTIGINOSA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 44; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 74. 

A hybrid from Calanthe labrosa and C. x Veitchii, the latter being the 
seed parent. 

There are two sub -varieties, rosea and carminata, the last-named one of 
the darkest of all hybrid Calanthes. 

CALANTHE x MASUCO-TEICAEINATA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 210 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

This pretty hybrid raised from the two Indian varieties expressed by the 
name has white flowers suffused with rosy lilac, about 1 in. in diameter. 

CALANTHE x SEDENII, Hort. Veitch & Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 168; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 75. 

Eaised by Seden from Calanthe X Veitchii crossed with C. vestita rubro- 
oculata, and flowered for the first time in 1878 ; one of the best rose- 
coloured of all Calanthes. 

162 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CALANTHE x VEITCHII, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 1016; Bot. Mag. t. 5375; Fl. Mag. t. 280; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 75, figs. ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Calanthe, hybr. pi. 1. 

Eaised by John Dominy at Exeter in 1856, and now the most popular 
and widely-grown representative of the genus. The bright and unusually 
attractive rose-coloured flowers on gracefully arching spikes are produced 
during the winter months, and the ease with which the plants can be 
grown account for its popularity. The parents are Calanthe (Limatodes) 
rosea and C. vestita. 

CALANTHE x VEITCHII, var. ALBA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1897, p. 10. 

Although originally raised by us at the same time and from the same 
cross as the typical C. X Veitchii, this variety has always been rare. It 
differs from the type in having pure white flowers. 

CATTLEYA x ADELA. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 16 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised by Seden from Cattleya Trianae and C. Percivaliana. The 
flower has lilac rose-tinted sepals and petals and a rich dark purple lip. 

CATTLEYA x APOLLO. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 471 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Eaised from Cattleya Mossiae and C. Aclandiae. The flowers in form 
and firm substance resemble C. Aclandiae, but are almost as large as 
C. Mossiae and of great brilliance. 

CATTLEYA x ATALANTA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 275 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1897, p. 6. 
Obtained from Cattleya Warscewiczii and C. guttata Leopoldii, the 
former being the pollen parent, from which the front lobe of the lip derived 
its brilliant colour. 

CATTLEYA x BACTIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 330 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 350. 

Raised from Cattleya Bowringiana and C. guttata ; the form of the 
flower is that of C. guttata, but the colour approaches more nearly that of 
C. Bowringiana. 

CATTLEYA x BRABANTI^]. 

Fl. Mag. 1867, t. 360; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 89. 

A hybrid raised by John Dominy and named in compliment to the 
Duchess of Brabant, afterwards Queen of the Belgians. 

The species used were Cattleya Loddigesii and C. Aclandiae. 

163 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CATTLE YA x BROWNIE, VEITCHS' var. 
Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 330 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

A remarkable hybrid raised by Seden from Cattleya Harrisoniana and 
C. Bowringiana, in that the flower is very large, whilst those of both the 
parents are comparatively small. 

CATTLEYA x CHAMBEELAINIANA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 427; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 90; 
Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 491 (Rolfe's List of Gdn. Orchids) ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Cattleya hybr. pi. 17. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya guttata Leopoldii and C. Dowiana, and 
named in honour of the Eight Hon. Joseph Chamberlain, a well-known 
admirer of orchidaceous plants. 

The flowers of the hybrid are like those of the first-named parent in 
shape, but larger, the sepals and petals less spreading and of a remark- 
able warm brown tint which strikingly contrasts with the rich crimson 
purple lip. 

CATTLEYA x CHLOE. 

Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 316 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
A hybrid raised at Langley from Cattleya Bowringiana and C. bicolor. 

CATTLEYA x CHLOEIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 525, fig. 88; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. pp. 339, 352. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Bowringiana and C. maxima. The 
flowers are 5 in. across ; the sepals and petals bright rose-purple and 
the lip deep purple-crimson with a lighter orange-barred throat. 

CATTLEYA x CLYTIE. 
Eaised from Cattleya Bowringiana and C. velutina. 

CATTLEYA x CYBELE. 
Eaised from Cattleya gaskelliana and C. Lueddemanniana. 

CATTLEYA x DEVONIENSIS. 

Syns. C. X devoniana. 
Williams' Orch. Man. 7th edt. p. 160. 

One of the early hybrids raised by Dominy, of which no record was 
kept, and which received a First Class certificate from the Eoyal 
Horticultural Society, October llth 1864. 

164 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CATTLEYA x DOMINIANA. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 948; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 90. 

Raised by John Dominy at Exeter between Cattleya labiata and C. 
intermedia. 

The several seedlings raised from this cross produce flowers alike in 
form but varying in colour ; some have received varietal names, as alba 
(Fl. Mag. 1867, t. 367), with pale sepals and petals ; and lutea, with a 
large yellow disc on the lip. 

CATTLEYA x ELLA. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 202 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1898, p. 317; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cattleya hybr. pi. 13. 

A distinct hybrid raised by Seden from Cattleya bicolor and C. Warsce- 
wiczii. The pale rosy lilac sepals have a white area at the base ; the 
petals are broader than the sepals and of a darker tint ; the lip resembles 
that of C. bicolor, having pinkish side-lobes and a front lobe of glowing 
purple. 

CATTLEYA x ELVINA. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 534 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised by Seden from Cattleya Trianiae and C. Schilleriana. 

CATTLEYA x EMPRESS FREDERICK, var. LEONATA. 
Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 428, 429, fig. 127. 

Raised by Seden from Cattleya Mossise and C. Dowiana, the first plant 
flowering in the collection of Baron Schroder in June 1892. The variety 
Leonata differs from the original in having the sepals and petals of a bright 
rose colour instead of white. 

CATTLEYA x ENID. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 92 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cattleya hybr. pi. 23. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Cattleya Mossiae and C. Warscewiczii. 
The sepals and petals are light rose-purple with a finely crisped lip of 
deep crimson-purple with a rich yellow throat. 

CATTLEYA x EROS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 192 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 259. 

Raised from Cattleya Mossiae and C. Walkeriana. The flowers have the 
open shape of the last-named, but are larger, bright rose in colour, with a 
velvety crimson lip. 

165 M 



CATTLEYA x EUPHEASIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 310 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 297. 

Eaised from Cattleya Warscewiczii and C. superba, the latter being the 
pollen parent. The flower is of good form and substance, most like the 
seed parent in general character : the sepals and petals are bright rose- 
purple, the lip sub-entire, rich crimson-purple in front, and the throat 
nearly white with two yellow blotches at the sides. 

CATTLEYA x EUEYDICE. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 527 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Eaised by Seden from Cattleya labiata and C. Aclandiae. The sepals and 
petals, of a pinkish lavender hue, bear a few purple spots ; the rich crimson 
lip is yellow on the disc passing to cream-white at the base. 

CATTLEYA x FABIA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 375. 

Eaised from Cattleya labiata and C. Dowiana. The light rosy-pink 
flowers have mottled segments and a lip approaching that of C. labiata, 
with some yellow in the throat. 

CATTLEYA x FABIOLA. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 601. 
Eaised from Cattleya Bowringiana and the hybrid C. Harrisi. 

CATTLEYA x INTEETEXTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 177. 

Eaised from Cattleya Mossias and C. Warneri ; the flowers adhere 
closely in form to those of the last-named parent. 

CATTLEYA x MANGLESII, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 556; Veitchs' Man. Oroh. PI. pt. ii. p. 91. 
Eaised by Dominy from Cattleya Lueddemanniana crossed with C. Lod- 
digesii, and flowered for the first time in August 1866. 

CATTLEYA x MANTINII. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896, p. 4. 

A charming hybrid raised by Mons. George Mantin, President of the 
Orchid Committee of the Societe Nationale d' Horticulture de France, and 
also by Seden from Cattleya Bowringiana and C. Dowiana, the latter 
being the pollen parent. Specimens from both progenies were exhibited 
simultaneously at the Eoyal Horticultural Society's Meeting on October 
29th 1895. 

166 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CATTLBYA x MABSTERSONLZE, Bchb. f. 

Rohb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 556; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 92. 

Eaised and named in honour of Mrs. Seden nee Marsterson, and one of 
the first as also one of the most beautiful of the series of hybrids obtained 
by crossing one of the labiata forms with other species of Cattleya. 

The parents were C. Loddigesii and C. labiata vera. 

CATTLEYA x MELPOMENE. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 315 (Eeport of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Forbesii and C. Mendelii. The light 
rose-coloured flower has the lip white tinged with pink and a yellow 
throat. 

CATTLEYA x MINUCIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 379 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 357. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Loddigesii and C. Warscewiczii. The 
flowers resemble somewhat a form of C. labiata, but with distinct 
traces of C. Loddigesii in the lip. 

CATTLEYA x MIEANDA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 51 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 80. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya amethystoglossa (guttata Prinzii) and 
C. Trianae, the second hybrid in which C. amethystoglossa participates 
in the parentage. 

CATTLEYA x NIOBE. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 280 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 149. 

Eaised from a cross between Cattleya Aclandiae and C. Mendelii. The 
seedling is singularly dwarf in habit, and has large wax-like flowers of a 
rose-colour sparsely spotted with purple. 

CATTLEYA x OLIVIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 315 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya intermedia and C. Trianas : the flower 
is of a delicate peach-blossom colour. 

CATTLEYA x PHEIDIN^l. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 470 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 363. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya intermedia and C. maxima; the reverse 
of the cross which produced, thirty-four years earlier, C. X Dominiana. 

167 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

From this last-named it differs in having the lip closely veined all over, 
as in C. maxima. 

CATTLEYA x PHILO. 
Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 535 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya iricolor and C. Mossiae, the first in which 
the rare C. iricolor participated. 

CATTLEYA x PHILO, var. ALBIFLOEA. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 357. 
A light coloured form of the preceding derived from the same parents. 

CATTLEYA x PICTUEATA, Bchb. /. 

Syns. C. X hybrida, var. picta. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 584; Fl. Mag. 1881, t. 473; Gard. Chron. 
1889, vol. v. p. 746 (Rolfe's List of Garden Orchids) ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. 
pt, ii. p. 91. 

A hybrid raised by Dominy at Exeter from Cattleya guttata and C. 
intermedia. 

CATTLEYA x POEPHYEOPHLEBIA, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 552 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 92. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Cattleya intermedia and C. superba. 
The rich purple veinings on the lip of the flower are remarkable, and 
suggested the name, " a purple vein." 

CATTLEYA x PEINCESS. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 335 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Trianae and C. Lueddemanniana. 
The sepals and petals are of a pale rose colour, the lip bright reddish 
purple with diverging orange-coloured lines, and all parts very broad. 

CATTLEYA x QUINQUECOLOE. 

PI. Mag. t. 511 ; Williams' Orch. Man. 7th edt. p. 183. 

A hybrid raised by Dominy, which received the name quinquecolor, or 
five-coloured, on account of the many colours the different parts of the 
flower assume. The parents were Cattleya Forbesii and C. Aclandiae. 

CATTLEYA x SUAVIOE. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 92 ; Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 802 (Rolfe's List of 

Garden Orchids). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya intermedia and C. Mendelii. 

168 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CATTLEYA x VESTALIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 402 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Raised by Seden from Cattleya Dowiana aurea and C. maxima, the 
latter being the seed-bearer. The flowers of the hybrid resemble those of 
C. maxima, but are larger and of a blush-white or pale pink hue, with a 
purple lip passing to rich orange colour at the base. 

CATTLEYA x WENDLANDIANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 447 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 144 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cattleya hybr. pi. 12. 

Eaised from Cattleya Warscewiczii and C. Bowringiana, two of the 
most distinct of all Cattleyas : the best characters of both are blended in 
the progeny. 

The brilliant rose-purple is reproduced, but the throat is more expanded 
and has two bright yellow blotches. 

The plant was named in compliment to the late Herr Wendland, 
Superintendent of the Berggarten, Herrenhausen, Hanover. 

CHYSIS x CHELSONI, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 535 ; id. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 717, fig. ; Fl. Mag. 1878 ; 
n.s. t. 297 ; 1'Orchidophile, 1883, p. 497 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 27, 
fig. ; Williams' Orch. Man. edt. 7, p. 195, fig. 

This, the first hybrid raised in this genus, was flowered at Chelsea, 
Chysis Limminghei being the seed and C. bractescens the pollen 
parent. 

CHYSIS x LANGLEYENSIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 593 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Eaised by Seden from Chysis bractescens and the hybrid C. X Chelsoni. 

CYMBIDIUM x EBURNEO-LOWIANUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 363 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 23 ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Cymbidium, hybr. pi. 1. 

The first hybrid in the genus produced artificially : as the name 
implies, the parents were Cymbidium eburneum and C. Lowianum. 

The seedling plants took nine years to flower. Since the appearance of 
this first cross another hybrid has been produced by using the species 
reversed, and is known as C. X Lowio-eburneum. 

CYMBIDIUM x LOWIO-GEANDIFLOEUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 116 ; Orchid Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 100. 

Eaised by Seden from Cymbidium Lowianum and C. grandiflorum, the 
former being the seed-bearer. The flowers resemble a good form of 

169 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

C. Lowianum with the addition of some red-brown spots at the base of 
the front lobe of the lip, which show the influence of C. grandiflorum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x ADBASTUS. 

Syns. C. x Euryades. 
C. x Hera. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. pp. 214, 243 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Diet. 
Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium, hybr. pi. 44 ; Jour, of Hort. 1894, p. 103, fig. 16 ; 
Orchid Review, 1899, vol. vii. p. 61. 

Raised by Seden from Cypripedium x Leeanum and C. villosum Boxalli, 
and exhibited in February 1892 under the name of C. X Hera, but 
owing to another variety already bearing that name it was changed to that 
which it now bears. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x -ESON. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xiii. p. 744 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 61. 

Eaised from Cypripedium insigne and C. Druryi, with much resemblance 
to the first-named parent. A great improvement on the original hybrid is 
known as jffison giganteum. 



CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x AINSWOETHII, 
var. CALUEUM. 

Syns. C. X calurum, Rchb. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. iii. p. 413 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 41 ; 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 22 ; Fl. and Pom. 1884, p. 145, pi. 619 ; Orchid 
Album, iii. t. 136. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) longifolium and 
C. x Sedenii. The very curious and beautiful petals, resembling C. longi- 
folium, but longer and twisted, suggested the name given by Professor 
Eeichenbach. 

The type was raised by Mitchell, gardener to Dr. Ainsworth, of 
Manchester. 



CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x ALBO-PUEPUEEUM, 

Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 38 ; 1'Orchidophile, 1883, pp. 508, 509, fig. ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 102. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) Schlimii and the first 
hybrid Cypripede (C. x Dominianum) of the Selenipedia group. 

The influence of the pollen parent preponderates in the form of the 
floral segment, and that of the seed parent in the colour. 

170 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CYPEIPEDIUM x ANTIGONE. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 716 ; Jour, of Hort. 1891, vol. xxiii. p. 262, 

fig. 49. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and 
C. niveum, the reverse cross of that which produced C. x Aphrodite, 
altogether a more robust plant. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x APHEODITE. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 77 ; Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 342 (Report of 
R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Gard. Mag. 1894, Feb. 10, p. 76, fig. 

Eais'jd from Cypripedium niveum and C. Lawrenceanum ; and a very 
handsome hybrid, with foliage scarcely less attractive than the flowers, 
which are white with rosy veins and dots. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x AEETE. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 744 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); id. 1893, 
vol. xiii. p. 8 ; Orchid Review, 1903, vol. i. p. 32. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium concolor and C. Spicerianum, the 
latter being the pollen parent. 

The creamy white flowers are all covered with a profusion of rose 
dots, and the upper sepal, base of petals and edge of lip are tinged with 
green. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x AETEMIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 199 (Chapman's List of Hybrid Orchids). 
Eaised from Cypripedium Dayanum and C. Swanianum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x AETHUEIANUM, Echb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 676 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 77, fig. ; 
1'Orchidophile, 1887, p. 209, col. pi. ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 305, fig. ; 
id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 40 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedinm hybr. pi. 12. 

Eaised at Chelsea by Seden from Cypripedium insigne and the then 
rare and beautiful C. Fairieanum. 

Only a single seedling was raised, and this flowered for the first time 
in 1874, when Professor Eeichenbach dedicated it to the late Arthur 
Veitch. It was the second of the Fairieanum hybrids to be raised, and 
is one of the most robust of the group. The influence of C. Fairieanum is 
obvious in the undulate petals and in the veining of the dorsal sepal. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x AETHUEIANUM, var. PULCHELLUM. 

Jour, of Hort. 1892 (Feb.), fig. 66; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 305; id. 1894, 
vol. ii. p. 44 ; id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 40, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 10. 

A variety obtained from a cross in which Cypripedium insigne Chantini 
was used with C. Fairieanum instead of the typical C. insigne. 

171 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The dorsal sepal in this variety is broader than in the type, the spots 
fewer in number and twice as large ; the petals shorter and the nerves 
darker. 

CYPKIPEDIUM x ASTEEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 191 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Spicerianum and C. Philippinense. 

The upper sepal is pure white with a green tinge at the base and a 
purple line in the centre ; the twisted petals are tinted with rose and the 
lip with lilac. 

CYPKIPEDIUM x BAEON SCHEODEE. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 667 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Jour, of 
Hort. 1896, p. 533, fig. ; Gard. Mag. 1896, p. 890, fig. ; Orchid Review, 1901, 
vol. ix. p. 81, fig. 16. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium x cenanthum superbum and the once 
rare C. Pairieanum, and one of the most perfect of the hybrid Cypripedes 
in which C. Fairieanum participates as a parent. The dorsal sepal is 
heavily spotted with reddish purple on a lighter ground, and the petals 
veined and suffused with similar colours and spotted on the lower half. 
It is a hybrid of the third generation, four species being concerned in its 
ancestry ; C. Fairieanum, C. insigne, C. villosum, and C. barbatum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x BEYSA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 343 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) x Sedeni candi- 
dulum and C. (S.) Boissierianum. 

The flowers resemble a large form of the first-named parent with a 
greenish tinge in the colouring. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CALANTHUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 652; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 79. 
A hybrid from Cypripedium barbatum Crossii and C. Lowii, flowered 
for the first time in September 1878. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CALOPHYLLUM. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 169; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 80. 

One of the earliest hybrids to be raised artificially by us, and never 
described until it was again flowered by Mr. B. S. Williams. The parents 
are Cypripedium barbatum and C. venustum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CALYPSO. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1890, p. 14; Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ix. p. 86 (Report of R.H.S. 
Orchid Committee) ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees ; Cypripedinm hybr. pi. 26. 

Eaised from Cypripedium villosum Boxalli and C. Spicerianum, and 

172 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

distinguished among the C. Spicerianum hybrids by most bright and varied 
colours. 

The white purple-banded dorsal sepal is inherited from C. Spicerianum 
as is also the red-brown lip ; the brilliant colour so remarkable in this 
hybrid is due to the influence of C. villosum Boxalli. 

There are now in cultivation many forms raised since the type 
appeared, distinguished by varietal names. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CAPTAIN HOLFOED. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 198 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium hirsutissimum and C. superbiens. 
The large handsome flowers have a decided resemblance to C. hirsutissimum 
in the dorsal sepal ; the broad sepals are white, tinged with green at the 
base, densely spotted with dark purple ; the lip is large, of a dull rose 
colour. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x CAEDINALE, Rchb. f. 

Syns. Phragmopedilum X cardinale, Rolfe. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 488; The Garden, 1885, vol. xxvii. p. 520, 
pi. 495 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 102; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i.p. 81, 
fig. 5; id. 1903, p. 248, fig. 5; Orchid Album, vii. t. 370. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium x Sedenii and C. (Selenipedium) 
Schlimii albiflorum. 

The richly coloured lip in contrast to the almost pure white sepals and 
petals, and the elegant form of the flower render this hybrid one of the 
most attractive of the Selenipedia group. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x CLEOLA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 744 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); id. 1893, vol. 
xiii. p. 8 ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 326 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Seleni- 
pedium hybr. pi. 2. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) Schlimii album and C. reti- 
culatum (Boissierianum) . The plant has the characteristic habit of the 
Selenipedium section to which both the parents belong. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x CLONIUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 536 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Jour, of Hort. 

1893, pp. 394, 395, fig. 59. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) x conchiferum and 
C. (S.) caudatum Wallisii. 

The flowers somewhat resemble those of C. x conchiferum, but have 
more attenuated petals ; the pouch is clear waxy white with the infolded 

173 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

lobes spotted with purple ; the petals white with green lines and rose- 
tinted drooping tail-like tips. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CEBON. 

Jour, of Hort. 1892, vol. xxiv. p. 205, fig. 31; Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ix. p. 214 
(Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised from Cypripedium x cenanthum superbum and C. Harrisianum, 
having fine hybrids for parents ; the result is disappointing. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CEETHUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 622 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 359. 

Eaised from Cypripedium Spicerianun crossed with the pollen of C. 
Argus. 

The upper sepal is white-bordered, with black dots about the surface, 
the petals yellowish-green, also black-spotted, and the lip coppery green 
with a rosy suffusion round the orifice. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x DOMINIANUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1181 ; PL Mag. 1870, t. 499 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 
PL pt. iv. p. 103, fig. opposite; The Garden, 1891, vol. xxxix. p. 412, pi. 803; 
TOrchidophile, 1882, pp. 452, 453, fig. 

Eaised by John Dominy at Chelsea from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) 
caricinum and C. caudatum, and named by Professor Eeichenbach in 
compliment to him. This, the first hybrid raised among the Selenipedia, 
is still one of the most admired of the group. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x DOMINIANUM, 
var. CLYMENE. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 160; Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 456 (Report of 

R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

A variety of the preceding having pale coloured flowers. It was raised 
by Seden from C. (Selenipedium) caricinum and C. caudatum Wallisii. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x DEUEYO-HOOKEEJE. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 530 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 39. 

The parentage of this seedling is expressed by the name. 

The flowers are of wax-like substance and singular in colour ; the dorsal 
sepal green passing to white at the border ; the petals clear green strongly 
tinted with rose-lilac passing to white at the tips with a strong median line 
of purple ; the lip is yellowish-green, tinted and veined with rose. 

174 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CYPEIPEDIUM x ELECTEA, Eolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 297 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iv. p. 83. 

A hybrid raised from unknown parents, but probably of the same origin 
as Cypripedium x Galatea. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EUEYALE. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 83. 
Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and C. superbiens. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EUEYANDEUM, Echb. f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 772; Fl. Mag. n.s. t. 187; Fl. des Serres, 
xxii. t. 2278 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 83, fig. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium barbatum and C. Stonei, and well 
known as one of the most distinct of its race. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EUEYLOCHUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 664 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 359. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium ciliolare and C. hirsutissimum. 
The flowers, attractive and prettily spotted, have petals curiously elongated 
and deflexed. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EVENOE. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 664 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 359. 

A very interesting hybrid with purple-spotted flowers on a cream-white 
ground, raised from Cypripedium Argus and C. bellatulum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x GALATEA, Eolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 168; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 84. 

A hybrid of unknown parentage, probably from Cypripedium Har- 
risianum and C. insigne Maulei, and to this cross probably also belong 
C. x Acis, C. x Orestes, and C. x Electra. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x GEEMINYANUM, Echb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 200; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 85; 
Jour, of Hort. 1893, pp. 67, 74, fig. 10 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium 
hybr. pi. 52. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium villosum and C. hirsutissimum, and 
dedicated to Count Adrien de Germiny, of Gonville, near Eouen, who was 
the owner of one of the finest collections of orchids in France. 

175 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x GIGANTEUM. 

Syns. C. X macrochilum, var. giganteum. 

Orchid Eeview, 1894, vol. ii. p. 186 ; Gard. Mag. 1894, p. 256, fig. ; Jour, of Hort. 
1894, pp. 386, 387, fig. 62; Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 602 (Report of 
R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

A hybrid, raised by Seden, resembling a very large form of Selenipedium 
X macrochilum, and derived from Cypripedium caudatum Lindeni 
(Phragmopedilum caudatum, var. Uropedium) and the hybrid Selenipedium 
X grande. The lip is broad and well rounded in front with white side 
lobes beautifully spotted and tinged with purple ; the petals, white, striped 
with green, with claret coloured tips, attain a length of over 18 in. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x GEANDE. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 462 ; id. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 488 ; Lindenia, vi. p. 7, 
t. 242; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 104, fig. 

One of the finest of the Selenipedium hybrids, raised from Cypripedium 
(Selenipedium) longifolium Eoezlii (Hartwegii) crossed with the pollen 
of C. (Selenipedium) caudatum. 

It is the most robust in the group to which it belongs, the sword-shaped 
leaves being from 20 to 30 in. long, the flower-scape frequently more 
than a yard in height, and the flowers 7 to 8 in. across the sepals from 
tip to tip. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x GEANDE, var. MACEOCHI- 

LUM. 

Syns. 0. X macrochilum. 
Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 326; O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1891, vol x. pp. 199, 343, fig. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) longifolium and C. (S.) 
caudatum Lindeni (Phragmopedilum caudatum, var. Uropedium), and the 
most extraordinary hybrid in the group to which it belongs, being the 
product of the practically pouchless Phragmopedilum crossed with the 
normal pouched Selenipedium, and possessing a remarkably long and 
elongated pouch. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x HAEEISIANUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 108 ; PI. Mag. 1869, pi. 431. Fl. des Serres, torn, 
xxii. tt. 2289-2290; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 86, fig.; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 11. 

Eaised by John Dominy about the year 1864 from Cypripedium villosum 
and C. barbatum at Chelsea, where it flowered for the first time in 1869, 
and the first Cypripedium artificially raised : it has since been obtained by 
several operators from the same cross. 

The name Harrisianum was given in compliment to Dr. Harris, of 
Exeter, who gave Dominy the idea of hybridizing orchids. 

176 




CYPRIPEDIUM X" JAMES H. VEITCH 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

There are several forms, of which the one named superbum is probably 
the most distinct. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x H. BALLANTINE. 

Syns. C. X Ballantinei. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 408 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1893, p. 13, fig. ; 
Orchid Review, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 18. 

Raised by Seden from Cypripedium purpuratum and C. Fairieanum, 
named after Mr. H. Ballantine, the grower of Baron Schroder's fine 
collection of orchids, and flowered for the first time in August 1890. 

It is undoubtedly one of the finest of the hybrids from C. purpuratum, 
and clearly shows the influence of both parents. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x IANTHE. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 343 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 358 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 13. 

Probably from Cypripedium Harrisianum and C. venustum : the flowers 
much resemble C. Harrisianum in shape, but are distinct in colour. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x JAMES H. VEITCH. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 258 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. p. 287, 
fig. 40; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 309; Jour, of Hort. 1894, Sept. 6th, 
p. 227, fig. 33. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Stonei platytaenium and C. Curtisii, 
and one of the finest of all hybrids. The great breadth of petals peculiar 
to the celebrated variety of Cypripedium Stonei is transmitted to the 
offspring ; they are broadly ribbon-like, pendulous, 4| in. in length, 
about 1 in. broad, and light yellow evenly spotted with dark red- 
purple warts except near the apices. The lip is helmet-shaped and 
almost uniform red-crimson with the infolded side lobes paler but dotted 
with darker warts. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x LEEANUM, var. SUPEEBUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiii. p. 277 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 168 ; 
1'Orchidophile, 1885, p. 240 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 88, with fig. 

This variety was raised by Seden from Cypripedium insigne Maulei 
and C. Spicerianum. The hybrid known as C. Leeanum was first raised 
at Burford Lodge, Dorking, and flowered sometime after that of Seden's 
production, which, being the finer variety, was called superbum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x LEUCOEEHODUM, Rchb. 

Syns. Phragmopedilum X leucorrhodum, Rolfe. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiii. p. 270 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 104 ; 
Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 169, fig. 11. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) Eoezlii and C. (S.) Schlimii 

177 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

albiflorum, the influence of the pollen parent shows strongly in this 
hybrid. The general colour is blush white with a suffusion of delicate 
pink on the upper sepal and a lip light rose pink suffused with white. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x LITTLE GEM. 

Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 341 ; id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 108, fig. 25. 

A seedling raised by Seden from Cypripedium x Baron Schroder and 
C. X Harrisianum, which flowered for the first time in April 1903. 

Several seedlings were raised from the same cross, but they differ 
widely in size as in form. 

In the typical form, now known as the Westfield variety, the flower is 
small, the dorsal sepal white, flushed with dark rose, and the markings 
are of chocolate-purple ; the lip is purple-brown ; other varieties show 
more of the influence of C. x Harrisianum, and have flowers above the 
medium size and of a rich deep colour. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x LUCIDUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 521. 

Eaised by Seden by crossing Cypripedium Lowii with the pollen of 
C. villosum. The upper sepal is greenish with much brown at the base, 
and in the centre there are many spots ; the petals, narrow at the base, 
are dilated at the apex and shining ; the lip is like that of C. villosum, 
and chiefly brownish-violet in colour. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MACEOPTEEUM, Rchb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 552 ; id. 1883, vol. xx. p. 294 ; Veitchs' 

Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 90. 

Eaised from Cypripedium Lowii and C. superbiens, and remarkable as 
being one of the comparatively few hybrids in which the influence of the 
seed parent is shown in the flower and that of the pollen parent in the 
foliage ; the influence of C. superbiens is seen only in the spotting on the 
basal half of the petals and in the large helmet-shaped lip and in the 
staminode. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MAEMOEOPHYLLUM, Echb.f. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 130 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 90. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Hookerge crossed with C. barbatum. 
The influence of the pollen parent preponderates in the flower ; that of 
the seed parent is most decided in the foliage. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MAESHALLIANUM, Bchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 804 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 91. 
Eaised from Cypripedium venustum pardinum crossed with C. concolor. 

178 



CYPEIPEDIUM x MEDEIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 199 (Chapman's List of Hybrid Orchids). 
Eaised from Cypripedium Spicerianum and C. hirsutissimum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MELANCHUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 456 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 147. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Hookerae and C. Stonei, the latter 
being the pollen parent. The dorsal sepal is almost of the same shape as 
that of C. Stonei, but is suffused with olive-green and the stripes are less 
distinct. The petals are broader than in C. Stonei, and bright purple- 
brown with numerous small spots. The lip is veined with light brown on 
a paler ground. The flower resembles the pollen parent, and the 
influence of the seed parent is chiefly seen in the foliage. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MELIS. 

Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 320. 
Eaised from Cypripedium Boxallii and C. philippinense. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MEEOPS. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol ii. p. 159. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium ciliolare and C. Druryi. The 
flowers are pale buff yellow with red-brown blotches and stains. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MICEOCHILUM, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 77 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 92, 
with fig. ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium, pi. 17. 

Eaised from Cypripedium niveum crossed with the pollen of C. Druryi, 
and first flowered in 1882. 

One of the most distinct of hybrids well-nigh intermediate between the 
two parents, the lip is nearly as in C. Druryi, white, veined with pale 
green, but very small. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MILO. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 670 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 

Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 30. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium insigne Chantinii and C. cenanthum 
superbum ; there are many varieties, but none superior to that known as 
grandis. 

179 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CYPEIPEDIUM x MINOS. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 692 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 23 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, sub Cypripedium hybr. pi. 47. 

Eaised from Cypripedium Spicerianum crossed with pollen from 
C. X Arthurianum. The pure white upper sepal is tinted with purple at 
the base ; the lip and petals are yellowish-brown, the latter retaining 
the downward curve so conspicuous in C. X Arthurianum. 

Two of the most distinct varieties are distinguished by the names 
magnificum and supcrbum. 

CYPRIPEDIUM x MORGAN!^. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 134; Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 241, fig. 
49 ; id. 1890, vol. vii. pi. p. 544 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 92, fig. ; The 
Garden, 1883, vol. xxiii. p. 58, pi. 372 ; Orchid Review, 1904, vol. xii. p. 41, fig. ; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 27. 

Raised from Cypripedium superbiens crossed with C. Stonei, and named 
in compliment to Mrs. Morgan of New York, in her day an ardent amateur 
of orchids. At the time of its first appearance the finest hybrid of its 
class, the large pouch and long, drooping, spotted petals rendering it 
peculiarly attractive. 

CYPRIPEDIUM x MORGANLE, var. LANGLEYENSE. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 79 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 6. 

This is the first hybrid to flower in which the remarkable Cypripedium 
Stonei platytaenium participated in the parentage. 

It differs from the original C. X Morganiae in the flowers being larger, 
the spots on the petals more isolated and brighter, and the lip more 
highly coloured. 

CYPRIPEDIUM x NIOBE. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 9; Orchid Album, vol. x. t. 438; W. J. Bean in The Garden, 
1891, vol. xxxix. p. 483, pi. 806; 1'Orchidophile, 1892, p. 81, fig. ; Orchid Review, 
1893, vol. i. p. 7, fig. 1 ; id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 41, fig. ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, 
Cypripedium hybr. pi. 13. 

Raised from Cypripedium Spicerianum with pollen from the once rare 
C. Fairieanum, from seed sown in 1884, the first flower opening in 1889. 
They show a combination of the characters of the two parents, and are 
remarkable in that they possess the broadest dorsal sepal in the group to 
which they belong. 

C. X Niobe forms the subject of the first figure in the first volume of 
the Orchid Review. 

CYPRIPEDIUM x NITENS, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 398; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 93; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 22. 

Raised from Cypripedium villosum and C. insigne Maulei, and first 

180 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

flowered in 1878. The name nitens was suggested by the highly lustrous 
appearance of the flowers. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x NOEMA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 82; Orchid Review, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 104, figs. 22 

and 23. 

Eaised from Cypripedium Spicerianum and C. X Niobe, the first of 
the hybrids in which the beautiful C. x Niobe took part ; it first flowered 
in January 1895. 

A finer form, known as the Westfield variety, has a broader dorsal 
sepal and is of a darker shade. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x NUMA, Bolfe. 
Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 608. 
An uninteresting hybrid from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and C. Stonei. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x (ENANTHUM, Schb. /. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 297 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 93. 

Eaised by Seden at Chelsea from Cypripedium x Harrisianum and C. 
insigne Maulei, the first hybrid Cypripedium to flower, of which one of the 
parents is itself a hybrid. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x CENANTHUM, var. SUPEEBUM. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 11 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 94, fig. ; Lindenia, 

t. 33. 

An improved form of the type and a very magnificent slipper. 
CYPEIPEDIUM x (ENONE. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 744 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Veitchs' Catlg. 

of PI. 1894, p. 13. 

Eaised from Cypripedium superbiens and C. Hookerae, the former being 
the pollen parent. 

The flowers are fairly intermediate between those of the two species, 
though the lip is nearer that of C. superbiens, brownish in front, pale 
green beneath. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x OEESTES. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 94. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium x Harrisianum and probably C. 
insigne Maulei, but there is much doubt on the point. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x OEION. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 80 (Report of the R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 61 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 62. 

Eaised from Cypripedium insigne crossed with the pollen of C. concolor. 

181 N 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The upper sepal is large, whitish washed with yellow, with spots and tints 
of purple ; the lip and petals are creamy yellow, also washed and spotted 
with purple. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x OEPHANUM, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 166; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. 

p. 94. 

Probably obtained from Cypripedium barbatum and C. Druryi, but by an 
oversight the parentage was not recorded, and refuge was taken in this name. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PATENS, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 456. 

Eaised at Chelsea from Cypripedium Hookerse crossed with C. 
barbatum ; of no great interest. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x PENELAUS. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 61 ; Jour, of Hort. 1893, March 16th, p. 219, fig. 45. 

Eaised from the pouchless Cypripedium caudatum (Phragmopedilum 
caudatum Uropedium) and the hybrid C. x Ainsworthii calurum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x PEESEUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 622 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) x Sedenii, porphy- 
reum and C. Lindleyanum, and one of the first hybrids to flower, of which 
this distinct species was a parent. 

This occurred during the year 1892. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x PEESEUS, var. PH^EDEA. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 52; Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 80; Veitchs' Catlg. 

of PI. 1894, p. 13. 

A hybrid of the Selenipedium group, from Cypripedium Lindleyanum 
of Mount Eoraima, and C. (Selenipedium) x Sedenii candidulum, three 
distinct species being concerned in the parentage. 

The dorsal sepal is cream-white mottled with light rose for two-thirds of 
its length ; the petals are about 3 in. long, light rose pink with a white 
medium line, and the helmet-shaped lip is rose-pink with yellowish-white 
lobes dotted with crimson. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PHEEES. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 745 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 32. 

Eaised from Cypripedium hirsutissimum and C. insigne, the latter being 
the seed-bearer ; a not very successful experiment. 

182 



CYPEIPEDIUM x POEPHYEOCHLAMYS. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 476 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. p. iv. p. 96 ; 
Orchid Album, ix. t. 426 ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 105, fig. 7. 

Eaised from Cypripedium barbatum Crossii and C. hirsutissimum, the 
first hybrid in which the last-named species participated. The prevailing 
colour of the flowers is deep crimson-purple ; the upper sepal has a white 
margin and dark veins; the petals are yellowish -green at the base, and 
the lip brownish-purple. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PEIAM. 

Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 373 ; id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 105. 

Eaised from Cypripedium x Niobe and C. insigne Chantinii, and first 
flowered in November 1900 ; a light-coloured form of the type is known 
as Leucas. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PEIAPUS. 

Syns. C. X (Bolus. 
Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 526 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium philippinense and C. villosum ; the 
latter it much resembles. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PYCNOPTEEUM, Bchb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 622 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 96. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x PYCNOPTEEUM, Echb.f., var. POEPHYEOS- 

PILUM. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 489 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iv. p. 97. 

Both these plants were raised from seed from the same capsule ; the 
second can but be regarded as a variety of the former, which it surpasses 
in size of flower and depth of colour. The parents are Cypripedium 
venustum and C. Lowii. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EADIOSUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 424 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL pt. iv. p. 97. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and C. Spicerianum, 
and of little value. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x EEGINJE. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 534 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised from Cypripedium Leeanum and C. Fairieanum. 
The flowers suggest those of C. Arthurianum, but the upper two-thirds 
of the dorsal sepal is pure white with a few lines of purple. 

183 



HORTUS VE1TCHI1 

CYPEIPEDIUM x SAPPHO. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 199 (Chapman's List of Hybrid Orchids). 
Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Lowii and C. barbatum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SCHEODEEJE, Rchb. /. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 432; Orchid Album, v. t. 196; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 105, fig. ; Orchid Review, 1898, vol. vi. p. 361, fig. 17. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) caudatum and C. (S.) X Sedenii. 
It is one of the finest of the Selenipedia hybrids, and was named as a 
compliment to the late Baroness Schroder of the Dell, Egham. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SCHEODEE^ CANDI- 

DULUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 88 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

From Cypripedium (Selenipedium) caudatum Wallisii and C. (S.) 
X Sedenii candidulum. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SEDENII, Echb.f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1431 ; id. 1886, p. 596, 597, fig. (peloria) ; Fl. Mag. n.s. 
1876, t. 206 ; id. 1878, t. 302 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 105, fig. p. 106 ; 
1'Orchidophile, 1882, p. 179, fig. ; Rev. Hort. 1879, p. 470, col. pi. ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Selenipedium, hybr. pi. 1. 

A hybrid raised by Seden, after whom it is named, by cross-fertilizing 
Cypripedium (Selenipedium) Schlimii with the pollen of C. (S.) longifolium. 

The plant is very floriferous, of easy culture, and one of the most 
popular hybrids in this special group of Slipper Orchids. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SEDENII, var. POE- 

PHYEEUM. 

Syns. C. X porphyreum, Rchb. 

Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 366 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 106. 
Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) longifolium Hart- 
wegii (Eoezlii), crossed with C. (S.) Schlimii, a graceful and delicate object. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SEDENII, var. CANDI- 
DULUM. 

Lindenia, t. 245 ; Orchid Album, t. 481 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Selenipedium hybr. pi. 2. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) longifolium crossed with 
C. (S.) Schlimii albiflorum ; the flowers are more highly coloured than 
those of the type. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x SELLIGEEUM. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 13, with fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 776, with fig. 
133 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 97 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium 
hybr. pi. 37. 

Eaised from Cypripedium barbatum crossed with C. philippinense, and 

184 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

flowered for the first time during the summer of 1878. The dorsal sepal 
is finely lined with purple, and the drooping petals are narrow and most 
delicately twisted. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x SIEIUS. 

Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 32. 

Obtained by Seden from Cypripedium barbatum Warneri and C. Gode- 
froyae. 

CYPEIPEDIUM (SELENIPEDIUM) x SUAVE. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 93. 

Eaised from Cypripedium (Selenipedium) x Sedenii candidulum and 
C. (S.) Klotzschianum. 

In the details of the flower this hybrid approaches the first-named plant, 
which was the seed-bearer, but it also shows intermediate characters 
between the two species. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x SUPEECILIAEE, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 795 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 98 ; Diet. 
Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 38. 

A hybrid from Cypripedium barbatum and C. superbiens. The dorsal 
sepal is very broad, marked with purple and green lines on a white ground ; 
the petals are strongly ciliated with long black hairs and marked with large 
points of the same colour. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x TAUTZIANUM, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 681 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 98. 

Eaised from Cypripedium niveum and C. barbatum, and dedicated to 
the late F. G. Tautz, Esq., of Studley House, Hammersmith, S.W., at that 
time possessor of one of the best collections of Cypripedes in the country, 
and a most ardent orchidist. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x T. B. HAYWOOD. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v.' p. 428. 

A hybrid from Cypripedium superbiens and C. Curtisii, named in 
compliment to the late T. B. Haywood, Esq., of Woodhatch, Eeigate, 
a great amateur. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x TELEMACHUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 816 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 359. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Lawrenceanum and C. niveum, 
a similar parentage to C. X Aphrodite, of which it is merely a variety, 
differing in having the greater part of the surface of its flowers suffused 
rosy crimson. 

185 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CYPEIPEDIUM x TESSELATUM, Rclib.f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 614; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium 

hybr. pi. 14. 

Eaised at Chelsea from a cross between Cypripedium concolor and 
C. barbatum. There is a form of the original hybrid named porphyreum 
more vigorous than the type and more brilliantly coloured. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x TESSELATUM, var. POEPHYEEUM, Bchb. f. 

Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 41 ; id. 1885, vol. xx. p. 492 ; Veitchs' Man. 

Orch. PI. iv. p. 99. 

Eaised from Cypripedium concolor and C. barbatum. At the time of 
its introduction the peculiar and distinct shade of rose-purple seen in the 
flowers of this hybrid was unique amongst Cypripedes. 



CYPEIPEDIQM x THALIA. 
Orchid Eeview, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 107, fig. 24. 

Obtained from Cypripedium x Baron Schroder crossed with C. insigne 
Chantinii, and a beautiful flower with an orbicular white dorsal line 
spotted with dark purple. The petals and lip are yellow marked with 
purple-brown ; a variety named punctatum is more spotted than the type. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x THIBAUTIANUM, Echb. f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 104; Veitchs' Man. Oroh. PI. pt. iv. p. 99. 

Eaised from Cypripedium Harrisianum crossed with the pollen of 
C. insigne Maulei ; the same parents as produced C. X oenanthum, and 
named in compliment to the late M. Thibaut of Sceaux, near Paris, 
formerly a well-known nurseryman and lover of Cypripedia. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x TITYUS. 

Gard. Ohron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 622 (Eeport of B.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Eeview, 1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

An interesting hybrid obtained from Cypripedium Spicerianum crossed 
with the pollen of C. X oenanthum superbum, and flowered for the first 
time during 1892. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x VEENIXIUM, Bchb.f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 398 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 99. 

Eaised by Seden from Cypripedium Argus crossed with C. villosum. 

186 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

CYPRIPEDIUM x VEXILLARIUM, Bchb. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1373 ; id. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 780, fig. 135 ; Orchid Album, t. 447 ; The 
Garden, 1874, vol. v. p. 102, fig. ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 100, fig. ; 
Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 297, fig. 15 ; id. 1905, vol. xiii. p. 16 ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 2. 

Eaised by Dominy at Chelsea from Cypripedium barbatum and C. 
Fairieanum, this hybrid has the peculiar curved and drooping petals of 
the latter, and the dorsal sepal resembles, more or less, that of C. barbatum. 
Flowering for the first time in 1870, it was one of the earliest hybrids of 
the Fairieanum series to bloom. 

CYPKIPEDIUM x WINNIANUM, Bchb.f. 

Bchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 362; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iv. p. 100; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Cypripedium hybr. pi. 18. 

Kaised from Cypripedium villosum and C. Druryi, and dedicated to 
Charles Winn, Esq., of Selly Hill, Birmingham, a noted amateur. The 
flowers are intermediate between those of the two parents, the prevailing 
ground colour a soft light brown. 

CYPEIPEDIUM x ZENO. 

Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 32. 
Kaised from Cypripedium x nitens and C. insigne Chantinii. 

DENDROBIUM x ADRASTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 503 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

Raised by Seden from Dendrobium Pierardii and D. superbum, and the 
first artificial hybrid in which D. Pierardii participated. 

The flowers are very pretty, having pale pink sepals and petals, and 
have a decided primrose-yellow lip. 

DENDROBIUM x TINEAS. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 366 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 128. 

Raised from Dendrobium moniliforme crossed with D. crystallinum. 
The sepals and petals are creamy white, with tips of pale rose ; the cream- 
coloured lip tipped with rose has a curious fulvous bronze disc. 

DENDROBIUM x AINSWORTHII, var. INTERTEXTUM. 

Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 103. 

Raised by Seden from Dendrobium nobile and Lee's variety of D. aureum. 
The waxy-white flowers are large and handsome, the lip primrose- 
yellow with a maroon disc ; a handsome hybrid. 

187 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

DENDEOBIUM x AINSWOKTHII, var. SPLENDIDISSIMUM. 
See Dendrobium x splendidissimum. 

DENDKOBEIUM x ALCIPPE. 

Syns. D. X Aureum. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 475 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1894, vol. ii. p. 173. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Dendrobium lituiflorum Freemannii and 
D. Wardianum. 

The sepals and petals are bright rose-purple, paler at the base ; the lip 
is chiefly very white, with an Indian purple disc and an apical border of 
rose-purple. 

DENDEOBIUM x ASPASIA. 

Syns. D. X Wardiano-aureum. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 336 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 137, fig. 9 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896. 

A curious and charming hybrid from Dendrobium aureum and D. 
Wardianum. 

The plant has a habit nearly intermediate between that of the two 
parents ; the flowers have the general outline of those of D. Wardianum, 
the sepals and petals are white tipped with rose-purple, and the lip is 
cream-white with an orange-coloured disc and an irregularly pencilled 
crimson blotch. 

DENDEOBIUM x COEDELIA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 172. 

Eaised from Dendrobium aureum and D. euosmum leucopterum ; the 
flowers, 3 in. in diameter, resemble those of D. aureum in shape. The 
sepals and petals are ivory-white, the former narrowly margined with 
light pink. The lip is light yellow, the front lobe and apex white. 

DENDEOBIUM x CYBELE, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 202 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 87. 

A hybrid from Dendrobium Findlayanum and D. nobile, in which 
the pollen parent has exerted the most influence ; the conspicuous yellow 
lip of the seed parent, D. Findlayanum, is here totally lost and has had 
no perceptible influence. 

DENDEOBIUM x DOMINIANUM, Bchb. /. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 202 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 88. 

Eaised by John Dominy at Exeter from Dendrobium nobile and D. 
Linawianum, and named in compliment to him. 

188 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

DENDEOBIUM x DULCE. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 214 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

Raised from Dendrobium Linawianum and D. aureum, the former 
being the male parent, a pretty hybrid with rose-coloured flowers. 

DENDEOBIUM x EDITHS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 337 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised by Seden from Dendrobium aureum and D. nobile nobilius. 

DENDROBIUM x ENDOCHARIS, Rchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 298 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 88, fig. ; 
V-eitchs' Catlg. 1880, p. 12, fig. 

The chaste white flowers, with their delightful perfume, render this 
one of the most admired of all hybrid Dendrobes ; it was raised from 
Dendrobium japonicum crossed with D. aureum. 

DENDROBIUM x EUOSMUM, Bchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiii. p. 174; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 89; 
Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 112. 

Raised by Seden from Dendrobium x endocharis and D. nobile. 

The influence of the pollen parent is conspicuous in the form and colour 
of the flower, while that of the seed parent itself a hybrid is chiefly 
noticeable from a delightful fragrance. 

DENDROBIUM x EUOSMUM, var. LEUCOPTERUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 488. 

One of the most beautiful hybrid Dendrobes yet raised. The flowers are 
white, the disc of the lip Indian-purple. 

DENDROBIUM x EUOSMUM, var. VIRGINALE. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 337 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

The flowers of this form are pure white with a purple blotch at the base 
of the lip : one of the finest of all Dendrobes. 

DENDROBIUM x EURYALUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 409 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Jour, of 
Hort. April 26th, fig. ; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 142. 

Raised by Seden from Dendrobium nobile and D. x Ainsworthii, the 
former the pollen parent. 

The flowers have the general shape of D. nobile ; the sepals and petals 
are light rosy purple, the lip of the same colour with a large-feathered 
maroon blotch in the centre. 

189 



HORTUS VEITCH1I 

DENDEOBIUM x EUEYCLJEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 503 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

Eaised from Dendrobium lituiflorum and D. Wardianum, the reverse of 
the cross that produced D. X micans, and flowered for the first time in 
1892, but now probably lost to cultivation. 

DENDKOBIUM x ILLUSTBE. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 15, fig. 4; Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 243; Jour, 
of Hort. 1895, June 27th, pp. 561, 566, fig. 99 ; Gard. Mag. 1895, June 29th, 
p. 385, fig. 

The two species crossed are unusually dissimilar and have little in 
common, though they both inhabit Burmese territory. Dendrobium 
Dalhousieanum, introduced in 1837, has tall terete stems, leafy when 
young, and D. chrysotoxum clavate pseudo-bulbs with a few leaves at 
the top. In the hybrid the amalgamation of the two species is most 
distinctly traceable. 

DENDEOBIUM x MENTOE. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 580 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 189. 

Eaised by Seden from Dendrobium primulinum and D. superbum ; a 
pretty hybrid with light rose-coloured flowers. 



DENDEOBIUM x MICANS, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 332; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 89. 

Obtained from Dendrobium Wardianum crossed with D. lituiflorum, 
and a very interesting hybrid and free grower. 

DENDEOBIUM x NIOBE. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 456 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 

Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 146. 

From Dendrobium tortile and D. nobile, the latter, the pollen parent, 
very much influenced the colour of the flowers ; these are bright rose- 
purple and the lip has a deep maroon disc as in the pollen parent. 

DENDEOBIUM x OPHIE. 

Orchid Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 100. 

Eaised from Dendrobium aureum and D. signatum, the former being 
the seed-bearer ; the flowers are of a charming tone of yellow, the lip 
a deeper shade of colour and pubescent. 

190 




f- H 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

DENDEOBIUM x PORPHYROGASTRUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 102 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised from Dendrobium Dalhousieanum and D. Huttonii. The large 
flowers are a curious rosy lilac in colour. 

DENDROBIUM x RHODOSTOMA, Rchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 795 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 90. 

Exhibited for the first time at the Brussels Centennial flower show 
in 1876 ; the parents are Dendrobium Huttonii and D. sanguinolentum. 

DENDROBIUM x SPLENDIDISSIMUM, Bchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 298 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. iii. p. 91. 

Raised by crossing Dendrobium aureum with D. nobile. The flowers 
are of firm texture and glisten as if varnished. The hybrid first flowered 
in 1879, received the above name from Reichenbach, though really a 
variety of D. Ainsworthii, a much finer form is known as grandiflora. 

DENDROBIUM x STRIATUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 566 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 358. 

A curious hybrid, raised by Seden from Dendrobium moniliforme 
crossed with D. Dalhousieanum, two species belonging to entirely different 
groups. 

The shield-like lip is a feature of the flowers. 

DENDROBIUM x THWAITESLE, VEITCHS' var. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 274, with fig. 

A handsome yellow-flowered Dendrobe, one of the finest in cultivation, 
raised at Langley from Dendrobium splendidissimum grandiflorum and 
D. x Wiganse, and flowered for the first time in April 1904. 

DENDROBIUM x VIRGINIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 343 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 171. 

The first hybrid from Dendrobium Bensoniae and D. moniliforme 
(japonicum). The flowers are a lovely clear white with a small maroon 
spot near the base of the lip. On account of the shortness of the 
internodes the pseudo-bulbs are quite hidden on that part of the bulbs 
where the flowers are produced. 

191 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

DBNDEOBIUM x WAEDIANO-JAPONICUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 343 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised from the two species expressed by the compound name ; a very 
pretty and delicately coloured hybrid. 

DIALvELIA VEITCHII. 

Orchid Review, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 115. 

A bigeneric hybrid raised by Seden from Diacrium bicornutum and 
Laelia cinnabarina as seed parent. 

The flowers, borne in the same manner as those of Diacrium, measure 
some 2 in. across, have narrow segments, white tinged with lilac, the 
younger showing a slight bronzy tint; this remarkable success flowered for 
the first time in March 1905. 

DISA x DIOEBS. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 49 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid Review, 

1894, vol. ii. p. 239. 

Eaised by Seden from Disa X Veitchii and D. grandiflora, the latter one 
of the parents of D. X Veitchii. 

The flowers closely approach those of D. grandiflora, but are paler in 
colour, the dorsal sepal being nearly white. 

DISA x LANGLEYENSIS, Hort. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 35, fig. 5; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 202. 

A hybrid between Disa tripetaloides and D. racemosa, flowered at 
Langley, and subsequently at the Eoyal Gardens, Kew. 

The flowers, of a beautiful rose-pink shade, are borne in racemes of ten 
to twelve and more. 

DISA x LUNA. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 314 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
The parents of this hybrid are Disa racemosa and D. x Veitchii, the 
first named being one of the parents of the latter. In size the flowers 
exceed those of D. racemosa, and are bright rose-purple in colour; the 
interior of the flower is whitish with a slight tint of rose and a network 
of purple. 

DISA x VEITCHII. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 93, fig. 14; The Garden, 1892, vol. xlii. p. 408, pi. 882; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Disa hybr. pi. 1. 

One of the first and one of the best hybrids in the genus from Disa 
grandiflora and D. racemosa. 

The flowers, rose-purple with dark crimson and yellow markings in the 
centre, last long in perfection. Shown for the first time in flower in 
London on June 9th 1891. 

192 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

EPICATTLEYA GUATEMALBNSIS, Rolfe. 

Syns. Cattleya x Guatemalensis, Veitch. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 491, in List of Garden Orchids; PI. Mag. 1861, 
t. 61 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 86. 

A remarkable hybrid sent from Guatemala by Mr. G. Ure-Skinner, who 
found it with Cattleya Skinneri and Epidendrum aurantiacum on the stem 
of the same tree ; and it may be assumed that this plant is a natural 
bigeneric hybrid of the two species with which it was found. 

EPICATTLEYA MATUTINA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 210 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Gard. Chron. 
1897, vol. xxi. p. 232, fig. 77, p. 233 ; Orchid Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 110. 

Eaised from Epidendrum radicans and Cattleya Bowringiana. The 
plant has much the same habit as E. radicans, even to the air-root-bearing 
characteristic, and the base of the stem shows a tendency to thicken, 
but there is little evidence of the Cattleya. 

The flowers are some 2 in. in diameter, yellow in colour, tinged with 
vermilion. 

EPICATTLEYA MES JAMES O'BKIEN, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 31 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee), fig. 11, p. 37. 

Eaised by Seden from Epidendrum x O'Brienianum and Cattleya 
Bowringiana ; a brilliant coloured plant. 

EPICATTLEYA EADIO-BOWEINGIANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 385 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. p. 391, 
fig. ; Orchid Review, 1898, vol. vi. p. 198. 

A bigeneric hybrid from Epidendrum radiatum and Cattleya Bowringiana 
with the habit of Epidendrum radiatum, with ovoid, flattish pseudo-bulbs ; 
rosy purple flowers, and a lip of a deeper tint. 

EPIDENDEUM x CLAEISSA. 

Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxvii. p. 239 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) j id. 1901, 

vol. xxix. p. 242. 

Eaised from Epidendrum x elegantulum and E. Wallisii. The flowers, 
sepals and petals white with reddish markings ; the lip violet with white 
at the base and along the margin. 

The variety superba, with blooms of a darker shade and bolder spots, 
is a superior form of the type. 

EPIDENDEUM x ELEGANTULUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xix. p. 361, fig. 49 ; Jour, of Hort. 1896, March 16th, p. 251, 
fig. 46 ; Orchid Review, 1896, vol. iv. pp. 108 and 124 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, 
Epidendrum hybr. pi. 1. 

A hybrid raised from Epidendrum x Endresio-Wallisii and E. Wallisii. 

193 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

EPIDENDEUM x ELEGANTULUM, var. AUEEUM. 

Orchid Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 108. 

A paler coloured form of the type in which the sepals and petals are 
entirely light yellow and the disc of the lip nearly half red-purple in 
radiating lines. 

EPIDENDEUM x ELEGANTULUM, var. LEUCOCHILUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 238 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Epidendrum hybr. pi. la. 

A variety of the type with yellow sepals and petals and a pronounced 
pure white lip. 

EPIDENDEUM x ENDEESIO-WALLISII, Hort. Bolfe. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 104; Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 88 (Report of R.H.S. 

Orchid Committee). 

A hybrid obtained by crossing two species widely different in size and 
appearance. 

The pollen parent is the rare and lovely Epidendrum Endresii, a native 
of Costa Eica, few plants of which have been imported alive ; the seed 
parent is E. Wallisii, from the Frontino district of New Grenada. 

The flowers from different plants vary considerably in colour, and are 
about 1 in. in diameter and most freely produced. 

EPIDENDEUM x LANGLEYENSE. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 402 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised at Langley from Epidendrum Pseudepidendrum and E. Wallisii, 
the latter being the seed parent. 

EPIDENDEUM x O'BEIENIANUM, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 771, with figs. ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. 
p. 128, with figs, reproduced ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Epidendrum hybr. pi. 2. 

Eaised and first flowered in the spring of the year 1888, the first 
artificially produced hybrid in the genus to be raised in this country. 

The species used as parents were Epidendrum erectum and E. radicans, 
and the hybrid shows fairly intermediate characters. 

It was named in compliment to Mr. James O'Brien, a well-known 
authority on Orchidaceous Plants. 

EPIDENDEUM x EADICO-VITELLINUM, O'Brien. 

J. O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 16; Orchid Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 314. 

Eaised from the two species expressed by the name, and of slender 
growth, the root-bearing stems, furnished with alternate leaves. The 
evidence of the mother is seen in the soft green tint and slightly glaucous 

194 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

hue of the stems and leaves, the former having a slight tendency to 
enlarge at the nodes. 

The flowers, on erect stems some 6 in. in length, are yellow, tinged with 
scarlet on the margin of the trilobed lip. 

EPIDENDEUM x EADICO-STAMFOEDIANUM. 

Orchid Eeview, 1898, vol. vi. p. 198. 

Eaised at Langley from the two species indicated by the name, and the 
first artificially raised hybrid in which Epidendrum Stamfordianum 
participated. 

In habit and inflorescence it resembles the pollen parent, E. radicans, 
and the influence of E. Stamfordianum is clearly seen in the shape of 
the flowers. 

EPIDENDEUM x WALLISIO-CILIAEE. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 730 ; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 14. 

Eaised by Seden from the two species expressed by the compound 
name, Epidendrum ciliare being the seed-bearer. This singular-looking 
hybrid has yellow sepals and petals, and a white lip delicately fringed 
along the margin, with four or five short radiating maroon-purple lines 
on either side of the deep yellow crest. The influence of the seed parent 
is seen in the shape of the leaves, segments and the fimbriation of the lip. 

EPIL^LIA EADICO-PUEPUEATA, O'Brien. 

O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 61, fig. p. 83; Orchid Review, 1897, vol. v. 

pp. 232, 273, fig. 12. 

A bigeneric hybrid from Epidendrum radicans and Laelia purpurata, 
the former the pollen plant. 

The hybrid resembles the male plant in habit, having erect, reed-like 
stems, which produce aerial roots. The flowers are 2 in. in diameter, 
rich orange-scarlet, with a lemon-yellow lip broadly margined with light 
reddish-purple. 

The influence of the female parent is seen in the dwarf habit, the 
nearly entire lip, and in the modified colour. 

EPIPHEONITIS VEITCHII. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 799 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Watson's 
Orchids, new edit. 1903, p. 348, col. pi. ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 116 ; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Epiphronitis, hybr. pi. 1. 

A bigeneric hybrid obtained by crossing Epidendrum radicans with 
Sophronitis grandiflora, the latter being the seed parent. The two plants 
used as parents are totally distinct in habit, the one being but a few 
inches high and the other as many feet. In the hybrid the pollen parent 
greatly preponderates, but the stems are only about 1 ft. or 1 ft. high. 

195 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The flowers are increased in size and have a dash of crimson added in 
the sepals and petals ; the disc of the lip is also more yellow, clear cut 
and spathulate in form. 

GOODYEEA x VEITCHII. 

Williams' Orch. Man. ed. 7, p. 412. 

Raised by John Dominy from Goodyera discolor and Ancectochims 
Veitchii ; a bigeneric hybrid of great botanical interest. 

L^BLIA x CLIO. 

Syns. Brassolcelia Clio. 
Orchid Eeview, 1902, vol. x. p. 86. 

A hybrid between Laelia (Brassavola) glauca and L. cinnabarina, raised 
by Seden at Langley and first flowered in January 1902. 

The flowers are light reddish-buff in colour, and in form fairly inter- 
mediate between those of the two parents. 

LJELIA x DIGBYANO-PUEPUEATA. 

Syns. Brassolmlia Veitchii. 
Orchid Review, 1899, vol. vii. p. 31 ; id. 1902, vol. x. p. 85. 

An interesting and striking hybrid raised from Laelia (Brassavola) 
Digbyana and L. purpurata. 

The flowers resemble those of the last-named parent in shape, the sepals 
and petals are white, and the front of the lip is purple. 

LAELIA x DIGBYANO-PUEPUEATA, var. KING EDWAED VII. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. pp. 206, 207, fig. 68, also suppl. col. pi. p. 413. 

A very fine form with an enormous lip, sepals and petals white in 
colour, slightly tinged with rose, the lip primrose-yellow, veined with 
bright rose-purple markings and delicately fringed. 

LAELIA x EDISSA. 

Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxvii. p. 143. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia anceps and L. purpurata. 
The flowers resemble those of the first-named species, but are larger ; 
the lip is rich purple. 

L^LIA x EUTEEPE, Rolfe. 

Eolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. s. 3, p. 533. 

An interesting little hybrid raised by Seden from Laelia pumila Dayana 
and L. crispa. 

196 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

L^ELIA x PLAMMEA, EcU. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 599; id. 1876, p. 394; PL and Pom. 1874, p. 133; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 96. 

This, one of the most beautiful of all hybrid Laelias, is, as regards 
colour, unique even among orchids, and was raised from Lselia cinna- 
barina crossed with L. x Pilcheriana. 

LSELIA x FLA VINA. 

Orchid Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 147. 

A pretty hybrid raised by Seden from Laelia pumila and L. flava ; the 
flowers, of good size, are primrose-yellow in colour, with an orange- 
coloured disc to the lip. 

L^ELIA x LATONA. 

Jour, of Hort. 1892, vol. xxiv. p. 353, fig.; Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 598 (Report 
of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 14; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees, Laslia hybr. pi. 3. 

A very beautiful and much appreciated hybrid raised from Lselia cin- 
nabarina and L. purpurata. 

The colour of the flowers, distinct and unusual, is a uniform orange- 
yellow; the lip, scarcely lobed, being deep red-purple with an orange- 
coloured border. 

L^LIA x MES. M. GKATEIX. 

Syns. Brassolfelia Gratrixix, Rolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxix. p. 17, fig. 5. ; Orchid Review, 1899, vol. vii. pp. 349, 351 ; 
1902, vol. x. p. 85 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Laelia hybr. pi. 10. 

A hybrid between Laelia cinnabarina and L. Digbyana, first flowered 
in October 1899 : the flowers are a beautiful orange-yellow, and the lip 
has the fringe peculiar to L. Digbyana. 

KELIA x OMEN. 
Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 667 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia purpurata and L. autumnalis, with flowers 
of singular appearance and of a light rose colour, close in form to those of 
L. autumnalis. 

L^ILIA x PILCHEEIANA, Bckb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 815; PL Mag. t. 340; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PL 

pt. ii. p. 96. 

A hybrid raised by John Dominy from Laelia crispa and L. Perrinii, 
flowered for the first time in March 1867, and named in honour of 
Mr. Pilcher, formerly gardener to Sigismund Eucker, Esq., a successful 
cultivator of orchids. 

197 o 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

L^LIOCATTLEYA AMESIANA. 

Syns. Lcelia X Amesiana, Echb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 109 ; Orchid Album, vi. t. 253 ; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 94. 

Eaised at Chelsea, and dedicated to the late Hon. F. L. Ames, of North 
Easton, Massachusetts, formerly one of the most liberal patrons of horti- 
culture in America, and the owner of an unusually choice collection of 
plants. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA ASCANIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 518 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Jour, of 
Hort. May 4th, 1893, p. 351, fig. 65 ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 167. 

Eaised by Seden from Lselia xanthina and Cattleya Trianse. The 
flowers are much like C. labiata in shape, but are smaller. The 
sepals are sulphur-yellow in colour, the petals much broader, and white 
with a tinge of sulphur-yellow, the lips similar in colour but that the front 
lobe is rich crimson. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA AUBOEA, Rol/e. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 380. 

A hybrid from Laelia pumila Dayana and Cattleya Loddigesii, raised 
from seed sown in 1882, and first flowered in October 1889. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA BELLA. 

Syns. LceUa X bella, Rchb. f. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 78 (List of Garden Orchids); Rchb. in Gard. 
Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 174 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 94. 

The fortunate result of crossing Laelia purpurata and Cattleya labiata 
vera, the reverse of the cross which produced Laeliocattleya Antigone. 

At the time of flowering, this beautiful hybrid was unsurpassed by any 
of its class. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA CALLISTOGLOSSA, Rolfe. 

Syns. Lcelia X callistoglossa, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 76 ; Orchid Album, t. 235 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 
PI. pt. ii. p. 94, fig. ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Laeliocattleya, hybr. pi. 8. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia purpurata and Cattleya Warscewiczii. 
The gorgeous lip of this hybrid is scarcely equalled in colour by any of 
the species belonging to the grand race of orchids from which it is derived. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA CALLISTOGLOSSA, var. IGNESCENS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 588 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Veitchs' 

Catlg. of PI. 1899, fig. p. 9. 

This variety is the result of another cross from the same species that 

198 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

produced the type, but finer varieties were used, and the progeny 
improved in all its parts. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA CALOGLOSSA. 

Syns. L<elia X caloglossa, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 139 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 94. 
Eaised by John Dominy from Cattleya labiata vera crossed with either 
Laelia crispa or L. Boothiana (lobata). 

LAELIOCATTLEYA CANHAMIANA. 

Syns. Lalia X Canhamiana, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 6 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 95 ; Flora 

and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 376. 

Eaised at Chelsea from Laelia purpurata and Cattleya Mossiae, and named 
after Charles Canham, a well-known grower of a former generation. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA CASSANDEA. 

Syns. Cattleya X Cassandra, Rolfe. 
Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 596 ; id. 1890, vol. viii. p. 529. 

A hybrid, raised by Seden by crossing Cattleya Loddigesii with the 
pollen of one of the forms of Laeliocattleya elegans, the latter itself a 
natural hybrid between Laelia purpurata and Cattleya guttata Leopoldii. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA CASSIOPE, Eolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 620. 

Eaised from Laelia pumila and Laeliocattleya exoniensis, the fourth of 
a series of bigeneric hybrids with Laelia pumila as one parent. The seed 
was sown in 1881, and the first flowers produced in November 1889, 
proving of little interest. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA CLONIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 511 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 373 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Laeliocattleya hybr. pi. 12. 

Eaised by Seden from Laeliocattleya elegans Turneri and Cattleya 
Warscewiczii. The flowers resemble those of the last-named, and the 
front lobe of the lip is broad, circular and undulated. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA CLONIA, var. SUPEEBA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 421, fig. 

An improved form of the type, with a very much richer and broader lip. 

199 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

LJELIOCATTLEYA COENBLIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 692 (Report of E.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised from Lselia pumila crossed with the pollen of Cattleya labiata. 
L^LIOCATTLEYA COEONIS. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 23 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised from Cattleya labiata and Laelia cinnabarina. The flowers are 
copper-yellow in colour with a purple lip. 

LjELIOCATTLEYA CYBELE. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 156. 

A handsome hybrid from Laeliocattleya Schilleriana and Cattleya Trianae, 
with lavender-tinted sepals and petals, a bright crimson-purple lip, 
primrose-yellow at the disc passing to white at the base. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA DECIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 699, fig. 89; Jour, of Hort. 1895, Feb. 14th, pp. 130, 131, 

fig. 21. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Dowiana aurea and Laelia Perrinii. 
LJELIOCATTLEYA DECIA, var. ALBA. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 667 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. 1897, 

vol. xxi. p. 120, fig. 34. 

The sepals and petals of this variety are pure white, and the lip has an 
indescribable silvery white tracery on a delicate rose-pink ground. It was 
adjudged the best hybrid orchid of the year in 1896. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA DIGBYANO-MENDELII, VEITCHS' var. 

Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 204, fig. 63, p. 207; Jour, of Hort. 1901, vol. xliii. pp. 237, 
239, fig. ; Gard. Mag. 1901, pp. 594, 597, fig. 

The parentage of this fine hybrid is expressed by the compound name. 
It differs from other varieties of the same class in having larger flowers of 
uniform purplish-rose, and not the usual pallid whitish colour ; the lip, 
3 in. wide, is of a reddish tinge, the disc yellow. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA DIGBYANO-MOSSLE. 

Syns. Brassocattleya Veitchii, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 742, fig. Ill ; id. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 161, fig. 
reproduced; Orchid Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 83 ; Flora and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 264. 

The product of a cross, as its name implies, between Laelia (Brassa- 
vola) Digbyana and Cattleya Mossiae, raised by Seden, and flowered for 
the first time in May 1889, when the plant was seven years old. It is 
still one of the very choice and rare of this group. 

200 




L^LIOCATTLEYA DOMIN1ANA LANGLEYENSIS 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

L^LIOCATTLEYA DIGBYANO-TEIAN^E. 

Syns. Brassocattleya Sedenii, Bolfe. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 9, fig. 3 ; Orchid Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 132; id. 1902, 

vol. x. p. 84. 

A hybrid from the two fine species expressed by the name. In colour 
a bright rose-pink with the throat of the frayed lip buff-yellow passing 
into light yellow inside the rose-pink margin, the basal half of the disc 
veined with reddish-purple. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA DOMINI AN A. 

Syns. Lcelia X Dominiana, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 332; Fl. Mag. n.s. t. 325; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. ii. p. 95. 

Eaised by Dominy from Laelia purpurata and Cattleya Dowiana. 
L^ELIOCATTLEYA DOMINIANA, var. LANGLEYENSIS. 

The Garden, 1899, vol. Ivi. p. 142, pi. 1236. 

Eaised at Langley from Laelia purpurata and Cattleya Dowiana, and 
a beautiful interesting hybrid, as it clears up the uncertainty which 
previously existed as to the origin of Laeliocattleya Dominiana, one of 
the early hybrids raised without a record by John Dominy. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA EPICASTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 342 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Jour, of 
Hort. 1895, April 25th, pp. 358, 364, fig. 60; Gard. Mag. 1895, May 4th, p. 261, fig. 

Obtained by Seden from Laelia pumila and Cattleya Warscewiczii. 



L^LIOCATTLEYA EUMCEA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 21. 

The first result of many attempts to cross the Mexican Laelias with 
the South American Cattleyas. Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Trianae 
and Laelia majalis, the flowers smaller than those of the Cattleya parent, 
have much the same shape, and the influence of the Laelia is seen in the 
colour and in certain slight modifications in the form. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA EUDOEA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1899, p. 18. 

A superb hybrid, the offspring of Cattleya Mendelli and Laelia purpu- 
rata, with flowers between 7 in. to 8 in. in diameter : one of the finest of 
all the Lseliocattleyas. 

201 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

L^LIOCATTLEYA EUNOMIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 307 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 292. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia pumila Dayana and Cattleya Gaskelliana, 
and fairly intermediate in shape, but on the whole most resembling the 
pollen parent, C. Gaskelliana. 

The sepals and petals are bright lilac-rose, the lip amethyst-purple with 
two small yellow blotches on the disc. 

L^BLIOCATTLEYA EUPHBOSYNE. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 527 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised from Laelia pumila Dayana and Cattleya Warscewiczii ; the 
flowers large and well formed, light rose-colour, with a bright purple lip 
with a central primrose -yellow disc. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA EXIMIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 800 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Lindenia, 

t. 386. 

Noteworthy as the first of a series of Cattleya Warneri crossed with 
Laelia purpurata. The flowers are highly coloured and the lip extremely 
handsome. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA EXONIENSIS. 

Syns. Cattleya x exoniensis. 

Rolfe in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiv. p. 169 ; Fl. Mag. 1866, t. 269; Gard. Chron. 1867, 
p. 1144 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 95. 

One of Dominy's earliest and most successful efforts, and, at the time 
of its introduction the most beautiful of the noble race to which it belongs ; 
the parents were probably Laelia crispa and Cattleya Mossiae. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA FAUSTA, Eolfe. 

Syns. Cattleya X Fausta, Rchb. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 619; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 289, figs, 
p. 290; The Garden, 1873, vol. iv. p. 435, fig. ; Fl. Mag. t. 189; Veitchs' Man. 
Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 90. 

Eaised by Seden from a cross between Cattleya Loddigesii and 
Laeliocattleya exoniensis, but no great improvement on the parents. 

There are several varieties, which differ somewhat in colour, distin- 
guished by the names aurea, bella, crispa, and delicata. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA FELIX. 
Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 68 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 96. 

Eaised by John Dominy, probably from Cattleya Schilleriana crossed 
with Laelia crispa : a poor thing. 

202 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

LJELIOCATTLEYA HIPPOLYTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 398 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Diet. Ic. des 
Orchidees Lseliocattleya, hybr. pi. 12. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia cinnabarina and Cattleya Mossiae, the 
latter the seed-bearer ; the hybrid combines in a happy manner the 
characters of the two species. 

KELIOCATTLEYA ILLIONE. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 367 ; Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 401 (Report of 

R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Bowringiana and Laeliocattleya Dominiana 
Langleyensis, one of the best of the Cattleya Bowringiana crosses, the 
flowers being large and finely formed, of a bright, dark rosy purple, with 
a rosy red labellum. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA ISIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. rviii. p. 467. 

Eaised from Cattleya x Marstersoniae and Laelia pumila, the former 
being the pollen parent. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA KING OF SPAIN. 

Orchid Review, 1905, vol. xiii. p. 211. 

A fine hybrid of unrecorded parentage, but probably derived from Laelio- 
cattleya Digbyano-Mossiae and some Cattleya of the labiata group. The 
lip, the most attractive feature, is of large size, beautifully crisped, rich 
purple-crimson in colour with a yellow throat. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA LACUSTA. 

Orchid Review, 1898, vol. vi. p. 41. 

Eaised from Cattleya bicolor and Laelia harpophylla. The flowers are 
intermediate in shape and colour ; the sepals and petals orange-yellow, 
the side lobes of the lip white, and the front lobe scarlet-crimson extending 
down the disc. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA LADY EOTHSCHILD. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896, p. 8 ; Orchid Review, 1895, p. 353. 
A lovely hybrid raised by crossing Cattleya Warscewiczii and Laelia 
Perrinii, the latter being the seed parent. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA LEUCOGLOSSA. 

Syns. Cattleya x leucoglossa. 
Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 357. 

Eaised from Cattleya Loddigesii and Laeliocattleya Fausta. 

203 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA LEUCOGLOSSA, var. BELLA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 43. 

The typical form has rose-pink sepals and petals, and a white lip with 
some yellow in the throat. The variety bella differs in having the front 
lobe of the lip dull violet-purple. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA LUCILIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 403 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Kaised by Seden from Cattleya Dowiana and Lseliocattleya Schilleriana. 
The flowers are cream-white tipped with purple ; the lip yellow veined in 
front with purple. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA MAEDELLI. 

Syns. Cattleya X Mardelli, Rchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 234; PI. Mag. 1881, pi. 437 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. 

PI. pt. ii. p. 91. 

Raised by Seden from Cattleya Lueddemanniana and Lseliocattleya 
elegans, and of no great interest. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA MONA. 

Eaised from Cattleya Schroderse and Lselia flava. The flowers are self- 
coloured throughout, pure yellow, of a similar shade to that of Cattleya 
flava, but larger. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA MYEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 337 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 103 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Laeliocattleya, hybr. pi. 10. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Trianse crossed with the pollen of Lselia 
flava : the flowers are creamy yellow with a sulphur-yellow disc to the lip, 
marked with reddish veins. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA NOVELTY. 

Syns. Lcelia X Novelty. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 288; Gard. Mag. Aug. 26th, 1893, pp. 530, 531, fig. 

Eaised from Laelia pumila Dayana and Lseliocattleya elegans, but a 
similar hybrid had previously been raised by Dr. Harris of Lamberhurst, 
and neither had any great beauty. 

L^BLIOCATTLEYA NYSA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 342 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 307; id. 1894, vol. ii. p. 349; Jour, of Hort. 1894, 
Jan. 10th, fig. ; id. 1900, vol. xli. p. 329, fig. 91 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Lzelio- 
cattleya hybr. pi. 1. 

Eaised from Lselia crispa and Cattleya Warscewiczii, this hybrid varies 

204 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

considerably, and several seedlings have been named, such as superba, 
picta, and purpurea (as their names indicate), differing from the type 
in size, marking and colour of the flowers. The typical form is a light 
rosy-mauve with the front lobe of the lip deep purple-crimson, but the 
variety superba is one of the finest products of orchid hybridizing. 

LvELIOCATTLEYA OPHIE. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 350. 

Eaised by Seden from Lselia xanthina and Cattleya Dowiana aurea, a 
striking plant with flowers with yellow sepals and petals and a tawny 
purple lip. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA OEPHEUS. 

Syns. Brassocattleya Orpheus. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 50 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 

Review, 1902, vol. x. p. 85. 

This most interesting cross, obtained from Laelia (Brassavola) glauca 
and Cattleya Trianae alba, is fairly intermediate in character, having 
white sepals slightly tinged with pink and white petals and a lip blotched 
with a yellow disc. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA PALLAS. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. pp. 620, 701 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); 
Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 21 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 18, fig. ; Rev. 
de 1'Hort. Beige, 1897, p. 130, fig. 22 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Lseliocattleya 
hybr. pi. 9. 

Eaised from Laelia crispa and Cattleya Dowiana ; an exceptionally fine 
hybrid, and none are finer than the variety superba, exhibited for the first 
time in December 1889. 

The sepals and petals are very pale yellow suffused with light blush 
pink ; the lip deep rose-purple, undulated and crisped, with a rich golden 
yellow throat. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA PAEYSATIS. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 310. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Bowringiana crossed with the pollen of 
Lselia pumila, from seed sown in 1888 ; the plants first flowered in 1893. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA PHILBEICKIANA. 

Syns. Ltelia X Philbrickiana, Rchb. f. 
Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 102; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 96. 

Eaised from Cattleya Aclandise and Laelia elegans and dedicated to the 
late Judge Philbrick, of Oldfield, Bickley. 

205 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA PISANDEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 536 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Jour, of 
Hort. Nov. 2nd, 1893, pp. 394, 407, fig. 60; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 374. 

Eaised from Cattleya Eldorado and Laelia crispa. The flowers are of a 
beautiful rose-purple with a deep velvety purple lip. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA PEOSEEPINE, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 352; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Laeliocattleya hybr. 

pi. 2. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Laelia pumila Dayana and Cattleya 
velutina, from seed sown in 1883 and flowered in August 1890. 

L^BLIOCATTLEYA QUEEN ALEXANDEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 116; Supp. col. fig. p. 413. 

A very beautiful hybrid Laeliocattleya raised by Seden from Lseliocattleya 
bella and Cattleya Trianae, with sepals and petals of an intense rosy lilac, 
and a lip deep ruby-purple with an orange-coloured disc. The petals are 
very broad and well displayed. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA EEMULA. 
Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 228. 

Eaised from Cattleya Aclandise and Laelia tenebrosa, the latter the pollen 
parent. 

The flowers favour those of the Cattleya parent in shape; the sepals 
and petals of a coppery yellow tint, unspotted, the lip a light purple with 
the side-lobes and disc nearly white. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA EOSALIND. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 2, fig. 1 ; Jour, of Hort. January 21st, fig. 16. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Trianae and Laeliocattleya Dominiana. 

The sepals are French-white ; the broad petals silvery white with a 
delicate tinge of rose-pink ; the lip is rich yellow at the base with clear, 
white veining, the side lobes rosy purple, the front with a large rich purple 
blotch. 

LJELIOCATTLEYA SEDENII, Bchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 424; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 97. 

Eaised from Cattleya superba and Laeliocattleya elegans, and named by 
Professor Eeichenbach in compliment to the raiser ; it is doubtful if this 
plant still exists. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA SEMIEAMIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 588 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. 1901, 

vol. xxx. p. 401. 

Eaised from Laelia Perrinii and Cattleya Gaskelliana. The variety 
superba is the showiest of all the Perrinii hybrids. 

206 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA STATTEEIANA. 

Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 21 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. for 1895, p. 7. 
Kaised from the autumn-flowering Laelia Perrinii crossed with the 
pollen of Cattleya labiata vera. 

The purple front lobe of the lip with its milk-white disc offers a 
remarkable contrast, and is a marked characteristic of the flower. 

L^LIOCATTLEYA STELLA, Rolfe. 

Eolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 322. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia crispa and Laeliocattleya elegans Wolsten- 
holmiae from seed sown in 1881 ; the plant flowered for the first time in 
July 1889. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA TIMOKJE, N. E. Brown. 
N. E. Brown, in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 428 ; Orchid Eeview, 1894, vol. ii. p. 255. 

Eaised by Seden from Laelia pumila Dayana, and Cattleya Luedde- 
manniana, and of no great interest. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA TIEESIAS. 

Orchid Eeview, 1896, vol. iv. p. 15. 

Eaised from Cattleya Bowringiana crossed with the pollen of Laelio- 
cattleya elegans. 

The flowers resemble those of the seed parent, the sepals and petals 
being rose-purple with a rich crimson-purple lip white at the base. 

KELIOCATTLEYA TEIOPHTHALMA. 

Syns. Laelia x triophthalma, Cattleya x triophtlialma, Echb. 

Eolfe in Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ix. p. 802 ; vol. x. p. 155; Orchid Eeview, 1893, vol. i. 
p. 101 ; id. 1894, vol. ii. p. 40 ; Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 526 ; 
Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 97. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya superba and the beautiful hybrid Laelio 
cattleya exoniensis. The colouring of the disc gives a tripartite appear- 
ance suggesting the name. 

The sepals and petals are blush.pink, the side-lobes of the lip the same 
colour as the sepals, but inside suffused and veined with rose. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA TYDEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 210 (Eeport of E.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Eeview, 1894, vol. ii. p. 95 ; Jour, of Hort. 1894, March 8th, p. 181, fig. 30. 

Eaised from Laelia pumila and Cattleya Trianse. The flowers are of a 
deep tint of rosy purple, and bear a resemblance to the first-named 
parent. 

207 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

L^LIOCATTLEYA VACUNA. 

Orchid Eeview, 1901, vol. ix. p. 119. 

A hybrid from Cattleya guttata and Lselia cinnabarina. 
The flowers are pale yellow with the front lobe of the lip deep- 
crimson-purple. 

L^ILIOCATTLEYA VBITCHIANA, Eolfe. 

Syns. Lcelia X Veitchiana, Rchb. Cattleya X Veitchiana, Hort. 

Kolfe in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiv. p. 169 ; Echb. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 566 ; 
PI. Mag. n.s. t. 305 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 97. 

A hybrid raised by Dominy from Cattleya labiata vera with Lselia crispa, 
and flowered for the first time in March 1874, when sixteen years old ; 
exhibited before the Floral Committee of the Eoyal Horticultural Society, 
it was awarded a First Class Certificate. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA VICTOBIA, Eolfe. 

Syns. Lcelia X Victoria, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 156 (Rolfe's List of Garden Orchids) ; Gard. Chron. 1888, 
vol. iv. p. 578 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Gard. and For. 1888, p. 495. 

Eaised by Seden from Lselia crispa and the beautiful Lseliocattleya 
Dominiana, a hybrid with the richest colouring possible ; it passed to the 
collection of Baron Schroder, who first exhibited it in flower before the 
Eoyal Horticultural Society. 

L^ELIOCATTLEYA VIOLETTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 115 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised from Cattleya Gaskelliana and Laslia purpurata. The flowers 
have the Cattleya form with the rich colouring of the Laelia parent. 

LvELIOCATTLEYA ZENOBIA, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 552. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Loddigesii and Lseliocattleya elegans 
Turneri. 

LAELIOCATTLEYA ZEPHYBA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 103 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 285. 

Eaised from Lselia xanthina and Cattleya Mendelii, the former the 
pollen parent. 

The hybrid resembles the first-named in its flowers, the sepals and 
petals are light buff, the front lobe of the lip purple-crimson, and the 
remainder yellow, deeper at the throat. 

208 



LEPTOLJELIA VEITCHIL 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 50, fig. 23 ; Orchid Keview, 1902, vol. x. p. 157. 

A bigeneric hybrid from Leptotes bicolor and Laelia cinnabarina, the 
former the seed parent. 

The cream-coloured flowers flushed with pink are about If in. in 
diameter ; the leaves, intermediate in form between those of the two 
progenitors, are neither cylindrical as in Leptotes nor flattened as in 
the Laelia. 

The first recorded hybrid between the two genera Leptotes and Leelia. 

MASDEVALLIA x AJAX. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 137 (Report of B.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 228. 

Raised by Seden from Masdevallia x Chelsoni and M. Peristeria, the 
latter being the pollen parent. 

The general effect is that of M. x Chelsoni modified in shape and 
darker in colour on account of the numerous little dots derived from 
M. Peristeria. 

MASDEVALLIA x ALCESTE. 

Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 154. 

Eaised from Masdevallia x Asmodia and M. Veitchiana, with large dark 
red flowers, an orange-yellow ground colour breaking through in places. 

MASDEVALLIA x ASMODIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 762 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 202. 

Three species are involved in the parentage of this hybrid raised from 
Masdevallia X Chelsoni and M. Eeichenbachiana. 

In shape it resembles the pollen parent, M. Eeichenbachiana, is of 
about the same size, and in colour a peculiar reddish-purple with slightly 
darker veins and some dull yellow in the throat. 

MASDEVALLIA x CAUDATO-ESTEAD^l, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 714; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 74. 
A hybrid, as its name indicates, between Masdevallia Estradas and 
M. caudata Shuttleworthii, the seed parent. 

MASDEVALLIA x CHELSONI, Rchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 554 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 74. 

MASDEVALLIA x CHELSONI, var. SPLENDENS, Veitch, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 619 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 74. 
This, the first Masdevallia raised from seed in Europe, and the first 
hybrid to flower, is of unusual interest. 

209 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

It was raised by Seden from Masdevallia amabilis and M. Veitchiana, 
as was the variety splendens, by reversing the cross, the hybridizer em- 
ploying finer varieties of the species than those that produced the type. 

MASDEVALLIA x ELLISIANA, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 74; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 75. 

A hybrid from Masdevallia coccinea Harryana and M. ignea, dedicated 
to the late Lady Howard de Walden, Ellis being the family name. 

MASDEVALLIA x GAIEIANA, Bchb. f. 

Echb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 38; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 75. 

Eaised from Masdevallia Veitchiana and M. Davisii and dedicated to 
John Gair, Esq., of The Kilns, Falkirk, at that time the possessor of the 
best collection of orchids in Scotland. 

MASDEVALLIA x GLAPHYEANTHA, Bchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 648; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 76. 

A hybrid of no great interest raised from Masdevallia infracta crossed 
with M. Barlaeana. 

MASDEVALLIA x IMOGEN. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1899, p. 21. 

A distinct, interesting hybrid from Masdevallia Veitchiana and M. 
Schlimii, the latter the seed-bearer. The sepals have the rich scarlet of 
M. Veitchiana, shaded with the chestnut-brown of M. Schlimii. 

MASDEVALLIA x SPLENDIDA, Bchb. 

Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 493; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 73. 

A natural hybrid gathered on the Eastern Cordillera of Peru, near 
Cuzco, by Walter Davis, who sent it with a consignment of Masdevallia 
Veitchiana and M. Barlaeana. Seden has since produced this artificially 
by fertilizing M. Veitchiana with M. Barlaeana. 

MASDEVALLIA x SPLENDIDA, var. PAELATOEEANA, Veitch. 

Syns. M. Parlatoreana, Kchb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 172; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. v. p. 73. 
A more attractive form than the above-named, dedicated by Professor 
Eeichenbach to Professor Parlatore of Florence, the most distinguished 
Italian botanist of his time. 

210 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

MILTONIA x BLEU ANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 203 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. viii. p. 118. 

Eaised in this country for the first time the cross was effected in 1884, 
and the first flower from the progeny opened in 1891. 

The same cross had previously been obtained by M. Bleu of Paris, whose 
hybrids flowerei in 1889. 

The parents were Miltonia vexillaria and M. Eoezlii, the latter being 
the pollen parent, and the offspring may be said briefly to possess the 
vegetative characters of the mother plant and the flowers of the pollen 
parent. This success created quite unusual interest. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM x EXCELLENS, Bchb., Nat. hyb. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 426 ; Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ix. p. 754 ; Diet. 
Ic. des Orchidees, Odontoglossum hybr. pi. 1. 

This beautiful Odontoglot first appeared in the collection of Sir Trevor 
Lawrence at Burford Lodge, Dorking. In his description Professor 
Keichenbach suggested that it might possibly be a hybrid between Odon- 
toglossum Pescatorei (nobile) and 0. triumphans or O. tripudians. 

Seden proved the correctness of the Professor's hypothesis by raising 
O. X excellens from 0. Pescatorei crossed with O. triumphans, further 
remarkable as the first Odontoglossum hybrid to be raised in this country 
and successfully brought to the flowering stage. 

PHAIOCALANTHE INSPEEATA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 315 (Eeport of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
A bigeneric hybrid raised by Seden from Phaius grandifolius and 
Calanthe Masuca, the latter the pollen parent. 

PHAIOCALANTHE IEEOEATA, Rolfe. 

Syns. Phaius X irroratus, Rchb. f. 

Rolfe in Jour. Linn. Soc. 1887, xxiv. p. 168; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 264, 
fig. ; Fl. Mag. 1869, t. 426; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 17. 

A hybrid raised by Dominy between Phaius grandifolius and Calanthe 
vestita Turneri nivalis, which flowered for the first time in 1867. 

The creamy white flowers are intermediate between the two parents as 
regards their expansion, both have a rosy hue over the limb, and a pale 
yellow hue over the disc of the lip. 

PHAIOCALANTHE IEEOEATA, var. PUEPUEEA. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 17. 

Eaised by Seden from the same cross. As distinguished from Phaio- 
calanthe irrorata the sepals and petals are of a purer white, the lip some- 
what larger and more deeply lobed, the colour richer, and the white 
margin broader. 

211 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

PHAIOCALANTHE IEEOEATA, var. EOSEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 337 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 128 ; Jour, of Hort. 1895, April 18th, p. 331, fig. 56. 

Eaised by Seden from Phaius grandifolius and Calanthe vestita 
gigantea : a rose-coloured form of the type. 



PHAIOCALANTHE SEDENIANA, Eolfe. 

Syn. Phaius X Sedenianus, Rchb. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 136; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. vi. p. 17; Rchb. f. 
in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 174; Jour, of Hort. 1894, Dec. 6th, pp. 512, 
513, fig. 80. 

A beautiful plant with flowers of a shade of pale primrose -yellow, 
raised by Seden by crossing the large-flowered Phaius grandifolius with 
the beautiful Calanthe X Veitchii, the latter being the pollen parent and 
itself a hybrid : it is one of the best bigeneric hybrids. 

PHAIOCALANTHE SEDENIANA, var. ALBIFLOEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 88 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Jour, of 
Hort. 1896, Jan. 30th, p. 99, fig. 15. 

A white form of the preceding, raised at Langley. 



PHAIUS x AMABILIS. 

J. O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 226, fig. 32, p. 229 ; Orchid Review, 1893, 

vol. i. p. 87. 

A hybrid, raised by crossing Phaius grandifolius with the pollen of 
P. tuberculosus, the flowers with white sepals and petals tinged with rose 
on the face ; lip claret-coloured, with darker purplish lines on a whitish 
ground on the base inside, the lower portion of the labellum yellow on the 
outside throughout. 

PHAIUS X MACULATO-GEANDIFOLIUS. 

Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. x. p. 591 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

Eaised from the two species expressed by the name, and exhibited for 
the first time in November 1891. 



PHAL^BNOPSIS x AEIADNE. 

Orchid Review, 1896, vol. iv. p. 147. 

Eaised from Phalasnopsis Aphrodite and P. Stuartiana, the latter 
the pollen parent. The sepals and petals white, of usual shape, the 
lip nearly intermediate ; the side lobes less oblique than in P. Aphrodite, 

212 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

but the markings almost as in that species ; the front lobe has the basal 
half densely spotted with purple, the remainder being white. 

PHAL^NOPSIS x AETEMIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 49 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 356. 

From Phalaenopsis amabilis and P. rosea, with a considerable resem- 
blance to P. x intermedia. 

PHAL^NOPSIS x CASSANDRA. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 106 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised by Seden from Phalaenopsis rosea and P. Stuartiana. 

PHAL^NOPSIS x F. L. AMES. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 201, fig. ; Veitchs' Man. Oroh. PI. pt. vii. 
p. 48, fig. ; Orchid Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 106. 

A hybrid from Phalaenopsis X intermedia and P. amabilis, the former 
the pollen parent, itself a cross between P. Aphrodite and P. rosea. 

The varietal name was given in honour of the late Hon. F. L. Ame8, 
of North Easton, Massachusetts, (J.S.A. 

PHALjENOPSIS x HARRIETTS, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 8, with fig. ; The Garden, 1890, vol. xxxviii. 
p. 158, t. 766 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 49, fig. ; Jour, of Hort. 1901, 
vol. xlii. pp. 236, 237, with fig. 

A beautiful and interesting hybrid from Phalaenopsis amabilis with 
P. violacea. The only result from this cross was purchased by the 
late Hon. Erasmus Corning, of Albany, U.S.A., and named in compliment 
to his daughter, Miss Harriett Corning. 

PHAL^NOPSIS x HEBE. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 115 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid 
Review, 1897, vol. v. p. 79. 

Raised from Phalaenopsis rosea and P. Sanderiana, with some 
resemblance to P. x intermedia, the only difference in the parentage 
the replacement of P. Sanderiana by the closely allied P. Aphrodite. 
The flowers of P. x Hebe are blush-white, slightly veined and suffused 
with rose; the lip is bright rose, mottled on the side lobes, with the 
usual crest and very short tendrils. 

PHAL^ENOPSIS x HERMIONE. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 174 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Raised by Seden from Phalaenopsis Stuartiana and P. Lueddemanniana. 

213 P 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

PHAL^lNOPSIS x INTEEMEDIA, var. VESTA. 

Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 52 ; Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xii. p. 343 (Report of R.H.S. 

Orchid Committee). 

The hitherto supposed natural hybrid Phalaenopsis x intermedia was 
proved to be such by Seden, who raised a plant identical with the type 
from P. Aphrodite and P. rosea. Subsequently fertilizing P. rosea 
leucaspis with P. Aphrodite, a second was obtained with smaller flowers 
and shorter broader segments, of a rose-purple colour, distinguished 
by the varietal name Vesta. 

PHALAENOPSIS x JOHN SEDEN, Rolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 331, fig. ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 50, 
with fig. reproduced; Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 171, fig. 68. 

Eaised by Seden, and named at our request in his honour by Mr. Rolfe 
of the Herbarium, Kew. 

The parents were Phalsenopsis amabilis and P. Lueddemannia. 

PHAL^INOPSIS x LEDA, Bolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iii. p. 457. 

This plant, a stray seedling, was detected growing in a greenhouse 
where no other Phalaenopsis seed had been sown, and nothing certain is 
known of its parentage ; it is probably the result of a cross between 
Phalaenopsis amabilis and P. Stuartiana. 

PHALAENOPSIS x LUEDDE-VIOLACEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 102 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. 1898, 
vol. xxiv. p. 43, fig. 11; Orchid Review, 1895, vol. iii. p. 259; Jour, of Hort. 
1895, July 25th, pp. 77, 87, fig. 11. 

Eaised and reared by Seden from the seed produced- by crossing the 
two species indicated in the compound name. 

The peculiar bar-like markings of amethyst possessed by Phalaenopsis 
Lueddemanniana are in the hybrid transformed into distinct spots. 

PHALAENOPSIS x MES. JAMES H. VEITCH. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxv. p. 114, fig. 43; Jour, of Hort. 1901, vol. xlii. 

pp. 226, 227, fig. 

Eaised by Seden from Phalaenopsis Lueddemanniana and P. Stuartiana, 
and remarkable among Phalaenopsis in shape and colouring. The 
sepals and petals are greenish-yellow, with brownish-crimson dots; the 
front lobe of the lip is white, and a yellow tinge is noticeable in the throat. 

PHAL^NOPSIS X EOTHSCHILDIANA, Bchb. f. 

Rchb. f . in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 606 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vii. p. 51, 

with fig. 

The second hybrid Phalsenopsis ever raised, and dedicated to the Eight 
Hon. Lord Eothschild, of Tring Park. The parents were Phalaenopsis 
Schilleriana and P. amabilis. 

214 




PHAL^NOPSIS X " JOHN SEDEN " 

THE DELL, EGHAM 



PHAL^NOPSIS x STUAETIANO-MANNI. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 238 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 
Eaised by Seden from the two species expressed by the name. 

SOBEALIA x EOSEO-MACEANTHA. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 277 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee). 

A hybrid Sobralia, one of the best the genus has produced, which 
resembles Sobralia macrantha in foliage and habit, and the flowers 
soft light rose-purple with cream-white margins, are fully 6 in. in 
diameter. 

SOBEALIA x VEITCHIL 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 103 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 239 ; Jour of Hort. 1894, Aug. 2nd, pp. 98, 99, fig. 5 ; 
Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Sobralia, hybr. pi. 1. 

A hybrid from Sobralia macrantha and S. xantholeuca, and one of the 
most distinct of the few that have been raised between species of this 
genus. The flowers soft rosy blush, with a rich rose-lilac lip have a 
conspicuous orange-yellow throat, in size and shape approximating closely 
to the two parents. 

SOPHEOCATTLEYA BATEMANIANA. 

Syns. Lalia X Batemaniana, Rchb. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ii. p. 92, figs. ; Rolfe in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiv. p. 156 ; 
Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 263. 

The first hybrid to be raised between the genera Cattleya and Sophro- 
nitis, to the ordinary observer so widely separated, led orchid experts in 
early years to doubt the correctness of the assigned parentage. Eaised 
from Sophronitis grandiflora and Cattleya intermedia, the seed was 
sown in June 1881, and the first flower opened in August 1886, and 
caused very great interest. 

This remarkable plant is dedicated to Mr. James Bateman, author of 
Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala. 

SOPHEOCATTLEYA CALYPSO. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 744 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. 1895, 
vol. xx. p. 695, fig. 122; Orchid Review, 1903, vol. i. p. 291. 

A hybrid raised by Seden from Sophronitis grandiflora and Cattleya 
Loddigesii Harrisonae. 

The flower of Sophrocattleya Calypso, in form and size, partakes much 
of Cattleya Loddigesii Harrisonae, and is similar to that species in the firm 
substance of the sepals and petals, rose-purple in colour, with a number 
of very dark purple lines. 

215 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

SOPHEOCATTLEYA EXIMIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 378 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); Orchid 
Review, 1894, vol. ii. p. 333 ; Jour, of Hort. 1894, Oct. 4th, p. 321, fig. 48 ; id. 
1900, vol. xli. p. 373, fig. 103. 

A bigeneric hybrid raised by Seden from Cattleya Bowringiana and 
Sophronitis grandiflora, resembling S. grandiflora in habit, but that the 
pseudo-bulbs are ovoid in shape and rather stout. The flowers are 
larger than those of Sophronitis, sepals and petals bright purplish-rose, 
and the lip darker, with a light yellow throat. 

SOPHEOCATTLEYA QUEEN EMPEESS. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 96 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); id. p. 112, 
fig. 43 ; Orchid Review, 1898, vol. vi. p. 258. 

Eaised by Seden from Cattleya Mossiae and Sophronitis grandiflora, 
the latter being the male parent. The flowers are as Cattleya Mossise in 
form, but smaller, and in colour rosy crimson. 

SOPHEOCATTLEYA SAXA. 

Orchid Review, 1903, vol. xi. p. 267. 

Eaised from Sophronitis grandiflora and Cattleya Trianae. The flower 
is of a rose shade, with a crimson blotch on the lip. 

SOPHEOL^LIA L^TA. 

Syns. Sophrocattleya Iceta. 

Chapman in Watson's Orchids, ed. 2, p. 468, fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 447 
(Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; id. p. 476, fig. 63 ; Orchid Review, 1894, 
vol. ii. p. 333. 

Eaised by Seden from Sophronitis grandiflora and Laelia pumila 
Dayana, with flowers resembling more closely those of Sophronitis 
than those of Laelia, and similar in appearance to the Sophrocattleya 
Batemanniana. 

In the Gardeners' Chronicle above quoted the figure is erroneously 
named Sophrocattleya Batemanniana and the matter applies to Sophro- 
Iselia lasta. 

SOPHEOL^SLIA VALDA. 

O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxix. p. 53 ; Orchid Review, 1901, vol. ix. p. 37. 

Eaised by Seden from Sophronitis grandiflora and Laelia harpophylla. 
The flower resembles the Laelia, but is larger and of a light orange- 
yellow colour, without the characteristic markings of the Sophronitis 
parent on the lip. 

216 



PRINCIPAL ORCHID HYBRIDS 

SOPHEOL^LIOCATTLEYA VEITCHII, Chapman. 

Syns. Sophrocattleya Veitchii, Veitch. 

Chapman in Watson's Orchids, ed. 2, 1903, p. 469; Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. 
p. 312 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 1893, vol. i. p. 356. 

A hybrid obtained by Seden from the bright scarlet-flowered Sophronitis 
grandiflora and the bigeneric hybrid Laeliocattleya elegans, involving three 
distinct genera in its parentage, and flowered for the first time in the year 
1892. 

SPATHOGLOTTIS x AUEEO-VEILLAEDII. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 10 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee); id. 1898, 
vol. xxiii. p. 309, fig. 115 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Spathoglottis, hybr. pi. 1. 

The first hybrid raised between two species of this genus, a product of a 
cross effected by Seden, between Spathoglottis aurea and S. Veillardii. 

The flowers were produced for the first time in May 1897, on which 
occasion the plant was exhibited at the Eoyal Horticultural Society's Show 
held in the Temple Gardens. 

THUNIA x VEITCHIANA, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. in Gard. Chron, 1885, vol. xxiii. p. 818; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. vi. p. 20, 

First raised by Mr. Toll of Manchester, and shortly afterwards by 
Seden : a great advance on the type species. 

Plants of both progenies were exhibited in flower at one of the Eoyal 
Botanic Society's Shows in 1885 Mr. Toll's under the name of Wrigleyana 
and our own as Veitchiana ; as the materials for Professor Eeichenbach's 
description were supplied by us, this name has priority of publication. 

The parents are Thunia Marshalliae and T. Bensoniae. 

ZYGOCOLAX LEOPAEDINUS. 

Syns. Zygopetalum X leopardinus, Rchb. f. 

Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 66 ; Rchb. in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 66 ; 
Orchid Review, 1900, vol. viii. p. 12. 

A hybrid raised by crossing Zygopetalum maxillare with the pollen of 
Colax jugosus, in which the influence of the latter seems to have been 
quite subordinate. 

The plant flowered for the first time in 1886, when Professor Eeichen- 
bach described it, but at that time the parentage was not correctly known 
and could only be conjectured. More conclusive evidence has since been 
obtained, and the names of the two species now given as parents are 
undoubtedly correct. 

217 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ZYGOCOLAX VEITCHII, Eolfe. 

Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 765 ; Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiv. p. 170 ; Veitchs' 
Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 66 figs. ; Jour, of Hort. 1893, Feb. 2nd, pp. 87, 94, 
fig. 13 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7980 ; Diet. Ic. des Orchidees, Zygocolax, hybr. pi. 1. 

One of the most interesting hybrids ever raised, either from the 
botanical or horticultural aspect, and obtained by crossing two species 
of two different genera, Zygopetalum crinitum and Colax jugosus. 

The seed was sown in September 1882, and the first flowers produced 
in March 1887. 

This plant is interesting as having been the principal subject of 
Mr. E. A. Eolfe's articles on a uniform plan of naming bigeneric hybrid 
orchids. He followed Dr. M. T. Masters, who combined the elements 
of the two generic names of the plants concerned when he named the 
first artificial bigeneric hybrid on record, Philageria Veitchii, a cross 
between Lapageria rosea and Philesia buxifolia. 

Zygocolax Veitchii is also found as a natural hybrid, and specimens 
introduced from Brazil and flowered in the gardens of Sir Frederick 
Wigan, Bart., closely resembled those of artificial origin. 

ZYGOPETALUM x LEUCOCHILUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 214 (Report of R.H.S. Orchid Committee) ; Orchid Review, 

1896, vol. iv. p. 62. 

Raised by Seden from Zygopetalum Burkei and Z. Mackayii, the latter 
the seed-bearer. The flowers are over 2^ in. in diameter, the sepals and 
petals light -green lined along the centre and spotted near the margin with 
dark brown. The lip is white with a few violet striations. 

ZYGOPETALUM x SEDENII, Rchb. f. 

Rchb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 290 ; Veitchs' Man. Orch. PI. pt. ix. p. 66, fig. ; 
Fl. Mag. n.s. t. 417; Jour, of Hort. 1893, May llth, p. 377, fig. 69. 

Eaised from Zygopetalum maxillare, crossed with Z. Mackayi, the first 
hybrid Zygopetalum to flower in this country. 



218 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE 
PLANTS 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 



. ABUTILON P^ONI^IFLOKA, Hook. 
Syns. Sida peeoniaflora, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4170. 

Sent by William Lobb, from the Organ Mountains of Brazil, and first 
flowered at Exeter in January 1845. 

The petals are of a deep red-rose colour which admirably contrasts 
with the tuft of bright yellow anthers occupying the centre of the flower 
and give the appearance of a miniature single Paeony. 

ACALYPHA WILKESIANA, Muell Arg. 

Syns. A. tricolor, Seem. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 26. 

A handsome stove plant with leaves mottled and blotched with bright 
red and crimson, introduced from New Caledonia through the late John 
Gould Veitch, and now rarely seen. 

ADELASTEE (EEANTHEMUM ?) ALBIVENIS, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Proc. R.H.S. 1861, vol. i. p. 568 ; Gard. Chron. 1861, pp. 387, 499 (advts.) ; 

I'lllus. Hort. 1862, t. 320. 

A charming stove plant from Peru, with dark green leaves, the veins 
of which are marked with pure white ; the undersurface is bright purple. 

ADHATODA CYDONI^FOLIA, Nees. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4962. 

A handsome Acanthaceous plant from Brazil, first flowered in the 
autumn of 1855. The flowers are two-lipped, large and showy, striking 
from the contrast presented by the dark purple lower lip and the pure 
white upper one. 

.ECHMEA VEITCHII, Baker. 

Syns. Chevalliera Veitchii, Morren. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6329; The Garden, 1881, vol. xix. p. 654, pi. cclxl. (sic) ; La Belg. Hort. 

vol. xxviii. (1878), p. 177. 

A very fine Bromeliad discovered by Gustave Wallis in New Grenada 
in 1874, and introduced the same year to cultivation. 

221 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The spiny margined, gracefully curved leaves are pale green in colour 
and the cone-like inflorescence is brilliant scarlet. 

.ESCHYNANTHUS COBDIFOLIUS, Hook. 

PI. des Serres, 1861, torn. iv. p. 101 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5131. 

A handsome species introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb. 
The leaves are dark bluish-green, rather fleshy, and the hairy flowers deep 
red in colour with a black line in the throat of the tube. 

jESCHYNANTHUS FULGENS, Wall. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4891. 

A species with large, thick, entire leaves, and terminal umbels of bright 
crimson tubular flowers with a yellow throat. 

Found by Thomas Lobb in Moulmein, it flowered for the first time in 
October 1855. 

^ESCHYNANTHUS LOBBIANA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4260. 

One of the many species of the epiphytic genus .ZEschynanthus intro- 
duced through Thomas Lobb. This species is striking from the strong 
contrast offered by the purplish-black calyx and the brilliant scarlet hue of 
the corolla. 

It was introduced from Java and first flowered in 1846. 

jESCHYNANTHUS LONGIFLORUS, Blume. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xv. p. 25 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4328. 

A species with erect, long, tubular flowers of a uniform puce colour, 
with exserted stamens. 

A native of Java, it was detected by Thomas Lobb growing in woods 
in the provinces of Buitenzorg and Bantam, for the most part epiphytic 
on old or decaying trees. 

It flowered for the first time in this country in August 1847. 

^SCHYNANTHUS MINIATA, Lvndl. 

Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 599 (note on exhibit of New Plants) ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1846, 
vol. xix. t. 61 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xvi. p. 67. 

Introduced from Java through Thomas Lobb in 1845, and first flowered 
at Exeter in November of the following year. 

^SCHYNANTHUS OBCONICA, C. B. Clarke. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7336. 

Imported from the Malayan Peninsula and flowered for the first time in 
July 1893 : a quaintly neat plant. 

222 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

It is closely allied to ^schynanthus tricolor, but the corolla-tube is 
shorter and the calyx broadly campanulate. The flowers are scarlet in 
colour with yellow stripes. 

JESCHYNANTHUS PULCHEA, G.Don. 

Syns. JEschynanthus pulcher, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 407 (Report of Exhibit of New Plants); Bot. Mag. t. 4264; 
La Belg. Hort. 1892, p. 13, col. pi. 

A beautiful species with large rich scarlet flowers introduced from 
Java through Thomas Lobb. First exhibited in bloom at the Great 
Exhibition held by the Horticultural Society at Chiswick on June 13th 

1846, it was awarded the Silver Knightian Medal as a plant of very 
exceptional merit. 

.ESCHYNANTHUS PUEPUEESCENS, Hasck. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4236. 

A native of the mountainous regions of Java, whence it was introduced 
through Thomas Lobb. 

It is quite distinct but not as striking as many of the other species of 
-/Eschynanthus in cultivation. The flowers are small, yellow with a 
dotted throat ; the calyx has long sepals, margined and tipped with purple. 

jESCHYNANTHUS SPECIOSA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4320; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1847, vol. xiv. p. 199; The Garden, 1897, vol. li. 

p. 188, pi. 1109. 

Introduced through Thomas Lobb, who detected it on Mount Asapan, 
near Bantam, in Java, on the trunks of forest trees. 

It was first exhibited in the Botanic Gardens, Eegent's Park, in May 

1847, and was voted " the most charming of the plants then exhibited." 
In the description in the Botanical Magazine, Sir William Hooker writes, 
" It is unquestionably the most beautiful species known to us of a genus 
eminent for the rich colour of its blossoms." 

AGALMYLA STAMINEA, Blume. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5747 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xv. p.73 ; Fl. des Serres, 1848, vol. iv. t. 358. 
A brilliantly-coloured stove epiphyte, native of Java, where it was 
discovered by Thomas Lobb growing in humid parts of mountain woods. 
In December 1847 it was exhibited in flower for the first time. 

The flowers are produced in axillary fascicles of eight to fourteen 
together, are brilliant scarlet in colour, with long exserted stamens, 
purple at the tips, bright yellow towards the base. 

223 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

AGAPETES MACEANTHA, Hook. f. 

Syns. ThUxmdia macrantha, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 501, fig. ; id. vol. xxix. p. 47, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4566 ; 
Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 695 (advt.) ; Fl. des Serres, vol. vi. p. 345. 

A handsome hard-wooded greenhouse plant with drooping inflated 
tubular flowers, of a rosy white colour, marked with wavy V-shaped lines 
of red. Eaised from seed collected on Kola mountain, Moulmein, by 
Thomas Lobb, it flowered for the first time in this country in December 
1830, and is still largely grown. 

AGLAONEMA COSTATUM, N. E. Brown. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 426; id. vol. xiii. p. 86. 

A pretty little stove aroid with ovate green leaves spotted and veined 
with white, introduced from the region of Perak. 

AGLAONEMA MAEANT^EFOLIUM, Blume, var. FOLIIS MACU- 

LATIS. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5500. 

The whole-coloured leaved type is a very old garden plant ; the form 
with spotted leaves was introduced in 1864 from Manila. 

AGLAONEMA OBLONGIFOLIUM, Schott., var. CUETISII. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxi. p. 70 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1897, p. 2. 

A variegated form of the type, sent to England by Charles Curtis from 
Malaysia. 

The leaves, 15 to 18 in. long, are effectively marked with oblique 
silvery lines symmetrically arranged on both sides of the midrib, the 
ground colour bright grass-green. 

AGLAONEMA PUMILUM, Hook. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 5, fig. p. 3. 

A charming little stove aroid from the Malayan region, resembling in 
habit a miniature Dieffenbachia. 

The leaves are from 4 to 6 in. long, beautifully marbled and veined 
with white on a deep sea-green ground. 

ALLOPLECTUS PELTATUS, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6333. 

Introduced from Costa Eica through Endres, an addition to the family 
of Gesneriads remarkable in having one leaf of each pair permanently 
rudimentary, and further, the fully developed leaf distinctly peltate, a 
curious feature. 

224 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

ALOCASIA x INTEEMEDIA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, fig. p. 3 ; Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 660 (note on exhibit). 

A hybrid raised by Seden at Chelsea from Alocasia longifolia fertilized 
with the pollen of A. Veitchii. 

It received the Silver Medal of the Eoyal Horticultural Society, at the 
Exhibition held in June 1867, as the best garden hybrid then exhibited. 

ALOCASIA LOWII, var. PICTA, Hook. 

Syns. Caladium Veitchii, Lindl. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5497; Gard. Chroii. 1859, p. 740; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 6. 

A well-known stove plant remarkable for its massive leaves, which 
are of great substance, rich greyish-bronzy-green on the upper surface, 
deep purple beneath, with a beautiful metallic lustre. 

It was sent from Borneo by Thomas Lobb. 

ALOCASIA SCABEIUSCULA, N. E. Brown. 

Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 296. 

A stove aroid belonging to the large-leaved section of the genus of 
which Alocasia Lowii and A. Thibautiana are better known and more 
showy species. 

ALOCASIA x SEDENII. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, fig. p. 2. 

A rather fine hybrid raised by Seden at Chelsea from Alocasia 
metallica and A. Lowii, which retains in its handsome leaves the metallic 
hue of one parent and the dark green and white veins of the other ; a 
striking combination ; the plant is now rarely seen. 

ALOCASIA THIBAUTIANA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 527 ; id. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 485, with fig 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 5, fig. 

A noble stove aroid with leaves 2 to 2| ft. long and from 15 to 20 in. 
broad, deep olive- greyish-green in colour, traversed by numerous grey 
veinlets, and of a lustrous metallic hue. 

It is a native of Borneo, named in compliment to M. L. Thibaut, 
in his day one of the first continental nurserymen. 

ALOCASIA ZEBEINA, C. Kock & Veitch. 
Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.). 

Introduced to cultivation through the late John Gould Veitch from the 
Philippine Islands. 

The specific name is derived from the peculiar appearance of the 

225 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

leaf-stalks pale yellow in colour heavily marbled and banded with a shade 
of the darkest green. 

AMASONIA PUNICEA, Hort. 

Syns. A. calycina, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6915 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1889, p. 27 ; The Garden, 1885, vol. xxvii. 

p. 130, pi. 479. 

An interesting and showy stove plant from British Guiana through 
David Burke, known to science for nearly a century prior to its intro- 
duction, having been described by a German botanist, Martin Vahl, as 
long since as 1796. 

As a horticultural plant, Amasonia punicea is of great value from 
the brilliantly coloured bracts which subtend the flowers, and which 
remain on the plant for nearly three months after these have fallen. 

ANTHUEIUM BEOWNII, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 744, figs. 139 and 140. 
Introduced from New Grenada, where it was discovered by Gustav 
Wallis, and named by Dr. Masters in honour of Mr. N. E. Brown of the 
Herbarium, Kew, who has done so much to elucidate the difficult order 
to which this genus belongs. 

ANTHUEIUM CUSPIDATUM, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 428, fig. 85. 

Discovered in Columbia by Gustav Wallis, and sent to this country 
in 1874. 

It is remarkable in having the petioles of its leaves entirely cylindrical 
and not at all sulcated as in the majority of species. The leaves are bold 
and handsome, some 1 ft. 7 in. in length and 1 ft. in breadth. 

ANTHUEIUM KALBEEYEEI, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 117, with fig. 

A handsome ornamental climbing aroid, introduced from New Grenada 
through Kalbreyer. 

The leaves are palmately divided into nine oblong sinuate leaflets of 
various sizes, glabrous and rich deep green in colour. 

ANTHUEIUM VEITCHII, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. vi. p. 772, fig. 143 ; 1'Illus. Hort. vol. xxviii. t. 406; Bot. Mag. 
t. 6968 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, fig. p. 5. 

A magnificent aroid, found in Columbia and sent to England by Gustav 
Wallis, and probably the noblest inhabitant of European stoves. 

The leaves are of extraordinary appearance, often attaining a length of 

226 




AMASONIA PUNICEA 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

from 4 to 5 ft., with a breadth of not less than one-third of these 
dimensions. The principal veins are sunk, and the waved appearance 
thus caused is further enhanced by a deep glossy green colour and a most 
brilliant metallic lustre. 

ANTHUEIUM WALLISII, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 429, fig. 86. 

Discovered by Gustav Wallis in New Grenada, and through him 
introduced to this country. 

ANTHUKIUM WAEOCQUEANUM, Moore. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1878, p. 20, fig. p. 6 ; Fl. and Pom. 1878, p. 101, fig. 

Introduced from Columbia, and dedicated to the late M. Warocque, 
formerly an eminent horticulturist in Belgium. 

It is a noble species with leaves 2 to 2| ft. in length, rich deep green in 
colour, and prominent paler coloured veins. 

APHELANDEA ACUTIFOLIA, Nees. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5789. 

A common plant in South America, collected in Mexico, Peru, New 
Grenada, and Surinam. 

The figure in the Botanical Magazine was prepared from an imported 
plant flowered for the first time in October 1868. 

APHELANDEA NITENS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5741 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1863, p. 2, fig. 

Introduced from Guayaquil, New Grenada, through Eichard Pearce, 
and flowered in May 1868. 

It is a handsome and still favourite stove plant, with shining dark green 
leaves, and orange-scarlet flowers borne in erect spikes at the ends of the 
branches. 

APHELANDEA VAEIEGATA, Moore. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4899. 

An extremely handsome plant from Brazil, the foliage bold and striking ; 
the large imbricated bracts forming a spike, resembling a fir cone, are of a 
rich orange-yellow colour, from between which the bright yellow flowers 
protrude. 

AEALIA ELEGANTISSIMA, Hort. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 782 : Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 5, fig. 
A charming stove species similar in habit to the beautiful Aralia 
Veitchii, but with larger and more deeply serrated leaves. 

227 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

It was introduced from the South Sea Islands through the late John 
Gould Veitch. 

AEALIA KEECHOVEANA, Hort. Veitch. 
Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 430 ; Veitclis' Catlg. of PI. 1883. 

A graceful object for the stoves from the South Sea Islands, first 
distributed in 1883. The leaves are digitate, composed of 9 to 11 
spreading leaflets, making almost a circular outline. The plant is 
dedicated to Count Oswald de Kerchove of Ghent, one of the most 
distinguished patrons of Belgian horticulture. 

ABALIA OSYANA, Hort. Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 17, fig. p. 3, also col. pi. 

, A graceful free-growing stove plant, introduced from the South Sea 
Islands through the late John Gould Veitch. 

The leaves are digitately compound, with 6 to 8 strap-shaped leaflets 
divided at the apex, bright green in colour with chocolate-coloured veins 
and tips. 

AEALIA VEITCHII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1873, fig. p. 3 ; Fl. and Pom. 1874, p. 5 ; Nich. Diet. Gard. 

vol. i. fig. 143. 

A very elegant, universally-cultivated, slender-growing stove plant from 
New Caledonia, unsurpassed, as a pot plant with ornamental foliage 
for house decoration and for the exhibition tables. 

AEDISIA MAMILLATA, Hance. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1888, p. 9. 

A stove plant from Southern China found by Mr. Charles Ford, late 
Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens at Hong Kong, who also sent 
plants to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, about the same time. 

The specific name is derived from the teat -like processes or mamillae, 
each surmounted by a bristle-like hair, thickly studded over the whole of 
the upper surface of the leaf. 

The chief ornaments, however, are the rich coral-red berries which 
follow the flowers, and remain in perfection through the winter months. 

AEDISIA OLIVEEI, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 680, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6357 ; Veitchs' 

Catlg. of PI. 1878, fig. p. 7. 

This stove flowering shrub of great beauty, somewhat resembling an 

228 



Ixora, and of considerable botanical interest, was introduced through 
Bndres from Costa Eica. 

Named by Dr. Masters in honour of Professor Oliver, of the Kew 
Herbarium, "as a trifling, but very sincere acknowledgment of the 
very valuable services he has, in a manner as thorough as it has been 
unobtrusive, rendered to horticultural botany for many years past." The 
plant was eventually distributed in 1878. 

AEISTOLOCHIA PEOMISSA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 494. 

Described by Dr. Masters from specimens collected in West Tropical 
Africa by Kalbreyer, who sent seed to Chelsea from which plants were 
raised. 

Dr. Masters says, " It is one of the most extraordinary members of an 
extraordinary genus." The flowers extend into three tails, which some- 
times reach a length of 2 ft. 

AEISTOLOCHIA EINGENS, Vdhl. 

The Garden, 1879, vol. xvi. p. 335, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1880, p. 19. 

A member of the remarkable genus Aristolochia with peculiar gaping 
flowers, from New Grenada, sent by Gustav Wallis, in 1877. It had, 
previous to the present introduction, been in cultivation in the Eoyal 
Gardens, Kew, and probably also in other botanical collections, but was 
still a very rare climber. 

The flowers, usually some 6 in. in length, vary in size according to the 
strength of the plant, the ground colour is pale, netted with a venation 
of dark purple. 

AETHEOPODIUM NEO-CALEDONICUM, Baker. 

Baker in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xv. p. 352 ; Bofc. Mag. t. 6326. 

Introduced from New Caledonia, first flowered in May 1877, and 
interesting geographically as extending to New Caledonia, the range of 
other characteristic Australian and New Zealand genera. 

J. G. Baker writes of this plant in the Botanical Magazine : " I 
described it from a single dried specimen gathered on Mount Kanala in 
New Caledonia by M. Deplanche, and it is No. 1695 of the Vieillard 
collection distributed by the late M. Lenormand." 

ASCLEPIAS VESTITA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4106. 

Eaised from seeds received from North America, and flowered for the 
first time in October 1843. The flowers, purple in the bud, are greenish- 
white when expanded, in dense heads in the axils of the uppermost leaves. 

229 Q 



ASPAEAGUS PLUMOSUS, Baker. 

Baker in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. 1875, p. 613 ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1878, 

vol. ix. p. 527. 

This popular plant, introduced from South Africa by Christopher Mudd, 
is commonly known as the Asparagus Fern, and is in great request for all 
floral decoration. 

ASPAEAGUS EACEMOSUS, Willd. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 19. 

A climbing species of elegant habit, introduced from Mauritius through 
Charles Curtis. An admirable subject for covering pillars or trellises in 
the conservatory or warm greenhouse ; the slender branchlets and sprays 
of glossy green are ever effective. 

BAEBACENIA SQUAMATA, Paxt. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. x. p. 75 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4136 ; Fl. des Serres, 1847, p. 266 ; Gard. 
Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 409, with fig. 

A pretty species of the monocotyledonous genus Barbacenia, with fine 
orange-red flowers produced singly on slender scapes, introduced from the 
Organ Mountains of Brazil through William Lobb in 1841. 

BAELEEIA PEIONITIS, Lindl. 

N. B. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 339. 

A pretty acanthaceous soft-wooded plant, re-introduced to Chelsea from 
Sumatra through Curtis, with opposite lanceolate acuminate leaves with 
axillary spines, and terminal spikes of yellow flower : though previously 
in cultivation, it had been lost. 

BEFAEIA ^ISTUANS, Linn. 

Syns. Bejaria cestuans, Mutes. 
Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 119, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4818. 

Detected by William Lobb in Peru, in the province of Chochapoyas, at 
an elevation of 8,000 ft. 

It was called sestuans, as the flowers glow like fire, and somewhat 
resemble a Ehododendron ; of a beautiful deep rose-colour, they are borne 
in corymbs terminating the branches. 

BEFAEIA CINNAMOMEA, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 175. 

An ericaceous greenhouse shrub, with purple flowers, introduced 
through William Lobb in 1847, from the Andes of Peru, with the leaves 
remarkable in that they are covered on the lower side with a light-brown 
wool ; it is named the Cinnamon Befaria. 

230 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

BEFAEIA COAECTATA, Humb. & Bon. 

Syns. Bejaria coarctata. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 175, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4433. 

Eaised from seeds sent home from Peru by William Lobb in 1847. 
The figure in the Botanical Magazine is from a plant which flowered 
in a cool greenhouse in the nursery of Messrs. Lucombe, Pince & Co., 
of the ancient city of Exeter. 

BEPAEIA MATHEWSII, Fielding. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4981. 

From seed sent from the mountains of Peru by Thomas Lobb, the 
cream-coloured flowers were seen for the first time in this country in 
March 1857. 

BEGONIA x ACEEIFOLIA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1899, p. 53. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea from the remarkable Burmese species 
Begonia Burkei crossed with the Malaysian B. decora. 

The leaves resemble those of an Acer in outline, with silvery blotches on 
a dark bronzy-green ground. 

There is a species B. acerifolia, in comparatively common cultivation, 
with which this hybrid must not be confused. 

BEGONIA BOLIVIENSIS, A. DC. 

Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 544, fig.; Bot. Mag. t. 5657; PI. Mag. 1867, t. 354; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1868, fig. p. 6. 

A very beautiful plant with drooping scarlet flowers, from Bolivia, 
sent by Eichard Pearce, and of great interest as one of the original 
species from which the numerous garden varieties, so popular at the 
present day, have been derived. 

BEGONIA BUEKEI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 39. 

A singular, very distinct species, introduced from Upper Burmah 
through David Burke. 

The leaves, large and peltate, are on foot-stalks over 1 ft. long ; from 
their axils the peduncles bearing much-branched cymes of delicate pink 
flowers rise, and continue in great beauty through the late autumn and 
early winter months. 

BEGONIA x CAEMINATA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896, p. 2, fig. 

A handsome Begonia, the result of a cross between the Brazilian species 
Begonia coccinea and the South African B. Dregii. The foliage is neat 

231 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

and attractive, the bright carmine-pink flowers, in pendulous cymes 
composed of from twenty to thirty each, are massive and effective. 

BEGONIA COCCINEA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3990 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1843, vol. x. p. 73. 

A very beautiful now well-known species, from the Organ Mountains 
of Brazil, sent by William Lobb in 1841. 

The plant flowered for the first time in April 1842, soon after it was 
received, and was subsequently exhibited at the rooms of the Horticultural 
Society in Eegent Street. 

BEGONIA CEINITA, Oliver. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5897. 

A very elegant plant introduced through Pearce from South America, 
with a tendency in the branches to develop hairs on that surface only 
which faces the petiole of the leaf below. 

BEGONIA DAVISII, Hart. Veitcli. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6252 ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 70, with fig. ; PI. Mag. n.s. pi. 231 ; 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 22 ; PI. and Pom. 1877, p. 85, col. pi. 

Introduced from the Andes of Peru through Walter Davis, after whom 
it is named. 

The plant of dwarf tufted habit has elegant bluish -green foliage, purple 
on the under surface, and handsome dazzling scarlet flowers. 

This species was effectively used as a parent by Seden in obtaining a 
dwarf race of hybrids suitable for summer-bedding. 

BEGONIA DECORA, Stapf. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1893, p. 9, fig. p. 4. 

A species with ornamental foliage from Penang. 

The plant is of a dwarf compact habit with a creeping rootstock, from 
which are produced the handsome leaves, often 3 to 4 in. long, rich 
bronzy red-brown with yellow-green nerves, covered with thick-set papillae 
terminating in short hairs. 

This species has been crossed with varieties of Begonia Rex by various 
continental growers, and the offspring are amongst the finest ornamental- 
leaved foliage plants our stoves possess. 

BEGONIA x EUDOXA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1899, p. 53, fig. 

A hybrid Begonia raised at Chelsea from Begonia Burkei fertilized with 
the pollen of B. decora. 

The oblique leaves 6 to 9 in. long, of a bronzy-green ground colour, 

232 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

covered with small white spots tinted with rose, are most effective ; the 
under surface is rich carmine. 

BEGONIA FALCIFOLIA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5707. 

This lovely plant, introduced from Peru through Eichard Pearce, by 
whom it was discovered, is a stove species with falcate-lanceolate leaves, 
of a deep red-purple beneath, deep green-bronze on the upper surface, 
and with numerous rose-pink flowers, in axillary panicles on the ends of 
the branches. 

BEGONIA GOGOENSIS, N. E. Brown. 

N. B. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 71 ; PI. and Pom. 1882, p. 121. 

A native of Gogoe in Sumatra, discovered by Curtis, through whom it 
was introduced. 

It is a very handsome ornamental-foliaged species with peltate leaves, 
of a bronzy-metallic hue when young, changing to deep velvety-green when 
mature and intersected by a paler midrib and delicate veins ; the under 
surface deep red. 

BEGONIA x HEBACLEICOTYLE. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 48. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea from Begonia heracleifolia and B. hydrocoty- 
lifolia, with bold attractive leaves 6 in. across, and large pyramidal panicles 
of pale pink flowers, which open in the early spring. 

BEGONIA LINEATA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 199. 

A pretty species, which dies down annually, with a tuberous rootstock, 
and blackish-green leaves more or less covered with silvery spots, sent 
home from Java by Curtis. 

BEGONIA x MAEGAEITACEA. 

Yeitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 2, fig. p. 4. 

A hybrid foliage Begonia raised at Chelsea, with leaves of a deep 
bronzy-green ground colour covered with irregular silver-rose spots and 
blotches, and numerous short crimson hairs. The leaves, of the usual 
oblique form, are toothed along the margin ; the under surface is of a 
glossy vinous-red. 

BEGONIA PEAECEI, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5545 ; Veitcha' Catlg. of PI. 1866, fig. 5, col. pi. 
This species was introduced from La Paz through Eichard Pearce. 
The leaves are very beautiful, of a dark velvet-green above, dull red 

233 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

traversed with pale green nerves beneath, an agreeable contrast to the 
bright yellow flowers. 

The source of all the yellow-flowered forms, it entered largely into the 
production of the summer-flowering tuberous varieties. 

BEGONIA EOS^FLOEA, Hook. /. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5680; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 1, fig. ; La Belg. Hort. 1868, p. 153. 

This beautiful species, a native of the Bolivian Andes, closely resembles 
Begonia Veitchii. 

It differs in the stouter red petioles and scapes, the broader, rounder 
leaves, and more numerous flowers, pale red in colour as those of a Briar 
Eose, and it flowered for the first time in July 1867. 

From light-flowered forms of this species the first white tuberous 
Begonias were obtained, and these have steadily improved in quality for 
many years. 

BEGONIA VEITCHII, Hook. f. 

Hook. f. in Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 734, with woodcut; Bot. Mag. t. 5663; Veitchs' Catlg. 
of PI. 1867, p. 11, fig. ; Fl. des Serres, 1877, p. 119. 

A superb species, due to Eichard Pearce, who discovered it near Cuzco 
in Peru, at an elevation of from 10,000-12,000 ft. 

At the time of its introduction, this, the finest species then known, was 
described in the Botanical Magazine. " Of all the species of Begonia 
known, this is, I think, the finest. With the habit of Saxifraga ciliata, 
immense flowers of a vivid vermilion cinnabar-red, that no colorist can 
reproduce, it adds the novel feature of being hardy in certain parts of 
England at any rate, if not in all." 

It flowered with us for the first time in the open air in 1866. 

BEETOLONIA PUBESCENS, Hort. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1865, p. 485 (notice of exhibit) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1886, p. 9. 
This dwarf stove plant, the light green leaves with a very broad dark 
chocolate band down the centre, was introduced from Ecuador through 
Eichard Pearce, 

BOEONIA ELATIOE, Bartl 

Bot. Mag. t. 6285 ; The Garden, 1876, pi. xxxix. ; Fl. and Pom. 1877, p. 145, col. pi. 
A charming hard-wooded greenhouse plant related to the older and 
better-known Boronia megastigma, but differs in having numerous pretty, 
small bell-shaped flowers of a bright rose-pink colour. 

BOUCHEA PSEUDOGEEVAO, Cham. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6221. 

Eaised from seed imported from Brazil and first flowered in 1874. The 

234 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

terminal spikes of pale rosy-purple flowers are not unlike the common 
Verbena of South America, to which, moreover, the plant is closely allied. 

BUEBIDGEA NITIDA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6403 ; Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 398, fig. 63, p. 401 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of 

PI. 1880, p. 8, with fig. 

This very beautiful stove plant, the type of an entirely new genus, was 
discovered by Burbidge when in Messrs. Veitchs' employ in Borneo. 

An interesting account of the fortunate discovery is given in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle quoted above. 

The plant inhabits the shady forests of the Marut district in North- 
West Borneo, between the Lawas and Trusan rivers, at an altitude of 
1,000-1,500 ft. 

The generic name was given by Sir Joseph Hooker " in recognition of 
Mr. Burbidge's eminent services to horticulture, whether as a collector in 
Borneo, or as author of ' Cultivated Plants, their Propagation and 
Improvement.' " 

CALATHEA LEUCOSTACHYS, Hook. f. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6205. 

Sent from Costa Eica by Endres and first flowered in October 1874. 
The specific name is in allusion to the pure white tips of the yellow bracts 
with which the flowers are subtended. 

CALATHEA OENATA, Koern. 

Syns. Maranta ornata, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 

An ornamental-leaved stove plant of some beauty from Borneo, sent 
by Thomas Lobb. 

The leaves, elegantly marked, have the appearance of a dark green fern 
frond laid upon a pale greyish-green surface. 

CALATHEA TUBISPATHA, Hook. 

Syns. Maranta tubispafha. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5542 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 8, fig. 

Introduced through Eichard Pearce from Western Tropical South 
America. 

Handsome leaves from 8 to 12 in. in length, of a pale green colour, 
with a row on either side of the midrib of oblong deep brown blotches, are 
the distinguishing characteristics. 

235 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

CALATHEA VEITCHIANA, Hook. 

Syns. Maranta Veitchiana^ Van Houtte. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5535; Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 414; id. 1870, p. 924, fig. 170; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1866, p. 3, fig. 1 on col. pi. ; PI. des Serres, xvi. t. 1656; The 
Garden, 1872, vol. ii. p. 544, fig. 

A very beautiful ornamental-leaved stove plant from Western Tropical 
America, found by Richard Pearce. 

The leaves attain a height of 2 ft. when mature with a blade 14 in. 
long by 9 in. broad. The colouring is very fine, the under surface 
purplish, the upper deep shining green blotched with conspicuous patches 
on either side of a yellowish-green midrib. 

CALCEOLAEIA ALBA, Euiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4157 ; Fl. des Serres, 1850, p. 319 ; Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 140, 
fig. 40 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 259. 

Introduced through William Lobb, when collecting in Chili, and seed 
sent from which plants were raised and flowered for the first time in 
September 1844. 

The flower is snow-white, globular in appearance, resembling the ripe 
fruit of the snowberry (Symphoricarpus racemosus). 

CALCEOLAEIA AMPLEXICAULIS, H. B. K. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4300 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 259. 

Raised from seed collected near Muna, in Peru, by William Lobb, 
about the year 1849. 

Easily recognized by soft dark green leaves, which clasp the stem, 
and a profusion of pale yellow flowers, formerly so familiar an object 
in gardens, it is now rarely found, though having as a summer-bedding 
plant undeniable merits. 

CALCEOLARIA CRENATA, Lam. 

Syns. C. fl oribunda, Hook. 

Hook, in Bot. Mag. t. 4154 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 258. 
Discovered in the environs of Quito by William Lobb, sent home in 
1843, and probably now lost to cultivation. In this country the first 
flowers opened in September 1844. 

CALCEOLARIA DEFLEXA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Syns. C. fuchsicefolia, Hemsl. ; C. grandis, Hort. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6431, as C. deflexa; The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 258, col. pi. as C. 
fuchsisefolia ; Gard. Chron. 1849 (notice of exhibit as C. grandis) ; id. 1881, vol. i. 
p. 269. 

A Peruvian species introduced through William Lobb, flowered for the 
first time in 1849, and exhibited as Calceolaria grandis. 

236 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Figured in The Garden as a new species in 1879, Mr. Hemsley 
applied the name C. fuchsisefolia, from the resemblance of the leaves 
to those of species of Fuchsia. Later in the same year Sir Joseph 
Hooker figured it in the Botanical Magazine under the name of C. 
deflexa, remarking at the same time, " There are specimens in the Herbaria 
which were cultivated many years ago, from Messrs. Veitchs' garden (then 
probably at Exeter)." 

CALCEOLAEIA FLEXUOSA, Buiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5154 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 259 ; PI. des Serres, 1877, 

p. 137. 

Eaised from seed sent by William Lobb from Peru. 

A fine species of this extensive genus with dense massive panicles and 
large yellow flowers, well adapted for bedding-out during the summer 
months. 

CALCEOLAEIA LOBATA, Cav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6330 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 260. 

Introduced from Peru, and figured in the Botanical Magazine. 

The leaves are lobed, roundish cordate, the lip of the flower remarkably 
long, folded back upon itself about the middle, in colour a pale, clear, 
yellow, purple-red spots inside. 

CALCEOLAEIA PISACOMENSIS, Meyen. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5677 ; The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 260. 

A species originally discovered by the distinguished traveller Meyen, 
near Arequipa, Peru, and subsequently by our collector, Eichard Pearce, 
through whom it was introduced. A sub- shrubby perennial, with flowers 
of a rich orange-red to bright red, in cymes on the upper part of the 
stem ; first flowered in August 1868. 

CALCEOLAEIA PUNCTATA, Vahl 

Bot. Mag. t. 5392 ; The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 259. 

This species belongs to the shrubby Calceolarias, the same section as 
C. violacea, in which the lips of the corolla are nearly equal, but not 
saccate. The flowers are lilac-coloured, with a bright yellow blotch on 
the lower lip, and the plant, a native of the southern provinces of Chili, 
was introduced through Pearce in 1862. 

CALCEOLAEIA TENELLA, Peep. & Endl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6231 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 261. 

A little elegant plant, with bright, glossy green leaves, and pale golden 
flowers, the corolla spotted with red within. 

237 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Seeds were sent from Chili by the collector, Downton, and plants 
raised in 1873. It had been, however, discovered by the German 
traveller Pceppig in 1823, and later by the English collector Bridges, 
both of whom failed to introduce the plant to cultivation. 

CAMPSIDIUM CHILENSE, Beiss & Seem. 

Syns. Tecoma Guarume, Hook. ; T. mirabilis, Hort. 
Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1182, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6111, and sub tab. 4896. 

This beautiful greenhouse climber, a native of Chiloe and Chili, known 
to science from specimens collected by many travellers prior to its intro- 
duction through William Lobb, has pinnate dark green leaves, tubular 
scarlet flowers, and flowered for the first time in April 1874 ; it is now 
rarely met with. 

CANAVALIA ENSIFOKMIS, DC. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4027. 

This stove -climber, with handsome purple pea-shaped flowers, was 
raised from seed received with other plants from Ashantee, in which 
country it is known as the " Over-look." It is planted by the natives 
along the margin of their provision grounds, in the belief that it fulfils the 
part of a watchman, and, from some supposed dreaded power, protects 
property from plunder. 

CANTUA BICOLOE, Lindl. $ Paxt. 

Syns. Periphragmos uniftorus ? Ruiz & Pav. 
Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1849, vol. xv. p. 220 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4729. 

The credit of this introduction is probably due to Mr. Low, but seeds 
were sent to us by William Lobb about the same time, from which 
plants were raised and flowered in April 1853. 

A greenhouse shrubby plant, with handsome drooping flowers, with a 
yellow tube and a rich scarlet limb. 

CANTUA DEPENDENS, Pers. 

Syns. C. buxifolia, Lam. ; Periphragmos dependens, Ruiz & Pav. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 303 (notice of exhibit of New Plants) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4582 ; Fl. des 
Serres, vol. vii. p. 11 ; The Garden, 1885, vol. xxviii. p. 271, pi. 509. 

A beautiful greenhouse climbing shrub, with long drooping orange- 
coloured flowers of great beauty from Peru sent by William Lobb, and 
flowered for the first time at Exeter in May 1848, on which occasion it 
was exhibited before the Horticultural Society, and awarded the Society's 
large Silver Medal. 

It is the " Magic Tree " of the Peruvian Indians, 

238 




Q o 



CANTUA PYEIFOLIA, Juss. 

Syns. Peripliragmos flexuosa, Ruiz & Pav. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4386 ; Fl. des Serres, 1848, p. 385. 

This, not by any means the most showy of the species of Cantua, was 
raised from seed collected by William Lobb in Peru, and first flowered 
in March 1848. 

The flowers in a dense terminal corymb, individually funnel-shaped, 
cream-white in colour, have a limb composed of five pure white 
segments. 

CAEAGUATA ANGUSTIFOLIA, /. G. Baker. 

J. G. Baker in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 616 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7137. 

A distinct species discovered by Kalbreyer when collecting in New 
Grenada, with green leaves, red-brown veins, and flowers bright yellow, 
subtended by scarlet bracts tipped with green. 

First flowered in the houses at Kew in 1884. 

CAEAGUATA ZAHNII, Hook. f. 

Syns. Tillandsia Zahnii, Hort. Veitch. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6059; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 14, fig. 

Introduced through Zahn, who discovered it on his great journey to 
Costa Eica in 1870, in Chiriqui, Central America, shortly before he 
perished by drowning. 

A handsome stove plant, with leaves 1 ft. long, the base yellow with 
crimson stripes, the middle portion bright crimson, passing into green at 
the tips. 

The flowers, in dense panicles, on the end of erect scapes, are pale 
yellow in colour, subtended by bright scarlet bracts. 

Flowers opened for the first time at Chelsea in May 1873. 

CAVENDISHIA ACUMINATA, Benth. 

Syns. Thibaudia acuminata, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5752 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 10, fig. 

This showy, free-flowering greenhouse shrub, a native of the Andes 
of Columbia, sent by Eichard Pearce, produced its brilliant scarlet tubular 
flowers for the first time in November 1868. 

CELMISIA MUNEOI, Hook. f. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7496. 

One of the handsomest of the New Zealand Daisy bushes, the Asters of 
other parts of the world. The flowers resemble a large Marguerite Daisy, 

239 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

the ray florets white and the disk yellow ; the leaves strap-shaped, dark 
green, with an electric coloured pellicle and a silvery woolly under surface. 
It is hardy in the warmer localities of the British Isles. 

CELMISIA SPECTABILIS, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6653. 

This, the first species of a handsome genus to be cultivated in this 
country, is a native of New Zealand, where the family represents the 
Asters and Erigerons of the Old and New Worlds. With this sole 
exception they are absent from the Archipelago. 

Celmisia spectabilis flowered for the first time in May 1882. 

CELOSIA HUTTONI, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 215, with figs.; Veitchs' Catlg. of Garden and Fl. Seeds, 1873, 
p. 30, figs. ; Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. i. p. 395. 

An ornamental-leaved plant introduced in 1870 from Java, through 
Henry Hutton, after whom it is named. 

It has deep claret-coloured leaves and scarlet flowers, and, although a 
stove perennial, succeeds as a half-hardy annual, and as such is a most 
useful subject for summer-bedding. 

CENTEOPOGON COCCINEUS, Begel 

Syns. Sipho campy lus coccineus, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4178; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xii. p. 173; PI. des Serres, 1846, pi. ix. 

Sent by William Lobb from the Organ mountains of Brazil to Exeter, 
and first flowered in June 1845, and awarded a silver gilt medal by the 
Horticultural Society at Chiswick and by the Koyal Botanic Society in 
Eegent's Park the following month. 

It is a stove species with tubular red flowers, unhappily seldom seen 
in cultivation. 

CEPH^ILIS TOMENTOSA, Willd. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6696. 

A very singular plant related to the species that yields the valuable 
medicinal Ipecacuanha, but of different appearance. A native of tropical 
America, introduced from British Guiana. 

CEKATOSTEMA LONGIFLOEUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 87, fig.; Bot. Mag. t. 4779; Fl. des Serres, torn. ix. 

p. 197. 

A splendid ericaceous shrub with tubular flowers nearly 2 in. long, 
of a rich orange-scarlet colour, introduced from the Andes of Peru 

240 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

through William Lobb, and first exhibited at the Chiswick Horticultural 
Summer Exhibition of 1853. 

It is a very pretty evergreen greenhouse shrub, loving a melange of 
peat and sand. 

CEEOPEGIA CUMINGIANA, Dene. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4349. 

Sent from Java by Thomas Lobb, and first flowered in August 1847 : 
dried specimens had previously been obtained from Manila by Cuming, 
and named in his honour. 

A stove climber with numerous flowers of peculiar shape, coloured 
with transverse bands of white, red, chocolate, and yellow. 

CEEOPEGIA GAEDNEEI, Thwaites. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5306. 

A native of Ceylon, first detected by Mr. Gardner, whose name it bears, 
on Eambaddo, at an elevation of 4,000-5,000 ft. In this country a green- 
house climber, it has the peculiar shaped flowers typical of the genus, and 
ovate leaves purple on the under surface. 

CHIEITA EBUENEA, Ranee. 

Journal of Botany, 1883, vol. xxi. p. 168. 

A gesneraceous greenhouse plant with radical lanceolate-ovate leaves 
and tubular pinkish flowers on a white background, in clusters on 
erect stems, from the Province of Hupeh, Central China ; flowered at 
Coombe Wood in 1903. 

CHIEITA HOESFIELDII, B. Br. 

Syns. Liebiijia speciosa, DC. ; Tromsdorffia speciosa, Blume. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4315 ; Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 599 (Report of Exhibit of New Plants). 

A beautiful gesneraceous plant, with flowers in corymbs in the axils 
of the uppermost leaves on stems If to 2 ft. high resembling those of a 
Gloxinia. 

The somewhat large coarse foliage hides many of the flowers and 
detracts from any horticultural merit. 

Introduced from Java through Thomas Lobb, first exhibited in bloom 
on September 1st 1846 before the Horticultural Society, and now 
probably lost to cultivation. 

CLEMATIS SMILACIFOLIA, Wall. 

Syns. G. glandulosa, Blume. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4259 ; Gard Chron. 1856, p. 338 (advt.). 

A stove species of " Traveller's Joy," with leaves resembling 
some large-leaved species of Smilax, and dark purple, almost black, 

241 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

floral segments; the central mass of pure white anthers a striking 
contrast. 

This climber was introduced to cultivation through Thomas Lobb, 
many years since, from Mount Salak in Java. 

CLERODENDEON CRUENTUM, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. I860, p. 339 (Report of Show) ; id. p. 456, Lindl. 

Imported through Thomas Lobb, this stove species, with rich red 
flowers, was exhibited before the Royal Horticultural Society in April 
1860, and created much interest. 

CLERODENDRON ILLUSTRE, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 424. 

Introduced by Curtis, who discovered it in Celebes, the species is valuable 
for the bright vermilion scarlet flowers on red branches in dense terminal 
panicles. 

CLIANTHUS DAMPIERI, All Cunn. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5051 ; Gard. Chron. 1858, p. 476; PI. des Serres, 1850, torn. vi. p. 121 ; 
The Garden, 1890, vol. xxxvii. p. 299, fig. 

This remarkable plant, commonly known as " Sturt's Pea," was 
first met with in the dry sandy islands of Dampier's Archipelago, 
North-West Australia, by that renowned navigator and buccaneer, 
whose name it commemorates. In 1817 Allan Cunningham found it 
in New South Wales, and later on Captain Sturt met with it in the 
same region, growing on sterile bleak open flats skirting Prince Regent's 
Lake. 

It first flowered in this country at Exeter, was exhibited before the 
Horticultural Society of London at St. James's Hall on April 21st 1858, 
and awarded a Silver Medal. 

COFFEA BENGHALENSIS, Eoxb. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4917. 

A native of the mountains of the north-eastern frontier of India, chiefly 
about Silhet, and brought many years ago to Calcutta, where it was for 
some time much cultivated under the idea that it was the real Coffee 
of Arabia. The plant from which the figure in the Botanical Magazine 
was taken was sent to this country by Thomas Lobb. 

COLEUS GIBSONII, Verlot. 

Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 432 (advt.) ; PI. Mag. 1867, t. 338; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1866, 

fig. 6 on col. pi. 

Coleus Gibsonii was found by the late John Gould Veitch in New 

242 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Caledonia, in vast quantities, the highly coloured foliage a striking 
feature. It was used as a parent in the production of the numerous 
hybrids now in cultivation, and proved most unusually prolific. 

COLEUS VEITCHII, Hort. Vcitcli. 
Fl. Mag. 1867, t. 345 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, with fig. 

Introduced from New Caledonia through the late John Gould Veitch. 

The leaves, of heart-shaped outline, are of a deep chocolate colour with 
a lively green edge. This species, with Coleus Gibsonii, was much used 
by the hybridist, and some very beautiful-leaved varieties resulted, more 
especially those which originated in the Gardens of the Koyal Horticultural 
Society at Chiswick. 

COLOCASIA AEFINIS, Schott. 

Syns. Alocasia Jennmgsii, T. Moore. 

1'Illus. Horfc. 1869, t. 585 ; Fl. des Serres, t. 1818 ; Fl. and Pom. 1868, p. 276, with 
fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 4, with fig. 

Introduced from India. A fine foliaged stove plant with glaucous green 
leaves blotched with deep blackish-green, and a prominent venation very 
effective when well grown. 

The plant was honoured with a Silver Medal when shown before the 
Koyal Horticultural Society in May 1867. 

COLUMNEA KALBREYERI, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6633 ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. pp. 44, 216, with fig. ; Fl. 

and Pom. 1882, p. 26. 

A superb discovery by Kalbreyer, whose name it bears, when 
travelling in the province of Antioquia, growing on trees in the forests 
of Cinegetas. The striking contrast afforded by the pale-green, 
yellow-mottled upper surface, and the blood-red under surface of the 
leaves, with the golden yellow of the flowers, forms one of the most 
distinct of the many colour contrasts to be found in the vegetable 
kingdom. 

CORDIA DECANDRA, Hook. & Arn. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 564 ; Eot. Mag. t. 6279. 

A beautiful greenhouse shrub with large white flowers, sent from Chile 
in 1849 through William Lobb. 

The excessively hard wood is much used for charcoal, and it is from this 
the local name " Carbon " is derived. It is also used for smelting 
copper. 

The specimen figured in the Botanical Magazine first flowered at 
Chelsea in May 1875. 

243 



COEEEA CAEDINALIS, Muell 

Bot. Mag. t. 4912 ; The Florist, 1856, pi. 116. 

This handsome hard-wooded greenhouse plant, with scarlet tubular 
flowers tipped with green, was originally discovered by Dr. Ferdinand 
(afterwards Baron von) Miiller in sandy places in the sterile plain of Port 
Albert, Victoria, South Australia. 

Eaised from seed from the same locality, it flowered for the first time 
in England in May 1856. 

CEAWFUEDIA FASCICULATA, Wall. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4838. 

One of the climbing Gentians, a plant with beautiful blue flowers, raised 
from seed sent by Thomas Lobb from Khasia. 

Plants flowered under glass for the first time in January 1855. 

CEOSSANDEA GUINEENSIS, Nees. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6346. 

A charming plant with dark-green leaves, golden reticulation, and spikes 
of rose-purple flowers, long known to science prior to introduction, but 
only flowered for the first time in October 1877. 

CEOTON ANEITUMENSIS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1881, p. 31. 

The midribs, margins, and principal veins of the leaves of this variety 
are coloured gamboge-yellow on a bright green ground. 

CEOTON APPENDICULATUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 20, fig. p. 9 ; PI. and Pom. 1879, p. 67, fig. 

A peculiar variety in which the blade of the leaf is separated by a 
considerable interval occupied by the midrib only. 

CEOTON AUCUBJEFOLIUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1879, p. 2, fig. 

Introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from the South Sea 
Islands, the foliage bears a strong resemblance to the well-known vulgar 
Aucuba japonica of gardens. 

CEOTON AUEEO-MACULATUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1878, p. 26 ; Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 430. 
A variety with neat and small foliage, bright green spotted with yellow. 

244 




CROTON CAUDATUS TORTILIS 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

CEOTON AUEEO-MAEMOEATUS, Hort. 

Fl. aud Pom. 1882, p. 122 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 13. 

Introduced through Charles Moore, Esq. 

The leaves, fully 1 ft. long and 3 in. broad, beautifully variegated with 
bright golden-yellow on a deep olive-green ground. 

CEOTON BISMAECK. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 51. 

A form intermediate in the shape of the leaves between the trilobed and 
broadly lance-shaped varieties, spotted and blotched with yellow on a 
green ground. 

CEOTON BEAG^ANUS, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 17 ; Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 122. 

An elegant variety with pendulous lance-shaped leaves 18 to 21 in. 
long, deep olive-green, speckled and spotted in a quaint way with bright 
yellow of various shades. 

It was dedicated to Senhor Jose Terceiro Da Silva Braga, formerly 
well known in Portugal as a distinguished and enlightened patron of 
Horticulture. 

CEOTON CAUDATUS TOETILIS, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 14, fig. p. 5. 

A twisted-leaved variety, one of the best in cultivation, introduced 
through Charles Moore, Esq., at one time Superintendent of the Botanic 
Gardens, Sydney, and the last Government servant to be appointed to 
such a post by the home authorities. 

CEOTON CHALLENGER 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 21, fig. p. 10. 

A long-leaved variety from the South Sea Islands, found by Peter C. M. 
Veitch, and also by Sir William MacArthur, of Camden Park, Sydney, 
N.S.W. 

The ground colour of the leaf-blade is light green, blotched and streaked 
with yellow, assuming a rosy tinge with age. 

CEOTON CHEYSOPCECILUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 34. 

The foliage of this variety offers a striking instance of the peculiar color- 
ation to which the foliage of Crotons is subject. The midrib, foot-stalks, 
and sometimes two-thirds of the length of the entire leaf, is coloured pale 
canary-yellow, the remainder a deep olive-green. 

24.5 R 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CEOTON COMTE DE GEEMINY. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 20. 

A handsome variety with broad leaves, coloured crimson along the 
midrib and blotched with light golden-yellow on the blade, dedicated 
to the Comte de Germiny in recognition of that noble's continuous 
patronage of Horticulture. 

CROTON COOPEEI, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 11, fig. p. 6. 

A variety with large oblong slightly wavy leaves, conspicuously veined 
and blotched with yellow, the markings, as the foliage ages, developing 
shades of red. 

CEOTON COENUTUM, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 884 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 18, fig. p. 6. 

An introduction through the late John Gould Veitch from one of the 
South Sea Islands. 

A compact growing variety with curious horn -like processes at the apex 
of the leaves caused by an extension of the midrib. 

CEOTON CEONSTADTII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 17, fig. p. 8 ; Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 122. 
Leaves twisted and crisped, glossy green margined and variegated with 
yellow lost to cultivation. 

CEOTON DAYSPEING. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 32. 

A variety introduced through Charles Moore, Esq., late of the Botanic 
Gardens, Sydney, N.S.W. 

CEOTON DISEAELI. 

Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 420, figs. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1876, p. 20, fig. p. 10. 
A variety with trilobed leaves marked and blotched with yellow on a 
green ground, sent to us by A. H. C. Macafee, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W. 

CEOTON EAEL OF DEEBY. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 27. 

A trilobed-leaved form of the Disraeli type, with nearly the whole 
central portion of the leaf-blade yellow, the margins and tips of the lobes 
a grassy green. 

CEOTON EVANSIANUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 23, fig. p. 7. 

A very handsome form remarkable for the deep colouring of its trilobed 
leaves, and still to-day a garden favourite. 

246 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

When first formed these are light olive-green with midribs and veins of 
golden-yellow ; when mature the ground colour deepens to bright bronzy 
crimson and the yellow to an orange-scarlet. 

It was introduced from the South Sea Islands through Peter C. M. 
Veitch. 

CEOTON FOEDII, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 20. 
A dwarf-growing form with richly coloured trilobed leaves. 

CEOTON HANBUEYANUS, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 33, fig. 

A variety with leaves of varied coloration, introduced through Charles 
Moore, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W. 

CEOTON HAEWOODIANUS, Sort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 26. 

A form with dimorphous foliage of bright and varied colour, the larger 
leaves are 10 in. in length and the smaller little more than 6 in. 

CEOTON HAWKEEI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 23, fig. p. 8. 

For this variety we are indebted both to Lady Eobinson, of Govern- 
ment House, Sydney, N.S.W., and to Charles Moore, Esq. 

The leaves have the middle and lower portion together with the foot- 
stalks, coloured bright yellow, the margins and tips tending to a bright 
green. 

CEOTON HILLIANUM, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 12, fig. p. 2. 

Introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from the South Sea 
Islands, and remarkable for the reddish-yellow effect of the foliage. 

CEOTON HOOKEEI, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 15, fig. 5 ; Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 943 ; Fl. and Pom. 

1871, p. 199, fig. 

A beautiful form with leaves marked in the same manner as the Milk- 
maid Holly, introduced from the South Sea Islands through the late 
John Gould Veitch. 

CEOTON INTEEEUPTUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 16, fig. p. 8; Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 844; id. 1870, 

p. 137, fig. 

Introduced from the South Sea Islands through the late John Gould 
Veitch. 

247 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The leaves, prettily variegated with red, exhibit the peculiar phaenome- 
non of being in separate portions, connected only by an unusually 
powerful midrib. 

CEOTON IEBEGULAEE, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 17, fig. p. 9. 

The leaves of this variety are of variable size and shape, dark green, 
more or less spotted with yellow. 

It was introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from the South 
Sea Islands. 

CEOTON JOHANNIS, Hort. 

Syns. C. angustissimum. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 844; id. 1871, p. 612, fig. 123 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1871, p. 14, 

fig. p. 3. 

A variety from the South Sea Islands through the late John Gould 
Veitch, after whom it was named, with long narrow leaves of a glossy 
green colour, the centre and margins flaked with bright yellow. 

CEOTON LACTEUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1872, p. 12, fig. p. 4. 

A distinct variety introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from 
the South Sea Islands. 

The leaves, of dark shining green, have broad lines of milky or yellowish- 
white colour. 

CEOTON MACAETHUEI, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1877, p. 21, fig. p. 7. 

Sent to us by Sir William MacArthur of Camden Park, Sydney, N.S.W., 
a well-known Australian amateur, in whose honour it was named. 

The leaves are effectively variegated with large blotches and flakes of 
yellow on a bright-green ground. 

CEOTON MACULATUS KATONII, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 430; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 21, fig. p. 11. 
Also due to Sir William MacArthur of Camden Park, Sydney, N.S.W. 
It is a trilobed form of the Disraeli type, with numerous bright 
yellow spots scattered over the deep but bright green leaf -blade. 

CEOTON MAXIMUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1871, p. 36 ; Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1668, fig. ; 1'Illus. Hort. p. 534. 
Introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from the South Sea 
Islands ; a species with large leaves of oblong form, bright golden-yellow 
in colour, blotched on either side of the centre with olive-green bands. 

248 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

CEOTON MOOEEANUS, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 21, fig. p. 11. 

Sent to us by Charles Moore, Esq. ; the midrib and margin of the leaf 
bright orange-yellow on an olive-green ground. 

CEOTON MULTICOLOE, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 15, fig. p. 4 ; Fl. and Pom. 1872, p. 89, fig. 

Introduced from the South Sea Islands through the late John Gould 
Veitch. 

The leaves, of irregular shape, are light green in colour blotched with 
yellow, reddish-yellow, and red. 

CEOTON NEVILLLE, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 21, fig. p. 9. 

A native of the South Sea Islands, named in compliment to Lady 
Dorothy Nevill, as a tribute to this great lady's interest in gardening. 

The leaves, variegated green, yellow, and crimson, are suffused with a 
metallic hue peculiar to this plant. 

CEOTON NOBILIS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 22, fig. 8 ; Fl. and Pom. 1878, p. 133, fig. 

A beautiful variety with long, lanceolate, weeping leaves, found in the 
South Sea Islands. 

CEOTON OVALIFOLIUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 16, fig. p. 6. 

A very distinct form with large oval leaves, from the South Sea Islands 
through the late John Gould Veitch. 

CEOTON PEINCESS OF WALES. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 26, fig. 

A very graceful variety with pendant foliage. The leaves are some 
24 in. in length, coloured light yellow in the centre, margined with light 
olive-green profusely spotted with yellow. 

CEOTON EECUEVIFOLIUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 37, fig. p. 34. 

A very fine broad-leaved variety, the foliage dense and gracefully 
recurved at the tips, the yellow-crimson and deep olive-green variegation 
unusually brilliant. 

249 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CEOTON BEGINS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 22, fig. p. 12 ; PI. and Pom. 1879, p. 59, fig. 

Sent to us by J. E. Young, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W. ; this handsome 
form has crimson midribs and veins, and a leaf-blade deep olive-green 
sparingly spotted with yellow. 

CEOTON SINITZINIANUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 37, fig. p. 35. 

This variety, for which we are indebted to the kindness of Sir William 
Macarthur, Camden Park, Sydney, N.S.W., has narrow lance-shaped 
leaves of a deep olive-green streaked with straw. 

It is named in compliment to M. Peter Sinitzin, an accomplished 
Eussian amateur. 

CEOTON TOETILIS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 22, fig. p. 9. 

A peculiar and remarkable form with the leaf-blade twisted in a spiral 
manner around the midrib. 

CEOTON UNDULATUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 19, fig. p. 7. 

Introduced from the South Sea Islands through the late John Gould 
Veitch. 

Of unusually free growth, the margins of the leaves are beautifully 
undulated and wavy. 

CEOTON VAEIABILIS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 22. 

Sent by A. H. C. Macafee, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W. 
It has long leaves, marbled, blotched and flaked with various shades of 
orange, bronze-yellow, and crimson. 

CEOTON VEITCHIANUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 19, fig. p. 7. 

This introduction from the South Sea Islands, through the late John 
Gould Veitch, has leaves which attain a large size effectively variegated 
with rose, carmine-purple, and creamy yellow. 

CEOTON WEISMANNI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1872, p. 12, fig. p. 3 ; Fl. and Pom. 1873, p. 55, fig. 
A very handsome form introduced from the South Sea Islands, with 
long and narrow leaves not unlike a Dracaena, splashed with bright golden- 
yellow on a dark shining green ground. 

250 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

CEOTON YOUNGII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 12, fig. p. 4. 

This variety, sent through J. E. Young, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W., 
has leaves coloured with creamy yellow and bright rosy red on a dark 
green ground. 

CUPHEA COED ATA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4208 ; Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 477 (Notice of Exhibition) ; Fl. des Serres, 

1846, pi. vii. 

A native of the hills and woods of Peru, about Huassahuassi, Chacalla, 
Acomayo, and Huanuco. From the last-named locality seed was sent to 
Exeter by William Lobb in 1842 ; plants raised and flowered for the first 
time in 1845. 

This beautiful species has remarkable flowers, a scarlet tubular calyx 
and two large petals held erect as banners, and is much valued by the 
Peruvians, who credit it with various medicinal properties. 

CUECUMA AUSTEALASICA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5620. 

Introduced from Cape York, North Australia, through the late John 
Gould Veitch, and first flowered at Chelsea in August 1866. 

Prior to this discovery no species belonging to the extensive genus 
Curcuma had been known to inhabit the Southern hemisphere. 

CUECUMA SUMATEANA, Miq. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 393. 

This plant, introduced from Sumatra through Curtis, is a stove species 
with dense spikes of yellow flowers and large deep orange-red bracts. 

DAEWINIA FIMBEIATA, Benth. 

Syns. Genethyllis fim'briata, Kipp. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5468 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 7, fig. 

A beautiful inhabitant of the greenhouse from South- West Australia, 
first flowered in June 1864. 

The flowers are small and insignificant, but the bright rose-coloured 
fringed scales, resembling a large drooping bell- shaped flower, are very 
attractive, and for this reason alone it is cultivated. 

DENDEOSEEOS MACEOPHYLLA, Don. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6353. 

A handsome shrubby greenhouse plant of the peculiar group of tree 
Composites, now lost to cultivation. 

251 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

This genus confined to the Juan Fernandez group of Islands, whence 
it was first imported through Downton, flowered in August 1877. 

DIANTHEEA CILIATA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Syns. Helper one ciliata, Hook. ; Jacobinia ciliata, Nees. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5888; Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 1567. 

A pretty winter-flowering stove plant with violet-purple flowers, raised 
from seed received from Venezuela, and flowered for the first time in 
November 1870 ; it had also been collected in Panama and Peru. 

DIDYMOCAEPUS CKINITA, Jack. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4554 ; Fl. des Serres, 1850, p. 303. 

An interesting stove plant, its beauty dependent on the rich velvety 
appearance of the leaves, purple on the lower surface ; the flowers are 
white, sparsely produced. 

Sent from Singapore by Thomas Lobb, it flowered for the first time in 
June of 1846. 

DIDYMOCAEPUS LACUNOSA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7236; Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 120, fig. 38, p. 211. 

A lovely little Gesneraceous plant with flowers similar to those of a 
Streptocarpus, discovered by Charles Curtis in the Island of Langkawi, 
on the west side of the Malayan Peninsula, first flowered at Chelsea in 
July 1891, and it was from this material the plate in the Botanical 
Magazine was prepared. 

DIDYMOCAEPUS MALAYANUS, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 123, fig. 24; Bot. Mag. t. 7536; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

1897, p. 6, fig. 

A charming little plant due to Charles Curtis, when in charge of the 
Botanic Gardens, Penang, through whom it was introduced. 

The flowers, similar in appearance to those of Streptocarpus Eexii, are 
of a pure primrose-yellow with a darker yellow blotch on the lowermost 
segment. 

DIEFFENBACHIA BOWMANNI, Hort. Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 6, fig. ; Eev. Hort. 1872, p. 198 ; The Garden, 1874, vol. v. 

p. 416, fig. 

A fine species discovered by David Bowman during his trip to South 
Brazil. 

It is distinguished by very large leaves, of a pleasing light-green colour 
spotted with dark and nearly black green blotches. 

252 



DIEFFENBACHIA JENMANI, Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 8, fig. ; PI. and Pom. 1884, p. 58. 

A species from British Guiana sent to us by the discoverer, Mr. G. S. 
Jenman, Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens, Georgetown, in whose 
honour it is named. 

A handsome stove plant with bold foliage banded and spotted with 
cream-white on a bright green ground. 

DIEFFENBACHIA PEAECEI, Hort. Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig. 

A stove plant with ornamental foliage from Ecuador found by and 
named after Eichard Pearce. 

The large leaves have a broad creamy-white midrib, and irregular 
blotches of the same colour scattered over the surface. 

DIEFFENBACHIA PICTA, Schott. 

Syns. D. braziliensis, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 7, fig. 

A handsome species from Brazil, with large leaves effectively spotted 
with white or yellowish- white on a pale green base. 

DIPLADENIA ACUMINATA, Hook. 

Syns. D. magnified,, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4828; Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 455; The Florist, 1854, col. pi. 

A native of Brazil, a beautiful stove climber with large deep rose- 
coloured flowers, flowered for the first time in this country at Chelsea in 
July 1854, and still popular. 

DIPLADENIA ATEOPUEPUEEA, A. DC. 

Syns. Echites atropurpurea, Lindl. - 

Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1843, t. 27; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1842, vol. ix. p. 199; PI. des Serres, 
torn. i. p. 70 ; The Garden, 1893, vol. xliv. p. 488, col. pi. 937. 

A handsome stove climber from Brazil, first flowered in 1842, when it 
was exhibited before the Horticultural Society of London, and awarded 
a Banksian Medal as a new plant of exceptional merit. 

Soon lost to cultivation, it was not re-introduced until it appeared as a 
seedling on a clump of Cattleya imported in 1889 by Mr. Eussell Clarke of 
Croydon. 

DIPLADENIA BOLIVIENSIS, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5783 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 6, fig. 

Introduced from Bolivia through Eichard Pearce, and flowered at 
Chelsea for the first time in June 1868. 

253 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

The pure white flowers have a rich orange-yellow throat, and are 
usually less than 1 to If in. across. 

DIPLADENIA SPLENDENS, A. DC. 

Syns. Echites splendens, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 3976 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. x. p. 25 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. i. p. 74. 

A beautiful stove climber described in Curtis's Botanical Magazine in 
the following terms : 

" This is unquestionably the most beautiful of the many handsome 
species of this genus, and may vie with the choicest productions of Flora 
which have been of late years introduced to our gardens. It was sent 
from the Organ Mountains of Brazil by William Lobb in 1841. Only three 
plants were met with, and these all reached Exeter in a living state." 

DIPLADENIA UEOPHYLLA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4414; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xvi. p. 67. 

A stove species with salmon-coloured flowers inclined to purple, obtained 
from seed sent from the Organ Mountains of Brazil by Thomas Lobb. 

DIPTEEACANTHUS SPECTABILIS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4494 ; Fl. des Serres, 1850, torn. vi. p. 49. 

A stove plant with charming blue flowers, raised from seed sent from 
the Andes of Peru by William Lobb, and flowered for the first time in 
August 1849. 

DEAC^NA ALBICANS, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 10, fig. 

A distinct form of Dracaena terminalis, with large, somewhat undulated 
leaves, of a pleasing green colour, variegated with white when mature, 
and occasionally developing some others in which all colouring matter is 
entirely absent. 

DEAC^ENA ALBO-VIEENS, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 21, fig. p. 12. 

A graceful form with bright green leaves, margined creamy-white and 
light crimson : white sometimes predominates, others have light crimson 
or pink most in evidence. 

DEACON A AMABILIS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1873, p. 14, fig. p. 7 ; Fl. and Pom. 1874, p. 75, fig. 

The leaves of this beautiful variety are from 24 to 30 in. in length and 
4 to 5 in. in breadth, bright glossy green in colour, marked and suffused 
with pink and creamy white, when mature distinctly rose-coloured. 

254 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

DEACJENA BALMOEEANA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 8, fig. p. 12. 

An interesting variety introduced from the islands in the South Pacific 
Ocean through the late John Gould Veitch. 

The foliage, as it ages, has a metallic lustre, and is conspicuously 
marked with rich rose-coloured stripes of variable length and width. 

The venation is very distinct and regular. 

DEAC^NA BAPTISTI, Hort. 

Fl. and Pom. 1875, p. 53, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 50, fig. p. 49. 

A distinct and highly ornamental variety received by us from our 
correspondents, Messrs. John Baptist & Sons of Sydney, N.S.W., in 
compliment to whom it is named. 

Bold foliage, leaves measuring from 2 to 3 ft., margined and striped 
with yellow and pink, and the additional charm of a stem similarly 
variegated ; a very valuable stove plant. 

DEAC^ENA CHELSONI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 21, fig. p. 11. 

Introduced through the late John Gould Veitch from the South Sea 
Islands. 

The ground colour of the leaves deep glossy green, almost black, which, 
as the plant attains age, become mottled and suffused with a deep 
crimson, a broad line of the same colour bordering the leaves on both 
edges. 

DEAC^ENA ELEGANTISSIMA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 21, fig. p. 13. 

A narrow-leaved form of a deep bronze hue with a metallic lustre, very 
distinctly margined with bright crimson ; in the young leaves crimson of 
a lighter shade largely predominates. 

DEAC^ENA GUILFOYLEI, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 21, fig. p. 12. 
An introduction from the South Sea Islands. 

The plant is of rather small growth, with leaves 15 to 18 in. long, 
striped their entire length with creamy white, in age a rosy tint, always 
deeper at the margin. 

DEAC^ENA HENDEESONI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 17, fig. p. 10 ; Fl. and Pom. 1875, p. 53, fig. 
A variety of graceful and elegant form, with leaves 1| to 2 ft. in length, 
light green in colour, marbled with white and rosy pink lines. 

255 



DRACAENA IMPEEIALIS, Hart. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 12, fig. p. 8. 

The leaves of this robust variety are 1^ to 2 ft. in length, of a dark 
green ground colour, suffused with bright red over the whole of the older 
leaves, the younger of a lighter shade. The plant has a peculiar bronzy 
metallic lustre, the leathery texture of the leaves rendering it valuable for 
decorative purposes. 

DRAOENA x INTERMEDIA, Hort. 

Syns. D. hybrida, Hort. 
PI. and Pom. 1876, p. 17, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 12, fig. p. 8. 

A fine form obtained at Chelsea by crossing the two varieties Dracaena 
magnifica and D. albicans, the foliage clearly indicating the parentage. 

DRAC^NA JAMESII, Hart. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1894, p. 6. 

A distinct and beautiful variety sent to us by Charles Moore, Esq., late 
of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, N.S.W. 

In growth of dwarf habit, the leaves rarely exceeding 1 ft. in length and 
1 in. in width. 

The colour is a rich maroon carmine-crimson. 

DRACAENA LEVANGERI, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 12. 

An introduction from the South Pacific Ocean, through the late John 
Gould Veitch. The leaves, 12 to 14 in. long, are gracefully curved and 
distinctly marked with deep rose, almost crimson, on an emerald-green 
ground. 

DRAC-^NA MACARTHURI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 23, fig. p. 11. 

Sent to us by Sir William Macarthur, after whom it is named. 
The leaves, scarcely 1 ft. in length, are elegant in form and colour, 
especially brilliant and attractive. 

DRACAENA MACLEAYI, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 13, fig. p. 5. 

A very beautiful variety brought home by the late John Gould Veitch 
from the South Sea Islands. 

A dwarf, robust plant, with leaves 15 to 18 in. long, of a dark, bronzy 
brown tint, and a decided gloss over the upper surface. 

256 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

DEACvENA MAGNIFICA, Hort. 

Fl. and Pom. 1871, p. 273, fig. ; Vcitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 16, fig. p. 8. 

A magnificent variety introduced from the South Sea Islands through 
the late John Gould Veitch. 

The leaves attain a length of from H to 2 ft., are of a bronzy pink 
colour, changing, when mature, to a deeper shade. 

DRACAENA MOOEEANA, Hort. 

Fl. and Pom. 1872, p. 233 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870. 

Discovered by the late John Gould Veitch in the South Sea Islands, 
this magnificent variety has foliage 2 to 3 ft. in length, beautifully 
undulated. The colouring of the leaf is rich, glossy bronze, with a 
bright reddish-crimson midrib and leaf-stalk ; it was dedicated to Charles 
Moore, Esq. 

DKAC^INA NIGRO-RUBEA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 13, fig. p. 5. 

A narrow-leaved form from the South Sea Islands, with leaves 16 to 
20 in. in length, dark blackish-brown in colour, with a bright rosy crimson 
centre, the latter colour entirely predominating in the young foliage. 

DEAC^INA PEINCESS MAEGAEET. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1879, p. 24, fig. p. 11. 

A very fine variety of bold habit and distinct markings, introduced 
from the South Sea Islands by Peter C. M. Veitch. 

When the leaves first unfold they are of a creamy white, slightly 
shaded with green, with oblique stripes of a deeper shade, and with a pale 
crimson artery. 

The light-coloured portions of the midrib are suffused with delicate 
rosy pink. 

DEAC^INA POEPHYEOPHYLLA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1871, p. 12, fig. p. 9. 

This charming variety, from the South Sea Islands, where it was found 
by the late John Gould Veitch, attains really noble proportions. The bold 
leaves, of a deep bronzy tint on the upper surface, effectively contrast with 
the glaucous hue of the under. 

DEAC^NA EEGINA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1869, p. 21, fig. p. 18 ; FL and Pom. 1872, p. 63, fig. 
A magnificent Dracaena discovered by the late John Gould Veitch in the 
South Sea Islands ; the leaves, large and broad, are exquisitely marked with 
creamy white on a green ground. 

257 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

DEAC^JNA EOSEO-PICTA, Hort. 

PI. and Pom. 1878, p. 29, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 23, fig. p. 12. 

A sub-erect leaved variety of robust habit and bold aspect, raised at 
Cbelsea. The leaves, from 18 to 20 in. in length, are beautifully coloured 
with a delicate rose tint, deepening with age to a bright carmine. 

DEAC^NA SPECIOSA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 23, fig. p. 13. 

The foliage of this tricoloured variety is broadly striped or margined 
with yellowish-white, stained edged with light rosy pink ; the ground 
colour is eau-de-nile. 

DEAC^ENA x TAYLOEI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876. 

Eaised at Chelsea in early days from the two varieties Dracaena 
magnifica and D. Mooreana, a handsome hybrid, with deeply coloured 
foliage, and a very decided metallic lustre tinged with crimson. 

The petioles of the leaves are of a light crimson hue. 

DEYANDEA CALOPHYLLA, Br. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7642. 

A shrubby plant from the Antipodes, of the Order Proteacese, first 
flowered in this country in the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, in 1898, but raised 
by us from seed received in 1891. 

ECHEVEEIA x GLAU CO-METALLIC A. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 22, fig. p. 14. 

A hybrid raised by Seden at Chelsea from Echeveria metallica and 
E. secunda glauca. It was in its early days much used for summer- 
bedding on account of a dwarf character and large leaves, approaching 
in size those of E. metallica ; of a bronzy glaucous blue-green hue. 

EPISCIA EEYTHEOPUS, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6219. 

Introduced from New Grenada, and flowered for the first time in 
March 1874, this stove herbaceous plant has handsome oblanceolate 
leaves, bright green above, pale and suffused with red beneath. The 
flowers, white with a yellow throat, are clustered at the base and more or 
less hidden. 

258 



BEANTHEMUM ASPEESUM, Hook. f. 

Bot, Mag. t. 5711 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1869, p. 6, fig. 

Introduced by the late John Gould Veitch from the Solomon Islands, 
where he discovered it in 1866. 

The flowers, white speckled with purple, one lobe almost wholly purple, 
give the corolla limb the appearance of a member of the orchidaceous 
family. 

EEANTHEMUM BOENEENSE, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6701. 

Discovered in North- West Borneo by Curtis, and flowered in England 
for the first time in May 1882. 

The flowers, collected in a dense terminal cone-like inflorescence, are 
pure white in colour with a faint lemon tinge on the lower segment of the 
corolla. 

EEANTHEMUM COOPEEI, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5467 ; Fl. Mag. 1864, t. 182 ; Fl. des Serres, 1880, p. 293. 

A handsome species of Eranthemum raised from seed sent by Sir Daniel 
Cooper, Bart., from New Caledonia. 

The flowers, pure white with purple spots on the lower lip opened for 
the first time in this country in September 1863. 

EEANTHEMUM LAXIFLOEUM, A. Gray. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6336 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 29. 

A handsome stove flowering plant introduced from the New Hebrides 
through Peter C. M. Veitch. The flowers, of a rich purple colour, are 
borne in many-flowered cymes in the axils of the uppermost leaves, and 
produced continuously during the autumn months. 

EEANTHEMUM SANGUINOLENTUM, Hort. Veitch. 

Fl. des Serres, 1862-1865, torn. xiv. p. 167. 

An Acanthaceous plant from Madagascar, with opposite leaves 
beautifully marked along the midrib and veins with bright carmine on an 
emerald-green ground. 

EEANTHEMUM TUBEECULATUM, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5405. 

This very floriferous species, raised from seed sent by Sir Daniel 
Cooper, flowered for the first time in June 1863. 

259 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

EBYTHEINA INDICA, Lam., var. MAEMOEATA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 12, with fig. 

A beautiful stove shrub with variegated leaves, found in several of the 
South Sea Islands. 

The leaves, broader than the variety commonly cultivated, are effectively 
variegated with white and blotched with orange-yellow. 

EUPHOEPIA PULCHEEEIMA, Willd., var. PLENISSIMA. 

Syria. Poinsettia pulcherrima, var. plenissima, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1876, vol. v. p. 16, with fig. ; The Garden, 1876, vol. ix. p. 288, pi. xiii. ; 
Fl. Mag. 1876, pi. 200 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 1, with figs. 

The discovery of this remarkable plant is due to Herr Benedict Eoezl, 
who met with it in an Indian village in Mexico. 

It differs from the ordinary Poinsettia in having branched inflorescences, 
so called " double," and as a consequence produces two or three times as 
many brilliantly coloured bracts as does the type. 

The plant, distributed for the first time in 1876, proved of difficult 
culture, and is now lost to cultivation. 

EUEYGANIA OVATA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6393. 

A very beautiful evergreen greenhouse shrub, allied to Thibaudia, with 
brilliant glossy green leaves relieved by bright red petioles. 

A native of the Andes of Peru, it was introduced to England through 
William Lobb. 

FICUS PAECELLI, Hort. Veitch. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 17, figs. pp. 8 and 9. 

A handsome stove plant received through Messrs. Baptist & Sons, of 
Sydney, whose collector Mr. Parcell discovered it in the South Sea 
Islands. 

The leaves are handsome, as large as those of Ficus elastica, but thinner 
in texture, and profusely blotched with irregular patches of cream- white 
on a green ground ; it is still in use as a stove decorative plant. 

FUCHSIA DEPENDENS, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1847, p. 734 (Notice of Exhibit of New Plants) ; Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 65. 

A beautiful species from Quito, in which locality it had previously been 
met with by Dr. Jamieson, from whose dried specimens the figure in 
Hooker's Icones was prepared. This Fuchsia first flowered and was 
exhibited at Exeter in 1847. 

260 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

The drooping tubular flowers, 2 to 3 in. long, are soft rosy scarlet, 
the petals of a deeper shade. It is now seldom met with outside 
Botanical Gardens. 

FUCHSIA x DOMINIANA. 

The Florist, 1855, pi. 96; Fl. des Serres, 1854-1855, torn. x. pi. 1004. 

Eaised by John Dominy in 1852 from seed obtained by crossing the 
two fine species Fuchsia spectabilis and F. serratifolia multiflora. 

The flower tube is some 2 in. in length, coloured bright scarlet; the 
spreading calyx lobes of a pinkish colour on the inner surface. 

FUCHSIA MACBANTHA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4233 ; Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 238 (Report of Exhibition) ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 
vol. xiii. p. 97 ; Fl. des Serres, 1846, pi. xix. 

This handsome species was first discovered by Mr. Mathews climbing 
on trees in lofty mountains at Andinamarca, Peru, and he sent home 
Herbarium specimens, and later detected by William Lobb, in woods 
near Chasula, Columbia, at an altitude of 5,000 ft. 

Plants, flowered at Exeter for the first time in 1846, were exhibited 
at the Horticultural Society's rooms in April of that year. 

The flowers are without petals, but the long tubular calyx is brightly 
coloured rose-red, changing to cream-white at the apices of the four-cleft 
limb. 

FUCHSIA SEKRATIFOLIA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4174 ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1845, t. 41 ; Fl. des Serres, 1849, p. 447 ; The 
Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 70. 

This species, one of the handsomest for greenhouse culture, raised 
from seed collected in moist shady situations at Mufia in Peru by 
William Lobb, flowered for the first time in April 1845. 

The young deep red shoots and large flowers, 2 to 3 in. long, single 
on long stalks from the axils of the leaves, are most striking, and when 
first exhibited before the Horticultural Society was awarded a Silver-gilt 
Medal as a plant of exceptional merit. 

FUCHSIA SIMPLICICAULIS, Ruiz & Pw. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5096 ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 70 j Fl. des Serres, 1858, torn. iii. p. 179. 

Introduced from Peru through William Lobb, and flowered for the first 
time at Chelsea in 1858. 

The calyx tube, sepals, and petals, are brilliant red in colour, the 
showy blooms in dense drooping clusters at the termination of the 
branches. 

261 s 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

FUCHSIA SPECTABILIS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4375 : Gard. Chron. 1848, pp. 238, 270, and 319, with fig. ; Paxt. Mag. 
Bot. vol. xvi. p. 225 ; Fl. des Serres, 1848, pp. 359-360. 

A truly beautiful species introduced from the Andes of Cuenca, Peru, 
through William Lobb, who described it in his letters as the " loveliest 
of the lovely, found in shady woods and growing from 2 to 4 ft. high." 

It flowered for the first time at Exeter, was exhibited before the 
Horticultural Society in their rooms in Eegent Street on April 18th, 1848, 
and awarded the large Silver Medal of the Society. 

The plant forms a shrub of moderate size, with young wood of a 
blood-red colour, glabrous and shining ; the large rich velvety green 
leaves are rich purple on the under surface, and the bright red flowers, 
4 in. in length, have petals of a deeper tint. Dr. Lindley describes 
it as a magnificent thing : the " Queen of Fuchsias." 

GAEDENIA FLORIDA, L., var. RADICANS FOLIIS VARIEGATA. 

Syiis. 0. radicans, Thunb., foliis variegata. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 

A beautiful form of this well-known plant with leaves effectively 
variegated ; from Japan through the late John Gould Veitch. 

GESNERA DONKLARII, Hort. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5070. 

Figured in the Botanical Magazine from a specimen which flowered 
in 1858, and a native of Columbia, a region rich in species belonging to 
this genus. The leaves, large and cordate, rich green above and velvety, 
have a purple under surface ; the tubular, drooping flowers dull red in 
colour, a yellow bronze throat. 

GESNERA POLYANTHA, DC. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3995. 

Plants raised from seed sent from the Organ Mountains of Brazil by 
William Lobb, produced their rich and copiously flowered panicles for the 
first time in August 1842 : now lost to cultivation. 

GLOBBA ALBO-SANGUINEA, N. E. Brown. 

Syns. G. atrosanguinea, Teijsm. & Binn. ; G. coccinea, Hort. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6626 ; Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; 
N. B. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 71 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, 
p. 10, fig. ; The Garden, 1882, vol. xxi. p. 361, fig. ; Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 89. 

A stove plant of the Ginger family (Zingerberaceae), found by Curtis 
in Borneo. 

262 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

The plant has slender erect or gracefully arched stems with deep 
glossy green leaves terminated by a dense inflorescence. The flowers, 
of peculiar structure, are pale yellow in colour with bright scarlet 
bracts. 



GLOXINEEA BEILLIANT. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xvii. p. 145, fig. 22. 

A bigeneric hybrid raised at Chelsea by the foreman West, by crossing 
a florist's variety of Gloxinia, Kadiance with the pollen of Gesnera 
pyramidalis. 

The brilliant scarlet flowers, tinged with magenta in the shadows, are 
of intermediate character, and the foliage follows more the Gloxinia than 
the Gesnera type. 

GLOXINIA SPECIOSA, Lodd., var. MACEOPHYLLA VAEIEGATA. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3934. 

This, the finest variety of Gloxinia known at the time of its intro- 
duction, has rich purple drooping flowers and large green leaves 
variegated along the veins with greenish-white. 

Eaised from seed sent by William Lobb from the Organ Mountains of 
Brazil, the first of the Veitchian introductions to be figured in 1842 in 
Curtis's Botanical Magazine. 

GEAVESIA GUTTATA, Triana. 
Syns. Bertolonia gutiata, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5524 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1866, p. 2, fig. 7 on col. pi. ; Fl. Mag. 1867, 

t. 347. 

A variegated-leaved stove plant received from Madagascar, though the 
habitat is probably Brazil. 

The dark olive-green leaves, splashed at regular intervals with bright 
rose spots, offer a charming contrast. 

HEBECLADUS BIFLOEUS, Miers. 

Syns. Atropa biflora, Ruiz & Pav. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4192 ; Fl. des Serres, 1846, pi. iv. 

A native of the Andes of Peru, about Tarma, and Canta Cullnay, where 
it was collected by Euiz and Pavon, and by Mathews, but it was not 
introduced till William Lobb sent specimens in a living state to Exeter, 
where it flowered in 1845. 

263 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

HEDYSCEPE CANTEEBUEYANA, W. & D. 

Syns. Veitchia canterburyana, Wend. ; Kentia canterburyana, Sec. 
Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 327, fig. 116 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1872, p. 10, fig. 

A useful Palm for decorative purposes, of robust constitution and dwarf 
habit, introduced by the Veitchian firm from Lord Howe's Island. 

HELICONIA AUEEO-STEIATA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 37. 

A handsome foliage plant, with Canna-like leaves, and midrib and veins 
of a light golden-yellow, from the South Sea Islands through Charles 
Moore, -Esq., late of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, N.S.W. 

HEMICH^NA FEUTICOSA, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6164. 

A rock plant with handsome yellow Mimulus-like flowers, sent from 
Costa Eica by Endres, and first flowered in 1873 ; not hardy in the 
British Isles. 

HETEEOTEICHUM MACEODON, Planch. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4421. 

A remarkable and very handsome Melastromaceous plant, with beautiful 
velvety green leaves and pure white flowers in terminal corymbs, raised 
from seed sent by William Lobb from New Grenada. 

HIBISCUS EOSA-SINENSIS, L., var. COOPEEI. 

Syns. H. Cooperi, Hort. 
Fl. des Serres, 1862-1865, t. xiv. p. 109. 

Sent by Sir Daniel Cooper from Australia. The leaves, beautifully 
variegated, have irregular blotches of white, rose-carmine, and greenish- 
white, on a dark green ground. 

HIBISCUS SCHIZOPETALUS, Hook. f. 

Syns. H. rosa-sinensis, var. schizopetalus, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 272, fig. 45 ; Boulger in Gard. Chrou. 1879, 
vol. xii. p. 372; Bot. Mag. t. 6524; Veitchs 1 Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 14, with fig. 

This singular and beautiful plant discovered by Dr. Kirk, H.B.M. 
Consul at Zanzibar, who found it at Mombasa and in various other 
localities in East Tropical Africa, and sent seeds to Kew. 

It grows both in dry rocky slopes, damp mountain glades, and in 
dense shade, with Bignonias, Balsams, and Ferns. 

264 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Plants brought to us from Eastern Africa by the Eev. J. A. Lamb, of 
the Church Missionary Society, in 1878, attracted much attention from 
the beauty of the flowers and a peculiar drooping elongated structure and 
curiously laciniated petals. 

HINDSIA LONGIFLOEA, Benth. 

Syns. Rondeletia longiflora, Cham. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. ix. p. 217; Bot. Mag. t. 3977; Lindl. Bot. Eeg. 1843, pi. 42; 

id. 1844, t. 40. 

A beautiful stove plant, with long salver-shaped bright blue flowers in 
dense terminal corymbs, from the Organ Mountains of Brazil, flowered 
for the first time at the Mount Eadford Nursery, near Exeter, in August 
1842. 

HINDSIA VIOLACEA, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4135; Lindl. Bot. Eeg. 1844, t. 40 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xi. p. 198 ; Fl. des 

Serres, torn. i. p. 19. 

A species somewhat resembling Hindsia longiflora, with large flowers 
of a violet-blue colour. 

Imported from the Organ Mountains of Brazil, through William Lobb, 
it was exhibited in flower for the first time in May 1843, on which 
occasion the Horticultural Society awarded a large Silver Medal. 

HOYA BELLA, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4402 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1848, vol. xv. p. 243 ; Fl. des Serres, 1848, p. 399. 

This plant, a native of the Talung Kola Mountain, Moulmein, found by 
Thomas Lobb, is described in the Botanical Magazine as " The most 
lovely of all the Hoyas, resembling an amethyst set in silver." It was 
exhibited for the first time in June 1848. 

HOYA CINNAMOMIFOLIA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4347 ; Fl. des Serres, 1848, p. 310. 

A handsome stove climber, from Java through Thomas Lobb, flowered 
for the first time in July 1847. 

The flowers in a globular head are effective, a strong contrast to the 
deep purple blood-colour of the staminal crown and the pale yellow-green 
of the corolla. 

HOYA COEIACEA, Blume. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4518 ; Fl. des Serres, 1850, torn. vi. p. 143. 

Discovered by Dr. Blume in mountain woods on the western side of 
Java, and detected in the same island by Thomas Lobb on Mount Salak, 
who transmitted living plants to Exeter : first bloomed in 1849. 

265 



HORTUS VETTCHII 

This twining stove plant has thick, almost fleshy, leaves, and dense 
umbels of honey-yellow flowers. 

HOYA COEONAEIA, Blume. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4969. 

Blume was apparently the first to discover this Hoya in the moist woods 
and shady banks of Western Java, though it was sent to this country by 
Thomas Lobb, and produced pale sulphur-yellow flowers for the first time 
in November 1856. 

HOYA FEATEENA, Blume. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4684 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. viii. p. 179. 

A fine stove climber, discovered by Blume in Java, and later in the 
same locality by Thomas Lobb, through whom it was introduced. 

The honey-yellow or buff-coloured flowers opened for the first time at 
Exeter during the summer of 1851. 

HOYA LINEAEIS, Wall 

Bot. Mag. t. 6682. 

A curious species, with hairy linear leaves and corymbs of creamy 
white flowers, first flowered at Chelsea in April 1883. 

HOYA PUEPUEEO-FUSCA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4520 ; Fl. des Serres, 1850, p. 143. 

Introduced through Lobb, who describes it as a handsome climber 
common to the woods at Panarang, this denizen of the stoves, with ovate 
leaves and umbels of peculiar brownish-purple blossoms, flowered in 
September 1849. 

HYPOCYETA PULCHEA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 244; Bot. Mag. t. 7468. 

A pretty little stove Gesneraceous plant, detected in New Grenada by 
David Burke, through whom the introduction was made. The flowers, 
singly in the axils of the uppermost leaves, are about 1 in. in length, 
hairy, of a bright orange colour. 

HYPOCYETA STEIGILLOSA, Mart. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4047. 

A Gesneraceous plant with bright scarlet and yellow flowers in the 
axils of the leaves ; the remarkable tubular corolla with an inflation on 
the underside resembling the breast of a " pouter " pigeon. 

266 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Grown from seed sent from the Organ Mountains of Brazil by William 
Lobb, and first flowered in May 1843. 

HYPOESTES AEISTATA, Soland. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6224. 

A native of Extra-tropical South Africa, detected by Forbes when 
travelling for the Horticultural Society in 1822, though flowered with us 
for the first time in February 1874. The flowers, freely produced, have 
a rose-purple outside, and the inside striped with white they are 
showy. 

HYPOESTES SANGUINOLENTA, Hort. ex Veitch. 

Syns. Eranthemum sanguinolentum, Van Houtte. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5511. 

A pretty little Acanthaceous plant, conspicuous for the broad pale-purple 
bands that mark each vein : a native of Madagascar. 

IMPATIENS JEKDONLSJ, Wight. 

The Florist, 1854, n.s. vol. iv. pi. 82 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4739. 

Sent from the Neilgherry Hills, British India, by Mr. Mclvor in 1852, 
and also about the same time to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew. 

This Balsam has flowers of singular shape and strikingly-contrasted 
colours brilliant red, bright yellow, and green. 

A flowering plant, exhibited for the first time at the Horticultural 
Society's rooms in Eegent Street on October 18th 1853, was honoured 
with a Knightian medal " in testimony of its singular beauty and use- 
fulness." 

IMPATIENS MIEABILIS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7195. 

Sent to us by Curtis, by whom it was discovered in Langkawi Island, 
off the east coast of Sumatra. In Curtis's Botanical Magazine Sir Joseph 
Hooker writes as follows : 

" It would be difficult to conceive a wider departure from the habit of 
its genus than this remarkable plant presents. It is an undoubted species 
of Impatiens, but, whereas the other species of that large genus are weak 
succulent annuals or branched perennials, Impatiens Mirabilis possesses 
an erect naked trunk that attains a height of 4 ft. in its native country 
and the thickness of a man's leg crowned with a tuft of many leaves, from 
the axils of which spring erect racemes of golden flowers, larger by far 
than in most of the genus known to me, but slightly uncouth in form." 

267 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ISOLOMA HYPOCYETIFLOEUM, Benth. & Hook. f. 

Syns. Gloxinia hypocyrtiflorum, Hook. ; Hypocyrta brevicalyx, Hort. Veitch. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5655 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, with fig. 

An interesting Gesneraceous plant, introduced through Eichard Pearce 
from Ecuador, with ornamental foliage and attractive flowers. 

In the Botanical Magazine above quoted, Dr. Hooker writes of it as 
follows : " In its habit, fibrous roots, and the presence of propagula it is 
a Gloxinia ; in the corolla a Hypocyrta ; in the glands a Gesnera ; whilst 
in the small calyx it differs from all these genera." 

The leaves are of a pleasing green with silvery white veins ; the flowers 
scarlet with a yellow gibbous portion. 

IXOEA ACUMINATA, Boxb. 

Gard. Chron. 1857, p. 378 (advt.). 

A handsome species with large pure white trusses, introduced from 
India through Thomas Lobb. 

IXOEA BUEBIDGEI, Hort. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 153 (Eeport of R.H.S. Floral Committee); Veitchs' 

Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 14. 

Sent from Borneo by F. W. Burbidge, and like Ixora salicifolia in habit 
and foliage. It differs from that species in having inflorescenses axillary 
in the uppermost leaves, as well as terminal, and the flowers bright 
orange-scarlet in dense trusses. 

IXOEA FLOEIBUNDA, Griseb. 

Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 315 (advt.). 

A very neat and compact-growing species with bright reddish-scarlet 
flowers, abundantly produced in large trusses, from Java through Thomas 
Lobb. 

IXOEA FULGENS, Eoxb. 

Syns. I. salicifolia, DC. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4523. 

A scarlet-flowered species with narrow leaves, a native of Java, in which 
island it was first found by Blume, and later introduced to cultivation 
through Thomas Lobb from Mount Seribu : exhibited for the first time in 
July 1850. 

IXOEA LOBBII, London. 

Gard. Chron. 1853, p. 497 (advt.) ; London's Ency. PI. supp. ii. 1853. 
A stove species with bright orange-scarlet flowers discovered in the 

268 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Seribu Mountains, Java, by Thomas Lobb, through whom it was intro- 
duced. 

Apparently but a short time in cultivation, it is now not to be found 
in any garden collection. 

IXOEA MACEOTHYESA, Teijsm. & Binn. 

Syns. I. Duffii, T. Moore. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6853 ; Fl. and Pom. 1878, p. 76, with fig. 

Discovered by Mr. Duff of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, in Ualan or 
Strong Island, one of the Caroline group in the Pacific ; the plant pro- 
duces a large truss of pure bright scarlet flowers, and is one of the most 
imposing of all cultivated species of this genus. 

Specimens from the Sydney Botanic Gardens first flowered in England 
in 1878. 

IXOEA SALICIFOLIA, Blume -, var. VAEIEGATA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 71. 

This variety, with a feathered silvery grey band down the centre of 
the leaf, was found on the island of Sumatra by Curtis, through whom it 
was introduced. 

The type is widely spread among the islands of the Malay Archipelago, 
but the variety appears to be restricted to the one on which Curtis 
made the fortunate discovery. 

IXOEA x WESTII. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 281 (Report of International Hort. Show at Manchester); 
The Garden, 1892, vol. xlii. p. 496, pi. 886 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 18. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by West from Ixora odorata, a white flowered 
species from Madagascar, and I. amboinensis, one with rich vermilion- 
scarlet blooms. 

The combination of white and scarlet has resulted in flowers of a 
rich rose-pink, a character peculiar to I. Westii ; the noble size of the 
flower trusses and their distinct and novel appearance make this hybrid 
an important gain. 

JASMINUM GEACILLIMUM, Hook. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 9, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6559 ; The Garden, 1881, vol. xix. 
p. 628, pi. 279 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 8, fig. ; Fl. and Pom. 1881, p. 23, fig. 

A charming white flowered stove species introduced from Borneo 
through Burbidge, one of the numerous species found in Eastern Asia 
and its many islands, the type of which, Jasminum pubescens, is a native 
of India and China. J. gracillimum is the most distinct in its graceful 

269 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

habit and in the abundance of large pure white sweet-scented blooms, 
more copiously produced than by any other cultivated species. 

A favourite with the natives of Borneo, it is used as a perfume for the 
hair. Plants cultivated in gardens or in open grassy plots near houses 
are browsed by goats during the dry season and denuded of their leaves 
and young branches. On the return of the wet season the plants break 
into leaf as if by magic, and become fountains of pure white deliciously 
fragrant flower. 

K^EMPFEEIA VITTATA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 264. 

A distinct species discovered at Loboe, in Sumatra, by Curtis, through 
whom it was introduced. 

The flowers insignificant, but foliage attractive, much resembling that 
of some species of Calathea. 

LAPAGEEIA EOSEA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4447 ; PI. des Serres, 1849, p. 491 ; The Garden, 1878, vol. xiv. p. 376, 
pi. cli. ; id. 1896, vol. xlix. p. 174, pi. 1056 ; Flora and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 221. 

This beautiful greenhouse climber, commonly known as the Chilian 
Bell-flower, from the bell-like appearance of the pendant blooms, was first 
introduced by Mr. Eichard Wheelwright, who sent a plant to the Eoyal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1847. 

In the following year plants were received at Exeter from William 
Lobb, then collecting in Chili, and a coloured drawing of the flower, 
from a plant in its native habitat. From this drawing the coloured plate 
in the Botanical Magazine was prepared, and when the plants flowered 
later, the colouring was found to be unusually faithful. 

LAPAGEEIA EOSEA, Ruiz & Pav., var. ALBIFLOEA, Hook. 

Syns. L. alba, Decn. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4892; 1'Illus. Hort. 1864, t. 406; PI. Mag. t. 199; The Garden, 1878, 
vol. xiv. p. 376, pi. cli. ; id. 1896, vol. xlix. p. 174, pi. 1056; Flora and Sylva, 
vol. ii. p. 221, fig. 

This charming companion to the rose-coloured type flowered for the 
first time in Europe in the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, in 1855, a living 
plant having been sent from Chili by M. Abadi. 

In 1860 Eichard Pearce sent home seed and living specimens from 
Chili, where the plant is rare, and from this source a stock raised was 
afterwards distributed. 

It flowered with Messrs. Veitch for the first time in 1862, and 
was exhibited with Lilium auratum, at that time rare, before the Eoyal 
Horticultural Society on July 2nd of that year. 

270 




LAPAGERIA ROSEA 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

LATUA VENENOSA, Philippi. 

Syns. Lycioplesium pubiflorum, Griseb. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5373 ; Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 388, fig. 

An extremely handsome half-hardy Solanaceous shrub sent from 
Valdivia, South Chili, by Eichard Pearce ; William Lobb had procured 
specimens in the island of Chiloe in 1848, but failed to introduce to 
cultivation. 

The habit of the shrub is like that of Oestrum (Habrothamnus), the 
shape of the flowers resembles that of Oestrum fasciculatus, though they 
are larger. 

According to Dr. Philippi the inhabitants of Chili and Chiloe regard this 
plant with superstition : it is to them the Latue, Palo-mato, and Palo de 
los bruyos, or the tree of the magician. 

LEEA AMABILIS, Mast. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 11, with fig. ; Jour, of Hort. April 6th, 1882 ; Gard. Chron. 
1882, vol. xvii. p. 493, with fig. ; The Garden, 1882, vol. xxi. p. 352, with fig. ; 
Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 75. 

A handsome stove foliage plant, collected in Borneo by Curtis. 

When the leaflets first expand they are a bright crimson tinged with a 
rich shade of brown, a central midrib of pale rose ; when mature they 
assume a dark bronzy-green, and a broad silvery white band develops on 
either side of the central midrib, from which short branches are given off 
at each nerve ; the under surface claret-red. 

LESCHENAULTIA BILOBA, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1842, p. 95 ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1842, p. 2 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. viii. p. 151 ; 
The Garden, 1884, vol. xxvi. pi. 460. 

This beautiful blue-flowered Australian plant of difficult culture, now 
rarely met with, enjoyed a high degree of popularity at the time " hard- 
wooded " plants were more generally cultivated : it first flowered at 
Exeter, and when exhibited before the Eoyal Horticultural Society 
obtained a large Silver Medal. 

LHOTSKYA EEICOIDES, Schauer. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7753. 

A small-growing, hard-wooded greenhouse shrub with white flowers, 
of the Myrtle family, having the general appearance of an Erica, and 
now quite lost to cultivation. 

Eaised from seed collected in Western Australia by James H. Veitch, 
it first flowered at Kew in June 1900. 

271 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

LICUALA VEITCHII, Watson. 

Syns. Pritchardia grandis, Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 54; Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 139; Bot. Mag. 

t. 7053. 

A beautiful Palm with a short stem and spreading, rounded, much- 
plaited bright green leaves with short petioles, forming a compact crown. 

The species, unfortunately distributed as Pritchardia grandis, under 
the erroneous impression that it was that much-sought-for Palm, was on 
flowering found to be of the genus Licuala. Difficult to cultivate, few, if 
any, now exist in collections. 

Curtis discovered Licuala Veitchii in Sarawak, North Borneo, and made 
a successful introduction. 

LOMATIA FEEEUGINEA, E. Br. 

Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 355 (advt.). 

A fine evergreen shrub with cut foliage covered by rusty tomentum, 
usually cultivated as a cool greenhouse or conservatory plant, though 
in favoured localities in this country plants have attained considerable 
dimensions in the open air. 

It was introduced from Chiloe and Patagonia through William Lobb in 
1851, and is still grown. 

MACLEANIA PUNCTATA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4426. 

Sent from the Andes of El Ecuador by William Lobb, and first flowered 
at Exeter in November 1848. 

A greenhouse shrub of the Vaccinium family, with neat evergreen 
leaves punctuated with dots, bearing numerous bright scarlet tubular 
flowers tipped with white. 

M AN DE VILLA HISPID A, Hemsl. 

Syns. Echites hirsuta, Ruiz & Pav. 
Bot. Mag. t. 3997. 

A stove climber with delicate pale yellow and rose-coloured flowers, 
from the Organ Mountains of Brazil through Thomas Lobb in 1842, and 
flowered for the first time at Exeter in September 1843. 

MANETTIA BICOLOE, Paxt. 

Syns. M. luteo-rubra, Benth. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. 1843, vol. x. p. 27 ; Fl. des Serres, vol. ii. p. 445, t. 6; The Garden, 
1899, vol. Ivi. p. 6, pi. 1229; Bot. Mag. t. 7776. 

This charming little trailing plant, well known in our stoves, is seldom 

272 



out of flower, and the brilliant vermilion-scarlet and yellow blossoms 
are always appreciated. 

It was introduced to Exeter through William Lobb from the Organ 
Mountains of Brazil. 

MANETTIA MICANS, Pcepp. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5495. 

Originally discovered by Poeppig in Peru, and afterwards by McLean, 
Mathews, and others. This plant was not introduced until Pearce met 
with it near Mufia, at an elevation of from 3,000-4,000 ft., and sent home 
seed, from which plants were raised and flowered for the first time in 
December 1864. 

MAEANTA STEIATA, Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 671 (advt.) ; Nich. Diet. Gard. ii. p. 327. 

A charming little plant from the Philippine Islands due to the late 
John Gould Veitch : the leaves, of a bright green ground colour, are 
profusely marked with streakings of pale yellow. 

MAEIANTHUS DEUMMONDIANUS, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5521. 

A West Australian climber, producing pretty pale blue flowers, first 
opened in May 1865, from which the figure in the Botanical Magazine 
was prepared. 

MEDINILLA CUMINGII, Naud. 

Syns. if. speciosa, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1847, p. 485 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4321, as M. speciosa. 
First discovered by Mr. Cuming in the Philippine Islands and later 
introduced to cultivation through Thomas Lobb, when, as the handsomest 
species then known, it attracted much attention at the Chiswick Horti- 
cultural Fete held in July 1847. 

The plant bears delicate rose-coloured flowers in large, drooping panicles, 
with handsome dark green ample leaves, in opposite pairs. 

MEDINILLA CUETISII, Hook. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 621, fig. 108; Bot. Mag. t. 6730; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

1884, p. 9, fig. 

A native of the western coast of Sumatra, discovered by Curtis when 
collecting in that region. Though not so striking a plant as Medinilla 
ainabilis or M. magnifica, it is worthy of a place in any stove. The graceful 
habit, ivory-white flowers, purple anthers and coral-red flower-stalks are 
of a distinct order. 

273 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

MEDINILLA MAGNIFICA, Lindl. 

Syns. M. Iracteata, Hort. Veitch (now Blume). 
Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. i. 1. 12 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4533 ; PI. des Serres, 1850-1851, t. 572. 

A magnificent species, first found in Manila by Thomas Lobb, who 
sent plants, first flowered in April 1850. 

Numerous heads are produced in a dense drooping panicle 1| ft. long, 
and their value is greatly enhanced by the addition of large delicately 
coloured bracts; at its best, perhaps, before the full perfection of the 
flowers, when the large imbricated bracts separate and allow the buds to 
be partially seen. As the expansion of the blossoms advances the upper 
bracts fall, but the lower ones remain and reflex. It has proved to be one 
of the most showy ornamental stove plants ever imported, and is still 
largely grown. 

MICONIA HOOKEBIANA, Triana. 

Syns. M. pulverulenta, Hook. 
Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 693 (advt.) ; Bot. Mag. t. 5411. 

Introduced through Eichard Pearce from Peru in 1862, this plant 
attains a height of from 3 to 4 ft., is furnished with elliptic rugose dark 
green leaves 12 to 15 in. long, marked by a broad central silvery bar. The 
flowers, white, are followed by bunches of red berries. 

MITEAEIA COCCINEA, Cav. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 350 (Keport of Exhibit of New Plants) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4462 ; Paxt. 
Mag. Bot. vol. xv. p. 148; Fl. des Serres, 1848, p. 385; The Garden, 1883, 
vol. xxiv. p. 17, with fig. 

An interesting greenhouse shrub, remarkable as monotypic and as 
confined to a group of islands off the coast of Chili, of which Chiloe is 
the principal ; introduced through William Lobb, and shown for the first 
time at an exhibition held by the Horticultural Society in May 1848. The 
plant, with neat evergreen foliage, tubular brilliant scarlet flowers with 
yellow base depending from drooping tubercled peduncles, is attractive, 
but does not thrive in this country the perennial mists of Chiloe are 
essential to its existence. 

MONOPYLE EACEMOSA, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6233. 

A handsome Gesneraceous plant with terminal racemes of pure white 
flpwers, the first species of the genus cultivated in this country ; raised 
from seed from New Grenada, and flowered for the first time in July 
1875. 

274 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

MUSA BASJOO, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Syns. N . japonica, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7182 ; Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxviii. p. 456. 

Introduced through Charles Maries from Japan, where it is cultivated 
for fibre, as is Musa textilis in the Philippines. This plant is hardy 
in favoured localities, with slight protection from mats or netting in 
severe winters. 

MUTISIA DECUEEENS, Cav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5273 ; The Garden, 1876, vol. x. p. 134; col. pi. ; id. 1883, vol. xxiv. p. 552, 
col. pi. ; Fl. des Serres, 1877, p. 101. 

A thinly branched greenhouse climber, with narrow undivided leaves 
remarkable for a blade running down the stem in the form of a wing. 
The flower-heads, deep orange or almost vermilion in colour and from 4 to 
5 in. in diameter, resemble a single dahlia in appearance. 

Introduced from the Chilian Andes through Eichard Pearce, and first 
flowered in 1861, but now rarely met with, as the necessary climatic 
requirements are difficult to reproduce. 

MYEMECODIA BECCAEII, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6883. 

Imported from the Gulf of Carpentaria in 1884, Sir Joseph Hooker 
states : " This plant is one of the most singular ever imported in a living 
state to this country, and it belongs to a genus, or rather to one of a group 
of genera, of epiphytic Eubiaceae, which have been long known from their 
singular habit of forming often spinous toothed tubers of great size, the 
interior of which is galleried by ants of various species, and of which insects 
these are the native homes." 

Named after Dr. Beccari, the eminent botanist and traveller, and 
the author of a work the bulk of which is devoted to the four Eubiaceous 
genera, Myrmecodia, Hydnophytum, Myrmephytum, and Myrmedoma, 
under which their botany and the economy of their growth, and the 
insects they harbour, are described with a fulness and ability that are 
quite admirable. 

OPLISMENUS BUEMANNII, Beauv., var. VAEIEGATA. 

Syns. Panicum va/riegatum, Hort. 
Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 458, Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig. ; Fl. des Serres, t. 1715. 

A prettily variegated grass, common in glass-houses, introduced from 
New Caledonia through the late John Gould Veitch, and exhibited for 
the first time in April 1867. 

275 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

OETHOSIPHON STAMINBUS, Benth. 

Gard. Chrou. 1869, p. 941 fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5833 ; Fl. Mag. 1871, p. 546 ; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 15 ; also col. pi. fig. 10. 

A remarkable plant with an inflorescence more resembling a Clerodendron 
than that of the Labiate family, to which it belongs. 

From Assam and Burma to the Philippine Islands it is widely distributed, 
and from the Nicobars and Siam to Java, Borneo, and Cape York in North- 
East Australia. The late John Gould Veitch sent it from the last- 
named locality to Chelsea, where it flowered for the first time in July 
1869. 

OSBECKIA EUBICUNDA, Arnott. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 562 ; Hooker's Companion to Bot. Mag. vol. ii. p. 309. 

A handsome Melastomaceous undershrub, native of Ceylon, recalling in 
appearance a species of Pleroma, but with stamens equal. The peculiar 
calycine scales, with the purple flowers and yellow anthers, give a very 
rich appearance. 



OUVIEANDEA FENESTEALIS, Poiret. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4894; Fl. des Serres, 1856, torn. i. 2nd ser. p. 65. 

This very remarkable aquatic, known as the " Lattice-leaf Plant," was 
discovered by Aubert du Petit-Thouars, in Madagascar, and described 
by him in a work on the plants of that island. 

For its introduction to this country we are indebted to the Eev. William 
Ellis, who was living in Madagascar in 1855, and brought home plants in 
a satisfactory state. 

Specimens were presented to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, to various 
other botanical establishments in this and other countries, and the 
remainder placed in Messrs. Veitchs' hands for propagation. For a long 
time after its introduction Ouvirandra fenestralis was a source of great 
interest, and plants found their way all through the principal gardens, but 
good specimens are now rare; they are in excellent condition in the 
Chatsworth gardens. 

PALICOUEEA NICOTIAN^EFOLIA, Cham. & Schlecht. 

Syns. P. discolor, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1867, p. 7 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7001. 

A stove plant with variegated foliage sent from Peru by Eichard Pearce. 
The leaves are 5 to 9 in. long and 2 to 3 in. broad, bright green above 
with yellow midrib and veins ; the under surface is yellow-green. 

276 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

PALISOTA BICOLOE, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 527. 

This stove species, closely allied to Palisota Barteri, imported from 
Fernando Po, West Africa, has very ornamental foliage. 

PANAX FKUTICOSUM, Linn., var. LACINIATUM. 

Syns. P. laciniatum, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 24, fig. p. 15. 

A stove plant with a fern-like aspect, the leaves cut in fine segments 
of variable shape and size. 

A native of the South Sea Islands, sent to us by Mr. A. H. C. Macafee, 
of Sydney, N.S.W. 

PANDANUS BAPTISTI, Hort. Veitch. 

L' Horticulture Beige, 1893, p. 166, fig. 35. 

Introduced from the Botanic Garden, at Sydney, N.S.W. 

The plant has long, gracefully disposed, linear leaves, effectively marked 
with white or cream colour on a green ground ; an absence of spines 
an additional recommendation. 

PANDANUS PACIFICUS, Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 664 (Report of Show) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1893, p. 11. 

A species introduced from the Pacific Islands through Charles Moore, 
Esq., late of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, N.S.W., with bright glossy 
green leaves 15 to 20 in. in length, fringed with short spines along 
both margins. 

PANDANUS VEITCHII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 11, fig., also col. pi. ; Regel's Gartenflora, 1872, p. 310; 
Fl. and Pom. 1871, p. 177, fig. 

The well-known stove plant with sword-shaped leaves, 2 to 4 ft. in length, 
with serrated edges, pale green in the centre, margined with clearest bands 
of white. 

Introduced from the South Sea Islands by the late John Gould Veitch, 
and the most popular of all stove plants in all civilized countries. 

PASSIFLOEA ACTINIA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4009; Fl. des Serres, 1846, pi. x. ; Jour. R.H.S. 1872, vol. iv. p. 142; 
Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 15, with fig. 

Seeds of this species, known as "The Sea Anemone Passion-flower," 
were sent from Brazil in 1841, plants raised and flowered for the first time 
at Exeter in 1842. 

277 T 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

From the resemblance the flowers bear to the Sea Anemone, Sir Joseph 
Hooker named the Passion-flower Actinia after a genus of low marine 
animals. 

PASSIFLOEA BILOBATA, Juss. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 420. 

Introduced from Costa Eica, and flowered for the first time in September 
1875 ; belonging to the small section (Cieca) with no petals, it can boast 
but little beauty. 

PASSIFLOEA OEGANENSIS, Gardn., var. MAEMOEATA. 

Gard. Chroii. 1869, p. 1158. 

The form with spotted leaves introduced through Bowman from the 
Organ Mountains, Brazil. 

The flowers small, greenish-white, the coronal threads violet and tipped 
with white ; the leaves green, prettily mottled with cream-white or 
yellow. 

PAULLINIA THALICTEIFOLIA, Juss. 

Hot. Mag. t. 5879 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1872, p. 8, fig. ; The Garden, 1873, vol. iii. 

p. 84, fig. p. 87. 

A native of the Eio de Janeiro province of Brazil, introduced through 
Bowman ; a pretty semi-scandent stove foliage plant with finely divided 
feathery leaves resembling the fronds of some species of Davallia. 

The flowers, greenish and insignificant, were produced for the first 
time in October 1870. 

PENTAPTEEYGIUM EUGOSUM, Hook. 

Syns. Vaccinium rugosum, Hook, and Thorns. MS. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5198 ; Gard. Chron. 1860, p. 384; Fl. des Serres, 1874, p. 131. 

A hard-wooded greenhouse plant introduced through Thomas Lobb from 
the Khasia Hills, where it was originally discovered by Griffiths, and later 
by Drs. Hooker and Thomson. 

The drooping tubular flowers with transverse lines of red on a white 
ground, a peculiarity which gained for the plant the trivial name of " Chinese 
Lantern Flower," were first produced and exhibited as a species of 
Thibaudia, in April 1860, before the Eoyal Horticultural Society. 

PHILAGEEIA VEITCHII, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 358, with fig. 

A more than remarkable bigeneric hybrid raised at Chelsea from 
Lapageria rosea crossed with the pollen of Philesia buxifolia, in habit 

278 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

intermediate between the two parents, though rather more akin to the 
female than to the male. 

In the character of the flower-stalk, calyx, and corolla the plant more 
closely follows Philesia than Lapageria, but in stamens it resembles the 
male parent, and in colour the mother. The few plants still existing 
are sickly subjects Dame Nature will have none of it ! 

The compound name given by Dr. Masters, derived from the two 
generic names of the parents, formed a precedent since followed in 
naming all bigeneric hybrids. 

PHILODENDEON ANDEEANQM, Devans. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1887, p. 11, fig. p. 4. 

A striking stove Aroid, first discovered by M. Andre of Paris, after whom 
it is named, and subsequently introduced direct from New Grenada, the 
native country. 

The large leaves, which resemble those of Anthurium Veitchii, often 
attain a length of from 4 to 5 ft., and are deflected vertically from a stout 
erect foot- stalk. When young they are of a decided scarlet colour tinged 
with brown, when older of a bronzy red-brown before finally changing to 
the bright velvety-green of the mature leaf. The midrib and veins of 
a whitish colour through all stages of development. 

PHOEMIUM TEN AX, L. /., var. VAEIEGATUM. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1870, p. 33. 

A variegated form of the New Zealand Flax sent from New Zealand 
by the late John Gould Veitch. 

The long strap-shaped leaves of a dark green ground colour are 
ornamented with broad stripes of yellow of varying breadth, the whole 
length of the leaf. 

The plant is ornamental for indoor decoration, and a striking object 
when planted out-of-doors during the summer months. 

PHOEMIUM TENAX, L. /., var. VEITCHII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1866, p. 13. 

A handsome form of the New Zealand Flax with shorter narrower leaves 
than the type, effectively variegated along the whole length with broad 
stripes of creamy white on a pea-green ground. 

It was introduced to cultivation through the late John Gould Veitch, 
is a much-valued plant in the class to which it belongs, admirable 
for conservatories or winter-gardens, and a striking subject for sub-tropical 
bedding. 

279 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

PHEYNIUM VAEIEGATUM, N. E. Broivn. 

Syns. Maranta arundinacea, L. , var. variegata. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1887, p. 11, fig. p. 5. 

An elegant stove plant allied to Maranta and Calathea with leaves on 
foot-stalks about 1 ft. high, most effectively variegated with cream-white 
on a green ground. 

PHYLLANTHUS EOSEO-PICTUS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 24, fig. ; PI. and Pom. 1878, p. 13, fig. 

A stove shrubby plant of graceful habit introduced from the South Sea 
Islands. The small rounded alternate leaves on slender branches arch 
gracefully, the variegation is rich, no two blades showing the same 
marking; some are delicate rose colour, some pure white, others a 
mixture of the two on a dark olive-green ground. 

PHYSOSTELMA WALLICHI, Wight. 

Syns. Hoya campanulata, Blurae. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4545 ; Lindl. Bot. Keg. 1847, t. 54 ; PI. des Serves, 1850, p. 283. 

A very remarkable stove plant, native of the copses in the mountainous 
districts of Java, first detected by Blume, and later introduced to cultivation 
through Thomas Lobb. 

It produced a somewhat curious waxy pale buff-coloured flower for the 
first time in this country in October 1846, on which occasion, exhibited 
before the Eoyal Horticultural Society, it was awarded a Silver Banksian 
Medal. 

PINANGA VEITCHII, Wendl. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 16, with fig. ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xvii. p. 435, fig. ; 

PI. des Serres, 1877, p. 93. 

A remarkable distinct Palm distinguished by the unusual colour of the 
foliage, a native of Borneo, sent by F. W. Burbidge. 

The fronds in an early stage are pale green, blotched and stained with 
spots of a deeper shade, the under surface dull crimson, deepening with age 
to a bronzy hue. Of dwarf shrubby habit, shoots from the rhizome rise 
freely in a young state, the chief feature as a decorative plant the foliage 
coloration. 

PIPEE BOENEENSE, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 108. 

A species of Pepper sent from Western Borneo through Curtis, by whom 
it was discovered. The leaves are of a rich dark green with silvery-grey 

280 



stripes between the nerves ; the flowers, as in the majority of this genus, 
inconspicuous. 

PIPEE OENATUM, N. E. Brown. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 13 ; Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 424. 

A stove climbing plant introduced from the island of Celebes in the 
Malay Archipelago through Curtis. 

The leaves are heart-shaped with pale rose foot-stalks and numerous 
rose-coloured spots on a bright glossy green blade. 

PIPER PORPHYROPHYLLUM, N. E. Brown. 

Syns. Cissus porphyrophyllus, Lindl. ; C. cordifolius ? Horfc. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. iii. fig. 189 ; Gard. Chron. I860, p. 482 (Report of Show) ; PI. des 
Serres, 1861, torn. iv. p. 263. 

A handsome stove climber raised from seed sent from India by Thomas 
Lobb as Cissus cordifolius ? and first exhibited before the Royal 
Horticultural Society in May 1860. 

The dark olive-green leaves with salmon-pink spots along the principal 
veins of the upper surface, purple beneath, are very handsome. 

PIPTOSPATHA INSIGNIS, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xi. p. 138, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6598. 

An interesting little Aroid, discovered in Borneo by F. W. Burbidge 
while plant-collecting in that island. 

On this species Mr. N. E. Brown of Kew founded the new genus 
Piptospatha, a small Malayan group of the tribe Philodendrese, closely 
related to Schismatoglottis, from which it however differs in wanting the 
terminal spike of neuter florets so conspicuously terminating the spadix 
in that genus. 

PLUMBAGO ROSEA, Lindl., var. COCCINEA. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5363. 

A handsome variety raised from seed sent by a correspondent in the 
Neilgherries. 

Previously 'cultivated at Kew, but not in commerce, the type species, a 
very old garden plant, was figured in Curtis's Botanical Magazine in the 
year 1794, t. 230. 

The variety coccinea produces panicles of bright brick-red or scarlet 
flowers often more than 2 ft. in length, when well cultivated a very 
striking object. 

281 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

PODOLASIA STIPITATA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 70 ; PI. and Pom. 1882, p. 123. 

A remarkable and interesting Aroid, introduced through Curtis when 
collecting in Borneo. 

On this species Mr. N. E. Brown of Kew founded the genus, which 
previously had received the provisional name of Lasia, to which it is 
closely allied. The leaves are arrow-shaped on prickly petioles ; the 
spathe boat-shaped, open to the base, brownish-red, 3 to 4 in. long. 

POTHOS CELATOCAULIS, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 200; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 23. 

Introduced from Borneo by F. W. Burbidge, this interesting climber, 
flat on any surface it can feel, holds its position by numerous adventitious 
roots ; the leaves are oblique, of a dark velvety green, produced under 
almost all conditions in any stove. 

PEIMULA OBCONICA, Hance. 

Syns. P. poculiformis, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6582 ; The Garden, 1881, vol. xix. p. 655, fig. ; id. 1884, vol. xxvi. p. 206, 
pi. 456, id. 1897, vol. li. p. 316, pi. 1116 ; Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 121, 
fig. 19. 

This pretty greenhouse Primula, now well known, has undergone great 
improvement since first introduced through Charles Maries, who found it 
in the gorges of the Yangtsze, in the Ichang district. Plants flowered at 
Chelsea for the first time in September 1880. 

The colour in the virgin species is an undecided lilac, but many seminal 
forms show a wide range, from a pure white to a deep rosy purple. 

The form of the flower has much changed, is now more circular, and, in 
some forms, the margins are deeply fimbriated. It has, after many un- 
successful attempts, been made to cross with another species of the genus 
Primula megassefolia ; the result first shown at the Temple Show of 
1905. 

PEOUSTIA PYEIFOLIA, Lay. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5489 ; Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 142, fig. 37. 

A woody greenhouse climber, a Composite, with unattractive small 
white flowers and holly-like foliage. As the fruit approaches maturity it 
is a singular object, the pappus of slender rose-purple hairs collectively 
forming a plumose mass of great length and breadth. 

It is a native of Chili, introduced through Eichard Pearce, and flowered 
for the first time at Chelsea in July 1864. 

282 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

PSYCHOTEIA TABACIFOLIA, Muell. 

Syns. Palicourea nicotiansefolia, Cham. & Schlecht ; P. discolor, Hort. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1866, p. 4; Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 432 (advt.) ; Bot. Mag. t. 7001. 

An ornamental-leaved stove plant introduced from Peru through Kichard 
Pearce in 1865, lost to cultivation. 

The figure in the Botanical Magazine, above quoted, was prepared from 
a specimen flowered at Kew, but the details of origin have been lost. 

PTYCHOSPEEMA MACAETHUEII, Wendl. 

Syns. Kentia Macarthurii, Hort. 
Veitchs 5 Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 72, with fig. 

An elegant Palm with sub-erect leaves and graceful semi-pendulous 
leaflets introduced from the neighbourhood of the Katan Eiver, New 
Guinea. 

The stems of the leaves smooth and slender, the leaflets, from 4 to 
8 in. in length and i in. in breadth, are effective. 

EEHMANNIA ANGULATA, Hemsl. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 290, snppl. illus. ; Flora and Sylva, 1904, vol. ii. 
p. 280, col. pi. ; Eev. Hort. 1905, Dec. 16th, col. pi. 

This perennial herbaceous plant, too tender for the open border in the 
winter months, but in summer suitable for German bedding, attains a 
height of 6 ft. A native of Central China, tres repandu, it was first 
detected by Dr. Henry, and afterwards introduced to cultivation through 
Wilson. 

The flowers in shape as a large Mimulus, with a broad spreading lip 
and reflexed standard ; in colour a shade of deep rosy-pink with a cream- 
white throat spotted with purple, flowered for the first time at Coombe 
in May 1902. 

EHODODENDEON BEOOKEANUM, Low. 

Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 404, fig.; Bot. Mag. t. 4935; Fl. des Serres, 1857, torn. ii. p. 111. 

An East Indian species with golden-yellow flowers, from Sarawak, 
Borneo, through Thomas Lobb, named after Sir James Brooke, the 
distinguished Eajah of Sarawak. 

The plant flowered for the first time and was exhibited in July 1855. 

EHODODENDEON BEOOKEANUM, Low, var. FLAVUM. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1872, p. 9, fig. 

A form of Ehododendron Brookeanum with clear yellow flowers and 
thick dark green very glossy leaves, from Borneo. 

283 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

EHODODENDEON BEOOKEANUM, Low, var. GEACILIS. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 12, fig. 

A variety introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb, differing from 
the type in a more slender, graceful habit, and in having larger flowers 
of a pale yellow colour. 

EHODODENDEON JASMINIFLOEUM, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1851, p. 183 (Report of Show) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4524. 

A native of Mount Ophir, Malacca, at elevations of 5,000 ft., sent to 
Exeter by Thomas Lobb in 1848. 

In the Botanical Magazine above quoted, the Editor remarks : "At 
the first, and truly splendid, exhibition of flowers at the Chiswick 
Gardens of the present year (1850), few plants excited greater attention 
among the visitors most distinguished for taste and judgment, than the 
one here figured, from the nursery of Messrs. Veitch of Exeter. Many 
excelled it in splendour, but the delicacy of form and the colour of the 
flowers (white with a deep pink eye), and probably their resemblance to 
the favourite Jessamine (some compared them to the equally favourite 
Stephanotis), attracted general notice. So unlike indeed are they to the 
ordinary form of Ehododendron blossoms that the Gardeners' Chronicle, 
in recounting the prizes of the day, seemed to imply that it was probably 
no Ehododendron at all ! " 

This species has entered largely into the production of the race known as 
the javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids. 

EHODODENDEON JAVANICUM, Benn. 

Gard. Chron. 1847, p. 374 (Notice of Exhibit of New Plants) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4336; Paxt. 

Mag. Bot. vol. xv. p. 217. 

A native of Java, extremely handsome in foliage and in the brilliant 
colouring of the flowers. Introduced through Thomas Lobb from Java, 
an imported plant was exhibited in flower for the first time before the 
Eoyal Horticultural Society in June 1847. 

In reporting the Show, the Gardeners' Chronicle states it " promises 
to be a great acquisition as well on account of its own intrinsic merit as 
for the purposes of hybridization." That the species has justified the 
high opinion held when first exhibited, the race of Greenhouse Ehododen- 
drons, known as javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids, afford to-day ample 
evidence. The history of these hybrids, in the production of which 
Ehododendron javanicum took a large share, is given in a special part 
of this work devoted to the genus Ehododendron. 

BHODODENDEON JAVANICUM, Benn., var. AUEANTIACUM. 

Fl. des Serres, 1850, torn. vi. p. 135. 
Introduced through Thomas Lobb from Java. 

The flowers of the typical species vary considerably in colour, from 
citron to red-orange the colour of this variety is golden-yellow. 

284 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

RHODODENDRON JAVANICUM, Benn., var. FLAVUM. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 303 (Keport of Exhibit of New Plants). 

A form with flowers of a paler yellow colour than the type, introduced 
through Thomas Lobb from Java. 

RHODODENDRON JAVANICUM, Benn., var. TUBIFLORA. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6850. 

A variety differing from Rhododendron javanicum in having much larger 
flowers of a citron-yellow colour, with broad corolla-lobes and a more 
vigorous habit of growth. 

It was sent from Sumatra by Curtis, and flowered for the first time in 
June 1885. 

RHODODENDRON LOBBII, Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 16, fig., also col. pi. ; Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1323 ; 

Fl. Mag. 1861, pi. 10. 

A very distinct species of the East Indian Rhododendrons with bright 
scarlet tubular flowers in trusses of from 8 to 12 blooms. 

Introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb in 1861, it has proved 
useful in the production of that beautiful race of garden forms known as 
the javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids. 

RHODODENDRON MALAYANUM, Jack. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6045. 

Introduced by Thomas Lobb in 1854 from Mount Ophir, it was 
originally discovered by Dr. William Jack, of the East India Company's 
service, on the summit of Gunong Bunko, an insulated mountain in the 
interior of Bencoolen, Sumatra, commonly called by Europeans the Sugar- 
loaf. 

The flowers are small, of a beautiful cerise-crimson colour, and the 
habit of the plant neat and compact. It has been successfully used 
as a parent in the production of the beautiful greenhouse hybrid 
Rhododendrons, and has materially influenced the whole strain. 

RHODODENDRON MOULMEINENSE, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4904. 

A species detected by Lobb at Moulmein, on the Gerai Mountains, at an 
elevation of 5,000 ft., and by him introduced to Chelsea, flowered for 
the first time in January 1856 ; flowers pure white with a tinge of yellow 
in the centre. 

RHODODENDRON MULTICOLOR, Miquel. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6769. 

A small-flowered species with blooms of various colours, native of the 

285 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

island of Sumatra, where first discovered by Curtis, it was through him 
introduced. 

The type species, with bright yellow flowers, bloomed for the first time 
in February 1884. 

EHODODENDEON MULTICOLOE, Miquel, var. CUETISII. 

Syns. R. Curtisii, Hort. 
PI. and Pom. 1883, p. 185; id. 1884, t. 615. 

A variety of Ehododendron multicolor with dark red flowers, first 
produced in November 1883, and sent in 1880 from the island of Sumatra, 
where it had been detected by Curtis on mountains at an elevation of 
some 2,000 ft. 



EHODODENDEON (AZALEA) OLDHAMII, Maximow. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 524. 

Introduced from the island of Formosa through Charles Maries, but 
previously met with by Mr. Oldham, after whom it was named by 
Maximowicz. 

This greenhouse shrub has reddish salmon-coloured flowers, suffused 
rosy lilac on the upper lobe, with numerous small darker blotches. 

EHODODENDEON x PEINCESS ALICE. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 262 (Report of Horticultural Society's Show); PI. Mag. 1865, 

pi. 206. 

A hybrid between the two beautiful Himalayan species, Ehododendron 
Edgeworthii and E. ciliatum. 

In size the flowers of the hybrid nearly equal those of E. Edgeworthii, 
and possess a delicate perfume. They are slightly tinted with rose in the 
bud, but become pure white as they expand. 

EHODODENDEON VEITCHIANUM, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1857, pp. 326, 347 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4992 ; PI. des Serres, 1861, torn. iv. p. 57 ; 

id. 1862, torn. iv. p. 41. 

A beautiful species with large flowers of the purest white, and crinkled 
margins, native of Moulmein, sent by Thomas Lobb, and the finest of the 
genus, exhibited for the first time in flower at a meeting of the Eoyal 
Horticultural Society in London, May 6th, 1857. Succeeding admirably 
in this country, it produces in early spring large white flowers in great 
profusion. Eeproduction is simple, from home-saved seed. 

286 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

EUELLIA PEAECEI, Veitch. 

Syna. Stemonacanthus Pearcei, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5648. 

A native of Bolivia, discovered by Pearce, whose name it bears. 

An erect-growing stove shrub, with lance-shaped leaves 5 to 6 in. 
long, green above, brown-purple below, with a lax inflorescence of scarlet 
tubular flowers. 

SALVIA OPPOSITIFLOEA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. xv. p. 53 ; PI. des Serres, 1848, p. 345. 

A half-hardy sub-shrub with scarlet hairy flowers, discovered by 
Thomas Lobb in exposed situations in Tarma, Peru, and introduced 
by him to cultivation. 

SANCHEZIA LONGIFLOEA, Hook. f. ex Planch. 

Syns. Ancylogyne longiflora, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5588 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, with fig. ; PI. des Serres, 1880-1883, 

torn, xxiii. 257, t. 2460. 

Undoubtedly one of the finest tropical Acanthaceae ever sent to this 
country from Guayaquil through Pearce, by whom it was discovered. 

The flowers in a drooping elongated branched panicle, about 2 in. long, 
of a rich vinous-purple, the corolla tubular, and mouth oblique, the small 
segments of a lighter colour. 

SANCHEZIA NOBILIS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5594 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig. ; The Florist, 1867, p. 154. 

A most beautiful and interesting Acanthaceous plant, discovered by 
Eichard Pearce in Ecuador in 1863, and flowered for the first time in this 
country at Chelsea in June 1866. The flowers are bright yellow, densely 
borne in panicles, the bracts bright red and the branches deep purple. 

A form known as variegata has the midrib and veins of the leaves 
coloured yellow, and is cultivated in quantity. 

SAEMIENTA EEPENS, Ruiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6720; Fl. Mag. 1862, t. 112; PI. des Serres, torn. xvi. t. 1646; Gard. 
Chron. 1901, vol. xxix. p. 303, fig. 

This plant belongs to a monotypic genus, closely allied to another also 
monotypic from Chili, Mitraria coccinea, has larger flowers of a somewhat 
similar form. 

Sarmienta repens inhabits the southern provinces of the main-land from 
Concepcion southwards, and the island of Chiloe, which is the southern 
limit. 

287 



HORTUS VEITCHIT 

It was introduced through Richard Pearce, and thrives in cool, damp 
conservatories among moss, stones and stumps of plants. 

SCHISMATOGLOTTIS CEISPATA, HooJc. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6576 ; Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. iii. fig. 443. 

A variegated -leaved Aroid, through F. W. Burbidge from Borneo, 
flowered for the first time in the Chelsea stoves in January 1881. 

The leaves are dark green above with a broad irregular greyish-green 
band on either side of the midrib. 

SCHISMATOGLOTTIS LAVALLEEI, Linden, var. PURPUREA, 

N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 298. 

A variety differing from the type in the deep vinous-purple colour of its 
petioles, introduced through Curtis, who discovered it in Sumatra. 

SCHISMATOGLOTTIS NEOGUINEENSIS, N. E. Brown. 

Syns. 8. variegata, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 8. 
An ornamental-leaved stove plant of the Aroid family, sent from Borneo 
by Thomas Lobb. 

The leaves resemble those of a Maranta, have a glossy green surface 
along the whole length of which runs a feathery line of silver-white. 

SCINDAPSUS CUSCUARIA, Prestl 

Syns. Aglaonema commutatum, Schott. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 695 (advt.) ; id. 1863, p. 460 (Notice of Exhibit). 
A stove plant belonging to the Aroid family, introduced through the 
late John Gould Veitch from the interior of Luzon, Philippine Islands. 
The plant grows to a height of about 2| ft. and produces large leaves of a 
glossy green colour, effectively ornamented with flakes of creamy white 
and pale green. 

SCINDAPSUS PICTUS, Hassle. 

Syns. Pothos argyreus, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 426 (Report of Show) ; id. p. 603 (advt.) 
A charming little stove plant of the Aroid family, introduced to 
cultivation from Borneo through Thomas Lobb, with ornamental leaves 
rivalling in their markings the Ancectochili. 

SCUTELLARIA FORMOSANA, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 212 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7458. 

A pretty purple-flowered Labiate from the Island of Formosa through 
Mr. Ford, late Curator of the Botanic Gardens, Hong Kong. 

288 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

It succeeds well in a cool greenhouse, producing freely pale violet-blue 
flowers during the early summer months. 

SCUTELLAEIA INCAENATA, Vent. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4268. 

A pretty little greenhouse plant of the same order with sage-like leaves 
and bright purplish rose-coloured flowers, raised from seed gathered on the 
western declivities of the Andes, sent by Professor Jameson. 

It flowered for the first time in July 1846. 

SENECIO K^MPFEEI, DC., var. AEGENTEA. 

Syns. Ligularia Ksempferi, Sieb. & Zuce., var. argentea; Farfugium Kcempferl, Benth. , 

var. argentea. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 694 (advt.). 

An ornamental-leaved herbaceous plant introduced from Japan through 
the late John Gould Veitch. The foliage resembles that of Senecio 
(Farfugium) grande, but the variegation is in flakes and blotches of 
white. 

SINNINGIA CONCINNA, Hook. f. 

Syns. Stenogastra concinna, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 530 (Notice of Exhibit) ; PI. des Serres, 1862-1865, torn. xiv. 
p. 65; Bot. Mag. t. 5253; The Garden, 1897, vol. lii. p. 22, pi. 1126; Gard. 
Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 361, fig. 137. 

A curious and pretty but rather small hothouse herbaceous plant with 
small roundish leaves forming a tuft, from among which spring numerous 
peduncles bearing solitary nodding tubular blossoms. 

Flowered for the first time in April 1861, it was exhibited before the 
Eoyal Horticultural Society in June of that year. 

SINNINGIA SPECIOSA, Hiern., var. MACEOPHYLLA VAEIE- 

GATA. 

Syns. Gloxinia speciosa, Lodd., var. macrophylla variegata. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3934. 

Eaised from seed from our collector in the Organ Mountains of Brazil, 
flowered in September 1841, and exhibited before the Eoyal Horticultural 
Society. 

As with other species from which the florists' Gloxinia has been derived, 
the flowers droop and are more like those of Achimenes than the Gloxinias 
we are accustomed to at the present day. 

SONEEILA BENSONI, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6049. 

Eaised from seed sent by Col. Benson, who procured it in the Western 
Ghauts of Malabar. 

289 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

This stove plant has shining green leaves shot with brown, purple 
above, rose-purple beneath, and bright rose-purple flowers with yellow 
stamens. 

SONEEILA ELEGANS, Wight. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4978. 

A pretty stove plant with beautiful leaves and delicate rose-pink blooms, 
introduced from the Neilgherries through Thomas Lobb, and first flowered 
in January 1851. 

SONEEILA MAEGAEITACEA, Lindl 

Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 727 ; Bot. Mag. t. 5104 ; PL des Serres, fc. 1126 ; The Florist, 

1855, pi. 98. 

A very ornamental stove plant with small rose-pink flowers and dark 
green leaves regularly punctuated with silvery white spots on the upper 
surface marked beneath with rose-purple veins. From India through 
Thomas Lobb, first flowered during the summer of 1854. 

SONEEILA SPECIOSA, Zenker. 

Syns. 8. orliculata, Lindl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5026; Lindl. in Jour. R.H.S. 1853, p. 56. 

A species remarkable for the beauty of deep rose-purple flowers, 
introduced with Sonerila elegans from the Neilgherries through Thomas 
Lobb in 1856. 

SONEEILA STEICTA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4394. 

The first species of this genus of ornamental-leaved plants to be cultivated 
in Europe. The seed received from Thomas Lobb from Java, plants 
raised flowered in May 1848. 

STENOSPEEMATION POPAYANENSE, Schott. 

Syns. Spathiphyllum Wallisii, Hort. ; Stenospermation Wallisii, Mast. 
Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 558, with figs. 

An interesting and ornamental Aroid, from Columbia through Gustav 
Wallis. 

The stems reach a height of from 2 to 3 ft. and produce alternate 
petiolate leaves. The spathes on long slender peduncles which bend, 
are boat-shaped, ivory-white in colour, and enclose an oblong spadix, 
which bears the same relation to the spathe as the clapper does to 
a bell. 

STIGMAPHYLLON HETEEOPHYLLUM, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4014. 

A handsome yellow-flowered stove climber, from seed sent by 

290 



Mr. Tweedie from Buenos Ayres in 1841, first flowered in the December 
of 1842. 

This interesting plant derives its generic name from the curious green 
foliaceous appendage of the stigma. 

STEEPTOSOLEN JAMESONI, Miers. 

Syns. Browallia Jamesoni, Benth. 

Card. Chron. 1847, pp. 374, 401 (Reports of Exhibitions) ; id. 1848, p. 618 (advt.) ; 
Bot. Mag. t. 4605 ; Fl. des Serres, 1849, p. 436 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xvi. p. 5 ; 
The Garden, 1884, vol. xxvi. p. 6, pi. 447. 

A well-known greenhouse climber, native of North Peru, found by 
William Lobb at an elevation of 6,000 ft. in woods near Monitre, in the 
province of Cuenca. 

First exhibited in flower on June 5th, 1847, as Browallia Jamesoni, and 
again in 1848 under the same name. 

The figure in the Botanical Magazine above quoted was prepared from 
material supplied by Hector Munro Esq., of Druid's Stoke, near Bristol, 
with whom it flowered in June 1851. 

After a few years the plant apparently fell out of cultivation until 1882, 
when re-introduced it became more common, and is now frequently met 
with. 

STYLIDIUM SAXIFEAGOIDES, Lindl 

Bot. Mag. t. 4529. 

Eaised from seeds from the Swan Eiver Settlement in 1849, this 
interesting little tufted plant has the appearance of a mossy Saxifraga 
scapes of rather large white or yellowish flowers. 

TACSONIA MOLLISSIMA, H. B. & K. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4187 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xiii. p. 25 ; Fl. des Serres, 1846, pi. v. 
A beautiful greenhouse climber with lovely blossoms of a deep rose 
colour, a native of the woods near Quito, whence seeds were sent to 
Exeter by William Lobb, and plants raised flowered for the first time 
in 1845. 

TECOMA FULVA, Don. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4896 ; Fl. des Serres, 1856, torn. i. p. 83. 

A greenhouse shrub apparently identical with Tecoma Smithii, said 
to be of garden origin, with pinnate leaves and handsome orange-yellow 
tubular flowers borne in terminal racemes, reared from seed received from 
Peru. 

THIBAUDIA ACUMINATA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5752 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 15. 

A distinct greenhouse shrub from the Andes of Columbia and Ecuador, 

291 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

introduced through Eichard Pearce in 1868, but previously collected 
by Jameson, Hartweg, and others, though not introduced. The flowers 
are brilliant red in colour, the plant almost constantly in bloom. 

THUNBEEGIA LUTE A, T. Anders. 
Syns. Hexacentris lutea, Lindl. ; H. mysorensis, Wight, var. lutea of Fl. des Serres. 

Anders. Jour. Linn. Soc. 1867, vol. ix. p. 448 ; Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 150 ; 
PI. des Serres, 1854, torn. ix. p. 217. 

A stove climber from India through Thomas Lobb, with yellow 
flowers generally resembling those of Thunbergia (Hexacentris) mysorensis, 
but differing in important technical details. 

THUNBEEGIA MYSOEENSIS, T. Anders. 

Syns. Hexacentris mysorensis, Wight. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4786 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. iii. p. 88 ; Gard. Chron. 1852, pp. 307, 310. 

A shrubby stove climber with racemes of rich yellow flowers, raised 
from seed received from Mr. M'lvor of the Botanic Gardens, Ootacamund, 
and exhibited for the first time in flower at an Exhibition held in the 
Chiswick Gardens of the Eoyal Horticultural Society, May 8th, 1852. 

THUNBEEGIA NATALENSIS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5082. 

A native of Natal, from seed received from that colony through Mr. 
Cuming, and flowered for the first time in July 1858. 

A greenhouse Acanthaceous plant with flimsy pale blue flowers, yellow 
in the centre. 

TIBOUCHINA ELEGANS, Cogn. 

Syns. Pleroma elegans, Gardn. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4262 ; Paxt. Bot. Mag. vol. xv. p. 27. 

First discovered by Mr. Gardner in the Organ Mountains of Brazil, 
and later introduced to cultivation through William Lobb from the same 
locality. 

It produced the splendid rich blue blossoms for the first time in the 
summer of 1846. 

TIBOUCHINA GAYANUM. 

Syns. Pleroma Gayanum, Triana. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6345. 

Pleroma Gayanum, one of the least conspicuous in the genus, a native 
of Cuzco, in Peru, was discovered by the French botanist and traveller 
Claude Gay, in whose honour it is named. 

292 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

It was first introduced to this country through Walter Davis, and 
flowered in October 1874. 

TIBOUCHINA OKNATA, Baill. 

Syns. Pleroma strigosum, Triana ; Chsetogastra strigosa, DC. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xv. p. 265. 

A native of Guadaloupe, originally discovered growing in beds of 
Sphagnum on the summit of Sulphur Mountain, and introduced through 
Thomas Lobb. 

TILLANDSIA CHEYSOSTACHYS, E. Morren. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6906 ; La Belg. Hort. 1881, vol. xxxi. p. 87 ; Rev. Hort. 1887, p. 166. 
A beautiful species with bright lemon-yellow spikes of flowers from the 
forests of the Peruvian Andes through Walter Davis in 1881. 

The specific name is in allusion to the long narrow yellow flower- 
spike, the colour most pronounced in the numerous overlapping leathery 
bracts. 

TOCOCA LATIFOLIA, Naud. 

Syns. Sphasrogyne latifolia, Naud. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 8. 
A magnificent stove plant with large leaves of a rich velvety olive- 
green on the upper surface, red beneath, stems and leaf-stalks thickly 
covered with recurved hairs. 

It received the Silver Knightian Medal when exhibited before the Eoyal 
Horticultural Society in May 1862. 

TEICHANTHA MINOE, Hook. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 666; Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 172, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5428. 

This plant was first described in Hooker's Icones Plantarum from 
specimens collected in Columbia by Thomas Lobb in 1861, but plants 
were not obtainable till Eichard Pearce sent seed from Guayaquil, and 
they flowered in 1863. 

A stove climber, with ovate acuminate leaves, and clustered axillary 
flowers, the limb yellow, and the tube striped with blackish-purple, 
surrounded by a red hairy calyx of many segments. 

TEICUSPIDAEIA DEPENDENS, Ruiz & Pav. 

Syns. Crinodendron Hookerianum, Miers, Gay ; C. Patagua, Cav. ; T. hexapetala, Turcz. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7160 as T. dependens ; Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 564 (Notice of New Plants) 
as Crinodendron Patagua ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xviii. p. 542, col. pi. ; id. 
1890, vol. xxxviii. p. 273, fig., as Crinodendron Hookerianum ; Nich. Diet. Gard. 
vol. iv. fig. 99, as T. hexapetala. 

This much-named plant is a beautiful greenhouse shrub with evergreen 
leaves and drooping urn-shaped flowers of a brilliant scarlet colour. 

293 u 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

A native of Chili in the Province of Valdivia, and of the island of 
Chiloe, introduced through William Lobb in 1848, and successively re- 
introduced by Downton and Pearce. 

Though rarely met with, an attractive plant, not difficult to cultivate 
if planted in a peaty soil in a cool greenhouse or in the open in the 
favoured counties of Devon and Cornwall. 

TEOPvEOLUM CEENATIFLOEUM, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4245 ; Fl. des Serres, 1846, pi. iv. ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. 

p. 442. 

Introduced through William Lobb from Pillao and Chagula, Peru, 
about 1845, but of little value in comparison with other species of the 
genus. 

TKOP^OLUM UMBELLATUM, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4337 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1878, vol. xii. p. 444. 

One of the most remarkable of all the Tropaeola in having umbellate 
and not solitary flowers, as in all hitherto known species. 

First discovered by Professor Jameson of Quito, who gathered it on 
Pilzhum, a mountain to which it is peculiar, at an elevation of 7,000 ft., 
but it did not reach England till sent by William Lobb in 1847. 

TKOP^EOLUM VIOL^FLORUM, A. Dietr. 

Syns. T. azureum, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3985 ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1842, t. 65 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. ix. p. 247 ; Fl. des 

Serres, 1846, pi. vii. 

Genera in which predominate bright red or orange-coloured flowers, 
seldom blossoms of a blue colour, an exception in the genus Tro- 
pgeolum. Tubers of a blue-flowered species sent by William Lobb 
from Brazil, on being cultivated for only a few months, produced flowers 
at the Mount Eadford Nursery, causing great interest when exhibited at 
the Eoyal Horticultural Society's meeting of October 4th, 1842, on which 
occasion a Silver Medal was awarded. 

Figured in the name of T. azureum in the Botanical Magazine, it has 
now been found identical with T. violaeflorum previously collected by 
Mr. Miers in Chili, and also by Bridges on the mountain range Campana 
de Quillota at an elevation of 4,000 ft. 

VACCINIUM EEFLEXUM, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5781. 

A greenhouse sub-shrub, from Bolivia through Eichard Pearce ; an 
interesting plant of pendulous habit with reflexed glossy green leaves 
and bright red flowers, opened for the first time in January 1869. 

294 



STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

VEITCHIA JOHANNIS, Wendl. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 205, fig. 32. 

A specimen commemorating the late John Gould Veitch, who intro- 
duced the plant to European gardens from Fiji. 

First discovered by Dr. Seemann, it was sent to the Sydney Botanic 
Gardens, but an attempt to introduce it alive to England proved a failure. 

The plant is of slender, elegant growth, in a young state with some 
resemblance to Kentia Exorrhiza, with which it has been confused. The 
fruits, at first green, gradually turn to a bright orange, ultimately red 
at the base, the much-branched panicle is highly ornamental, and in 
cultivation this Palm is rare. 

VEETICOEDIA NITENS, Schauer. 

Syns. Chrysorrhoe nitens, Lindl. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5286. 

An interesting plant of the Myrtle family, first made known from 
specimens collected in Western Australia by Captain Mangles, and 
described by Dr. Lindley as "the magnificent Chrysorrhoe nitens, whose 
yellow flowers of metallic lustre form masses of golden stars some feet in 
diameter." Long a desideratum, it was at last raised from seed sent by a 
correspondent in Australia, and flowered for the first time in August 
1861. 

Under cultivation it did not attain that perfection expected, and is now 
apparently lost to British gardens. 

VITIS ENDEESII, Hort. 

Syns. Cissus Endresii, Hort. Veitch. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 8, fig. 

A stove climber collected in Costa Eica by Endres, named in com- 
pliment. 

The upper surface of the leaf is of a rich velvety green, reddish 
prominent veins and midribs, the younger leaves and tendrils strongly 
tinged with a rich purple-crimson. 

WOEMIA BUEBIDGEI, Miguel. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6531; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 13. 

Discovered by F. W. Burbidge in Northern Borneo, related to the 
Hibbertias of our glasshouses, and interesting as the first species of the 
genus to flower in Europe. The blossoms golden-yellow in colour, 
are 4 to 5 in. across. 

295 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

XEEONEMA MOOEEI, Brongn. 

Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 8, fig. 3 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1889, p. 12, fig. p. 8. 

A singular Liliaceous plant with the habit of an Iris, re-introduced 
through the late John Gould Veitch from the South Sea Islands, at 
the time lost to cultivation. 

The brilliant crimson flowers, turned to one side of the rachis, are 
very brightly coloured ; each is about 1 in. in length, an erect tube, 
from the centre of which protrude the stamens fully | in. beyond the 
mouth, and which, from their crowded position, impart a striking effect to 
the inflorescence. 

ZAMIA MONTANA, A. Braun. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 34. 
Introduced from New Grenada through Wallis. 

The sharp-pointed pinnae near the extremities of erect leaf-stalks, deeply 
furrowed throughout, are about 1 ft. in length, very beautiful in form and 
colour. 

ZAMIA OBLIQUA, A. Braun. 

Dyer in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 460, fig. 72 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7542. 

Originally introduced through Gustav Wallis, by whom it was discovered 
in New Grenada, this species of rather small size, but neat habit, 
produces bright green sharp-pointed leaflets, 6 to 8 in. in length, on the 
extremities of slender leaf-stalks. 

ZAMIA WALLISII, A. Braun. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7103. 

One of three new species discovered by Gustav Wallis when collecting in 
New Grenada in 1873, and first flowered in this country in May 1889. 

ZINGIBEE COLOEATUM, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 166. 

This very interesting plant, of little horticultural value, was introduced 
from Borneo through Burbidge. The showy inflorescence at the base 
is to a great extent concealed. 



296 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 



DEOSEEA CAPENSIS, Linn. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6583 ; La Belg. Hort. 1880, p. 311, pi. xvi. 

Introduced by us from the Cape in 1874, and flowered for the first time 
in a cool greenhouse in the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, in July 1881. 

This interesting plant, allied to the Sundew, Drosera rotundifolia, has 
strap-shaped leaves from 4 to 8 in. long. 

HELIAMPHOBA NUTANS, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7093 ; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 194, fig. 79. 

This most remarkable plant discovered by the brothers Schomburgk, 
the energetic travellers, the first to visit the mountain Eoraima, in British 
Guiana, at the base of which this pitcher plant was found. 

Sir Eobert Schomburgk made an excellent drawing and sent it, with 
dried specimens, to Mr. Bentham of Kew, who published a full account 
in the Trans, of the Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 432, and on this species founded 
the new genus Heliamphora. 

Ee-discovered in the same locality by the collector, David Burke, in 
1881, plants sent home flowered for the first time in June 1889. 

NEPENTHES ALBO-MAEGINATA, Lobb. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 580, with fig. ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xvii. p. 542, col. pi. fig. 3 ; 
Fl. des Serres, 1877, p. 165. 

Sent to Exeter by Thomas Lobb from Borneo with several other fine 
pitchers, this small, handsome species takes its specific name from the 
peculiar white band surrounding the throat of the urn, below the peristome. 
The base is green, the upper portion bright rosy carmine dotted with 
creamy white on the interior as on the lid. 

NEPENTHES ANGUSTIFOLIA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 524. 

A species found in Sarawak by both Curtis and Burbidge, and raised 
from seed sent home by the former ; the pitchers small, not very orna- 
mental. 

299 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

NEPENTHES BICALCAEATA, Hook. f. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 200, fig. ; Burbidge in Gard. Chron. 1880, 
vol. xiii. p. 264; The Garden, 1880, vol. xxvii. p. 542, pi. 237; id. 1888, 
vol. xxxiii. pp. 29, 78. 

A remarkable Pitcher plant, first described by Sir Joseph Hooker from 
specimens collected in Borneo by Low and others, but not introduced to 
this country till Burbidge succeeded in sending home living specimens 
from Borneo to Chelsea. 

The pitchers, very singular, and distinct from those produced by any 
other species in cultivation, are furnished with two sharp incurved spurs 
which project downwards over the mouth of the urn, and resemble the 
fangs of a snake with the head lifted to strike. 

A possible use for these fangs is suggested by Burbidge in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle above quoted, where he observes that they serve to 
prevent the contents of the pitchers being rifled by a little creature known 
as the " Tamperlilie " or "Spectre Tarsier," an insectivorous quadruped 
in the habit of emptying the urns of their captured insects. 



NEPENTHES BUKKEI, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 492, fig. 69 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1890, p. 6, fig. 

A handsome wingless species from the Philippine Islands by David 
Burke. 

The pitchers, some 8 in. in length, are cylindrical, contracted in the 
middle, green in colour spotted with red ; the top bordered by a deep red 
rim, divided at the margin into irregularly sharp-pointed lobes. 

NEPENTHES BUEKEI, Mast., var. EXCELLENS. 

Jour. E.H.S. vol. xxi. pt. ii., fig. 47 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1891, p. 66. 

A variety of the variable Nepenthes Burkei, introduced from the 
Philippines through David Burke. 

Distinguished from the type by much larger and somewhat more 
cylindrical pitchers more richly coloured ; the sharp-pointed, lobed rim 
of the aperture is broader, of a rich chestnut-red, the spots on the pitchers 
larger and more numerous. 

NEPENTHES BUEKEI, Mast., var. PEOLIFICA. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1890, vof. viii. p. 184. 

A variety differing from the type in slender growth, narrower leaves, 
and smaller, less highly coloured pitchers, produced in such profusion 
as to suggest the name prolifica. 

300 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 

NEPENTHES CINCTA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 240; id. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 576, with fig. ; 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1886, p. 5, with fig. 

Introduced from Borneo in an importation of Nepenthes Northiana 
by David Burke. The seed was collected from plants of N. Northiana 
growing in company with N. albo-marginata, and the plants to which the 
name N. cincta is applied in all probability are natural hybrids between 
these species. 

The tubular pitchers, 9 in. long from the lid to the base, are pale 
yellowish-green stained with crimson marked with numerous deep purple 
blotches. The rim oblique, deep purple, finely ribbed, has several angular 
lobes as in N. Northiana; beneath the rim is a pale band as in N. albo- 
marginata, from which the name is derived. 

NEPENTHES CUETISII, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 681, fig. p. 689 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1888, 
p. 6, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 7138. 

A very interesting, attractive species from Borneo through the collector 
whose name it bears. 

The peculiar, long, narrow pitchers are yellowish-green, thickly mottled 
with large blotches of purple, wider at the mouth than at the base. 

The operculum is remarkable in having two horns projecting from the 
inner or lower surface, one towards the apex and one at the junction 
of lid and pitcher. The horn at the back in the majority of cases 
projects from the base of the lid, and is some distance beneath it. 

NEPENTHES CUETISII, Mast., var. SUPEEBA. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 661, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 68. 
The urns of this variety are not only much larger than those of 
the type, but the colour is more rich; the ground tint a brilliant 
sanguineous-red with longitudinal yellow-green streaks and markings. 

NEPENTHES GEACILIS, Korth, var. MAJOE. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig. 

A variety from Borneo with pitchers of medium size, of elegant outline, 
green, spotted and marked with deep brown, larger than those of the 
type. 

NEPENTHES KENNEDYANA, F. Muell. 

Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 257, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 53. 

A native of Cape York, North Australia, sent to Messrs. Veitch through 
the Botanic Gardens, Sydney. 

301 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

It is distinguished by handsome sub-cylindrical crimson pitchers, from 
3 to 4 in. long, inflated below the middle, contracted above, narrow wings 
in front and a prominent rib on the sides. 

NEPENTHES LJEVIS, Lvndl. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 655, with fig. 

A species imported from Java and Singapore, described as follows in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle : 

" It is readily distinguished from Nepenthes phyllamphora by its narrow, 
shining, leathery leaves, wholly destitute of fringed teeth, and by its 
smaller pitchers inflated near the base. The crests of the pitchers are 
sometimes fringed and sometimes naked." 

NEPENTHES LANATA, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 375 (Note on Exhibit of New Plants) ; 1'Illus. Hort. 1876, t. 261 ; 
Hooker's Monograph in the Trans. Linn. Soc. ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, 
vol. xvii. p. 178. 

Introduced from Sarawak, Borneo, where it was discovered by Thomas 
Lobb. 

There has been confusion regarding this species, which had been 
mistaken for Nepenthes Veitchii and vice versa. By an oversight the 
plate in I'lllustration Horticole, Gand, quoted above, bears the name N. 
lanata, but the accompanying text is headed N. Veitchii, and the 
description applies to that species. 

The pitchers are 6 in. long, greenish, not in the least ventricose, winged, 
and like its supporting tendril thickly covered with coarse hairs. 

NEPENTHES MADAGASCAEIENSIS, Poiret. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 685, fig. 139. 

This handsome Pitcher plant, native of the exposed swamps of Mada- 
gascar, and probably the earliest Nepenthes to be made known in gardens, 
was discovered by Comerson, the first European traveller in Madagascar, 
in 1661. 

Nothing further was heard for 136 years, when Poiret, in 1797, 
published a description in Lamarck's Encyclopaedia, and it is remarkable 
that this species was almost the last to be introduced, nor was it sent 
home till Curtis made a collecting mission in Madagascar in 1878-1879. 

The pitchers, only of medium size, are unusually elegant, and richly 
coloured. 

First exhibited on October llth, 1881, before the Koyal Horticultural 
Society, a First Class Certificate was awarded. 

302 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 

NEPENTHES NOETHIANA, Hook. f. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 717, fig. 144 and suppl. 

The existence of this noble species was first made known to science 
through Miss North, the well-known botanical artist. 

Nepenthes Northiana formed the subject of a sketch by this lady, 
made in Sarawak, North- West Borneo, from specimens brought to her 
by Mr. Herbert Everett of the Borneo Company, who "traversed pathless 
forests amid snakes and leeches, to find and bring them down to her." 

The sketch having been shown to Mr. Harry Veitch, was at once 
recognized as a new and desirable species, and Curtis, about to start at 
the time on a collecting expedition to the East, was instructed to especially 
search for the plant. After some difficulty he succeeded, sent seed to 
Chelsea in 1881, from which plants were raised. 

NEPENTHES EAJAH, Hook. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 492, fig. 91; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 53, fig.; 

Bot. Mag. t. 8017. 

This remarkable species first made known in 1851 by Sir Hugh Low, 
who discovered it on Mount Kina Balu, in Borneo, though he failed to 
introduce to cultivation, and it was Burbidge, collecting in 1878, who 
first succeeded in procuring seed from which plants were raised at 
Chelsea. 

The huge bag-shaped pitchers are thus described by Sir J. D. Hooker : 
" The broad ampullaceous pitcher is 6 in. in diameter and 12 in. long; it 
has two fimbriated wings in front, is covered with long rusty hairs above, 
and studded with glands within. The margin is scolloped into bold 
undulations, and the lid is sub-orbicular 10 in. long and 8 in. broad." 

Unfortunately this noble species is unusually difficile, and now exceed- 
ingly rare. 

NEPENTHES SANGUINEA, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 580, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 43. 

A magnificent species, with pitchers of a dark crimson, blood-red 
colour, with a peculiar milk-white interior. Introduced to Exeter 
through Thomas Lobb, who met with it on Mount Ophir ; the pitchers 
often 12 in. in length by 2* to 3 in. in width, are of cylindrical shape with 
a dilatation at the middle and a broad margin round the aperture, and 
have been known to hold a pint of water. 

NEPENTHES STENOPHYLLA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 243 ; id. 1892, vol. xi. p. 401, fig. 
A species from Borneo, at first thought to be but a mere form of 

303 



HORTUS VE1TCHI1 

Nepenthes Curtisii, from which, however, it differs in several important 
particulars. 

The pitchers, 6 to 7 in. in length by about 1| in. at their broadest part, 
are green, thickly mottled with longitudinal dark reddish-purple blotches, 
cylindric, narrowed in the middle, with two moderately deep laciniate 
wings. 

NEPENTHES VEITCHII, Hook. f. 

Hook. f. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxii. p. 421 ; Burbidge in Fl. Mag. t. 265 ; 
Masters in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 541 ; id. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 780, fig. 152 ; The 
Garden, 1880, vol. xxvii. p. 542, pi. 237 ; W. W. in Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. 
p. 239. 

A very handsome species sent to Exeter by Thomas Lobb in 1847, from 
Mount Kina Balu in Sarawak, confused with one, Nepenthes villosa, 
probably from the fact that the pitchers and leaves are densely covered 
with hair : figured in the Botanical Magazine under that name. 

Though destitute of the rich colouring possessed by many, the broad 
reflexed finely ribbed peristome, of a creamy olive or reddish colour, and 
the pale green hairy body of the pitcher, render it a striking object. 

Never common in cultivation, it is now rare. 



NEPENTHES x BALFOUEIANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. pp. 90, 91, fig. 39. 

A very remarkable hybrid named in compliment to Professor Bailey 
Balfour of the Edinburgh Botanic Gardens, raised at Chelsea from 
Nepenthes X mixta and N. x Mastersiana, the descendant of four 
distinct species. 

NEPENTHES x CHELSONI. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 11, fig. ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 429, fig. 

A hybrid raised by Seden at Chelsea from a cross between Nepenthes x 
Dominii and N. Hookeri. 

The pitchers, of a peculiar urn-shape, broad at the base, narrowing 
towards the rim, with two broad wings ciliate along the margin, are 
heavily blotched with crimson. 

NEPENTHES x CHELSONI, var. EXCELLENS. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1903, p. 59, with fig. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by Tivey from the original Nepenthes X 
Chelsoni and N. Eafflesiana, the latter the seed parent and a very 
magnificent urn. 

304 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 

In shape resembling N. x Chelsoni, but the wings are broader, and 
the colouring of the profuse crimson blotches richer. 

NEPENTHES x COUETII. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1878, p. 13, fig. ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 844, 

fig. 160. 

A hybrid from seed of an unnamed species from Borneo fertilized with 
pollen of Nepenthes X Dominii, raised at Chelsea by Court. 

NEPENTHES x CYLINDKICA. 
Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 521, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1888, p. 6, fig. 

A distinct hybrid raised at Chelsea by George Tivey from Nepenthes 
hirsuta glabrescens (N. zeylanica rubra of gardens) crossed with N. 
Veitchii. 

NEPENTHES x DICKSONIANA. 

Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 543, fig. 541; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1889, p. 11, fig. p. 6. 

The offspring of Nepenthes Rafflesiana flowering in the Botanic Garden 
at Edinburgh, fertilized with the pollen of N. Veitchii sent from Chelsea. 
The cross effected by Mr. Lindsay, the progeny was dedicated to the late 
Professor Dickson. 

NEPENTHES x DOMINII. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 398. 

This, the first hybrid Nepenthes ever raised by man, was obtained at 
Exeter by John Dominy, by crossing N. Eafflesiana with an unnamed 
species with green-coloured pitchers from Borneo. 

NEPENTHES x F. W. MOORE. 

Jour, of Hort. 1904, Nov. 10th, p. 414, fig. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by Tivey from Nepenthes X mixta with 
N. X Dicksoniana, and of the same parentage as N. X Sir W. Thiselton- 
Dyer and x N. picturata. 

The pitchers are green, more or less globular in shape, with a fine red 
margin to the mouth and deep fimbriated wings. 

NEPENTHES x INTERMEDIA. 

Gard. Chron. 1875, p. 118 (Report of Exhibit of New Plants) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1875, 
p. 9, with fig. ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 429, with fig. ; Masters in Gard. 
Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 179, with fig. 

Raised at Chelsea by William Court from Nepenthes Rafflesiana and an 
unnamed Bornean species with small spotted pitchers. 

305 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

NEPENTHES x MACULATA. 

Syns. N. x hybrida maculata. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1866, p. 4; Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 432 (advt.) ; Fl. Mag. 1868, 

pi. 409. 

Kaised by Dominy from a cross between Nepenthes distillatoria and an 
unnamed species from Borneo. 

NEPENTHES x MASTEESIANA. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 748 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 6, with 
fig. ; Flora and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 112. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by Court from Nepenthes sanguinea crossed 
with the pollen of N. Khasiana (N. distillatoria of gardens). 

NEPENTHES x MIXTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 46, fig. 9. 

An interesting hybrid from Nepenthes Curtisii and N. Northiana, the 
first named the pollen parent. 

First exhibited under the name of Northisii, a compound of the names 
of the two parent species, but subsequently changed to mixta. 

NEPENTHES x MIXTA, var. SANGUINEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 318 (Report of E.H.S. Meeting). 
A very dark form of the type with the ground colour suffused with deep 
sanguineous-red. 

NEPENTHES x PICTUEATA. 

Gard. Mag. 1903, Oct. 10th, pp. 670, 677, with fig. ; Flora and Sylva, 1904, vol. ii. 

p. 69, fig. 

Eaised at Chelsea by Tivey from Nepenthes x mixta and N. X 
Dicksoniana, of the same parentage as the hybrid N. x Sir William 
T. Thiselton-Dyer. A singularly handsome seedling. 

NEPENTHES x EATCLIFFIANA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 53, 1881, p. 56, fig. ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, 

vol. xvii. p. 178, fig. 28. 

A hybrid dedicated to Alfred E. Eatcliff Esq., Edgbaston, Birming- 
ham, a distinguished amateur of this interesting class of plants, and 
obtained at Chelsea from Nepenthes phyllamphora and N. Hookeriana. 

NEPENTHES x EUBEO-MACULATA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 53 ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 143, 

fig. 24. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea from Nepenthes X hybrida maculata and a 
Bornean species which, at that time, had not been identified (probably 
N. lanata). 

306 



INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS 

NEPENTHES x BUFESCENS. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 669, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1889, 

p. 49. 

A hybrid obtained by Court at Chelsea from Nepenthes zeylanica rubra 
(N. hirsuta glabrescens) crossed with the pollen from a hybrid named 
Courtii. 

NEPENTHES x SEDENII. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 10, fig. 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by Seden from a cross between an unnamed 
species with deep-coloured pitchers and Nepenthes distillatoria. 

NEPENTHES x SIB WILLIAM T. THISELTON-DYEE. 

Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xxviii. p. 137 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee), pp. 256, 257, 

fig. 76. 

A very fine hybrid won by George Tivey, the result of crossing 
the two fine hybrids Nepenthes x mixta and N. X Dicksoniana, the 
descendant of four distinct species. 

NEPENTHES x TIVEYI. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 187 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee); Gard. 
Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 200, 201, figs. 59, 60. 

Baised by George Tivey at Chelsea from Nepenthes Veitchii and N. 
Curtisii superba, the latter the seed-bearer. 

NEPENTHES x WBIGLEYANA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 54 ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 143, 

fig. 23. 

A hybrid named in compliment to Oswald Wrigley Esq., of Bridge 
Hall, Lancashire, a distinguished amateur of Pitcher plants, and raised 
at Chelsea from Nepenthes phyllamphora crossed with the pollen of 
N. Hookeriana. 

SABBACENIA x CHELSONI. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 18, with fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 722, fig. 125 : 
id. 1881, vol. xv. p. 817, fig. 148a. 

A beautiful hybrid raised by Court at Chelsea from Sarracenia rubra 
and S. purpurea, the latter the pollen parent. 

The pitchers intermediate in form between those produced by the two 
species, are of a bright rich crimson hue. 

SABBACENIA x COUBTII. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 8, with fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 381 (Report 
of R.H.S. Floral Committee). 

A hybrid raised at Chelsea by Court from Sarracenia purpurea and 
S. psittacina, the last named the pollen parent. 

307 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The procumbent pitchers, as those of both the parents, in a regular 
radiating rosette, bright crimson-purple from the middle upwards, are 
veined and reticulated with a deeper tint : they change with age to a 
deep blood-red with blackish-purple veins. 



SAEEACENIA x FOEMOSA. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 41; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 55. 

A beautiful hybrid from Sarracenia psittacina and S. variolaris in which 
the characteristics of the two are intimately blended in the ascend- 
ing pitchers, intermediate in form and length, while the beak-like lid is 
altogether that of S. psittacina. 

All the upper portion of the pitcher has bright crimson reticulated 
nervation, with the characteristic spotting of S. variolaris; the basal 
portion pale fulvous-green. 

SAEEACENIA x MELANOEHODA. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 40 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 54, with fig. 

A hybrid raised by Court at Chelsea between Sarracenia purpurea and 
S. X Stevensii, the latter itself a hybrid by the late Mr. Stevens, one 
time gardener to the Duke of Sutherland, at Trentham. 

The pitchers are semi-decumbent and about intermediate in position 
between the erect ones of S. X Stevensii and the prostrate ones of S. 
purpurea, funnel-shaped with a broad wing on the upper side, when 
mature blood-red veined with crimson. The lid erect and crisped, is 
beautifully veined with blackish crimson on a reddish-yellow ground. 

SAEEACENIA x WILLISII. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 761 (Report of B.H.S. Floral Committee). 

Eaised at Chelsea from Sarracenia X melanorhoda and S. X Courtii 
derived from four distinct species. 

The green pitchers with purple veining are some 8 in. in length. 

UTEICULAEIA ENDEESII, Rchb. f. 

Rchb in Gard. Chron. 1874, vol. ii. p. 582; Bot. Mag. t. 6656; The Garden, 1880, 
vol. xxviii. p. 432, col. pi. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 20, with fig. 

A pretty epiphytal Bladder-wort, introduced in 1868 through Endres 
from Costa Eica. 

The flowers, of a light lilac or delicate mauve colour with a creamy 
white lip and yellow palate, resemble those of Utricularia montana in 
shape. 

308 



EXOTIC FERNS 



EXOTIC FERNS 

ACEOSTICHUM AUEEUM, L. 

Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 432 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1866, p. 1. 

A bold-habited semi-aquatic fern, introduced by the late John Gould 
Veitch from Cape York, Australia. The tall erect fronds of pinnate form, 
the pinnae oblong, emarginate, sometimes almost cuspidate, the lower 
entirely barren, the upper wholly fertile ; it is usually found near the sea. 

ACEOSTICHUM LECHLEEIANUM, Hook. 

Syns. Poly'botrya Lechleriana, Mettenius. 
Moore in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. pp. 394, 400, 401, figs. 79, 80. 

Introduced through Walter Davis from Peru, this fine stove species, 
of scandent habit, has finely divided fronds exceeding 2 ft. in length. 

At first taken to be Cyathea microphylla, it was found, on fructification, 
to belong to the genus Polybotrya, now included under Acrostichum by 
Hooker. 

ADIANTUM jEMULUM, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 584, with figs. 

Introduced from Brazil, this handsome species, less rigid in habit than 
Adiantum decorum, and less drooping than A. cuneatum, is of about equal 
stature, but a bluer green. 

ADIANTUM ^THIOPICUM, L., var. CHILENSE, Kaulf. 

Syns. A. chilense, Kaulf. 
Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 11. 

For this Chilian Maiden-hair Fern, a very beautiful species, we are 
indebted to Eichard Pearce, who discovered it in Chili; the smooth- 
looking glaucous-green broad pinnuled fronds are distinct and remarkably 
handsome. 

311 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ADIANTUM JETHIOPICUM, L., var. SCABEUM, Kze. 

Syns. A. scalrum, Kze. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 11. 
This Silver Maiden-hair Fern, a native of Chili, sent by Richard 
Pearce, is of dwarf habit, with oblong fronds and black stipes ; the 
pinnules, oblong or trapeziform, are sprinkled on both surfaces with 
farinose powder. 

ADIANTUM COLPODES, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1865, p. 530. 

Baised from spores collected in Ecuador by Richard Pearce, the fronds 
tinted with rose-colour in the young state like those of Adiantum tinctum, 
somewhat resemble A. Capillus-veneris in outline, but the sori are very 
distinct. The margin of the pinnule has a crenated appearance with 
bay-like recesses as the specific name implies. 

ADIANTUM CONCINNUM, H. B. R., var. LATUM, Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 14, fig. p. 2. 

A beautiful form, differing from the type in having broader fronds, a 
more erect habit and stronger growth. 

It was introduced from Muna, a Province of Peru, through Richard 
Pearce, and exhibited for the first time before the Royal Horticultural 
Society in May 1867. 

ADIANTUM CUNEATUM, L. & P., var. GRANDICEPS, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 685. 

A variety of garden origin, a multifid form of the well-known Adiantum 
cuneatum, of the same habit of growth as the type, differing only in 
tasselled apices. 

ADIANTUM DIGITATUM, PresL, var. SPECIOSUM, Hook. 

Syns. A. speciosum, Horfc. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 10, fig. p. 1 ; Fl. and Pom. 1875, p. 272, fig. 
A variety from Peru, with the whole of the pinnules covered with dense 
short hairs, a woolly feeling to the touch. 

The semi-scandent habit and the deciduous fronds are uncommon 
characters in the genus to which the Maiden-hair Ferns belong. 

ADIANTUM HENSLOVIANUM, Hook. f. 

Syns. A. sessilifolium, Hook. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 15 ; Moore in PI. and Pom. 1873, p. 277. 
A distinct greenhouse species of Adiantum with fronds 2| to 3 ft. 
in length, of a semi-pendulous character, sent from Peru through Richard 
Pearce. 

312 



FERNS 

ADIANTUM MACROPHYLLUM, Sw., var. GLAUCUM, T. Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 621, figs. 126 and 127. 

Imported both from Peru and New Grenada. 

As compared with the typical species, this form may be distinguished 
by a pronounced glaucous-green hue, and by the narrower pinnae with a 
strong tendency to be straight-edged. 

ADIANTUM MONOCHLAMYS, Eaton. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1886, p. 9; Hooker's Sp. Fil. p. 125. 

A dwarf species of Maiden-hair Fern from Japan, closely allied to 
the beautiful Himalayan Adiantum venustum, from which, however, the 
dwarf habit and glaucous foliage are distinct. 

ADIANTUM MOOEEI, Baker. 

Syns. A. amabile, Moore. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 811; Moore in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1090; PI. and 

Pom. 1872, p. 287, fig. 

Introduced through Richard Pearce from the Andes of Peru. 

Unfortunately the specific name amabile which Mr. Moore selected had 
already been used by Liebmann for a Mexican species, and in the 
2nd edition of Synopsis Filicum, Mr. Baker changed the name to Moorei 
in compliment to Moore of Chelsea, who had done so much to elucidate 
the nomenclature of Ferns. 

ADIANTUM PALMATUM, T. Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. p. 40, fig. 5 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 20, 

fig. p. 4. 

One of the most beautiful and attractive of Maiden-hair Ferns, from 
very high elevations on Chimborazo, South America : the fronds deciduous. 

ADIANTUM PERUVIANUM, Klotzsch. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 457, fig. ; Hooker and Baker, Synop. Fil. ii. 35, t. 81 ; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 10, fig. p. 3. 

A noble Maiden-hair first made known to science from specimens 
collected in Peru by Ruiz and Pavon, later in the same locality by 
Mathews, and introduced to cultivation through Richard Pearce. 

A remarkably handsome species, the fronds spread and hang gracefully 
dependent as the boughs of a weeping willow. 

ADIANTUM PRINCEPS, T. Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 18, fig. p. 4; Moore in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 197, 
figs. 43, 44; Fl. and Pom. 1877, p. 243, figs. 

Introduced to cultivation from New Grenada through Gustave Wallis, 

313 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

and remarkable for the size of the individual pinnules and for the graceful 
pendant form of the frond. 

ADIANTUM EUBELLUM, T. Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 866; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 1. fig. 

Introduced from Peru through Kichard Pearce. A dwarf and compact 
plant belonging to the Capillus-veneris section, characterized by a roseate 
hue with which the young fronds are more or less decorated, and which 
suggested the specific name. 

ADIANTUM SEEMANNI, Hook. 

Syns. A. Zahnii, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, p. 10, fig. p. 2 ; Moore in Gard. Chron. 1875, p. 396 ; 
PI. and Pom. 1876, p. 218, fig. 

A noble species of Maiden-hair, first exhibited under the name of 
Adiantum Zahnii, but afterwards found to be identical with A. Seemanni, 
described in 1851 by Sir William Hooker, from dried specimens collected 
by Dr. Seeman at Veraguas, Central America ; introduced to cultivation 
from the same locality through Zahn. 

ADIANTUM SULPHUEEUM, Kaulfuss. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 12. 

A charming greenhouse Maiden-hair Fern with the whole under surface 
of the frond covered with golden-coloured powder, as in several of the 
Gymnogrammes and other gold ferns. Introduced from Chili through 
Kiohard Pearce. 

ADIANTUM TINCTUM, T. Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 932. 

A beautiful Maiden-hair Fern from Peru, apparently closely related to 
Adiantum concinnum. The fronds, however, appear to be only bipinnate, 
the habit of growth quite different. It is especially remarkable for 
the rose-red tint of the young fronds, approaching in outline the larger 
forms of A. Capillus-veneris, but the fructification has no resemblance. 

ADIANTUM VEITCHIANUM, T. Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1090 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 1, fig. 

One of the Peruvian introductions of Eichard Pearce, by whom it was 
found at Mufia, in the Peruvian Andes. 

The young fronds are very beautiful, of a fine red colour, the mature 
pale green. 

314 



FERNS 

ADIANTUM WAGNERI, Mett. 

Syns. A. decorum, T. Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 582. 

Introduced from the Andes of Peru through Eichard Pearce. 

In aspect this species is suggestive both of Adiantum concinnum and 
A. cuneatum, having much the same outline of frond as the latter, and 
pinnules of about the same size, but more variable in form. In habit 
stiffer and more erect than either of the two named, due to the stouter 
stipites and rachides. 

ADIANTUM WEIGANDII, Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1885, p. 9 ; Moore in Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 748 ; PI. and 

Pom. 1884, p. 9. 

A pretty distinct fern of garden origin, obtained from Mr. Weigand of 
Astonia, Long Island, New York, for our houses. 

ASPIDIUM ACULEATUM, Sw., var. TSUS-SIMENSE, Hook. 

Syns. Polystichum Tsus-simense, Schott. 
Hooker's Sp. Fil. t. ccxx. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1891, p. 60. 

A useful decorative fern, from Japan, of dwarf, compact habit, the 
fronds rarely exceeding 1 ft. in length, spread gracefully on all sides ; the 
pinnae of leathery texture are of a deep lustrous green. 

ASPIDIUM AEISTATUM, Sw., var. VARIEGATUM, Hort. 

Syns. Lastrea aristata, Moore, var. variegata. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 75. 

An elegant greenhouse fern received from Japan, differing from the type 
in bands of yellowish-green running through the bases of the pinnules 
along the course of the rachis. 

ASPIDIUM FALCATUM, Sio., var. PENDULUM, Hort. 

Syns. Cyrtomium falcatum, Pappe & Raws, var. pendulum. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1892, p. 8. 

A pendulous form of the type with more narrow pinnae, but with the 
same glossy-green colour, well adapted for cultivation as a basket plant 
in the cold greenhouse. 

ASPIDIUM FLEXUM, Kze. 

Syns. Polystichum flexum, Remy. 
Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 13. 

A fine hardy fern, sent from Chili by Richard Pearce, with tripinnate 
fronds, oblong toothed segments of a thick leathery texture. 

315 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ASPIDIUM SETOSUM, Blume. 

Syns. Polystichum setosurn, Schott. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 14; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.); Nich. Diet. Gard. 

(Century Suppl.), fig. 89. 

Introduced to cultivation from Japan through the late John Gould 
Veitch. 

A hardy species with bipinnate fronds 2 to 3 ft. or more in height ; 
the pinnules remarkable for a fringe of setae or stiff hairs, stand erect 
from the plane of the frond and have a bristly appearance. 

ASPIDIUM TEIPTEEON, Kunze. 

Syns. Polystichum tripteron, Knnze. 
Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 74 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881,p. 17. 

Introduced from Japan through Charles Maries, found growing in rocky 
places on the shady hills of that country. 

It is a hardy or cool greenhouse fern of great elegance, with fronds 
from 12 to 18 in. in length. 

ASPLENIUM BELANGEEI, Kunze. 

Syns. A. Veitchianum, Moore. 
Lowe's British and Exotic Ferns, vol. v. pi. v. 

A native of Java, and various parts of the Malay Peninsula ; the fronds 
1 ft. to 18 in. in length, are bipinnate, with numerous pinnae 1 to 1^ in. 
long by \ in. broad. It is an elegant species, a stove temperature 
essential for successful cultivation. 

ASPLENIUM CETEEACH, L., var. AUEEUM, Link. 

Syns. Ceterach aureum, Link. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 34. 

An introduction from Teneriffe, resembling the common Ceterach 
officinarum, but the fronds covered behind with silvery scales assume 
a yellowish-brown hue as they develop. 

ASPLENIUM CONSIMILE, Gay. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 695 (advt.). 

Introduced from Chili by Eichard Pearce, this dwarf tufted species, 
with pinnated deep green fronds, rising from a dense crown of brownish 
semi-transparent scales, is remarkable for its enduring properties. 

316 



FERNS 

ASPLENIUM FERULACEUM, Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 44; Nich. Diet. Gard. (Century Suppl.), fig. 103. 
A beautiful stove fern from New Grenada by Gustave Wallis, with 
fronds unusually light and pleasing in appearance, and pinnules delicate 
and fine in texture. 

ASPLENIUM LATIFOLIUM, Don. 

Syns. Afhyrium latifolium, Presl. 
Gard. Chron. I860, p. 432 (advt.) ; id. p. 634 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1866, p. 1. 

A distinct, hardy fern, not unlike Asplenium lanceolatum in appearance, 
introduced from Chili through Richard Pearce. 

ASPLENIUM LONGISSIMUM, Blume. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 27. 

A useful basket subject from Java, with fronds 2 to 8 ft. in length, in 
some respects resembling a species of Nephrolepis. 

ASPLENIUM OBTUSILOBIUM, Hook. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1000; Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 696. 

A handsome fern brought to this country by Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart., 
from the New Hebrides, and placed in the hands of the Veitchian people 
for distribution. Dark green smooth shining fronds form a thick tuft, 
out of which grow numerous stolons, on which at intervals young fern 
plants are produced. 

ASPLENIUM SCANDENS, /. Sm. 

Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 639. 

Introduced from Sumatra through Curtis. A stove species of climbing 
habit, with lanceolate fronds 1 ft. or more in length, narrowed gradually 
from the middle towards the base and apex. 

ASPLENIUM VIELLAEDII, Mett. 

Syns. A. Schizodon, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1004, with fig. ; id. 1872, p. 1654; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

1874, p. 15. 

Introduced from New Caledonia through the late John Gould Veitch in 
1868, and remarkable for the frond serration irregularly bi- or tri-serrate, 
and from 3 to 4 hi. long. 

BLECHNUM NITIDUM, Presl. , var. CONTRACT UM. 

Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 670 (advt.); Hooker's Sp. Fil. iii. p. 55. 
A bold habited Lomaria-like fern from the Philippine Islands, with 
fronds in a young state of a deep red colour. 

317 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CHEILANTHES MYSUBBNSIS, Wallich. 

Hooker's Sp. Fil. ii. p. 100; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.); Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

1862, p. 12. 

An elegant, small-growing species, raised from spores collected in 
Nagasaki, Japan, by the late John Gould Veitch. 

The fronds, from 6 in. to 1 ft. in length, are furnished with oblong 
pinnules ; the rachis and stipes are dark purplish-brown and scaly. 

CHEILANTHES UNDULATA, Hope & C. H. Wright. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 397. 

This species was first discovered in Yunnan, Central China, by Dr. 
Henry, and later, from the same region, Wilson sent home material from 
which plants were raised at the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

DAVALLIA AFFINIS, Hook. 

Syns. Acrophorus affinis, Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 11; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399; Nich. Diet. Gard. fig. 

622. 

A handsome stove species sent from Borneo through Thomas Lobb. 
The thick scaly rhizomes creep along the surface of the soil, and give 
off at intervals finely divided fronds, 2 to 3 ft. long. 

DAVALLIA ALPINA, Bl. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig. ; Nich. Diet. Gard. fig. 623. 

An interesting little stove fern of dwarf creeping habit, with neat fronds 
only 2 or 3 in. in length, of exceptional interest to the collector, sent 
from Borneo through Thomas Lobb. 



DAVALLIA BULLATA, Wall, yar. MABIESII, Moore. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 21, fig. p. 11 ; Fl. and Pom. 1880, p. 151, fig. 

This beautiful evergreen fern, by Charles Maries from Japan, produces 
flexuose rhizomes freely in all directions, suitable for basket-work, and 
for training in all possible shapes. 

The familiar fern-balls of the London shops are made of this fern. 

DAVALLIA ELEGANS, Sw., var. POLYDACTYLA, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 562 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1882, p. 18; Fl. and 

Pom. 1882, p. 52. 

A pretty crested form, raised at Chelsea by George Schneider from 
spores of Davallia elegans. 

318 



FERNS 

DAVALLIA FEEEUGINEA, Desv. 

Baker in Gard. Chroii. 1887, vol. i. p. 639. 

Described from specimens collected in Madagascar by Curtis, through 
whom it was introduced to cultivation, this large sarmentose stove species 
has decompound fronds and sessile crowded ultimate segments. 

DAVALLIA FIJIENSIS, Hook., var. MAJOE, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 24. 

An elegant fern, a native of the Fiji Archipelago, sent by the late 
Charles Moore, Esq., one time of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, N.S.W. 

A stove species with slender stipes, gracefully arching fronds, the 
pinnules finely cut and of a very bright green. 

DAVALLIA HIETA, Kaulfuss, var. CEISTATA. 

Syns. Microlepia hirta, var. cristata. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 24, fig. p. 14. 

A crested form of Davallia hirta, from the New Hebrides in the South 
Pacific Ocean by Captain Hoskins, of the same dwarf habit as the type, 
but the frond apices and the pinnse are bi- or tri-furcate. 

DAVALLIA INTEEMEDIA, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. xxv. p. 31 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; Veitchs' Catlg. 

of PI. 1889, p. 5. 

A supposed hybrid between Davallia Mooreana (D. pallida) and D. 
decora, raised from prothallium produced in a pan in which the spores of 
the two species had been sown. 

D. intermedia shows clearly the characteristics of the two supposed 
parents. 

The plant of free growth, of elegant aspect, is very suitable for 
suspended baskets in the warm conservatory. 

DAVALLIA PALLIDA, Mett. 

Syns. D. Mooreana, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 964, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 20, fig. p. 9 ; 
Fl. and Pom. 1872, p. 21, figs. 

A native of Borneo, whence it was introduced through Thomas Lobb, 
this Davallia, one of the most beautiful of the genus, is remarkable for a 
graceful habit, a large size combined with a small sub-division, pale green 
colour, a smooth surface and bullate sori. 

319 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

DAVALLIA PAEVULA, Wall. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. i. fig. 627 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1868, p. 7, fig. ; Fl. and 

Pom. 1872, p. 108, fig. 

Introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb, a dwarf-growing stove 
fern with finely divided leaves, averaging from 1 to 1^ in. in height, 
on creeping rhizomes of from 4 to 6 in. in length. 

DAVALLIA PENTAPHYLLA, Bfame. 

Lowe's British and Exotic Ferns, vol. viii. pi. xviii. 

A distinct dwarf fern, native of Java and the Malay Archipelago, whence 
it was introduced. 

The fronds consist of a terminal segment and usually two pairs of 
lateral ones. 

DAVALLIA REPENS, Desv. 

Syns. D. hemiptera, Bory. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1869, p. 12, fig. p. 4. 

A beautiful stove fern, similar in appearance to some of the fine filmy 
species, with a dwarf compact habit, delicate cut fronds attaining some 
4 or 6 in. in length. 

DAVALLIA STRIGOSA, Sw. 

Syns. Microlepia strigosa, Presl. 

Hooker's Sp. Fil. i. 47; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1862, 

p. 13. 

An elegant fern of moderate size introduced by the late John Gould 
Veitch from Nagasaki, Japan, with bright green hairy fronds about 2 ft. in 
height, ovate acuminate in form, bipinnate or tripinnate with roundish 
oblong or somewhat trapeziform pinnules more or less lobed or toothed on 
the margin. 

DAVALLIA TENUIFOLIA, Sw., var. BUEKEI. 

Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 102 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee); Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PL 1896, p. 6, with fig. 

A variety sent from New Guinea by David Burke. 

As distinguished from the type the fronds are longer, quite pendulous, 
the pinnae more distant and the ultimate segments narrower and more 
elongated. 

DAVALLIA TENUIFOLIA, Sw., var. VEITCHIANA, Hart. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1885, p. 12, fig. p. 7; FL and Pom. 1882, p. 122; Gard. Chron. 

1882, vol. xvii. p. 648. 

Probably the most finely cut and graceful fern in cultivation, sent to us 
from the Straits Settlements by the late Dr. J. T. Veitch, whose name 

320 



FERNS 

it bears. As distinguished from Davallia tenuifolia, the fronds are arching, 
almost drooping, the foliage more lace-like, the pinnae longer, more 
slender, and the ultimate segments quite minute. 

DICKSONIA BEBTEEOANA, Hook. 

Hooker's Sp. Pil. i. 23a ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 13, with fig. ; Nich. Diet, of 

Gard. vol. i. same fig. 

Introduced from Juan Fernandez through George Down ton, and of 
special interest as one of the very few plants in cultivation from that 
remarkable island. 

DICKSONIA DAVALLOIDES, R. Br., var. YOUNGII. 

Syns. Dennstaedtia davalloides, var. Youngii. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 22, fig. p. 10. 

This handsome fern, a native of the New Hebrides, was introduced 
through J. E. Young, Esq., of Sydney, N.S.W., with whose name it is 
associated. 

The large fronds have a bold graceful aspect, attain upwards of 
10 ft. in length, and are furnished with finely cut pinnules of a light 
cheerful green. 

It needs the temperature of a warm conservatory for successful culture. 

DOODIA ASPEEA, B. Br., var. MULTIFIDA, Hort, 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 72. 

A pretty greenhouse fern of dwarf habit, sent to us from N.S.W. by 
Charles Moore, Esq., late Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney. 

It is of dwarf er habit than the type, with crested fronds of a pinkish 
colour when young. 

DOODIA DUEIUSCULA, Moore. 

Syns. D. media, R. Br., var. duriutcula. 
Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1114. 

A native of New Caledonia, introduced through the late John Gould 
Veitch, of neat tufted habit, with arching gracefully curved fronds which 
are practically evergreen. 

GYMNOGEAMME FLEXUOSA, Desv. 

Syns. Cryptogramme retrofracta, Hook. 
Hooker's Sp. Pil. v. 129; Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 531. 

Introduced from Tropical America, where it has a wide distribution, it is 
noteworthy for finely cut fronds and a flexuose rachis. 

321 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

GYMNOGRAMME JAPONICA, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 628 (Notice of Exhibit). 

A species closely allied to the Javanese Gymnogramme javanica, from 
Japan through the late John Gould Veitch. 

GYMNOGEAMME PEARCEI, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 340. 

One of the finest of the Silver Perns with tall triangular bright green 
fronds finely cut into small narrow segments with a superficial resemblance 
to Asplenium ferulaceum. The lower part of the stipes as well as the 
caudex have a covering of white powder, confined to about 2 in. from the 
very base. The remaining part of the stipes, as well as the lamina of the 
frond, are smooth and shining. It is still a popular fern in collections 
largely grown for decorative purposes. 

For its introduction we are indebted to Richard Pearce, who discovered 
it during his journey in Chili. 

GYMNOGRAMME PEARCEI, Moore, var. ROBUSTA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1888, p. 11. 

A variety of more vigorous habit than the type, of freer growth. Like 
the original species, the base of the stipes as the crown is covered with 
a white powder, the remainder of the frond green. 

GYMNOGRAMME SCHIZOPHYLLA, Baiter. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 14, fig. p. 7. 

A native of the West Indies ; a remarkable peculiarity of this Gymno- 
gramme is the furcation of the rachis at about two-thirds of its length, 
where it is proliferous, each frond producing a young plant at the point. 

GYMNOGRAMME VEITCHII, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 652 (Report of Show); Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xvi. 
p. 446 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 7. 

A beautiful Silver Fern with finely-cut pinnas raised from spores of 
Gymnogramme Pearcei robusta sown with spores of a variety of G. 
chrysophylla, and it may reasonably be assumed a hybrid between these 
two beautiful forms. 

LINDSAYA RETUSA, Mett. 

Syns. Davallia retusa, Cav. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1886, p. 11. 

An elegant stove fern of vigorous growth introduced from Sumatra 
through Curtis. 

322 



FERNS 

The fronds from 2 to 3 ft. long, have pale crimson stipes and.rachids 
and light green pinnae : of extremely light appearance, one of the best for 
basket culture. 

LOMARIA BLECHNOIDBS, Bory. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499(advt.). 

An effective hardy greenhouse fern of moderate size, from Chili, with 
fronds, which grow in a spreading tuft from a short caudex, about 10 in. 
to 1 ft. in height, lance-shaped in form and deeply pmnatifid. 

LOMARIA CILIATA, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 290 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, p. 8, tig. 
An elegant dwarf-growing tree fern, from New Caledonia by the late 
John Gould Veitch. 

The arborescent character of the stem, together with the lobate 
character of the pinnae, the undulate surface, truncate lobes, and spinulate 
teeth, present the most striking distinction, and render this species one of 
the most interesting in the genus. 

LOMARIA DISCOLOR, Willd., var. BIPINNATIFIDA, HorL 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 68 ; Moore in Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 488. 

This truly fine fern, one of the best for decorative purposes, was 
introduced from Melbourne through Peter C. M. Veitch. 

It is a sub-arborescent species with numerous gracefully arching fronds, 
18 to 24 in. in length, from a short robust stem ; the pinnae so closely set 
that they overlap, are cut to the rib, the sub-divisions being slightly 
crisped. 

LOMARIA GBRMAINII, Hook. 

Syns. L. crenulata, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advfc.) ; Hooker's Sp. Fil. iii. 152. 
A hardy evergreen fern introduced by Richard Pearce from Chili. The 
plant forms a close tuft about 6 in. high ; the sterile fronds narrow, 
lanceolate, almost pinnate, with small oblong acute crenulate divisions, 
and the fertile fronds taller on reddish stalks, linear and crenulate. 

LOMARIA GIBBA, Lab., var. BELLI, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 35. 

A crested form of the typical Lomaria gibba, with tasselled fronds, of 
distinct and elegant appearance. 

323 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

LOMAEIA GIBBA, Lab., var. CRISPA, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 682; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 35. 
A form of dwarfish habit, so densely leafy and wavy that the edges of 
the pinnas have a crisped appearance. 

LOMABIA LECHLEEI, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1866, p. 634. 

An evergreen hardy greenhouse fern obtained from Chili through 
Richard Pearce. 

The fronds, spread into a head of 18 to 20 in. in diameter, reach 
from 1 ft. to 18 in. in height. The aspect of the plant is as a very rigid 
form of Lomaria lanceolata, but the texture of the fronds as well as the 
size and form of the fertile ones show the distinction clearly. 

LYGODIUM POLYSTACHYUM, Wall. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 671. 

An ornamental species discovered in Moulmein by Thomas Lobb at an 
elevation of 1,000 ft., in general appearance and habit resembling several 
species of Gleichenia. 

MARATTIA BURKEI, Baker. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 315 (Report of Show); Baker in Gard. Chron. 1897, 
vol. xxii. p. 427, fig. 129, p. 435. 

Discovered by David Burke, probably in Columbia, but as no locality 
was given, the native country cannot be known with certainty. 
It is closely allied to Marattia alata. 

NEPHRODIUM HOPEANUM, Baker. 

Syns. Lastrea Hopeana, T. Moore. 
Moore in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 744. 

Imported from the South Sea Islands, and named by Mr. Baker from 
specimens previously collected in Fiji by Lieut. Hope. 

The slender stipes and bipinnatifid fronds cut into narrow falcate 
segments make this plant light and graceful, and particularly suited for 
decorative purposes. 

NEPHRODIUM MAXIMOWICZII, Baker. 

Syns. Lastrea Maximowiczii, Moore. 
Moore in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 626; Baker, Syns. Fil. 499. 

Introduced from Japan, a hardy evergreen fern of dwarf habit, dense 
glossy green fronds, striate along the pinnae on the upper surface. 

324 



FERNS 

NEPHBODIUM OPACUM, Hort. 

Syns. Lastrea opaca, Hook. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1862, p. 12 ; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.). 

A hardy species introduced from Yokohama through the late John 
Gould Veitch, with tufts of opaque, dark green fronds, more or less olive- 
green when young, bipinnately divided. 

NEPHEODIUM EICHAEDSII, Baker, var. MULTIFIDUM, Hort. 

Syns. Lastrea Eichardsii, var. multifida, Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xv. p. 104; Veitchs' Oatlg. of PI. 1881, p. 15, fig. p. 9 ; 
Fl. des Serres, 1880, tt. 2401, 2402. 

A beautiful crested fern sent by Charles Moore, Esq., late of the 
Botanic Gardens, Sydney, N.S.W. 

It differs from the type in having the frond, tips and pinnae cut into 
numerous narrow finger-like segments ; distinct and ornamental. 

NEPHEOLEPIS DAVALLOIDES, Kunze, var. FUECANS, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. p. 22, 1876, fig. p. 46, 1877 ; Fl. and Pom. 1877, p. 18, fig. 

A crested form of the beautiful Java fern, Nephrolepis davalloides, sent 
by Messrs. J. Baptist & Sons, of Sydney, N.S.W. 

The plant is of robust growth, produces numerous arching fronds 
from 3 to 4 ft. long, bifurcate at the apex, as well as at the apex of each 
pinna. 

NEPHEOLEPIS DUFFII, T. Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 622, fig. 113, p. 623; Fl. and Pom. 1878, 

p. 171, fig. 

Introduced from Australia, and named by Dr. Moore in honour of 
Mr. Duff, an employe in the Sydney Botanic Gardens, who discovered 
the species on Duke of York's Island. 

The numerous fronds arch gracefully, and are further forked at the 
extremity of the tips. 

NEPHEOLEPIS PLUMA, T.Moore. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 588, fig. 108, p. 589. 

The tubers, peculiar to the species, were discovered in the sterile 
fronds of a Platycerium imported from Madagascar. 

A deciduous species, the fronds entirely die in the winter months, and 
new ones arise in spring from the tubers in small fascicles. 

The plume-like fronds from 4 to 5 ft. in length, 4 in. broad, are 
pendulous. 

325 T 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

NEPHEOLEPIS EUFESCENS, Presl, var. TEIPINNATIFIDA, 

Baker. 

Syns. N. exaltata, Schott. 

Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 476, tigs. 90, 91, pp. 477, 481 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1887, 

p. 10, fig. p. 3. 

A native of the Fiji Islands, and one of the most beautiful of all forms 
of the widely distributed type species. 

A stove fern with tufted sub-erect fronds, 2 to 3 ft. high, and pinnae 
cut in segments of endless variety of length and form. 

NOTHOCHL/ENA MOLLIS, Kunze. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 

This fine hardy greenhouse fern, indigenous to the South of Chili, is of 
tufted habit, with long narrow lanceolate fronds, bipinnate with crowded 
deeply lobed pinnules. 

OSMUNDA JAVANICA, Blume. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 761 (Report of Show) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 74 ; 

Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 122. 

A handsome evergreen fern from Java, with erect fronds 1 to 2 ft. high, 
with crimson stipes and lance-shaped pinnae 4 to 6 in. long, of leathery 
texture, and of a grass-green colouring. 

OSMUNDA EEGALIS, L., var. COEYMBIFEEA, Hort. 

Syns. 0. japonica, Thunb., var. corymbifera, Mast. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 466; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 16, tig. p. 8; 
Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 122 ; id. 1883, p. 104, fig. 

A very distinct dwarf -growing variety of the Eoyal Fern, with the 
tips of the fronds and pinnae peculiarly crested. 

The fronds crowded, and the stipes, about 4 in. in height, erect, of a 
distinct rosy pink. 

It was introduced from Japan through Charles Maries, has proved 
exceedingly ornamental for pot culture, and interesting as one of those 
forms with multifid fronds which are reproduced in the same character 
when raised from spores. 

PELL^IA BELLA, Baker. 

Syns. Platyloma bellum, Moore. 
Moore in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 213; Fl. and Pom. 1873, p. 157, fig. 

A pretty greenhouse fern from California, allied to Pellea brachyptera, 
with smaller pinnae and of more slender growth. 

326 



FERNS 

PELL^A BEACHYPTEEA, Baker. 

Syns. Platyloma brachypterum, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 141 ; PI. and Pom. 1873, p. 157, fig. 

A dwarf -growing cool greenhouse fern with fronds 4 to 6 in. in length, 
introduced from California, remarkable for the decided blue-green colour 
of the fronds. 

PELLJEA GLAUCA, J. Sm. 

Syns. Cheilanthes glauca, var. hirsuta, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 

A beautiful coldhouse fern of dwarf habit, from the Andes of Peru, 
with tripinnate or even quadripinnate fronds, stiff on rigid foot-stalks of 
a deep brown colour. 

PLATYCEEIUM ALCICOENE, Desv., var. HILLII, Moore. 

Syns. P. Hillii, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 429, figs. 74, 75 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 16, fig. p. 9. 

This Elk's Horn Fern remarkable for the decided green colour of the 
fronds, the foliage of Platyceriums usually of a greyish hue from the 
abundant white stellate scales spread over their surface. 

P. Hillii is a native of Queensland, Australia, named in compliment to 
Mr. Walter Hill, late Superintendent of the Botanic Garden at Brisbane, 
through whom it was introduced. 

PLATYCEEIUM ALCICOENE, Desv., var. MAJUS. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1873, p. 13, fig. p. 9. 

A fine form of the Stag's Horn Fern, from Australia. 
The sterile fronds attain a large size, and the growth is more free than 
that of the type. 

PLATYCEEIUM ALCICOENE, Desv., var. VEITCHII, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. p. 652 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee). 

A form introduced from Australia, distinct in having unusually stout 
erect fertile fronds, of leathery substance, narrower than those of other 
species in cultivation, and of a dark green colour. 

POLYPODIUM ALBO-SQUAMATUM, Blume. 

Syns. Pleopeltis albido-squamata, Presl. 
Hooker's Garden Ferns, t. 47 ; Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 1180. 

Introduced from Borneo, but previously only known as a native of Java. 

327 



The fronds from 1 to 3 ft. in length, droop gracefully and the pinnae 
covered on the upper surface along the margin with small white scales 
suggested the specific name. 

POLYPODIUM FOSSUM, Baker. 

Syns. Pleopeltis fossa, Moore. 
Moore in Gard. Chroii. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 586; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 73. 

A native of the Malayan Archipelago, sent to Chelsea from the Botanic 
Garden at Leyden. 

The gracefully arching fronds spring from a creeping rhizome, and, with 
the comparatively dwarf habit of the plant render the species desirable 
for clothing rockeries or for ferneries. 

POLYPODIUM KEAMEEI, Franch. & Sav. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 136; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 74. 

A pretty little hardy fern in the way of Polypodium phegopteris, 
introduced from Japan. A dwarf-growing species with slender stipes 
3 to 4 in. long, suitable for rockwork, and an interesting companion 
to the native P. Phegopteris and the North American P. hexagonopterum. 

POLYPODIUM NEEIIFOLIUM, Schk., var. CEISTATUM, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1897, p. 7, with fig. 

A distinct form of the South American Polypodium neriifolium, 
obtained by sowing the spores of that species with spores of a crested 
form of the common P. vulgare. 

The fronds are from 3 to 4 ft. long, the pinnae markedly crested or 
tasselled. 

POLYPODIUM SCHNEIDEBIANUM, Hort. Veitch. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1896, p. 8, with fig.; Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 665; The 
Garden, 1894, vol. xlv. p. 472. 

Eaised by our employe, George Schneider, from Polypodium aureum 
and P. vulgare elegantissimum from spores of these two species sown 
together. 

The plants show a decided blending of the characters of both the 
parents, and there is little doubt as to a hybrid origin. The fronds 
attain a length of 2 to 3 ft., are about 18 in. wide, with closely set, 
narrowly oblong pinnae, and gently undulated margins. 

PTEEIS LONGIFOLIA, ., var. MABIESII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 9, with fig. 

A variety of the old Indian fern, Pteris longifolia, sent by Charles 

328 



FERNS 

Maries, at the time Superintendent to the Maharajah Scindia of Gwalior 
at the State Gardens. 

It differs from the type in having shorter fronds and more narrow 
pinnae. 

PTEEIS LUDENS, Wall 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 761, fig. 101, p. 783; Veitchs' Ca%. of PI. 1895, p. 85, fig. 
A remarkable and at the same time beautiful stove fern, native of 
Malaysia and the Philippines, with fronds of two quite distinct forms. 
The barren ones vary in shape from triangular to hastate, more or less 
lobed; the fertile are of variable shape, on long stipes, more or less 
pinnatifid. 

PTEEIS PALMATA, Willd. 

Syns. Litobrochia nobilis, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 932 ; Hooker's Garden Ferns, t. 22. 

Introduced to this country from Eio de Janeiro by Mr. J. Wicks, and 
placed by him in our hands for distribution. 

In the younger stages the fronds are marked with a greyish band, lost 
as they reach maturity ; about 15 in. in length, the breadth across the 
centre is of the same proportion. 

The fern is of large size for the group of net- veined Pterids to which it 
belongs, and to which the specific name nobilis in the older designation 
is due. 

PTEEIS QUADEIAUEITA, Eetz., var. AEGYE^EA, Moore. 

Syns. P. argyreea, Moore. 
Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 671 ; Fl. Mag. 1861, pi. 4 ; Lowe's New and Bare Ferns, pi. x. 

This, the first well-marked variegated fern introduced to cultivation, is 
still noteworthy for its distinct and novel character, due to the presence 
of a well-defined conspicuous stripe of silvery grey along the centre of 
each pinnae. 

From Central India through Thomas Lobb. 

PTEEIS SEEEULATA, L. /., var. CEISTATA. 

Moore in Proc. R.H.S. vol. iii. p. 289; Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 1180. 
A form introduced from Japan through the late John Gould Veitch, 
with the general habit of the typical species, but with fronds more or 
less bipinnately divided, giving a crested appearance. 

SCOLOPENDEIUM VULGAEE, Sm., var. SCALAEIFOEME, Hart. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1895, p. 11, with fig. 

A pleasing form of the favourite old Harts' Tongue Fern, with curious 
crisped and corrugated margins of the fronds. 

329 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

SELAGINELLA ATROVIBIDIS, Spring. 
Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 603 (advt.). 

This fine species of dwarf habit introduced from Borneo through 
Thomas Lobb has very dark green leaves. 

SELAGINELLA CANALICULATA, Baker. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1884, p. 16. 

A robust caulescent species from the East Indies, with erect stems, 
about the thickness of an ordinary writing pencil, clothed with numerous 
leafy scales. The apical portion bright green, towards the base pale 
crimson. 

SELAGINELLA CAULESCENS, Spring. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 
Introduced from Central India. 

The fronds bright green, somewhat rigid, of from 8 to 12 in. in height, 
and of neat, compact habit. 

SELAGINELLA GEANDIS, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 40, figs. 7,8; Fl. and Pom. 1882, p. 123; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1883, p. 18, fig. p. 11. 

This bold, handsome species, one of the most beautiful in cultivation, is 
remarkable for a deep grass-green colour and great width of frond. 

The stems erect, produce numerous branches which arch gracefully 
to one side at the apex, and are, when fringed with the tail-like 
fructifications, very elegant. 

It was introduced from Borneo through Charles Curtis, and exhibited 
for the first time before the Royal Horticultural Society under the 
provisional name of Selaginella platyphylla. 

SELAGINELLA GRIFFITHII, Spring. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 499 (advt.). 

Introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb, this dwarf, elegant 
species has pale green fronds with a beautiful metallic lustre. The stems 
grow 8 or 10 in. high, branch pinnately, and droop gracefully at their 
extremities. 

SELAGINELLA LOBBII, Moore. 

Syns. 8. cognata, Hort. 
Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 603 (advt.). 

Interesting for the fern-like branches and rich lustrous metallic hue, 
and introduced from Borneo through Thomas Lobb. 

330 



FERNS 

SELAGINELLA POULTEEL Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1868, p. 17, fig. p. 7. 

A miniature form of Selaginella denticulata which it somewhat re- 
sembles, but the habit of growth is more dense. 

TODEA FEASEEI, H. & G., var. WILKESIANA. 

Syns. T. Wilkesiana, Brack. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 795, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, p. 13, fig. 
This beautiful miniature tree fern was first discovered by the United 
States' Exploring Expedition in Ovolau, one of the Fiji Islands, and 
subsequently imported by the Veitchian people. 

It has a slender stem 18 to 20 in. high, surmounted by ten to twelve 
spreading fronds of a broadly-lanceolate outline, 2 ft. or upwards in 
length, of thin texture and pellucid character, distinguishable in this from 
others of the Leptopteris group to which it belongs. 

TODEA MOOEEI, Baker. 
Syns. T. grandipinmila, Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 752 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1887, p. 13. 
This handsome fern originated in the Chelsea fernhouse under circum- 
stances which suggested that it might be a hybrid between Todea Fraseri 
and T. hymenophylloides, the form, however, subsequently proved to be 
identical with a species found on Lord Howe's Island. 

The obvious and characteristic peculiarity of the plant is the leafy 
aspect of the fronds, the pinnae of which much overlap at the edges on 
account of the free growth, and from their unequal development give an 
irregular outline. 

TODEA SUPEEBA, Col. 

Syns. Leptopteris superba, Presl. 

Moore in Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 697; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 35. 
This beautiful fern from New Zealand requires a cool greenhouse 
temperature and a moist shady position for successful cultivation. 

The fronds cut into minute crowded segments, have an upward manner 
of growth and a rich moss-like appearance; from 18 to 24 in. in length, 
they curve gracefully from the centre, and the dark green of the older 
are a perfect contrast to the brighter verdure of the younger. 

TEICHOMANES PLUMA, Hook. 

Lowe's New and Bare Ferns, pi. Ixiii. A. 

An exceedingly beautiful and rare species, found near Sarawak in 
Borneo by Thomas Lobb. 

331 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The rhizome, creeping and covered with bright brown scales, has 
fronds 4 to 6 in. long, most delicately cut in segments, which, when 
covered with the dew-like moisture essential to the growth of Filmy 
Ferns, amply justify the specific name " plume-like " or " feathery." 

WOODSIA POLYSTICHOIDES, Eat., var. VEITCHII, Hook. 

Hooker's Garden Ferns, pi. 32; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.). 

Found in Japan by the late John Gould Veitch. The narrow, almost 
linear fronds, 6 or 8 in. or more in height, are pinnately divided, the 
pinnae about 1 in. in length, linear-oblong, and distinctly auricled with a 
row of sori near each margin, the surface above and beneath covered with 
short close hair. 

WOODWAEDIA OBIENTALIS, Swartz. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 399 (advt.) ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1862, p. 14. 

Eaised from spores sent from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch. 
The fronds have on the upper surface, more or less profusely, bulbi- 
form plants opposite the sori, sometimes sufficiently numerous to cover 
the whole of the frond. 



332 



CONIFEROUS TREES 



CONIFEROUS TREES 



ABIES BEACTEATA, Nutt. 

Gard. Chron. 1853, p. 435 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4740 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. ix. t. 109 ; Gard. 
Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 242, fig. 44, p. 241; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 493, figs. 127, 
128, and a full-page illus. 

Introduced through William Lobb from the Santa Lucia mountains, 
South California, in 1853, first seen by the Scot, David Douglas, 
travelling in South California for the Horticultural Society of London, 
1830-1832, and shortly afterwards by Dr. Thomas Coulter, but no ripe 
seed obtained. 

Theodore Hartweg, at that time in the service of the Horticultural 
Society of London, again made the attempt in 1846, but with no better 
success, and it was not till 1852 that William Lobb sent seed to Exeter, 
and from plants raised in this country of this consignment originated all 
the older specimens of Abies bracteata in Europe. 

In describing the species in the Botanical Magazine, Sir Joseph 
Hooker remarks, " Perhaps the introduction of no Conifer, not even that 
of the Deodar, has excited a more lively interest in horticulture and 
arboriculture than that of the present species with its porcupine fruits." 

ABIES CONCOLOE, Lindl & Gard. 

Syns. Picea con color, A. Murr. 

Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 748, figs. 147, 148; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p 502 

fig. 129. 

Abies concolor was introduced from the Sierra Nevada of California 
through William Lobb in 1851, and at the same time seed was received 
by the Scottish Oregon Association from Southern Oregon. 

The plants raised from Lobb's consignment were distributed under the 
name of A. lasiocarpa, and those sent to the Scottish Oregon Association 
as A. grandis. 

ABIES FIEMA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 265; ul. 1879, vol. xii. p. 198; Man. Con. 1900, ed 2 p 506 

figs. 130-132. 

Abies firma was introduced in 1861 by the late John Gould Veitch, and 
again in 1878 by Charles Maries. 

Isolated specimens may be seen in favoured localities in this country, 

335 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

but in general, though on the plains of Japan one of the finest and 
largest of the Japanese Abies, this fir proved disappointing. 

ABIES GEANDIS, Lindl. 

Syns. Picea grwndis, Loudon. 
Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 512, fig. 

The tallest tree of the genus from the valleys of Western Oregon 
never reaching a greater elevation than 4,000 ft. ; found also in Van- 
couver Island and British Columbia, this Conifer spreads southwards to 
Mendocino in North California. 

Abies grandis was discovered by David Douglas during an excursion to 
the Columbia Eiver in 1830, and he sent seed to the Horticultural Society 
of London, but few germinated. 

No further consignment of the species was received for a quarter of a 
century till William Lobb in 1851 sent a small quantity to Exeter ; about 
the same time John Jeffrey was able to despatch a limited supply to the 
Scottish Oregon Association. 

ABIES MAGNIPICA, A. Murr. 

Syns. A. nobilis, Lindl., var. robusta, Carr. 

Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 652, figs. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 517. 

From seed of this species by John Jeffrey in 1851 the Scottish Oregon 
Association distributed specimens to the members as the Abies amabilis 
of Douglas. 

In the following year William Lobb also sent seed as A. amabilis, but 
on germination the plants were found to differ from the species in cultiva- 
tion under that name ; these were distributed as A. nobilis robusta, the 
name adopted by Carriere in the second edition of his Traite General des 
Coniferes. 

ABIES MARIESII, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 788, figs. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 520. 

Discovered by Charles Maries on Mount Hakkoda near Aomori, the 
northern seaport of the main island of Japan, in 1878. The following 
year seed sent to Coombe Wood gave poor results. 

On Hakkoda it is common at 4,000-5,000 ft. mixed with deciduous trees ; 
in Nikko the fir ascends higher, but occurs sparingly. 

Abies Mariesii is an alpine tree with a comparatively restricted habitat, 
occupying a geographical position between that of A. Veitchii and 
A. sachalinensis, the nearest affinity A. homolepis. 

336 



CONIFEROUS TREES 

ABIES MICEOSPEEMA, Lindl. 
Lindl. in Gard. Chron. I860, p. 22 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 425. 

The specific name microsperma was given by Lindley to a Spruce Fir 
brought from Hakodate by the late John Gould Veitch, a weakly plant 
unsuitable for the climate of the British Isles. 

ABIES SACHALINENSIS, Mast. 

Syns. A. Veitchii, Lindl., var. sachalinensis, Schmidt. 
Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 588, fig. 97; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 538, fig. 138. 

Originally discovered by Freidrich Schmidt, a German botanical 
traveller, in the island of Saghalien, in 1866, and described by him as a 
variety of Abies Veitchii. 

Nothing further was heard till 1878, when, re-discovered by Maries in 
Yeso, it was introduced the following year : the species has proved too 
tender to be a success. 

ABIES VEITCHII, Lindl 

Syns. A. Eichleri, Lauche ; Picea Veitchii, Hort. 

Gard. Chroii. 1861, p. 23 ; id. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 275, fig. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, 

p. 541, fig. 

Discovered in 1860 on Fuji-yama, the "sacred" mountain of the 
Japanese, named by Dr. Lindley in honour of the late John Gould 
Veitch, and in 1879 introduced by Charles Maries, when young plants 
were widely distributed. 

Mayr observed cones in great abundance every third year, and in 
intermediate years, but few the tree apparently unable to support the 
continual exhaustion of a heavy annual crop. 

The same observer distinguishes two forms ; the type, in which the 
apical end of the cone-bract is exserted and bent downwards, and the 
Nikko form, a local variety with smaller cones, the cone-bracts of which 
do not protrude beyond the scale. 

AEAUCAEIA IMBEICATA, Pawn. 

Syns. Dumbeya chilensis, Lamarck. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. vii. p. 587, figs. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, pp. 296-302, 

figs. 

Araucaria imbricata was discovered in 1780 by Don Francisco Dendari- 
arena, a Spaniard, and later by two others, Doctors Euiz and Pavon, who 
had been sent to Peru to investigate the forests on behalf of the Spanish 
Government. These explorers sent the first dried specimen to Europe, 
to a Frenchman, Dombey, after whom it was named. In 1795 Captain 
Vancouver reached the coast of Chili, and with him the botanist Archibald 
Menzies. 

337 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Menzies procured cones seed and young plants which he succeeded 
in bringing alive to Europe. He gave them to Sir Joseph Banks, and some 
found their way to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew ; one lived in an unhealthy 
condition till the autumn of 1892, when it incontinently died. 

Eor many years after Menzies' introduction of A. imbricata the Conifer 
remained scarce till William Lobb sent a large supply of seed in 1844, and 
the tree became generally planted; to this consignment many of the 
oldest specimens in this country are traceable. 

AEAUGAEIA KQLEI, F. Milller. 

Syns. A. Niepratschki, Hort. Lemoine. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 868, figs. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 304. 
Originally discovered by William Duncan, a plant collector in the 
employ of Mr. John Eule of Melbourne, Victoria, about the year 1860, 
the tree, a native of New Caledonia, was found on the lofty summit of an 
extinct volcano, and introduced to British Gardens in 1863. 

A Certificate of Merit was awarded by the Eoyal Botanic Society in 
June 1879, as Araucaria Niepratschki, on being exhibited by Messrs. 
Veitch. 

CEPHALOTAXUS OLIVEEI, Mast. 

Syns. 0. Oriffithii, Oliver. 

Masters in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 645 ; id. in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. 

p. 227, fig. 93. 

A new species from China from seed collected in the Province of Hupeh, 
noticeable for the regularly two-ranked manner in which the leaves are 
disposed, in close approximation, as the teeth of a comb. 

Yet too early to predict the position this tree will occupy in British 
Arboreta, but as a handsome, desirable addition to Coniferous subjects 
it should ever hold a high position. 

CEYPTOMEEIA JAPONICA, Don, var. ELEGANS, Mast. 

Syns. C. elegans, Carriere. 

Masters in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 498 ; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 73 ; Man. 
Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 264, figs. 80, 81. 

Introduced by the late John Gould Veitch, a most fortunate and 
distinct addition to Pineta. 

In the southern and western counties of England this Conifer produces 
such masses of foliage that the weight causes the apex to incline. 

CEYPTOMEEIA JAPONICA, D. Don, var. LOBBII, Carriere. 

Syns. 0. Lobbii, Hort. 
Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 264, fig. 

This form introduced through Thomas Lobb, from the Buitenzorg 

338 



CONIFEROUS TREES 

Botanic Gardens, Java, had been sent twenty years earlier by Siebold 
from Japan. 

Of more compact habit than the type, the branches shorter and more 
ramified, the leaves longer, of a darker green. 

CUPEESSUS OBTUSA, C. Koch. 

Syria. Retinospora obtusa, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 265 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 220, fig. 64. 
Sent from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch, probably the first 
timber-producer of that country : a favourite subject for the mutilation and 
dwarfing in which the Japanese delight, and in which they so greatly excel. 
The species and several varietal forms are in general cultivation. 

CUPEESSUS OBTUSA, C. Koch, var. FILICOIDES, Kent. 
Syns. Retinispora nobleana, Hort.; R. filicoides, Gordon. 

Mail. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 221, fig. 65 ; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 364 ; Gard. Chron. 

1876, vol. v. p. 235, fig. 

A variety received with the type from Japan by the late John Gould 
Veitch, with fern-like foliage and corrugated coruscated branchlets. 

CUPEESSUS OBTUSA, C. Koch, var. LYCOPODIOIDES. 

Syns. Retinospora lycopodioides, Gord. 
Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 364 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 222. 

Introduced by the late John Gould Veitch, with the type species, in 
1861, the foliage that of a Lycopode. 

CUPEESSUS PISIFEEA, C. Koch. 

Syns. Retinispora pisifera, Sieb. & Zucc. 
Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 265 ; id. 1876, vol. v. p. 235, fig. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 224, figs. 

Cupressus pisifera and all varieties of Japanese origin in cultivation are 
due to the late John Gould Veitch. 

Many as C. aurea, C. filifera, C. plumosa, and C. squarrosa are among 
the most frequently met with, and the most decorative of Conifer. 
Though mostly found with C. obtusa, they are in old age scarcely 
distinguishable, but long recognized as distinct species by the Japanese, 
who designate each by a different vernacular name ; C. obtusa is Hi-no-ki 
and C. pisifera, Sa-wa-ra. 

CUPEESSUS PISIFEEA, C. Koch, var. SQUAEEOSA, Mast. 

Syns. Retinispora squarrosa, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Masters in Jour. R.H.S. vol. xiv. 297; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 371; Man. Con. 

1900, ed. 2, p. 225, fig. 69. 

So very a distinct variety of Cupressus pisifera Siebold and Maxi- 
mowicz held it a distinct species, the real origin unknown. Beissener 

339 



pointed out that it was a juvenile form of C. pisifera from cuttings with 
primordial leaves only. Introduced by the late John Gould Veitch in 
1861. 

FITZEOYA PATAGONICA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4616 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. ii. p. 147, pi. 387 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, 
p. 198 ; Lindl. in Jour. Hort. Soc. London, 1851, vol. vi. p. 264. 

From Valdivia in 1849 by William Lobb to the Veitchian firm, this 
species, in cultivation since introduction, has proved hardy, though not 
altogether a satisfactory subject for British Pineta, as the same climatic 
conditions essential for Saxe-gothaea conspicua and Libocedrus tetragona 
lack in the British Isles. 

Eichard Pearce affirmed this Conifer to be the Fitzroya which supplies 
the valuable alerze timber of the Chilians, and not Libocedrus tetragona 
as stated by most travellers. 

Among the largest specimens in the British Isles are those at 
Killerton, Exeter ; at Upcott, near Barnstaple ; at Penjerrick, Cornwall ; 
at Fota Island, Cork, and one at Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow. 

JUNIPEEUS CALIFOENICA, Carr. 

Syns. J. occidentalis, Hook., J. pyriforinis, Lindl. 

Card. Chron. 1855, p. 420; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 167; Sargent's Silva of North 

America, vol. x. t. 517. 

Introduced in 1853, at the same time as Sequoia gigantea, by William 
Lobb, discovered on the mountains of San Barnardino in California, where 
it forms a low tree 10 to 12 ft. high, and distributed under Dr. Lindley's 
name, Juniperus pyriformis, on account of the pear-shaped fruit. The 
climate of this country is unsuited to the tree, and few are in 
cultivation. 

JUNIPEEUS CHINENSIS, Linn. 
vars. ALBO-VAEIEGATA, Hort., and AUEEA, Hort. 

Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 169. 

The varieties albo-variegata and aurea were first sent to this country 
by Eobert Fortune, and subsequently by the late John Gould Veitch. 
The type reached the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, through a young gardener, 
William Kerr, at that time in the employ of the Government in China. 

JUNIPEEUS EIGIDA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Card. Chron. 1861, p. 23 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p.' 188. 

Juniperus rigida, introduced to gardens by the late John Gould Veitch 
in 1861, was found growing luxuriantly at a great elevation on the 
Hakone ridges, attaining a height of from 15 to 20 ft. : as a decorative 
object this Juniper has proved superior to many others. 

340 



KETELEERIA DAVIDIANA, Franch. 

Syns. P&eudotsuga Davidiana, C. E. Berfcr. ; dbies Davidiana, Franch. 
Gard. Cliron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 85, figs. 37, 38; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 486. 
A Chinese species of unusual interest discovered by the French mis- 
sionary Pere David, after whom it was named. Seed sent by Wilson in 
1901 has germinated freely. 

KETELEERIA FORTUNEI, Carr. 

Syns. Abietia Foriunei, Kent. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 440; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 485. 
This remarkable Conifer originally discovered by Fortune in 1844, near 
a temple at Foo-chow-foo only a single tree, was rediscovered in 1873 
in the same locality by Dr. Hance, and five years later by Charles Maries, 
who found it in quantity on the coast range of Fo-Kien (Fu-chau) 
associated with Pinus massoniana. 

LARIX LEPTOLEPIS, Endl. 

Syns. Abies leptolepis, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 23, 1883, vol. xix. p. 88, fig. 13 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 398, 

fig. 102. 

This larch, first found wild by the late John Gould Veitch during an 
ascent of Fuji-yama in 1860, was introduced the following year. Suitable 
for the climatic conditions which prevail in Scotland, and frequently 
planted in that country in preference to Larix europea. 

LIBOCEDRUS MACROLEPIS, Benth. & Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 467; The Garden, 1902, vol. Ixii. p. 183 ; Man. Con. 1900, 

ed. 2, p. 255. 

Raised from seed collected at Szemao by Wilson, in 1900. 

In a young state a singularly handsome species, mature trees are still 
more beautiful objects. In Southern Yunnan commonly planted in the 
courtyards of temple grounds, in a wild state this Conifer chooses ravines 
usually associated with a water- course. 

Logs frequently found in the forest strata in a semi-fossilized condition 
are in this state valued by the Chinese as coffins for the higher classes. 

It will only be hardy in these islands in the warm corners of South- 
West Ireland and Cornwall. 

LIBOCEDRUS TETRAGONA, End. 

Syns. Thuia tetragona, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 563 (Notice of New Plants) ; id. 1861, p. 505 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 1850, 
p. 46, with fig. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 256, fig. 74. 

Introduced through William Lobb from Chili in 1849, but rare in this 

341 z 



HORTUS VEITCH1I 

country, owing to absence of that excessive atmospheric humidity 
prevalent in the districts the plant inhabits. 

In the Gardeners' Chronicle (I.e. supra) it is erroneously described 
as the Alerze timber of the Chilians, a timber almost indestructible by 
weather. 

PICEA AJANENSIS, Fischer. 

Syns. Abies ajanentis, Kent; A. micros per ma, Lindl. ; A. AlcocTciana, Hort. (in part.) 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 115 ; id. vol. xiv. p. 427, figs. ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 6743 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 425. 

Picea ajanensis introduced in 1861 by the late John Gould Veitch from 
Japan, was distributed under the name of Abies Alcockiana from the 
unfortunate circumstance that the seed of both species came home mixed. 

One of the handsomest species, in May loaded with cones of the 
brightest crimson. 

PICEA ALCOCKIANA, Carr. 

Syns. Abies Alcockiana, Veitch; VeitcTiia japonica, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 212, fig. 43 (Picea) ; id. 1861, p. 23 (Abies) ; id. 1861, 
p. 265 (Veitchia) ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 429. 

Named in honour of Sir Eutherford Alcock, one time British Minister 
at Tokio, to whom the late John Gould Veitch, the discoverer, was 
indebted on his travels in Japan. 

On Mount Fuji-yama, at an altitude of 6000-7000 ft., seed was saved 
and sent home in 1860. 

Bare in British Pineta, and at one time frequently confused with 
Picea ajanensis, the seed of the two species having been sent in one 
consignment. 

The genus Veitchia, of Lindley, was founded on imperfect specimens of 
two mutilated cones and a few seeds of this fir, sent by the late John 
Gould Veitch, and in publishing a description of this supposed new genus 
Lindley says: "We cannot do otherwise than associate with this 
extraordinary genus the name of John Gould Veitch, its active and 
intelligent discoverer, the introducer of so many fine trees previously 
unknown in this country." 

PICEA POLITA, Carr. 

Syns. Abies polita, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Masters in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 507; Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 233, 
fig. 44 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 446, fig. 

A native of Japan, found by the late John Gould Veitch in 1861. Bare 
in its native isles and only as isolated specimens of a miserable aspect, it 
is yet widely scattered over the mountainous districts from the extreme 
south to the 38th parallel of the north latitude. 

342 




PICEA POLITA 

PEXCARROW, CORNWALL 



CONIFEROUS TREES 

It thrives poorly in the too dry atmosphere of England ; better in New 
Zealand, where it has been introduced, and it is cultivated by the Japanese 
for the decoration of gardens and temple enclosures. 

The specific name polita, " polished or adorned," was selected in 
reference to the lustrous smoothness of the leaf and leaf-bud. 

PINUS AEMANDI, Franch. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 66, figs. 30, 31. 

Eaised at Coombe Wood from seed collected in the Province of Hupeh, 
Central China, by Wilson in 1900, this five-leaved pine of the Cembra 
section has a smooth bark, slender leaves, and oblong cones. 

It had already been met with in China by the Peres David, Farges, and 
Delavay. 

PINUS COULTEEI, Don. 

Syns. P. macrocarpa, Lindl. 
Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 325 ; Lindl. Bot. Beg. 1840, vol. xxxi. misc. 61. 

Though discovered by Dr. Thomas Coulter in 1832 on the west side of 
the Saint Lucia at 3,000-4,000 ft. elevation, it was not till David Douglas 
sent seed and specimens from the same locality to the Horticultural 
Society of London, under the name of Pinus Sabiniana, that this pine was 
known, and from this seed was raised the oldest specimens growing in 
Great Britain. 

A further quantity subsequently collected was sent by William Lobb in 
1851-1852. 

The species is remarkable for the large size of the cones, sparingly 
produced. 

PINUS DENSIFLOEA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 265 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 327. 

Pinus densiflora, introduced to British gardens in 1861 by the late John 
Gould Veitch, had previously been grown in the horticultural establish- 
ment founded by Dr. Siebold at Leyden, but the pine was not in general 
cultivation. 

PINUS KOEAIENSIS, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 1114 ; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 306 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, 

p. 334, fig. 94 (cone). 

Introduced from Japan in 1861 by the late John Gould Veitch, but not 
endemic to the islands its home the neighbouring peninsula of Corea. 

In 1892 James H. Veitch met with several medium-sized specimens 
when crossing that peninsula, and in 1899 seed was gathered in Yuen- 
chiang, in South China, by Wilson. 

343 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

PINUS PAEVIFLOEA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Cliron. 1861, p. 265; id. 1878, vol. x. p. 624, fig. 103; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, 

p. 353. 

Introduced to British Gardens by the late John Gould Veitch in 
1861. 

Cultivated everywhere in pots throughout Japan, dwarfed and distorted 
in every way, trained to every conceivable monstrosity, this pine when 
in the forest groves is a light and graceful object. The small size, well 
furnished trunk and light foliage are adaptable to small lawns. 



PINUS PENTAPHYLLA, Mayr. 

Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 356. 

A species closely allied to Pinus parviflora, endemic to Japan. 

Cones brought home by the late John Gould Veitch were supplemented 
by a few seeds from Charles Maries in 1879, from which plants raised at 
Coombe were subsequently distributed as P. parviflora, but their destination 
is unknown. 

PINUS THUNBEEGII, Parlatore. 

Syns. P. massoniana, Sieb. & Zucc. 
Man. Con. 1000, ed. 2, p. 384, fig. 

Pinus Thunbergii, sent to Europe by Siebold in 1855, and to Great 
Britain with P. densiflora by the late John Gould Veitch, was unfortunately 
distributed as P. massoniana. 

The curiously trained trees seen by Siebold, Maries, and others, probably 
belong to this species. One of the most remarkable may be seen in front 
of the Naniwaja tea-house, another in the village of Karasaki, and a 
third and most curious of all in the garden attached to the monastery at 
Kinkakuja, trained in the form of a Chinese junk. 

A figure of this extraordinary tree, which has taken over three centuries 
of patient labour to produce, is given in the Manual of Coniferae (I.e. 
supra) and as a photogravure plate in Traveller's Notes. 

PODOCAEPUS MACEOPHYLLUS, D. Don, vars. AEGENTEO and 
AUEEO-VAEIEGATUS, Kent. 

Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 151 ; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, p. 331. 

The type species first became known to science in the early part of the 
eighteenth century, through Kaempfer, and the two variegated forms above 
named are due to Fortune : re-introduced by James H. Veitch in 
1892. 

344 



CONIFEROUS TREES 

PODOCAKPUS NUBIGENA, Lindl 

Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 1851, p. 162, fig. 128 ; Jour. Hort. Soc. London, 1851, vol. vi. p. 264 ; 
Jour. R.H.S. xiv. p. 234; Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. x. p. 171, fig. 23; id. 1902, 
vol. xxxi. p. 113, fig. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 153. 

Discovered in Southern Chili by William Lobb in 1846, and introduced 
the following year to Exeter. 

A disappointing subject under cultivation, the climatic conditions of this 
country evidently unsuited to its requirements. 

PRUMNOPITYS ELEGANS, Philippi. 

Syns. Podocarpus andina, Poepp. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 6; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 155; Masters in Jour. R.H.S. 
vol. xiv. p. 244; Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 113, fig. 

Introduced in 1860 through Eichard Pearce, this Conifer has proved 
hardy over the greater part of Great Britain wherever planted, and in 
Ireland. 

Specimens are growing at Eastnor Castle ; Tortworth Castle ; Menabilly, 
Cornwall ; Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow ; in Fota Island, and Lakelands, 
Co. Cork. 

SAXEGOTEJEA CONSPICUA, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 684 ; figs. 130, 131 ; id. 1889, vol. v. p. 782, fig. ; Paxt. 
PI. Gdn. vol. i. p. Ill, figs. ; Jour. Hort. Soc. London, 1851, vol. vi. p. 258 ; 
Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 158. 

Discovered by William Lobb in 1846 in Southern Chili, this Conifer 
attracted great interest on introduction, but hopes entertained of a 
distinct addition to British Arboreta were not realized, and the Saxegothsea 
is now rarely seen. 

SCIADOPITYS VEBTICILLATA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 22 ; Fl. des Serres, 1861, torn. iv. p. 241 ; Nicholson in Woods 
and Forests, 1884, vol. i. p. 132, figs. ; The Garden, 1890, vol. xxxviii. p. 499, fig. ; 
Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 287, figs. ; Bot. Mag. t. 8050. 

Thomas Lobb sent the first living specimen of this remarkable tree in 
1853, having met with it in the Botanic Gardens at Buitenzorg, Java ; it 
arrived at Exeter in feeble health, and shortly died. In 1861 the late 
John Gould Veitch brought home seed, and to this source most of the 
older specimens growing in this country may be traced. It was seen by 
James H. Veitch in the Province of Mino on the Nakasendo below 
Nakatsu-gawa, growing by the roadside, but that the trees were growing 
naturally is improbable. Except in the neighbourhood of Nakatsu-gawa, 
the Sciadopitys is not regarded as a garden plant in Japan, and is not 
often seen in old gardens, but usually in the neighbourhood of temples. 

Wherever rhododendrons thrive, this fine Conifer may be planted, as 

345 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

the conditions for successful cultivation of the former are suited to the 
requirements of the latter, and good specimens, once the tree becomes 
established, are soon formed. 

SEQUOIA GIGANTEA, Torr. 

Syne. S. Wellingtonia, Seem. ; Wellingtonia gigantea, Lindl. ; Washingtonia 
californica, Winsl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1853, p. 823; Gard. Chron. 1853, p. 819; id. 1854, p. 118 (Note 
on wood and cone) ; id. 1855, p. 70 (a Lecture on Wellingtonia gigantea); PI. des 
Serres, torn. ix. p. 93 ; id. p. 121 ; Man. Con. ed. 2, p. 275, figs. 84, 85. 

This, the Wellingtonia, or Mammoth Tree, giant in the forest primeval, 
the largest of all coniferous subjects, unsurpassed by any of any other 
Natural Order, with the possible exception of the Eucalypti of Western 
Australia, was probably first discovered by John Bidwill in 1841, but 
nothing definitely known till in 1852 it was again met with by the hunter 
Dowd. 

First introduced to Europe through William Lobb, who sent seed and 
a living specimen to Exeter in 1853. 

A full account of the introduction of this tree to this, country is given 
in Veitchs' Manual of Coniferae (I.e. supra). 

THUIA DOLABEATA, Linn. 

Syns. Thujopsis dolabrata, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 23 (Thujopsis); id. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 556, figs.; Man. Con. 

1900, ed. 2, p. 236. 

Thuia dolabrata, first known to Europeans through the Swedish 
botanist Thunberg, who gathered specimens, communicated to Linnaeus, 
in Japan in 1776. These specimens became the property of the Linnsean 
Society of London, and descriptions were published by David Don in 
Lambert's Genus Pinus in 1828. 

The first living plant to reach England was sent by Thomas Lobb in 
1853 from the Botanic Garden at Buitenzorg in Java ; arriving in an 
exhausted condition, all attempts to save it proved fruitless. Shortly 
afterwards a plant received by Captain Fortescue, planted in Devonshire, 
had better fortune, but it was not till the late John Gould Veitch in 1861 
sent seed to Chelsea, and Fortune some to Ascot, that T. dolabrata became 
generally distributed, and could take that high rank as an ornamental 
tree it has won in this country. In the Japanese hill districts bordering 
the shores of Lake Yumoto, it is the forest carpet. 

THUIA DOLABEATA, Linn., var. L^TEVIEENS, Mast. 

Syns. Thujopsis Isetivirens, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard Chron. 1862, p. 428 ; Gordon's Pinetum, ed. 2, 399 (as T. dolabrata 
nana); Masters in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. 486; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 237. 

Sent from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch, a dwarf-spreading 

346 



*'-.?**. ',' -.&%& 

V* * "IP 

"*-jiat - - &':$*&*&* 



'**',.. ^#v$mM 




THUYOPSIS DOLOBRATA 

KILLERTON, DEVON 



CONIFEROUS TREES 

shrub with more slender branches, more divided than the type, and smaller 
leaves of a brighter green. 

THUIA GIGANTEA, Nutt. 

Syns. T. Loblii, Hort. 

Nicholson in Woods and Forests, 1884, p. 190, with fig. ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 239, 

fig. 72, and full-page illus. 

Thuia gigantea was known prior to 1807, in which year James Don 
mentions it in Hortus Cambridgiensis under T. plicata. It again 
appeared under the same name in Lambert's Genus Pinus, published in 
1828, and in 1834 as T. gigantea in Michaux' work on North American 
Trees, in a description by Thomas Nuttall. David Douglas, when 
travelling for the Horticultural Society of London, 1825-1827, named 
it T. Menziesii, after his countryman, and later, the tree received the 
name of T. excelsa from Borgord, who described it from specimens 
collected by Mertens on the island of Sitka. 

From the first consignment of seed received at Exeter in 1853, plants 
were distributed under the name of T. Lobbii, Hort. 

TOKEEYA CALIFOENICA, Torr. 

Syns. T. Myristica, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 519 ; id. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 681, fig. 116 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4780 ; 
PI. des Serres, torn. ix. p. 175 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 117. 

A native of the elevated regions in the Sierra Nevada, California, by 
William Lobb rediscovered, and seed and specimens sent in 1851. 

The credit of the first information is to David Douglas, who met with 
specimens while travelling for the Horticultural Society of London, but 
he failed at introduction. One of the best may be seen at Tortworth 
Court, Gloucestershire. 

TSUGA DIVEESIFOLIA, Maxim. 

Syns. Abies Tsuga, Sieb. & Zucc. 
Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 23 ; Man. Con. 1900, ed. 2, p. 467. 

Eaised from cones from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch in 1861, 
unfortunately mixed with those of Tsuga Sieboldii, and both species 
were cultivated under the names of Abies Tsuga and A. T. nana. The 
introducer, unknown to himself, was the discoverer. 



347 



TREES AND SHRUBS 

DECIDUOUS AND CLIMBING 

PLANTS 



TREES AND SHRUBS-DECIDUOUS AND 
CLIMBING PLANTS 

ABUTILON VITIFOLIUM, DC. 

Syns. Sida vitifolia, Cav. 

Lindl. Bot. Keg. vol. xxx. t. 57; Bot. Mag. t. 4227 and t. 7328; The Garden, 1883, 
vol. xxiii. p. 224, pi. 369; id. 1897, vol. li. p. 334, pi. 1117; Gard. Chron. 1889, 
vol. vi. p. 156, fig. 21. 

A handsome deciduous shrub or small tree from seed collected in Chili 
by William Lobb in 1844, first flowered under glass in 1845, and said 
to have been brought to Europe by Captain Cottingham, in 1836, and 
cultivated in his garden in Dublin, where it proved to be quite hardy. 

In England it needs the protection of a greenhouse or wall except in 
favoured localities. In colour the flowers are variable, sometimes white 
and occasionally blue, a peculiarity that has caused some confusion in 
the nomenclature. Both forms are figured in the Botanical Magazine 
(I.e. supra), on separate plates, and also in The Garden, 1897 (Lc. supra). 

ACEE AEGUTUM, Maxim. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 725, fig. 132; Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, 

1903, vol. i. p. 131, pi. Ixvi. 

A very fine maple introduced through Charles Maries from Japan, with 
leaves acutely five-pointed, and the wings of the samara widely apart. 

It is hardy in this country and in the United States of America. The 
light green graceful foliage in summer and the purple branches in winter 
render it an attractive addition to hardy ornamental trees. 

ACEE CAEPINIFOLIUM, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 565, fig. 105. 

A very distinct maple, in the leaf-form and veining closely resembling 
the Hornbeam (Carpinus), from which is derived the specific name. 

A rare tree in Japan, whence it was introduced through Charles Maries, 
probably the only really respectable specimen is at Coombe Wood, 

351 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

ACEB CBAT^GIFOLIUM, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 75 ; Flora Japonica, t. 147. 

A slender tree with unequally lobed bright green leaves about 3 in. 
long, not unlike those of the Hawthorn, introduced from Japan through 
Charles Maries. 

ACEB CBAT^EGIFOLIUM, Sieb. $ Zucc., var. VEITCHII, Nichols. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 75. 

A vigorous form of the type with leaves finely marked white and rose 
on a dark green ground, from Japan in the same consignment. 

ACEB DAVIDII, Franch. 

Jour. B.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 348, figs. 86, 90; Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, pt. iv. 

pi. Ixxxiii. 

Introduced to Coombe Wood through Maries from North China 
and distributed as Acer sp. for many years. From seed sown in 
January 1902, collected in Central China by Wilson, this species was 
again raised, and found to be identical with Maries' unnamed species. 
Herbarium specimens having also been sent by the last-named collector, 
made it possible to identify the species as A. Davidii of Franchet. 

A variable plant, the leaves sometimes attain a length of 8 in. with a 
breadth of 5 in., on the first appearance of a reddish-bronze tint, they 
become when mature rich shining green with yellowish-green veins. 

ACEB DIABOLICUM, K. Koch. 

Syns. A. pulchrum, Hort. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 532, fig. 100 ; Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, 
1903, vol. i. p. 133, pi. Ixvii. 

A noble maple somewhat resembling Acer platanoides, from Japan 
through Charles Maries. This large-leaved species grows rapidly in this 
country, apparently quite at home, and attracts attention by the very 
large and bold foliage. 

The specific name is said to have been suggested by the two horn-like 
processes between the wings of the " keys." 

ACEB DISTYLUM, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 499, fig. 

A distinct maple with simple leaves which attain a large size in this 
country, introduced from Japan through Charles Maries ; it succeeds 
admirably, and is superior to many species and varieties in ordinary 
cultivation. 

352 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

The "keys" in erect racemes form a feature during the early summer 
months when the light green colour is relieved by the dark green of 
the foliage. 

ACER FRANCHETI, Pax. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 353, fig. 88; Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, pt. iv. 

pi. Ixxxvii. 

A species allied to the Himalayan Acer villosum, from which it may 
be distinguished by trilobed leaves, the small teeth on the margin and 
the simple inflorescence. A common tree in Hupeh, Central China, 
raised from seed collected in that locality by Wilson. 

ACER GRISEUM, Pax. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 100; Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 354. 

A handsome species, the Chinese representative of a maple found 
in Japan, Acer nikoense. 

Attaining in Central China a height of from 15 to 40 ft., the young 
foliage is beautifully coloured in the early spring, and the bark peels as 
in the common Silver Birch. 

Discovered by Dr. Henry, and introduced to cultivation through Wilson, 
who sent seed in 1901. 

ACER HENRYI, Pax. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1896; Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 100; Sargent's Trees and 

Shrubs, pt. iv. p. 181. 

A Chinese species of the Negundo section of Acer, specimens of which 
were first collected in the Province of Hupeh by Dr. Henry. 

The species is remarkable for the great length of the samara in a young 
state of a bright red colour. The petioles of the long leaves have three 
ovate acuminate leaflets. 

Young plants at Coornbe were raised from seed collected in Central 
China in 1903. 

I 

ACER L^TUM, C. A. Mey., var. CULTRATUM, Pax. 
Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 354, fig. 101. 

This form with five-lobed leaves of a lively shining green colour, borne 
on a rather dwarf-growing plant, was raised at Coombe Wood in 1902 
from seed collected in Central China by Wilson. 

ACER L^TUM, C. A. Mey., var. TRICAUDATUM, Behd. 
Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. figs. 100, 102. 

A new form discovered in Central China named by Mr. A. Rehder 
of the Arnold Arboretum, Mass., U.S.A. 

353 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The leaves are three to five lobed, the lower pair often obsolete ; the 
apices acutely pointed, and the petiole, bright rose -pink, contrasts strongly 
with the dark green of the blade. 

It was raised at Coombe Wood from seed sown in February 1902. 

ACEE L^VIGATUM, Wall, var. FAEGESII, Behd. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 353, fig. 91. 

A form of the Indian Acer laevigatum of dwarfer habit and with smaller 
leaves, discovered on mountains south of the Yangtsze in the Province of 
Hupeh, Central China, and raised at Coombe in 1902. 

The leaves leathery in texture, entire or slightly notched, are when 
first produced of a bright red and very ornamental colour. 

Native of mountainous regions, this variety will probably prove to 
possess a hardier constitution than the Indian type, which will not 
withstand English winters. 

ACEE NIKOENSE, Maxim. 

Syns. Negundo nikoense, Nichols. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 815; Garden and Forest, 1893, p. 155, 

fig. 26. 

This remarkable species, named after the district in Japan where it was 
first discovered, has a wide distribution, and is in all probability of Chinese 
origin, as it has lately been met with in the mountainous region of 
Central China, undoubtedly wild. The trifoliate leaves, densely hairy on 
the under surface, are in autumn a rich vinous red. 

The samara are large with spreading wings, and the cells like the other 
parts of the plant thickly covered with hair. 

It is quite hardy at Coombe Wood, where a specimen, one of the first 
raised, is now over 20 ft. high and 25 ft. through. 

ACEE PALMATUM, Thunb. 

Syns. A. polymorphum, Sieb. & Zucc. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 80, figs. 

Acer palmatum, known in gardens as A. polymorphum, was re- 
introduced by the late John Gould Veitch from Japan (though it had 
formerly been introduced through Dr. Siebold) as well as many and 
various forms. The varieties known as atropurpureum dissectum,palmati- 
iidum, roseo-marginatum, and sanguineum were distributed in 1877. 

ACEE PICTUM, Thunb., var. CONNIVENS, Nichols. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 375. 

A form of Acer pictum, from Japan, lobes of the leaves out to the base 

354 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

of the blade, and the nerves on the under surface pubescent, bearded in 
the axils ; the wings of the fruit erect with converging tips. 

ACER PICTUM, Thunb., var. MONO, Pax. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1905, vol. xxix. pts. i., ii., and iii. 

A form of the type introduced from the Province of Hupeh, Central 
China, through Wilson. 

The leaves three to five lobed, with attenuated apices ; the upper surface 
shining green and the under covered with a soft velvety pubescence. 

From seed sown in February 1901. 

ACEE EUFINEEVE, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 42 ; Flora Japonica, vol. ii. t. 158. 

Introduced from the mountains of the Central Island of Japan through 
Charles Maries. 

A large tree with leaves variable in size and outline, resembling in 
habit the common Sycamore. The specific name refers to the reddish 
hairs which clothe the veins on the under surface of the leaf, and to the 
red colour of the peduncles and petioles. 

ACEE SINENSE, Pax., var. CONCOLOE, Pax. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 348, fig. 92. 

A new form of the type with leaves of a large size coloured green on 
both surfaces, detected by Wilson in South Wushan on the sides of 
streams, raised at Coombe from seed sown in April 1901. 

The leaves are somewhat as those of Acer pictum, five-lobed with 
acuminate apices, reddish in colour when first produced, when mature 
bright green. 

ACEE SUTCHUENENSE, Franch. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 353, figs. 93, 96. 

Discovered by Dr. Augustine Henry in the Province of Szechuan, close 
to the border of Hupeh, and introduced to cultivation through Wilson. 

It is closely allied to Acer Henryi, a trifoliate species, but differs in the 
inflorescence. 

ACEE TETEAMEEUM, Pax., var. LOBULATUM, Behd. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxix. p. 353, fig. 94. 

A graceful variety with leaves resembling those of a Birch, coarsely 
serrated along the margin ; discovered in Central China, and raised at 
Coombe from seed sown in April 1901. 

355 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ACTINIDIA CHINENSIS, Planch. 

Maries in The Garden, 1882, vol. xxi. p. 101 ; Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 248 ; 
id. vol. xxvi. p. 211; Jour. E.H.S. vol. xxviii. pt. i. ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 
1904, p. 3, figs. 

A handsome hardy climber introduced from Central China of the 
very first order. 

It was known for some time prior to introduction, having been found 
by Fortune when travelling on behalf of the Eoyal Horticultural Society, 
and from his specimens Planchon's description is written in Hooker's 
London Journal of Botany, 1847, vol. vi. p. 303. Maries also detected it 
in the North Island of Japan, but failed to introduce it. 

A rapid grower, valuable for very handsome foliage, covered with 
bright red hairs in a young state. The flowers, not yet seen in cultiva- 
tion, are bright yellow, very handsome, and followed by edible fruits 
about the size of walnuts with a flavour resembling ripe gooseberries. 

ACTINIDIA KOLOMIKTA, Euprecht. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 262 ; Eev. Hort. 1872, p. 395, fig. 43. 

An interesting semi-scandent shrub, by Maries, who met with it in 
Yesso, Japan, in the year 1878, though it had previously been discovered 
on several occasions, and had appeared in France a few years earlier. 

Now seldom met with in gardens, it deserves a place for the brilliant 
crimson and white autumn tints. 

^ISCULUS CALIFOENICA, Nutt. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5077 ; Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 187, fig. of fruit ; Fl. des Serres, 
1858, torn. iii. 2nd ser. p. 39. 

This, one of the rarest of the horse-chestnuts, a native of the western 
slopes of the' mountains of California, where it is known as the Californian 
Buck's Eye, was raised from seed sent to Exeter by William Lobb, and 
produced fine thyrsi in July 1858. 

Unfortunately, though hardy in this country, the absence of sufficient 
sun prevents the tree freely flowering. 

A specimen in the Bath Botanic Garden produced both flowers and 
fruit in 1901, and from this material the figure in the Gardeners' Chronicle 
(I.e. supra) was prepared. 

According to Professor Sargent, who describes the species as one of 
the most beautiful in the genus, the flowers are white tinted with rose, 
but in this country they are wholly white. 

.3ESCULUS TUEBINATA, Blume. 

Rev. Hort. 1888, p. 496, figs. 120-124 ; Gordon in Gard. Mag. Sept. 21st, 1901, p. 614 
Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 187, fig. 

This Japanese Horse-chestnut closely resembles our own (J^sculus 

356 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

Hippocastanum), but is readily distinguished by the greyish under surface 
of the leaves. Though often confused with M. chinensis, it is probable 
that that species is not in cultivation in this country. 

One of the first specimens to be reared is growing at Coombe Wood, 
where it has attained a height of 16 ft., with a head 12 ft. in diameter 
and a circumference of stem at 3 ft. from the ground of 12 in. 

It flowered in 1901. 

AEISTOLOCHIA HETEEOPHYLLA, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 361. 

A quick-growing climber with variable leaves, raised from seed collected 
in Central China. 

The species was first detected by Dr. A. Henry, and from this material 
Mr. Hemsley described it (I.e. supra) : " In foliage this resembles A. 
Kaempferi, Willd., presenting similar variations ; but the narrower and 
somewhat smaller perianth differs in the very sharply bent tube, and the 
equally 3-lobed limb similar to that of the North American A. Sipho, Ait." 

BETULA ALNOIDES, Ham., var. PYEIFOLIA, Franch. 

The type species is found in Southern and Western China, and occurs 
also in Northern India and Upper Burmah. 

The variety, as the name indicates, has leaves resembling a species of 
Pyrus, and was introduced to cultivation through Wilson, from seed 
collected in the Province of Hupeh, Central China. 

BETULA MAXIMOWICZII, Eegel. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1888-1889. 

The finest of the Japanese Birches, introduced to cultivation through 
James H. Veitch, who met with it in the neighbourhood of Hokkaido. 

A tree 80 to 90 ft. high, in its native habitat it is easily distinguished 
from other birches by a pale smooth orange-coloured bark. 

BEANDISIA EACEMOSA, Hemsl. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 2383. 

Introduced through Wilson from Central China, but so far of little 
use in cultivation. 

It is an unusually handsome plant, as a reference to the plate (I.e. supra) 
will at once show, and it forms a dwarf shrub producing masses of densely 
flowered racemes of bright scarlet blossom. 

At Coombe Wood it flowered imperfectly for the first time in 1904. 

357 A a 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

BUDDLEIA ALBIPLOEA, Hemsl. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. pp. 118, 139 ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1904, p. 5, fig. 

A species named by Mr. Hemsley from specimens collected in Central 
China by Dr. Henry, whose notes state "Flowers white," and on this 
account the specific name albiflora was chosen. 

The flowers, however, are not white, but pale mauve with an orange- 
yellow throat. 

BUDDLEIA NIVEA, Duthie. 

Card. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 275, fig. 102. 

A new species from Central China and of doubtful promise. 

The flowers not so striking as those of some of the species recently 
introduced, but this defect is compensated for by the great beauty of the 
foliage, the whole under surface of which is, together with the young wood 
and leaves, covered with a dense white woolly tomentum. 

The flowers in tail-like panicles at the ends of the branch are rose- 
purple in colour, individually small, but in a mass conspicuous. 

BUDDLEIA VABIABILIS, Hemsl., var. MAGNIFICA, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 115 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; id, p. 157 
(Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; Flora and Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. p. 339. 

A very striking form of the well-known type introduced from the 
Province of Hupeh, Central China, through Wilson. 

It differs from the brilliant Veitchiana, which it equals in size of flower- 
spike, in profusion of bloom, in a more constricted thyrsus, and in having 
flowers of a deeper richer shade of violet -purple. 

BUDDLEIA VARIABILIS, Hemsl., var. VEITCHIANA, Hort. 

Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1903, p. 4, fig. 

A superor form of the variable typical species, introduced from the 
Province of Hupeh, Central China. 

The plant is more robust than the type, the flower spike larger, and 
more richly coloured ; the spikes in some instances measure over 2 ft. 
in length, and form continuous masses of bloom, not divided into globose 
axillary clusters as in the type. 

Perfectly hardy in this country, it has been extensively planted since 
1901. 

GffilSALPINIA JAPONICA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 513, fig. ; Gard. Mag. 1888, p. 445, fig. ; 
The Garden, 1891, vol. xl. p. 588, pi. 837. 

A beautiful shrub from Japan, and the only representative of the genus 
known to be hardy in Great Britain. 

358 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

Of spreading, semi-scandent habit, it attains but a moderate height, 
and needs for support a wall or wooden trellis. The stems and branches, 
armed with numerous hard, curved prickles, are furnished with cut foliage 
of a soft fern-like aspect. 

The raceme bears from twenty to thirty bright canary-yellow flowers, 
each 1 in. in diameter, with which the red filaments and anthers form a 
contrast. Flowers produced for the first time in this country in 1887 on 
specimens which had stood many years uninjured by the frost at Coombe 
Wood. 

CAEPINUS CORDATA, Blume. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1888, p. 37. 

This, one of the largest of the Hornbeams and certainly one of the finest, 
forms a conspicuous ingredient in the forests of the northern island of 
Japan, where it was met with by James H. Veitch during his journeyings 
in the Far East. Previously found by Maries in the same district, and 
through him first introduced to cultivation. 

The leaves, large and striking in appearance, are 6 to 7 in. long and from 
3 to 4 in. broad, with the characteristic venation of the genus ; the long, 
hop-like catkins of fruit attain a length of 6 in or more, and are also very 
striking. 

CELASTEUS HYPOGLAUCUS, Hemsl. 

This fine species, which takes its specific name from the glaucous hue of 
the under surface of the large handsome leaves, was first detected by 
Dr. A. Henry in the Province of Hupeh, Central China, and subsequently 
introduced to cultivation from the same locality. 

The leaves, 6 in. long by 2| in. broad, are of a deep pea-green on the 
upper surface, glaucous beneath ; the young wood purple, covered with 
waxy bloom. 

CELASTEUS LATIFOLIUS, Hemsl. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 2206. 

This fine species of Celastrus, first made known to botanists through 
Dr. A. Henry, who collected specimens in the Province of Hupeh, Central 
China, was introduced to cultivation from the same locality from seed 
collected in 1900. 

The leaves large, 6 in. broad by 8| in. long, are broadly ovate, or nearly 
orbicular, acuminate with a cordate base, dark green on the upper surface, 
paler beneath, strongly veined, and serrated along the margin. 

It is a common shrub in the neighbourhood of Ichang, known as Nan- 
shan-yeh. The root and leaves, powdered and mixed with flour, are 
scattered over growing crops of cabbage, turnip, and others of a similar 
nature, to kill obnoxious insects. 

359 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CHAM^BATIA FOLIOLOSA, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5171 ; Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 652, Bentham in Plantae Hartwegianae, 

p. 308. 

A half-hardy shrub with flowers resembling those of a Potentilla, and 
finely-dissected foliage not unlike that of some species of Milfoil (Achillea). 
The shrub grows to a height of 2 or 3 ft., and has an agreeable balsamic 
odour. 

The branches, when mature, are covered with smooth reddish-brown 
bark ; when young, densely clothed with gland-tipped hairs. 

It was introduced to Exeter in a living state from California through 
William Lobb in 1859. 

CLEMATIS GOUEIANA, Roxb. 

A species introduced to cultivation through Wilson, who sent seed 
from Hupeh in 1901. 

The plant, a hardy climber, has compound leaves composed of five 
petioled leaflets, irregularly serrate along the margin towards the apex ; 
the petioles and young wood of a reddish-purple. 

The flowers, produced in September, individually small, cream-white in 
colour, are showy from a great profusion, and are also very fragrant. 

CLEMATIS MONTANA, Wall., var. GBANDIFLOKA. 

Bot. Mag. fc. 4061. 

Both this variety and the type, natives of Northern India, are worthy of 
a place in every garden on account of the profusion of large, white, 
delicately fragrant flowers usually produced in early summer and in the 
autumn months. 

The variety grandiflora flowered for the first time at Exeter in 1844. 

CLEMATIS MONTANA, Wall, var. EUBENS, 0. Kuntze. 

Flora and Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. p. 252, col. pi. 

A magnificent form of the well-known type introduced to Coombe 
Wood from the Province of Hupeh, Central China, where it occurs on 
scrub-clad mountain- sides at elevations of 5,000-9,000 ft. 

In foliage and habit this form closely resembles the typical species, but 
the stems and leaf -stalks are of a reddish-purple hue, as are the young 
leaves. 

The rosy- red flowers differ in a marked degree from those of the type, 
are as large as those of the variety grandiflora, and are also produced twice 
during a season, in early May and in September. 

Plants flowered for the first time at Coombe Wood in September 1903. 

360 




CLEMATIS MONTANA RUBENS 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

CLEMATIS PATENS, Morr. & Decne, var. JOHN GOULD VEITCH. 

PI. Mag. 1867, pi. 394 ; PI. cles Serres, 1869, torn, xviii. p. 85 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

1868, fig. p. 12. 

A double blue Clematis with numerous narrow perianth segments, at 
the time of introduction, 1865, the finest of its kind ; from Japan by the 
late John Gould Veitch. 

COKNUS PAUCINEEVIS, Hance. 

A small-growing, free-flowering species somewhat resembling the 
American Cornus stricta, inhabiting Central and Western China, where it 
is met with as a fluviatile shrub at 1,000-3,600 ft. 

COENUS STOLONIFEEA, Michx. 

Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 678, fig. 138, p. 679. 

Eaised from seed sent by a correspondent from the Eocky Mountains, 
where it is known as " The Eed Osier Dogwood." 

By misadventure it received the name of Cornus capitata, and specimens 
under that name unfortunately distributed. 

C. stolonifera is a hardy deciduous shrub, of rapid growth in moist 
situations, forming large clumps 5 to 6 ft. high, multiplying freely by 
prostrate or subterranean suckers. Ornamental in summer when it 
blossoms freely, in autumn when laden with white berries, or in winter, 
when stripped of its leafy honours, the bright red bark of the annual 
shoots are conspicuous. 

COEYLOPSIS HIMALAYANA, Griff. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6779. 

This delicate graceful shrub, the rarest species of the genus in cultiva- 
tion, produces spikes of creamy white flowers with a primrose-like smell 
early in the year, preceding * the foliage by some three to four months. 
Discovered by Griffith in Bhotan, north of the Assam valley, at elevations 
of 5,000-8,000 ft., seed was sent to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, by Dr. King, 
in 1879, and to the Veitchian firm about the same time. 

COEYLOPSIS PAUCIFLOEA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 335 (Beport of R.H.S. Show) ; Bot. Mag. t. 7736. 

As with the other species of Corylopsis hardy in gardens, the primrose- 
yellow flowers appear in early spring before the leaves. It may be 
distinguished from the better-known C. spicata by a more slender habit, 
fewer flowered spikes, and smaller leaves, longer in proportion to their 
breadth than those of C. spicata. 

It was introduced from Japan, where it occurs in various localities. 

361 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CORYLOPSIS SINENSIS, Hemsl 

Hemsley in Gard. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. p. 18, fig. 12. 

Introduced through Wilson from Central China, this species flowered 
for the first time at Coombe in the spring of 1905. 

As a species closely allied to Corylopsis spicata, of Japan, the chief 
distinctions are as given by Mr. Hemsley (I.e. supra) : 

" Corylopsis sinensis differs from C. spicata, to which it is closely allied, 
in the stipules of the flowering branches being broader than long ; in the 
leaves being broadest above the middle ; in the orbicular petals being 
suddenly narrowed into a distinct claw ; in the yellow anthers and white 
seed." 

COEYLOPSIS SPICATA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5458 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. xx. t. 2135 ; Gard. Chron. 1865, p. 172, fig. ; 
id. 1881, vol. xv. p. 510, fig. ; Nicholson in Woods and Forests, 1884, p. 333, fig. 

Introduced by Fortune and by the late John Gould Veitch in the year 
1864. 

As the generic name implies, this shrub has the general appearance of 
the common Nut-bush (Corylus), its habit deciduous and its leaves long- 
stalked, heart-shaped, and feather-veined. The great value to the garden 
is with the flowers, in themselves small, yellow in colour, but produced 
profusely and in conspicuous racemes before any leaves appear. 

The flowers, the colour and odour of the cowslip, are singly borne in the 
axils of greenish bracts, some eight to twelve in a raceme. 

COEYLUS TIBETICA, Bat. 

A species remarkable in having the young wood covered with rough 
ferruginous hairs, and the involucre surrounding the nuts spiny. 

The leaves, large and handsome, are broadly ovate in outline, cordate at 
the base, with biserrate margins ; it was introduced from Central China. 

CEAT^EGUS PINNATIFIDA, Surge, var. MAJOE, N. E. Brown. 

Syns. C. tartarica, Hort. Veitch. 
N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxvi. p. 621, fig. 121, p. 620. 

Introduced by us from Tartary, and valuable for the berries, of large 
size and of a fine bright red colour. 

DAVIDIA INVOLUCEATA, Baillon. 

Plantac Davidianas, pt. ii. p. 60, t. 10 ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1903, p. 4, fig. ; 
Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 236, fig. 98. 

This truly remarkable plant was first made known to science from 

362 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

specimens collected by Abbe David on the mountains of the Mu-Pin, west 
of Szechuan, Central China, in 1871. 

Seeds were later sent to M. Maurice de Vilmorin, in Paris in 1897, and a 
few plants raised. For its introduction to gardens in this country we are 
indebted to Wilson, who succeeded in introducing a quantity of fertile 
seed from which plants were raised in 1903. Davidia involucrata is a 
deciduous tree, with handsome cordate leaves, resembling those of the 
lime. The feature of the plant is the presence of two large white bracts 
subtending a cluster of red stamens, freely produced from dwarf shoots. 
So far the tree has proved perfectly hardy in the county of Surrey and of 
most vigorous growth, but the plants are yet too young to flower. 

DENDEOMBCON EIGIDUM, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5134 ; Jour, of Hort. July 31st, 1902, p. 102, with fig. ; Fl. des Serres, 
torn. iv. 2nd ser. 1861, p. 43 ; The Garden, 1896, vol. 1. p. 292, pi. 1087. 

This half-hardy shrubby plant with yellow poppy-like flowers, meriting 
the name Dendromecon or Tree-Poppy, was first discovered by David 
Douglas in California, in the dry rocky ranges from San Diego to Clear 
Lake, and it is also found more abundantly south of Point Conception 
and on Santa Eosa Island. Long after discovery it was only known from 
herbarium specimens until raised from seed sent home by William Lobb. 
Still rare in gardens, it needs the protection of a wall, except in favoured 
localities, but is undoubtedly a handsome plant, the length of time during 
which the bright yellow flowers are produced not the least valuable of 
many qualities. 

DEUTZIA DISCOLOE, Hemsl. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 371 ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1905, p. 2, fig. 

Several forms of this variable species have been introduced to Europe, 
principally through Jesuit missionaries who transmitted the seeds collected 
by natives in China. 

The variety piirpurascens is perhaps the best known, and has helped 
largely in the production of hybrid forms raised by M. Lemoine. The 
type, a dwarf shrub producing a wealth of small white or pinkish flowers, 
was introduced through Wilson, among numerous forms, from the 
Province of Hupeh, Central China. 



DEUTZIA GLOBOSA, Duthie. 

A species introduced from Western Hupeh, Central China, first flowered 
at Coombe Wood during the summer of 1905. 

Characterized by dense globose panicles of creamy-white, medium- 

363 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

sized flowers, the filaments of the stamens are petaloid but not lobed at 
the apex. 

DEUTZIA GEACILIS, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1851, p. 513 (advt.) ; Fl. des Serres, 1850-1851, torn. vi. t. 611. 

A hardy Japanese shrub grown in almost every garden for forcing 
purposes, with white flowers useful in winter or early spring. 

Introduced from Japan through Thomas Lobb, it was first exhibited on 
May 3rd 1851, at the Horticultural Society's Show, Chiswick, and again on 
May 14th of that year at the Eoyal Botanic Society's Show in Eegent's 
Park, on both occasions a Medal awarded. 

DEUTZIA MOLLIS, Duthie. 

A distinct species from Central China. 

The leaves ovate or elliptic lanceolate with the characteristic stellate 
hairs on the upper surface clothed beneath with a soft pubescence of a 
velvety appearance. 

The white flowers in a flat corymbose inflorescence. 

DEUTZIA PLANIFLOEA, Duthie. 

A medium-sized shrub with flowers of the purest white, raised from seed 
collected in Central China. 

The leaves somewhat membraneous, lanceolate acuminate, with serrate 
margins : the flowers in thyrsoid panicles ; the obtuse petals spread flat 
and the broad filaments prominently lobed. 

DEUTZIA EEFLEXA, Duthie. 

A species collected in Central China by Wilson, a somewhat slender- 
growing shrub with greyish wood and narrow lanceolate leaves serrate 
along the margin. The flowers on slender pedicels in corymbose panicles 
are pure white in colour, the lateral margins of each petal folded back have 
a distinct and curious appearance. 

DEUTZIA WILSONI, Duthie. 

A vigorous-growing species with coriaceous elliptic-lanceolate leaves, 
serrate along the margin, rough to the touch. 

The flowers, individually the largest known in the genus, are in erect 
thyrsoid panicles. 

It was raised from seed collected in Central China by Wilson, after 
whom it is named, and first flowered at Coombe Wood during the summer 
of 1905. 

364 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

DIEBVILLA SESSILIFOLIA, Buckl. 
Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 17, fig. 3, p. 14. 

A North American species with honey-yellow flowers, in dense heads on 
short cymes, imported from North Carolina in 1889, and first exhibited 
in flower in July 1897. 

DIPELTA FLOEIBUNDA, Maxim. 

A handsome deciduous shrub allied to the Weigela, with a great 
and probably undeserved reputation, introduced to cultivation through 
Wilson, who sent living roots in 1902, and in 1904 a supply of seed. 

The plant inhabits almost inaccessible cliffs, and seldom produces fertile 
seed. The flowers are tubular, white and pink in colour, freely produced ; 
plants growing at Coombe Wood have proved hardy, but not yet shown 
signs of flower. 

DIPTEEONIA SINENSIS, Oliver. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 22 ; Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxvii. p. 60, figs. 18, 19. 

A tree closely allied to the Maple with pinnate leaves of from five to 
seven pairs of ovate-lanceolate leaflets, with serrate margins. 

The small white polygamous flowers, in terminal panicles, are followed 
by numerous winged fruits which, composed of two connate carpels 
surrounded by a continuous membraneous wing, resemble those of the 
Wych elm. 

It was raised from seed from the Province of Hupeh, and is an 
interesting shrub. 

ELEUTHEEOCOCCUS HENEYI, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1711 ; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 403, fig. 151. 

An Araliaceous shrub discovered in the Province of Hupeh, Central 
China, and named in compliment to Dr. A. Henry. 

Wilson introduced it to cultivation from the same locality, plants raised 
from seed flowering at Coombe in August 1905. 

The plant clothed with five-foliate leaves, has spiny branches terminated 
by globular heads of flower, resembling the inflorescences of the Ivy. 
These are succeeded by jet-black fruits deeply coloured. 

The root bark is used as a drug by the natives. 

ELEUTHEEOCOCCUS LEUCOEEHIZUS, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. sub t. 1711 ; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 404, fig. 153. 

Like the preceding species, originally discovered by Dr. A. Henry and 
subsequently introduced to cultivation through Wilson. 

365 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

It is distinguished by the Chinese by the white bark of the root, famous 
as a drug, that of Eleutherococcus Henryi being red. 

EUPTELIA DAVIDIANA, Baill. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 2787. 

An extremely interesting tree, widely distributed in Central and Western 
China, where specimens have been obtained by many travellers, the first 
Pere David, after whom it is named. The species is variable, and 
different forms have at various times been given specific rank, but 
Mr. Hemsley (I.e. supra) does not find sufficient distinctive characters to 
form more than one species. 

Seed collected in the Province of Hupeh in 1900 germinated, and plants 
raised at Coombe Wood have proved perfectly hardy. 

The plant forms a shrub or small tree with neat, nearly orbicular leaves 
terminated by a thick mucro-like apex, and colours well in autumn ; the 
wood resembles that of the Hazel. 

EVODIA EUT^CAEPA, Benth. 

An interesting member of the Eue family, known in the Himalaya and 
Japan, introduced to cultivation from the Province of Hupeh, Central 
China. 

The pinnate leaves consist of four to six pairs of lanceolate leaflets 1 in. 
or more in length ; the petioles red and the under surface with a silky 
pubescence. 

The flowers, in terminal much-branched corymbs, are greenish-white in 
colour, with the powerful odour characteristic of the Eue family. 

FEAXINUS BEACTEATA, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 84. 

Specimens of this handsome Ash were first collected by Dr. A. Henry 
in the neighbourhood of Ichang, Central China, from which locality it was 
subsequently introduced. 

The leaves, very light and handsome, are composed of eight to eleven 
pairs of sub-opposite leaflets, glossy deep green above, bright green 
beneath, with entire margins, and the tree attains a height of some 40 ft. 

Mr. Hemsley (I.e. supra) remarks : "It differs from F. retusa, Champ., 
in having entire leaflets, less capillary pedicels, and obtuse fruits ; and 
from F. Griffithii, Clarke, in the very differently shaped fruit." 

FEAXINUS MAEIESII, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6678. 

An ally of the South European Manna Ash, which it resembles in a 
profusion of small white flower in dense broad panicles during the early 
spring months. 

366 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

A native of China, discovered in the province of Kiu-kiang by Charles 
Maries, who sent home seed from which plants were raised and flowered 
for the first time at Coombe in May 1882. 

FEEMONTIA CALIFOENICA, Torr. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5591 ; Fl. des Serres, 1877, p. 175 ; The Garden, 1873, vol. iii. p. 54, fig. ; 
id. 1882, vol. xxii. p. 115, fig. ; id. 1886, vol. xxix. p. 8, pi. 525 ; Flora and Sylva, 
vol. ii. p. 279, fig. 

This singular and beautiful hardy shrub was first raised in this country 
from seed sent by Mr. Eobert Wrench from California to the Gardens of 
the Horticultural Society, where a plant flowered for the first time in 
April 1854. The specimen remained unique for a number of years, as all 
attempts at propagation failed, but the plant died on removal when the 
arboretum at Chiswick was given up. 

Seed subsequently by William Lobb, from California, a number of 
plants were raised and afterwards distributed. 

Fremontia californica, the only species in the genus, is found on dry 
hills from Pitt Eiver to San Diego, abundant in the foothills of the 
Southern Sierra Nevada. It was first discovered during Colonel 
Fremont's adventurous expedition to the Eocky Mountains in 1846, and 
bears the name of that distinguished officer. 

HAMAMELIS AEBOEEA, Mast. 

Syns. H. japonica, Hook, f . 

Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 205, fig. 38; The Garden, 1891, vol. xxxix. p. 546, 

pi. 809 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6659. 

A handsome species, originally introduced from Japan, a near ally of the 
American Hamamelis virginica, but with larger and more showy flowers. 

It is a very desirable hardy shrub, not only for the structural interest 
the flowers possess for the botanist, but, from a horticultural standpoint, 
of considerable beauty, and, moreover, furnishing an additional link 
between the flora of the Eastern United States and that of Japan. 

The long strap-shaped crinkled petals of the flowers are of a bright 
yellow colour, the centre rich purple, borne in early spring while the plant 
is still leafless, and very conspicuous. 

HAMAMELIS MOLLIS, Oliv. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7884 ; Flora and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 104. 

This, the rarest and largest-flowered of all the Witch-Hazels, found 
in Kiang-su in the district of Kiu-kiang, China, by Charles Maries, 
and sent by him to Coombe, was for twenty years overlooked till 
Mr. George Nicholson, late Curator of the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, brought 
the plant to notice. 

367 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

HYDRANGEA HOETENSIA, DC., var. MAEIESII, Hort. 
The Garden, 1898, vol. xliv. p. 390, pi. 1196. 

This most curious of the many varieties of the common Hydrangea was 
introduced from Japan through Charles Maries. 

The inflorescence is remarkable in having sterile flowers confined 
to the outer edge of the corymb, of large size, each measuring from 
3 to 3f in. across, of a pink or delicate mauve-pink hue. 

HYDRANGEA HORTENSIA, DC., var. ROSEA. 

Rev. Hort. 1904, p. 544, col. pi. 

A beautiful form introduced from Japan, producing in a normal state 
flowers of a beautiful deep rose remarkable in that they assume a peculiar 
porcelain blue tint, for which a ferruginous soil is essential. 

HYDRANGEA LONGIPES, Hemsl. (non Franch.). 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 274. 

A new species first sent by Dr. Henry from the Province of Hupeh, 
Central China, and subsequently introduced to cultivation from the same 
locality. 

A shrub 2 to 3 ft. in height with long-stalked ovate-rotund leaves 
resembling those of Hydrangea scandens, and terminal cymes surrounded 
by white sterile blooms on stalks at some distance from the fertile flowers. 

LINDERA TZUMU, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 392. 

A tree 20 to 50 ft. high with variable foliage introduced from the 
Province of Hupeh, Central China. 

According to Bretschneider, this is the t'ze tree of the Chinese Classics, 
valued by the ancient Chinese for its timber. 

Of rapid growth in this country, seedling trees at Coombe Wood having 
attained a height of 8 ft. in four years ; the leaves broadly ovate, or 
rhomboid, cuneate at the base, are sometimes trilobed; the under side 
glaucous, the petioles and principal veins of a reddish tinge ; the young 
wood brightly spotted with purple. 

LIRIODENDRON CHINENSE, Sarg. 

Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, 1903, vol. i. p. 103, t. 51 ; Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. 
p. 370 ; Hooker's Ic. PI. 1905, pi. 2785 j Flora and Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. p. 202. 

This species was formerly regarded as a geographical form of the 
variable North American Tulip Tree, Liriodendron tulipifera, but more 
complete specimens have shown sufficient characters to render it a distinct 

368 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

species. It has been collected by several travellers, including Maries, 
Dr. A. Henry, and Wilson, and through the last named was introduced to 
cultivation. 

The flowers green, are smaller than those of L. tulipifera and more 
spreading ; when fully open they do not present the tulip-like appearance, 
there is a difference in the construction of the pistil, and the leaves 
are more glaucous. 

In the native habitat it forms a tree 15 to 20 ft. high, though occasionally 
isolated examples are met which greatly exceed this height. 

LONICEBA GYNOCHLAMYD^3A, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 362. 

A dwarf-growing shrub first from the Patung district, Central China, 
and subsequently introduced to cultivation from the Province of Hupeh. 

The flowers, remarkable for the cap-like production of the calyx over 
the connate bracteoles, are rose-coloured, produced on two-flowered 
peduncles in the axils of the leaves. 

LONICERA KCEHNEANA, Behd. 

Rehder in Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, 1902, pfc. i. pi. xxi. 

A Chinese species first sent as dried specimens from Central China by 
Dr. A. Henry, and " dedicated to Professor E. Kcehne, the distinguished 
German botanist, whose arrangement of the cultivated species of Lonicera 
in his Deutsche Dendrologie is the best and most natural hitherto 
published." 

A strong-growing shrub with ovate acuminate leaves, in the axils of 
which the two-flowered peduncles are produced, flowered at Coombe 
during the summer of 1905 from seed collected in Central China by 
Wilson. 

LONICEEA TBAGOPHYLLA, Hemsl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 8064; Hemsley in Jour. Linn Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 367; Jour. R.H.S. 1903, 
vol. xxviii. p. 63, fig. 24 ; Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 151, suppl. illtis. ; 
Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1905, p. 3, figs. ; Sargent's Trees and Shrubs, pi. xlvi. 

A Chinese Honeysuckle flowered in June 1904 at Coombe, figured in 
the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) in March 1906, the month of the 
publication of Hortus Veitchii. 

The flowers in dense heads, each composed of from twelve to fifteen 
yellow trumpet-shaped blooms, have exserted stamens. The blooms are 
the largest produced by any species of the sub-genus (Periclymenum), and 
the species is the only representative in Central and Eastern Asia of the 
almost exclusively Mediterranean sub-section Eucaprifolium, Spach. 

369 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

LOEOPETALUM CHINENSE, R. Br. 

Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 620; id. 1883, vol. xix. p. 152, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 7979. 

A native of the mountains of China, introduced through Charles 
Maries in 1880, a member of the family to which the Sweet Gums 
(Liquidamber) and Witch Hazels (Hamamelis) belong, and originally 
described under the name of H. chinensis by Eobert Brown in Abel's 
Narrative of a Journey in the interior of China, p. 375. 

A free blooming shrub with flowers clustered in small heads termi- 
nating the branches, the calyx pale green, the long linear strap-shaped 
petals pure white. 

As with many not perfectly hardy plants, it is not generally met with 
in gardens, but it blooms profusely in winter and early spring, in a small 
state, and is well adapted for conservatories and the winter garden during 
the early months of the year. 

MAGNOLIA SALICIFOLIA. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1902, p. 45. 

Of this Japanese species, not yet flowered in Europe, seed was collected 
on Mount Hakkoda by James H. Veitch, but failed to germinate, and was 
later successfully introduced through the Arnold Arboretum, U.S.A. 

A small tree with slender branches, willow-like leaves 5 to 6 in. long, 
light green above, silvery white beneath. 

MAGNOLIA SOULANGEANA, Ilort., var. NIGEA, Hort. 

Nicholson in The Garden, 1884, vol. xxv. p. 276, pi. 434. 

Mr. Nicholson, late Curator of Kew, the first authority of his day on 
cultivated trees and shrubs, is of opinion that this is of hybrid origin, the 
possible parents the purple-flowered Magnolia (M. obovata) and the Yulan 
(M. conspicua), and this is probable, as both the species suggested 
have been cultivated in the gardens of the Japanese and Chinese 
from time immemorial. 

The original plant from Japan through the late John Gould Veitch. 

MAGNOLIA STELLATA, Maxim. 

Syns. M. Halleana, S. B. Parsons ; Burgeria stellata, Sieb. & Zucc. 
The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. pi. cxxxii. ; PI. Mag. 1878, n.s. pi. 309; Bofc. Mag. t. 6370. 

A delightful hardy shrub long known to science as Burgeria stellata, a 
name founded on an erroneous observation as to the nature of the fruit, 

370 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

and subsequently as Magnolia Halleana, given by Mr. S. B. Parsons of 
Flushing, U.S.A., in compliment to Mr. G. E. Hall, who in 1862 intro- 
duced the plant to America. 

Found wild on Fuji-yama, it had long been cultivated, and those first 
sent home were obtained from gardens in Nagasaki by Oldham in 1862. 

Plants introduced by Messrs. Veitch from Japan, flowered for the first 
time in this country at Coombe in March 1878. 

The flowers star-shaped, pure white in colour, are produced early in the 
year before the leaves appear. 



MELIOSMA MYEIANTHA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Card. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 30, fig. 

An uncommon shrub, the only species of the genus, with small greenish- 
yellow flowers densely borne in branched panicles, resembling some species 
of Spiraea. The plant, though not perfectly hardy in all parts of England, 
flowers and seeds freely at Coombe "Wood. 

It was introduced from Japan, but has by no means a wide distribution. 

NEILLIA SINENSIS, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1540; Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 61. 

A beautiful hardy shrub, from Central China, which attains a height of 
from 4 to 5 ft., furnished with an elegant currant-like leafage, and 
produces in great abundance drooping racemes of rose-pink flowers. 

Perfectly hardy, and flowered for the first time in this country in the 
summer of 1904. 

NYSSA SINENSIS, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1964. 

A deciduous shrub or small tree discovered in the Province of Hupeh 
Central China, by Dr. A. Henry, and subsequently introduced to cultiva- 
tion from the same locality. 

The discovery of this genus in China and in the Himalaya is interest- 
ing as it was formerly supposed to be restricted to the Eastern United 
States. 

PEETYA SINENSIS, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 2214. 

A genus of the Mutisia group of the Composite*, first made known 
in China from specimens collected in the Province of Hupeh by 
Dr. A. .Henry. 

371 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

A bush some 6 ft. high of thin graceful reddish-purple stems clothed 
with glabrous oblong-lanceolate leaves in the axils of which the peduncled 
capitula of flowers are formed. 

Plants growing at Coombe Wood were raised from seed from Central 
China. 

POPULUS LASIOCAEPA, Oliver. 

Jour. K.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 65, fig. 27. 

Discovered by Dr. A. Henry as a tree 20 to 40 ft. high, in the Province 
of Hupeh, Central China, and introduced to cultivation from the same 
locality. 

The leaves are large, probably the largest of any species in the genus, 
the plant perfectly hardy. 

PEUNUS (CERASUS) PSEUDO-CEEASUS, Lindl, 

var. JAMES H. VEITCH. 
Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xix. pp. 466, 51V, fig. 79. 

The finest of all forms of the Japanese Cherry, cultivated in gardens for 
the beauty of their flowers. When travelling in that country, James H. 
Veitch heard by chance in Tokio of a nurseryman who specialized 
cherries in a district he was unable to visit, and he wrote for the most 
distinct forms the man grew. Subsequent trial in England proved all to 
be valueless save this variety. 

In this country it forms a small tree or bush-like shrub, with blossoms 
in early spring, later than in Japan. 

The deep rose-pink double flowers are some 2 in. in diameter, the 
young leaves serrated, of a bright bronze tint. 

PYEUS DELAVAYI, Franch. 

Plantss Delavayanae, 1890, p. 227. 

This species, one of the most interesting and ornamental of the whole 
family, attains the dimensions of an ordinary orchard apple tree, and in 
flower presents a similar appearance. 

The foliage of two forms, the young leaves pinnatifid and hairy, give 
the tree the appearance of a species of Crataegus ; the mature leaves 
obovate, entire, and nearly glabrous, present quite a different aspect. 
The interesting fruits ovoid in shape are about the size of those of Pyrus 
Maulei. 

Intermediate in structure between those of the quince and apple, 
having seeds arranged in rows as in the quince, but numerically the same 
as in the apple. 

A native of the high plateaux of Yunnan, first discovered by Pere 
Delavay, and subsequently introduced to cultivation. , 

372 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

EHODODENDEON CALENDULACEUM, Torr. 

Syns. Azalea calendulacea, Michux. 
Watson in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 742. 

A North American species, said to cover wide stretches of country in 
Virginia, introduced to Exeter in 1837, and very fragrant. 

The gorgeous flowers in June are of every shade of lemon-yellow to 
brilliant fire-red. Many forms appeared, raised in gardens by selection 
and cross-fertilization, to which varietal names have been given. 

EHODODENDEON DILATATUM, Miq. 

Syns. Azalea dilatata, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7681. 

A native of Japan, of the Azalea section of the genus, with deciduous 
foliage and flowers with only five stamens, first made known through 
Siebold, and introduced by us in 1883. 

EIBES GLACIALS, Franch. 

A species from Central China with leaves resembling those of the 
gooseberry and the wood as the scaly bark of the currant. 

The flowers inconspicuous, greenish, dioecious, followed by small red 
fruit. 

EIBES LOBBII, Asa Gray. 

Syns. JR. sulvestitum, Hook. 
Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xix. p. 11, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4931. 

A native of California introduced to Exeter through William Lobb, 
this hardy Currant is now seldom seen, although an early flowering 
character should commend it to the lover of hardy shrubs. 

The flowers, small and fuchsia-like, are dull purple in colour, the sepals 
tipped with green. 

EOS A SEEICEA, Lindl, var. PTEEACANTHA. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 260, figs. 98, 99. 

A form of the type with red spines dilated into wings at the base in an 
extraordinary degree, frequently the entire length of an internode ; the 
foliage neat and attractive, the flowers white, and the fruits yellow. 

Found by several travellers in various localities in China, and introduced 
to cultivation through Wilson, who met with it in the Province of Hupeh. 

373 sb 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

EOSA SOEBIFLOEA, Focke. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 227, fig. 96. 

A species closely allied to the Banksian Eose with numerous small 
white flowers, clustered in a corymbose inflorescence as in the Sorbus. 
From the heights in West Hupeh, it has not as yet flowered in this 
country. 

EOSE QUEEN ALEXANDEA. 

Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 30, fig. 

Eaised by Seden from Crimson Eambler, fertilized with Eosa multi- 
flora simplex, it was the Gold Medal Eose of the year 1901. Of 
climbing habit, clothed with large trusses of rich rose-coloured flowers 
in great profusion. 

EUBUS BAMBUSAEUM, Focke. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. sub fc. 1952. 

This handsome Eubus, first discovered by Dr. A. Henry, and intro- 
duced to cultivation through Wilson, who collected seed in the Province of 
Hupeh, Central China, in 1900. The leaves resemble those of E. Henryi, 
but being trilobed are so divided as to be trifoliate, and in exceptionally 
vigorous growths often five-foliate. 

The leaflets are narrow, lanceolate, resembling those of Bamboos or 
Willows, dark green above, covered on the under surface with a cream- 
white or dun-coloured indumentum. In some districts the leaves are 
dried and used as tea. 

The flowers, not showy, develop black edible fruit. 

This bramble is a handsome pillar plant of a vigorous constitution, 
the long trailing branches attaining a length of from 10 to 12 ft. in a 
summer's growth. 

EUBUS BIFLOEUS, Buch. 

Syria. R. leucodermis, Hort. (non Douglas). 
Bot. Mag. t. 4678. 

A handsome Bramble originally from Nepal, cultivated under the name 
of Eubus leucodermis, a name well-deserved from the pure white stem, 
but the name had already been given by Douglas to a North American 
species. 

E. biflorus is a curious ornamental plant, quite hardy, a striking object 
in the shrubbery from the white-washed appearance of the stems, which 
when examined are found to be covered by a minute, perfectly white, 
pulverulent substance. 

The pure white flowers are followed by orange-coloured fruit, edible 
and of pleasant flavour. 

374 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

EUBUS CHEOOSEPALUS, Focke. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1952. 

A species discovered by Dr. A. Henry, and later introduced to cultivation 
from Central China in 1900 . 

It is a simple-leaved species, the leaves aptly compared by Dr. W. 0. 
Focke, the author of the specific name, to those of Tilia alba. 

The flowers in a lax panicle are remarkable in having the inner surface 
of the reflexed sepals coloured compensation for the want of petals. 

RUBUS CONDUPLICATA, Duthie. 

A new species from the Province of Hupeh, Central China, through 
Wilson, who sent seed in 1900. 

Simple-leaved with trilobate leaves, dark green on the upper surface, 
white beneath with pinkish veins : the wood covered with a thick waxy 
white substance gives the plant a distinctly ornamental appearance. 

The white flowers are not sufficiently showy to be of value from a 
horticultural standpoint. 

EUBUS COEEANUS, Miq. 

Moore in Jour, of Bot. 1875, p. 230; Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (In. PI. S.), p. 230. 

An erect-growing bush, native of the Corean Archipelago and Central 
China, introduced to cultivation from Hupeh. 

The stems are covered with a conspicuous waxy white covering ; the 
leaves pinnate, with 2 to 3 pairs of pinnae and a terminal rhomboid 
leaflet, dark metallic green in colour, pale green beneath. 

The fruit varies in colour from red to yellow and black. 

EUBUS FLAGELLIFLOEUS, Focke. 

A handsome Eubus found in the mountain woods of Central China : 
a strong-growing plant with long whip-like growths 6 to 8 ft. in length, 
bearing white flowers, which suggested the specific name. 

The leaves handsome, cordate, acuminate, have an irregularly serrate 
margin. In the shade the leaves are beautifully marbled on the upper 
surface, as in certain forms of Eex Begonia ; the under surface covered 
with a thick cream- or dun-coloured tomentum, as is the wood of the 
young growth. 

EUBUS HYPAEGYEUS, Focke. 

This handsome Chinese bramble has trifoliate leaves of a peculiar 
metallic lustre on the upper surface, covered beneath with a white felt-like 
tomentum. 

375 



The young wood and spines are red, the small flowers pink, followed 
by woolly fruit. 

Eaised from seed collected in Central China, this fine species flowered 
at Coombe Wood in 1905. 

EUBUS ICHANGENSIS, Hemsl. & 0. Knntze. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 231. 

Introduced through Wilson, who collected seeds in 1901, in the neigh- 
bourhood of Ichang, in which locality it had previously been met with 
by Dr. Henry, from whose material it was described. 

Mr. Hemsley states (I.e. supra), "The elongated, cordiform, distantly 
toothed, glabrous, or early glabrescent leaves, associated with small 
flowers and few ovaries are especially characteristic of this species." 

RUBUS INNOMINATUS, 8. Moore. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 291, fig. 112. 

A handsome bramble introduced to cultivation from the Province of 
Hupeh, with leaves usually trifoliate, green above, white beneath ; the 
stems covered with a curiously soft pubescence which gives a velvety 
impression to the touch. 

The feature is the bright orange- scarlet colour of the fruit. 

Throughout the month of September, when the large panicles of these 
are at their best, the plant presents a remarkably striking and ornamental 
picture, as decorative as any spring-flowering shrub. The fruits edible, 
resemble in flavour those of the common blackberry, but differ in being 
of a larger size and more flat in general shape. 

RUBUS IREN^US, Focke. 

A trailing species with heart-shaped or occasionally slightly trilobed 
leaves, dark green above, dun-coloured beneath with serrate margins, 
suitable for covering low banks or for the margins of woods and planta- 
tions where the long shoots can ramble unrestricted. 

RUBUS LAMBERTIANUS, Ser., var. GLABER, Hemsl. 

A simple-leaved species with remarkable young shoots glandular and 
sticky to the touch, with the stipules of the leaves divided into about five 
unequal bristle-like segments. 

The leaves cordate at the base, slightly trilobed, acute, with dentate 
margins bi'ight green and glossy on the upper surface, are pale green 
beneath. 

376 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

The inflorescence consists of a terminal panicle of small white flower 
followed by red fruit. 

EUBUS LASIOSTYLUS, Focke. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7426 ; Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxiv. p. 170 ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 

1905, p. 6, figs. 

This handsome Chinese bramble was introduced to the Botanic Gardens 
of this country through the discoverer, Dr. Augustine Henry, in 1899, 
from the Province of Hupeh, and later sent home by Wilson, who found 
it in the same locality. 

Eemarkable for white stems, closely set with prickles, and a very 
woolly fruit of sub-globose shape, resembling a raspberry as it also 
does in flavour. 

EUBUS LEUCOCAEPUS, Benth. 

A species raised from seed collected in Central China. The leaves 
pinnate, consist of several pairs of pinnae ; the leaflets small with serrate 
margins. 

The flowers in small sessile clusters in the axils of those of the cur- 
rent season's growth are of a pink colour, individually small, followed 
by white or red fruit. 

EUBUS NIVEUS, Watt. 

A strong-growing species often reaching a height of 20 ft., clothed with 
three to five foliate leaves, covered with a soft pubescence which gives a 
satiny impression to the touch. 

The lateral leaflets oblique, the terminal triangular in outline with 
coarsely toothed margins, the under surface white. 

The small white flowers are in axillary and terminal corymbs followed 
by purplish fruit. 

EUBUS PALMATUS, Thunb. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7801. 

A white-flowered species with elegantly lobed palmate leaves, not 
perfectly hardy in other than favoured localities in this country, and a 
suitable subject for clothing pillars in the cool greenhouses or the winter 
garden. 

A native of the central mountains of Japan, Korea, and China, it was 
from the first-named country introduced to cultivation. 

EUBUS PAEKEEI, Hance. 

A species introduced through Wilson from the Province of Hupeh, 
Central China, where it is commonly met with in the wooded slopes of 
glens and gorges. 

377 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The leaves ovate acute, cordate at the base, with an irregularly toothed 
margin have a soft pubescence on the under surface. 

The flowers small, in large panicles, are followed by dull red fruit of an 
indifferent flavour. 



EUBUS PLAYFAIEII, Hemsl 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 235. 

A species named in compliment to Mr. G. M. H. Playfair, by whom it 
was discovered at Pakhoi, in the Province of Kwang-tung, South-Eastern 
China, in 1889, and introduced to cultivation from seed collected in 1901. 

Mr. Hemsley states (I.e. supra), " This is the only shrubby bramble 
with pedately divided leaves known to occur within our limits ; and it is 
a very well-marked species readily distinguished from the few other species 
of this group inhabiting Eastern Asia." 

EUBUS WILSONI, Duthie. 

A species raised from seed collected in Central China in 1901 by Wilson, 
after whom it is named. 

The leaves pinnate with two pairs of ovate-lanceolate pinnas and a 
terminal cordate leaflet, dark green above, paler beneath, have serrate 
margins. The wood of the stem is very prickly. 

SAPINDUS MUKOEOSSI, Gartn. 

This Chinese representative of the genus makes a handsome tree 20 to 
25 ft. high with pinnate leaves 1 to 1^ ft. in length. 

The flowers are small, white in colour, in very large panicles at the end 
of the branches. The fruits round in form, about f in. in diameter, have 
a horny coat which, saponaceous in water, is used as soap by the Chinese. 
The round very hard seeds are threaded and used as rosaries by the 
Buddhist priests. 

Plants are growing at Coombe Wood. 

SCHIZOPHEAGMA INTEGEIFOLIA, Oliver. 

Jour. E.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 62. 

A climbing or trailing plant remarkable in having an inflorescence 
surrounded by large white bracts, similar to those produced by Mussaenda 
frondosa. 

Plants introduced from Central China by Wilson have proved hardy at 
Coombe Wood, though at present too young to flower. 

378 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

SPIE^A HENEYI, Hemsl. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 61, fig. 20. 

A Chinese species, first detected by Dr. A. Henry, a compact shrub 
with neat foliage and white flowers in corymbs in the axils of the leaves 
along the whole length of the previous season's growth. 

Eaised from seed collected in Central China, the shrub has proved 
perfectly hardy and flowered with unusual freedom at Coombe Wood 
during the summer of 1904. 

SPIB^A VEITCHII, Hemsl. 

A new species discovered in Central China by E. H. Wilson and through 
him introduced to cultivation. 

The plant forms a neat compact shrub, with thin growths 6 to 8 ft. long, 
of a reddish-brown clothed with small glaucous-green, oblong-lanceolate 
leaves serrate along their apical portion. 

The flowers on the short side growths along the whole length of the 
previous year's shoots are in terminal corymbs pure white, very showy 
in a mass. 

SPIE.ZEA WILSONI, Duthie. 

A new species, in some respects intermediate between Spiraea Henryi 
and S. Veitchii. 

The flowers white, are in large flat corymbs composed of several 
smaller corymbs, and the peduncle and pedicels are covered with silky 
hair. 

A native of the scrub-clad mountains of Western Hupeh, 7,000-8,500 ft. 
elevation, it was first flowered during the summer of 1905 at Coombe 
Wood. 

STEPHENANDEA FLEXUOSA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1882-1883, p. 30. 

A graceful Eosaceous shrub of Spiraea-like habit, introduced through 
Charles Maries from Japan. 

The slender stems arch gracefully, are covered with crimson bark and 
furnished with trilobed deeply-cut leaves about 2 in. long, the flowers 
white, in small erect clusters. 

STEANSV^JSIA UNDULATA, Decnc. 

A handsome Photinia-like shrub with entire lance-shaped, coriaceous, 
shining leaves, entire along the margin with an undulate surface, collected 
in bunches at the end of the growths. 

The small white flowers are in flat corymbs, followed by brilliantly 

379 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

coloured hawthorn-like fruits, only equalled by the exquisite colouring of 
the foliage in the autumn. 

A form introduced with the type known as fructo-luteo has yellow 
fruit. 

STUAKTIA MONADELPHIA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

This species inhabits the forests of Central China at elevations of 
5,000-7,500 ft., forming a tree some 25 to 30 ft. in height, with a 
slender trunk ; the thin bark continually peels in flakes. 

The elliptic leaves are acuminate with a serrate margin, clothed with 
silky hairs on the principal veins of the under surface. 

The fragrant white flowers the same size as those of Stuartia Pseudo- 
camellia, but not so cup-shaped. 

STUAETIA PSEUDO-CAMELLIA, Maxim. 

Syns. 8. gran&iflora, Briot. 

Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 187, fig. 22; Bot. Mag. t. 7045; The Garden, 1893, 
vol. xliii. pi. 899 ; Rev. Hort. 1879, p. 430. 

A species closely allied to the old North American garden plants 
Stuartia pentagyna and S. virginica, the three constituting the whole 
of this interesting genus in cultivation in this country prior to the 
introduction of S. monadelphia from China. 

S. Pseudo-camellia was introduced from Japan, but appears to have 
been cultivated in the United States of America for several years ; and 
in France in the nursery of M.M. Thibaut and Keteleer as early as 1868. 

A handsome shrub, with creamy- white flowers resembling those of a 
single-flowered Camellia, and foliage at all times beautiful, in some 
seasons the brilliant crimson with gold autumnal tints render it excep- 
tionally attractive. 

STYEAX OBASSIA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 131, fig. 12 ; Jour, of Hort. 1888, p. 513, fig. 73 ; Bot. 

Mag. t. 7039. 

One of the most interesting of all hardy shrubs introduced from Japan, 
and first made known by Siebold and Zuccarini in Mora Japonica, 1835, 
vol. i. t. 56, where a description and figure are given. 

The difference in the size and form of the leaves is noticeable, the 
larger attaining 10 in. in diameter, sometimes alternate, some larger than 
others, and usually one of great size at the apex of the branch ; the bases 
of the petioles are sheaths, and entirely conceal the bud, as in 
the London Plane. The flowers pure white, with yellow stamens, are 
in racemes 4 to 7 in. long, with a hyacinth scent. 

380 



TREES AND SHRUBS-DECIDUOUS 

Styrax obassia was introduced to this country through Charles Maries, 
and flowered for the first time at Coombe Wood in June 1888. 

TETRACENTRON SINENSE, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1892. 

The representative of a new genus of the Magnoliaceae, first discovered 
by Dr. A. Henry in Hupeh, and subsequently introduced to cultivation 
from the same locality through Wilson : in the native habitat a tree 
20 to 50 ft. high, with alternate ovate-elliptic leaves, serrate along the 
margin. 

The flowers minute, on drooping spikes 4 to 6 in. in length, of singular 
botanical interest, are of little value from a horticultural standpoint. 

TILIA HENRYANA Szy. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxvii. p. 66. 

A species named in compliment to Dr. A. Henry, somewhat resembles 
Tilia Tuan, but has broader leaves and a different inflorescence. 

Raised from seed collected in Central China, the Lime has proved 
quite hardy. 

TILIA MIQUELIANA, Maxim. 

Bean in Gard. Chrou. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 766 ; Gard. and For. 1893, p. 113, fig. 19. 

Introduced through Charles Maries from Japan, where it forms a 
common forest tree on the hill slopes in the north island, often attaining 
a height of 100 ft. 

TILIA MIQUELIANA, Maxim., var. CHINENSIS, Szy. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1927. 

A form of the type first met with by Dr. A. Henry in the Province of 
Hupeh, Central China, and later introduced to cultivation from the same 
locality. 

TILIA OLIVERI, Szy. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. sub t. 1927. 

Discovered in Central China, and seed received at the same time by 
Messrs. Veitch in 1900. 

The leaves heart-shaped, unequal at the base, shortly acuminate at 
the apex, have unequally serrate margins ; glabrous on the upper surface, 
covered beneath with a white tomentum. 

381 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The plants growing at Coombe Wood are at present too young to show 
the true character. 

TILIA TUAN, Szy. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 66. 

A handsome Lime tree with obliquely-ovate leaves semi-cordate at the 
base, dark green on the upper surface, covered beneath with a stellate 
white tomentum : raised at Coombe Wood from seed collected in Central 
China. 

VIBUENUM CEANOTHOIDES, Wright. 

As the specific name implies, this Viburnum closely resembles a 
Ceanothus in general appearance, forming a bush 4 to 6 ft. in height with 
leaves cuneate and toothed. 

The flowers white, in corymbs, are succeeded by very numerous bright 
red fruit. 

A native of the plateaux of Yunnan, first discovered by W. Hancock 
Esq., of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, and described from 
material sent by him to Kew. 

VIBUENUM COEYLIFOLIUM, Hook. f. & Thorns. 

A species from Central China through Wilson, with dark green leaves, 
hairy on both surfaces and strongly veined, in outline and general 
appearance not unlike a Corylus. The wood in a young state is very 
tomentose. 

VIBUENUM DILATATUM, Thvrib. 

Syns. V. Mariesii, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6215. 

A handsome hardy shrub, with apparently a wide range in Japan, 
having been collected in various localities throughout the whole length 
of the archipelago. 

Introduced through Charles Maries, it flowered at Coombe Wood for 
the first time in England in June 1875. 

VITIS ACONITIFOLIA, Hance. 

Jour. R.H.S. vol. xxviii. 1904, p. 392, fig. 87. 

A Chinese species with leaves of variable form, but more or less 
resembling those of the Monkshood, introduced by the Veitchian firm, 
and exhibited for the first time in September 1903, before the Eoyal 
Horticultural Society. 

382 



TREES AND SHRUBS- DECIDUOUS 

VITIS AEMATA, Diels & Gilg. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 392, figs. 83, 88, 104; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1904, 

p. 4, fig. 

A peculiar vine with stems and leaf-stalks beset with fleshy processes 
resembling prickles. 

It is a native of Central China, from seed collected by Wilson, and 
plants raised proved hardy and very ornamental. 

The leaves heart-shaped, 7 to 8 in. broad and 9 to 10 in. long, are 
three-angled, glabrous in all parts; the autumnal colour rich and 
brilliant. 



VITIS ABMATA, Dicls & Gilg., var. VEITCHII, Hort. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 393, fig. 89, aiid col. pi. p. 389. 

A more vigorous form of the type, superior in every way, and probably 
the finest of the Chinese vines : the autumn coloration of a solid richness 
quite unexampled. 

VITIS DELAVAYI, Franch. 
Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 393, fig. 102. 

A Chinese species of great promise with trifoliate leaves, aptly named in 
compliment to Pere Delavay, a French missionary, to whom is due much 
for his labour in making known the Flora of the Chinese Empire. 

VITIS FLEXUOSA, Thunb., var. CHINENSIS. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 393, fig. 107. 

The leaves of Jihis form vary to a great extent, are glossy when young, 
the upper surface shining green, dull when mature, with traces of purple 
on the under surface as in the type. 

It was introduced to cultivation from the Province of Hupeh, Central 
China, in 1900. 

VITIS FLEXUOSA, Thunb., var. WILSONI. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 394, fig. 90; Veitclis' List of Novelties, 1905, p. 5, figs. 

A peculiarly attractive form of the type, from China through Wilson, 
after whom it is named. The leaves small, are remarkable for a deep 
bronzy-green hue, a shining metallic lustre, the under surface bright 
purple : first exhibited in September 1903. 

383 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

VITIS HENRYANA, Henisl. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 394, fig. 92; Veitclis' List of Novelties, 1905, p. 4, 
figs. ; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxviii. p. 309, fig. 122. 

This Chinese species was first collected by Dr. A. Henry, in whose 
honour the vine is named. 

A trailing subject with prettily variegated leaves of five lance-shaped 
leaflets and serrate margins : the variegation silvery white lines margined 
with pink along the principal veins, the interspaces of the darkest green. 

It was introduced by Wilson. 

VITIS INCONSTANS, Miq. 

Syns. Ampelopsis tricuspidata, Sieb. & Zucc. ; A. Veitchii, Horfc. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1869, p. 838 ; Lynch in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 664, 
fig. ; La Belg. Hort. 1877, vol. xxvii. p. 224. 

Introduced to Europe from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch, and 
distributed under the provisional name of Ampelopsis Veitchii. 

It is believed to have been previously sent by Oldham to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, and is stated to have been known in the United States 
of America prior to cultivation in Great Britain. 

Scarcely any other climber has attained so great a popularity, and no 
climber requires so little attention when once planted. It withstands the 
hot, dry, smoky atmosphere of towns with impunity, and in autumn the 
foliage assumes a brilliant tint of crimson quite unequalled in the plant 
kingdom. 

VITIS LEEOIDES, Maxim. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 395, figs. 95, 96. 

A pinnate-leaved vine, the leaves in five leaflets resembling those of the 
allied genus, Leea, introduced from Central China. 

A handsome species, the under surface of the foliage coloured bright 
claret-purple, a striking contrast to the glaucous-green hue of the upper 
half. 

VITIS MEGALOPHYLLA, Diets & Gilg. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 395, figs. 86, 97. 

The most remarkable of all Chinese species of Vitis, with pinnate or 
bipinnate leaves 2 to 3 ft. across, resembling individually those produced 
by some Araliads or Kcelreuteria paniculata, dark green on the upper sur- 
face, pale glaucous-green beneath, glabrous in all parts. The stems 
of the same glaucous-green hue as the under surface of the leaves, and of 
rapid growth, attain a height of 8 to 10 ft. in a season. 

384 



TREES AND SHRUBS DECIDUOUS 

One of the most handsome climbing plants, of light and graceful 
appearance, a valuable addition to pergola and pillar plants, hardy in the 
British Isles. 

VITIS OBTECTA, Watt. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 395. 

A compound-leaved species from China through Wilson with digitate 
leaves resembling in appearance those of a miniature horse-chestnut ; the 
terminal leaflet, the largest, measures from 4 to 5 in. in length, the 
smallest about 2| in., oblanceolate in outline terminated by an acuminate 
point. 

VITIS EEPENS, W. & A. 

A native of India, first made known to science from specimens collected 
in that country. Introduced from Central China through Wilson, who 
sent seed in 1901, and of little interest. 

The leaves of the species are dark green, sometimes slightly trilobed 
with bidentate margins and red petioles. 

The specific name repens appears to have been given in allusion to the 
rambling habit of growth characterizing the species. 

VITIS SINENSIS, Diels & Gilg. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 396, fig. 99. 

A species with very variable leaves, those at the base usually simple, 
broadly ovate in outline, more or less trifid ; later more lobed, they 
become at about 5 ft. from the ground deeply cut into three or five 
distinct leaflets; the figure in the Journal of the Koyal Horticultural 
Society (Z.c. supra) shows the two extreme forms of leaf-variation. 

It was exhibited for the first time before the Royal Horticultural Society 
on September 1st, 1903. 

VITIS THOMSONI, If. Laws. 

The Garden, 1903, vol. Ixiv. p. 203, fig. ; Jour. E.H.S. 1904, vol. xxviii. p. 396, 
figs. 85, 100 ; Veitchs' List of Novelties, 1904, p. 4, fig. 

A graceful vine with purple leaves and stems, the former digitately 
compound, composed of five small leaflets, the terminal, measuring 3| in. 
in length by 1 in. in breadth, the largest. 

When first produced of a bright claret-purple, ultimately suffused on 
the upper surface with green as the plant matures, but on the under 
the purple hue retained all through the summer, glistens with a metallic 
lustre. 

As an ornamental species perhaps one of the best of the Chinese vines 
and certain to become popular. 

385 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

VITIS TOMENTOSA, Planch. 

A Chinese species with cordate leaves, sometimes slightly trilobed, 
resembling those of the common vine (Vitis vinifera). 

The young wood, petioles, the upper and under surface of the leaf 
are covered with soft hair. 

ZELKOVA ACUMINATA, Planch. 

Syns. Z. Keaki, Maxim. ; Planera acuminata, Lindl. 

Nicholson in Woods and Forests, 1884, p. 176, figs. ; Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1862. 

p. 428. 

A handsome deciduous tree discovered near Yeddo, Japan, by the late 
John Gould Veitch, through whom it was introduced to this country. 

In the native habitat a tree 90 to 100 ft. in height, with a straight 
stem, not unlike an elm. 

The very valuable timber used by the Japanese in the construction of 
houses, ships, and the best kind of cabinet work, is hard and takes a fine 
polish ; the gnarled stems and roots are used for the best kinds of lacquer 
work. So far in this country the tree has not become common, and 
specimens are of comparatively small dimensions, but the light graceful 
foliage, most pronounced in early spring, should commend the species to 
a wide class of planters. 



386 



TREES AND SHRUBS 
EVERGREEN AND CLIMBING 

PLANTS 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN AND 
CLIMBING PLANTS 



ABELIA SPATHULATA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6601. 

A beautiful free-flowering hardy shrub introduced from Japan through 
Charles Maries. 

The flowers in pairs, white with a yellow throat, are subtended by a rosy 
calyx of four or five spreading lobes. 

AEUNDINAEIA NITIDA, Mitford. 

Syns. A. Khasiana, Hort. (non Munro). 
Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxir. p. 211, fig. ; Mitford in The Bamboo Garden, p. 73, fig. 

Eaised at Coombe from seed received in 1889 from Dr. Eegel, at that 
time Director of the Botanic Gardens, St. Petersburg. 

It is described in The Bamboo Garden (I.e. supra) as "By far the 
daintiest and most attractive of all its genus," and the tale is : 

"The story of this lovely species is somewhat curious. When the 
Bamboo Garden was being formed at Kew, Mr. Bean came across it in 
Messrs. Veitchs' nursery at Coombe Wood, where it was then named 
Bambusa nigra. ... At that time the only Arundinaria known to have 
black stems was the Himalayan A. Khasiana, and with this species the 
plant now under notice was conjecturally identified. As A. Khasiana, 
accordingly, it was described by Mr. Bean in the Gardeners' Chronicle 
and by myself in The Garden. Attention, however, was called to the 
subject by Mr. Gamble's monograph of the Bambuseae of British India, 
from which it is clear that this Arundinaria agrees only in its purple-black 
stems with A. Khasiana, and, moreover, that there is not among the 
Bambuseae of the Himalayas any known plant corresponding with it." 

Further inquiry showed that the seed received from Dr. Eegel had 
been collected in North Szechuan by the Eussian, Potanin, and a new 
name required, nitida was chosen as appropriate to its brilliancy and 
beauty ; an unusually graceful species. 

AEUNDINAEIA VEITCHII, N. E. Brown. 

Syns. Bamlusa Veitchii, Carriere; B. allo-inarginata, Hort. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 521; Mitford in The Bamboo Garden, 

p. 77, fig. 

A dwarf-growing species from Japan, some 2 ft. high, with leaves 

389 c c 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

7 in. long by 2 in. broad, green on the upper surface, glaucous 
beneath. 

The edges wither and turn white in autumn, the plant assuming a 
half -dead appearance during the winter months. The thick new foliage 
of the spring is robust, and for ousting weeds and noxious rubbish this 
Bamboo is very valuable. 

AZARA MICROPHYLLA, Hook. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1874, vol. i. p. 81, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, p. 3, fig. 

A neat evergreen shrub, a native of Valdivia, introduced through 
Richard Pearce. 

From the distichous arrangement of the shoots, the branches spread in 
one plane ; the small, dark, shining green leaves in pairs, one of each pair 
darker than the other and slightly different in form. 

The flowers small, inconspicuous, numerous, with a vanilla-like fragrance, 
are succeeded by bright red ornamental fruit. 

In the West of England Azara microphylla forms a small tree 20 to 30 ft. 
high, with neat shining evergreen foliage. 

BALBISIA VERTICILLATA, Cav. 

Syns. Cruckshanksia cistiflora, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6170. 

Balbisia verticillata is a half-hardy evergreen shrub, with yellow flowers 
resembling a Cistus or an ,ZEnothera, introduced to this country for the 
first time by the Horticultural Society in 1825, and subsequently lost ; it 
was later sent to the Veitchian house, and flowered in September 1875. 

Like other plants that love a cool, dry atmosphere, B. verticillata, 
difficult to cultivate, is liable to damp in a long wet winter. 

It has a wide range in Chili and Peru, and is known to the natives of 
the country as the Flore de San Jose. 

BERBERIDOPSIS CORALLINA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5343. 

This charming evergreen shrub, a native of the Valdivian forests, 
introduced to this country through Pearce, is not only a beautiful plant, 
but botanically one of the most interesting, as it connects the two 
natural orders Berberidese and Lardizabalse united by Bentham and 
Hooker in the Genera Plantarum previous to its discovery a link which 
proved the theory correct. 

It is not a little remarkable that such a striking plant should have 
remained so long unknown. 

The deep coral-red flowers, from which the plant takes its name, are 

390 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

on slender deep-red pedicels, usually in pairs, in the axils of the upper 
leaves arranged in drooping terminal racemes, of a thick consistence with 
a shining surface. 

Unfortunately not perfectly hardy, there are in the south-west corner of 
England fine examples growing in the open. 

BEEBEEIS ACUMINATA, Franch. 

Plantae Delavayanse, t. 38. 

This fine evergreen species was first made known through Pere Delavay, 
who collected it in Central China in 1882. 

In 1900 seeds were sent from the same locality, and plants raised 
flowered at Coombe Wood in 1904. 

The foliage is distinct and handsome, 5 to 6 in. long, narrow, lanceolate, 
acuminate, with spiny margins : the young wood bright red. 

The flowers in the axils of the uppermost leaves are large for a 
Berberis, creamy yellow in colour, on slender peduncles. 

BEEBEEIS CONGESTIPLOEA, Gay, var. HAKEOIDES, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6770 ; Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxix. p. 295, fig. 

This striking plant is quite unlike any other Barberry in cultivation. 

It forms a large bush of decurved branches loaded with globose 
masses of yellow flower, sessile in the axils of the leaves and along the 
leafless terminations of the branches. 

It was introduced from the Cordillera of Chile through Eichard Pearce 
in 1861, and flowers annually at Coombe Wood. 

BEEBEEIS DAEWINII, Hook. 

Moore in Gard. Mag. Bot. 1851, p. 129, fig. ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 1851, t. 4-6; Bot. Mag. 
t. 4590 ; Fl. des Serres, torn. vii. p. 47 ; Gard. Chron. 1851, p. 167 ; id. 1884, 
vol. xxi. p. 452. 

First discovered by the celebrated Charles Darwin, and named in 
compliment to him. 

Probably the best known, if not the most beautiful, of all the species of 
Berberis at present in cultivation, introduced by William Lobb in 1849 
from Chiloe, an island off the south coast of Chili. 

The neat glossy foliage and rich golden-yellow flowers beautifully tinged 
with red are borne in dense profusion in early spring. A writer in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle (I.e. supra) states : " If Messrs. Veitch had done 
nothing else towards beautifying our gardens, the introduction of this 
single species would be enough to earn the gratitude of the whole 
gardening world." 

It is further interesting as one of the parents of B. x stenophylla, a 
very widely grown garden hybrid. 

391 



BEEBEEIS WALLICHIANA, DC. 

Syns. B. Jainesoni, Hort. (non Lindl.). 
Bot. Mag. t. 4656 ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. vol. i. pp. 12 and 79, fig. 

Originally detected in Nepal by Dr. Wallich, after whom it is named, 
and sent for cultivation through Thomas Lobb, and shortly afterwards by 
Dr. Hooker, from the Eastern Himalaya. 



CAMELLIA GEIJSII, Hance. 

A Camellia closely allied to the attractive little Japanese species, 
C. Sasanqua, inhabiting the glens and gorges of the Yangtsze and its 
chief tributaries at elevations of 1,000-2,000 ft. 

An attractive shrub, seldom exceeding 5 ft. in height, with neat 
lanceolate-acuminate shining leaves and ivory-white flowers 1 to 1| in. 
in diameter, produced abundantly in the early spring, and at intervals 
till late in autumn. 

Introduced to cultivation through Wilson from Central China in 1901. 



CAMELLIA SASANQUA, Thunb. 

The Garden, 1893, vol. xliv. p. 328, pi. 930 ; Bot. Mag. i. 5152. 

There are several forms of this beautiful Camellia in a wild state, and 
numerous garden varieties. 

Long known in gardens, having been introduced by the East India 
Company in the early part of the 18th century, it appears to have been 
subsequently lost to British horticulture till re-introduced from Japan 
through Charles Maries. 



CARYOPTERIS MASTACANTHUS, Schaucr. 

Syns. Nepeta incana, Thuub. 

The Garden, 1883, vol. xxiv. p. 523, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6799; Gard. Chron. 1884, 
vol. xxi. p. 148, fig. 30 ; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1846, t. 2 ; La Belg. Hort. 1893, p. 273, 
col. pi. 

Caryopteris Mastacanthus was first sent to this country by Fortune 
who found it wild near Canton. 

First cultivated as a greenhouse plant, it was discarded for more showy 
occupants, and not being perfectly hardy was ultimately lost to cultiva- 
tion. 

For its re-introduction we are indebted to Charles Maries, who sent 
seed from China. 

392 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

CASTANOPSIS CHEYSOPHYLLA, A. DC. 

Syns. Castanea cJirysophylla, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 411, fig. 120; id. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 152, fig. 59; 

Bot. Mag. t. 4953. 

A representative of a most remarkable genus, intermediate in character 
between the oak and the chestnut, the " Golden-Leaved Chestnut." The 
name in allusion to the bright golden-yellow colour of the under surface 
of the leaves, the upper bright lustrous green ; as the branches move 
to the wind, the contrast presented by the two surfaces is singularly 
conspicuous. 

A native of Oregon, a small tree, of a shrubby nature, found at high 
elevations on the Californian coast range south of the Bay of San 
Francisco. It attains full size and beauty in the humid climate of the 
coast valleys of Northern California, and is one of the noblest of the 
forest inhabitants, reaching a height of 100 to 150 ft., frequently free 
of branches up to 80 ft. above ground. Seed sent from California by 
William Lobb, probably about the year 1853, from which plants were 
raised. The finest specimen in this country is at Tortworth Court, 
Gloucestershire, the seat of Earl Ducie, which bears fruit freely every 
year, and from which plants have been raised. 

There is also a good specimen in the gardens at Pencarrow, Cornwall. 



CEANOTHUS FLOEIBUNDUS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4806 ; Watson, Gray and Brewer, Botany of California, vol. i. p. 104. 

A handsome and interesting hardy species raised from seed sent from 
California by William Lobb. 

In Botany of California (I.e. supra) is written: "This species is as 
yet known only from the figure and original description drawn from 
cultivated specimens. But for the peculiar inflorescence it might be a 
form of Ceanothus dentatus." 

The flowers are of the richest mazarine-blue that can be imagined, 
in numerous capitate globose corymbs, crowded at the extremity of 
numerous short stubby branches. 

CEANOTHUS LOBBIANUS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4810 ; Fl. des Serres, 1854-1855, torn. x. p. 125. 

This Californian species, introduced to Exeter by William Lobb, has 
many points in common with Ceanothus thyrsiflorus, and is possibly a 
hybrid form of that species. 

393 



CEANOTHUS OEEGANUS, Nutt. MSS. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5177. 

This species was first detected by Douglas in the woods of Oregon, 
frequent from the Blue Mountains to the sea, and was also found by 
Nuttall and Tolmie ; introduced to this country through William Lobb 
from the same locality; the flowers white, in copious lateral panicles 
during the month of May. The plant is now rarely seen. 



GEANOTHUS PAPILLOSUS, Torr. & Gray. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4815. 

One of the discoveries of David Douglas, for the Horticultural Society 
of London, though not introduced to this country until William Lobb 
sent seed to Exeter, from which plants raised flowered in an open border 
for the first time in June 1854. 



CEANOTHUS VEITCHIANUS, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5127; Fl. des Serres, torn. iii. 2nd ser. 1858, p. 171; Sargent, Silva of 
North America, vol. ii. p. 43. 

A magnificent hardy shrub introduced from California through William 
Lobb, and generally the most successful of the genus. 

Though closely allied to Ceanothus floribundus, C. papillosus, and C. 
Lobbianus, it is distinguished by its foliage, and surpasses these in an 
abundance of bright mazarine-blue flowers, and a glossy, almost varnished, 
leaf -surf ace. 

C. thyrsiflorus shows a tendency to cross with other species and 
produce natural hybrids ; several had been suspected, and Dr. Parry, 
who long studied the Californian Ceanothus in the field, reached the 
conclusion that C. Lobbianus and C. Veitchianus are hybrids of this 
species. 

CEANOTHUS VELUTINUS, Douglas. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5165. 

This species was first found on the Eocky Mountains, at considerable 
elevations, by David Douglas, but not introduced to cultivation until sent 
home by William Lobb. 

A white-flowered shrub with singularly dark-green leaves, glossy from 
an aromatic resin exuded in hot weather, the under side velvety with a 
whitish down. 

394 




CEANOTHUS VEITCHIANUS 

BICTON, DEVON 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

CLEMATIS AEMANDI, Franch. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 58, fig. 14; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 30, 

suppl. ill ii s. 

An evergreen species of Clematis allied to C. Meyeniana, and by some 
botanists considered only a form. 

A native of Central and Western China, frequently met with at altitudes 
above 3,000 ft. on open scrub-clad mountains. 

The flowers pure white, often rosy-pink at the back, 2 in. in diam., are 
in dense axillary clusters, the trifoliate evergreen leaves of leathery 
texture. Plants, from seed sent from Central China, flowered for the first 
time in this country at Coombe Wood in April 1905. 



CLEYEEA FOETUNEI, Hook. f. 

Syns. Eurya latifolia, Hort., var. variegata. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7434; Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 398 (advt.). 

A handsome Japanese shrub, introduced to this country through the 
late John Gould Veitch, and about the same time by Fortune. 

It is half-hardy except in favoured localities, remarkable for the great 
beauty of the bright green leaves, variegated with golden-yellow, scarlet 
towards the margin. 

The plant long in cultivation under the name of Eurya, till specimens 
ultimately flowered which proved it to be a species of Cleyera. 



COTONEASTEE APPLANATA, Duthie. 

An important addition to a genus of useful garden shrubs, raised from 
seed collected in Central China in 1900. The branches have a tendency 
to grow at right angles to the erect main stem in one plane only, and 
the plant is naturally adapted for growing on trellises or against a wall, 
and in such situations the neat dark-green foliage, and in autumn the 
brilliant scarlet berries, are particularly effective. The leaves small, heart- 
shaped, I in. long by \ in. broad, dark green above, covered beneath 
with a white tomentum. 



COTONEASTEE BULLATA, Duthie. 

This fine Cotoneaster, a new species raised from seed collected in 
Central China in 1900, has leaves dark green on the upper surface, paler 
beneath, slightly tomentose along the midrib and principal veins; they 
measure 2 in. long by lj in. broad, the margins entire, the surface bullate, 
suggesting the specific name. 

395 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

COTONEASTEE HUMIFUSA, Duthie. 

A dense-growing creeping species, introduced from Central China 
through Wilson, the leaves dark green above, pale and slightly tomentose 
on the under surface, 1 in. long by f in. broad. 

The long shoots run over the ground as a carpet of bright green foliage, 
in autumn studded with vivid scarlet fruit. 

The habit of this plant is admirably adapted for covering banks or 
rockeries. 

DESFONTAINEA SPINOSA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 564 (Notice of New Plants) ; id. 1854, p. 287 ; Bot. Mag. t. 4781 ; 
Fl. des Serres, torn. ix. p. 207. 

An evergreen shrub with glossy holly-like leaves and tubular flowers 
often 2 in. long, bright scarlet, tipped with yellow. 

Unfortunately not hardy in all localities, it is worth growing as a pot 
plant, if protected during winter and plunged in borders to flower in 
the summer months. 

The plant was long a puzzle to systematic botanists, who differed in 
their opinion as to its affinities and the exact position in the Natural 
System, but it was finally placed in Loganiacese, a family of which the 
Buddleia is a familiar example. 

Desfontainea spinosa was introduced to gardens through William 
Lobb, who sent plants to Exeter, where it flowered for the first time in 
August 1853. 

ELJE AGNUS MACEOPHYLLA, Thunb. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7638. 

A handsome species, the largest-leaved in the genus, with the young 
wood, leaves, flowers, and fruits, the latter bright red in colour, and very 
ornamental, covered with the characteristic lepidote scales. 

It was introduced from Japan to Coombe Wood by Charles Maries, in 
1879, and is perfectly hardy. 

EMBOTHEIUM COCCINEUM, Forst. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 564 (Notice of New Plants) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4856; Fl. des Serres, 
1858, torn. iii. 2nd ser. p. 37 ; The Florist, 1858, vol. xi. n.s. pi. 135 ; The Garden, 
1876, vol. x. p. 566; pi. li. 

A handsome evergreen shrub with racemes of the richest scarlet 
in profusion at the end of April and the beginning of May, justifying 
the popular appellation of " Flame Bush." 

Like other South American shrubs not perfectly hardy in all parts of 
this country, it succeeds admirably in South Devon, Cornwall, and 
Ireland. 

Interesting as a member of the order Proteaceae, an order representative 

39G 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

of Australian plants, formerly much cultivated in glasshouses in this 
country, although seldom seen in beds or borders. 

Embothrium coccineum is a native of the Straits of Magellan and 
Tierra del Fuego, introduced through William Lobb, and later by Pearce. 
There are two forms, one having much brighter-coloured flowers than 
the other. 

It flowered for the first time in this country at Exeter in May 1853. 



ENKIANTHUS CAMPANULATUS, Nichols. 

Nich. Diet. Gard. vol. i. p. 510; Bot. Mag. t. 7059. 

A native of the northern part of Japan, frequently collected, though in 
the more southern provinces only known in cultivation, a pretty, quite 
hardy ericaceous shrub bearing in abundance in the spring of the year 
small bell- shaped ochreous-red flowers. 

Charles Maries sent it to English gardens. 

ESCALLONIA x LANGLEYENSIS, Hart. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 17, fig. p. 15 ; id. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 11, fig. 4. 

A valuable hybrid raised by Seden at Langley by crossing Escallonia 
Philippiana with the pollen of the dark variety of E. macrantha known 
in gardens as sanguined. Perfectly hardy, of semi-scandent habit, 
in many respects intermediate between the two parents ; the slender 
elongated branches furnished with small oval leaves of a dark lustrous 
green, produce along their whole length numerous erect branchlets, each 
with four to seven bright rose-carmine flowers. 

ESCALLONIA MACEANTHA, Hook. & Arn. 

Bot, Mag. t. 4473 ; Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 371 (Report of Exhibition) ; Fl. des Serres, 

1850, p. 305. 

First made known by Mr. Cuming, and shortly afterwards introduced 
in a living state through William Lobb, from Chiloe, it flowered in 1848, 
and, exhibited at the Garden Exhibition of the Horticultural Society 
held in July of that year, is now one of the most generally planted of the 
genus. 

As a subject for sea-side planting, few shrubs are more charming or 
useful, combining beautiful glossy foliage with a profusion of rose-carmine 
flowers in early spring, and a dense habit of growth ; a valuable subject 
for hedge-work in warmer spots. 

Along the Cornish coast it may be seen in quantity, and the flowers 
are sold in the streets of watering-places. 

397 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ESCALLONIA MONTANA, Philippi. 

Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 947. 

This plant introduced from the mountains of Valdivia through Eichard 
Pearce, first flowered in 1873. 

The species closely allied to Escallonia rubra, has reddish blossoms and 
is not quite hardy, except in favoured localities. 

ESCALLONIA OEGANENSIS, Gardn. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4274. 

This species first detected by Gardner, William Lobb sent seed about 
the same time from the Organ Mountains to Exeter, from which plants 
raised flowered during the summer of 1846. 

The blooms of a deep rose colour, the midrib and margins of the leaves 
tinted red. 

ESCALLONIA PHILIPPIANA, Mast. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 947 ; id. 1878, vol. x. p. 109, fig. ; Bean in Gard. Chron. 

1893, vol. xiv. p. 60. 

This, one of the most distinct and the hardiest of all Escallonias in 
cultivation, was introduced from Valdivia through Eichard Pearce, and 
first flowered in July 1873. 

The pure white flowers, in dense profusion during the summer months, 
give the plant the appearance of some of the Spiraeas. 

It is further interesting as one of the parents of E. x langleyensis, 
a really valuable cross. 

ESCALLONIA PTEEOCLADON, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 36, with fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4827. 

A small hardy shrub, with leaves like a small-leaved myrtle, and 
pretty Epacris-like flowers, white tinged with red, which grows to a 
height of some 4 to 5 ft. ; an abundant, fragrant bloomer. 

The specific name is in allusion to the wings which clothe the young 
stems, but which in a measure peel off and disappear as the plant 
ages. 

It is a native of Western Patagonia, first detected by William Lobb, 
who sent plants to Exeter which flowered in July 1854, on which occasion 
it was exhibited at one of the Horticultural Society's exhibitions held at 
Chiswick. 

EUCEYPHIA COEDIFOLIA, Cav. 

Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 246, 247, fig. 

This species flowered, probably for the first time in Europe, at Coombe 

398 



J 



TREES AND SHRUBSEVERGREEN 

Wood during the summer of 1897, and from material supplied from that 
source the figure in the Gardeners' Chronicle (I.e. supra] was prepared. 

A native of Chili, attaining a height of 30 ft. or more, the dark 
persistent foliage sets off to advantage the snowy white flowers : not so 
hardy as the beautiful Eucryphia pinnatifolia, except in southern or south- 
western counties a sheltered position is required. 



EUCEYPHIA PINNATIFOLIA, Gay. 

Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. i. p. 337; The Garden, vol. xii. p. 544, col. pi. ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 7067 ; Flora and Sylva, vol. i. p. 73, fig. p. 41. 

An exceptionally fine and most interesting shrub or small tree from 
Chili, very locally distributed, confined, as far as at present known, to the 
Cordillera of Concepcion, where it forms a small tree about 10 ft. high, 
called " Nirhe " by the people. 

The flowers in August, produced in immense quantities, are pure white, 
and in shape and set of the stamens similar to the ordinary St. John's 
Wort or a Stuartia. 

The stamens are numerous, with long filaments tipped with golden- 
yellow anthers, red when the flower first expands, a contrast to the pure 
white perianth ; they persist after the petals have fallen, and in them- 
selves are very ornamental. 

It will always remain a very choice shrub in this country on account of 
the difficulty of propagation and an intense objection to transplanting, 
but when once established no further attention is required. 



EUONYMUS BADICANS, Sieb. & Zucc., FOLIIS VARIEGATIS. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 398 (advt.). 

A very pretty little shrub from Japan, of neat habit, small ovate leaves 
of a bright green, blotched and margined with silvery white. 

FAGUS OBLIQUA, Mirb. 

Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 563 (Notice of Novelties for the year 1849). 

A handsome evergreen beech of great beauty growing from 30 to 40 ft. 
in height, and inhabiting Chili and Patagonia, whence it was introduced 
by William Lobb. 

It is one of the Bobles of the Chilenos, and is of value for a very 
solid, close-grained, heavy wood. 

According to Sir Joseph Hooker, it occupies only the lower elevations of 
the mountains, and so cannot be perfectly hardy. 

399 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

GAULTHEEIA FEEEUGINEA, Cham. & Schlecht. 

Syns. Andromeda hirsuta, Arrab. 
Gard. Chron. 1844, p. 38 (Report of Horticultiiral Society's Show) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4697. 

A half-hardy evergreen shrub from the Organ Mountains, Brazil, 
through William Lobb, exhibited in flower for the first time before the 
Horticultural Society in January 1844. 

The figure in the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) was prepared from 
plants raised at the Comely Bank Nursery, 'Edinburgh, in 1852, from seed 
collected by Gardner in the same locality as Lobb. 

It is a handsome plant with urn-shaped drooping rose-pink flowers 
in short racemes from the axil of the leaf. 

HAPLOPAPUS SPINULOSUS, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6302. 

This low bushy sub-shrub, with pinnatifid spiny leaves and numerous 
bright yellow composite flowers which open late in the year, native of 
the prairies which border the Eocky Mountains, from the boundary of 
the British possessions as far south as New Mexico. 

It was raised from seed and first flowered in August 1874. 

HYMENANTHEKA CEASSIFOLIA, Hook. f. 

Card. Chron. 1875, vol. iii. p. 237; id. 1892, vol. xii. p. 411, fig. reproduced; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 14, fig. ; The Garden, 1877, vol. xi. p. 145, fig. 

A hardy evergreen shrub of the violet family, with small inconspicuous 
blossoms, succeeded by pure white berries ; an interesting subject during 
the autumn months, raised from seed sent by a correspondent from New 
Zealand, still rare in cultivation. 

There is an especially good specimen on a wall in the Botanic Gardens 
at Cambridge and one at Coombe. 

HYPEEICUM HOOKEEIANUM, Wight & Am. 

Syns. H. oblongifolium, Hook.- 

Bot. Mag. t. 4949. 

A native of Northern India, Nepal, and the Himalayas, at elevations of 
6,000-12,000 ft., found on the hills about Mufflong, Assam, by Thomas 
Lobb, through whom it was introduced. 

It forms a neat bush with evergreen leaves and large rich yellow 
flowers, unfortunately not perfectly hardy in all localities. 

ILEX PEENYI, Franch. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 59. 

A species named after Pere Paul Perny, a French Jesuit missionary ; 
a discovery during his travels in China between the years 1850 and 1860. 

400 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

A dense-growing species with small spiny leaves and red berries, 
probably allied to Ilex cornuta. 

Eaised from seeds collected in China by Wilson, it has proved perfectly 
hardy at Coombe Wood, and of very dwarf compact habit. 

JASMINUM PRIMULINUM, Hemsl, 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 2384 ; Gard. Cliron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 197, fig. 83 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 7981 ; Flora and Sylva, 1904, vol. ii. p. 168, col. pi. 

A beautiful shrub first discovered by W. Hancock Esq., at Mengtse in 
Yunr.an, and later by Dr. A. Henry and Wilson in the same locality. 
By the last-named living plants were sent to Coombe Wood, where they 
flowered in October 1901 for the first time. 

In general appearance the plant resembles the well-known Jasminum 
nudiflorum, but the flowers and leaves are much larger and the plants 
when grown in the open almost evergreen. 

In Dr. Henry's view, in an article in Flora and Sylva (I.e. supra), it is 
only a form of J. nudiflorum that has escaped from cultivation. In 
support of this theory he mentions the facts that it never sets seed, 
the flowers are often semi-double, and the shrubs were always seen 
growing in gardens or in hedges in the vicinity of villages, and never in 
woods and forests, but a greater knowledge may lead to a different 
opinion. 

Plants of a high order, grown by Leopold de Rothschild Esq., Gunners- 
bury, were exhibited in London in January 1906, cultivated as a cold 
greenhouse subject. 

LARDIZABALA BITERNATA, Ruiz & Pav. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4501. 

This singular evergreen climber introduced through G. T. Davy Esq., 
who found it in the Province of Concepcion and gave instructions for 
plants to be sent to him at Valparaiso, ultimately brought to Exeter by 
William Lobb ; it is now in general cultivation. 

It flowered for the first time in March 1849. 

LEUCOTHOE DAVISLE, Torrey. 

Syns. L. Lobbu, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6247. 

A handsome evergreen shrub with neat elegant racemes of white flower 
resembling those of the lily-of-the-valley. 

Discovered by William Lobb in 1853 on the Sierra Nevada Mountains 
of California, at an elevation of 5,000 ft., introduced and distributed by 
the Veitchian firm under the name of Leucothoe Lobbii, and subse- 
quently again gathered in the same locality by Miss N. J. Davis, 

401 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

after whom Dr. Torrey named it, a name adopted by Dr. Asa Gray in the 
Proceedings of the American Academy and in his work on the Botany of 
California. 

Eemarkable as the only species of the genus known on the western side 
of the American Continent. 

LIGU STRUM HENRYI, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 90. 

An evergreen species of neat appearance first detected in the immediate 
neighbourhood of Ichang by Dr. A. Henry, after whom it is named, and 
from this locality afterwards introduced to cultivation. 

A neat and attractive shrub with glossy dark green leaves somewhat 
variable in form, from 1| to 2 in. long by 1| to 1| in. broad, in outline from 
rotund-ovate to ovate-lanceolate. 

Mr. Hemsley states (I.e. supra), " This is very near Ligustrum 
Tschonskii, differing markedly in the shape of the leaves, which in the 
present species vary much in size and shape on the same branch." 

The flowers white, fragrant, and the fruits black. 

LONICEEA PILEATA, Oliver. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 243, figs. ; Hooker's Ic. PL t. 1585 ; The Garden, 
1904, vol. Ixv. p. 235 ; Bot. Mag. t. 8060. 

A hardy Chinese honeysuckle, with neat evergreen foliage, introduced 
from the Province of Hupeh. 

It is a dwarf-spreading shrub with dark green foliage somewhat re- 
sembling that of the common privet. The flowers freely produced in the 
axils of the uppermost leaves are about \ in. in length, greenish-white 
in colour, not showy, but delightfully fragrant. 

It flowered for the first time in this country at the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, during April 1904. 

MAGNOLIA DELAY AYI, Franch. 

Plantae Delavayanae, p. 33, tt. 9, 10 ; Flora and Sylva, 1903, vol. i. p. 18. 

An evergreen species named in compliment to Pere Delavay who dis- 
covered it in Central China. It was afterwards collected by Dr. A. Henry 
and Wilson, and by the last-named traveller introduced to cultivation at 
Coombe Wood. 

The plants are at present too small to flower, but from information 
derived from those who have seen it in the native habitat this Magnolia 
promises to be a great addition to gardens. 

The flowers are said to be pure white, egg-shaped, of great substance 
and very massive. 

402 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

MYBTUS CHEKEN, Spreng. 

Syns. Eugenia Cheken, DC. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5644. 

A pretty evergreen Chilian plant introduced from Chili through 
William Lobb, suitable for walls in the southern and western parts of 
England, with pure white flowers plentifully produced during the 
summer months. 

MYETUS LUMA, Barn. 
Syns. Eugenia Luma, Berg. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5040. 

A charming evergreen, quite equal in beauty to the common myrtle, 
a native of the colder parts of Chili from Concepcion to the island of 
Chiloe and Valdivia, sent to this country through William Lobb. 

Blossoming in the summer months, the branches literally loaded with 
white flowers, almost concealing the foliage. 

MYETUS UGNI, Molina. 

Syns. Eugenia Ugni, Hook. & Arn. 

Gard. Chron. 1857, p. 267 (Note on the fruit) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4626 ; Fl. des Serres, 

torn. vii. p. 215. 

A half-hardy evergreen shrub, the " Myrtilla " of the Chilians, allied to 
the common myrtle, and requiring the protection of a wall for successful 
cultivation out-of-doors, except in most favoured localities. 

It is a native of Chili, wild on the hills near Valparaiso, introduced to 
this country through William Lobb. 

The fruit a jet black, delicate juicy berry, large as a black currant, of 
an agreeable flavour and aroma, is cultivated in the private gardens of 
Valparaiso as a dessert. Hopes entertained, but not fulfilled, that it 
might be a useful addition to English hardy fruit, led to trials being made, 
C. Wentworth Dilke Esq. offering prizes for competition at the Grand 
Autumn Fruit Show of the London Horticultural Society in 1857. 

NOTOSPAETIUM CAEMICH^ILLE, Hook.j. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6741 ; Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 169, fig. 26; Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees 

and Shrubs, 1883, p. 20. 

Known to the inhabitants of New Zealand as the "Pink Broom," 
and introduced through P. C. M. Veitch. 

In its native habitat a large shrub or small tree with green rush-like 
branches devoid of leaves, on which small clusters of rosy pink pea-shaped 
flowers are produced during the summer months. 

Endemic to the archipelago, but chiefly confined to the Middle Island. 

403 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

OLEARIA HAASTII, Hook. f. 

Masters iii Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 1195, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 6592; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 
1874, p. 12, fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 532, fig. 

Raised from seed sent by a correspondent from New Zealand to Exeter 
in 1858, Olearia Haastii, popularly recognized as the " Daisy Bush," is 
now well known, and a favourite subject for planting. 

Perfectly hardy, it withstands the dry atmosphere and heat of summer 
with impunity, and produces in profusion white daisy-like flowers during 
the months of August and September. 

OLEARIA MACRODONTA, Baker. 

Syns. 0. dentata, Hook. f. ; Eurybia dentata, Hook. 
Bot. Mag. t. 7065. 

A hardy shrub from New Zealand, with evergreen holly-like leaves and 
numerous small daisy-like flowers, in broad corymbs terminating each 
branchlet. 

Originally described by Sir Joseph Hooker in his flora of New Zealand 
as Eurybia dentata, this plant, in his later work, became united to Olearia, 
the specific name retained. This having, however, been already given to 
an Australian species, Mr. Baker changed it to O. macrodonta. 

A handsome shrub, especially in the south and west of England, and in 
July has many large corymbs of white flower. 

OSMANTHUS AQUIFOLIUM, Siebold, var. ILICIFOLIA, Dippel. 

Syns. Olea ilicifolia, Haask. 
Gard. Chron. 1858, p. 419 (advt.). 

A native of China and Japan, introduced from the latter country through 
Thomas Lobb in 1856, a holly-like evergreen shrub with clusters of 
white flower in the axils of the leaves. 

PERNETTYA CILIARIS, Don, 

Syiis. Gaultheria ciliaris, Cham. & Schlecht. 
Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 89, fig. 12; Jour. Hort. Soc. London, vol. vi. p. 268. 

A pretty evergreen, producing in the early spring months racemes of 
lily-of-the-valley-like flowers in dense profusion. 

A native of Mexico whence it was introduced, now almost certainly lost 
to cultivation. 

PHILESIA BUXIFOLIA, Lcm. 

Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 105, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4738; The Florist, 1854, u.s. 
vol.iv.pl. 85; Fl. des Serres, torn. ix. p. 41 ; The Garden, 1883, vol. xxiii. p. 380, 
col. pi. 

A very curious plant, a native of Valdivia, with flowers similar in shape 

404 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

and appearance to those of the well-known Lapageria rosea, and a native 
of Valdivia, where it inhabits marshy places under trees. Long a 
desideratum in gardens till William Lobb sent plants to Exeter, which 
flowered in June 1853, for the first time. 

Hardy in Devon and Cornwall, and in some parts of Ireland, it is best 
grown under glass in less favoured localities, treated as the Lapageria. 

An interesting hybrid, intermediate in general character between the 
two, known as Philageria Veitchii, has been raised by crossing Lapageria 
with Philesia buxifolia. 

QUEECUS ACUTA, Thunberg. 

Syns. Q. Buergeri, Blume. 
Woods and Forests, vol. i. 1884, p. 85, fig. ; The Garden, 1881, vol. xix. p. 285, same fig. 

A handsome evergreen oak sent from Japan by Charles Maries. 

It forms a small tree in this country with handsome leathery leaves, 
resembling those of the common laurel in shape, but of a darker green. 
Seedling plants vary much in habit, and some forms selected have 
received the varietal names pyramidalis and robusta, differ from the 
type in habit as the names indicate. 

The Oak is perfectly hardy in this country, and at Coombe Wood on 
cold, clayey soil, in an exposed situation there is a very noble symmetrical 
specimen 20 ft. in height. 

QUEBCUS GLABBA, Thunb., var. LATIFOLIA, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1881-1882, p. 22. 

A large-leaved form of Quercus glabra, the finest evergreen oak of 
Japan. The type species has long been in gardens, but has not proved 
generally hardy ; the leaves smaller than those of the form latifolia, are 
very fine, of a bright fulvous green. 

BAPHIOLEPIS JAPONICA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Syna. R. j&ponica, var. integernma, Hook. ; R. ovata, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 694 (advt.) ; Fl. Mag. t. 299; Bot. Mag. t. 5510; The Garden, 

1876, vol. ix. p. 597. 

A pretty plant with thick evergreen shining leaves and spikes of large 
fragrant white flower. 

A native of Japan, Bonin, and the Corea, introduced from the first- 
named country through the late John Gould Veitch. 

BHAPHITHAMNUS CYANOCABPUS, Miers. 

Syns. Pceppigia cyanocarpa, Bertero. 

Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 474 (Report of E.H.S. Show) ; Bot. Mag. t. 6849. 
A half-hardy evergreen shrub or small tree from Chili, where it was 

405 D d 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

first detected by Mr. Miers, with neat foliage, and small tubular pale 
blue flowers, succeeded by globose bright blue fruit. 



EHODODENDEON AUKICULATUM, Hemsl. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 64, fig. 25. 

A handsome species introduced through Wilson from Central China, 
common on precipitous cliffs north of the Yangtsze at elevations of more 
than 5,000 ft. 

The flowers, not yet seen in England, are large, funnel-shaped, 3 in. in 
depth, 4 in. wide at the mouth, pure white or rosy pink in colour, and 
very striking. 

The leaves some 8 in. in length by 2| in. broad, are prolonged into two 
ear-like processes at the point of insertion of the petiole with the blade. 



EHODODENDEON CALIFOENICUM, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 391 (Note on Exhibit) ; Bot. Mag. t. 4863. 

Discovered by William Lobb during his first collecting mission to 
California, and introduced to this country, where the plant flowered for 
the first time during June in the year 1855. 

It produces compact trusses of flowers, deep rose-tinted, and is now 
rarely met with. 

EHODODENDEON x EAELY GEM. 

Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 335, fig. 57, p. 336. 

A hybrid raised at Coombe Wood from Ehododendron praecox and 
E. dahauricum, the former itself the offspring of E. dahauricum and 
E. ciliatum. 

Early Gem is a dwarf compact plant with small dark green persistent 
foliage and fairly large pinkish lilac flowers in dense profusion in March 
and early April. Always an admirable subject for forcing, and in 
favourable springs one of the earliest to flower in the open. 

EHODODENDEON INDICUM, Sweet, var. OBTUSUM. 

Syns. JZ. obtusum, Planch ; Azalea obtusa, Lindl. 
Lindl. Bot. Reg. vol. xxxii. t. 37 ; Nicholson in Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 585, fig. 

This charming little plant with vivid orange-scarlet flowers was 
originally introduced from Shanghai to the gardens of the Horticultural 
Society by Fortune, in 1844, but probably lost to cultivation until re- 
introduced from Japan by the Veitchian firm. 

406 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

EHODODENDEON X MANGLESII, Hort. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Trees and Shrubs, 1885, p. 11 ; Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 48, 
fig. ; The Garden, 1890, vol. xxxviii. p. 225, fig. 

A beautiful hybrid obtained at Coombe from the Himalayan Ehodo- 
dendron Aucklandii and a garden form of E. catawbiense known as album 
grandiflorum. 

The flowers of the hybrid fully 4 in. in diameter, are of the purest 
white, with the exception of a few red spots on the upper segment of the 
corolla. The truss large and full-flowered, composed of from ten to 
fifteen blooms, resembles in this respect the American species, whilst in 
the foliage and calyx, and the size and quality of the flower the influence 
of E. Auckland! may be traced. 

It was dedicated to the memory of J. H. Mangles, Esq., of Haslemere 
under whose care this genus was so very greatly improved. 



EHODODENDEON MICEANTHUM, Turcz. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 64. 

This Ehododendron, a native of Central China, on cliffs north of the 
Yangtsze at elevations of more than 5,000 ft., forms a bush from 4 to 
20 ft. high, and produces in great abundance small white flowers in erect 
racemes. The leaves small, are covered on the under surface with 
ferruginous scales. Plants raised from seed collected by Wilson are 
growing at Coombe Wood, and the species first flowered in this country 
at Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, in the spring of 1905. 

EHODODENDEON OCCIDENTALS, A. Gray. 

Syns. Azalea occidentals, Torr. & Gr. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5005. 

Eaised from seed sent from California by William Lobb, and much 
resembling the Azalea calendulacea of Eastern America, but differing 
in flowers white striped with pink on the exterior of the perianth, with 
a yellow blotch on the standard petal. In A. calendulacea the corolla 
is from yellow to orange changing to flame colour. 

EHODODENDEON EACEMOSUM, Franch. 

Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 62 ; The Garden, 1892, vol. xlii. p. 320, col. pi. ; Bot. Mag. 

t. 7301. 

A charming dwarf-growing species of Ehododendron raised from seed 
sent from the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, collected in Yunnan, Western 
China, by Pere Delavay. 

407 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

The plant quite hardy, produces in the spring months dense clusters 
of soft rose-pink flowers at the end of the short branches. 

EHODODENDEON SCHLIPPENBACHII, Max. 

Card. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 462, fig. 58; Bob. Mag. t. 7373 ; The Garden, 1894, vol. xlvi. 

p. 80, col. pi. 

A Corean and Manchurian species discovered by Baron Alexandra von 
Schlippenbach on the shores of Possjet Sound, Manchuria. From the 
texture of the leaves, deciduous in this country, it obviously belongs 
to the Azalea section of the genus, of which it is the largest leaved. 

The flowers of a delicate rosy lilac, are spotted at the base with darkish 
brown. 

Ehododendron Schlippenbachii was introduced by James H. Veitch, 
who sent it to Chelsea in 1893 from Japan, where it was found cultivated, 
but it is said to have been first collected by a young Kewite, Eichard 
Oldham, in 1863, collecting at that time in China ; it was not introduced 
nor was it named till Maximowicz wrote a description from Baron 
Schlippenbach's specimens seven years later. 

EUBUS JAPONICUS, Veitch, var. TEICOLOE, HorL 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xvi. p. 95, fig. 15. 

A slender-growing trailing plant from Japan, with rose-coloured stems, 
the petioles and leaves with large patches of white amongst the green, in 
a young state pinkish- white. 

SAECOCOCCA PEUNIFOEMIS, Lindl. 

A neat dwarf evergreen shrub of Holly-like appearance, with shining 
bright green pointed leaves, in the axils small clusters of whitish flower, 
open in the winter, followed in the spring by bright blue fruit. 

It is recorded from Afghanistan, Northern India, and south-ward from 
Ceylon and Sumatra, and was introduced from the Province of Hupeh, 
Central China. 

SCHIZANDEA HENEYI, Clarke. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 162, fig. 55. 

A hardy climbing shrub from the Province of Hupeh, Central China, 
a member of a genus little known in gardens, forming with Kadsura a 
distinct tribe of the Magnoliacese. Botanically the flowers are interesting, 
but not showy ; the leaves bright shining green have showy red petioles ; 
the young stems winged. 

After flowering, the receptacle becomes fleshy, enclosing mucilaginous 
berries, and the fruit is eaten by the local peasantry. 

408 



TREES AND SHRUBS EVERGREEN 

THIBAUDIA MICROPHYLLA, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 23, fig. 

An evergreen shrub with scarlet flowers, from seed collected in Peru by 
William Lobb. 

The figure and description (I.e. supra) were prepared from Lobb's 
herbarium specimens, only seedling plants, not large enough to flower, at 
that time in cultivation. 

Apparently the plant not hardy was never distributed ; and it is doubtful 
if a member of this genus, as the flowers solitary and axillary are not in 
a racemose inflorescence. 

TEOCHODENDRON AEALIOIDES, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Gard. Chron. 1894, vol. xv. p. 716, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 7375. 

A very singular hardy evergreen shrub, native of Japan, introduced 
to Coombe Wood ; flowered in April 1894 for the first time. 

With Euptelia a distinct tribe of the Magnoliaceae, known as Trocho- 
dendrae, distinguished by an entire absence of sepals and petals. 

The stamens radiate from the centre of the flower as the spokes of a 
wheel, suggesting the generic name. 

VACCINIUM LEUCOSTOMUM, Lindl. 

Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1848, p. 7, fig. 

Eaised from seed sent by William Lobb from Peru, collected at Veto, 
8,000 ft. above sea-level. 

The flowers are described as "scarlet tipped with white"; the plant 
probably not hardy, was soon lost, and does not appear to be now in 
cultivation. 

VALDIVIA GAYANA, Remy. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 366 (Report of B.H.S. Show) ; The Florist, 1863, p. 87. 
This singular, small, half-hardy evergreen shrub, with a short pyramidal 
panicle of pretty rose-coloured flowers from a tuft of long, serrated 
rugose leaves, was exhibited in flower in April 1863, and is now, in all 
probability, also lost. 

VIBUENUM BUDDLEIFOLIUM, C. H. Wright. 
Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 257. 

A new species introduced to Coombe Wood from Central China through 
Wilson. 

The leaves about 3| in. in length, hairy on the upper surface, densely 
floccose beneath, resemble those of Viburnum rhytidophyllum, but are 
smaller ; the flowers white, in terminal corymbose panicles. 

The plant has not yet flowered. 

409 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

VIBUENUM PEOPINQUUM, Hemsl. 

First discovered in the neighbourhood of Ichang, on the Yangtsze, by 
Dr. Henry, this species was afterwards introduced to cultivation through 
Wilson, who sent seed collected in 1901. 

As a species it closely resembles the Western Viburnum Tinus, but 
differs in the nervation of the leaf and the small greenish- white flowers. 

VIBUENUM EHYTIDOPHYLLUM, Hemsl. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 63, fig. 23. 

A very striking shrub of an unusually promising nature with large, 
broadly-lanceolate leaves, strongly nerved on the upper surface, covered 
beneath with dense woolly tomentum. The branches terminate in 
corymbs of yellowish- white flowers 7 to 8 in. across. 

Plants raised at Coombe Wood from seed collected in China have 
proved perfectly hardy. 

VIBUENUM UTILE, Hemsl 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 257. 

This neat, attractive Viburnum, a native of Central China, was first 
detected by Dr. A. Henry, and subsequently introduced to cultivation. 

The leaves small, lanceolate-oblong, dark shining green above, are 
covered beneath with a thick coat of white stellate hair. 

Mr. Hemsley states (I.e. supra), " This species is readily distinguished 
by its thick, entire leaves, glabrous and shining above and felted beneath. 
The branches are used for making pipe stems, according to Dr. Henry." 

VIBUENUM VEITCHII, C. H. Wright. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 257 ; Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. pts. i. and ii. p. 63 ; 
Flora and Sylva, vol. ii. p. 209. 

A species introduced from Central China through Wilson. The leaves 
about 5 in. in length, cordate at the base, with margins coarsely dentate, 
have an under surface densely tomentose. 

The species with flowers white, in terminal corymbose panicles, is 
closely allied to two others, Viburnum rhytidophyllum and V. buddleifolia. 



410 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

ACONITUM HEMSLEYANUM, Pritz. 

A climbing Aconite, a hardy herbaceous perennial, with curious bulbils 
in the axils of the leaves and bracts, as in many lilies. 

The flowers are of a rich deep blue colour, large and showy. 

Living roots from Central China in 1901 failed to grow, but a better fate 
awaited a second consignment collected in 1903, and plants flowered at 
Coombe in the summer of 1905. 

ACONITUM SCAPOSUM, Franch., var. PYEAMIDALE. 

A strong-growing hardy herbaceous perennial with foliage typical of 
the genus and pyramidal spikes of dark blue flowers crowded on the 
upper two-thirds of a scape 2 to 2| ft. in height. 

The flowers consist of a long blue spur with little or no hood and the 
small petals are whitish tipped with green. 

It was raised from seed collected in Central China in 1901, and first 
flowered at Coombe Wood in August 1904. 

ADENOPHOKA CAPILLARIS, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 10. 

A hardy herbaceous perennial about 2 to 2| ft. high, with loose, graceful 
panicles of blue campanula-like flower. Mr. Hemsley (I.e. supra) states, 
" A very distinct and beautiful species remarkable for the exceeding 
slenderness of the pedicels, the narrow somewhat inflated corolla and the 
very thick tubular disk." 

Discovered in the Patung district, Central China, introduced to 
cultivation through Wilson from the same locality and first flowered in 
the summer of 1905. 

ADENOPHOEA POLYMOEPHA, Ledeb. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 187. 

This hardy herbaceous plant of the Campanula family of a height of 
4 to 5 ft., has numerous dark blue bell-shaped blossoms, introduced from 
China, and first flowered in the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, in September 1903. 

413 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

AMAKANTHUS MELANCHOLICUS, Linn., var. EUBEE. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 398 (advt.). 

A plant with striking blood-red foliage, introduced by the late John 
Gould Veitch from Japan, selected from amongst several varieties as the 
one most valuable for garden flower decoration, summer bedding, and 
general ornamental purposes. 

AMAEANTHUS SALICIPOLIUS, Hort. Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1871, p. 1550, with fig. ; Fl. Mag. 1871, pi. 557 ; Fl. dea Serres, 1873, 

vol. xix. p. 3. 

Introduced from the Philippines by the late John Gould Veitch. 

This annual is of pyramidal form, 2 to 3 ft. high ; the leaves, from 5 to 
7 in. long by in. wide, of a bright bronzy-green, change as the plant 
matures to an orange-red. 

ANDEOSACE HENEYI, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1973. 

Detected by the Eev. E. Faber on Mount Omei and by Dr. A. Henry in 
the Province of Hupeh, from whose specimens it was originally described. 

A somewhat large species for the genus with reniform crenate leaves on 
hairy petioles 4 to 6 in. in length, and umbels of pure white flower freely 
produced. 

It was raised from seed collected in high ranges at elevations of 
6,000-8,500 ft. 

APEEA AEUNDINACEA, Hook. f. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 282, 283, fig. 84. 

A New Zealand grass raised from seed at Coombe Wood in January 
1896, and flowered in October 1897 ; an unusually graceful plant. 

AETEMISIA LACTIFLOEA, Wall 

A strong-growing hardy herbaceous perennial from 4 to 5 ft. with 
elegant lobed leafage and terminal panicles of milk-white flower, small 
individually, showy in a mass. 

Sent from China by Wilson, flowered for the first time in 1903 at 
Coombe Wood ; an unusually valuable plant. 

AEUM PALvESTINUM, Boiss. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5509 ; N. B. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 428. 

A singular Aroid discovered by the distinguished botanist and traveller 
M. Boissier, near Jerusalem, and from this locality plants secured 
flowered for the first time in 1865. 

414 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The spathe is pale green suffused with purplish dots and blotches on the 
outside, rich velvety black with a yellowish-white base on the inner, quite 
free from odour. 

ASTILBE DAVIDII, Henry. 
Syns. A. chinensis, var. Davidii, Franch. 

Henry in Gard. Chron. 1902, p. 95, fig. p. 103; Bot. Mag. t. 7880; The Garden, 

vol. Ixii. p. 179, fig. 

A beautiful hardy perennial, the best of its class, from the Province of 
Hupeh, through Wilson a herb of a high order. 

The elegant leafage more or less that of Astilbe japonica on a large 
scale ; the flowering stems 6 or more ft. high, the upper portion some 
2 ft. in length, densely covered with deep rose-violet, mauve-coloured 
flowers ; these first opened in July 1901. 

ASTILBE GEANDIS, Stapf. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 426, suppl. illus. 

This beautiful herbaceous perennial resembles in habit the well-known 
Astilbe Davidii, having similar foliage and the same erect tall flower- 
spikes, but differs in pure white flowers, and in some other technical 
details. 

A native of Central China, quite hardy, the plant will prove of very 
great value. 

ASTILBE THUNBEEGII, Miq. 
Fl. Mag. t. 457. 

This Astilbe from Japan in 1878, first exhibited in flower in 1881, has 
elegant tufted foliage above which the scapes bear on the upper third 
densely clustered greenish-white flower. 

BLUMENBACHIA CHUQUITENSIS, Hook. 

Syns. B. coronata, Haage & Schmidt. 

Fl. Mag. t. 139; Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1211, fig. of stinging hairs; Bot. Mag. t. 6143 ; 
The Garden, 1875, vol. vii. p. 173, fig. ; Fl. des Serres, 1877, p. 189. 

A beautiful biennial from Peru through Pearce, possessing unfortunately 
one drawback, every part of the floral organs being covered with numerous 
stinging hairs. 

When first sent to be named held to be Blumenbachia (Caiophora 
coronata, it was as this unfortunately distributed. 

BLUMENBACHIA CONTOETA, Hook. f. 

Syns. Caiophora contorta, Presl. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6134. 

A native of Peru and Ecuador raised from seed collected in the first- 
named country, and flowered in July 1874. 

415 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The leaves elegantly lobed, the flowers bright scarlet : the plant now 
probably lost to cultivation. 

CALANDEINIA UMBELLATA, DC. 

Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xii. p. 271; Nich. Diet. Gard. p. 236, fig. 316; PI. des Serres, 

1846, pi. v. 

Discovered in rocky places in the regions around Concepcion by Euiz 
and Pavon, and introduced to cultivation through William Lobb ; a 
charming half-hardy biennial with dazzling magenta-crimson flowers 
about the size of a sixpence. 

CALCEOLAEIA EEICOIDES, Juss. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 659 (advt.). 

A hardy herbaceous plant found by Eichard Pearce on mountains of 
considerable elevation near Cuen9a, Ecuador, in habit and foliage not 
unlike a free-growing Erica. 

The flowers are bright yellow in great abundance. 

CALCEOLAEIA PLANTAGINEA, Sm. 

Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 695 ; Bot. Mag. t. 2805 ; The Garden, 1879, vol. xv. p. 261. 

Ee-discovered by Eichard Pearce near the line of perpetual snow on 
the Andes of Chili, and sent to this country in 1860. 

Previously in cultivation, sent home by Mr. Cruickshanks in 1826, it 
was subsequently lost. 

CAEDIANDEA SINENSIS, Hemsl. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 82. 

A perennial herb from the Province of Hupeh, with a creeping root- 
stock, alternate, oblong, or ovate-lanceolate leaves, and an inflorescence 
resembling that of the Hydrangea. 

CELOSIA CEISTATA, Linn., var. COCCINEA, Hort. 

PL Mag. 1861, t. 49. 

Eaised from seed sent from China as a species of Amaranth. 

The figure (I.e. supra) represents what would now be considered a poor 
specimen of the well-known annual, since improved by selection to 
an unusual degree. The possibilities of the plant were recognized by 
Thomas Moore Esq., the Editor of the Moral Magazine, who wrote : 
"It is not improbable that the more branched of the spicate forms, if 
carefully selected, might in time yield a plumy crimson variety, analogous 
to the golden one we already possess ; and this is the result at which 
growers should aim, rather than to obtain large expanded combs which 
would take away from the elegant aspect of the plant." 

416 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

CHELIDONIUM LASIOCAKPUM, Oliver. 
Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1739. 

A yellow-flowered herbaceous perennial introduced through Wilson 
from Central China, and previously collected by Dr. Henry. 

The root known by a name signifying " Man's-Blood Herb," from the 
red juice in the root and stem, is used as a drug by the Chinese. 

CHIONOGKAPHIS JAPONICA, Maxim. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6510 ; Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 720 ; figs. 128-130. 

Thib interesting plant, described by Thunberg in his Flora Japonica, 
p. 152, had been known to science for a century prior to introduction by 
Messrs. Veitch in 1880. 

A glabrous perennial herb, the only species in the genus, closely related 
to the East North American genera Helonia and Chamaelirium. 

From seed sent by Maries from Japan, plants were raised and flowered 
in April 1880 for the first time. 

CODONOPSIS TANGSHEN, Oliver. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1966. 

A member of the Campanula family with twining stems, raised from 
seed from Central China, where, considered an important drug, and used 
amongst the very poor as a substitute for the costly ginseng, it is known 
as the t'ang-shen. 

COLLINSIA BAKTSLEFOLIA, Benth. 

Gard. Chron. 1852, p. 689 (advt.). 

A pretty annual herb sent from California by William Lobb, dis- 
tributed in 1852. 

The plants from 6 to 9 in. in height, with pale lilac- coloured flowers in 
profusion, are useful for the borders or bed edging during the summer 
months. 

COLLINSIA MULTICOLOE, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1852, p. 690 (advt.) ; Paxt. Fl. Gdn. 1851-1852, p. 89, t. 56. 

A pretty Californian annual about 1| ft. high, through William Lobb, 
first distributed in 1852. 

The flowers, in whorled inflorescences in the axils of the uppermost 
leaves, are of variable colour, mostly white with lilac, rose, or violet stripes 
and markings. 

For beds or borders in the summer a charming subject, growing on a 
poor soil equally as in a rich. 

417 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

CONANDKON BAMONDIOIDES, Steb. & Ziicc. 

Masters in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 232; Bot. Mag. t. 6484; The Garden, 1897, 

vol. li. pi. 1099, p. 6. 

An interesting plant, at home in moist rocks in the mountains of Nippon 
and Kiusiu, Japan. 

It is an aberrant member of a group of Gesnerads which span the 
middle mountain regions of the old world from Spain to Japan, closely 
related to the genera Eamondia, Haberlea, Wulfenia, and Shortia, botani- 
cally connecting the regular-flowered five-membered corollifloral orders with 
superior two-celled ovaries, with the Gesneraceae and Scrophulariaceae. 

The regular corolla is a most remarkable botanical character, excep- 
tional not only in the order to which it belongs, but in the whole group of 
Personales. 

COEYDALIS CHEILANTHIFOLIA, HemsL 

Jour. Linn. Soc. 1892, vol. xxix. p. 392 ; Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 288. 

A Chinese species from Hupeh, first distributed in 1904 ; a hardy 
herbaceous perennial with elegant fern-like foliage and spikes of pale 
yellow flower. 

Dr. A. Henry and Wilson both discovered the herb among stones on the 
banks of streams in the higher mountains ; it is the least interesting of all 
the Chinese Corydalis. 

COEYDALIS THALICTEIFOLIA, Franch. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7830 ; Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. pp. 288, 289, 320, fig. 94 and suppl. 
The Eev. E. Faber was probably the first to find this plant in the 
mountains of Ningpo. Dr. Henry sent specimens from Ichang, and 
Pere Ducloux and W. Hancock Esq. collected some in Yunnan, though 
only first introduced to gardens by Wilson, who sent seed in 1900, from 
which plants raised flowered in June 1901. 

OOEYDALIS TOMENTOSA, N. E. Brown. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 123 ; Gardening World, 1903, p. 757, fig. 

This handsome half-hardy species from China has leaves finely divided 
covered with white silky hair. The flowers yellow, tubular, in erect 
racemes, hardy in favoured localities are, during the summer, adapted 
for cool greenhouse decoration. 

COEYDALIS WILSONI, N. E. Brown. 

N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 123; Bot. Mag. t. 7939 ; Gard. Chron. 
1904, vol. xxxv. p. 306, fig. 130. 

A Chinese species with handsome glaucous-green foliage and spikes of 
deep golden-yellow, raised from seed and flowered for the first time at 
Coombe in 1903. 

418 



DEINANTHE BIFIDA, Max. 

Jour. B.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. p. 62. 

A rather tall-growing herbaceous perennial with unisexual, herma- 
phrodite, and sterile flowers on one and the same inflorescence, in 
general appearance resembling those of the Hydrangea, of which it is a 
near ally. The leaves large, usually in whorls of four, broadly ovate, 
serrate margins have often a bifid apex. 

DELPHINIUM CAEDINALE, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4887. 

A handsome species of Larkspur from California, due to William Lobb. 

The rich scarlet colour of this much-cultivated, well-known plant was, 
prior to introduction, unknown in the genus, and is still unique. 

In a description in the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) Sir Joseph 
Hooker writes : " Blue or purple or white Larkspurs are familiar to us 
in our gardens. We have now the pleasure of making known a species of 
Delphinium equalling if not surpassing any other in the size and symmetry 
of the plant, and excelling in the brilliancy of colour of the flower, and 
that as rich a scarlet as can well be looked upon. It is one of the many 
novelties detected by William Lobb in California, and introduced to our 
gardens by Messrs. Veitch & Sons of the Exeter and Chelsea nurseries." 

DELPHINIUM DAVIDII, Franch. 

This species, from seed collected on Mount Omei, in the extreme 
West of China, grows some 2 ft. high, developing flowers of a very rich 
rose-purple. The foliage is typical of the genus, but the flowers do not 
compare in size with those of the finer garden forms. 

DICENTEA CHEYSANTHA, Walp. 

Syns. Dielytra chrysantha. 

Fl. des Serres, torn viii. p. 193 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7954. 

First detected by David Douglas, but not introduced, and flowered at 
Exeter 1852, from seed sent from California by William Lobb. 

Long branching panicles of yellow blooms appear in August and Sep- 
tember, and, though the plant is hardy and very beautiful, it is short-lived. 
The leaves large, glaucous-green, pinnately divided ; the ultimate lobes 
small linear or cuneate, somewhat acute. 

DICENTEA MACEANTHA, Oliv. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. pi. 1937. 

This is an important addition to a favourite garden genus, which includes 

419 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

the familiar Dicentra spectabilis, known as the " Bleeding Heart," 
valuable for forcing in early spring and for the hardy border. 

D. macrantha, a Chinese species rare in its native habitat, was first 
met with by Dr. Henry, who detected the herb in a wood in Hupeh, and 
only obtained one plant. 

Bare on Mount Omi, in the extreme West, Wilson obtained a few seed 
and succeeded in introducing it. The flowers droop, are narrower and 
longer than those of D. spectabilis, pale yellow in colour. 

DEACOCEPHALUM EUYSCHIANA, Linn., var. JAPONICUM, 

Asa Gray. 
Masters in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. xii. p. 167, fig. 29. 

This old inhabitant of gardens, Dracocephalum Euyschiana, was intro- 
duced as long since as 1699, and is now rarely seen. 

In Central Europe and Southern Asia the species widely distributed, 
was only noticed in 1859 by Professor Asa Gray to be a variety known 
to be in Japan. A pretty herbaceous perennial introduced through Charles 
Maries. 

ECHINOCYSTIS LOBATA, Torr. & Gray. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 270, 271, fig. ; Rev. Hort. 1896, p. 9, fig. 

A trailing annual of the Cucurbitacese, native of the North-Eastern 
States of America, with inconspicuous flowers, of elegant habit and green 
prickly fruit. 

Flowered and fruited at Coombe Wood during the summer of 1897, 
and from this material the figure in the Gardeners' Chronicle was 
prepared. 

ESCHSCHOLTZIA C^ESPITOSA, Benth. 

Syns. E. tenuifolia, Benth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4812 ; Gard. Chron. 1854, p. 451 (Notice of Exhibit); Bentham in Trans, of the 
R.H.S. 2nd ser. i. p. 408. 

In figuring this plant, sent from California by William Lobb, in the 
Botanical Magazine as Eschscholtzia tenuifolia, a doubt is expressed as 
to the advisability of keeping one so variable apart from E. caespitosa 
as a distinct species, and modern authorities, with a fuller knowledge, 
hold it synonymous, or merely a form of that species. 

GENTIANA DETONSA, Fries., var. BAEBATA, Griseb. 

An erect-growing biennial 1| to 2 ft. in height with dark violet-blue 
flowers 1 in. in diameter. 

The bearded margin of the corolla lobe suggested the varietal name. 

420 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The type species is Himalayan, and the variety common in the grasslands 
of the Chino-Tibetan borderland at elevations of 8,500-11,500 ft. 

Plants raised from seed flowered at Coombe Wood for the first time 
in 1905. 

GERANIUM PLATYANTHUM, Duthie. 

Gard. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. p. 51. 

A handsome hardy herbaceous perennial with three to five lobed leaves 
on erect stems 2 to 2| ft. in height, bearing in profusion large rosy purple 
flowers ; raised from seed collected in Central China 1901. 

GERARDIA LANCEOLATA, Benth. 

Syns. Vvrgula/ria lanceolata, Ruiz & Pav. 
Gard. Cliron. 1849, p. 564. 

A herbaceous plant with rose-coloured Pentstemon-like flowers from 
North Chili, distributed in 1849. 

Of a genus difficult to cultivate, not perfectly hardy, it was soon lost 
to cultivation. 

GILIA CALIFORNICA, Benth. 

Syns. Leptodactylon californicum, Hook. & Arn. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4872 ; Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 423 (Notice of Exhibit) ; The Florist, 1855, 
pi. 105 ; PI. des Serres, 1856, torn. i. 2nd ser. p. 79. 

A half-hardy annual through William Lobb, by seed from San ^ (r^L^o v*JLAf 
Bernardino, South California, though David Douglas first made known < 
the plant by dried specimens from the same locality ; Coulter had also 
previously met with it. tt 

Exhibited in flower for the first time in June 1855. 



GILIA DIANTHOIDES, End. 

Syns. Fenzlia dianthijlora, Benth. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4876; PI. des Serres, 1856, torn. i. 2nd ser. p. 89. 

Discovered in California by Douglas, later introduced to our gardens 
from the same locality through William Lobb, and flowered during the 
summer of 1855. 

Excellent as a bedding-out plant, closely ramified and spreading, 
furnished with filiform branches, completely covered and concealed by 
numerous blossoms of a delicate lilac. 

GILIA LUTEA, Steud. Nomencl. 

Syns. Leptosiphon luteus, Benth. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4735 ; PI. des Serres, torn. ix. p. 97. 

Seed of this species, first detected by Douglas about the year 1833, 
was sent by William Lobb in 1852 from California. 

421 B e 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

It remained unknown in cultivation till raised from Lobb's seed ; 
first flowered in 1853, and exhibited at a meeting of the Horticultural 
Society held at Chiswick. 

GOMPHBENA PULCHELLA, Mart. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4064. 

Raised from seed imported from Monte Video, and flowered for the first 
time in July 1844. 

The flowers, in dense heads, rose-purple in colour, are not unlike the 
common Globe Everlasting, the bracts highly coloured. 

HELONIOPSIS JAPONICA, Maxim. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6986. 

This interesting liliaceous plant, first flowered in the spring of 1881, 
was long known to botanists prior to introduction from Japan by Maries ; 
it is widely spread in the mountains, and has been detected in Corea. In 
general habit a Scilla, the leaves persistent, but not fleshy in texture. 

HEMIBCEA HENEYI, C. B. Clarice. 

Hooker's Ic. PI. t. 1798. 

A hardy herbaceous perennial Gesnerad, a family poorly represented 
amongst hardy garden plants, first discovered by Dr. Henry at Ichang, 
and subsequently introduced. 

It forms a plant about 1 ft. high with dark green shiny leaves and 
white waxy-looking tubular flowers, yellow in the throat. A decoction of 
the root in alcohol is said to be efficacious in cases of snake-bite. 

INCARVILLEA VABIABILIS, Batalin, var. LATIFOLIA, Batalin. 

A form of the type with much-divided leaves and lax panicles of small 
tubular rose-pink flowers ; a herbaceous perennial not perfectly hardy, 
from Western China, common in gorges at elevations of 3,000-4,500 ft. 

LINUM MACRJEI, Benth. 

Syria. L. Chamissonis, Hort. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5474; Fl. Mag. t. 214. 

This species, a half-hardy perennial, has in abundance heads of orange- 
yellow flowers, detected and introduced through Pearce from Lota in 
1860 : first flowered in 1864, and exhibited at a meeting of the Royal 
Horticultural Society under the name of Linum Chamissonis. 

422 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

LOASA PICTA, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4428. 

A very pretty annual, of which seeds were first sent from Chacapoyas, 
in the Andes, by William Lobb. 

As with other members of the genus, the species is covered with stinging 
hairs, a drawback from a horticultural standpoint. 

LOBELIA TENUIOE, B. Br. 

Syns. L. heterophylla, Labill. 

Pnxt. Mag. Bot. vol. vi. p. 197; Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxix. 3rd ser. ; Bot. Mag. 

t. 3784. 

Introduced from Western Australia in 1835, lost to cultivation till 
recently, and a very fine plant, in the way of Lobelia ramosa. 

It is a large-flowered species of the Erinus section, of an attractive blue, 
worthy of greenhouse culture. 

LYSIMACHIA CEISPIDENS, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. 1889, vol. xxvi. p. 50, pi. 1 ; Bot. Mag. t. 7919 ; The 
Garden, 1903, vol. Ixiii. p. 389, fig. 

A pretty little pink-flowered herb, raised from seed collected in Hupeh, 
the plants opening pink flowers for the first time in the spring of 1900 
at Coombe Wood. 

One of the numerous species of Lysimachia from the mountainous 
regions of Central China, differing from all Species hitherto in cultivation. 

LYSIMACHIA HENBYI, Hemsl. 

The Garden, 1903, vol. Ixiv. p. 269, with fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 187 ; 

Bot. Mag. t. 7961. 

A pretty species first discovered by Dr. Henry in the Province of 
Hupeh, Central China, in 1885, and later sent to Messrs. Veitch from 
the same locality. 

The plant of tufted trailing habit has large yellow flowers in the angles 
of the crowded leaves, is of vigorous constitution, and an excellent subject 
for carpet beds or for the rock garden. 

LYSIMACHIA STENOSEPALA, Hemsl. 

The Garden, 1903, vol. Ixiv. p. 269. 

A free-growing Chinese species, with numerous white flowers in long 
racemes, introduced from the Province of Hupeh. 

MECONOPSIS HENEICI, Franch. 

A dwarf -growing species with scapes seldom exceeding 1 ft. in height. 
The flowers 3 to 4 in. in diameter, of an intense violet-purple colour, 

423 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

usually borne singly, but occasionally two or more are produced on one 
flower-stem. The leaves narrow, oblong-obtuse, glabrous, more or less 
covered with brownish spinescent hair. 

A native of the grasslands of the Chino-Tibetan frontier, at elevations 
of 11,000-14,000 ft., first met with by Prince Henri d'Orleans and 
subsequently introduced to cultivation from the same locality. 

MECONOPSIS INTEGKIFOLIA, Franch. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 240, fig. 97, and suppl. illus. ; id. vol. xxxvii. p. 291, 
fig. 121 ; Bot. Mag. t. 8027 ; Die Gartenwelt, 1905, Jahrgang, ix. p. 534, col. pi. 

Meconopsis integrifolia was first discovered by the Kussian, Przewalski, 
who sent herbarium specimens to Maximowicz, and he named them 
Cathcartia integrifolia ; Franchet subsequently, however, noticed that the 
dehiscence of the capsule excluded the plant from that genus, and he 
named it Meconopsis integrifolia ; the honour of first flowering in Europe 
this plant is to M. Maurice de Vilmorin, a principal in the great seed 
house on the Quai de la Megisserie. 

A Meconopsis of which there is a coloured plate in Flora & Sylva, 1905, 
vol. iii. p. 80, named M. integrifolia, is not the plant of which Franchet 
writes in Plantm Delavayance : 

" La plante du Yunnan ressemble absolument a celle du Kansu, dont 
M. Maximowicz a communique un exemplaire a 1'herbier du Museum. 
Le mode de dehiscence de la capsule ne permet pas de la considerer 
comme une espece du genre Cathcartia, ainsi que 1'avait pense M. Maxi- 
mowicz auquel du reste les fruits du M. integrifolia etaient demeures 
incornus. 

" La plante ressemble singuilierement au M. simplicifolia, Hook, et 
Thomps. ; mais les tiges sont constamment pluriflores et la portion 
retre*cie constituant le style est tres raccourcie." 

The plant referred to as La plante du Yunnan was received with 301 
other packets by M. de Vilmorin on March 28th 1895 from Abbe Farges 
Tchein-keon Eastern Schezuan : packet 1,102 was distributed in three 
directions, and the seed differently treated, and at Les Barres, the country 
mansion of M. de Vilmorin par Nogent-sur-Vernisson, Loiret, a plant 
flowered in April 1896 a photograph of that plant is before the writer. 
Others kept in pots remained small and did not bloom till 1897 ; in every 
case, hand pollination proved unsuccessful and the plant was lost until 
distributed in 1905 by the Veitchian firm. 

MECONOPSIS PUNICEA, Maxim. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 282, fig. 130; Flora and Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. p. 84. 
A hardy Alpine from the Tibetan frontier through Wilson, first flowered 
at Langley in September 1904. 

424 




MECONOPSIS INTEGK1FOLIA 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The plant, of tufted habit with lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate leaves, 
tapering at both ends, is covered with straggling yellow hair. The flowers, 
deep reddish -purple in colour, nod on scapes 7 to 8 in. long, and are 6 to 
7 in. in diameter. 

Pound in company with Meconopsis integrifolia on a pass 12,500 ft. 
high, between the Provinces of Szechuan and Kansu, the watershed of the 
Yellow and Yangtsze rivers. 

Plants remain in flower for several weeks usually three blooms open 
at one time ; the most congenial treatment is as for M. integrifolia. 

MIMULUS LUTEUS, L., var. ALPINUS. 

Syns. M. cupreus, Regel ; M. variegatus, Loddiges. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 530 (Note on Exhibit) ; Veitch in Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 2; Bot. 
Mag. t. 5478 ; Fl. Mag. 1862, pi. 70. 

This species, found at elevations of 6,000-7,000 ft., sent from the 
Chilian Andes by Eichard Pearce, is the origin of a beautiful race of 
hybrids known as Mimulus maculosus. 

MIMULUS EADICANS, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 21, fig. 

An attractive perennial bog plant from New Zealand : the stems creep- 
ing with short leafy branched densely packed leaves ; the flowers white 
with a violet blotch. 

MONAEDELLA MACEANTHA, A. Gray. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6270. 

A highly aromatic plant from seed received from California in 1875, of 
a spreading tufted habit ; the bright scarlet flowers in close terminal 
heads. 

NEPETA WILSONI, Duthie. 

A hardy herbaceous perennial 2 to 2f ft. high, produces flower in 
whorls of a rich deep blue colour, introduced from Sungpan in the 
extreme west of China by Wilson, and flowered for the first time at 
Coombe in August 1905. 

NIEEEMBEEGIA EIVULAEIS, Miers. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5608 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, with fig. 

A trailing perennial, commonly known as the " Trailing Cup Plant," 
introduced from La Plata in 1866. 

Common on the banks of the Plate Eiver, within high-tide mark, the 
flowers rise above the dwarf grass and may be discerned from a great 
distance. 

425 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The plant, of tufted habit with lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate leaves, 
tapering at both ends, is covered with straggling yellow hair. The flowers, 
deep reddish-purple in colour, nod on scapes 7 to 8 in. long, and are 6 to 
7 in. in diameter. 

Found in company with Meconopsis integrifolia on a pass 12,500 ft. 
high, between the Provinces of Szechuan and Kansu, the watershed of the 
Yellow and Yangtsze rivers. 

Plants remain in flower for several weeks usually three blooms open 
at one time ; the most congenial treatment is as for M. integrifolia. 

MIMULUS LUTEUS, L., var. ALPINUS. 

Syns. M. cupreus, Regel ; M. variegatus, Loddiges. 

Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 530 (Note on Exhibit) ; Veitch in Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 2; Bot. 
Mag. t. 5478 ; PI. Mag. 1862, pi. 70. 

This species, found at elevations of 6,000-7,000 ft., sent from the 
Chilian Andes by Eichard Pearce, is the origin of a beautiful race of 
hybrids known as Mimulus maculosus. 

MIMULUS EADICANS, Hook. 

Gard. Chron. 1883, vol. xx. p. 21, fig. 

An attractive perennial bog plant from New Zealand : the stems creep- 
ing with short leafy branched densely packed leaves ; the flowers white 
with a violet blotch. 

MONAKDELLA MACEANTHA, A. Gray. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6270. 

A highly aromatic plant from seed received from California in 1875, of 
a spreading tufted habit ; the bright scarlet flowers in close terminal 
heads. 

NEPETA WILSONI, Dutkie. 

A hardy herbaceous perennial 2 to 2f ft. high, produces flower in 
whorls of a rich deep blue colour, introduced from Sungpan in the 
extreme west of China by Wilson, and flowered for the first time at 
Coombe in August 1905. 

NIEEEMBEEGIA EIVULAEIS, Miers. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5608 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, with fig. 

A trailing perennial, commonly known as the " Trailing Cup Plant," 
introduced from La Plata in 1866. 

Common on the banks of the Plate Eiver, within high-tide mark, the 
flowers rise above the dwarf grass and may be discerned from a great 
distance. 

425 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

NIEREMBERGIA VEITCHII, Berkeley. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5599 ; PI. and Pom. 1872, p. 141, fig. 

A dwarf hardy perennial from Tucuman in South America, with cam- 
panulate flowers on a tube \ to f in. long, white or pale lilac, a charming 
dwarf border subject. 

NOLANA LANCEOLATA, Miers. 

Syns. Sorema lanceol.ata, Miers. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5327 ; Hooker's Lond. Jour, of Bot. 1845, vol. iv. p. 493. 

This handsome compact-growing annual, with large flowers bright blue 
in colour with a white centre, is a form of the Chilian Bellflower 
discovered by Mr. Cuming at Coquimbo, in Chili, and later introduced 
from the same locality. 

(ENOTHEEA BISTORTA, Nutt. MS., var. VEITCHIANA. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5078. 

A native of South California introduced through William Lobb in 
1858. 

Of dwarf habit, the flowers large, in copious succession on the racemes, 
bright yellow in colour with a deep bronze-orange or blood-red spot at 
the base. 

OMPHALODES KRAMERI, Franch. & Sav. 

The Garden, 1881, vol. xix. p. 411 (Report of R.H.S. Meeting). 

A beautiful little herbaceous plant with flowers in clusters, Forget-me- 
not in shape, deep blue in colour, about f in. in diameter ; a native 
of Japan, first flowered in 1881. 

OSTROWSKYA MAGNIFICA, Regel. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7472 ; The Garden, 1888, vol. xxxiv. p. 604, pi. 681 ; Gard. Chron. 1888, 

vol. iv. pp. 16, 65, fig. 6. 

Discovered in Eastern Bokhara at an elevation of 7,000 ft. by Albert, 
son of Dr. Regel, long the able Director of the Imperial Botanic Gardens, 
St. Petersburg. The honour of first flowering this magnificent plant in 
Europe is to Herr Max Leitchlin, in whose garden at Baden Baden it 
bloomed in 1887, and also for the first time in England at Coombe in the 
following year. 

OURISIA COCCINEA, Pers. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5335; Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 564; id. 1862, p. 398 (advt). ; Nieh. Diet. 

Gard. fig. 

A hardy perennial with bright scarlet, drooping, tubular flowers, native 
of the Andes of Chili introduced through William Lobb in 1849. 

426 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

This truly lovely plant, now seldom seen in gardens, other than in choice 
collections, requires a not too full sun and a moist, well-drained soil : it is 
best in masses. 

OUEISIA PEAECEI, Phillip. 

PI. Mag. t. 154; Proc. E.H.S. vol. iii. p. 227; Gard Chron. 1863, p. 439. 

Introduced from the Chilian Andes through Richard Pearce, and flowered 
in May 1863. 

In general as the better-known Ourisia coccinea, the leaves are flatter, 
more regularly ovate and crenate ; the flowers larger, with a longer tube, 
more spreading lip, in colour crimson, the limb streaked with the deepest 
blood red. 

OXALIS ELEGANS, H. B. K. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4490 ; Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xvi. p. 258. 

A native of the Andes of Loxa in Columbia, bordering on Peru, usually 
found at elevations of nearly 7,000 ft. First detected by Humboldt in 
this locality, and subsequently introduced to cultivation by William 
Lobb. 

OXALIS VALDIVIENSIS, Veitch. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 550 (Notice of Exhibit) ; Regel's Gartenflora, 626. 

A charming annual from Chili, with yellow flowers streaked with red 
on the outside, hardy during the summer months and suitable for green- 
house culture in the winter. 

P^EONIA OBOVATA, Maxim. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 779. 

This fine Paeony, first discovered by the Eussian explorer, Dr. Alexander 
Tartarinov, near Pekin, and afterwards collected by several later travellers, 
was introduced to cultivation through Wilson, who sent seeds collected 
in the Province of Hupeh in 1900. 

A strong-growing herbaceous Paeony, a perennial, about 2 ft. high, 
with red-purple flowers as large as those of the common garden type 
(Paeonia officinalis). 

PALAVA DISSECTA, Benth. 

Syns. P. fiexuosa, Mast. 
Gard. ChroTj. 1866, p. 435; Bot. Mag. t. 5768. 

A half-hardy annual discovered in the valley of San Lorenzo, in Peru, 
by Mr. McLean, of Lima, about the year 1810. Nothing further was 
known until Pearce sent home seed from which plants raised flowered at 
Chelsea in 1868. 

427 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The leaves obovate-oblong, irregularly toothed, narrowed at the base, are 
slightly farinose, the flowers in successive whorls as in P. japonica, but 
the plant is of more slender growth. 

PRIMULA COBTUSOIDES, L., var. AMGBNA. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 1218; Bot. Mag. t. 5528; PI. Mag. 1865, t. 249. 

A variety with larger flowers of a deeper, brighter shade of colour 
than the type, introduced from Japan through the late John Gould 
Veitch, and a very pretty form. 

PRIMULA CORTUSOIDES, L., var. GRANDIFLORA, Hort. Veitch. 

The Florist, 1870, p. 193. 

Introduced from Japan by the late John Gould Veitch, this Primula 
in style and habit of growth resembles P. cortusoides amcena. The 
flowers, however, larger than those of that variety, are concave or cup- 
shaped, slightly drooping. The exterior is of a pleasing deep rose colour, 
the interior nearly white. 

PRIMULA CORTUSOIDES, L., var. STRICTA. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 1218. 

A variety with smaller flowers than those of Primula cortusoides amoena, 
delicate pink in colour striped with crimson. 

PRIMULA DEFLEXA, Duthie. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 332 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee). 

A charming alpine species raised from seed collected in the high 
mountainous regions of Talien-lu, Western China, in 1903. 

It forms a small tufted plant with leaves about 4 in. in length, hairy on 
both surfaces, irregularly dentate along the margin. The slender flower- 
scapes about 1 ft. high, bear at the apex a dense head or capitulum 
of dark blue or purple flowers, about in. in length, pointed downwards. 
The interior of the corolla limb, some ^ in. in diameter, is dusted with a 
white farina. 

PRIMULA DENTICULATA, Sm. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3959. 

A native of Northern India, whence seeds were sent to the Veitchian 
people by the Directors of the Honourable the East India Company, 
through the medium of Dr. Royle, and plants first flowered in a cool 
greenhouse, were exhibited in March 1842 before the Horticultural Society 
of London. 

430 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

PEIMULA NIVALIS, Pall, var. FAKINOSA, Schrenck. 
Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 332 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee). 
A form of the type differing in having the stems and the under surfaces 
of the leaves mealy, and flowers of a beautiful blue colour, dotted with 
white farina on the limb. A native of Western China, discovered and 
introduced through Wilson, the flowers first opening at Coombe Wood in 
May 1905. 

PEIMULA OVALIFOLIA, Franch. 

Jour. R.H.S. 1903, vol. xxviii. pt. i. p. 64; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 62, 

suppl. illus. 

A beautiful species, native of the mountainous regions of Central and 
Western China, introduced through Wilson. 

Seed, sent in quantity, failed to germinate, but plants brought home in 
1901 flowered in March 1905. 

In a wild state in masses in moist, shady woods, carpeting the ground 
with flower as soon as the snow melts, as does the common Primrose 
in England. 

The species remarkable for the deep violet-purple flowers, approaching 
blue, is a very fine introduction. 

PEIMULA PULVEEULENTA, Duthie. 

Syns. P. japonica, A. Gray, var. pulverulenta, Duthie. 
Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 301 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee). 

A very magnificent Primula with flower stems 2 to 3 ft. high, occupying 
a high place in the ranks of plants of recent introduction. The scape, 
pedicels, and calyx thickly coated with white farina, greatly enhance 
the appearance of the rich rose-purple flower. 

From the mountainous regions of Western China on the borders of 
Tibet, flowered for the first time at Coombe Wood in May 1905. 

PEIMULA PYCNOLOBA, Bur. & Franch. 

This remarkable Primrose found by Prince Henri d'Orleans at Tatien-lu, 
in the extreme west of China, on the frontier of Tibet, was later introduced 
to cultivation from the same locality. 

Of botanical rather than of horticultural interest, the flowers small, are 
almost entirely hidden by the large leafy green calyx. These were 
produced for the first time in this country at Coombe Wood in the spring 
of 1905. 

PEIMQLA TANGUTICA, Duthie. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 301 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee); id. 
vol. xxxviii. p. 42, fig. 17 ; Bot. Mag. t. 8043. 

A remarkable Primrose introduced to cultivation from the same district 
and first flowered at Coombe Wood in May 1905. 

431 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The flowers in whorls on an erect scape about 1 ft. in height, are 
remarkable for a deep maroon colour, unlike anything in the genus 
previously known. The petals long, strap-shaped, are, when the flowers 
have fully expanded, reflexed, as in the Cyclamen. Although of small 
size, they are strongly perfumed. 

The plant was discovered by Wilson growing abundantly in open grassy 
places, at elevations of 11,000-13,000 ft. on the mountains of Szechuan, 
Western China. 

PEIMULA VEITCHII, Duthie. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 301 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; id. 
p. 344, siippl. illus. ; Bot. Mag. t. 8051. 

A species from Western China introduced through Wilson, flowered at 
Coombe Wood for the first time in May 1905. 

In general appearance this Primrose somewhat resembles Primula 
cortusoides, but is botanically quite distinct. The leaves are petiolate, 
elegantly crenate along the margin, densely hairy on the under surface. 

The flower-scape is 1 ft. high, terminated by a cluster of richly coloured 
rose-purple blooms, similar in appearance to the improved varieties of 
P. obconica, about twenty in each cluster. 

PEIMULA VIOLODOEA, Dunn. 
Dunn in Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 129. 

A species closely related to the Himalayan Primula mollis, from which 
species however readily distinguished by the colour and shape of the 
calyx. The flowers mauve, have, especially in the evening, a delicate 
scent, resembling the violet. 

It was introduced from Central China. 

PEIMULA VITTATA, Bur. & Fr. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 332 (Report of R.H.S. Floral Committee) ; id. 

p. 390, fig. 165. 

A species from Western China of the same habit of growth as Primula 
sikkimensis, from which it differs in having rich rose-purple drooping 
flowers. 

The appearance of the calyx, a striking feature, suggested the specific 
name. The whole of the upper part of the scape, the pedicels, and 
calyx are covered with a thick white farina, except for five longitudinal 
stripes on the latter corresponding to the sepals, of a brownish hue and 
very conspicuous. 

Introduced to cultivation and first flowered at Coombe Wood in May 
1905. 

432 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

PRIMULA WILSONI, Dunn. 
Card. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 413. 

Discovered in Yunnan. South China, by Pere Delavay and Dr. Henry, 
and introduced to cultivation from the same locality. 

Of the section of the genus of which Primula japonica is an example, 
it is intermediate in habit between that species and the Javanese P. 
imperialis. 

The flowers are about 1 in. in diameter, reddish-purple in colour, sweet- 
scented, in whorls of five or six each. 

RANUNCULUS LYALLII, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6888; Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 724, fig. 131 ; The Garden, 
1879, vol. xv. p. 391, with fig. 

This beautiful buttercup, justly called the monarch of the genus, 
commonly known as the " Rookwood Lily," or "Mountain Lily," was first 
discovered by Dr. Lyall on the west coast of the Southern Island of 
New Zealand, during an exploring expedition, between the years 1847- 
1849. A difficult plant to cultivate, many thousands of seeds sent have 
failed to germinate, nor will they grow on the plains of New Zealand. 

The late Mr. Anderson Henry, said to have flowered the plant before 
1864, remarked that the seeds remained dormant for four or five years. 

Messrs. Veitch imported it in quantity from New Zealand through 
Peter C. M. Veitch, succeeded in flowering it in May 1879, and exhibited 
it before the Royal Horticultural Society. 

RICHARDIA HASTATA, Hook. 

Syns. Calla ? oculata, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1859, p. 788 ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xviii. pi. cclxi. p. 596 ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 5176 ; Watson in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 123. 

A hardy aroid received from Natal in 1857, smaller but resembling in 
foliage the well-known Richardia africana. The spathe, which rises 
above the leaves, is about 3 in. long and 1| in. across the mouth : in form 
bell-shaped with an oblique limb ; in colour a clear rich yellow with a deep 
purple eye. 

RODGERSIA PINNATA, Franch., var. ALBA. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 398 (Report of K.H.S. Floral Committee). 

A white flowered form of the type introduced from Mount Wa in 
Western China. 

It forms a strong-growing herbaceous plant with handsome foliage 
showing the pinnate arrangement of the leaflets very prominently, and 
with a general resemblance to those of the Horse-chestnut. 

433 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The flower stem rises to a height of from 2 to 2| ft. bearing numerous 
small pinkish white flowers very showy in a mass and of Hawthorn-like 
fragrance. An excellent subject for bog gardens. 

BODGEBSIA PODOPHYLLA, A. Gray. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 131 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6691. 

A favourite inhabiting the mossy woods of Japan, introduced through 
Maries, who sent seed from which plants raised flowered for the first 
time in June 1882. 

At the time of introduction the only species of the genus known, but 
the botanical exploration of China during recent years has revealed 
several new to science, more than one promising to be unusually valuable 
garden plants. 

Bodgersia podophylla, like the newer species, is essentially a plant for 
the bog garden where moisture is abundant and space can be given for 
the large handsome foliage, which, when mature, assumes a deep bronzy- 
green, forming an effective background. 

SALVIA SOULIEI, Duthie. 

This new species of Salvia was discovered by Wilson in the high 
mountain ranges and gorges of Tatien-lu, Western China, and introduced 
to cultivation. 

It is a handsome herbaceous perennial with shining dark green rugose 
leaves of triangular outline, cordate at the base, with irregularly serrate 
margin. 

The flower stems attain a height of about 2 ft. and produce in quantity 
large tubular two-lipped flowers of a bluish-white colour. 

It flowered for the first time at Coombe Wood during the summer of 
1905, and is a very promising herb. 

SAUSSAUBEA LAMPBOCABPA, EemsL 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 465. 

Discovered by Dr. A. Henry in the Patung district, Central China, and 
introduced to cultivation by Messrs. Veitch. 

Mr. Hemsley (I.e. supra) states, " This is very distinct from all the 
other Chinese species that we have seen, and closely resembles the Indian 
Saussaurea hypoleuca which has smaller heads, quite entire bracts and a 
rusty pappus." 

SAXIFBAGA COBTUSIFOLIA, Sieb. & Zucc. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6680. 

A herbaceous perennial, native of South China and Japan, sent from 
the last-named country by Charles Maries. 

434 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

Closely allied to Saxifraga sarmentosa, the old Strawberry Saxifrage 
of gardens, and still closer to S. Fortunei, of which, in the view of some 
authorities, it is but a form. 

SCABIOSA BBETSCHNEIDEEI, Natal. 

A species first discovered by the Russian traveller Kaskarov in Tibet 
in 1893, and named in compliment to Dr. Bretschneider, formerly 
Physician to the Eussian Legation at Pekin, and author of " A History 
of European Botanical Discoveries in China." 

It was introduced to cultivation through Wilson, who sent seed 
collected in Western China in 1903, at elevations of 4,500 ft. 

The plant is a hardy herbaceous perennial with deeply pinnatisect 
radical leaves and scapigerous flower-stems about 1 ft. in height bearing 
deep rose-coloured flower-heads during September. 

SCOPOLIA SINENSIS, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 176. 

A Solanaceous herbaceous plant 4 to 5 ft. high with obovate leaves aud 
solitary axillary greenish-purple flowers, having a large green foliaceous 
involucre. 

A native of Central China, much valued for the sake of a drug extracted, 
used as a cardiac. 

Plants raised from seed flowered at Coombe in 1902. 

SENECIO CLIVOEUM, Max. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 217, suppl. illus. ; Bot. Mag. t. 7902. 

This, the largest flowered of all the hardy herbaceous species of the 
genus at present in cultivation, was introduced from the Province of 
Hupeh, through Wilson, and first flowered at Coombe Wood in July 
1901. 

The bold striking foliage and handsome orange-yellow flowers at once 
won a permanent and quite unassailable position in the wild garden and 
the herbaceous border. 

SENECIO MOSOYNENSIS, Franch. 

One of the numerous species of Senecio from Central China, with 
elongated cordate obtuse leaves and erect flower-stems, on the apices 
racemose inflorescences of yellow flowers ; it is of little horticultural 
merit. 

435 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

SENECIO TANGUTICUS, Maxim. 

Syns. 8. Henryi, Hemsl. 

Bot. Mag. t. 7912. 

Collected in the Province of Hupeh by Dr. Henry, by the Eev. E. Faber 
in the Province of Szechuan, and introduced to cultivation from the 
former locality by the collector, Wilson. 

The stems, furnished with deeply cut leaves of a light, graceful 
appearance, reach a height of 6 or 7 ft.; the flowers, bright yellow in 
colour and very showy, in dense panicles at the apices of the branches, 
opened for the first time at Coombe Wood in the autumn of 1902. 

SENECIO VEITCHIANUS, Hemsl. 

Syns. S. Ligularia, Hook, f., var. speciosa, Hemsl. 
Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 212 ; id. p. 455, suppl. illus. 

This strong-growing herbaceous perennial introduced from Western 
China flowered at Coombe during the summer of 1905. 

At first considered only a form of the widely distributed Senecio 
Ligularia, further study revealed sufficient characters to justify specific 
rank. 

For the wild or bog garden it is an effective subject, the bold foliage 
and strong erect spikes of yellow flowers some 6 to 8 ft. in height 
particularly striking. 

SENECIO WILSONIANUS, Heml. 

Syns. 8. Ligularia, Hook. f. , var. polycepJialus, Hemsl. 
Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 212. 

A species named in compliment to Wilson by whom it was introduced 
to cultivation from Western China. 

The bold reniform leaves form a large tuft from which rise erect spikes 
thickly covered with small capitula of bright yellow flowers, resembling in 
the manner in which they are borne the tall spikes of the Eremurus. 

SEEEATULA ATEIPLICIFOLIA. 

Veitchs' List of New Chinese Plants, 1905, p. 7, fig. 

This striking herbaceous plant, a member of a genus poorly represented 
in gardens, was introduced from Central China from seed collected in 
the Province of Hupeh in 1901. 

The plant forms a large tuft of triangular or cordate leaves dark green 
above, white beneath, on long petioles, and produces erect branched 
flower-stems some 5 to 6 ft. high, with numerous globular heads of purple 
flowers enclosed in overlapping involucral persistent bracts. 

436 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

SPRAGUEA UMBELLATA, Torr, 
Bot. Mag. t. 5143. 

A curious half-hardy perennial from California, first discovered by 
Colonel Fremont, from whose specimens a new genus constituted by 
Dr. Torrey was dedicated to Isaac Sprague Esq., of Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, the well-known botanical draughtsman. 

Introduced to this country through William Lobb, the plant first 
flowered at Exeter in July 1859. 

SWEETIA BIMACULATA, Clarke. 

A herb of the Gentian family 2 to 2| ft. high with greenish-yellow 
flowers covered with small black dots. 

A native of grassy mountain-sides at elevations of 4,000-6,000 ft. in 
Central and Western China, and also found on the Himalayas ; plants 
from seed collected by Wilson flowered at Coombe Wood in the summer 
of 1905. 

TEUCEIUM ALBO-EUBEUM, Hemsl. 

Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soo. vol. xxvi. p. 311. 

A hardy herbaceous perennial, made known from specimens collected 
in the neighbourhood of Ichang by Dr. Henry, the two-lipped flowers 
white and red, in axillary racemes. 

Plants raised from seed collected in Central China flowered at Coombe 
Wood during the summer of 1905. 

TEUCEIUM OENATUM, Hemsl. 
Hemsley in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 313. 

This species, also discovered by Dr. Henry, was introduced to cultivation 
through Wilson, from seed in 1900. 

It is a hardy herbaceous perennial with lanceolate dark green leaves 
serrate along the margin, purplish beneath. 

The small rose-coloured flowers, in erect racemes in the axils of the 
uppermost leaves, opened for the first time at Coombe Wood in 1904. 

THALICTEUM DIPTEEOCAEPUM, Franch. 

An attractive addition to a genus of hardy herbaceous plants, charac- 
terized by neat glaucous-green foliage and purple flowers, in light graceful 
panicles. 

Sent to cultivation from Western China through Wilson, who detected 
it at elevations of 4,000-5,000 ft. 

The specific name is in allusion to the flattened wing-like appearance 
of the ripe carpel. 

437 F f 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

TEICYETIS LATIFOLIA, Maxim. 

A broad-leaved species of the "Toad Lily," a herbaceous perennial, 
attaining a height of from 2 to 2 ft., with white flowers spotted with 
purple and broadly ovate leaves distinctly marked with seven longitudinal 
veins. 

A native of Central China, introduced to cultivation in 1900, but known 
to science previously from specimens collected by Maximowicz in Northern 
Japan. 

TKOPJEOLUM LOBBIANUM, Hort. Veitch. 
Syns. T. peltopliorum, Benth. 

Hemsley in The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. p. 442 ; Fl. des Serres, 1846, January, pi. iv. ; 

Bot. Mag. t. 4097. 

Found about the same time both by William Lobb and Hartweg, but to 
the former is the honour of introduction to gardens. Native of the lofty 
mountains of Columbia, Lobb detected it in 1843, and sent seed to 
Exeter. 

TKOP^EOLUM SMITHII, DC. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4385 ; Hemsley in The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. p. 444. 

This hardy annual or greenhouse perennial, with dull, brick-red sepals 
and spur, bright orange-yellow petals striped red and curiously fringed, 
is a native of the high mountain ranges of Columbia, sent by William 
Lobb in 1848. 

TKOP^EOLUM SPECIOSUM, P. & E. 

Paxfc. Mag. Bofc. vol.' adv. p. 173; Bot. Mag. t. 4323; The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. 
pi. 127, p. 442 ; Kev. Hort. 1904, n.s. torn. iv. p. 88, col. pi. 

A magnificent species, native of the southern provinces of Chili, from 
Concepcion to Chiloe, probably the handsomest of the genus, well 
meriting the common name of " Flame Flower," introduced to this 
country through William Lobb, and flowered for the first time in June 
1847. 

Though perfectly hardy, the plant will not succeed in all positions, 
and like others from the same locality dislikes strong sunlight, a dry 
atmosphere and draught, and failures in connection with its cultivation 
are often doubtless due to the want of these simple precautions. 

A brilliant garden picture. 

VIOLA PEDUNCULATA, Torrey & Gray. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5004. 

One of the many discoveries of David Douglas in California during his 

438 



HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

last journey, and but little before the accident in the Sandwich Islands 
which resulted in his death. 

Subsequently introduced to cultivation through William Lobb, who 
sent seed from the same locality, from which plants were raised. 

WAHLENBEEGIA TUBEEOSA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6155. 

A campanulaceous plant, native of Juan Fernandez, introduced through 
Downton in 1873. 

Eemarkable for a tuberous root-stock which grows above the surface 
of the soil as a cluster of potato tubers, contrasting strongly with the 
graceful thread-like stems and pearl-white rose-streaked blossoms so very 
freely produced. 



439 



BULBOUS PLANTS 



BULBOUS PLANTS 

ALLIUM ANCEPS, Kellogg. 

Bot. Mag. t. 6227. 

An inhabitant of the Sierra Nevada portion of the Eocky Mountains, 
at elevations of 4,000-5,000 ft. Bulbs received proved quite hardy in 
England, and flowered in the open in May 1875. 
From these the plate in the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) was prepared. 

ALSTECEMEEIA INODOEA, Herb. 

Syns. A. nemorosa, Gardn. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3958 ; Herbert's AmaryllidaceaD, p. 90, t. 2, fig. 1. 

Introduced from the Organ Mountains of Brazil through William Lobb, 

and first flowered under glass during the winter of 1841-1842, at Exeter. 

The flowers, in loose clusters at the end of long stems, yellow and 

margined with red, have dark markings on the three inner floral segments. 

BLANDFOEDIA AUEEA, Hook. f. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5809; Fl. Mag. 1867, t. 403; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1870, p. 5, fig.; PI. and 

Pom. 1872, p. 113. 

This, the sixth species of the Australian genus Blandfordia introduced, 
was imported from New South Wales and flowered for the first time in 
this country at Chelsea in July 1869. 

A cool greenhouse evergreen plant with narrow linear bluish-green 
leaves from the base of which the flower-scape rises from 1 to 2 ft. in 
height, bearing at the apex umbellate clusters of from three to five pure 
golden-yellow bell-shaped drooping flowers. 

BOMAEEA ANDINAMAECANA, Baker. 

Syns. Collania andinamarcana, Herb. 

Bot. Mag. t. 4247; Gard. Chron. 1846, p. 54 (Notice of Exhibition of New Plants). 

Originally gathered by Mr. Mathews on the lofty mountains of Andina- 
marca in Peru, and from his dried specimens described by Dean Herbert 
for the first time. 

William Lobb collected seed in the locality where the bulb was first 
detected, and from these, plants raised flowered for the first time in April 
1846. 

It is a singular-looking object with a climbing stem terminating in a 

443 



HORTUS VETTCHII 

much-branched leafy corymb, pendant from the weight of the flowers, 
remarkable for their coloration, the three outer perianth pieces orange- 
red tipped with black, the three inner yellow flaked green, and the centre 
a tuft of golden-yellow anthers. 

BOMAEEA CALDASIANA, Herb. 
Syns. Alstrcemeria Caldasii, Humb. & Rth. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5442. 

A lovely species first discovered on the Quitinian Andes by Humboldt 
and Bonpland, and later introduced from the same locality through 
Eichard Pearce. 

The climbing stems, terminated by drooping umbels of bright orange- 
yellow flowers, are thickly spotted with reddish-brown. 

BOMAEEA MULTIPLOEA, Mirb. 

Fl. des Serres, t. 2316 ; The Florist, 1864, p. 97, col. pi. ; Gard. Chron. 1863, p. 627 
(Eeport of Exhibition of New Plants). 

A greenhouse climber with lance-shaped leaves and terminal umbels of 
handsome, drooping, orange-red flowers dotted inside with crimson. 
A native of Peru, introduced through Eichard Pearce. 

BOMAEEA TOMENTOSA, Herb. 

Syns. B. densiflora, Herb. ; Alstrcemeria densiflora, Herb. 
Bot. Mag. t. 5531 ; Herbert's Aniaryllidacege, p. 399, t. 46, fig. 4. 

A richly-coloured Peruvian species, originally described by Dean Herbert 
from specimens collected by Mathews in the vicinity of Chachapoyas in 
Peru, and introduced to cultivation from the same locality by Eichard 
Pearce. 

The bright red flowers, dotted black in the throat of the perianth-tube, 
are in dense umbels terminating twining stems. 

CEINUM PUEPUEASCENS, Herb. 

Syns. C. bracteatum, var. purpurescens. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6525 ; Fl. and Pom. 1879, p. 108, fig. 

A very distinct Crinum of the star-flowered set, native of West Tropical 
Africa, from Old Calabar by Kalbreyer. It had previously been sent to 
this country by the Eev. H. Goldie. 

The flowers white, tinted with rose, on purple foot-stalks, have con- 
spicuous purplish-crimson stamens, terminated by yellow anthers. 

EUCOMIS BICOLOE, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 492; Bot. Mag. t. 6816; W. W. in The Garden, 

1893, vol. xliii. p. 185. 

Sent to Messrs. Veitch by Christopher Mudd, the son of a former 

444 



BULBOUS PLANTS 

Curator of the Cambridge Botanic Gardens, from Natal, and flowered in 
this country in the autumn of 1878. The plant suited to greenhouse 
culture, is, when in bloom, very ornamental. The flowers on the upper 
portion of a spike 1 ft. or more high, are greenish-white margined purple. 

EUEYCLES SYLVESTEIS, Salisb. 

Syns. E. australasica, Loud. 
Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1879, p. 25, fig. p. 13. 

A bulbous plant allied to Pancratium, re-introduced from the South Sea 
Islands by P. C. M. Veitch in 1877. 

The pure white flowers in umbels open during the months of February 
and March. 

FEITILLAEIA VEETICILLATA, var. THUNBEEGII, Baker. 
Syns. F. Thunbergii, Miquel. 

Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiii. p. 532, with fig. ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xvii. p. 313, 

with fig. 

A Japanese species introduced through Charles Maries, remarkable 
for a long, narrow, linear leaf, terminating in a tendril, the flowers small, 
bell-shaped, greenish and mottled with pale purple. 

H^MANTHUS CINNABAEINUS, Desne. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 23 ; Fl. and Pom. 1878, p. 155, fig. ; The Florist, 1877, 

col. pi. 

A gorgeous flowering bulbous plant from the West Coast of Tropical 
Africa, with very dense globular heads of flower of an unusually brilliant 
cinnabar-scarlet, with the lustre of the familiar Guernsey lily, remaining in 
perfection for a long period. 

HvEMANTHUS (DIACLES) HIESUTUS, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. ix. p. 756. 

Sent from the Transvaal by Mudd and flowered in April 1878. It 
resembles the hairy variety of Haemanthus virescens, but has leaves of a 
different shape, longer pedicels, and a differently constructed bract. 

H^MANTHUS KALBEEYEEI, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. x. p. 202 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 30, fig. ; The 
Garden, 1879, vol. xvi. p. 438, col. pi. 

Discovered on the West Coast of Africa by Kalbreyer, after whom 
Mr. Baker, late of the Herbarium, Kew, named the bulb. 

The splendid flower-head fully 8 in. in diameter, has a somewhat 
dense and remarkably striking umbel of upwards of one hundred flowers 
of the brightest vermilion-red. 

445 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

HEMEEOCALLIS FULVA, L., var. FLORE PLENO. 

Syns. H. disticha, Dom. 
Gard. Chron. 1860, p. 482 (Report of Exhibition of New Plants) ; PI. Mag. 1861, pi. 13. 

A semi-double form of the common "Day Lily," with spikes of orange 
flower similar in colour to the type, possessing the important quality 
of remaining longer on the plant. 

Sent to Messrs. Veitch by the Rev. W. Ellis, by whom it was brought 
to this country from Mauritius ; the type a native of China. 

HIPPEASTEUM LEOPOLDII, Dombrain. 
Syns. Amaryllis Leopoldii, Hort. 

Gard. Chron. 1870, p. 733, fig. 140; PI. Mag. 1870, tt. 475-476; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 

fig. p. 3. 

This beautiful species, introduced from Peru through Richard Pearce, 
first flowered during May 1869, and was named, by permission, in 
honour of the King of the Belgians, on the occasion of His Majesty's 
visit to an exhibition held in the Royal honour in the gardens of the 
Royal Horticultural Society at Kensington. 

It was described by Pearce as the finest of any Amaryllid he had met 
with, and the plant has fully borne out this description. 

The perianth of the flower widely spreading with a short tube and 
broad segments is tipped deep crimson and cream with a green star in the 
centre. 

Largely used as a parent in the florists' varieties of the present day, its 
influence has been very great. 

HIPPEASTRUM PARDINUM, Dombrain. 
Syns. Amaryllis pa/rdima, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5645; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1867, fig.; Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 458 (advt.); 

PI. Mag. t. 344. 

Introduced from Peru through Richard Pearce to Chelsea, where it 
flowered for the first time in March 1867. 

This striking, distinct species is remarkable for spreading flowers, with 
scarcely any tube, the whole inner surface displayed ; the colour suggests 
a spotted variety of Calceolaria or Tydaea, so closely is it covered with 
small dots of crimson-red on a cream ground more or less confluent. 

It has been used by the hybridist but sparingly, in the production of 
the florists' forms of the Hippeastrum. 

HIPPEASTRUM PRATENSE, Baker, var. QUADRIFLORA. 

Syns. Habranthus pratensis, Herb., var. quadriflora. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3961. 

Sent by William Lobb from Valdivia and about the same time to 
Mr. Bevan by Bridges, and first flowered in May 1842 in the open. 

446 




LILIUM AURATUM 

THE ROYAL GARDENS, KEW 



LILIUM AUEATUM, Lindl. 

Gard. Chron. 1862, p. 644, b. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5338 ; Fl. des Serres, 1862-1865, torn. xv. 
p. 57 ; Fl. Mag. 1862, pi. 121. 

The most splendid creation of the temperate zone unrivalled in pure 
distinction aristocrat in every line and when the day comes that the 
House of Veitch must pass, it may well and safely leave its laurels with 
the " Golden-rayed Lily of Japan." 

This lily was introduced to Europe from the " Land of the Eising Sun " 
by the late John Gould Veitch in 1862, and about the same time Eobert 
Fortune sent bulbs to Mr. Standish, a nurseryman of that day. 

Flowered for the first time in July of that year, shown at the great 
exhibition of the Horticultural Society in the Gardens at South Kensington, 
the interest and surprise were quite unusual. 

At home in any ordinary garden in any ordinary peaty soil, it need but 
be left alone to improve and multiply. 

Idle to attempt description of one of Nature's happiest efforts, it is yet 
permissible to quote Dr. Lindley in the Gardeners' Chronicle the issue of 
July 12th, 1862 : 

" If ever a flower merited the name of glorious, it is this, which stands 
far above all other Lilies, whether we regard its size, its sweetness, or its 
exquisite arrangement of colour. Imagine, upon the end of a purple 
stem no thicker than a ramrod, and not above 2 ft. high, a saucer- shaped 
flower at least 10 in. in diameter, composed of six spreading, somewhat crisp 
parts, rolled back at their points, and having an ivory-white skin thinly 
strewn with purple points or studs, and oval or roundish prominent, 
purple stains. To this add in the middle of each of the six parts a 
broad stripe of light satiny-yellow losing itself gradually in the ivory 
skin. 

" Place the flower in a situation where side-light is cut off, and no 
direct light can reach it except from above, when the stripes acquire the 
appearance of gentle streamlets of Australian gold, and the reader who 
has not seen it may form some feeble notion of what it is. 

" Fortunately some ten thousand eyes beheld it at South Kensington on 
the 2nd instant (July 2nd, 1862) and they can fill up the details of the 
picture." 



447 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

LILIUM AUEATUM, Lindl, var. PLATYPHYLLUM, Baker. 
Baker in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 198. 

Introduced through Maries from a small island on the south-east side 
of Japan, and quite the finest of the type. 

In form close to the typical species, it differs in a habit more dwarf and 
broader leaves ; the perianth segments are more massive, with spots as in 
Lilium auratum, less copious and more concentrated in the centre of 
the segments. 

LILIUM AUEATUM, Lindl., var. TRICOLOE, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 198. 

The distinctive marks are a robust habit, broad sub-erect leaves, and 
large flowers, without any brown dots, but with copious spots and papillae 
of the same colour as the lamina. 

LILIUM DUCHAETEEI, Franch. 

A handsome lily introduced to cultivation by Wilson, from Western 
China, found growing in bogs and marshes at elevations of 4,000-5000 ft. 

The flowers at Coombe Wood in the summer of 1905, of a creamy-white 
ground colour with purple spots, had the perianth pieces reflexed. 

The plant attains a height of from 2 to 4 ft., and carries from six to 
eight flowers on a stem. 

LILIUM GIGANTEUM, Wall. 

Syns. L. cordi/olium, Don. 

Gard. Chron. 1851, p. 513 (advt.) ; id. 1853, pp. 324, 327 (Notice of Exhibit) ; Bot. Mag. 

t. 4673. 

Bulbs of this striking lily were collected by Thomas Lobb in Nepal, the 
native habitat, where it had originally been discovered by Dr. Wallich in 
moist shady places. 

These arrived in England in 1851, flowered, and were exhibited in May 
1853. 

According to the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) it bloomed for the 
first time in this country in July 1852 in the nursery of Messrs. 
Cunningham, Comely Bank, Edinburgh, from seed collected by Major 
Madden. 

A majestic object, attaining 6 to 10 ft. in height with large glossy 
heart-shaped leaves clothing the stem, and white trumpet-shaped fragrant 
flowers on terminal spikes ; suitable for the bog garden and bamboo- 
planted lake -sides. 

448 



BULBOUS PLANTS 

LILIUM LEICHTLINII, Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 5673 ; The Garden, 1882, vol. xxi. p. 236, pi. cccxxxi. 

A charming lily, somewhat difficult to cultivate, imported by Messrs. 
Veitch from Japan with Lilium auratum. 

It resembles in some respects L. tigrinum, but differs in colour and in 
a more graceful habit, scattered leaves, and crested inner segments of 
the perianth. The flowers have a bright yellow groundwork, spotted with 
clear red-purple or maroon-brown. 

In naming this lily, Sir Joseph D. Hooker writes (I.e. supra) : " I have 
named this plant after the zealous cultivator of the genus to whom the 
Eoyal Gardens are indebted for many rare species, M. Max Leichtlin, of 
Carlsruhe, a gentleman who is especially devoting himself to the elucida- 
tion, by culture, of the numerous species and races of this noble genus of 
bulbous plants." 

LILIUM LONGIFLOEUM, var. FOBMOSANUM, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 524 ; The Garden, 1880, vol. xviii. p. 458, fig. 
p. 459 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 10, with fig. 

A variety with more numerous, longer, and narrower leaves than the 
type, a red keel at the back of the perianth segments. 

It is mentioned in Elwes' Monograph, but at the time of writing had 
not been seen alive in this country. 

Bulbs were sent home by Maries from Formosa. 

LILIUM MYEIOPHYLLUM, Franch. 

Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 328, suppl. illus. ; Flora and Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. 
p. 328, col. pi. fig. 1, also p. 331, fig. 

A charming lily with numerous narrow slightly twisted lanceolate leaves 
clothing the stem from base to apex. The flowers large, trumpet-shaped, 
of substance, have a pure white ground colour stained with rose-purple 
on the exterior of the perianth and inside, as far as the throat a rich 
golden-yellow ; the anthers large, the pollen orange-yellow. The flowers 
open during the latter part of August to the beginning of September. 

Originally discovered by Pere Delavay in Central China, introduction by 
Messrs. Veitch did not take place till bulbs were collected in 1904. 

LILIUM NEILGHEEKENSE, Wight. 

Syns. L. WallicManum, Wight ; L. neilgerricum, Hort. Veitch. 

Baker in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. p. 230; PI. Mag. n.s. t. 237 ; Bot. Mag. t. 6332; 
1'Illus. Hort. vol. x. t. 253 ; PI. des Serres, 2266-2267. 

This, the only lily of the mountains of Southern India, inhabiting 

449 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

the Neilgherries and Pulnies, at an elevation of some 8,000 ft., was 
introduced by Thomas Lobb in 1862, but failed to become established, 
and later was again imported in considerable quantity. 

The flowers from 6 to 10 in. long, narrowly funnel-shaped, cream-white 
with a yellow throat, change to almost pure white when mature. 

LILIUM PHILIPPINENSE, Baker. 

Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1141, fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, frontispiece ; Bot. Mag. 
t. 6250 ; Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. p. 228. 

A very distinct species, sent to Chelsea by Gustav Wallis from the 
Island of Luzon, found at an elevation of 7,000 ft. 

The flowers pure white with the exception of a green tinge at the 
base of the tube, very long and funnel-shaped, are remarkably sweet- 
scented. 

Botanically interesting as showing the extreme development of the 
peculiarities distinguishing the Eulirion group. 

LILIUM SPECIOSUM, Thunb., var. GLOKIOSOIDES, Baker. 
Baker in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. xiv. p. 198. 

Discovered by Maries in the mountains of Central China and introduced 
by him to this country. 

It differs from previously known varieties of Lilium speciosum in more 
narrow leaves, much reflexed perianth-segments, resembling those of 
Gloriosa superba, and by scarlet spots and papillae mainly confined to the 
third quarter of the segment. 

LILIUM SUTCHUENENSE, Franch. 

Bofc. Mag. t. 7715; Gard. Chrou. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 91, suppl. illus. ; Flora and Sylva, 
1905, vol. iii. p. 328, col. pi. fig. 2, also p. 329, fig. 

The figure of this species in the Botanical Magazine (I.e. supra) was 
prepared from plants which flowered in the Eoyal Botanic Gardens, 
Kew, in July 1899, from bulbs procured from M.M. Vilmorin of Paris. 

Seed was first sent to M. Maurice de Vilmorin by the Abbe Farges, 
collected in the Province of Szechuan, Western China, in which locality 
it was also found by Prince Henry d'Orleans. 

Bulbs in quantity introduced to this country through Wilson to Coombe 
Wood flowered in July 1905. 

The lily belongs to the Martagon section, orange-scarlet flowers thickly 
spotted with purple and narrow linear leaves resembling those of Lilium 
tenuifolium, to which species it is closely allied : it is possible that its 
constitution will prove suitable to the English climate. 

450 



BULBOUS PLANTS 

NAKCISSUS TAZETTA, L., var. OEIENTALIS, FLOEE PLENO. 
Gard. Chron. 1874, p. 385 ; Bot. Mag. t. 1001. 

Exhibited before the Floral Committee of the Eoyal Horticultural 
Society on March 18th 1874 and awarded a First-class Certificate. 

An old garden plant, figured in the Botanical Magazine as early as 
t. 1001, but probably lost to cultivation for many years. 

TEISTIGMA NAECISSOIDES, Benth. & Hook. 

Syns. Stephanolirion narcissoides, Baker. 
Baker in Gard. Chron. 1875, vol. iv. p. 234. 

An interesting bulbous plant from Chili, first flowered at Chelsea in 
September 1874. 

At a first glance the flowers have the general appearance of Narcissus 
Tazetta, with a white limb and orange crown, but further examination 
shows the flower not an Amaryllid, but Liliaceous, more closely allied 
to the Millas than to the Narcissus. 

Mr. Baker founded the new genus Stephanolirion on this plant, but it 
has now been referred to Tristigma, a genus confined to only three or four 
species. 

UECEOLINA AUEEA, Lindl. 

Syns. U. pendula, Herb. 

Gard. Chron. 1864, p. 627; id. p. 890, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5464 ; PI. Mag. 1866, p. 307 ; 
The Garden, 1888, vol. xxxiii. p. 436, pi. 648. 

This interesting bulbous plant, a native of the Andes of Peru, was first 
detected by the travellers Euiz and Pavon and described by them in Flora 
Peruviana, iii. p. 58, t. 287. 

Introduced to this country through Eichard Pearce in 1863, from Mufia, 
and first flowered during the spring of the following year, it has proved 
unusually amenable in cultivation. 

As an Amaryllid the flowers are remarkable both in colour and shape, 
in an umbel at the apex of a scape about 1 ft. high, each resembling an 
inverted pitcher suspended by a slender stalk ; the floral segments bright 
yellow, tipped with green and margined white. 

WATSONIA DENSIFLOEA, Baker. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6400. 

Introduced by us from Natal through Christopher Mudd, who sent 
home living plants collected when in the Veitchian service in that country ; 
nrst flowered at Chelsea in August 1878. 

451 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

ZEPHYEANTHES CITEINA, Baker. 
Bot. Mag. t. 6605. 

This, the first yellow Zephyranthes to be introduced to cultivation, 
was imported by the Veitchian people, it is believed from Demerara, 
but Mr. Baker, in describing it in the Botanical Magazine (I.e. siipm), 
suggests the probability that the bulb is a native of Mexico. 

ZEPHYEANTHES MACEOSIPHON, Baker. 

Baker in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 70. 

A species imported from Mexico, somewhat close to Zephyranthes 
carinata, with which it agrees in the bright red colour of the flower, 
readily distinguished by short stigmatic lobes and an expanded tube as 
long as the segments. 

ZEPHYEANTHES TEEATI^B, S. Wats. 

W. W. in The Garden, 1890, vol. xxxvii. p. 155. 

Introduced from the swamps of Florida about the year 1880, and very 
closely approaching Zephyranthes Atamasco. 



452 



BEGONIAS 



BEGONIAS 



ANDEAN OR TUBEROUS-ROOTED SPECIES. 

THE numerous garden varieties of this section of the genus are among the most 
popular of the summer-flowering plants of the present day, and probably no race 
has so quickly gained favour or become so widely distributed. 

This pre-eminence is due to the rich and varied colours of the flowers, the many 
forms they take, and the ease with which they can be grown. 

To the student of the evolution of our garden plants, and to the intelligent 
cultivator, there is not a more interesting group to study, as it is within a com- 
paratively short period, not more than five-and-thirty years, that the work of 
hybridizing Begonias was commenced, and the foundation laid of that magnificent 
race common in our gardens to-day. 

The modern varieties with their large flowers have entirely ousted the early 
hybrids from cultivation, whilst the original species from which they were derived 
are now unfortunately seldom seen outside Botanic Gardens. 

Seven wild species were employed in the production ef the modern summer- 
flowering Begonias, all natives of the Andes of Peru, and all, with but two excep- 
tions, introduced to this country and distributed by Messrs. Veitch. 

The exceptions mentioned are Begonia Clarkei and B. cinnabarina, both intro- 
duced by E. G. Henderson of Pine Apple Place. 

Of the five other species Begonia boliviensis, B. Pearcei, B. Veitchii, B. rosae- 
flora, and B. Davisii four were introduced through Richard Pearce and the 
last-named through Walter Davis. 

The first species, * Begonia boliviensis, was found by Pearce in the Bolivian Andes 
in 1865, though it had previously been discovered by Weddell in the same region 
but not introduced. 

It was exhibited for the first time at the International Horticultural Show in 
Paris, in May 1867, on which occasion it is stated to have " attracted more of the 
attention, both of botanists and horticulturists, than any other plant then brought 
to that magnificent exhibition." 

The plant is occasionally met with in cultivation at the present day in summer 
bedding, and its bright scarlet flowers and graceful drooping habit merit such 
attention, though more brilliant effects are produced by its descendants, the 
modern garden varieties. 

The stems of Begonia boliviensis spring from a tuberous root-stock, and attain 
a height of from 12 to 18 in. ; the flowers produced in pairs or threes on short 
stems in the angles of the obliquely lanceolate leaves, are bright in colour, 
composed of four pointed segments. 

* Begonia boliviensis, Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 544, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5657 : Fl. Mae 
1867, t. 354. 

455 



The stamens differ from those of the typical Begonias in that they are in an 
elongated column, instead of a globular cluster, and the stigma also differs in 
some minor technical points. These characters considered by Klotzch sufficient 
to merit a new genus, he proposed the name of Barya, subsequently merged 
into Begonia by De Candolle. 

Begonia boliviensis will always be of special interest to gardeners, from the fact 
that it was one of the species used by Seden in the production of the first hybrid 
tuberous Begonia raised in England, B. x Sedenii. 

The next great find was * Begonia Pearcei, a beautiful species with yellow 
flowers, native of La Paz, where it was discovered by Pearce, after whom it 
was named. 

The plant is of tufted habit, has the unusual quality of possessing orna- 
mental foliage and showy flowers. The leaves are dark velvety green 
above, traversed by straw-coloured veins : the under surface dark red with 
the exception of a prominent venation. Well above the handsome leaves 
are borne the bright yellow flowers, usually three in number, on slender 
scapes. 

This species entered largely into the production of garden varieties, developing 
colours entirely absent prior to its introduction. Traces of its ornamental foliage 
can still be detected in the yellow-flowered varieties of the present day. 

It was distributed in 1866, and figured amongst other new Plants, in a 
coloured plate in the Veitchian Plant Catalogue of that year, associated with 
Calathea (Maranta) Veitchiana, Lapageria alba, and Urceolina pendula, all of 
which we owe to Pearce, and all of which remain favourite garden plants. 

t Begonia Veitchii, another introduction due to Richard Pearce, was discovered 
near Cuzco in Peru at an elevation of 12,000-12,500 ft. in 1866, and first 
flowered in this country in 1867, soon after B. boliviensis had produced its scarlet 
blooms. 

In the Botanical Magazine (sub t. 5663), Sir J. D. Hooker writes : " Of all 
species of Begonia known, this is, I think, the finest. With the habit of Saxifraga 
ciliata, immense flowers of a vivid vermilion-cinnabar red, that no colourist can 
reproduce, it adds the novel feature of being hardy, in certain parts of England 
at any rate, if not in all. 

" Unwilling as I am to pronounce on the probable or possible adaptation of 
exotic plants to an English climate, I cannot but believe that in south-western 
counties and in the south of Ireland, the Begonia Veitchii will certainly prove 
one of the most ornamental of garden plants." 

This expectation of the probable hardiness of Begonia Veitchii was not realized, 
as it was found of too delicate a constitution to withstand the combined 
effects of cold and damp of English winters, but tubers stored in a dry 
place flowered freely out-of-doors during the summer months ; this is the case 
with all the Andean species of Begonia. 

Walter Davis, who traversed Pearce's ground some years later, found Begonia 
Veitchii inhabiting rocky positions by waterfalls, in company with Masdevallia 
Veitchiana. 

In association with Begonia boliviensis and B. Pearcei, this species has been 

* Begonia Pearcei, Hook. f. Bot. Mag. t. 5545 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1866, col. pi. 
t Begonia Veitchii, Hook, f . Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 734, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5663 ; 
Fl. Mag. 1867, vol. vi. pi. 365. 

456 



BEGONIAS 

much used by the hybridist, and in the varieties of to-day may still be seen 
traces of the stout circular leaves and short thick stem. 

A closely allied species, named Begonia Clarkei, in honour of Colonel Trevor 
Clarke who first flowered it, had been introduced from Peru a few years prior to 
the introduction of B. Veitchii, but the plants did not flower for several years, 
and when they did, were found to differ from B. Veitchii in habit as well as in 
colour, size, and shape of flower, 

A higher temperature is required by Begonia Clarkei than by the majority 
of the genus, and the presumption is that it is a native of a lower altitude than 
B. Veitchii. A figure of the latter is given in the Veitchian Plant Catalogue 
for 1868, in which year it was distributed. 

Another of Pearce's Andean introductions, * Begonia rosseflora, a species in 
many respects resembling B. Veitchii, from which, however, it differs in several 
important points. 

The petioles of the leaves coloured red, as is the villous flower-scape ; the 
bracts and stipules of a different form to those of Begonia Veitchii bright 
rose-coloured ; the colour of the flowers, the most marked difference, is that of 
the Wild Rose, not the cinnabar-red of B. Veitchii. 

Seden early made use of this species in the production of hybrids, and it may 
be looked upon as one of the most active progenitors of the garden tuberous 
Begonias of to-day. 

Another interesting fact regarding this species is that from seedlings obtained 
by crossing light-coloured varieties, the first white-flowered tuberous Begonia 
was obtained, and sent out under the varietal name Queen of the Whites. 

Davis found that the colours of the flowers in this species varied greatly, and a 
white-flowered form sent home by him some years later, proved identical with the 
seedling known as Queen of the Whites. 

The last of the Andean species to be introduced to cultivation was t Begonia 
Davisii, named after the discoverer, who detected it near Chupe, in Peru, when 
collecting in that region. 

Like its congeners, Begonia Veitchii and B. rosseflora, it is a stemless species 
with broadly ovate-cordate leaves, glossy green above and purplish beneath, 
with a slightly lobed serrated margin ; the flowers rich orange-scarlet in colour, 
are in threes on erect red-coloured scapes 6 to 8 in. high. 

The dwarf habit and erect flowers characteristic of this species were taken 
advantage of by Seden, who rapidly evolved several garden forms possessing 
most desirable qualities and of a very high order. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED HYBRIDS. 

The first hybrid Begonia of the tuberous-rooted section was raised at Chelsea 
by John Seden as the result of a cross between B. boliviensis and an unnamed 
Andean species. 

The Royal Horticultural Society awarded it their Silver Floral Medal as the 
" best new plant shown for the first time in bloom " at their New Plant Show 
held on June 2nd, 1869. 

* Begonia rosaeflora, Bot. Mag. t. 5680 ; Fl. and Pom. 1869, col. pi. p. 1. 
t Begonia Davisii, Hort. Veitch ; Bot. Mag. t. 6252 ; Fl. Mag. t. 6252 ; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of PI. 1879, fig.; The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. p. 208, pi. 118, 

457 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

* Begonia x Sedenii was the name given in compliment to the raiser. 

Plants distributed in 1870, and figured in the Plant Catalogue of that year, are 
described as " of the same upright habit as Begonia boliviensis but with larger 
leaves, the veins of which are slightly rose-coloured ; the flowers are of the richest 
magenta and of large size." 

It is interesting in that the first double-flowered Begonia was obtained from 
seeds produced by self-fertilized flowers from this hybrid. 

This was followed by t Begonia x Chelsoni, another hybrid raised by Seden by 
fertilizing the hybrid B. x Sedenii with B. boliviensis, thus crossing the progeny 
with one of its parents. The appearance of B. x Chelsoni greatly resembled 
B. boliviensis, but the flowers larger, were a glossy red in colour. 

J Begonia x intermedia was the next, a product of the two Andean species B. 
Veitchii and B. boliviensis, distributed in 1872 and described in the Veitchian 
Plant Catalogue for that year: "In habit it partakes strongly of B. boliviensis, 
being a strong upright-growing plant, branching freely, and attaining an average 
height of 15 to 18 in. The leaves have much the form and substance of 
B. Veitchii, but are toothed like B. boliviensis. The flowers are of the size and 
form of B. Veitchii and resemble it also in colour, but are of a rather darker 
shade." 

In 1874 two more were offered, Stella and Vesuvius : the former the 
result of crossing Begonia x Sedenii with B. Veitchii, and the latter the 
progeny of B. Clarkei crossed with B. x Sedenii. Vesuvius had bright orange- 
scarlet flowers, combined with a robust habit, a useful and popular subject 
for summer-bedding. || Excelsior and || Model next raised, were distributed 
in 1875. The variety Excelsior was obtained from Begonia X Chelsoni, crossed 
with B. cinnabarina, and is described as a very free-blooming variety, with 
large flowers of the form of B. Veitchii and the colour of B. cinnabarina. It 
was one of the best bedding Begonias of its time. Model was the product of 
a cross between B. x Sedenii and B. Pearcei, the flowers of a delicate rosy 
blush colour, and of the finest shape. 

The hybrids Begonia x Sedenii and B. x intermedia were next used as parents, 
and these produced the variety named IF Acme, sent out in 1876. A figure of the 
flower is given in the Plant Catalogue of that year, and in an accompanying 
description it states : " The flowers are of a delicate orange-pink, tinged with a 
deeper shade of orange-rose. In well-grown plants the flowers are large, the 
male or staminate ones from 3 to 4 in. between the extremities of the alternate 
narrower petals ; the petals of both staminate and pistillate flowers are 
beautifully veined symmetrically with the edges." 

** Kallista, derived from Begonia x Sedenii crossed with the variety Stella, was 
also sent out in 1876. The flowers, of a rich vermilion-scarlet, were the darkest 
shade of that colour known at the time Later Kallista gave rise to many fine 
varieties from self-fertilized seed. 

* Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1870, col. pi. and fig. p. 4 ; Fl. and Pom. 1869, p. 169, 
col. pi. 

f Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1871, col. pi. and fig. p. 2. 
% Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1872, p. 2, fig. ; Fl. Mag. Feb. 1872. 
| Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, pp. 4, 5, figs. 
|| Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1875, pp. 4, 5, figs. 

V Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 6, fi^. ; The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. pi. 118. 
* Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1876, p. 7, fig. 

458 



BEGONIAS 

In 1877 appeared * Emperor, from Begonia Clarkei crossed with the hybrid 
B. X Cbelsoni, which proved a marked advance on the forms then existing, having 
brilliant orange-scarlet flowers of large size. 

Following Emperor came f Monarch, from crossing the two hybrids Begonia x 
Sedenii and B. x intermedia. This, with bright vermilion-scarlet flowers, was, 
when distributed, undoubtedly one of the finest of all the earlier successes. 

Up till 1877 the colours of the flowers of the Hybrid tuberous-rooted Begonias 
were not of a wide range, mostly shades of red or varying from magenta to 
orange-scarlet, but a break occurred when J Queen of the Whites developed 
among a batch of seedlings of B. rosseflora. 

In habit Queen of the Whites resembled Begonia rosseflora, dwarf and 
furnished with orbicular leaves and deeply-sunk veins ; the flowers, 2 to 2 in. 
in diameter, milk-white in colour, were freely produced on erect scapes, and 
the variety largely used as a parent, became the forerunner of all the white 
and light-coloured forms now so numerous. 

In 1880 two varieties, named Mrs. Charles Scorer and roseo-superba, were 
distributed. Mrs. Charles Scorer, a splendid crimson-scarlet flowered variety, 
was produced by crossing Viscountess Doneraile (a hybrid not then sent out) 
with another seedling. 

It is thus described : " A splendid variety with large well-formed flowers of a 
brilliant glowing crimson-scarlet, unequalled in this particular shade of colour by 
any Begonia of its class. The plant is of robust habit, free-flowering and 
vigorous, furnished with a neat dark green foliage, which, together with brilliant 
flowers, render it one of the best Begonias yet obtained." 

The variety roseo-superba, the progeny of Begonia rosseflora crossed with an 
unnamed seedling, produced flowers of a clear bright rose-colour suffused with 
white, at that time a unique tint amongst Begonias. 

|| Admiration and Viscountess Doneraile were the next two, catalogued for the 
first time in 1881. The first-named was raised from the Excelsior crossed with 
Begonia Davisii, and showed the influence of the latter parent in its dwarf, 
compact habit and vivid orange-scarlet flowers. 

Viscountess Doneraile, one of the most brilliant of Seden's achievements with 
the Begonia, resulted from crossing the two hybrids Monarch and B. x Sedenii ; 
the flowers, on stout erect scapes, well above the light green leaves, were freely 
produced, and rich vermilion-red in colour. 

An important role played by this variety was its use in connection with Begonia 
socotrana in the production of that entirely new and remarkable race of Begonias 
which has become such a popular winter-flowering section, and of which the variety 
John Heal was the first to be distributed. 

In 1882 two varieties, the results of experiments made with the dwarf Andean 
species, Begonia Davisii, with a view to the production of dwarf compact plants 
for bedding or for small pot culture, were distributed. They were named Miss 
Constance Veitch and Mrs. Arthur Potts, and both had the desired compact 
habit, and bore flowers of varying shades. 

* The Garden, 1878, vol. xviii. p. 208, pi. 118; PI. Mag. 1876, t. 194. 
f Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 8, fig. 

J The Garden, 1878, vol. xiii. p. 208, pi. cxviii. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1878, p. 9, fig. ; 
Gard. Chron. 1877, Dec. 15, col. pi. fig. 4. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1880, p. 6, 7. || Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, p. 49, fig. 

459 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

With the introduction of this dwarf race of Begonias, Seden ceased experiment- 
ing. The hybrids produced had become widely distributed, and many hybridists, 
both in England and on the Continent, had engaged in the work of improvement, 
and new varieties appeared each year, but the eighteen hybrids, with the five 
original species introduced by Messrs. Veitch, form the foundation of the Begonia 
of to-day. 

The following table gives in a concise form the history of the eighteen hybrids 
raised by Seden, with the order in which they were produced and the dates of 
their distribution : 



Order in 




Date of 


which the 




Introduc- 


hybrid was 


Name. Parents. 


tion to 


raised. 


( 


/ommerce. 


1. 


B. Sedenii . . . = (B. boliviensis X unnamed species) 


1870 


2. 


B. intermedia . . . = (B. boliviensis x.B. Veitchii) 


1872 


3. 


B. Chelsoni . . . = (B. boliviensis X B. Sedenii) 


1871 


4. 


B. Stella . . . . (B. Sedenii x B. Veitchii) . 


1874 


5. 


B. Vesuvius . . . = (B. Clarkei x B. Sedenii) . 


1874 


6. 


B. Excelsior . . . = (B. Chelsoni x B. cinnabarina) . 


]876 


7. 


B. Model . . . = (B. Sedenii x B. Pearcei) . 


1875 


8. 


B. Acme . . . . = (B. intermedia X B. Sedenii) 


1876 


9. 


B. Monarch . . . = (B. Sedenii x B. intermedia) 


1878 


10. 


B. Viscountess Doneraile = (B. Monarch x B. Sedenii) . 


1881 


11. 


B. Mrs. Chas. Scorer . = (B.V'tess Doneraile x B. seedling) 


1880 


12. 


B. Emperor . . . = (B. Clarkei X B. Chelsoni) . 


1877 


13. 


B. Kallista . . . = (B. Sedenii x B. Stella) 


1876 


14. 


B. Queen of the Whites . a sport from B. rosaeflora . 


1878 


15. 


B. Admiration . . = (B. Excelsior x B. Davisii) . 


1881 


16. 


B. roseo-superba . , = (B. rosseflora x B. seedling) 


1880 


17. 


B. Miss Constance Veitch = (B. Davisii x B. seedling) . 


1882 


18. 


B. Mrs. Arthur Potts . = ( do. do. ) . 


1882 



WINTER-FLOWEKING VARIETIES. 

Since the introduction of Begonia Davisii from Peru probably no species 
has played a more important part in hybrids and garden varieties than -has 
B. socotrana. 

The credit of introducing this species is due to Professor Balfour, of the 
Edinburgh Botanic Gardens, who discovered it during botanical explorations in 
Socotra, a small island off the Arabian coast, in the Indian Ocean, and one of the 
most improbable places in the world in which to find a Begonia. 

Tubers, or more correctly scaly rhizomes, of Begonia socotrana were sent, 
among other plants, to Kew in April 1880, and produced plants which flowered 
in December of the same year, and the great horticultural merit of the species 
at once became patent. 

From Kew, by arrangement with the late Director, the stock passed into 
Messrs. Veitchs' hands and was distributed in 1882. 

Begonia socotrana is a dwarf-growing plant with stout orbicular leaves nearly 
1 ft. in diameter, and rose-pink flowers of a very pleasing shade, nearly 2 in, 
across, freely produced in mid-winter. 

460 



BEGONIAS 

It was at once perceived that, could this latter property of flowering in mid- 
winter be combined with large flowers having the brilliant and varied colours of 
the summer-flowering tuberous kinds, a valuable race of garden plants would 
ensue, and extend the flowering period of this beautiful genus through practically 
the whole year. 

Several hybridists at once commenced work, but the merit of being the first to 
produce a hybrid, of which Begonia socotrana was one parent, is to John Heal, 
who succeeded in crossing B. insignis (incarnata), a Mexican species with rose- 
coloured flowers, with the pollen of B. socotrana. The hybrid plant from this 
cross first flowered in 1882, and was named Autumn Rose, from the colour of the 
flowers and in allusion to the flowering season ; it was not distributed, and 
probably is not now in existence. 

The variety * John Heal, now well known, was the next raised, and the first 
sent out. Flowered in . 1883, the produce of Begonia socotrana crossed with 
the pollen of the summer-flowering Viscountess Doneraile, the latter hybrid 
raised by Seden and previously referred to. 

Only one seedling obtained, all plants of this variety now in cultivation are the 
produce of this one plant. 

Distributed in 1885, it is still largely grown as a winter-flowering decorative 
subject, the neat, compact habit of growth, rich rosy-carmine flowers gracefully 
borne in terminal panicles, and bright emerald-green leaves, combine to make a 
useful plant for the decoration of the. table or conservatories. 

The next Adonis was raised from an orange-flowered tuberous variety crossed 
with the pollen of the hybrid John Heal, a marked advance in the size of the 
flower which, upwards of 3 in. in diameter, resemble those of the summer- 
flowering varieties. In colour a bright scarlet to red with carmine, distributed 
in 1887. 

Following Adonis came f Winter Gem, the result of crossing Begonia socotrana 
and a very dark crimson tuberous variety, the former the female parent. 

In habit resembling Begonia socotrana, dwarfer and more compact, the 
leaves smaller and neater. The flowers, the darkest of all the group, are rich 
deep crimson, 2 to 2 in. in diameter, held erect on stout peduncles well above the 
foliage. 

A semi-double rose-coloured tuberous variety was next used as a seed parent 
crossed with the pollen of Begonia socotrana, and from a single seed-pod, the 
varieties Ensign, Winter Perfection, J Ideala, and Success, were selected. 

These all flowered in 1891, showed a marked deviation from each other both in 
leaf and habit and in the size and colour of the flowers. 

Ensign, exhibited for the first time in November 1896. was the first of this group 
to be distributed. The flowers are semi-double, of a pleasing shade, of light rose- 
carmine, with the petaloid stamens yellow or yellow-green, and the foliage inter- 
mediate between that of the two parents. 

Winter Perfection, a taller-growing form, produces semi-double rose-pink 
flowers, the outer petals spreading, the metamorphosed stamens remaining in 
various stages of development, the outer ones rose-pink and the inner more or 
less streaked with yellow. 

* The Garden, 1889, vol. xxxv. p. 218, col. pi. 691. 
t The Garden, 1891, vol. xxxix. p. 504, col. pi. 807. 
J Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. xxx. p. 411, fig. 124. 

461 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

The variety Success also rather tall-growing, bears numerous semi-double flowers 
fully 2 in. in diameter, and in colour bright carmine toned with scarlet; the 
petaloids are yellow tipped with green. 

The most distinct is the variety Ideala, unusually neat and compact, some 
9 in. in height ; the flowers large for so small a subject, are semi-double, of a 
brilliant rose-colour, freely produced. 

Another cross of the year, between a single scarlet- flowered variety crossed with 
the pollen of Begonia socotrana, proved unusually prolific. From the plants 
raised of one capsule were selected * Mrs. Heal, Myra, and Winter Cheer. 

Mrs. Heal is by far the finest and most distinct of the set, the flowers, 
2 to 3 in. in diameter, in colour brilliant rose-carmine toned with scarlet, are 
freely borne, and gracefully disposed. 

The variety Winter Cheer, from the same seed-pod, is clearly distinct, having 
leaves which resemble those of Begonia socotrana, and semi-double flowers of 
an effective shade of rose-carmine. 

The third of the set, Myra, produces single flowers of a bright rose-carmine 
colour, the pistillate blooms smaller and of a lighter shade. 

A decided break in colour was obtained by using a semi-double white variety as 
seed-bearer and Begonia socotrana the pollen parent. From the one seed-capsule 
which this cross produced two distinct varieties were selected, Julius and Sylvia. 

Julius is the most distinct of any in point of colour, a rose-pink suffused with 
white, and flowers more truly double than those of any other of the section. 
Sylvia has semi-double rosy carmine flowers 3 in. in diameter, which open in a 
peculiar flat manner. 

Venus was the result of crossing Begonia socotrana with a single-flowered 
variety of the tuberous section single flowers, in colour resembling those of 
Winter Cheer. 

In 1903 followed two other hybrids, Agatha and Agatha compacta, the first- 
named from Begonia socotrana with a hybrid long known in gardens under 
the name of Moonlight, the product of B. Pearcei with B. Dregii, a small- 
flowered species from South Africa. Agatha is not only a charming garden 
plant, but interesting, as the flowers closely resemble those of Gloire de Lorraine, 
a hybrid raised by M. Lemoine of Nancy from the supposed cross-fertilization of 
B. socotrana and B. Dregii. 

The correctness of the supposition is confirmed by the close resemblance between 
the two plants Agatha showing a slight difference in the shape and colour of the 
leaves, as well as in a more compact growth, features probably due to traces of 
Begonia Pearcei in its composition. 

Agatha compacta, a dwarf form of the last-named, was obtained from the two 
species Begonia socotrana and B. natalensis, the latter a small white-flowered 
South African species, resembling B. Dregii. 

The flowers of this hybrid bear a close resemblance to those produced by Agatha, 
but are of a deeper shade of rose, and slightly larger. The great distinction, 
however, lies in the compact habit, unusually dwarf and neat, requiring no tying 
to make a shapely plant, as in the case of Gloire de Lorraine. 

* Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. xviii. p. 585, fig. 101. 
462 



HIPPEASTRUMS 



THE HIPPEASTRUM (AMARYLLIS) 



THE plants long known in gardens as Amaryllis have been in cultivation for 
a number of years. The generic name in use before the time of Linnaeus was 
applied to many species of plants now referred to as Hippeastrum, and to a 
number of others, since separated under various generic designations, as Vallota, 
Griffinia, Sprekelia, and Lycoris. 

Parkinson figured the old Amaryllis formosissima in his Paradisus at p. 71 as 
Narcissus indicus, or the Indian Daffodil with a red flower. This plant subsequently 
became distributed in gardens as the Jacobsea Lily, and is now botanically known 
as Sprekelia formosissima, this name having been given by the German botanist 
Heister, in honour of Dr. Sprekel. 

The native habitat of Sprekelia formosissima long remained uncertain, but it is 
now known to be Mexico and Guatemala. It appears to have reached England by 
way of Spain, and to have become generally grown in this country about the 
year 1593. 

Of the early species in cultivation in England, Hippeastrum reginse seems to 
have been the first. It is stated in the Botanical Magazine, t. 453, that this 
species first flowered by Mr. Fairchild in his garden at Hoxton, in 1728, and was 
in full beauty on March 1st, the birthday of Queen Caroline, wife of George II., 
in whose honour it was named. 

Hippeastrum equestre, another of the early species, is said to have been 
introduced from the West Indies by Mr. William Pitcairn in 1778. Figured in 
the Botanical Magazine, t. 305, the Editor states that " The spatha is composed 
of two leaves, which standing up at a certain period of the plant's flowering, 
like ears, give to the whole flower a fancied appearance to a horse's head ; whether 
Linnaeus derived his name of equestris from this circumstance or not, he does not 
condescend to inform us." 

Other early species cultivated were Hippeastrum vittatum (Bot. Mag. t. 128) 
introduced in 1788, and H. reticulatum (Bot. Mag. t. 667) in 1777 through 
Dr. E. W. W. Gray. 

With the generic name Amaryllis that of Dean Herbert is indissolubly con- 
nected. This enthusiastic horticulturist and Churchman laboured long at the 
genus, and assiduously cultivated and experimented on every species of the 
family he could procure, publishing the results of his investigations from time to 
time in the Botanical Magazine, the Botanical Register, and the Transactions of 
the Royal Horticultural Society. His famous collection of Amaryllids formed 
at Spofforth, in Yorkshire, attained a world-wide reputation, and the views he 
put forth regarding them (the first of which appeared in the Botanical Magazine 
in 1820, t. 2117) assisted considerably towards their class definition, and formed 
the basis of the classification adopted by botanists of the present day. 

Another collection exceptionally rich and well-cared for was that belonging 

465 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

to Mr. Griffin of South Lambeth, from which the Botanical Register largely 
drew material for those figures and descriptions of such importance to modern 
cultivators and historians of the genus. 

The labours of this gentleman have been commemorated by the genus Griffinia, 
proposed by Ker in compliment to him. 

Dean Herbert was the first to cross the different species and to raise seedlings, 
and in so doing incurred no small amount of reproach from his contemporaries 
for tampering with Nature. 

The good Dean was likewise the first to notice the difference between the 
seeds of the Cape Amaryllis Belladonna and those of the South American and 
Central American species, and to demonstrate by repeated experiments that 
those from America would not cross with those from South Africa. On these 
grounds, but technically on the appearance of the seeds, the Dean separated the 
species Belladonna from the rest of the Amaryllis, leaving it as the sole repre- 
sentative of the genus, and proposed for the more numerous South American 
species the generic term Hippeastrum, or the Knight's Star Lily, from the 
resemblance the radiating segments of the flower bear to the stars of some of the 
orders of knighthood. The new characters which separated the genus Amaryllis 
from Hippeastrum were published in 1822, and first adopted in the Botanical 
Magazine in the same year when H. puverulentum, the Bloom-leaved Knight's 
Star Lily, was described under t. 2273. In explanation of this change of nomen- 
clature it states, " The name Amaryllis having been given by Linnaeus originally 
to Belladonna, with a reason assigned, it has been thought expedient to leave 
the name Amaryllis to that plant and its congeners, and to detach the occidental 
group (to which, as more numerous, it has been proposed to preserve the known 
appellation) under the name Hippeastrum or Knight's Star Lily, following the 
idea which suggested the name equestre for one of the species." 

The name Hippeastrum thus given was kept until the introduction, in 1867, 
through our collector Pearce, from Peru, of the beautiful H. pardinum, figured in 
the Botanical Magazine, t. 5645, and described by Sir Joseph Hooker under the 
name of Amaryllis pardina. 

In justification Sir Joseph states, " The genus Hippeastrum, of Herbert, which 
includes many American species of Amaryllis, differs from this latter by such slight 
and variable characters that it cannot be regarded as of any practical value, and 
I therefore follow Endlicher in regarding it, together with its allies Zephyranthes 
Nerine, Vallota, as sections of the great and widely diffused and very natural 
genus Amaryllis." This arrangement, however, did not last long, for with the 
publication of the " Genera Plantarum," the standard work of botanical reference, 
the Dean's genus Hippeastrum was again revived and has remained in use to the 
present day, though Amaryllis still lingers in gardens as a name for the beautiful 
flowers botanically Hippeastrum. Besides H. reginse and H. equestre, before 
alluded to, the ancestry of the present race includes H. vittatum, a native of 
Central America, the influence of which may be still traced in the long bands of 
colour on the segments of some of even the latest hybrids (it was named vittata 
by M. L'Heritier, " from the gaiety of its flowers, which, from their stripes, appear 
like an object decorated with ribbands ") ; H. reticulatum from Brazil, which 
imparted the crimson veinings and reticulations to the floral segments, and the 
variety striatifolium, which gave the white stripes to the leaf. 

Many years later came Hippeastrum psittacinum, also from Brazil, a species 

466 




HIPPEASTRUM " EGLAMOR 



HIPPEASTRUMS 

with a prominent green centre and deep crimson veining on the apical portion of 
the floral segments. About the same time H. aulicum, from the Organ Mountains 
of Brazil, introduced by the celebrated horticulturist Mr. William Harrison, was 
described by Ker in the second volume of the Journal of Science and the Arts, 
p. 353. It has an irregular flower, red in colour, a prominent green centre, and 
segments thin and pointed. 

Another remarkable species, named Hippeastrum solandrseflorum, has flowers 
with a long greenish-white tube and almost regular segments, which, when seen 
individually, resemble some of the Japanese species of Lilium. The Dean crossed 
this species with the male H. reginse-vittatum, and obtained a similar result to 
that whijh is figured in the Botanical Magazine, t. 3542, as Hippeastrum 
ambiguum longiflora, afterwards used as a parent in the production of the forms 
with long-tubed flowers. 

As early as 1824 Dean Herbert had thirty-five recorded hybrids, all, with the 
exception of five, raised by himself. 

In his " Amaryllidaceee," Herbert states that the first cross made was between 
the two species Hippeastrum vittatum and H. reginse or equestre, by a Mr. 
Johnson, a shoemaker, or, according to others, a watchmaker of Lancashire, in 
the year 1811, and later by Herbert himself at Mitcham in 1811. 

This hybrid received the name of Johnsoni from the first-named raiser, and 
from Herbert, a compound of the two specific names H. regio-vittatum. The 
correctness of the recorded parentage of Johnsoni was at one time doubted, but 
Mr. Gowen, at that time gardener to the Earl of Carnarvon, by raising seedlings 
from the same cross, proved it identical with Johnsoni. 

A remarkable fact in connection with this hybrid is the length of time it 
retained its character under cultivation, and its potentiality with other species 
and varieties when used as a breeder, influenced the offspring to a great extent. 

Amongst many hybrids that existed but for a short time, and exerted little 
influence on succeeding generations, one may be singled out as of more importance 
than the rest. 

This received the name of Acramanni (and also the erroneous one of 
Ackermanni), and was the result of a cross by Messrs. Garraway & Sons of 
Bristol in 1835 between Hippeastrum aulicum, H. platypetalum, and H. 
psittacinum. It was named Acramanni in compliment to G. Acraman Esq., of 
the city of Bristol. 

This was unquestionably the finest hybrid yet raised, but a few years later was 
eclipsed by a seedling of the same firm, flowered in 1850, from Hippeastrum 
aulicum crossed with the hybrid Johnsoni, named Acramanni pulcherrima, from a 
resemblance it bore to the original hybrid. This last is of great interest, as one 
of the parents used by Messrs. Veitch some years later, in the production of the 
first Hippeastrum raised at Chelsea. 

Van Houtte and other horticulturists in Belgium and France took up the 
culture of these plants soon after the appearance of Acramanni pulcherrima, and 
produced many fine seedlings remarkable for brilliance of colouring, though 
usually deficient in form, with narrow pointed petals of unequal size. 

The elder de Graaff of Leyden afterwards surpassed Van Houtte's productions, 
especially with one named Graveana. This fine form afterwards used by his sons 
in connection with a dark form of Hippeastrum psittacinum produced the fine 
Empress of India, still in cultivation. 

467 



HORTUS VEITCHI1 

The introduction of the beautiful species Hippeastrum pardinum, through the 
collector Pearce, in 1866 gave a new impetus to the cultivation of Hippeastrums 
and supplied hybridizers with new material. 

The magnificent flowers are spotted all over with vermilion on a yellowish 
ground, as in the skin of a leopard. The flower-tube short or nearly absent, the 
floral segments broad, recurved, and spreading, form a flower nearly 7 in. in 
diameter. 

The Veitchian employes commenced the work of hybridizing in 1867, using 
Hippeastrum pardinum as one parent and the hybrid Acramanni pulcherrima 
as the other. The cross was effected by John Seden, and from the one capsule 
obtained three distinct plants originated, named Chelsoni, Brilliant, and maculata 
respectively, the former the best. With all its fine qualities H. pardinum did 
not realize the expectations which were held of it as a breeder, and it was with 
the introduction of H. Leopoldii discarded. 

Hippeastrum aulicum was also used in some of our early experiments, but the 
results were always disappointing, and did not justify any further use of that 
species as a parent, most of the flowers produced by its progeny being thin and 
ill-shapen, with narrow pointed segments and a large amount of green in the 
centre. 

Hippeastrum Leopoldii was the species most successfully used as a parent, and 
one which exerted the most influence in producing the present race. The species 
first flowered in 1870, was shown for the first time at the Royal Horticultural 
Society's Exhibition held at South Kensington in honour of Leopold King of the 
Belgians, at the time paying a visit to this country. His Majesty was much 
struck by the beauty of the flower of the new species, and courteously granted 
permission to name the plant in commemoration of his visit. The flowers are 
large and widely expanded, the tube is short and the segments broad and of good 
substance, the habit and general contour of the plant possesses points which it 
became desirable to infuse into those at that time in cultivation. 

Many were raised of the Leopoldii type, the highest degree of perfection in form 
and size being attained in John Heal. 

Beyond this the plants of this type refused to break into any form that could 
be considered an improvement, and, as the constitution became weakened by 
continued in breeding, new blood became necessary. Moreover the varieties 
produced by Hippeastrum Leopoldii seldom bore more than two flowers on a 
spike. 

The next step was to increase the number of flowers on a spike to five or six, 
and to retain the symmetry and refinement characteristic of the Leopoldii type. 
With this in view de Graaff's hybrid Empress of India was crossed with the best 
Leopoldii forms, and resulted not only in an increase in the number of flowers on 
a scape, but in decided breaks of colour, and shades and tints previously unknown. 

A further aim to obliterate or reduce as far as possible the green centre from 
the blooms met with a like success ; the modern flowers seldom show sufficient 
green to be objectionable, and in certain self-coloured forms it is usually 
replaced by a darker shade of the ground colour. In other varieties the green 
centre assumes a yellowish or orange tinge, a happy contrast to the prevailing 
colour of the segments. 

Among the most striking colours of the past few years, the yellowish-green 
tinge of the Veldt is probably the most novel. It is by no means so pleasing a 

468 



HIPPEASTRUMS 

shade as that possessed by many of the older forms, but to the breeder it has 
considerable attractions, and indicates an approach to an entirely new break which 
may eventually culminate in a yellow-flowered Hippeastrum. 

Other points always kept in view were the shortening and expansion of the 
flower-tube, the widening of the floral segments, especially the lowermost one, the 
intensifying of the natural colour, and the production of new tints. 

The work of improving the Hippeastrum, carried on for thirty-five years, has 
resulted in the production of numerous beautiful forms, nearly 200 Certificates 
having been awarded the Veitchian house since 1867 by the Royal Horticultural 
and Royal Botanic Societies. 



469 H h 



ORCHID HYBRIDIZATION 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 



THE exceptional attention devoted to orchid hybridization for some thirty years, 
whether with species or varieties, has given rise to a numerous progeny as varied 
in form and colour as many Florists' flowers, and still scarcely a year passes 
without adding a new genus amenable to artificial hybridization. 

Probably the first attempt to raise hybrid orchids is due to Dean Herbert, 
known for his work among the Amaryllidese, but little apparently resulted. 
Robert Gallier, a gardener, sent to the Gardeners' Chronicle in 1849 an account of 
his attempt to raise hybrid orchids by crossing Dendrobium nobile and D. chrysan- 
thum, and of the short life only a few weeks of the young plants reared 
from the cross-fertilized seed. The first successful hybridizer of Orchids, John 
Dominy, acting on the suggestion of Mr. John Harris, a surgeon of Exeter, 
worked there about the year 1853. The first result was Calanthe X Dominii, 
obtained from C. masuca and C. furcata, which flowered for the first time in 
October 1856, the plants being two years old. About three years later a hybrid 
Cattleya followed, C. X hybrida, the result of crossing C. guttata and C. inter- 
media, and was exhibited for the first time in August 1859. 

In November of the same year Cattleya x Dominiana flowered, a very grand 
hybrid named after the raiser. Still another appeared in 1859, and this, perhaps 
the most brilliant result ever obtained by the hybridist, named Calanthe X 
Veitchii, is probably the most widely grown of any hybrid orchid, the beautiful 
rose-coloured flowers especially valuable during the winter season. It resulted 
from a cross between C. rosea (then called Limatodes rosea) and C. vestita. 

In June 1861, what was held to be the first bigeneric hybrid appeared, and was 
exhibited under the name of Goodyera x Dominii, a product of a cross between 
G. discolor and Anoactochilus Lowii, now known as Hsemaria discolor and 
Dossiiiia marmorata respectively. It appears to be now lost, but a similar 
hybrid, Goodyera X Veitchii, flowered the following year, the result of crossing 
Hsemaria discolor and Macodes petola, or Anoactochilus Veitchianus, as it was 
then called. 

Cattleya x Brabantise (at first named Cattleya X Aclandi-Loddigesii) flowered 
in July 1863, and received a silver Banksian Medal from the Royal Horticultural 
Society. 

The next, a remarkable advance, the forerunner of the numerous Lselio- 
cattleyas since raised, was exhibited under the name of Cattleya X exoniensis, the 
parents being either C. Mossise or C. labiata and Lselia crispa. 

Following these came Lselia X Pilcheriana, from L. crispa and L. Perrinii, one 
of the earliest of all crosses, the seed sown in 1853 ; Ancectochilus X Dominii, 
derived from Goodyera (Hsemaria) discolor and Anoactochilus xanthophyllus, in 
May 1865 ; Cattleya X quincolor in June 1865 ; C. X Manglesii in August 1866 : 

473 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Phaius (Phaiocalanthe) X irroratus, the result of crossing P. grandifolius and 
Calanthe vestita, early in 1867, followed by Phaius X inquilinus in May of the 
same year. 

It was not till 1869 that the first hybrid appeared in the genus Cypripedium, a 
genus which proved unusually prolific. 

This hybrid was named Cypripedium X Harrisianum, a name perpetuating the 
memory of Dr. Harris who first suggested to Dominy the possibility of obtaining 
hybrid orchids. The parents were C. villosum and C. barbatum. In 1870 C. 
(Selenipedium) x Dominianum from Selenipedium caricinum and S. caudatum 
flowered, and in the same year Cypripedium x vexillarium made an appearance. 
This was derived from C. barbatum and the at that time rare C. Fairieanum, the 
influence of the latter predominating. 

Among other good seedling hybrids due to Dominy may be mentioned 
Liolia x Veitchiana, derived from Cattleya labiata and Lselia crispa in 1874 ; 
Cattleya X Felix, from Laelia crispa and Cattleya Schilleriana in 1876 ; Lselia x 
caloglossa, from Cattleya labiata and Lselia Boothiana or L. crispa in 1877 ; Den- 
drobium X Dominianum, the first hybrid of the genus, from D. Linawianum and 
D. nobile in 1878. Dominy's last and very remarkable hybrid Lseliocattleya 
Dominiana, a gorgeous seedling from Cattleya Dowiana and Lselia purpurata, 
was described by Reichenbach under the name of L. X Dominiana. 

The twenty-four hybrids raised by Dominy during his fifteen years' work, trifling 
in view of later results, cover a wide field, and were the foundation of all future 
work Dominy was the pioneer. They comprise six Cattleyas, one Lselia, six 
Lseliocattleyas, two Calanthes, one Phaiocalanthe, three Cypripediums, one 
Dendrobium, one Aerides (probably lost), and several Goodyeras and Anoectochili. 

John Seden succeeded Dominy, and continued the work so successfully com- 
menced, and from the appearance of his first hybrid in 1873 till retirement in 
1905 he added hundreds of the most distinct to collections, and for a series of 
years experimented over a wide field. 

Cypripedium (Selenipedium) X Sedenii, the name given to the first hybrid, was 
the result of a cross between Selenipedium longifolium and S. Schlimii. This 
flowered in 1873, and is still frequently met with ; the flowers valued for a rose- 
pink colour, are produced with freedom. 

The same year that Seden flowered his first cross he also established a record 
by flowering a secondary hybrid, i.e. a cross between a pure species and a hybrid. 
This, Lseliocattleya Fausta, derived from Cattleya Loddigesii as seed-bearer and 
Dominy's hybrid Lseliocattleya exoniensis as pollen-parent, developed several 
forms from the same seed-pod, a variability that has proved usual in secondary 
hybrids. 

The year 1874 saw two genera, the species of which would consent to cross, 
added to the list of hybrids : Chysis and Zygopetalum. The hybrid in the 
first-named genus, Chysis x Chelsoni, was derived from C. bractescens and 
C. Isevis (at first recorded as C. Limminghei), and flowered early in the year. 

The hybrid Zygopetalum, named in compliment to the raiser, had as parents 
Z. Mackayii and Z. maxillare. 

Lselia X flammea, a secondary hybrid, from L. cinnabarina and Dominy's hybrid 
L. x Pilcheri, also flowered in 1874, as well as a fine hybrid Cypripedium, named 
C. X Arthurianum in compliment to the late Mr. Arthur Veitch, from C. insigne 
and the at that time rare C. Fairieanum. 

474 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 

During 1875 three new hybrids were flowered, the result of Seden's work ; 
Cypripedium x tesselatum, obtained from C. concolor and C. barbatum; C. X 
Euryandrum from C. barbatum and C. Stonei, the first of the group with 
racemose flowers; and C. X Marshallianum from C. venustum pardinum and 

C. concolor, a charming little plant. 

In 1876 the first secondary hybrid in the genus Cypripedium was also due to 
Seden, derived from Dominy's C. x Harrisianum and C. insigne Maulei, the 
former the seed-bearer, establishing a further record, the result having a hybrid 
as seed-bearer. 

A charming Dendrobe, from Dendrobium moniliforme (D. japonicum) and 

D. aureum, flowered about the same time, and during that same year two new 
hybrids were added to the list Cypripedium x pycnopterum, obtained from 
C. Lowii and C. venustum, and C. X superciliare from C. barbatum and C. 
superbiens. 

In 1877 Cypripedium (Selenipedium) X atropurpureum flowered, the first 
secondary hybrid amongst the Selenipediums, the parents S. Schlimii and 
Dominy's cross S. X Dominianum. 

Other hybrids of the year were Lseliocattleya Sedenii, the only plant raised 
from a cross between Cattleya superba and Lseliocattleya Devoniensis; Cypri- 
pedium x patens from C. barbatum and C. Hookerse, and C. X lucidum from C. 
Lowii and C. villosum. 

Early in 1878 Calanthe x Sedenii made its appearance, a hybrid from C. X 
Veitchii and C. vestita rubro oculata. The flowering established another record, 
as the first instance among hybrid orchids of one of the original parents being 
used with its hybrid offspring. Others of the year were Cypripedium x selligerum 
from C. barbatum and C. philippinense ; C. X nitens from C. villosum and C. 
insigne Maulei, and Cattleya X Marstersonise from C. Loddigesii and C. labiata. 

Six appeared in 1879, comprising one Cattleya, two Dendrobiums, two 
Cypripediums, and one Leelia. 

In 1880 the handsome Masdevallia x Chelsoni, the first seedling in the genus 
to be raised from M. amabilis and M. Veitchiana, flowered for the first time, and 
added a new genus to the list of hybrids. 

Chysis x Sedenii, derived from C. Limminghei and C. bractescens, the second 
hybrid in the genus, also flowered in 1880, and the handsome Cypripedium x 
Morganise from C. superbiens and the remarkable C. Stonei, and C. X calanthum, 
were others of that year. 

In 1881 four hybrids flowered, including the remarkable Cypripedium (Seleni- 
pedium) x grande, the product of a cross between Selenipedium Roezlii and 
S. caudatum. 

The year 1881 completed a quarter of a century's work in this absorbing branch 
of Horticulture Dominy's first hybrid having flowered in 1856, and during the 
following years to the present time results have been numerous, and very varied. 

In 1882 the beautiful Laeliocattleya callistoglossa flowered, remarkable for an 
unusually large and richly-coloured lip, from a cross between Leelia purpurata and 
Cattleya Warscewiczii. 

Cypripedium x microchilum, from C. niveum and C. Druryi; C. x macropterum 
from C. Lowii and C. superbiens, C. (Selenipedium) x cardinale from Seleni- 
pedium x Sedenii and S. Schlimii were other successes. 

In 1883 three interesting seedlings made their first appearance ; namely, 

475 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Calanthe x lentiginosa from C. labrosa and C. x Veitchii ; Cypripedium (Seleni- 
pedium) x Schroderse from Selenipedium caudatum and the hybrid S. x Sedenii, 
one of the finest of this group of Slipper Orchids, and Cattleya x triophthalma, 
from C. superba and Lseliocattleya exoniensis, a rare hybrid, two plants only 
being raised. 

In 1884 five flowered at Chelsea, comprising two Cypripediums, two Lselias and 
a Masdevallia. This last-named was M. x Gairiana obtained by crossing the 
yellow-flowered M. Davisii with the scarlet-flowered M. Veitchiana. It received 
the name Gairiana in compliment to John Gair Esq., of Falkirk. 

A hybrid of great interest in a new genus flowered for the first time in 
1885, Thunia x Veitchiana, a charming seedling from T. Marshalliana and 
T. Bensonise. Six others followed : Dendrobium x euosmum from D. x 
endocharis and D. nobile ; Cypripedium (Selenipedium) x leucorrhodum from 
Selenipedium Roezlii and S. Schlimii ; Zygopetalum x pentachromum from 
Z. Mackayi and Z. maxillare ; Lseliocattleya Canhamiana from Lselia purpurata 
and Cattleya Mossise ; Cypripedium x radiosum from C. Lawrenceanum and 
C. Spicerianum, and Cattleya x porphyrophlebia from C. X intermedia and 
C. superba. 

The most remarkable plant of 1886 was Lselia x Batemanniana, so called 
when first exhibited, but now known under the more appropriate title of 
Sophrocattleya Batemanniana, a bigeneric hybrid raised by Seden from 
Sophronitis grandiflora and Cattleya intermedia, described by Professor 
Reichenbach as "a lovely gem ; a miniature Lselia," and dedicated to James 
Bateman Esq., of Worthing, an enthusiastic orchidist. 

The five following hybrids also appeared in 1886, viz. : Cypripedium x 
Winnianum derived from C. villosum and C. Druryi ; C. x orphanum, of unrecorded 
parentage ; Zygopetalum x leopardinum, also unrecorded ; and Masdevallia x 
glaphyrantha from M. infracta and M. Barlseana. 

The year 1887 was remarkable for several striking crosses which made their 
appearance at Chelsea first Zygocolax Veitchii, a bigeneric seedling from 
Zygopetalum crinitum with the pollen of Colax jugosus, the plants but a little 
over five years old when they flowered. 

* " The appearance of this plant marked a new era in the history of Orchid 
hybridization, as it led to an extension of the principle of compounding a new 
name derived from the joint names of the parent genera for all hybrids between 
species of different genera raised in gardens," as proposed by Dr. Masters in 1872 
when naming Philageria Veitchii, a bigeneric hybrid between Philesia buxifolia 
and Lapageria rosea. 

Phaiocalanthe Sedenianus, another bigeneric cross, from Phaius grandifolius 
and Calanthe x Veitchii, flowered the same year and named after the raiser. 
Other hybrids of note, Phalsenopsis x Rothschildiana, the second hybrid in 
the genus, was obtained from P. Schilleriana and P. grandiflora (amabilis), 
and dedicated to Lord Rothschild ; P. x Hariettise from P. amabilis and P. 
violacea, named after Hariett, daughter of the late Hon. Erastus Corning of 
Albany, U.S.A. ; Dendrobium x Cybele from D. Findlayanum and D. nobile ; 
Lseliocattleya x Zenobia from Cattleya Loddigesii and Leelia elegans Turnerii ; 
and Cypripedium x obscurum, of unrecorded parentage. 

* Rolfe in Jour. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiv. pp. 156-170. 

476 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 

In 1888 the genus Epidendrum was added to the list of those genera, the 
species of which would intercross. 

The first hybrid, Epidendrum x O'Brienianum, was from E. evectum with the 
pollen of E. radicans, but the most beautiful of the year was undoubtedly 
Phalsenopsis x John Seden, a very rare plant obtained from P. grandiflora 
(amabilis) and P. Lueddemanniana. 

Phalaenopsis x Leda and P. x F. L. Ames, the latter dedicated to the late 
Hon. F. L. Ames, of North Easton, Mass., U.S.A., were flowered in 1888. 

In 1889 the first of a series in the parentage of which the fringed Lselia 
Digbyana participated, flowered, as also did Lseliocattleya Digbyano-Mossise, 
the parentage indicated by the name. The original plant is in the collection 
of Baron Sir Henry Schroder, The Dell, Egham. 

In addition to these seedlings Seden undertook experiments to verify the 
supposed parentage of natural hybrids, i.e. supposed hybrids occurring in a 
wild state. 

Masdevallia splendida and M. Parlatoreana are two such, and in his de- 
scription Professor Reichenbach spoke of them as being probably " mules " 
between M. Veitchiana and M. amabilis, and M. Veitchiana and M. Barlceana 
respectively. 

By making crosses and reverse crosses with the two last-named species 
artificial hybrids were obtained identical in appearance with the type, and these 
flowered during 1889. 

There flowered in 1890 a noteworthy hybrid, a totally new and unexpected 
departure, the bigeneric Epiphronitis Veitchii, from a cross of the dwarf 
Sophronitis grandiflora with the tall-stemmed Epidendrum radicans, two plants 
quite unlike in habit. The seedling has intermediate characters, and the flowers 
a combination of the brilliant colours of both parents. 

Sophrocattleya Calypso, three Lseliocattleyas, and five Cypripediums were the 
other new hybrids of the year. 

During 1891 the first between two species of the genus Disa flowered, Disa x 
Veitchii, raised from D. racemosa crossed with the pollen of D. grandiflora, 
and but one year and a half old, the youngest of any hybrid orchid to flower. 
Another interesting seedling of 1891 was Odontoglossum x excellens, hitherto 
supposed a natural hybrid between O. Pescatorei and O. triumphans, and Seden's 
plant, raised artificially from the two species, proved to be identical with the 
wild form. 

The most interesting result of 1892 was probably Sophrolseliocattleya 
Veitchiana, a complicated hybrid derived from Sophronitis grandiflora and 
Lseliocattleya Schilleriana, involving three distinct genera in its parentage. 
Epidendrum X Endresio-Wallisii, Zygopetalum X leucochilum, Phalsenopsis X 
Artemis, three Cattleyas, Lselia X Latona, four Dendrobiums, two Selenipediums 
and eight Cypripediums were among the other hybrids of the year. 

Twenty-two new hybrids flowered during 1893, but no new genus shared 
in their production. 

In 1894 probably the most interesting of many was Sobralia x Veitchii, the 
first in the genus, obtained by Seden from S. macraritha and S. xantholeuca. 

Others of the year were Sophrolselia Lseta, a bigeneric hybrid from Sophronitis 
grandiflora and Lselia pumila Dayana ; Cypripedium x James H. Veitch, from 
C. Curtisii and C. Stonei platytaenium, the most remarkable of the whole 

477 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

group, in which the peculiar and handsome broad petals of the variety of C. 
Stonei are transmitted the only instance ; and in addition there were sixteen 
other hybrids of various genera. 

The novelties of 1895 included two in the difficult genus Phalsenopsis 
P. X Ariadne, obtained from P. Aphrodite and P. Stuartiana and P. x Luedde- 
violacea, the parentage is expressed by the name. 

Amongst several Lseliocattleyas probably the best was Lady Rothschild, 
from Cattleya Warscewiczii and Leelia Perrinii. 

The most interesting of the year was Dendrobium x illustre from D. 
chrysotoxum and the remarkable D. Dalhousieanum, a very rare hybrid, of 
which the only specimen is in the collection at The Dell, Egham. 

Another success in the genus Chysis added in 1896, Chysis x Langleyensis, 
was derived from C. bractescens and the hybrid C. x Sedenii, a secondary hybrid 
and the first in the genus. 

The most striking novelty of the year was the beautiful Lseliocattleya Decia 
alba, an exquisite form with clear white sepals and petals, with a delicate rose- 
pink lip. To the Cypripediums was added G. X Baron Schroder, in the parentage 
of which the at that time rare C. Fairieanum combines with C. x cenanthum 
superbum. 

During the year 1897 numerous fine winter-flowering Cattleyas and Lselio- 
cattleyas which it had been the especial endeavour to produce were flowered, 
many crosses between new species, and others from choice forms or varieties of 
species previously employed. 

A hybrid in a new genus also followed in 1897, Spathoglottis x aureo- 
Veillardii, derived from the two species indicated by the name. The flowers 
of a rich yellow are effectively marked with crimson. 

As finer forms of the favourite species became available they were at once 
made use of, and many of the old crosses reproduced with more brilliant 
results: Lseliocattleya Wellsiana Langleyensis, L.-c. Eudora splendens, L.-c. 
Cahamiana superba, L.-c. callistoglossa ignescens, L.-c. Dominiana Langleyensis 
are improvements on the original seedlings. 

These and many others of the same class flowered in 1898, as did also the 
following noteworthy hybrids : Disa X Diores, L.-c. Clio, the curious Epicattleya 
radiato-Bowringiana, Phalsenopsis x Stuartiano-Mannii and Masdevallia x 
Imogene. 

Several more appeared during 1899, one a great advance in a new genus 
the remarkable Angrsecum x Veitchii, derived from A. sesquipedale and A. 
superbum. The flowers are waxy white, and show intermediate characters 
between those of the two parents. Epicattleya Mrs. James O'Brien, a bigeneric 
hybrid from Cattleya Bowringiana and Epidendrum x O'Brienianum, is also 
interesting. Phaiocalanthe Niobe, Phalsenopsis x Cassandra, and Phalsenopsis x 
Mrs. James H. Veitch are among the other notable productions of the year. 

Hybrids amongst species of the fore-named genera continued to flower, with 
greater variety in colour and improved form each year. 

In 1902 a new bigeneric cross appeared, from Leptotes bicolor and Lselia 
cinnabarina, received the name of Leptolselia Veitchii, and although the flowers 
of a pleasing colour are small, they are very interesting. The last bigeneric 
hybrid was Dialselia Veitchii, a cross between Diacrium bicornutum and Laalia 
cinnabarina, followed early in 1906. 

478 




DENDROBIUM X EUOSMUM EXCELLENS 

THE DELL, EGHAM 



ORCHID HYBRIDS 



From the numbers mentioned, and by reference to a more complete list given 
in another portion of this work, it will be readily seen that Seden extended 
the practice of hybridizing among many species and genera, and raised several 
between genera apparently quite distinct. 

True hybrids, or crosses between two species belonging to one genus, were 
raised in the following : Angraacum, Anguloa, Cattleya, Calanthe, Chysis, 
Cymbidium, Cypripedium, Dendrobium, Disa, Epidendrum, Lselia, Masdevallia, 
Miltonia, Odontoglossum, Phaius, Phalsenopsis, Sobralia, Spathoglottis, Thunia, 
and Zygopetalum. 

The bigeneric hybrids or crosses between species belonging to different genera 
are: 

Epikelia, from species of Epidendrum and Lselia 

Epicattleya Cattleya 

Epiphronitis 

Dialselia 

Lseliocattleya 

Leptolselia 

Phaiocalanthe 

Sophrocattleya 

Sophrolselia 

Sophrolseliocattleya 

ZygocolaxJ 






Sophronitis 


Diacrium 


Laelia 


Lselia 


Cattleya 


Leptotes 


Laelia 


Phaius 


Calanthe 


Sophronitis 


Cattleya 





Laelia 





Lseliocattleya 


Zygopetalum 


Colax 



479 



NEPENTHES 



NEPENTHES * 



SPECIES. 

THE first introduced to British Gardens was Nepenthes distillatoria, the type 
species on which Linnaeus founded the genus. A native of Ceylon, this Pitcher 
had formed the subject of some remarkable writings by early travellers in the 
East before its introduction to this country, and which, according to Alton, was 
in 1789. N. distillatoria was not the first species known to science, that distinc- 
tion probably belonging to N. madagascariensis, which nevertheless was one of 
the latest to reach England. N. distillatoria was followed in 1826 by N. gracilis 
(under the name phyllamphora) and in 1828 by N. Khasiana (as distillatoria) 
three species before the year 1830. These soon lost to cultivation, their cultural 
requirements being little understood. 

Later followed Nepenthes Rafflesiana and N. ampullaria, discovered by Dr. 
William Jack in Singapore, the former named in honour of Sir Stamford 
Raffles, but an attempt to introduce it by the discoverer was unsuccessful. 
Better fortune attended the labours of Captain Bethune, who brought living 
plants to Kew in a Wardian case, which he so well cared for that they practically 
all lived. 

In 1847, Nepenthes Hookeriana was introduced to the Clapton Nursery by 
Mr. (later Sir Hugh) Low, and shortly afterwards Thomas Lobb sent to Exeter 
N. Rafflesiana, N. ampullaria, N. albo-marginata, N. Veitchii, N. phyllamphora, 
N. sanguinea, and other unnamed species. These formed the nucleus of the 
large collection since cultivated at Chelsea. 

Nepenthes Isevis, sent from Singapore, is figured and described by Lindley in 
the Gardeners' Chronicle, 1848, p. 655, from specimens growing in the houses at 
Chelsea at that time. 

Sir Hugh Low made known four new species in 1861, having discovered 
them in making the ascent of Kina Balu, a well-known mountain in Borneo. 
These respectively Nepenthes Rajah, N. Edwardsiana, N. Lowii, and N. villosa, 
were not introduced to cultivation at that time, but sufficient material 
was sent home to enable Sir Joseph Hooker to write a lucid account of the 
genus, in a paper read before the Linnaean Society in 1859, subsequently 
printed in the Transactions. 

Ten species and four hybrids are enumerated and described by Dr. Masters 
in the Gardeners' Chronicle for 1872, as growing at Chelsea in that year. 
The species mentioned were Nepenthes ampullaria, N. Veitchii, N. Rafflesiana, 
N. phyllamphora, N. Khasiana, N. albo-marginata, N. gracilis, N. Isevis and 
N. sanguinea. 

* Harry J. Veitch, P.L.S., F.R.G.S., Ac., in Jour. R.H.S. vol. xxi. pt. ii. 

483 



HORTUS VE1TCHII 

During the following ten years some of the finest were introduced by the 
Veitchian collectors, including, * Nepenthes Rajah and N. bicalcarata from Borneo 
through Burbidge ; N. hirsuta from the same region through another agency ; 
N. madagascariensis from Madagascar through Curtis ; N. Kennedyana from North 
Australia, and N. Viellardii, a native of New Caledonia, through the Botanic 
Gardens at Sydney ; and N. Northiana from Borneo, also through Curtis. With 
a view of obtaining some of those remarkable plants made known through the 
discoveries of Mr. Low in Borneo, Thomas Lobb, acting under the direction of Mr. 
James Veitch junior, reached the foot of Kina Balu in 1856, but was prevented 
from ascending the mountain by the hostility and extortion of the natives. He 
was followed in 1877 by Burbidge and P. C. M. Veitch, who met with a like 
failure, and again by the first-named, eight months later, on which occasion 
some seed of N. Rajah was obtained, despatched to Chelsea, and plants raised, 
but few lived. N. Rajah has the largest pitchers of any known species, and these 
are described in Mr. Spencer St. John's book " Life in the Forests of the Far 
East " : " This morning, while the men were cooking their rice, as we sat 
before the tent enjoying our chocolate, observing one of our followers carry- 
ing water in a splendid specimen of Nepenthes Rajah, we desired him to bring 
it to us, and found that it held exactly four pint bottles. It was 19 in. in 
circumference. We afterwards saw others which were much larger, and Mr. Low, 
while wandering about in search of flowers, came upon one in which was a 
drowned rat." t N. albo-marginata one of the earliest introduced species, 
previously unknown to science, was one of Thomas Lobb's Bornean discoveries, 
sent home to Exeter in 1848. The species is difficult to cultivate, but repays 
trouble by the great beauty of the pitcher, light green at the base, rosy red 
at the apex, with a pale band edging the top below the peristome. 

Nepenthes zeylanica, or, as it is sometimes called, N. hirsuta glabrescens, and 
N. zeylanica rubra, a red form of the type, were the next introductions, followed 
shortly afterwards by the handsome, and still rare, J N. Veitchii. Much 
confusion has arisen regarding the nomenclature of this species, sometimes 
called N. lanata and also N. villosa, both in themselves good species. 

Nepenthes Veitchii was first met with by Hugh Low Esq. junior, on Mount 
Kina Balu, Borneo, but not introduced. Later found by the collector Thomas 
Lobb in Sarawak, living plants sent to Exeter proved one of the most remark- 
able of all Nepenthes : large pitchers covered with hair, a remarkable peristome 
or frill round the mouth, resembling both in structure and appearance the gills 
of a fish ; the frill cream-coloured, slightly reddish ; the habit as in other of the 
family. 

In 1879 Nepenthes Veitchii was followed by N. Kennedyana, a species from 
Cape York, North Australia, sent from the Botanical Gardens, Sydney ; the 
pitchers are over 5 in. in length by 1 in. in width, reddish in colour, elongate- 
cylindrical in shape, slightly dilated below the middle and tapering at the base 
with two sharply fringed wings. 

* N. Rajah, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 493, fig. 

t N. albo-marginata, Lobb ex Lindl. in Gard. Chron. 1849, p. 580, fig. The Garden, 
1880, col. pi. p. 542. 

J N. Veitchvi, The Garden, 1880, vol. xvii. p. 542, col. pi. ; Bot. Mag. t. 5080 as villosa. 
Gard. Chron. 1881, p. 781, fig. 152. 

N. Kennedyana, Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 257, fig. 36. 

484 



NEPENTHES 

In 1880 Messrs. Veitch distributed and figured in the Catalogue the Bornean 
species * Nepenthes bicalcarata, found in Borneo, by Low, Beccari, and other early 
travellers, but not sent to England till Burbidge found it in the neighbourhood 
of Lazas River. N. bicalcarata is peculiar in having two prominent spurs 
projecting from below the base of the operculum over the mouth of the pitcher, 
as the head of a snake with projecting fangs and head uplifted about to strike. 
It is one of the most robust and vigorous of all Pitcher-plants. The N. Dyak 
of Mr. S. Le Moore, figured in the Journal of Botany, is an immature form of 
this species. 

In 1881 Dr. Masters described in the Gardeners' Chronicle a new species raised 
from seed sent from Sarawak by Curtis as t Nepenthes angustifolia. Of no value 
as a decorative plant, it was not distributed. A more important species, one of 
the first to be known, was also introduced through Curtis, J N. madagascariensis, 
not introduced till 1880. The name denotes the island in which it was dis- 
covered, the extreme western limit of the Nepenthes range. It is at home 
in fully exposed swamps, and has characters clearly distinguishing it from all 
other species. The pitchers from 6 to 8 in. long, remarkable for the richness 
of their coloration, rival in this the N. sanguinea of Borneo. 

The next important find was Nepenthes Rajah, a magnificent species already 
alluded to, named in honour of Rajah Brook, whose services to its country 
it commemorates. 

In the following year, 1883, Nepenthes Northiana, a species as wonder- 
ful as the last named, was offered to European growers, the specific 
name commemorating Miss North, the lady through whom it was first made 
known. 

Plant drawings executed by Miss North in Borneo were shown to Mr. Harry 
Veitch, and one of a curious Pitcher-plant, at that time unknown to science, 
greatly attracted his attention. Further information was obtained regarding 
the habitat, and Curtis, about to start on a collecting expedition to Borneo, 
was commissioned to go in search. After long and unsuccessful effort, Curtis 
gave up hope, under the impression that Miss North had been wrongly informed, 
but fortunately before leaving the district it occurred to him to look over a 
steep escarpment in the hill-side, accomplished by lying prostrate on the ground, 
when to his great joy he discovered the long-looked-for plant some distance 
below. 

He succeeded in gathering ripe capsules, and lost no time in transmit- 
ting them to Chelsea, where the seed soon germinated. The pitchers of Nepenthes 
Northiana are flask-shaped, striped and spotted with purple on a greenish ground, 
when mature they are 1 ft. and more long, and 3 in. in width, with two 
dentate fimbriate wings. The mouth oblique, surrounded by a broad finely 
ribbed margin or peristome. The shape variable ; the upper pitchers swing 
in mid-air unsupported, trumpet-shaped, whilst those on the ground are larger 
and more distended. 

* N. Ucalcarata, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. i. p. 200, fig. 36 ; The Garden, 
1880, vol. xvii. p. 542. 

j- N. angustifolia, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. xvi. p. 524. 

t N. madagascariensis^oiret, Gard. Chron. 1881, p. 685, fig. 139; Veitchs'Catlg. of PI. 
1882, fig. p. 12. 

N. Northiana, Hook. f. in Gard. Chron. 1881, vol. ii. p. 717, fig. 144 and suppl. 

485 I i 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Another handsome species, Nepenthes * Curtisii, was sent from Borneo, and 
offered in 1888. The pitchers dull green, are thickly spotted with purple. A 
fine variety of this species, N. C. superba, possesses larger and more highly 
coloured urns than the type. 

During a second mission to Malaysia, 1882-1883, Curtis sent seed of a species 
since named t Nepenthes stenophylla, with green pitchers mottled with red, 
and first held to be a form of N. Curtisii, but since raised to specific rank 
by Dr. Masters. 

In the following year Burke collected plants and seeds of two species in the 
Philippines, one, Nepenthes Burkei, commemorating his labours. Handsome 
pitchers narrowed in the middle, devoid of the winged appendages common 
to the majority. A variety N. B. excellens is richly coloured and unusually 
handsome. During this trip Burke also collected a further supply of seed of 
N. Northiana, and from this was obtained a distinct plant distributed under 
the name of N. cincta. It is a supposed natural hybrid between N. Northiana 
and N. albo-marginata (as these two plants grow in company), and from the 
resemblance N. cincta bears to the two species, the inference is reasonable. 
It resembles N. Northiana in leaf and habit of growth, and the pitchers have the 
white band round the mouth characteristic of N. albo-marginata. 

Nepenthes Pervillei, obtained from seeds sent by a correspondent in the 
Seychelles, has since been sent to Kew through Mr. Griffith, the Administrator 
of the Islands. 

Another handsome species, obtained through Mr. Ford, late of the Hong Kong 
Botanic Gardens, and also from the Royal Gardens, Kew, 1891, is || Nepenthes 
ventricosa, a native of the Philippines, one of the most distinct of this 
remarkable genus. The pitchers, wholly without wings, are curiously con- 
tracted in the middle, with a transverse, not oblique mouth, surrounded by 
a bright red undulating peristome marked with numerous transverse ribs. 
The colour delicate pale green with a rosy suffusion at the base, without 
spots, the pitchers deepening in colour to a deep purplish-rose as they reach 
maturity. 

Many of the species are from various causes now lost to cultivation, or 
supplanted by hybrids, in most cases easier to cultivate and more decorative. 

HYBRIDS. 

The artificial hybridization of Nepenthes was commenced by John Dominy at 
Exeter, and continued by Seden, Court, and Tivey at Chelsea. 

The dicecious character of the Nepenthes renders the pollination of a female 
flower easy, as emasculation is unnecessary and self-fertilization an impossibility ; 
but there are drawbacks to even these apparently advantageous conditions, the 
greatest the difficulty often experienced of procuring pollen when a female 
plant is in flower, and vice versa, as the sexes seldom flower at the same time. 

* N. Curtisii, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 681, fig. 133 ; id. 1889, vol. vi. 
p. 661, fig. ; Bot. Mag. t. 7138 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1888. 

f N. stenophylla, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 240; id. 1892, vol. xi. 
p. 401, fig. 58. 

J N. Burkei, Masters in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. vi. p. 493, fig. 

N. cincta, Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxi. p. 576, fig. 110. 

|| N. ventricosa, Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 380, fig. 143. 

486 



NEPENTHES 

The methods pursued in cultivating Nepenthes as docorative subjects are likewise 
unfavourable to the production of flowers, as pitchers being the desiderata, 
plants are subjected to severe pruning, with the object of their production. 

The species used by Dominy in the first cross was an unnamed one with 
green pitchers from Borneo, and Nepenthes Rafflesiana, the result a plant 
producing pitchers fairly intermediate in character. Named N. x Dominiana 
after its raiser, and distributed in 1862,' exhibited at the Royal Horticultural 
Society's Show, held in June of the same year at Kensington. The second of 
Dominy's hybrids, N. X hybrida, had as parents N. Khasiana (then known as 
N. distillatoria) and an unnamed Bornean species. The pitchers larger than 
those of N. distillatoria, were bright green. A variety N. x hybrida maculata 
has grodn pitchers thickly covered with red spots; both were distributed in 
1866. 

Seden followed Dominy in this interesting work, and obtained his first hybrid, 
which bears his name, from Nepenthes Khasiana (distillatoria) and an unnamed 
Bornean species, the same as Dominy employed in producing N. x hybrida. 
The pitchers of N. x Sedenii are vivid green, splashed with bright crimson 
spots. 

This was followed by Nepenthes x Chelsoni,* also raised by Seden, from 
N. Hookeriana crossed with the pollen from N. x Dominii, a hybrid being used 
for the first time as a parent. 

The work of hybridization has been carried on by succeeding growers whenever 
staminate and pistillate flowers have been available simultaneously, either of 
species or of hybrids. 

Court, who succeeded Seden, produced several fine hybrids, the first 
Nepenthes x intermedia, the result of crossing an unnamed species with N. 
Rafflesiana, followed in 1877 by N. x Courtii, from the same parentage as 
N. x hybrida. 

Nepenthes x Stewartii appeared in 1879, from N. phyllamphora crossed with 
N. Hookeriana, and N. x Ratcliffianaf in 1881 from a similar parentage. The 
latter dedicated to Alfred E. Ratcliff Esq., of Edgbaston, Birmingham, at that 
time a distinguished amateur of this interesting race. 

A hybrid Nepenthes x rubro-maculata, the result of crossing N. x hybrida 
with an unknown species, was distributed in 1881. The varietal name was given 
in allusion to the marked claret-red spotting marking the pale green ground 
colour of the pitchers. The same year a hybrid, N. x Wrigleyana, named in 
compliment to Oswald Wrigley Esq., of Bridge Hall, Lancashire, was obtained, 
the product of N. Hookeriana and N. phyllamphora, and this was followed by 
a hybrid of American origin, N. x Morganise, in 1882, the result of either 
N. x Sedenii or N. phyllamphora with N. Hookeriana. 

The year 1883 is noteworthy for one of the most ornamental and easily 
grown of all hybrid Nepenthes, N. x Mastersiana, " in compliment to Dr. 
Masters, of the Gardeners' Chronicle, as a slight recognition of his invaluable 
services to Horticulture." Raised by Court from N. sanguinea crossed with 
N. Khasiana (N. distillatoria, Glasnevin variety, of gardens), the seed remained 
dormant so long that it barely escaped destruction. Fortunately life was 
detected at the last moment, and a further trial resulted in a plant which 

* Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1874, fig. f Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1881, fig. 

487 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

ranks amongst the finest of the genus. N. x Mastersiana produces pitchers 
remarkable for a fine coloration, rivalling that of N. sanguinea, with the 
characteristic blotches of N. distillatoria. The plant is of a robust constitution, 
dwarf in habit. 

A hybrid with peculiar-shaped pitchers was next obtained by crossing Nepenthes 
hirsuta glabrescens with N. Veitchii. This, called N. x cylindrica, from the 
shape of its pitchers, 6 to 8 in. long, cylindric, has a slight dilation below the 
middle, is pale green in colour, with a few crimson spots and markings. 

Nepenthes x Dicksoniana, offered in 1889, is the offspring of N. Rafflesiana 
flowering in the Botanic Gardens at Edinburgh, fertilized by pollen of N. 
Veitchii sent from Chelsea. Mr. Lindsay, late Curator of the Edinburgh 
Botanic Gardens, effected the cross, and in deference to his wish the seedling 
bears the name of Professor Dickson, formerly Professor of Botany at the 
University. The pitchers of the hybrid are fully 10 in. long, sub-cylindric, of a 
light fulvous green, densely spotted and speckled with bright crimson. 

A very mixed variety named Nepenthes x * rufescens, sent out with N. x 
Dicksoniana, is remarkable in having the blood of three species and two hybrids 
in its composition. Raised at Chelsea from N. x Courtii crossed with N. zeylanica 
rubra, N. x Courtii, itself a hybrid from an unnamed Bornean species and 
N. x Dominiana, the latter also a hybrid between N. Rafflesiana and the same 
unnamed Bornean species. 

George Tivey, to whose charge the Nepenthes were eventually entrusted, has 
produced some excellent crosses, the parentage indisputable, a statement which 
cannot be made without reserve of some of the earlier results, of which records 
are imperfect, and when the variability both in colour and shape of the pitchers, 
a marked characteristic of seedling Nepenthes, was not so well understood or 
appreciated. 

Tivey's first hybrid, t Nepenthes x mixta, was from two beautiful species, N. 
Northiana and N. Curtisii, the latter the pollen parent. As might be expected 
N. x mixta is a fine cross, with pitchers 1 ft. or more in length, of a cream- 
yellow colour suffused with red and blotched as is N. Northiana. The wings 
shallow, are deeply laciniated ; the ribs, which form the mouth of the pitcher, 
of a rich shining crimson. It was distributed in 1893. A handsome variety, 
N. x mixta sanguinea, has reddish-brown pitchers spotted with large blotches of 
chocolate-brown . 

The next success was a superb cross from Nepenthes Veitchii and N. Curtisii, 
J N. x Tiveyi, named in compliment to the raiser. N. Veitchii is one of the 
grandest Pitcher-plants in cultivation, remarkable for hairy pitchers and a 
curious gill-like peristome, and many of the best characteristics have been 
imparted to the hybrid, the most conspicuous the broad rim round the mouth, 
richly coloured a deep mahogany-red, with occasional transverse bars of a deeper 
shade. The pitchers, larger than those of N. Veitchii, have much the same 
form, but are on finer lines. 

Nepenthes x Balfouriana, an especially interesting hybrid, has for parents 
two hybrids, and four distinct species concerned in the production. It is the 
outcome of a cross between N. x Mastersiana and N. x mixta ; N. x Mastersiana 

* Masters in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. iv. p. 699, fig. 95. 

t Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. fig. 9. 

J Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 200, 201, fig. ; Gard. Mag. 1897, Sept. 18th. 

488 




NEPENTHES X MIXTA 



NEPENTHES 

resulted from N. sanguinea and N. Khasiana, and N. x mixta from N. Curtisii 
with N. Northiana. The pitchers are of a sub-cylindric shape, from 7 to 9 in. 
long, stained with carmine, marked with crimson spots and streaks on a yellowish- 
green ground. 

Another beautiful Pitcher oifered in 1903 is probably one of the finest hybrid 
Nepenthes in cultivation, a result effected by Tivey between N. x mixta and 
N. x Dicksoniana, both hybrids. It is named *Sir William T. Thiselton- 
Dyer in honour of the late Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. The pitchers 
attain a length of 14 in. or more, are sub-cylindric in shape, with a handsome 
peristome or ribbed mouth, the colour bright crimson, and the form undulate 
as in N. x mixta. The ground colour of the body is green, the surface 
irregularly blotched with large spots of purplish or crimson brown. In addition 
to the ordinary slender spur at the back of the lid, the hump-like process 
characteristic of N. Curtisii is prominent. 

Another offspring of the same parents, but from a separate cross, was exhibited 
in 1903 as t Nepenthes x picturata, so called from a highly-coloured, spotted 
pitcher and lid. It attains large dimensions, and is 10 to 12 in. in length, 
and the rim round the mouth is exceptionally fine and of a rich brownish-red. 
A further cross to the two preceding varieties has produced quite a distinct 
form, to which the name F. W. Moore has been applied, in compliment to the 
Curator of the Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin. The pitchers, somewhat globular 
in form and green in colour, have a moderately broad rim of deep reddish- 
brown. 

The majority or all of the hybrids mentioned, raised under artificial conditions 
in this country, have proved more amenable to cultivation than many species 
from the equatorial regions, and, from a horticultural point of view, are very 
much superior. 

* Card. Chron. 1900, vol. xxviii. p. 256, fig. 76. 
t Flora and Sylva, 1904, vol. ii. p. 68, fig. 



489 



GREENHOUSE 
RHODODENDRONS 



GREENHOUSE RHODODENDRONS 



EAST INDIAN SPECIES. 

THE beautiful plants comprised in this section of the genus Rhododendron 
known in gardens by the above name are natives of the East Indies, inhabiting 
the islands of Java, Sumatra, and Borneo, Penang and Malacca in the Malay 
Peninsula. 

The first species introduced to cultivation in this country was Rhododendron 
*jasminiflorum, sent to Exeter from Malacca by Thomas Lobb, flowered for 
the first time in September 1849, and exhibited at Chiswick on the occasion 
of the first show of the year, held by the Royal Horticultural Society in 1850. 
The flowers pure white with a deep pink eye, somewhat resemble the blooms of 
a Stephanotis or a Jessamine. The corolla salver-shaped, pure white, slightly 
tinted with pink below the limb, 2 in. in length, has five equal wavy 
lobes : the anthers are red, forming a deep rosy pink eye in the centre of the 
flower. 

The next species named Rhododendron t javanicum, after the island in which 
it was discovered, Blume met with on Mount Salak, and Dr. Horsfield on the 
volcanic range extending through Java, in dense forests, at an elevation of 4000 ft. 
Received from Java through Thomas Lobb in 1845, with a much darker form 
previously introduced by Rollison ; the flowers orange-coloured, ten or twelve in a 
head, here and there marked with red spots, have ten dark purple-coloured 
anthers. 

Rhododendron javanicum was followed by a beautiful species R. J Brookeanum, 
also sent by Thomas Lobb, who met with it in Borneo, where it had previously 
been observed by Mr. Low. The name was given in honour of Sir James Brooke, 
the distinguished Rajah of Sarawak, in whose territory it was discovered. The 
first flowers produced by this species in 1855, when sent to the Royal Horticultural 
Society's Show, attracted great attention. In its native country epiphytal on 
trees overhanging water-courses, the plant, when lit by the sun's rays, is a 
gorgeous sight : closely allied to R. javanicum, it differs in having a crisped 
margin to the petals, more prominent stamens, and broader petioles to the 
leaves. There are two varieties, one having yellow flowers of slender growth 
received the varietal name gracile, whilst the other, as the typical form, has a, 
more robust habit of growth and flowers of a full orange or buff-yellow colour. 

* R. jasminiflorura, Bot. Mag. t. 4524. 
t R. javanicum, Bot. Mag. t. 4336. 

% Low in Jour. R.H.S. vol. iii. p. 82 with fig. ; Gard. Chron. 1855, p. 454 with fig. 
Bot. Mag. t. 4935. 

493 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

In 1855 Thomas Lobb sent a species with small cerise-crimson flowers from 
Sumatra, subsequently found to be the species Rhododendron *malayanum of 
Jack, figured in the Botanical Magazine with the following remarks : " Dr. 
William Jack, of the late East India Company's Service, a very able botanist 
and author of ' Malayan Miscellanies,' was the first to make known this fine 
plant (in about 1823) which he discovered on the summit of Gunong Bunko, a 
remarkably insulated mountain, commonly called by the Europeans the Sugar- 
loaf, in the interior of Bencoolen, Sumatra. Dr. Jack observed of this mountain 
that, though estimated at only 3000 ft. in height, the character of its vegetation 
is decidedly alpine, which he attributed to the form and consequent exposure of 
the sharp conical peak. R. malayanum has since been gathered repeatedly on 
Mount Ophir, Malacca, at an altitude of 4000 ft., and is clearly the same plant as 
the Javanese R. tubiflorum. 

" The Celebes Island R. celebicum differs only in the paler under surface of its 
leaves, and was originally introduced by Lobb in 1854, probably from Borneo 
where he was travelling : as that indefatigable collector had already visited Mount 
Ophir, whence he had sent excellent dried specimens, now in the Hookerian 
Herbarium, it is probable that the Bornean habitat is a mistake." 

The plant is said to form a shrub or small tree with elliptic or elliptic-lanceolate 
leaves 3 to 4 in. long; the flowers, in terminal few-flowered umbels, are f in. 
long by about ^ in. across at the mouth, dull-scarlet or cerise-crimson in 
colour. 

Curtis followed Thomas Lobb as collector in the East, and sent home many 
plants, amongst them being two new species of Rhododendron, named respectively 
R. t Teysmanni and R. J multicolor. 

Rhododendron Teysmanni, a lax shrub, is a native of Penang and Sumatra, 
with golden-yellow flowers 2i in. in diameter. Exhibited for the first time in 
flower in March 1885, a certificate was awarded. 

Though not in itself a first-class garden plant, the flowers reflexed and the 
trusses small, R. Teysmanni has for cross-breeding proved one of the best, and 
entered largely into the present race of hybrids. 

Rhododendron multicolor is distinct from the Malayan species in the form of 
its funnel-shaped corolla, and approaching R. citrinum, differs from that species 
in the absence of calyx-lobes, and in the possession of twice as many stamens. 
The most marked characteristic of the species is the great variability in the 
colour of the flowers, in the type yellow, and in the variety Curtisii, rich 
crimson. 

This last-mentioned received a First Class Certificate at the meeting of the 
Royal Horticultural Society on November 13th, 1883, when it was greatly 
admired. 

HYBRIDS. 

From the fore-mentioned seven species of Rhododendron, all of which are 
natives of the various islands of the Malay archipelago, there have been produced, 
by hybridizing and cross-breeding in a variety of ways, several hundred new 

* Bot. Mag. t. 6045. f Bot. Mag. t. 6850, as K. javanicum, var. tubiflora. 

% Bot. Mag. t. 6769. PI. and Pom. 1884, p. 113. 

494 



m 




RHODODENDRON JAVANICO J ASM INIFLORU M 
"NE PLUS ULTRA" 



GREENHOUSE RHODODENDRONS 

forms, many, from a horticultural standpoint, exceed the original species in 
brilliant and varied colours, large size of truss and individual blooms, compact 
habit of growth, and the ease with which they can be cultivated. 

A classic paper by Professor Henslow, on the Hybrid Rhododendrons raised in 
the Veitchian houses, read before the Royal Horticultural Society and afterwards 
printed in the Journal, vol. xiii. pt. ii. (1891), contains a full account of the various 
hybrids, with their genealogies, and the various phenomena exhibited by them 
as the result of cross-breeding and hybridizing. To this paper we are largely 
indebted for much of the following information. 

With regard to the colours of the flowers of the original species, Professor 
Henslow remarks : " They are all reducible to two, yellow and rose-red. The 
former is produced by the presence of yellow granules scattered within the cells 
of the epidermis or underlying tissue, while the reds are due to various degrees of 
concentration of the coloured fluid, both in individual cells, as well as by super- 
position of cells containing the rose-coloured fluid. The buffs or orange-colours 
are due to combinations of the pink fluid with yellow granules, either in the same 
cell, as occurs in some epidermides, or in adjacent cells, as occurs in orange- 
coloured anthers examined. If there be a pink throat with a yellow or orange 
border to the corolla, this is due to the epidermal cells containing a more 
concentrated solution of the pink fluid." 

"The first hybrid raised was named Princess Royal, the product of a cross 
between R. jasminiflorum (white) and R. javanicum (yellow), and the result is 
remarkable. The flowers of Princess Royal show no trace of yellow, but are of a 
delicate pink or rose colour. Another hybrid produced later from the same cross, 
named jasminiflorum carminatum, resembles Princess Royal in all but colour, 
which approaches crimson. By combining Princess Royal (pink) with one of its 
parents (jasminiflorum, white) a white-flowered variety was produced, which 
received the name of Princess Alexandra." 

"The dissociation of colours by crossing, in other plants, may give rise to a 
striped, flamed, or blotched appearance, as in Calceolaria, and in some varieties 
of the Snapdragon : but this has never occurred in these Rhododendrons. Some- 
times, however, the flower has the interior of the tube or throat of a more strongly 
tinged hue than the lobes, and vice versa" 

Our employe, the late George Taylor, accomplished much with the species of 
this genus, and raised several excellent varieties. His first success, named 
* Duchess of Edinburgh, a scarlet-flowered hybrid from Rhododendron Lobbii 
crossed with R. Brookeanum, was exhibited at the Royal Horticultural Society's 
meeting in March 1874, and distributed in 1877, in which year it was figured and 
described in Messrs. Veitchs' Plant Catalogue. A seedling, named in compliment 
to its raiser t Taylori, was sent out the same year, a pink-flowered variety of the 
third generation, the parents Princess Alexandra (white) and Rhododendron 
Brookeanum, a Bornean species with bright yellow flowers. 

In 1879 two new varieties were distributed, named respectively Duchess of 
J Teck and Prince Leopold. The first resulted from crossing Princess Royal 
with Rhododendron Brookeanum, and produced flowers of a light buff-yellow, 

* Fl. and Pom. 1874, p. 145, col. pi. 

f Veitchs' Catlg. of PI. 1877, p. 19, tig. ; Fl. Mag. 1877, pi. 242. 

J Veitchs' Catlg. of PL 1879. Fl. and Pom. 1876, p. 145. 

495 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

shaded with orange-scarlet. R. x Prince Leopold, from R. Lobbii, a Bornean 
species with red flowers, and R. Brookeanum, had flowers of fawn suffused with 
rose, deepening in intensity towards the centre. 

Duchess of Connaught, from the same parents as Prince Leopold and Duchess 
of Edinburgh, was sent out in 1882, the flowers, in shape those of the Duchess 
of Edinburgh, but the colour a rich glowing red. 

From the commencement of hybridizing experiments with this genus up till 
the year 1882, the following varieties, as well as those already mentioned, had 
received certificates of merit from the Royal Horticultural and Royal Botanic 
Societies : 

Queen Victoria (R. Lobbii x R. Brookeanum), Princess Frederica (Princess 
Royal x R. Brookeanum), *Maiden's Blush (Princess Alexandra x R,. Brooke- 
anum), Excelsior (Princess Royal x R. javanicum), Monarch (Princess Alexandra 
x Duchess of Edinburgh), Favourite (Princess Alexandra x R. javanicum), 
Crown Prince of Germany (Princess Royal x R. Brookeanum), and Aurora 
(Crown Prince of Germany x R. javanicum). These hybrids were all raised 
by John Heal, who received charge of the Rhododendrons on the retire- 
ment of George Taylor. All possess large flowers, varying much in colour and 
form. 

Heal's great success was achieved when varieties appeared with double flowers, 
which now constitute what is known as the Rhododendron t balsamceflorum 
hybrids. This section originated by impregnating the stigma of a flower which 
had one of the filaments slightly petaloid, the others being normal, with the 
pollen from its own anthers : self-fertilization. From the seed capsule which 
resulted, about twenty plants were raised, and when these flowered they were 
found to produce double or semi-double blooms. The section received the name 
of balsamseflorum from the resemblance the flowers bore to those of the double 
Balsams. 

The colours of the offspring show great variety, from white and pink to 
dark red or crimson, from pure yellow to various shades of orange ; the foliage 
is also very variable, and frequently there is a want of symmetry between the 
two halves of the leaf-blade. The principal seedlings in this section are named 
album aureum, roseum, carneum, indicating the colour, and the handsome 
Rajah, with bright fawn-yellow segments tinted with rose towards the margin. 

The balsamieflorum hybrids cross with other javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids 
or with species, but in all cases the progeny have single blooms, and the tendency 
to petaloidy is apparently overcome by the natural vigour of the true species or 
crosses. 

In 1886 Favourite and J Lord Wolseley were sent out. The former, a hybrid 
of the third generation, from Princess Alexandra (white) crossed with Rhodo- 
dendron javanicum (orange-yellow), has flowers of a satiny rose colour, with a 
white tube and crimson filaments. Lord Wolseley raised from Duchess of Teck 
(buff-yellow) and R. javanicum (orange-yellow), has flowers of an orange-yellow, 
tinted with rose at the margin, in large trusses. 

In the year 1887 Rhododendron album and R. aureum of the balsamteflorum 
section were distributed, and also a new single-flowered variety, a cross between 

* L' Horticulture Beige, 1888, p. 141, col. pi. 

t PI. and Pom. 1883, p. 31. + Veitclis' Catlg. of PI. 1886. 

496 



GREENHOUSE RHODODENDRONS 

Crown Prince of Germany and R. javanicum, called President. The flowers of 
this last-named resemble those of R. javanicum, but are an improvement, to be 
preferred for decorative purposes. These varieties were followed in 1888 by 
R. x balsamoeflorum carneum, R. x jasminiflorum carminatum, and Princess 
Christian (Princess Frederica x R. javanicum), the last-named remarkable for 
large trusses of bright nankeen-yellow flowers. 

Rhododendron x luteo-roseum distributed in 1889, as the name implies, had 
flowers satiny rose, toned with yellow, a very charming tint. 

Rhododendron x balsamoeflorum Rajah, sent out in 1890, is well figured in 
the Plant Catalogue for that year. The figure typical of the whole of the 
balsameeflorum section, shows a high decorative value, but no mere picture can 
convey an idea of the durability of these flowers, perfect for several weeks, 
and, when cut, surpassing in lasting qualities many commonly grown plants. 
Souvenir de J. H. Mangles was distributed the same year, and figured in the 
same issue of the Catalogue of Plants. Derived from Crown Prince of Germany 
and R. javanicum, it was named in compliment to the late distinguished 
amateur of Rhododendrons, to whom experiments with his favourite genus were 
a source of great interest. 

The varieties Ophelia (light-rose), Brilliant (brilliant scarlet), and Aphrodite 
(blush-white) sent out as novelties in 1890, were followed in 1891 by Minerva 
(nankeen-yellow) Militaire (orange- scarlet) and Princess Beatrice (yellow suffused 
with pink). 

In 1893 appeared the superb variety * Exquisite, which originated from crossing 
the two species Rhododendron javanicum and R. Teysmanni. The flowers 
produced by this hybrid, nearly 3 in. in diameter, have a short broad funnel-like 
tube. The colour toned with a faint fawn-yellow with a slight tinge of rose- 
pink in the centre of each segment, bright crimson anthers, add greatly to the 
beauty of the cross. 

With this novelty there were also described in the Catalogue upwards of fifty 
others then in cultivation, including such fine forms as t Ceres, J Primrose, 
Minerva, J luteo-roseum, and J R. jasminiflorum carminatum. 

All the hybrids mentioned are the products of crosses between the five 
species Rhododendron jasminiflorum, R. Lobbii, R. javanicum, R. Teysmanni, 
R. Brookeanum gracile, and their offspring, but, with the introduction of R. 
multicolor from Penang through Curtis, fresh material came, which proved 
invaluable ; promptly used in connection with the best forms of the javanico- 
jasminiflorum hybrids, many varieties, the flowers of which, though inferior 
in size to the last named group, are unparalleled in brilliance and depth of 
colouring. 

Professor Henslow remarks with regard to the form of the small-flowered 
Rhododendron multicolor, that whenever this species is crossed with any other, 
or a descendant of them, it universally reduces the size, so that the offspring, 
though intermediate, are nearest to that of multicolor. The short funnel- 
shaped tube is more or less traceable in all offspring of the multicolor 
section. 

One of the most beautiful of multicolor hybrids, that named Mrs. Heal is 

* The Garden, 1889, vol. Ivi. pi. 1232. 

f The Garden, 1892, vol. xli. pi. 845. J The Garden, 1892, vol. xli. pi. 852. 

Cassell's Dictionary of Practical Gardening, vol. ii. p. 270, pi. 16. 

497 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

one of the fourth generation, and a combination of five distinct species. Its 
genealogy is as follows : 

R. jasminiflorum x R. javanicum 



(white) 



(orange) 



R. Lobbii x R. Brookeanum R. jasminiflorum x Princess Royal 



(red) 



gracile (yellow) (white) 



(pink) 



Duchess of Edinburgh Princess Alexandra 



(white) 

Princess Beatrice x R. multicolor 
(pink) (yellow) 



(crimson) 



Mrs. Heal (white) 

The flowers produced by Mrs. Heal are of a delicate pure white, funnel-shaped, 
and nearly 2 in. in diameter, and other distinct varieties belonging to the multi- 
color series are Ruby (R. jasminiflorum carminatumx R. multicolor Curtisii), dark 
coral red; *Rosy Morn, soft rose-pink, Latona, cream-yellow, Neptune, brilliant 
scarlet, *Hippolyta, crimson, and * Virgil, yellow. 

The Malaysian species, with small cerise-crimson flowers, Rhododendron malay- 
anum, has also been used as a parent, the result a charming variety t Little 
Beauty, which, apart from its interesting pedigree, has many excellent qualities, 
not the least the compact habit of growth ; a fit subject for a small structure 
where the larger-growing varieties cannot be used. 

Little Beauty is the product of a cross between the javanico-jasminiflorum 
hybrid known as Monarch and the Sumatran species Rhododendron malayanum, 
containing a combination of five species, and consequently a hybrid of the fourth 
generation. Its pedigree is as follows : 

R. jasminiflorum x R. javanicum 

R. javanicum x Princess Royal R. Lobbii x R. Brookeanum 

| | gracile 

Princess Alexandra x Duchess of Edinburgh 

Monarch x R. malayanum 
Little Beauty 

The flowers are of a uniform-growing carmine-scarlet tint, the tube being some- 
what less than 1 in. long, the segments of the limb spreading to little more than 
the length of the tube. It is one of the most brilliant of all Rhododendrons, and 
has the further advantage of a dwarf and compact habit. 

Difficulty was found in crossing the East Indian section with the Sikkim and 
American species. Success, however, after many attempts was ultimately 
obtained by crossing R. Aucklandii, a Sikkim species with white flowers, with 
Princess Royal (R. jasminiflorum x R. javanicum), a pink-flowered hybrid, the 
former being the pollen parent. The result was a small white-flowered cross 
called Pearl, as the male parent had eliminated the pink colour from Princess 
Royal, scarcely affecting the shape or size of the flower, and leaving a hybrid 
closely resembling Princess Alexandra. 

* The Garden, 1892, vol. x. lii. pi. 871. t The Garden, 1889, vol. Ivi. pi. 1241. 

498 



GREENHOUSE RHODODENDRONS 

Another interesting cross resulted from a variety of the Indian A/alea Stella 
with Lord Wolseley, a javanico-jasminiflorum hybrid, the latter being the female 
parent. This bigeneric hybrid did not flower until it was six years old. 

Professor Henslow gives the following account of this hybrid in the paper 
above referred to : " The female parent is of the third generation, the descent 
being as follows : 

R. jasminiflorum x R. javanicum 



(white) 



(orange) 



Princess Royal x Brookeanum gracile 
(pink) (yellow) 

Duchess of Teck x R. javauicum 



(reddish orange) 



(orange) 



Lord Wolseley 
(red orange) 

" The male-parent has a dark rose-coloured corolla, with crimson spots over the 
upper petals. The corolla of the cross is smaller than that of either parent, 
having a broadish, nearly straight tube, slightly bulging above ; the lobes of 
the limb are much shorter than is the case with either parent. The colour is a 
rather redder orange than that of the female parent ; the anthers are crimson, 
as well as in both parents. With regard to the foliage of the cross, though 
smaller in size, the leaf agrees, both in form and anatomical details, with that of 
the Rhododendron or female parent in every detail of importance. The leaf of 
Azalea is markedly different, being obovate instead of lanceolate ; toothed, and 
not entire ; covered with fibrous hairs instead of being glabrous above, with 
minute peltate scales below ; the cell-walls of the epidermis being sinuate instead 
of straight ; and the proportion of stomata being less than in the Rhododendron 
as well as the cross. 

"The hairs of the Azalea are very peculiar in structure. They grow on the 
branches, petioles, midrib, and veins below, and are generally scattered over the 
upper surface of the leaf. They are composed of numerous fibres resembling 
short libre-fibres, graduated in length so that the longest form the point of the 
hair, like a fine camel's-hair brush. 

" With regard to a dwarf Sister-plant (this plant is now twenty-one years old, but 
does not exceed five inches in height: it has never flowered), the anatomical 
details exhibited a very considerable amount of arrest of structure, the number 
of cells, in consequence of their minute size, being nearly twice that of the 
Rhododendron in the same area, with fewer stomata. It also agreed in most 
other respects both with the sister-cross as well as with the Rhododendron, except 
that the shape was more elliptical, and possessed glandular hairs instead of scales. 
It is observable that this case followed the supposed rule in so far as that the 
female parent gave its likeness to the foliage. Of the numerous hybrids and 
crosses raised by Messrs. Veitch, amongst these seven East Indian species, the 
above rule was found to fail very generally, in that each parent would impart 
certain peculiarities either to the flowers or leaves, according to its own prepotency, 
but the cause of such power is unknown." 

The great value of the javanico-jasminiflorum hybrids for the decoration of 
conservatories, corridors, and for cut bloom, is now generally recognized, and 

499 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

provided a sufficient number of plants be grown, it is not difficult to have flower 
throughout the year. This perpetual-flowering property was demonstrated in 
1897, when at every fortnightly meeting held by the Royal Horticultural 
Society, throughout that year, a tray of cut blooms from the collection at Chelsea 
was exhibited. 

Many of the early hybrids, which, on their first appearance, were valued as 
improvements, have now been discarded in favour of still more highly developed 
varieties, as King Edward VII., with magnificent bright yellow flowers borne in 
bold trusses, The Queen, a pure white-flowered form, and Cloth of Gold, pale 
yellow. 



500 



STREPTOCARPUS 



K k 



STREPTOCARPUS 



SPECIES. 

THE species composing the beautiful race of Gesneraceous plants, mostly natives 
of South Africa and Madagascar, are allied to the Gloxinia, Achimenes, Tydsea, 
and other favourite garden genera. 

Some dozen are in cultivation which may be for horticultural purposes classed 
in three groups : (1) The one-leaved or monophyllus, of which Streptocarpus 
Wendlandii is a familiar example ; (2) the stemless or acaulescent, typified by 
S. Rexii, an old garden plant ; and (3) the caulescent, of which S. caulescens is 
perhaps the best known ; these have stems 6 to 8 in. high and opposite leaves, but 
are seldom seen in cultivation. 

The acaulescent or stemless species which form the first two groups are the most 
frequently met with, the caulescent species of botanical interest only. The 
plants belonging to the latter have insignificant flowers, which refuse to cross 
with other species, and are hardly worth cultivating. 

The first Streptocarpus to be introduced to British Gardens was-* Streptocarpus 
Rexii of Lindley, figured in the Botanical Magazine as Didymocarpus Rexii, and 
sometime known in gardens as Streptocarpus biflorus or S. floribundus. This 
species, sent to Kew in 1824 by Mr. Bowie, His Majesty's collector in South 
Africa, was found on the estate of Mr. George Rex, after whom it was named. 
It belongs to the stemless group, has several prostrate leaves from 3 to 9 in. long, 
white flowers, with a tube 3 in. long of a delicate pale-blue inclining to purple ; 
the lateral lobes have each two, and the lower three purple lines. 

Following Streptocarpus Rexii came f S. polyantha, a native of Natal, acci- 
dentally introduced to Kew in 1853 in some material surrounding the trunks 
of tree-ferns sent from Natal by Captain Garden. With one, or occasionally two, 
pairs of leaves, one of which grows to a much larger size than the other, reaching 
1 ft. or more in length, the plant produces from the base upright flower-scapes. 
The flowers. 1 $ in. broad, are of a delicate pale-blue coloration. 

+ Streptocarpus Gardeni, also introduced in 1853 from the same country through 
the same channel, and named in compliment to Captain Garden, who sent seeds 
to Kew, bears a tuft of radical leaves from which the flower-scapes rise, each 
bearing at the apex a greenish-white flower with a lilac lip. 

In 1860 a species was sent from Natal to Kew by Mr. Wilson Saunders, and 
received the name of Streptocarpus Saundersii. It forms a solitary prostrate 
leaf 1 ft. long and 8 to 9 in. broad, flowers pale lilac in colour with two deep purple 
blotches separated by a yellow line at the throat, and closely allied to the above- 
mentioned S. polyantha. 

* Bot. Mag. t. 3005. f Bot. Mag. t, 4850. 

J Bot. Mag. t. 4862. Bot. Mag. t. 5251. 

503 



In 1882 the caulescent species Streptocarpus Kirkii was sent to Kew from 
Zanzibar by Sir John Kirk, and, although an interesting plant, is of no value 
in the garden. S. caulescens follovyed in 1886, an allied species also of little 
horticultural merit. 

* Streptocarpus parviflora, of the acaulescent group, the next introduced, was 
raised from seed brought from the vicinity of Grahamstown by Mr. Watson, of 
Kew, in 1887, and the plant apparently has a somewhat wide range in South 
Africa, from Cape Town to Natal. From the base of the tufted leaves, several in 
number, 4 to 6 in. long, arise the flower-scapes 6 to 10 in. high. The corolla-tube, 
purple within and without, with a white, slightly unequal, five-lobed limb, is in. 
long. 

A somewhat closely allied species, figured in the Botanical Magazine as 
t Streptocarpus parviflora, raised from seed by Mr. Lynch, of the Cambridge 
Botanic Gardens, produces yellowish flowers with purple streaks : the plant is 
now found to be the S. lutea of Clarke. 

The next in order of introduction, a handsome and interesting plant, J Strepto- 
carpus Dunnii, played an important part in the production of the beautiful 
hybrids such ornaments to our conservatories at the present day. A native of 
Spitzkop in the mountains of the Transvaal Gold-fields, at elevations of 3,600- 
6,000 ft., whence seed was sent to Kew by Mr. E. G. Dunn, of Claremont, Cape 
Town, in 1884. It is a one-leaved species, producing a single prostrate leaf 
attaining a length of 18 to 36 in. : flower-scapes numerous, form a sheaf of 
much-branched panicles with many blooms of a rose or salmon red colour, 
varying in tint. S. Dunnii flowered first at Kew in 1886. 

Streptocarpus Galpini, another South African species, was introduced to Kew 
in 1890 by Mr. E. Galpin, who met with it on the " Bearded Man," a peak forming 
one of the boundaries of Swaziland. The flowers, rich blue in colour tinted with 
purple, are remarkable in that they are nearly regular at the mouth and not 
oblique as in other species. 

Perhaps the most remarkable species of all is that named || Streptocarpus 
Wendlandii, sent from the Transvaal to Naples in 1887 to Messrs. Damman, and 
first made known in their Catalogue of Plants for the year 1890-1891. First seen 
in England in the Royal Gardens, Kew, where seed had been sent in some soil 
with tree-ferns from South Africa, it flowered in 1895. This notable plant 
produces only one huge prostrate leaf, from 30 in. in length to 24 in. in breadth ; 
the numerous flowers blue and white in colour, with violet markings. 

A hybrid named Streptocarpus X Dyeri raised at Kew by crossing S. Wendlandii 
with S. Dunnii. 

An Australian species, Streptocarpus Faninii, closely allied to S. polyantha, 
and very noteworthy as having helped in the production of many of the more 
beautiful hybrids. 

HYBRIDS AND VARIETIES. 

The first hybrid Streptocarpus on record is IT S. X Greenii, the progeny of 
two species, S. Saundersii and S. Rexii, the latter the pollen parent. It was 

* Bot. Mag. t. 7036. t Bot. Mag. t. 6636. 

t Bot. Mag. t. 6903. Bot. Mag. t. 7447. 

|| Bot. Mag. t. 7320 ; The Garden, 1892, vol. xli. pi. 849. 
<[[ Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 303, tig. 

504 



STREPTOCARPUS 

raised by Mr. Charles Green, at that time gardener to Sir George Mackay, of 
Pendell Court, Bletchingly, and is described in the Gardeners' Chronicle as of 
tufted habit, bearing several leaves and pale lilac-blue flowers. This hybrid 
apparently never became widely grown, and had nothing whatever to do with 
the production of the present garden race. 

The initial step which led to the formation of the beautiful forms now in culti- 
vation was taken by the Curator of Kew, who raised the hybrid Streptocarpus x 
*Kewensis by crossing S. Rexii with the pollen of S. Dunnii. Before the intro- 
duction of S. Dunnii some had been raised at Kew by fertilizing S. parviflora 
with the pollen of S. Rexii, and to the most distinct of these the names White 
Pet, S. R. multiflorus, and S. R. albus were given. A coloured plate of these 
appeared in The Garden for May 22nd, 1886, and it is interesting to compare 
the present wide range of colour in the modern varieties with the limited area of 
that day. 

The flowers produced by Streptocarpus x Kewensis were 2^ in. long with a 
spreading limb 1^- in. in diameter, and bright mauve-purple in colour striped 
with brownish-purple in the throat. 

Another hybrid, flowered in 1887, raised at Kew by crossing Streptocarpus 
parviflora with the pollen of S. Dunnii, received the name of t S. x Watsoni, 
after Mr. Watson by whom it was raised. It has several tufted leaves and 
numerous flower-stems, each bearing ten to sixteen flowers 1J in. long by 1 in. in 
diameter, bright rose-purple with a white throat and brownish-purple stripes ; 
like others, this hybrid fails to produce seed, but the pollen is potent when used 
on others. 

In 1887, the two hybrids Streptocarpus x Kewensis and S. x Watsoni were 
crossed with each other and with their parents in all possible combinations, and a 
host of seedlings resulted. These showed a marked deviation amongst themselves 
in colour, size and form of flower, many decidedly attractive. A selection of 
these was obtained from Kew, and came under the care of Heal, who again 
crossed them amongst themselves and with the red-flowered S. Dunnii, obtaining 
many seedlings now known in gardens as Veitchs' Original Hybrids. These 
hybrids are remarkable for the abundance of bloom, the continued succession 
with which the flowers are produced, and for the long time the individual blooms 
remain in perfection ; the flowers trumpet-shaped, widely open at the mouth, 
measure If in. in length. 

A coloured plate, prepared from plants growing at Chelsea, appeared in The 
Garden for February 6th, 1892, p. 843, and may be compared with one published 
in 1886. The influence of Streptocarpus Dunnii in the production of the rich and 
varied colours of the modern varieties is very obvious. 

By crossing the finest and most highly coloured varieties selected from Veitchs' 
Original Hybrids with the beautiful species from South Africa, a new race has 
been created, which for distinction and delicacy of shading are amongst the 
most valuable of modern plants for the decoration of conservatories or the cool 
greenhouse. 

A variety of Veitchs' Original Hybrids, having magenta flowers with a deep 
blotch on the lip, was crossed with the red-flowered Streptocarpus Dunnii, and 
from this cross the strain known as gratus was derived. The flowers of many 

* Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 247, fig. t Gard. Chron. 1887, vol ii. p. 215. 

505 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

distinct shades of colour, magenta-rose, pink, light-red, mauve, pale violet, blue, 
all have crimson streaks on the lower segments. 

In 1894, Virgil, a white variety of Veitchs' Original Hybrids with a deep blotch 
on the lower lip, was crossed with Streptocarpus Wendlandii, and from this cross 
originated the seedling Sylph ; flowers of a soft light mauve, with two violet 
maroon bands in the throat, and a narrow line of the same colour between. 

The charming variety Mrs. Heal had a similar origin, but in this case a magenta- 
rose shade was crossed with Streptocarpus Wendlandii. The flowers are 1^ in. 
in diameter, the tube broad, bluish-red above, whitish beneath ; the limb violet- 
blue shaded with purple ; the throat yellow with maroon spots on the basal half, 
and two to three maroon streaks and blotches on each side. 

The pulchellus strain from a white-flowered variety of Veitchs' Original Hybrids 
crossed with the pollen of Streptocarpus Fanninii, an Australian species, has 
flowers of various shades of blue, from violet to almost white, all with a narrow 
blotch at the base of the lowermost segment of the limb. 

A selection now much cultivated, and very popular, is one known as achimeni- 
florus, from the resemblance the flowers bear to those of an Achimenes, obtained 
by crossing a form of Veitchs' Original Hybrids, with white flowers and a purple 
blotch in the throat, with Streptocarpus polyantha, the latter the seed-bearer. 
The flowers of a light mauve tinted blue, in much-branched panicles, have a light 
canary-yellow and white throat. 

By selecting the finest variety from seedlings of the achimeniflorus strain, and 
crossing with pollen from a pure white-flowered form of Veitchs' Original 
Hybrids, two distinct varieties were obtained, to which the names achimeniflorus 
albus and achimeniflorus giganteus were given, the former pure white and the 
latter lavender-blue of fine large form. 

The strain known as pallidus was selected from a number of seedlings originated 
by crossing a white-flowered form of Veitchs' Original Hybrids with a white- 
flowered form of the achimeniflorus strain. 

The latest variety selected from the achimeniflorus section is the beautiful 
rose-coloured achimeniflorus roseus, originally produced by crossing achimeniflorus 
albus with a magenta-flowered variety of Veitchs' Original Hybrids, and for a 
number of years rigorously selecting the rose-coloured seedlings. 

Only a tithe of the crosses effected are here mentioned, many results worthless 
from a horticultural standpoint, others showing in no way the influence of the 
parents were discarded. An attempt to cross the caulescent with the acaules- 
cent species has also been made, but without success, and the Gloxinia, closely 
related, has also proved no more amenable. Great improvement has been effected 
in size, form, and colour by selection, hybridization of late only being resorted to 
when a break in some desired direction was necessary. 



506 



FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



FRUITS 



APRICOT, KAISHA (De Syrie). 

Jour. Hort. Soc. London, July, 1849; Gard. Chron. 1851, p. 451 (advt.) ; id. 1850, 
p. 487 ; Hogg's Fruit Manual, ed. v. p. 265. 

A well-known, richly flavoured, early variety, introduced from Syria in 1842 by 
Mr. Barker, Consul at Aleppo, from whom the Chelsea house acquired the stock ; 
now one of the standard sorts. 

APPLE, H. BALLANTINE. 

Gard. World, vol. xxi. n.s. 1904, p. 931, fig. 

Raised from Peasgood's Nonsuch and St. Edmund's Pippin ; the fruit large, 
oblate in form, with a yellowish-green skin, spotted with russet, and slightly 
splashed with red. 

The flesh, greenish-white, firm, brisk, and juicy, is slightly acidulated when at 
its best ; a culinary variety in use in October and November. 

APPLE, LANGLEY PIPPIN. 

Gard. Mag. Sept. 3rd, 1898, with fig. 

Raised by Seden from Mr. Gladstone crossed with Cox's Orange Pippin, the 
latter the seed parent. The fruit of medium size, roundish, inclining to conical, 
the skin pale yellow, brighter on the side next the sun. 

APPLE, MIDDLE GREEN. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 279 (Report of R.H.S. Fruit Committee) ; id. p. 291, 
fig. 123; The Garden, 1903, vol. Ixiv. p. 292, fig. 

Raised by Seden at Middle Green Farm, Langley, from Frogmore Prolific 
crossed with Blenheim Orange. 

The fruit, of medium size, is nearly round in shape, yellow, streaked with red 
on the exposed side, the flesh soft, of good quality. 

APPLE, MR. LEOPOLD DE ROTHSCHILD. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 295, with fig. 

The fruits are of globose-conic shape, clear yellow in colour on the shaded 
portion, brilliant orange-red on the basal half of the exposed side ; the fruit 
crisp, sub-acid, of pleasant flavour. An ornamental as well as a useful dessert 
fruit, in season during the month of October. 

509 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

APPLE, MRS. JOHN SEDEN. 

Jour. R.H.S. vol. xxii. p. 189, figs. ; Card. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 293 (Report of 

R.H.S. Fruit Committee). 

Raised by Seden from a cross between Transcendent Crab and King of the 
Pippins Apple. 

The tree is a marvellous bearer, the fruit ornamental, flavour slightly acid, 
but decidedly pleasant, and the flesh firm and crisp. 

APPLE, REV. W. WILKS. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 253, fig. 109. 

A culinary sort raised at Langley from Peasgood's Nonsuch and Ribston 
Pippin, named in honour of the most energetic Secretary of his day. 

The fruits resemble in shape those of Peasgood's Nonsuch, are of pale greenish- 
yellow colour, with faint streaks and markings of red, and the flesh firm, crisp, 
juicy, of excellent flavour. 

In season during September. 

An Award of Merit was granted by the Fruit Committee of the Royal 
Horticultural Society on September 29th, 1904, when first exhibited. 

BULLACE, TEE LANGLEY. 

The Garden, 1902, vol. Ixii. p. 399, fig. ; Gard. Mag. 1902, p. 671, fig. 
A hybrid raised at Langley, from Damson, The Farleigh, and Plum, Black 
Orleans, the latter the pollen parent ; the tree is an enormous cropper, the fruits, 
about the size of an Orleans' Plum, have a distinct trace of the Damson flavour. 

CRAB APPLE, MARSHAL OYAMA. 

Gard. Mag. Oct. 15th, 1904, p. 669, fig. p. 673. 

A handsome ornamental Crab raised by Seden from Apple American Mother 
and Crab John Downie. 

The brilliantly coloured fruits, freely produced, are a beautiful ornament in 
the shrubbery in early autumn. The flavour that of American Mother, and the 
fruits make excellent jelly. 

CRAB APPLE, THE LANGLEY. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 435, fig. 147. 

Raised at Langley from Crab John Downie and Apple King of the Pippins. 
The fruits conical in shape, bright yellow in colour, are abundantly produced in 
clusters, remaining on the tree till late in the year. 
The flesh crisp, juicy, and of pleasant flavour. 

CRAB APPLE, VEITCHS' SCARLET. 

Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 253, fig. 108. 

An ornamental variety raised at Langley from a cross between Crab Red 
Siberian and Apple King of the Pippins. 

The fruit is highly ornamental, the skin bright red, changing to deep crimson 
on the sunny side ; the flavour pleasant, and the variety is suitable for culinary 
purposes. 

510 



FRUITS 

GOOSEBERRY, GOLDEN GEM. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 113. 

Raised from the two varieties Whitesmith and Antagonist, with large, long, 
yellow berries, of most excellent flavour. 

GOOSEBERRY, LANGLEY BEAUTY. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 155, fig. 27. 

A hybrid from Yellow Champagne and Railway, in which the fruits produced 
by the seedling exceed in size those borne by either of the parents ; the berries 
are large, of a buff-yellow colour, semi-transparent, somewhat hairy, and of fine 
flavour. 

GOOSEBERRY, LANGLEY GAGE. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 137 (Report of R.H.S. Fruit Committee). 
Raised at Langley from the two varieties Pitmaston Green-Gage and Telegraph, 
the fruit a white or amber-coloured berry, smooth, of good flavour, and very 
sweet. 

RASPBERRY-BLACKBERRY HYBRID, THE MAHDI. 

Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 235, 236, fig. 71 ; Veitchs' Catlg. of Fruits, 1903, 

pp. 64, 65, fig. 

A hybrid from Raspberry Belle de Fontenay, the seed parent, and the common 
Blackberry of English hedges. 

The habit of the plant is fairly intermediate between the two, but inclines 
rather to that of the Blackberry. The fruits large, red-violet in colour, are of 
brisk and pleasant flavour, in which that of the Raspberry can be distinctly 
detected. The most valuable quality, the period of ripening, is after that of the 
Raspberry, and before the Blackberry. 

RASPBERRY, NOVEMBER ABUNDANCE. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 375, fig. 129. 

An autumn-bearer, a cross between the American variety Catawissa and the 
well-known Superlative. 

The fruits of excellent flavour, dark red in colour, are in season during the 
latter part of October and the beginning of November. 

RASPBERRY, QUEEN OF ENGLAND. 

Syns. Golden Queen. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 63, with fig. ; Veitchs' Catlg. of Fruits, 1903, p. 66, fig. 
This fine Berry, first exhibited at the Hybrid Conference held at the 
Royal Horticultural Society's Garden, at Chiswick, on July llth, 1899, under 
the name of Golden Queen, was raised at Langley from Raspberry Superlative 
and Rubus laciniatus. The fruit, a rich golden yellow in colour, resembles in 
size and shape that of Superlative the influence of the Rubus is slight. 

RASPBERRY, YELLOW SUPERLATIVE. 

Veitchs' Catlg. of Fruits, 1901, p. 56, fig. 

Raised by Seden from the two varieties Superlative and Yellow Antwerp, and 
similar to the well-known Guinea. 
The fruit is large, clear yellow in colour, with an agreeable sub-acid flavour. 

511 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

STRAWBERRY, LORD KITCHENER. 

Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. xxvi. p. 59. 

Raised from the two varieties British Queen and Waterloo, the last-named 
the seed parent. 

A useful mid-season variety, in perfection early in July, with fruits flavoured 
as British Queen, in size and colour approaching Waterloo. 

STRAWBERRY, PRESIDENT LOUBET. 

Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiv. p. 70, fig. 

Raised at Langley from a cross between the two Berries Waterloo and Lord 
Napier, with fruit of more than average size, dark vermilion in colour, not unlike 
Waterloo, and of fine flavour. 

It was named in commemoration of the visit of the late President of the French 
Republic to this country in 1903. 

STRAWBERRY, THE ALAKE. 

Gard. Chron. vol. xxxvi. 1904, p. 61, fig. 26. 

A variety raised at Langley from a cross between Frogmore Late Pine and 
Veitchs' Perfection, with fruit of very large size, variable in form, usually more or 
less cock's-comb-shaped in outline. 

Flesh scarlet, of good flavour, produced in great quantity, the fruit in season 
the end of June and the first week of July. 

STRAWBERRY, THE KHEDIVE. 

Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. xxxii. p. 64 (Report of R.H.S. Fruit Committee) ; Veitchs' 
Catlg. of Fruits, 1903, p. 68, fig. 

Raised by Seden from Lord Suffield and British Queen, the latter being the 
pollen parent, with fruit of medium size, conical, a dark red colour, the flavour 
largely that of British Queen. 

STRAWBERRY, VEITCHS' PERFECTION. 

Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. xx. p. 105 ; id. 1897, vol. xxii. pp. 42, 61, fig. 20. 

Raised at Langley from the varieties British Queen and Waterloo, the latter 
the seed parent, and remarkable for an exquisite flavour, inherited from the 
former, but cultivation has been found most difficult. 

STRAWBERRY, VEITCHS' PROLIFIC. 

Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 78, fig. 20. 

Raised at Langley from the two varieties Empress of India and British Queen, 
in shape as British Queen, of bright crimson colour, ripening to the tip a 
remarkably profuse Strawberry. 



512 



VEGETABLES 



ON taking over the Chelsea Nursery of Messrs. Knight & Perry in 1853, a 
considerable business in vegetable and flower seeds was found to be in existence, 
and it at once became the persistent policy of Mr. James Veitch junior to 
extend that business. 

With this view, stocks of seeds of the highest quality were obtained from 
growers in the neighbourhood of London, from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy 
and the United States. 

The success which followed is largely due to a Scotchman, one John Davidson, 
who, in addition to an exceptional knowledge, was gifted with unusual business 
capacity. In thirty years, under his regime, a world-wide business was developed. 

Many of the improved varieties of vegetables originated with the Veitchian house 
or with amateurs who from time to time placed selections at our disposal, and it 
is necessary to make clear that, although they appear in this section as Veitchs' 
Introductions, the credit of being the first to raise them is not in all cases our 
own, but sometimes due to those who sent us the stock. Evident as it is that 
the steady improvement in the varieties of vegetables rapidly causes many forms 
once considered first-rate to disappear from cultivation, yet, nevertheless, many 
originally distributed still hold a leading position in their respective groups. 

The following may be quoted as examples : Veitchs' Improved Ashleaf Kidney 
Potato, distributed in 1868, one of the best early potatoes in cultivation, and an 
excellent forcer ; Veitchs' Chiswick Favourite Potato, in 1885, a very fine round 
variety of first-rate table quality and admirable for late use ; Veitchs' Autumn 
Giant Cauliflower, distributed in 1870, still the best late variety and indispensable 
for autumn use ; Veitchs' Self-Protecting Broccoli, first offered in 1876, and 
Veitchs' Model Broccoli in 1878, have both become standard varieties of this 
important vegetable ; Ellam's Early Spring Cabbage sent out in 1879 is still un- 
surpassed as a Spring Cabbage, and Lily White Seakale remains the finest 
flavoured known for forcing. 

That very important vegetable the Pea naturally received great attention, and 
as a result several marked improvements were obtained. 

Amongst others in a foremost position are Chelsea Gem, offered in 1884, 
a dwarf -growing early variety, rarely exceeding 15 in. in height, and very 
prolific. The pods are large and handsome, remarkably well filled for an 
early sort, and contain from eight to ten good-sized peas of first-rate quality. 
Veitchs' Criterion Pea is a leading main crop, sent out for the first time in 
1876, and Veitchs' Autocrat, distributed in 1888, is one of a rare quality for 
late work ; owing to a strong constitution, it bears successional crops for a long 
period. Of the blue wrinkled marrow section, the pods are large and broad, well 
filled with deep grassy-green seed of a superb quality. Veitchs' Main Crop and 

513 



HORTUS VEITCHII 

Veitchs' Prestige are two excellent varieties for second and general crops, the 
former distributed in 1892, the latter in 1903. 

There is scarcely a family of culinary plants that has not at some time received 
attention, and been improved either by selection in the trial grounds, or by 
crossing distinct varieties producing new breaks. 

Among Beans, Veitchs' Giant White, the largest-podded runner in cultiva- 
tion, and Mammoth Scarlet, are two excellent varieties ; Veitchs' Selected Red, 
Veitchs' Improved Black, Improved Globe, and Pragnell's Exhibition are standard 
Beets, and with the Brassicas, besides those previously alluded to, may be 
mentioned the varieties of Broccoli or Kale, such as Chelsea Exquisite Curled, 
Read's Improved Hearting, Veitchs' Sprouting and Veitchs' Exhibition, leading 
kinds of these important winter vegetables. Veitchs' Exhibition Brussel Sprouts, 
Veitchs' Paragon and Veitchs' Market Favourite are well tried and excellent, 
and Veitchs' Scarlet Model and Veitchs' Matchless Scarlet among the most widely 
grown of all Carrots. 

Lettuce, so much in demand in all gardens, received important additions in 
Veitchs' Golden Queen, a desirable small early variety of the Cabbage section, 
and Veitchs' Perfect Gem, also a Cabbage Lettuce, valuable on account of its 
ability to withstand summer drought and for the beautiful crisp and tender leaves. 
Amongst the Cos varieties none are better than Veitchs' Superb White and 
Veitchs' Selected Brown, and the Self-Folding Chelsea Imperial is a great type. 

Several varieties of Cucumber distributed are also now recognized as standard 
kinds; Veitchs' Perfection, one of the best for spring and winter work, and 
Allan's Favourite, Veitchs' Improved Telegraph and Tender and True are all 
meritorious, and more recent varieties, Veitchs' Sensation and Veitchs' Unique, 
promise to be indispensable. 

The varieties of Melon have been numerous and excellent, and include the best 
raised in the first gardens of the country. 

Tomatoes have benefited by the addition of such familiar kinds as Ham Green 
Favourite, Frogmore Selected, Hackwood Park, Golden Jubilee, and Chiswick 
Peach, while Veitchs' Main Crop and Selected Globe Onions are in all gardens 
where high-class vegetables are in demand. 



514 



INDEX 



INDEX 



(The Names in italics are Synonyms.) 



ABELIA spathulata, 389 
Abies ajanensis, 342 
,, Alcockiana, 51 
,, Alcockiana, 342 
,, Alcoquiana, 19 
,, amabilis, 39 
,, bracteata, 15, 39, 335 
,, concolor, 335 
,, ,, var. Lowiana, 39 

,, Davidiana, 341 
Eichleri, 337 
firma, 19, 50, 335 
grandis, 39, 336 
leptolepis, 341 
magnifica, 39, 336 
Mariesii, 80, 336 
microsperma, 50, 337, 342 
nobilis, 39 

,, var. robusta, 336 
polita, 342 

sachalinensis, 80, 81, 83, 337 
Tsuga, 347 
Veitchii, 51, 80, 83, 337 

,, var. sachalinensis, 337 
yessoensis, 81 
Abietia Douglasii, 39 
,, Fortunei, 341 
Abutilon paeoniaeflora, 221 

,, vitifolium, 351 
Acalypha tricolor, 221 

Wilkesiana, 20, 221 
Acanthophippium Curtisii, 111 
Acer argutum, 351 
,, carpinifolium, 351 
,, crataegifolium, 352 
,, ,, var. Veitchii, 352 

,, Davidii, 352 
,, diabolicum, 352 
,, distylum, 352 
,, Francheti, 353 



Acer griseum, 353 
Henryi, 353 
laetum, var. cultratum, 353 

,, ,, tricaudatum, 353 
laevigatum, var. Fargesii, 354 
nikoense, 354 
palmatum, 50, 354 
pictum, var. connivens, 354 

,, ,, mono, 355 
polymorplium, 354 
pulchrum, 352 
rufinerve, 355 
sinense, var. concolor, 355 
sutchuenense, 355 
tetramerum, var. lobulatum, 

355 
Aconitum Hemsleyanum, 413 

,, scaposum, var. pyramidale, 

413 

Acrophorus affinis, 318 
Acrostichum aureum, 311 
botryoides, 73 
juglandifolium, 73 
Lechlerianum, 311 
poly botryoides, 73 
suberectum, 73 
Actinidia chinensis, 94, 356 

Kolomikta, 81, 356 
Adelaster albivenis, 221 
Adenophora capillaris, 413 

,, polymorpha, 413 

Adhatoda cydoniaefolia, 221 
Adiantum amabile, 313 
,, aemulum, 311 
,, sethiopicum, var. chilense, 

311 
,, ,, scabrum, 

312 

chilense, 311 
,, colpodes, 312 



517 



INDEX 



Adiantum concinnum, var. latum, 312 
,, cuneatum, var. grandiceps, 

312 

,, decorum, 315 
digitatum, var. speciosum, 

312 

,, Henslovianum, 312 
,, scabruin, 312 
,, sessilifolium, 312 
,, speciosum, 312 
,, macrophyllum, var. glau- 

cum, 313 

,, monochlamys, 313 
,, Moorei, 313 
,, palmatum, 313 
peruvianum, 313 
,, princeps, 313 
,, rubellum, 314 
,, Seemanni, 314 
,, sulphur eum, 314 
,, tinctum, 314 
,, Veitchianum, 314 
,, Wagneri, 315 
Weigandii, 315 
,, Zahnii, 314 
^Echrnea Veitchii, 221 
Aerides Burbidgei, 76, 78 
Fieldingi, 42, 111 

,, var. Williamsii, 111 
Huttoni, 151 
japonicum, 111 
Lobbii, 111 
matutinum, 150 
multiflorum, var. Lobbii, 42, 

111 
Veitchii, 42, 

112 

,, pachyphyllum, 112 
.ZEschynanthus cordifolius, 222 
fulgens, 222 
Lobbiana, 222 
longiflorus, 222 
miniata, 222 
obconica, 222 
pulcher, 223 
pulchra, 223 
purpurescens, 223 
speciosa, 223 
calif ornica, 356 
,, turbinata, 356 
Agalmyla staminea, 223 
Agapetes macrantha, 224 
Aglaonema commutatum, 288 



Aglaonema costatum, 224 

,, marantaefolium, var. foliis 

maculatis, 224 
,, oblongifolium, var. Cur- 

tisii, 224 

,, pumilum, 224 
Allium anceps, 443 
Alloplectus peltatus, 224 
Alocasia x Chelsoni, 103 
guttata, 78 

X intermedia, 103, 225 
Jenningsii, 243 
Lowii, var. picta, 225 
pumila, 78 
scabriuscula, 78, 225 
x Sedenii, 103, 225 
Thibautiana, 225 
zebrina, 225 
Alsophila Burbidgei, 77 
hispida, 73 
,, ? late-vagans, 73 
,, podophylla, 73 
Alstrcemeria Caldasii, 444 
,, densiflora, 444 
inodora, 443 

nemorosa, 443 
Althaea ficifolia, 104 

,, Primrose Queen, 104 
,, rosea, 104 
Amaranthus melancholicus, var. ruber, 

20, 414 

,, salicifolius, 414 
Amaryllis Belladonna, 466 
,, formosissima, 465 
,, Leopoldii, 446 
,, pardina, 446 
Amasonia calycina, 226 
,, punicea, 87 
,, punicea, 226 
Ampelopsis japonica, 19 
tricuspidata, 19 

,, tricuspidata, 384 

Veitchii, 8, 19, 50 
Veitchii, 384 

Ancistrochilus Thomsonianus, 147 
Ancylogyne longiflora, 287 
Andromeda hirsuta, 400 
Androsace Henryi, 414 
Angraecum citratum, 112 
,, falcatum, 112 
,, hyaloides, 112 
Kotschyi, 113 

X Veitchii, 104, 161, 478 



518 



INDEX 



Anguloa x intermedia, 104 
,, X intermedia, 161 
,, x media, 161 
Anoectochilus X Dominii, 161, 473 
Anthurium Brownii, 226 

cuspidatum, 226 
Kalbreyeri, 226 
Scherzerianum, 61 
Veitchii, 63, 72, 226 
Wallisii, 64, 227 
Warocqueanum, 63, 227 
Apera arundinacea, 414 
Aphelandra acutifolia, 227 
nitens, 47, 227 
,, variegata, 227 
Apple, H. Ballantine, 509 

Langley Pippin, 105, 509 

Middle Green, 105, 509 

Mr. Leopold de Eothschild, 

105, 509 

,, Mrs. John Seden, 105, 510 
Eev. W. Wilks, 105, 510 
Apricot, Kaisha, 509 
Arachnanthe Cathcartii, 113 

Lowii, 113 

Aralia elegantissima, 227 
Kerchoveana, 228 
,, osyana, 228 
Veitchii, 20, 50, 228 
Araucaria imbricata, 38, 45, 337 
,, Niepratschki, 338 

Eulei, 338 
Ardisia mamillata, 228 

Oliveri, 228 
Aristolochia heterophylla, 357 
promissa, 229 

,, ringens, 229 

Artemisia lactiflora, 414 
Arthropodium neo-caledonicum, 229 
Arum palaestinum, 414 
Arundinaria Khasiana, 389 
nitida, 389 

Veitchii, 389 
Asclepias vestita, 229 
Asparagus plumosus, 230 
,, racemosus, 230 
Aspidium aculeatum, var. tsus- 

simense, 315 
,, aristatum, var. variega- 

tum, 315 
falcatum, var. pendulum, 

315 
flexum, 315 



Aspidium setosum, 316 
,, tripteron, 316 
Asplenium Belangeri, 316 

Ceterach, var. aureum, 

316 

consimile, 316 
ferulaceum, 317 
filicaule, 73 
latifolium, 317 
longisorum, 73 
longissimum, 317 
obtusilobium, 317 
porphyrorachis, 77 
scandens, 317 
schizodon, 317 
Veitchianum, 316 
Viellardii, 317 
xiphophyllum, 77 
Astilbe chinensis, var. Davidii, 415 
Davidii, 94, 415 
grandis, 415 
Thunbergii, 415 
Athyrium latifolium, 317 
Atropa biflora, 263 
Azalea calendulacea, 373 
dilatata, 373 
obtusa, 406 
occidentalis, 407 
Eollisoni, 80 
Azara microphylla, 390 



BALBISIA verticillata, 390 
Bambusa albo-marginata, 389 

Veitchii, 389 
Barbacenia squamata, 230 
Barclaya longifolia, 43 
Barkeria Lindleyana, var. Centers 

134 

Barleria prionitis, 230 
Batemannia Burtii, 158 

Wallisii, 64 ' 
Bean, Mammoth Scarlet, 514 

Veitchs' Giant White, 514 
Beet, Pragnell's Exhibition, 514 
Veitchs' Improved Black, 514 
Globe, 514 

Selected Eed, 514 
Befaria aestuans, 230 
cinnamomea, 230 
coarctata, 231 
ledifolia, 47 
,, Mathewsii, 231 



519 



INDEX 



Begonia X acerifolia, 231 
,, Acme, 458 
Adonis, 461 
,, Agatha, 462 
,, compacta, 462 

,, Autumn Eose, 461 

boliviensis, 47, 231, 455, 456 

Burkei, 231 
,, X carminata, 231 

X Chelsoni, 458 
,, cinnabarina, 455 

Clarkei, 455, 457 
coccinea, 232 
,, crinita, 232 

Davisii, 232, 455, 457, 460 
,, decora, 232 
,, Dregii, 462 
Emperor, 459 
Ensign, 461 
,, X Eudoxa, 232 
,, Excelsior, 458 

falcifolia, 233 
,, gogoensis, 233 
,, x heracleicotyle, 233 

Ideala, 461, 462 
,, insignis, 461 
X intermedia, 458 
,, John Heal, 461 

Julius, 462 

Kallista, 458 
lineata, 233 
X margaritacea, 233 
,, Miss Constance Veitch, 459 
Model, 458 
Monarch, 459 

Mrs. Arthur Potts, 459 
,, ,, Charles Scorer, 459 
Heal, 462 

Myra, 462 
,, natalensis, 462 

Pearcei, 47, 233, 455, 456, 

462 
Queen of the Whites, 459 

rosaeflora, 104, 234, 455, 457 

roseo-superba, 459 

X Sedenii, 104, 456, 458 

socotrana, 460, 461, 462 

Stella, 458 

Success, 461 

Sylvia, 462 

Veitchii, 15, 47, 234, 455, 456 

Venus, 462 

Vesuvius, 458 



Begonia Viscountess Doneraile, 459, 

461 

Winter Cheer, 462 
,, Gem, 461 

,, Perfection, 461 

Bejaria astuans, 230 

coarctata, 231 
Belperone ciliata, 252 
Berberidopsis corallina, 390 
Berberis acuminata, 391 

,, congestiflora var. hakeoides, 

391. 

Darwinii, 15, 38, 391 
Jameson*, 392 

Wallichiana, 392 
Bertolonia guttata, 263 

pubescens, 234 
Betula alnoides, var. pyrifolia, 357 

,, Maximo wiczii, 357 
Blandfordia aurea, 443 
Blechnum nitidum, var. contractum, 

317 

Blumenbachia chuquitensis, 415 
,, contorta, 415 

coronata, 415 

Bomarea andinamarcana, 443 
,, Caldasiana, 444 
densiflora, 444 
,, multiflora, 444 
,, tomentosa, 444 
Borecole, Chelsea Exquisite Curled, 

514 

,, Eead's Improved Heart- 
ing, 514 

,, Veitchs' Exhibition, 514 
,, Sprouting, 514 

Boronia elatior, 234 
Bouchea pseudogervao, 234 
Brachycorythis Kalbreyeri, 70 
Brandisia racemosa, 94, 357 
Brassia arcuigera, 113 
thyrsodes, 114 
Brassocattleya Orpheus, 205 
Sedenii, 201 

Veitchii, 200 
Brassolaelia Clio, 196 

,, Gratrixice, 197 

,, Veitchii, 196 

Broccoli, Veitchs' Model, 513 

,, Self -Protecting, 513 

Browallia Jamesoni, 291 
Brussel Sprouts, Veitchs' Exhibition, 
514 



520 



INDEX 



Brussel Sprouts, Veitchs' Market Fa- 
vourite, 
514 
Paragon, 

514 

Buddleia albiflora, 358 
nivea, 358 

,, variabilis,var.magnifica,358 
Veitchiana,94, 

358 

Bulbophyllum Leysianum, 78 
Lobbii, 114 

mandibulare, 78, 114 

reticulatum, 114 

,, retusiusculum, 117 

Bullace, The Langley, 105, 510 
Burbidgea nitida, 78, 235 
Burgeria stellata, 370 



CABBAGE, Ellam's Early, 513 
Caesalpinia japonica, 358 
Caiophora contorta, 415 
Caladium x Chelsoni, 103 
x Veitchii, 225 
Calandrinia umbellata, 416 
Calanthe x bella, 161 
Curtisii, 114 

X Dominii, 99, 162, 473 
x gigas, 162 
x Harrisii, 162 
labrosa, 114 
x lentiginosa, 162, 476 
x masuco-tricarinata, 162 
pleichroma, 115 
proboscidea, 115 
rosea, 42, 115 

X Sedenii, 162, 475 
Textorii, 115 
tricarinata, 115 
Turneri, 116 

X Veitchii, 100, 163, 473 
x ,, var. alba, 163 
vestita, 15, 42, 115 
var. Turneri, 116 

Calathea leucostachys, 235 
,, ornata, 235 
tubispatha, 235 
Veitchiana, 236 
Calceolaria alba, 236 

amplexicaulis, 236 
crenata, 236 
deflexa, 236 



Calceolaria ericoides, 47, 416 
flexuosa, 237 
floribunda, 236 
fuchsia/olio,, 236 
grandis, 236 
lobata, 237 
pisacomensis, 237 
plantaginea, 416 
punctata, 237 
tenella, 237 
Calla ?oculata, 433 
Camellia Grijsii, 392 

Sasanqua, 392 
Campsidium chilense, 238 
Canavalia ensiformis, 238 
Cantua bicolor, 238 
,, buxifoUa, 238 
dependens, 238 
pyrifolia, 239 
Caraguata angustifolia, 239 

Zahnii, 56, 239 
Cardiandra sinensis, 416 
Carpinus cordata, 359 
Carrot, Veitchs' Matchless Scarlet, 

514 

,, Scarlet Model, 514 

Caryopteris Mastacanthus, 392 
Castanea chrysophylla, 393 
Castanopsis chrysophylla, 393 
Catasetum saccatum, var. pliciferum. 

116 

Cattleya x Aclandi-Loddigesii, 473 
X Adela, 163 
X Apollo, 163 
x Atalanta, 163 
aurea, 72 
autumnalis, 116 
x Bactia, 163 
,, Bowringiana, 116 

X Brabantiae, 163, 473 
x Brownise, Veitchs' var., 

164 

x Cassandra, 199 
x Chamberlainiana, 164 
X Chloe, 164 
X Chloris, 164 
X Clytie, 164 
X Cybele, 164 
x Devoniana, 164 
x Devoniensis, 164 
x Dominiana, 165, 473 
Dowiana, 61, 116 
x Ella, 165 



521 



INDEX 



Cattleya x Elvina, 165 

x Empress Frederick, var. 
Leonata, 165 

x Enid, 165 
x Eros, 165 
x Euphrasia, 166 
x Eurydice, 166 
x exoniensis, 202, 473 

X Fabia, 166 

x Fabiola, 166 
x Fausta, 202 

X Felix, 474 

gigas, 72 
x guatemalensis, 193 

X hybrida, 473 
x picta, 168 
X intertexta, 166 
X iricolor, 117 
labiata, var. Dowiana, 116 
Lawrenceana, 116 
x leucoglossa, 203 

X Manglesii, 166, 473 
x Mantinii, 166 
x Mardelli, 204 
x Marstersoniae, 167 
x Melpomene, 167 
Mendelii, 88 
x Minucia, 167 
x Miranda, 167 
x Niobe, 167 

X Olivia, 167 
x Pheidinae, 167 

X Philo, 168 

x ,, var. albiflora, 168 
,, x picturata, 168 
x porphyrophlebia, 168, 476 
x Princess, 168 
x quincolor, 473 
x quinquecolor, 168 
Schr6derae,*88 
Skinneri, var. alba, 117 
x suavior, 168 
triophthalma, 207, 476 

Trianas, 88 

x Veitchiana, 208 
x vestalis, 169 
x Wendlandiana, 169 
Cauliflower, Veitchs' Autumn Giant, 

513 

Cavendishia acuminata, 239 
Ceanothus floribundus, 393 
Lobbianus, 393 
oreganus, 394 



Ceanothus papillosus, 394 
Veitcbianus, 394 
velutinus, 394 
Celastrus hypoglaucus, 359 

latifolius, 359 
Celmisia Munroi, 239 

spectabilis, 240 
Celosia cristata, var. coccinea, 416 

Huttoni, 240 
Centropogon coccineus, 240 
Cephaelis tomentosa, 240 
Cephalotaxus Griffithii, 338 

Oliveri, 338 
Cerasus pseudo-cerasus, var. James 

H. Veitch, 91 

Ceratostema longiflorum, 240 
Ceropegia Cumingiana, 241 

Gardneri, 241 
Ceterach aureum, 316 
Cbaetogastra strigosa, 293 
Chamsebatia foliolosa, 360 
Cheilanthes glauca, var. hirsuta, 327 
mysurensis, 318 
undulata, 318 
Chelidonium lasiocarpum, 417 
Chevalliera Veitchii, 221 
Chionographis japonica, 417 
Chirita eburnea, 241 

Horsfieldii, 241 
Chrysorrboe nitens, 295 
Cbysis x Chelsoni, 104, 169, 474 
x Langleyensis, 104, 169, 478 
x Sedenii, 104, 475, 478 
Cirrhopetalum retusiusculum, 117 

robustum, 117 

Cissus cordifolius ? 281 
Endresii, 295 
,, porphyrophyllus, 281 
Clematis Armandi, 395 
glandulosa, 241 
Gouriana, 360 
,, montana, var. grandiflora, 

360 
montana, var. rubens, 94, 

360 
patens, var. Jobn Gould 

Veitch, 361 
,, smilacifolia, 241 
Clerodendron cruentum, 242 

illustre, 242 
Cleyera Fortunei, 395 
Clianthus Dampieri, 242 
Codonopsis Tangshen, 417 



522 



INDEX 



Coelogyne Arthuriana, 119 
Day ana, 118 
flavida, 118 
humilis, 118 
lagenaria, 42, 118 
lentiginosa, 118 
maculata, 42, 119 

var. Arthuriana, 

119 

peltastes, 119 
pogonioides, 119 
Beichenbachiana, 119 
salmonicolor, 120 
Schilleriana, 119 
speciosa, 42, 120 
Veitchii, 120 
Coffea benghalensis, 242 
Coleus Gibsonii, 20, 242 
Veitchii, 20, 243 
Collania andinamarcana, 443 
Collinsia bartsiaefolia, 417 

,, multicolor, 417 
Colocasia affinis, 243 
Columnea Kalbreyeri, 243 
Conandron ramondioides, 83, 418 
Cordia decandra, 243 
Cornus paucinervis, 361 

stolonifera, 361 
Correa cardinalis, 244 
Corydalis cheilanthifolia, 418 
thalictrifolia, 418 
,, tomentosa, 418 

Wilsoni, 418 

Corylopsis himalayana, 361 
,, pauciflora, 361 
,, sinensis, 362 
,, spicata, 362 
Corylus tibetica, 362 
Cosmanthus grandiflorus, 428 
Cotoneaster applanata, 395 

bullata, 395 
humifusa, 396 

Crab Apple, Marshal Oyama, 510 
The Langley, 105, 510 
Veitchs' Scarlet, 105, 510 
Crataegus pinnatifida, var. major, 362 

tartarica, 362 
Crawfurdia fasciculata, 244 
Crinodendron Hookerianum, 293 

Patagua, 293 
Crinum bracteatum, var. purpuras- 

cens, 444 
purpurascens, 444 

523 



Crossandra guineensis, 244 
Croton aneitumensis, 244 
angustissimum, 248 
appendiculatus, 244 
aucubaefolium, 244 
aureo-maculatus, 244 
aureo-marmoratus, 245 
Bismarck, 245 
Bragaeanus, 245 
caudatus tortilis, 245 
Challenger, 245 
chrysopoacilus, 245 
Comte de Germiny, 246 
Cooperi, 246 
cornutum, 246 
Cronstadtii, 246 
Dayspring, 246 
Disraeli, 246 
Earl of Derby, 246 
Evansianus, 246 
Fordii, 247 
Hanburyanus, 247 
Harwoodianus, 247 
Hawkeri, 247 
Hillianum, 247 
Hookeri, 247 
interruptum, 247 
irregulare, 248 
Johannis, 248 
lacteum, 248 
Macarthuri, 248 
maculatus Katonii, 248 
maximum, 248 
Mooreanus, 249 
multicolor, 249 
Nevilliae, 249 
nobilis, 249 
ovalifolium, 249 
Princess of Wales, 249 
recurvifolius, 249 
reginae, 250 
Sinitzinianus, 250 
tortilis, 250 
undulatum, 250 
variabilis, 250 
Veitchianum, 250 
Weismanni, 250 
Youngii, 251 

Cruckshanksia cistiflora, 390 
Cryptocoryne caudata, 78 
Cryptogramme retrofracta, 321 
Cryptomeria elegans, 19, 338 
japonica, 82 



INDEX 



Cryptomeria japonica, var. elegans, 

50, 338 
var. Lobbii, 

338 

Lobbii, 338 

Cryptophoranthus gracilentus, 120 
Cucumber, Allen's Favourite, 514 
Tender and True, 514 

Veitchs' Improved Tele- 

graph, 514 

Perfection, 514 

Sensation, 514 

Unique, 514 

Cuphea cordata, 251 
Cupressus obtusa, 50, 339 

var. filicoides, 339 

lycopodioides, 

339 

pisifera, 339 
var. squarrosa, 339 

Curcuma australasica, 251 

sumatrana, 251 
Curmeria Wallisii, 64 
Cyathsea suluensis, 78 
Cycnoches pentadactylon, 120 
Cymbidium, canaliculatum, 121 

X eburneo - Lowianum, 

104, 169 

grandiflorum, 121 

Hookermnum, 121 

Huttoni, 54, 121 
x Lowio - grandiflorum, 

169 

Wilsoni, 121 
Cypripedium x Adrastus, 170 

X ^son, 170 
X var. giganteum, 

170 
x Ainsworthii, var. ca- 

lurum, 170 

x albo-purpureum, 170 

x Antigone, 171 

X Aphrodite, 171 

x Arete, 171 

Argus, 122 

x Artemis, 171 

x Arthurianum,171,474 

X ,, var. pulchel- 

lum, 171 

x Astrea, 172 

x atropurpureum, 475 

x Ballantinei, 177 

barbatum, 42, 122 



Cypripedium x Baron Schroder, 172, 

478 
,, Boissierianum, 122 

X Brysa, 172 

X calanthum, 172, 475 

X calophyllum, 172 

x calurum, 170 

X calypso, 172 

x Captain Holford, 173 

x cardinale, 173 

caricinum, 122 

caudatum, 15, 122 

x Cleola, 173 

x Clonius, 173 

,, x Creon, 174 

x Crethus, 174 

Curtisii, 86, 123 
,, Dayanum, 78 

, , X Dominianum, 174, 474 

x var. Cly 

mene, 174 

x Druryo-Hookerae, 174 

x Electra, 175 

x Euryades, 170 

X Euryale, 175 

X euryandrum, 175, 

475 

x Eurylochus, 175 

x Evenor, 175 

,, x Galatea, 175 

,, x Germinyanum, 175 

x giganteum, 176 

X grande, 176, 475 
x ,i var. macro- 

chilum,176 
x Harrisianum, 176, 

474 

Haynaldianum, 123 

X H. Ballantine, 177 
X Hera, 170 
X lanthe, 177 
X James H.Veitch, 177, 

477 

javanicum, 123 

IcBvigatum, 124 

Lawrenceanum, 78, 123 

x Leeanum, var. super- 

bum, 177 
,, x leucorrhodum, 177, 

476 

Lindleyanum, 123 

x Little Gem, 178 

Lowii, 86 



524 



INDEX 



Cypripedium x lucidum, 178, 475 
x macrochilum, 176 

X var. gi- 

ganteum, 176 
x macropterum, 178, 

475 

,, x marmorophyllum, 178 

x Marshallianum, 178, 

475 

x Medeia, 179 
x Melanchus, 179 
X Melis, 179 
x Merops, 179 

x microchilum, 179, 475 

x Milo, 179 

X var. grandis, 179 

x Minos, 180 

X ,, var. magnifi- 

cum, 180 
X var. superbum, 

180 

x Morganiae, 180, 475 
x var. Lang- 

leyense, 
180 

x Niobe, 180 
x nitens, 180, 475 
niveum, 124 

x Norma, 181 

x Numa, 181 

x obscurum, 476 

x oenanthum, 181 

x var. su- 

perbum, 
181 

X CEnone, 181 
x (Eolus, 183 
x Orestes, 181 
X Orion, 181 
,, x orphanum, 182, 476 

x patens, 182, 475 
x Pearcei, 122 

x Penelaus, 182 

x Perseus, 182 

x var. Phaedra, 

182 

X Pheres, 182 
philippinense, 124 
X porphyreum, 184 

x porphyrochlamys, 183 
" X Priam, 183 

x var. Leucas, 

183 



Cypripedium X Priapus, 183 

x pycnopterum,183,475 

X var. por- 

phyrospilum, 183 
x radiosum, 183, 476 

x reginge, 183 

reticulatum, 122 
Koezlii, 72 

x Sappho, 184 

Schlimii alba, 72 
X Schroder, 184, 476 
X var. can- 

didulum, 184 
X Sedenii, 104, 184, 474 
x var. candidu- 

lum, 184 

x var. porphy- 
reum, 184 

X selligerum, 184, 475 

x Sirius, 185 
Stonei, 86 

x suave, 185 

x superbiens, 124 

x superciliare, 185, 475 

X Tautzianum, 185 
x T. B. Haywood, 185 

X Telemachus, 185 
x tesselatum, 186, 475 

X var. por- 

phyreum, 
186 

X Thalia, 186 

x Thibautianum, 186 

tibeticum, 124 
X Tityus, 186 
tonsum, 125 

x vernixium, 186 

X vexillarium, 100, 187, 

474 

villosum, 42, 125 
X Winnianum, 187, 476 
X Zeno, 187 

Cyrtomium falcatum, var. pendulum, 
315 



serrulata, 73 
Daphne Genkwa, 82 
Daphniphyllum glaucescens, 81, 83 
Darwinia fimbriata, 251 
Davallia affinis, 318 

,, alpina, 318 

,, bullata, var. Mariesii, 318 



525 



INDEX 



Davallia elegans, var. polydactyla, 318 
ferruginea, 319 
fijiensis, var. major, 319 
hemiptera, 320 
hirta, var. cristata, 319 
intermedia, 319 
Mariesii, 83 
Mooreana, 319 
pallida, 319 
parvula, 320 
pentaphylla, 320 
repens, 320 
retusa, 322 
strigosa, 320 

tenuifolia, var. Burkei, 320 
,, Veitchiana, 

320 

Veitchii, 77 
Davidia involucrata, 94, 362 
Deinanthe bifida, 419 
Delphinium cardinale, 419 

Davidii, 419 

Dendrobium acrobaticum, 125 
x Adrasta, 187 

x JEneas, 187 

x Ainsworthii, var. in- 

tertextum, 187 
var. splendidis- 

simum, 188 

albosanguineum, 125 

x Alcippe, 188 

amethystoglossum, 125 

,, annuligerum, 126 

,, Antelope, 126 

arachnostachyum, 126 

x Aspasia, 188 

atroviolaceum, 126 

bellatulum, 126 

,, Bensonae, 127 

,, bigibbum, var. super- 

bum, 127 
binoculare, 127 

Burbidgei, 76, 78 
canaliculatum, 127 

cerinum, 78, 127 
X Cordelia, 188 
erassinode, 128 
cretaceum, 128 
crystallinum, 128 
cumulatum, 128 
X Cybele, 188, 476 
X Dominianum,188,474 
X dulce, 189 



Dendrobium x Edithae, 189 

,, x endocharis, 189 

X euosmum, 189, 476 

X var.leucop- 

terum, 189 

x ,, var. virgin- 

ale, 189 

X Euryalus, 189 
x Euryclaea, 190 

glomeratum, 129 

Gouldii, 129 

Huttoni, 54, 129 

X illustre, 190, 478 
infundibulum, 42 

var. Jamesi- 

anum, 129 

Jamesianum, 129 

Johannis, 129 

Johnsoniae, 129 

Kuhlii, 130 

,, lasioglossum, 130 

leucolophotum, 130 

lineale, 130 

Macfarlanei, 129 

macrophyllum, var. Hut- 

toni, 130 

var. Veitchi- 

anum, 130 
marginatum, 133 

X Mentor, 190 
mesochlorum, 131 

x micans, 190 

Moorei, 131 

X Niobe, 190 

X Ophir, 190 
,, Palpebras, 131 

Petri, 131 

,, polycarpum, 131 

X porphyrogastrum, 191 

praecinctum, 131 

x rhodostoma, 191 

X splendidissimum, 191 

,, X var. grandi- 

flora, 191 

x striatum, 191 

subclausum, 131 

superbiens, 132 

superbum, var. anosum, 

132 
,, ,, Burke's var., 

132 

,, ,, Hutton'svar., 

132 



526 



INDEX 



Dendrobium Tattonianum, 127 

taurinum, var. amboin- 

ense, 132 

tetrachromum, 132 

X Thwaitesiae, Veitchs' 

var. 191 
tortile, 133 

transparens, 133 

tulipiferum, 132 

Veitchianum, 130 

x Virginia, 191 

x Wardiano-aureum, 188 

, , x Wardiano - j aponicum , 

192 

xanthophlebium, 133 

Dendromecon rigidum, 363 
Dendroseris macrophylla, 251 
Dennstaedtia davalloides, var. Youngii, 

321 
Desfontainea spinosa, 15, 38, 46, 

396 

Deutzia discolor, 363 
globosa, 363 
gracilis, 364 
mollis, 364 
planiflora, 364 
reflexa, 364 
Wilsoni, 364 
Dialaelia Veitchii, 192, 478 
Dianthera ciliata, 252 
Dicentra chrysantha, 419 
macrantha, 419 
Dicksonia bertroana, 58, 321 

davalloides, var. Youngii, 

321 

pubescens, 73 
Didymocarpus crinita, 252 
lacunosa, 252 

malayanus, 252 

Bexii, 503 

Dieffenbachia Bowmanni, 53, 252 
,, braziliensis, 253 

,, Jenmani, 253 

Pearcei, 253 

picta, 253 

Wallisii, 64 

Dielytra chrysantha, 419 
Diervilla sessilifolia, 365 
Dipelta floribunda, 365 
Dipladenia acuminata, 253 
,, atropurpurea, 253 
boliviensis, 253 
magnifica, 253 



Dipladenia splendens, 10, 15, 254 

urophylla, 254 
Dipteracanthus spectabilis, 254 
Dipteronia sinensis, 365 
Disa X Diores, 192, 478 
x Langleyense, 192 
X Luna, 192 
x Veitcbii, 192, 477 
Dombeya chilensis, 337 
Doodia aspera, var. multifida, 321 
,, duriuscula, 321 
,, media, var. duriuscula, 321 
Dracaenia albicans, 254 
albo-virens, 254 
,, amabilis, 254 
,, Balmoreana, 255 
Baptisti, 255 

Chelsoni, 20, 255 
elegantissima, 255 
Guilfoylei, 255 
Hendersoni, 255 
hybrida, 256 
imperialis, 256 
X intermedia, 256 
Jamesii, 256 
Levangeri, 256 
Macarthuri, 256 
Macleayi, 20, 256 
magnifica, 20, 257 
Mooreana, 20, 257 
nigro-rubra, 257 
porphyrophylla, 257 
Princess Margaret, 257 
regina, 20, 257 
roseo-picta, 258 
speciosa, 258 
X Taylori, 258 
Dracocephalum Ruyschiana, 81 

var. ja- 

ponicum, 
420 

Drosera capensis, 299 
Dryandra calopbylla, 258 

BCHEVERIA x glauco-metallica, 104, 

258 

Echinocystis lobata, 420 
Echites atropurpurea, 253 
,, hirsuta, 272 
,, splendens, 254 
Elaeagnus macrophylla, 396 
Eleutherococcus Henryi, 365 

,, leucorrhizus, 365 



527 



INDEX 



Embothrium coccineum, 38, 46, 57, 

396 

Enkianthus campanulatus, 397 
Epicattleya guatemalensis, 193 
,, matutina, 193 
,, Mrs. James O'Brien, 193, 

478 

,, radiato-Bowringiana, 478 
,, radio-Bowringiana, 193 
Epidendrum bicameratum, 133 
,, x Clarissa, 193 

x ,, var. superba, 

193 

cnemidophorum, 133 
,, criniferum, 133 
,, x elegantulum, 193 

x var. aureum, 

194 

,, x ,, var. leuco- 
chilum, 194 
Endresii, 61 
,, x Endresio-Wallisii,194, 

477 

,, Karwinskyi, 133 
x Langleyense, 194 
,, Lindleyanum, var. Cen- 

teras, 134 
x O'Brienianum, 194, 

477, 478 

,, physodes, 134 
,, pseudepidendrum, 134 
,, x radico-Stamfordiamim, 

195 

x vitellinum, 194 
,, syringothyrsis, 134 
,, thrombodes, 134 
WaUisii, 64, 135 
x Wallisio-ciliare, 195 
EpilaBlia Eros, 104 

,, radico-purpurata, 104, 195 
Epiphronitis Veitchii, 195, 477 
Episcia Erythropus, 258 
Eranthemum aspersum, 259 
borneense, 259 
Cooperi, 259 
laxiflorum, 259 
sanguinolenta, 267 
sanguinolentum, 259 
tuberculatum, 259 
Eria Curtisii, 135 

,, ignea, 135 

Erythrina indica, var. marmorata, 260 
Escallonia x Langleyensis, 104, 397 



Escallonia macrantha, 38, 397 

,, ,, var.sanguinea, 

104 

,, montana, 398 
,, organensis, 398 
philippiana, 104, 398 
,, pterocladon, 398 
Eschscholtzia caespitosa, 420 
tenuifoUa, 420 

Esmeralda Cathcartii, 113 
Eucomis bicolor, 444 
Eucryphia cordifolia, 398 

,, pinnatifolia, 46, 399 
Eugenia Cheken, 403 
Luma, 403 
Ugni, 403 
Euonymus radicans, var. foliis varie- 

gatis, 399 
Euphorbia pulcherrima, var. plenis- 

sima, 260 

Euptelia Davidiana, 366 
Eurya latifolia, var. variegata, 395 
Eurybia dentata, 404 
Eurycles australasica, 445 

,, sylvestris, 445 
Eurygania ovata, 260 
Evodia rutaecarpa, 366 
Exochorda grandiflora, 82 

FAGUS antarctica, 46 
,, betuloides, 46 
,, obliqua, 399 
Farfugium Kcempferi, var. argentea, 

289 

Fenzlia dianthiflora, 421 
Ficus Parcelli, 260 
Fitzroya patagonica, 38, 46, 340 
Fraxinus bracteata, 366 

Mariesii, 366 
Fremontia calif ornica, 367 
Fritillaria Thunbergii, 445 

, , verticillata, var. Thunbergii, 

445 
Fuchsia dependens, 260 

x Dominiana, 100, 261 
macrantha, 261 
serratifolia, 261 
simplicicaulis, 261 
spectabilis, 262 

GALEANDEA barbata, 135 
Gardenia florida, var. radicans foliis 
variegata, 262 



528 



INDEX 



Gardenia Kalbreyeri, 70 

,, radicans, var. foliis varie- 

gata, 262 

Gastrochilus Curtisii, 86 
Gaultheria ciliaris, 404 

ferruginea, 400 
Genetbyllis fimbriata, 251 
Gentiana detonsa, var. barbata, 420 
Geranium platyanthum, 421 
Gerardia lanceolata, 421 
Gesnera Donklarii, 262 
polyantha, 262 
Gilia californica, 421 
dianthoides, 421 
lutea, 421 

Globba albo-sanguinea, 262 
atrosanguinea, 262 
coccinea, 262 
Gloxinera Brilliant, 263 
Gloxinia hypocyrtiflorum, 268 

,, speciosa, var. macrophylla 

variegata, 263 
speciosa, var. macrophylla 

variegata, 289 
Gomphrena pulchella, 422 
Goodyera X Dominii, 473 
macrantha, 135 

x Veitchii, 196, 473 
Gooseberry, Golden Gem, 105, 511 
Langley Beauty, 105, 511 

,, Gage, 105, 511 

Gravesia guttata, 263 
Gymnogramme flexuosa, 321 
japonica, 322 

Pearcei, 322 
var. robusta, 

322 
schizophylla, 

322 

Veitchii, 322 
vellea, 73 

Gymnostachys Pearcei, 47 

HABRANTHUS pratensis, var. quadri- 

flora, 446 

Haemanthus cinnabarinus, 445 
hirsutus, 445 

,, Kalbreyeri, 445 

Hamamelis arborea, 367 
japonica, 367 

mollis, 367 

Haplopapus spinulosus, 400 
Hebecladus biflorus, 263 



Hedyscepe canterburyana, 264 
Heliamphora nutans, 87, 299 
Heliconia aureo-striata, 264 
Heloniopsis japonica, 422 
Hemerocallis aurantiaca majus, 104 
,, disticha, 446 

,, fulva, var. flore pleno, 

446 

x luteola, 104 

Thunbergii, 104 

Hemiboaa Henryi, 422 
Hemichaena fruticosa, 264 
Hetrotrichum macrodon, 264 
Hexacentris lutea, 292 

mysorensis, 292 
var. Zfea,292 

Hibiscus Cooperi, 264 

,, rosa-sinensis, var. Cooperi, 

264 
var. schizope- 

talus, 264 

,, schizopetalus, 264 
Hindsia longiflora, 265 

violacea, 10, 265 
Hippeastrum Acramanni, 467 

,, var. pulcher- 

rima, 467 

ambiguum, var. longi- 

flora, 467 
aulicum, 467 

Brilliant, 103, 468 
Chelsoni, 103, 468 
Empress of India, 467 

equestre, 465, 466 

Johnsoni, 467 

Leopoldii, 47, 446, 468 
,, maculata, 103, 468 

pardinum, 47, 446, 466, 

468 

,, platypetalum, 467 

,, pratense, var. quadri- 

flora, 446 

psittacinum, 466 

pulverulentum, 466 

reginse, 465, 466 

-vittatum, 467 

,, regio- vittatum, 467 

reticulatum, 465, 466 

var. striati- 

folium, 
466 

solandraeflorum, 467 

vittatum, 465, 466 



529 



INDEX 



Homoianthus viscosus, 428 
Houlettia Brocklehurstiana, 136 
Hoya bella, 265 

campamilata, 280 
cinnamomifolia, 265 
coriacea, 265 
coronaria, 266 
fraterna, 266 
linearis, 266 
purpureo-fusca, 266 
Hydrangea Hortensia, var. Mariesii, 

368 

var. rosea, 368 

longipes, 368 
rosea, 83 

Hymenanthera crassifolia, 400 
Hypericum Hookerianum, 400 
oblongifolium, 400 
Hypocyrta brevicalyx, 268 
pulchra, 266 
strigillosa, 266 
Hypoestes aristata, 267 

sanguinolenta, 267 

ILEX Pernyi, 400 
Impatiens Jerdonias, 267 
mirabilis, 267 
Incarvillea variabilis, var. latifolia, 

422 

Iris Kaempferi, 83 
Isoloma hypocyrtiflorum, 268 
Ixora acuminata, 268 
Burbidgei, 268 
Du/ei, 269 
floribunda, 268 
fulgens, 268 
Lobbii, 268 
macrothyrsa, 269 
salicifolia, 268 

var. variegata, 269 
x Westii, 269 

JACOBINIA ciliata, 252 
Jasminum gracillimum, 78, 269 

primulinum, 93, 401 
Juniperus californica, 39, 340 

chinensis, var. albo-varie- 
gata, 340 

,, var. aurea, 50, 

340 

occidentalis, 340 

pyriformis, 340 

,, rigida, 340 



vittata, 270 
Kentia canterbury ana, 264 

Macarthurii, 283 
Keteleeria Davidiana, 341 
Fortune!, 341 

L^iLiA x Amesiana, 198 

anceps, var. Veitchiana, 136 
X Batemanniana, 215, 476 
X bella, 198 
X callistoglossa, 198 
X caloglossa, 199, 474 
X Canhamiana, 199 
X Clio, 196 

X Digbyano-purpurata, 196 
X var. King 

Edward 
VII., 196 

X Dominiana, 201, 474 
X Edissa, 196 
X Euterpe, 196 
x flammea, 197, 474 
X flavina, 197 
X Latona, 197, 477 
X Mrs. M. Gratrix, 197 
X Novelty, 204 
X Omen, 197 
X Philbrickiana, 205 
X Pilcheriana, 197, 473 
X triophthalma, 207 
X Veitchiana, 208, 474 
X Victoria, 208 
Laeliocattleya Amesiana, 198 
Ascania, 198 
Aurora, 198 
bella, 198 

callistoglossa, 198, 475 
var. ig- 
nescens, 
198, 478 
caloglossa, 199 
Canhamiana, 199, 476 
var. superba, 

478 

Cassandra, 199 
Cassiope, 199 
Clio, 478 
Clonia, 199 

var. superba, 

199 

Cornelia, 200 
Coronis, 200 
Cybele, 200 



530 



INDEX 



Laeliocattleya Decia, 200 

var. alba, 200 

Digbyano-Mendelii, 

Veitchs' var., 200 
Digbyano-Mossiae, 200, 

477 

Digbyano-Trianae, 201 

Dominiana, 201, 474 

var. Langley- 

ensis, 201, 
478 
Epicasta, 201 

Eudora, 201 
var. splendens, 

478 

Eumoea, 201 
Eunomia, 202 

,, Euphrosyne, 202 

,, eximia, 202 

,, exoniensis, 202 

Fausta, 202, 474 
Felix, 202 
Hippolyta, 203 
Illione, 203 
Isis, 203 

,, King of Spain, 203 

Lacusta, 203 

Lady Kothschild, 203, 

478 

leucoglossa, 203 

var. bella, 

204 

Lucilia, 204 
Mardelli, 204 
Mona, 204 

Myra, 204 
Novelty, 204 
Nysa, 204 

,, var. picta, 205 
var. purpurea, 

205 

var. superba, 205 
Ophir, 205 
Orpheus, 205 
Pallas, 205 

,, var. superba, 205 
Parysatis, 205 
Philbrickiana, 205 
Pisandra, 206 
Proserpine, 206 
Queen Alexandra, 206 
Eemula, 206 
Eosalind, 206 



Laeliocattleya Sedenii, 206, 475 
Semiramis, 206 
Statteriana, 207 
Stella, 207 
Timorae, 207 
Tiresias, 207 
triophthalma, 207 
Tydea, 207 
Vacuna, 208 
Veitchiana, 208 
Victoria, 208 
Violetta, 208 
Wellsiana, var. Lang- 

leyensis, 478 
Zenobia, 208, 476 
Zephyra, 208 
Lapageria alba, 15, 45, 456 
alba, 270 

rosea, 15, 38, 45, 270 
var. albiflora, 270 

Lardizabala biternata, 401 
Larix Ksempferi, 82 

leptolepsis, 50, 341 
Lastrea aristata, var. variegata, 315 
Hopeana, 324 
Maximowiczii, 324 
opaca, 325 

Richardsii, var. multifida, 325 
Latua venenosa, 271 
Leea amabilis, 86, 271 
Leptodactylon californicum, 421 
Leptolsslia Veitchii, 104, 209, 478 
Leptopteris superba, 331 
Leptosiphon luteus, 421 
Leschenaultia biloba, 271 
Lettuce, Self -folding Chelsea Imperial, 

514 

Veitchs' Golden Queen, 514 
Perfect Gem, 514 

Selected Brown, 514 

Superb White Cos, 

514 
Leucothoe Davisise, 401 

Lobbii, 401 

Lhotskya ericoides, 271 
Libocedrus macrolepis, 341 

tetragona, 38, 45, 46, 341 
Licuala Veitchii, 272 
Liebigia speciosa, 241 
Ligularia Ecempferi, var. argentea, 289 
Ligustrum Henryi, 402 
Lilium auratum, 15, 19, 50, 447 
gloriosoides, 83 



531 



INDEX 



Lilium auratum, var. platyphyllum, 

83, 448 

var. tricolor, 448 

cordifolium, 448 
Duchartrei, 448 
giganteum, 448 
lancifolium, var. formosanum, 

82 

Leichtlinii, 449 
,, longiflorum, var. formosanum, 

449 

myriophyllum, 449 
neilgerricum, 449 
,, neilgherrense, 449 
philippinense, 450 
speciosum, var. gloriosoides, 

450 

sutchuenense, 450 
Thunbergianum, 81 
Wallichianum, 449 
Limatodes labrosa, 114 

,, rosea, 115 
Limodorum callosum, 147 
Lindera Tzumu, 368 
Lindsaya crispa, 77 

jasminoides, 78 
retusa, 322 
Linum Chamissonis, 422 

Macraei, 422 
Liparis formosana, 136 
Liriodendron chinense, 368 
,, tulipiferum, 82 

Lisianthus magnificus, 47 
Litobrochia nobilis, 329 
Loasa picta, 423 
Lobbia dependens, 44 
Lobelia heterophylla, 423 
littoralis, 429 
tenuior, 423 
Lomaria bipinnatifida, 68 
blechnoides, 323 
ciliata, 323 
crenulata, 323 
,, discolor, 68 
var. bipinnatifida, 

323 

Germainii, 323 
gibba, var. Belli, 323 
crispa, 324 

Lechleri, 324 
Lomatia ferruginea, 272 
Lonicera gynochlamydaea, 369 
Krehneana, 369 



Lonicera pileata, 402 

tragophylla, 369 
Loropetalum chinense, 82, 370 
Lycaste lasioglossa, 136 
,, linguella, 136 
Locusta, 136 
,, Skinneri, var. superba, 137 
Lycioplesium pubiflorum, 271 
Lygodium polystachyum, 324 
Lysimachia crispidens, 423 
Henryi, 423 

stenosepala, 423 

MACLEANIA punctata, 272 
Magnolia Delavayi, 402 
,, Halleana, 370 
salicifolia, 370 
soulangeana, var. nigra, 370 
stellata, 370 
Mandevilla hispida, 272 
Manettia bicolor, 272 
luteo-rubra, 272 
micans, 273 
Maranta arwidinacea, var. variegata, 

280 

ornata, 235 
striata, 273 
tubispatJia, 235 
Veitchiana, 236 
Veitchii, 15, 47 
Wallisii, 64 
Marattia Burkei, 324 
Marianthus Drummondianus, 273 
Masdevallia x Ajax, 209 

x Alceste, 209 
,, x Asmodia, 209 

,, attenuata, 137 

Barlaeana, 137 

brevis, 152 

x caudata-Estradae, 209 

X Chelsoni, 209, 475 
x yar. splen- 

dens, 209 
coccinea, var. Harryana, 

60, 137 

Davisii, 66, 137 
x Ellisiana, 210 

x Gairiana, 210, 476 
,, gargantua, 138 

,, gibberosa, 153 

,, x glaphyrantha, 210, 476 

gracilenta, 120 

Harryana, 137 



532 



INDEX 



Masdevallia x Imogene, 210, 478 
inocharis, 138 
lata, 138 
Lindenii, var. Harryana, 

137 

macrodactyla, 138 
Normani, 139 
X Parlatoreana, 210 
Peristeria, 138 
polysticta, 139 
radiosa, 139 
Keichenbachiana, 139 
simula, 139 
X splendida, 210, 477 
X var. Parla- 

toreana, 
210 

triaristella, 139 

Veitchiana, 15, 65, 140 

Wallisii, 64 
Masonia punctata, 141 
Maxillaria ctenostachya, 140 
Meconopsis Henrici, 423 

integrifolia, 95, 424 

punicea, 95, 424 
Medinilla bracteata, 274 
Cumingii, 273 

Curtisii, 86, 273 
magnifica, 15, 274 
,, speciosa, 273 
Meliosma myriantha, 371 
Miconia Hookeriana, 274 
pulveruknta, 274 
Microlepia hirta cristata, 68 

,, hirta, var. cris tata, 319 
,, strigosa, 320 
Miltonia X Bleuana, 211 

X ,, var. splendens, 

104 

Endresii, 56, 57, 61, 140 
vexillaria, 60, 72, 140 
Mimulus cupreus, 425 

luteus, var. alpinus, 425 
radicans, 425 
variegatus, 425 
Mitraria coccinea, 274 
Monardella macrantha, 425 
Monopyle racemosa, 274 
Mormodes fractiflexum, 141 
Ocanae, 141 
Skinneri, 141 

Wendlandii, 141 
Musa Basjoo, 275 



Musa japonica, 275 
Mutisia decurrens, 47, 275 
Myrmecodia Beccarii, 275 
Myrtus Cheken, 403 

,, Luma, 403 

Ugni, 403 

NAECISSUS Tazetta, var. orientalis 

flore pleno, 451 
Negundo nikoense, 354 
Neillia sinensis, 371 
Nepenthes albo-marginata, 299, 483, 

486 
ampullaria, 42, 483 

angustifolia, 299, 485 

X Balfouriana, 108, 304, 

488 
bicalcarata, 76, 78, 300, 

484 

Burkei, 300, 486 
var. excellens, 300, 

486 

,, prolifica, 300 

X Chelsoni, 103, 304, 487 
x var. excellens, 

108, 304 
cincta, 301, 486 
X Courtii, 102, 305, 487 
Curtisii, 86, 301, 486 
var. superba, 301, 

486 

X cylindrica, 108, 305, 488 
X Dicksoniana, 305, 488 

,, distillatoria, 483, 488 

X Dominii, 100, 305, 487 
Dyak, 485 
Edwardsiana, 76, 483 

X F. W. Moore, 108, 305, 

489 

,, glabrescens, 484, 488 

,, gracilis, 483 

var. major, 301 

hirsuta, 484 
Hookeriana, 483 

X hybrida, 100, 487 
,, x ,, maculata, 487 
X maculata, 306 

X intermedia, 102, 305 

487 

Kennedyana, 301, 484 

Khasiana, 483, 489 
laevis, 302, 483 
lanata, 302, 484 
533 M m 



INDEX 



Nepenthes Lowii, 483 

x maculata, 306 

madagascariensis, 85, 302, 

483, 484 
X Mastersiana, 102, 306, 

487 

X mixta, 108, 306, 488 
,, X ,, var. sanguinea, 

306, 488 

X Morganiae, 487 
Northiana, 85, 303, 484, 

485 

Pervillei, 486 
phyllamphora, 483 

X picturata, 108, 306, 489 
Kafflesiana, 42, 483 
var. nivea, 78 

Rajah, 75, 78, 303, 483, 

484 

X Eatcliffiana, 306, 487 
,, X rubro - maculata, 306, 

487 

X rufescens, 102, 307, 488 
sanguinea, 42, 303, 483 
X Sedenii, 103, 307, 487 
X Sir William T. Thisel- 
ton-Dyer, 108, 307, 
489 

stenophylla, 303, 486 
X Stewartii, 487 

X Tiveyi, 108, 307, 488 
Veitchii, 42, 304, 483 
ventricosa, 486 

Viellardii, 484 
villosa, 483 

X Wrigleyana, 307, 487 
,, zeylanica, 484 
,, var. rubra, 484 

Nepeta incana, 392 
Wilsoni, 425 

Nephrodium antioquoianum, 73 
Hopeanum, 324 
longicaule, 73 
Maximowiczii, 324 
nudum, 78 
opacum, 325 
Richardsii, var. multifi- 

dum, 325 

,, valdepilosum, 73 

Nephrolepis davalloides, var. furcans, 

325 

Duffii, 325 
exaltata, 326 



Nephrolepis Pluma, 325 

,, rufescens, var. tripinna- 

tifida, 326 

Nierembergia rivularis, 47, 425 
Veitchii, 47, 426 
Nolana lanceolata, 426 
Nothochlgsna mollis, 326 
Notospartium Carmichaelise, 68, 403 
Notylia albida, 142 
Nyssa sinensis, 371 

ODONTOGLOSSUM baphicanthum, 142 

blandum, 71, 142 
,, brachypterum, 142 

,, citrosmum, 55 

Coradinei, 143 

,, coronarium, 71 

var. Day- 
anum, 142 

crispum, 88 

,, ,, var. Ches- 

tertonii, 
60 

,, ,, var. Ches- 

tertonii, 
143 

crocidipterum, 71 

,, deltoglossum, 143 

,, Denisonae, var. 

Chestertonii, 143 
,, X excellens, 104, 

211, 477 

,, hastilabium, 71 

,, Krameri, 55, 143 

,, Leeanum, 143 

,, Lindleyammi, var. 

Coradinei, 143 
(Erstedii, 144 

,, odoratum, var. ba- 

phicanthum, 

142 

,, ,, var. deltoglos- 

sum, 143 
,, ,, vox. Leeanum, 

143 

,, Pescatorei, 70 

,, ,, var. Veitchi- 

anum, 71, 
144 

,, praenitens, 144 

ramosissimum, 72 

,, retusum, 144 

,, sceptrum, 72 



534 



Odontoglossum tripudians, 71 
triumphans, 71 
Uroskinneri, 144 
vexillarium, 140 
Warscewiczii, 56, 57 
Warsceiviczii, 140 

CEnothera bistorta, var. Veitchiana, 
426 

OLEA ilicifolta, 404 
Olearia dentata, 404 
Haastii, 404 
macrodonta, 404 
Omphalodes Krameri, 426 
Oncidium anthocrene, 145 

bryolophotum, 145 
chrysodipterum, 145 
cur turn, 145 
euxanthinum, 145 
glossomystax, 145 
metallicum, 146 
praetextum, 146 
superbiens, 146 
tectum, 146 
Warscewiczii, 146 
Onion, Veitchs' Main Crop, 514 

,, Selected Globe, 514 

Oplismenus Burmannii, var. varie- 

gata, 275 

Orthosiphon stamineus, 276 
Osbeckia rubicunda, 276 
Osmanthus aquifolium, var. ilicifolia, 

404 
Osmunda japonica, var. corymbifera, 

83 
,, japonica, var. corymbifera, 

326 

javanica, 326 
regalis, var. corymbifera, 

326 

Ostrowskya magnifica, 426 
Ourisia coccinea, 46, 426 
Pearcei, 46, 427 
Ouvirandra fenestralis, 276 
Oxalis elegans, 427 
valdiviensis, 427 

PACHYSTOMA Thomsoniana, 70, 147 
Paeonia obovata, 427 
Palava dissecta, 427 

,, flexuosa, 47 

,, flexiiosa, 427 
Palicourea discolor, 276, 283 



Palicourea nicotianaefolia, 276 
,, nicotiancefolia, 283 
Palisota bicolor, 277 
Panax fruticosum, var. laciniatnm, 277 

,, laciniatus, 277 
Pandanus Baptisti, 277 
,, pacificus, 277 

Veitchii, 20, 50, 277 
Panicum variegatum, 275 
Passiflora Actinia, 277 
bilobata, 278 
,, organensis, var. tnarmorata, 

278 

Paullinia thalictrifolia, 53, 278 
Pea, Chelsea Gem, 513 
,, Veitchs' Autocrat, 513 
,, Criterion, 513 
,, ,, Maincrop, 513 
,, Prestige, 514 
Pellaaa bella, 326 

,, brachyptera, 327 
,, glauca, 327 
Pentapterygium rugosum, 278 
Pentstemon Jaffrayanus, 428 
Perezia viscosa, 428 
Periphragmos dependens, 238 
flexuosa, 239 

uniflorus ?, 238 
Pernettya ciliaris, 404 
Pertya sinensis, 371 
Pescatorea Dayana, var. rhodacea, 158 

,, lamellosa, 158 

Phacelia Whitlavia, 428 
Phaiocalanthe insperata, 211 

irrorata, 100, 211, 474 
,, var. purpurea, 

211 

,, var. rosea, 212 

Niobe, 478 
Sedeniana, 212, 476 
var. albi- 

flora, 212 

Phaius x amabilis, 104, 212 
,, Bensonce, 154 
,, Bernaysii, 147 
Blumei, var. Bernaysii, 147 
,, callosus, 147 

grandifolius, var. Blumei Ber- 
naysii, 147 
x inquilinus, 474 
,, x irroratus, 211, 474 
x maculate -grandifolius, 104, 
212 



535 



INDEX 



Phaius philippinensis, 147 

x Sedenianus, 212 

Phalaenopsis amabilis, 148 

X Ariadne, 212, 478 
X Artemis, 213, 477 
X Cassandra, 213, 478 

,, Corningiana, 148 

X F. L. Ames, 213 
,, grandiflora, 15 

grandiflora, 78, 148 

X Harriettiae, 213, 476 
X Hebe, 213 
,, x Hermione, 213 

,, intermedia, 43, 148 

x ,, var. Vesta, 214 

. x John Seden, 214, 477 

X Leda, 214, 477 
Lobbii, 148 

,, x Luedde-violacea, 214, 

478 
maculata, 148 

Mariae, 76, 78, 149 
x Mrs. James H.Veitch, 

214, 478 

,, rosea, 149 
x Eothschildiana, 214, 

476 
,, x Stuartiano-Manni,215, 

478 

sumatrana, var. pauci- 

vittata, 149 

var. san- 

guinea, 149 

,, X Veitchiana, 149 

violacea, 86, 149 

Philageria Veitchii, 278, 476 
Philesia buxifolia, 38, 46, 404 
Philodendron Andreanum, 279 
Phlomis umbrosa, var. australis, 428 
Phormium tenax, var. variegatum, 279 

Veitchii, 279 

Phragmopedilum x cardinale, 173 
Phrynium variegatum, 280 
Phygelius capensis, 428 
Phyllanthus roseo-pictus, 280 
Physalis Francheti, 91, 429 
Physostelma Wallichii, 280 
Picea ajanensis, 50, 342 
Alcockiana, 50, 342 
concolor, 335 
grandis, 336 
polita, 50, 342 
Veitchii, 337 



Pinanga Veitchii, 78, 280 
Pinus Armandi, 343 
Coulteri, 39, 343 
,, densiflora, 50, 343 
,, koraiensis, 90, 343 
,, Lambertiana, 39 
,, macrocarpa, 343 
,, massoniana, 344 
,, monticola, 39 
,, muricata, 39 
,, parviflora, 50, 344 
,, pentaphylla, 344 
,, ponderosa, 39 
,, radiata, 39 
Sabiniana, 39 
sinensis, 82 
,, Thunbergii, 50, 344 
,, tuberculata, 39 
Piper borneense, 280 
ornatum, 281 
porphyrophyllum, 281 
Piptospatha insignis, 281 
Planera acuminata, 386 
Platycerium alcicorne, var. Hillii, 327 
var.majus,327 

var. Veitchii, 

327 
Platycodon grandiflorum, var. 

Mariesii, 81, 83, 90, 429 
Platyloma helium, 326 

,, brachypterum, 327 
Pleopeltis albido-squamata, 327 
,, elegans, 15 
,, fossa, 328 
Pleroma elegans, 292 
Gayanum, 292 
strigosum, 293 
Pleurothallis glossopogon, 150 
Pleurothallus insignis, 150 
Plumbago rosea, var. coccinea, 281 
Podalasia stipitata, 282 
Podocarpus andina, 345 

, , macrophyllus , var. argen - 

teo-varie- 
gatus,344 

var. aureo- 

variega- 
tus, 344 

nubigena, 38, 46, 345 
Poeppigia cyanocarpa, 405 
Poinsettia pulcherrima, var. plenis- 

sima, 260 
Polybotrya Lechleriana, 311 



536 



INDEX 



Polycynis gratiosa, 150 
Polypodium albo-squamatum, 327 
,, antioquoianum, 73 

Burbidgei, 78 
,, fossum, 328 

,, holophyllum, 78 

,, Krameri, 328 

Leysii, 78 
minimum, 78 

,, neriifolium, var. crista- 

tum, 328 

,, oxyodon, 78 

,, Schneiderianum, 328 

,, stenopteris, 78 

,, strep tophyllum, 78 

,, sylviculum, 73 
,, taxodioides, 78 
Polystichum flexum, 315 
,, setosum, 316 

,, tripteron, 316 

,, tsits-simense, 315 

Populus lasiocarpa, 372 
Potato, Veitchs' Chiswick Favourite, 

513 
,, Improved Ashleaf 

Kidney, 513 
Pothos argyreus, 288 

,, celatocaulis, 78, 282 
Pratia angulata, 429 
Primula Cockburniana, 429 
,, cortusoides, 50 
,, ,, var. amcena, 19, 

430 
,, ,, var. grandiflora, 

430 

,, var. stricta, 430 

deflexa, 430 
,, denticulata, 430 
japonica, 50 
,, var. pulverulenta, 

431 
,, nivalis, var. farinosa, 431 

obconica, 82, 83, 282 
,, ovalifolia, 431 
poculiformis, 282 
pulverulenta, 431 
,, pycnoloba, 431 
,, tangutica, 431 

Veitchii, 432 
violodora, 432 
vittata, 95, 432 
Wilsoni, 433 
Pritchardia grandis, 272 



Proustia pyriformis, 282 
Prumnopitys elegans, 46., 345 
Prunus pseudo-cerasus, var. James 

H. Veitch, 372 
Pseudotsuga Davidiana, 341 
Psychotria tabacifolia, 283 
Pteris argyrcea, 329 

longifolia, var. Mariesii, 328 

ludens, 329 

palmata, 329 

quadriaurita, var. argyraea, 329 

serrulata, var. cristata, 329 

Treacheariana, 78 
Ptychosperma Macarthurii, 283 
Pyrus Delavayi, 372 

QUEECUS acuta, 405 
,, Buergeri, 405 
,, glabra, var. latifolia, 405 

EANUNCULUS Lyallii, 68, 433 
Baphiolepis japonica, 405 

,, v&r.integerrima, 

405 

,, ovata, 405 
Easpberry Blackberry, The Mahdi, 

105, 511 

,, Golden Queen, 511 
,, November Abundance, 

105, 511 
,, Queen of England, 105, 

511 
Yellow Superlative, 105, 

511 

Behmannia angulata, 283 
Eenanthera Loiuii, 113 

,, matutina, 150 
Eestrepia elegans, 150 
Reimispor&filicoides, 339 

lycopodioides, 339 
nobleana, 339 
obtusa, 339 
pisifera, 339 
squarrosa, 339 
Ehaphithamnus cyanocarpus, 405 
Ehododendron auriculatum, 406 

X balsaminaeflorum, 

496 
X ,, var. album, 

496 

X ,, var. aureum, 

496 



537 



INDEX 



Ehododendron x balsaminaeflorum, 
var. carneum, 

497 
X 



j var. Eajah, 

497 
X ,, var. roseum, 

496 

Brookeanum, 42, 283 
,, var. flavum, 

283 
,, var. gracilis, 

284 

calendulaceum, 373 
calif ornicum, 406 
Curtisii, 286 
dilatatum, 373 
X Early Gem, 406 
Fortune!, 82 
indicum, var. bal- 
saminaeflorum, 
80 
,, var. obtusum, 

406 

jasminiflorum, 15, 42, 
284, 493 

X ,, carmina- 

tum, 497 
javanico- 

jasminiflorum 

Aphrodite, 497 
,, Aurora, 496 
Brilliant, 497 
,, Ceres, 497 
X Cloth of Gold, 

500 

,, Crown Prince 
of Germany, 
496 

X ,, Duchess of 
Connaught, 
496 

x ,, Duchess of 
Edinburgh, 
495 

X ,, Excelsior, 496 
X ,, Exquisite, 497 
X ,, Favourite, 496 
X ,, King Edward 

VII., 500 
,, Lord Wolseley 

496 

,, luteo - roseum, 
497 

538 



Ehododendron 



javanico- 

jasminiflorum 
Maiden's 

Blush, 496 
Militaire, 497 
Minerva, 497 
Monarch, 496 
Ophelia, 497 
President, 497 
Primrose, 497 
X , Prince Leo- 
pold, 496 

,, Princess Bea- 
trice, 497 

,, Princess Chris- 
tian, 497 

Princess Fred- 
erica, 496 
X PrincessEoyal, 

495 
X ,, Queen Victoria, 

496 

X ,, Souvenir de J. 
H. Mangles, 
497 
X ,, Taylorii, 495 

The Queen, 500 

javanicum, 42, 284, 493 

,, var. auran- 

tiacum, 

284 

var. flavum, 

285 
,, var.gracile, 

493 

var. tubi- 
flora,285 
Lobbii, 42, 285 
malayanum, 285, 494 
X Manglesii, 407 
micranthum, 407 
moulmeinense, 285 
multicolor, 86,285,494, 

497 

,, var. Curtisii, 

86,286,494 

,, Hippolyta, 

498 

,, Latona, 498 
Little 

Beauty, 498 
,, Mrs. Heal, 
497 



INDEX 



Khododendron multicolor, Neptune, 

498 
,, EosyMorn, 

498 

Euby, 498 
obtuswn, 406 
occidentale, 407 
Oldhamii, 286 
X Princess Alice, 286 
racemosum, 407 
Schlippenbachii, 91, 

408 

Teysmanni, 86, 494 
Veitchianum, 286 
Eibes glaciale, 373 
Lobbii, 373 
subvestitnm, 373 
Eichardia hastata, 433 
Eodgersia pinnata, var. alba, 433 

,, podophylla, 434 
Eodriguezia leochilina, 151 
Eondeletia longiflora, 265 
Eosa sericea, var. pteracantha, 373 

,, sorbiflora, 374 
Eose Electra, 104 
Myra, 105 

Queen Alexandra, 104, 374 
Eubus japonicus, var. tricolor, 408 
bambusarum, 374 
biflorus, 374 
chroosepalus, 375 
conduplicata, 375 
coreanus, 375 
flagelliflorus, 375 
hypargyrus, 375 
ichangensis, 376 
iunominatus, 376 
irenaeus, 376 

Lambertianus, var. glaber, 376 
lasiostylus, 377 
leucocarpus, 377 
leucodermis, 374 
niveus, 377 
palmatus, 377 
Parkeri, 377 
Playfairii, 378 
Wilsoni, 378 
Euellia Pearcei, 287 



SACCOLABIUM bigibbum, 151 
,, giganteum, 151 

Huttoni, 54, 151 



Saccolabium miniatum, 151 
Salvia oppositiflora, 287 

Souliei, 434 
Sanchezia longiflora, 287 
nobilis, 47, 287 

,, var. variegata, 287 

Sapindus Mukorossi, 378 
Sarcanthus chrysomelas, 152 

,, flexus, 152 
Sarcochilus luniferus, 152 
Sarcococca pruniformis, 408 
Sarmienta repens, 287 
Sarracenia X Chelsoni, 102, 307 

X Courtii, 102, 307 
x formosa, 308 
,, x melanorhoda, 102, 308 

X Willisii, 308 

Saussaurea lamprocarpa, 434 
Saxegothaea conspicua, 38, 345 
Saxifraga cortusifolia, 434 
Scabiosa Bretschneideri, 435 
Scaphosepalum breve, 152 

,, gibberosum, 152 

Schismatoglottis crispata, 288 

,, Lavalleii, var. pur- 

purea, 288 

,, neoguineensis, 288 

,, variegata, 288 

Schizandra Henryi, 408 
Schizophragma hydrangeoides, 81 

,, integrifolia, 378 

Sciadopitys verticillata, 50, 51, 345 
Scindapsus Cuscuaria, 288 

,, pictus, 288 
Scolopendrium vulgare, var. scalari- 

forme, 329 

Scopolia sinensis, 435 
Scutellaria formosana, 288 
,, incarnata, 289 

Seakale, Lily White, 513 
Selaginella atroviridis, 330 
canaliculata, 330 
caulescens, 330 
cognata, 330 
grandis, 330 
Griffithii, 330 
Lobbii, 330 
longissima, 73 
Poulteri, 331 
Selenipedium x cardinale, 475 
Senecio clivorum, 94, 435 
,, Henryi, 436 
,, Ksempferi, var. argentea, 289 



539 



INDEX 



Senecio Ligularia, var. polycephalus, 

436 

,, ,, var. speciosa, 436 

mosoynensis, 435 
,, tanguticus, 436 
,, Veitchianus, 436 
Wilsonianus, 436 
Sequoia gigantea, 39, 346 
,, sempervirens, 39 
,, Welling tonia, 346 
Serratula atriplicifolia, 436 
Sida pceoniceflora, 221 

vitifolia, 351 
Sinningia concinna, 289 

,, speciosa, var. macrophylla 
variegata, 289 

Siphocampylus coccineus, 240 
Sobralia X roseo-macrantha, 215 

X Veitchii, 104, 215, 477 
Sonerila Bensoni, 289 
,, elegans, 290 
,, margaritacea, 290 
,, orbiculata, 290 
,, speciosa, 290 
,, stricta, 290 
Sophroeattleya Batemanniana, 215, 

477 

Calypso, 215, 477 
,, eximia, 216 

fata, 216 

,, Queen Empress, 216 

,, Saxa, 216 

Veitchii, 217 

Sophrolaelia laata, 216, 477 

Valda, 216 

Sophrolaeliocattleya Veitchii, 217 
Sorema lanceolata, 426 
Spathiphyllum Wallisii, 290 
Spathoglottis aurea, 153 

,, x aureo-Veillardii, 217, 

478 

Petri, 153 

Sphaerogyne latifolia, 293 
Spiraea Henryi, 379 
,, palmata alba, 83 
Veitchii, 379 
Wilsoni, 379 
Spraguea umbellata, 437 
Stanhopea gibbosa, 153 

,, xytriophora, 153 
Stauropsis gigantea, 153 
Stelis Briickmulleri, 154 
glossula, 154 



Stelis zonata, 154 
Stemonacanthus Pearcei, 287 
Stenia guttata, 154 
Stenogastra concinna, 289 
Stenospermation popayanense, 290 
Wallisii, 64 
Wallisii, 290 

Sfcephanolirion narcissoides, 451 
Stephenandra flexuosa, 379 
Stigmaphyllon heterophyllum , 290 
Stransvaesia undulata, 379 
Strawberry, Lord Kitchener, 105, 512 
,, President Loubet, 105, 

512 

The Alake, 105, 512 
The Khedive, 105, 512 
,, Veitchs' Perfection, 105, 

512 
,, Veitchs' Prolific, 105, 

512 
Streptocarpus achimeniflorus, 506 

,, ,, var. albus, 506 

var. giganteus, 

506 

,, var.roseus,506 

,, caulescens, 503 

,, Dunnii, 504 

X Dyeri, 504 
,, Faninii, 504 

,, floribundus, 503 

,, Galpini, 504 

,, Gardeni, 503 

,, gratus, 505 

,, x Greenii, 504 

,, X Kewensis, 505 

Kirkii, 504 
,, lutea, 504 

,, pallidus, 506 

,, parviflora, 504 

,, polyantha, 504 

Eexii, 503, 505 
,, ,, var. albus, 505 

,, ,, var. multiflorus 

505 

Saundersii, 503 
Sylph, 506 
Virgil, 506 
X Watsoni, 505 
Wendlandii, 503, 504, 

506 

Streptosolen Jamesoni, 291 
Stuartia grandiflora, 380 
,, monadelphia, 380 



540 



INDEX 



Stuartia Pseudo-Camellia, 380 
Stylidium saxifragoides, 291 
Styrax obassia, 80, 83, 380 
Swertia bimaculata, 437 

TACSONIA mollissima, 291 
Tecoma fulva, 291 
,, Guannne, 238 
mirabilis, 238 
Tetracentron sinense, 381 
Teucrium albo-rubrum, 437 

,, ornatum, 437 
Thalictrurn dipterocarpum, 437 
Thibaudia acuminata, 46, 291 
acuminata, 239 
,, macrantha, 224 
,, microphylla, 409 
Thrixspernium lumferum, 152 
Thuia dolabrata, 346 

,, ,, var. laetevirens, 346 

,, gigantea. 347 
,, Lobbii, 347 
tetragona, 341 
Thujopsis dolabrata, 51 
,, dolabrata, 346 
,, latevirens, 346 
Thunbergia lutea, 292 

,, mysorensis, 292 
,, natalensis, 292 
Thunia Bensonae, 154 

X Veitchiana, 104, 217, 476 
Thuya Lobbii, 15 
Tibouchina elegans, 292 
,, gayanum, 292 

,, ornata, 293 

Tilia Henryana, 381 
,, Miqueliana, 381 
,, ,, var. chinensis, 381 

Oliveri, 381 
Tuan, 382 

Tillandsia chrysostachys, 293 
,, Zahnii, 56 
Zahnii, 239 
Tococa latifolia, 293 
Todea Fraseri, var. Wilkesiana, 331 
,, grandipinnula, 331 
,, Moorei, 331 
,, superba, 331 
,, Wilkesiana, 331 
Tomato, Chiswick Peach, 514 
,, Frogmore Selected, 514 
,, Golden Jubilee, 514 
,, Hackwood Park, 514 



Tomato, Ham Green Favourite, 514 
Torreya californica, 347 
,, Myristica, 347 
Trichantha minor, 293 
Trichocentrum Pineli, 154 

,, purpureum, 154 

Trichoglottis cochlearis, 155 
Trichomanes Kalbreyeri, 73 

Pluma, 332 

Trichopilia coccinea, var. lepida, 155 
,, grata, 155 

,, lepida, 155 

,, marginata, var. lepida, 

155 
Tricuspidaria dependens, 58, 293 

hexapetala, 293 

Tncyrtis latifolia, 438 
Tiistigma narcissoides, 451 
Trochodendron aralioides, 409 
Tromsdorffia speciosa, 241 
Tropaeolum azureum, 15, 57 
azureum, 294 
crenatiflorum, 294 
Lobbianum, 438 
peltophorum, 438 
Smithii, 438 
speciosum, 15, 438 
tricolor, 57 
umbellatum, 294 
violaeflorum, 294 
Tsuga diversifolia, 50, 347 

UBCEOLINA aurea, 451 

,, pendula, 451, 456 
Utricularia Endresii, 61, 308 

VACCINIUM leucostomum, 409 
reflexum, 294 
,, rugosum, 278 
Valdivia gayana, 409 
Vanda Bensoni, 155 
Cathcartii, 113 
caerulea, 15, 42, 155 
caerulescens, 156 
Denisoniana, 156 
gigantea, 153 
Hookeriana, 156 
insignis, 15, 54, 156 

var. Schroderiana, 157 
Lowii, 113 
suavis, 15, 42, 157 
tricolor, 15, 42, 157 

,, var. suavis, 157 
541 N n 



INDEX 



Veitchia canterbury ana, 264 
,, japonica, 342 

Johannis, 20, 295 
Veronica Purple Queen, 104 
Verticordia nitens, 295 
Viburnum buddleifolium, 409 
ceanothoides, 382 
corylifolium, 382 
dilatatum, 382 
Mariesii, 382 
propinquum, 410 
rhytidophyllum, 410 
utile, 410 
Veitchii, 410 
"Viola pedunculata, 438 
Virgularia lanceolata, 421 
Vitis aconitifolia, 382 
armata, 383 

,, var. Veitchii, 383 
Coignetias, 91 
Delavayi, 383 
Endresii, 295 
flexuosa, var. chinensis, 383 

,, var. Wilsoni, 383 
Henryana, 384 
inconstans, 50, 384 
leeoides, 384 
megalophylla, 384 
obtecta, 385 
repens, 385 
sinensis, 385 
Thomsoni, 385 
tomentosa, 386 



WAHLENBEEGIA tuberosa, 439 
Washingtonia californica, 346 
Watsonia densiflora, 451 
Wellingtonia gigantea, 10, 15 

gigantea, 346 

Whitlavia grandiflora, 428 
Woodsia polystichoides, var. Veitchii, 

332 

Woodwardia orientalis, 332 
Wormia Burbidgei, 78, 295 

XEKONEMA Moorei, 296 

ZAMIA montana, 296 
,, obliqua, 296 
Wallisii, 296 
Zelkova acuminata, 386 

Keaki, 386 
Zephyranthes citrina, 452 

macrosiphon, 452 

Treatiae, 452 

Zingiber coloratum, 296 
Zygocolax leopardinus, 217 

Veitchii, 218, 476 
Zygopetalum Burkei, 87, 157 
Burtii, 158 
Dayanum, var. 158 
lamellosum, 158 
X leopardinum, 476 
X leopardinus, 217 
X leucochilum, 218, 477 
X pentachromum, 476 
X Sedenii, 218 



542 



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