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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENTS 



PRIKTBD BT ORDBB Of 



THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



DURIHO THB 



FIRST SESSION OF THE THIRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS, 

1857-'58. 



IN FOURTEElf VOLUMES. 



Volume 1 .:No. 1 to No. 10, except No 2. 

Volume 2 No. 2, parts 1, 2, and 3. 

Volume 3 No. 11 to No. 20, except Nos. 13 and 17. 

Volume 4 No. 13. 

Volume 5...... No. 17, quarto. 

Volume 6..... No. 21, quarto. 

Volume 7 No. 22 to No. 31. 

Volume 8 No. 32, parts 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

Volume 9 No. 33 to No. 70. 

Volume 10 No. 71 to No. 88. 

Volume 11 No. 89 to No. 96. 

Volume 12 No. 97 to No. 118. 

Volume 13 No. 119 to No. 140. 

Volume 14 Ck)mmeroe and Navigation. 



WASHINGTON 
JAMES B. 8TEEDMAN, PRINTER. 



EEDMAN, PRINTER. ^ T 

18 5 9. Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Digitized by 



Google 



INDEX 






---• 



THE EXECUTIVE DOCUMENTS 

OF THB 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES, 

• Of 

THE FIRST SESSION l^IRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. 



TlUe. 



Vol. 



Part 



Doc. 



Page. 



A. 

Accounts of the goverament for the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Letter of the Treasurer of the United States, transmitting a 
statement of the 

Adjutant Qeneral, for the service of the army during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1859. Estimates of the 

Adjutant Qeneral of the United States army during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1857. Report of the 

Adjutant General of the United States army, relative to the opera- 
tions of the army in the Territory of Kansas. Correspondence 
of the 

Adjutant General of the United Staler army, of the number of 
recruits for the army enlisted during the year ending June 
30, 1857. Report of the i 

Africa, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

American seamen registered in the several ports of the United 
States during the year ending June 30, 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of State, transmitting an abstract of the returns 
of 

Amoor river. Letter of the Secretary of State relative to the ex 
pi orations of the 

Anthracite coal sent to marlset from tlie different regions of Penn- 
sylvania, from 1820 to 1856, inclusive. Statement of the 
quantity and value of 

Appropriations for the fifcal year ending June 30, 1859. Statement 
of the Becictary ot the Treasury of the estimates of 

Appropriations for the service of the army and War Department 
on July 1, 1857. Statement of the balances of 

Appropriations, specific and indefinite, which may be required for 
the last three quarters of tlie fiscal year ending Juno 30, 
1858, made by former acts of Congress. Statement of the 
Register of the Treasury of the estimates for 

Appropriations for the service of the Department of State remain- 
ing on June 30, 1857. Statement of the balances of 

Appropriations for the service of the Department of the Interior 
remaining on June 30, 1857. Letter of the Secretary of the 
Interior, transmitting a statement of the 

Appropriations from 1789 to 1857. Statement of D 



1 
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158 
68 

98 



80 
182 
443 



334 



4 
24 






INDEX. 



Title. 



Appropriations on account of the different Territories of the United 
States, from 1845 to June SO, 1857. Statement of the 

Appropriations to be expended in the prosecution qf the treasury 
extension, custom-houses, and marine hospitals. Letter of 
the Secretary of the Treasury asking for 

Aqueduct, during the year ending September 30, 1857. Report of 
the engineer in charge of the operations of the Washington . 

Aqueduct, for the year ending June SO, 1859. Estimates for, an 
appropriation for the continuation of the Washington..!... 

Arkansas, for tlie year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor ganeral 
of public lands in the State of .., , 

Armories, during the year ending June 30, 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of War, transmitting a statement of the expenses 
of the national .... . ... 

Armories, caused by the omission of the appropriation in the army 
appropriation act of the last session. Letter from the Secre- 
tary of War, asking for an appropriation for the manufac- 
ture of arms at the national. 

Armories, during the year ending June SO, 1857. Statement of 
the expenditures and number of arms and appendages manu- 
&ctured at the national 

Armories, during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of 
the expenditures at the national... 

Arms distributed to the several States and Territories during the 
year 1857. Statement of the 

Arms and appendages manufactured at the national armories during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number of. 

Army during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for ap- 
propriations for the suppoit of the 

Army in Uie Territory of Utah. Correspondence relative to the... 

Army during the year 1857. Beport of the commanding general 
on the operations and disposition of the .... 

Army on the 1st July, 1857. Statement of the actual strength of the 

Army in the department of the east June SO, 1857. Statement 
of the position and distribution of the 

Army in the department of Florida June 30, 1857. Statement 
of the position and distribution of the.. 

Army in the department of the west June SO, 1857. Statement 
of the position and distribution of the..... 

Army in the department of Texas June SO, 1857. Statement 
of the position and distribution of the 

Army in the department of New Mexico June 30, 1857. State- 
ment of the position and distribution of the 

Army in the department of the Pacific June 30, 1857. State- 
ment of the position and distribution of the 

Army recruits enlisted during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the number of 

Army. Beport of the Adjutant General, showing estimated differ- 
ence of expense between volunteers and regular troops for 
the 

Army, of the operations of his department during the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Adjutant General of 
the 

Army, of the operations of his department during the year ending 
June SO, 1857. Annual report of the Quartermaster Gen- 
eral of the United States 

Army, of the operations of his department during the year ending 
June SO, 1857. Annual report of the Commissary General 
of the 

Army, of the operations of his department during the year ending 
June SO, 1857. Annual report of the Paymaster General 
of the.......... ....4 



Vol. 



Part. 



Page. 



10 

IS 
2 
2 
2 



79 

120 
2 
2 
2 

55 



2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

S 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 



2 

1 
2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 



225 
230 
159 



547 
540 
542 

547 

i *« 
i 159 

21 

48 
62 

68 

70 

72 

74 

76 

78 

80 

82 

59 

15a 

161 



ize8b/(ip®glCi62 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Vol. 



Part. 



9oc. 



Page. 



Aimy, of the operatloDB of his departmest during the year ending 
June SO, 1867. Annual report of the Surgeon Qeneral of 
the 

Army, during the year ending June SO, 1857. Statement of the 
sick and wounded of the 

Army, of the operations of his department during the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Annual repot t of the Colonel of Engineers 
of the 

Army, of the operations of his department, and the condition of 
the harbors on the northern and western lakes and rivers, 
and military roads, during the year 1857. Annual report 
of the Colonel of To(M>graphicaI Engineers of the 

Army, of the operations of Im department during the year ending 
June SO, 1867. Annual report of the Colonel of Ordnance 
of the ....... . . .. 

Army, in the Territory of Kansas. Reports and conespondence of 
the Adjutant General in relation to the operations of the... 

Army, in the Territory of Utah. Reports to the Secretary of War 
relative to the operations of the .... ...... 

Army Register for 1858. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmit- 
ting copies of the 

Army Reg^ter for 1857. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmit- 
ting a transcript of the .. 

Arizona. Report of Lieut. Sylvester Mowry, describing the Ter- 
ritory of - 

Arsenals, during the year ending June 30, 185f . Statement of the 
operations of the national..... 

Arts and Manufactures during the year 1857. Report of the Com- 
miarioner of Patents on 

Assay office of the United States, at New York, from 1854 to 1857, 
inclusive. Statement of value of bars at the . 

Asylum during the year 1857. Report of the operations of the 
Naval 

Attorney General, asking an appropriation to defray expenses in 
defending the title of the United States to public property 
in the State of Califoiuia. Letter of the 

Attorney General of the Unitt-d States, relative to the military 
expe'uition ordered into the Territory of Utah. Report of 
the 

Auditor of the Treasuiy, of the operations of his office during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the First.... 

Auditor of the Treasury, of the operations of his office during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Second.. 

Auditor of the I'reasury, of the operations of his office during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Third.... 

Auditor of the Treasury, of the operations of his office during the 
year ending Juno 30, 1857. Annual report of the Fourth.. 

Auditor of the lYeasuiy, of the operations of his offioe during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Fifth 

Auditor of the '^asury for the Post Offioe Department, of the 
operations of his office during the year ending June 30, 
1857. Annual report of the 

Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office Department, of the 
receipts and expenditures of the Post Office Department 
during the year ending June 30, 1867. Report of the 

Auditor of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of balances 
against disbursing officers of the army standing over more 
than twelve months. Report of the Second 

Auditor of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of balances 
against disbursing officers of the army standiiig over more 
than twelve months. Report of the Third 



2 
2 
2 

8 
9 
2 
2 

8 
1 
2 

12 

10 



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2 

2 

2 

34 

66 

2 

2 

32 

S 

2 

106 

71 
S 
S 
3 
3 
8 

3 

2 

15 



165 
166 

168 

283 

636 
98 
21 



684 
647 

69 
664 



211 
151 
153 
154 
162 
163 

165 

1083 



By 



4«d)gld* 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Auditor of the Treasury, tranBmitting copies of the aooounts of the 
disbursements made for the benefit of the Indians during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the 
Second 

Auditor of the Treasury, showing the pay and allowances to offi- 
cers of the navy and marine corps, during the year ending 
June :;0, 1867. Statement of the Fourth 

Auditor of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of the accounts 
upon the books of his office remaining unsettled more than 
three years prior to July 1, 1857. Annual report of the 
Second ....... . . . ....... .... 

Auditor of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of the accounts 
upon the books of his office remaining unsettled more than 
three years prior to July 1, 1857. Annual report of the 
Third 

Auditor of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of the accounts 
upon the books of his office remaining unsettled more than 
three years prior to July 1, 1857. Annual report of the 
Fourth 

Austria, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

B. 

Balances of the contingent fund of the State Department remaining 
on the 30th June, 1857. Statemenfof the 

Balances of appropriations for the service of the Department of 
the Interior remaining on June 30, 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of the Interior, transmitting a statement of the .. 

Balances against disbursing officers of the army standing over for 
more than twelve montlis. Letter from the Secretary of 
War, transmitting a statement of 

Balances of appropriations for the service of the army and War 
Department on July 1 , 1857 . Statement of the 

Banks of the different States. Statement of the returns of the 

Banks of the different States during the years 1853 -'54, 1 854-' 55, 
1855-'56, and 1856-57. Comparative statement of the 

Banks, according to returns d *ted nearest January 1, 1857. General 
statement of the condition of the ... . 

Banks of the United States, according to returns dated nearest 
January 1, 1837, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844. 1845, 1846, 1847, 
1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1854, 1855, 1856, and 1857. Com- 
parative statement of the condition of the 

Banks of the United States. Bepoit of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, as to condition of the 

Borbary States, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of 
the United States with the 

Bavaria, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Belgium, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Bounty lands, under the several acts of 1847, 1850, 1852, and 1855, 
during the year ending September 30, 1857. Statement 
of the 

Brazil, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

Breadstuffs and provisions exported annually from 1821 to 1857. 
Statement of the value of ......... 

Bridge across the Potomac river, in the District of Columbia, at * 
the Little Falls. Report of the engineer in charge of the 
erection 



Vol. 

7 
10 



Part. 



Doc. 

22 
73 

12 

12 



12 
17 



PHge. 



101 
418 



24 



10 



15 

46 
3 



'\y\Q\T\2e6T)y 



3 

107 
17 
17 
17 

2 
17 



317 
321 
324 

32& 

175 
120 
395 



83 
220 
490 

298 



0(ic^le774 



INDEX. 



TiU«. 



Btowne on the sabject of Indian affidn in the Territories of On^on 
and Waehington. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, 
transmitting a report of J. Boss - 

Browne on the subject of the Indian war in Oregon and Washing- 
ton Territories. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, 
transmitting areport of J. Boss...... 

Ballion imported and exported annually from 1821 to 1827, inclu- 
« siY€. Statement of the amount of..... 

BoenoB Ayres, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

C. 

Galifomia for the year 1857. Annual report of the surreyor gen- 
eral of public lands for the State of.. • 

Galifomia, during the year ending June 30, 1868. Letter of the 
Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting an estimate for an 
appropriaticm for surveying the public lands and private 
land claims in...... 

Galifomia. Letter of the Attorney General, asking for an appro- 
priation to defray expenses in defending the title of the 
United States to public property in the State of.... ........ 

Canada, and other British possessions, from July, 1851, to June 
30, 1857. Statement of the value of exports and the im- 
ports from 

Capitol extension and reconstruction of the dome, during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Report of the engineer in charge of 
the progress in the erection of the 

Canon's Valley, asking for the establishment of a territorial gov- 
ernment over them. Memorial of the people of....... 

Cassidy. Letter of the Secretary of the Navy relative to the claim 
of Joseph 

Census of Minnesota. Message of the President of the United 
States, transmitting a report of the Secretary of the Inte- 
rior in reference to the 

Census of Minnesota Tenitory. Estimate of expenses of taking 
the 

Chickasaw Indians. Statement of stocks held in trust for the ben- 
efit of the 

Chili, during the year 1857. Commercial rekUions of the United 
States with 

China. Message of the Preddent of the United States, transmit- 
' ting a copy of the regulations adopted by the United States 
commissioner for the government of the consular courts in. . 

China, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
.States with 

Cheyenne expediUcm. Correspondence of the Adjutant General of 
the army relative to the operations of the army on the 

Ciril list, for the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates fur appro- 
priations for the 

Clerk of the House of Bepresentatives. Estimate of appropria- 
priations during the year ending June SO, 1859, for the sup- 
port of the office of the , 

Clerks and other persons employed upon the survey of the coast 
during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 
names and compensation of. 

Clerks and other persons employed in the Department of State, 
during the year 1857. Beport of the Secretary of State, 
transmitting a statement of the names and compensation 
of the 

Clerk hire. Letter of the Postmaster General, asking an appro- 
priation for temporary 



Vol. 


PMt. 


Doe. 


9 


.... 


39 


9 


.... 


38 


1 


.... 


3 


5 


— 


17 


2 


1 


2 


9 


.... 


41 


12 


.... 


106 


1 


.... 


3 


2 


2 


2 


12 





102 


13 


.... 


130 


9 


...• 


49 


12 

1 
1 13 


.... 


110 

3 

133 


[5 


.... 


17 


1 




9 


5 


.... 


17 


2 


2 


2 


1 


.... 


1 


1 


.... 


1 


3 





20 


7 




90 


(9;:::: l\ 

lo!-.*.. 77 



Paff«. 



274 
506 

221 



313 
40 



. 270 

186 
477 



186 
477 

96 

5 



gle 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Vol. 



Part. 



Doc. 



Page. 



Clerks and other persons employed in the Post Office Department, 
for the year 1867. Letter of the Postmaster General trans- 
mitting a list of 

Clerks and other persons employed in the War Department, for 
the year 1857. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmit- 
ting list of 

Clerk hire, office rent, &o., in the several land districts in the States 
and Territories. Estimates for 

Clerks and other persons employed in the Treasury Department, 
during the year 1867. Report of the Secretary of the Tkrea- 
sury , transmitting the names and compensation of. 

Clerks and other employes of the Department of the Interior, for 
the year 1867. Report of the Secretary of the Interior, 
transmitting a list of 

Clerks and others employed in the Navy Department, for the year 
1867. Letter of the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting a 
list of 

Coal depot for the navy, at Key West, Florida. Report of the 
superintending engineer relative to the....... 

Coal sent to market from the different regions of Pennsylvania, 
from 1820 to 1856, indusive. Statement of the quantity 
and value of anthmcite...... .... 

Coal, annually, from 1820 to 1866, inclusive. Statement of the 
value of the imports and exports of foreign and domestic, 
and consumption of... 

Coast Survey of the United States, during the year ending June 
SO, 1859. Estimates for appropriations for the continuation 
of the .- 

Coast Survey, showing the numher and names of persons employed 
on the Coast Survey. Report of the dishursing agent of 
the 

Coast Survey, of expenditures for survey of the Florida reefs and 
keys for the year 1867. Report of the disbursing agent of the. 

Coast Survey of the United States during the year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1857. Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
showing the progress and condition of the 



Parpen aooompamfing the above rqxfri. 

No. 1. Distribution of the parties of the Coast Survey upon 
the coasts of the United States during tho survey- 
ing season of 1856-*67 

No. 2. list of army officers on Coast Survey 

No. 3. List of navy officers on Coast Survey ....... 

No. 4. List of assistant engineers of the navy on (yoast 
Survey 

No. 6. List of information furnished by the Coast Survey 
during the year 1856-57, under authority of the 
Treasury Department ..... ... 

No. 6. list of capes, headlands, islands, harbors, and an- 
chorages on the western coast of the United States, 
of which either topographical, hydrographic, pre- 
liminary^ or complete surveys have been made, or 
maps, charts, or sketches issued to date qf report 
of 1857 

No. 7. Statistics of field and office-work 

No. 8. General list of Coast Survey discoveries and develop- 
ments to 1856, inclusive 

No. 9. Letter of the Superintendent to the Secretary of the 
Treasury, communicating the discovery of a ledge 
off Ca|»e Small Point, Maine, by Lieut. Comd'g. 
W. O. Temple, United States navy ? 



13 



10 



10 



64 

69 
122 

76 

63 

76 
2 



596 
334 

384 

( 38 
\ 78 



12 



... 21 



.... 21 
.... 21 

... 21 



121 
130 
131 

134 



136 



157 
140 

142 



^l^.qQgF 1*7 



INDEX. 



TlUe. 



Vol. 



Coast Rurrej of the IT. S , papers aooompanying — ContlnQed — 

No. 10. Report of Anistant H. L. WhlUng on the topo- 
graphical reBurvey of Provincetown harbor, 
MassachusettB, &c , 

No. 11. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, comDcnni- 
cating extracts from a report by lieat. Comd'g 
G. R. P. Bodgers, United States navy, in reUtion 
.to the gradual decrease in the depth of water on 
George's bank 

No. 12. Letter to the Secretary of the IVeasury, communi- 
cating the discovery of a small shoal southward 
and westward of Little George's Bank, by Lieut. 
Comd'g G. B. P. Rodgers, U. S. N., assistant in 
the Coast Survey................. .... 

No. 13. Report of Ueut. Comd'g W. G. Temple, U. S. N. 
assistant Coast Survey, stating the results of an 
examination made to determine the least water 
on the rocks at Hell Gate, East river, New York. 

No. 14. Report of Lieut Comd'g W. G. Temple, U. S. N., 
assistant Coast Survey, on the examination of a > 
locality in New York bay, containing a portion i 
of a wreck 6 

No. 16. Extracts from report of Commander W. T. Muse, I 
U. S. N., assistant Coast Survey, relative to i 
changes at the bars of Hatteras and Ocracoke I 
inlets, North Carolina I 6 

No. 16. Extracts from report of Lieut. Comd'g C. R. P. Rod- 
gers, U. S. N., showing the results of a resurvey 
of the bar and anchorage at Beaufort, N. C 

Ko. 17. Report of Lieut. Comd'g J. N. Maffitt, U. S. N., 
showing the result of a re examination of the 
bars and entrances to Cape Fear river, N. C 

No. 18. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, communi- 
cating the discovery and position of a shoal 
inside of the entrance to Amelia river, Florida, 
reported by Lieut. Comd'g S. D. Trenchard, U.8.N. 

No. 19. Extract from report made by Assistant George 
Davidson, communicating the discovery of a 
bank near the northern entrance to Colvos Pass- 
age, Admiwlty Inlet. W. T. 

No. 20. Ude tables for the use of navigators; piepared 
from the Coast Survey observations by A. D. 
Bache, Superintendent 

Ko. 21. Reports made to Superintendent, showing the 
least water in channel entrances to certain har- 
* bors, rivers, and anchorages on the coasts of the 
United States 

No. 22. Report of Captain M. L. Smith, U. S. Topograph- 
ical Engineers, assistant in charge of the Coast 
Survey office, and extracts of sub-reports of 
chiefs of the office divisions 

No. 23. List of original topographical sheets registered in 
the archives of the United States Coast Survey 
office, geographically arranged 

Ko. 24. List of original hydrographic sheets registered in 
the archives of the United States Coast Survey 
office, geographically arranged 

J^o, 25. List of geographical positions determined by the 
United States Coast Survey, and continued from 
reports of 1861, 1853, and 1855 

Digitized 



Part. Doe. 

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150 

160 

151 

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by Google 



10 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Vol. 



Ooaat Snrvej of the U. 8. , papers accompanying^ Continued — 

No. 26. Notes of measurement of a base for the primary 
triangulation of the eastern section of the coast 
of the United States on Epping Plains, Maine... 6 

No. 27. Beport of Dr. B. A. Qoald, jr., on the progress 
made in telegraph campaigns for differences of 
longitude, and the preparation of results for 
publication...... ............ ........ 

No. 28. Beport of Professor W. C. Bond on the moon cul- 
minations and other phenomena observed for 
the Coast Survey 

No. 29. Beport of Professor Benjamin Pierce, LL. D. , on 
the determination of longitudes by occultations 
of the Pleiades and solar eclipses 

No. 30. Notice of the determination of the longitude of 
Fernandina, Amelia island, Florida, by means of 
chronometer exchanges from Savannah, Georgia, 
by the Superintendent Coast Survey 

No. 31. Account of the method and formulie for the deter- 
mination of the astronomical latitude by means 
of the zenith telescope, as used in the survey of 
the coast of the United States ' 6 

No. 32. Beport of Assistant Charles A. Schott upon the 

gradual loss of magnetism of the several magnets 

• now in use in the survey of the coast 

No. 33. On the heights of the tides of the United States, 
from observations in the Coast Survey by A. D. 
Bache. superintendent 

No. 34. Beport of Assistant L. F. Pourtales, in charge of 
the office-work, relating to tidal observations.... 

No. 35. Beport of Sub-assistant H. Mitchell, on observa- 
tions of tides and currents in Nantucket and 
Martha's Vineyard sounds, and m ine East river 
at Hell Qate, with remarks on the revision of 
levellings on Hudson river. 

No. 36. On the winds of the western coast of the United 
States, from observations in connexion with the 
United States Coast Survey, by A. D. Bache, 
Superintendent .......... ... ......... 

No. 37. Beport to the commissioners on the preservation 
of New York harbor Ax>m encroachments, by the 
advisory council on the comparative map of New 
York bay and harbor, and the approaches 

No. 38. Beport of Mr. A. Boschke, on the drawing of maps 
of New York harbor, made for the oommissionei-s 
on harbor encroachments 

Ho. 39. Beport made by lieutenint A. W. Kv^-.b, United 
States army, on a topographical reconnais;>ancu | 
of a part of Sapelo island, Georgia, for the seiec i 
tion of a site for a primary base line..... 6 

No. 40. Extracts from a report by Assistant A. M. Harri- 
son, relative to the topographical features of 
Cumberland and Amelia islands, St. Mary's 
river, Georgia, and Amelia river, Florida 

No. 41. Beport of Captain J. H. Simpson, United States 
Topographical Engineers, on the reconnaissance 
and progress made in triangulation for an air 
line between Fernandina and Cedar Keys, Flor- 
ida 



Part. 



Doc. 

21 

21 
21 

21 

21 



Page. 



302 

305 
310 
311 

314 



21 


32^ 


21 


334 


21 


342 


21 


.348 



21 
21 

21 

....|21 
I 
j 

...I 21 
21 



. 21 



350 
354 

358 

«73 

374 

377 

379 



Digitized by 



Google 



INDEX. 



11 



Title. 



I Vol. 



Part 



Doc. I Piffe. 



CoMt Surrey of 
No. 42. 



No. 43. 



No. 44. 



No. 46. 


No. 


46. 


No. 


47. 


No. 


48. 


No. 


49. 


No. 


60. 


No. 


61. 


No. 


62. 



No. 63. 



No. 64. 



No. 66. 



No. 66. 



the U. 8., papers accompanying — Continued — 

Beport to the Commiuioner of the General Land 
Office, showing the progress made in the survey 
and marlcing of the Florida Keys, in quarter 
sections, during the present seaiion 

Extracts from the report of Sub-assistant W. M. 
Johnson, on the topographical features of the 
coast adjacent to Santa Barbara channel, Cali- 
fornia 

Beport of Assistant W. E. Greenwell, on the sur- 
vey, character, and resources of the islands and 
main adjacent to Santa Barbara channel, Cali- 
fornia 

Description of an apparatus for measuring subsid- 
iary base lines 

Description of deep-sea sounding apparatus, in- 
vented by Commander B. F. Sands, United States 
navy.... 

Notes by Lieut. E. B. Hunt, on a new sounding ap- 
paratus proposed by him for coast survey use 

Beport of Lieutenant Commanding W. G. Temple, 
United States navy, on the result of trials made 
with the new sounding apparatus devised by 
Lieut. E. B. Hunt, United States engineers 

Description of the tide-gauge devised by Lieuten- 
ant Commanding S. D. Trenchard, United States 
navy 

Letter from the Superintendent, communicating 
the description of a tide-gauge devised by Sub- 
assistant H. Mitchell, for taking observations in 
deep water 

Beport of Lieutenant E. B. Hunt, United States 
engineers, on the preparation of an index of 
scientific references..... 

Beport of J. G. Kohl, esq., on the method, scope, 
and completion of a history of maratime dis- 
covery and exploration on the western coast of 
the United States, prepared for publication with 
the records of the United States Coast Survey. . . 

Beports of Commander W. T. Muse and Lieuten- 
ant B. D. Minor, United States navy, on the 
rescue of the American ship Manlius fh>m sink- 
ing, near Cape Henry, by the officers and crew 
of the Coast Survey steamer Hetzel 

Letter of Lieutenant Commanding J. K. Duer, 
United States navy, and correspondence showing 
the action taken by him, at the request of the 
United States vice-consul at Nassau, N. P., and 
United States consul at Havana, relative to the 
crew and passengers of the American ship Julia 
Howard, wrecked on the Bahama bank 

Results of examinations for sites of light-houses, 
&c., made by the Coast Survey, at the request of 
the Light-house Board, under directions from 
the Secretary of the Treasury, and in accordance 
with Uws of March 3, 1861, August 31, 1852, 
and August 3, 1864 

Letter of the Superintendent, transmitting the re- 
pott of Lieutenant Commanding C. B. P. Rodgers, 
United States navy, upon a re-examination of 
the ** Point of Bocks," at Westport, Mass , for a 
Ught-houeesite..... 



21 

21 

21 
21 

21 
21 

21 

21 

21 
21 

21 

21 



382 

390 

392 
396 

398 
399 

401 
402 

493 

404 

4U 
434 



21 



21 



43$ 



438 



Di^tiledbylV^^ 



C)OS 



12 



INDEX. 



Titie. 



Vol. 



Coast Survey of the U. 8., papers accompanying— Continued — 

No. 57. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, trans- 
mitting a report from Commander James Alden, 
United States navy, on the result of his ex- 
amination for a light-house site on the shore of 
Santa Barbara channel, California ...... 

No. 58. Letter from the secretary of the Light-house 
Board, with a communication from Commander 
S. Swartwout, United States navy, relative to 
the establishment of a light-house and fog-bells 
at Point Wilson, Admiralty Inlet, W. T., and fog- 
bells at Smith's island and New Dungeness Spit.. 

No. 59. Aids to navigation, recommended in reports made 
to the Superintendent by assistants in the Coast 
Survey.......... ... .... .. .. 

No. 60. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, trans- 
mitting the recommendation of Lieutenant Com- 
manding C. R. P. Rodgers, United States navy, 
for a buoy to mark the flat ground near the Sal- 
vages, (Cape Ann,) Massachusetts... 

No. 61. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, communi- 
cating the position recommended by Lieutenant 
Commanding J. J. Almy, United States navy, for 
a buoy on the southern edge of the Middle 
Ground, near Cape Henry light-house.......... 

No. 62. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, communi- 
cating the recommendation of Lieut Comd'g C. 
U. P. Rodgers, United States navy, for buojs to 
mark a new channel westward of the main ship 
channel into Beaufort harbor, N. C 

No. 63. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, communi- 
cating the reconmiendations of Lieut. Comd'g S. 
D. Trenchard, United States navy, for buoys at 
St. Simon's bar and St. Alary's river entrance, 
Georgia 

No. 64. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, transmit- 
ting the recommendation of Lieut. Comd'g S. D. 
Trenchard, United States navy, for an additional 
buoy on St. Blaiy's bar, Georgia ... .... 

No. 65. Letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, communi- 
cating the recommendation of Lieut. Comd'g T. 
A. Craven, United States navy, for a beacon on 

Love Key, Florida reefs 

Codification of the revenue laws. Report of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, relative to a revision and 

Coinage at the mint of the United States, and branches and assay 

office, from January 1 to June 30, 1857, inclusive. State- 
ment of the amount of deposits and ..... . 

Coinage at the mint of the United States and branches, from 1793 

to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the amount of the 

Coinage at the United States mint at Philadelphia, from 1793 to 

1857. Statement of the amount of the 

Coinage at the branch mint of the United States at San Francisco, 

from 1854 to 1857 . Statement of the amount of the 

Coinage of the branch mint of the United States at New Orleans, 

from 1838 to 1857. Statement of the amount of the 

Coinage at the branch mint of the United States at Charlotte, N. 

C, from 1838 to to 1857. Statement of the amount of the.. 
Coinage at the branch mint of the United States at Dahlonega, 

Georgia, from 1838 to 1857. Statement of the amount of 

the 



t 



Part Doc. 



Pafe. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



...1 f 



439 

440 
442 

442 

443 

443. 

444 
445 
445 

46 
61 
62 
64 
65 
67 



INDEX. 



13 



TIU«. 



Coin and bullion imported and exported annually, from 1821 to 
June SO, 1857. Statement of the amount of 

Cook, for flerrioes as United States marshal to the consular court 
at Canton. Letter of the Secretary of State, asking an ap* 
propriation for paying J. P 

Commerce, tonnage, &c., of the Ohio and other western rivers 
during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographi- 
cal Engineers of the army of the ..... ... ... 

Commerce and navigation of the United States for the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Beport of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
transmitting a statement of the 

P^poTf aeeoagMtnifing tht above rtporU 

No. 1. Statement of goods, wares, and merchandise, of 
the growth, produce, and manufacture of the 
United States, exported to foreign countries 
during the year ending June 30, 1857 

No. 2. Summary statement of the value of the exports of 
the growth, produce, and manufacture of the 
United States during the year ending June 30, 
1857 

No. 3. Genera] statement of goods, wares, and merchan- 
dise, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of foreign countries, exported from the United 
States during the year ending June 30, 1857.... 

No. 4. Summary statement of goods, wares, and merchan- 
dise, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of foreign countries, exported from the United 
States during the year ending June 30, 1857 

No. 5. Gkneral statement of goods, wares, and merchan- 
dise, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of foreign countries, imported into the United 
States during the year ending June SO, 1857.... 

No. 6. Summary statement of goods, wares, and merchan- 
dise imported into the United States in Ameri- 
can and foreign vessels during the year ending 
June 30, 1857 

No. 7. General statement of goods, wares, and merohan- 
* disc, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of the United States, exported from each collec- 
tion district during the year ending June 30, 
1857 

No. 8. General statement of goods, wares, and merohan- 
dise, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of foreign countries, exported from each collection 
district of the United States during the year 
ending June SO, 1857 

No. 9. General statement of goods, wares, and merchan- 
dise, of the growth, produce, and manufacture 
of foreign countries, imported into the United 
States daring the year ending June 30, 1857.... 

No. 10. Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
foreign vessels, with their tonnage and crows, 
which cleared from the United States for foreign 
countries during the year ending June 30, 1857.. 

No. 11. Statement exhibiting the number of American 
and foreign vessels, with their tonnage and 
crews, which entered into the United States from 
foreign countries during the year ending June 
30, 1857 



Vol. 



12 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



Part 



DigitizecTby 



Doc. 



115 



Fife. 



274 



336 



52 



56 



142 



152 



272 



284 



328 



370 



490 



^odgle 



14 



INDEX. 



TlUe. 


Vol. Ptft. 

1 


Doc. 


pm«. 


Commerce and navigation U. S. , papers aooompanying— Continued — 

No. 12. Statement exhibiting the naUopal character of the 

foreign yesselfi which entered into and cleared 

from the United States for foreign ooimtries 

dnrinir the vear endinor June SO. 18fi7 


14 

14 
14 

14 

14. 

14 






498 


No. IS. 


Statistical view of the commerce of the United 
States, exhibiting tlie value of the exports to 
and imports from each foreign country, and the 
tonnage of American and foreign vessels arriving 
from and departing to each foreign country, 
during the year ending June 30. 1857.... ...... 






510 


No. 14. 


Statement of the commerce of each State and Ter- 
ritory during the year ending June SO, 1867 

Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
foreign vessels, with their tonnage and crews, 
which cleared from each district of the United 
States for foreign countries during .the year end* 
ing June 30, 1857 






514 


No. 15. 




.... 


518 


No. 16. 


Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
foreign vessels, with their tonnage and crews, 
which entered into each district of the United 
States from foreign countiies during the year 
ending June SO, 1 857 ........................ 






522 


No. 17. 


Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
foreign vessels, with their tonnage and crews, 
which departed from each district of the United 
States, and the countries to which they cleared, 
during the year ending June 30, 1857.......... 






526 


No. 18. 


Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
foreign vessels, with their tonnage and crews, 
which entered into each district of the United 
States, and the countries from whence they ar- 
rived, during the year ending June 30, 1857.... 

Statement exhibiting the indirect trade of the 
United States, the countries of production and 
shipment, with the value of the articles imported, 
during the year ending June 30, 1857 ......... 


14 

14 

14 

14 

14 






552 


No. 19. 






578 


No. 20. 


Summary statement exhibiting the value of the 
indirect trade of the United States during the 
vear endinsr June t}0. 1867 ...... .. 




..*. 


608 


No. 21. 


Statement of the tonnage of the several districts 
of the United States on the 30th June, 1857.... 

Statement exhibiting a condensed view of the ton- 
nage of the several districts of the United States 
on the 30th of June, 1857 






612 


No. 22. 






620 


No. 23. 


Statement showiog the number and class of ves- 
sels built, and the tonnage thereof, in each State 
and Territory of the United States during the 
year ending June 80, 1857.......... 


14 
14 






624 


No. 24. 

• 


Comparative view of the registered and enrolled 
tonnage of the United States, showing the ton- 
nage employed in the whale fishery ; alsp the 
proportion of the enrolled and licensed tonnage 
employed in the coasting trade, cod fishery, 
mackerel fishery, and whale fishery, from 1815 
to 1857, Inclusive 






632 


No. 25. 


Statement showing the number and class of ves- 
sels built, and the tonnage thereof, in the sev- 
eral States and Territories of Uie United Stales, 
from 1815 to 1857, inclusive 






636 



Digitized by 



Google 



INDEX. 



16 



Title. 



Vol. Part. 



Doc. 



Commerdft] reUtiona of the United States with foreign nations 
during the year ending September 30, 1857. Report of the 

Secretary of State of the 

Commercial relations of the United States with Great Britain dur- 
ing the year 1857 

Commerda] relations of the United States with France daring the 

year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Spain during the 

year 1857 

Commerda! relations of the United States with Portugal during 

the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Denmark during 

the year 1857 , 

Commercial relations of the United States with Sweden and Nor- 
way during the year 1857...... . 

Commercial relations of the United States with Russia during the | 

year 1857 , 

Oommerciai relations of the United States with Prussia during the 

year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Austria during the 

year 1857 

^ Commercial relations of the Uniled States with Kixony during the 

year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Bavaria daring 

the year 1857 1 

Commerciai relations of the United States with Wurtemburg during I 

the year 1857 1 

Commercial relations of the United States with Belgium during the , 

year 1837 j 

Commerdal relations of the United States with Holland during the : 

year 1857 l 

Commerdal relations of the United States with Franlifort-on-the- i 

Main during the year 1857 

Commerda] relations of the United States with Oldenburg, during ' 

the year 1857 

Commeix'ial relations of the United States with the Hansc Towns 

during the year 1857. .«. 

Commerdal relations of the United States with Sardinia during . 

the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Tuscany during the 

year 1857 , 

Commercial relations of the United States with Switzerland during ' 

tlie year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Papal States 

during the year 1867 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Two Sicilies i 

during the year 1857..... ... 

Commerdal rdations of the United States with Turkey during the 

year 1857 

Commcn ial relations of the United States with Egypt during the 

year 1857 

Commercial relatiois of the United States with Greece during the 

ycji 1867 

Commercial relations of tho United States with the Ionian Repub- 
lic daring the year 1867 • 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Barbary States i 

during the year 1867..... 

Commercial relations of the Dnited States with Persia during the • 

year 1857 — 

Commercial relations of the United States with Africa during the 
year 1857 



5 1. 



5 1 

5 i 

6 

6 

5 

6 

6 

6 

1^ 

5 
6 
5 
6 

(' 

!= 

5 
6 
5 
6 
5 

U 



I— 



(5 I. 



17 

17 

17 
17 
17 
17 
17 



..: 17 
17 



17 

17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
... 17 

-1 " 

...I 17 



.17 I 

17 

17 I 

I 

17 ' 



•• " ,1 



17 
17 
17 
17 



1 
233 

44 
326 

65 
342 

69 
389 

76 
405 

82 
410 

83 
410 

98 

101 
418 

116 

120 

121 

396 

396 

122 

137 
142 
422 

427 

43^ 

142 

144 
146 
431 
149 
440 

443 

m 

171 
175 



....I 17 ! 180 
j 182 



' Digitized by' 



(SobgPe 



16 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Vol. Part. Doc. 



Page. 



Commercial relations of the United States with Muscat during the | 
year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with China during the i 
year 1857 ' 

Commercial relations of the United Staten with the Sandwich 
Islands during the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Friendly and 
Navigator's Islands during the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Ftjee Islands | 
during the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Hayti during the 
year 1857 ' 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Dominican Be- l 
public during the year 1857...... 

Commercial relations of the United States with the Republic of J 
Mexicoduring the year 1857..... 

Commercial relations of the United States with Nicaragiui during I 
the year 1867 1 

Commercial relations of the United States with Costa Rica during i 
the year 1857 • 

Commercial relations of the United States with Honduras during I 
the year 1857 ' 

Commercial relations of the United States with New Oranada i 
. duriog the year 1857 ....- 

Commercial relations of the United States with Venezuela during 
the year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Ecuador during the 
year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Brazil during the 
year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Peru during the 
year 1857 , 

Commercial relations of the United States with Chili during the 
year 1857 

Commercial relations of the United States with Uruguay during the 
year 1867 

Commercial relations of the United States with Buenos Ayres during 
the year 1867 

Commissary General of Subsistence of the army, of the operations 
of his department during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Annual report of the... .. 

Compensation of lan«l officers. Recommendation of the Commis- 
sioner of the General Land Office relative to the 

Comptroller of the Treasury, of the operations of his office during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the First. 

Comptroller of the Treasury, of the operations of his office during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the 
Second 

Comptroller of the Treasury, of the balances of appropriations on 
July I, 1857, for the service of the army and War Depart- 
ment. Statement of the Second................. ... 

Comptroller of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of the ac- 
counts upon the books of the Second, lliird, and Fourth 
Auditors, and Register of the Treasury, remaining unsettled 
more than three years prior to July 1, 1857. Report of the 
First - 

Congress. Estimate of appropriations for per diem and mileage of 
members and senators during the year ending June 30, 

1869, of the two houses of... . 

Congress. Message of the President of the United States, recom- 
mending a prolongation of the session of 13^ 

Digitized by 



6 

i' 
I' 
1' 

6 

I' 

5 

I' 

6 
6 
6 

!' 
(• 

6 

5 
6 
6 

2 
2 
1 

1 

9 



17 
17 
17 
17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 
17 

17 j 

17 

17 

17 

17 
17 
17 

2 
2 
9 

3 

46 



12 



'eo-5§fe 



INDEX. 



17 



Tide. 



I Vol. Put. I>oc. 



Fage. 



OoDBtniction, Equipment, and Repair of tlie Navy, during the year 
ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for the support of the Bu- 
reau of - 

Construction, Equipment, and Bepair of the Navy, during the year 
1857. Beport of the Chief of the Bureau of 



Papvt aeoompanjfmg (ha above report. 

A. — Estimate of the amount required for the expenditures 
of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and 
Bepair, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859.. 
B. — Estimate for pay of commission, warrant, and petty offi- 
cers and seamen, including the engineer corps of 
the navy, required for vessels proposed to be kept | 
in commission, including vessels for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1859..... 

C. — Estimate of the amount requiied for objects under the 
direction of the Bureau, payable from the ap- 
propriation for construction, equipment, and re- 
pair, for wear and tear of vessels in commission, 
including fuel for steamers and the purchase of 
hemp for the navy, for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1859 

S. — Vessels in commission belonging to the navy on Octo- 
ber 1, 1857 

F.— Vessels in oitiinary, repairing and equipping, belonging 
to the navy on October 1, 1857 

O. — ^Vessels on the stocks and in progress of construction on 
October 1, 1867 ^... 

H. — Abstract statement, showing receipts and expenditures 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, and 
the value of the stores on hand at the various 
navy yards on July 1, 1857 

I. — Statement of the number of days' labor and its cost, 
from the 1st day of July, 1856, to the 30th of 
June, 1867, for the respective navy yards, for 
building, repairing, and equipping vessels of the 
navy, or in receiving or securing stores and ma- 
terials for those purposes....... 

No. 1. — Scale of oflfers to furnish live oak timber under the 
advertisement from the Bureau of Construction, 
Equipment, and Bepair, of May 2, 1857 

No. 2. — Scale of offers to fumiBh naval rupplies at the navy 
yard of Kittery, Maine 

No. 3. — Scale of offers to furnish naval supplies at the navy 
yard of Charlestown, Massachusetts 

No. 4. — Scale of offers to furnish naval supplies at the navy 
yard at Brooklyn, New York 

No. 5. — Scale of offisrs to furnish naval supplies at the navy 
yard at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

No. 6. — Scale of offers to furnish naval supplies at the navy 
yard at Washington, District of Columbia ...... 

No. 7. — Scale of offers to furnish naval supplies at the navy 
yard atGosport, Virginia 

No. 8. — Scale of offers for freight to China of anthracite coal 

from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Uit of contracts made and received by the Bureau of Construction, 

Equipment, and Bepair, from October 15, 1856, to Novem- 
ber 19, 1857 

^tingent fund of the House of Bepresentatives Letter of the 

Secretary of the Treasury to First Auditor respecting the... 

2 



1 ,..-. 

2 3 



2 I 3 



238 
802 



80i 



2 3 2 804 



1. 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



805 
806 
808 
808 

809 



809 

810 
811 

812 
820 
828 
834 
838 
844 

845 



Digifizecl by' 



Coc9gle 



18 



INDEX. 



Tide. 



Contingent expenses of the Department of State daring the year 
ending June 30. 1857. Letter of the Secretarj of State, 
transmitting a statement of the . ... .. 

Contingent ezpeus* s of foreign intercourse during the year ending 
November 30, 1857. Letter of the 8ecn;taryof State, trans- 
mitting a statement of the 

Contingent expenses of the Department of the Interior during the 
year ending June 30, 1867. Letter of the Secretary of the 
Interior, transmitting a statement of the . 

Contingt nt expenses of the navy during the year ending June 30, 
1857. Statement of the 

Contingent expenses of the War Department during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1857. Beport of the Secretary of War, trans- 
mitting a statement of the... . ........ 

Contingent expenses of the military establishment during the year 
1857. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting a state- 
ment of the -. 

Contingent expens< s of the Treasury Department during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Beport of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, transmitting a statement of the ....... .... 

Contingent expenses of the Post Office Department for the year 
1857. Report of the Postmabter General, transmitting a 
statement of the . 

Contracts for carrying the mails, made by the Post Office Depart- 
ment, during the year ending June SO, 1857. Statement of 
the offers and.. . ....... .... 

Contracts for deepening the channels of Southwest Pass and Pass k 
I'Outre, at the mouth of the Mississippi river..... ..... 

Contracts made in connexion with the Utah expedition. Statement 
of all 

Contracts to furnish articles coming under the cognizance of the ) 
Bureau of Yards and Docl&s during the year 1857. Abstract > 
of the offers and ...... ) 

Contracts to furnish ai tides coming under the cognisance of the 
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography during the year 1857. 
Ktatcmen tof 

Contracts to furnish articles coming under the cognizance of the ) 
Bureau of Construction. Equipment, and Repair to the 19th > 
November, 1857. Statement of the ............... ) 

<k>Dtract8 to furnish articles coming under the cognisance of the 
Bureau of Provisif n? and Clothing, to be delivered during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1858. Statement of the .... 

•Contracts made by his office during the year 1657. Letter of the 
Secretary of the Interior, transmitting a report of the Com- 
missioner of Public Buildings of the 

Contracts made for carrying the mails to foreign countries, and a 
Btatt-ment of the amount of postage derived therefrom. Let- 
ter of the Postmaster General , transmitting copies of 

Cont acts made under the authority of the War Department for the 
year 1857. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting state- 
ments of..... — ... .......... 

Costa Bica during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United SUtes with 

Cotton exported annually, from 1821 to 1857, inclu^sive, with the 
cost per pound . Statement of the quantity and value of the 

Cotton, from 1840 to 1^67, Inclusive. Statement of the value of the 
imports of foici ;n, and exports of the foreign and domestic 
manufacturefl of .. — ....... 

Cotton in Eurtipe. Report of John Claiborne, special agent, on the 
oonsunipti n of ................ 

Court of Cluiins during the year ending June 30, 1859. ^timat^ 
for approprlatluus for the support of the............ 



Vol. 

1 

1 

1 
2 

7 

9 

3 

9 

II 
13 
12 



itized 



Part. 



Doc. 



3 

85 

(piQpg 



6 
2 

30 

65 

18 

66 

96 
139 

99 

2 
19 

2 
2 

2 

iO 

47 

58 

17 

3 



Pate. 



26 



956 



668 



801 

810 

846 



923 



470 
299 

302 



INDEX. 



19 



Tide. 



Vol. Part. 



Doe. 



Page. 



GoQii-hoiiseft. Statement of the appropriation, cost of site, date of 
contract, contract price, and date of completioo of the 

Crobb and his associates. Message of the President of the United 
States, transmitting official information and correspondenoe 
relative to the execution of Colonel ................ 

Creek Indian boundary line. Reports of Captains Sltgreaves and 
Woodruff of the surrey of the... .^.. 

Custcm-houses during the year ending September 30, 1857. Beport 
of the engineer in charge of the progress in the construc- 
tion of the ,. 

Custom-houses purchased and built. Statem<>nt of the number of. . 

Custom-houses. Statement of the appropriation, cost of site, date 
of contract, contract price, and date of completion of the.... 

Customs, of the operations of his office during the year ending June 
30, 1857. Annual report of the Commissioner of the...... 

Customs, annually, from 1849 to 1857. Statement of the amount 
of importations, the amount of cubtoms, and the expenses 
of collecting the..... 

Customs in the Pacific ports, from July 1, 1850, to June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the expenses of collecting the. .............. 

Custom-houses. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, asking ap- 
propriations for the prosecution of certain 

D. 

Deaf, dumb, and blind, to the 1st July, 1857. Beport of the presi- 
dent of the Columbia Institution for the 

Deaths, dismissals, &c., in the navy during the year 1857. State- 
ment of the ... ..... ......... .... 

Delaware river. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting esti- 
mates of appropriations for completing the harbors on the.. 

Delaware breakwater, &c. Letter cf the Secretary of War, trans- 
mitting a report relative to the cost of the completion of the 

Denmark, for the discontinuance of the Sound dues. Message of 
the President of the Uuited States, transmitting a copy of 
the convention between the United States and the King of.. 

Denmark, for the discontinuance of the Sound dues. Letter of the 
Secretaiy of State, inclosing letters calling attention to the 
necessitv of an appropriation to meet the interest on the 
sum stipulated to be paid to 

Denmark, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the ) 
United States with f 

Des Moines river grant. Statement relative to the 

Des Moines rapids Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting a 
report relative to the improvement of the ...-.- 

Diplomatic Correspondence from 1776 to 1783. Letter of the Sec- 
retary of State, asnng for an appropriation to purchase five 
hundred copies of tho •. 

Disbursing officers and disbunting agents. Circular instructions 
from the Secretary of the Treasury to the 

Disbursing officers, standing over more than twelve months Letter 
of the Secretary of War, transmiteng a statement of the 
bi^ances against , . 

Dismissions from the navy in the year 1857. Statement of the 

District of Columbia lor the year ending September 30, 1857. 
Annual report of the warden of the penitentinry in the 

District of Columbia for the year ending June 30 1 ^57 . Report of 
the superintendent of the hospital for the insane of the army 
and navy and the 

District of Columbia. Report of the engineer in charge of the 
erection of a bridge across tho Potomac river at Little Fails, 
in the...... •••.••• 



1 :.. 

9 
IS 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

13 



2 
10 

3 
1 



133 



64 
104 

3 
3 

S 

3 

3 
3 

ISO 



90 
124 

133 

174 

40 
40 



2 

2 

44 

62 

31 



36 

17 

2 



14 
3 

15 



744 

588 



76 

405 

90 

83 



79 

588 
750 



2 1 2 i 7J3 



20 



INDEX. 



Titie. 



V<d. 



Part. 



Doe. Page. 



District of Columbia. Report of the preiddent of the Columbia 
luBtitution for the deof, dumb, and blind in the.. 

District of Colombia, and to codify the same. Message of the 
President of the United States, transmitting a repoft of the 
prcoeedings under the act of March 3, 1855, to improve the 
laws of the ........... . ..... 

District of Columbia. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, 
asking an additional appropriation for the support of the 
penitentiary in the District of Columbia 1 

Dome of the Capitol during the year 1857. Report of the engineer 
in charge of the reconstruction of the>. 

Dominican republic during the year 1867. Commercial relations 
of the United State* with the 

Duties on United States domestic exports to Great Britain, France. 
Spain, Holland, Belgium, and Brazil ; also the duty on like 
articles imported into the United States. Statement of the 
import 

Dmties accruing on the imports of wools^ns, cottons, hempen goods, 
iron, sugar, hemp, salt, and coal, annually, from June 80, 
1844, to June 30, 1857. Statement of the amount of. 

£. 

Ecuador, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Egypt, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with , 

Engineer in charge on construction of custom-houses, court-houses, 
post offices, and other public buildings confided to the 
charge of the 1 reasury Department. Report cf the 

Engineer in charge of the progress in the erection of the Capitol 
ex'^ension for the year 1857. Annual report of the 

Engineer in charge of the Washington Aqueduct during the year 
1857. Annual report of the.. 

Engineers for the service of the army during the year ending June 
30, 1859. Estimates of the colonel of 

Engineers of the army of the operations of hia department during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the 
colonel of............. — 

Engineera of the army of the operations of the Military Academy 
during the year 1857. Annual report of the colonel Of 

Engineers of the army. Annual report of the colonel of engineers, 
stating the necessity for additional.. 

Estimates for appropriations during fiscal year ending June 30, 
1859. Statement of 

EsUmates for appropriations for the per diem and mileage of the 
members and senators of the two Houses of Congress during 
the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the oflBces of the 
Clerk of the House and Secretary of the Senate during the 
year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the office of Superin- 
tendent of the I^iblic Printing, and for paper required by 
the same during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Court of Claims 
during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Executive 
during the year ending June 30, 1859... 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Department of 
State during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Treasury D^^^fcd 
partment during the year ending June 30, 1869 



744 



10 

12 
2 

6 

1 

1 

6 
6 

1 
2 
2 

1 

2 
2 



74 

lis 

2 
17 

3 
3 

17 

17 

3 
2 
2 
1 
2 



41 

462 

364 
288 

485 
443 

90 

40 

225 

199 

168 
283 

188 

187 

a 



itw 



<^oo 



?og 



8 

9 

9 

10 

11 



INDEX. 



21 



Tide. 



Etttniatos for appropriatioiis for the support of the Department of 
the Interior daring the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the War Depart- 
ment during the year ending June 30, 1859 

&timates for appropriations for the support of the Navy Depart- 
ment daring the year ending June 30, 1859 

Ertimates for appropriations for the support of the Post Office De- 
partment during the year ending June 30, 1859 .. 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the mint of the 
United States and its branches, and assay office, during the 
year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for i^>propriations Tor the support of the goyemments in 
the Territories during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the judiciary during 
the year ending June 30, 1859......... ........ 

Estimates for iq>propriations for the support of the independent 
traasary during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the continuation of the survey of 
the coast of the United States during the year ending June 
SO, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the light-house 
esta* lishment during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the expenses of intercourse with 
foreign nations during the year ending June 30, 1859 ..•••. 

Estimates for appropriations for surveying the public lands duriog 
the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the payment of pensions during 
the year ending Jane 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the current and contingent ex- 
penses of the Indiui Department, and fulfilling treaties with 
the Tarious Indian tribes during the year ending June 30, 
1859 

Estimates for i^>propriations for the support of the army during the 
yestf ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Military Academy 
during the year ending June SO, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the repairs, preservation, and con- 
struction of fortifications during the year ending June 30, 
1869 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the navy during the 
year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the penitentiary in 
the District of Columbia during the year ending Jane 30, 
1869 

Estimates for appropriations for public buildings, grounds, &c., 
during the year ending June SO, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Adjutant Gene- 
ral's department of the army during the year ending June 
30, 1869 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Quartermaster 
General's department of the army during the year ending 
June 30, 1859 

Ertimates for appropriations for the support of the Surgeon Gene- 
ral's department of the army during the year ending June 
30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Ordnance depart- 
ment of the army during the year ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Engineer depart- 
ment of the army during the year ending June 30, 1859 



Vol. 



Part. 



Digitized by 



Doe. 



Ptge. 



17 
148 

21 
169 

26 
621 
944 

26 

(27 
17S 

30 

31 

37 

38 
39 
41 

43 

47 
126 

47 
130 

49 

60 



61 
63 

213 
946 



120 
122 

168 

173 

190 
190 



b 



oogl^ 



22 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Bureau of Ord- 
DHDce and Hydrography of the navy during the year ending 
June 3«, 1869. Ktatementof 

Estimates for Appropriations for the support of the Bureau of Yards 
and Docks of the navy during the year ending June 30, 1859. 
Statement of ... 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Bureau of Con- 
struction, Equipment, and Repair of the navy during the 
year ending June 30, 1859. Statement of the 

Estinuites for appropriations for the support of the Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing of the navy for the year ending June 
30, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for that portion of the naval service 
under the cognissance of the Bureau of Provisions and Cloth- 
ing, for the year ending June 30, 1859. Btatement of the 

ESstimates for appropriations for the support of the Bureau of Medi- 
cine and Surgery of the navy during the year ending June 
30, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the medical depart- 
ment of vessels in commission, navy yards, naval stations, 
marine corps, and coast survey, for the year ending June 
30, 1869. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Paymaster's de- 
partment of the marine corps during the year ending June 
30, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Quartermaster's 
department of the marine corps during the year ending June 
30, 1859. Statementof the 

Estimates for appropriations for the pay of the commissioned and 
warrant officers of the- navy and the engineer corps for the 
year ending June SO, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the southwest exe- 
cutive huilding during the year ending June 30, 1859. 

Statementof the.... .......... 

' Estimates for appropriations for the pay of officers of the navy em- 
ployed on ordnance duty during the year ending June 30, 
1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for ordnance and ordnance stores, 
lahor, and contingent expenses for the year ending June 30, 
1869. Statemtnt of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Naval Observa- 
tory and Hydrographical office during the year ending June 
SO, 1869. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the pay of officers of the navy at- 
tached to recruiting stations during the year ending June 
30, 1869. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the pay of officers of the navy at- 
tached to navy yards and stations during the year ending 
June 30, 1854. Statement of the— 

Estimates for appropriations for the construction and completion of 

works and for current repairs at the several navy yards dur- 

* ing the year ending June 30, 1869. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the construction and completion of 
works and current repairs at the several naval hospitals dur- 
ing the year ending June 30, 1859. Statement of the 

Estimates for appropriations for the construction and completion of 
works and current repairs at the several naval magazines 
during the year ending June 30, 1869. Statement of the. .. 

Estimates for appropriations for construction, equipment, &c , of 
vessels, and for fuel and hemp fur the navy during the year 

ending June 30, 1859. Statement of the ....i 

Digitized 



Vol. 



I. 



1 

1 
f2 



Part. 



1 

r2 

1 



Doc. 



by 



L-oogle 



INDEX. 



23 



TiUe. 



EBttiDAles of fandfl required for subdstence of troops for the Utah 
expedition. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting.. 

Estimate for expenses growing out of the reciprociiy treaty with 
Great Britain. Letter of the Secretary of State, transmitting 
an - 

Iktimate for an appropriation for surveying the public lands and 
private land claims in California during the year ending June 
30, 1858. Letter of the Secretai-y of the Treasury, trans- 
mitting an . . 

Estimate for an appropriation to supply deficiency for conservatory 
and stables at the President's house. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, transmitting an 

Estimate for an appropriation for deficiency for the Post Ofiioe De- 
Letter of the 



Vol. 



9 



partment for the year ending June 30, 1858. 

Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting- an....... 

Intimates of appropriations for completing the harbors on Delaware 
river. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting....... 

Estimates for repairs of works in Plymouth harbor. Letter of the 
Secretary of War, transmitting 

Estimates of appropriations for the mail service for the year ending I 

June 30, 1859 j 11 

Estimates of appropriations for the foreign mail service for the year 
ending June 30, 1859 

Estimates for the Indian service on the Pacific coast and in remote 
Territories upon either side of the Bocky mountains, &c., for 
the year ending June 30, 1859. Supplemental .... 

Estimate of expenses of taking the census in the Territory of Min- 
nesota 

Estimates for clerk hire, office rent, &c., in the several land dis- 
tricts in the States and Territories 

Estimates for fulfilling treaty stipulations with the Pawnee Indians. 

Ertimates for the preservation of peace in the northern superin- 
tendency... ..... 

Brtimates for carrying stipulations of sgreement with the Sioux 
and Fort Pierre Indians ......... ...... .... 

Executive during the year ending June 30, 1857. Estimates for 
appropriations for the support of the..... ...... .......... 

Expenditures of the government during the year ending June ) 
30, 1857. Statement of the amount of the receipts and .. ) 

Expenditures of the government during the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1857. Statement of the receipts and..... 

Expenditures of collection of the customs in the Pacific ports from 
July 1, 1850, to June 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Expenditures of the maiine hospital fund during the year ending 
Jane 30, 1857. Statement of the receipts and 

Expenditures of the government, annually, from 1789 to June ) 
30, 1857. Statement of the amount of the ............ ) 

Expenditures under the direction of the Commissioner of Public 
Buildings during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement 
of the receipts and .... 

Expenditures for the recruiting service of the army during the 

year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the.............' 2 

Expenditures of the government for the construction and repairs 
of custom-houses, marine hospitals, court-houses, post offices, 
branch mints, &c., during the year ending September 30, 

1857. Statement of the 

Expenditures of the government for the collection of customs 

from 1850 to 1857. Statement of the 

Expenditures of the Quartermaster General's department of the 
United States army during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the . 



11 



Part 



Doc. I Page. 

33 
35 

il 

42 

43 
44 
48 
90 
91 

93 
110 

122 

134 

135 
136 



1 

3 

13 

3 

3 

3 

3 

60 

2 

a 



9 
33 



40 

138 
272 



728 
80 

183 
40 



Digitized by 



2 154 

Google 



24 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Expenditures of the pay department United States army during 
the year ]857. Statement of the 

Expenditures for ordnance and ordnance stores of the army daring 
the year 1857. Statement of the ................. 

Expenditures at the national armories during the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Expenditures of the Post Office Department during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1857. Beport of the Auditor of the Treasury 
for the Post Office Deputment of the 

Expenditures on account of the different Territories of the United 
States from 1845 to June 30, 1857. Letter of the Sec 
retary of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of 

Expenditures of the contingent fund of the Post Office Department 
for the year 1857. Report of the Postmaster General, trans- 
mitting a statement of the .. 

Expenditures of the contingent fund of the Navy Department for 
the year 1857. Report of the Sjcretary of the Mavy of 
the 

Exploring expedition directed to he transferred to the Smithsonian 
Institution. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, respect- 
ing collections of 

Explorations of the Amoor river. Letter of the Secretary of State, 
relative to the ••...... 

Exports from and imports into the United States of certain articles 
during the quarter ending September 30, 1857. Statement 
of the - - 

Exports of bullion and coin, annually, from 1821 to 1857, inclusive. 
Statement of the amount of • 

Exports, annually, from beginning of the government to June 30, 
1857. Statement of the amount of 

Exports of manufactured articles of domestic produce to foreign 
countries, from June SO, 1845, to Jane 30, 1857. Statement 
of the 

Exports of the United States, annually, from 1821 to 1857. State- 
ment of the value of domestic — ... 

Exports of domestic produce, &c , of the United States, annually, 
from 1847 to 1857, inclusive. Statement exhibiting a sum- 
mary view of the — 

Exports of foreign merchandise and domestic produce, annually, 
from 1821 to 1857. Statement of the value of 

Exports of breadstufiis and provisions, annually, from 1821 to 1857. 
Statement of the value of the l 

Exports of cotton, annually, from 1821 to 1857, with the average 
cost per pound. Statement of the quantity and value of 
the 

Exports of tobacco and rice, annually, from 1821 to 1857, inclusive. 
Statement of the quantity and value of the 

Exports of the manufactured and unmanufactured products of 
foreign countries, from 1840 to 1857, and the exports of 
domestic products of like character during the same period. 
Statement of the value of the 

Exports to Canada and other British possessions from July 1, 1851, 
to June 30, 1857. Statement of the value of the 

Exports of pig iron into the United States from 1820 to 1857. 
Statement of the quantity and value of the ...... 

Exports of domestic coal for the last thirty-two years. Statement 
of the value of the 

Exports of goods, wares, and merchandise, the growth, produce, ^ 
and manufacture of the United States, daring the year I 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the quantity and | 
value of the .•.•.•...•••...• .... j 



Vol. 

2 
2 
2 

2 
11 

9 

10 

12 
12 



Part. 

2 

2 
2 



Doc. I Page. 

2 162 

2 536 
2 \ 640 

2 1093 



79 
56 

82 

117 
98 



3 38 

3 274 
3 275 



3 
3 

8 
3 
3 

3 
8 

3 
3 
3 
3 



282 
285 

287 
292 
298 

299 
300 

302 
313 
330 
334 



Digitized by 



Googje 



INDEX. 



26 



Title. 



Exports of goods, wans, sod merchsQdise, of the growth, prodace, | 
and maaufactore of foreign coantries, dnring the year end- |- 
iogJimeSO, 1857. Statement of the ) 

Exports of goods, wares, and merchandise, of the growth, produce, 
and mannfactiire of the United States, from each collection 
district, daring the jear ending June 30, 1857. Statement 
of the 

Exports of goods, wares, and merchandise, of the growth, prodnoe, 
and mannfiM^ture of foreign countries, from each collection 
district, duriog the year ending June SO, 1857. Statement 
of the 

Exports to each foreign country, during the year ending June 30, 
1857. Statement of the value of the 

Exports of each State and Territory during the year ending June 
30, 1857. SUtement of the value of the 

F. 

Feeje islands, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with the 

Finances of the country during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Bcport of the Secretary of the Treasury on the condition of 
the 

Fines and deductions from the pay of mall contractors, for failures 
to deliver the mail, during the year 1857. Report of the 
Postmaster General, transmitting a statement of the....... 

Flax, and the manu£scture thereof, annually, from 1840 to 1857. 
Statement of the imports and the exports of foreign and 
domestic, and the home consumption of 

Florida for the year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor general 
of puhlic lands for the State of 

Florida reefs and keys for the year 1867. Report of the disbursing 
agent of the Coast Survey of expenditures for survey of 
the 

Foreign intercourse during the year ending June 30, 1859. Esti- 
mates for appropriations for the expenses of 

Foreign interoourae during the year ending June 30, 1857. I/'tter 
of the Secretary of State, of the contingent expenses of 
the 

Foreign mail service for the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates 
for appropriations for the.............. 

Foreign countries, and a statement of the amount of postage de- 
rived therefrom. Letter o? the Postmaster Oeneral, tians- 
mitting copies of contracts made for carrying the mails to... 

Fortifications and defences during the year ending June 30, 1859. 
Eiitimates for appropriations for 

Fortifications of the seaboard and northern frontier of the United 
States during the year 1857. Annual report of the colonel 
of engineers of the army, on the condition of the 

Fort Riley. Letter of the Secretary of War, relative to the sale of 
the military reservation at.... ... 

Fort Defiance to the Colorado river. Letter of the Secretary of ( 
War, relative to the wagon road from « ( 

France. Postal convention between the United States and 

Fiance. Tables of mail arrangements between the United States and 

France during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

Frackfert-on-the-Main during the year 1857. Commercial rela- 
tions of the United States with 

Friendly and Nav*gator's islands during the year 1857. Commer- 
cial relations of the United States with the 



Vol. 
U 

14 

14 
14 
14 

5 

1 

10 

1 
2 

3 
1 

1 

9 
1 



11 

12 

13 

2 

2 



Put 



Doc. 



1^ 



17 

1 

81 

3 
2 

20 

1 

4 
1 

47 

1 



94 

108 

124 

2 

2 

17 



Pife- 



66 
142 



284 

328 
510 
614 

457 



1 



302 
218 

12 
41 



30 

213 

91 



61 



168 



1022 

1030 

44 

326 



17 



122 
( 203 



|itized"byGO0gf^ 



26 



INDEX. 



TlUe. 



G. 



Geary, late governor of Kansas, for extraordinary expenaea incurred 
by him. Letter of Uie Secretary of State, asking an appro- 
priation to reimlmrse John W , 

Geological reconnoissance of the Territories of Oregon and Wash- 
ington. Statement of the progress in the 

Geological surveys of Oregon and Washington Territories. Message 
of the PreBident of the United States, transmitting ... 

Gold coins. Report of the director of the mint of the United States 
upon the fineness and value of certain foreign.... ..... 

Gold deposited at the mint of the United States and branches, and 
assay office, from 1804 to 1857, inclasive. Statement of the 
amount of domestic... .......... ... 

Gold coinage of the mint of the United States and branches, and 
assay office, from 1792 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the 

Goods in warehouse on July I, 1866, and on each succeeding month 
to June 30, 1857. Statement of the amount of 

Graduation act. Rf port of the Commissioner of the General Land 
Office, giving the number of entries confirmed under the land 

Great Britain. Letter of the Secretary of State, transmitting an 
estimate for expenses of the oommisijion under the recipro- 
city treaty with.................. ............ ... 

Great Britain. Letter of the Secretary of State, relative to the 
number of troops engaged in the service of the United States 
in the late war with.. .................. 

Great Britain during the year 1867. Commercial relations of the 
United States with.: 

Greece during the year 1867. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 



Hamburg. Postal convention between the United States and..... 

Hanse I'owns during the year 1867. Commercial relations of the 
United States with the 

Harbors and rivers of the Atlantic coast during the year 1867. 
Annual rep(rt of the colonel of engineers of the United 
States army, in relation to the improvement of the....... 

Harbors on the northern and northwestern lal&es during the year 
1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographical Engineers of 
the anny on the condition of the improvements of the...... 

Harbors on Delaware river. Letter of the Secretary of War, trans- 
mitting estimates of appropriations for completing the...... 

Harbor. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting estimates for 
the repair of worlds in Plymouih... ......... ........ 

Hastings, late collector of customs at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Relative to the alleged robbery of John.. .... 

Hayti during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
State's with 

Hemp and Manilla, and the manufactures thereof, annually, from 
1840 to 1857. Statement of the value of the imports and 
exports of foreign and domestic, and home consumption of. . 

Holland during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

Honduras during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 

United States with 

' House of Representatives. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury 
to the Fir^t Auditor, respecting the contingent fund of the., 

House of Representatives is ready for occupation. Letter of thn 
Secretary of War, stating that the new hall of the......... 

Digitized by 



Vol. 


Part. 


12 




2 


1 


13 

1 


.... 


1 


••.. 


f' 


--. 


1 





2 


1 


9 


.... 


10 


.... 


I' 


.... 


5 





2 


3 


6 





2 


2 


2 


2 


9 


.... 


9 


.... 


11 


.... 


1' 


.... 


1 
6 


.... 


5 

1 




'^•ir-V. 



Doe 



.. 111| 

I 
2! 

126 

3 

3 
3 

3 
2 

35 

72! 



95 



48 



71 



( 61 
\ 272 

314 

97 



1^ ) 233 



17 



17 



I 2 
I 23 

44 

48 

95 
17 



17 
17 



171 



1047 
142 



218 
283 



204 
457 



302 

396 

472 

82 



y^Grrbg!^ 



INDEX. 



2t 



TiUe. 



ItlinoiB for the year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor gen- 
eral of pohlic lands in the State of 

Illinoifl. Statement of the unsold pnblic lands in the State of 

Imports into the United States of certain articles during the quar- 
ter ending September SO, 1867. Statement of the......... 

Imports, annually, from July 1, 1849, to 1857, the amount of cus- 
toms each year, and the expenses of collection during the 
same period. Statement of the...... 

Imports of coin and bullion, annually, from 1821 to 1827. State- 
mentof the amount of .. . .... .... 

Imports, annually, from the beginning of the government to June 
30, 1857. Statement of the amount of 

Imports, re-exported and consumed, and estimated population, and 
rate of consumption, jxr eapUa, from 1821 to 1857. State- 
ment of the amount of the 

Importis into the United States annually consumed from 1821 to 
1857. Statement of the value of the 

Impbrts, annually, of certain articles, and the amount of duty 
which accrued on eaich, from June 30, 1844, to June 30, 
1857. Statement of the valueof . 

Imports of wine, spirits, &c., imported annually, from 1843 to 1867, 
inclusive ...... . . 

Imports, annually, from 1821 to 1857. Statement of the value of 

Imports of iron, manufactures of iron and iron and steel, steel, 
sugar, wines, and all fabrics cf which wool, cotton, silk, 
flax, or hemp is a component -part, annually, from 1847 to 
1867, inclusive, with the duties which accrued thereon during 
each year, and of brandies from 1856 to 1857. Statement 
of the value of the. .. .. ..... 

Imports from Canada and other British possessions, from July 1, 
185 1, to June 30, 1867. Statement of the value of 

Imports of certain articles in 1866 and 1857, with the increase or 
decrease in quantity and value. Statement of the quantity 
and value, value per bushel, pound, &c., of 

Imports of pig iron into the United States from 1820 to 1857. 
Statement of the quantity and value of the 

Imports of coal, and consumption of foreign imports less domestic 
exports, and total consumption of foreign coal for the last 
32 years. Statement of the value of the 

Import duty on United States domestic exports to Great Britain, 
France, Spain, Holland, Belgium, and Brazil ; also the duty 
on like articles imported into the United States. Statement 
of the 

Imports of goods, wares, and merchandise of the growth, produce, 
and manufacture of foreign countries, during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1867. Statement of the quantity and value 
of the 

Imports of goads. Wares, and merchandise of the growth, produce, 
and manufacture of foreign countries, into each collection 
district of the United States, during the year ending June 

80, 1867. Statement of the 

Imports from each foreign country during the year ending June 30, 

A867. Statement of the valueof the 

Imports of each State and Territory of the United States during 
the year endiog June 30, 1857. Statement of the value of 

the 

Imports through the indirect trade of the United States during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of *the value of 
the 



Vol. 



10 



Pan. 



■Digital 



:elrC5f' 



Doc. 



Pige* 



148 



38 



3 


40 


3 


274 


3 


275 


3 


284 


3 


285 



288 

294 
296 



3 


309 


3 


313 


3 


320 


3 


330 



334 

364 

152 

370 
610 



514 



28 



INDEX. 



Tide. 



Indian department, and falfiUing treaties with varioos Indian 
tribes, dnring the year ending June 30, 1869. Estimates 
for appropriations for the current and contingent expenses 
of the -.-. 

Indian Aflfairs, of the operations of his office and the condition of 
the Indian tribes during the year 1867. Annual report of 
the Ck>mmissioner of...... 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



Ptgm'S and doeumaUi aeoon^panying tht a6oM report. 

1. Report of Marcus H. Johnson, agent for Indians in 
NewYorli 

2. Letter from Philip E. Thomas, respecting the Sen- 
eca Indians 

3. Beport of N. H. Pariter, interpreter, as to the con- 
dition of the Senecas at Cattaraugus ........... 

4* Extracts from a report made to the Society of 
Friends respecting the Indians of New York.... 



MACKINAC AGINCT. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



6. Beport of A. M. Mtch, agent for Indians in Michi- 
gan 

6. Report of N. F. Murray, teacher at Sheboygan 

7 . Report of Timothy Hegney , teacher at Grand Portage 

8. Report of Stephen D. Caley, teacher at L'Ause .... 

9. Report of William O' Donovan, teacher at Garden 

Island ... 

No. 10. Report of John B. Weiluunp, teacher at Cross Vil- 
lage 

No. 11. Report of Frederick Moscowitt, agent for Indians 

in the vicinity of Green Bay.............. ... 

No. 12. Report of Joseph M. Ostroph, teacher of music to 

the Menomoneea.. 

No. 13. Report of Jane Dousman, teacher to the Menomo- 

nees 

No. 14. Report of Rosalie Dousman, teacher to the Menom- 

onees ........ ........... 

No. 16. Report of Frederick Hass, farmer to the Menom- 

onees ....... ...............•....•••••.••.« 



Vol. 



VORTHXBN SUPBBIKTIKDKNCT. 



I 



No. 16. Report of William J. CuUen, superintendent | 

No. 17. Report of David B. Herriman, agent for the Chip- 

pewasof the MissisBippi......... ..... . | 

No. 18. Report of Charles £. Flandrau, agent for the Sioux., 
No. 19. Report of James Magner, farmer to the Lower Sioux.- 

No. 20. o Report of Captain Bernard B. Bee, U. S. army 

No. 21. Telegraphic despatch from Superintendent Huebsch- 
mann .................................... 

No. 22 . Report of Superintendent Huebschmann ..... 

No. 23. Letter from Agent Flandrau to newspaper ** Pioneer 

and Democrat '........................ 

No. 24. Letter from Agent Flandrau to Superintendent 

Huebschmann .... . .......... 

No. 26. Letter from Superintendent Huebschmann to Gov- 
ernor Mcdary ...... .... ...... 



2 



Ptft. 



Doe. 



PHe. 



( 47 
] ISO 



341 
345 
348 
349 

355 
366 

367 

360 

360 



^ Papers from No. 20 to No. 68, inclusive, relate to the 
|>arty of Sioux. 



I at Spirit Lake by a 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDEX. 



29 



TiUe. 


Vol. 


Part. 


Doc. 


Pa«e- 


Indian AffidiB, report Commissioner, papers accompanying — Con. — 
No. 26. Letter from Superintendent Huebschmann to Col. 
Alexander, United States army 


2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

DigSiz 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

•edJy 


2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2^ 


361 


No. 27. Telegraphic despatch from Agent Flandrau 

No. 28. Letter from Commissioner of Indian Afl&drs to Su- 
perintendent Cullen .... . «... 


361 
362 


No. 29. Telegraphic despatch from Superintendent Cullen 
to Commissioner of Indian Affairs ...-.--...... 


362 


No. 80. Telegraphic despatch from Commissioner of Indian 
Affietirs to Superintendent Cullen --........ 


363 


No. 31. Telegraphic despatch irom Commissioner of Indian 
ASain to Agent Flandrau 


363 


No. 32. Letter from Commissioner of Indian Affairs to K. 

Pritchette, appointing him special agent 

No. 33. Beportof Superintendent Cullen 


363 
366 


No. 34. Letter from Special Agent Pritchette 


372 


No. 35. Letter from Special Agent Pritehette 


373 


No. 36. Letter from Special Agent Pritehette 


374 


No. 37 . Letter from Specials Agent Pritehette 


376 


No. 38. Beportof A. J. Campbell, interpreter 


376 


No. 39 . Narrative given by individual Indians 


377 


No. 40. Minutes of examination of Ta-te-yoh-he 


378 


No. 41. StatementofSee-see-toan and Wahpay-toan. warriors 
No. 42. Telegraphic despatehfrom Superintendent Cullen .. 
No. 43. Telegraphic despatch in reply to Superintendent 
Cullen 


378 
380 

380 


No. 44. Beport of Special Agent Pritehette 


381 


No. 46. Telegraphic despateh to Special Agent Pritehette— 

No. 46. Telegraphic despateh to Superintendent Cullen 

No. 47. Beport of Special Agent Pritehette 


383 
383 

383 


No. 48 . Beport of Superi ntendent Cullen .- 


384 


No. 49. Report of Special Agent Pritehette 


387 


No. 50. Proceedings of the first council held with the Sioux. 
No. 51. Proceedings of second council held with the Sioux. 
No. 52. Proceedings of the third council held with the Sioux. 
No. 53. Beport of Jonathan E. Fletcher, agent for the Win- 
nebagoes .--. --• -----....-..-... . 


396 
397 
400 

403 


C1»TBAL SUPKRIKTSNDKMCT. 

No. 54. Beport of Alfred Cumming, superintendent 

No. 56. Beport of Alfred J. Vaughan, agent for Blackfeet 
Indians .-..--.----.-.-. .. ..... 


405 
408 


No. 66. Beport of A. H. Bedfield, agent for Indians of Up- 
per Missouri....- ---- ....... 


411 


No. 57. Statement of Blalcolm Clarke relative to condnct 
of a party of Assinaboines 


426 


No. 58. Speech of *• Long Hair," chief of the Gros Ventres 
No. 59. Beport of Thomas S. Twiss, agent for Indians of 
the Upper Platte 


426 

428 


No. 60. Beport of Bobert C. Miller, agent for Indiana on 
the Arkansas.. .... . ... .... 


429 


No. 61. Letter from Colonel Sumner, United States army, 
to Agent Miller 


436 


No. 62. Beport of John B. Bobertson, agent for the Omahas. 
No. 63. Beportof Charles Sturgiss, superintendent of Omaha 
school . ... 


437 
439 


No. 64. Beport of William W. Dennison, agent to the Ottoes 
and Missourias and Pawnees.... .. 


440 


No. 66. Beport of D. A. Murdock, superintendent of the 
Ottoe and Missouria school 


ogk 





30 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Indian Afifairs, 
No. 66. 

No. 67. 

No. 68. 

No. 69. 
No. 70. 

No. 71. 
No. 72. 

No. 73. 

No. U. 

No. 75. 

No. 76. 

No. 77. 

No. 78. 

No. 79. 

No. 80. 

No. 81. 



report Comraisfiioner, papain aocompaoying— Con. — 
Beport of John Lorion, fanner to the Ottoes and 

Mlfisourias .. ....................... 

Beport of Daniel YandeTBlice. agent for the lowayg 

and the Sacs and Foxes of the Miasouri 

Report of S. M. Irvin, Buperintehdent of the loway 

and Sac and Fox mission 

Report of Royal Baldwin, agent for the Kickapoos . 
Beport of E. M. Hubbard, superintendent Eickapoo 

mission.................................... 

Report of B. F. llobinson, agent for the Delawares.. 
Report of John G. Pratt, superintendent Delaware 

school.. .............. 

Report of A. Arnold, agent for Shawnees and Wy- 

andotts 

Report of Simon D. Harvey, superintendent of 

*' Friends" miesion to Shawnees 

Beport of Thomas Johnson, superintendent Shaw- 
nee Methodist school . .. ...... ..... 

Beport of William £. Murphy, agent for the Potta- 

watomies..... .. . . ........ 

Beportof J. B Duerinck, superintendent St Mary's 

Pottawatomie mauual labor school 

Beport of John Jackson, superintendent Baptist 

Pottawatomie manual labor school ......^..... 

Beport of Burton A James, agent for Sacs and 

Foxes of the Mississippi 

Beport of John Montgomery, agent for the *'EawB" 

or Kansas Indiaos. .... . .............. 

Beport of Maxwell McCaslin, agent for Weas and 

Piankeshaws, Kaskaskias and Peorias, and Mia- 

mies . ... ....................... 



No 82. 
No. 83. 

No. 84. 

No. 85. 
No. 86. 
No. 87. 

No. 88. 

No. 89. 

No. 90. 

No. 91. 
No. 92. 

No. 93. 

No. 94. 

No. 95. 

No. 96, 



SOUTBXaH SVPERINTENDEHCT. 

Beport of Ellas Bector, superintendent . 

Beport of Andrew J. Dorn, agent for the Osages, 
Qnapaws, Senecas and Shawnees, and Seuecas.. 

Beport of John Shocnmakers, superintendent Osage 
manual labor school . . 

Beport of J. L. French, farmer for the Quapaws.... 

Beport of George Butler, agent for the Cherokees.. 

Beport of D. D. Hitchcock, marshal of Cherokee 
temperance society...... . ........ 

Beport of S. A. Worcester, missionary to the Chero- 
kees -..••. . ,...--....... 

Beport of W. A. Duncan, superintendent of Chero- 
kee public schools . . 

Message of John Boss, principal chief of the Chero- 
kees, to the national council 

Beport of William H Garrett, agent for the Creeks, 

lloport of Josiah W. Washboume, agent for the 
Seminoles ........... 

Beport of John Lilley, superintendent of the Semi- 
nole mission . -. 

Beport of Douglass H. Cooper, agent for the Choc- 
taws and Chickasaws 

. Beport of Cyrus Byington, missionary to the Choc- 
taws at Stockbridge ....••.... ..... 

Beport of 0. P. Stark, missionary to the Choctaws 
at Good Land station .•••...^.. .....••, 



Vol. I Part. Doc. 



Paft. 



Digitized by 



Lioogle 



INDEX. 



31 



TIU*. 



Afhire, 
No. 97. 


No. 


98. 


No. 


99. 


No. 


100. 


No. 


101. 


No. 


102 


No. 


103. 


No. 


10(. 


No. 


105. 


No. 


106 


No. 


107 


No. 


108 


No. 


109 


No. 


110 


No. 


111 



No. 112. 
No. 113. 
No. 114. 
No. 115. 
No. 116. 
No. 117, 
No. 118. 



No 119. 
No. 120. 

No 121. 
No. 122 

No. 123. 

No. 124. 



report Commiflsioner, paperg aoooinpau7'g--Coii. — 
. Report of C. C. Oopeland, xniflBionarj to the Cboo- 

tawsat Bennington station....... 

William and Lewis Cass and Simon Hancock, natire 

Baptist preachers 

, Report of J. D. Chamberlain, superintendent of 

lyannbi female seminary — .. . 

. Report of H. Balentine, superintendent of Koonsha 

female academy 

. Report of C. Kiogsbury, superintendent of the 

Chuahla female seminary............ 

. Report of T. W. Mitchell, superintendent of Port 

Coffee and New Hope academies 

. Report of Ebeneser Hotchkin, missionary and prin- 
cipal of the Living Land school 

. Report of John Edwards, superintendent of Whee- 

lock female seminary 

. Report of Qaylord L. More, superintendent of 

Spencer academy...... .................. 

. Report of W. R. Baker, superintendent of the 

Armstrong academy 

. Report of J. H. Carr, superintendent of Bloon^eld 

Chickasaw academy 

. Report of J. C. Robinson, superintendent of Chick- 
asaw manual labor academy 

. Report of F. M. Payne, teacher in Chickasaw 

manual labor school . . . .... 

. Report of E. Cunch, superintendent of the Co'.bert 

institute ...... ...... . .... 

. Report of A. H. McKissick, agent for the Wichitas 

and other wild tribes 

nXAS AGKNCT. 

Report of Robert 8 Neighbors, supervising agent 

for the Indians in Texas. 

Letter of (>uperviBing Agent Neighbors to Major 

Q<neral Twiggs, relative to Indian relations 

Report of M. Letper, agent for Indians of the 

Camanche agency 

Report of S. P. Ross, agent for Indians of the 

Braaus agency . .. .... ......... 

Peport of Samuel Church, farmer at the Brazos 

agency , 

Report of Jonathan Murray, farmer at the Brazos 

agency ..... . 

Report of James M. Taylor, blacksmith at the 

Btazoe agency , 

NSW MEXICO SUPKBIimENnKHCT. 

Report of J. L. Collins, superintendent.. '... 

Report of Christopher Carson, agent for the Mo- 

huache Utahs .... ., 

Report of Samuel M. Tost, agent for the Pueblos., 
Report of Diego Archuleta, agent for the Utahs, 

Capotes, and Apache Jicarillas . . 

Report of M. Steck, agent for the Indians within 

the Apache agency 

Letter of Superintendent Collins, transmitting 

copies of letters from Agent Steck and Colonel 

R. C. Bonneville, United States army , 



Vol. 



Part. 



Doc., Page. 



iteib^Ctcjchglg, 



527 
528 
528 
629 
530 
532 
533 
635 
537 
538 
539 
541 
543 
546 
548 



2 550 
2 ! 553 



555 
557 
558 
559 
560 

561 

567 
569 

572 

576 



J 



32 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Ihdiaii Affiiira, report Commiiisioner, papers acoompany'g — Con. — 

Kg. 125. Letter from Agent Steck, relative to aa interview 

held with a deputation of Coyotero Apaches..... 

Ko. 126. Letter from Colonel Bonneville, describing the 

region watered by the Gila river ..... ..... 

Ko. 127. Beport of Lieutenant Sylvester Mowry, describing 
the Tenitory of Aiizona, or the ''Oadsden pur- 
chase/' and the tribes inhabiting the same ..... 

UTAD SVFEBUnaSiVMKCY, 

No. 128. Letter from Agent Garland Hurt, relative to Mor- 
mon missionaries ....... ............. 

No. 129. Communication from Acting Commissioner of In- 
dian Afifairs to Secretary of the Interior, upon 
the subject of these missionaries.......... 

No. 180. Memoranda upon the same subject, made by the 
Acting Commissioner, for the consideration of 
the Secretary 

No. 131. Beport of George W. Armstrong, agent for the 
Indians in Utah 

No. 182. Letter from Brighsm Young, governor, to the 
Comminsioner of Indian Affairs 

No. 133. Beply of the Commissioner of Indian Afhirs to 
Governor Young ......••........•••... 



No. 
No. 


184. 
135. 


No. 


186. 


No. 


137. 


No. 

No. 


138. 
139. 


No. 


140. 


No. 


141. 


No. 


142. 


No. 


143. 


No. 


144. 


No. 


145. 


No. 


146. 


No. 


147. 


No. 


148. 


No. 


149. 


No. 


160. 



OEBQOM AMD WASHIKOTOM SUPKBIMTiainKNCT. 



Beport of J. W. Nesmith, superintendent 

Beport of E. C. Fitzhugh, special agent for the 
Neuk-sark, Samish, and Lummis tribes 

Beport of G. A. Taige, local agent at Fort Kitsap 
reservation 

Bfport of M. T. Simmons, agent for Indians of 
Puget's Sound district 

Beport of B C. Fay, local agent at Penn's cove... 

Beport of Thomas 8. Hanna, special agent for the 
Indians on Puget's Sound 

Beport of W. B. Gosnell, agent for the Nitqually, 
Payallup, and other Indians 

Beport of Sidney 8. Ford, sr., special agent for 
Indians in western district of Washington Ter- 
ritory ••..••••.. 

Beport of J. Cain, agent for Indians on Columbia 
river, from its mouth to the Dalles ........ 

Beport of A. Townsend, local agent at White S;il- 
mon reservation ..... 

Beport of A H. Bobie, special agent for the In- 
dians between Columbia river and the Cascade 
mountains 

Beport of William Craig, sub-agent for the Caynses 
and Nez Perc^ ....... ............... 

Beport of W. W. Baymond, sub-agent for the 
Indians within the Astoria district .... 

Beport of B. B. Metcalf, agent for the Indians 
within the Siletsa agency. .................... 

Beport of E. P. Drew, sub-agent for the Indians 
within the Umpqua sub-agency 

Beport of John F. Miller, agent for the Willamette 
tribes • 

Beport of John Ostrander, teacher of the Bogue 
Biverand Umpqua schooli ...iiti^ed 



Vol. 

2 

2 



Part. 'Doc. Pace. 



2 



2 



580 
582 

584 



a/lQdQglle656 



INDEX. 



33 



TiUe. 



Indkn Affidn, report ComminioDer, papers acoompany'g — Cont'd— 

No. 161. Report of Mary C. Ostrander, teacher of Willamette 
lichool 

No. 152. Report of Amaaa Howe, saperintendent of farming 
for Willamette tribes 

Na 153. Report of A. P. Dennison, agent for Indians of 
the northeastern district of Oregon 

Ko. 154. Report of R. H. Lansdaie, iigent for the Flat Head 
district 

No. 155. Letter from William Hchnor to Superintendent 
Nesmith, relative to Smith's River Indians 

Ko. 156. Reply of Superintendent Nesmith to William 
Tichnor 

Ko. 157. Letter from Brigadier General Clarke to Superin- 
tendent Nesmith........ 

Ko. 158. Reply of Superintendent Nesmith to Brigadier 
General Clarke ........ .... 

Ko. 159. Letter of Assistant Adjutant General Mackall to 
Superintendent Nesmith . ........ 

Ko. 160. Order of Assistant Adjutant General Mackall to 
Major Gamett 

Ko. 161. Report of Thomas J. Henley, superintendent..... 

No. 162. Report of H. P. Heintzelm'an) sub-agent for the 
Klamath reservation 

No. 163. Repot t of Vincent E. Geiger, agent for the Nome- 
Ladcee reservation 

No. 164. Report of H. L. Ford, sub-agent for the Mendo* 
cino reservation ............................ 

No. 165. Report of M. B. Lewis, Bub-sgent for the Fresno 
farm .......... .................. 

Ko. 166. Report of J. R. Vineyard, agent for the Indians of 
Tejon 

Ko. 167. Report of a reconnaissance through the country 
around Cape Mendocino, by Janes Tobin 

Ko. 168. Letter of Commissioner of Indian Affairs to Super- 
intendent Henley, relative to the concentration 
of the Indians upon the reservations in Cali- 
fornia. ..... 

Indians, during the year euding June 30, 1857. Statements of the 

disbursements of money and goods for the benefit of the 

Indian war in Oregon and Washington Territories. Letter from 

the Secretary of the Interior, transmittiog a report of J. 

Ron Browne, on the subject of the 

Indian aifidrs in the Territories of Oregon and Washington. Letter 

of the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting a report of J. 

Ross Browne, on the subject of 

Indian wars in Oregon and Washington Territories. Letter of the 

Secretary of War, transmitting a report of the commis- 
sioners to ascertain the expenses incurred in the 

Indian service on the Pacific coast and in remote Territories upon 

either side of the Rocky mountains, &c. Supplemental 

estimates for the 

Indian affairs in Oregon and Washington Territories, &c. Message 

of the President of the United States, transmitting corre- 
spondence and documents relating to . ..... 

Indian depredations in New Mexico. Report upon claims for. 

Indians. Annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury respect- 
ing the funds held in trust for the Chickasaw .... 

Indians. Estimates for fulfilling treaty stipulations with the i 

Pawnee ... ....... ..... . ...| 

Indians. Estimates for carrying out stipulations of agreement 

with the Sioux and Fort Pierre 



Vol. 



Part ;Doe, 



11 



Page. 

657 

658 

659 

663 

670 

670 

671 

672 

674 

674 
675 

678 

680 

682 

686 

689 

691 

694 



270 



12 ■.... 

13 I 

tl3;.... 3 ) 
j 1..... 133 f 

13 L...134 

lSg|t.edji^|00gle 



112 

123 

3 

133 



3 



34 



INDEX. 



Title. 



ladiao tribec, payable on time. Statement of amonnt due nnder 
treaties with Tarions ... 

Indians. Statement of tiie amount of stock held in trust for the 
Chicliasaw 

Indian reserves. Report of the Commigsioner of the General 
Land Office relative to the trust lands on the 

Indiana. Statement of the public lands unsold in the State of... . 

Insane of the army and navy and the District of Columbia, for the 
year ending June SO, 1867. Report of the Superintendent 
of the Hospital for the 

Interior during the year ending June 30, 1869. Estimates for 
appropriations for the support of the department of the.... 

Interior, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of 
the Department of the Interior during the year ending June 
30, 1867. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting a statement of the balances of appropria- 
tions for the service of the Interior Department remaining 
on July 1, 1867. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, eihibiUng the operations of the Interior Department 
during the year 1867. Report of the Secretary of the 



Papen aceon^Mutjfwg tht oboo€. 



Report of the CommiFsioner of the Ocneral Ijind Office 2 

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs 2 

Report of the Commissioner of Pensions 

Report of the Commisfioner of Public Buildings .......... 

Report of the Superintendent of the Gk>vemmeut Hospital 

for the Insane -.-. . 

Report of the Warden of the Penitentiary of the Listrict 

of Columbia , 

Report of the Engineer in charge of the Little Falls bridge 
in the District of Columbia 

Interior, transmitting the report of J. Ross Browne, on the subject 
of the Indian war in Oregon and Washington Territories 
Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting a report of J. lUws Browne, special agent, on 
the subject of Indian affairs in the Territories of Oregon 
and Washington. Letter of the Secretary of the 9 

Interior, transmitting a report of the Conunissioner of Public 
Buildings of the contracts made by his office during the 
year 1857. Letter of the Secretary of the 9 

Interior, in reference to the census of Minnesota. Report of the 

Secretary of the 9 

Interior, trrmsmitting papers in reference to certain private land 
claims in New Mexico. Letter of the Secretary of the. .... 

Interior, transmitting a statement showing the amount of land dis- 
posed of and the amount undisposed of on the 30th June, 
1857. Letterof the Secretary of the 9 

Interior, transmitting a tabular statement, showing the number of 
suits on the dockets of the United States courts during the 
year 1866. Letter of the Secretary of the 9 

Interior, transmitting a report of F. W. Lander, relative to the 
practicability of a railroad through the South P<i8m. Letter 
of the Secretary of the ..... ...... 

Interior, relative to the military expedition ordered into the Ter- 
ritory of Utah. Report of the Secretary of the 10 

Interior, communicating the report of John Claiborne on the con 

sumptiun of cotton io Europe. Letter of the Secretary of the. 10 

Interior, transmitting a statement of the unsold public lands in the 

States of Illinois and Indiana. Letter of the Secretary of the. _, 

Digitized by 



Vol. 

1 

1 

2 
10 

2 

U 



Part-i Doc. 

J 

I 

I 

3 
3 

2 

86 

2 
1 



Page. 

260 

270 

97 



733 

17 
148 



10 
2 



67 



78 
289 
698 
718 

733 

760 

774 



38 



39 



40 



49 
67 



68 



69 



70 
71 



86 



114 



?y^otS§k 



INDEX. 



35 



Tide. 



Interior, transmitting new echednieg of pneblo and private land 

daims in New Mexico Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior relative to the confltrnction of a railroad from Dubuqae to 
Sionx City, and branch from the mouth of the Tete de8 

Morta. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting an estimate for expenses of taking the census 

of Minnesota Territory. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, asidng an additional appropriation for the support of the 
penitentiary in the District of Columbia. Letter of the Sec- 
retary of the....... 

Interior, transmitting information relative to the Kansas half-breed 

reservations. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, relative to the claim of Joseph B. Johnson and P. J. 

Wheeling. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, respecting col lections of Exploring Expedition directed to 
be transferred to the Smithsonian Institution. Letter of the 

Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting the namts and residences of invalid pen- 
sioners. Letter of the Secretary of the...... . ...... 

Interior, transmitting estimates for clerk hire, ofiBce r<fnt, &c., for 
the several district land offices in the States and Territories. 

Letter of the Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting a report upon claims for depredations by 

Indians in Kew Mexico. Letter of the Kecretary of the 

Interior, transmitting estimates for fulfilling treaty stipub&tions 

with the Pawnee Indians Letter of the Secretary of the... 

Interior, submitting estimates for the preservation of peace in the 

northern superin tendency. Letter of the Secretary of the. . . 

Interior, submitting estimates lor carrying out stipulations of agree 

ment with the Sioux and Fort Pierre Indians. Letter of 

the Secretary of the 

Interior, transmitting a list of clerlis and other employes in the 
Department of the Interior, for the year 1857. Beport of 

the Secretary of the ... 

Ionian Bepublic, during the year 1867. Commercial relations of 

the United States with the 

Iowa, for the year 1867. Annual report of the surveyor general of 

public lands in the State of..^ — 

Iron, and manufactures of iron and sreel, imported annually, from 
1847 to 1867, with the duties which accrued thereon during 

each year. Statement of the value of 

Iron and steel, annually, from 1820 to 1867. Statement of the 
value of the imports of the foreign and exports of the foreign 
and domestic, and the home consumption of the manu&c- 

tures of........................ 

Iron. Statement exhibiting the values of home production and 
importations into the United States, from 1824 to 1^57, in- 
clusive ; the diflferent tariffs under which tke production and 
importations were made; aggregate values of production 
• and importations under each tariff ; increase less decrease of 

the same, and the annual average cost of 

Iron and steel, annually, from 1840 to 1867. Statement of the 
value of the imports of the foreign and exports of the foreign 
aud domestic, and the home consumption of the manufac- 
tures of - , 



Vol 

11 

11 
12 

12 
12 
12 

12 
IS 

13 
IS 
13 
18 

13 

9 
5 
2 



Part. 



J. 

Johnson and F. J. Wheeling. Letter of the Secretary of the In- 
terior relative to the claim of Joseph E 

Judiciary during the year ending June 30, 1869. Estimates for the 
support of the 



Doe. 

89 

92 
110 

113 
114 
110 

.117 
.119 

. 122 
. 128 
. 134 
. 136 

- 136 

. 63 

. 17 

2 



Par. 



171 
137 



3 809 



330 



332 



302 



12 

jiti^c 



116 



^iSw^^i 



36 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 




K. 

KanKUB, for the year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor general 
of public lands in the Territory of. ... . ...... 

Kansas. Correspondence of the Adjutant General of the United 
States army relative to the operations of the army in the 
Territory of .- - 

Kansas, during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographi- 
cal Engineers on the condition of the military roads in the 
Territory of . . ... 

Kansas, for the year 1857. Statement of the legislative expenses of.. 

Kansas, for extraordinary expenses incurred by him. Letter of the 
Secretary of State, asking an appropriation to reimburse John 
W. Geary, late governor of ...... 

Kansas half-breed reservations. Letter of the Secretary of the 
Interior, transmitting information relative to the.... .. 

Kansas into the Union, l^etter of the Secretary of Statj, asking an 
appropriation for carrying into cfftct the act for the admis- 
sion of the State of . 

Kansas, certain extraordinary expenses incurred by him. Letter 
of the Secretary of State, relative to the repayment to Robert 
J. Walker, late governor of .. 

Kansas. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting the report of 
Col. Johnston's survey of the southern t)Oundary line of.... 



Lakes during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographi- 
cal Eugineeis of the army of the progress in the survey of 
the northern and northwestern . 

Land Office during the year ending June 30, 1857. Estimates for 
appropriations for the support of the offi'e of the Commis- 
sioner of the General.. .„ ... 

Lands during the year ending June 30, 1869. Estimates for appro- 
priations for surveying the public 

Load Office, transmitting estimates for appropriations during the 
year ending June SO, 1859. Letter from the Commissioner 
of the General ....... ..... ...... .... .. 

Papen aeeompamfing (he above. 

A. — Estimates of appropriations required for salaries and 
contingent expenses of the office 

B. — ^To meet expenses of collecting revenue from sales of 
public lands .. 

C. — Appropriations for surveying department 

D. — Appropriations required for surveying the public lands. 
E. — Appropriations to supply deficiencies for surveying 

oming the last two fiscal years 

F.— Appropriations of the 2, 3, and 5 per cent, to States 

therein named............ 

Land Office of the operations of his office during the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1857, and for the quarter ending Septem- 
ber 30, 1857. Report of the Commissioner of the General. 



Papers accompanying the above. 

A. — Statement of public land sold. &c., fn the first half of 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857 ^.. 



: zea by 



111 

lU 

118 

128 
103 



I 



262 

98 

293 



285 

112 
43 

111 

112 

113 
116 
118 

119 

119 

78 



Q(b6^1e^ 



>102 



INDEX. 



3T 



TiUe. 



Land Office. Beport of the CommissioDer of the Oeneral — Cont'd. 

B. — Similar statement for second half of said fiscal year 

C. — ^Estimate of appropriations for office of Commissioner 

of (General Land Office 

D. — Estimate of contingent appropriations for same 

£. — Estimate of appropriations for surveying department 

F. — Estimate of appropriations for surveying public lands.. 

O. — ^Estimate of same for supplying deficiencies 

H. ~ Reports of surveyors general and accompanying docu- 
ments ..... . . .... 

Lands prepared for market and not advertised on the 30th Septem- 
ber, 1857. Statement of the quantity of 

Lands advertised for sale during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the quantity of 

Lands that will be prepared for sale during the year ending June 
30, 1867. Statement of the qiumtity of 

lAnds Sales and other disposals of the public 

Lands under the several acts of 1847, 1850, 1852, and 1855, on 
September 30, 1857. Statement of the condition of the 
bounty 

Lands selected by the several States under the acts of March 2, 
1849, and September 28, 1850, up to and endhig September 
30, 1857. Statement of the quantity of swamp .. 

I^nds granted under various acta, from 1850 to 1857, to the several 
States for railroad purposes. Statement of the number of 
railroads and quantity of ...... ............ 

Lands during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 
surveying operations of the public ^ ...... 

Lands selected under the several acts for the improvement of the 
Fox and Wisconsin rivers, in Wisconsin. Statement of the 
quantity of . .. .... .... 

Lands in the Territory of Minnesota for the year 1857. Annual 
report of the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the State of Iowa for the year 1857. Annual report of 
the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the State of Illinois and Missouri for the year 1857. 
Annual report of the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the State of Arkansas for the year 1857. Annual report 
of the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the State of Louisiana for the year 1857. Annual report 
of the surveyor general of the public... 

Lands in the State of Florida for the year 1857. Annual report of 
the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the State of California for the year 1857. Annual report 
of the surveyor general of the public . 

Lands in the Territory of Oregon for the year 1857. Annual report 
of the surveyor general of the public 

Lftnds in the Territory of Washiogton for the year 1857. Annaal 
report of the surveyor general of the public . 

Lands in the Territory of New Mexico for the year 1857. Annual 
report of the surveyor general of the public .... 

Lands in the Territory of Kansas for the year 1857. Annual re- 
port of the surveyor general of the public 

Lands in the Territory of New Mexico. Report of the acting gov- 
ernor of the necessity for a geological survey of the public. 

Lands and private Icmd claims in California for the year ending 
June 30, 1858. Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, 
transmittiDg an estimate for an appropriation for surveying 

the public... , 

Lands disposed of and the amount undisposed of on the 30th June, 
1857. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting 
a statement of the public 




2 I 

'\ 

2 I 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 I 
I 

2 I 
I 

2 ' 

2 

9 

itized 



^^.iy984s^^ 



108 

114 
115 
116 
117 

118 

119 
79 

79 

79 
82 

83 

85 

89 
94 

90 
119 
137 
148 
159 
190 
218 
221 
233 
247 
255 
262 
286 



88 



INDEX. 



Tide. 



Lands in the States of Illinois and Indiana. Statement of the un- 
sold puhlic. .. 

Land claims in New Mexico. Letter of the Secretary of the Inte- 
rior, transmitting new schedules of pueblo and private 

Lander relative to the pnctlcability of a railroad through the 
South Pass. Report of F. W 

light-house establishment during the year endina; June 30, 1859. 
Estimates for appropriations for the support of the......... 

light-Hoase Board, asking to be allowed an additional clerk. Let- 
ter from the chairman of the .. ... ... .. 

Light-House Board during the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual 
report of the ........... ... 

Light-house service on the northwestern lakes. Letter of the 
Secretary of the Treasury relative to certain expenses of the 

linen, from 1840 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the foreign 
importation and exportation, and home consumption, and 
the consumption of domestic... 

Louisiana for the year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor gen- 
eral of public lands for the State of........... . .. 

Loan not to exceed fifteen millions of dollars. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, asking for an additional. . ........... 

Louisyille and Portland canal. Report of the President on the con- 
dition of the... ... .......... ..... 

Louisville and Portland Canal Company. Letter of the Secretary 
of the Treasury, giving information as to the condition and 
affairsof the. ..,...>...... .... .......... 



Vol. 



ICail service for the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for ap- 
propriations for foreign . . ......... .. 

Mail service between the United States and France. Tables of mail 
arrangements, showing the... ....................... 

Kails in steamships to foreign countries during the year ending 
June SO, 1857. Statement of the amount of postage re- 
ceived on the 

Mail service for the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 
condition of the .......................... .... 

Mail service in the New England section, as tn operation on Sep- 
tember 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Mail service in the New York section, as in operation on September 
30, 1867. Statement of the 

Mail service by railroads, as in operation on the 30th of June and 
SOth of September, 1857 . Statement of the 

Mail service by steamboats, as in operation on September 30, 1857. 
Statement of the 

Mails to foreign countries, and a statement of the amount of post- 
age derived therefrom. Letter from the Postmaster (Gene- 
ral, transmitting copies of contracts made for carrying the.. 

Mail contractors, for failures to deliver the mails during the year 
1867. Statement of the fines and deductions from the pay 
of 

Mail service for the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for ap- 
propriations for the............................. 

Mails to Bremen and Havre, and relative to the Collins' line be- 
tween New York and Liverpool. Letter of the Postmaster 
General, asking further legislation for the transportation of 
the ocean...... ...... ........... . 

Mail proposals. Answer to a resolution of the House, calling for 
inforu^ation in regard to advertisements for...... 



10 

11 

9 

(■ 

1 

1 

12 

1 

2 

13 

1 

13 



Pan. 



Doc. 



Page. 



86 
89 

70 

1 

1 

3 

101 

3 

2 

127 

3 

131 



u 



Ij 89 
t{ 91 

89 

229 



302 

190 

149 



Digitized 




213 
622 

1030 



1098 
1052 
1054 
1055 
1056 
1080 



INDEX. 



39 



TiU«. 



▼ol. 



Part. 



Doc. 



Pn^e* 



Mails made under the authority of the Post Office Department 
during the year ending June 30, 1657. Statement of the 
offere and contracts for carrying the.. ................... 

ManufiEu.'tured articles of domestic produce exported to foreign 
countries, from June 30, 1845, to June 30, 1857. State- 
ment of ... . ......... ... 

Manufactured and unmanufactured articles of foreign countries, and 
domestic products of like character exported annually, from 
1840 to 1857. Statement of the value of the 

Manufactures of iron and iron and steel, steel, wool and cotton, 
silk, flax, linen, hemp, manilla, sun, and other hemps of 
India, silk, and worsted goods, imported from and exported 
to foreign countries, from 1840 to 1857 ; and also showing 
the domestic exports of like articles for the same periods. 
Statement exhibiting the values of the 

Manufactures of iron, steel, sugar, wines, and all fabrics of which 
wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp, is a component part, im- 
ported annually from 1847 to 1857, inclusive, with the duties 
, which accrued thereon each year, respectively. Statement 
exhibiting the values of the 

Ifianufiictnres of pig iron, and iron and steel, annually, from 1820 
to 1855, inclusive. Statement of the values of the imports 
of foreign, and exports of foreign and domestic, and the 
home consumption of the............. ............... 

Manufactures during the year 1857. Beport of the Commissioner 
of Patents on arts and...... 

Marine corps of the navy, during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the pay and emoluments of the several officers 
of the 

Marine corps of the navy, during the year 1857. Beport of the 
commandant upon the condition of the ....* 

Marine corps of the navy, October 31, 1857. Qeneral return of the 
officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates 
of the 

Marine corps of the navy, during the year ending June 30, 1859. 
Statement of the estimates for appropriations for the support 
of the Paymaster's department of the 

Marine corps of the navy, during the year ending June 30, 1859. 
Statement of the estimates for appropriations for the support 
of the Quartermaster's department of the...... ..... .. 

Marine hospitals during the year ending September 30, 1857. Be- 
port of the engineer in charge of the progress in the con- 
struction of the ... 

Marine hospitals, purchased or built. Statement of the number and 
coat of...... 

Marine hospital fund, during the year ending June 30, 1857. State- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures of the 

Marine hospitals. Statement of the appropriation, cost of site, 
date of contract, contract price, and date of completion of the. 

Marine hospitals. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, askiiig for 
appropriations to be expended in the prosecution of certain. 

Manacre at Spirit Lake by Sioux Indiana. Papers, from No. 20 to 
No. 62, relating to the 

Medicine and Surgery of the navy, during the year ending June 30, 
1859. EsUmates for appropriations for the support of the 
Bureau of 

Medicine and Surgery of the navy, of the operations of his bureau, 
and the medical service of the navy during the year 1857. 
Beport of the chief of the Bureau of.. 



96 
3 
3 



3 
32 

73 



3 
3 
3 
3 
120 
2 
1 



282 
302 

802 

309 
330 

27 
934 

936 

244 
938 

247 

90 
124 
138 
133 

349 

240 
243 



2 I 92 



Dhgitized by 



Google 



40 



INDEX. 



Ttie. 



Ta^% acoompanyinff the above report. 

A. — Estimate of the amount required for the support of the 
Bureau of Medicine aud Surgery for the year ending 

June 30, 1859 

B. — Estimate of the amount required for the support of the 
medical department of vessels in commission, navy 
yards, naval stations, marine corps, and coast survey, 
for the year ending June 30, 1859 2 

Merchandise imported, re exported, aud consumed ; the estimated 
population, and the rate of consumption, per capita, annually, 
from 182 1 to 1 857. Statement of the value of 1 

Merchandise exported annually, from 1821 to 1857. Statement of 
the value of foreign aud domestic....... ............. 

Merchandise re-exported annually, from 1821 to 1857. Statement 
of tlie value of the dutiable . 

Mexico, duriog the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

Michigan. Letter from the Secretary of War, transmitting the last 
annual report of Lieutenant Colonel J. D. Graham on the 
harbors of Lake.. ............................ 

liilitary Academy during the year ending June SO, 1859. Esti- 
mates for appropriations for the support of the 

Military Academy during the year ending June 30, 1857. Report 
of the Colonel of Engineers of the army as to the condition 
of the. 

Military Academy from 1842 to 1857. Statement of the condition 
in life of the parents of cadets of the . ..... .... 

Military Academy on the 30th September, 1857. Statement of the 
officers and professors of the 

Military Academy for the year 1857. Annual report of the Board 
of Visitors of the 

Military roads. (See Roade,) 

Militia during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of ord- 
nance and ordnance stores distributed to the 

Militia of the United States. Letter of the Secretary of War, 

transmitting abstract of the returns of the ... 9 

Minnesota. Estimate of expenses for taking the census in the 

Territory of 12 

Minnesoti. Message of the President cf the United States, trans- I 
mitting a report of the Secretary of the interior in reference | 
to the censusof ' -9 

Minnesota to the Senate. Message of the President of the United | 
States, informing the House of his having transmitted a I 
copy of the constitution of I 7 

Minnesota for the year 1857. Annual report of the surveyor gen- i 

eral of the public lands in the Territory of ..I 2 

Minnesota during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topo- | 
graphical Engineers on the condition of the military roads 
in the Territory of 

Mint of the United States and branches, and assay office, during 
the year ending June SO, 1859. Estimates for appropria- 
tions for the support of the 

Mint of the United btates. Estimates of appropriations as per 
letter of the Director of the..... 

Mint of the United States and branches and assay office during the 
year 1857 to June 30. Report of the Director of the opera- 
tions of the... ., 

Hint of the United States and branches and assay office, from Jan- 
uary 1 to June 30, 1857. Statement of the amount of de- 
posits and coinage at the • 

• Digitized by 



Vol. 



Doc. 



3 
3 

8 

17 

23 

I 

2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

63 

110 

49 



... 25 

1 I 2 

2 I 2 

I 
... 1 



933 

934 

284 

292 

297 
205 

4GS 



60 

201 



188 
191 
193 
197 

643 



109 

291 

] 73 
71 

46 



'!^OOg 



le 



46 



INDEX. 



41 



Titi«. 



Mint of the United States and branches. Statement of the amount 
of coinage from their organisation, in 1793, to the end of the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, of the............ 

Mint of the United States, at Philadelphia, from 1793 to 1857, 
inclnsire. Statement of the amount of coinage at the. . . . . 

Mint of the United States, at San Francisco, from 1854 to 1857, 
inclusiTe. Statement of the amount of coinage at the 

Mint of the United States, at New Orleans, firom 1838 to 1857, in- 
clusive. Statement of the amount of coinage at the bxanch . 

Mint of the United States, at Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1838 
to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the amount of coinage at 
the branch...... ........ 

Mint of the United States, at Dahlonega, Georgia, from 1838 to 
1857, inclusiye. Statement of the amount of coinage at the 
branch.. •• 

Mint cf the United States and branches from 1804 to 1857, inclu- 
sive. Statement of the amount of domestic gold deposited 
in the 

Mint of the United States, at New Orleans. Beport of the Engi- 
neer in charge of the construction of the branch 

Missisippi river. Mesrage of the President of the Ignited States, 
transmittiog copies of contracts for deepening the channels 
of Southwest Vam and Pass k I'Outre, at the mouth of the.. 

Mississippi river during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of 
Topographical Engineers on the removal of obstructions 
from the mouths of the.... 

Missouri for the year 1 857. Annual report of the surveyor general 
of public lands in the State of............ 

Murphy, late consul at Shanghai, for judicial services, &c. Letter 
from the Secretary of State recommending an appropriation 
be made for the compensation of B. C 

Muscat during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 



Toi. Pin. 



13 

2 
2 

7 



N. I 

Nautical Almanac during the year endiog June 30, 1859. £«ti- j 
mates for appropriations for the expenses of compiling and ' 
printing of the 1 !..., 

Nautical Almanac during the year 1857. Beport of the progresK j 

and condition of the 2\ S 

Naval Observatory and Hydrographical Office during the year end- } j 

ing June 30, 1859. Estimates for appropriations for the ! >1 ,.... 
support of the. ............................... ........ ) j 

Naval Academy during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates * 1 1 | 
for appropriations for the support of the ! ) • 

Naval Academy during the year ending Jane SO, 1857. Report of I 

the Board of Examiners of the condition and operations of i ' 
the I 2 ; 3 

Naval bosi^tahi during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates ! | 
for construction and completion of works and repairs at the ' i 
several..... , 1 '..., 

Naval Magazines duriog the year endiog June 30, 1859. Estimates { i 
for construction and completion of works and repairs at the ; { 
several ] ;,.., 

Naval practice ship Plymouth, during the year 1857. Report of , | 

Commander J. F. Green, of the cruise of the ....| 2 I 3 

Naval Asylum, during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement t | 

of the operations of the.... ' 2 3 

Navigation. (See Ommeree and Navigation ) I | 

Navy, of the operations of the navy and the Navy Department, i (TorK 

during the year 1857. Annual report of the Secretary of : '^'^^^ by V4j\^vt^ 
the : 2. 3 



Doc. 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
S 

139 

2 
2 

28 
17 



Fife. 

61 
62 
64 
65 

67 

68 

71 
120 



291 
148 



185 
445 



219 

600 

216 
217 

217 
218 



593 

235 

236 
598 
664 



42 



INDEX. 



Titie. 



RepcfU ani papen aeeompoMifkig the iAone» 

A.— List of deaths, resignations, and dismissals, in the navy 

since the last report 2 

D.~ Annual report cf the board of naval offioere of their 
examination and condition of the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis, Maryland 2 

C. — Beport of the superintending engineer of the ooal depot 
for naval purposes at Key West, Florida, and his 
estimate for its completion .... 2 

D. — Letter of superintendent of Naval Academy, transmit- 
ting report of Commander Qreen, commandant of 
midshipmen, of the cruise of the practice ship Preble. 

K.- -Report of the superintendent of the Nautical Almanac 

of its progress..... 2 

F.— Beport of Commander J. A. Dahlgren, of the cruise of 

the ordnance ship Plymouth................ 2 

No. 1. Estimate for the support of the office of the Secre- 
tary of the Navy, for the year ending June 30, 1859. 2 

No. 2. Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Yards 

and Docks 2 

No. 3. Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Ord- 
nance and Hydrography, including those of Naval 
Observatory and Naval Academy .-..| 2 

No. 4. Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of (.ionstruc- i 

tion. Equipment, and Repair ...... I 2 

No. 6. Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Pro- I 

visions andClothing 2 

No. 6. Beport and detailed estimates of Bureau of Medi- 
cine and Surgery..... 2 

No. 7. Beport of the commandant of the marine corps, 
and detailed estimates from the paymaster and 
quartermaster of the corps .............. . 

No. 8. General estimate of the office of the Secretary of the 

Navy, and the several bureaus of the department ... 2 

No. 9. General estimate of the south west executive building. 2 

No. 10. Summary statement of the estimates for the navy, 

the marine corps, and special objects 2 

No. 11. General estimate for the support of the navy 2 

No. 12. General estimate for the support of the marine 

corps . .... . ............. .... 2 

No. 13. General estimate for special objects under the 

Navy Department •••.•....•••..... 1 2 

No. 14. Second Comptroller's statement of the appropria- 
tions for the Navy Department, viz: Balances of 
appropriations on the Ist of July, 1856 ; appropria- 
tions for the fiscal year 1853-'57 ; repayments and 
transfers in the same time ; the amount applicable 
to the service of the year 1856-'57 ; the amounts 
drawn by requisition from the treasury in the same 
period; and the balances on the 30th June, 1857, 
with the sums specially designated that have bden 
canied to the surplus fund....... ........ 

No. 15. Abstract of expenditures, under thft head of **Oim- 
tingent Expenses," settled and allowed at the office 
of the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, from July 1, : 

1856, to June 30, 1857, inclusive ' 2 

Navy, transmitting an abstract of offers received at the Bureau of i 

Yards and Docks. Letter of the Secretary of the i 3 

Navy, transmitting a statement showing the pay and allowances of | 

officers of the navy and marine corps, during the year 1857. 

Letter of the Secretary of the ..•••••...... I 10 




Doc. 



Page. 



588 

593 

596 

698 
600 
603 
621 
623 

791 
802 
900 
927 

934 

944 
944 

945 

948 

949 
950 



2 ' 952 

2 , 957 
19 



.ai)gk 



INDEX. 



43 



Title. 



Navy Begister for the year 1858. Letter of the Secretary of the 
Navy, tranRmitting copies of the 

Nayy, relative to the purchase of lands for the enlargement of the 
Charlestown navy -yard. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Navy, transmitting copies of papers relative to the claim of Joseph 
Cassidy. Letter of the Secretary of the.... .. .. 

Navy, transmitting list of clerks and others employed in the Navy 
Department for the year 1857. Letter of the Secretary of 
the 

Navy, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of the 
Navy Department for the year 1857. Report of the Sec- 
retary of the --.-. . 

Nary, during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for ap- 
propriations for the support of the . ... 

Navy Department, daring the year ending June 30, 1859. Esti- 
mates for appropriations for the support of the .. . 

Navy yurd at Charlestown. Letter of the Secretary of the Navy, 
relative to the purchase of lands for the enlargement of the. 

Nebraska, during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topo- 
graphical Engineers on the condition of the military roads 
in the Territory of 

New Granada, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

New Mexico for the year 1857. Annual report of the Surveyor 
General of public lands in the Territory of.. 

New Mexico. A list of the grants of land by the Spanish and 
Mexican governments in the Territory of ..... 

New Mexico. Report of the acting governor for the necessity for a 
geological survey of the Territory of 

New Mexico. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting 
papers in reference to certain private land claims in 

New Mexico. New schedules of pueblo and private land claims tn. 

New Mexico. Report upon claims for Indian depredations in ..... 

Nicaragua. Message of the President of the United States relative 
to the seizure of Cieneral William Walker and his followers 
In 

Nicaragua had made no complaint on account of the arrest of Uen. 
William Walker and his followers. Message of the President 
of the United States, communicating a letter of the Secretary 
of State that the government of 

Nicaragua during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Norway during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with Sweden and 

Norw^ian barque ** Ellen." Letter of the Secretary of State, 
recommending an appropriation to refund the amount paid 
for repairs of the.. 



Offen and contracts for carrying the mails, made under the 
authority of the Post Office Department during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Oldenburg during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Ordnance for the service of the army during the year ending June 
30, 1859. Estimates of the colonel of 

Ordnance and Hydrography during the year ending June 30, 1859. 
Estimates for appropriations for the support of the Bureau of. 



Vol. 


Part 


Doc. 


10 




78 


13 


-.-- 


121 


13 





130 


10 


.... 


75 


10 


.... 


82 


1 





1 


!' 


.... 


1 


13 


..... 


121 


2 


2 


2 


5 


.... 


17 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


9 
11 

IS 


.... 


57 
89 
123 


7 


.... 


24 


7 


.... 


26 


5 


^ 


17 


5 


.... 


17 


9 





61 


11 




"ie" 


5 





17 


li 


T 


1 
1 

A 



Page. 



53 
218 

25 
212 



29S 
212 
472 

255 

261 

286 



46R 

; 82 

410 



137 

190 
214 
705 



Digitized by 



yGOOgI 



u 



INDEX. 



Title. 



Ordnance and ordnance storee for the navy during the year ending 
June 30, 1859. EBtimateB fdt appropriations for the pur- 
chase of 

Ordnance of the United States army of the operations of his 
department during the year ending Jane 30, 1867. Annual 
report of the Colonel of..... 

Ordnance and ordnance stores distribnted to the militia during the 
year ending Jane 30, 1867. Statement of 

Ordnance and ordnance stores issued to the army and the several 
military posts daring the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the.... .......... 

Ordnance and Hydrography of the navy of the operations of his 
bureau during the year ending June 30, 1857. Report of 
the chief of the Bureau of.. • 

A. — For pay and contingent expenses of the bureau .... 

B. — For pay of officers on ordnance duty.. ... .... 

C. — ^For ordnance and ordnance stores 

i^PMtcd. — For arming fire propeller sloops-of-war 

F. — For the purchase of articles and incidental expenses 
connected with the Naval Observatory and Hydro- 
graphical Office 

Q. — For the pay of superintendent and officers on duty at 
the Naval Observatory and Hydrographieal Office.... 

H. — For the erection, repair, &c., of buildings, and for con- 
tingent expenses at the Naval Asylum 

I. — For the pay of officers, &c., at the Naval Academy..... 

J. — For NautioU Almanac...... 

Oregon for the year 1857. Annual report of the Surveyor General 
of public lands for the Territory of 

Oregon for the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographical 
Engineers on the condition of the military roads in the Ter- 
ritory of.. .... ............. 

Oregon and Washington Territories. Letter of the Secretary of 
the Interior, transmitting a report of J. Roes Browne, on 
the subject of the Indian war in 

Oregon aod Washington. Letter of the Secretary of the Literior, 
transmitting a report of J. Ross Browne, special agent, on 
the subject of Indian affaire in the Territories of 

Oiegon and Washington Territories. Letter of the Secretary of 
War, transmitting a report of the comaiissionere to ascertain 
the expenses incurred in the Indian ware in 

Oregon and Washington Territories, &c. Message of the President 
of the United States, transmitting correspondence and docu- 
ments relating to Indian affidrein... 

Orego*i and Washington Territories. Message of the President of 
the United States, transmitting geological survey of ... ^.. 

P. 



Vol. 



Pacific coast for the year ending June 30, 1859. Supplemental ei 

timates for the Indian service on the 11 

Papal States during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with the 

Passengera arriving in the United States, by sea, from foreign coun- 
tries during the year 1857. Annual report of the Secretary 
of Stateof 9 

Pappreniza, an Austrian subject. Letter of the Secretary of State I 

relative to the daim of Michael... : 3 



p«t. 


1 
Doe. 


2 


1 
2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 
8 
3 
3 


2 
2 
2 
2 


1 
3 1 2 


3 2 


3 2 
3 2 
3 2 


1 2 

1 


1 2 


.... 


38 


.... 


39 


.... 


45 


.... 


112 


.... 


126 




93 


.... 


17 




62 


... . 


16 



Page. 



216 

635 
543 

644 

791 

794 
794. 
795 
795 

797 

797 

798 
799 
800 

233 

294 



144 



Digitized by 



Google 



INDEX. 



45 



TiUe. 



Vol. 



Pan. Doc. 



Pace. 



Pangiiay. Mr. Marcj to lieat. Flige, relative to the ratification 
of the treaty between the United States and 

^ngnay. Commiiader Page to Mr Dobbin, relative to the firing 
into the United States steamer Water Witch by order of the 
government of..... ........... ........... 

Fkngnay. Lieutenant Jefiiers to Ciommander Page^fficial ac- 
count of the firing into the United States steamer Water 
Witch by order of the government of. 

I^usguay. Commander Page to Mr. Toucey, relative to the firing 
hito the United Stotes steamer Water Witch by order of the 
government of 

FiitentBof the operations of his office during the year 1857. Be- 
port of the Commissioner of 

IWttts have expired during the year 1867, with their inventions 
and class. An alphabetical list of the names of the persons 
whose 

Patents for inventions that have expired during the year 1857. A 
classified list of the 

Fitents for designs have expired during the year 1857. An alpha- 
betical list of the names of the persons whose 

Patents for inventions or discoveries, and for designs, have been 
granted during the year 1857. An alphabetical list of per- 
sons to whom 

hdents for inventions and discoveries orranted during the year 
1857. A classified list of the ...I 

Patents granted during the year 1 857 . A list of reissues of. 

Patents entered during the year 1857. A list of disclaimers of 

hitent extensions granted during the year 1857. A list of....... 

Patents for designs granted during the year 1857. A list of 

Patents for inventions and discoveries issued during the year 1857. 
Description and claims for ... ....... 

Platent Office for reception of models. Letter of the Secretary of 
the Treasury, transmitting copies of letters relative to fit- 
ting up of a portion of the old 

Patents for inventions were reissued in the year 1857. Claims for 
which 

PSatents were granted during the year 1857. Claims to additional 
improvements for which .... .................... 

Patents granted in the year 1857. Claims for extensions of 

Patents were granted in the year 1857. Claims for designs for 
which 

Patents for inventions and discoveries issued during the year 1857. 
Illustrations of the descriptions and claims of. 

Patents for inventions and discoveries issued during the year 1857. 
Illustrations of the descriptions and claims of 

Patent Oflice for reception of models. Letter of the Secretary of 
the Treasury, transmitting copies of letters relative to the 
fitting upof a portion of the old 

Pawnee Indians. Batimates for fulfilling treaty stipulations with 
the 

Paymaster of the marine corps for the year ending June SO, 1859. 
Estimates of the...... 

Paymaster General of the United States army of the operations of 
his department during the year ending June .SO, 1857. An- 
nual report of the 

Penitentiary, in the District of Columbia, during the year ending 
September SO, 1857. Annual report of the Wiu-den of the.. 
Penitentiary, in the District of Columbia. Letter from the War- 
den, transmitting estimates for appropriations for the 

PftUtentiAry, in the District of Columbia, for the year ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1857. Annual report of the Warien of the 



8 
8 
8 

9 

13 
2 

2 
2 



2 

32 

32 
32 
32 

32 

32 
32 
32 
32 
32 

32 

67 

32 

32 
32 

32 

32 

32 

67 

....134 

1 
3 2 

! 

2 I 2 
1 i 2 



9 .... 

.!. 

8 ^ 2 
8 



35 
41 
42 
51 

14 
28 
50 

55 

181 
2&2 
288 
288 
289 

295 

533 

555 
560 

564 

579 



1 I 



938 

162 

750 

20 



Digitized by 



doggie 



46 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Penitentiary, in the District of Columbia. 

tioQB required for the support of the 
Pensions during the year ending June 30, 1859. 

propriations for the payment of ........ 

Pensions, showing the operations of his department for the year 

ending June 30, 1867. tieport of the Commissioner of.... . 



Additional appropria- 
Estimatos for ap- 



Foftn aooompanywg the above report. 

A. — ^Tabular statement showing the number of original 
claimii for army pensions, and applications for in- 
crease of those previously granted, and the aggregate 
annual amount of the same in the di£ferent btates 
and Territories for lAie year ending June 30, 1857.... 

B — ^Tabular statement showing the amount of arrears of 
pension allowed in the different States and Territo- 
ries for the year ending June 30, 1857 

C— Tabular statement of the number of army pensioners 
on the rolls, and aggregate yearly amount of their 
pensions, on the 30th June, 1857...... 

D. — ^Tabular statement showing the amount paid to army 
pensioners in the different Btates and Territories dur- 
ing the year ending June 30, 1857 

E.— Tabular statement of balance of funds in the hands of 
agents for paying army pensioners in the different 
States and Tenitories on the 30th June, 1857 

F. — ^Tabular statement, having exclusive reference to navy 
pensions, and showing 

1. The number and yearly amount of original applications, 

and number of claims for increase of pensions ad- 
mitted during the last fii)cal year . 

2. The number on the rolls in the several States and Terri- 

tories June 30, 1857, and the aggregate amount of 
their pensions ...... 

8. The amount paid in the several States and Territories 
during the year ending June 30, 1857..... 

4. The balances in the hands of agents in the several States 

and Tenitories June 30, 1857 

Pensions under the various acts during the year ending Juno 30, 

1857. Statement of the amount paid in the several States 

and Territories for army .. 

Pensions during tbe year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 

amount paid in the several States and Territories for navy .. 
Pensions in the different States and Territories. Statement of the 

balances in the hands of agents fur paying army ... . 

Pensions in the different States and Territories. Statement of the 

balances in the hands of agents for paying navy. 

Pensions during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for ap- 
propriations for the payment of ... ....... 

Pensioners on the rolls in the several St^ites and Territories June 

30, 1857. Statement of the number of army 

Pensioners on the rolls in the several States and Territories June 

30, 1857. Statement of the number of navy.... ...... 

Pensioners on the rolls since March 3, 1849. Repoitof the names, 

residences, and pension per annum, of all the invalid 

Persia during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 

States with 

Persia. Treaty between the United States and 

Peru during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 

Stotes with 

Portugal during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 

United States with 



Vol. 



12 

(■ 



Put. 



Doe. 



113 
1 



2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

13 

6 
6 

I' 



2 
2 

1 

2 

2 

119 

17 
17 

17 



odgk 



INDEX. 



47 



TlUe. 



Postage deriTed therefrom. Letter of the Fdetmaster Oeneral, 
traiismitting copies of contracts for carrying the mails to 
foreign countries, and a statement of the amount of 

Postage received, incidental expenses of pest offices, and for trans- 
portation of the mail by States and Territories. Statement 
of tiie amount of 

Postal ounrention between the United States and France 

Postal oon mention between the United States and Hamburg 

Postmaster General, relative to returns for box rents for the year 
1857. Letter of the 

Postmaster Oeneral, asking further legislation for the transporta- 
tion of the ocean mails to^ Bremen and Havre, and rela- 
tive to tlioee between New York and Liverpool. Letter of the. 

Postmaster Oeneral, transmitting information in regard to adver- 
tisements for mail proposals. Letter of the 

Piostmaster Oeneral, of the operations of his department during the 
year 1857. Beportof the 

Paperi aecamptmymg the above report. 

A. — Aggregate amount of postages—inland, sea, and for- 
eign — on letters and other mailable matter received 
and sent by the United States steamship lines during 
the year ending June 30, 1857 

B. — United' States mail service abroad, as in operation Sep- 
tember 30, 1857 

C. — Statement of the sums paid for the year ending June 
30, 1857, and deductions, as fines, on the New York 
and Liverpool, New York and Chagres, and the As- 
toria and Panama lines 

D. — Postal convention between the United States and France. 

Bevenue and expenditures of the Post Office Department for 
the year ending June 30, 1857 

Number and amount of money orden issued in the United 
Kingdom of Oreat Britain and Ireland every fifth 
year, commencing with 1840 

Ocean steamship and foreign mail arrangements 

City posts delivery of letters in Boston, New York, and 
Philadelphia 

Express agents, for providing moro e£fectually for the regu- 
lar and safe transmission of the mails conveyed on 
railroads..... 

Mail route from New York to New Orleans 

Mail service on the Mississippi river below the Ohio..... 

Settlement of the claim of Oeorge Chorpenning, jr 

Overland mail service to California 

Ueport of William H. Dundas, Second Assistant Postmaster 
Oeneral 

Beport of the Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office 

Department.. ..... — .. 

Postmaster General, for the year 1H57. Annual report of the 

Second Assistant 

Papere aeDompanymg the aibcne. 

A. — Table of mail service for the year ending June 30, 1857. 
B. — Number of mail routes, mail contracton, route agents, 

local agents, and mail messengers, June 30, 1857 .... 
C. — Mail service in the New England section, as in operation 

September 30,1857 



Vol. 



Part. Doc 



Page. 



47 



97 

105 

409 

2 



1095 

1022 
1047 



9«1 



2,312 

2 I 3 i 2 



2 t 3 I 
2 3 

2 I 3 

2 I 3 
2 3 



968 
1020 



1022 
1022 

965 



967 
968 

974 



975 
977 
981 
984 
986 



I 



2 , 1052 

2 I 1083 

2 1032 

I 

2 . 1052 

2 ; 1054 



le^by^^^dO 1^^ 



Digitized by 



48 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



I I 

Vol. , Put. Doc. 



Postmaster General. Annual report of the Second ABsistant — Con. 
C— Mail service in the New York section, as in operation 

September 30,1857 

D. and E. — Railroad service, as in operation June 30 and 

September 30, 1857 

F.— Steamboat service, as in operation September SO, 1857.. 

Postmaster General, transmitting copies of contracts made for car> 
rying the mails to foreign countries, and a statement of the 
amount of postage therefrom. Letter of the .......... 

Postmaster Geoeral, asking an appropriation for temporary clerk ) 
hire. Letter of the .. ...'.. ) 

Postmaster General, transmitting a list of clerks and other persons 
employed in the Post Office Depattment for the year 1857. 
Letter of the 

Postmaster General, transmitting a statement of the fines and de- 
ductions from the pay of mail contractors for failures to 
deliver the mail during the year 1857. Report of the 

Postmaster General, transmitting estimates for the mail service for 
the year ending June 30,1859. Letter of the..... 

Postmaster General, transmittiog estimates for mail service to for- 
eign countries for the year ending June SO, 1859 . Letter of the 

Postmaster General, traiismitting a statement of the offers and con- 
trarts for carrying the mail during the year ending June 30, 
1857. Report of the 

Post Office Department during the year ending June 30, 1859. Esti- 
mates for appropriations for the support of the....«. 

Post offices during the year ending September 30, 1857. Report of 
the engineer in charge of the progress In the ccnstruction of 
the 

Post Office Department for the year ending June 30, 1858. Letter 
from the Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting an esti- 
mate for an appropriation for deficiency for the 

Post Office Department for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1656, 
and June 30, 1857. Report of the Treasurer of the United 
States, transmitting copies of receipts and disbursements of 
the 

Post Office Department for the year 1857. Report of the Postmaster 
General, giving a statement of the expendituie cf the con- 
tingent fund of the 

Post offices. Statement of the appropriation, cost of site, date of 
contract, contract price, and date of completion of the.. 

Post office extension duriug the year 1857 Report of the engineer 
in charge of the progress in the erection of the... 

Preemption laws. Further legislation recommended by the Com- 
missioner of Public Lands, in reference to the operation of 
the 

President of the United States, transmitting a copy of the regula- 
tions adopted by the United btates commissioner for the 
government of the consular courts in China. Message of the. 

President of the United States on the state of the Union, with ac- 
companying documents and reports. Annual message of the. 

DoeumentB and r^rta accompanying the above. 



Mr. Marcy to Lieut. Page, June 2, 1854 

Lieut. Page to Mr. Marcy, October 17, 1854 

Lieut. Page to Mr. Marcy, November 5, 1854 

Lieut. Page to Mr. Falcon, October 16, 1854 

Mr. Falcon to Commander Page, October 21, 1854.. 
Commander Ptige to Mr.. Dobbin, February 5, 1855. 
lieut. Jetfers to Commander Page, February 2, 1855 ^... 



11 



11 



13 



t^igitized' 



54 



96 



43 



129 



56 



Q6c^l 



35 
2 ' 36 

2 I 37 
2 I 38 
38 
41 
42 



I 



I 



INDEX. 



49 



Tide. 



Piirt. Doc. Pa|«. 



President of the United States oq the state of the Union — Con. 

Commander Page to Mr, Marcy, January 28, 1856 2 1 

Mr. Marcy to Mr. Fitzpatrick, Augusts, 1856 2 1 

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Fitzpatrick, November 8, 1856 2 1 

Mr. Fitzpatrick to Mr. Vasquez, November 10, 1856 2 1 

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Fitzpatrick, November 15. 1856 2 1 

Mr. Fitzpatrick to Mr. Vasquez, November 18, 1856 2 1 

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Fitzpatrick, November 26, 1856 2 1 

Commander Page to Mr. Toucey, August 4, 1857 2 1 

Report of the Secretary of the Interior, showirg the opera- 
tions of the Interior Department during the year 1857. 
(Sec Interior) 

President of the United States, relative to the Fcizure of Generai 
William Walker and his followers in Nicaragua. Message 
from the - - - 7 

President of the United JStates, transmitting a copy of the constitu- 
tion of Minnesota to the Senate. Message of the 7 

President of the United States, commimicating a letter from the 
Secretary of State that the government of Nicaragua had 
made no complaint on account of the arrest of General 
William Walker and his followers. Message of the 7 

President of the United States, transmitting a copy of the conven- 
tion between the United States and the King of Denmark 
for the discontinuance of the Sound dues. Message of the.. 7 

President of the United States, transmitting a report of the Secre- 
tary of the Interior in reference to the census of Minnesota. 
Message of the -. 9 

President of the United States, transmitting official information 
and correspondence relative to the e.Kecution of Col. Crabb 
and his associates Message of tbe .... 9 

President of the United States, transmitting reports of the Secre- 
taries of State, of War, of the Interior, and of the Attorney 
General, relative to the military expedition ordered into the 
Territory of Utah. Message of the 10 

Prerident of the United States, transmitting a report of proceedings 
nnder the act of March 3, 1855, to improve the laws of the 
District of Colnmbia, and to codify the same. Message of 
the 10 

President of the United States, transmitting correspondence between 
the late Secretary of War and Major General John E. Wool. 
Message of the 10 

President of the United States, transmitting a memorial of citizens 
of Carson's Valley, asking for the establishment of a terri- 
torial government over them. Message of the 12 

President of the United States, transmitting coirespondence and 
documents relating to Indian affairs in Oregon and Wash- 
ingt<m Territories, &c. Message of the 12 

President of the United States, transmitting report of the Secretary 
of State relative to attacks upon United States vessels in the 
Gulf of Mexico and on the coast of Cuba. Message of the .. IS 

President of the United States, relative to the probable termination 

of Mormon troubles in Utah Territory. Message of the 13 

President of tbe United States, transmitting copies of contracts for 
deepening tbe channels of Southwest Pass and Pass h TOutre, 
at tbe mouth of the Mississippi river. Message of the.. 13 

President of the United States, calling the attention of Congress to 
tbe condition of the treasury, and recommending a prolonga- 
tion of the session of Congress. Message of the 13 

President of the United States, transmitting geological survey of 

Oregon and Washington Territories. Message of the 13 

4 

Digitized by 



24 
25 

26 
31 
49 
64 

71 

74 

88 

102 

112 

132 
138 

139 

140 

126 



44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
60 
51 



67 



Google 



66 



INDEX. 



Title. Vol. 



President's House. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury relative 

to an appropriation for lightiug the 10 

Private land claims. Relative to 

Private land claims in the Territory of New Mexico granted by the 

Spanish and Mezi(>an governments. A list of the 

Private land claims in New Mexico. Letter of the Secret iry of the 

Interior, transmitting papers in reference to certain . 9 

Private land claims in New Mexico. New schedules of pueblo and. 11 
Provisions exported annually, from 1621 to 1857. Statement of the 

value of the breadstuffs and 1 

Provisions and Clothing of the navy for the year ending June 30, ) 1 

1859. Estimates for the support of the Bureau of . ) 

Provisions and Clothing of the navy, of the operations of his bureau 

during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857. Report of the 

chief of the Bureau of.. 

Paperi acoompanying the above report, 

A. — Estimate of the expenses of the bureau for the fiscal 

year . . .- 2 

B. — Estimate for provisions for tbe navy for the fiscal year.. 2 
. C. — Estimate for contingent for the navy for the fiscal year. 2 
D. — Statement showing (he value of provisions, clothiog, 

and small stores on hand 

E. — Statement showing the value of shipments made by the 

bureau to foreign stations 2 

F.— Abstract of proposals received for navy supplies - . 2 

Q. — Statement showing the cost of provisions, clothing, and 

small stores condemned ........ 

H. — Abstract of proposals received for clothing and clothing 

materials 2 

I. — Abstract of proposals received for small stores 2 

K. — ^Abstract of proposals received for sail- water soap, can- 
dles, &c 2 

L. -^Abstract of proposals received for beef and pork . 2 

M.— Abstract of proposals received for fresh beef and vegc 

tables 2 

N. — Abstract of proposals received for transportation of 

stores ....... .... . 2 

O. — Statement of contracts made during the year by the 

bureau ..-..'. 2 

Prussia, during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 

States with 5 

Public buildings, grounds, &c., during the year ending June 30, ) 

1 859. Estimate for appR>priations for .. ) 

Public debt on the Ist July, 1857. Statement of the amount of ) 

the i 

Public debt on the 3d March, 1857. Statement of the amount of 

the 

Public debt on the 17th November, 1857. Statement of the 1 

amount outstanding of the ( 

Public buildings coofided to the charge of the Treasury Depart- 
ment. Report of the engineer in charge of oonstiuction of.. 
Public buildings constructed, or in course of construction, since 

1850, for which appropriations have been made. Li«t of 

Public buildings petitioned for by citizens and members of Congress 

for which no appropriations have been made. List of ... 

Public buildings, of the operations of hi-^ office during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Commis- 
sioner of.... ..... . — — ...... .. 

Public Buildings, during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement 

of the receipts and expenditures of the Oommissioner of.^..^ ^ . 



Put. 

.... 

1 



Doe. 



84 
2 



67 

89 

3 

1 
2 



17 

1 



Page. 



100 
261 



298 
240 
900 



900 



905 
906 
906 

907 

907 
908 

916 

917 
919 

920 
920 

921 

921 

923 

98 

122 

207 

41 

42 

42 
41 
42 

90 

125 

127 

718 



Gb^^le^*^ 



INDEX. 



51 



TiUe. 



Pablic BaildfngB of the oontncts made by bis office during the 
year 1857. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, trans- 
mitting a report of the Commissioner of.-.*.. , 

Q. 

Qnaitermaster Qeneral for the service of the army during the year 

ending June 30, 1859. Estimates of 

Qoartermaster Qeneral of the United States army of the operations 

of his department during the year ending June 30, 1867. 

Ueport of the 

Quartermaster of the marine corps for the year ending June 30, 

1859. Estimates of the 



Bailioad through the South Pass. Letter of the Secretary of the 
Interior, transmitting a report of F. W. Lander relative to 
the practicability of a 

Bailroad from Dubuque to Sioux city and branch from the mouth 
of the Tete des Morts. Letter of the Secretary of the In- 
terior, relative to the construction of a ............. 

Railroads of the United States for the year 1857. Statement of the 
capital paid in, net income, annual interest on debt, and 
available income of the ...... ... 

Railroads under various acta from 1850 to 1857. Statement of the 
amount of lands granted to the several States for 

Bailroada of the West. Statement of the length, transportation of 
freight and passengers on the various 

Railroads ia operation on the 30th of June and 30th of September, 
1857 . Statement of the mail service by the .............. 

Rancbos in California that have been fully confirmed by the court 
of last resort. Tabular statement showing the ............ 

Receipts of the government from customs, public lands, and all \ 
other sources, from the beginning of the government to [• 
June 30, 1857. Statement of the amount of the ) 

Receipts and expenditures under the direction of the Commissioner 
of Public Buildings during the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Statement of the .... 

Receipts and expenditures of collecting the customs in the Pacific 
from Jaly, 1S50, to June 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Receipts and expenditures of marine hospital fund during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statemeutof the 

Receipts and expenditures of the Post Office lepartment during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Report of the Auditor of the 
'Pre: sury fur the Post Office Department of the .. ... 

Receipts and expenditures of the government during the quarter 
ending September 30, 1857. Statement of the 

Receipts and expenditures of the government for the year ending 
June 30. 1857. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
transmitting a statement of the 

Reciprocity treaty with Great Britain. Letter of the Secretary of 
State, transmitting an estimate for expenses of the commis- 
sion under the ........... ...... .- -- 

Recruits fur the army duriog the year ending June 30, 1857. 
Btatment of the number of 

Register of the Treasury of the operations of his office during the 
year ending June 30, 1857 . Annual report of the 

Register of the '1 reasury, transmitting a statement of balances on 
the books of his office remaining unsettled' more than three 
years prior to July 1, 1857. Report of the 

BerfgnatioQS in the navy during the year 1857. Statement • 'f the. . 



Vol. 


Put 


Doe. 


9 




40 


1 


— 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


9 


.... 


70 


11 


.... 


92 


1 




8 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 
1 


.... 


3 
3 


2 


1 


2 


1 





S 


1 


.... 


3 


2 


3 


2 


1 





3 


3 




13 


9 


.... 


35 


2 


2 


2 


1 


.... 


3 


Di^iz 


ed Dy 


d 



173 

155 
941 



44 

89 

842 

1056 

228 
S3 

279 
60 

728 

40 

138 

1093 
38 



80 
184 



62 



INDEX. 



TiU«. 



BeveDne laws. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, relative to 
a reyi:«ion and codification of the 

Bice exported annually from 1821 to 1857, inclusive. Statement 
of the quantity and value of the ...... .... 

Bivers and harbors of the Atlantic coast during the year 1857. 
Report of the colonel of engiueers, in relation to the im- 
provement of . 

Bivers. Statement of the navigable length of the western 

Beads in the Territory of Minnesota during the year 1857. Report 
of the Colonel of Topographical Engioeers on the condition 
of the military ...... 

Boads in the Territories of Kansas and Nebraska for the year 1857. 
Beport of the Colonel of Topographical Engineers on the 
condition of the military 

Boads in the Territories of Oregon and Washington during the year 
1857. Report of the Colonel of Topographical Engineers on 
the condition of the military . 

Road from Fort Defiance to the Colorado river. Letter of the( 
Secretary of War, relative to wagon ( 

Russia during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 



Vol. 



13 



Sandwich Islands during the year 1857. Commercial relations of 
the United States with the 

Sardinia during ihe year 1857. Commeicial relations of the United 

States with i 6 

Saxony during the y^ar 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

Seamen at Havana. Letter of the Secretary of State transmitting 
communications relative to the expediency of making pro- 
vision for the care of destitute and sick American 

Seamen, during the year 1857. Statement of the receipts and ex- 
penditures of the marine hospital fund for the relief of the 
sick and disabled .. ....... 

Seamen registered in the several poits of the United States during 
the year ending September 30, 1857. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of State transmitting an abstract of the returns of 
American 

Secretary of the Senate. Estimate for appropriations during the 
year ending June 30, 1859 , for the support of the office of 
the 

Silk, from 1840 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the value of the 
imports and exports of the foreign and domestic, and the 
home consumption of .. 

Silver coins. Report of the director of the mint of the United 
States of the fineness and value of certain foreign 

Silver deposited at the mint of the United States and branches, and 
assay office, from 1841 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the 
amount of...... ........ .......... 

Silver coinage at the mint of the United States and branches, and 
assay office, from 1793 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the 
amount of 

Smithsonian Institution. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior 
respecting collections of exploring expedition, directed to be 
transferred to the - 

Smithsonian Institution. Statement of the stocks held in trust for 
the benefit of the .. ... . .... 

Solicitor of the Treasury, of the operations of his office during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report of the 



12 



Pari. 



Doe. 



... 60 
3 



2 ! 2 
2 ! 2 



2 

2 , 2 



2 

108 
124 



.... 17 



17 



....|137 



117 



Digitized by VjOOQ 



Pace. 



300 



218 
340 



291 
293 
295 

83,410 

200 
450 

427 

116 

138 



302 
48 

76 

62 
272 



270 
179 



INDEX. 



63 



Tide. 



Tol. 



PfUt. 



Sound does. Message of the President of the United Stats trans- 
mitting a copy of the convention between the Uniteil States 
and the King of Denmark for the discontinuance of the 

Sound dues. Letter of the Secretary of State enclosing letters | 
calling attention to the necessity of an appropriation to meet | 
the interest on the sum stipulated to be paid to Denmark 
for the discontinuance of the ....... .. .............. 

Southwest Pass and Pass H l* Outre, at the mouth of the Mississippi 
river. Message of the President of the United States trans- 
mitting copies of contracts for deepening the channels of the. 

South pass. Report of F. W. Lander relative to the practicability 
of a railroad through the 

Spain during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with 

State, relative to the number of troops engaged in the service of 
the United States in the late war with Great Britain. Letter 
of the Secretary of - 

State, relative to the explorations of Amoor tiver. Letter of the 
Secretary of 

State, asking an appropriation to reimburse John W. Geary, late 
governor of Kansas, for extraordinary expenses incurred by 
him. Letter of the Secretary of 

State, asking an appropriation for the compensation of J. P. Cook 
for services as United States marshal to the consular court 
at Canton. Letter of the Secretary of 

State, asking an appropriation for carrying into effect the act for 
the admission of the State of Kansas into the Union. Letter 
of the Secretary of .. .- 

State, transmitting communications relative to the expediency of 
making provision for the care of the destitute and sick 
American seamen at Havana. Letter of the Secretary of 

State, during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimate for appro- 
priations for the support of the Department of 

State, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of the 
State Department and foreign intercourse during the year 
ending June'30, 1857. Letter from the Secretaiy of .. 

State, transmittiDg an abstract of the returns of American seamen 
registered in the several ports of the United States during 
the year ending September 30, 1857. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of... ...... .. . 

State, for an iH>propriation to purchase, for the use of his Depart- 
ment, copies of the diplomatic correspondence from 1776 to 
. 1783. Letter of the Secretary of 

State, relative to the claim of Michael Papprenitza. Letter of the 
Secretary of 

State, that the government of Nicaragua had made no complaint 
to the United States on account of the arrest of William 
Walker and his followers. Lotter of the Secretary of 

State, recommending an appropriation be made (or compensation 
of B. C. Murphy, late consul at Shanghai, for judicial ser- 
vices, Ac. Letter of the ."iecretary of 

State, transmitting a list of clerks and others employed in the State 
Department. Letter of the Secretary of..... 

State, transmitting an estimate for expenses growing out of the 
reciprocity treaty with Great Britain. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of . .............. 

State, enclosiDg letters calling attention to the necessity of an ap- 
propriation to meet the interest on the sum stipulated to be 
paid to Denmark for the discontinuance of the Sound dues. 
Letter of the Secretary of - - -- 

State, recommending an appropriation to refund the amount paid 
for repairs of the Norwegian barque '* Ellen." Letter of the 
Secretary of.......... ..-- ---- — 



10 
12 

12 

12 

12 

13 
1 



jitizecj by 



Doo. 



31 

36 

139 

70 
17 

72 
98 

HI 

115 

118 

137 

1 



61 



Fage. 



6d 

342 



10 



gle 



54 



INDEX. 



Tld«. 



State, tnmsmitting a statement of the number, sex, age, and oocn- 
pation of passengera arriving in the United Btate, by sea, 
from foreign oonntrieB during the year 1867. Annnal report 
of the Secretary of - 

State, relative to the military expedition ordered into the Territory 
of Utah. Beportof the Secretary of 

State, relative to the repayment to Bobert J. Walker, late governor 
of Eansaa, certain extraordinary expenses incnrred by him. 
Letter of the Secretary of 

Steamboats. Fifth annual report of the Board of Inspectors of 

Steamboat disasters on the western riven during tbe year ending 
June 30, 1857. Statement of the • 

Steamboats in operation on the 30th September, 1867. Statement 
of the mail service by 

Steam and sailing vessels engaged in trade between the United 
States and France, and vite vena, and those (steam vessels) in 
contemplation. Statement of tonnage, crews, and aggre- 
gate entered and cleared during the year ending June 30, 
1867, of American and French..... 

Steel, annually, froxsi 1840 to 1867. Statement of the value of the 
imports of the foreign and exports of the foreign and domes- 
tic, and the home consumption of the manufiMtures of. 

Stocks of the United States, to March 3, 1867. Statement when 
redeemable ; the amount redeemed and Texas debt paid ; the 
amount of interest to maturity ; and the amount saved by 
anticipating the day of payment of the. 

Stocks held in trust for the benefit of the Chickasaw Indians. State- 
ment of the - 

Stocks held In trust for the benefit of the Smithsonian Institution. 
Statement of the 

Suits on dockets of clerks of the United States courts during the 
year 1856. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, trans- 
mitting a tabular statement showing the 

Superintendent of Public Printing. Estimate of appropriations for 
support of the office and for paper required during the year 
ending June 30, 1859, by the 

Surgeon General for the service of tbe army during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1859. Estimates of the 

Surgeon General of the United States army of the operations of his 
department during the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual 
report of the 

Survey of the Creek Indian boundaiy line. Beports of Captains ffit^ 
greaves and Woodruff of the 

Survey of the southern boundary line of Kansas. Letter of the Sec- 
retary of War, transmitting Colonel Johnston's report of 
the 

Survey of the southern boundary line of Kansas. Beport of Colonel 
Johntiton's . 

Surveyor general of tbe public lands in the Territory of Minnesota 
for the year 1857. Annual report of the 

Surveyor general of the public lands in the State of Iowa for tbe 
year 1857. Annual report of the 

Surveyor general of public lands in the States of IIlinolB and Mis- 
souri for the year 1857. Annual report of the 

Surveyor general of public lands in the State of Arkansas for the 
year 1857. Annual report of the . 

Surveyor general of public lands in the State of Louisiana for the 
year 1857. Annual report of the 

Surveyor general of public lands in the State of Florida for the year 

1857. Annual report of the 

Digitized 



▼ol. 



tPart, 



Doc. 



9 
10 

13 

1 

t 

2 



1 

1 

2 
12 

12 

12 

2 

2 



62 
71 

128 
3 

S 

2 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

69 

1 

1 

2 

104 

103 
103 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



212 

344 

1086 

379 
802 

4S 

276 
270 



8 
190 

166 



by^66^: 



119 
137 

148 
159 
190 
218 



INDEX. 



66 



TIU«. 



Sureyor geDeral of public lands in the State of California for the 
jear 1857. Annual reportof the 

Snrreyor general of public lands in the Territory of Oregon for the 
year 1857. Annual reportof the ... 

Sonreyor general of public lands in the Territory of Washington for 
the year 1857. Annual report of the 

Sarreyor general of public lands in the Territory of New Mexico for 
the year 1857. Annual report of the 

Sarreyor general of public lands in the Territory of Kansas for the 
year 1857. Annual reportof the 

Surreyor general for the Territory of Utah. Letter of the Secretary 
of the Treasury relative to the compensation of the 

Swamp lands selected by the several States under the acts of Ifarch 
2, 1849, and September 29, 1850. Statement of the quan- 
tity of 

Sweden and Norway during the year 1857. Ck)mmordal relations 
of the United States with 

Ewitwrland during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with , 



T. 

%zi£b of the United States of 1846 and 1857. Comparative state- 
ment of the..... 

Territories during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates for 
appropriations for the support of the governments of the... 

Texas debt paid since March 3, 1857. Statement of the amount 
redeemed and the amount of interest to maturity of the.... 

Tobacco exported annually from 1821 to 1857, inclusive. State- 
ment of the quantity and value of the 

Tonnage of the United States, registered and licensed annually, 
from 1789 to 1857. Statement of the 

Tonnage employed in steam navigation each year, registered, en- 
rolled, and licensed. Statement of the ... ...... 

Tonnage employed in foreign and domestic exports and imports, 
exclusive of specie, from 1821 to 1857. Statement of the 
amount of 

Tonnage and crews of American and foreign vessels which cleared 
firom the United States for foreign countries during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number 

Tonnage and crews of American and foreign vessels which entered 
the United States from foreign countries during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number 

Tonnage of American and foreign vessels arriving from and depart- 
ing to each foreign country during the year ending June 
30, 1857. Statement of the 

Tonnage of vessels that entered into each State and Territory 
during the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the 
number, crews, and 

Tonnage of American and foreign vessels which cleared from each 
district of the United States during the year ending June 
30, 1857. Statement of the number, crews, and 

Tonnage of American and foreign vessels which entered each dis- 
trict of the United States during the year ending June 30, 
1857 Statement of the number, crews, and 

Tannage of American and foreign vessels which departed from each 
district of the United States, and the countries to which they 
cleared, during the year ending June 30, 1858. Statement 
of the number and 

Tannage of American and foreign vessels which entered the several 
districts of the United States, and the countries from whence 
they arrived, during the year 1857. Statement of the num- 
ber and. .... • • - ........... 



Vol. 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
10 

2 
6 

6 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

litizec 
14 



Part 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Doc 

2 
2 
2 
2 
S 
87 

2 

17 

17 

3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Paga. 

221 
233 
247 
255 
262 



85 

82 

410 

142 



by 



Goo 



S9€ 
SO 
43 

300 
277 
277 

285 

490 

494 

510 

514 

618 

522 

529 

552 



66 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Tonnage of the several districts of the United States on June 30, 
1867. Statement of the 

Tonnage of vessels built in each State and Territory during the 
year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number and. 

Tonnage of the United States, and the proportion employed in the 
whale fishery, cod fishery, mackerel fishery, and the coast- 
ing traie, from 1816 to 1867, inclusive. Comparative state- 
ment of the 

Topographical Engineera of the aimy of the operations of bis de- 
partment, and on the condition of the improvements of the 
harbors on the northern and western lakes and the western 
rivers during the year 1857. Report of the Colonel of..... 

Treasury, transmitting estimates for appropriations lor the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1859. Letter of the Secretary of the. 

Treasury, for appropriations specific and indefinite, which may be 
required for the last three quarters of the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1868, made by former acts of Congress. State- 
ment of the Register of the 

Treasury Department during the year ending June 30, 1869. Esti- 
mates for appropriations for the support of the..... 

Treasury during the year ending June 30, 1869. Estimates for 
appropriations for the support of the independent.......... 

Treasury on the condition of the finances of the government for 
the year ending June 30, 1867. Annual report of the Sec- 
retary of the 

RqwiU and documaUt accompanying the above rqwL 

No. 1. Statement of the receipts and expenditures for the 
year ending June 30, 1857 

No. 2. Statement of the receipts and expenditures for the 
quarter of the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1857 

No. 3. Statement exhibiting the exportations from and im- 
portations into the United States of certain arti- 
cles during the quarter ending September 30, 
1867 

No. 4. Statement exhibiting the amount of Importations 
annually, from July 1, 1849, to 1857; the 
amount of customs of each year, and the ex- 
penses of collection during the same period .... 

No. 6. Statement exhibiting the expenses of collection in 
the Pacific ports from July 1, 1850, to June 30, 
1867 

No. 6. Statement exhibiting the amount of public debt on 
the 1st July, 1867 ; the amount paid and re- 
deemed since, and the amount outstanding No- 
vember 17, 1867 

No. 7. Statement exhihiting the amount of the public debt 
on the 3<1 March, 1857 ; the amount redeemed 
and paid to July 1, 1867 ; the amount since, 
and the total amount redeemed and paid, and 
the amount outstanding November 17, 1867 .... 

No. 8. Statement exhibiting when the United States stock 
is redeemable ; the amount redet* med and Texas 
debt paid since the 3d March last ; the amount 
of interest to maturity, and the amount saved 
by anticipating the day of payment .. 

No. 9. Statement exhibiting the capital paid in, the amount 
of debt due, the net income, annual interi>st on 
debt, and available income of the railroads of 
the United States for the year 1857 



Vol. 



14 
14 



14 



Part 



Doe. 



612 
624 

632 

283 



4 
11 
37 



<^oos 



32 

38 

38 

40 
40 

41 

42 

43 
44 



INDEX. 



67 



TJUe. 



TteMQTj, report of Secretary of, papers aooompanyiDg—CoDtioued. 

No. 10. Statement exhibitiog the depoeite and coinage at 
the mint of the United States, branches, and 
assay office during the first six months of 1857 ; 
report of the director of the mint, and explana- 
tory tables -- -- 

(No. 2.) Circular instructions to the Treasurer of the United 
States, the assistant treasurers of the United 
States, the treasurers of the mint and the branch 
mints charged by law with the duties of assistant 
treasurers and the public depositaries, designa- 
ted under the 15th section of the act of August 
6. 1846 

(No. 3.) Circular instructions to the disbursing officers and 
disbursing agents employed under the direction 
of the Treasury department 

No. 11. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the First 
Auditor respecting the contingent fund of the 
House of Representatives 

No. 12. Statement exhibiting the report of the engineer-in- 
charge on construction of costom-houses, court- 
houses, post offices, marine hospitals, and other 
public buildings confided to the charge of the 
Treasury department 

No. 13. Statement exhibiting the receipts and expenditures 
of the marine hospital fund for the relief of sick 
and disabled seamen in the ports of tbe United 
States, for the fiscal yeir ending June SO, 1857.. 

No. 14. Statement exhibiting the report on the condition of 
the Louisville and Portland canal .... 

A. Statement exhibiting the report of the First Auditor 

on the operations of his office 

B. Statement exhibiting the report of the Second Au- 

ditor on the operations of his office 

C. Statement exhibiting the report of the Third Audi- 

tor on the operations of hisoffice...... .... 

D. Statement exhibiting the report of the Fourth Au- 

ditor on the operations of his office . 

E. Statement exhibiting the report of the Fifth Auditor 

on the operations of his office. ........... 

F. Statement exhibiting the report of tbe Sixth Audi- 

tor on the operations of hisoffice 

G. Statement exhibiting the report of the First Comp- 

troller on the operations of his office .... 

H. Statement exhibiting the report of the Second Comp- 
troller on the operations of hid office. ... 

I. Statement exhibiting the report of the Commissioner 
of Customs on the operations of his office ...... 

J. Statement exhibiting the report of the Treasurer on 

the operations of hisoffice 

K. Statement exhibiting the report of the Solicitor on 

the operations of hisoffice . . ........... 

L. Statement exhibiting the report of the fiegister on 

the operations of hisoffice 

No. 15. Statement exhibiting'the report of the supervising 

inspectors of steamboats 

No. 16. Statement exhibiting the report of the Light-house 

Board 

No. 17. Statement exhibiting the amount due under treaties 
with various Indian tribes payable on time 



Vol. 



Part. 



Doc. 



Paie. 



4ft 



7g 
79 

S2 

90 

13S 
149 
151 
153 
154 
162 
16S 
165 
170 
171 
174 
177 
17^ 
184 
212 
229 



Digitized by 



doMgf^ 



58 



INDEX. 



Titie. Vol. 



Part. 



TnaMwrj, report of Secretary of, papers acoompanylng — Oontinned. 

No. 18. Statement exhibiting the amount of stock held in 
trust by the United States for several of the In- 
dian tribes and Smitlisonian Institation 1 

No. 19. Statement exhibiting balance of various other trost 

funds 1 

No. 20. Statement exhibiting the gold and slWer coinage at 
the mint of the United States annually, from its 
establishment in 1792, and including the coin- 
age of the branch mints and the assay office, 
(New York,) from their organisation to Septem- 
ber SO, 1867 1 !- 

No. 21. Statement exhibiting the amount of coin and bul- 
lion imported and exported annually, from 1821 
to 1857, inclusive ; also the amount of importa- 
tion over exportation, and of exportation over 
importation during the same years 1 

No. 22. Statement exhibiting the gross value of exports 
and imports from the banning of the govern- 
ment to June 30, 1857 1 

No. 23. Statement exhibiting the amount of the tonnage 
of the United States, annually, from 1789 to 
June 30, 1857 ; also the registered and enrolled 
and licensed tonnage employed in steam naviga- 
tion each year 

No. 24. Statement exhibiting the revenue collected from 
the beginning of the government to June 30, 
1857, under the severid heads of customs, pub- 
lic lands, and miscellaneous sources, including 
loans and treasury notes ; also the expenditures 
during the same period, and the particular tariff, 
and price of lands under which the revenue from 
those sources were collected 1 

No. 26. Statement exhibiting the value of manufactured 
articles of domestic produce exported to foreign 
countries from June SO, 1846, to June 30, 1857. 1 

No. 26. Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merehan- 
dise imported, re-exported, and consumed, an- 
nually, from 1821 to 1857, inclusive; and also 
the estimated population and rate of consump- 
tion, per capita, during the same period 

No. 27. Statement exhibiting the total value of imports, 
and the imports consumed in the United States, 
exclusive of specie, during each fiscal year, from 
1821 to 1857 ; showing also the value of foreign 
and domestic exports, exclusive of specie, and 
the tonnage employed during the same period.. 1 

No. 28. Statement exhibiting a summary view of the ex- 
ports of domestic produce, ftc, of the United 
States, annually, from 1847 to 1857, inclusive... 1 

No. 29. Statement exhibiting the value of certain articles 
imported annually from June 30, 1814, to June 
30, 1857, (after deducting re-exportations,) and 
the amount of duty which accrued on each dur- 
ing the same periods respectively 1 

No. SO. Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merchan- 
dise and domestic produce, &c , exported annu- 
ally from 1821 to 1857, inclusive 1 

No. 31. Statement exhibiting the quantity of wine, spirits, 
&c., imported annually from 1843 to 1857, in- 
clusive Jii'^^^^^ 

No. 32. Statement exhibiUng the value of imports annually 

from 1821 to 1857 1 



Doc 



Par. 



279 
271 



272 

274 
276 

277 



s 



279 
282 

284 

286 
287 

288 

292 

^ 294 
29€ 



INDEX. 



59 



Title. 



Trenmry, report of Secretary of, papers acoompanjring — Ck>D tinned. 

No. 83. Statement eihibiting the value of dutiable mer- 
chandise re-exported annually from 1821 to 1857, 
inclusiye ; and showing also the value re-export- 
ed from warehouse under the act of August 6, 
1846 

Ko. 84. Statement exhibiting the aggregate value of bread- 
stufis and provisions exported annually from 
1821 to 1857 

No. 35. Statement exhibiting the qiuuitity and value of 
cotton exported annually from 1821 to 1857, in- 
clusive, and the average price per pound 

No. 86. Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of 
tobacco and rice exported annually from 1821 to 
1857, inclusive 

No. 87. Statement exhibiting the values of iron and manu- 
facture of iron, and iron and steel, steel, wool 
and manu&ctures of wool, manufactures of cot- 
ton, dlk and manufactures of silk, ilax, linen 
and linen fabrics, hemp and manufactures of 
hemp, manilla, sun and other hemp of India, 
and silk and worsted goods, imported from and 
exported to foreign countries from 1840 to 1857, 
inclusive, and also showing the domestic exports 
of like articles for the same periods 

No. 38. Statement exhibiting the value of iron, manufac- 
tures of iron, and iron and steel, steel, sugar, 
wines, and all fabrics of which wool, cotton, 
silk, flax or hemp is a component part, imported 
annually from 1847 to 1857, inclusive, with the 
duties which accrued thereon during each year 
respectively, and brandies for the years 1856 and 
1857 

No. 89. Statement exhibiting the exports to and imports 
from Canada and other British possessions in 
North America from the 1st of July, 1851, to 
the 30th of June, 1857 

No. 40. Statement exhibiting the amount of goods in 
warehouse on July 1, 1856. and on the first of 
each succeeding month until July 1, 1857 

No. 41. Statement exhibiting a synopsis of the returns of 
the banks in the different States at the dates 
annexed • 

No. 42. Statement exhibiting a comparative view of the 
condition of the banks in different sections of 
the Union in 1853-'54, 1854-'55, 1855-'56 and 
1856-'57 

No. 43. Statement exhibiting a general 8tat«ment of the 
condition of the banks, according to returns 
dated nearest to January 1, 1857 

No. 44. Statement exhibiting a comparative view of the 
condition of the banks of the United States, 
according to returns nearest to January 1, 1837, 
1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845. 1846, 1847, 1848, 
1849, K50. 1851, 1854, 1855, 1856 and 1857... 

No. 45. Statement exhibiting the amount of moneys in the 
United States treasury, amount of drafts out- 
standing, amount subject to draft, amount of 
receipts and amount of drafts paid, as shown by 
the Treasurer's weekly exhibits rendered during 
the year ending June 30, 1857 



Vol 



Pan. 



Doe. 



Paie. 



itiz|d by.vjQflQl^S 



97 
298 

299 
800 



802 



809 



8 


818 


3 


814 


3 


817 


8 


321 


8 


824 



326 



60 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Treasury, report of Secretary of, papers aocoinpanyiDg— Continued. 

No. 46. Statement ezbibiiing the quantity and value, 
value per bushel, pound, &c., of ct^rtain articles 
Imported in 1856 and 1857, with the increase or 
decrease in quantity and value of 1857 as com- 
pared with 1866 

No. 47. Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of 
pig iron produced in the United States from 1820 
to 1855, inclusive, togetlier wi«h the foreign 
imports and exports ; consumption of foreign 
imports ; consumption of foreign imports less 
domestic exports of iron and iron and steel, and 
the manufactures thereof, and the total consump- 
tion of domestic iron and imports of iron and 
steel, and the manufactures thereof, in the 
United States, annually, for the last thirty-five 
years 

No. 48. Statement exhibiting the values of home produc- 
tion and importations of iron in the United 
States, with the increase or decrease compared 
with the preceding year, frum 1824 to 1857, in- 
clusive ; the different tariffs under which the 
aforesaid production and importations were 
made ; aggr gate values of production and im- 
portations during the operation of each tariff; 
increase less decrease of the same, and the 
annual average of the same exhibits 

No. 49. Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of 
anthracite coal sent to market from the different 
regions in Pennsylvania from the commencement 
of the trade in 1820 to 1856, inclusive, together 
with the foreign imports and exports ; consump- 
tion of foreign imports, consumption of foreign 
imports less domestic imports, and the total 
consumption of domestic coal, (reaching market,) 
and foreign imports thereof for the last thirty- 
' two years... .. .... 

No. 60. Statement exhibiting a comparative statement of 
the United States tariffs of 1846 and 1857 

No. 61. Statement exhibiting a comparative statement of 
the import duty on United States domestic ex- 
ports to Ureat Britain, France, Spain, Holland, 
Belgium, and Brazil ; also the duty on like arti- 
cles imported into the United States .. ... 

No. 62. Statement exhibiting the number of American and 
French steam and Bailing vessels engaged in trade 
between the United States and France and vice 
vena ; also those (steam vessels) in contempla- 
tion, the number of 200 horse-power and up- 
wardrt, tonnage, crews, and the aggregate entered 
and cleared at the ports of Boston, New Totk 
and New Orleans, during the fiscal year ending 

June 30, 1857 

T^reasury, transmitting a statement of the receipts and expenditures 

of the government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867. 

Letter of the Secretary of the .......... ..... 

Treasury, trani^mitting a report of the general disbursing agent of 

the Coist Survey, showing the number and names of persons 

employed on the Coast Survey. Letter of tbe Secretary of the. 
TVeasury, transmitting a statement of tbe balances against disburs- 
ing officers of the arm^- i^tanding over more than twelv^j 

months. Beport of the Second Auditor of the . ., 



Vol. 



Part. 



Doc. 



Fife. 



S2» 



330 



382 



334 
33( 

364 



:ed by 
3 



3 
13 
20 



379 



9.^w 



INDEX; 



61 



Title. 



Vol. 



Part. 



Doc 



Page. 



'.] 



TVeasuiy, iransmitting copies of the accounts of the disbursements 
made for the benefit of the Indians du<ing the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Annual report of the Second Auditor of the 

Treasuryf transmitting a statement of the balances against disburs- 
ing officers of the army standing over more than twelve 
months. Report of the Third Auditor of the 

Treasury, transmitting a statement of expenditures on account of 
miscellaneous claims, &c., for the year ending June 30, 
1867. Letter of the Secretary of the 

TVeaAury, transmitting an estimate for an appropriation for survey- 
ing the public lands and private land claims in California 
during the year ending June 30, 1858. Letter of the Sec- 
retary ofthe - 

Treasury, transmitting an estimate for an appropriation to supply 
deficiency for conservatory and stables at the President's 
House. Letter of the Secretary of the 

TtenBury, transmitting an estimate for an appropriation for de- 
ficiency for the Post Office Department fur the year ending 
June 30, 1858. Letter of the Secretary ofthe 

Treaenry, relative to a revision Hud codification of the revenue 
laws. Letter of the Secretary of the.. 

lYeasnry, transmitting a communication from the Postmaster 
General, asking an appropriation for temporary clerk hire, 
Letter of the Secretary ofthe 

TVeasnry, relative to the receipts, expenditures and appropriations, 
from 1 789 to 1 857 . Letter of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, trai^smitting copies of letters relative to fitting up a por- 
tion of the old Patent Office for models. Letter of the Sec- 
retary ofthe , 

Trtasarjt transmitting a statement of appropriations and expendi- 
tures on account of the difierent Territoiies of the Urited 
biAU-s from 1845 to June 30, 1857. Letter of the Secretary 
of the 

Treasury, transmitting a statement of the legislative expenses of 
the Territory of Kansas for the year 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of the .- 

Treasury, relative to appropriations for lighting the President's 
House and the Capitol. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Txeumrj, relative to the compensation of the surveyor general of 
the Territory of Utah. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, transmitting supplemental estimates for the Indian ser- 
vice on the Pacific coast, and in remote Territories upon 
either ride of the Rocky mountains, &c. Letter of the Sec- 
retary ofthe ..--- -. .... — .. 

Treasury, relative to the alleged robbery of the late collector of 
customs at Pittsburg, Pa. I etter of the Secretary of the. . . 

Treasury, giving the numl)er of vessels the names of which have 
been changed under the act of March 5, 1856, &c. Letter 
ofthe Secretary of the . .- 

IVeasury, relative to certain expenses of the light-house service on 
the northwestern lakes. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, asking for appropriations to be expended in the proseai- 
tion of treasury extension, custom houses, and marine 
hospitals. Letter of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, transmitting copies of papers relating to the claim of 
John H. Wheeler, late minister to Nicaragua. Letter of 
the Secretary ofthe 

Treasury, asking an additional loan, not to exceed fifteen millions 
of dollars. Letter of the Secretary of tht^ 

Treasury, transmitting information as to the condition and afiiaini 
of the Louisville and Portland Canal Company. Letter of 
the Secretary of the £\ 



9 
10 

9 
9 

10 

10 
10 
10 

11 
11 

12 
12 

13 

13 
13 



22 
15 
27 

41 
42 

43 

50 

51 

77 

60 
67 

79 

80 

84 
87 

93 
96 

100 
101 

120 

125 
127 



14 



3i3ek^(liaa)bgle 



62 



INDEX. 



Tide. 



Treasury, respecting funds held iu trust for the Chickasaw Indians. 

Annual report of the Secretary of the 

lYeasury, showing the proffress and condition of the Coast Survey 

of the United States during the year ending November SO, 

1857. Beport of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, transmitting a lUt of clerks and others employed in the 

Treasury Department, and their compensation, during the 

year 1857. Beport of the Secretary of the 

TVeasury, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of 

the Treasury Department during the year ending June 30, 

1857. Beport of the Secretary of the 

Treasury, as to the condition of the banks throughout the United 

States. Beport of the Secretary of the 

Treasury. Message of the President of the United States calling 

the attention of Congress to the condition of the...... 

Treasury extension. Beport of the engineer in charge of the 

progpress in the construction of the ............. 

Treasury extension. Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, asking 

for appropriations to be expended in the prosecution of the.. 
Treasurer of the United States and assistant treasurers. Circular 

instructions from the Secretary of the Treasuiy to the...... 

Treasurer of the United Ktatcs, transmitting a statement of the 

accounts of the government for the year ending June 30, 

1857. Beport of the 

Treasurer of the United States, of the operations of his office 

during the year ending June 30, 1857. Annual report 

the 

Treasurer of the United States, transmitting copies of receipts and 

disbursements of the Post Office Department for tlie fiscal 

years ending June 30, 1856, and June 30, 1857. Letter of 

the 

Treaty between the United States and Persia ^ 

Trust and special funds held by the United States on June 30, 

1857. Statement of the balances of appropriations of ..... 
Trust lands in the Indian reserves. Beport of the Commissioner 

of the General Land Office relative to the ......... 

Trust funds held for the benefit of the Chickasaw Indians. Annual 

report of the Secretary of the Treasury respecting 

Turkey during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the | 

United States with J 

ToBcanv during the year 1857. Commercial reUtions of the United 

States with 

Two Sicilies during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the ( 

United States with I 



oe) 



U. 



Utah. 



Beports of the Secretary of War on the expedition to the 
Territory of - 

Utah expedition. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting an 

estimate for subsistence of troops for the 

Message of the President of the United States, transmit- 
ting reports of the Secretaries of State, of War, of the In- 
terior, and of the Attorney Gtneral, relative to the military 

ex pedition ordered into the Territory of 

Letter of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the com- 
pensation of the surveyor general for the Territory of. ...... 

Utah expedition. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting a 
statement of all contracts made in connexion with the ..... 

Utah Territory. Message of the President of the United Staten 
relative to the probable termination of Mormon troubles in.. 

Uraguay during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the United 
States with - 



Utah. 



Utah. 



▼ol. 



13 



10 

3 

12 
13 

1 
13 

1 

3 

1 



13 
5 

1 

2 

13 
5 

5 
5 



2 
9 

10 
10 
12 
13 



Part. 



Doc. 

133 

21 

76 

18 
107 
UO 

3 
120 

3 

11 
3 



129 
17 

3 

2 

133 

17 

17 

17 



2 
33 

71 

87 

99 

138 



Paie. 



120 



78 



177 

32S 



180 

S71 

97 



140 
440 

430 
146 
431 



SI 



9.pm 



:le, 



606 



INDEX, 



68 



TiUe. 



V. 



Yoiemela daring the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 

Yessels engaged in trade between the United States and France, 
and vice vena ; alsi) those (steam yessels) in contemplation ; 
the nnmber of 200 horse power and upwards, tonnage, crews, 
and the aggregate entered and cleared at the ports of Bos- 
ton, New Tork, and New Orleans, daring the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number of Ameri- 
can and French steam and sailing.... ..... .. ... 

Vessels in commission belonging to the navy on October 1, 1857. 
Statement of the ......... 

Veacls in ordinary, repairing and equipping, belonging to the 
navy on October 1, 1857. Statement of the 

VesEels on the stocks and in progress of oonstraction belonging to 
the navy on October 1, 1»57. Statement of the . .... 

Vessels, the names of which have been changed under the act of 
March 5. 1856, &c Statement of the nnmber of 

Vessels of the United States in the Qulf of Mexico and on the coast 
of Cuba. Message of the President of the United States 
transmitting a report of the Secretary of Btate relative to 
attaclu upon 

Veswis, with their tonnage and crews, which cleared from the 
United States for foreign countries during the year ending June 
30, 1857. Statement of the number of American Hnd foreign. 

Vessels, with their tonnage and crews, which entered the United 
States from foreign countries during the year ending June 
30, 1857 . Statement of the number of American and foreign. 

Vessels which entered into and cleared from the United States for 
foreign couotries during the year ending June SO, 1857. 
Statement of the national character of the foreign 

Vessels arriving from and departing to each foreign country during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the tonnage 
of the American and foreign .. . .... 

Vessels entered into each State and Territory during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number, crews, 
and tonnage of ...... .. ............... 

Veoels cleared from each State and Territory daring the year 
ending June 30, 185/. Statement of the number, crews, 
and tonnage of ...... ............ ............ 

Vessels, their tonnage and crews, which cleared from each collec- 
tion district of the United States for foreign countries during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number 
of American and fort'ign 

Vessels, their tonnage and crews, which entered each collection 
district of the United States from foreign countries during 
the year ending June 30, 1857. Statement of the number 
of American and foreign .. 

Vessels wuich departed fiom each district of the United States, and 
the countries to which they cleared, during the year ending 
June 30, 1857. Statement of the number and tonnage of 
American and foreign..... -.—.... 

Veaeels built in each State and Territory daring the year ending 
June 30. 1857. Statement of the number, class, and ton- 
nage of the ... :....... 

Vessels buUt in the several States and Territories from 1815 to 
1857, inclusive. Statement of the number, class, and ton* 
nageof..... 

Virginia military claims. Views of the Commissioner of the Gene- 
ral Land Office relative to the 

Volunteers and regular troops for the army. Bepoii of the Adjutant 
General relative to estimated difEerence of expense between.. 



Vol. 



Put 



Doc. 



17 



Pags. 



217 
479 



1 


— 


3 


379 


2 


3 


2 


806 


2 


3 


2 


808 


2 


3 


2 


808 


12 


.... 


100 




13 





132 




14 






490 


14 






494 


14 


.... 




498 


14 






610 


14 






514 


14 






51& 


14 






522 


14 






652 


14 






626 


14 






624 


14 






636 


2 


1 


2 


84 


[^gi 


zejb 


V 


30gje 



64 



INDEX. 



TiUe. 



Vol. 



Pvt 



Doc. 



Pa«». 



W. 

Walker and his followers. Letter of the Secretary of State that 
the government of Nicaragua had made no complaint against 
the United States on account of the arrest of William 

Walker and his followers in Nicaragua. Message of the President 
of the Uolted States, relatire to the seizure of Oen'l William 

Walker, late governor of Kansas, certain extraordinary expenses 
incurr^ hy him. Letter of the Secretary of State, relative 
to the repayment to Bobert J . ... . ... 

War Department during the year ending June 30, 1859. Estimates 
for expenses for the support of the 

War, asking that an appropriation be made to supply deficiency in 
the appropriation for the manu&cture of arms at the 
national armories, caused by omission of the appropriation 
in the army appropriation act of last session. Letter from 
the Secretury of. ... . - 

War, stating that the new hall of the House of Representatives is 
ready for occupation. Letter of the Secretary of . 

War, showing the operations of the army and the War Department 
during the year 1857. Annual report of the Secretary of 

Papert acoompanywg the above report. 

No. 1. Reports on Utah expedition 

No. 2. Report from Bureau of Explorations and Surveys. .. 
No. 3. Report on the Capital extension, reconstruction of 

dome, and Poet Office extension 

No. 4. Report from Commanding General . 

No. 5. Report of the Adjutant Oeneral...... 

No. 6. Report of the Quartermaster General 

No. 7. Report of the Commissary General . . ... 

No. 8. Report of the Paymaster Genera! ..... 

No. 9. Report of the Surgeon General. ...... 

No. 10. Report of the Chief Engineer 

No. 1 1. Report of the Chief Topographical Engineer 

No. 12 Report of the Chief of Ordnance 

War, transmitting a statement of balances agdnst disbursing offi- 
cers of the army standing for more than twelve months. 
Letter of the Secretary of 

War, tranandtting the last annual report of Lieutenant Colonel J. 
D. Graham on the harbors of Lake Michigan. Letter of the 
Secretary of .... .. ...... 

War, transmitting a statement of expenditorea for contingencies of 
that department during the year 1857. Letter of the Secre- 
tary of - 

War, transmitting an estimate for subsistence of troops for the 
Utah expedition. Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting copies^of the Official Army Register for 1858. 
Letter of the Secretary of 

War, as to present condition of works of improvement on the west- 
ern and northwestern lakes and rivers. Letter of the 8ecre> 
tary of 

War, transmitting estimates for appropriations for completing the 
harbors on Delaware river. Letter of the Secretary of ... 

War, transmitting a report of the commissioners to ascertain the 
expenses incurred in the Indian wars in Oregon and Wash- 
ingi on Territories Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting a statement of appropriations drawn during. 
' the year 1856-'57, and balances on hand on July 1, 1857,' 
and amount carried to the surplus fund. Letter of the 
^'^^of ^„^^.^ 



7 

7 

13 
1 

1 

1 
2 



26 
24 

128 

1 

7 
8 
2 



21,Idf 



15 

23 

30 
33 
34 

37 
44 

45 



21 
38 

40 
48 
58 
153 
161 
162 
165 
168 
283 
535 



by 



Ci-ee^e 



INDEX. 



65 



TiU«. 



Vol. 



Part 



Doe. 



PH*. 



War, tniDsmitting estlmateB for the repair of works in Plymoath 

harbor. Letter of the Secretary of —..••.•• 

War, transmit tiDg a report relative to the costs of the completion 
of the Delaware breakwater, &c. Letter of the Secretary of 
War, transmitting abstract of the retoms of the militia of the 
United States. Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting a statement of the expenses of the national ar- 
mories, &c., for the year ending June 30, 1857. Letter of 

the Secretary of .••••• 

War, transmitting statement of contracts for the year 1857. Letter 
of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting a list of clerks and other persons employed in 
the War Department daring the year 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of......... 

War, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of the 
military establishment during the year 1857. Letter of the 
Secretary of...... 

War, transmitting a transcript of the offidal Army Register for 
1867. Letter of the Secretary of 

War, relative to the military expedition ordered into the Territory 
of Utah. Beportof the Secretary of 

War, transmitting a report relative to the improvement of the Des 
Moines rapids. Letter of the Secretary of .. . . 

War aad Major General John E. Wool. Message of the President 
of the United States, transmitting correspondence between 
the late Secretary of... • 

War, relative to the sale of the military reservation at Fort Ripley. 
Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transnutting a statement of all contracts made in connexion 
with the Utah expedition. Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting the report of Colonel Johnston's survey of the 
southern boundary line of Kimsas. Letter of the Secretary 
of 

War, transmitting reports of Captains Sitgreaves and Woodruff of 
the survey of the Creek Indian boundary line. Letter of 
the Secretary of - 

War, in answer to a resolution of the House, calling for the report 
on the wagon road from Fort Defiance to the Colorado 
river. Letter of the Secretary of 

War, transmitting the report of the superintendent of the wagon 
road fiom Fort Defiance to the Colorado river. Iietter of 
the Secretary of 

Warehouse from July 1, 1856, and on each succeeding month, to 
June 30, 1857. Statement of the amount of goods in...... 

Wsshington Territory for the year 1857. Annual report of the sur- 
veyor general of public lands in....... — 

Washington during the year 1857. Report of the colonel of topo- 
graphical engineers on the condition of the military roads 
in the Territory of 

Washington Territories. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, 
transmitting a report of J. Ross Browne on the subject of 
the Indian War in Oregon and...... 

Washington. Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting 
a report of J. Ross Browne, special agent, on the subject of 
Indian affairs in the Territories of Oregon and 

Washington Territories. Letter of the Secretary of War, transmit- 
ting a report of the commissioners to ascertain the expenses 
incurred in the Indian wars in Oregon and................ 

Washington Territories, kc. Message of the Preddent of the 
United States, transmitting correspondence and documents 
relating to Indian afiain in Oregon and 

6 



12 



12 



12 



12 



13 



_ 12 

Digitized 



48 
52 



53 



55 

58 



59 



65 
66 
71 
83 



88 
94 
99 



103 



104 



108 



124 



313 

247 



294 



38 



39 



46 



-b-y"<2B6gle 



M 



INDEX, 



TiUe. 



WaBbington Territories. Message of the President of the United 
States, transmitting geolc^cal surveys of Oregon and...... 

Wheeler, late minister to Nicaragua. Letter of the Secretary of 
the Treasury, transmitting copies of papers relating to the 
claim of John H..... ..-..--..-...-.---....... 

Wheeling Letter of the Secretary of the Interior, relative to the 
claim of Joseph £. Johnson and F. J 

Wool from 1840 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the foreign im- 
portation and exportation and home consumption, and the 
consumption of domestic .... 

Wool. Message of the President of the United States, transmit- 
ting correspondence between the late Secretary of War and 
Major General John £ ....... ....... ........ 

Wines, spirits, &c., imported annually from 1843 to 1857. State- 
ment of the value of the... ..... 

Wisamsin. Statement of the quantity of land selected under the 
several acts for the improvement of the Fox and Wisconsin 
rivers, m 

Wool from 1840 to 1857, inclusive. Statement of the foreign im- 
portation and exportation and home consumption, and the 
consumption of domestic. 

Wool. Message of the President of the United States, transmitting 
copies of correspondence between the late Secretary of War 
and Major General John E. ................ ...••.....•.. 

Wurtemburg during the year 1857. Commercial relations of the 
United States with 



Yards and Docks of the Navy during the year ending June SO, 
1859. Estimates for appropriations for the support of the 
Bureau of 

Yards and Docks of the operations of his bureau during the year 
ending June 30, 1857. Report of the Chief of the Bureau 
of 

Papen aeoon^panying the above nporl, 

A. General estimate from Yards and Docks 

No. 1. Estimate for the support of the bureau ... .... 

No. 2. Estimate for recruiting stations 

No. 3. Estimate for officers and others at yards and stations 
Ko. 4. Statement showing the sums which make up the 

first and second items in paper A 

No. 5. Estimate for improvements and repairs at yards and 

stations , 

No. 6. Estimate for improvements and repairs at hospitals 

and naval asylum 

No. 7. Estimate for improvements and repairs of magazines 
Yards and Docks during the year 1857. Abstract of the offers 
and contracts made to furnish articles coming under the 
cognizance of the Bureau of 



Vol. 



Part 



Doc.: Pif«. 



13 

13 
2 



10 

1 



126 

L25 

116 



88 
3 



10 
5 



88 
17 



2 
2 

2 

19 



802 

294 

90 

302 

121 

220 
623 



624 
625 
625 
626 

635 

635 

638 
639 

668 



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35th CoNaRBsa, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Ex. Doc. 
Ist Session. ^ ( No. 2. 



MESSAGE 



PEESIDMT OF THE UNITED STATES, 



TOTHI 




TWO HOUSES OP CONGRESS 



COMMENCEMENT OF THE FIRST SESSION 



OT 



THE THIRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. 



Dbokkbie 8, 1867. — Bead, and oommitted to the Committee of the Whole on the state of 
the Union, and ordered to he printed. 

DiciimB 16, 1967, ^Beaohedf That there he printed, for the use of the memhers of the 
House of Bepresentatlyes, twenty thousand extra copies of the President's Annual Mes- 
sage and aooompanying docomonts. 



VoLIIL 



WASHINGTON: 



CORNELIUS WENDELL, PRINTBR, Digitized by VjOOg Ic 
1868. 



! Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 



Navy Department, 

December 3, 185T. 

Sib: The naval force which has been employed during the past 
year has been sufficient to give adequate security to our commerce^ 
and to the persons and property of American citizens in all parts of 
the world. 

The Home squadron, under the command of its Flag Officer, Hiram 
Paulding, has consisted of the steam frigates Wabash and Roanoke, 
the sloops-of-war Saratoga and Cyane, and the war steamers Susque- 
hanna and Fulton. The unsatisfactory state of affairs in New Granada 
and portions of Central^ America required the increase of this squadron, 
and the almost constant presence of a considerable force in the neigh- 
borhood^ both on the Atlantic and the Pacific. In January the Wabash 
returned from Aspinwall to New York with the officers and crew of the 
St. Mary's ; in April sailed for Aspinwall ; in June returned again 
to New York with 138 of the destitute and suffering American citi- 
zens who had been involved in the troubles of Central America; 
and on the 29th of July sailed again for Aspinwall, where she still 
remains. In May the Cyane sailed from Aspinwall upon a short 
cruise, touching at Carthagena, thence to San Juan del Norte ; in June 
received on board, and transported to Aspinwall, the men who where 
brought home by the Wabash, and proceeded herself to Boston with 
63 of the sick and wounded. On the 2d of September she sailed on a 
cruise to the eastward, returned to Hampton Beads October 30, and 
on the 19th of November sailed for Cape Haytien to the relief of an 
American vessel and two American seamen, seized upon suspicion by 
order of the Haytien government. The Boanoke, while malcing her 
six months trial trip at sea, was, under the command of Capt. Mont- 
gomery, temporarily attached to this squadron. On the 30th of May 
she sailed for Aspinwall, and returned on the 4th of August, with 
205 of Walker's men. It being necessary to put her in dock, she was 
sent from New York to Boston, and put out of commission. All these 
men were brought home without previous orders; but such was 
their deplorable condition, that it was an act of humanity, which 
could not, and ought not to be dispensed with ; and the department 
approved it. The expense of providing for them necessary food, 
clothing, and medicine while on shipboard amounted to $7,376 16, 
for which an appropriation is recommended. 

The Saratoga having returned to Norfolk in December, proceeded 
on the 16th of January on a cruise, visiting St. Domingo, St. Thomas, 
^'^enezuela, Cura^oa, Aspinwall, and San Juan del Norte ; thence, by 



574 REPOET OP THE 

way of Aspinwall, the island of Grand Cayman, Havana, and Key 
West, she returned to Norfolk, where she arrived on the 29th of April. 
On the 23d of May she left Norfolk for Aspinwall, and will soon be 
relieved by the Susquehanna. 

The Fulton was put in commission in September, and sailed from 
Washington on the 14th of October for Mobile, New Orleans, and 
Chiriqui, in New Granada, for the purpose of intercepting and prevent- 
ing unlawful expeditions from the United States, against Costa Rica, 
Nicaragua, and Mexico. Instructions, having the same object in view, 
were given to Commodore Paulding at Aspinwall, and Commander 
Chatard at San Juan del Norte. The Susquehanna, having been 
ordered from the Mediterranean to the Home squadron, has doubtless 
arrived at Key West, and proceeded to San Juan del Norte with similar 
instructions. If any unlawful expedition from the United States 
against Nicaragua, Costa Rica, or Mexico, shall succeed in effecting a 
landing, it will be because it has been able to elude the vigilance of 
this squadron. The Jamestown is now preparing at Philadelphia to 
join it, and will soon be ready for sea. 

The force in the Pacific, under the command of the Flag Officer, 
William Mervine, has consisted of the frigate Independence, the 
sloops-of-war St. Mary's, John Adams, and Decatur, and the war 
steamer Massachusetts. A large part of this squadron has been 
much and usefully employed at Panama and on the coast of Central 
America, where its presence was deemed indispensable. 

The Independence sailed, August 3, from Panama to San Fran- 
cisco, to be stationed at the navy yard as a Receiving Ship, and for the 
general purposes of the yard, under the command of Commander 
S'airfax. During her long stay at Panama, her officers, at intervals 
of leisure, were engaged in surveys and expeditions of much interest. 
A party was dispatched, in charge of Lieutenant James B. McCauley, 
to explore the timber resources about the Gulf of San Miguel, the 
mouth of the Darien, one hundred miles from Panama. The expedi- 
tion was eminently successful. 

The John Adams was ordered home, in September, to Norfolk. 

The Massachusetts, having been stationed in Puget Sound to aid in 
preventing Indian disturbances, when her presence was no longer 
required, was ordered to San Francisco ; and, arriving there in April, 
was, in June, put out of commission. The Decatur was also employed 
on the northwest coast in suppressing Indian hostilities, from which 
she proceeded to San Francisco, thence to Panama, and arrived there 
March 9. On the 1st of April the officers and crew were relieved by 
others, sent across the Isthmus. In June she sailed from Panama for 
Punta Arenas and San Juan del Sur; August 5 she returned to 
Panama, with twenty-five of Walker's men. 

The St. Mary's sailed from Panama, in January last, with orders to 
touch on the coast of Central America, and thence proceed to Jarvis 
and New Nantucket islands, which were supposed to possess valuable 
deposits of guano. She was detained on the coast of Central America 
by the condition of affairs there, and did not continue her course to 
those islands until June. Commander Davis had instructions to visit 
them, to make soundings, to ascertain their location, and the quantity 



gECEETAEY OP THE NAVY. 576 

aud quality of their guano deposits, to make other observations useful 
to navigation, and to return by the Sandwich Islands to San Francisco. 
She proceeded to the Jarvis and* New Nantucket islands, made the 
soundings, surveys and examination which had been ordered, and^ pro- 
ceeding thence to Honolulu, arrived there on the 23d of September. 
Commander Davis reports that nothing resembling guano was found 
at either of those islands. He, however, procured several samples of 
the soil from a sufficient variety of places, fully to illustrate the char- 
acter of the deposits. The American Guano Company having pre- 
viously, under the act of August 18, 1856, given to the State Department 
the proper notice of discovery, and entered into the required bond. 
Commander Davis, no conflicting claims appearing, took formal pos- 
session of the islands in the name of the United States, and deposited 
in the earth a declaration to that effect, executed on parchment and 
well protected. In view of the large fleet of whale ships, in number 
about 200, carrying 7,000 men, that usually visit the Sandwich Islands 
in the fall of the year, Commander Davis, at the earnest solicitation of 
the United States Commissioner, and of many of the principal Ameri- 
can merchants, decided to prolong his stay there. 

Commodore Mervine having been ordered home, and the Independ- 
ence to San Francisco, Captain John C. Long has gone out to succeed 
him, sailing from Boston, October 17, in his flag-ship, the Merrimack. 
The steam frigate Saranac, under Captain John Kelly, has sailed for 
the Pacific to supply the place of the John Adams. The Vandalia 
has recently left Portsmouth, New Hampshire, for the same station. 

It was deemed necessary, as a measure of humanity and policy, to 
direct Commodore Mervine to give General Walker, and such of his 
men, citizens of the United States, as were willing to embrace it, an 
opportunity to retreat from Nicaragua. Before these instructions 
were received, Commodore Mervine had sent Commander Davis, with 
the St. Mary's, to San Juan del Sur, with instructions to protect the 
persons and property of American citizens. With this authority only, 
Commander Davis negotiated with General Walker terms of capitu- 
lation, under which he surrendered with his men, and was conveyed 
to Panama, whence he proceeded to the United States. Commander 
Davis also received from General Walker the surrender of a small 
schooner which he had detained, called ** the Granada," and deliv- 
ered her to the Nicaraguan Authorities. The action of Commander 
Davis, so far as he aided General Walker and his men, by the UHe of 
the St. Mary's, to retreat from Nicaragua and return to the United 
States, was approved by the Department ; but his interference with 
the Granada, and her transfer to the Nicaraguan authorities, by his 
intervention, was not approved. The whole number of men surren- 
dered and carried to Panama was about 364. Commodore Mervine 
finding his squadron suddenly encumbered with these men, in the 
most wretched condition, suffering for the want of everything, and 
endangering the health of those under his command, had no mode of 
relief except by turning them adrift, which was impossible, or sending 
them by the railway to Aspinwall. Adopting the latter alternative, 
he was under the necessity of drawing on the Department, in favor of 
the railway company, for $7,476, being the amount which would be 



576 BEFOBT OF TEIE 

due for traosporting them across the Isthmus at the usual rate of 
charge. This bill has neither been paid, accepted| nor protested. 
The company voluntarily relinquished the personal responsibility of 
Commodore Mervine, and put the bill at the disposal of the Oovern- 
ment. I submit it, with an expression of my conviction that Con- 
gress should make reasonable provision for it; and also for the 
expenses of providing these men while on shipboard with necessary 
food^ clothing, and medicine, of which an estimate will hereafter be 
furnished. 

The Mediterranean squadron, under its Flag Officer, Samuel L. 
Breese, was composed of the frigate Congress, the steam frigate Sus- 
quehanna, and the sloop Constellation. The Susquehanna, having 
aided in the attempt to lay the telegraphic cable across the Atlantic, 
has been ordered home, as already mentioned, and attached to the 
Home squadron ; and Commodore Breese having been ordered with 
his flag-ship, the Congress, to the United States, they will not be re- 
placed by others until the opening of the spring, leaving the Constel- 
lation, under the command of Captain Charles H. Bell, to look after 
the interests of the United States in that quarter. The vessels of this 
squadron have visited many ports in the Mediterranean, where their 
presence has had an important influence by giving a feeling of security 
to citizens of the United States residing there, and thus promoting 
our commercial interests. 

The Brazil squadron, during the past year, has been under the 
command of Flag Offlcer French Forrest, and has consisted of the 
frigate St. Lawrence and the sloops Falmouth and (Jermantown. 
The Germantown, being ordered home, arrived at Norfolk, February 
9, and, having been repaired, sailed for the East Indies on the 4th of 
August, to be employed as part of the force on that station. The 
Falmouth, having been sent home by Commodore Forrest for repairs, 
which being completed, was sent back at the earliest moment to re- 
join the St. Lawrence. It is proposed, at an early day, to add the 
brig Perry to this squadron. 

These two squadrons, the Brazil and the Mediterranean, have been 
able quietly and efiectively to perform the duties required of them, 
respectively, without any act of direct interference. 

The Jamestown, Cumberland, St. Louis, Vincennes, Dale, and 
Dolphin have been employed on the coast of Africa. Commodore 
Crabbe^ late in command on that station, arriving at Philadelphia 
with the Jamestown on the 2d of June, was succeeded by the present 
Flag Officer of the squadron, Thomas A. Conover, who, on the 23d of 
the same month, sailed from Boston in his flag-ship, the Cumberland. 
The Dale left Norfolk May 5 to relieve the Dolphin, which arrived 
at Boston July 22. The Vincennes left New York on the 20th Novem- 
ber to relieve the St. Louis. The sloop Marion is preparing to join 
the squadron. The force on the coast of Africa has fully accomplished 
its main object, by discharging the obligations we are under by the 
treaty of August 9, 1842, for the suppression of the slave trade. 

The steam frigate San Jacinto, Commander Henry H. Bell, and 
the sloops-of-war Portsmouth, Commander Foote, and Levant, Com- 
mander William Smith, have constituted the East India squadron^ 



8ECRETABY OF THE NAVY. 577 

nnder Flag Officer James Armstrong. The duties of this sqnadron 
have been ardaons, and the officers and men attached to it distin** 
ffuisbed themselves on a memorable occasion. On the 16th of Novem- 
ber, 1866| as one of the boats belonging to the squadron was passing 
up the river to Canton with the American flag fully displayed, it 
was several times fired tipon by the Barrier forts, endangering the 
lives of all on board. This outrage was promptly resisted and 
redressed by the capture and destruction of the forts, and razing their 
walls to the ground. These forts, four in number, commanding the 
approcush to (^nton, were among the strongest defences of the Empire, 
mounting 176 guns. The prompt and decisive course pursued by 
Commodore Armstrong, his officers and men, has caused the flag of 
the United States to be respected by the Chinese, contributed largely 
to the security of our citizens in China, and, during the troubles which 
followed, has probably been the means of saving many lives and much 
property. 

The Portsmouth, in January, sailed for Shanghai, visited all the 
ports north of Canton open to our vessels by treaty, and in March 
returned to Hong Kong. In April she was dispatched to Singapore 
to look into the affair of the Dutch barque ^^ Henrietta Maria,'' 
and having accomplished the object of her visit, she proceeded to 
Siam with Mr. Charles William Bradley, United States Consul at 
Ningpo, bearing a treaty of amity and commerce between the United 
States and Siam for ratification by that government. While there 
she was visited by one of the kings of Siam, a courtesy never before 
extended to a man-of-war of any nation. On the 17th June she sailed 
with Mr. Bradley for Hong Kong, thence to Shanghai, from which 

Sort she sailed on the 29th of August for Simoda and Hakodadi, 
apan. The Levant, in February, was ordered to Manilla with invalids 
of the squadron, to obtain a passage for them to the United States. She 
left Manilla in March for Shanghai, was there docked, and on the 23d 
of June sailed for Hong Kong. Orders were sent out on the 16th 
September for her return to Boston. The San Jacinto, at the lat<est 
dates, was at Shanghai, where she arrived on the 23d of June from 
Hon^ Kong, having in view the health of officers and crew which 
required a change of climate. 

The open hostilities existing between the English and the Chinese, 
the consequent embarrassments of trade, and the prospect of obtain- 
ing much better commercial arrangements with China, rendered an 
increase of our naval force in those seas a measure of prudence, if not 
of necessity. Accordingly, the steam frigates Minnesota and Missis- 
sippi, and the sloop-of-war (Jermantown, were ordered to that station. 
The Minnesota sailed firom Norfolk July 1, the Germantown August 
4, and the Mississippi from New York August 19. The Hon. Wm. 
B. Reed, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary from the 
United States to China, went out in the Minnesota. 

The steam frigate Powhatan has been ordered to China to relieve 
the San Jacinto, and Captain Josiah F. Tattnall to succeed Commo- 
dore Armstrong as the Flag Officer of the squadron. The late Presi- 
dent of the United States, your immediate predecessor, having accepted 
the offer which you courteously extended to him of the use of a public 

Vol. ii 3T 



578 REPORT OF THE 

vessel to conrey him and his family to Madeira, the Powhatan will 
receive them on board at Norfolk and convey them to that island. 

Besides the squadrons, other vessels have been in commission. The 
steamer Michigan, under Commander Charles H. McBlair, is upon the 
northwestern lakes. 

The steam frigate Merrimack returned to Boston, in March, from a 
successful trial trip of six months, under Captain Pendergrast ; she 
has since gone out as the flag ship of the Pacific squadron. 

The sloop-of-war Preble, the practice ship at the Naval Academy, 
under Commander Joseph F. Green, has, with the 1st and 3d classes 
of Acting Midshipmen, made the usual summer cruise ; from which 
they have derived much practical information in their profession. 
The report of the cruise is herewith transmitted. 

The store-ship Relief, under Lieutenant Cooke, returned to New 
York in January, having conveyed stores to the squadron on the coast 
of Brazil. The store-ship Supply, under Lieutenant A. F. V. Gray, 
performed a similar duty, sailing from New York in April, returning 
in August, and has since sailed with stores for the African and Brazil 
squadrons. The barque Release, under Lieutenant Simms, dispatched 
in November, 1856, under the direction of the Department of the 
Interior, to Demarara and Venezuela, to procure cuttings of sugar 
cane, returned to New Orleans in February with 300 tons of the cut- 
tings. She landed her cargo, proceeded to New York, and arrived 
there March 19. In June, under Lieutenant Brasher, she sailed from 
New York for Aspinwall with stores for the squadron in the Pacific, 
and in August returned to Boston. 

In accordance with the joint resolution of Congress approved August 
28, 1856, the barque Resolute, late one of an English exploring 
squadron, abandoned in the Arctic seas, purchased by the United 
States from her salvors, and thoroughly repaired and refitted, was 
tendered to the British government. As stated in the last annual 
report, the Resolute, under the command of Commander Hartstene, 
sailed from New York lor England November 13, 1856 ; she arrived 
at Portsmouth December 12, and on the 16th was delivered to the 
Queen of Great Britain in person. Commander Hartstene performed 
the duty assigned him to the entire satisfaction of the Department, 
and was received in England, both by government and people, with 
every manifestation of the high appreciation with which they regarded 
this signal mark of courtesy and friendly feeling on the part of the 
government and people of the United States. 

The act of March 3, 1857, "to expedite telegraphic communica- 
tion for the uses of the government in its foreign intercourse," 
authorized the employment of two ships in laying down a telegraphic 
cable from the coast of Newfoundland to the coast of Ireland. The 
Niagara, then at New York, nearly ready for sea, was ordered to 
England to aid in the enterprise. She left New York, under the com- 
mand of Captain Iludson, on the 22d of April, and arrived in England 
on the 12th of May. The Susquehanna, under Captain Sands, then 
in the Mediterranean, was also directed to proceed to England, and to 
accompany the Niagara across the Atlantic, rendering such assistance 
BH she might require. These vessels, with those designated for the 



SECBETABT OF THE NAVY. 579 

same purpose by the government of Great Britain, assembled in the 
Cove of Cork, and, on the 6th of August, the Niagara commenced 
laying down the telegraphic cable. After about three hundred and 
thirty-four miles of it had been laid, it parted, without fault of the 
officers or crew of the Niagara, and the fleet returned to Plymouth. 
The Niagara was ordered, after landing the cable, to return to New 
York, and has arrived. The Susquehanna returned to the Mediter- 
ranean. She has since received orders to join the Home squadron, at 
Key West, and has probably at that point received her orders to pro- 
ceed to San Juan del Norte with the special instructions which 
accompanied them. 

The act of March 3, 185T, making appropriations for the naval 
service, appropriated $49,000 ** to enable the Secretary of the Navy 
to arm and man the Ordnance ship Plymouth, with a view to the im- 
provement of ordnance and gunnery practice." She was accordingly 
pnt iu commission, and, on we 7th July, sent to sea on a six months' 
cruise, under Commander Dahlgren. Her armament consisted of four 
nine-inch shell guns, one eleven-inch shell pivot gun, two twenty-four- 

tounder and one twelve-pounder howitzers. She was ordered to cruise 
y the Azores to Lisbon, along the coast of France to Amsterdam, 
and, returning, to touch at Southampton or Bristol and the Bermuda 
Islands. Ciommander Dahlgren, having completed the cruise, has re- 
turned to this port, and will continue the drill necessary to perfect the 
training of such seamen as have been found capable of receiving it. 
The Plymouth encountered long continued boisterous weather on her 
return homeward, with some heavy gales, during which the heaviest 
of the cannon were secured perfectly with ordinary lashings, and were as 
well under control in a rough sea, when cast loose for priictice, as could 
be desired. One hundred and twenty-one shells were fired at sea, 
during the cruise, from the 11-inch pivot gun, and ** without expe- 
riencing aity of the difficulties usually supposed to render such heavy 
ordnance nearly unavailable on shipboard." The result of the opera- 
tions of the Plymouth seems to dispel all remaining doubt whether the 
heavy cannon which she carried would be manageable, and not only 
to justify the previous adoption of such ordnance in the steam frigates 
recently built, but also to render it expedient to extend this plan of 
armament. I earnestly recommend a renewal of the appropriation, 
and the permanent employment of a ship on this duty. 

The act of March 3, 1867y making appropriations for the Naval 
service, directed the Secretary of the Navy '* to have prepared, and 
to report to Congress for its approval, a code of regulations for the 

Jovernment of the Navy." To aid me in the performance of this 
Qty, I convened in Washington, on the 10th of August, a board of 
officers, consisting of a captain, commander, lieutenant, the lieutenant 
colonel of the marine corps, a purser, and a surgeon, to prepare a 
code of regulations conforming to the requirements of the act. They 
are diligently engaged in the work, and have made such progress 
that I shall be able to submit a report to Congress at an early day. 
The same act appropriated twenty-five thousand dollars to verify 
the survey of the Atrato and Truando rivers, with a view to a shinj 
caaal between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Measures were iu^^^ 



680 EEPOET OP THE 

mediately taken b^ the War and Navy Departments to organize an 
expedition for this object. Lieutenant Craven, of the Ifavy, and 
Lieutenant Michler, of the Topographical Engineers of the Army, 
were, by yonr direction, assigned to this duty. The schooner 
Yarina, of the Coast Survey, temporarily placed at the control of this 
Department, was pre^red at the Ifew York navy yard for this special 
service, and, with suitable hydrographical and topographical parties 
on board, set sail on the 12th of October for the Gulf of Darien. 
When we consider the magnitude of the object ; the influence it is 
destined to have upon commerce, if accomplished; its effect in binding 
together in closer relations the remotest parts of our confederacy, we 
cannot fail to regard any hopefhl enterprise having this object in 
view as fraught with the deepest interest. It is not without hope, 
founded upon reliable information, that this enterprise is undertaken. 
By the same act of March 3, 1857, making appropriations for the 
naval service, the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars was appro- 
priated to extend and complete the exploration of the Parana and the 
tributaries of the Paraguay. Early in the season an arrangement was 
made with Mr. B. B. Forbes, of Boston, for the construction, at his 
own expense, of a stea'mer of suitable size and draught for the navi- 
gation of those rivers, to be delivered by him at some convenient 
point on the La Plata, and chartered by the government for the time 
that will necessarily be occupied in the survey. The contract for the 
charter of the vessel has been duly executed. She is now nearly com- 
pleted, and will soon proceed to the La Plata. It is proposed to 
•send out Commander T. J. Page, with proper officers and men, to 
•meet her there, and to enter upon the exploration authorized b^ 
Congress. The government of Paraguay having prohibited the navi- 

{ Ration by forei^ vessels of that part of the river Paraguay which 
ies within its jurisdiction, some difficulty may possibly arise in com- 
pleting that portion of the survey ; but there are many rivers em- 
braced within the scope of the act, the exploration and navigation of 
which will probably develop great commercial advantages. 

^Commander Page informs the Department that four charts of the 
former survey have been already printed ; that the greater portion of 
the remaining sheets are ready for the engravers ; and that the oon- 
stFUotion and topography of the whole work will be completed in six 
months if not delaved by them. 

The work of puolishing the survey of the late expedition to the 
North .Pacific and Bhering's Straits, under Commander Bodgers, is 
rapidly advancing. Enragements have been made with eminent 
professors in the various branches of natural history for describing 
the most interesting of the zoological specimens brought home by the 
expedition. A portion of the hydrographical work is in the hands of 
the ^engraver ; tne rest in a state of forwardness. 

Congress ^at its last session authorized the enlistment of eight 
thousand five hundred men for the nav^, instead of seven thousand 
five hundred, the former limit. This increase enabled the Depart- 
ment to employ more vessels-of-war at sea; but the number of marines 
has not been increased so that guards can be provided for them. To 
obviate this difficulty, under the authority of the naval appropriation 



SECBETABT OF THE NAVT. 581 

act of March 3, 1849, you directed the employment of two hundred 
landsmen as marines, in addition to the two hundred authorized to 
be 80 employed by one of your predecessors. By this arrangement 
the number employed as privates in the marine corps amounts to 
thirteen hundred and sixty-eight, while the number of landsmen is 
thereby diminished. I would respectfully reccommend, as has been 
done by my predecessors, that the privates of this corps be increased. 
Two thousand men are deemed necessary for the ordinary detail of 
the service. 

Wishing to give greater efficiency to this important branch of the 
service^ I have recently directed that there be furnished to the head- 
quarters of the corps a battery of two 32-pounders and four of Dahl- 
fipren's field guns, that the officers and men may be instructed in their 
drill before being sent to sea. They will then be able to act as in« 
fantry, serve a division of heavy artillery on shipboard, or the field 
pieces on landing. 

The naval appropriation act of Au^st 16, 1856, appropriated 
ninety-six thousand dollars for the erection and completion of marine 
barracks at Brooklyn, New York, and sixty thousand dollars for the 
same purpose at Pensaoola, Florida. The site for those at Brooklyn 
requiring piling and filling in, not yet completed, proposals have 
not been invited for the erection of barracks there. Proposals for 
those at Pensacola were invited by my predecessor, but as the lowest 
bid was beyond the limit of the appropriation, plans and specifications 
were directed to be made for smaller buildings, and on the 21st of 
September proposals were again invited. Seventeen were received, 
and those of Mahon & Gibbon for fifty-three thousand eight hundred 
and forty-seven dollars, being the lowest, the contract was awarded to 
them. The marine barracks at Boston, Philadelphia, and Norfolk are 
represented to be contracted and entirely unfit for use ; and the Com- 
mandant of the Corps recommends that provision be made to purchase 
ground and erect suitable buildings at those places. 

I would respectfully invite your attention to General Henderson's 
report for the general condition of the corps. 

Two appropriations, each of twenty thousand dollars, have been 
made for the construction and completion of a coal depot at Key West, 
in Florida. A wharf has been built, but the foundation having partially 
&iled, it is deemed unsafe. A coal shed has been commenced^ but is 
neither covered in nor paved. The constructing engineer reports that 
a similar one, parallel to it, is needed for soft coal, that having been 
designed for anthracite; that the sheds will be of little use without a 
substantial and permanent wharf from which vessels can receive their 
supply ; that the site of the present wharf is excellent, having a depth 
of water of twenty-five feet ; that the construction of two railway tracks 
from the wharf to the coal sheds will be necessary ; and that to com- 
plete what he proposes would require an appropriation of one hun- 
dred and seventy-five thousand dollars, tne former appropriation 
having been exhausted. In view of the admirable position of Key 
West for conveniently supplying with coal the steamers of the Home 
sqoadron, I would earnestly recommend that suitable proviflion be 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



582 REPORT OP THE 

made, by legislation, for the completion, upon a proper scale and in 
an economical manner, of this important public work. 

The act of January 28, 1857, authorized the President to purchase 
a site for a Naval Depot on Blythe island, in the State of Georgia, and 
to erect such buildings and to make such improYements as may be 
necessary to repair vessel s-of- war and to afford them refuge. A board 
of officers, consisting of Captain Mcintosh, Commander Hartstene, 
Lieut. Brooke, and a civil engineer, Mr. Calvin Brown, were directed 
to examine the island and the adjacent waters. In pursuance of their 
report, about one thousand one hundred acres of the southern portion 
of the island have been purchased for $130,000. The Attorney General 
having certified that the title is good, and the State of Georgia having 
consented to the purchase, and thereby ceded the requisite jurisdiction, 
the purchase money has been paid. Immediate steps will be taken to 
prepare the site for the purposes expressed in the act of Congress. 

The war steamer building at Hoboken by the executor of Robert L. 
Stevens was first authorized by the act of April 14, 1842. The 
present contract provides that Mr. Stevens should build the vessel on 
his own plan and deliver her to the government for the sum of 
iSSGjtlT 84; and that after the sum of $500,000 should have been 
paid on account, she should be examined by a boards and if she could 
DC completed for the balance of the appropriation, then it should be 
paid. This balance of $86,71Y 84 has been appropriated by Congress 
to enable the Department promptly to make the payment when it should 
be due. On the 19th of February, 1856, a board was appointed, and 
in their report of March 7, 1856, they estimate that, in addition to the 
sum of $500,000 already paid, there will be required the further sum 
of $812,033 68 to complete the vessel. The balance appropriated 
August 16, 1856, remains therefore in the treasury. Mr. Stevens and 
his executor have expended upon the vessel the sum of $702,755 37. 
It is now proposed by the executor that the balance of the contract 
price — that is to say, the sum of $86,717 84 — be paid to him from 
time to time as an equal amount in work and materials shall here- 
after be put upon the vessel, the same being secured to the government 
by a pledge of the whole. As the vessel is already virtually owned by 
the government, and will be of little valueunless completed, it is deemed 
proper to invite attention to the inquiry whether it may not be expedient 
to authorize the application of the balance in aid of the means of the 
executor, and in the mode proposed, to the accomplishment of the work. 

The Naval Academy, at Annapolis, now under the charge of Captain 
Blake, the successor of Captain Goldsborough in the administration 
of this important and delicate trust, is in a flourishing condition. It is 
to the Navy what the Military Academy is to the Army — an institution 
not merely of great utility, but of indispensable necessity, without 
which, in the present state of science, an accomplished and efficient 
corps of officers could not be secured. There are now attached to it, for 

fmrposes of instruction, 176 acting midshipmen. At the close of the 
ast academic year 15 graduated, and 89 have since been admitted. 
The report of the last annual board of inspecting officers speaks in 
terms of high commendation of the discipline and police regulations 
of the institution ; of the performance of the students in field artillery 



8ECRETABY OP THE NAVT. 583 

and infantry tacticfl ; in the exercise of the great gnns in battery, and 
in shell and shot practice at the target; of the admirable acquirements 
of the graduating class, and of the successful management of the 
academy, now no longer an experiment. It also proposes some mea- 
sures deserving earnest consideration, and others which in due time 
ought to be carried into effect. 

The joint resolution of March 3, 1857, directing the Secretary of 
the Navy to cause medals to be struck and presented to Dr. Kane, his 
officers and men, I have been unable to carry into effect, because Con- 
gress accidentally omitted to make an appropriation for that object. 

When I entered upon my duties in this Department I found a Naval 
courtof inquiry already organized under the act of January 16, 1857. 
Deeming it important that the investigation directed by that act 
should be brought to an early conclusion, I immediately organized 
two additional courts. These three courts have prosecuted their 
labors with great assiduity. The result in many cases has been 
presented to you. As to all those cases in which the courts have 
recommended restoration to the active list, or to the service, or 
a transfer from furlough to leave pay, you have approved the ac- 
tion of the courts; and when you shall have presented corresponding 
nominations to the Senate, you will have done as to them all 
which this act has committed to your discretion. As to those cases 
in which the courts have recommended no change, the action of the 
President, whether it be that of approval or disapproval, will not 
vary the result, but leave the parties in statu quo^ as if there had been 
no inquiry. The President having no power to change the state of 
any person already in the navy, except by dismissal, or by promotion 
with the advice and consent of the Senate, or to restore any person to 
it except by a new appointment, with the advice and consent of the 
Bame body, it is obvious that little could be done to remove or palliate 
the presumed evil which it was the object of that act to remedy, 
except by the prompt execution of the act itself. Unwilling to be 
drawn into any allegation against those officers who had been 
affected by the action of the Retiring Board, I examined the act of 
Congress to see if any such duty had been imposed upon me. I found 
that it admitted no latitude of construction. It directed a definite 
inquiry. It prescribed the exact limits of the investigation. It left 
in the Department no power to enlarge, or to restrict, or to modify. 
It directed the physical, mental, professional, and moral fitness of the 
officer for the naval service to be investigated by a court of inquiry. 
Accordingly the precept to the court in every case directed that pre- 
cise inquiry. Instructions were given to the Judge Advocates in 
every instance where the party desired it to take the initiative, and to 
present all the evidence which they intended to introduce before the 
party should be called upon to respond to it, and then to give him 
ample opportunity. They were directed to consent to depositions 
when necessary or convenient. They were instructed, when reason- 
able objection should be made to any court, to give way to it, and to 
interpose no obstacle to the transfer of the case to another court, to 
which there should be no objection. These instructions were given to 
insure a fair, impartial, and faithful execution of the intentions of 
Congress. 



584 BEPOBT OF THE 

The policy has been adopted of shortening the period of the craise 
in all remote seas, and several ships have been ordered home in pur- 
suance of it. The necessity of the change has been long felt. It 
will conduce to the preservation of the health of both officers and 
men. Long exposed to the enervating influences of hot climates, th^ 
are often broken down, or their usefulness in after life impaired. It 
will facilitate enlistments. Making the service more acceptable to 
seamen by more frequently returning them to their homes, it will 
make them more ready to engage in it. It will promote economy. 
The ships returning from a short cruise of two years, will be ready 
for sea again without bein^ subject to those searching repairs to 
which they are generally subjected after one long absence in view of 
another equally Ions. It will contribute to the increased activity, 
efficiency, and usefulness of the navy, by making it more a school of 
actual experience to officers and seamen, and by presenting our ships 
more frequently wherever there shall be American commerce or 
American citizens to be protected. These considerations have led to 
the adoption of this change, and it will probably be permanent, 
unless experience shall disprove its utility. 

At the same time the proportion of landsmen and boys allotted to 
a national ship has been increased. There is often great difficulty in 
obtaining seamen, and still greater in obtaining American seamen — 
the best in the world for the United States service. The employ- 
ment of landsmen and boys contributes much to remedy the incon- 
venience. They soon become trained and fit to take the place of 
seamen ; and instead of being starving supernumeraries in the popu- 
lation of the larger cities, they become efficient and useful members 
of an improving and valuable class, without which neither a naval 
nor mercantile marine can be sustained. 

Congress having at its last session authorized the building of five 
steam sloops, and appropriated a million of dollars towards the object^ 
measures have been taken for their immediate construction. They 
will be built at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Norfolk, and Pen- 
sacola — one at each of those places. That at New York will be built 
by contract, in the yard of Mr. Jacob A. Westervelt. The act having 
expressly authorized their construction by contract or otherwise, it 
has been deemed expedient to commit one of them wholly to private 
enterprise The object is to open the way to improvement, by sum- 
moning the skill and genius of the country to contest the palm of 
superiority with the navy yards in the endeavor to give the govern- 
ment the best sloop-of-war that can be built. But as the government 
has its own establishments, provided at immense cost, and thoroughly 
organized and supplied with the requisite materials, it was thought 
to be expedient, and, indeed, necessary, to employ them in the con- 
struction of the others. The Department, after bavins advertised for 
the best model, plan and specincations, and received thirteen pro- 
posals, organiz^ a board composed of the most experienced naval 
officers, naval constructors, and chief engineers, to aid in awarding 
the contract according to the terms of the advertisement. I am confi- 
dent that the result, both as to the ship built by the private contractor 
and those built at the navy yards, will reach as high a point of 



8ECBETABT OF THE KAYT. 585 

exoellenoe as is at present attainable. They will be constructed with 
water-tight compartments — an improyement in the mode of construc- 
tion which, in case of disaster, will often save the ship from goin^ to 
the bottom, and ought generally to be introduced where many lives 
are at stake. 

The act authorizing the five sloops-of-war having specified the class 
of vessels to be built, did not admit of the construction of small 
fteamers of light draught, which are very much wanted in the public 
service. For some years past the government has had no means of 
supplying its indispensable wants, except by hiring small steamers 
as occasion might require. At this moment, when much needed, we 
have no vessels which can penetrate the rivers of China. We have 
few that can enter most of the harbors south of Norfolk. Harbors 
which are the recipients of hundreds of millions of our commerce are 
not accessible to most of our public ships. This state of destitution is 
so remarkable that it should attract particular attention, especially as 
some of our greatest interests and most vulnerable points are thus left 
exposed. Besides, this class of steamers, of lignt draught, great 
speed, and heavy guns, would be formidable in coast defence. They 
cost but little in construction, and require but little to keep them in 
commission, and, for most practical purposes in time of peace, are as 
effective as larger vessels, and often more so. One or more of them 
should be at every point where we maintain a squadron. Three or 
four should be constantly employed on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 
Economy, efficiency, and utility combine to recommend them as al- 
most indispensable. Ten of them would be of incalculable advantage 
to the naval service, and would cost $2,300,000. 

Under the present small appropriation for testing improvements 
several trials have been made ; but tne Department feels itself crippled 
by the limited appropriation. The sum of ten thousand dollars is not 
adequate to do justice to improvements which promise public utility. 
Men of inventive genius are so devoted to the one favorite pursuit that 
they are most frequently without the means necessary to test their in- 
ventions. Were Congress to appropriate tenfold the sum now allotted 
to this oUect for naval purposes, a sinele successful result, after a 
hundred iailures, would reimburse the vrhole cost, while the influence 
of the measure in aiding the progress of improvement in the naval 
service could hardly be over estimated. 

It is impossible, without doing injustice, to give a summary of the 
reports of the Chiefs of Bureaus of this Department. They have pr^ 
sented a fiill and detailed statement of the condition of the service in 
the respective branches committed to their particular charge ; of pub- 
lic worxs prosecuted, of improvements introduced, of evils remedied^ 
and many suggestions and recommendations which deserve the con- 
sideration of Congress. Their reports exhibit detailed statements of 
the expenditures of the present, and estimates for the ensuing fiscat 
year. I commend them to particular attention, as exhibiting a full 
view of the actual condition of the navy and its auxiliary establish- 
ments, so far as they are under the immediate supervision of the 
Bureaus. 

The estimates for the support of the navy and marine corps, and 



586 REPORT OP THE 

for all other objects under the control of the Navy Department for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, are — 

For the support of the navy and marine corps $9^749,615 01 

For special objects 4,866,783 22 

Making 14,616,298 23 

The aggregate estimates for the fiscal year ending June, 1858, 
were $13,803,212 77, being $813,085 less than the present estimates. 
This difiference is principally caused by estimating $250,000 ibr the 
armament for the five new sloops, $350,000 more than last year for 
building the sloops, and by estimating for provisions and pay for one 
thousand additional men, authorized by the act of March 3, 1857. 

The expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1857, for all pur- 
poses under the control of the Department, were $12,632,696 81. Of 
which $4,343,698 14 being for special objects, the legitimate expenses 
of the navy and marine corps for that period were $8,288,998 67. 

A review of the present condition of the navy, and of the estab- 
lishments connected with it, has afforded me great gratification. I see 
in them, taken in connexion with our commercial marine and our im- 
mense resources, the means of promptly putting afioat a naval force 
equal to any exigency likely to arise in the history of the country. 
It is not the policy of our government to maintain a great navy in 
time of peace. It is against its settled policy to burden the resources 
of the people by an overgrown naval establishment. It is universally 
admitted to be inexpedient to endeavor to compete with other great 
commercial powers in the magnitude of their naval preparations. 
But it is the true policy of our government to take care that its navy, 
within its limited extent, should be unsurpassed in its efficiency and 
its completeness, and that our preparatory arrangements should be 
such that no event shall take us altogether by surprise. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ISAAC TODCEY, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

To the President. 



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8ECEETARY OP THE NAVT. 587 

iMt of papers ctcoompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy of 

December 3, 1857. 

A. — List of deaths, resignations, and dismissals in the navy since the 

last report. 
B. — Report of the annual board of naval officers of their examination 
of the organization and condition of the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis, Maryland. 

C. — ^Report of the superintending engineer of the coal depot for naval 
purposes at Key West, Florida, and his estimate for its com- 
pletion. 

D. — Letter of superintendent of Naval Academy transmitting report 
of Commander J. F. Green, commandant of midshipmen, of 
the cruise of the practice ship Preble. 

E. — Report of the superintendent of the Nautical Almanac of its pro- 
gress. 

F. — Report of Commander J. A. Dahlgren of the cruise of the ordnance 
ship Plymouth. 

No. 1. — Estimate for the support of the office of the Secretary of the 
Navy for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 

No. 2. — Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Yards and Docks. 

No. 3. — Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Ordnance and 
Hydrography, including those of Naval Observatory and Naval 
Academy. 

No. 4. — Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Construction, 
Equipment, and Repair. 

No. 5. — Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Provisions and 
Clothing. 

No. 6. — Report and detailed estimates of Bureau of Medicine and 
Surgery. 

No. 7. — Report of the commandant of the marine corps, and detailed 
estimates from the paymaster and quartermaster of the corps. 

No. 8. — General estimate of the office of the Secretary of the Navy 
and the several bureaux of the department. 

No. 9. — General estimate of the southwest executive building. 

No. 10. — Summary statement of the estimates for the navy, the marine 
corps, and special objects. 

No. 11. — General estimate for the support of the navy. 

No. 12. — General estimate for the support of the marine corps. 

No. 13. — General estimate for special objects under the Navy Depart- 
ment. 

No. 14. — Second Comptroller's statement of the appropriations for 
the Navy Department, viz : balances of appropriations on the 
1st of July, 1856 ; appropriations for the fiscal year 1856-'57; 
repayments and transfers in the same time ; the amount appli- 
cable to the service of the year 1856-'57 ; the amounts drawn 
by requisition from the treasury in the same period ; and the 
balances on the 30th June, 1857, with the sums specially 
designated that have been carried to the surplus fund. 

No. 15. — Abstract of expenditures under the head of ^'contingent ex- 
penses" settled and allowed at the office of the Fourth Auditor 
of the Treasury, from July 1, 1856, to June 30, 1857, inclusive. 



588 



BEPOBT OF THE 



List of deaths in the navt/f aa ascertained at the department, since 

December 1, 1856. 



Name and rank. 



CbpCoMit. 



Bladen Dolany.... 
Joseph Smoot..— . 
Henry Henry -.-.. 
John T.Newton... 
Stephen Cassin.... 
Foxhall A. Parker. 



QMiMMmdcrt. 



Samuel Larkin ......... 

Thomas J. Manning .... 

'William Lewis Hemdon . 
niomas R. Oedney ... .. 



Xtrufenonte. 



Montgomery Lewis ... 

Henry Darcantel 

William Boss Gardner. 

Isaac G. Strain 

Albert Allmand 

John P. Decatnr . 

George M Totten 

William H. Cheeyer .. 

George H. Hare 

Beaben Harris 

Edward Benshaw 



8urgtom» 

George B. McKnight. 
BobertT. Barry 



Pantd AMtidnA Shirgmm, 
EUasK. Kane.. ........... 



Thomas P. McBlair . 
Edward Fitagerald.. 
George B. Griswold. 



William McKenney.. 
Maden. 



William Yanglian — 
Edmund F. Olmstead . 
Bobert Knox •• 




Dec. 26, 1856 
Mar. 13, 1857 
July 26, 1857 
July 28, 1857 
Aug. 29, 1857 
Not. 23, 1857 



Dec. 22, 1856 
Jan. 6, 1857 
Sept. 12, 1857 
Not. 80, 1857 



Jan. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
May 
May 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Oct. 
Nov. 



21, 1857 
9, 1857 

22, 1857 
14, 1857 
31, 1857 

17, 1867 

18, 1857 
18, 1857 
24, 1857 
28, 1857 
28, 1857 



May IS, 1857 
Aug. 14, 1857 



Feb. 16, 1857 



Feb. 17, 1857 
Feb 27, 1857 
Apr. 5, 1857 



May 4, 1857 



Dec. 10, 1856 
Feb. 8, 1857 
Feb. 24, 1857 



Place. 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. G. 
York, Penn. 
Washington, D. C. 
Georgetown, D. C. 
Philadelphia. 



Portsmouth, N. H. 
Gharlestown, Ya. 
Lost at sea. 
Charleston, S. C. 



Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Aspinwall, New Grenada. 

Boston, Mass. 

Naval Hospital, New York. 

Mendhim, N. J. 

Bio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Philadelphia. 

New York. 

Philadelphia. 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. 0. 



Havana, Cuba. 



Santa Orua, W. I. 
(Georgetown, D. C. 
At sea, coast of Africa. 



Washington, D. C. 



Sackett's Harbor, N. T. 
Portsmouth, Ya. 
Boston. Digitized by 



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8ECRETABT OF THE KATT. 
A — Continued. 



589 



Name and rank 



Date. 



Place. 



R. W. M. Qiaham Not. 19, 1866 



DMBoel Drew ••••••••■ 

Van KenieHaer Hall ... 

Aetmg Qwmar, 

CiMrles F. Ciuhmaa ... 



V. Bait 

Leooaid Mons 

BaactliisMiddletoQ.. 
Geoiga FMrker 



Mitfor K. 8. Waldron 

Xijor Fiurke Q. Howie ... 
H^or Geoige F. lindaay . 

Walker Andenon.. ...... 



Sept. 



2, 1867 
27, 1867 



Constantinople, Turkey. 



Portemonth, K. H. 
New York. 



Dec U, 1866 



May 

Aug. 



22, 1867 
20, 1867 



New York. 



PhiladelpLla. 
Boeton. 






Feb. 
Oct. 



Feb. 
July 
Sept. 



5, 1867 

6, 1867 



21, 1867 
16, 1867 
27, 1867 



Jan. 18, 1867 



Baltimore, Md. 
Portamouth, Yai 



Portimoath, N. H. 
Washington, D. G. 
Washington, D. C. 



PensaooUi Fla. 



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690 BEPOBT OF THE 

List of resignations in the navy since December 1, 1856. 



Name and rank. 



Date of aooeptaoce. 



Captain. 

Abraham Bigelow 

Lieutenants. 

James Higgins 

J. G. Heilemann 

Francis S. Conover 

Robert. Stuart 

Theoc^oric Lee 

Wm. Downes Austin 

Lardner Gibbon 

William H. Wilcox 

J. Van Ness Philip 

J. Dabney Eainey 

Thomas M. Crossan 

Passed Assistant Surgeons, 

Frederick Horner, jr 

James F. Heustis 

Edward R. Squibb 

Assistant Surgeon. 

J. Pembroke Thorn 

Pursers, 

Edward D. Reynolds 

John V. Dobbin 

Passed Midshipman. 

Allen C. Izard 

Professor of Mathematics, 

William Flye 

Acting Midshipmen, 

E. H. Crump 

Benjamin Gregory 

Westbrook Van Santvoord 

Gustavus F. Merrian 

Charles B. Cleveland 

Gove D. Saulsbury 

James T. Brown 

Louis Girod Burt 

George Roberts Griswold 

George Thomas Howard 

Charles Kean 

John W. Stevenson 

Woodhull Smith Schenck 



February 28, 1857. 



December 31, 1856. 
December 31, 1856. 
March 9, 1857. 
April 16, 1857. 
April 25, 1857. 
May 13, 1857. 
May 15, 1857. 
June 20,1857. 
June 26, 1857. 
July 29, 1857. 
September 1, 1857. 



May 16, 1857. 
June 9, 1857. 
December 4, 1857. 



May 27, 1857. 



July 7, 1857. 
August 17, 1857. 



May 29, 1857. 

March 6, 1857. 

December 16, 1856. 
December 26, 1856. 
December 26, 1856. 
January 24, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 16^oq\q 



8ECSETABY OF THE NAVT. 
RESIGNATIONS— Continued, 



691 



Name and rank. 



Acting Midshipmen — Continued. 

Francis A. Shute 

Wm. Wallace Smith 

Charles 0. Judaon 

T. W. W. Davies 

Hamilton A. Brown 

John H. Comstock 

George P. Harris 

R. P. S. Talbott 

John Hesse 

Richard S. CoUum 

J. C. Dowling 

H. M. Herman 

R. L. Meade 

John W. Allen 

Francis S. Kinney 

Jefferson A. Slamm 

John Weidman 

R. B. D. Sydnor 

S. B. Reardon 

E. D. Cordell 

F. P. Webster 

D. S. Hayward 

J. S. McKinley 

E. J. W. Eaynsford 

T. E. M. Adams 

Clavius Phillips 

Samael Milliken 

E. R. Devault 

Acting Boatswain. 

Francis Pnrsell 

Acting Sailmaker. 

John C. Chavalier 

Third Assistant Engineers. 

William M. Willett 

George R. Woodend 

Granville T. Pierce 

Marine Corps. 

Second Lieutenant E. H. Youngblood 

Naval Storekeeper. 

Henry J. Wilde 



Date of acceptance. 



February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
February 23, 1857. 
March 20, 1857. 
March 21, 1857. 
April 7, 1857. 
April 7, 1857. 
April 8, 1857. 
April 18, 1857. 
May 4, 1857. 
Miy 6, 1857. 
May 9, 1857. 
May 12, 1857. 
June 3, 1857. 
June 9, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
June 23, 1857. 
September 30, 1857. 
September 30, 1857. 
October 12, 1857. ' 



August 31, 1857. 



October 5, 1857. 



March 6, 1857. 
April 20, 1857. 
August 8, 1857. 



February 28, 1857. 
November 30, 1857. 

— UigitizedbyCjOOQlC 



692 SfiPOBT OF THE 

Ust of dismisaiotu in the navy tince December 1, 1866. 



Name and rank. 


Date of disminlon. 


Commander. 
Jamefi H. Bowan - ..»«.».. 


January 23, 1867. 

February 6, 1857. 
September 3, 1857. 
October 7, 1857. 


LieuienmUe. 
Charles E. Fleminir 


Johnston Blakely Garter. •..•• ••• 


Leonard H, Lyne •• • • 


Acting Midshipmen. 
William Welch 


March 11, 1857. 


Beniamin W. Bristow..... 


March 23, 1857. 


Charles W. Pleasants » 


March 27, 1857. 


Philin 8. Sanderson... 


April 29, 1857. 
November 10. 1857. 


C. B. Walker 


Baatdwaina. 
Oeorfire H. Leach.. • , 


Jan. 15, 1857, (dcwerted.) 
January 17, 1857. 
July 29, 1857. 
November 2. 1857. 


Armistead Pomeroy..... •• 


John Bates • 


John C. Hayden... •••..... 


Navy Agents. 
Conrad Swackhamer ........•*»•» 


Mar. 30, 1857. ) oommis- 
Mar. 30, 1857. J sions. 
September 1, 1857. 

April 4, 1857. 


Alfred Day 


Nehemiah Moses. ••• •••••••••• 


Naval Storekeeper. 
Daniel E. Delayan^ •• 





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SECRETABT OF THE NAVT. 593 

B. 

Naval Acadrmy, 
Annapolis J Md., June 17, 1857. 

Sib : The board of ofScers appointed to witness the examination of 
the several classes of acting midshipmen, and to examine into the 
state of the police discipline and general management of the academy, 
duly assembled here on the 30th of May, agreeably to your orders, 
and, having performed this duty, now submit the result in the fol- 
lowing report. 

Before entering into the details, it may be as well to premise that 
they commenced this duty impressed with the necessity of ascertaining 
how far the education afforded the acting midshipmen tends to fit 
them for naval officers, and to render them most useful for the service 
of their country. 

The discipline of the academy is excellent and we should be at a 
loss to point out wherein it could be changed for the better. The 
superintendent has established and maintained it firmly^ humanely, 
and efficiently. 

The police regulations are well understood, and appear to be closely 
observed, and not only insure the safety, but the comfort and cleaali- 
ness of the establishment throughout. 

The order observable in every department shows the existence of a 
strict and uniform system of responsibility throughout the institution ; 
but inasmuch as the revised regulations of the academy hold the 
superintendent responsible for its police and discipline, the board are 
unanimously of the opinion that, in justice to him as well as to the 
public service, he should, in order to meet this responsibility, be 
clothed with the power of selecting all those whose especial duty it is 
to assist in maintaining the police and discipline of the establishment. 

The exercises in field artillery and infantry tactics were rapidly 
and admirably performed, and the skill and celerity of movement ex- 
hibited in the mounting and dismounting of the boat gun, and its 
exercise ashore as a field piece, in the various circumstances attendant 
on attack and defence, advance and retreat, changing front and firing 
with shell and shrapnel, elicited the admiration of the board. 

The board also witnessed the exercises of the several classes at the 
great guns in battery, and in shot and shell practice at the tareet, 
and were much struck with the ease, intelligence, quickness, and skill 
exhibited under all the circumstances of loading and firing, shifting 
trucks and breechings, and transporting guns from one side to another. 
The target practice was particularly good. 

The 1st and 2d classes exhibited commendable proficiency in sea- 
manship and naval tactics. 

It appears to the board that the want of proper text books is sensibly 
felt by some of the professors and students, and we recommend that 
such portions of the course as are now taught in manuscript, and 
which are required to be copied by the students, shall be printed under 
the authority and direction of the superintendent. 

A competent knowledge of the French and Spanish languages is 
Vol. ii 38 



594 REPOET OP THE 

essential to form the character of an accomplished naval officer ; and 
whilst noticing the progress made in these languages by the students 
of the academy, we cannot refrain from strongly recommending that 
more time be devoted to the study of both. 

The present course of instruction in French comprises a period of 
one academic term and a half, and in Spanish of one term only. This 
time is wholly inadequate to attain the desired end, and we recommend 
that the study of the French language embrace the whole academic 
course, and that more time be given to the Spanish language. 

In the examinations of the classes, the board have been struck with 
the admirable acquirements of the members of the graduating class. 
Their attainments are of a high order, and prove the ability of their 
professors as well as their own diligent application. 

These graduates so forward Ailly versed in nautical astronomy, a 
most essential brancn ; but the government has no guarantee that the 

fTaduate will retain the knowledge acquired in this most important 
ranch, or even pay any attention to it after his graduation. 

The board therefore recommend that the revised regulations be bo 
amended as to include nautical astronomy and French, and that the 
final examination for promotion be held here at this academy. 

The board have been impressed with the different attainments of 
the sections of the fourth class. The studies for the year, as laid 
dowU; are strictly adhered to by the professors; this at once becomes 
a great impediment to all those who enter the academy without being 
well grounded in the rudiments of education required by the regula- 
tions. It is well known how low is the standard of admission into the 
academy, yet it cannot be denied that many offer who are found in- 
competent and are rejected, and some who pass the first examination^ 
and are admitted into the fourth class, are totally unable to pursue 
the studies allotted to it. The consequence is they fall behind, and 
are rejected at the next or second examination, or are turned back to 
pass over the same studies again. 

This has a very detrimental effect on both professors and students ; 
the former have to give a large part of their time to those who are 
slow and unprepared ; and the latter to struggle against the mortifi- 
cation and depressing effect consequent on their inability to keep pace 
with their class. The board have anxiously looked for a remedy, and 
beg leave to propose what they conceive would meet this difficulty in 
part, viz : That after the examination for admission, the academic 
board should consider and pass upon the qualifications of the candi- 
dates, and admit into the fourth class such as may be found qualified 
to enter on the studies allotted to it, whilst those who are judged in- 
capable of pursuing those studies should be formed into a fifth class, 
and continue in it during such time as may prove their ability to join 
the fourth class, and, when capable, be admitted into it on passing 
the necessary examination at the end of the term. 

The board have made a carefal inspection of all the buildings, ex- 
amined into their uses, ventilation, and condition ; also into the mess 
arrangements, heating and lighting of the halls, grounds, and build- 
ings, and particularly of the students' quarters, and have satisfied 
themselves that every attention has been paid to convenience, comfort, 



8ECRETABY OP THE NAVY. 595 

security^ and economy, and in this view does infinite credit to the in- 
telligence and zeal of the superintendent. 

The academy has hitherto straggled through many difficulties, owing 
to the manner in which it was originally organized. This we are 
aware was unavoidable. We cannot withhold our opinion that its 
present flourishing condition is mainly to be attributed to the untiring 
seal and ability of those to whom the government has committed its 
control and management. 

The plan of appointing the graduates of the academy as assistant 
professors is an admirable one, and the board are aware of the results 
already apparent from it; but in order that the fullest benefit may be 
insured from the adoption of this plan, it is essential, in the opinion 
of the board, that the assistants shall not be ordered away at the time 
that their usefulness as instructors has begun to develop itself fully in 
the teaching of their respective classes. Teaching is an art in itself, 
and cannot be acquired without labor and practice ; and inasmuch as 
a frequent change of instructors is highly injurious to the student, and 
clogs the ambition of the professor also, we hope that some system may 
be devised by which no injury may be done to the officer or the service 
by keeping him too long on shore, and at the same time none to the 
student by depriving him of the aid of his instructor at the very time 
when it has become most valuable to him. This end we think may 
be attained by permitting the assistant professors to continue at the 
academy for a period of four years, and by appointing them from the 
ranks of the navy. 

The sea-wall, the docks, and the buildings designed for the quar- 
ters of the surgeon and assistant professors are well advanced towards 
completion. 

In the opinion of the board, it is evident that the Naval Academy is 
no longer an experiment, and the time has arrived when a full and 
well digested plan, embracing all the present and future wants of the 
institution in buildings, improvements, &c., should be adopted and 
carried out. 

The necessity for the removal of the buildings in the centre of the 
grounds, and now in the occupancy of the commandant of midship- 
men, the professor of natural philosophy, the professor of French, and 
others, is apparent, and has been repeatedly urged upon the attention 
of the Secretary of the Navy by preceding boards. A bare inspection 
of the grounds is sufficient to convince any one that the exercise of 
the acting midshipmen in infantry and field artillery drills cannot be 
effectively conducted within the narrow space comprehended between 
the quarters of the acting midshipmen and the buildings above men- 
tion^. We therefore recommend the immediate buUding of new 
qnarters for the commandant of midshipmen, the professor of Frenoh, 
and others, and the removal of the houses which now stand in the 
centre of the area desired for military drills. In this connexion we 
abo recommend the removal of the laboratory to a more eligible site. 

The board are fully convinced that an exercise ship, constructed on 
the land to represent the deck and bulwarks of a man-of-war, and 
with masts, yards, rigging, sails, and ^ns complete, will greatly 
facilitate the acquirement of all that portion of the naval officer's pro- 



596 EEPORT OF THE 

fession not pertaining to a ship afloat or in motion, such as the hand- 
ling of spars, yards, sails, guns, &c. We therefore strongly 
recommend the building of such a ship. The acting midshipmen, it 
is true, are trained to the exercise of these duties on board the prac- 
tice ship, but the time allotted is too short to give to the student the 
full benefit of such instruction and exercises. 

In conclusion, the board take much pleasure in expressing their 
high appreciation of the ability and zeal with which the superintendent, 
commandant, professors, and assistants have discharged the respon- 
sible duties required of them at this institution. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. J. PENDERGRAST, 

President of (he Board, 

Hon. Isaac Toucby, 

Secretary of the Navy^ Washington. 



C. 

Fort Dblawarb^ 
Near Delaware City Post Office, July 22, 1857. 

Sir : I have the honor to report that I have closed my accounts for 
disbursements under your department in constructing coal shed at the 
United States naval station Key West, Florida, and transmitted them 
to the Fourth Auditor for settlement. I acknowledge a balance unex- 
pended remaining in my hands of $158 93. 

The appropriation is exhausted and the shed is neither covered in 
nor paved. The walls are well, substantially, and cheaply built. To 
complete roof and pavement will require an additional appropriation 
of $25,000, which I recommend to be asked for at the ensuing session 
of Congress. This coal shed will hold about 6^000 tons of coal. It 
is intended for hard coals. A similar shed parallel to it on the custom- 
house lot is needed for soft coals. Two such sheds would not suffice^ 
however, to keep an adequate supply of coals for many steamers if we 
have to maintain a large fleet in the gulf. The sheds, moreover, will 
be of little use without a subtantial and permanent wharf from which 
vessels can coal. The site and position of existing wharf is excellent ; 
but the wharf itself is neither substantial nor safe ; sixty feet of its 
lower end fell under a very moderate load. The largest steamer in 
the navy can lie alongside of this wharf. I understand that the 
Wabash or Merrimac coaled there, though not while I was on the 
Key. There is 25 feet water close along the outside of wharf, which 
I believe fully suflices. I do not know what may now be the policy 
of the federal government as to rendering Key West a regular naval 
station, there can, however, be but little diflerence of opinion as to its 
fitness for a coal depot. The advantages it presents for such a pur- 
pose are marked and peculiar. The construction of a permanent wharf 
at which men-of-war steamers can coal is an indispensable part of the 
works required for a coal depot alone. The successful building of 
sach a wharf in five fathoms of water, with some uncertainty as to 



SECRETART OP THE NAVY 597 

the foundation offered by the bed of the harbor must necessarily call 
into play practical skill and judgment in such constructions. I can, 
therefore, only venture a conjectural estimate of the cost of the work, 
I would not be willing to undertake to build one there for less than 
|75,000. The wharf should have two platforms, one above the level 
of high water, the other somewhat higher than the bulwarks of the 
tallest steamer, and the latter should be large enough to hold all the 
coals required for one coaling of a steamer. There should be two 
railroad tracks respectively of the levels of the two platforms, leading 
from wharf to coal sheds ; would estimate wharf and railroad tracks 
to cost $100,000, 

I would therefore take the liberty to submit the following as an 
estimate of funds required for the United States naval coal depot at 
Key West, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859 : 

Finishing shed for hard coals $25,000 00 

Building shed for soft coals 50,000 00 

Wharf, with two platforms of different levels, and rail- 
road tracks to coal sheds 100,000 00 

175,000 00 



As I have been detached from the charge of Fort Taylor, and shall 
not return to Key West, I beg to be relieved from the further charge 
of the coal depot, and would suggest that I may be authorized to turn 
over the balance of the appropriation for that work still remaining in 
my hands to my successor, Captain D. P. Woodbury, of the corps of 
engineers. A letter from the Navy Department to Captain Wood- 
bury, asking him to take charge of the works at the coal depot, and 
to receive the funds I may have to turn over to him, is probably all 
that is requisite to accomplish the object. 

The temporary shed standing on the private lands of Messrs. Tift 
& Gaudelpo, and used for storing cement and other materials, at a 
rent of fifty dollars a year to the latter from the time it was occupied, 
and fifty dollars to the former after the first year's occupancy, for 
which there was no charge, and some large timbers, for the trusses of 
the roof of the coal shed, constitute all the property remaining undis- 
posed of, or unconsumed in the construction of the walls of the coal 
shed, to be turned over to my successor. The books and papers be- 
longing to the work are now in the office of my successor, in the 
charge of the clerk of Fort Taylor. 

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, 

JOHN SANDERS, 
Brevet Major of Engineers, 

Hon. Isaac Toucby, 

Secretary of the Navy, WaahingUm^ D. C. 



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598 SEPOBT OF THE 



Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., 

October 23, 1867. 

Sib : I have the honor to forward herewith a copy of a detailed 
report made to me by Commander J. F. Green, of his late cruise in 
the practice ship ^^ Preble,'' which seems to me to have been ably 
and snccessfally performed. 

I beg to add that I inspected the ship carefully on her arrival at 
this port, and found her in excellent order. 

I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. S. BLAKE, 

Superintendent. 
Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretary of the Navy^ Washington City, D. C. 



U. S. PRAcncB-SHip Preble, 
Off AnnapdiSj Maryland, September 29, 1857. 

Sib : In compliance with your general instructions for my govern- 
ment during the summer cruise of the practice-ship, received from 
your predecessor. Captain Goldsborough, I sailed from Annapolis on 
the 3a of July, and proceeded to Norfolk, where we arrived on the 
following day, for the purpose of making necessary alterations in the 
equipment of the ship. The most important of these were, raising 
the side belaying racks to a convenient height to secure and belay the 
running rigging, shifting a hatchway of the spar deck that was im- 
mediately forward of the mizen>mast, in order to allow the wheel 
and binnacles to be placed further aft, and thereby remove the steer- 
ing compasses from the influence of a number of iron stanchions on 
the main deck and the spindles of the capstan, over which they were 
originally placed, and raising the trap-bands on the lower masts, to 
allow the lower yards to brace properly. 

These alterations, with others of minor importance, were completed 
by tbc 13th of July, every facility and aid having been furnished by 
Captain Dornin, commandant of the station, to hasten their comple- 
tion, and to prepare the ship in other respects for the cruise. In con- 
sequence, however^ of a number of the officers of the ship being obliged 
to attend a court martial as witnesses, I did not receive permission to 
proceed to sea until the 20th, when I immediately got under way, in 
tow of the steamer ''Water Witch/' and went to Hampton Roads, 
and from thence to sea the following morning. 

We arrived at Fayal on the 9th, and sailed from thence on the 13th 
of August, on our return to the Chesapeake, where we arrived, after a 
long passage, on the 22d, and at Annapolis on the 27th instant. 

I deem it proper, as you have recently assumed the super in tendency 
of the academy^ to submit for your examination a copy of the regula- 
tions that were observed on board of the practice-ship for her internal 
government, and also to report a portion of a former report relating 

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8ECKETABY OF THE NAVY. 599 

to the daily routine of duties and exercises of the students, and their 
organization for instruction. 

They were divided into two watches and six gun's crews. During 
the day, at sea, a whole watch, and at night, and also when in port, a 
quarter watch was required to he on deck. Each of the gun's crews 
were successiyely stationed in the master's and powder divisions when 
assemhled at quarters for general exercise, to familiarize them with 
the duties of the different divisions. 

At 9 a. m., daily, (Sundays excepted,) when at sea, and the weather 
would permit of it, the members of the second class were placed alter- 
nately in charge of the deck, and required to perform evolutions, &c., 
for one hour and a half, the ship being worked by the students, 
assisted by the crew. After the termination of this exercise, and 
until 11.30 a. m., and from 1 to 3.30 p. m., the watch below attended 
school for the purpose of studying navigation, and the watch on deck 
was employed fitting rigging, &c. At 4 p. m. they were either exer- 
cised at target firing, divisional or general quarters, and received 
instruction in practical gunnery. In addition to the regular exer- 
cises, the watch on deck assisted to work the ship, and after our depar- 
ture from Fayal the members of the second class, under the supervision 
of the officer of the deck, performed all the evolutions required to sail 
the ship. During the wnole cruise, also, a student from each class 
was stationed at the wheel to steer the ship. 

The members of both classes have had a great deal of practice, and 
have made satisfactory improvement in performing the ordinary duties 
of a seaman of fitting rigging, making, reducing, and reefing sails, 
and sending u{) and down yards and masts. More attention and 
instruction was intentionally bestowed upon the second than the fourth 
class, and they have attained to a corresponding decree of proficiency. 
They have fitted collars of stays, eyes of shrouds and back-stays, lower 

tendants, rigging of bowsprit, &c., in a very seamanlike manner, and 
ave acquired confidence and commendable skill in the performance 
of the ordinary evolutions required to sail a ship. 

They have also made satisfactory proficiency in gunnery. By the 
distribution of the guns' crews alternately in the several divisions at 
general quarters, the daily divisional exercise, and target practice, 
they have acquired a practical knowledge of the organization and 
duties of each division, the use of implements required for the service 
of guns, the nomenclature and construction of truck ffun-carriages, the 
manner of dismounting, mounting, housing, and transporting guns, 
and become very expert in the management of guns, in either a rough 
or smooth sea. Their target practice, although at the commencement 
of the cruise somewhat unsatisfactory, by reason of the motion of the 
ship, was eventually characterized by that judgment in pointing and 
accuracy of fire which the students have heretofore exhibited, ashore 
and afloat. 

In navigation, the fourth class progressed so far as to learn the 
naanner of working a day's work, the different sailings, the method 
of determining the latitude by meridian altitudes, and also the longi- 
tude by chronometer, and the adjustments and use of the sextant. 
The members of the second class, following the system of instruction 



600 REPORT OF THE 

adopted last year, of taking and completing their own observations 
instead of having examples furnished them by the instructor, or taking 
them from their text books, have made themselves familiar with the 
adjustment and use of the sextant, the manner of ascertaining the 
error and rate of a chronometer and variation of the compass, the va- 
rious methods contained in Bowditch, as well as others, for determining 
the position of a ship at sea ; and are qualified, with but few excep- 
tions, to navigate a ship. 

In connexion with the subject of teaching navigation, I would re- 
spectfully state that, to promote the proper advancement of the fourth 
class, it is very necessary the complement of officers attached to the 
ship should admit of another instructor being detailed to assist in the 
performance of this duty, as one instructor cannot give sufficient at- 
tention to more than the second class. 

Although the time usually allotted for the cruise was considerably 
reduced this year by circumstances beyond my control, and the' stu- 
dents were thus prevented from having so complete a course of exer- 
cises as I contemplated and desired ; still, I now consider the results 
of the cruise very satisfactory, inasmuch as they have made about the 
same proficiency as the classes that were embarked either last or the 
previous year, and they have been so circumspect in their deportment 
that no impropriety of conduct of a character that would render an 
official report necessary has come to my knowledge. 

I am, sir, very re«pectfuly, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Commandant of Midshipmen, 

Captain Gborgb S. Blake, 

Superintendent Naval Academy ^ AnnapoliSy Md. 



E. 

CAMBRiDaB, Massachusetts, November 10, 1867. 

Sir : I have the honor to submit to the department the following 
report of the progress and state of the work under my charge : 

The volume of the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac, for 
the year 1869, which was far advanced at the time of the report of last 
year, has been completed and published. 

The nauticar edition for the year 1860 has also been completed and 
published, and much the greater portion of the computations of the 
whole volume, including the (strictly speaking) astronomical part, are 
finished. Considerable progress has been made in the volume for 1861. 
The work is further advanced than it has been at this time in any pre- 
vious year. 

But few changes, and only such as circumstances rendered necessary, 
were made in the distribution of the work for 1860, of the portions 
that were not at that time provided for. The sun was computea by Mr. 
Eastwood, with the occasional assistance of several other computers. 
The ephemeris of Mars and Uranus was prepared under my own im* 
mediate direction by Mr. Bardwell, Mr. Newoomb, and Mr. Ferrel. 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 601 

The ephemeris of Mercury, as in the preceding years, is prepared hy 
myself, with the assistance of Mr. Bradford. 

Commander Davis' translation of Gauss' theory of the motions of 
the heavenly bodies, &c., which was completed, with the exception 
of the appendix and final revision, at the time of the report of last year, 
has also been finished ; and an edition of five hundred copies is now in 
press and will be ready for distribution to subscribers in a few days. 
Although the translation was finished at the time of Commander Da- 
vis' departure, and the preparations made by him for the appendix 
left but little of a theoretical character to be done, the completion, in 
accordance with his plans and the thorough examination necessary to 
secure the accuracy and elegance worthy of an American edition of 
this great work, has required much more time and labor than was an- 
ticipated. The importance of accuracy in a work of this standard char- 
acter, and the limited amount of time that could be spared from the 
regular duties of this office, it is horded will be sufficient explanation 
of the delay of publication. 

In addition to the regular computations necessary for the preparation 
of the annual Volume, very satisfactory progress has been made in the 
theoretical department of the work, in the improvement of planetary 
tables and of methods of computation. Professor Peirce has made some 
valuable improvements in Professor Hansen's new method of com- 
puting the perturbations of planets ; he has devised and prepared useM 
subsidiary tables to facilitate its application to theories of planets, and 
has applied it to the computation of the effect of Saturn and Neptune 
on the motion of Uranus. He has also made considerable progress in 
tabulating Hansen's theory of the mutual perturbations of Jupiter and 
Saturn. The theoretical investigations of Professor Hansen on this 
subject are of the highest value ; but the great labor necessary to reduce 
them to an available form, so that they can be used to improve the 
ephemeris of these planets for nautical and astronomical purposes, has 
heretofore deterred astronomers from attempting to employ them. 

Mr. Runkle has continued his tables of the coefficients of the per- 
turbative function depending on the ratios of the mean distances, sa 
as to include many of the asteroids. These have been received and 

Sublislied by the Smithsonian Institution. Something also has been 
one on his memoir on the secular variations of the orbits of the planets. 

Improvements of the tables of Venus and Mars have been begun, 
and sufficient progress has been made to facilitate in some degree com- 
putations of these planets for the next volume of the almanac. 

Tables for the computation of the perturbations of Uranus by Nep- 
tune have been prepared from Professor Peirce's formulas, by Mr. 
William Ferrel. 

The importance of this branch of scientific labor has always been 
recognized by the department, and the employment of the resources of 
this office in making permanent contributions to the science of astron- 
omy has been liberally encouraged. It is by the introduction of 
new and original methods of computation, the improvement of the 
lunar and planetary theories, and the construction of tables of per- 
manent utility to navigation and astronomy, not less than by those 
computations demanded by the daily necessities of the nay^gator And 

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602 BEPOBT OF THB 

astronomy, that an institution such as the Nautical Almanac should 
expect to meet its obligations to the science of the country, and merit 
the continuance of the liberal patronage that has been extended to it. 

The English government has recently manifested its appreciation 
of the practical importance of this department of astronomy by aid- 
ing Professor Hansen, of Germany by an annual appropriation for a 
series of years, in the prosecution of his investigations on the lunar 
theory ; and by printing in most costly style, at the expense of the 
English government, his new and elaborate tables of the moon, for 
the use of their Nautical Almanac. A handsome gift of six copies of 
this valuable work has been received by this office from the lord's 
commissioners of the admiralty ; but an examination of them, and a 
comparison of results obtained from them with our own ephemeris, 
has given us no reason to believe that our own tables, prepared under 
the direction of Professor Peirce, are inferior to them either in conve- 
nience or accuracy. 

While the importance of such investigations are admitted in the 
work of the office, they are subordinate to the current duties neces- 
sary for the preparation of the annual volume, and the almanac must 
be indebted to the devotion of astronomers to their science for the 
voluntary contribution of much time and labor to the class of subjects 
here referred to ; the gentlemen engaged upon them are also actively 
employed on the current duties of the office. 

The attention of the department has been called, in former reports, 
to the rapid increase in the number of the new planets, and the addi- 
tion to the appropriation which was asked for the purpose of meeting 
the expense whicn this increase occasioned was granted ; within the 
past year eight have been discovered. The present large number, and 
the continual additions which are to be expected, greatly increase the 
difficulties of deciding upon a plan of carrying forward the work upjn 
them so as to meet the requirements of this most interesting subject 
with moderate resources. If methods which were thought sufficient 
when the number was small were adopted, and each new planet re- 
ceived as much labor as was bestowed on the earlier ones, our whole 
force would be inadequate to keep up the computations on this re- 
markable group alone. It has, therefore, not been thought expedient 
to distribute the whole work on the asteroids, provided for in the ap- 
propriation, until the best system for carrying it forward had been de- 
cided upon. Something, however, has been done. Mr. Schubert has 
been engaged in this department during the year, and Professors 
Smith, Van Yleck, and Searle have been employed upon it, and the 
volume for 1860 will contain elements and ephemerides of many of 
them. I believe that the methods of computation can be so modified, 
and the work so systematized, that, without asking any further in- 
crease of the appropriation for the purpose, the Nautical Almanac will 
be able to furnish astronomers all the facilities for keeping up a series 
of observations on the whole group of asteroids that it is desirable 
that an astronomical ephemeris should contain. A plan for effecting 
this is now under consideration, and will be matured in time to be 
adopted in the work of the coming year, for the volume for 1861. 

The changes that have taken place among the assistants have been 



8ECRETABY OF THE NAVY. 603 

made under the aathority of the chief of the bureaa of ordnance and 
hydrography. The general distribution of the duties of the office for 
the coming year does not differ materially from that of last year, and 
no important changes in the general system for prosecuting the work 
seem to be required. 

The sales of the nautical edition for 1860 greatly exceed those of 
any previous volame, and tbere is every reason to believe that the 
American Nautical Almanac will, in a few years, be the only one 
used generally by American ship masters. To effect this, it is 
desirable that it should be published earlier than it has been in pre- 
vious years. This can be accomplished, if all of the present resources 
of this office are used, without the necessity of asking an increase of 
the appropriation beyond that of last year. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH WINLOCK. 

Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretoi-y of the Navy, 



F. 

United States Ordnance Ship Plymouth, 
Washington f November 20, 1857. 

I have had the honor to acquaint you with the arrival of this 
ship in the United States, and also of having in course of the cruise 
touched at Fayal, Lisbon, Amsterdam, and Southampton, in pursu- 
ance of your orders. Want of time prevented me from using the 
permission given to visit other ports of £ngland and France. 

The Plymouth, as directed by your orders, received 23d June, left 
Washington the following day, and put to sea after completing neces- 
sary supplies from the Norfolk navy yard. The ship has been absent 
134 days, and was 34 days of that time in the ports above named. 

The operations of a vessel employed on the duty to which the 
Plymouth has been assigned would include a great variety of objects; 
but the shortness of the cruising season unavoidably restricted my 
attention to such issues as were alone determinable by sea practice, 
and which, from their importance, demanded the earliest consideration. 

Of these, none are of more consequence than that which has for its 
object to ascertain the calibres and weights of ordnance best fitted to 
give the greatest power to the broadside ; for no error in this, the 
fundamental principle, could be compensated by excellence in the 
mere accessories. 

The constant attention which the question receives from the artille- 
rists of other naval powers indicates the interest they feel in its 
proper settlement. Having been led to investigate the subject some 
years since, the results induced me, in 1850, to propose essential 
changes in our naval batteries by the substitution of other ordnance, 
for which purpose I submitted draughts of guns having nine-inch and 
eleven-inch calibres for broadside and pivot. 

Commodore Warrington, then chief of the bureau of ordnance, was 
so fitvorably impressed as to recommend to the department the casting 



604 REPORT OF THE 

of some cannon of this description, which were made trial of in 1850 
and in subsequent years. The asserted strength of model, the power 
and accuracy of fire, were fully maintained by the most thorough 
course of experiment on record, extending through 1850, 1851, 1852, 
&c. 

The often repeated objection, however, to the unwieldiness of such 
ordnance, prevented their even being tested at sea, until the arma- 
ment of the new screw frigates came under consideration, when it was 
made manifest that no power of battery proportionate to the enormous 
size of these ships could be developed by any of the existing cannon, 
such as thirty-two pounders and eight-inch shell guns. 

The burea'i then adopted the 9-inch shell gun tor the gun decks of 
these vessels, but unqualifiedly refused the pivot 11-inch designed for 
the spar decks, mounting in lieu thereof 8-inch of 63, and pivot 10- 
inch. 

And there the matter might have remained for time or accident to 
decide, so long as the question was limited in its application to our 
own navy ; but other powers have been prompt to follow the example 
set by the United States, and to improve on it ; they have constructed 
ships yet larger than the Merrimac cla^s, and gi^en to them greater 
speed, and cannon of heavier calibre. 

It is, therefore, imperative on us to be well assured that our bat- 
teries are established on a sound basiSy and have their due extension. 

The armament of the Plymouth was chosen expressly with reference 
to the attainment of some satisfactory datA, whereby it might be 
ascertained to what extent the weight of the new ordnance diminished 
or interfered with its efficient management at sea, as well as the dis- 
covery of the means best calculatf'd to remove or abate such evil. 

The practice in the ordnance ship has afford<i;iji good opportunities 
for some conclusions on the subject. 

Besides the customary drill every day that circumstances permitted, 
there were fired, under various circumstances of wind and sea — 

121 shells from the 11 -inch pivot gun ; and 

230 shells from the 9-inch guns in broadside. 

The results, in connexion with those previously obtained at the ex- 
perimental battery, lead me to the following general inferences : 

1. When the ship has no motion, or but little, and is without incli- 
nation, the 9-inch gun can be worked and fired nearly, if not quite, as 
rapidly as the long 32-pounder, or the 8-inch of 63 cwt., a succes- 
sion of shells having been discharged from a piece of this description 
(mounted at the experimental battery^ and manned by twelve men, the 
crew of a 32-pounder) at intervals of 40 seconds, a celerity not easily 
surpassed with a 32-pounder. 

2. When there is no motion or inclination of the decks, the work- 
ing of the 9-inch gun is proportionately retarded, and the celerity of 
fire diminished ; yet, even under the disadvantage of an inclination 
exceeding 6^ and reaching to 18° at the extreme roll, a well drilled 
crew was able to fire three shells at intervals of 65 seconds and 35 
seconds. (General quarters to test the time in which the battery of 
the Plymouth could be brought into action.) 

3. When the ship is still, and on an even keel, the 11-inch gun can- 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 605 

not be fired as rapidly as the 9-inch — perhaps no faster than once a 
minute ; but the motion or inclination of the ship that suffices to de- 
crease the quick working of the 9-inch gun is exerted less unfavor- 
ably on the 11-inch ; so that it is proportionally more controllable 
under such circumstances, and in manoeuvring can be aimed much 
more rapidly. On one occasion 13 shells were fired from it, starboard 
and port, while the two adjoining 9-inch guns, together, only fired 17 
shells, the 11-inch gun being also at the disadvantage of having to 
pivot from one side to the other when the ship was tacked to keep the 
target under fire. In this instance the wind was light, but the swell 
considerable, so that the ship rolled 7° to 8°, and pitched 3° — target 
distant 800 to 1,000 yards. 

4. ]No difficulty occurred during the cruise in making the nine-inch 
and eleven-inch guns perfectly secure in the roughest sea. Coming 
from England, in October and November, a continuance of boisterous 
weather, occasionally increased to a gale, afforded the most satisfac- 
tory evidence in this respect. 

On the whole, I have no hesitation in affirming that, as a pivot gun, 
the^ eleven-inch is in every way as manageable as the 64-pounders, 
which have been so long and are now used on board our steamers. 
And if this be correct, there should be no objection to restoring that 
part of my plan of armament which assigned a tier of eleven-inch 
guns to the spar decks of the screw frigates, for which, too, there may 
be a more imperative reason in the fact that until this be done the 
ordnance power of those ships will not only be less than what it should 
be, but even inferior to that of some foreign screw frigates of inferior 
dimensions. Certainly the present spar deck batteries of the Merrimac 
class are altogether unworthy of being placed there. 

It may be observed, with regard to the retarding influence of the 
ship's inclination oii the heavier ordnance, that in general it is reduced 
to a minimum before going interaction, because it is then customary 
for vessels to diminish their canvas to the least quantity with which 
the ships can be properly handled. And we may look for a further 
abatement of the evil to the introduction of steam, which has become 
a prime necessity to every ship of war in battle. No more sail will 
then be spread than will be required to give steadiness to the vessel, 
and the inclination of the decks will be comparatively inconsiderable. 

Again : the opportunities of firing with correct aim are so far de- 
layed by the interposition of smoke, and the constant motion of the 
ships, that it is hardly probable that the heavy cannon now in ques- 
tion will fail to be prepared when those opportunities offer. 

To insure the comparative results just stated with ordnance as 
heavy as the nine-inch and the eleven-inch, more careful drill and 
intelligent direction are required than with lighter guns ; for it is to 
be understood that, though certainly attainable, more difficulty in 
doing so will unavoidably be experience* I in proportion as the cannon 
are heavier. 

It becomes indispensable, therefore, not to omit the employment of 
every means that can facilitate the management of the weightier ord- 
nance under all possible circumstances. 

And this'is suggestive of the next important office that will devolve 



606 REFOBT OF THE 

upon the ordnance ship — the training of the men who are to handle the 
guns. Science may achieve its utmost in perfecting the cannou and 
their appointments ; but if the crews are deficient in skill and practice^ 
better men, with inferior means, may bear away the palm. 

It will be first necessary to procure seamen suitable to receive in- 
struction as gun captains. The importance of their duties in battle 
can hardly be overvalued ; they direct the details under the officers of 
division, aim the cannon at the mark, and discharge them. They also 
assist to instruct the gun's crew, which is the more responsible duty 
with the heavier ordnance, because more perfect accord in the manip- 
ulation is necessary, and to attain it the more thorough drill is re- 
quired in proportion to the greater number of men which the new 
cannon need. 

The operations of this cruise confirm the common experience in re- 
gard to the difficulty of obtaining men likely to answer the purpose. 
The crew of the Plymouth were, with few exceptions, all seamen, 
which is never the case in vessels of war, and being shipped under 
favorable circumstances, may be accepted as above the average. Yet 
the number which might be trained into well qualified gun captains 
is exceedingly limited. 

The full influence of the department will probably be indispensable 
to procure a supply of seamen fitted physically and intellectually to 
receive instruction. They may be obtained by selections from the re- 
ceiving ships and ships in commission, as well as by special recruit- 
ment, and induced to qualify themselves by rates, pay, &c. The 
gunners and gunners' mates should be appointed from them. In 
short, no incentive omitted that can properly be offered. 

The difficulties that attend the undertaking have arisen and con- 
tinue in France and England, but are perseveringly and successfully 
encountered. Some discouragement has been experienced from the 
anticipation that many who enter and qualify may subsequently de- 
cline to re-enter, which, no doubt, will happen. But so far from 
viewing this as an objection, or even as a difficulty, I should consider 
it only as a temporary inconvenience, which had its ulterior advan- 
tages in diffusing among our seamen a skill in their peculiar arm, 
which must eventually tell to the benefit of a maritime power whose 
avowed policy is, and has been, to recruit its resources in war from 
the seamen and vessels of the commercial marine. 

In England a like result is not left to this accidental source only, 
but especial efforts are made to train the great mass of those whose 
business is on the water, and ships with competent officers are pro- 
vided for the purpose ; one of these, a frigate, lay near the Plymouth 
when at Southampton, and I witnessed the drilling of a number of 
men, who would remain for a term and then return to their vocation. 
It appeared to me a decided improvement on the *' inscription mari- 
time" of France, to which it is probably a counterpart. 

No doubt it can be made an object to most of our seamen who qualify 
as gun captains to continue as such in the navy, and those who leave 
may some day render good service in the armed ships of the republic, 
private or public. 

When such ample expenditure is made to train and arm our citizens 



SECBETABT OP THE NAVY. 607 

for the common defence ashore^ and one of the best military academies 
also contributes its quota to the same purpose by the return of cadets 
to private life, there seems to be no valid objection to a system which 
incidentally makes some, though slight, provision for the military 
training of our citizens afloat. 

As a proper system of drill is indispensable to the uniform training 
of the personal, my attention has been given to the preparation of a 
manual adapted to the manipulation of the two-truck carriage of the 
9-inch gun and the pivot carriage of the 11-inch. By the diligence 
and well-directed efforts of the lieutenants of this ship this has been 
80 far accomplished that the settlement of a few minor points, which 
will be arranged by the winter drill, is alone required to make the 
work presentable and to fit it for service. 

I am satisfied that the employment of a ship on this duty cannot 
fail to result in all the advantages which were anticipated, though 
some time will be necessary to render its operations certain and 
regular. 

Should it be BO fortunate as to secure your favorable opinion I would 
respectfully beg leave to recommend to your consideration the oon- 
tinuanoe of the appropriation made at the last session of Congress. 

I would also ask to submit a request that a screw corvette might be 
constructed for this duty. In the course of the practice at sea no one 
could fail to remark the unavoidable difficulty of keeping the target 
within the lateral scope of the guns by manoeuvring with sails only, 
and how much loss of time was thereby occasioned. The superior 
efficiency of steam under such circumstances would have been invalu- 
able. Undoubtedly no ship of war can be considered complete which 
is UT^umished tvith this motor j while its assistance would compensate 
for an inferior number of guns, and in many cases confer an irresistible 
advantage over an opponent. 

The present practice of the great naval powers indicates a remark- 
able unanimity in tbis respect, notwithstanding the cost consequent 
upon the use of steam. No ship of war is now constructed in England 
without a power of this kind. The official list shows that in 648 
vessels composing the navy of that country 289 have steam ; of 188 
vessels in commission, 126 (or two-thirds) are steamers, besides 185 
steam gnn-boats. 

Many important facts, not procurable in any other way, would be 
obtained if the department would authorize the use of one of the old 
ships as a target for shell practice. Perhaps there is no better pur- 
pose to which some of them could be applied. 

The Plymouth has exhibited excellent qualities during the cruise. 
She sails well in light winds and also in fresh gales, as there was 
occasion to observe when embayed on the English coast and obliged 
for safety to bear a heavy press of canvas — works well, rolls easily, 
and is very comfortable. The construction must be admirable, from 
the fact of her carrying, without strain in the heaviest sea, a pivot 
gun, which, with its carriage, weighs 121 tons, on a space where no 
such burden could have been anticipated, and where the only addi- 
tional support was a single stanchion, while the cutting of a large 
port (8 feet by 4 feet) on each side, just opposite, must have detracted 



608 REPORT OF THE 

from the strength of the fabric. Nor does it appear that the repeated 
shocks of firing so heavy a gun have produced the least effect on the 
<3onstruction. 

The Plymouth is, in every way, a most creditable ship to the builder, 
Mr. S. Cook. 

In conclusion, I ought not to omit bringing to the notice of the de- 
partment the effective assistance rendered to the work by the earnest 
and harmonious co-operation of the oflScers of the ship — Lieutenant 
Jones, as executive officer,"^ Lieutenant Balch, as master and ordnance 
officer. Lieutenants Edwards, Webb, Badger, andTruxton, as officers 
of division; while the medical officers, Doctors Miller and Vedder, and 
the purser, Boggs, failed not to contribute their efforts to the common 
cause by the satisfactory manner in which the affairs of their respective 
departments were conducted. 

It is with regret, therefore, that I see approach the period when, by 
the usual conditions of service, the relations that have existed between 
them and myself may be dissolved. 

Under the authority to that effect from the department, I took the 
•opportunity of visiting such foreign ordnance and naval establishments 
as were convenient of access from the ship. The time that could be so 
used was, however, limited, and being reduced still more by the delays 
unavoidable in obtaining permission from the proper authorities, I 
was compelled to omit some places altogether, and to be satisfied with 
a very hasty view of others. 

Still, much of interest came under my observation which was of 
4Bervice in enabling me to compare the present condition and probable 
prospects of our national marine with those of high repute abroad. 

Cannon foundry at Liege, 

The official permit from the Belgian ministry of war authorized me 
to visit the cannon foundry, the manufactory of small arms, and the 
ponton train, but not the laboratory — all located at Liege. As I had 
out one day to spend at this place, and could do little by dividing the 
time among the three objects, it seemed preferable to appropriate it to 
that which was of most interest in connexion with my particular 
duties. Wherefore, my attention was bestowed exclusively on the 
process of fabricating cannon. 

This department has been long under the direction of Colonel 
Frederix, so well known for his ability in this line. The extent of 
the works is very much beyond the necessities of Belgium, but they 
are turned to good account by opening them to such governments as 
desire to be benefitted by the excellence of the product, or whose re- 
quirements are too limited to warrant the expense of creating a foundry 
for the purpose. 

In this way the ample resources of Liege in iron, coal, and water 
power are rendered profitable to the industrial population, and the 
experience acquired in the process is exclusively available to the gov- 

* I beg to refer to a previous mention of this officer, under date of August 18. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8ECHETARY OP THE NAVY. 609 

^rnment of Belgium, which, by the way, spares no pains to preserve 
the repatation of the establishment at the highest point. 

The following obserrations are abbreviated from memoranda made 
at the time : 

The boring lathes are numerous, and ranged in order ; they 
seemed to be nearly all occupied, and the cannon that came under my 
eye were generally of very heavy calibre. After examining the course 
of mechanical operations, we passed over to the casting department, 
where a large piece of ordnance was about to be cast. Two furnaces 
were required to contain the metal ; they were fitted with double 
ftpertnres for pouring. The pit was large and quite open, without 
any arrangements for heating it, or for excluding the atmospheric air. 
The process was conducted successfully. 

The manner of moulding differs entirely from that practiced in the 
United States and elsewhere, in having the flask divided into short 
transverse sections secured together by flanches and bolts, which Colo* 
nel Frederix prefers to the common method, and with reason, if the 
accuracy and smoothness of the surface maybe accepted as the criterion; 
for here it is the custom to retain the crust of the casting on the can- 
non, consequently the correctness of the exterior dimensions depend 
on the skill of the moulder. The director assured me that the results 
were always satisiactory, and certainly the eye could perceive nothing 
to the contrary. 

The examination of metal by the mechanical tests is invariably per- 
formed, and there seems to be every disposition to rely on them. 
The machine for obtaining the tensile strength differs from our own 
in having but a single lever, and in the mode of exerting the power ; 
the samples are also of another form, and the area of breaking surface 
less. 

During the whole time Colonel Frederix was so good as to favor 
me witti his presence, and with full explanation of whatever came 
voder notice; and to the United States chargS, Mr. Clark, I was 
indebted for the trouble he took in coming from Brussels in order to 
fiicilitate the attainment of my purposes. 

The next day was spent at the Polygon of Brasschaet, where so 
many interesting experiments have been made for a long series of 
years by officers of the Belgian artillery. It is situated some ten 
miles north of Antwerp, in the direction of the Dutch frontier, from 
which it is not very remote. 

Four batteries of horse artillery are assembled here now ; but, the 
term of practice having nearly expired, the troops were to break up 
the camp on the 15th, (September,) and return to their barracks. 

The most important experiments had been concluded or suspended 
till next season, though some were still going on that were of much 
interest. 

The rifled cannon appears to be the subject of attention here, as it 
is with most other artilleries, though so far without results that 

Emise a full solution. One of heavy calibre was mounted, and had 
n subjected to a course of firing. Near by was a pile of elongated 
shells '* d teton^" apparently for a piece of smaller bore, and so^nearlr 

Vol. ii 39 Digitized by CjOOglC 



610 REPORT OF THE 

lesembliQg the French projectile* that it was not easj for the eje to 
discern the difference. And I witnessed some practice from a small 
rifled cannon with a peculiar form of shot, the invention of a distin- 
guished artillery officer, though the results were very unsatisfactory. 

Another experiment with excentric discs, by Captain De Puydt, had 
just suffered interruption by the bursting of the cannon at the fifth 
fire, the fragments of which were still lying on the ground. 

At a later period of the day I witnessed the practice of the artillery- 
men from a section of a regular work upon a breeching battery thrown 
up at the distance of four hundred metres. 

As Belgium is not a naval power, there is nothing to be seen here 
in regard to the application of ordnance to naval purposes. 

Woolwich arsenal is the grand central establishment where ord- 
nance articles of all kinds are prepared, stored, and issued to the 
British army and navy. Its enormous capacity must be seen in order 
to be fully appreciated. The principal divisions are the gun/aundryf 
the carriage department^ the laboratory. 

The gun foundry is under the immediate direction of an inspector 
of artillery, Colonel Wiimot, and has been limited hitherto to the 
easting and finishing of bronze light artillery for the land and sea 
forces. 

The various processes of moulding, melting, and of fabrication con- 
form to the customary practice, though differing somewiiat in the 
detail from our own. 

The new feature of this department is the contemplated fabrication 
there of iron ordnance, for which the most extensive arrangements 
are making. This was initiated, I was told, during the late war 
with Russia, previous to which all iron guns had been furnished by 
private establishments. I am not aware that the official reasons for 
this change of policy are known authentically, but presume it orig- 
inated in the deBcient endurance said to have been exhibited at times 
by English cannon during the severe and protracted service to which 
they were exposed in various operations of the war. 

This measure is no doubt considered as the first step indispensable 
to improvement, and perhaps as a specific for the evil ; but I much 
doubt if it can of itself have the effect in view ; the success that may 
follow will be due rather to the ability of the men who shall have 
the responsibility, and also ample discretion in the premises; and 
they would have obtained equal results in the old mode, with equal 
power to control its management. 

In countries like the United States and England, where individual 
enterprise has such immense development^ it is hardly to be advised 
that the government should voluntarily separate itself therefrom. It 
iDfty« by so doing, be better able to guard the work against the in- 
jurious influences of the contract system ; but the certain and pernicious 
consequences of routine in men and measures will more surely, though 
less openly, produce greater evils. Let the private operation be 
supervised with as much care as that of the government, and there 
will be no reason to be dissatisfied with the results. 

•The dimensionB of which were published in the work on oi|^<|y^J^ 8^^^^ Ouns.*' 



SECBETABY OF THE NAVY. 611 

A Bmall experimental dcpartmeDt woald be highly beneficial, where 
ooscare and difficult investigations should be scientifically conducted, 
and the standard of material and workmanship indicated as well as 
the terms of contracts determined ; but there its functions ought to 
cease. To go further will be to incur the danger of rotUine, that b^tne 
of improvement, which of itself would be ruinous to the best conducted 
private enterprises in the world. 

It would be difficult for me to convey, by description, an adequate 
idea of the quantity and excellence of the machinery that I saw being 
pat up in the new and spacious buildings designed for it. Whatever 
the ingenuity of the day could suggest to make perfect seemed embodied 
there, and well sustained the reputation of the private establishment 
(Napier's) where it is said the work was designed and executed. 

Still more, however, thau the best machinery will be required to 
make good cannon. The purpose of the new undertaking must be 
accomplished otherwise than by the finish, which, indeed, is unexcep- 
tionahle now in ordnance everywhere. And if the views which are 
put forth at times unofficially, really represent the opinions of those 
who will direct the management of the government foundry, the re- 
sults desired may not be obtained immediately. Of course, the little 
by which I can judge in advance precludes any positive statement. 

The fragments of the mortars which had burst ho readily in bom- 
barding Sweaborg were lying about, but the fractured surfaces had 
been too long exposed to the weather to permit one to estimate the 
quality of the iron ; however, I saw some samples afterwards taken 
for examination, and am only surprised that the pieces were ever 
allowed to go into service. 

I also observed some new breech-loading cannon of enormous weight 
which are soon to be put under trial. 

We now passed outside the walls of the arsenal to the practice 
ground, in order to look at the enormous mortar which is in course of 
preparation there. It is of wrought iron and composed of several 

Krts ; is said to weigh, with its accessories, some fifty tons ; has a 
re of thirty-six inches, and throws a shell of 26 cwt., which is about 
the weight of a light class 32-pounder. The design is by Mr. Mallet, 
the author of a very able work on the endurance of cannon^ and the 
mortar is supposed to have attracted the favorable attention of a high 
political functionary. The power of such a projectile it would be 
difficult to conceive. 

Just near by, a well equipped battery of horse artillery was prepar- 
ing for practice, under the eye of General Sir W. Williams, who is 
the commandant of that arm. 

In an appartment appropriated to the purpose, the examination by 
mechanical test of samples from metal for bronze and iron ordnance 
wag being executed. The machine used for tensile strength is pre- 
cisely similar to that so long since adopted in the United States for 
like purposes, designed by Major Wade, formerly of the United States 
army. 

I was also shown the extensive department that had been appropri- 
ated to the manufacture of Lancaster shells. Cast iron had been found t 
too weak to withstand the enormous strain of first displacement, an^^^ 



612 EEPORT OF THE 

wrought iron shells were proposed, hut the cost proved to he so exoea- 
sive as almost to forhid their use. The skill of English mechanics at 
last overcame this difficulty, and a mode was devised of making 
wrought iron shells at a very reasonahle rate. But the ample means 
provided are now idle and the workshops silent. Samples of shells in 
the various forms through which they must pass were exhihited, and 
one could not but remark on the ingenuity displayed. 

I was favored with the company and explanations of Mr. Anderson, 
the inspector of machinery, until his presence was required at a board 
of which he was a member. 

The lahoTaiory is under the direction of Captain Boxer, so well 
known as the inventor of many improvements in this branchy particu- 
larly the fuze and diaphragm for shrapnel. 

The scale of this department is commensurate with that of the 
arsenal itself, and the product seemed sufficient to supply the largest 
armies and fleets. 

I will only notice here, and that briefly, a few of the more promi- 
nent novelties that arrested my attention. 

The machine for drawing lead into coils of dimensions suitable for 
being pressed into conical shot for musketry has great power and 
capacity. 

The bullet machine, by Mr. Anderson, a compact and ingenious 
contrivance ; there are four at work, and each can turn out 14,000 
bullets daily. 

The machine for making cartridges directly from paper pulp, in- 
tended for those of small-arms ; but trials are making for field cannon 
cartridges also. The Pyro.echnic department of the Laboratory was 
not shown me. 

The carriage department is directed by Colonel TuUoch, an officer 
of well known abilities. Here, as in the other departments, the ma- 
chinery for working up material is extensive, varied, and of the best 
description, but is chiefly adapted to the cutting, shaping, &c., of 
timber, the consumption of which, as may be supposed, is very great, 
and it is not found easy to furnish it with sufficient supplies of sea- 
soned oak ; wherefore other woods, such as teak, African oak, &c., are 
frequently substituted. The smithy of this branch is very large. 

My attention was naturally drawn to the carriages for pivoting 
heavy naval ordnance, some of which were about. Upon the efficiency 
of this machine hinge the most important difficulties that obstruct the 
employment of large calibres. That of the English navy differs 
widely in many essential points from our own, but to my mind not 
advantageously ; and it would hardly serve to handle conveniently a 
gun of the weight carried by the Plymouth, (142 cwt.) 

The day was now closing, and I reluctantly took leave of Colonel 
Tulloch and Major Yandeleur, into whose hands I had fortunately 
fallen at this time, and to whose polite attentions I am much in- 
dited. 

The gunnery ship "Excellent," so well known to naval officers, 
and so high in repute for the beneficial results to the British navy 
that have attended its appropriation to gunnery practice, is attached 
to the Portsmouth dock yard, and permission to go on board was 
promptly gives by the commander-in-chief, Admiral Sir G. Seymour. 



8ECBETART OP THE NAVY 613 

The silip is so moored that the port broadside commands a wide 
range over a part of the harbor rendered useless for other purposes by 
the shoalness of the water, but for that reason well adapted to prac- 
tice, particularly as the placing of targets is thereby much facili- 
tated. 

I reached the ressel in time to witness the afternoon drill, which 
commenced at 1 p. m., immediately after the men had finished din- 
mer. The battery was composed of the usual regulation calibres, 32- 
pounders, and 8-inch shell guns ; and everything was in good work- 
ing order, plain and substantial, with such indication of wear and 
tear as mignt be expected from constant use — not the slightest regard 
given to ornament or show of any kind. 

A brief summons by the drum brought the men promptly to the 
gnns — a very good-looking set, and above the average, but not so 
much so as to be styled picked men. As a matter of course, they 
handled the pieces in capital style, with precision and accuracy in 
every movement — the orders being given by an ordnance lieutenant, 
while an instructor was stationed at each gun. The exercise was by 
no means short ; and the men were allowed to pause at intervals for 
rest, which the very spirited character of the drill, as well as its con- 
tinuance, rendered no doubt quite acceptable. 

At one of the 32-pounders were quartered several lieutenants of the 
navy, members of the class then studying on board the Excellent for 
a gunnery examination. They did the duties of captain of gun, 
sponger, loader, and handspikemen, by no means as a mere ceremo- 
nial, but in good earnest, and with a vigor which generally made the 
movements of their gun remarkable even here, where skill and celerity 
was the order of the day. No men that I saw worked with more zeal 
and animation than these lieutenants, who, by the way, were good- 
looking fellows, stripped to trowsers and a knit shirt. Besides the 
ordinary manual, they shifted their gun to another carriage. I sup- 
posed that they volunteered for drill, but was informed to the con- 
trary. It was a part of the course, and was repeated more than once 
in the week. 

There was perfect attention given by every man, and no voice heard 
but that of the directing officer. 

A 68-pounder of 95 cwt. , placed at the extreme of the port broadside, 
was to me an object of special interest, because it indicates the direc- 
tion which the British authorities propose to follow in solving the 
question of heavy calibres in broadside, whilst the drill with the piece 
enabled even a casual observer to form some idea of the degree of suc- 
cess which might probably attend the undertaking. The gun itself 
weighs some 10,600 pounds, or two-thirds of a ton more than the 
United States broadside 9-inch gun ; and it throws a shot of 67 
poands with a charge of 16 jpounds. It was designed and has always 
been used as a pivot gun, being the equivalent mr the United States 
64-pounders mounted on pivot in our large steamers. But now that 
Bome ships of other powers have been armed with broadside guns of 
heavier calibre than usual, the British authorities have given their 
attention to a corresponding move, and have armed some of their new 
screw frigates with 10-inch shell guns in lieu of 32-pounders, and 



614 REPORT OF THE 

S-inch guns. It is also asserted that 68-pounders are to be similarlj 
applied. 

As for the carriage of the gun, so little difference meets the eye be- 
tween it and that which forms part of the pivot system (English) as 
to convey the idea that, for the advantage of simplification^ the latter 
had been merely transferred from the slide to the deck ; and thus 
might be explained the first use in broadside of rear trucks acting ex- 
centrically, which, however, do not appear to have answered the pur- 
pose on decks as well as on the slide, judging from the fact that they 
are disused in the '^Excellent's" drill, (though still in place,) and 
have also been omitted in the new broadside carriages for batteries of 
10-inch guns, with slight exception. Their place is taken by the 
roller handspike, so that, in short, the carriage is now of the same 
description as that used by the French and ourselves for heavy cali- 
bres in broadside, which was devised by M. Marsilly, chef de battal- 
lion, and tried on board the Dryade in 1835. 

This 68-pounder was worked by eighteen men, and the difference 
in celerity between it and the neighboring 32-pounder8 was so trifling 
that my attention would not certainly have been drawn to the gun 
on that account. So that if this result is to be accepted as testing the 
facility of manoeuvre, it can hardly be refused as satisfactory, and 
seems to have been so far accepted by the British authorities as to 
induce the trial of the 10-inch of 81 cwt. for the broadsides of some of 
the new screw frigates. 

After the gun exercise, the men were assembled on the spar deck, 
and drilled with short muskets, or carbines. There might have been 
eighty or ninety men under arms, divided into four sections, each 
under one of the lieutenants who had been working the 32-pounder ; 
the whole drill being conducted by a non-commissioned officer, pro- 
bably of marines or marine artillery. 

I took my leave late in the day, much gratified by what I had 
seen, and by the extreme courtesy extended by Captain Hewlet, the 
commander, and by Captain McKenzie, the next in rank. 

Dock yards of Chathamy Wooitvichj and PortsnunUh. 

The want of time compelled me to forego, as already stated, the 
intention of visiting all the English naval establishments, and I was 
necessarily restricted to those which were near at hand. 

Even they, however, would supply a greater range of topics than 
would comport with the limits of a general report, if every object of 
interest that presented were merely to be catalogued. Wherefore, 
with your leave, I will here only mention, as briefly as possible, the 
more prominent objects of interest, such as the ships and their pecu- 
liarities, which are the latest products of these immense establish- 
ments, and are therefore to be regarded as the exponents of present 
views. 

The Mersey is the designation of a new screw frigate now build- 
ing in Chatham and commenced in this year. On the official list she 
is registered us a ''screw steam frigate of 40 guns." The dimensions 
Assigned by the current publications are— Digitized by GoOglc 



SECHtTTABT OF THE NAVY. 615 

Length extreme 336J feet. 

Length between perpendiculars 300 ^^ 

Length of keel for tonnage 264^ '^ 

Breadth extreme 52 *< 

Breadth for tonnage 51 J^ " 

Breadth moulded 50| " 

Depth of hold, 19| *' 

Burden 3,'726 « 

Engine, horse power 1,000 " 

The planking is complete as high as the gun deck, the form has 
great sharpness at both ends, and the length of the hull is very 
striking. The dimensions above given are considerably greater than 
those of our Merrimac class, and nearly, if not quite, approach those 
of the Niagara. The capacity of such a hull to unite the highest rate 
of speed and power of battery is very amjple. What the steam power 
is to be is not stated, but the 40 guns assigned by the official register 
must needs be of the heaviest calibre; it is reported sixty- eight-pouud- 
^s of 95 cwt. on the gun deck, but I heard nothing on the subject 
that was authentic. There can be little doubt that, with any reason- 
able success in applying the capacity of such a vessel, she must be- 
come the most formidable of ships of war. 

The Diadem, registered on the official list as a ^^ screw steam 
ship, 32 guns, 800 horse power," exhibits a finished sample of the 
larger class of new Britisn screw frigates that are designed to rate 
with our Merrimac class, being complete in all appointments and 
commissioned for service. 

She is by no means as large as the Mersey, and is even inferior 
in size to the Merrimac, if the dimensions given by the nautical peri- 
odicals are correct, viz: 

Between perpendiculars 240 feet. 

Breadth extreme 48 ** 

Tonnage 2,600 

The gun deck affords fine roomy quarters even for the massive can- 
non mounted there ; the distance between the ports (nearest sills) be- 
ing 18 feet, while the siso of the ports, like the guns themselves, is 
extraordinary. 

The pieoes which I saw mounted on this deck were twenty 10-inck 
shell guns of 87 cwt., being in reality the original of our own 10-inch 
gtin adopted from the English in 1841, and yet to be seen playing the 

?irt of pivot guns in the Mississippi, Macedonian, and Constellation. 
he exterior figure of the English gun has, however, been remodelled 
so as to conform to that of the ordnance generally. These guns are 
mounted on the two truck Marsilly carriages, already described in 
speaking of the Exoellent's sixty-eight pounder. It differs from the 
copy which I made of the original for the 9-inch guns of the new Uni- 
ted States frigates in having the rear transom to rest on the deck in- 
stead of the brackets, as already explained, while the roller handspike 
ships a little on one side and the training tackle hooks as much on the 
other. 

These carriages are nnnsually low, which is by no means undesi- 



616 REPORT OF THE 

rable if not in conflict with other requirements, and the gnncr can be 
elevated 14^ or depressed 8^, so ample are the dimensions of the 
ports. 

There are no eccentric rear trucks, except in that pair of carriages 
which is abreast of the hatches closed by bulkheads for the convenience 
of the steam, and where it is probable there might be some embarrass- 
ment with the roller handspike, which is, however, the only resort of 
the other 10-incb guns, and is longer and much heavier than our 
own. 

On the spar deck are ten 32-pounders of 68 cwt., mounted and 
equipped as such guns usually are, and two 68-pounders of 95 cwt., 
one at each end. These last are on pivot carriages, resembling our 
own in the general principle only of a carriage moving on a slide, to 
which it is compressed in recoil — in detail the difference is very con- 
siderable ; the slide is much shorter, and, instead of a bolt and socket^ 
the connexion with the deck is established by a plate attached to the 
fore end of the slide which plays on a hinee, so as to turn down and 
allow the hole in it to. drop over a bolt in the deck, which is so rounded 
for the purpose that its head resembles that of an acorn ; these bolts 
are placed permanently in the deck wherever it is intended to pivot 
the slide, and the plate when turned up against the fore end of the 
slide lies flush with its surface^ so as to present no projection. The 
compressor is applied to the rear transom, the latter being extended 
underneath from the brackets sufficiently for the purpose, which ex- 
plains the contact of the transom with the deck instead of the brackets, 
when the carriage is transferred from its slide to be used in broadside. 
The fore trucks have fixed axles, the rear act excentrically by attached 
levers, to which hook the side tackles. The upper surface of the rail 
is faced with a wide iron plate. All of these arrangements seemed to 
me inferior to our own, though this may not appear so markedly with 
such pieces as 68-pounders. 

The after pivot gun is stowed athwart the deck directly forward of 
the propeller well, which is without a trunk , as in our ships, but 
is closed by a flat hatch flush with the deck plank when the screw is 
submerged, so that the slide traverses without obstruction, and enables 
the gun to command the entire sweep of the stern, which is well 
opened for that object, and thus half the purpose in having a sterB 
gun is not uselessly sacrifloed, as it is in all the new United States 
screw frigates. 

According to the official register, the engines are of 800 horse 
power. They are by the firm of Maudslay — have two cylinders of 
82 inches, and four feet stroke. The boilers are fitted with horizontal 
tubes, and the length occupied by the whole steam power was said to 
he about one-third that of the ship. The consumption of fuel at full 
speed not yet ascertained. No bunkers on the berth deck, but only 
below it, which might contain 450 tons. The stowage of water in- 
considerable, but a distilling apparatus was relied on to furnish a 
supply, which, with one pound of coal, was assumed to produce nine or 
ten pounds of drinkable water when the engine was not in motion. 

When I visited the Portsmouth yard, on the 29th September, the 
Diadem was alongside the wharf, receiving, with all despatch, the 



SECBETABT OF THE KAYT. 617 

final details which were to complete her equipment for sea, under the 
eye of the officer who is to command, Captain Moorsom, so well known 
as the inyentor of the English percussion shell ; he politely invited 
me to witness the first trial trip. 

This took place on the 2d October. About half past nine a. m. the 
Diadem was hauled out of the basin and steamed deliberately down 
the harbor towards the roads of Spithead— the draught, 20^ feet aft, 
being some 10 inches less than when fully laden, and causing the 
upper edge of the screw blade to be slightly exposed. 

About quarter past ten o'clock the ship ranged along the measured 
mile in Stokes bay, but no observation of the rate was then made, be- 
cause the engine was not at full speed, and the makers desired to 
attain this gradually. I chanced, however, to note it for my own 
satisfaction, and found that the mile's length was passed over in five 
minutes and three seconds, being 11.9 knots per hour. Water smooth, 
wind moderate and right ahead, the last of the tide favorable, and 
estimated by the pilot to be about one knot per hour. Engine making 
41 revolutions, with a pressure of 1 1 lbs. 

The vessel was now wore round and crossed over towards Byde^ then 
headed out to sea by the eastern passage, the machinery working with 
ease, draught good, temperature of engine room perfectly agreeable, that 
of the furnace room high enough, but not more so than in our own 
ships. 

At noon the Diadem, being outside in the open channel, was put 
round heading back into harbor, the engine being now up to forty- 
eight revolutions, and about one o'clock was approaching the nearer 
station of the mecisured i7it%, when a counterpoise in the machinery 

Sve way, upon which the makers of the engine decided to postpone 
rther trial of the full speed, being properly unwilling to do so under 
a disadvantage so easily and permanently reparable as that just en- 
countered. The ship was therefore put rounds steamed to Spithead, 
and anchored near the Gangea^ 84. 

As the engine is said to be capable of fifty-five revolutions, I see no 
reason to doubt that the speed of the ship at load draught of twenty- 
one feet, would be less than twelve knots. 

The Diadem is a warlike looking vessel, ship-rigged, though less 
heavily masted and sparred than usual. 

The screw is hoisted, not by the spanker boom, but by sheers step- 
ping on the spar deck at each side of the well ; the legs are readily 
separable, and, being short, admit of being conveniently stowed out of 
the way. 

Two other ships, one building, are styled on the official list like the 
Diadem, ^' screw steamships, thirty-two guns, 800 horse power," and, 
I am told, are of the same class, but am without any authentic infor- 
mation to that effect. 

Another type of the screw frigate I saw in construction at the 
Woolwich yara, named the Oalateay but no vessel answering to the 
name or class appears on the official list. All the frames were up, ex- 
cept a few at the extreme after end. The length was said to be 280 
feet, which is about that of the Diadem; whether the resemblance 
extended to the other dimensions I was not informed, but they were 



618 REPORT OF THE 

certainly those of a large ship. As well as I could distingdish, there 
were indications of twentj-four ports on the gun deck, and I was told 
the spar deck would be light, except at the ends, where it would be 
made strong enough to bear a heavy pivot gun. If correctly informed 
then, there would be twenty-six guns, all no doubt of the heaviei^t 
description, as would befit so large a ship ; but what they would be, 
my conducfcor was unable to say. 

These three ships — Mersey, Diadem,and Galatea — may be consid- 
ered as embodying the views of the British authorities in relation to 
the types of vessels preferable for screw frigates of the largest size. 

The latest style of screw sloop class may be represented by two 
ships which I saw on the stocks. 

One of these, nearly completed at the OhcUJuim yard, is a fine 
looking hull, said to be about 200 feet long and of 1,600 tons ; is 
styled on the register a ^^ steam screw oorvetttj of twenty-one guns and 
four hundred Jiorse power;" has sharp ends and a flat floor; is 
planked up outside, but the decks are not entirely. 

The beds ready for the engine, but no part of it in yet ; the after- 
most section of the shaft was, however, fitted to the bearings in the 
stern post. 

The propeller is to be hoisted, but there is no trunk, (or continua- 
tion of the propeller well above the spar deck,) and thus a clear 
sweep is left for the pivot gun when mounted aft, the stern and 
quarter ports for which seemed, however, contracted. 

It is said that the battery will consist of twenty 8-inch of 65 cwt , 
and one pivot 68-pounder of 95 cwt., carried forward or aft, as may be 
convenient. I could not but notice the planene^s of her deck, so 
advantageous in working guns, and, indeed, indispensable when 
on pivot. I understood the name to be ** Charybdis," but am not 
sure. 

The Challenger is the name of another ship of like class, and 
also borne on the register as a ^^ steam screw corveitCj of twenty one 
gunsyfour hundred horsepower." I was told that the dimensions and 
form were the same as those of the Chatham ship, just mentioned, the 
difference being that this vessel is to have a light deck, strengthened 
at the ends to bear a pivot gun. The propeller is designed to bis lifted 
by the spanker boom. 

Though these are the latest and perhaps the finest of the English 
screw corvettes, the class is by no means so recent as not to have 
undergone trial ; on the contrary, three are in service, four more 
have been completed, and three are building ; from which it may be 
inferred that the results are in general satisfactory. There is also 
another new class of screw corvettes, rather less in size, of 17 guns 
and 200 horse power, of which one is in service and four are now in 
process of construction. 

Screw Gtunrioats. 

This is a class with which we are entirely unprovided, and 
yet of great interest to us by reason of their adaptation to the 
shallow waters of the southern seaboard, where heavier vessels 



SECBETABY OF THE NAYT. 619 

would be entirely useless. There are several sizes of them, but 
the best miay be described as being of 106 feet by 22 feet in dimen- 
sion, with a draught not exceeding five or six feet. Two pivot 
Sms are carried habitually on the deck just over the keel, the distance 
tween them about twice that of each from the bow or stern. When 
not used they stow fore and aft ; each may be pivoted to either side 
where the bulwarks open for their reception, or may be transported to 
the extreme which is nearest — where, too, the bulwarks are movable, 
80 as to admit the gun ; while other appliances, invariably permanent 
in other vessels, are also made to yield to the working of the cannon. 
There is no bowsprit, for instance, but a light jib-boom that can be 
readily got in, and thus the aim may be had in any direction, even 
right ahead or astern, without moving the boat. 

The gun boat I saw (Biter) had mounted one 68-pounder of 95 cwt., 
and a 32-pounder of 68 cwt. ; but an officer who had commanded one 
of like class in most of the operations of the Baltic, told me that, on 
such occasions, the 32-pounder was commonly exchanged for a 68- 
pounder from one of the line-of-battle ships. Two bronze 24-pounder 
howitzers were also on deck. 

Three light masts for fore and aft sails are stepped on the spar 
deck, and can be lowered by means of sockets. 

But the chief motor is steam. The engine is high pressure, of sixty- 
horsepower, and remarkable for its snugness ; said to be capable of giving 
a speed of seven or eight knots. The screw is fixed. As may be sup- 
posed, the vessel is nearly occupied by this amount of ordnance and 
steam power, and little space is left for stores of coal, provisions, or 
water, or for the accommodation of men ; wherefore, such craft cannot 
cruise far from their depots^ whether afloat or ashore ; but quite as 
far as would be required for coast defence. I was told by good au- 
thority that the performance of these gun boats had been very satis- 
factory in every respect. The official list registers one hundred and 
forty-lour such vessels. There are some forty more, which differ in 
size and power, but not materially, with engines of twenty, sixty, and 
eighty-horse power. 

I saw many new ships of the heaviest class, such as the 91-gun 
ships and larger ; but it is needless to enter into any particular de- 
scription thereof, because the naval policy of the United States renders 
them almost useless, and there is little ingenuity required to apply 
their great capacity profitably, whether to accommodate guns, steam, 
men, or provisions. 

Nor need this paper be unnecessarily extended by mentioning de- 
tails which came under my notice, but belong to the technicalities of 
other branches, except in a few particulars that more directly interest 
or concern the convenience of the battery. 

Thus, it seems to be the invariable practice in the late British ships 
to plank the gun decks with oak from the waterway nearly to the 
combings of the hatches, intended to obviate the greater wear to which 
the decks are liable by the use of two truck carriages and heavy cali- 
bres. It may be, however, that the choice which is to be had in this 
country of excellent pine may not require the same precaution in our 

own ships. Digitized by GoOglC 



620 BEPOET OF THE 

In many of the new British vessels I observed the greater planeness 
of the decks, a conveifience for all classes of guns, but indispensable 
for the heavier calibres ; nor will the most perfect carriages and appa- 
ratus nor the best skilled crews avail with pivot guns of the first 
order, if the constructors will not furnish this essential requisite. 

The after pivot gun is also unobstructed in the new English ships 
of all classes by the trunk or continuation of the propeller well, yet 
all the screws hoist in every class of vessel, from the sloop upward. 
When down, the flat hatch covers the opening, and the gun pivots 
right over all. In all our new screw frigates, the after pivot gun is 
shorn of half its power by the presence of the trunk. 

While at Lisbon, the Dutch screw frigate Waaaenar arrived just 
completed, and on the trial trip. A fine warlike ship of 2,400 tons, but 
presenting no novelty of design or detail ; carries 44 guns, 30-pounders, 
and 8-inch shell guns, with a pivot 68-pounder on forecastle. Engine, 
nominally, 300 horse power, but can work to 600 horse power. Two 
cylinders ; trunks ; four-foot stroke ; burns 35 tons daily, at 65 revolu- 
tions ; eight days' fuel ; said to steam eight knots. 

With this abbreviated account of the manner in which I have en- 
deavored to fulfil the trust that you were pleased to commit to my 
charge, and which, I hope, will meet your approval, 

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commander^ 

Hon. I. ToucBY, Secretary of the Navy. 



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8ECRETAEY OP THE NAVY. 
No. 1. 



621 



Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secre- 
tary of the Navy for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 



For «lary of the Seorotoiy of the Navy, per aoc of March 3, 18&3, lection 4, 
Statates at Large, rolame 10, page 212 

For salary of the chief clerk, per act of March 3, 1863, seotioD 3, Statatea at 
Large, ▼olume 10, page 211 

For a^ry of one fourth claaa clerk, per act of March 3, 1853, section 3, Stat- 
utes at Large, ▼olume 10, page 210 

For aalary of one fourth class derk, as disbursing clerk, per act of March 3, 
1853, section 3, Statutes at Large, ▼olume 10, page 211 

For salaries of six third class clerks, at $1,000 per annum, per act of April 
22, 1854, section I, Statutes at Large, ▼olume 10, page 276 

For salaries of four second class clerks, at $1,400 per annum, per act of April 
22, 1854, section 1, Statutes at Large, ▼olume 10, page 276 

For salary of principal messenger, per Joint resolution of Congress, approved 
August 18, 1856, Statutes at Large, pamphlet edition, page 145 

For salary of assistant messenger, per same resolution •••. 

For salary of laborer, per same resolution 



Total salaries for fiscal year 185&-'59 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1857-'58 $39,600 00 

Cmtingtnt npem$e$. 

For blank books, binding, stationery, labor, newspapers, periodicals, and mis- 
cellaneous items 

Appropriated fur fiscal year 1857-'58 $2,840 00 

Total estimate fi>r fiscal year 1858-'59 



Total appropriated lor fiscal year 1857-'58. 



Salaries.... 
Contingent . 



$8,000 00 


2,200 00 


1,800 00 


200 00 


9,600 00 


5,600 00 


900 00 
700 00 
600 00 



29,600 00 



2,840 00 



:»,440 00 
32,440 00 



29,600 00 
2,840 00 



Estimate of the sums required for support of the Southwest Executive 
Buildingy for thefisad year ending June 30, 1859. 



For salaries of fi>ur watchmen, per acts of August 26, 1842, section 4 ; Statutes 
at Large, volume 5, page 524 ; September 30, 1850, section 2 ; Statutes at 
Large, ▼olume 9, page 543; August 31, 1852, section 1; Statutes at Large, 
▼olume 10, page 82; and April 22, 1854, section 2; Statutes at Large, vol- 
ume 10, page 276 

For labor, fuel, lights, and miscellaneous items, per act of August 26, 1842, 
section 22, No. 1 ; Statutes at Large, ▼olume 5, page 528 



Total estimate for fiscal year 1858-'59 

Total appropriated for fiscal year 1857-'58. 



Salaries.... 
Contingent . 



Digitized by 



$2,400 00 
3,913 00 



6,313 00 



6,313 00 



2,400 00 



622 



REPORT OF THE 



Estimate of pay for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, of the comr 
mission and warrant officers of the navy^ including the engineer corps^ 
not on duty ; and also for the pay of those officers on duty who are 
not included in the estimates of the bureaus. 



For pay of oflicen not on duty 

For pay of officers on duty connected with the United Statea Coast Sorrey. .. 

For pay of officers on light-honse daty...... • 

For pay of officers on special service 

Total 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1857-'58 

VAVT. 

Pay of the navy 



$346,900 00 

62,ueo 00 

26,700 00 
68,300 00 



493,300 (0 



5*29,250 00 



493,200 00 



Estimate of the sums required for the transportaiion of the United Stales 
mails for the fisccd year ending June 30, 1859, as authorized by the 
acts of Congress approved March 3, 1847, and March 3, 1851. 



For traosportatioD of the mails from New York to Liverpool 
and back, per act of March 3, 1847, section 2, Statutes at 
Large, volume 9, page 187 

From which deduct the sum required, by act of March 3, 1851, 
section 1, Statutes at Large, volume 9, page 623, to be re- 
funded by deductions annually from compensation of said line, 
to repay advances authorized by act of August 3, 1848, viz.: 
10 per centum on the aggregate advances, $385,000 



Appropriated for fiscal year 1857-*58, $346, 500. 

For transportation of the mails from New York to New Orleans, 
Charleston, Savannah, Havana, and Chsgres, and back, per act 
of March 3, 1847, section 4, Statutes at Large, volume 9, page 

188 



From which deduct the sum required to be refunded by act of 
March 3, 1851, viz.: 10 per centum on the aggregate advances 
to said line, $i90,000 



Appropriated for fiscal year 1857-*58, $261, 000. 

For transportation of the mails from Panama to California and 
Oregon, and back, per acts of March 3, 1847, section 5, Sta^ 
tutes at Liirge, volume 9, page 188, and of March 3, 1851, sec- 
tion I , Statutes at Large, volume 9, page 623 

From which deduct the sum required to be refunded by act of 
March 3, 1851, viz : 10 per centum on the aggregate advances 
to said line, $199,(K)0 



Appropriated for fiacal year 1857-'58, $328,350. 

Total estimate for fiscal year 18o8-'59 

Total appropriated for fiscal year 1857-*58 



Transportation of the mail. 



$385,000 00 



33,500 00 



290,000 00 
29,000 00 



348,250 00 
19,900 00 



jitized by ' 



$346,500 00 



261,000 00 



:»d, 350 00 



935,850 00 



9:)5,850 00 



^* 935,a50 00 



SECRETAEY OP THE NAVY. 623 

RECAPITULATION. 



OITIL. 

Office of the Secretary of the Navy- 
Salaries 

Condnffent , 

Southveat EzeeatiTe Building— 

Salaries 

Contingent 

HATT. 

Pay of the navy 

SPBOUL. 

Tranaportation of the mail 



$29,600 00 
2,d40 00 

2,400 00 
3,913 00 



493,200 00 
935,650 00 



No. 2. 

Bureau of Yards and Docks, 

Ntyoember 20, 1857. 

Sir : I Have the honor to submit herewith duplicate and triplicate 
sets of the estimates from this bureau for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1859, the first set having been submitted on the 15th ultimo. 

I submit also my report for the past year in duplicate, with an ab- 
stract or compendium of the same. 

An abstract of the offers which have been received for furnishing 
supplies, under the cognizance of this bureau, for the year ending 
June 30, 1868, as required by the act of Congress approved March 3, 
1843, is also herewith submitted, together with a list of contracts 
made by this bureau for the year 1857. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH SMITH. 

Hon. Isaac Toucet, Secretary of ike Navy. 



Schedule of the papers accompanying the report of the chief of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks to the Secretary of the Navy^ for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 

Y. & D. A. — Greneral estimate from yards and docks. 

Y. & D. No. 1. — Estimate for the support of the bureau. 

Y. & D. No. 2. — Estimate for recruiting stations. 

Y. & D. No. 3. — ^Estimate for officers and others at yards and sta- 
tions. 

Y. & D. No. 4. — Statement showing the sums which make up the 
first and second items in paper Y. & D. A. 

Y. & D. No. 5. — Estimate for improvements and repairs at yards 
and stations. 

Y. & D. No. 6. — ^Estimate for improvements and repairs at hos- 
pitals and naval asylum. 

Y. & D. No. 7. — Estimate for improvements and repairs of maga- 
zines. 

Bureau of Yards and Docks, October 15, 1857^ig,,3,,yGoogle 



624 



REPORT OF THE 



T. & D. A. 

OeTieral estimate from the Bureau of Yards and Dockafor (he fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1859^ in addition to the balances remaining unex' 
pended July 1, 1858. 



Object. 


Estimated for 
the year end- 
ing June 30, 
1859. 


Estimated for 
the year end- 
ing June 30, 
ia58. 


1. For the piy of commiHion, warrant, and petty offioen, 
(■eeDBperY. & D. No. 4.) 


$276,664 00 

139,232 00 

1,952,509 00 

159,866 00 

209,615 00 

479,600 00 


$272,952 00 

128,382 00 

2,127,392 00 

63,615 00 


2. For the pay of saperintendenta, naTal conitruotora, and 

all the civil eatabUshmenti at the several yards and 
Btationi, (lee paper Y. Sl D. No. 4.) 

3. For improvements and necessary repairs at yards and 

stations, (see paper Y. & D. Nu. 5.) 

the naral asvlam. fsee naner Y. db D. No 6.) 


5. For ordnance works, magazines, and their dependencies, 
fsee naoer Y. &, D. No. 7.^. .... --.. ...- .... .... .... 


113,458 00 


6. For contingent eipenses that may accrue daring the fiscal 
year for the following purposes, viz: For the freight 
and transportation of materials and stores for yards and 
docks ; for printing and stationery ; for hooks, maps, 
models, and drawings; for purchase and repair of fire 
engines; for machinery of every description, and patent 
right to use the same; the repair of steam engines and 

and maintenance of horses and oxen and driving teams; 
for carts, timber wheels, and workmen's tools of every 
description, and repairing the same; for postage of 
letters on public service; for furniture for government 
houses; for coais and other fuel : for caudles and oil for 
use of navy yards and stations ; for cleaning and clearing 
op yards; fur flags, awnings, and packing boxes; for 
watchmen ; and for incidental labor at navy yards not 
applicable to any other appropriation ....•.••..• ...... 


442,000 00 




Total - - 


3,216,486 00 


3,147,799 00 





BuKKAO or Yaeds asid Dooks, Oetoisr '15, 1857. 



JOSEPH SMITH. 



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8ECRETAKY OP THE KAVY. 
Y, & D. No. 1. 



626 



EMmaie of (he amount required for the support of the Bureau of Tarda 
and Docks for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 



For salaiy of the chief of the bnreaa, per act of Aagaat 31, 1842, Scatates 
at Large, ▼oliime 5. chapter V86, lectioD 3, psfre 579 

For salary of chief clerk, fourth elaai, per act of March 3, 18S3, ScaCutet at 
Large, pamphlet editioD, chapter 97, tectioD 3, page 210 

For tidaries of five clerks, iocludiog draiighumsD, (four of second olass. one of 
first elsss,) per act of March :), l8o3, Statutes at Large, pa»phle( edition, 
chapter 97, section 3, page 210 ; and act of April 22, 1854, Bututes at Large, 
pamphlet edition, chapter 52, section l,pRge276 

For salary of messenger, per act of August 31, 1842, Statutes at Large, ▼olnme 
5, chapter 20H, section 6, page 5-iO ; act of April 22, 1854, pamphlet edition. 
Statutes at Lsrge, chapter 52, section 2, page 276; act of August 4, 1854, 
pamphlet edition, Statutes at Large, chapter 242, section 6, psgo 572 ; and 
Joint resulutiun No. 18, August 18, 1856, pamphlet edition. Statutes at Large, 
page 145 

Fur wages of two laborers, per act of August 4, 1854, pamphlet edition. Statutes 
at Large, chapter 242, vection 6, page 572; and joint reaolutioa No. 18, of 
August le, 1^56, pamphlet edition, Statutes at Large, page 145 • 

Appropriated for the year ending June 30,1668 

Oontingeni exptrua. 

Tot stationery, books, plans, drawings, and incidental hbor 

Appropriated for the year endinir June 30, 1858 



$3,500 00 
1,800 00 

6,800 00 

840 00 
1,200 00 



14,140 00 



14, 140 00 



800 00 
800 00 



BoasAO or Tards akd Docks, Gather 16, 1857. 



Y. & D. No. 2. 

Estimate of the pay of the officers attached to the recruiting stations 
for the year ending June 30, 1859| f/ no aiteration is made in the 
number of stations. 



Bank. 


a 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

1 


3 


Aggregate. 


Commanders ....••.....•. 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


6 
G 
6 
6 


$12,600 00 
9,000 00 
10,50(f 00 
4,51.0 00 


I4eutifnsiit8 -----r. ...... .. 


SurvDonit ...... ........... 


Passed midshipmen 




4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


34 


:j6,6<)0 00 



BouA« OP Tarm 4aD OooKii, Otttbtr 15, 1857. 
Vol. ii 40 



Digitized by 



Google 



626 



REPORT OF THE 
T. & D. No. 3. 



Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy yards and Nations for 
the year ending June 30, 1859. 



P0BT8M0UTH, N. H. 



No. 



1 

I 

11 

6 



Offioen, A^o. 



Captain - 

CommaDder 

Lieutenant - —- — 

Master 

Surgeon — 

Purser ..— - 

Chaplain 

Passed midshipman 

Boauvain 

Gunner — • 

Carpenter .••• - 

Sailmaker 

Purser's assistant, when performing the duties of clerk also. 
Steward, (surgeon's).... 



ORDUIART. 



Passed midshipman ..... 

Carpenter's mate ..... 

Seamen, at $180 each 

Ordinary seamen, at $144 each. 



Storekeeper • 

Naval constructor 

Civil engineer 

Draughuman to civil engineer.... 
Superintendent of floating dock .. 
Foreman and inspector of timber. 

Clerk of the yard 

Clerk to the commandant ...••.. 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk to the naval constructor... 
Porter .* 



Total. 



Pay. 



$3,500 00 

2,100 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

1,800 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

750 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

750 00 

480 00 



750 00 

2*28 00 

1,980 00 

864 00 



1,500 00 

2,6U0 00 

1,500 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

1,050 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

800 00 

456 00 



Aggregate. 



$18,180 00 



3,822 00 



13,106 00 



35, 108 00 



BOSTON. 



VATAL. 

Captain < 

Commander .....< 

lieutenants, at $1,500 each 

liaater 



3,500 00 
2,100 00 
3,000 00 
1,000 0000 



gle 



SECSEf ABT OF TDE NAYT 
T, & D. No. 3— ContinueA, 



627 



BOSTON— Continued. 



Offioen,fte. 



SQrg6<Hl. •••••• •••••■ .-••-• •••• 

Puraer •• ••• •• 

ChapUin 

Puaed midahipmen, at |750 each. 

Boatswain 

Gunner 

Carpenter.. 

Sailmaker 

Gunner, keeper of magazine 

Clerk to purser 

Steward, (puner'a) 

Steward, (aargeon'a) 



BosprrAU 



Snnceon.... 

I Aaaiatant luigeon 

Steward 

Matron 

NurM9,at |180each 

Cook 

Washer 

Watchmen, at $240 each . 



CITIL. 



1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
] 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 



Storekeeper •• •— 

Naval oonstmotor 

Ciyll engineer 

]>faiighum>in to civil engineer 

Master machinist and steam engineer 

Measurer and inspector of timber 

Clerk of the yard • 

Clerk to the commandant 

Clerk (2d) to the commandant 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk C2d) to the storekeeper 

Clerk to inspector of provisions and clothing. 

Clerk to naval constructor 

Porter - 



Total. 



Nora.— The anrgeon of the yard will attend the marines 
also. 



Pay. 



$1,800 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

800 00 

800 00 

800 00 

800 00 

800 00 

500 00 

480 (M) 

480 00 



2,000 00 
1, 150 00 
480 00 
204 00 
360 00 
204 00 
144 00 
720 00 



1,700 00 

2,600 00 

2,000 00 

900 00 

2,000 00 

1,050 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

960 00 

1,200 00 

9(M) 00 

750 00 

800 00 

456 00 



Aggregate. 



$22 960 00 



5,262 00 



17,716 00 



45,338 00 



Digitized by 



Google 



628 



KEPORT OF TUB 
T. & D. No. 3— Continued, 



NEW YORK. 



No. 



Officers, &c. 



Captain 

ComiuiiDder 

LieutenaDtfl, at $ 1 , 500 each 

Maiter 

Surgeon 

Purter *.... 

Chaplain 

Passed mid«bipmen, at $7&0 each 

Boatswain 

Gunner 

Carpenrer 

Sailmaker 

Gunner, keeper of magasine 

Clerk t» purser 

Steward, (purser's) 

Steward, (sargeota*s) 

HOSPITAL. 

Surgeon 

Assistant surgeons, at $t,l50 each 

Hospit<il steward 

Matron 

Nurses, at $180 each 

Washers, at $144 each 

Cooks, at $168 each 

House-cleaner ....'. 

Messenger 

Gate-keeper 

Gardener 

Porter ... 

Watchmen, at $240 each 

Engineer for steam pump 



laboratort. 



Surgeon, director of laboratory . 

Assistant surgeon 

Laborer , 



Storekeeper 

Navsl constructor 

Civil engineer 

Draughtsman to civil engineer ..... 
Inspector and measurer of timber. 

Clerk of the yard 

Clerk to the commandant 

Clerk (2d) to the commandant..... 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk (2d) to storekeeper... 



Pay. 



$3,r.oo 00 

2, lOU 00 

3, 000 00 

1,000 00 

],800 00 

2,500 IK) 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

8O0 1*0 

800 00 

800 (N) 

800 <N> 

mo (Ni 

500 00 
480 00 
480 00 



2,250 00 
2, 300 00 
480 00 
204 00 
7t») 00 
288 00 
336 00 
144 00 
144 00 
360 00 
276 00 

im 00 

480 00 
480 00 



2,250 00 

1,150 00 

360 00 



1,700 00 
2, 600 00 
2,500 00 

900 00 
1,050 00 
1,200 (K) 
1,200 00 

960 00 
l,20<p0 



Aggregate. 



$22,360 00 



8,642 00 



3,760 00 



ogle 



BECEETABY OP THE NAVY. 
T. & D. No. 3— Continued. 



629 



NEW YORK— Continued. 



No. 



OfHoen, &o. 



Pay. 



Aggregate. 



Clerk to in«peetor of proTiaiont and clothing . 

Clerk to naval oonscmctor 

Porter 



ToUl. 



NoTK. — ^The surgeons of the yard will attend the ma- 
rines also. 



$760 00 
»00 00 
4d6 00 



$16,916 00 



50,976 00 



PHILADELPHIA. 



Captoin 

Commander ^ 

Lieutenaot • ••• 

Master 

Burgeim • 

Porser 

Chaplain 

Passed midshipman ..••• 

Boatswain • 

Qmmer......... • 

Carpenter 

Sailmaker 

Purser's assistant, when performing the duties of clerk 

Steward, (purser's) 

Steward, (surgeon's) 

HOSPITAL. 

Surgeon • •• 

Passed assistant surgeon • .•• . 

Steward, (suigeon's).... 

Cook 

Nurses, at $180 each 

Waahers, at $108 each 

ITATAL ASYLUM. 

Captain 

Commander • 

Lieutenant 

Chaplain 

Secretary 

Carpenter 

Steward to the asylum 

Purser's assistant 

Matron 

Washers, at $108 each 

Cook 



3,500 00 

2,100 00 

1,5410 00 

1,000 00 

1,800 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

750 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

750 00 

460 00 

480 00 



2,250 00 
1,150 00 
460 00 
156 00 
360 00 
216 00 



3,500 00 

2, KK) 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

900 00 

800 00 

480 00 

760 00 

204 00 

432 00 

168 00 




18,660 00 



4,612 00 



oogle 



630 



BEPORT OF THB 
T. & D. No. 3— Continued. 



PHILADELPHIA— Continiied. 



No. 



Oflioeray &o. 



Cook'a astistantt— one at $120, and one at $96. 

Laandresses, at $108 each 

Scrubbers and houie-cleaoers, at $96 each .... 

Laborera, at $18() each 

Matter-at-arms ••.... 

Ship's corporal :. 



Storekeeper 

Naval constmctor 

Superintendent uf fttiatins dock and machinery . 

Measurer and in»pector uf timber. 

Clerk of the ynrd 

Clerk to the commandant 

Clerk (seor»nd) to the commandant 

Clerk to the st(»rekeeper 

Clerk (second) to the storekeeper .••.. 

Clerk to the naval ctinatruotor. 

Porter 



Total. 



NoTs. — ^The iurgeon of the yard is to attend the marinea 
alao. 



Pa 



Aggregate. 



$216 00 




540 00 




768 00 




720 00 




300 00 




240 00 






$16, 118 00 




1,600 00 




2,600 00 




1,000 00 




1,050 00 




1,200 00 




1,200 00 




96(» 00 




9()0 00 




750 00 




800 00 




456 00 






12,416 00 





50,806 00 



WASHINGTON. 



1 
1 
1 

10 



NATAL. 

Captain 

Commander ^•••. 

Lieutenant 

Master 

Surgeon 

Purser 

Chaplain 

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 

Boatsvain 

Gunner 

Carpenter 

Purser's assistant, when performing the duties of clerk also 

Steward, (purser's) 

Steward, (surgeon's) 



Passed midshipman 

Boatswain's mate 

Carpenter's mate 

Oidlnaiy teamen, at $120 each 



3,500 00 

2,100 00 

1,500 00 

1,(M)0 (M) 

1,800 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

760 00 

480 00 

480 00 



750 fO 

828 00 

228 00 

1,200 00 



19,910 00 



ooqIc 

M06 00 



8ECRBTABY OP THE NAVY. 

Y. & D. No. S— Continued. 



631 



WASHINGTOK— Continaed. 



Officers, &e. 



Pay. 



Aggregate. 



Storekeeper •••• ••• 

CiTil engioeer • 

Naval coDfltruetor ••• .. 

Draughtsman to civil engineer «. 

Measurer and inspector of timber 

Clerk of the yard • 

Clerk to the commandant ... 

Clerk (second) to the commandant 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk (second) to the storekeeper 

Steam engineer and machinist.... ••.••••.. 

Master un and camboose maker 

Master chain-cable and snehor maker 

Pyrotechnist • •» 

Keeper of the magasine ....••. 

Porter 



Total. 



NoTS. — ^The suigeon of the yard is to attend the marines 
also. 



$1,700 00 

3,000 00 

2,600 00 

90A 00 

900 00 

1,200 00 

1,300 00 

960 OU 

1,200 00 

900 00 

2,000 00 

1,250 00 

1,250 00 

1,500 00 

480 00 

456 00 



$21,496 00 
43,112 00 



NORFOLK. 



Csptain • 

Commander 

Lieutenants, at $ 1 , 500 each . • . . . 

Masters, at $1,000 each 

Surgeon 

Purser 

Chaplain 

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 

Boatswains, at $S0O each 

Gunners, at $^K) each 

Carpenters, at $!JOU each 

Sailmaker 

Gunner, keeper of magazine 

Clerk to the purser 

Steward, (purser's) 

Steward, (surgeon's) 



Surgeon 

Passed assistant surgeon * 



1 I Assistant surgeon. 



3,500 00 

2,100 00 

3,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,800 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

800 00 

800 00 

500 00 

480 00 

480 00 



2,000 00 

1,150 00 

960 Oq^ 



25,760 00 



ioogle 



632 



REPORT OF THE 
Y. & D. No. 3— CJontinued. 



NORFOLK— Continued. 



No. 



OflBoen, &o. 



Steward 

Matron 

Gardener 

Nurses, at $180 each... 
Cooks, at$168 each.... 
Washers, at $144 each. 
Boatmen, at $i68 each. 
Boy 



Storekeeper 

Naval oonstnictor 

Civil engineer 

Draughtsman to civil engineer 

Inspector and measurer of timber 

Clerk of the yard 

Clerk to the commandant..... 

Clerk (2d) to the commandant 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk (Sd) to the storekeeper 

Clerk to the inspector of provisions and clothing. 

Clerk to the naval constructor 

Porter 



Total. 



NoTi.— The surgeon of the yard is to attend the marines 
also. 



Pay. 



$480 00 
204 00 
SS76 00 
540 00 
336 00 
5W8 (K) 
672 00 
144 (10 



1.700 00 
2,600 00 
2,&00 00 
900 00 
],2(N) 00 
1,200 00 
l,2fM) 00 

960 no 

1,200 00 
9(10 00 
750 00 
800 00 
456 00 



Aggregate. 



$7,040 00 



16,366 00 



49, 1()6 00 



PENSACOLA. 



VATAL. 

Captain 

Commander , 

Lteurenants, at $1,500 each , 

Master 

Surgeon • 

Purser 

Chaplain 

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 

Boatswain 

Gunner 

Carpenter , 

Sailmaker , 

Parser's assistant, when performing the duties of clerk also 

Steward, (purser's) , 

Steward, (surgeon's) , 

ORDISTART. 

Lieutenant , 

Carpenter's mate. 



3,500 00 
2. 100 00 
3,0(10 on 
l,0(Mi no 

1,800 00 
2,500 00 

i,5no 00 

1,500 00 
8(10 00 

800 on 
800 on 
8(N) 00 
750 00 
480 00 

480 no 



1,5(^0 00 
Digitizef^y@OOgle 



2 ,810 00 



8ECRETABT OF THE KAVT. 
Y. & D. No. 3— Continued. 



633 



PEK8AC0LA— continued. 



Ko. 



Officers, &o. 



2 ] Boatswain*! mates, at $228 each . 
1 C<N.k . 

10 

80 



Seameo, at $180 eaeb 

Ordioary seamen, at $144 each 



1 Borgeon 

8 ! AssUtantsargeons,at $930 each. 
1 i Steward 

1 I Matron 

3 Norses, at $180 each 

2 Cooks, at $I6S each 

3 Washers, at $144 each 

1 Carter 

1 Messenger 

Watchmen, at $360 each 



OITIL. 



Storekeeper 

Naval constructor ...... ..•• 

Civil engineer 

Assistant civil engineer and draughtsman 

Measurer and inspector of timber 

Superintendent of floating dock and machinery. 

1 I Clerk of the yard 

1 I Clerk to the commandant 

Clerk (2d) to the commandant 

Clerk to the storekeeper 

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 

Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper 

Porter 



Total. 



KoTi.— The surgeon of the yard is to attend the marines 
near the yard, and such persons in the yard as the com- 
mandant may direct. 



Pay. 



$456 00 
228 00 

1,800 00 
11,520 00 



2,250 00 
1,900 00 
480 00 
250 00 
540 00 
336 00 
432 00 
144 00 
168 00 
1,080 00 



1,700 00 

2,600 00 

3,000 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

960 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

750 00 

466 00 



Aggregate. 



$15,732 00 



7,580 00 



17,066 00 
62, 188 00 



MABE ISLAND. 



Captain 3,500 00 

Commander, (act of August 5, 1854) 3,500 00 

Lieutenant < 1,500 00 

Master i 1,000 00 

Surgran ' 2,000 00 

Steward, (surgeon's) 750 00 



12,230 00 



634 



EEPOBT OP THE 

Y, & D. No. 3— Oontinued. 



MARE ISLAND—Continaed. 



So. 



Officers, &o. 



Nary agent, to do the duty of puraer also 

Storekeeper 

Naval constructor 

Civil engineer jf 

Clerk to navy agent; one to do duty as clerk of the yard 

also 

Clerk to navy agent 

Clerk and draaghtsman to ci?il engineer , 

Clerk to the commandant • 

Clerk to the storekeeper.. 

Porter 



Total. 



Pay. Aggregate. 



$4,000 00 
2,500 00 
2,600 00 
4,000 00 

3,000 00 
2,500 («0 
2,500 00 
1,600 00 
1,500 00 
750 00 



t2i,e50 00 



37,100 00 



SACKETTS HARBOR. 



1 Captain.. 
1 Master... 



Total. 



3,500 00 
1,0U0 00 



4,500 00 



4,500 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



I 



I 



} 



i 



Portsmouth, N. H $18,180 

Boston I 22.360 

New York I 22,360 

Philadelphia . 
Washington.. 

Norfolk 

Pensacola ... 
Mare Island . 



$3,822 



18,660 
19,210 
25,760 
21,810 
12,250 
Sackett's Harbor 4,500 



$5,262 

8,642 i 

4,612 $15,118 



$3,760 



2,406 

I 7,040 I. 

15,732 I 7,580 |. 



$13,106 
17,716 
16,216 
12,4(6 
21,496 
16,366 
17,066 
2l,e50 



Total 165,090 



21,960 



33,136 15,118 



3.760 



139,232 



$35,108 
45.3:W 
50,978 
50,806 
43,112 
49,166 
62, 188 
37,100 
4,500 



378,296 



Google" 



BUBB4U Of Yabds AMD DooKB, Odober 16, 1867. 



Digitized by 



SECEETAEY OP THE NAVY. 635 

Y. & D. No. 4. 

Statement shelving the aeveral sums which mate up the amounts of the 
first and second items in the general estimate from the Bureau of 
Yards and Docks for the year ending 30th June^ 1809, marked 7. dt 
D.A. 

FIBST ITBM. 

For recruiting stations $36,600 00 

For naval branch at yards and stations 1^5,090 00 

For hospital branch at yards and stations, including 
the naval asylum at Philadelphia and the laboratory 

at New York 52,014 00 

For ordinary branch at yards and stations 21,960 00 

275,664 00 

SECOND ITEM. 

For the civil branch at all the yards and stations 139,232 00 

Bureau of Yards and Docrs^ 

October 15, 1857. 



Y. &. D. No. 5. 



Estimate of the amounts that will he required towards the construction 
and completion of works^ and for the current repairs at the several 
navy yardsj for the fiscal year ending ZQth Jwie^ 1859. 

Partsmouthy N. H. 

For mooring piers for dock $13,618 00 

For extending stables 7,082 00 

For completion of dock basin 6,760 00 

For repairs of floating dock 3,865 00 

For repairs of all kinds 20,900 00 

52,215 00 

BoHon. 

For reservoirs 13,500 00 

For boiler house, chimney, and boilers at ropewalk 25^000 00 

For altering tar kettles 2,000 00 

For machinery and bobbins for ropewalk 8,000 00 

For machinery for machine shop and foundry 35,000 00 

For extension of dry dock 80,000 00 

For repairs of all kinds 40,000 00 

203,500 00 

Digiti aJLi 



636 REPORT OP THE 



New York. 

For boiler houso and setting boilers |8,816 00 

For lightning rods ^85 00 

For water pipes 1,200 00 

For drains 3,000 00 

For quay wall 80,000 00 

For sewer extended to quay wall 2,000 00 

For boiler to dredger 1,000 00 

For bilge blocks for docks , 3,000 00 

For large derrick and foundation 21,000 00 

For wall on Flushing avenue, 800 feet 8,385 00 

For timber basin 6,000 00 

For repairs of oakum shop 2,500 00 

For filling ponds in yard 22,000 00 

For filling in new purchase 50,650 00 

For dredging channel and scows 30,000 00 

For piling site for marine barracks 46,000 00 

For machinery for machine shop, boiler shop, saw mill, 

foundry, smithery, and brass foundry 27,000 00 

For repairs of all kinds 40,000 00 

363,6:)6 00 

PhUaddphia. 

For extending gun carriage shop 3,213 00 

For additional story to plumber's shop 1,800 00 

For completing guard house 1,500 00 

For dredging channels and repairs of dredger, &c 11,600 00 

For repairs of dry dock ,..., 71,300 00 

For repairs of all kinds 9,301 00 

98,714 00 

Washington. 

For wall west side of yard 14,000 00 

For covering and fiUiog space behind wall 9,000 00 

For extension of navy store 13,000 00 

For anchor shop and coal houses 46,000 00 

For carriage houses and cart sheds 2,000 00 

For pavements, drains, andgutters 4,000 00 

For gas works 7,000 00 

For machinery and tools 11,100 00 

For repairs of all kinds 26,000 00 

131,100 00 

Digitized by V_ ~ ' """ 



SECRETABT OP THE NAVY. 637 



Norfolk. 

For continuation of quay wall $80,000 00 

For completing YictnalliDg establishment 68,000 00 

For completing grading and drainage 16.300 00 

For dredging channels 8,000 00 

Fur comuleting ship house No. 48 47,688 00 

For machinery and tools 15,300 00 

For timl^er shed No. 18 26,350 00 

For completing reservoir 3,745 00 

For completing carpenter's shop 12,275 00 

For repairs of all kinds 54,500 00 

332,158 00 



Ptnaacdla. 

For continuing granite wharf. $96,000 00 

For repairing and operating dock 15,000 00 

For filling and paving around dock basin 13,400 00 

For dredging in front of basin 9,000 00 

For repairs of railways 2,000 00 

For completing water pipes to permanent wharf. 820 00 

For completing foundry 30,000 00 

For ship house over slip 88.650 00 

For constructor's workshop 47,600 00 

For cistern at machine shop 2,550 00 

For trip-hammer for smithery 3,500 00 

For police room 7,300 00 

For blast pipes 500 00 

For repairs of all kinds 46,995 00 

363,315 00 

Mare Mandy Cali/ortiia. 

For guard house No. 73 $11,330 00 

For tar and pitch house No. 74 9,592 00 

For two cisterns No. 49 6,532 00 

For grading 20,000 00 

For paving 11,110 00 

For continuing wharf. 45,276 00 

For foundries, boiler establishment, &c 2^2,131 00 

For gas works 10.000 00 

For Bishop's derrick 12,000 00 

417,971 00 

Digitized by^ 



63d BEPOBT OF THE 



BecapUulatum. 

Portsmouth, N. H $52,215 00 

Boston 203,500 00 

New York 353,536 00 

Philadelphia 98,m 00 

Washington 131,100 00 

Norfolk 332,158 00 

Pensacola 363,316 00 

Mare Island 417,971 00 

Total 1,952,509 00 



Y. & D. No. 6, 



Estimate of the amouid that will be required towards the construction 
and completion of works^ and for the current repairs ai the several 
naval hospitalSyfor the year ending June 30, 1859. 

Portsmouthy New Hampshire. 

For building for hospital $30,3H 00 

Boston. 
For repairs of buildings and grounds 3,000 00 

New York. 

For enlarging cemetery, and enclosing the same 7,800 00 

For purchase of lot adjoining cemetery 6,000 00 

For completing heating apparatus 6,000 00 

For repairs of buildings and fences 7,200 00 

21,000 00 

Naval asylum^ Philadelphia. 

For gateway and iron gate on Shippen street, and road 

from same • 1,500 00 

For repairs to Airnaces, grates, and ranges 1,000 00 

For painting main building and lodges 1,600 00 

For brick floors in governor's and surgeon's houses 400 00 

For cleaning and whitewashing 500 00 

For gas tax r^^^J^OOO 00 

Digitized by VjOiJ 



SECBETABT OF THE NAYT. 639 

For water tax |200 00 

For furniture for the asylum, and repairs 300 00 

For general repairs 2,000 00 

8,500 00 
For support of beneficiaries at the asylum 26,392 00 

34,892 00 

Norfdh. 

For stone pier and landing 34,900 00 

For repairs of buildings and appurtenances • 11,000 00 

45,900 00 

Penaacdla. 

For draining and filling ponds 2,000 00 

For repairs of buildings, grounds, &c 16,700 00 

18,700 00 

BecapUulaiion. 

For Portsmouth 30,374 00 

For Boston 3,000 00 

For New York 27,000 00 

For Philadelphia (asylum) 34,892 00 

For Norfolk 45,900 00 

For Pensacola 18,700 00 

Total 159,866 00 

BuBSAU OF Yabds AND DocKS, October — , 1857. 



Y. & D. No. 7. 



Estimate of the amount thai tviU be required towards the construction 
and camjUetion of ordnance tvorh^^ and for the current repairs at the 
several naval magazineSyfor the year ending June 30, 1859. 

Portsmouth^ New Hampshire. 

For gun carriage shop and storehouse $36,500 00 

For boiler room, boiler, engine, and machinery 8,100 00 

For repairs of all kinds 2,000 00 

46,600 00 

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640 BEPORT OP THE 

Boston. 

For repairs of all kinds $1,500 00 

New York 

For dredcring channel to Ellis' island 800 00 

For repairs of all kinds 6,000 00 

6,800 00 

Philadelphia. 

For repairs of all kinds 1,000 00 

N(yrfdh. 

To complete ordnance building, for which $50,000 was 
appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858, the 

original estimate amounting to $102,704 21 52,705 00 

For quay wall at St. Helena, estimated to cost 

$267,571 y3 80,000 00 

For continuation of sea wall at magazine 5,560 00 

For iron crane at Fort Norfolk 3,000 00 

141,265 00 

Penaaodla. 

For repairs of all kinds 1,000 00 

Mare Island. 

For shell house 6,200 00 

For magazine, keeper's house, and grounds 3,000 00 

For tank house and filling room 800 00 

For railway and cars to transport powder to and from 

magazine 1,200 00 

For shot beds, cleaning and piling shot and shells 250 00 

11,450 00 

Becapiivlation. 

For Portsmouth, New Hampshire 46,600 00 

For Boston 1,500 00 

For New York 6,800 00 

For Philadelphia 1,000 00 

For Norfolk 141,265 00 

For Pensacola 1,000 00 

For Mare Island 11,450 00 



Total 209,615 00 



BuREATT OF Yards akd Docks, OdobtT 15, 1857iized by Google 



8ECBETAST OF THE NAVY. 641 



Compendium of the anrnud report from the Bureau of Yards and Docks 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, showing: 

What has been done at each navj yard in works of improvement 
and repairs during the past fiscal year, naming the objects completed, 
and the amount expended thereon ; those which have been in progress 
bat not completed, and the aggregate expenditure on the same ; as 
also the amount expended on account of the Bureau of Yards and 
Docks for contingent at each navy yard. 

Detailed remarks upon objopts for which estimates are submitted, 
and the aggregate amount asked for each navy yard. 

The same with reference to each of the naval hospitals and the 
naval asylum. 

Also in regard to the magazines and ordnance works at the several 
stations. 

Bemarks in relation to the state and condition of the several float- 
ing and stone dry docks. 

Statements with reference to the number, condition, <&c., of the 
beneficiaries at the naval asylum in Philadelphia, and the expenses 
of the establishment during the past year. 

Suggestions in regard to the present system of protection afforded 
to the timber growing on the public lands suitable for naval pur- 
poses ; further legislative provisions recommended. 



Beport from the Bureau of Yards and Docks ^ in expUxnotion of the 
estimates from thai bureau^ under the head of each navy yard, as to 
works which have been completed during the past year, those now in 
progress, and as regards the estimates which are now submitted in 
detail, for the year ending June 30, 1859. 

POBTSMOUTH. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

The only wf)rk of improvement which has been completed at this 
yard during the past fiscal year is the timber slip, which has been 
commenced and completed within the year, in a thorough and perma- 
nent manner, and within the amount estimated. The amount ex- 
pended upon this object is $1,889 80. 

The works upon which expenditures have been made, but which 
are not yet completed, are — 

1. Dredging in front of dock basin. — This important work has 
been vigorously prosecuted. At the commencement of the fiscal year 
the dredge had removed the sand, mud, loose gravel, &c., over the 
whole area intended for the deep basin. Ledge gravel, clay^ and 
rubble, cemented together, were found to occupy a large space, and 
its removal was necessary to obtain a sufficient depth of water for the 
operations of the floating dock. The removal of these substances re- 
quired submarine blastings and the use of the diving belL both of 

Vftl \\ i '\ Digitized by vjOOQIC 



642 REPORT OP THE 

which operations, though difficult and tedious, hare heen successfullj' 
accomplished, and about 20,000 cubic feet of ledge, compact clay, and 
gravel, have been conveyed beyond the space to be occupied by the 
dock. The removal of some sharp projecting points of ledge is all that 
now remains to be done to complete this work. 

2. Launching and hauling up ways in ship house No. 4. — ^Within 
the past year the stone work outside the ship house has been com- 
pleted and the timber ways laid and secured. The continuation of 
the ways in the ship house must necessarily be delayed until the 
Franklin (now on the stocks^ shall have been launched. 

3. Dock hasin, — Proj^ress nas been made towards the repairs of the 
walls of the basin by removing the filling behind them, and taking 
up twelve of the courses of stone for a distance of one hundred and 
seventy-five feet. These walls had been seriously injured by the 
iotensely cold weather of this climate, and to render them secure 
Against the effects of this powerful agent great care will be required 
in their reconstruction. For the completion of this work, and the 
purchase of an additional course of large stone, a further appropria- 
tioo of $6,750 will be required. 

4. Fitch house, — The foundations for this building have been laid^ 
the walls erected, the kettles set, and the roof partly finished, and 
the building will be ready for use in a few weeks. 

5. Imn fences. — In front of the officer's quarters, and in place of the 
dilapidated wooden palings, an appropriate and substantial iron fence 
on stone foundations has been erected, seven hundred feet in length. 
The grouads on the line of fence have been graded and gravelled, and 
the whole property drained. 

6. Repairs o^ cdl kinds, — Proper and necessary repairs have been 
made upon the various buildings, wharves, fences, and bridges, and 
the total amount expended upon these works of improvement during 
the fiscal year is $23,659 93. There has been expended for contin- 
gent the sum of $17,001 11. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th 
June, 1859^ for the following objects, viz : Mooring piers for floating 
dock ; extension of stables ; completion of dock basin ; repair of float- 
ing dock, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting in the aggregate to 
$52,215. 

1. Mooring piers o/Jloaiing dock. — At present, the only moorings 
for the dock are anchors, and three wooden piers each twenty feet 
square. These piers, constructed of piles but slightly driven into the 
hard bottom, are very insecure and insufficient for the safe mooring 
of the large structure, exposed as it is to violent gales and rapid cur- 
rents. In such deep water, (34 feet,) clusters of piles afford but little 
protection, and it is deemed necessary to provide substantial and per- 
manent works of granite, and an estimate is, therefore, submitted for 
this object. 

2. Extension of stabUs. — When any considerable amount of work 
is in progress at this yard, the stables are insufficient to contain the 
teams necessarily employed. For several seasons stalls have been 
constructed in the sheds^ and the carts and other tool8>remov«d and 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECBETABT OF THE NAVT. 643 

left exposed to the weather, injury, and decay. The additional ex- 
pense and loss, in conveying the food from one huilding to another^ 
suggests the propriety and necessity of an extension of the stables. 
A small appropriation is asked to extend the present convenient ar- 
rangement sufficiently to meet the wants of the yard. 

3. Completion of dock basin. — An appropriation has been made for 
this object, and the work is in progress ; but upon taking up the old 
work it has been found necessary to provide an additional course of 
larger stone, and the work will therefore cost something more than 
was at first contemplated. It is a very important object, and should be 
urged forward to completion as soon as possible. 

4. Bepaira o/JUxUing dock, — Estimates of the amount necessary for 
the repairs and care of the floating dock are submitted by the super- 
intendent. This sum will be required for the thorough repair and 
necessary fitting of rigging, painting, calking, &c., to enable the dock 
to be used in a successful manner, and to preserve the structure from 
premature decay. 

5. liepaira of all hinds. — ^In the amount estimated for under this 
head is embraced the necessary painting of ship houses and yard build- 
ings, refitting of store houses, repairs of officers' quarters, bridges, 
landing stages, roads, walks, gutters and drains, fences and walls, 
cranes, scows, derricks and boats, timber and knee dock, and all other 
miscellaneous and incidental repairs, which may become necessary 
during the fiscal year. 

BOSTON. 

At this yard the following works of improvement have been com- 
pleted during the past fiscal year, viz : Packing house and cooperage, 
battery and sheer wharf ; engines and pumps for rope- walk ; stone 
wall north of timber dock ; dock engine boiler house, coal house at 
rope-walk ; gas pipes and burners, and engine for dry dock. Upon 
ethese objects ther has been expended during the past fiscal year for 
labor, $24,586 26, and for materials, $44,003 03, making an aggre- 
gate of $68,589 2<^. 

The works which have been in progress during the year, but which 
are not yet completed, are : 

1. Machine ahopf foundry , dec. — The progress made upon this im- 
portant work has been highly satisfactory. The principal walls of 
the main buildings are now up, and most of them will be under cover 
this fall ; and it is confidently expected that they will be ready for 
occupation by the 1st of July, 1858. 

2. Paving. — A large amount of paving, between the timber sheds, 
has been laid in a most substantial and permanent manner, and all 
that has been provided for, by appropriation, will be completed during 
the present season. 

3. Piie wharf. — The materials for this object have been procured, 
but the work has been deferred until the opinion of the district attorney 
can be obtained as to the nature and extent of the right possessed by 
the government to build in the waters of the harbor. 

4. Bobbins for rope-walk, — A portion of these have been procured, 



644 REPORT OF THE 

and are in use. Great improvements have been made in the building 
and machinery^ and this establishment is now in better condition than 
heretofore. 

6. Repairs of all hinda. — ^Such repairs have been put upon the dif- 
ferent buildings, wharves, docks, fences and other existing improve- 
ments as were necessary for their protection and preservation ; and 
the amount expended during the year for these works is $135,246 70. 

There has been expended for contingent purposes at this yard, 
during the past fiscal year, the sum of $60,976 46. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th 
June, 1859, for the following objects, viz: Keservoir nefir packing 
bouse ; reservoir for machine shop ; boiler house ; chimney and boilers 
for rope- walk; alteiing tar kettles at pitch house; machinery and bob- 
bins for rope-walk; machinery for machine shop and foundry ; exten- 
sion of dry dock, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting in the 
aggregate to $203,500. 

1. lieaervoir near packing house, — This object is greatly needed to 
furnish a supply of water for yard purposes ; the proposed location is 
between the rope-walk and the cooperage, from which buildings a 
large quantity of rain water may be saved, which now passes off over 
the surface of the yard, and is lost. 

2. Reservoir for machine shop, — This establishment will require a 
large quantity of water for supplying the boilers, and, as there is no 
other source from which it can be obteined, it is proposed to construct 
a large reservoir to receive the water which may fall upon the roofs. 
This work is indispensable. 

3. Boiler house, chimney, and hoilefs for rope-walk. — The present 
boilers are old and nearly worn out ; are not of sufficient capacity to 
furnish steam for driving all the machinery, and there is no room in 
the present boiler house to place additional boilers. The rooms now 
occupied for this purpose are much needed for store rooms, and the 
additions now asked for will render the establishment complete and 
ample to answer all the demands of the service for many years to 
come. 

4. JUering tar kettles at pitch house. — The process of boiling tar in 
the pitch house is found to generate so much heat and smoke in the 
confined space as to render the place excessively uncomfortable, and 
it is sometimes difficult to find men who are willing to attend to the 
duty. It is proposed to change the location of the kettles, that this 
inconvenience may be removed. 

5. Machinery and bobbins for rope-walk. — ^The largely increased 
demand for manilla cordage renders additional machinery for its 
manufacture necessary. By its introduction, much of the hand heck- 
ling labor will be dispensed with, and the rope made at a reduced 
cost. The amount estimated for bobbins is for new ones to supply the 
place of those which are worn out and worthless. 

6. Ma^inery for machine shop and foundry. — The amount already 
appropriated for this object will not be sufficient to provide all the 
machinery required in these extensive establishments, and it is deemed 
judicious to provide the means for purchasing such as may become 
necessary as the work progresses. ^ I 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECBETABT OF THE KAYT. 645 

7. Extenaion of dry dock. — An appropriation for this object was 
made by the last Congress, and the work will be prosecuted as rapidly 
as the funds in hand will permit ; the balance of the estimated cost 
will be required during the next fiscal year^ and it is important that 
the appropriation should be made, that the work may be brought to a 
speedy completion. 

8. Repairs of aU kinds. — The amount asked for under this head is 
for the current repairs of roads and walks, fences, walls, sea-wall, 
storehouses, work shops, offices, officers' houses, drainage, wharves, 
and docks, and is such as is deemed necessary for the proper protection 
and preservation of the public property. 



NEW YORK. 

The works which have been completed at this yard during the past 
fiscal year are as follows : Saw mill and machinery, carpenter's shop, 
paying and flagging, filling in low places, oakum shop and picker, 
heating saw mill, lightning conducters, commandant's stable, ma- 
chinery for engine house, and repairs of all kinds ; upon which several 
objects there has been expended during the year the sum of $70,632 34. 

The works which have been in progress, but which are not yet com- 
pleted, are : 

1. Quay ioaU — About eighty feet of wall west of the dry dock have 
been completed, and a large quantity of materials has been procured 
and prepared for the continuation of the work, which hereafter will 
be constructed by the aid of diving bells. 

2. Smithery extension. — The only work done to this building during 
the year consists in filling the interior up to the grade and completing 
the chimney, which is now carried up to the height of 152 feet. 

3. Machinery for smithery. — The boilers, engines, blowers and 
forges have been procured and set up, and have been in operation 
since November last. 

4. Foundry and boiler shop. — Tho foundry building is nearly 
finished, the roof being on and the doors and windows completed. 
The chimney is nearly up, and the principal work remaining is the 
construction of the ovens. The roof of the boiler shop has been 
erected since the last report^ the floors laid, and the building is in 
occupation. 

5. Machinery for foundry and boiler shop — ^In the foundry the 
trusses for supporting the cranes, and the foundations for the same, 
have been prepared. In the boiler shop the boilers for driving the 
machinery have been erected ; the necessary forges, furnaces and 
benches have been put up ; foundations for tools prepared, and the 
shafting is now being put in place. 

6. Dredging channels. — The dredging machine has been employed 
pretty constantly during the year ; lar^e quantities of mud have been 
excavated in the vicinity of the masting derrick and dry dock, and 
the channel has been improved. 

7. Storehouse. — The excavation and foundal ion walls for this build- 
ing have been commenced, and will probably be completed this fall. 



646 REPORT OF THE 

A large quantity of materials has been procured, and the work will 
be in condition for vigorous prosecution early in tbe spring. 

8. Launching ways, — The impossibility of obtaining piles before the 
middle of May prevented any early commencementof work on this object. 
Diving bells and other necessary machinery have been prepared; a 
quantity of material purchased, and the work will be in progress as- 
soon as practicable. 

9. Dry dock, — This work has been thoroughly overhauled, the joints 
well calked with cement, and the leaks, which were numerous^ have 
been stopped. 

10. Filling in new purchase. — The filling in on the site proposed for 
the new marine barracks was commenced in November last, but, owing 
to the very inclement weather of the last winter, but little progress 
was made with this work during that season. Since that time the 
work has been progressing rapidly. The area of TOO by 400 feet has 
been enclosed on three sides by a wall of rubble stone, and upwards 
of 100,000 cubic yards of gravel filling have been deposited, and this 
has gradually settled into the mud until it has apparently reached 
hard bottom ; no perceptible settlement having occurred for some time 
past. 

11. Eoctension of setoer. — ^This work was commenced as soon as the 
necessary materials could be procured, and has progressed as rapidly 
as possible. It will soon be completed and, it is oelieved, will remove 
the great nuisance which has existed in that part of the yard for some 
years past. 

12. Bepairs of aR kinds, — ^Under this head the requisite repairs have 
been put upon the ship houses, workshops, storehouses, offices and 
officers' quarters, timber sheds, wharves, roads, fences, &c., and there 
has been expended during the fiscal year, upon all the improvements 
enumerated, the sum of $260,827 02. 

The amount expended for contingent during the past year was 
$66,715 12. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the next fiscal year, for the 
following objects, viz: boiler house and setting boilers, lightning rods, 
water pipes, yard drains, quay wall, sewer extension, steam boiler for 
dredges^ bilge blocks for dry dock, large derrick and foundation for 
same, wall on Flushing avenue, timber basin, repairs of oakum shop, 
filling in low places, filling in new purchase, dredging channels and 
buildmg scows, piling ground for marine barracks, machinery for ma- 
chine and boiler shops, saw mill, foundry, smithery, and brass foundry, 
and for repairs of all kinds^ amounting in the aggregate to the sum 
of $353,536. 

1. Boiler hoi^e and setting boilers. — In this house it is designed to 
concentrate the steam power for the smithery, engine house, machine 
and boiler shops, thereby economizing labor and fuel, and by its prox- 
imity to the smithery chimney materially assisting the draught. 

2. Lightning rods, — Most of the buildings are supplied with this 
means of protection. The smithery chimney, reservoir buildings, 
loaded shell house, and new receiving store, however, are without it, 
and an estimate is submitted to provide these necessary appendages. 

3. Water pipes. — Appropriations have heretofore. been(g^^fo^^hiB 



8ECSETABT OF THE NAVY. 647 

object, and the pipes have been extended from the reservoir to variotis 
points in the yard with great benefit to the service. There are other 
points, which have not been supplied, where water is much needed, 
and an estimate is submitted for the continuation of the work. 

4. Yard drains, — The principal part of the yard is so nearly level 
that sufficient fall to carry ofT the water rapidly by surface drainage 
during hea/y rains cannot be obtained, and consequently on such 
occasions a large surface becomes inundated. To remedy this diffi- 
culty, it is proposed to construct a small sewer provided with proper 
wells at suitable points, to receive the water from the gutters and 
carry it off under ground, and for this purpose an appropriation is 
ask^. 

5. QuayivaU. — This important work has been in progress for some 
time, and it is desirable that a liberal appropriation should be made 
for this object, that it may be completed as soon as practicable. This 
work may be regarded as among the most important for which esti- 
mates are submitted. 

6. Sewer extension. — The object of this appropriation is to connect 
the present terminus of the sewer with the quay wall, which is to be 
constructed in front of the new purchase, and is an important one. 

7. Steam boiler for dredge, — ^The boiler of this machine is old and 
much worn, and cannot last much longer without expensive repairs ; 
and as it is extremely important that the machine should always be 
kept in good working order, it is very desirable that a new boiler be 
provided before the old one fails altogether. 

8. Bilge blocks for dry dock. — The present blocks have been in use 
since the completion of the dock, and now require renewing. They 
are not in proper condition for docking heavy ships, and it is essen- 
tially necessary that their place should be supplied by others of a 
more substantial character. 

9. Large derrick andfaiindatumfor same. — The present derrick has 
been several years in use, and is not considered safe for service in 
masting heavy ships and moving boilers for steamers of large class. 
It is the only means now in the yard by which such operations can 
be performed ; and as its ability to sustain these great weights is 
doubtful, the aid of the floating derrick in the harlwr has been ob- 
tained on several occasions. This is attended with much expense, 
and, besides, the machine cannot at all times be procured. It is 
therefore proposed to construct a new derrick of larger dimensions, 
^eater power, and strength ; and this appendage is of the utmost 
importance. 

10. Wall on Flushing avenue. — A large area of the new purchase has 
been filled in ; but as there is no enclosure to exclude depredators, it 
is at present useless. An estimate is submitted for a wall along 
Flushing avenue to enclose this property, and render it available for 
useful purposes. 

11. Timber basin. — Since a portion of the old timber dock has been 
filled in much inconvenience has been experienced from the want of a 
proper place to stow this valuable material. Recently a space on the 
mud flats at Block island has been appropriated for the purpose, and 
answers well. It is proposed to extend the accommodations for this 



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648 BEPOBT OF TUB 

object by building additional timber pens ; and for that purpose an 
estimate is submitted. 

12. Repairs of oakum shop. — The roof of this building is of corru- 
gated iron, and has been found very defective and insufficient for the 
protection of the valuable machinery in operation under it. It is 
therefore proposed to remove the iron covering, and substitute a roof 
of slate ; and it is important that the repairs should be made speedily, 
otherwise the machinery may be seriously injured. 

13. Filling in low places. — This is an important object, as there are 
yet many low places in the yard, which in wet weather are almost im- 
passable ; and to facilitate the transportation of heavy articles, it is 
necessary that these places should be filled up and properly graded. 

14. Filling in new purcha^se. — A large amount of filling has been 
deposited upon this place, and a portion of the surface has been raised 
above the tide water, so that it may now be made useful. There yet 
remains a large area to be filled in, and it is important that the work 
should be speedily accomplished, as the ground is much wanted for 
yard purposes ; besides, it is essential for the health of those residing 
in the vicinity that the flats should be covered and not exposed to the 
summer sun. 

15. Dredging channels and building scows. — Along the front of this 
yard there is a constant deposit, which, if neglected, would soon render 
the water too shoal for naval purposes, and it is therefore highly 
necessary that the dredging machine should be frequently employed. 

16. Filling ground for marine barracks. — This ground will soon be 
in a condition for commencing the foundation of the barracks, for 
which appropriations have been made, and it is desirable that means 
should be provided that the work may be commenced at an early day, 
and the foundations prepared so that there may be no delay in the 
erection of the buildings. 

17. Machinery for machine and boiler shops, saw-miU, foundry y 
smithery, and brass foundry. — Much valuable machinery has been 
purchased already for these shops, but to render them efficient and 
competent to meet all the demands which may be made upon them 
many other tools are necessary, and for their purchase and erection an 
estimate is submitted. 

18. Repairs of all kinds. — An estimate is submitted for such repairs 
as are deemed necessary to the ship houses, offices and officers' quar- 
ters, storehouses, timber sheds, streets and avenues, paving and 
flagging, wooden docks, fences and walls, cisterns, drain^i and reser- 
voirs, and for general miscellaneous repairs. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

The works of improvement which have been in progress at this 
yard, but which are not completed, are : 

1. Dredging channels. — During the past year all operations under 
this head have been confined to the space in front of the yard allotted 
for working the sectional floating dock. About twenty thousand 
cubic yards of mud have been removed from this place, and a sufficient 
depth of water has been maintained for the successful operation of the 
dock. 



gECRETAKY OF THE NAVY. 649 

2. Dry dock, — The operations of the dock for the past year have 
been satisfactory ; but a large expenditure has been necessary to keep 
the sections in serviceable condition, owing to the perishable nature of 
the materials of which they are constructed. The iron floats which 
were appropriated for last year are now being constructed, and when 
the present wooden floats are superseded by those of a more durable 
character, doubtless a great point of economy with regard to expendi- 
tures on this object will have been attained. 

3. Steam house and stoves, — The foundation of this building is laid, 
window and door frames and sash all completed, and the joists and 
roof partly framed. The steam stoves are not commenced; but as they 
form part of the building, they will progress with it. 

4. Ctuard house. — This building is almost entirely completed, and 
will be ready for occupation in two months. 

6. Offices. — But little could be done upon this building until the 
old guard house, which occupied part of its site, was removed. This 
has now been done, and part of the foundation for the new building 
has been prepared ; the doors, door and window frames, and sash are 
finished, and the framing for floors and roof is in progress. 

6. Repairs of all kinds. — The usual and necessary repairs have been 
made upon the shiphouses, workshops, storehouses, timber sheds, 
offices and officers' quarters, fences, wharves, &c. ; and for all objects 
of improvement there has been expended during the fiscal year the 
sum of $50,527 43. The expenditures for contingent amount to 
|27,ni 12. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1859, for the following objects, viz : for extending gun carriage 
shop fifty feet ; additional story to plumber's shop ; for completing 
guard house ; dredging channels ; repairs of dredge and scows ; 
repairs of dry dock ; and for repairs of all kinds — amounting in the 
Aggi'egate to $98,714. 

1. Extending gun carriage shop. — The present gun carriage shop 
is 80 limited that, in order to execute the work oi the deparment in 
proper time, it is found necessary to distribute the workmen about the 
yard, in the ship houses, and other workshops ; and in order to con- 
centrate the workmen, it is proposed to extend the building so as to 
afford sufficient accommodation for all employed in this department. 

2. AddiiioncU story to plumbers* shop. — In this yard there is no 
place provided for coppersmiths and tinners, and, to suppy the defi- 
ciency^ it is proposed to add a story to the plumbers' shop, by which 
a suitable and convenient room will be obtained for the purpose. 

3. Completing guard house. — The amount allotted for this object 
has been found inadequate for the purpose, and a small additional 
appropriation is required to complete the building. 

4. Dredging channels. — In order to insure the effective operation 
of the floating dock, it is necessary to keep the dredging machine in 
constant operation during the working season, and for this object an 
appropriation is highly necessary. 

5. Repairs of floaling dock. — The estimate for the repairs and 
support of the floating dock is predicated upon the work which it has 
been required to perform' during the past few years, and upon the 



650 EEPORT OF THE 

supposition that the amount of work will not be diminished. The 
mooring anchors, chain cables, and iron tanks, or floats, are items 
in this estimate which form a large portion of the gross amount. 

6. Bepaira of aU kinds. — The amount asked for this object is for 
materials and labor for the general repairs of all existing improve- 
ments, and is such as is believed to be necessary for the proper protec- 
tion and preservation of the buildings and valuable articles contained 
therein. 

WASfflNGTON. 

The works which have been completed at this yard during the peist 
fiscal year are ^uay wall, shoring ways, raising roof of brass foundry, 
and the extension of iron foundry. These have all been completed 
for the amounts originally estimated, and are now in use for the pur- 
poses designed. The amounts expended upon these objects during 
the year are, for labor, $9,131 91, and for materials, $3,707 75, making 
an aggregate of $12,839 66. 

The works of improvement which have been in progress during the 
year, but which are not yet completed, are — 

1. Extension of boiler shop and conversion of old ordnance to ma- 
chine shop. — These works have progressed rapidly, and a large portion 
of the buildings are now occupied by the various workmen for whom 
they are intended. The buildings will all be completed and occupied 
before the close of another fiscal year. 

2. Steam engine and machinery for ordnance building. — The chief 
expenditure under this head has been for the purchase of some new 
tools. The building is now supplied with a large amount of good ma- 
chinery, and is in condition for the execution of heavy orders for work. 

3. Dredging channels. — The dredging machine has been employed 
but a small portion of the year, most of its work having been in cleaning 
out in front of the marine railway and around some of the wharves. 
The machine and scows are now all in good condition for working. 

4. Forge shop. — This building has been completed and is now ready 
for use ; the account would have been closed but for some bills for ma- 
terials which remain to be paid. 

5. PavemefUSj drains^ and gutters. — During the past year about 
12,000 square yards of pebble pavement have been laid, which has 
contributed greatly towards the convenience for hauling heavy articles, 
and much improved the drainage of the yard. 

6. Reservoir for waier. — Lines of service pipe have been laid in 
various parts of the yard, and to the different houses, and the reser- 
voir is now in condition to receive the water, which will be raised from 
the river by a steam pump. 

7. Gas pipes and fixtures. — Six additional lamps have been put up 
in the vicinity of the ordnance building and laboratory, where there 
was a deficiency of light. 

8. Timber shed. — Under this head a floor has been put in the lower 
story of the block shop and saw mill, where convenient workshops 
were prepared for the accommodation of the joiners and wheelwrights. 
The building formerly occupied by these two branches of workmen, 



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8ECRETABT OF THE NAVY. 651 

has been extended sixty-five feet, and prepared with proper foanda- 
tions and skids, and now furnishes an excellent timber shed two hun- 
dred and sixty-five feet long and sixty -five feet wide. 

9. Filling and grading. — This appropriation has been usefully ex- 
pended in hauling earth and gravel into the yard and depositing it in 
low places, and around the different buildings, where required, by 
which the surface has been greatly improved, and some places rendered 
useful which before were too low and wet to be available for any pur- 
pose. 

10 Machinery and tools. — Two of Hunneman's best fire engines, 
with hose and reels, have been purchased ; the castings for an iron 
furnace have been procured, and the furnace erected ready for use ; 
two large cranes have been built for the forge shop ; two steam en- 
gines and boilers have been constructed and erected for driving the 
machinery in the new machine shop, and one of them is in daily use, 
blowing the fires in the smithery and driving a line of shafting to 
which are connected several lathes, planers, drill presses, &c. New 
blowers have been purchased and put in operation, and a large amount 
of shafting, pulleys, hangers, and belting made and put up, part of 
which is in use. Boilers for driving the large hammer have been 
made and put up. A wood planing machine, tennoning machine, 
and circular saw have been purchased for the joiners' shop, and their 
use has resulted in great economy. Six lathes, two planers, and an 
upright drill and slatting machine have been procured for the plumbers' 
department. A new and valuable machine for cutting and trim- 
ming copper has been put up in the copper rolling mill. A number 
of the old tools, such as lathes, planers, and drill presses, have been 
thoroughly overhauled and put in good order, and are now placed in 
the new shop ready for use. 

11. JSepaira of all kinds, — Under this head the tank shop walls 
have been raised about five feet, and an iron framed roof, covered with 
slate, has been put upon the building. The usual necessary repairs 
have been put upon the different workshops, storehouses, quarters, 
furnaces, machinery, wharves, roads, fences, and various other objects 
of improvements, and these works are now generally in good condi- 
tion. Upon the foregoing works there has been expended during the 
fiscal year, for labor, $101,395 64, and for materials, $64,891 48, 
making an aggregate of $166,287 12. The expenditures for contin- 
gent amount to $80,604 37. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th 
June, 1859, for the following objects, viz : for wall west side of yard; 
covering and filling space behind wall ; extension of navy store ; an- 
chor shop and coal nouses ; carriage houses and cart sheds ; pave- 
ments, drains, and gutters ; gas generator; machinery and tools; and 
for repairs of all kinds, amounting in the aggregate to $131,100. 

1. Wall west side of yard, — The present enclosure on the west side 
of the yard is an old dilapidated wooden fence, which affords little or 
no protection against evil disposed persons, and it is deemed highly 
necessary for the safety of the public property that it should be re- 
moved, and a permanent brick wall erected on the boundary line. 
This fence is not on the proper line, but some sixty feet from rL and 

igi ize y g 



652 REPORT OP THE 

by the erection of a new wall, a large strip of ground belonging to 
the government could be brought into profitable use. 

2. Filling apace behind wall, — If the appropriation for the wall is 
made, this will be required to put the space enclosed in a proper con- 
dition for use. 

3. Extension of navy store. — ^The public business at this yard has 
greatly increased within the past few years, and the present storehouse 
is entirely inadequate for the proper storage and protection of the 
large quantity and variety of articles manufactured here, and for those 
on hand for yard purposes. Additional store room is much needed, 
and it is earnestly hoped that an appropriation will be made for this 
object. 

4. Anchor shop and coal houses, — The present anchor shop is an old 
building, badly ventilated, inconvenient, and entirely too small for 
the manufacture of large anchors. All the anchors for the navy are 
made here, and it frequently happens that in making those for the 
largest class of ships, where long porter bars are used, that the work- 
men are compelled to stand outside of the building, exposed to rain, 
cold wind, or snow, immediately after being subjected to the heat of 
heavy fire and large masses of hot iron. This is also deemed a very 
important object of improvement, and one which is worthy of imme- 
diate adoption. 

5. Car^^iage houses and cart sheds, — Houses and sheds are much 
needed for the protection and preservation of the public carriages, 
carts, timber, wheels, &c.,many of which are now exposed at all times 
to the weather, much to their injury. The cost of Keeping these in- 
dispensable articles in proper condition for use is a heavy item of ex* 
pense, and it is believed that if suitable sheds, &c., be erected for 
their protection the expense will soon be saved in the reduced cost of 
repairs. 

6. Pavements, drains and guiters, — Great benefits have already been 
derived from the improvements which have been made under the ap- 
propriation for this object, and there are others in contemplation, for 
which materials have been procured, and a small amount is now re- 
quired for the continuation of the work. 

7. Oas generator, — Since the introduction of gas into this yard, the 
quality of the article and the deficiency of the supply have been sub- 
jects of constant complaint. During the winter months it has fre- 
quently occurred that there was no gas for several nights in succession, 
and when it did flow, the quality was bad. The bills are high and 
seem to be constantly increasing, although the number of burners is 
not increased. At the asylum for the insane, opposite the navy yard, 
and at the naval academy at Annapolis, gas is manufactured on the 
premises at cheap rates, and no difficulty has yet been encountered in 
obtaining a good article, and in sufficient quantities at all times. It 
is, therefore, believed to be advantageous and economical to manufac- 
ture the gas in the yard, and an estimate of the cost of the necessary 
apparatus is submitted. 

8. Machinery and tools, — Under this head an additional estimate is 
submitted for the purchase of heavy cranes for the erecting machine 
and boiler shops, and for a few lathes, shaping machine, and bending 



8ECRETART OF THE NAVT, 653 

rollers for the boiler shop. With these tools, the shops will be in con- 
dition to meet any demands which may be made upon them at present. 
9. Bepairs of all kinds. — For the necessary annual repairs of the 
various workshops, storehouses, ship houses, offices, officers' quarters, 
marine railway, furnaces and machinery, wharves, roads, fences, 
bridges, lamps, and other miscellaneous objects, the amount submitted 
will be required. 

NORFOLK. 

The works which have been completed at this yard during the past 
fiscal year are : sheds and machinery for saw mill, and setting up 
engines, boilers, and machinery ; and the dry dock engine, upon which 
there has been expended during the year for materials, |8,541 83, 
and for labor, $4,043 06, making an aggregate of |12,584 88. 

The works which have been in progress during the year, but which 
are not yet completed are — 

1. JEactenaion of quay wall. — The work upon this object has steadily 
progressed ; the first section extending east 225 feet to the corner, 
and returned on the foundation 32 feet, may be considered as com- 
pleted. On the line of the river front, running in a southerly direc- 
tion, the piles have been driven for a distance of 165 feet, cut off and 
filled in with rubble stone, preparatory to the laying of the masonry, 
and the first course of masonry, 165 feet long, has been laid. The 
work is steadily progressing, and but for the extreme severity of the 
last winter, and the failure of the contractors to deliver materials in 

{proper time, this section would at this time have been nearly up to 
ow water mark. 

2. Foundry i boiler, and machine shops, and tods for same. — The 
foundry building has been completed, with the exception of the core 
ovens, which are well under way. A smoke stack for this establish- 
ment, 120 feet high, has been finished ; the walls of the boiler house 
are up and ready for the roof ; the foundations for the forge shop have 
been prepared, and the walls are now in progress ; the steam cranes 
for the foundry, and the new steam engine for this establishment 
have been nearly completed, and will soon be ready for setting up. 
All the tools contracted for for this establishment have been delivered, 
except the large boring mill, which was lost in its passage to the yard ; 
another is nearly ready to supply its place. This whole establishment 
is now well advanced towards completion, and will soon be put in 
operation. 

3. Dredging and filling in low grounds. — This work has progressed 
in a satisfactory manner^ and considerable work has been done in 
filling in low parts of the yard and at St. Helena. 

4. Grrading and drainage. — The old ditch, covered by a wooden 
walk, running the whole length of the western wall, has been filled 
up, and a brick pavement has been laid here. A brick side walk has 
also been laid outside of the north wall from the gate to the western 
extremity of the same, with a substantial curbstone and surface gutter. 
Side walks and gutters have been laid around buildings Nos. 14 and 
15 ; a brick culvert has been built near the lieutenants' quarters, and 



654 REPOET OF THE 

one from the timber dock to the western wall, on the north side of the 
stables. Several blind drains have also been laid, and a large amount 
of drain pipe is now on hand for minor drains in different parts of the 
yard, and also a large quantity of paving bricks which have been pur- 
chased for the continuation of these operations. 

5. Timber landing slip for aaw-miu. — But little progress has been 
made upon this object ; a small portion of the excavation for the walls 
has been done, and some of the materials for the piling, &c., have 
been procured. 

6. Beservoirs for rain water. — Under this head are included two 
reservoirs, one of which, with a capacity of 90,000 gallons, is located 
at Fort Norfolk, and has been fully completed, together with a line 
of pipes to the end of the wharf at that point, for watering ships. 
The other reservoir, of about 128,000 gallons, is located in the yard 
near the Burnetizing house and timber sheds 32 and 33. It has been 
completed, except the plastering, which is now in progress. 

7. Carpenters' workskopa. — The work on this object is now in rapid 
progress ; the walls are up and the roof is on ready for slating ; the 
gable ends and cornice are now going up ; the joiners' work is well 
advanced ; and it is believed the building will be ready for occupation 
in three months. 

8. Scows, landing cranes and derricks^ tods, engines, and lighters. — 
Under this head two large iron landing cranes have been purchased 
and one of them put up and in use ; two large camels have been built, 
a variety of tools purchased, and a large portion of the work upon the 
new steam engine has been completed. 

9. Iron railway and cars. — In consequence of the failure of the con- 
tractors to furnish the materials for this object at the proper time, but 
little progress has been made with the work. The materials are now 
on hand, the grading commenced, and it is believed that the track 
will be completed in five months. 

10. Masting sheers. — The work upon this object has also been de- 
layed in consequence of the difficulty in obtaining suitable timber ; 
such as has been procured has been prepared for the work; but not 
being properly seasoned, it is deemed best to defer putting it together 
for some time yet. 

11. Repairs of all hinds. — Under this head the necessary repairs 
have been put upon the various workshops, timber sheds, ship houses, 
offices, officers' houses, docks, wharves, bridges, buoys, fences, &c.; 
and upon all the foregoing objects of improvement there has been ex- 
pended during the fiscal year, for labor, 1 155,258 39, and for materials, 
|l 50,791 80, making an aggregate of |306,050 19. 

The amount expended for contingent is $52,892 24. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1859, for the following objects, viz: continuation of quay wall; com- 
pleting victualling establishment; grading and draming; dredging 
channels; completing ship house No. 48, machinery, tools, cranes, 
&c.; timber shed No. 18; completing reservoir; completing carpenters' 
shop, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting, in the aggregate, to 
$332,158. 

1. Continuaiion of quay wail. — The amount asked for this object is 



8ECEETABY OP THE NAVY. 655 

for its completion to slip No. 48, which, with the portion of the wall 
already completed, and extending from the north end of the yard, 
will enclose in a continuous line about three-fourths of the entire front 
on the river, and leave but a moderate extent to be completed for the 
enclosure of the whole yard. It is important that this work should be 
pushed forward to completion with all possible despatch, as there is a 
great want of wharf room for the accommodation of the large number 
of vessels visiting the yard. 

2. Completing victualling estaUiahment. — The commencement of this 
work was authorized last year and an appropriation made for that 
purpose. Contracts have been made for the delivery of the materials, 
and it is desirable that the work should now be prosecuted with en- 
ergy, as the building is much needed for the storage of the large 
amount of providons and clothing concentrated at this station. 

3. Grading and draining. — This is an important object, and the 
progress which has already been made in introducing a proper system 
of drainage has contributed much towards improving the health of 
those employed in the yard. A large amount of materials has been 
procured, and means are required for the continuation of the work. 

4. Dredging channda, — ^Extensive preparations have been made 
for this work ; the dredging machine and scows are in good condition, 
and it is important that they should be employed in cleaning out 
around the docks and wharves. 

5. Completing ehip house No. 48. — This object has been authorized 
and an appropriation made for the purpose ; a portion of the materials 
for the foundation has been contracted for, and the work will soon be 
commenced. The amount now asked is for the continuation and com- 
pletion of the building. 

6. Machinery y toclsy cranes, (&c. — ^The articles embraced under this 
head are essential for the economical prosecution of work in the differ- 
ent departments, and it is important that they should be procured as 
soon as possible. 

7. Timber sited No. 18. — The want of more shed room for the 
stowage of timber has been very apparent during the last year, and it 
has been found necessary to pile up the material in the yard, exposed 
to the weather and occupying space much needed for other purposes. 

8. Completing reservoir. — This work has cost more than the origi- 
nal estimate, in consequence of the existence ot a large quantity of 
quicksand encountered in the excavation, which rendered sheet piling 
necessary, for the protection and security of the surrounding buildings. 

9. Completing carpenters* shop. — The cost of this building has also 
exceeded the original estimate, owing mainly to unexpected difficul- 
ties which were met with in the preparation of the foundations. The 
building is now nearly completed. 

10. Repairs of aU kinds. — The amount submitted under this head 
will be necessary for the annual repairs of the various buildings, 
docks, wharves, bridges, fences, engines, cranes, cisterns, and other 
miscellaneous objects. 



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656 REPOBT OF THE 



PENSACOLA. 

The works which have been completed at this yard during the past 
fiscal year are: permanent wharf and deep basin ; extension of machine 
shop ; pitch and oil house, and kitchen at quarters for the ordinary. 
Upon these several objects there has been expended during the year 
the sum of $57,317 10. 

The works which have been in progress during the year, but which 
are not yet completed, are — 

1. Extension of granite wharf. — In consequence of the unavoidable 
suspension of this work during a part of the year, much loss has been 
sustained by the deterioration of tools, scows, engines, and carriages, 
and a heavy expense incurred in the removal of the sand and mud 
which had accumulated upon the foundations and parts of the work 
below the surface of the water. Since these damages have been re- 
paired, the work has progressed at rapidly as possible ; for the 
economical execution of this work, it is indispensable that its progress 
should be uninterrupted. 

2. Mooring, operating, and repairing floating dock, — Within the 
past year the expenditures under this head have been principally for 
the current necessary repairs, calking, and painting the dock. 

3. Coping of dock basin, filling in and paving around basin and 
railway, — A quantity of granite has been purchased for this object, 
but the work of construction has not been commenced. 

4. Dredging in front of basin. — This work has been carried on 
without interruption, and a large quantity of mud and sand has been 
removed from the space allotted for working the floating dock. The 
constant deposit of sand and mud at that point renders it necessary 
to continue the dredging, in order to preserve the required depth of 
water. 

5. Railways. — The railway to the spar pond has been completed, 
and considerable repairs have been put upon the tracts in the yard, 
and these works are now in good condition. 

6. Masting sheers. — The sheers have been constructed and are nearly 
ready for raising. The anchors for guys have been placed in position 
and well secured, and the sheers will soon be in a condition for use. 

7. Water pipes to permanent wharf — These have been procured, but 
in consequence of the unfinished state of the grading in the rear of 
the wharf, the pipes have not yet been laid in position. 

8. Steam box, — The materials for this object have been purchasetl 
and the boiler made, but the work of construction has not yet com- 
menced. 

9. Repairs of all kinds — The necessary repairs have been put upon 
the ofiicers' houses, storehouses, timber sheds, the ordinary quarters, 
stables and shops, fences, wharves, boat houses, cisterns, pavements, 
floating stages, boats and scows, and the dwelling houses outside the 
wall, and upon the foregoing works of improvement there has been 
expended, during the fiscal year, |91,109 92. The expenditure for 
contingent amounts to $36,386 46. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th 
June, 1859, for the following objects, viz: continuing the extension 
of granite wharf; repairing and operating dock; filling in and paving 



8ECBETAEY OP THE NAVY. 657 

aronnd dock basin; dredging in front of basin ; repairs of railways ; 
completing water pipes ; completing foundry ; ship house over slip ; 
constructor's workshops; cistern at machine shop; trip hammer 
for smithery ; police room ; blast pipes, and for repairs of all kinds, 
amounting in tne aggregate to $363,315. 

Ist. Continuing the extension of granite wharf, — This is a very impor- 
tant work, and it is necessary that it should be kept constantly in 
progress until completed. Any suspension of work adds sreally to 
the cost, and. postpones the completion much longer than the actual 
term of suspension, because, during the stoppage of the work, large 
quantities of sand and mud are deposited upon the unfinished parts^ 
the removal of which by diving bells is attended with heavy cost and 
the consumption of much time. It is, therefore, hoped that an appro- 
priation will be made for this object. 

2d. Mepairing and operating dock, — The perishable nature of the 
materials of which the dock is constructed renders an annual appro- 
priation for its repair and preservation necessary. This item is for 
that purpose, and to meet the expense of operating the dock when its 
services are required. 

3d. Filling in and paving around dock basin. — The amount hereto- 
fore appropriated for this object has proved insufficient to complete 
the work ; it has also been found necessary to construct an embank- 
ment wall and pavement along the sides of the marine railway, which 
is alfio provided for under this head. 

4th. Dredging in front of dock basin, — This is the site for working 
the floating dock ; and in consequence of the constant deposit of sand 
and mud at this point, frequent operation of the dredging machine is 
necessary in order to maintain a sufficient depth of water for the purpose. 

5tb- Repairs of railways, — For current repairs, relaying tracks, 
&c. , the amount estimated for this object will be necessary. 

6th. Completing water pipes, — A small additional amount will be 
necessary to complete this object, in consequence of a part of the ap- 
propriation having been transferred in the settlement of the accounts 
at the Treasury Department. 

7th. Completing foundry, — An appropriation has already been 
made for this object, and it is now proposed to substitute an iron roof 
for the wooden one at first contemplated. For this object, and for 
preparing the necessary pits, cranes, railways, cupola furnaces, brick 
cistern for supplying water for the foundry and the steam boiler in the 
machine shop, and for putting up the necessary sheds and fixtures to 
put the foundry in operation, the amount of estimate now submitted 
will be required. 

8th. Ship house over slip, — At this station there is no ship house 
for the protection of vessels on the stocks; and as the department has 
determined to make this a building yard, it is highly important that 
a ship house should be provided for the purpose, and an estimate for 
one is therefore submitted. 

9th. Constructor's workshop, — An estimate has been prepared for 
the erection of a building to accommodate the sawyers, gun carriage 
makers, block makers, boat builders and carpenters on the lower 
floor, and to furnish a mould loft in the second story. At present 

Vol. ii 42 



658 EEPOET OP THE 

there is no suitable building in the yard for carrying on these descrip- 
tions of work ; and in constructing new vessels or making extensive 
repairs upon old ones, such facilities as a building of this character 
would afford will be essentially necessary. 

10th. Cistern at machine shop. — An estimate is submitted for build- 
ing a cistern in the vitinity of the smithery and machine shop to 
supply the boilers in these establishments, the present supply of water 
being entirely inadequate. This object is highly necessary. 

11th. Trip hammer for amithery,— There is at present no heavy 
hammer at this yard ; and when there is a demand for heavy work, 
it becomes necessary to call on remote shops to execute the order. It 
is proposed to erect a steam hammer, which will be capable of doing 
all the work wanted at present at this yard. 

12th. Felice room, — An old wooden building is at present used as 
a police room and watchmen's quarters. It is small, inconvenient, 
and entirely ^unsuitable for the purpose ; and it is proposed to erect a 
comfortable brick building capable of affording all the necessary ac- 
commodations, and for this object an estimate is submitted. 

13th. Blast pipes for smithery. — These are required to convey the 
blast from the blowers to new fires recently erected. 

14th. Repairs of all kinds. — For the necessary repairs of officers' 
houses, government houses outside the yard, storehouses, timber 
sheds, workshops, scows, lighters and yard boats, wharves and slips, 
pavements and yard wall, cisterns, and for grading and filling in yard, 
the amount estimated will be required. The climate at this ntation 
is such as to promote rapid decay in wood work unless properly pro- 
tected ; and it is therefore necessary that all repairs should be promptly 
made. 

MARB ISLAND. 

The only work of improvement which has been completed at this 
yard during the past fiecal year is the block of officers' houses, Nos. 
6 and 8 ; and upon them there has been expended for materials 
$18,846 75, and for labor |30,212 43; making an aggregate of 
$49,059 18. 

The works which have been in progress, but which are not yet 
completed, are: * 

Ist. Joiners* shop. — This building has been so far completed as to 
admit of occupation. The upper story is now used as a joiners' shop 
and the lower floor for the storage of lumber and other materials. 
The amount of work remaining to be done is small, and will be 
completed this season. 

2d. Storehouse. — This building has also been nearly completed, and 
will soon be ready for occupation. Cellars have been excavated for 
the storage of provisions, and there remains but an inconsiderable 
amount of work to be done to finish the building, for which there are 
ample funds provided. 

3d. Officers' houses, 2, 4, 3 and 5. — The walls of these buildings have 
been riised, the roofs put on, floors laid, and the plastering is in 
progress. They will probably be completed during the present year. 

4th. Grading. — About 40,000 cubic yards of grading has been done, 



8ECBETART OF THE NAVT. 659 

and the material deposited on the tnle, therehy adding greatly to the 
working area of the yard. Under this head, 781 feet of curbstone, 
1,758 feet of flagging, and 2,311 square yards of pavement have been 
laid, which has contributed much towards facilitating the transporta^ 
tion of materials over the yard. 

5th, Wharf, — During the past year 132 feet* 9 inches of quay wall, 
with an area of 13,275 square fbet of wharf surface, for the landing and 
distribution of materials, have oeen comj)leted;.also the pile and tim- 
ber foundations ibr 190 feet additional, upon. whiqh about. one-third of 
the stone work is finished ; and in addition to this, the piles have been 
driven and capped for a further extension of 180 feet, 

6th. Pitch kettlea. — This object has been completed, except the hang- 
ing of some doors and a small amount of other work. 

7th. Steam boxes. — The boilers, fire front and grate bars, have been 
completed, and the bricks and a portion of the lumber have been 
delivered ; but the work of erection has not yet commenced, the site 
not being properly filled in and prepared for the building. 

8th. Artesian well. — The pipe in this well has penetrated to the depth 
of 218 feet below the surface, and thus far no water has been obtained 
other than the ordinary filtrations from the surface. 

9th. Mepairs of aU kinds. — The amount expended under this head 
has been for the repairs of the temporary buildings^ sheds, &c., which 
were erected for the protection of workmen and for the storage of 
public property during the construction of the permanent works. 

Upon all the foregoing improvemenis there has been expended 
during the fiscal year for labor $138,326 21, and for materials 
$1^4,982 04 ; making an aggregate of $273,308 25. 

The amount expended for contingent at this yard is $69,266. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th 
Jane, 1859, for the following objects, viz: guardhouse; tar and pitch 
house; two cisterns; grading; paving; extension of wharf ; foun- 
dries, boiler establishment, &c.; gas works ; and for one of Bishop's 
derricks, amounting in the aggregate to $417,971. 

Ist. Guard hotue. — This building is much needed as quarters for the , 
watchmen, who now occupy a temporary shed, which must soon be 
removed in grading the surface of the yard. 

2d. Tar and pitch house. — There is no suitable place in the yard for 
the storage of these articles ; and as it is important they should be 
kept separate from other materials, the house is very necessary. 

3d. Two cisterns. — The great difficulty hitherto experienced in pro- 
curing sufficient fresh water during the dry season to supply the 
numerous demands for the article, and the uncertainty of success with 
the artesian well now in progress, make it advisable to multiply these 
reservoirs, as buildings of sufficient roof surface to fill them, promptly 
are completed. Estimates are therefore submitted for two to be built 
daring the next year. 

41 h. Grading. — The amount estimated for this object is required for 
grading and levelling around some of the buildings which have been 
erected, and in preparing sites for others which are contemplated. 

6th. Paving, — This is one of the most important objects, as at certain 
seasons the roads are almost impassable, anditisnecessar- '^''^^ — 



■^t?6p 



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660 KEPORT OF THE 

nual appropriations should be made for paring the roads as they are 
graded and brought into use. 

6th. Extension of wharf. — The importance and necessity for the 
gradual extension of the wharf front, and the enlargement of the 
area for the reception of the various materials which are being landed 
daily, are obvious, and it is hoped that liberal appropriations will be 
made for this object. 

7th. Foundries y boUer establishment ^ dtc. — An estimate is submitted 
for this object, and it is deemed important that the establishment 
should be commenced as soon as possible. The great scarcity of shops 
of this kind on the Pacific coast, where steam vessels-of-war can 
obtain repairs in case of accident to their machinery, and the inconve- 
nience to which they may be subjected in such event, are strong rea- 
sons for this appropriation. 

8th. Gas works. — This yard being situated on an island exposed to 
depredations from all quarters, it is essentially necessary for the pro- 
tection of the public property that an abundance of light should be 
provided, and it is believed that the gas light is the best adapted for 
the purpose ; and an estimate for supplying the necessary apparatus 
and pipes is submitted. 

9th. Bishop's derrick. — No provision has yet been made for the con- 
veniences necessary for masting ships and hoisting boilers and other 
heavy weights. The derrick known as Bishop's derrick is admirably 
adapted to the purpose, and an appropriation for the purchase of one 
of suitable dimensions is much needed. 

saceett's harbor. 

The expenditures at this station during the past fiscal year were for 
current repairs necessary to keep the various buildings in good pre- 
servation, and amount in the aggregate to $708 67. 

No appropriation is asked for this station, the unexpended balance 
of previous appropriations being deemed sufficient for all demands 
during the next fiscal year. 

nOSPITALS. 

Portsmouth, N. H. — At this station there is no properly arranged 
building for the accommodation of the sick ; the house occupied ibr 
the purpose being an old building formerly intended as quarters for 
the teamsters. This building is now in a dilapidated condition, and 
is not worth repairing ; and as it is highly necessary that comfortable 
and suitable accommodations should be provided for the protection of 
invalids against the rigors of the winter months, plans and estimates 
for that object are submitted. For the erection of this building there 
will be required the sum of $30,374. 

Boston. — For the necessary repairs of the hospital building and its 
appendages, and for the erection of the new house for the surgeon, 
there has been expended during the past year the sum of $7,919 56. 
The new quarters for the surgeon are nearly completed, and will pro- 
bably be ready for occupation by the Ist November, .^^^ ^ GoOqIc 



SECRETART OF THE NAVY. 661 

For the annual repairs of buildings and care of the public grounds^ 
there will be required for the next fiscal year the sum of |3,000. 

New York. — For the neoesary repairs of the hospital building, sur- 
geon's house, furnaces and ranges, north wall, paving and flagging, 
filling and grading cemetery, brick furnace house, mill, &c., tor la^ 
boratory , and for furniture for hospital, there has been expended during 
the past year the sum of $12,246 93. 

For the enlargement of the cemetery grounds and enclosing the 
same, and for the annual repairs of the hospital buildings, fences, &c., 
and for keeping the grounds in good condition, there will be required 
for the next fiscal year the sum of $21,000. This appropriation is 
highly necessary, as the area of the cemetery is very limited and 
much exposed to depredation. By the purchase of two small slips of 
ground the government will own the whole space included between 
three streets, and can enclose it in such manner as to guard it from all 
intrusion. 

Hospital and naval asylum^ Philadelphia, — The amount expended 
at this institution during the past year for general repairs of buildings, 
fences, furnaces, grates and ranges, iron railing on southwest wall, 
gas and water rent, is $8,900 28. 

Estimates are submitted for gates, wall, &c. ; repairs to furnaces, 
grates, and ranges; painting, cleaning, and whitewashing; gas, 
water rent, furniture and repairs to same ; repairs of all kinds, and 
for supplies of clothing, &c., to beneficiaries, amounting to $34,892. 
This amount is necessary for the proper care and comfort of the in- 
mates of the institution. 

Waahingion. — The amount expended for repairs of hospital during 
the past year is $77 60. No additional appropriation is required at 
this station. 

Norfcik. — For the necessary repairs of the hospital building, walls, 
fences and bridges, and for building a new boat house and two new 
water tanks, there has been expended during the past year the sum of 
$10,952 68. 

Estimates are submitted for a stone pier and landing, and for repairs 
of all kinds, amounting to $45,900. The present landing is an old 
wooden wharf, much decayed and badly cut by the marine worms. It 
is scarcely safe for landing articles of much weight, and a more per- 
manent structure is much needed. 

Pensacola. — At this station there has been expended during the 
fiscal year, for wall round burial ground, draining and filling ponds, 
and for general repairs of hospital buildings, the sum of $11,381 10. 

Estimates are submitted for the next year for draining and filling 
ponds, and for repairs of hospital buildings, amounting to $18,700. 
This amount will be required for the proper care and attentiou to the 
public property and to promote the health of the inmatea.. 

HAOAZINES AND ORPNANCB WORKS. 

Portsmouth^ New Hampshire. — The foundations for the ordnance 
building, forty by eighty feet, have been laid on the ledge, requiring 
an excavation of 15 feet in depth ; the walls have been erected ana; 



662 REPOBT OP THE 

are ready for the roof. This storehouse for ordnance purposes and 
armory, so necessary for the proper arrangement and preservation ot 
this description of property, is spacious, well constructed, and of the 
best materials. It will be in condition to receive stores this season. 

To prepare the site for the shell house, for loaded shells, it was 
found necessary to remove about 1,000 cubic yards of ledge. This 
has been done, the foundations laid, and the walls erected. The 
building is of stone and brick, iron doors and shutters, vaulted roof, 
and fire-proof. The arched covering of bricks, the stone facia and 
cornice, and roof to be laid, to complete the structure. 

The temporary wooden skids in the gun park have all been removed, 
and three hundred lineal feet of skids of dressed stone subptituted, on 
foundations of the same material, extending below the action of frost, 
and properly pointed and grouted with cement. The park is being 
graded and gravelled, the old stone skids repaired or relaid, and this 
part of the yard placed in thorough and permanent condition for the 
reception of such property as the department may assign to it. Upon 
these objects there has been expended during the fiscal year the sum 
of $19,106 61. 

Plans and estimates are submitted for the next fiscal year, for a 
gun carriage, shed, and storehouse, a boiler room, boiler, and ma- 
chinery, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting to $46,600. These 
objects are all highly necessary to meet the demands of the service upon 
this particular branch, and to keep the existing improvements in a 
proper state of preservation. 

Boston. — At this station the following works have been completed : 
battery and ordnance quay, platforms for shot, gun carriage store, 
and the building for unloaded shells. The amount expended upon 
these objects during the past year is, for labor $4,764 56, and for 
materials $8,306 07 ; making an aggregate of $13,070 63. There 
has also been expended for repairs of magazine the sum of $652 80. 

For the necessary repairs of the buildings and grounds dnring the 
next fiscal year there will be required $1,500. 

New York. — The gun carriage shed, and the building for unloaded 
shells, have been completed during the past year, and the amount 
expended upon them during the year is $10,128 79. 

The works which have been in progress, but which are not yet com- 
pleted, are : machinery and filling room for magazine, armory, re- 
pairs of wharf, cranes, altering gunner's store to storehouse, repairs 
of all kinds, and dredging near landing wharf. Most of these works 
are well advanced, and will probably be completed during the current 
year. The amount expended on these objects during the past fiscal 
year is $14,087 51. 

Estimates are submitted for the next fiscal year for dredging chan- 
nel near Ellis' island, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting to 
$6,800. The amount asked for dredging is necessary for cleaning 
around the landing wharf, and securing a sufficient depth of water 
for vessels landing stores. The amount asked for repairs will be re- 
quired for the proper care and protection of the different buildings, 
.Ac, belonging to this branch of the service. 

Philaddphia. — The new magazine at Fort Mifiiin has been com- 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, 663 

pleted during the past year, and there has been expended daring the 
same period for labor $1,750 77, and for materials $1,166 94; making 
an aggregate of $2,917 71. For the next fiscal year the sum of 
$1,000 will be required for the necessary repairs upon buildings, docks, 
and fences. 

Washington, — At this station extensive repairs have been put upon 
the ordnance building and magazine ; the foundations for the gun 
carriage shed have been prepared, and upon these objects there has 
been expended during the fiscal year for labor $i,765 48, and for ma- 
terials $1,638 20; making an aggregate of $6,393 68. No further 
appropriation is required at this yard for the present. 

Norfolk, — The ordnance works which have been completed at this 
station are: the magazine keeper's house and the magazine, upon 
which objects, there has been expended during the past fiscal year for 
materials $5,37^ 76, and for labor $145 13; making an aggregate of 
$5,521 89. 

The works in progress are : shot beds, gun skids, and cranes, new 
machinery and tools for ordnance department, and repairs at Fort 
Norfolk ; and on these objects there has been expended during the 
fiscal year for materials $915 43, and for labor $3,734 16; making 
an aggregate of $4,649 59. 

Estimates are submitted for completing ordnance building, quay 
wall at St. Helena, sea wall at magazine, and for an iron crane at 
Fort Norfolk, amounting to $141,265. 

At the last session of Congress an appropriation was made for com- 
mencing the ordnance building. That appropriation will be sufficient 
for the present fiscal year, and for the next the balance of the esti- 
mated cost of this work will be required. A large portion of the 
lands at St. Helena have been allotted to ordnance purposes, and for 
the convenient landing of heavy guns, shot, &c., good substantial 
wharves are necessary. Those in present use are of wood, much de- 
cayed and injured by the marine worm, and require renewing. It is 
deemed best to replace tneee old wharves by a permanent stone wall, 
and for commencing this work an appropriation is asked. The sea 
wall at the magazine has been authorized, and the materials have 
been contracted for. An estimate is now submitted for its comple- 
tion, and it is very important that this work should progress without 
interruption. The iron landing crane is highly necessary, as there is 
now no convenience at this jjoint for landing heavy articles. 

Pensacda, — At this station there has been expended upon the 
wall around the shell house, and for repairs of magazine, &c., the 
sum of $1,050 38; and for the necessary repairs of the buildings, 
fences, &c., during the next fiscal year, there will be required $1,000. 

Mare Island, — The excavation for the magazine has been made, 
the foundation walls prepared, and the walls of the building com- 
menced, and the work is now in rapid progress. There has been 
expended during the past fiscal year for materials $4,022 29, and 
for labor $11,776 68; making an aggregate of $15,798 97. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, 
for a shell house, magazine keeper's house, tank house, and filling 
room, railway and cars, shot beds, and for cleaning and piling shot, 



664 REPOBT OP THE 

amounting to $11,450. These objects are all necessary to place this 
branch of the service in condition to meet the demands upon it at this 
distant station. 

DEY DOCKS. 

The balance floating dock at Portsmouth^ New Hampshire^ continues 
in good condition, and has been usefully employed during the past 
year. The materials of which it is constructed being of a perishable 
nature, the structure requites the constant care and attention of the 
superintendent. 

The atone dry dock at Boston is in good order, except some of the 
courses of stone above low water, at the entrance, which have been 
affected by the heavy ice formed about them. These will be repaired 
as soon as an opportunity presents itself; but during the past year 
the dock has so frequently been called into requisition, for docking 
the large steamers, that the repairs could not be made. The work of 
extending the dock has been pushed forward with great energy ; the 
excavation is finished, and thus far the work has progres6ed without 
interrupting the use of the dock for vessels. It is believed it will be 
completed without any material interruption to its future use. 

The atone dry dock at New York is now in good working order. 
Some of the stones near the entrance which had been affected oy frost, 
have been relaid, and the gates have been thoroughly cleaned and 
painted. 

The sectional floating dock at Philadelphia has been in frequent use 
during the past year, and is now in pretty good condition. This work 
being of perishable materials, it has been found necessary to construct 
iron floats in place of wooden ones. Six of these have been contracted 
for and are nearly completed. An estimate is submitted in another 
part of this report for additional iron tanks. This important struc- 
ture requires constant care and watchfulness on the part of the super- 
intendent. 

The atone dry dock at Norfolk has been kept in good working con- 
dition, and the demands upon it have kept it in almost constant use 
during the past year. 

Th^ balance floaling dock f basin, and railway , at PensaxxHa, have been 
carefully attended to, and are in good condition, but the effect of the 
climate at this place is such as to produce rapid decay, and consequently 
frequent repairs will be required upon these works. 

At San Francisco, the basin and railway have been completed and 
tested, and the works have all been turned over to the officers of the 
yard by the contractors. The dock has been in frequent use during 
the past year in raising public and private vessels, and is now in good 
working order. 

NAVAL ASYLUM. 

The order at this institution during the past year has been better 
than usual. There are one hundred and eighty-two inmates, inclu- 
ding officers and attendants, and the number of beneficiaries is annu- 
ally increasing. Five have been dismissed for bad conduet, andionly 

igi ize y g 



SECBETABT OF THE NAVY, 665 

a few have been punished for insubordination, and other violations of 
the rules of the asylum. 

The officer in command has administered the affairs of the institu- 
tion with strict economy, and enforced a most judicious system of 
discipline in the management of its inmates. 

The sailor must be governed by firmness, blended with kindness ; 
and while it is the aim of the asylum to afford a home for the worn- 
oat tar, the rules which have been adopted for its government mus^ 
be respected and enforced. 

Discipline is always tempered with forbearance in the management 
of the old sailor at this institution, and it is only when kindness is 
abused to a degree beyond endurance and the necessities of a whole- 
some discipline, that the severe penalties of punishment and expulsion 
are resorted to. 

The privileges of the beneficiaries were fully set forth in my last 
annual report, to which you are respectfully referred for information 
in this respect. 

The expenses of the asylum for the past year were as follows, viz : 

Subsistence |:U,080 4T 

Qothing, &c 7,320 0& 

Miscellaneous items 4,511 80 

Officers and attendants 14,578 00 

Total 40,490 32 



The navy hospital fund is fast ebbing, and therefore it is absolutely 
necessary that a large ^rtion of the support of this institution should 
be provided for by special appropriation. 

TIMBKR AGKI7CIES. 

This branch of business has been assigned to the bureau since the 
year 1845. During the past year the administration of the live-oak 
interests has been attended to with increased industry and faithful- 
ness. 

There are four timber agents employed in Florida, and one for the 
States of Louisiana and Mississippi. The agency in Alabama waa 
abolished in A^ril, 1855. The agents are required to traverse their 
resj^ective districts monthly, and make report of observations. It ia 
their duty to see that no depredations are committed upon the landa 
which grow live-oaks, long-leafed yellow pines, and red eedars ; and 
to explore the public lands with a view to the selection of such traicts 
as contain timber suitable for the use of the navy, and report them tx> 
the department for reservation by the President for naval purposes. 

Within the past year about nfty thousand acres of land growing 
valuable naval timber has been selected and reserved ; and instructions 
have been issued to all the agents to renewed industry in this respect,, 
lest the liberal grants by Congress to the States and private corporar- 
tions may take precedence of the interests of this department. 

The whole expense attending this work is about twelve thousand 



666 EEPORT OF THE 

dollars per annum, and the amount is quite inconsiderable compared 
with the valuable interests involyed. If this expenditure were not 
thus judiciously disbursed for the protection of the naval timber, the 
land speculators would construe it into a license to spoliate upon the 
public domain at will, arid millions of dollars' worth of the finest ship 
timber in the world would be exposed to the cupidity of the home 
depredator and the contractors for foreign governments. 

The agent in Mississippi and Louisiana; Mr. Claiborne, a most ef- 
ficient and intelligent officer, reports that during his incumbency, of 
about six years only, that at least three hundred thousand dollars 
worth of timber has been saved from pillage by persevering watchful- 
ness and a thorough system of administration. He has wisely in- 
terpreted the genius of the various acts of Congress relating to naval 
timber, and established a system which is aptly termed a '^ preventive 
service J** and thereby secured the lands and timber from serious depre- 
dations, and saved, necessarily, the incurment of expensive prosecu- 
tions against trespassers. The bureau has reason to believe that a 
proportionate aniount has likewise been saved in the State of Florida, 
where the agents are also efficient and faithful. 

Information has reached the bureau that there are agents and con- 
tractors for foreign governments among our own citizens, who receive 
compensation for spoliating upon the naval lands, and for buyins up 
ship timber for exportation — thus becoming instrumental in builaing 
up foreign navies to the detrinient of our own. 

It is a conceded fact that the finest ship timber now known is grown 
in the southern States of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisi- 
ana ; and it is believed that a sufficient quantity of the best quality 
cannot be found in any other quarter of the globe for the increasing 
demands of commerce, navigation, and war purposes ; and hence the 
resort of foreign government to this country to obtain such materials. 

This subject is commended to the fostering care of the department ; 
and, in view of the interests involved, it is suggested that if more 
stringent laws were enacted for the preservation of the timber and 
the punishment of trespassers, the public interests would be greatly 
promoted. 

A great abuse is practiced by many owners of saw mills in pil- 
lapng the public lands for stuff to work the same, as well as by 
other depredators who procure wood and lumber for sale under the 
head of "lightwood," "dead timber," &c. ThtMse mills are placed 
contiguous to the government lands in order to afford greater facilities 
for spoliations. A more stringent law is required to govern this 
class of depredators. 

The settler on the lands who uses " dead wood" is not interfered 
with, provided he does not construe the license into a permit to make 
it an article of commercial traffic, and to girdle the standing trees 
for purposes of prospective profit. The rule of the department is, 
that no person has a right to appropriate the timber upon the public 
lands, whether standing or on the ground, for speculative uses ; but 
liiat it may be used by a settler for all proper domestic necessities, 
such as fire-wood, fencing, &c. This rule is in conformity with the 
decision of the Supreme Court, (vide 9th Howard, page 351,) and the 



SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. C67 

opiaions of Attorneys General Nelson and Mason^ dated August 11, 
1843, and July 16, 1845. 

It has always been difficult to procure the proper proofs to convict 
trespassers, and, consequently, many escape the penalties of the law 
for want of sufficient evidence. The woodsmen of pioneer life, in too 
many instances, do not regard their obligations to public law when 
private interests-can profit by its transgression. It is almost imprac- 
ticable, therefore, to prove a wanton trespass in the courts of law. 
Some remedial measures are indispensably necessary, therefore, to 
insure detection and bring to summary punishment the guilty depre- 
dators ; and the question is respectfully submitted for the deliberate 
consideration of the department. 

JOS. SMITH, 
. . Chief of Bureau. 

Bureau of Yards and Docks, October 15, 1857. 



Digitized by 



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668 



BEPOBT OP THE 



Abstract of offers {embracing^ as well those which are rqected as those 
which are accepted) received for furnishing articles coming under the 
cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks; made in conformity to 
the act of Congress approved March 3^ 1843. 

OFFERS FOR SUPPLIES FOR THE NAVY YARD, PORTSMOUTH. N. H , UNDER 
ADVERTISEBiENT DATED MAY 1, 1857.' 



Names. 



CLAflB No. 1. — Bridc». 



Wm. Swenarton . 

Alfred Hoitt 

A. W. SimpeoQ .. 
Eaoch Pinkham. 
John Wendell ... 
M. F. Goodwin .. 
G. A. Hammond . 



Clabb Na 2.— iStom. 



Ezra £2ame8 . 

0. Emerson .. 

Seward & Packard. 

E.G. Sargent 

John Blood 



Class No. 3. — Tdiow^M Umber. 



David S. Walton.. 

Alfred Hoitt 

D. Rlsley 

G. W. Lawrence .. 
Wendell & Call ... 

Wm. Lang 

Nat. Dunn 

G. A. Hammond.. 

8. B. Grice , 

N. W. Coffin 

8. P. Brown 

W. E. Anderson .. 
George L. Neville . 



Class No. 4. — TdUiwpiine lumber. 



D. S. Walton 

Alfred Hoitt 

D. Rlsley 

G. W. Lawrence.. 
Wendell &; Call... 

William Lang 

Samuel Adams 

G. A. Hammond . . 

8. B. Grice 

N. W. Coffin 

8. P. Brown 

W. E. Anderson .. 
George L. Neville. 



Aggregate. 



$4,995 00 
4,725 00 
4,623 75 
4,441 50 

•4,050 00 
4,380 75 
4,866 75 



«19, 181 80 
25,980 56 
22,664 87 
20,641 16 
23,419 62 



2,290 20 
885 54 
763 00 
855 00 
855 00 
824 47 

1,068 76 
807 67 

1,832 16 
847 37 
824 47 

1,038 22 

1,404 65 



540 00 
364 50 
337 60 
351 00 
378 00 
364 50 
297 00 
333 99 
810 00 
347 62 
378 00 
391 50 
540 00 



* Accepted. 



Digitized by 



Google 



8ECEETABY OF THE NAVY. 
ABSTRACT— Continued . 



669 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Clasb No. 5. — Cherry ^ aeatoned. 



O W. Lawrence . 
WiUiam long... 
Samuel Adams... 
G. A. Hammond . 
8. P. Brown 



Class No 6. — White pme and tpruee tknber and lumber. 



James Dodge 

A. Hoitt 

BobcrtS. Webster... 

Oeorge Chesley 

O. W. Lawrence 

Wendell & Can 

Ssmuel Adams 

0. A. Hammond, jc. 

N. W. Coflln 

8. P. Brown 



Class No. 7 — Lime and hair» 



J. M. Ifathes.... 

N. K. Baynes 

George Cbesiey .. 
G. W. Lawrence . 
J. H. Broughton. 
John Wendell ... 



Class No. S.— Cement. 



N. K. Baynes.... 
J. H. Brooghton . 
John WendeU ... 
William Lang... 



Class No. 9,— Sand. 



J. H. Brooghton . 



Class Na 10.— ^SZote. 



J. T. Hanks 

J. H. Broughton. 
William Lang ... 



Class No. II. -^Iron and naak 



fipsddlng at Parrott. 
Handj A Morris ... 

John WendeU 

WiUiam Lang 

J. P. Lyman 



Class No. 12.— Sted, 



Spalding A F.irrott , 



$1G0 00 


88 00 


148 80 


156 80 


224 00 


8,621 25 


6,121 98 


6,660 34 


6,484 29 


6,325 51 


7,775 23 


6,316 90 


6, 184 40 


7,027 69 


7,204 79 


1,197 50 


1,220 90 


1,085 80 


1,572 50 


1,171 90 


1, 197 50 


411 25 


350 15 


352 50 


446 50 



593 75 



1,552 50 
2, 205 00 
1,350 00 


774 75 

1,285 00 
880 75 
864 75 
940 12 



Cigftfeed by VjOtWfc 



670 



BEPOBT OF THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Class No. 12'-ContmQed. 



John Wendell . 
William Lang . 
J. P. Lyman... 



Class No. 14.— /Ifes. 



N. K. Baynes 

George L. Tread well. 

John Wendell 

William Lang 

A. Q. Wendell 

Samuel Lawson 



N. K. Raynes... 
G. L. Treadwell- 
John Wendell .. 
William Lang- -. 
A. Q. Wendell-. 



N. K. Baynes... 
G. L. Treadwell. 
John Wendell .. 
A. Q. Wendell.. 



N. K. Baynes.-. 
G. L. Treadwell- 
John Wendell .. 
A. Q. Wendell.. 



C. C. Harvey . 



J. M. Mathes. 

N. K. Baynes- 



John iUce 

A. Hoitt 

N. K. Baynes 

G. A. Hammond. 
James Fhilbrick . . 



A. Hoitt 

A. W. Simpson 



Class No. 15. — Potnfo, oiZt, '^. 



Class No. 16. — Sh^ chandlery. 



Class No. 17.— -fbrvfuwrs. 



Class No. 18. — Stationay. 



Class No. 19. — Firt-teood, 



Class No. 20.— J7<^. 



Class No. 21.— ProtJwufer. 



$224 00 

238 00 
217 00 


2,732 26 
2,958 36 
3,017 50 
2,377 50 
3, 191 75 
2,991 70 


1,344 02 
1,467 94 
1,211 00 
1,440 02 
1,520 01 


1,042 65 
1, 193 60 
1,047 25 
1,147 76 


829 33 
835 77 
958 00 
977 65 



Digitized by 



142 22 



160 00 
157 40 



1, 125 00 
1,042 50 
1,481 25 
1, 192 50 
1,275 00 



660 00 
^ 120 00 

CjOOgle 



8ECBETABT OF THE NAVY. 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



671 



Karnes. 



Aggregate. 



Cla» No. 21— Ck>ntlna^. 



5. K. Bftynefl. 
C. Bobinson.. 



Claib No. 22 .—Outrcoal, 



J. M. Mathes.. 
A. Hoitt 

N. K. Baynes.. 
John Wendell . 



Clasb No. 2i.—€bpper and comptmUbri naib. 



Edgar M. Brown . 

N. K. Baynee 

G. L. Treadwell - 
John Wendell ... 
A. Q. Wendell... 



Class No. 25.— Iron cviiW'. 



Drake & Field . 
Ira Hiudeton .. 



Class No. 27 .^^ExcavaUcn, 



A. W. Simpson 

John Mugridge 

Whitehouse &Titcomb. 

Harden & Stimpson 

Band & Holmes....... 



$627 00 
738 00 



230 00 
200 00 
220 00 
230 00 



167 40 
193 55 
204 60 
192 20 
186 70 



172 50 
180 00 



11,000 00 
15,300 00 
14, 600 00 
14, 600 00 . 
19,800 00 



OFFEBS FOB SUPPLIES FOB THE NAVY YAED, BOSTON, UNDEB ADVEBHSE- 
MENT DATED MAY 1, 1857. 



Class No. 1 —Brides, 



Oakman & Eldridge . 

John Mnrphy ... 

Mullet & Bradbary.. 
Horton. Hall & Co... 

N. W. Coffin 

Philander Amen..... 



Class No. 2.—SIoia 



Granite Bail way Company. 

Henry Barker .. 

Reward k Packard 

John F. Oilman 

Blaisdell & Emerson 

Eieazer Frederick 

E. C. Sargent 



Digitized by 



10,410 00 
11,290 00 
11,655 00 
10,875 00 
11,217 50 
10, 763 00 



55,215 00 
64,705 00 
71,885 00 
53, 790 00 
57,810 00 
64,077 00 
73,017 00 

Google 



672 



KEPOET OF THE 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Class No. 4. — TeUaio pine Umber. 



Porter & Darrow.. 

David RiBley 

Alfred Hoiti 

George L. Neville . 

William Lang 

N. W. Coffin 

8. P. Brown 

Joseph Young 

Philander Ame3. . . 



Class No 5. — Oak and hard wood. 



Alfred Hoitt 

WUUam White .. 
N. W. Coffin .... 

8. P. Brown 

G- W. Lawrence . 
Philander Ames . 
Nat. Dmin ... 



C^ASS No. 6. — White pUu, tpruee, and juniper lumber and timber. 



Alfred Hoitt.... 
William Lang ... 

N. W. Coffin 

8. P. Brown 

G. W. Lawrence . 
Philander Ames . 
Bobert Todd 



Class No. 7.— Ztmf and hair. 



Oakman & Eldridge 
Horton, Hall & Co.. 

Philander Ames 

Bobert Todd 



Class No. 8. 



Porter and Darrow.. 
Oakman & Eldridge . 

John Murphy 

John Wendell 

Horton/ Hall &Co.. 

William Lang 

Philander Ames . . . . . 
Bobert Todd 



Class No. 9.—Oraod and sand. 



O^man & Eldridge 
Philander Ames 



Class No. 10.— Slate. 



Porter & Darrow . 
WiUiam Lang ... 



Digitized by 



$357 26 


S90 00 


406 00 


640 00 


405 00 


360 00 


450 00 


871 26 


375 00 


780 00 


1,300 00 


630 00 


665 00 


625 00 


691 00 


1,650 00 


7,806 26 


7,692 60 


6,567 50 


7,276 75 


6,593 75 


7,152 50 


7,863 50 


630 00 


605 00 


692 00 


680 00 


209 25 


210 00 


195 00 


210 00 


202 50 


225 00 


205 50 


226 00 


442 00 


467 00 


3,373 60 


Q^Q 8.900 00 



SECRETABT OF THS KAYT. 

ABSTBAOT— Oontinned. 



673 



Names. 



Clam Ko. 10.— Oontinaed. 

H. W. Coffin 

J. T. Hknks 

D. D. Jones •• - 

Clam No. U. — Bm: iron ^pOm mdnaiU, 

John Wendell .••.•.••..... •...••. 

Horton, Hall A Co 

HandjftMonis - — 

William Lang 

Ci.Aai No. 12.— <8M. 

John Wendell ...........•—•.. 

HortoQ, Hall ft Co 

William Lang 

Glass No. U.—iV«. 

John Wendell - - 

Horton, Hall & Co 

O. B, HubbeliatCo 

William Lang 

Glass No. 15.— PoMb, Mb, Sfc 

John Wendell - - 

Horton, Hall ft Co 

William Lang 

George D. Glenn • - 

E. A. Plsher 

Class No. 16 

John Wendell .—...... 

Horton, Hall ft Co < 

Class No. 17.— Ardbpora. 

inHm Wendell ........—.. .......... 

Horton, Hall ft Co 

Class No. 19.— Stationery. 

A E. Cutter - 

Eayres ft Fairbanks 

A B. Gay 

Class No. 20. — Hajf md ttraw, 

P6rter ft Darrow - - - 

8.ftE. Knight 

Mnlleit ft Bradbnry 

Alfred Hoitt ^ , 

Phllandor Ames -^ 

Vol. u 43 



Aggregate. 



$3,602 60 
8,625 00 
4,600 00 



980 60 

722 00 

1,360 00 

911 00 



236 00 
200 00 
208 00 



1,926 04 
1,706 26 
1,621 69 
1,486 22} 



1,621 60 

1.489 94 

1.490 22 
1,663 73 
1,647 08 



1,779 20 
1,428 09 



2, 148 20 
1,686 66 



724 96 
676 64 
611 66 



1,749 00 

1,476 80 

1,689 SO 

r 1,490 00 

ized by ^^ 1,551 50 



674 



BEPOBT OF THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Culm No. Ih-^Proimider. 

Porter & Darrow 

Mullett & Bradbury 

Alfred Hoitt , 

Philander Ames 

N. Tufts 

Class No. %2.—ChareoaL 

Porter ft Darrow 

Oakman & Eldridge 

John Wendell 

Mullett ft Bradbury 

Horton, Hall ft Co 

Philander Ames 

C1.ASSN0. 28. — Packing. 

Porter ft Darrow... 

John Wendell 

Horton, Hall ft Co 

Class No. 26. — Ircn tfuting^ 

Horton, Hall ft C6 

Francis Alger 

W. B. Bradford 



Aggregate 



$917 7& 


881 00 


931 25 


1,058 60 


963 25 


780 00 


1,000 00 


800 00 


690 00 


660 00 


800 00 


49 25 


60 00 


76 00 


626 00 


30,167 50 


606 25 



OFFERS FOR SUPPLIES FOB THE NAVY YARD, NEW YORK, UNDER ADVER- 
tISEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1857. 



William Beard 

William Swenarton. 

T. W. Rollins 

John Wendell 

E. N. Hubbell 



G. A. Buckingham.. 
James C. S. Sinclair . 
Andrew Harrison ... 

William Beard 

T. Wilson 

T. W. Rollins 

J, W. Smith 

Charles Guidet 

James N. Palmer ... 



Class No. l.—BrkHn, 



Class No. 2.— iSkoiie. 



Class No. Z.-^TdUnepku (mber. 



D. S. Walton 

George T. WalUoe. 



.PigJtUPi^by 



$4,741 09 

3,916 00 

6,606 00 

3,629 00 

4,767 00 



130,101 25 
147,029 00 
168,669 64 
168,039 75 
212,607 50 
172,662 OO 
128,799 00 
109,411 60 
392,320 75 



.Go^; 



964 00 
161 00 



8ECBETABT OF THE KAYT. 
ABSTBAOT— Continued. 



675 



Names. 



Clas No. 3— Contiiiaed. 



John H. Vidmer... 

8. P. Brown 

JsmesBigler 

WUliam White 

Ounpbell ft Moody:. 

PetenftBeed 

W. E. AnderaoD ... 

E. H. Herbert 

8. B. Grice 

J. 8. Garrison, jr... 

D. Biriey 

George L. Neville .. 

Beidft Bright 

M. Coetin&Ck) 



Clam No. 5.^ Oak and hard wood tmb§r. 



D. 8. Walton 

John H. Uidmer... 
James Blgler ...... 

WiUiam White 

Campbell k Moody. 

E. H. HerbdH. 

Nat. Dunn........ 

£«. 0. Sonthmayd .. 
Geoige L. NeTille.. 



CLAM No. 6. — White pme, tpruee, and jumper. 



John H. Midmer... 

8. P. Brown 

James Bigler ...... 

Biglerft Wilt 

Campbell & Moody. 
W. W. Campbell... 
Joseph Westoott... 



Class No. 7. — Ume and hair. 



WUliam Beard 

William Swenarton. 

8. P. Brown 

John Wendell 



Class No. 8.— Conotf. 



WUliam Beard 

Lawrence Cement Company ........ 

James W. 8mitn 

Newark lime and Cement Company . 
John WendeU 



Class No. 9.— (TtomI and mnd. 



George A. Bnckingham. 

Andrew Harrison ....... 

WUUam Beard ^. 



Aggregate. 



$14,796 30 
7,508 80 
9,176 20 
9,781 00 
8,846 90 

10, 614 80 

12,822 40 
7,864 80 
7,980 00 

16, 696 00 
6, 394 40 
9,641 20 

10,116 76 
8,093 60 



746 00 
660 00 
621 00 

1,340 00 
684 60 

1,064 00 
689 00 
696 10 
663 68 



12,049 67 
12,832 60 
10,428 10 
13, 674 66 
9, 922 60 
9, 662 70 
13,618 00 



1,394 96 
1, 180 20 
1,671 92 
1,873 80 



14,200 00 
12,766 00 
16, 260 00 
11,440 00 
14,096 00 



"t)7giti; 



37,810 00 

^^ r 38,727 60 

^^^y^ 43, 726 00 



676 



BEPOBT OF THB 

ABSTBACrr— Gontinoed. 



Namet. 



Clam No. 9— C!oiitiiiii«d. 



M. 8. Smith 

T. W. BoUini ... 
James W. Smith. 
OharlesGaldet... 
John Wendell ... 



Club No. 10.—Slat$. 



J. T. Hanks 

William Swenartoa.. 

John Wendell 

William Ung 



Club No. 11. — JroHf iron tpOm, Sfc 



Seoor&Co 

Hand J & Marrifl. . . . - 
John H. lidgenrood 

John Wendell • 

William Lang 



GLAflB No. 12.— iSCarf. 



Seoor&Co 

J. H. Lidgenrood. 
John Wendell .... 
WUliamLang.... 



Club No. 14.— FtZet. 



W. D. Kennedy 

Handf & Brenner ... 

SeooTftCk) 

J. W. Delano, & Ck> . 
G. B. HubbellftCo.. 
John H. linderwood. 

John Wendell .. 

WUliaanLang 



GLAflB No. 16.— Pomtt, oOf, Sfe. 



B. A. Fiflher 

W. D. Kennedy 

Battelle ftBenwick.... 
J. W. Delano & Co.... 

George D. Glenn 

W. M. B. Hartley 

Baynolds, Deroe ft Co . 

John Wendell 

WUliamLang 



ClabbNo le.Sh^ ehandtery. 



W. D. Kennedy 

Seoor &Co 

J. W. Delano ft Co.«. 
John H. lidgenrood. 
John Wendell .••... 



*t)TgitTze3T / 



Aggregate. 



$44,106 00 


60,660 00 


67,800 00 


43,410 00 


49,360 00 


403 00 


878 00 


343 00 


930 00 


3,701 00 


4,828 64 


3,464 00 


3,361 00 


3,667 25 


8,288 00 


8,101 00 


1,978 00 


8,883 60 


9,876 08 


10,481 44 


10,328 93 


9,072 62 


9,616 64 


10,296 16 


9,906 87 


9,616 63 


8,043 67 


7,027 60 


7,966 76 


8,603 76 


8,786 96 


10, 629 80 


9,018 70 


7,252 50 


9,161 96 


1,961 28 


2,640 09 


2, 162 90 


r;^^2,480 46 



SECBETABT OF THE NAVT. 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



677 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Clam No. 17.— AtAmml 



J. W. Delano ft Co.. 
John H. lidgerwood. 
John Wendell 



Clam No. 18. 



John J. Koomfield.. 
Bowne ft Hasbronck. 
Bfgelow ft Bleecker.. 

Nathan Lane ... 

Slote ft Janee 



Clam No. 20.— Ji^ tmd tinw. 



John Delanj 

William Myen 

Bobert Mnrraj, jr . 

T. MoUigan 

Thomas Lynch 

George Hannaman . 
Charles Spear 



Class No. 21.— /'hiMMfar. 



John Delany ..... 

R. Unrray,jr 

Thomas Molligan . 
Thomas Lynch ... 
George Hannaman 
Charles Spear..... 



Class No. 22.— {7AarvMi. 



James H. Lipscomb.. ....•• 

John Delany —......... 

C. UcGlinchey 

A. McConnell 

Felix Derlin i. 

John Wendell 

W. W. Campbell 



Class No. 23.— BrfCay, 

W. D. Kennedy 

Hatthew March 

Secor ft Co 

H. 8. McCombs 

John Wendell 



Class No. 26. — Jnm vark md mdmgi. 

Jsmes Knrphy ftCo ....••.. 

Maiahall ft J. A. Lefferto 

J. A. Kit)ehl -^. 

Qeofge R. Jackson 2l^.^ 



$6,946 17 
6,469 40 
6,644 99 


2,660 44 
1,608 64 
2,606 72 
2, 162 36 
2,320 08 


1,710 00 
1,977 60 
2,010 00 
2, 180 00 
1,906 00 
1,646 00 
1,976 00 


3,904 62 
3,748 00 
4,206 00 
4, 118 00 
3, 168 00 
3,998 00 


662 60 
640 00 
640 00 
600 00 
640 00 
610 00 
640 00 



1,847 60 
2,014 60 
2,003 97 
1,486 60 
1,664 10 



11,422 80 

13,646 20 

r 17, 619 80 

^ed by ^11, 066 60 



678 



BEFOBT OF THE 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



ClabbNo. 26— Continned. 

John H. lidgerwood..... 

G. W. Richardson, & Co 

Boardman, Holbrooke & Co 

CLAflB No 26.— 'Maehitmy^ Sfe, 

[No bids.] 



$14,282 00 
10,761 80 
10,827 20 



OFFERS FOR BUPPLIFSS FOR THE NAVY YARD, PHILADELPHIA, UNDER AD- 
VERTISEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1867. 



Class No. 1.— ^ndbt. 



Handy & Morris.. 
Jonathan Powell. 

P. J. Field 

R. McCay 

John A. Higgins. . 



Class No. 2,^SUm, 



Jonathan Powell. 

P. J. Field 

John C. Leiper .. 



Class No. S.^YeUowjrine timber. 



George L. Nerille. 

William Lang 

8. B. Grice 

E. H. Herbert 

W. 8. McAllister.. 
Jonathan Powell.. 

Peters & Reed 

DaridRislej 



Class No. 4. — Tettow jwm bmiber. 



Geoige L. Neville. 

WUliamLang 

B. B. Grice 

W. S. Donghton.. 
W. 8. McAllister.. 
Jonathan Powell.. 

Petets&Reed 

DaTidRislejT 



Class No. S.— WTnUe cak and hard toootL 



H. N. Basby 

Qeoige L. Neville. 

8. B. Grice 

£. H. Herbert 

W. 8. McAllister.. 



Digitized by 



$1, 119 60 


887 76 


866 76 


866 76 


1,726 60 


1,864 66 


1,712 78 


1,466 40 


1,462 12 


1, 136 44 


947 04 


1,262 72 


928 09 


1,104 74 


1, 104 88 


789 20 


2,303 00 


1,632 00 


1,692 00 


1,329 00 


1,361 80 


1,780 00 


1,680 00 


1,199 00 


6,384 64 


8,167 98 


8,076 00 


6,414 64 


^ 4,203 44 

Google 



SECSETABT OF THE NAYT. 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



679 



Names. 



Clam No. 5— Ckintlnaed. 

Jonathan Powell 

Nat. Dunn 

Samnel Battenon. 

James 8. Gairison, jr 

DaTid Risley 

William Fatton 

Class No. 6.^ WkiU pine timbir. 

8. B. Grice 

W. 8. Doogliton 

W. 8. McAllister 

Jonathan Powell 

8amnel Patterson.... 

Bfgler&Wilt 

William Patkon 

Cluh No. 7. — Lim9 and hair. 

P. J. Field 

Class No. 9. — Cfraod and iond, 

Jonathan Powell 

P. J. ndd 

Class No. 10.— iSZafe. 

Handj ft Morris 

W. 8. Doaghton 

John Wendell 

Porter k Darrow 

BobertMoCajr 

WiUiam Bagee 

J. T. Hanks 

Class No. 11. — ^iron, iron naiU, and tfikeM. 

Handy & Morris * 

William Lang 

A. H. Stillwell 

Timothy Field 

J. Lealy. jr 

Class No. l2.^Sud 

William Ung 

H. B. Wilson 

John Wendell 

P. J Field 

Bandy k Brenner..... .. ... •.•.......•••••.. 

John A. Higgins... •........• 

Baxter ft Bro.. ............. .•••••..........•..... 

Ji-iy.jr 



Aggregate. 



$4,4S5 75 


6,612 82 


7,29S 7$ 


11,814 8< 


3,935 89 


4, 244 91 


6,097 4« 


5,000 48 


6,231 49 


6, 120 61 


7,638 6S 


4,649 46 


6,182 12 



60 62 



146 6f 


132 09 


tU 09 


180 00 


160 09 


t49 25 


325 00 


190 00 


2«8 75 


995 25 


1,210 00 


1,688 00 


2,412 60 


2,261 59 


364 00 


383 00 


272 00 


323 00 


313 00 


500 00 


341 00 


331 50 



Digitized by 



Google 



630 



SKPOBT GW THB 

ABSTRACT— Continiied. 



Names. 



Aggregmte. 



G&ABB No. 14.— JQm. 

Samuel Lawson 

H. B. WUion 

John Wendell 

P. J. Field 

Handj ft Brenner .•.....-.•••..... •....•......•••. 

John A. Higgins.. ••.....••. 

Baxter &Bro 

J. Lealy, jr 

CLAflB No. n,—PmtU, oik, |[c 

B. W. Dmigan 

William Lang 

J. H. Spn^ne 

H. R Witaon 

John Wendell 

W. D. Kennedy 

John A. Higgins........ 

B. A. Fisher 

BatteUe & Benwick 

A. F. Haaard & Co 

Clam No. 16.--iS%ip dboMBcry. 

J. G. Tonng.. ........ ...... • • ............... 

Michael Wise 

John Wendell 

W. D. Kennedy 

William Bagee 

John A. Higgins . 

J. B. Whetham 

A. F. Ha«rd AOo 

Clam No. 17.— Bardman, 

H. B. WDeon 

John Wendell 

P. J. Field 

Handj & Brenner ......................... ................. 

John A. Higgins ...................... ..•..•..•......••••. 

Baxter k Brother .... 

J. Ledy, jr 

C&ABB No. 18.— iSlalwnfry. 

W. H. Maurice 

CiiAM No. 19.— JirwKMiZ. 

W. 8. Donghten 

H. B. Wilson 

Bohert McOay 

Wm. Sagee 

Samuel Patterson .............................................. 

John A. Higgins 

John Sherry ..••—....................—...—••..•..... 

J. B. Baxter, Jr......................................«.....^i2^ 



$657 76 


602 8S 


661 81 


642 40 


636 06 


1,082 00 


653 10 


619 89 


911 66 


954 17 


819 86 


937 18 


810 26 


812 31 


1,532 40 


840 87 


949 10 


976 61 


2,038 25 


2, 165 26 


2,093 25 


1,862 60 


1,966 60 


3,813 50 


2,226 OS 


2,107 60 


1,439 43 


1,376 10 


1,228 96 


1,361 29 


2,994 00 


1,283 60 


1,280 21 



944 62 



2,632 60 
2,542 60 
2,452 60 
2,790 00 
2,466 00 
4,950 00 



Goal 



2,812 60 
340 00 



8HCRETABT OF THE NAVT, 

ABSTRACT— Oontinaed. 



681 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Class No. 20.— Ay and $tn». 



W. 8. Donghten.. 
W. a McAllister. 



Clam No. 21.— FrotwuEir. 



W. 8. DoQghten . 
W. & McAllister. 
John A. Higgins . 



Class No. 28.^(7AarooaL 



J. a. Toang. 
P. J. Field .. 



Class No. IS.'—Bdtmgf padang, and horn. 



H. 8. McCombs k Brother. 

P.J. Jleld 

Wm. Sagee 

John A. Higgins 



Class No. 27.— .^tM FtoaU. 



Trenton MsnnfiMtoring Company. 

Merrick & Sons 

A. H. StillweU 

John A. Higgins 

W. C. Bridges 

Betts, Pasey k Co 



$1,257 ftO 
1,229 00 



951 00 

922 60 

1,570 50 



40 00 
30 00 



1,040 00 
1,027 00 
1, 130 00 
6,570 00 



12,180 00 
13, 860 00 
13,440 00 
18,480 00 
16,800 00 
14,028 00 



OFFERS FOB SUPPLIES FOB NAVAL ASYLUM, PHILADELPHIA, UNDEB ADYEE- 
ITSEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1857. 



Class No. 1 — BriekM. 



A. Bobeno, jr. 



Class No. 2.— iXtft, booU, andtkom. 



Wm. Mnldoon. 



Qottleib Scheldt. 

aHebbly 

D.Woelpper 



W. L. Maddock. 
J. 0. Yonng 



Class No. 3. — Pramdom. 



Class No. 4.— (TroosriM. 



Dig 



$3,884 7ft 
1, 168 88 



7,708 00 
8,725 75 
8, 185 00 



4,575 00 
izedbyGbS^^ 



682 



BEPOBT OF THE 

AB8TBACT— Continned. 



Names. 


Aggregate. 




Class No. 5.— Dry Ooods. 




W. L. Maddock 




$198 00 


A. Bobeno, jr 


656 00 


J. 6. YouDg , - 


520 00 




Class No. Q.-^Bread, fye. 




J. G. Young ^ 




1,810 00 
1,495 00 


W. W. Barnes 




Class No. T.—Jo&aaoo. 


W. L. Maddock-.. 




650 00 


J. G. Young. -.-..•-, ........... --....- ...... ........ 


700 00 


C. H. lindley 


675 00 


J. Lesly, jr - — -- 


775 00 








W. L. Maddock 




119 50 


J. G. Young 


135 54 


C. Heishley «. 


123 35 


J. Lesly. jr _- - - 


134 80 




Class No. 9. — Hardware, 




P.J. Field 




90 56 


J. Lesly, jr 


80 52 




Class No. 10.— /ron and notZs. 




P. J. Field 




28 00 


J. Lesly, jr 


28 00 




Class No. 11. -Paifiti and oOs, 




B. W. Dungan 




100 90 


A. F. Hazard & Co 




106 26 


J. H. Sprague ..... 




86 80 




Clam No. ll.^FUet, 




P. J. Field 




3 65 


J. Lesly, jr 


3 70 




Class No IS.— Tools. 




P. J. Field 




2 46 


J. Lesly, jr 


2 96 




Class No. U. ^Lumber. 




W. L. Maddock. .- 




239 00 


8. B. Grice 


211 57 


J.Powell .- 


236 26 




Class No. 15.— Protvsmfer. 




W. L. Maddock.... 


.Djaitized. 


yGoOglft 00 



SECRETARY OF THE KAVT. 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



688 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



ClabbNo. IB.—Firewood, 

W. L. Haddock 

Jno. Sheny 

8. B. Grice 

J. PoweU 

CLAflB No. 17. — Excavation and wall, 

R. HcCky.jr 

8. K. Andrews 

P. J. Field 

J. Powell 



62 50 
67 50 
75 00 


10,839 60 
8,979 37 

10,015 46 
8,029 00 



OFFERS FOB SUPPLIES FOR THE NAVY YARD, WASHINGTON, D. C, UNDER 
ADVERTISEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1857. 



Glass No. 1. — Bridu 



A. &T. A. Richards.... 

Hoigan k Rhinehart 

Cyrus Oault 

Jno. Wendell 

Thompson ft Oadeslnys . 



ffilsby & Bldgelj . 
Henry Parry .... 

ILG. Emery 

NSch. Acker 



E.Flckerell 

£. H. Herbert... 

8. B. Grioe 

J. S. Garrison, jr. 

Wm. White 

T. Mosher 

Geo. h. NeTille.. 

D. S. Walton 

Peters ft Reed ... 
A. B. Waller.-.. 

D.Risley 

H. N. Easby .... 



KPickereU.... 

8. B. Grice 

T. Mosher 

Geo. L NeTiUe. 
D. S. Walton... 
Peters ft Reed.. 



Jlasb No. Z.—Stane. 



Class No. 3. — Yellow phu Umber, 



Class No. 4. — Tdlowpmebanber, 



-Big+tebd by 



.C 



$1,590 00 


1,672 60 


1,500 00 


1,740 00 


1,515 00 

• 


4,530 00 


4,991 50 


5,003 10 


4,566 20 


2.403 78 


4,256 60 


8,430 28 


8,037 54 


3, 905 94 


2,568 96 


3,380 28 


5,909 24 


3,535 54 


3,355 28 


2,528 89 


2, 628 96 


980 00 


1,185 00 


O830 00 


1,205 00 


1,300 00 


1,264 00 



684 



BEPOBT OF THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



NameB. 



Aggregate. 



Clam No. 4— ContinTied. 



A. B. Waller . 
D. Bisley.... 
H. N. Easby . 



Clam No. 6. — Oak and hard wood tMber and Umber. 



Samuel Patterson ... 

P. Otterback 

Morgan & Rhinehart. 

E. H. Herbert 

Wm. White 

T. Hoeher 

H. N. Easby 



Clam No. 6 — White jrine, qtruoe, Jvn^t ^^ Cfpreu. 



B. Pickerel 

W. W. Can4>beU. 

UlyMea Ward 

T MoBher 

A.B. Waller 

Bigler&Wilt.... 



Clam No. 7. — Lime and hair. 



Morgan ft Bhinehart. 

Burrow^ft WiUit 

W. H. Godey 

W.W. Campbell 

Jno. Wendell 

T. Moeher 

luP. Hoover 



Clam No. 9. — Qraod andeand. 



P. Otterback . 
T. MoBher 



Clam No. 11. — Iron, node and tfOeee, 



Jos. L. Savage ••• 

Harvey ft Adams • 

Samuel Lawson. ....... 

Jno. A. Higgins....... 

Jno. Wendell. ••.••... 

Handy ft Morris 

Thompson ft Oudesluys 
Keyser, Th>xel ft Co... 



Clam No. 12.— iSM. 



Jos. L. Savage 

Harvey ft Adams.... 

Samuel Lawson 

Jno. A. Higgins 

Jno. Wendell 

Keyser, Troxel ft Co . 



■!lff^Tl"t5V 



$1,395 00 


885 00 


920 00 


396 00 


255 00 


268 00 


500 00 


420 00 


•187 00 


588 00 


2,389 52 


2,789 36 


2,495 79 


2,420 20 


2,825 26 


2,607 21 


1,100 00 


O850 00 


1,000 00 


1,750 00 


999 00 


1,250 00 


870 00 


•645 20 


670 00 


4,615 56 


4,852 26 


5,569 10 


5,776 00 


4,465 85 


7,369 60 


5,841 80 


•4,202 62 


1,182 50 


1,251 50 


2,083 00 


1,423 00 


1,219 00 


Qo^\,iblw^ 



SBCBETABT OF THE NAYT. 

ABSTRACT— ContiDoed. 



685 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Clam No. 13.— /^ •'w- 



Joa. L. Savage......... 

Ulywee Ward 

Jno. A. Higgins. ....... 

Jna Wendell 

Handy & Morria 

W. H. Townaend & Co.. 

D. R. Porter 

Ttiompeon & Oadealiiys . 



GLAflB No. 14.— ilte. 



Job. L. Savage 

Harvey & Adams... 
Handy & Brenner .. 
Samuel lAwson.... 

Jno. Wendell 

Q. B. HubbeU & Co. 



Clam Ko. 16.— Pomtr, oOt, Sfe, 



W. D. Kennedy 

E. A. Fisher 

Geo. D. Olenn 

Howell & Morsell .. 

Jno. Wendell 

Batelle & Benwick. 
Z. D. Gilman 



Class No. 16.— fi%ip ekaniUry, 



Joa. L. Savage... 
W. D. Kennedy.. 
Harvey k Adams. 
Jno. A. Higgins.. 
Jno. Wendell 



Class No. 17.— Amftoan. 



Jos. L. Savage... 
Harvey & Adams. 
Jno. A. Higgins.. 
Jno. Wendell 



Class No. 18. — AJbrtumery. 



Bobert Famham. 
Taylor &Kaary.. 



Class No. l^.^F^rtwood, 



Samuel Patterson ... 

Qeo. T. HcGlae 

A. & T. A. Bichards . 

P. Otterback 

Chapin& Bro 

Ulysses Ward 

T. Hoaher 



.fbigjized 



•$7,900 00 
9,376 00 
8,700 00 
8,930 00 
10,260 00 
12,600 00 
8,726 00 
9,200 00 


•3.699 76 
8,782 36 
3,879 46 
3,945 26 
3,876 33 
3,689 14 


•4,877 75 
6,064 S3 
6 819 60 
6|6.^6 79 
6 369 60 
6,019 60 
6,616 90 


•2,216 92 
2,220 60 
2,347 90 
4,693 60 
2,321 SO 


661 68 

601 16 

2, 140 76 

914 00 


644 86 

682 60 


3,132 00 

2,970 00 

3,078 00 

•2,907 00 

2,871 00 

^4,347 00 

by Lj 3, 016 00 



686 



BEPOET OF THE 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Karnes. 



Class No. 19 Continued. 



Geo. L. Neville. 
W. H. Gnnnell . 
S D. Castleman. 



Class No. 20. — Ba^ and draw. 



P. Otterback 

Morgan & Rhinehart 

Clark & Bro 

T. Mosher 



Class No. 21.— Ffoooidier. 



P. OtUirback 

Morgan & Rhinehart . 

C:ark& Bro 

John A. Higgins...., 

T. Mosher 

A. &T. A. Richards.. 



Class No. 22.~Chareoal» 



Samuel Patterson ... 

P Otterback 

Morgan & Rhinehart. 

John L. Mooro ... 

John Wendell 

W. W. Ounnell 

W.T.Clark 



Class No. 23. — Bdling^ paddng^ and hote. 



Joseph L. Savage 
W. W. Campbell- 
McCombs&Co ... 
John A. Higgins. 
John Wendell 



Class No 24. — Iron gun carriage shed. 



M. LeiTerts&Bro 

M. Lefferts & Bro 

M. Lefferts & Bro , 

Trenton Manufacturing Company . 

J. H. Kroehl 

J. H. Kroehl 

J. H. Kroehl 

J. H. Kroehl 



Aggregate. 



$6,625 00 


3,015 00 


3,367 00 


•747 00 


810 00 


927 00 


900 00 


1,000 80 


1, 036 00 


0928 80 


1.572 00 


1, 074 00 


1,040 00 


4, 250 00 


12, 103 75 


2, 384 00 


01,513 00 


3, 060 00 


1. 870 09 


1, 628 SO 


1, 192 00 


1, 416 00 


1,215 00 


1, 969 26 


1,223 GO 


15,512 00 


27,803 00 


20,384 00 


•24,200 00 


29,289 81 


27,830 71 


21, 692 00 


22,600 00 



Digitized by 



Google 



8ECEETART OF THE NAVY 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



687 



OFFERS FOU SUPPLIES FOR THE NAVY YARD, NORFOLK, VIROINU, UNDER 
ADVERTISEMENT DATED MAY 1, 1867. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Clabb No. l.^Brides, 

John A. Higgins 

Ctths Gault 

McC&7 & Wehr 

Forbes Holland 

John Murphy ..... 

Jfiseph Temple ........... 

E. N. HubbcU 

Joseph P. Reynolds ..... 

James Bigler 

William Denby 



CiJUH No. %.— Stone. 

John A Higgins 

Gault & McCJanahan 

John McLeod Murphy 

C. S Breed 

George A. Pierce . .. ....... 

M. G. Emery 

Eleazer Fredericli .. .... . ........ 



Class No. 3. — Tdknopme (imber. 

D. S. Walton 

O. T. Wallace 

George L. Neville .... .. ... 

Joseph Temple . . ......... 

H. Irwin 

J. S- Garrison, jr 

Stokely, Williams & Co 

WiUUm White 

D. Risley 

Peters & Reed 

J. W. McAlpine 

E. H Herbert 

Coetin. Gregg & Co 

8. B. Orice 



Class No. 4. — TdUnopine lumber. 

D. 8. Walton 

Gfreorge L Neville 

J. N. Gray 

D. Risley 

John E. Tunis 

Petersft Reed 

E. H. Herbert 

James Bigler 

Costin, Gregg & Co r.^,- 

8. B. Grice!: 5L9i" 



$22^091 80 

•23,032 40 

81, 660 00 

20, 246 00 

23.660 00 
36 00 

24,462 00 

23.661 60 
24,891 66 
30,380 00 



61,628 69 
60,2T2 96 
73,792 44 
•66,337 11 
61,676 21 
69,746 30 
32,886 00 



36,068 89 
20,013 70 
32, 149 62 
23,607 11 

20.160 16 
36,319 04 

28.161 20 
20,811 88 
40,093 67 
24,237 69 

019,896 80 
23,046 80 
67,083 06 
28,674 27 



19,720 60 

14,297 46 

17,748 61 

010,846 38 

17,266 62 

16,776 48 

13,804 42 

13, 804 42 

^^ r 14,790 46 

dby^ 13,804 42 



688 



SEPOBT OF THE 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



NamoB. 



Aggregate. 



Clam No. S,—Whita jmu timhtr and lumber. 



John E. Tunis... 
Peters & Reed... 
Samuel P. Brown. 
Hgler&Wilt...- 
fihmiael UarsU... 

James Bigler 

W. W. Campbell. 



Clam No. 7.— Zmm. 



John A. Higgins . 
John E. Tunis . . . 

Peters & Reed 

L. P. Hoover.... 

8. P.Brown 

Samuel Marsh... 
John Wendell... 
W. H. Godey 



Clam No. 8. 



John A, Uiggins.......... ... 

Wm. Swenarton..... 

John E. Tunis 

Petersft Beed 

NewarlL lime and Cement Company . 

Lawrence Cement Company 

Samuel Marsh 

John Wendell 



Clam No. 9.— Amd. 



Samuel Patterson . 

Peters & Reed 

Bnrford&Ward... 



Clam No. lO.^-SlaU. 



John A. Higgins. 
J. T. Hanks 

C. &M. Gault... 
John Murphy.... 
John Wendell... 
Wm. Lang ...... 

D. D. Jones 



Clam No. 11.— irwi and iron naUt. 



Griffith & Wilson.... 
John A. Higgins..... 
Allyn, Rose & Capps.. 

Handy & Morris 

Keyser, Troxell & Co . 

Tabh & Moore • 

John Wendell 

tiamuel lAwson 



•$1,6S9 60 

1.662 43 
3,143 76 
8,S04 74 
1,666 06 
1,912 38 

2.663 93 



6,773 20 
6,292 10 
6,484 64 
4,811 00 
6,206 19 
6,632 66 
6,248 99 
6,628 51 



2,491 66 
«2, 162 66 
2, 608 60 
2,467 76 
2,373 00 
2,271 80 
2,467 76 
2,373 00 



•6,766 50 
9, 139 80 
8,906 00 



6,612 00 
6,667 60 
4,276 00 
6, 700 00 
•2,731 26 
6,320 00 
6,606 00 



Digitized b' 



1,129 60 
1, 122 00 
1,320 60 
1,440 00 
1, 162 60 
1, 276 00 
n,063 60 



SECBETABT OF THE NAYT. 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



689 



NameB. 



Clam Ko. 12.— iStel. 



Griffith & Wilson... 
John A. Hig^Ds...., 
Allyo* Bose k Capps. 
Keyaer, Troxel & Ck>. 

Tabb k Moore 

John Wendell 

Samoel LawBon 



Class No. U.—FUm. 



Griffith & Wilson.... 
Allyu, Bote A Capps. 

l^bbjt Moore 

John Wendell 

Samuel Lawson 

James Lesly, jr 



Class No. 15 —PamU, o&, Sfc 



▲. J. Williams & Co. 

John A. Higgins 

W. D. Kennedy 

V. B. Billsoly 

Bartlett & Ben wick. . 

John Wendell 

George D. Glenn 



Class No 16.— Shyf chandlery. 



Griffith & Wilson 

John A. Hij^Rins 

Joseph L Savage — . 

W D. Kennedy 

Allyn, Ruse&Capps. 

Tabb & Moore 

John Wendell 



Class No. 17. — Btrdware. 



Griffith & Wilson ... 
Allyn, Bose & Capps. 
John Wendell 



Class No l^.-Statiomery. 



J. T. Bomm & Co. 

W. P. Griffith 

VIckery & Co 



Class No. 20.—ITatf<mdStrttw. 



John A. Higgins... 

B. B. Moeely 

Peters & Beed 

Jones & Ward 

8. P. Brown 

Beld & Wailington 



Vol. ii.- 



Ai 



• Acoepted. 



Aggregate. 



Digitized by 



$792 00 
927 30 
738 70 
721 74 
780 30 

O706 00 
941 00 



1.913 68 
1,912 24 
2,113 80 
2,479 24 
2,898 93 
2,083 95 



4,112 37 
5,212 75 
3,709 15 
5,486 40 
3,915 50 
4,065 00 
4,307 00 



2. 254 05 
2,428 50 
2,491 12 
2, 191 50 
2. 166 50 
2,486 25 
•2,018 80 



♦5,807 77 

9.874 21 

13,478 09 



617 51 

O530 81 
553 10 



2, 175 00 
2, 166 00 
•1,902 00 
1,941 00 
2, 122 50 
,<^2,052i)0 

Cjoogle 



690 



REPORT OF THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Aggjegate. 



Claab No. 21.— Provemfar. 

John A. Higginfl , 

B. B. Mosely , 

Peters & Reed 

Jones & Ward - 

Reid & Wailington 

Class No. 22.—€fharcoal, 

John A. Higgins 

J. H. Lipscomb 

John Tart 

Burfiird & Ward 

D. J. Turner 

John Wendell 

Class No. 25. — Iron eaatmga. 

John A. Higgins.. .. 

John Wendell 

Class No. 26. — Surgeon's haute, 

John A. Higgins , 

W. G. Butler , 

W. Callis 

John Staub .-.-.... , 



ti,068 00 


5,400 00 


5,280 00 


03,760 00 


4,664 00 


690 00 


450 00 


736 00 


600 00 


555 00 


•540 00 


•1,122 00 


1,800 00 


15,974 00 


014,796 00 


18,250 00 


14,815 00 



OFFERS FOR SUPPLIES FOR NAVY YARD, PENSACOLA, UNDER ADVERTISE- 
MENT DATED MAY 1, 1867. 



Class No. l.—JBrieka. 

A. L. Avery - 

John A. Higgins 

W H. Baker 

William Swenarton 



Class No. 2. — Oranate, 



John A. Higgins . 
Pierce & Rowe... 



Class No. 3. — YeUow jrine timber. 

A. L. Avery..-.-. 

C. P. Knapp 

W. E Anderson 

H B. Grice 

Jesse Pritchett 

D. S. Walton 



5,260 00 

5,450 00 

5,020 00 

03,760 00 



12,59) 90 
•9,766 80 



9,441 19 
05,696 99 
8,758 58 
9, 299 88 
7, 644 93 
12,439 86 



• Accepted. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



691 



Names. 



CLA8B No. i.—YdUm pirn lumber. 



A. L. Avery 

C P. Knapp 

W E. Anderson 

8. B. Grioe 

William Miller. 
Jesse Pritchett... 
D. S. Walton.... 



Class No. 5. — Hard wood limber and Uunber, 

A. L Avery 

C. P. Knapp 

W. K. Anderson.. .. ... 

Jesse Pritchett 



Class No. 6. — WhUe jrinef junqterf ife., timber and lumber. 



A- L Avery..-., 
C. P. Knapp ... 
W. E. Anderson 
Jesse Pritchett.. 



Class No. 7.--£tme. 



A. L Avery 

John A Higglns. 
John Wendell ... 

C P Knapp 

W. W. Campheil. 
8. P. Brown 



Class No. 8. — Cement. 



A. L. Avery . 

John A. Higgins 

John Wendell 

C. P. Knapp 

W. W. Campbell.--. 
William Swenartoa 



Class No %.—CoddeMU^ soiMf, ^. 



A. L. Avery. 
C. P. Knapp. 



Class No. X^.^SlOe. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Hig^rins. 
John Wendell... 
John Mnrphy ... 
JohnT. Hanks .. 



«^ Accepted. 



Aggregate. 



$7,342 60 


6,854 23 


8,074 16 


10,359 92 


9,621 44 


7,283 27 


12,816 22 


486 00 


•438 00 


777 00 


546 00 



Digitized by 



2,299 70 
2,211 70 
2,423 70 
2,681 00 



1,793 60 
1,960 00 
•970 00 
1, 147 60 
1,310 00 
1, 167 00 



1, 125 00 

1, 250 00 

760 00 

960 00 

1, 125 00 

876 00 



9.250 00 
*8,890 00 



1,222 00 
1.960 00 
1, 170 00 
1,300 00 
1,106^00 

Google 



692 



REPORT OP THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Clam No. 11. — /nm, tron naiitf and apiket. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Higgins . 
John Wendell ... 
Brand & Adams.. 
Samnel Lawson.. 
Handy & Marris . 



Clabb No. U.—SUel. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Higging . 
John Wendell:... 

G. P. Knapp 

Brand k Adams.. 
Samuel Lawson.. 



Class No. IS.^Raaroad iron. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Higgins , 
John Wendell ... 
Handy & Marris.. 



Class No. U.—FOtt. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Higgins . 
John Wendell... 
Brand & Adams., 
i^amuel Lawson.. 



Class No. 16. — PainU, oUs^ fye. 



A. L Avery 

John A. Higgins... 

John Wendell 

C. P. Enapp 

Brand & Adams. . . . 
Battelle k Renwick. 
JohnB, Todd 



Class No. 16. — &i^ dutndlery. 



A. L. Avery 

John A Higgins . 
John Wendell . . . 
Brand & Adams. . 
John B. Todd 



Class No. 17. — Bardware. 



A. L. Avery 

John A. Higgins. 
John Wendell ... 
Brand & Adams.. 



$2,898 82 
2,736 62 
2, 199 95 


3,303 56 
2,946 88 


3,347 15 


160 00 


196 00 


141 00 


144 00 


167 00 


198 00 


1,700 00 


1,750 00 


•1,700 00 


1,909 00 


792 90 


940 50 


O609 26 


683 65 


622 17 


6,628 22 


9,896 80 
•6,622 68 
6,904 81 
6,438 90 
6.961 47 
6, 147 78 


2,920 86 

6,730 70 

•2,767 86 

3«13l 26 


3,076 85 


3,793 80 
6,890 64 
3, 198 76 


3, 666 38 



Aocepted. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SECBETARr OF THE KAVT. 
ABSTRACT— Continued. 



693 



Names. 



Claw No. IS.— Suaumery 

A. L. Avery. - .......... ...... - 

C. P. Knapp 

Middleton& McMastera 

Clasb No. 19. — /Ere-wootf. 

A. L. Avery 

C. P. Knapp 

Class No. 20.— Bay, 

A. L Avery.-.-- 

C. P. Knapp 

8. P. Brown 

Cla48 No. 21. — Provender, 

A. L. Avery. - 

John A. Higgins 

C. P. Knapp 

Class No. 22.— Charcoal 

A. L. Avery 

C. P. Knapp -- .- 

Jesse Pritchett 

Class No. 23. — BeUing, paddng^ and hote. 

A. L. Avery . 

John A. Uiggins 

John Wendell 

G. H. O'Neal 

Class No. 24. — Copper and composition naiU. 

A. L. Avery .... 

John A. Higgins 

John Wendell 

E. M. Brown 

Class No. 25. — Iron eatHnga. 

A. L. Avery 

John A. Higgins 

C P. Knapp 

Class No. 26.—InairtmmU. 

A. L. Avery.- - - ...- 

John Wendell 



Aggregate.. 



o$l,067 50 
1,336 95 
1,517 85 



*3,060 00 
3. 100 00 



224 00 

»179 20 

218 40 



2,982 00 

4,710 00 

*2, 628 00 



400 00 

200 00 

•200 00 



1,849 00 

3,831 00 

•853 00 

1,723 50 



462 50 

890 00 

370 00 

•323 00 



640 00 

640 00 

•540 00 



O700 00 
790 00 



* Aooepied. 



Digitized by 



Google 



694 



EEPORT OF THE 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



OFFERS FOR SUPPLIES FOR THE NAVY YARD, SAN FRANCISCO, UNDER AD- 
VERTISEMENT DATED JUNE 9, 1867. 



Names. 



Aggregate. 



Class No. 1,—Briekt. 

Ryan k Callahan...... 

Timothy Sage 

M. Fennell 

Shobe &Hen]y 

J. M. Estell 

J. F. McCauley 

Class No. 2.— Stow 

Dobson &Co — 

C. B. Qrant 

Class No. S.-^GraniU ashler. 

E Bassett 

California Granite Co 

G. Griffith 

J. S. Emery 

William Andrews 

W. S. Sherwood 

C. B. Grant 

Class No. 4. — Dremd stone. 

J. S. Emery 

GalifomiA Granite Co 

G. Griffith 

W. 8. Sherwood 

William Andrews 

Charles B. Grant 

Class No. 5. — Pine timber and piles. 

A. W. Macpherson 

L. Balch 

Class No. S.—Pine. 
L. Brich 

Class No. 7.— Pww. 

L. Balch 

J. H. Dall 

Class No. H.— Flooring, 

J. H. Dall 

A. W. Macpherson 

Class No. 9.— Xcm« and hair, 

P. Bannon 

J. T. Stelle 

F. L. Such & Co 

J. H. Culver 

0. T. Fay 

K McLean 

GkJkss No. lO.—Sand, 

De Vries ft Chase 

T. H. Dowling Di^^Lzedby 



$38,006 60 
40,396 76 
30,206 00 
33,228 00 
28,931 91 
28,490 00 



6,411 91 
6.083 86 



3,848 89 
6,584 99 
2,370 00 
3, 161 20 
2,239 80 
2,449 33 
2,688 09 



7,760 00 
12,216 60 
12,400 00 
12,234 00 
11,650 00 
11,333 33 



8,386 80 
6,438 18 



6,813 64 



1,799 66 
1,721 44 



4,377 60 
4,567 76 



7,645 60 
7,800 40 
5,446 60 
7,396 60 
6,788 00 
8,965 60 



IP 3,402 00 

MOO 8^596 40 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVT. 

ABSTRACT— Continued. 



695 



Names. 



Clam No. lO^^ontlnued. 

C. B. HooKhtoQ 

J. T. HcKensie , 

A. Blanchard 

J, M. Eatelle 

Cla» No. 11.— Pomtf, oiZt, ifc 

CSamcron, Whittier & Co 

Brjrant & Co 

E. McLean 

CLAflB No. 12.— lS9^p ehmtdUry. 
Bryant ft Co 

Clam No. 13. — Baritean, 

Bryant ft Co 

W, L. Bromley 

CL&fls No. U.—StaUomry, 

H. H. BancroftftCo 

Hodge ft Wood 

Clasi No. 15. — firMoood. 

J. H Culver 

C. B. Houghton 

Marvin Tifft 

HughSayers . 

J. M. atelle 

Clam No. 16. — Provender. 

Marvin Tiift 

Class No. n.—Cbal, 

J. H Cnlver 

Bryant ft Co. .---...... . . ...-.-.-.- 

A. W. Macpherson 

E. McLean 

HaateftKirk 



Aggregate. 



$3,207 60 
2,866 00 
2,721 60 
3,948 12 



1,845 12 
2,027 77 
2,386 18 



1, 167 76 



2,111 43 
2, 329 85 



677 60 
303 62 



2,700 00 
2,361 00 
2,962 50 
2,610 00 
2,610 00 



2,089 00 

3,010 00 
3,550 00 
3.075 00 
3, 780 00 
3, 276 00 



OFFERS FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO BE MADE ON THE «« OLD GUNNERS' HOUSE" 
AND «« BARRACK " AT ELUS' ISLiLND, NEW YORK. 



Namea. 


Aggregate. 


Ed m n Bon ton ..-- .-....----.- 


$17,266 00 


John Welden 


17,900 00 


R. Calfow, jr — .. 


t3,643 00 
•9,999 00 


Jno. H. Midmer 


Andrew Clarke ............^.r.. .......... .. .-r 


t5,696 00 
to, 000 00 


Patri<^Coyle 


M. Glhlan 


t4,990 00 
t6,300 00 


Bernard Kelly 





* Accepted. 



t Informal. 



Digitized by 



Google 



696 



SEFOBT OP THE 



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SEGfRETABT OP THE NAVY. 791 



No. 3. 

Abstrad or compendium of anntud report from the Bureau of Ordnance 
and Hydrography f dated October 15, 1857. 

Forward's efitimates for ordnance for the United States Naval Ob- 
servatory and Hydrographical office, for the Naval Academy, and for 
the Nautical Almanac. 

Explains cause of excess in estimate for ordnance. 

Buildings for the proper preservation of ordnance stores at the navy 
yards, estimates for. 

Relative to the armaments for new screw frigates, and batteries for 
"Franklin" and ''Cumberland." 

Relative to the manufacture of shells at Washington navy yard. 

Reports from commanders of squadrons, &c., show improvement 
in discipline, &c. 

Practice of target firing and its results. 

Estimates from superintendent of United States Naval Observatory, 
show reduction in amount, additional force required, &c. 

Recommends annual appropriation to be applied to the purchase of 
saltpetre. 

Reports of superintendent of Naval Academy and Board of Exam- 
iners upon the condition of that institution ; recommendation for 
vessel with steam power for practice ship renewed. 



Bureau of Ordnance and Htdrographt, 

October 15, 185T. 

Sir : I have the honor to forward herewith estimates of the amounts 
supposed to be necessary to meet the expenditures required for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, for ordnance and other articles 
connected with the armament of the navy ; for hydrographical pur- 
poses and other objects under the immediate direction of the superin- 
tendent of the United States Naval Observatory and Hydrographical 
office ; for the Naval Academy ; and for the Nautical Almanac. 

The estimate for ordnance purposes exceeds that of last year, in 
consequence of the advance! price of powder, and the necessity of pro- 
viding a supply to be stored in the magazine which has recently been 
built at the navy yard Mare island, California. A large quantity of 
powder is also required for the heavy guns now in use on board some 
of the ships of the navy. The estimate is also increased by the sum 
asked for the purpose of supplying armaments and ordnance equip- 
ments for the new pr<5peller sloops-of-war authorized to be built by 
act of Congress approved March 3, 1857. 

Some of the navy yards still require convenient buildings for the 
preparation and preservation of ordnance stores. Estimates for such 
as are deemed necessary have been furnished to the Bureau jQf Yards 

and Docks. Digitized by VjOOQIC 



792 BEPOET OP THE 

All the cannon of large calibre for the new screw frigates have been 
cast and delivered, and the batteries for the " Franklin" and *' Cum- 
berland " are now in coarse of fabrication, and will be completed in a 
few months. 

The casting and fitting of shells is still continued at the Washing- 
ton navy yard ; they are found to be of the best quality. 

The reports of commanding officers of squadrons and single ships 
show an increased attention to the exercise of the great guns and 
preparation for battle. Target firing is extensively practiced with 
the best results, the men being now trained to fire with great accuracy, 
affording satisfactory evidence of skill in this branch of the service. 

The letter from the superintendent of the United State Naval Obser- 
vatory and Hydrographical Office, of the 30th July last, shows that a 
reduction of |16,000 has been made in the estimates of that office, a 
balance being on hand from former appropriations to meet the require- 
ments for the next fiscal year. He requests that a larger force be 
employed in the astronomical and hydrographical departments, the 
present number of officers being considered oy him entirely inadequate 
to perform the duties required. 

There is on hand, belonging to the navy, about three hundred 
thousand pounds of saltpetre. In the event of war the supply would 
be cut off ; and I would recommend an annual appropriation, to be 
applied to the purchase of this article until the stock reaches two mil- 
lion pounds. It does not deteriorate by long keeping, and we certainly 
should not be left with so small a supply. 

The reports of the superintendent of the Naval Academy and Board 
of Examiners, who attended the annual examination at that institu- 
tion, are of the most satisfactory character. The discipline and course 
of instruction of the acting midshipmen is such as will insure to the 
navy a corps of officers capable of performing their duties in the most 
efficient manner. The report of the cruise of the practice ship also 
shows improvement by the students in seamanship and navigation. 

I would again urge the propriety of having a larger vessel, with 
auxiliary steam power, for the practice ship, it being of the first im- 
portance that the acting midshipmen should be instructed in the use 
of machinery. When not employed for the annual cruise, she could 
always be ready as a despatch vessel, or be used for the purpose of in- 
structing officers in practical gunnery, a very important nranch of 
their profession. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant 

D, N. INGRAHAM, 

Chief of iht Bureau. 

Hon. Isaac Toucit, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



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8ECBETAKY OF THE NAVY. 



793 



Summary of the estimatea from the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydro- 
g^'aphy for the JiaeaZ year ending June 30, 1859. 



For what objects. 




Amount esti- 
mated for 
year end'g 
June SO, 
1859. 



Am't appro- 
priated for 
year ending 
June 30, 
1858. 



A. For pay and contingent expenseB of the bureau 

B. For pay of officers on ordnance duty.. 

C. For ordnance and ordnance stores • 

Special — for arming fiye propeller sloops^f-war 

F. For the purchase of articles, and incidental expenses con- 

nected with the NaTal Observatory and Hydrographical 
Office 

G. For the pay of superintendent and officers on duty at the 

Naval Observatory and Hydrographical Office 

H. For the erection, repair, &c. , of buildings, and for con- 
tingent expenses at the Naval Academy.. 

L For the pay of officers, &c., at the Naval Academy 

J. For Nauticad Almanac 



$13, 090 00 

20,300 00 

348,000 00 

250,000 00 



47, 160 00 

31,000 00 

45,671 22 
95,991 00 
26,880 %0 



$13,090 00 

20,300 00 

304,000 00 



62, 160 00 

37,000 00 

42,307 22 
96,831 00 
26,880 00 



878,092 22 



602,568 22 



D.— -Statement of value of stores on hand, and values received and expended, from July 

1, 1856, to Juno 30, 1857. 
E.-— Statement of amount and cost of labor, from July 1, 1856, to June 30, 1857. 
K.^ S tate ment of contracts for the year ending June 30, 1857. 

D. N. INGEAHAM, 

CW </ ^« Bureau. 
BuBEAU or OansAxcn avd HrnBoaBArnT, Od. 15, 1857. 



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794 



REPORT OF THE 



A. 

Estimate of the amount required for the support of the Bureau of 
Ordnance and Hydrography for the year ending June 30, 1859. 



For salary of chief of the hureau, per act of August 31, 1842, vol 6, sec. S, 
page 679 

For salary of one 4th class clerk, per act of March 3, 1853, pamphlet edi- 
tion of laws, section 3, page 211 

For salary of four 2d class clerks, including draughtsman, per act of March 
3, 1863, pamphlet edition of laws, section 3, page 211, and act of April 
22, 1854, pamphlet edition, page 276 

For salary of messenger, per act of August 31. 1842, toI. 6, section 6, page 
680, and act of April 22, and August 4, 1854, pamphlet edition of laws, 
and joint resolution of August 18, 1856 

For wages of one lahorer, per joint resolution of August 18, 1856, pamphlet 
edition of laws, page 145..... 



$3,600 00 
1,800 00 

6,600 00 

840 00 
600 00 



12,340 00 



Appropriated for year ending June 30, 1858 t 12, 340 00 



ChntingeiU exjteruet. 
For blank books, stationery, and for miscellaneous items . 
Appropriated for year ending June 30, 1858... 



750 00 



750 00 



D. N. INGRAHAM, 

Okirf of the Burwu 
BuBXAV or Ordmakci Asn Hydbogbapht, Odober 15, 1857. 



B. 

Estimate of pay required for officers proposed to be employed on ord- 
nance duty for the year ending June 30, 1859. 



One captain, as inspector .... . ... 

One commander, as assistant inspector, charged with experiments in gun 

nery at the Washington navy yard 

Ten lieutenants, as assistant inspectors, at $1,500 

Amount appropriated for year ending June 30, 1858 



$2,800 00 

2,500 00 
15,000 00 



20, 300 00 



20,300 00 



D. N. INGRAHAM, 

CW qf the Btirmu. 
BuBXAU or Obonanob and Htdboobapbt, October 15, 1857. 



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BECRBTiJRY OF THE NAVY, 



795 



EatimcUe of amounts that wxU probably be required for ordnance and ord- 
nance stores, for labors and for contingent expenseSyfor the year ending 
June 30, 1859. 



ForcaDnon ! |50,000 00 

For gun cariiaget and gim carriage timber ; 30,000 00 

For khella, and for fitting the same for service \ 30,000 00 

For boat and field guns | 17,500 00 

For porchaae of imall armi and laboratory storet ; &0,000 00 

For purchase of gunpowder 80,000 00 

For labor at yards, besides that iocloded above in cost of articles { 70, 000 00 

For freight and transportation, printing, and contingent expenses of all kinds 

fi>r ordnance parposes I 20,500 00 

\ 348,000 00 

Ameuut appropriated for year ending June 30, 1858 | 304,000 00 



'Excess . 



44,000 00 



For guns, gun carriages, and ordnance equipments, and stores complete for 
fire screw propeller sloops-of-war I 250,000 00 



* This excess is caused by the increased price now asked for powder, and by the necessity 
of providing a supply, to be stored in the magazine which has recently been built at the 
navy yard. Mare island, California. 

D. N. INQSAHAM, Chief of Bureau. 

BoRXAu or Ordhahob and Hydroorapht, October 15, 1857. 



Statement of cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy 
yards J July 1, 1856; ofartides received and expended from June 
30, 1856, to June 30, 1867 ; and of those remaining on hand July 1, 
1867, which are under the direction of the Bureau of Ordnance and 
Hydrography, 



Navy yards 


On hand July 1, Beceipts. 
1856. 


Expenditures. 


On hand July 1, 
1857. 


Portsmouth 

Boston 


$154,124 91 
473,866 04 


$34,403 49 


$10,407 30 
118,797 31 
151,592 01 
83,045 16 
279,448 86 
117,525 61 
5,355 04 


$178,121 10 
549,752 68 


New York 

Philadelphia 

Waahington 

Norfolk 


551,376 92 ' 257,901 08 

81,739 30 1 77,894 94 

138,166 23 j 271,920 44 

601,502 98 97 tt/lS 27 


657,685 99 

76,589 08 

130,637 81 

581,329 64 


Pensacola 

«Bfare island 


109,788 38} 

646 50 
38,746 48 


864 52 


105,297 86} 


On the lakes 






38,746 48 










Total 


2,149,957 74} 


935,020 69 


766, 171 29 


2, 318, 160 64} 



® No return of receipts and expenditures received from Mare island. 



D. 

BlfBEAV OF ObDX AKCK A5D HVDBOORAPHT, OctobtT 



N. INGBAHAM, ChvfqfVuBur^^ 
15, 1857. O 



796 



EEPORT OF THE 



E. 

Statement of the number of days' labor, and cost thereof, from July 1, 
1856, to July 1, 1857, at the respective navy yards, chargeable to the 
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, 



Navy yards. 


No. of days' 
lahor. 


Ck>Bt of lahor. 


Average 
per day. 


Portemouth ......^........... ........ 


2, 338 J 
9,515} 
10,008} 
4, 755} 
26, 798 
25,000 
317} 
11 


$4,237 30 

16,626 90 

16,632 19 

9,617 68 

44,888 34 

46,005 31 

54a 84 

46 00 


$1 81 


Boston . .. 


1 74 


New York 


1 56 


Philadelphia 


2 02 


Washineton . ................. 


1 67 


Norfolk 


1 84 


Pensacola ...... .................. 


1 73 


Mare island .......................... 


4 18 






Total 


78,744} 


137,502 06 


1 72 







D. N. IN6BAHAM, Chi^ qf the Btinau. 
Bureau of Obonakob and Htdboghapht, October 15, 1857. 



Sir: 



U. S. N. Observatory and Hydrographical Office, 

Washington, July 30, 1857. 

I have the honor herewith to submit estimates, marked - 



for the support of this office during the year ending June 30, 1859. 

You will observe that the total amount called for by the estimate for 
the next fiscal year is |47,160, or |15,000 less than the amount appro- 
priated for the year current. This difference arises from the balance 
of former appropriations remaining on hand under the 2d and 4th 
heads. It is sufficient, should Congress be pleased to authorize the 
extension landward of the meteorological investigations of the office, 
for inaugurating such extension, and for carrying it on during the 
year. Lawful authority so to use a part of it is asked for. 

These balances arise chiefly from tne circumstance that the working 
force of the observatory has been very much weakened, owing to which 
the publications of the office have fallen behindhand. The lithogra- 
pher also is excluded. 

The astronomical force is altogether inadequate to the duties to be 
performed, and the hydrographical force is not equal to the work re- 
quired of it. A much larger force could, with marked advantage to 
the public service, be employed, and I earnestly urge an increase of it 
for both of these departments. 
Respectfully, &c.. 

M. F. MAXJRT, 

Lieutenant U, 8. Navy. 
Captain D. TS. Inorahah, 

Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance ^ I 

and Hydrography, Washington. tizedbyLjOOglC 



8ECBETABT OF THE KAYT. 



797 



LsHmcUe of the amount required for the support of the United States 
Naval Observatory and Hydrographical Office for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1869. 



For the parchase of Dantieal initrument« required for the use of the navy ; 
for the repatrs of the tame, and also of astronomical instruments; and for 
the purchase of nautical books, maps, and charts, and for backing and bind- 
ing the same 

For printing and publishing sailing directions, hydrographical surveys, and as- 
tronomical observations, and for extending landward the meteorological in- 
vestigations of the observatory, in addition to the balance on hand 

For continuing the publication of the series of the Wind and Current Charts, and 
&r defraying all expenses connected therewith 

For models, drawings, and copying; for postage, freight, and transportation ; 
for keeping grounds in order ; for fuel and lights, and for all other contin- 
gent expenses ; and for the wages of persons employed at the United States 
Naval Observatory and Hydrographical Office, viz: one instrument maker, 
two watchmen, and one porter 

Amount appropriated fur the year ending June 30, 1858 



$18,(100 00 



5,U00 00 
18,000 00 



6, 160 00 



47, 160 00 



62, 160 00 



B. N. INORAHAM, Ckuf of Bwnom. 
BoRiAU OP OwtoHAMom, ASD Htdeooraprt October 15, 1857. 



G. 

Estimate of the amount required for the pay of officers and others pro^ 
posed for duty at the United States Naval Observatory and Hydro- 

nhical Office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, chargeable 
t appropriation for the ^^pay of the navy," 



One lieutenant, as superintendent » 

Ten lieutenants, at $1,500 each 

ffix professors of mathematics, at $1,500 each , 

One assistant observer, (eivil) •••.. .«•••• . 

One derk, (civil) 

\, appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858 



$3, 000 00 

15, 1 00 00 

9, OdO 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 



31,000 00 



37,001) 00 



D. K. INGBAHAM, Chief of tht Bartov. 
BuasAU or Obpmahob amd HTDBOOBApnT, October 15, 1857. 



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798 



REPORT OF THE 



H. 

Esimate of the amount required for the erection and repairs of builtlinga 
for improvement and preservation of the grounds, and for contingen- 
cies , at the United States Naval Academy^ for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1859. 



For the removal of building* from old to new ground, in aocordaDce with the I 
plan hitherto submitted and duly approved, and the repeated reeommenda- ' 
tionsof boards of examiners ; $16,000 00 

For grading the line of ground along and about which these buildings are to be 
placed 2,500 00 

For repairing superintendent's quarters, a building erected, by all accounts, 
considerably upwards of a century ago, and now sadly out of order 3, 225 00 

For keeping f^as and steam works in repair 500 00 

For repairs of all kinds 5,000 00 



For the wages qf the faUcwing penona : 



Assistant librarian 

Six watchmen, at $1 37^ per day, each 

One messenger 

One attendant at recitation hall, $18 per month 

Ooe attendant at laboratory, $16 per month 

One attendant at library building, the observatory, and chapel, $18 per month . 
One head manager to superintend both gas and steam works, per day, $2 25 . . 

Two attendants at gas apparatus, at $1 25 per day, each 

Two attendants at steam apparatus, at $1 25 per day, each 

One mechanic, to superintend and be head workman at workshop, at $1 75 per 



day . 



Ten laborers, to keep in order and attend students* quarters and public grounds, 
at$10per month, each 



OonUngeni expentei. 

For materials for heating and lighting the esublishment , 

For the purchase of books for library 

For stationery, blank books and forms 

For furniture and fixtures for public buildings 

For incidental expenses and repairs in the astronomical and philosophical de- 
partments 

For all other incidental expenses, printing, freight 

Total amount required for the Naval Academy for year ending Jane 30, 1859. .. 
Amount appropriated for year ending June 2M), 1858 



26,225 00 


700 00 


3,01122 


312 OU 


216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


821 ^ 


912 50 


912 50 


638 75 


1,640 00 


9,596 32 


3,950 00 


2,000 00 


500 00 


2,000 00 


400 00 


1,000 00 


9,850 00 



45,671 22 
42,307 22 



D. N. INGRAHAM, Ckirfo/ the Bmam. 
Bureau of OaDNASCi and Htdboobafht, October 15, 1857. 



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SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. 



799 



I. 

Estimate of the amount required for the pay of officers and others 
propof*edfor duty a^ the United States Naval Acadtmy for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1859, chargeable to the appropriation for the 
^^ pay of the navy.'* 



One superintendent, (oftptain) 

One eommandaat of midshipmeny (commander) 

Three Mustantt for commandant of midahipmen, to aid in inBtmcting in sea- 

manahip, praoiical gunnery, and for police duties, (lieutenants) 

One surgeon 

One chaplain •••• 

One professor of astronomy and navigation 

One professor of mathematics 

One professaor of field artillery and infantry tactics 

One professor of natural and experimental philosophy 

One professor of English studies 

One profesior of the French language 

One professor of the Spanish language 

One professor of drawing and teacher of the art of defence 

One assistant professor of astronomy, (lieutenant) 

Three assistant professors of mathematics, ( lieutenants) 

Three assistant professors of English studies 

One assistant professor of natural and experimental philosophy 

One assistant professor of French 

One secretary 

One clerk to superintendent 

One clerk to purser 

One hundred and fifty acting midshipmen as students, at $350 each 

Onegunner*s mate 

One hospital steward 

One quarter gunner 

One coxswain to attend to boats 

One steward for acting midshipmen's mess 

One cook for acting midshipmen's mess 

Two seamen—one to assist gunner's mate, and the other to keep mechanics* 

time, for police duties, &c 

One ordinary seaman to attend hospital 

One master of the band 

Six musicians of the 1st class 

ive musicians of the 2d class 

One drummer and one fifer, payable from the appropriation for the marine 

corps , 



1^,800 00 
1,900 00 

3,600 00 
2,250 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 IK) 
1,500 (m 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 Oi) 
1,050 00 
4,500 00 
3,500 00 
1,0(10 00 
1,000 00 
1,250 00 
700 00 
500 00 
52,500 00 



288 00 
288 00 
216 00 

576 00 

193 00 

312 00 

1,512 00 

1,080 00 

432 0(1 



95,991 00 



Amount appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858. 



96,831 00 



D. N. INGRAHAM, Chirfofth^ Bmrtam. 
BvRKAU or OftDifAiioB A5D Htdroqrapht, OctohtT 15, 1857. 



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800 



BEPOBT OF THB 



J. 

Estimate of the amount required for the American Ephemeria and Nauti- 
cal Almanac for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 



For lalarieBof computers 

For purchate of paper, printiDg, dec, in order to publish, to the year 1859, the 
Nautical Almauac for the year 1862, and for jcaslonal printixig, stationery, 
books, binding, &o •— ••••.. 

For the twenty-four new planets discoTered since 1849 ••. ..«•• 

For new planetary tables •«••«•«.••«••««••• 

For auxiliary tables .^ 

For extra editions of the Tolumes already published »...•••• 

Clerk 

Cootingent, including rent of office, fuel, senrant hire, &o. •—•..*« .»»•.•«••.. 



Amount appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858. 



$16,350 00 



3,630 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

80O 00 

500 00 

700 00 



S6,880 00 
26,880 00 



D. N. INORAHAM, Ckirfqftkt 
BoftBAU or Ordnawox akd Htdroorapbt, Oetobtr 16, 18&7. 



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8ECBBTABT OF THE NAVT. 



801 



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€02 BEPORT OP THE *^ 

No. 4. 

Navy Departbiknt, 
Bureau of Conatructiony dkc.y Nov, 19, 1857- 

8ir: I have the honor to transmit herewith two copies of the an- 
nual estimates called for bj your letter of the 19th August, 1857, ac- 
companied by a report, with an abstract of the same. 
Bespectlully, your obedient servant. 

JOHN LENTHALL, 

Chief of the Bureau. 
Hon. I. ToucET, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, Ac. 
Estimates for the fiscal year ending ZQth JunCy 1859. 

Navy Department, 
Bureau of Construction^ dc^ November 19, 1857. 

Sir: In compliance with your instructions, it is respectfully sub- 
mitted that, in addition to the balance that may remain on band at 
the close of the present fiscal year, which may not be liable for the 
then existing contracts, there will be required to maintain the ships 
of the navy, in condition for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1859, 
with the increased number of men authorized at the last session of 
Congress, the sum of $2,850,000, being $27,000 less than the amount 
appropriated for the present fiscal year ; the difference mainly arising 
from the different classes of ships to be repaired and the adoption of 
the lowest estimate. 

For the completion of the steam sloops- of-war, authorized at the 
last session of Congress ; and, in addition to the one million dollars 
already appropriated, the further sum of $1,350,000 will be required, 
exclusive of the armament. 

The deficiency in the number of the smaller classes of sailing ves- 
sels may be again brought to notice, arising from their decay and loss, 
and further by two of the sloops-of-war being used for purposes not 
immediately connected with this bureau, although their expenses are 
paid from its funds. The ordnance practice ship takes a sloop-of-war 
of the first class, and the Annapolis school ship another ; and the 
alterations required to adapt them to those purposes interferes with 
their being used on any other service. 

It will be perceived, from the statement of the expenditure from the 
'^contingent" fund by this bureau, that most, if not all the objects 
therein enumerated, can be as readily estimated as other expenditures, 
and it is recommended that the appropriation for this object be in- 
cluded in that for *' construction, equipment and repairs." This, it 
is thought, may be conducive to economy, making the^esponsibility 

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SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. 803 

more direct than when sucli expenditures are drawn by several bureaus 
from a common fund. 

Should this be approved, it will merely increase the sum above 
asked for, under the head of '^ construction, equipment and repairs," 
by the amount of $50,000, and reduce to that extent the amount 
estimated for '^ contingent," leaving the latter fund solely for the 
legitimate objects of the department, and not to be used for purposes 
of this bureau. 

The bureau of ordnance and hydrography has been permitted, for 
some years, to include its incidental expenses in its general estimate. 

The wants of the service, and particularly the increase in the num- 
ber of screw propeller steamers, will make an additional ''dry dock" 
necessary at the principal yards, which would much facilitate the fit- 
ting of ships ; for in many stages of their repairs it is iiipossible to 
remove them, however urgent may be the necessity ; and, in time of 
^r, one dock only at an important naval station would be seriously 
inconvenient, and even now great delays are experienced on that 
account. 

The advantage of accumulating seasoned timber materials is so 
great that it is again brought to notice, together with that of provid- 
ing sufficient protection for it, as it is upon the supply of the rough 
material that the efficiency of navy jatqs depend, however well they 
may be provided in other respects with workshops or machinery. 

The inconvenience that has been experienced from the deficiency in 
crooked live-oak timber will, to a great degree, be remedied by the con- 
tracts that have been made for a further supply, and it has also been 
found necessary to increase the amount or coal for steamers' use on 
foreign stations. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN LENTHALL, 

Chief of the Bureau. 

Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Abstract of Beport of Bureau of Constructiony dc. 

Vessels in commission, with increased number of men, estimates 
slightly less than those for the last fiscal year. 

Steam sloops, estimates for completion of. 

Armed steamers of small class for coast defence, &c., also steam 
tugs for principal navy yards for towing vessels, &c., suggested. 

Sailing vessels of small class, attention called to the decrease of. 

Contingent fund for this bureau, suggestions for including it with 
the appropriation for construction, &c. 

Suggests the construction of additional dry docks at the principal 
yards. 

Timber materials, suggests the accumulation of. 

Live-oak, want of certain prices will be remedied by existing con- 
tracts. 

Coal on foreign stations, increased demand for. Digitized by CjOOglc 



804 BEPOBT OF VHE 



A, 

Estimaie of the amount required for the expenditures of the Bureau of 
Constructiony Equipment and Repair^ for (he fiacoi year ending June 
30, 1859. 

For salary of chief of bureau, per act Slst August, 1842, 
volume 6, section 3, page 579, and act of March 3, 
1855, volume 10, page 675 |3,500 00 

For salary of engineer-in-chief, per act of August 31, 

1842, volume 5, section 4, page 577 3,000 00 

For salary of chief clerk, (4th class,) per act of March 
3, 1853, volume 10, page 210 1,800 00 

For salary of seven clerKS, (2d class,) per acts of March 3, 
1853, volume 10, page 210, and of April 22, 1854, 
page 276 9,800 00 

For salary of one clerk, (1st class,) per acts of March 3, * 

1853, and April 22, 1854 1,200 00 

For salary of one messenger, per acts of August 31, 

1842, volume 5, section 6, page 580, and of April 22, 

1854, and August 18, 1856 840 00 

For salary of two laborers — one for the bureau and one 

for the oflSce of engineer-in-chief— per act August 18, 

1856 : 1,200 00 

21,:^40 00 
Contingent expenses. 

For blank books, binding, stationery, printing, and 

miscellaneous items 800 00 

22,140 00 



B. 

Estimate for nay of commission^ warranty and petty officers and seamen^ 
including the engineer corps of the navy^ required for vessels proposed 
to he kept in commission^ including receiving vessels^ for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1859. 

Appropriation for the fiscal year ending June 30, 

1858 12,899,117 00 

Estimate for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859 2,889,250 00 



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8ECEETAEY OP THE NAVY. 



805 



c. 

Estimate of the amount required for objects under the direction of this 
bureau, payable from the appropriation for construction, equipment 
and repair^ for wear and tear of vessels in commission, including fuel 
for steamers and the purchase of hemp for the navy, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1859. 



Appropriation for the fiscal year ending Jnne 
30, 1858. 



Eitimate for tlie fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 
]859. 



Constmction, Ac $2,877,000 00 

Five steam sloops 1,000,000 00 



3,877,000 00 



Construction, ^ $3,850,000 00 

Five steam sloops 1,356,000 00 

4,200,000 00 



The excess arises in the estimate for the six steam sloops-of-war. 



D. 

Estimate of the amouiU required for the expenditures under the head 
of ^^ enumerated contingent'* for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 

Appropriation fur the fiscal year ending June 30, 1858. |350,000 00 
Estimate for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859 350,000 00 

RECAPITULATION OP ESTIMiTES. 

CivU. 

Salaries $21,340 00 

Contingent 800 00 

Navy. 

Pay of the navy 2,889,250 00 

Construction, &c 4,200,000 00 

Contingent enumerated 350,000 00 



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806 



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808 



BBPORT OF THB 



F. 
Vessels in ordinary, repairing, equipping, (tc. 



Name of yeBsel. 



Shipi^-thg-liM. 



Yermont .. 
Ck)l umbos. 
Delaware . 



Fr^faiei. 



Constitution ., 
United SUtes , 
Brandjrwine .. 

Ck)lumbia 

Potomac 

Baritan 

Santee 

Sabine 



Sloops, 



Macedonian . 
Jamestown.. 
Savannah .. 
Marion 



BriffB, 



Bainbridge 

Perry .. 

Fennimore C!ooper , 

Belief 

Belease , 

Dolphin 



JS^mmen. 



Boanoke 

Massachnsetts . 
John Hancock. 
Despatch 



Guns. 



84 
84 
84 



60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 



22 
22 
22 
16 



60 
9 
2 



Where built. 



Boston ...... 

Washington 

Oosport 

Bodton ...... ...... 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

—do 

...do 

PhilftdelphU 

Portsmouth 

New York 

Gosport, (rebuilt) 

Gosport..... 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Gosport 

Purchased 

Phlladslphia 

—do.... 

New York 

Gosport...... 

Transf'd from War Dep't. 
Boston 

Purchased.. ............ 



Date. 



1848 
1819 
1820 



1797 
1797 
1826 
1836 
1821 
1848 
1856 
1866 



1836 
1844 
1842 
1839 



1842 
1843 
1862 
1836 
1866 
1836 



1866 



1860 
1866 



Station. 



Boston .. 
Gosport. 
....do... 



Portsmouth. . 
Gosport..... 
New York... 

Gosport 

New York... 
Gosport .. . 
Portsmouth.. 
New York... 

Boston .... . 
Philadelphia . 
New York... 
Gosport 

Gosport 

....do....... 

Mare island.. 
New York... 

Boeton 

.-.-do 



Boston .... 

Bfare island. 
....do...... 

New York.. 



Vessels on the stocks and in progress of construction October 1, 1857. 

Skq^qf-tht-UM. 

Alabama Eittery. 

'Narginia Boston. 

New York Gosport. 

New Orleans Sacketfs Haibor. 

AtaiUary dmmfiigakt, 

Franklin Kittery. 

Colondo GoqK»rt. 

SteTcns' iron steamer .SK^lilVfioboken, N.J. 



SECRETAEY OP THE NAVY, 



809 



H, 



Abstract statement showing receipts and expenditures during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1857, and the value of aU stores on hand at the 
various navy yards on the 1st JuLy^ 1857. 



Nayy yards. 


On hand July 1, 
1856. 


Beceived. 


Expended. 


On hand July 1, 
1867. 


Kittary 

Charlestown 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia... 
Washington . .. 

Oosport 

Warrington.... 


$666,408 86 

1,435,463 20 

1,346,764 03 

469,398 70} 

424, 234 82 

1,508,239 47 

320, 184 87 


$198,662 00 
655,610 47 
476,040 07 
234, 108 84 
658,874 15 
441,793 22 
25, 164 69 


$113,375 36 
560,273 28 
507, 785 07 
177,075 61 
554,993 54 
384,074 41 
4.002 76 


$751,685 50 

1,530,800 39 

1,315,019 03 

526,426 93 

528,115 43 

1,565,958 28 

341,346 80 


Total 


6, 170, 688 95 


2,690,243 44 


2,301,580 03 


6,559,352 36 



I. 

Statement of the number of days' labor and its cost from the 1st Jvly^ 
1856, to the ZQth June^ 1857, /or the retspective navy yards for build' 
ingy repairing^ and equipping vessels of the navy^ or in receiving or 
securing stores and materials for those purposes. 



Nayy Tarda. 



Kitterj 

Charlestown 
Brooklyn ... 
Philadelphia 
Washington 
Gosport .... 
Warrington. 



Number of days' 
labor. 



61,012 
120, 103 
231,065f 
142, 187} 

84,846 
186,S63i 
4, 410 J 



818,968 



Cost of labor. 



M02,283 78 
225,215 95 
432,856 58 
264,669 96 
145,668 04 
821,535 49 
6,427 03 



1,488,736 83 



Average 
per diem. 



$2 00 



88 
87 
79 
71 
73 
46 



1 82 



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Navy Dbpartmekt, 
Bureau of Construction^ {fee, Novemb^ 19, 1857. 
Sir : In conformity with the act of the 3d March, 1843, I respect- 
fully transmit herewith duplicate abstracts of offers to furnish naval 
supplies coming under the cognizance of this bureau, exhibiting in 
scales from No. 1 to No. 8, inclusive, as well those which were rejected 
as those accepted, between the 21st October, 1856, (date of last report,) 
and the 19th November, 1857, and in conformity with the act of 2l8t 
April, 1808. I also transmit herewith duplicate lists of contracts 
made during the same period. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN LENTHALL, 

Chief of the Bureau. 
Hon. Isaac Toucy, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



No. 1. 



Scale of offers to furnish live-oak timber ^ under advertisement from the 
Bureau of Construction^ Equipment and Bepair, of May 2, 1857. 



No. 



Bidders. 



Charlestown 



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Philadelphia. 



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1 
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6 
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8 
9 
10 



Brown & McQtlvery. 

G. W. Lawrence 

(l J. Degraw....... 

S. B. Grice 

WilUam Deale 

David S. Walton 

James Bigler ....... 

Elijah Swift 

W. C. N.Swift 

Bodolphus N. Swift . 



$68,800 00 
83, 160 00 



81, 160 00 



$76,000 00 
71,400 00 



86, 600 00 
78,000 00 
79,760 00 
69,280 00 
63,660 00 



86, 600 00 
73,250 00 
76,080 00 
69,280 00 
62,600 00 



$71,400 00 
76,000 00 
86, 600 00 
71,660 00 



69,280 00 
63,650 00 



$71,400 00 
76,000 00 
86,600 00 
72, 760 00 
72,740 00 
69, 280 00 
62, 600 00 



Offer 10, of Bodolphus N. Swift, received on the I6th June, being after the time 
limited for the oonsideration of proposals and by direction of the department it was not 
entertained. 



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No. 8. 

Scale of offers for freight to China for 4,000 ions anthracite coal from 
the port of Philadelphia to HoThg Kong and Shanghai, uvder adver^ 
tisementfrom the Bureau of Conatructiony Equipment and Repair of 
August 13, 1857. 



No. 



Bidders. 



Number 
of tons. 



Deliverable 'Demurrage per 
at Hong I day per ton. 
Kong. I 



Deliverable 
at Shang- 
hai. 



Demurrage per 
day per ton. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

li 



J. D. Baker 

Henry L. Stevenson. 

Alex. L. Botts 

Qliddon k Williams. 

Workman & Ck> 

Weld & Co 

D. S. Stetson & Co.. 
Jerome A. Merritt .. 

Alfred Ladd 

James E. Ward & Co. 
Dawson & Hancock . . 

Charles Peterson 

A. A. Frazer ... 

C. J. F. Bimey 



1,600 



1,200 
1,600 



1,360 
7 or 800 I 
1,400 I 



$13 00 

8 00 
12 60 
12 00 
18 00 
12 00 
22 00 

9 98 

8 96 

9 95 
10 00 

8 80 
10 00 
10 00 



$100 00 

11 

100 00 

100 00 

120 00 



20 

100 to 150 00 

100 00 

100 00 

160 00 



66 to 90 00 



$16 00 

8 00 
12 60 
12 00 
18 00 

1 14 00 
22 00 
11 98 

9 96 
10 96 



$100 00 

11 

100 00 

100 00 

120 00 



20 

100 to 150 00 

100 00 

100 00 



9 80 
10 00 
10 00 



66 to 90 00 



Offers No. 2, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 declined. 
Offer No. 3 accepted, but ship would not pass inspection. 
Offer No. 6 of Weld & Co. accepted. 



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900 BEPORT OF THE 



No. 5. 

Abstract of annual report from the Bureau of Provisums and Clothing , 
dated November 6, 1857. 

Transmits estimates, with abstracts and statements. 

Sets forth the value of preserved vegetables and preserved meats for 
naval use. 

Recommends the establishment of bakeries for the navy. 

Asks for appropriation on account of provisions, &c., issued to 
"supernumeraries" returning from Nicaragua. 

Renews recommendation for creation of grade of assistant pursers. 

Renews recommendation for increase of pay of pursers' clerks at 
navy yards. 



Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, 

November 6, 1857. 

Sir: In compliance with your instructions dated August 19, 1857, 
I have the honor to submit the enclosed estimates marked A, B and 
C, for the wants of this bureau for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 
1859, with abstracts and statements marked D to 0, inclusive. 

The affairs of this bureau are in good condition. Its efforts to pro- 
cure from contractors the prompt delivery of stores, of the best quality, 
and to distribute them seasonably to ships and foreign squadrons, 
have been ably seconded by the inspectors in charge of provisions, 
&c., and have been, in a great degree, successful. From the very 
high prices of provisions, during the last fiscal year, a few of the con- 
tractors were delinquent, in part, but no great inconvenience or loss 
to the government has resulted therefrom. 

Preserved vegetables. 

The most valuable improvement which has been made, for many 
years, in the diet of the sailor, is the introduction of vegetables pre- 
pared, by a French process, in such a manner as to retain their nutri- 
tive and wholesome qualities for years and in all climates. 

Modern science has discovered a mode by which vegetables are per- 
fectly preserved by desiccation. In 1845, Masson, a French gardener, 
conceived the idea of preserving vegetables of different kinds by dry- 
ing and pressing, and in 1850 introduced the process to public notice. 

Vegetables, thus treated, could be kept many years, but, though 
adopted in the French marine with some success, extensive experiments 
made in our navy proved that the difficulty of cooking them properly 
was so great as to make them useless to us. But, subsequently, Morel 
Fatio perfected the method of Masson by steaming the vegetables 
before drying and pressing, and now it is an established fact that, 
when thus prepared, they are easily preserved for many years, retain- 
ing their nutritious and wholesome qualities, and their original flavor. 

Digitized 



SECRETARY OF THfc NAVY. 901 

almost unimpaired, and they may be cooked properly by the most 
inexperienced person. The advantages flowing from the use of these 
vegetables by ships on long cruises are inestimable ; and when it is 
added that sixteeen thousand of these rations are contained in a cubic 
yard, and that the cost of each ration of the ** mixed vegetables" 
(composed of carrots, turnips, potatoes, cabbage and onions) is but 
one cent and six-tenths, it will not be deemed unreasonable in me to 
recommend their substitution for dried fruit, rice or cheese, at least 
twice or thrice in each week. By your sanction a quantity has been 
procured and supplied to the several squadrons, with orders to sub- 
stitute them for dried fruit once in each week. 

Should the reports from ships using these vegetables prove favor- 
able, as is confidently anticipated, it will unquestionably be advanta- 
geous to the naval service to continue and extend their use. 

Preserved meats. 

It is desirable that the new processes for preserving food which have 
been presented for public favor within the last few years should be 
fairly tested and adopted in our navy as soon as a more wholesome 
and palatable diet for sailors can be found. The subject of alimenta- 
tion has, within the present century, engaged much of the attention 
of men of science in Europe and in the United States. 

In 1809 Appert, of London, invented the mode of preserving meats 
fresh, by partially cooking them and by expelling the air from the 
glass or tin vessels in which they are placed, and hermetically sealing 
the same. 

Many attempts have been made to improve upon this mode, but 
hitherto, it is believed, without success. Meats preserved in this 
manner have formed part of the ration in the British and French 
navies for some years, and they are doubtless preferable for a portion 
of the time to salted meats. It is to be hoped that some one of the 
many ingenious minds so intensely engaged in inventions at the pre- 
sent day may evolve a system for more perfectly pn;serving meats for 
sea use. Meantime, it would be advisable, in my opinion, to give to 
the Secretary of the Navy the power to substitute preserved or desic- 
cated fresh meats for the salted meats now composing a part of the 
navy ration, whenever he shall be satisfied that the health and com- 
fort of the sailor would be promoted thereby. 

Bakery. 

In this connexion I would again renew my recommendation for the 
erection of a bakery for the navy at some one of the navy yards on 
the Atlantic coast. 

The health and contentment of the sailor, and the efficiency of the 
ship, depend more upon the quality of the bread on board, than upon 
any other part of the ration. Yet, the present system of procuring 
navy bread, by contract with the lowest bidder, makes it impossible 
to obtain that which is best, or will keep longest at sea. 

Bread may be made of adulterated, or old and deteriorated flour 



902 REPORT OF THE 

which has been, by chemical process, so far restored as to appear 
sweet and good, and to deceive all but the most skillful judges. Tet 
time soon shows its defects, though too late to prevent the misfortune 
of having bread which is not only unwholesome and injurious to the 
sailor, but causes pecuniary loss to the government, and seriously in- 
terferes with the movements of the ship. 

Southern flour, made from hard wheat, keeps much better than that 
from northern or western wheat ; hence the Haxall, G-allego, and 
other southern brands are, almost exclusively^ sought for exportation 
to tropical countries, though others are equally good for use on shore. 
The bread made from this southern flour is more compact, and lasts 
longer than that made from any other kind. 

The British and French governments not only bake the bread for 
their navies in their own bakeries, but they buy the wheat, and grind 
it into flour in their own mills. The reason for this is two-fold ; first, 
to prevent adulteration ; and second, to secure bread made of the kind 
of flour best suited to sea use. The finest and whitest flour does not 
make the most wholesome bread, nor that which keeps longest at sea. 
A certain proportion of bran is found to improve bread in its preserva- 
tion, as well as in its nutritive and wholesome qualities. 

Under the present system of contracts, competition not unfre- 
quently leads bakers to engage to furnish bread at ruinous prices. 
Hence, it is not surprising that they should endeavor to save them- 
selves by using inferior, and even unwholesome flour, the faults of 
which cannot always be detected. 

The whole quantity of bread condemned in the navy for the last 
six years was 1,599,262^ pounds, costing $T9,714 04. It cannot be 
doubted that a large portion of this loss would have been avoided had 
there been a public bakery for the navy. 

The expense of building a bakery of the most approved construc- 
tion, and of sufficient capacity to supply the wants of the navy for 
years to come, would not equal the loss of bread, by condemnation, 
every three years. 

Considering tbat the health of the sailor and the efficiency of the 
ship depend so much upon the bread on board, and that under the 
existing system of procuring it so little reliance can be placed upon 
its being of the best, or even of good quality, I cannot too strongly 
express the hope that a bakery will be authorized at New York or at 
Norfolk. 

I would also recommend that a government bakery be established 
at the navy yard at Mare island for the supply of the Pacific and East 
India squadrons. 

Hitherto a great part of the bread for our naval forces in the Pacific 
has been made at Valparaiso. This should be no longer permitted. 
The wheat crop in California is now so abundant as not only to sap- 
ply the wants of the resident population, but to afford a considerable 
surplus for exportation. Instead of taking large quantities of bread- 
stuffs from the Atlantic States and from Chili, San Francisco is now 
sending cargoes of wheat to New York. 

With suitable facilities for baking the naval forces M the Pacific 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8E0BETARY OF THE NAYT. 903 

can be better and more cheaply supplied with bread at Mare island 
thaa from any other quarter. 

The bread for the £ast India squadron is now received from our own 
Atlantic ports, or it is baked in China from American flour sent out 
for the purpose, mixed with that of the country. 

The average passage from New York to Hong Kong may be stated 
at 120 days, while from San Francisco to the same port is but 40 days ; 
and the natural course of trade gives facilities for cheap and frequent 
shipments to China by which the squadron stationed there may be 
supplied from California with bread made in our own country, which 
has not passed through the tropics twice, and which has not been made 
from flour after a voyage of 19,500 miles. 

A bakery at Mare island need not, for the present wants of the ser- 
vice, be as large as the one proposed for the Atlantic, but in view of 
the possibility of a war with a maritime power^ as well as of the im- 
portance of our possessions and commerce in the Pacific, it would seem 
advisable to build with some reference to the prospective wants of the 
navy. 

Issues to Supernumeraries from Nicaragua. 

During the present year large numbers of Americans returning from 
Nicaragua found refuge on board several of our national ships and, 
being in a destitute condition, were fed and clothed from the stores of 
the government. 

Humanity called for this expenditure, which seems in every ship to 
have been kept within moderate limits ; but as the issues were prop- 
erly chargeable neither to the appropriation for ''clothing for the 
navy" nor to that for ''provisions," I respectfully recommend an ad- 
ditional appropriation sufficient to reimburse the amounts taken from 
the two appropriations mentioned. 

The aggregate expenditures for this purpose in the "Wabash," 
'^Roanoke," "Cyane," and "Saratoga," amount to $3,106 27 for 
*'clothing," and $4,004 14 for "provisions." 

There are also some issues of small stores to the same persons, 
amounting to $265 75 in all, which should be restored to the appro- 
priation "pay of the navy." The "Independence" and '^St. Mary's" 
made similar expenditures under all these heads, but, in the absence 
of official returns, the amounts cannot be stated. 

Assistant Pursers. 

The creation of a grade of assistant pursers is again recommended 
as being calculated to give greater efficiency to the pay department 
and to relieve commanding officers of small vessels from the perform- 
ance of duties which do not legitimately belong to them. 

The commander of a vessel-of-war ought not to be required to do the 
duty of a purser in addition to his own In such case he cannot give 
his full attention to his duties as commander ; and besides he is placed 
in a false position by acting as paymaster to his crew when there can 
be no umpire between them — himself bein^ the arbiter as well as a 
party in any question which may arise relatmg to accounts. 

From his want of acquaintance with pursers' duties a commanding 



904 KEPOBT OF THE 

officer acting as purser is sure to encounter losses on the settlement of 
his accounts at the end of the cruise, yet he receives no additional pay 
for his increased responsibility and labor. 

The pay department of the navy would, doubtless, be improved by 
the appointment of assistant pursers who should be subject to an ex- 
amination before appointment, whose appropriate service should be in 
small vessels ; who should not be required to give bonds for so large 
an amount as pursers are required to do, and whose pay should be less 

Pursers* Clerks. 

The pay of pursers' clerks at navy yards was, by the law of 1842, 
fixed at $500 per annum, a sum quite inadequate to the services or 
the decent support of those officers. The clerk of the yard, the first 
clerk to commandant, and the first clerk to the naval storekeeper, 
receive $1,200 per annum each, yet none of them have more arduous 
or responsible duties, nor do their places call for more capacity or 
integrity than those of pursers* clerks at the same yards. The me- 
chanics at those yards are all better paid. The mere copying clerk 
in Washington is paid more than twice as much, and the colored 
laborer in the departments receives $100 per annum more than a^ 
purser's clerk, who keeps the rolls of one hundred or two hundred 
officers and two thousand men, and who prepares the accounts for the 
disbursement of a million dollars per annum. Since the year 1853, 
Congress has annually appropriated $750 for the pay of each of those 
officers ; but, as the appropriations were based upon the estimates 
from the department, and not upon the existing law, the fourth 
auditor has recently prohibited the further payment of more than. 
$500 per annum, and has notified the officers mentioned that they 
must refiind the difference between the two sums last named. 

It is to be hoped that Congress, in its wisdom, will avert this 
calamity from a most deserving class of officers, and will give them a 
pay in some measure commensurate with the importance of their 
duties. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. BRIDGE, Chief of Bureau. 

Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



Schedule of tlie papers accompanying the report of the chief of the Bureau 
of Provisions and Clothing to the Secretary of the Navy, darted No- 
vember 6, 1857. ^ 

A. — Estimate of the expenses of the bureau for the fiscal year, 

B. — Estimate for provisions for the navy for the fiscal year. 

C. — Estimate for contingent for the navy for the fiscal year. 

D. — Statement showing the value of provisions, clothing, and small 

stores on hand. 
E. — Statement showing the value of shipments made by the bureau 



to foreign stations. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SECRETAKY OF THE NAVY. 905 

F. — Abstract of proposals received for navy supplies. 

O. — Statement showing the cost of provisions, clothing, and small 

stores condemned. 
H. — Abstract of proposals received for clothing and clothing materials. 
I. — Abstract of proposals received for small stores. 
K. — Abstract of proposals received for salt-water soap, candles, &c. 
L. — Abstract of proposals received for beef and pork. 
M. — Abstract of proposals received for fresh beef and vegetables. 
N. — Abstract of proposals received for transportation of stores. 
0. — Statement of contracts made by the bureau during the year. 




^ 



A. KV^r^ , 

EstinuUe of the expenses of the Bureau of Proviaiona and Clothing for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 

For salary of one clerk of the fourth class, per act of 

Congress of March 3, 1853 $1,800 Oa 

For salaries of four clerks of the second class, per acts 

of Congress of March 3, 1853, and April 22, 1854 5,600 00 

For salary of one messenger, per joint resolution of Con- 
gress of August 18, 1856..... 840 00 

For salary of one laborer, per joint resolution of Congress 
of August 18, 1856 600 00 

8,840 00 

Contingent. 
For blank books, stationery, and miscellaneous items... TOO 00" 

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858 — 

For salaries of clerks, messenger, and laborer 8,840 00 

For contingent .* TOO 00 

9,540 00 

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending June 30, 
1859— 

For salaries of clerks, messenger, and laborer 8,840 00 

For contingent TOO 00 

9,540 00 



H. BRIDGE, 

Chief of Bureau^ 
Navy Department, 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. Digitized by GoOglc 



906 EEPOBT OF THE 

B. 

Ustimate from the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing for that portion 
of the naval service coming under its oognizance for the fisoid year 
ending June 30, 1859. 

ESnMATB FOR PR07ISI0NS FOR 8,500 MEN. 

One ration per day for 8,500 men would be, for the year, 

3,102,500 rations, at 25 cents each $775,625 00 

One ration per day for 750 commission and warrant offi- 
cers "attached to vessels for sea service" for the year 
would be 273,750 rations, at 25 cents each 68,437 50 

One ration per day for 750 officers and marines "at- 
tached to vessels for sea service" would be 273,750 
rations, at 25 cents each 68,437 50 

Additional sum required for an estimated number of 
4,000 men, who may decline to draw the spirit por- 
tion of their ration, as provided by the acts of March ^ 
3, 1847, and August 3, 1848 29,200 00 

' 941,700 00 

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending June 30, 

1859 941,700 00 

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1858 850,450 00 

Excess 91,250 00 

This excess is occasioned by the addition of one thousand men to 
the navy, per act of Congress, March 3, 1857. 

H. BRIDGE, 

Chief of Bureau. 
Navy Department, 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 



Estimate of the sum which will he required by the Bureau of Provisions 
and Clothing under the head of contingent for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1859. 

CONTINGENT. 

To meet the demands upon the bureau for candles, freight 
to foreign stations, transportation from station to sta- 
tions within the United States, cooperage, pay of assist- 
ants to inspectors, advertising for proposals, printing 
pursers' blanks, and stationery for cruising vessels.... $68,000 00 

H. BRIDGE^ 

Chiefof Bureau, 
Navy Dbpartbcent, ^ Digitized by GooqIc 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. ^ 



SECKETAKY OP THE NAVY. 



907 



D. — Statement showing the value of provieiona^ clothing^ small stores ^ 
^^and contingent on hand at the United States navy yards and at 
naval depots on foreign stations y July 1, 1857. 



stations. 



Date. 



ProviBions. 



Clothing. 



Small Btores.' Gonting't. 



Portsmouth, N. H 

Boston, Mass 

New York 

Philadelphia. Pft 

Washington, D. C 

Norfolk, Va 

Warrington, Fla 

Mare Island, Cal 

Valpanuso, Chile 

Bio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Speaa, Sardinia 

Porto Pftiya, Cape de 

Yerd Islands 

Hong Kong, China . . . 



July 1,1867. 
.-.-do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
-do. 



.do 

.do...... 



$348 62 
61,559 55 
72, 920 49 
2,381 62 
3 182 10 
80,105 11 
13,850 30 
31,420 15 
41,410 05 
24,796 91 
22,494 95 

17,294 08 
18,231 28 



$90,534 66 

154,835 18 

9,502 56 

5, 643 88 

65, 120 59 

18, 254 38 

36,311 14 

18, 262 50 

16, 176 32 

24,691 02 

13,641 63 
44,780 98 



$6, 113 90 

16,071 36 

854 86 

291 83 

II, 650 58 

4,830 23 

7,298 04 

3,541 45 

5,518 64 

6,684 63 



$407 42 

4, 260 70 

6,685 9$ 

48 81 

263 46 
2,444 96 
1, 203 81 
1,765 11 

596 48 
1,477 30 
1,311 28 



Total. 



889,995 21 



2,635 11 ; 2,304 67 
4,085 29 



497,754 84 69,576 92 22,769 94 



Natt DiPARTHKirr, Bureau vf Provitum and Clothing. 



E. — Statem^ent showing the value of shipments made by the Bureau of 
Provisions and Clothing to the United States naval squadrons on 
foreign stations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857. 



stations. 



China squadron .. 

Do 

Do 

Mediterranean squad' n 

Do 

African squadron 

Do 

Brasil squadron 

Do 

Psdfic squadron 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 



Date. 



Provisions. 



Not. 27, 1856. 
April 3,1857 
June 9,1857. 
July 29,1856. 
Jan. 10,1867 
Dec. 12,1858. 
Feb. —,1857. 
Sept. 6,1856. 
April 4,1857. 
July 12,1856. 
Sept. 18,1856. 
Oct. 25,1856. 
Oct. 30,1856. 
Nov. is, 1856. 
Nov. 17, 1866. 
Jan. —,1857. 
Mar. —,1857. 
April 18, 1867. 
April 20, 1867. 
May 9,1857. 
June 5, 1857. 



Total 245,037 16 



$6, 113 30 
16,053 21 
35,055 S3 
19,838 31 
18,836 38 
13,002 16 

6,564 75 
19, 574 31 
17,670 21 

4,010 27 



21,592 06 
344 73 

10,997 74 
196 67 



S, 118 62 
34,238 86 

2,451 20 

827 34 

16,661 82 



Clothing. 



$562 26 

2,287 70 

13,197 75 

1,713 98 

6.432 25 

2,640 23 

3,683 04 

4,487 71 



1,096 87 
7,263 00 
1,206 67 



1,890 61 

19,896 34 

367 14 

1,181 18 

2,765 67 



Soudl stores, 



$1,301 03 
2, 138 67 

865 15 
6,240 96 
2,791 81 

243 86 
2.086 85 
2,356 04 
1,866 38 



608 80 
2,446 12 



193 12 
4,868 88 



2,118 27 



69,660 20 29,009 93 



Contingent 



$907 20 



748 80 
100 00 



197 81 
1,890 00 



1,068 87 



1,653 10 
443 60 



453 60 



7,976 2S 



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8ECBETAST OF THE NAYT. 



919 



I. 

Sdiedde of propaaala received /or ^^ email stores f" under the advertise^ 
ment of the Bureau of Provmona and Clothing y dated April 13 , 
1857. 



Articles. 



Boxes, BhavioG; each. 

Brushes, shaviDg **... 

finishes, scrub ••.•• ..*' 

BniKhtt*, shoe.-.....-.....,,, **--- 

Pushes, clothes ..---'*..., 

Buttons, navy, Test...... ......gross-, 

Battons, nary, medlom .."... 

ButtuDs, ooat. . ....-.**..,, 

Buttuud, dtsadeye .--**.-,, 

Blacking, boxes dozen.. 

BesHwax........... ..pound.. 

Combs, coarse....... ...... ....dozen-. 

Combs, fine •• 

Cotton, spools of...... **.... 

Onus, for hats........ 100 hands.. 

Handkerchiefs, cotton..-.. ..each.. 

Jack knives ** 

Needles 1.000.. 

Basurs each-. 

Baaor straps ............ .**.... 

Bibbon, hat...... . .....•--.. ..piece.. 

Soap, shaving ..... ......dozen.. 

HlK, sewing ..pound-. 

Scissors............ .-each.. 

Spoons ....•.••..**.... 

lliread, black and white........ pound.. 

Tape, white... dozen.. 

Tape, black ♦» 

Tidmbles • ....each.. 



1 

1- 


1 

U 

1 


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1 


1 


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i 


$0 27 


$0 27 


$0 27 


to 28 


$0 20 


6 


6 


6 


3 


4 


22 


20 


18 


22 


20 


20 


20 


22 


20 


17 


10 


10 


10 


6 


9 


1 90 


2 00 


2 76 


1 80 


2 26 


2 76 


8 uO 


2 76 


S 00 


4 00 


3 70 


4 00 


6 00 


4 00 


4 00 


16 


16 


10 


10 


26 00 


66 


60 


46 


46 


40 


86 


SO 


33 


20 


26 


2 60 


2 60 


2 60 


2 60 


2 60 


2 00 


1 80 


1 80 


1 96 


1 86 


47 


46 


44 


46 


46 


2 27 


2 26 


3 60 


2 26 


2 26 


18 


11 


10 


14 


12 


28 


28 


30 


28 


29 


70 


70 


70 


SO 


70 


27 


26 


26 


26 


20 


20 


20 


17 


16 


28 


78 


64 


67 


76 


72 


12 


12 


20 


10 


12 


6 26 


4 26 


6 60 


4 26 


6 00 


17 


16 


16 


14 


14 


12 


8 


6 


12 


10 


98i 


90 


96 


92 


93 


30 


30 


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30 


30 


18 


20 


20 


20 


20 


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1 


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Burwu sf Finvukmt and ClaOung. 



Digitized by 



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BEPOBT OF THK 



K. 

Ahatrad of jpropaaals received for ^^eaU-water aoap," ^^ candles," *'i 
tard aeedj*' ^^VUtck pepper y'* " hottlea and oorkSf" under the advertise- 
ment of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing ^ dated April 13,1 857. 



Names. 



Woodman & Hill 

B. G. & J. U. Sawyer.. 

Wm. MathewB 

Wm. G. Baker 

E. A. & W. Winchester.. 
Charles Callaghan, jr.«. 

Heniy B. Williams 

Isaac C. Noe — 

WiUiam Lang 

John A. Higgins . 



Besidenee. 



Boston 

Pittsburg, Fa... 

New York 

New Bedford.. 

Boston 

New York.... 

Boston 

New York 

Boston 

Norfolk 



I 



4JUL 



«* 



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33 



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63 



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2 00 



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Natt DiPABTiDBMT, Bunou qf PrtmrioM mid OkOmkg, 



L. 

Abstract of proposals received for the supply of ^^navy heef** and ^^navy 
pork*' for the year 1868, under the advertisement of the Bureau^ 
Provisions ana Clothing ^ dated June 2, 1867. 



Names. 



Sdmnnd B. Di<^ermaQ.. 

D. Pulsifer & Co 

James G. Adams ... 

E. A. & W. Winchester. 

Thomas Lewis 

Tunis Van Brunt 

Hiram Slocum 

H. M Freeman 

Needham M. Standart... 

Cngin&Go 

James W. McCulloh ... 

David Cooper 

Henry Bieman & Sons ... 



Besidenoe. 



Milwaukie.Wis.. 
Boston, Mass.... 
Baltimore, Md .. 

Boston, Mass 

Norfolk, Va .... 

New York 

Troy, N. Y 

New York 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

New York 

New York 

Philadelphia . .. 
Baltimore, Md.. 



Beef, per bbl., 



019 60 



$18 91 
19 66 
21 40 



19 09 



19 66 
18 88 



19 90 



I 



19 86 



I 



$19 91 



18 49 



19 26 
18 19 



30 00 



19 69 



19 96 

19 48 



19 90 20 40 



Pork, per bbl., at— 



$21 1 
22 96 
22 40 



23 76 
23 39 
23 26 



22 48 
21 l\i 
26 60 



I 



022 66 



029 10 



22 96 
^2 89 

23 00 



21 48 
20 93 
:!6 26 
24 67 



1 



23 89 
23 60 



23 48 
21 83 



24 41 



Navt DiPABimifT, Bureau rf Frovitkm and CkOdng. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 



921 



M. 

Abstract ofproposcda received for the supply qf/resh beef and vegetaMes 
at the several navy yards during the fiscal year ending June 30 , 1868^ 
under advertisements of the respective navy agents^ by direction of the 
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 



Names. 



Joseph B. Gnrrier 

Wells Chase 

J. B. Severance ............... 

Chapln & Sawyer ...... . .. 

Jchn Walsh 

WiD. H. and Charles G. Cornell . 

William Keeler* 

Henry A. Weeks...... 

William Goodheart 

Henry and L S. Boraef .... 

Gotleib Scheldt 

Edward Wartman 

John Sherry 

Wm. H. Muckelroy 

Oeorfre W. Pftppler 

Philip Otterback 

WUllam Ward 

B. H. Ctttherel 

Oelestino Serra 

WUliam McVoy 

William T. Bell 

8. B. Sherwood 

G. W. Greene 

A. Matelin 



Where to be delivered. 



Portsmouth, N. H. 
Charlestown, Mass. 
do 



do 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

.. .do 

do 



do 

do 

Philadelphia, Pft. 
do 



do 

do 

Baltimore, Md.. 
do 



Washington, D. C . 

Gosport, Va 

do 



Warrington, Fa. 

do 

do 



San Francisco, Cal. 

do 

do 



Fresh beef, 
per pound. 



$0 



11} a 
15 a 
10 a 



12} 

IS 

10 

?* 

8 
8 

lot 

lOf 

11 
11 

17 
11 
11 

8 

8 

13 
13 
16 



Vegetables, 
per pound. 



Navt Dvabthivt, 

Bureau of ProvmonM und CkQmg. 



• No guaranty. 



N. 



Ahsirad of proposals received for the transportation of stores from the 
navy yard at GharUstowny Massachusetts y to Porto Praya, Cape de 
VerdCy under an advertisement of the navy agent j (by direction of the 
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing,) dated December 1, 1856. 



Names. 



Lombard &Co....... 

N. W. Bridge 

Thomas Lord* 

C. J. F. Binney 

James Williamsf 

Baker & Morrill 

N. W. Coffin 

Wheelwright & Cobb . 



Name of vessel. 



Price per bbl. 



$1 65 
1 38 
1 23 
1 50 
98 
1 72} 
1 48 
1 85 



• Bid withdrawn. 



t Not ftfui^y Google 



922 



BEPOST OF THE 



Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of stores from the 
navy yard ai Brooklyn, N, T , to Spezziaj in Sardiniaj under an 
advertisement of the navy agent, {by direction of the Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing,) dated December 20, 1856. 



Names. 


Name of Teflsel. 


Price per bbl. 


James W. Elwell & Co 


Warden............. ..... 


ft2 00 


G. A Ferris&Co 


Grapeshot.... ................... 


S 60 


Snow & Burgess.... -..-«.--.«.- 


Arthnr ....... 


1 S5 


Neamith & Sons .- - 


RAnjomln T Har^n 


1 74 









Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of sf^oresfrom the 
navy yard at Charlestown, Mass. , to Mare island, California, under 
an advertisement of the navy agent, (by direction of the Bureau of 
Provisions and Clothing,) dated April 4, 1857. 



Names. 


Name of vessel. 


Price per bbl. 


Glidden & Williams 


Ship John lAird 


$2 50 


Nathaniel Winsor, jr., & Co 

Walden Porter . ....... 


Belle of the Sea 


1 78 


Crystal Palace............... 


1 97 


James Blaisdell ... ..... 


Elisa I£1U 


1 is 


N. W. Coffin 


Clarendon .................. 


1 88 









Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of stores from the 
navy yard ai Brooklyn, N. F., to Hong Kong, China, under an ad- 
V€rtisem£nt of the navy agent, (by direction of the Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing,) dated April 27, 1857. 



Names. 


Name of vessel. 


Price per bbl. 


A. Ladd 


Swordflsh ... .......... 


$1 55 


W. Bartlett 


J. W. Snow..-.. 


1 49 


Eklmund Gellebrand .......... 


Barque Willebroder .............. 


1 10 


Charles H. Coffin, ^conditional)...... 




1 09 


James E. Ward ...... .. 


Game Cock 


1 60 


Gary & Co ............ .. 


EIndeavor ....................... 


2 00 









Digitized by 



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8ECBBTAET OP THE NAVT. 



923 



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8ECBETAET OP THE NAVT. 927 

No. 6. 

Navt Department, Bureau of Medicine and Suroert, 

October 27, 1857. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following synopsis of the 
annual report of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery : 

1. Fiscal condition of the medical department of the navy. 

2. Remarks upon the mortality on board the vessels of war on the 
various stations, and tabular statements reduced from the quarterly 
reports of sick from stations within the United States, for the year 
ending September 30, 1857 ; and from vessels in commission for sea 
service for the year ending December 31, 1856. Also an exhibit of 
the principal forms of disease that prevailed on the different foreign 
stations in the year 1856. 

3. Notice of the progressive diminution of the hospital fund, and 
renewing the recommendations made on former occasions, that it be 
relieved of the burden of sundry allowances made to beneficiaries in 
the Naval Asylum ; and that the value of land diverted to other pur- 
poses by act of Congress be reimbursed to the fund. 

4. Exhibits of receipts into and payments from the hospital fund 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857. 

5. Observations on the naval laboratory, with a statement of its 
receipts and issues for the year ending June 30, 1857. 

6. Report of the number and condition of the insane of the navy 
in the government hospital for the insane, near Washington. 

7. Estimates in detail for the support of the Bureau of Medicine 
and Surgery, (A,) and of the medical service, hospitals excepted, (B,) 
for the year ending June 30, 1859. 

8. Observations and statements exhibiting the urgent necessity for 
an increase in the number of medical officers of the navy. 

W. WHEELAN. 



Navy Department, 
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery^ October 26, 1857. 

Sir : In compliance with your instructions of the 19th of August 
ultimo, I have the honor to submit herewith estimates of the amounts 
required for the support of this bureau, and of the medical service of 
the navy, with the exception of hospitals for the year ending June 30, 
1869. 

The fiscal condition of the medical department is exhibited as 
follows : 
Balance of appropriation for ^' surgeons' necessaries 

and appliances" in the treasury October 1, 1867... $24,444 14 

Amount of hospital fund in treasury October 1, 1867 63,524 43 

Amount required for the support of the Bureau of 
Medicine and Surgery for the year ending June 30, 
1869 (schedule A) ^tized by C 9,990 00 



928 SEPOBT OF THE 

Amount required for the support of the medical de« 
partment of the navy (hospitals excluded) for the 
year ending June 30, 1869, (schedule B) |S2,160 00 



The estimates hased upon the distribution of the naval force, pre- 
pared by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, &c., embracing the 
increase of men and vessels authorized by recent acts of Congress, in 
some cases fall below, and generally do not exceed, the estimates of 
former years. 

The medical department of the navy has been sustained for two 
years past from the surplus of former appropriations, the last appro' 
priation of money having been made in the naval appropriation bill 
approved March 3, 1866. 

The general system of order and economy with which the business 
of the department is conducted, and the better preservation of our 
property at the laboratory, have contributed greatly to the reduction of 
our expenses ; but as the funds at our disposal in the treasury will be 
expended by the expiration of the present fiscal year, an appropria- 
tion becomes necessary for the objects indicated. 

Subjoined are tabular statements deduced from reports of sick from 
naval stations within the United States for the year ending September 
30, 1857, and from the different squadrons in commission on home 
and foreign service for the year ending December 31 , 1856. 

These tables show a very satisfactory state of health on board our 
vessels in active service, and certainly display a ratio of mortality very 
far below the average of most pursuits. 

The peculiar exposures incident to nautical life, in the shape of ever- 
varying climatic influences, protracted confinement on shipboard, and 
the large number of persons necessarily restricted within the limited 
accommodations of most of our vessels, the uniformity of diet, not always 
of a kind roost conducive to health, make it worthy of observation that 
we are enabled to maintain the high sanitary condition exhibited by 
these statistics ; the results redound as much to the credit of the medi- 
cal officers as to the discipline and attention to general principles of 
hygiene that pervade the service. 

I have endeavored to group some of the prominent diseases prevail- 
ing on board our ships in commission ; but they fail in some instances 
to illustrate any peculiarities of climate or local causes, for the reason 
that some stations, as the Pacific, embrace in their vast extent every 
condition of climate, temperature, &c. 

It will be noticed, however, that the vessels of the African squad- 
ron, owing to the very great precautions and excellent sanitary regu- 
lations in force, exhibit a marked exemption from death. 

The Jamestown, late flae-ship of that station, with a complement 
of 230 officers and men, did not lose one of the crew by death daring 
a cruise of upwards of two years. 

The St. Louis, with a complement of nearly 200, reports but one 
death during the year 1866 ; and the brig Dolphin, with a comple- 
ment of about 80, had but one death between April, 1866, and July, 
1867. 

The Cyane and Saratoga, employed continuously vx the home 



SECRETARY OF THE NAV^. 



929 



squadron, for a long season on the coast of Central America during 
the year 1856, with complements of above 190, report, in the case of 
the former one death, and in the latter none. 

The Germantown, of the same complement, reports but two deaths 
during a cruise of more than three years on the coast of Brazil. The 
John Adams, of the same class, on the Pacific station, has had but 
two deaths in the last three years, and the St. Mary's, on the same 
station, had no death in the last two and a half years of her cruise. 

Indeed, with the exception of the squadron employed in China, the 
ratio of mortality has been remarkably small ; and on that station, a 
state of hostilities, for a time, did much more than climate towards 
the destruction of life. 

But where climatic causes do not result in death, a protracted expo- 
sure to such unfarorable influences undermines health and too often 
permanently impairs the constitution ; a change of climate is as need- 
ful to health as changes of diet ; hence the policy that limits cruises 
on the stations of long continued heat and moisture is eminently wise 
and humane. 

At the close of the year 1865 there remained under treatment 464 
cases ; during the year 1856 there occurred 14,283 cases, making an 
aggregate of 14,747 cases of disease, injury, &c., during the year. 
Of this number 119 died, 14,189 were returned to duty, or discharged 
the service, and 439 remained on the sick report at the end of the year. 

The average strength of the navy, including officers, seamen, ma- 
rines, &c., for the year 1856, as nearly as can be ascertained, was 
about 9,962. The ratio of cases under treatment to the whole number 
of persons in the service was about 1.43 to 1, or, each person was sick 
1 iVo times during the year. The proportion of deaths to the whole 
number in service was 1 to 8.37, and the proportion of deaths to the 
whole number of cases treated, 1 to 124. 



Hospitals. 



.S M 

H 
1^ 



3 



II. 

I So" 



I 

I! 
Ill 



tttOO 

II 



Chelsea 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Norfolk 

Pensacola 

Total hospitals , 

Narjr yards, receiving ships, Naral 
Academy and Observatory 

Total shore stations 



12 
36 
13 

30 

8 



150 
228 
124 
210 

28 



162 
263 
137 
240 
36 



3.08 
4.66 
7.30 
2.08 
6.66 



98 
64 



740 
2,486 



838 
2,639 



4.06 
.70 



102 



3,226 



3,337 



62 



1.49 



11 
31 
16 
17 

e 



so 

60 
140 



Vol. ii- 



-59 



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930 



KEPORT OF THE 



Squadrons. 



Home. .. 

Pacific 

Mediterranean _ .. 

Brazil 

Africa). ..--- 

East India 

Total 



19 



962 
9()5 
1,100 
652 
610 
641 



4,830 



a u 

i s 



29 
69 
58 
17 
23 
27 



223 



be 

c 

'V 



B 



1,496 
1,288 
1,469 
1,053 
800 
2,365 



8,471 







1 



1,525 
1,357 
1,527 
1,070 
825 
2,392 



8,694 



51 



o a 

s > e 

O V 



1.58 
1.40 
1.38 
1.64 
1.61 
3.71 



1.80 



ss 

Hi 



.26 
.44 

.78 

.18 

.24 

1.04 



.58 



•82 






& 



42 

39 
35 
30 
18 
59 



223 



Summary of tlie principal forms of disease which occurred on the foreign 

stations in 1856. 



Diseases. 



Febrile diseases-.. .,-.. 

Diseases of digestive system ......... 

Diseases of respiratory system ....... 

Diseases of circulatory system . . 

Diiseases of brain and nervous system . 

Diseases of cutaneous system 

Diseiises of fibrous and osseoua system 

Diseases of gcnnito urinary system 

Diseases of eye and ear 

Wounds and injuries - ... 






5 



116 

348 

256 

1 

81 
142 
138 
/08 

34 
131 



a 

Oi 

i 

I 



225 

225 

133 

6 

34 
199 
130 
135 

25 
163 



d 

a 

o 
Id 



42 

266 

66 

9 

15 

115 
92 
70 
18 
95 






168 

808 

178 

19 

50 

160 

163 

159 

20 

194 



s 



312 

179 

92 

4 

26 

88 

152 
84 
22 

126 



HOSPITAL FUND. 

The hospitals of the navy, as well as the Naval Asylum, are sup- 
ported exclusively from a fund raised by a deduction of twenty cents 
per month from the pay of every officer, seamen, and marine, and by 
a transfer to the iUnd of the value of rations stopped on account of 
sick while in hospitals. 

Owing to various causes, prominent among them to the extravagant 
price uf everything tending to the support and comfort of life, thifl 
fund has m rapidly diminished as to threaten its early extinction, un- 
less some different policy be adopted in regard to the beneficiaries at 
the Naval Asylum, as this establishment is as heavy a tax upon the 
fund as the other hospitals combined. The allowance to the benefici- 
aries of clothing, pocket money, tobacco, &c., must be regarded as 
somewhat extraneous to the intent of the law, which provides a per- 



SECRETARY OT THE NA^. 931 

manent home '* for disabled oflScers and seamen of the navy," in one 
of the naval hospitals. I have suggested on more than one occasion 
already that these outlays he met from other sources. I beg respect- 
fully to renew the subject, as one of vital importance to the perma- 
nence of the fund. 

I beg leave also to renew a recommendation of my last report, that 
Congress be requested to reimburse the hospital fund for the ten acres 
of land directed by act of Congress of March 3, 1855, from the hos- 
pital estate at Chelsea, Massachusetts, for the purpose of a '^ marine 
hospital for the district of Boston and Charlestown, Massachusetts." 
The act of Congress of February, 1811, originating the hospital fund, 
specifies the objects to which it shall be applied, viz : '^ to procure at 
suitable places proper sites for navy hospitals, and, if the necessary 
buildings are not procured with the site, to cause such to be erected," 
&c. The property at Chelsea was purchased in pursuance of this en- 
actment and with the means provided by this and other kindred 
statutes ; and yet the most eligible portion of the estate, purchased out 
of a tax upon the pay of the navy, has been appropriated for the erec- 
tion of a hospital for the sick of the merchant service of the district of 
Boston. 

The naval committee of the Senate reported a bill (No. 577) on the 
Yth February ultimo, ^^authorieing the Secretary of the Treasury to 
ascertain and pay the value of a tract of land ceded for the purposes 
of a marine hospital for the district of Boston," ifec, but, owing per- 
haps to the pressure of other business at the conclusion of the session, 
no further action was had on the subject. The value of the land 
would be of material aid to the fund and seems to be justly due to it. 
The condition of the hospital fund is stated as follows : 

Amount of hospital fund in treasury July 1, 1856 $86,730 38 

Drawn during the year ending June 30, 1857, by Bu- 
reau of Medicine and Surgery, on acccount of expenses 

of hospitals and for purchases for laboratory 35,959 00 

Drawn by Bureau of Yards and Docks for naval asylum, 

and by transfers made by Fourth Auditor 29,090 00 

65,049 00 
Balance 20,681 38 

Credits. 

By deductions and credits made by Fourth Auditor 29,402 83 

Laboratory supplies to vessels and stations 13:,551 66 

Value of stopped rations of sick sent to hospitals on shore 

during 1856 6,375 67 

Pensions of inmates of the asylum reverting to fund for 

the year ending June 30, 1857 703 5T 

60,033 73 
Balance as above * 20,681 38 

Amount remaining in treasury July 1, 1857 .70,715 11 

Digitized by vjO^JVJLL: 



932 * BEPORT OP THE 

The average coat per week of hospital patients for the year ending 
September 30, 1857, has been |2 7fi, under all heads of expenditure 
coming under the supervision of this bureau. 

The naval laboratory at Brooklyn has furnished the entire outfit 
of all vessels commissioned for seryice during the year, as well as the 
usual quarterly supplies to various home stations, and occasional ship- 
ments to the squadrons on foreign service. 

In this establishment we have happily within our own control a 
sure means of obtaining pure and reliable medicines for the navy, at 
no greater cost, if indeed, as great as we had formerly paid for such 
articles, too often made for sale, as are vended in the stores of our 
large cities. The adulteration of medicine amounts to a science, 
and there seemed to be no alternative to escape the mishaps attendant 
upon the administration of uncertain agents than to commence the 
preparation and manufacture of our supplies upon the moderate scale 
commensurate with our wants. Three years' experience have re- 
moved whatever doubts might h'lve been entertained of the success of 
the undertaking. 

The laboratory continues to afford valuable facilities to other de- 
partments of the navy in the shape of analysis, and other scientific 
examinations of sundry articles offered under contract, whose quality 
and composition could not be satisfactorily ascertained by any ordinary 
inspection. Among these duties may be enumerated the examinatioD 
ot the composition of cloths, flannels, &c., whiskey, vinegar, soap, 
oil, and candles under the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 
Amount of purchases for laboratory for year ending June 

30, 1857 116,319 98 

Issues for the same term 15,659 78 

8tock on hand, machinery and appliances 22,860 07 

The insane of the navy are under the charge of Dr. C. H. Nichols, 
superintendent of the government hospital for the insane of the army 
,and navy, &c., near this city, where they receive every possible care 
and attention, as well as the most judicious moral and physical treat- 
•ment. 

At the date of my last report, October 29, 1856, eleven patients 
.were in the hospital, viz : One lieutenant, one' passed assistant sur- 
geon, and nine seamen, landsmen, and marines. During the year 
there have been two deaths and three admissions, leaving one officer 
and eleven men under treatment. Most of the cases are of long 
standing, and generally hopeless of cure ; but this admirable institu- 
•tioi^ offers everything in its arrangement, police, and enlightened 
medical direction that can possibly contribute to recovery. 

According to the schedule of the naval force for the year, prepared by 
the " Bureau of Construction, Equipment and Repair,*' in accordance 
with the increase of men and vessels authorized by the last Congress, 
it appears that thirty-seven surgeons and sixty-one assistant surgeons 
will be required for service at sea. Besides this, surgeons are required 
.at each of our hospitals, navy yards, rendezvous, and receiving ships, 
an aggregate of twenty-six, making the whole number required tor 
service ashore and afloat sixty-three. The strengh of the medical 
corps, under the limitation of the act of Congress of August, 1842, is 
^sixty-nine surgeons and eighty passed and other assistant surgeons ; 



BEC^ETABY OF THE KAVT. 



933 



and when this number is contrasted with the positive requirements of 
the service, as above stated, it must be obvious that it is totally in- 
adequate to the demand, even if all its members were physically 
capable of their share of duty. But when it is considered that of the 
sixty-nine surgeons at least ten are disqualified for sea service by age 
or infirmity, and of the eighty assistant surgeons seven may be stated 
to labor under permanent disability, it would seem to require no 
argument to show the absolute necessity for some actual increase of 
number, or such other measure of relief as will make the service more 
equal in its requirements of its members. 

It is customary to employ a surgeon wherever there is duty for a 
captain or commander ; and yet, while the aggregate number of these 
two grades is one hundred and sixty-five, but sixty-nine surgeons, in- 
cluding those unfit for active employment by age or health, are 
expected to perform the corresponding duty. Two years since the 
naval committee of the House proposed to make an addition of ten 
to each of the grades of surgeon and assistant surgeon, to meet the 
then demands of the service. Since that time, however^ provision has 
been made for an addition of eleven steamers and one thousand men 
to the force of the navy, which only adds so much to the necessity for 
an augmentation of the medical corps. Ten additional surgeons and 
as many assistants, the number proposed by the naval committee, 
would be no more than, if indeed quite as many as, are absolutely 
required, but even this small increase would be of essential relief to 
the corps and highly conducive to the public interest. With our pre- 
sent restricted number, it often happens that the usual indulgence 
accorded to oflicers at the termination of a cruise is necessarily with- 
held from the medical officers, whose service is thus extended through 
years without respite or intermission. 

No contracts have been made by this bureau during the year ; the 
third section of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1845, excepts 
medicines, among specified articles^ from the contract system. 

We purchase our crude materials in open market upon the best 
terms, and always subject them to rigid inspection^ from which we pre- 
pare all the drugs and chemicals, with rare exceptions, that enter into 
our allowance table. W. WHELAN. 



A. 



Estimaie of the amount required for the support of the Bureau of Medi- 
cine and Surgery for the year ending June 30, 1859. 



Salary of the chief of di« bureaa, per act of Congtett, approved March 3, 18S5, 
Statutes at Large, 9d scMion 33d Congreis, page (Hi. 



Salary of one ciprk of (boith claMi, anistant to chief, per act of March 3, 18S3, 
StatutesatLnrfe, 9d te«vion 33d Congrem, page 91 1 

Salary of two clerks of second claM, at $1,400 each, per acta of March 3, 1853, 
Statutes at Large, 9d strseion SSd CongreM, page 311 ; April 93, 1854, Sta- 
tutes at Lnrge, 1st s«ssion 33d Congrees, page 976 ; aad August 4, 1854, Su- 
tutes at Large, 1st session 33d Congress, page 579 

Salary of messenger, per Joint resolutfoa of August 18, 1856, Statutes at Large, 
1st session 34th Congress, page 143 

Salary of laborpr, per Joint resolution of August 18, 1856, Statutes at Large, 
1st session 34tb Congress, page 145 > 



Contingefd ezpeatcs. 
Blaiili books, sutionery, and miscellaneous iteraa., 
Total required 



#3,500 00 
1,800 00 

9,800 00 
840 00 
600 00 



Digitized by ' 



«9,540 00 



G^o- 



450 00 



9,090 00 



934 



REPORT OP THE 



B. — EsHmatefrcm the Bureau ofMerficine and Surgery of the amount re- 
quired for the support of the medical department of vesada in com- 
mission, navy yards, naval stationSy marine corpsy and coast survey y 
for the year ending June 30, 1859. 



Saittng oesseit— 32. 

Three frigates, at $1 ,100 each 

Four raztle esloop», firat and second class, at $700 each 

BevenieLMi sloops, first, second, and third class, at ^00 each. 

Three brij^, nt j^^^Ocach 

Five store ships, at 9*200 each 



Steam veueh — 13. 

Four screw steamers, first cla»s, at $I,10U each 

One ditto, second class 

Four side wiieel steamers, first and second class, at ^^ each.. 
Three ditto, third clasd, at $300. 



Receiving thipt—4. 

Tbrec ships of the line, at #500 each 

Onesloo, , at $150 



Xavy yarrfs— 8. 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 

Boston, Maasnchusetts 

New York 

Philadelphia and receiving ship. 

Wa8hiii|>!nn and marine barracks 

Norfolk, Vin^inia 

Pensacola, Florida 

Mare island, California 



Kaval statioiu — ^2. 

Naval Academy, Annapolis 

Observatory and general relief of officers 

Coast mrvey. 
Twelve steam and sailing vessels, at $75 each . . 



Total required. 



$3,300 00 
*i,800 00 

10,-iO(« 00 

750 00 

1,UOO 00 



4,400 00 
600 00 

3,4UU 00 
900 00 



l^.'iOO 00 

150 00 



liSO 00 
IM 00 
ISO 00 
S»0 00 
1,900 00 
900 00 
900 00 
150 00 



400 00 

400 00 



$18,050 00 

8,300 00 
1,690 00 



9,450 00 

600 00 
900 00 



33,150 00 



[No. 7.] 



W, WHELAN. 



Headquarters of the Marine C!orps, 

WashingtoUy November 12, 1857. 

Sir : Since my last annual report I have inspected the troops at the 
barracks at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and at the stations as far 
south as Norfolk, Virginia, and have found their condition to be gen- 
erally satisfactory. 

New and comfortable quarters will soon be erected for officers and 
men at New York and Pensacola. 

At Boston, Philadelphia, and Norfolk the barracks are not fit to be 
used as such. The buildings are very old, of one story, and very 
low ; so constructed that they cannot be ventilated, and so contracted 
that the men have frequently to sleep in mass upon the floor, there 
not being room for iron bedsteads. This, of course, is not conducive 
to health, and breeds discontent among the men. 

The parade grounds attached to these barracks do not furnish suffi- 
cient space for drilling and steadying the men. 

It would be only necessary for you, sir,, to glance at these quarters 
to see that the troops cannot be otherwise than uncomfortable so long 
as they are quartered in them. I trust therefore that appropriations 
will be made at the approaching session of Congress for the purchase 
of ground and for the erection of barracks at these three stations. 

I also urge the necessity which exists for the increase of the officers 
and the rank and file of the marine corps. digitized by GoOqIc 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 935 

The guards of all the veesels-of-war, except those of side wheel 
steamers of the first class, are too small. This will be apparent when 
I mention that in many vessels a marine has not a whole night ^4n" 
during thte entire cruise. 

The guards are too small at the navy yards. This will appear also 
when I state that officers are compelled to resort to ** running guards." 
These two statements as to the insufficiency of the present guards are 
supported, I believe, by all officers, navy and marine. 

Barracks occupied by troops should never be left without an officer 
of the day. The reasons for this are so obvious that it is only neces- 
sary to make the statement. Three officers are required at each sta- 
tion for this duty, and one officer of higher rank for drill officer. But 
the state of the service is such that there is neither drill officer nor 
officer of the day at Portsmouth, Norfolk, or Pensacola ; but one 
officer for these duties at Boston and Washington, and a deficiency at 
New York and Philadelphia. 

The President, acting under the authority granted him by Con- 
gress, has twice been compelled by the demands of the service to in- 
crease the rank and file, but it is still too small. I therefore 
recommend that the marine corps be raised to two thousand men, 
with the regular number of officers and non-commissioned officers. 
Nothing under this will supply the present wants of the service, and, 
I suppose, it will not be long before a large guard will be wanted for 
the navy yard and Mare island, California. In which case barracks 
would have to be constructed there. 

First Lieutenant Greene, with your approval, passed a large por-* 
tion of the past summer at West Point, engaged in acquiring a know- 
ledge of artillery, for the purpose of introducing it into the marine 
corps. A battery of heavy and light guns, directed by the depart- 
ment to be turned over to the marine corps, will be in a few days at 
headquarters, and instruction in artillery will immediately thceafter 
commence. This will be an important step onward, and will add 
much to the weight and efficiency of the corps. But it is not enough. 
The marine officer should be placed on a footing with the army and 
navy officer by being given the advantage of a military education. 
He should be not only an infantry and artillery officer, but an engi- 
neer. When bodies of men are landed from vessels-of-war their 
numbers are rarely large ; but they may be made very formidable by 
properly constructed field works, or by more permanent works. There 
is no officer on board the ship who would be expected to do this but 
the marine officer, and it would not be fair to expect it of him without 
military education. I think, therefore, that as this desideratum can 
be so easily obtained by appointing graduates from West Point to the 
marine corps, that a provision to that effect should be introduced into 
the naval appropriation or some other bill. 

A general return of the marine corps accompanies this report. 
I remain, most respectfully, yours, 

ARCH. HENDERSON, 
Brevet Brigadier General, Commanding. 

Hon. Isaac Toucby, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Digitized by GoOglc 



936 



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SECRETABT OP THE NAVT 



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938 REPORT OP THE 



No. T. 

Hbadquartebs op the Marine Corps, 

WashingtoTij October 8, 1857, 
Sir: I enclose estimates in triplicate from the paymaster of the 
marine corps. 
I remain, most respectfully, yours, 

ARCH. HENDERSON, 
Brevet Brigadier General and Commandant. 
Hon. Isaac ToucEY, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Headquarters Marine Corps, 

Faym^aster's Office^ October 8, 185Y. 

Sir: I have the honor to enclose herewith estimates in triplicate 

for pay and subsistence of officers, pay of non-commissioned officers, 

musicians, privates, &c., of the United States marine corps for the 

year ending June 30, 1859. 

The amount of the estimates for the coming fiscal year exceed the 

amount appropriated for the present year by the sum of thirty-five 

thousand eight hundred and eighty-six dollars and fifty-eight cents, 

as follows : 

Pay of 20 sergeants, 20 corporals, and 200 privates, addi- 
tional, ordered to be enlisted by the President of the 
United States, under the act making appropriations for 
the naval service for the year ending June 30, 1850, 
approved March 3, 1849 $33,600 00 

Pay of one clerk in the paymaster's office, authorized by 
the Secretary of the Navy, in place of one sergeant, 
temporarily employed as clerk, ordered to be discharged. 862 08 

Increase in pay of messenger at headquarters, authorized 

by the Secretary of the Navy, February 26, 1857 152 50 

Increase in price of rations for officers' servants, under 

the act of 2l8t February, 1857 2,592 00 

37,206 58 
Decrease in number of additional rations to officers for 

five years' service 1,320 00 

35,886 58 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. RUSSELL, 
Paymaster United States Marine Corps, 

Brigadier Greneral Arch'd Henderson, 

Commandant United Stages Marine Corps, Headmarters. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 



939 



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8ECRETABY OF THE NAVY. 941 



Hbadquartebs of thb Marinb Corps, 

WaahingUmj October 14, 1857. 

Sir : I enclose to the department triplicate estimates for the quar- 
termaster's o£Bce of the United States marine corps for the fiscal year 
ending the 30th June, 1859. 

I remain, most respectfully, yours, 

ARCH. HENDERSON, 
Bv't Brig. General and Commandant. 
Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Headquarters Marine Corps, Quartermaster's Office, 

. Washington, October 13, 1857. 
Sir : Accompanying, I have the honor to suhmit estimates in trip- 
licate of the expenses of the quartermaster's department, marine corps, 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859, and also an explauatory 
statement of the differences hetween them and the estimates for the 
current fiscal year. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your ohedient servant, 

D.J.SUTHERLAND, 

Qtuirterma>8ter. 
(General A. Henderson, 

Commandant United States Marine Corps j 

HeadquarterSj Washington, D. C. 



Estimateoftheeo^pensesofthe quartermaster's department of the marine 
corps/or one year, from July 1, 1858, to June 30, 1859. 

There will he required for the quartermaster's department of the 
marine corps for one year, commencing on the 1st July, 1858, in 
addition to the halances then . remaining on hand, the sum of two 
hundred and twenty*nine thousand and eighty-one dollars and seventy- 
five cents, viz : 

Ist. For provisions |64,313 GO 

2d. For clothing 66,512 00 

3d. For fuel 20,766 76 

4th. For military stores, viz : pay of armorers, repair 
of arms, purchase of accoutrements, ordnance 
stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instru- 
ments 9,000 00 

For the purchase of 1,000 rifled muskets, complete, 

at|16 each 16,000 00 

For the transportation of officers and troops, and ^ 

for expenses of recruiting Q^tued by VJ.2,000 00 



942 



REPORT OF THE 



6th. For repair of barracks and rent of offices, where 

there are no public buildings for that purpose. $8,000 00 

Tth. For contingencies, viz: freight, ferriage, toll, cart- 
age, wharfage, compensation to judges advocate, 
per diem for attending courts martial, courts 
of inquiry, and for constant labor, house rent 
in lieu of quarters, burial of deceased marines, 
piinting, stationery, postage, telegraphing, 
apprehension of deserters, oil, candles, gas, 
forage, straw, furniture, bedsacks^ spades, 
shovels, axes, picks, carpenters' tools, keep of a 
horse for the messenger, pay of matron, washer- 
woman, and porter at hospital headquarters, 
and for the purchase of a fire engine for the 
use of the marine barracks headquarters 32,500 00 



Amount required. 
Respectfully submitted. 



229,081 75 



D. J. SUTHERLAND, 

Quariermasier. 



PROVISIONS. 



For whom reqaired. 


1 


S 

1 

1 


1 


1 






▲mount. 


NoD-commiBsioDed officers, muBiciaoB, 
DrivAtfli. Hod washorwomoD .... ...... 


846 


33 
I 


1 


879 
2 


1 


1 


|64,ie7 00 

146 00 


Matron and waf«herwomaQ at hospital 
headquarters 








AiPOiiDt nMiuired ..ir*--. ....... 


64,313 00 

















CLOTHING. 



For whom required. 



Non-commissioned officers, mnsicians, and privates, at |36 per 

annum 

700 watch coats, at |tj each 



Amount required . 



Enlisted men 



1,692 



Digmzed by 



Go(i> 



Amomit. 



$60,912 00 

5,600 00 



% 



1,512 00 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, 



943 



FUEL. 



For whom required. 



CommaDdant 

Lieutenant coloDel 

Mnjora 

Staff majors 

Staff captains 

Aid-de camp 

Captain« 

LieuteDanta, 1st and 2d 

Non-commisi)ioDed ciificers, musicians, privates, 

washerwwmen, and servants 

Matron to hospital headquarters 

Hospital headquarters 

Hospitals at other posts 

Armory at headquarters 

Mf'ss rooms for officers 

Offices of commandant and staff, and commanding 

officers « if posts 

Officers-of-day's rooms 

Guard rooms at barracks and navy yards 

Stores for clothing and other supplies 

One-fourth additional on 6(J0 cords, the quantify 

supposed to be required in latitude north of 39^.. 



Number. 



Amount required. .. 
Which, at $7 per cord, is . 



1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 

12 
2J 

880 
1 
1 
5 
1 
7 

15 

7 
9 
3 



Cords! Feet. 



29 
29 
29 
24 
IG 
24 
16 

1 

1 

33 

16 

30 

3 

7 

3 

21 

6 



Cords. 



36 

29 

118 

88 

24 

16 

297 

:J79 

1,320 
I 
3:j 
8'^ 
30 
24 

105 
24 

189 
15 

150 



Feet. 



2,965 I 2 
$20,756 75 



Explanations to the estimates for the quartermaster's department^ marine 
corps, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 

These estimates vary from those of the current fiscal year under the 
following heads of appropriations, viz : 

*^ Provisions" increased $9,782 ; the amount estimated for 134 men, 
the number supposed to be on bhore, of the increase authorized by the 
letter of the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, dated April 21, 1857. 

** Clothing" increased |11,248; amount required for 268 men, 
authorized as above, with 20G additional watch coats. 

^^Fuel" increased |474 88; amount required for 134 men, sup- 
posed number on shore, as authorized above, and also to meet increased 
allowances to officers, by army regulations of January 1, 1857 ; the 
fuel is estimated at |7 per cord, instead of $7 60 per cord. 

**Milittiry stores" increased |16,000 ; to purchase 1,000 rifled 
muskets, that character of arm having been introduced into the 
marine corps ; and by a new regulation of the War Department the 
corps is required to pay tor arms, instead of being supplied, as here- 
tofore, by the War Department upon requisition. 

D. J. SUTHERLAND, 

Quartermaster. 

Quartermaster's Office, 

United States Marine Corps, October 13, 1857. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



941 



REPORT OF THB 



No. 8. 



General estimate of tlie sums required for the support of the office of ike 
Secretai-y of the Navy, and the several bureaus of the Navy Depart- 
ment^ for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 



Office or baroan. 


Salariea. 


Contingent 


Office of the Secretarv of the Navv .... - ...... ...... ..-. .... 


$29,600 00 
12,340 00 
14, 140 00 
21,340 00 

8,840 00 
9,540 00 


$2,840 OU 
750 00 


Bureau of OrdnaDoe and HvdroffraDhv ...................... 


Bureau of Yards and D>>cks' .... .... ...... .... ...... .... .... 


800 00 


Bureau of CoostructioD. Eauiomeot. and Reoalr .............. 


800 00 


Bureau of Provisions and Clotbinir .... ...... ...•......••...• 


700 00 


Bureau of Medicine and Surirory .... .......... .... ...... .... 


450 00 








95,800 00 


6,340 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



OITIL. 

Salaries 

Contingent 

Appropriated for fiaocH year 1867-'68 

For salariei , 

For contingent 



$95,800 00 
6,340 00 



U5,8OO0O 
6,340 00 



No. 9. 

General estimate of the sums required for the expenses of (he SouthwetA 
Executive Building for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859. 



OITII.. 

Foraalaries 

For contingent 

AppropriaUd for fiaoal ytar 1857-'68. 

For aalariet 

For contingent • 



$2,400 00 
3,913 00 



2,400 00 
3,913 00 



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SECRETARY OF THE NAVT.. 951 

Treasury Departbient, 
Second Comptroller' a office^ November 20, 1857. 

Sir : I have the honor to transmit, in duplicate, the annual state- 
ment of the appropriations for the navy department for the fiscal year 
1856-'57, showing the balances of appropriations on the Ist of July, 
1866, the appropriations for the fisciu year 1856-'67, the repayments 
and transfers in same time, the amounts applicable to the service of 
the year 1856-'57, the amounts drawn by requisitions from the trea^ 
stiry in same period, and, finally, the balances on the 30th of June, 
1857, with such sums specially designated as have been carried to the 
surplus fund ; prepared in pursuance of an act of Congress approved 
May 1, 1820. 

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, 

J. MADISON CUTTS, Comptroller. 
Hon. Isaac Touckt, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



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955 



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Relief of Joseph D Beers 

Relief of widows and orphans of those lost in sloop- 

of-war Albany, Ac 

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956 HEPOKT OP THE 



No. 15. 

Treasury Department, 
Fourth Auditor's officCy December 3, 1857. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit, herewith, two copies of an 
abstract of expenditures under the head of contingent expenses of the 
navy, as settled and allowed at this office, from the 1st of July, lb56, 
to the 30th of June, 1857. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient per van t, 

A. 0. DAYTON. 
Hon. Isaac Toucey, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



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KEPORT OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL.* 



Post Office Departmeni, December 1, 1857. 
To THE President of the United States : 

Sir : Since entering on the administration of the Post OfBce De- 
partment, I have ventured on no ne^ theories, nor attempted any 
innovations on the well-tried system established and practised upon 
by my predecessors. I have contented myself with endeavoring, as 
far as in my power, to perfect existing arrangements, and extend \U 
facilities equally and fairly to every portion of our widely-extended 
country. In examining its present condition, it is worthy of observa- 
tion that, while the total number of post offices created during the 
twenty years from 1827 to 1847 was but 8,14f>, the number estab- 
lished in just half that length of time, from 1847 to 1857, was 11^444. 
On the 30th of June, 1827, the whole number of post offices in the 
United States was 7,000; in 1837, 11,767; in 1847, 15,146; and ou 
the 30th of June, 1857, 26,586. During the last fiscal year there 
have been 1,725 offices established and 704 discontinued, being a net 
increase of 1,021. The number of postmasters appointed during the 
year was 8,680. Of these appointments 4,767 were to fill vacancies 
occasioned by resignation ; 1,681 by removal ; 238 by death ; 269 by 
change of names and sites, and 1,725 by the establishment of new 
offices. The total number of offices at this time is 27,148, of which 
368 are of the class denominated presidential, their incumbents being 
subject to appointment by the President and Senate. The commis- 
sions of the higher class run four years from the date of confirmation, 
but thv.se of the lower are not limited. 

TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS. 

On the 30th of June last there were in operation 7,888 mail routes. 
The number of contractors was 6,576. The length of these routes is 
estimated at 242,601 miles, divided as follows, viz : 

Railroad 22,530 miles. 

Steamboat 15,245 " 

Coach 49,329 " 

Inferior grades 155,497 " 

The total annual transportation of mails was 74,906,007 miles, 
costing $6,622,046, and divided as follows : 

RaUroad, 24,267,944 miles, at $2,559,847 — about ten cents and five 
mills a mile. 

Steamboat^ 4,518,119 miles, at $991,998 — about twenty-twct cents ^ 

niiie. Digitized by VjOOQIC 

VoL ii 61 



962 BEFOBT OF THE 

Coachj 19,090,930 miles, at |1,410,826— about seven cents and four 
mills a mile. 

Inferior gradeSy 27,029,074 miles, at $1,659,376 — about six cents a 
mile. 

Couppared with the service reported on the 30th of June, 1856, there 
is an addition of 2,959 miles to the length of mail routes ; 3,598,170 
miles to the total annual transportation — being about 5 percent.; and 
of $586,572 to the cost, or 9 ^V P^r cent. 

The aggregate length of railroad routes has been increased 2,207 
miles, and the annual transr ortation thereon 2,458,648 miles — 11 -i\ 
per cent.; at a cost of $249,458, or 11-^^^ per cent. 

The length of steamboat routes is greater by 294 miles, and the 
annual transportation by 277,949 miles, costing $131,243 additional, 
or 6^ per cent, on transportation, and 15/o per cent, on the cost. 

The expense for this species of service was increased^ in one case 
alone^ $28,200, without any additional service, that is, owing to the 
failure of the contractor on the New Orleans and Key West route. 
By act of Congress $7,200 additional was also allowed between Bain- 
bridge, Georgia^ and Apalachicola, Florida, without additional ser- 
vice. A route was put in operation on the Missouri river on the 1st 
of June last, at $85,000 per annum, including side mails by horse 
or coach, and regular land service during the suspension of naviga- 
tion. Steamboat contracts were also made between Paducah, Ken- 
tucky, and Cairo, Illinois, at $6,006 per annum; and between Columbus 
and Bay Port, Florida, at $7,000 ; and a fourth weekly trip commenced 
between New Orleans and St. Francisville, at $8,323. On the other 
hand, a reduction of $15,719 per annum was effected by discontinuing 
service between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Decatur, Alabama, and 
curtailing the Nashville and Memphis route so as to end at Cairo, 
Illinois. Such are the more prominent changes in the steamboat 
service. 

The length of coach routes has been reduced 1,124 miles, and the 
annual transportation 24,061 miles ; while the expense has been 
increased $70,470, or about 5^ per cent., ($10,000 less than would 
appear from comparing the cost on 30th June last with that reported 
on 30th June, 1856, the latter having been short stated by that 
amount.) 

In the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, 
and Ohio, where new contracts took effect on 1st July, 1856, the 
length of coach routes was decreased 505 miles, and the annual 
transportation 228,976 miles, at an increased cost of $24,752. At 
the same time the railroad service and cost in those States were 
largely increased — 907 miles in length of routes, and $119,208 in the 
cost. 

In the New England States, during the past year, the coach trans- 
portation was slightly decreased, but the cost increased $11,264 — the 
amount allowed by Congress to a failing contractor. 

In Missouri there is a seeming reduction of coach service 1,366 
miles in length of routes, 137,960 miles annual transportation, and 
$43,174 in cost ; but it must be noted that the Missouri river con- 
tract, above referred to, absorbed much coacl^. 6t^|J^<^^^l^^|e^ * 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



963 



great extent, will continue as such, although, under the circumstanceSi 
unavoidahly reported under the head of steamhoat transportation. 

In Tennessee there is a disproportion between the miles and cost of 
coach service, the cost only being increased. This is accounted for by 
an allowance for expediting in the gap between the Virginia and 
Tennessee and the East Tennessee and Virginia railroads, and other 
changes. 

In other States there have been no changes requiring special notice. 
In some there have been reductions ; but in most of them the coach 
service, has been somewhat increased. 

There is nothing of note in connexion with the California^ Oregon, 
New Mexico, Nebraska, and Kansas routes. 

The cost of the Utah routes was increased $17,500 by the allowance 
of that additional pay, under an act of Congress, without any increased 
service, on the route between Salt Lake and San Pedro. 

The additional length of inferior routes is only 1 ,582 miles, owing 
partly to the fact that during the year ending 30th June last com- 
paratively little new service of this description was put in operation. 
The large increase of such service reported 30th June, 1856, arose 
from new routes established by Congress, amounting to nearly 6,000 
miles^ in the northwestern and southwestern sections alone, and from 
other extraordinary service. 

The increased cost over that of 30th June, 1856, ($124,401,) may 
be explained by the additional expense under the new contracts com- 
mencing Ist July, 1856, in the middle section of the Union, ($63,533,) 
while there was a decrease in the length of routes of this grade; and 
the allowance of $17,500 on the Salt Lake and San Pedro route, 
without additional service, must also be taken into account. 

As already stated, the extension of railroad service has been very 
great ; and in order to exhibit this more plainly, the increase is given 
separately in five geographical sections, as follows : 



States. 



Additional 

length 
of route. 



New England 

New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Mary- 
land, and Ohio 

Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and 
Georgia < 

Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin. . . 

Kentucky, Tennessee* Alabama, Mississippi, 
and Louisiana 



Miles. 
137 

907 

184 
586 

393 



ToUl. 



2,207 



Additional miles 
of transportation . 



Additional 
cost. 



26,123 

1,257,075 

171,078 
650,088 

354,284 



2,458,648 



$11,149 

119,208 

19,899 
71,26^7 

27,935 



249,458 



The letting of new contracts for the term commencing 1st July last 
embraced the New England States and New York. 



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964 BEPORT OP THE 

The following table shows the new service as in operation on thd 
30th September : 



Co„„yanc,. , — ■ 



Miles in i Miles of annual 
transportation. 



Railroad ■ 6,413 7,099,505 

Steamboat i 770 i 474,608 

Coach 9,967 ! 4,6()4,4;>6 

Inferior modes 10,258 t 3,276,073 



Total ' 27,408 15,454,612 



Cost. 



$718,840 

27,348 

208,468 

144,093 



1,098,749 



Compared with the service on 30th June last, there appears to be a 
decrease of 791 miles in the length of routes, and 823,034 miles in the 
annual transportation, while the cost is increased $120,044. 

In New England the annual transportation by railroad is decreased 
885,870 miles ; but this is more nominal than real, owing to the fact that 
a great portion of this grade of service in that 8*»ction has heretofore 
been stated at twelve trips a week, the contracts requiring the con- 
veyance of mails as often as the cars run, while really but six trips 
were performed. Now, however, the service is reported as actually 
existing, and there is no reduction of mail facilities. 

The cost is increased $61,041. 

Steamboat transportation is increased 147,784 miles, at a cost of 
$13,918. 

Coach transportation is decreased 320,474 miles, but the expense 
increased $5,074. 

Inferior grades of service are increased 360,925 miles In annual 
tj-aasportation, and $22,405 in cost. 

In New York the railroad transportation is increased 293,328 miles, 
at a cost of $10,268. Steamboat service, rfecrea^erf 161,664 miles, at a 
decreased cost of $7,501. Coach service, decreased 143,384 miles, but 
the cost increased $12,642. Inferior service, decreased 113,673 miles, 
and <;ost increased $2,197. 

On the 30th June last there were in service 406 route agents, at a 
compensation of $310,900; 45 local agents, at $28,488; and 1,335 
mail messengers, at $160,425; making a total of $499,813. This 
amwmt, with the increased cost of service commencing Ist July under 
new contracts ($120,044) added to the cost of service as in operation 
on the 30th June last, ($6,622,046,) makes the total amount for the 
current year $7,241,903. 

This is independent of the cost of ocean mail service. 

There should also be added the estimated cost of improvements 
made since 1st July last, (including the San Antonio and San Diego 
route,) $587,825. 

I have caused to be put in operation a steamship route, twice a 
month, between San Francisco and Olympia, and a weekly line on 
Puget's Sound. 

Also, a tri-weekly steamboat line between Napoleon and Pine Bluff, 
Arkansas; and a semi-weekly line between Napoleon and Yicksjburg ; 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



POSTMASTEB GENERAL. 965 

besides the daily mail on the Missouri river, already referred to, viz: 
from Jefferson City to St. Joseph. 

The overland route from San Antonio, Texas, to San Diego, Cali- 
fornia, has also been successfully commenced. 

I have also made a contract for conveying mails six times a week 
between Prairie du Chien and St. Paul, in coaches or sleighs, as 
the case may be, during the suppension of navigation on the Upper 
Mississippi. 

REVBNirB AND EXPENDITURES. 

The comprehensive report of the Auditor, hereto appended, will be 
found to contain a mass of statistics skilfully prepared, and so judi-^ 
ciously arranged as to present with clearness and precision the finan- 
cial operations of the department, in their various branches, during 
the past fiscal year. 

The expenditures of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, including 
payments to letter carriers and for foreign postages, amounted to 
$11,508,057 93, viz : 

Compensation to postmasters |2,285,609 86 

Ship, steamboat, and way-letters 17,594 76 

Transportation, including foreign mails 7,239,333 27 

Wrapping paper 52,120 78 

Office furniture, for post offices 3,978 26 

Advertising 75,106 37 

Mail bags 65,219 21 

Blanks 117,170 87 

Mail locks, keys, and stamps 12,287 50 

Mail depredations and special agents 65,228 25 

Clerks for offices — post offices 834,025 60 

Postage stamps 30,638 80 

Stamped envelopes 63,597 74 

Payments to letter carriers 154,710 51 

Re-payments for *' dead letters" 41 84 

Miscellaneous payments 189,107 99 

Payments for balances on British mails 297,098 88 

Payments for balances on Bremen mails 5,187 44 

I — ^— ^— .— — ^-^.^ 

111,508,057 93 



If to the expenditures of the year, as stated, there be added the sum 
of $734 16 lost by compromisiog debts under the 3d section of the 
act of March 3, 1851, and if the sum of $1,121 93 gained by small 
balances carried to '' Suspense account" be deducted, the net expen- 
ditures for the year will be $11,507,670 16. 



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966 REPORT OF THE 

The gross revenue for the year 1857, including receipts from letter 
carriers and from foreign postages^ amounted to |7,353,951 76, viz : 

Letter postage.. $983,207 24 

Stamps sold 5,447,764 61 

Newspapers and pamphlets 634,863 51 

Registered letters 35,87fi 87 

Fines 15 00 

Receipts on account of emoluments 79,351 00 

Receipts on account of letter carriers 154,710 51 

Receipts on account of dead letters 6,756 57 

Extra compensation overcharged 1,667 30 

Miscellaneous receipts 9,739 25 

|7,H53,951 76 

But if to the gross sum ahove stated be added the permanent annual 
appropriations made by the acts of March 3, 1847, and March 3, 1861, 
in compensation for services rendered to the government in the trans- 
portation and delivery of franked matter, the whole revenue of the 
year will be |8,053,951 76, being |3,453,718 40 less than the expen- 
ditures. 

ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDirURES IN 1868. 

The aggregate sum appropriated by the 

act of Congress approved March 3, 1857, 

for the regular expenditures of the year 

ending June 30, 1858, exclusive of the 

transportation of foreign mails, of pay- 
ments for foreign postages and to letter 

carriers, was |11,173,247 

For Panama mails, act of March 3, 1857.. 135,000 

For Charleston and Havana mail, act of 

March 3, 1857 50,000 

For the transportation of the mails between 

New York and Havre, and New York 

and Bremen, under the new contracts 

authorized by the acts of March 3, 1845, 

and July 2, 1836, there will be required 

the sum of. 230,000 

For payments to letter carriers, act of 

March 3, 1851, estimated 165,000 

Payments for foreign postages, estimated 300,000 

Total $12,053,247 

The means applicable to defray the fore- 

foine expenditures consist of— 
St. The balance standing to the credit of 
the department on the Auditor's books 

on the 1st July, 1857 1,163,886 

2d. The estimated gross revenue of 1858, 
including foreign postages and receipts Digitized by doOQlC 

from letter carriers 7,796,188 



P08TMA8TEB GENERAL. 



967 



Sd. Balances of appropriations made by 
Congress remaining in the Treasury sub- 
ject to requisition |1,625,000 



|10,584;074 



Leaving the sum of. 1,469,173 

to be appropriated from the Treasury to defray the expenditures of the 
year 1858, as they have been authorized by law. 

In the foregoing statement I have not embraced the cases in which 
Congress has by law directed particular services and made special ap- 
propriations for them out of the Treasury, such as the transportation 
of the mail by sea between San Francisco, Cal., and Olympia, W. T., 
between New Orleans and Vera Cruz, Mexico, and for the mail on 
Puget's Sound, W. T., because the means are supplied by the Trea- 
sury upon the Postmaster General's requisitions ; and if they were 
embraced as matters of receipt and expenditure, the resulting balance 
to be provided for would still be the same. 

MOITET ORDBRS. 

The adoption of some plan for the more convenient and safe 
remittance of small sums of moneyt hrough the mails bymeans 
of orders drawn upon one postmaster by another having been fre- 
quently urged upon this department as a matter worthy of its atten- 
tion, it is deemed proper here to state that, on the 31st January last, 
my predecessor transmitted to the chairman of the Committee on the 
Post 0£Sce and Post Boads in the House of Representatives, in com- 
pliance with his request, the outline of such a plan as might be put 
in operation in this country. The submission of it does not appear 
to have been accompanied by any recommendation of the depart- 
ment, nor does it appear that the Hon. Committee acted upon the 
subject. A system of remitting sums ot money not exceeding £5 ster- 
ling ($25) in amount was adopted by the British Post Office Depart- 
ment in 1839, and some idea may be formed of the growth and extent 
of its operations from the following brief statement derived from the 
Annual Report of her Majesty's Postmaster Greneral, dated March 17, 
1857: 

Number and amount of moTiey ardera issued in the United Kingdom o/ 
Great Britain and Ireland every fifth year^ commencing with 1840. 



Year ending- 



No. of orders issued 
in snms not exceed- 
ing £5 sterling. 



Aggregate amoant in 
ponnda sterling. 



JannarjA, 1S40.. 
Jattiiarj6, 1S46.. 
December SI, 1S50 
December 31, 1865 
December 31, 1856, 



188,921 
2,806,803 
4,439,713 
6,807,412 
6,178,982 



~j)i[iiti7Pd hy 



£313, 124 

6,695,895 

8,494,498 

11,009,279 

41,805,662 



968 REPORT OF THE 



OCEAN STEAMSHIP AND FOREIGN MAIL ABRANGEMENTB. 

The contract with the Ocean Steam Navigation Company for 
monthly trips between New York and Bremen, and New York and 
Havre, via Southampton, expiring on the first of June last, it became 
necessary to make some arrangements for the continuance of that 
service, or leave the carrying of the European mails almost exclusively 
to the lines running between Boston and Liverpool and New York 
and Liverpool, on which twenty only of the seventy-two annual 
voyages arc performed by American steamers. The Bremen and 
Havre lines havinp^, under the sanction of Congress, been in opera- 
tion ten years, affording direct communication between the United 
States and the continent of Europe, and it not appearing by its action 
at the last session that it was the intention of Congress that they 
should be discontinued on the expiration of the contract, I deemed it 
my duty to make provision for their continuance another year. This 
seemed proper, in view not only of the importance of keeping up, and 
if possible increasing, the direct communication with the continent, in 
order to avoid the expense of the English transit, but also for the 
reason that I had official information of the intention of a Bremen 
company to put on a line of semi-monthly steamers, so as, in con- 
nexion with an increased American line, to secure a weekly communi- 
cation with the United States. In the mean time Congress may take 
action on the subject. Under the old contract, the annual compen- 
sation for twelve round trips on the Bremen line was two hundred 
thousand dollars ; and on the Havre line, for the same number of trip?, 
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The temporary contract for 
the service on the Bremen line is with Cornelius Vanderbilt, and upon 
the Havre line with the New York and Havre Steamship Company. 
Each contract provides for thirteen round trips annually ; and the 
compensation to be paid is limited to the United States postages, sea 
and inland, accruing from the mails conveyed. This, it will be ob- 
served, is a very considerable reduction upon the former pay, assuming 
that the postages for the year will be nearly the same as for the year 
ended 30th June last, when on the Bremen line they amounted to 
$124,193, and on the Havre line to $90,042. Moreover, it appeared 
to be a fit occasion to inaugurate a system of self-sustaining ocean 
mail service ; and I shall esteem it fortunate if the present temporary 
arrangements lead, as I trust they may, to the adoption of this as a 
permanent system. 

A contract has been made with the Panama Railroad Company f<ir 
the conveyance of the mails, as frequently as may be required, be- 
tween Aspinwall and Panama, at an annual compensation of one 
hundred thousand dollars. It took efi^ect on the first day of April 
last, and is to continue until the first of October, 1859, the date of 
expiration of the contract for the connecting lines from New York and 
New Orleans to Aspinwall. Prior to the first of April last, the price 
of the isthmus service was regulated by the weight of the mails, the 
law authorizing the payment of twenty-two cents a pound ; and at 
that rate the cost of the service for the year ended 3Vst JIarch last 

•^ Digitized by VjCJCT 



POSTBfASTEB GENERAL. 969 

was $160,321, being $60,321 a year more than is now paid under the 
oontract. 

The original contractors on the New Orleans and Vera Cruz line 
having abandoned the service, I made a temporary contract with Mr, 
C. K. Garrison for semi-monthly trips on the line at $1,210 93 the 
voyage, or $29,062 32 a year. This is the same rate of compensation 
paid the old contractors, who, although their contract called for three 
trips a month, never performed but two. The present contract will 
expire on the 30th June next, the date fixed for the expiration of the 
original contract. 

By its terras, the contract with the Pacific Mail Steamship Company 
for semi-monthly service from Astoria, by San Francisco, &c., to 
Panama, expires on the Ist October, 1858, while, under the decision 
of the Navy Department, the contract of the connecting lines on this 
side runs until Ist October, 1859. Therefore, to keep up the con- 
nexion with the Pacific line, as provided by law, and as originally 
contemplated, it will be necessary to extend the contract on the Pacific 
one year; and as the Pacific Mail Steamship Company have performed 
their service generally in a highly creditable and satisfactory manner, 
I cheerfully recommend an appropriation for such extension. 

The aggregate amount of postages (sea, inland, and foreign) on mails 
transported during the year by the steamers of the New York and 
Liverpool (Collins) line was $210,463 03, which is a heavy decrease 
as compared with the amount ($461,6*75 94) of the previous fiscal 
year. It should be observed, however, that the additional allowance 
to this line authorized by the act of 2l8t July, 1852, having been ter- 
minated on the 20th of February, 1857, and six yearly trips dis- 
pensed with from and after that date, twenty round trips only, instead 
of twenty-six, as ibrmerly, were performed during the year. 

The postages upon mails conveyed by the New York and Bremen 
line were $137,754 78, and by the New York and Havre line 
$97,950 05 ; being a decrease of $5,491 74 by the Bremen, owing to 
the fact that much of the time there have been several foreign steamers 
running and carrying ship letters on this line, and an increase of 
$2,125 02 by the Havre line, as compared with the fiscal year ended 
30th June, 1856. 

The amount of letter postages upon mails exchanged during the 
year with Great Britain was $874,194 75 ; Prussia, $326,872 57 ; 
Bremen, $52,082 99 ; France, (from 1st April to 30th June, 1857,) 
$41,188 19 ; Hamburg, $1,059 60 ; being a decrease on British mails 
of $23,453 95, on Bremen mails of $3,706 86, and an increase on 
Prussian closed mails of $27,406 86, compared with the preceding 
year. 

Of the amount of postages on mails exchanged with Great Britain, 
$574,194 75 was collected in the United States, and $300,133 30 in 
Great Britain ; the excess of United States and British postages thus 
collected in the United States being $274,061 45. In like manner, 
an excess of $95,397 95 of the postages upon mails exchanged with 
Prussia, and of $32,494 15 on mails exchanged with Bremen, was 
collected in this country. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



970 REPORT OP THE 

The gross amount of United States postage, sea and inland, on 
mails transported during the year, was — 

By the Collins line (20 round trips) $189,456 61 

Bremen line (12 round trips) 124,193 81 

Havre line (12 round trips) 90,042 47 

The ocean postage upon mails conveyed hy the Collins line 

amounted to $154,445 93 

By the Bremen line 84,231 19 

Havre line 73,716 37 

The following statistics will exhibit the operation of the United 
States and British postal treaty during the last four years : 

Number of letters and newspapers conveyed in the open mail between the 
United States and Oreat Britain from Jvly 1, 1853, to June 30, 
1857, indvsivey viz: 



Year 


Bjr United States steamerB. 


By British steamen. 




Letters. 


Newspapers. 


Letters 


Kewspapett. 


Ending Jane 30, 1854 . 
Ending June SO, 1855 . 
Ending June SO, 1866 . 
Ending June 30, 1857 . 


1,595,838 
2,026,7>i7 
2,017,269 
1,220,733 


901,477 
1,777,130 
1,662,825 
1, 178, 629 


2,740,866 
1,815,501 
l,b91,859 
2,658,343 


1,571,299 
1,377,470 
1,633,1M 
2,143,423 




6,860.567 


5,520,061 


9,106,569 


6,625,381 



Origin ofths above correspondence. 



Year 


Sent from the United States. 


Received from Great Britain. 




Letters. 


Newspapers. 


Letters. 


Newspapers. 


Ending June SO, 1854 . 
Ending June SO, 1855 . 
Ending June 30, 1856 . 
Ending June 30, 1857 . 


2,137,611 
1,937,572 
1,997,571 
1,917,934 


1,512,671 
1,976.288 
1,954,102 
2,041,466 


2,199,093 
1,904,656 
1,911,557 
1,961,142 


960, 105 
1,179,812 
1,241,912 
1,280,586 




7,990,688 


7,483,527 


7,976,448 


4,661,915 



Digitized by 



Google 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



971 



Amount of postages collected in each country. 



Year- 


Collects by United States. 


Collected by ( 


3reat Britain. 




Paldforf. 


Unpaid reaived. 


Paid tent 


Unpaid received. 


Ending Jane 30, 1854 . 
Ending Jane 30, 1856 . 
Ending June 30, 1856 . 
Ending June 30, 1857 . 


1 

$276,459 09 ' $363,326 62 
276,060 78 : 328.046 41 
294.634 28 306,397 12 
273,386 72 . 300,808 03 


$146,594 63 
181,886 27 
150,942 18 
l.H,423 68 


$193,268 16 
143,703 98 
145,675 12 
146,709 62 




1,120,640 87 
ted States 


1.298.578 08 
1,120,640 87 


633,846 66 
In Great Britain 


628,356 88 
633,846 66 


Total collections in Uni 


2,419,118 96 


1,262,203 64 



Excess of British postages collected by the United States over and above 
total amount of United States postages collected by Great Britain. 



Ysar— 



Amonnt. 



Ending Jane 30, 1854 

Ending June 30,1855 

Ending June 30, 1856 

Ending June 30, 1867 

Total excess in four years 



$176,367 11 

64,820 6i 

84,630 83 

193, 287 47 



618,006 06 



Number y in ounces ^ of letters conveyed in closed mails through the terrir 
tories of the United States and Great Britain from July 1 y 1853^ to 
June 30, 1857, inclusive. 



Year— 



U. 8. closed mails in 
transit through 
England. 



U. States and Prus- 
sian closed mails. 



British closed mails in transit through 
the United States. 



Canada mails. 



Califomia, Havana, 
&c. 



Ending June 80, 1864... 
Ending Jane 30, 1866... 
Ending June SO, 1866.. 
Ending June 30, 1867.. 

oial U. B. closed mails. 



227, 666 ounoeo. 
814,461 •* 
314,808 " 
841,636 •< 



206,224iouDoes. 
244,2094 *• 

261,680 « 
260,323^ •< 



26, 022} ounces. 
28,366 " 
26,432 " 
28,798} •* 



1,198,860 •* 



962,437 «• 



108, 619 
962,437 



Totel Br. dosed mails 

' ' " ■ D i g'l i ^cd bv 



1,061,056 •• 



GQQQle; >. 



972 



BEPOET OP THE 



Number of newspapers conveyed in dosed mails through the territories 
of the United States and Great Britain from July 1, 1853, to June 
30, 1857. 





U. 8. mails in transit 
through England 


British mails in transit through the 
United States. 


Year- 


U. 8. and PruFsian 


Canada mails. 


California, Havana, 
&c. 


Ending 30th June, 1854. 
Ending 30th June, 1855. 
Ending 30th June, 1856. 
Ending 30th June, 1857. 


60,417 
49, 953 
65,722 
90,486 


790,046 
996,892 
809, 197 
976, 244 


49, OU 
35,206 
60,722 
62,075 




256,578 


3,672,379 
187,047 


187,047 




3,759,426 





Note. — ^The transit charge upon newspapers is 2 cents each in either country. 
The Atlantic conveyance of closed mails tvas performed as follows ^ viz: 





By United 8tates steamers. 


By British steamers. 


Tear— 


Letters, 
in ounces. 


Newspapers. 


Letters, 1 Newspapers. 
in ouneet. | 


Ending 30th June, 1854. 
Ending SOth June, 1855. 
Ending 30th June, 1856. 
Ending 30th June, 1857. 


122,932} 
269,318 
262,511 
159,398J 


46,763 
299,311 
295,136 

97,141 


335,870 842,744 
317,7181 782,740 
330,409 ! 630,505 
461,2581^! 1,021,664 




814,160 


738, 351 


l,445,265i 3,277.653 



Payments made for the transit conveyance of closed mails. 



Tear- 



Ending 30th June, 1854. 
Ending 30th June, 1855. 
Ending 30th June, 1856. 
Ending 30th June, 1857. 



Balance in favor of the British office . 



By Great Britain to 
United States. 



$54,826 21 
84,471 68 
84, 127 53 
64,969 30 



288,394 72 



Digitized 



By the United States 
to Great Britain. 



$91,926 68 
109, SOS 92 
115,598 66 
150. 868 90 



467,698 06 
288,394 72 



Jay. 



179.303 33 

Cooglf . 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 973 



Balances due the United States on adjustment of accounts toith Prussia. 

Flacal year ended Jnne 30, 1854 $70,412 13 

FiiiQil year ended June 30, 1855 69,694 11 

Fiscal year ended June 3f), 1856 45,305 70 

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1857 43,501 34 

Total balance in favor of United States in 4 years 228,913 28 



Balances due Great Britain on adjustment of accounts. 

For fiscal year ended June 30, 1854 $195,522 68 

For fiscal year ended June 30, 1-65 71,164 65 

For tit$cal year ended June 30, 1866 108,261 37 

For fiscal year ended June 30, 1857 264,918 89 



Total balance against the United States in 4 years 619, 867 59 



It will be seen that the excess of British postage alone collected 
in the United States is very considerable^ amounting the last year 
to $193,287 47. This, as explained in previous reports, results dis- 
advantageously to this department, inasmuch as its postmasters are 
paid commissions for collecting. Its expenses the last year on this 
account have been not less than $73,000. The large increase in the 
excess of last year arises mainly from the circumstance that nearly 
two-thirds of the trans- Atlantic mails have been conveyed by the 
Cunard line of British mail packets, and, when thus conveyed, nearly 
four-fifths of the postage goes to the British government, saying no- 
thing of the still greater proportion it receives on mails so conveyed 
for countries beyond England. In the final settlement, too, it will 
be observed that the balance is every year largely, against the United 
States, and that for the year ending 30th Juno last it reached the sum 
of $264,918. A part of this, however, to wit: $43,501, has been re- 
ceived back in the balance ])aid to the United States on final adjust- 
ment by the Prussian office, thus reducing our indebtedness to 
$221,417. Under the arrangement with Prussia, the balance is in 
favor of this department, because the United States provides for the 
ocean as well as British transit conveyance of the Prussian closed 
mails ; but the general balance must continue to bo largely against 
the United States while so great a proportion of the mails are con- 
veyed by British packets. Whether it is more desirable to be subject 
to this outlay for the transmission of our mails abroad than to incur 
probably a still greater expense in fully providing our own means of 
ocean transportation, is for the wisdom of Congress to determine. If, 
fortunately, as before suggested, our steamship companies, aided by 
receipts from passengers and merchandise, shall find sufficient en- 
couragement to establish lines of steamers and carry the mails for the 
postages thereon, it will be a great point gained. On this principle, 
were it practicable, I would be pleased not only to see the number of 
trips increased upon existing lines, particularly to the continent, but 
all the lines put in operation which have been or may be projected by 



974 REPORT OP THE 

our enterprising citizens. Among these are the proposed lines from 
Norfolk to Milford Haven; from New Orleans to Bordeaux; from New 
York to Antwerp, Hamburg, or Gluckstadt; from Savannah to Pat a, 
in South America ; from Panama to Valparaiso, &c. This whole 
subject is worthy the serious consideration of Congress ; and I ven- 
ture to hope that such action may be taken upon it, at an early day, 
as that the department may clear »y understand its duty in the prem- 
ises. Whether the present lines are to be continued, and the trips 
increased, on the expiration of the contracts, or new ones established, 
at a cost, in each instance, exceeding what they may earn in post- 
ages, and, if so, at what expense, in each case, I respectfully submit 
to Congress to decide. 

A postal convention has been concluded between the United States 
and France, having been signed on the part of the United States by 
my immediate predecessor, and on the part of France by the French 
minister, on the 2d of March last, and has been in operation since the 
first of April. The rate of postage for letters of the weight of one- 
quarter ounce or under is fifteen cents, irrespective of the route, 
whether through England or direct, by which they are conveyed. 
France accounts to Great Britain for the British sea, and transit 
postage, as explained in the articles of agreement hereto annexed. 
This is the first postal convention between the two countries. 

A postal convention has also been concluded with the Hanseatic 
republic of Hamburg, similar in all respects to that existing between 
the United States and Bremen — the rates of postage under both be- 
ing the same. It was finally executed in June last, and went into 
effect on the first of July. The articles are annexed. 

Negotiations are pending for a radical change of our postal ar- 
rangements with Great Britain ; but as the proposition of the British 
office, in its present shape, cannot be acceded to, and as it involves, 
also, a preliminary agreement requiring the sanction of the treaty- 
making powers, definite action upon it has been necessarily postponed 
for the present. 

CITY POSTS. 

With the view to facilitate the receipt and delivery of letters in New 
York, Boston, and Philadelphia, the postmasters in those cities have 
been instructed to make improvements in their letter-carrier system to 
the full extent authorized by law. In New York, I found that nearly 
everything had been done that could be accomplished under existing 
laws, except the transmission of drop letters direct to their address 
without going into the main office, which is now done. Six stations, 
or sub-offices, had been established, at which, as well as at the prin- 
cipal office, the letters were sorted and passed into the hands of the 
carriers ; and a large number of boxes for the collection of letters had 
been placed at convenient distances throughout the city. On all 
letters through the mail the carriers receive two cents each for de- 
livery, and on drop letters one cent. I had hoped to be able to reduce 
the delivery fee to the uniform price of one cent ; but this was found 
impracticable in New York and Philadelphia, inasmuch as the law 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 975 

requires that the entire oost of delivery shall he defrayed out of the 
carriers' receipts. In Boston, where the districts are all compara- 
tively densely populated, one cent a letter is made to pay. The post- 
age on drop letters, including the carrier's fee, is now two cents ; and 
upon the improved plan now adopted ibr their delivery direct from 
the main office, or the nearest station, as the^case may he, it is helieved 
that the public convenience will be fully subserved. In each of these 
cities there are to be from four to six deliveries a day, and the letters 
for mailiog, &c., are to be collected and disposed of as frequently as 
occasion may require. I do not feel at liberty to advise the free de- 
livery of letters by carriers ; but I would recommend a modification of 
the present law, so as to giie the Postmaster General authority to 
have the delivery made at one cent a letter, whether the carriers' re- 
ceipts are sufficient to meet expenses or not. If the improved system 
is found to work satisfactorily in the three cities above mentioned, it 
is my purpose to extend it to all the other principal cities in the 
United States. 

EXPRESS AGENTS. 

One of the prominent subjects which have demanded my attention 
is that of providing more efifectually lor the regularity and safety of 
mails conveyed on railroads. Owing to the large number of separate 
bags on the great through lines, the frequent changes of cars, and the 
brief time allowed, in most cases, for that purpose, great care :s neces- 
sary to guard against mistakes and losses. This is more especially 
important to the letter-mail pouches, which are exchanged between 
the principal cities and towns having railroad connexions in all sec- 
tions of the country, however remote. In order that they may receive 
due attention at all points, agents of this department are required, 
and also a regular system of accountability for the performance of their 
duties. The beginning of such a system was made by my immediate 
predecessor, and my aim has been to extend and improve it as much as 
possible. Its main features are, briefly, as follows : In the post offices 
at the ends of each separate route, as apportioned to mail agents, (^say 
Washington and Philadelphia,) and at the prominent intermediate 
points, lists are kept, showing the pouches forwarded ; which lists are 
receipted by the route or mail agent, who thus becomes directly re- 
sponsible for a certain number of pouches for certain specified points. 
Upon delivering the same into post offices, to mail messengers, or to 
an agent on a connecting route, he takes receipts to show the fulfil- 
ment of his duties. In addition, it is icquired, on some routes, that 
full and careful accounts be kept, in book form, of all pouches, so as 
to show where they are received, how labelled, and how disposed of. 
By such means it becomes practicable to trace missing pouches, and 
there is also kept alive a sense of responsibility on the part of agents, 
impelling them to greater watchfulness in performing duties which, 
ficom their laborious and monotonous nature, might otherwise insen- 
sibly become, in a measure, mechanical^ and not occupy so much of the 
mind as their importance demands. Moreover, all irregularities in 
any way chargeable to agents can be traced to their true 



976 EEPORT OP THE 

that suspicion in no case attaches to innocent parties. For such rea- 
sons, apart from an interest in the service generally, which is presumed 
to be felt by all agents ot* the department, the system in question has 
commended itself favorably to all who have been called on to give it 
attention. Its details are not yet perfected ; but it is regarded as the 
beginning of a work which must be gradually advanced and improved, 
under the teaching of experience, until it shall fully accomplish that 
for which it is designed. 

Experiments have been made on the great railroad lines between New 
York and Montgomery, Alabama, and Nashville, Tennessee, which 
have shown the advantages of the system as now existing, and given 
ample encouragement that it will be made more useful in the future. 

On some of the principal western lines — as from Buffalo, New York, 
to Chicago, Illinois, and St. Louis — accounts of mail pouches are kept, 
but not quite so satisfactorily as on the other lines referred to, owinj^ 
chiefly to the fact that the larger proportion of what are called through 
mails go by ''express trains," in charge of baggage masters, and not 
the agents of this department. The latter travel on other trains, for the 
purpose of delivering mails to numerous post offices on the way where 
'^express trains" do not regularly stop ; and it has been considered an 
unnecessary expense to appoint agents simply to deliver bags, when 
the railroad companies are paid as well for that service as for convey- 
ing them, there being express stipulations to that effect in all con- 
tracts. These views are undoubtedly correct in theory ; but experience 
has shown that railroad companies cannot be made to appoint persons 
to give the mails due attention in all cases, and there is, therefore, 
no alternative but to multiply largely the number of agents of the 
department on all great routes where important mails now go without 
them. In addition to the western routes just alluded to, there are 
many others ot' equal grade in the same category. The principal 
mails between Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, and the 
west, for instance, have been nominally cared for by baggage masters, 
but who, having other duties equally if not more important in their 
estimation, have not always duly attended to the mails. Especially 
is it found that they cannot be induced to account for pouches, ss 
desired by the department. Believing that such a state of things 
should be remedied, I have placed agents on the express lines between 
Baltimore and Cincinnati, and Philadelphia and Cincinnati, and re- 
quired each one to run through the whole distance between those cities. 
Starting, say at Baltimore, an agent will give a receipt for the several 
pouches according to their destination, and the same will also be 
entered on a'' way bill." For mails received and delivered on the route, 
receipts are to be exchanged and entries made on the '*bill," and the 
agent will go through in the shortest possible time to Cincinnati, 
and deliver his mails and way bill for examination at the post office. 
If detained from any cause, he is to go forward by the first opportu- 
nity, and in no case to allow passengers to outstrip him ; and he must 
report to tlic postmasters the particulars of all delays, with their 
causes, for publication, immediately on reaching his final destination, 
so that the public shall be fully informed on the subject, and know 
where blame rests. In this way one individual is held responsible, 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 977 

withont chance of evasion, for the whole distance ; whereas, under 
the ordinary division of duties, the mails would pass through the 
hands of perhaps five or six persons, rendering it always difficult and 
sometimes impracticable to know with certainty, in case of irregulari- 
ties, who is really hlameahle. 

Similar agencies will be established between New York and Cincin- 
nati, and Cincinnati and St. Louis, and on other great routes, and all 
possible precautions adopted to insure the regularity and safety of the 
mails. 

It is frequently charged that the mails have not uniformly equal 
expedition with travellers on railroads ; and, insofar as this may be 
the fact, it is considered attributable to the want of attention to the 
mails on the express lines which are without agents of this department. 
The evil, therefore, can only be remedied by employing additional 
agents to accompany mails long distances without changing, and 
guard against all delays that can possibly be avoided, and especially 
to see that passengers enjoy no advantages over the mails, but that 
both are equally expedit^ under all circumstances. 

It may be proper to add in this connexion that the preparation of 
all necessary forms and instructions for maintaining accountability on 
routes where this work is already commenced, and for extending it 
generally as proposed, will involve an amount of additional labor 
which cannot be performed with the present clerical force. 

NEW ORLEANS AND NEW YORK ROUTE. 

For a number of years the attention of Congress and of the commer- 
cial public has been directed to the necessity of adopting measures to 
insure greater speed and regularity in the transmission of the mails 
between New York and New Orleans, the recognized centres, as these 
cities are, of two great commercial circles, conducting by far the larger 

?ortion of the importing and exporting trade of the whole country, 
'he interest felt in the subject has been manifested, from time to time, 
in the presentation to Congress of memorials from citizens, chambers 
of commerce, and State legislatures, praying that means might be 
employed to efiect increased expedition and certainty in the transmis- 
sion of these mails ; and in the subsequent passage of resolutions, by 
both Houses, calling on the Postmaster General to report the causes 
of the failures and delays referred to by the memorialists, and to state 
whether any and what legislation was necessary to accomplish the 
object of their prayers. 

The great northern and southern mails are transported by railroad 
from New York, via Philadelphia, Washington, Richmond, Peters- 
burg, Weldon, Wilmington, Kingsville, Augusta, Millin, Macon, and 
Columbus, to Montgomery, thence by coach to Stockton, and thence 
by steamboat to Mobile and New Orleans. The service is twice daily 
between New York and Montgomery, and daily between Montgomery 
and New Orleans. The time prescribed in the contract schedules for 
the performance of the through trip is six days ; but the instances in 
which this speed is actually attained constitute rather the exceptions 
than the rule. Of 627 mails sent from New York to NewrOrleanp^ 

y^j jj g2 Digitized by ^OOgre 



978 REPOKT OF THE 

within the year ending Slst March, 1856, only 163 were carried 
through in six days, the time occupied in the transportation of the 
remaining 464 ranging from seven to twelve days. Of 369 mails 
sent in the same year from New Orleans to New York, only 
153 were carried through in six days, the remaining 216 ranging from 
seven to fourteen days. Of 651 mails sent from New York to New 
Orleans within the year ending 31st March, 1857, only 15^ were 
carried through in six days, the remaining 492 ranging from seven to 
twenty days. Of 363 mails sent in the same year from New Orleana 
to New York, 161 were carried through in six days, the remaining 
202 occupying from seven to sixteen days. No mail was received at 
New Orleans from New York on sixty-five several days within the 
year ending 31st March, 1866 ; and on ninety-six several days within 
the same year no mail was received at New York from New Orleans. 
Thirty-five similar failures occurred at New Orleans during the year 
ending 31st March, 1857, and ninety-seven at New York. The 
failures at intermediate points, going south, during the year ending 
Slst March, 1856, amounted to 331 ; going north, to 262. During 
the year ending 31st March, 1857, the failures going south were 284 ; 
going north, 324. The average time occupied in the performance of 
the through trip from New York to New Orleans, during the year 
ending 31st March, 1856, was seven days, four hours ; from New 
Orleans to New York, seven days, one hour. For the year ending 
31st March, 1857, the average time from New York to New Orleans 
was seven days, three hours ; from New Orleans to New York, six 
days, twenty hours. The shortest time either way, in either year, was 
six days ; the longest going south, in the year ending 31st March, 
1856, was twelve days ; going north, fourteen days. In the year 
ending 31st March, 1857, the longest time going south was twenty 
days ; ^oing north, sixteen days. 

The mconvenience occasioned by these delays and failures is aggra- 
vated by the fact that by far the larger portion of them occur within 
the winter months — from October to March, inclusive — comprising 
the period during which the great mass of the commercial operations 
of the year transpire. Thus, of the 163 mails carried through in six 
days from New York to New Orleans in the year ending Slst of March, 
1856, only forty-six were transmitted within the winter months. Of 
153 carried through in six days, in the same year, from New Orleans 
to New York, only forty-three were transmitted within the winter 
months. Of 159 carried through in six days from New York to New 
Orleans in the year ending 31st of March, 1857, only fifty-six were 
transmitted during the winter season. And of 161 carried through 
in six days, in the same year, from New Orleans to New York, only 
forty-nine were transmitted during the winter months. Of sixty-five 
failures, in the year ending 31st of March, 1856, to receive any mail 
at New Orleans from New York, forty-six occurred during the winter. 
Of ninety-six failures, in the same year, to receive any mail at New 
york from New Orleans, fifty-four occurred in the winter. Of thirty- 
five similar failures at New Orleans^ in the year ending the 31st of 
March, 1857, thirty occurred in the winter ; and of ninety-seven at 
New York, sixty* one occurred in the winter. Nearly four-fifths of 



POSTMASTER OENERAL 979 

all the failures at intermediate points, in each year, transpired during 
the winter months. The average time of the through trips from New 
York to New Orleans for the six summer months ending with Sep- 
tember, 1856, was six days, eighteen hours ; for the six succeeding 
winter months, the average was seven days, fifteen hours ; for both 
together, seven days, four hours. The average time from New Orleans 
to New York, for the same year, was, for the summer, six days, eleven 
hours ; for the winter, seven days, fourteen hours ; for both, seven 
days, one hour. The average time from New York to New Orleans 
for the six summer months ending with September, 1856, was six 
days, seventeen hours ; for the six succeeding winter months, seven 
days, thirteen hours ; for both, seven days, three hours. The average 
time, the same year, from New Orleans to New York, was, for the 
summer, six days, nine hours; for the winter, seven days, eight 
hours ; for both, six days, twenty hours. 

The causes uniformly assigned for these failures and delays are such 
as these : ** Oars off the track," " Collision of trains," ** Machinery 
deranged," **High winds," "Snow storms and ice," *'Snow drifts," 
'*Road injured by heavy rains," *' Bridge broken," &c. They are 
such, too, as necessarily attach to the description of service employed. 
The line between New York and New Orleans is composed of sixteen 
different links, or routes, the service on each being performed under a 
separate and distinct contract, having annexed to it, as a material 
part, a schedule of departures and arrivals, by which the contractors 
are to be respectively governed. To secure the speediest practicable 
transmission of the mails over the whole line, the connexions between 
these links must necessarily be close, and each separate road must be 
put up to its greatest average running power. Under these circum- 
stances, a very slight accident upon any one of the roads occasions a 
tailure on its part to form a connexion with the succeeding link, and 
the consequence is a loss, in the through trip, of twelve or twenty- 
four hours, accordingly as the service on that part of the line is double 
or single daily. Periods occur every winter when the transmission of 
the mail is suspended for days together by reason of snow storms. 
During the last winter it was arrested for ten days at one point on the 
line, and at others for seven, eight, and nine days together. 

Among the routes established by law during the first session of the 
thirty-fourth Congress were two described in the following words, viz : 
" From Cedar Key, Florida, to New Orleans, Louisiana, in steamera." 
** From Fernandina, Florida, to New York, New York, in steamers." 
In advertising these routes, the department, believing that they 
were designed, in connexion with a railroad in course of construction 
across the peninsula of Florida, from Fernandina to Cedar Key, to 
constitute a new route from New York to New Orleans, with a view 
to the speedier and more certain transmission of the great northern 
and southern mails, invited bids for tri>weekly and also for daily ser- 
vice, and requested bidders to state the least time in which they would 
guaranty to perform the trip. The railroad part of the line was not 
embraced in the advertisement, the act of 1845 (section 19) autho- 
rizing the Postmaster General to contract for the transportation of 
the mails on railroads with or without advertising. ^ ^^ ^ GoOqIc 

igi ize y g 



9S0 EEPOBT OF THE 

In response to the invitations of the department, the Florida Bail- 
road Company presented the following proposals, viz : 

1st. To carry the mails tri-weekly m steamers between Cedar Key 
and New Orleans, the trip to be performed in thirty-^ight hours each 
way, at $110,000 per annum. 

2d. To carry the mails tri-weekly in steamers between Fernandina 
and New York, the trip to be performed in seventy-five hours each 
way, at $165,000 per annum. 

3d. To carry the mails tri-weekly or daily in steamers from New 
York to Fernandina, thence by railroad across the peninsula of Flo- 
rida to Cedar Key, and thence in steamers to New Orleans, and back, 
the trip each way to be performed within five days, at $300,000 per 
annum for tri-weekly, or $500,000 per annum for daily service — ^fco 
commence on the completion of the railroad between Fernandina and 
Cedar Key, and the contract to be renewed for four years from the 
expiration of the current term, (i. e., June 30, 1859.) 

In a subsequent correspondence between the department and the 
bidders they gave assurances of their ability to perform the through trip 
ordinarily within four days^ and stated that in fixing five as the limit 
they had allowed ample margin for any such detentions as were likely 
to result from accidents, head winds, or storms. They also submitted 
the following modification of their proposals, viz : 

**The company will perform a daily service throughout the year 
for the sum of $456,260. 

"To insure a five-days mail, they will guaranty the time ; or, in 
other words, no pay will be demanded for any trip not performed 
within five days between the terminal points of the route^ viz : New 
York and New Orleans. 

** The company ^ ill also stipulate that at any time during the con- 
tract, when required by the department, upon three months' notifica- 
tion, they will convey a mail from Cedar Key to Aspinwall, Greytown, 
or Huasacualco, (as preferred by the department,) and back, twice 
monthly, and from Cedar Key to Key West and Havana and back 
twice monthly, the compensation for both services to be $100,000 per 
annum. 

**The time between Cedar Key and Aspinwall guarantied not to 
exceed one hundred and twenty hours, and between Cedar Key and 
Havana not to exceed thirty-five hours. 

**If Greytown or Huasacualco be selected, the time to be propor- 
tionately reduced. 

** The service to Havana and the Pacific crossing to start from 
Tampa, instead of Cedar Key, when the road to that point is com- 
pleted." 

The transportation of the great northern and southern mails by the 
proposed new route would obviously be free from many of the causes of 
interruption and delay to which the land route is subject. The whole 
line would be under contract to a single party, with a schedule fixing 
the period within which the entire trip should be performed ; whereas, 
by the present arrangement, sixteen difierent parties are employed in 
the service, with separate schedules, each of which must be exactly 
complied with to insure the performance of the through trip in con- 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 981 

tract time. The running time proposed, also, is one day less than the 
least in which it has proved practicable to transport the mails hj 
land, and more than two days less than the actual average. The 
liability of mails to depredation and to misdirection by frequent over- 
hauling and distribution would be obviated, in the proposed arrange- 
ment, by enclosing the matter in crates or boxes in New York or New 
Orleans and transporting it unopened to its destination; and thus, 
also, the abrasion of packages, with the consequent liability to loss of 
directions, &c., would be prevented — a consideration of no small value, 
in view of the generally bad condition of the document mail on its 
arrival in the southwestern States, and the too frequent failure of such 
matter to reach its proper destination. 

The establishment of the proposed service, while it would not inter- 
fere with the carriage of the local mails on the inland route, would 
relieve the department from liability to embarrassments under which 
it has at times been placed in consequence of being dependent on a 
single line for the transmission of the through mails ; and it would be 
productive, both to the department and the public, of other advantages 
naturally arising from the competition it would create. 

The inducement it would oflTer to the mercantile community to 
insure the due transmission of their communications by duplicate let- 
ters, to be forwarded by both routes, would be a source of increased 
revenue to the department ; and the greater speed and certainty it 
promises would have the effect of relieving the mail service, to some 
extent, from the competition of the telegraph. 

By conveying the mails for California upon the proposed route as 
far as Cedar Key, and forwarding them thence by a separate steamer 
to Aspinwall, Greytown, or Huasacualco, and by substituting the 
branch proposed from Cedar Key to Key West and Havana for the 
present Charleston and Havana line, and for that part of the New 
Orleans and Key West line between Cedar Key and Key West — ^say 
half the route — an annual saving of $285,000 would be effected. In 
such event, this saving should be deducted from the cost of the pro- 
posed daily service, to show the net additional expense to the depart- 
ment, which would thus be reduced to $181,250 per annum. 

Upon the question of accepting the proposals for this service, con- 
sidering the uncertainty of the period at which the railroad portion of 
the proposed line will be completed, I have been unable, thus far, to 
announce to the bidders any definitive determination. But the subject 
is referred to here because it is deemed to be one of vast public interest, 
in view of the promise which the contemplated new arrangement 
affords of so materially facilitating the communication between the 
two sections and the two great commercial capitals of the country. 

THE MAIL SERVICE ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BELOW THE OHIO. 

The river is divided into the following sections, for distribution of 
the local mails at the different towns and offices on it : 

Route Y305. — New Orleans to St. Francisville, 170 miles, four times 
a week, by steamboats. 



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982 BEFOBT OF THE 

Boute 7309.— New Orleans, via St. Francisyille^ to Yicksborg, 39T 
miles, three times a week, by steamboats. 

Note. — This arrangement makes the service daily between New 
Orleans and St. Francisville, and three times a week between St. 
Francisville and Vioksbnrg. 

Boute 7499. — Vicksburg to Napoleon, 230 miles, twice a week, by 
steamboats. 

Boute 7612. — Napoleon to Memphis, 203 miles, twice a week, by 
steamboats. 

Besides these four subdivisions for local purposes, there is the great 
through maHy No. 7809, from New Orleans to Cairo, which, like i^l 
the others, will expire the 30th June next. 

The department recommends that, on the expiration of the present 
contracts, another subdivision be added, from Memphis to Cairo, 89 
that the plan for supplying the local mails to the various towns and 
settlements between the Ohio and New Orleans may be adequate and 
uniform. 

As to the great through mail from Cairo and New Orleans, the hope 
is indulged that there will be no necessity for continuing it on the 
river, as at present. When first ordered by Congress, there was great 
and obvious propriety in it ; but the progress since made in constructing 
several railways nearly parallel with it has put a new aspect on the 
question. By the 30th June next, it is believed that the railroad 
from New Orleans to Jackson, Canton, &c., will be so far compl^^ed 
that, with one or two short stage lines between the unfinished portions, 
the mails may be conveyed over it in nearly half the present time, 
and with much more certainty and regularity. This may confidently 
be anticipated with respect to so much of said road as is south of the 
Tennessee line. Thence it is already completed to Jackson in the 
latter State, and, from the progress making and expected, it is probable 
that the great through mails may, at no distant day, be conveyed on 
the entire line to and from Cairo with ini^nite advantages over the 
present river route. 

The department, however, desires the power to make river contracts 
for a shorter term than four years^ as at present, so as to continue that 
mode of conveyance until sufficient progress is made with the above 
or any other parallel route to authorize the transfer of the entire 
through mail service from the river. 

The personal acquaintance of the Postmaster General with that 
river, and the investigation of the fines heretofore imposed on the con- 
tractors for the present service, fully convince him that no regular 
and expeditious transportation of the mails need ever to be looked for 
on so long a route, at any reasonable compensation. If the contractors 
shall be required, by express provision, to take on themselves all the 
risks and losses growing out of the ice in winter, the low waters of 
summer and fall, and of the fogs that prevail at nearly every season of 
the year, they will covenant to perform the service, but only at enor* 
mous rates. In making out bids, they would estimate liberally for aU the 
trips that may be lost, all the failures to arrive in schedule time, and all 
the failures to connect with other routes, whether arising from ice, 



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POSTMASTER GBNBRAL. 98S 

low water and fogjB, the breaking of maehinery, or other oasualtiefl, of 
whatever nature. Thus enormous prices would be paid, and, after 
all, on account of the physical impossibility in some cases and unavoid- 
able accidents in others, the regular and punctual service required 
would not be obtained. The express service, on horseback, established 
by a former able head of this department, (Mr. Kendall,) furnishes an 
apt illustration of this subject. He expressly advertised that no excuses 
would be received, and the consequence was, that when a failure took 
place the fine or forfeiture was deducted unconditionally; but to 
this the contractor could well afford to submit, having amplv allowed 
for it in his bid, and obtained a contract accordingly at a high price. 

In the existing contract, however, for transporting mails between 
New Orleans and Cairo, there was no express provision that the con- 
tractors should take on themselves all the risk of failures by physical 
causes or unavoidable accidents, such as ice, unprecedented low 
waters, fogs, damage to machinery, &c. ; and hence due allowance 
was to be made for them, as in the case of all other contracts, con- 
strued and enforced as they have been in the long and uniform 
practice of the department. 

Congress, on the last night of the last session, enacted, with refer- 
ence to this case, ^' That the Postmaster General be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to re-examine and adjust all questions arising out of fines 
imposed upon the contractors for carrying the mails on the Mississippi 
river."— (Act of 3d March, 1857.) 

Under this law several applications were made for the remission of 
fines and forfeitures under late contracts for services on the Mississippi 
river ; but, as the act seemed to the department to have been only in- 
tended to embrace existing contracts now in course of being carried 
out, such applications were not considered, under a rule, well settled, 
not to review or reverse the decisions of a former head of the depart- 
ment, unless something existed on the record showing that he himself 
intended to have re-examined the case. 

The act of Congress above quoted, referring to the present case^ 
took it out of this rule, and the decision of the department is shown 
by the separate statement marked A in the appendix. The amount re- 
nlitted may appear large; but, according to law and the testimony 
taken in the case, and the practice in similar cases, the department 
seemed not to be warranted in making it less. 

The irregularity of the service, as fully ascertained by this investi- 
gation, would have induced the annulment of the contract ; but, having 
only some eight or ten months yet to run, no one was found willing 
to take it, except at a rate double the present compensation, and even 
then it was required that a new contract should be made for four years^ 
and not merely for the few months remaining of the regular term. 
Such a contract not being allowable by law, it was found unadvisable 
to annul the existing one; and, in order to secure its most efficient 
execution through the remainder of the term, the agents of the depart- 
ment at New Orleans and Cairo were instructed to engage any boat 
on hand and despatch the mails in every case of failure on the part of 
the contractors to do so at the time required — ^the cost of such 
teni])orary service (not exceeding $450 the half trip) being chargeable 



984 REPORT OP THE 

to them. The postmaster at Memphis, where commercial connexioDs 
have now become vastly important, was also instructed that wheneyer 
the mail boat from Cairo failed to arrive there in reasonable time he 
shoald transmit mails for New Orleans by any other boat, at the 
expense of the contractors. Under these arrangements, now being 
energetically executed, the hope is indulged that the service for the 
few months remaining may be satisfactorily rendered. 

All the difficulties in relation to this route have been inherited from 
former years ; and the department looks forward to the day, believed 
not to be distant, when the great through mails from Chicago, St. 
Louis, Memphis, and other important cities of the west, can be trans- 
mitted to New Orleans in less than half the time now required, and 
with the regularity of a well-constructed and well-managed railroad. 

FINES. 

A detailed statement will be presented to Congress showing the 
fines and deductions which were imposed upon the contractors for 
imperfect mail service during the fiscal year. These fines and deduc- 
tions will be found to amount in the aggregate to $188,746 84. In 
this amount of $188,746 84 is included the sum of $74,598 46, being 
that portion of the deductions made from the contractors' pay on the 
New Orleans and Cairo route during the third and fourth quarters of 
1856, which has since been remitted to them, in pursuance of the 
7th section of the act of Congress passed on the 3d March, 1857. 

SETTLEMENT OF THE CLAIM OF GEORGE CHORPENNING, Je. 

By an act of Congress of March 3, 1851, the Postmaster General 
was " required to adjust and settle the claim of George Chorpen- 
ning, jr., as surviving partner of Woodward & Chorpenning, and in 
his own right, for carrying the mails by Ran Pedro, and for supplying 
the post office in Carson's Valley, and also for carrying part of the 
Independence mail by California ; allowing a pro rata increase of com- 
pensation for the distance by San Pedro, for the service to Carson's 
Valley, and for such part of the eastern mail as was carried by Cali- 
fornia during all the time when said services were performed ;'' and to 
adjust and settle the claim of said Chorpenning ^' for damages on 
account of the annulment or suspension of Woodward & Chorpen- 
ning's contract for carrying the United States mail from Sacramento, 
in California, to Salt Lake, in Utah Territory, as shown in the affida- 
vits and proofs on file in the House of Representatives ;" also, to 
allow and pay to said Chorpenning his full contract pay during the 
suspension of their contract, from 15th Harch to 1st July, 1853, and 
thereafter to pay him at the rate of thirty thousand dollars per annum, 
which sum was to be in lieu of the contract pay under both the con- 
tract with Woodward & Chorpenning, which expired June 30, 1854, 
and under his (Chorpenning' s) present contract, which runs four years 
from July 1, 1854. The contract pay under the first was $14,000 for 
monthly service between Sacramento city and Salt Lake, by Carson's 
Valley ; and under the present, $12,500 a year, for the same number 



POSTMASTER OENEBAL. 985 

of trips from San Diego or San Pedro to Salt Lake by San Bernardino. 
In obedience to this law, and on the proofs and affidavits on file in the 
House of Bepresentatives, to which I was, by the terms of the law, 
restricted, I have allowed — 

1. For damages on account of the annulment or suspension of the 
old contract $30,000 00 

2. For five months' service to Carson's Valley 1,153 33 

3. For increased distance from Sacramento, in carrying 
the regular California and Salt Lake mail, by San Pe- 
dro, ten months $6,410 00 

and Independence mails eight of same 

months 15,384 62 

21,794 62 

4. For carrying Independence mails eight months be- 
tween San P^ro and Salt Lake, (all the above being 

under old contract) 28,000 00 

5. For carrying Independence mails under present con- 
tract, from July 1, 1854, to October 1, 1856 28,125 00 

In theaggregate 109,072 95 



In making the pro rata allowances, the act of Congress not being 
specific on this point, I have taken as the basis of the calculations 
the original pay under each contract, instead of the higher sum of 
$30,000, to which, as above observed, the compensation has been 
raised. But, even upon this lower basis, the sum allowed^ it will be 
perceived, is very considerable, independently of the further increased 
compensation of sixteen thousand dollars under the old, and seven- 
teen thousand five hundred dollars per annum under the new con- 
tract. 

The settlement of this claim has not been made without considerable 
embarrassment. The act of Congress was peremptory to adjust and 
settle, not according to the proofs that might be taken before the final 
action, but ''as shown by the proofs and affidavits on file in the House 
of Bepresentatives." The«e were to be the sole guides in the settle- 
ment, and neither the records of the department nor any contradictory 
or explanatory testimony could be taken by the government to assist 
in attaining what might be considered exact justice in the case. The 
act directed that the claimant should be paid pro rata for carrying 
his own mail, under his contract, from Sacramento, around by San 
Francisco and the coast, to San Pedro, instead of east by Carson's 
Valley to Salt Lake, and that he should be paid also for carrying the 
Independence mail that way, when the records and correspondence of 
the department show that the change in the route was permitted at 
the claimant's own instance and request, and not forced upon him by 
an order or wish even of the department. The pro rata allowance for 
this change alone, it will bo observed, is $21,794 62. The act further 
directed that he should be paid pro rata for carrying the eastern mail 
for Salt Lake, sent round by the isthmus to California ; whereas, by 
the contract itself, and the usage of the department i^n^|i|l^uoh cases, 



86 BEFI^BT OP THE 

he was bound, as a coi^tractory to carry the mails of the United States, 
from whatever quarter they might be sent to his line. The principal 
difficulty in the case, however, was in deciding on the true intent 
and meaning of the act in requiring him to be paid pro rata. Pro 
rata, or in proportion, to what? The first contract was to carry the 
mail at $14,000, and the second at $12,500 ^r annum. Congress, 
however, in the very act which granted him this pro rata relief, raised 
these prices up to $30,000 per annum. Now, in making the estimate 
required by Congress, should the basis of calculation be a pro rata on 
the $14,000 and the $12,600 contracts, or on the $30,000? The de* 
partment could find nothing in the act throwing light on this subject, 
and therefore made the calculation on the contract or lowest basis, 
instead of the $30^000 basis. In doing so, the department has gone 
on the principle that, in every case of doubt in a matter of this Und, 
the government was entitled to the benefit of that doubt, until Con- 
gress, by some new enactment, should remove it. 

OVERIAND MAIL SERVICE TO CALIFORNIA. 

In order to carry into effect the act of Congress approved the third 
of March, 1857, relative to the overland mail to California, the de« 

1>artment issued the following notice, and caused the same to be rego- 
arly advertised according to law : 

"Post Office Departbcent, 

''Apra 20, 1857. 
^ "An act of Congress, approved 3d March, 1857, making appropria- 
tions for the service of the Post Office Department for the fiscal year 
ending 30th June, 1858, provides : 

" ^ Sec. 10. That the Postmaster Oeneral be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to contract for the conveyance of the entire letter mail 
from such point on the Mississippi river as the contractors may select 
to San Francisco, in the State of California, for .six years, at a cost 
uot exceeding three hundred thousand dollars per annum for semi- 
monthly, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars for weekly, or six 
hundred thousand dollars for semi-weekly service, to be performed 
semi-monthly, weekly, or semi-weekly, at the option of the Post- 
master General. 

' ^ ^ Sec. 1 1 . That the contract shall require the service to be performed 
with good four-horse coaches or spring wagons, suitable for the con- 
veyance of passengers as well as the safety and security of the mails. 

^' 'Sec 12. That the contractor shall have the right of preemption 
to three hundred and twenty acres of any land not then disposed 
of or reserved, at each point necessary for a station, not to be nearer 
than ten miles from each other ; and provided that no mineral land 
shall be thus pre-empted. 

'^ 'Sec. 13. That the said service shall be performed within twenty- 
five days for each trip ; and that, before entering into such contract, 
the Postmaster General shall be satisfied of the ability and disposition 
of the parties bona fide and in good faith to perform the said con- 
tract, and shall require good and sufficient securitv fo^the perform- 



POSTMASTEB GENEBAL. 987 

anoe of the same— the service to commence within twelve months 
after the signing the contract.' 

" Proposals will accordingly be received at the Contract Office of the 
Post Office Department until 3 p. m. of the Ist day of June, 1857, 
for conveying mails under the provisions of the above act. 

<' Besides the starting point on the Mississippi river, bidders will 
name intermediate points proposed to be embraced in the route, and 
otherwise designate its course as nearly as practicable. 

'^ Separate proposals are invited for semi-moniMyy weekly ^ and semi- 
weeJdy trips each way. 

•* The decision upon the proposals offered will be made after the Post- 
master 'cneral shall be satisfied of the ability and disposition of the 
parties in good faith to perform the contract. 

'' A guarantee is to be executed, with good and sufficient sureties, 
that the contract shall be executed with like good security, whenever 
the contractor or contractors shall be required to do so by the Post- 
master General, and the service must commence within twelve months 
after the date of such contract." 

In pursuance of the said advertisement, the Postmaster General and 
his three assistants assembled in the Contract Office and opened the 
respective bids, making the following abstract of them, and causing 
said abstract to be copied into a separate book, and also in the route 
book for California. 

ABSTRACT OP THE BIDS. 

John Butterfiddy WUliam B. Dinsmorej WiUiam G. Fargo^ James 
V. P. OardneVf Marcus L. Kinyon, Hamilton Spencer ^ and Alexander 
Holland: From St. Louis, by Springfield, and from Memphis, by Little 
Bock, connecting at a common point at or eastward of Albuquerque; 
thence west, to and along the military road to Colorado river ; thenoe 
up the valley of the Mohahoc river, to and through the Tejon passes 
of the Sierra Nevada ; and thence along the best route to San Fran^ 
dsco ; weekly y $450,000; semi-weeUyy $600,000. 

John Butterjidd and others: From Memphis, by Little Bock, Albu- 
querque, mouth of Mohahoc, on the Colorado river, and one of the 
Tejon passes of the Sierra Nevada, to San Francisco ; semi-monthly^ 
$300,000 ; weekly^ $450,000; semirweekly, $595,000. 

John Butierfield and others: From St. Louis, by Springfield, to 
Albuquerque ; thence, as above, to San Francisco ; semirmowthly^ 
$300,000 ; weekly, $450,000; semi-weekly^ $585,000. 

James E. Birch: From Memphis, by Little Bock, Washington, 
Fulton, Clarksville, Gainesville, Fort Chadbourne, head spring of 
Conche river, to Pecos river, nearly due west ; thence, along Pecoe 
river, Delaware creek, through the Guadalupe and Hueco mountains, 
to the Bio Grande Mver ; thence, over the emigrant road, to Fort 
Yuma ; thence, by S%n Gorgona pass, San Bernardino, Tejon, Tulare, 
or Salinas valleys, to San Francisco ; semi-weekly ^ $600,000. 

James Olover: From Memphis, by Helena, Little Bock, across 
Texas, to £1 Paso, Fort Yuma, San Bernardino, Los Angeles; 
thence, between the coast range and Sierra Nevada mountainGL to San 

' ^ Digitized byV^OOgle 



988 BEPOBT OF THE 

Francisco ; or, from Vicksbnrg, by Shrevesport, to El Paso, &c., 
&c., (as above;) semi-monthly , $300,000; weekly y |450,00O; semi- 
weekly, $600,000. 

S. HoweU and A. E. Pace : From Oaines' Landing, on tbe Missis- 
sippi, to San Francisco ; term of four years ; commence at Vicksbnrg, 
if preferred ; weekly ^ $1,000,000 for the first year, $800,000 for the 
second year, $700,000 for the third year, $600,000 for the fourth 
year. 

David D. Mitchell, Samuel B. Churchill, Bchert Campbell, WiUiam 
Gilpin, and others : From St. Louis to San Francisco ; semt'tveekly, 
$600,000. 

James Johnston, jr., and Joseph Clark: From St. Louis, by Fort 
Independence, Fort Laramie, Salt Lake City, or any other point 
named by the department, to San Francisco ; semi-monthly ^ $260,000; 
weekly, $390,000; semi-weekly, $520,000. 

Irregular (after time) bid. WiUiam HoUinsJiead, president Minne- 
sota, Nebraska, and Pacific Mail Transportation Company : From St. 
Paul, by Fort Ridgely, South Pass, Soda Springs, Humboldt river, 
Honey Lake valley, Noble's pass, Shasta City, to San Francisco ; 
semi-weekly, $550,000. 

On the second day of July, 1857, the department, after full and 
mature consideration, made the following order in relation to the 
route selected and the bid accepted : 

^' 12,578. From St. Louis, Missouri, and from Memphis, Tennessee, 
converging at Little Bock, Arkansas ; thence, via Preston, Texas, or 
as nearly so as may be found advisable, to the best point of crossing 
the Bio Grande, above £1 Paso, and not far from Fort Fillmore ; 
thence, along the new road being opened and constructed under the 
direction of the Secretary of the Interior, to Fort Yuma, California ; 
thence, through the best passes, and along the best valleys for safe and 
expeditious staging, to San Francisco. 

*' The foregoing route is selected for the overland mail service to 
California, as combining, in my judgment, more advantages and fewer 
disadvantages than any other. 

^* No bid having been made for this particular route, and all tbe 
bidders (whose bids were considered regular under the advertisement 
and the act of Congress) having consented that their bids may be held 
and considered as extending and applying to said route : 

"Therefore, looking at the respective bidders, both as to tbe 
amount proposed and tne ability, qualifications, and experience of the 
bidders to carry out a great mail service like this, I hereby order tbat 
the proposal of John Butterfield, of Utica, New York, William B. 
Dinsmore, of New York city, William G. Fargo, of Buffalo, New 
York, James V. P. Gardner, of Utica, New York, Marcus L. Kinyon, 
of Bome, New York, Alexander Holland, of New York city, and 
Hamilton Spencer, of Bloomington, Illinois, at the sum of $595,000 
(five hundred and ninety-five thousand dollars) per annum for semi- 
weekly service, be accepted. The contractors, however, to have the 
privilege of selecting lands, under the act of Congress, on only one of 
he roads, or branches, between Little Bock and the Mississippi river — 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



POSTMASTER OENEHAL 989 

the on« selected by them to be made known and inserted in the con- 
tract at the time of its execution." 

Subsequently, on re-examining the proposal, the above acceptance 
was modified so as to fix the pay at $600,000 per annum, that being 
the true amount of the bid. 

Under strong representations that a better junction of the two 
branches of said road could be made at Preston than at Little Bock, 
on the eleventh day of September, 1857, the following order was 
made: 

" That whenever the contractors and their sureties shall file in the 
Post OflSce Department a request, in writing, that they desire to make 
the junction of the two branches of said road at Preston, instead of 
Little Rock, the department will permit the same to be done by 
some route not further west than to Springfield, Missouri, thence by 
Fayetteville, Van Buren, and Fort Smith, in the State of Arkansas, 
to the said junction, at or near the town of Preston, in Texas ; but 
said new line will be adopted on the express condition that the said 
contractors shall not claim or demand from the department, or from 
Clongress, any increased compensation for or on account of such change 
in the route from St. Louis, or of the point of junction of the two 
routes from Little Bock to Preston ; and on the further express con- 
dition that whilst the amount of lands to which the contractors may 
be entitled under the act of Congress may be estimated on either of 
said branches from Preston to St. Louis or Memphis, at their option, 
yet the said contractors shall take one-half of that amount on each of 
said branches, so that neither shall have an advantage in the way of 
stations and settlement over the other ; and in case said contractors, 
in selecting and locating their lands, shall disregard this condition, 
OT give undue advantage to one of said branches over the other, the 
department reserves the power of discontinuing said new route from 
St. Louis to Preston, and to hold said contractors and their sureties 
to the original route and terms expressed and set forth in the body of 
this contract." 

In pursuance of the above orders and proceedings, on the 16th day of 
September, 185Y, the following contract was entered into between the 
department and the contractors whose bid had been accepted : 

No. 12,578.— $600,000 per annum. 

This article of contract, made the sixteenth day of September, in 
the year one thousand eight hundred and fifly-seven, between the 
United States (acting in this behalf by their Postmaster General) and 
John Butterfield, of Utica, New York, William B, Dinsmore, of 
New York city, William G. Fargo, of Buffalo, New York, James 
V. P. Gardner, of Utica, New York, Marcus L. Kinyon, of Bome, 
New York, Alexander Holland, of New York city, and Hamilton 
Spencer, of Bloomington, Illinois, and Danford N. Barney, of the city 
of New York, Johnston Livingston, of Livingston, New York, David 
Moulton, of Floyd, New York, and Elijah P. Williams, of Buffalo, 
New York, witnesseth : 

That whereas John Butterfield, William B. Dinsmore, Wil- 
liam G. Fargo, James Y. P. Gardner, Mascus L, Kinyon, Alex- 



990 BEPORT OF THE 

ander Holland, and Hamilton Spencer, have been accepted, ac- 
cording to law, as contractors for transporting the entire letter 
mail, agreeably to the provisions of the llth^ 12th, and 13th sections 
of an act of Congress approved March 3, 1857, (making appropriations 
for the service of the Post Office Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1858,) from the Mississippi river to Sail Francisco, California, 
as follows, viz: from St. Louis, Missouri, and from Memphis, Tennessee, 
converging at Little Bock, Arkansas; thence, tna Preston, Texas, or as 
near so as may be found advisable, to the best point of crossing the 
Bio Grande above El Paso, and not far from Fort Fillmore ; thence, 
along the new road being opened and constructed under the direction 
of the Secretary of the Interior, to or near Fort Yuma, California ; 
thence, through the best passes and along the best valleys for safe and 
expeditious staging, to San Francisco, California, and back, twice a 
week^ in good ibur-horse post coaches or spring wagons suitable for 
the conveyance of nassengers as well as the safety and security of the 
mails, at six hunared thousand dollars a year, for and during the 
term of six years, commencing the sixteenth day of September, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, and ending with 
the fifteenth day of September, in the year one thousand eight hun* 
dred and sixty-four: Now, therefore, the said John Butterfield, 
William B. Dinsmore, William G. Fargo, James V. P. Gardner^ 
Marcus L. Kinyon, Alexander Holland, and Hamilton Spencer, con- 
tractors, and Danford N. Barney, Johnston Livingston, David 
Moulton, and Elijah P. Williams, their sureties, do jointly and 
severally undertake, covenant, and agree with the United States, and 
do bind themselves : Ist. To carry said letter mail within the time 
fixed by the law above referred to — that is, within twenty-five days 
for each trip, and according to the annexed schedule of departures and 
arrivals ; 2d. To carry said letter mail in a safe and secure manner, 
free from wet or other injury, in a boot^ under the driver's seat, or 
other secure place, and in preference to passengers, and to their 
entire exclusion, if its weight and bulk require it; 3d. To take the 
said letter mail and every part of it from, and deliver it and every 
part of it at, each post office on the route, or that may hereafler be 
established on the route, and into the post office at each end of the 
route, and into the post office at the place at which the carrier stops 
at night, if one is there kept ; and if no office is there kept, to lock it 
up in some secure place^ at the risk of the contractors. 

They also undertake, covenant, and agree with the United States, 
and do bind themselves, jointly and severally, as aforesaid, to be an- 
swerable for the persons to whom the said contractors shall commit 
the care and transportation of the mail, and accountable to the 
United States for any damages which may be sustained by the United 
States through their unfaithfulness or want of care ; and that the 
said contractors will discharge any carrier of said mail when re- 
quired to do so by the Postmaster General ; also, that they will not 
transmit, by themselves or their agent, or be concerned in transmit- 
ting, commercial intelligence more rapidly than by mail, other than 
by telegraphy and that they will not carry out of the mail letters or 



Digitized by 



Google 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 991 

newspapers which shonld go by post ; and fiirther, the said contractors 
will convey, without additional charge, the special agents of the de* 
partment, on the exhibition of their credentials. 

They further undertake, covenant, and agree with the United States, 
that the said contractors will collect quarterly, if required by the 
Postmaster General, of postmasters on said route, the balances due 
from them to the Geueral Post Office, and faithfully render an account 
thereof to the Postmaster General in the settlement of quarterly ac- 
counts, and will pay over to the General Post Office all balances re- 
maining in their nands. 

For which services, when performed, the said John Butterfield, 
William B. Dinsmore, William G. Fargo, James V. P. Gardner, 
Marcus L. Kinyon, Alexander Holland, and Hamilton Spencer, con- 
tractors, are to be paid by the United States the sum of six hundred 
thousand dollars a year, to wit, quarterly, in the months of May, 
August, November, and February, through the postmasters on the 
route, or otherwise, at the option of the Postmaster General of the 
United States; said pay to be subject, however, to be reduced or dis- 
continued by the Postmaster General^ as hereinafter stipulated, or to 
be suspended in case of delinquency. 

It is hereby also stipulated and agreed by the said contractors and 
their sureties, that in all cases there is to be a forfeiture of the pay of 
a trip when the trip is not run ; and of not more than three times the 
pay of the trip when the trip is not run and no sufficient excuse for 
the failure is furnished ; and a forfeiture of a due proportion of it 
when a grade of service is rendered inferior to the mode of convey- 
ance above stipulated ; and that these forfeitures may be increased 
into penalties of higher amount, according to the nature or frequency 
of the failure and the importance of the mail ; also, that fines may 
be imposed upon the contractors, unless the delinquency be satisfacto- 
rily explained to the Postmaster General in due time, for failing to 
take from or deliver at a post office the said letter mail or any part of 
it ; for suflfering it to be wet, injured, lost, or destroyed ; for carrying 
it in a place or manner that exposes it to depredation, loss, or injury, 
by being wet or otherwise ; for refusing, after demand, to convey a 
letter mail by any coach or wagon which the contractors regularly 
run or are concerned in running on the route beyond the number of 
trips above specified; or for not arriving at the time set in the 
schedule. And for setting up or running an express to transmit 
letters or commercial intelligence in advance of the mail, or for trans- 
mitting knowingly, or after being informed, any one engaged in trans- 
S or ting letters or mail matter in violation of the laws of the United 
tates, a penalty may be exacted of the contractors equal to a quar- 
ter's pay; but in all other cases no fine shall exceed three times the 
price of the trip. And whenever it is satisfactorily shown that the 
contractors, their carrier or agent, have left or put aside the said 
letter mail, or any portion of it, for the accommodation of passengers, 
they shall forfeit not exceeding a quarter's pay. 

And it is hereby further stipulated and agreed by the said contrac- 
tors and their sureties, that the Postmaster General may annul the 
contract for repeated failures ; for violating the post office laws ; for 



992 



REPORT OF THlfi 



disobeying the instructioDS of the department; for refusing to dis- 
charge a carrier when required by the department; for assigning 
the contract, or any part of it, without the consent of the Postmaster 
General; for setting up or running an express as aforesaid; or for 
transporting persons conveying mail matter out of the mail as afore- 
said ; or whenever either of the contractors shall become a postmaster, 
assistant postmaster, or member of Congress ; and this contract shall 
in all its parts be subject to the terms and requirements of an act of 
Congress passed on the twenty-first day of April, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight, entitled '^ An act con- 
cerning public contracts." 

And the Postmaster General may also annul the contract whenever 
he shall discover that the same, or any part of it, is ofiered for sale in 
the market for the purpose of speculation. 

It is hereby further stipulated and agreed, that if obstacles, such as 
the want of water or feed, or physical obstructions, should be found 
between the points herein designated, so that time cannot be made^ 
and a better line can be found between those points, the Postmaster 
General may vary the route to such better line. 

And it is also further understood and agreed, that the oontractorg 
shall have all the rights of pre-emption, whatever they may be, se- 
cured by the 12th section of the act of Congress aforesaid, approved 
March 3, 1857, on either of the lines from the Mississippi river to the 
point of their junction with the main stem, but not on both — the elec- 
tion to be made by them at any time within twelve months after the 
date of the execution of this contract. 

In witness whereof, the said Postmaster General has caused the seal 
of the Post Office Department to be hereto affixed, and has attested 
the same by his signature, and the said contractors and their sureties 
have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year set opposite 
their names respectively. 

AARON V. BROWN, [l. s.l 
Postmaster Oenerd. 



JOHNBUTTERFIELD, 


L. 8.^ 


Sept, 16. 


W. B. DINSMORE, 


'l. 8.' 


'^it 


WM. G. FARGO, 


L. s.' 


a 


J. V. P. GARDNER, 


L. 8,^ 


tf 


M. L. KINYON, 


L. 8.' 


'* • 


ALEX. HOLLAND, 


L. 8.' 


(( 


H. SPENCER, 


L. 8.' 


tt 


D. N. BARNEY, 


'l. 8.] 


iC 


JOHNSTON LIVINGSTON, 


L. 8.' 


a 


DAVID MOULTON, 


'l. 8.] 


ft 


ELIJAH P. WILLIAMS. 


'l. 8,' 


a 


Signed, sealed, and delivered by the Postmaster 


Gene 


ral in the 


presence of— 






Wm. H. Dundas. 






And by the other parties hereto in the presence of- 


- 




Rbverdy Johnson. 






Isaac V. Fowler. 







I hereby certify that I am well acquainted with Danford N. Barney, 



P0STMA8TEB GENERAL. 993 

Johnston Livingston, David Moulton^ and Elijah P. Williams, and 
the condition of their property, and that, after fall investigation and 
inquiry, I am well satisfied that they are good and sufficient sureties 
for the amount in the foregoing contract. 

ISAAC V. FOWLER, 

Postmaster at New Yorkj N. Y. 

[Endonement.] 

Ordered: That whenever the contractors and their securities shall 
file in the Post Office Department a request in writing that they 
desire to make the junction of the two branches of said road at 
Preston^ instead of Little Rock, the department will permit the 
same to be done by some route not further west than to Springfield, in 
Missouri, thence by Fayetteville, Van Buren, and Fort Smith, in the 
State of Arkansas to the said junction at or near the town of Preston, 
in Texas; but said new line will be adopted on the express condition 
that the said contractors shall not claim or demand from the department 
or from Congress any increased compensation for or on account of 
such change in the route from St. Louis, or of the point of junction 
of the two routes from Little Rock to Preston ; and on the further 
express condition, that whilst the amount of lands to which the 
contractors may be entitled under the act of Congress may be esti- 
mated on either of said branches from Preston to St. Louis, or 
Memphis, at their option, yet the said contractors shall take one-half 
of that amount on each of said branches, so that neither shall have 
an advantage in the way of stations and settlement over the other ; 
and in case said contractors, in selecting and locating their lands, shall 
disregard this condition, or give undue advantage to one of said branches 
over the other, the department reserves the power of discontinuing 
said new route from St. Louis to Preston, and to hold said contractors 
and their securities to the original route and terms expressed and set 
forth in the body of this contract, 

AARON V. BROWN, 

Postmaster Oeneral. 

SSPTEMBSR 11, 1857. 

Having furnished the above detail of facts, the department does 
not consider it improper to submit a few observations in relation to 
the reasons which induced a preference for the route selected. 

The law of Congress not being mandatory, the department did not 
feel at liberty, in the exercise of a sound discretion, to select any route 
over which it was considered physically impossible to obtain the ser- 
vice within the time and by the mode of conveyance specified in the 
act. The trip was to be made within twenty-five days, in four-horse 
coaches, suitable for the conveyance of passengers as well as the 
safety and security of the mails. Applying these requirements to 
the extreme northern route proposed, from Sfc. Louis by Fort Inde* 
pendence, Fort Laramie, Salt Lake, <&c., the department had the re- 
corded experience of many years against the practicability of procur- 
ing anything like a regular and certain service on that route. The 
United States had had a mail carried for years on that route, and the 
Vol. ii 63 ^'^' ""' '^ boogie 



994 REPOBT OF THE 

returns in the department showed the most condusive facts against 
its selection. The mails for Novemher, December, and January, 
1850-51, did not arrive until March, 1851. The winter months of 
1851-'52 were very severe. The carrier and postmaster reported that 
they started in time, but had to turn back. The mails of February, 
March, and December, of 1853, were impeded by deep snow. Those 
of January and February, 1854, on account of deep snow, did not 
arrive until the month of April. There was no improvement in the 
service even down to the November mail of 1856, which left Independ- 
ence on the first of November, and, on account of deep snow, was 
obliged to winter in the mountains. The snow caused almost an 
entire failure for four months of the year. These actual experiments, 
made from the year 1850 to the present time, without referring to the 
concurring testimony of explorers and travellers, put this route en- 
tirely out of the question. 

The next route to be considered was the one by Albuquerque— 
whether the same might start from Memphis or St. Louis. Is this 
route sufficiently level and exempt from snow, ice, and extremely cold 
weather, to give the promise that the required service can be per- 
formed with regularity and certainty throughout the entire year? and 
if it can be so performed, can it be done with reasonable safety and 
comfort to the passengers who are to be transported over it ? The 
mere transmission of the '^ letter mail" was certainly not the sole 
object of the law. It looks expressly to the comfort of travellers in 
the stage, and doubtless to the millions of emigrants and others who, 
for ages, might pass to and from, our Pacific States. 

By an inspection of the general profile sheets accompanying the 
Pacific Railroad Reports, it will be seen that the mean elevation of the 
plateau of the Sierra Madre and Rocky mountains is about 7,000 feet 
above the level of the sea near the 35th parallel, (Albuquerque route,) 
and near the 32d parallel (El Paso route) it is about 4,000 or 4,200 
feet, (Lieut. Parke,) giving a difference of 2,800 or 3,000 feet. This 
difierence in elevation, in a dimatological point of view, is very im- 
portant, as will be shown by comparison of extremes of climate on 
these routes. 

Next, with regard to the climate of winter, particularly along these 
routes, we present the following facts : 

Albuquerque rotde, — At Albuquerque, according to the meteorolo- 
gical report of the medical department of the United States army, 
the maximum and minimum temperatures^ respectively, were, for the 
winter months of 1849 and 1850 : in December, 53°, 5® ; January, 
49°, minus 12°; February, 57°, 17°. For 1850 and 1851 : in De- 
cember, 52°, minus 5°; January, 57°, 8°; February, 59°, 7°. For 
1852 and 1853: in December, 65°, 21°; January, 65°, 19°; Febru- 
ary, 66°, 13°. For 1853 and 1854 : in December, 66°, 20° ; January, 
63°, 5° ; February, 67°, 15° ; and in December, 1854, 58°, 19°. 

At Fort Defiance^ about twenty miles north of Campbell's Pass in 
latitude^ and from 300 to 500 feet higher, the maximum and mini- 
mum temperatures, respectively, were : for the month of December, 
1851. 62°, 4°; 18 inches snow. For 1852 and 1863: in December, 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



POSnCASTEB aEKCBAL. 995 

50^, 2^; January, 55°, 7°; February, 56°, 6°. For 1853 and 1854 : 
in December, 57°, 6°; January, 49°, minus 20°; February, 54°, 2°. 
For 1854 and 1855 : December, 65^, 10°; January, 59°, minus 17°; 
February, 61°, 13°. For 1855 and 1856: December, 56°,mini« 25°; 
January, 54°, minus 8°; February, 51°, minus 3°. 

At Albuquerque, December, 1856, the maximum was 65°, mini- 
mum 5°; Bio Grande frozen over, so as to be passable from 7th to 
25th January, 1857 ; maximum 66°, minimum 4°; on the 9th, 10th 
and 11th the thermometer stood, respectively, minus 3°, minus 2°, 
mintts 4°. February, 1857, maximum 72°, minimum 10°. 

At Fort Defiance, December, 1856, the maximum was 50°, mini- 
mum miniLS 11°. On the 2d the thermometer stood, at 9 p. m., minus 
2°; on the 3d, at 7 a. m. and 9 p. m., mintis 2°; on the 4th, at 7 a. m., 
minus 10°; on the 5th, at 7 a. m., minus 6°; on the 6th, at 7 a. m., 
minus 11°; on the 7th, at 7 a. m., minus 7°; on the 8th, at 7 a. m., 
minus 1°; on the 10th, at 7 a. m., zero; on the 13th, at 7 a. m., minus 
9°, and at 9 p. m., mintis 7°. 

For January, maximum 54°, minimum minus 11°. On the 9th, 
10th, and 11th, the thermometer stood, at 7 a. m., respectively, minus 
7°, minus 11°, mintts 11°; on the 10th, at 9 p. m., minus 4°. 

For February, maximum was 60°, minimum minus 12°. 

^^On December 25, 1855, the thermometer at the hospital at Fort 
Defiance gave a reading of thirty-two degrees (32o) below zero, at 6i 
a. m. The hospital is not by any means in the coldest portion of the gar- 
rison. Two hundred yards distant the mercury, in January, 1856, 
ranged from four to eight degrees below that at the hospital, and 
there is not the slightest doubt of the freezing of the mercury had the 
instrument been placed in the more exposed situation on the morning 
of December 25, 1855. A number of men on detached service had their 
hands and feet frozen^ and some badly. The mercury was below zero 
four mornings in December, 1855 ; six mornings in January, 1856 ; 
three mornings in February, and on the mornings of the 1st and 2(1 
of March, it was below zero. 

" The table above will give a fair idea of the climate of the country. 
The winter of 1855 and 1856 was more severe than any one known 
for many years. The wintry weather commenced on the 1st of 
November, 1855, and has continued up to the present time, March 
14, 1856. The Rio Grande, at Albuquerque, was frozen over, and 
with ice sufficiently strong to bear a horse and carreta. Those Indians 
who live habitually to the north of Fort Defiance were obliged to 
aban&on that portion of the country and move south, with their flocks 
and herds, in quest of grazing, on account of the depth of snow, 
which, in the mountains, at whose base the fort is situated, was over 
two feet in depth in March, 1856." — {Correspondence^ J, Leiherman^ 
Assistant Surgeon^ U, S. A, ; Smithsonian Report^ 1855, page 287.) 

On the 24th of December, 1853, Captain Whipple experienced snow 
storms and weather sufficiently cold to contract the mercury 3^ 
degrees below zero, near the San Francisco mountains, and still 
further west, in the Aztec Pass, to 2^ degrees below zero, when he 
experienced another severe snow storm. So much for the climate of 
winter on the Albuquerque route. ^^.^.^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



996 BEPOBT OF THE 

Let us compare this account of the climate, extracted from un- 
doubted sources, with that along the more southern route selected. 

At Fort Fillmore, on the El Paso route, the meteorological report 
above referred to shows the minimum temperature at this place^ up to 
1854^ to be but 10 degrees. 

At Tucson^ February, 1854, Lieutenant Parke reporto the mini- 
mum temperature 32 de^rees^ and on one occasion, on the San Pedro, 
to be 12 degrees at sunrise. We have searched in vain every source 
of information, and have yet to learn that snow ever lies upon the 
plains near the El Paso route, or that the thermometer ever descended 
below zero. The mean temperature of winter at Fort Fillmore is 
about 46.6 degrees. The mean temperature of winter at Fort Web- 
ster, (Copper Mines,) north of Ojo de la Vaoa, and 6^350 feet above the 
sea level, is but 41.3 degrees, while at Fort Defiance^ a corresponding 
position, with reference to the Albuquerque route, it is 28.7 degrees, 
and at Albuquerque it is 3*7 degrees. At Fort Yuma, (mouth of the 
Gila,) on the El Paso route, the mean temperature of winter is 66.8 
degrees. 

Although this superiority of climate on the El Paso route must be 
admitted^ still it has been and may be argued that the degree of cold 
on the Albuquerque route is not greater than on many of the stage 
routes of the Atlantic States — not greater, perhaps, than between Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburg, or between Baltimore and Wheeling. Without 
admitting the fact, at all events so far as the latter route is concerned, 
it requires but little effort to remember how uncertain during|the winter 
season was the transportation of the mails when the roads were in 
their natural state, and with what extreme suffering from the cold 
staging used to be performed between those cities, with all the advan- 
tages of short and well-appointed stations for recruiting the energies 
of the benumbed and exhausted passengers. 

But would Congress or the public be content with a route to Cali- 
fornia no better in point of climate than those by Harrisburg and 
Cumberland, when a more mild and favorable one could be easily 
procured ? Imagine four stages to start out from St. Louis on the 
Albuquerque route with eight passengers in each, thirty-two in num- 
ber. At the starting point the snow is eight or ten inches deep, which it 
often is for weeks together. They are to go day and nighty the 
thermometer ten or fifteen degrees ahave^ not below zero. They pro- 
gress westward, ascending every mile higher and higher, the cold 
increasing with every mile, for an entire week. At last they reach 
Albuquerque, an elevation of 6,000 feet, the mercury standing four or 
five degrees below zero. Benumbed by the cold for more than a 
week, overcome by the loss of sleep, they begin another ascent to 
Campbell's Pass, the best on the route, about 7,000 feet in height, in 
the vicinity of which the thermometer is standing, by authentic and 
undoubted observations, from 2^ to 32° below zero. 

How can thirty-odd passengers, men, women, and children, some 
feeble in health or delicate in constitution, be otherwise than in 
almost a dying condition? This is no picture of the imagination ; it 
is one of those practical views whii;h common sense will always sug- 
gest as to the eufferings and exposures of stage travelling under 



POSTICASTEB OENEBAL. 997 

circumBtanoeB 00 inauBpicious. But a truer picture of more intense 
suffering may be found in the groups of emigrants camped out amid 
the snows, or struggling to get on, when the mercury, as it vei^^ often 
happens, is down at or below zero — whether a few degrees above or 
below makes no difference, for a long continued stage or emigrant 
travel, under circumstances of so much severe exposure, would, in a 
few years, mark every station with the fresh graves of its victims. 
Most emigrants are compelled to be en route in some portion of the 
winter months. Most families cannot well start from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific or interior States until they have first finished and disposed 
of the crop of the preceding season ; at all events, it must be so far 
matured before they start that something approaching its value can 
be realized from it, in order to help in defraying the expenses of re* 
moval. Nor can emigrants linger too long on the way. They must 
go on, however much exposed to hardships, in order to reach their 
new homes in time to make a crop the next season. The poor can- 
not lose two crops in succession without being ruined. The southern 
or El Paso route is eminently comfortable and desirable for winter 
emigration, which the Albuquerque one cannot be, whatever might be 
said in its iavor as a route in the summer season. The department 
supposed Congress to be in search of a route that could be found safe, 
comfortable, and certain during every season of the year j as well for 
the transportation of the mails as for the accommodation of emigrants 
and the Aiture location of a railroad to the Pacific. 

In relation to the relative facility with which four-horse stage 
coaches can be run over the Albuquerque and the El Paso routes, it 
must be remembered that this service was to commence within twelve 
months. The distance was more than two thousand miles, over many 
ranges of mountains, and nearly the whole distance uninhabited. 
There were no roads yet opened, and even the foot of the white man 
had not yet trodden many portions of the way which might finally be 
selected. Still, the stages must be running within twelve months. 
To do so it was evident that some route must be selected which was 
naturally a good one — such a one that, by cutting down some trees 
and blazing others, as mere guide posts, digging down occasional hill- 
sides, and building slight and temporary bridges, the work of trans- 
portation might begin within the brief period required by the law. 
It was not enough that, by great labor of years and by large expendi- 
ture of money, a graded turnpike could be made^ or a railway con- 
structed, at the end of some half dozen years, or even a longer period, 
but it must be over a surface of country naturally so favorable that 
sta^e coaches, with their mails and passengers, could be running 
within twelve months with a rapidity scarcely equalled on the best 
routes of the older States. To make the trip in twenty-five days they 
must go day and night, averaging about eighty miles each day. Now, 
which of these two routes presented the greatest probability of afford- 
ing such a service? Captain Marcy explored both routes as far as the 
Bio G-rande, and, after having examined both, he gave a decided 
preference to the southern or El Paso route. He says, on page 228 
of his report, after a favorable description of the route irom the Kio 
Grande to the Pecos : Digitized by LjOOglC 



998 BEPOBT OF THE 

^' Our road from here runs across the Llano Estacado for fieventy- 
eight miles, upon a perfectly level prairie as firm and smooth as 
marble. It then descends from the high table land, about fifty feet, 
into a rolling prairie country, where the Colorado of Texas has its 
source. Thus far there is but little timber or water on our route, 
except at certain points noted upon the map ; but these points can be 
made from day to day with loaded teams. As if, however, in com- 
pensation for the absence of other favors, nature, in her wise economy, 
has adorned the entire face of the country with a luxuriant verdure of 
different kinds of grama grass, affording the most nutritious sustenance 
for animals, and* rendering it one of the best countries for grazing 
large fiocks and herds that can be conceived of. 

'^ Immediately after we descended from the high table lands, we 
struck upon an entirely different country from the one we had been 
passing over before. By a reference to the map it will be seen we 
kept near the plain upon the head branches of the Colorado and the 
Clear Fork of the Brazos. Here we found a smooth road over a gently 
undulating country of prairies and timber, and abounding with 
numerous clear spring branches for two hundred miles, and in many 
places covered with large groves of mezquite timber, which makes 
the very best of fuel. The soil cannot be surpassed for fertility. The 
grass remains green during the entire winter, and the climate is salu- 
brious and healthy. Indeed, it possesses all the requisites that can be 
desired for making a fine agricultural country ; and I venture to pre- 
dict that at no very distant period it will contain a very dense popu- 
lation. It is only necessary for our practical farmers to see it, and 
have protection from the incursions of the Indians, to settle it at once. 

^^ Soon after crossing the Bio Brazos, our road strikes out upon the 
high ridge lying between the waters of the Trinity and Red rivers ; 
and it appears as if nature had formed this expressly for a road, as it 
runs for a hundred miles through a country which is frequently much 
broken up on each side with hills and deep ravines, and the only 
place where wagons can pass is directly upon the crest of this natural 
defile. It is as firm ana smooth as a turnpike, with no streams of 
magnitude or other obstruction through the entire distance to near 
Preston, where we left it and crossed the Bed river — ^from Preston 
o Fort Washita, and thence to our outward route upon Ghiines' creek, 
the road passing through the Chickasaw country, which is rolling, 
and in many places covered with a great variety of large timber and 
well watered, with no mountains or high hills to pass over. Hence 
you will perceive that from DoHa Ana to Fort Smith, a distance of 
994 miles, our road passes over smooth and very uniformly level 
ground, crossing no mountains or deep valleys, and for five hundred 
miles, upon the eastern extremity, runs through the heart of a 
country possessing great natural advantages. I conceive this to be de- 
cidedly the best overland wagon route to California, for several reasons." 

We will now call attention to the evidence of Captain John Pope, 
Topographical Engineers, who has been stationed a long time in New 
Mexico^ andhas seen a great portion of the plains between the 32d 
and 39th parallels. In chapter XI, Pacific Railroad Reports,, vol. 2, 

Digitized by VjOO^C 



POSTMASTER OEinBRAL. 999 

speaking of the general character of the country along the 32d parallel 
route, he eays : 

^< In glancing at the topographical features of the immense plains 
which extend westward from the frontiers of Arkansas and Missouri, 
the first great peculiarity which strikes the attention is the remark- 
able interruption to their vast monotony presented by the belt of 
country between the 32d and 34th parallels of latitude. The great 
deserts, commencing about the 97th meridian, extend over a distance 
of six hundred miles to the eastern base of the Rocky mountains. In 
this whole extent they are badly watered by a few sluggish streams 
which intersect them, many of which disappear altogether in the dry 
season, and are destitute absolutely of timber, except a sparse growth 
of dwarf cotton along the streams. From the northern part of the 
United States, at the parallel of 49°, this immense region of desert 
country extends without interruption as far to the south as the paral- 
lel of 34°. At this parallel its continuity is suddenly and remarkably 
interrupted Between the32d and 34th parallels of latitude a broad 
belt of well-watered, well-timbered country, adapted in a high degree 
to agricultural purposes, projects for three hundred and twelve miles, 
like a vast peninsula, into the parched and treeless waste of the plains, 
and at its western limit approaches to within less than three hundred 
miles of the Rio Grande at El Paso.'' 

The same distinctive preference to the El Paso route (the one selected^ 
over the Albuquerque route is given by Commissioners Emory ana 
Bartlett, Lieutenant Parke, and A. H. Campbell, at the head of the 
Pacific Wagon Road Office, Interior Department, who accompaned 
Captain Whipple over the Albuquerque route, and Lieutenant Parke 
over the El Paso, as principal engineer, in 1853, '64, and '55. The 
comparison of the two routes west of the Rio Grande the department 
considered equally favorable to the one selected. Beside the fact of 
its being over a country about 3,000 feet lower than the Albuquerque 
route. Congress had appropriated $200,000 on this route to be expended 
in the construction of a wagon road between the Rio Grande and Fort 
Yuma, on the Colorado. So large a sum expended on a surface so 
favorable by nature will, doubtless, prove of an immense advantage 
in expediting the proposed service, both as to regularity and speed. 
Before this appropriation was made by Congress, Mr. Secretary Davis, 
who collected a larger amount of reliable information on this subject 
than any other person, reported to Congress that the most practicable 
and economical route for a railroad from the Mississippi river to the 
Pacific ocean was the one which the department has selected. Lieut. 
Howry, writing on this subject, since the route was established, says: 
** For years, a mail has been regularly carried from San Antonio to 
El Paso without difficulty or danger, except from Indians. At pre- 
sent a monthly mail is carried from El Paso to Tucson, 340 miles 
west, by government express, for the benefit of the troops in Arizona. 
This express has a military escort. Fort Yuma and San Diego, Cali- 
fornia, have for five years been connected by a semi-monthly mail, 
(government express,) which, during my two years' service at Fort 
Yuma, was as regular in its arrival as the steamer fron^he east at 
San Francisco. Digitized by dooglc 



1000 REPORT OF THE 

^' The only part of the newly selected route not now opened by a 
mail is that from Fort Yuma to Tucson, 260 miles ; and this is almost 
daily travelled by the people of the Territory, by emigrants, and by 
Mexicans. Tucson is a growing town, and will afford all the grain 
needed for the road to £1 Paso. The Pimas villages, on the 6ila 
river, will supply grain for the route to Fort Yuma, l^sides any quan- 
tity to transport to any desired point, or a depot of supply. 

'' At Fort Yuma, last year, a large quantity of corn was allowed to 
rot for want of a market, and there is grazing for ten thousand ani- 
mals on the river banks. A few military posts, which would be 
necessary on either of the other routes, will mako the southern route 
perfectly safe ; and the immense mineral wealth, in silver and cop- 
per, will at once draw to Arizona a large population. It ia the only 
available route aJt all seasons of the year. The route through the South 
Pass is as much closed by snow from four to six months in the year 
as if barred by a gate of adamant. During the winter of 1854- '55, 
I was in the Salt Lake valley, and no mail irom the east reached us 
from November to April. The mail was at that time transported on 
pack mules, and was in the charge of experienced men, who had 
spent their lives on the plains. 

'^If they could not set the mail through either way, h ow much less 
the chance is there for Concord coaches? The centra^ route is no 
better. I refer to Colonel Fremont or Lieutenant Beale to state, 
upon their reputation as travellers and ^ mountain men,' how much 
dependence can be placed upon the regular transmission of a semi- 
weekly mail through the Cocheetopee Pass in December, January, 
February, or March. The route by £1 Paso and Fort Yuma is open 
the entire year. On both the other routes artesian wells are neces- 
sary to get water at convenient distances, and this necessity upon the 
southern route is therefore no extraordinary argument against it. 
I may be allowed to remark that the impression so generally diffused 
in the eastern States, that Arizona Territory is a desert and a God-for- 
saken country, is entirely erroneous. It will be recollected that Cali- 
fornia, now celebrated as an agricultural State, was stigmatized with 
the same epithets, and said to produce nothing but gold. Arizona 
promises to convince the world that she is able to produce silver 
enough to supply all the demands of commerce, and to show to the 
emigrant in search of a quiet and fruitful homestead beautiful valleys 
and clear running streams, where he may cultivate his crops with a 
fullness of fruition only known to the virgin soil of our western pos- 
sessions." 

The scarcity of water has been often urged against the southern or 
£1 Paso route. There is no route between the Mississippi river and 
California against which the same objection may not be made. After 
much examination, we believe that the route selected is freer from 
this objection than almost any other. The statements of Lieutenant 
Mowry and Mr. Campbell are fully sustained by other authorities. 
The former, in a published statement, says : 

y The country from £1 Paso to Tucson, three hundred and forty 
miles, is susceptible of early settlement, and is, moreover, one of 
the finest routes ever opened towards our western possessiona. In no 



POSTMASTER QBNEBAL. 1001 

part of it is there a distance of over thirty miles without water, and 
it is often fonnd at distances of ten and fifteen, with plenty of good 
grazing throughout the entire distance. 

*'From Tucson, the principal town of the Territory of Arizona, 
(throughout the whole length of which the route runs,) to the Gila 
river, ninety miles, there is no water in the dry season, and two 
artesian wells will he necessary. In the wet season there is plenty 
of water. This distance is travelled at all seasons with mule teams 
and oxen, without difficulty. Down the Gila to Fort Yuma, one 
hundred and seventy-five miles, there is plenty of water and grass. 
From Fort Yuma, on the Colorado river, to Carissa creek and San 
Diego county, California, ahout one hundred miles, the route is heavy 
with sand, and water is found in hut three places at all seasons of the 
year. In the wet season water is found every few miles. Twenty- 
four miles from Fort Yuma, or Colorado City, are Cook's wells, 
which, at an expense of $1,000^ can he made to furnish an ample 
supply. Twenty-six miles heyond are the Alamo Mucho wells, which 
can he enlarged, at the same cost, to any quantity desired. Thirty 
miles further on are the Indian wells, which will also yield an ample 
supply. Twenty miles further are the Sackett's wells, which are fed 
by a subterranean stream, and can also be made to supply any quan- 
tity of water. 

'^ These two distances, from Tucson to the Gila and from Fort Yuma 
to Carissa, present the only difficulties on the route. United, the dis- 
tance is but one hundred and ninety miles, and it is travelled at all 
seasons of the year by heavily loaded teams. 

'' From Carissa creek into San Diego the route is well watered and 
affords excellent grazing. The distance is one hundred and twenty- 
five miles ; but the supervisors of San Diego county are now engaged 
in laying out a new road, which will much shorten the distance." 

Mr. Campbell, who, as we have before stated, travelled over both 
routes, has borne the most ample testimony ^^ that between the Bio 
Grande and the San Pedro river there are thirteen permanent water 
stations in about two hundred and twenty-four miles^ giving an aver- 
age of one in seventeen miles, and eighteen, including several fine 
rain-water stations, where water can be preserved, which will give an 
average of one in twelve miles." 

We have submitted this letter of Lieutenant Mowry to Mr. Camp- 
bell. He confirms the statements of Lieutenant Mowry in every 
important particular, and further informs us '^ that the ninety miles 
Jornada from the Tucson to the Gila is avoided entirely by following 
down the San Pedro and Gila rivers to the Pimas villages. The 
distance from the San Pedro, by either route, to the Gila, is about 
the same ; and it is probable that, by following down the Aravaypa, 
a tributary of the Gila, discovered by Lieutenant Parke's party, a 
distance of many miles can be saved ; and in the Calitro mountains, 
along this route, there is an abundance of pure water in living 
streams, fine grazing, and oak, ash, walnut, and some pine timber. 
Deer, antelope, bear, and grouse abound there also, and many indi- 
cations of gold were observed, and gold was found near the San Pedro 
river. ' ' Digitized by GoOglc 



1002 BEPORT OF THE 

Captain Humphreys, in his report to the Secretary of War, and 
Lieutenant Parke, both testify that a sufficient supply of water can 
be had on the route for either a railroad or stage line. 

In relation to the relative distance on the two routes, an examina- 
tion of the map will exhibit the fact that the distance from Boston, 
New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore^ and Washington, to San Fran^ 
cisco^ is about the same upon both routes. 

AUmqtierque rotUe, 

Distance from San Francisco to Fort Smith, on the Albu- 
querque route, (see Captain Whipple's report, vol. 2, 
p. 76) 1,952 miles. 

From Fort Smith to New York, (Captain Humphreys' 
report, Pacific Railroad Report, vol. 1, p. 108)...; 1,S45 " 

Total 3,297 " 

El Paao i^ofuie. 

From San Francisco Bay (San Jose) to Fulton, (Lieut. 

Parke's report, 1855, unpublished,) 1,972 miles. 

From San Francisco Bay (San Jof6) to San Francisco.... 44 " 
From Fulton to New York, (Humphreys' report, in Pacific 

Railroad Report, vol. 1, p. 108) 1,335 



ti 



Total 3,351 



CI 



Making a difierence of only fifty-four miles in favor of the Albn- 
querqe route, as shown by the Pacific railroad surveys — a difierence 
too small to be a matter of grave objection. These and other esti- 
mates of distance cannot be expected to be entirely correct ; but they 
approximate the precise distances as nearly as published surveys and 
explorations will allow of. The above difference of fifty-four miles, 
however, is reduced to four miles, if we estimate the aistance from 
San Bernardino to San Francisco, via the Cajon Pass, Caiiada de los 
Uvas, and Estero Plain,* as in the following table, thereby avoiding 
the detour of Lieutenant Parke's route via Santa Barbara and the 
Gaviote Pass. 

^ From the latest authorities, for the respective routes from the Mis- 
sissippi river, at St. Louis, via Albuquerque, and at Memphis, via 
El Paso and Fort Yuma, to San Francisco, California, I find the most 
direct distances over which the mail should travel as follows : 

* See Birch's propoe&l. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



POSTIIASTEB GENERAL. 1003 



Route from Memphis^ via El Paao^ Ac, 

From Memphis to Preston (a) 375 miles. 

From Preston to Waco Tanks (6) 615 " 

From Waco Tanks to Fort Fillmore (c) 40 « 

From Fort Fillmore to Pimas villages (d) 306 " 

From Pimas villages to Port Yuma (e) 167 " 

From Fort Yuma to San Bernardino (/) 180 " 

From San Bernardino to San Francisco, via Cajon Pass, 

Canada de los Uvas, and Estero Plain (g) 420 " 



2,106 


« 


1,080 
1,085 


(< 


2,165 


« 



2,103 



Boute from St. Louis, via Springfield^ Antelope HiUs, or Canadian 
river y Albuquerque^ dcc.y to San Francisco. 

From St. Louis to head of Pajarito creek {h) 860 miles. 

From head of Pajarito creek to San Francisco (via 
Canon Carnuel or San Antonio, New Mexico,) and 
via Tah-ee-chay-pah Pass, California 1,246 " 



From St. Louis to Campbell's Pass, via Galisteo (t)... 
From Campbell's Pass to San Francisco, as above (J). 



NoTB. — As an interesting comparison between these two routes, 
take Captain Whipple's modified distance — 1,952 miles— from Fort 
Smith to San Francisco, and add 250 miles in a direct line from Fort 
Smith to Memphis, from the General Railroad Map above referred to, 
and* we have from the same initial point — Memphis — a distance to 
San Francisco of 2,202 miles. 

Thus the difference in the distances of the two routes between the 
Mississippi river and San Francisco is too inconsiderable to become 
material. 

(a) See General PactSo Railroad Map, in hands of enffraver. 

(b) See Captain J. Pope'i report, 1854, Ho. Doe. 129, page 61. 

(c) General Pacific Railroad Map 

(d) Lieut. Parke't report, unpublished. 

(«) Major Emory's reconnaissance, 1846. and Pacific Railroad profile, 32d parallel route. 

(/) Lieut. Williamson's surreys. Ho. Doc. 129, Ac. &o. 

(s) Lieut. Williamson, l85d-'54, and Liem. Parke, '54-'55, unpublisbed map and report. 

(A) General Pacifio Railroad Map, &c 

i) General Pacific Railroad Map and Captain Whipple's undistributed report 
f) Captain Whipple's report and General Pacifio Railroad Map, dbo., dice. 



n 



Digitized by 



Google 



1004 EEPOBT OF THB 

As a pioneer route for the first great railroad that may be con- 
structed to the Pacific, the Postmaster General has bestowed upon it 
all the labor and examination which the multiplied business of his 
department would allow of. If all or a greater portion of the railroads 
from the large cities and the States east of the Mississippi had concen- 
trated at any one point on that ri^er, such point would have been 
selected for the overland route to California. But Puch is not the fact. 
They concentrate chiefly at St. Louis, Cairo, and Memphis. Cairo is 
mentioned in this connexion because, through the Illinois Central, 
nearly all the railroads constructed for St. Louis may be said also to 
connect with the Mississippi at Cairo. Finding, therefore, no common 
centre on the Mississippi, the next desirable object was to find some 
common point west of that river from which a main stem could be 
projected passing westward to California. If you started out from St. 
Louis west you must lose all the connexions with the Cairo and 
Memphis railroads ; but by starting out from St. Louis, and diverging 
south with her railroad now making to her Iron Mountain, you will 
presently receive the great railroad coming out from Cairo, so richly 
endowed that it is sure to be made at no distant day. Still bearing 
south westward, we presently receive, at Little Rock, the other branch 
of the road irom Memphis, connecting the line with all the great rail- 
roads of Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and 
Kentucky. Not far from Little Rock the Vicksburg and New Orleans 
and Texas railroads fall in, bringing in, from almost every portion of 
the great river, all the connexions which all the Atlantic States north 
and south can make to that great highway which we are trying to 
establish. Thus it is that we have found west of the Mississippi what 
we could not obtain on it — ^a common concentration of railroads to a 
single point from which the future railroad may commence, swollen 
and enlarged in its common stem by the contributions of the railways 
coming in from nearly every State of the Union. 

This diversion of the route to a southern direction by Little Rock 
or Preston has, however, other advantages than any to which we have 
as yet adverted. 

** By starting from St. Louis, the great western mart, and connecting 
at Little Rock or Preston with the line from Memphis, the two great 
sections of the country are accommodated. 

^^ Instead of projecting this mail, and its attendant benefits, into the 
wilderness, from the frontier of Missouri, to buffet with north winds 
and snows upon the plains of Kansas in winter, and drag over mo- 
notonous, waterless, treeless wastes in summer, it was located through 
the centre of Missouri, of Arkansas, and throughout the western fron- 
tier of Texas. It will thus develop hitherto unknown resources in 
those States. It will open a vast agricultural and mineral region in 
Missouri ; lend a helping hand to the young, growing, and unappre- 
ciated State of Arkansas ; and conduct the hardy pioneer to the de- 
lightful woodlands and prairies of Texas. For nearly a thousand 
miles the traveller will be traversing a country abounding in beauty 
and in healthfulness, possessing a salubrious climate and a fruitful 
soil." 

Nor should it be forgotten that the southern location of the route. 



POBTMASTEB GENERAL. 1005 

especially if it shall be followed by the construction of a railroad, may 
serve a valuable purpose in reference to the neighboring republic of 
Mexico. In time of peace it will shed its blessings on both nations, 
whilst in time of war it will furnish a highway for troops and muni- 
tions of war, which might enable us to vindicate our rights, and pre- 
serve untarnished our national honor. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AARON V. BROWN. 




Note. — Since the action of the department on this important subject, 
a publication has appeared in the public journals, from the pen of Mr. 
Bartlett, late of the Boundary Commission, so full of valuable and 
reliable information, that the Postmaster General respectfully begs 
leave to subjoin it to this report, as follows : ^y^w^ 

THE OVERLAND MAIL TO CALIFORNIA. 
\Vnm the ProTidence Joornal of August 16.] 

OommunicatuM from Mr. John 22. BarUett. 

The recent decision of the Postmaster General* in adopting the 
southern route as the one over which the United States mail shall be 
carried between the valley of the Mississippi river and San Francisco, 
in California, having attracted much attention, I have deemed it a 
duty to submit a few remarks on the subject. In doing this, I do not 
propose to discuss the geographical question of a northern, a central, 
or a southern route, or the advantages or disadvantages which may 
accrue to any particular section of the country from the selection of a 
route, but simply to speak of the advantages which I believe the route 
adopted to possess, and of the facility with which a wagon road may 
be constructed over it. My conclusions are based, not upon the repoits 
or explorations of others, but from my own observations while em- 
ployed upon the survey of the Mexican boundary line. 

The government has doubtless made its choice from the reports of 
the examinations made by the several parties which crossed the country 
with a view to collect such facts as would enable it to decide upon a 
route for a railroad to connect the Atlantic with the Pacific ocean. 

It is well known that the surveys and explorations of the United 
States Boundary Commission, with which I was connected from the 
year 1860 to 1853, were near the parallel of 32 degrees, both east and 
west of the Bio Grande. Our journeys in Texas commenced near the 
97th meridian of longitude, whence we passed to the table lands at 
the north, and traversed the country a distance of nearly six hundred 
miles between the 31st and 32d parallels. From the woodless nature 
of the country here, one is enabled from any hill or eminence to cast 
his eye over a vast surface, as though locking at a map, and notice 
all mountains, elevations, and depressions ; the rivers and small water- 
courses, the water^sheds, and the timbered lands ; in fact, over so 
open a district as here exists, an observer may obtain a most exact idea 
of the {w» of the country for fifty or a hundred miles fronr^is point 



1006 REPORT OF THE 

of observation, particularly if that point is on the summit of an isolated 
hill, of which there are many in the district in question. 

For a large portion of this journey we travelled, with seven loaded 
wagons, where no travellers had been before, following no track and 
directed by no guide. Water was found in the various tributaries of 
the Colorado, which river was in sight at the north, and until we 
reached the sources of the Concho. Here came the first desert, and 
here begins the vast desert region which extends to the Rio Grande. 
This line of desert reaches far to the north, and includes the well 
known Llano Estacado, which was crossed by our party at its shortest 
angle, about sixty-five miles across. This plain is level and hard the 
entire distance, and would require no labor to make a road across it 
available. It is without wood and water, yet in several depressions 
water is often found, and there is little doubt that by sinking wells it 
might be procured at all times. In the passes of Castle mountain, 
ten miles east of the Pecos, there were traces of water, where it might 
be found by digging. We followed the Pecos and its tributary, Del- 
aware creek, for more than a hundred miles, the country being quite 
level the entire distance to the Guadalupe mountains and pass. From 
this the country is comparatively level to the Rio Grande. There are 
no mountains to cross, except the Hueco range, twenty-eight miles 
from El Paso, and these are attended with trifling difficulties. In 
water there is the greatest deficiency, there been no running streams 
between the Guadalupe mountains and El Paso, a distance of about one 
hundred and ten miles. The first water is a spring called Ojo del 
Cuerpo, about fifteen miles northwest of the pass, and ten miles further 
a pond where there is water and grass at all times ; next, at the Cor- 
nudos del Alamo, and again at the Sierra Hueco, where there are 
springs and natural water tanks or basins. These, by being dug out 
and properly opened, could be made to furnish the necessary water 
for the stations. This district^ between the Guadulupe mountains 
and the Rio Grande, is the longest and most difficult to cross of any 
east of that river, on account of the deficiency of water ; yet, reckoning 
two springs at the Cornudos del Alamo, ten miles apart, and there are 
five watering-places in the one hundred and ten miles. Of this dis- 
tance, eighty-two miles is over a hard rolling country, where we ran 
our teems without danger ; the remaining twenty-eight miles, from 
the Hueco mountains, is sandy. At the several watering-places there 
is an abundance of grama grass. 

The route thus far described lies a little to the south of that selec- 
ted by the Postmaster General for the California mail, though the 
western portion of it for nearly three hundred miles (presuming that 
of Captain Marcy to be followed) will be the same. From this point, 
on the Pecos, to the 99th meridian, the character of the country is 
much the same. The Llano Estacado is crossed further north, after 
which the route is intersected by the northern tributaries of the Col- 
orado, while the Boundary Commission crossed the southern ones. 
Thence he follows the Brazos and Washita rivers. The country here, 
from the Pecos to the Red river, except across the plain referred to, 
is well watered, with timber bordering most of the streams, many 
of which have valleys or bottoms well adapted for cultivation. This 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1007 

belt of country, which is watered by the Colorado, the upper 
Brazos, and the Bed river, projects three hundred miles or more 
beyond the generally acknowledged limit of population west of the 
Mississippi, thereby lessening the distance of desert to be crossed in 
order to reach the Rio Grande. For this reason, therefore, the south- 
ern route along the line traced has advantages over the central one 
in having a much narrower belt of woodless and waterless country to 
pass over, while the whole distance is about the same. 

The next advantage of the southern line, and a most important one, 
is, that the summit level at El Paso is from 3,800 to 4,000 feet above 
the level of the sea, while that of the central or Albuquerque route, 
near the 35th parallel, is, according to the Pacific Railroad Reports, 
not far from 7,000 feet. The temperature at these two points corre- 
sponds with the difference in elevation. At Albuquerque the mercury 
sinks below zero, and the Rio Grande is sometimes frozen over so that 
persons may cross on the ice. At El Paso it has never been known 
to sink as low as zero. The Boundary CSommission wintered there in 
1850 -'51, which was pronounced the coldest ever known there. Snow 
fell once or twice at night, but disappeared the day following before . 
noon, and the mercury sank on a single occasion to 10^. 

These conclusions are not new, as the same opinion was expressed 
in my *' Personal Narrative" — a report of explorations connected with 
the Boundary Commission, published immediately on the return of 
that body from the survey of the line. In volume one of that work, 
page 139, in speaking of the district east of the Rio Grande, it is 
stated that — 

^'The country is well adapted for a wagon road, and equally so for 
a railway. From Fredericksburg, in Texas, all the way to the Rio 
Grande, there is a ncUural road, which, as a whole, is better than one- 
half the roads in the United States west of the Mississippi. Very 
little has been done to this road of nearly 600 miles to render it what 
it is ; and a little labor where the streams are crossed, with a bridge 
across the Pecos, which could be constructed with ease and at a small 
expense, would make the whole of it equal to our best turnpikes." 

In continuation of my remarks on the practicability of constructing 
a great wagon road near the parallel of 32^, I suggested the necessity 
of sinking wells at certain places, and further stated as my belief, from 
what I had heard from Mexicans who had travelled the country be- 
tween the Pecos and the Rio Grande, that wat^r could be found in 
other places not then known to travellers, thereby removing one of 
the greatest obstacles in crossing this arid region. 

The district of country bordering on the Rio Grande at El Paso is 
the widest and richest portion of the bottom lands along that stream, 
and hence capable of sustaining a larger population thaa at any other 
point. The strip of bottom land known as the '^Mesilla Valley," 
though not one-half the extent of that south of El Paso, is also valua- 
ble ; and at DoSa Ana, as well as a few miles to the north, the bot- 
tom lands again expand into a broad plain, admirably adapted to arti- 
ficial irrigation and agriculture, and consequently to the sustaining 
of a larger population than is elsewhere to be found in that vicinity. 
Indeed, it may with truth be asserted that the richest portion of tU^ 



1008 REPOBT OF THE 

valley of the Kio Grande lies between the parallels of 31° SCK and 33 
degrees. £1 Paso lies in 31° 45'. Of the extent of the culturable 
valley near the parallel of 35° I am not prepared to speak with con- 
fidence. 

I will now speak of the country west of the Rio Grande near the 
parallel of 32 degrees, near which the contemplated mail route ia to 
run. This district was frequently crossed and recrossed by myself 
personally, as well as by various engineering parties of the Boundary 
Commission. To avail ourselves of the tew watering-places then 
known, we followed the Rio Grande to Santa Barbara, thence westwardly 
to Cooke's spring. Our surveying parties, which followed the line 
of 32° 22', found springs at several places between Dofia Ana and 
Cooke's spring, and in their various reconnaissances discovered water 
in many places not marked on the maps or known to travellers. 
Proceeding west, the Rio Mimbres and a copious spring called Ojo de 
Yaca followed at intervals of ten and twelve miles. 

Westward from Ojo de Yaca the vast region extending to Tucson 
was entirely unknown, and I am not aware was ever traversed by any 
party of white men previous to 1861, when it became necessary that 
our Commission should penetrate it. When Col. Cooke was here in 
1847 with his battalion, on his march to California, his guide, Leroux, 
was afraid to cross it, not knowing of the existence of water there. 
He therefore advised the Colonel to take a southwesterly course to the 
Guadalupe Pass, in Sonora, thence to San Pedro river, Tucson, and 
the Gila. Col. Cooke took this route and opened a way, which has 
since been laid down on the maps as Cooke's road, while the district 
avoided by him is designated '^as an open prairie and a good route, 
if water can be found." Such was simply the "ftelic/"" of Leroux. 
In entering upon this unknown district we had many fears ; yet, with 
a train of both heavily laden wagons and pack mules, we took a course 
due west from Ojo de Yaca, and found in the Burro mountains, fifteen 
miles distant^ an abundance of water and a small stream, which I 
think extended to the Gila. We had followed a ravine for five miles 
through the mountains, and supposed we should be obliged to retrace 
our steps ; yet, after searching an hour or two, we found a passage 
through the mountains for our wagons without using a spade or 
encountering any steep ascent or descent. 

Thus the whole party for the survey of the line to its western ex- 
tremity, and that for the survey of the Gila, as well as one of the Rio 
Grande divisions, with their loaded wasons, pack mules, a herd of 
twenty-five oxen and one hundred and fifty sheep, traversed this un- 
known region, crossing mountains, ridges, open plains, and desert 
wastes, without losing or crippling a wagon; without suffering for the 
want of water, which was always found at convenient distances until 
the rivers San Pedro and Gila were reached. In some cases where no 
water was seen we dug for it, and in every instance found it near the 
surface. In every mountain range defiles easy of access, with gradual 
ascents and descents, were everywhere found by diverging a little to 
the right or left. Grass, too, for our large train of mules, horses, 
cattle, and sheep, was always found in abundance. When encamp- 
ing on the woodless plains there was a deficiency ^J^f^oo^y ^^^ ^b®° 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1009 

near the mountains or streams there was plenty. Sometimes we were 
put to a little inconvenience to find wood, water^ and grass at once ; 
out I saw enough to satisfy me that a party exploring for the purpose, 
and not confin^ to a particular line, could find all these necessaries 
in abundance and at convenient distances from the Rio Grande to the 
valley of the Santa Cruz. 

The valley of the Santa Cruz is the richest, and, though quite limited 
in breadth, contains more land suitable for agricultural purposes than 
any between the Rio Grande and the Pacific within the belt between the 
Slst parallel and the Gila. Here, too, near Santa Cruz, Tubac, Tnm- 
•acacovi and Tucson, are forests of mesquit, and the only considerable 
tracts of woodland (the mountains excepted) in this large district. 
In this valley are some of the oldest missionary establishments in 
America, Marco de Niza and Coronado having traversed this valley 
and made known its advantages before the year 1550. Such is the 
superior excellence of this valley, as compared with the other portions 
of the so-called " Gadsden Purchase," lying west of thb Rio Grande val- 
ley, that it should be made available for as many stations as possible 
on the contemplated mail route. It contains the chief population of 
the district ; is traversed by an excellent road ; it opens the most direct 
ftnd best route to Sonora, and is bounded on the east by the Santa 
Rita and other mountains known to abound in iron as well as the 
precious metals. The valley of San Pedro is admirably adapted for 
grazing, but not for agricultural purposes. 

That my ideas with regard to this route are not now stated for the 
first time, but were made known to the government six years ago, 
I will quote from my despatch from Santa Cruz to the Hon. Alexander 
H. H. Stuart, Secretary of the Interior, dated September 27, 1851: 

"Being the first party of which we have knowledge which has 
crossed the unknown region lying east of the San Pedro and south of 
the Gila, * * * I am now enabled to state, with great 
satisfaction, that the direct route travelled by the commission, nearly 
west from Ojo de Vaca, is a route far more practicable for a road or 
railway than Cooke's route; that the distance from water to water is 
less; that the hills and mountains to be crossed are infinitely less in 
height and easier to pass ; and, lastly, that there is a saving in the 
distance, between this and Cooke's, of more than 100 miles." 

A more extended view was given by me of the adaptation of this 
route for a wagon road or railway in a communication to the presi- 
dent of the Atlantic and Pacific Railway Company, in reply to a note 
from him asking my opinion on the subject. My letter was dated 
December 21, 1853, and appeared in several New York and other 
papers. I make a few extracts : 

** Until recently, the maps of the interior portions of our continent 
have exhibited a great chain, known as the Rocky mountains, as con- 
tinuous from a high northern latitude to the Isthmus of Panama, 
thereby presenting a barrier to the construction of a great public 
highway ; but such does not convey an accurate idea of the geographi- 
cal features of this region. ♦ * * * * ♦ ♦ 

** About the parallel of 32° 32' the Rocky mountains suddenly drop off, 
eight miles south of Fort Webster, and, with the exception of a lew 
Vol. ii 64 



1010 BEPORT OP THE 

spurs^ seem to disappear eDtirelj for about 100 miles. Here we emerge 
into the great plateau, elevated from 4,000 to 5,000 feet &bove the level 
of the sea, which is crossed by no continuous range of mountains for 
the distance stated. Short, isolated mountains and conical hills alone 
appear at intervals, and these are sometimes separated by fifty miles 
of plain. Through the State of Chihuahua this plateau is limited on 
the west by the Sierra Madre, but on the east it crosses the Bio Grande 
and extends across the northern portion of Texas. * * ♦ 

*' The belt of country here noted may safely be set down at from 80 
to 100 miles in width, and extends from the Rio Grande to the Coast 
range of mountains on the Pacific. The mountains present no barrier 
to the construction of a railway, being in short ridges from five to ten 
miles in length, overlapping each other, with broad defiles or open 
spaces between, aflbrding easy passages tnrough. * * * * We 
travelled, with loaded wagons, more than thirty miles a day across 
this district, without once locking their wheels, and this too where 
there was no road. Every mountain range was passed through 
without di£Sculty ; and, in some instances, so gradual was the ascent 
and descent as to be scarcely perceptible." 

It will thus appear that this entire district, from the Rio Grande to 
the Colorado, with its broad, open, gravelly plains, is admirably adapted 
for either a great wagon road or a railway. From Tucson to the Gila 
is a desert of ninety miles without water. This desert is aa hard as 
marble and perfectly level. Midway, at the Picacho, is a depression 
where water is often found, and where it would be advisable to sink 
wells. Twelve miles south of the Gila are similar cavities. 

At the Pimo villages, on the Gila, is a fine agricultural district, 
consisting of a plain more than twenty miles in length by four in width, 
which for ages has been cultivated by the semi-civilized Indians. Im- 
mediately to the north of this is another large and excellent agricul- 
tural district, bordering on the Salinas, which enters the Gila t»even 
miles below the Pimo villages. This river is much larger than the 
Gila. I traced its course for about forty miles, and found its bottom 
lands intersected in all directions by ancient irrigating canals ; while 
the numerous tumuli, mounds, and crumbling edifices of a race now 
passed away show that it once sustained a large population. 

The Gila would be followed by a road for about one hundred and 
eighty miles to Fort Yuma, at the junction with the Colorado, chiefly 
on the adjacent plateau, which is hard and level. The bottom varies 
in width, and in many places bears a heavy growth of cotton-wood. 
The Colorado, which is crossed by ferries, might easily be bridged. 
Here, again, is a wide valley or bottom susceptible of a high degree 
of cultivation. This, too, is marked by the remains of irrigating canals, 
first dug by the aboriginal tribes, and subsequently by the old Span- 
iards, who had a mission here. 

We n'^w reach the California desert, about one hundred miles across. 
This is very hard and level, with occasional spots of sand. It is 
entirely destitute of wood, and nearly so of grass. Water in the dry 
season is only to be obtained by digging. This is found at Cooke's 
wells. Alamo Mucho, and Sackett's wells. By sinking large wells 
it could doubtless be found in any quantity desirablgQltui^ons 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1011 

when the Colorado overflows its hanks, its waters fill large basins in* 
the desert, where it sometimes remains two or three years before it is- 
entirely absorbed by the sands or evaporated by the sun. Carissa creek,. 
a small stream, which, after flowing a few miles, is lost in the sands, 
iiirnished water in the driest seasons. From this point to San Diega 
there is not only water at convenient distances, but an abundance of 
grass. 

The route here described from eastern Texas is taken by numbers 
of emigrant trains, except that portion of it from the Bio Grande to the 
Santa Cruz valley, which, until the Boundary Commission followed it, 
was unknown. The emigrants took Cooke's road, which was a hundred 
miles longer. On my return from California we met emigrant parties 
every day after leaving the Gila, and in one instance a drove of 17,000 
sheep, all bound for San Francisco. 

As these remarks have already been too much extended, I forbear 
mentioning other and more minute particulars of the advantages which 
may be claimed for the southern route. From what has been stated, 
it is evident that the region over which it is to pass is not the paradise 
which some have claimed for it ; but, poor as it is in many respects, 
it is infinitely better and presents more advantages for a great national 
highway than any yet discovered to California. 



Digitized by 



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1012 EEPOBT OP THE 



APPENDIX A. 

JRouie No. T,809 — New Orleans to Cairo; oompeiiaaiion, $329,000 ; half 

trip, $449 50. 

In pursuance of the seventh section of the act of Congress, passed 
on the 3d March, 1857, and by direction of the Postmaster General, 
ihe undersigned have re-examined all questions arising out of fines 
imposed upon the contractors for carrying the mails on route No. 
7,809, New Orleans to Cairo, on the Mississippi river ; and having 
compared the same with the evidence produced, respectfully submit 
the following adjustment, and recommend its adoption : 

First quarter of 1856. 

Remit the fines and deductions imposed for failures, for failures to 
arrive in schedule time, for failures to connect, for failures at inter- 
mediate offices, and for inferior service during the months of January 
and February, 1856, amounting to $48,504 73; and let the fines and 
deductions imposed for failures, for failures to arrive in schedule time, 
and for inferior service in the month of March, 1856, amounting lo 
$7,619 95, remain as settled, upon the following evidence, viz : 

No. 1. William M. Murphy, special agent, reports from New Or- 
leans, on the 6th February, 1856, '* That the interruptions in the 
service, on route 7,809, still continue; the almost unprecedented state 
of the navigation, and the continued cold weather, promise but little 
improvement for some time to come. I have refrained from giving 
you frequent reports, which could have been but reiterations of the 
same thing, from time to time ; no company, whether they owned 
boats or not, could improve the service until the ice shall disappear." 

No. 2. William J. Brown, special agent, reports from Cairo, on 
the 16th January, 1856 : ** Failures have been quite frequent in con- 
sequence of the intensely cold weather. In many instances engines 
were frozen up on the road. From Cincinnati to Louisville ice has 
so obstructed the navigation that the mail line of boats have ceased 
their regular trips. The ice is running very heavily on the Migsis- 
fiippi river from Cairo to Vicksburg, an occurrence scarcely ever known 
before. This detains and impedes the operation of the mails between 
Cairo and New Orleans, which are now very heavy ; but the company 
Are making every exertion, and receiving mails with much more regu- 
larity than could be expected from the present condition of the river." 

No. 3. Postmaster at Cairo, reports from Cairo, on the 30th Jan- 
uary, 1856, in regard to performance of service on route 7,809, and 
states: ''That the contractors have done everything in their power, 
sparing neither labor nor expense in the prosecution of their contract ; 
but, owing to the heavy running ice in the river below here, and the 
low stage of the water, there have been but few boats for the past 
month that would hazard a trip, or up to this point. Reliable citi- 
zens of this vicinity, who have resided in this country from fifteen to 
twenty years, all concur in the statement that they have never wit- 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1013 

nessed such formidable impediments to navigation on the Mississippi 
river, below here, of so long continuance. All the old boatmen whom 
I have heard speak of it, and it is a subject of daily and almost hourly 
remark here, make the same statement. There have been from twenty 
to thirty-five boats lying here ever since the 25th of December. Most 
of them retaining their officers and crews, resting under the proba- 
bility, justified by this latitude and the experience of all past seasons, 
that a day or two later would witness a change of weather and the 
condition of the river, but up to this present moment there has been 
no indication of improvement in either. I make this statement from 
a sense of justice to the contractors, who are, apparently, and, I be- 
lieve, really, doing all that can be done to carry out their contract." 

No. 4. Postmaster at Cairo, 'on the 1st February, 1856, reports : 
**The river is still obstructed by heavy running ice, and but few boats 
are leaving or arriving. Those arriving for the past month have 
been from eight to twenty days from New Orleans, and the prospect 
is still unfavorable to improvement." 

No. 5. Postmaster at Cairo reports from Cairo, on the 3d March, 
1856 : **I have permitted the mails to be carried, in some instances, 
on boats that, under ordinary circumstances, would have been refused. 
I had no other alternative but to ship on them or retain the mails, as 
it has been impossible to make any calculation since the first of Janu- 
ary when a boat would leave." 

No. 6. The postmaster at Natchez, on 16th February, 1856, re- 
ports : '^ This office has been without a mail from Cairo, and all offices 
between there, for from three to six days, at tarious times ; they are 
now beginning to arrive more regularly as navigation is opening. 
The contractors have no boats; they wait for the first that comes." 

No. T. A memorial, signed by twenty-three merchants and busi- 
ness men of New Orleans, and by the captains of twenty-seven steam- 
boats running on the Mississippi river, recommending that the 
contractors on 7,809 be indemnified for all fines and forfeitures im- 
posed by the Postmaster General in consequence of failure on their 
part to make schedule time during the first and third quarters of 1856. 
The captains of steamboats state that they know from their personal 
knowledge, having had long experience in navigating the Mississippi 
river, that the ice during the first, and low water and fogs during the 
third quarter, rendered it impossible to perform the service any better 
than it was done, the difficulties from ice and low water having been 
worse than ever known ; *'and we believe that every effort was made, 
regardless of expense, to perform the service in good faith," The 
twenty-three merchants and business men of New Orleans urge the 
department to a favorable consideration of the foregoing. 

No. 8. G. A. Philips makes oath on the 17th January, 1857 : 

'* I have been in the employ as agent of the conductors on route 7,809, 
New Orleans to Cairo, since March 1, 1856, and have been during the 
whole time familiar with their business. Most of the money they 
have expended has been paid out either by myself, under my super- 
vision, or on drafts drawn by me. I have charge of the books. I 
know of my own personal knowledge no pains or expense have been 
spared to overcome the natural or other obstacles which have presented 

* Digitized 



1014 REPORT OP THE 

themselves, for the purpose of carrying the mails according to the 
spirit and letter of the contract, having myself transacted the husiness 
under such instructions from the contractors. The expense incurred 
for the first and third quarters far exceeded the pay received from the 
department. It is a fact generally known that the ice almost entirely 
suspended navigation during the months of January and February ^ and 
it was during this time that the heaviest outlay of the first quarter 
was incurred, having to pay large sums to get the mail forwarded at 
all. The expenses exceeded the receipts alx)ut $30,000." 

No. 9. Postmaster General Camphell, in obedience to a resolution 
of the 4th of February, 1856, calling for information relative to the 
mail communication between New Orleans and Cairo, reported on the 
9th February, 1856, to the Senate, viz : 

'^ The short time allowed would alone have rendered it difficult to 
perfect all necessary preparations for commencing on the 1st of Janu- 
ary, and regularly continuing daily mail service, as required ; but an 
additional and entirely unforeseen difficulty arose, from the severity of 
the weather, which caused, to some extent, a suspension of the navi- 
gation of the Mississippi river. A special agent of this department, 
writing from New Orleans on the 28th January, 1856, says, "that 
owing to the condition of the river, which is filled with floating ice, 
from Cairo to the mouth of Red river, a distance of T50 miles, no line 
of boats could perform the service with any degree of regularity.' He 
also states that there is a combination of steamboat interests aiming 
to break down the mail contractors and force the department to accept 
the enormous and combined bid of $600,000." 

"Another agent under date of 30th January, 1856, reports as 
follows : ' The uncommon severity of the winter, and unheard of ob- 
structions from ice on the lower Mississippi, have prevented the ship- 
ment of mails with any regularity. It has been beyond the power or 
capacity of any parties to have performed a regular service, even with- 
out the opposition against which the contractors have contended.' 

"These formidable difliculties have thus far prevented the conveyance 
of the mails with due regularity. I have the most positive assurances 
that the contractors are using every effort to perform their duty, and 
that they will yet succeed to the satisfaction of this department and 
the public. In the present condition of the river they are clearly en- 
titled to some indulgence ; but so soon as the obstructions from ice are 
removed, they will be held to the strictest accountability. If then, 
after a reasonable time, the stipulated service is not rendered, and fre- 
quent irregularities occcur, I shall proceed to exercise the power 
specially reserved to me, to annul the contract for repeated failures." 

No. 10. Postmaster at Cairo reports from Cairo, on the 19th Feb- 
ruary, 1856 : "I have not strictly observed the instructions of the de- 
partment relative to the departure of the mails from this office, for 
the reason that it has been impossible to do so during the obstructions 
to navigation, occasioned by the ice. Boats have had to choose their 
own time of leaving port, and rather than detain the mails in this 
office, in the absence of any probability that they would be sent at the 
actual time required, I have thought it the interest of the department 
and the public to embrace, in every instance, ^tl^e^first opportunity 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1015 

afforded, afler a mail was made up in the morning, that it might be 
forwarded the same day, rather than to observe the schedule hour of 
departure, when it was certain by so doing it would not leave until 
the next day, or, perhaps, in two or three days after." 

No. 11. William M. Murphy, on the 23d May, 1857, on his oath 
deposes and says : <' I was deputed as special agent of the Post Office 
Department to put in operation the mail service on the Mississippi 
river, route 7,809 — New Orleans to Cairo — to commence on the 1st 
January, 1856. On the given day I was at Cairo, and the contractors 
commenced the service. After remaining at that point for several 
days, in conference with the mail company, they presented a list of 
boats, which being duly inspected and received, according to instruc- 
tions, a copy was forwarded the department, and the postmasters of 
Cairo and New Orleans were directed by me to ship the mails on said 
boats, or on such as were of equal class and speed." 

" The weather had been extremely cold for some weeks, and ice was 
commencing to form very rapidly on the upper Mississippi and the 
Ohio rivers. Oft the night of the 3d, I started for Louisville on 
steamer * David White,' but such were the interruptions that we 
were only able to reach Evansville, where the boat was compelled to 
lay up. In a few days the Ohio was entirely closed to its mouthy and 
the Mississippi was filled with floating ice. On the 17th, (January, 
1856,) 1 had returned to Cairo, where I found a large number of boats 
laid up, and navigation almost entirely suspended. On that night I 
left for New Orleans, on board the ' Effie Afton,' with the mails of 
the 15th, 16th, and 17th. It was with great difficulty we made our 
way through the ice, being mostly to float with it, until below Mem- 
phis, and serious interruptions were experienced until we passed 
Vicksburg. These interruptions continued up to the 2%th February^ 
1866. Navigation continued to be more or less obstructed until some 
time in March, to an extent which prevented boats from making good 
time. From the commencement of the service the contractors seemed 
to make every effort to perform it, regardless of expense or trouble, 
or sacrifice. I know that they have paid alone, for the transporta- 
tion of the mails, five hundred dollars per day, besides heavy contin- 
gent expenses for agents, &c. It was an impossibility for boats to 
have made schedule time." 

Second quarter of 1856. 

Let the fines and deductions imposed upon the contractors during 
the second quarter of 1856, amounting to $9,287 38 ; and the fines 
for failures at intermediate offices during the said quarter, which were 
imposed upon the contractors in the settlement of the third quarter, 
amounting to the further sum of $3,570, remain as settled upon the 
following evidence, viz : 

George A. Phillips, the agent of the contractors, in his affidavit 
made on the 17th January, 1857, states: 

" During the second quarter (of 1856) the outlay was not so heavy, 
and the mails were carried with much greater regularitv^the river 
being in good navigable condition." Digitized by CiOOglc 



1016 REPORT OP THE 

William M. Murphy, in his affidavit made on the 23d May, 1867^ 
states : 

*^ The spring of 1856 opened with a good river, and, during the 
second quarter, the contractors had every opportunity to perform a. 
satisfactory service. The long continued cold weather and interrup- 
tions to the navigation had caused large accumulations of freights on 
the coast, and the rivers* were crowded with steamers." 

I can see no reason for excusing any failures on their part, save 
those which might occasionally occur from the unavoidable accidents 
of navigation. They certainly, if ever, had now a fair opportunity to 
fulfil the promises made for a good and sufficient service. The records 
of the department show the character of the service performed, and 
the Postmaster General expressed satisfaction with it. 

Third quarter of 1856. 

Of the sum of $36,112 26 deducted from the pay of the contractors 
in the third quarter of 1856, let the fines and deductions imposed for 
failing to depart, amounting to $6,742 50 ; and the fines which were 
deducted from their pay this quarter for failures at intermediate offices 
during the second quarter of 1856, amounting to $3,570, making 
together, the sum of $10,312 50, remain as settled. And let there l^ 
remitted the fines imposed for failures to arrive in schedule time, for 
failures to connect, inferior service, and failures at intermediate 
offices, during this third quarter of 1856, amounting to $25,824 76^ 
upon the following evidence, viz : 

William M. Murphy, in his affidavit made on the 23d May, 1857, 
states : 

*' The commencement of the third quarter found the river falling 
very rapidly ; the Ohio not navigable for large boats, and the Upper 
Mississippi scarcely so ; the New Orleans boats had commenced to lay 
up for their usual repairing. The contractors immediately made ar- 
rangements for such control over boats as would enable them to be 
employed in the transportation of the mails, irrespective of the want 
of business. To do this, they had to charter them at from one to two 
thousand dollars per month, and run them at their own expense. 
During the third and fourth quarters they purchased, to my knowledge, 
the controlling interest In the T. C. Twitchell and St. Charles, and 
chartered the * Antelope,' ' Empire,' ' R. W. McRae,' ' Lucy Robin- 
son,' 'Republic,' 'J. E. Montgomery,' 'Wm. Garvin,' and 'High 
Flyer.' " 

''The water continued very low all the season, and winter approached 
with no improvement in the condition of the river. Of course but 
little business was doing, and^ though a very healthy season, the travel 
was limited. The shipment of the mails seemed the principal object 
of the contractors, and I have known them to return one of their 
boats to New Orleans after only an hour or two, and that at a lo8» 
of over a thousand dollars for the trip." 

No. 8. G. A. Philips, in his affidavit made on the 17th day of 
January, 1857, states : '' The expenses of the third quarter exceeded 
those of any other. The river, during the whole time, was so low 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1017 

that none but the highest draught boats could run. Indeed, all river 
men concur in saying that the Mississippi was never so low and so 
dangerous to navigate as during this season. The statistics of disas- 
ters, during the time, being sufficient evidence of this, even without 
the evidence of the boatmen themselves. 

Being determined to carry the mails in the best manner the condition 
of the river would permit, the contractors purchased and chartered 
boats at a heavy expense and run them at a heavy loss. The boats 
chartered, with three exceptions, were at two thousand dollars per 
month. All these boats, with but one exception, met with serious 
accidents. One of them, the *^ Empire," was sunk, and proved 
almost a total loss. The '^B. W. McBae" was snagged and was 
saved but with the utmost exertion ; her repairs and loss of time cost 
over ten thousand dollars. The "William Garvin" was also seri- 
ously injured by striking a rock, which compelled her to go in dock 
at a cost of over twelve hundred dollars. The "Antelope" was 
grounded and so strained and injured as to compel her to go in dock, 
and proving too heavy for the river, was not brought out again. The 
** St. Charles " was very seriously injured by grounding, so much so 
as to cause her to go in dock, being damaged to the amount of two thou- 
sand five hundred dollars. The " T. C. Twitchell " was hurt several 
times, but not seriously. The " Lucy Bobinsou " was also snagged 
several times, at one time carrying away a part of her side house and 
wheel ; her repairs amounted to about five hundred dollars. 

Besides these boats, the "Belle Sheridan" and "High Flyer" 
were chartered, but neither could be brought out of the Ohio river in 
consequence of its falling so rapidly. Every possible exertion was 
made, and fifteen hundred dollars expended to get the " High Flyer" 
out, but all to no purpose. Besides these boats there were others, but 
they proved of too great draught to run all the season ; other suitable 
boats were sought for, but coiud not be procured. 

The "Virginia" was purchased, but in making two trips was so 
much injured as to compel her to go in dock. In short, nothing in 
the power of the contractors was left undone to facilitate the prompt 
delivery of the mails. The expenses of this quarter were about sixty- 
five thousand dollars. 

No. 13. The postmaster at Cairo, on the 19th January, 185T, reports: 
" That at the request of G. A. Phillips, esq., agent for the Cairo and 
New Orleans Mail Company, I would beg leave to state the condition 
of the Mississipi river below this point during a portion of the past 
summer and the present winter. During the latter part of July and 
the whole of the months of August and September the rivers were 
both at a very low stage. The Ohio above and the Mississippi below 
being lower, according to the invariable statements of the oldest and 
most experienced captains and pilots, than at any previous correspond- 
ing season within the past twenty-fivo years, rendering navigation 
impracticable for loaded boats of largest size, and quite difficult for 
those of medium size." 

The memorial, (No. T,) signed by 23 merchants and business men 
of New Orleans, and by the captains of 27 steamboats running on the 
Mississippi river^ (produced as evidence in the first qiia^^e^f 1856,) 



1018 REPORT OF THE 

recommends that tlie contractors on route 7,809 be indemnified for all 
fines and forfeitures imposed by the Postmaster General tor failures 
on their part to make schedule time during the third quarter of 1856. 
That they know, from their own personal knowledge, that the low 
water and fogs during the third quarter rendered it impossible to per- 
form the service any better than it was done. 

Fourth quarter of 1856. 

In the fourth quarter of 1856 it was found that the fines and deduc- 
tions amounted to 151,770 70, and that of this sum the fines for failing 
to arrive in schedule time and for inferior service during this quarter 
liad been doubled, and amounted to the sum of $25,340 87. 

Remit $12^670 43, the excess amount of the doubled fines; and 
Temit likewise the further sum of $36,103 27, for fines and deductions 
imposed upon the contractors for failures to arrive in schedule time, 
for failures at intermediate offices, and for inferior service ; and let 
the fine for inferior service in the month of December, 1856, here 
reduced to $300, and the deductions for failing to depart during this 
quarter, amounting to |2,697, remain as settled, upon the following 
-evidence, viz : 

No. 8. G. A. Phillips, in his affidavit taken on the 17th January, 
1857, states : '* The fourth quarter (October and November) presented 
very much the same scenes and occurrences in the history of the mail 
on this route as the three previous months. The river may have at 
times, possibly, been in a little better condition ; but the boats had 
the greater obstacles, fogs, (which at this season of the year occur 
almost nightly,) to contend against. During December the river has 
been in better navigable condition, but the fogs are still very preva- 
lent in the lower part of the river. I am confident that the mails 
have been carried as promptly as the condition of navigation would 
permit, and that they could not have been delivered as promptly 
without this heavy outlay." 

No. 13. Postmaster at Cairo, on the 19th January, 1857, reports 
from Cairo: **A rise occurred in October, affording a fair stage of 
water until about the middle of December, when the rivers again 
became quite low, and have continued receding to the present time." 

William A. Murphy, on the 4th June, 1857, explains so much of 
his affidavit made on the 23d May, 1857, (No. 11,) as refers to the 
service during the fourth quarter of 1856 as follows, viz : 

^^ It is due to my statement, made and filed in the department 23d 
May last, and now under your investigation, in reference to the ser- 
vice performed by the Cairo and New Orleans mail company during 
the year 1856, that I should further state, in explanation of the river 
and other difficulties attending the navigation during the fourth quar- 
ter, that the season therein referred to embraced the entire fall and 
commencement of winter ; that I intended to imply thereby that the 
usual rise in our rivers, which occur from the Ist September to let 
Noveilaber, did not take place that year, and that the stage of the 
wat^r was a very little improvement upon what it was during the 
third quarter, or summer season. The low st^lg^ ^(^Qi^^ig{i^d the 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1019 

usual trouble from fogs, which are the effect of those natural causes of 
a change of seasons, rendered the navigation much more uncertain 
and unsafe than had the usual rise taken place, and the boats not hare 
been compelled to be more careful in navigating the route. It is due, 
therefore, to the contractors to say that during the fourth quarter they 
had more than the usual natural difficulties to contend with, and that 
they spared neither trouble nor expense in performing the service in 
good iaith. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WM. H. DUNDAS, 
JOHN OAKFORD. 
Hon. Aaron V. Brown, 

Postmaster General. 



Post Office Department, June 13, 185T. 

Having, pursuant to the 7th section of the act making appropria- 
tions for the service of the Post Office Department during the nscal 
year ending June 30, 1858, (acts 3d session 34th Congress, chap. 96, 
page 189,) re-examined and adjusted all questions arising out of fines 
imposed upon the contractors for carrying the mails upon the Missis- 
sippi river, on the route No. 7,809, New Orleans to Cairo^ it is there- 
fore — 

Orderedy That of the sum of $56,116 68, deducted from the pay of 
the contractors for failing, &c., in the first quarter of 1856, there be 
remitted to them the sum of $48,504 73. 

That the fines for failures, &c., imposed in the second quarter of 
1856 remain as settled. That of the sum of $36,112 26, deducted 
from their pay in the third quarter of 1856, there be remitted to them 
the sum of $25,824 76. 

And, finally, that of the sum of $51,770 70, deducted in the fourth 
quarter of 1856, there be remitted the sum of $48,773 70, making the 
aggregate amount of fines and deductions to be remitted and paid to 
said contractors under this order $123,103 10, and leaving charged 
to them the sum of $30,183 83. 

Postmaster General. 



Post Ofhcb Department, June 16, 1857. 

For the purpose of correcting errors of statement in the order of the 
13th of June, 1857, remitting fines imposed and deductions made 
from the pay of the contractor on route No. 7,809, New Orleans to 
Cairo, it is now — 

Ordered^ That the sum of $56,116 68, deducted from their pay in 
the first quarter, be stated at $56,124 68, the correct amount ; that 
the amount remitted in the third quarter of 1856 be stated at 
$25,799 76, the true amount, instead of $25,824 76 ; and that the 
amount of fines and deductions to stand charged to the contractors be 
stated at $30,216 83, instead of $30,183 83, as expressed^in that 

order. Digitized by VjOOQ IC 

Postmaster GeneraL 



1020 



BEPOBT OF TnE 






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POSTHASTEB GENERAI. 



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1022 



REPORT OF THE 



Statement of the sums paid for the year ending June 30, 1857, on (he 
New York and Liverpool line, tlie New York and Chagrea line, and 
the Astoria and Panama line, exhibiting, in separate columns^ the 
tvhole contract pay, the amount of the 10 per cent, deductions, the sums 
deducted as fines on the recommendation of the Postmaster General j 
and the ach^l amount paid over. 



New York and Liverpool line, 
$858, 000 per annum to Feb- 
ruary 20, 1867, and after that 
time, at $385,000 per annum. 

New York and Chagres line, 
$290,000 per annum 

Astoria and I anama line, $348,- 
250 per annum 



Amount of 10 
per cent, de- 
ductions. 



Amount de- j Amount paid Amount of 
ducted as over. , interest 

fines. < I 



$38,600 00 $135,000 00 $462,756 89 



29,000 00 



1,650 00 263,224 14 



19,900 00 325,271 78 



$9, 993 11 
6, 225 86 
3,078 2t 



Treasury Department, 

Fourth Auditor's Office, Xoveniber 26, 1857. 



A. J. 0. BANNON, Acting AudUcr, 



D. 

POSTAL CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE. 

Articles agreed upon between the General Post Office of the United States 
of America, by James Campbell, Postmaster General, in virtue of his 
constitutional poivers, and the General Post Office of France, by Count 
de Sartiges, Minister of his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of the 
trench, and invested ttnth special powers to this effect, to wit : 

ARTICLE I. 



There shall be an exchange of correspondence between the French 
post office and the United States post office by the means of communi- 
cation and of transportation hereinafter designated, to wit : 

1st. By packets and other steam vessels performing regular service 
between the ports of France and the ports of the United States. 

2d. By United States mail packets plying between the ports of the 
United States and the ports of Great Britain. 

3d. And, finally, by British packets and other British steam vessels 
performing regular service between the ports of Great Britaia and the 
ports of the United States. r^ ^^^T^ 

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POSTMASTER GENERAL, 1025 



ARTICLE n. 

The French post office shall pay the expenses resulting from the 
transportation between the United States and France of all mails 
which shall be transported by packets and other steam vessels depart- 
ing from or bound for France, except those which shall be brought to 
France or sent from France by the United States mail packets. 

The French post office shall pay, besides, as follows : 

1st. The expenses resulting from the transportation between France 
and England of all mails which shall be exchanged between the French 
and United States post offices by way of England. 

2d, The transit charges due to the British post office for the said 
mails. 

3d. And, finally, the expenses of sea transportation due to the 
i?ame office for mails exchanged between the French post office and the 
United States post office by means of British packets and other British 
vessels bound for or departing from the ports of Great Britain, 

On its side, the United Skates post office shall pay as follows : 
let. The expenses resulting from the transportation between the 
United States and France of mails which shall be despatched from 
one of the two countries to the other by United States mail packet4» 
plying between France and the United States. 

2d. The expenses resulting from the transportation between the 
United States and Great Britain of mails which shall be exchanged 
between the French and United States post offices by means of United 
States mail packets plying between the ports of the United States and 
the ports of Great Britain. 

ARTICLE ni. 

The exchange of correspondence between the French and United 
States Post Office Departments shall take place through the follbwing 
post offices : 

On the side of France, 

1. Havre. 

2. The travelling office from Paris to Calais. 

On the side of the United States. 

1 . New York. 

2. Boston. 

3. Philadelphia. 

4. San Francisco. 

Independently of the above designated offices of exchange, others 
may be established by a mutual understanding between the respective 
post office departments at any other points in the territories of the 
two countries at which direct relations may hereafter be deemed 
necessary. ^^.^.^^^ ^^ GoOglc 



1024 REPORT OF THE 



ARTICLE IV. 

The relations between the French and the United States exchange 
post offices designated in the preceding article shall be established in 
the following manner : 

1st. The Havre office shall correspond with the New York, Boston, 
Philadelphia, and San Francisco offices, as well by the packets and 
other steam vessels plying between Havre and New York as by the 
United States packets and the British packets and other British steam 
vessels plying between Southampton and New York, between Liver- 
pool and New York, and between Liverpool and Boston. 

2d. The travelling office from Paris to Calais shall correspond with 
the New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco offices by the 
United States mail packets and the British packets and other British 
steam vessels plying between Southampton and New York, between 
Liverpool and New York, and between Liverpool and Boston. 

ARTICLE v. 

Correspondence of all kinds exchanged between the French post 
office and United States post office shall be directed conformably to 
Table A, annexed to the present articles. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Persons who shall wish to send ordinary letters — that is to say, un- 
registered letters, either from France and Algeria to the United States 
and their territories, or from the United States and their territories to 
France and Algeria, may, at their choice, leave the postage to be paid 
by the person addressed, or pay in advance the postage to the place 
of destination. 

Ther postage to be levied in France and in Algeria on letters for the 
United States and their territories, paid to destination, as well as on 
unpaid letters coming from the United States and their territories, 
shall be established according to the weight of each letter, at the rate 
of eighty centimes per seven grammes and a half, or fraction of seven 
grammes and a half. 

Reciprocally, the postage to be levied in the United States and in 
the territories of the United States on letters for France and Algeria 
paid to destination, as well as on unpaid letters coming from France 
and Algeria, shall be established according to the weight of each let- 
ter, at the rate of fifteen cents per American quarter ounce, or fraction 
of American quarter ounce. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The rates of postage to be paid by the French post office to the 
United States post office, as well on prepaid letters sent from France 
and Algeria for the United States as on unpaid letters sent to France 
and Algeria from the United States, are fixed as follows, vi^je 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1025 

1. At the sum of three cents per seven grammes and a half, or frac- 
tion of seven grammes and a half, on each letter transported between 
the French frontier and the American frontier at the expense or on 
account of the French post office. 

2. At the sum of nine cents per seven grammes and a half, or frac- 
tion of seven grammes and a half, for each letter transported between 
the American frontier and the British frontier, for or from France, at 
the expense of the United States post office. 

3. And at the sum of twelve cents per seven erammes and a half, 
or fraction of seven grammes and a half, for each letter transported 
between the American frontier and the French frontier direct, or when 
touching only at one intermediate English port without passing 
through England, at the expense of the United States. 

As to the rates of postage to be paid bj the United States post office 
to the French post office, as well for prepaid letters sent from the 
United State for France and Algeria as for unpaid letters sent from 
France and Algeria for the Unit^ States, they are fixed as follows: 

1. At the sum of three cents per American quarter ounce, or frac- 
tion of American quarter ounce, for each letter transported between 
the American frontier and the French frontier direct, or when touch- 
ing only at one intermediate English port without passing through 
England, at the expense of the United btates. 

2. At the sum of six cents per American quarter ounce, or fraction 
of American quarter ounce, for each letter transported between the 
American frontier and the British frontier, for or from France^ at the 
expense of the United States post office. 

3. And at the sum of twelve cents per American quarter ounce, or 
fraction of American quarter ounce, for each letter transported between 
the French frontier and the American frontier at the expense or on 
account of the French post office. 

ARUCLB vm. 

Ordinary letters sent by way of France either from the United 
States and their Territories for the countries mentioned in table B, 
annexed to the present articles, or from these same countries for the 
United States and their Territories, shall be exchanged between the 
French post office and the United States post office on the conditions 
stated in the said table. 

Ordinary letters sent by way of the United States, either from 
France and Algeria, for the countries mentioned in table C, annexed 
to the present articles, or from those same countries for France and 
Algeria, shall be exchanged between the French post office and the 
United States post office on the conditions stated in said table C. 

It is understood that, in case the conventions which regulate the 
relations of France with the foreign countries, designated in table B, 
should be modified in such manner as to affect the conditions of ex- 
change, stated in that table ; and reciprocally, that, in case the conven- 
tions which regulate the relations of the United States with the foreign 
countries, designated in table C, should in like manner be modified so 
88 to affect the conditions of transmission, stated in that table, these 
Vol. ii 65 



1026 BEPOBT OF THE 

modifications shall be admitted on the one part and on the other, ac- 
cording to the information and evidence which the two post offices of 
France and the United States shall reciprocally fumisn one to the 
other. 

ABTICLB IX. 

Letters badly addressed or badly directed shall, without delay, he 
reciprocally returned, by means of the respective exchange offices, for 
the sum which the office sending shall have allowed the other office 
on these letters. 

Letters which shall hare been addressed to persons who hare 
changed their residence, shall be, respectively, delivered or returned, 
charged with the postage which should have been paid by the persons 
addressed. 

aruclb X. 

The rates which the two post offices of France and the United 
States shall mutually have to carry to each other's account, shall be 
marked on the letters at the exchange office from which they are sent, 
in ordinary figures, plainly and uniformly, on the right hand of the 
upper part of the address. 

The rates of letters unpaid to be carried to the debit of the corre- 
sponding office by the sending office, shall be marked in black ink ; 
those of prepaid letters to be carried to the credit of the correspond- 
ing office shall be marked in red ink. 

ARUCLB XI. 

The United States post office shall cause to be placed on the address 
of the prepaid letters, which the United States offices of exchange 
shall deliver to the French offices of exchangCj this impression (paid), 
stamped in red ink. 

On its side, the French post office shall cause the impression (p d), 
stamped in red ink, to be placed on the letters prepaid to destination, 
whicn shall be delivered by the French offices of exchange to the 
United States offices of exchange. 

ARTICLE xn. 

The respective offices of exchange shall place upon the superscription 
of the correspondence of every kind contained in the mails, which they 
shall receive from the corresponding offices of exchange, a stamp, with 
the date, showing the way in which such mails shall have been for- 
warded. 

The stamp to be placed upon the correspondence transported between 
the French frontier and the American frontier, at the expense of or on 
account of the poet office of France, shall bear, independently of the 
name of the exchange office of destination, the characters Serv. Fr. or 
Br., (French or British service.) This stamp shall be placed in blue 



P08T1IASTER GENERAL. 1027 

ink on the correspondence transmitted directly, and in red ink on the 
correspondence transmitted by way of England. 

The stamp to be placed on the correspondence transported between 
the American frontier and the French frontier, or the British frontier, 
at the expense of the United States post office, shall bear, independ- 
ently of the name of the exchange office of destination, the characters 
Serv. Am. (American seryice.) This stamp shall be placed in blue 
ink, both on the correspondence transmitted direct and on that com- 
prised in the mails of or for the office of Havre, which shall have been 
transported by the packets of the New York line to Bremen, and by 
the packets plying between Havre and Southampton, without touching 
the British territory. It shall be placed in red ink on the correspond 
ence comprised in the mails, which shall have been transported by the 
aid of the British post office. 

ARTICLE XTTT. 

Each of the mails exchanged between the exchange offices of the 
two countries shall be accompanied by a letter bill, or statement, 
showing the nature, the number, and the weight of the articles which 
the mail shall contain, as well as the amount of the rates mentioned 
in Article X. 

The exchange office to which the mail shall be addressed shall ac- 
knowledge its receipt to the exchange office transmitting it by the 
next conveyance. 

The letter billa, or statements and the acknowledgments of receipt, 
of which the French offices of exchange shall make use, shall be con- 
formable to the model D, annexed to the present articles. 

The letter bills or statements and the acknowledgments of receipt, 
of which the United States exchange offices shall make use, shall be 
conformable to the model E, in like manner annexed to the present 
articles. 

ARTICLB XIV. 

In cases where, on the days fixed for sending the mails, an office 
of exchange shall have no letter to address to the corresponding ex- 
change office, the office of transmission shall, nevertheless, send in the 
ordinary form, a mail, which shall contain a negative letter, bill, or 
statement. 

ARITCIiB XV. 

Letters which cannot be delivered for any cause whatever, shall be 
returned on one part and the other, at the end of each month, and 
more frequently, if possible. Those of such letters which shall have 
been placed in the account shall be returned for the sum at which they 
have been originally counted by the sending office. Those which shall 
have been delivered prepaid to destination, or to the frontier of the 
corresponding office, shall be returned without charge or deduction. 

The deduction resulting from charges on correspondence which can- 



1028 REPOBT OF THE P08TMA8TEB GENERAL. 

not be delivered shall be established ia detailed memorandums, con- 
formable to the model F, annexed to the present articles. 

aruclb xvi. 

There shall be prepared every three months, at the French General 
Post Office, precise accounts, recapitulating the facts relative to the 
transmission of correspondence between the respective offices of ex- 
change. These accounts, which shall have for their base and for vouch- 
ers the acknowledgments of receipt of mails sent and received daring 
the period of three months, shall be recapitulated in a general account, 
intended to present the definitive results of the transmission of cor- 
respondence exchanged between the two departments. 

After having been discussed and objections settled, the balance of 
the general account above mentioned shall be paid hj the department 
which shall be found indebted to the other in the course of the quarter 
which shall follow that to which the account relates. 

The amount of the accounts shall be paid as follows : 

1. In drafts on Washington when the payment shall be in favor of 
the United States post office. 

2. In drafts on Paris when the payment shall be in favor of the 
French post office. 

In the latter case the amount of the account shall be paid in French 
money, at the rate of five francs thirty centimes per dollar. 

ARTICLE xvn. 

The present articles shall take effect on the firstday of April, 1867, 
and they shall remain obligatory until one of the two post offices shall 
have informed the other, a year in advance, of its intention to abro- 
gate them. 

During this last year the before mentioned articles shall continue 
to be fully and entirely executed, without prejudice to the liquidation 
and payment of the amount of the accounts between the postal depart- 
ments of the two countries after the expiration of the said term. 

Made in duplicate original, and signed at Washington, the second 
day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and fifty-seven. 

JAMES CAMPBELL, [sbal.] 

Pastnuuter General. 

SARTIGES. [SKAL.] 



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TABLES 



MAIL ARRANGEMENTS 



THE UNITED STATES AND FBANCE. 



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1030 



BEPOBT OF THE 



A. 

Table showing the direction to he given to correspondence of aU hinds ex- 
changed between the Post Office Department of France and the Post 
Office Department of the United States. 



BouDULB I^MAILB FROM THE FRENCH POST OFFICE. 



f! 

oil 

ill 



8* 
I 



Origin of tbe correipond- 
ence. 



Deitination of the < 
ipondence. 



HtTie. 



New York. 



Bofton. 



SAnfnncisco 



Havre to New Tork* 



Bremen to N. York, 

by Southampton. 

U verpool to N . York 

liverpool to Boaion. 

Havre to New York* 



Bremen to N. York, 

by Boothampton. 

Liverpool to N.York 

Liverpool to Boston, 



Havre to New York* 



Bremen to N. York, 

by Boatbamplon. 

Liverpool to N.York 

Liverpool to Boeton. 

Havre to New York* 



Bremen to N. York, 

by Boathampton. 

Liverpool to N. York 

Liverpool to Boeton. 



kll France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves as 
■n intermediate point. 



The City of Havre . 



An the United States, (ei- 
cept the cities of Boston 
and Philadelphia,and flnis 
of Calilbmia,) the Territo- 
ries of tbe United Slates, 
(except Oregon and Wash- 
ington.) and the Ibrsiga 
countries to which the 
United States serves as aa 
intermediate point, ezcq^ 
the Sandwich Islands 

do 



.do., 
.do.. 



All France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves as 
an Intermediate point. 

The City of Havre , 



The City of New York. 
The City of Boston 



.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



All the United States, (ex- 
cept the ciUes of New Tock 
and Fhiladelphia,and State 
of CaUfomia,) the Territo- 
ries of the United r 



(except Oregon and Waih- 
1.) and the lbi«i|B 

which the 



ington,j 
ntii< 



countries to 



United I 

intermediate point, except 



All France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves as 
an intermediate point. 

The City of Havre , 



The City of Philadelphia . 



.do.. 



.do.. 



All France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves as 
an intermediate point. 

The City of Havre , 



.do.. 



CaUfomia and the Territories 
of Oregon and Washing- 
too, and the Bandwin 

^do. 

do 




oation more promp . ^ 

MBt by way of Bngtand when there is room to suppose that they will reach their destin 

• tl»abrU..diiwt route. Digitized by i^OOgl 



DvCOOQle 



POSTMASTER GBNERAL. 
' A — Continued. 



1031 



Souvvui I.— MiJU FROM THE FRENCH POtlT OFnCB. 



office bom 
Paris CO 



New York. 



Philadelpbia, 



SuFrancnoo 



■{ 



iHi 




1 to N. York, 
by Bouttaamptoo. 



Liverpool to N. York 
Liverpool to Boston. 

Bremen to N. York, 

by Southampton. 

Liverpool to N. York 

Liverpool to Boeioo. 



Bremen to N. York, 

by SoatbamptOB. 

Liverpool to N.York 

Liverpool to Botton. 

Bremen to If . York, 
by BoQthampton. 



Liverpool to N. York 
Liverpool to Boston. 



Origin of the correspond- 
ence. 



AU France, (except the 
city of Havre.) Algeria, 
and the foreign coun- 
tries to which France 
serves as an interme- 
diate point. 



.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Destination of the corre- 
spondence. 



All the United Butes, (ex- 
cept the cities of Bostoa 
and Philadelpliia,and fitato 
of California,) the Territo- 
ries of the United States, 
(except Oregon and Wash- 
ington,) and the foreign 
countries to which ifie 
United Sutes lerves as an 
intermediate point, except 
the Sandwich Islaads. 

do 

The Oity of New York 



The City of 
.do.. 



All the United States, (ex- 
cept the cities of New York 
and Philadelphia,and Stata 
of California^ the Tenlto- 
ries of the United States, 
(except Oregon and Wash- 
ington.) and the foreipt 
countries to which the 
United Sutes serves as an 
intermediate point, except 
the Sandwich Islands. 



do 

do 

do 

do 


The City of Philadelphia . . . 

;."!*!.'.".*.*do.'.';!;i !!;!!;;!!! 

OalUbroia and the Territa- 


do 


ries of Oregon and Wasb- 
do 


do 


do 



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1032 



BEPOBT OF THE 

A — Continued. ' 





SOBBDOLK n.- 


-MAILS FROM THB 0NITBD 8TATB8 POST OPFIOB. 


II 


S 


tbe lines 
ships by 
hicb tbe 
be sent. 






s8 


« 8 


e-^s 


Ori|in of the correspond- 


DcsUnation of the eor- 




^1 

ill 

as 


If-! 


ence. 








New Tork to Havre* 


All the United Butes, (ei- 


All France, Algeria, sad 
the foreign coantiies t» 








cept the cities of Boston 








and PhUadelDhia, and 
State of California,) th« 








an intermediate poinl. 








Territories of the United 










8tates,(ezcept Oregon and 
Washington and the for- 






Havre 




eign countries to which 
tbe United States serves as 
an intermediate point, ex- 
cept the Sandwich Islands. 








N. York to Bremen. 


r....do 


Tbe City of Havre 






s,^ m M^^mmm •wr affB«/Ba««rBB^ 










N.York to Uverpool 


do 


do 






Boston to Uverpool. 


The City of New York 


<kD 


HcwYork... 




N.York to Bremen, 


All tbe United States, (ex- 


All France, (except the 








cept the ciUes of Boston 
and Philadelphia, and 
State of California.) the 
Territories of the United 


city of Havre,) Algeria, 
tries to* which r^oee 








serves as an IntexBedt- 




Travelliny of- 
fice from 
Paris to Ca- 
lais. 




9tates,(exeept Oregon and 
Washington,) and the for- 
eign countries to which 


ate point.t 
























N.York to Uverpool 
Boston to Liverpool. 

New York to Havre* 


cept the Sandwich Islands. 
(lo. ., 


dot 






The City of New York 


:::;. .:;;:dot :;;;;:..;... 






The City of Boston 


All Fiance, Algeria, and 
the foreign eonntnes t» 
which France serves as 




















N. York to Bremen. 


do 


Tbe (Xty of Havre 






by Southampton. 
N.York to Liverpool 
Boston to Liverpool. 








do 


do.... 






All the United States, (ex- 


do 




Havre 




cept the cities of N. York 








and Philadelphia, and 
Bute of California,) tbe 
Territories of the United 


























States,(except Oregon and 
Wasbington,) and the for- 


















eign countries to which 










theUnlted States serves as 




BOMOB. 






an intermediate point, ex- 
cept the Sand wlch Iilands 






TvavelUnf of- 
fice (from 
Paris to Ca- 
lais. 


N. York to Bremen, 


The aty of Boston 


AU France, (except tbe 
eityof Havt«,) Algeria^ 
and the foreign co«b- 
trtes to whieb Franee 
serves as an intenscdl- 












atepoint-t 






N.York to Uverpool 


do 


dot 



* Ezeept In caaae where a contrary desire is suted on tbe address by the seBdere,corre«pond«nc« excbnaged 
Kween mnce and the United States is to be sent direct by tbe packeu and other 8 



^ ipiyiBgi 

Bavre and New York, in aU instances in which there is room to suppose that by this means ibey wf 
tkeir destination more oromptly than, or as promptly as, by way of Elngland. They are, on the eontiary, lo be 
■•Bt by way of England when there it room to snppose that they will reach their destinatiOB mora proaiipily by 
tfiat means than by the direct roate. 

f Correspondence intended to be re-sent by tbe travelling oAce, during tbe passage ftom (Calais to Paris, 
diOBid be placed in a separate package, endorwd thus : " Travellinf oAce fW>m Calais to Paris— intermedial^ 



■■dPoiand. 



Bervlce." This correspondence is that intended for the French Departments de PAisne, des Ardennes, ia 
Pon,^e I'Oise, da Pas de Calais, de la Seine inflrieure, and de la Bomme, and that intended for BeMBm. the 
Mw Ooontries. Prussia, (eccept the Recency of Tr6ves,) Hanover, the Grand Dochlea of Meckleabn^ 
■eBwerin and Mecklenbaif Streliu, Oldenborg, tbe Dncby of BnuuwicK, Denmarit, Bwed^, Norww, BBsiii, 

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POSOVASl^ER GENERAL. 
A — Continaed. 



1033 





SCBBDOLB 11 


r.^MAlL8 FROM THE ONITSD STATES POST OPPIOE. 


II 

Hi 


Names of the exchance 
post offlcee of desU- 
nation. 


B 

11*5 

Boston to Liverpool. 


• 

Oriffin of the correspond- 
ence. 

All the United States, (ex- 
cept the ciUes of N.York 
and PhUadelpbia, and 
State of CaliihmiaO the 
Territories of the United 
Statefl.(except Oregon and 
Washington,) and the for- 
eign countries to which 

an intermediate point, ex- 
cept the Sandwich Islands. 




Boston 


TraveUinfof. 
flee ftom 
Paris to Ca- 
lais. 


All Prance, (except the 
city of Havre, Algeria, 
and the foreign coun- 
tries to which France 

atepoint-t 




Havre 


New Tork to Havre* 

N. Tork to Bremen, 

N. Tork to Liverpool 
Boston to Uverpool. 

N. Tork to Bremen, 
by Sotttbampion. 

N. Tork to Liverpool 
Boston to Liverpool . 


do 

do 


All France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves as 
an intermediate point. 

The City of Havre 

do 




.do 


do 


PkUadelphla 


Travellincoi^ 
flee Rom 
Paris to Ca- 
lais. 


do 


All France, (except the 
city of Havre.) Algeria, 
and the foreign coun- 
tries to which France 
serves as an intermedi- 
ate point, t 

dot 


do 




do 


:;:;;;::.:do{.. .:;:.:!:.: 




Havre 


New Tork to Havre* 

N. York to Bremen, 

N. Tork to Liverpool 
Boston to Liverpool. 

N. York to Bremen, 

N. Tork to Liverpool 
Boston to Liverpool. 


California and the Territo- 
ries of Oregon and Wanb- 
ington, and the Sandwich 

.".!do 

do 


AU France, Algeria, and 
the foreign countries to 
which France serves an 

The City of Havre . : .... 

do 




do 


.....do 


SuiFniMia. 


TiaveDiBfOi:^ 
flee from 
Paris to Ca- 
lais. 


do 


AU Fnnee, (except the 
city of Havre.) Algeria, 
and the foreign eoiui> 
tries to which France 

atepoint-f 
dot • • 


CO. 


do 




do 


dot 



* See note on page 78. 



t See note on page 79 



Digitized by 



Google 



1034 



SEPOBT OF THE 



B. — Tabu showing tJie conditions on which shaU be eocchangedj bettoeen the 
U. States J letters sent from the United States and their Territories to (Ae 



Defifnation of the coiutriei where corre- 
spondence with the United Sutei may 
he directed hy way of France. 



Great Britain, Belgian, the Low Countries, 
tiM grand duchy of Luxemburg, the Swiss 
Cantons, the Sardinian States, and the 
Qennan States, (except the empire of 
Austria.) 

Denmark, empbw of Austria, Berria, Tusca- 
ny, Slates of the Church, and duchies of 
Parma and If odena. 

Baasla. Poland, the Two SiciHes, Malta, 
Ungoom of Greece, Alexandria, Taffk, 
Be]^out, Tripoli in Syria, Lattakia, Alex- 
andretta, Masina, Rhodes, Smvma, Mity- 
lene, the Dardanelles, GaUipolis, Constan- 
tinople. Tunis, Tangiers. Pondieberry, 
Kankal,Tanaon, Mahl, ana Chandemagor . 

Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway , 

Spain, Portugal, and Gibraltar 

Ionian Islands..... 

Ad«n,lut Indies, Ceylon, Mauritius, Isle of 
Reunion. Penang, Singapore, Hong Kong, 
Shanghai, China, Datavla, and other 
countries whose correspondence can ad- 
vantageously be sent by Suez. 
Countries beyond seas other than those 
above desiniated— 
Letters fh>m the United Sutes.. 

Letters ftv the United Sutes 



Moldavia, Wallachia, and Turkey in Bu- 
rope, by way of Austria. 



Condition of pre- 
payment. 



Limit of prepayment. 



Optional 

OpUonal 
Optional, 



Optional. . 
Obligatory 
Obligatoiy 
Obligatory 



Obligtaory. 
Obligtaory. 



.(*). 



To destination. 



Tod< 
Tod< 



To destination 

Behobta 

Trieste 

Seaport of the ladies or of 
the sea of China to which 
the Englisb packets ply. 



Port of arrival in the conn- 
try of destination. 

Port of deputure in the 
country from which they 
are sent. 

(•) 




Sum to be paid on 
each letter and 
per each quarter 
ounce or ftac- 
bonofAmerie'B 
quarter ounce. 



91 



87 
30 



91 
97 
30 



30 
30 



*The postages on letters which the inhabitants of the United States shall exchange with the 
inhabitants of Moldavia, Wallachia, and Turkey in Burope. 



Digitized by 



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POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



1035 



Fast Office Department of France and the Fast Office Department of the 
countries to which France serves as an intermediate point, and vice versa. 



Datiefl or rmtes to be paid by the U. 8. poit office to the 
French post office, u well on prepaid letters sent 
from the TJ. S. and their Territonea. addressed to the 
countries designated in the first colnmn of this uble 
as on letters not prepaid, or partially prepaid, seht 
from said count's, addressed to U. 8. and their Ter's. 



•3 « ^ C <^ « 

2 ^ "U - Bf - 

fc .s t 3 « _ a. 




mm 

^ E- r ~ 2 ^ »; 



CmU. 

9 



15 
18 



31 
9 
15 
18 



18 
18 



^ V « o « 

list's 



I 



him 



Cents, 

la 



18 
SI 



94 

IS 
18 
91 



91 
91 




Duties or rates to be paid by the French post office to the 
U. Stttes post office, as well on letters not prepaid, sent 
from the U . States and iheir Territories, addressed to the 
countries designated in the first column of this taMe, 
as for letters addressed fh>m the said countries to the 
U. States or their Territories and prepaid to destination. 



Genu. 
18 



94 

97 



30 
18 
94 
97 



97 
97 



V Ci .a *■ * 
* V ^ 

^ € '= ■= 

-- t 5 u 5 o 



CmU. 
3 



Am 

tn - I ^ S. 

I « tf 3£Xr 



CetU$. 
9 



« _. i S ?*^ 

F =£ £ O jV ^ C 

« *-ii * t S ° 

i 



Ceiitt. 
19 



19 
19 



19 



19 



Moidairia, Wallachia, and Turkey in Europe, by way of France and Austria, is always to be fUlly paid by the 



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1036 



REPORT OF THE 



C. — TahU ahotoing the conditions on which shall be eocchanged, between 
the U, StcUes, letters sent from France and Algeria for countries to 









Ifflfl 
















■^S5«^S 








1=1=11 








siliU 








Amount of tiie rates to 
of France and Algei 

the flrst column of t 
prepaid, or partially 
countries addressed 


Dealgnation of the countries where corre- 


Condition of pre- 


Limit of prepayment. 




payment. 




by way of the United States. 








Sum to be paid ob 








each letter k. per 








each seven gram- 








mes and a half or 








fraction of seven 




-- 




grama.andahal£ 






J^t. eenfiasi. 


Mexico. British West India Islands, Cuba, 
BritisD Guiana, Aspinwall, and Panama, 
(New Granada.) 

West India Islands, (not British, except 


Obligatory 


Seaports to which the United 


1 50 




States packets ply. 




Obligatory 


United Sutes, French, and 


3 50 


Cuba,) Turks Island, Carthacena, Hondu- 
ras, St. .hian, (Nicaragua,) QuyaquU and 
; Quito, *(£quador,) Cobiga and La Paez, 




British posuge to port of 






arrival in country of des- 






tination. 




(Bolivia.) Copiapo, Huasco, Coquimbo, 
Valparaiso, and St. Jago, (Chili.) 

Payta, Lambayeque, Huanchaco, Casma, 
Uuacho, Callao, Lima, Pisco, Islay, Arica, 
and Iquique, (Peru.) 

Canada and other British North American 








Obligatory 


do 


1 00 


Obligatory 


Seaports in South Pacific, to 


1 80 




which the British packets 






ply- 




ObUgatory 


Frontier of country of des- 


80 


Provinces. 




tination. 




Sandwich Islands 


Obligatory 


San Francisco 


80 







NoTB.~8ince the execution of the convention, ubies A, B, and C have, by mntoa 



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POSTMASTER OENERAL. 



1037 



ihe Post Office Department of France and the Poat Office Department of 
which the United States serves as an intermediate pointy and vice versa. 



Duties or rates to be paid by the French |poet office to 
the United States post office, as weli on prepaid letters 
sent from France or Algeria addressed to the countries 
designated in the first column of this table as on let- 
ters not prepaid, or partially prepaid, sent from the 
■aid countries aadressed to France and Algeria. 



Duties or rates to be paid by the United States post 
office to the French post office, as well on letters not 
prepaid sent from France and Algeria addressed to 
tlie countries designated in the first column of thia 
uble as on letters addressed from the said countries 
to France or Algeria and prepaid to destination. 



fill I 

mm 

ih y s « vu 

m i *f Si s 



CenU, 
10 



34 



18 
99 



"O S S S (3 

S£e5S 



I 






3 cx:^ 









CenU, 
16 



*g5f«-ao 

•o s •• B a P ^ 

s.2g<o|s 

l^i'lllo 

P S •*• SiS • 



19 



27 
31 

19 
19 




CenU. 







CcNte. 



Km 






£5 



'S.orzgl's 



2 e** 
o o\ 

** Ci >• » O 






Cents. 



eoiMwnt, been sUfbtly modifled to conform more exactly to the articles of agreement. 



Digitized by 



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1038 



KEPOBT OP THE 



Porr OrricB Dbpabtmirt | 
OP Frakcb. S 



D. 

LEriTEB BILL. 



EOOKKCSPOllDBlfCB Wmi THC 
Ukitkd Statbs Po«r Opficb. 



Mail tent from the office^ 



-y/or the office of^- 



tht»- 



-18—. 



o ( of England and qf^ 
Departing from^ fon* 



Ihe'T- 



18—. 



(1) Name of the tending office ofdetpateta. (S) Name of the office of deednation. (S) Date of dopa: eking ilic 
mall. (4) Ohancter, name, and nation of the vesiel by which the mail if to be transported from France to the 
United Btatea. (5) Name of the port whereat the mail ii to be placed on board the vesset chained with trana- 
porting it to the united Statee. (6) Port of destination of aaid veMel. (7) Data of the departure of the vaaaeL 

I tend yott, together with the present letter bill, the letters and printed matter of every kind specified fta the 
following tablet. I beg you to acknowledge the reception of these matters, article by article, by your next 
mail, taking care to mention the differences or the errors which yon shall have observed after exact compaii> 
son of the contents of this mail. 

Tabli No. 1. — Oorretpondenee not /w^NiiVf, or partiaUy pr^aidf delivered on aceoutU to the United 

^aies Pott Office. 



Il 




Statement by the French office 




li 




of exchange. 


States office of exchange* 


Number 


Amount of poit- 


Number 


Amount of posi> 




of articles. 


ages to be carried 


of articles. 


ages to be carried 






to the credit of 




to the credit of 






the French Pom 




the French Poet 






Office. 




Office. 


^x 


9 


3 


4 
Dollars. ; Cts. 


5 


6 










Dollars. 


CIS. 






rThe U. States(~ 
















cents per jounce) 














M 


Unpaid letters from 
France and Alge- < 


The countries to 
which theUSutet 














a( 


riafor 
Letters not prepaid 


serves as an inter- 
mediate point (— 
cent« per jounce) 














3 


orchareed with the 
price of transit, sent 
ftom countries to 


The United States. 
















The countries to 
















which theU.8tates 
















which France serves 


serves as an inter- 














4 


point for 


mediate point.... 














5 


Letters badly directed by the United Sutes 
Post Office, and returned to tliat office. . . 














6 


have departed, but have left their address . 





























Tablb No. 2. — Prepaid eorreapondeneey the senders whereqf have paid pottages which should be earned 
to the credit of the Vhited States Post Office, 



11 « 

© y,^ 

£ OS O 



Statement by the French office 
of exchange. 



9 

10 



Designation of the correspondence. 



Number i Amount of post- 
of articles, t ages to be carried 
to tlie credit of 
the United States 
I Post Office. 



Letters for the United 
States prepaid to de»- 
li nation, and pro- 
ceeding 



Prepaid letters for 
countries to which 
Uie United States 
serves as an inter- 
mediate point, and 
proceeding 



From France and 
Algeria, (— cents 
per 7| grammos) . . 
From countricin to 
which Fr'ce serves 
as an intennediate 
point (— cents per 

, 7^ grammes) 

From France and 

Algeria 

Prom countries 
which Fr*ce serves 
as an intermediate 

, point 



Number 
of articles. 



I 



CiT 



DM 



Veriftcatinn by the United 
Sutes office of exchange. 



Amount of post- 
ages to be carried 
to the credit of 
the United Slates 
Poet Office. 



_ 



lioltars. I tnt. 



ed by ^ 



Google 



POSTMASTER GENEBAL. 



1039 



CONTINUATION OF THE LETTER BILL OF THE FRENCH POST OFFICE. 

Tabu No. S.—Oorrapondmee ddivered to the VnUtd States F<M Office free qf all charge for 

tfantpoftaliioiiL 





Statement hy the French 
office of exchange. 


Verification by the UniMd 
flutes office of exchange. 


1 


Number of 

articles. 

3 


Net weight 
in grammes. 


Number of 
articles. 

4 


Net weight 
in grammes. 


Printed matter of every kind 
addrened to the United 
Sutes, and proceeding 


From France and Algeria. . . 
From countriefl to which 
' Prance serves as an inter- 
mediate point 










Printed matter of every kind 
addmaed to coantriee to 
which the United States 
servee aa an intermediate 


From France and Algeria. . . 

From countries to which 

Prance serves as an inter- 

mMlintJt noint 




point, and proceeding J - ■" 

Correepondence relating to the lervice, dead matter, and 

Poet Office to the United StAtAa P<Mt Office 











Tablb No. 4. — AlMraet qf the mature which are to serve as a hose for the tettlemeni qf the amount 
due to the British Post Office^ or to a^ptains qf commereial vessels, for the transportation qf the eor- 
respondenee con^frised in the mail,^ 



Stttement by the French office of exchange. 



Verification by the United States office of exchange. 



Letters. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Letters. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Number. 

1 


Net weight in 
grammes. 


Number. 
3 


Net weight in 
grammes. 


Number. 
5 


Net weight in 

grammes. 

6 


Number. KTet weight in 




• 








i 

1 

1 





*Tbe correspondence relating to the service, the dead matter, and the letters relating to the account, ad- 
dreseed bv the French Post Oflice to the United dutes Post Office, and described in Table No. 3, are not to be 
included ui this abstract. 

Certified by the undersigned postmaster. 



Digitized by 



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1040 



BEPORT OF THE 



PofT OrricB Dbtartmsiit I 

or FftAMCK. I 



J VottMrnroMpntcEwmruM 
I Umitbo States Porr Orrici. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF EECEIPT. 



From the office • 

I received on the^^ — 
to* . by the* — 



for the office of • 



18 — , your mail of the* ■ 



18 — , transported from* • 



You will find hereinafter stated, article by article, the result 
of the comparison to which the matters which that mail contained were submitted at the 
moment of opening the said mail. 

(1) Date of the arrival of the mail at the office of deatination. (9) Date of the depaitare of the mail fioM 
the office from which it was sent. (3) Name of the port where the mail has been embarked on the veaMl 
which has brought it to Europe. (4) Name of the European port of di«embarkaiion. (5; Nature, narionality, 
and name of the vesMl which brought the mail from the United States to Europe. 

Tabu No. 1. — Oorretpimdence not prepaid^ or partially prepaid, ddivered on account to (he FrtnA 

Pod Office, 



t» "^ s 



Designation of the correspondence. 



w 



Unpaid letters from 
the United Sutea for 



■Letters not prepaid 

, or charged with tlie 

I price of transit, sent 

I from countriea to 

I which the Uniud 

' States serves as an 

\ intermediate point, 

t for 1 . 

: Letters Hhdly directed of the French Post 

Office, and returned to that office 
Letters re-sent addressed to persons who 

have departed, but have left tneir address. 



France and Algeria 
(— cents per 7^ 
grammes) 

Countries to which 
France serves a» 
an intermediate 
point (— cents per 
7| grammes) . . 



France andAlgeria 
Countries to which 
France serves as 
an intermediate 
point 



Statement by the United States 
office of exchange. 



Number of] Amount of poet- 
ages to be carried 
to the credit of the 
United Sutes Post 
Office. 



Nomber of 
articloa. 



Dollars. Genu. 



Verillcation bj the Pmoch 
office of exchange. 



AflMwnt of post- 
afea to be carried 
to the credit of the 
United S 
Office. 



Dollars. Gents. 



Tabu No. i.^^Prepaii oorre^pondtnee^ the undtre whereof hne paiipodagn which 
to the eredU qf the French Pott Office, 



ehpudd be carried 





9 


office of exchange. 


VoilfieatioB by the Fmidi 
office of exdiai^e. 


Number o( 
articles. 

3 


Amount of post- 
ageatobe carried 
to the credit of 
the French Post 
Offlee. 

4 


Number of 
articlea. 

ft 


Anonnt of post- 
ageatobccaiTied 
to the credit of 
the Franeh Post 
Office. 

6 


7f 
8 

9 
10 


and Algeria, prepaid 
to destination, and 

Prepaid letters for 
Fimnce senrea aa an • 
and proceeding Ihmi 


[TheU. sutes (— 
cents per jounce) 
Ooontries to which 
the United Sutes 
aenrea as an inter- 
mediate point (— 
cent! permeance) 

The United States. 

Countriea to which 

the United Sutea 

verves aa an inter- 

. mediate point.... 




DoUars. 


Centa. 




DoUais. 


Cents. 
















ffi.iyii. 





POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



1041 



CONTINUATION OF THE ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF THE FRENCH POST OFFICE. 

Tablb No. 3 — Oorrespondenee ddxoertd wer to the French Post Oficefree qf aU eharga for 

irantportation. 



Designation of the correspondence. 



Statemrnt by the United 
States office of exchange. 



Yeriflcation by the French 
office of exchange. 



Number of 

articles. 

3 



Net weight 
in grammes. 
3 



Number of 
articles. 

4 



Net weight 
in grammea. 



Printed mauer of every kind 
addressed to France and 
Algeria, and proceeding 

Printed matter of every kind 

addressed to the European 

SUtes to which Prance 

serves as an intermediate' 

point, (except Spain and 

Portugal,) and proceeding . 
Correspondence relating to the service, dead matter, and 

if>tter8 relating to the account, addressed by the United 

States Post Office to the French Post Office 



From the United Sutea . . . 

From countries to which 
the U. States serves as an 
intermediate point ... 



From the United States. 

From countries to which 
the U- Stales serves as an 
intermediate point . . . 



Tabu No. 4. — Ahstrad qf Ike matten tphich are io terve as a bate for the tdOement of the amomi 
due to the British Post Office, or io captains qf oonmercial vessds^ for the transporiaticn </ the ear- 
respondenee comprised in the mail,* 



Statement by the United States office of exchange. 


TerificaUon by the French office of exchange. 


Letters. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Letters. 


ArUdes of printed matter. 


Number. 
1 


Net weight 

in grammes. 

9 


Number. 
3 


Net weight In 
grammes. 


Number. 
5 


Net weight in 

grammes. 

6 


Number. 

7 


Net weight in 
grammes. 



















* The correspondence relating to the service, the dead matter, and the letters relating to the account, ad- 
dressed bv the United States Post Office to the French Post Office, and described in Uble No. 3, are not to be 
incJaded in this abstract. 

Ccrtilled by the undersigned poetmaster. 



Vol. ii- 



-66 



Digitized by 



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1042 



BEPOBT OF THE 



Post Orrici Dbpaktmkiit 
or THB Uhitbd Btatbs 



LETITER BILL. 

Man rndfram the offiee^ -for the office </«- 



fCOBKKtPOirVBIICB Wir* TBI 
Fmbmcb Post OrncE. 



Departing from^ 



{ of England and o/«- 



•4h^- 



-18—/*' 



-/or«- 



"Ihe^- 



-, 18— 






^. 



r (1) 5ame of the office of despatch. (9) Name of thr oflke of destination. (3) Date of despatehincthe mail. 
'4) Obaracter, name, and nation of the vessel by which the mail is to be transported from the United States to 
forope. (5) Name of the port whereat the mail is to be placed on board the vcmcI charged with tiansprnting h 

to Kurope. (tt) Port of deaiination of the said Tessel. (7) Date of the departure of the said veeseL 

I send yon, together with the present letter bill, the letters and printed matter of every kind specified in the 
following tables. I beg yon to acknowledge the reception of these matters, article by article, by yourneit 
mail, taking care to mention the differences or the errors which you sliaJI have observed after exact corapsil- 
son of the contents of tliis mail. 



Tabli No. 1. — Oorretpondence not prepaid, or parUaUy pr^paid^ delivered on account to the /WnoA 

Fott Office, 



DesignatioB of the correspondence. 



Number 
of articles. 



Statement by the U. States 
office or eichange. 



Verification by the French 
office of exchange. 



Amonnt of poet- 
ages to l>e carried 
to the credit of 
the United Stales 
Post office. 



Number 
of articles. 



Amount of post* 
ages to be carried 
to the credit of 
the United Sates 
Poet Office. 



6_ 

Dollun. 



vsr 



Unpaid letters 
from the United 
Suites fbr 



' France and Algeria, (— 
cts. per 7^ grammes.) 
Countries to which 
France serves as an 
Intermediate point, (— 
, cts. per 7^ grammes.) 
Prance and AI 

geria 

(Tountriei to 
which Prance 
serves as an in 
termediate point 



Letters not prepaid or 

charged with the price 

of transit sent from 

countries to which the 

U. Sutes serves as an 

intennediate point. 
Letters badly directed by the French Post 

Office, and returned to that office 

Letters resent, addressed to persons who 
have departed, but have left their ad- 



Dollars. 



Uts. 



Tabia No. 2, — Prepaid oorretpondence^^the tendere wherei^ have paid pongee which ahotdd be eearrid 
to the credit </ the French Pod C " 



P. 

Hi 

S 01 *f 



1^ 

» 1 



Designation of the correspondence. 



Number 
of articles. 



SUtement bv the U. Sutes 
oflice of exchange. 



Amount of poet- 
ages to be carried 
to the credit of 
the Prench Poet 
Office. 



Number 
of articles. 



Verification by the Freadi 
ofllce of exchange. 



Amount of poM- 
agets to be carried 
to the credit of 
th« French Post 
Office. 



Letters Ibr France 
and Algeria pre- 
paid to destine- < 
tion and proceed- 
ing 



Prepaid letter* for 
countries towhich 
Piance serves as, 
an intermediate 
point, and pro- 
ceeding 



From the U. States, 
(— cts. per ^ ounce.) 

From conntries to 
which the U. Sutes 
serves as an inter- 
mediate point, (— 
cents per ^ ounce.) 

From the U. States., 
From countries to 
which the U. Sutes 
serves as an inter- 
mediate point ... 



Dollars. 



D i y i i i /^U by 



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POSTMASTER OENERAL 1043 

CONTINUATION OP THE LEfTTKR BILL OP THE UNITED STATES POST OFFICE. 

Tablb No. 3.— Cbrropoiufenee ddioend over 1o the French Fott Office free qf all duaye for irang- 

jfortaUm. 



Statement by the U. fltttet Verifleation by the French 



Deeignation of the eorreepondence. 



Printed matter of erery kind f ^ *5!„^?iJ!? S^^HiVn 
addrened to Prance •nd\%'^j'^}^S! J^ ^^^""^ 
Alferia, and nroceedinc 1 ***® ^P^^^ ®]f **■ ■*"^<» 
AiBCfw, UQ procevoins ^ aa an intermediate point. 

ranted matter of every kind 
addreaeed to the European 
Statei to which France 
serves as an intermediate 
point, rezeept Spain and 
Portogal,) and proceeding J 

Correspondence relating to the service, dead matter, and 
letters relatinv to the account, addressed by the United 
States Poet OlSce to the French Post Offlce. 



From the United States. . . . 

From countries to which 
the United States serves 
aa an intermediata point. . 



office of exchange. 



Number of 
articles. 



Net weight in 
grammes. 



Number of 
articles. 



office of exchange. 



Net weight in 
grammes. 



Tablb No. 4. — Ahtlraet ^ (he matters wMeh are to eerve aa a bam for the mttUment <^ the amoimi 
due to the BrUiah Pott Office, or to agatamt <tf commercial vetada, for the transportation of the corrta- 
pondenee eonymaed m the maU,^ 





Verification by the French office of exchange. 


Letten. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Letters. 




Number. 

1 


Net weight In 
givnimes. 

9 


Number. 
3 


Net weight in 
grammes. 

4 


Number. 
5 


Net weight in 
grammes. 

8 


Number. 

7 


Net weight in 
8 



















* The correspondence relating to the service, the dead matter, and the letteri relating to the account, ad- 
dressed by the united States Post Office to the French Post Office, and described iu table No. 3, are not to be 
included in this abstract. 

CertiHed by the undenigned Postmaster. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1044 



REPORT OF THE 



Porr Orrici Dbpartmbrt ) 
or THE Unitxp Btatbi. f 



( CoBKKVrOlCDBVCB WITB TSB 

( PRBMCH Post OrncB. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPT. 

From Die office for the offiot <^ , 

I received on the^ , 18 — , your mail of the" , 18 — , transported from' —^ 

to* , b)' the^ . You will find hereinafter stated, article by article, the result 

of the comparison to which the matters which that mail contained were submitted at tbe 
moment of opening the said mail. 

(1) Date of the arrival of the mail at the oAee of destination. (9) Date of the departure of the mail froaa 
the office from which it waa »ent. (3) Name of the port where tbe mail was placed on the ▼esael which broof bt 
it to the United s^taies. (4) Name of the United States port of disembarkation. (S) Character, name, and na- 
tion of the veMsel which brought tbe mail from Kurope to the United Btatea. 

Tablb No. 1. — CorreipQindaiet nU prepaii^ or partially prepaid^ ddmertd on aaxuni to the VmUd 

StaUt FoH Office. 



II i 

m 


BUtement by the French 


Yerification by the U. Statei 


office of exchange. 


office of exchange. 




Number of 


Amount of poet- 


Number of 


Amount of post- 


2^y. 




articles. 


ages to be carried 


articles. 


ages to be ouried 








to the credit of the 




to the credit of tbe 






French Post Of- 




French Post OP 


fill 




fice. 




fice. 


1 1 9 


9 


4 


5 


6 






liollars. 


Cento. 




Dollars. Cents. 






The United States, 


















(— cenu per i 

ounce) 

Countries to which 














11 


Unpaid letten from 














- 


France and Algeria 


the United Sutes 














s( 


<br 


serves as an in- 
termediate point 
(— cents per ^ 
















Letten not prepaid, 


ounce)....... ••.. 




















3 


or charif ed with the 
price of transit, sent 
from countries to- 


















Countries to which 
















the United States 
















which Fnince serves 


serves as an inter- 














4 


as an intermediate 
point, for 


mediate point.... 














5 


Letters badly directed by the United States 
PoKt Office and returned to thai office.. . . 














8 


Letters resent, addressed to persons who 
have departed, but have left their ad- 
dress. 





















Table No. 2 — Prqnnd eorregpondmce. the aendert tthereqf have paid pottageB which ehoyldbe carried 
to the credU qf the United Staiet Poet Office. 



8^7 

lis 

O C; ts I 



Statement by the French 
office of exchange. 



Designation of the correspondence. 



Number or Amount of post- 
articles, ages to be carried 
to the credit of 
the United States 
Post Office. 



.1 

,.1 



Letters for the Uni- 
ted States prepaid 
to destination, and 
proceeding 



Prepaid letters for 
countries to which 
the United States 
serves as an inter- 
mediate point, and 
proceeding 



From France and I 
Algeria (— cenu' 
per 7| grammes.)' 

Prom countries to 
which France 
serves as an inter- 
mediate point, (— 
cents per 7^ 
grammes) 

From France and 
Algeria 

From countries to 
wliich France 
serves as an in-i 
termediate point. 



DoiJaiB. ~ Cento. 



Number ol 
articles. 



Dig 



Verification by the U. States 
office of exchange. 



Amount of post- 
ages to be carried 
to the credit of 
the United -Utea 
Post Office. 



Dollars. Cents. 



1 
:izedbyC.OOgIe| 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



1045 



OONTINUATION OF THE ACKNOWLEDGMENT OP THE UNITED STATES POST 

OFFICK 



Tablb No. S.—Oorreipondenee ddioertd over io the United SUdu Pott Offioe free qf aU charge for 

trcmsportaUon, 



Dedgnfttioii of Ui« correspondence. 



Number of 
articles. 



Printed matter of every kind 
addresiied to the United 
States, and proceeding 

Printed matter of every kind 
addressed to countries to 
which the D. States serves 
as an intermediate point, 
and proceeding 



' From France and Algeria. . 

From countries to which 
France serves as an inter- 
mediate point. 

From France and Algeria. . 

From countries to which 
France serves as an inter- 
mediate point. 



Correspondence relating to Uie service, dead matter, and 
letters relating to the account, addressed by the French 
Post Office to the United States Post Office 



Sutement by the French 
office of exchange. 



Net weight in 
grammes. 



Number of 
articles. 



Verification by the U. 8. 
office of exchange. 



Net weight in 
granunes. 



Table No. ^.^Abebrad qf the matten whkh are to aerve at a bate/or the aeUkment of the amount due 
to the British Post Office, or to eaptama qf eommerdal vessels, for the trantportaiion of (he correspond- 
ence con^msed in the mail.* 



Sutement of the French office of exchange. 


Verification by the United States office of exchange. 


Letters. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Letters. 


Articles of printed matter. 


Hnmber. 

1 


Net weight in 
grammes. 

9 

■ 


Number. 

3 

■ 


Net weight in 
grammes. 

4 


Number. 
5 


Net weight in 
grammes. 

6 


Number. 

7 


Net weight in 
grammea. 

8 



















* The correspondence relating to the service, the dead matter, and the letters relating to the aceouat 
addressed by the French Post Office to the United States Poet Office, and described in Table No. 3, are not to 
included in this abstract. 

Certified by the undersigned Postmaster. 



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1046 



BEPOBT OF THE 



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POSTlfASTER GENERAL. 1047 

E. 

POSTAL CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND HAMBURG. 

The nndersigned, being duly authorized for that purpose, have 
agreed upon the following articles, providing for the reciprocal ex- 
change of mails between the United States and the Hanseatic Repub- 
lic of Hamburg, to wit: 

ARTICLBL 

The post office of New York shall be the United States office of ex- 
change, and Hamburg the office of exchange of that republic, for all 
mails transmitted under this arrangement. 

ABTIGLB n. 

The international correspondence, conveyed either by United States 
or by Hamburg steamers, as hereinafter stated, between the United 
States, or its territories, and Hamburg, will be subject to the follow- 
ing postage charges, viz : 

Postage on each letter or packet not exceeding half an ounce 

in weight 10 cents. 

Abo^e half an ounce and not over once ounce 20 '^ 

Above one ounce, but not exceeding two ounces 40 '' 

And the postage will increase in this scale of progression to wit : 
Additional 20 cents for each additional ounce or fraction of an ounce. 

Payment in advance shall be optional in either country. It shall 
not, however, be permitted to pay less than the whole rate, and no 
account shall be taken of the pre-payment of any fraction of that rate. 



ABTiCLB in. 

All the States belonging to the Q^rman- Austrian Postal Union*; re- 
spectively, are to have the advantage of the rate of ten cents, estab- 
lished by the preceding article, (2d,) whenever their postage to and 
from Hamburg, for letters to and from the United States, shall be re- 
duced to the uniform rate of five cents or less. On all correspondence 
for or from such of said States as shall not so reduce their rates, the 
charge between the United States and Hamburg, by either of the two 
lines, will be fifteen cents the single rate. 

And optional prepayment, a regular progressive scale, &c., upon 
the same principles as in article 2d, shall be admitted and observed. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1048 BEPOET OP THE 



ARTICLB IV. 

On all letters originating and posted in other countries beyond the 
United States^ and mailed to, and deliveral^le in, Hamburg, or origi- 
nating and posted in countries beyond Hamburg, and mailed to, and 
deliverable in, the United States, or its territories, the foreign postage 
(other than that of Hamburg, and other than that of the United 
States) is to be added to the postage stated in article 2d or 3d, as the 
case may be. And the two post office departments are mutually to 
furnish each other with lists stating the foreign countries^ or places in 
foreign countries, to which the foreign postage, and the amount there- 
of, must be absolutely prepaid, or must be left unpaid And, until 
such lists are duly furnished, neither country is to mail to the other 
any letter from foreign countries beyond it, or for foreign countries 
beyond the country to which the mail is sent. 

It is further understood and agreed that no correspondence for or 
from Hamburg shall be exchanged under this arrangement, unless 
the rates of postage to and from such countries, via Hamburg, are 
identically the same as the rates charged via Bremen, under the 
United States and Bremen postal arrangement. 



ARTICLB V. 

Newspapers, not weighing more than three ounces each, mailed in 
the United States and destined to Hamburg, or mailed in Hamburg 
and destined for the United States, may be sent by the United States 
and Hamburg steamers, when the whole postage of two cents is pre- 

Said thereon at the mailing office ; and newspapers of like weight 
one up singly, may be sent to any part of the German Postal Union, 
via Hamburg, on prepayment of three cents each at the office of mail- 
ing in the United States, which shall be in full of the postage to des- 
tination ; the German postage beyond Hamburg to be one cent each 
in addition to the two cents chargeable to Hamburg. The postage on 
pamphlets and magazines per ounce, or a fraction of an ounce, shall be 
one cent, prepayment of which shall likewise be required in both 
countries. Said newspapers, pamphlets, and magazines are to be 
subject to the laws and regulations of each country, respectively, in 
regard to their liability to be rated with letter postage when contain- 
ing^ written matter, or for any other cause specified in said laws and 
regulations. They must be sent in narrow bands, open at the sides 
or ends. 



aruclb VI. 

The postage for which the United States and Hamburg post offices 
shall reciprocally account to each other upon letters which shall be 
exchanged between them, shall be established, letter by letter, accord- 
ing to tne scales of progression determined by the preceding 2d and 
3d articles, as follows, viz : r^ ^ 

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POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1049 

The Hamburg oflSce shall pay to the United States office, for each 
unpaid letter weighing half an ounce, or less, originating in the 
United States and destined for Hamburg, as well as for each letter of 
like weight prepaid in Hamburg and destined for the United States, 
when conveyed under article 2d, by United States steamer, nine cents, 
and when by Hamburg steamer, five cents. When conveyed under 
article 3d, by United States steamer, fourteen cents, and when by 
Hamburg steamer, five cents. 

The United States office shall pay to the Hamburg office, for each 
unpaid letter weighing half an ounce or less, originating in Hamburg 
and destined for the United States, as well as for each letter of like 
weight prepaid in the United States and destined for Hamburg, when 
conveyed under article 2d, by United States steamer, one cent, and 
when by Hamburg steamer, five cents. When conveyed under article 
3d, by United States steamer, one cent, and when by Hamburg 
steamer, ten cents. , 

Respecting the postage for newspapers, pamphlets, and magazines 
received in either country, the whole is to be paid to the United 
States office when the same are sent by United States steamers, and 
one half to the United States, and the other half to the Hamburg 
office, when sent by Hamburg steamers. 

Letter bills and acknowledgments, as well as forms of account, 
shall be made to conform to these articles. 



ARTICLE vn. 

The accounts between the two departments shall be closed at the 
expiration of each quarter of the calendar year, by quarterly state- 
ments and accounts prepared by the Greneral Post Office in Washing- 
ton ; and, having been examined, compared, and settled by the post 
office of Hamburg, the balance shall be paid, without delay, by that 
department which shall be found indebted to the other. If the balance 
is in favor of Hamburg, it shall be paid over by the United States at 
Hamburg ; and if in favor of the United States, it shall be paid over 
by Hamburg at Washington, or to the General Post Office at London, 
to the credit of the United States, as the Postmaster General of the 
United States shall direct. Neither office is to charge to the other 
any commissions upon any postage it may collect. 



ARTICLB vin. 

The steamers of either government plying between New York and 
Hamburg shall be required to convey all dead and returned letters, 
and the official communications of the respective post departments of 
the United States and Hamburg, free of charge. 



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1050 BEPOBT OF THE 



ABTIGLB IX. 

The sailing days of the steamers carrying the mail between New 
York and Hamburg under this arrangement shall be so arranged as 
not to conflict with the schedule days of sailing of the United States 
mail steamers plying between New York and Bremen, and between 
New York and Havre ; and also of the Bremen mail steamers plying 
between New York and Bremen ; and shall, as near as practicable, 
alternate at regular intervals with the days of sailing of the steamers 
conveying the mail to and from Bremen and Havre. 



aruclb X. 

TJiis arrangement is to go into effect on the first day of July, 1857, 
and it is to be continued in force until annulled by mutual consent, or 
by either post department, after the expiration of three months' previons 
notice to the other ; and it may cease whenever all the direct steamers 
between New York and Hamburg cease running. 

Done in duplicate, and signed at Washington on the 12th day of 
June, and at New York on the 30th day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-seven. 

HORATIO KING. 
FERDINAND KAROK, 
Commissioner for the Hanseatic BqnMic 
of Hamburg, 
Approved : 

AARON V. BROWN, 

Postmaster general, U. S. 

Hamburg, August 7, 1867. 
This convention is ratified with the advice and consent of the senate 
of Hamburg. 

0. H. MERCK, LL. D., 
Member of the senate, and president of the 
Post Office Departfneni. 



F. 

Post Office Dbpartmbnt, 
Contract Office, December 1, 1857. 
Sir : For a statement of the mail service for the contract year end- 
ing iWth of June, 1857, I respectfully refer you to the tables hereto 
annexed. 

Table A exhibits the character of the service, the number of miles 
of transportation, and the cost thereof as it stood at the close of the 

year. Digitized by GoOglC 



POSTMASTER GENERAL. 1051 

Table B shows the number of mail routes in operation, and the 
number of mail contractors, route agents, local agents, and mail mes- 
sengers in the service of the department on the 30th of June, 1857. 

On the 1st of July last the new service in the New England and 
New York sections was put in operation, the first quarter of which 
expired on the 30th of September, 1857. 

Table C exhibits the seryice* of these sections as it stood at the 
close of the contract year, 30th of June, 1857, and at the close of the 
first quarter of the current year. 

Table D exhibits the railroad service as in operation on the 30th 
of June, 1857 ; also, the cost per mile in each State. 

Tables E and F exhibit the railroad and steamboat service for 
the current year, showing the particulars of each railroad and steam- 
boat route. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. DUNDAS, 
Second AsaisturU Fostmaater General. 

Hon. A. V. Brown, 

Postmaster General. 



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1052 



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1054 



REPORT OP THS 



B. 

Number of mail routes^ maU contractoray ratUe agents^ local agenUy and 
mail messengers J at the dose of the contra^ year ending on the oQih 
day of June^ 1857. 



Sections. 


Routes. 


Contrac- 
tors. 


Route 
agents. 


TiOOAl 

agents. 


Mail mes- 
sengers. 


New Kogland »-^»- ,^^--^ 


879 
862 
1,400 
1,204 
1,865 
1,670 
8 


776 
751 
1,111 
1,036 
1,543 
1,352 
7 


63 
52 
93 
60 
88 
52 


2 
2 

9 

2 

20 

9 

1 


187 


New York 


289 


Middle 


442 


Southern ....... .......... 


80 


North wetitem .--.- ........ 


260 


South western .............. 


77 


Ocean routes ............ 










Total 


7,888 


6,576 


406 


45 


1,336 






« 






WM. H. DUNDAS, 
Seoond Amdant Pottmaater GaurmL 



/ 


MaU 


service in the New 


England section. 










, 1857. 


. — 


Annual trans- 
portation 


Annual rate 
of cost. 


Railroad ...... 


<u in operation en 30(A June 


MUm, 
4,104,082 

217,880 
2,506,036 
1,533,804 


DoOan, 
330, 171 


Steamboat ................... ....... ... 


6,182 


Coach . .................... ........ 


95,089 
58,863 


Inferior modes - - « _ _ _ 














Total 


8,361,802 
7,664,161 


490,256 
















Decrease... 


697. 641 






operation on 30th September, 


1867. 






Asm 
Railroad 


3,218,206 

365, 664 

2,185,562 

1,894,729 


391,212 


Steamboat 


20, 050 


Coach 


100, 163 


TnfftHnr mndAfi __. _ _____ 


81, 268 














Total...... 


7, 664, 161 


592, 693 












490,255 






Increase ... 




102,438 















WM. H. DUNDAS, 

Seoond AmUani PoetmoMler QmenL 

Digitized by V^ 



P0STKA8TEB GENEKAL. 



1055 



C. 



Mail aervice in the New York aedion. 





Annual trans- 
portation. 


1 

Annual rate 
of cost. 


Senriee aa m operation on SOth June, 1867. 
FAflrnn/^ ... 


MOn. 
3,687,971 

270, 608 
2,562,248 
1,496,017 


DoOan, 
317,360 


8t4ff!UnlKMlt - - 


14,799 
95. 663 


Coach 


Inferior modos ............ .^i...........^..^......^... 


60, 628 






Total 


7,915,844 
7,790,451 


488,450 








Decrease 


126,393 









Am in cpenOion on mh ^S^ptonfter, 1857. 
K%i1ro«il ... . 


3,881,299 

108,944 

2,418^864 

1,381,344 


327,628 


8tMunlinAt . „ , „ , 


7,298 


Coach 


108, 305 


Inferior mode^ ...................................... 


62,825 




Total 


7,790,451 


506,056 
488,450 










Increase.... ...... ................ 




^ 17,606 







WM. H. DUNDA8, 
Seoond AmaUmt Pottma$ter Omenl, 



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POSTMASTER GENERAL. 



1059 

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