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Full text of "The household book of Lady Grisell Baillie, 1692-1733"

0262465 



j 



PUBLICATIONS 



OF THE 



SCOTTISH HISTORY SOCIETY 



NEW SERIES 

VOL. 
I 



LADY GRISELL BAILLIE'S 
HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



October 1911 




LADY GRISELL BAILLIE, 

AGED 69. 



(From a Portrait at Mellerstain, probably by Maria Verelst.) 



AUG 221945 

THE 

HOUSEHOLD BOOK OF 
LADY GRISELL BAILLIE "^ 

1692-1733 



Edited, with Notes and Introduction, by 
ROBERT SCOTT-MON CRIEFF, W.S. 




GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

OF THE CHURCM OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF LAnEP-OAV SAIMT»v 

EDINBURGH o^^o^'> 

Printed at the University Press by T. and A. Constable 

for the Scottish History Society 

1911 





^'T^^- 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION, . 

Extracts from Household Books — 
Sundry Disbursements, 
Housekeeping, . 
Servants, . 
Household Furniture, 
Clothing, . 
Business Charges, 
Horsekeeping, . 
Estate Management, 
Expenses of Garden, 
Doctors and Surgeons, 
Small Payments, 
Brothers' and Sisters' Accounts, 
Expenses of Mrs. Baillie's Funeral, 

Sketch of Life of Robert Baillie, . 
Memoranda and Directions to Servants, 
Bills of Fare, ..... 
Note of Supplies consumed at Mellerstain, 
Expenses of a Visit to Bath, 



PAGE 

ix 



1 

61 
117 
164 
188 
218 
225 
236 
251 
255 
257 
261 
267 

269 
27S 
281 
304 
306 



vi HOUSE BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

PACE 

Expenses of Foreign Tour, ...... 309 

Memoranda as to Foreign Travel, ..... 384- 

APPENDICES— 

I. State showing articles mentioned in accounts 
with prices then and now, 

n. Statement as to Servants' Wages, 

III. Note of Fees in connection with Education, 

IV. Tables of Money and Measures, 
V. Note as to Salary and Wages, 

VI. Genealogical Table, ..... 



GLOSSARY, . 
INDEX, . 



411 
418 
420 
421 
428 
430 

431 
433 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Lady Grisell Baillie, age 69, . . . . 

From a Portrait at Mellerstain, probably by Maria Verelst. 



Frontispiece 



Robert Baillie of Jerviswood, 



. To face page xi 



Rachel Johnston, wife of Robert Baillie of Jervis- 
wood, , • . . . • t} 

From a Portrait by John Scougall at Mellerstain. 

George Baillie of Jerviswood and his Daughter 

vtRISELL, * • • • • . y^ 

From, a Portrait at Mellerstain. 

Book Plate of George Baillie of Jerviswood, . „ 

Lady Murray, aged 33, . . . • )> 

From a Portrait at Mellerstain by Maria Verelst. 

Lady Binning, aged 29, . . . • )> 

From a Portrait at Mellerstain by Maria Verelst. 
Lord Binning, . . . , • ,> 

From a Portrait at Mellerstain. 

'Grisie' and 'Rachie' Baillie, aged 6 and 2 
respectively, . . . . • }} 

From, a Picture at Mellerstain by John Scougall. 

Sampler at Mellerstain, worked under the Direc- 
tions OF Miss Menzies. The animals are copied 
from a book which belonged to Miss Menzies, and 
is still at Mellerstain, , . , • ,> 

The Right Hon. Patrick Hume, Earl of March- 
MONT, ....... 

From a Portrait at Mellerstain. 



Xll 



XIX 



XXVI 



,, xxvni 

„ xl 

,, xliii 

xlv 



xJvii 



ixxix 



INTRODUCTION 

This volume forms one of a series of publications issued 
by the Scottish History Society dealing with household 
expenditure during the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies, and goes far to fill the hiatus in years between the 
Foulis Book ^ and the Ochtertyre Book.^ For this reason 
alone it would serve a useful purpose, but considerably 
more than this is claimed for it. In the first place, it deals 
with a much wider range of subject-matter than is usually 
included in what are termed ' House Books,' taking these 
words in their ordinary acceptation. To a certain extent, 
therefore, its title is inadequate. In the second place, 
owing to the various changes of residence of the family 
with which it deals, it affords an opportunity of contrasting 
the expenses of living in the country with those of living 
in a close in the High Street of Edinburgh, and again of 
comparing these with the expenses of living in London, 
in Bath, and on the Continent. In the third place, it 
gives us memoranda as to the duties of servants, as to the 
arrangement of the dinner-table, as to travelling, and as 
to many other matters of interest. And lastly, it brings 
us indirectly into touch with a remarkably interesting 
group of people, whether viewed socially, politically, or 
intellectually, who were well known in their day and 
generation, and whose history it is a pleasure to study. 
The Baillies of Jerviswood were cadets of the Baillies 



^ The Account Book of Sir John Foulis of Ravelston, 1671-1707. 
- Ochtertyre House Booke of Accomps, 1737-1739. 



X HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

of St. John's Kirk, who in their turn were cadets of the 
BailHes of Lamington, ' the original BaHiols,' according to 
Lord Foimtainhall. The first Baillie of Jerviswood was 
George BailHe, second son of BaiUie of St. John's Kirk,^ 
and grandfather of Lady Grisell's husband. As was then 
common, he entered into trade, duly compeared before 
Thomas Inglis, Dean of Guild of the City of Edinburgh, 
and others, on 8th September 1613, ' sufficientlie armit 
with ane furnisht hagbut,' and was sworn in as a ' Mer- 
chant Burgess ' of the city. What he traded in it is 
impossible to say, but he at least owned a share in a 
ship to which he had succeeded through his first wife 
Christian Vorie.^ This lady, who was the illegitimate ^ 
daughter of John Vorie in Balbaird, died without issue 
on 7th October 1628. George Baillie throve, became a 
town councillor* in 1631, purchased in 1636 the lands 
of Jerviswood in Lanarkshire from the family of 
Livingston, and in 1643 the estate of Mellerstain in 
Berwickshire from Andrew Edmonston of Ednem. The 
titles to these properties, along with his ' best clothes ' 
and his ' silver and goldsmyth work,' were ' all totallie 
burnt ' in August 1645, ' the tyme of that Lament- 
able fyre that was then in Edinburgh,' they being 
contained in ' ane trunk and ane kist ' in the house of 
James Baillie, INIerchant Burgess of Edinburgh, which was 
' totallie burnt ' (Act of Parliament, 1647). 

It was probably before 1636 that he had made his 
second marriage — that \\ith Margaret Johnston, daughter 
of James Johnston, Merchant Burgess of Edinburgh, 



' Reg. Mag. Sig., 14th June 1647. 

- Edinbtirgh Comviissariot Testaments, 24th December 1623. 

' Letters of legitimisation granted to Christian Vorie, natural daughter of the 
late John Vorie in Balbaird, spouse of George Baillie, Merchant Burgess of 
Edinburgh. — Reg. Mag. Sig., 7th July 1625. 

* Reg. Mag. Sig., 25th March 1631. 




ROBERT BAILLIE OF JERVISWOOD. 



INTRODUCTION xi 

and sister of Sir Archibald Johnston, Lord Wariston, 
by whom he had several children, namely : — 

1. John Baillie, who predeceased him. 

2. Robert Baillie, who succeeded him. 

3. Archibald Baillie. 

4. Captain George Baillie of Mannerhall. 

5. Captain James Baillie of the City Guard of Edinburgh. 

6. Christian Baillie. 

7. Elizabeth Baillie,^ was married to Mr. James Kirkton, 
-at one time minister of Merton, afterwards of the Tolbooth, 
Edinburgh, 31st December 1657 {Edinburgh Register of 
Marriages). 

8. Rachel Baillie, was married first to Mr. Andrew Gray, 
one of the ministers of Glasgow ; second, to Mr. George 
Hutcheson, at one time minister in Edinburgh, afterwards 
in Irvine. 

George Baillie probably died early in 1646, for the 
' Account of the Annual Rents belonging to the Children 
-of George Baillie ' begins in March of that year. He was 
succeeded by his eldest surviving son Robert. A sketch 
of the life of this remarkable man will be found on p. 269. 
The original is not in the handwriting of Lady Grisell, 
but it is endorsed by her ' My father-in-law.' As will 
be seen from this sketch, Robert Baillie first came into 
the clutches of the law in 1676, tlirough rescuing his 
brother-in-law, the Rev. James Kirkton, from the hands 
of Captain Carstairs. The story is a curious one, and will 
be found fully set forth in volume forty-four of the Pro- 
ceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. The 
result of the trial was that Baillie was fined £500 sterling,^ 



1 This lady's name is erroneously given in Scott's Fasit Ecclesia as ' Grisell.' 
Both Kirkton and Hutcheson suffered for their principles, the latter on one 
occasion being fined half a year's stipend for not keeping the Anniversary of 
the Restoration. 

■^ This fine, or at least a considerable part of it, was subsequently remitted by 
the Earl of Lauderdale. 



xii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

and incarcerated in the Edinburgh Tolbooth. It was 
during his confinement at this time that his son George 
Baillie first made the acquaintance of his future wife, then 
Grisell Hume, aged twelve, the eldest daughter of Sir 
Patrick Hume, afterwards Earl of Marchmont. Sir 
Patrick was anxious to communicate with Jerviswood, ta 
whom he was deeply attached, and in order to avoid 
suspicion sent his little daughter from Redbraes, his 
country seat, to execute this dangerous and delicate com- 
mission. She succeeded so well ' that from that time 
her hardships began, from the confidence was put in her 
and the activity she naturally had far beyond her age in 
executing whatever she was intrusted with.' 

When Robert Baillie was arrested in 1683 for high 
treason, he was residing in London, and was accordingly 
first confined in the Tower. As his condemnation bv an 
English court would only have entailed forfeiture of his 
movable estate, it was resolved to send him and his fellow- 
countrymen in misfortune to Scotland, where their heritable 
estates could also be confiscated. The prisoners were 
accordingly shipped north, and we have the following 
pathetic note as to her husband's arrest and journey to 
Scotland in the handwriting of Mrs. Baillie. It is con- 
tained in a small commonplace-book of her husband's, 
and has for convenience been divided into sentences. 

We war Led in presen by en order from his Majest, writer of 
it S"" Lyen Jenkins, detted 27 of Joun 1683. 

Last OcV 1683. 
We cam from London by the Kings yach called the Kettchen 
yach, on Capten Croo our skipcr and on scrgcn histinns, 12 
sogers, all of the Kings owen foot gard. We was sheped open 
the Last of Ocf^ and had a very dengerowes Jarny, and cam 
to Lcth opon 14 day of Novb'', when 11 gcntellmen was garded 
w' horse and foott, the prcseners being in coshs ontill they 
cam to the Netherbow ell, and then Mager Whett cam from 
the Chansler and traserer and commanded them to go on foot- 




RACHEL JOHNSTON 

WIFE OF ROBERT BAILLIE OF JERVISWOOD 



{From a Portrait by Joint Scougall at Mellentain. ) 



INTRODUCTION xiii 

and so they did, garded w* hors and foot, to the ToUboth, 
where thay ar keeped geloss. The end of Des*" we got in twes 
wt S*' Will petterson and pettrick Menzies, Clark to the Counscll. 
Then in Jan'" I got in tow days wt a keeper, then being stoped 
agen in f eb"^ I got in ones a day or more wt on of the good men. 
We got opon dors preson dors upon 18 Aprell 1684. Thay war 
med clos presoner in Jully 24 opon a thursday, and w*in 8 dayes 
my husband fell very sik and was put clos in a rume alone and 
keeped ther un'ell he was allmost ded and opon the 14 Agust 
my sister was Let in to him and 3 dayes after I myself was 
Lett in and stayed 18 dayes w* him, and we was taken from 
him when non wold have toght he could heve Lived en houre 
and he stayed Loked op tell the six of novbir all a Lone. 

The trial and its result are too well known to require 
more than a passing notice here. Jerviswood, who had 
been desperately ill in prison, Avas carried to court in his 
' night gown,' ^ and driven to execution a few hours after 
sentence had been pronounced. Wodrow reports that 
he said to his son George, who had been recalled from his 
studies abroad, ' If ye have a strong heart ye may go and 
see me nagled ; but if ye have not a heart for it ye may 
stay away.' From what Lady Murray says in her Memoirs 
he appears to have gone, but whether he remained with 
his aunt Mrs. Graden to see the body ' cut in coupons and 
oyled and tarred ' is nowhere mentioned. Lady Murray, 
however, states that his mother and aunts said ' that it 
ever after gave that grave, silent, thoughtful turn to his 
temper which before that time was not natural to him.' 
It also gave him what was by no means so common at 
that period, namely, feelings of compassion towards his 
political opponents when the wheel of fortune placed some 
of them in the same position in which his father had been. 
After the ' '15,' when he was a Lord of the Treasury, and 
at a time when to speak his mind might easily have 
damaged his position, he publicly ' declared himself for 

^ See p. Ixxi. 



xiv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

mercy to the poor unhappy sufferers by the rebellion,' 
and began a long Parliamentary speech ' by sapng that 
he had been bred in the School of affliction which had 
instructed him in both the reasonableness and necessity 
of showing mercy to others in the like circumstances.' 
As his accounts show, he did more than talk, for there are 
several entries of payments made to the unfortunate 
prisoners taken at Preston. ' To the Laird of Wedder- 
burn when in Prison, £5 ' ; 'To James Hume of Aiton My 
Ld Humes brother, £l. Is. 6d ' ; 'To Mrs. Hume White- 
field, £l, Is. 6d.,' wife of Hume of WTiitefield, and to others 
— thus confirming Lady Murray's statement as to his 
helping ' the wives, sisters, and other relations and friends 
of the poor prisoners.' That Lord Kenmore's body was 
handed to his relatives instead of to the surgeons for 
dissection was entirely owing to his intervention and 
foresight. 

His conduct to these unfortunates is made even more 
remarkable by the fact ' that they plundered several 
gentlemen's country seats (particularly the houses of Sir 
John Pringle of Stitchell and Mr. Baillie of Jerviswood) 
carry 'd away what peuther they could get to melt down 
for Bullets, destroyed their corn, etc' ^ 

Robert Baillie cannot have been much over fifty, ^ if so 
old, at the time of his death. Lord Fountainhall in his 
Chronological Notes describes him as being a ' huffy proud 
man * who ' huffed a little that he should be esteemed 
guilty of any design against the life of the King or his 
brother whereof he purged himself as he hoped for mercy.' 
He was survived by his widow and by the following 



' TAe History of the Rebellion raised against King George, etc. (1715), by 
Peter Rae, 17 18. 

2 His father's first wife died on 7th October 1628, and as he was the second 
son of his father's second marriage, he cannot have been older than fifty-three, 
and was probably a little younger. 



INTRODUCTION xv 

children, who were all born at Jerviswood Tower, which 
he made his residence : — 

George, who succeeded him, born 16th March 1664. 

Archibald, born 15th April 1665. 

Robert, born 4th July 1666. 

William, born 24th January 1669. 

Rachel, born 3rd April 1671, married Dundas of Breast- 
milne, Linlithgowshire. 

James, born 9th June 1673. 

John, born 14th March 1675, died 1717. His funeral 
cost £11, 16s. 6d. (see p. 59). 

Helen, born July 1676, married John Hay, Writer in 
Edinburgh, died in 1717. 

Elizabeth, born 25th September 1677, married Mr. 
Robert Weems of Graingemuir, made Collector at Alloa 
March 1717. 

Robert Baillie's execution took place on 24th December 
1684, and while his head was exhibited on the Netherbow 
Port of the city of Edinburgh, his quarters were exposed 
on the Tolbooths of Jedburgh, Lanark, Ayr, and Glasgow. 
The quarter which was sent to Lanark Tolbooth, not a 
mile from liis own house of Jerviswood, remained but a 
short time in its position, for ' a band of young men, 
headed by a certain yeoman named William Leishman, 
came and stole it away for burial.' ^ This Leishman's son 
and namesake was afterwards sent to college by the 
Jerviswood family out of gratitude for this service, and 
eventually became Principal Leishman of Glasgow Uni- 
versity. 

The execution of Robert Baillie made it evident to his 
old friend Sir Patrick Hume that if he wished to preserve 
his life he had better get out of Scotland as soon as possible. 
The story of Sir Patrick's concealment and subsequent 



^ A Son of Knox, and other Studies^ hy]. F. Leishman, 1909. 



xviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

a mild gamble, as the numerous entries in the London 
accounts show. 

On his return to Scotland Baillie found himself in a 
very different position from that in which he had been 
when he fled the country. The Whigs and Presbyterians 
were all-powerful. His father and his grandfather — Lord 
Wariston — were regarded as martyrs for the cause ; his 
uncle James Johnston had been appointed Secretary of 
State for Scotland ; and his first cousin once removed, 
IMr. Gilbert Burnet, afterwards Bishop of Salisbury, was 
now King William's chaplain. It is not surprising, there- 
fore, that he was at once elected one of the four members 
returned by the county of Berwick to the Convention of 
Estates ; that he was appointed a Commissioner of Supply 
for that county and also for Lanarkshire ; that his estates 
were restored to him; and that he was made Receiver- 
General of Scotland, a post which brought him in £300 
a year, a good salary for those days. His prospects 
were now such as to entitle him to ask for the hand 
of Grisell Hume from her father, who in December 1690 
had been created Lord Polwarth. The young people 
had always been deeply attached, and they were married 
at Redbraes, the seat of the Humes, on 17th September 
1691. It was an ideal union. ' They never had the 
shadow of a quarrel or misunderstanding or dryness 
betwixt them, not for a moment.' ' He never went abroad 
but she went to the window to look after him ; and so she 
did that very day he fell ill the last time he was abroad, 
never taking her eyes from him as long as he was in sight.' 

It is from about a year after the date of the marriage 
that the accounts begin to be kept, but before referring 
to them it is necessary for their proper appreciation to 
say a few words regarding George Baillie's position, 
political and social. 

It has been already stated, that Baillie sat in Parliament 




GEORGE BAILLIE OF JERVISWOOD AND HIS 
DAUGHTER GRISELL. 



(From a Portrait at Meller stain.') 



INTRODUCTION xix 

as one of the members for Berwickshire, of course as a 
Whig ; but he was by no means the sort of man to vote 
bhndly for the ' Court Party,' however much that might be 
to his interest. When, therefore, questions arose in Parha- 
ment regarding the affairs of the unfortunate ' Company 
trading to Africa and the Indies,' better known as the Darien 
Company, in which he held £1000 of stock, and of which 
he was a director, he was one of those who, deeply resent- 
ing the interference of England, joined the new ' Country 
Party ' which was then formed.^ Of this party Baillie 
was one of the leaders, and ' gained a great reputation 
by standing so stiffly by the interests of his country.' ^ 
So much so, that when in 1703, a year after the accession 
of Anne, a new Parliament was called, Baillie was returned 
as member for the shires of both Berwick and Lanark. 
Electing to sit for the latter, he continued to represent this 
constituency until his retirement in 1725. The Sessions 
that followed were most momentous ones, embracing the 
long struggle that preceded the passing of the Treaty of 
Union, but it is unnecessary here to trace the prominent 
parts played by the ' Country Party ' and subsequently 
by the ' Squadrone Volante ' in that fight, as they are 
well known. Baillie was in the forefront of the battle. 
He was one of the three representatives sent by the 
' Country Party ' to set their views before Queen Anne, 
was made Lord Treasurer Depute in the short-lived 
Tweeddale Administration and a member of the Privy 
Council, and, in short, was ' by far the most significant 
man ' of the ' Squadrone Volante,' ' to whom he was a 
kind of dictator.' ^ The position occupied by Baillie at 
this time is well shown in the Jerviswood Correspondence, 
where we read the private views of the three leaders of 



^ George Ridpath's Accotoit of the Proceedings of the Parliament of Scotland^ 
1703. 
2 Lockhart Papers. 3 j^j^^ 



XX HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

the ' Squadrone Volante,' viz. of Secretary Johnston, 
that ' shrewd cunning fellow ' ; of the Earl of Roxburgh, 
' the best accomplished young man of quality in Europe ' ; 
and of Baillie of Jerviswood, ' the morose, proud and 
severe, but of a profound solid judgment.' ^ We see how, 
step by step, they were driven to the conclusion that the 
only way to ensure the Hanoverian Succession, the Presby- 
terian form of worship, and equal trading rights with 
England was by an absolute union with her ; they had no 
love for union in itself, seeing clearly what it entailed ; 
but it seemed to them to be the least of the many evils 
that hovered over Scotland. The ' Squadrone Volante * 
has been accused of venality ; but these letters make it 
clear that, while in the manner of the time the leaders 
had a keen eye to their own interests, and hoped to be 
eventually rewarded for the course they adopted, still in 
making up their minds to that course they conscientiously 
considered, in the first instance, the interests of their 
country. 

That the Treaty of Union could not have been passed 
without the help of the ' Squadrone Volante ' was fully 
recognised ; and it was therefore not unnatural that Baillie 
should be one of the selected members who sat for Scot- 
land in the fkst Union Parliament, and that he should 
be rewarded for his services by being appointed one 
of the Commissioners of Trade with a salary of £1000 
per annum. The duties of this post he was eminently 
capable of discharging, as he had been a member of the 
important Council of Trade, which before the Union had 
reported on the exports and imports of Scotland. 

The first elected United Parliament met in November 
1708, and in this Baillie sat, as formerly, for the county 
of Lanark. Then followed the Queen's quarrel with the 



' Lockhart Papers. 



INTRODUCTION xxi 

IMarlboroughs, the ousting of Her Majesty's Whig ad- 
visers, the election of 1710, with the return to Parha- 
ment of a large Tory majority. Baillie, however, retained 
his seat, and in connection with his so doing his daughter 
writes : ' As he never liked making court to any minister 
when there was anything he thought proper for him 
to represent he always had a private audience of 
the Queen, who shewed so great a personal favour for 
him, that, on the change of her ministry in the end of her 
reign, she kept him in office a year after the rest of his 
party were turned out, and when they prevailed to have 
him removed, they pressed her to give some orders they 
thought necessary to hinder him of his election, which 
she absolutely refused.' 

If Scotland had good reason to object to the treatment 
it had received at the hands of a Whig Government, it had 
still more reason to resent what was meted out to it by 
the now victorious Tory party. Both parties in Scotland 
were exasperated by one or more of the measures passed 
by Parliament, and even amongst the staunchest Whigs 
there was a feeling that the Union had been a failure and 
should be repealed. Indeed there was made by the 
Scottish members a movement in this direction, in which 
Baillie to a qualified extent joined.^ The question even 
got the length of being raised in the Lords, but it was 
unsuccessful and, as it was not thought advisable to bring 
it forward in the Commons, it accordingly fizzled out. 
This result was in no ways diie to the want of Parliamentary 
sympathy for the Scottish Jacobite party, who had always 
been opposed to the Union, for the Tories made little or 
no concealment of their intention to attempt the restora- 
tion of the Stuarts upon Anne's death. So fully was this 
recognised by the Whigs, that, resolving to resist to the 



^ Lockhart Papers. 



xxii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

death, they prepared themselves for civil war. Societies were 
formed of those favouring the Hanoverian Succession, and 
meetings were held to arrange for organised resistance 
and for the purchase of arms. That Baillie took his share 
in these warlike preparations is shown by the following 
entries in his accounts : — 

1714. 15 May For a gun and 30 swords £4 and for 

packing 4s. 6d. . . .£446 

18 Sept. For 29 guns and Bagginets , 18 4 lyV 

For a barrill powder weighe 7h 
stone . . . . .368 

One cannot help wondering if these arms fell into the 
hands of the Highlanders when they looted Mellerstain 
in the ' '15.' 

Mercifully for the peace of the country, Queen Anne's 
sudden death on 1st August 1714 threw out the calcula- 
tions of the Jacobites, and before they had time to rally 
George had been proclaimed king and had landed in 
England. 

On his arrival there naturally ensued a complete 
change in Government, the Whigs once again being 
all-powerful.i Of Baillie's position at this period Lady 
Murray writes: 'Upon the accession of King George 
the First he was made one of the Lords of the Admir- 
alty,- and soon after one of the Lords of the Treasury,^ 
without his ever soliciting or asking for either of them; 
and had no thought nor expectation of being in the 
Treasury when the Earl of Stanhope, then at the head of 
it, sent him orders to come and take his place at the 
Board. There he continued till at his own earnest desire 
he laid down in the year 1725 against the opinion and 

' 'The chief men in place are the Speaker, Sir Richard Onslow, Mr. 
Boscawen, Mr. Aislaby, Mr. Smith, Mr. Lechmere, Mr. Bayley, Mr. Putteney, 
Mr. Stanhope.'— (?« i/ie State of Party at the Accession of George /., by Mr. 
Wort ley. 

■ Salary ^looo per annum. 3 Salary ;^l6oo per annum. 



INTRODUCTION xxiii 

entreaties of all his friends, and even the King desired him 
to continue and was a year before he accepted his demis- 
sion.' ^ If Lady Mmray is correct in the latter part of 
this statement, Baillie was more fortunate than the other 
members of his party, who in 1725 were all turned out of 
their posts by Walpole for not being sufficiently sub- 
servient to the English view of Scottish polic3^ Be that 
as it may, he ceased after the year 1725 to take a part 
in public affairs, and devoted himself to the education 
of his grandchildren, and to ' constant meditation, con- 
templation and prayer.' He died at Oxford on 6th August 
1738, at the age of seventy-five, and was buried at Meller- 
stain in the private burial-ground prepared by himself^ 
' At one and the same time he was a most zealous patriot, 
a very able statesman, and a most perfect Christian. 

His courage was undaunted and his patience immovable ; 
his piety unfeigned and his truth exact to the greatest 
precision.' ^ 

In addition to his political work, Baillie, as was but 
natural, took a deep interest in the affairs of the Church 
of Scotland. He was chosen as representative elder to 
the General Assembly for the parish of Earlston, in which 
Mellerstain lies, and this position he held for many 
years, attending the Assembly with characteristic regu- 
larity. "When resident in Edinburgh he had a loft 
in that part of St. Giles known as the Tolbooth, for 
which he paid £l, 10s. a year, and when in England 
he ' continued steadily in his own Church and princi- 
ples,' having a pew in King's Street Chapel, London, 



' He retired on a pension of ;i{^i6oo per annum. In regard to this, Lady 
MaryWortley Montagu, writing to her sister the Countess of Marin 1726, says,. 
* Mr. Baily you know is dismissed the Treasury and consoled with a pensioa 
of equal value.' 

- An Historical Character of the Hon. George Baillie^ by C. Cheyne 
M.D. , F.R.S., appended to Lady Murray's Memoirs. 



xxiv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

for which he paid 9s. a quarter. He also contributed 
generously to the building funds of Presbyterian Churches 
both in England and Ireland. Not that he adhered to 
his own Church with ' rigidness and narrowness of soul,' 
for his Accounts show that when abroad his charities 
extended to priests and nuns and monks ; and Lady 
Murray narrates how ' two of the poor Episcopal Clergy 
in Scotland came to ask charity for themselves and their 
brethi'en without the expectation of seeing him. He 
received them kindly, kept them to dinner with him, 
contributed to their necessities, and shewed great dis- 
pleasure at his servants for not having taken proper care 
of their horses, nor bringing them so readily as they would 
have done to those from whom they expected a reward.' 

It must not, however, be imagined that Baillie was 
entirely taken up with politics and religion. He had his 

* hunting mares,' which we learn from the Accounts were 
specially fed with beans, and he went on hawking expedi- 
tions. He evidently could also take a hand in a carouse, 
for on 4th June 1706, the Earl of Haddington writing to 
the Earl of Mar says : ' Drinking indeed succeeds pretty 
well, thanks to my Lord Roths, Hindfoord, Anster, George 
Baillie, James Bruce and myself, who as long as the 
Assembly lasted lived as discreet a life as you could 
wish.' ^ When the family went to stay in London in 
1715, Lady Grisell and he took part with their daughters 
in the ' ball, masquerades, parties by water and such 
like,' ' neither choosing to deprive us of them nor let us 
go alone . . . and they generally were calculated at times 
most convenient for my father.' Many are the references 
in the Accounts to these parties. 

There is no doubt, however, that such diversions were 

* not quite suitable to his own temper,' and that his chief 



* YxaA^x^i Memorials of the Earls of Haddington. 2 vols, 1889. 4to. 



INTRODUCTION xxv 

pleasure lay in his books and in retirement with them. 
The Accounts show that Baillie constantly bought books. 
He purchased from Mosman in the Luckenbooths, from 
Johnston, Knox and Vallance ; he bought at auctions, 
and had heavy accounts with Andrew Bell, Bookseller, 
London. One of the earliest entries after his marriage is 
for the erection in his first house in Warriston Close of 
five double presses for books at a cost of £72 Scots or £G 
sterling ; and when he finally left Edinburgh for Meller- 
stain in 1708 he took with him four cartloads of books. 
He was not contented with reading himself, but must needs 
encourage reading amongst his dependants. He saw to 
it that they all had Bibles ; and on one occasion we find 
him spending £3, 10s. sterling ' for books for the tenants 
and servants,' and on another, 2s. for a ' Thomas a Kempis 
to the servants.' It is to be regretted that the Accounts 
only give the names of a few of the volumes purchased, 
such as : ' Jaillots Maps,' ^ £12, 10s. stg. ; ' Mazerays 
History,' 2 3 vols., £6, 13s. 4d. stg. ; ' Foster's Book,' 
6s. 8d. stg. ; ' Defoe's Book in defence of the Union,' 
2s. 6d. (this of course purchased in 1707) ; ' Naphtah,' 
covenanting Records, by Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees ; 
' Johnston, Engraver, for his book of Maps, £2, 2s. ' ; 'a 
little Divinity Book,' Is. Sd. ; ' Atalantis ' by Mrs. Manley, 
which was one of the scandalous works lent out by Allan 
Ramsay in 1726 from the first circulating library in the 
kingdom. 

Even when travelling on the Continent books were pur- 
chased, and a box was sent home containing, along with 
several books of prints, maps and music, such works as 
Telimon's History, Don Quixote, Bocaccio, Le Fortunate 
Neapolinano (in two volumes), Delices de la Holland, 



' Bernard Antoine Jaillot, a well-known map-maker in the early eighteenth 
century. 

2 Probably Histoire de France, published 1643 to 1651. Folio. 



xxvi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Delices d' Italy, History of the Painters, Salvini's Works, 
Monsignr della Casa's Works, Cato in Italian (unbound)^ 
Terense's Plays in Italian, Recueil de Pensees (in five 
volumes), Retratto di Venezzia, Confession of Augsburg, 
Dieu present par tout, etc. 

The Mellerstain library contains to this day many 
hundreds of books with his bookplate carefully pasted in. 

Baillie was also a patron of the Arts. He had ' wax 
pictures ' done of his son and mother, presumably after 
their deaths, for which he pays £l, 14s. 4d. stg. and £3, 4s. 
stg. respectively. Then he purchased many pictures from. 
John Scugald, whose name is associated with the first 
picture gallery in Europe, this artist having added an 
upper story to his house in Advocates' Close, Edinburgh, 
and fitted it up for the purpose of an exhibition.^ 

The prices paid strike one as small, even bearing in 
mind the remuneration of services at that time. For 
instance : ' To Scugald for 2 pictures and frames, 
£74 8s. ' Scots (£6, 4s. stg.). ' Scuglad for pictures, £48 ' 
Scots (£4). ' Scugald balance, £96 ' Scots (£8 stg.). 
'1705 Deer. To John Scugald painter in full of all 
accounts, £84 Scots ' (£7 stg.). The most curious entry, 
however, in connection with this artist is the following 
in 1706: 'For drawing Grisies peticoat by Skugald,' 5s. 
stg. Does this mean that he turned his artistic talents to 
designing clothes or grounding patterns for embroidery ? 

In 1710 Sir John Medina painted Baillie, his wife, and 
the ' two bairens's pictures ' for £20 stg.,^ and in 1711 

* Old and New Edinburgh, by James Grant, ' For some years after the 
Revolution he was the only painter in Scotland, and had a very great run of 
business. This brought him into a hasty and incorrect manner.'— Pinkerton. 

- Induced by the promise of customers to venture from London, the Spaniard 
Juan Bautista Medina had come to the unknown North, bringing with him in 
a smack to Leith an ample supply of canvases containing bodies and postures, 
male and female, ready painted, to which the heads of his future clients were 
to be affixed. — Graham's Social Life of Scotland in the Eighteenth Century. 
He was knighted in 1707, before the Union, by the Duke of Queensberry. 




BOOK PLATE OF GEORGE BAILLIE 
OF JERVISWOOD. 



INTRODUCTION xxvii 

Hay did several pictures of Jerviswood as presents for 
various friends at the rate of £1, 10s. stg. each, and 10s. 
for the frame. 

The most expensive work got is a portrait from William 
Aikman,^ but of which member of the family is not stated. 

1717 Mr. Aickman in pairt for picturs . . £21 O 

In full payd for the picturs at 5 guinys sitting 

and 5£ coppys . . , . . 31 



£52 stg. 

When at Florence in 1733, Ladj^ Grisell has portraits 
of her husband, her daughter Grisie, and her two grand- 
daughters, Grisie and Helen, painted by Mr. Martin at a 
cost of eleven guineas, and in Bologne a ' pictor of the 
Autom ' is purchased for £2. Cases are bought for these 
works of art, the conveyance of which must have added 
considerably to the trouble of their homeward journey. 

George Baillie died on 6th August 1738 and was 
survived by his widow and by two daughters — Grisell, 
born at Redbraes on 26th October 1692, and Rachel, 
born in Warriston's Land on 23rd February 1696. 
He was predeceased by his only son Robert, who 
was born on 23rd February 1694 and died on 28th 
February 1696. His daughter Grisell was married on 
16th August 1710 to ' Mr. Alexander Murray, the son 
and heir of Sir David Murray of Stanhope, Baronet, by 
the Lady Anne Bruce, daughter of Alexander, Earl of 
Kincardine.' ^ Grisell's father, who 'was the most just and 
sagacious observer of mankind that was possible,' was 
opposed to the marriage, but overcome by his daughter's 

' ' William Aikman (laird of Cairney) had been at his easel since 1 7 12 in his 
High Street Close, a laird by rank, a good painter by craft, . . . but ten years 
were enough to weary Aikman of a poor business, and customers that grudged 
to be immortalised at ;^io for a painted yard of canvas, "forbye a frame," and 
he quitted Edinburgh . . . and went to London.' — Graham's Social Life of 
Scot/and in the Eighteenth Century. 

~ Appendix V. to Lady Murray's Memoirs. 



xxviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

tears, reluctantly gave his consent. The union turned out 
a most unfortunate one, for INIr. Murray ' under a pleasing 
exterior ' possessed ' a dark, moody and ferocious temper ' 
amounting almost to insanity, which ' made him the help- 
less victim of the most groundless suspicions.' This curious 
temper showed itself on the very first day after their 
marriage, and although he appears to have lived with 
his wife in his father-in-law's house for some five months, 
it was at length found necessary to obtain from the Court 
a Decree of Separation, which was pronounced on 5th 
IMarch 1714. With all his unreasoning jealousy, which 
made life with him impossible and dangerous, Mr. INIurray 
seems to have been reallv attached to his wife, for it is 
told that at the time when she was having her portrait 
painted in London, a gentleman, who afterwards was dis- 
covered to be her husband, came frequently to the artist's 
studio, where he ' Avould stand for an hour with his arms 
folded gazing at her likeness.' 

Mrs. Murray, afterwards Lady Murray, was for many 
years a great friend of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, until 
the latter ' thought fit to exercise her wicked wit in an 
infamous ballad ; which of course she loudly disclaimed 
all knowledge of, but of which her own letters to her sister 
Lady Mar plainly enough betray her to have been the 
writer.'^ 

Lady IMurray was famous both in London and Edin- 
burgh for her singing. Gay refers to her in his lines to 
Pope as ' the sweet-tongued Murray,' and afterwards in 
her flat in the Parliament Square of Edinburgh ' she was 
still accustomed to sing the native airs and ballads of her 
own country with a delicacy and pathos quite peculiar 
to herself,' ^ and to draw tears from the eyes of her 
audience. 



' Appendix V., Lady Murray's Memoirs. 
^ Appendix to Lady Murray's Memoirs. 



tj 



\ 




LADY MURRAY, 
AGED 33. 



(From a Portrait at Mtller stain by Maria Verelst.) 



INTRODUCTION xxix 

Lady INIurray's younger sister Rachel was married at 
Edinburgh, on 3rd September 1717, to Charles, Lord 
Binning, the eldest son of the Earl of Haddington. This 
marriage was as happy as Lady Murray's was the reverse. 
Lord Binning ^ seems in very truth to have become one of 
the family, and his early death from consumption, at 
Naples, on 27th December 1732, was deeply felt both by 
Lady Grisell and her husband. ' His heart, etc., was 
buried in St. Corrolas Church Yeard and his corps sent 
home to Tiningham.' ^ It was to his father-in-law that 
Lord Binning on his deathbed confided the education of 
his children. Lord Binning was survived bv : — 

Grisell Hamilton, born 6th April 1719. 

Thomas Hamilton, born 23rd October 1720, who suc- 
ceeded his grandfather Lord Haddington. 

George Hamilton, born 24th June 1723, who assumed 
the surname of Baillie and succeeded to the Baillie estates. 
His descendants eventually succeeded to the Earldom of 
Haddington. 

Charles James Hamilton, born 8th October 1727. 

Rachel Hamilton, born 3rd Januarv 1729. 

He was predeceased by Helen, born 8th October 1724 ; 
Charles, born 6th October 1725 ; and John, born 22nd 
October 1726.^ 

On Mr. BaiHie's death his estate passed by destination 
to his widow in liferent, then to his elder daughter and 
her issue, whom failing, to his younger daughter and her 
second son. Thus, as Lady Murray had no children, 
Lady Binning's second son, George, succeeded to the 



^ Lord Binning, like his father, was a versifier of considerable skill. One of 
his songs, ' Ungrateful Nanny,' was published in the Gentleman^ Magazine. 

" Note by Lady Grisell. 

* The above names and dates are taken from a Memorandum in Lady 
Grisell's handwriting, but judging from the Accounts there must have been 
another child of the marriage born in 1718, for in that year Lady Grisell 
spends a considerable sum of money for ' my Rachels cloaths to her child.' 



XXX HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

properties of Jerviswood, Mellerstain, etc., assuming the 
name of Baillie. Through the failure of the male line 
of Thomas, Lady Binning' s eldest son, the succession to 
the Earldom of Haddington opened to the descendants 
of her second son George. The Haddington and Baillie 
estates are thus now merged in the same proprietor, and 
Mellerstain is still the residence of George Baillie' s descend- 
ants. Nothing now remains of the ' Old melancholick 
hous that had had great buildings about it,' ^ purchased 
by the first George Baillie of Jerviswood in 1643, and of 
the Mellerstain known to Lady Grisell only the wings are 
left. Although the old tower which she used to have 
repaired so regularly has been replaced by the present 
Adam's buildings, her own voluminous Memoranda and 
Account Books have been carefully preserved, and it is 
to her descendant, Lord Binning, the present occupant 
of Mellerstain, that the thanks of the Scottish History 
Society are due for his kindness in placing at its disposal 
these most interesting and valuable records of a bj'^gone 
age and of an exceptional personality. 

So many sketches of Lady Grisell's life have been pub- 
lished, dealing with her romantic history, her poetic talents, 
and her charming personality that nothing further need 
be said here upon these points. Her extraordinary business 
capacity has also been the subject of much comment, but 
as it is the side of her character which is most prominently 
brought into notice in this volume, a few words in regard 
to it may be pardoned. 

From the time Lady Grisell, as a mere child, had proved 
her capacity through her skill in gaining communication 



^ 'Nov. lo, 1659. . . . We cam be Eccles and Stichell, and at lenth cam to 
Mellerstane, wher we met with Jerviswood, who took us in and we took a 
drink with him. It is ane old melancholick hous that had had great buildings 
about it. He cam with us to Lauder at night.' — Diary of Andrew Hay of 
Craignethan. 



INTRODUCTION xxxi 

Avith Mr. Robert Baillie, she became the mainstay of her 
father's house. She went with her mother to London 
after her father's estates were forfeited in order to solicit 
an allowance for the support of the family ; she came 
back from Holland by herself and brought over her younger 
sister Julian to Utrecht — and a wretched journey it was ; 
at Utrecht she sat up two nights a week ' to do the business 
that was necessary for the household ' ; after her marriage 
she returned to her father's house, on one occasion for 
many weeks, and worked day and night at putting his 
accounts in order ; when her brother was abroad she 
managed his affairs, and seems also to have helped many 
of her friends as well. It is, therefore, little to be wondered 
at that her husband trusted her with the entire administra- 
tion of his finances ' without scarce asking a question 
about them, except sometimes to say to her, "Is mj^ debt 
paid yet ? " though often did she apply to him for direc- 
tion and advice.' ' In her family her attention and 
economy reached to the smallest things ; and though this 
was her practice from her youth there never appeared in 
her the least air of narrowness ; and so far was she from 
avarice, the common vice of the age, that often has my 
father said to her " I never saw the like of you, goodwife, 
the older you grow, you grow the more extravagant ; 
but do as you please provided I be in no debt.' So writes 
Lady Murray, and an examination of the Accounts fully 
bears out her statement, showing as it does the most 
careful supervision, and also at times what must have 
struck her husband as dangerous extravagance. For 
instance, when the family went to London and the expen- 
diture suddenly rises from £733, 16s. lid. in 1714 to 
£1872, 18s. lOd. in 1715, the ' clothes ' bills alone increasing 
from an average of about £60 to £346, 13s. 4d., one can 
quite undertsand Mr. Baillie being somewhat horrified. 
As an example of the careful way Lady Grisell went 



xxxii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



into all matters of expenditure, note the following little 
statement. The unusual circumstance — namely, that 
Lady Grisell makes a mistake in it and thus arrives at a 
wrong result — rather adds to its interest. It is merely a 
jotting on a scrap of paper in Lady Grisell's handwriting, 
and was drawn up while abroad in 1732 to enable her to 
judge whether it was cheaper to take a house or to go 
into lodgings. 













D. 


C. G.i 


By wood in chamber . . . (£10 16 


0) 


54 





Flamboys , 






(1 2 


0) 


5 


5 


Chocalet 






(6 2 


9) 


30 


7 


Canary 






(8 16 


0) 


44 





Cyder and Ale 






(5 


9) 


25 


2 


AYax Candle 






(2 5 


7) 


11 


4 


Tee . 






(1 4 


0) 


6 





Sugar 






(4 3 


8) 


20 


9 


Drinkmoney 






(1 


10) 


5 


2 2 


Sundry smalls 






(0 12 


0) 


3 





Coffie 






(0 4 


11) 


1 


3 3 


House Book in 13 weeks aftei 


; 








taking what is above 


out ( 


)f it . 


(76 12 


2) 


383 


5 















2593 


3 







383 





5 


House Rent 


. (24 


0) 








120 





(V 


Saverio 


















Maid 


. (0 18 


0) 


4 


5 











Cook 


. (4 4 


0) 


21 














Cook's Boy 


. (0 18 


0) 


4 


5 





30 









533 5 

this is 41 Ducat a week for 13 weeks and is in Sterling 
money £8 4 sh. pr week which is in 13 weeks st. 108. 12. 

In Madam Petits we was 12 guinys pr week, which in 
13 weeks is ... . £163 14 



1 Ducats, carlins, and grains. See Appendix iv. p. 424. 

'^ Lady Grisell turns the page here and carries forward 383.0.5 instead of 

593-3-0- 



INTRODUCTION 



XXXIU 



£173 14 



1 also reckon for goats milk 

Ice and sundry other things 10 this £10 cither 

taken of mine or 
aded to Madam 
Petits makes it the 
same thing, 
with a much better dyit 

2 more at table and verj'' often strangers and many more 
candles.^ 

Madam Petits . . . £173 14 

Naples . . . . 105 12 



£65 2 
It is in 13 weeks more by the above sum of £65, 2sh. at 
Madam Petits than our own housekeeping which is just £5 a 
week more. 

Somehow these odd jottings on margins and scraps of 
paper intensify the human interest of the Accounts. 
Here are two or three more of a like nature. 

' Salvato Guarino near the Vice Roys Palice sells all Grossery 
wair.' 
' remember to take out the velvet for Mr. Baillie's Night gown.' 

' Francisco entered to Ld. Bn. the 15 of November at 5 Ducats 
a moneth without meat and gets livera.' 

' The price of washing at Naples 1st January 1733. 



a shirt and cravat 

shifts 

Table cloths fine 

Ditt cours 

Shiets fine 

Shits cours 

Aprons and wast coats 

table napkins fine 

Ditt cours 

all small pieces 

We see from the Aecou 



o 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
1 
1 



grams- 



h 



-2M. 



n 



h 

i 
1 ' 

4 



its that Lady Grisell shortly 



after her marriage took a course of cooking lessons from 



^ This evidently refers to her own housekeeping. 

C 



xxxiv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Mrs. Addison, for which she paid £1, 6s. stg., and also a 
course of dancing lessons for which £8 stg. M'^as to be paid 
to ' perfite her.' Although no mention is made of her 
having taken lessons in book-keeping, one cannot help 
feeling that she must also have had careful instruction 
in this branch of education. Lessons in this could appar- 
•ently be had easily, for in 1701 £2 stg. is paid for James 
Baillie — Lady Grisell's brother-in-law — ' lairning book- 
keeping in pairt,' and in 1714 either she or one of her 
daughters received lessons from Mr. M'Gie at a cost of 
£3, 2s. stg. If she did not receive lessons, she must have 
been a born book-keeper, for her accounts are remarkably 
able productions. 

Her principal account-book was what she termed her 
' Day Book,' but what would nowadays be termed a ' Cash 
Ledger,' for in it she did not enter her expenditure as it 
occurred from da}^ to day, but her expenditure as special- 
ised under separate headings. These headings vary from 
time to time, some of the less important being occasion- 
ally merged in others. The following may be taken as 
those of a fixed nature : — 

I. Household Expenditure. This included all expenses 
in connection with food, drink, lighting, firing, washing 
and feeding of animals destined for table use. 

II. Sundries, which included Education. 

III. Servants' wages. 

IV. Men-servants' Clothing. 

V. Clothing for herself, husband, and children. 

VI. Furniture and Furnishings. 

The minor headings which occur in some years but 
which are merged under Sundries in other years are : — 

I. Expenses of Horses. 

II. Doctors and Surgeons. 

III. Business Charges. 

IV. Estate Expenditure. 



INTRODUCTION xxxv 

V. Cess. 

VI. Pocket-money. 

It will thus be seen that Lady Grisell's ' Day Book ' 
nominally embraces the whole of the family expenditure. 
Full details, however, are not given under the headings 
' Household Expenditure ' and ' Pocket Money.' The 
reason for this omission in the first case is that for small 
ordinary house expenditure Lady Grisell kept separate 
books, the monthly totals of which she alone posted to 
her ' Day Book ' ; in the second, the reason was probably 
that her husband, to whom the ' Pocket INIoney ' was paid, 
kept no account thereof. 

Lady Grisell left three ' Day Books ' folio size, the first 
running from 1692 to 1718 inclusive, and containing 442 
pages ; the second from 1719 to 1742 inclusive, and con- 
taining 354 pages, and the third from 1742 to the date of 
her death (6th December 1746), continued b}^ her daughter, 
Lady ]Murray. She also left books containing the accounts 
of expenses in connection with their journeys to Bath 
and to the Continent ; Books containing Inventories of 
Bottles, etc. ; a Book of Receipts ; a Book of Bills of 
Fare ; Books relating to estate management during the 
years 1742, 1743 and 1744, and many other Account and 
Memoranda Books. All are written in her own clear 
handwriting, the character of which was so well known 
that in 1706, when the leaders of the 'Squadrone Volante' 
were corresponding in cypher, Secretary Johnston writes 
to Baillie, ' Write by an unknown hand ; your wife's is as 
well known as your own.' 

It will be easily understood that with such a wealth of 
material in these papers, the difficulty of selection has been 
great. After careful consideration, the Editor has resolved 
to deal mainly with Lady Grisell's first ' Day Book,' 
adding one or two selections from the other books. The 
reasons that have led to this choice are, first, that Day 



xxxvi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Book No. 1 deals with that intensely interesting period of 
Scottish history immediately preceding and succeeding 
the Union of the Parliaments ; second, that it gives the 
expenses of living in Edinburgh, in the country, and in 
London ; and third, that it gives the accounts for old 
INL's. Baillie's funeral and for the marriages of Lady 
Grisell's two daughters. Even this selected volume can 
only be dealt with by means of extracts, and much 
interesting matter has thus to be left out. An attempt 
has been made to remedy this by the formation of appen- 
dices drawn from the M'hole volume and by the notes 
which follow ; but such a method is at best unsatisfactory, 
taking as it were the flavour from the meat, and the 
Editor is only too conscious of its inadequacy. 

Then as to the extracts themselves and their arrange- 
ment, it has been thought best not to select individual 
entries, which would have still further destroyed the 
character of the Accounts, nor vet to select individual 
years, which would have led in some cases to needless 
repetition, but to take as the unit of selection individual 
branches, choosing the most interesting of each respect- 
tively, and arranging these not chronologically as a whole, 
but, in order to facilitate reference, chronologically in 
their respective groups. Thus all entries dealing with 
any one subject, such as, say, ' Expenses of Horses,' will 
be found together. 

As already stated, the Accounts begin about a year 
after the marriage of Mr. Baillie and Lady Grisell, that is, 
in the autumn of 1692, and are peculiarly rich in all sorts 
of information which can be most suitably referred to 
under separate headings. 



INTRODUCTION xxxvii 

I. Rents of Houses and of Lodgings and Expenses 

OF Travelling 

We learn from the Accounts that the young couple 
took up their quarters in a house in Warriston Close,^ 
perhaps the same house which had belonged to Baillie's 
grandfather, Lord Warriston, and to which his father 
had turned on his wav to execution with the remark to 
his sister-in-law, ' Many a sweet day and night with God 
had your now glorified father in that lodging or chamber.' ^ 
The rent paid for it was £200 Scots, or £16, 13s. 4d. stg., 
and the whole expenditure of their establishment, including 
upkeep of property, expenses of horses, journeys to London, 
etc., for the next three years averaged £430 per annum, 
which does not seem overmuch, according to our modern 
ideas, for a ' Baron,' as the county Members of Parliament 
were called. It must, however, be borne in mind that 
at this time the salary of a Judge of the Court of Session 
was only £300 (raised in 1707 to £500), Avhile a Peer with 
an income of £500 a year could not plead poverty as an 
excuse for changing his politics.^ 

In 1697 old Mrs. Baillie died, leaving to her daughters, 
Helen Baillie or Hay and Elizabeth Baillie or Weems, her 
property, which consisted of household furniture and 
£50 stg. invested in the Darien Scheme.'^ Her death set 
free her jointure of £102, 13s. 8d., and George Baillie and 
his family accordingly moved into a more expensive house 
belonging to Bailie Hamilton, at a rent of £38, 6s. Their 
flitting cost them 18s. 4d. Here they remained but a short 
time, moving in 1700 to a house belonging to Sir James 
Foulis of Colinton (generally known as Lord Colinton), 



' Warriston Close is still extant, running north from the High Street at a 
point nearly opposite to St. Giles. 
- Wodrow's Atiakcta. ^ Lockhart Papers. 

■* Edinburgh Testaments, 17th September 1707. 



xxxviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

which was probably situated in Foulis Close, and for which 
the rent was £33, 6s. 8d. This house they occupied until 
1707, when they gave up living in Edinburgh and retired 
to Mellerstain. Mr. Baillie, however, came regularly to 
Edinburgh for the Assembly of the Church of Scotland, 
lodging either at Mrs. Room's ^ (an excellent name for a 
lodging-house keeper) or Mrs. Marshall's, paying as a 
rule 5s. stg. per night : — ' A chamber in Mrs. Marshalls 2s., 
candle, 2s., maid Is., 5s.' 

What added very considerably to Mr. Baillie's expen- 
diture was the necessity of frequent journeys to London on 
political business. We find such entries as : — 

1694. Augt. 1. Taken with me to England £948, 16s. 
(£79, Is. 4d. stg.). 

English road when I last came from London with the Secre- 
tary £80, 10s. (£6, 14s. 2d. stg.).^ 

1707. April 1. to London journey in his pocket 50 Guinys. 

For to answer bills to London £103 stg. more. 

To Mr. Watson for a bill sent to London to Jeris £2100, 4s. 
(£175, Os. 4d. stg.). 

There can be little doubt that when Baillie travelled 
by himself he rode, as there are constant references to 
the pm'chase, conveyance, and repair of ' Clog bags.' On 
one occasion, at least (1714), he returned by sea to New- 
castle, which cost him £3, 7s., whence he proceeded to 
IMellerstain by horse, the hire of these (three) costing him 
£2, 5s. 

Then in addition to these business journeys there were 
constant journeys for health. In 1696 an expedition was 
made to Bath at a cost of £84, Os. 9d. stg.^ The October 



^ George Hume of Kimmerghame, an uncle of the Earl of Marchmont, 
when he came to Edinburgh in January 1695 lodged 'in Mrs. Romes, up 
Blair's stair, the fourth story upon the street.' — George Hjtme^s Diary, (\\xo\.e.d, 
in Miss Warrender's Marchmont and the Htimes of Polwarth. 

" Mr. Secretary Johnston, Baillie's uncle. 

■'* This may have been a political journey, as the Court was often at Bath. 



INTRODUCTION xxxix 

of the following year they were at Prestonpans ^ at a cost 
of £18 stg., where they spent a considerable sum on ' Scots 
tartan muslin.' In 1701 they went to Scarborough from 
9th July to 12th September, during which time meat and 
lodgings cost them £33, 6s. 8d. stg. From thence they 
brought back ' Two barrils of souns and gullits,'^ which 
cost lis. (stg.) and 8s. 4d. (stg.) for carriage. It is curious 
to find Prestonpans a more expensive place of residence 
than Scarborough. 

After the Union Baillie must have been more and more 
in London, for his daughter writes that ' he strictly ob- 
served his attendance in Parliament and blamed those 
who made a bustle to get in and then absented themselves 
upon any pretence.' Unfortunately we have no note of 
his expenses nor of the presents he always brought back 
to his children, unless the following are some of them : — 



rt 



rFor a goun to Rach 



O 



For a black gown to Grisic 



to 



For three night gouns to me and the bairens 
For making the gouns by Madmoscl Odinat 



£9 12 





7 





6 1 





2 10 






On the accession of George i., when Baillie became a 
Lord of the Admiralty, he moved all his family to London. 
Two servants, Tam Youll and Katie Hearts, were sent by 
sea, ' fraught to London victuals furnished by the skipper 
£l, 10s.,' and the heavy baggage, including four and a half 
barrels of herrings, was also sent by sea in three different 
ships at a cost of £3, 8s. The family went by stage-coach,^ 



^ A small town on the Firth of Forth, eight or nine miles east of Edin- 
burgh. 

^ When the Baillies dined with Lady Essex in London, on 2ist December 
1722, the second course consisted of 'a sadle mutton, a dish cod souns with 
hard eg and half yolks of egs and some poatched egs on it.' 

^ This must be a very early reference to stage-coaches in Scotland. There 
was no coach between Edinburgh and Glasgow until 1749. 



xl HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

five seats costing £22, 10s, and 2s. 6d. for booking money. 
A sum of £2, 7s. was paid for excess luggage, each person 
being allowed 20 lbs. free. The coach was apparently 
joined at Dunglass,^ the Baillies taking with them ' little 
Robie Pringle,'^ and the expenses of the six during the 
thirteen days which it took them to reach London were 
only £10. They arrived in London on 18th December 
1714, and at first hired a furnished house at a rent of 
£14 per month. This they left at the end of June 1715, 
paying in addition to their rent ' To Mr. Brown for spoiling 
his furniture 10s. 2d.,' and took an unfurnished house, 
apparently at Chelsea, at a rent of £45 per annum. They 
must have taken the house as it stood, for the repairing 
of the roof, glazing of windows, painting and sundry 
' reparations ' were all paid for by them. 

In August 1716 they paid one of their many visits to 
Bath. They travelled by coach via Oxford, the journey 
there and back to London costing £20, the servants and 
luggage going separately. Their lodgings there, four 
rooms and garrets, were at the rate of £2, 5s. 9d. per week. 
In addition to the entries relating to taking the waters, 
amusements, etc., there occurs the following : — ' For 
cleaning all our teeth at Bath £l, 14s.' 

As already stated, Rachel Baillie was married in 1717 
to Lord Binning. As the marriage was to take place in 
Edinburgh, the family, five in number, left London on 
5th August in a coach with six horses, which was to carry 
them to Scotland in nine days ^ for £32, 15s. The expenses 
on the road on this occasion amounted to £14, 13s. 9d. 

^ A property on the east coast of Berwickshire belonging to Sir John Hall. 
See p. 27. 

- Probably the son of Mr. Robert Pringle, Under-Secretary of State, who 
was the third son of Sir Robert Pringle of Stitchell. 

' This must have been very fast travelling for those days. In 1725 the hire 
of ' a close bodyed carriage and six horses ' cost £'^0, and the journey took 
fourteen days. In 1717 the commissioners on the forfeited estates were each 
allowed £^0 for their expenses on the road to Scotland. 




LADY BINNING. 

AGED 29. 



{From a Portrait at Mellerstain by Maria I'ere/sl.) 



INTRODUCTION xli 

In 1729 the household were again resident at Mellerstain, 
and consequently the visit to Bath in that year was a much 
greater undertaking. The expedition consisted of a coach 
and six horses and eight riding horses, the journey from 
Berwick to Bath taking sixteen davs. There were six of 
the family in the coach and two maids ; and the cost of 
their provisions on the road amounted to £23, 18s. 6d. 
The board and lodging of seven men for the same period 
came to £5, 12s., or at the rate of Is. per diem per head, 
while the cost of feeding the horses during the same period 
amounted to £30, Is. 9M. The horses got five days' rest 
at Bath, after which nine of them were sent back to 
Scotland under charge of ' Tam,' who got £14, 14s. for his 
expenses on the journey. 

But by far the most important of their journeys was 
undertaken in 1731, when Lord Binning was ordered 
abroad for his health. Jerviswood, who was getting on 
in life, was by no means anxious to undertake the fatigues 
of a long foreign sojourn, but he yielded to the solicitations 
of his son-in-law, and on the 9th of June 1731 he and 
Lady Grisell, their daughters Grisie and Rachel, their 
son-in-law Lord Binning, and their granddaughter ' little 
Oris ' landed at Rotterdam. They were accompanied 
by at least four servants, two women and two men, but it 
is a little difficult to gather the total number of the party, 
as friends seem to join and leave them. The accounts 
show clearly the course of their journey. They travelled 
by schuit or public canal boat, by diligence, by private 
carriage, and by chair. As was but natural, they made 
first for Utrecht, where Lady Grisell had lived in exile 
with her father, and where, in spite of poverty and 
anxiety, they had been a merry household. ' She had 
the greatest pleasure in shewing us every corner of the 
town, which seemed fresh in her memory ; particu- 
larly the house she had lived in, which she had a great 



xlii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

desire to see ; but when she came there they would not 
let her in, by no arguments either of words or money, for 
no reason but for fear of dirtying it. She offered to put 
off her shoes, but nothing could prevail, and she came 
away much mortified at her disappointment.' ^ 

The fkst long stay was made at Spa, where they took 
lodgings at the ' Loup,' engaging their own cook. They 
must have found this house comfortable, for the party 
makes a still longer stay in it on their return journey. 
Here they took the waters, and here also they gave a ball 
and supper to ' 70 persons.' The expense of this latter 
amounted to £13, 4s. 5d., including £l, lis. 6d. for the 
' fidels ' and 12s. for the ' Buckie ' (bouquet). Then they 
moved on through Liege, Namur, Arlon (where we find 
the suggestive note ' imposed on '), and other places on 
the road south. Each little town provided its custom- 
house worries and ' searchers ' to be squared, sometimes 
not altogether satisfactorily, as witness Champagne, 
where ' we was searched overly,' and Chalons, where ' we 
was stopd 3 days by the impertinence of the Bourro.* 
They reached Lyons on 11th October, and contracted to 
be conveyed to Tmin partly by chaises and partly by 
chairs ' over the Alps cald Munt Sines.' (It will be noted 
that the sums entered for conveying the party from place 
to place generally include meals, sometimes two and some- 
times three a day.) Then they passed through Milan, 
Parma, Reggio, Modena, Bologna (where it is refreshing 
to see the first entry of lis. 9d. for ' sasageses '), Loretto, 
and so to Rome, where they arrived on ' the 23 Novr. at 
one o'clock of the day 1731.' On this occasion but a short 
stay was made in the Eternal City, the party pushing on 
to Naples, which was their objective, and which they 
reached on 5th December. 



' Lady Murray's Memoirs. 




LORD BINNING. 
{From a Portrait at Mellerstaiti.) 



INTRODUCTION xliii 

At Naples they took a house at £8 per month, for which 
they had to supply china, glass, cutlery, napery, etc. 
They also hired a coach and horses at £8 per month, and 
engaged a cook and cook-boy, a maid, and M. Saverio and 
a ' Vanditor.' Here Lady Grisell at once set to work to 
learn Italian, her master being paid the munificent sum 
of 13s. 7d. per month ! In regard to this her daughter 
Avrites : ' At Naples she shewed what would have been 
a singular quickness of capacity and apprehension at any 
age much more at hers. She knew not one word of 
Italian, and had servants of the country that as little 
understood one word she said ; so that at first she was 
forced to call me to interpret betwixt them ; but in a 
very little while, with only the help of a grammar and 
dictionary, she did the whole business of her family with 
her Italian servants, went to shops, bought everything 
she had occasion for, and did it so well that our acquaint- 
ances who had lived many years there begged the favour 
of her to buy for them when she provided herself ; think- 
ing and often saying she did it to much better purpose 
than they could themselves.' 

As well as studying Italian, the Baillies at this time 
also studied music, and had much music copied, amongst 
which the music of Corelli is specially mentioned. 

They remained in Naples until the beginning of May 1732, 
when they went for the summer to Portiche, again taking 
a house and having to provide a good many furnishings. 
On the 14th November they returned to Naples, where 
apparently thej?^ were Joined by two of Lord Binning's 
sons and a second daughter, and where Lord Binning 
died on 27th December. The Accounts show the expense 
of the mourning, including a velvet nightgown for ' my D.,* 
which sounds strange to ears accustomed to the modern 
meaning of the word ' nightgown.' After this sad event 
chaises and saddlery were repaired, boxes purchased and 



xliv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

got ready, accounts settled, and a start made on the 
homeward journey. Before leaving Naples, however, 
they sent home by ship a supply of hams, parmesan cheese, 
and macaroni. They also shipped home marble slabs to 
the value of £646, 16s. sterling. ^ 

They reached Rome on 29th March 1733, and remained 
there until 22nd April. Thence they proceeded to Florence, 
where Lady Grisell had the pictures already referred to 
of her husband, her daughter Grisie, and her two grand- 
daughters Gris and Helen painted by Mr. Martin for 
£11, lis., and where she saw the ostrich in reference to 
which she afterwards notes for her grandsons, ' If you 
have any brass money in your pocket it will be very good 
for the ostrich.' ^ At Bologna they took a box in the 
Opera House, which they provided with a cushion and 
cloth ; and at Venice they bought books and treacle ! and 
attended amongst other things a ' Gundaliers ' wedding, 
subscribing a shilling to the fiddlers. Thence through 
Verona, Trent, Innsbruck, Frankfort, Cologne, they worked 
their way back to Spa, where they again made a long stay, 
and then passing through Liege and Brussels to Paris 
they finally crossed over from Calais to Dover, carrying 
with them silver, lace, and clothes of all sorts. 

Looking through these Accounts, one cannot but note 
the constant repairing required by the chaises, or ' cheases,' 
as Lady Grisell frequently writes it, the furbishing up of 
pistols and purchasing of sword belts, etc., indicative of 



' Boxes containing all sorts of things, clothing, books, honey, treacle, pins, 
needles, lamps, etc., were sent home in various ways: ' by the Dut. of Newcastle 
to be left at Dr. Mowbrays,' 'in the trunk that goes to Leghorn to be sent in 
a man of war,' to be sent by John Gordon Banker in Rotterdam 'in a Scots 
ship to Robert Foulerton at the Custome Mouse in I.eath,' etc. Careful lists 
were kept of what each box contained, and at the top of one of these is a deleted 
note in Lady Grisell's hand, '43 Marbel Tables in the coach house, 2 tables in 
the galarie.' 

- See p. 396. 




■GRISIE' AND 'RACHIE' BAILLIE, 
AGED 6 AND 2 RESPECTIVELY. 

(From a Picture at Mellentain by John Scougall.) 



INTRODUCTION xlv 

the bad ^ and dangerous state of the roads. It will also 
be noticed that even at that early stage in the history of 
tea the British matron refused to do without it, and 
seemed to have had little or no difficulty in obtain- 
ing it. 

Amongst the purchases, ' beavor ' skin stockings strike 
one as peculiar ; and the number of pairs of spectacles 
purchased is also remarkable. It looks as if a pair must 
have been left behind by mistake at every stopping-place. 

Amongst the books purchased abroad there are three 
cookery-books added to Lady Grisell's household library. 



II. Education and Amusements 

As is but natural, entries relating to ' Grisie ' and 
' Rachie ' bulk largely in the Accounts. We cannot trace 
the career of ' Grisie ' from her birth, as that event took 
place shortly before the Accounts begin, but we can 
follow the life of Rachie from its very dawn, when £2, 18s. 
stg. is paid to Mrs Scott the midwife, 9s. 8d. to Mr. 
Livingston for christening her, 3s. 8d. to the ' bathel of 
the Church,' and 4s. lOd. in charity, up to the date of her 
marriage in 1717, when £4, 6s. is paid ' To my Rachys Pro- 
clamation etc.,' and £1, Is. 6d. 'For the garland that is brock 
over the Brid's head,' ' For Bryds favours £3,' and ' To the 
Brids Garter £l, 3s. '^ We can watch the two sisters grow- 



' ' I bought a chaise at Rome, which cost me twenty five pounds, good English 
pounds, and had the pleasure of being laid low in it the very second day after I set 
out. I had the marvellous good luck to escape with life and limbs ; but my 
delightful chaise broke all to pieces, and I was forced to stay a whole day in 
a hovel while it was tacked together in such a way as would serve to drag me 
hither.' So writes Lady Mary Wortley Montagu from Naples on 25th Novem- 
ber 1739. 

- 'At tlie marriages of persons of the upper class favours were sewn upon 
the bride's dress. When the ceremony was concluded all the members of the 
company ran towards her, each endeavouring to seize a favour. When the 



xlvi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

ing up by watching their petticoats growing down. ' 1708. 
For lining Rachys gown and letting down her peticoats ' 
2s. stg. Then there are all the payments in connection with 
their education, and with IMiss May Menzies who came 'at 
Lambis 1705 to wate on my children,' and who remained 
as a friend of the family presumably until her death. 

Miss Menzies was the daughter of Wilham Menzies of 
Raw, W.S., and her nominal salary was £8 stg. per annum, 
but ' I have always paid her £100 Scots ' (£8, 6s. 8d. stg.). 
She was a devoted friend to her charges, for in 1709 Lady 
Grisell enters, ' To her over and above her fie for her care 
of the bairens Avhen they had the fever ' £27, 12s. 2d. stg., 
and there are also many entries of presents given to her, 
such as dresses, etc. Talking of her girlhood. Lady Murray 
writes as follows : ' We were always with her [Lady 
Grisell] at home and abroad, but when it was necessary 
we should learn what was fit for us ; and for that end 
she got Mrs. May Menzies, a daughter of Mr. Menzies 
of Raws, Writer to the Signet, to be our governess, who 
was well qualified in all respects for it, and whose faithful 
care and capacity my mother depended so much upon, 
that she was easy when we were with her. She was always 
with us when our masters came and had no other thought 
or business but the care and instruction of us ; which I 
must here acknowledge with gratitude, having been an 
indulgent though exact mistress to us when young ; and 
to this time, it being now forty-five years that she has 
lived with us, a faithful, disinterested friend, with good 



confusion had ceased the bridegroom's man proceeded to pull off the bride's 
garter, which she modestly dropped. This was cut into small portions, which 
were presented to each member of the company.' — Roger's Scotland, Social and 
Domestic. We also learn from the same source that it was the custom when 
a bride of a more humble station entered her new home to break a cake of 
shortbread over her head, the fragments of which were gathered up by the 
young people and dreamed on. Perhaps the bride's garland here mentioned 
was a prettier form of the same custom. 




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INTRODUCTION xlvii 

•sense, good temper, entirely in our interest, and that with 
so much honesty that she always spoke her mind sincerely 
without the least sycophantry.' 

The following letter of instructions by Lady Grisell to 
Miss Menzies gives us some idea of her duties : — 

Edinburgh, August 16, 1705. 
Directions for Grisie given May Menzies 
To rise by seven a clock and goe about her duty of reading, 
etc. etc., and be drest to come to Breckfast at nine, to play on 
the spinnet till eleven, from eleven till twelve to write and 
read French. At two a clock sow her seam till four, at four 
learn arithmetic, after that dance and play on the spinet again 
till six and play herself till supper and to bed at nine. 

But the education of Grisie, poor mite, had begun long 
before this, and had been conducted partly at school and 
partly by special masters. On 10th November 1696, when 
she is just four years old, her reading master receives 
4s. lOd. for the quarter, and her education in this branch 
is completed in 1701, Avhen a payment of £l, 10s. is made 
' to Porterfield to perfect Grisie in reading.' Mr. Thomson 
receives 9s. 8d. per quarter for teaching writing, Mr. 
Brown £1 for teaching arithmetic, and Mr. M'Gie £l. Is. 6d. 
for teaching geography. We also read of 5s. 5d. as the 
quarter's fee for the reading school ; of 2s. 3d. for ' Rachies 
quarter at the School,' and of 4s. lOd. paid for ' the Bairens 
milk going to the School.' There is no mention of French 
lessons — except those given by Miss Menzies — until the 
family are in London in 1715, when ' Mistress Faucour ' 
receives 10s. for a month's tuition and Mr. Dumbar £l, Is. 6d. 
for the same. 

Then there were dancing lessons, both for the children 
and, as already mentioned, for Lady Grisell herself. The 
children's lessons ' with the Frenchman ' cost about 
£l, 3s. 8d. a month, just about half what was paid in London 
to ' Mr. Isaach for a months dancing to Rachie £3, 4s. 6d.' 



xlviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Then of course they go to the balls given by their dancing 
masters, and we read : — 

1702. May. To Rachys Ball and Grisics . . £0 4 11 

For a straw hat to Grisies Ball . 10 

Gloves to them . . . 2 6 

Cheries at the Ball . . . 10 

We also find the rather suggestive entry : ' To Grisies 
master for coals ' Is. 2|d stg. 

In addition to going out to dances they sometimes had 
the fiddlers in, for 4s. lOd. was paid ' To Thomson the violer 
for j)laying to the bairens a day,' and 9s. 8d. was paid ' For 
the Kelso fiddlers 2 days at Mellerstains.' 

Of course the fiddlers may have been employed for 
the pleasure of their music alone, for music was one 
of George Baillie's delights, and one which was shared 
in bv his wife and children. The musical education of 
the latter was certainly varied. ' Grisie ' was taught to 
play the spinet, virginal, viol and harp. She was also 
taught singing and ' through bass,' while ' Rachie ' learns 
the spinet, virginal, and flute. ' Grisie ' continued her 
musical studies long after her marriage, and we find her 
taking advantage of her stay in Naples, then one of the 
principal schools of music in the world, to prosecute them 
there. By the way, there was apparently no one in 
Edinburgh competent to mend a virginal, although there 
were tuners there, for in 1714 the ' fine virginal ' has to 
be sent from Mellerstain to Leith and shipped to London 
to be repaired. The repairs cost £12, 10s. and the expenses 
of getting it there and back came to £2, 3s. 8d. How 
devoted the family were to music is shown from their 
Accounts while in London, which show constant entries 
for tickets for operas and concerts. They evidently 
belonged to the Handel faction, and not to that of his 
rival, Bononcini, for they patronise the concert of Castruchi, 
the leader of Handel's Opera band, who was famous as 



INTRODUCTION xlix 

a performer on the ' Violetta Marina,' an instrument of 
his own invention ; and they go to hear Bernachi, ' II Re 
dei cantatori,' take the part of Goffredo in Handel's 
' Rinaldo,' and Berenstadt sing the bass part of Arganti. 
Evidently Bernachi, whose singing particularly appealed 
to the musically educated, was a special favourite of 
theirs. He presented them with a dog called ' Senorina,' 
and they presented him with a gold watch costing £25 
and a gold chain costing £4, 10s. ^Vhen her grandsons 
Lord Haddington and his brother went abroad in 1740, 
Lady Grisell specially directed them when at Bologna to 
' ask also for Sig'"^ Barnachi the famous singer and Sig^^ 
Sandoni the husband of the Cuzone,^ they will be pleased 
to be of service to any of our family.' 

Then they bought tickets from the famous singer IMrs. 
Anastasia Robinson, afterwards Countess of Peterborough, 
and they no doubt attended her weekly concerts in Golden 
Square, where were to be found ' all such as had any pre- 
tensions to politeness and good taste.' ^ 

Concert tickets in London cost about 10s. each ; while 
in Edinburgh we read of ' a concert to Grissie,' at various 
times costing Is. 2|d. stg., 2s. 2d., 2s. 6d., etc. 

Money was easily spent in London on less intellectual 
pleasures than music. Masquerades, a form of entertain- 
ment to which the king was partial, were naturally fashion- 
able, and to many of these the Baillies went as ' Caposhins,' 
' Pilgrims,' etc. Rachel was present as a ' Country Girl ' 
at the famous masquerade at Montagu House, tickets for 



^ Cuzzoni, one of the most famous singers of the day. She appeared first in 
London on I2th January 1722 as Teophane in Handel's * Otto.' It was while 
rehearsing for this opera that Handel in a rage seized her round the waist 
and threatened to throw her out of the window. On one occasion a gentleman 
in the gallery poetically exclaimed, ' Damn her, she has a nest of nightingales 
in her belly.' She married Sigr. Sandoni, a harpsichord master and composer 
of some eminence. She was a foolish and extravagant woman, and eventually 
died in great poverty. — Grove's Dictionary of Music. 

^ Burney's History. 

d 



1 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

which were much sought after, and where ' there was a 
drawing-room for the King who was not there,' and 
' where everything was in great order and magnificence,' 
and ' could not have cost less than five or six hundred 
pounds.'^ Then they lost money at cards at the Dukes 
of Roxburgh and Montrose, at the Earls of Stair and 
Rothes, at Ladies Loudoun, Strafford, Mar, Dupplin, etc. 
They dined with the Prince and Princess of Wales, with 
the Dukes of Chandos and Hamilton, Sir Robert Walpole, 
Mr. Speaker Onslow, Mr. Doddington, and scores of other 
interesting people,^ ' and were as usual in the first circles, 
Mr. Baillie's house being the resort of the best company 
and the rendezvous of many of the wits of that day.'^ 

We have mentioned how the Baillies accepted a present 
of a dog from Signor Bernachi, but we read in Lady 
Murray's Memoirs of another present which was not so 
well received. She writes : ' He had an infinite pleasure 
in giving even little trifling presents to his friends, but 
did not like receiving. If it was from any he thought 
had a view to his interest for them he would not suffer 
it though never so trifling. He made us return a parrot 
given us when he was in the Admiralty by a gentleman 
who was soliciting something there.' As to this Mr. Harry 
Graham writes : * ' To be given a parrot at any time is 
annoying, but when such a gift partakes of the nature of 
a bribe it becomes doubly offensive.' Mr. Graham, how- 
ever, forgot when writing this that Mr. Baillie's fondness 
for animals was well known. An examination of Lady 
Grisell's accounts shows that the gentleman who presented 
the parrot was not such a simpleton as Mr. Graham not 



^ Diary of Mary, Countess of Corvper. 

' See 'Bills of Fair,' p. 281, in which Lady Grisell not only states with 
whom they dined, but what they had for dinner, and how the dishes were 
arranged on the table. 

' Appendix to Lady Murray's Memoirs. 

* A Group of Scottish Wot?ien, by Harry Graham. 



INTRODUCTION li 

unnaturally concludes, for Mr. Baillie had a sufficient 
liking for parrots to pay 4s. lOd. for having one brought 
from Glasgow in 1703, and a reward of 2s. ' for finding the 
parrit,' when it escaped in 1704. Besides this parrot 
there were purchased in 1705 a mavis for 2s. 6d., 2 lint 
whites for Is. 8d., and in 1713 the then large sum of £l, 10s. 
is paid for a ' mavis cage.' ' The dog Lyon ' is purchased 
in 1718 for 2s. 6d., and in the same year 10s. 6d. is paid 
' To teach Jessie the dog tricks.' 

III. Servants 

The question of servants seems to have bulked as 
largely then as now. One is accustomed to talk of the 
good old-fashioned servant who came as a girl and died 
as a nuisance at an advanced age, but although there 
are occasional traces of this class of domestic to be met 
with in the Baillie Accounts, one is more struck by the 
constant changes in the household. In fact, those changes 
are so frequent that it is very difficult to judge of the size 
of the establishment,^ and one is reluctantly driven to the 
conclusion that Lady Grisell was in some ways just too 
good a manager. For instance, there are eighteen different 
servants mentioned in the first three years of their married 
life, and that in an establishment consisting apparently 
of four women servants and a manservant. During the 
next ten years there are sixty different servants men- 
tioned, of whom thirty-one do not remain a year and 
seventeen do not remain two years. When, after the 
accession of George i., the family took up its quarters in 
London, the same ill luck as to domestics followed them 
there. In 1715 there were no fewer than eight cooks : one 
remained a day, one a night, and one made out two months. 



servants. 



^ In 1697 cess is paid for eight servants, and in London there were eight 

GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY qno t •; 

OF THE CHURCH OP JESUS CHRIST ^ ^ * ^ ** 
OF LAHEtt-OAY SAINTS AUG 22 1945 



lii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

but was then carried away by the constables. The same 
misfortune overtook Hellen Williams the housemaid, who 
is charged with 8s. 2d. ' For constables and cariing befor a 
Justice of Peace.' No hint is given of their crimes, nor 
do we learn anything of their fate, unless this item in the 
following year's Accounts has reference to them : — ' July 
31. To the servants at Newgate Prison 2s. 6d.' In 1717 
there were four cooks, one of whom stayed a night and 
one a fortnight and was paid for a month, which meant a 
good deal under Lady Grisell's careful sway. No wonder 
Lady Grisell when an old woman wrote to her daughter, 
Lady Murray : ' My dear, Stay till Saturday if Lady S. 
desires you, and tell her not to be uneasie at the disap- 
pointments in servants, for being a thing she will always 
meet, it would be a plague indeed if one laid it to heart. 
If she can lift her house to St. Giles's we should all live 
together and everyone serve another, but I would keep 
the purse and make them eat their meat in order. Om^ 
housemaid is so long that your sister has made two of 
her, for we have only her and the cook and I 'm in no 
hope for a laundrimaid. You '11 think I have said enough 
with a vomite on my stomach which is only by way of 
prevention.' ^ 

There are, as has been hinted, several notable exceptions 
to this short service system. May Menzies, the governess, 
to whom reference has already been made, remained all 
her life, and Tam Youll, the coachman, seems also to have 
been more or less of a fixture. Tam entered the Baillies' 
service in 1706 as groom, at a money wage of £l, 10s. stg. 
and his clothes, excepting linen. He eventually became 



^ This is written by Lady Grisell in an old and shaky hand in the middle of 
an undated letter from Lady Binning to Lady Murray describing a seizure Lady 
Grisell had had the previous night, diagnosed by Dr. Carlton as the result of 
wind caused by too long fasts. He advises ' she should eat little at a time, and 
often, fasting long is very bad for her.' 



INTRODUCTION liii 

coachman, and went with the family to London, where his 
wages were raised to £3. His career exempHfies another 
point in connection with Lady Grisell's household service, 
viz. the custom of fining the domestics for faults and 
charging them with any loss sustained through their 
carelessness or misconduct. Thus there is an entry in 
Tam Youll's account as follows : 1709. ' To him for 
George Dods loss of work when drunk and lam'd his leg 
£7, 4s. Scots.' ^ And George Dods's account for the same 
year contains this entry : ' March 25. For a velvet cap 
he spoilt £2, 8s. Scots.' In 1712 Tam is again in disgrace 
for having got drunk at Makerstoun, for which he is fined 
10s. stg., the entry being, ' April 20. To him for excessive 
drinking.' In 1714 he meets with still severer punish- 
ment in connection with a mare which had apparently 
come by an accident through his carelessness, for he has 
not only to pay £l, 10s. stg. ' To the ferriers account,' 
but also 10s. stg. for the hire of a horse ' to the coch when 
the mare was spoilt ' — £2 out of a money wage of £2, 10s. 
When his wife is ill a doctor and drugs are provided for 
her, but they are charged against him in his account — 
£l, 16s. 6d. It is the same with the accounts of all the 
other servants. They are carefully charged with anything 
provided or done for them or their families beyond the 
bargain of their service. They are fined for misbehaviour, ^ 
and have to pay for ' breakages ' unless reported the same 
day.^ 

As this subject of servants is one of considerable interest, 
Lady Grisell's ' Memorandums and Directions to Servants ' 



^ It was Youll who was drunk, and not Dods, as is shown by another 
entry. By the way there were not fewer than three ' Tam Youlls ' in the 
establishment at the same time, which must have made things a trifle 
confusing. 

- '1706. To James Carrin for wilful absence from his service, ;C3 Scots.' 
His wage was ;^30 Scots. 

^ See p. 275, rule 22. 



liv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



has been included in this volume. It is rendered still 
more interesting by there being given a table of their 
weekly diet — diet which would certainly not suit the 
servant of to-dav. It will be observed that there is no 
such thing as butter allowed with their ' oat loaf, broun 
bread or Ry.' 

As already stated, it is difficult to gather from the 
earlier accounts how many servants were kept, but when 
the family were in London there apjDcar to have been eight, 
and latterly at Mellerstain there must have been about 
seventeen, as is shown by a list of the servants as at 
Whitsunday 1740 : — - 

Ann Turnbull, Housekeeper 

Margaret Rutherd, Gentlewoman 

Betty ogle, Landry maid 

Janet, Housemaid 

Ann Castles, Cook 

Margaret Hard5% Washer 

Hellen Youl, Dary Maid 

Pegie, Kitchen Maid 

Hendry de Pallie, Butler 

George Deans, Gardner 

Robert Taylor, Cochman 

William Hull, Footman 

Tam Youll, his land coachman about 

Andrew Youl, Postilion 

George Carter, Groom . 

Tam Youll, Carter 

John, Under cook . 

George Howison, herd without meat 

George Dods, officer without meat . 



In Appendix ii. will be found a note of the money wages 
paid to servants prior to 1718 as shown in the Accounts. 
In judging of the figures there given as applicable to 
Scotland, it is necessary to add to the money wage the 





£5 










5 










2 










2 










8 










2 










2 










2 










14 










14 










8 










5 










2 










2 










2 


10 







4 










3 










5 










7 


5 







£94 


15 






INTRODUCTION Iv 

value of two pairs of shoes supplied annually to each 
maidservant, and the value of all clothes except linen 
supplied to most of the menservants. The former may 
be taken as having been worth about 4s. stg. per annum 
and the latter about £2 stg. per annum. 

' Drink money ' or tips to servants of course figures 
largely, and there seems little doubt that this burden was 
even more oppressive then than now. As far as can be 
judged, ' drink money ' per annum averaged about one- 
fifth of the annual wage-bill of the servants. The entry 
which gives the largest amount of drink money is in 1717, 
and is as follows : ' For all drink money while at Edin- 
burgh and travelling about the 6 moneths I was in Scot- 
land £29, 10s. stg.' This would represent something like 
£200 of the money of to-day, and strikes one as a large sum 
even for people in such a position as the Baillies, who were 
no doubt accompanied by two or three servants. 

It is not only the amount of the drink money that is 
surprising ; it is also the servants to whom drink money 
is paid. The recipients are nearly always nm-ses.^ Of 
course one can understand that at a christening the nurse 
would be the natural person to tip, but the occasions cannot 
always have been christenings, even admitting how fashion- 
able large families then were. 

As already stated, the menservants received clothing, 
but it is a little difficult to give details of what was supplied, 
as in most cases material is purchased and made up by 
the tailor at a wage of 4d. a day and his food. Still it is 
possible to glean a certain amount of information. Duncan 
Bisset, whose wage was £2 per annum, received in 1702 
shoes 4s., linen running drawers Is. 3d., running shoes 
3s. 2d., twil drawers Is. 2|d., string 3|d., hat 4s. 6d., shirts 



^ See vol. xxxix. of the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 
p. 121, where Mr. A. O. Curie refers to this. 



Ivi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

4s. 8d., cap 3s., drawers and gloves 2s. 8d., stockings 
Is. lOd., a bonnet Id., blue cloth for a coat £1, 14s. 3|d., 
for furnishing and making the same 4s. 8d. Duncan had 
to supply at his own expense ' linen to his neck,' which 
cost him 2s. lOd. In 1715 a suit of livery seems to have 
cost £4, 10s., and a big lined coat £2, 10s., while a suit of 
ordinary clothes for the barnman cost only £l. 

We get another instance of Lady Grisell's careful 
management from such entries as the following : ' 1716. 
Nov. 16. For turning two coats into two waistcoats to 
George and Tam 10s.' 

Board wages in Scotland were at that time Is. a day, 
but this no doubt included lodging, as the cost of feeding 
a servant according to the dietary given by Lady Grisell 
on p. 277 works out at about 3d. a day. In 1716 the 
cost of feeding servants in England is given as follows : — 

For meat to 4 servants when I was nine weeks at Bath from 
8 Augt. till 8 Oct. from Betson . . . £0 15 2 
For bread in that time . . . . . 12 2 
For candle, cheese roots, etc. in that time . 6 6 
For Bear 18 



£3 1 10 



or nearly Is. 9d. per head per week. Either the servants 
must have starved themselves in 1716 or they must have 
' done ' themselves uncommonly well in 1718, for under 
8th October of that year we find the folloAving corresponding 
entries : — 

For meat to 4 servants for 6 weeks wt Mrs. Dundas 
[while] I was at Bath from Clements Butcher . £1 8 

bread 9 1 

drink 2J barrill . . . . . . 12 6 

sundry other provisions . . , . . 2 12 3 



£5 11 10 
This works out at 4s. 8d. per head per week. 



INTRODUCTION Ivii 

IV. Household Expenses 

Under this heading, as ah*eady mentioned, Lady Grisell 
entered all expenditure in connection with provisioning, 
firing, lighting, and washing. Not only did she enter 
sums actually spent, but she also charged herself with the 
prices of all supj^lies drawn from the estate. These 
would no doubt be credited in some ' home farm ' Account 
Book, but that has not been found. During the first 
years of her married life the details given under this heading 
are rather meagre, but they increase year by year, and are 
eventually very voluminous. It is, of course, quite impos- 
sible to refer to all the articles mentioned, and as the 
extracts from the Accounts may not give some of these, 
an attemj)t has been made by means of an appendix to 
keep a note of the most important of them and of their 
prices, though the Editor is aware that a tabulated state 
of this sort is apt to be misleading as it gives no indication 
of what was in common or only in occasional use. An 
attempt has also been made in the same Appendix to 
contrast, where data make it possible, the prices ruling 
in Scotland and in England in the early eighteenth century 
with those of the present day. 

A careful examination of this part of the expenditure 
shows that on an average nearly a fourth of it was spent 
on alcoholic drinks, and that exclusive of the beer brewed 
at home. In Scotland, French wine (this may be another 
name for claret, although Lady Grisell seems to draw a 
distinction between the two), claret, canary, sack, mum, 
brandy, ale, and beer are the principal drinks and are 
bought in large quantities, while other wines and spirits, 
such as burgundy, aquavita;, arrac, etc., are only rarely 
mentioned. In England, on the other hand, arrac and 
burgundy frequently figure, and champagne makes its 
appearance. These two latter wines are generally bought 



Iviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

together and in the same number of bottles, rather in- 
dicating that they were got for special occasions. 

Turning to temperance drinks, the first mention of tea 
in Lady Grisell's Accounts is in 1702, when a shilling is 
paid for a ' tee pot.' There is, however, a still earlier 
reference to tea in the Inventory of the furnishings of 
her mother-in-law's house in Edinburgh, which is dated 
5th June 1696, and where we find mention of ' a whet 
(white) ern (iron) tee stop (stoup).' Little tea-cups to 
drink out of are also purchased in 1702, and a little ' yetlen ^ 
kettle ' and spirits of wine for boiling the same.^ Li 1705 
we have ' 2 dozen china plats, 2 dusin tee and jacolite 
dishes and a tee pot and basone bought by Greenknowe 
in Holland ' £8, 2s. 6d. stg., and in 1706 Is. 4d. is paid for 
' a pot for milk to tee.' We have thus the tea-table fairly 
complete. The first entry narrating the purchase of tea 
itself does not occur until 1708, when half a pound Bohea 
is purchased for £l. That is at the rate of £1, 9s. Id. per 
pound avoirdupois. Probably prior to that date any tea 
got was purchased by Mr. Baillie when in London. With 
tea at such a price Lady Grisell naturally buys but seldom, 
and at first in half or quarter jjound quantities, generally 
purchasing at the same time with Bohea an equal quantity 
of green tea, which cost about half as much. As the 
fortunes of the family improved and the price fell, tea 
was used more and more, and latterly figures pretty often 
in the Accounts. Coffee is mentioned in 1703, and a 
' coper pott ' for Coffee is entered in old Mrs. Baillie's 
Inventory of 1696. Chocolate is referred to as early as 
1695. Fruits and confections are frequently bought, and 
occasionallv ' taiblet for the bairens.' 



^ Cast-iron. 

2 Spirit lamps are mentioned in old Mrs. Baillie's Inventory already 
referred to, where we find ' two coper things for holding of cotten to burn 
with wein.' 



INTRODUCTION lix 

As to food supplies, not much need be said. With the 
exception of anchovies, which are only once purchased, 
the other items mentioned in the Appendix occur with 
more or less frequency. Herrings of course bulk largely, 
and many barrels of them are sent as presents to Mr. 
Secretary Johnston in London. It is curious to note that 
when in London Lady Grisell finds it cheaper to have 
barley, starch, washing blue, butter, shelled peas, indigo, 
etc., sent from Edinbm'gh. 

Cows, oxen, calves, sheep, lambs, and pigs are also 
largely used for food, as well as fowls, domesticated and 
wild, the latter being pm*chased at all seasons. Unfor- 
tunately there are no data to enable us to contrast the 
prices of butcher meat in Scotland and England, but it 
will be noted that in England mutton is dearer per pound 
than beef, and the relative prices of cattle and sheep 
indicate that this also was the case in Scotland. Lady 
Murray gives us a carefully drawn up statement of the 
quantities of supplies consumed by the establishment for 
several years after Lady Grisell's death, two of which are 
given as specimens,-^ but when considering these, it must 
be borne in mind that Mellerstain was at that time the 
residence of ladies only. 

Perhaps it is not inappropriate under this head to refer 
to the question of menus. Lady Grisell left a book of 
these ' Bills of Fair ' as she calls them. They are peculiarly 
interesting from the fact that they give not only her own 
dinners, but the dinners of the friends by whom she was 
entertained, and further, the lists are made so as to show 
the position of the dishes on the table. A few of these 
are printed,- and it will be seen from them that two 
courses, a relief and dessert, constituted a formal dinner. 
All the dishes of each course were set down on the 

^ Pp. 304-306. 2 pp^ 281-304. 



Ix HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

table, and a relief consisted of one or two dishes sub- 
stituted for some of those of the first course. Some- 
times Lady Grisell draws circles round the name of 
each dish to represent the plate. From these ' Bills ' 
we see what was the dinner when the Baillies dined 
with the Prince and Princess of Wales at Richmond, ^^'ith 
the Duke of Montrose, the Duke of Roxburgh, Bishop of 
Sarum, Duke of Chandos, Lord Stair, Lord Oxford, Lady 
Mary Wortley Montagu, etc., and what the Baillies gave 
these great peojDle Avhen they in turn dined with them. 
It will be noted that in these menus there is only one 
mention of potatoes, and that in one of the foreign menus 
in 1733. 

The House Accounts contain many other odd items of 
information. For instance, we find that Lady Grisell made 
her own ink, and excellent ink it was, out of copperas and 
galls, and her blacking for boots out of lamp black and 
beeswax. We learn that a barrel containing thirty salted 
cod cost £l, and a barrel of pickled oysters 2s. ; that out of 
thirty dozen oranges and twenty dozen lemons Lady Grisell 
had ' 8 gallons orange wine and large 12 gallons of panch 
and 2 doz. oranges besides to preserve ' ; that a flambeau 
cost from Is. 2d. to Is. 6d ; that the salmon bill for the 
year amounted to £l, 7s. ; that tobacco cost 2s. and snuff 
4s. a lb., also that the ladies used the latter. We find 
that in London, as coals were expensive, a cinder sieve 
was purchased, and charcoal and billets of wood were 
burned, and brushwood and roots used. In fact, the 
information is inexhaustible. 

V. Buildings, Gardens, and Estate Management 

The picturesque old tower of Jerviswood had been the 
residence of George Baillie's father. There all his 
children had been born, and there his widow took up 



INTRODUCTION Ixi 

her residence when the estates were restored to the 
family. There is extant in the old lady's handwriting 
an Inventory of the furniture and plenishings at Jervis- 
wood as at November 1694. It is an interesting and mar- 
vellously spelt document, and we learn from it how the 
various rooms were furnished, or rather unfurnished : 
witness the purple chamber, which contained only ' a 
very old bed all brok,' and ' ]My study,' which belied its 
title by containing nothing but water stoops, cups, coggies, 
spits, girdels, raxes, quiechs, etc. There was no drawing- 
room, ' My Chamber ' having no doubt contrived a double 
debt to pay, and the dining-room held nought but ' en 
beg ern chemly [grate] with a bake ' and ' a bege wenscott 
tebell and two fur tember one lesser.' Some of the windows 
would also appear to have been only half glazed, the lower 
half being a hinged wooden shutter, as indicated by there 
being ' In a beg pres ' ' 4 pr of wendow bands ' or hinges. 
Jerviswood and its furnishings, its ' three win glasses two 
of them wanting the foot,' was as typical of the Scotland 
that was passing as Mellerstain Tower, the Baillies' other 
residence, became typical of the Scotland that was coming. 

As his mother w^as occupying the old family residence 
of Jerviswood, George Baillie had perforce to adopt Meller- 
stain Tower as his country residence. Unfortunately, 
there are no traces left of the latter place. It probably 
occupied the site of the buildings erected towards the 
end of the eighteenth century from the designs of R. and J. 
Adam, and united as these do now the two wings built 
by George Baillie. In spite of the beautiful roofs and 
exquisite woodcarvings of its successor, one cannot help 
regretting the disappearance of the old Tower, the top 
of which we learn from the Accounts was so carefully 
repaired every year. 

Probably during old Mrs. Baillie's lifetime this old 
Tower was even less comfortable than Jerviswood, but 



Ixii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

she had not long been dead, and the estates freed of her 
jointure, before extensive repairs and additions began to 
be made to it. During the years 1701, 1702, and 1703 
£217, 12s. 4d. was spent on repairing the Tower and 
offices. Each follo-^nng yeax something was added. In 1706 
there is paid 6s. for measuring off ' 33 acres, 3 ruds, 17 f . 
8 ells for a park,' and in 1708 the park dykes are built at 
a cost of £54, 9s. 5d. In 1709, looking to the times, this 
most extraordinary entry occurs : ' Expense of building 
the Bath house £65, 4s. 4d.' In 1711 a new kitchen is 
built which apparently had a thatched roof. And so the 
additions go on. 

Nor is the garden or planting neglected. In 1701 young 
trees are bought for 3s. 4d. from ' Hundalie,' and fir seed 
is frequently got — sometimes from London. The price 
of the latter seems to have varied considerably, from 2s. 
per lb. in 1704, to 15s. in 1711. There is a nursery formed 
at Jerviswood, and large numbers of j^oung trees purchased 
for there and Mellerstain — limes, yews, thorns, planes, 
elms, geans, firs, chestnuts, walnuts, and fruit trees. 
Acorns are also got. In 1712 we have one of Lady Grisell's 
characteristic entries : ' For young trees bought by John 
Hope which was a perfit cheat £2, 10s.' and in 1715 we 
read of Is. 8d. being paid ' For nailing up the vine tree.' 

There were evidently a few well-grown trees still left 
in Scotland at this date, in spite of the general belief 
to the contrary, as shown by such entries as : 1703. 
' Repairing tenants house in part,' ' all timber being cut in 
the wood,' and again in 1709, ' To James Blakie 2 days 
at Langshaw cutting timber.' 

Unfortunately, little or no detail is given of seeds pur- 
chased for the garden. Of vegetables, spinach, peas, and 
parsley are mentioned, and of flowers anemones, ranun- 
culuses, jonquils, and tulips. 

A bowling-green is laid out in 1710 and 1711, at a cost 



INTRODUCTION Ixiii 

of £7, 3s. Id., on which the peacock purchased in 1704 no 
doubt displayed itself. 

The entries in regard to the enclosing of land are of 
interest, the first occurring in 1699, when £4 is paid for 
putting up one of the park dykes, and later on there are 
entries of abatements granted to tenants for ' dykes, 
eaten corns and cart roads.' The cost of building a dry 
stone dyke was Is. per rood,^ as compared with about 
Is. per yard nowadays, and Lady Grisell took care to see 
that she got a good job, as witness the following docu- 
ment : — 

Be it known that whereas I George Cairncross Mason in 
Selikrete being imployed by the Right Hon. Lady Grisell 
Baillie on building these dry dykes at the strype being south- 
ward from the towne [?] hill at Mellerstain but there being 
thirty roods of the said dyke that are builded with small stones 
and thereby is not {sic\ found not to be good and sufficient 
I therefore do hereby bind and oblige myself to hold good and 
sufficient the said thirty roods of dykes during the space of 
twentie years under the paneltie of five pounds Sterling given 
at Mellerstane this twentie-ninth day of Novem^" 17 hundred 
and forty-three years before these witnesses Wm. Lamb and 
George Carter servants to the said Lady Grisell Baillie. 

(Sgd) George Cairncross. 

William Lamb, Witness. 

George Carter, Witness. 

The most startling figures, however, in those Accounts 
are those relating to the building of cot-houses. Even 
assuming them to have been no better than the dwellings 
described by John Ray, ' pitiful cots built of stone and 
covered with turfs having in them but one room, many of 
them no chimneys, the windows very small holes and not 
glazed ' — even at this the prices paid for the erection of 
some of them strike one as ridiculously small. In 1696 



' A rood here probably meant 6 ells Scots, or 6 yards 6 inches Imperial. 



Ixiv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

a cot-house is built for ' Liddas the Marchant ' at a cost 
of £l, but it must have been a building of a superior class, 
for in 1702 James Ormiston's cot house is built for 4s., 
and we find mention of others costing lis. Id., 5s., and 
14s. 4d. In 1714 many of the details of building the 
' new house ' are given, the cost of which amounted to 
£4, 12s. 3d. This house was of a superior order, and was 
glazed with ' dies losens ' — presumably small square 
panes of glass instead of diamond- shaped ones.^ There 
can be little doubt that the low price at which cot-houses 
were erected is accounted for by the fact that the build- 
ing material consisted largely of tuft divots, the supply 
of which is so often referred to. Divots, no doubt, also 
formed the roofing of these miserable dwellings, although 
the larger houses were either slated or thatched. In 
1709 there is an entry dealing with the slating of Lang- 
shaw House, and in the same year we read of straw being 
supplied for the thatching of Mellerstain, ' For 85 threve 
oat stra crop 1707 @ 6s. to sting the house,' £2, 2s. 6d. stg., 
and of heather being got for the thatching of the Church of 
Earlston, ' For hather and thicking of the church,' 7s. stg. 

VI. Furniture and Furnishings 

The purchases of furniture and furnishings for the 
Baillies' Edinburgh house, for Mellerstain, and for their 
house in London, are given in great detail, and show a 
good supply of most of our modern requirements. Mr. 
Henry Grey Graham, in his Social Life of Scotland in 
the Eighteenth Century, refers to the lack of drinking 
glasses, and, as aheady mentioned, there would appear 
to have been a lack of these at Jerviswood. But 



^ The farm-houses in Dumbartonshire in the beginning of the nineteenth 
century are described as small buildings ' of dry stone, or at best cemented 
with clay, a roof of heavy timber covered with sod and rotten straw, or ferns.' 
— General View of the Agrictilttire of Dtimbarionshire. 



INTRODUCTION Ixv 

in George Baillie's establishment there were plenty of 
single wine-glasses purchased at 5d. each, double wine- 
glasses at 8d., ale-glasses at Is., water-glasses at Is., and 
decanters at 4s. each. There was also a glass churn 
which cost Is. 8d., and which strikes one as a curious thing. 
Then there are scarlet carpets (1696), and in London oil- 
cloth for the dining-room floor ; window curtains of crape, 
calico, muslin, and damask ; arras hangings of plush, etc., 
which in 1712 began to give place to wallpaper, for we 
read of three ' pices of stamped paper ' being purchased at 
2s. 6d. each, and five ' pice varnished paper ' at 13s., and 
in the following year twenty-five ' pices of stamped paper ' 
for £4, 6s. This must be an early use of wallpaper, but 
the two following entries dealing with bells are still more 
interesting : 1696. ' For a bell and cord to the door ' 
2s. 5d. stg., 1705. ' For a bell to the low room ' 2s. stg. 
The first of these clearly indicates a hanging front door 
bell instead of a tirling pin or knocker, while the second 
seems to indicate a bell communicating with the servants* 
quarters. As hanging bells in houses are said to have 
been unknown in France until the beginning of the eigh- 
teenth century, and were not introduced into England 
until the reign of Queen Anne, these two entries are 
distinctly worthy of note. 

The decoration of rooms with mirrors was evidently 
much in fashion, and there seems to have been tradesmen 
in Edinburgh capable of making these, for in 1704 we read 
of £3, Is. 6d. paid for a ' Chimney glass and silvering ' ; 
and again in 1709, 14s. paid for ' silvering the chimney 
glass.' Still the Edinburgh mirrors cannot have been 
equal to the London ones, for ' Chinmey and pannel glass * 
to the value of £10, 17s. lOd. was shipped to Leith in that 
same year, and when the Baillies furnished their London 
house wall mirrors played a most conspicuous part in its 
decoration. 



Ixvi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

VII. Lawyers and Doctors 

We get from these Accounts a considerable amount of 
information as to the fees paid to counsel and to agents. 
In December 1694, the King's Advocate, Sir Gilbert 
Elliot, gets £8, 8s. for four consultations ; in April 1696 
he is paid a fee of £l, 6s. 2d. for a consultation ; in January 
1696 he is paid a fee of £5, 5s. ; and in November of the 
same year he is paid £3, 3s. for drawing two Deeds of 
Entail of IMr. Baillie's estates. Lawyers will note that 
the client consults counsel and pays his fees without the 
intervention of an agent, and that the Lord Advocate 
did not require, as he does now, to have a junior conjoined 
with him in a consultation. It is a little difficult to com- 
pare the charges of Mr. Baillie's solicitor, Mr. Chiesly, with 
those prevalent nowadays, as documents and business 
were of such a different nature. We do, however, learn 
that in 1705 2s. 5d. is paid for drawing a Bond and two 
Back Bonds, and 4s. lOd. for writing a Bond in the follow- 
ing year. In 1707 John Wood is paid 4s. Id. ' for writing 
2 mens tacks and a Court at Langshaw,' so we may 
safely assume that solicitors were no more overpaid than 
were the Judges of the Court of Session. It is interesting 
to note that Jerviswood was granting tacks of his land, 
a custom which did so much to improve agriculture in 
Scotland, but which was at that time only just coming 
into practice. 

The fees paid to doctors and surgeons compare favour- 
ably with those paid to lawyers. Fees of lis., £2, 2s., and 
£3, 3s. are common, and the practice of bleeding must 
have yielded to the surgeons a regular and remunerative 
return. The ordinary charge in Scotland for bleeding a 
member of the family was 9s. 8d., and for one of the ser- 
vants, 4s. lOd. If the luxury of being bled from the 
' Jouglar vain ' was indulged in, it was more expensive, 



INTRODUCTION Ixvii 

costing £l, Is. 6d. In England the bleeding was done at 
the Bagnio or Baths, such entries as ' For cupping Rachy 
in the Banyo 5s.' being of frequent occurrence. The 
Bagnio in Edinburgh, situated in the Canongate and kept 
by one Rees, which is mentioned two or three times, did 
not apparently undertake surgery, but, curiously enough, 
it was possible to get accommodation there for the night, 
for in 1707 we read : ' For lodging 2 nights in the Bainio 
and 4 times bathing ' £l, 4s. stg. Head baths could also 
be obtained, for £l is j)aid to ]Mr. Knox for 'head baths.' 
These Bagnios or Baths were no doubt of the nature of 
Turkish Baths, and those in Edinburgh are referred to 
also in the Account Book of Sir John Foulis.^ 

The frequency with which the Baillies took these baths 
and went to watering-places, and the large quantities of 
mineral waters that appear so frequently in the accounts. 
' Spa Water,' ' Scarbrough Water,' ' Queen of Hungry 
Water,' etc., indicate that either Lady Grisell or her hus- 
band or both were troubled with rheumatism or gout. 

It is also to be noted that in 1705, when ' Rachy ' is ill, 
a special nurse is got for her at a fee of 5s. 

Two or three entries occur relating to the syringing of 
ears, which are explained by the fact that Mr. Baillie 
gradually became very deaf. Indeed, his increasing deaf- 
ness was the reason given for his retirement from the 
Treasury. 

It is impossible to leave this subject without a reference 
to dentistry. Throughout the Accounts no mention is 
made of the purchase of a tooth-brush, although the family 
go occasionally to a dentist to have their teeth ' cleaned,' 

^ The College of Physicians had a bath in the Cowgate about this time, for 
which i/- stg. was charged, and ^^d. stg. as fee to the servant. This bath 
was let in 17 14 to Alex. Murray, W.S., and John Russel of Bradshaw, W.S. 
Looking to the fees prevailing in the W.S. profession, one is not surprised to 
find two of the members trying to eke out their incomes by running a 
bath. 



Ixviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

at which times powder is mentioned as being purchased. 
Thus in 1709 : ' To teeth cleaning each half a crown and 
puders ' 14s. ' 1717. To cleaning all our teeth at Bath 
£l, 14s.' Visits are also paid to the dentist for still more 
unpleasant purposes, as witness the entry in 1705 : ' For 
stopping teeth with lead and something to clean 'em 10s.' ; 
and the entry in 1717 : ' July, to Vilponta for drawing 
Grisie's tooth 10s. 9d.' 

VIII. Horses and Carriages 

The Baillie expenses in connection with the keep of 
horses and upkeep of carriages and harness in Scotland 
averaged for the years 1692 to 1714 about £35 per annum, 
exclusive of the wages of coachmen and grooms. As there 
were certainly four coach mares,, besides hunting mares 
and a cart horse, it may be taken that this figure covered 
the keep of at least seven horses, and that consequently 
the keep of a horse for a year was under £5. As the Baillies 
bred their own horses, there are not so many entries dealing 
with their purchase as one might otherwise have expected. 
The highest price given for a horse is £22, 4s. 5d., paid in 
1696 for a gelding. A pony for Grisie cost £3, 6s. 8d. ; 
horses £10, £9, 14s. 8d., and £7 ; a mare £4, 8s. lid. Colts 
are gelded at 2s., although, as Lady Grisell explains, the 
usual price is Is., rumping costs Is., and bleeding, which 
is of frequent occurrence, lOd. ; while stallions for the 
mares cost £2, 2s. (Bath). Coach harness for a pair of 
horses cost in 1705 £4, 16s., in 1702 a leather side saddle 
is bought for 12s., while in 1712 ' a fine sadle to Grisie 
yellow velvite trim'd with silver ' costs £13 ; a pad saddle 
and furniture in 1701 costs £2, 2s., and a 'clog bag^ saddle' 
and all its furniture costs, in 1704, 17s. 4d. 

When the Baillies were first married, the carriage they 



Saddle bag. 



INTRODUCTION Ixix 

owned M^as a ' berlyn,' a light carriage capable of containing 
two persons, said to have been invented about forty years 
before by ' Philip de Chiese, a native of Piedmont in the 
service of Frederick William, Elector of Bradenburg.'^ 
In 1699, however, a chariot is purchased in London, whence 
it is brought to Edinburgh, at a cost of £5, 3s. The price 
of the chariot unfortunately is not given. Some idea of 
the state of the roads is obtained from the constant mention 
of purchases of glass for the chariot, and the frequency 
with which new wheels have to be got. These latter cost 
£5 a set, and on one occasion are bought at St. Andrews, 
and on another are made by the local workmen at Meller- 
stain. 

The coach itself does not last long, for in 1704 it gets 
such a complete overhaul that, after reading the details, 
one wonders how much of the original coach was left.^ 

In spite of having had ' her ' so thoroughly repaired, a 
new chariot is purchased and brought from London next 
year. This new chariot seems to have been not altogether 
a success, and must have been the subject of some com- 
plaint, for Mr. Secretary Johnston writes in regard to it : 
' There could be no knavery in your Chariot considering 
the price of it, and since you saw it before it was covered, 
the wood, as it often happens, may not have been seasoned 
enough ; none but workmen can judge of that.' Although 
the Baillies imported their carriages from London, it is 
evident that coaches of a sort could be procured in Scotland, 
for in 1707 we read : ' To King Coachmaker for helping 



* A Book about Travelling, Past and Present, by Thomas A. Croal. It was 
in the Berline of Baroness de KorfF that Louis XVI. and his queen attempted 
to escape from France. 

, ^ 1704 Oct. 26. For helping and dighting thecoch;(fi 8/, nailstothecoch 10/, 
Axe tree ;^5 8/. 

For a hind axe tree £ii, 6/, a pair fitchers £i, lo/. 

For a transem £■},, lining the bottom ;^2, 2 rollers 6/, mending £\ i?/. 

For 2 skins £\ 8/, nails to her 14/2, drink 2/ (Scots money). 



Ixx HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

the Chariot, the money sent to Edinburgh by Francis 
Newton' 1 15s. 

When the family went to London, towards the close of 
the year 1714, they did not take their own carriage, but 
travelled by the stage-coach. It was thus necessary for 
them, on their arrival in London, to purchase a coach, 
which they did from one ' Mr. Baldwine,' at the price of 
£55, which was paid by instalments. Instead of horsing 
this themselves, they hired a coachman and two horses 
at £25 per quarter. Judging from the amount of chariot 
glass appearing in the London Accounts the streets of that 
city were not much better than those of the northern 
capital. 

It will be noticed in Lady Grisell's ' Memorandum ' as 
to travelling on the Continent, that when the chaises ^ 
arrive at Trent, ' you must put an avan train to your 
Chaise,' ' you cannot travel without these fore carriages, 
they not been used to drive as in Italy.' 

It is evident from the directions which Lady Grisell 
gives her grandsons as to the careful adjustment of the 
' avan train ' that the chaises proceeded thi'ough Germany 
with six wheels each. These ' avan trains ' were neces- 
sary in order to provide a seat for the driver, the chaises 
until Trent was reached having been di-iven by postillions, 
and Lady Grisell gave directions that they are to be got 
rid of at Cologne or Frankfort. 

It will also be noted from the same ' Memorandums * 
that it was considered hardly worth while to bring these 
travelling chaises across the Channel, they being ' but 
unwildy and troublesome in our country,' therefore ' sell 
them for what you can get.' 

* In 1693 the Scottish Parliament granted a monopoly to Wm. Scott, 
cabinetmaker, to build coaches, chariots, sedan-chairs, and calashes, coach 
' Ilarnish and grinding of glasses.' Before that all coaches, etc., were 
imported. 

2 A chaise could be bought for £2^. 



i 



INTRODUCTION Ixxi 

One word as to carts ! Mr. Henry Grey Graham, in 
his Social Life of Scotland in the Eighteenth Century, 
gives a description of tumbrils, which he said were 
regarded as ' a triumph of mechanism when the century 
was young.' He goes on to say : ' Carts were a later 
institution ; and when in 1723 one carried a tiny load 
of coals from East Kilbride to Cambuslang, crowds of 
people, it is recorded, went out to see the wonderful 
machine ; they looked with surf)rise and returned with 
astonishment.' ' Yet in many parts of the Lowlands 
they did not come into use until 1760.' This may have 
been so in certain districts, but in Edinburgh carts capable 
of carrying half a ton of coal seem to have been common 
enough. In 1696 ten carts of coal are brought from Car- 
berry ; coals are constantly being carted from Leith ; 
in 1701 a ' cart and all that belongs to it ' is purchased for 
£4 ; and in 1704 a new axle-tree is got for the cart. Both 
the price paid and the last entry show clearly that the 
Baillies' cart was not a tumbril, but had wheels revolving 
independently of the axle-tree, and there is no reason for 
assuming that it was in any way superior to the other carts 
mentioned. 

IX. Clothing 

It is a little difficult for a mere man to form an opinion in 
regard to matters of feminine clothing, and it is dangerous 
to express it when formed. The first thing that strikes 
one in looking through the Clothing Accounts is the change 
that has taken place in the meaning of the word ' night 
gown.' We find nightgowns of damask, of stained satin, 
of yellow satin, of striped satin, of calico, of velvet, etc., 
all lined with various materials, and costing anything 
from £l to £5. They are frequently given as presents. 
George Baillie brings back ' night gowns ' from London for 
his wife and daughter, and ' night gowns ' are given to his 



Ixxii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

wife's sister * Jeanie,' and to his sister Mrs. Weems, costing 
respectively £3 and £2, 15s. From the number that are 
bought they are evidently more than dressing-gowns, and 
from the fact that elaborate ones are also purchased for 
INIr. Baillie himself, the term can hardly be synonymous 
with ' an evening gown.' In the case of ladies, it was 
probably a sort of tea-gown ; and in the case of men, a 
dressing-gown for more or less public wear. It was no 
doubt in this sort of ' night gown ' that Robert Baillie 
was tried and hanged, and not in the garment we now 
understand by the words.^ 

What would be now termed ' nightgowns ' are called 
in the Accounts ' night clothes,' and were made of muslin 
or cambric. 

In the matter of underclothing, the Accounts show but 
cold comfort, and it is with a sense of relief that one reads 
of the occasional purchase of flannel. No doubt the 
material for woollen underwear was woven at home, as 
we find frequent references to the purchase of wool, some- 
times bought specifically to be ' made into flanell.' 

Stockings of cotton, wool, and silk are purchased at 
prices ranging from Is. Id. to 14s. per pair, the finer kind 
being worn over woollen understoekings. AVhen abroad, 
specially thick stockings for travelling are bought, as are 
also stockings of beaver skin, which cost three florins 
(7s.) the pair. One would be inclined to doubt the 
meaning of the word, but a few entries further on ' baver 
skin gloves ' are purchased, and ' baver ' for a * peticoat 
and clock,' the former costing Is. lOd. per pair, and the 
latter £2, 19s. 3d. It will also be noted from the snuff- 



^ Lady Mary Wortley Montagu writes in 1716: *I met the lover yesterday 
going to the ale house in his dirty night gown, with a book under his arm to 
entertain the club ; and as Mrs. D. [the gentleman's fiancee] was with me at 
the time, I pointed out to her the charming creature ; she blushed and looked 
prim ; but quoted a passage out of Herodotus in which it is said that the 
Persians wore long night gowns.' 



INTRODUCTION Ixxiii 

boxes and handkerchiefs purchased for the ladies that 
snuff was used by them as well as by the men. 

On p. 203 and p. 213 will be found the trousseau 
accounts of Lady Murray and Lady Binning respectively, 
the bridal dress of the one, 'a sute clothes trini'd with 
silver,' costing, along with her sister's dress and some 
other items, £112, 8s. 6d., and of the other, ' For 25 yards 
silver stuff for gown and coat,' costing £41, 5s. 

A plain suit of clothes for a gentleman cost between 
£4, 10s. and £7, but of course if expensive materials were 
used the cost might be anything. The accessories to the 
suit, such as the lace for cravats and ruffles, often cost 
more than the suit itself, on one occasion, in London, as 
much as £20, 5s. being spent on a cravat and two pairs of 
ruffles. A muff with its case was also a necessary part of 
a gentleman's equipment. 

Wigs naturally figure frequently. We have campaign 
wigs at about £l, 5s., long wigs at £2, 5s., and undesigned 
wigs at £3, 5s. Then there are the concomitant nightcaps 
of wool or double holland for keeping warm shaved heads. 
Here also we notice Lady Grisell's careful hand. Nothing 
is thrown away that can be repaired : ' Helping the fore- 
head of a wig ' 5s. ; ' Helping a wig and shaving 8s. 7d. 
stg.' ; * Turning my pophn gown ' ; ' Dying red gown 
green ' ; ' Making up the old floord night gown,' etc. 

X. Jerviswood's Brothers and Sisters 

When George Baillie was restored to his family estates 
he became responsible for the payment of his mother's 
jointure of £102, 13s. 8d., and of the provisions made by 
his father for his younger children, amounting to 43,000 
merks or £2388, 17s. 9d. stg. Along with her other 
accounts Lady Grisell kept an account of how this money 
was paid away to, or for the benefit of, the beneficiaries, 



Ixxiv HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

and these Accounts give us some information on a different 
and not so pleasant side of eighteenth century life. It 
is evident from them that Jerviswood's immediately 
younger brother Archibald was not altogether a satis- 
factory character. At one time or another he was reduced 
to pawning his coat, his Bible, and, still more reprehensible, 
his brother's watch, which various articles were redeemed 
at the cost of 10s., 8s. 4d., and 12s. 6d. respectively. He 
eventually lands in the Tolbooth, presumably for debt, 
when we find the following entry : ' To him by Plumer 
when he was in ye Tolbooth £54, 8s. Scots ' (£4, 10s. 8d.). 
If this sum was paid for his maintenance, and it looks as 
if such were the case, and if the expense of his board 
' inside ' was in any way commensurate with his board 
outside, he must have been in durance vile for some time, 
as his board, lodging, and pocket-money for six months 
when at liberty only cost about £10. 

Evidently some sort of special arrangement had to be 
made about Archibald, as a separate account is kept 
for him long after his brothers and sisters have been 
paid off and their names have disappeared from the 
Accounts. 

Just as the Accounts for Archibald cease, that is, about 
1708, Lady Grisell opens an account in her ledger for 
* Rachell Dundas.' No clue is given as to who this was, 
but she was probably a daughter of George Baillie's sister 
Rachel, who married Patrick (?) Dundas of Breistmilne. 
This child apparently possessed a little money, which Lady 
Grisell administered for her, and her name figures through 
the Accounts for several years. She went with the family 
to London, and she and Miss Menzies are occasionally sent 
to the theatre together : ' 1715. Ap. 6. For a play to 
Rachel Dundas and May Menzies gallarie 4s.' ; ' Two 
gallerie tickets to ane opera 3s.' ; ' To Rachel Dundas for 
going to a play 4s.,' etc. Looking to the small amount 



INTRODUCTION Ixxv 

spent on her and on her amusements in comparison with 
her cousins, one is afraid she must have felt somewhat of 
a Cinderella. 

XI. General Remarks 

Having dealt with Lady Grisell's Accounts more or less 
in detail, it may not be out of place to add a word or two 
upon them as a whole. In Appendix v. will be found 
a statement showing the yearly expenditure under its 
various heads from 1693 to 1718 inclusive, and as far as 
possible giving the yearly income for the same period. The 
note of expenditure has been made up from Lady Grisell's 
Accounts, and may be taken as accurate, except in regard 
to the figures under headings ' Pocket Money ' and ' London 
Expenses.' The former one feels can hardly give the 
whole of the pocket-money spent by Jerviswood, and the 
latter is certainly incorrect, for Baillie was in London every 
year after the Union attending to his parliamentary duties, 
and there is no mention of the expenses of these visits in 
the Accounts. With these exceptions, the figures give a 
fair idea of the expenditure of a country gentleman immedi- 
ately preceding and succeeding the Union. 

The figures setting forth Baillie' s income are derived 
partly from balance-sheets, which were prepared periodi- 
cally every few years either by Lady Grisell or her husband, 
and which give the rental of his estates together with a 
note of his investments and debts, and partly from the 
Records, which mention the salaries attaching to the 
various posts held by him. 

In considering any of the branches of the expenditure 
it is always necessary to take a few years together, as 
wages and accounts are often left unpaid for several years, 
probably from the scarcity of coin. For instance, in 
1707 ' May Menzies ' receives two years' wages ; in 1717 
' John Hume Garner at Mellerstaine ' is paid his wages for 



Ixxvi HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

three years ; in 1709 Torwoodlee is paid £8 for a horse 
' got 10 years since,' and there are many similar entries, 
although in the last case the length of delay is exceptional. 
Whether it was this want of ready money, or whether it 
was a legacy from his days of adversity, it is impossible 
to say, but certain it is that George Baillie had in December 
1695 to redeem a gun from pawn at the small sum of 
2s. lOd.i 

The average expenditure in Scotland for the years from 
1693 to 1714, exclusive of sums spent on estate manage- 
ment and expeditions to London, works out at rather 
under £550 sterling per annum, and it is strange to think 
of this sum being able to finance an establishment in 
which the number of servants must have averaged at least 
ten, and which boasted a carriage and four, besides 
hunters. 

This naturally raises the question as to the relative value 
of money then and now, a difficult question, the answer 
to which alone can enable us to compare the prices of 
two hundred years ago with those of to-day, and to say 
that such and such an article was dearer or cheaper then 
than now. It is a problem that can be attacked in various 
ways, but for the purposes of this book it is perhaps 
sufficient to examine it from the charge side of the account, 
that is, from a study of what a man or woman was able to 
earn for labour, whether manual or mental : approached 
from this side an article may be said to be dear or cheap 
as its price varies to the earning capacity of the in- 
dividual. If, therefore, we can find any fairly common 
ratio existing between salaries and wages of the various 



^ Truthful accounts not only at times give away the writer, but also are 
occasionally hard on others, as the following entry in 1717 bears out: — 'To 
my Lady Lockhart. lent and never pay'd £1, is. 6d.' It is hard to think of 
such acts of omission rising up in judgment after so many years have 
elapsed. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxvii 

trades and professions then and now, we shall at least 
be enabled to judge by it whether any special com- 
modity has increased or decreased in value from a 
purchaser's point of view. Now it will be seen from 
Appendix iv., which has been j)repared from the 
Accounts of Lady Grisell and from other sources, and 
which the Editor is well aware is far from exhaustive, 
that the salaries and wages therein referred to have 
increased from six- to ten-fold. It will also be seen 
that the increase in the wages of domestic servants, 
taking into account the cost of the clothes supplied and 
the cost of their maintenance, both relatively greater then 
than now, lies somewhere between the same two figures. 

Let us therefore take eight, the mean of these two figures, 
as representing the decrease in the power of money to buy 
the services of men and women, and let us multiply by 
eight the price of any article in 1707 before comparing it 
with the price of to-day. The result should enable us to 
judge fairly accurately whether it has increased or decreased 
in value. 

As long as income was spent on the employment of 
labour, such as servants, tradesmen, doctors, lawyers, etc., 
our ancestors were just as well off as we are to-day. The 
same may also be said in regard to one or two items, such 
as farmyard produce, keep of horses, etc., but, as will be 
seen from Appendix i., the cost of nearly every other 
commodity was relatively much dearer then than now. 
Even the staff of life, oatmeal, which costs now about 17s. 
the boll, cost then about 10s., that is, it was then relatively 
nearly five times dearer. This merely brings us to what 
we know already, namely, that our incomes go much 
further now than then, and that we are consequently much 
better off. 

Mention has been made of the periodical balance-sheets 



Ixxviii HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

made out by George Baillie. In these Baillie valued his 
landed estates at so many years' purchase, gave a list of 
his investments, and a note of the debts due by him. 

In 1693, Jerviswood and Mellerstain were both valued at 
twenty years' purchase, but the value of the latter was raised 
in subsequent statements to twenty-two years' purchase. 
In 1736 the Barony of Earlston was bought from Lord 
Haddington at twenty-five years' purchase, and in the 
same year the superiority of some subjects in Earlston was 
acquired at twenty-one and a half years' purchase. The 
following is rather a curious entry in relation to land 
purchase. BailHe, who had bought the estate of West- 
fauns for £2000, afterwards acquired the ' Snyp Rights 
upon it,' for £432, 4s. 7d., seeming thus to indicate that 
they were separable possessions. 

These balance-sheets show that it was not until after 
the Union that Baillie began to save money, and that 
these savings he generally laid out in the purchase of land. 
His first balance-sheet in 1693 shows that he was worth 
£8037 ; his last in 1736 that he was worth £37,724. 

Although it does not fall within the scope of this paper to 
treat of the effects which the Union of the Parliaments had 
upon Scotland, it is a subject which naturally bulks largely 
in the study of the career of George Baillie. In his own 
correspondence we learn that he foresaw much of what 
happened, but he probably did not see one effect, that is, 
the injury inflicted upon Scotland through the practical 
removal from her capital of such men as Baillie of Jervis- 
wood and his father-in-law, the Earl of Marchmont. They 
saw no sin in the innocent enjoyment of music, singing, and 
dancing. We have already noted how George Baillie got 
in the fiddlers to play to his bairns, and Lady Murray gives 
the following delightful picture of her grandfather : ' As 
mirth and good humour, and particularly dancing, had 
alwavs been one characteristic of the family when so 



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THE RIGHT HON. PATRICK HUME, EARL OF 
MARCHMONT. 



(From a Portrait at Mellersfain. ) 



INTRODUCTION Ixxix 

many of us were met, being no fewer than fourteen of his 
children and grandchildren, we had a dance. He was 
then very weak in his limbs and could not walk down- 
stairs, but desired to be carried down to the room where 
we were to see us ; which he did, with great cheerfulness, 
saying, " Though he could not dance with us, he could yet 
beat time with his foot," which he did, and bid us dance 
as long as we could ; that it was the best medicine he 
knew, for at the same time that it gave exercise to the 
body, it cheered the mind. At his usual time of going to 
bed he was carried upstairs and we ceased dancing for 
fear of disturbing him ; but he soon sent to bid us go on, 
for the noise and music, so far from disturbing, that it 
would lull him to sleep. He had no notion of interrupting 
the innocent pleasures of others, though his age hindered 
him to partake of it. His exemplary piety and goodness 
was no bar to his mirth ; and he often used to say none 
had so good a reason to be merry and pleased as those 
that loved God and obeyed his commandments.' ^ 

Both of these men Avere prominent Presbyterians, who 
had suffered for the cause, and whose principles were 
beyond suspicion. They were powerful socially, they were 
powerful politically, and their example, and the example 
of others like them, might have done at least a little to 
counteract the bigotry and despotism of the Presbyterian 
ministers, whose influence for so many years cast a shadow 
over Scotland. 

The Editor begs to acknowledge his indebtedness to 
some notes left by the late Mr. Fitzroy Bell, into whose 
experienced hands the editing of Lady Grisell's papers 
had been entrusted, but whose untimely death prevented 
him from making more than a beginning of what would 



^ Lady Murray's Memoirs, pp. 77, 78. 



Ixxx HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

have been to him a most congenial task. The Editor's 
thanks are also due to Dr. Maitland Thomson, Mr. A. O. 
Curie, Mr. Mill of the Signet Library, and many other 
friends, for much valuable help. 

He also feels that he owes an apology to Lady Grisell 
for prying into books which were never meant to be seen. 
If Lady Grisell is cognisant of what goes on here, she is 
no doubt amazed, amused, and annoyed at the many 
wrong deductions which have been drawn from the 
Accounts, over which she must have spent so much time 
and trouble, and which she must have thought so clear. 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK OF 
LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Sundry debursments, 1692 [Scots] 

Novr. 1st To David Robison vintner as £ s. d. 
acount and p'^ recept . . 122 (> 

For sevarall things from Novr. 92 to 
1693 Aprill 1693 . . . . 112 13 

Novr. 25 To Coptain Baillie ^ his interist from 

Lam. 91 to Lam. 92 . . . 136 

To said Coptain in full of all acct. 
betwixt him and me ather by bill 
or otherwise except what he has 
my bond for .... 1143 14 
To a glas to a chariot . . . 60 

To payment of the cess for the year 

1693 398 12 2 

To James Gordon, agent for the 

linin ^ manufactory and that in 

full payment of my entry for ten 

shars being 19s. st. per share 

1693 To James Drumond per tiket 

Aprill 20 To Robert Baillie ^ of Manerhall . 

To Alex^ Magill in full payment of 

a horss bought from him . 

ditt. To Pockock, barber 

May 2d To the drums .... 

To drink monv to nurses 



114 








120 








116 


16 





24 








4 


16 





11 


12 






^ James Baillie, captain of the City Guard, uncle of George Baillie. 

^ For an account of this company, see ' Scottish Industrial Undertakings 
before the Union,' Scottish Historical Review, vol. ii. p. 53. 

' George Baillie's cousin, son of his uncle, George Baillie of Manorhall, 
Peeblesshire. 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1693 



[Sundries] 

Dito 16 For cariadges to Edinburgh . 

For taking horses out of Edinburgh 
Ditto 20 To Chamber rent in Mrs. Hervies 

For pistols bought by my brother 

Will 

To the colection for the poor 

To James Baillie given out by him 

for me Sept. 25, 1691 
To Georg Clark as p^ bill w* the 
interest therof for 26 monethes 
being 64 lb. 14s. . 
To anuity of my howss from 
Whitsunday 92 to Whit. 1693 . 
To John Hunter the cess for the 
terms of Whitsunday, Lambis and 
Mertimas 1693, and descharg'd 
for all precidings 
To McKuloch for 1 inning a room in 
1694 the top of Waristons Land 

Febr. 4 To Mr. Will Liviston ^ at my childs 
christining .... 
March 18 To Mr. Will. Vetch minister at 
Peebles per rect, from the collector 
of the vacant stipends of Meller- 
stens stipen 1693 
Jun. 18 To drinkmony to Mr. Ch. nurs 
August 1st Taken with me to England . 
Dito 15 For streat mony and poors mony 
per recept 
To a barber 

To a sclater for helping the howss 
Taken to the country and given out 
ther .... 

Oct. 9 For thirling to INIellarsteans . 



[Scots" 


£ 


s. 


d. 


8 


18 





2 


16 





86 


2 





36 







3 








904 14 
12 



85 

40 

9 



400 

2 18 
948 16 

11 4 oj 

1 16 0] 
700] 

-12 oj 

3 14 01 



1 A writer in Edinburgh, who appears to have collected the fees fod 
various Edinburgh churches. Sir John Foulis paid his fees to him ' when I gavfi 
up our names to be proclaimed.' 



1695] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 3 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

1695 £ s. d. 

For helping glas windows 17s. . 17 
To anuity for the howss per recept . 12 
For a coch from Barty Gibson to 

Walstons 1 buriall, Mrt. 94 . 30 

To my ant Huchison at sevarell 

times . . . . . 30 

For baithing in Rees bathing hows 4 16 

For frawsht of 2 trunks and 2 boxes 

from London . . . . 16 12 

For survayanc mony and to 

watters . . . . . 1 16 

Jun. To ant Hutchison 7 lb. To the 

Bainio in the Canigate 9 lb. 
To Mr. John Vass 
For helping the watch . 
To Sornbegs man 10 merks . 
To Georg Mosman for books : 
To bringing goods from Lieth 
Deer. 30 To John Smith for my expences on 

the English rood, when I cam 

last from London with the 

Secretar^ 80 10 

To Mr. Watson for a bill sent to 

London to Jeris . . . 2100 4 

To Georg Clark for the linin manu- 

1695 factory 120 

Deer. To the poll of my famely . . 30 

To expences at tinding for the years 

1691, 1692, 1693, and 1694 . 73 17 

To the minister of Ersiltons for his 

stipon 1694 .... 146 13 
To Will. Trotter, scoolmaster in 

Mellersteans . . . . 5 

To James Massie scolmaster in 

Mellerstains . . . . 10 

^ Frequently mentioned by Sir John Foulis as one of his companions. 
^ Mr. Secretary Johnston. Seep. 286. 



16 








29 








8 


14 





6 


13 


4 


50 


2 





3 


6 






4 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695 



[Sundries] 
To David Hume colecter for the cess 
1694 and 1695 .... 
1695 To Roger Hoburn by receat . 

Deer. To expences at fair and other out- 

givins for years allowed to 

John Wight .... 

To 3 years rent allowed to Will. 

Brounlies, etc. . . . . 

To mending the cross . 

For lousing a gun was panded 

To the Linin manufactuary for 

Smallits recept 
To cloath for Robert Baillie at Kelso 
For a coch howss to the Berlyn 
To Mosman for books 
G.P. To John Hay for a sword to Cap. 
Baillie ..... 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 
572 19 8 
200 



186 3 

62 8 

5 12 

1 14 

180 

40 

12 18 

40 

36 

9040 12 



Take out of the 
third pag and 
this. Cap. Bail- 
lies, mony paid 
to him to be 
taken of this 2184 8 0^ 

It. More the 
hnin manu- 
factory . 414 

It. More mony 
payd to the 
minister . 546 13 

It. More Lon- 
don jornay . 3048 0^ 



There remains besid 

To Holland to my brothers 



sume 6193 



2847 12 
120 



Caried to page 13th S. 2967 12 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 


4 





1 9 





9 





2 8 





8 8 





24 





5 16 





2 4 





4 18 





29 





11 12 





6 






1696] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Sundry debursments. 1696. 

January 1st To the poor per recept 

To the bathell of the church 
For a ring w* the Quins hair 
For glasing the forroom window . 
To Johnston barber 
Febr. 10 To Ridpath ^ at London 

23 To Mr. Liviston at Rachis christining 
To the bathell of the chiuch 
To charity ..... 
To Ms. Scot midwife . 
To Ms. Hutchison 
March For munting 3 swords 

To John Hunter my cess preceeding 

Whitt. 96 . . . . 73 

To John Hunter for polmony by act 

of parliment, 1695 for my whole 

famaly . . 

To charity ..... 
To Ms. Scot midwife . 
Aprill To lairn cookry from Mr. Addison 
To Will Johnston for books . 
To Captain Baillie in balance of ane 

acount ..... 217 
To a man in Gray Frirs for keeping 

up my childs grave . . 19 

May 10th For payment of the sess of the year 

1696 

To my Ant Hutchison . 

For the expence of fliting 

To Ms. Guttary .... 

To Hew Brown a doller 



32 


7 





3 


14 





5 


16 





15 


12 





36 









93 


1 


6 


12 








11 








3 








2 


18 






^ George Ridpath, Whig journalist, published a system of shorthand, wrote 
many party pamphlets and books, was obliged to fly the country in 1713 for a 
series of articles in the Flying Post and Observator. Lord Grange writing of 
him after his death states that ' his memory is not savoury here. I 'm sorry he 
was so vile for he once did good service. ' Frequent payments are made to him 
through these accounts, and he is often mentioned in the Jarviswood Corre- 
spondence. 



6 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1696 

[Sundries] 

For drawing the blewhowse 2lb. 8, 4| 

ounce silk and twisting 
July To the Wast Church 

To the loss of mony by crying doun 
For 8 monethes sess per recept 
July 19 To my jurnay to the Bath . 
To Scugald/ painter 10 dollers 
To expences at the fairs July 96 . 
Agust 12 To Grisies dancing master for 3 

monthes .... 

To Scugald painter 
To paper, pen and ink 10s. 
To the poor at Greenlaw Church . 
To severall litle things in the 

country ..... 
To Robert Young dark to the court 
To the scolmaster 
Octr. 1st To Scugald for 2 pictors and frames 
To James Borthick for the poor per 

recept . . . . . 4 2 

Novr. 10th To Grises reading master for a 

quarter . . . . . 2 18 

To 5 monethes cess per recept Lamb 

and Merts. 96 ... 162 17 8 

To the contrabusion for the fire in 

the Caningate . . . . 11 8 

For expence at the fair Oct. 96, 4lb. 

8, expence at tinding 96, lllb. 8*5. 15 16 
To acount of expences in going to 

head courts and w* cess etc. . 2 4 
To the linin manufactary . . 120 

For repairing of Mellerstean mill kill 

and howses .... 556 12 2 
To James Drumond by Ms. Hutchi- 
son 8 doll .... 23 4 
S. 490 £. 

^ See p. xxvi. 



[Scots] 


£ s. 


d. 


8 16 





20 3 





5 12 





286 18 


10 


008 9 





29 





4 4 





20 12 





68 8 





10 





4 10 





3 4 





12 





10 





74 8 






I70I] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Edenburgh, 1701. Sundry expences. Deb. to Cash. 



For a big Bible and velvit pock . 
For drinkmony 2 li. 18. more 

o 11. . • . . 

For writing a paper, 14 

For poket .... 

For bearing rains to the coch and 

helphing her 
For 7 ounce white threed 3 ti 10 
To the church bathel . 
For pins 19s. for a horn comb 6s. 
Feb. 5 For pictors in full of all I owed 

Scugald to this day . 
To poket .... 
For Grisies dancing a mounth with 

the Franch man 
For Robert Youngs sallary this year 
For a bridle and 2 curpils 
For a cariadge to Mellersteans 
For blooding given Georg Kirton 
For poket .... 
For pamphlits 4s. Grisies ball 

mony 1 li. 9 s . 
For cuping given Georg Kirton 
For a thresher 21 day without meat 
For yron to the horss 1 ti. helping 

the barndoors 2 li. . 
For hansels in January 
To Mr. Knox for head bathes 
To Georg Kirton which pays him his 

account in full till January 1700. 

June 10 For the rent of our loft in Tolbuth 

Church from Whitsunday 1700 to 

Whitsunday 1701 year 
To nurses 5 li 16s. to a barber to a 

nurses 3 li. 4s. . 
To the poor Aprill last 



£ s. d. 

18 

5 16[sic] 

14 
10 

2 10 

3 10 

2 18 a 
14 

96 

10 

14 4 

6 

1 17 
10 
5 16 

11 12 

1 13 

5 16 

12 6 

3 
23 
12 

76 



18 

9 14 6 
36 



8 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1701 



[Sundries] [Scots] 

For sweet powder £2, coch hires £ s. d. 

18s. 6d., and mending the coch 

Hi 4s 4 2 6 

To Porterfield to perfite Rachy in 

reading . . . . . 18 

For Grisies quarter with Cnimbin . 19 7 
For ane express to Dunglas 2 li 8s. 

nails 6s. rubarb 9s. . . . 8 13 

For 12 clouts to the cock 1 li 4s. 

booking the mairs 6s. . . 1 10 

For the bairenes milks going to with 

[sic] ther scooll . . . 2 18 

For shoes to a horss 8s. to sevarall 

outgiving b}^ James Carrin 8 li 8 3 16 

To poket 14s. 6d. more 6s. . . 110 

For puting up the park dicks of 

Jerriswood in full of all . . 9 3 4 

For lime to the dick barn . . 2 

For a ledger book 5 li 10 s. for sherp- 

ing the milne 31i. . . . 8 10 

To the clarks for the rights of Ballan 

crief . . . . . 4 7 

For books 23 

July 8 For dreg staf cluting and grising the 

coach . . . . . 1 16 

For wire and rings to the coch, 16s. 

for lokes to doors, 1 li 9s. . . 2 5 

For tows, 10 fadour, 10s. a smith 

for work 1 li. lis. . . . 2 10 

For a horss to Ballancrieff 1 li 16s. 1 16 

For a book 2 li a book 1 li letters in 

England 7 li 4s. . . . 10 4 

For snuf boxes 3 li 12s. For pins 

and knitins 1 li 10 . . . 5 2 

For a horss cumb and brush . 18 

For horss hires to Edinburgh . 300 

Octob. 1st For lead to the doors . . 6 

For tows to the stair of Mellersteans 16 



3701] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



9 



[Sundries] 

For wax and wafers 

For a comb and spung 

For a colt helter 

For 3 bridles to water the horss 

For helping the coach at Lidgert- 

wood 
For a blade and 2 scaburts to a 

sword ..... 
For severall little things at the fair 
.Ditto 2 For a sett of new coch whiles G.P. 

60£ 
For 4 cariadges from Edenbm*gh . 
For caring clogbags and other things 

from Thorontonbridge and New- 
castle to Mallersteans 
For cariadges by Munga Brounlies 

all cleard .... 

For expences at the 2 fairs with 

drumers, etc. .... 
For 2 sives and 2 ridles 1 ti 10s. 

suples 8s. .... 

For expence of selling 20 bolls oats 
To James Massie his salarie for this 

year ..... 

For a carte bought at Mellersteans 

with all that belonges to it 
For Brounlies howse rent 6 ti 13s. 4d 

ane emty hows 6 li 13s. 4d. 
To Ms. Hume of Bogend 
For suples 12s. 
For the head court at Kelso 
For young trees from Hundalie 
To the poor at Mellersteans 2 bols 

4 f[irlots] 2 p[ecks] oats at 5£ per 

boll ..... 

For biging Thomas Leadhowse's 

stable ..... 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 
15 2 
9 
14 
2 8 



4 16 
7 



6 

13 4 

9 19 

7 7 

1 18 
16 

10 

48 

13 6 8 

11 2 
12 
10 

2 

14 10 
82 



10 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1701 

[Sundries] 

For John Wights sallary the year 
1700 . . . . ' . 

To Andrew Lamb 

To the contrabusion for the burning ^ 

To Crombin for a quarter to Grisie 

To my Ant Effie 2 . . . 

For hering to Mr. Johnston 

For painting the chariot 

For the cochmans seat 4 ti helping 
harnis 2 li 2s . 

For plush to J. Rainalds 

To Androw Lamb 

To Stewarts nurs 

For repairing Mallersten tower 
given out this year as by par- 
ticular accumpts 

For 2 poks to bibles 10s. 

For a pad sadle and furnitur 25 ti. 4s. 

2 huntin stoks 20 ti. . . 45 4 

For feu duty at Jeriswood to account 

of bygans . . . , 15 13 0' 



[Scots] 


£ s. 


d. 


40 





14 


6 


13 





17 8 





5 16 





31 12 





3 12 





6 2 





11 





14 





2 18 





767 18 


4 


10 






S. 1700 11 6 



Edenburgh, January 1702. Sundry Expences, Deb. 

to Cash. 

To the bathell in the church 

To Adam Marchell 

To my brother Archibald 

For a window in the little closit 

For Grisies ball mony . 

To Grisies singing master Krenberg 

For helping the coach . 

For Shaws to Dina Ridpath . 

To Mr. Mitchell . 



2 18 





2 14 


6 


1 9 





10 





1 9 





g 14 4 





10 





1 9 





14 


6 



' Fire in Lawnmarket, 28 October 1701. — Faults Accounts. 

^ Youngest daughter of Lord Wariston. Died unmarried in 1715. 



1702] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



11 



[Sundries] 
23 To Georg Kirton to accumpt upon 

his letter .... 
To Grisies Candlesmas mony 
For lace to shirt hand 
For siringing the ears 
To Docter Sincklair for Rachy 
To Breastmills mans weding 
To a horss hire payd for Jame 

Baillie .... 
For caring our clogbag to New 

castle payd by Breastmille 
Febr. For books bought bv Mr. Knox 
28 For the Acts of the Assembly got 

from Mosman 
For Grisies singing to Mr. Krenberg 
For Grisies singing book 
For James Latie the measons 

coming to town 
March 8 For a diamond ring- 
To 2 nurses Cavers^and Mrs.Wather 

burns ^ . . . 

To Charly Hume 
To Grisies nurs for lint sead 
To Doct[or] S. Christining £2 18s. to 

his nurs 2£ 18s. 
To P.3 Sabath 12 Aprill 
For puting one a new plate on the 

coch and new clouts 
To Robert Young dark his salary 

for this year 
To James Massie schoollmaster his 

salarie for this year . 
May For letters from London 
To Docter Sincklair 
To Hellin Garner 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

21 6 a 

2 18 

2 12 6 

3 

28 8 

2 18 a 

1 16 

2 18 a 

34 Q 

6 6 

7 8 
19 

14 6 

63 5 

5 16 

7 4 

18 

5 16 

6 a 

6 

6 

10 

10 

17 8 

4 7 



^ Cavers, the seat of the Kers. Lady Grisell's mother was a Ker of Cavers. 
- Mrs. Hume of Wedderburn. 
' To pocket. 



12 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1702 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

£ s. d. 

To drink mony at Polwart 1 . . 2 18 

To Marth Black lost of rent . . 13 12 6 
To Munga Brunlies fathers howse 

and ane emtv howse . . 13 6 8 
For a pair new Wings and helping 

all the coch . . . . 5 8 
For a new poll £3 mending the ax- 
tree 10s. . . . . 3 10 
To Thomas Bell . . . . 29 
20 For a siging book to Grisie . . 19 
To Thomas Bell . . . . 2 
To Will Simson in Lanark bate of 

his rent 12 10 

1 day To Mr. Kramberg, Grisells singing 

master for the mounth past . 7 8 
ditto To Mr. Crumbin Grisies playing 

master for a quarter past 6 dollers 

and a doller for tuning . . 20 6 

9 To Docter Sincklair . . . 18 
For letters 15s. more 5s. more £l 13s. 

more £l 16 10 . . . 4 9 

To the bairnes to goe to a bridle . 5 

To Rachys ball and Grisies . 2 19 

To Rachys dancing master . . 8 14 
For a stra hat to Grisies ball 10s. 

gloves to them £l 12 . . 2 2 
To Sutherlands man £l 9s. cheries 

at the ball 10s. . . . 1 19 

For new tops to the coach . . 4 16 
To St. Andras Colledg given Mr. 

Pringle . . . . . 14 4 

To Grisie to goe to a consert . 14 6 

To Stewarts nurs and christining . 10 
June 30 To Mr. Crumbin for a month to 

Grisie 7 8 



^ Polwarth, tlie village adjoining Redbraes, the seat of the Earl of March- 
mont, frequently used as denoting Redbraes in these accounts. 



Scots 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


4 





366 


13 


4 


8 


14 





18 








11 


2 





1 


9 





1 


6 


a 


5 


16 





2 









1702] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 13 

[Sundries] 

To Crumbin for a book 

To my Lord Collinton ^ for his rent 

at Whitsunday 1702 and all pre- 

cidings clear' d .... 
To Rachys dancing master . 
August 6 To the rent of the loft in the church 
To Lith contrabution . 
To a consurt fro Grisie 
To a coller to Grisie 
To brotherAndrow's^ childs christin- 

ing ..... 

To Captain Burck the yrish man . 

Ditto 26 For repairing John Wights dwelling 

howse . . . . 21 10 

To puting up James Ormistons cott 

howse . . . . . 2 8 

For mending the pinits at Meller- 

steans . . . . . 1 10 

For a bible to Gris £l 7s. mending 

coch bridles 6s. ... 

For a little Galaway 
For letters £l 6s. 2 nurses £5 16., 

letters £1 16s. 14s. wath helping 

For letters £l 6s. 5 £l 15s. 6s. 5 . 
For sevarell things spent at the fair 
Octo 29 For yron bought at Fairs 

To a garner for seeds £l 9s. For 

mending a coat house . . 3 5 

To Androw Lamb given him for 

service . . . . . 22 

To the pip and drum £2 16s. Drink- 

mony Green . . . . 5 14 



1 


13 





26 








11 


12 





3 


17 





10 








3 


14 






^ Sir James Foulis of Colinton, raised to the Bench as Lord Colinton. It was 
he who offered to prove the authenticity of the petitions to Parliament against 
the Union by bringing the Petitioners themselves, which was the last thing the 
Government wanted. - See p. 27. 



14 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1702 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

To pip and drum £2 16s. for mend- £ s. d. 

ing my watches £2 8. . . 5 4 

To drink mony £2 18s. letters £l 

more 10s. . . . . 4 8 

To a raffil £14 4s. Haburn 14s. 6d. 

Ms. Muir £1 9s. . . . 16 7 6 

To the domany in Mellersteans 3 

bolls oats . . . . 13 10 

Novr. 20 To Crisis singing master Cremberg 

£7 8 Brun for arthmetick £12 . 19 8 
To Franch dancing master for Gris: 

and Rach 17 12 

For a flute £6 a quarter with Crum- 

bin 6| doll. 
Deer. 30 To Mr. Knox for books 

To James Massi this year 



25 1 





20 





15 





S.1148 17 


6 



Edenburgh, January 1707. Sundry Accounts. 
Deb. to Cash. 

For mounthes at the violl to Grisie 

with Sinckolum 
For mending her violl 
To Mr. G. B. nurse 
For letters £2 10s., 6s., 7s., £4 4s., 

£211s., lis., 5s.,7s. . 
To Thomson writting master for 

Rachy one mounth . 
For chair heir ] 4s. 6d., £3 Is., £1 12s., 

lo** • • • • • 

To Montroses nurs £3 5s., Marrs 

£2 18, Marrs £2 18s. 
For Defos book ^ £l 10s. gune 

powder 14s. . 



12 








2 








2 


18 





11 


1 





2 


18 





5 


14 





9 


1 





2 


4 






• Defoe's book in support of the Union. 



1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 15 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

£ s. d. 

To Docter St. Clair for Grisie . 28 8 
To drinkmony in a shipe by 

Grisie . . . . . 19 

For servants drinkmony at Les/y ^ 14 14 
To John Steall singing master, for 2 

mounthes to Grisie . . . 24 
To a raffile for herpsicords by 

Grisie . . . . . 14 4 

For gunn puder . . . . 6 

For shoeing horses by Tam Youll . 2 
To drinkmony at Kinross ^ £2 18, 

4 horses 3 servants 2 nights . 6 18 
To drinkmony at Dupphn ^ a f ourt- 

night . . . . . 9 
To drinkmony at Lesly £3 18, 4 

hors, 3 servants 2 nights £3 12 . 7 10 
For crosing Quensf erry £1 4s. crosing 

from Kingoren £2 12s. . . 3 16 

For vizicater plasters 14s. . . 14 

To Thomas Bellsson £l 9s. . . 19 
To a man to goe to Rickerton ^ twise 

16s. 16 

May For paper 9s. 9s. was [sic] 8s. gilt 

paper 9s. wax 6s. . . . 2 10 

For mending sadle graith £2 7s. . 2 7 
To hoboys £l 9s. drinkmony 6s. Ms. 

Carr £2 18s 4 13 

To the bairens po: £3 3s. Is. 8d. . 3 4 8 

For drinkmony at the Reath ^ . 3 12 6 

To May Minzies to buy gloves . 1 16 
For J whit satin for the bairenses 

satin pice . . . . 12 6 



1 Seat of the Earl of Rothes. 

- The residence of the Earl of Morton or of John Bruce of Kinross. 

^ Seat of Earl of Kinnoull. 

■• Probably Riccarton near Edinburgh, the seat of Robert Craig, advocate. 

■■^ Seat of the Earl of Melville. 



16 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

For silks to it 6s. nails threed to the £ s. d. 

tent Is. . . . . . 7 

For silk to make a purs and strings, 

13s 13 

To La: Marrs footman 10s. . . 10 

For drinkmony twise at Gather 

House and groom . . . 7 5 

For Londan journay in his poket 

April 1st 50 guinys . . . 710 

For to answer bills to London £103 

str. more .... 897 

To the Docters Pitcarin/ Dundas,^ 

St. Clair,3 Bailie . . . 170 8 

To Baillie for 3s. blooding and to his 

man . . . . . 21 15 

To Ms. Haliwall £1 12s. 6d. lamb 

10s. Monros lad 10s. . . 1 12 6 

For tickets to Steals consurt . 7 2 

For nails to the coch £l 17s. oyl to 

chair 14s. 6 . . . . 2 11 6 

To new traces and other things to 

the traveling coach got from 

Brutherstons last year . . 30 

For a new male pillion 12s. girthes 

and mendnig the sadles when I 

went to Dupplin 
To poket May 18th 
For a handcurcher to May Minzies 
To Crumbin for a quarter throwgh 

bass to Grisie 2 guinys . . 25 16 

To the Marques of Tweddels groome 

for the coch mares . . . 5 16 

For letters 10s. 10s. 10s. 5s. paper 

18s 2 13 



2 2 


6 


10 





1 9 






^ The famous Dr. Archibald Pitcarne, physician and poet. 
2 Dr. Alexander Dundas, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, 
Edinburgh. 
^ See p. 256. 



1707] 



OF LADY GEISELL BAILLIE 

[Sundries] 



17 



May To chair man £l 10s., 16s., 14s. 6d. 

For mending window in pairt of 

Collintons rent 

June 6 For 3 mounthes writting Rachy 

with Thomson and 12s. for 

pens . . 

For letters 10s. . 

For dresing the garden, to Wear in 

Hariots work . 
For 2 mounth to Grisie with St 

Culume on the vyoll, etc. . 

For a Bible to John Harla £l 10 

For covers to books 15s. wafers 

2s. 4d. poket 6s. 

Mellerst. For mending Grisies watch . 

June 10 For a lock to the childrens room 

For ane express from Edinburgh 

Xij oS. . . . 

For Androw Lams expences at 

Langsha, etc. . 
July 2 To Tam Youls weding . 

To drinkmony at Boughtrige, etc 
For letters pay'd by Ms. Monro 
July 22d For ane express to Mellerstaines 

sent by Kersland ^ 
To P. at Earleston, July 
To poket £1 10s. . 
To the fair 18s. . 
For John Brouns house 
To Widow Yellas 
To John Boe for puting us [? up] his 

house ..... 
For Androw Brownlies house rent 



[Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


2 





6 


3 


11 





9 


6 








10 





6 








15 


3 





1 


10 





1 


3 


4 


3 











8 






2 8 

10 

3 14 6 
3 7 

8 8 

2 4 
36 

1 10 
18 
6 13 4 

3 16 

2 
6 13 4 



^ John Ker of Kersland, Ayrshire. The head of the Cameronian party. He 
intrigued with both Whigs and Jacobites, and was no better than a government 
spy. At this time he was willing to sell his influence either for or against the 
Union as might best pay him. 



B 



18 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[Sundries] 
For puting up Androw Brownlies's 

house in pairt .... 
For mending the coch harnis by 

Androw Dods .... 
For ane express to Grange Muir ^ to 

Rob: Baillie .... 
To a Councell post 
Aug. 26 For letters payd by Ms. Monro 
To Grisie Monro 





[1707 


[Scots' 


£ 


s. 


d. 





6 


8 





10 





1 


16 








14 


6 


2 


2 





1 


10 






Lady G. Bailhe. 

For lodging 2 nights in the Banio 

and 4 times bathing . 
For drinkmony £3 4s. drink, etc. 
For chairs .... 
To Mr. Knox apothicars account 
For silks for the childrens satine 

pice Ms. Miller 
For helping the nurses house payd 

a wright in Fanns 
To Ann Faa 12s. 
To Docter Pitcarn 3 guinys 
To Docter Dundas 3 guinys 
To John Baillie one guiny 
To Francy Easton for blooding 
To a coach to Edinburgh 12sh. 6d 
To Docter Dundas's man 
To drinkmony at Gather 
For a horse to Gather . 
Sepr. 12 To Do. Abernathy 2 guinys a 

21s. 6d 

14 To Doc. Abernathy a guiny 

To Telfoord, cherurgione, 2 guinys 
For 3 snuf milnes £4 . 



14 


8 





2 


8 





1 


9 





46 








e 

3 
4 


12 





Ll 

3 











12 





38 


14 





. 38 


14 





12 


18 





2 


18 





7 


10 





2 








5 


16 





1 

4- 


4 





. 25 


16 





12 


18 





25 


16 





4 


8 






Seat of George Baillie's brother-in-law. 



1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 19 

[Sundries] [Scots] 

To Rob. Hope £3, docters man £ s. d. 

£1 10 4 10 

Sep. 27 To Docter Abernathy a jacobos and 

a guiny . . . . . 28 10 

To all expences of puting up the loft 

in Erilston Church . . . 166 

For puting up the uter cattle rack 

etc. in the house by James Blakie 6 
For shoeing the horss at Mellersteans 

by Pate Newton from Sep. 23, 

1706, to Sep. 29, 1707 . . 13 4 

To James Duncon in Kelso payd by 

Pat Newton 14 years agoe . 2 

Sep. 29 To Troter in Kelso for mending 

sadles . . . . . 3 14 

Ditto To Pringle in Kelso cherurgion his 

account . . . . . 23 

For a good strong bridle £l 2s. for 

head steels, etc. £l 12s. . . 2 14 

For letters payd Ms. Monro when I 

went away . . . . 1 10 

Sep. 30 For yron to shoe the horses since 

Sep. 30, 1706 . . . . 6 14 

For paper 10s. tows for the box with 

plate, etc. . . , . 17 6 

For cariing 2 cariages and a clogbag 

to Newcastle . . . . 12 

For Coltcrooks vicarage 1706 paid 

Mr. Gowdy . . . . 10 

For repairing Androw Brounlies 

house 4000 divids £2 8s. . . 2 8 

To expence last winter by Androw 

Lamb . . . . . 9 14 6 

For hay rakes 18 : suples 9s. mend- 
ing stable door . . . 1 18 
To pip and drum, July fair . . 2 18 
To Androw Brounlies house puting 

up 6 13 4 



20 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Sundries] 

For Rob. Dods house . 

To Androw Lam 3 akers land 

To loss on Georg Trumbles house 

3 years rent .... 
To the nurss house rent 
Sep. 31 For puting up the Hall House pay'd 

out for Widow Wight 
To James Massy scoolmaster in 

Mellerstains his sallary payable at 

IMartimas 1707 
To James Miller, glazer, for a years 

at Mellerstains .... 
To Ms. Mean .... 
For a pair sods to Docter St. Clairs 

lady ..... 

To John Frazar he gave out at 

London ..... 
Oct. 2 To Pegie M'Kinzie £6 14s. . 
To Isabell Dippo 
To King, coachmaker, for helping 

the chariot the money sent to 

Edinburgh by Francis Newton 
For letters £l 10s. £2 10 paid Francy 

Newton in full 
To Tam Robisone in a year keeping 

up the Park 2 fous bea[n]s 
Oct. 3 ^ For binding books to the ministers 
For Acks of Parliment 
For the news £l paper £l 14s. more 

A. 4 o« • • • • • 

For rubans to Peggy M'Kinzy 

For binding the operas 14s. 

For shoeing the horse chariot rent 

etc. payd to Barty Gibson in full 

of all accounts 





[1707 


Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


3 








40 








24 








3 


13 


4 


8 


12 





10 








4 


18 





1 


9 





1 


16 





6 








6 


14 





2 








8 









4 





2 





3 14 





2 





3 11 





5 15 


6 


14 





54 






The last Scots Parliament met on this clay. 



I7I0] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



21 



[Sundries] [Scots] 

To John Baillie, cherurgion, for £ s. d. 

drogs from to October 

3d, 1707 . . . . 158 

To Docter Trotter , . . . 12 18 

Oct. 4 To drinkmony at Polwarth ^ . 2 18 
To the pip and drum at this 

moneths fair . . . . 2 18 
To Mr. Gowdy the vicarage of 

Coltcrooks this year . . 10 
For repairing Mellerstaine Tour and 

other work there . . . 241 19 2 



3386 6 8 
Take out the London journey . 1607 



1779 6 8 



Mellerstaines, January 1710. Sundry Accounts. 

Deb. to Cash. 

[Sterling] 

To Ms. Rume ^ for 9 weeks and 5 
nights chamber rent at 3sh. 4d. 
per night and drinkmony . 11 17 2 

For coch and chaire hire at Edin- 
burgh in abovesaid time . . 12 

For drinkmony at severall places 
and to nurses . 

For compases to Grisie 

To Mr. Crombine half a moneth 

To Mr. M'Gie for teaching Grisie 

geographic . . . . 116 

For tickets to consorts 7s. raffles 
£1 10s. . 

For writting paj^ei* and letters 

See p. 12. 2 See p_ 



2 6 


8 


2 


6 


10 






• 


1 17 





• 


11 





xxviii. 







22 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



[Sundries] 

To Robert Morton and Ms. Riddle 
To the Lady Mannerhall ^ when her 

son died .... 
Febr. To John Baillie surgeon in full of all 

accounts .... 
To a man from Edinburgh to tune 

the spinits and virginells . 
For boat fraught at Rutherfoord ^ 
To Doct. Abernathys man 
To Piter Brown for measuring of 

land 2 days 
For letters .... 
May 24 For drinkmony at the Hirsill ^ nurs 

10s. 9d. house 6s. 
For powder and lied 
For drinkmony . . . 

For Spaw watter 
For letters .... 
To Docter Gibson 
For drinkmony at sundry times 
To Docter Abernathys nurs 
For yron for uses in the house 
To the Marques of Tweddels groom 

half a guiny 
To the two servants caried over the 

4 mares 4 days 
May 29 For the cariages of two boxes from 

London .... 
For bringing my letters from Ber 

wick .... 

For letters 5d. lOd. 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
5 

10 

2 2 3 






15 


6 





2 








1 








5 








2 


6 





16 


9 





2 








12 





5 


11 


2 





5 


6 


1 


1 


6 





18 








5 








3 








10 


9 





4 





1 


6 


2 





8 








1 


3 



^ George Baillie's aunt by marriage. 

^ A ferry across Tweed at the old village of Rutherford, still in use. 

* Seat of the Earl of Home. Lady Grisell's eldest and favourite brother, 
Lord Polwarth, married for the second time Lady Jane Home, daughter of the 
Earl of Home, * Bonnie Jean o' the Hirsel.' 



[Sterling! 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


1 








5 








5 






7 10 


6 


5 





5 





5 





3 


6 



1710] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 23 

[Sundries] 

June 8 For drinkmony at Calder ^ . 

To Rutherfoords cochman and 

Newtons ^ . 

To my sister Julian ^ at Calder 
To Adam Mershall for the filly 

bringing . . . . . 5 

July 6 To Docter Abernathy when Rachell 

had a fever .... 
To the Docters man 
Aug. 30 To musick ..... 
For letters 2 sh. 6d. an express 2s. 6d 
For ane express from Edinburgh 
For expresses to Edinburgh three 

times . . . . . 3 

Sepr. 30 To Docter Gibson for blooding in 

the jouglar vain . . . 116 

For capris and gass for ink . . 12 

For cariing letters Is., 2s. 6d., Is., 

3sh. 8 8 2 

For drinkmony at Boughtrige and 

Ridbreas* . . . . 10 

For cariages by Alexander Wood of 

books . . . . . 2 6 

For sundry things to the house 

given out myself . . . 6 

To the ho boys . . . . 2 6 

For 2 nights lodging in Seatons 

house . . . . . 5 

To John Carrs nurse 5s. other drink- 
mony 2s. . . . .070 



^ Seat of Lord Torphichen. 

^ Lady Grisell's aunt, Julian Hume, married Richard Newton of that Ilk. 

^ Julian Hume, Lady Grisell's sister, eloped in 1698 with Charles Bel- 
lingham, a man of no means or position. She was no doubt staying at this 
time with her sister Jean, who married James, seventh Lord Torphichen, in 

1703. 
* The seat of the Earl of Marchmont. 



24 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

For teath cleaning each half a £ s. d. 

crown and puders . . . 14 
For letters Is. 4d. paper 3s. letters 

3s. . . . . . .074 

To Sir James Cockburn of Ryslaw . 10 
To contrabution for Irish meeting 

house . . . . . 14 
To a nurse for Rachy at Edinburgh, 

July 5 

To Pittcurs 1 nurse . . . 5 

For expence of letters cariing . 10 
For powder and sope Is. more 1 sh. 

Baillie, surgen's man 2s. 6d. . 4 6 

To fidlers 2 sh. 6d. . . . 2 6 

To Litildanes ^ nurse and midwife 10 

To Ms. Robertuns nurs 5s. . . 5 
To Medina ^ picture drawer for 

Jerriswoods my oun and the two 

bairens's pictures drawing . 20 
For cariing letters to Mintto,* etc. 

5s. drinkmony for lodging . 9 6 
Aug 12 For Grisies proclamation in the 

church to . . . . 116 

To the door of the house on the 16 . 10 

To her poket on the 17th . . 116 
To her she gave John Baillie 

Murrays servant . . . 2 3 
To Prestonhalls ^ servant for useing 

their rooms . . . . 5 

To poket given Grisie . . ; 2 

To poket 10 sh 10 

For a moneths chamber rent in Ms. 

Burns . . . . . 8 11 

To the fidlers . . . . 116 



^ Haliburton of Pitcur. '•^ Kerr of Littledean Tower on Tweed. 

* See p. xxvi. * Belonging to Sir Gilbert Eliott. 

* Roderick Mackenzie of Prestonhall, raised to the Bench as Lord Prestonhall. 
His wife was a sister of George Baillie's mother. 



3710] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 25 

[Sundries] 
Novr. 8 To expence at Ginelkirk ^ comeing 

in £l going out 6 sh 
To drinkmony at Brughton ^ 
For snuff and tobaca to cary to 

London ..... 
For a nights lodging at Linton ^ 
For 6 weeks chamber rent in Ms. 

Rumes * at 5s. per night . 
For chaire hyre 6 sh. more 2s. 
To Androw Lambs expences at 

fairs and head courts 1710, 6s., 

more Is., 2s., 2s. 6d. . 
To the pyp and drum for 2 fairs 
To Mr. Steall for Grisie 
For letters by post, etc., per Francy 

Newtons account 
To Thorindick 18s. for a horse to 

Greenlaw 6s. . 
To Ms. Richison for her rooms 
For cariage of a box from London . 
. July To a servant of the Banck for 

bringing dook {tlege, doun] the 

books . . . . 
For fraught of the Spaw watter, etc. 
For paper Is. and caring letters 

befor the election 12 
For the Acts of Parliament . 
For 2 years news papers pay'd 

Francy Newton 
For a goun and coat to May Minzies 

at Grisies marriage . 
To George Newton for the cart road 

in the Greenlands 



Sterling' 
£ s. d. 
16 
1 13 6 


11 
11 



6 


10 10 

8 






11 
9 
12 


6 

4 



2 3 


6 


1 4 
8 
8 







2 
16 


6 
9 


13 
2 9 



6 


5 


8 


8 





5 






^ Channelkirk, a place about half-way between Edinburgh and Mellerstain. 
^ Belonging to Sir David Murray of Stanhope, Bart, whose eldest son married 
.Lady Grisell's daughter Grisell. 

^ A village lying between Jerviswood and Mellerstain. 
* See p. xxxviii. 



26 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Geordy Newton more for that £ s. d. 

road a fou oates . . .034 
For 3 concave chimnys and 120 foot 

hewin lintells and rebets for 

Lighting the House hewin by 

James Brady 10s. chi[mney] ; 4d. 

foot 3 10 

For Wright, measone, and glazier 

work, etc. about the House . 26 

For bring stons from Greenlaw to 

J. Ormston at 5d. per day . .050 

To the nurses house rent 16s. 1 j^^d. 

John Browns lis. lx\d. . .17 2^^ 

To the scoolmasters salary this year 16 8 



S. 158 09 05^^ 



Mellerstaine, Janry. Account of Sundry Expences. 1714. 



For mending the fine virginall at 


£ 


s. 


d. 


London .... 


12 


10 





For Fraught of them cariing 








out of Edn .... 


2 








For the church Bathel at Edn 





2 


6 


To Collonell Hamilton 5s. to 








others 4s. 6d. more 





9 


6 


For a Book ls.4d. another Is. . 





2 


4 


For cleaning pistols Is. 





1 





To Mrs. Howie 





10 





Edn To Robert Mandersons doughter 








Grisells nurs .... 





5 





March 7 For booking my seal in the Gold- 








smith's Chope 





1 





10 For Poket Tolbooth church 


1 


4 





To Drinkmoney at Lienhouse 


1 









10 





4 





1 






1714] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 27 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Drinkmoney at Calder ^ and 

to coachman and stal:)les 
To powder and ball 4s. 
For letters 6d. more 6d. . 
To Poket Is. 6d. drinkmony at 

Ridbreas . . . . 2 

To Mary Plumer Is. Abernathys 

Nurs 5s 6 

For a Prognostication 3d. . . 3 

To Hillons ^ Nurs 5s. Kimergham ^ 

6s. Dunglas ^ 10s. . . . 110 

For Horse at Berwick 4s. to 

Adam Mershall for the Mares 5 

To Drinkmoney at Ridbreas 5s. 

Nickle Is. . 
To the Nurs at Dunglas 
To the fidlers two times 3s. 6d. 
To Drinkmoney at Dunglas the 

2d time 5 garner 2s. groom 2s. 9 

For letters 6d. more 6d. more 

6d 2 6 

For James Duncans holding court 

at Langshaw . . . 4 

May 15 To John Walker for the chair rent 

a year .... 

To the pys and drum July fair . 
For fairins and for fruit 
For a coat to Baillie Youll 4s.4d. 

makeing 8 . 
To Mr. Anderson the Minister, etc. 
For a book .... 
To Hary Fouls the Rent of Collin- 






6 








5 








3 


6 






5 








4 








8 








5 








3 


6 





1 






^ Lord Torphichen's. See note, p. 23. 

* Johnston of Hilton. Lady Grisell's grand-aunt, Sophia Hume, married 
Joseph Johnston of Hilton. 

' Belonging to Lady Grisell's brother Andrew Hume, raised to the Bench as 
Lord Kimmerghame. 

'' Anne Hume, Lady Grisell's sister, married Sir John Hall of Dunglass. 



[Sterlin 


g] 


£ s. 


d. 


33 6 


8 


1 4 





5 





4 4 


6 


11 





3 10 





11 






28 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 

[Sundries] 
tons House the last year we was 
in it and which clears all due 
him ..... 

For a lb. Rubarb 

For a lb. sealing wax 

For a gun and 30 swords 4£ pack- 
ing 4s. 6d. 

For cariing letters and letters 
Aug. 8 For expences of going to Wooler 

For cariage of boxes from London 

For expence of coming by sea to 

Newcastle . . . . 3 7 

For 3 horses from Newastle to 
Mellerstaines 

To Docter Gibson 

For chamber rent at Edn 2s. 
6d. ..... 

To Smelholm boge . 

To Drinkmoney at Minto and 
Newton .... 

ToRutherfoordboat and cochman 

For 29 Guns and Bagginets . 18 4 1 3^ 

For a barrill Powder weighe 7| 
stone .... 

To James Pringle surgen account 

To Docter Gibson's surgen ac- 
count . . . . . 4 11 9 

To John Craw's bill at the last 

Election . . . . 7 10 

For Powder for shooting craws, 

To the fidlers .... 
For carting a box from London . 
To ]Mr. M'gie .... 
To Pyp and drum octr fair 4s. for 

fairins l£ 4s. . . . 18 

To Drinkmoney at Kimergham 

7s. Ridbreas 7s. . . . 14 



2 


5 





1 


1 


6 





2 


6 





10 


9 





14 








2 





18 


4 


1; 


3 


6 


8 


4 












8 


8 





5 








9 





1 


1 


6 



I7I4] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



29 



[Sundries] 
To Drinkmoney at Stewartfield,^ 

To Drinkmoneyat Longformakus^ 

and Horses .... 
To David Weems ^ a guinv his 

horse 2s. 6d. .... 
To Poket at Earlston 
To the Bathel of Earlston. 
To Nans Walker and Sandy Broun 
To Poket Is. . 
To Piter Broun for measuring the 

Hill . . . 

To Drinkmoney Redbreas . 
To Drinkmoney Dunglas . 
For shiping goods 2s. more 15s. 
For Drinkmoney Ridbreas 
For Account books from Mr. 

Mcgie ..... 
To Mr. Mcgie for teaching book 

keeping 
To James Kilpatrick 
Breast Mills doughters * 
For a chair 

To Poket Earlston, etc. 
To Jean Lambs Bridle 
To Poket Servante, etc. 



Sterling] 


£ s. 


d. 


8 


6 


10 





1 4 





1 14 





2 


6 


6 





1 





5 


Q 


17 


6 


18 


6 


17 





5 






10 





3 2 







1 1 


6 




5 







2 







1 







1 10 







5 






London 
Deer. 18 For Servants Tam j^oull and Katie 
Hearts fraught to London 
victualls furnisht by the Skiper 1 10 
To Tam and Kate when they went 

a shore, etc. . . . . 10 

For 5 places in the stage Coach 

from Edn to London . . 22 10 

^ Now known as Hartrigge. Seat of Col. John Steuart, killed by Sir Gilbert 
Eliott of Stobs in an election brawl in 1726. ^ Seat of Sir Robert Sinclair, 



See p. 45. 



■* George Baillie's nieces. 



30 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For booking money . . . 2 6 

For cariing bagage one the coach 

over and above 20 lb. weight for 

each of us . . . . 2 7 

For our expences on the road for 

ourselves five and litle Robie 

Pringle ^ 13 days from Dunglas 10 
For James Grive's expence and 

the horses on the road . . 1 17 6 

For shoes to the coach mares at 

Dunglas to Mouse Mare same 

road on, basts and cords to 

trunks etc. . . . . 14 

For fraught of goods from Berwick 

in three ships . . . 3 8 

30 For warfage porters carts to the 

Lodging etc. . . . 19 1 

For fraught of 4 half barrills 

herins . . . . . 6 

For warfage bale and cariing to 

the Lodgine . . . 2 6 

For fraught of boxes from London 

in Aug: last and cariages . 2 
For 8 quare white paper gote last 

sommer . . . . 4 8 

For squaring and binding 2 count 

books ..... 
For a spectickle eye Is. letters 2s. 
For puting the Coach in currant 
For a cover to Grisies bible 8d. to 

her Is. . 
For letters Is. 
For binding the Atlas's 
To John Walker for the chairs rent 

till White 1715 . . . 18 4 

' See p. xl. 






8 








3 








3 


6 





1 


8 





1 








7 






1715] OF LADY GRISSEL BAILLIE 31 





Sundries 


Sterling] 






£ s. 


d. 




To Nurses House rent 


15 







To Will Mills Housereut . 


5 


6A 




To John Gifferts house rent 


5 







£183 8 


6 


• 

London, 


• ••••• 

January 1715. Sundry Accounts, Deb. 


• 


12 day 


For 4 weeks House Rent payd Mr. 








Broun .... 


14 







To Grisell Robison . 


10 


9 




For the Mous Mare stabling 19 






nights shoes Is. 


1 11 







To Docter Shien 


1 1 


6 




To Rachy a play 


5 


6 




For letters 4s. Ms. Boyds childs 








toy 2s. 6d. .... 


6 


6 


26 


For a chair and coaches since we 








came ..... 


1 10 







To poket .... 


3 


6 




For a coach Is. more 2 


3 







To Margrat Robison 


1 1 


6 




To cards lost at Dutches Mon- 








troses 1 .... 


5 







To the French Mistres Taucour 








for a moneth 


10 







To Mrs. Wests Nurse 


10 


9 




To Captain Kirton ^ for lose on 








Raches Lottary Ticket 


1 1 


6 




For 300 Limes and 90 frute trees 








went to Scotland the frute trees 








was 4£ Is. 6d. the limes 


4 1 


6 




For caring them to Greenwage to 








a ship for Berwick 


7 






^ See p. 282. 

- Captain Kirkton, R.N., son of the Rev. James Kirkton, and thus a first 
cousin of George Baillie. There are a good many of his papers at Mellerstain. 



32 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For Goldbaters Lieff Is. . . 10 

For a french book 2s. a psalm 

book 2s.6d 4 6 

febr. 22 For the Elections last Parliment 

and this new election giveing 

in the two returns to the Crown 

Clark . . . . . 9 

For a hood and Mantle to Ann 

Kenadyi ... . 100 

For 8 plays at a croun to my Nices 

and doughters 
For a book ls.6d. 
For News Powder and oyl pay'd 

John Baillie he gave out 
For Mastregs C oiler . 
To Major clelands Nurs 
For 3 laches 3s. 
March 8 For coach's and chairs to this 

day ..... 
For 2 losens to a window 
To John Scote for phisick and 

wateing on me . . . 116 

9 To Mr. Broun for 2 Moneth Lodg- 
ing . . . . . 28 
For the Lady Mannerhall . 10 
For 300 Lime Trees sent to Meller- 

staine and cariing . . 5 

For a watch and gold chean to 

Rachie from Massie . . 27 

ditto To Mr. Dumbar Franch Master for 

a Moneths teaching . . 116 

For Straff ords try ell 16sh. staf- 

fords tryell 2s. 6d. . . 18 6 

To Mr. Isack for a Moneths 

Dancing to Rachy . . 3 4 6 



2 











1 


6 


1 











1 


6 





5 








3 





1 


12 








2 


6 



^ Probably the daughter of Lady Kennedy afterwards mentioned. 



I7I5] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



33 



[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Monsieur La fever Mr. Isacks £ s. d. 

violer a moneth . . . 10 9 

To poket 2s., coch 2s., Ink 2s. . 6 
For dying Ms. Turnbuls goun 4s., 

lineing and makeing 19s. . 13 
To Monsieur Isack a Moneth for 

Rachels Dancing and La fever 2 14 3 

To Mr. Dumbar French Master 116 

Ap. 6 To Mr. Broun for 4 weeks Rent 14 

Ap. 20 To Mr. Massys man . . . 10 

For a play to Rachel Dundas and 

May Menzies, gallarie . . 4 

For Thomas a Kempes . . 4 

For letters Is. Is. 6d. more 4s. Is. 7 6 
For 6 weeks news to July 1 st 9s . 2d . , 

more lis., Is. 6d. . . . 11 7 
For coaches 4s., chairs 7s. Is., Is., 

Is., Is., Is., Is., Is., 2s. 6d. . 10 6 

For Acts of Parliament . . 3 
To Chair men for removeing our 

goods to the new house 6s. 6d. 

more 12s. . . . . 18 6 

For a play to Rachy . . 5 

For play Captain Murrays Lady 10 

To George Drumond . . 116 

To Andrew Kenady ^ . . 2 3 

To Lady Kenady 2 . . . 3 
To Mr. Baldwine Coachmaker in 

paint 25 . . . . 25 
To pamphlets Is., church Bethell 

4s 5 



^ Probably the son of Lady Kennedy. 

^ Perhaps Jean Douglas, daughter of Captain Andrew Douglas of Mains, R.N., 
and wife of Sir John Kennedy of Culzean, Bart., two of whose sons afterwards 
became Earls of Cassillis. She had twenty children, fourteen of whom died 
young. Amongst the six who survived was a daughter Anne, who married John 
Blair, younger of Dunskey. It is quite likely that she had a son Andrew 
amongst those who died young. 



34 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1715 



[Sundries] 
To Mr. Dumbar French Master for 

a Moneth 
To Johny Stewart for a play 
To John Simmerall . 
For a moneth Lodging payd Mr 

Broun 
To tax for the death of the Cows 
For a French book . 
To poket 

To plays for Grisie and Rach 

To Ms. Hurnes litle Girle . 

May 28 To Captain Clivelands coachman 

For a pair orrs to Richmond and 

back again to London . 
For Morklet rols and wt Mrs. 

Cockburn .... 
To Mr. Hays for 2 coach horses a 

quarter the 9 May 25 . 
To Mr. Hays for 2 horses to 

Twittenhame 
To a Rafle given John Scote 
For 2 reports to send to Scotland 
To Rachy of poket money 
June 21 For marled paper 2d. a sheat 

For scouring all the wanscote of 
I new house at 20d. a day with- 

out meat .... 



For white washing the House Is. 



a 



roof ..... 
For news prints Is. 6d. 
For the last two moneths of our 

lodging payd Mr. Broun 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
116 
5 
3 4 6 

14 

5 

2 

10 

10 

2 6 

5 

7 

2 

25 

10 
10 
7 
116 
6 



17 

15 
16 

28 



^ The tax here mentioned was no doubt imposed to meet the expense 
incurred in connection with a cattle plague which broke out in London and the 
neighbourhood in the preceding autumn, when many thousands of cows were 
destroyed by orders of the magistrates, the owners receiving compensation at 
the rate of 40s. per cow. — Caleiidar of Treasury Papers. 



1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 35 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Mr. Broun for spoyling his £ s. d. 

furnitur . . . . 10 2 

June 24 For Repairing the Rooff of the 

new house . . . . 2 6 

For 50 Reports of the secret 

Committy to send my father . 15 
For stoping Grisies Teeth with leed 

and some things to clean 'em 10 

To James Minzies to begine a 





stock .... 


1 


1 


6 




To Mr. Isack for 3 moneth and 






1 




to Mr. La fever 


8 


12 







For Andersons pills . 





2 


6 




For drinkmoney at Twettenham 










to all the servants 


1 


7 


6 




To Richmont ball with Mrs. Boyd 






1 




and bairens .... 





4 


6 


July 30 


For newspapers Is. 7d. Aug: 3s. 










lOd. . . . . . 





5 


5 




To Lady Buts 1 Nurs 





5 







For painting the house by Muns at 










3d. a yeard 


5 


7 


6 




For Glazing the windows l£ 5 










cleaning them all 10s. 


1 


15 


1 




The Smith account of Reparations 










to the house 


1 


5 


; 


Aug. 7 


To Earls Mitting House . 





10 


9 : 




To lose at Carts 





9 







For a necklace hook to May 










Menzies .... 





1 







To Dickson joyner for reparations 










OSIl* • • • • • 





5 







To John Colecot joyner for shelf to 










the house, etc. 





12 


i 






To Mr. Burnets servant for 










bringing the picturs 





5 


i 

1 



^ Lady Bute, Lady Anne Campbell, only daughter of first Duke of Argyll, and 
wife of James, second Earl of Bute. 



36 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1715 



[Sundries] 

10 To Mr. Dumbar French Master 
To Robert Baillie was taken by 

the Turks 
For a coach fram to a glass pay 

Mr. Baldwine 
For a Nightgoun to my sister 

Graingmoor . 
To Grisie l£ 5s. 
To Lady Kihaick ^ . 
For 3| yd. yellow satine at 28d 

for curtine to the coach 
To Rachy 3s. 2d. 
Aug. 26 For new prints to Turnbull 

For writting the Lease from Coll 

Mckenzie of Mrs. Smithes house 
To Mr. Baldwine in pairt for the 

coach 20 . 
To Mr. Turin for a glase in two 

pices 84 inches high and 28 
set here inches broad with a glas Muller 
by } To Mr. Turin for a chimny^ glass 
mistake in ane pice 54| by 22| . 

To Mr. Turin for a walnut tree 

writing Desk 
For ane Apron to Raplocks 

doughter ^ . . . . 

To Grisie .... 

For 2 fans for my Nices Grisie and 

Anny Humes ^ . . . 

Sepm. 17 For news prints 18d. more 22d. 

more 21d. Is. 7d. . 



[Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

116 

5 

2 6 

2 15 
15 
116 

8 2 
3 2 
10 

15 

20 a 



16 
116 

7 

6 8 



^ Elizabeth Calder, daughter of Sir James Calder of Muirton, fourth wife of 
Hugh Rose of Kilravock or Kilraick. 

^ Jean, only child of Gavin Hamilton of Raplock by Lady Margaret Keith^ 
daughter of John, Earl of Kintore. She married Francis Aikman of Brambleton 
and Ross. 

" Daughters of Lady Grisell's brother Lord Polwarth. Anne afterwards 
married Sir William Purves of Purveshall ; Grisell died unmarried. 



^7^5] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



37 



[Sundries] 

For chairs Is. 6d. Is. 

For cariing my brothers box to 

this house 
For letters 6d., 3d., 6d. 
To lose at Carts at the Duke of 

Montroses 
For wax and wafers 2s. 
To let Lady Shusan Hay see the 

wax works . 
For the Court and country Cook 
For Howards Cookry 
dit. 18 For a book of choise recepts 
1 Oct. For 2 weeks news papers . 

For a weeks papers more Saterday 

1st Oct. 
For gazets that time 
For letters Is., more Is. 6d. F.N 

more 4d., 3d., lOd., 6d., 6d. 
For coaches 3 sh., more Is., 2s.6d 

J.O** Xo*k *xo*k Xo« • • 

For scouring 3 pr pistols . 

For writting a Factory to receive 

mony from Bank . 
To Francy Newtons expence in 

going to Jerriswood 2s. . 
For a weeks papers Saterday 8 

Oct Is. ... 

For news papers Saterday 22d 
For News papers Saterday 29 
For cuping Rachy in the Banyo 
For collection to build Andersons 

Meating house 
To Grisie .... 

For coaches and chaires 2s., Is., 

18d. Is., 3s. . 
For cleaning three pair pistols 

better . . . . . 



Sterling' 
£ s. d 





2 6 





2 





1 3 





11 





2 





3 





5 





2 





2 6 





3 9 





2 4 





4 



4 11 






13 


6 





6 








1 


6 


1 











1 


6 





3 


1 






1 
5 








5 





1 


1 


6 





8 


6 








6 



38 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Sundries] 

To old Mrs. Colvill . 
To lose at Carts in Dick Montroses 
To the Mob : on Princes birthday 
To poket 2s., 5s., more 5s. . 
To Will Brown for his book 
To Brother Andrew lent him 
To lose at Carts in the Duke of 

Montroses .... 
To a Necklace to Jeanny BiUing- 

ham 1 . 
For a Ridinghood to my sister 

Julian - . . . . 

To the Dutches of Montroses son 

Ld George's Nurse 
To Rachy .... 

To the scaffinger a quarter at 

Michelmas .... 
To the watch a quarter at Michel- 
mas ..... 
To Mr. Hays for 2 coach horses for 

a quarter due the 8 of Septmr. 

last 
Novr. 5 For News papers Saterday 5 Novr 
For letters Id., 6d. . 
For News papers Saterday 12 
For News papers Saterday 19th 
For letters Is. 2d., 16d. 
For a coach Is. 
For news Ij^d. new papers 

Saterday 26 Is. 6d. 
ForMayMinzies going and coming 

from Twittenham . 
For Raches going to the Biano to 

cup ..... 



[Sterling 
£ s. d 





2 


6 





6 








1 


6 





12 








10 


9 





2 


6 





4 


6 





1 





1 


10 


6 


1 


1 


6 





5 








2 


6 





2 


6 


25 











1 


4 








7 







1 
1 
2 


6 





1 








1 


7A 





2 


6 





6 






* Lady Grisell's niece, daughter of Lady Julian Billingham. 
' Lady Julian Billingham, Lady Grisell's sister. 



Ste 

£ 


rlir 

s. 


d. 





2 


10 





2 


6 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


6 


4 








1 


1 


6 





3 






1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 39 

[Sundries] 

For wax 2s. lOd. 

For a Thomas of Kempes for 
Rachy .... 

To Rachys poket 

To Mrs. Wilkison 

To John Simmerrell 

For a pair coach whiels 5£ got l£ 
for the old ons 

To Mrs. St clair 

For a I lb. sealing wax 3s. . 

For 2 yd Caffa for helping the 

coach l£ 4s. . . . . 14 

thursday For 2 picturs of King George in 
Decmr. 1 Toliduse ^ . . . . 

For News prints Saterday 3d 

For Queen Anns Acts of Parlia- 
ment the last sessions 

To my Dears poket . 

To lose at Carts Lady Lowdens - 

For the Attalantes ^ . 

For a St Andras crosses Is. 

For letters Is, more Is, 6d. 

For a coach Is. ... 

To lose at Carts Lady Marr * and 
Duplin s ^ and Dutches Mon- 
troses ^ . . . .10 

To Androw Bell on account of 

books 10 guinys . . . 10 15 

For servantes and horses at the 

Tour two times . . . 4 






5 








1 


6 


2 


3 





14 


10 








10 








14 








1 








2 


6 





1 






^ Taille-douce. Engraving on a metal plate wiih a graver or burin, as dis- 
tinguished from work with the dry point and from etching. 

"^ Lady Loudoun. Lady Margaret Dalrymple, daughter of first Earl of Stair, 
and wife of Hugh, third Earl of Loudoun. * See p. xxv. 

* Frances Pierrepont, daughter of the Duke of Kingston, sister of Lady Mary 
Wortley Montagu and wife of the Earl of Mar. 

. " Abigail, youngest daughter of the Earl of Oxford, wife of George Henry 
Hay, Viscount Dupplin. ^ See p. 282. 



40 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
To Mrs. Couper . . . 5 

. For 3 coach glasses . . . 3 15 

For 2 frames and covering them 

for the coach glasses . . 7 

To the Laird of Wedderburn ^ 

when in prison . . . 5 

To Mrs. St clair . . . 13 6 

For 4 weeks news papers Saterday 

31 Decmr 5 6 

To the wathman a quarter at 

Christenmas . . . . 2 6 

To Mrs. St clair . . . 10 

To the Church Bathel in Mr. 

Earls meeting house . . 2 6 

To Major Boyds son James 

christening where I stood God 

mother 28 Decmr. 4 Guinys . 4 6 
Decmr. 29 To the servant at Twittenham of 

Drinkmoney . . . . 116 

To the Twittenham stage coach 

for 6 coming in . . . 12 

To the servants christenmas box 

half a croun each . . 10 

To John Stewart to go to a play . 5 
To lose at Carts at Lord Lowdens ^ 

Lady Strafford ^ etc. . . 8 

For 5 1 Callico to Mrs. Crafoord at 

3s. 6d. pr yd . . . ] 1^)^ 

For a coach man and two horses 

payd Mr, Hays for a quarter 

due the 8 of Decmr. 1715 . 25 

For 6 moneths House Rent at 

Christenmas Mrs. Smith . 22 10 

To John Simmerell . . . 5 



^ See p. xiv. - See p. 39. 

' Anne, only daughter and heiress of Sir Henry Johnson and wife of Thomas, 
third Earl of Strafford, whom the Commons at this time were anxious to impeach. 



ji7i6] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



41 



[Sundries] 
To Mr. Alexr Guthery writter for 

Ballencrieffs affair in full of all 

he can ask .... 
To the Heralds for our coat of 

Armes ..... 
To Pate Hunter for a coach Mare 

stabling .... 

For fraught of young trees to 

Berwick .... 

For sclating Langshaw house by 

Thomson .... 



Sterlin 

£ s. 


g] 
d. 


7 


18 








10 








18 








15 





1 


16 





448 





9 6 



London 
January 1st, 1716. Sundry Accounts. Deb. to Cash. 



6 For a coach Is. 3d. 

7 For letters 6d., 6d., 8d., Is., 3d., Id 
For a chair and coaches 5s. 
To Poket I. 5s. 
For a pair spectickles mending 

\^ |y V^ • • • • • 

For a moneths news 
For a pair spectickles 
To Grisie l£ Is. 6d. 
To Rachy for a Raffle lost 
For Thomas a Kempes to the 
servants ... 

feb. For letters 5d., 6d., 6d. 

For chairs and coaches 4s. 6d. 

2s. 6d 

For a weeks news papers Is 

6d-6- 
To Rachy for a Play 
6 To John Simmerall . 





s. 


d. 





1 


3 





3 








5 








5 








2 


6 





4 








2 


6 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


6 





2 








1 


5 



7 





1 



1 

4 

16 




6 



42 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1716 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Cess for the poor three quarters £ s. d. 

at Ladyday next . . . 12 6 

febr. 10 To a joyner for puting out the 

closet door . . . . 10 

For news Saterday 11th Is. 2d., 

2s. Id/y., 2s. SdjAr. 
For chairs 7s. 6d., 2s., Is. . 
For letters Is. 6d., 9d., 3d,, 3d., 3d. 
For water tax half a year from 

Midsomer to Christenmas 
To John Simmerall . 
For mending the watchmans box 

Is. to him Is. . . . 

To St leonards ^ son Patrick Ingles 
To the Bannew for Grisie . . . 
To the Bannew for Rachy 
To the Opera for Rachy . 
For a fram to Captain Kirtons '^ 

Pictor ..... 
To Mr Doll the painters man . 
March For chairs 2s. 7d., more 2s. 

For news papers Is. 3d., Is. 2d., 

Is. 6d., Is. 2d. 
For letters 6d., 5d., 7d. 
24 To the watchman a quarter at 

Ladyday .... 
Ap : For news Is. Tid^\j. Is. 2d., free- 
holders 3s., Is. 2d., Is. 2d. 
For letters Is. 3d., Id., Is. 2d. 
For mending Rachels watch 
To Mr. Frazer Minister 
To Rachyfor a Play and ane opera 
For tuning the spinets 
For 8 yeards lutstring to Raplochs 

doughter^ . . . . 2 8 






6 








10 


6 





3 








10 





1 


1 


6 





2 








10 








5 








5 








10 


9 


2 


3 








3 








4 


7 





5 


1 





1 








2 


6 





7 


7'A 





2 


6 





6 








2 


6 





15 








2 


6 



^ Mr. James Ingles, fourth son of Cornelius Ingles of East Barns, married 
Elizabeth Holburne,"and purchased the lands of St. Leonards. 
2 See p. 31. ' ^ See p. 36. 



iyi6] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



43 



[Sundries] 
For a bed to Johnie Stewart 2 

weeks .... 

For a coach, Is. Is. . 
For window tax 3 quarters from 

Midsomer to Lady day 1716 
For seeing, the lyons in the Tower 
May 5 For news Is. 5d., 4d., Is. 6d. 
For letters Id., 7d., Id., 9d. 
May 10 To Docter Arburthnet ^ for 

Rachy .... 

For a coach Is. ... 

For Rachel Dundas's going and 

comeing from Twittnem 
June For 2 weeks news 2s. 4d., more 

Is. 6d., 3s. 2d. 
For letters 3s. 6d., 3d., paper 

lOd., letters 6d. 7d. 
To Jamie Scugald 
To P. at Mr. Andersons 
To Mr. Andersons Bathel 
For 2 gallary tickets to ane opera 
To Barnackie's ^ benefite 2 tickets 

to the opera . 
To Mrs. Betsons Nurse 
To Poket 2s. 6d. 
For a coach 2s. 6d., 2s. Id. 
For a soliter 
To Mr. Scote Garner at Chelsy for 

dressing the Gardine, etc. 
For 3 dusone mother pearl fish 

6s. pr du:, 6 duson counters 

4s. dus. .... 

To Mr. Baillies Poket of Ladyday 

quarter .... 



[Sterling' 


£ 


s. 


d. 





5 








2 





1 


2 


6 





1 


6 





3 


3 





1 


6 


2 


3 








1 






16 

7 

5 8 

5 

10 

2 6 

3 

2 3 

5 

2 6 

4 7 

3 

2 12 



2 2 
12 14 



^ Dr. John Arbuthnott, Queen Anne's favourite physician, author of several 
works ; frequently mentioned in the Journal to Stella. 
^ See p. xlix. 



44 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1716 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Mr. Scote in Chelsy for puting £ s. d. 

the Garden in order . . 2 

To John C cleat for the partition in 

the seller 28s., etc. . . 1 14 

To the watchman a quarter at 

Midsomer . . . . 2 6 

To Mr. Andersons meeting house 

building . . . . 10 

To my brother Polwarthes man 

went to Hamburgh . . 3 

June 26 For mending the coach by . 3 

To Mr. Baldwine coachmakers 

exequeters in pairt . . 10 15 

For a Burnisht Gold fram to my 

brother Polwarths picture . 16 
For a glass to the coach l£ Mr. 

Turnbulls man for geting it Is. 110 
For 2 Lottery tickets I gave Cap 

Murrays bairens . . . 10 

For 2 Quarters to Mr. Hays for 2 

coach Horses from 8 Decmr. 

1715 to June 8th 1716 . 50 

.July For coach 2s., Is., 2s. . . 5 

For letters 2s. 2d., 7d., 9d., Is., Is. 5 6 

For news 2s. 5d., Is. 4d. . . 3 9 

For a horse hire to a servant to 

woonsour . . . . 7 

For Rachel my doughters picture 

drawen by Cummine . . 116 

For 2 setts of vots to my father 

and Torphichen . . . 2 3 

July 18 To my Dearests poket 10 guinys 10 15 
To the Lecterers ^ tax a year at 

Midsomer last . . . 3 6 



^ A class of preacher in the Church of Englnnd at this period, often Puritarts, 
usually chosen by the parish, whose duty consisted mainly in delivering after- 
noon or evening lectures. They are said to have been supported by voluntary 
contributions, but this entry wrould indicate a regular assessment. 



I7i6] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



45 



[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

To my Dear . . . . 5 
For giveing in and writting 

Grangemoors Meniorialls . 16 

To Walstons * Nurse . . 5 
For 3 yd. yellow sheveret for a 

curtine to the coach . . 9 

For cords, etc., to the curtine . Oil 
For a pound sealing wax super 

fine . . . . . 5 
ForRachys Bathing and cuping at 

the Banio Long Aiker . . 6 

To Grisie . . . . 116 

To Mr. Frazer . . . . 2 

To lose at carts at sundry times 3 15 

July 31 For half a years house Rent at 

Midsomer last payd to Mark 

Dickson in Broad Street . 22 10 

For spectickles . . . 6 6 

For Pamphlets . . . 2 

For Pamphlets . . . 2 
For drinkmoney at Mr. Wests - 

son christening . . . 3 4 6 

To a watch man . . . 6 

Aug. For news Is. 2d., 6d. . . 18 

For letters 3d., 2s. 6d., Is. . 3 9 

For a coaches 5s. . . . 5 

8 To David Weems ^ . . . 2 3 

To Martha Johnstons Nurse . 5 

For mending the Kitchin sink . 10 

To my Dearests poket at Bath . 22 18 
For expence of Publick divertions 

at Bath . . . . 8 10 



^ John Baillie of Walston, Lanarkshire. 

^ Probably John West, son of Baron De La Warr, and afterwards first Earl De 
La Warr. 

^ Perhaps the son of Elizabeth Eaillie, George Baillie's sister, who married 
Mr. Robert Weems of Grangemoor. 



46 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1716 

[Sundries] 

To Raffles at Bath . 

To Docters and Apothicarys at 

Bath ..... 
For cleaning all our Teeth at Bath 
For chairs to the pump and 

otherwise .... 
To Mr. Chanler, etc. 
For pumping and drinkmoney at 

Bath ..... 
To Rachys poket a moydor 
For coaches to and from Bath 

by oxfoord .... 
For seeing Blenhome and oxfoord 

Collages .... 

For cariing servants to Bath 
For cariage of trunks to Bath . 
For 8 weeks lodging 4 rooms and 

garets at Bath 
To the Cook and maids 
For Musick books to Grisie 
To my Dears poket at Bath 
Oct. 13. For the coach from Robert Hays 

from the 8 of June till the 8 

Aug: and for the coaches stand- 
ing 9 weeks at 18d. a week and 

horses 3s. to Hamtoncourt 
For news Is. 9d., Is. 2d., 3d., lid. 
For letters 6d., 6d., Id., 6d., 

oQ., oQ. > • . • 

To my Dearests poket 
For a coach glas La saget l£ 5s. . 
For 2 Snuff Mills La Sashet 
For a kain string 
To Grisie .... 

To David Weems ^ to clear his 
accounts and cary him home 

1 See p. 45. 



Sterlin 

£ s. 


d. 


4 10 





5 5 





1 14 





3 





3 





5 10 





1 7 


6 


20 





1 5 





3 18 





6 14 





18 6 





2 3 





1 





2 






18 


17 








4 


1 





2 


1 


3 








1 


5 








17 


6 





1 


6 


1 


1 


6 


15 









I7i6] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 47 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

For a years scafangers tax from £ s. d. 

Michelms 1715 to Michf^ 1716 . 10 
To Androw Bell in pairt of ane 

Account for books . . 10 

To the Poors tax from Ladyday to 

Michalmes 1716 . . . 12 

For ane Apron to Mrs. Turnbull 6 

Novr. 8 To water tax three quarters at 

Michalmes last . . . 15 

For a Piew in King Streat chapel 

a quar. at Michel^ . . 9 

For 2 brass hinges to the coach 6s. 

puting them on . 
To Poket .... 

To the Countes of Pickburgs ^ 

footman .... 
Novr. 16 For Pamphlets 5s. 6d., Is. 

For letters Is. lOd., 6d., 3d., Is. 

8d., 6d., 2d., Id. . . . 5 

For news pamphlets 2s. n. 3s. 6d., 

pam. 8d., 2s. 3d., Is. 2d., Is. 2d. 11 9 
To Mr. Weems Apothecary in full 

of his account . . . 5 16 

wrong For fraught and cartage of 5 duson 

fish from Hadinton . . 13 

25 For poket 6s., Mr. Andersons 10s., 

Jamie Scugald 5s. . 
For mending the water pyps 7s. 
For lose at carts 8s. . 
For a pen glas to a window lOd. 
For a chair Is. 
For scaffingers tax for a quarter at 

Christmas 1716 . . . 2 6 

For Christmas box 8 servants l£ 

watchman bellman 2s. . . 12 






7 


6 





7 


6 





3 








5 


6 



1 


1 








7 








8 











10 





1 






^ Countess of Lippe and Buckenburg (in French Piquebourg), one of the 
Ladies of the Princess of Wales. — Diary of Lady Cozuper. 



48 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1716 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

For Apoticars man, strewer 5 £ s. d. 
waterman Is. shoemakers 2s. 8 

To Drum trainbands Is., dustman 

Is 2 

To the Princes footman for a crose 

10s. 9d 10 9 

For copping a musick book 

£1 Is. 6d., ruled paper 10 , 1 11 6 

For Meeting House rent Christmas 

quarter . . . . 8 

For half a years house rent at 
Christmas payd Mrs. Dickson 

To poors tax a quarter at Christmas 

For tuning the Spinets 2 times 

To Dickson for puting out the 
four windows in the litle draw- 
ing rooms in Broad Street . 7 



22 10 





11 





5 






373 8 5 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of Sundry Expences 



For paveing the streat 


5 


4 





For laying the plain stons before 








the door .... 


2 


ft 




10 


To Mr. Frazer .... 





2 


6 


For newspapers Is. 2d., Is. 2d., 2s. 








6d. ..... 





4 


10 


For letters Is. 6d. 6d. 6d. 6d. 





3 





To Mr. Mitchels Christening hs 








son James .... 


3 


4 


6 


For a fan Rachy gave Mrs. Mitchel 





5 





For covers of Fans sent to Utright 








to Lord Binning . 





10 





For ruled paper to Grisie . 





12 





For lose at Carts by Grisie at 








Lady Marrs ^ . . . 


2 


3 






^ See p. 39. 



I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



49 



[Sundries] 

For 2 plays to Gris and Rach 
For a Desk to Grisies spinet 
To the watchman to Drink 
For a Purs to my Lord Ghram 
To the watchman drinkmony 
To Poket of Christmas quarter 5 

guinys .... 

To my brother John Baiihe 
febr. For news 14d., 2s. 6d., Is. 6d., 

Is. 6d. ..... 

For letters Is. 6d., 6d., 6d 

For stamp paper to write Turnbuls 

Factory .... 

For a chair 18d., Is., 2s., 3s., Is., 

4s., 2s., 3s., 2s., 5s. 
To Alexr Hume of Whitehouse ^ 
To lose at Carts at Duke Rox- 

burgs, etc .... 

For ane opera ticket to Rachy . 

wrong For 18 botles Ale from Dorathy 

Halliwall .... 
For 2 tooth picks 2s. Tho. Hervie 

2s. 6d 

For helping Mr. Johnstons strong 

box foot .... 
March For letters Is. 6d., 3d., Is., Is. 6d., 

Xo« • • • • • 

For News Is. 6d., 14d., Is. 6d., 
Is. 6d., Is. 6d. Is. 3d., Is. 2d. 

To the watchman half a year at 
Christmas last 

For A poyam dedicat to 

Rachy on the Princes 

To old Frazer 2s. 6d. 



Sterling 
£ s. d. 





8 








2 


6 





2 








7 


6 





2 





5 


7 


6 


1 


1 


6 





6 


8 





2 


6 



2 



1 


4 


6 


1 


1 


6 





12 








10 








8 








4 


6 





1 


6 





5 


3 





9 


7 





5 








10 


9 





2 


6 



^ Perhaps Alexander Hume, son of George Hume of Whitefield, who along 
with his father was taken prisoner at Preston and was at this time in prison. 

D 



50 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
To Mrs. Hume Whitefield ^ . 116 

To my Dearests Poket 5 guinys . 5 7 6 
To Grisie . . . . 116 

To lose at carts at D Roxburgs, 

Rotheses and Mrs. Verners . 1 12 6 
To Mr. Barnackies '' man for sinor- 

ina the Dog 
To Docter Cheine for Rachy 
For opera tickets from Mrs. 

Robison ^ . . . . 

To Mr. Cuningham of Acket * 7 

guinys .... 

For tickets to Castruches ^ Musick 

meeting .... 

For 3 seats in a Pew in King Streat 

Chapell at Lady day h year 
For Pasing Graingmoors warrant 

for Collecter at Alloa 
To my Dears Poket of Ladydays 

quarter .... 

To the poors Tax a quarter at 

Ladyday .... 
March 8 To the water tax half a year at 

Ladyday .... 
For 2 Coach Horses from the 12 of 

October 1716 to the 12 of April 

1717 . . . 50 

For sadle Horses in the 

above sd time at 3sh 

pr day from Robert 

Hay in full of all ac- 
counts . . 4 10 54 10 



5 





1 1 


6 


2 3 





7 10 


6 


1 1 


6 


18 





1 13 


6 


11 13 


4 


11 





10 






1 The wife of George Hume, who was taken prisoner at Preston and was at 
this time in prison. 

2 See p. xlix. ' See p. xlix. 
* Probably another unfortunate of the '15. ® See p. xlviii. 



1717J OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 51 

[Sundries] 
To James Hume ^ of Aiton my 

Ld Humes brother 
For writing Musick l£ Is. 6d. 
Ap. 12 To the lecterer ^ half a years tax 

at Ladyday .... 
For window Tax a year at Lady 

day 1717 .... 
To Whitelich Coachmaker in full 

of all Acctts 
To the Kings Houshold Drums 5s. 

footmen a guiny . 
To the Gard Drums 6s. Cadogons 

Drums 5s. . 
To the parish wates 5s. Toun 

Trumpets 10s. 9d. 
To the yemen of the Guard a 

guiny ..... 
To the Princes footman 10 9d. 

for a poyam 10s. 9d. 
To the Kings watermen 
May 1st For chairs Is., Is., 3s., 2s., 2s., Is., 

5s., 2s., 4s., 2s.6d., 2s. 6d., Is. . 
For letters 6d., 2s., Is., 2s. 6d., 

4d., 2s. 2d., 3s. 2s. 
For Newspapers Is. 2d., 2s, 6d.,ls. 

6d., 2s. 3d., 6d., Is. 2d. . 
For a book bound to set doun the 

visiters .... 

For 14 yd. Masarin blew ruban 

for the order 
For wax candles 6d. 
For cheana cups, basons, etc. 
To a Herper came with Mr. 

Isack . . . . . 116 

To watherburn ^ l£ Is. 6d. Aitton 

a guiny ^ . . . . 2 3 



Sterling 
£ s. d. 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


6 





2 


6 


1 


10 





9 


1 


6 


1 


6 


6 





11 








15 


9 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


6 





7 


6 


1 


7 








13 


6 





9 


1 





4 


6 





12 











6 


2 


12 






^ Taken prisoner at Preston, and then in prison. * See p. 44. 

* See p. xiy. 



0262465 



52 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1717 



[Sundries] 


[Steriing] 




£ s. 


d. 


For lose at Dice in Lord Staires . 


1 18 





To the Clark of the Crown for the 






return of Election and giveing 






in the write .... 


1 11 


6 


For materialls for my mothers 






elickses 5s. 5s. . 


10 





For 4 Tickets to Mr. Barnackies ^ 






opera ..... 


4 6 





For 2 tickets to Berenstats ^ 






opera ..... 


2 3 





For a purs to the Duke of Mon- 






trose ..... 


5 





For snuff mills, etc. in full from 






Lasaget .... 


7 





To my sister Graingmoor . 


20 





For a pair Garters in a present 


10 


9 


To Rachy .... 


7 


6 


To Carts at Rotheses 


13 





June For chairs Is., Is., 4s., Is., Is., Is., 






Is., Is., 4s., 2s., 5s. 


1 2 





For News Is. 2d., Is. l^^^d.. Is. 2d., 






Is., Is. 2d., Is. 6d., Is. 2d., 






~ro« • • • • • 


12 


^1 


For letters 6d., 3s. 7d., Is., 2s., 






5d., 2s. 8d., Is., 4s., Is. 6d. 


16 


8 


For paper Is. pills 18d. snuff 






Milne 3s. ... . 


5 


6 


For Glasing the windows 


4 


6 


For glas tee cups to sister Juhan 






at 3d. a Tee pot 8s., glas cups 






etc. 5s. .... 


13 


3 


To Mary Hamilton . 


10 





For cloath to be a peticoat G. I. . 


2 5 





For tuning the Spinets 2s. 6d. 


2 


6 


To Mr. Bradberys House 


2 


6 



T¥ 



^ See p. xlix. 



^ See p. xlix. 



1717] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 53 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

For dressing the Gardine . 14 6 

For a piece flowrd Indian Callico 

to sister Julian . . . 4 

For linen to the CalHco l£ 3s. . 13 

To the bairens for operas . 16 

For the Pilgrams dress l£ 12s. 12s. 2 4 

To my Lady Lockart lent and 

never payd . . . . 116 

For 2i yds scarlet cloath for 

Docter Abernathys son George 2 5 
July 8 For 3 Monethes dancing to Mr. 

Isack for Rachy . . . 8 2 

For standing God mother to Mr. 

Johnstons doughter Lucie . 5 7 6 

To Poket of the Midsomer quarter 12 2 

To cards at Duke Roxburghs ^ 4s. 

more 2s. 6d. . . . 6 6 

To scaffingers tax a quarter at last 

Ladyday 1717 . . . 2 6 

To the watch half a year at Mid- 
somer 1717 . . . . 5 

To James Kilpatrick . . 2 

For rubans to give in presents . 10 

To Grisie l£ Is. 6d. To Grisie 

2£ 3s. . . . . 3 4 6 

For a gold watch to Monsr Ber- 

nackie ^ the Italian . . 25 

For a gold chean to the watch . 4 10 

For a coat to Grisie Turnbull 14 

For scafifingers tax a quarter Mid- 
somer 1717 . . . . 2 6 

For Mr. Isacks Jamie l£ Is. 6d. 116 

To Vilpontu for drawing Grisies 

tooth 10 9 

For a hat to Patrick Dickson . 116 

^ See p. 284. 2 See p, xlix. 



[Sterling] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 











10 








4 





10 











2 


6 





12 






54 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Sundries] 
For Grisie and Rachys lose at 

VyCllX^O • • • • • 

For my own lose at Carts 10s. 
For a string to My Lord Grahmes 

tortishel staff 
July 30 To May Minzies to buy a gown . 
To Frazer 30d. 

For copping songs by Bernackie^ 
To Mr. Dickson for half a years 

rent at Midsomer 1717 . 22 10 

Aug. 5 To Androw Bell by a bill on 

Midleton in pairt paymt . 20 

For a sadle house and hulster caps 6 18 6 
For shiping goods aboord when I 

went to Scotland payd Hendry 

Mill in full of all acctts . . 15 4 

For stoping Rachys tooth with 

Leed 5 

For a curtine of Calamanka to the 

coach ..... 
To Betty Dundas 
For news while I was in Scotland 

at Lond. .... 
For letters at London while I was 

in Scotland , . . . 11 9 

To Hays for horses to Twitten- 

ham Barnet and 18d. a week for 

the coach standing when we 

wrought not his horses . . 5 18 

Eden. For a coach and six horses to carie 

us to Scotland in 9 days . 32 15 

For expences of 5 in the coach on 

the road to Scotland till we came 
Aug: 14 to Tiningham on the 14th Aug: 
For expence of a servant and a horse 
To my Rachy .... 

^ See p. xlix. 






5 








7 


6 


1 





9 6 



14 13 


9 


1 15 





4 3 






I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



55 





[Sundries] 


Sterling] 




To Docter St clair ^ and John 


£ s. 


d. 




Baillie .... 


4 10 







To My Rachys Proclamation, etc 


4 6 







To Mr. Robertsons men 


5 







To Mr. Dickson for writing bonds 








etc ..... 


4 10 


9 




To Mr. Aickman ^ in 








pairt for picturs . 21 








In full payd for the 








picturs at 5 guinys 








sitting and 5£ coppys 31 


52 







For Drinkmony at Tin- 








ingham ^ when My 








Rachy went home 15 








For all Drinkmoney while 








at Edn. and traveling 








about the 6 monethes 








I was in Scotland 29 10 


44 10 







For chears while at Edn. . 


4 14 







For Dails and trees bought by 








Cap. Turnbull 


33 12 


8 




For 16 cart to bring the above sd 








timber from Berwick 


5 9 


4 


Eden- 


For 32 nights chamber rent in 






burgh 


Mrs. Rooms .... 


6 12 


6 


Sept. 3 


For 7| weeks chamber rent in 








Mrs. Cytons .... 


8 







To my Dears Poket in Scotland 


9 9 







For Tickets to Consorts 


15 







For lose on guinys when cry'd 








doun ..... 


2 5 





Decmr. 


To Androw Kerr writer on account 








of my brother James Baillie 


3 







For house rent of chairs in full of 








all at 6s. 8d. a year each chair 


1 10 

See p. XXV 





1 Dr. Matthew St. Clair. - 


ii. 



' The seat of the Earl of Haddington. 



56 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

To Pate Hunter Stabler for horses £ s. d. 
while we was in Scotland being 
6 monethes . . . . 4 9 8 

For 2 pr gloves to my father at 

Rachys mariage . . . 6 

For 2 pr gloves to Mr. Hamilton 

Minister . . . . 5 

For fraught and cariages by land 
for goods from London to Eden- 
burg etc . . . . 4 16 6 

For Gloves to Lord Hadingtons 

servants . . . . 17 

For fraught of 2 servants to Edn 

and up again . . . 6 4 10 

To the servants at the Bank at 

recpt of the Intr^t . . . 2 

For a cover to Grisies dressing 

box . . . . .050 

For writing bonds and persuing 

wood cutters . . . 10 6 

For cariage of a Trunk from 

London . . . . 10 

To John Vint shoemaker my 

brother Johns Acctt , . 18 4 

To Mr. Will Hall man Arch: 
Stewart .... 

To Docter Gibsone ^ for Grisie . 

To Domany for a years writing . 

To repairing the horse furniture 
in Scotland .... 
Decmr.29 To P. at Earlston and Bathel 

To a Councel post 

To Betty Dundas Grisie Dundas 
George Sim Mrs. Olifers bairens 
and Mr. Turnbuls etc. and to 
servants and others of Hansels 2 18 



1 


11 


6 


1 


1 








10 








7 








15 








5 






^ Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh. Appointed an 
Examiner in 1725. 



I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



57 



t 



[Sundries] 

To a surgen at Berwick for my 
brow ..... 

For 5 places in the stage coach the 
11 Jany that brought us to 
London the 25 January 1718 
wher of Tarn Lesly payd 2£ 10 

For expence of a man and horse 
along with us . . . 

For sadles mending boots and 
whips at London . 

For cariage of a box from Scotland 

To the stage coachman of Drink- 
money .... 
Dec 30 For Acts of Parliment 5£ 3s. 6d 
more books 14s. 8d. 

For chairs 3s. 

For mending the glas windows 

To Christenmas box dustman Is., 
watch 2s. 6d., water 2s. 6d., Boes 
man 2s., news boy 6d., Brewer Is. 

For the votes 

For coach horses to Hamton 
Court payd Hays . 

To my Dear for his journey on the 
Road to Scotland and back to 
London again and for Poket 
money besids the 9£ 9s. he gote 
at Edn. 86. 16 from 5 Aug. to 
coches and chairs included 

To the watchman half a year at 
Christenmas 

To the poors tax at Christenmas 
1717 

To the scaffinger at Christenmas 
half a year .... 

To my Grisies Poket 5 guinys . 

To Labushier surgen 

For lose by a horse bought at 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
11 6 



21 16 6 

1 16 

1 12 

12 6 

5 

5 18 2 

3 

6 6 



9 6 
116 

4 6 



86 


16 








5 





2 


4 








5 





5 


5 





1 


1 






58 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

7£ 18s. and sold at 6 guinys to £ s. d. 

carie a servant to Scotland and 

back again . . . . 1 12 

For expences in getting out the 

Debenturs^ . . . . 1 12 

To the water tax 3 quarters at 

Christenmas . . . 15 

For writeing in three years 1714, 

15 and 1716 to James Massy . 1 10 
For 7 tarms Cess for Mellerstaine 

from March 1715 till March 

1717 inclusive . . . 37 6 6^ 

For repairing Houses at Lang- 

shaw in 3 years 1715, 1716 and 

1717 

Milne by Park . . 1 19 

Coumslyhill given doun 

16s., 4s. . .10 

Sclats Langshaw house 10 
more for reparations on 

Parks acct . . 10 

repairing Langshaw Mill 1 18 2 
on Parks acct divits . 10 
Wright work by James 

Blakie in 3 years 6 6 10 

Meason work in sd years 18 10 
To a sclater for Lang- 
shaw house . . 1 15 10 



14 8 8 
For 10 tarms Cess of Langshaw 
from March 1715 till December 
1717 inclus . . . . 32 7 S^ 



^ The word ' debenture ' was at this time generally used to denote the acknow- 
ledgment issued by a Government Department either for goods supplied or 
money lent. In this case Mr. Baillie had no doubt been lending to the 
Government. His balance-sheets show that he held debentures of considerable 
amount. 



1717] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 59 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

For Trees and seads bought from £ s. d. 

Samuel Robson in Kelso . 9 3 

For slating the Towr of Meller. 

17s. by Thomson . . 17 

For a kevelmell 18| Tb. 9s. 3d., 2 

hows 2 gote 1715 Meller. . 11 3 

For young thorns from Newcastle 15 

To a fferrier for the Coach 

geldine . . . . 12 

To James Blakie Messeger for 

bussines pr acctt and recpt. . 11 8 
For 3 spades lis. a shuvel 20d. 

this year to Mellerstaine . 12 8 

For mending glas windows at 

Meller in 3 years by Miller . 19 2 
For 160 bolls lime laid in at 

Mellerstaine . . . . 4 

For yron and nails furnish' d by 

Liedhouse in 3 years Meller . 18 8 
For charges of my brother John 

Baillies Funarels . . . 11 16 6 

For smith work by Pat Newton 

shoeing horse and mending work 

lumes in 3 years . . . 2 13 5^^ 

To the Nurs 3 years house rent 

White. 1715, 16 and 1717 . 2 5 
To Tame Hilandman 3 years house 

rent Whit. 1715, 16 and 1717 . 1 13 4 
To Will Mill 3 years House rent 

abovesd 3 years . . . 16 8 

To Androw orniston a years rent 

White. 1717 . . . 15 

for 100 firrs gote from John 

Humes father . . . 8 

For Measone work in building 

dicks at Meller in 3 years . 3 16 
For Wright work at Mellerstaine 

in 3 years 1715, 16, 17 . . 2 6 10 



60 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Sundries] [Sterling] 

For the basan in the toun of £ s. d. 

Mellerstaine 1717 . . . 7 10 8 
To the 5d. men at planting dicking 

and quarie in 3 years . . 37 17 4 
The windows tax for half a year at 

Christen™^ 1717 . '. . 15 

The Cess of JerrisAvood payd at 

White. 1717 and preceedings 7 

Tarmes in all . . . 9 16 7^% 

To Wilsone writer in Lanark for 

warning tenants . . . 6 6 

To the nurs 3 bolls oats every year 

of Crops 1714, 15 and 1716 . 4 10 
To Captain Turnbull 1 

3 bolls bear at 10s. 1 10 
To him of the rent of 

Jerriswood Park for 

3 years 1715, 16 and 

1717 grass . 
248 hens at 5d. 
60 capons at 8d. 
To Captain of the 

Park rent 



36 11 
5 3 4 

2 

3 18 


49 2 

7 18 
7 16 


4 


given out 

• • 

• • 







by Cap. Turnbull 

For trees and seeds 

To sundry workmen at Meller- 
staine etc . . . . 3 

To Mr. Turnbulls expences in 

going to Langshaw, etc . 2 10 

To expence of holding courts, 

writings etc in 3 years . 1 15 

To the pyp and drum at the fairs 

for 3 years . . . . 15 8 



1 Seems to have been the factor staying at Jerviswood and being paid largely 
in kind. 



1702] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



61 



[Sundries] 
For paper to Cap. TurnbuU 



[Sterling] 



£ 


s. 


d. 





13 





993 


13 


8 



Edenburgh, Januer 1st, 1702. Howsekeeping. 
Debt to Cash. 



[Housekeeping] 

For a muchkin sinamon water . 

For ginger .... 

2d. For 2 pices of clarit gotten from 

my brother John . 
For a boll meall bought from 

Lady Hill .... 
For cariadges by Lesly 
For 2 little swine 
For 3 lb. 2 ounces suger . 
20 For 2 bolls pies to the mairs and 

swin ..... 
For a salmond .... 
For 2 hams .... 
For 5 fous of oats from Meller- 

steans crop 1701 . 
For 10 lods colls 
For 8 lb. brown suger 
For gins bread 
For a lb. cannell 7£ 2 ounc mace 

26s. per ounce 
For 4 ounce nutmug 9s. per ounc, 

4 ounc cloves 9s. per ounce 
For I lb. white paper 12s. a pot 

cofeced ginger 1 li. 2s. . 
For 2 loafs candibrod suger at 18s. 

per pound .... 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 


2 8 





1 4 





120 





5 





2 





8 





2 17 





7 6 


8 


1 10 





4 





5 





7 





5 





1 10 





9 12 





3 12 





1 14 





5 7 


4 



62 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1702 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

For 5 fous oats to the mairs from £ s. d. 

Mellers. . . . . 4 

For bringing from Glasgow 8 

galons wine 5 marks at the port 

14s. . . . . . 4 8 

For 5 fous ots for the mairs from 

Mell 

For 8 galons 4 or 5 pints seek from 

Cap: Broun .... 
For a barrill Lews herin to Mr. 

Johnston .... 
For gardin seeds from Ms. Willie 
To James for bringing in the horss 

and out .... 

For green oyntment to the mairs 

hills ..... 
For oats .... 

For a scon to the bairens . 
From Mellersteans of oats one 

boll and 4 fous . . . 7 

May 14 From Mellersteans of ots one 

boll ..... 
From Mellersteans of pies one boll 
For beans to the hunting mair . 
For expenc of bringing in corn . 
For pits at Mellersteans 
For yron to shoe the horss Iti. 5s. 
For markums balls from Ingles 
For foulls bought by Androw L. 

sine Deem'". 

For chickens bought by A. L. this 

munth ..... 

For howse and horss expences in 

small things from Nov^ to this 

day ..... 

For my expences at Ginelkirk and 

Mellers. .... 

For yron for horss nails and other 



4 





89 4 





6 





9 12 





1 12 





1 9 





12 





18 






5 





5 





2 5 





3 





11 15 





1 5 





1 18 





14 13 





2 





8 18 


6 


9 






1702] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 68 



I 



[Housekeeping] 


[Scots] 


things got from Liedhowse 


£ s. 


d. 


marchant .... 


16 15 





May For 18 loads colls 


12 12 





For oyl from Lady Greenknow ^ . 


4 





For sweeping all the chimnys 


1 17 





For whiting the howse roofs and 






S/ii • • • • • 


5 4 





12 For malt got from Preston in Lith 






in full payment 


111 10 





For colls that cleard of the old 






colyer ..... 


7 14 





begins this For 5 scor lods colls to Edmis- 






years colls tons ^ man .... 


60 





1702 For 2 bottles oyl . 


4 16 





For 12 pecks of oats 


3 12 





For gresing the mairs at 6d. ^ a 






pice 36 days 


21 12 





August 10 For gresing the mairs 36 days at 






6s. a day .... 


21 12 





, 26 For 8 bolls malt got from John 






Wight .... 


64 





For casting truffs 


00 14 





For going out and in to Ed. with 






horss, etc. .... 


5 14 





For fouls brought to Ed. . 


8 7 


6 


For howse at Mellerstean such as 






SalCj 6l>C* • • • • 


1 





August 27 For foulls bread etc. since the 






childrin cam ther . 


4 





For sevarall things given out by 






Androw Lamb 


3 





To pay ane old account of Georg 






Lasons for 1699 


9 





For wax and waffers 


00 15 





For 5 scor loads of colls . 


60 






^ The wife of Pringle of Greenknow. 2 john Wauchope of Edmonstone. 

^ 6d. Sterling or 6s. Scots. 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 


3 10 





15 





3 15 





3 14 





12 





2 4 


8 


1 7 


6 


6 14 


6 


10 





6 





12 





39 10 






64 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1702 

[Housekeeping] 
For my expences at Ginelkirk 

going, coming 
For Trumbels bring in oats 
8 For 2 furlits of oats 

For materialls to a dyet drink 
For a scor colls from Carlips 
For oats to the mairs 
To the barber 6s. more 7s. Suther- 

lands man 14s. 6d. 
To Lesly for cariadges 
Oct. 12 To Lesly for cariadges in full of all 
Meller- For a veall £6 ... 

steans For 4 ship brought from Andrew 

Lamb .... 

29 For a stack of hay bought in the 

toun ..... 
For 2 ston cotten 6 in the tb. at £4 

6s. 2 ston rag 6 lb. one ston 8 in 

lb. 2 ston 12 in lb. 2 ston 20 in 

the tb. at 3£ 6s.h . . . 33 16 

For a fatt cow bought at the fair 20 
For 2 ship from John Wight . 10 
For 2 ship from T. Liedhowse . 6 
For 3 ston best chease at 211. 4s. 

the cowrs cheas being at l£ 

16sh. 9 lb. of it l£ 6 4 . . 7 5 4 

For 2 swin . . . . 20 

For 17| staks pittes . . . 35 

For 27 stack of pitts out of our 

moss ..... 
To Davi Youll to goe in with the 

ass . . . . . 17 

For a pot oyntment to the mairs 19 

For a stack of hay from Person . 28 
For shoeing horses at Mell. . . 2 2 

For a chair . . . . 14 6 

For starch . . . . 16 

Nov. 20 For cariadges . . . 2 8 



1702] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 65 

[Housekeeping] 

To cochman and groom in arles 
To a ferriar for the mairs 
For corn to the mairs 
For powder and starch 
Noyi" 1 For 2 ruks hay to the ases 
For a lofe suger at 14s. 6d. 
For stabhng horses payd in full to 

Pat. Hunter .... 
To Sir Robert Chiesly ane old 

accumpt of ale 
For mending the coach harnis . 
For 3 days chairs 
For washing linin brought from 

the book .... 
For meall from Jerriswood 2 bolls 

at *.o » . . , 

For backing payd Cap^^ Mitchell 
For brandy got from Sir Georg 

Hume in Deem'" 1700 . 
Decmr 30 To Bartie Gibson for the coch 

mairs soeing, etc. from Jan^ 8 

1701 to Nov. 13th 1702 
From James Gray 2 bolls meall at 

XtO • • • • • 

For meall at Mellersteans of crop 
1701, 18 bolls and 4 fous at £5 
per boll .... 

For corn to the horss at Meller- 
steans of the crop 1701, 14 bolls 
at £5 per boll 

To foulls and swine crop 1701 at 
£5 per boll, 3b. 2f. 

To the ass of ots from Mellerstens 
and to the foulls 8 fouss, of the 
crop 1702 .... 

For bear for the ases from Meller- 
steans crop 1702, 3f. 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 


1 


9 








14 


6 


7 


14 








8 





30 








2 


6 





43 


2 


a 


78 








5 








2 


7 





90 


12 


a 


60 








61 


8 


a 


30 








10 








94 








70 





a 


17 








8 








3 









66 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1702 



[Housekeeping] 
For shild pies from Mellersteans 2 

peck out of 5 p. 1701 raw 
For 3 ship to the servants and 

salt at Mellersteans 
For 10 hens, lOduckswild foull 14s. 
For saim and girthes to the horss 
Dec. 24 For 18 pecks bran to the horss 

oLo X^S* • • • • • 

Meller- For fish £3 6s. Candle £l. 
steans Salt 10s. since 1st November 

Jldo L • • • • • 

For drink to them since November 

1st to this day 
Ditto For fish lis., spice Is., sop 3s. 8d., 

to the servants candle . 
For warping ale 6s., sow 6s., sop for 

naprie 7s. . 
For salt pitter to 6 lambs £l 10, 

Sciil/ dLX • • • • • 

For a forpit of malt to the mairs . 

For blooding the horses 

For washing more this year 

For bear 5 fous 

From the book of small accumpts 

for the monthes of Jan^, Feb^", 

March .... 

For the month of Aprill 
For the month of May £48 
For the mounth of Juny . 
For the monthes of July and 

August .... 

For the mounthes of Septm^. 
For the month of October 
For the monthes of Nov^ and 

Decm^. .... 

Decm^ For corn to the horses at Meller- 

30 steans this winter of the crop 

1702 



Scots] 
£ s. d. 
2 


9 14 
1 10 
1 19 


8 




3 12 





4 16 





2 





2 5 


8 


19 


6 


2 10 
3 

10 

1 8 
6 









334 8 
41 15 
48 1 

132 12 





4 
4 


122 4 
94 
41 14 


6 
2 
2 


145 14 


4 


5 






1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 67 

[Housekeeping] i 

For threves oat stra to the 

horss . 
For meall at Mellersteans this 

winter of crop 1702 
For meall from Jerriswood was 

forgot to be fill'd up on the 

other side .... 
For 10 bolls malt browin in Edin- 
burgh 1702 pay'd to Thomas 

Preston at 7Ti. and 6Ti. per boll 
For a cow bought by Francy 

Newtons wife 
For brandy from James Marjori- 

banks .... 228 3 

For 3 barralls herin whereof 2 sent 

to London . . . . 86 

For bringing herin from Glsagow 1 5 13 4 



Scots" 
£ s. d. 
80 


15 








10 








68 








17 


10 






S. 3154 06 2 



Edenburg, January 1st, 1707. Houshold Expenc. 

Deb. to Cash. 

For 12 dais of colls from James 

Ballinton . . . . 68 8 

For ale browen by Ms. Howie of 

my own malt . . . 30 11 10 

For frute . . . . 6 

For 2 duson of French aples . 14 

For 1 ston cotten, rage one ston, 
gotten from Johnston, candle- 
maker . . . . 9 

For a bottle sweat oyl from Ms. 

Wyllie . . . . 2 8 

To Alexander Wood for cariing 

£1 10s 1 10 

For rubarbane ounc £l 16s., beries 

2s 1 18 



68 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

For limons £l 2s. more £19 12s. £ s. d. 

4s 20 18 

For 5 bottles clarit wine from 

tenants . . . . 3 15 

Forchestons 14s.,suger and spices 

£4 9s., frute £2 10s., Hungarie 

water £l 16s. . . . 9 9 

For taking out horses, etc. given 

out by Tarn Youll . . 2 7 

For a bottle Queen Hungary 

water . . . . . 16 

To Frazar for ale from Ocf 10 to 

Janr 1st 1707 . . . 33 4 

For stra to the mairs £7 6s. 6d. till 

Decmr 30, 1706 . . . 7 6 6 

For oyl to the coch £l 14s. £l 17s. 

£1 17s 

April 8th For coalls from Ulmatt £14 16s. . 
For Mugwart water 5s. 
For stra to the mairs 19s. 16s. 15s. 

15s. 15s. 15s. 6d. £1 4s. £4 18s. 
For a bottle Hungary water 16s. 
For tows to jack 4s., tobaca 14s. 

2s 10 

For severall smalls given out by 

James Carrin . . . 7 5 

For ale by Ms. Howi of my own 

malt 20 17 6 

For 3 bolls mallt from Preston in 

Lieth at £5 . . . . 15 

Stochton's drops 14s. 
For a hogshead cherie seek from 

Hugh Mountgomerie . . 200 

For 2 little swin at Kelso £4 . 4 
Ma. 8 To Patrick Hunter in full of all 

accounts of stabling . . 22 16 

For 3 bolls one fou oats from 

Meller. Crop 1705 at £5 . . 16 



4 8 





14 16 





5 





10 17 


6 


16 






1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 69 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

15 For 14 galons small bear from £ s. d. 

Abay Hill at Is. per pint . 5 12 
May 20 For a hogshead clarit sent by 

Gawin Plumer to Mellersteans 
For 10 pints brandy — by Sandy 

Inis to Edinburgh . . 20 

For 4 galons brandy sent by my 

brother James to Mellersteans 57 12 
For a suger lofe . . . 3 7 6 

For 4 galons ale from Ms. Howie 

and £lO's worth Ms. Monro . 12 8 
June 6 For a hogshead clarit laid in from 

Plummer at Edinburgh 
For corks and botleing it at Lieth 

and cariing the bottles Is. duson 

cariing doun eraty and 2s. per 

pice duson full ther being 19 

duson of chapin bottles and 3 

duson of muchkins, and drink- 

mony . . . . . 4 8 

For expence at Ginelkirk 9 men 

and 5 horss . . . . 3 12 

For 14 turs stra at Edinburgh 

£14 ; 4 load grass, 10s. per load 13 16 
For oats 12 bols 2 f. at £3 made in 

meall wherof 66 ston spent at 

Mellersteans betwixt the 4th of 

October till the 10 June 1707 by 

4 servants and swinglers 7, 3, 

days and one a month to serve 

also 2 pecks grots and 6 pecks 

to Edinburgh and 18 ston meall 
Meller- For 4| lb. candibrod suger 
stean For courser suger 
June 10 For a lb. capers a lb. cucumbers 

£1 7s. .... 

Forounc nutmugs 9s., | cloves 5s., 

1 lb. spice 18s. . 



37 4 





3 16 


6 


2 18 





1 7 





1 12 






£ 
1 


Scots' 

■ s. d. 

4 


26 








1 


15 


6 


14 









70 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

[Housekeepi ng] 

For 4 tb. rise £l 4s. . 

For bread at Edinburgh from 

October 10 to June 10 . 
For 1| fows malt to servants in 

Meller[steans] in winter . 
For a sow to Edinburgh from 

widow Wight 
For sop 5s., blew 2s. 4d., thread 

3s. 2d., sand and oyl 2s. 6d., ale 

2s., quicknin Is. this in winter 

at Mellerstean by Mary Muir . 
For ale Aprill 1st 10 pints werping 

2 pints .... 

For 6 sheep from Mellerstains to 

Edinburgh .... 
For ale from Ms. Monro 
For 4 dales colls from Ulmatt in 

full of all account . 
Ditto For corn to the horss at Meller- 

steans crop 1706 at £3 3s. — 

31 bol— till the 2d of October 
For light corn to the horss £l 4s. 

at 28s. per boll 
For corn to the swine crop 1706 at 

£3 3s. per boll 4 b[olls] 1 f[irlot] 
June For 66 threves oat stra at 4s. per 

threve at Mellerstains 
For pies to the swine crop 1705, 

1 f. 2 p. 
For bear to the swine 2 bolls 1 f. 

£5 per boll .... 
For swine and fouls till Oct. 3d 

7 bols oats at £3 3s. 
To the mairs sent to Edinburgh in 

winter 9 bols oats at £3 3s. 
For a Tb. tobaca £l 4s. 
For mum from Ms. Monro 






17 


6 


1 


4 





20 


8 





10 








16 


4 





97 


10 





2 


2 


6 


12 


11 





12 


18 





1 


7 





11 








22 


1 





28 


7 





1 


4 





7 


1 






1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 71 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

For a punshon small bear from £ s. d. 

Lieth 6 

To Alshy Wood for cariages 

£2 4s, 6d 2 4 6 

June 10 For 12 bolls 4 fous at £3 4s. of oats 

made at Mellerstains wherin 

ther was 53 ston meall and 2 

pecks and a half of grots 6 pecks 

seads of on kilfull in the other 

kilfull 42 ston and 4 ston to the 

fouls and 4| pecks grots 6 pecks 

seads . . . . . 41 0' 

July 20 For 6 bolls 2 fous oats made in 

meall at £3 3s. per bol . 20 4 6 

Aug. 10 To expenc at Ginelkirk with 5 

horss . . . . . 2 14 

Aug. 26 For meat and drink at Edinburgh 

a fourtnight with 3 servants . 62 
To expenc at Ginelkirk with 6 

horss . . . • . 3 11 6 

For 5 load gras to the mairs in 

May 2 5 

To Patrick Hunter, stabler, in full 

of all accounts . . . 10 10 

To Alshi Wood, cariar, £3 14s. . 3 4 

For a load Scarsburg water . 22 
To Hendry Youll for a boll malt 

makeing £4 more . . . 5 8 

For 6 bolls bear for malt at £5 per 

bol 30 

Sep. 24 To Alshy Wood in full of all 

accounts . . . . 3 
For ale to Grace Brunfild at Green- 
law 3 O 

For canlle from Agnes Smith in 

Kelso from June the 10th till 

the 1st of October 4 ston 2 lb. 

wherof a stone J cotten at 



72 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

[Housekeeping] 
£4 per ston comon candle 

Sep. 29 For sope from Thomas Chato in 

Kelso from June 10th to this 

day at 6 shilline per pound . 
Ditt. For starch and indigoe to said 

Chato .... 

Ditt. For severall small things to the 

house from said Chato such as 

veniger, spice, gatt, same, etc. 
For half a ston of candle more 

from Agnis Smith . 
For 9 tb. wight candle 5 last winter 

and 4 in Aprill when Jerriswood 

was out .... 
For a thousand herins 
For expenc of horses bringing to 

Edinburgh .... 
For 14 loads colls 
For a tb. tobaca £l 4s. 
For soap at Mellerstains last 

winter 12s. .... 
To sow piges .... 
For bringing wine from Lieth 

mans expences 
For salt at Mellerstains last winter 

from Oct. 1st to June . 
For 16 scor ewes milk 2 days for 

cheases .... 

For sundry expence with horss at 

Broxmouth, etc., payed Tam . 
Oct. 2d For 30 threve oat stra to the horse 

at 4s. per threve . 
ditt. For 78 threve bear stra at 2s. 6d. 

per threve .... 
For pies to horss at Edinburgh 

1 bol 2 f ., horse at Meller[steans] 

4 fo: 4l. .... 



Scots' 
£ s. d. 


15 9 





10 16 





1 





6 





1 16 





1 16 





6 





2 16 





2 5 





1 4 





12 





1 3 


4 


13 





4 10 





5 6 


6 


2 15 





6 





9 15 





8 16 






1709] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 73 



[Housekeeping^ 


[Scots] 




£ 


s. 


d. 


To the swine of pies If. ll. 





16 





For 6 pound snuf tobaca 


3 








For last winters candle from 








Cochran .... 


43 








For 10 pints brandy payd Gawin 








Plumers man 


21 


6 


6 


To Patrick Hunter for M'gies 








horse ..... 


1 


9 





For 20 stacks piets casten for 








other 20 bought at £2 per stack 


40 








For 11 rucks hay at £9 and £8 per 








ruck ..... 


93 








For 14 lambs from the Park kild 


14 








For 19 sheap at £4 per pice from 








the Park .... 


76 








For ane ox and a cow from the 








Park kild .... 


50 










1620 


10 





Brought from day book this year 


827 


10 






2448 

By 11 ruks hay of Coltcrooks park 93 
By 8 horse grased on Coltcrooks 

park at £12 per pice . . 96 



S.2637 



Mellerstaine, January 1st, 1709. Housekeeping, 

Deb: to Cash. 

For 2|fous of shield bear for broth £ s. d. 

from the Milne . . . 4 3 
For 4| ounce of indigoe at 7s. per 

ounce . . . . . 116 



74 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1709. 

[Housekeeping] 
4th For 2 boll malt from Hendrj^ 

Youll ..... 
For 4 tb. sope £l, more 10s. 10s. 

10s. 10s. 15s. £1 15s. 10s. 10s. 
18 For candle 9s. pay'd in full for 

candle from Greenlaw 
For muton to the servants £3 5s. 

more £2 6. 
For 13 bolls bear at £7 per boll 

from the tenants . 
For makeing 2 stip of mallt of the 

abovesaid bear 
For ale given the maltman for a 

steep at Huntly Wood . 
For ale to John Shiels's stiep of 

malt ..... 
For 2 tb. suger 
March 24 For a ib. spice from Kelso 

Ditto For George Dods expence to 

Edinburgh, etc. 
For 23 pints of brandy bought 

by John Monro 
For half a barrill of Glasgow herins 
For a I fow bear meall 
For 2 swine from the milne 
For 1 ounc cinamon at 10s. ounc, 

cloves 9s., ounce nutmugs 10s. 
For 1 ounce mace at £l 6s., 2 

kitchen suger 12s. . 
For 4 ib. 4 ounces loaf suger at 14s. 

per tb. .... 

For a chapin cucombers £l, a tb. 

capers 16s. . 
For a muchkin oyl . 
For 2 J ston butter at £3 10s. per 

stone, salt Is. . . . 

May 1 For wild foull from Bowir to this 

Cla\ • • • • • 



Scots' 
£ s. d. 


16 





6 10 





4 13 





5 11 





48 11 


8 


6 





8 





12 





1 





1 4 





1 16 





48 6 


6 


5 10 





17 





24 





1 9 





1 18 





2 19 


6 


1 16 





1 1 





8 16 





1 10 






1709] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



75 



[Housekeeping] 


[Scots 




£ 


s. 


d. 


For butter from Kelso £8 . 


1 


17 





For 2| stone butter from Ms 








Bilingham . . . . 


9 








For veniger, 2 pints 


1 


4 





For bief from Kelso 


2 








For 4 tb. hopes at 14s. 


2 


16 





For suger 6s. 





6 





For 8 tb. starch 8 tb., powder at 4s 








per tb. . . . . 


3 


4 





For salet oyl 6s. tobaca pips 8s. . 





14 





For a tb. tobaca 


1 


4 





For sweat butter 





6 





For foulls . . . . 





16 





For 2 duson oranges 


4 


16 





For drink in John Shiels's 


1 


4 





6 For 12 bolls and a fow of oats at 








£9 per boll wherin there was 


> 






12 stone twise shild meall anc 


I 






43 ston houshold meall and 31 








ston for fieding fouls and ^ 


i 






pecks grots . . . . 


109 


16 





For 2 furlits pies shield 


5 








For a furlite bear meall fronr 


I 






Widow Wight 


1 


14 





For 4 tb. hops 


2 


16 





For 3 botles white wine £2 8 


> 






veniger 6s. . 


2 


14 





For 12 tb. suger 5s. 12 tb. 8s 








cariage 14s. . . . . 


12 


8 





For trouts . . . . 


1 


4 





For 2 firikins butter wighting each 


I 






4 stone 13 ounces including the 








barrills one at 13 sh. 6d. the 


k 






other 14 sh. and a sivenpence 


^ 






cariage from Anick to Woollei 


17 


3 





For veniger 12s. a tb., butter 6d. 





18 





For a quarter of bief at Kelso . 


7 


12 






1 17 





5 11 





12 





3 4 





14 






76 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1709 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

£ s. d. 
For floor at Kelso . . . 18 

For mirr 4s. tobaca and pips 

£1 12s. waffers 4s. bread £l . 3 
For mending the jack 12 sh. wild 

foull £1 5s. . 
June 23 For half a firiken of sope . 
For pigeons 12s. 
To Ms. Oliphent for sugar 
For tobaca 14 sh. . 
For 2 dusone hard fish from 

Patton one at 12 sh. one at 

14s. and cariage . . . 14 13 

For . . . ston cotten candle at 

.... and . . . stone rage weeked 

candle at . . . . . . 30 

For candle at 4s. 6d. per tb. clears 

all from Greenlaw . . 3 12 

For blew 12s. blew £3 4s. at 8 per 

ounce . . . . . 3 16 

For a fou of bear for meall 

£2 12s 2 12 

Aug. 12 For 2 tb. sope lOsh. 10s. 15s. 10s. 

10s. 10s 3 5 

For 65 stacks peats casten in the 

moss, £1 10 for 30^ of them . 45 15 
For spices, pickles, etc. from Ms. 

Oliphant . . . . 4 8 

To William Mitchell pairt of his 

fathers account for backing . 110 
For corks from Edinburgh £7 2s. 7 2 
For limons and orangs £7 8s. 

more £4 16s. . . . 12 4 

For sundry things sent by Ms. 

Monro such as solan gees, herin, 

bread, etc. .... 
For brandy at £2 2s. per pint 
For a barrill of herin • • 



12 8 





48 6 


6 


5 10 






I 



[Scots 


£ 


s. 


d. 


6 








10 


8 





15 


2 


6 





6 





1 


4 





2 


8 





6 


4 






1709] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 77 

[Housekeeping] 
For diner at Channelkirk going to 

toun ..... 
For linin washing while 14 days in 

Edinburgh .... 
For 3 bolls malt from Preston of 

ane. old account in full of all he 

can ask or crave 15 
For cariing bagage 
For spirit of wine 14 sh., 2 tb. 

pouder 10s. 
For 4 tb. suger 
For 8 hunder Dumbar herins 
For a cariage and a half pay'd 

John Waugh to Edinburgh . 2 5 
For a stack piets from Robert 

Hope in winter 
For 3 veals .... 
Sep. 26 To William Burnit for couper 

work since 9 Sept. last . 
For 8 darg troves casting at 6 

pence per day 
For 51 loads colls from Itell 

[?Etal] Hill at 6d. per load . 
For a stone and a tb. butter from 

John Mair in Jerriswood 
For 1 tb. suger 18s. more 18s. 18s. 

14s. £1 16s. .... 
For a four gallon barrill being 1^ 

aghtendeel wite boonties and 

Irf aghtendell graw errete ^ 

was 16 gulders 3 sturs the 

profite and exchange of mony 

by Lewis Pringle in all is . 19 9 

For a firikine Dutch sope from 

Lewis Pringle . . . 9 12 



7 





a 


6 


10 





12 








2 


8 





15 


6 





3 


8 





5 


14 






' Aghtendeel wite boonties = eighth part of white beans (harricot beans), 
and aghtendell graw errete = eighth part of grey peas. The words are old 
Dutch phonetically spelled. 



78 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1709 



[Housekeeping] 

For a leg beef and the trips of it 
For 2 dusone hard fish from Will 

Patton .... 

For veniger .... 
For a botle of oyl 
For half a dusone aples to Grisie 
For a botle oyl 
For frawght and other expences of 

bringing the Spaw water from 

Lieth to Edinburgh 
For a veall from Munga Brounlies 
Oct. For candle £2, more £3 12s. more 

12s 

For 1 tb. spice 

For cheas at £2 2s. per stone 

For brandy at £2 16 per pint 

For tobaca 

To workmen for clineing the 

closes ..... 
For 24 bolls 2 fous 2 pecks meall 

made in Jan^ last and put in 

the ark at £5 10s. the boll oats 
For 31 bolls oats to the horses at 

£6 the boll betwixt the 2d Oct^ 

1708 and the 1st Sep^ 1709, 

that the horse was taken in 
For 5 bolls horse corn in the 

abovesaid time £3 
For foulls that was fed 1 bol, 2 f. 

cLIj otrO • • • • • 

For f eading all the fouls in generall 
and swine 3 bolls 3 f. . 

For peas to the horse in abovesaid 
time 2 bols 1 f . at £7 

For pies to the fed swine in above- 
said time, etc. 2 bols 4 f . . 

For 12 bolls 2 fows oats made 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 
4 10 

14 13 

1 10 

2 2 
2 14 
2 2 



11 6 

2 

6 4 

14 

1 16 
6 17 

2 6 

1 10 



132 



186 

15 

8 8 

21 12 

15 8 

19 12 



1709] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 79 

[Housekeeping] [Scots] 

in meall in May last wherein £ s. d. 

there was 84 stone houshold 

meall and 10 stone twise shield 

meall and 8 stone given to 

Munga Park for Langshaw 

milnetakeof £11 4s. forMun[g]a 

Parks the oats comes at £6 to 63 4 
For horses in the abovesaid time 

6 bolls 1 f. 2 p. at £6 . . 37 16 

For light oats at half price, 7 bols, 

1 f . 2 p 21 18 

For pies to the horse 1 bol 3 f . at 

£7 9 4 

For pies to swine, pigions, etc. 3 

bols If 22 8 

For bear stra to the horse at 8 per 

th. 19 th 7 12 

For 200 threve oat stra at 12 per 

th 120 

For 19 th. bear stra at 8s. per 

threve ..... 
For 3 cows gras in the Mains 
For milk £2 2s. cheas £2 2 sh. 
For a leg bief 
For a stone butter . 
For spices suger etc. from Charles 

Ormiston . . . . 12 

For spices £l 18, starch £l, tobaca 

and snuff £3 10s. . . 6 8 

For expences in botleing the clarit 

and puting 14 dusone a bottles 

in shiepboord for London . 9 18 
For 1 stone 3 quarters candle from 

Greenlaw since Oct. . . 6 6 

For three bolls of wheat bought 

from Rutherfoord . . 36 

To Alexander Wood for cariing all 

this year and pairt of the last . 18 4 



7 


12 





12 








4 


8 





3 


4 





3 


6 






80 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1709 

[Housekeeping] 

For bringing pigeons 6s. . 
For two milk cows from the Park 
For 2 veals from the Park 
For five cows from the Park kild 
For 34 sheap kild in the house 
For 9 sheap salted in the ladner . 
For 11 lambs kild to the house . 
For bringing pigions 6s. 
Deem'" 1 For drinkmony for pigions from 

Rutherfoord .... 
From daybook for this year 
For suger pickles, etc. from Ms. 

Olifent .... 

For 14 rucks hay at £9 per pice 
For graseing 13 horses 



[Scots] 


£ s. 


d. 


6 





72 





8 





130 





137 6 





36 





24 





6 





12 





173 12 





50 





126 





156 






S.2603 8 



Mellerstaines, January 1710. Housekeeping. 
Deb. to Cash. 

Sterling 
For 14 bolls bear for two steeps of 

malt at £8 10s. Scots which is in 

English moony 14 sh. 2d. . 9 18 4 
For makeing the two kills full of 

mallt at Kelso . . . 18 10| 

For 2 stone barlie 6s. 4d. . . 4 6 

For 8 lb. paper 16s., 1 lb. nutmugs 

10s., a botle oyl 3s. 6d. . . 19 6 

For 4 ounces blew 3s. 4 lb., starch 

Is. 6d. ..... 5 6[sic] 

For a muchkine orang floor water 

2s. 6d 2 6 

For 6 dusone limons and 2 duson 

oranges . . . . 10 



1 


2 


6 


6 


5 


8 





9 


6 


1 


10 


8 



i7io] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 81 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

For 7 pints of miim . . 11 8 

For suger at Is. 2d. per !b. from 

Sir Robert Blackwood . . 1 13 6 

For bisket to my L[ord] Marches 

childreen and Lord Grahme . 3 

For 4 botles of white wine at 4s. 

per pint . . . . 9 

For a barrill of Liews herin £l Is. 
8d. cariing from Lieth lOd. 

For brandy at 4s. lOd. per pint 

For 4 botles brandy at 4s. 8d. per 
pint and cariing 2d. 

For 3 dusone and 4 hard fish 

For washing linins in Edinburgh 

near 10 weeks . . . 112 

For starcht linins dresing and 

washing said time . . . 12 

For expences going in to Edin- 
burgh and comeing out . 1 10 

For cariages in that time by 

Wood . . . . 16 

March 1 To household expence in Edin- 
burgh near 10 weeks brought 
from daybook this year . . 8 7 8 

For 2 stone candle from Greenlaw 
at 6sh. .... 

For 13 ells seckin at lOd. per ell . 

For a peck floor 

For a back say and a rump of bief 

For a for leg of veall 

For half a leg of bieff 

For I tobaca Is. 1|, pips 2d|, 
chark 3d| .... 

For 12 flasks Burgundy at 7s. per 

flask . . . . . 4 4 

For a tb. cinamon 10s., | ib. cloves 

5s. I mace 12sh. . . . 17 

F 






12 








10 


la 





2 








5 








2 


1 





6 


8 





1 


n 



82 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



[Housekeeping] 

For 2 stone rice at 8 sh. per stone 

For half a pound Bohea tee 

For I lb. green tee . 

For a barrill salt cod from Bailiff 
Fall in Dumbar 

For cariage of the cod from 
Dumbar 

For a boll oats to the mares 

For cariages payd Alexander 
Wood 

For pigions 
Ap. 3d For a pint of oile [?] to the 
werping .... 

For a fatt oxe from Thomas "1 
Turner to kill .200 

For corn to the above- 
said oxe at £7 10s. per 
boll . . . 17 6 

For 12 bolls of oates made of meall 
at 12 sh. 6d. per boll, there was 
of houshold meall 48 ston, of 
meall for sour cakes 5 stone, 
for meall to the foulls 30 stone, 
there was three pecks of grots 

For twelve bolls oates made in 
meall 103 stone 103 stone [sic] 
and 6 pecks of grots, thire oats 
was at 12sh. 6d. per boll 

The meall of thire 24 bolls oats 
was begune to on the 23d of 
November last 1709 

For 15 bolls oates to the coach 
mares preceeding the 1st of 
Aprill at the Christinmas fiers 
£7 10s. Scots 

For 3 bolls to straingers horse 
preceeding the 1st of April 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
16 
110 
5 

13 4 



2 


6 


13 


4 


3 


6 


2 








2 


2 17 


6 



7 10 



7 10 



9 7 6 
1 17 6 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



83 



y 



[Housekeeping] 

For 3 fous oates to the cart horses 
For 2 bolls 2 fous to the swine and 

fouls preceeding 1 Aprill 
For 9 bolls light oates to the foils 

and other 3 horses preceeding 

the 1st of Aprill at 5sh. per boll 
For 3 fous peas to the mares at 15 

sh. per boll .... 
For 1 boll bear made in meall at 

15sh. per boll 
For a sow from Adam 

Hutchison . .10 

For a boll oats to feed 

the abovesaid sow 12 6 
For a fow of peas to the 

sow and 1 peck . 3 9J 
For 10 forpers ^ of peas reckon' d 

1 furlit and a peck at 15 sh. per 

boll given to the pigions 
For 2 forpets peas to the house 
For 1| fows peas to the mares at 

J. Oo* • • • • • 

For I fow bear meall from 

Widow Wight 
For limons and oranges at 2s. 6d 

per duson 
For 2 duson limons . 
For brandy at 5sh. per pint 
For a stone butter . 
For 100 herins . 
For salt pitter 8d. 4d. 
For 6 bolls 4 fous and 3 fourtperts 

came to the horse oats . 
For half a stone of pouder 4d| 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
6 6 

18 4 



2 5 

9 

15 

1 16 3 



3 9 

9 

4 6 

18 

8 

5 
18 1 

6 

2 4 

10 

4 18 

3 



^ Forpet, forper, or fourtpert is stated by Jamieson to be the fourth part of a 
peck, or in other words a lippy. Lady Grisell, however, makes it the fortieth 
part of a boll, or equal to if of a lippy. This entry is arithmetically wrong. 



[Sterling' 


£ 


s. 


d. 





7 


6 





2 








6 


5 





1 









2 


5 





1 


6 





4 








2 


6 





11 








18 








3 


4 



84 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Housekeeping] 

For 6 gross of corks . 

For a botle of spirits 

For several! small things for 

Rachels backing 
For killing 3 swine . 
For the coches going in for 

Colonel Stewarts lady . . 16 

For the cartes going to Edinburgh 

for the kavie etc. 
For 4 tl). small candle Is. 6d. 
May 27 To Alshy Wood for cariing 
For 2 lb. hopes 2s. 4d. 
For 22 gooslings from Togoe [sic] 
For a firikine of sope as it cost at 

Newcastle .... 
For 10 lb. Cheshire cheas 
For whittining to the wals Is. 3d. 

Glew Is. 6d. 
For bring[ing] the firikin sope 

from the Hirsile 
June 16 For wild foull from Bowir 3 sh. 

For sundry small things in Edin- 
burgh 3sh. more 2sh. 
For Ginelkirk bill going and 

comeing the first of June 
For boord wages to three servants 

in Edinburgh 
For the coach mares at Kelso 

with Lady Rutherfoord . 
For eight dargs of truffs casting 

by Mowit .... 
For 2 swine from Adam Hutchison 
For servants beds, etc. at Edin- 
burgh . . . . . 10 
For a cariage of clarit and another 

of cloathes . . . . 5 

For 4 lb. candle Is. 8d. . . 18 






1 








3 








5 








9 








8 








1 


2 





4 





1 


17 


6 



I7I0] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 85 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For 1| gros korks 2s. 5| tb. £ s. d. 

almonds Is. . . . . 3 5 

For 500 herin 5s. lOd., 500 herin 

5 sh 10 10 

For tobaca a tb. Is. lOd. . . 1 10 

For wildefoull plivergs [sic] gray 

at 6d. green 5d. per pair, ducks 

6d. per pice small tiel 4d. per 

pice . . . . . 5 8 

Sep. For bringing wine from Dumbar 

etc. M. Brounlies . . 10 4 

For salt from Munga at 4d. § per 

peck . . . . . 8 6| 

For cariages of Spaw water, etc., 

by Alshy Wood . . . 16 

For suger at 8d. a pound got by 

Lady Couston . . . 116 

For pears and aples at the second 

hand a gess ^ of both . . 8 

For a gess of aples from Purvis 

Hall ..... 
For frute at the fair 
For barberies in drinkmony 
30 Oct. For cariages by Alshy Wood 

preeceeding this day 
For 22 wild foull at 6 pence a pice 
For 2 bolls meall from Jerriswood 

at £6 per boll . . . 01 

Decm^ For wine from the Taverin in all 

£4 wherof £l set in d[ay] book 3 
For colls at Edinburgh from 

midle November till January, 

£l 16s. 6d. wherof £l 4s. 8d. set 

in day book . . . 11 10 

To Alshy Wood for cariages from 

8 Novr till January, £l 6s. 6d. 

^ Gess or guess applied as a measure for apples and pears two or three 
times, but no information as to its meaning has been found. 






7 


6 





3 


6 





1 








8 








11 






86 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



[Housekeeping] 

wherof 8s. 6d. more 2s. in day 

book ..... 
For bread sent to Mellerstaines , 
For ale from Baillie Hay when 

Grisie was maried . 
For brandy .... 
For drags to the efflixar . 
For a pice of wine at Grisies 

mariage from Doc: Melvin . 
For aples bought at Kelso 
For a lofe suger at Is. Id. | per lb. 
To Ms. Howie for linins to our beds 
For spices .... 

To Alshy in full of this years 

cariages .... 

For milk from Adam Hutchisons 

ewes at 2d. per pint 
For butter bought from John 

Main in Jerriswood at 5sh. 4d. 

per stone, 13 1 ston more 3 lb. 

wight ..... 
To Provist Brown ane old 

account taken on 1705 
For meall to fead foulls from 

Widow Wight at 16d. per ston 

12 stone .... 
For 2 st. 3 lb. cheas from her at 

3 sh. per stone 
For 4 fous malt to the servants 

in winter .... 
For 19 stacks of piets being a foot 

larger then the £4 staks I payd 

Tam Youll 4sh. 2d. ster. for 

91 stacks . . 3 10 10 

For 10 double stacks 

piets casten by Mowit 

and Lindsay at the 

same price for 5 stacks 117 6 



Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





16 








3 


6 





16 


8 





17 


8 





4 





28 


10 








6 


8 





7 


6 





2 


6 





6 








2 


6 





3 


4 



3 12 

Oil 

16 

6 6| 

14 8 



5 8 4 



I7I0] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



87 



[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

To William Mitchell in full £ s. d. 

of his fathers account for bake- 

ing . . . . . 7 13 4 

For wine seek brandy at Grisies 

mariage from George Christy 7 12 6 

For 4 Turkies bought in Septem- 
ber at Ripath . . . 8 
For seek ale etc. furnish by Ms. 

Monro 16 Aug. . . . 1 10 O 

For 47 loads cols quherof 6 small 

from Itell . . . . 12 

For Androw Lams expence at the 

colls 10 

For sundry things bought by 

Androw Lamb such as bread, 

fish, butter, wild foull, etc. . 3 9 6 
For chickens bought by Lamb . 15 
Aug. For stoktens draps 2s. 2s. . . 4 

For oranges and limons . . 1 13 

For brandy . . . . 1 10 3 

SepJ". For tobaco, etc. . . . 10 IQ 

For severall things bought by 

Francy Newton as oysters, 

solan geess, limons, snuff, etc. 16 

For meat bought in the Market of 

Edinburgh by Robert Mander- 

sons bill . . . . 7 10 O 

For spices at the mariage . 7 

For one boll oats to 

fead two swine and 

2 fous at 17s. 6d. 10 
For 3 fous bear at !> 2 1 4 

13s. 4d. per boll 8 
For 4 fous peas at 

16s. 8d. . 13 4 ^ 

For 2 bolls 1 fow bear given for 2 

bolls malt from Sticher 13s. 4d. 

boll 19 4 



88 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



2 8 



[Housekeeping] 
To the foulls of bear 

1 fow 
To the foulls of oates 4 

fous . . 10 , 

For peas to the pigions 12 forpets ^ 

at 16s. 6d. per boll is about 
For 3 fous peas to the mares at 

16s. 6d. is about 
For oates to the mares, etc., till 

3d September 3 bols 1 fow 
For ,oats to straingers horse 

abovesaid time 4 B: 2 f. at 

12s. 6d. 
all crop Made in meall 12 bolls 4 fous at 
1709. 12s. 6d. per boll is 

For a boll bear for feeding the 

borr . . . . . 

For bear to the milne for servants 

9 fous ..... 
For oate stra at 6d. per 200 

th[reve] ... 
For 40 threave bear stra at 4d. 

per threve .... 
For 40 th: peas stra at 6d. being 

very ill .... 

For hay this year from Coltcrooks 

meadow .... 
For a veall calf from John Hope 
For 28 fatt sheap bought from the 

Park at 9s. 2d. 
For 5 fatt nowt from the Park . 
For 6 sheap and a cow to the 

servants from Park 
For 14 lambs from the Park at 4s. 

per pice 
For 3 more sheap to the servants 



[Sterling 
£ s. d. 





12 


8 





5 


1 





9 


10| 


2 








2 


15 





7 


10 








13 


4 


1 


4 





5 











13 


4 


2 








9 


15 








5 





12 


16 


8 


11 


9 


8 


2 


15 


4 


2 


16 








15 






1 See p. 83. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 89 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For meat to Georg Baillies man . 12 
For 2 bolls malt from Androw 

Broun that was brown in 

strong ale in October . . 2 

For 2 sheaf) to the servants . 5 6 
For expence for the tenant bring- 
ing meall Brughton . . 6 
For suger, frutes, pickles, etc. 

from Ms. Olifent . . . 6 5 

For sundry things from Char: 

Ormston per account . . 1 15 10 

For a firikine soap . . . 10 6 

For ewes milk from Georg Newton 3 4 
To Charles Hay, baxter, for 

backen meat at one diner when 

Grisie was maried . . . 5 

To Thomas Fenton for confections 

and milk one diner at Grisies 

mariage . . . . 11 15 

For household expence at Meller- 

stains from 1st March till 1st 

July, brought from Day book . 7 5 6j^ 
For household expence in Edin- 
burgh, June and July . . 17 3 3 
For household expenc at Meller- 

steans, Aug. and September . 1 8 6^^ 
For household expence Nov^ and 

Decmr at Edinburgh . . 10 4 2 

For 13 rucks hay from the Park 

at 15sh. per pice , . 9 15 

For graseing 12 horses at £l the 

pice . . . . . 12 

£345189^ 



90 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 



Mellerstaine, Janr. 1st 1714. Houshold Expences. 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
To Mrs. Liver for six turkies . 10 9 
For 44f pints Brandy from Will 
Robison in Aymouth in part 
payment . . . . 4 15 

To expence of the horse that caried 

the Brandy . . . 10 

March 26 To John Baillie Sm-gen in full of 

all Accounts .... 
For half a stone starch 
For expences at Faladam ^ going 

6 and 8d. Ginelkirk coming 

home 7 and 8d. . 
For washing at Edn: till 10 March 
For small thing such as powder 

and oyl, etc. 
For three chopins of Hunny 
For Brandy at 4d. the pint 
For snuff 5s. . 
For suger and other small things 

given out by myself 
For a Milk Cow at Faladam 
For corks to the cherie and 

botleing of it at Lieth . . 2 7 

For 30 dusone oranges, 20 dusone 

limons at 15d. p duson, out of 

which I had 8 gallons orrange 

wine and large twelve gallons 

of pansh and 2 dusone oranges 

beside to preserve . . . 3 2 6 

For a cariage of cherie and 

customs . . . . 2 7 

For cariing trunk 6d., drinkmony 

6d., horse brecking . . 10- 



1 17 


7 


2 


8 


14 


4 


18 





2 





6 





7 12 





5 





8 


6 


2 16 


8 



A small village lying between Edinburgh and Mellerstain. 



1714] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 91 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For 2 bolls 2 fows Malt from £ s. d. 

stonerige Tividale measure . 2 6 
For 10 bolls oates at 4£ 15d. Scots 

pr boll out of which there Is. 

6d. stone twise sheeld Meall two 

pecks of Meall which is recond 

duble Meall and sixty three 

stone of servants Meall 8 pecks 

of seads . . . . 3 19 2 

For three bolls one fow Malt from 

Berwick at 15s. the Lowthien 

boll 3£ customs 4d. . . 3 4 

For 7| stone butter last year from 

Jerri swood at 5s. pr ston . 1 17 6 

For bolls Meall from Jerris- 

wood to Edn. 
Ap. 14 For sope, candle, etc. from Lied- 

house Merchant haveing cleard 

all with him this day 
For cariing by Wood 
To carrin for snuff Is. ornistons 

stable Is. . 
For cards Is. 4d., 3| lb. resins Is. 

5d.y%, wax 4d. ^^"'2 . 
For Brewing 7 bolls Malt by Mrs. 

Ainsly ..... 
For a ston hopes to the said Malt 

out of which I had a puntion 

very strong Ale 10 gallons good 

second Ale and four puntions of 

Beer ..... 
For Diets from Hume Mose this 

winter ..... 
Ap. 21 For salt a boll .... 
To the English Butcher for mak- 
ing a sow in hambs 
Ap. 28 For a firriken sope from New- 
castle l£ Is. 6d. cariing Is. 6d. 






6 








5 








2 








3 


2 





10 









14 








8 


6 





8 








2 


6 


1 


3 






92 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1714 



[Housekeeping] 

For cariing hopes etc. 6d. . 
May For 5 lb. butter from John Person' 

2s. 6d. more 18 lb. more 9d. 
For 14 lb. at 5d. 5s. lOd. . 
For 3 old Geess at 8d. 6 young 

ones at 6d. almost at full gruth 
For baling at Preston Is. 6d. At 

Ginelkirk 4s. ... 

To Mrs. Crafoords Maid Is. 

Francy Newtons 2s. 6d. John 

Barr Is. ... . 

To mens boord wages at Edn. 
For pometum to the bairens 
For 47 pints of Cherie from 

Gilbert Stewart 
For 2 duson and nine botles 

muchkins of fruntimack from 

Will: Carss .... 
For a veal calf from the hird 
For drink at Dunce Is. 6d., drink 

at Langshaw Is. . 
For floor from Berwick 3s., suger 2s. 
For 8 pecks Meall for fouls at 

Kelso ..... 
For Bieff 5s. . 

For 1 ston wight figs and resins . 
May For bread and drink at Edn. in 

Francy Newtons Lodging 
To servants of boord wages 
For Tee from Lewis Pringle in full 

of all accounts 
To William Robison in Aymouth 

in pairt payment of 44| pints 

brandy at 42d. pr pint . 
For goosberies to botle at 3d. a 

pint 2s. 6d., cheries to preserve 

at 3d. 600 .... 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
6 





17 


4 





5 








5 


6 







4 
4 
2 


6 

6 



6 5 



2 


5 








5 


9 





2 


6 





5 








9 








5 








6 


2t^ 





3 








2 





2 


18 





4 


15 






4 



1714] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 93 

[Housekeeping] 

July 15 For wild foull .... 
To men with 7 horse with 13f bolls 

Meall from Jerri s wood . 
For 13| bolls Lithgow measure 

Meall from Jerriswood at 8 sh. 

the boll 
For 5 duson of limons to be 

Joyce 

For 8 fous wheat from Ridbreas 

<Ai\j • • • • • 

For 11 gallons and a pint brandy 

at 27d. pr. pint 
For bringing the brandy from 

Dunglas .... 
For a barrill of Herins from 

Hempsead .... 
For 5 bolls 4 fous Bear got from 

George Newton at 7£ Scots pr 

boll ..... 
To Robert Hume for makeing the 

steep Malt .... 
For 8 lb. sope 4s., 2 ounce blew 

16d 

For 3 kishps 2s. . . . 

For 3 dusone Arrack 12s. gallon 

and packing .... 
For 3 lb. Tee and boxes 
For 6 fous Malt from Stenrige . 
For 4 ston chease from Widow 

Wight at 4s. 
For 14 lb. courser chease at 3s. . 
For a ston Meall for foulls 
For drink money for frute 
For Scarsburg water 5 dusone 

botles .... 

Aug. 18 For 8 pecks salt 18 Aug. 10 pecks 

Salt ..... 



[St( 
£ 


srlir 
s. 


d. 





5 








1 


10 


5 


10 








5 





1 


16 





10 











2 








16 


8 


3 


10 








5 








5 


4 





2 





5 


19 





2 


16 





1 


3 








16 








2 


8 





1 


2 





15 





2 











9 






94 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1714 



"Housekeeping] 


[Sterling] 


For swine chease Milk and all 


£ s. 


d. 


Gorg Newton can ask or crave 


3 





For corn eaten by swine and 






fouls allowed George Newton . 


2 





For Bieff from Kelso 


10 





For some small things given out 






by myself .... 


7 


6 


To Wood for cariing 


2 





For 12 broom bussoms 





6 


Septmr. For a years work payd Will. 






Burnit the Couper 


10 





For couping L. Rutherfoords 






barrills .... 


2 


6 


For tinkler work 


3 





For 6 bolls Bear from Mr. Gowdy 






at 12s. 6d. pr boll for malt 


3 15 





For 7 bolls oats for Meall at 9s. 






lOd 


3 4 


2 


For casting 12 darg trufes with 






meat ..... 


6 





For 2 half Barrills of Herin from 


1 10 


9 


For suger at 9d. and at 13d. 






comes to ... . 


4 1 





For Allocs and bay Berries 


2 


8 


For 2 guess Aples 


12 


8 


For pears .... 


6 





For sand 2s. 6d. 


2 


6 


Oct. 30 For cariages .... 


12 





For ry bread 4 loves 


4 


8 


For candle 4£ Is. 8d. 


5 


8 


For bran Is. 3d., corks Is. 2d. . 


2 


5 


For 8 galons Ale the Princes ^ 






birthday at the Bonfier 


10 


8 


For Mr. Wilsons Horse 


1 


2 


For a Bea Skep cariing by John 






Hope ..... 


1 

II. Old s 





^ The birthday of the Prince of Wales, afterwards George 


tyle 



10 Nov. N.S. 



I7I4] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



95 



[Housekeeping] 
For sundry things such as sope 

candle from James Liedhous 
From Day Book the 26 of Nivem- 

ber that I left Mellerstaine 
For small things given out by 

myself 

Forcariing Is. 6d. more Is. more 9s 
For expence at Faladam and 

Dalkieth 
For dry fish 8s. Hempsteed 
For a lb. Tee from Blair . 
For a botle snuff 5s. 
For Butter at Hardis Mill 
For Aples 4s. 6d., chickens 2s. 

tinker at Kelso 2s. 
For couper work payd Androw 
To Jesper when he went to Edn 

with the Horses 
Decmr 1 To Charles Ormston in full of al 

accounts 
For I lb. Jocolet 
Edn For washing cloathes 5s. . 

For a lb. of Tee from Mr. Blair 
For 1 lb. Tee Gilbert Pringle 
For suger spices and sundry other 

things from Mrs. Olifer 
For 300 loods of Colls from the 

English side and some expences 

in bringing them the great at 

6d. the small 3d. at the hill and 

what I hired in was eliven pence 

small and fourteen great 
To Charles Ormston in full of all 

accomits .... 
To Alexr Lamb Candlemaker in 

full of all accounts F.N. 
To Baihff Fall in Dumbar in full 

accounts R.T. of wines . 



[Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

12 

22 16 

10 

11 6 

16 

8 

17 

5 

18 6 

8 6 

15 

2 

4 15 

2 

5 

18 

11 

8 



9 19 

2 

7 17 

18 2 



96 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 

[Housekeeping] 
London To Will Robison in full of all 
accounts of wines etc. R.T. . 
Decmr 18 For drinkmony for the Kings 
venison etc. 
For a porter to carie it 
For boord wages to Kate and Tarn 
for ten days .... 
30 To account of John Baillies boord 
wages was resting him when I 
came news powder oyl etc. 
For a chaldron of colls from Tod 
For 250 billets .... 
For seller rent of Cariage of 6 

barrill Herins from fiife . 
For cotten to be candle 
For 3 duson botles Malligo from 

Gil. Stewart 
For 51 b. 2 fous oates to the horses 

<X\j HjX^ • • • • • 

For fouls and swine 11 bolls 
For 13 bolls oates to straingers 

horses .... 

For 7 bolls light com at 50d. 
For peas to pigeons 9 fows at 15s. 

boll ..... 
For 200 threve stra beside beding 

ah OCl* • • • • • 

For 12 bolls oats for Meall and 

4 fows .... 

For 24 bolls more for straingers 

horse Meall etc. 
For light bear at 5d. pr boll to the 

XiOx^O • • • • • 

For Ry at 15s. 

For Bear 2 bolls at 12s. 6d. 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 


14 5 





1 9 





3 


6 


1 





1 





1 12 





3 





7 





3 


6 


3 3 


4 


21 8 


4 


4 11 


8 


5 8 


4 


1 6 


8 


1 7 





5 





5 6 


8 


10 





10 





1 1 





1 5 






S. 279 19 6 



I7I5] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



97 



London, January 1715. Houshold Expences. 



[Housekeeping] 
For 10 lb. Westfalia Hamb at 

lid. pr lb. . 
For cloves and Nutmug half a 

pound of each at 5s. 6d. 
For half a pound cinimon . 
For a lb. white peper 
For 8 lb. Barhe at 3d. pr lb. 
For a litle botle hungary water 
For a lb. Bohea Tee 16s. Fergison 
For a lb. Beco Tee 24s. Fergison 
For I lb. fine green Tee cal'd 

Hey son Tee at fergison . 
For a lb. firriken of sope 

For two Milk . 

For a lb. tobaco — Fergison 
For 2 duson Arrack at 14s. the 

galon Fergison 
1st For 2 1 chaldron colls from Tod 
For a Tun of Scots Coll . 
For 250 billets 3s. 25 brushes 

Is. 9d. 
For 2 barrills of sope 
For Mutton chops Ms. Boyd and 

we in the citv 
For sope blew 4s. 3d.y<^, blew 3s 

more Is. . . 

For 2 lb. wax candles 5 

For bread 9d., toungs Is., herin 

Id -« 
For Aples 100 18d., a duson 2d. 
i March 1st For a firriken of sope brock up this 

day ..... 
For bread from Day Book from 

18 Decmr to the 1st March 
For Bear from Day Book from 

G 



[SterlingI 

£ s. d. 

9 2 

11 O 

5 

3 6 

2 

1 a 

16 O 

14 



8 

6 

6 

2 

4 4 

4 

1 16 

4 9 

15 6 

3 

8 3^% 

5 

1 10j-<^ 
18 

18 

2 17 3 



08 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1715 



[Housekeeping] 

18 Decmr 1714 till the 1st March 

1715 

For Hoiishold Expences from 
Day book from the 18th 
Decmr 1714 till the 1st 
March 1715 

For 3 botles Cinamon water 

For 3 cakes Ginger bread 4 lb 
6cicn • • • • 

For blew 8d. . 

For tobaca 2s. Ale 2s. powder Is 
dit For 2 chalder of colls from 

Ghrame all charges 
ditt For 500 billets . 
dit For half a Tunn of Scots coll 

For blew and starch 3s. 4d. 

For wine from a frenchman 

For 4 botles of oyl and a half 

For cinamon water . 

For stacktens drops 2s. Drogs 4s. 

For Lisbon suger at 7d. a pound 

For the fraught and other ex- 
pences of a barill with barly 
starch blew and two barrills of 
Ap. 20 butter .... 

May 13 For 4 lb. powther Ish. 8d., two 
wash bals 6d., a comb 6d. 

For 4 lb. power at 5 a lb., irise 
root powder at 17d. 

For 1| chalder of Colls from Tod 

For lb. rosted cofiie . 

For Balsamick cyrop 

For confected pears 

For Almonds 6d. 

For blew 8d., powd. 5s., 2 month 
wash ball 6d., bleck 6d. . 

For spice and barly from Mrs. 
Abercromby .... 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
5 8 



37 11 10^4^ 
13 



6 

8 

5 

3 
6 
17 
3 4 

4 
13 6 
8 
6 
7 



1 


10 








2 


8 





3 


1 


2 


8 








12 








1 








1 


6 








6 





6 


8 





5 


6 



1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 99 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For 5 weeks washing of great £ s. d. 

linins only . . . . 2 3 6 

For 2 weeks sope 5s. 10 for wash- 
ing 2 gouns and coats 6d. . 6 8 
For fine suger and 13d. course lofe 

at lOd. 2 loves . . . 9 11 

For fraught of 5 dusone clarit and 

a box with prints . . . 6 

For expences of bringing them 

out of the ship . . . 9 

13 For a weeks sope another weeks 

sope 9 lb. I at 6d. . . 4 9 

For sope lid. for 3 weeks sope till 

22d. June 9s. . . . 9 11 

For sope from 2d June till 15 

August . . . . 15 6 

For paper a lb. 3s. 6d., barly 2s. 3 5 9 
For tobaca 2s., pyps 6d. . . 2 6 

For a pain of glas to a window . 13 
For Bear from 1st March till 1st 

May 4 15 

To drink to wrights and chimny 

sweap . . , . 16 

To Tarn youll at Twittenham . 10 
For sope Is. 3d. . . . 13 

For tobaca . . . . 2 

To Polwarths man for Spa water 

Is. more Is. . . . 2 

For drink bread and cheas to the 

scourers, etc. . . . 2 6 

For sope and sand to scour the 

house . . . . . 3 

For speaping all the chimnys of 

our new house . . . 2 6 

For fraught of 2 hampers wine 5s. 

other expences 5 . . . 10 

For nailing up the vine tree . 18 
July 4 For 10 chaldron colls with half a 



100 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Housekeeping] 

chalder into them being 12 

cart fulls 12 seeks each 1| 

chaldron more 
For 8|- lb. fine suger at 12 j^^d. . 
For 6| lb. suger at 9d. 
To litle Charles bell Is. 
For a lb. wax candle for tobaca 

lighting .... 

To wonsar park keeper for 2 

bucks of the Kings venison 
For cariing the 2 bucks from 

winsour park 
For a duson lb. mold 6 in the lb. 

candle ..... 
For half a Chalder cols owing 

Gryms since winter 
To Tam at Twettenham and 

Hamton Court 
For greens to the parlour chimny 
For frute 2s. Is. more 3s. . 
For triming 10| chalder Cols in 

the seller .... 
For 12 botles Spa water . 
To Charles Hays Nephew ane old 

account of backing 
For fraught and cariage payd 

Mill for 5 dusone Clarit and 4 

botles snuff 
For cariing my brother Kimer- 

ghams box .... 
For frute by May Minzies to the 

bairens .... 

For starching linins and sope 

4s. 2d. ..... 

For pometam .... 

For Houshold expences from day 

book from the 1st March till the 

first May . . . . 32 12 2^\ 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 


16 3 6 
8 8 
4 10j% 
10 


2 


6 


2 3 





6 





7 


6 


14 


6 


3 
1 

6 



6 



1 
15 


6 



10 


9 


1 3 





3 




1 


8 



i 


4 
1 


\ 
2 

6 



1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 101 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For Houshold expences from day £ s. d. 

book from the 1st of May till 

the first of July . . . 32 4 10^^ 

Aug. 26 For half a pound Bohe Tee from 

Mrs. Johnston . . . 9 

To a Butcher for Bieff and 

mutton the Bieff at 3d. the 

mutton at 3 y^^^^d. pr lb. from the 

12 July till the 1st September 

Jo: Betson . . . . 7 12 

To John Wright Backer for bread 

and floor, etc. from the first of 

March till the Last of August 

for the use of Thomas Broun 

Backer . . . . 8 2 

To Ambrose Jackson for Bear from 

the first of May till the last of 

August at 10s. 2 moneth and 

9s. 2 moneth 
For — lb. finest suger at 12d. a lb. 
For — lb. of courser suger at 9d. j-**^ 
For — lb. of coursest lofe suger at 

oQ. ..... 

For Lisbon powder suger at 6d. . 
For 4 botles Spa water at 14d. a 

flask 4 8 
For 6 lb. sago 

For a lb. Tee 16s., | lb. Tee 12s. 6d 
Sep. 10 For 3 Chaldron of Colls to fill the 

cole house up . . . 

17 For 4 weeks sope till this day 
For a lb. tobaca 
For 6 botles Spa water 

18 For Houshold expence from the 

1st July till the last of August 
from day book 
Sep. 18 For a duson pound 10s. in lb. 
candles molded frenchman 



7 


12 








11 


6 





4 


6 





5 








5 


6 





4 


8 





18 





1 


8 


6 


4 


5 








12 


3 





2 








7 





22 


1 


4 





6 


6 



102 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Housekeeping] 

For 12 botles Spa water . 

For a lb. bohea Tee 17s., a lb. 

coffie 4s., a lb. Spice 3s. 
For 17j-*Y lb. westfalia hamb at 

lid. ..... 

For 4 lb. Bohea Tee Fergison 

For 12 lb. candle 

For 2 lb. Indigo bought in 

Scotland .... 
For 56 lb. of Starch bought at 

Edn. ..... 

For 7 stone Pearl barly bought at 

Edn. ..... 

For 2 ston shield peas bought at 

Edn. ..... 

For a barrill and pock to put the 

abovsd things in 
For a botle of snuff 
For a bill loadening and putting 

them in the ship . 
For a barrill for the butter Is. 

payd Marion Hempsteed fishing 
For cariing and boxes Is. lOd. 

more lOd. .... 
For a hamb at 14d. a lb. a botle 

oyl 3sh. 6d. .... 
Octr. 1 For 100 billets a string of roots 50 

brushes .... 

For a dusone Spa watter . 
For setting 2 hogsheads wine by 

Mr. Douglas's cuper 
To Captain Douglases Maid for 

Tee, etc. .... 
For 2 Dusone Mold Candles 10 in 

the lb. . 
For past to wash hands, etc. and 

to Mrs. Colvile 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
14 


1 4 





15 

4 4 
6 


7 

6 


1 





18 


8 


1 8 





5 


4 


2 

4 




6 


4 





15 





2 


8 


19 


10 


1 1 
14 


6 



10 





2 


6 


13 


6 


4 






1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 103 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For a botle spirits Is. 8d. . . . 18 
Oct. 28 For 7 lb. 14 ounce 

suger at 13 . 8 6| 

For 6 lb. 6 do. 

suger at g^^d. 5 0^^ 15 S^ 

For 4 lb. suger at 5d. 18 
Nov. 8 For 2 dusone Mold Candles 6 and 

10 in the lb. at G^^d. . . 13 

For a dusone Spa water 14s., half 

a lb. Tee 8s. . . . 12 

Ditto 28 For a thousand billets 12s. 5 

brushes 3s. 6d. . . . 15 6 

Ditt. For sope from the 23 of Sepr till 

the 28 Novr . . . . 13 8 

For sope more gote in the abovesd 

10 weeks . . . . 2 

For powder 2s. 6d. more lOd. . 3 4 
For saffron 4s. 2d. lead ure 

6d 4 8 

For genever and Rubarb 3s. lOd. 3 10 
For Tee 9s. 6 wax candles 3 lb. 

12s. 6d 12 

For a Hogshead of Clarit from 

Archbald Hamilton . . 30 

For a Hogshead of Clarit from 

Major Boyd . . . . 30 

For I lb. Tee . . .- . 8 

For 13 lb. suger at 9|d. 

pr lb. . . 10 3 j^ 

For 11 lb. 10 ounces suger 

at 123Ajd. pr lb. . 12 1 ^^ 2 13 1 
For 16 lb. powder suger 

at 6d. 18 lb 6 ou at 

9d. . . . 1 10 8 

For a Tun of Scots Coll . . 1 16 

For 6 botles champyne at 7s., 2 

botles Harmtage 12s. Dutches 2 14 



104 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[Housekeeping] 
For 10 dusone botles Port wine 

from Bonnet 
For 16 lb. resins at 4d., 8 lb. 

curran: S^-^^d. 
Decmr.31 For Bear from Ambrose Jackson 

from 1st Sptb. till the date 

here at 9s. per barrill and a 

croun more for stronger Ale . 
To John Betson Butcher from 

1 Septmr. till 31 Decmr. 
To Arther Grumball Backer from 

1 Sepmr till 31 Decmr. 19s. 
For Houshold expenc from day 

Book from 1 Sepmr. till 31 

Decmr. .... 

For sope from 28 Novr. till the 

last of Decmr. 
For wine from Gilbert Black 
For miscount page 352 





[1715 


[Sterling 
£ s. d. 
9 





9 



7 8 

18 14 

5 19 3 

48 17 

15 

22 6 

10 



S. £441 



4 lOA- 



London, January 1st, 1716 Account of Housekeeping 

For 4 lb. powder Is. 8d. more 

2s. 2d 3 10 

For a weeks sope 2s. 6d. . . 2 6 
21 For 3 weeks frut 4s. 6d. Bought 

myself . . . . .046 

ditt For Candle 6 dusone 6s. and 6 

dusone 10s. in the lb. . . 3 18 

For snuff at 4s. the lb. . . 4 

For sope this moneth . . 9 8 

For a lb. paper 3s. mace Is. 3d. . 4 3 
For \ lb. orange pill \ lb. cordi- 

citron , . . • 16 



:i7i6] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



105 



[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For 1 lb. Tee l£ Is. 6d., cimone £ s. d. 

water4, paste 18d.,pamatuni Is. 18 6 
Febr. 1 For 12 lb. powder 5s. 4washballs 

1 6 

For washing my brothers shiets . 5 

For 4 ounces Rubarb at 18d. ounce 6 
For 3 lb. Pistashi nuts at Mr 

Toom's . . . . 6 

For 2 weeks 6s. 9d. news . . 6 9 
For fraught of 3, 8 gallon barrils 

with Meall Berwick . . 7 6 

For a bote to Hungerfoord stairs 2 
For a cart to Broad Streat with 

the meal . . . . 1 10 
febr. 10 For a porter to help with it 3d. 

warffage 4 . . . . 7 
For a lb. Bohe Tee from Mr. 

Hamly . . . . 18 

For a lb. green Tee . . . 16 

For a dusone Nutmugs . . 5 

Foralb. GreenTeeMr. Hamlie . 16 
For a litle barrill Sturgen from 

Mr. Heart . . . . 8 

For ane old account of Spa water 1 12 

For a suger lofe at 12d j^^. . 8 

For sope for this moneth . . 11 3 
;March 8 For 2 lb. | all sorts dry sweat- 
meets at 3s. 6d., paste at 2s. 6d. 

I lb 10 

For 1 lb. al sorts white confits . 3 

For a box prunellas 1^ lb. . . 2 
For 3 glases wate ^ sweatmeets at 

6d 16 

For I lb. waffers . . . 10 
For a suger lofe at 12dj4j. a lb. 

weight 6| lb. . " . . 6 9 



^ Wet, moist. 



106 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1716. 



[Housekeeping] 

For 4 ounces Coffie powder 

For I ounce Nutmugs 

For sope this raoneth 

For powder and hungary water 

For Billets and brushes 

For 25 brushes 

For a Hamb from Gumly at 10s 

6d. a lb. 
For 2 lb. Bohea Tee 
For half a lb. Tee 
31 For Bieff and Mutton for 3 

Monethes payd John Betson 

Butcher Bieff 3d. Muton 3d 3%. 

shins 8d. . . . . 

March 31 For bread in three moneths from 

Arther Grumble 
For 1| chalder Colls from Ghrames 
For a suger lofe 
Ap. 16 For 6 duson of Mold candle 6 in 

the lb. at 7d. 
For I lb. Tee Mrs. Abercrumby in 

full of all acctts 
For Candle 10s. in the lb. 3 duson 
For a lb. Tee from Mr. Hambly . 
30 For sope in this moneth . 
For Coffie 18d. oranges 3s. 
For Coach Is. . 

For News 2s. 6d. plays operas . 
For letters 6d., 2d. . 
For suger .... 

For wash balls 6 . . . 

May For 5 Dusone Botles Clarit got 

from Major Boyd 
For suger at 12d. a lb. 
For sope in this moneth 
For 25 lb. Jacolet made by Mr. 

Scots orders 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 



1 


6 





5 


15 





3 


6 


12 





3 





10 





1 16 





9 






15 1 

5 14 

2 2 

7 9 

2 2 






9 








19 








16 








14 


6 





4 


6 





1 








2 


6 








8 





8 


6 





1 


6 


8 


6 








7 


6 





13 


6 



.530 



I7i6] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 107 





THousekeeping 


"Sterling 


June 1st 


For 121 Chalder Colls from 


£ s. 


d. 




Ghrames .... 


17 1 


2 




For 2 botles Champain 9s., 2 botles 








Burgundy 8s., Chovet . 


17 







For 3 gallons Rack Mr. Hambly 


2 8 







For Id. botles 


2 


6 




For a lb. Tee, Hambly 


16 







For a du. Stockton drops 13 or 14 








to the dusone 


9 







For 6 flasks Clarit 


1 4 







For a kit of three salmonds 








the salmond . . 15 








For the kitt boyling and 




-. 




veniger, etc. . . 4 








For frought to London 2 


1 1 







For 2 botles Champaine 


9 







For 2 botles Champaine 


9 







For suger and 12 botles Spa water 


1 3 


6 




For suger .... 


18 


10 




For sope in this Moneth . 


16 


9 




For 6 flasks Clarit Muns : Chovet 


1 4 







For 4 botles Champaine 


18 







For 3 gallons Rack from Hamly 


2 8 





July 16 


To the Keeper of Wonsour Park 








for a Buck . . 


1 1 







To the Carier for bringing it 








home ..... 


3 







For powder .... 


6 







For a lb. of Tee . . . 


16 







To lose at Carts 


14 





Pdin 


For a hogshead Clarit 

from Gilbert Stewart 18£ 






Scotland 


For french duty 7£ 3 J^^d. 

custome house dues 

9s. 6d. . . . 7 12 7{\f 
For a duble cask and 








packing . .07 lO^Hj 


26 


6 




For fraught 10s. London duty ■ 







108 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1716 



[Housekeeping] 
l£ 2s. 6d. other expences given 
out by Hendry Mille 12s. 9d. . 
July 31 To the Park keeper for a Buck a 
guiny the carier 3s. 

For spermacity 18d., Lozanges 2s 
saffron 3s. 6d., Baino Rachel ( 
and spice Is. 6d. . 

To the servants at Newgat 
Prison 2s. 6d.^ 

For sope this moneth 

For suger l£ 2s., oyl 6s. 6d. 

For Meat bought in the Market 
August For sope the first week 

To poket 

For suger 

For Mrs. Smithes glass 

For sope 

For cheries to Brandy 

For sope to scour blankets, etc 
when I was at bath 

For cleansing the house of office 

For meat to 4 servants 
when I was 9 weeks at 
bath from 8 Aug. till 8 
Octr. from Betson 15 

For bread in that time 1 2 

For candle chease roots 

etc. in that time . 6 

For Bear . . 18 

For sope and sand to the house 
while at bath 

For Meat, bread, bear, and all pro- 
visions at the Bath from the 9 
August till the 12 of October . 

For Meat and Lodging going and 
coming from Bath being 9 days 
on the roads 

' See p. lii. 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
2 5 9 

14 6 



14 6 

2 6 

12 7 

18 6 

18 

4 6 

2 6 

8 








1 9 

2 2 



8 

14 
15 9 



2 
2 

6 

3 1 10 

3 8 
38 
11 18 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
11 


8 



10 
16 






1 


16 





6 



1 
2 









4 


6 


8 








1 


10 


6 



1716] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 109 

[Housekeeping] 
For 24 lb. white sope brought 

from Bath .... 
For washing linins at Bath and 

starching .... 
For a lb. Tee .... 
For fraught of 8 lb. green Tee 

from Holland 
For 8 lb. Tee bought from Mr. 

Jerrard at Raterdam 
For scouring the Hamer cloath . 
For fraught of ginger bread from 

Lord Bining .... 
For Modera gote from James 

Douglas .... 

For a hamb at 12d. another at 

14d. a pound 
For a Hogshead Pontack wine 

bought at Bourdaux by my 

Lord Stairs all expences came 

to ..... 

To Hendry Mille for bringing it 

home ..... 
To the Banio for Rachy . 
For 5 dusone botles Clarite gote 

from Major Boyd to send to 

Bath 7£ 10s. 16s. botles and 

corks ..... 
Oct. 17 For suger at 8d. 5s. and 6d. fine at 

12d. 6s. 6d 

For 4 dusone of lb. Candle 10s. in 

the lb. at 6 j^^^d. 
For 7 duson lb. Mold Candles 6 in 

lb. at 7d. .... 
For 2 lb. Bohe Tee . 
For a dusone 12s. in 
For 7 lb. suger 
Oct. 30 For 5 Duson 6 botles Clarit from 

Major Boyd . . . . 8 6 



34 


16 


7- 9 





10 








8 






8 


6 








12 





1 


6 





2 


8 





2 











6 








7 






110 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1716 



ditt. 
31 



[Housekeeping] 

For billits 15s. 6d. . 

For expences of meat going to 
Windsor .... 

For drinkmoney at Mrs. John- 
stons in Twitnem 

For 2 botles Hermitage 8s. 2 botles 
champaine 10 . . . 

For confections to diner . 

For 2 botles cinamon water 
Oct. 20 For a muchkine botle snuff 

For suger at 8d. 

For 2 bushal charcoll 

For Bread flour, etc., payd Arther 
Grumbald from the first of 
Aprill till the last of October . 

For Meat payd John Betson 
Butcher from Ap. 1st till the 
last of October 

To Mr. Tod for Bear gote from 
Ambros Jacson from January 
1st till 1st August 
Novr. 6 For a fine suger lofe at 12d. 

cL Ik) • • • • • 

For cooling seads Is. Ales Milk 

xOS* • • • • • 

For glasing the House brock by 

servants .... 

For pomatum Is. 
For strong Ale from . 
For sope 4s. 6d. 
For sope 3s., 3s., 7s., 4s. . 
For powder 6s., Is., 3d. 
For 6 monethes window tax at 

Michelmas 1716 
For a hamercloath 2| yd. at 

6s. 9d., lace 3d. and 2d. lining 

3s. making 5s. 



Nov. 16 



wrong 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
15 6 

15 



10 





18 
12 
8 
3 
4 
9 





8 
8 



8 12 





24 12 





17 12 





5 


11 


17 





7 
1 
12 

4 
17 

7 


6 


6 

3 


15 





1 9 


4t% 



I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



111 



[Housekeeping] 
friday For 6 duson candle 10s. a lb. and a 
Decmr. 21 Id. to R. and M. 

For expence of foul, fish and other 

provisions from day book 
To John Betson Butcher for Bieff 

and Muton in Novr. and Decmr. 
To Arther Grumble for Bread in 

Novr. and Decmr. 
For salmond from Berwick 
For fraught Meall, etc. 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
2 5 6 



149 7 



10 18 6 



3 
1 5 
1 10 


8 
6 



S. 506 6 


3 



London. January 1st, 1717. Account of Household 

expences. 

For 14 lb. fine suger 

For 2 lb. at lid. 2 lb. at 8d. 

powderd suger 
For 2 lb. resins at 4d., 2 lb. currins 

at 5dy^^. 2 lb. pruns 3d^^r. • 
For ane ounce Cofiie powder 
For 3 dusone Candles 6s. in the 

pound at 7d. 
11 For a woman to wash Is, and 2 

weeks sope 7s. 
For a thousand Billets and half a 

hunder Brushes 
For powder .... 
For 2 lb. rise lOd., 2 lb. barly 5d., a 

lb. suger 5d., Mace 8d. . 
For a woman to wash Is. 4 lb. sope 
For a lb. Tee from Fergison 
For a barrill of sope from ]Mr. 

West a lb. salt and peas 
Feb. 4 For 4 lb. | sope 2s. 3d., 6s., 3s. . 






14 








3 


2 





2 


2 








5 


1 


1 








8 








16 








3 








2 


4 





3 





1 


2 





1 


7 


6 





11 


3 



1 





8 





10 






112 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For half a Hogshead £ s. d. 

strong Clarit L.P. 10 
For half a Hogshead 

smaller at . . 7 

For the French duty 

payd by Lewis 

Pringle . . 7 12 

For botles corks and 

botleing . . 2 10 

For 3 casks and pack- 
ing 22d. and 2 botles 

in all . . . 7 6 27 9 6 

For frought 

For suger suger [sic] and fruts 
For 2 botles cinamon water 
For 4 lb. wax candle 10s. 
For fraught of 2 punchens Meall 

and the corper . . . 10 

For bring them from the ship all 

expences . . . . 6 

For pometam 2s., more Is., eme- 

ticks Is. . . . . 4 

15 For 2 dusone candle 10s. in the 

pound for R. and M. . . 13 

For fraught and other expences by 

Hendry mills acctt for the 

Kinary and herin from Duke 

Montrose . . . . 12 

For 2 hambs from Matucks at 13d. 

pr lb. . 
For 2 botles cinamon water 
March For sope 3s., 3s., 3s., 3s. . 
18 For a thousand billets and 

hundred brushes . 
For suger 7s. 6d. 10s. 3s. 6d. 
For a Hogshead syder 2£ 5 cate 

etc. bring in 2s. 6d. . . 2 7 6 

31 March To John Betson Butcher for Bieff 



• 


1 





• 


8 





• 


12 





I 






m 


16 





m 


1 1 






I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



113 



ditto 



Aprill 



May 



May 1 



28 
June 4 



July 11 



Housekeeping^ 


[St 


erling] 




£ 


s. 


d. 


and Mutton in 3 monethes 


14 


8 





To Arther Grumble for bread flowr 








etc. in three monethes from 








1 Janr. till 1st Aprill 


4 


8 





For sope 4s, 3d. 3s. 9d. 





10 


& 


For powder 3s. Almond powder at 








a 4d. p lb. 1 





4 





To a Duson of candle 





6 


6 


For 3 J Chalder of Colls gote in the 








2d March .... 


6 


10 


a 


For sope Is. Id. 4s. 2d. 





5 


3 


For champain .... 


1 


8 





For 7 Chardron of colls bought by 








Mr. West .... 


10 








For sope 3s. lOd. 14s. lOd. 





18 


8 


For wax candles 2s. 6d. 





2 


6 


For chesier cheas at 3d.^ a lb. 





7 


n 8 


For a hamb at 6d. a lb. . 





8 


4 


For suger at lid. 





10 


7 


For a lb. Bohea Tee 


1 


2 





For Spa water pd Captain Kirk- 








ton 


3 


12 


6 


For 2 dusone of small candles . 





13 





For sope 5s. 2d. 3s. lOd. 4s. lid. 








4s. 4d. starch 6d. 5s. 2d. 


1 


3 


11 


For Candle from Wansour at 6 








and j^v pr. lb. . . . 


3 


5 


6 


For pils Is., pills 18d. 





2 


6 


For starch 6d. 








6 


For 4 botles Arrack from Mr. 








Hambly .... 


1 


1 


6 


For 12 lb. powder 6s. 





6 





For sope 4s. 6d., starch 6d. 4s. 4d., 








4s. 6d. 3s. 8 strch Is. 





18 


6 


For 2 dusone Candles 





13 





For lose by James Grieve he aither 








lost or miscounted 


1 









H 



114 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Housekeeping] [Sterling] 

For the cariage of a Buck and £ s. d. 

drinkmoney . . . 14 

For Bieff and Muton from Betson 

Butcher in Apr. May and June 

in full of all accounts . . 12 

For Bread from Arther Grumble 

from the 1st of Aprill till the 

14th of July . . . 5 6 

For white bear 5 barrils at 10s. . 2 10 
For the custom and charge of 57 

lb. hambs sent from Holland by 

my Lord Binning . . 13 

For a thousand billets | hunder 

brushes . . . . 16 6 

For 2 wash balls 4d. Drinkmoney 

2s. 6d 2 8 

For 3 botles Arack more 2 botles . 110 
For some small things by James 4 

Aug, 5 For sweeping chinny . . 16 

To Arther Grumble for bread since 

14 June . . . . 15 

For Bear from Sam: Willis from 

29 Aug. 1716 till the 5 of August 

1717 21 2 9 

For I hogshead Clarit from Alexr 

Baird 18 

For some things bought by May 

Minzies . . . . 16 

For six kipper Mrs. Dalrimple . 10 
For a box and shiping the fish . 16 
For 6 Ling. Fall . , . 5 7 

For 4 stone chease from Tweddal 13 4 
For ninteen ston Pork at 2s. lid. 

pr ston barrills for salting etc. 

12 toungs 8d. salting 9d. . 3 17 3 

For Cheas from Newton and 

Wight tenants at 4s ston . 10 

For powder and wash balls . 13 10 



[Sterling" 


£ 


s. 


d. 





6 





3 








2 


10 


9 





2 


6 



1717] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 115 

[Housekeeping] 

For tobaca 2s., snuff 4s. 
For Candle while I was in Scot- 
land spent in Lond: besids 

l£ 15s. worth left in the House 
For sope at London while I was in 

Scotland .... 
For seting razors 2s. 6d. . 
To the Coachman and servants 

expences at Barnet . . 4 

For expence of the servents at 

London from the 13 Aug: till 

the 17 of Semtm"" . 
For bring the Barbatos waters and 

sweatmeats .... 

For 7 Chaldron of Colls in octo^r . 

For 2 ,1b. tobaco .... 

Edenburg For wine from Gilbert and Lewis 

Aug. 17 Pringle .... 

For Meat from the Cooks etc.: from 

18 Aug: till the last of Deem'" . 
For washing .... 
For Confections Plumcaks and 

Bisket from Mrs. Fenton at my 

Rachys mariage 
For 100 lb. weight starch at Edn 
For 100 lb, powder . 
For 21 pint Brandy Mcnill at 

2s. 8d. pr pint 
For dry cask to it and puting 

aboord all . 
For Casks to powder and starch . 
For expences of servants and 

horses traveling about in 6 

monethes .... 
For 4 botles snuff 
For 150 lb. Pork at 4d. lb. salt, etc. 

to be hung . 



5 








1 


1 





10 


15 








4 





16 








34 


18 





6 


9 





15 


3 





1 


16 


8 


1 


16 





2 


16 








6 


10 





2 





8 


13 


6 


1 








2 


14 






116 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1717 



[Housekeeping] 

For Meat, drink, coll, and candle 
the two times we was at Meller- 
staine .... 

For a pice of Clarite from Major 
Boyd . . . . 

For confections in full of all 

C4'V/V' • • • • • 

For a Doe at Christenmas . 
wrong For lose one Guinys at London . 
wrong To the Kings footmen and 

Beefeaters .... 
To Shiriff at Ginelkirk was owing 

by servants .... 
For locks and bands by flint to 

doors and gates at Meller.to^ . 
For snuff sent to London by James 

Carren ..... 
For Meall to the Barnman Meller 
For Meall to the poor at Meller- 

staine .... 

For servants expences in Pate 

Hunters .... 

For 16 bolls oats at 10s. made in 

Meall and sent to London in 

1715, 16 and 1717 
For our carte horse at Meller- 

staine in 3 year 10 bols . 
For 6 bolls ots in meall while I 

was in Scotland 
For Boord wages to the barman at 

7s. 4d. a moneth . 



From the Day book for 11 
JMonethes .... 



Sterling^ 
£ s. d. 


14 


4 6 


30 





3 


3 





10 6 





15 


1 


1 





5 





10 


2 
2 


3^^^ 
7 8 


1 


7 2 





5 


8 





5 





3 





4 


8 


364 


5 8-1% 



175 2 6^ 



S. £539 8 2^4 



1693-95] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 117 



To Servants fies 

1693 To Margrat Flimin her fie . 
Apr^i To Sandy Frazer in full of his fies 
May 2d. To Ann Faa in full of her fies 
Ditto 7. For cloathes to servants . 
To fieing and arls to servants 
To Isabell Johnston 
Sept^ 6 To Sandy Corbett in full of his fies 
To David Makeom quhich pays all 

his fies 
To Babi Tamson in full of all her 
fies ..... 
Jun. To Mary Sincklar her fie . 
1694 Jun. To Nany Christy of her fie 

To Nany her shoes for Whit. 94 , 
For shirts to John Broun 
For Crises nurses goun 
Septr To Shusan Brown for her shoes 
Mertimas 94 . 
To Shusan of fie . 
For shoes to Davi Nickelson and 

to John Broun 
For making cloathes to the men 
Novr 26 To Nany Christy of fie . 

To David Nickelson in full of his 

fie 

Deem'' 14 To Sara Semple in full of her 

fies ..... 

To Shusan her shoes for Whit. 95 

To Grisies nurs in full of her fie . 

1695 To Nany Chrf^ her shoes for Mert. 

Febr. 23d.To her of fie 10s. to her 6lb. 8 

For stokins to Davi lib. 3s. a hat 
to John 18 . 
May To Nany for shoes for Whit. 95 . 
To Nany lib. 6 . . . 



Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


18 








12 








18 








18 








18 


18 





2 


18 





6 


3 





9 








8 








8 


6 





4 








1 


8 





2 


2 





6 


8 





1 


4 





2 








4 


8 





8 


4 





12 








38 








60 








1 


6 





50 








1 


6 





6 


18 





2 


1 





1 


6 





1 


6 






118 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695 



[Servants^ 


Scots] 




£ s. 


d. 


For helping the mens cloathes 


2 10 





To Adam Owin a rest of fies 






owing by my mother 


39 6 





For stokins to Johny 12s., shoes 






to him lib. 4s. . 


1 16 





Jun. 26 To Nany Chr. 12s. . 


12 





July To my Robis nurs 






August 9 To An Forrist 


4 





Sept. To Ann Forrist 


8 





To Shusan shoes for Mer* 95 


1 6 





For shoes to John 


18 





Novt. Ist.For helping mens cloathes 


18 





To Mary Marchall of fie . 


9 6 





To Nany her shoes Mer* 95 


1 6 





Decmr. To Nany of fie 


3 





To Frances Newton per recept to 






John Wight .... 


45 





To Frances Newton for shoes 


6 





S. 


358 6 






To Servants fies 1696 
To An Forrist 



January 


It. caried from the — page 


Aprill 


To her of her fie 


July 


To her .... 




To her .... 


Decmr. 


To her .... 




To Shusan Broun 


January 


It. caried from — page 


16 


To her of fie 



To her lib. 10s. Febr. 10 to her 14 
Aprill To her her shoes for Whit. 96 



12 

12 

2 10 

8 

6 6 



5 16 

2 4 

2 4 

16 



1696] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 119 

[Servants] 

To her of her fies 

21 To her lib. 4s. ... 

Septm. To her for shoes for Mertimas 96 

Octor. 1 To her ..... 

To Mr. Robison for 16 ells stuff e to 

her ..... 

To Nany Christy 

January It. caried from — page 

15 To her of her fie . . . 

Febr. To her ..... 

July To her her shoes for Whitsunday 

«7\J • • • • • 

To her 2lb. 2s. ... 

Octor. 7 To her ..... 

To Rachys nurs for her fie 

To Francy Newton caried from 
Febr. 10 For shoes to Johny and brehes 

helping .... 

Aprill To Francy for shoes 2tb. 8 

For a coat to Tam 6tb. 18s. 

stokins and shoes to him and a 

wastcoat . . . . 9 8 

For blew stokins to Tam itb. Is. 

briches to him 2tb. . . 3 10 

For a hat to Francy and dresing to 

him .... 
For shoes to Tam Itb. 9s. a shirt to 

him, shoes Itb. lis. 
Decmr. 1 To Francy Newton . 

For briches to Piter Broun 2tb. 8 

in this year 



Scots 


£ s. 


d. 


4 19 





1 4 





1 7 





1 11 


6 


12 16 





33 6 





4 





2 4 





1 9 





2 2 





3 





40 





45 





1 13 





2 8 






4 16 





3 

3 14 





60 





2 8 





S. 192 






120 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1697 

[Servants] [Scots] 
To servants fies 1697 
Mertimas 1694, Ann Forrist her 
fie £24 00 00 

£ s. d. 

Item, brought from pagees . 040 16 00 

Janury To her 006 10 00 

Aprill 21stTo her 003 07 00 

Agust 1st Item, to her . . . . 014 16 00 

Item, to John Rainalds for her 002 08 00 
Mertimas '97 Item, to her quhich pays her 

fie and shoes . . . 016 12 00 

Candlmas 1694, Shusan Broun fie 

in the year £16 00 00 
Item, brought from page 
Item, to her shoes for Whitsunday 

'97 001 08 00 

May 24th Item, to her . . . . 005 16 00 

July 8 Item, to her . . . . 000 14 00 

Item, payd my sister for hangins 

she got from them . . 007 18 00 

Mertimas 1693. Nany Christy in 

the year £16 00 00 
Item, brought from page . 045 17 00 

Item, to her shoes for Whitsunday 

'97 001 06 00 

NovT. 1697 Item, to Jean Brown her full fie 

and shoes for 3 quarters . 013 04 00 

Ditto Item, to John Innis his full fie for 

half a year . . . . 009 00 00 

Ditto Item, to James Carrin his fie for a 

quarter .... 004 10 00 

To menservants cloathes 



1697] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 121 

[Servants] 
Item, stokins and shoes to Tam 

Herrit ..... 
Item, 2 runing wastcoats 8 ells at 

14s. per ell, linen to them and 

draurs ..... 
Item, making the wastcoats with 

butons of the same 
Item, for making a p[air] drawers 

2s. mending 4s. . 
Item, a plush cap iti. 8s. shoes to 

Rob 2ti. 4s. . 
Item, stokins to John Inis lli. 12 

shoes to him 2ti. 4 bootmending 

loS. ..... 

For mendings lOsp. to arls to 

Jamie and fieing 14s. 6d., 10s. 
For 4 ells I blew cloath at 7s. 6d. 
For cloth to a groms coat 2 ell | at 

8s. 6d. sterling 
For blew cloath for a groms big 

coat 3 ells at 9s. 6d. 
To 4| ells blew serg for linin, and 

5 ells yellow at 16s. 
To yellow for facing and 3d. u 

hair, buttons, and 14 ells serg 

16d. ..... 

To silk and threed and buttons per 

Francy Newtons acount 
For blew facing Iti. 10s. molde to 

buttons .... 

To John Hume for making, to 

acount 5H. 5s. 
For cloathes making to Georg 

Taylor ..... 
For John Inises coat and Robs 

making .... 

For a hat and string to Rob: lli. 

7 shoes to him iti. 10s. . 



£ 


[Scots] 
s. d. 


004 


00 


00 


008 


00 


00 


001 


00 


00 


000 


06 


00 


003 


12 


00 


004 


09 


00 


001 


14 


06 


019 


16 


00 


012 


18 


00 


017 


02 


00 


007 


12 


00 


013 


16 


00 


009 


00 


00 


002 


00 


00 


005 


05 


00 


002 


00 


00 


002 


04 


00 


002 


17 


00 



122 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1697 

[Servants] 

For 7 ells blew cloath for chair 
coats at 3ti. 3s. per ell . 

For blew serg to Johns coat linin 

To my childs nurs to acount 

For the servants mornings dress- 
ing ..... 

To John Hume for making cloathes 
quhich pays all precidings 

For furnitur to cloathes per Mr. J. 
Hums acount . . . 

To Francis Newton per recept 



[Scots 


£ 


s. 


d. 


022 


01 


00 


002 


00 


00 


008 


14 


00 


010 


00 


00 


008 


06 


00 


10 


18 





100 


00 






S. 367 



Edenburgh, 1700, charg of servants. Deb: to cash. 

Gawin Cluther 
January To him in cash and cloathes 

Francis Brumigham 
For cloathes to him . 



9 


15 





12 








6 








54 









Judith Malbank 
Fbry. To her in cash .... 
To her in full of her fie 

James Cannell 
His wage is in mony in the year 

£36. All cloathes except linins. 
To him for 3 month month he 

came befor the tarme . . 15 

To him for a sadle he lost . . 5 16 

To him 16s., more 14s., more 12s. 

he keep't . . . . 2 2 

James Carrin 
His wages in the year is of mony 
£24. 
8d. To him in cash 2ti. 18 6 . . 2 18 6 

To hime more Iti. . . . 10 0- 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



123 



May 



[Servants] 

Nany Christy 

To her for shoes 
To her her fie in full 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

18 

40 



Dina Ridpath 

Her wages is 20 pounds in the 

year and shoes 22 16 
To her iti. 8s. more 1 il. 8s. more 

2ti. 2s. . . . , 

To her in full of her fies . 

Hellin Garner 

Her fie is in the year 16ti. and her 

shoes 18 16. 
To her for her gown . 
To her cariar 2ti. more to her 3ti. 6 

Janit Robison 
To her in full of all her wages 

Margrat Ingles 

To her in full of all her wages 

Cloathes to the men. 
To James Carrins shoes 2ti. 18s. 
Cannei stokins and shoes 2ti. 

XOo* ■ • • • • 

To Carrins shoes 2ti. 18s. and 

cloathes makins 12s. 
For serges to them and yellow 

cloath per accumpts 
For hats to them 
For serg 7ti. 2d. Cannells frok 

2ti. 6. Carrins shoes 2ti. 2 
Cannels shoes Iti. 16s. Franks 

shoes Iti. 16s. 



4 18 
17 18 



6 


8 





5 


6 





12 








18 









5 16 





3 10 





61 12 





6 





11 10 





3 12 






124 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1700 



[Servants] 


[Scots] 


For cloath to servants at the 


£ s. d. 


Pa[r]liment^ 


16 


Georg Trumble 




His fie is in the year 22ti. 2 pairs 




shoes and stokins £26 and a 




few of bear 


18 


To him in mony 


5 


To him for shoes and stokins 


1 19 


To him a furlit of oats 


10 



331 16 6 

To John Wight for this year £40 40 



S. 371 16 6 



Edenburg, 1701. Servants cloathes. Deb: to Cash. 

To Francis Brummigham when he 

went away . . . . 20 

To Cannell and Carrins shoes . 3 18 
To a taylor 6s. skins to ther 

briches iti. 6s. taylor iti. 4s. . 2 16 
To account for stokins etc. payd 

Ms. Al)ercrumby . . . 8 

For a sword and belt to Georg 

Edger ..... 
For boots to Georg Edgar 
Octobr. For a hatt to Canell iti. 6s. for 

bonnits to the men 17s. 6d. . 
For pladin to Black 6s. 8d. 
For shoes to Isabel! Lamb iti. lis. 
For a coat and shirts to Tam 

Plendarlith . . . . 4 5 4 



3 


18 





5 


17 





2 


3 


6 





6 


8 


1 


11 






* At the Riding of the Parliament the members for the shires rode each 
accompanied by two footmen. See note p. 224. 



C70I] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 125 



Servants^ 


Scots] 


For linin to runing drawers 15s. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


makeing cloathes Iti. 18 


2 


13 





For stokins to Canell and runing 








2ti 


2 








For shoes to Georg Edgar . 


1 


16 





For briches to Cannell iti. 16s. for 








serg at 16s. 


4 


16 





For 17^ ells blew livery cloath at 


85 








For stuf to be a frok to George 








Edgar ..... 


2 








For threed .... 





6 


10 


For 19 days work of a taylour at 








4s. Georges coat 2ti. 8 . 


6 


8 





For silk and moolls . 


1 


10 





i: 


159 


5 


4 



Edenburgh, servents wages. Deb: to Cash 1701. 

Katharin Robison came to my 
service at Whitsunday 1700, 
her fie in the j^ear is £48 

July 8 To her 12 

August To her in England and when we 
went ther for goun rubans and 
2 shi. sterling more, goun 54ti. 
ruban 2ti. 18s. . . . 58 18 

This stuf taken to myself so could 
not be rekoned to her. 

Grisell Robisone came to me 
Mertimas 1700 her fie in the 
year is £24 
For perfiting her in sowing . 12 O 

James Carrin came to my service 
at Whitsunday 1699 his fie in 
the year is £24 



126 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1701 

[Servants] [Scots] 

I give him all his cloathes £ s. d. 
except linins 
May To him iti. 10s. To him 8!i. . 9 10 
To him when he came first home 

again . . . . . 8 

July 8 To him 14s. 6d. . . . 14 6 

To him of fie from Mertimas 1701 
in the year £30 
Decmr. To him . . , . . 3 5 

James Cannel cochman came to 

my service at Whitsunday 

1700 his fie in the year £36 
I give his all cloathes except 

linins 
May 



To him ..... 


86 


18 





To him 9s. ... . 





9 





Jean Boge came to my service, 








Martimas 1700, her fie and 








buntith is £22 16 








To her ..... 


1 


8 





For her shoes iti. 6s. To her 








iti. 5s. . 


2 


11 





To her ..... 


10 









Octor. 



Georg Edgare came to my ser- 
vice Lammas 1701, his fie is in 
fie the year £36 
August To him in England . . . 19 15 

Agnis Christy came back to my 

service at Lambis 1701, her 

fie and bountith in the year 

£22, 16s. 

Feb. To her Iti. 8s. To her iti. 18s. 6d. 

To her 14ti. . . . 17 6 6 



1704] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 127 



Servants^ 


[Scots] 


Georg Trumble barnman came 


£ s. d. 


to me Mertimas 1700, his fie 




stokins shoes in the year is £26. 




A furHt of bear 


18 


To him 12ti. a furht of bear 


12 19 


To him 2li. 10s. more 6ti. more 




14s. 6d. more 6s. 6d., Novr. 




22d. lOti 


19 6 6 



Hellin Garner came to me Marti- 

mas 1699, her fie and shoes is 

in the year £18 16. 
To her lii. 10s. To her Iti. 6s. 

To her 5li. 10s. quhich complits 8 6 



S. 234 14 6 



5 


16 





1 








2 








5 


17 





76 


4 





15 


12 






Edenburg, January 1704. Servants Wages. Deb: to cash. 

Katharin Robison 

May 20 To her 2 dollars 

To her ..... 

To her in March 

To her ..... 

To Francis Newton on her accumpt 
To Lapairl on her accumpt 

Grisell Robison came at Merti- 
mas 1703 ; her fie in the 
year, £24 
To her fie in full of all she can 

crave 24 

Margrate Carr, came to my ser- 
vice at Whitsunday 1703, her 
fie in the year is £20 
Janr. 20 To her £l lining her goun 8s. . 18 



128 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1704 

[Servants] [Scots] 

To Francy Newton on her ac- £ s. d. 

cumpt . . . . . 7 9 

To her by Katharin £3, 16s. 6d., 

more £4, 6s 8 2 6 

To stuf for a goun £15, 4s., more 

£2, 18s., more £2, 2s. 6d., 

£1, 13s 6 13 a 

Mary M'Intosh 

To her by Kat: £l, 14s. 6d. . 1 14 & 

To her in full of her fie . . 54 O 

Jean Cuningham came to my 
service at Christinmas 1703 
for chambermaid, her fie £18 
; her shoes in the year is 
£2 18 0. 
To Jean for 5 monthes service . 9 

Maorin Rule came to be cham- 
bermaid, Whitsunday 1704, 
her fie in the year £16, her 
shoes £18 18. 
To her £l, 10s. . . . 1 10 

James Carrin 



To him by Kat: for a pan, 4s. 


4 





To Isabell Ramsay on his ac- 






cumpt ..... 


2 8 





To him 5s. more £l, 9s. more 






£1, 9s. more £l, 9s. 


4 12 





Decmr. 7 To him ..... 


26 






Ms. Tulip came to waite on the 
childrin Martimas 1704, her 
wages is in the year £36 0, 
besids the expenc of bringing 
her. 



18 


15 





4 


8 








14 


6: 


5 


16 





2 








19 


5 


a 



1704] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 12» 

[Servants] [Scots] 

For cariing her eloathes £2, 6s. 

for some of the expene by the 

road she layd out herself, £2, 

more for her eloathes . . 8 10 O 

To cary her back £9, to her wages 

for 3 monthes 
For bringing her doun 

John Harla 

Janr. 15 To him 14s. 6d. 

August To him ..... 

Novr. 20 To Francy Newton on his account 

To his wife .... 

Novr. 24 To him by Kate: £l, 9s. more 

£1, 4s. more by her £2, £l, 10s. 6 3 

To Androw Lamb for this year . 
For a hat and 2 cravats to him . 

Dick Rule 

Feb. To him 2 dollers 

To him by Androw Lamb 

To him at Wooller . 

To Francy Newton on his accumpt 
Oct. To himself in sumer . 

Margrat Lamb 

To her fies for a year and a half . 
To her shoes .... 
Margrat Ross, came to keep 
howse at Mellerstean, Whit- 
sunday 1704, her fie in the 
year £20, shoes £22, 18. 
Oct. To her by Androw Lamb . 2 10 2 

To her for a years fie . . 20 8 

Georg Trumble 

For shoes to him £1, 16s. 6d. 

hose to him 9s. hose again 9s. . 2 14 6 
I 



13 6 


8 


2 14 





5 16 





3 10 





1 17 





5 2 





3 


a 


24 





4 10 






130 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1704 



[Servants] [Scots] 

Margrat Robison, came to £ s. d. 
wate on the childrin, Whit- 
sunday 1704, her fie in the 
year £66 13 4 

Novr. 1st To her 20 

Dito 20 To her 13 6 8 

Katharin Munro, came to serve 
as chamber[maid], Whitsun- 
day 1704, her fie in the year 
£20, her shoes £2, 16, £22, 16. 

To her, May 20 . . . 14 6 

To her, £l, lis., more 14s. 6d. 

10s 2 15 6 

Nany Christy came to my service 
as cook at Martimas 1704, her 
fie in the year is £20 and 
her shoes. 

To her ..... 

For 16 ell stuf at lOsh. per ell 
To her £1, 9s., payd James Miller 

taylor £l, 16s. 
To her £l, 9, more £l, 6 . 



11 





8 





3 5 





2 15 





>. 185 03 


6 



Edenburgh, January 1704. Servants cloathes. Deb: to Cash. 

To arle Margrat Robison . . 10 

To arle Margrat Ross, chamber- 
maid . . . . , 7 

To J. Miller taylor for mending 

servants cloathes . . . 2 10 

For Dicks briches making 8s. linin 

and pokets 13s. . . . 110 

For mending James Carrins 

cloathes . . . . 8 



i 



1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 131 

[Servants] [Scots] 

July 2d For makeing 2 suts cloathes to 

Dick and John 
Aug. 4th To one Devison upon a decriet 

gott against him . 
For hose to Dick, 12s. 6d. 

Dicks shoes £2 . . . 

For threed, silk, pokets 
To a taylor 15s. 10s. £3, lis. 6d. . 
Novr. 22 For stokins to Geordy Dods 18s. 

shoes to him, 2 pair one of them 

running ons at £l, 15 the other 

at ^^, os. .... 
For shoes to James Carrin 
For stokins to Geordy Dods 16s. 
For mending servants cloathes 
For making furniter to Dicks blew 

COo-L • • • • • 

For 4 ells cloath at 6s. 6d. per ell 

For 6 ells stuf 7s. per ell 

For 8| ell black serg at 13s. per ell 

For 4 ells serge 13s. per ell 

For hardne, stentin, etc. . 

For harden .... 



£ s. 


d. 


4 12 





3 





2 12 


6 


4 





4 16 


6 


18 





3 18 





2 8 





16 





3 





5 5 





15 12 





1 19 





5 10 





2 12 





1 15 





12 






S. 65 02 



[Servants' Wages, 1707] 

Mary Menzies ^ 
June 18 To her 2 years wages . . 200 

Margrat Ritchy 
June 10 To her a year and a halfs fie being 

all her time . . . . 63 

^ See p. xlvi. 



132 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1707 



[Servants] 

Grisell [sic] came to be chamber- 
maid June 17th, her fie in all 
is £20 a year. 

To her arls 3s. 

She entred not home but went 
to Ms. Monro. 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 



Mary Muir 

To her for shoes £l, 5s. 
Oct. 2 To her £2, 8s. for 2 pair shoes 

To her ..... 

To her shoes 3 pair by Androw 

Lamb .... 

Meg Mill 

For stuf to her goun 

For pack threed bodies £l, 9s. ane 

ell muslin 19s. 
For stentin and goun making 18s. 
June 5 To Meg Miln £l, 9s. for a suts 
haed cloathes 19s. 
For ane apron 18s. . 
June 10 For a plad to her 
July 2 To her, Tams wedin, 14s. 6d. 

Janit Kirk came to be cook, 
Martimas 1706, her fie in the 
year is £30. 

Feb. 26 To her 

May 15 To her for half a year . 

To James Carrin 

March 12 To him when he went back from 
Durhome 2 guinys and 15 sh. 

o LCX • • • • • • 

To James by Margrat £l, 9s. 
To him a guiny at 22s. lOd. ster. 



1 


5 





2 


8 





4 








3 


18 





9 


18 





2 


8 








18 





2 


8 








18 





11 











14 


6 



19 
13 11 



34 16 

19 

13 14 



1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 133 

[Servants] [Scots] 

To Isabell Ramsay on his account £ s. d. 
for musline . . . . 4 7 

To him a duson of servits for many 

he destroy'd . . . . 6 15 

To James for a key 6s. for glases 

he got the mony of . . 1 16 

July 2 To him, Tams wedin, 16s. 6d., for 

8 ell towils £2, 5 . . . 3 16 

To him, July 1708, £12, 18s. to 

him by Francy Newton £6 . 18 18 
Margrat Broun, came to be kook 
at Whitsunday 1707, her fie is 
£20 in the year and her shoes 
£1, 6s. in all £22, 12. 
To her for half a year . . 11 9 

To Isabell Brounlies for washing 

4s. pd. wringing 2 . . 19 

John Frazer, came to serve at 
Martimas 1706, his fie in the 
year is £36 0. 
Ap. To him £3, To him £33, for a year 36 



John Harla 

To him his fie for Whitsunday 

1707 

Sepmr. For a stone wooll payd John 
Wights widow for him . 
To him for shoes got from 

Androw Lamb 
To Alshy Blith on his account . 
Oct. 4 To him £3 to the marchand on his 
account £l 18 

AlisonBrounliesentred to service 
again at Whitsunday 1707. 



24 





5 12 





1 16 





18 





4 18 






134 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1707 



[Servants] [Scots] 

To her for ten day dightin £l 10 £ s. d. 

brewing 13s. . . . 2 3 

Oct. 4 To her in full of all . . . 8 



Geogre Dods 
Aug. To Will. Dickson for his childs 
boord ..... 

To Tarn Youll by Androw Lamb 
To James Ormston for threshing 
To James Carrine, January 1709 



18 








1 


3 


2 


12 








12 









S. 543 6 2 



Febr. 12 



June 10 



1707. Servants clothes 








For the rid clok dying 


2 








For shoes to G. Lamb 


1 


10 





For stokins to G. Lamb 


1 


2 





To an ell musline to Marie Muir . 





19 





For serg to line Jameses cloathes 








at 10s. per ell 


3 


15 





For shoes to Tarn Youll 


1 


16 





For shoes to Geordi Dods . 


1 


19 





For shoes to Geordie Lamb 


1 


10 





For makenig Geordie Lambs black 








cloathes .... 


2 


12 





For skins for pokets 7s. at 5s. 6d. 








per pice .... 


1 


18 


6 


For threed lis. butons lis. 4s. 


1 


6 





For shoes to Geordy Dods 


1 


14 





For shoes to Georg Lamb . 


1 


13 





For shoes to Georg Dods 2 hose 








£1, 3s. 2 . 


3 


3 


2 


For shoes to Nicoll Marchell 





10 





For stokins to Lam £l, 6s. 


1 








For blew hair and threed 


5 


6 






I7091 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



135 



[Servants' 


Scots 


)r wastcoat and drawers and 


£ s. d. 


runing briches to Dods . 


6 10 


)r butons threed and for Jameses 




C03;L • • « • • 


2 6 


)r mending the servants cloathes 


7 7 


)r mending boots 7s. 


7 


S. 


50 3 8 



Mellerstaine, January 1709. Servants wages. Deb: to Cash. 

May Minzies 

To her 100 

S. To her over and above her fie for 
her care of the bairens when 
they had the fever . . 333 6 8 



Betty Navell. At candlesmas last 
I ingag'd her for £36. 
June 29 To her ..... 
To her at Edinburgh 

Margrat Mill 



May 7 


To her £l, 


4s. . 


June 29 To her . 


• 






Bessi Clark 




To her £l, 


4s. . 




To her , 


• • 




To her . 


• • 




To her £3 





To her in full of her wages 



18 








12 








1 


4 





9 








1 


4 





2 


14 





6 








3 








11 









Nans Lindsay came at Martimas 
1708, her fie in the year £14 
and her shoes £16 8 0. 



130 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1709 



Servants] 


[Scots 




£ s. d. 


To her ..... 


14 


To her . . . . 


14 


To her ..... 


2 


To her in full of her fie pay'd by 




Adam Hutchison . 


12 



Grisell Wate came to be under 
cook Whitsunday 1709, her fie 
in the year £14 and shoes 
£16 8 0. 

George Mathy came to serve at 
Lambes 1709, his fie in the 
year is £36 
To him by Francis Newton . 1 10 

John Frazer 

To him at Edinburgh . . 12 

To him from his master at 

London by his account . 28 6 

To him for briches he bought at 

London . . . . 4 4 

He is fully pay'd 

Tam Youll, he was made coach- 
man at Whitsunday 1709. 
To him at John Shiels's . . 12 
To him for George Dods loss of 
work when drunk and lam'd his 
leg 7 4 

George Lamb 
For shirts to him . . . 3 12 

George Dods 
March 25 For a velvit cap he spoilt . 2 8 



J709] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



137 



[Servants] 

For 1 yeard and a half musline . 
For 6 cravats from James Lied- 

house ..... 
To him at several! times that he 

never gave account of . 

John Clark came to thresh in the 
barn at Martimas 1708, his 
fie in the year £20. 
To him pay'd by Will Halliwall . 
To him over and above his wage 
To Tam Youll for 10 days thresh- 
ing at 4s. per day . 

Androw Lamb, toun officer 

To him for a year 

To him by his officers land 



Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


3 


3 





3 


14 





2 


5 






20 
4 2 

2 



3 
36 



Oct. 22 



John Hope came to be garner 
Martimas last 1708, his wage 
in the year with a house to his 
wife is £48, and if he have 
not the house it is £60. 

To him a bed at £8 

To him .... 

To him £3, more £5, Is. 4d. 

To him .... 

To him .... 

In whole for this years fie 
being more then bargone. 



8 
12 16 

8 14 
15 

8 2 8 

52 00 



!Mellerstains, January 1709. Servants cloathes. Deb: to 

Cash. 



For 6 ells course white plain for 
briches at 6s. ... 



1 16 



138 


THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 


[170^ 




^Servants^ 


Scots 


• 




£ s. 


d. 




For dying the said eloath at 3 sh. 


18 







For hand bands to slives 


10 







For mending Tarn Youlls- boots 


14 





March 11 For shoes to Tarn Youll 


1 16 







For shoes to Geordy Dods £l 10, 








his sons 6s. . 


1 16 







For 5 ell hnin to Geordy Dods 








drawers £3, strings 2s. . 


3 2 







For 3 pairs stokins at £l 10 per 








pair ..... 


4 10 







For boots to George Mathy 


6 







For helping eloathes and altering 








Lambs eloathes pay'd A. B. 


2 







For shoes to Dods £l 10 . 


1 10 







For 20 ells linine for eloathes at 








7s. 6d. ..... 


7 10 







For shirts to George Lamb payd 








his mother .... 


3 







For 1 stone 4 lb. wight 








sorted wooll for a 








gray wab at £7 per 








stone of waild wooll 








is . . . £8 15 








For oyl to said web . 18 








For working the said .. 








wab 20 ells by John 








Muckle . . 3 


15 13 







For dressing the gray 








wab . . .300* 








For half a stone waild wooll for 








pladine to be hose at £7. 








£3 10 


3 10 







For working 12 ells of the pladine 








3d. per ell . 


1 16 







For shoes to Geordy Lamb 


1 14 







For 4 cravats to George Lamb at 








14s. . .■ . . . 


2 16 









I7I0] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



139 



[Servants^ 


Scots] 


For threed to sow the servants 


£ s. 


d. 


murnins .... 


16 





For pokets to them . 


1 8 





For buckerram threed button 






molds and to their murnins 


1 19 





For a hat to Tam Youll 


1 8 





For a hat and stokins to Wight . 


3 12 





For other necessarys for their 






cloathes .... 


1 10 





To a taylor 16s. pladine for hose 






£1 10s. . . . . 


2 2 





To Will Dickson taylor for make- 






ing their murnings 


1 10 





For threed .... 


14 





For pladin for hose 


1 10 





For dying yellow cloath 


6 


2 


S. 


77 6 


2 



Mellerstaines, January 1710. Servants wages. Deb: to cash. 



Sterlin 



May Minzies 






March 6th To her 10s. more £l . 


1 10 





To her ..... 


3 10 





To her ..... 


3 6 


8 


Betty Navell 
To her lOsh 


10 





The chair glas brecking of the 

drinkmony 
To her 


10 





Margrate Brown, came to be 






kook at Whitsunday 1709, 

her wage in the year is 2 10 0. 

To her 


1 05 





To her 2sh. more £2, lOsh. 


2 12 






£ 


s. 


d. 





4 








2 








2 








5 


6f 



140 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

Margrate Milne 

To her for shoes 
March 9 To her for shoes 

To her 2sh. .... 
To her fathers house rent White 
[sunday] 1710 
Ap. 12 To her 2sh. more by Androw 

Lamb £l . . . . 12 

To her which compleats her wages 

for 5 years time . . . 15 

Grisell Wate 

March 9 To her for shoes . . . 2 

To her 2sh. more by Androw 

Lamb £l . . . . 12 

To her for shoes 2sh. . . 2 

Jean Ridpath, came to take 
care of the fouls and swine, her 
wage in the year with her shoes 
at 2sh. sterling is (she came at 
Martimas 1709 year) 14 
. To her far shoes . . . 2 

To her 3d. more £5 Scots which is 

her wage for 5 month . . 8 7 

Alisone Brownlies, entred to 
serve in the kitchen, March 8, 
1710, her wage in the year 
is 13 4 

her shoes 4 
To her 10s. by An'd»-. more 17s. 4d 17 4 

Jean Glen, came to wash and 
spin at Whitsunday 1710, her 
wage is with shoes in the year 
1 10 8. 



I7I0] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 141 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
To her by Andrew, 4s. . . 4 

To her which compleats a years 

fie 16 8 



I 



George Mathy 

To him by his master at London 

£1, Os. 6d., more £l . . 2 6 

To Alshy Blyth for him Is. 2d. 

more 14s. 6d. more 17s. in full 

of all 1 12 8 



Thomas Cockburn came to be 
Mester Houshold, at White- 
smiday 1710, his wages is in 
the year 4 0. 
To him his wages for half a year . 2 
j Novr. 12 To his wages for half a year longer 

at £5 a year . . . . 2 10 

John Hope 

To his house rent, this besids his 

£4 of fie 
Ap. 3 To him 5sh. .... 
To him for Pringles shoes 
To him by corn from Widow 

Wight . . . . 2 16 8 

To him a stone wooll at 6s. 8, 

more Ssh. . . . . 14 8 

To him which clears his wages 

from Martimas 1709 till Marti- 

mas 1710, etc. . . . 10 

Tam YouU 

To him by his brothers oats . 2 13 4 
To hime by Androw Lamb . 11 8 

To him by Meg Hendersons bear 16 8 






11 


1-2- 





5 








2 


10 



142 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

Rob: Wight came to be bred £ s. d. 
buttler at Martimas 1709. 
For learning him to shave at 

Edinburgh . . . . 116 

George Dods 

To him in Edinburgh . . 6 

To him payd Will: Hutchison . 3 7 



John Clark 

To him of oats at £8 Scots 3 fous 

3 pecks .... 

To him a boll bear from Widow 

Wight . . . 

To him by the tenants in the 

Mains corn and mony 
To Tarn Youll of lott as it came to 

15sh. bear, 13sh. 4d. oats, 15sh. 

Tjcd'S • • • • • 

To a porter at Grisies mariage . 
To a cook and two men 
To Robert Manderston £l, IDs., 
Roberton Master Houshold 
£1, Is. 6d 



Androw Lamb 

To his expences in Jan^ and Feb'*. 2 6 
July 6 To his expences Is. 4d. more 8d. 

and 8d 2 8 

To him his wages this year . 3 

To a cook at Edinburgh caled 

Margrat Wabster . . . 3 6 

S. 54 4 7i% 



10 





16 


8 


19 





1 14 





5 

1 11 



6 


2 11 


6 



I7I0] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 143 



Mellerstaines, January 1710. Servants cloathes. Deb: to 

Cash. 

[Servants] 
For cloathes, etc. for Rob: Wight 

ridin coat .... 
For makeing Robert Wights rid- 
ing coat . . . . 
For a frock to Wight 
Ap. 8 For 4 pair shoes to George Dods 
For Rob: Wights riding coat 
For threed Ish. 8d. 
For shoes to Rob: Wight . 
For shoes to Tarn Youll 
To James Watson for makeins 

mens cloathes 
For 12 ounces threed 

For 21 ell plain for blew cloath at 

71 

For a chopin of oyl for livera 

wooll ..... 
For 2 1 ston wooll for levera 

cloath and linine ; this wooll 

wa,s all sorted and clean wail'd 
For butter 5s. [buttons ?] . 
For 42 ells six quarters cloath 

working at 3d. per ell, J: M: 
For 21 ell lining ell broad at ld.| 

working .... 

For shoes to Robie Wight 
For shoes to Tam Youll . 
For shoes to Tam Youll, Geordy 

Dods, and Rob: Wight . 
For 2 hats to Tam Youll and 

Geordy Dods 
For dresing a hat to George 

Mathy .... 

For galoun to the hats Ssh. 9d. . 



Sterling] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


9 








2 








12 








10 





1 


10 








1 


8 





2 








2 


6 





3 








1 


11 





13 


n 








10 


1 


5 








5 








10 


6 





2 


7i 





2 








2 


6 





9 








8 








1 








8 


9 



144 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Servants] 
For stokins to Rob. Wight, Tarn 

Youll, Geo: Dods . 
For stokins to Rob: Wight 
For a hat to Rob. 2s. 6d. Dods 

Is. Id. .... 
For shoes to Rob. 2s. 8d. shoes to 

Geordy Dods shoes 3sh. 
Decmr. For boots to Tarn Youll cochman 
For shoes to James Kilpatrick . 
For a hatt and galune to Wight . 
For galuns and tracing to the rest 

of the servants to finish them 
Aug. 16 For Robie Wight cloathes and 

furnishone .... 
For makeing and furnishing 

Wights cloathes 
For stokins shoes and buckles to 

Wight .... 
For linins to Wight, Youll and 

Dods .... 
For stokins to Dods and Youll 
For 4 ells bustin for Dods's runing 

wastcoat 3s. 4d. strings and 

threed 9 . . . 

For furniture for cloathes from 

Cha: Ormston 



Sterling] 

L £ s. d. 

7 6 

16 


» 




3 7 


> 







5 8 

10 

2 4 

9 




[ 


2 


L 

2 








6 6 





6 

1 


1 




1 

4 6 

5 6 

i 





1 

4 1 





10 6 


S. 16 


01 1 



Account of Servants wages 1713. 

May Minzies 
To her . . .£100 

Margrat Finla 
Edn. To her 6s. 8d. more 

from my doughter 5s. 11 8 



1 713] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 145 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

Edn. To her 5s., 2s. 6d., 9s. £ s. d. 

lOd. . . . 16 10 

To her in full of her 

wages . . 2 9 10 3 18 4 



Ann Bell came to waah 








and spine at Marts 








1712 her wage in the 








year with 2s. each 








half year for shoes 








is 1 14 








To her 2s. more 2s. 





4 





To her a chist . 





8 


7 


To her in full of her 








wages 


1 


19 


9 



2 12 4 



Alison Brunfield came 

to be chamber Maid 

Whit. 1713 her wage 

with shoes in the 

year is 1 14 

To her wages for half a 

year . . . 17 17 

Peggy Johnston came 

at Whitesunday 1713 

her wage in the year 

is 1 16 

To her wages for half a 

year . . . 1 16 1 16 

Dorathy Gilroy came to 

be Kitchen Maid at 

White 1713 her wage 

in the year is 50s. fie 

and drinkmony 
To Dolly wages for 

half a year . . 13 13 

K 



146 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1713 



[Servants] 
To Dolly Cook Maid a 
quarters wages and 
cariage . . 18 







Thomas YouU Coachman ^ 
To his wife when they 

were sick . .050 

To his Lambes Rent 

1712 . . . 15 
febr. 2d To him at Edn Decmr. 

last . . .040 

To his Candls Rent 

1713 . . . 15 
July 28 To him 3s. more 5s. to 

Docter Gibson l£ 
Is. 6d. . . .19 6 

To his Lambis Rent 
15s. 2^%d. 1713 
shoes 3s., 2s. 6d., 2s. 
6d. . . .33 



2 6 

^T2 



2t^ 



23% 



Will Brounlees came 

to be footman at 

Marts 1712 his years 

wages for stokins 

shoes and alltogether 

is 2 10 

To him for shoes 3s. 

stokins 2s. 3d. .053 
To him in full and for 

other work for \ 

year . . . 1 13 4 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 

18 



4 11 7 



1 18 7 



John Hume 
March To him 6 bolls oats 
11 Lithgow measure at 

^ The items here entered against Thomas Youll are included in the fuller 
statement on p. 148. 



I7I3] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



147 



Servants] 




Sterling] 


4£ 2 bolls Bear alto- 




£ s. d. 


gether comes to 32£ 






4d. . . . 2 13 


8 




To him of his wages 16 


8 




To him a ston 4 lb. 






wooll . . .09 


7 


7 16 10 


July 20 To him 13s. 9d., 8s. to 






him 2£ . . 3 11 


9 




To his House rent . 15 








July 15 



John Clark entred at Marts 

1712 His wages in 

the year is 2 
To him payd over and 

above his account of 

days work . .10 

To him for 4 bolls oats 

and two ston Meall 1 15 
To him 2s. . .020 



2 17 



Androw Lamb 



To the officers land . 

To Matha Blacks land 

Tame YouU came to 
be barnman Whit 
1713 his wage is in 
the year 50s., and 
hose and shose each 
half year. 

To him 10s. more. 













3 



Thomas Youll came to be footman White 
1713 his wage is 2£ 
and for stokins and 
shos 10s. in the 
year in all 2 10 
To him stokins 2s. 



148 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1713 



Servants] 
shoes 3s. more 3s. 








Sterling' 
£ s. d. 


more 3s. 





11 









To him Is. 2d. 





1 


2 


12 


2 


To Barbry Hardy for 
hay working 16 
days 

To a washer 6d. more 





5 





5 





18d. . 





2 





2 





Tarn Youll Barnman 












has gote of late 
Crop 
1712 4 bolls oats at 


1 


12 


8 






4£ 12s. Scots 4 fows 












more a boll 4 fous 












bear at 7£ Scots . 


1 


1 




s. 


2 13 


8 




23 16 


10 



Thomas Youlls Account ^ 



For wages from A^Tiite 
1706 to White 1709 

1707 To him by Androw 

Lamb 

1708 To him by Androw 

Lamb 
To him by corn and 

SuFd' • • • 

1709 To him by John Shiels 
To him by lose of 

Dods services and his 

own drinking . 
To him 
For wages at 2£ from 

Whit 1709 till Whit 

1712 



4 10 



6 



2 

1 13 4 

9 6 
10 



10 
2 



* This statement of accounting with Thomas Youll is written on a separate 
piece of paper pinned into the Account Book. 



1713] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 149 



irio 



1711 



1713 



[Servants] 


[Sterling" 


To him by Andrew 


£ s. 


d. 


Lamb 


11 


8 


To him by Androw 






Lamb Henderson 


16 


8 


To him by his brothers 






corns at several! time 






and allow pat: in his 






rent 


6 10 





To him 


1 





To the Lambes Rent 






1711 . . 


15 


(j 


To him for drinking at 






Makerston, etc. 


10 





To George Dods for 






him 


13 


8 


To the Docter l£ Is. 6 


•. 




his wife 5 drogs 10 . 


1 16 


6 


For wages at 2£ 10s. 






from Whit. 1712 till 






Marts. 1714 . .65 







To him 3s., 5s., 3s., 2s. 






6d., 2s. 6d. 


6 16 





To him at Edn 4s. 3s. 






4d. R D 2s. 6d. 


9 


10 


To him 3s. 6d. more 3s. 


6 


6 


To the Ferrier of horse 






hire ... 


2 





By his rent for 3 year at 






Lambs 1714 . 


4 11 


3 


16 15 


23 15 


1t% 


ballance over pay'd . 7 15 


1 <> 





Account of Expence of Servants Cloathes 1713. 

To Alison Brunfield of Arls . 6 

To Dolly kilray of Arls and bring- 
ing her home. . ... . 2 



150 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1713 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

For going Whissen bank May £ s. d. 

Minzies and Androw Lambs 

expence with one horse . 2 9 

bringing home bella 2s. 2d. 

James young arls 6d. . . 2 8 

For bustine to make oat a wast- 

eoat at lid. . . . 2 2| 

For brew hair 6d. pr ounce and 

threed 6: . . . . 2 

For 15 ell Gray working six 

quarter broad at 3d. . . 3 9 

For 8 ells Bustine for runing 

cloathes . . . . 9 

For arls to wemen Is. . .010 

For working 15 yeards gray at 3d. 

pr yd 3 9 

To spotswood taylor for mending 

cloathes . . . . 2 



£1 11 7^ 



Mellerstaine, Janry 1714. Account of Servants wages. 

May Minzies 

Ap. 24 To her . . .10 

June To her . . .10 

For dying her goun .070 

To her . . .10 3 7 

Fanny Bell Entred at 

White 1714 to be 

House keeper her 

wage in the year is 

£ s. d. 

5 

To her . . .200 200 



I7I4] 



I 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 151 


[Servants" 


"Sterling" 


Jeany Forsieth Entred 


£ s. d. 


at Marts 1713 to be 




chamber Maid her 




wage in the year is 




£ s. d. 




2 




To her half a years 




wages . .10 


10 



Katharin Kenady En- 
tred at White 1714 
to be chamber Maid 
her wages in the year 
is 2 

To her for half a year 10 10 

Katharine Heart En- 
tred to be Landry 
Maid and washer at 
White: 1714 her 
wage in the year is 
34s. and 4d. and 
her two pairs shoes 
at 2s. a pair . . 1 18 4 

Isabella Rickelton en- 
tred to wash and 
Milk cow at Marti- 
mas 1713 her wage 
in the year is with her 
shoes at 2s. 1 10 8 

To her 2s. lj%. 

To her in full for a year 1 10 8 ] 10 8 

Bella Robison entred 
to be under Cook at 
Marts 1713 her wage 
in the year is 

2 



152 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1714 



Janr, 



Servants' 






[Steriing" 


To her 5s. more 2s. 






£ s. d. 


6d. more 5s. one s 








to her . . .0 


13 


6 




For stuff to her goun 1 










To her linin to it 2s. 








6d. makemg Is. 8d. 


4 


2 




For two Aprons James 








Liedhouse . . 


3 







For changeing a plate 


1 


6 


2 2 2 



Peggie Sharp entred 

to be under cook at 

July 8 her wage in 

the year is 1 10 
To her for half a year 15 15 

To the Nurs 3s. 4d. 

more 3s. 4d. . .068 

To her 6 bolls oats at 

5£ 16s. 8d. . .360 3 12 8 



Janr, 



Alexander Hume En- 








tred at White 1713 








to be Butler his 








wages in the year is 








2 








To him . 


1 








To him for boots 





10 





To him for cheno and 








other things he 








brock . 





10 






2 



Octr. 



James Grieve Entred 
at Marts 1713 to be 
Butler his wage in 
year is 2£ but if he 
pleases me it is to be 
3£ 3 

To him . . .1 







10 



I 



1714] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 153 

k [Servants] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
Thomas Youll Coachman 

»To the fferriers ac- 
count l£ 10 a horse 
hire to the coch when 
the Mare was spoilt 
10 . .200 

To him for shoes 3s. 
4d. from R D 2s. 
6d. . . . 5 10 

Candles rent 1714 
Lamb rent 1714 

1£ 10s. 5d. . . 1 10 5 3 16 3 

May 15 he is over payd at 
White 1714 5£ 19 
Id. 
June 3 To him 3s. 6d. more 3s. 

John Hume Garner 
To him 5s., 2s., more 

10s. ston wooll 8s. 1 5 
To him in full of his 

wages at Marts 1714 2 6 8 
For his bbolls oats and 



2 bolls bear Lithgow 



measure . . 2 


13 


4 


For his House Rent 


15 





For his Cows meatt 






and grase. 






John Clark 






To him shoes 3s. 2d. 






Meal 2s. 5d. more 






2s. Id., 15s. 4d. . 1 


3 





Androw Lamb his ex- 






pences at fairs 2s. 






more 3s. . .0 


5 






7 



154 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1714 



July 14 



[Servants' 


[Sterling] 


To Andrew Lamb for 


£ s. d. 


his land . .300 




To Dick . . .068 


4 14 8 


Thom Youll footman 




To Tom 3s. 6d. .036 




To him 5s. more 2s. 




more 6d more 3s. 




6d. . . . 11 6 




To him 3s. . .036 




To him which pays him 




for a year and a half 2 6 


3 4 & 



To Tamas Youll the 
Banmian a years 
wages payd him at 
Whitsunday 1714 

Thomas Bell Entred 
at White 1714 to be 
Banmian his wage 
in the year is three 
pound and two pair 
shoes and 2 pr stok- 
ins 10 . 3 10 

To him 5s. to him his 
whole fees for 6 
monethes 

To 5d. men for going 
errands thresing etc. 
for a year 

To Meg Henderson 
two Aprons 3s. shoe 
2s. 2d. . 

To her 2s. and to 
Barbry Hardy for 
her Is. more in full 



14 2 



14 2 



2 17 4 



1 15 a 



1 18 4 



28 6 1 



£ 


s. 


d. 





10 








1 








2 






1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 155 

[Servants] 

Account of Servants Cloathes and other expences 1714. 

[Sterling] 

For a pair boots to Sandy Hume 
To Fanny Bells Arls Is. 
Ap. 14 To Liedhouse for threed last year 
Ap. 26 To Alexander Blyth for makeing 

and mending cloathes to this 

day haveing cleard accounts 

with him . . . . 8 6 

For cariing Jean Forsyth and her 

trunk from Newcastle . . 12 6 

For bring Fanny Bell out of toun 

Is. bringing Katharin heart 2s. 3 
For bringing Katharin Kenady 

from Berwick Is. . . 10 

For bringing Pegie Sharp from 

Berwick . . . . 10 



1 19 



London, January 1715. Servants wages. 

May Minzies 
To her 116 

April] To her which compleats all her 

wages till Lambes last 1714 . 19 11 6 
Aug. 26 To her l£ lOsh. Decmr. 2 to her 

2£ 3s. . . . . 3 13 

Katharin Hearts wages I highted 
when I came to London from 
Candles 1715 to .300 
March 8 To her . . . . 1 12 

Aug. 26 To her 116 

Jean Housnem came to be Cook 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 


1 




7 
2 

8 


4 
6 




156 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Servants] 

the 16 day of Dcemr 1714 her 

wage in the year is £8. 
To her for 2 Monethes caried away 

by constables 
To Marie Swan cook for a week . 
To Hana Stivens cook 

Sara Lies came to be Chamber 
Maid the 21 Decmr. 1714 her 
wage in the year is £4 

1715 

Janr. 11. To her for 3 weeks wages . 5 

Hellen Williams came to be 

Housemaid the 12 her wage in 

the year is . .£400 

For a mug 2 more for 6 weeks 

6s. 2d. 
Aug. 26 For constables and cariing befor a 

justice of peace 8s. 2d. . . 16 4 

' Ann Frazer came to be chamber 
maid the 22d febr. her wage in 
the year was .300 

Aug. 26 To her for a fourtnights wages 3 

weeks more . . . . 7 6 

Sara Thrift came to be Housemaid 
the 10 of March her wage in the 
year is . . £4 

To her for a week . . . 2 

Ap. 8 To Doraty house made for a week 17 

Lattes Hall entered to be Cook 
the 26 of March her wage in the 
year is . 8£ 

To her for a moneth wages 

13s. 4d 13 8 



1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 157 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

To Winifrid Rollands for a £ s. d. 

monethes wages. . . . 16 8 

Aug. 26 Katharin Loid came home for one 

night only 
Sep. 18 Amee cook a day . . . 2 6 

John Baillie came to 

be Jerriswoods ser- 
vant at White 1714 

his wages in the 

year is £5 
11715 
[Janur. 11 To him half a years 

wages ... 2 10 

May 1 To him in full of his 

wages . . 2 10 

Thomas Hewie came 

in John Baillies 

place his wage 

4£ 
To him for half a year 

tho he was only 

from 6 May till 28 

Sepr ... 200 

James Grives wages I 

highted after I came 

to London at 

Candles 1715 to (in 

the year) £4 
Aug. 26 For a Mug Is. a fork 

lOsh. . 
I highted James 

wages at Lambes 

1715 to £5 

Tam youls is to con- 
tinue at in the year 
£3. 



158 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

To his wifes Candles £ s. d. 

rent 1715 . . 15 2A 

To her Lambes rent 

1715 . . . 15 2^4^^ 

Aug. 26 For plewing his land 

this year . . 18 10 

2 9 1 



Betty cook 

for a moneth . 10 6 

Aug. 17 To her for days wages 8 18 6 

Jean Forsith entred to 

be house Maid at 

Whitsunday 1715 

her wage in the 

year is £3 
Aug. 26 To her a pair shoes .046 
To her . . .116 

To her fraught come- 

ing up beside her wages 10 
To her in full of 11 

moneths wages at 

4£ a year . .200 3 16 

Nelly Ormand came 

to be Cook on the 

17 August her wage 

in ye year £5 
To her for 6 moneths 2 10 2 10 

Robert Anderson came 

to be Jerriswoods 

footman Sepr. 28 

his wage in the year 

with Liverras is £5 
he furnishes shoes and 

stokins — stayd a 

week. 



1715] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



159 



[Servants] 
George Midcalf came 
to be footman Octo- 
ber 1715 his 
wages in the year 
without stokens and 
shoes is 5 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 



S. £48 16 2 



To Hellen Williams arls 

For a Big coat to Tam Youll lined 

and brass buttons 
For a Big lin'd Coachmans Coat . 
For a hatt and laceing two with 

old lace I had by me 
Ap. 20 For a blew coat to Tames Youll 
May 28 For 4 pair Stokins to the Liverras 
For shoes to Tam youll 
For dresing and cuting two hats 
For a sute Liveras to James Grive 

at 4£ lOsh. .... 
For a big Blew coat to James 

Grive ..... 
For a sute Liverras to Thomas 

Hardy and a big coat 
For a coate to the coachmas 

Nicolles .... 

For a wastcoat and briches to 

make Tam youll a full sute 
To Robert Anderson arls to be 

Jerriswoods footman 
Aug. 26 For gold lace to two hats 
Sep. 18 For shoes to Tam youll 

For a hat to George Midcalf 8s. 

lace to it 3s. ... 









6 


2 


5 





2 


10 








6 





2 


5 








14 








4 








2 


6 


4 


10 





2 


10 





7 








1 


10 





2 


5 








1 








17 


2 





4 


6 





11 






160 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Servants] [Sterling] 
For a pair plushes and with £ s. d. 

shambo briches to George . 16 
For a pair of shoes to Tarn youll . 4 6 



S. £28 16 2 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of Servants 

wages. 

May Minzies 

To Mr. Hambly for a piece of 

chints . . . . .600 

To her at Lambes 1717 in full of 

all wages . . . . 4 15 6 

Katharine Heart 
I highted her wages at Whit 1717 

to ... 5 

To her full and compleat payment 

at White 1717 . . . 5 16 2 

Katharin Lasell came to be cham- 
ber Maid to my doughters the 
day of her wages 

in the year is .500 12 6 

She stayd 6 weeks . . . 12 6 

Mary Pen came to be chamber- 
maid her wage in the year is 

6 
June 2d To her l£ Is. 6d. returned 6s. 6d. 

pay her for six weeks . . 15 

Katharin Kenady came to be 
House Maid the 23 day of Janr. 
her wage in the year is 

4 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 161 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

I highted her wages at Lambes £ s. d. 

1717 to . . 4 10 
To her when she was in Scot- 
land 2 12 

To her compleat wages at Marts 

1717 13 

Jean Dickson came to be cook the 

1st febr. her wage in the year is 

8 
To her a moneths wages for a 

fourtnight . . . . 13 4 

Pegie came to be cook 

the 18 day of febr. her wage in 

the year is . .600 

She stayd only a night. 

Betty was cook from 20 feb. 
to 
To her 10 sh., more 10s. more for 

10 weeks 8 lOd. . . . 1 8 10 

Ann Phillips entred to be cook 

Wedensday the 24 Aprill her 

wages in the year .700 
To her in full for 2 monethes and 

2 weeks at 8£ a year . . 1 13 6 

Ann Griffeth came to be cook the 

9 July her wages in the year is 

7£ and 8 if she dos well 

8 
To her 7 Moneth and 3 weeks at 

3s. 4d. a week . . . 5 3 4 

James Grieve 
To him full payment of all wages 

at Martimas 1717 . . 14 19 7 

L 



£ s. 


d. 


12 





9 12 





2 5 






162 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Servants] [Sterling] 

John Hume Garner at Mellerstaine 

To him three years wages at 

Martimas 1717 
To him 18 bolls oats and 6 bols 

bear Lithgow measure at 8sh. 

pr boll for sd 3 years 
To his house rent 3 years at 15 
To his cows grase and fother in 

winter. 

James Park came to be footmas 
13 febr. his wages without shoes 
and stokens is 5 

Thomas Youll 
To him the Candles and Lambs 

1716 and 1717 rent . . 3 10 10 

For Plewing his Land the sd 2 

years . . . . . 1 17 8 

George Divison entered footman 
his wages in the year 

is . . . 4 10 

June To him 5s. in full of his wages for 

8 moneth more . . . 3 

To Androw Lamb 3 years rent 
Lambs 1715 16 and 1717 his 
being 2£ Matha blacks l£ 2s. 

8^^—9£, 8 Ij^ . .98 I3.J 



(j 



Dorathy Hunter came at the end 
of Aug: 1717 to be my Grisies 
Maid her wages in the year is 

5 
octr. To her by Francy Newtons ac- 
count . . . . 6 14 4j^J 



I7I7] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



163 



[Servants] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

To her by Mrs. Wisharts account 6 

To Babie Robison for sowing at 

half a crown a week . . 1 12 3 

febr. 11 For a woman to wash Is. to scour 

2 days 2s 3 

For washing Is. Is. Is. Is. Is. Is. 

2s. 6d. Is. Is. Is. Is. Is. . . 13 6 

For scoiuring Is. Is. 6d. . . 2 6 



S. £96 6 9lf 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of Servants cloathes. 

For stokins to Tam 3s. . . 3 

For mending Tam youls Cloathes 5 3 

For 6 duson brass buttons at 18 . 9 

For 9 dusone small at 9d. . 6 9 

For a pair gloves for Park . 16 

^larchs For 3 hats to the servants 15s. 

lace to them 10s. 4d. . . 15 4 

For cloath to servants at 8sh. 2 

biff coats and sute cloathes . ^ ^ . 

- 6 5 4 
The serge linin at 20d. big butons 

as above for one coat 
To Pringle the Taylor for makeing 

the sute at rates agreed on . 3 12 

For a pair hose to Tam . . 3 1 

For a pair shoes to Tam . . 4 

For a hat and galoun to George 

5s. 4s. . . . . . 9 

For 4 pr scarlite stokens to the 

servants 5s. on at 6s. 6d. . 116 

For Tams shoes 18d. . . 16 

For I cloath for Georges Briches 

5s. 5d. . . . . .055 



164 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1717 



[Servants] 
For shoes to James Park 4s. shoes 

to George 4s. 
For dresing a hat 
For a pair boots to James Park 

XXo* • • • • • 

For 7 duson guilt bras buttons for 

2 coats at 2s. pr du. 
For nin duson waistcoat buttons 

3X/ x sn« • ■ • • 

For a goun to Tarns doughter 
For stokens to Tam youll . 
For ane Apron to Nans Haliwall . 
For a Blew Ridincoat to Will Mc 
Aug. For cariing Dol Hunters cloaths, 

\Z l/v^ ■ • • • • • 

For boots to George which he lost 



[Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





8 








1 








11 








14 








9 





1 


4 








4 


6 





5 


5 


1 


14 


10 





11 








4 


6 



S. £23 9 11 



Deburst for Houshold furnitur 1693. 



table, 



1693 

Aprl 22d To William Scott for a 

stands and glas 

May 20. For a sut Aras hangins of 14 ells 

in 3 pices .... 

For puther from Mrs. Hervie 

Ditto For sevarall othar things to the 

howss that stands in ane other 

book ..... 

For furniture betwixt Oct' 12 

1693 and May 12, 1694 . 
For bed bolster and cods . 
For drinking glases . 
1694 To Penman, goldsmith, for work 
as per account and recept 



[Scots] 



60 



96 
39 




4 








88 18 



. 304 








22 


2 





11 


6 





40 









1693] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



165 



[Furnishings] 



[Scots] 







£ 


s. 


d. 




For furnitur to my green bed, etc. 


169 


19 







For dornick .... 


24 


12 





Jun. 20 


For a washing ruber . 





9 





Ditto 


For bottles .... 


57 


12 





Aug. 


For dornick at Inerkithin 12lb. 3d. 










X/L ••■••• 


124 


12 







For liting my coper culrd stuf , etc. 


28 


1 





Ditto 26 


For 2 ston lint 


10 










For linin for shits 


9 


8 





Oct. 


For the litle long folding table 


4 


4 







For the rond table . 


3 


10 







For 6 Holland codwars 


6 










For a bast to a bed . 


17 










For 4 spinell yerin . 


4 


4 





Novr. 


For a lint whille 3lb. 10 earthin 










pots 6s. .... 


3 


16 







For 5 duble preses for books at 










13lb. p. pice, cohering 7lb. 


72 










For bakets seals and 3lb. helping 










the screwtor 18s, . 


13 


18 







For a wanscot chist of drawers . 


16 










For lint spining for shits 6 slips in 










the pound 14s. p. lb. 










For cariing the Lady Laws chist . 


1 


10 





1695 


For stript crap for window 








March 12 


courtins at 8s. 6d. per ell 


4 


8 







To 24 ells linin for shits 


15 


12 





May 30 


For a bason 4, for 6 puther 










spoones lib. 4s. . 


1 


8 







For 5 glases 2lb. 6s. a lid to a 










stand 14s. .... 


3 


10 







For a washing tub 12s. a ruber 8s. 










a glas 14d. jacolit stick lOd. . 


2 


14 





July 


For polishing my drawers 18s. 





18 







For 6 lame plats for milk . 


1 


16 







For a key to the closit 8, a 










poranger 4s. . 





12 






166 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695 



[Furnishings] [Scots] 

For a gross bottels from Georg £ s. d. 

Lason at 2lb. pr duson . . 24 

For 36 pint bottles . . . 19 16 
For a pott 14s. a ston lint for shits 

101b 10 14 

For working crap for curtins . 6 10 

S. 1310 14 



Deburst for houshold furnitur 1696. 

January For 2 ston of lint to the toun of [Scots] 

Mellerstens . . . . 11 18 
To a pairt of payment for linin 

working . . . . 4 7 
20 For a ladle 3s. a flamer 4s. caps 3s. 

washen brush 6s. . . . 16 

For a shovell 14, skull 6s. . . 10 
For 6 drinking glases 3ft. 2 

chamer pots Ifb. 7s. . . 3 7 

For tikin to bed and bolster . 2 16 

For buttons for codwars . . 19 

For a water stoup w* yron girths 18 

Aprill For a posit dish . . . 14 

For drinking glases . . . 7 4 
For setting a fixt bed in the 

nursary . . . . 2 18 

For 2 pair shits 4lfe. hnin 14s. . 4 14 
For linin working 5 quarters brod 

at 3s. 4d. per ell. 

For ane yron draping pan . . 3 14 
May 1st For a pair linin and woolan 

blanckets . . . . 8 16 

For scuring 3 piece Arass hangins 2 2 

For 6 Dutch wand chiers . . 19 16 
For 54 ells hair plush at 3 ft. 8 per 

ell for hangins . . . 183 6 



i6q7] of lady GRISELL BAILLIE 167 

[Furnishings] [Scots] 

To Pringle for litting the scarlit £ s. d. 

crap, etc. . . . . 15 

Jun. 18 For rubers hard and washing . 18 

For the Japan table stands and 

glas 120 

For 6 chairs at 16sh. the pice . 49 12 
For a fring to the plush hangins 

2 lb. 7s. cover to Japan table . 5 7 

For bliching 43 ells linin at 2s. 6d. 

the ell 5 8 

July 19 For tikin to a bed 9 ells . . 6 15 

For a Dutch basket for my 

cloathes . . . . 3 

For a hather brush 3s. 6d. . . 3 6 

For making 6 cuchines at lis. pice. 

linnin to one of them . . 3 16 

Decmr. For 6 water glases . . . 3 

To Carr, goldsmith for 6 spons 

6 forks, etc. per recept . . 100 

To put the blads in the silver 

knives . . . . 

For a bast to the door 
For 68 ells cours dornick working 

bliching, etc. 



2 2 





12 





ig 




8 14 





S. 600 16 


6 



Deburst for howshold furniture 1697. 

Agust 1st To Carr goldsmith the remains of [Scots] 

ane acount . . . . 012 00 00 



For a lame bason 

For bustin the big chair 

For a clogbag lock 

For a fish pan . 

For puting a blad in a knif 



000 14 00 
000 14 00 
000 04 00 
000 07 00 
000 12 00 



168 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1697 



Ditto 



Septm. 



[Furnishings] 


Scots] 


For sives and riddels at Meller- 


£ s. d. 


SLv^cxllS • • • • • 


002 02 00 


For a fathirbed bolster and 2 cods 


042 00 00 


For a bason 4s. 6d. 4 glases iti. 16 


002 00 06 


For the shoe yron 10s. a lock 




mending and key to a trunk 


001 00 00 


For a cover to the green chair 


4 ell at 2ti. per ell 


004 00 00 


For scuring 5 pice of Arrass 




hangings .... 


003 04 00 


For 2 milk basons at 10s. and 14s. 




3 caps at 18sh. 


002 02 00 


For a rimin dish 2s. milsy 2s. 




bason 7sh. .... 


000 11 00 


For 6 knives with horn hefts 


001 16 00 


For a lame chamber pot 13 : 




2 rid ons and a dry stool 


001 04 00 


For a harth buson 12 a busom for 




hangins 11 . 


001 03 00 


For a gros of chapin and a gros 




muchkin bottels 


036 00 00 


For a bed bolster and 2 cods 


016 00 00 


For werping and sowing my 




holland .... 


001 00 00 


For working my holland 43 ells 




12s. per ell and drinkmony 


026 10 00 


For 5 hesps mor yerin to the 




holland at iti. 10 the spinill . 


001 17 00 


For a clogbag lock 


000 05 00 


To Thomas Carr goldsmith 6 




ounces silver 


019 04 00 


For 6 ells scarlit crap to my bed 




at 24 s.per ell . . . 


007 04 00 


To Robert Hadden for munting 




it 6ti. 16, a big cushin 2ti. 


008 16 00 


To the timer of the bed 15ti., 




rops 2ti. .... 


017 00 00 


To the rods of the bed 4ti. 4ti. 


008 00 00 



-T703] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



169 



[Furnishings] 


Scots] 


To stentin silk and threed and 


£ s. d. 


LdflvlLo • • * • • 


007 00 00 


To 3 cut Vinis glases 


012 13 00 


To 4| ells Damask table cloath, 




30| ells Damask servits. 




To table cloathes at per ell, 




the servits at 




For 25 ft. tow .... 


010 08 00 


For 4 pair of linin shits 


041 12 00 


For 4 pair shits at 5ti. 10 . 


022 00 00 


For a pair old shits . 


004 04 00 


For seals and 2 pound wight 


004 06 00 


For 3 carpit cushins 4ti. 10s., a 




chamber box. 


005 12 00 


The timber of a bed with rods . 


006 00 00 


To John Hancha for tables and 




timer work per acount and 




recept ..... 


027 04 00 


To Ms. Henry for pother as per 




recept ..... 


018 06 00 




377 14 


For plode [? plade] to Mr. Johnston 


167 12 



Edenburgh, January 1703. Houshold Furnitur. 


Deb: to Cash. 




For 12 ells callico to help to lint 


; [Scots] 


the bed .... 


24 


For 19 bottles .... 


1 18 


For a large sawse pan 


5 8 


For a skellit pan 


2 8 


To Ms. Willy for 18 glases ale 12s 




wine 6s. and 8s. . 


7 


For 4 jelly glases 


14 


For 8 jugs at 3sh. per pair 


7 4 


For 2 crewits .... 


14 



170 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1703 



[Furnishings] 



For a wine glas 
Febr. 2 For 17| ells silk and cotten for 

window curtins 
For drawing the pand of the white 

bed ..... 
For 5 bottles .... 
For 2 little cups to drink out off . 
Mar. 13 For a little yethn kettle . 
For a little bras pan 
For tining the pan . 
For calico to line my bed 
For ane earthin pot to pickle 

salmond .... 
To Thomas Carr goldsmith ane 

ballance of ane old accumpt 

for silver work in full of all I 

am due him as per his recept 
For a little wort shill 
For a whisk 
For a dry stool 10s. 
For 33 bottles . 
For a ridle to the tind 
For tows to the wall last year 
Aprill For wall tows . 

For a jack £4 16s. for smithwork 

in making the whils 
For cuper work 
For a chamerpot 
For 4 bottles 8s. 
For 11| ell tickin 
For nails 9s. seting the kitchin 

chimny £12 
For 8 bottles 16s. nails 4s. 
For 3 slips yeron 18s. 
June 15 For 2 pair sheats for the childrins 

beds, 12 pillabers , 
For 2 pair sheets to the servants 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 





6 





32 


3 


6 





18 








10 








3 





8 








1 


18 








8 





20 









4 



36 











6 








3 








10 





3 


6 








14 


6 





16 


8 





13 


6 


10 











9 








12 








8 





10 


2 





n 

1 


11 





1 











18 





IS 

14 








7 





(V 



1703] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



171 



August 



[Furnishings] 

To James Imry smith for work 

To Ernist for my bed making 

For 3 bottles 6s., for a map 7s., a 
whisk 2s. 6d. 

For a shp yeron 6s., for a rill 6s. 6d. 

For 3 cups 14s. 

For a bottle 2s., 5 bottles 10s. 

For 2 decanters 

For 12 cheana custard dishes 

For 2 hand sconces 

For a coffie pot 

For ordinar Dornick 

For 57 ells linin for shits 

For chamber pot 

For 2 tb. Dutch threed for fringes 

For wirsit to make fringes 

For a basin 14s. 

For 18 bottles . 

For 21 ells plading working 

For 50 ells linin bliching . 

For a timber morter 

For a skep for meall 

For a pound and ane ounc Dutch 
threed ..... 

For knitins 4s., small cords 7s. 8 

For takets £l, a ladle and sowin 
sive 5 .... 

For a pair wooll cards £l 2s. 

For yron for cruks and bearers . 

For a tree stoup lis. a handy cog 

For 10 ells harden 

For ane ston wooll . 

For linin for shits 

For 3 ston lard wooll at £6 10 

For oyl to wooll 

For threed £l, 12 cravat to Steed- 
man 12s. .... 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 
10 
10 



15 
12 
14 
12 
4 16 
4 16 
12 
14 
54 10 
38 
12 
4 16 
7 16 

14 

1 16 
1 11 
3 9 
14 
6 



1 
1 
3 
1 

9 



1 

5 



6 
6 













6 
8 





3 4 
11 8 



5 

2 

3 10 










6 13 
13 
19 10 

3 10 



2 4 



172 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1703 

[Furnishings] 
For forcing shirs 2 pair 3s. , threed 

^o> • • • • • 

For knitins 4s,, while bands 2s., 

knitins 4s. . 
For 50 ell stuf for the little room 

at 7s. 6d. .... 
To Steedmans son a mounth at 

Mellersteans in pairt 
Meller To the couper a years accumpt 
[steans] For 20 ells strakins at 6s. 6d. 
Oct. 20 For 156 days spinin whereof 6 to 

washen .... 

For 18 days all at Is. 6d. per day 
For 30 ells linin at 3s. the ell 

working .... 

For 20 ells linin to Frater . 
For 30 ells pladin by heart at 2s. 

per ell . 
For 21 ells pladin wrought by 

Rob: Milne at Is. 6d. 
For 43 days work by Alshy Blith 

and his son 
For 29 ells harden for bed and 

horse shites .... 
For 2 seeks £4 for a pott 2s. 
For dying yellow fringes . 
For a map 8s., ridle 5s. 8d., tyle for 

chimny, £1 2s. . 
For takets 8s. 6d. 
December For scarlit wirsit litting to a fring 

of a bed .... 
For green worset to the said bed . 
For bangall for servants towills . 
For cloath to the black riding 

furnitur at 10s. str, . . 15 

For a black coutch with canvis 

botom . . . . . 9 

For a black arme rush chair . 3 12 



Scots] 
£ s. d. 


5 





10 





17 15 





08 





6 11 





6 10 





11 14 


10 


1 7 





4 10 





3 





3 





1 11 


6 


8 11 


6 


7 10 





4 2 





1 10 





1 15 


8 


8 


6 


26 10 





2 17 


6 


3 17 






OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 173 

[Furnishings] [Scots] 

For two low rush chairs 

For a rush bottomd eassi chair . 

For a big bufft eassi chair with 

cushon .... 

For a walnut tree footstooll and 

buffing .... 

For two rush foot stools . 
To P. N. for making a cran and 

cripit ..... 
For 2 crook trees bed rods etc. by 

Jl Oi^* XN • • • • • 

For 100 ells cord for curtins 

For furnitur to make beds 

For rods to a bed at 3s. per foot 

For a larg fire shuffill 

For a fine cutt timber of a bed . 

For a ston of douns 

For dying silk fring and cushons 

For making 7 cushons 

For 2 cutt cornises 3s., drinkmony 

6s 2 2 

For buckarm threed, takets, and 

to a bed .... 
For lame bouls and basons, etc. 
For a pice muslin for window 

curtins .... 

For 11 bottles £1 2s. 
To Stidmans son pays out a 

month at Mellersteans . 
To Imrie, smith 
For linin to help to line the 

barens bed .... 
For brush to the horse 10 nails, etc. 
For setting chimnys . 
For table cloathes 
To Clark wright in pairt of his 

account .... 



£ 


s. 


d. 


4 


16 





4 


4 





18 








4 


16 





3 











8 





1 


8 





4 


3 


4 


2 


6 





2 


8 





3 








48 








9 








4 


6 





7 









6 


7 





3 


18 





37 








1 


2 





12 








2 








5 


14 





1 


5 








18 





9 


12 





60 





0- 



174 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1703 



"Furnishings' 


Scots' 


For tining two pots, another pot, 


£ s. d. 


3 covers .... 


2 


For busoms and brushes and 




chamber pots 


8 


For a frying pan 


2 2 


For 9 ells hardin from Hellin 




Garner .... 


2 14 


S. 


807 8 



Edenburg, January 1707. Houshold Furnitur. 
Deb. to Cash. 

For glazing the house at Edin- [Scots] 
burgh . . . . 20 

For the workemanship of a cooler 
54 ounces and 13d., a duson 
spoons 31 ounce 8d., 12 knife 
helfts 10 ounce lOd., six salts 
15 ounce 3d. as per Robert 
Bruce goldsmithes account . 91 8 

For 37 ounces 2d. silver of the 
abovesaid work (the rest being 
my own) at £3 4s. per ounce . 118 16 

For severall things mended by 

Mr. Bruce . . . . 8 16 

For a bras hand candlestick to 

the bairens room . . . 12 

For 2 smothing yrons £l 8s., 

mending the rest 7s. . . 1 15 

April Ist.To Sibit Smith in full of all 

accounts . . . . 19 

For a big bras pan . . . 4 16 

For a virginall hammer 16s., a 

musick book £6 . . . 6 16 

For another big brass pan . 4 6 6 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 175 

[Furnishings] [Scots] 

For a pair little bras candle sticks £ s. d. 

£2 8s., 3 pair snuffers £l 10, 

extinguisher 5 . . . 4 3 

For screw nails from Mr. Inis . 4 16 

For half a gross bottles £9, cariing 

them 9 2 

For mending a pot Is. 6d., cocks 

and pales 2s., oven mending 

5s. 6d 9 

For nails 2s. 6d., smith work 

14s. 6d., 2s. 6d., Is., Is., 6s., 

Is., 2s. . . . . 1 11 

For mending the bucat and 

girthes 9s., tubs 7s. 6d., 3s. 6d. 10 

For kitchen towils £l 2s., more 

cours cloath £3 6s. . . 4 8 

For threed Is. 2s. Is. 6d., a hair 

busom 16 . . . . 10 6 

For a washing ruber lis., a ruber 

8s., a ruber 12s. . . . 1 11 

For keys to back gate lis., 2 little 

tubs lis. . . . . 110 

For a whipe 12s., a Spanish busom 

4s., hard brush 8s. 6d. . . 14 6 

For 4 sillibub glases £2 8s., a glas 

10s 2 18 

For 11 ells Holland for window 

curtins . . . . 21 

For comb and brush to the mares 

£l 16s. . . . . 1 16 

For glazing windows £l 16s., a 

map and whisk 12s. 6d. . 2 8 6 

For 7 earthen juggs £l 2s. 4d., a 

tin tanker 5s. 6d. . . 1 7 10 

For a sand glas 6s., a milk sive and 

pott 6s. . . . . 12 

For a ston douns to the easie chair 

£8 10s., a rugh head £l 2s. . 9 12 



176 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

[Furnishings] 
For 4 ells harden £l 2s., a coll 

ridle 4s. ... . 

For a lock to Grisies door 16s., a 

key to the drawers 6 
For helping trunk locks 8s., a cours 

chamer pot .... 
For bast 6 ells of 8 bread £2 2s., 

3 ells fine 8s. 6d. per ell . 
For a washin ruber for Meller- 

SXCd'IlS • • • • • 

For strings to window courtins 

X ff Oa • • • • • 

For 3 hand candlesticks to 

Mellersteans 
For 10 duson of bottls 
Meller For 3 lame basons and 
[steans] chamerpots 4 to Mellerstean 
June 10 basons 7s. p. pots 8sh. p. 
Mellerstean For a saus pan 
June 10 For spoons bought by Mary Muir 

Oo* • • • • • 

For 9 ells strakins at 6s. per ell . 
13 For a ladle 2s., kitchin knif 3s. 6d. 
For 3 ells bast £l Is., for harden 

at 4s. per ell ... 

For 12 yron scewers 9s., a Spanish 

busom 4s. 6d. 
July 8 To the couper in Earlston in full 

of all accounts 
For 5 ells strokins for kitchin 

aprons, etc. .... 
For stamping plush 2s. per ell 8s. 
For scouring 16 pair blankets 
For puting up chmneys and doing 

other things in the house . 2 
For a map 3s. 6d., a filler for 

Meller[stean] 3s. 6d. . . 7 

For a glass chirn . . . 10 



[Scots' 
£ s. d. 
16 


1 2 





9 


6 


3 7 


6 


11 





17 





2 2 
12 






2 13 

2 8 






6 
2 14 
5 




6 


2 





13 


6 


4 





1 5 

8 

1 8 








1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 177 

[Furnishings] [Scots] 

Aug. 15 For houshold furniture from £ s. d. 

Moubra in full of all accoumpts 

acording to his account and 

discharge .... 107 10 
To Docter Dundas for 2 Ormiston 

queches . . . . 3 

For helping loks and keys at 

Edinburgh 8s. ' . . . 8 

For 6 duson table napkins and 15 

table cloathes bought at Inner- 

kithin by Ms. Linsday . . 136 

For sowing table napkens 6 

napkens 3 dusone . . 1 13 

For a damask table cloath from 

Ms. Orr . . . . 6 

For makeing a brander, etc., in the 

kitchen . . . . 14 4 

Sep. 29 For another glas chirn the first 

being broke . . . . 10 

For a lock to the utter door of 

later meet room . . . 16 

For a clogbag lock 6s., 2 timber 

plates 14s. . . . . 10 

For aim to lite coverins 8s., work- 
ing hnt £1 more £2 7s. . . 3 15 
For 2 big timber milk basons, a 

big plate . . . . 2 9 

To John Mucle for working 5 

coverings 8s. per p. . . 2 0^ 

To the couper in Earlston in full 2 15 O 

To Lethem, smith, ane old account 

for chimnys, etc. . . . 36 00 



S. 694 19 2 



M 



Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





8 








7 








4 








8 






178 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

London, January 1715. Household Furniture. 
[Furnishings] 

For 4 litle chena frute dishes 
For a dusone wine glases 6£, 2 Ale 

Glases Is. . 
For 2 crewits Is., 2 water botles 3s. 
For 21 water glases 8s. 
For 6 litle green Tee cups and 

sassers . . . . . 8 

For 4 big dishes from Fergison at 

3s. 6d 14 

For 2 duson of chena truneher 

plate fergison 
For 4 big Dishes for Frut Fergison 
For a big punsh bowl Fergison . 
For 2 litle punsh bowls Fergison 
For close stoall 10s., a pan 3s. 4d. 
For 2 triming cloath 
For a Tee ketle 7 0, a hatshet for 
:, suger Is. ... . 

For a spung 6d. 
For a new washing tub 5s. 6d., a 

second hand tub 3s. 6d. 
For a wig block 
For a linin skreen 
For a coll ridle yron one 2s., 

timer one 6d. 
For a head to Coffie Milne . 
For 2 Ale jugs 4s., 3 earthen pans 

Qd 
For a hard Ruber 
For a grater and timber spoon 3d., 

2 serches 8d., map 11 . 
For a pair sisers for the Dog 
For a dusone of knife hafts make- 

ing 4s. pr pice and puting on 

the creast Ish., the blads 14d. 3 14 



2 











16 





2 


10 








8 








13 


4 





6 


4 





8 











6 





9 








4 


6 





7 








2 


6 





1 


6 





4 


9 





4 


6 





1 


10 








6 



1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 179 





Furnishings" 


Sterling 




For 26 ounces 10 peny wight of 


£ 


s. 


d. 




new sterline at 5s. 6d. . 


7 


5 


9 




For a dusone of forks workman- 










ship 3s., graveing creast Is. . 


2 


8 







For 26 ounces 4d. weight of new- 










sterline at 5s. 6d. 


7 


4 


1 




For a coper knif basket 





10 







For 2 bowls Is. 6d., a close stool 










pan 3s. .... 





4 


6 




For a coper tanker . 





2 


6 




For a writing table . 













For a close box 10s., a puther pan 










os. ..... 





13 





Ap. 20 


For mending the Hamer . 





1 


4 


May 


For a brush to the servants 
For fraught of 5 beds, 12 pr 








10 




blankets, bolster piller twills . 





12 







For other expences in bring them 










out of the ship 





9 


4 




For a hard ruber Is. 6d., 2 chamber 










pots 10 .... 





2 


4 




For a paill 2s. . 





2 







For 2 broun china litle plates 





5 







For ane ovel Dutch table 6 cups 










and sassers .... 


1 


10 







For a Honn to sharp razors 





8 







To Mrs. Couper for a blew camblet 










bed ..... 


6 










For ane yron foot to the Marble 










table . . . 





5 







For a sea Green Camblet Bed . 


8 


18 







For a Japan Lief to hand about 










Tee 





5 







For 2 dressing Glasses for my 










self and Grisie with drawers . 


2 


14 







For 3 knives and forks 





1 


6 




For a duson of wine Glases 8s., 2 










glas mug? 2s., 2 Ale glas 2s. 





12 






180 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Furnishings] 

For 4 white basons . 

For brass nails for chimny brushes 

cilj OCl* • • • • • 

For 2 hooks of brass for curtins Is. 
For a coper Callender 
For a big coper pot for Bear 
For a nother les copper pot for 

bear ..... 
For a pair Kitchen Bellis 
For a pair bellies to the Landry . 
For a brass choffer with bras foot 
For a top to the Lanthorn of tinn 
For a fether bed bolster and 

pillows from Mrs. Murray 
For a dressing glass to May and 

Rachel .... 

For mending the stair sconce 
For scales and weights and broads 

and weights 
For a hook to hold my keys 
For 4 duson truncher plates and a 

bason of puther 
For 38 foot Mullers 

dyed pear tree for 

prints at 6d. and 4d. 

pr foot . . 15 10 

For 19| foot dyed peer 

tree mullers the smal 

picturs at 3d. the 

midle size at 4d. the 

largest size at 5d. by 

Mr. Lasaget . . 2 18 , 

For a bed from Mrs. Simson and 

bolsters .... 

For 2 earthen pots for salting meat 
For 2 timber plates for takeing up 

meat out of a pot . 





[1715 


Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





3 


4 





3 








1 








8 








7 








6 








4 








3 





1 











2 





3 











15 








3 





1 


4 








8 





3 


19 


6 



3 13 10 



3 
2 4 

3 6 



£ 


s. 


d. 





1 


6 





14 











10 








8 


3 


10 








1 


10 


14 








25 









1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 181 

[Furnishings] [Sterling] 

For a brass tinder box 

For ane English blanket to my 

own bed .... 
For a clock pin with 10 pins 
For 6 litle hard brushes 8d, 
Aug. 26 For 52 els linin for shiets from 

May Minzies 
For ane yron scewer with a wight 

a long one for spiting small foul 

4 others lesser 
For a chinny glass in one pice 54| 

by 221 Mr. Turin 
For a large Glass in a Glase fram 
For a writting Dask on wheels 

walnut tree Mr. Turin . . 7 

For a pair bellies 5sh., a hearth 

brush 18d. of walnut tree 
For a pair litle hand sconces 
For 3 pices yellow Damask for 

window curtins 
For 6 pices Green Damask for 

hangins, chairs and window 

curtins from Piter Hambly 
For Mattine 3s. 4d. to the entry 
For a litle Tee pot 3s. 6d., a plate 

to it 9d., glas suger box Is. . 
For a brass pestel to a morter . 
Sep. 18 For 3 litle stools 

To Mr. Scots man for ane Indian 

Matt bringing . . . 10 

For a pair tongs, shuvel, and 

Poker to the Kitchen 
For a trivit to stove halls . 
For a pair brass tongs and poker 
For a glass Lamp 9sh., the yron 

to fix it at the door 30d. 
For a Backie for Tee dishes 






6 


6 





5 





18 








36 











3 


6 





5 


3 





1 








3 









8 











10 





16 








11 








4 






182 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Furnishings] [Sterling] 

For a pair Bellies 
For a wire sive for the sinders 
For a glass to the wemens room 
For 2 basons Is., a chamber pot 

6d 

For a Callico Twilt to the blew bed 
For ane yroning blanket . 
For 2 porangers 3d., a litle pan 2d. 
For a spunge to the chambermaid 

6d. ..... 

For a saffron botle 3s. 

For a large chist of drawers 

For a table with Drawers for the 

Cupboord .... 
For a hanging and 2 corner shelfs 

to the Cupboord . 
For 2 hanging shelfs in my Closet 
For 60 clock pins at peny a pice . 
For a firr table for dressing of 

linins ..... 
For a furm to the Kitchin . 
For a Basket for cloathes 
For 9 wine glases 
For a pair glass sconces to the 

litle drawin room . 
For black Japan Frams for picturs 

at 2d. and Ij^d. . 
For dyed pear tree frams at 3d., 

4d. and 5d. a foot 
For 2 frames to the picturs more 
For a pair of Raxes and a chean 

to the Jack .... 
For a brass fender 
For a chimny pice 
For a yellow Moyhair bed and 

stuff Tourdelie 2 window 

curtins .... 



£ 


s. 


d. 





3 


6 





2 








2 








1 


6 


1 


5 








3 











5 








6 





3 





2 


5 








14 








10 








10 








5 








10 








5 








1 


6 





6 








14 





1 








5 











2 








10 








15 





2 


10 





46 









1715] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 183 

[Furnishings] 

For a glas 6 foot high 

For 2 chimny glasses with black 

frams and 2 pair of glas 

sconces .... 

For a lage glass with black frame 
For a large Glass with glas frame 
For a chimny glass with guilt 

frame ..... 
For a chimny Glass with glas 

frame ..... 
■' For a litle chimny glass wt black 

frame ..... 
For a large Glass with black 

frame ..... 
For 2 black japan tables with 

green plush 
For 2 blew Bundet window 

curtins .... 

For a japan Tee Table 
For a litle glass with black frame 
For 12 japan chairs, 2 Arm chairs, 

2 stools .... 

For 6 Kain chairs at 12s, a pice . 
For 4 black chairs with rush 

bottoms .... 

For 2 beds Green and blew for 

servants 2£ each . 
For 2 fatherbeds, 2 bolsters, 2 

pillows, 2 twilts, 4 blankets . 
For 2 folding beds for the abovesd 

beding for servants 
For a large Marbel table a litle 

table and 2 window soils 
For 4 window kain sashes 
For a wanescot table for 8 sitters 

10s., one for 5 sitters 5s. 
For a book case with looking glass 



[Sterling 
£ s. d. 
5 14 


7 

7 

13 







3 





4 15 





1 9 





5 10 





3 5 





3 
1 10 
1 15 







5 10 
3 12 






8 





4 





6 





1 4 





6 
2 10 






15 

7 18 







184 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Furnishings] 

For 2 Portigal Matts for floors . 

For 2 litle guilt sconces 

For a japan corner cupboord with 

a table fixt to it . 
For 2 wanscots tables and a 

blacke one each 4s. 
For 3 chimny graits of one sort 

with yron fenders tongs etc. . 
For a grate .... 
For a Landry grate and grate for 

heating yrons 
For a hearth and endyrons and 

brass tongs and shuvell . 
For a smothing table 8s., a long 

brod for washing on starch 8s. 
For the stair lantron 6s., 2 stair 

sconces 7s. . 
For a House Lader 8s., a Horse 

for drying linins 7s. 
For a coper for washing 
For a banch 5s., 4 tubs 10s., a 

water tub 6s., litle standert 6d. 
For a Kitchin grate 18s., with 

cran 6s., tongs, poker, etc. 5 . 
For a litle rax and 2 speets 6s., 

pot hook Is., a gridyron 18d. . 
For a coper pot 16lb 18s., a pot 

lOlb 10s., 2 stew pans 10s. 
For 2 sauce pans 8s., a brass 

Ketle 14s., a bras morter 2s. 6d. 
For a driping pan and foot 3s., a 

truncher stand 8s., frying pan 

loQ. • • . . • 

For a brass ladle and skumer 2s., 

a trivet 2s., a plate rack 3s. 
For 3 brass candle sticks, snuffers 

9s., 2 yron ons Is. 



St( 
£ 


erlir 

s. 


d. 


1 











6 








10 








12 





5 


2 








15 








5 





1 


17 








16 








13 








15 





3 








1 


1 


6 


1 


9 








8 


6 


1 


18 





1 


4 


6 





12 


6 





7 








10 






^715] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



185 



[Furnishings] 
For a floor barril Is., tinn candle 

box Is., a folding table 3s. 
For ane yron coll basket 3s., a 

roling ston 18s. . 
For a Red and white Marbel table 

at 5s. a foot .... 
For Rid japan Bellis and brush 

6s., bought on ye Terns ^ 
For a brun vernisht tee brood 

bought on the yce on Terns ^ . 
For a purple and white Devon- 
shire Marble table 5s. a foot . 
For sume wrong caried over page 

368 .... 
For a shad shuvel 
For a puther chamber pote 
For green tape and silk to 

chairs 
For a fine slap basone 
For a litle Tee broad 
For a pittipan to ane ashet 
For a grate for Jerriswoods closet 
For a pair bras tongs and shuvel 
For a brass fender 
For a coper scutle 
For a new fashond coper scuttel 
For 18 bras pins at 3d. 
For a hearth and dogs 
For a back to the Hearth . 
For a pair Bellows — walnut tree 
For ane extinguisher 
For ane browning yron 
For a stiel to warm water 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 

5 

110 

1 10 
6 
2 
12 6 








3 










1 


6 







2 


6 


e 





2 


7 




1 


5 










3 










1 





t 


1 


16 










14 










12 







1 


1 


6 




1 













4 


6 




1 


3 










5 










4 


6 







1 










4 










2 






^ 'In the winter of 1715-16 the frost was again so intensely severe that the 
river Thames was frozen over during almost the space of three months. Booths 
were erected on the congealed river for the sale of all kinds of commodities and 
all the fun of the fair of 1684 was revived. On 19 January 1716 two large oxen 
•were roasted whole on the \Q.Q.'—Old ami New London, by Edward Walford, 



186 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1715 

[Furnishings] 

For a coll rack 2s. . 

For a tinn'd Basket for Plates 

For a litle china Tee pot a saffron 

pot at 5s. . 
For 4 pieces of the Green Damask 

of my furnitur 
For a Cavie for chickens . 
For a silver stand for small wax 

candle weight 6 ounces 
For a case to the bige knives etc. 
For a pair Glas Branches 
For 11 litle picturs glased . 
For a litle wooden cooller . 
For a table bed with canves 

Bottem to the Landry . 
For 2 large glas sconces from 

Turin . . . . . 

NovT. 16 For a powdering tub 6s., a meal 

barrill Is. . 
For 8 yd hollon for one sheat at 

4s. the ell . 
For a powdering tub 
For 9 yd a quarter holland for the 

uper shiet 4s. 6d. the ell 
For the easie chair with rid 

Damask cushon 
For a Balband screen 
For 12 knives weight 26 ounces 

and 3 peny weight at 5s. 6d. . 
For 12 forks 12 spoons weight 33 

ounc 1 peny 5s. 6d. 
For the fashon of knif 9s., spoons 

and forks 2s. 6d., engraveing Is. 
For a case to them l£ all made by 

Platel .... 

For ane fine blanket to my own 

bed ..... 



Sterling] 
£ s. d. 
2 
6 


5 





24 
5 






1 18 
1 4 
12 
5 
2 





6 
6 


1 5 





3 10 





7 





1 8 
6 






1 12 


n 6 


4 1 
1 1 



6 


7 3 


9 


9 1 


9 


10 4 





1 





14 






I7I5] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



187 



en 

o 

o 

rt- 
0- 



3 

a. 
o 

cr 



o 
o 

-t 



I 



[Furnishings] 
For a Blanket to my Doughters 

bed 
To Ocheltr}' for working 20 yd. 

Damask Table cloathes . 
For boyling 27 spinell yeron 
For winding werping and dresing 

the yeren .... 
For Blitching the Table cloathes 
For changing the big salver 

weighting 58 ounces at 5s. 7d. 

and Is. the ounce workmanship 
For puting a handel in the Milk 

pot ..... 
For puting the extinguisher to 

the Tee Ketle and mending it 
For Damask Table cloath and 12 

servits .... 

For a steling to the iner seller 7s.. 

a shelf 2s. 6d. 
For 2 sumter trunks 
For scouring 35 pr blankets at 

Mellerstaine 
For 10 walnut tree chairs wt 

mated seats l£ 8s. 
For 2 stoolls of the mated chairs . 
For a yellow Callamanca easie 

chair ..... 
For a iitle folding walnuttree table 
For 10 chairs stuft back and seat 

beside the Damask at l£ 15s. 

and 4 squar stools of the same 

at l£ 6s. . 
For a settle stuff of the same above 
For a f ram to a fire screen . 
For a walnut tree book case 
For a fram to a marbel table 
For 4 Iitle stufft stools these in to 

the bargon 



[Sterling 
£ s. d. 


5 




4 



6 







6 
16 


2 

8 


2 


4 


6 





2 


6 





10 





4 


11 






4 


9 



6 




6 



4 








2 


3 





5 








1 









22 14 
4 6 
116 
3 
1 10 



188 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1715 



[Furnishings] [Sterling] 

The Dininroom great and harth £ s. d. 

grate 2£ 5s. hearth 4£ . . 6 5 

For a fish Ketle weight 18 lb. at 2s. 1 16 
For makeing 8 Damask window 

Curtins with 4 seats two pieces 

of hangins all furniture but the 

Damask by John Sanderson . 26 



£559 



^12 





Deburst for cloathes 




Scots 


Aprill 1693 To ane acount pay'd to Mr. 








Ditto 


Robert Blackwood per recept 


37 


14 





May 12 


To acount to Baillie Pat John- 
ston quhich is all presiding 










this day .... 


213 


6 







For a white Damask wastcoatt . 


17 


16 







For strip muslin for cravat and 










slives ..... 


5 


8 







For 2 pair shoes 


5 


8 





Jun. 30 


To John Ross for shoes quhich is 










all he can crave 


4 


16 







For shoes from Georg Ross 


13 


4 







For linint for shirts and froks . 


33 


6 







For a hat .... 


7 


16 






Novr. To James Richy acount of 

22d. cloaths got befor Sept. 1691 

and all acounts preciding this 

day 174 

To the night goun Jeany ^ got . 36 
1694 For black crap for a goun and 
Apr. 20 coat at lib. 5s. per ell . . 24 

Ditto For lace to shirt hands at 2lb. per 

ell 25 14 



^ Lady Grisell's sister afterwards married James, seventh Lord Torphichen. 



1695] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 189 

[Clothing] [Scots] 

For 3 ells galoun to a coat . 
July 18 For buff to be briches 
August For boots 13lb 4s. shoes 2lb. 4s. . 
For 2 pair shoes from Andrew 
Baird ..... 
For making the buff briches and 
gloves ..... 
Novr. 1st For ternin for a goun to Gris 
Decmr. For 3 ells h Belliden silk fring 
lib 16, making Grises goun 
lib. 16 .... 

For shoes 2lb. 16, for black cloath 

for goun at 23sh. st. per ell 
For shoes to Robin 9s., froks to 
him, pladin to him 3lb. . 
1695 For stays to my Robin lib. 6s. . 
For 4 ells muslin for morning for 
the Quin .... 
For rubans lib. 6s., black shoes 
2lb. 8s., shambo glovs 2lb. 14s. 
May For a bongrace to my Robin 12, 
one to Gris 12s., thread 2s. 
For a love hud 3lb 10s. For a 

snuf-napken 2lb. 10 

For under stokens 

For making Grises goun lib. 16, 

shirts and wascoats to her and 

Robin ..... 

For worsit for strips lib. and 

working 2 pair 

For a mask lib., cuting shoes 8s., 

dying and washing 3lb. 12s. . 

For a campain wig from Manson 

5 dollars .... 

July For a pair cotten stokins . 

20 For 2 pair shoes 4lb. 16s. to the 
man 3s. 6d. .... 



£ s. 


d. 


2 4 





13 4 





15 8 





3 8 





1 16 





2 4 





2 12 





78 4 





3 9 





1 6 





13 4 





6 8 





1 18 





6 





18 





9 3 





1 18 





5 





14 10 





4 





5 19 


6 



190 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695 



[Clothing] 

For fiirnitur to a peticoat . 
For pladin to my Robin . 
For a pair silk slipers with silk 

and waltin furnisht 
For lace to the bairnes and 
August For holland from Holland 

For plying to a goun lib. 16 for 

flanen 2lb. 12 . . . 

For dressing the rid ridin coat 

4lb. 8 . 
To shoes to Gris 12s. for flanell 

Jd^ x^S. • • • • 

Sept. To Grahme for a hat 

To linin for Robin 3lb. 4, stuff to 
him lib. 4s., blew base to him 

J.J.L/a • • • • • 

Novr. To a frok to Gris 2lb. 3s., for lace 
1st to her lib. 10 . . 

For 2 pair shoes 5lb. 10, Forone 

pair 2lb. 14 . 
For pladin to Robin and stuff to 

Gris 21b. 6s. ... 

For bustin 2tb. 8, for flanell 2}b. 2s. 

3 ells lace 2tb. 14s. 
For blew shirts litting and Grises 

goun litting .... 
For linin 17s. For making Grises 

goun 3tb. stokins lis. . 
Decmr. To Mr. Robert Blackwood per 

acount . . 

To Lapairl tags for crap . 



[Scots' 
£ s. d. 
18 
18 


1 4 
13 10 

29 







4 8 





4 8 





3 4 
12 






5 8 





3 13 





7 4 





2 6 





6 14 





3 





4 8 





22 3 
1 







S. 914 



1696] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



191 



[Clothing] 

Deburst for cloathes for 1696. 
January For 10 ells Flanen at 16s. per ell 
For gloves to Grisie 9s. 6d. en ell 

flanen .... 
For linin for litle cloathes . 
For 2 pair understokens 
For stokens to Gris . 
To mor linin for litle cloathes 
Febr. 10 To muslin for 3 napkens . 
For a pair understokins 
For shoes to Grisi: 10s. F. 
Ditto 28 For my childs dead linen ^ 

For pladin to Rachy 11. 3s. linin 

for her froks and for shirts 
For camrick to slives 
For linin to be shirts 
For a muslin cravat . 
For shoes 21. 18s. 
For a long wig from Manson 
For a blew cock to a hat, For 
shoes to Grisie and a bongrace 
For 2 ells muslin for a cravat 
For 2 ells muslin for a cravat 
Aprill For a blew cock to a hat, for a 
ruban to a staf 
For butons to shirts, for ane apron 
For 6 ounces worsit for stokens . 
For under stokens 
For a snuf napken 
For a pair shoes to my self . 
May For whit bustin for a coat at 21. 
per ell . 
For a whit fring to it 



[Scots] 
£ s. d. 
8 



1 13 

1 16 

2 14 
14 
16 

3 
15 

10 
17 8 

10 3 

3 14 
15 
14 16 

2 18 

28 

2 12 

6 

4 16 

1 11 

1 12 

18 
14 

2 8 

1 14 

10 

3 6 



^ 'My Robin' died 28 February 1696, and was 'buried by his grandfather 
Robert Baillie in the Grafreers Churchyard 3 quarters from Mortons stone.' — 
From a note by Lady ^Grisell in a book of MS. songs. 



192 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1696- 



[Clothing] 
For whit flard bustin at 21. 4s. the 

ell 
For 9 ells black silk stuf for a coat 

at 41. 16s. the ell . 
For making Grisie a goun . 
For a black fring to my coat at 3s 

st. the ounce 
For a black gos hood 
Jun. For bustin to Jeriswoods wast 

coats and furnitur to them 
For 2 napkins — snuf ons . 
July 1st For a wige from Manson Campain 
For dying a coat black 
For muslin for cravats 5| ells at 

ol. oS. .... 

For shoes to my self 

For shirts to Rachy 21. 12s. 6d 

shirts to Gris 21. 15s. 
Agst. For stokins to Rachy 18s., Linin 

for drauers 41. 10s. 
For 2 caps fo my sisters 
For 2 ells bustin for a wast coat 
For dresing a cap to Gris 31 

Shoes to her 11. 6s. 
For washing 9 pairs gloves 11. 16s 

Understokens 11. 4s. 
Novr. For dresing boots 18s. for butons 

to wastcoats 6 duson 
For 2 shoes to Gris 11. 8s. For 

pladin and making cloath to Ra 
For making Grisis sadculerd goun 

and a rufiiin to it 
For shoes to Gris 17s. tape for 

cloathes 10s. 6d. . 
For a strip flanell coat at 11. 12s. 
For a sute of cloathes from John 

Hoburn of cloath . 
For an alamod skerf 



Scots 
£ s. d. 


11 








43 


4 





4 


2 





27 








1 


12 


6 


6 








2 


3 





15 








2 








26 


14 





3 


8 






5 7 6 



5 


8 





15 


12 





1 


12 





4 


6 





3 








1 


14 





3 


6 





7 


1 





1 


7 


6 


4 








81 


2 





20 


10 


00 



1698] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



193 



[Clothing] 

For stript stuf to Grisie 
Janr. For shoes and slipers to J . 

For making a velvit cap 12s. to 

cambrick and muslin to cravats 

To Roses wife an account for shoes 



"Scots' 


£ 


s. 


d. 


6 








7 


4 


0. 


9 


12 





8 


2 






S. 476 00 00 



To the expence of cloatheS; 1698. 

Janr. 10 To a sute of black cloathes taken 
1698 of in Janr. 1697 . 

For a sute of black cloothes from 
Mr. Blackwood, Mar. 1696 
Ditto For lace to shirt hands 
11th For 4| ells stript flanill at iti. 16s. 
for 2 wastcoats 
For muslin I bought at Preston 
pans ..... 
For gloves to Grisy . 
For muslin to my self 
For a mask .... 
For 10 ells blew camlit to a riding 

COdiL • • • . • 

For sowing of things when I went 

to England .... 
For bustin to a wastcoat 
For lining to Rachys shirts and 

drawers to Grisy 14 ells 
For lining bought from Ms. 

Abercrummy 
For lace to the bairens 
For gloves to Grisy . 
For rabitt skins to lin briches 

with ..... 
For making Grisies goun . 

N 



54 





73 15 





26 15 





7 13 





85 05 


0- 


15 





9 14 





18 


0- 


17 00 


oa 


6 00 





2 15 





7 04 





9 5 





5 07 





4 





8 





3 12 






194. 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1698 



Clothing^ 


Scots] 




£ s. d. 


For shoes to Grisy . 


16 


For gloves to Gris 


1 10 


For a bongrace to her 


12 


For wirsit to be stokens to her , 


15 


For eggin 


13 6 




S. 313 16 6 



Febr 



Edenburgh, January 1702. Cloathes. 


Debet to 




Cash. 




Scots 


For 2 pair gloves to the bairens . 





12 





For 3 ells lace at 18s. the ell 


2 


12 





23d For 4 yeards white rubans to the 








bairens .... 


3 


16 





For lace to shirt hands at £3 the 








ell 

\^xx • . • • • • 


7 


10 





For shoes to Grisie . 


1 


2 





For boots bought from Bruther- 








sxcBjUS • • • • • 


11 


12 





For drinkmony 





7 





For 2 pair gloves 


1 


4 





Dr. 27 For 3 pairt of shoes from Bruther- 








steans in pairt of payment at 








4s. 6d. the pair 


6 


10 





To Cowin Taylor to a pairt of his 








accumpt .... 


6 


10 





For working stokins to Jer. 18s. 








for on stokin 10 . 


1 


9 





For spining wirsit for stokins and 






1 


I ib. bought .... 


1 


16 


For black gloves 


1 








For 2 pair of gloves . 


1 


4 





For 20 ells Maskarad for gown 








and peticoat 


30 









4 





1 10 





15 





2 5 





15 





15 19 





42 12 






1702] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 195 

[Clothing] [Scots] 

£ s. d. 
For strip flanen coats to the 
bairens .... 
For serg to line a wastcoat 
For taill borders the bairens 
For linin to the bairens 
For a pair black gloves 
To calico the bairenses gowns is 

made of 
Aprill For a wige from Shin 3 guinys 

To Cop for puting up the wige and 

finding it for me . . . 19 

For wires 2s. For making up 

ane old goun 18 . 
For 13 ells lace from Jean Cheasly 
For a pair of cloath shoes makmg 
For makeing up my old goun 
For a side of a night goun of strip 

SH-Lin • • * • • 

For a fan .... 

For working a pair of stokins to J 
For plading to pice a plying of a 

goun ... 
May For 11 ells of lace for the bairens 
For making Grisies and covering 

Rachys gouns 
For shoes to Grisie £l, more £l 4 
For 24 ells stuf working at 5 per 

June For a cravat from Ramsay 

For 2l ell strip bustin for a wast- 

cod/L • • • • • 

For gloves £2 10s., for shoes £2, 

muslin £4 18s. 
For muslin to cravats 
For 2 pair under stokins 
For 50 ells linin for shifts 
For holland for shirts 



1 








2 


14 





1 


16 








18 





14 











18 





1 


10 








16 





11 








5 








2 


4 





7 


4 





7 


4 





2 


14 





9 


8 





16 


4 





3 








50 








42 









196 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1702 

[Clothing] 
August To Francy Newton for muslin paid 

accounts for cravats and 

childrin and my own morning 
For silk handcurchefs to the 

childrin .... 

August For 2 pair black stokins 
29 For hatband and black gloves 
For calico to the childrin . 
For snuf handcurchefs 6 . 
For a black fan £l 12s. 3 masks 

£4 
For necklace and eyrrings £l 8s. 

white silk gloves £3 12 . 
For a black silk belt 18s. . 
For tape threed shoestrings etc. 

per F. N. . 
For shoes to myself £l 16, shoes 

to Gris, £2 . 
For cleaning and dying the camlit 

goun, bairens gouns, etc. 
For a black sword £7 4s. for 3 

quarter shed muslin 3sh. sterling 
For working stokings £l 10s. 
For a hatt £5 16s., strings 6s., 

butons for shirts £l, Le'pairls 

14s. 6d. .... 

For threed £l 16s., for sowing by 

my Ant Couls ^ maid 18s. 
To a taylor at Mellersteans £l 18s., 

a pair gloves 16s. 
For shoes to myself £l 16s., shoes 

Grisie and R[achel] £l 16s. 
For stokins to John Hume 
For 6 ells eggine 
For lining to a satin night 

wastecoat . . . . 110 



[Scots" 
£ s. d. 


41 





7 4 

8 14 
5 16 

15 
20 









5 12 





5 
18 






11 10 





3 16 





4 4 





9 
1 10 






7 16 


6 


2 14 





2 14 





3 12 

18 

1 10 








' A sister of George Baillie's mother married Sir Alexander Mackenzie of 
Coul. 



1702] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



197 



[Clothing] 

Novr. For muslin to the bairens . 
20 For 20 ells linin for ther shifts . 
For ther second mourning gouns 
last 3^ear .... 
For 11 ells black crap to line a 
goun ..... 
For a black crap hood 
d. 23 To John Haburn for hats and 
gloves old account 
For twill and burds eye for 
drawers .... 

For black silk cord for a necklace 
Novr. 30 For 4 pair stokins to the bairens 
from Ms. Abercrumie 
For 9 ells blew grounded callico at 
For strong shoes to Mersser 
To Rachi's calico nightgoun from 
Ms. Hogg .... 
For spining wirsit at 18s. per lb 
Decmr. From strong shoes from Merser 

I tj CO \ • • • « • 

For 2 spinell wirsit for stuff 

For a belt to Grisie . 

For pins 6s., to a taylor 8s., gloves 

t/o» • • • • • 

For a muff to Rachy 
30 For a sute black cloth 2f ells at 

£13 10s 

For 11 ells black linin for 2 sutes 

obX ^S* • • • • 

For 5 1 ells black shagrin at £3 6s. 
For 6 ells lace .... 
For shoes at Kelso to the bairens 
For a white satin paticoat from 
Lisie Rainalds 



Scots] 


£ s. 


d. 


7 4 





12 





25 6 





10 





5 8 





27 8 





5 





10 





4 





16 4 





3 14 





15 1 


6 


18 





3 14 





2 10 





18 





19 





18 





37 2 


6 


11 16 


6 


18 9 





6 





5 2 





24 






S. 729 2 



198 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1707 

Edinburgh, January 1st 1707. Cloathes. Deb. 

to Cash. [Scots] 

For a pair boots from Mersser . 12 
To Merssers man . . . 7 

To Merstone 2 pair Campagn 

shoes . . . . . 7 8 

To him for a pair marican, ap: 

calf lather . . . . 5 8 

For my Poplin goun and coat . 97 
For helping my Tipper £l 16s., 

safer for the juell £l 10 . 3 6 

For stript muslin for heads £5, 

more £4 5s., more £2 12s., £2 

5s 14 2 

For shoes to Rachy lac'd £2 8s., 

serg tair border 16s. 
For strips to J. 
For serge for lining 
For a duson kids to my self at 

Pearth 12sh., 6 pair to Rach: 

6s. 6d. ..... 

To drmk mony to a taylor 14s. 6d. 
April For last somers drogat dying and 

stokins .... 

For 9 ells drogat dy'd over again 
For a pair stokins dying 
For shoes to Rachy £l Is., 2 black 

neckleses 8s. . . . 1 10 

For eggin £2 13s., washing 3 pair 

gloves 10s., 6s. 6d., 6s. 6d. 
For black ruban to slives £l 6s., 3s. 
For stokins £l 8s., silk 7s., threed 

8s. 6d., Is. 6d. . 
For a taylor in the house £1 8s. . 
For patches 6s., blew serg for 

Grisies coat helping £l Is. . 17 

For mending the bairens dust- 

gouns . . . . . 1 12 



3 


4 





1 


4 





4 


4 





1 


2 





3 


12 


6 


7 








1 


16 





1 


5 






3 16 





1 9 





1 17 





1 8 






1707] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 19& 

[Clothing] 

For gloves £2 4s., £2 8s. 6d. 

For 3 ells black silk for aprons at 

8s. per ell . 
For rubans to the borders and 

strings of the aprons 
For cotton threed 3s. lOd., shoes 

3s. 6d. ..... 

For ane ell plain muslin £3 6s., 

threed 5 8d. .... 
For linin to Rachys calls [?collars] 

lis., for 11 ell linin for 6 shifts 

to her ..... 
For muslin to Grisie £2 16 gas 

handcurchefs £5 14 for 2 
For a pair black silk gloves £3 6s. 
To Grisell Robison for sowing . 
For a big staind satin nightgoun 
For 18^ ell egin at lis. 6d. per ell 

£10 10s. more £2 4s. 8d. . 
For 10 ells satin to line Grisies 

taby goun .... 
For Scots muslin for night cloathes 
For a hatt £4 4s., shoes £2 18s 

stokins £1 . 
For gloves to the bairens and 

myself last year 
For stript muslin £13 14s. 6d., 

eggin £13 10s. 
For thi-eed 10s., 3s. 6d., 3s., 4s., 

14s., tape 6s. stentin 4s. 4d., 

threed 8s. 4s. ... 

For 8| ell camlit for sourtoot 

4d., butons to it £3 6 per el, 

£3 4 

For sarge to line the coat 

For stokins £l 4s., a handcurcher 

black and white £19. 



Scots] 
£ s. d. 
4 12 6 


15 12 





1 5 


10 


7 


4 


3 11 


8 


6 11 





8 10 
3 6 
3 12 

48 





6 



12 14 


8 


26 
5 6 






8 2 


a 


18 12 





27 4 





2 17 


2 


21 1 

9 







2 13 






200 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1707 



[Clothing] 
For fine musline a sute £7 17s. 6, 

2 1 strip camrik £4 10 
Vov 1| muslin for Rachy 
For shoes to Grisie and Rachy 

made by John Blyth 
For 1 ell[?] musline to Rachy 

£3 6s. ... 

For threed £2 10s., laces 15s. 

tape 2s. 4d., knitins 10s. 
For 3 ell linin for calls £3, 3 ell 

Scots cambrick plain 
For 14 ells stript Scots cambrick 

different prices 
For shoes 5s. 6d., nidles 4s. 6d. 

a comb lis., shoes 6s. 
For a belt to Grisi 18s., knitons 

5s., nidles 3s. J 100 
For threed and silk 15s., p. tape 

7s., ruban 6s., pins 7s. 2s. 
For a scor linin for drawers 
For a pair slipers £l 6s., half ell 

moskarad lis., threed 6 
For 6 ells silk waltins 
For 25 ells cloath for shirts to my 

self and the bairenses shirts at 

£1 2s. 6, 26 ells at £l 6d., 21 ell 

at 10s. per ell for drawers 
For 2 ell plain cambrick . 
For ane ell stript cambrick and 

ane ell musline 
For a black lace 9s., a pair wirsite 

under stokens 
To Will Cowin taylore 
For a pair threed stokens 13s. 6d. 

riding stokens 14s. 
For 18 ells Holland £2 19 per ell 

for shirts .... 
For 2 ells cambrick . 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

12 7 6 

4 7 

8 18 

3 6 

2 17 4 

2 8 

20 10 

17 

16 

1 17 

10 16 

1 17 6 

18 



55 

3 18 10 

3 5 

1 10 

40 

17 

53 2 

3 8 



1707] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



201 



[Clothing] 

For 4 ells lace at 3sh. per ell 

For 24 shirts sowing at 3s. per 

pice, etc. .... 
For silk 13s., tape pins £l, yellow 

ruban £2 2s. ... 

For one ell I kelt for gramashes . 
For 12 ells unblitcht linin at 12s. 

per ell . 
For 20 ell drogate bought by Milne 
Octr. For 21 ell Holland from Francis 

Newton, shirts 
For a lutstring hood of 2| ell from 

ditto ..... 
For calico to the bairenses 2 gouns 

outsid and in . . . 

For a lutstring hood 2^ . 
For 2 ells Holland 4s. 8 . 
'Octor. 3 For 10 ells musline and a half 

for sutes from Francis Newton 

since Martimas last at sundry 

prices ..... 
For a black gaz hood £2 5, black 

gloves 2 pair £2 6s. 
For 11 J ell fin cambrick for 

ruffils at sundry prices from 

Francis Newton since Martimas 

Xdo Lf • • • • • 

For rubans in ditto time F. N. 

For 2 fans £2 8s. 2 p. 

For patons £2 8 

For threed lupin pins, etc. 

For 10 ell stript musline at 6s. 6d 
per ell, 10 ell plain muslin 6s 
6d., 10 ell stript at 6s. got from 
Francie Newton and taken to 
London with me . 

For 4 ell lace to shirts 



Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


7 


4 





4 


12 





3 


15 





2 


5 





7 


4 





3 








62 


16 





8 


2 





18 


18 


6 


8 


2 





5 


12 






34 6 6 
4 11 



52 14 6 

27 7 

2 8 

2 8 

23 16 



114 
7 4 



202 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1707 



[Clothing] 
Oct. 3d For cloathes in full of all accounts 
to Will Cowin 
For a sute black cloathes from 
Sr. Ro: Blackwood 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

50 

72 



S. 1171 8 10 



Mellerstaines, January 1710. Cloathes. 


Deb. 




to Cash. 




St 


g- 


For cloathes to Grisie and Rachell 








in Edinburgh when they were in 








morning .... 


12 


14 





For cloathes to my self in Edin- 








burgh .... 





15 





For gloves to Jerri s wood . 





17 


a 


For patches pins etc. 





2 





For a stone gray cloath petticoat 


1 


10 





For some small things at Kelso for 








my mornins 





5 


6 


For black cloath to help my goun 


1 


05 





For black shoes 2 pair 





6 





For plain musline 


1 


1 


8 


For love hood 10s., black gloves 








4s. 6d. ..... 





14 


& 


For black silk gloves 6s., vellam Is., 








serge 2s. ... . 





9 





For stokins 2s. 6d., plain shoes 3s. 








4d. ..... 





5 


10 


For Grisie and Rachy musline . 


2 








For cloath to help Grisies goun . 


1 


5 





For shoes to Rachie 6s., stokins 








2s. 6d. ..... 





8 


6 


For a neckles lOd. 








10 


For a gas napken 5s., lining silk to 








help a goun 





7 


9- 



I7I0] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 203 

[Clothing] 

24 14 1 For silk gloves to Rachell . 

17 For ruban 6d. all the abovesaid 

for mornings excep for gloves 

23 71 1 17s 

For 8 ells holland for Grisies goun 
at 6s. 6d. .... 
March 1 For pins threed, etc. 

For 4 yard plain musline at 5s. 6d. 
per yard .... 
Ap. 4th For 5 ell prying to Rachys night 
goun ..... 
For 5| ell plying to my callico 
goun ..... 
For lining to help nightcloathes 
For bustine for pokets 
For 6| ell cambrick for night- 
cloathes .... 
For 2 pair gloves to Rachy 
Maj' 31 To William Dickson taylor for 15 
days . . . , . 
For a silk lace .... 
For 40 ells linin for shifts and 
aprons at 2s. the ell from 
James Ainsl}^ 
For 17 ells linin for drawers at Ish. 
4d. from James Ainsly 
August For 40 ells linin for Grisies shifts 
from Lithgow 
For pins, etc. .... 
Aug. 16 For holland cambrick musline 
and severall other things at 
Grisies mariage as per Francis 
Newtons account . . 38 11 
For altering two gouns by 

Finlisone . . . . 5 

For 20 ells Unins for the bairens's 

shifts 1 13 4 



Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





6 











6 


2 


12 








2 


6 


1 


2 








3 








3 


lOf 








8| 





2 


6 


1 


18 


9 





2 








5 








] 





2 








1 


2 


8 


5 











2 






£ 


s. 


d. 


2 


9 





3 


4 








7 








3 








2 





1 











3 


6 



204 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Clothing] [Sterling] 

For 21 ells linin for my own shifts 

at 2sh. 4d. .... 
For musline for night cloathes, 

ruffles, tukers, etc. 
For 2 snuf handkerchiefs 
For a silk handkerchief 
For 2 litle blew and white napkins 
For gloves for Jerriswood 
For shoes to Rachel 1 
For a pair of boots from 

Messer . . . . 10 

For drinkmony to his man and 

for liquering boots . . 01 

For gloves to Rachy 6s., washing 

gloves 2s 8 

For gloves to Jerriswood 2sh., 

washing gloves 4sh. 8d. . . 6 8 

To Grisie Lamb for sowing shirts 

at 3d.| per pice . . . 2 8 

For black silk for ane apron at 

6sh 9 

For gloves Is. 6d., working frienge 

to my aprone 6d^ . . 2 Oj^ 

To Mr. Weems for my Tabic goun 

and coat and lining . . 11 7 

For sowing Grisies holland coat 

18s. the ell square . . 2 12 6 

For a pice musline got from 

Provist Broun 1705 . . 5 10 

For gloves from Liviston at Grisies 

marriage . . . . 4 10 

For altering two gouns to Rachy 

by Ms. Duncan . . . 2 

For 6f ells fine lace at 26sh. per 

ell for a head sute to Rachy from 

Lewis Pringle . . . 8 15 6 

For a taill border to Grisies sowed 

coat . . . . . 5 6 



I7I0] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 205 

[Clothing] [Sterling] 

For severall small things such as £ s. d, 

pines, tape, threed, etc. . . 8 6 

For a pice knitins . . . 6 

For Grisies brids favorits . . 3 10 6 

For 4 ells ruban 12s. and silver 

tasels 10s. for her brids garters 12 
For ruband for the brids garland 

thats brock over her head . 3 
For a head sute fine laces to Grisie 

£10 9s. 9d., ruffels £5 8s. . 15 17 9 

For lace to shift tuckers and 

egins, etc. . . . . 15 6 

For Grisies best night cloathes 

and ruffles . . . . 3 12 

For a linin to the sow'd goun . 3 16 
For two pices of holland by Ms. 

Crafford . . . . 9 9 

For a headsute of narrow lace to 

Grisie and ruffles . . . 4 10 

For lace for tuckert and egin . 2 10 
For fine musline for Grisies apron 

and heads, etc. . . . 1 14 

For rubans to Grisies night 

cloathes .... 

For ruffels to Rachys fine head . 
Aug: For egine to a sute to Rachy 

For sowing linins at the mariage 
For a gold and white handkerchieff 
For Grisies slipers 
For 2 pair slipers and a pair shoes 
For gloves at the mariage from 

Ms. Burn . . . . 10 

To Ms. Lyon manto makers ac- 
count ..... 
For shoes to Jerriswood 
For a hatt at the mariage 
For a sute cloathes trim'd with 
silver for Grisie, a sute trim'd 



12 





2 11 





1 16 


8 


2 13 


8 


10 





10 


a 


8 


6 



1 











5 








9 






206 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



[Clothing] [Sterling] 

with silk to Rachy, a skerff to £ s, d. 

each, and stokins, shoes, rubans, 

fans and handkerchieffs and 3 

big night gouns and stays for 

Grisies mariage . . . 112 8 6 

For small things from Char; 

Ormstons . . . . 7 4 

For green satine to Grisies 

peticoat . . . . 2 7 3 

For gold galoun to the green 

peticoat . . . . 16 3 

S. 315 1 9 



London, January 1st, 1717. Ac 
Dearests Cloathes. 
For 5 yd cloath at 17s. 6d. . 
For 5 yd black cloath at 17s. 
feb. 28 For a hat 

For scouring 2 pr stokens 
For silk stokens 
For a scabert to a sword 
For Black gloves 16d. 
For a Duson of gloves 
For Musline for Cravats at 7s. 
For makeing 3 suts cloath by 
Whisle at 2 guinys the sute I 
furnishing linin and buttons to 
coat and wastcoat 
For some linin he bought for the 
cloathes .... 

March 2 For a wige from Robert Boe 
For 16 yd shagreen at 3s. 6d. 
For 15 yd drogat at 3s. 6d. 
May 28 For 16 yd shagreen for the sute 



int of my 




Stg. 




4 7 


6 


4 5 





1 1 


6 


2 





14 





2 


6 


15 





3 7 


6 



6 9 

18 

3 4 6 

2 16 

2 12 6 



1.717] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



207 



[Clothing; 


[Sterling' 


and 6 yd for the Bragad wast- 


£ 


s. 


d. 


coat ..... 


4 


4 





For a yd more linin to the wast- 








coat ..... 





3 


6 


For 3 pr under stokens 10s. 6d., 








2 pr stryps 6s. . 





16 


6 


For 3| yd Gold Brogade for a 








wastecoat .... 


10 


10 





For a wige .... 


3 


4 


6 


For a pair silk stokens 





17 





For cleaning stuff coats, cleaning 








black cloathes Is. . 





2 





For 4 pr shoes from Broun 


1 


4 





For mending a sword 





1 





For gloves 8s. 8d. 





8 


8 


For 3d. 3 buttons at 2s. 6d. 3d.| 








at 12d. 2 wastbands 3d. 





11 


lOj^ 


For a hatt l£ Is. 6d., 2 hair skins 








3s., another 3s. . 


1 


7 


6 


For a pair silk stokins 15s., scour- 








ing cloathes 2s. 6d. 





17 


6 


For a cotton satine goun 2£ 


2 








wrong For a glas weight for Lady 








Margrat Hamilton 





7 





For holland from Cycell Wray . 


1 


4 


10 


For a powdering goun 





10 


2 


Eden- For 2 wigs bought at Edn: 2£ 10 








burgh and l£ 5 . 


3 


15 





For a wig from Bowie octr last . 


3 


3 





For 6 pr gloves 7s. 6d., a pair 








stokens 15s. 


1 


2 


6 


For Holland for shirts 


2 


8 





For rubans, etc. 8s. . 





8 





For shoes l£ 10 


1 


10 





For Black Cloath from Elliot . 


4 


9 


3 


S 


. 76 


10 


9 



208 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of my 

own Cloathes. Stg. 

For 27 yd White Indian quilting £ s. d. 

at 4s. 6d. and 5s. 6d. . . 4 13 6 

For dying my green goun 7s., my 

callico and lining scowring . 6 
For glazing my white lining Is. 

and the green above not drawn 

out 8 

For 8 yd lining to the green at 

5s. 6d 2 4 

For gloves washing Is., hood 

washing Is. . . .020 

For 2 ounces threed and tape . 2 6 
For If yd cambrick for a sute at 

lis. pr yd . . . . 18 3 

For a girdle Is., washing 3 hoods 

18d., gloves 2s . . . 4 6 

For 5 yd white callico at 28d. a 

yd 11 8 

For 9 pr gloves 18s. 9d., silk gloves 

6s. 3d 15 

For2|| ydlann at 4s. 6d., 10s. 6d., 

sowing 4 shifts 6s. 8d. . . 17 2 

For Dutch Manto to be body and 

slives to my black goun 6s. 3d. 9 
For satine laceing Is,, pluf 6d., a 

cypres hood 2s. . 
For some small things 3s., pins Is. 
For a pair gloves 2s. 2d., 2 pair 

stokins at 7s. and 5s. 
For 1| yd cloath for a peticoat 
For 14 yd egin at 5s. 6d. 3 19 9 
For a yd f i Ian at 1 2 6 

For Musline and making 

a handkerchief . 2 6 



3 


6 


4 





14 


2 


1 8 


6 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 209- 

[Clothing] [Sterling] 

For a wire makeing and £ s. d. 

starching ye head 4 6 



5 


9 


3 





13 








10 





1 











8 





1 


17 








1 






For a floorisht hood and Apron . 

For a yd Cambrick . 

For a Marsyls wastcoat 

For 2 pr Gotten slives 2s., a pair 

green shoes and lace 6s. 
For Holland for shirts at 4s. 

6d. ..... 

For dying a pr stokins Is. . 

For egine at 5s. 6d. valentians 

ground and severall other 

things from Mrs. Pearks this is 

above inceart. 
For a fan 2s. 5s., Ian at 12s. l£ 5s. 

6d., alamed hood 8s. 
For a pr green lacd shoes 6s., plain 

oS. . . • • • 

For 6 snuff handkerchieff at 28d. 

pr piece .... 

For 25 1 yd Green strypt Lutstring 

at 10s. ..... 

For 5 combs 9s., sweat waters 2s., 

lace for shoes lid. 
For silk gloves 6s. 3d., more for 

gloves 18s, more 16s, 
For 9 yd green lutstring for linin 

and ane aprone 
For making my scarlet peticoat 

4s., 2 pr threed stokins 6s. 
June 28 To Mrs. Lindsay Manto maker in 

full of all accounts 
For a piece satine 14| yd f broad 
For a piece pertian of 10 yds 
For 9 yd green lutstring 3£ 3s. 

22 yd pench 3£ 4s. 6d. . . 6 7 6 

For I piece pertian 1 12s. 3d., 

o 



2 





6 





9 








14 





12 


17 


6 





11 


11 


2 





3 


3 


3 








8 





6 


4 


6 


4 


10 





3 


2 


6 



210 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 





[Clothing; 


[Sterling] 




girdles 10s., scowring white linin 


£ 


s. 


d. 




2s. 6d. ..... 


2 


4 


9 




For 2 allamod hoods l£, a gass 










hood 6s., rose ruban 2s. 6d. 


1 


8 


6 




For 2 pieces chints 10 a pice 










scarlet Damask 5£ 


15 








ALUg. 3d For a yellow satine night goun 










2£ 8d., a pr stays 2£, opening 










body 10s. .... 


4 


18 







For linin from old silk shop to 










this day .... 


7 










For Camrick frome Cicel Wray, 










C/LfV/* • • • • • 


4 








Aug. 5 


To Mrs. Lindsay manta maker 
in full of all accounts to this 










day ..... 


4 


4 





Edinr, 


For some things bought by May 










Menzies, Lond: 


1 


4 





Sept. 3 


For gloves from Livingston 










kids 2, lambs 14d . 


4 


12 







For severall small things at my 










Rachys mariage . 

S. 


4 





i 




116 


9 


11 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of my 

Grisies Cloath. Stg. 

For a green and gold Attles . 16 
For 8 yd green lutstring for lining 

it at 6s. 3d. . . . 2 10 
For 11 yd fring for a head sute at 

8d 9 4 

For gloves washing Is., Is. 6d. . 2 6 

For a white Apron 6s. 6d. . 6 6 
For 5 years green lutstring for a 

skerf at 6s. 3d. . . . 1 11 6 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 211 



[Clothing; 


[Sterlin 


^g] 


For making the skerf by Mrs. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


Gray ..... 





7 





For a scarlet apron 7s. 6d. 





7 


6 


For 27 yd Black velvet for goun 








and coat at 17s. 


22 


19 





For 8 3'd Black Italian Lutstring 








lining ..... 


2 


10 





For severall small things 8s., a 








girdle Is. . 





9 





For 18 yd white Persian for the 








Caposhins dress 


1 


13 





For 6 yd ruban 3s. 9d., pins Is. . 





4 


9 


For 10 yd fringe at 8d. 





6 


8 


For gloves 18d. 15d. 





3 


9 


For 11 yd quilting for coats at 








OS* OCi.* • • • • • 


3 





6 


For dying the blew Damask goun 








without a linin 





7 





For Green Ruban at 9d., 2s. 3d., 








fan 3s., a hook 6d. 





6 


6 


For 22 yd green and white stript 








Armozeen at 13sh. 


14 


6 





For 4 snuff handkerchiefs at 28d. 





9 


4 


For combs 3s., lining to a peticoat 








1 o« • • • • • 





10 





For djdng peticoat linin 3s., 5 yd 








Damity 10 . 





13 





For a pair buckles 3s. 9d., a visard 








6d. ..... 





4 


3 


For small things 4s. lOd., a duson 








gloves l£ 5s. ... 


1 


9 


10 


For thick Musline 9s., a Hoop l£ 


1 


9 





For boning a hoop 5s., a pairthreed 








stokins 6s. 6d., shoes 16s. 


1 


7 


6 


To Mrs. Lindsay Manta maker in 








full to this day 


5 


6 





For blew ruban 4s., shoes lis., fan 








18d., hat lOd. 


1 


6 


6 



212 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Clothing] 
For 12| yd. Gindgum ell broad for 

a goun .... 

For girdles 9s., green lutstring 

9s. 8d., a glas weight 5s. 
For half piece china taffito 2£ 

17s. 6d., a girdle 2s., wires Is.. 
For I piece pertian to Grisies old 

chinse l£ 12s. 3d. . 
For black egine 5s. 6d., white egin 

6s. 4d., ruban 2s. 6d. 
For shoes 6s., lining hatt Is., white 

Damask goun scowring 6 
For ane alamad hood 10s., small 

things 5s., more 2s. 
For scouring wraping goun 4s. 6d., 

threed Is., laceing Is. 
For a dusoneof gloves l£ 8s., shoes 

14s. 6d., fans 6s. 6d. 
For 4 yd crimson ruban 3s. 4d., a 

piece chints 5£ . . . 

For 8 yerds gingem to line the 

gingem goun 
For a piece gellow Damask, | a 

piece Taffita .... 
For covering breast wt white 

tabic 5s. p jumps 10 
For dressing box l£ 12s. 3d., 

lace from Mrs. Dessliger 
Aug. 3 For lutstring for gouns and linins 

from old silk shop 
For camirick l£ 4s., gloves 6s. 
Aug 5 To Mrs. Lindsay Manta maker in 

full of all acctts 
For Clasps .... 
Sep. 3d For sundry things bought by May 

Minzies .... 

For sundry things to her at her 

sisters mariage 



[Sterling' 
£ s. d. 


2 10 





] 3 


8 


3 


6 


1 12 


3 


14 


4 


13 





17 





6 


6 


1 19 





5 3 


4 


1 





7 10 





15 





4 18 


9 


11 


2 


1 10 





3 





3 





2 13 


6 


7 14 






1717] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 213 

[Clothing] [Sterling] 

For Gloves from Livinston kids £ s. d. 

2s., La: [lambs] 14d. . . 4 12 

For 2 pieces Indian Pertian . 5 19 

For 2 pr shoes at 16sh. . . 1 12 



April 



11 



s. 


£151 


2 


11 


ceount of money given Rachel Dundas. 






For shoes .... 





4 


6 


For 26 yd white Gotten satine at 








2s. 9d., 12 yd white sesnet 27sh. 


5 





2 


For 6 pair gloves I give her 





12 


6 


To Piter Hambly for a pice of 








Chints ..... 


6 








To her ..... 


1 


12 





For 1 lace 2s. ... 





2 





To her by Captain Turnbull, etc., 








in Scotland .... 


3 


5 





For a pice chints 


5 








To her ..... 


2 


2 







S. 23 


8 


2 



London, January 1st, 1717. Account of My 
Rachy's cloath. 

For a cherie handkerchieff . 

For washing gloves Is., Fan 9s. . 

For Fans 5s. 6d. more 7s. 6d. 

2s., more 9s. . 
For a duson and 3 pr gloves 
For a scarlet Apron 7s. pr yd old 

silk shop .... 
For 27 yd velvet at 17s. . 
For 8 yd black Italian Lining for 

it at 6s. 3d. 
For 10 J yd fring for a sute at 8d. 





Stg. 





3 


6 





1 


9 





15 


9 


1 


12 


3 





7 





22 


19 





2 


10 








7 






1 


7 








4 


9 





1 








9 








6 


8 





2 






214 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Clothing] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For IJ yd thick Musline at 5s. . 6 3 
For 3 yd pink ruban 2s. 6d., a 

girdle Is 3 9 

For sundry small things . . 10 

For 18 yds white persian at 22d. 

pr yd for her Caposhin dress at 

the Maskarad . . . 1 13 

For 12 yd white semet for the 

Damask goun 
For 6 yd rubans 3s. 9d., pins Is. . 
For gloves washing 18d., gloves 2s. 
For ane Alamod hood 
For 10 yd fring 

For dresing a head by Mrs. Tuer 
For 24 yd Rid and silver stuff at 

22s., 8 yd lining . . . 30 6 

For 7 yerds Indian quilting at 

5s. 6d 1 18 6 

For dying the rid damask goun 

yellow wt out linin . . 7 

For scouring the pillen linin and 

peticoat . . . . 5 

P'or narow valentians lace at lis. 

lane 12 makeing, etc. . . 5 7 

For a girdle 6s., ane ell ruban 7s. 13 

For cambrick and makeing a sute 

head cloathes and Ruf . . 19 

For Fans 9s., a stra hat 10s., floors 

7s., Mask 2s 18 

For green lac'd shoes 7s., for 2 

snuff handkerchiefs . . 4 8 

For combs 3s., fan 2s., hooks and 

pendons 3s. 6d. . . . 8 6 

For rid galoun 5s., rid silk 3d., green 

silk stokins lis. 6d. . . 16 9 

For lace to shoes Is., sundry small 

things 4s. 10 . . . 4 10 



1717] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 215 

[Clothing] 
For a gase handkerchief 2s., raffle- 
ing and mounting a 3£ fan 

25s 

For a duson of Gloves l£ 5s., a 
Hoop l£ . . . . 

For 8 yd Indian chekerd linin cald 
to a Best [?] goim at 2s. 7d. . 
For a Riding goun . 
For boning a hoop 5 rubans 4s., 

fan 18d. 3 girdles 9s. 
To Mrs. Lindsay Mantua maker 

in full of all accounts 
For a dresing box l£ 12s. 3d., green 

lutstring 9s. 8d. . 
For I piece china taffita 2£ 17s. 6d, 

a glas weight 5d., girdles 2s. . 
For 4 girdles 12s. 6d., lace Mrs. 

Waird Is. 4d., laceing 9d. 
For ruban 2s. 6d., 8 yds lace Mrs. 

Ward, etc. 2£ 7s. 6d. 
For lining a hat Is., sco wring white 

Damask goun 6 . 
For gloves 6s., shoes at 16s., and 

slipers 2£ 3s. ... 

For shoes by Reinolds 
For a cloath hat to her riding 

habite .... 

For a naturall black hair wige 

from Boe .... 
For 36 yd Holland from Mr. 

Lind ..... 
For ane Alamad hood 10, a pair 

stokins 6s. a roll 18d. . 
For li yd Damity for pokets 2s. 

6d., small things 5s., more 2s. . 
For robings to a goun 4s. 6d., 

threed Is 

For a white satine quilted coat . 



Sterling 
£ s. d. 


1 7 


0' 


2 5 





1 


8 


2 15 





19 


6 


1 15 


6 


2 1 


11 


3 4 


6 


14 


7 


2 10 





7 





2 9 





2 12 





13 





1 1 


6 


L2 7 


6 


17 


6 


9 


6 


5 


& 


2 15 






Sterling] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


15 





3 


7 


4 





5 





1 


3 


2 





5 


4 


10 








2 









216 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1717 

[Clothing] 

For a yellow pertian quilted coat 
For 2 dusone 4 pr gloves at 2s. 8d. 

pr D . 
For a pr tickine shoes 
For 2 Callico Aprons 10 3 jepsies 

13s. 2d 

For laceing 18d., 4 yds crimson 

ruban 3s. 4d., wires 6d. . 
For a piece chints 5£, another 

piece 5£ got befor . 
For 16 yd gingem for a goun 
For a pr white stays 2£, covering 

a pr on breast 5s. . . . 2 5 

For a pr jumps yellow canves 

sticht wt green 10 
For satine with silver shoes from 

Green .... 

For 12 yd rid and white silk at 

7s. for wraping goun 
For 8 yd white lutstring for lining 

the goun at 5s. 6d. 
For 20 yd black lutstring at 6s. 3d. 

for linings and aprons . 
For 4d. white sesnet hoods 12s. 8d. 

more lutstring old silk shop all 
For lining to the old chints goun 

l£ 12s. 3d 

For a sute laces at 4£ from Mrs. 

Devliger .... 
For lace to Night cloathes, Apron, 

shift, etc. .... 
For 5| Cambrick 
For Cambrick night cloathes and 

ruffles ..... 
For handkerchiefs 2£ 10 . 
Aug. 5 To Mrs. Lindsay mantua maker 

in full of all . . . 4 9 






10 








15 





4 


4 





2 


4 





3 


5 





1 


9 


2 


1 


12 


3 


30 


9 


6 


16 


4 





3 


9 





4 


1 


6 


2 


10 






I7i8] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 217 





Clothing^ 


Sterling 




For lace and cambrick, etc., from 


£ s. 


d. 




Mers. Perks .... 


11 





Eden- 


For 9 yd Dajaper from Rob. 






burgh 


Manderson .... 
For sundry things bought by 


12 







May Minzies 


4 18 


5 


5ep. 3d 


For Linins and sowing and gloves 
and sundry other things at Edn. 








at her Mariage 


36 10 







For Bryds favours ^ . 


3 







For the Brids Garter ^ 


1 3 







For the Garland that is brock over 








the Brids head ^ . 


1 1 


6 




For 25 yeards silver stuff for goun 








and coat .... 


41 5 







For a green Podisoy hood and 








Mantle Trimd wt Gold 


12 10 







For a Gotten Satine Night goun 








to Lord Binning . 


2 10 







For 8 yd lutstring for the silver 








stuff goun .... 


2 12 







For lutstring to slives and necks 








of gouns .... 


9 







For a sute loup'd laces from Mrs. 








Tempest .... 


28 9 






S. 361 12 3 



1718 My Rachys childs cloathes. Stg. 

Aug. 16 To Mrs. Lindsay in full . . 10 

For scouring gouns . . . 12 

For mending lace 5s., a hook Is. 6 
For child Bed Linins and every 

thing she wanted . . . 74 4 3 

^^ovr. 19 For egine Mrs. Tempest . . 14 

^ See p. xlv. 



218 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1718: 

[Clothing] 
For I piece jueling for childs day 

vests ..... 
For cleaning a goun py'd Whit- 
son ..... 
For quilting a goun 
For 2 baskets 
For litle wastcoats 3s. 
For egins for 3 sute litle cloathes 
For 4 p. litle threed Mittons 
To Mrs. Childs account coats and 

froks ..... 
For hoUand from Lind 
For 6 sute litle linins besids the 

egines ..... 
To Mrs. Perks for egins for 3 suts 
For a Bed table and chair from 

Moor 
For more eggine . . . 1 10 

For 4j yd Podisoy for 

a cloack . . 2 13 

For scarlet sesnet at 

3s. 6d. . . . 10 

3 13 



Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





16 








4 





1 


10 








6 








3 





5 


11 








2 


6 


4 


11 


6 


4 


19 





4 


15 





5 


15 


9 



For makeing the clock the lace 
my own .... 

For loops to the goun 
For more eggine 
a pair white shoes with silver . 



4 





9 





11 


6 


16 





113 3 


6 



Debursments in bussines 1692. Scots 

Decem- To Mr. William Chiesly^ per 
ber 27 receipt for Drumkairn's bussi- 



William Chieslie of Cockburn, W.S. 






1694] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 219 

[Business Charges, etc.] [Scots] 

nes and extracting ane act 
against the tenant in Easton . 58 00 00 
ditto 30 To Mr. William Chiesly for ex- 
peding the gift of Ballancriefs 
wardei . . . . 58 

1693 To Broun messenger for citing of 

July Tersonce . . . . 11 4 

Sept. 30 To Nicoll Somervill agent for 
William Melvill, merchant, for 
ane attestation of the best 
assignation granted by Banja- 
min Wirsely . . . . 34 16 

Octr. 2 To Mr. William Chiesly for in- 

fefting me in Wariston's Land 21 6 
To a consultation in the bussines 

of Landrick . . . 24 

Novr. 22 To Mr. Chiesly for raising a 
sommonds for proveing the 
tenuer of some writs relating 
to Ridhall . . . . 20 

Decmr. 9 To Mr. Chiesly to consult Mr. 

Brody in Meldrum's affair . 11 
ditto 26 To Mr. Chiesly for informations in 

Landrick affair . . . 8 8 

1694 To Mr. Chiesly for extracting 
Januar 3 decriets against Lanrick, 
Meldriun and Kemne, per re- 
ceipt . . . . . 56 
Ditto 8 To consult Lenrick bussiness . 28 10 
24 To the decector of the Chancery 
for passing of my gift of genarell 
receaver ^ . . . . 46 



^ A grant of ward entitled the grantee to draw the rents of an estate held 
' ward ' of the Crown, the owner of which was dead, during the minority of the 
heir, under burden always of the alimony of the heir, widow's terce, etc. The 
tenure of ward was abolished in 1747 in consequence of the ''45.' In the 
present case the grant was made for the minority of Alexander Hamilton, heir 
of his father James Hamilton. 

^ Salary ;^300. 



220 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1694 



[Business Charges, etc.] 

To the servants of the abovsaid . 
To the keeper and under keeper 
of the great seall and purs dues 
To expences at the privie seall . 
Febr. 28 To Mr. Chieslys man Rob 
Young ..... 
May 9 To him for ane execution of 
arristment against Meldrums 
tenets ..... 
July To Mr. Chieslys servants . 
August 2 To Mr. William Chiesly to acount, 
per receipt .... 
23 To Mr. Chiesly per receipt 

To Mr. Chiesly for a sommonds 
of valuation of the tinds of 
Mellersteans 
For writting memorialls about the 
poll ..... 
Deem. To 3 consultations with the Kings 
advocat ^ 2 in Duck Gordons 
business and on in the tinds of 
Mellersteans 
1695 To Mr. Chiesly for Meldrums 

Feb^ 22 bussines, per receipt 

To his men for informations 
writing .... 

March 11 To Sir Archibald Moor ^ he gave 
out in the Duck of Gordons 
bussines .... 

To the sheriffe dark in Aberdien 
to take infeftment in Meldrums 
Land 40lib, expences sending 
ther 4lib 4s. ... 



Scots 
£ s. d. 


6 








100 








13 


4 





8 


12 





14 








6 








240 








40 








5 


16 





2 


8 






100 16 

100 

4 16 

43 10 



44 4 



^ Sir James Stewart, whose curious actings at the time of the Revolution 
earned him the sobriquet of ' Wily Jamie.' 

"^ Probably Sir Archibald Muir of Thornton, afterward Provost of the city of 
Edinburgh. 



1697] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 221 

[Business Charges, etc.] [Scots] 

£ s. d. 
August To Mr. Chiesly per receipt . 66 13 4 

Novr. 1st To Adam Urwin . . . 72 

To Mr. Chiesly to get out the 

decreat about the hows . . 9 8 

To a consultation in Duck Gordon 

bussines . . . . 64 2 

For executing a sommond . 3 4 

To Patrick Christy at the infeft- 

ment takeing . . . 2 10 00 

Take out Mr. Cheslys mony. 

lent first . 240 

It. more per recept 40 

It. more per recept 66 13 4 



346 13 4 



The sume of all the rest is S. 976 14 



Debursments in bussiness, 1697. Scots 

January To Sir Gilbert 1 5 guinys . . 0075 00 00 

To Sir Gilberts man for writing 
informations in the bussiness of 
Ridhall .... 0001 09 00 



^ Sir Gilbert Elliot of Minto practised first as a writer in Edinburgh, acting 
as agent for William Veitch, the convenanting minister, and for the Earl of 
Argyll, whose escape he secured. lie took a leading part in arranging Argyll's 
Rising, and was actually in arms with him, but escaped abroad. Having 
obtained a pardon, he passed for the Bar in November 1688 (having failed to 
pass the examination in the preceding July), was made a Baronet in 1700, and 
became a judge under the title of Lord Minto in 1705. He and his wife were 
evidently intimate friends of the Baillies, as much ' drink-money ' is entered as 
having been left at Minto, and it was to Lady Minto that Baillie gave the com- 
mission, which evidently caused some amusement at the time, and which is 
referred to by Mrs. Calderwood (twenty years after his death), viz. ' to get him 
a fine house at the Cross of Edinburgh with a large garden behind it, that 
he might both have the pleasure of seeing the street and walking in his own 
garden. ' — Coltness Collectiotis, 



222 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1697 

[Business Charges, etc.] [Scots] 

Di. 7th To the clerks and servants for the £ s. d. 

dues of a decreet of making 

a r i s t e d goods forthcoming 

against the tenents of Meldrum 0012 07 00 
To the Signit for horning and 

punding on the decritt . . 0001 16 00 

To Jo: Russell for seeking out the 

process for proving the tener 

of writs relating to Ridhall . 0001 09 00 
To writting 18 informations for 

proving the tenar of said writs 0006 17 00 
Ditt. 18 To Patt. Christy for doing bussi- 

ness Novr. '96 . . . 0005 16 00 

To consult my brother Wills 

assignation .... 0036 00 00 
For a messingers going for 

Meldrum .... 0000 14 00 
July 10 To Mr. Chiesly for expeding of 

bussiness, per recept . . 0042 10 00 

To Mr. Chiesly for a decritt of 

valuation of the tinds of 

Mellersteans . . . 0006 00 00 

Novr. 10 To Sir Gilbert Elliot for the two 

Taylies of my estate 3 guinies 0043 04 00 
To Sir Gilberts man for writting 

them 0008 14 00 

To Androu Car the writers man 0001 00 00 
To Mr. Crafoords man . . 0001 09 



S. 244 5 



Edenburg, January 1704. Publick Burdins. 

Deb: to Cash. Scots 

Cess. 
The lands of Langshaw for 
Martinmas 1703 and Candlemas 
1704 79 19 4 



1704] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 223 

[Business Charges, etc.] [Scots] 

For going in with cess by Androw £ s. d. 

Lamb . . . . 7 
For 3 termes cess by James Gray 

for Jerriswood . . . 32 18 
For 4 tarmes cess out of Meller- 

steans preceeding the 1st of 

September 1704 . . . 236 11 6 



S. 349 15 10 



Expenc at Law. Deb: to Cash. 

Febr. To Alexander Pringle for writting 14 4 
May 30 To bussines in Landrick pay'd 
Rob: Dick in full for head 
courts and all preciding this day 12 13 6 
For the messangers expenc at 

Langshaw in takeing infeftment 7 
For a discharge to Androw Bruce 14 6 
To Houstons brother . . 7 2 

To Alexander Cuningham writter 
for Rickertons bussines and 
others as per his account given 
in ..... 145 7 4 



S. 197 01 4 



Edenburgh, January 1704. Sundry Account. 

Deb: to the Rents of Langshaw. Scots 

For two monthes cess at Canilmes 

1704 payd by the tenants in 

Coumsly hill . . . 39 19 7 

For 4 tarmes cess payd by John 

Mudie in Threepwood the last 

tarme being Cats 1704 . . 5 14 

For cess at Whitsunday 1704 

payd by John Moodie . . 12 



224 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1704 





[Scots^ 
£ s. d. 




29 


18 


6 




1 


8 







1 


8 


6 




39 


18 


3 


s. 


99 


08 


10 



[Business Charges, etc.] 
For cess payd by Thomas Turner 

for the tarme of Whitsunday 

1704 

To cess payd by John Moody 

Febr. 26 ... . 

To cess for Whitsunday 1705 payd 

by John Mudie 
To cess payd by Cumsly Hill 

Septr. 1st 1704 



To loss upon Langshaw rents 
crop and year 1703, this was 
of the Parks set to Thomas 
Ladlay so much doun of the 
rentall . . . S(. 119 13 8 

For kirk stent payd by John 

Mudie, Whit. 1704 . ^. 1 10 

To James Hunter for reparing the 

ivXX jv • • • • • 

August For the foot mantle of Twidale ^ S^. 

For answering at the head court $. 

To Will : Nicolson pay'd by John 
Moodie in Threepwood of few 
duty for the tarmes of Whit- 
sunday and Martimas 1703 S. 14 15 2 

To Will: Nicolson of few duty 
payd by Tho: Turner for Mose 
howses, Coumsly hill and 
Blainsly for the tarmes of 
Whitsunday and Martimas 
1703 . . . . S. 141 8 4 



38 12 


8 


17 7 


8 


1 9 






^ A similar entry occurs in the accounts of the previous year. It was pro-1 
bably an assessment levied under an Act passed in 1661, whereby the commis-l 
sioners of shires were relieved of the expense of providing the costly foot-mantlesj 
worn by them at the Riding of Parliament, which for the future were to be paid] 
for by the shires, to whom they were to be restored at the rising of Parliament. 
Langshaw lay in the shire of Roxburgh or sheriffdom of Teviotdale. 



I 



1704] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 225 

[Business Charges, etc.] [Scots] 

To Will: Nicolson by Moodie in £ s. d. 

Threepwood the few duty for 

Whitsunday and Martinmas 

1704 . . . . S. 14 15 2 

To William Nicolson the few duty, 

Martimas 1704 . . S. 141 8 4 

To the scoolmasters sallary for 

Whitsunday and Martimas 

1703 payd by John Moodie in 

Threepwood . . S. 10 

To scoolmasters sallary by 

Moody for Whitsunday and 

Martimas 1704 . . S. 10 

To the scoolmaster sallarie by 

Ladlay, but recept brunt . S. 10 
To scoolmasters sallary Wliit- 

sunday and Martimas 1704 S. 10 
For a milston to the milne . S[. 21 

For yron work to her £4 13s., 

wright work £14 12 . S(. 19 15 

For lime and meason work to the 

milne howse £14, wright £6 ^. 20 
For puting up Cumsly Hill bire 

£1 18s. more £l 18 . )^. 3 16 a 

For repairing Will. Marssers bire 

howse . . . . Si. 3 4 

For a workmans wages 2 days at 

Thom: Turners . . S. 16 (> 

Oct. To Mr. Willson of Steapond payd 

by T. Ladlay . . S. 261 a 

These artickles marked S^ is caried 
to the 137 fol. in this book 1705. 

Horsekeeping.i 
To expencess in horss keeping. Scots 

Jun. 1693 To James Moor stabler of ane old 

acount . . . . . 87 11 

^ N.B. — Many entries relating to this heading will be found under ' Sundries.' 

P 



■226 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1693 



[Horsekeeping] 

To Moffit, stabler per recept 
Sept. 22d For shoes to horsses . 

1694 To James Moor stabler 
Oct. For girth 4s. 6d., mor 6s. . 

1695 For caring out horss at severall 
Decemr. To James Moor stabler which 

pays all precidings 
To Moffit stablar per recept 
For shoes to horss 
For hay to horses 
For a bridle to the guilding 
For sevarell things to the gueld 

ings leg 
^ This was mostly at Edn. 



To expence of horses at Meller- 
stane which is caried to leger 
particularly by itself 



Scots] 


£ 


s. 


d. 


15 


4 





2 


12 





. 40 











10 


6 


4 








1 

60 








5 


16 





4 


1 





18 











12 





4 


14 


6 



244 



500 



To expences in horskeeping 1696 

January To David Denun, sadlar, per 

recept ..... 

March 8 For a gelding .... 

To Pat. Hunter for horss . 

For horss carrig to Edinburgh . 

For 2 horses to Polwart and shoes 

to the gray hors . 
For bridle to the hors 
For girding .... 

. 1697 For a comb, spung, brush, shiers 
August 20 to the horss 

To take horses out of toun . 

To gress to the horss at the Dean 



46 





266 13 


4 


5 10 





1 12 





9 4 





15 





7 





2 2 


6 


1 





10 4 






lyoS] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



227 



[Horsekeeping] 

Decmr. To Mr. Moor, stabler 
Janr. 1 To Mr. Moor stabler in full of 
1698 acounts preciding this day 

For things bought for the horss at 
Mellerstean as yron and bind- 
ings, etc., go. 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

64 

24 



4 10 



S. 105 8 10 





Scots 





14 6 


4 


11 





9 





12 



14 



12 



Mellerstains, Janr. 1708. Horses expence. 
Deb: to Cash. 
For feading at Ginelkirk . 
For feeding at Ginelkirk £l 6, and 

dwO O • • • • • 

For feeding by the road 9s. 
For drogs to them 
Dec: For 4 coch mares a night at 

Greenlaw .... 
For cleaks to the grate cart traces 

makeing them 
To Patrick Hunter in full for 

stabling this year 
For nets fiet oyls 
For munting the old chariot 
For a crem and plate to a sadle 

and stuffing . . . . 

For mending a clogbag sadle 
For a strip lather and strip yron 
For a chean bitt and bosses 
For a tie to a side sadle . 
For paneling 2 cart sadles one 14s. 

one £l 4s. . 
For a bridle .... 
For a horse comb and a brush to 

Tarn Youll . . . . 16 



39 





2 10 





35 





12 





1 





14 





18 





1 





1 18 





14 






228 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1708 



Horsekeeping" 


'Scots] 




£ 


s. 


d. 


For 2 tathers to the cart horse . 





12 





For a cart sadle 


2 


18 





For 2 new collers to the horse 


1 


6 





For 2 pair cart fiets great tows 


3 


4 





For lamp bleck for the coach 





3 





For 3 bridles and bitts at 20s. . 


3 








For a pair strips and yrons 


1 


2 





For a mane comb 





6 





For a bridle and curple 


2 


2 





For 11 ells girding 


1 


2 





For 6 pair buckles 





12 





For mending a side sadle . 


1 


4 





For a sadle mending 





9 





For 6 ells girdin 12s. 2 pair 








buckles 4s. Ch: Or . 





16 





For yron for shoes at Mellerstains 








this year .... 


25 








For shoeing horse by Pate Newton 








from 19 Sep. 1707 till Janr. 1st 








1709 


20 


2 





S. 


156 


12 


6 



Meller[staine], Janr. 1709. Expence of Coach 

and Horses. Deb: to Cash. Scots 

For oyl to the coach . . 14 

For oyl to horse legs . . 19 

For horse shoes . . . 14 
For expence of horses to George 

Baillie 4 10 

For 3 ell girthin . . . 6 
For a ps of 24 ells girthin from 

John Muckle . . . 14 
June 29 To Patrick Hunter in full of all 

accounts . . . . 9 



I7I0] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



229 



"Horsekeeping] 
July 30 To Barty Gibsone for 2 coach 

mares 13 nights and helping the 

coach ..... 
For mending harnes . 
For glas to the chariot from Mr. 

Burtone .... 

For more glases for the chariot 
For shoeing horse and mending 

sadles .... 

For the white mares expence to 

Cesnock .... 

For horses expence at Kelso, etc. 

For horse expence at Kelso in full 

July 17th For 1 stone 14 ounces yron for 

shoes £1 12s. per stone . 
Aug. 26 For 22 tb. yron at £l 12 per stone 
Decmr. 12 For 3 stone 4 tb. 3 ounces yrone 

at £1 12s. per stone 
For shoeing horses by Pat. 

Newton £18 



"Scots' 


£ 


s. 


d. 


21 








1 


10 





3 


4 





3 


17 





1 


4 





3 








10 








2 


14 


6 


1 


13 


6 


2 


4 





5 


4 





18 








S. 91 


8 






Expence of coch and horses 1710. 
For the coch mares at Ginelkirk 

with Tam Youll 
For gat same to the mares 
For horse sezers [scissors] 
For lamp bleck to the harnes 
For a pint of oyl to the harnes 
Ap. 17 For 1 ston 1 tb. yron for shoes 
For lamp bleck 3d. 
For mending the chariot wheals 
For grase to the powny at Edin 

burgh 6d. per night 



Stg. 






2 





5 





2 





3 





1 6 





2 10 



6 



2 6 



230 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1710 

[Horsekeeping] 
July 6 To Tam of yron for shoes 1 ston 

7 tb. is 3s. lOd. . 
For tethers to the horses 
For lamp bleck 7d.| 
To Bartie Gibson ane account of 

stabling .... 

To Pate Hunter ane account of 

stabling .... 

For bringing the mare and foil 

from Cesnock 
Novr. 1 For 1 ston 1 tb. 5 ounces yron to 

Tam Youll 2s. 9d. 
For a pair safe braces to the coach 
For a pad .... 

For a clogbage sadle, and furnitur 
For ane account of horse expence 

pay'd T. Y 

For oyl to the coach 

For caring out horses 2s. 

For a pair hulsters to the clogbage 

SHQIc • • • • • 

For expence of horses on the road 
To Pat: Hunter stabler in full of 

all preceeding 4 Decmr. 
To sundry accounts laid out by 

George Mathy at Kelso, 

C^ VX/ • • • • • • 

For glas to the chariot by Barton 
For horse at Ginelkerk when we 

went to toun pay'd Shirrifs 

account sometime after 
For expence of horses at Kelso . 
For shoeing horse, by Pat. Newton 

from 1 Janr. 1710 till 6 Novr. 

1710 £1 4s. 6d. . 
For noult feet oyl 
For oyl 2d.^, tar 8d. 
For yron got by Tam Youll 



Sterling 
£ s. d. 
3 10 
3 6 
7i 


1 





17 


3 i 


5 


j 


2 
2 3 

4 
18 


n 


11 
5 
2 


: 1 


3 
3 


* 1 


18 


" 1 


6 
13 


1 


7 

4 


'1 


1 4 
5 
00 
2 


n 



i7ii] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



231 



[Horsekeeping] 

For 2 broad white bridles with bits 
14d. a pair, come and brush 27d. 

For 8 fathom 9 threed tows 13d.|, 
6 pair girth buckles 9d. 

For a broad white bridle 14d. 

To William Miller garner in the 
Abay compleat payment of 
Bartholamew Gibsons account 
for stabline from 31 Janr. 1710 
till 1 Decmr. 1710 

To Clark in Melrose for head 
courts .... 



"Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





3 


5 





1 


lOi 





1 


2 



11 4 8 



2 4 



S. 23 14 



irlO 



Expence of Horses and Coach 1711, Stg. 
Janr. 19 For 3 bolls oates from the 

Tenants of the Mains to the 
Horses at lis. 8d. pr boll . 1 15 

feb. 28 For Horse upon the road 4s. Id., 

more 2s. . . . . 6 1 

For horse at Ginelkirk . . 3 

For stabline at Pat Hunters to 

this day . . . . 10 

For lintsead oyl to the Horse . 6 
For oates to the Horse 
at lis. 8d. from 3 
Sepr. 1710 till Ap. 12 £ , 



1711 . 
more 
For cart Horse 

going to toun 
For 6 bolls light 

oats at 5s. pr 

boll . . 6 



30B If 17 10 



2 3 1 10 



d. 

4 



2 4 8 



1 10 



20 15 O 



232 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1711 



[Horsekeeping] 
For oats more 

to the Horse 3 
which is sett doun 
above sum of all 
is . . .42 



[Sterling] 
£ s. d. 







For Bear to the Horse at 15s. pr 

Boll . . . . If . 

For Bear to the Horses 1 . 

For shoeing Horses payd John 

Flint from Novr. 18 1710 till 

Aprill 18 1711 . . . 

"May 29 For 19 lb. 7 ounes yron from the 

Marchant to Tam youll 3s. 3d. 
For a chapine oyl 9d. 
Sepr. 21 For 2 Colts gelding the ordirier 

price is a shillin I gave . 
For gras to Horse at Edn . 
To a Ferrier for the young coch 

mare ..... 
For a bridle Is. payd Trotter 

sadlers account at Kelso 15 
For cutting down the Hay in 

Jerriswood Park . 
For cutting doun Coltcrooks 

Meadow .... 
For horses at Edn. . 
For poling sisers 5d. 9 fathom 

9 threed tows 15d. strip lethers 

16d. ..... 

For a fine bridle 26d. another 18d. 
For 14 Bolls oates at lOsh. from 

12 Ap. till 1st Sepm. 
For 1 boll 1 fou peas at 15s. from 

Apl. 12 till Sepm. 1 . 
To William Miller Gardner in the 

Abay full payment of Barthola- 

mew Gibson stablers account 






8 








3 








5 


6 





3 


3 








9 





4 








2 


6 





2 


6 





16 





3 











15 








2 


6 





3 








3 


8 


7 











18 






I7I2] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 233 

[Horsekeeping] [Sterling] 

from 1 July 1711 till 21st Novr. £ s. d. 

1711 8s. 8d. . . . 8 8 

To Pate Hunter stabler till 18 

August 1711 . . . 3 6 8 

To Pate Newton for shoeing 6 . 

horse from Mart. 1710 till 

Martemas'1711 1£ 10s., mending 

the chariot 2s. 8d., rumping 2 

horse Is. . . . . 1 13 8 

To James Hunter wright for the 

chariot mending . . . 5 

For yron to the coach and Tarr 

8s. 6d. from Liedhouse . . 8 6 

For dresing a boar skine Is! lOd. 

more ..... 
For 20 Rucks Hay at 10s. prUuck 
For Grass to 14 horses 
To timber to the coach wheels 

l£ 14s. 4d. yron l£ 5s. 4d. 

making them l£ 8s. 4d., shoeing 

them l£, collering 5s. 4d., Tarr 






1 


10 


10 








14 









S. £73 10 11 



Expence of Coch and Horses 1712. Stg. 

Coch etc. Horses Corn and Stra 

For oyl to the coch .040 
For a comb and brush 2 3 
For hemp sead . 16 

For oats to the Horses 
from the 1st Septmr 

1711 till the 22 May 

1712 at lOsh. pr boll 



234 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Horsekeeping] 



[1712: 



[Coch 



b: f. 
38 4 1 

For strangers 

horses . 2 

May 23 For horses put 
in the stable 
chist this day 1 3 . 



This stra 
was 1711 
crop and 
spent last 



For Peas Straw at 
lOd. . 30st 

For oat stra at 
8d. . 

For bear strat 
at 6d. 



100 



32 



year but To a boll Lang- 
was forgot shaw light 
to be in- oats 4s. 2d. . 4 

cert till For bear at 4sh. 8d. 
the acct 2 fouls 

was clos'd For helping the chariot 
by Hunter 8 days . 
For mending horse 

furniture 
For 100 nails to the 

coach . 
To the Ferrier for the 

Gray Mare . 
For oyl to the coach 
For mending sadles by 
Trotter 



[Sterling] 

Horses Corn and Stra] 

£ s. d. 



5 



4 



10 



16 



4 



21 4 



42 


2 




For light oats 






to the horse 






5s. • 4 





10 


For pease at 






15s. . 


2 


6 



15 

3 6 8 

16 

16 8 

4 8 



2 



I7I2] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 235 



[Horsekeeping" 








[Sterling 


[Coch 


etc. 


Horses Corn and Stra] 


' 








£ s. d. 


For oyle to Gray Mare 








16 


For bran and Drogs 










when colded . 








5 


For 12 ells Girthing at 










2d. very broad 





2 







For 2 pair strip lathers 








r» 


2s. 3d., buckles 18d. 





3 


9 


■: 


For shoe to a horse . 








4. 


I 


For Tarr to the coach 










6d., oyl 2s., bleck 










3d. . 





2 


9 




For expenc on the 










road to Edn . 








2 


For mending the coach 










and 2 pair shekles, 










the shekles with nails 










15d. a pair . 





3 


6 




For expences on the 










road 








3 


To a pyper at Red- 










breas for the horse 








10 


Deem. 10 To Patrick Hunter in 










full of all Accounts 










for this year 








2 12 


For two trees for polls 





2 







For mending of sadles 










at Kelso, etc. 





5 


3 




For mending sadles by 










Mrs. Troter 





1 







For the Hay of Jerris- 










wood Park last year 










being still untoucht 








6 


For the Hay of Colt- 










crooks . 








10 


For stra which comes 










to 7£ 5 of crop 1712 








7 5 



236 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1709 



[Horsekeeping] 

To Pat Newton for 
shoeing horse from 
the last March 1712 
till last March 1713 



[Sterling] 

[Coch Horses Corn and Stra] 

£ s. d. 



2 



£4 2 4 35 12 



[1709] 



Estate Management.^ 
The expence of repairing tenants houses. 



Deb: to Cash. [Scots] 

March 22 For meason and wright work in 
Langshaw Milne allowed to 
' '^ Thomas Ladly this day . . 44 7 8 

For naills to sclate the house, etc., 

of Langshaw . . . 6 10 

June 8 For a milne stone to Langshaw 

Milne bought by James Deas . 20 12 

For doors to Moss houses . . 2 8 

For a nather milston from Green- 
law to Langshaw. 

For sclateing the house of Lang- 
shaw by Pat: Thomsone . 30 

To Jamie Blakie 2 days at Lang- 
shaw cutting timber . . 14 

To Mellerstains workmen at 

Langshaw Dam . . . 5 15 

For helping to put up Langshaw 

Park dicks . . . . 28 

For repairein the stone dicks at 

Langshaw . . . . 16 

For 6 loads lime for Langshaw 

House . . . . 1 16 

For divits to Langshaw House . 3 6 

For thicking LangshaW stables . 4 10 





8 




^N.B. — Many entries relating to this heading will be found under ' Sundries. 



1709] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 237 

[Estate Management] 

To a milne wright for repaireing 

Langshaw Milne . 
To said milne wright Munga Dick 

half a boll meall . 
To Munga Park measone for re- 
paireing Langshaw IMilne 
For yrone £5 lOsh., casting divits 

to Langshaw Milne £5 12s. 
For nails to the milne by John 

Boe and other yron work 
For other expences at Langshaw 

Miln by Ja: Ainsly 
For reparations in Over Langshaw 

and Mose Houses . 
For glazing Langshaw Houss 
For lime to Langshaw House 
For casting divots to Langshaw 

Milne 

For divits leading and other work 

at Langshaw House 
For pan cratch a boll £l 14, Tam 

Youlls expence a night with a 

horss going to the Pans for it, 

he haveing corn along with him 

6sh. 4d. and custome 
For pan cratch to the Tour head 
For 4 days bringing the cratch at 

5s 

For drawing thack to the thicker 
For helpnig the pigion house at 

Jerriswood .... 
For a furlite to Langshaw Milne 



Scots 
£ s. d. 
42 


9 





48 





11 2 





7 2 





4 10 




41 18 

13 

2 


8 




7 





11 






2 





4 


1 


16 





1 











10 





1 


10 





2 









S. 369 9 4 



238 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1710 



5 



2 



10 
Ormstons 



[Estate Management] 
Expence of repairing Tenants Houses, 
May 15 For repairing Tarn 
Williamsons house 
and the smithes T: 
Hop 
' For 4 days thicking of 

these houses by 
Mowit . 

For building the 
smidy belonging to 
John Flint by Tarn 
H. 

For divits to Jamie 

house when he entred to it 

For repairing Coltcrooks park 
dick by Kerncorse 

For 4000 divits for Ormston and 
Thomsons houses . 

For stinging the barn 9 J day 

For 56 threve bear stra for sting- 
ing the barn at 4d. per threve 
1709 crop .... 

To Hunter for 2 cuples in the 
smithes house and two in Tam 
Williamsons house and timering 
them and helping the nurses 
house . . . . 

For service at the smidy 11 days 
more at it and T: W: 19 

For 5000 divits for Tam William- 
sons house .... 

For building the kitchen payd 
Munga Dick 3 15 2 

To Mungae for the park gate 
makeing .... 

For the nurses house repairing . 

For John Brouns house, for 1709 
repairing .... 



[Sterling] 
1710. 



£ s. d. 
17 



16 

9 8 

4 
4 9 

18 8 



6 


8 


12 


6 


5 





3 05 


2 


2 





6 


li 



11 1* 



171 1] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 239 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For repairing Langshaw Dicks . 15 6 
For repaireing Langshaw Milne 

houses which compleats them at 

James Ainslys entry payd to 
( Munga Dick . . . . 2 

For repaireing Mose Houses payd 

the said Munga Dick in pairt 

4s. 5^ . . . . 4 5^-% 

For repairing Alexander Pringles 

houses in Langshaw . . 7 3 

For divits casting to Langshaw 

Milne house at 12d. per thou- 
sand ..... 
For lime to the slouse of the milne 
For nails and wooud bands to the 

Milne ..... 
To Munga Dick in full of Mose- 

houses reparations 
For mending Langshaw Miln 

whiel and traugh 
For 4000 divits to malt barn, etc. 
For repairing Coumsly Hill and 

Over Langshaw payd Munga 

Dick the timber all cutt on the 

ground . . . . 11 4 

For 3400 divits to Coumsly Hill, 

and 2400 to Over Langshaw 

5000 to Langshaw office houses 3 5 



1 











1 


6 





2 


8 





12 


lOi ] 


1 


7 


6 





4 






29 8 lOj^^ 



Reparations of Langshaw Barrony 1711. 

[Sterling] 
For repairing Langshaw Park 
Dicks when Thomas Turner 
entred to them Mart. 1710 . 5 10 



240 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[i7ir 



[Estate Management] 

Repairing Houses 1711. 

For helping the walls of Mains 
Houses by Imry . 
May 29 For bilding up the Stable and 

coachhouse by John Wilson 

For three shovels 

For cloding Jerviswood Park 5sh. 
6d. 

For building Jerviswood Park 
door . . . . . 

For 17^ days work at Cochhouse 
and Stable by John Wilson at 
lOd. a day without meet 

For pan crach to the tour head 
2s. 2d. pr boll, cariage 2s. 6d. . 

For Nails .... 

For building the Kitchen payd 
Mungo Dick 2 15 2 . 

For 53 days work of 5d. men 
about the houses this year 

For 114 5d. days at the Kitchen 

2 7 6 

For work about the House and 
for dails, etc. 

For cariing home the Dails the 
100 dails the rest our own 
horses . . . . . 

For building the Kit- 
chen by Imry in full 
of his . . .18 

For building the 
Kitchen by John 
Young . . .14 8 

For work about the House by 
Hunter 33 days lOd. pr day . 

For 468 foot pavement at 2d. pr 
foot in kitchen and trance 



[Sterling] 



£ 


s. 


d. 





5 








6 








3 


6 



1 a 



14 


2 


4 


8 


10 


6 


2 15 


2 


1 1 


3 


2 7 


6 


25 





13 


4 



2 12 8 

17 6 

3 18 



i 



I7I2] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



241 



[Estate Management] 
For 45 days work at the quarie for 

the pavement 
For helping Caltcrooks park Dicks 

by Tam Hope 5| . 
For Nails from Liedhouse Is. 6, 

yron for sundry uses 16sh. 
For inclosing the Thack Meadow 

to the Tenants in Mellerstaine 

Mains at 8d. pr Rood 
For inclosing the Bogg in Meller- 
staine Mains at 8d. pr Rood 





"Sterling 




£ 


s. 


d. 







18 


1 







5 


6 







17 


6 




7 


3 


4 




12 








s. 


62 


14 


8 



Expence of Repairing Tenants Houses 1712. 



March 24 For puting a band 
about Langshaw 
Miston 1 

For building Malt Barn 
at 15sh. pr Rood . 

For 2 days by Hunter 
at Tho Willisons 
House 

For 5 days at Hall 
Houses 
July 3 To James Hunter for 
John Humes House 
cuples 5 

For George Dodses 
chimny and win- 
dows 4 days . 



Millstone. 



Sterline Money 

Barony of 
Langshaw. 



2 1 



5 



3 4 



12 6 



18 



Q 



242 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1712 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

For Timber paydJohn £ s. d. 

Gibson for Fanns 

Scooll . , 11 8 

For bands to the spinle 

and armes Lang- 

shaw Milne . . 3 8 

For John Boes work 

at the Spinle and 

armes . . 2 6 

To Ammers Wright 

for work 4 days 

there ... 3 10 

For timber to the 

Garners house and 

George Dodses .15 8 
For Meason and 

wright work at 

Garners house by 

MungaDick atl2ds. 

a day lad 8ds. . 2 13 8 
For work by Munga 

Dick at making a 

chimny to Dodses 

House . . .010 

For puting up Coum- 

slyhill barn, etc. . 15 4 

For Hillandmans Ber- 
ing Dick 12 days .050 
For more timber from 

Park for Garners 

House . . .19 

For 4 doors crooks and 

bands to Coumsly- 

hill ... 13 4 

£6 17 9 3 12 



iyi2] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 243 

[Sterling] 



Estate Management" 








For mending old 








Ditch Dick in Colt- 


£ 


s. 


d. 


crooks . 








10 


For the Dick and 








Ditch at 8s. pr 








Rood in Coltcrooks 





10 





For helping Coltcrooks 








Ditch Dick 10 days 





4 


2 


For 10 thousand 








Divits for Hall 








House 





10 





For 6 days work at 








Hall House 5d. men 





2 


6 


For 3000 divits to 








Fanns Scooll 





3 





For for Coltcrooks 








park to Munga Dick 





3 


8 


S. 


£1 


14 


2 



Expence of Repairing Mellerstaine Tour and 
offices Houses 1712. 

For hair to plaster the Kitchin at [Sterling] 

9d. a stone . . . . 6 6 

For Nails 7s., more 4s. 6 . . 11 6 

May 13 For 400 ^vindows at 2d.|, 200 

doors at 5d., 200 planshers at 

8d. p hunder . . . 3 

For Nails 4s. 4d., 1000 windows, 

200 doors, 200 planshers . 8 7 

For 45, 5d. days at the quarie for 

payment to the Kitchin, etc. . 18 9 
For flooring the Milk House, etc. 

by Thomson . . . 10 

22 For 13 days Meason work about 

the House by David Imry . 17 



244 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1712 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

For 65 days work of 5d. men £ s. d. 

about the House, etc. . . 12 1 

For 24 days 5d. men at the stone 

quarie . . . . . 10 

For work about the dicks by 

John Clark 25 days at 5d. . 8 9 
June 24 For biging the Collhouse 9 days, 

other work 3 1 days by Tam Hope 12 6 
For building the house of office by 

Tho Hope 5 days . . 5 

For nin score Dails from Eymouth 

and Berwick to the house only 

110 of them at lid. . . 5 10 

For bringing home two carts full 

Daills from Berwick . . 13 8 

Ditt 16 To James Miller Glazier 2£ to 

account in full of all 2£ Is. 8 . 4 1 8 
For Nails from Liedhouse 2s. 8d., 

for yron from him 3s. . . 5 8 

For lead 2lb. 4d., lime lis. 8d., 

lime 5s. . . . . 17 

For Nails 5s. 4d., 3s. 5d., 4s., Is. 

8d., and more 5s. 7d. . . 10 

For 60 Dails from Aymouth 

brining home . . . 6 3 

To William Moor lis. 6d. . . 16 

To John Smith for makeing and 

mending smith work 2£ . 2 

Sep. 2 For wright work about the house 

by James Blakie 4£ . . 4 

For plastering l£, more wright 

work by James Blakie 2£ 7s. . 3 7 
To James Hunter for sawing 

Dails lOd. a day 6 days . 5 

For work about house and offices 

houses by the 5ds. men, etc. . 4 14 8 



S. £33 7 4 



1713] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 245 

Expence of Repairing Tenants Houses 1713. 

Mellerstanes Langshaw 
For mending Lang- 
shaw Milne Arms . 2 1 
For Nails to the park 

gate ... 003 



4 9 



For cuting down colt- 








crooks Hay 





17 





For 5d. men at Colt- 








crooks park . 





18 


6 


For hay rakes 6 





1 


4 


For suples to the barn 





1 


3 


. 


1 


18 


1 


June To Andrew Lambs 








expences at fairs . 





1 





Fuly 17 To his expence 





1 


4 



To his expences Is. 2. 1 2 



For 2600 divits to 2 4 

Fanns House 23 6d. a 

days work by Jamie 

Paterson that has it 

2 9 2 9 
To Munga Dick for 

work at Fanns house 2 



£0 3 6 

Expence of Repairing Mellerstean Tour and 

office Houses 1713. [Sterling] 

For 8 sto. whitening from Grive 
in Dunce at 8ds. p stn. 
June 18 For Nails . . . .064 

For Lead to door crooks . . 18 



\ ■ 



246 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1713 



[Estate Management] 

For a mutchkin lientsead oyl 

16ds. 2d., white lead 8ds. 
For a Muchken Lintsead oyl 15ds. 
For a botle to hold it 2ds. 3^ 
For 8 st. whitening Grive in Dune 

at Sds. pr ston 
For a chopine lintsead oyl 14ds., 

culours for dyill lOds. 
For 20 1 days stinging the house 

Sds. and meat 
For 100 threve bear stra at Sds. 

for stinging the house 
To Pat Newton for smith work 

till Lambes 1713 . 
To Mean Meason for work about 

the house .... 
For 5| road meason work in the 

garden dick upon the North 

side by Robert Mean at lis. Sds. 
For work by 5d. men about the 

House and Dicks till the IS day 

July 1713 .... 
For 5d. men at back close till 18 

July ..... 
For 12 yron snakes for windows 

at Dunce .... 
For pan cratch 2s. 6d., cariing it 

2s. 6d., paynting tour head 2s. 
For a wainfull Dails bringing 

from Berwick 
For a rake lime 4s. 2ds. 
For 8 trees and 60 dails from 

Edmiston in Berwick 
For smith work about the house 

by Hardy .... 
For more smith work at Gordon 

5s., more Is. 2d., more Sd. 
For thicking the kitchin 2s. 6d. . 



[Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 





2 








1 


3 








6 

^12 





5 


4 





2 








13 


S 


1 


5 





1 











6 






3 4 2 






17 








9 








6 








7 








6 


10 





4 


2 


3 


15 


6 





14 








6 


10 





2 


6 



1714] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 247 

[Estate Management] 

For 50 Dails at Is., 60 at 9ds. from 

Will. Robertson in Aymouth . 
For 4 lb. white leed a chapine lint- 

sead oyl 2s. 7ds. . 
For a tree from Park 5 Nails 3s. . 
For wright work by James Blackie 



Sterling' 
£ s. d. 


4 


15 








2 


r 





8 





3 


9 





£23 


11 


n 6 
"12 



Repairing Mellerstaine Tour and office Houses 1714. 

[Sterling] 
Ap. 14 For yron from James Liedhouse 

last year haveing cleard all 

accounts with him till this day 12 
For lime lis. last year . . 11 

For 7 loads lime at 6ds., 3s. 6d., 

An^ expences 9ds. to new house 4 8. 
For stones to soil the big oven 

and building up the mouths of 

Both with new hewen ston and 

stons for their mouthes and the 

workmenship with their meat 

3 of them 3 days Sanders Mean 

and his sons a grot to the lads . 10 4 
Ap. 27 To James Pringle at founding the 

House 4d., Blakie at Aymouth 

2s 2 4 

To James Pringle for building the 

back office houses 12d. pr day 3 10 

May 24 To Jamie hunter for work about 

the house last year . . 9 Q 

For Nails to the new house 9s. 

Nails 7s. 6d.,. more 5s. . . 116 

For 3 thousand Divits to the new 

House . . . . .030^ 

For 4 days barrowmen Is, 8d. A. 

Hardy . . . . . 18- 



248 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

For thicking the house 2s. 8d., 2 £ s. d. 

shuffels 3s. 2d. . . . 5 10 

For bring home three wanefuUs of 

dails and trees to the house . 10 3 

For glazing the new house 100 

ches losens 36 foot wire losens 

at 3d. and 4d. 
For payment and laying the litle 

close by Alex'' Mean 
For days work about the house by 

him . . . . 

For expence of the cart horse 

going to Coldstream 
For mending the glass windows 

from Aug. 18, 1713 till July 12 
For Nails at severall times 17s. 2d., 

X o» • • • • • 

For 265 ells Casow at the well back 
closes at 2d. pr ell without meat 

For 5d. men 69 days at the offices 
houses in back close 
Sept. 6 For leveling and leeding stons to 
the back closes 86 days . 

For 8 days Meason work about the 
house ..... 

For 100 dais brought home in two 
wains . . . 

For 4 trees from George Dods 

To Pate Newton for smith work 
about the house and workmens 
shuvels and house 
Sept. 11 To 5ds. men 65 days at back wind 
and sowing dails 6 of them 
which clears of all the 3 work- 
men to this day also 18 days 
' ' work by John Shirra 83 in all . 1 14 7 

Nov. 19 To 5ds. men for work at Dicks 

houses, etc. . . . . 2 18 



2 








2 


7 








5 








2 





1 


3 








18 


2 


2 


3 


4 


1 


8 


9 


1 


15 


10 





8 








13 


6 





5 








13 


6 



j.yi4] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 249 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

For Lime Is. 2d., 3s., glazing in £ s. d. 
full to Miller by R. T. Is. 8d. . 5 10 

For bands, locks, and sneoks to the 
offices houses by Hara/ Smith 
in Gordon Is. 4d., more 2£ 5s. 2 6 4 

To John Mowit for stinging the 

house and dick . . . 17 6 

For 20 dails from James Blakie 

l£, cariing 3s., 4d. . . . 13 4 

;Nov. 24 To Jamie Blakie cleard all ac- 
counts and payd . . . 8 8 

For thicking the house by Young 

8 days 8 

For 1 St. 11 lb. yron for quarie 

work, looms mending . . 4 6 

For more yron 4s. 8d„ 2 shuvels 



3s. 2d. . 




• 


7 10 


For 34 lb. lead 5s. 9d. 




• 


5 9 




£41 8 7 


, c 

Mellerstaine, Janry 1714. Repairing 


Tenants Houses. 


Mellerstaine. Langshaw. 


To Amers Milne wright 






Sterling' 


for Langshaw Mile 








Wheel . 






5 19 4 


To Munga Dick for 








over Langshaw barn 








10 days 8ds. 






6 8 


To Munga Dick 2 days 








building up the 








cross and tronn 





2 





To a Meason to finish 








out the Malt Kill 








and barn 


1 








To Ainsly for over- 








langshaw Houses . 






6 



250 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1714 

[Estate Management] [Sterling] 

To John Gray for £ s. d. 

doors at Mosehouses 5 

For a door to Coumsly 

hill and 2 days work 4 8 

For casting Divits to 

the Malt barn 12ds. 

p 1000 . . .050 

For 2 suples 3d. more 

2 suples 2j^d. 
For flals and hudins 

to Tam Bell . .011 

For tar to the sheep 

last year in the toun 2 4 
To Hope Meason 2 

days at Jerriswood 

Park dick . .020 

To 5d. men at Jerris- 
wood park dicks and 
._. ..„,__„ other dicks . .218 

To 5d. men at Colt- 
crooks park dick 9 

days . . .039 

Septm. 6 For 5d. men at the 

Hay 27 days being 

9 day each . . 11 3 

For 5d. men at the 

park dicks . .071 

For working at the 

Hay by 5d. men etc. 10 
For cuting the Hay in 

nm-sary ground .080 
For 2 days at Nurses 

house . . .010 

£5 15 2 7 13 



1709] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 251 

Expense of Garden.^ 

Mellerstaines, Janr. 1709. Expence of the 

Gardine. Deb: to Cash. [Scots] 

For 2 spads £6, a how £l 16s. . 7 16 
For men to work with the garner 

at 5sh. per day . . . 3 10 

For 3 rackes, a howe, a pairin 

yron, a stalk for a Hne threed, 

and a pair of fork grains . 2 2 

For plants at 4s. per 100 . . 2 8 

To Samuill Robsone in Brigend 

for gardine seeds . . . 19 11 

For spinage sead 4 ounces at 

Edinburgh . . . . 11 

For 51 day by Tarn Youll in the 

gardine at 5d. [stg.] . . 12 15 

Decmr. 12 For workmen at the gardine 

preceeding this date 
For workmen at the gardine 
For 34 foot glass for hote beds . 



29 





2 10 





7 12 






S. 87 15 



Expence of the gardine 1710. [Sterling] 

For a tb. peas . . . . 13 

Ap. 22d For workmen at 5d. a day, delving 15 
To Tam Youll at the boulling 

green 15| days . . . 6 5| 
To White in Fans and Black in 

Mellersteans at the boulingreen 9 2 

For plants 3s. 6d., peas Is. 3d. . 4 9 
For gardine seads from Brigend 

Garner . . . . 17 



^ Many entries relating to this heading will be found under ' Sundries.' 



252 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Expense of Garden] 

For 3 shuffels 
For 200 days work at the 
Boullingreen at 5d. per day 





[1710 


Sterling' 
£ s. d. 
3 6 


4 


3 4 


7 


10 5^^ 



Expense of the Gardine 1711 
For Spades 2 at 4sh. 6d., shaffels 

4 at Is. 2d. 
For Gardine seads 
For pursly sead 
For a watering cann c. o. . 
For 106 5d. days at the Bowlin 

green . . . . 



s [Sterhng' 





13 


8 


1 


5 


6 





1 


4 





4 


4 


2 


4 


2 


S. £4 


9 






Expence of the Gardine 1712. 
For a lb. of white pease 
For men to work the ground at 

5d. p day .... 
For a lb. firr sead 
For inclosing the Nursary 80 5d. 

days ..... 
For 78 5d. days trinching and 

setting trees and in gerdine 
For 19 days at Jerriswood 

Nursary more 
For 38 days ditehen out the 

Nursary Dicks 
For 25 days more at setting out 

the trees .... 









6 





15 








12 





1 


13 


4 


1 


12 


6 





8 








15 


10 





10 


5 



I7I3] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



253 



I 



[Expense of Garden] 

For young Trees bought by John 

Hope which was a perfit cheat 
For Elm sead from Hundalie 
For 2 shuffels 2s. . 
For a Hne threed 7d. 
For gardine seads by John Hope 

from Samuell Robsone . 
For a syth .... 
For a spade 3s. 8 a shovell 18d. 

another shovell 14d. 
For a spade 4s. 2ds. . 
For 5ds. men at the Green 80 

days ..... 
For 5d. men at the Gardine 20 

days ..... 



Sterling 


£ 


s. 


d. 


2 


10 








2 


6 





2 











7 


1 


16 


8 





2 








6 


4 





4 


6 


1 


13 


8 





8 


4 



S. £13 14 2 



1713 



Expence of the Gardine 


Sterling 


For a spade Berwick 3s. 6d. 





3 


6 


For floors 2s., 2 shovles c. 0. 3s. . 





5 





For a long syth 2s. 2d., sharpening 








stons 4ds. a pice . 





3 


6 


For a spade c. 0. 4s., 3 lb. clover 








sead 2s. 3d. .... 





2 


3 


For a lb. lime sead 5s. 6d. . 





5 


6 


For 5ds. men and others at the 








Boulling green and banks 


5 


12 


6 


For 5d. men at the North wall till 








18 July .... 





14 





For 5ds. men at Gardine 4s. 6d. 








at for close l£, gravell 4 . 


1 


5 


6 


For 5ds. men at the Gardine 








10 


For 34 ewe trees from William 








Miller ..... 


5 









254 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1713 



Expense of Garden" 


Sterling" 


For a roling ston from Kimmer- 


£ s. d. 


gham ..... 


12 6 


For Gardin seads and tree seads 




Samuell Robson 


4 


For John Humes expences 2s. 8d., 




more Is. ... . 


3 8 


For trees from Earlston . 


1 19 




£21 9 



Elms 15s.L 100 geans 2d. 



•2i 



Sep. 6 



For 200 firs 12s. pr 100 . 

For 5d. mens work in the Gardine 

and at planting 192 days for a 

years time . . . . 

Sep, 9 For smith work by Pat Newton 

till this day .... 



Sterling 


1 


16 








2 


6 





8 






Expence of the Gardine and Planting 1714. 



For trees from Jedbrugh . 

To Sr Pat. Scots Garner for geting 

the Allers .... 
March For 2 spades at Edn. 

For John Humes expences going 

about seeds, trees, etc. . 
For a spade from my father 

4s. ..... 

For a syth 2s. another syth and 

2 sharping stons 3s. 
For Gardine seeds this year 
For 2800 thorns 10s. pr 1000 . 
For Anemonys 4d. Ranunculus 3d. 

Junquils Id. Tulips 2d. . 
For 40 plains Id. pr pice, 1000 



4 8 



4 






5 







13 


4 




8 







5 







8 


4 




4 





4 











7 






1694] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 255 

[Expense of Garden] [Sterling] 

£ s. d. 
For Akorns 2s., Mrs. Mean Is. . 3 
For lines Is. . . . . 10 



14 9 10 



Expence of the Gardine and Planting 1718. 



For chestons and Walnuts 
For 300 horse chestons 
For a sneding knyf Is. 6d. 



For corn to Cart Horses 



Sterling] 


1 5 





6 





1 11 





3 2 





2 5 






Doctors and Surgeons.^ 

To docters and chirurgions. 

1694 To a consultation of chirurgions [Scots] 
Janr. 4th for my leg . . . . 34 16 

March 18 To John Baillie cherurgion for 

drawing my wife blood . 5 16 

Jun. 6 To John Baillie and DocterKirton 2 

for wateing on me in my flux . 
. July 2 To Mr. Knox for letting blood . 
. 1695 For blooding .... 
For Sarsaroot^. 



92 16 





3 12 





3 10 





16 6 






^ Many entries relating to this heading will be found under ' Sundries.' 
2 Doctor George Kirkton, a first cousin of George Baillie. See p. 31. 
' Sarsa or sarsaparilla, a still much employed medicine. 



256 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695, 



[Doctors, etc.] 

Augt. To Docter Sincklair.^ 
Novr. To Docter Burnits man at two 
times. ..... 

To John Baillie cherurgion 
For Sarsa root 
January To Docter Sincklar . 



[Sterling] 

£ s. d. 

11 12 

5 16 
34 16 

6 
11 12 



S. 226 12 
To more expence of Docters, etc. 399 14 



S. 626 6 a 



1696 To Docters and cherurgions. 
January To George Kirton for his pains 

Aprill For 3 ib. sarsaparella 
To Docter Sincklair . 
9 To Mr. Rainolds per recept 
To Mr, Rainalds 
For Andersons pills . 
To Georg Kirkton 8 rex dollers to 

account 
To Georg Kirton for blooding 
May To Georg Kirton to acount 
January To Docter Burnits man 

1697 To Docter Senclair . 
To his man 



[Scots] 

29 a 

13 10 

46 16 a 

120 

60 

2 

23 4 

5 16 

13 16 

2 18 

52 

2 



1 Elsewhere called Dr, St, Clair. Probably Dr. Matthew St. Clair of Herd- 
manston, East Lothian, the ancestor of the present Lord Sinclair. He was a 
deputy-lieutenant of East Lothian, and was in command of the party who went 
to interview Mr. Hepburn of Humbie, who in 17 15 was considered as likely to 
join the rising. In the skirmish which followed Keith's younger son was killed, 
'the first that was killed in the late rebellion,' — Rae's Rebellion. In revenge 
the Highlanders plundered Herdmanston House ' of everything valuable which 
they could carry with them.' — Rae's Rebellion, 



1694] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



257 



[Doctors, etc.] [Scots] 

Febr. 12 To Georg Kirton a guiny at 23s. £ s. d. 

6d 14 2 O 

Jany. To Docter Sincklair . . 69 12 0' 

1698 To Docter Sinckair . . . 59 14 O 

S. 197 8 0* 



Small Payments. 
Sundr\^ small things. 

1694 Jun. For nidles .... 

For paper, puder, and jasamin . 
To Greenocks man^ . 
To materialls to japan ^ 
For drinkmony and horss hire at 

Temple .... 

October For caring books 14s., for paper 

and for a coch 
For sevarell small things 6tb. for 

safer of a mufe 2tb 18. . 
For paper, wax, pens, 14s, pins, 

knitins, 12s. 
1695 For sevarell small things Itb. 16, 

sevarell things 3tb. 13 . 
Febr. 23 To Christinins .... 
For a coch 14s., Greenocks man 

14s., flitting the seller lOsh. . 
To Lisi Rainald for my Robins 

vallantin gloves 
To the poor 6tb., to Jedbrughs^ 

cochman 14s., corks 9sh. 



[Scots] 

1 a 

14 

2 

3 a 

4 13 
19 
8 18 
16 

5 9 
8 14 

1 18 

1 10 

7 3 



^ Sir John Shaw of Greenock. 

^ Japanning must have been a comparatively new art in Scotland at this time, 
for in 1705 a petition was presented to Parliament by Sarah Dalrymple for 
leave to carry on 'a japaning manufactory,' which was opposed by two glass 
makers, * M. la Blanc and Mr. Scott.' 

' William Kerr, Lord Jedburgh. 

R 



258 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1695 



[Small Payments] 
For tape thrid 12s., to a barber 

14s., to a nurs 3tb. 10 . 
To a poor womian itb. 8, drink 

mony to nurses 7 . 
ForacochTs. To Reths ^ nm-s 3tb. 

10, thrid and knitins 2tb. 2s. . 
Jun. To John Formons mariadg for my 

self and gris .... 
For letters 13s. Lady Boyis 

womans mariadg . 
For taking Nany to Polwarth 

Hows and to buy sop . 
To Docter Sincklars childs 

christining .... 
July For powder and jassamin . 

To the woman in the tobuith 

lib. 9s. To Tam Noble lib. 9s. 
August For letters lib. For letters from 

London betwixt August 94 and 

this day .... 

For helpin windows 10s. To 

Manson, barber, l4s. 
To Drink mony in the contry 
For letters 

To Adam cochman . 
Novr. To Provist Chis's nurs 

To letters at the post 2lb. 4 
To Greenocks man 14, Torwoodly 

nurs 3lb. 
Deemr. To Drumsho boys, etc. 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

4 16 

8 18 

5 19 

6 10 
3 10 
2 12 

5 16 

1 12 

2 18 

9 

14 

8 

1 13 

2 18 
2 16 

2 4 

3 14 
2 10 



S. 122 



^ Alexander, Lord Raith, at one time Lord Treasurer Depute for Scotland. 



1696] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



259 





Small Payments' 


Scots" 




Sundry small debursments, 1696. 


£ s. 


d. 


Janr. 


To Andrew Lamb 


10 







To hansels .... 


10 





20th 


For knitins and tap 15s. . 


15 





Aprill 


For letters 9s. to Ladikins to a 








poor woman 11. lis. 


2 







For threed ll. 14s., for coch heirs 








Xl» t70» • • • • * 


3 3 







For letters ll. 5s. For paper 7s., 








powder 121., to An Faa ll. 9s. 


3 13 







To Justice Clarks ^ nurs 


2 18 







For a bell and cord to the door . 


1 9 







For cariing books 


1 13 







For washing a goun 


1 9 







To a christining of a child of 








Breastmills .... 


5 16 







To the woman in Tolbooth 


14 


6 


July 


For letters 15s., mor 41. 8s. 


5 3 







To Will Padyen 


1 16 







For a hather brush 3s., pins 10s. . 


13 





Agust. 


For threed 18s., pins 10s., knitins 
10s. 








To the falconer 14s. 


14 





Sept. 


To the Justice Clarks man 


1 9 





Octobr. 


To a barber for half a year 


3 14 





1st 


For 4 ounces of threed 


2 18 





Novr. 


For letters .... 


2 19 







To Car when he brought in Rachy 


1 18 







To Will: Padyen 


14 







To gloves to Marin Li das . 


10 







To the woman in Tolboth 


14 







To Meg Vas . 


2 18 







To Gavin Plumers ^ nurs . 


2 18 







To my sister Elisabeth I gave her 

S. 


2 







65 00 


00 



1 Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, appointed 28th November 1692. 
^ Frequently mentioned in the Account Book of Sir John Foulis, 



260 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1697 



[Small Payments] 
Sundry small Debursments, 1697. 

January To hansels and new years gifts 
1st To Wisharts man 

For letters .... 
To drinkmony to Conservater and 
Cap[tain] Drumonds nurses 
Febr. 12 To the barber a quarter . 
For a letter from John 
To Justice Clarks man Iti. 9s., to a 
poor man 14s. 
March To Provist Chieslys 2 nurses 

To pouther 8sh. 2 quer paper 14s. 
To Jame Carein in arls and to 

Jacson 14s. 6d. 
To my fathers cochman in drink- 
mony ..... 
Agust. To the old woman . 
To flint and ball 
To my sister Breastmills nurs . 
Sep: To An Faa .... 
For letters to b. 
Octor 12 To the barber. .... 
To fieing and arls 
For wafers .... 
To Grisies master for cols . 
For sweat powther 12s. . 
For letters .... 
To Jamie Carr .... 
For letters .... 
To a cochman .... 
For bringing Dorathie Farellton 

from Berwick 
To chairmen .... 
For cariing a chair and box twis . 
For sevarell little things . 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

012 00 00 
001 00 00 

000 10 00 

005 16 00 

001 09 00 

000 13 00 

002 13 00 
005 16 00 

001 02 00 

001 01 06 

002 10 00 
000 14 06 
000 04 00 
004 00 00 
000 14 00 

000 05 00 

001 09 00 

001 00 00 
000 02 00 
000 14 06 
000 12 00 
000 10 00 

002 00 00 
000 15 00 

000 14 06 

003 12 00 

001 02 00 
000 16 00 
007 00 00 



1696] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 261 

[Small Payments] [Scots] 

For pins and other litle things £ s. d. 

per Francy Newtons account 002 04 00 



S. 62 18 



Scots] 


62 10 





5 16 





5 16 





17 10 





12 





66 13 


8 


24 






Brothers and Sisters' Accounts. 

1696 Pay'd to my brothers and sisters. 

January To Archibald Baillie. 

the 18 To BailUe Faa on his acount 

Febr. 24 To him 

Aprill To him ..... 

To Will Johnston on his acount . 

May 13th To John Murduck on his acount 

per recept .... 

To my mother in law on his acount 

To Archbald per recept 

July 19 To Archbald Bewhauen on his 

acount per recept . . . 21 

To the Lady Gradins ^ servant 

]yjargrt Ingles on his acount 
To Breastmill ^ on his acount 
To Hew Mintgumary on his 
acount ..... 
To John Wight on his acount 
To him brought from the 4 page 

To John Bayllie. 
July 96 To pay a bill for him . . . 130 

To him he pay'd his skiper and 

conservaters lady . . . 30 

To Manson for a wige to him . 17 8 



2 


8 





19 








36 








36 








'86 


14 






^ Helen Johnston, daughter of Lord Wariston, and aunt of George Baillie, 
married George Hume of Graden. 

■^ Dundas of Breastmiln, Linlithgowshire, married George Baillie's sister 
Rachel. 



262 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1696 



Octor. 



[Brothers, etc.] 

To him he lent a Ham bargeman 
To him when he went away 10 

crons, more lib. 9 
To pay his chamer rent 
For Harton to be his night goun 
For making his goun 
To him by bill to Holland 



"Scots" 


£ 


s. 


d. 


17 


8 





) 

31 


9 





1 








12 


17 








14 





. 120 








360 


16 






Payd to my brothers and sisters 1697. 

[Scots] 
January To my sister Hellin . . . 009 14 00 

To linin to her ... 007 10 00 

To muslin to her . . . 001 19 00 

To muslin to her ruffils . . 001 10 00 

To her ant Johnston on her 

acount 026 02 00 

To her for flowrd muslin . . 007 15 



To Elisabeth. 
January To her 

To her in mony 

To her 2 ells strip flanell 

To her 5 ells alamod 

To linen for her 

To strip muslin to her at 3ti. 18 
per ell . 

To muslin for ruffils at 3ti. 

To her ant Johnston on her 
acountt 
Jun. 22d To her . 
Septm. To her . . . 
Novr. To her 3ti. 12s. 

To her for flourd muslin 



002 00 
009 14 00 

005 00 00 
012 00 00 

007 10 00 

008 08 00 
001 10 00 

026 02 00 

006 06 00 
004 00 00 

003 12 00 

007 ]5 



1698] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



263 



[Brothers, etc.] 
March To John Baillies acount to Cowin 
Taylor ..... 
To Chisim shoemaker on his 
acountt .... 

Septm. To Mr. Robison on his acount 
Decmr. To him a doller 

To Cowin taylor in full of ane old 
acount ..... 



[Scots] 

£ s. d. 

012 00 00 

002 08 00 
120 00 00 
002 18 00 

010 00 



Febr. 28 

March 

Ditto 

Aprill 
May 

Jun. 

July 

Agust. 



Septr. 



Johns account is £147 6 0. 

To Robert he got for his master . 
To him 10s., to making a wastcoat 

12, hat and gloves llti. 2s. 
To 3 pair shoes by Chisim 6V1. 8s., 

to him iti. 4s., puder 10s. 
To him iti. 9, more iti. 9, stokins 

to him iti. 6s. . 
To him Iti. 10, more 16s. 6d. 
To him to go over the water iti. 

9sh., more iti. 9s. 
To him iti. 9s., for writting his 

book 5ti. .... 
To him Hi. 9s., stokins iti. 14s., 

bukels 16s. .... 
To a wige llti. 16, ane other wige 

2I1. 18s., shoes 2ti. 14 . 
To him Ih. 9s. To him 14s., 

muslin to him iti. 4s., mending 

10s 
To him 2ti. 18s., more iti., puder 

14s. shoes 2ti. 13s. 
To him iti. 9s. butons, threed, shoes, 

mending and iti. 2s. lid. 
To muslin to him at 3ti. 8s. 



002 14 OO 

012 04 00 

008 02 00 

004 04 00 
002 06 06 

002 18 00 

006 09 00 

003 19 00 
017 08 00 

003 17 00 

007 05 00 

002 11 00 
Oil 18 00 



Febr. 



To James to give his master, 

8ti. 14s., writting master, 2ti. 14 Oil 08 00 



264 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK . [1698 

[Brothers, etc.] [Scots] 

To him for books, 10s., shoes iti. £ s. d. 

16s., to himself 10. . . 002 16 00 
To stokins to him 19s., puder 10s., 

to ge over the water iti. 9s. . 002 18 00 

March To pay 3 quarters at the scooll . 017 08 00 
To stokins iti. 6s., to his writing 

master 14s., to him 9s. . . 002 09 00 
Jun. To shoes iti. 10s., dressing a hat 

6s., gloves 6s. 6d., pokits 6s. 6d. 002 09 00 
October To books to him 2ti. 9s., to Lily 

for him 14s. 6d. . . . 003 03 06 
To stokins 18s., candle to his scool 

14s. 6d., to himself 10s. . . 002 02 06 



Edenburg, '99. Mony pay'd my brothers this year. 

To Archbald Baillie as follows. 
1699 To Georg Drumond in Edinburgh 
January tolbuth . . . 

To Andrew Carr per instructione 
Febr. 24 To Robert Spence 
To chamber rent 
To John Rainalds 
To Mr. Dumbar 
To loos a panded coat, the man in 

Canigate Tolbuth . 
To man in tolbuth 9 
To him at severall times 30 19 
For Mr, Bonnar 
October For boord to Will Paton per 

recept 129 

To William Thomson per accumpt 
and recept . . . . 

John Baillie. 
January To him . . . . . 81 14 

To him which was the last he got 

befor he counted . . . 38 3 4 



Scots" 


63 12 





57 16 





6 10 





6 10 


6 


20 8 





70 14 





6 





009 





30 19 





20 






1700] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



265 



■ 


Brothers, etc' 


"Scots' 


June 


To him the ballance of his count 


£ s. d. 




that he had his brothers not for 1169 8 4 


July 


To hime which was the first he 
got after he counted with his 






brother .... 


9 8 4 




To his poll .... 


4 




To his docters . . . 


49 6 


ovemb 


er To him his principall sume of 






333ti. 6s. 8d., intrest 185ti. 8s. 


Scots 




Od 


518 14 8 



Febr. 



Decmr. 



S. 



James Baillie. 
To him at severall times befor his 

accumpt was made . . 32 06 

To Baillie Bowdens accumpt the 

first after his counting . . 205 4 4 

To him at severall times this year 

as per Cash book . . . 155 10 

The ballance of his last account, 

Candlemas '99 . . . 134 6 8 



Robert Baillie. 
Febr. To him quhich was the last befor 
cumpting with his brother 
To him at severall times after 
cumpting and per Grahm's 
account .... 

To Baillie Bowdens accumpt 
To a bill from Holland 
S. To ballance of his last account, 
Candlemas '99 £157 5 6 



49 14 6 



72 


6 





317 


13 


6 


520 









Edenburgh, 1700. My brothers. Deb: to Cash. 
Archibald Baillie. [Scots] 

To Francy Newton per accumpt . 29 5 
To Mr. Abercrummie per accumpt 16 10 



266 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1700' 



[Brothers, etc.] 

June To Mr. Dumbar by instructions . 
To Will: Papon [sic] for boord 

and poket mony . 
For loosing a bible was panded . 
August 24 To Will: Cowins accumpt . 

To Provist Johnstons accumpt . 
To a baxter in town 
To pay Hay, wige maker . 
To one Duncan in town 
To him at severall times in cash . 
To Dinigile Robison . 
Deem. To William Paton for 6 monthes 
11th boord and poket . 

To him by Plumer when he was in 
the Tolbooth 

John Baillie. 
To his poll .... 
To hime per recept . . 

Robert Baillie. 
For his poll .... 
To Francy Newton per accumpt 



Scots' 


£ 


s. 


d. 


38 








194 








5 








25 








96 


3 





8 








9 


3 





8 





a 


14 


13 





5 


16 






113 1 



54 


8 





4 








480 








10 








7 









James Baillie. 
Decmr. 4th To him at sevarall times as per 

his recept .... 
Ditto 30 To him being the first after he 

sign'd his account in Deem' 4th 



121 5 6 
22 11 



Edenburgh, January 1702. My brothers. Deb. to 

Cash. 

Archibald. [Scots] 

20 To Georg Edgar on his precept . 53 3 
March To Breastmill for him . . 3 



"Scots' 


£ 


s. 


d. 


12 








3 


6 





1 








14 


4 






1698J OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 267 

[Brothers, etc.] 
2d. To my sister Breastmill per his 
precept .... 

To Androw Car per hir [sic] recept 
May 15 To himself .... 
To my sister Breastmills woman 
per his precept 
26 To my sister Breastmill to ac- 
cumpt of the above said precept 
the whole precept being for 
£60 Scots .... 
For a skin to his briches and one 
sent to my sister Breast[mill] . 
June 9 To him sent by his man to Breast- 
mill ..... 
To my sister Breastmill on his 
precept .... 

For shoes .... 

For lowsing his brothers watch he 
panded .... 

July 18 To Ms. Stothert in Lanrick on his 
precept .... 

August To Francis Newton per his precept 
To my sister Breastmill in pairt of 

a precept of £52 12s. Scots 

To my sister Breastmill in full of 

the precept of £52 12s. . 

Oct. 6 To Georg Edgar one his accumpt 

Novr. 26th To my sister Breastmill per his 

precept .... 

To my sister Breastmills woman 

in full of the precept abovesaid 

of £60 Scots .... 



[1698] The expence of my mothers funerals. 

[Scots] 
To her dead linin . . . 060 00 

To her coffin . . . . 076 00 



15 











14 





4 








4 








2 








7 


10 





17 


16 





61 


18 





36 








16 


12 





3 


14 





57 


16 





30 


16 






268 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1698 



Mother's funeral' 




"Scots" 


To charge of her lying in the 


; £ 


s. 


d. 


church .... 


029 


00 





For writting the letters and paper 14 


10 





For plumkake 18ti. bisket 36 


054 


00 





For glases .... 


13 


00 





For brecking the ground 




14 


10 





To the batthels 




07 


05 




To the kirk tressorar 




52 


10 





For the morcloath 




11 


12 





For the grave and turf 




08 


14 





To the bell man 




02 


08 




To the poor 




06 


00 




For coch and harse 




37 


04 




For cariing the letters 




08 


00 


00 


For keeping the stairs 




01 


10 




To the man that drove the harse 02 


00 




For cariing letters to the country 03 


00 




To drink mony to the surgons 






man .... 


07 


08 




To the Wrights man 


02 


00 




For wins and seek, my oun 


. 129 


12 





To the herralds for her scuchens 






and horsemunting per the 


r 






accompt 


. 210 


06 


8 




750 


9 


8 



Of this mony only 

payd out presently, 

the wine being in the 

howse . . .478 12 00 

Heralds and wine 

together is . . 339 18 8 



S. 818 10 8 
Given out for sundry small things 68 1 



818 10 8 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 269 



My Father-in-law 1 

Robert Baillie of Jerriswood, Esqr. was eldest son to 
George Baillie of Jerriswood. His Mother was sister to Sir 
Archibald Johnston Lord Warriston. After having been 
educated in the Universitys of Scotland he went abroad 
to study the law, and, being at Paris when Sir William 
Lockart of Lee was first time Ambasoder at that Court, 
he was recommended by Sir William Lockart to the 
Popes Nuncio then at Paris to travel with him to Rome, 
which gave him an opertunity of being acquainted with 
many great men. 

Returning to Scotland some years therafter, he was well 
seen in the Civel Law, divinity. History and whatever else 
could acomplish a Gentleman and good Christian. Abount 
the year 1661 he married ^ Mrs. Rachell Johnston, Daughter 
to the Lord Warriston. When the Lord Warriston was 
committed to the Tower in the year 1663 Jerriswood came 
from Scotland to wait of him, and stayed at London untill 
The Lord Warriston was sent to Scotland. Then Jerris- 
wood went to Scotland and attended him till his Death. 
It is observable That from the time of my Lord Warristons 
Death Jerriswood had an impression on his Spirit that he 
would suffer death for the Cause of his Religion in the 
same place that my Lord Warriston did, which he told to 
some of his nearest friends long before his death. 

Also about two years before he died, having been long in 
the fields alone, he came in and told his Lady that he 
would Certainly Suffer Death at the Cross of Edinburgh 
for his principles ere long. 

Tho' he was a very Bright man he would never accept of 
any pubhck Employment, nor be member of parliament. 



^ The words • My Father-in-law ' are in Lady Grisell's handwriting, and are 
endorsed on the paper. The document itself is not in her hand, and is unpunc- 
tuated. 

- ' 20 January 1661. Proclaimed in marriage Mr. Robert Baillie of Jerviswood 
and Rachel Johnston, daughter of Sir Archibald Johnston, Lord Warriston.' 
— Lanark Parish Registers. 



270 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

because he would not take the Declaration Test and other 
Oaths imposed at that time. Yet he lived always peaceably 
under the government, acknowledged the King's authority, 
and Declared in his last words that he never intended any 
thing against the government but to have things redressed 
in a parlimentary way. 

About the year 1677 Mr. James Kirton, late Minester of 
Edinburgh, who was seized in his own Chamber by 
Captain Carstairs unwarrantably without any order, 
Jerriswood, being lodged near by, was Called, and desired 
the Captain to show his order for apprehending Mr. 
Kirton; and he having none to produce, Jerriswood Rescued 
him out of the Captan's hands. Jerriswood was summened 
to Appear nixt day before the privy Council, and having 
appeared was fined in five hundred pound Str. and com- 
mitted prisoner to the tolbooth of Edinburgh. Afterward 
was sent prisoner to the Castle of Stirlen where he Con- 
tinued a long time. 

In the year 1678 Jerriswood went to London with Duke 
William Hamilton and the Noblemen and Gentlemen to 
represent the grivences of the Highland Host invading 
the West of Scotland. 

About the year 1682, when the Duke of York was appointed 
Commissioner for the parliament of Scotland, Duke 
William Hamilton, Lord Tarras and many other members 
of parliament had concerted to Oppose The Duke's being 
Commissioner because he was a papist, and had the 
Oppinion of Sir George Lockart and Sir John Cunningham 
two Eminent Lawyers who thought it was against law. 
Jerriswood being consulted all along by Duke Hamilton 
etc. in that affair, tho he was no member of parliament 
but as a man very Capable of advising them. The Duke 
of York, being come to Scotland, by his intrest kept the 
two lawyers from pleading against him ; but Jerriswood 
was looked upon by the Duke with a Jealous eye and as 
an enimy to the government because of his opposing 
popery and arbitrary power 

About the year 1683 Sir Hugh and Sir George Campbles 
of Sesnock, Jerriswood, Commissar Monro and several 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 271 

other Gentlemen were seised in London. Jerriswood, being 
brought before King Charles the Second and the Councill, 
was charged with tresonable practices and of being En- 
gaged in a plot against the Government, which he abso- 
lutly denyed. The King Threatned him with the Boots 
in Scotland, to which he answeared. His Majesty might 
^ive him Spurs too but he Could Say nothing but the 
truth. He was returned to the gate house and laid in 
Irions, where he continued Six Months, and afterwards 
sent down in a Yaught to Scotland with Sir Hugh Campble 
etc. and there confined Closs prisoner in Edinburgh 
Tollbooth, where being Called and examined before the 
Councill and charged with Conversing with and advising 
the members of Parliament to oppose the Duke of Yorks 
being Commissioner and several other things Relating 
thereto of which there was no proof, yet he was fined 
in Six thousand pound Str. It was then thought their 
malice would have gone no further against him but he was 
Still detained Closs prisoner, during which time he was 
afflected with a fever of Sex weeks Continuance, and 
before he was well recovered there came an order from 
Court to pursue him before the Justiciary for his life. It 
was very remarkable the thursday night before he Re- 
ceived his indictment he had some glorious Manefestation 
from God, and on the friday morning he wrot out a note 
which he convey'd by his keeper to his Sister Mrs. Kirton 
in which he said * Sister, Praise, praise God with me for I 

* have got such a glorious Manifestation of God this night 

* as I would not exchange for Many Many Worlds. They K Chas: th 

* are thirsting after my blood, which they will get, but Some z^. ^^^^}^!^^^' 

* of the greatest of them will live Short while after." 

It was very extraordinary The Justiciary Court pro- 
ceeded against him on the same grounds and Reasons 
for which he was fined by the Councill without ever the 
Councills Sentence being recalled. 

On Munday the 22 of December 1684 he received his 
indictment to Appear befor the Justice Court at ten a 
Clock the day following, wher Sir George Lockart was made 
assessor to Sir George McKenzie, then King's Advocat, to 



272 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



plead against him. He was Carried out in his nightgown 
not being fully recovered of his fever, and was kept in the 
Court untill one on the Wedindsay morning, returned 
again to prison, appeared before them again about 
eleven the same day, and Received Sentence of death to 
be execute the very Same day betwext two and three in 
the afternoon. When he returned to prison after Receiving 
his Sentence, he prayed publickly before all in the room. 
Some of his words were * Lord, we take this Severe Sentence 
from the land of man as a love token from the heart of my 
God This night Shall I be a piller in the House of God 
to go furth no more and I shall be with the General! 
Assembly of the first born and with the Spirits of Just 
men made perfect and the Mediator of the new Covenant 
which is best of all.' 

A little before his excecution there came two of the town 
Curats Mr, Trotter and Mr. Londie to desire access to him, 
but his Lady and her sisters told them none of them 
Should come there to trouble him. He pleasantly said he 
would be content to Speak with the brethren, but he Saw 
the Sisterhood were not for it and he had little time to 
Spare. Some of his fellow prisoners came to take their 
leave of him, asked him what Lord Tarras and others 
had witnessed against him. He answeared, * Who Could 
Remember fire Side discourse Several years ago.' For he 
could not Remember whether one word of it was true or 
not. But, tho none of the witnesses agreed in any one point 
in the proof against him, yet they Thirsted So much after 
his blood that it was resolved this great and good man 
Should be made a Sacrifice to Popery and arbitary power. 
He said also to some of his fellow prisoners they are to cutt 
me in pices and Send me thorrow the Country but do 
what they will this body Shall be a glorifyed body in the 
day of the Resurrection. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 273 



Memoradums and derections to Servants and 
ruels layd down by my Mother both fer their 
diet and work. Copyd and colected together 
1752, made by her Deer. 1743, and the derec- 
tions given to the severl Servants. 

To THE Butler 

1. You must rise airly in the morning which will make 
your whole business and houshold accounts easie. 

2. Two bells are to be rung fer every meal ; for break- At tlie stated 
fast half an hour after 8 and at 9 ; for diner half an hour ^^uis. 
after 1 and at 2 ; for super half an hour after 8 and at 9. 

At the first bell for super lay the bible and cushions for 
prayers. 

3. Have bread toasted, butterd tost or whatever is 
orderd for breakfast all set ready by the second bell. 

4. Consider your business and have a little forethought 
that you may never be in a hurry or have anything to 
seek, to which nothing will contribut more than having 
a fixt and regular places for seting every thing in your 
custody in order, and never fail seting every thing in its 
own place, which will prevent much trouble and con- 
fution, and soon make every thing easie, when you know 
where to go derectly for what you want. 

5. See that the back doors of the Porch be shut as soon 
as the last bell rings for diner and super. N.B. 

6. That all the servants that are to wate at table be 
ready in the room before we come. 

7. That you may never have occation to run out of 
the room for what is wanted have always at the sideboard 
what follows or any thing ells you can foresee there can 
be occation for 



Bread 


Water 


peper 


vinigar 


Ail 


wines 


mustard 


shalot 


smal Beer 


sugar 


oyle 


sallad 



274 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

N.B. 8. Stand at the sideboard and fill what is cald for to 
the other servants that come for it, and never fill, nor let 
any other do it in a dirty glass, but as soon as a glass is 
drunk out of, range it dereetly in the brass pail which 
you must have there w ith water for that purpos, then 
wype it. 

9. Never let the dirty knives forks and spoons go out 
of the dinning room, but put them all in the box that 
stands for that use under the table. 

10. When a signe is made to you, go and see if the second 
course is ready, then come and take away all the first 
course before you set down any of the second. 

11. In like maner when a sign is made take away the 
second course. 

12. Take the napkine of the midle of the table and 
sweep all the bread and crums clean of all round the table 
into a plate. 

13. Have any desert that there is ready to set doun, 
always have butter and cheese, and set plates and knives 
round. 

14. When all that is taken away, set doun water to 
wash. 

15. Then take away the cloath and set doun what wine 
is cald for, with the silver marks upon them, in bottle 
boards, and a decanter of water, and glasses to every one 
round. 

16. ^Mien diner and super is over, cary what leaves of 
smal beer and bread into the Pantry your self, and the 
cheese, that nothing may go to waste. 

17. As soon as the company leaves the dining room 
after diner and super come imediatly and lock up what 
Liquors are left, clean your glasses, and set every thing 
in its place and in order. 

18. Always take care to keep your doors and your 
cuberts lockt where you have any charge. 

N.B 19. The Plate must always be clean and bright, which 
a little wiping every day will do, when once it is made 
perfectly clean, which must not be by whitening but a 
little soap suds to wash it, or spirit of wine if it has got 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 275 

any spots, and wiping and rubing with a brush and then 
a piece Shambo leather. 

20. The Pantry, seler and Larder and every thing that 
is under your care must be kept perfectly clean and 
sweet, which will require constant attention, but if things 
are alowed to run into dirt and confution, double the time 
and pains will not set it right, and every thing that stands 
in dirty places will soon grow musty and stinking and unfit 
to be used. 

21. Let not the dirty cheney go into the kitchin till 
the cook be ready to clean it and empty the meat of them 
into pewter dishes befor it goes to the second table, and 
see that none of them is brock when you put them by. 

22. Who ever breaks cheny, glasses or bottles let me 
know that day, otherways thay will be layd to your 
charge. 

23. Be exact in giving your pantry cloaths to wash, and 
in geting them back and keeping them together. 

24. Clean everything without delay and put all your 
things in order after every meal and after tea. 

25. Have tea, water and what may be usualy cald for 
in the afternoon ready, that it may not be to wait for. 

26. Every morning clean all the bottle that have been 
emptyd the day befor, and set them up in the bottle rack, 
this will save much trouble and make cleaner bottles, 
then when the dirt is allowed to dry in them, if any has a 
bad smel or sedement sticking to them, to make them as 
sweet and clean as new, boyle some wood ashes in watter 
and make a strong Lee, put the bottles into it befor it is 
cold, let them soak in it all night, next day wash them 
well in it, then in clean water, a few hours standing in 
the Lee may do for those not very dirty, and hang them 
in the bottle rack with their heads down, the most neces- 
sary thing for having good wine and ale is clean bottles 
and good corking, every bottle must be ranced with a 
little of the Liquor that is bottling, and one bottle of it 
will do the whole. 

27. Be constantly atentive in looking about to see 
what any one wants at table and when you take away a 



276 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

dirty plate take also the dirty knife and fork and give all 
clean. 

28. You must keep your self very clean. 

29. At one a clock in the sumer when the servants are 
at out work all the stable people, carters and maids go 
to diner, in the winter they dyn at the hour with the rest 
of the family altogether after we have dynd, but in the 
sumer you and those that wait at table must dyn after us, 
both second table and later meat are alowed a clean table 
cloth every other day, and you must see that all get their 
vituals warm and in order without confution or waste. 

N.B. 30. You must see that all the servants about the stables 
and out works be out of the kitchin before ten a clock, 
except when any of them is obliged to wait at super 

N.B. 31. The under butler puts on the gentlemens fiers, cleans 
their boots and shoes, helps you to clean every thing, and 
to get breakfast and to cover the table, etc. 

82. If any of the family is indesposed and eat in their 
room, require back from the person you gave it to any 
thing that is under your charge, such as knives, forks, 
spoons, glasses, linnen, etc., and never allow any thing 
of that sort to go about the house or to be out of its proper 
place. 

33. Deliver carefully back to the house keeper what 
ever table linnen you get from her and upon no account 
make any other use of them, nor dity them by wyping 
any thing as you have cloaths for every use you can want. 

34. N.B. Bring up your Account books every monday 
morning and lay them at my room door. 

35. Every servant gets a mutchkin of beer every meal, 
except when they get milk, which is always when there 
is any to give them, and then they have only beer for their 
diner. 

36. The servants gets half an Oat loaf at every meal, 
or if it is broun bread or Ry, the loaf is set down to eat 
what they want, but no pocketing or waste alowed, and 
that you must see to, and observe these ruels for bread 
and beer, for your account of it must hold out with this. 

37. N.B. If a glass of wine is cald for to company bring 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 277 

as many glasses on a salver as there is people, and fill it 
befor you come into the room, and leave the bottle at the 
door in case more is wanted, and have a clean napkin 
hung over your arm. 



The Servants Diet 

There is to be brewed out of every Louthian Boll of 
Malt 20 gallons of small beer, our coper and looms brews 
2| bolls at a time which is 50 gallons, that is 400 Scots 
pints. From 6 furlets of Malt that is a Louthian boll 
and half there is 240 scots pints of beer. 

pints 

17 servants 3 mutchkins a day each is about 13 

pints a day which in 14 days is . . . 182 

For the table 2 pints a day in 14 days is . . 28 

For second table 2 pints a day is and 2 more . 30 



240 

This calculation is when all the servants get beer. 

8 stone of meal or broun flower should fully serve 17 
servants eight days. 

There is 30 loves out of the stone of Oat meal, the same 
reckoning to be made of broun flower or Ry, backt in half 
peck,i loaves. Beef salted for the servants is cut in pieces 
of as many pounds as there are common servants, if 15, 
every pice is 15 pounds, no alowence in that for the second 
table, they geting what comes from the first table. 

Sunda}^ they have boild beef and broth made in the 
great pot, and always the broth made to serve two days. 

Monday broth made on Sunday and a Herring. 

Teusday broth and Beef. 

Wednesday broth and 2 egs each. 

Thursday Broth and beef. 

Fryday Broth and Herring. 



' This should surely be half pound ; a peck is a measure of capacity containing 
about two stones. 



278 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

Saterday broth without meat, and cheese, or a puden or 
blood pudens, or a hagish, or what is most convenient. 

In the big pot for the 2 days broth is alowed 2 pound 
of barly or grots, or half and half. 

Breakfast and super half an oat loaf or a proportion of 
broun bread, but better set down the loaf, and see non is 
taken or wasted, and a muchkin of beer or milk when 
ever there is any. at diner a mutchkin of beer for each.^ 



Derections for the House Keeper 

The servants diet belongs to her charge but I chose to 
put it altogether. 

To get up airly is most necessary to see that all the 
maids and other servants be about their proper business. 
a constant care and attention is required to every thing 
that there be no waste nor any thing neglected that should 
be don. 

The dayry carefully lookt after, you to keep the kie of 
the inner milk house where the butter and milk is, see 
the butter weighted when churn'd, and salt what is not 
wanted fresh, to help to make the cheese and every now 
and then as often as you have time to be at the milking 
of the cows. 

Keep the maids closs at their spining till 9 at night 
when they are not washing or at other necessary work, 
weight out to them exactly the soap, and often go to the 
wash house to see it is not wasted but made the proper 
use of, and that there be no linnen washt there but those 
of the family that are alowed to do it. often see that 
they waste not fire either in the wash house or Landry 
and that the Landry be keept clean. 

Take care that the Cooks waste not butter, spices, nor 



^ From the data here given the cost of feeding a servant would seem to have 
amounted to about 3d. per diem, made up thus: bread f^d., beer |^d., meat 
|§d., eggs or herrings S^d., barley H^-, sundries -^^d. — total -W-d. = 3d, In 
this calculation oats are taken at lOs. per boll, barley at 3d. per lb., malt at 
15s. per boll, eggs at 2d. per dozen, and meat at 2d. per lb. 



i 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 279 

any thing amongst their hands, nor embasel it, and that 
the kitchin fire be carefully lookt after and no waste, let 
it be getherd after diner and the cinders thi'owen up that 
non be throwen out, neither from that nor by the Chamber 
maid. 

Make the kitchin maid keep all the places you have 
lookt up very clean, also the kitchin, Hal and passages, 
and see the Cook feed the fouls that are put up right and 
keep them clean or they can never be fat nor good. 

To take care the house be kept clean and in order, help 
to sheet and make the straingers beds, that the beds and 
sheets be dry and well aird. get account from the chamber 
maid of what candles she gets from you for the rooms and 
see there be no waste of candle nor fire any where. 

Keep the kie of the cole house but when it is wanted to 
get out coals, but be sur it be always lockt at night, that 
the Turf stack be not tred down but burnt even forward, 
let them fill all their places with coals at once, that the 
kie be not left in the door. 

To make scimed milk cheese for the use of the family 
when ever there is milk enough for it. when there are 
more cows then the dairy maid can milk so soon as they 
shoud be, let Grisell Wait or any other in the toun I shall 
name help her and get for doing it a pint of scim'd milk 
a day. 

As every thing is weighted to you give out nothing but 
by weight. 

6 ounces pruens for Cockaleekie or stove. 

6 oun. Makerony for a smal dish, 8 oun. larger. 

6 oun. vermiceli for a soup. 

a pound peas for a puden or soup. 

for best short bread 8 lb. flower 3 lb. butter, second 
short bread 8 lb. flower 2 lb. butter. 

For a bun of 5 lb flower 1 lb butter, 2 lb raisins, 1 lb 
curants, 4 ounces caraway seed, 4 ounces sugar and barm. 

The servants sheets is changed once a munth. 
One week the body linnin is washt, the second week 
table and bed linnin and always bouckt when the weather 



280 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

will alow of it, the third week the landry maids miist be 
keept closs at spining and at all times when they have not 
other necessary business, such as Hay and Harvest and 
the Barn M^hich the dairy maid goes to when she has a 
moments time for it, and always to the miln with any 
melder. the dairy maid, house maid and kitchin maid 
always to spine when they are not otherways necessarly 
imployd which they will often pretend to be if they are 
not diligently lookt after and keep to it. 

Thomas Yool, George Carter and postilion do not wash 
in the house nor 

John Hume the Carter. 

The other men servants wash in the house or out of the 
house as I can agree for them, but not at a certainty, 
when washt out I give lOsh. a year for each of them. 

All the scim'd milk that can be spaird after serving the 
family or when cheese is not made of it, to be measurd 
and sent to Grisell Wait who sells it and accounts for it, 
or gives it away to such poor people in the toun as I give 
her a note of. but non of them to come about the doors 
for it. 

Take care there be no hangers on, nor santering odd 
people come about the house, but those that have business 
and that not at male time, which they will always do if 
not hinderd. 

See that all the maids keep their dusters and washing 
clouts dry and in order, and not let them ly about in hols 
wet, which soon rots and makes an end of them. 

See that every one keeps what is in their charge in there 
proper stated places, then nothing will be out of order, or 
to seek when wanted, nor any hurry. 

In general to keep all the servants in order, with some 
authority and make them obay you and do their duty 
without feed or favour to any, and to look after every 
thing with the same care and faithfulness as if it was 
your own, then few things can go wrong, if diffident or 
ignorant of any thing, ask derections from me or Mrs. 
Menzies or any that can inform you. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



281 



EXTRACTS FROM BOOK MARKED 
' BILLS OF FAIR * ^ 

Lord Orknays,2 Oct. 12, 1715 



boyld chickens 
-with bate butter 
and shces of bread 
and Hmon 



pickled sols 



Peas soup 
pidgion py 



relief hame and 

spinich 
stacks with minst 
meat about them 



sewd bief very 
tender with sallarly 



Rosted Turkic 



friassy of cocks- 
combs and 
sweat breads 



4 rosted partrages 



aples 
Chestons 
pears 



milk in a boill 

confections 

milk 



pears 

peald walnuts 

aples 



^ There are one hundred and seventy of these. 

- Lord George Hamilton, Earl of Orkney, fifth son of the Duke of Hamilton, 
one of the Lords of the Bedchamber to George I. He married Mrs. Villiers, 
William iii.'s mistress, after the death of Queen Mary, She is commemorated 
by Swift for her wisdom and ugliness, and according to Lady Mary Wortley 
■Montagu she drew the greatest number of eyes at the coronation of George II. 
* She exposed behind a mixture of fat and wrinkles, and before a very consider- 
able protuberance which preceded her. Add to this the inimitable roll of her 
•eyes and her gray hairs, which by good fortune stood directly upright, and 'tis 
impossible to imagine a more delightful spectacle.' 



282 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



friasy rabits 
ratafia cream 



Duck of montroses ^ super 

Scots collips w* 
marow and black 
pudins about them 



frut 
rost small 
wild foull 



rost cheas 
earned cream 



Sunday, Christenmas 1715, w* 9 of our frinds 14 at table- 

in all. 

Plumb patage with sagoe and 
a few f rute 
relief minsht pys 
fricascy chickens Bran ^ plumb puden 

rost bief 





2 






a rost goos 




cold toung 


Bran 
wild foull 


oyster loves 




Desert 






Ratafia cream 




Dutter and chease 


sillibubs 


Jacolet walnuts 
and almonds 


aples 




stewd pears 


chestons 


Jellys 


butter and chease 



1 James Graham, fourth Marquis and first Duke of Montrose, at this time-| 
Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland, married Lady Christian Carnegy, second 
daughter of David, Earl of Northesk. The Duke and Duchess seem to have-j 
been very intimate friends of the Baillies, as their names occur frequently in the I 
Accounts. Lockhart was not unnaturally very sore at the Duke becoming aj 
Whig, and sums up his character as follows : ' He was a man of good under- 
standing yet was led by the nose by a set of men whom he far surpassed, andl 
never in all his by-past life did one material action that was prudent andj 
discreet. His courage upon certain accounts was much questioned, but his 
unsincerity and falseness allowed by all.' '^ 'Bt&win. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



283 



Lord Orfoords 1 28 Deer. 



sup 
rost bief on by table rost mutton 
cut by servants 



2 ser 



2 partrages 
and partrages hasht 
ragow hogs feet 



a relief 2 young geas 



Ragow cokscoms 



rosted larks and 





Deseart, 


V^l/Xl^X OlllClll ILflXt^O 


Chestnuts 


Jellys 


aples 


ter and cheese 


Confections 


butter and cheese 


Bisquet 


Jellys 


oranges 



Bishop Sarums ^ Christenmas Din^. 

Plumb patage relief Scots colops cokscombs 
little bals and sawsages 



fricasey forst 


Bran 


orange pudine 


meat 


Rost Bieff 




and other 






things 


2 

Minsht pys 






Bran stood still 


Larks rosted 




a side of lame 






Deseart 




Bisquets 




stwd pears 


r 


sillibubs 

Jellys 

Pears oranges 




stwd aples 




Bisquits 



' Edward Russel, Earl of Orford, at this time First Lord of the Admiralty. 

" Dr. Gilbert Burnet, Lord Bishop of Salisbury, chaplain to William in. 
His mother was a sister of (ieorge Baillie's grandmother, so they were first 
cousins once removed. As Bishop Sarum died on 17th March 1715 the dinner 
recorded must have been his last Christmas dinner. 



284 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



1715 
Jan^. at home, 8 at table w* the duck of Montros.^ 

Broth relief of salmond 

pudens hages 

sheap head 



Lobsters 



checker! py 
2 rosted turkies 



peas 



Duke of Roxburgh,- January 3, 1715. 

soup with a fouU relief of fish 

fricascy chickens little py of cocks combs 

lams stons 
leg rost mutton 



sparagrasse 



2d 
Rosted wild foull 4 or 5 

athine aple py dry'd whitiens 

a rosted turkie 





Deseart 






Limon Cream 




dry'd aples 


confections 


chestons 


shelld walnots 


Jellys 


pears 



' See p. 282. 

2 John, fifth Earl and first Duke of Roxburgh, at this time Secretary of State 
for Scotland. He married Lady Mary Finch, only child of Daniel, Ear* ofj 
Winchelsea and Nottingham, and widow of William Savile, Marquis of Halifax, f 
His Grace had been very closely associated with Baillie at the time of the passing 
of the Act of Union, being one of the inner circle who directed the voting of the J 
' Squadrone Volante.' Lockhart describes him as follows: 'He was a man ofj 
good sense improven by so much reading and learning that perhaps he was the | 
best accomplished young man of quality in Europe, and had so charming a way 
of expressing his thoughts that he pleased even those 'gainst whom he spoke. ] 
-The Duchess of Roxburgh was said to be the original of the Roxana of Lady j 
Mary Wortley Montagu's Town eclogue. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



285 



Makrell 



Geni Eries,! 10 May 1715 
Green Soup 

hens w* collofloiir 



soles 



2d 

Rost hear 
green peas 



colopes 



tartes 



Mr. Mitchels, Feb. 29, 1716. 

Soup relief salmon 

fricascy of rabits a py 

rost a saddle of mutton 



rague sweat breads 
truffle and morels 



2ncl 

3 rost ducklins 



4 rost chickens 



sparagras 



April 1717. Duck and Duck Montrose Lord ^ and 

Lady Rothes 

Soup relief cods head with alle sauce 
natle cale 3 boyld chickens 

boyld hame 



fricascy rabits 



' General Erles. Probably Colonel Giles Earle, distinguished both in war 
and politics. He attached himself first to the Duke of Argyle, and was known 
as ' the Duke of Argyll's Erie.' He was appointed in 1718 groom of the Prince 
of Wales's bedchamber, and afterwards filled several other posts. He was a 
coarse humorist who played for his own hand, and eventually became more or 
less the tool of Walpole. 

"^ John Leslie, eighth Earl of Rothes, eldest son of the fifth Earl of Hadding- 
ton by the elder daughter of the Duke of Rothes, who left no sons. On succeed-. 



286 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



2n(l 

a rosted fillet of bief Larded with a rague of sweat 

breads under it 
Ptansy Crawfish limon puden 

rague sweatbreads sparagrass 

8 rost ducks 





Deseart 




ratafia cream and gellies 


chestnuts 


cheas butter 


oranges 


confections aples 


cheas 


pistoches 



silHbubs 



1718, 26 May, At Mr. Jhonstons.i 

soup with a foule 

relief boyld hame and pidgeons 

beans and bacon fricasey of chikens 

rost veall with rague saus 
relief of rost mutton 



ing to the earldom of Rothes he assumed the surname of Leslie, and resigned 
the earldom of Haddington to his younger brother. He married Lady Jean 
Hay, daughter of John, second Marquis of Tweeddale. He was another of the 
Whigs for whom Lockhart had not a good word to say, ' being false to a degree, 
a contemner of honour and engagements, extremely ambitious, ridiculous, vain, 
and conceited (tho' of very ordinary parts and accomplishments), extravagantly 
proud and scandalously mercenary.' 

* Son of Sir Archibald Johnston, Lord Wariston (executed 1663), and uncle 
of George Baillie. He was for many years Secretary of State for Scotland under 
William and Mary, but was dismissed over the Darien Scheme in 1696. He 
was generally known as ' Secretary Johnston,' and at one time was probably 
the most unpopular man in Scotland. Lockhart cannot find words in which to 
express his hate and contempt for that 'vile and execrable wretch,' who never- 
theless was ' much esteemed ' by Queen Caroline for his humour and pleasantry. 
He married Catherine Poulett, daughter of the second Baron Poulett, and lived 
latterly at Orleans House, Twickenham, where he cultivated fruit and enter- 
tained royalty. Lady Grisell's accounts show that many barrels of herrings 
were sent to him from Scotland by his dutiful nephew George Baillie. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



287 





2 Cour* 




frayd eles 


a goos 


peas 


archocks 


tarts 
3 chickens 


cold salmond 




Dessert 




Milk 


Chirries 


Milk 


strawberes 


silibubs with strawberres 




sweet meats 




milk 


oranges 


milk 



Augst 1718. Lord Sundrelands,^ 4 folks at table 

Soup without anything init 
Hog potch of bief mutton veall 



2 

boyld sols 
fricasy chickens 




3 

Rost fillet bief 
puden 




4 
4 patriedges 
bottams of Raeteehocks 

2 young hairs 


broyld cells 


Desert 
frut sillibubs 
frut frut 

Limon cream 


frut 
frut 



1 Charles Spencer, third Earl of Sunderland, married, first, Lady Arabella 
Cavendish, fifth daughter of the Duke of Newcastle, and, second, Lady Anne 
Churchill, second daughter of the Duke of Marlborough. He was at this time 
First Lord of the Treasury. He was a great book collector, and a most un- 
attractive character. His son succeeded as Duke of Marlborough. 



288 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

Dinner at Sir William Bairds, 30 Dess. 1718 

brown soup 
chached calfs head 



2nd 

stewd carp 
asalray se\^ ^ 
rost Lame. 



3rd 

fasond with Larks about it mintched 
pys jellies bran 

salmond scoloped oysters 

gundie partrages 

with pickels and wood cocks. 



Lord Anadall,^ 29 January 1719, 10 at table 
Brown Soup 
Relief fish 
backed pudins stewed Breast of veall 

Beef or Mutton py 
stewed fillet of boyled chickens 

Beef 

whit soup 
relief boyld Turkic with 
forsed balls and sagages 



' A celery salad. 

^ William Johnstone, third Earl and first Marquis, married, first, Sophia, 
daughter and heiress of John Fairholm of Craigiehall, Linlithgowshire, and, 
second, Charlotte Vanhose, only child of John Vanden Bempole. * He was a 
man framed and cut out for business, extremely capable and assiduous ; of a 
proud, aspiring temper, and when his affairs and politics went right, haughty to- 
a great degree ; and vice versa the civillest, complaisantest man alive, and a 
great affecter of popularity.' — Lockharfs Papers. He played for his own hand, 
and was trusted by neither party. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 289 

[Bills of Fare] 

2dC. 

Phesan and partrage 
sparagras scoloped oysters 

aple tart w* cream 
ragu of sweet broyled salmond. 

bread and cockscombs 

3 Ducklins 



DeseH 
a salver with sweet meats 
stweed pears pistosenuts 

butter chees 

sillibubs and jellies a lagere salver sillibubs and jellies 

wt sweet meats 
cheese butter 

pistashe nuts stweed aples 

a salver with sweet meats 



suyer 

confections 

Lobster rost lame 

silibubs and jellies a ring w* wild silibubs and jellies 

foull collops and pickles etc. 

bran cold tart 

confections 



feb"^ 23, 1719. Super att home D and Ducthess of 
Montross Lord and Ladye forster. 

4 rost chickens 
salmond collops 

Candles 
eating poset fatafia cream 

pattie a salver w* jellies and a hair ragud 

sillie bubess 

T 



290 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 

sago lemon hatted 

kiti 
Candles 
frecasy veals drest Lobsters 

feet 3 Ducklines 



At home Lady Mary Worthly.^ 
A soup with Marrabon 



2 

boyld lam 
a plum pudine 



3 

rost turkie with mushrom sauce 
and pickles w* a litle bread 



Deseri 

Curds 

pears Jelly aples 

cream 



^ Hatted Kit, a preparation of milk, etc., with a creamy top. 'Make 2 
<iuarts of new milk scalding hot, and pour upon it quickly 4 quarts of fresh 
butler milk ; let it stand without stirring till it becomes cold and firm, then take 
off the hat or upper part, drain it in a hair sieve, put it into a shape for half-an- 
hour, turn it into a dish, and serve with cream and sugar.' — Stevens's Farm Book, 
1855, vol. ii. p. 299. 

^ The famous Lady Mary Pierrepont, eldest daughter of Evelyn, first Duke 
of Kingston, and the Lady Mary Fielding, daughter of William, Earl of 
Denbigh. She rnarried Edward Wortley Montagu, eldest son of the Honour- 
able Sydney Montagu. She was at this time a great friend of Lady Murray, 
n^e Grisell Baillie, a friendship which came to an end a few years afterwards. 
In 1721 'the peace of Mrs. Murray's family had been painfully broken in 
consequence of the brutality of a servant of her brother-in-law. Lord Binning, 
who, in a fit of drunkenness, burst into her bedchamber in the middle of the 
night and threatened to put her instantly to death if she ventured to resist his 
violence. With great courage and presence of mind she succeeded in alarming 
and calling up the family; but for this crime, which was held to be a capital 
burglary, the man was condemned to death, though afterwards his punishment 



I 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 291 

[Bills of Fare] 
21 [Novr 1719]. Lady Hindfoord,i L^ Sutherland.^ 

10 at table. 

1. Broth sheaps head boyld goos and a hagis 

2. rost veal 2 casterlings limon pudine collerd pig the 
relief was fish 

Confections and Jellys. 



14 Decmr (1719). Super at Mr. Cockburn 11 at table 

22 persons in al. 

head, eating poset in cheana high dish, foot, hauch 
venison, one side backd pudine, 2 partrages and larks, 
midle litl dish with sallory sellet made and unmade, 
othe[r] s^ veal collops white sauce, 2 boyd pullets w* 
persley sauce in the midle pickles of other sort than the 
comon ones 

In the midle of the table a pirimide sillibubs and orang 
cream in the past, above it sweet meets dry and wet. 



was commuted for transportation. On the subject of this escape, Lady Mary 
thought fit to exercise her wicked wit in an infamous ballad, which of course 
she loudly disclaimed all knowledge of, but of which her own letters to her sister 
Lady Mary plainly enough betray her to have been the writer. , . . The subject 
is repeatedly alluded to in the printed collection of her letters, and still more 
pointedly in some of those that have not been published.' — Appendix to Lady 
Murray's Memoirs. 

^ Lady Hyndford, daughter of John, fifth Earl of Lauderdale, and wife of 
James Carmichael, second Earl of Hyndford. 

" John Gordon, sixteenth Earl of Sutherland. President of the Board of 
Trade. Took a leading part in suppressing the '15. * He is a very honest 
man, a great asserter of the liberties of the people, hath a good rough sense, is 
open and free, a great lover of the bottle and of his friend, brave in his person 
which he hath shown in several duels, too familiar for his quality, and often 
keeps company below it.' — Mackay. He married three times. 



292 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 
5 June (1720) Mr. Wallop ^ and 8 at table 

1. Barly broth with lambs head 

2. a chean rost mutton 

3. a dish turbet 

4. Chickens, hair, peas and cold toung 



Deseart 
Milk, strawberies, SilUbubs 



June 21 St, Earle of Staires ^ and eleven at Table ^ 

Scots Broth 
Remove of Turbet and broild salmond 
muton collups Pigen py chickins boyld 

Boyld Lamb and French beans 
2 Turkic poults. 



Mushrooms Peas 

Cheries Tart 
Lobsters cream loafs. 

a goose. 



Desert and 
Cream Jellies strawberies 
Cheries swetmeats allmond-cream 
Lemon Cream 



1 John Wallop, afterwards first Earl of Portsmouth, at this time M.P. for 
Hampshire, and a Lord of the Treasury. He was created Baron Wallop and 
Viscount Lymington on 1 1 June 1720, a few days after the date of this dinner. 

* John Dalrymple, second Earl of Stair, famous both as a general and as a 
diplomatist. At this time he must have just returned from his brilliant embassy, 
to Paris. He married Eleanor, Viscountess Primrose, daughter of the second 
Earl of Loudon, and widow of James, first Viscount Primrose. The curious 
phantasmagoria of the death of her first husband in Rotterdam seen by her in 
Edinburgh was the origin of Sir Walter Scott's ' My Aunt Margaret's Mirror,* 
and the circumstances of her marriage with Lord Stair were almost as peculiar. 

' This Menu is not in Lady Grisell's hand. 



I 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 293 

[Bills of Fare] 
15 July 1720. At the Princess ^ 
the Lady of the bed chambers Table at Richmond, 

9 at table 
a white soup with hearbs 
salt rosted mutton 
sids fish a large Mackerall 
fricassy chickens 
bacon and beans 
a chicken py 
midle a piece bief stewd whole 
no relief 



2 pullets at top 
6 pigions at foot 
sids peas 

broyled herins with butter souce 
lopsters 
beans 

tart in the midle 
Deseart 
a big dish in the Midle with 
connections and frute only 



22 June Prince Wales Duchess Shrosberries ^ Table. 
13 at one and 6 at a litle. 
midle soup with j)eas 
top boyld Lamb 
foot rost mutton 
one s^ fish boyld chicken rague 
side pigion py, veal colep, fricassy 



' Carolina Wilhelmina, Princess of Wales, daughter of the Markgraf of \ 

Anspach. j 

- Duchess of Shrewsbury. One of the Ladies-in-Waiting on the Princess of 
Wales. According to Lady Cowper she was rather forced on the princess by 
the king, but she ' had some extraordinary talents, and it was impossible to 
hate her so much as her Lord. . . . She had a wonderful art at entertaining and 
diverting people, though she would sometimes exceed the bounds of decency. 
She had a great memory, had read a good deal, and spoke three languages to 
perfection.' — Diary of Lady Cowper. 



294 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 







2 Course 




midle 


tart with 


L cream 




top 


pullets 






foot 


pigions and partrage 




side 


sturgen, 


venson pasty peas 


side 


fryd sols. 


, frensh beans, 


lopsters 



Deseart 
2 big dishes frute and confections. 



20 Nov 1722 at L^ Carlils,i 7 at Table. 

1. A Dish stewd Meat muton bief veall and crimp cod, 
the fish set up and rost beaff set down with gravie sauce 
boyld with shalot on one side and bitrowes w* oyl and 
veniger on the other side in litle chena hollow plates 

2. A pigion py and Mutton collips stew'' Ld. Rothes way 
8. 5 Ashiets ; 3 teel, squab pigions, scollopd oysters, 

fryd smelts and butterd scorsonera or something of that 
kind hertickhos cut in thin slices will do better it was 
cream bet up with butter was on it 

4. rid herin and tarts butter on one side and cheas 
on the other 

5. Deseart : oranges, apels, pears, and chestons all the 
dishes litle and very neat no case with knives on the 
by table. 



17 Decmr. 10 at a big table L^ Carlile,i etc. 1722. 

1^*. 7 dishes 2 soups, a terean, stewd pigions w* sweat 
breads mushrooms etc. with a sauce half rague half 



* Charles Howard, third Earl of Carlisle, at this time Constable of the 
Tower of London. He held several important posts under Whig Administra- 
tions. He married Lady Anne Capel, daughter of Arthur, first Earl of Essex. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 295 

[Bills of Fare] 
fricassy, a litle py of toungs etc. veall a la dob with 
spinag sauce a boyld pullet sallary sauc 

2 Releaffes a whole turbot and fryd smelts and rosted 
veal 

Host Bieff on the By table for any that cald for it 

2°*^. 7 Dish a Turkic, a Phesant, snyps, partrages, a 
wild duck and larks round 

3^. 7 Dish in chena a large dish crawfish, a tart, fryd 
soils, Blang mange, sallary and chease, sparagrass, lambs 
livers whole w* sauce 



Deseart 
Aples in cyrop and pears stewd in a round glass in 

raw ones round with a foot and raw pears round 

them 
Jelluy 6 glasses 3 of biskets 
hipd as high betwixt each 
2 glasses, a high scaloped glass 
in midle wet orang chips 
Milk in candle candle bowl milk 

china bowl but I in midle wet orang chips 
think glas as good salver confections in the 

middle 
carrans in cyrop the like below aples with cyrop and 
and raw pears round raw ones round 

1725, January 22 Duke Hamilton i L^ Twedle 2 
Rothes ^ Selkirk ^ 10 at Ta. 
2 end Dishes soup and Lamb Midle dish bieff py in 
blood one ashiet in each salt tung w* red cabage and 
sasages and boyld Turkic with salary sauce. 
2 Reliefs salmond and sadle of Mutton 

' James, fifth Duke of Hamilton, married, first, Anne, daughter of the fourth 
Earl of Dundonald ; second, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Strangeways ; and 
third, Anne, daughter of Edward Spencer. 

"^ Lord Tweeddale. John Hay, fourth Marquess, one of the Representative 
Peers in six Parliaments. He married in 1748 Frances, daughter of John, Earl 
Granville. ^ See note 2, p. 285. 

* Lord Selkirk. Charles Douglas, formerly Hamilton, Earl of Selkirk, one 
of the Lords of the Bedchamber to the king ; died unmarried. 



296 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 



2nd Service 
partrage and wood cock young Ducklins for end dishes 
the midle dish aple py with cream 
2 ashiets on each side, rague with sweat bread, Aspara- 
grass rost oysters on Squers and marrow pudine 

Deseart Jelly ratafia cream sweat meats frute etc. 



Mr. Dundas of that Ilk ^ Jan. 25 Mr. Dundas Advocate ^ 

Sr. G. Eliot 3 and Lady 
At the 2 ends soup and rost Mutton pickles in the 
midle, ane ashet on each side, salt toung and fricassy of 
rabets, relieff of salmond. 



2nd Course 

ends 2 Ducklins, a Rague of sweatbread pallets etc., 
Midle dish aple py with cream 

2 ashets on each side, Tanzie, fricassy ousters, caparata. 
Lamb. 

Deseart, confections, frute, etc. 



April 12, 1725. At the Duke Chandes^ howse at 

Cannons. A Duson at Table. 
1^*. a broun soup and a white soup, fricassy, pudine, 
broun rague, and collopes, ane Eparn in the Midle. 

^ Mr. George Dundas of that Ilk, advocate, at this time M.P. for Linlith- 
gowshire, married Alison, daughter of Brigadier-General Bruce of Kennet. 

^ Mr. Robert Dundas, advocate, eldest son of Robert Dundas of Arniston. 
He was at this time M.P. for the county of Edinburgh. He became Lord 
President of the Court of Session in 1748. 

3 Sir Gilbert Elliot of Minto, second Baronet, son of Sir Gilbert Elliot. (See 
p. 221.) He was at this time M.P. for Roxburgh, afterwards a Lord of Session 
as Lord Minto. He was interested in music, arboriculture, etc. He married 
Helen Stewart of Allanbank. His daughter Jean was the authoress of the 
' Flowers of the Forest.' 

* Duke of Chandos. James Brydges, first Duke of Chandos, built a magnifi- 
cent house at Canons near Edgware, where this dinner took place. According 
to Defoe there were one hundred and twenty persons in family, and the choir 
entertained them every day at dinner. Pope is said to have drawn his Timon's 
Villa from this house. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 297 

[Bills of Fare] 

Reliefs 2 salmond, Lamb, and Chickens. 

2^. 3 rings with 5 plates 4 low and one higher in the 
midle in each, 1^* ring a green goose a chicken, a Rabet. 

the midle ring, blang Mangie and broun Mangie, brunt 
cream, custart white and custart green or Tanzie. 

3rd. ring, a dukline, turkie pout, 2 pigions, broyld 
chicken, rabet. 

2 ashets on each side, a Rague sweat breads, fryd sols, 
hartichocs spnch. 



15 March [1727]. At L^. Mountjoys ^ 10 at table, 
7 and 7 and 2 removes. 

l^t. a Tareen with Beafe, veall, etc.; ducklins, chickens, 
pigions, pallets, sweatbreeds, cocks combs, all sorts of 
roots, Asparagras, sallary, licks, etc. : in midle a rogued 
Turkie with oysters gisert's livers. Morels and sundry 
things put on scewars and stuck in it and light broun sauce. 

sids : 3 litle pudins, a plumb, a green, a white, and 
backed one cut and put betwext them. Beef collops stewd 
tender, Pigions one suortout, and a very smal sadle 
mutton ; at other end white soup and a pullet in it, 
7 dishes in all. 

Relieffs, a jack with pudin in it, and whitens w* smelts 
and a good sauce, a ragued breast of veall prety white. 

3 young ducks, 4 Turkies, aple tart, and small sweat- 
meat tarts round it, craw fish, 3 sols fryd and craw fish 
tails and shrimps, and bodys craw fish brused and put 
in the sauce and pourd on the midle of them. 

3 whole sweatbreads and a piece veall stuft with forst 
meat, the skiny piece of the veall or lamb the bigness of 
a large sweat bread and put in the midle ; they were all 
prity white and bate butter and limon, Asparagrass with 
cream and butter sauce, and tost and fryd sippets [?] round. 

1 Thomas Windsor distinguished himself in the wars in Flanders, and was 
made Viscount Windsor of Black Castle in the Irish peerage. He was afterwards 
made Baron Mountjoy in the peerage of the United Kingdom. He married 
■ Charlotte, daughter of the seventh Earl of Pembroke. 



298 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 

Deseart : 9 all on guilt cornered salvers, low feet ; 
midle, with one row glass salvers with half inch broad 
brims with franch plumb, Apricoks, fruts dry, Almond 
bisket and Ratafia. 8 in all, and wafers put in betwixt 
them, a salver above that w* 4 frute jelly s and wet sweat- 
meats, with covers, and betwixt them high glasses, white 
confits on the top, a scolloped glass cornered brim. 

2 ends bottom row. Jelly harts horn and limon and 
ratafia cream, a salver on top with the same cornered 
brimd glasses as in the midle. 

2 sids l^K row, Aples in sawcers and frensh figs and 
plumbs, the last pistashe nuts on one and aples in cyrop 
in the other, the same cornerd brimd glasses as the rest> 
the 4 corners, 2 slist oranges and 2 almonds and resins, in. 
glass broad cream bowls. 



At Lord Hallifax ^ in the Country at Bushy Park, 

28 May 1726. 

green soup 
veal in it 
Bacon and Beans veal stewed pidgeon pye 

carp 
Relief Roast mutton 



Pidgeans, Chickens, 
and young turkies 
Ragout of sweatbreads Pease 

Tart 
Sparagras green geese char 



^ Lord Halifax. George Montagu, first Earl of Halifax, married, first, 
Ricarda Posthume, daughter of Richard Saltonshall, and, second, Mary, daughter 
of the Earl of Scarborough. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 299 



[Bills of Fare] 
1727, June 6. Sir Robert Walpoul/ Mr. Dodington.^ 

8 at Table. 

5 dish, a sop, Pudin, Hamb, 4 boyld chickens, a stwd 
fillet bieff ; 2 releiffs, fish and rost Mutton. 

7 dish ; 2 young gees, Turrem green pigions, curran 
tart, peas stewd, burnt cream, hautichok sukers, Angeloty. 

Deseart : Confections, frute, Jellys, and Milk. 



We was eight days at Twitenham. We had always an 
Eparn in the midle, 2 dish at first, 4 at 2^, 6 at the last, 
the variety was soups, peas, Mager, gravie, rise, barly, 
vermaselly, variety of meat was rost Bieff, Bran, stwd 
cops [?], pigions, minsd pys, boyld lamb, rost lamb, boyd 
foull, rost foull and sasages, jack, hard fish, stewed rump 
bieff, boyld beaff, rost veall, ragu'd breast veall, Turkic, 
chean pork, rosted breast of pork, Lamb, boyld and backed 
pudin, orang pudin, Asparagrass, Brocaly w* sasages, 
vension Pasty, rost venison, rost mutton, wild Ducks, 
rabets, boyld wild ducks w* ounions, larks, rost goos, 
boyld goos, sturgen, rague sweat breads, hogs pudins 
and white ones, lamb frys, fricassy rabets, rost rabets. 



^ Sir Robert Walpole, afterwards Ean of Orford, at this time Prime Minister, 
This dinner took place shortly before the death of George I., the news of which 
reached Walpole at Chelsea on the 14th. He is said to have killed two horses 
in carrying the tidings to the new king at Richmond. 

- (ieorge Dubb Doddington, afterwards Lord Melcomb Regis, at this time 
a Lord of the Treasury. He left a diary which has been published, and which 
shows the writer in anything but a pleasant light. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, 
who never missed an opportunity of saying something spiteful of her quondam 
friend, Lady Murray, writes in 1725 : • Mrs. Murray has got a new lover in the 
most accomplished Mr. Doddington.' 



300 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

[Bills of Fare] 
26 Janur 1728. Mr. Onsly/ the Speaker, Hadinton,^ 
and Marchmont,^ Coll. Hope, Mr. Johnston, and 
Mr. Mitchell. 11 at Table. 
l^t. 7 dish : a soup, a sweatbread and cox comb py, 
a Lamb, 4 on the sids, a pudin, boyld chickens, ragu'd 
fillet bieff. Tush. 2 relieffs, Turbet and rost mutton. 

2°d. 7 dish : wild foull, cheston py and a goos, on the 
sids craw fish or white beans and sasages, Asparagras, 
minsd collips and sasages, burnt cream. 

Deseart : Sweatmeats and Jellys and sillibubs, etc. 



London, 30 March 1728. L^ Carlyl,* Lady Lechmoor,^ 
Lady Mary,^ Lds. Stairs,'^ Hadinton,^ Marchmont.^ 12 

1st, 4 (jish : Soup, Lamb, sids, 4 boyld chickens and 
a pudin ; 2 relefes, crimp hard [?] and forsadle of mutton. 

2^^. 5 dish : 2 Duclins, date py, Kidny beans and sheaps 
toungs rosted ; sids, a crab and Asparagras. 



^ Arthur Onslow was elected Speaker on 23rd January 1728, so this was no 
doubt a dinner in his honour. He held this most distinguished position until 
i8th March 1761, when he retired after thirty-three years 'constant and un- 
wearied attendance in the chair.' 

^ Thomas Hamilton, sixth Earl of Haddington, whose son. Lord Binning, 
was married to Lady Grisell Bailiie's daughter Rachel. 

^ Alexander Hume, second Earl of Marchmont, K.T. , Lady Grisell Bailiie's 
brother. He was the third son of the first Earl, his elder brothers predeceasing 
their father. He married Margaret, daughter and heiress of Sir George Campbell 
of Cessnock, when he assumed the surname of Campbell. 

■* See note i, p. 294. 
■ ' Lady Elizabeth Letchmere, daughter of the third Earl of Carlisle, married, 
first, Nicholas Letchmere, Attorney-General in 1718 and raised to the peerage 

in 1721 as Lord Letchmere. 'The discreet and sober Lady L re has lost 

such furious sums at the Bath that it may be questioned whether all the sweet- 
ness the waters can put into my lord's blood can make him endure it, particularly 
;^700 at one sitting which is aggravated with many astonishing circumstances.' 
— Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. She married, second, Thomas Robinson 
of Rokeby Park. 

^ Lady Mary Howard, daughter of the Earl of Carlisle. 

' See note 2, p. 292. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



301 



[Bills of Fare] 
Deseart : Jellys and Sillibubs, curds and cream, pears 
iid aples, pistaches and scorcht almonds, Bisket round 
le milk. 



The following three Menus are from a jotting left by 
ady Grisell of dinners at Naples shortly before Lord 
inning's death : — 

18 Dec 1732. Mr. Horner Archer, etc. 12 at Table. 

Soup 

oyld veal and Lamb plumb pudin and 

colifloor litle paties round it 

Soup 



2 reliefs fish and muton py 



peas 



4 wood cocks, 4 snyp 
french lof drest 

with milk salmagundy ^ 

fryd soles 
)rainorely [?] Pig burnt cream 



Biskit 
rest buter etc. 
pistaches 



Aples 

Chesnuts 
graps drest buter upon crots 
plumb etc. bisket 



Mr. H. Hunters. 16 Folk. 
Mr. Horner. 10 at Table, 6 by table. 
Mrs. Archer. 

Boyld leg Pork 
Soup 
mustart pickle, etc. potatos 

pudin rague veal and sweet breads cok comb, etc, 
turnips fish souce 

fish 



' Salmagunde,' a dish of minced meat with eggs, anchovies, vinegar, pepper, 



302 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[Bills of Fare] 



relife, pigion py 



wood cocks and partrages 
salet Minshed py Morells 

cold toung fryd soils 

peas fish sause 

loyn veal 



Peas pudin 


Soup ^ 
Boyld Turkic 


Pork and torts 




relief of fish 




Salmagundy 
Turnips 


rost udder 

Aple Dumplin 

ragued veal 


frogs 
salet 



The following Menus are from some loose sheets of 
paper, and relate to a visit paid by Lady Harvey ^ at 
Mellerstain : — 

Super, Thursday, July 15, 1756. 
cold Chickens 
Waffles colerd pig 

Jelly 
Hartichoks Salmon 

Collops 



^ There is no heading to this Menu, but it is on the same sheet as the two 
ipimediately preceding. 

^ 'Sweet Molly Lapell,' familiarly known as 'Torn' in the Prince of Wales's 
circle, daughter of Brigadier-General Nicholas Lepell, at one time Maid of 
Honour to the Princess of Wales, afterwards Mistress of the Robes to her when 
Queen. She married John Hervey, the handsome son of the Earl of Bristol, 
who rather neglected her. She was a great friend of Lady Murray, and stood 
loyally by her in her quarrel with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Indeed, she 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



303 



[Bills of Fare] 

Diner, IQ^. 

Soup 
relif cod 

pickls 

rost beef 


salad 


Tarts 
cowhead 


chickens 

puffs 

veal colops 


peas 
pickled salmon 




Diner, Sunday, 18th. 

Giblet broth 

relief salmon 

salad 

rost beef 




Colerd Eel 
pudens 


Hagis 

moor foul 
Cold Pig 


peas 
cox coims 



no super 
but strawbery 



Diner, 21 
Rumble of Veal and broth 
Salmon 



was beloved by the whole Baillie family. It was she who attended Lady Grisell 
on her deathbed, both Lady Murray and Lady Binning being ill at the time. 
She was noted for her beauty, and seems to have been a charming personality. 
Her portrait still adorns the walls of Mellerstain. Her husband was a great 
friend of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, with whom his wife was not on speaking 
terms on account of the quarrel between Lady Mary and Lady Murray. 



304 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[Bills of Fare] 
Loin of Mutton and stakes 
Stewed cucumbers Makerony 

Moor foul 



Cream 



Super 
veal colops 

fryd eggs 



strawberys 



Mellerstain 1748 account of what is spent yearly in the 
house of meat and drink, etc., in quantity, but not 
the value. ^ 



6 oxen cut in 199 pieces, besK 


ies beef from 


Kelso 


6^ 


Wedders 




• 


19 


Lambs 




• 


11 


Ewe .... 




• 


1 


Calfs .... 




• 


3 


Swine 




• 


4 


Pigs .... 




• 


10 


Eggs besides those of our owr 


1 hens 2284 






Candle Stones 


* • • 


• 


. 30 


Butter for sheep . 


. 12 pound 






for greesing wool 


Spd 


• 




in family 


. 300 pd 








320 




Soap pounds 




• 


231 


Cheeses . . . . 




• 1 


24 


Fouls eat or given away. 








Turkies . . . . 




56 




Geess 




22 




Hens . . . . 




62 




ducks . . . . 




33 




capons . . . . 




12 




Chickens . . . . 




191 
376 





^ It must be remembered that Mellerstain was at this time a lady's establish- 
ment. 



1749] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



305 













Bottles 


Liquors Claret . . . . ... 31 


Port 










62 


Hermitage 










18 


Cotrotee . 










5 


Canary . 










33 


Modera . 










28 


Chirrie 










56 


Serainse . 










9 


Tocky . 










1 


"WTiite wine 










11 


Frontiniac 










12 


Cyder 










54 


Strong Ale 










269 


Second Ale 










458 


Bottled small Beer . 








218 








Bottles 1265 



Small Beer in Barels 850 gallons Scots 
Flower 111 Stone 14 pounds 
Oat Meal 264 stone 



Mellerstain 1749 Account of what is spent yearly in the 
house of meat and drink, etc., in quantity, but not 
in value. 



5 Oxen cut in 166 pieces 




5 


Wedders 




18 


Ewes .... 




6 


Lambs 




12 


Calfs .... 




4 


Swine 




5 


Pigs .... 




27 


Eggs besides those of our own hous 


e . . . 3720 


Candles, Stones 29, pounds 4 




Soap pounds . . . . 


. 228| 


Butter, our own pounds 2161 
Butter bought pounds 128/ 


. 344 


Cheeses .... 


a 


.51 



u 



306 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



Herrings, half Barrels . 
Tusk fish .... 


• ■ • 

• • • 


Fouls eat or given away 
Turkies .... 


45 


geess .... 
ducks .... 


5 
. 22 


Hens . . 


. 81 


Chickens .... 


. 181 


Pigions, our own 


. 113 



[1749 

4 
5 



447 



Liquors 



Small Beer in Barrels, 850 Scots gallons 
Flower, Stones 134, pounds 8 
Oatmeal and Ry, Stones 272 



Bottles 



Claret 








26 


Port 








65 


Hermitage 








10 


Canary . 








25 


Shirrie 








43 


Modera . 








24 


Frontiniac 








4 


Seraionse 








4| 


Strong ale 








152 


Second Ale 








572 


Bottled small Beer 








. 217 


Orange wine 








33 


White wine 








15 


Cotrottee 








5 


Punch besides shrub 


v' 




34 




1232| 



Extracts from small paper covered book marked ' Cash 
Book begune 22 March 1729. For no use at all.' 
It deals with a visit to Bath and Bristol. In this 



749] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



307 



book Lady Grisell uses the word * By ' when she 
means ' Paid to.' 



arch 22 By May Menzies to account . 


. £1 


1 





By Account pay^ Ja Johnston 


. 1 





3 




Fraught, etc. payd Mrs. Towyn 





16 


6 




Cariing Allers 





2 







Doc: Gibson's man . 





5 







Plasters 





1 







Limmons sent to Mellerstane . 





10 


5 




3 p^ under stokins . 





6 







Megilsidler 5s. Pate Allan 2 





7 







Betty and Nelly 


2 


2 







Kimergham Drinkmoney 





13 


6 




Whitehall Drinkmoney . 





13 


6 




Mr. Halls Carter 





2 


6 


• • 


S'" James Halls Coachman 





2 


6 


j» 


John Coachman 7\ 


' 








Mo wages at 10£ a year, 


6 


6 







14 


9 


2 



By the expence of 6 coach horses 
and 8 Riding horse from 





Dunce to Bath . 30 


1 


n 


>5 


cariing Bagage . 2 
guids . . 
Turnpicks . . 
mending sadles and 
blooding . . 


2 

9 
2 

5 




2 

4 


5> 


pistol ball 2s sope Is. 
Bassindain and Hume' s 


3 







horss . . .0 


4 





JJ 


Washing on the Road 


16 


2 


>5 


Eating for 5 and Georg 
in the Coach and 2 
maids from Berwick 








16 days to Bath . 23 


18 


6 


9> 


Servants at Dune . 


J, 






308 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1749 



Api 17 



By 7 mens board 16 days 

at Is. pr day . 5 12 

„ Duncan and John each 

5s. of wages . 10 

„ John Coachman and 
Tams board 5 days 
at Bath and Joeys 15 

,, Horses 5 nights at Bath 6 18 

,, Shoeing horses at Bath 

etc. . . . 1 14 

„ Tam to cary home 9 

horses . . 14 14 














8 





£88 9 7J 



L: B is to pay the half of this 
£88, 9s. 7d|. 



[Note as to details of £30,ls. 9|d. above stated, con- 
tained on a separate piece of paper and not in Lady 
Grisell's handwriting.] 



Berwick a night . 


1 7 


1| 


Belfoord a night . 


1 12 





Anwick a night . 


1 14 


8 


Morpeth a night . 


1 14 


8 


New Castle a night 


2 


4 


Darlington baitting 


6 


11 


fferryhill a night . 


1 10 


8 


Northalerton a night 


1 11 





Borrowbridg a night 


1 14 


3 


Wetherby baitting 


10 


1 


ffarybridge a night 


1 14 


4 


Doncaster baiting 


11 


3 


Blyth a night 


1 12 


8 


Nottingham a night 


1 11 


8 


Leister a night 


1 14 


3 


Smokington a night 


1 7 


8 


Coventry baitting 


9 


10 



31] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 309 

Warwick a night . 
Hartfoordbridge baiting 
Mortinmash a night 
Cirensister a night 
Alerton baitting . 



Duns 
Franc 



[Note as to Lodgings at Bath.] 

my 3 rooms and one Caret , 
■ week L. Bin 2 rooms and half and Caret . 
Mr. Mitchell 2 rooms and a half 



1 


8 


1 





4 





1 


11 


7 


1 


14 


5 





7 


11 


28 


9 


H 


1 









12 


6 



30 1 


H 


£1 15 





1 10 





1 5 






4 10 



p. Month, 18£. 



Durnel, May 20, 1731, that we went abroad To the 

October, new still, 1733, that we left Paris, and to 
the Oct., old style, that we came to London, 

1733.1 



oterdam 29 May 1731 Old Stil and the 9^ of June N. St. 






gdr. St. doit. 


£ s. d. 


For Boat fraught 


from 






the yaught 


• 


6 


11 


Diner at 


• 


6 


11 


bagage 


• 


2 6 


4 2 


a coach 


• 


2 10 


4 6 


a scout 2 from Roterdam 






to Delph . 


• 


5 2 


9 4 



' Contained in a paper-covered notebook 75"X6^". The outer column giving 
: values in Sterling money has been added by the editor. For money tables 

ip. 421. 

' Schuit or trekschuit, a public boat drawn through the canals by horse. 



gdr. St. 


doit. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


4 12 








8 


4 


3 2 








5 


8 


1 10 








2 


8 


12 








1 





3 18 








7 





6 9 








11 


9 


1 5 








2 


3 



310 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] 

Paline, etc., at Delph 
Coach hire at Roterdam . 
Coach at Delph 
Seeing the church ther . 
N.S. for a large hamper and 

lock and a little ham-. 

per for Grisie 
June 10. Passage of letters to the 
Saterday 11 day 

Exchange for 150 £ Stel. 

Bag and portage of 

521g. Sst. 
the roof in scout from 

Delf to Leyden each 10s 

1 doit Servants in 

scout, 7s. Id. . 
a hamper for the Drogs . 
2 Tea Kells . 
Bagage from Roterdam 

to Lyden, . . .420076 

11. For Breckfast and diner 

the last Ig. pr head 

and for wine . . 14 2 1 5 10 

To Edwards for 2 nights 

lodging at Roterdam 

he reckoned it a week 

payd by J. Gordon 75 6 17 6 

our intertainment there 

being 2 diners 2 breck- 

fasts and 2 suppers 

payd by Gorden . 96 15 

Lyden. 
June 12. For diner and super 

and wine the maids 8 8 16 
13. the maids 8, we dining 

in Mr. Burnets . .080 

Smalls by John for breck- 
fast and suppers . 1 14 



4 8 4 


8 1 


1 13 


2 11 


6 


11 



8 17 


3 


16 








8 


3 






gdr. St. doit. 


£ s. d. 


16 


2 4 


14 


2 2 



3 7 








6 


1 


2 16 








5 





14 





1 


5 


8 


3 








5 


6 


11 











11 


13 16 





1 


5 


2 


12 





1 


2 






731] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 811 

[Foreign Tour] 

For sugar for Tea at 8| 

St. 3| lb. 
For washing Roterdam . 
For entertainment in 3 

days . . . 33 3 6 

jeyden For milk at a Bours 

une 15. house . . . 13 1 1 

For bagage Ig. 7st. more 

2g 

For a coach 2g. 16st. 
16. For lodging a week at 

Lyden 
To Frederick, etc. . 
To a man for errands 
For 6 lb. chocalet . 
For a lb. Tea 
For lodging 2 nights at 

Edwards errour in 

Roterdam this is set 

down befor. 
For a Scout from Liden 

to harlem for the roof 

and 6 and 4 servants in 

Scout . . . 6 6 2 11 

mster- For scout harlem to Am- 
am June sterdam 
3 For bagage . 

For tape at Harlem errour 

For a guid . 

For a coach . 

For a coach . 

For bagage . 

For lodging and inter- 

tainment 3 nights . 64 16 518 8 
For a scout to utright 

the whole of it which 

was devided 20 gul. 

and drink . . 15 9 18 3 



3 15 








6 9 


2 6 








4 2 


6 








6 


3 6 








6 


3 5 








5 11 


1 12 








2 10 



47 


5 





4 6 


7 


5 








9 


2 


9 








16 


6 



S12 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] 

gdr. St. doit. £ s. d. j 

For diner at Newer Sluce 

of fish . . . 24 2 4 

Utright 
June 20. For 4 lb. coffie powder 

32 St. and box 18st. . 7 6 13 4 

a lb. Tea Bohea from 

Lord Bins landlord . 6 10 11 10 

2 pair gloves Grisie and 
I errour 

For lodging and entertain- 
ment at the Castel of 
Antwerp. 3 nights 

For a coach to Syst 

For a coach to Sousdick- 

Gildermause 

For diner to 6 of 

us and 2 maids 3 11 
Servant : . . 12 

4 3 7 7 

For 2 Post wagon to the 

Buss to the wagennears 40 
To servants at Utright . 
To the wageneer . 
For smalls by James 
Buss 25. For lodging and inter- 

tainment 3 nights at 

the golden Lyon 
To servants . 
To a sergent 11 st. soger 

OoL* • • • • 

For a Berline to 

Mostrick:. . 40 

2 Post wagons . 50 
bagage . .55 

Commissers Knight 11 



40 





3 


13 


4 


2 10 








4 


6 


12 








1 





3 4 


4 





5 


11 


32 15 





3 








1 2 








2 





17 








1 


5 



Wageneers . .18 



97 4 8 18 2 



I73I] 

[Foreign Tour] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



For diner at Lumpt 4 18 
Overbeck a night. 6 5 
maid . . .06 

bree for breckfast 1 6 
Diner At Ass . 4 10 



313 



gdr. St. doit. £ s. d. 



17 5 1 11 7 



741 12 2 67 14 5 



Mostrick a guiny is 27 Skillins,^ and each skillin 
10 Marks, and each Mark 6 doits. 











Stff. 




June 27 For lodging and super 


Sk. 


M. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


and breckfast 


36 








1 


1 





Servants 


1 














7 


For a berline to Aix 


32 











18 


8 


For 2 Diligances to Aix . 


45 








1 


6 


3 


For baggage . 


4 











2 


4 


To the Wagennears 


3 











1 


9 


To a soger to forbear 














serching 


1 














7 


9 Marks is For Diner at Gulph 


21 











12 


3 


a skillin To a wageneer 


1 














7 


at Aix To the 3 servants boord 














21 days to 27 June 


111 








3 


4 


9 


30 To accounts from John of 














Smalls for breckfasts 














and supers . 


27 











15 


9 


To smalls by John and 














James 


7 


3 








4 


3 


To clear house accounts 














pd. John . 


15 


8 


4 





9 


2 


June 9 To clear house accounts 














more at Aix 


22 


8 


6 





13 


3 



^ This should be thirty-seven skillings, and is so given elsewhere. 



314 



4 THE HOUSEHOLD 


BOC 


)K 




[1733^ 


[Foreign Tour] 








[Stg.] 


To sundry smalls for 


Sk. 


M. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


house I bought . 


31 


8 


4 


18 6 


For diners 11 days and 2 










skillins a head . 


195 








5 13 9 


cooks maid . 


] 








7 


to see the relicks in great 










church 


17 








9 11 


a coach 


6 








3 6 


For 12 nights lodging in 










Mr. Tewis house 


168 








4 18 


the maid in the house . 


8 








4 8 


coffie .... 


1 


4 


4 


10 


For a Berline and 2 










waggons to Spa . 


88 








2 11 4 


3 wagonneers 


3 








19 



1 850 4 24 14 
Spa. 

here the guiny is 37 skill and 4 souse, a skillin 10 sous, 

and a sous 4 Hers 













stg. 






sk. 


St. 


doits. 


£ s. d. 


July 9 To John 




78 


8 





2 5 11 


13 To John 




74 


8 





2 3 7 


For wood, etc. 




13 








7 7 


To house 




5 








2 11 


To a Copashin 




1 








7 


For a water bottle 


1 








7 


20 To John . 


• 


. 37 


4 





1 1 10 


23 To John 


• 


. 81 


16 





2 8 2 



Spa. 



S. 293 6 8 11 2 



This is Lievers, sous, etc. 

French Stg. 

£ s. d. £ s. d. 

July 25 To John . . . 12 13 4 



' This column is wrongly summed. It should be 847 Sk. 4 M. 



7 








7 


10 


18 14 





1 


1 





18 14 





1 


1 





10 











7 


18 14 





1 


1 





18 14 





1 


1 





18 14 





1 


1 





37 8 





2 


2 






731] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 315 

[Foreign Tour] [French] [Stg.] 

To make up a former £ s. d. £ s. d. 
balance . . . 13 9 

For powder lib to 

day 20 a wash ball 7d. 17 16 
26 To Lady Fannys car- 
nush [?] . 
To John 
30 To John 

To Neckles Grisie and 

Mrs. Burnet 
To poor pilgrims 1 sk. 
Aug* 1 For John 
To John 
2 To John 
To John 
^londay 6 For a moneths Lodging 
9 rooms and a kit- 
chen and 2 beds for 
men servants, 14 sk. 
p. week, 10| guinys 
and 6 sk. and 3 liers . 
7 To John 

To John was forgot to 
set down . 
9 To John 
For letters . 
13 To John 

20 For 2 wagons at 3 sk. a- 
piece for 37 days to 
this and 2 days riding 110 10 
Augt 20 To John 

22 To John 4 guinys 

For the Buckie to the ball 
Lug. 25 For 12 doz. botls water 
O.S. to Mr. Cockburn 

To Roclor for the Ball 
and Super to 70 
persons . . . 196 7 11 11 



196 








11 





6 


18 


14 





1 


1 





37 


8 





2 


2 





37 


8 





2 


2 





3 


5 








3 


8 


37 


8 





2 


2 





110 


10 





6 


4 


4 


37 


8 





2 


2 





74 


16 





4 


4 





11 











12 






316 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



[Foreign Tour' 


[F 


rench] 


[Stg.] 




£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


To John 


37 


8 





2 


2 





To John 


18 


14 





1 


1 





To John 


30 


12 





1 


14 


5 


To the fidels at the ball 


28 


1 





1 


11 


6 


Wednes- For bread etc. by John 














day 28 To a cook at 1 sk p"" day 














49 days . 


24 


15 





1 


7 


10 


For 3 weeks lodging to 














Monday 27 


147 


' 





8 


5 


4 


To John at 3 times 3 














guinys 


56 


2 





3 


3 





For a weeks lodging the 














Sunday 31 Sept.^ 


49 








2 


15 


1 


For a chaise to the 1st 














of Sep. and horses 


35 


10 





2 








Septm 3 To John to the 10 


74 


16 





4 


4 





and 10 For Arrack and Limons 


10 











11 


3 


Washing to Saterday 8 














2 weeks . 


8 


13 








9 


9 


2 french caps Mrs. 














Twiles at Aix . 


6 


18 








7 


9 


11 To John 


37 


8 





2 


2 





12 To John 


37 


8 





2 


2 





For 12 nights lodging to 














Saturday 15 at 12 skill 


72 








4 


1 





To the Caposhins 


37 


8 





2 


2 





To the wemen at Ger- 














onster Pohon . 


18 


14 





1 


1 





To the wemen at Pohon 














in Toun . 


8 











9 





Friday 14 To the cook for 10 days 


8 


10 








9 


7 


To the housemaid Ann 














Mary Nort Livoux, 














daughter of our land- 














lord 


9 


7 








10 


6 



* Probably a mistake for ist September. 



I73I] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



3ir 



Foreign Tour] 




[F 


rench^ 


[Stg.] 


For a wanscote chest £ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


and lock . 


• 


6 











6 


9 


Saturday 15, 
















we went 
















to Leige For a chaise 12 


days 


. 35 


10 





2 


10 





16 For the last weeks wash 












8 frank . 


, 


8 











9 





For Kains the half 


37 


8 





2 


2 





For a p^ shoes my D. 


5 











5 


7 


mending shoes 


• 


1 











1 


1| 


2 pr clogs . 


. 


8 


10 








9 


7 


letters 


. 


8 


15 








9 


10 


Apoticary's bill 


• 

1 


13 











14 


7 




1038 


6 





60 


19 


4i 


taken out of 
















this washing 


8 13 ( 


) 












washing 


8 ( 


) 












shoes my D 


5 ( 


) 












mending shoes 


1 ( 


) 












2 pr Cloggs G 
















and I 


8 10 ( 

S. 


) 31 


3 













1007 


3 







Leige. 
















17 Sepm For 1 lb. Tee 


• 


7 


10 








8 


5 


To 54j broad 


hollanc 


I 












for 3 pr shiets at 3^ 


) 












Sturs the ell 


• 


94 


10 





5 


6 


4 


For 34| demie 


hollanc 


I 












at 45 Sturs for 7 Shift 


s 












to Grisie . 


, 


77 


12 


2 


4 


7 


4 


5 els Muslin for 4 cravat 


3 












45 St. 


• 


11 


5 








12 


3 


2 night napkins 


• 


5 


6 


1 





5 


11 




196 


3 


3 


11 





3 



' This column is wrongly summed by Lady Grisell. 



318 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] [French] [Stg.] 

take out the demi hoi- £ s. d. £ s. d. 
land muslin and night 

caps . . . 94 3 3 5 5 11 



S. 102 102 00 00 5 14 4 

For 2 chases 

from Spa to 

Leige that 

caried 8 

persons . 28 1 11 6 

A wagon for 2 

servants and 

bagog . 12 13 6 

a horse to a 

servant . 4 

44 4 6 



To drink money to 

Chaises . . . 1 1 If 

To the poor . . 1 10 1 9 

19 Sep. For diner at Barixpay 7 

masters 5 servants . 14 10 16 4 
For a kain to Charles 

Forbes 3 guinys . 56 2 3 3 
pay^ his horse from 

Spa . . . . 5 5 7| 

For 5 Nights at the Altas 

Noble to Msr Pontels 250 14 1 3 
makeing 4 p^ shiets . 3 3 4| 
a blunderbush 2 guin. 2 

pr pistols 2 gu. . 74 16 4 4 

Namour. 

For 2 Berlins 

from Leige 80 
a horse to a 

servant . 5 



85 4 15 8 



To Lodging and supers 
for 4 nights for we 



731] 



OF lADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



319 



Foreig 


'11 Tour^ 


[F] 


-one 


•h] 


[Stg. 






dined mostly in the 


£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 




Bishops . 


96 


3 





5 


8 


2 




To the Bishops Servants 


45 


8 





2 


11 







For 2 Berlins and a Rid- 
















ing horse from Namure 
















to Shalong 39 guinys 
















15 the riding horse was 
















5 of it 


748 


6 


2 


42 


1 


10 




Seeing the Castle of 
















Namure . 


11 











12 


5 




For bread etc. by John . 


2 


2 








2 


4 




flay at Rosey 
















upon Stra 8 00 











9 







fDind at Ritch- 
















mount . 12 











13 


6 




For Diner at 
















erriton . 4 10 











5 


1 




Super at Mash 6 











6 


9 




Diner at Runion 4 10 











5 


1 




Super at Bostogne 9 











10 


1 




Diner at Mark- 
















lange . 5 











5 


7| 




Super at Arlong 
















impos^ on 16 











18 







Diner at Luxen- 
















burg . 12 











13 


6 




fthe 2 above 
















'^rirMi iH r»r^ noTr^ 


77 
















S. 1 






616 


17 


2 


90 


18 


4 




Sup<i at Carmine, 
















the first village 
















in Lorain and 
















here the Lewi- 
















dors^ is 32 livers 6 10 








4 


4 






^ Lady Grisell seems to use • Lewis dors ' as synonymous to ' guiny,' and the 
ilculations are based on this assumption. 



320 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731^ 



[Foreign Tour] [French] 

28 breckf ast at Pont- £ s. d. 

mush . 3 10 

lay and sup^ at 

Nancy . 32 

wine upon the road 1 10 

29 dind at Roviell 6 

30 Sup<i at Lunavile 20 
lay at Mercour 15 10 

Oct. 1 Din at Alunavile 7 

lay at Ish . 7 15 

Coshers for going 
out of the road 
3 leigs to Luna- 
vile . 48 

Seeing the Duke 
of Lorains Palice 
and the Acad- 
amie . 21 

168 15 



Oct. 2 



here the Lewidor is 24 livers 
For diner at Jussie 



in Burgundy 

biskets etc. 

lay at Doncour 
Chato a private 
house and left 
the servants 

Dind at Dampier 

lay at Champain 
in the Dutche 
of Burgundy 

was serched here 
overly and gote 
a pass gave the 
men 

breckfast at Ark- ' 
surtiel 



6 

4 



10 

7 



15 
4 



12 

7 



7 10 



3 2 



3 



[Stg.] 
£ s. d. 
2 4 



1 1 
1 
4 
13 
10 
4 
5 



4 


4 
4 
8 
2 



1 12 






14 





5 


12 


6 


Sterling 





5 


8 





3 


10 



13 8 
3 10 



6 7 



2 8 

2 7 



31] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 321 



[Foreign Tour] 










stg. 


[French] 








£ s. d. 


lay at Dijon 24 











110 


Cyrop copilair ^ 












suger, etc. 4 


15 








4 2 


Maid at Dijon 1 


4 








Oil 


5 Dind at Nuys 10 











8 9 


lay at Beaune 11 











9 7 


6 Dind and lay at 












Shalong up 












Soan . 33 











1 8 10 


servants twise 












paid . 3 











2 7 


was stopd at 












Shalong 3 days 












by the imper- 












tinance of the 












Bourro and paid 












lodging, etc 24 


14 








117 


A chase post for 












L^ Bin and my 












Dear to Lyons 160 





361 


1 





7 








4 servants in the Dili- 










gence to lyons . 


• 


48 








2 2 


4 trunks 12£ caring 


out 










and in 8£ . 


• 


20 








17 6 


their supers at Macom 3£ 










boat men 30st. 


• 


4 


10 





3 11 


Oct. 9 For 5 places in the Dili- 










gence upon the Soan in 










2 days from Shalon to 










Lyon us 4 women 


and 










a footman 


• 


60 








2 12 6 


lay at Macom for super 


6 








5 3 



^ Capillaire. a syrup extracted from the maiden-hair fern ; a simple syrup 
avoureii with orange-flower water. 

X 



322 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 



[Foreign Tour 










< 


Stg. 












French 


£ 


s. 


d. 


11 


Dind at Roiotin . 




• 


5 12 








4 


11 




a coach at Lyons 3 hours 


3 16 








3 


5 




letters 12£newl£ 




« 


13 








11 


5 


Lyon 


For Lodging, au 
















guinys strl Park and enter- 
















24 


tainment 6 
















Livres. 


nights . 230 









10 


1 


3 


12 


3 lb. chocolet 


10 


15 









8 


5 




2 bottles Genever 


1 


8 









1 


3 




Suger and other 


















smalls graps etc. 


6 


10 









5 


8 




Serchers 


1 


10 









1 


4 




a clogbag a lewi- 


















dor and 24 sous 


25 


4 






1 


2 


1 




a clogbag lock 




10 












5 




2 Maps 


3 












2 


7 




harden bags 





6 












3 




wax cloath to 


















trunks 


2 


17 









2 


6 




a pillow and cover 


5 


10 









4 


10 




mending clogbags 


1 


10 









1 


4 




phisick bag 10s, 


















Bowers Bag 4£ 


















18 ft. 


5 


08 









4 


9 




a chocalet pot 


9 












7 


10 



303 8 



Oct. 23 For caring 6 chairs over 

the Alps cald Munt 

Sines to men to drink 12 10 6 
Sundry things layd 

out by Bower 

for Gibson when 

sick . 8 11 7 9 

For 4 chases and a sadle 

horse from Lyon to 

Turin giveing as din- 
ner and super and car- 



31] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 323 

[Foreign Tour] Stg. 

ing us over the Alps, [French] £ s. d. 

40 Lewidors . . 960 42 
to the Camariers from 

Lyons to Turin . 8 15 7 8 
Serchers the Duan at 

Novalies . . .200019 



^ 1779 13 77 9 6 

the sequin is 9 livers 10 St. here 
r31, Turin 
3et. 27 For coaches at 8 Livers 

a day . . . 28 10 1 11 8 

Persico and other waters 6 15 7 6 

Seeing Palices and other 

places . . . 33 1 16 8 

La Boundanc the foot- 
mat [sic] 30 st. p. day 
and something to drink 7 10 8 4 

opera tickets . . 12 13 6 

Mr. Banker at 

Turin Commission for 
200£ . . . 37 10 2 1 8 

Lodging and entertain- 
ment 5 nights and 4 
day at Turin . . 229 13 12 15 2 

For drink money 
upon the road 
la}^ at Syany 1 
30 dind at Versiles 15 

lay at Navar 1 

Serchers at Bourg- 

deversail . 2 10 

(not summed into account) 

For 4 chases and a 
sadle horse from 



^ Wrongly summed by Lady Griscll. 



324 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



[Foreign Tour 






Stg. 




Turin to Rom 




£ 


s. 


d. 


in twenty dajs 










with 2 mails a 










day 180 sequins 1710 




95 








the Coshers to . 










drink 4 . 38 1748 





2 


2 


3 


6 geografical maps 18 





1 








2120 18 





117 


16 


9 


Millan, 1 November 1731 










a sequin here is 14 livers 










For seeing Ecco 4 10 







8 


5 


Tomb . 4 







3 





Palaces, Liberrary 










Hospitall in all 20 







15 





2 days 2 coaches 36 15 




1 


7 


7 


Bourgon footman 4 10 







3 


5 


Lantron . 1 










9 


Cinamon water 1 14 







1 


4 



the Countes of 
Borameas ser- 
vant brought 
us chocolet 

Servant St. Ber 
nardo 

3 Nights Lodging 
and entertain 
ment 

a footman . 



Plasentia here a sequin is 20 Julios 
For seing Churches 

Palices etc. . . 18 9 5 

Camarier . . .400021 



2 5 







1 9 


15 







8 


108 5 




4 


1 2 


8 








6 


191 14 


7 


3 10 



22 11 



731] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



325 



[Foreign Tour] 

Parma, here and in all Italy where we went till we came 
o Naples a sequin is 20 and sometimes 20| Pol or Julios 
byoks is a Poul. 

Stg. 











£ 


s. 


d. 


carred over 


22 





11 


6 


For diner at 












Parma . 28 










14 


7 


The 5 servants 7 


5 







3 


10 


Milk . . 5 










2 


7 


Tobaco . 3 










1 


7 


wine . . 5 










2 


7 


finding books was 












lost . 6 










3 


2 


a woman in Regio 4 










2 


1 


serchers . . 1 













6 


frute . . 1 













6 


(name Sending to Mr. 












erased) 





5 


61 








2 








To Gosolas ser- 












vant . 3 










1 


7 


galary 


5 










2 


7 


Theater 


4 










2 


1 


Palaces 


12 










6 


3 


Coachman 


5 










2 


7 


footman 


4 










2 


1 


camarier 


2 










1 





iggie For seeng Palaces 3 










1 


7 


more . , 3 










1 


7 


camaries . . 3 
Ddena 





44 





1 


7 


For seeing Paleses 10 










5 


2 


footman . . 3 










1 


7 


Passage gilt 












Severals . 


13 










6 


9 



326 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] Stg. 

£ s. d. 
Camarrir . 2 10 



28 



Bulonia 
10 Nov, For sasageses 22 10 11 9 



a Scots pint of 



waters 


12 





wax cloth to 






trunks 


8 





bad brandy 


6 





Tobaco 


2 





Messages to 
Dulioly . 
books 


1 

6 






2 gramers . 
Duan sercher 


6 
2 






seing palaces 
seing institute 
Coledge 
Coches 


19 
5 
3 

58 








footman 


9 





Lodging and 
entertainment 


102 





Camarier 


5 






6 3 






4 


2 





3 


2 





1 











6 





3 


2 





3 


2 





1 








9 


11 





2 


7 





1 


7 


1 


10 


3 





4 


9 



2 7 
266 10 2 13 2 



Loretta 












16 For lodging only 


12 








6 


3 


fish 


3 


5 





1 


9 


Seing St. Casa 


6 








3 


2 


Seeing Treasurs 


6 








3 


2 


a footman . 


2 








1 





to a woman 












Pilgram . 


1 











6 



731] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 327 



Foreign Tour 






Stg. 


a guid to Cascad 






£ 


s. d. 


at Teriiy . 


3 








1 7 






33 o 




To Camariers upon 










the road 










17 Dind at Matcher- 










S'td' • • 


1 


5 





8 


lay at Toranteens 


1 


5 





8 


18 Dind Ponta de 










latravo 


2 








1 


lay at Seravala 


1 


5 





8 


19 Dind at Foligna 


1 








6 


lay at Spoletta 


1 


5 





8 


Dind and lay at 










Terne 


2 








1 


Suger plumbs and 










frute 


4 


8 





2 4 


Dind at Narni 


1 








6 


lay at Uticoly 


1 








6 


a Prist at Narni 










to see reliks 


3 








1 7 


Dind at Chevita 










costelata . 


1 


5 





8 


lay at Castle Nov 


1 








6 




1 








6 




1 


5 





8 




1 


24 18 





6 






479 3 


12 


9 10 



We came to Rome the 23 Novmr at one a clock of the 
day 1731, here a sequin is still 20 Julios or Pols in some 
payments | poul more, a sequin is 2 Phillips, there is half 
phillips and quater phillips which is 2 and a half Poul. A 
Powl is 10 byocks, there is half and quarter pouls and 5 
quotrins for a byock. 



alios 


by. 


q- 








1 














6 


6 











3 


2 


5 


5 








2 


9 


20 











10 


5 


3 











1 


7 


3 











1 


7 



328 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] 

Rome, 23 Novmi-, 173. Stg. 

For passage at the 
bridge 

Duan serching bagage 
overly 

At the Port for bagage 

Mrs. Gotten a sequin 

Mr. Hays man for wine 

wax candle . 

a hamper and cords for 

wine . . .490024 

Suger at 16 byocks the 

Yb 8 5 4 4 

Coaches at 12 pouls p^. 

day . . . 144 3 15 

Lodging and entertain- 
ment 3 times a day ex- 
cept Tee and suger for 
8 days 3 sequins a day 
at 20 Julios, in all 24 
sequins . . . 480 12 10 

to the cook 2 



testoun . 6 











3 


to the camarier 3 











1 


to the maid a 












testoun . 3 











1 




12 












to vincent the footman 


27 











14 


L^ M I's servant 


6 











3 


Sir Thomas Derhams 












servant . 


6 











3 


Mr. Hays servant 


6 











3 


Countes Bolanetis Ser- 












vants 


6 











3 


Corsini the Pops 












Nephews servants 


6 











3 


Prince St. Abonys ser- 












vants 


6 











3 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



329 



Foreign Tour 










Stg 




Books of Travel?^ 


> Mr. 


.Fiilios hy. t|. 








Elphistoii 




• 


33 





17 


2 


For seeing Mo- 














saickwork 


3 










1 


7 


Bustas 


1 













6 


St. Chorls Church 


1 













6 


villa Borghese 


4 










2 


1 


Borghese Palice 


3 










1 


7 


Farnesi Palic 


3 










1 


7 


the famous Bull 














there 


1 













6 


Pamphili Palic 


3 










1 


7 


Barberini Palice 


6 










3 


2 


Justiniani Palic 


3 










1 


7 


the Vatican . 


4 










2 


1 


Villa Pamphili 














Pal . 


4 










2 


1 


seting up coach 














ther 


6 










3 


2 


the Amphitheater 


1 













6 


Collona Palic 


3 










1 


7 


For entering the 






■ 








Kingdom of 














Naples 


1 













6 


Mala Duan . 


4 










2 


1 


Naples Duan 


5 





56 





2 


7 


ecm 5 For 4 Chases by the Pi 


■o- 








catcho and a 


sadle 










horse from Rom 


to 










Naples in 5 day? 


i \vi 


th 










2 Mails a day - 


26 ! 


iC- 


; 








quins and 2 to drink 


560 


14 


10 


8 



S 1398 19 36 8 2 



330 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 




15 9 4 



£ 


s. 


d. 





2 


11 





2 


7 





2 









1 


2 








9 








3 



[Foreign Tour] 

Naples, Wedensdav, 5 Dec^ N.S., 1731. 

Stg 
For 2 Doz Naples D. c. g. 

chena plats 7 2 

6 basket chamber 
pots . 6 4 

5 water basons 5 

6 Chamber ston 

pots . 6 2 5 

8 earthen pots 

kitchen . 7 2 2 11 

3 Kitchen pots 

more . 3 

a big water jar 18 
2 sauce pans 6 

2 big blew and 

white bonis 3 8 16 

6 Tee cups 10 

Coffie cups and 

saucers and 4 

little bouls 2 5 10 

6 Ivery Knives 

and forks 3 8 15 2 

2 Tee pots . 19 9 

a boyling and 2 

washing basons 3 8 16 

12 cristal wine 

glases . 14 5 7 

12 slight wine 

glases . 2 4 

2 cruits . 2 4 

10 water glayses 8 
12 small carafs 14 4 
4^ Doz. wine 

flasks 
2 salet Dishes 
a Tee pot . 



I 






1 








1 








3 


2 





5 


9 





2 


1 





1 











3 



I 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



331 



Foreign ToiirJ 



Mr. Douglasses man's 

service 
Cleaning the house 







Stg. 




D. c. 


S- 


£ s. 


d. 


2 8 





11 


2 


9 


9 


3 


9 


19 7 


3 


3 18 


9 


19 IT 


3 


3 18 


9 



For 33 1 can Hag- 

abag for 5 doz. 

Tee napkins 

fringd . 23 2 5 
4 doz. hagabag 

napkins 7 ca. 20 3 
4 can hagabag 2 

tablecloths 2 8 

32 Napens and 4 

Table cloaths 

of German 

Dyaper . 35 

3 Naples Dyaper 

Tablecloths 8 5 
some second 

hand linen 16 8 

4 Ian towels finer 2 8 5 



109 2 



To Francisko foot- 
mans wage . 8 7 

Cooks wages at 

6D. pr mo. 14 1 

Fransiska the 
maid 15 car- 
lins pr Moneth 
to her . 



4 13 
4 12 
11 2 



7 

1 14 

3 7 2 

11 4 

1 14 9 

2 16 5 



2 5 



23 4 



1731 For house rent a moneth 

nuary 28 to this day . . 40 



8 






332 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1732 



Febr4 



1 Tour] 




D. 


c. 


g- 


( 

k 

£ 


Stg. 

s. 


d. 


making a Chimny 
For coach and horses 


a 


5 








1 








Moneth to 6 Jan''. 


, 


40 








8 








For coaches to see Presa- 














pias, etc. . 
For a Millan Chase 


• 
• 


3 
52 


3 
5 







10 


13 
10 


2 




To Saverios child 2 


C. 














taylor 2 Car. 


• 





4 








1 


7 


For mending smokie 
















chimny . 
To a cook . 


• 


5 



5 

8 






1 




2 
3 



2 


To Fransisca the maid 














of wages . 
To Saverio of wages 


• 

at 





8 








3 


2 


lOD. pr Month 


• 


14 








2 


16 





To the french cook 


at 














7D. pr. Month . 


• 


2 











8 





For the coach 


a 














]Moneth 


, 


40 








8 








For House Rent a 
















moneth the 


, 


40 








8 








For letters . 


• 


2 


2 








8 


10 


For cariing Chease 
Rome 


to 

• 


2 











8 





For two Millan chases 


• 


91 








IS 


> 4 





For bringing home the 
chases 





6 








2 


5 


For glasses . 


, 





8 








3 


2 


For a Coach to see Presa- 














pias, etc. . 
For a Balcony to see the 


1 


2 








4 


10 


car . 


a 


4 











16 





For a Lodge at the opera 

a night 
For 2 trunks 


3 
5 












1 


12 








To St. Francis Church 







2 











10 


To Saverio of wages 


• 


8 








1 


12 






2] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



333 



rch 6 



Foreign Tour] 

To the French cook John 

of wages . 
To Francesca maid in full 
of 3 moneth wages 
27 For a moneth and a half 
house Rent to the 12 
of March . 
For the coach a moneth 

this day . 
For making 30 ft. 

chocalet in house book 
24 pound coco 

nuts . 9 6 

14 pound powder 

18 
6 6 6 
5 3 

18 5 9 



suger 



4 ounces vinellas 
4 oun cinamon 



D. 

7 



c. 








Stg. 
£ s. d 
1 8 







3 10 12 5 



60 12 



40 8 



1 18 5 






7 


2 


1 


6 


8 





2 


2 



Dies 

From Day house Books 

from 5 Dec"i 1731 to 

the 1st March 1732 

N.S. . . . 603 9 1 120 15 7 

ip. 14 For House Rent a moneth 40 8 



For Saverias wages 


10 








2 








The Cook a moneths 














wages 


7 








1 


8 





To Francisco a moneths 














wages 


1 


5 








6 





To Nicola the Boy a 














moneth . 


1 


5 








6 





To the Cook at Soriento 














of his wages 


1 











4 





For 95 Can gas at 22 and 














24 g. for beds . 


21 


2 





4 


4 


10 


To Nicolla in full wages 





2 











10 



/ 1 



334 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[173: 



[Foreign Tour] 










Stg 






For 3 chases to Putsola 


D. 


c. 


g- 


£ 


s. 


d. 




and Bara, etc. . 


3 


9 








15 


7 




For expenses at Xeros 
















Baths, etc. 


6 


1 





1 


4 


5 




To the Chasemen 





6 








2 


5 


30 For House Rent to this 
















day 


26 








5 


4 







For a coach and 2 horses 
















2 jNIoneths 


80 








16 










For 20 packs of cards . 


2 


2 








8 


10 




For 3 chases to Castle 
















j\Iarc 


6 








1 


4 







To the Chase men 





6 








2 


5 




To French Cook a 
















moneths wages 


7 








1 


8 





May 2 


To Saverio a moneth 














* 


this day . 


10 








2 








10 


To Francisco the Maid a 
















moneth . 


1 











6 







To Nicol cook boy a 
















moneth and 2 days . 


1 


7 








6 


10 


25 


To Francisco cook bov 
















28 days . 


1 


4 








5 


8 



11448 4 291 13 2 



Naples. 





The Furnitui 


•e for our 


House 






i 




At Portiche and removing 






1 


^lay 3 


For Naples 












1732 


3 Doz Plates 


116 







4 


8 




2 soup basons 


7 







2 


10 




3 Dishes 


8 







3 


2 




2 Dishes 


5 







2 







a boul 1 caraf 


14 










7 




12 Jelly glases 


7 2 







2 


9 



' This summation should be 1458 o 4. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



335 



Foreign Tour] 

12 Earthen 

Candlesticks 6 
6 pr. snuffers 6 6 

36 white Avicker 

chairs at 15 

grains the peace 5 4 
3 can bedin to 



D. c. g. 



Stg. 
£ s. d. 
2 5 
2 8 



117 



cookboy . 
a looking glas 1 


6 

















2 

4 


5 



yron grate to 
stove hal . 


6 


4 











2 


7 


Nails . . 


1 





13 





2 








o 










Serching our 

goods at Duan 1 
ffelucas with goods 


3 














5 


2 


and ourselves 5 


3 











1 


1 


2 


Whiting the 
house . 3 


O 














14 





Cleaning house 


8 














3 


2 


chases with ser- 


















vants . 2 


5 





13 


4 








10 













nails 4g 




4 








4 








2 


Porters for caring goods 
Coper pots 17 qrtt 
yron things, spits, etc 


8 
8 


5 
6 




1 

8 


1 
1 




14 
14 

8 



5 
4 



To Saveria a months 

wages to this day . 10 2 
To cook a moneths wages 

to this day . .700180 

To Francisco cook in full 

this day . . .030012 



336 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1732 



1 Tour] 

To washing table linen 
For 32 can cords 


D. 




c. 

8 





£ 



stg 

s. 
3 


d. 
2 


to beds 


10 7 











4 


3 


80 yron rings 
2 ounces scarlet 


2 2 














11 


silk 
Taylor 10 days 


6 
4 












2 
16 


5 



more rings, etc., 
to beds 


3 1 











1 


3 



632 11 


7 126 12 


8 


5 


10 





6 


2 


5 



6 2 

30 To-daybook from the 1st 

March to the 1st of 

July being 4 moneths 

To hear Carastin ^ sing . 

Augt. 16 To cary a bed to Naples 

For the coach to 

Angelo . 36 7 4 

For the coach to 

1 Augt. 7w. 54 10 16 

90 
To the vanditor 4 

Moneth 1 

Septmi-. . 53 00 53 3 4 10 13 5 

To Mr. Saveria of 

wages . 12 50 2 10 

To the cook 2 ms. 

2 Aug. . 14 00 2 16 
Francisco Maid 2 

August 3 m. 4 50 18 

To Frances Kit- 
chen boy . 2 50 10 

Giovanni Carestini, born about 1705. ' His voice, at first a powerful clear 
soprano, afterwards changed to the fullest, finest, deepest contralto ever perhaps 
heard.' — Groves's Dictionary of Music, etc. Carestini made his debut in London 
under Handel on 4th December 1733. He was a tall, handsome man, and a 
very good actor. 



J732] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 337 

[Foreign Tour] Stg. 

To Joseph Kit- d. c. g. £ s. d. 

chen boy 10 Aug. 3 50 14 
To Lowrenc a 

Month 22 Aug. 5 00 10 







42 












To Indian rute 


• 





5 





2 





Portice 














Octr2 To the Cook 2 














moneth 2d. Oct. 14 











2 16 





22 To Lorensine to 














this day 2 mo. 10 











2 





ToMushet . 5 











1 





To Francisco the 














maid to 18 Octr. 8 











12 





To Joseph cook 














boy to 10 Novr 6 











1 4 





To Frances coach- 














man . 1 











4 






39 
To Nicola Gove- 

gho, coach 1 Mo. 

hire . . . 36 7 4 a 

To Guis^ Attanassio on 

acct. of house rent .100 20 
To Notaro di Roma pr 

the Pohcy . .^100 040 

For the coach a Moneth 

by Toriano . . 36 7 4 

For coach horses to 1st 

November from Angelo 

viti a moneth . . 36 7 4 

To venditor 

at the 1st November 

for 2 monthes . . 26 6 5 6 5 

For carts at 4| car- 

lins with goods 

Y 



338 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1735 



[Foreign Tour] 






Stg. 






d. c. g. 


£ 


s. d. 


from Portice to 










Naples 


5 


75 


1 


2 HI 


porters 2 carl. 










each cart 


1 


80 





7 2i 


to drink 





30 





1 3^ 


Birris at Bridge 










several times 


1 








4 or 


caring more good 


2 


40 





9 7: 


bring a press 





25 





1 0( 


puting up Da- 










mask curtins 





30 





1 3 


a cloath to cover 










the carts . 





30 

12 1 





1 3 


For abed at Mr. Temples 12 





4 10 


Naples 

Nov. 15 For a tee boord 


1 








4 


1732 a hagabag table- 










cloathe 


1 


70 





6 10 


12 rush chairs 


1 


80 





7 3 


a coper pot 24 gr 










ounce 


1 


56 





6 3 


2 doz. Tee Nap- 










kins 


7 


20 


1 


8 10 


4 can hagabag 7 










Carlins 


2 


80 





11 2 



16 6 

To ventitor in 

pairt of 100 Ducats 
for 6 moneth begin- 
ning the 1st. of Nov'" 
1732 . . . 20 4 

To Caposhins and Saints 

Pictors .. .. .080 032 

For our coach from Angelo 

for the moneth of Nov^ 36 7 4 C 



1 



733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 389 

[Foreign Tour] Stg. 

d. c. g. £ s. d. 
To cooks wage to 

2 Deer . 14 2 16 

To Lorrance to 

22 Nov^ . 5 10 

To Joseph under 

cook in full 4 16 

Fransisco Maid to 

18 Novr. . 1 50 6 

For 2 hatts to 

John and James 2 40 9 7 

To Calabria a 

moneth 15 Dec^ 2 8 



28 9 
To Cap* Piels ships crew 2 7 10 10 
To horses to the Consols 

coach etc . 14 5 7 

jFriday 14 For chair men etc. . 12 4 10 
we came To Caposhins . . 4 17 

toNaplesFrom Day House Book 
from 1st July to the 
1st Decem^'^ being 5 
Moneths . . . 765 7 153 3 



1733 



To cooks wages to D. C. gr. 

2 January 7 18 

To Lowrencon to 

2 ms. 22 Janr. 12 2 8 

To Calabria cook 

boy full . 1 50 6 

To Francisco Maid 

to 18 Jan^. 3 12 

To a Cook Xmas 

daj . . 2 8 



25 5 



To Angelo for 



840 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 

[Foreign Tour] 

2 Moneths to the 1st d. c. g. £ s. d. 

Febr. . . . 72 14 8 

To the vanditor in pairt 

of 100 Dt for 6 moneth 

which is not full 17 D* 

p^ moneth and this 

maks 60 Dt^. . 
For bringing cheases 

from Hammons 
To Prests . 50 

old shiets . 2 50 

James bedin in 

ship . 6 32 15 4 

custom house for 



40 








8 





3 





13 
2 
10 





trunks . 3 95 











15 


10 




rubarb . 2 55 


15 


8 


2 





10 


2 




For repairing cheases . 


1 


2 








4 


10 


teh^2 


To Mark Cook boy to 6 
















feb. 1 mo. 


1 


5 








6 







To House Book in 
















Decmr 1732 


165 


7 


8| 


33 


3 


1 




To D'^ Guiseppe Atten- 
















assio on account of 
















house Rent 


50 








10 










For lock and repairs at 
















Portice 


4 


8 


6 





19 


5 


Naples 
















1733 
















March 26 To the venditor in 
















full for Moneths 5 


20 








4 










For our coach 1 
















March . 36 








7 


4 







Ditt to the 27 
















March . 30 








6 









66 



To Portice House Rent 

for a year . . 170 34 



1733] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



341 



[Foreign Tour] 

To the house at Naples 
in full of 200 D 

For letters by Hammons 
aco** in 17 Mon 

To Sig^. Spelteras Jour- 
ney to England 

To Ditt of wages 5£ Str. 

To John the Cook in full 
of wages . 

To Fransisco of wages . 

To Mark under cook 

For jack boots 2 82 

buff britches 1 D. 

42g. 2 42 



For 259 Rottolo 

hambs 36 of ynJ 25 90 

bring them from 
, Soriento and 
puting them a 
boordintheMoll 2 30 

3 Parmozan cheases 
165 lb. . 43 85 



Sterling 
d. c. g. £ s. d. 
50 10 

52 5 9 10 10 4 



To Erasmus Hol- 






land 


1 





Mr. Golds Maid 


1 





SigJ" Stefano a hat 


3 





Capusins and 






Preasts 





20 


the Consul and 




i 


Tories servants 


1 


50 


Marquis R. . 


1 





Faranta Mr. 






Temples man 


1 





Gratcia 


1 






76 


6 





15 


6 


5 


65 








13 








21 








4 


4 





3 


4 








13 


7 


3 


1 








12 


5 











11 


8 











9 


8 


5 


2 


4 

















4 














4 














12 

















10 











6 














4 














4 














4 






9 7 



5 3 7 



9 3 
8 15 4 



all sent home 



72 5 



342 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 

[Foregn Tour] Sterling 

For Maccarony at 7|g. d. c. gr. £ s. d. 
10, 11, 13, 14 grpr. 
Rott. all sent home 69 
Rottolo of it . . 8 31 1 12 1 



4501 7 902 11 10 
For repairing 

Chases . 13 50 2 14 

Ditt . . 3 71| 14 9 

Ditt 2D. 94g. ID. 



73g. 
days wages to 
workmen 


4 67 
3 60 






18 
14 


8 
5 






25 


4 


8| 




For mending 
sadles 


1 20 






4 


10 


caring trunks and 
sighting yni 

postilions to ty on 
bagag 

stra to lay bagage 
right • 


3 30 
05 
07 


4 


6 


13 




2 


8 



The expense of our Jour- 
ney in the Kingdom of 
Naples to Rome 51 1 10 4 5 

From Household book 
from 1 January 1733 
to the 22nd of March 
1733 . . . 333 2 5 66 13 



4916 1 5|985 9 8 

1 this in English money at 510 Ducats for 100£ Sterline is 
960£ 2 shillins. 



^ Lady Grisell here takes the ducat as worth 3s. iid. sterling. In the 
editor's calculations the ducat has been taken as worth 4s. ; hence the dis- 
crepancy. 



1733] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



34S 



[Foreign Tour] 

Bring back Rome ex- 
penc which is . 

2 crouns is a sequin, a se- 
quin 20 Julios, this in 
English money is 138 
guinys£l45 8 6 

reckoning 20 Julios or 
pauls half a guiny 



Bring back Bolome sum 



d. Julio by 
554 2 9 



Sterling 



£ by. 



of 



.1160 13 4 



this in English money 10£ 
10 byocks to a sequin 
57£ 16 shillins . 



Rome, 1733 

March 29 For our journey from 
Terracina to Rome 
Apl. 22 For our journey from 
Rome to Florence and 
from Florence to Bal- 
onia 

For seeing Churches 
Palices and villas 9D 
6 P. of it for the great 
Duks Gallarie . 

For Chease repairs 

For cords 5p. caring 
cheases . 

For greess . 

For porters to Duan, etc. 

For 7 days coach Mezar- 
eri week, 20 pouls 

10 days at 12 pauls 

For 2 coaches 2 days . 

To Mr. Strods contribu- 
tion 

To Mrs. Cottan . 



crouns p. byocks Stg. 



164 8 43 4 2 



37 


8 





9 


18 


5 


40 


4 





10 


12 


1 





6 


8 





3 


4 





7 


7 





3 


10 


1 


4 








7 


4 


14 








3 


13 


6 


12 








3 


3 





5 








1 


6 


3 


4 








1 


1 





1 











5 


3 



cr. 


p. by. 


1 
£ 


s. d. 





3 





1 7 





7 





3 8 



344 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 

[Foreign Tour] 

To JNIr. Hamiltons ser- 
vant 
To coachman 
For a syrang 2 D a box 

for it Ip 3d. . . 2 13 11 1 

For 2 brushes Ip. 5 paper 

6 . . . .021011 

To Angelo the footman 5 10 16 9 
To Lowrensin to cary 

him to Naples . . 4 110 

To mend boots and 

baginet . . .035019 

Florence For repairs of Cheases ID 

9 washing, etc. 5 . 2 4 12 7 
For nails and gemlet 

8Sc. and caring chease 

2p 2 8 13 

For essenes for us all and 

orang butter . . 14 9 3 18 3 

For 2 ounces apaplectick 

balsom . . .10 5 3 

To the house and cook 

here . . .10 5 3 

For letters for Mr. 

Temple 3p. for our- 
selves . ..100 053 
For a coach 17 days at 

9 pauls p^ day . 
For pometam 
For Lodging and enter- 
tainment at Madam 

Pettits for 5 days 50 

9 wax candle, suger, 

etc. 5 5 4 . . 56 4 4 14 16 2 

To Ditt 14 Days at 48 

Pauls a day and to 

servants 2D. . . 86 7 22 15 2 

Jossipies For Ditt at a f rench house 



5 


3 


9 


4 


4 





1 


5 





8 



\ 



1733] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



345 



[Foreign Tour] Sterling 

May 26 18 days 40C. pr day or. p. by. £ s. d. 

french etc. 3 . . . 80 4 8 21 2 4 

house 

brought all from house 

book . . . 554 2 9 145 7 7 



here a sequin is 10 Liners 10 byocks, and l£ is 2 pauls, 
and 12 demi is a byock 

Balonia 

15 May For 2 Cheases to Palazzo £ by D 
1733 Albegote with Lady 

Essex 12£, voitarins 

men to drink £4 10 . 
For a coach 23 days at 

10 pauls p'^ day 
For our lodging at 1| se- 
quin for 26 days 
For 4 linch pins 2£ rops 

7£ . . . 

For puting in cheases l£ 

mending pistols 
For a saddle 
To Lowra the maid, 2 

pistols at 36 pauls 
From House Book 
Going Post to Franco- 

lina 5| post pr acct. 1037 13 4 

to be added 123£ to 

this 

6 3 



Vinice 
.11 June 



16 10 16 6 



131 6 11 



408 10 20 8 6 



9 9 



4 10 





4 


6 


11 10 





11 


6 


36 





1 16 





420 13 


4 


21 


8 



1160 13 4 58 8 



For 2 piots in 3 days from 
Francolina 9 florence 
sequins at 21 paul 
which is here 21 Linrie 



846 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1733 



[Foreign Tour] 

and to the rowers 3£ £ 
8 byoks or soldis de- 
vide this in 3 pairts is 126 

painters maid 2£ paper 
wax etc. 4£ . .6 

For a Gundala 8 days at 
8£prday . . 64 

For lodging and enter- 
tainment in a French 
house at 35£ per day 



s. 


d. 


Sterling. 
£ s. d. 


8 





3 3 2 








3 








1 12 



except Tee and suger 


372 








9 


6 





to servants who served 














us well 


24 











12 





for frute and wine in the 












piot 


4 











2 





For seeing the Doges 














Palice and other 














places 


12 











6 





3 glases at glass work . 


5 











2 


6 


For a Barchella to Padua 














48 the 3<i is 


32 











16 





to Rowers . 


4 











2 





idua For Super, breckf ast, and 














diner with S^ Rob 














Broun and Neil Broun 














ConsuU . 


70 








1 


15 





to the servant 


1 


10 











8 


cariing baggage 














To a scrivener 6£ 


6 











3 





To the cetcerony a pistol 














I rekon it 


36 











18 





For 2 Coaches 


20 











10 





For suger wax candle 














etc. at Vinice . 


51 


9 





1 


5 


9 


For washing at Vinice . 


24 











12 





Verona For grees to 














cheases . 5 











2 


6 


a coach at Verona 8 8 











4 


2 



I733J OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 347 

[Foreign Tour] Sterling 

£ s. d. £ s. d. 
seeing churches, 

etc. there 6 3 



19 8 



877 15 21 18 9 

This in English money at 2143 £17 7 soldis for £50 is 

about 2l£ 15s. 6. 

Frankford 

here 4 florins and 15 Karmitens is a unger 

Flo. k. 
For seeing churches • 2 7 
this is about 5 shillins sterlin 



Vinice 



For 1 lb. green 1 lb. 

BoheTea . . 32 12 16 4 

For 25 lb. Chocalet 112 10 2 16 3 

For wax candle 1, 17, 

letters 17£ . . 18 17 9 5 

To sum brought over . 858 7 

To Mr. Smiths Commis- 
sion . . . 64 9 1 12 3 



S 1087 05 p 
bringdown 2l£ 15 6 
and ad at 22£ 
in a sequin 
228 £18 which 
is . .550 



27 00 5 



For our Joiu'ney from d. g. d 
Padua to Aix . . 627 



348 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 

[Foreign Tour] Sterling. 

£ s. d. 
14| guiny From Padua to Trent 

28| sequins at 22£ 

15 4 6 

73 16 8 From Trent to Aix 

a Post Horse 48 38 6 17 

eating and lodgingllO 34 13 16 5 

odd expences 33 14 4 3 1 

expences of 2 Florins Kar. 

cheases . 398 16 590 42 49 15 8 



From Aix to Spa for 

journey and other l. Su. 

things 143 1 shillin . 71 15 



4 10 



£93 2 



For our journey from 

Leige to Valensien by 

a particular account a 

pairt, which particular 

I must cary to Leger 327 19 14 9 9 
For our Journey from 

Valencien to Paris by 

a particular account . 450 4 20 12 6 
For our journey from 

Paris to Calice by ditt. 517 6 23 13 11 
To the Master of the Sloup 

from Calice to Dover 96 4 8 



1391 09 



this at 1090 Livers for 
£50 is near about 63£ 
Sterling 14 sh. 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 349 

[Foreign Tour] Sterling- 

Spa £ s- d. 

10 July From Day House Book 

1733 from this date to the ^ ^^ 

22nd Sepm'^. about franc S. Hers 

£39, 12Stg. . 1464 5 2 85 8 

Sept. 22 For 2 cheases with 18 

2 horses each 
to Liege . 24 
2 riding horses 8 9 4 

cariage of bagage 

and postilions 7 15 2 

diner for 14 at 

Chairfountain 24 5 1 10 3 

Leige, 24 2 night super 
diner and break- 
fast, 7 of us and 
2 servants at 

Mutton blane 40 2 6 8 

Brusles 25 For 3 nights Lodg- 
ing and eating, 

6 of us . 53 2 3 1 11 

to servant of the 

house . 2 10 2 1 

159 12 



1623 17 2 



This at 1725£ for 100£ 
Str is £94 4 6 Stg. 

Paris, October 

Tewsday 27 From Daybook from 
2 Oct. to the date here- 
of for 5 of our selves 

and Mr. Horatio Man 320 14 2 
this at 1090 Livers for , 
£50 stg is about 14£ 
2 sh. Stirling. 



350 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 

[Foreign Tour] Sterling 

For lodging 3 weeks 3 £ s. d. 
days at le otel der 

Hambourg 315 315 13 17 6 

Sterling. 
£ s. d. 
For our laces at Brusles 63 11 
Cambrick at Valensien . 17 2 1| 
Duty at Custom house 

for Cambrick . . 1 3 6| 

For our journey from 

Dover to London, 6 of 

us and 2 servants p^. 

a particular account . 16 8 8 
To Mr. Man to clear 

traveling accounts . 4 8 
For silver plate 111 

ounces and fashion . 31 17 6 
For gilding the porangers 12 6 



Leyden. 

Account from the new stil that we came to 

Roterdam which is 27 May : stil of expenses only 

for my D Grisie and I. 

G. St. D. £ s. d. 
For washing . . 2 8 4 5 

For a piece of 7 Snuff 

hander chiefs . . 11 10 111 

For 51 Pertian to line 

wraper at 28st . . 7 7 13 5 

To a writing Apron 3| ell 

armapre say 28 . 4 11 8 4 

To James a pair of 

Stokins . . .200038 

For a pair pockets . 17 2 5 
To John a p^. stokins . 2 3 8 



1 14 3 1 



I73I] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 351 

[Foreign Tour] Sterling. 

To 2 pr. threed stokins g. st. d. £ s. d, 

mine . . . 3 14 6 9 

For making Grisie's 

goun 

For a washing . . 3 5 6 

For a pair pockets . 16 2 4 

For 2 threeds of broad 

holland 19i ell 54 st. 28 10 2 12 3 
For 50| ell hoU gris 

shifts at 37 st. . . 91 11 8 8 7 11 

For 2 thrids of 49 ells 

holland at 4 gul. . 130 14 11 19 7 
For 16| holland at 58 

sturs . . . 52 4 4 15 8 

For Mushets holland 2£ 

Stirling . . . 21 19 2 3 

To Mushet 30 sh. Str. 

errour set in Leger . 00 
To Mrs. Clench for 6 

shirts . . . 95 18 8 15 10 

For tape at Harlem . 10 15 4 19 8 
For 2 piece green hand- 

erchieff . . . 34 3 2 4 

For 6 pr thread stockins ^ 

Grisie . . . 21 1 18 6 

To 5 pr. thread stockins 

for Grisie 2g 18st . 14 15 8 
For 2 pr coUerd thread 

stockins errour .000 000 

For a piece broun 

handerchiefs errour . 
For apron Mushet . 19 2 8 

Utright For a purs Grisie . 

silver . 17 10 1 12 1 

For a purs Rachy 

ditt . 17 10 1 12 1 

For a purs litle 

gris — 17 1 11 2 



852 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



Foreign Tour" 








Sterling. 


For 3 velvet purss 


g- 


St. 


d. 


£ 


s. d. 


to them . . 4 16 


56 


16 








6 9 






For 2 pr. gloves Grisie 












and I . . . 


1 


8 








2 7 


For washing 


3 


13 








6 8 


For 10 Dutch els yaly ( ) 












silk for a goan 


70 








6 


8 4 


For stokins Grisie 29 2 st. 


2 


2 








3 10 


For 2 pr under stokins 












Gris 2 g 2 St. . 


2 


2 








3 10 


For a pr baver 












stokins . 3 











5 6 


a pr baver gloves 1 4 











2 2 




4 


4 









litle coffie pot 


2 


4 








4 


a litle lock to coffie pot 








2 





0:: 


litle copper ketle . 


1 


4 








2 2 


For a pr thread stok 












under stokins Gris 


1 


10 








2 9 


For 4 piece tape 












10, 5, 7, 6 . 1 12 











2 11 


buttons . 3 











3 




1 


15 









For a wagone to loonup- 












stant . . 


6 











11 


expenses at loonupstant ^ 


1 


4 








2 2 


put to Grisies slives 












For 4| ells hoUen for my 












west coats 


9 


9 








17 4 


For the silver conforture 


34 








3 


2 4 


740 


9 


6 


67 ; 


14 11 



^ This line has been interlined, and no doubt refers to the immediately suc- 
ceeding entry. 



I73I] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



353 



[Foreign Tour] 
Mostrick. At this place 37 skillins, and each skilling 10 St. 





IS m a gumy. 








Sterling] 




For Mushets goun at 24 


Sk. Mks. 


doits 


£ s. d. 




Mark 10 ells . 


24 








14 


Aix 


To chairman for 3 days 


3 








19 


37 sk. 4 


For a doz glovs L Hervie^ 


15 








8 9 


Marks in 


2 doz Grisie 


26 








15 2 


a guiny 


2 doz me 


26 








15 2 




3 doz to give away 


52 








1 10 4 




2 pr gloves Mrs. Terris 


3 


7 





2 2 




2 kains 


5 








2 11 




2 nidle cases 


3 








19 




Nidles 


15 








8 9 




2 p'" shoves my D. 


9 








5 3 




a litle silver plate 


37 


4 





1 1 10 




2 biger plates 20 crowns 


160 








4 13 4 




callico for 2 bed gouns 












lining 


7 


7 


4 


3 11 




galoun and silk my coat 





2 





1^ 




6 p^ gloves to my D. 


9 








5 3 




a floorishd handker 












chief Grisie 


15 








8 9 




3 snuff handkerchief my 












Dear 


24 








14 




a pair gray threed stok- 












ins me 


8 








4 8 




a pie boban 





6 





5 




2 lb. puder . 


1 


3 





9 




For 7| els camb- 












letforfrok5sk.37 4 








1 1 10 




furniture buttons. 












etc. . 10 5 7 








6 2 




making 9 sk. 11 












ells lining 15 27 3 3 








16 11 






75 


4 


2 





1 See p. 302. 



354 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1731 

[Foreign Tour] 
July 4 

Aix For washing 

Chair 8 days to Douse 
17 times each near half 

an hour at Douse 
Making Grisies seek and 

mine 
a box for the heads 
servant at Douuse 
For 10| ell Indian 

Tafita Gris 66 
10 ells brountafita 

me . . 60 

clohth for stay 

bands . 13 9 

lining for the 

sieves . 4 2 4 







Sterling" 


Sk. Mks. 


doits 


£ s. d. 


16 





9 4 


8 





4 8 


34 





19 10 


10 





5 10 


1 1 





8 


1 





7 

1 18 6 
1 15 



131 3 

For 3 1 ell Dyaper 

Grisie . 10 4 4 6 1 

6 ell holland my 

D drawers 24 14 

6 yd. holland my 

drawers . 15 8 9 

13| ell holland 3 

aprons . 54 1 11 6 



103 4 4 



825 3 2 24 1 9 



Spa, the 9 July 1731. 

For a Neclace to me 
a pair breast straps 
13| ell holl for 4 aprons 

Grisie 4 sk. 
2 1 holl for pockets 



2 


5 





15 


3 








19 


54 








1 11 6 


6 


7 


2 . 


3 11 



I73I] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 355 

[Foreign Tour] [Sterling 

31 1 ell holl gris shifts at Sk. xMks. doits £ s. d. 

4 skil . . . 127 9 3 14 7 

3 pr spectickles 3 sk. 

staff string U . .442027 

lace at 15 sk Grisie 

tuckers . . . 45 1 6 3 

20 To John erour 

a waterbotle errour 

a pr. threed stokins . 6 3 6 

To Moushets to buy her 

goun lining . . 8 6 



250 4 7 6 
To the half of the stons 

andwaxfrute . . 37 4 1 1 10 



S. 287 8 8 7 10 
il43£ 18 143£ 18s. 

21 For 2 weeks washing this l. S. 

21 sk. 7 . . . 10 17 12 2 

To litle Grisie I owd her 

on the last account . 3 3 5 
To the old woman at 

well . . . 10 7 

To the waganier 5s. Dick 

Litletonscarinish[?]5s. 10 7 
To Grisie and Mrs. 

Burnet necklaces . 2 3 2 
To a Ball 4 sk. the boy 

1 sk. . . . 2 10 2 10 

Aug. 1 For a wash ball 7 2 lb. 

powder 10 . . 17 11 

For a weeks washing 

saterday 28 July . 2 17 3 2 



^ Lady Grisel here changes skillings, sous, and liers into its equivalent at Spa 
in French money of livers and sous. 



356 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



[Foreign Totir] 

For a p^ gray threed 
stokins 

For a Jeronstat dyell 

For a box to Phillips the 
Jesuit at Liege 
8 For a lb. powder 5s a lb 
this day 5s. 

For neckleses Mrs. Dal 
rymple and I . 

To French horns . 

To my Dear 

For a box to Mr. Cartret 

For 4 weeks washing a 
sk. the day great pieces 
6 sturs doz. small 5 st. 
shirt, cravat,and hand- 
kerchief and 3 st. shifts 
and 3 sturs peticoats 

8 handkerchiefs 4 hoods 
to Grisie equely and 
me 14 yd. 
18 2 lb. I poweder a lb. this 
day 

a pr threed stockins 

lost to Mrs. Spence 
18 To my dear 

For washing to the sater- 
day 19 . 

For a soliter to Grisie . 

For 3 black neckleses . 



take out pocket . 



[Sterling] 



1 L. S. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


. 3 








3 


4 


5 











3 


e 

1 10 








1 


9 


10 











7 


I- 

2 








2 


3 


1 








1 


1 


2 10 








2 


10 


t 1 








1 


1 



4 











4 


6 


31 


5 





1 


14 


10 





19 


2 





1 


1 


3 











3 


5 


12 











13 


6 


37 


8 





2 


1 


8 


10 











11 


3 


3 











3 


5 


3 











3 


5 



138 11 
37 8 


2 




7 16 
2 1 


2 

8 


101 3 


2 


5 14 


6 



Spailing. L. S. 

28 For 3 lb. powder 2 ysday 15 



10 



I73I] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



357 



[Foreign Tour] 








[S 


terl 


ing 




For a weeks washing 


L. 


S. 




£ 


s. 


d. 




Saterday 25 


4 


5 








4 


9 


Sept. 6 


To Mushet . 


18 


14 





1 


1 







Washing 


16 


13 








18 


9 




Shoes my D. 5£ mend- 
















ing l£ . . . 


6 











6 


10 




2 pr clogs Grisie and I . 


8 


10 








9 


7 


Leige 


3 articles in generall 
















account . 


94 


3 


3 


5 


5 


11 




fine holland my Dear at 
















4 livers 20 els . 


80 








4 


10 





19 Sepm. 
















Leige 


The articles of 94 livers 















8s 3 on the other side 
set by mistake in the 
general account is as 
followeth : 

34 J Demi holland 
at 45 sturs for 7 
shifts to Grisie 77 12 5 

5 ells muslin for 



4 cravats 11 5 














2 night Napkins 5 6 1 


46 


15 





2 


12 




Cambrick fine 46 15 


7 


3| ell Baskest which is 














cambrick 


29 


15 





1 


13 


5 


For a pr boots to James 


6 


10 








7 


5 


For a pr shoes my Dear 


6 











6 


10 


4 lb. powder and wash 














ball 


1 


5 








1 


4 


Waltins and silk for 














mantle 


1 


10 








1 


9 


Pocket my D. 


6 











6 


10 


2 pr. stokins to Gr. 


5 











5 


8 


2 Ink horns 





14 











9 


John a guiny he has not 














acc**ed for . , 


18 


14 





1 


1 






358 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



Foreign Tour" 






[Sterling] 




the half of the kams in 


L. S. 




£ s. d. 




the box . 

S. 


18 14 





110 




369 17 


3 


20 16 3 


Oct. 12, 


1731. 








Lyon here the guiny or Lewidor is 24 livers 




For 101 ell fioord silk to 










G. at 20 Livers the ell 


210 





9 3 9 




10| ell my goun at 10 










Livers 


105 





4 11 10 




lining and borders to 










goun G. . 


11 10 





10 




lining etc. to mine 


6 4 


2 


5 5 




my goun making . 


5 





4 4 




Grisie goun making 


5 





4 4 




Maid 


1 





lOi 




6 head wires 


6 





3 




mending James boots . 


1 16 





1 6| 




Mushet for smalls 


12 





6 




a hoop 


15 5 





13 4 




washing linin 


12 





10 6 




ell silk for a sute 










cloaths 


120 





5 5 




The Taylors for lining 










and making 


72 





3 3 




For making my old sack, 










etc. 


7 





6 2 




For mending James's 










cloaths 


2 





19 




For Dressing a hat and 








Turin 


lining 


3 





2 7 


Oct. 27 


For stokins to my D. . 
2 pr uper and 4 under 


7 





6 2 




myself 


28 10 





1 4 11 




Grisie stokins 


11 17 





10 4 




washing linins 


7 





6 2 




spectickles . 


1 10 





1 3| 


Millan 


For washing 


1 





10| 



I73I] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



359 



Foreign Tour 








[Sterling 


1 Nov. 




L. 


S. 




£ 


s. d. 


Bolonia 


For washing 


11 











9 7 




washing 

S. 


15 











13 2 




660 


10 


2 


28 


17 8 


Rome 


23 Nov^ 1731. 20 pols a sequin. 










1 


Poul. 


By. 




£ 


s. d. 




To my Dears pocket 


21 










10 11 




a Stafe string 


1 


5 







9 




a Necklace me 


5 










2 7 




Gloves my D 


1 


5 







9 




Gloves me . 


1 


5 







9 




Washing the doz. 1 pol 














the shirts 5 byoks 


18 










9 4 




48 


5 


1 


5 1 




26 Carlin in a Rom 


sequin 










2 Kain Damaty for 2 p^" 














pockets Gris at5 carline 














261 . . . 


1 











4 


Naples 














5 Deem. 


1732 A Kain and a Palm 
ermasin for one apron 














261 ... 


2 


7 








10 9 




6 Kanscord silk Rob 36 














cor for Grisie . 


21 


6 





4 


6 5 



25 3 5 12 

A Ducat is 10 Carlins and Terie is 2 Carlins. 10 grains 
is a Carline, 26 or 26| Carlins is a sequen, a Venetian 
sequin is 27 carlins, a Ducat is about 4 sh. stirlin. 



Naples. Wednesday, 5 Dec^. N. S. 1731. 

Due. Car. Gr. £ s. d. 

Caried over 25 5 12 
To a capashin for siring- 

ing the ears . . 5 2 1 10 



360 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1731 



Foreign Tour] 








[Sterling' 




For 15 Palm Cloath 11 


Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


d. 




Due. can . 


20 


6 


2 


4 


2 


6 




For tape 3 Carlins 5 g. . 





3 


5 





1 


5 




For threed and silk 


1 


1 








4 


5 




For paper 8 g., tape 5 
















car .... 





5 


8 





2 


4 




For powder 2 car paper 





3 








1 


3 




For black ruban . 





2 











10 




For gold buttons 9 grain 
















big and 4| gr small 
















the peice . 


14 


4 





2 


17 


8 




For threed 4 g . 








4 








2 




For a wige to Gr . 


3 











12 







For making and lining 
















my Deirs Cloaths by 
















John 


12 


6 





2 


10 


5 




For making G. wastcoat 














and mine 





8 








3 


2 




For 9^ can velvet my 
















goun at 5| Ducat 


52 


7 


n 


10 


10 


10 




For a pr. black silk 
















stokins 


2 


8 








11 


2 




For a can blew 
















cloath . 7 2 








1 


8 


10 




5 and 4 yellow 
















serge . 3 2 2 











12 


9 




5| ou. gold galoun 7 15 








1 


8 







buttons . 8 











3 


2 




makeing . 4 


22 


jj 


7 





16 





1732 













Seteday 


For 10 ells Demie holl: 
















G and I . 


9 








1 


16 





January 


9 For 6 spoons 15 D. 6 C. 
5 g. gote for 2 old ones 
















3 D. 9 Carlins . 


11 


7 


5 


2 


6 


9 




To the Italian Master a 
















moneth . 


3 


3 


8 





13 


7 



1732] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



361 



[Foreign Tour] 

To Gibson of her 20£ 

12 Legu . 
For 3 can Dyaper for Dr. 
For threed 3 g. . 
To Musick Master a 

moneth . 
For coppying Musick . 
To my Dears pocket 
For washing 5 weeks 
12 For li xV Can Muslin 26 

Cctx • • • • 



[Sterling] 



1732 

Janr 22 



To the litle Italian Mr. 
For fine sope 
For a hat to James 
For a p'^ shoes to me 
To Doctor . 

To the Mantua Maker me 
To the Mantua Maker 

Gris 
For my velvet mittons . 
For copiing music at 1 C. 

the 4 lines 
For 5 Lottery Ticket of 

Millan 
For Tuning spinet a 

month 
For a pr. short furd gloves 

me .... 
To S. Carmany Playing 

master 
For St. Josephs pictor . 



Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


32 


4 





6 


9 


7 


3 











12 











3 








n 


4 


5 








18 





2 


6 








10 


5 


7 


8 





1 


11 


2 


6 








1 


4 





3 


9 


5 





15 


91 


246 


4 


9| 


49 


6 


4 


2 











8 








2 











10 


1 


4 








5 


7 


1 











4 





5 


4 





1 


1 


7 


4 











16 





4 











16 





1 


7 








6 


10 


8 


1 





1 


12 


5 


7 


2 





1 


8 


10 


1 


2 








4 


10 


1 




5 








2 





4 


5 








18 








2 











10 



1 Up to this point the accounts are given in full detail. Henceforward, in 
order to avoid repetition, only selected entries are given. 



362 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1732 



[Foreign Tour] 

For Chera de Spanie is 

wax and jostro. Ink 

and ostio [?] wafers . 
For 2 Naples handker- 
chiefs 
For 4 Mesina handker- 

chieffs 
For 3 can of the 10 can 

strypd armazin for my 

Rob 25 C. 
For a pr. shoes my D. . 
For 25 1 can blew armazin 

for curtins 22 Carlins 
For 17 can snuff colour 

linins 
For I can black armaz. 

hats 
For 8 venturs in the 

Lotery at Rome for us 

and our grandchildren 
For 8 ventors in the 

Lotery at Millon for 

Ditto 
For Jamie Mitchell and 

Mr. Sausure in Rome 

Lottery . 
For 3 can strypd armozin 

of the purple for me 
1732, 23 C. 

Naples, 
12 Mch 









Sterling] 


)uc. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. d. 





1 


8 





9 


1 


8 








7 2 


4 











16 


7 


5 





1 


10 


1 











4 


56 








11 


4 


37 


1 





7 


8 5 


1 


1 








4 5 



20 2 5 4 10 



18 8 5 3 15 4 



5 



4 117 



6 9 17 7 



For 4 pr spectickles and 














one case . 


1 


3 








5 


2 


For Don quickset 





8 








3 


2 


For a pr. black knit 














mittons G. 


1 











4 





For 14 palm armazin 














Cantoush at 24 c. Gr. 


4 


2 








16 


10 


For 1|. 1. p. green g : 














wraper 22^ c. . 


3 


7 








14 


10 



1732] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 363 

[Foreign Tour] [Sterling] 

For 2 cans p. green Due. Car. Gr. £ s. d. 

peticoat 22i C. . 5 4 10 2 

For 1 C. 5 palm g : 

wraper 25 C. . . 4 6 16 3 

For 3 Can green for 

Sultain22|C. . .675170 

For 2 green aprons G:. 278 0112 
For making Can- 
tush G. . 5 

green peticoat 3 1 

wraper . 5 

ruban to peticoat 2 6 

Sultain . 6 



For 3 snuff handker- 
chiefs G. . 

For 2 fether Tipits G 
and I . . . 

For 4 snuff handker- 
chiefs me 

For a p^ shoes my D : 
broun 

For 4 picturs to George . 

For 4 pair spectickles . 
29 To the Italian Master . 

To the Playing Master 
to 12 Mar. 

For making 3 

gouns me 5 4 

making 1 to G : 18 



2 


1 


6 





8 


8 


1 


5 








6 





1 


G 








6 


5 


2 


6 








10 


5 





9 








3 


7 


2 











8 





2 











8 





3 


4 








13 


7 


4 


5 








18 






7 2 19 2 



For 2 can black 

silk my D 2 4 8 

making the waist- 
coat . . 6 2 2 

lineing and but- 
tons 



364 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1732 



[Foreign Tour^ 














making velvet 








[Sterling' 


britches . 2 2 


Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


d. 




Q 


ft 


ft 


1 


Ifi 


ft 


Naples 


«7 


yJ 


\j 


X 


xu 


\f 


1732 copiing Musick 14 














Italian Master 3 4 


4 


8 








19 


2 


Churches at Soriento 


1 


5 








6 





2 handkerchief snuff 














ones me . 





7 








2 


10 


a Dressing glass . 


1 











4 





2 fans Gris . 


5 








1 








6 aprons changeing 














colour 22 C. 


9 


6 





1 


18 


5 


2 pr yellow stokins Gr. 


2 











8 





a tortoyshel comb, Gr. . 





9 








3 


7 


2 goss handker chiefs G. 


1 


4 








5 


7 


yellow shoes Grisie 













3 


2 


a rid coffer with yellow 














nails 


5 








1 








Coppiing musick . 


3 


2 








12 


10 


a subscription for Musick 


2 


7 








10 


10 


Blooding 


1 


2 


4 





5 





May 12 Carmany Gordana play- 














ing Mst. . 


9 








1 


16 





tuning spinet 





6 








2 


5 


Itahan Master Mr. Nicol 


3 


4 








13 


7 


Chuches which is asses 














at a Terie the whole 














day and a man 


1 


8 








7 


2 


22 1 Can green Pertian 














bed 11 C. 


24 


1 





4 


16 


5 


Cutting Grisie's hair 





8 








3 


2 


14 binding music books 














16 gr. . 


1 


2 


8 





5 


2 


For cutting Grisies hair 





4 








1 


7 


For copiing Corellies 














Musick 





2 


6 





10 


5 


For 3^ can Armazin me 















1732] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



365 



[Foreign Tour^ 








[S 


terl 


ing 


22 C. changing gold 


Due. 


Car 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


and white 


7 


1 


5 


1 


8 


7 


To Nicol taylor for all 














Mantas 18, carlins sul- 














tains 8 c., cantush 5 c, 














peticoats 3 and work 














in the house 4 carlins 














p day and meat 


9 


7 





1 


17 


9 


1 can jmdisoy britches . 


2 


4 








9 


7 


a pr garters 





4 








1 


7 


2 pr silk stokins . 


6 


5 





1 


6 





2 pr under stokins 


3 


2 








12 


10 


For 20 gold loups 


3 











12 





20 gold buttons . 





8 








3 


2 


1732 Account of Marbel bought at 


Naples. 








May 24 For 2 Marbel Tables 














Fiore de persico from 














Don Michel Dicalabria 


56 








11 


4 





2 wooden cases 


2 











8 





Shiping in the Barcelona 














and custom house 














officers 


2 


3 








9 


2 


For the whole Marble 














Tables . . 3846 





4 


769 


4 


2 



3906 3 4 781 5 4 
take of this for some was 

sold . . . 666 133 4 



3240 3 4 648 1 4 
To sundry things by Mr. 

Man pr ace*. . . 108 7 21 14 10 



3349 4 669 16 2 
take of Mr. Man's Tables 50 10 



3299 4 659 16 2 
the whole drawn upon Mr. Hammon this at 510 Ducats 



366 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1732 

[Foreign Tour] 
for 100£ sterling is 646£ 16 shillins str. where entered in 
cash book 300 



346 10 
[Note. — Lady Grisel bases her calculations here on the 
ducat = 3/11, while in detailed calculations it has been taken 
as worth 4/ ; hence the discrepancy.] 

[Sterling] 



Portice, 1732 


Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


July 20 2 pr. silver clasps 





1 


5 








7 


a pr. velvet shoes 


2 











8 





2 pr. silk gray stokins . 


3 


2 








12 


10 


To Carmany for 














singing . 13 5 








2 


14 





hire of spinet .220 











8 


10 


Chases to Masters 3 6 











14 


5 


copiing music .0 4 











1 


7 


2 floors 


1 


6 








6 


5 


To Doctor Piagiddel 














Potzzos . 


4 


5 








18 





To Nicols for blooding . 


1 


4 








5 


7 


For turning broun waste- 














coat 





6 








2 


5 


For 2 can velvet 6| 














palm 2 cloks 


16 


5 


n 


3 


6 


4 


1| can Armagin to line 














cloks . . . 


3 


3 


n 





13 


6 


making and ruban to 














cloks 


1 


3 








5 


2 


To the Doctor 


2 


7 








10 


10 


To Biries at the bridge . 





2 











10 


For 5| can Dyaper 8 C 














12 servits 


4 


4 








17 


7 


18 long towills 25 gr. pr 














can 


4 


5 








18 





1 1 can 3 hagabag napkins 





8 


9| 





3 


8 


4 can servants and pantry 


1 


2 








4 


10 


2 can kitchen cloaths . 





3 


4 





1 


4 


threed 9 gr. pr ounc 





4 








1 


7 



1732] 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



367 



[Foreign Tour" 














For 4 baths Ishi water 








[Sterling^ 


12 barrals each bath ] 


Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ 


s. 


(1. 


15 gr. pr. barrel 


7 


2 





1 


8 


10 


caring it 4 days 3 carhns 














each 


1 


2 








4 


10 


a tub 9 days 





9 








3 


7 


To caposins 


1 











4 





a can flanen 


2 


10 








4 


5 


a pr velvet shoes 2^. 














plain 8 car 


2 


8 








11 


2 


ar gloves 6 C. 2 pr. 














mittons 7 C. . 


1 


3 








5 


2 


a pr. jumps and slives . 


6 








1 


4 





1 can silk for hoop 


2 


1 








8 


5 


2 necleses 8 C. tape 2 C. 


1 











4 





staples Deer 1732 














a knite silk wastcoat 


3 











12 





For 16| Cann olive Dam 


- 












ask to be sent home . 


49 


5 





9 


18 





For rolling up silks 





2 











9 


TomyD. . 


2 











8 





For chases to Masters to 














Portice 


1 


20 








4 


9 


For 4 Moneths tuning 














spinets 


2 


4 








9 


7 


For tuning spinets to 














ysday 





6 








2 


5 


For copiing music 


1 


7 








6 


9 


For cuting hair G 


1 











4 





For 6 Can shagreen my 














XJ • • • • • 


9 








1 


16 





velvet for Nightgoun . 


7 








1 


8 





velvet shag 3| c linin . 


17 








3 


8 





gold loops for Ditt 


4 











16 





a wige . . . 


4 


5 








18 





makeing goun, etc. 


1 


6 








6 


5 


For a pair of shoes 





8 








3 


2 


Cambrick weepers 


1 


6 








6 


5 


a black sword and gloves 


1 


8 








7 


2 



368 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1732 



[Foreign Tour 








[Sterling^ 


15j and a half black 


Due. 


Car. 


Gr. 


£ s. 


d. 


cloath 


19 


4 





3 17 


7 


3 can armazine . 


6 


6 





1 6 


5 


buttons 


2 


4 





9 


7 


making the sute . 


4 


5 





18 





making velvet sute 


5 








1 





armazin 





2 


n 


1 


2 


molds to velvet buttons 





5 





2 





making goun pocks etc. 


1 


1 


o| 


4 


5 


18 palm cloath a full sute 


24 


7 


5 


4 19 





2 can 5 palm armazin . 


5 


7 


7 


1 2 


10 


Damity for body lin 





5 





2 





making the sute and 












buttons . 


4 


5 





18 





twist for holls this should 












not be . . 





5 





2 





2 pr. gray slipers . 


1 


6 





6 


5 




124 


7 





24 18 


10 


For my knit wastcoat 












this is a green one to 












my D. . . . 


4 








16 





makeing 2 seks 


4 








16 





a new hoop made 


3 








12 





cover old hoop 





5 





2 





6 can moyhair rigote 


14 


4 





2 17 


7 


a black fan . 





3 





1 


2 


a crap hood 





3 





1 


2 


covering my jumps 


2 


4 


n 


9 


7 


1 can black damask 


3 


1 





12 


5 


1 can armaz to line it 


1 


1 





4 


5 


making wastcoat 





5 





2 





aples 1732, O.S. Dec^. 27 












For a velvet Muff Grisie 


3 


3 


3 


13 


3 


a p'" silk mittons . 


1 


2 





4 


10 


7| can broun velvet 


30 








6 





making 2 Robs. . 


4 








16 






10 


2 





2 


10 


3 


4 





13 


2 


1 








4 





2 


5 





10 





3 


5 





14 





3 








12 





4 


5 





18 





8 


4 





1 13 


7 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 369 

[Foreign Tour] 

To 6 canes Poaso Du- [Sterling] 

manz for my black Due. Car. Gr. £ s. d. 

seek . . . 10 2 

7 Jany. For 12 can velvet to the 

N.S. Boys . . . 48 9 12 

To Carmany playing 

Master, etc. 
For Mushets goun 
Making 
apron to her 
Making and cloath to 
James 
Lowrenchiens cloath 
John cudberts cloaths , 
Drinkmoney Cagnonies 
20 To Mrs. Cagnonies a pies 

cambrick . . 16 14 

For a trunk with bras 

Nails 
For a book of Minuits 
For a red trunk with 

nails 
For blooding by Nichels 
vomits 
recept plaster 2 7 in 

gredians 1-6 . 
Scots pills from England 
Gravel cups to cure it . 
Feb. For beding to the Maids 

Shiets and pillabers 
Brazier 8^ w^^ 22 gr. 
Stand and spaleta for it 
pen knif 

2 clogbag trunks . 
belt for lead bag . 
bars to trunks by Gartano 
wax cloth for trunks 
paper 27 g. . 

2 A 



5 








1 








1 











4 





7 








1 


12 





1 











4 








2 











10 


4 


3 








17 


2 


5 


1 





1 





5 


2 











8 





7 








1 


8 





2 


5 








10 





1 


8 








7 


2 


1 


7 








6 


10 





3 








1 


2 


9 


1 


4 


1 


16 


7 





4 








1 


7 





4 








1 


7 


1 


2 








4 


10 





2 


7 





1 


2 



370 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1733 



[Foreign Toui\ 








Sterling 




Due. 


Car 


. Gr. 


£ s. 


d. 


2 Lamps from Lig- 












horn 


16 


3 


5 


3 5 


4 


ib. For 6 snuff boxes 


15 








3 





cristall to my watch 





5 





2 





2 fine snuff boxes Gr. . 


17 








3 8 





to the Banificato . 





8 





3 


2 


Dona Luisas blew Dam- 












ask . . . . 


3 


1 





12 


5 


Musick paper 





8 





3 


2 


copiing musick 


1 


8 





7 


2 


11 sword belts 


3 


3 





13 


2 


26 fans 


13 








2 12 





18 fans 


2 








8 





2 caps to the boys 


2 


2 





8 


10 


To John Cuthberts 4 












spoons 


9 








1 16 





more of wages 


37 


8 





7 11 


2 


more 6 guinys 


16 


2 





3 4 


10 


more . . . . 


2 


7 





10 


10 


To James of wages over 












his fans . 


4 


1 


n 


16 


8 


more by John after he 












was gone . 


2 








8 





more by John 


3 








12 





For a wige . 


4 


5 





18 





2| p. green shagreen 





5 





2 





2 wige combs 





1 








5 


patches 12 gr. 





1 


2 





6 


padisoy for clock . 


3 


7 


3 


15 





I spomalincena for hood 





8 





3 


2 


irch For 6 Torteshel combs . 


4 


6 





18 


5 


For a spinet 


1 


4 





5 


2 


For spomalincina sent 












home 5 can and 4 pain 


I 










I take the half and L. 












Bin the other and is . 


8 


8 





1 15 


2 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 871 

[Foreign Tour] 

10 pauls a croun, IG byocks a paul. 



Rome 1733 


Crs. 


Pis. 


By. 


£ 


R. 


d. 


29 March For 2 wax Pops . 





8 








4 


2 


to 
22 April 


For prints . 

For 4 copper Medles 

For 2 Corinthen brass 


c 

4 


2 







1 
1 


12 
1 


6 





pops 
For 2 gold crouns and a 


2 











10 


6 




silver croun 


4 


3 


5 


2 


2 


10 




For a discription of 
Rome 


1 


6 








8 


4 




For 2 marbel weights for 














Frolenc 


paper 
For 2 volums of the 





4 








2 


1 


25 April 


gallary of the great 
Duke 


25 


2 





6 


11 


4 




10 vol. Italian books 


6 


4 


4 


1 


13 


9 




2 alabaster figurs 


1 











5 


3 




For a putter tee pot 
For Barminis Mistres off 





6 


4 





3 


3 




a Statue . 








4 








n 




To Mrs. Colmans coach- 
















man 





5 








2 


7 




For a wooden box with a 
















lock 


1 


2 








6 


3 




For 2 Lyons of Marbel . 


1 











5 


3 




For my gandchild Hel- 
















lens Pictor 


8 








2 


2 







For 3 Pictor of Mr. Baillie, 
















my Daughter Grisie, 
and my grandchild 
Gris by Mr. Martine . 


36 








9 


9 







frames and glases and 
















box to ditt 


16 


1 





4 


4 


6 




For making my Dears 
















wastcoat . 


4 








1 


1 







For lutstring at 36 pauls 
pr lb. . 


16 








4 


4 






372 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1733 



[Foreign Tour] 






[Sterling] 






Crs, Pis. 


By. 


£ 


s. 


d. 




Dressing hair and wires 


1 9 


6 





10 


3 




For my lutstring . 
Bolonia 


16 





4 


4 





1733 












May 


15 A Sequin 21 paul, 2 pauls 


a livre, 


10 bycocks 


is a 




paul, and 12 Dinis a byock. 














L. B. 












4 pr filosel stokins 


21 





1 


1 







For seeing palaces 


6 








6 







To the Copsin Convent 


2 10 








2 


(i 




For cariing spinet to St 














Donis 


1 








1 







To Prists . 


1 








1 





Bolonia, For a pair jack boots . 


22 





1 


2 





1733, 


For wire and dressing 












May 


hair 


1 10 








1 


6 




For a whip to John 


2 10 








2 


6 




For tobaco powder 


5 








5 







For the box in the opera 














house 


85 





4 


5 







cushen in the box 


10 14 








10 


8 




cloath to ly over the box 


8 6 








8 


4 




18 Tickets to the opera 


30 10 





1 


10 


6 




2 opera book 


2 








2 







For caring pictors 


1 5 








1 


3 




a book of what is to be 














seen here 


1 








1 







mending my watch 


3 10 








3 


6 




letters 6£. 10s. 


6 10 








6 


6 




For a pictor of the Autom 


40 





2 










For a wax cloth curtin to 














Chease 


4 








4 







puting it up 


2 6 








2 


4 



1733 

Venice 



A vinecian sequin is 22 Lieris, a Florence sequin 
2l£. 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 373 



[Foreign Tour" 






"Sterling 


11 June For a book of the curi- 


L. B 


• 


£ s. 


d. 


ositys here 


2 





1 





Baucaches history 


36 





18 





A Map of Venice . 


31 





15 


6 


a Map of Germany 


3 





1 


6 


the lives of the Painters 


12 





6 





Plans of houses . 


37 10 





18 


9 


For 2 lb. tryackle with 










boxes 


13 





6 


6 


hipocacuana 


6 





3 





Sir Robert Brouns Nurs 


22 





11 





Sir Robert Brouns Ser- 










vants 


6 





3 





General Shulenbergs ser- 










vants 


4 





2 





Seeing a Newranberge 










show of Christs birth 










and passion 


1 10 








9 


Sir Rob* Broiuis garner 


2 





1 





a barber 


1 








6 


at a gundaliers weding 










to fidls 


2 





1 





For a wastcoat to 










Jacome . 


76 5 





1 18 


2 


For Mush . 


15 





7 


6 


tobaco pip case . 


5 





2 


6 


a spung l£ 5s esher l£, 










steel and flint 6s 


2 11 





1 


6 


3 whisks 


16 








5 


3 pr spectickles . 


2 





1 





stuflfine to cushen 


2 





1 





For 9 1 brack camblet 










8| lirie 


8 10 





4 


6 


12 bratch shogreen 5£ . 


60 





1 10 





make cantush and seek 










c^LO* • • • 


16 





8 





5 brach a la mod for 










sandella . 


45 





1 2 


6 



374 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 



[Foreign Tour] 




L. B. 




Sterling 
£ s. d. 


black lace for mittons 


• 


2 5 





12 


masks 


• 


3 





16 


a black cap 


^ 


25 





12 6 


For the half of the 








Apoticarys bill . 


• 


11 10 





5 11 


1733 

Frankfoord 


















For 2 pair havers 




Fl. K. 






stokins 


• 


6 





14 


For 5 Doun pillows 


• 


13 





1 10 4 


For 30 of their ells for 








pillabers . 


• 


13 





1 10 4 


For 45 1 lb. hamb 


H 








sture 


• 


6 1 





14 



3 10 





4 


1 


3 





3 


6 


9 9 





11 





50 17 


2 


2 19 


3 


25 3 


2 


1 9 


4 



44 48 
this at 4 flarans 15 kamtins to ane unger and ane unger 
10 sh. strline is £5, 5 shillins sterling. 
Aix la Chaple, 10 July 1733, N.S. Livers. 
For a pr. of shoes to me 
Spa glovs at 15 st. Doge Skin 
baver skin gloves 6 pair 
Baver at 23 sk. peticoat 

and clock 
Castor clock at 11 12 . 
For 6 ell castor for frok 

and wastcoat . . 69 15 4 14 

Sep™ To Mr. Hays subscrip- 

tion 
the Judge at Dimburgh 
13 drawings of the Foun- 

tons, etc. 
3 pincils to my boys 
a wanscote chist w* a lock 
wax f rute . 
a play to little Grisie . 
2 Kain strings 



37 10 





2 3 


9 


30 





1 15 





10 





11 


8 


1 10 





1 


9 


6 10 





7 


7 


8 





9 


4 


2 





2 


4 


2 





2 


4 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 375 



[Foreign Tour] 








Sterling 


Livers. 






£ 


s. 


d. 


capashiens in convent . 


22 


10 





1 


6 


3 


carvie box . 


1 











1 


2 


2 Peutter salts 


1 











1 


2 


a tortoy shell snuff box 














Gr 

VJI • • • • • 


7 











8 


2 


For Japan Dressing boxes 28 


12 


2 


1 


13 


4 


a quadreel box 


15 


3 








17 


8 


5 Ivory boxes and 2 dyels 


42 


10 





2 


9 


7 


6 kains and a head to one 


22 








1 


5 


8 


a comb trea 


2 











2 


4 


5 brushes 


2 


10 








3 


1 


To the wemen at Geron 














State 


18 


18 





1 


2 





the wemen at the Pohone 


11 


7 


2 





14 


3 


For Lodging at the Loup 














for 11 sk. pr. night from 














10 July to 31 Aug. . 


291 


10 





17 





1 


at 8 sk. to 22 Sept. 


88 








5 


2 


8 


Anna Mary doughter 


18 


15 





1 


1 


10 


the maid 


2 


10 








3 


1 


Spa 














Sep. 22 For mending cheases 














and sadles 


114 


5 





6 


13 


3 


a cheas for 4 persons to 














go to Geronstat at 3 sk. 














p'^ day in the season 














and 2| sk. after it 


96 


10 





5 


12 


7 


To a cook 72 days 


36 








2 


2 





a sute cloathes to James 


78 


10 





4 


11 


7 


James of wages half a 














guiny 


9 


7 


2 





10 


6 


John Cudbertson wages, 














2 guinys . 


37 


10 





2 


2 





For letters . 


38 


3 





2 


4 


2 


For washing 5 sow shirt 














and cravat and hand- 














kerchief 4 sows shifts 















376 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1733 



[Foreign Tour] [Sterling] 

and a skillin the Doz. Livers. £ s. d. 

on all other pices . 55 8 3 4 7 
a cours sheat for the 

trunk . . . 2 10 3 1 



Leige 
Sep. 23 



For 12 ells lace 6| sk. 10 

ell 13 sk., 10 ell 19 sk. 179 

2 ells lace . . . 33 18 
19 p^ gloves Lady HarvieM 4 5 

3 pr mens gloves to give 

away . . . 3 15 

a purs Donohow . . 1 10 






10 8 


10 





1 19 


6 





16 


7 





4 


4 





1 


9 



Brusles For bring brass trumpet 
25 from Ipers 

a surgeon to Grisies arm 
Seeing Arch Dutches 

Palice etc. 
Lodging 3 nights and 

eating 6 of us 
muslin 



1 10 19 
4 4 8 

4 10 5 3 



6 4 7 3 



Paris,^ friday, 20 October 1733. 


24 livers a 


Lewidc 


)r 


or guiny. 












For 2 J ell cloath . 


55 








2 8 


1 


7| ell silk lining . 


37 


10 





1 12 


10 


a pr. stokins to the cloaths 15 








13 


1 


a pr. stokins or sheverin 


18 








15 


9 


a pr. baver stokins 


9 








7 


10 


a pr. worset stokins 


10 


5 





9 





a pr. thick traveling 












stokins 


3 








2 


7 


a Hatt 


17 








14 


10 


5 duz butons to cloath . 


5 








4 


4 


plying etc. to ditt 


5 








4 


4 



' See p, 302. 



' Paris accounts given in full. 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 377 

[Foreign Tour] [Sterling] 

Livers. £ s. d. 

making ditt . . 10 8 8 

2 wigs a ty one and a bob 

3 Lew. . . . 72 8 8 
taylors man . . 1 lOj 
baver gloves at 35 sturs 13 10 11 6 



Paris 







271 5 








For ane Alamad 5 


9 








4 


9 


hood to me 












a duzon combs 












9£, 3 of tor- 












toyshel 12£ 21 











18 


4 


making my vin- 












ice silk Rob 8 











7 





a sheneel Pala- 












tine . 6 











5 


3 


6 ells black lace 30 








1 


6 


3 


8 ells narow 












black lace 12 











10 


6 


puder puff 10 












St. wires 10 s. 1 














io| 


black gass hood, 












etc. . . 9 











7 


10 


thick travel- 












ling stockins 3 











2 


7 


Baver skin 












gloves at 35 












st . .20 











17 


6 






115 9 




For a gass head 4 











3 


6 



For caps quilted 
for dressing 
4 of them 5 15 5 



378 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[1733 



[Foreign Tour] 








[Sterling 








Livers. 


£ 


s. d. 


For wires 10 st. 












patches l£ 












puff 10s. . 


2 











1 9 


to a tire woman 












for dressing 


3 











2 7 


13 ell floord 












silk goun and 












coat 26st. i 


338 








14 


15 9 


6 breads white 












satin with a 












deep floord 












border for a 












Jupon 


132 








5 


15 6 


Neclaces slav- 












ages and ear- 












rings 


30 








1 


6 3 


Alamode hood 


5 











4 4 


Sheneel Tipit 


4 


10 








3 9 


a duzon of 












combs 


9 











7 11 


a flowrd and 












silver tipet 


5 











4 4 


a black ladd 












Hood 


90 








3 


18 9 


white rubans 


1 


4 








1 


Mantua maker 


16 











14 


a sute Muslins 


12 











10 6 


fringe at 7 st 












8 ells 


2 


15 








2 4 


Muslins for 












fashus 


6 


6 


9 





5 6 


making fashus 












and washing 












them 


1 


13 








1 5 


2 pr shoes . 


12 











10 6 


4 pr Imbro- 












dered shoes 


20 











17 6 



1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 379 



Foreign Tour 








[Sterling' 




Antoylage 






Livers. 


£ s. d. 




head 


13 








11 5 




3 ells aunage, 












3£ 10s. . 


10 


10 





9 2 




2 ells aunage 












5£ . 


10 








8 9 




palatins 


10 








8 9 




thick travel- 












ing stokins 


3 








2 7 




Baver gloves 












35 St. the pr. 


20 








17 6 




Antoylage sute 


37 








1 12 2 








803 13 9 


1 




1190 7 9 


1 


Paris 












Oct. 11 


To the person < 


of 








1733 


Lord Walgraves 










Chaple 


• 


6 




5 3 




Sn^ Bellonys 


Bill 










from Buro 


at 










Rome 




12 





10 6 




Description of 












Paris 




15 





13 1 




3 cookry Books 




6 


15 


5 11 




a book of beasts 


> 


3 


10 


3 




4 unbound books 










of 


• 


6 


10 


5 8 




4 places in the 










opera house 


• 


32 





18 




seeing observato^, 










palices, and 












churches 




18 





15 9 




Madam la Duches 










and W. Lessis 










otels etc. . 


• 


8 





7 



380 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



[Foreign Tour] 

Cardinal Richlieu's Livers. 

Monument . 4 
Seing looking glass 
work . . 4 10 



[1733 

[Sterling 

£ s. d. 
3 6 

3 11 







116 5 









For a lisenc for a 












coach to the 












country 


6 








5 


3 


errour 15 An order to see 












versyles 












Diner at Mudin 


8 


6 





7 


8 


Lodging and eat- 












ing a night at 












versyle 


43 


12 


1 


18 


1 


Diner at Marley 


7 


8 





6 


6 


Lodging a night 












and eating at 












St. Jarmens . 


24 





1 


1 





Diner at . 


9 


18 





8 


7 


black pudins at 












St. Jarmans . 


2 


12 





2 


3 


a botle ratafia 3£ 












drams 12 st . 


3 


12 





3 


2 


Seeing Lamule . 


3 








2 


7 


The Dary there 


1 


4 





1 





St. Clou etc. 


4 


16 





4 


2 


Menagery 


3 








2 


7 


Treanon . 


3 








2 


7 


Marly seeing things 


4 


4 





3 


8 


the water machine 












near Marley . 


3 








2 


7 


Seeing Mason . 


3 








2 


7 


17 crossing the river 












Sean 


1 


10 





1 


3 


James the foot- 












man or Jacome 


2 








1 


9 






134 2 








1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 381 



[Foreign Tour] 








1733 






[Sterling' 


Paris To Caparan teeth 


Livers 


. 


£ s. d. 


drawer 


96 




4 4 


tooth powder . 


1 15 




16 


teeth water 


G 




5 3 


For 12 botles Laii 








de Carin 


10 




8 9 


hungary water . 


6 




5 3 




119 


15 





For a toothpice 

case . . 10 8 9 

4 knives 14£ a pen- 

knif£l . 15 13 1 

2 razors ..60 053 

a St. Clou shoe 

snuffbox . 24 110 

another St. Clou 

box ..60 053 

2 doz. St. Clou 

hefts for knives 24 110 

5 salt botles .50 044 
2 pr. siszers .40 036 
hinges to 2 boxes 

of Ivory .60 053 



For ane Eparn 




±\j\j yj 


\j 




french silver . 


205 





8 19 


4 


a pr ditt Candle 


ka. 








sticks . 


22 





19 


3 


2 pr ditt candle- 










sticks . 


48 





2 2 





2 salts of ditt . 


12 





10 


6 


a p^. snuffers and 










pan 


10 





8 


9 


2 snuff pans 


12 


10 


10 


11 


2 frute plates of 










ditt 


26 





1 2 
1 n 


9 



382 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK [1733 



[Foreign Tour' 












For 14 ells floord 






Sterling" 




silk Mally Mit- 




Livers. 


£ 


s. d. 




chell £16, lOst. 231 





10 


2 1 




making the sute 


12 








10 c 




a geneel tipet Mrs. 












Mitchell 


5 








4 4 




a tipet to Miss 












Johnston 


12 








10 6 




a handkercheff 












Lady Louth . 


12 








10 6 




2 p^ rufles to my 












boys T and G 


34 





1 


9 9 




2 knoted tipets to 












give away 


6 








5 3 




an imbroyderd 












handkerchieff 


6 








5 3 




a block to dress 










' 


upon . 


2 








1 9 




- 




—320 




1733 








- 




Paris. 












Oct. 15 


To one Mr. Menzies 


8 








7 




reading new prints 


1 








10| 




Mr. Knights coach- 












man 


3 








2 7 




Mrs. Horner s 












coachman 


3 



— 15 





2 7 




For the prints of 












versyles 


20 








17 6 




pocket books from 












nuns 


31 





1 


7 1 




nidle books from 












nuns Ms Howard 


6 








5 3 




blew marking 












threed 7| small 












hanks . 


2 


5 





1 11 




. 




— 59 5 





1733] OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 383 

[Foreign Tour] 

For the coach and 

2 horses and our [Sterling] 

own 2 horse 3 

day to Marsils Livers. £ s. d. 

etc. . . 12 10 6 

Jacome the foot- 
man drink .20 019 

14 

For a coach and 2 

horses at 10 

Livers p^ day 230 10 1 3 

to the coachman 12 10 6 

Lewis Mr. Mans 

servant .30 027 

245 

Tewsday, 27 For the otel 

for 3 weeks and 3 days 
servants in Lodging . 12 10 6 

To John Cudbert 

of wages . 24 110 

ditt3iLewider 90 3 18 9 

ditt 6£ 9£ . 15 13 1 

129 

Jacomo . . 43 1 17 8 

a lacd hat 7£ lace 

15 . . 22 18 3 

footman Martins 

place ..90 7 10 

530 
For washing . . 20 17 6 



132-16 Stg.^ 2884 4 9 126 3 8 



^ This is Lady Grisell's jotting as to the value of the Paris expenditure, but 
if 24 livres=;^i, is. as she states elsewhere, it is difficult to see how she arrives 
at her result. 



384 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



Memorandums for Earl Hadinton and Mr. Baillie in their 
Travelling.' Oxford, March 10th, 1740. 





Inns in France 


Dijon . 


St. Loois. 


Lyons 


. Au Pare. 


Nismes 


a L' Orange. 


Montpellier . 


Cheval blanc. 


Avignon 


. Au Pelican. 


Aix 


. Au Bras d'Or. 


Marseills 


. Aux treze Cantons. 


Valence 


. A la Post. 


Monteumant 


. A la Post. 


Toulon 


. Notre dame de Petie 


Narbon 


. A la d'Orade. 


Beziers 


. A la Croix blanche. 


Carcassone . 


. Au Lion d'Or. 


Castlevaudon 


. Au Lion d'Or. 


Toulouze 


. Au bon Pasteur. 


Montauban . 


. Au Tapis Verde. 


Bourdeaux . 


Chez Madame Bennet. 


Xaintes 


. L'Ecu de France. 


Nants 


. Vis a vis les Carmes. 


Angers 


. L'Ours. 


Samur 


. Trois Maures. 


Tours 


. A la Galere. 


Orleans 


. Notre dame de Chaise. 


Estampes . 


. A la Post. 




Inns in Italy 


Turin . 


La Bonne Femme. 


Milan . 


Le Faucon, Al Puozza o' Tre Re. 


Genoua 


. La Croix blanche ou Santa 




Martha. 


Leghorne 


Lion blanc ou Croie d'Oro. 



^ These 'Memorandums' are contained in a note-book of 120 pages, 
8" X 6", and are not in Lady Grisell's handwriting, though evidently of her 
composition. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



385 



Pisa . 
Florence 



Sienna 
Rome 



Naples 
Bologna 
Ferrara 
Venice 



Padona 

Vicenza 

Verona 

Modena 

Reggio 

Parma 

Piacenza 

Luca . 

Mantua 



Ceremonies. 

Collins's, an English house, but 

a French house in Via Magia 

to be preferd. 
Trc Re. 
Monocos al Trinita di Monte, 

best apartments 20 crouns a 

month. 
II Cappello Rosso. 
Al Pellerino. 
Lione Bianco. 
Chez Monsieur d'Hemy sopra 

ill Grande Canale extream 

good. 
Re e Regina d'Inghilterra. 
Le due Rote. 
Le due Torre. 
St. Georgio. 
Giglio Coronato. 
Alia Posta. 
La Croce Bianca. 
II Corallo. 
Lione d'Oro. 



Wesel 

Dusseldorp 

Cologn 

Bonn . 

Coblentz 

Mayentz 

Frankfort 

Wurtzburg 

Donawert 

Nuremburg 

Ausburg 

Munick 

Inspruck 

Trent . 



Inns in Germany 

Le Baisin Bleu. 

Hoff van Holland 

Hoff van Holland. 

Der Stern. 

Lillie. 

Gulden Crannerin. 

Gulden Engel. 

Gulden Swaan. 

Gulden Sunne. 

Gulden Haan, 

Le Raisin d'or. 
. The Daler. 
. Gulden Rosen. 

Gulden Rosen. 
2 B 



886 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

Directions for Holland 
In general avoid lodgeing at any English or Dutch 
house, they being the most imposing, the French the best. 
A rule never to be departed from throw all Holland 
is constantly to make an agreement first for every thing 
you get, or in imploying anybody if but for a message, 
or you will be greatly imposed upon and pay duble. If you 
use them with sevilety and show them you will not be 
bubbled the}' will use you well, but in no way will bear 
rugh treatment, and are ever ready to impose upon any 
they see ignerant and careless. 

At Rotterdam 
Avoid the English house the most impertinently im- 
posing of any we met with. If Mr. Baillie the banker be 
alive send for him, or for Mr. Knaghten a banker, both 
Scots men, either of them will be usefull to you, when 
they know who you are. 

At the Hague 
Send for Monsieur Piere Daniel Tonyn sur le Corte 
Vyverberg he is brother to Capn. Tonyn, he will assist you 
in anything. Lodge at Mr. Adams at the Golden Star 
and Lyon in the Korte Houtstraet near the plain. There 
is an ordinary which it is very right to dyn at when you 
do not stay long in a place, to see the manners and ways 
of different peojDle, but a disagreeable thing to be con- 
stantly in a croud of straingers. Here you must go and 
wait upon the King of Britains Minister if there is one, 
and so you must do where ever you go where the King has 
a Minister. If he returns not yoiu* visit go no more. 

At Amsterdam 
Send for Mr. James Wedderburn, INIerchant, a relation 
of yours, he will assist you in any thing, he lives over de 
Illustre School op de flucale Burghwall. Lodge at the 
Bible and Orange in the Warmer Straet or Ville de Lions. 
Hear the fine organ in the great church. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 887 

At Leyden lodge at the Castle of Antwerp on the Kopen- 
burgh. The Phisic Gardens and other gardens there are 
worth seeing. 

At Delft see the Prince of Oranges Tomb. 

At Harlem see the Bleech field, a fine sight when covered 
with cloth. 

At Utrecht lodge at the Casteel van Antwerp op de 
ganse Markt. If the Prince and Princess of Orange be at 
Insedyck, a house of theirs near Utrecht, or at their house 
in the wood near the Hague, or anj'^ where near, you must 
go wait upon them, and get some body to go with you to 
introduce you. 

A Rout for seeing North Holland 
Hire voitures at Amsterdam by the day, make it in your 
bargen that the coachman shall maintain himself and 
horses, otherways you will be much imposed upon in that 
article, if you can likeways agree with him that he shall 
pay all the passage and toll money, it will be better, but 
that thej^ will not like to do. 

Let the voiture cross the river in the morning befor 
you are ready, otherwise you will be detaind, you take 
coach just at the place where you land on the other side 
of the river, the first toun you come to is Munickendam, 
from that you come through another toun cald Edam, 
but in neither of those places is there any worth seeing, 
then go to Hoorn where you may dine at the Dool.^ Befor 
you come to Munickendam yon pass a village cald Brook, 
which is remarkable for being built without any order or 
regular streets, the houses all detacht from one another ; 
it is very neat and the inhabitants reckond vastly rich, 
after seeing Hoorn you go that night to Enchussen, the 
best house is the Toorn upon the shore, see the Stadhouse 
there. If you stay out but two days go from Enckuyhen 



' In most towns in Holland there were ' doelen ' or shooting galleries, where 
archery was or had been practised. These either developed into hotels or gave 
the name to many hotels which still exist. The old ' Dool ' at Alkmaar still 
survives, in the courtyard of which people may be seen even to this day practis- 
ing archery. The word ' doel ' means ' mark ' or ' aim.' 



388 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

to Alckmaer which is the prittiest toun you ^vill see, go 
airly and you can be back at Amsterdam at night, re- 
member to hear the organ in the great church of Alckmaer, 
the finest in the world. Lodge at the Dool.^ Between 
Alckmaer and Amsterdam you come through a very fine 
coiuitry which formerly was three great lakes and stile 
retain the names of the Bumerent, the Beemster, and the 
Scermer, if you stay out three days go from Enchuysen 
to Medenblyck, the best house the Valck, you may be 
early in the afternoon at Alckmaer and next da}'^ return 
to Amsterdam by Harlem. 

Some Account of the Difference of Money 
Guineas are a ready coin all over Holland and Flanders 
if you can carry them without discovery, and is better then 
a bill when the Exchange is 36 Eskillings for a guinea, 
the Eskillings in Holland are not so good as in Flanders, 
those with a star are the best, those cald Mai Eskillings 
pass for a peny or half peny less, they will take non of the 
Dutch Eskillings for what the}'' pass in Holland in Flanders, 
so get rid of them. The Guilders which are 1 shillin and 
8 pence of our money are a good coin and taken in Flanders 
for the full value. At Leige and Spa and all the Bishop 
of Leige's Country an Eskilling gose for 10 pence, so that 
every Guinea passes for £1, 10 10, reckoning 37 Eskillings 
to the guinea.^ 

No money gose in France but the new French Louis, 
but they are seazable at entring into the country if they 
find above 5 Louis for each person, but as you loose much 
by bills of exchange you must hide what you have and 
show only a little, Li a Louis there is 24 livers, in a liver 
20 sols, there is 3 liver pieces which is cald Ecus blanc 
and 6 liver pieces which is cald Ecus grand. 

Spanish or French Pistols^ go best in Italy any other 



1 See note, p. 387. 

^ This statement of Lady Grisell hardly coincides with her accounts, where 
the schelling is valued at a little over 6d., which would appear to be more 
correct. 

' About 17s. 7jd. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 389 

money loosing much, so change your French money for 
Spanish or French Pistols befor you go into Italy, they go 
all over it, and so dos Florentine, Genoese and Venetian 
Sequins,^ which last are the best money, if you can get 
them at the same price they are allways best but do not 
take them in Lombardy. A Sequine is about the value 
of half a guinea, what is cald a Roman croun, tho I never 
saw the coin, is 10 Pauls, there is 20 Pauls in a Sequin, 
in a Venetian Sequin I think there is 21 or 22 Pauls, a 
Testoon is 3 Pauls. 

The silver money in the Kingdome of Naples is different 
from that all over Italy. In a Sequin there is Naples 

ducats, in a ducat 10 Carlins, and a coin cald a terri which 
is two Carlins. 

In Germany Hungars is the money most curent, a 
Hungar is a gold coin in which is 4 Florins and some times 
10 or 12 Karrentari, 60 Karrentari make a Florin, 12 
Karrentari make a Roman Paul, Spanish Pistols are also 
good money here and are worth 7| Florins. In going out 
of the different dominions in Germany which come very 
quck, some times twice in a day, you must take care to 
get rid of j^our silver money, for what passes in one terri- 
tory will not pass for the same in another, and they are so 
intricat and different little coins I can give no account of 
them. 

In every toun where you stay a day or more you may 
hier a servant that knows the place and can conduct you 
every where, there is always plenty to be had, but you 
must get your Land Lord to recomend and answere for 
their honesty, since there are many rogues amongst them, 
their constant pay is a Testoon " a day, or the value of it 
alike all over Italy. 

For seeing churches and palaces and most other places 
give a Testoon, if you see any Sovereign's house you must 
give two Testoons, if you have audience of any Sovereign, 
the guards and servants expect some thing to drink, half 
a Pistol amongst them all is sufficient. At Rome a Croun 

* los. 5d. - IS. 6d. 



390 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

is enough to the Pope's. At the great seasons of the year 
if you are there they come again, as likewise the servants 
of all the Italian houses you go to, who also constantly 
come the day after you have been at their house the first 
time for some thing, two Testoons is enough to give them 
and the first time only, and again at Christianmass and 
Easter. If you walk often at Villas you need not give 
every time. A Testoon now and then is sufficient. 

At Rome you must have an antiquary to conduct and 
show you the antiquatys and raretys who ^vill always atend 
you when you send to him when you go to see any thing. 
5 Pistols is enough to give him for all when you go away. 

Through your whole journey you will be often stopt at 
coming into every different dominion to serch your trunks 
for merchandise as they call it. Telling them they may look 
if they please, at the same time assuring them you have 
non, and giving them a little money, will free you from any 
trouble, sometimes a Paul in France, one, two or three 
livers accoridng as you have things about you to be 
affrayd of a strict serch. 

At every place you stay at, any acquaintens you meet, 
or in some things your Land Lord will inform you of the 
general price of things, such as the hier of your coach, 
how much a head for eating. All over France the general 
price is 25 ^ sols a head for diner, and 30 ^ sols for super 
and bed. But then you must make your agreement or 
they will make you pay a great dale more and you will 
not be better served. In Italy you only say when you come 
into your Inn you eat a Pasto and there is a fixt price all 
over Italy for diner and super. I think it is 2|- ^ Pauls 
at diner and 3 * pauls at super. 

Going in to Italy over the Alps 
We were not at Leghorn nor Genoua so can give you no 
derections about them. If you go to Genoua Mr. Jackson 
the King's Consul there will be of great use to you, he is 
an honest, civil, good naturd man. 

1 IS. Id. - IS. 74d. 3 IS. 3^cl. * IS. efd. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 391 

You are caryd over Mount Senis in chairs by men, for 
which you give a Pistol a piece, and your chaises and bagage 
by mulls for which you must make the best bargen you can, 
there will be fifty people tearing you to pieces to be em- 
ployd. 

Turin 

The first toun you come to worth notice here you may 
see all in two or three days. Some houses of the King's 
a little way out of town worth seeing, a noble prospect 
from them. If there is a British ]Minister there go to him. 

Milan 

Here you may stop three or four days. There is many 
things worth seeing, the great Church St. Paolo and others, 
the Hospital, the Pest house, the house where the Ecco 
repeats above fifty times ^ etc., the Boromean Islands 
near Milan, which are fine, if you go will take up 3 days to 
go and return. In the way to Milan see the Chartereax 
at Pavia. 

At Piacenza stop a day to see the Dukes Palace and the 
Theater. 

At Parma — a day to see the galery of pictures and the 
famous Theater. 

At Regio there is nothing, but within two mills out of 
the road there is a new house of the Prince of Modena's 
in the French tast worth seeing, to see how inferior it is 
to the Italian Palaces, etc. 

At Modena — a day or two to see the Duke's Palace, etc. 

Bologna 
This will take up a week. Inquire for Mr. Magnoni a 
banker in our name. He will be of great use to you when 
he knows who you are, and is an honest man, ask also for 
Sigre. Barnachi - the famous singer and Sigre. Sandoni ^ 
the husband of the Cuzone, they will be pleasd to be of 
service to any of our family. See the Institute — the 
Churches — Palazo Sanpieri, Palazo Tavi — Pal. Bonfiglioli 

' This is the ' Ecco ' Lady Grisell paid 3s. 5d. ' for seeing.' 
* See p. xlix. ^ See p. xlix. 



392 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

— Pal. Zambeccari — Pal. Magnani — Pal Monti. They are 
best stored with paintings. The Toun house cald Palazo 
Publico. Without the toun the Convents of St. Michall 
in Bosco, the Certosa and Capuchins. There is here the 
famous Signora Laura Bassa, a learned lady who is made a 
doctor ; she is very affable good company and makes 
straingers wellcome that come to see her ; Mr. Magnoni 
will introduce you to her. 

At Loretta half a day is enough where there is only the 
Santa Cassa and the riches in it to be seen. 

Betwixt Loretta and Rome you must see the famous 
cascade at Terni, which is but 2 or 3 leagues going and 
coming out of your road. 

At Rome 

Here so many things are to be seen that it will take you 
up some months and you must have an antiquary to con- 
duct and show you every thing. The only one I know is 
Sigre. Marco Parker al Caffe Inglese in Piazza di Spagnia. 
He is an English man and cousen to Mr. Parker the Beedle 
at Oxford. 

At Naples 

Here you need no derections, only inquire for the Marquis 
Rinuccini, Mr. Consul Allen and Mr. Hammond, who are 
so good friends of ours they will conduct and derect you 
in every thing. I only desire you woud wait upon Made- 
moiselle Louise Cagnony and her sister where ever they 
are and they will make you acquainted with any other of 
our friends. See Portici, where we lived, and Soriento, 
where we past some time very agreeably. 

A list of posts from Naples to England by way of 
Germany which we came ourselves and what is worth 
seeing in the different places we came to. 

Naples to Rome posts to pay 

Naples to Aversa, Post Royall . . . • 1^ 

To Capua ........ 1 

To Francolino ....... 1 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



393 



posts to pay 
To St. Agata ....... 1 

To Carigliano where there is a river to pass, pay 3 
carlini for each Chaise. . . . . .1 

To Mola ........ 1 

Here you show your pass which you get at Naples 
and pay some thing to avoid having your trunks opend. 
2 carlins. 
To Itri . . . . . ■ . . .1 

To Fondi 1 

To Terracina where ends the Neapolitan State and 
there is a chain where you pay one Carlino per 
Chaize ........ 1 

To Capaccie ....... 1 

To Piperno ........ 1 

To Casa Nuova ....... 1 

To Sermoneta ....... 1 

To Cisterno . . . . . . . .1 

To Veletri ■ . . .1 

To Marino ........ 1 

Here they will insist upon puting 3 horses to each 
shaise which they cannot oblige you to, having no order. 
To Torre di Mezza via . . . . . .1 

To Rome ........ 1 



in all 18| 



At going into any great toun you pay only common 
post, at seting out from a great toun you pay Post Royal, 
which is a post and a half for only one post of way. Coming 
into Rome they drive you directly to the Customehouse 
to have your bagadge serched. Give a Festoon, and if 
they do not suspect you have counterband goods, they 
will be very sivil and just open your trunks and look 
into them, but if you have any thing seasable you loose 
it if they find it. Put your Bibles or prayer book in your 
pocket or hide them in the sate of the chaise which is 
seldome serched, or they will certainly take them from you, 
or any English books they think heretical. 



394 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



In the Neapolitean State you pay 11 Carlini per chaise 
every post and 3 Carlini to each postilion. 

In the Roman State you pay 8 Pauls for your horses 
every post for each chaise, 2 Pauls to each postilion and 
3 pauls for a single horse. 

Rome to Florence 



Rome to La Storta, post Royal 




• • 


• 


« 


n 


Passing the gate 1 paul per chaise 




To Baccano .... 


. 1 


To Monte Rossi 




. 1 


To Ronciglione 




. 1 


To the Mountain of Viturbo 




. f post] 6 pauls each 


ToViturbo .... 




f post per chaise 


To Monte Fiasconc 




.1 


To Belsena do not ly here 




. 1 


To St. Laurenzo 




f of a post ) 6 pauls each 


To Acqua Pendente 




1 of a post ) per chaise 


To Centino . 




. 1 


To Re di Coffano a good place 


to 


ly at . 






ii 


To Rieorso . 












To La Scala . 












To Torriero . 












To Bon Convento . 












To Montarone 












To Sienna 













Here see the dome and church, they are fine pices of 
Gothick Archetecture, the Chapel Chigi is very rich, the 
floor of the church deserves particular notice, it is the 
finest in Europe and make them take the boards of the 
pavement. Off the church see the Library painted in 
Fresco after the desins of Ra])hael, oposit to the Church 
see an hospital erected by a shoe maker, see the Market 
place. Sennesino ^ that was so long in England has a house 

^ Francesco Beinardi detto Senesino, one of the most famous sopranists of 
the century, born about 1680 at Siena, received his musical education from 
Bernacchi, and was brought to England by Handel. ' In 1739 Senesino was liv- 
ing in Florence, and sang a duet wilh ihe Archduchess Maria Tleiesa there. 
He died about 1750.' — Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



395 



here and will be glad to see you if he is at home. Lodge 
at the 3 kings. 



Sienna to Castiglioncello 
To Pogibonsi 
To Le Tavernelle 
To St. Cassiano 
To Florence . 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



A French house in the Via Magia is the best to lodge at, 
where we were well used, Collins's, an English house there, 
is generally full and not the most reasonable. All English 
houses or any English body you employ abroad for any 
thing are generally the first and readyest to impose upon 
you, therefor to be avoided, or at least be much upon your 
guard. 

If Mr. Mann is stile Resident here he will conduct and 
take care of you in every thing. In case he is not I set 
down what follows. See the galary, which imploys you 
several days, ask for the Copys in Brass of the 4 famouse 
status that are in the Tribuna, where there is inumerable 
fine and curious things, as there is in every part and room 
in that galery. The great Church, which is larger every 
way then St. Pauls in London ; behind the great alter in 
the dome is an unfinisht statue of a dead Saviour by 
Michal Angelo. See Giotto's Tower from whence there is 
a fine prospect of the Citty and Country. Observe the 
gates of the Baptistry, particularly that facing the church. 
It is the finest piece of work of that kind perhaps in the 
world. The little chappel under St. Lorenzo where the 
bodys of the great Dukes are reposited is the design of 
Michal Angelo and several of the statues in it are by his 
own hand. The Library of St. Lorenzo, the entrence into 
it with the stairs are from the design of M. Angelo. The 
Cloysters of the Annunciata are painted by Andrea del 
Sarto and his scholars. The best are a Saint bringing to 
life a dround boy, which is the first on your right hand 
as you enter, and a Maddonna with Joseph leaning on a 
sack oposit to the entry. 



396 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

In the Church of the Carmes is a handsome Chappel 
belonging to the Corsini Family. 

The Poggio Imperiale about a mile from toun is a 
country seat of the Great Dukes, the apartments adorn' d 
with valuable paintings and other fine furnitur. 

Pratolino six mills from Florence another seat of the 
Dukes. The great colossall statue in the garden, the water 
works, the grotto, the Theatre in the house, all worth 
seeing : when you are here ride the ring. 

Boboli the Dukes garden is very fine, desire to see the 
Menagery there, where George will be delighted with great 
variety of all kinds of strange burds and beasts, if you have 
any brass money in your pockets it will be very good food 
for the Ostrich, in the uper part of the garden where the 
Citronades grow there is a good statue of Adam and Eve 
by Michel Ajigelo. You will have good luck if you escape 
being wet when the water works plays, they are very 
pritty. 

The Capins a little way out of toun, beautiful road to 
it, cows are keept there, fine chise, butter and cream, 
people go there to breakfast, and there is several rooms 
and arbers for company to sit in. 

The Palaces best worth seeing are Pitti, Ricardi, Strozzi, 
larini where there is a fine colection of paintings. 

There is statues and paintings to be seen in the old 
palace belonging to the Duke, you must send over night 
to have leave to see the Wardrobe. The Dukes coaches 
are worth seeing. 

The apartment of the Electrise is well worth seeing. 

There are good statues in the streets as a Herculus and 
Centaur by John de Bologne, a Rape of the Sabins by the 
same, a man suporting his dead friend antique. Take 
notice of the beautys of the Ponte Santa Trinita. 

Florence to Bologna posts 

Florence to Uccellatojio, Post Royal . . .1 

Near Uccelatojio is a house of the Dukes cald Prato- 
lino, where are many fine water works, you pay some 
thing more to the Postilions to bring horses from 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 397 

posts 
the next post to cary you on when you have don seing 
the house. 
To Ponte Assieme ....... 1 

Here if you have much baggage they can oblige 
you to put 3 horses to each Chaise or take your 
baggage off and cary it on horses, the will endeavour to 
make you do both. We took 3 horses for the two bad 
posts only and did not take off our baggage. 
To Giogo . . . . . . . • li 

To Fiorenzolo a good place to ly at . . . • lo 

To Tilligare 1 

To Sojano ........ 1 

The Pope's Dominions 
To Pianore . . . . . . . • 11 

To Bologna . . . . . . . • li 



101 



Lodge at the Pellegrino and see page 17 for what is to 
be seen. 

Bologna to Venice 

Bologna to St. Giorgio, Post Royal . . . • ll 

To St. Carlo a river to pass pay 1 paul per Chaise . li 

To Forrara ........ 2 

Here in the churches are good paintings but few by 
men of note. See the Senola della Madona Delia Cir- 
concisione. Cardinal Rufo, Bishop of the place, has 
a fine collection of paintings. Lodge at St. Marco. 
Ferrara to Francolino . . . . . .1 

6 

At Francolino we took water to Venice. We hierd two 
piotte (having 3 chaises in company), for which we payd 
at the rate of a hunger to each man that rowed. You may 
go by land but it is excessive bad road and dear. You 
will be two days going and must take provision^ in the 
boat with you. We coud neither get beds nor any thing to 
eat the night stopt by the way. 



398 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

At Venice 

Lodge at Monsieur D'Henrys on the great Canall where 
we were well used and cheap. See the Church and Pro- 
curatories of St. Mark. The smal church dedicated to St. 
Geminiano, which stands at one end of the Place of St. 
Marks, was built by Sansovino. INIr. Law ^ that made such 
a figur in France in the Messasipie year your country 
man is buried there. If Mr. Consul Broun be alive who is a 
worthy honest Scots man send to him and he will do every 
thing for you when he knows who you are. Your hierd 
servant will cary you to all the churches worth seeing. 
In the Church and Convent of St. Giorgio Maggiore are 
fine paintings by Titian, Tintoret and other masters of the 
Venetian school, in the refectory is the famous Marriage 
of Cana by Paul Veronese. There is good paintings in the 
schools of St. Rocco and St. Marco. The Palaces best 
worth seeing are Grinani — Maniani — Grassi — Delphino — 
Pisani — Barberigo. The Doge's Palace and the Courts 
of Justice are adornd with fine paintings of Titian, Tintoret, 
Paul Veronese, Bassan, etc. Observe in going into the 
Palace the statues of Adam and Eve much esteemd. The 
Arsenal is well worth seeing and the Treasury and Towr 
of St. Mark. The Library of St. Mark contains several 
fine busts, statues and other remains of antiquaty, the 
roof is finely painted. The Realto, a bridge over the great 
Canal, is very fine and many fine buildings by Paladio. 
Eat Serbetti at a house near St. Marks famous for making 
every thing in Ice the best of any place, it is like a Coffie 
house. 

Venice to Padua 

We went by water doun the Brent, hierd a Bercello 
which is a large boat, for which we payd 48 pauls ; it con- 
veniently holds a great many with chaises and baggage, 
and is a most agreeable way of going, great numbers of 
fine houses being all along that river. 



^ The well-known John Law, born in Edinburgh 1 68 1, died in Venice in 
poverty in 1729. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 399 

At Padua 

Lodge at the post house, see the Church of St. Guistina, 
it is one of the finest in the world, was built after a plan 
of Palladio's, the Convent behind the Church is very 
pritty, the Libary and Cellers are commonly seen by 
straingers. The Church of St. Antonio di Padua. The 
Chappel del Santo. The Bas relief that adorns it is the 
history of his life and miracls, very fine ; the Scuola di St. 
Antonio is well painted by Titian. See the toun house in 
which is the Monmnent of Titus Livius the Roman His- 
torian ; see the Garden of Simples and Papafava. It is a 
large toun once well inhabited and fine Colleges for study- 
ing and many students but now quite ruinous and no 
body there. 

Padua to Vicenza 
Posts 
Padua to Slesega . • 1 1 Here you pay 16| jjauls 

To Vicenza . . • 1 J P^i' chaise each post. 

Vicenza, lodge at the post house. The tounhouse is a 
noble pice of Archetectui-e. Many of the Palaces within the 
toun were built by Palladio or Sansovano and are esteemd 
the best in Italy. The Olimpick Theatre is a noble work of 
Palladio's. The Triumphal Arch as you go out of toun, the 
house of Marquis Capra a little way out of toun is well 
worth seeing, it is cald the Rotunda. 

Vicenza to Verona 

Posts 
Vicenza to Montebello . . . . . .1 

To Caldier li 

To Verona ........ l 

Lodge at the due Torre. See the Amphetheatre, it coud 
contain 23,000 spectators — the Arsenal — the Dome — II 
Giardino Gusto — the Church of St. George — the Academia 
Philarmonica. 

From Padua quite through the Venetian State there 
can be no regulation for the price of post horses, they will 



400 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

have what they please, there being no limited order. We 
some times payd 18|, 16| and 15 pauls per chaise, and in 
proportion for a single horse. It being thought dear 
makes most people go by Voiturino's, but it is a mistake. 
We endeavourd to agree with those people from Venice 
to Trent, but found afterwards their demands was realy 
more then it cost us post : they woud have taken double ' 
time with all the inconveniences of rising, etc., that 
atend traveling that way. 



Verona to Trent 

Posts 
Verona to Volarni . . . . . . • 1| 

A river to pass pay 2 pauls per chaise. 

To Peri ........ 1 

A difficult passage where they take out the horses 
and dragg the chaises up by men about 200 yards. 
We payd for 3 chaises 22 pauls. 
To Kala ........ 1 

To Roveredo . . . . . . . .1 

To Trent 2 

From Verona hither we payd 15 pauls a chaise per post. 
See the church where the Counsell was held in which is a 
very fine organ, hear it play, it is extream curious. See 
St. Peters, where is keept the body of St. Simion, a child 
murderd by the Jews. Lodge at the Golden Rosan. 

Here you must put an avan train to your chaise, for 
which you pay from 22 to 25 florins a pice. You may 
find them ready made, but further on you must wait the 
making ; you cannot travel without these fore carriages, 
they not being used to drive as in Italy. Care must be 
taken to fit the axletrees of your chaise to your anan 
trains that they may both run in the same tract. Have the 
fore wheels higher then they commonly are if you can get 
them. The people there are used to fit them as they 
shoud be. Here the mony changes to Hungars, Florins 
and Karrentari, see page 11. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



401 



Trent to Inspruck 

Trent to St. Michale the first post in the Imperial 
dominions after which no more Italian spock nothing 
but Germans . ...... 1 

To Equa ........ 1 

Those two posts you pay one Florin per horse and 3 
horses to each chaise. 

Posts 

here you pay 45 
Karrentari for 
each 3 quarters 
of a post. 



To Bradnol . . . . . 


5 


To Bolsano . . . . . 


f 


ToTentschen . . . . 


f 


To Colman .... 


3 

4/ 


To Brixen a good place to ly at 
To Mittewald 


1 


To Sterzingen 

To Brenner .... 


4 
1 


To Stainack .... 




To Scamberg 

To Inspruck .... 


3 

4 



45 
Karrentari each. 



At each whole post you pay one Florin per horse and 
put 3 horses to a chaise. At the 3 quarters of a post you 
pay 45 Karrentare, which is three fourth parts of a Florin, 
and at every post you pay 24 Karrentari to the Postillions. 
Lodge at the Golden Rosen, see the Franciscans Church, a 
pent house belonging to the toun house, and the Emper- 
ours Garden. The pent house is coverd with gold plate. 



Inspruck to Munick 

Posts 
Inspruck to Seafield . . . . . .2 

you hier an additional horse at the half way house 
and not at Inspruck which they will endeavour to 
make vou do. 



To Mittewald 

To Waller — see a very odd place 

To St. Bennedict Buren . 

2 C 






402 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



To Wolfertshousen 
To Munick . 



Posts 
. 2 
. 2 



8 

Lodge at the Daler and not at the Soliel d'Or ; it is an 
imposing house. See the Elector of Bavaria's 3 houses, that 
in the toun, Slysham about 4 mills out of toun, and as you 
go on your way to Auxburg see Nymfenberg, it is in the 
post road. The Jesuits Church is fine ; the whol toun very 
pritty. The Elector has many fine houses and all well 
furnished, but without taking up too much time you can 
see no more but these three, they being at a distance from 
the toun. Beware here of any bodys coming to you on 
pretence of showing you the place. We were imposed upon 
by one who pretended to be a gentleman orderd by the 
Elector to atend staingers and was the only bite we met 
with in out whole journey. One cannot be enough upon 
ones guard ; there being folks in all places upon the watch 
for straingers, to pick their pockets in any way they can 
best. Your hierd servant or your Land Lord will inform 
you of every thing to be seen and get a coach for you. 



Munick to Auxburg 



Posts 



U 



Munick to Pruch ...... 

Pruch to digenpank . . . . . • 1| 

To Auxburg . . . . . . . • li 

Lodge at the Raisin d'Or, see the secret gates of the toun 
and toun house. They work plate finely here. It is 
worth going to the great Silver Smiths shope to see it. 



Auxburg to Frankfort 



Posts 



Auxburg to Meeintenham 


. . . H 


To Donnawert .... 


. . . n 


To Winding 


. ii 


ToAding 


. 1 


To Dinkenpil .... 


. . . ii 


To Kreilsheim .... 


. 1 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 403 



To Blauslelden . . . . . . . 1^ 



Posts 

1 

2 

To Mergentheim, this belongs to the Prince of Anspach 

— Lutherans . . . . . . • 1^ 

To Bischofsen, belongs to the Prince of Holsten — 

Catholicks ....... 1 

To Mittenberg, belongs to the Elector of Mayence — 

Catholicks ....... 2 

To Aschafsenberg El. of Mayence . . . .2 

To Dettingen ....... 1 

To Hannaw see the Prince's house here . . .1 

To Frankfort, lodge at the Bone Noir on the Parrade. 

See the Cathedrall and Protestent Churches . 1 

Frankfort to Collogne. See page 44 

We went by water doun the Rhine in two days and a 
half. We hierd two boats, one for ourselves close coverd 
like a Pleasur Barge upon the Tames, in which we lay all 
night upon good straw and Pillows for our heads, and 
never went on shore. An open boat for the servants and 
chaises. We payd 75 Florins for all. Taxes included, of 
which there are many at every toun you pass by. It was 
in the sumer and no danger of catching cold. We 
caryd our provitions, had tea water boyld and every thing 
dresst in the Boat with the servants which was tyd to ours. 
The water men or servants went on shore at any toun we 
came to and got us what ever we wanted. 

At Collogne lodge at the St. Esprit, see the toun and 
chiu'ches here or at Frankfort, get rid of your avan trains, 
which you may now go without, and will be of no use to 
you in Flanders, sell them for what you can get tho less 
then you payd. We left 3 at Spa thinking they offerd us 
too little for them at Frankfort ; they are yet unsold. At 
the entrence into Germany they are wanted and necessary 
for people going in, and by chance you may sell them for 
what you gave, but take any thing reither then leave them 
to be sold at a better price which they will perswade you 
to do and you never hear more of them. 



404 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 






n 



see page 45 
Collogne to Aix la Chappelle 

Posts 
Collogne to Bergen ...... 

To Juliers ........ 

To Aix la Chappelle ...... 

Lodge at Florentins near the Spring, see the Cathedrall 
— Toun house — Baths — Ramparts — where they drink the 
waters, etc. 

Aix la Chappelle to Spa 
There is no post, we hierd 3 horses to each chaise and 
payd 12 Eskillins per horse. The whole toun is lodging 
houses, you pay an Eskillin a night for each room, eat 
at the Ordinary. Mr. Hay a Scotsman is a Banker there, he 
knows us well and will be of service to you, he also lets 
lodgeings. See all the fountains round the toun. The 
Capuchins garden where all the Company walk. 

Spa to Leige 

We hierd 2 horses to each chaise, payd 12 eskillins per 
horse, dyn at Chaude Fontaine half way, see the Baths 
and the mashine for rasing the water which is a little like 
the great one at Marli. 

At Leige lodge au Mouton Blanc, see the great Church. 
The English Jesuits Convent, ask for Father Phillips who 
is a Cannon of Leige, he will be glad to show you sevility, 
you saw him at Oxford. 

From Frankfort to Collogne by land 



Frankfort to Kuningstein 

To Weirgas . 

To Limperg 

To Walmroth 

To Frayling . 

ToGutroth . 

To Weyerbus 

To Warth . 

To Spieg 



Posts 

li 

1| 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1| 
1 

1 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 405 

Posts 
To Collogne ........ 2 

From Collogne to Utrecht if you prefer going by 
Holland to tother road 
Collogne to Nuyse ....... 2 

To Hofstadt bad lodgeing . . . • .2 

To Santen ....••. 2 

To Cleeves ........ 2 

To Nimeguen about 20 mills, lodge at White Swan. 

To Utrecht about 35 mills, lodge au Chateau d'Anvers. 

Frome Venice to Utrecht by this Route is computed 
about 940 Enghsh mills. 

From Leige to Brussells to follow the Route from 
Page 44. 

From Leige to St. Turon 3 horses to each Chaise if two 
persons are in it, at 12 Eskillins for 3 posts which it is 
reckond, it is at the rate of 4 Eskillins per post each horse, 
at each barrier you pay 4 sols per chaise. Postillions at the 
rate of one Eskillin per post. 

Posts 

To Tirelemon 3 Eskillins per post each Chaise . . 2 

To Loven ........ 2 

To Brussells ........ 3 

10 
Lodge at the Emperour. See the Cour — the Arch- 
Dutches' s Palace and the Toun. 

Brussells to Paris 
Brussells to Tubise ...... 2| 

To Brenlecourt . . . . • • 1^ 

To Chateau .....••• Ig 

To Corignion by way of Mons which is half a league 
about . . . • • • • -2 

To Chivrein .....••• 1^ 

Here you are sercht. At 50 yards from Chivrein you 
are sercht again, at entering into France, at entering 
Valencienne again. We had little trouble by imediatly 



406 



THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 



giving a little money, and without hesitation telling them 
at the same time we gave the money that they might 
serch if they pleasd for we had nothing counterband nor 
any Merchandise which is the question they ask. 

From Brussells to Valencienne you pay 3 Eskillins per 
horse each post. If two people are in the Chaise you pay 
for 3 horses tho you get but two and so it is generaly all 
over France. 

Posts 
Chivrien to Valencienne . . . . -21 

Lodge at Grand St. Martin. At every Bureau, which 
is the same as our Custome house officers, they inquire 
if you have old money, which is prohibited. If you have 
any you must take care to hide it well, for some times 
they serch very narowly, and if they find it you loose it, 
but a little money given in time generaly j)revents it. 

Posts 
To Bushein ........ 

To Cambray ........ 

Here they serch slightly. Lodge at the post. See 
the house Lord Marchmont lived in. He is stile rememberd 
in this place with honour and affection, which you will 
find if you go to the English Nunery, and but name him 
and say you are related to him or indeed any where ells 
in the whole toun. 

Posts 
To Metz en Conture . . . . . .2 

To Peronne here you are serched again but no more 

till you get to Paris 
To Marche le pot . 
To Fouches .... 

To Roy .... 

To Couche Le pot . 
ToCuvilly .... 

To Goiirnay a good place to ly at 

To Bois de Lihu 

To Point St. Maixence . 

To Chantilly 






OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 407 

From Pont St. Maixence you go through the Duke of 
Bourbon's fine Park and Gardens. When you come to 
Chantilly lodge at the post house and stay a day to see 
the house and Gardens, the finest thing to be seen in France. 

Chantilh to Lusarche ...•••! 
To Ecouen . . . • • • • • 1'2 

To St. Denis where you see the Treasury of the Kings 

of France who are cround and hurried there . 1 
To Paris post Royal you pay . . • • -2 

Here you get a little printed book of all the posts in 
France which derects you very exactly. 

Paris 
Here we had privet lodgeings at the Hotel d'Ambour, 
Rue de Tour, Fauxbourg St. Germain, payd 300 livers 
a munth for all the first floor, containing 6 handsome well 
furnished rooms, 3 rooms on the floor over it, a Hall for 
servants and other conveniences. 

A Tour we made to see some of the Kings houses 
about Paris, October 1733 
We set out with our own coaches, with only a pair of 
horses. First to La Mutte, a hunting Seat of the Kings, 
the house not fine, the gardens pritty. From that through 
the Bois de Bologne to St. Cloud, a Seat of the Duke of 
Orleans's, the Park and Gardens 6 Leagues round. From 
that about a League to Mudon, a house of the Kings finly 
situated. Thence to Versaills about 4 a clock and saw 
part of the house that evening. Lodged at the Cadran 
Blue. Next morning saw the rest of the house and gardens, 
which woud take up more then a day. Saw the Menagery 
where there is a smal house. Went through the Park 
of Versaillies to Trianon, a very pritty house of the Kings 
built of marble and fine gardens. From that to Marli, 
an exceeding fine place. The house has 4 apartments, no 
body gose there when the King gose but whome he names. 
There is on each side of the house 6 pavillions in the 
garden sourounded by trees, 2 familys can lodge in each. 
Tho this place lys high yet it apears very low, being 



408 THE HOUSEHOLD BOOK 

surounded by high mountains, except towards the garden. 
There is no water but what is supplyd by a vast machine 
half a league below the house, which may be said to throw 
the river Sein up a vast hill, which is there received in 
reservoirs to throw it back again into the Garden, where 
water abounds in all shapes. From Marli see the Machine, 
which is composed of 14 vast wheels. From that to St. 
Germans, a very fine place where King James and his 
Queen died. It is quite ruinous, but capable of being 
made the finest place the King has. The Castle is now 
inhabited by Irish people of fashion adherents to that 
King. The Tarrass is very fine. Here we lay the second 
night at the Prince de Galles, and got to Paris next day by 
diner. 

To be seen more in and about Paris 

Le Cabinet de Monsieur Le Due d' Orleans au Palais 
Royal, where there is the finest colection of picturs in 
France, or almost any where ells. That of the Holy 
Family by Raphael valued at 5000 pound. 

La Gallerie du Luxembourg, where there is fine paintings 
of Rubens. 

Lese Invalides. 

L'Hotel du Mayne, Rue de Bourbon. 

Le Palais de Madame La Duchess de Bourbon, proch 
les Invalides. 

L'Hotel d'Antin, Rue neuve St. Augustin. 

L'Hotel d'Evreux, Fauxbourg St. Honore. 

L'Hotel de Toulouze, proch la Place des Victoir. 

La Bibliothique du Roy — Rue de Richelieu. 

L'Observatoire. 

Seaux. The Duke of Maynes house, 4 leagues from 
Paris. 

Vincennere, 1 league from Paris. 

Bagnolet the Duke of Orleans's, 1 league. 

St. Maur the Duke of Bourbon's, 2 leagues. 

St. Ouen, 1 league. 

Petitbourg, 6 Leagues. 

Fountainebleau, 14 leagues. 



OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



409 



Choisy, 4 leagues. 

Issy, the Princess of Conti's. 

The Tuilleries. 

The Louvre. 

The Gallery of Fortifications. 

Notre Dame. 

The Chappell of Val de Grace. 

The Chartreux Convent, where are paintings esteemd 
good don by Le Sieurs. 

The Chappelle of Carmalet Nuns, where is a pictur by 
Guido for which Lord Burlington offerd 3000 pound, and a 
Magdalen by Le Brune. 

The Sorborne, where is Cardinal Richlieus Monument, 
extream fine. 

The Church of St. Sulpice. 

Place Vandome. 

Place Victoire. 



Paris to Callais 










Posts 


Paris to St. Dennis, post Royall . . . .2 


To Ecouen .... 










To Lasarche .... 








1 1 

^2 


To Chantilly 










To Lingueville 








• 1* 


To Clermont, a good place to ly at 










To St. Just .... 








1 1 


To Wavigny .... 










To Breteul .... 










ToFlors .... 








11 

J-2 


To Habecour 










To Amiens .... 










To Piequigny 








11 
^2 


To Flexcourt 










To Haut Cloches . . 










To Abbeville a good place to ly at 








n 


To Nouvion .... 








n 

^2 


To Bernay ..... 










To Nampon .... 











410 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

Posts 
To Montreal . . . . . . . • ll 

To Frane ........ 1^ 

To Neuchatel ....... 1 

To Boulogne ....... 1| 

A good place to ly at, inquire for Mr. Smith, a wine 
Merchant, a Scots man ; we had wine from him ; he 
is very sivil and servisable to all his country folks. 

From Boulogne to Marquise . . . . • I5 

To Haut Buisson ....... 1 

To Callais ........ 1 



301 



Here if you do not think it worth while to bring your 
Chaises home and they are but unwildy and troublesome 
in our country, sell them for what you can get. Some 
times it happens people just come there wanting to go to 
Paris or Italy will give you there value and be glad to get 
them. If that dos not happen, the people there who 
make it their business to buy chaises to sell again, will 
give you very little for them, but take it reither then leave 
them there to be sold. It will perhaps cost duble there 
price for the hier of there standing and not to be sold at 
last, as we found by two we left there.^ 

From Callais to Dover we hierd a little shipe, on of Mr. 
Minets, 3 guineas is the common hier for the whol shipe, 
if others are going you may get passage cheaper, either 
in those boats or in the Kings packet boats that go con- 
stantly. Ly at Dover at the Shipe. Your trunks and 
baggadge. 



^ ' They ask me here [Calais, 27 July 1739] extravagant prices for chaises, of 
which there are great choice, both French and Italian : I have at last bought 
one for fourteen guineas of a man whom Mr. Hall recommended me.' — Lady 
Mary Worthy Montagu'' s Letters. 



APPENDIX I 

I. — State showing various articles mentioned in the accounts, 
and their prices between the years 1693 and 1718. The 
money, weighs and quantities appearing in the Accounts 
are here reduced to money sterling, weight Avoirdupois 
and quantity Imperial Liquid Measure. 







Scotland. 


Lonci< 


3n. ' 


Present Day. 






£ 


.9. 


d. 


£ 


*. 


d. 


£ 



«. d. 
1 6 


Almonds .... 


p. lb. 








11 -G 








to 



















2 !» 


Almond Biscuits 


do. 





1 


0-4 










. .* 


Aloe Berries . . no p 


rice given 














■ . . 


Anchovies 


do. 
















• . • 


Apples .... 


p. barrel 


1 


10 









1 




• . . 


Apples .... 


per dozen 








S» 








2 






Apples from Bemersideand 




















Bassendean 


per doz. 








8 










• .. 


Apples (French) 


per doz. 





1 







... 






... 


Barley .... 


p. lb. 








1-4 








3 





n 


Barley (pearl) . 


}> 








.3-0 











2" 


Bee skep .... 


, , 





1 















Bees wax. .... 


p. lb. 





1 


1 











1 10 


Blue (washing), dearer after 




[0 



to 


6-.5 











Of 


Union 


p. oz. 


lo 





10-2 


/ 


















27 


1 










Butter (cheaper after Union) 


p. lb. 


lo 


to 



43 


... 







1 4 


Butter from England 


p. barrel 


1 


8 







... 






... 


Camomile .... 


no price 




... 












... 


Candles (rag wick, 6, {{, 12, 
















1 




and 20 totlie lb.) 


p. lb. 








2-9 












Candles (cotton wick, G to 




















the lb.) 


p. lb. 








4-3 




■ . ■ 







4 
to 


Candles (Irish), 


p. lb. 








3-8 




• .. 




\7 


Candles (Mould, and 10 








/ 






to 



G~\ 


) 



ItXJ 

8 


to the lb.) . 


p. lb. 




... 


1 





7j 






Candles (wax for lighting 




















tobacco) 


p. lb. 




... 







2 


G , 







411 



412 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 





Scotland. 


London. 


Present Day. 




£ 


*. 


d. 


£ 


*. 


d. 


£ *. d. 


Capers . . • P- lb. 





1 


1 




• < • 




• > • 


Carmel . . p. lb. 





8 


5-8 








... 


Caraway seeds . . no price given 




• • • 






• • • 




• • • 


Chalk, do. 








2-2 




... 




... 


Cheese (Best) ... p. lb. 





to 



3-6 








3 


10 


„ (coarse) . . p. lb. 








1-6 




... 




• . • 


„ (Cheshire) . . p. lb. 




. . • 










3* 


10 


„ (Tweeddale) uo price given 




. . . 






... 






Cherries to brandy .... 




... 







8 





• . • 


Do. to preserve . p. GOO 





6 


3 




• • • 




> • • 


Chestnuts . . .no price given 


(^ 


2 


2-1 


] 


... 




... 


Chocolate . . p. lb. 


t 


to 

2 


11 


] 


... 




1 10 


Cinnamon ... p. lb. 





9 


8-3 





10 





2 8 


Cinnamon water . . p. pint. 








8-7 


10 

1p- 


4 
bottle 


... 


Citron peel ... p. lb. 





1 


111 





3 





8 


Cloves . . p. lb. 





9 


8-3 





11 





1 10 




1' 

[o 


2 


6-5 


1 

/ 








Coffee Beans (unburned) . p. lb. 


to 




• • ■ 




1 8 




3 


3-2 








Do. (roasted) . p. lb. 




... 







12 





1 10 
14 


Coffee powder ... p. lb. 




... 







G 


0- 


to 
1 10 




(^ 


1 





■ 




( 


1 


Corks . . . • p- gross 




to 




■ 




\ 


to 




10 


1 


4 


. 




( 


3 


Corn flower . . no price given 




< . • 






• . • 




... 


Cucumbers, ... p. pint 





6 







... 




fO o" 3* 


Currants, . p. lb. 








G-5 








5h 


( to 
|0 5 


Figs . . . . p. lb. 





1 


0-7 




• • • 






Fish- 
















Barrel containing 30 salt cods 


1 










. . . 






Herrings p. barrel, exclusive 


1' 


15 
to 

7 













of carriage .... 


ii 


G 




... 






Herrings (Glasgow) . p. barrel 


1 


(5 


8 




... 






„ (Lewis) . . „ 


1 


1 


8 




• • • 




■ . • 


„ (Hempstead) . „ 





10 


8 




■ • • 




• • . 


„ (Dunbar) „ 





17 


H 




... 






„ fresh to salt for 
















„ servants . p. 1000 





G 


8 










Killine (dried) , each 








8 




... 




■ • • 


Ling 





1 











"{ 


4 
p. lb. 



APPENDIX I 



413 







1 Scotland. 


I 


ondon. Present Day. 


Fish — contd. 




£ 


.V. ,1. 


£ 


X. d. 


• • • 


Oysters . 


. p. barrel 





2 




• . . 




• • • 


Oysters (pickled) 


. p. barrel 




• . • 





2 




• •• 


Salmon for a year 


• ■ ■ 


1 


7 




... 




■ ■ • 


Sturjjeon 


p. little barrel 




• • • 





8 




• • • 


Trout . 


price not given 








• • • 




• • • 


Flambeaux 


. each 


r 

lo 


1 2^ 

to 

1 4j 






















Ginger 


p. lb. 





58 




... 





1 4 


Ginger bread 


no price given 








• ■ . 




• ■ • 


Ginger confected 


p. pot 





1 10 




■ . • 





2 


Gooseberries to bottle 


p. pint 




... 





1 




... 


Hartshorn jelly 







1 G 










Honey 


. p. quart 





8 




... 




... 


Indigo 


p. oz. 





8-7 








... 






{^ 


2*1 
to \ 
7 J 




( 





1 


Lemons 


each 


] 




... \ 




to 






lo 




1 





1§ 


Lemons, syrup of 


no price given 


f^ 


7 1 
to ' 
8 j 










Loaves 


each 











5 






lo 

















1 2 1 










Mace 


p. oz. 


.0 


to [ 
1 4 J 




... 





3 9 


Milk Ewe. 


p. pint 





0-2 








• . . 


Mugwort water . 


. 





5 










Mustard . 


p. lb. 





5-8 




• . • 





1 <5 


Myrrh 


• • ■ 



JO 


4 
4-4) 




... 




... 


Nutmeg . 


p. oz. 


|o 


to } 
7-2) 





8^ 





2 


Nuts Pistachio . 


p. lb. 




• > • 





2 





3 (J 


„ Spanish 


p. pint 






2-7 

1 4^ 
to \ 
1 8 J 








• • • 


Oil salad . 


p. pint 


■ 









1 2 






.0 










Olives 


. 





(5 4 




... 




• . • 






f^ 


0|^ 
to \ 
4 J 




i 





Oh 


Oranges . 


each 








to 






lo 







2 


Orange peel 


p. lb. 





1 11-2 
1 4-3 




\ 


3 





6 


Pepper 


p. lb. 


to 


to 

1 8-3 


} 


... 





1 



414 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Pickles 

Pipes, tobacco 

Plumbs, musk 
Potash 
Prunes 
Pruuelles, box of 

Quicknin 

Raisins 
Ratafia 
Rhubarb 

Rice 

Rolls . 

Saffron 
Safjo . . 
Salt . 
Saltpetre 
Seed for birds 
Shortbread . 
Snuff . 
Snuff tobacco 

Soap (Newcastle) . 

Soap 

Spermaceti . 
Spice . 

Spirits of Wine . 

Starch . 

Sugar, candibord . 

„ coarse 

„ kitchen . 



no 


price given 




p. doz. 


no 


price giveu 
p. lb. 
p. lb. 
li lb. 




D. lb. 



no price given 
p. oz. 

p. lb. 
p. doz. 



p. lb. 

p. peck 

price given 

p. lb. 
price given 

p. lb. 

p. lb. 



no 
no 



no 



p. firkin 



do. 

price given 
p. lb. 

p. pint 



p. stone 
p. lb. 



Scotland. 

£ s. d. 

* 2i 

to 
.3 

4-5 
4-3 



1 



'0 3-8) 

to 
.0 5-8j 



2 21 

ro 2 2 1 

lo 4 4 J 

4i 



4 4 
2-9 



7-2 

(0 18 5 \ 

(l 2 J 

ro 12 ) 

lo IG 6 J 

i 1 

fO 8 1 

(o 11 J 

ro 2 Qh \ 

lo 3 4i J 

fO 9-4) 

to 

U 1 1 J 

ro 3G1 

to \ 

lo 8 J 

6* 



London. 

£ *'. d. 



2 



4 



.0 3 10 








4 
3 



2' 




4 



12 9 



1 U 

8 

4 



Present Day. 

£ *. d. 



Oi 
7' 



4 



'0 2 

to 

.0 4i 

6" 



2| 

0* 2i 

5 6 

12 6 



14 
4 



4 



If 



J 



APPENDIX I 



415 







Scotland. 


London. { 


Present Day. 






£ *. d. 


£ *. 


d. 


£ 


s. d. 


Sugar, powdered . 


• • • 


4-3 





(! 





3 


Syrup, balsamic . 


. 


... 


12 







... 


Tartar, red . 


p. lb. 


7-2 














fO 16 1 

to 
U 9 1 J 


ro 16 


«1 

oj 


» 




Tea, Bohea . 


p. lb. 


] to 










ll 1 





1 6 


,, Green . 


p. lb. 


14 7 


• • • 




f 


to 


„ Hyson . 


p. lb. 


• • • 


1 12 








3 


,, Pekoe . 


p. lb. 


• • * 


1 4 









Chocolate . 


p. lb. 


7 4-8 


• • • 




J 




Tobacco 


p. lb. 


1 5-4 


2 








9 4 


AV'afers 


. 


1 


... 






• • • 


Varnish 


no price given 


... 


... 






... 


Vinegar 


p. pint 


4 


... 







6 3 



II. — List of Wikes, Ales and Si'irits, and their prices, 
between 1693 and 1718. 



Ale, English 
Ale from H.Y.i 
Aquavitae .... 
Arrac .... 

Beer — 
Small beer from Abbey Hill * 

Brandy .... 
Burgundy .... 

Canary .... 

Champagne 

Claret .... 



p. pint 
p. pint 
p. pint 
p. doz. 



p. pint 
p. pint 

p. flask 

p. gal. 

p. bottle 
p. doz. 



Scotland. 

£ *. d. 

1 

O5 

63 

5 4 



OJ 

8] 

to 

1 8 J 



7 6 



r 6 
\ to 
I 7 



f 4 1 

I 7 J 

1 13 2 

r 5 W27 ] 

p. hogshead \ to \,\ to ,- 

I2.5 J 147 J 



13 .5 



London. 

Z s. c 



2 2 



I P- 



4 
to 

4 () 
bottle 



^ Perhaps Harry Younger's Abbey Hill Brewery. Beer is also got from 
Dunfermline, Dundee, and Leith. 



416 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Emetic wine 




Scotland. 

£ *. d. 
7 




London. 

£ *. d. 


Florence wine . 

French wine 

Fruntimack, Frontignan . 


p. doz. 

p. hogshead 

p. pint 






15 



to 

5 

1 




:} 

9 






■ • • 




Gineva, bought in England 

rhubard 
Green wine 


along with 
p. gal. 





"7 


1 






• • • 




Hermitage 


. p. bottle 








1 






4 
to 
6 


"1 

. 


Madeira . .no price given 

Malaga p. doz. 

Mum p. pint 


1 




1 



1 

6| 






... 




Pontack from Bordeaux 
Port 


p. hhs. 
p. doz. 




• • • 






34 



16 
18 


7 



Sack 

Sherry .... 
Sherry sack . . . 


p. gal. 
p. pint 
p. hhs. 


6 



16 13 


1 

11 

4 






... 




White wine for physic 


p. pint 





1 


4 






• • ■ 





III. — Pricks of Cattle, Sheep, Poultuy, etc., 
between 1693 and 1718. 



Cattle. Milk cows 

Holland cow . 
Cows for killing 
Calfs 



£3 2 6 

18 4 

1 12 to £2 7 

3 6 to 10 

6 8 



Skin and tallow of a cow, worth . _ _ _ 

Beef, back, say, and rump, 5s. ; h leg of beef, 7s. ; in England, 

3d. p. lb.; Veal, leg of, 2s. Id.; leg of veal from Berwick, 

5s. 

Sheep. Rams, 15s. 6d.; Ewes, 5s. to 10s. each; Sheep for servants, 
about 5s. each ; Lambs, Is. 8d. to 4s. each ; skin of a 
sheep, wortli about Is. 4d.; killing sheep, 6d.; Mutton,, 
leg of, 5s.; in England, 3|d. p. lb. 

Pigs. Pigs, £1 to £1, 5s. each ; hams in Scotland, 7s. each ; in 

England, hams (Westphalian), Gd. to lid. p. lb.; other 
hams. Is. 2d. p. lb. 

Birds. Hens, 5d., capons, 8d. each; chickens, 2f each; turkeys. 
Is. 4d. to 3s. Id. each ; geese, lOd. each ; goslings, 6d. 
each ; carrying same from Border, Id. each ; grey plovers, 
6d. p. pair; green plovers, 5d. p. pair; wild ducks, 4d. 
to 6d. each ; small teal, 4d, each. 



APPENDIX I 



417 



IV.— Prices of Fuel between 1693 and 1718. 







Scotland. 


London 


Coal— 




£ 


A'. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


Carberry 


p. cart 





4 


8 




... 




Carlops ..... 


p. load 





1 











Woolmit 


p. dale 





9 







... 




Clackmannan, put down in the close 


p. dale 





9 


6 




... 




Alloa 


p. ton 





6 


8 








Carting same from Leith 


p. ton 





9 

*4 


2 




• • • 




Etal (Northumberland) — 
















Small coal .... 


p. load 








3 




... 




Great coal .... 


p. load 








G 




... 




Cost of carrying same . 


p. load 








9 


fl 


14 





Scots coal 


p. ton 








- 

u 

n 


to 

16 

8 







Coal 


p. ton 




... 




V. 


to 






Peat . . 


p. stack 





3 


4 




... 




Charcoal p 


. bushel 











4 


6 


Billets of wood 


p. 100 




... 







1 


4 


Roots and brushwood used in England 


. 




... 






• >• 





Note. — There is nothing in the accounts to show what weight is repre- 
sented by the words 'dale,' 'cart,' and 'load.' A dale, how- 
ever, seems to be used as synonymous with a ton, and as we see 
from the Accounts (1703) that it took two carts to carry a dale, 
a cart probably represents a h ton. A load nowadays means 
8 cwt., and it probably meant the same then. 

In Loudon the Accounts show that a cart carried nearly a 
ton (I). 



\ 



2n 






418 . HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



APPENDIX II 

Statemknt showing money wages per annum of servants, etc. 





Scotland 




London 


Continent. 




Prior to 1714. 


In 


1740. 


I7I8. 


1732- 




£ .V. d. 


£ 


s. d. 


£ s.d. 


£ *. d. 


Master Household . 


5 




• ■ ■ 


• . . 


• .. ••■ 


Butler . 


3 
r 1 13 4 ) 


14 





I'4'o Oj 
le oj 


... 


Footman 


to \ 


5 





• ■ • ... 




I 2 10 j 








Coachman 


\ to "- 
I 4 j 


8 





13 




i 










1 


f 1 10 1 
{ to [ 
1. 2 J 










Groom . 


2 


10 




... 


1 










Postillion 




2 





• •• 


... 


Carter 


... 


4 







... ... 


Valet . . . 1 


3 




. . • 


5 


... ... 


Barnman 


2 3 4 
■ 4 1 




... 


... 


... 


Gardener 


with house 

5 

without 

{ A Q \ 


14 





... 


... 


Housekeeper . 


to 
Is J 


5 





... 


• • • • • • 


Ladysmaid 


3 fi 8 


5 





5 


... 




( 1 13 4 ^ 

\ to 

I 3 J 






(G 0) 
18 Oj 


10 10 Spa 


Cook 


8 













16 16 Naples 




f 1 12 ' 

] to 

I 2 J 










Under Cook . 


3 





• • ■ 


3 12 Naples 














f 1 3 4 ) 

to \ 

I 2 10 J 










Kitchen Maid . 


2 





■ • • 


* • • • •• 














f 1 13 4 ) 
■' to 

I 2 10 . 






(4 0| 




Chambermaid . 


2 





(5 0) 


3 12 Naples 











1 This was the Baillies' Scots coachman, so £t, cannot be fairly regarded as 
the English wage. 



APPENDIX II 



419 





Scotland 




London 


Continent. 




Prior to 1714. 


In 


1740. 


1718. 


1732. 




£ A-. d. 


£ 


s. d. 


£ .V. d. 


£ *. d. 




f 1 14 1 










Laundry maid . 


to 


2 





• • ■ 


... ... 




I 1 17 4 J 










Frencli Maid . 


• . * 




. . . 


3 




Nurse 


3 () 8 




. . . 


. .. 




M'oman to wait on 












Children 


5 










Dairy Maid 




2 









Fowl and swine girl 


1 "4 




. . . 






A\'^oman to wash and 












spin 


1 14 




... 






Woman haymaking-, 












without food 


3| 
p. day 










P'ield labourer. Do. 


5 
p. day 




... 


... 




Thresher, Do. 


11| 
p. day 




... 


... 




Herd, without meat 


... 


5 





... 




Officer, Do. 


... 


7 


5 


... 





Tradesmen in Scotland prior to 1714 : Tailor, 4d. p. day and food ; 
mason. Is. p. day ; wright, lOd. p. day ; thatcher, Is. p. day. Drystone 
dykes cost Is. p. rood, and turf dykes 8d. p. rood.^ 



^ See note, p. Ixiii. 



420 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



APPENDIX III 



Note of Fees paid in connection with Education in Edinburgh 
except where otherwise marked. 









Stg. 










£ s. 


d. 


Miss May Menzies Governess . 


, 


p. annum 


8 6 


8 


Arithmetic .... 


, 


a quarter 


1 





Boolv-keeping .... 


, , 


a course 


3 2 





Cooking- lessons 


• 


a course 


1 6 





Dancing — 










A course to perfect Lady Grisell 


(Edinburgh) . j 


8 









1 


(1 3 


^1 


Children .... 


• 


p. month \ 


\ to 
U 9 


4 


In London .... 


, 


p. month 


3 4 


6 


Fiddler for same . 


• 


p. mouth 


10 

1 10 


9 
^1 


Flute' lessons .... 


• • 


p. quarter 


to 
U 1 


ol 


French (London). To tlie French Mistress 


p. month 


10 





French (London). To the French Master 


p. month 


1 1 


fi 


Geography .... 


, , 


p. quarter 


1 1 


6 


Harp lessons (London) 


, , 


the first month 


3 3 





Italian Lessons (Naples) 


, , 


p. month 


18 


7 


Painting lessons 


• 


p. month 


1 
(1 9 



7) 


Playing (spinet and virginel) 


• 


p. (juarter 


to 
U 12 


a! 


Tuning do. 


. 


p. (juarter 


4 


10 


Playing lessons, spinet (Naples) 


. 


p. month 


18 





Reading ..... 


. 


p. quarter 


4 


10 


To perfecting reading 


• 


• • • 


1 10 
(0 2 




5) 


Reading School . 


• 


p. quarter 


to 
(O 5 

ro 12 


4 


Singing ..... 


• 


p. month 


] to 
U 





Singing (Naples) 


, 


p. month 


18 





Theory of Music. Thorough Bass 


. 


p. (|uarter 


2 2 





Viol lessons .... 


, 


p. month 


1 





^V^iting Lessons 


• 


p. month 


4 


10 



1 Two flutes are bought, one for los. stg. 
Prices of spinets and virginels are not given. 



and the other for £i, 5s. stg. 



I 



APPENDIX IV 



421 



APPENDIX IV 

TABLES OF SCOTS AND ENGLISH MONEY 
AND MEASURES! 



I. — Money 

12 Scots pennies =1 Scots shilliiifj^ = l penny stg. 

20 Scots shillings = 1 Scots pound =ls. 8d. stg. 

A guinea = between £1, Is. and £l, 3s. 6d. 

A jacobus = about £] , Hs. 

A mark =l;>s. 4d. Scots =ls, 

A rex dollar =7s. 3d. 

A dollar =4s. 2id. 



IJd. 



stg. 



II. — Measures of Extension 



Scots Lineal Measure. 



1 Scots inch 


= 1 


l-OOKUG 


imp. inches 


8-88 Scots 


inches = 1 link 


8-89435 


^? 53 


1-35 Scots link 


s =1 Scots foot = 12-0194 


y y >y 


3,V Scots feet 


= 1 ell 


37-0598 


)} }> 


6 e'lls 




= 1 fall 


= 222-3.588 


?y a 


4 falls 




= 1 chain 


= 889-4352 


}> >} 


10 chains 




= 1 furlong 


= 8894-352 


yy yi 


8 furlongs 




= 1 mile 


= 71154-816 
or 1970-522 


imp. yds. 


Imperial Li 12 


'^al Measure. 






7-92 


imp. 


inches = 1 


imp. link. 




1-615 


}} 


links =1 


„ foot. 




3 


}> 


feet = 1 


,, yard. 




5^ 


>> 


yards = 1 


„ pole. 




4 


)> 


poles = 1 


„ chain. 




10 


7y 


chains = 1 


„ furlong. 




8 


>) 


furlongs =1 


,, mile, or 1700 


yards. 



III. — Measures of AVeight 

(1) Scots Troyes or Dutch Weight raised from the Standard Lamirk Stone. 
16 drops =1 ounce = 475-56 imp. troy grains. 

16 ounces =1 lb. = 7608-95 

16 lbs. =1 Lanark stone =121743195 









^ The following measures are. taken from the tables, etc. published in 1827 
by the authority of the Magistrates and Justices of the City and County of 
Edinburgh. 



422 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



(2) Imperial Troy Weight. 

24 grains = 1 pennyweight — 24 imp. Troy grains. 

20 pennyweights = 1 ounce = 480 

12 ounces =1 lb. =5760 






33 
33 



(3) Scots Tron Weight raised from the Edinburgh Tron Pound. 

16 drops =1 ounce = 601 '417 imp. Troy grains. 
16 ounces =1 lb. = 9622-67 „ 

16 lbs. =1 stone =15:3962 -72 



33 
33 



33 



33 
33 



(4) Imperial Avoirdupois Weight. 

16 drams =1 ounce = 437'5 imp. Troy grains. 
16 ounces = 1 lb. = 7000 
14 lbs. =1 stone =98000 
1 dale =1 ton. 

1 Scots Troy pound =1 lb. 1 oz. 6'3 dr. imperial avoirdupois. 

1 Edinburgh Tron pound = 1 lb. 6 oz. ,, ,, 

Assuming that Lady Grisell in her Accounts used the Edinburgh Tron 
Weight, it is necessary in order to compare the prices then and now to 
multiply the quantity or divide the price by j^ = -iJ-. 



IV. — Measures of Capacity 



26'0.508 imp. cubic inches. 
52-1017 



(1) Scots Liquid Measure. 

4 gills =1 mutchkin = 

2 mutchkins = 1 chopin = 

2 chopins = 1 pint = 1042034 

8 pints = 1 gallon = 833-6272 

(2) Scots Dry Measure for Barley and Oats. 

4 lippies = 1 peck = 807*576 imp. 

4 pecks = 1 firlot = 3230-305 

4firlots =lboll = 12921-222 

16 bolls =lchalder =206739-546 

A forpet, forper, or fourtpert = according to Jameson |^ of a peck, 
or jijj^ of a firlot ; according to Lady Grisell it equalled ("jj of a firlot. 

(') firlots =A Lothian boll. 

1 boll oats = 10 stones weight. 

2 bolls oats = 1 load =20 stone = 2| cwt. 
A chalder =1 ton =160 stones. 

1 cwt. = 8 stones. 



3> 


}> 


}} 


33 


)} 


)> 


cubic 


inches 


33 


33 


33 


33 


33 


3) 



(3) Imperial Liquid or Dry Measure. 



4 gill 
2 pints 
4 quarts 
2 gallons 
4 pecks 
8 bushels 



= lpiiit = 34-6.59 

= 1 quart = 69-318 

= 1 gallon = 277-274 

= 1 peck = 554-548 

= 1 bushel = 2218-191 

= 1 quarter = 17745-526 

1 Scots pint =3 imperial pints. 
1 Scots peck = 1§ imperial pecks 



imp. cubic inches. 



APPENDIX IV 423 



TABLES OF FOREIGN MONEY 

Rotterdam, Leyden, Utrecht, GxldeRxMause (?), Buss(?), and Iampt 

8 doits or duyten = 1 stur (stu vver ?). 1 doit or duyt = Ud. st^. 

20stur =1 guilder. 1 stur =^",-j*^- 

1 guilder =ls. lOd. stg. 



j! Maastbicfit 

G doits or duyten = 1 mark. 1 doit or duyt = -lid. stg. 

10 marks = 1 skillin or schelling. 1 mark "^ o!^" " 

37skillins =a guinea. 1 skillmg or schelling = 0-»cl. „ 



Aix LA Chapki.lk 

6 doits =lmark. 1 doit -'l 2d. stg. 

9 marks = 1 skilling. 1 mark = •74d. „ 

8 skillings = l crown. 1 skillnig = n-<od. ,, 

1 crown =4s. 6d. „ 



Spa 

4liers = lsou. 1 lier = "ITd. stg. 

10 sous = 1 skilling. 1 sou = '(ud. ,, 

1 skilling = "Tod. ,, 



'r^ 



French Money 

20 sous =1 livre. 1 sou = -Cud. stg. to '"d. stg 

3 livres = l ecu blanc. 1 livre = from Is. l^d. to Is. :id. 

6 livres = l ecu grand. 

24 livres = 1 louis. 



Lorraine 
20 sous =1 livre. 1 sou =;3nd. stg. 

32 livres = 1 louisdor = a guinea. 1 livre- / "Sd. ,, 



Burgundy and I'auis 

20 sous =1 livre. J fou =-52d 

24 livres = 1 louisdor = 1 guinea. 1 livre = lO^d. stg. 



424 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Turin 



20 sous = 1 livre. 

9h livres =1 sequin = 26 carlins. 

10 carlins = 1 ducat. 



1 sou = "GSd . stg. 
1 livre =ls. l"ld. stg. 
1 carlin =4"8d. 
1 ducat = nearly 4s. 
1 sequin = ,, 10s. 5d. 



20 sous = 1 livre. 
14 livres = 1 sequin. 



MiLLAN 



1 sous = •4-5d. stg. 
] livre =!)d. stg. 
1 sequin = 10s. 5d. 



Plasentia, Parma, Reggio, Modena, Loreto, Rome 

10biocks(baiocchi) = l Julio or paul(paolo). 1 biock = •62d.stg. 

10iuliosorpauls = ] Roman crown or scudo. 1 Julio or paul = 6|d. ,, 

20Julios or pauls = 2 crowns = 1 sequin. 1 Roman crown = 5s.2|d. ,, 

3juliosor pauls = l testoon. 1 sequin =10s.6d. ,, 



Bologna 
12 demis = 1 biock. 
20 biocks = l livre = 2Julios or pauls. 
10^ livres = 1 sequin. 



1 demi = •0.5d. 
1 biock = '(yd. 
1 livre =ls. 



10 grains = 1 carlin. 

2 carlins = 1 terri. 
10 carlins = 1 ducat. 



Naples 



1 grain = ■48d. stg. 
1 carlin = 4 "Sd. ,, 

1 ducat = nearly 4s. ,, 



Venice 



20 soldi = 1 lira. 

21 liras =1 Florentine sequin. 

22 liras =1 Venetian sequin. 



1 soldo = 'Sd. stg. 

1 lira = nearly 6d. ,, 
1 sequin = 10s. 5d. ,, 



Frankfort 

60 karrentari =1 florin. 

4 florins 15 karrentari = 1 hungar. 
7^ florins = 1 Spanish pistole. 



] karrentari = •47d. stg. 

1 florin =2s. 4d. "2 ,, 

1 liungar =10s. ,, 



1 Spanish pistole = l7s. 7 "5 



From LiioK to Calais 
20 ous = 1 livre. 



1 sous = *55d. stg. 
1 livre = lid. ,, 



APPENDIX IV 



425 



NoTKs as to SalakiivS and Wac.es in 1707 and now 





1707. 


Present 


Time. 


Increase. 




£ s. d. 


£ 


S. 


d. 




Judges ...... 


500 


3,600 








7-2 


Church^ (1) Best Charges 


138 17 9f 


1,000 








7-2 


(2) Average Stipend 


50 


300 








6 


Educatwn.- 










Ediiiburgh University. 












Paid by 
City. 


Queen 
Anne's 
Crant. 


Class 
Fees. 


1 










£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 










Principal . . 


Ill 2 2 






111 2 2 


1,600 








... 


Divinity . . 


88 17 9 




30 


110 17 9 


570 










Hebrew . . . 


50 


35 14 3 


no fees. 


85 14 3 


800 










Church History 


100 




30 


130 


440 








... 


Public Law 


150 






150 


600 








... 


Mathematics . 


50 


35 14 3 


30 b 


115 14 3 


1,100 










Greek . . . 


22 4 5 


35 14 3 


50 


107 18 8 


1,100 








... 


Logic and Meta- 


















physics . . 


22 4 5 


35 14 3 


50 


107 18 8 


900 








... 


Natural Philo- 


















sophy . . . 


22 4 5 


35 14 3 


50 


107 18 8 


1,100 










Moral Philo- 


















sophy . . . 


22 4 5 


35 14 3 


50 


107 18 8 


900 










Humauit}- . . 


24 9 5 


35 14 3 


50 


110 3 8 


1,100 










Librarian . . 


36 13 4 




20 


56 13 4 


400 












i 


1302 1 


10,610 








8-1 


Tradesmen,'^ etc. 












Masons . . . . .p. day 


10 





7 


1 


7 


Joiners . . . . .p. da3' 


10 





7 


6 


9 


Tailors . . . . .p. daj' 


8 





6 





9 


Dykers . . \). rood of (i yds. G inch. 


10 





6 





6 


Field labourer 




. 


. p. day 


5 





4 


2, 


10 



1. The Church. — The stipends of tlie niinister.s of the Ediiiburjjh 
churches were raised in 1094 to 2500 merks Scots, or £1J38, 17s. 9k^d. 
stg. They were reduced in 1708 to 2000 merks, but were raised again 
to the old figure in 1712 for three of their uumhev {Citf/ 0/ Fdinhnrgh 
Ih-cnrd.s). As to the average stipend of the Ministers, IVIr. Steel, the 
minister of Sorn in Ayrshire, speaking in 1749, stated that at that time 
it did not exceed £52. This figure was apparently an underestimate, 
for it appears from the statistics collected by the Committee, who 
reported upon the stipends to the General Assembly in the following 
year, that the average stijjend at that time must have been nearer £05. 
As there must have been some increa.^e during the forty years that had 
elapsed since the Union, it cannot be far wrong to take £50 as the 
averHge stipend in 1707. In regard to the average stipend of to-day, 
.Mr. Simpson, minister of Bonhill, estimates it for landward parishes 
at about £260. Mr. P. ('. Robertson, however, the Interim Auditor of 
the Church of Scotland, considers th;it if the city churches, with their 
largely augmented stipends, be included, the average is nearer £300. 



426 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 

2. Education. — The figures entered as paid by the city are taken 
from the City Accounts ; the figures entered as paid from Queen Anne's 
grant are taken from Sir Alexander Grant's History of the University ; 
the figures entered as derived from fees in the classes of Greek^ Logic 
and Metaphysics, Natural Philosophy, Moral Philosophy and Humanity, 
are based on the fact that when the Professor of Moral Philosophy 
in 1708 was forbidden to charge class fees, he received an additional 
salary of £'oO in lieu thereof. It is therefore probable that £50 also 
represents the value of the fees in these other classes which formed part 
of the same course of study. The sums entered as class fees for Divinity, 
Church History, and Mathematics are merely estimates. The fees 
drawn by the Librarian were for issuing diplomas, and the figure entered 
is an estimate founded on the number of graduates, and the fees he was 
allowed to charge. In judging of the salaries of the Principal and of 
the Professor of Divinity, it has to be remembered that these gentlemen 
also held as ministers city charges, which brought each of them in an 
additional sum of £122, 4s. .5d. Graham in his Social Life of Scot/and 
states that the salaries of Professors in Scotland during the first quarter 
of the eighteenth century averaged from £25 to £30, exclusive of class 
fees. As will be seen from the above state, the salaries of the regular 
professors in Edinburgh averaged considerably more. 

It is more difficult to ascertain what rise has taken place in the 
remuneration of the parish 'Dominie.' According to statute he was 
entitled in 1707 to a salary from the heritors of not less than £5, 18s. 3d., 
and not more than £11, 2s. (?d. In a Memorial drawn up in 1782 for 
the Pai'ochial School Masters in Scotland, it is stated that this remunera- 
tion, 'though not great, was yet well suited to the times, the funds, 
and distinction of rank at the period. The emoluments of their office 
placed them above day labourers, and the poorer class of mechanics and 
farmers ; nay, raised them to an equality with the more opulent farmers, 
respectable tradesmen and citizens ; among vvliom their employment, 
their manners, and prospects in life procured them a degree of respect 
very advantageous to their profession.' Still in spite of this opinion, 
and of our knowledge that they enjoyed in addition certain perquisites, 
their pay seems to have been relatively j)oor. On the other hand an 
examination of the fees paid by Lady Grisell for the education of her 
daughters as shown in Appendix iii., would indicate that private tuition 
was relatively well paid, and taken all over, it may be assumed that the 
increase in their professional incomes lies between six and ten. 

3. Tradesmen, etc. — In comparing the wages paid to tradesmen then 
and now, it is necessary to bear in mind that whereas they worked at 
least 10 hours a day in 1707, they only work at most 9 hours nowadays. 
This has been taken into account in the foregoing state. The amounts 
entered as presently paid are based on the wage per hour paid to the 
tradesman, not the sum per hour charged by his master against the 
customer. 

It will be observed that in the foregoing state no notice has been 
taken of the earnings of Solicitors, Doctors, and Surgeons, nor of the 
pay of the Army. In regard to the first three of these, it has been 
found impossible to arrive at any true method of comparison, the work 
performed by them then and now being so different. The few items 
capable of comparison, such as drawing bonds for money, bleeding, 
syringing the ears, etc., indicate that a man in the position of George 
Baillie would have had to pay eight times more now than he did then. 



APPENDIX IV 



427 



(Syringing the ears, 5s. then, £2, 2s. now ; bleeding, 9s. 8d. then, 
£4, 4s. now.) 

As to the pay of tlie army, it was relatively so high that it stands 
alone, and must he judged by itself. The generous treatment meted 
out to soldiers does not appear to have arisen from any attempt to place 
the Scottish army on the same footing as the English army, alongside of 
which it was called upon to fight, for we find the same high rate of pay 
ruling in Scotland during the reigns of Charles ii. and James vii. before 
the beginning of the great Continental war. It arose more probably 
from the desire to ensure the loyalty of the army, and it no doubt 
accounts for the fact that so many gentlemen were to be found serving 
as non-commissioued officers and privates, and that desertion was at that 
time practically unknown. The following state, for which the editor 
is indebted to Mr. Andrew Ross, Ross Herald, shows how small has been 
the increase in the pay of the army during the last two hundred years, 
and indicates that in spite of its pay being occasionally a year or two in 
arrears, the army was either largely overpaid then, or miserably under- 
paid now. In looking at the figures it must be borne in mind that 
colonels, lieutenant-colonels, and majors had companies, and drew 
captain's pay in addition to their pay as field officers. 



Colonel. 


Lt. -Colonel. 


Major. 


c 
"3 

■ o. 

6 


Lieutenant. 


Ensign. 


Sergeant. 


Corporal. 


Drummer. 



1. 1677 

2. 1702 

3. 1707 (England) ' 20 

4. 1911 







Foot Guards. 


Per dietii 








J. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


12 


7 


5 


8 


4 


3016 


I 


I 


12 


7 


5 


8 


4 


3016 


I 


I 


20 


12 


8 


14 


7 


5016 


I 


I 


18 


18 


(13 7| 
\ to \ 


II 7 


(6 6| 


5326 


I 9 


I 2 






(16 oj 











Marching Regiments. Per diem. 



1. 1685 

2. 1702 

3. i707(EngIand)| 12 o 

4. 1911 . . 18 o 



s. 
7 
7 
7 

18 



d. 
o 



d. 



f'3 
1 16 



'■\ 



s. 
4 
4 
4 



d. 
o 
o 
o 

6) 



to , 
7 6 ) 



d. 


.c. d. 


s. d. 


6 


I 


I 


6 


I 


I 


6 


1 


I 


4 


I 8 


I I 1 
1 



J. d. 

o 6 
° 7 

O ID 



XoTK.— There was no line regiment on the 1677 Establishment, and the pay of the Foot 
Guards was the same in 1685 as in 1677. 



428 



HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



APPEJ 





I. 


II. 


III. 




IV. 




V. 




VI. 


VII. 




Mil. 




House- 


























keeping 


























Accounts 


Sundry 
Disburse- 
ments, 
including 
taxes, feu- 
duties, etc. 






















Ykar. 


(Food, 

drink, 

firing, light- 


Servants' 


Servants' 


Clothes 


for 


Furniture 
and 


Expenses of 

Horses, 

etc. 


Doctor.' 

and 
Surgeon 

'9 '1 




ing, wash- 
ing, and all 


Wages. 


Clothes. 


Familj 




Furnish- 
ings. 




expenses in 


























connection 






















«l 




therewith.) 






















fl 




£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


£ -V. 


d. 


^ 


1693, 1694, \ 
























^M 


and 169s ( 


175 


257 9 4 


"29 17 


2 






Sg IS 





log 4 6 


62 





52 H 


Average for \ 
these years / 


58 6 S 


85 i6 5 


9 19 


I 






29 18 


4 


36 8 2 


20 13 


4 


"1 


1696 


79 15 


46 5 


16 









5° 13 


2 


50 I 4 


8 15 


8 


i6 ^^ 


I1697 


149 3 


70 9 8 


14 9 


4 


31 " 


8 


48 15 


10 


31 9 6 






. • 


1698 


78 I 8 


8 19 4 


4 ID 









27 15 


6 


I 15 3 








21699 


165 8 2 


246 IS 8 


29 2 













29 18 2 


19 17 


9 


7 3 1: 

!^ iS f 


1700 


242 10 4 


3234 15 6 


21 18 





9 









14 12 2 


10 I 


8 


1 701 


250 13 7 


82 17 10 


19 II 


2 


13 5 


S 


44 9 


3 


42 4 9 


41 2 


I 


7 6 c 


1702 


23s 5 5 


59 3 8 


18 


4 


16 8 


10 


60 15 


2 


66 14 8 


30 19 





.s 6 4 


1703 


237 14 3 


104 I 7 


19 3 


6 


10 5 


■3 


65 I 


8 


67 5 


27 16 





21 12 5 


1704 


2T2 7 6 


103 4 2 


15 8 


7 


5 8 


6 


49 7 


2 


90 14 10 


42 





2 9 9 


170S 


214 4 


no 4 9 


29 8 





TI 14 


I 


53 15 


S 


71 7 3 


50 3 


9 


340 


1706 


213 10 4 


81 9 6 


24 8 


3 


8 10 





86 5 


5 


68 II 8 


45 7 


9 


6 7 a 


1707 


197 10 


lOI I I 


45 5 


6 


4 3 


7 


97 12 


5 


57 18 I 


33 7 


6 


52 s 


81708 


78 5 10 


164 2 3 


,n^9 3 


6 


17 3 


10 


37 18 


3 


18 10 I 


37 13 





1 3 II 


1709 


178 13 6 


123 6 5 


10 58 6 





6 8 


10 


20 18 


7 


63 3 II 


45 17 


2 


17 19 9 


1710 


318 3 I 


196 9 2 


54 4 


7 


16 I 


I 


315 I 


9 


IS 


SI 10 


4 


II 16 9 


1711 


231 9 


248 11 II 


41 6 


7 


6 2 


7 


63 




35 3 


73 10 


II 


I 16 


1712 


2o6 9 9 


17c! 16 7 


51 4 


6 


13 ° 





74 13 


8 


36 4 


34 4 


4 


490 


,,/7i3 


133 10 2 


144 18 9 


23 16 


10 


I II 


7 


57 15 


3 


30 2 3 


61 15 


6 


3 14 6 


1^1714 


256 13 7 


184 10 8 


43 13 


7 


I 19 





40 17 


5 


66 8 7 


. 54 8 


4 


7 10 7 


1715 


44T 4 10 


183 10 6 


48 16 


2 


28 16 


2 


346 15 


4 


559 4 


14 129 9 


2 


2 14 


1716 


S05 3 8 


189 5 II 


40 12 


8 


8 15 


4 


351 IS 


8 


10 15 II 


82 5 


6 


15 17 6 


1717 


S39 8 3 


15 706 7 7 


96 6 


7 


23 9 


11 


702 15 


10 


20 18 


77 15 





7 19 9 


1718 
Average for" 


618 19 


237 '4 8 


18 18 


2 


34 8 


7 


"513 9 


8 


62 5 7 


83 4 





17 13 






years 1693 


























to 1714 in- 


























elusive, 
being years 


175 


1*121 


.£35 







62 


° 


44 


35 





12 


family resi- 


























dentin Scot- 


























land 


















1 









1 Old Mrs. Baillie died this year, and the Baillies flitted to a house belonging to Bailie Hamilton. 

'■2 Lady Grisell has an entry to the effect that her book 'was not rectified, and it was to great truble to 
writt them all out.' This probably accounts for the want of detail in that and the two preceding years. 

•* This figure includes the family clothes, but no details are given to enable a separation to be made. 

4 Flits to Lord Colinton's house, probably in Foulis Close. 

5 Expenses of going to London on ist April, staying there and reluming by 15th May. 
* Includes Bonds for borrowed money. 

" This and the two entries immediately below include servants' clothing. 
" This should be ;{Ji6o, 13s., but Lady Grisell enters it as shown here. 

9 Lady'iGrisell and her husband seem to have been in London for several months at the beginning of the year. 

10 Includes a payment oK £it, 15s. 6d. to Miss Menzies, 'over and above her fie for her care of the bairens 
when they had the fever.' 



APPENDIX V 



429 



DIX V 



IX. 



ll Business 
Charges. 



{. 


^. ( 


i. 


8i 


7 10 


27 


2 


7 


8 


9 


8 


20 


7 


I 


13 


6 


4 


I 


13 





13 


6 


6 


16 


10 


I 


631 


I 


8 


«o 


4 


10 


Bii 


10 


9 


1 


6 





24 





I 


7 


17 


J 


I 


I 


4 


5 


16 


9 


4 








S 


4 


II 


I 


6 


6 





3 





5 


7 


6 





5 






1200 



Rent. 



^ ^. <<'. 
50 o o 



16 13 

16 13 
38 6 
38 17 
38 6 
430 II 
33 6 
30 10 

6 
6 
6 
6 



33 
33 
33 
33 



13 



D O 

45 o o 

45 ° ° 

45 o o 



XL 

Estate 
Expenses. 
Building 

and 
repairing 
mansion 
houses, 
tenants' 
houses, 
dykes, etc. 



d. 



46 7 
6 18 

5 II 
20 16 
II 6 
70 19 

13 12 

181 II 

51 10 

^i 6 



36 


II 


149 


13 


130 

66 


13 
19 


71 


5 


117 


II 


47 
68 




15 


17 


17 


2 


14 


135 


4 


7 


4 



60 



XII. 



Pocket 
Money. 



54 10 

18 3 

26 16 

20 I 

4 13 



d. 
4 

5 
8 
8 
4 



14 3 
28 II 



22 12 

9 10 

40 9 

26 o 

9 17 

6 I 

15 o 

7 17 
5 o 

14 14 
II 12 o 

3 15 o 

15 8 10 
39 S o 
38 9 4 
55 17 o 



15 



XIII. 



Expenses in 

connection 

with 

political 

journeys to 

London. 



£. s. d. 

329 7 ID 

109 15 II 

84 O O 



'96 



8133 19 2 



29 



Total. 



£ s. d. 
1250 IS 10 



u 



450 

431 

IS3 

557 
598 
61S 
66 1 
622 
761 
700 

625 
014 

574 

684 

1061 



6 
II 
5 
7 
o 
o 

4 " 

8 4 

3 

8 



19 



It 
o 



777 

732 

519 

733 

1872 

1291 

16 2399 

1717 



7 II 

3 

8 I 

1 6 
16 10 
16 II 
iS 10 
14 2 

2 5 



Probable 
Income. 



Year. 



£ s. d. 



550 ° 

Do. 

Do. 
650 o 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do, 

Do. 
J 350 o 

Do. 
1770 o 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
2830 o 



/ 1693, 1694, 
\ and 1695 
/ Average for 
\ these years 

1696 

1697 

1698 

1699 

1700 

1701 

1702 

1703 
1704 
170S 
1706 
1707 
1708 
1709 
1710 
1711 
1712 

1713 
1714 

1715 
1716 
1717 
1718 



630 



11 This is the year their daughter Grisell was married to Mr. Murray, and the expenses directly attributable 
to this event amount to nearly .£280. 

l-i In the autumn the family go to London. 

13 Furnished lodgings at £n p. month. r u • r „»,„ 

14 This includes £45 paid to a carriage builder 'to accc^nt,; and was no doubt part of the pr.ce of a new 
carriage. Two horses and a coachman are hired at £25 a quarter. 

15 This includes three years' cess, etc., for Scottish Estates. ., . . , ^ 

took place. , 

17 This includes ;£i 13, 3S. 6d. for ' My Rachels cloaths to her child. 
1^ This sum includes Cess and Poll Tax and Poor money, averaging about £36 p. ann. 



430 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



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GLOSSARY 



Ala:\ioi)E, a silk material, a la mode, 
in the seventeenth century. 

Antoylage, entoilage, linen or other 
ludterial to which lace is sewed. 

Armogeen, a stout silk almost invari- 
ably black. 

AttleSj a silk stuff wrought with 
threads of gold and silver imported 
from India. 

Bast, matting made of the inner bark 

of the lime. 
Batthel or bathelj beadle. 
Bear, barley. 
Bongrace, a sort of front standing 

erect round the face attached to the 

hood. 
Bragad, brocade. 
Buffing, buffines {?), a kind of coarse 

material. 
Bufft, covered with buffines. 
Bustin, bustian (?), same as fustian, 

a coarse twilled cotton cloth. 
Busum, besom, broom. 

Calamanka, calimanco, a woollen 
material made plain and glazed in 
finishing. 

Camlet, camblet, a cloth made of 
wool, silk, or hair, or all three. 

Capillaire. l^ee note, p. 321. 

Chutches, cuches, donkeys. 

Clogbag, saddle bag. 

Cods, pillows. 

Codwars, pillowslips. 

Cog, pail. 

Cruk, crook, an iron hook suspended 



in kitchen chimney on which pots 
were hung. 

Dail, a load, a ton. 

Dails, wooden boards. 

Daniaty, dimity, a fine sort of 

fustian. 
Dicks, dykes, stone walls. 
Divits, divots, turfs cut into squares. 
Dornick, dornock, chequered table 

linen. 
Drogat, drugget, a sort of woollen 

stuff. 

Fairins, a gift of money for spending 
at a fair or a gift bought at a fair. 
Furd, made of fur. 

Galown, galloon, a hard braid of 

silk or wool used for edging. 
Gass or gaz, gauze. 

Hagabag, coarse table linen. 
Harden, a common linen or the 

coarsest quality of hemp or flax. 
Hatted kit, a preparation of milk, 

etc., with a creamy top. See note, 

p. 290. 

Jacoi-it, chocolate. 

Jumps, jimps, a kind of easy stays 
open in front, worn by nurses. 

Kains, canes. 

Kevelmell, a heavy mell or hammer. 

Lame, earthenware. 



432 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Lutestring, lustriug, a bright silk 
mjtch used, said to have been intro- 
duced into this country by the 
French refugees after the Revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. 

Manto, manteau. 
Maskarad, masquerade. 
Milsy, a milk strainer. 
Mohair, cloth made of mohair ; the 
fine silken hair of the Angora gout. 

Panscratch, the thick scale that 

forms on the bottom of a salt pan. 
Pertian, persian, a thin plain silk, 

much used for linings. 
Pice, piece, a hogshead. 
Pillabers, pillowberes, pillowslips. 
Pittipan, pettypan, a white iron mold 

used for pastry. 
Podisoy, paduasoy, a strong silk, 

usually black. 
Pother, pewter. 

QuECHES, quaich, a small and shallow 
drinking cup. 

KiMiN nisH, perhaps the rimmer or 
vat in which curd is set to harden 
for cheese. 

Salmagundy, salmagunde, a dish 
of minced meat with eggs, anchovies, 
vinegar, pepper, etc. 

Scout, schuit, a public boat drawn by 
horse through the canals. 



Sesnet, sarcenet. 

Shad, /a/. 

Shagreen, a sort of baize. 

Sheneal, chenille, striped taffatu. 

Shill, shovel. 

Skep, basket hive. 

Snakes, snecks, fastenings. 

Sods, a sort of saddle used by the 

poorer classes made of cloth stuffed. 
Stenting, stretching. 
Stinging, thatching. 
Stoup, flagon. 
Strakins, linen cloth made of coarse 

flax. 

Tabir, tabby, a kind of silk watered 

or waved. 
Tafita, taffeta, a sort of thick 

silk. 
Thack, thatch. 
Thicking, thatching. 
Tolliduse, taille-douce. See note, 

p. 39. 
Tourdelie, tour de lit, the valance of 

a bed. 
Tows, ropes. 
Trivet, a movable iron frame for 

supporting kettles, etc. 
Tusk, a fish as big as a ling, much 

esteemed for its delicacy. 

Wort skill, a shovel for wort for 
brewing. 

Yettin, cast-iron. 
Yrone, iron. 



INDEX 



Abernethy, Dr., i8, 19, 22, 23. 

George, 53. 

Aikman, Francis, of Brambleton and 

Ross, 36 «. 
William, portrait painter, xxvii 

and n, 55. 
Ainsly, James, 203. 
Aislaby, Mr., xxii n. 
Aiton, taken prisoner at Preston, 51 

and M. 
Aix-la-Chapelle, 404. 
Ale, 415. 

Allen, Mr. , British consul at Naples, 392. 
Amsterdam, 386. 
Anchovies, lix. 
Anderson's meeting-house, 37. 

pills, 35. 

Robert, footman, 158. 

Andrews, Eliza, 430. 

Annandale, William Johnstone, first 

marquis of, 288 and n. 
Arbuthnott, Dr. John, 43 and «. 
Archery in Holland, 387 ti. 
Army pay, 427. 
Augsburg, 402. 

Baillie, Archibald, son of George 

Baillie of Jerviswood, xi. 
Archibald, son of Robert Baillie 

of Jerviswood, xv, l.xxiv, 261, 264, 

265. 

Christian, xi. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Robert 

Baillie of Jerviswood, and wife of 

Robert Weems of Graingemuir, xv, 

xxxvii, 45 ;/, 430. 

George, first of Jerviswood, and 



merchant burgess of Edinburgh, x, 
XXX, 430. 

George, son of Robert Baillie of 

Jerviswood, xii, xv; present at the 
execution of his father, xiii ; his life 
influenced by his father's fate, xiii- 
xiv ; escapes to Holland and his 
estates forfeited, xvi ; in the service 
of the Prince of Orange, xvii ; re- 
turns to Scotland and is made re- 
ceiver-general, xviii ; his marriage, 

O 



xviii ; his political position, xix ; a 
member of the first Union parliament, 
XX ; a lord of the treasury, xxii, 
xxxix ; his retiral, xxiii, Ixvii ; a 
lover of books, xxv ; an encourager 
of the fine arts, xxvi ; his love of 
music, xlviii, Ixxviii ; valuation of 
his lands, Ixxviii ; his social qualities, 
xxiv ; his death, xxiii, xxvii. 

Baillie, George, of Manorhall, xi, 430. 

lady Grisell, her parentage, xii ; 

sent on a mission to Robert Baillie, 
prisoner in Edinburgh Tolbooth, xii ; 
accompanies her father in his flight 
to Holland, xvi ; her marriage, xviii ; 
her daughters' marriages, xxvii-xxix ; 
her business capacity, xxx-xxxv ; 
house rents, xxxvii, 40, 45, 48, 54, 
59. 140, 141, 146, 149. 153. 15^, 162, 
331-334, 337,. 340 ; travelling ex- 
penses, xxxviii-xlv ; education and 
amusements, xlv-li, Ixxviii ; house- 
hold expenditure, xxxi-xxxvi, Ivii- 
Ix ; estate management, Ix-lxiv, 236- 
255 ; stable expenditure, 225-236 ; 
furniture and furnishings, Ixiv-lxvj 
164-188; lawyers' and doctors' fees, 
Ixvi ; expenses of a foreign tour, 309- 
383 ; horses and carriages, Ixviii-lxxi ; 
clothing, Ixxi-lxxii ; general remarks 
on the accounts, Ixxv-lxxix. See 
also under Servants. 

Grisell, daughter of George Baillie 

of Jerviswood, and wife of sir Alex- 
ander Murray of Stanhope, xxvii- 
xxviii, xliv, xlviii, 7, 10, 12-15, 24, 
25 and «, 86-89 passim ; her 
marriage expenses, 203-205, 429 m; 
her Memoirs, xiii, xxii, 1, Ixxviii. -i- 

Grisell, grand-daughter of George 

Baillie of Jerviswood, xxvii. 

Helen, daughter of Robert Baillie 

of Jerviswood, and wife of John Hay, 
XV, xxxvii. 

Helen, grand-daughter of George 

Baillie of Jerviswood, xxvii. 

James, merchant burgess of Edin- 
burgh, X. 



^E 



434 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Baillie, James, captain of the CityGuard 
of Edinburgh, xi, i and n, 2. 

James, son of Robert Baillie of 

Jerviswood, xv, 55, 265, 266. 

John, of Walston, 3 and ft, 45. 

John, son of George Baillie of 



Jerviswood, xi. 

John, son of Robert Baillie of 



Jerviswood, xv, 49, 59, 264, 266. 

John, chirurgeon, 21, 22, 32, 90, 

255, 256. 

Rachel, wife of (i) rev. Andrew 



Gray ; and (2) of rev. George 
Hutcheson, xi, 430. 

Rachel, daughter of Robert Baillie 



of Jerviswood, and wife of Patrick 
Dundas of Breistmilne, xv, Ixxiv. 

Rachel, daughter of George Baillie 

of Jerviswood, and wife of Charles, 
lord Binning, xxvii, xxix, xl, xlix, 
8, 14, 17, 32 passim ; her marriage, 
115; cost of her trousseau, Ixxiii, 
213, 429 n; her life illustrated by 
entries in the account books, xlv- 
xlvii. 

Robert, of Jerviswood, the story 

of his rescue of the rev. James 
Kirkton, xi, 269 ; arrested for high 
treason and confined in the Tower, 
xii ; carried prisoner to Scotland, 
xii ; his execution, xiii-xiv and ti, 
XV ; his family, xv ; notice of, 269- 
272. 

Robert, son of George Baillie of 

Jerviswood, xxvii, 191 and m, 265, 
266. 

Robert, of Manorhall, i and «. 

William, son of Robert Baillie of 

Jerviswood, xv. 

Mr., banker in Rotterdam, 386. 



Baillies of Jerviswood, ix. 
of Lamington, x. 

of St. John's Kirk, ix. 

genealogical tree, 430, 

Baird, Alex., 114. 

sir William, 288. 

Baldwin, Mr., coachmaker, 33. 

Ballinton, James, 67. 

Balsamic syrup, 98. 

Barr, John, 92. 

Bassa, Laura, 392. 

Baths or bagnios, Ixviiand n, 3, 7, 18, 

37, 38, 45, 109. 
Bayley, Mr., xxii n. 
Beaver-skin stockings, xlv, Ixxii. 
Bell, Andrew, bookseller in London, 

xxv, 39. 

Ann, 145. 

Charles, lOO. 

Fanny, housekeeper, 150. 



Bell, Thomas, 12, 154. 
Bellingham, Charles, 23 n. 

Jeanie, 38 and «. 

lady Julian, 38 and n, 52. 

Bells, Ixv. 

Bempole, Charlotte Vanhose, wife of 

William, marquis of Annandale, 

288 «, 
Bernachi, signor, xlix, 43, 52-54, 391. 
Betson, John, butcher, 104, io6, no, 

III. 
Bewhauen, Archibald, 261. 
Bible pawned, 266. 
' Bills of Fair,' lix ; extracts from, 281- 

.304- 
Binning, Charles, lord, xxix and «, 

109, 430 ; his marriage, xl ; dies at 

Naples, xliii. 

George, lord, 430. 

Eisset, Duncan, Iv. 
Black, Gilbert, 104. 

Marth, 12. 

Blacking, Ix. 

Blackwood, sir Robert, 81, 188, 190. 

Blainsly, 224. 

Blakie, James, 19, 244. 

Bleeding, Ixvi, 7, 16, 18, 23, 37, 38, 

45, 255. 364, 366, 369, 427. 
Blyth, Alexander, 155. 

John, shoemaker, 200. 

Boe, John, 17. 

Boge, Jean, 126. 

Bologna, 391. 

Book-keeping, 29. 

Books, 52, 

Boscawen, Mr., xxii tt. 

Boughtrige, 23. 

Bowling-green, Ixii. 

Boyd, James, 40. 

Brady, James, 26. 

Bran, 66. 

Brandy, 69, 73, 74, 76, 4iS- 

Breastmiln. See Dundas, Patrick. 

Broom besoms, 94. 

Broughton, 25 and n. 

Brown, Mr., British consul in Venice, 

398. 
Hew, 5. 

Jean, 120. 

John, 117. 

Margrat, cook, 133, 139. 

Neil, consul in Padua, 346. 

Peter, 22, 29, 119. 

sir Robert, 346, 373, 

Susan, 117, 118. 

Thomas, baker, lOi. 

Will, 38. 



Brownlies, Alisone, 133, 140. 

Andrew, 17-19. 

Isabell, 133. 



i 



INDEX 



435 



Brownlies, Mungo, 9, 12, 78. 

Will., 4, 146. 

Bruce, Alison, 296 n. 

lady Anne, xxvii. 

Brumigham, Francis, 122. 
Brunfield, Alison, 145, 149. 

Grace, at Greenlaw, 71. 

Burke (Burck), captain, 13. 
Burnet, Gilbert, bishop of Salisbury, 
xviii, 283 and n. 

William, 77. 

Bute, lady, 35 and ;/. 

Cairncross, George, mason, Ixiii. 

Calais, 409. 

Calder, 22 and n, 27. 

Elizabeth, fourth wife of Hugh 

Rose of Kilravock, 36 and n. 

Cambray, 406. 

Campbell, sir George, 270. 

sir Hugh, 270, 271. 

Margaret, countess of Marchmont, 

300 «. 
Candibrod sugar, 61, 69. 
Candles, 71, 72, 76, 79. 97. 102, ill, 

411. 
Cannel, James, coachman, 122, 126. 
Canongate, bagnio, 3 ; fire in, 6. 
Capel, lady Anne, 294 71. 
Capons, 60. 
Cards, losses at, 1, 31, 37-40. 45. 47" 

50, 52-54, 107, 282. 
Carestini, Giovanni, 336. 
Carlisle, Charles Howard, third earl 

of, 294 and n. 
Carnegy, lady Christian, 282 «. 
Carolina Wilhelmina, princess of 

Wales, 293 and n. 
Carr, Andrew, 264, 267. 

Margrate, 127. 

Carrin, James, liii «, 8, 116, 120, 125, 

128. 
Carss, Will, 92. 

Carter, George, servant, liv, Ixiii, 280. 
Carts, Ixxi. 

Castles, Ann, cook, liv. 
Castruchi, xlviii. 
Cattle, plague among, 34 m. 

prices of, 416. 

Cavendish, lady Arabella, 287 n. 

Cavers, 11 and n. 

Cess, I, 2, 4-6, 42, 58, 60, 223, 224, 

429 n. 
Champagne, 103, 107, 415. 
Chandos, James Brydges, first duke of, 

296 and n. 
Channelkirk (Ginelkirk), 25 and n. 
Chato, Thomas, in Kelso, 72. 
Cheese, 64, 78, 84, 86, 113, 412. 
Cheyne (Shien), Dr., 31. 



Chiese, Philip de, inventor of the 
Berline carriage, Ixix and ;/. 

Chiesly (Cheasly), Jean, 195. 

sir Robert, 65. 

William, of Cockburn, 218 and 

;/, 219, 220. 

Chocolate (jocolet), Iviii, 95, 106, 322, 

347. 412. 
Christy, Agnes, 126. 
Nany, cook, 117, 119, 120, 123, 



130. 



Patrick, 221. 



Churchill, lady Anne, 287 n. 
Churchyard charges, 5. 
Cinnamon, 74, 81, 412. 

water, 98, 1 10, 412. 

Claret, 69, 109, 415. 
Clark, Bessie, 135. 

George, 2, 3. 

John, 137, 147. 

Clog bags, xxxviii, Ixviii and «, 

230. 
Clothing, Ixxi, 188-218. 
Cloves, 69, 74, 81, 97. 
Cluther, Gawin, 122. 
Coach wheels, 39. 

Coal, 61, 63, 64, 72, 77, 85, 95, 97-98, 
417 and n. 

Cockburn, Adam, of Ormiston, 259 n. 

sir James, of Ryslaw, 24. 

Thomas, 141. 

Cocks combs (cox colms) in the ' Bill of 
Fair,' 289, 303. 

Cod, Ix. 

Coffee, Iviii. 

Coinage of Holland, France, Italy, etc. 
388 ; relative value of money, Ixxvi ; 
table of Scots and English money, 
421 ; tables of foreign money, 423. 

Colecot, John, 35, 44. 

Cologne, 403-405- 

Coltcrooks, 19, 243. 

Corbett, Sandy, 1 1 7. 

Corks, 84, 85, 412. 

Cot houses, Ixiii-lxiv, 13. 

Coumsly hill, 224, 225, 239. 

Couston, lady, 85. 

Cow tax, 34 and n ; price of cows, 67, 
89, 90. 

Craw, John, 28. 

Croo, captain, xii. 

Crumbin, Mr., teacher of music, 12, 
16. 

Cuningham, Alexander, writer, 223. 

Jean, 128. 

sir John, 270. 

Currants, ill. 

Cutiibert or Cuthbertson, John, 369, 

370, 375. 383- 
Cuzzoni, signor, xlix and «. 



436 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Dalrymple, lady Margaret. See 
Loudoun, lady. 

Sarah, 257 «. 

Dancing, xlvii-xlviii, Ixxviii, 7, 10, 14, 

33. 53. 420. 
Darien Company, xix. 
Davidson (Divison) George, footman, 

162. 
Deans, George, gardener, liv. 
Deas, James, 236. 
Debentures, 58 and «. 
Dentistry, Ixvii, 24, 35, 46, 53, 54. 
Denun, David, saddler, 226. 
Derham, sir Thomas, 328. 
Dice, 52. 
Dick, Munga, 240, 242, 243. 

Rob, 223. 

Dickson, Jean, cook, 161. 

Patrick, 53. 

William, tailor, 139, 203. 

Dippo, Isabell, 20. 

Doctors' fees. See Medical fees. 

Doddington, George Bubb, 299 and «. 

Dods, Andrew, 18. 

George, servant, liii and «, liv, 

131. 136- 
Door bells, Ixv. 
Douglas, James, 109. 
Jean, wife of sir John Kennedy of 

Culzean, 33 n. 
Drink expenditure, Ivii. 

money, Iv, 7, 13, \^ passim. 

Drummond, George, 33, 264. 

James, i, 6. 

Ducks, 85. 

Dunbar, Mr., teacher of French, 32-34, 

36. 
Duncan, James, 27. 
Dundas, Dr. Alexander, 16, 18. 

Betty, 54, 56. 

George, of that ilk, 296 and n. 

Grisell, 56. 

Patrick, of Breastmiln, xv, 261 

and «, 266, 267, 430. 

Rachel, Ixxiv, 33, 43, 213. 

Robert, advocate, 296 and n. 



Dunglass, xl and n. 

laird of. See Hall, sir John. 

Dupplin, 15 and n. 

lady, 39 and «. 

Dykes, Ixiii and n. 

Earl's meeting-house, 40. 

Earle, general, 285 and n. 

Earlston, xxiii ; repairs of the kirk, 

Ixiv, 19 ; valuation of subjects in, 

Ixxviii. 
Edgar, George, 124-126. 
Edinburgh, great fire in 1645, "^ 5 

house rents and lodgings, xxxvii. 



Edmonston, Andrew, of Ednem, x. 

Education, xlv-xlvii, 420. 

Eliot, sir Gilbert, of Minto, Ixvi, 24, 

221 and n, 222, 296 and n. 

sir Gilbert, of Stobs, 29 n. 

Essex, lady, 345. 

Estate management, Ix, 236-255. 

Expresses from and to Edinburgh, 17, 

23- 

Faa, Ann, 18, 117, 260. 

Fairholm, John, of Craigiehall, 288 >/. 

Sophia, 288 ;/. 

Fairings, 27, 28. 

Faladam, 90 and ;/, 95. 

Farellton, Dorathie, 260. 

Fenton, Thomas, 89. 

Finch, lady Mary, 284 n. 

Finla, Margrat, 144. 

Fir seed, Ixii. 

Fire in Edinburgh in 1645, x ; fire in 

Lawnmarket, 10. 
Firs, 59. 

Fleming (Flimin), Margaret, 117. 
Flint, John, 232. 
Florence, 394. 
Foot-mantles, 224 and n. 
Forbes, Charles, 318. 
Forman, John, 258. 
Forrist, Ann, 118, 120. 
Forsith, Jean, housemaid, 151, 158. 
Forster, lord, 289. 
Foulerton, Robert, of the Custom 

House in Leith, xliv n. 
Foul is, Hary, 27. 
sir James, of Colinton, xxxvii, 

13 and n. 
Frankfort, 402. 
Frazer, Ann, chambermaid, 156. 

John, 20, 133. 

Frogs in the ' Bill of Fair,' 302. 
Fuel, prices of, 417. 
Funeral expenses, 267. 
Furniture and furnishings, Ixiv. 

Garner, Hellin, ii, 123, 127. 

Gascoigne, Anne, 430. 

George i., accession of, xxii. 

Geese, 92. 

Gelding, 232. 

Gibson, Dr., 22, 23, 28, 56 and n. 

Bartholomew, 65, 229. 

GifTord, John, 31. 

Gilroy, Dorothy, kitchenmaid, 145, 

149. 
Glass churn, Ixv. 

windows, 3, 5, 32, 35. 

Glen, Jean, 140. 
Goldbeater's leaf, 32. 
Gooseberries, 92. 



INDEX 



437 



Gordon, the duke of, obtains the 
forfeited estate of Robert Baillie of 
Jerviswood, xvi. 
• James, agent of the Linen Manu- 



factory, I. 
— John, 
xliv;/. 



banker in Rotterdam, 



Gowdy, Mr., 21. 
Grange Muir, 18 and «. 

laird of. See Weems, Robert. 

Grant of ward, 219 and n. 
Granville, John, earl, 295 n. 
Gray, Andrew, minister of Glasgow, 
xi. 

James, 65. 

Grazing, 73, 80, 89. 
Greenknowe. See Pringle. 
Grieve, James, 113, 152, 157, 159. 
Griffeth, Ann, cook, 161. 
Grumball, or Grumble, Arthur, baker, 

104, no, 114. 
Gunpowder, 28. 
Guns and bayonets, 28. 
Guthery, Alex., writer, 41. 



Haddington, Charles, eighth earl 
of, 430. 

George, tenth earl, 430. 

George, eleventh earl, 430. 

Thomas, sixth earl, 300 and ;/, 



430- 



Thomas, seventh earl, xxix, 384, 



430. 



Thomas, ninth earl, 430. 
Haliburton of Pitcur, 24. 
Halifax, George Montagu, first earl of, 

298 and n. 
Hall, Laltes, cook, 156. 
Halliwall, Dorothy, 49. 

Will., 137. 

Hamilton, Alexander, 219 «. 
Archibald, 103. 

Charles, son of Charles, lord 

Binning, xxix. 

George, son of Charles, lord 

Binning, succeeds to Jerviswood and 
Mellerstain, xxix, xxx. 

Grisell, daughter of Charles, lord 

Binning, xxix, xliv. 

• Helen, daughter of Charles, lord 

Binning, xxix, xliv. 

James, fifth duke of, 295 and n. 

■ Jean, 36 and m, 42. 

John, son of Charles, lord Bin- 
ning, xxix. 

lady Margaret, 207. 

Mary, 52. 

Rachel, daughter of Charles, lord 



Binning, xxix. 



Hamilton, Thomas. See Haddington, 
earl of 

■ William, duke of, 270. 

Hardy, Barbry, 148. 

Margaret, liv. 

Ilarla, John, 17, 129, 133. 

Hartrigge, 29 n. 

Hay, Charles, baxter, 89. 

lady Jean, 286 n. 

John, writer in 



Edinburgh, 



430- 



Robert, 46. 
lady Susan, 37, 



Heart, Katharine, laundrymaid, xxxix, 

29, 151, 160. 
Hempsteed, Marion, 102. 
Hens, 60. 
Heraldic arms, 41. 
Herdmanston, 256 n. 
Herring, lix, 72, 76, 77, 85, 412. 
Hervey, lady, 302 and n, 353, 376. 
Hervie, Tho., 49. 
Hewie, Thomas, 157. 
Hilton. See Johnston, Joseph. 
Hirsel, the seat of the earl of Home, 

22 and «, 84. 
Histinns (? Hastings), sergeant of the 

King's Foot Guard, xii. 
Hoburn, Roger, 4. 
Holland, directions for travelling in, 

386. 
Holt, Mary, 430. 
Hope, Helen, wife of Thomas, earl of 

Haddington, 430. 
John, gardener, Ixii, 88, 



137, 



141. 



Robert, 19. 
Tarn, 244. 
col., 300. 



Hopetoun, John, earl of, 430. 

Hops, 75, 84. 

Horses and carriages, expenditure on, 

xl, Ixviii-lxxi, 8, li. 
Horse-shoeing, 19, 64. 
Household expenses, xxxi-xxxvi, Ivii- 

Ix. 

furniture, Ixiv-lxv, 164-188. 

House-rents, xxxvii, 40, 45, 48, 54, 59, 

331-334. /«^-f«'"- 
Howard, lady Mary, 300 ;/. 
Hull, William, footman, liv. 
Hume of Wedderburn, xiv, 40 and «, 

5'- 
Alexander, second earl of March- 

mont, 300 and «. 

Alex, of Whitehouse, 49 and n. 

Andrew, lord Kimmerghame, 4, 



27 and ;/. 

— Ann, wife of sir John Hall of 
Dunglass, 27 «. 



438 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Hume, Anne, wife of sir William Purves 

of Purveshall, 36 and ;/. 

■ David, collector of the cess, 4. 

sir George, 65. 

George, of Graden, 261 n. 

George, of Kimmerghame, xxxviii 

n. 



— George, of Whitefield, 50 «. 

Grisell, wife of George Baillie of 

Jerviswood. See Baillie, lady 

Grisell. 

Grisell, daughter of lord Polwarth, 



36 and n. 
— • James, of Aiton, xiv. 

— Jean, wife of James, lord Tor- 
phichen, 23 n, 188 and n. 

— John, carter, 280. 

— John, gardener, Ixxv, 153, 162. 

— John, tailor, 121, 122. 

— Julian, wife of Newton of that ilk, 
23 and n. 

Julian, sister of lady Grisell, 23 



and n. 

— sir Patrick, aftw. earl of March- 
mont, xii, 406 ; escapes to Holland, 
XV ; his estates forfeited, xvi; returns 
to Scotland, xvii ; created lord 
Polwarth, xviii. 

— Patrick, son of sir Patrick, xvii 
and n. 

— • Robert, 93. 

Sophia, 27 «. 

Mrs., of Bogend, 9. 

Mrs., of Whitefield, xiv. 



Hungary water, 68, 97, 381. 
Hunter, Dorathy, 162. 

James, 224, 233. 

John, 2, 5. 

Patrick, stabler, 41, 65, 68, 71, 

73- 

Hutcheson, George, minister in Edin- 
burgh, xi and n. 

Hutchison, Adam, 83, 84. 

Hyndford, lady, 291 and «. 

Indigo, 73. 

Inglis, Margrat, 123. 

— Patrick, 42 and «. 

Thomas, dean of guild of Edin- 
burgh, x. 

Ink, Ix. 

Innes, John, 120, 121. 

Inns of France and Germany, 384 ; of 
Holland, 386. 

Innspruck, 401. 

Jackson, Ambrose, ioi, 104. 

Mr., British consul in Genoa, 390. 

Jaillot, Bernard Antoine, map-maker, 
XXV and n. 



Japanning, 257 and n. 

Jedburgh, lord. See Kerr, William. 

Jenkins, sir Lyon, xii. 

Jerviswood, xv, xxx, Ix, 8, 60 ; pur- 
chased by George Baillie, x, 430 : 
valuation, Ixxviii ; feu-duty, 10. 

Johnston, Archibald, lord Wariston, 
xi, xviii, 269 and n. 

Effie, 10 and n. 

Helen, wife of George Hume of 

Graden, 261 n. 

Isabell, 117. 

James, merchant burgess of Edin- 



burgh, X. 

— James, secretary of state for Scot- 
land, xviii, xix, xxxv, Ixix, 3, 286 
and M, 300. 

— Joseph, of Hilton, 27 and n. 

— Lucy, 53. 

— Margaret, wife of George Baillie 
of Jerviswood, x, 430. 

Martha, 45. 

— Rachel, daughter of lord Waris- 
ton and wife of Robert Baillie of 
Jerviswood, 269 and n ; note on the 
imprisonment of her husband, xii. 

Will, bookseller, 5. 



Kennedy (Kenady), lady, 33 and «. 

Andrew, 33 and «. 

Anne, wife of John Blair yr. of 

Dunskey, 33 n. 

Anne, 32 and n. 

Katharin, chambermaid. 



160. 



151. 



Kerr of Littledean Tower, 24 and n, 

Andrew, writer, 55. 

John, of Kersland, 17 and «. 

William, lord Jedburgh, 257 n 

Kilpatrick, James, 29, 53, 144. 

Kilravock (Kilraick), lady, 36 and «. 

Kimmerghame, 27 and n. 

Kirk, Janit, cook, 132. 

Kirkton, Dr. George, 7, li, 31, 255, 

256, 257. 
James, minister of the Tolbooth, 

Edinburgh, xi and «, 270. 

captain, R.N., 31 and «, 42. 



Knaghten, Mr., banker in Rotterdam, 

386. 
Krenberg, or Kramberg, or Cremberg, 

teacher of singing, 10-12, 14. 

La Bushier, M., surgeon, 57. 
Laidlay, Thomas, 224, 236. 
Lamb, Alexander, candlemaker, 95. 

Andrew, 10, 13, 17, 20, 25, 62, 

63, 87, 129, 137, 147. 

Isabell, 124. 

Jean, 29. 



INDEX 



439 



Lamb, Margrat, 129. 

William, Ixiii. 

Langshaw, Ixiv, 27, 41, 58, 222-224 

and 71, 236. 
Lasell, Katharin, 160. 
Law, John, financier, buried in Venice, 

398 and ;/. 
Lawnmarket fire in 1701, 10. 
Leadhowse. See Liedhouse. 
Lechmere, Mr., xxii ;/. 
Lecturers' tax, 44 and n, 51. 
Legal fees, Ixvi, 219-223, 426. 
Leishman, William, xv. 
Lemons, 80, S3, 413. 
Lesley, 15 and 11. 

Tam, 57. 

Letchmere, lady Elizabeth, 300 and ;/. 

Liedhouse, James, 137, 247. 

— — Thomas, 9, 64. 

Liege, 404. 

Lies, Sara, chambermaid, 156. 

Lindsay, Nans, 135. 

Linen manufactory, i and ;/, 3, 4, 6. 

Littledean Tower. See Kerr. 

Liviston, William, writer in Edinburgh, 

2 and n. 
Loaf sugar, 86. 
Lockhart, lady, Ixxvi ;/, 53. 

sir George, 270. 

sir William, of Lee, 269. 

Longformacus, 29 and «. 
Lottery tickets, 44, 361, 362. 
Loudoun, Hugh, third earl of, 39 m, 40. 

lady, 39 and n. 

Louth, lady, 382. 
Lutestring, 42, 209-212. 

Macclesfield, George, earl of, 

430- 
Mace, 74, 81, 413. 
M'Gie, Mr., 21, 29. 
M'Intosh, Mary, 128. 
Mackenzie, sir Alexander, of Coul, 

196 «. 

Coll, 36. 

Pegie, 20. 

sir Roderick, of Prestonhall, 24 «. 

Magill, Alex., i. 

Magnoni, Mr., banker in Bologna, 

391- 
Main, John, 86. 
Mair, John, 77. 
Malbank, Judith, 122. 
Malcolm (Makcom), David, 117. 
Malt, 68, 74. 

Man, Horatio, 349, 350, 365. 
Manderson, Robert, 26, 87, 142. 
Mar, lady, 39 and ;/, 48. 
Marble brought from Naples, xliv and 

n, 365- 



Marchmont, earls of. See Hume. 
Marjoribanks, James, 67. 
Markham, Georgina, 430. 
Marriage customs, xlv and ;;. 
Marshall, Adam, 10, 27. 

Mary, 118. 

Martin, Mr., portrait painter, xliv, 271. 
Massie, James, schoolmaster at Mel- 

lerstain, 3, 9, 11, 14-20, 32. 
Maihy, George, 136. 
Meal, 65, 85. 
Mean, Alex., 247, 248. 

Robert, 246. 

Medical fees, Ixvi, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18, 

19, 21-23, 28, 31, 32, 43, 56, 255 ;/, 

257, 374, 427- 

Medina, sir John, xxvi and n, 24. 

Mellerstain, xxiii, xxx, lix, Ixi-lxiii, 
2, 8, 10, 13, 21, 26, 59, 304, 305 ; 
purchased by George Baillie, mer- 
chant burgess of Edinburgh, x, 430 ; 
teinds, 222 ; cess, 223 ; valuation, 
Ixxviii. 

Melvill, William, merchant, 219. 

Menzies (Minzies), James, 35. 

May, xlvi. Hi, Ixxiv, Ixxv, 15, 

16, 25, 33, 35, 54, 131, 135, 139, 
150, 155, 217, 280. 

Patrick, xiii. 

William, of Raw, xlvi. 



Mercer (Marsser), Wdl, 225. 
Midcalf, George, 159. 
Milan, 391. 
Mill, Henry, 54, 108, 109. 

Margaret, 132, 135, 140. 

Will, 31. 

Miller, James, glazier, 20, 244. 

James, tailor, 1 30. 

William, gardener, 231. 

Mineral waters, Ixvii. 

Ministers' stipends, 425. 

Minto, lord. See Elliot, sir Gilbert. 

Mirrors, Ixv. 

Mitchell, James 48. 

Mally, 382. 

William, 76, 87. 

Money. See Coinage. 
Monro, Grisie, 18. 

John, 74. 

Montagu, lady Mary Wortley, xxiii ;/, 

xxviii, xlv M, Ixxii n, 281 «, 290 

and «, 299 «, 300 n, 302. 
Montgomerie, Hugh, 68. 
Montrose, Dick, 38. 
James, first duke of, 52, 282 and 

«, 284, 285, 289. 

duchess of, 31, 39, 282 and n. 



Morton, Robert, 22. 
Mosman, George, bookseller in the 
Luckenbooths, xxv, 3, 4, 11. 



440 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Mountjoy, Thomas, lord, 297 and n. 

Mowit, John, 249. 

Muckle, John, 138, 228. 

Mudie, John, in Threepwood, 223, 

224. 
Mugwart water, 68, 413. 
Muir, sir Archibald, 220 and n. 

Mary, 70, 132. 

Munich, 401. 

Munro, Katharin, chambermaid, 130. 

Murduck, John, 261. 

Murray, sir Alexander, of Stanhope, 

xxvii-xxviii, 430. 
Alexander, W. S., keeper of a 

bagnio in the Cowgate, Ixvii n. 

lady. See Baillie, Grisell. 

sir David, of Stanhope, 25 n. 

Music and musical instruments, xlviii- 

xlix, 16, 361, 366. 

Namur Castle, 319. 
Naples, 392. 
Navell, Betty, 135. 

May, 139. 

Newton, Francis, Ixx, 20, 25, 37, 118, 

201. 

George, 26, 89, 93, 94. 

Pate, blacksmith, 19, 228, 229, 

233> 236. 

Richard, of that ilk, 23 and it. 



Nicolson (Nickelson), David, 117. 

Will, 224, 225. 

Nightgowns, xiii, Ixxi-lxxii and n. 
Nutmegs, 61, 69, 80, 97, 106, 413. 

Ogle, Betty, laundrymaid, liv, 
Onslow, Arthur, 300 and n. 

sir Richard, xxii n. 

Opera tickets, xlix, 42, 43, 49, $2, 53, 

323. 332, 372, 379- 
Orange flower water, 80. 
Oranges, 75, 80, 83, 413. 
Orford, Edward Russel, earl of, 283 

and n. 
Robert Walpole, earl of, 299 and 

ft. 
Orkney, George Hamilton, earl of, 281 

and n. 
Ormand, Nelly, 158. 
Ormiston, Charles, 79, 95. 

James, Ixiv, 13, 133. 

Owin, Adam, 118. 
Oysters, Ix. 

Padua, 399. 

Pallie, Henry de, butler, liv. 
Paris, directions for travellers, 407. 
Park, James, footman, 162. 

Munga, 79. 

Paterson (Petterson), sir William, xiii. 



Paton, William, in the Tolbooth, 

266. 
Pawnbroking, 4, 266, 267. 
Peas, 83 and n, 88, 96. 
Peat, 73, 76, 86. 
Phillips, Ann, cook, 161. 
Pierrepont, Frances, wife of the earl of 

Mar, 39 n. 
Pigeons, 76. 

Pipe and drum, 19, 25, 27, 28, 60. 
Piquebourg (Pickburg), countess of, 47 

and n. 
Pistols, 2, 318. 

Pitcairn, Archibald, 16 and n, 18. 
Plumer, Gavin, 259 and n. 

Mary, 27. 

Polwarth, 12 and n. 

Poor tax, 47, 48, 57. 

Portsmouth, John Wallop, first earl of, 

292 and It. 
Potatoes, Ix. 
Poultry, prices of, 416. 
Poulett, Catherine, wife of Secretary 

Johnston, 286 n. 
Pratolino, 396. 
Preston, Thomas, 67. 
Prestonhall, lord. See Mackenzie, 

Roderick. 
Prices of articles between 1693 and 

1718, 410. 
Primrose, Eleanor, viscountess, 292 n. 
Pringle, Mrs., of Greenknow, 63. 

Alexander, 223. 

Gilbert, 95. 

James, surgeon, 28. 

sir John, of Stitchell, his house 

plundered by the rebels, xiv. 

Lewis, 77, 204. 

Mary, 430. 

Robert, xl and n, 30. 



Prognostication, 27. 

queensferry, i5. 

Raith, Alexander, lord, 258. 

Ramsay, Isabell, 133. 

Redbraes (Ridbreas), xii, xviii, 23 and 

«. 93- 
Redhall, 219, 221, 222. 
Rees's bagnio in the Canongate, Ixvii, 

3- 
Riccarlon, 15 and n. 
Rice, 70, 82. 
Rickelton, Isabella, 151. 
Riding of the parliament, 124 and n, 

224 n. 
Ridpath, Dina, 10, 123. 

George, 5 and n. 

Jean, 140. 

Ritchy, Margrat, 131. 



INDEX 



441 



Robertson (Robison), Bella, under- 
cook, 151. 

David, vintner, i. 

Grisell, 31, 125, 127. 

Janet, 123. 

Katharin, 125. 

Margrat, 130. 

Thomas, of Rokeby Park, 300 «. 

Tam, 20. 

William, in Eyemouth, 90, 92, 



247. 

Robinson, Anastasia, xlix. 
Robsone, Samuel, in Brigend, 251, 

253. 254. 

Samuel, in Kelso, 59. 

Rolland, Erasmus, 341. 

• Winifred, 157. 

Rome, 392. 

Room (Kume), Mrs., xxxviii, 21, 25, 

Ross, Margrat, chambermaid, 129, 

130. 
Rothes, John Leslie, eighth earl of, 285 

and «, 295. 
Rotterdam, xli, 309, 386. 
Roxburgh, Jchn, first duke of, 49, 53, 

284 and n. 

duchess of, 284 n. 

Rule, Marion, 128. 

Russel, John, of Bradshaw, W.S., 

keeper of a bagnio in the Cowgate, 

Ixvii. 
Rutherd, Margaret, liv. 
Rutherford ferry, 22 and «, 28. 

Saddlery, Ixviii. 

St. Andrews college, 12. 

St. Clair, Mrs., 39, 40. 

Dr. Matthew, II, 12, 15, 55, 

256 and n. 
St. Giles tolbooth, xxiii. 
St. Leonards, lands of, 42. 
Salaries and wages, liii-lvi, Ixxvii, 425. 
Salmon, 61. 
Salt, 93. 
Salting, Katherine Augusta Millicent, 

430- 
Saltonshall, Ricarda, Posthume, 298 //. 
Sandoni, signor, xlix and ;/, 391. 
Sanderson, John, 188. 
Scarsburg water, 71, 93. 
Scavengers' tax, 47, 53. 
Schoolmaster's salary, 225. 
Scot, John, 32. 

William, coachbuilder, Ixx n. 

Scugald, John, painter, xxvi and «, 6, 

7, 43. 47- 
Seaforth, the earl of, succeeds to the 
forfeited estate of sir Patrick Hume, 
xvi. 



Selkirk, Charles, earl of, 295 and «. 

Semple, Sara, 117. 

Senesino, Francesco Bernard! detto, 

394 and «. 
Servants, li-lvi ; clothes, Iv, 124, 130- 

131, 137-140, 143. 149, "55. 159. 

163 ; instructions to servants, 273 ; 

diet, 277-278 and n ; directions for 

the housekeeper, 278 ; wages, liv, 

1 17-120, 122-123, 125-137, 139-140, 

144, 160, 418 and n. 
Sharp, Peggie, under-cook, 152. 
Shaw, sir John, of Greenock, 257 

and n. 
Sheep, 64, 73, 88, 89, 416. 
Shirra, John, 248. 
Shrewsbury, duchess of, 293 and n. 
Sim, George, 56. 
Simmerall, John, 34, 39-42. 
Simson, Will, 12. 
Sinkolum, music teacher, 14. 
Sinclair, Mary, 117. 

sir Robert, 29 «. 

Singing fees, 420. 

Smith, Agnes, in Kelso, 71 

John, 3. 

Mr., wine merchant in Boulogne, 

410. 
Snuff, Ix, 104, no, 414; used by 

ladies, Ixxii. 
handkerchiefs, 209, 211, 350, 

353, 363, 364- 

mills, 52. 

Soap, 72, 74, 414. 

Somervill, NicoU, 219. 

' Souns and gullits,' xxxix and «. 

Spaw water, 25, 78, 99-102, 105. 

Spence, Robert, 264. 

Spencer, Anne, aflw. duchess of 

Hamilton, 295 n. 
Spinet tuning, 42, 48, 52. 
Spirit lamps, Iviii. 

Squadrone volante, xix, xxxv, 284 w. 
Stable expenditure, 225-236. 
Stage-coaches, xxxix and n, xl ; stage- 
coach from Edinburgh to London, 

29. 
Stair, John Dalrymple, second earl of, 

292 and n, 300. 
Stanhope, earl of, xxii. 
Steal), John, teacher of singing, 15, 

16, 25. 
Stewart, Gilbert, 92, 107. 

Helen, of Allanbank, 296 ;/. 

sir James, king's advocate, 220 

and n. 

col. John, killed in an election 



brawl, 29 11. 

John, 34, 40, 43. 



Stewartfield, 29 and n. 



442 HOUSE-BOOK OF LADY GRISELL BAILLIE 



Stitchell. See Pringle, sir John. 
Stockton drops, 107. 
StrafTord, lady, 40 and «. 
Strangeways, Elizabeth, 295 n. 
Sugar, 74, 75, 109, III, 414. 
Sunderland, Charles Spencer, third 

earl of, 287 and «. 
Surgeons' fees, jxvi. 
Sutherland, John Gordon, sixteenth 

earl of, 291 and «. 
Swan, Marie, cook, 156. 
Swine, 61, 64, 68, 74, 416. 
Swords, 4, 5, 9, 196, 

Tailoring, 125, 150, 155, 203. 
Tarras, lord, 270, 272. 
Taylor, George, 121, 

Robert, coachman, liv. 

Tea, xlv, Iviii, 82, 93, 95, 97, loi, 
102, 105, 106, 109, 317, 347, 

415. 
Thames frozen in 1715-16, 1S5 and n. 
Threepwood, 223-225. 
Thrift, Sara, housemaid, 156. 
Tobacco, Ix, 70, 72, 415. 
Tonyn, Pierre Daniel, at the Hague, 
,,386. 
Torphichen, James, seventh lord, 

23 «. 
Tradesmen's wages, 419 and n. 
Travellers' directions, 386-410. 
Treaty of Union, xx-xxi. 
Trees, Ixii, 31, 32, 254, 255. 
Trent, 400. 
Trotter, Dr., 21. 
Will, schoolmaster at Mellerstain, 

3- 
Trumble, George, barnman, 127, 

129. 
Turkeys, 87, 90. 
Turnbull, captain, 60 and ti. 

Ann, housekeeper, liv. 

Grisell, 53. 

Turin, 391. 

Turner, Thomas, 224, 239. 

Tweeddale, John Hay, fourth marquess 

of, 295 and «. 
Tyninghame, 55 and w. 

Urwin, Adam, 221. 
Utrecht, xvi, xli, 405. 

Valenciennes, 406. 

Vass, 3. 

Veitch, William, covenanting minister, 

221 «. 
Venice, 397-398- 
Verona, 399. 
Vetch, Will., minister at Peebles, 

2. 



Vicenza, 399. 

Villiers, Mrs., 281 and n; described 

by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, 

281 w. 
Vinegar, 75, 415. 
Vint, John, shoemaker, 56. 
Virginals, 22, 26. 
Vizicater plasters, 15. 
Vorie, Christian, wife of George Baillie 

of Jerviswood, x and «. 
John, in Balbaird, x. 

Wabster, jNIargrat, cook, 142. 
Wages of tradesmen, etc. See Salaries 

and Wages. 
W^ait or Wayte, Grisell, 136, 279, 

280. 
Walker, John, 27, 30. 

Nans, 29. 

Wall paper, Ixv. 

Wallop, John. See Portsmouth, earl 

of. 
Walpole, sir Robert. See Orford, earl 

of. 
Walston. See Baillie, John. 
Warrender, Helen Catherine, 430. 
Wash balls, 114. 

Washing, 99, 105, 133, 163, 355-359- 
Watch pawned, 267. 
Water tax, 42, 47, 58. 
Watson, James, tailor, 143. 
Wauchope, John, of Edmonstone, 

63 «. 
Waugh, John, 77. 
Wedderburn, James, merchant in 

Amsterdam, 386. 
Weems, David, 29, 45 and «, 46. 
Robert, of Graingemuir, xv, 45 «, 

430. 
Weights and measures, 421 and «. 
West, John, 45 and «. 
Westfauns, Ixxviii. 
White (Whett), major, escorts Robert 

Baillie of Jerviswood to the Tolbooth, 

xiii. 
Wight, John, 4, ic, 13, 64. 

Rob, 142. 

Wigs, Ixxii, 206, 207, 215, 261, 367, 

,?7?> 377- 
Williams, Helen, housemaid, lii, 156. 
Willis, Sam, 114. 
Wilson of Steapond, 225. 

John, 240. 

Window tax, 43, 51, 60, no. 
Windsor, Thomas, viscount. See 

Mountjoy. 
Wines, 416. See also under Champagne, 

Claret, etc. 
Winter, Jamie, carpenter, xvi. 
Wirsely, Benjamin, 219. 



INDEX 



448 



Wood, Alexander, carrier, 23, 67, 71, 

79- 
John, solicitor, Ixvi. 

Wray, Cycell, 207, 210. 

Wright, John, baker, loi. 

YouLL, Andrew, postillion, liv. 
Davie, 64. 



Youll, Helen, dairymaid, liv. 

Henry, 71. 74- 

Tarn, coachman, xxxix. Hi, Hii 

and w, liv, 15, 17, 29, 68, 132, 133, 
136, 146 and ft, 148 and «, 154, 162, 
280. 

Young, Robert, clerk of court, 6, 7, 11. 

Younger's brewery, 415 and «. 



Printed by T. and A. Constable, Printers to His Majesty 
at the Edinburgh University Press 



REPORT OF THE TWENTY-FOURTH 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 

SCOTTISH HISTORY SOCIETY 



The Twenty-fourth Annual Meeting of the Society was 
held in DowelFs Rooms, Edinburgh, on the 26th November 
1910, — Mr. W. B. Blaikie in the chair. 

The Secretary read the Report of the Council as 
follows : — 

During the past year ten members have died, and ten have 
resigned membership. 

Dr. John Dowden, Bishop of Edinburgh, Chairman of 
Council, was so intimately associated with the daily work 
of the Society, and its officials and other workers had so 
learned to lean on his help and encouragement, that his death 
is felt as the greatest of the great losses which the Society has 
sustained in recent years. His work on the Lindores and 
Inchaffray volumes, invaluable as it is, represents only a 
small fraction of the Society's debt to him. 

After filling the vacancies, twenty-four candidates for mem- 
bership remain on the list. 

Except Craig's De Uiiione, announced in the last Report as 
about to appear, no volume has been issued since the last 
General Meeting. Warist07i's Diary and Miscellaneous Nar- 
ratives relating to the "'45 will it is hoped be sent out early 
in 1911, and the other volumes promised for 1909-1910, viz. 
Lady Grisell BailUc's Household Books, and Seajiekl Corre- 
spondence^ are well advanced at press. 

The difficulties which have so seriously delayed the issue of 



2 



The Scots in Poland will, it is now hoped, be shortly overcome, 
and the vohime issued during the coming year. 

For 1910-1911 it is intended to issue two of the three 
vokimes followino; : — 

1. The Book of the Accounts of the Granltars and Chamber- 
lains of the Archhishopric of St. Andrews during Cardinal 
Beaton's tenure of the See, a.d. 1539 to 1546. Edited by 
R. K. Han nay. 

2. Letter-booh of Bailie John Stuart, Merchant in Inverness, 
1715-1752. Edited by William Mackay. 

3. Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, vol. 3. This 
will include, among other items, selections from the Wardrobe 
Book of Edward i. for tiie 33rd year of his reign (a.d. 1304-05), 
from the original in the British Museum, which contains a 
great deal of matter relating to Scotland ; a batcli of seven- 
teenth-century Haddingtonshire Trials for Witchcraft, edited 
by Dr. Wallace James; List of PoUable Persons in St. 
Andrews in 1693, edited by Dr. Hay Fleming ; Papers 
relating to the "15 and the "45, from the originals at Perth ; 
and perhaps Mr. Archibald Constable's long promised trans- 
lation of Ferrerius" Histoi'ia Abbatum de Kynlos. 

In accordance with the resolution of last year's Meeting, a 
general index to the first series of the Society's publications is 
m preparation, and will in due time be offered to Members. 

There are four vacancies in the Council to be filled up, 
caused by the election of Mr. Donald Crawford as Chairman of 
Council, and by the retirement in rotation of Sir James Balfour 
Paul, Lord Guthrie, and Mr. W. B. Blaikie. It is recom- 
mended that Sir J. Balfour Paul and Mr. Blaikie be re-elected, 
and that the other vacancies be filled by the appointment 
of The Hon. Hew Hamilton Dalrymple and Mr. C. S. 
Romanes, C.A. 

The Accounts of the Hon. Treasurer, of which an abstract 
is appended hereto, show that the balance in the Society's 



3 

favour on 10th November 1909, was dfi'^TS, Is. Id., the income 
for 1909-1910, 1^529, 10s. 9d., the expenditure, ^^329, 15s. 
lid., and the credit balance on 10th November 1910, £611, 
15s. lid. 

The Chairman, in moving the adoption of the Report, said : — It 
must be a matter of regret to the Society that I should occupy 
this place to-day, but our President, Lord Rosebery, who has so 
frequently given us illuminating addresses from this chair, is 
perforce absent in the act of making history, and has naturally 
little time for speaking about history. You have before you the 
Annual Report for the current year. The Report is short and 
somewhat laconic, but if you examine it you -will find that it 
is teeming with interest. We have this year to deplore the death 
of him who was Chairman of Council from the time Professor 
Masson left us until this year. Bishop Dowden, as you probably 
are aware, was the life and the soul of the Council of this Society. 
Mr. Law told us in his last speech in 1903 how the inception 
of the Society was that of Lord Rosebery, who suggested its 
establishment in a letter to the Scotsman nearly twenty-five years 
ago, and that his suggestion was first taken up by Bishop Dowden, 
Avho became chairman of a committee that carried the prelimi- 
naries through. The interest taken by the Bishop in the Society, 
and the counsel and assistance he ever gave to those who were 
doing historical work, can never be forgotten by those who sought 
his aid. He edited for the Society, The Chaiiulari/ of Lindores, 
and inspired and assisted in the editing of The Charters of the 
Abbey of Inchaffray. Strange to say, like our first Secretary, 
Mr. Law, Bishop Dowden was not a Scotsman by birth, but like 
Mr. Law he became a Scotsman by adoption and association, and 
these two men did as much to further the study of Scottish 
history as any Scotsman amongst us. 

The Council have elected as their Chairman Sheriff Donald 
Crawford, a gentleman who has given much service to the Society 
and who has edited one of its most interesting books. 

It is the custom of the Chairman at these annual meetings to 
give a slight foretaste of the bill of fare which is offered to the 
members of the Society. I do not think that at any previous 
meeting the Council have been able to offer a more tempting 
programme than they have to-day. It is true that only one 



book has been issued since our last meeting (Professor Terry's 
Translation of Craig's De Unione), but there are no fewer than 
five volumes in type awaiting the finishing touches of the various 
editors. The volume of The Scots in Poland has been pro- 
vokingly and unavoidably delayed by the difficulty of verify- 
ing descriptions and getting documents from Warsaw, but the 
Council hope that these difficulties will be overcome in the 
current year. 

The issue of The Diary of Johnston of Warislon will complete the 
first series of the Scottish History Society's publications, and the 
Council have resolved to prepare a general index of the whole of 
the sixty-one volumes comprising that series. This it is hoped will 
be issued to members in the course of the year, and it is believed 
that it will be a work of the greatest use to students of history. 
It is possible that the Council may print a small extra edition 
which may be purchased by libraries and collectors who are not 
members of the Society, and thus extend the usefulness of the 
Society's work. 

Of the books promised, the first that may be mentioned is The 
Diary of Johnston of Wariston, 1632-34, and again in the moment- 
ous years, 1637-39- This book is edited by Mr. George M. Paul, 
Deputy Keeper of the Signet, whose sympathetic work on a 
Diary of Archibald Johnston, issued in 1896, is well known to 
later members. This new instalment, refen-ing, however, to an 
earlier period, is of absorbing interest, for it embraces that 
crucial period in which Laud's Service Book was imposed upon 
the people of Scotland, and the National Covenant (practically 
the work of Johnston himself) was prepared and signed. We 
have here at first hand this epoch-making event graphically told 
by one of the principal actors. The Diary is, however, more than 
the mere relation of events ; it shows the mental working 
of a strange, nervous, intensely religious Puritan, full of egotism 
and introspection, but whose whole soul is filled with a desire 
to walk closely with his God, whom he consults and to whom 
he gives information on nearly every page of the journal. 
There have been few portrayals of the real Covenanter. The 
Covenanter of romance must disappear Avhen we read this Diary of 
Johnston of fVaristo7i and compare with it the work, edited by 
Sheriff Scott Moncrieff twenty-one years ago. The Narrative of 
James Nimmo. If the Scottish History Society had done nothing 



else than given these introspective memoirs, showing the inward 
working of the Covenanter's mind, it would have accomplished 
a great work. 

The Household Book of Lady Grisell BaiUie is a volume edited 
by Mr. R. Scott Moncrieff to be ready shortly. It gives the 
daily expenditure of an aristocratic family in the last decade 
of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the eighteenth. 

The Correspondence of the first Lord Seafield, edited, from the 
originals at Cullen House, by Mr. James Grant of Banff, is another 
book of much historical value. Lord Seafield was Chancellor of 
Scotland at the time of the Union ; it was he who uttered the 
historical obiter dictum, ' This is the end of an auld sang,' when the 
last Scottish Parliament accepted the Union. 

Then there is a volume of Narratives relating to the '45 with 
which I am entrusted. To me at least they are all full of interest. 
They belong to that type of article classed as ' fragments which 
must not perish,' and the incentive to the collection of these is 
the motto engraved on the Society's insignia. Among them is a 
portion of a mutilated manuscript of John Murray of Broughton 
picked up on the field of Culloden. There is the narrative 
of a Captain in Lord Balmerino's Horse, an Englishman, occa- 
sionally referred to by historians, but which has never before 
been printed. There are several narratives written by ministers 
from various parts of the country giving minute local details to be 
found nowhere else. There is the apology of the Laird of Grant 
for his somewhat ambiguous conduct during the rising. There is 
the narrative relating to the capture of Edinburgh and the Battle 
of Prestonpans. Jack, its author, was a writing-master in Edin- 
burgh, who assisted Professor M'Laurin to prepare the defences of 
the city, and who attempted to assist Cope's artillery at the Battle 
of Prestonpans. Lastly, it contains a good deal of narrative and 
many accounts of secret service performed by Walter Grosset, 
Commissioner of the Excise, who was an active agent of the 
Government in the '45. 

The programme for the following year begins with a volume by 
Mr. Hannay on the Accounts of the Granitars and Chamberlains of 
the Archbishopric of St. Andrews shortly before the Reformation, 
a theme which has been little written of, yet there is no doubt 
that it was the inordinate care of the worldly goods of the 
great ecclesiastics that exasperated the nobility and commons, 



6 

and contributed largely to the unanimity of the Reforma- 
tion. 

Mr. Maitland Thomson is collecting material for a Miscellany 
which comprises historical tit-bits ranging over four and a half 
centuries. Whether that book will be included in the next year's 
issues remains to be seen. 

One work I have left to the last and that is the Letter Book of 
Bailie John Stuart, to be edited by Mr. William Mackay of Inver- 
ness. The Society has hitherto had only one book on com- 
mercial affairs, and this volume, giving the details of a Highland 
merchant's business in the early eighteenth century, will be of 
much historical value. John Stuart, a bailie of Inverness, who 
was of the family of Kinchardine in Strathspey, and was related 
to several other Highland families, was a merchant in Inverness 
from about the year 1700 till 1752, During that period he carried 
on an extensive trade, in all kinds of commodities, with Highland 
chiefs and Government garrisons in the Highlands, as well as 
with Edinburgh, London, and various parts of the Continental sea- 
board from Norway and Sweden to Venice. Hugh Miller states 
in his Scotch Merchant of the Eighteenth Centia-y that coal had not 
found its way into the Cromarty Firth before I7o0, but we find 
Bailie Stuart bringing coals from Newcastle thirty years before 
this, probably even earlier. He owned about a dozen ships, some 
of which were built at Inverness ; the oak timber for these was 
brought from Darnaway and Loch Ness side, and part of 
the iron and timber frame - work came ready made from 
Dantzig. Stuart was factor on the Inverness-shire estates of 
the Earl of Moray. His business transactions and ventures, his 
successes and misfortunes, are recorded in his letters, which 
give a vivid picture of the conditions under which trade 
was carried on in the capital of the Highlands during the 
first half of the eighteenth century. Among the Bailie's 
partners in business was William Duff of Braco, afterwards the 
first Earl of Fife ; and his numerous customers and correspond- 
ents comprised the Duke of Gordon, the Earls of Moray, Seaforth, 
Cromartie, Sutherland, and Caithness, Lord Lovat, Lord Reay, 
Lord President Forbes, The Mackintosh, Lochiel, Mackintosh of 
Borlum, Glengarry, Stewart of Appin, the Laird of Grant, Sir 
Alexander Macdonald of Sleat, MacLeod of MacLeod, General 
Wade, Captain Burt, and the Bailie's cousin, the famous Colonel 



John Roy Stuart, the Jacobite soldier and poet. One of Stuart's 
descendants made his mark in British history, for his grandson 
was that Sir John Stuart who beat the French at the battle of 
Maida in 1806, the first British general who defeated Napoleon's 
veterans on European soil. With this programme before you 
I think you will agree that the Council is not neglecting the 
interests of the Scottish History Society. 

The motion was seconded by Sir James Balfour Paul, and 
unanimously agreed to. 



ABSTRACT OF THE HON. TREASURER S 

ACCOUNTS. 

For the Year ending \Oth November 1910. 

I. Charge. 

I. Balance from previous year — 

(1) In Bank on Deposit Receipt, £400 

(2) In Bank on Current Account, 72 1 1 

£472 1 1 

II. Subscriptions, viz. — 

(1) 400 Subscriptions for 

1909-1910, . . . £4^20 

8 in arrear for 1 908- 1909, 8 8 
7 in advance for 1910-1911, 7 7 



£435 15 
Less 25 in arrear and 3 in 

advance for 1909-1910, 29 8 



406 7 



(2) 89 Libraries, . . . £9^ 9 

1 in arrear for 1 908-1909 
and 4 in advance for I9IO- 
1911, . . . .550 



£98 14 
Less 1 in arrear for 1909- 

1910, . . . .110 



97 13 

III. Copies of previous issues sold to New Members, 10 17 

IV, Interest on Deposit Receipts, . . . . 14 13 9 



Sum of Charge, . . £1001 11 10 



II. Discharge. 

I. Incidental Expenses — 

(1) Printing Cards, Circulars, and 

Reports, ... £679 

(2) Stationery, and Receipt 

Book, 1 17 9 

(.S) Making - up and delivering 

Publications, . . . 12 15 5 

(4) Postages of Secretaries and 

Treasurer, . . . . 4 3 

(5) Clei'ical Work and Charges on 

Cheques, . . . . 2 11 

(6) Hire of rooms for Annual 

Meeting and Advertising, 118 



II. De Unione Regnorum Bntannice — 

Composition, Printing, and Paper 

540 Copies, . . . £115 10 6" 

Proofs and Corrections, . . 56 \S 6 
Binding Stamp, . . 110 

Binding 540 Copies at 8d., . 18 
Photogravure Portrait of Prof 

Masson, . . . . 6 l6 6 



£198 1 6 
Less paid to account October 

1909, 145 6 



III. The Scots in Poland. Expense to date — 

Composition, .... £72 1 

Corrections, . . 19 18 

Engraving Map, . 5 5 



£29 12 11 



52 15 6 



Carry forward, £97 4 £82 8 5 



10 

Brought forward, £97 4 £82 8 5 

Less paid to account, 

October 1908, £77 17 

Less paid to account, 

October 1909, 12 5 

90 2 

7 2 



IV^. Miscellaneous Narratives relating to the '45. 
Expense to date — 
Composition, . . . . . . 39 12 6 

V. Household Books of Lady Grisell Baillie. 
Expense to date — 
Composition, .... £53 6 
Corrections, . . . . 10 11 



VL Correspondence of James, Fourth Earl of 
Findlater. Expense to date — 

Composition, .... £27 4 

Corrections, . . . . 14 3 



VII. Diari/ of Archibald Johnston, Lord Wariston. 
Expense to date — 
Composition, .... £58 14 
Alterations, . . . . 32 14 6 

Transcribing, . . . . 72 15 

£l64 3 6 

Less paid to account, 

October 1908, £3 18 

Less paid to account, 

October 1909, . 64 l6 6 

68 14 6 



VIIL Balance to next account — 

(1) On Deposit Receipt, . .£650 

(2) On Current Account, . . 21 15 11 



63 17 



41 7 



95 9 



671 15 11 



Sum of Discharge, £1001 11 10 



11 

Edinburgh, 22nd November 1910. — Having examined the Accounts of the 
Hon. Treasurer of the Scottish History Society for the year ending lOth 
November 1910, of which the foregoing is an Abstract, we find the same to be 
correctly stated, and sufficiently vouched, — closing with a balance of £6ti, 
15s. lid. in Bank, whereof ;^650 is on deposit receipt and ;^2i, 15s. Iid. is 
on current account. 

Ralph Richardson, Auditor. 

Wm. Traquair Dickson, Auditor. 



S)cotti0t) i^is^torp ^ocietp* 



THE EXECUTIVE. 

1910-1911. 

Presidenl. 

The Earl of Rosebery, K.G., K.'I'., LL.D. 

Chairman of Coioicil. 

Donald Crawford, K.C, Sheriff of Aberdeenshire. 

Coiaicil. 

Sir James Balfour Paul, C.V.O., LL.D., Lyon Kin<r of Arms. 

Walter B. Blaikie. 

The Hon. Hew Hamilton Dalrymple. 

C. S. Romanes, C.A. 
Sir G. M. Paul, D.K.S. 
Ralph Richardson, W.S. 
Sheriff W. G. Scott Moncrieff. 

Professor P. Hume Brown, M.A., LL.D., Historiographer 

Royal for Scotland. 
William K. Dickson, Advocate. 
A. O. Curle, B.A., W.S. 

D. Hay Fleming, LL.D. 
Professor John Rankine, K.C, LL.D. 

Correspouding Members of the Coimcil. 
Prof. C. H. Firth, LL.D., Oxford ; Rev. W. D. Macray, Diick- 
lington Rectory, VVitney, Oxon. ; Prof. C. Sanford Terry, 
Aberdeen. 

Hon. Treasurer. 

J. T. Clark, Crear Villa, 196 Ferry Road, Edinburgh. 

Joint Hon. Secretaries. 
J. Maitland Thomson, LL.D., Advocate, 3 Grosvenor Gardens, 

Edinburgh, 
A. Francis Steuart, Advocate, 79 Great King Street, 

Edinburgh. 



RULES 

1. The object of the Society is the discovery and printing, 
under selected editorship, of unpublished documents illus- 
trative of the civil, religious, and social history of Scotland. 
The Society will also undertake, in exceptional cases, to issue 
translations of printed works of a similar nature, which have 
not hitherto been accessible in English. 

2. The number of Members of the Society shall be limited 
to 400. 

3. The affairs of the Society shall be managed by a Council, 
consisting of a Chairman, Treasurer, Secretary, and twelve 
elected Members, five to make a quorum. Three of the twelve 
elected Members shall retire annually by ballot, but they shall 
be eligible for re-election. 

4. The Annual Subscription to the Society shall be One 
Guinea. The publications of the Society shall not be delivered 
to any Member whose Subscription is in arrear, and no 
Member shall be permitted to receive more than one copy of 
the Society"'s publications. 

5. The Society will undertake the issue of its own publica- 
tions, i.e. without the intervention of a publisher or any other 
paid agent. 

6. The Society will issue yearly two octavo volumes of about 
320 pages each. 

7. An Annual General Meeting of the Society shall be held 
at the end of October, or at an approximate date to be 
determined by the Council. 

8. Two stated Meetings of the Council shall be held each 
year, one on the last Tuesday of May, the other on the Tues- 
day preceding the day upon which the Annual General Meeting 
shall be held. The Secretary, on the request of three Members 
of the Council, shall call a special meeting of the Council. 

9. Editors shall receive 20 copies of each volume they edit 
for the Society. 

10. The owners of Manuscripts published by the Society will 
also be presented with a certain number of copies. 

11. The Annual Balance-Sheet, Rules, and List of Members 
shall be printed. 

12. No alteration shall be made in these Rules except at a 
General Meeting of the Society. A fortnight's notice of any 
alteration to be proposed shall be given to the Members of the 
Council. 



PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

SCOTTISH HISTORY SOCIETY 

For the 1/ear 1886-1887. 

1. Bishop Pococke's Tours in Scotland, 1747-1760. Edited by 
D. W. Kemp. 

2. Diary and Account Book of William Cunningham ok Craio- 
ENDs, 1673-1680. Edited by the Rev. James Dodds, D.D. 

For the year 1887-1888. 

3. Grameidos libri sex : an heroic poem on the Campaign of 

1689, by James Philip of Almerieclose. Translated and 
Edited by the Rev. A. D. Murdoch. 

4. The Register of the Kirk-Session of St. Andrews. Part i. 

1559-1582. Edited by D. Hay Fleming. 

For the year 1888-1889. 

5. Diary of the Rev. John Mill, Minister in Shetland, 1740- 

1803. Edited by Gilbert Goudie. 

6. Narrative of Mr. James Nimmo, a Covenanter, 1654-1709- 

Edited by W. G. Scott-Moncrieff. 

7. The Register of the Kirk-Session of St. Andrews. Part ii. 

1583-1600. Edited by D. Hay Fleming. 

For the year 1889-1890. 

8. A List OF Persons concerned IN THE Rebellion (1745). With 
a Preface by the Earl of Rosebery. 

Presented to the Society by the Earl of Rosebery. 

9. Glamis Papers: The ' Book of Record,' a Diary written by 

Patrick, first Earl of Strathmore, and other documents 
(1684-89). Edited by A. H. Millar. 
10. John Major's History of Greater Britain (1521). Trans- 
lated and edited by Archibald Constable. 



4 PUBLICATIONS 

For the 1/ear 1890-1891. 

11. The Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies, 

1646-47. Edited by the Rev. Professor Mitchell, D.D., and 
the Rev. James Christie, D.D. 

12. Court-Book of the Barony of Urie, 1604-1747. Edited 

by the Rev. D. G. Barron. 

For the year 1891-1892. 

13. Memoirs of Sir John Clerk of Penicuik, Baronet. Ex- 
tracted by himself from his own Journals, 1676-1755. Edited 
by John M. Gray. 

14. Diary of Col. the Hon. John Erskine of Carnock, 1683- 

1687. Edited by the Rev. Walter Macleod. 

For the year 1 892- 1 893. 

15. Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, First Volume — 
The Library op James vi., 1573-83. Edited by G. F. ^Varner. — 

Documents illustrating Catholic Policy, 1596-98. T. G. Law. 
— Letters of Sir Thomas Hope, 1627-46. Rev, R. Paul. — Civil 
War Papers, 1643-50. H. F. Alorland Simpson. — Lauderdale 
Correspondence, 1660-77. Right Rev. John Dowden, D.D. — 
Turnbull's Diary, 1657-1704. Rev. R. Paul. — Masterton 
Papers, 1660-1719. V^. A. Noel Paton. — Accompt of Expenses 
IN Edinburgh, 1715. A. H. Millar. — Rebellion Papers, 1715 
and 1745. H. Patou. 

16. Account Book of Sir John Foulis of Ravelston (1671-1707). 

Edited by the Rev. A. W. Cornelius Hallen. 

For the year 1893-1894. 

17. Letters and Papers illustrating the Relations between 

Charles ii. and Scotland in 1650. Edited by Samuel 
Rawson Gardiner, D.C.L., etc. 

18. Scotland and the Commonwealth. Lei-iers and Papers 

relating to the Military Government of Scotland, Aug. 
l651-Dec. 1653. Edited by C. H. Firth, M.A. 

For the year 1894-1895. 

19. The Jacobite Attempt of 1719- Letters of James, second 

Duke of Ormonde. Edited by W. K. Dickson. 

20. 21. The Lyon in Mourning, or a Collection of Speeches, 

Letters, Journals, etc., relative to the Affairs of Prince 
Charles Edward Stuart, by Bishop Forbes. 1746-1775. 
Edited by Henry Paton. Vols. i. and ii. 



PUBLICATIONS 6 

For the 1/ear 1895-1H96. 

22. The Lyon in Mourning. Vol. in. 

23. Itinerary ok Prince Charles Edward (Sup])lement to the 

Lyon in Mourning). Compiled by W. B. Bi.aikie. 

24. Extracts from the Presbytery Records oi- Inverness and 

Dingwall from 16'3S to lf)88. Edited by William .\Iackay. 

25. Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies 
(continued) for the years 1648 and l()49. Edited by the Rev. 
Professor Mitchell, D.D., and Rev. James Christie, D.D. 

For the yea}- 1896-1897. 

26". Wariston's Diary and other Papers — 

Johnston of Wariston's Diahy, 1039. Edited by G. M. Paul. — 
The Honours of Scotland, 1651-52. C. R. A. Howden. — The 
Earl of Mar's Legacies, 1722, 172G. Hon. S. Erskine. — Letters 
BY Mrs. Grant of Laggan. J. II. N. Macphail. 

Presented to the Society by Messrs. T. and A. Constable. 

27. Memorials of John Murray of Broughton, 1740-1747. 

Edited by R. Fitzroy Bell. 

28. The Comht Buik of David Wedderburne, Merchant of 

Dundee, 1587-16'30. Edited by A. H. Millar. 

For the year 1897-1898. 

29. 30. The Correspondence of De Montereul and the brothers 

De BELLifevRE, French Ambassadors in England and Scot- 
land, 1645-1648. Edited, Avith Translation, by J. G. 
Fotheringham. 2 vols. 

For the year \S9S-\899. 

31. Scotland and the Protectorate. Letters and Papers 

relating to the military government of scotland, from 
January 1654 to June 1 659. Edited by C. H. Firth, M.A. 

32. Papers illustrating the History of the Scots Brigade in 
the Service of the United Netherlands, 1572-1 7S2. 
Edited by James Ferguson Vol. i. 1572-1697. 

S3, 34, Macfarlane's Genealogical Collections concerning 
Families in Scotland ; Manuscripts in the Advocates' Library. 
2 vols. Edited by J. T. Clark, Keeper of the Library. 

Presented to the Society by the Trustees of the late Sir William Fraser, K.C.B. 



6 PUBLICATIONS 

For the 9/ear 1899-1900. 

35. Papers on the Scots Brigade in Holland, 1572-1782^ 

Edited by James Ferguson. Vol. n. 1698-1782. 

36. Journal of a Foreign Tour in 1665 and 1666, etc., by Sir John 

Lauder, Lord Fountainhall. Edited by Donald Crawford. 

37. Papal Negotiations with Mary Queen of Scots during her 
Reign in Scotland. Chiefly from the Vatican Archives. 
Edited by the Rev. J. Hungerford Pollen, S.J. 

/'or if/i^^mr 1900-1901. 

38. Papers on the Scots Brigade in Holland, 1572-1782. 
Edited by James Ferguson. Vol. in. 

39. The Diary of Andrew Hay of Craignethan, 1659-60. 

Edited by A. G. Reid, F.S.A.Scot. 

For the year 1901-1902. 

40. Negotiations for the Union of England and Scotland in 

1651-53. Edited by C. Sanford Terry. 

41. The Loyall Dissuasive. Written in 1703 by Sir ^neas 

Macpherson. Edited by the Rev. A. D. Murdoch. 

For the year 1902-1903. 

42. The Chartulary of Lindores, 1195-1479- Edited by the 

Right Rev. John Dowden, D.D., Bishop of Edinburgh. 

43. A Letter from Mary Queen of Scots to the Duke of Guise, 
Jan. 1562. Reproduced in Facsimile. Edited by the Rev. J. 
Hungerford Pollen, S.J. 

Presented to the Society by the family of the late Mr. Scott, of Halkshill. 

44. Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, Second Volume — 

The Scottish King's Household, 14th Century. Edited by Mary 
Bateson. — The Scottish Nation in the University of Orleans, 
133G-1538. John Kirkpatrick, LL.D. — The French Garrison 
at Dunbar, 1563. Roberts. Rait. — De Antiquitate Religionis 
apud Scotos, 1594. Henry D. G. Law. — Apology for William 
Maitland of Lethington, 1610. Andrew Lang. — Letters of 
Bishop George Gr^mk, 1602-38. L. G. Graeme. — A Scottish 
JouRNiB, 1641. C. H. Firth. — Narratives illustrating the Duke 
OF Hamilton's Expedition to England, 1648. C. H. Firth. — 
Burnet-Leighton Papers, 1648-168-. H. C. Foxcroft. — Papers 
of Robert Erskine, Physician to Peter the Great, 1677-1720. 
Rev. Robert Paul. — Wit,!, of the Duchess of Albany, 1789. 
A. Francis Steuart. 

45. Letters of John Cockburn of Ormistoun to his Gardener, 

1 727-1 743. Edited by James Colville, D.Sc. 



PUBLICATIONS 7 

For the year 1903-1904. 
46*. Minute Book of the Managers of the New Mills Cloth 
Manufactory, 168I-I69O. Edited by W. R. Scott. 

47. Chronicles of the Erasers ; being the Wardlaw Manuscript 

entitled ' Polichronicon seu Policratica Temporum, or, the 
true Genealogy of the Erasers.' By Master James Eraser. 
Edited by William Mack ay. 

48. The Records of the Proceedings of the Justiciary Court 

from 1661 TO 1678. Vol. I. 1661-1669. Edited by Sheriff 

SCOTT-MONCRIEFF. 

For the year 1904-1905. 

49. The Records of the Proceedings of the Justiciary Court 

FROM 1661 TO 1678. Vol. II. 1669-1678. Edited by Sheriff 

SCOTT-MONCRIEFF. (Oct. 1905.) 

50. Records OF THE Baron Court OF StitchilLj 1655-1807. Edited 
by Clement B. Gunn, M.D., Peebles. (Oct. 1905.) 

51. Macfarlane's Geographical Collections. Vol. i. Edited 
by Sir Arthur Mitchell, K.C.B. (April 1906.) 

For the year 1905-1906. 

52. 53. Macfarlane's Geographical Collections. Vols. 11. and iii. 

Edited by Sir Arthur Mitchell, K.C.B. 

(May 1907; March I9OS.) 

54. Statuta EccLEsiiE ScoTicAN^E, 1225-1559. Translated and 

edited by David Patrick, LL.D. (Oct. 1907.) 

/'or^/i^^/mr 1906-190T. 

55. The House Booke of Accomps, Ochtertyre, 1737-39. Edited 

by James Colville, D.Sc. (Oct. 1907.) 

56. The Charters of the Abbey of Inchaffray. Edited by W, A. 

Lindsay, K.C, the Right Rev. Bishop Dowden, D.D., and 
J. Maitland Thomson, LL.D. (Feb. 1908.) 

57. A Selection of the Forfeited Estates Papers preserved in 

H.M. General Register House and elsewhere. Edited by 
A. H. Millar, LL.D. (Oct. 1909.) 

For the year 1^01 -\90d,. 

58. Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies (con- 
tinued), for the years 1650-52. Edited by the Rev. James 
Christie, D.D. (Feb. 1909.) 

5^. Papers relating to the Scots in Poland. Edited by Miss 
Beatrice Baskerville. {Puhlicaiion delayed.) 



8 



PUBLICATIONS 



Forthe 1/ear 1908-1909. 

60. Sir Thomas Craig's De Unione Regnorum Britannia Trac- 
TATUs. Edited, with an English Translation, by C. Sanford 
Terry. (Nov. 1909.) 

61. Johnston of Wariston's Memento Quamdiu Vivas, and Diary 

from 1637 to 1639. Edited by G. M. Paul, LL.D., D.K.S. 

(May 1911.) 
Second Series. 

For the 1/ear 1909-1910, 

1. The Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie, 1692-1733. 

Edited by R. Scott-Moncrieff, W.S. (Oct. 1911.) 

2. Miscellaneous Narratives relating to the '45. Edited by 
W. B. Blaikie. 

3. Correspondence of James, fourth Earl of Findlater and 

first Earl of Seafield, Lord Chancellor of Scotland^ 
Edited by James Grant, M.A., LL.B. 

For the ?jear 1910-1911. 

4. Accounts of the Chamberlains and Granitars of Cardinal 

David Beaton, 1539-1546. Edited by R. K. Hannay. 

5. Selections from the Letter Books of John Stuart, Bailie 

of Inverness. Edited by William Mackay. 

In preparation. 

Register of the Consultations of the Ministers of Edinburgh, 
and some other Brethren of the Ministry since the 
interruption of the Assembly 1653, with other Papers of 
public concernment, 1653-1 660. Edited by the Rev. James 
Christie, D.D. 

A Translation of the Historia Abbatum de Kynlos of 
Ferrerius. By Archibald Constable, LL.D. 

Miscellany of the Scottish History Society. Third Volume. 

Analytical Catalogue of the Wodrow Collection of Manu- 
scripts IN THE Advocates' Library. Edited by J. T. Clark. 

Charters and Documents relating to the Grey Friars and thk 
Cistercian Nunnery of Haddington. — Register of Inch- 
coLM Monastery. Edited by J. G. Wallace-James, M.B. 

Records relating to the Scottish Armies from 1638 to 1650. 
Edited by C. Sanford Terry. 

Papers relating to the Rebellions of 1715 and 1745, with other 
documents from the Municipal Archives of the City of Perth. 

The Balcarres Papers. Edited by J. P. Melville. 



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