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Full text of "The housekeeper's friend"

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Eugene Weber, 
Pharmacist 

445 N. CLARK ST. 

S. W. Cor. Division St. 


JAS. H.WALKER&CO. 

f)ry Goods 

WABASH AVE. 


Telephone ISlo. 331S 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

CAREFULLY 

COMPOUNDED. 


ADAMS STREET. 
CHICAGO. . . . 

Carpets, Glassware, 

Upholstery, Art Goods. 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 



(Jha$. Gafbefi, 

Confectionery 



Ice (Jreatn g&rlor. 

176 N.CLARK STREET 
CHICAGO. 

TELEPHONE 3396. 

Chicken, Lobster and Shrimp 
Salads made to order. 





I am still making Shoes, and guar- 
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I have also a large variety of my 
very best Shoes on hand, which I 
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and would be pleased to receive 
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24 and 26 Adams St. CHICAGO. 



Dr. Ph. D. Paul, 



Diseases 



OF THE 






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AT OFFICE : 



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From 2 to 4 p. m., Sundays Excepted. 



HaLF savED 



IF YOU BUY BOOKS AT 



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FANCY LAMPS. . 

Our assortment is without questiop the most 
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Table Bonbons. 

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The 



HOUSEKEEPER'S FRIEND 



Published by The 



/ 

Young Ladies Missionary Society, 



Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, 

Corner La Salle Avenue and Locust Street, 



CHICAGO, ILLS. 



I 



- 



NOV 






Her/: 



" We may live without poetry, music or art; 

We may live without conscience, live without heart; 
We may live without friends, we may live without books, 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks. 

" He may live without books, what is knowledge but greiving? 
He may live without hope, what is hope but deceiving? 
He may live without love, what is passion but pining ? 
But where is the man that can live without dining? " 



. 












Copyrighted 1891 

BY 

The Young Ladies Missionary Society, 

Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Chicago. 



PRESS OF 

C. H. MORGAN CO., 

CHICAGO. 



PREFACE. 

In presenting this book to our friends and patrons we guar- 
antee that ''Indigestion, that conscience of every bad stomach," 
will not be a portion of those who try our recipes. We have 
followed closely that old proverb, ."prove all things, hold fast to 
that which is good," and have only such recipes as have been 
tried and proved entirely satisfactory by ladies whose rare dis- 
crimination in matters of culinary art is well known. 

The Housekeeper's Friend is submitted with the hope that it 
will be a guide and an inspiration to those who are seeking per- 
fection in the most useful of all arts. 

Y. L. M. S. 



Miss Nellie J. Flood, 
Miss Carrie Kenner, 
Miss Anna Riddell. 
Miss Grace Walrath 
Mrs. L. A. Mannhei.mer, . 



Committee. 



A Country Wedding Feast. 



A great long table fairly crammed, 
With boils and bakes, with stews and steaks, 
With roasts and pies and stomach aches, 
Of every fashion and every size, 
From doughnuts up to pumpkin pies; 
With candies, oranges and figs, 
And raisins and all the whirligigs 
And jimcracks that the law allows 
On such occasions; bobs and buns 
Of giggling girls with glossy curls 
And fancy ribbons red and blue, 
With beau catchers and curb/cues 
To beat the world. 

— James Whitcomb Riley. 



INDEX 



Soups - . 5 

Fish 8 

Oysters . . . . . . . . 13 

Meats 16 

Fish and Meat Sauces .... 19 

Poultry and Game 21 

Vegetables ....... 25 

Entrees ........ 30 

Eggs 35 

Salads and Salad Dressings . . -37 

Bread, Rolls, Breakfast Cakes, Etc. . 41 

Pastry 47 

Puddings 57 

Cake 58 

Fillings 68 

Cookies, Etc 71 

Desserts 74 

Preserves 78 

Pickles 82 

Ice Creams ........ 86 

Beverages 89 

Candy . . . . . . . . .91 

Miscellaneous ...... 94 



SOUPS. 



CLAM SOUP. 

First catch your clams, along the ebbing edges 

Of Saline coves, you'll find the precious wedges. 

With backs up, lurking in the sandy bottom, 

Pull in your rake, and lo ! you've got 'em. 

Take thirty large ones, put a basin under; 

Add water, three quarts to the native liquor. 

Bring to a boil (and by the way the quicker 

It boils the better, if you'll do it cutely) 

Now add the clams, chopped up and minced minutely. 

Allow a longer boil of just three minutes, 

And while it bubbles, quickly stir within its 

Tumultuous depths, where still the mollusks mutter, 

Four tablespoons of flour and four of butter, 

A pint of milk, some pepper to your notion, 

And clams need salting, alto' born of ocean. 

Remove from the fire, (if much boiled they will suffer 

You'll find that india rubber is not tougher). 

After 'tis off add three fresh eggs well beaten, 

Stir once more and its ready to be eaten. 

A. R. H. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CODFISH SOUP. 

One-quarter pound codfish cut in small squares, freshen- 
ed by boiling in water once; after which boil again 15 minutes, 
strain into a quart of milk, thicken with a teaspoon of corn 
starch. When it comes to a boil, set aside, add yolk of egg; 
season to taste, lastly add codfish, one-half tablespoonful 
Worcestershire sauce. mrs. a. m. p. 

CELERY CREAM SOUP. 

Boil a cupful of rice in three pints of milk until it will 
pass through a sieve. Grate the white part of two heads of 
celery (three if small) on a bread grater, add this to the rice 
milk after straining, put to it a pint of strong white stock. 
Allow to boil until celery is tender. Season with salt and 
cayenne pepper and serve. 

If cream is obtainable substitute one pint for same 
quantity of milk. mrs. d. sauer. 

BEEF SOUP WITH VEGETABLES. 

Take beef or veal bone, put in one gallon cold water, boil 
five hours; add salt and pepper; skim as is necessary, strain, 
set in a cool place over night. Skim next day. Chop piece 
of cabbage, two medium sized potatoes, one small carrot, one 
turnip and one onion, altogether add one tablespoonful rice, 
one can tomatoes strained. Put all in a vessel, boil till soft, 
serve hot. mrs. w. h. bush. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Four large potatoes, one onion. Boil in two quarts of 
water till soft. Press through a sieve and add one pint sweet 
milk, one tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste. Boil 
up again and serve. miss k. nash. 

PEA SOUP. 

Put a pint of split peas to soak over night. About three 
hours before dinner pour off the water and add two quarts of 
water, a carrot, an onion, a little celery or celery seeds and 
a small piece of salt pork. Boil it steadily and be careful to 
stir it often, lest it should burn; have boiling water at hand 
to add as the water boils away much faster in pea soup than 
in any other kind, strain it through a coarse sieve; a cup of 
milk added after the soup is done is an improvement. 

MRS. B. H. WALRATH 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



TOMATO SOUP. 

One quart stock, one pint tomatoes, one-half cup cream, 
one-half cup rolled crackers, season with salt and pepper. 
Put tomatoes on in separate kettle, with one-half teaspoonful 
soda; allow it to come to aboil, put through a sieve, add stock, 
cream, salt and pepper. Boil five minutes and then add 
crackers, let it come to a boil and serve, mrs.c.a.mannheimer 

CREAM TOMATO SOUP. 

To one can of tomatoes add one-half pint water, strain 
through wire sieve; after boiling ten minutes add teaspoonfnl 
soda, salt to taste and butter size of walnut, one pint milk. 
Boil ten minutes longer and serve. mrs. w. h. bush. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Two quarts of water, three pound can tomatoes, one 
tablespoon salt; boil one hour, then put through a sieve, add 
one-half teaspoon of baking soda, one-quarter pound of butter, 
pint of sweet milk, pint of crushed crackers, little pepper, 
then let all come to a boil and it will be ready to serve. 

MRS. E. B. POWERS. 

MUTTON OR LAMB BROTH. 

Take the water in which a leg of mutton or lamb was 
boiled in on the previous day, take off the fat and boil it two 
hours, with a turnip, an onion and a carrot cut fine, add some 
minced parsley and a spoonful of rice. All these except the 
parsley should be put in while the water is cold. 

MRS. B. H. WALRATH. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

The water chicken was boiled in, set away in a cool place 
makes a good broth. The next day skim off all the fat; take 
the bones of the chicken, put into the soup pot with the broth 
one onion cut very fine, one carrot, one turnip, a small bunch 
of parsley, a little salt and pepper; let it boil two hours, take 
out bones and add one-half cup of rice or vermicelli, let it 
boil one hour, mrs. b, h. walrath. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



FISH. 



"The silvery fisli 

Grazing at large in meadows submarine, 

Fresh from the wave, now cheers 

Our festive board." 



BAKED FISH. 

Fish will cook better if placed upright in the pan instead 
of on one side. Fish that are flat like shad may be kept in 
place by propping' with stale bread or pared potatoes, others 
may be made into shape of letter S. Run a threaded needle 
through the head, middle of body and tail, and draw string, 
fasten the ends. Thus prepared fish will keep their shape 
and can be better served. 

In putting fish to bake, rub the pan well with salt pork 
and cut small pieces of pork under the fish, which will 
prevent it from sticking. Baste often with pork fat. Bake 
until brown. mrs dr. webb 

STUFFING FOR FISH WEIGHING FROM 4 TO 6 LBS. 

One cup cracker crumbs, one saltspoonful salt, one salt- 
spoonful pepper, one teaspoon chopped onion, one teaspoon 
chopped parsley, one teaspoon capers, one teaspoon pickles, 
one-quarter cup melted butter. This makes a dry crumbly 
stuffing. If a moist stuffing is desired use stale bread (not 
dried) crumbs and moisten with one beaten egg and the 
butter, or moisten the crackers with warm water. 

If an oyster stuffing is desired; one pint of oysters, one 
cup of seasoned and buttered cracker crumbs; drain and roll 
each oyster in the crumbs. Fill the fish with the oysters and 
sprinkle the remainder of the crumbs over the oysters. 

MRS. WEBB 



THK HOfSKKKEI'KRS FRIEND 



TUKBAT A LA CREME. 

Boil five pounds of whitefish, take out all bones and shred 
the fish very fine. Have one quart of milk, one onion and a 
piece of parsley come to a boil, then stir in a cup of flour and 
milk and the "yolks of two eggs, season with half white 
pepper, a little thyme, salt to taste. Putter a pan, put . 
in a layer of sauce and then a layer of fish and so on, finish 
with sauce over it. Sprinkle with cracker crumbs and a light 
grating of cheese. Bake in a moderate oven one hour. 

MRS. 1). WATTERSON 

COLD BOILED FISH A LA VINAGRETTE. 

Take the skin and bones out and place in the centre of a 
dish, have two cold hard boiled eggs cut fine, sprinkle the 
fish with this and garnish with small lettuce leaves, water 
cresses or cold boiled potatoes and beets, cut in slices, with 
here and there a sprig of parsley. Serve the Vinaigrette 
sauce in a separate dish, garnish and pour a spoonful of the 
sauce over each dish as your serve it; a nice dish for tea or 
lunch in summer, and takes the place of a salad. 

MRS. BALDWIN 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

One-quarter pound salt pork cut in small pieces, fry until 
crisp and brown, do not burn; four large onions in slices, six 
potatoes, add one quart boiling water, one quart clams, salt 
and pepper to taste. Let cook two hours, before serving add 
one quart of milk and a little butter. mrs. h. wunderle. 

SCALLOPED FISH. 

Boil a large whitefish, pick it up fine, taking out the 
bones. Make a sauce of a quart of milk, a little thyme if 
desired, a few sprigs of parsley, a small onion, simmer to- 
gether until well flavored. Wet two ounces of flour, stir in 
with a quarter pound of butter, stir until it thickens then 
strain it over two well beaten eggs, season with pepper and 
salt. Put some of the salt in a pudding dish, then a layer of 
fish, etc., with sauce on top. Cover with cracker crumbs; 
brown in hot oven. mrs. jane wick 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



BAKED SALMON OR LOBSTER. 



One can of salmon picked fine, one cup of fine bread 
crumbs, one cup of scalded milk or cream; if milk, thicken 
with one teaspoon of cornstarch, salt and pepper, a very small 
onion and one egg well beaten; pour off nearly all the oil, 
steam in a covered dish in the oven two hours, then remove 
cover and brown the top. mrs. C. e. morris 



ESCALLOPED LOBSTER. 



For two and one-half pounds green lobster, use one pint 
cream, two tablespoons flour, two of butter, a little cayenne 
pepper, salt to taste; a small pint of bread crumbs. Take the 
lobster from the shell, cut in small pieces; put the cream over 
to boil saving enough to blend the flour. When boiled, add 
the flour and butter. Let boil ten minutes then add the 
lobster and boil one minute, add salt and pepper. Now 
butter your individual dish and fill; sprinkle over each with 
bread crumbs and bake until slightly brown, serve hot. 

MRS, I. A, JONES 



LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

Mince the meat of the lobster fine, season with salt and 
spice; melt a piece of butter in a sauce pan, mix with it one 
tablespoonful of flour, add lobster and a little finely chopped 
parsley, also a little stock. Let it come to a boil, remove 
from the fire and stir into it the yolks of two eggs, spread 
this mixture in a shallow pan, and when cold cut into cutlets, 
dip in beaten egg then in cracker crumbs, and bake to a rich 
brown in hot lard. mrs c, d. burroughs 



FRIED FISH. 

After thoroughly scraping and washing the fish, sprinkle 
lightly with salt, put in a coal place for two or three hours. 
Cut in pieces sizes desired, dredge with fresh cornmeal or 
flour, fry in hot lard. mrs. p. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS ERIEND 



FISH TURBOT. 

Use whitefish, about three pounds; steam three-quarters 
of an hour, then place aside to cool; when cold, pick meat 
from bones and skin. Make a sauce by boiling one and one- 
half pints milk, four tablespoonfuls flour and same of butter, 
rub to a cream, add salt, pepper and yolks of three eggs, well 
beaten. Stir while cooking. Butter a dish, put a layer of 
sauce on bottom, then a layer of fish and so on until dish is 
full, on top put cracker crumbs and butter. Bake for one-half 
hour in quick oven, mrs, d. y. mc mullen 

CODFISH CROQUETTES. 

Take one pint bowl full of fish in strips and twice full of 
small potatoes, pared, boil in plenty of water, then drain off 
the water and mash very fine, when cool beat two eggs and 
add butter the size of an egg and a little pepper, beat all 
thoroughly, then have a kettle of hot lard and drop with a 
spoon in an oblong shape, cook until a light brown. 

MRS. I. A. JONES. 

BROILED BROOK TROUT. 

A good way to serve them is with parsley butter but 
fried in butter is the general way they are cooked. Clean 
and wipe dry, season with salt and pepper, roll in flour, dip 
in beaten egg and roll in cracker crumbs; fry brown in hot 
butter and serve with fried parsley. mrs. c, d. burroughs. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



JVIain Office and Station, 73 boornis St. 
South Side Station, 2936 Cottage Grove Ave. 

Two deliveries daily to all sides of the City. 

Telephone 4678. CHICAGO. 

W. H. RICH, 

... DEALER IN ... 

Staple & pancy Groceries, 



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Tne twisted wire rope selvage Is a peculiar 
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a single wire selvage. 




Fencing and Gates of All Kinds. Send for Free Catalogue. 

McMULLEN WOVEN WIRE FENCE CO., 

N. MARKET AND ONTARIO STS , - CHICAGO. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND I J 



OYSTERS. 



Fruit of the wave ! Oh dainty and delicious! 
Food for the gods, Ambrosia for Aspicius, 
Worthy to thr 11 the soul of sea-1 orn Venus, 
Or titilate the palate of Silenus! a.r.h. 



OYSTER FRICASSEE. 

A tablespoon each of butter and flour mixed in a sauce 
pan over the fire till a smooth paste is formed, then add the 
oyster liquor strained; a little water may be added if neces- 
sary. wSeason with salt, pepper and a little nutmeg; boil up, 
add the oysters and cook until the edges curl. Remove from 
the fire and stir in the yolks of three raw eggs, three table- 
spoons salad oil, one of vinegar or lemon and chopped parsley. 

MRS. w. D, 

STUFFED OYSTERS. 

Chop fine a dozen oysters, mix with the beaten yolk of 
one egg, thicken with bread crumbs; salt and pepper to taste, 
add tablespoon of cream. Fill oyster shells and brown in a 
quick oven. mrs. w. d. 

ESCALLOPEI) OYSTERS. 

Butter the pan selected, then sprinkle with cracker 
crumbs, strain the oysters required, season with salt and 
pepper, a little nutmeg and Worcestershire sauce; melt some 
good butter, fill your pan alternately with a layer of oysters 
and cracker crumbs, sprinkle each layer with crumbs and 
some of the melted butter, having the top layer crumbs; put 
in the oven to bake. A pan containing four dozen, three 
layers deep would require one-half hour baking. 

.MRS. C. I). m'RROfOHS. 



14 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



FRIED OYSTERS. 



One dozen oysters, three eggs well beaten, one-half pound 
crackers rolled fine. First put the oysters in the cracker, 
then dip in the egg, then in the cracker again and place on 
well buttered griddle, frying them to a nice brown. Care 
must be taken not to have the fire too hot. mrs. c. h. squire 



OYSTER PATTIES. 



Make a pie crust and line your shells or dish; then fill 
with old bread or buns, or else nut shells which have been 
cleaned and put aside for that purpose; put on top crust and 
bake. While baking make a rich oyster stew thickened. 
When the patties are done take off upper crust and take out 
filling, then fill with the oysters and cover with the crust. If 
meant to be eaten late in the day they can be warmed over. 

MRS. W. HEYWOOD 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



15 



Do You Wish Perfectly Cooked Food ? 

If so, you should at once supply your kitchen with a 



«rrr- ■ 




wmm. 

Leach Roaster and Baker, 

They save Health, they save Food, they save Time, they save Labor, they 
save Worry, they save Money 

Your Roasts and Fowls will come from the oven rich, tender and juicy, and 
with all their nutriment and flavor retained. Your Bread and Cakes will be simply 
perfect. No article cooked in the Roaster and Baker can burn. 

It is a self-baster and requires no watching. It will do its work while you are 
busy about your household duties or at church. 

The Leach Roasters and Bakers are the most perfect, complete and satisfactory 
cooking utensils ever brought before the public. They have stood the test of time 
and use, and ladies all over the United States unite in pronouncing them invaluable. 

Description. — It is not a complicated affair, but merely two pans of equal 
size so arranged that the heat and steam is returned inside, so that the article, 
whether roasting or baking, will not become dry and hard, as it does in an open pan 
unless the cook keeps a constant watch on the article being baked. 



Oak Park, Sept 9th. 1890 
Mr. T. E. Hogge, Sir: — Your Leach Roaster 
is all that can be desired in its line. Meat bak- 
ed in it has a much finer flavor than in the old 
way, and with little or no trouble or attention. 
Very resp't. Mrs. W. E. Hughes. 

Woodlawn Park, Sept 12th, 1890 
Mr. T. E. Hogge, Sir: — 1 fully endorse the 
above statement. It also makes the meat ten- 
der without waste by shrinkage. 

Very resp't, Mrs. R. E. Rapp 



Chicago, III, Sept 10th, 1890 
Mr, T. E. Hogge, Sir: — I fully endorse the 
above statements, and furthermore say it will 
with proper use, make "tough meat tender" 
and fine flavored. I would not be without one 
for many times its cost. Very resp't, 
Mrs. A. W. Sweet, 

6929 Dickey St. 



Chicago, III, Polytechnic Institute, 
Sept 24th. 1890 
Mr T. E. Hogge: — We have used your Leach 

All orders sent to T. E. Hogge, 100 
promptly attended to and Bakers delivered 

p-RieB 

No. 1, Small Family $1.00 

No. 2, Medium 1.25 

For further information address, 



Roaster and Baker and I like it better than any- 
thing of the kind I have ever seen. 

Emma C. Sickels, 
Sup't Domestic Service Dept 

Austin, Cook Co., Sept 25th, 1890 ) 
220 Franklin Avenue, ( 

Mr. T. E. Hogge:—! would say in regard to 
the Leach Roaster that I have never had any- 
thing in my kitchen that pleased me so much. 
Resp't, Mrs G. S. Thompson, 
T. A. Snow, 

Chicago, Sept 23d, 1399 W. Madison St 
Thos E. Hogge: — As you requested I tested 
the Leach Roaster on quality and shrinkage of 
the roast. I weighed the Roaster and meat to- 
gether; it was \2% lbs. I then at 8 o'clock put 
it in the oven with % pint water. At 12 o'clock 
I took it out and found to my astonishment that 
it still weighed 1254 lbs and was the best roast 
I have tasted for 40 years. It is certainly the 
best thing to roast meats I ever saw. 

Resp't, J. E. Davis, M. D. 

N. Sacramento St., Chicago, will be 

to any part of Chicago or suburbs. 

l_ I ST. 

I No. 3, Large $ 1 -50 

I No. 4, Boarding House 1.75 



THE LEACH ROASTER & BAKER CO., 

Paxton, 



lis. 



l6 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



MEATS. 



"Cook, see all your sauces 
Be sharp and poignant in the palate, that they may 
Commer d you: look to your roast and baked meats handsomely 
And what new kickshaws and delicate made things." 



DUMPLING FOR POT PIE. 



One pint flour, pinch of salt, heaping teaspoonful Dr. Price's 
Baking Powder, one-half cup sweet milk; roll, cut in small 
biscuit shape, steam twenty minutes. l. m. 



BOILED FRESH BEEF.— Horse Radish Sauce. 



Procure a piece of brisket, wash in cold water, then put 
in boiling water and let boil; any substance which may rise 
to the surface skim off. Add salt, three whole peppers, a little 
parsley, one large onion, two small carrots. A piece of beef 
weighing eight pounds, boil about two and one-half hours. 
Grate two stalks of horse radish; make a rich cream sauce, 
mix the horse radish with it and slice the beef thin, pour over 
a little of the stock, garnish with parsley, and serve while 
very hot. c. i>. 



BEEF ROAST— AVith Yorkshire Dressing. 

First prepare your roast and put it in the pan without 
using any water. If you have no suet, use butter by 
spreading it over the top of roast - Pepper and salt to taste 
(use no lard); baste the roast often while baking. If you wish 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 1 7 



to add potatoes, pare as many as you wish to use and put them 
in the pan with the roast about one hour before useing for 
the meal. Baste the potatoes in the pan same as you do the 
meat. For Dressing — Yorkshire dressing. One egg beat 
thoroughly added to one-half pint of milk, add flour enough 
to make very thin batter. Bake in the pan with the roast and 
potatoes about ten minutes before dishing up. 

MRS. WICKER. 

CORN BEEF. 

After washing put on in boiling water; change the water 
after boiling half an hour, covering with boiling water the 
second time and adding water as it boils away, allowing thirty 
or forty minutes to a pound. Cook the cabbage in a separate 
vessel using some of the meat liquor to boil it in. Potatoes 
can be steamed in a colander over the meat. 

MRS. \v. H. BUSH. 

ENTREE DE BOEUF (Stew). 

Have a thick piece of beef; chop fine a medium sized onion 
and put in kettle with a tablespoonful of lard, when brown 
throw in the meat cut into two inch squares. Sprinkle over 
with a small handful of flour, pepper and salt and parsley 
chopped fine. Keep stirring; the Are must not be too hot. A 
small piece of garlic chopped fine will give flavor without 
being disagreeable. "When the meat is well moistened add 
some tomatoes peeled and seeded and cut in small squares. 
Pour over a half-glass of wine or stock; let all this simmer 
two and one-half or three hours. Carrots or turnips may be 
substituted for tomatoes. h. c \xks. 

POT ROAST BEEF. 

After scraping the meat off with a knife, put a lump of 
butter half the size of an egg in an iron kettle, brown, then 
put the meat in after dredging with flour; sprinkle salt and 
pepper all over it. Brown all over quickly, turning over with 
a fork, add two tablespoons, set back on stove where it will 
simmer slowly allowing twenty minutes to a pound. When 
nearly done peel potatoes and put in kettle under meat, turn- 
ing once before taking up. MRS. w. H. BUSH. 



18 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



MEAT PIE. 

First prepare what cold meat you wish to use by cutting- 
it up in small square pieces. Put in a kettle and boil in water 
until it is perfectly tender, then add flour to make gravy 
enough to fill the dish you wish to bake the pie in; salt and 
pepper to taste. For crust take one pint of flour, rub in about 
two tablespoonsful of butter or lard, mix it thoroughly with 
the flour then add one teaspoonful of baking powder (mix 
with water or milk). Roll it out then spread it over with 
enough butter to grease it, then sprinkle flour over it and roll 
again. Take one half for bottom liner and the other half for 
top covering; put in oven and bake for about thirty or forty 
minutes. mrs. wicker. 

VEAL POT PIE. 

Obtain veal cut from the breast or shoulder and cut in 
small pieces. Wash and put in enough water to nearly cover; 
let it come to a boil and skim. Season with salt, pepper and 
butter about the size of an egg, let it stew nearly an hour. 
For the crust, sift one pint flour with one heaping teaspoon- 
ful baking powder and a pinch of salt; mix it with one tea- 
spoonful butter and enough milk to make a dough like biscuit. 
Roll out about one inch thick, cut an opening in the center 
lay it on the meat, cover and boil twenty minutes. Remove 
pot pie and meat and thicken the gravy with flour; add more 
water and butter if necessary. mrs. fisher. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 1 9 



FISH AND MEAT SAUCES. 



CELERY SAUCE. 

Boil two heads of celery until tender, put through a sieve, 
add the well beaten yolk of an egg with a little lemon juice, 
butter, salt and pepper to taste. This may be thickened with 
a little flour. mrs. w. f. 

OYSTER SAUCE— For Turkey. 

A pint of oysters cut up small and boiled in their own 
liquor, add a cup of cream, tablespoon of flour made smooth 
with part of the cream, salt, peppr and butter. 

MRS. JONES. 

SOUR GRAYY. 

One pint hot water, one-half cup vinegar, one-half cup 
sugar or to taste, one-half teaspoonful nutmeg and butter size 

Of eo-g. MRS. MC KNIGHT. 

TOMATO SAUCE, 

One small can tomatos, eight cloves, one onion, boil fifteen 
minutes. Cream in pan, one and one-half tablespoonsful but- 
ter, one tablespoonful flour; add strained tomatos, onion and 
cloves; boil ten minutes. mks. jas. w. buell. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

Melt one tablespoonful butter in a sauce pan, stir in one 
tablespoonful flour, add gradually one cup hot milk. Season 
with one-half teaspoonful salt and one-half saltspoonful white 
pepper. m ks.. dr. fisher. 

VINAGRKTTE SAUCE. 

One teaspoonful white pepper, one teaspoonful salt, one 
and one-half teaspoonful mustard, one and one-half cupful 
vinegar, one teaspoonful of oil. Mix salt, pepper and mustard 
together, then very slowly add the vinegar and after mixing 
well add the oil. This sauce is to be eaten on cold meats or 
on cold fish. mks. Baldwin. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



E1DWI/N F. -HEyWOO-D, 

GROCER, 

239-241 N. CLARK STREET, 

CHICAGO. 

Telephone 3055. Established 18T8. 

JACOB H- MflHkE$, 

(Successor to GEO. A. BUSH.) 

Fresh, Salt and Smoked Meats, 

Poultry, pish, Game and Oysters in Seasoi?. 
247 E. CHICAGO AVENUE, 

Telephone 3420. CHICAGO. 

T. C. CUNNINGHAM, 

... DEALER IN ... 

Stoves and flanges, 

STOVE REPAIRS, FIRE BRICK, STOVE CEMENT, ETC. 

Stove and Furnace "Repairing a Specialty. 

229 Wells Street, 

Third Door North of Chicago Avenue. 

Telephone 3711. CHICAGO. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



POULTRY AND GAME. 



"Who seeks an audit here. 

Propitious pays his tribute — Game or fish. 

Wild fowl or venison, and his errand speed." 



JELLIED CHICKEN. 



One good-sized chicken, boiled until tender. Take out 
and save liquor. Pick up in small pieces. Add to liquor one 
box gelatine, salt and pepper, small piece of butter. Put all 
back in kettle, boil a few minutes then pour in mould to get 
cold. 

MRS. E. BURLING. 



CHICKEN CROQUETS. 



One chicken boiled and cut up fine, four ounces of butter, 
three tablespoons flour, one-half pint cream or stock, one-half 
lemon, season with pepper and salt; melt butter, stir in flour, 
then add the rest. Mix up well and form the shape like oys- 
ters, dip in beaten yolks of eggs, then in cracker crumbs and 
fry in hot butter. 

BELLA REEVE. 



CHICKEN PIE. 



Two chickens, cut small, cook tender, season with butter, 
salt and pepper. Thicken gravy with flour, line sides of dish 
in which it is to be baked with crust about one-half inch thick, 
fill dish with chicken and gravy, cover with crust, bake one- 
half hour. 

MRS. W . R. FISH. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CREAMED CHICKEN. 

One chicken of four and one-half pounds, four sweet- 
breads and one can of mushrooms. Boil chicken and sweet- 
breads, and when cold cut up as for salad. In a sauce-pan put 
four coffee-cups or one quart cream; in another four large 
tablespoons butter and five even ones of flour; stir until melt- 
ed, then pour on the hot cream, stirring until thickened. Fla- 
vor with a small half of a grated onion and a very little grat- 
ed nutmeg; season highly with black and red pepper. 

Put chicken and ingredients together with sweet-breads 
and mushrooms in a baking pan, cover with bread crumbs and 
pieces of butter and bake twenty minutes. 

MRS. S MANDEVILLE. 

WILD DUCKS. 

Wild ducks should be cooked rare, with or without stuff- 
ing. Baste them a few minutes at first with hot water to 
which have been added an onion and salt. Then take away 
the pan and baste with butter, and a little flour to froth and 
brown them. The fire should be quite hot, and twenty to 
thirty minutes are considered the outside limit for cooking 
them. A brown gravy made with the giblets should be served 
in the bottom of the dish. Serve also a currant jelly. Garn- 
ish the dish with slices of lemon. 

MRS. gee. 

PRAIRIE CHICKEN— ROASTED. 

The chicken should not be to fresh. Do not wash them. 
Put plenty of butter inside each chicken, this is necessary to 
keep them moist. Roast half an hour or longer, if liked thor- 
oughly done; baste them constantly with butter. When near- 
ly done, sprinkle over a little flour and plenty of butter to 
froth them. Serve on toast with water cresses around. 

MRS. GEE. 

STEWED PIGEON. 

Tie them in shape; place pieces of bacon at the bottom of 
the stew pan; lay in the pigeons, side by side; add a sliced 
carrot, an onion with a clove stuck in, a teaspoonful of sugar 
and some parsley. Pour over enough stock or hot water to 
cover them. Put some thin slices of bacon over the tops of 
each; pour boiling water when necessary. Let them simmer 
until very tender. 

MRS GEE. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 23 



ROASTED QUAILS. 

Cover the breasts with very thin slices of bacon or rub 
them well with butter; roast, basting them often with butter. 
Fifteen or twenty minutes will cook sufficiently. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Serve on a hot dish. Bread sauce can be 
served with them. 

MRS. GEE. 



STUFFING FOR CHICKEN, DUCK OR TURKEY. 

Cook gizzard, liver and heart until tender, chop fine with 
one small onion. Soak bread in the liquor that liver, etc. has 
been cooked in; season with salt and pepper to taste, add 
little butter. Sage may be used instead of onion. 

MRS. W. FLOOD. 



24 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRfEND 



G A. Stanley & Co, 

Butetyers and prouision Dealers, 

Early Fruits apd Vegetables a Specialty. 
98 N. CLARK STREET. 



FRANK MUELLER & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Groceries and Provisions, 

242 N. CLARK STREET, 

Vegetables and Fruits in Season. CHICAGO, ILL. 



J. W. MOO/sIEy 



DEALER IN 



Foreign and Domestic 

Papers and Magazines 

— AND _ 

NoYels of fill Kinds. 

Subcriptions received for all 
Periodicals. 

267 N. CLARK ST. 



Mrs. Emily Lee, 
^lillinery 



-AND- 



tampin; 



335 jt. Wells Stfeet. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 25 



VEGETABLES. 



"Witness thou Anana, thou the pride of 
vegetable life. Beyond what'er the poets im- 
agine in the golden age. Quick let me strip 
thee of thy tufty coat. Spread thy ambrosial 
stores, and feast with jove." 



BAKED BEANS. 

Soak one quart beans over night. In the morning par- 
boil with a pinch of soda. When add one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup vinegar, a pinch of mustard and a chunk of salt 
pork. Cover and bake several hours. Keep plenty of water 
or they will get dry. 

MRS. wells. 

HYGENIC BAKED BEANS. 

One quart beans and three quarts water, soak six hours,, 
boil in same water three hours; one-half cup cream or butter,, 
salt. Then bake one hour. 

DR. F. B. WILKINS. 

BEETS. 

Clean the beets carefully so as not to break the skin and 
boil until soft. Remove the skin; cut them in slices or small 
pieces; .put into a kettle with vinegar; butter and salt. Let 
them thoroughly heat through and thicken with a little flour 
or corn starch. Serve hot. 

MRS. A. 

BAKED CORN. 

Grate eight large ears of corn. Half pint of milk, two 
eggs, salt and pepper to taste, one tablespoonful each of sugar 
and butter. Beat eggs light, add milk, grated corn, sugar, 
salt and melted butter. Bake in earthen dish until a light 
brown. 

MRS. W. F. COCHRAN. 



26 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CORN PUDDING. 

Grate twelve ears tender, green uncooked corn, add yolks 
and whites, beaten separately, of four eggs, one teaspoon sug- 
ar, same of flour, mixed with one tablespoon of melted butter, 
pepper and salt to taste. Add one pint of milk and bake about 
three quarters of an hour. 

MRS. W. C, WYNNE- 

CORN OYSTERS. 

One cup flour, one-half cup melted butter, three table- 
spoonsful milk, two teaspoons salt, one quarter teaspoon pep- 
per, one pint grated corn. Pour on the flour and beat well, 
then add the other ingredients and beat rapidly for three 
minutes. Have fat in frying pan to depth of two inches, put 
in the batter by the spoonful. Fry .about five minutes. 

MRS. BALDWIN. 

ESCALLOPED CORN. 

Cover the bottom of a dish with canned corn; put a layer 
of bread crumbs, pepper, salt and butter to taste; then another 
layer of corn, covering with bread crumbs; season and butter. 
Add milk enough to make it moist and put in oven; bake. 

MRS. j. a. white. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

One pint grated corn, one egg, one small cup flour, one- 
half small cup butter, pepper and salt. Drop in hot fat and 
fry brown. 

MRS. BALDWIN. 

SUCCOTASH. 

One pint green Lima beans, one-half dozen ears corn 
grated, one-half pound salt pork ; freshen the pork a little ; then 
cook beans and pork together. About one-half hour before 
serving put in corn. Use no more water than necessary. 

MRS. W. C WYNNE. 

SUCCOTASH. 

Take one quart of string beans, sliced up fine, and one- 
half dozen ears of corn, cut off the cob; put beans on to boil 
until tender; then pour off the water; add the corn and one 
pint of milk; boil twenty minutes; then add one ounce of but- 
ter mixed with a small teaspoonful of flour; salt and pepper 
to taste. 

MRS. HAMILL. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 27 

EGG PLANT. 

Peel, slice and boil until very tender; mash and season to 
taste with salt, pepper and small piece of butter; thicken with 
cracker crumbs until stiff enough to make into small patties 
and fry in hot lard or butter. 

MRS. M. A. JONES. 

BOILED ONIONS IN CREAM. 

Boil the onions about one hour, or until done; turn off the 
water; season with salt and pepper; add one cup of cream and 
a small piece of butter; let it come to a boil and thicken with 
a tablespoonful of flour stirred smooth in a little water. 

MRS. DR. FISHER. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS. 



Select those of uniform size; remove outer skins; then 
boil in water until nearly done; drain them and put in an 
earthen baking dish, with a layer of cracker crumbs, bits of 
butter, salt and pepper. Pour over this milk to nearly cover 
and bake half an hour or until done. 

MRS. M. E. SCRANTOX. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Take six or more tomatoes, or as many as desired, not to 
soft; wash, cut hole in center, put in small piece of butter, 
pepper and salt to taste; put in pan into the oven; allow to 
bake one-half hour (more or less) until cooked suffieientlv. 

MRS. w.'f. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES. 



Put in an earthen baking dish a layer of cracker crumbs 
and small bits of butter; then a layer of tomatoes with a very 
little sugar sprinkled over them; then another layer of crack- 
er crumbs seasoned with butter, and a layer of tomatoes, un- 
til your dish is filled, with the cracker crumbs at the top; pour 
over all this a little water to moisten, and bake half an hour; 
season to taste. 

MRS. A. PHILLIPS. 



28 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



TOMATO CREAM. 

One quart can tomatoes, one quart water; boil fifteen 
minutes; then strain and add one teaspoon soda, one pint boil- 
ing milk, two tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, one 
teaspoon sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Add soda before 
putting in milk. 

MISS NELLIE MANCHESTER. 

LYONAISE POTATOES. 

One quart of cold boiled potatoes cut into dice, three 
tablespoonfuls of butter, one of chopped onion, one of chopped 
parsley, salt and pepper. Fry the onions in the butter, and 
when they turn yellow, add the potatoes; stir with a fork, be- 
ing careful not to break them. When hot, add the parsley 
and cook two minutes longer. Serve immediately on a hot 
dish. 

MRS. J. BALDWIN. 

ESCALLOPED SWEET POTATOES. 

Parboil; then peel, slice crosswise and pack in layers in a 
pudding dish, seasoning each layer with butter, salt, pepper 
and a little sugar; cover thickly with bread or cracker crumbs, 
wet with cream; stick bits of butter in this coating, dust with 
salt and pepper; bake, covered half an hour until brown. 

MRS. G. F. 

RAGOUT OF PEAS. 

Take one quart of dry green peas, teacupful of turnips, 
cut very fine, same of carrots. Soak peas over night; boil in 
same water as soaked in; salt and pepper to taste. Mix one 
tablespoon of flour with same amount of butter. Cook until 
vegetables are tender. 

MRS. G. F. 

FRENCH BAKED POTATOES. 

Six large potatoes as near the same size as possible; place 
in oven until half baked, then take them out and cut in halves; 
make a dressing of the yolk of one egg, well beaten, and seas- 
on with salt and pepper; place in oven again and leave until 
done. Serve on a platter garnished with parsley. 

miss ullian Mclaughlin. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 29 



POTATOES A LE PARISIENNE. 

Pare large uncooked potatoes; cut little balls out of these 
with the vegetable scoop; drop them into ice water. When 
all are prepared, drain them and put in the frying basket. 
Put the basket carefully into the fat; cook ten minutes; drain; 
season with salt and serve very hot. These are nice to serve 
with a fillet of beef, etc. They may be arranged on the dish 
with the meat or served in a separate dish. 

MRS. BALDWIN. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Season cold mashed potatoes with pepper, salt and a little 
nutmeg; beat to a cream with a tablespoonful of melted but- 
ter to every cup of potato, two eggs and one teaspoon of 
minced parsley. Roll in balls; dip in the beaten c^;^;; roll in 
cracker or crumbs and fry in lard. Pile in a pyramid upon a 
flat dish and serve. 

MRS. BOYNTON. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Butter an earthen baking dish; put in a layer of cracker 
crumbs and small pieces of butter, sprinkling with pepper and 
salt; then a layer of sliced raw potatoes and a few bits of but- 
ter, sprinkling with pepper and salt. Alternate these until 
the dish is nearly full, the top layer being crumbs. Fill the 
dish with milk and bake one-half hour in hot oven. Flour 
may be used in place of cracker crumbs if desired. 

MRS. S. MANDEVILLE. 

SARATOGA FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut into thin slices; put them in cold water over night, 
with a small piece of alum to make them crisp; rinse in cold 
water and dry with crash towel; fry light brown in boiling 

lard. 

MRS. A I'lIII.l 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Select medium sized potatoes; wash clean with a brush •' 
then bake. When done, cut each length; one side only; 

take out the inside of each potato, and mash all together in a 
pan, adding milk butter and salt; keep hot and put back in 
the skins, and draw together. Allow one for a person. 

MRS. C. I".. MORRIS. 



30 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



ENTREES. 



"And all that the curious palate couid wish 
Pass in and out the cedarn doors." 



CALVES' BRAINS. 

Soak the brains in salted water for several hours; pick off 
all the skin after soaking; then stew them a few minutes in 
some salted water, turning- them once. Take them out, and 
while they are cooling', roll several crackers to a powder and 
beat an egg; then take the brains and slice them as thin as 
possible, dip them first in the egg then in the cracker dust, 
and have a pan of hot butter with a little lard mixed to keep 
it from scorching, and fry the brains to a beautiful brown. 
Serve while hot. 

MRS. ROBT. McINTYRE. 

SWEET BREADS. 

Put in salt water for one hour; then put in boiling water 
for twenty minutes; then roll in cracker crumbs and fry in 
lard and butter, one tablespoon of each, or all butter. 

MRS. JANE WICK. 

BREAD OMELET. 

One cup sweet milk, one cup fine bread crumbs without 
crust, salt and pepper; beat all together, add two well beaten 
e gg s ; P u t in a frying pan a small lump of butter, let it melt 
and run all over the pan; pour in the omelet, cook gently until 
it sets, loosen the edges and fold one-half over the other; now 
put on a hot plate to fit the pan, hold firmly and turn the pan 
over, it will come out nice and whole. 

MRS. C H. SQUIRE. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS ERIEND 



LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Season large oysters with salt and pepper; cut fat bacon 
in very thin slices; wrap one oyster in each slice and fasten 
with tooth-picks; heat frying pan and put in the little pigs; 
cook just long enough to crisp the bacon, about five minutes. 
Place on slices of toast, cut small, and serve immediately; do 
not remove the skins; garnish with parsley. This is a nice 
relish for lunch or tea. 

MRS. D. WATTERSON. 

RICE PONE. 

One pint of boiled rice, three eggs, one pint of fresh milk, 
two ounces of butter, one small teacup of cornmeal, salt to 
taste. Beat eggs very light, add milk and rice, then melted 
butter, meal, salt and white of eggs beaten to a froth. Bake 
from one-half to three-quarters of an hour. 

MRS. W. F. COCHRAN. 



POTTED BEEF. 



Take a fore shank of beef (have your butcher saw it in- 
stead of chopping to avoid small bones); put on the fire with 
enough cold water to cover it; let it boil until the meat falls 
off the bone; then take out, but save the water. Chop the 
the meat into about half inch pieces; skim the boiled water 
and return the meat. Chop fine a good-sized onion, thyme, 
handful of parsley and a section of garlic. Toast a slice of 
bread, place in the oven until crisp, then roll fine. Cayenne 
pepper and salt to taste. Mix thoroughly with the meat and 
simmer for three or four hours, stirring; place in glasses or 
cup; put in cool place. 

H. CAZES. 



BREAKFAST RELISH OF OYSTERS. 

Fry one and a half dozen oysters a nice brown and lay 
them on five or six slices of well toasted bread. Over this 
sprinkle thickly fine cut celery; pour over a pint of hot milk, 
adding butter and salt; thicken with flour to the consistency 
of cream. Serve hot. 

MRS. A. J. WHITE. 



32 



THE HOUSE KEEPERS FRIEND 



VEAL LOAF. 

Four pounds of lean veal, one one-half pound of salt pork, 
chopped fine and well mixed, one teaspoon salt, one-half tea- 
spoon pepper, one cup bread crumbs, two eggs; mold in a nice 
loaf and place in a dripping pan, filled part full of water; bake 
three hours in a moderate oven, basting often; when done let 

stand in pan until cold. 

MRS, r. t. reeve. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

One pint of chopped cooked veal, one tablespoon of butter, 
two teaspoons of flour, one small onion minced fine, one cup 
of milk, one egg, season to taste. Put the butter and flour in 
a sauce pan; cook until smooth, stirring constantly; add the 
milk and onion, and when cool add the veal and e^g; roll in 
oblong shapes, dip in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs and 
fry in hot lard. 

MRS. BOYNTON. 

CURRIED VEAL. 

Three pounds veal cut in pieces. Stew in one pint water; 
add two onions, one apple cut fine, tablespoonful butter; then 
mix one tablespoonful curry powder with a little water, add 
this to the meat; also to thicken the gravy, mix one table- 
spoonful flour with enough milk to wet, then cook slowly for 
one and a half hours; season to taste with salt. When ready 
fur serving garnish with boiled rice. 

MRS. G. P. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One can salmon, picked fine, pour off most of the liquor, 
one cup bread crumbs, four eggs well beaten, one teaspoon 
butter. Pour in a mould and steam two hours. Dressing for 
same: one cup milk, one tablespoon corn starch; boil five 
minutes, then add one egg well beaten; stir thoroughly, then 
take off the stove immediately or the egg will curdle. 

" MRS. GEO. B. DUNHAM. 

CHEESE OMELET. 

Three eggs, one pound cheese. Melt cheese in oven, add 
the yolks beaten very stiff, then add the whites very stiff; bake 
to alight brown twenty minutes. If a larger omelet is desired 
add more eggs. Serve hot with Boston crackers split and but- 
tered, and toasted a light brown. 

MISS WILKINS. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 33 

MACARONI. 

Break one-half package of macaroni into small pieces. Put 
in a double boiler, pouring over it one quart of boiling water 
and heaping teaspoon of salt; boil one hour then pour off 
water; add one pint of cold milk; let come to a boil; season 
with butter, pepper and salt. Pour into a baking dish in lay- 
ers, alternating each layer with one of grated cheese; place in 
oven and let brown. This is excellent. 

miss liluam Mclaughlin, 

cheese: tondu. 

Soak one cupful of bread crumbs in two cupfuls of fresh 
sweet milk, beat into these three eggs (whipped very light), 
one tablespoonful of melted butter, a pinch of soda dissolved 

in hot water, pepper and salt, and lastly half a pound of grated 
cheese. Butter a baking dish, pour the mixture in it, strew 
■dry crumbs of bread over the fondu and brown in a quick 
oven. Serve at once, as it will fall if left to stand. 

MRS. FORD. 

MOCK SMELTS. 

This is a fish dish which is not fish at all. Make noodle 
dough as for soup, beating together with a rolling pin three 
eggs, a teaspoonful of salt, and flour to make a stiff dough. 
Cut into four pieces, roll out as thin as paper, spread on a pa- 
per to dry, and when dry enough roll up. With a sharp knife 
shave the roll into thin rings and boil them five minutes in 
water, boiling when the}- are put in. Brown a pint of bread 
crumbs in butter in a frying pan; skim out the mock smelts 
into the crumbs; pour a cupful of milk over all; let it heat up, 
then serve. mrs. ford, 

OYSTER OMELET. 

One dozen large oysters chopped small, one-half teaspoon- 
ful salt sprinkled on them, then let them stand in their own 
liquor half an hour; beat six eggs, yolks and whites separate- 
ly, the former to a smooth paste ; the latter to a stiff froth; add 
to the yolks a tablespoon of rich sweet cream, pepper and salt 
to taste, then stir in whites. Put two tablespoons butter in a 
hot frying pan; when it begins to fry, pour in your egg mix- 
ture, and add the oysters quickly; do not stir, but with a 
i knife lift, as the eggs set, the omelet from the 

om of the pan, to prevent scorching; in five minutes it will 
be done. Place in a hot dish, bottom upward over the om 
and turn the pan over with the brown side uppermost upon 
the dish. .Serve at once. MRS. J01 



34 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 

LOUIS HAAKE, 

DEALER IN 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, 

74 WELLS STREET, 

Butter and Eggs received direct /-i t t t r~\ \ s~\ s~\ 

from the Country. V_/ J~L 1 L/ 1\ V_J V_/ . 

RUD. LEHMANN, 

Manufacturer and Patentee of 
LEHMANN'S COMBINED 

Turkish Arm Chair and Sofa Bed, 

THE MOST COMPLETE BED. 
THE EASIEST CHAIR OR SOFA. 

Cheaper and Better than Folding Beds. 
236 WELLS STREET. co| _ AT - DCTA|| 

NEAR CHICAGO AVE. OULU Al hi t. I A I L . 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 35 



EGGS. 



BAKED EGGS. 

Melt a tablespoonful of butter, break the number of eggs 
wanted on a plate, pour butter over each. One tablespoonful 
cream, pepper and salt; put in oven and bake hard or soft as 
desired. mrs. geo. barker. 

COLUMBUS EGGS. 

Take hard boiled eggs, cut in halves lengthwise, take the 
yolks, mash fine and mix with a little of Durkee's salad 
dressing, replace in white and serve on small platter. Gar- 
nish with parsley or celery. mrs. boynton. 

CURRIED EGGS. 

Boil eggs hard then cool. Mix in a sauce pan two table- 
spoons of butter and one of curry powder, over a moderate 
fire; put in a couple of chopped onions and fry soft, add a cup 
or more of broth or rich gravy and simmer until the onion is 
reduced to pulp. Add to this a cup of cream mixed smooth 
with a tablespoon of flour, let boil up and add the eggs cut in 
slices. Heat through and serve hot. mrs. jones. 

FILLED EGGS— With Sauce. 

Boil hard one dozen eggs; take off the shell and cut 
lengthwise. Take out the yolks, chop up with a handful of 
lobster meat, a few capers, seasoning; add a little bread, fill 
the eggs, place in a pan and bake. Serve with cream sauce. 

MRS. ALEX. H. REVELL. 



36 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



EGG OMELET. 

Six eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, one tea- 
spoonful corn starch dissolved in one-half cup of milk, a pinch 
of salt, fry in one tablespoonful of butter. Fry slowly to a 
rich brown, roll over like a jelly roll, turn on a hot platter 
with as little handling as possible. Garnish dish with parsley 
and thin slices of lemon. mrs. boynton. 

PANNED EGGS. 

Make a mince meat of chopped ham, fine bread crumbs, 
pepper, salt and a little melted butter. Moisten to a soft paste 
with milk and half fill patty-pans; break an egg upon the 
top of each; dust with pepper and salt and sprinkle with 
powdered cracker crumbs. Bake in the oven about eight 
minutes. mrs. w. d. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil eggs hard; after removing shells put in vinegar; 
pepper and salt to taste. Cut lengthwise to serve. 

MRS. W. F. 

SNOW EGGS. 

Twelve eggs, one-half pound powdered sugar, one and 
one-half pints milk. Break the eggs, separate the yolks 
from the whites and beat the whites stiff; add the sugar and 
flavor with orange flower water or vanilla. Boil the milk 
with a little sugar and the flavoring, when boiling drop the 
whites a spoonful at a time and let them drip on a strainer. 
Take half of the milk and add the beaten 3 T olks, first di- 
ng with a little milk. Cook and turn with wooden spoon; 
take off the fire when the whites begin to fasten, place in a 
dish and pour over them the cream, carefully. 

An old Flemish dish. mrs. s. b. stanchfield 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 37 



SALADS. 



Have what you will, 
hut salads arc tempting 
to the palate. 



BEEF SALAD. 

Cut in very thin slices, cold roast or boiled beef, lay on a 
dish with chopped parsley; make a plain salad dressing and 
pour over. miss i lara d. vine. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil and cut one large chicken, one-half as much celery, 
four eggs boiled hard, the yolks pulverized and the whites 
chopped. Take the liquor in which the chicken was boiled 
and boil down one-half, then add half a cup. Add at the last 
one-half cup of Durkee's salad dressing. The chicken and 
celery must be chopped, not cut. mrs john worthy 

CABBAGE SLAW. 

One-half head cabbage cut fine, three tablespoonfuls milk, 
salt and pepper to taste, mustard if desired, one egg, one-half 
cup vinegar, lump of butter half the size of an egg; cook a 
little. MRS ROUNSA^ 1 1 1 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

One medium sized cabbage and one stick celery chopped 
together, fine; allow to remain in cold water while you make 
the dressing. Drain and sprinkle thickly with salt, pepper and 
sugar to taste. For dressing, one and one-hulf cups butter, 



38 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



three-quarters of a cup of flour rubbed together, six or eight 
eggs, (better the eight) one large teaspoon mustard, three- 
quarters of a cup vinegar, salt, pepper and a little sugar. 
Cook until thick; pour over your cabbage, mix well. 

MRS E BURLING. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Peel and slice cucumbers, mix with salt and let stand half 
an hour. Mix two tablespoonfuls sweet oil or ham gravy 
with as much vinegar and a tablespoonful of sugar. Add the 
cucumbers, which should be drained a little, add a teaspoon- 
ful pepper and stir well. Sliced onions are an addition if their 
flavor is liked. mrs Baldwin 

FISH SALAD. 

Boil a fish (whitefish or trout) when done take the bones 
out, cool and cut to pieces. Chop as much celery as you have 
flsh, with butter and salt to taste. Use any salad dressing. 

MISS NELLIE FLOOD. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can salmon. Pour off the liquor and remove the 
bones. Celery (about as much as salmon) chopped fine. Chop 
three hard boiled eggs; salt and pepper. One-half teaspoon 
mustard mixed in about a cup of vinegar. 

MISS EMMA H. SMITH 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut boiled potatoes into dice shape, one stalk of celery 
and one large onion. Dressing: half cup of water and the 
same of vinegar, butter size of walnut, two eggs well beaten, 
one-half cup of sugar, tablespoon of mustard mixed with 
vinegar, salt and pepper to taste and pour over the potatoes. 

MRS. GEO OLIVER, LaPorte, Ind 

SALADS. 

To prevent eggs turning dark colored after being boiled 
for salad use, first put them into cold water, boil five or ten 
minutes slowly after the water begins to boil, then take out 
and put in cold water a few minutes to cool. n. j. f. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 39 



CREAM DRESSING--For Potato or Lettuce Salad. 

Yolks of four hard boiled eggs crushed to a powder, 
about a quarter teaspoon dry mustard, half a teaspoon salt, 
three teaspoons powdered sugar, a small teacupful rich cream 
added by degrees, lastly vinegar to taste and a little pepper. 
A slice of onion allowed to remain in the dressing for a 
while is an improvement. mrs. stevenson 

SALAD DRESSING FOR POTATOES. 

Take the well beaten yolks of five eggs, (or three whole 
ones) add a small cup of boiling vinegar. Cook in earthen 
or new tin, in a vessel of boiling water until stiff. Stir all 
the time while cooking, then take from the fire, add f out- 
tablespoons of butter, stir until cool and perfectly mixed, 
then a tablespoonful of minced onion and parsley each. 
When cool season with one teaspoonful mustard, two tea- 
spoons sweet cream, salt and pepper according to taste. 

c. D. 

DRESSING FOR CABBAGE OR CHICKEN SALAD. 

One teaspoon of mustard, one teaspoon of flour, one 
tablespoon of sugar, one-quarter teaspoon of salt, little pepper; 
butter size of walnut, yolk of two eggs. Wet with water 
enough to be smooth. With this mixture thicken one cup of 
vinegar. When cold put in one cup of cream. 

MRS H. J, PORTER 

FRENCH SALAD DRESSING. 

Mix one saltspoon of pepper with one of salt; add three 
tablespoons of olive oil and one even tablespoon of onion, 
scraped fine; then one tablespoon of vinegar. When well 
mixed pour the mixture over your salads and stir all until 
well mingled. 

For chicken and fish salads use the Mayonnaise dressing. 
For simple vegetable salads the French dressing is most 
appropriate, using onion rather than garlic. 

MRS. E. PETRI 1. 



4o 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



Leads = The = VOorld ! 




Makes More bread 
Makes Whiter bread 
Makes Better bread 



Than Any Other Flour Manufactured. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 41 



BREAD- ROLLS, BREAKFAST CAKES. 



' It is with our judgment as with our watch, none go 
just alike, yet each believes his own." 



EXCELLENT BREAD RECIPE. 

Sift into a pan four pounds flour, bank it well up against 
the sides. Take one quart tepid water, into which mix thor- 
oughly two cents worth compressed yeast and one heaping 
teaspoonful salt. Thoroughly beat this; leave the remainder 
of the flour against the sides. Cover the pan with a cloth 
and set in a warm place until it rises. Mix in the rest of the 
flour until the dough will have left the pan. Work well for 
twenty minutes. Divide into four equal parts and let rise 
again to the top of the pan. Bake until a straw can be run 
through and come out clean, miss matie hiogins 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup rye flour, one cup corn meal, one cup sour milk, 
one-half cup molasses, one even teaspoonful soda, one tea- 
spoonful salt, one tablespoonful lard; sift three times, meal, 
flour, salt and soda; place in bowl. Mix lard and molasses 
together and slightly warm; then with sour milk add the 
contents of bowl. Work three minutes, place in greased 
mould and steam for three hours. mrs j. k. b. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups Indian meal, two cups rye or graham flour, 
one-half cup molasses, one-half cup yeast, one teaspoon salt, 
one teaspoon saleratus. Mix with warm water, not too stiff. 
Let rise and steam three hours. 

MRS N. W. HARRIS. 



42 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRfEND 



CURRANT BREAD. 

Take enough dough for one loaf from the white bread. 
Add one-half cup of shortening (lard and butter), two-thirds 
cup of currants, one-half cup of sugar. The secret of good 
bread is to mix the shortening and the sugar thoroughly into 
the dough and add the currants last, then let it rise again 
and bake in a moderate oven. mrs john worthy 

BEST BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One quart of sifted flour; work through it well; three 
and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder, (Dr. Price's) one 
teaspoonful of salt, one-half (small) cup of butter. Mix well, 
then add enough water to make a soft dough. Bake fifteen 
minutes in rather a quick oven. miss anna riddkll. 

GRAHAM BISCUITS. 

One quart Graham flour, three teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's 
baking powder, butter size of egg; mix thoroughly through the 
flour; add cold water enough to make a paste; roll quickly; 
knead as little as possible; bake in hot oven. 

MISS LIZZIE LEAVENS, Unionville, Can 

FRIED BREAD. 

Cut bread in small square (two inch) slices; soak in milk. 
After pressing the milk from bread dip in egg. Fry in 
butter; sprinkle a little sugar on while frying. Serve hot. 

N, j. FLOOD 

HASH CAKES. 

Six potatoes, one pound meat, one onion, salt and pepper, 
all chopped fine. Fry in butter. Serve with poached eggs 
on toast. mrs m. 

GERMAN PANCAKES. 

Take five eggs, beat whites and yolks separately, three 
tablespoonfuls flour, one-half pint milk, a little salt. Fry in 
butter. Serve with jelly or syrup. c. a. m. 



THK HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 43 



(iKVHAM GEMS. 

One pint sour milk, one egg, one tablespoon sugar, one 
teaspoon soda, good fresh graham flour enough to make a 
stiff batter. To be baked in a quick oven. 

.MRS STEVENSON 

CORN GEMS. 

One-half cup of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, rub 
together; one-half teaspoon of salt, one egg, one and one-half 
cups milk, two-thirds cup of yellow corn meal. Sift one and 
one-half teaspoons Dr. Price's baking powder in flour enough 
to have batter drop from spoon. Twenty minutes in a hot 
oven. mrs w. h. hammond 

GE3IS. 

Half cup of milk, half cup water, one egg, two table- 
spoons butter, one tablespoon sugar, one teaspoonful Dr. 
Price's baking powder; add flour enough to make a batter. 

MRS DR. PAUL 

W AFFILES. 

One pint milk, three teaspoons Price's baking powder, 
one-half cup butter, three cups flour, three well beaten eggs. 
Bake in waffle irons. miss lillian mc i.aughlin 

MUFFINS. 

One beaten egg, two tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons 
melted butter, one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, one tea- 
spoon cream tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, mrsn.w. Harris 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

Two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking 
powder, one-half teaspoonful salt, one-quarter cup sugar, one 
egg, one and one-half cups milk, one tablespoon melted 
butter. Mix the dry materials, beat the egg and add milk. 
Beat all together; add butter last, Bake in hot oven, 

MISS K. NASH. 



44 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



FLOUR PANCAKES. 

Soak dry bread in sour milk; two eggs, half teaspoon of 
soda and salt, flour enough to thicken. They are very nice 
with boiled rice added. If boiled rice is used do not use so 
much flour. mrs c. a. mannheimer 

POTATO PANCAKES. 

Take twelve raw potatoes, peel and grate; add three 
eggs, two tablespoonfuls flour, one teaspoonful sugar; salt to 
taste and fry slowly with plenty of butter and lard mixed. 

MRS M. A, JONES 



PANCAKES. 

One quart sweet milk; add one tablespoon melted butter, 
•mall teaspoonful of salt, yolks of two eggs, flour enough to 
make a thin batter, with two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder; whites of two eggs well beaten added last. 

MRS H. G. INGERSOLL 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One egg, two cups sour milk, two even teaspoonfuls soda, 
little salt, flour and corn meal in equal quantities, enough to 
make batter. j. k. b, 

POTATO BUNS 

Three large sweet potatoes, one-half pint flour, one pint 
cream, a little salt, two spoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder. 
Boil potatoes, mash and mix in dough; roll, cut and bake. 

MRS. P. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

Two teaspoonfuls sugar, butter size of egg, one egg, one 
cup warm milk, one-half yeast cake, flour enough to make 
stiff, like bread dough; after kneeding let rise over night, in 
morning make into rolls. mrs e. burling 



THE HOUSEEKEPERS ERIEND 45 



JOHNNIE CAKE. 

One quart meal, one teacup flour, one tablespoon lard, 
three eggs, three tablespoons baking powder, a little salt and 
sugar. Make batter with milk. mks. stevenson 

SPIRIT ROLLS. 

Four large potatoes, boiled and mashed through a colan- 
der; one quart of flour, and three ounces of butter; three 
eggs beaten light, one cup of yeast, one teaspoon of salt, one 
teaspoon of white sugar. Sift flour into bowl; mash potatoes 
while hot into it. Work them in with the butter, until quite 
smooth; add eggs, salt, sugar and yeast. Knead well, and set 
to rise at 12 o'clock in summer and 11 o'clock in winter. An 
hour before tea, turn it out on the board; do not knead, but 
roll lightly an inch thick; cut in round, cakes, let it stand 
awhile, and bake until brown. MRS. cochran. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

Two cups of yeast, one tablespoon of sugar; put in a cup 
one-half full of warm water; let it soak a few minutes. With 
a quart of warm milk make a sponge, with usual amount of 
flour; let rise, then add three-fourths of a pound of butter 
or lard, cup of sugar, two eggs beaten well; then add flour 
enough to make a soft dough; let rise, then spread about an 
inch thick in square low tins. When light spread with melted 
butter, strew with sugar, cinnamon, chopped almond; bake 
in quick oven; apples or sugar peaches may be substituted. 

MRS. SVLES. 



4 6 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



"l 'fthisP iedellc ^s 
rjian\n\anjade if ii^0^jjtes n 




In paper boxes; enough for two large pies. Always 
ready; easily prepared. 

DOUGHERTY'S 

NbW EqglaqdraSraMiqcB Meat 

THE ORIGINAL and only complete and satisfactory 
Condensed Mince Meat in the market. 

Cheap substitutes and crude imitations are offered with 
the aim to profit by the popularity of the New England. 

Do not be deceived but always insist on the New Eng- 
land Brand. The best made. 



For Sale; by all Groeers. 



THK HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



47 



PASTRY. 



How dear to my heart are the pies of my childhood. 

The pies that my mother used to make. 

The apple, the pumpkin, 

The dearly loved mince meat, 

The joy of all, which my boyhood days knew. 



-F.J. N. 



PIE CRUST. 



One cup of lard or part butter, three cups flour, one tea- 
spoon salt, one scant teacup ice water. 

MRS. S. MANDEVILLE. 



CHOCOLATE PIE. 

One pint sweet milk, two heaping tablespoons grated 
sweet chocolate, one-half small cup sugar, three eggs yolks. 
Beat the milk and chocolate together, heat (not boil); take off 
stove and add sugar and yolks; flavor with vanilla; bake with 
one crust. "While baking, beat ftie whites to a stiff froth with 
tablespoon powdered sugar, sprealMffver it and return to oven 
and brown delicately. 

miss c. D. 



COCO. 

One cup white sugar, bu 
nut grated, one tablespoon fir 
very stiff; one crust. 




egg, one-half eoeoa- 
f three eggs beaten 



MRS J. R. B. 



Bake crust 
stir in one-ha 
beaten wel^tog 
frost \.\\ajk wit 





CREAM PIE. 

ich. Boil one pint milk; while boiling 
ur, one cup sugar, yolks of two eggs 

dd juice and grated rind of one lemon; 
hites well beaten; brown lightly. 

MRS. A. R. EDWARDS. 



48 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



VERMONT LEMON PIE. 

The juice of three lemons and the grated rind of one, four 
cups coffee A sugar, five eggs, beat the yolks well, then add 
sugar and lemons and stir thoroughly; beat the whites to a 
stiff froth and add to the mixture, with three tablespoons of 
sweet cream; bake with upper and under crust. This rule 
makes two large pies. 

MRS. J. W. CALKINS. 

IRISH POTATO PIE. 

Boil potatoes; when cool, pass through grater. Little 
more than half pint of grated potato, three quarters of a pint 
of rich milk, two eggs, butter size of egg, little sweet wine, 
cinnamon or nutmeg; make very sweet. 

MRS. j. R. B. 

LEMON PIE. 

Two lemons; grate off the outer peel, chop the rest very 
fine. Put two tablespoons of corn starch in one teacup of hot 
water and boil; when co^l, add two teacups of white sugar 
and the beaten yolks of four eggs, then add the chopped peel 
and the juice; stir well together; bake until the crust is done, 
only one crust; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth; 
add five tablespoons powdere/l sugar, stirring in well; pour 
over the pie while hot. Set in the oven to brown. 

MRS. STEVENSON. 

JE FF DAVIS PIE. 

One pint granulated sugar, oW-half pint butter, creamed 
well, three eggs, yolflfe and whites' beaten separately, flour, two 
cups milk, whites inl^t; fiavoywith vanilla. 

MRS. L. MANSFIELD. 

LEMON CREAM PIE. 

Put one and one-half cups of milk m douftle boiler; when 
boiling add one teaspoon cornstarch; wjhen thickened remove 
from fire and mix with it one cup sugar, onelemon, one tea- 
spoon butter, a little salt; pour into a crust and bake. When 
cool frost. 



Mils. HAMMOND. 






THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 49 



LEMON PIE. 

One lemon, one cup sugar, two eggs, three tablespoons of 
(lour, one cup milk. (Irate the rind of the lemon; mix the 
whole together, leaving out the whites of the eggs; pour in 
the milk last. Hake in a deep plate lined with pastry. Heat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, sweeten with four table- 
spoons of sugar, put on top when baked, and return to oven 
and brown lightly. 

MISS E. T. SHIPLEY. 

MINCE PIE. 

Stew one package of Dougherty's New England Con- 
densed Mince Meat with a quart of water for twenty minutes 
or until the meat bccoTnes thick, and it is then read)- for the 
crust. This makes two delicious pies, although sugar, fruit 
syrup, wine or vinegar may be added to suit the taste, in 
which case use less water. 

T. E. DOUGHERTY. 

YANKEE PUMPKIN PIE. 

One can pumpkin, one pint rich milk, eight eggs, one cup 
brown sugar, one teaspoonful cinnamon and ginger, a little 
salt to taste. 

MRS. p. 

ST It AAV BERRY PIE. 

Make enough dough (not to short) for lower crust only; 
put in strawberries, peaches or blackberries; sift a little flour 
through and sweeten to taste; bake until done. Make a 
Meringue with the whites of two eggs and a tablespoon of 
•-sugar; pour over fruit when cold. in winter use canned fruit 
or preserved gooseberries. 

HARRIET CAZES. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Three pounds lean beef, boil and chop, two pounds suet, 
four pounds raisins, four pounds currants, one pound citron, 
four pounds sugar, grated rinds and juice 8f three lemons, 
three large tablespoons cinnamon, three grated nutmegs, two 
tablespoons each cloves and mace, one quart boiled down 
cider, four tablespoons salt, two quarts apples to quart meat. 
Boil slowly together for nearly two hours; then pack in a jar 
. closely; put in a cold place. 

MRS. A. R. EDWARDS. 

* m £ 



50 



THE HOrSRKEKPKR'S FRIEND. 



HIGHLAND BRAND 

EVAPORATED CREAM 



THE POPULAR 




TABLE LUXURY. 



belongs to the equipment of every well appointed pantry, even 
in dairy districts, as it is ever ready for use and thoroughly 
takes the place of either fresh cream or milk on the table, for 
cooking, baking, pastries, dressings and cream of all kinds. 

It has special advantages tor seasoning coffee and cocoa, 
as it does not weaken the flavor of the former like unprepared 
milk or cream and makes a delicious blend with the latter. 

It enables you to prepare and serve ice cream on short 
notice and at a small expense. 

For salad dressings and fruit it is of a more appetizing 
appearance than fresh cream, as it does not curdle. 

Delicious for oyster stews, puddings, custards, etc. 

As it is an absolutely pure milk of the best quality, produced 
in model dairies, which are kept under strict sanitary regulations, a 
as scrupulous cleanliness is observed in its handling and pre- 
paration, and as any deliterious elements, which may occur in 
fresh milk, are thoroughly destroyed by a process of steriliza- 
tion, Highland Evaporated Cream is fit for use on the table of 
any "gentlemen." To convince yourself you should see our 
canning kitchen which we take pride in showing to visitors. 

The high sanitarv value of our product commends it 
specially as a food for infants. 

Helvetia }A\\\ Qotodetosififl Qo., 

HIGHLAND, ILL. 



• 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 5 1 



PUDDINGS. 



"And solid pudding against empty praise." 



HOLLOW BLOCK OF ICE TO SERVE PUDDINGS, 
CREAMS, ETC. 

First have your ice sawed the desired shape, then fill the 
mold in which the pudding is to be packed with boiling water, 
and place it upon the ice until it has hollowed out a place suf- 
ficiently deep enough to support it. Cover a platter with ferns 
as gracefully as possible and set the block upon it. When 
time to serve immerse the mold of pudding in cold water to 
loosen it, remove the cover, insert and stand in the hollowed 
space. 

MRS. H. 

APPLE BUTTER PUDDING. 

One pint rich milk, two cups flour, four eggs, one tea- 
spoonfnl salt, one-half teaspoonful soda dissolved in hot water. 
Peel and core eight apples carefully, cut them up, spread over 
bottom of dish. Bake one hour and serve hot with sweet sauce. 

j. R. li. 

APPLE MERINGUE PUDDING. 

One pint stewed apples, three eggs, one-half cup white 
sugar, one teaspoonful butter, one teaspoonful nutmeg and 
cinnamon mixed; sweeten and spice, and while the apple is 
still very hot, stir in the butter, and a little at a time the yolks; 
beat all light, pour into a buttered dish and bake ten minutes; 
cover without taking from the oven, witli a meringue made of 
the beaten whites, two tablespoonfuls of sugar and bitter al- 
mond flavoring; brown very slightly. Eat cold with cream. 

MISs HARRIET CAZES. 



52 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



BREAD PUDDING. 

One pint milk, two eggs well beaten, two slices of bread 
well buttered and cut into small squares (cut off the crust), 
one-half cup cocoanut; flavor with nutmeg; sweeten to taste; 
mix all together and bake. Eat with sauce. This quantity is 
enough for four persons. 

MRS. K. ROBINSON. 

CAKE PUDDING. 

Three cups flour, one cup sour milk, one cup molasses, 
one cup fruit, one-half cup butter, one teaspoon soda, a little 
salt. Steam three hours and serve with lemon sauce. 

MISS MINNIE GOODENOUGH. 

CHERRY TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One cup of tapioca washed and soaked over night. In the 
morning boil in double boiler until free from lumps, it takes 
about two to three hours; add one cup of sugar and one tea- 
spoonful vanilla; stone one quart of cherries and sweeten; 
stir the cherries into the tapioca just before serving. Serve 
with cream and sugar. Very nice cold. 

MRS. DR. BOYNTON. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One egg well beaten, one cup of sugar, one cup of sweet 
milk, three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one and one-half 
teaspoonfuls of Dr. Price's baking powder, two cups of flour; 
bake forty minutes. To be eaten with sauce. 

Sauce for pudding: — One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one-half teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful flour; pour on three 
cups of boiling water, let it boil a few minutes; flavor with 
lemon or vanilla. 

MISS TEARE. 

DANISH PUDDING. 

Two cups of bread crumbs, one cup sweet milk, two table- 
spoons sugar, one tablespoon butter, two teaspoons baking- 
powder, yolks of two eggs. Stir together and bake one-half 
hour; then spread with jelly and the whites of the eggs beaten 
with sugar, and return to bake brown. 

MISS DORA MATTESON. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 53 



DATE PUDDING. 

Six ounces suet, six ounces bread crumbs, six ounces sugar, 
three eggs beaten separately, two teaspoonfuls cinnamon, one- 
half or three-quarter pound stoned dates. Beat the sugar and 
eggs together, stir in the other ingredients and steam two 
hours. 

Sauce: — Beat into the yolks of three eggs enough pulver- 
ized sugar to thicken, then stir in the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth 

MRS. D. SAUER. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One pound figs chopped fine, one cup bread crumbs, one 
cup flour, one cup chopped suet, one cup molasses mixed with 
tablespoon of soda, one cup sour milk, three well beaten eggs, 
one teaspoonful salt; steam two and one-half hours. Serve 
with sauce. 

Sauce: — One cup brown sugar, one tablespoonful corn- 
starch, one-half cup butter, yolks of two eggs; stir to a cream. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth add the other ingredients, place 
over a tea kettle and add one-half cup boiling water; stir well 
while boiling. Flavor with lemon. 

miss lillian Mclaughlin. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Two pounds seeded raisins; two pounds currants, one 
pound beef suet chopped fine, six eggs, two pounds sugar, one- 
half pound citron, two nutmegs, one pint milk, a few bread 
crumbs and three cups flour; put in tin pan well greased; boil 
ten hours. 

MRS. J. W, STEAD. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Two slices Baker's bread; soak in one pint sweet milk, one 
tea cup of molasses, one egg one half teaspoonful cloves, cin- 
namon, allspice and mace each, one-half nutmeg, one-quarter 
teaspoon of baking soda, one-half pound suet chopped fine, 
one pound raisins, one-half pound currants, two ounces citron 
and one pound flour; beat well and steam five hours. 

MRS. RICH. 



54 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



FLOATING ISLAND. 

Put into a sauce-pan one quart milk and set over moder- 
ate fire. When scalding hot add the whites of three eggs 
beaten stiff; stir briskly a few seconds and remove them from 
the milk. Have ready the yolks beaten to a cream with four 
tablespoons of sugar and one heaping tablespoon of flour; stir 
until well thickened; then turn into a dish and flavor with a 
teaspoon of vanilla. When cold add the whites to the top 
without stirring. Set on ice until ready for use. 

MRS. J. A. COLEMAN. 

STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Two cups Graham flour, one cup molasses, one cup sweet 
milk, one tablespoon soda, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon all- 
spice, one-half cup raisins stoned and chopped; one and one- 
half hours to steam. 

Sauce for above: — To one-half cup butter and one cup 
sugar stirred to a cream, add two tablespoons milk and let just 
come to a boil; stir quickly and take from the fire. Should be 
a perfect foam, 

MRS. S. MANDEVILLE. 

KISS PUDDING. 

Boil one quart milk; stir into it four tablespoons of corn- 
starch dissolved in a little milk, four tablespoons sugar and 
yolks of four eggs. Beat the whites of the eggs and add tea 
cup pulverized sugar; spread on top and brown lightly. Serve 
with cream. 

MRS. SMITH. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Boil one quart milk; while boiling stir in a small cup corn- 
meal and a teaspoon salt; when cool beat three eggs, sugar to 
taste, also spices ginger and cinnamon, one-half cup raisins,, 
a little bit butter on top; stir these in pudding dish, then add 
one pint cold milk; bake two hours. 

MRS. A. R. EDWARDS. 

ICED CHERRY PUDDING WITH AVHIPPED CREAM. 

For the medium size molds of iced cherry pudding use a 
quart of Morella cherries, which are very juicy and sour. 
Meanwhile put a pound of granulated sugar over the fire, with 
a gill of cold water and let it boil. When the cherries are 
stoned, put them into the sugar and boil them just tender 
only for a few minutes, but do not let them break. After ad- 



THK HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 55 



ding- the cherries to the boiling sugar, stir two heaping table- 
spoons of corn starch with a cup nearly full of cold water, stir 
that into the cherries and stir the mixture often enough to 
prevent burning until it has boiled sufficiently to thicken. 
Upon cooling, pour it into moulds wet with cold water and 
place it where it will cool; then put it next the ice to become 
entirely cold. Serve it turned from the molds within a border 
of cold whipped cream. 

MISS KIJ.A S. WAIDNER. 

PEACH DU3IPUIN<;S. 

Make a light baking powder biscuit dough and roll quite 
thin; cut in squares about four inches; place in each square 
two halves of canned peaches, one tablespoon sugar, small 
piece of butter and a little juice of the fruit; pinch the corners 
together and place in pudding dish, the corners and edges 
underneath; cover them with boiling hot water; add to the 
water, butter, sugar and juice from the canned fruit, and bake 
about twenty minutes in hot oven. 

MRS. S. MANDF.VILI.K. 

RICE PUDDING. 

One cup uncooked rice, one quart milk mixed with one 
cup cream, sugar to taste, a little salt and cinnamon; put in 
oven to bake about two honrs, stirring occasionally. 

MRS. W. C WYNNE. 

RUSSIA CREAM PUDDING. 

Four eggs, one quart milk, one cup sugar, one-half box 
Coxe's gelatine; beat the yolks of eggs with sugar, then add 
gelatine; scald the milk, turn it on the above mixture, boil a 
little longer than custard, strain, and when nearly cool, add 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth; flavor with lemon 
or vanilla and turn into a mold to cool. 

MISS NELLIE MANCHESTER. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 

One-half cup of butter, two tablespoons of sugar, two eggs. 
one cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, two. heaping tea- 
spoons of Dr. Price's baking powder, one cup of seeded raisins 
chopped tine; steam in cups one-half hour, and serve with 
pudding sauce. This will serve nine persons. 

MRS. CRUMPACKER, I.a Porte, Iiul. 



56 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



SNOW PUDDING. 

Pour over one-half package of Coxe's gelatine a cupful of 
cold water, add one and one-half cupful sugar; when soft add 
one cupful boiling water and juice of one lemon then the 
whites of four eggs; beat all together until it is white and 
frothy, or until gelatine will not settle clear in the bottom of 
dish after standing a few minutes. Put in a glass dish; serve 
with custard made from one pint milk, yolks of four eggs, four 
tablespoonfuls sugar and grated rind of lemon; boil. 

MRS. J. B. HOBBS. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One-half cup suet chopped fine, one-half cup N. O. molass- 
es, one-half cup sour milk, one cup chopped raisins, one-half 
cup vSanta currants, one-half teaspoonful cloves, one teaspoon- 
ful cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful nutmeg, one-half tea- 
spoonful soda, flour to make thick; steam three hours; serve 
with sauce. 

MISS TUTTLE. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of chopped suet, one cup of 
milk, one cup of seeded raisins, three and. one-half cups of 
flour, one tablespoonful of soda dissolved in the molasses. 
Steam three hours and eat with sauce. 

MRS. GEO. S. NORFOLK. 

QUEEN'S PUDDING. 

One quart of milk; boil, and pour over two and one-half 
pints of bread crumbs; the yolks of four eggs well beaten, a 
heaping tablespoonful of sugar; put in the oven and bake; 
then add a layer of preserves, then the whites of the eggs 
beaten with a cupful of white sugar; put in the oven and 
brown lightly. 

MRS. J. A. WHITE 

LIQUID PUDDING SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, one large tablespoonful butter, one tea- 
spoonful flour, one teaspoonful flavoring extract; mix; pour 
over just enough boiling water to thicken slightly; stir while 
pouring. An egg may be used instead of flour. 

MRS. BALDWIN. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 57 



The Sham and the Real. 



Every good thing has its imitators, every genuine article 
its counterfeits. The Ammonia and Alum Baking Powders 
sold over the counters are no more like Dr. Price's Cream 
Baking Powder, than the paste is like the real diamond, or a 
counterfeit is like one of the old master's genuine paintings. 

When greedy and merciless manufacturers claim their 
adulterated and harmful baking powders are as good as Dr. 
Price's, they know they are not telling the truth. These 
people know they are destroying the stomachs and the com- 
plexion of the consumers, and there are many grocers recom- 
mending such powders over their counters — knowing same 
to be injurious and worthless — simply to make a large profit. 

Dr. Price, a concientious physician, has spent a lifetime 
in perfecting and popularizing his Cream Baking Powder, 
the only Pure Cream Tartar Powder now to be obtained. 

Multitudes of imitators all over the land have sprung up, 
not to imitate the purity of Price's Cream Baking Powder, 
but to see how cheap they could make their counterfeits and 
hoodwink the public. 

Some use Ammonia and others Alum, but all these shams 
cry in chorus, "Buy this, its just as good as Dr. Price's and 
much cheaper. 

Price's Cream Baking Powder is the standard for purity 
and perfection the world over, and is beyond comparison. 

Dr. Price stands for Pure Food and a foe to all shams. 



58 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



CAKES. 



"With weights and measures just and true, 
Oven of even heat, 
Well-buttered tins aud quiet nerve" — 
Success will be complete." 



ALMOND CAKE. 

One pound sweet almonds, one-half ounce bitter almonds, 
three-fourths pound pulverized sugar, thirteen eggs, rind and 
juice of one lemon, two heaping teaspoonfuls corn starch, 
one-half teaspoonful Dr. Price's baking powder; stir almonds 
sugar, lemon and yolks of eggs; then mix the whites well 
beaten; add corn starch, and bake slowly one and one-half 
hours. MRS. d. s. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

Beat to a stiff froth the whites of eleven eggs, one table- 
spoon water, one-half teaspoon salt; sift seven-eighths cup 
flour three or four times; one cup sugar, one spoon vanilla, 
one spoon cream of tartar. Bake in tins that have never 
been used for anything else, and do not butter them. Bake 
not more than one-half hour in moderate oven, and invert as 
soon as removed. mrs. w. f. levings. 

BRIDE'S LOAF. 

Stir to a cream two cups powdered sugar and three- 
fourths cup of butter; add one cup milk, two cups flour mixed 
well with one cup corn starch and three teaspoons Dr. Price's 
baking powder, whites of six eggs well beaten; flavoring to 
taste; bake in moderately heated oven. When cold, ice with 
the whites of two eggs beaten stiff with powdered sugar and 
one teaspoonful corn starch. mrs. j. e. coleman. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 59 



BLACKBERRY CAKE 



Five eggs, two and one-half cups sugar, one and one-half 
cups butter; mix well together, and add two large cups of 
blackberry jam, one cup buttermilk, one dessert spoonful soda, 
four cupfuls browned flour, one teaspoonful cloves (ground) 
one allspice, one tablespoonful cinnamon, one and one-half 
pound citron. miss clara devin. 



BUTTERMILK CAKE. 



Two cups sugar, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
cloves, one-half nutmeg (grated), two cups buttermilk, one 
teaspoon soda, one cup chopped raisins, enough flour to 
stiffen. mrs. n. haythorn. 



BROI) TOETE. 



Six ounces grated almonds, twelve yolks of eggs, three- 
fourths pound sugar, the grated rind of a lemon, little less 
than one ounce cinnamon and cloves mixed, five ounces of 
finely grated pumpernickel and the whites of ten eggs beaten 
to a stiff foam. The twelve yolks, the almonds and sugar 
must be stirred one-half hour, then the bread added, and 
lastly the whites of the eggs. Take from one to one and one- 
half hours to bake, with most heat underneath till it has 
raised, with a moderate heat all the time. (Pumpernickel 
can be bought at any bakery.) mrs. i>. sauer. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE. 



One-half cake grated chocolate, one-half cup sweet milk, 
yolk of one egg; cook well over hot water, and set away to 
cool; two eggs, three-fourths cup milk, three-fourths cup but- 
ter, one and one-half cup sugar; put together and stir in the 
cold chocolate, adding two cups flour and one even tea spoon 
soda dissolved in milk. This makes a very large cake. 

MRS. JAM'. WICK. 



6o THK HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CHOCOLATE CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, one cup 
corn starch, two cups flour, whites of six eggs, one teaspoon 
soda, two teaspoons cream tartar; rub butter and sugar to a 
cream; add eggs well beaten; put in corn starch dissolved in 
milk, then the flour, and last 'the soda and cream tartar in a 
little milk; stir well; cook in long flat pan. When cold cover 
with this cream: Three cups granulated sugar, one cup milk; 
boil ten minutes; beat until cold, then put on cake and allow 
to cool; melt one-fourth cake chocolate (grate and put in pan 
over steam), and spread over top of cream; cut in squares 
when cold. mrs. d. sauer. 



CHARLOTTE POLONAISE. 

Make three thick layers of cake, one gold, flavored with 
lemon, and two silver, with almond. Make the cream as fol- 
lows: One and one-half pints milk or cream; put over water; 
add the yolks of six eggs well beaten, with two tablespoons 
arrow-root. When cooked, divide in two parts; to one part 
add two tablespoons pulverized sugar, six tablespoons grated 
chocolate, one-fourth pound crushed macaroons or cocoanut; 
to the second add one dozen bitter almonds and six dozen 
sweet almonds, blanched and split; one ounce citron sliced 
thin, four tablespoons pulverized sugar, one teaspoon rose; 
color with cochineal coloring. Put the cakes together thus: 
First, a white cake with chocolate cream; then a yellow cake 
with rose cream; then white cake covered with the following: 
Icing, made as follows: Whites of four eggs beaten with one 
pound of pulverized sugar; add, by degrees, one pound sweet 
almonds beaten to a paste with rose water; when nearly dry, 
finish with a plain white icing over top and sides. Procure 
the almonds ready shelled. mrs. e. durand. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Three eggs well beaten, one cup molasses, one cup sugar, 
one cup butter, one cup chopped rasins, one cup currants, one 
cup cold strong coffee, five cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon nut- 
meg, a little salt. Bake in slow oven from one and one-half 
to two hours. miss emma schwingel. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 6l 



DOLLY VARDFN. 

One heaping cup butter, two heaping- cups sugar, four 
eggs, two and one-half cups flour, two-thirds cup milk, two 
teaspoons Dr. Price's baking powder; put one-half of this 
mixture in a pan, add one tablespoon of molasses, one large 
cup raisins, stoned and chopped; one-fourth pound citron 
sliced fine, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves 
and allspice each; grate in a little nutmeg; add one teaspoon 
flour. This makes three layers. For filling: One pound 
raisins and one-half pound figs chopped fine; mix with jelly; 
water may be used, mrs. sauer. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, three-fourths 
cup milk, three cups flour, whites of six eggs, two and one- 
half teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder; flavor with 
vanilla. mks. e. s. smith. 

FRUIT CAKE WITHOUT BUTTER, EGGS OK MILK. 

One pound of fat salt pork, two pounds of raisins, one 
pound of English currants, one-fourth pound of citron, one 
pint of molasses, one pint of boiling water, one cup of dark- 
brown sugar, one tablespoon each of allspice, cinnamon, mace, 
cloves; one grated nutmeg, and one tablespoon of saleratus. 
Chop the pork until it is the same as lard, then pour the boiling 
water over it, only saving enough to dissolve the soda; then 
add the sugar, molasses and other ingredients, with the 
exception of the fruit, which should be added the last thing. 
Seed the raisins, slice the citron and wash and dry the cur- 
rants, and roll in flour before stirring in the cake; it should 
be stirred as stiff as an ordinary fruit cake; bake one hour. 
This will make four loaves, and will keep as long as any fruit 
cake. mrs. k. graham. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Two pounds seeded raisins, two pounds currants, ten 
eggs, one pound light brown sugar, three-fourths pound but- 
ter, four and one-half cups flour, one grated nutmeg, one 
pound citron, large glassful peach syrup; beat sugar and but- 
ter to a cream; stir the flour with the fruit; mix all together; 
add three teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder. 

MRS. J. W. STEAD. 



62 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



FRUIT POUND CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of currants, one pound of 
butter, eight eggs, one-fourth pound of citron, a small tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon and allspice, three heaping teaspoonfuls 
of Dr. Price's baking powder, one cup of milk, enough flour 
to make stiff; bake in a slow oven from an hour and a cpiarter 
to two hours, MRS. chas, cox. 

HASH CAKE. 

Two cups pulverized sugar, one half cup butter beaten 
to a cream; add one-half cup milk, two and one-half cups 
flour, two and one-half teaspoons Dr. Price's baking powder, 
whites of eight eggs; bake in jelly tins. For filling, make 
boiled frosting of one and one-half cups sugar moistened with 
a little cold water, whites of three eggs; add one cup hickory 
mits and one cup raisins chopped fine, mrs. d. sauer. 

COLD CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, yolks of five 
eggs and whites of three, three cups of flour, one-half cup of 
cornstarch, four teaspoons of Dr. Price's baking powder, one 
cup of sweet milk; flavor to taste, and bake in slow oven. 

F. A. M. 



JERSEY FRUIT CAKE. 

One and one-half teacups sugar, one-half teacup butter, 
one-half teacup sour milk, two and one-half teacups flour, two 
teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder, one pound raisins, 
one pound currants, one-fourth pound citron, foiir eggs. 

MRS. ROUNSAVELL. 

LADY'S CAKE. 

Three-fourths cup butter, two cups sugar, one-half cup 
milk, three cups flour, one teaspoonful Dr. Price's baking 
powder sifted with the flour; whites of six eggs beaten to a 
froth; flavor with bitter almond. mrs. i. a. jones. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 63 



MINNEHAHA CAKE. 

One and one-half cups granulated sugar, one half cup but- 
ter stirred to a cream, whites of six eggs or three whole eggs, 
two teaspoons cream tartar stirred in two heaping cups sifted 
flour, one teaspoon soda in half cup sweet milk; bake in three 
layers. For filling take a tea cup sugar and a little water 
boiled together until it is brittle when dropped in cold water; 
remove from stove and stir quickly into the well beaten white 
of an egg; add to this a cup of stoned raisins chopped line, or 
a cup of chopped hickory nut meat and place between layers 
and over tops. 

MRS. D. SAl'ER. 

NUT CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, one 
cup meats of nut desired (chopped), three-fourths cup milk, 
three and one-half cups flour, whites of five eggs, three tea- 
spoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder. mrs. j. w. stead. 

1-2-3-4 CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three cups flour, four eggs, 
one cup sweet milk, three teaspoons Dr. Price's baking pow- 
der, one spoon lemon extract; bake one-half in two layers, 
and add to other half one-third spoon of allspice, one-half 
spoon of cinnamon, two-thirds spoon of cloves, raisins, two- 
thirds cup, seed and chop; frost. miss joa riddkll. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 

Two pounds butter, four pounds flour, one pound sugar; 
rub thoroughly till it comes to a dough; roll out about one 
and a half inches thick, pinch the edges, put in flat pan, and 
bake twenty minutes. mr. i kaser. 

IMPROVED SUNSHINE CAKE. 

The whites of seven eggs, yolks of five, one cup of granu- 
lated sugar, two-thirds cup of flour, one-third teaspoon cream 
tartar, a pinch of salt; sift, measure and set aside flour; also 
sugar. Beat yolks thoroughly; then beat whites; after beating 



64 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



a little, add the cream of tartar and beat very stiff; stir in 
sugar lightly, then the yolks, then add flour. Put in tube pan 
and in the oven at once; bake from thirty-five to fifty minutes- 

MRS. D. SAUER. 



SNOW BALL CAKE. 

One cup white sugar, half cup butter, whites of five eggs, 
one and one-half teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder, 
flour enough to make a batter; bake in patty pans. 

MISS. TUTTLE. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs beaten well, three cups powdered sugar, four 
cups flour, one cup water, one teaspoonful Dr. Price's baking 
powder, the grated rind and juice of one lemon. 

MISS E. T. SHIPLEY. 



SNOW CAKE. 

One-half teacup butter, one cup sugar, one and one-half 
cups flour, one-half cup sweet milk, whites of four eggs, one 
teaspoon Dr. Price's baking powder; flavor with lemon. 

MRS. W, F. LEVINGS. 



STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

One pint flour, one cup lard; add a tablespoonful of salt; 
mix with cold water enough to make stick together; work it 
very little (enough to roll); put in jelly tins and bake; take 
from oven and butter while hot; place fruit between layers; 
add sugar to taste. Any canned berries may be used instead 
of strawberries. mrs. geo. barker. 



SPICE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, half cup butter, half cup sour milk, two 
eggs well beaten, half teaspoonful soda, one teaspoonful each 
of spices. F. A. M. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 65 



WHITE CAKE. 

Two cups white sugar, half cup butter, one cup milk, 
three cups flour, two teaspoons Dr. Price's baking powder, 
whites of five eggs beaten stiff, flavoring to taste; bake in 
slow oven one hour. miss fannie mc laughlin. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three and 
one-half cups flour, whites of five eggs, two teaspoons baking 
powder (Dr. Price's), one-half pound almonds, blanched and 
chopped, one cocoanut grated, one pound citron, chopped fine; 
mix the fruit with a little flour. 

MRS, GEO. DUNHAM. 

WOOLY CAKE. 

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, 

one cup sour milk, four eggs, two tablespoons vinegar, one 

teaspoon soda, one cup chopped raisins dredged with flour, 

three-quarters cup flour. 

MRS. GEO. p, power. 

YELLOW CAKE. 

Take yolks of three eggs, one cup sugar, five tablespoons 
melted butter, one cup new milk, one teaspoon cream tartar, 
one-half teaspoon soda, two cups flour; sift flour, cream tartar 
and soda together; flavor with vanilla. 

MIS* NELLIE MANCHESTER. 

MACAROONS. 

Soak one-half pound almonds in hot water until the skins 
rub off and pound fine; beat whites of three eggs stiff with 
one-half pound white sugar, add the almonds, drop on paper, 
sprinkle sugar over and bake. 

MRS. GEO. B. DUNHAM. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Melt one-half cup of butter in one cup hot water; while 
boiling stir in one cup flour; remove from fire, and when cool 
stir in three eggs, one at a time, without beating; drop in 
tablespoonful on buttered pan and bake twenty-five minutes 
in moderate oven. mrs. w. heywood. 



66 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CREAM FOR PUFFS. 

One-half pint milk, one-half cup sugar, two teaspoonfuls 
corn starch, two eggs, flavor to taste. Split puffs and fill with 
cream. This quantity will make eleven puffs. 

MRS. HEVWOOD, 

WHITE LAYER CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, whites of four eggs, four tablespoonfuls 
melted butter, one cup milk, two and three-quarter cups flour, 
two tablespoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder, flavor with 
vanilla. 

MRS. e. s. SMITH. 

LAYER CAKE. 

In which any kind of filling may be used. One and one- 
half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, two 
and three-quarter cups flour, two teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's 
baking powder, three eggs well beaten. 

MRS. e, s. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 67 

a^DERSO/M aRT CO., 

■Wholesale and "Retail 

PICTURES AND FRAMES, 

Fine Gold Work A Specialty. 

172 NORTH CLARK ST., - CHICAGO. 

PARIS FLORAL CO., 

Choiee - Cut - Flo\x7e;rs-, 

Wedding and Table Decorations. 

Orders for Weddings, Parties, 8cc, promptly attended to. 
TELEPHONE 4858. 189 N. CLARK ST. 



68 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



CAKE FILLINGS. 



BOILEI> ICEING. 

Two cups of white sugar, one-half cup of cold water; place 
on stove and let boil five minutes; when syrup is ready, have 
the white of one egg beaten stiff; then stir syrup into the egg, 
stir slowly at first. If icing is too thin, place the last of syrup 
on stove and let it get thicker before adding to egg; if too 
thick, thin it with a little hot water. 

F. A. M. 

ALMOND NOUGAT FILLING. 

One pound sweet almonds, blanched and chopped, one cup 
sour cream, one cup sugar, flavor with vanilla; beat all to- 
gether and spread between layers. 

MRS. currey. 

ALMOND FILLING. 

Whip thick cream, sweeten a little; add chopped almonds 
or other nut meats; mix well and spread. 

MRS. OWEN. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

Three cups light brown sugar, three-quarters cup butter, 
one-half cup cream, one teaspoon vanilla; stir well and boil 
in double pail fifteen minutes; take from stove and beat until 
cold; spread between layers. 

s. c. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

Three cups brown sugar, quarter cup water; boil until it 
hairs; add one-half cup cream, one tablespoon vanilla, one- 
half cup butter; boil all for ten minutes. 

MRS. J. BUELE. 



THE HOUSEKEEPER'S FRIEND. 69 



CREAM FILLING. 

One pint milk, two tablespoons corn starch, yolks of two 
eggs, three tablespoons sugar, flavoring to taste; boil until 
thick. 

MRS. A. R. EDWARDS. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

Two cups grated chocolate, one cup sugar, one cup water, 

small piece of butter; boil until it begins to thicken; flavor 

with vanilla. 

MRS. e. s. 

FIG FILLING. 

One-half pound figs chopped fine, quarter pound almonds 

chopped fine; add one large cup water with half cup sugar; 

cook until it thickens somewhat. Put in filling when nearly 

cold. 

MRS. j. w. stead. 

FIG FILLING, WITHOUT ALMONDS. 

One-half pound figs chopped fine, one cup water, one-half 

cup sugar; cook until soft and thickens. 

MRS. e. s. 

ICE FILLING. 

Three cups sugar, water enough to moisten; boil to a 
thick syrup; whites of three eggs well beaten; pour the boil- 
ing syrup over the beaten whites slowly, and while pouring 
beat very fast; add vanilla and beat until cold. 

MRS. GEO. NORFOLK. 

ICE CREAM FILLING. 

Four cups sugar, boiled in a pint of water until it ropes, 
then pour it on the whites of four eggs beaten stiff; when al- 
most cold add half a small teaspoonful citric acid; stir well 
until cold; flavor with vanilla. 

MRS. R. ROBINSON. 



70 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



LEMON JELLY FILLING. 



Grate the rind of one lemon; add juice and large spoon- 
ful of water, one-half cup sugar, butter size of walnut, one 
egg; beat all and let boil a few minutes. 



F. A. M. 



ORANGE FILLING. 

Boil to a syrup, one cup sugar, four tablespoonfuls water; 
add the well beaten whites of two eggs; beat until somewhat 
cool, then add the grated half of peel and pulp of orange. 

N. j. F. 



RAISIN FILLING. 

One cup chopped seeded raisins, one cup chopped nuts, 
one cup sugar dissolved; stir in raisins and nuts while boiling, 
white of one egg, beaten and stirred in when taken off the 
stove. 

MISS EMMA H. SMITH. 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN FILLING. 

One fresh cocoanut, one cup raisins, quarter pound citron, 
one-half pound almonds, one pound dates, six large figs, one- 
half cup currants; make a thin icing of whites of three eggs 
and two cups sugar; ice both sides of each of your layers. 
Prepare the fruit as follows: Grate the cocoanut, take one- 
third of the almonds, blanched, and chop fine with all of the 
fruit, mix with a small part of the cocoanut after icing the 
cakes, spread the mixture with each layer and sprinkle with 
cocoanut; on the top layer spread fruit and use the whole al- 
monds for decoration, sprinkling with the cocoanut. 

MRS. reichei/t. 



YELLOW FROSTING. 

Yolks of three eggs beaten light, with one and one-half 
cups sugar, flavor with vanilla. A tablespoon of sweet cream 
or one of vinegar will prevent crumbling. 

MRS. OWENS. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 71 



COOKIES. 



HOUND'S EARS OR MAGIC PASTRY. 

Two tablespoonfuls of white powdered sugar, four ounces 
fine flour, two eggs; mix all together very smoothly; cut in 
leaf shape and fry in lard. 

MRS. j. a. white. 

HERMITS. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, two-third cup of 
currants, two eggs, six tablespoonfuls sweet milk, one tea- 
spoonful cinnamon, one teaspoonful cloves, one teaspoonful 

soda, flour enough to roll. 

MRS. h. wunderle. 

VELVET CAKES. 

Three cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, beaten to a 
cream; the whites and yolks of six eggs well beaten, two table- 
spoonfuls sweet milk, one-half teaspoonful cream tartar, one- 
quarter teaspoonful soda sifted with one pound corn starch, 
one teaspoonful lemon juice; bake in patty pans. 

MISS MAUD WILLIAMS. 

CORN STARCH PATTIES. 

One pound Kingsford corn starch, one pound sugar, one- 
half pound butter, six eggs, two teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking 
powder, extract of vanilla; beat well together; bake in patty 
pans. MRS. j. w. STEAD. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, one eg^; well beaten, one-half cup butter, 
one-half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream of tartar, four 
tablespoons sweet milk; roll soft and bake in a quick oven. 

MISS MACK. 



72 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



GINGER COOKIES. 

Two cups N. O. molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup 
lard, one tablespoon soda, one-half cup boiling water; mix 
soft and bake. 

lillian Mclaughlin. 

ALMOND COOKIES. 

One-half pound sugar, one-half pound butter, four eggs, 
nine ounces flour, two teaspoonfuls Dr. Price's baking powder; 
bake in very thin sheets; before being put in oven, sprinkle 
with sugar and sliced almonds. Almonds may be grated or 
pounded if preferred. 

MRS. d. s. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

One cup molasses, one cup sugar, one cup boiling water, 
two eggs, two teaspoons ginger, one teaspoon soda, three cups 
flour, one cup butter; beat butter, sugar and molasses, add 
water, then eggs last of all. 

MISS JOA RIDDELL. 

POOR MAN'S SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

One teaspoonful soda dissolved in one cupful of molas- 
ses; add two tablespoonfuls butter, one-half cup sour milk, 
one teaspoonful ginger, one and one-half cup flour. 

MRS, F. M. LAUPEAR. 

CRULLERS. 

One-half cup sugar, one cup milk, two eggs, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one tablespoon melted butter, nutmeg to taste; 
fry in hot lard. 

D. G. 

BREAD DOUGHNUTS. 

Take three cups bread dough, one C up sugar, one egg, 
butter the size of an egg, salt; mix together and set to rise. 
When risen pull out with the hands until the dough is very 
light; break off pieces with the hands and drop into hot lard 
and fry. Sprinkle with sugar or cinnamon. 

MRS. M. B. MILLER. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 73 



Jtafth (?hiQ&cJo 

Street 
ffailw&y £o. 



74 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



DESSERTS. 



"They surfeited with honey 

And began to loathe the taste of sweetness; 
Whereof a little is more 

Thau a little is by much to much." 

— Shakespeare . 



APPLE SNOW. 

Peel, core and quarter dozen Spitzenberg apples; stew- 
gently with cup of water, white sugar sufficient to sweeten, 
and a little cinnamon; when reduced nearly to a pulp, turn 
into a dish. Make a soft custard of one quart milk, yolks of 
four eggs, small quantity sugar and essence of lemon; when 
cold, place over apples and whip the whites of four eggs with 
a quarter pound of pulverized sugar and heap lightly on top. 

MRS. j. R. B. 



A SIMPLE CUSTARD. 

One quart milk, six eggs, leaving out four whites for frost- 
ing, one tablespoonfuls corn starch, one-half cup sugar, flavor 
to taste; drop the whites, after beating well, into boiling wa- 
ter and cook a few minutes; put over custard. 

, MRS. BALDWIN. 



CHARLOTTE RURSE. 

One quart cream, white of one egg whipped stiff, sweeten 
and flavor to taste; pour over lady fingers. 

MRS, E. SMITH. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 75 



DATE SOUFFLE. 

Take a heaping cup of dates or prunes (if prunes, soak 
about one-half hour in cold water), stone them, cut up in small 
pieces, sprinkle two or three tablespoons sugar over them. 
Beat the whites of five eggs to a stiff froth and sweeten with 
pulverized sugar; mix all together and bake a light brown. 
Serve cold with whipped cream sweetened and flavored. 

MISS FLORA SAUER. 

DESSERT TRIFLE. 

Put a pint of strawberries or any fresh fruit in a glass 
dish; sprinkle with powdered sugar; then put a layer of maca- 
roons; pour over this a custard made of one quart of milk, 
yolks of eight eggs, one-half cup sugar; heat; when cold, place 
the beaten whites with a half cup sugar on top; dot it with 

currant jelly if desired. 

MRS. hiel. 

DATES STUFFED. 

Remove the stones from one pound of fine dates by cut- 
ting sides open. Remove the shells and skin from one-half 
pound almonds; the skin scan easily be rubbed of by first pour- 
ing boiling water upon the almond kernels. Replace the dates 
with almonds and arrange neatly on a dish, upon a shallow 
dish; dust a little powdered sugar over them and keep them 
cool and dry tmtil ready for use. Raisins can be used the 
same and made a very prettv table decoration. 

MRS. D. SAl'ER. 

PARADISE HASH. 

One dozen fine large oranges; slice off the top and scoop 
out the inside and put in bowl; be careful not to break the skin 
of the orange peel. Cut in small pieces, one dozen ripe bana- 
nas; can slice pine apple, cut in small pieces; put them all to- 
gether, sweeten to taste, and then fill your oranges. Serve 
with a spoon. 

MRS. E. B. POWERS. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Soak three tablespoonfuls of tapioca in cold water over 
night; boil with one quart of milk in a double pan ten min- 
utes; then add the yolks of four eggs well beaten and a small 



76 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



cup of sugar; remove from fire and stir rapidly for five min- 
utes, so it will not curdle; flavor with vanilla or lemon; pour 
into' a pudding dish; make a meringue of the whites and a 
teaspoon of sugar; put on top; serve cold. 

r MRS. J. H. SNYDER. 

HEN'S NEST. 

Make blanc mange and set in egg shell to cool; cut lemon 

peel in strips the size of a straw, and boil in syrup of sugar 

and water until clear; make a custard and put in glass dish; 

put lemon peel in shape of nest; take the shells from the blanc 

man^e and place them in the center. 

MRS. d. s. 

TAPIOCA JELLY. 

One cup of tapioca, one cup of sugar and one cup of any 
kind of jelly. Soak the tapioca over night in water; in the 
morning boil in a double boiler until done; then add the sugar 
and jelly, stirring until thorougly mixed together, and pour 
in moulds to cool; when cool enough place on the ice. Serve 
with whipped cream. Delicious. 

MRS. K. GRAHAM, 

PINE APPLE SPONGE. 

Soak one-half box gelatine two hours in one-half cup wa- 
ter, to one pint can; to half can of pine apple add cup of water 
and one cup sugar (simmer fifteen minutes) add gelatine and 
allow to remain on stove until perfectly dissolved; then re- 
move and place in a basin; place in a pan of cold water, add 
the juice of one lemon; when cold, it begins to thicken, add 
the stiffly beaten whites of four eggs; beat all together until 
it becomes liquid enough to pour into a mould; serve next day 

with whipped cream or custard. 

MISS p. 

TUTTI FRUTTI SPONGE. 

Prepare as for pine apple; before beating add thirty Cali- 
fornia grapes, sliced, two small bananas, three or four pears, 
one pint candied cherries or preserves, (cherries without juice) ; 
add eggs and serve next day with ice cream or whipped cream. 

MISS p. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 77 



SPANISH CREAM. 

One-half box of Coxe's gelatine dissolved in one pint milk 
for two and one-half hours; then add one pint more coldraiXk 
and set on stove to scald (not boil); then add five eggs, beat 
separate the whites, and add five tablespoonfuls white sugar 
to the yolks, six tablespoonfuls white sugar to the whites; stir 
the yolks into the scalding' milk, stir the whites in and set over 
night in cool place; flavor to suit taste. 

c. DE VINE, 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Soak one-half box of gelatine in a little water on the back 
of the stove; use fresh fruits in season and canned fruits; use- 
two or more kinds; put a layer of one kind in your mould, cov- 
er with sugar, another kind and sugar, etc.; put the fruit 
from the canned fruits in a dish; cover the mould tightly with 
a plate, turn over and drain the juice into the dish of liquor; 
mix the liquor and gelatine thoroughly, then pour over the 
fruit; put in the ice box to cool; two kinds of fruit may be 
uesd, but a different fruit for each layer makes a prettier and 
delicious dish. 

MRS. GEO. W. WHEELER. 



FRUIT GELATINE. 

One-third of an ounce package of gelatine to one pint of 
liquid, juice of two lemons and two oranges; soak gelatine a 
few minutes in a half cup of cold water, then one-half cup of 
hot water; add the lemon and orange juice, and if not enough 
liquid to makea pint, add more water; sweeten to taste; strain 
all through a fine strainer; put in a cool place, and as soon as 
it begins to set, put a layer of jelly in your mould, then a layer 
of sliced bananas or candied cherries (or other fruits), a layer 
of jelly and so on until all is used; put in ice box until firm 
enough to turn out. 

MRS. ELLA BURWNGHAM. 



7<S THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



PRESERVES. 



" Tempered with sweetness." 



APPLE LEMON JELLY. 

Stew one-half peck apples, then pnt in a bag and let it 
drip; cut up the lemons in thin pieces and soak over night in 
just enough water to cover it. To one cup of juice add one 
lemon and one cup of sugar; add the water in which the lemon 
is soaked; boil twenty minutes. mrs. fitch. 



APPLE JELLY. 

Stew one-half peck apples, then put in a bag and let it 
drip; to one cup of juice add one cup sugar and two rose 
geranium leaves; boil twenty minutes. mrs. fitch. 



COFFEE JELLY. 

Soak one-half ounce gelatine fifteen minutes in a little 
water; boil one pint of coffee; pour gelatine into coffee; 
sweeten it to taste; strain and pour into mold; let stand two 
hours at least, and serve with cream. miss l. mc laughlin. 



SPICED CHERRIES. 

Ten pounds fruit (pitted), five pounds sugar, one pint 
vinegar (scant), one small tablespoon cloves, one large table- 
spoon cinnamon, and a little allspice. Currants and goose- 
berries may be spiced in the same way, but to prevent the 
seeds hardening, the fruit should be removed after it has 
cooked twenty minutes; the juice may simmer alone for two 

hours. MRS. C. W. LASHER. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 79 



SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds of currants, four pounds brown sugar, two 
tablespoons cloves, two of cinnamon, one pint vinegar; boil 
two hours or more until quite thick; delicious for meats. 

MRS. JAXE WICK. 

PRESERVED GRAPES. 

Use California grapes; cut open and extract the seeds; 
add sugar in proportion to grapes; cook slowly half hour or 
longer, until the syrup and pulp are perfectly clear. 

TOMATO PRESERVES. 

vScald and peel the tomatoes; to each pound thereof add 
a pound of white sugar and let stand over night. Take the 
tomatoes out of the sugar and boil the syrup, removing scum. 
Put in the tomatoes and boil gently twenty minutes; remove 
the fruit and let the syrup boil until it thickens; on cooling 
put the fruit in jars and pour syrup over. m. r. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

Take sound fruit; rub the skins with flannel (this does 
not bruise them); three cloves to each peach, spices to taste; 
one quart vinegar, one-half pound granulated sugar. Let 
peaches boil until tender; carefully place in glass jars; add 
more sugar and boil to a syrup; pour over fruit. These will 
keep any length of time. mrs. paul 

PEACH PRESERVES. 

Pare the peaches; one pound of peaches to one pound of 
sugar; boil half an hour; skim the peaches out; boil the juice 
half an hour longer and pour it on the peaches. mrs. rich 

SWEET PICKLED WATERMELON. 

Take the rind and all the red off one watermelon; cut in 
pieces two inches square; cover with water and boil until 
tender; drain in colander. Make syrup with one pint of 
vinegar, three pounds sugar, one-half cup whole cloves, the 
same of stick cinnamon tied in thin muslin bag; boil the 
syrup ten minutes; put in the rind and boil two hours slowly. 

MR-. W. H. HAMMOND 



8o THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



CANNED GOOSEBERRIES. 

Fill glass jars as full as possible with uncooked goose- 
berries; then fill to the brim with cold water; seal tightly 
and put away for future use. Will keep two years. 

MRS. GEO. P. POWER 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

One dozen oranges; slice as thin as possible, taking out 
all the seeds and cutting off the thick rind at each end of the 
orange; cover them with four quarts of water and let stand 
thirty-six. hours; then boil in the same water four hours; add 
eight pounds sugar and boil for two hours; seal tightly. 

MRS J. A. WHITE 

SPICE CRAB APPLE. 

For seven pounds of crab apples use three and one-half 
pounds sugar, one quart vinegar, two ounces stick cinnamon, 
one ounce whole cloves, two or three pieces ginger root; boil 
fifteen minutes to a syrup; cook the apples until tender; put 
in a stone jar and pour the syrup over them. This will keep 
without sealing. MRS. w. f. 

CRAB APPLE MARMALADE. 

After carefully washing and removing cores from apples, 
put on stove with little water; let boil until tender; remove, 
then pass through colander; to every cup of apple add one 
cup sugar; boil until it thickens; put in stone jars; cover 
with paper and keep in cool place. mrs. c. a. m. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 

One-half bushel cling peaches; peel and put in preserv- 
ing pan, put over them ten pounds granulated sugar, allow 
to remain over night; in the morning add one quart water. 
Cook slowly for six hours. These preserves will keep three 
years. grandma h. a. boynton 

PRESERVED PEARS. 

One-half bushel bartlett pears, peal; cut into quarters; 
put into preserving pan, put over them eight pounds crushed 
sugar, allow to remain over night; in the morning add three 
quarts water and cook five hours; take off, put in stone jars 
and cover. grandma h. a. boynton 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



EISeNfill & GO. 

pancg Groceries, 

375 DIVISION STREET. 

F. BAUM, 
First=ClaSvS Meat Market, 

425 DIVISION STREET, 

Near La Salle Avenue. 



BEIERSDORF & LOHSAND, 

(Successors to CHIVILL & LENOX.* 

Stoves, Tin and Hardware, 

Smoke Stacks, Ventilators, Tanks, Guttering, &c. 

ALL KINDS OF COPPER, TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK. 

General Jobbing a Specialty. Furnaces Cleaned and Repaired 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

1 54 N. WELLS ST. 

Merriam, Collins & Co., 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

Flour and Fish, 

Cor. Wabash Avenue and South Water Street, 

CHICAGO. 



CHAS. W. MERRIAM 
ISAAC N. COLLINS. 
GEO. W. DCXTER. 



82 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



PICKLES. 



" Who peppered the highest was surest to please." 



COLD CATSUP. 

One-half peck ripe tomatoes, two roots hore-radish cut in 
small strips, two stalks celery, three red peppers, one cup nas- 
turtium (seeds), one-half cup salt, one-half cup sugar, one 
tablespoon cinn mon, one tablespoon ground cloves, one tea- 
spoon mace, one a teaspoon black pepper, one cup mixed black 
and white musta rd seed, one quart vinegar. Skin tomatoes 
without scalding; chop and put in colander to drain water 
off; then chop the peppers and mix all together. 

MRS. D. Y. MC MULLEN. 

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. 

Nine pounds gooseberries, six pounds sugar, two pints 
vinegar, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon mace, two teaspoons 
cinnamon. mrs. dunham. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

Five pounds common grapes, two and one-half pounds 
white sugar, one and one-half pints vinegar, one tablespoon 
each of cinnamon, cloves, pepper and allspice, one-half table- 
spoon salt. Boil grapes until soft, then put through colander; 
put back into kettle with sugar, vinegar and spices; boil until 
it thickens, and bottle. mrs. jane wick. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Fifty small cucumbers previously prepared for the table 
and cut in small pieces, two quarts small green tomatoes, two 
quarts small white onions, two quarts masturtiums (if liked) 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 83 



three large cauliflower, one tablespoon bird pepper, one pint 
shreded horse-radish, three ounces whole black pepper. Cut 
the cauliflower into pieces suitable for pickling; boil in salted 
water till easily pierced with a broom splint. Boil the onions 
and tomatoes separately in weak vinegar till tender. Mix 
one pint ground mustard, six tablespoons flour, three table- 
spoons tumeric, three tablespoons brown sugar; wet a little- 
vinegar and stir till smooth, after which add vinegar till you 
have used one gallon; let this boil till the flower thickens, 
then add all ingredients; heat thoroughly, stir constantly; can 
while hot. miss dixon. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

One-half peck tomatoes, one large pepper cut fine, one 
large onion chopped fine, one teaspoonful each of ground all- 
spice, black pepper, cinnamon and cloves, and one pint of 
cider vinegar; boil all together, slowly, for one hour; cool 
and bottle. mrs. e. f. higgins. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

To one peck ripe tomatoes add two red peppers, one pound 
dried currants, one pound sugar, one quart vinegar, one tea- 
spoonful mace, one teaspoonful cloves, one teaspoonful cassia 
buds, one teaspoonful allspice. Chop the tomatoes very fine; 
then add the peppers, spices, currants and sugar, and boil all 
together for thirty minutes. 

MRS. CYRUS J. WOOD. 

GREEN CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Make a brine, scald and pour over the encumbers every 
morning for three days; then heat water scalding hot and 
pour over pickles; then take one-half water and one-half vin- 
egar, scald and pour over three mornings; then scald vinegar 
with sugar, horse-radish root and white mustard seed. 

MRS. I. 1 . M \M HESTER. 

SWEET CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

For one gallon of pickles: Two quarts vinegar, one pound 
brown sugar, one ounce cinnamon, one ounce cloves, one ounce 
ground pepper; put all in a kettle; let come to a boil, pour 
over the pickles, and cover up tight. mrs. w. c. g m.i.aw ay. 



84 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



TOMATO BUTTER. 

Seven pounds tomatoes, three pounds sugar; boil quite 
thick, then add one pint vinegar, one teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon pepper, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
cloves. Do not strain tomatoes as for catsup. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

One peck tomatoes, six onions sliced; sprinkle one tea- 
cup salt over; stand until morning; drain well and scald in 
weak vinegar; drain again and cook with one quart vinegar, 
one pound sugar, two tablespoons curry powder, two tea- 
spoonfuls each of cloves, allspice, two of mustard; stir often. 

MRS. D. V. MC MULLEN. 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLE. 

Fifteen pounds of green tomatoes sliced; let stand over 
night with a little salt sprinkled over them; dram; five pounds 
brown sugar, one quart best cider vinegar, one ounce cloves, 
two ounces whole cinnamon; boil fifteen to twenty minutes; 
skim out, and boil the syrup till thicker, if preferred, but it is 
not necessary. mrs. boynton. 

RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Pare, quarter; take out seeds; put in salt brine over night; 
then take out and wipe dry in the morning; then one quart 
vinegar, one pound sugar, some whole cloves and cinnamon 
bark; put in cucumbers and boil until cucumbers are almost 
transparent; then take out cucumbers and lay in jar; throw 
the vinegar away and make fresh, same as before; boil ten 
minutes; then pour over. After two or three days they will 
fit for use. mrs. t. l. hammond. 

PICCALILLI. 

One peck tomatoes, six peppers, three onions chopped 
not very fine; add one cup of salt; let this compound stand 
through the night; drain in the morning; add one cup of 
sugar, two teaspoonfuls ground cloves, two of cinnamon, two 
white mustard seeds, and a little mace; put spices in a bag; 
add three quarts of cider vinegar; boil until soft, 

MRS. M. C. WAIDNER. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 85 



PICCALILLI. 

Take one-half bushel green tomatoes, an equal quantity 
of cabbage and one dozen each of onions and green peppers 
(cayenne may be used if green cannot be had). Chop all fine 
and mix together; sprinkle one pint of salt over and through 
them and let stand over night. In the morning drain off the 
brine, cover with good vinegar and boil slowly one hour, 
then drain and put in a jar; take two pounds of brown sugar, 
two tablespoons cinnamon, one each of allspice and cloves, 
one-half teacup ground pepper and one pint horseradish, with 
vinegar to mix; boil all together and pour over the contents 
of the jar; cover tight or bottle, and seal while hot. 

MISS DIXON. 

SHIRLEY SAUCE. 

To every six large ripe tomatoes add one green honey dew 
pepper, one onion, one tablespoonful salt, one tablespoonful 
sugar one tablespoonful ginger, and one cup of vinegar; chop 
tomatoes, onions and peppers fine, mix all together, boil one 
hour, and bottle while hot. J. R. b. 



36 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND. 



ICE CREAMS. 



"Glittering squares of colored ice; 

Sweetened with syrups, 

Tinctured with spice, 

Creams and cordial and sugared dates. 



BISQUE. 



One pint thick cream, yolks of four eggs, quarter pound 
of fine sugar, vanilla; mix lightly; pack in ice and salt, and 
let stand three or four hours without stirring. 

MRS. C. W. LASHER. 



BERRY ICE CREAM. 



Any kind of berries may be used for this; mash with a 
potato masher in an earthen bowl, jone quart of berries with 
one pound of sugar; rub it through a colander; add one quart 
of sweet cream and freeze. Very ripe peaches may be used 
i nstead of berries. 

MRS. C D. BURROUGHS. 



CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 



Use three ounces of bitter chocolate to one gallon of cream 
or boiled custard; boil the chocolate with sour milk and sweet- 
en to taste; strain it into the cream and flavor with vanilla; 
beat the ice cream to make it a bright rich color. 

MRS. C D. BURROUGHS. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 8 7 



ICE CREAM. 



For one-half gallon. Take one quart of cream, one quart 
of milk; sweeten and flavor to suit the taste; then freeze it; 
just after it begins to freeze, add the beaten whites of two 
eggs; to make it richer, add more cream and less milk; if not 
so rich take less cream and more milk. 

MRS. ROBT. McINTYRE. 



LEMON ICE. 



Juice of four lemons, one and one-half pints water and one 
pound of sugar (granulated); add the white of one egg well 
beaten, after straining into the freezer; freeze same as ice 
cream. 

MRS. BALDWIN. 



PINE APPLE SHERBET. 



Two cans of pineapple or the same amount of fresh fruit, 
two lbs of sugar, two quarts water, whites of six eggs; strain 
the juice from the cans into the freezer; make a boiling syrup 
of the sugar and one quart water; chop the pineapple small, 
scald it in the boiling syrup, then rub it through a colander, 
with the syrup and the remaining quart of water, into the 
freezer; freeze and add the whites of four eggs, and beat it 
perfectly white. 

MRS. C W. LASHER. 



88 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 

Dr. R. E. Crissman, 

DENTIST, 
283 Wells Street, Chicago. 

PURE COFFKK 

HOT FROM THE ROASTER. 
DOUBLE CONE COFFEE POTS. 
GOODS RESULTS GUARANTEED. 

BLACKAL^S 

2U lbs Best Coffee $1.00. 
105 Madison Street. Delivered Anywhere. 

Horlick'S Malted Milk. 

THE BEST DIET 

FOR INFANTS AND INVALIDS. 

Endorsed by Physicians everywhere as the best diet for infants in health or 
sickness. Also for Adults suffering from Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Wasting Diseases, and of 
special value in Typhoid Fever. Relieves Insomnia and Nervous Exhaustion, and is excellent for 
delicate ladies and nursing mothers. 

Malted Milk contains the soluble nutritive part of malted cereals, combined with pure sterilized 
milk, the whole being evaporated to powder form in vacuo. Our special malting process produces 
a plant pepsin, which largely predigests the casein of the milk, and so renders it easy of assimila- 
tion. A meal is instantly prepared by dissolving in water. No cooking or Milk being required. 

Malted Milk makes a pleasant and nutritious drink for the table, superior to tea, coffee, cocoa, 
etc. Excellent and convenient for travelers. Agrees with the most delicate stomach. Sold by 
druggists. Samples and full particulars free. 

Manufactured only by 

MALTED MILK (ZCD., 

London Depot, 39 Snow Hill, E. C. RACINE, WIS. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



BEVERAGES. 



COFFEE FOR THREE. 



For each person take one tablespoonful of best ( ). G. Java 
and enough Moca to flavor it; into this break half an egg and 
pour a little cold water; stir well; add one pint boiling water; 
boil five minutes; set back on stove two minutes before serv- 
ing. For six persons double the quantity, and always after 
using, clean the coffee pot thoroughly, or the coffee will loose 
its fine flavor. 

MISS MAUDE E. HIGGINS. 



EGG-NOG. 



Scald some new milk by putting it, contained in a new 
fruit jar with screw cover, into a sauce pan of boiling water. 
but it must not be allowed to boil; beat up a fresh egg with a fork, 
in a tumbler, with some sugar; beat to a froth; then add a 
dessert spoonful of brandy or port wine and (ill up the tumb- 
ler with scalded milk when cold. This is a highly nutritious diet, 
suitable at the beginning of convalescence after severe acute illness. 



II ASPBEHRY SHRUB. 



Place red raspberries in stone jar and cover with good 
cider vinegar; let it stand over night; in the morning strain, 
and to one pint of juice add one pint of sugar; boil ten min- 
utes and bottle while hot. 

MRS. jam-; WICK. 



9o 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS l-'RIEND 



EGG LEMONADE. 



This is a refreshing and nutritious drink, especially for 
invalids. A tin shaker and small wooden pestle are neces- 
sary. Put half of a large lemon in a glass, after extracting 
the seeds, also three lumps of sugar; press and work with the 
pestle until the juice is extracted and the skin soft; add two 
tablespoons of sugar, the same of finely cracked ice and one 
raw egg; fill nearly full with cold water; invert the tin shaker 
over it and shake well. This is not so good without the ice 
and should be cracked very fine. Put two straws in the glass 
and hand to your friend. 

MRS. CHAS. A. JONES. 

GRAPE JUICE. 



To every five pounds of grapes one pound sugar and one 
quart hot water; let it just come to a boil; put through a crash 
towel bag; take pulp that remains in bag, put in a dish and 
put one quart water to wash all juice; then drain in bag and 
add sugar water and juice; put on stove, let come to a boil, 
and seal in glass jars while hot. 

MRS. D. SAUER. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 91 



CANDY. 



'Sweets to the sweet.' 



SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanch the almonds by pouring boiling water over them; 
after the skins are removed, place them in a pan and brown 
slightly in a hot oven; as soon as removed from the oven, stir 
a small piece of butter among the hot nuts (only enough to 
moisten them slightly); sprinkle with salt. 

MRS. c. w. lasher. 



PEANUT CANDY. 

Melt two cups granulated sugar by heat, adding one cup 
shelled peanuts when nearly done: pour out on buttered plates 
and let cool. 

MISS ROSE ANDREWS. 



COCOANUT-CREAM CANDY. 

Three cups white sugar, scant half cup of water, one-half 
teaspoon cream of tartar; boil ten minutes; then add one cup 
of fresh cocoanut or desiccated; beat well together and drop 
on white paper by the spoonful. 

MISS NELLY OWEN. 



MAPLE CARAMELS. 

Melt one pound maple sugar in a cup of sweet milk and 
one tablespoon butter; cook until almost brittle; turn on to 
a buttered plate; when cool enough mark in squares. 

MISS MAY SMITH. 



92 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



MOLASSES TAFFY. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one large tablespoonful 
butter, three tablespoonfuls vinegar. 

MISS MOLLIE SMITH. 



MOLASSES CANDY. 

Two cups N. O. molasses, one cup white sugar, butter one- 
half size of an egg, two teaspoonfuls vinegar; boil until 
candy hardens in cold water. 

MISS MARY PRYOR. 



MARSH MALLOWS. 

Dissolve half a pound white gum arabic in one pint of 
water; strain and add half pound fine sugar; place over the 
fire, stirring constantly until the sugar is dissolved, and all is 
the consistency of honey; add gradually the whites of four 
eggs well beaten; stir the mixture until it becomes somewhat 
thich and does not adhere to the finger; pour into a tin, 
slightly powdered with starch, and when cool divide off into 
into squares. 

MISS MABEL F. ASPINWAU,. 



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Two cups pulverized sugar, half cup cream; boil five min- 
utes or until it is hard enough to mold when dropped in cold 
water; then stir until cool enough to make into balls; grate 
the chocolate and steam over a tea kettle; when soft, cover 
the balls by dipping them in on a fork; set in "a cool place. 

MISS MABEL F. ASPINWALL. 



ENGLISH WALNUT CANDY. 

One pound of confectionery sugar, white of one egg, as 
much water as the white; pour in sugar until thick enough 
to handle; when ready, put on bread board and knead fifteen 
minutes; roll out smooth and cut into squares; have a pound 
of English walnuts broken in halves and place between. 

l. c w. 



THE HOUSEKEEPER'S FRIEND. 93 



CARAMELS. 

One cake Baker's chocolate, four cups of brown sugar, one 
quarter pound of butter, large cup of milk; boil until it will 
harden slightly in cold water; beat and add one tablespoon- 
ful of vanilla and beaten white of one egg; pour into pans and 
cut in squares when cold. 

MISS LUCY COCHRAN. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Three pounds of brown sugar, one-half pound of butter, 
one cake Baker's chocolate, three gills of milk, one tablespoon- 
ful of vanilla. 

MISS CARRIE PATTERSON. 



94 the housekeepers friend 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Recipes for the sick. 



IDA WRIGHT RODGERS, M. D. 



ARROWROOT. 

Mix two tablespoonfuls arrowroot with three tablespoon- 
fuls cold water; add half a pint of boiling water, constantly 
stirring (milk may be used instead of water); flavor with 
sugar, nutmeg or other spice. This preparation is suitable when 
t/ie bowels are inflamed and relaxed. 

RICE WATER. 

Wash well one ounce of the best rice in cold water; then 
soak for three hours in a quart of water kept at a tepid heat; 
then boil slowly for one hour and strain. This may be flavored 
with cloves or other spices. 

SWEET WHEY. 

To a pint of milk add about a square inch of rennet and 
slowly warm to about one hundred degrees Fahr.; stand for 
thirty minutes and then strain through muslin. 

LIME WATER. 

This is easily made at home by taking a piece of un- 
slacked lime the size of a walnut and putting it into two 
quarts of filtered water in an earthen vessel and stirring it 
thoroughly; allow it to settle, and pour off the clear solution 
as required for use, replacing with water and stirring up as 
consumed This is useful in certain acid conditions of the stomach, 
and is often called for in treating infants. 



THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 95 



MUTTON BROTH. 

Boil one pound of lean loin of mutton with three pints of 
water for three hours; salt to taste; pour out the broth in a 
basin and when it is cold akim off the fat. It can be warmed 
up as wanted. This is the first preparation of animal diet that 
should be given during convalesence from any severe fever. 



VERMICELLI MILK SOUP. 

Into a quart of boiling milk put a level salt spoonful of 
celery salt; stirring slowly, add two ounces of vermicelli, and 
continue to stir twenty minutes. The yolks of two eggs thor- 
oughly beaten should be added when the soup is ready to be 
removed from the fire. This soup may be flavored with cin- 
namon and sugar if desired. This is one of the most nutritious 
and non-stimulating articles of diet. Persons who partake of this soup 
are said to have no craving for strong drink. 



THANKSGIVING DINNER. 

Blue Point Oysters on Shell. Celery, 



California Golden Cream Soufnee Crouton. 



Bouchee Salpicon. 



Fillets of Sole au Vin Blanc. Holandaise Potatoes. 



Roast Turkey, Giblet Sauce. Puree of Cranberries. 

Browned Mashed Potatoes. Sugar Corn in Cream. 



Plum Pudding. Maraschino Sauce. Pumpkin Pie. 
American Cheese. 



Ice Cream, Mikado Form. 



Assorted Fruit. Nuts. 

H. L. AUSTWICK, 

Culinary Director Central Restaurant, 75-77 Randolph St. 



96 THE HOUSEKEEPERS FRIEND 



Open oysters on deep shell, ice. Serve four to a person. 
One-half lemon. 

Trim and wash celery. Let stand one-half hour in ice 
water, before serving, to brittle, 

GOLDEN CREAM. 

Put small can of pumpkin or same amount of fresh 
boiled pumpkin in sauce pan; add pint of chicken broth; sea- 
son, nutmeg-, red pepper, salt, small piece butter; let come to 
boil; remove from fire, add one quart of pure cream sauce 
made thin, and pass all through fine strainer. Serve very hot; 
do not boil. 

SOUFFLE FOR SOUP. 

Mix one-half ounce flour with a little boiling water; salt; 
remove from fire; add two eggs; roll thin; cut in strips, then 
into small pills; roll around in seive; fry in hot lard; serve 
on top of the soup. 

BROUCHEE SALPICON. 

Make very small patties of puff paste, or fry a batter on 
iron form; drop off for the salpicon cases. Make a salpicon 
of the following ingredients, all well cooked the day before, 
cut in small dise, a tablespoon of each: Sweet breads, red 
tongue, ox palate, mushrooms, chicken livers, rooster comb, 
lamb fries; lastly, one truffle cut as rest. Put all in small 
sauce pan; add enough brown sauce (Espagnole) and tomato 
sauce, half-and-half, to moisten; small piece of glace, table- 
spoon good sherry wine; let simmer five minutes; fill up the 
bouchee at moment of serving, 

SOLE. 

Take the fillets of sole; roll up size of large cork, place in 
pan, moisten with Rhine wine, cover and steam in oven until 
well cooked; dish fillets, add little more wine to pan, small 
piece butter and salt; add yolks of six eggs, wisp to a yellow 
foam and pour over the fish. 

HOLANDAISE POTATOES. 

With French potato cutter cut out round potato balls; 
boil in salt water just done; drain; dish; pour over chopped 
parsley with melted butter. 

Fill the little Mikado moulds with ice cream; place in 
freezer until wanted; turn out, place a Japanese umbrella in 
the arms of each, and serve at once. h. l. a. 



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