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Full text of "Housekeeping in the Blue grass"

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CREAM BAKING POWDER 



IT IS NOT SOLD LX BULK; BUY IT ONLY IN TIN CANS, SECURE- 
LY LABELED. 



USE 

DR. PRICE'S SPECIAL FLAVORING EXTRACTS, 



MAUE FROM FRUITS AND SPICES. 



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IGNITED STATES OF AMERICA. | 



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FISH, GAME, POULTRY, 
Fruits, Vegetables, Canned Goods, &c., (fcc. 

No. 115 West Si.^th Street, South Side, near Race, 
CINCINNATI, O. 



HOUSE-KEEPING 



BLUE GEASS. 



HOUSEKEEPING IN THE BLUE GRASS. 



A NEW AND PRACTICAL 

COOK BOOK: 

COSTAIXIXG 

NEARLY A THOUSAND RECIPES, 

MANY OF THEM NEW, AND ALL OF THEJI TRIED AND KNOWN TO BE 
VALUABLE; SUCH AS HAVE BEEN USED BY THE BEST HOUSE- 
KEEPERS OF KENTUCKY AND OTHER STATES. 

TOGETUER WITH 

MAKY MISCELI.AXEOUS RECIPES, 

USEFUL IN FAMILIES, ETC. 



EDITED BT 

THE LADIES OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

PAKIS, KT. 



4 c, 






CINCINNATI: 

GEO, E. STEVENS & CO. 

1875 



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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1874, by 

THE LADIES OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, OF PARIS, KY, 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Stereotyped hy 
OGDEN, CAMPBELL & CO., 

176 Kim St., Cincinnati. 



PREFACE. 



The "Blue Grass" region of Kentucky, as is well known, is 
considered the garden-spot of the State. It is celebrated for the 
fertility of its soil, the beauty of its pastures, its flocks and 
blooded stock, and last, but not least, for the hospitality of its 
people and their table luxuries. 

It is useless to eularge upon the last feature, especially to 

those who have attended Bourbon Fairs, and made visits in this 

and the adjoining counties. We only refer to it, by Avay of 

introducing our book- to the appreciation of the public. 

It is said that 

" Wbo sweeps a room 
Wiih motive pure, 
Makes that and the action fine." 

May not this also be true of a cookery-book ; in view, first, 
of its containing recipes of dishes which have often gratified the 
appetites of families and guests of some of the best housekeepers 
in this far-famed region : secondly, and by way of climax, in 
that it was conceived in the earnest desire of the ladies con- 
nected with the "Missionary Society" of the Southern Presby- 
terian Church, Paris, Ky., to do something more in the way of 
benevolence than was found practicable in the use of the needle. 

It was suggested six months ago, after mature consideration of 
ways and means, that we might not only greatly increase our 

V 



VI PREFACE. 

funds, but also contribute to tlie convenience and pleasure of 
housekeepers generally, by publishing a good receipt book. 

As soon as it was decided that we should undertake it, each 
set about collecting the best practical recipes for our purpose. 
Very many of the most noted housekeepers in other churches, 
and in different parts of the country, cheerfully contributed to 
our pages ; but, with the utmost diligence, we were not able to 
complete the work of copying and classifying until the present 
time. 

Many of our recipes are entirely original with our own famed 
cooks ; others have been gathered from the most reliable sources ; 
not one, so far as we know, has been copied from books. 

All these we carefully copied, and afterward criticised the 
proofs in such a way as to insure accuracy. 

Now that the book goes Out, full fledged, to the world, we 
solicit for it a kind reception and fair trial. In its dedication to 
the work of the church of God, we ask His blessing upon it, 
and His acceptance of its proceeds. 

Paris, Ky., Jauuai-y 1, 1875. 



OOISTTEIBUTOES 



HOUSE-KEEPING IN THE BLUE GRASS. 



Mrs. B. T. Allin. 

Mrs. C. Alexander, Paris. 

Mrs. R. M. Adair, Paris. 

Mrs. L. J. Arnold, Paris. 

Miss Nannie Abbott; Paris. 

Mrs. L. H. P.lanton, Paris. 

Mr. Baker Blanton, Farmville, Va. 

Mrs. C. S. Brent, Sr., Paris. 

Mrs. Chambers Breut, Fred'bg, Va. 

Mrs. J. n. Brent, Paris. 

Mrs. H. C. Bujkner, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. W. T. Buckncr, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Allen Basbford, Paris. 

Mrs. James Basliforcl, Paris. 

Mrs. L. D. Barnes, Paris. 

Mrs. M. Barnes, Hot Springs, Ark. 

Mrs. Barclay, Scott county. 

Mrs. Batterton. 

Mrs. Bullitt, Jeiierson county. 

Mrs. Burnley, Frankfort. 

Miss Battaille, Va. 

Mrs. S. Brooks, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Jas. Blythe, Madison county. 

Mrs. Brutus J. Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Sam Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Ezekicl Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. C. F. Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mre. Green Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Frank Clay, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Mary Cunningham, Paris. 

Mrs. Crawford. 

Mrs. M. Chapline, Paris. 

Mrs. Frederick Cabell, Yd. 



Mrs. Amanda Clay, Bourbon. 
Mrs. Cooke, Va. 
Miss Jennie Cook, New York. 
Miss Belle Croxton, Paris. 
Miss Mattie Clay, Bourbon. 

Mrs. Geo. "W". Davis, Paris. 

Mrs. "Wm. Daviess, Harrodsburg. 

Mrs. C. A. Dougherty, Paris. 

Mrs. Deigman. 

3Irs. Mary Duncan, Paris. 

Mrs. D. M. Dodge, Bourbon. 

Mrs. Dudley. 

Mrs. Garnett Duncan, Louisville. 

Mrs. Edwards. 

Miss Sue Elbert. 

Miss Edmiston, Lexington. 

Mrs. ^Y. ^Y. Fisher, Bourbon Co. 

Mrs. Wash Fithian, Paris. 

Mrs. J. C. Ford, Louisville. 

Mrs. Alice Garrett, Lexington. 
Mrs. W. W. Gill, Paris. 
]Mrs. Morris Gass, Bourbon. 
Mrs. David Goodloe, Lexington. 
Miss Lucy Graddy, "Woodford Co. 
lion. R. Hawes, Paris. 
Mrs. Col. Hanson, Paris. 
Mrs* J. A. Ilowerton, Paris. 
Mrs. J. H. Holt, Bourbon. 
3Irs. Geo. Hiblcr, Paris. 
Mrs. Hamilton. 
Mrs. Hughes, Philadelphia. 
Mrs- James Hughes, Paris. 



LIST OF CONTEIBUTOES. 



Mrs. R. II. Hanson, Paris. 
Mrs. Dr. Ilumphrey, Louisville. 
Mrs. Ilalliclay, Bourbon Co. 
Mrs. V. Iliggins, Paris. 
Mrs. A. Hunt. Louisville. 
Mr. C. E. F. Hegman, Gibson House, 
Cincinnati. 

iliss Ilawes, Paris. 

Miss Ilalleck, Paris. 

Miss Hanson, W. City. 

Miss Ella Harrison, Lexington. 

Miss Bcttie Holt, Bourbon Co. 

Dr. "W. ^Y. Hall, N. Y. 

Mrs. J. Ingles, Paris. 

Mrs. Lawrence Jones, Lexington. 

Mrs. J. M. Jones, Paris. 

Mrs. Justice Winchester. 

Mrs. L. Johnson, Paris. 

Miss Jaynes, Paris. 

Mrs. Dr. Kenney, Paris. 

Mrs. Georgia Kellar, Paris. 

Mrs. W. B. Kinkead, Fayette Co. 

Miss Huttie Kenney. 

Mrs. E. Lyle, Danville. 

Miss Daisy Lyle, Bourbon C 

Mrs. N. T. Martin, Paris. 

Mrs. Robert Morrow, Paris. 

Mrs. Mollie Mitchell, Lexington. 

Mrs. T. II. Mitchell, Paris. 

3Irs. J. McCarney, Paris. 

Mrs. Myers, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Frank Massie, Paris. 

Miss Iva McCarney, Paris. 

Miss Ella Mitchell, Paris. 

Miss Belle Mitchell, Paris. 

3Irs. J. Ncely, Paris. 

Mrs. Northcutt, Paris. 

Mr. P. Nippert, Paris. 

Vlrs. J. Owens, Bourbon Co. 
jtilrs. J. B. Payne, Lexington. 
3Irs. Walter Payne, Lexington. 
Mrs. Richard Payne, Lexington. 
Mrs. Dr. Powell. 
Jlrs. Peers, Virginia. 
Mrs. Patrick Pope, Louisville. 



Mrs. Anne Rylaud, Lexington. 

Mrs. John Ray, Paris. 

Mrs. M. L. Rogers, Boiu-bon Co. 

Mrs. Russell, Lexington. 

Mrs. N. B. Rion, Jr., Paris. 

Mrs. Johnson Rogers, Bourbon. 

Mrs. Col. Randolph, Virginia. 

Mrs. Rucker, Paris. 

Mi.ss M. Redmon, Paris. 

Rev. Green Clay Smith, Frankfort. 

Col. W. E. Simms, Paris. 

Mrs. W. E. Simms, Paris. 

Mrs. M. T. Scott, Lexuigton 

Mrs. Stone. 

Mrs. R. G. Stoncr, Montgomery Co. 

Mrs. L. J. Smedley, Bourbon. 

Mrs. G. Spratt, Louisville. 

Mrs. J. Short, Paris. 

Mrs. Henry Spears, Paris. 

Miss F. Short, Paris. 

Miss Kate Spears, Bourbon. 

Miss R. Keith Spears, Paris, 

Miss Fannie Shropshire, Bour. Co. 

Mrs Ed. Taylor, Paris 

Mrs. W. Taylor, Paris. 

Mrs. Mat. Turney, Pai'ir, 

Mrs. F. Thomas. 

]M rs. W. G. Talbott, Paris. 

Mrs. Carrie Preston Thornton, Lex. 

Mrs. Amos Turney, Sr., Bour. Co. 

Mrs, Amos Turney, Jr., Bour. Co. 

Mrs. C. Withrow, Danville. 

INlrs. B. Woodford, Paris. 

Mrs. M. Webb, Paris. 

Mrs. Watson, Frankfort. 

Mrs. E. Wariield, Lexington. 

Mrs. B. Washington, Va. 

Mrs. Perry Wornall, Bourbon. Co. 

Mrs. Wing, Louisville. 

]Mrs. Dr. Wilson, Bourbon. 

Mrs. Mary White, Mt. Sterling. 

Mrs. SalJic Walker, Richmond,, 

Miss Phebc Wood, Maysville. 

Mrs. Dr. Young, Danville. 

Rev. D. P. Y'oung, Nicholasville. 



CONTENTS. 



CONTENTS. 



SOUP. 

PAGE. 

Suggestions — Chicken — Vegetal)lc —Pea —Noodles — Cleai- Beef— 
Okra — Beef Soup, or Tea — Delicious Soup — Soup — Bouillc — 
Gumbo— Pea— Gumbo— Cuirs Head 1—5 

FISH. 

Baked— Stewed— To Fry Fresh— To Boil Salt Cod— To Boil Fresh— 
A Large Fresh— Stuffed and Baked— Cod Fish Balls— Stewed 
Cod— Fish Pie— Sauce for Salad or Fish- Fish Sauce 6—8 

OYSTERS. 

Oyster Soup— Dressing for Cove— Fried— Stewed— Scallopcd—Oj'^s- 
ter Fritters — To Stew— A Fine Oyster Pie — Oyster Sauce for 
Fowls — Oyster Sausages 9 — 11 

MEATS. 

Suggestions— Saddle of Yenison — Beef a la Mode — Stuffed Beef- 
steak—Beef Tongue— Corn Beef— To Cook Corn Beef— To Cure 
Beef Ham — Curing Beef — Mutton Chops — To Cook a Joint of 
Mutton— How to Cook Ham- To Boil Ham— Baked Ham— Stuffed 
Ham— Boast Duck— Roast Goose— Roast Turkey— Boiled Turkey 
—Poultry— Roast Turkey— To Broil Ham— Sauce for Grated Ham 
—Chicken Pie with Rice— Chicken Pie — Pot Pie of Beef, Veal, or 
Chicken — Meat Cakes — Stewed Veal or Mutton — Baked Hash — 
Hashee — Sausage Meat — Smoked Sausage — Pickle for Pork— To 
Glaze a Cold Ham— Giblet Pie with Oysters — A Quick way to 
BroU Steak— Corn Beef-Dutch Pudding— White Pudding 12—21 



CONTENTS. 



SAUCES FOR MEATS. 

Venison Sauce — Drawn Butter— For Cold Meat — Wine Sauce for 
Roast Meat — Onion Sauce for Mutton — Wine Sauce for Venison — 
Horse Radish Sauce — Cucumber or Wine — Onion —Mustard — 
London Club— Sauce Jelly for Fowls or Meat 22—24 

CATSUPS. 

Cabbage — Green Tomato — Ripe Tomato — Cucumber — Goose- 
berry— Cbelee Sauce 25—27 

SOUR PICKLES. 

Oil Mangoes — Celery — Walnut — Oil Mangoes — Green Pepper 
Mangoes— Cucumber Pickle — Martinoe — Green Tomato — Yel- 
low — Cabbage — Peach Mangoes — Cucumber Piclvle — Tomato- 
Frosted Tomato — Mixed — Hidden Salad — Chow Chow— Rough 
and Ready — Composition — How to Color Green — India — Spanish 
— Onion — Mixed — Spice Vinegar — Cucumber Mangoes 28—38 

SWEET PICKLES. 

Apple Sweet — Sweet Mango — Sweet Peach — Cantelope — Cu- 
cumber 39 — 41 

SALADS AND SIDE DISHES. 

Chicken- Dressing for Chicken — Lobster — Salmon — Potato — Nice 
Side Dish— Sandwiches — Stewed Sweet Bread with Champignon — 
Croquettes — Rice Croquettes 42—45 

BREAD. 

Waffles made with Yeast— Light Bread— Potato and Hop Yeast- 
Rusk — Yeast — To Make Gems — Puffs — Cream Muffins — Rice 
Muffins — Corn-meal Muffins — ^Yeast Muffins — Quick Muffins — 
Corn Muffins— Buckwheat Cakes — Rice Griddle Cakes — Cream 
of Tartar Biscuit — Soda Biscuit — Sour Cream Biscuit — Graham 
Biscuit — Light Rolls — Light Loaf Rolls — Potato Yeast — Bread 
made with Flcischraan's Yeast — French Biscuit — Yankee Biscuit 
— Short Biscuit — Beaten Biscuit — Salt-Rising: Bread — Mush Bat- 



CONTENTS. XI 



ter Cakes — Rice Batter Cakes — Bread Crumb Cakes — Corn-meal 
Batter Cakes — Flannel Cakes — Light Rolls — Soda Rusk— Rusk — 
Potato Bread — Rice Corn-meal Bread — Kentucky Corn — Egg 
Bread— Old Fashioned Corn Dodgers — Sallj' Lunn without Yeast 
— Sallj- Lunn — Brown Bread — Brown Gems 4G— 58 

VEGETABLES. 

Suggestions — Baked Tomatoes — Scalloped Tomatoes — Broiled To- 
matoes — Fried Tomatoe? — To ]5oil Corn — Fricaseed Corn — Corn 
Pudding — Green Corn Fritters — Corn Pudding — A Xice Way to 
Prepare Rice — Hominy — How to Cook Hominy — Dressing for 
Slaw or Lettuce— Slaw — How to Prepare Sweet Potatoes— Pota- 
toes for Breakfast — To Boil Potatoes— Potato Puffs — Potato Balls 
— To Cook Parsnips — Macaroni — Cashaw — Salsify or Oyster 
Plant— Young Onions — Cymblings — Fried Peaches — ^Fried Egg 
Plant — Fried Green Tomatoes — Fried Cucumbers — Green Corn 
Pudding 59— C5 

OMELETTES. 

Puft Omelette— To Poach Eggs— Fried Eggs— Scrambled Eggs— To 
Boil Eggs— Columbus Eggs— Dressed Eggs GG— 68 

CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 

To Can Green Corn — Green Corn for "Winter Use — Tomatoes and 
Okra for Soup — Peaches — Fruit — To Seal Preserves — Apples — 
Tomatoes — Peaches and Pears 69—70 

PASTRY. 

Suggestions — Puff Paste — Confectioners' Paste — Common Pie — Lard 
Paste — Suet Paste — Cheese Cake — Transparent Pudding— Orange 
Roley Poley — Cream Pie — Custard Pudding — Bourbon Pudding 
— Kentucky Pudding — Vinegar Budding — Orange Pudding — 
Lemon Pudding — Lemon Pie — Snow Dumplings — Apple Dump- 
lings — Baked Apple Dumplings — Apple Custard for Pies— Quince 
Pudding — Citron Padding — Preserve Pudding— Cherry Pudding 
— Mince Pies— Mince Meat 71 — 73 



CONTENTS. 



PUDDINGS. 

Sweet Potato PiuUling — Sweet Potato Pie — Irish Potato Pudding 
— Cocoaniit — Jelly — Molasses — Molasses Pie — Potato Pudding — 
Jam — Pumpkin — Feather — Ginger — Gingerbread — Sago — 
Tapioca — Sponge Cake Roll— Dressing for Sponge Cake — Lemon 
Sponge Cake— Orange— Scotch— Tapioca Pudding without Eggs 
or Milk — Cottage — Woodford — German Puffs — Plain — Cake — 
Charlotte Russe — Pound Cake — Cake — Minute— Sweet Potato — 
Jelly Rolls — Biscuit — Jam Cake — Prune Meringue — Apple Cake 
Meringue- Apple Meringue— Omelette Souffle — Apple Souffle — 
Apple Cream — Apple Dessert — Coddled Apples — Pears in Syrup 
— Blackberry Flummery — Good Friday — Virginia — French — 
Bread — Very Nice— Oxford — Apple Fritters— Delicious Fritters 
— Cream Pufl's — Plum — Economical Plum — Raisin — Rice — Plum 
-Cream— The Queen- Thickened Milk— Batter— Sunderland.. . . 80—94 

SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 

White— For Plum- Wine— Cold 95 

CAKE. 

Suggestions — White Sponge — Cream Sponge — Icing — Yellow 
Sponge — Savoy Biscuit — Water Melon — Pound — Queens — Deli- 
cate — Charlotte Polonaise — White — Ambrosia — Mrs. Clay's 
Premium — Beautiful White — White Cup — A Nice Flavoring for 
— Tip Top— Rich Fruit- Fruit— Two Pound Cake by Measure — 
Cocoanut — Springfield — Economical — Ten Minute — Ginger 
Si)onge — Soft Ginger--Extra Ginger — Superior Ginger Loaf — 
Bride's — Corn Starch Bride's — Starch — Mountain — Icing for 
Mountain — White Mountain — Chocolate — Chocolate Filling — 
A Good Cup— Puff or Cup— Small Cup— Nut— Almond — Rosette 
— Orange- Golden — Ginger Snaps — Hard Ginger — Scotch — Jum- 
bles — Dough Nuts — Sugar Drop — Cream — Silver — Chocolate — 
Snow Ball— Portugal— Coffee— Spiced— Marble— Black and White 
Marble — Nice Tea — Delicate Tea — Black — Superior Black — 
Chocolate or Jelly — -Jelly — Biscuit a la Creme — Wine — Cream — 
Lady— 3Ioraines— 31ille-ans 96—115 



CONTEXTS. XI 11 



FILLING FOR CAKE. 

A Beautiful Coloring for Cake — Icing made with Gelatine — Choco- 
late Icing — Lemon Jelly — Cream Filling — For Jelly Cake — Icing 
between Jelly Cakes — Lemon Butter— Mixture for — Custards- 
Substitute for Jelly IIG— 1J8 

CUSTARDS AND JELLIES. 

"Wine Jelly— Boiled Custard— Trifle— Solid Custard— Cold— Lemon 
— Charlotte Russe — Farina — 'Without Moulding — Velvet Cream — 
Bavarian Cream — ^Float — Baked Custard — Bibavo — Irish Moss 
Blanc Mange — Isinglass Blanc Mange — Irish Cream — Ambrosia 
— Snow Pudding — Rock Cream — Angels' Food — Oriole's Nest — 
Isinglass Cream — Italian Cream — Calves' Foot Jelly — Gelatine — 
Isinglass — Russian — Oranges with Transparent 119 — 126 

ICES. 

Cocoanut Cream — Jerusalem Cream — Ice Cream — Almond Cream 
Lemon Cream — Chocolate Custard Frozen — Bisque Glace — Straw- 
berry Ice Cream — Caramel Cream — Chocolate Ice Cream — Frozen 
Pudding — Ice Pudding — Xesselrode Pudding — Toute Fruite — 
Madeira "Wine Sherbet — Roman Punch Ice— Champagne Ice — 
Pine Apple Ice — Lemon Ice — Sherbet — Orange Sherbet — Rasp- 
berry Ice 127—102 

JELLY FOR MEAT. 

Jelly for Meat — "White Pippin Apple — Currant — Crab Apple — 
Raspberry — Gi'een Grape 133 — 134 

CONFECTIONERY. 

Cocoanut Drops — White Cream Candy — Chocolate Caramels — 
Cream Candj' — Cand}' — Cocoanut Meringue — Meringues — Side 
Dish of Oranges — Chocolate Egg Kisses — Mirletons Aux 
Amandes — Frangipane a la Congurs — Tartlettcs Marin — Meringue 
Tarts — Meringue Pie — Lemon Meringue Pie — "White Tally Candy 
— Brown Taffy — Almond Candy — Burnt Almonds — Egg Kisses.. .135— 130 



xiv CONTENTS. 



BEVERAGES. 

Champagne Puncli — Whisky Punch — Catawba Punch — Superior 
Catawba Wine — Currant Wine — Blaclvberry Wine — Strawberry 
Wine— Gooseberry Wine — Grape Wine— Raspberry Vinegar — 
Blacliberry Cordial— Strawberry Acid— Eorg Fog— Porter Soda- 
Currant Shrub — Cream Nectar — Blackberry Vinegar— Beer — 
To Keep Cider Sweet — Champagne Cider — Apple Wine — 
Brandy Peaches — Currant Wine--Pine Apple Syrup— Rasp- 
berry Syrup — Orange and Lemon Syrup — Essence of Lemon — 
Tea— Good Tea— Chocolate— Boiled CofF'^e— Good Coffee— Drip- 
ped Coffee 140—147 

PRESERVES. 

Sweetmeats— To Preserve Peaches— Honey-Strawberry— Quince — 
To Preserve Orange Peel — Peach — To Clarify Sugar for Preserv- 
ing-Peach Marmalade— Tomato — To make Maple Syrup — Wild 
Crab— Raspberry — Cherry— Plum 148 — 151 

FOOD FOR SICK. 

Thickened Milk — Arrowroot with Milk — Corn-meal Gruel — 
Tapioca Jelly — Arrowroot Jelly — Sago — Rice — A Preparation 
for the Sick— For Infants— Blackberry Jelly 152—154 

REMEDIES. 

A Good Salve — To Cure a Felon — Excellent Bitters — A Cure for 
Rheumatism— Antidote for Poison— For Flesh Bruises — A very 
Fine Lip Salve — Poison Oak Cure — Breast Ointment— Lemon 
for Cough— A Fine Recipe for a Cough— Sprains— Scalds or Burns 
— Poisonous Vines— Neuralgia— Cold in the Head — Ear-Ache — 
Bruises — Lip Salve— Eye Water — Inflamed Eyes— Salve for 
Burns — Aperient— Dyspepsia 155 — 158 

SOAPS. 

Potash— Soft— Soda Ash 159— IGO 



CONTENTS. XV 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

rolUh for Grates, or to Taint Brick Ilonrths— Soap— WasJi for 
the Hair— For Cleansing Laces— "Wliitewash-Wash for llioSldn 
— Packing Butter — Brine for Butter — American Cement — Setting 
Colors — Bleaching- To Clean Black Silk— To Set Color in Calico 
— Crape Veils— To Clean Carpets — To Glaze Shirt Bosoms — Ink 
Stains- To Keep Eggs — To Remove Stains from Marble — To Clean 
Stair Rods— Ink— Preserving Butter — To Prevent Calicoes from 
Fading — Washing Clothes — Paint for Pavement— Sealing "Wax — 
To Freshen Grenadine — To Take Marks off Furniture — Sealing 
Wax— JIucilage— Hair Oil— Matting— Sapolio— To Take out Mil- 
dew — A Pretty Experiment — Virginia Brunswick Stew 101 — 108 

Index to Advertisers 1C9 



SOUP 



RULES ESSENTIAL IN MAKING GOOD SOUP. 

Beef is the best and most nutritious meat for making soup. 
Chicken can be used in various Avays for the same purpose, 
making a delicious and delicate soup. Pieces of cold broiled 
steak, also the bones of cold joints of meat, with a small quan- 
tity of the meat, can be made into soup with the addition of 
vegetables and proper seasoning. Always be careful to scour 
the pot thoroughly, and put the meat in cold water, which should 
heat gradually and simmer four or five hours. It should not be 
allowed to boil more than twenty minutes to cook the vegetables. 
It should be skimmed frequently. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Rice, dumplings, etc., should be added at the last to thicken. 
Vegetables, if used, should be sliced. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

To one full growm fowl, pour on two gallons of cold water, and 
set the pot on the back of the stove, so that it may cook slowly 
for three hours. Skim several times, then place the pot where it 
will boil slowly, and thicken Avith two table-spoonfuls of flour, 
mixed with a little cold Avater. One tea cup of rice, one tea cup 
of cream or sweet milk, salt and pepper to the taste ; and just be- 
fore serving throAV in a little parsley and thyme. — 3Irs. Martin. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Take a good sized .piece of beef shank, and crush the bone, so 
as to extract the marrow ; put in a pot with two gallons of cold 



SOUP RECIPES. 



water, Obsei've the same rules as given above for chicken 
soup, only cook jQour hours. About two hours before the soup 
is done, put in one quart peeled tomatoes ; one pint okra sliced, 
in another hour ; and a half hour before serving, add one 
half pint sliced Irish potatoes, one half pint tender corn. If 
the flavor of onions is liked, they must be sliced and put in one 
hour before the soup is done. Turnips also may be used, but 
should be added as soon as the water becomes hot. This soup 
may be made of cold steak. — 3Irs. Mart'm. 

PEA SOUP. 

Take one half of a fried or broiled chicken, put it in a pot 
with one and one half gallons cold water, cook slowly for two and 
one-half hours; skim well. Take one quart of pea hulls, and 
drop in Avhen the water becomes heated ; strain through a 
colander and thicken with two table-spoonfuls of flour, one cup of 
cream or milk, one-half hour before serving. Pepper and salt 
to taste. — Mrs. Matiin. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 

To one eg^, add a little salt and flour, enough to make a stiff 
dough ; roll out in a thin sheet, aiid dredge with flour, to prevent 
sticking ; then roll as for a dumpling, and shave down in very 
small pieces, just as you would shave cabbage for slaw. — Katy 
Desha. 

CLEAR BEEF SOUP. 

Cut up iu a pot the following ingredients : four pounds of the. 
lean of beef, two carrots, a knuckle of veal, a table-spoonful of 
butter, three small strips of pork, or sweet middling, or cold ham; 
two onions ; put the onions in whole and stick six cloves iu 
each ; one blade of mace ; pour a tea-cup of water on this and 
let it stew fifteen minutes ; then fill the pot with cold water ; 
let it come to a good boil ; carefully skimming all of the scion 
from the soup; it takes three skimmings. -After it has been 
well skimmed, set the pot on the back of the stove and let it 



SOUP RECIPES, 



boil gently six hours. About oue half luHir before serving, drop 
in a small bunch of parsley ; strain it through a cloth before 
sending to the table. Salt to the taste, and brown with burnt, 
brown sugai*. — Mrs. P., Lexington, Ky. 

OKRA SOUP. 

Cut up and skin two chickens, with two onions and tlirci 
strips of sweet middling. Fry this in a skillet; when it is done, 
pour some water on it and rinse all into a pot, filling the pat two 
thirds full of water. Put in one quart of tomatoes and let it 
cook with the soup. In a saucepan cook four pints of okra. 
AVhen the chicken in the soup has boiled long enough to bone, 
pour the soup through the colander, so as to take out all of the 
bones ; and drop in the tomatoes and the pieces of middling. Pull 
the meat or chicken into small pieces, and put back the soup to 
boil, adding the okra. Salt to the taste. — Mrs. L. Payne. 

BEEF SOUP OR TEA. 

Take one half pound of lean beef; cut in pieces as large as the 
end of your thumb ; put in cold water, one third of a pint ; let it 
soak over night. Cook the beef in two thirds of a pint of water 
gently for three hours ; pour off the tea ; dry the j)ieces of beef, 
and pound them in a mortar very fine ; then pour together the 
pounded beef, the soup, and the water in which the meat soaked 
during the night. The water and tea should be mixed while 
the tea is boiling. After the tea has boiled three hours, there 
should be as much water as when you began ; fill up \vith boil- 
ing water as it boils away. 

DELICIOUS SOUP. 

Have ready one quart of peeled tomatoes ; one half teaspoon- 
ful of soda ; let this stew until the tomatoes are thoroughly 
cooked. Have one half gallon of boiling milk, new and un- 
skimmed; pour in the tomatoes, stirring well. Let all boil to- 
gether about fifteen minutes ; season with red pepper, salt, and 
one table-spoonful of butter; just before pouring up, thicken 
with pounded crackers. — Mrs. Alice Garrett. 



SOUP RECIPES. 



SOUP. 

A little lard and flour sprinkled in the pot ; two carrots, two 
parsnips, two turnips, half a cabbage, parsley, thyme and onion ; 
then the beef, allspice and cloves pounded. Let the beef stew till 
brown ; then add boiling water, till you make the soup as strong as 
you Avish. When done, strain through a sieve ; the water from 
the Bouille is the best for the soup. — 3Irs. Brutus Clay. 

BOUILLE. 

Take the bone from the rump of the beef; put in a pot of 
water ; add cabbage, turnips, carrots, parsnips, parsley, and 
spice. Let it simmer six hours ; half an hour before dinner put 
some of the gravy in a stew pan ; thicken with brown flour and 
burnt sugar ; add the vegetables ; send the beef to table with 
the vegetables poured over it. 

GUMBO. 

Fry two chickens ; also, fry one quart of okra ; cut up four 
or five tomatoes, a lai'ge onion, and parsley to taste; while 
frying, pour in a pint or more of boiling water ; stew till you can 
pick the bones out of the chicken ; add a teacup of cream and 
one of rice boiled soft ; add cayenne and black pepper, salt, and 
butter, to taste. 

PEA SOUP. 

Two pints shelled peas ; half of a chicken ; put on with one and 
a half gallons of water; some thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper. 
When the peas are done, take them out; then return them to 
the water in the mashed state ; add quarter of a pound of but- 
ter, rolled in flour ; before sending to table add half a pint of 
cream. 

GUMBO SOUP. 

One chicken, cut up and fried brown ; one pint of lard ; then 
take out, and fry two or three slices of beef in same gravy ; 
five dozen pods of okra sliced and fried brown ; six onions 
chopped and fried ; a large pan of tomatoes chopped up. Put 
these ingredients into three quarts of water ; boil two hours ; 
season with pepper and sauce to taste, and serve hot. 



SOUP RECIPES. 



CALF'S HEAD SOUP. 

Put tlio head into one and a half gallons of water ; let it boil 
till the meat drops from the bones ; take out and chop very 
fine ; take out the brains and mix with them one pint of claret 
or port wine, one tea-spoonful of salt, and one glass of Madeira 
wine ; mix with chopped meat an onion minced fine, handful of 
parsley, one tea-spoonful of cloves, one of allspice, one of black 
pepper, a little sage and thyme, a piece of butter size of an egg, 
'with a little flour worked in, and put in the soup. 



FISH RECIPES. 



FIS ti 



BAKED FISH. 

Clean the fish thoroughly, and salt it; when ready to cook, 
wash it nicely ; have i-eady some light bread crumbs ; season 
highly with pepper, salt, a few celery seed, a very little chopped 
onion, a piece of butter about the size of a walnut ; stuff your 
fish with this dressing, and place in a baking pan with Avater 
enough to about cover it ; put in a little pepper and salt, and a 
piece of butter about the size of a large hen egg, rolled in flour. 
Put inside the stove, and when it begins to cook, baste frequently 
till done. Garnish fish with hard-boiled egg, cut in rings. — 
Louisa. 

TO BAKE FISH. 

Rub the fish with salt and pepper, and a very small quantity 
of cayenne pepper, inside and out ; prepare a stuffing of bread 
seasoned with pepper, salt, thyjne, or parsley ; sew the fish or tie 
with a string; put it in a pan, and to a good sized fish allow a 
pint of water ; sprinkle with flour, and add some butter ; baste 
well ; bake slowly one and a half hours. — Katy DesJux. 

TO STEW FISH. 

Rub Avith salt and pepper, and put in a pan ; also, one pint 
of water to a fish weighing five pounds. When about half done, 
season Avith salt and pe])per, half a pound of butter, one teacup 
of flour, parsley, and thyme. This can be stinted into a pint of 
oysters (^or, if not convenient, the oysters may be omitted). 
Serve, Avith the gravy in the dish. Instead of oysters, six hard- 
boiled eggs, sliced, may be used. — 3Irs. Mmihi. 



FISH RECIPES. 



TO FRY FRESH FISH. 

After having the fish nicely cleaned, season with salt and pep- 
per, and roll in flour or corn meal ; drop them in hot lard, and 
fry until brown. 

TO BOIL SALT COD. 

Soak the fish all night; change the water next morning. 
About two hours before dinner, put it on in scalding water ; 
boiling will harden it. Make a sauce of eggs and drawn 
butter. Codfish cakes can be made of cold fish, mashed jiota- 
toes and enough flour to make them stick. Make into little 
cakes and fry. 

TO BOIL FRESH FISH. 

Clean well and rub with pepper and salt, and pin it in a 
towel and drop in boiling water ; keep it boiling fast. A large 
fish will take three quarters of an hour, a small one less time. 
V/hen done, put it in a dish and dress with eggs, and drawn 
butter and parsley. Walnut and mushroon catsup are good 
with boiled fish. 

FOR A LARGE FRESH FISH. 

Wash and clean well ; have a kettle of boiling water on the 
stove ; take the fish and tie up in a cloth ; put about one 
table-spoonful of salt in the kettle; boil six eggs very hard, 
and chop up fine ; about two table-spoonfuls of butter ; one 
tea-spoonful of pepper ; one of salt, and a little mustard ; a 
little milk to make into a gravy. Pour over the fish ; if any fish 
eggs, boil them also. This is a nice fish sauce for any kind of 
fish. 

STUFFED AND BAKED FISH. 
Clean the fish and wipe dry ; rub salt inside, and pepper, 
salt and flour all over the outside ; then take stale bread and 
pound up well ; add one tea-spoonful of pepper and salt ; beat 
one egg, and add a little sage and onion ; stufi:' the fish, and 
bake about two hours, and serve with sauce as the above. 



FISH RECIPES. 



C0DFI3H BALLS. 

Take codfish and soak one day and night, then boil it all to 
pieces, and pick into shreds ; i)ick out all the bones, and let it 
drain. To about one pound of fish, allow one dozen Irish pota- 
toes, boiled and mashed very fine ; season with pepper, salt and 
tea-cupful of sweet milk ; break one egg ; then mix all well to- 
gether, and make into rolls and bake a light brown. 

STEWED CODFISH. 

Soak well ; put about a pint of water in a skillet, and pick 
to i^iec^es about as much fi^h as you want for a meal ; break two 
eggs into the skillet ; then season Avith butter, pepper and salt ; 
make a little thickening of flour and milk ; stew until all is thick 
enough. (A side dish for supper or breakfast.) 

FISH PIE. 

One can of salmon must be i)icked into small pieces, and put 
aside until the pap is made — thus : put one quart of fresh milk 
to boil ; with a rolling-pin or mortar pulverize about ten cents 
worth of oyster crackers, with which thicken the milk, making 
it about the consistency of mush; when almost cool, stir into 
it a quarter of a pound of butter, and a little suet ; fill your 
baking-dish with alternate layers of this pap and the fish, 
beginning and ending with the pap ; between each layer, grate a 
very little nutmeg; bake only until warm, for all of it has been 
cooked before. — 3frs. J. C. Ford, Lomi^ville. 

• 

SAUCE FOR SALAD OR FOR FISH. 

Take the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs ; pulverize them 
w-cll ; add mixed mustard, pepper, salt and three table-spoonfuls 
of salad oil, and three of vinegar; one table-spoonful of tomato 
catsup. — Mm E. Mitchell. 

FISH SAUCE. 

One half pint of cream and milk mixed ; two eggs well 
beaten ; juice of one half lemon ; salt and pepper. Put on the 
fire and stir constantly, until it thickens. — Mrs. Ed. Taylor. 



OYSTER RECIPES. 



OirSTlSRS 



OYSTER SOUP. 

To two quarts of new milk, add one pint of hot water ; let 
it come to a boil ; pour in the liquor of one whole can of oys- 
ters; then add the oysters, and boil two minutes. Have a soup 
tureen ready, with two dozen powdered oyster crackers, a table- 
spoonful of butter, salt and pepper to taste; pour on the soup 
and send to the table. Never allow butter to boil in soup ; 
it curdles. 

DRESSING FOR COVE OYSTERS. 

Put one pint of milk on, and let it come almost to a boil ; tlien 
beat two eggs, and stir into the milk ; add mustard, salt and 
vinegar to ta.ste. — Miss Kate Sj^ears. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Three quarts of new sweet milk ; one half pint of water, one 
half pound of butter ; salt and pepper to taste; pour into this 
the liquor of one can fresh oysters ; let it come to a boil ; then 
add the oysters, and one quarter of a pound of rolled crackers ; 
let all boil a few minutes. — 3frs. T. H. Mitchell. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

To a can of oysters and liquor, add the can full of water, 
seasoned with red pepper and salt to taste ; cook till nearly 
done. Add yolks of four eggs beaten, mixed in a pint of milk; 
put into the oysters, and stir till it thickens. — Mrs. Burnley. 



10 OYSTER RECIPES. 



FRIED OYSTERS. 

Use the largest oysters for frying. Take the oysters from the 
can and wipe them perfectly dry ; break four eggs for a whole 
can ; beat them a little and season very delicately with salt and 
pepper ; dip each oyster into the egg and then into bread crumbs 
grated very fine ; put them on a large board to dry again ; fry 
in boiling lard. — Mrs. P., Lexington, Ky. 

STEWED OYSTERS. 

Separate the oysters from the liquor. Put the liquor in a 
stew-pan and add one pint water, a wine glass of cream, a lump 
of butter, size of hen egg ; pepper, salt, bread crumbs to taste ; 
let them boil together ; then add oysters, and cook till thor- 
oughly heated.— ilf/-s. M. T. Seott. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Separate the oysters from the liquor. One egg, one gill 

milk, one table-spoonful flour, pepper and salt, beat well together ; 

then put oysters in batter, have ready powdered crackers; roll 

oysters in the crumbs and fry in hot lard or butter. — 3£rs. M. 

T. Scott. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Take the oysters from liquor ; place some in a baking dish or 
pan ; grate bread crumbs, seasoned highly with pepper and salt; a 
few celery seed over them and small bits of butter ; add another 
layer of oysters and the seasoning ; then jwur over a glass of 
wine and the oyster liquor, after grating bread over the whole. 
Bake till hot through. — Hiss E. Mitchell. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Toast slices of bread and butter well on both sides ; line the 
baking dish with it instead of a crust. Pour the oysters into the 
dish, after seasoning with butter, pepper and salt. Crumb bread 
on top and bake fifteen minutes. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Take two eggs ; bread crumbs and flour, and enough milk to 
make a stiff batter ; season this with pepper and salt. Take 



OYSTER RECIPES. 11 



equal portions of butter and lard, and put this in the frying pan ; 
drop in a siwonful of batter and one or two oysters ; cook brown 
and turn carefully. This is a nice breakfast dish. 

TO STEW OYSTERS. 

Put the oysters in a stew pan, with a lump of butter ; when 
the oysters come to a boil, put in a thickening of flour and water, 
salt and pejiper. Serve in a covered dish. 

A FINE OYSTER PIE. 

Make a rich puff paste ; and, after having greased the baking 
dish, line with the paste. Then season one quart of oysters with 
pepper and salt, one half pound of butter, and half a tea-cup 
of bread crumbs ; put this in with the oysters (without the 
liquor), and cover Avith paste (in strips.) This pie will bake 
in one ludf hour ; if in baking the crust browns too fast, put 
over it paper doubled ; if it looks dry, pour in some of the 
liquor, which must be boiled. Serve immediately, as paste is 
better when just from the oven. 

OYSTER SAUCE FOR FOWLS. 

Plump the oysters for a moment or two over the fire ; take 
them out and stir into the liquor, flour and butter mixed 
together; salt and pepper to taste. Yv'hcu it has boiled, put in 
the oysters and add a glass of wine. 

OYSTER SAUSAGES. 

Chop a pint of oysters with a quarter of a pound of veal ; 
some bread crumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper ; pound them 
in a mortar; make them into little cakes, dipped into an egg; 
flour and fry them dry. Serve hot. — Miss McCaniey. 



12 MEAT KECIPES. 



MB ATS 



MEATS. 

Meat slioulJ be kept for a day or two before being cooked, 
in order to render it more tender. Never parboil meat that is 
to be roasted. This extracts the juices and makes it insipid. 

The fire must be in proportion to the size of the article to be 
roasted ; an allowance of twenty minutes to each pound, is the 
time usually given. In summer, meat will roast in shorter time 
than in winter. Roast with a quick fire, and baste frequently. 

Salt meats, large fish, and meat for soup should be put to 
boil in cold water. 

Should poultry or meat not intended for soup be put to 
boil in cold or boiling water ? This is a question on which the 
highest authorities differ. We recommend a middle course — 
using hot, but- not boiling Avater ; boiling water contracts the 
sliin so rapidly as to toughen, and prevents impurities from 
escaping ; cover the meat with water and boil gently, one quart 
to a pound. Cover closely and skim frequently ; should the 
water become too much reduced, replenish with boiling water. 

Frozen meat should be immersed in cold water before cook- 
ing, or it will be tough. 

Boiled meat should be served as scon as ready for the table, 
or it will become sodden. 

SADDLE OF VENISON. 

Put the venison on to bake, with the side which is uppermost 
when it comes to the table next to the pan ; then make the 



MEAT RECIPES. 13 



dressing thus : ■with the fingers crumble a small piece of light 
bread, which season highly with pepper and salt. "When the 
meat is about half done, turn it over, and cut on cither side of 
the bone several places, about two and a half inches long, which 
stuff with the dressing just made. Then pour all over the meat 
a half tea-cupful of catsup. Into a half tea-cup of black molasses 
stir a table-spoonful of whole allspice, and a tea-spoonful of brown 
sugar ; this, too, pour over the meat ; then crumble light bread 
all over the upper surface, keeping the meat well basted all the 
while, and cooking slowly, for it burns readily. Just before 
taking the venison off, put here and there all over it a little 
jelly.— J/?-s. C. S, Brent 

, BEEF A LA MODE. 

Wash and wipe a round of beef; cut out the bone, and fill 
the place with a rich stuffing, made of bread crumbs, highly 
seasoned Avith pepper, salt and onions. Have ready one tea- 
spoonful of salt ; also, one of pepper, cloves, mace and nutmeg; 
make incisions in the beef with a knife, and put in them strips 
of fat pork, rolled in the spices ; sprinkle the remainder of the 
spices over the top of the beef ; and then cover the whole with 
fat pork,' to prevent burning. Tie the beef all around with tape, 
and skewer it well, to keep it in place ; place in an oven with 
at least three quarts of water, and let it bake five or six hours, 
(a small piece will require less time.) Baste constantly with 
butter and lard, mixed with a small quantity of flour. When 
nearly done, skim ofi" the fat and thicken the gravy. Season 
with walnut catsup and wine. — Mrs. Brutus J. Clay. 

STUFFED BEEF STEAK. 

Haifa tea-spoonful mace, one tea-spoonful cloves, alittle thyme, 
l')epper, and salt, a double handful of bread crumbs ; beat the 
steak well ; mix the ingredients and spread them over the steak, ' 
keeping out a large spoonful to thicken the gravy; roll the steak, 
and tie at each end and in the center ; put in a stove pan, and 
pour in enough water to prevent its burning ; add a piece of 



14 MEAT RECIPES. 



butter about the size of a small hen egg. Put inside the stove 
and baste frequently while cooking. When done, thicken the 
gravy with the table-spoonful of bread crumbs ; add a taste of 
pepper and salt. — iliiss Ella Mitchell. 

BEEF TONGUE. 

Soak in cold water all night ; then wash, and boil four or five 
hours ; when done, take off the skin and cut in thin slices ; or, 
it can be left whole ; garnish with parsley. — MissE. Ilitchell. 

CORN BEEF. 

Make brine enough to cover, and strong enough to bear an 
egg ; boil, and skim well ; add a table-spoonful of saltpetre and 
a quart of molasses when you take it off the fire ; then stir it 
lip well and mix thoroughl3% After the brine gets entirely 
cool, put in the beef. — il/rs. Laurence Jones. 

TO COOK CORN BEEF. 

Boil until the bone comes out ; then put fat and lean together 
to suit the taste, and press between two plates or dishes with a 
flat iron. — 31rs. Laurence Jones. 

TO CURE BEEF HAMS. 

Cut hams off at hip joint ; then rub and salt them ; let them 
lie two weeks in moderate weather, three when very cold. 
After remaining in salt a sufficient time, rub the hams 
well with molasses and saltpetre, mixed as follows : one quart of 
common molasses with two table-spoonfuls of pulverized saltpetre 
— clarified, if to be had. — 3Irs. Laurence Jones. 

CURING BEEF. 

Mix two tin cupfuls of salt, and one of brown sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls of pulverized saltpetre ; rub the beef well Avith the mix- 
ture ; let it remain three or four days ; then hang and smoke 
for a week or two. This mixture is for a round of beef cut up 
into six or eight parts. — Hon. E. Harms. 



MEAT EECIPES. 15 



TO COOK CORNED BEEF, 

Put on in boiling water, and when done let it remain In the 
same water until cold ; this renders it juicy and delightful. — 
Mrs. E. McCarney. 

MUTTON CHOPS. 

Trim the chops ; beat them well and chop into mince meat, 
taking care not to separate the meat from the bone ; chop both 
sides ; sprinkle salt and pepper on both sides ; have ready some 
bread crumbs and two eggs well beaten, and dip the chop in 
egg and roll in the crumbs ; have in the frying ^lan two ounces 
butter ; when it melts put in the chops and fry slowly ; never 
turn them till they look firm ; flavor with onion and parsley, a 
dessert spoonful of flour in an ounce of butter ; brown the flour 
and roll in the butter. — Mn. M. T. Scott, Lexington. 

TO COOK A JOINT OF MUTTON. 

Put it on in cold water, with one onion, some salt and pepper; 
let it boil two hours, or until tender, but not till it boils to 
pieces ; then put it in a large baking pan ; stuff" with bread 
crumbs seasoned with pepper^ salt, chopped onion, spices, herbs, 
and jelly; moisten crumbs with butter or melted lard ; pour a 
pint, or little more, of water into the pan ; place slices of fat 
bacon on the mutton ; just before dishing up add to the gravy 
one pint wine, one table-spoonful jelly, and a little spice. If the 
gravy is veiy greasy, skim a good deal off" before adding the 
wine. You should put on the mutton about 9 o'clock. — Mrs. 
Stoner. 

HOW TO COOK HAM. 

Take a good sized ham ; put it into lukewarm water covered 
as tightly as possible ; allow no more steam to escape than pos- 
sible ; a ham Aveighing sixteen pounds, boil from four to five 
hours ; then let it stand in the water until cold ; if taken from 
the stove at night do not take it from the kettle until morning. 
The same plan when boiling beef or tongue. 



16 MEAT RECIPES. 



TO BOIL A HAM. 

Fill the pot with water ; put in the ham ; fill all around with 
nice hay ; add garlic, cloves, mace, allspice, thyme, and pepper ; 
let it boil several hours, until quite done, and then add about a 
quart of cider or wine. — 3Iiss Kate Spears. 

BAKED HAM. 

Wash and clean, then wrap it well in a bundle of oats, and 
boil until done, then take out and skin ; then take two flat 
sticks and lay in the bottom of the stove pan ; lay the ham on 
the sticks, and make a batter of flour and water and spread all 
over the ham. Bake about one and a half or two hours, then 
take the batter off, and dress the ham. — 3Irs. Northcutt. 

STUFFED HAM. 

After boiling the ham, skin it; have ready a dressing made 
of corn-meal muffins, hoe-cake, or grated biscuit. Add one 
moderate sized onion, chopped very fine, one or two leaves of 
sage, pepper and sugar to taste, a few celery seed. Make 
incisions all over the ham with a large knife, and press down 
the dressing. Very fine. — 3Irs. M. L. Rogers. 

TO ROAST DUCKS. 

Wash the ducks and rub with salt and pepper; put them in 
the pan and cook three hours ; toast the bread for the filling 
and crush with a rolling pin ; season highly with pepper, salt 
and chopped onion. Some persons like three or four onions 
roasted with the duck and placed on the dish when brought to 
table. Basting is important in roasting meats. — 3Irs. Maiiin. 

TO ROAST GOOSE. 

Prepare as for ducks ; sage, thyme and parsley may be added 
for the stuffing ; it requires but little butter, as geese are gener- 
ally fiit. Cook three hours; pour off nearly all the fat that drips 
from the goose, as it will make the gravy too oily. Hash the 
giblets as for turkey and duck. — 3Irs. Martin. 



MEAT RECIPES. 17 



TO ROAST A TURKEY. 

Wash the turkey thoroughly, and rub ^vitli a little salt and 
pepper ; have ready a filling made of bread toasted until crisp, 
and moistened with water; season rather highly with pepper, 
butter, and a little salt ; put in a pan with one quart of water ; 
put in the gizzard, etc.; dredge well with flour, and baste fre- 
quently. It requires three hours to cook a large turkey ; a small 
one, one and a .half hours. Cut up the giblets and serve in 
the gravy, which will be sufficiently thickened by the flour with 
which the turkey was dredged. — 3Irs. Martin. 

BOILED TURKEY. 

Have the turkey nicely cleaned, and let it lay in salt and 
water a few minutes ; fill with a stuffing of bread, butter, salt, 
pepper and parsley ; tie the legs and wings, and then pin up in 
a towel ; drop a little salt in the water. A large turkey will 
boil in about three or four hours ; it should be kept boiling all 
the time, but not too fast, or it will boil to pieces. Serve Avith 
drawn butter, with four eggs chopped and some parsley. Oyster 
sauce is good with boiled turkey. — Mrs. Martin. 

POULTRY. 

If you have fowls that you fear will become musty before you 
can cook them, skin an onion and put inside, with a little pepper 
and salt ; also, wash them in soda water before cooking. Some 
persons fill a small muslin bag with chai'coal and put it inside 
and hang in a cool place. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

Wash the fowl, pepper, salt and flour it ; put in a pan Avith a 
little Avater, and bake, basting often ; Avheu nearly done take out 
and fill Avith a dressing made of bread crumbs, flavored Avith 
oysters, onions or sage ; or, if preferred, a dressing made of 
batter. Then put the t^urkey back in the pan Avith sufficient 
Avater to make gravy, and brown nicely. — Mrs. E. McCarncy. 



18 MEAT RECIPES. 



HOW TO BROIL HAM, 

Slice the meat as thin as you can, then put into a pan of cold 
water, set on the stove and let come to a boil ; then have your 
griddle hot, and broil your meat. — 3Irs. Barnes, Hot Spriiigs. 

SAUCE FOR GRATED HAM. 

Boil one pint of vinegar, beat the yelloAvs of four eggs, stir 
them in the boiling vinegar ; add mustard to the taste ; when 
cold, mix it into the grated ham. — 3Irs. 3IoUie 3Iitchell. 

CHICKEN PIE WITH RICE. 

Line a dish with slices of broiled ham ; cut up a boiled 
chicken, fill in with gravy or melted butter, then fill the inter- 
stices with boiled rice ; cover the top quite thick Avith rice ; 
bake three quarters of an hour. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Cut up a large chicken, with sufficient water to make a good 
gravy ; add quarter pound of butter rolled in flour, a little salt, 
pepper, and mace to taste ; make a jiaste with three quarters 
pound of lard, quarter pound of butter, a little water and a 
pinch of salt ; boil eight eggs hard, stir the yolks in the pie and 
bake. — 3Irs. Garnett Duncan. 

POT PIE OF BEEF, VEAL, OR CHICKEN. 

The best way to make the crust is as follows : Peel, boil and 
mash a dozen potatoes ; add a tea-spoonful of salt, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, heaped ; a half cup of SAveet cream or milk ; 
then stiffen with flour till you can roll it ; be sure to mash the 
potatoes fine ; run them through a sieve after mashing. To 
prepare the meat, first fry half a dozen slices of salt pork, 
cut it up, together with the beef, veal, or chicken, and boil 
in just water enough to cover them till the meat is nearly done ; 
then peel one dozen potatoes and slice them thin ; roll the 
crust half an inch thick, and cut into oblong pieces ; put alter- 
nate layers of crust, potatoes and meat ; sprinkle salt and pep- 
per over each layer of meat ; let the crust be at top and bot- 



IMEAT KECIPES. 19 



torn ; lastly, pour on the liquor tho meat was boiled in, until it 
covers the whole ; let simmer till top crust is baked. If you 
have occi\sion to add more liquor or water, it must be boiling. — 
Miss E. Mitchell. 

MEAT CAKES. 
If you have any cold meat, game, or poultry (if underdone, 
all the better), mince fine with fat bacon or ham, season with a 
little pepper and salt ; mix well, and fry in cakes. Serve in 
gravy. 

STEWED VEAL OR MUTTON. 

Cut broiled or roasted veal in slices, flour and fry till a light 
brown ; take them out ; put hot water in the butter they were 
fried iu ; mix flour and water together, and stir into the gravy ; 
season with pepper, nutmeg, or a little catsup. Put in the meat 
and stew till very hot. — Miss Hawes. 

BAKED HASH. 

Chop the meat very fine, and put in a pan with some water ; 
add salt and pepper, butter and bread crumbs to taste ; 
season with a little chopped onion, parsley, and thyme, all 
minced fine ; half a cup of milk or cream, with one egg beaten 
in ; grate some crumbs over the top, and bake till brown. 

HASHEE. 

Take any kind of cold beef or bouille ; let one third of it be 
fat ; mix a small portion of chopped ham ; season with chopped 
onions, black pepper, cloves, thyme, or a little sage, according 
to taste ; bind all together with yolk of egg or a little flour ; 
bake a short time, in two oval cakes ; take the gravy that fries 
out and thicken with a little flour; add a little water ; season 
with pepper and salt, and pour over the hashee. It may be 
made with cold veal. 

SAUSAGE MEAT. 

To thirty pounds of meat add eight ounces of fine salt, three 
ounces of pepper, two tea-cupfuls of sage, one tea-cupful of sum- 
mer savory. This is excellent. — 3Iiss Jaynes. 



20 MEAT RECIPES. 



SMOKED SAUSAGE. 

Make the sausage by the above recipe, only season more 
highly. Have ready bags made of strong cotton, which will 
hold almost two pounds each. Dip the bags in hot water and 
wring well. Put into them the sausage, stuffing very tightly. 
Close securely, and hang up to smoke several weeks. When 
wanted for the table, boil five hours. By this method sausages 
can be kept for months. — Mrs. Cook. 

SAUSAGE. 

Seven pounds lean meat, five pounds back-bone fat, seven 
spoonfuls sage, five spoonfuls salt, and three spoonfuls pepper. — 
Mrs. Elisha Warjield, Lexington. 

PICKLE FOR PORK. 

Four gallons of water, one and a half pounds of sugar, six 
jwunds of salt, two ounces of saltpetre : boil, and skim ; when 
cold, pour over pork. — Miss Halves. 

TO GLAZE A COLD HAM. 

After the ham is boiled and cold, cover it with the yolk of a 
well beaten egg ; sprinkle with cracker or stale bread grated ; 
then cover again with sweet cream, and bake until brown. — 
Mrs. Si7nms. 

GIBLET PIE WITH OYSTERS. 

Take the giblets of two fidl-grown chickens, or a large tur- 
key ; stew them until nearly done ; then cut up in pieces an 
inch in size; have ready a pan lined with rich paste; into 
which pour the giblets, mixed with a can of oysters ; put in also 
enough of the oyster liquor to make the pie very juicy; add 
flour to thicken slightly, with butter, pepper, and salt ; bake 
until the pastiy is a light brown. — 3Ir. 31. Chapl'me. 

A QUICK WAY TO BROIL STEAK. 

Have a nice tender-loin steak ; pound until thin ; put it in a 
dry hot skillet, if you have no broiler ; have ready in a meat 
dish, a heaping table-spoonful of butter, tea-spoonful of salt. 



MEAT RECIPES. 21 



a good deal of pepper, and a little water. Set this in front of 
the stove. As the juice cooks out of the steak, pour it in the dish, 
then turn it and brown on the other side. Saturate the steak 
Avell with the gravy, and serve very hot. — 3Iiss Florence Short. 
CORN BEEF. 

Rub the beef witli a little salt and sugar (and saltpetre if 
you like), mixed ; lay out on planks for two or three days, then 
pack the beef in a tight barrel ; make a brine that will bear up 
an egg ; add six pounds browu sugar, one fourth pound salt- 
petre, and twelve pods red pepper ; boil and skim well ; when 
cold, cover the beef with the mixture. Put a weight on, to 
keep the beef under ; examine in a day or two, and if the brine 
be found bloody, pour off, boil and skim again ; adding more 
salt and water ; when cold, cover the beef with it again. This 
will cover a flour barrel of beef. — Rev. Green Clay Smith. 
DUTCH PUDDING. 

Boil the neck of the beef until perfectly tender, and the 
bones come out easily ; take it up, on a tray, and pick it to 
pieces, just as you would souse meat; skim the grease off the 
liquor, and drain the liquor off; clean the vessel ; return the 
meat and liquor ; Avhen it boils, thicken with sifted meal until 
like mush ; cook till perfectly done ; season with salt, pepper 
and sage ; mould in pans, and slice and fry brown like sausage. 
— 3Irs. Blythe, Madison county. 

WHITE PUDDING. 

To one part of beef suet, chopped very fine, add two parts of 
flour ; mix well, and season highly with salt and black pepper. 
This mixture may then either be put in skins or tied in strong 
cloth (enough for a dish in one cloth), allowing room to swell. 
It must then be put in boiling water, and boiled very vigorously 
for some time — perhaps an hour, or until the skins are tender 
Avhen pricked Avith a fork. This pudding will keep many 
months. For breakfast, cut off what seems to be a sufficient 
portion. If in skins, broil it ; if in a cloth, turn it into a pie- 
pan, and heat it. It is only good when very hot. — 3Jrs. James 
Withroiv, Lewkburg, W. Va. 



22 RECIPES FOR SAUCES. 



SAUCBS FOR MBATS. 



VENISON SAUCE. 

One pound of brown sugar, one tumbler or one and one half 
pint of currant jelly, one pint claret wine (or if you prefer, to- 
mato catsup), two table-spoonfuls of ground mace and cinna- 
mon, one pound of butter. Boil all well together. — 3frs. Simms. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Rub two tea-spoonfuls of flour into a quarter of a pound of 
butter, add five tea-spoonfuls of cold water ; set it in boiling 
water till it melts , and when it begins to simmer, it is done. 
Do not set it on the stove, as it fries the butter and spoils it. 
Be careful always to work the flour in the butter so thoroughly 
as not to be lumpy. If the drav>'n butter is used with fish, add 
eggs — hard boiled and chopped very fine. If used with boiled 
fowl, put in oysters while it is simmering, and let them become 
thoroughly heated. — 3Uss Ella MifclielL 

A SAUCE FOR COLD MEATS. 

Beat three eggs, leaving out one of the whites, cut up one 
large wine-glass of acid jelly into the eggs, mix a table-spoonful 
of flour and mustard with a little vinegar, one table-spoonful 
butter, one half tea-cupful vinegar. Boil the whole mixture, and 
stir all the time until it becomes thick ; after cooling, chop up 
a green cucumber pickle very fine, and mix with it. — 3Irs. Simms. 

WINE SAUCE FOR ROAST MEAT. 

One quart of wine, one and a half pints jelly, three quarters 



RECIPES FOR SAUCES. 23 

pound of butter, three table-spoonfuls of sugar, one tind a half 
table-spoonfuls of allspice; cook together until it thickens. — 
Mrs. Jones. 

ONION SAUCE FOR MUTTON. 

Boil onions ^Yith milk and -svater, changing water ; afterward 
chop the onions fine ; add pepper and salt ; stew till done. 

WINE SAUCE FOR VENISON. 

Three quarters pound of butter, one and a half pints of jelly, 
three table-spoonfuls brown sugar, one and a half table-spoon- 
fuls of ground allspice, one quart of port wine ; stew till thick, 

HORSE-RADISH SAUCE. 

Four table -siDOonfuls of grated horse-radish, one tea-spoonful 
sugar, one of salt, one half of pepper, two of mixed mustard 
and vinegar, three or four table-spoonfuls of cream. When 
served with hot beef, put in a jar, which jar place in a sauce- 
pan of boiling water ; do not allow the mixture to boil, or it 
will curdle. 

CUCUMBER OR WINE SAUCE. 

To one gallon sliced cucumbers, put as much salt as you 
please ; let them stand two or three hours ; press all the watei 
out through a coarse linen cloth. Add two table-spoonfuls white 
mustard seed, one of mace, broken up, two of black pepper, 
one pint of Madeira wine, one and n half tea-cupfuls white 
sugar, four table-spoonfuls of good sweoit oil, a table-spoonful 
of Burrows' ground mustard, mixed with the oil and sugar ; 
then the wine stirred in gradually ; put enough cider vinegar to 
cover well. 

ONION SAUCE. 

Peel the onions, and boil until tender ; drain the water well 
from them ; chop and pour on them drawn butter, together 
with a little rich milk ; boil all up once. A turnip boiled with 
the onions makes them more mild. 



24 RECIPES FOR SAUCES. 



MUSTARD SAUCE. 

Beat yolks of two eggs, mix in them a glass of acid jelly, 
one tea-si:)oonful black pepper, one table-spoonful of mixed mus- 
tard, one table-spoonful butter, one tea-cupful of vinegar, 
cook, stirring all the time ; after it becomes cool, add a half tea- 
cupful of catsup. — Mrs. John Bay. 

LONDON CLUB SAUCE. 

One gallon vinegar, one pound black pepper, half pound 
cayenne pepper, half pound mustard, four ounces cloves, four 
ounces salt, six ounces burnt sugar. Put all in a stone jar and 
let steep for two weeks. — Miss 31. J. Eedmon. 

SAUCE JELLY FOR FOWLS OR MEAT. 

Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, rubbed to a paste, two table- 
spoonfuls of gravy or butter, one tea-spoonful of jelly, and a 
little vinegar, one tea-spoonful of mixed mustard, one table- 
spoonful of minced pickle. — Mrs. Frank Clay. 



CATSUP RECIPES. I) 



Ci^TSlQPS. 



CABBAGE CATSUP. 

Chop four heads of cabbage very fine, and sprinkle witli salt, 
drain in a bag one night, add half a pound of white mustard 
seed, two table-spoonfuls of made mustard, one table-spoonful of 
cinnamon, one of allspice, one of mace, two of celery seed, 
two of ground pepper, twelve of turmeric, four large onions, 
three pods of green pepper, one dozen small cucumbers, one tea- 
cup brown sugar ; vinegar enough to mix well. 

GREEN TOMATO CATSUP. 

Two gallons of tomatoes, three gills of white mustard seed, 
five tea-spoonfuls of black mustard (ground), two of ground 
pepper, two of ground spice, two of ground cloves, one gill of 
salt, six sliced onions, one pound of brown sugar, one gallon of 
strong cider vinegar ; put it all together ; mix well and boil till 
a light color; put in turmeric and horse-radish to taste; if con- 
venient, a tin vessel is the best for the purpose. Put in jars 
and tie up while hot ; temper your jars with hot water for fear 
of bursting. — Mrs. F. Thomas. 

TOMATO CATSUP 

To one gallon of strained tomato pulp, put four table-spoonfuls 
of salt, four of black pepper, two of allspice, four pods red 
pepper ; boil until quite thick ; vinegar to taste. Put allspice 
in a muslin bag, or the catsup will be dark. 



26 CATSUP RECirES. 



RIPE TOMATO CATSUP. 

One half bushel of skinned tomatoes, one quart of cider 
vinegar, one pound of salt, one quarter pound of black pepper, 
one ounce of cayenne, one of cloves, one quarter of a pound of 
allspice, three boxes of mustard, twenty cloves of garlic, six 
good onions, two pounds of sugar, one handful of peach leaves ; 
boil for three hours, constantly stirring,to prevent burning; when 
cold, strain through a sieve, and bottle for use. It improves 
with age. — Mrs. N. B. Eton. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

Put peeled cucumbers into cold water ; grate them ; season well 

■with salt ; tie up in a thin cloth and let them drain all night ; 

mix in the vinegar, white mustard and celery seed, black pepper 

and a little sugar ; pour over the cucumbers ; use all cold. — Mrs. 

Vol. niacins. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One gallon of tomatoes, one quart of vinegar, six pods of red 

pepper, six table-spoonfuls of black pepper, six of allspice, two 

of cinnamon, four of salt, and one of mustard seed. The spices 

must be ground. Boil slowly four hours. 

GREEN TOMATO CATSUP. 

To one gallon green tomatoes, pulled and cut fine, add one 
quart of finely chopped onions, one quart good cider vinegar, 
four pods of red pepper, one half tea-cup salt, one tea-c«p mixed 
ground spices, one cup of brown sugar ; stew until one half 
remains in the kettle. — Mrs. Kenncy. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck of tomatoes, one cup of salt, three table-spoonfuls of 
black pepper, two of cloves, two of allspice, one large pod of 
red pepper chopped very fine, four onions chopped, one tea cup 
of brown sugar, twelve cloves and same of garlic. Pour boiling 
water on the tomatoes, to remove the skins ; put them into a 
kettle with one quart of vinegar, and boil two hours ; put 
through a colander, and add two table-spoonsfuls of celery ^secd ; 
bottle while hot. — Mrs. Jones. 



CATSUP RECIPES. 27 



GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. 

Ten pounds of fruit just before ripe, five pounds of sugar, one 
quart of vinegar, two table-spoon ful.> each of ground black pep- 
per, allspice, cloves and cinnamon. Boil the fruit in the vinegar 
until reduced to a pulp, then add sugar and spices. — Mrs. 
Thomas. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

Grate the cucumbers, sprinkle with salt ; to every three 
dozen cucumbers grate one half dozen large onions, a little 
horse-radish ; jiress the cucumbers till all the water is out. Save 
the water and measure it ; when dry, use the same quantity of 
good vinegar as there is of water ; add sugar and a little tur- 
meric ; season with black and cayenne pepper, and white mus- 
tard seed; mix thoroughly, put in bottles and cork them tight. 

CHELEE SAUCE. 

Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, eight onions, six peppers, eight 
coffee cups of vinegar, eight table-spoonfuls of sugar, eight table- 
spoonfuls of salt, one table-spoonful of cinnamon, one of allspice, 
one of nutmeg, one of cloves. Boil all together well, and seal 
■while hot. Superior to tomato catsup. — Mrs. James Short. 



28 SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 



SOUR PXCKI^BS. 



OIL MANGOES. 

Quarter of a pound of garlic, one pound scraped horse-rad- 
ish, one pound white mustard seed, one ounce long and two 
ounces round black pepper, two of allspice, two of turmeric, 
one of mace, one of cloves, quarter ounce ginger cut up fine, 
four ounces olive oil. Scald the mangoes, when stuffed, in Avell 
spiced vinegar. — Miss Sawes. 

CELERY PICKLE. 

Cut up six or eight heads of cabbage, six or eight heads of 
celery, put them in a jar ; pour boiling salt and "water on them, 
and let them stand two days ; then drain in a colander; put in 
a pan ; take two ounces turmeric, some scraped horse-radish, 
six or eight blades of mace, broken cinnamon, white ginger 
broken, and a half paper of celery seed; mix all these with the 
cabbage ; put on the fire one quart of vinegar, made very sweet 
Avith sugar ; a handful of whole black pepper ; let it come to a 
boil, and when cold pour on the pickle ; fill up with cold vin- 
egar. — il/iss Clara Sawes. 

WALNUT PICKLE. 

Gather walnuts about the 10th of June, when you can stick 
a pin through them ; lay them in salt water for two weeks ; take 
them out and scrape them, and rub with a coarse towel ; then 
lay them in fresh water for three days, changing the water 
daily ; put garlic, allspice, and black pepper into vinegar, and pour 



SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 29 



it boiling on the walnuts. If they are rather old and hard, scald 
them in an iron pot. Cloves are an improvement. — Mrs. Peers, 
Virginia. 

OIL MANGOES. 

Take of ginger (soaked in salt water until soft), of horse-rad- 
ish (soaked half an hour), scraped, of mustard seed, each two 
pounds, one ounce black pepper (not beaten), half an ounce of 
mace, half an ounce cloves, half ounce turmeric, and two table- 
spoonfuls of oil or nice, fresh butter ; beat them all together in a 
mortar. The melons must be in salt three days, then wiped dry, 
and filled with the above ingredients. If any is left, put it into 
the jar with the mangoes. Also, half a pint home-made mus- 
tard, and cover with boiling vinegar. Always use sugar in 
pickle. They will not be fit for use for several Aveeks ; will keep 
for years. — 3Irs. B., Washington, Va. 

GREEN PEPPER MANGO PICKLES. 

Seed and lay them in salt and water ten days ; then soak in 
clear water twenty-four hours ; pack them in a jar and scald 
them with vinegar and water, Avith a small piece of alum, for 
three successive days ; then make a stuffing of one pound dried 
cabbage, horse-radish, ginger, mustard, half pound each ; 
mace, cloves, cinnamon, one ounce each ; sew each pepper, and 
pack in a jar ; boil strong vinegar and pour over them ; cover 
tightly, to keep the steam in. The cabbage must be dried and 
chop2)ed fine, and horse-radish scraped and dried; all ingre- 
dients, except cabbage, to be pounded fine; then mix the whole 
with salad oil or fresh butter. — Mi^s. Coolce, Va. 

PEPPER MANGOES. 

Put the peppers in strong brine for two weeks ; then put in 
fresh Avater until free from salt; take a piece out and fill Avith 
grated horse-radish* Avhite mustard seed, a little grated onion, 
and a few cloves of garlic, ground cinnamon, mace, black and 
green pepper, to taste. — Mrs. Radcer. 



30 SOUR FICKLE EECIPES, 

CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Make a brine that will bear up an egg ; drop in cucumbers, 
and let stand ten days ; take out of brine and drain. They 
should stand all night in clear water after being taken out of brine. 
After the clear water has drained off, put them in a kettle with 
grape and cabbage leaves and a lump of alum ; cover them with 
vinegar weakened with water, and let them simmer until of a 
pretty green color ; take them out to cool and drain ; and put 
them into a three gallon jar ; take one ounce mace, three 
ounces cloves, three ounces cinnamon, quarter pound mustard 
seed, one ounce celery seed, quarter pound whole black pepper, 
• quarter pound allspice, two table-spoonfuls ground mustard, 
handful chopped horse-radish, two pepper pods, four onions, 
two ounces race ginger, two pounds sugar ; put spices in one 
quart vinegar ; boil and pour over i^ickle. — Mrs. Henry Spears. 

MARTINOE PICKLE. 

Gather when young and tender ; wipe, and drop in strong 
brine until you wish to pickle; then soak in clear water twenty- 
four hours; put them in an iron pot and cover with vinegar 
and water (cold) ; let them simmer slowly, until they blacken ; 
do not boil. Put them in a jar (two gallon) ; chop four onions 
fine ; add one pound brown sugar, handful sliced horse-radish, 
handful cloves and allspice, one ounce race ginger, one ounce 
celery seed, two ounces mustard seed ; sprinkle these all in the 
jar ; boil strong vinegar and pour over the pickle ; set a plate 
over the jar, to cover while hot. — 3Irs. Cooke, Vci. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

Take half a bushel green tomatoes (being frosted is no dis- 
advantage) ; wash, and slice them thin, with one dozen onions, 
a few blades of garlic, and half a dozen green J)epper pods ; 
sprinkle them in layers with salt, and let them stand all 
night; next morning rinse and drain well; then mix Avell 
together one ounce pulverized ginger, one ounce allspice, one 
ounce mace, one ounce celery seed, one ounce mixed mustard. 



SOUR nCKLE RECIPES. 31 

a half ounce turmeric, and one pound of sugar. Put a layer of 
tomatoes and a layer of spices alternately in a kettle with strong 
vinegar, and boil until tender. — Mrs. Martin. 

YELLOW PICKLE. 

One and one half dozen of cucumbers sliced lengthwise, 
one and one half dozen onions, four heads of cabbage sliced ; put 
in a basket a layer of each, then a layer of salt ; hang up to drip 
twenty-four hours ; ground cinnamon, cloves, ginger, pepper, 
white and black mustard, mace to taste ; turmeric enough to 
color ; two gallons of vinegar, two cups of sugar ; boil sugar and 
vinegar together ; pour over four mornings. — Mrs. Morris Gass. 

CABBAGE PICKLE. 

For a two gallon jar take cabbage enough quartered to fill it, 
then pour on it hot brine ; let the brine remain on them four 
days ; squeeze them out of the brine, and pour weak vinegar 
over them, letting it remain several days ; take strong vinegar 
put into it two ounces of cinnamon bark, essence of cloves to 
suit the taste, two ounces of turmeric; put this over the cabbage 
and tie closely. — Mrs. Fafsey Edwards. 

This has taken the premium at the Bourbon Fair several 
times. 

PEACH MANGOES. 

Take large free-stone peaches, sufficiently ripe to allow the 
seed to come out easily ; put them in strong brine for two days. 
INIix to your taste chopped garlic, race ginger, soaked in water 
over night or until soft, and then slice thin, grated and sliced 
horse-radish, white mustard seed and cloves. Take out the seed, 
fill them with this mixture and tie them up. Fill up a jar 
with them, and sprinkle through, as they are put in, some 
cloves, stick cinnamon broken quite fine, and a bag of turmeric ; 
season, enough vinegar to cover the whole, with a little ginger, 
nutmeg and mustard — about one gill of mustard to one quart of 
vinegar. — 3Irs. M. T. Scott. 



32 SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 

PEACH MANGOES. 

Take large free-stone peaches (almost ripe enough to be 
eaten Avith cream), put them in brine for two days, wipe them 
dry ; take out the seed and fill the space with scraped horse-radish, 
white and black mustard seed, celeiy seed, garlic or onions, 
pounded cloves, allspice, nutmeg, powdered ginger, pepper, cin- 
namon and sugar. Cover with cold vinegar, allowing to each 
quart one gill of table mustard, mixed, seasoning the vinegar 
with Avhole cloves, allspice, ginger, mustard, horse-radish a 
good deal of stick cinnamon and a bag of turmeric. 

Keep the peaches well covered and the jar tied closely. — 3Irs. 
P., Lexington. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Take eighty-five cucumbers, put in salt water one day and 
night; one plate horse-radish, two table-spoonfuls whole black 
pepper, two red peppers, two onions, one tea-spoonful mace, same 
of cloves, three table-spoonfuls allspice, four table-spoonfuls mus- 
tard seed, three table-spoonfuls- celery seed, one pound sugar, 
two pieces ginger. — 3Irs. P., Lexington. 

TOMATO PICKLE. 

One peck green tomatoes sliced, one dozen onions sliced, 
sprinkle with salt, let stand till next day ; drain them ; then use 
one and one half ounces black pepper, one ounce whole cloves, 
one ounce yellow mustard seed, one ounce allspice. Put in the 
kettle a layer of spices and one of tomatoes and onions alter- 
nately; cover with vinegar ; wet mustard before putting in (one 
half box mustard). Boil ten or fifteen minutes. 

If pickles become sharp, add sugar. — Mrs. P., Lexington. 

FROSTED TOMATO PICKLE. 

One half bushel of tomatoes frosted slightly ; wash and slice 
them ; eight onions, one half pint of garlic seed, six pods of 
green pepper. Sprinkle with salt and let remain all night ; drain 
in the morning and add two ounces of allspice, two ounces race 
ginger, one ounce mace, one ounce turmeric, two ounces of white 



SOUR riCKLE RECIPES. 33 

nmstard ; put the turmeric in a bag, and beat tlie spices. To 
one half gallon of vinegar add two pounds of brown sugar. Put 
all into a kettle and let boil. 

MIXED PICKLES, 

Four large heads of cabbage, one peck green tomatoes, two 
dozen large cucumbers, one dozen onions, one dozen green pep- 
2)ers ; chop each separately, very fine ; mix all together ; then put 
a layer of the mixture and a sprinkle of salt ; let it set all night; 
in the morning squeeze it perfectly dry with the hands, and 
cover with cold vinegar ; let it set twenty-four hours, and 
squeeze as before ; put it in the jar. Then take fresh vinegar, 
enough to cover it, put in a kettle with two pounds of sugar, 
about one half ounce of cloves, cinnamon, allspice and mace ; 
grind the allspice, tie up in a thin cloth ; let this boil a few min- 
utes, then pour over the pickles. Excellent. — Mrs. W. W. Gill. 

MIXED PiCKLE. 

One dozen onions, one dozen green peppers, four dozen cu- 
cumbers, two heads of cabbage. Chop the whole fine and let 
stand one hour ; then put in a bag and hang all night to drain. 
Next morning, cover with cold vinegar and let stand for twenty- 
four hours ; then drain again all night. Then scald enough 
strong cider vinegar, with all kinds of spices tied in a muslin 
bag and sweetened to taste ; pour over the pickle, and put some- 
thing over the jar to keep the steam in. When you drain the 
pickle for the last time, before adding the hot vinegar, put in 
black and white mustard seed, and celery seed also, according to 
your judgment. — 3Irs. Blanton. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One large head of cabbage, two dozen cucumbers, one dozen 
green peppers, one gallon green tomatoes, one half dozen 
onions ; chop the onions and pour hot water over them, letting 
them stand ten minutes ; chop the other ingredients fine and 
sprinkle salt over them, adding the onions. Lot them stand all 



34 SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 

night, and put them to drain two hours ; then pour on weakened 
cold vinegar ; let stand twenty-four hours ; pour off that 
vinegar, and to every gallon of the mixture add one half pound 
sugar ; put good vinegar on ; season with niace and cloves ; 
mustard and turmeric to color ; put the vinegar on the fire ; 
let come to a boil and pour over it. — 3frs. D. M. Dodge. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One half gallon of cucumbers or tomatoes ; sprinkle with salt 
and let stand six hours. Then prepare half a gallon of cabbage 
in the same Avay ; press the water out ; cut one dozen onions 
fine ; pour boiling water over them and let stand a while ; then 
drain and mix all together ; add half a dozen green peppers cut. 
fine, a cup of ground mustard, two cups of white mustard seed, 
three table-spoonfuls turmeric, three of celery seed, one of mace, 
one of red pepper, one of ground cinnamon ; mix all these well 
together ; boil vinegar enough to cover ; put one pound of su- 
gar in the vinegar, or as much as you choose. Pour it boiling 
over the pickle. — Mrs. Worncdl. 

ROUGH AND READY PICKLE. 

Slice six dozen cucumbers, half a peck of green tomatoes, 
one dozen bull-nose peppers, and one dozen silver-skin onions; 
salt them separately, and let them stand over night ; next morn- 
ing press them perfectly dry and mix together, having chopped 
the onions and peppers fine. Put half a tea-cup of black pepper, 
half a tea-cup of allspice, half a pound of Avhite mustard seed, 
one ounce of celery seed, some horse-radish, a few cloves ; cover 
well with vinegar, and let it come to a boil. To every gallon 
of the mixture put half a pound of brown sugar. — 3frs. John B. 
Payne. 

HYDEN SALAD. 

One gallon cabbage, one gallon green tomatoes, one pint gi-een 
peppers, taking out the seeds carefully, one quart onions (all 
chojDped fine). Sprinkle salt over the tomatoes, and let stand 
awhile ; then strain the juice off and throw it away. Add to 



SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 35 

the cabbage, etc., five table-spoonfuls of mixed mustard, two of 
ginger, one of cinnamon, one of cloves, one of mace (all pow- 
dered fine), three ounces of turmeric, one ounce of celery seed, 
three pounds of sugar ; mix all well together ; cover with good 
vinegar and boil slowly till done. A tea-cupful of salad oil added 
is a great improvement. — 3Iiss C. Hawes. 

COMPOSITION PiCKLE, 

Three dozen cucumbers, peeled and sliced, three dozen onions, 
eight heads of early cabbage, which must be boiled in weak salt 
water until tender ; then put out in the sun to dry a little. 
Put all these ingredients in a basket with a towel in the bottom, 
a layer of the ingredients and a layer of salt alternately ; hang up 
to drip twenty-four hours. Take two gallons of cider vinegar 
and six pints brown sugar, withcimiaraon, cloves, ginger, Avhite 
and black mustard seed, to suit taste ; boil two or three morn- 
ings, and pour over pickle (after having previously cleared them 
of all the salt and water). Tie up closely. — 3Irs. Kcnney. 

HOVy TO COLOR PJCKLE GREEN. 

Never use a copper kettle, as it is poisonous. Boil together 
one gallon of water and two pounds common salt ; pour the hot 
solution over cucumbers, and allow it to remain three hours ; 
then pour off and cover Avith good vinegar, scalding hot ; let 
this stand three days ; then pour off and scald in fresh vine- 
gar. — Miss Ellen Mitchell. 

INDIA PICKLE. 

One peek of cucumbers, one gallon onions, one quart green 
pepjiers, one pound brown sugar, one box ground mustard, 
one ounce of olive oil, two ounces of celery seed, two or three 
grated nutmegs, one ounce each of race ginger, mace and tur- 
meric, some black and white mustard seed, garlic, and horse- 
radish to the taste. All (except the seasoning) to be soaked in 
salt water twenty -four hours, then drained ; add the spices, etc, 
and pour over strong cider vinegar. — 3Irs. Jim Bashj'onl. 



36 SOUR PICKLE RECIPES. 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

' Slice very tliin one gallon green tomatoes ; let them remain in 
brine one night. Prepare a mixture of white mustard seed, one 
pint grated horse radish, one third pint green peppers, one third 
pint chopped onion, one table-spoonful ground black pepper, two 
table-spoonfuls cloves, two of mace ; put in the jar a layer of this 
mixture, then a layer of tomatoes, and so on until it is filled. 
Pour on sufficient cider vinegar to cover the whole. To one 
quart of \dnegar add three quarters of a pint of sugar ; boil to- 
gether, and pour oyer the pickle. This quantity will iill a two 
gallon jar. — Mrs. Mary Wehh. 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

To every gallon of green tomatoes sliced, add one and one half 
cupfuls of salt, four large onions, and a small quantity of green 
pepper ; let it drip all night ; add white mustard, spice, cloves, 
two and a half cups of sugar, and enough vinegar to cover • 
let it boil fifteen minutes ; put in a jar and add vinegar suffi- 
cient to cover. — Mrs. Morris Gass. 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

One peck of cucumbers sliced, about an inch thick, two dozen 
onions sliced, two dozen pods of green peppers ; sprinkle with 
salt and let stand twenty-four hours, then put all in a bag and 
drain all night. Prepare vinegar by adding to one gallon pure 
cider vinegar, one ounce turmeric, two ounces white ginger, 
two boxes ground mustard, one ounce horse-radish, two ounces 
celery seed, four table-spoonfuls of salad oil and one and one- 
half pounds of bro^vn sugar. — Miss Nannie Abbott. 

ONION PICKLE. 

Take two gallons of small white onions, one pint of salt ; pour 
on boiling water and let it stand twenty-four hours. . Then boil 
slowly in sweet milk and water, until coddled ; soak a day 
or two in weak vinegar. Then scald good cider vinegar with 
all kinds of spices (except allspice, as it will make onions dark) 
and pour over. — Mrs. Blanton. 



SOUR TICKLE RECIPES. ^7 



PICKLE ONIONS. 

Peel and boil in sweet milk and water ten minutes ; drain ofF 
the milk and water, and pour sealding spiced vinegar on them 
immediately ; tie up. — Mrs. George Davis. 

MIXED PICKLE. 

Two gallons chopped cabbage and green tomatoes, one pint of 
chopped onions, five table-spoonfuls of ground mustard, three 
"gills of white mustard seed, two table-spoonfuls of ground pepper, 
two table-spoonfuls allspice, two tea-spoonfuls of ground cloves, 
one pound brown sugar, one table-spoonful celery seed, two table- 
spoonfuls of turmeric, three quarts of the best cider vinegar. Put 
all in a kettle and boil well. — Mrs. Davis. 

SPICED VINEGAR. 
Two and one half gallons of apple vinegar, two and one half 
pounds of brown sugar, one pound of white mustard seed, one 
box of Kentucky mustard, one half pound of pepper, two ounces 
of cloves, two ounces of celery seed, two ounces of allspice, two 
nutmegs. Boil all together ; then add one pound of scraped 
horse-radish, one half dozen sliced lemons, two dozen sliced 
onions, sprinkle with salt, and let drain one day ; keep the 
pickles in vinegar two weeks, then drain one day. Boil vine- 
gar and spices all together, and pour over pickle. — 31rs. 
CJuidton Alejccuuler. 

CUCUMBER MANGOES. 

Take two dozen large cucumbers ; cut a block an inch square 
out of the side of each cucumber ; scrape out the seeds and 
all the pulp, if possible, with thumb and finger ; lay them in 
weak salt and water for five hours. Make a dressing of two 
large heads of cabbage, cho})ped fine, and four green peppers, 
also chopped fine, two ounces celery seed, two ounces white 
mustard seed, one ounce ground black pepper, one ounce salt, 
and one tea-cupful of sugar. In stuffing the cucumbers, squeeze 
tiie water from dressing. Put two onion sets and two small 
beans into each cucumber. Put back the block and tie with 



38 SOUR PICKLE EECIPES. 

a strip of cotton a half inch wide. Put a lavfir of vine leaves, 
a layer of cucumbers, and a tea-spoonful of powdered alum 
alternately into a kettle, until it is full. Cover with vine- 
gar and scald three quarters of an hour. Then lift them out of 
this vmegar into jars, adding whole spices to the taste. 

Take a gallon of fresh vinegar and one pound and a half of 
brown sugar ; boil for fifteen minutes and pour over the 
pickles. If not sufficient to cover, pour in a little cold vine- 
gar. — ]\Its, a. Turneij, Jr. 



SWEET nCKLE RECIPES. 39 



SWBBT FXCKt.BS. 



APPLE SWEET PICKLE. 

Take five pounds of sugar, one quart of vinegar, one and one 
half ounces of stick cinnamon, one and one half ounces of cloves, 
one ounce of "white mustard ; boil all together. Pare and quar- 
ter eight pounds of apples ; put in boiling water; let boil till 
tender. Then pour the boiling vinegar and spices over the ap- 
ples. — Mrs. Amanda Clay. 

SWEET MANGO PICKLE. 

Let the mangoes remain in salt and water one week. Place 
grape leaves in the bottom of the kettle, and put in the man- 
goes with leaves between each layer. Take equal jiarts of vine- 
gar and water, with a tea-spoonful of alum, and let the mangoes 
scald, but not boll, until green; then throw in cold water and let 
them stay till cold. Take two pounds of sugar, half gallon of 
vinegar, one half gallon of water, and scald them for three 
days, first peeling and extracting the seed ; do not peel cucum- 
bers. 

The Stuffing for Mangoes. — Scald one pint of white mustard 
seed, one half ounce of mace, one half ounce of cinnamon, one 
dozen cloves (the spices must be ground) ; one half tea-spoonful 
anise seed, one ounce celery seed, two cloves of garlic, one pint 
of cabbage, chopped fine. 

Vinegar for Mangoes. — Three pounds of sugar, one gallon good 
vinegar ; let it come nearly to a boil, and pour it on the mangoes 



40 SWEET PICKIE RECirES. 

after they are stuffed, neatly tied up and packed iu a jar. Put 
a plate iu the jar to keep the nmugoes under the vinegai". — 
Mrs. D. Goodloe, Lexin/jton, Ky. 

SWEET PICKLE. 

Put the fruit in a stone jar, set it in a boiler of cold water, 
let it boil until the juice is "well extracted, remove the fruit, 
put the juice in a kettle with one half pound of sugar to each 
pound of fruit, and skim well ; drop in the fruit, again skim well ; 
let it boil up, then remove. For three mornings boil the juice 
and jiour over the fruit ; the last morning add a pint of vinegar 
for each quart of juice, some pounded ginger, grated horse- 
radish in muslin bags, cloves and allspice to taste. After it is 
done put in bits of broken race ginger. 

SWEET PICKLE. 

You can use cherries, damsons, peaches, or any other kind 
of fruit. Take off the stems and to seven pounds fruit, use 
three pounds sugar, one quart cider vinegar, one ounce of cin- 
namon, one half ounce of cloves. For two mornings vinegar 
and spices must be boiled and poured over the fruit ; the third 
morning put all in the kettle and simmer a few minutes. Tie 
tightly and keep in a dark closet. — Mn. Henry Buchier. 

PEACH SWEET PICKLE. 

Seven pounds of fruit, on or off the seed, add three pounds of 
sugar, one quart of vinegar, one half ounce of cloves, one half 
ounce of cinnamon boiled in the vinegar ; pour this over the 
fruit two mornings, and the third cook the fruit. Any other 
fruit may be pickled in the same manner. — Mrs. E. McCarney. 

SWEET CANTELOPE PICKLE. 

Take seven pounds of melons when they are nearly ripe 
enough to eat, but not yellow ; lay them in weak brine all night ; 
then take a lump of alum the size of a hickory nut and drop in 
the water, in which boil the fruit half an hour. Add to the 

fruit three pounds of sugar, two ounces of cinnamon, one ounce 



SWEET PICKLE RECIPES. 41 

of mace, and one and a half ounces cloves. Boil the vinegar, 
sugar, and spice, and pour boiling hot over the fruit. If you 
want the pickle to keep well, put the whole on the fire and scald 
twenty minutes ; it is then fit for the table. — 3Ls. II. /Sjjears. 

CUCUMBER SWEET PICKLE. 

Slice the cucumbers about one inch thick, and boil for one 
hour in weak alum water ; take out and lay in cold water ; let 
remain till perfectly cold ; then boil again in fresh alum water 
half an hour ; drain the fruit well ; make a syrup of one pound 
of sugar to each pound of fruit ; to four jwuuds of fruit one 
pound of cider vinegar ; boil the syrup ; then put in the fruit 
and boil it till transparent. Add mace, and if the syrup is not 
thick enough continue to boil after the fruit is removed. When 
cold, sprinkle in some wiiite mustard seed. — 3Iiss A. 



42 ' SALAD RFX'IPES. 



1 



CHICKEN SALAD. 

For a turkey, or three chickens, use yelks of twelve eggs, 
fifteen table-spoonfuls of purest olive oil, sixteen table spoon- 
fuls of pure vinegar. After stirring all well together, add 
three table-spoonfuls of mixed mustard, salt and cayenne pep- 
per to the taste ; cook this and make a rich custard. When 
cold, pour it on the meat and celery (cut any size you please). 
Mix it all through. — Mrs. J. P., Lexington, Ky. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Nine eggs, one tea-cupful of vinegar (strong), one half pound 
of butter, or tea-cupful of olive oil, four table-spoonfuls of mixed 
mustard, two table-spoonfuls sugar, one tea-spoonful black pep- 
per. Beat the eggs until smooth, and add the other ingredients. 
Place in a kettle over the fire, and stir all the time, and cook 
until it becomes almost a mush. When cold, add one half tea- 
cupful of strong vinegar. Chop the chicken and celery any 
size you may wish, and sprinkle with salt to the taste. Pour the 
dressing on and mix well just before serving ; reserving some of 
the dressing to pour over the top. This dressing will be 
sufficient for a medium turkey, or three chickens. — Mrs. Martin. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Two large cold fowls, cither boiled or roasted, yelks of nine 
hard boiled eggs, half a pint sweet oil, half a pint vinegar, a gill 
of mixed mustard, a small tea-spoonful cayenne pepper, same of 



SALAD RECIPES. 43 



salt, two largo lieads of celery. The dressing must be mixed 
very smooth ; the longer it is stirred the better. Pour over the 
chopped fowls and celery a few minutes before it is eaten. 

DRESSING FOR CHICKEN SALAD. 

Yelks of four eggs beaten, one tea-spoonful sugar, salt-spoonful 
of cayenne pepper, two tea-spoonfuls made mustard, six table- 
spoonfuls salad oil, five of celery vinegar ; stir all well, and put 
in the saucepan ; boil three minutes, stirring all the time. 
TVlien cold, poua: over chicken salad. — Mrs. Jones. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

One can of lobsters, chopped, same quantity of celery ; mix 
mustard, butter, and cayenne pepper to taste, adding yelks of 
three eggs. — J/rs. Taylor. 

SALMON SALAD. 
Pick the salmon in small pieces ; six eggs, three fourths of a 
pound of nice sweet butter, mustard, vinegar, salt, and cayenne 
pepper. — Miss Kate Spears. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Boil and mash the potatoes fine, season highly with butter, 
pepper, salt, a little sweet cream, and then have ready about 
three hard boiled eggs to one quart of the mashed potato ; take 
off the whites and chop fine ; mash the yellows and mix them 
according to your taste with some made mustard, a little sugar, 
pepper, salt, and just enough vinegar to moisten the prepai'ation ; 
mix well these ingredients. Put a layer of the mashed potatoes 
in a flat pan, and with a spoon put the salad dressing in spots 
over the potatoes ; another layer of potatoes, then the salad, and 
so on, putting potatoes on top. Smooth over nicely, and set in 
the stove to brown. A nice dish. — Mrs. Kenney. 

NICE SIDE DISH. 
Hard boiled eggs cut in half, oblong, yelks taken out and 
mixed with fine bread crumbs, salt, pepper, and butter ; then 
put back in the whites; set in the oven till the yelks brown ; 
the whites must not brown. 



44 SALAD EECIPES. 



SANDWICHES. 

Chop old ham very fine ; grate it, which will be still better ; 
beat au egg thoroughly ; mix with some ground mustard ; let 
half a pint of vinegar come to a boil, stir in the egg and mus- 
tard and mix with the ham. After buttering thin slices ot 
bread, spread on this the prepared mixture. — 3Irs. 31. T. Scott. 

STEWED SWEET-BREAD WITH CHAMPIGNON. 

Parboil one set of sweet-bread ; take all the skin and fat from 
them, and cut them up in a small saucepan, with a can of 
champignon, also cut up, and the liquor ; put in a quarter of a 
jwund of butter, and very little cayenne pepper. Let the cham- 
pignon cook one half hour before adding the sweet -bread ; just 
before taking them off, add one half tea-cupful of madeira or 
sherry ; thicken with a little flour, and brown with burnt brown 
sugar. — 3Irs. J. P., Lexington, Ky. 

CROQUETTES. 

One pound of cold turkey or chicken, one half pound of 
bread, three tea-spoonfuls of parsley, one half pound of butter, 
one tea-spoonful of onion, four eggs. Chop the meat very fine, 
also the herbs, and mix well together ; salt, pepper and pow- 
dered mace to taste. ' Cayenn6 pepper is preferable to the black ; 
season very delicately with mace ; grate one nutmeg and then 
break two raw eggs. Make a soft panada of the bread, butter and 
a little w\ater ; when cold, mix with the meat and break in two 
more raw eggs, and tlien add three table-spoonfuls of sweet 
cream ; mix this thoroughly ; roll into any shape you please, dip 
them in raw egg, then in grated bread crumbs and fry in boil- 
ing lard. — 3Irs. J. P., Lexington, Ky. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Boil one half pound rice till it is soft and dry. Then mix 
two table-spoonfuls of grated cheese, one small tea-spoonful mace, 
sufficient fresh butter to moisten it. Mince very fine six ta- 
ble-spoonfuls of the white meat of chicken or turkey, the soft 



SALAD RECIPES. 45 



parts of six large oysters, a few sprigs of parsley, a grated nut- 
meg, and tho yellow rind of one lemon. Mix whole well, moist- 
ening with cream. Take a portion of the prepared rice, about 
the size of an egg, flatten it and put in the center a dessert-spoon- 
ful of mixture; close the rice round it. Then form in the shape 
of an egg, brush over with some beaten yellow of an egg, and 
roll in pounded crackers. Have ready one pound of boiling 
lard, into which are thrown two croquettes at a time ; let them 
get brown, and take out with perforated skimmer. Serve hot. — 
Mrs. W. Jo)ies. 



46 BREAD RECIPES. 



JO jfv fe» .<^ xJt 



WAFFLES. 

One pint of sour milk, one tea-spoonful of soda ; beat the 
Avhites of five eggs and the yelks of two, one large spoonful of 
butter, one table-spoonful of salt, one pint sweet cream mixed 
with the yelks. Put the soda in the buttermilk and pour on the 
yelks ; after which add enough flour to make a light batter ; 
and lastly, beat in whites of the eggs. — 3Its. Edward Taylor. 

WAFFLES. 

One quart of flour, three eggs beaten separately, a piece of 
lard size of a hen's egg, half a tea-spoonful of soda, a little salt ; 
mix with sour cream. — Mrs. Henry Buckner. 

WAFFLES. 

Three pints flour, three eggs, well beaten (separately), salt to 
the taste, one table-spoonful of lard, two tea-spoonfuls cream of 
tartar, one tea-spoonful of soda ; mix uji with sweet milk, or 
leave off" the cream of tartar and use buttermillc and soda. — Miss 
Ilattie Clay. 

WAFFLES MADE WITH YEAST. 

One quart of flour, one quart sweet milk, with one table- 
spoonful of butter melted in it and mixed witli the flour grad- 
ually, so as to be free from lumps, one tea-spoonful salt, three 
table-spoonfuls yeast. When Avell risen, add two well beaten 
eggs.— J/iss E. M'd<iliell. 



BREAD RECIPES. 47 



LIGHT BREAD. 

Take one quart of flour, four table-spoonfuls of yeast, one 
table-spoonful of granulated sugar, one dessertspoonful of lard, 
and a little salt. In sununer make up Avith cold water, and in 
Avinter with warm. Make into a batch and work well, at least 
iit'teen minutes, and if it becomes light before the time for put- 
ting it to rise, work it over just a little without taking it from 
the bucket, or without adding flour. About an hour before 
baking, turn it out and make it into rolls as quickly as possible, 
adding just as little flour as you can get along with, to prevent 
it from adhering to the hands. Do not Avork it. In summer, 
make it up at 11 o'clock, and in winter about 9. It will be 
ready for tea. — 3Irs. Martin. 

INDIAN BREAD. 

Beat two eggs, very liglit; mix alternately with them one 
pint sour milk, or buttermilk, and one pint of fine indian meal, 
one tea- spoonful of soda, dissolved in a little sour milk; melt 
one table-spoonful of butter, and add to the mixture. Beat 
well ; and bake in a quick oven. — Mm. Lockett, Farmville, F«. 

POTATO AND HOP YEAST. 

Six good-sized potatoes, one quart boiling water, and a pinch 
of compressed hops; boil the potatoes until the skins crack; 
(the hops should be tied up in a muslin cloth and dropped into 
the water soon after the potatoes are put in) ; mash them with 
the skins on, and pour on the boiled water; add two table- 
spoonfuls of flour. A cake of Twin Brothers' yeast dissolved in 
Avarm water is excellent for starling. Ordinarily the same yeast 
Avill answer, but occasionally it will be necessary to use the Twin 
Brothers'. — Mrs. Martin. ' 

RUSK. 

One quart of flour, one tea-cupful of sugar, lard and butter 
size of an egg, two table-spoonfuls of yeast, and enough water 
to make a sponge. — Mrs. J. II. Holt. 



48 BREAD RECIPES. 



RUSK. 

One tea-cnpful of butter, one of yeast, three joints of flour, one 
half tea-cupful of sugar, three eggs, not quite a pint of milk; 
boil until reduced to a tea-cupful ; leave out one half pint of 
flour to mix into it after it becomes light. — 3Iiss Kate Spears. 

YEAST. 

Three large potatoes, boiled in clear water; then mash them, 
skill and all, in a quart of the potato water, a table-spoonful of 
sugar, two table-spoonfuls of flour, a tea-cupful of distillers' 
yeast, added after the above j)reparation is cool, 

TO MAKE THE BREAD. 

One quart flour, one table-spoonful of lard, one table-spoonful 
of sugar, one egg, one half tea-cupful of yeast. Mix with cold 
■water, and add a little salt. Work hard the first time, and very 
little the second rising. — 3Irs. Jones. 

GEMS. 

One cup of milk, one cup of hot water ; stir in Graham flour 
without sifting, to a batter, quite stiff"; beat well. Just drop the 
batter from a large spoon into the mufiiii irons, previously 
greased and heated. Bake quickly. A pinch of salt. — 3Irs. 
Blanton. 

PUFFS. 

Four eggs beaten separately, and very light, one quart of 
sweet milk, one pint of flour, a lump of lard about the size of a 
hen egg. Have the muffin irons well greased and very hot; 
pour in the batter and bake quickly. Stir in the whites, well 
frothed, the last thing, and cook at once. — Miss Mattie Clay. 

PUFFS. 

One quart of sifted flour, one pint of sweet milk, one pint of 
cold water, three eggs, one tea-spoonful of salt, one table-spoon- 
ful of lard ; mix the flour with the milk, add the eggs well beaten, 
then water, lastly melted lard ; bake in muffin irons. — 3Irs. 
Stoiie, Kansas. 



BREAD RECIPES. 49 



CREAM MUFFINS. 

Take one and a half pints ihnir, whites only of two eggs ; do 
not use yelks at all ; a little salt, just enough sweet cream to 
make the batter right consistency. Grease muffin irons, have 
them hot, and pour them half full. Bake quickly. — Mrs. Henry 
C. Buchier. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

Five table-spoonfuls each of flour (heaping), corn-meal and 
boiled rice ; two e^gs beaten separately ; one small tea-spoonful 
soda dissolved in enough sour milk to make batter right consis- 
tency. Beat very hard. — Mrs. M. T. Scott. 

CORN-MEAL MUFFINS. 

Take one|)Int of rich buttermilk, stir in it one half tea-spoon- 
ful soda, until it foams ; have ready three well beaten eggs (beat 
separately), and pour in yellows, one and one half pint of meal ; 
melt a piece of lard about the size of a small hen egg in the 
muffin irons, then pour in the batter ; salt enough to taste. Put 
whites of eggs in last. — Mrs. 3Iary Webb. 

YEAST MUFFINS. 

One quart flour, one egg, one half tea-cupful yeast, one pint 
new milk, one table-spoonful melted butter added last ; a little 
salt. Put batter to rise, and when light, bake. — 3Irs. Scott. 

MUFFINS. 

Melt a j)iece of butter the size of an egg into one pint of milk ; 
beat three eggs and stir in, sift in enough flour to make the 
batter right consistency ; add one tca-cujDful yeast. When light, 
bake. — Mrs. Blanton. 

QUICK MUFFINS. 

Two tea-cupfuls of buttermilk, one tea-cupful of thick cream, 
or three even table-spoonfuls of melted butter, four eggs, one 
half tea-spoonful of soda. Thicken to the consistency of waffle 
batter. — Mrs. Blanton. 



50 BREAD RECIPES. 



CORN MUFFINS. 

One pint meal, one half pint buttermilk with one half tea- 
spoonful soda in it, yellow of two egj2;s, one even table-spoonful 
lard. Add the white of eggs last ; beat well. — Ann Downing. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

One quart of buckwheat, one and one half pints of skimmed 
milk, a tea-cupful of good yeast, one tea-spoonful of salt ; mix this 
well together, and stir in a table-spoonful of melted lard ; make 
this at night for breakfast. Break one egg in the batter and 
beat well. — Mrs. L. P. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

One and one half pints buckwheat flour, one half pint of corn- 
meal, one quart of water, lard size of a hickory nut, half a tea- 
spoonful of soda, table-spoonful sugar, one tea-cupful yeast, a 
jiinch of salt, and one egg. In cold weather mix with warm 
w^ater, if the weather is mild use cold Avater. If wanted for 
breakfast, make about seven o'clock p. m.; if for tea, about ten 
o'clock. If on trying the batter it is sour, add a little soda. — 3Irs. 
3 far tin. 

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One and one half pints of cold boiled rice ; put it in a pint of 
milkDr water to soak the night before, one quart milk added 
next morning, one quart flour stirred in the rice and milk, two 
eggs well beaten (separately), one half tea-spoonful of soda 
dissolved in a little hot water, one tea-spoonful salt; stale bread 
crumbs may be mixed with the rice by the .above rule, leaving 
out the flour, except just enough to make the cakes turn well on 
the griddle. The rice should be salted when boiled. — Mits E. 
3IitchelL 

CREAM OF TARTAR BISCUIT. 

One quart flour, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, enough sweet milk to make rather a soft dough, 
salt to taste, one table-spoonful of lard. Sift soda and cream of 
tartar two or three times. — Mrs. Simms. 



BREAD RECIPES. 51 



SODA BISCUIT. 

Take one quart of flour, half a pint of thick buttermilk, one 
table-spoonful of lard, half a tea-spoonful of soda, half a tea- 
spoonful of salt. — -Aunt Henry. 

SOUR CREAM BISCUIT, 

Sift one tea-spoonful of salt, one of soda, with a quart of flour, 
one pint sour cream. Beat an egg and add to the cream; mix, 
I'oll, cut, and bake as quickly as possible. — Mrs. Hihler. 

GRAHAM BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, one tea-cup of sugar, sour cream enough 
to make a soft dough, one tea-spoonful of soda, one table-spoonful 
of butter; work sugar, butter and flour together until very fine, 
then add the cream ; work but little ; make into biscuit, and 
bake. — Mrs. Jones. 

LIGHT ROLLS. 

Two pints of flour, a little salt, rub one large spoonful of lard 
through the flour, perfectly smooth ; one tea-cupful of yeast, one 
tea-spoonful of white sugar in the yeast ; make it into a stiff* 
dough with cold water. Put in a warm place to rise, then work 
it well and let it rise again. — Miss Kate Spears. 

LIGHT LOAF ROLLS. 

One quart of flour, one table-spoonful of lard, one of sugar, 
one half cake of Twin Brothers' French biscuit yeast, made into 
a sponge. Two hours before making the dough, use one good- 
sized Irish potato, mashed fine in the sponge before making into 
dough. If the sponge is not sufficient to make up the flour, add 
a little cold water, a pinch of salt ; work it well, and let it rise ; 
work over the second time, make into small thin rolls, and 
into a loaf. — Miss Kate Sj)ears. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Take ten good-sized potatoes, and boil them in enough water 
to make up the yeast. When nearly done, put them through 
a sifter, and add a tea-cupful of white sugar. Then scald th'- 



BREAD RECIPES. 



Avitli a, piut of boiling Avater, from Avliich the potatoes were 
taken. Let theui stand awhile, and then thin them with the 
rest, or as much of the milk-warm potato water as will make the 
potato quite thin. Start to rise with a small cupful of yeast. A 
tea-cupful of this yeast for thi-ee light pints of flour. — 3Irs. 
BriXtiis Clay. 

BREAD MADE WITH FLEISCHMAN'S YEAST. 

Boil one half dozen Irish potatoes in a quart of water, when 
done, mash very fine ; add a large tea-cupful of flour ; when 
cool, add a piece of this quick yeast about the size of a small 
almond, 'dissolved in water ; make this sponge at dinner time, 
it will rise in a few minutes ; set it away till about one hour 
before supper, when you can work in enough flour to this 
sponge to make a soft dough ; put in a small lump of lard ; 
mould in any shape you desire, and put to rise ; when light, 
bake. — Mrs. Henry Buclcner. 

FRENCH BISCUIT. 

Four pints of flour, four eggs, leaving out the yelks of two, 
four tea-spoonfids of white sugar, one tea-cupful of good yeast, 
one table-spoonful of butter or sweet lard, a little salt, one pint 
of new milk; make into dough and work well, let it rise, work 
again, and then roll out thin, and cut into biscuits ; lard on 
one side and lay another on that already greased with lard ; let 
them rise again; bake in rather a quick oven. — Miss Kate 
Spears. 

YANKEE BISCUIT. 

Yeast for it — Five potatoes, mashed smooth, one cupful of 
sugar, one of yeast. To make the biscuit — Use one quart of 
flour, one cupful of yeast, lard the size of a walnut, pinch of 
salt; knead to a stiff" dough with very cold water, roll out, and 
cut, with a biscuit cutter; put to rise tdwut two hours before 
baking. 



BREAD KECIPES. 



SHORT BISCUIT. 

Three pints of flour, one pint of buttermilk, one tea-spoonful 
of soda, a little salt, and a piece of lard a little larger than au 
egg. — Miss Kate Spears. 

BEATEN BISCUIT. 

Two pints of flour, one table-spoonful of lard, one tea-spoonful 
salt ; mix into a very stiff dough with equal parts of sweet milk 
and Avater ; beat thirty minutes with an ax kept for the pur- 
j)ose ; or, if you use a kneader, run the dough back and forth 
through it until rather soft and perfectly smooth. — Mrs. Martin. 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 

Take one pint of boiling sweet milk and thicken it with meal ; 
keep in a warm place all night ; in the morning pour in a tea-cup- 
ful of lukewarm water; then stir in flour until a stiff batter is 
made. Set the batter in a kettle of warm water, to rise; it will 
be light in two hours ; then take six pints of flour and one tea- 
cupful of lard; mix with the rising; knead well, and put in 
pans and let rise ; then bake, 

SALT-RISING BREAD. 

Take half a pint of warm water, table-spoonful of meal, fourth 
of a tea-spoonful of salt, five table-spoonfuls of flour ; slice two 
or three pieces of raw Irish potato in it ; set to rise in tolerably 
warm water. About 11 o'clock stir a little flour in it; Avhen it 
rises take out the potato before putting the rising into the flour. 
Take five pints of flour, three table-spoonfuls of lard, one tea- 
sp(wnful of salt, and if the rising does not make it tolerably soft, 
add warm water ; knead it well ; you can put in rolls or loaves, 
as you like ; have the pans well greased ; grease the top of the 
bread well with lard, to keep it soft ; set it where it Avill keep 
warm ; when it rises sufficiently, put it to bake. — Mrs. Morris 
&a-is. 

SALT-RISIIVG BREAD. I 

Take a tea-cupful of new milk, let it boil, then stir in two table- 
spoonfuls of meal; set it where it will keep warm enough to lighten. 



54 BREAD RECIPES. 



Kext morning, thin with warm water, and add two or throe 
table-spoonfuls of flour and quarter of a tea-spoonful of salt ; set 
it in warm Avater, and the rising will come quickl}'. Take two 
quarts of flour, one table-spoonful of lard, about a tea-spoonful of 
salt ; mix with warm w^ater tolerably soft ; knead well ; grease 
pan well and top of bread ; set to lighten in a warm place ; 
Avhen it is quite light, put it to bake. You can make this rising 
in the morning, if you want it warm for supper. — 3Ls. 3Iorri)> 
Gass. 

EXCELLENT SALT RISING. 
Two table-spoonfuls of morning's milk, one pint warm Avater, 
one tea-spoonful of salt, two pints of flour ; work smoothly, and 
place in a pot of warm Avater; set in a Avarm place ; in five hours 
it Avill be light. Then take four pints of flour, pour the rising 
in and mix Avith a little Avarm Avatcr, a pinch of salt, and very 
little lard — a piece about the size of a hen's egg. IMould the 
bread, put to rise, and Avhen light, bake. — Mrs. 31. L. Rogers. 

MUSH BATTER CAKES. 

One pint mush, one half pint of flour, two egg$, a pinch of 
salt ; mix up Avith sweet milk. — 3Irs. Holt. 

RICE BATTER CAKES. 

One egg beaten light, one cupful sour milk, Avith enough soda 
stirred in it to make it foam. Then mash thoroughly two cup- 
fuls of cold boiled I'ice, put in enough flour to make the cake 
turn Avell. Have the griddle hot and well greased. — Daisy 
Lyle. 

BREAD CRUMB CAKES. 

Have one half pint light-bread crumbs, one pint flour, one 
egg, a piece of lard the size of a small Avalnut ; make up Avith 
sour milk and little soda. — Daisy Lyle. 

CORN MEAL BATTER CAKES. 

One pint corn-meal, three quarters of a pint of sour milk, 
one small tea-spoouful of soda in the milk, stirred till it foams, 



BRILLD KECIPES. 55 



one egg or two would be better ; salt to taste. Have the grid- 
dle hot and well greased. About one tea-spoonful of flour 
added to the meal is an improvement. — Miss Kate Spears. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

Four eggs, one pint sour cream, one pint water, one and one 
half pints of flour, one tea-spoonful of baking powder stirred 
iu tlie cream. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

To one pint flour, add one half pint corn-meal, four eggs, one 
table-spoonful yeast, with milk enough to make a stifi* batter. 
Set to rise over night. Thin with warm milk and water before 
baking next morning. — Miss Edgar. 

LIGHT ROLLS. 

To one pint of flour, add one table-spoonful of sugar, one tea- 
spoonful salt, whites of two eggs well frothed, a piece of lard 
the size of a hen egg, five table-spoonfuls of home-made or three 
of distillers' yeast. First mix the lard and flour, then stir in 
the other ingredients, and finally add enough milk-warm water 
to make a thin batter. Set in a warm place and it Avill rise suf- 
ficiently in two or three hours to work in flour; make the dough 
pretty stiflT, work till smooth and tolerably soft. If this is put 
to rise about 12 o'clock, it will be ready for supper. Do not 
work it much the last time. Make out in pretty shapes, put to 
rise and bake. — 3Irs. Zelce Clay. 

SODA RUSK. 

One egg, a piece of butter the size of a hen egg, three cup 
fuls flour, one cupful sweet milk, one half tea-cupful sugar, 
two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one tea-spoonful of soda. — 
Mrs. Scott. 

RUSK. 

Four pints flour, one pint of sweet milk, one tea-cupful sugar, 
one tea-cupful lard, one tea-cupful yeast, three eggs, one tea- 
spoonful salt ; let the dough rise twice before you make the 
rusks into shape. — Mrs. Myers. 



56 BREAD RECIPES. 



RUSK. 

Four eggs, a tea-cupful of butter, one of milk, two of yeast, 
one half pound of sugar ; beat the eggs Avell, add the sugar and 
gome flour ; the butter and milk melted together warm, but not 
too hot ; then more flour, lastly yeast ; add flour enough to 
make in a stiff batter ; set to rise in anything that "will hold a 
gallon; when the batter rises to the top, work in flour enough to 
make a stifi" dough ; let it rise again to the top, then w'ork in 
flour enough to make rolls for baking. 

POTATO BREAD. 

Two quarts flour, four large Irish potatoes, four eggs, one tea- 
cupful yeast, one table-spoonful of melted lard ; peel and then 
boil the potatoes till they are soft, then mash them till free 
from lumps, mix them well with the flour, then pour in the 
melted lard, also the eggs beaten together light, and then the 
yeast ; mix w^ell and knead until perfectly smooth ; put it in a 
pan and rub some lard over the top, to prevent it from becoming 
hard while rising ; let it stand over night and bake in loaves or 
rolls — much better though in loaves. This makes delightful 
rusk by adding sugar, and it also makes nice Sally Lunu. — 
Mrs. Kemiey. 

RICE CORN-MEAL BREAD. 

To one half pint of meal, add one half pint boiled rice, well 
mashed ; one egg beaten very lightly ; sour milk enough to 
make the batter right consistency ; one half tea-spoonful soda 
stirred in the milk till it foams ; a piece of lard about the size of 
a large almond, melted in the pan you cook it in ; salt to taste. 
Have the pan hot and well greased, sprinkle a little meal in 
the bottom. 

KENTUCKY CORN EGG-BREAD. 

Take one and one half pints of meal, one pint of buttermilk, 
one egg, a small tea-spoonful of soda, one of salt, one table- 
spoonful of lord; mix well and bake quickly. — Mrs. Morris Gass. 



BREAD KECirES. 57 



OLD FASHIONED CORN DODGERS. 

To a light quart of lueal, mix avcII one tea-spoonful of soda, 
one half tea-spoonful of salt, and one pint of fresh buttermilk. 
Bake in a moderate oven. — il//ss Belle Mitchell. 

SALLY LUNN WITHOUT YEAST. 

Beat three eggs separately, two pints of flour, a lump of but- 
ter the size of an C2.g, one tea-spoonful of soda, two tea-spoonfuls 
of cream of tartar; make it up with sweet milk to a batter, and 
bake quickly. — Mm Kate Spears. 

SALLY LUNN. 
Two pints flour, one table-spoonful lard, one table-spoonful 
butter, one table-spoonful sugar, two tea-spoonfuls cream of 
tartar, one of soda, three eggs beaten separately; mix with sweet 
milk ; make batter as thick as for batter-cakes. When ready to 
bake, dissolve the soda and cream of tartar in a little sweet 
milk — put in the last thing. Let the batter stand five or ten 
minutes, then bake rather quickly ; leave out sugai' if you 
prefer. — 3Irs. Kennaj. 

SALLY LUNN. 

One tea-cupful yeast, one pint warm sweet milk, a piece of 
butter size of hen eg^, two pints flour, two eggs, one table- 
spoonful sugar. AVhen ready to put to rise, work in one half 
tea-spoonful soda, or more if the bread is sour. — Mrs. Chapllne. 

SALLY LUNN. 

One quart of flour, one half pound butter, two eggs, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one half tea-cupful of sweet milk, and good 
yeast sufficient to mix the dough to a proper consistency. 
Make it up about nine o'clock in the morning in winter, and 
eleven o'clock in summer ; work it over about four o'clock, and 
make it in a round shape into pans and bake for seven o'clock 
tea. Butter, before sending it to the table.— ri/rs. J. Payne. 



58 BREAD RECIPES. 



BROWN BREAD. 

Prepare one quart of corn-meal gruel. Make a sponge of this 
gruel, and some unbolted flour and yeast, according to your 
judgment ; set in a warm place to rise. When light, put in 
one tea-cupful of common molasses, a piece of lard about the 
size of a hen egg, a little salt; work in nearly four pints of un- 
bolted flour. Mould into loaves, and set in a warm place to 
rise a second time. When light, bake. — Mrs. J. H. Holt. 

BROWN GEMS. 

One quart unbolted flour, one pint buttermilk, one egg ; 
stir in the flour very slowly, until it becomes a smooth batter ; 
use soda to sweeten the milk, a pinch of salt. Bake very 
quickly in a hot oven. — Mrs. Barnes, Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

The gems can be baked iu muffin irons. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Take two and one half cupfuls unbolted flour, two and one 
half corn-meal, one and one half buttermilk, one of warm 
water, one half tea-cupful molasses, one tea-spoonful salt, one 
tea-spoonful of soda ; stir all together and mix well. Have a 
pan well greased, pour in the batter, set in a steamer over 
a pot of boiling water. Keep up the steam and let it cook for 
three hours, then you can take it out, lay it on a paper, set in a 
moderately heated oven vat, but not long enough to brown it. — 
JJrs. RmseU. 



VEGETABLE RECIPES. 59 



VBGBTABtiKS. 



Endeavor to have fresh vegetables, as they become tough, 
and consequently indigestible, when old. Take out all imperfect 
parts, and put them in cold water, until ready for use. Most 
vegetables should be cooked in boiling water, and should not be 
allowed to stand. If compelled to keep them back, set them in 
a steamer on the back of the stove. Never use tepid water, cold 
is preferable — but boiling water best. 

Peas and asparagus should be cooked one hour ; beans, three 
hours ; beets, two hours ; turnips, two hours ; potatoes, half an 
hour ; cauliflower should be wrapped in a cloth and boiled two 
hours, and served with drawn butter. Do not salt vegetables 
until ready to be served for the table. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Peel as many tomatoes as will cover the bottom of the pan, 
and after making an excavation in the center of each, fill with 
crumbs of bread, seasoned highly Avith pepper, a little salt, but- 
ter, and sugar. Add a little water, to prevent burning, and 
bake two hours. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Peel and slice the tomatoes ; have ready grated bread crumbs, 
seasoned with sugar, butter, cayenne pepper, and salt. Place 
alternate layers of tomatoes and crumbs in the dish, and bake 
two hours. 



60 VEGETABLE RECIPES. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Place on a griddle smooth, flat tomatoes, the stem side down ; 
when brown, turn, and cook thoroughly. Serve with butter, 
pepper, and salt. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Take smootli round tomatoes ; cut in thick slices and roll in 
flour ; sprinkle with salt and pepper, and fry in equal parts of 
boilhig lard and butter. 

TO BOIL CORN. 

Select young, tender corn, .and put it in boiling water, seasoned 
with a little salt ; boil half an hour ; serve on the cob, or cut ofij 
and season with butter, pepper, and salt. 

FRICASEED CORN. 

Cut fresh corn from the cob ; put in a pot and just cover with 
boiling water ; let it boil half an hour ; mix in a half pint of 
cream, a table-spoonful of butter, one of flour, a little salt and 
pepper, and let it boil a few minutes. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Scrape the com from the cob ; add enough morning's milk to 
make it tolerably thin ; add butter and salt according to judg- 
ment. Do not use pepper until served for the table. — Mrs. H. 
C. Buckner. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 

Twelve ears of tender corn, grated or scraped, as for the 
alwve pudding ; one tea-spoonful of salt, one of pepper, one egg 
beaten into two large table-spoonfuls flour ; mix thoroughly ; 
make in small cakes ; fry in hot lard or butter. — il/rs. Buckner. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

Grate six ears of corn and mix it with two eggs, one spoonful 
of butter, pepper and salt to the taste, one table-spoonful of flour. 
Fry a light brown. — J/rs. J. P. 



VEGETABLE RECIPES. 61 



CORN PUDDING. 

Scrape the corn off of two dozen ears ; add one pint of sweet 
milk, half pound of butter, three eggs beaten well, and a little 
flour ; salt to taste. Bake one Lour. 

A NICE WAY TO PREPARE RICE. 

One tea-cupful rice boiled in tlie usual way ; drain carefully ; 
stir in two well beaten eggs, one table-spoonful of grated cheese, 
half a table-spoonful of butter, half a tea-spoonful of salt. 
Bake a few minutes in shallow pans. — Mrs. Simms. 

HOMINY. 

Large hominy is better after being soaked over night. Put it 
to boil earl)' in the morning, in a vessel carefully cleaned. A 
tin vessel is best for cooking hominy, in order to have it white. 
Small hominy wiU cook in a shorter time. Hominy will 
keep in a cool place several days. 

HOW TO COOK HOMINY. 

Wash slightly in cold water, and soak twelve hours in tepid 
soft water ; then boil slowly from three to six hours in the same 
"water, more being added from time to time, with great care, to 
prevent burning. Do not salt while cooking, as that or hard 
water will harden the corn ; so it will peas or beans (dry or 
green), and rice. — 3Ls. E. MeCarney. 

DRESSING FOR SLAW. 

Yelks of two eggs well beaten, one third of a tea-cupful of vin- 
egar, a tea-cupful of new milk or cream, and a tea-spoonful of 
mixed mustard, black or cayenne pepper, salt, piece of butter 
size of an Qg^. Stir on the fire until thick as custard j then 
pour on the cabbage. 

DRESSING FOR SLAW, OR LETTUCE. 

Yelks of three eggs ; mix with them half a tea-spoonful of 
mustard, half a teaspoonful of salt ; pour this in half a tea-cup 
of vinegar ; add a tea-spoonful of butter ; enough pepper to taste. 



62 VEGETABLE RECIPES. 

Steam this over a kettle of boiling water until it becomes the 
consistency of custard. Just before taking it up ; stir in a half 
tea-cupful of fresh sweet milk. — Mrs. Jones. 

SLAW. 

One half head of good cabbage chopped finely, the yelks of 
two eggs, beat and put in a little vinegar, also some sour butter- 
milk if convenient ; salt and butter to taste ; boil thick and pour 
over the slaw. 

HOW TO PREPARE SWEET POTATOES. 

Take large potatoes and put them on to boil, or steam. When 
nearly done, take out and peel; slice not quite half an inch thick. 
Put iu a baking pan with a very little water. Sprinkle white 
sugar thickly over them and spread each slice with butter. Set 
them in the stove to brown. 

POTATOES FOR BREAKFAST. 

Pare and slice the potatoes, boil them ; put a layer in a pan, 
with a little butter, pepper and salt, then another layer of pota- 
toes, and so on until the pan is full. Pour iu a tea-cupful sweet 
cream, sprinkle a little flour over the top and bake till brown. 
— 3Irs. Stoner. 

TO BOIL POTATOES. 

"When potatoes are old, pare them and drop them into a pot 
of boiling water, and boil until a fork can be run through them 
easily ; if you wish them wjiole, pour off the water and put in a 
little salt, and let them remain over the coals a few minutes. 
This will make them mealy. If you wish mashed potatoes, 
take them up and mash and beat thoroughly ; add a spoonful 
of cream, butter and salt. When potatoes are young and small, 
take about three and put them in a cloth and squeeze. This 
makes them mealy, and gives the appearance of large potatoes. 
Dress with cream and butter. 



VEGETABLE RECIPES. 63 



POTATO PUFFS. 

Two cupfuls mashed potatoes ; stir iu two table-spoonfuls 
melted butter, beaten to a creara, add two well beaten eggs and 
one cup of cream. Pour into a deep didh and bake iu a quick 
oven. — 3Irs. Ed. Taylor, 

POTATO BALLS. 

Boil the potatoes as above ; when just done take them up and 
mash and beat them well ; have ready some boiling milk, and 
stir into the potatoes with butter and salt ; have ready a pan of 
hot water and Avith the hands form the potatoes into balls (be. 
tween each ball dip the hand in the water); put in a round 
pan with one on top, bake until a light brown. This makes a 
beautiful and delightful dish. — Mrs. E. Payne. 

TO COOK PARSNIPS. 

First scrape the parsnips, slice lengthways, and parboil, then 
place them in a long baking pan, with just enough water 
to prevent them from burning ; sprinkle brown sugar over them 
and place strips of fat bacon on the parsnips, to season ; bake till 
brown. On taking them up, pepper well and lay aside the 
bacon. 

MACARONI. 

Boil one pound of macaroni until tender, but not enough for 
it to break ; take a quarter of a pound of butter and the same 
quantity of grated cheese; have a deep dish and 2)ut into it a 
layer of macaroni, and scatter over it bits of butter, and tlien 
put in a layer of cheese, and continue so until all are used; then 
put some bits of butter on the top, season with pej^per and salt, 
and then bake. — Mrs. Cunningham. 

HOW TO PREPARE CASHAW. 

Cut and peel off the rind, steam or boil until tender and 
thoroughly dry ; mash well and free entirely from lumps ; sea- 
son plentifully with butter ; add sugar to the taste. Place all 



64 VEGETABLE RECIPES. 



in a deep pan, sprinkle a little sugar over the top and lay bits of 
butter in places over the cashaw. Put inside the stove, and let 
it remain until it browns. 

TO COOK SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT. 

"Wash, scrape and slice in round pieces ; boil in salt water 
until perfectly tender, then drain off the water ; pour over a 
little sweet milk, or cream, if you have it, together with a piece 
of butter rolled in flour, season witli pepper and a little salt ; let 
simmer a few minutes ; take off and pour over a little vinegar, 
sweetened with sugar. Mix well, and serve hot, in a covered 
dish. 

TO STEW YOUNG ONIONS. 

Put the onions in boiling water; boil two hours or until ten- 
der, then mash them and stew ten minutes in a little cream ; 
butter, salt and pepper to the taste. — 3Irs. Martin. 

TO COOK CYMBLINGS. 

Put the cymblings in boiling water, or in a steamer over boil- 
ing water ; boil three hours ; then mash thoroughly and stew in 
eream and butter. Add salt and pepper to taste — Mrs. Mar- 
tin. 

FRIED PEACHES. 

Take firm, large free-stone peaches, halve them, and place them 
cup down in a skillet of boiling lard or butter (to suit taste). 
When the edges are nicely browned, turn them up and fill the 
cups with white sugar, and cook till thoroughly done. A most 
excellent relish. — 3Hss F. Short. 

FRIED EGG PLANT. 

Peel a nice, large Q,gg plant, cut in thin slices, lay in salt 
water two or three hours, then steam until tender. Make a 
batter of two eggs, first beaten separately, then together ; a 
tea-cupful of sour cream, a tea-spoonful of salt, half tea-spoonful 
of soda, and flour to thicken ; dip the slices of Qgg plant in the 
batter, and fry till a light brown in boiling lard ; serve hot. 
An excellent breakfast dish. — Miss Short. 



VEGETABLE RECIPES. G5 



FRIED GREEN TOMATOES. 

Slice the toraato,"'s and lay in salt water a half hour, drain 
and roll in eorn-nieal, and fry in hot lard ; salt and pepper to 
taste. — Mitis Shod. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS. 
Slice the cucumbers lengthwise, lay in salt water a while, 
drain and roll in corn-meal, and fry in hot lard ; salt and pep- 
per to taste. 

GREEN CORN PUDDING. 
Take twelve ears of corn, grate them ; one quart of rich milk ; 
stir into the milk quarter of a pound of melted butter, white 
sugar to make a little sweet, four eggs well beaten, last the 
grated corn ; put the mixture into a dish and bake.— Jfrs. A. 
Howerton, 



66 OMELETTE RECIPES. 



Gt ]^X ]ci Jji jB 11* 'jP JCi S 



OMELETTE-VERY FINE. 

Six eggs, beaten separately ; one tumbler sweet milk ; reserve 
about one fourth, into whicli stir one table-spoonful flour ; 
when the milk boils, stir in the paste, add salt, and about one 
table-spoonful of butter ; put aside to cool. Mince a little ham ; 
chop fine some parsley and thyme, a spoonful of each, and two 
of ham ; stir the yellows, ham and herbs into thickened milk, 
adding the well beaten six whites. Grease the skillet : bake 
in the stove. You can leave out bam and herbs if you choose. 
— 3Irs. Mary L. Rogers. 

OMELETTE— BREAKFAST DISH. 

Beat six eggs separately ; a slice of light bread, grated ; a piece 
of butter the size of a walnut; one cupful of morning's milk; 
pepper and salt to the taste ; stir in the six whites, well beaten. 
— Miss Jennie Cook. 

PUFF OMELETTE. 

Beat the yellows of six eggs, pour in a tea-cupful sweet 
morning's milk, add a pinch of salt. Beat together each a table- 
spoonful of butter and flour until smooth, add to the eggs, and 
beat all together well ; put into a frying pan that has been 
■Nvcll greased, and when it begins to thicken, add six whites 
beaten to a stiff^ froth, and another small pinch of salt. When 
stiff it is done. — 3frs. Stoncr. 



OMELETTE RECirES. C7 



TO POACH EGGS. 

Have a pan boiling water ; have tiic eggs carefully broken 
and slip them into the boiling Avater ; let them remain till the 
whites are set, and take out with spoon ; put in a dish and pour 
on some drawn butter. 

FRIED EGGS. 

Fry bacon in slices, then remove from the pan ; have the 
eggs ready and slip into the gravy. When done, serve with the 
meat, an egg on top of each slice. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 
Have in the frying pan some butter or ham drippings ; break 
the eggs and cook quickly, stirring constantly. Serve immedi- 
ately. 

TO BOIL EGGS. 
Have boiling water ; drop in the eggs and let them remain 
three minutes, if you wish the whites congealed ; if not, let them 
remain a shorter time. Silver spoons used in eating eggs should 
be put in water immediately. 

COLUMBUS EGGS-A NICE SIDE DISH. 

Take twelve hard-boiled eggs, peel off shells and cut the eggs 
in equal halves, cutting off a little piece from one end, to enable 
them to stand alone ; pulverize the yelks and chop fine some 
smoked tongue or old lean ham ; mix together and moisten 
slightly with a little fresh butter or vinegar, and season with 
black pepper, salt and mustard to suit the taste ; fill the cups 
or the empty whites (be careful not to break them) with this mix- 
ture, pressing down and smoothing nicely ; arrange them on a 
dish, j^utting two halves together and standing them upright, 
so as to look like whole eggs. — Mrs. Kenneij. 

DRESSED EGGS. 

Take any number of eggs ; boil hard and cool them in water ; 
peel and divide the whites carefully, cut the long way, lay the 



68 OMELETTE RECIPES. 



pieces in pairs on a dish ; masli the yelks witli a small quantity 
of butter and minced ham ; season highly with salt, pepper 
and mustard (add a very small quantity of oniou) ; make the 
dressing into very small balls, place in the cavities of the 
"whites and close very neatly as whole eggs. — 3Irs. Allen Bashford, 



RECIPES FOR CANNED FRUITS. GO 



CAHHBO FRUITS, BTC 



TO CAN GREEN CORN. 

Cut from the cob twenty-one quarts of corn, dissolve three 
and a half ounces of tartaric acid in a L'ttie hot water, put 
plenty of water, together with the tartaric acid, on the corn, 
and boil well ; when well cooked, jDut in tin can and seal at once. 
When ready for use, drain off the water, add one tea-spoonful of 
soda, a little sugar, salt and butter to taste. — Mrs. Hattie Kcnney. 

GREEN CORN FOR WINTER USE. 

Select young, tender corn, and boil (on the cob) until about 
half done ; cut it from the cob quite fine. To one gallon of 
corn allow one pint of salt, mixing when the corn is cold ; spread 
out on a cloth to dry a little, then pack in a jar, putting a layer 
of salt first, and then the corn, until the jar is almost filled ; 
then add a layer of salt, and fit a board on top, on which a weight 
should be placed. To prepare for the table, boil in a good deal 
of water, and if it should be too salty, pour off the water and 
add fresh boiling water ; season with butter, pepper, and a little 
sugar. — Mrs. Amos Turncy, Sr. 

TO CAN TOMATOES AND OKRA FOR SOUP. 

Throw ripe tomatoes into boiling water, and then peel them ; 
put into a bell metal kettle and boil ; as the Avater i-ises, dip part 
of it off, or it will require a long time to reduce the tomatoes so 
a.s to can ; boil until almost ready for table use ; in the mean- 



70 RECIPES FOR CANNED FRUITS. 

time wash the okra and cut cross-wise and drop into boiling 
water ; boil half an hour ; skim several times ; dip up with a 
perforated ladle and drop into the tomatoes, and let all boil half 
an hour ; put into tin cans, and seal while hot.— J/rs. Martin. 

TO CAN PEACHES. 

Make a rich syrup and drop the peaches in ; let them get hot 
through ; then put in the jars and seal at once. — Mrs. Jones. 

TO CAN FRUIT. 

Scald the fruit in a large kettle, with juice or water to cover 
it ; put the cans and tops into a vessel of cold water ; let them 
boil ; as soon as they are hot, fill with the fruit, which must be 
hot also ; let them remain open until cool ; cut paper size of the 
can and put over the fruit ; fill with juice, and seal. — Mrs. 
Howerton. 

TO SEAL PRESERVES, 

Beat the white of an egg, take tissue paper the size you require, 
dip into the Q^g, wetting the j^aper on both sides ; cover the jar, 
carefully pressing it around the sides securely. — Mrs. Howerton. 

TO CAN APPLES. 

Take green, acid apples, peel them and cut up in slices; when 
thoroughly done, strain through a sieve, put in air-tight cans, 
seal while hot. If you prefer, you can add quarter of a pound 
of sugar to a pound of apples; they keep just as well without. 
— Mrs. Garrett. 

TO CAN TOMATOES. 

Pour boiling water on the tomato, so as to take off the peel- 
ing readily ; put them in the kettle and cook down till the water 
from the tomatoes is nearly out ; can while hot, and seal imme- 
diately. — Aunt Harriel. 

TO CAN PEACHES AND PEARS. 

Select ripe fruit, peel, stone, and drop into cold water ; one 
pound of fruit to a quarter of a pound of sugar ; put in a kettle 
with a little water (to prevent burning), and boil till tender. 
Perfectly ripe fruit requires but little boiling. — 3frs. Maiiln. 



PASTRY KECIl'KS. 



PASTRY. 



All pastry should be made as quickly as possible and handled 
very little ; it should also be made in a cool place, and iu summer 
use ice water, and roll on a marble slab ; the butter should be sweet 
and fresh, and the salt thoroughly washed from it ; use as little 
water as possible, or the paste will become tough ; bake in a 
moderate oven, in order to give time to rise. Boiled paste is 
best made of suet, which should be minced very fine and well 
mixed with flour. 

PUFF PASTE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of flour — sift the flour, and 
then sift in something else a little additional flour for sprinkling 
and rolling ; wash all the salt from the butter ; then divide it into 
four parts, put one fourth into the flour and divide the remain- 
der in six pieces ; mix with a knife the flour and butter into a 
stiflf dough, sprinkle a little flour on the paste board, flour the 
rolling pin and roll into a thin sheet ; then put in little bits at 
equal distances one sixth of the butter, fold the paste, flour it 
an J roll again, and so on until the butter is consumed. Divide 
into as many pieces as you wish pies ; roll each piece and put 
into pans previously buttered ; always roll from you. — Mrs. 
Martin. 

PUFF PASTE. 

One pound of flour, fourteen ounces of good butter; ruD into 
the flour two ounces of the butter, having washed all the salt 



72 PASTRY RECIPES. 



out of butter ; tlien make a dougli with enough cold water to 
moisten, and if possible make the paste in a cool place, roll the 
dough into a sheet and place the remainder of butter over it ; 
roll out four times ; do not use it for an hour. — C E. F. Ilegman. 

CONFECTIONERS' PASTE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound butter, two pounds of flour, 
four eggs, a little cinnamon, and a small quantity of baking pow- 
der ; rub butter and sugar together, then add eggs, one half tca- 
spoouful baking powder, then the cinnamon, add flour next, and 
moisten with milk — enough to make a dough. — C. E. F. Hegman. 

COMMON PIE CRUST. 

Two quarts of flour, one pound of butter ; divide the butter 
in equal parts, and cut up one half of it into the flour, rubbing 
it fine ; mix with a little cold water into a stiff" dough ; flour the 
board and roll into a thin sheet ; spread on the rest of the but- 
ter, flour and fold up and roll ; then fold again into a 
scroll and divide into as many parts as desired, and I'oU out 
nearly an inch thick. — Mrs. M . 

LARD PASTE. 

One half pound of lard, one half pound of butter ; rub this 
together into two and a quarter pounds of flour, and mix with 
cold water into a stiff" dough ; roll out twice. — Mrs. M 

SUET PASTE. 

One pound of beef suet to two quarts of flour ; remove all 
strings, etc., from the suet and chop fine ; rub one half into the 
flour and mix Avith cold water ; roll out quite thin, and put on the 
remaining suet ; flour and roll again, and divide into as many 
pieces as you want sheets of paste. This is suitable paste for 
dumplings or pot pies. — Mrs. M . 

CHEESE CAKE. 

Beat the yelks of ten eggs, the whites of two ; then take one- 
half pound sugar, one-half pound butter, work well together ; 



PASTRY RECIPES. 73 



beat in the eggs, flavor with nutmeg ; bake the crust a little 
before putting in the custard ; when the pudding is done, spread 
a layer of acid jelly over, and make an icing of the remaining 
whites ; flavor with lemon, spread over, and brown slightly. — 
3I)'s. Wilson. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDfNG. 

Three eggs beaten together until perfectly light, one tea-cu])- 
ful white sugar, one tea-cupful butter, beaten to a cream ; put 
a layer of citron or acid jelly at the bottom of crust, then pour 
the transparency over. — 3Irs, HoUidai/. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDING. 

Nine eggs — put in only three whites, one pound of sugar, one 
half pound butter, one wine-glassful wine, two nutmegs grated. 
Take remainder of whites and make a meringue. When the 
jnuldings are baked and cold, spread on the icing and brown. 
Bake in paste. — Mrs. Brutus J. Clay. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDING. 

Four eggs — beat separately, one cup of butter, two cups of 
sugar ; beat butter and sugar to a cream, add yelks, two table- 
spoonfuls of jelly. Flavor to taste ; add the whites as a meringue. 
Excellent. — 3Iiss Iva McCarney. 

ORANGE ROLEY POLEY. 

Make a light jr.iste as for apple dumplings ; roll in oblong 
sheets, and lay oranges, peeled, sliced and seeded, thickly, all 
over it ; sprinkle with white sugar, scatter a tea-spoonful or two 
of the grated orange i^eel over all and roll up closely, folding 
down the ends securely, to keep the syrup from running out. 
Ijoil in a cloth one and one half hours. Eat with lemon sauce, 
prepared as follows : Six eggs, leaving out the whites of two, 
one half pound of butter, one pound sugar, juice of two lemons 
and rind of both gi*ated. Put in a tin pan over a slow fire ; 
stir until it thickens like honey. Very fine. 



74 PASTRY RECIPES. 



CREAM PIE. 

Two eggs, one cupful sugar, two table-spoonfuls corn starch ; 
Ijeat eggs, sugar, and starcli together. Boil one pint milk, sea- 
son with vanilla ; just as it boils, stir in the mixture ; stir all 
the time, until it thickens. JJefore cooking stir in one table-spoon- 
ful of butter ; this is for the pie. Take three eggs, one cupful su- 
gar, one quarter tea-spoonful soda in one half cupful sour cream, 
one tea-spoonful of cream tartar mixed in one and one half 
cupfuls of flour. Bake quickly in jelly cake pans. When 
cold, slice the cake and put in layers of the above cream. 

CREAM PIES. 

Five eggs (yellows), one tea-cupful of butter, one pint of gran- 
ulated sugar, one table-spoonful of flour, one pint of rich cream. 
This quantity will make two puddings. Bake in paste. Make 
a meringue of the five whites. — Mr&. Spears. 

CREAM PIES. 

One pint of milk with a vanilla bean boiled in it, eight eggs, 
three quarters of a pound of sugar, two ounces of flour ; mix 
together and stir into boiling milk ; when cool, put into pastry 
and bake. 

CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Beat seven eggs very light ; add a half pound of sugar ; stir 
in one quart rich morning's milk ; season to taste ; bake in pufi* 
I)aste. 

BOURBON PUDDING. 

One tea-cupful of butter, one of cream, two and a half cupfuls 
sugar, yelks of four eggs well beaten, one table-spoonful of flour ; 
flavor to taste, and bake in rich paste. — Mrs. Ed. Taylor. 

KENTUCKY PUDDING. 

Three fourths of a cup of butter, two and a half cupfuls of 
sugar, three eggs, one cup of cream, three table-spoonfuls flour; 
season with Icnion, and bake in paste. 



rAi5TRY RECIPES. 75 



VINEGAR PUDDING. 

Six eggs, three tea-cupfuls sugar, one tou-cupful butter, one 
table-spoonful strong vinegar diluted with one of water, three 
table-spoonfuls flour, a half tea-spoonful soda, three or four 
drops of oil of lemon. This quantity makes four puddings. 
—Mrs. Will Taylor. 

ANOTHER VINEGAR PUDDING. 

Four eggs, four table-spoonfuls butter, three cupfuls sugar, four 
table-spoonfuls flour ; vinegar to taste. — Mrs. J. A. Howcrton. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Peel, seed, and cut in small pieces four good-sized oranges, 
add a cupful of white sugar, and let it stand a Avhile. Into a 
quart of nearly boiling milk stir two table-spoonfuls of corn 
starch mixed with a little water, and the yelks of three eggs 
beaten light. AVhen cooked to the consistency of thick custard, 
put away to cool, after which mix Avith the orange and sugar ; 
make a frosting of the four whites of eggs and powdered sugar. 
Cook the pudding in pastry. When done, spread on the mer- 
ingue, and brown slightly. — 3Irs. L. H. Bhxnton. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Half a pound butter, half a pound sugar, two ounces sponge 
cake rubbed fine, five eggs, two table-spoonfuls brandy, juice 
and grated rind of one lemon. — Mrs. John Ray. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Take quarter of a pound of butter, quarter i)ound sugar, 
cream well together ; add three eggs, and the juice and grated 
rind of one lemon, or about three fourths of a tea-spoonful of 
citric acid dissolved in hot water, flavored with extract of lemon. 
Put on the stove and stir all the time, till thick : when cool, put 
in pastry and bake. — Mrs. Laurence Jones. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Grate the rind and press out the juico of four lemons, yelks 
of eight eggs beaten very light, and mix with the lemon, five 



76 PASTRY RECIPES. 



tea-sjDoon fills corn starcli dissolved in one and one third pints 
of new milk ; beat all -well together, and sweeten to taste. Have 
the crust ready, and pour in the custard ; let bake till thick ; 
then make an icingof the eight Avhitesand powdered sugar, until 
stiff enough ; spread over puddings, and brown slightly. This 
quantity makes four puddings. Two table-spoonfuls of butter to 
be used for the custard. — Mrs. R. Hanson. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Yellows of four cgg^^, eight table-spoonfuls of sugar, t\Vo of 
melted butter, two lemons grated (use both the rind and pulp, 
and be sure to take out the seed, as one left will make the cus- 
tard bitter) ; use four table-spoonfuls sugar to the four whites 
for meringue ; bake in paste. — Mrs. Frank Massie. 

LEMON PIE. 

Two lemons ; bake them a short time, then squeeze and strain 
the juice ; boil the rind in half a pint of water ; then pour the 
water in the following mixture; two cups of sugar, half cupful 
sweet milk, one table-spoonful corn starch, one of butter, yelks of 
six eggs. Bake it in paste ; then beat the whites with eight table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, and pour over the pie ; brown slightly. This 
quantity makes two pies. — Mrs. Mitchell. 

SNOW DUMPLINGS. 
Have several apples pared and cored ; wash a pint of rice, and 
roll the apples in it, so that the rice will adhere ; have ready a 
nice, short pie crust, wrap the apples in a piece of the dough, 
and roll the dumpling in rice again, and so on until you use up 
the apples. Put a napkin in the steamer, place it over a pot 
of boiling water, and put in the dumplings ; steam till done ; 
eat with cream sauce. — Mrs. Alice Garrett. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Pare and core the apples ; fill up the holes with sugar, a little 
butter, a little cinnamon (ground), and a small piece of lemon 
or orange peel. Make a rich custard, with one pint sweet milk 



PASTRY RECIPES. 



and two eggs, sweeten and flavor to taste ; thicken with a little 
flour, pour over apples and bake. — Lizzie, 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Peel and core several acid apples ; fill the holes ■with sugar, 
butter, and some ground cinnamon or nutmeg. Have prepared 
a nice, short crust, roll it out and inclose the apples in it ; place 
tlie dumplings in a deep pan, and pour over them enough warm 
water to half cover the dumplings, previously sweetened to taste, 
a piece of butter the size of a goose egg melted in it, and fla- 
vored "with nutmeg. Set in the stove and bake till a light 
brown ; if the water should cook out before they are done, add a 
little more hot water. Serve with solid sauce ; flavor according 
to taste. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Two tea-cupfuls apples, stewed and strained ; two tea-cupfuls 
sugar, one tea-cupful butter, seven yellows of eggs ; take the 
whites of five egg!^, and a half cupful of sugar, beat very light 
and spread over the puddings ; brown slightly. — 3Irs. S. Clcnj. 

APPLE CUSTARD FOR PIES. 

Six egg?^^ two cupfuls apples, two of sugar, nearly one cupful 
butter, the juice of one lemon ; leave two whites for the 
meringue. — Mrs, Sam. Clay. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Three tea-cupfuls apples, stewed and strained, two tea-cupfuls 
sugar, one tea-cupful butter, seven eggs ; leave out the whites of 
four for meringue ; bake in paste. — Mrs. Buchier. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

One dozen apples, stewed and strained, six eggs, one-half 
pound butter, one pound sugar, one nutmeg, season with lemon 
juice or peel ; bake with paste or not. 



78 TASTRY RECIPES. 



QUINCE PUDDING. 

To six large, rijic quinces, stewed and strained, one half pint 
sweet cream, one half pint sugar, seven eggs ; omit all the whites 
but two ; add lemon juice to the taste. — Mrs. H. Buchier. 

CITRON PUDDING. 

One half pound sugar, same of butter, seven eggs, juice and 
rind of one lemon, cooked on tlie fire till thick as molasses ; 
brandy and spices to be put in afterward with slices of citron. — 
Miss Hawes. 

PRESERVE PUDDING (CHERRY). 

One cupful sugar, one cupful of acid preserves (cherry is better 
than anything else), one half cupful butter, five eggs beaten sep- 
arately. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

Six eggs, one and a half cupfuls sugar, one cupful of butter, 
one and a half cupfuls of cherry preserves. — Mrs. S. Clay. 

MINCED PIES. 

Two pounds of beef, finely chopped ; one pound suet, nicely 
shred ; one dozen apples, pared and chopped small ; two pounds 
currants or raisins, stoned and floured ; three quarters of a pound 
of sugar, with nutmeg, mace, and cloves. Dried cherries are 
very good. Mix all together ; stir with it sweet cider, French 
or peach brandy; slice in citron or preserved orange jiecl ; some 
use cider and brandy, too — a quart of cider or a tea-cupful of 
brandy. — Mrs. Washington, Va. 

RECIPE FOR MINCE MEAT. 

Two table-spoonfuls ground cinnamon, two nutmegs grated, 
four dozen cloves, one table-spoonful powdered mace, one pound 
brown sugar, two pounds of meat chopped fine, two of suet, four 
pounds laisins, two pounds currants, four pounds apples chopped 
fine, old whisky or brandy to suit the taste. — 3Iiss Ilallerk. 



PASTRY RECIPES. 



MINCE MEAT. 
Two pounds of meat chopped fine, after being cooked , two 
pounds of suet chopped fine, four pounds of raisins, four pounds 
of apples, eight oranges, the peel of one, half pound of citron, 
all chopped fine ; one ounce of cinnamon, one of allspice, one of 
nutmeg, two pounds of brown sugar. — i/rs. N. B. Rion, Jr. 



80 



PUDDING RECIPES. 



PUOOINGS 



SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

Boil and peel the potatoes, mash and rub through a sieve, to 
make it loose and light ; stir to a cream, quarter of a pound of 
butter, quarter of a pound of sugar ; add a grated nutmeg, one 
tea-spoonful of cinnamon, half a glass of brandy. Beat three 
eggs till smooth, stir them into the mixture of butter and sugar 
alternately with the potato ; at last, mix all thoroughly by hard 
stirring. Have a deep baking dish, lay a border of puff paste 
all around, and pour in the mixture. Set the pudding in a 
quick oven, and when cool sift Avhite sugar over. — 3Irs. W. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

Two pounds of potatoes, steam entirely done, and slice them; 
make a syrup of one tea-cupful butter, two tea-cupfuls sugar, 
three quarters of a tea-cupful of good wine, one dessert-spoonful 
of allspice pounded fine, enough water to make one and a half 
pints of the syrup ; boil for a short while, and line a deep pan 
with rich paste, and bake slightly ; put in a layer of sliced po- 
tatoes and jDour over some of the syrup ; then another layer of 
potatoes, and the rest of the syrup. Cover with crust, and 
bake. — 3Irs. Sam Brooks. 

IRISH POTATO PUDDING. 

One and a half pints of fine mashed potatoes, one pint cream, 
one nutmeg, one and a half pounds sugar, one and, a half pounds 
butter, ten eggs. Bake in paste ; then spread on meringue and 
brown. 



rUPDIXG KECirES. 81 



IRISH POTATO PUDDING. 

Two tea-cupfuls sugar, two tea-cupfuls butter, one tea-cupful 
sweet cream, eight eggs, two and a half pints mashed potatoes, 
cue nutmeg grated. — Mrs. Henry Biichicr. 

ANOTHER POTATO PUDDING. 

One pound mashed potatoes, one pound sugar, nine eggs beaten 
separately, three quarters pound butter ; flavor with anything 
you please. This quantity will make six puddings. — Mrs. Dr. 
Barnes. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

One nut grated fine, whites of six eggs, one half pound of 
white sugar, one half pound of butter, juice of three lemons 
strained ; add the milk of nut if not thin enough. Mix well, 
and after the pastry is baked, pour on the mixture and bake a 
few minutes. — Mrs. Allen Bashford. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

One quarter pound butter, one quarter pound sugar, cream 
well together, add three eggs and tea-cupful cream or rich milk, 
in which the cocoanut has been soaked. Use as much of the 
cocoanut as you like. Cook before putting in pastry. — Mrs, 
Laurence Jojies. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Four yellows, one pint cocoanut, one pint sugar, one tea-cup- 
ful butter, make a meringue of the whites. Use milk of cocoa- 
nut. Bake in paste. — Mrs. Mary Webb. 

JELLY PUDDING. 

One tea-cupful jelly, one tea-cupful sugar, one half tea-cupful 
butter, two eggs, four table-sjooonfuls wine, nutmeg to the taste. 
Mrs. Jones. 

JELLY PUDDING. 

For two pies. One tea-cupful of sour jelly, two of sugar, 
six eggs, lump of butter the size of a hen's egg, two table-spoon- 
fuls of flour, tea-spoonful of lemon extract. — Miss Jennie Kenny. 



82 PUDDING RECIPES. 



JELLY PUDDING. 

Seven eggs (keeping back four wliites for top), one half 
pound of butter, two tea-cupfuls of sugar and one of jelly. Bake 
in a paste. — Mrs. William Buckner. 

MOLASSES PUDDING. 

Two and one half cupfuls sugar, one cupful molasses, three 
eggs beaten separately, one table-spoonful butter, two table- 
spoonfuls of cream. Bake in paste. — Mrs. Robert Stotier. 

MOLASSES PIE. 

One tea-cupful of sugar, one tea-cupful of molasses, four eggs 
beaten separately, two table-spoonfuls of butter. — Mrs. N. B. 
Rlon, Jr. 

MOLASSES PIE. 

Three eggs, one half tea-cupful butter, one half cupful flour, 
one pint of molasses. — Mrs. Geo. Davis. * 

POTATO PUDDING. 

Three eggs beaten together, two tea-cupfuls of sugar, one 
half cupful butter, two large potatoes ; put the butter into the 
potatoes while hot, after putting the potatoes through a sieve ; 
mix together the eggs and sugar, then pour into the butter and 
potatoes ; beat all together thoroughly. Season with orange. — 
3Irs. Howerton. 

JAM PUDDING. 

One tea-cupful of creamed butter, one tea-cupful of sugar, 
one tea-cupful of jam, three eggs beaten separately, cinnamon 
and spice to taste. 

PUMPKIN PUDDING. 

Twelve eggs, one and one half pounds of loat sugar, one half 
pound of butter, one quart cream, one half pound pumpkin ; 
strain the pumpkin through a sieve, boil the cream and set it 
aside to cool ; beat the eggs separately ; cream butter and sugar, 
add the eggs and cream, then pumpkin ; season with nutmeg, 
and grated rind and juice of lemon or extract. Bake in paste 
as long as for custard. 



PUDDING KECIPES. 83 



JELLY PUDDING. 

Four eggs beaten separately, two cupfuls white sugar, one 
cupful butter, one cupful of sweet cream, one cupful of jelly, 
two table-spoonfuls vanilla. Stir the yellows of the eggs and 
the sugar ; cream the butter ; add the cream, then the jelly, and 
last, the whites of the eggs and vanilla. Delicious. — Miss Phebe 
Wood, Maysville, Ivy. 

FEATHER PUDDING. 

To be served with sauce. One table-spoonful butter, one cup- 
ful sugar, one egg, one cupful sweet milk, one half tea-spoonful 
soda, one tea-spoonful cream tartar, two cupfuls flour. Flavor 
with nutmeg. — Daisy Lyle. 

GINGER PUDDING. 

To be served with sauce. One cupful of molasses, one cupful of 
boiling water ; to which add one table-spoonful butter, one tea- 
spoonful soda, one of ginger, or more, if you prefer. Flour 
enough to make a batter that will drop from a spoon. Bake 
quickly in a long pan, or in loaves. — Mrs. Blanton. 

GINGERBREAD PUDDING. 

One pint sour milk, four eggs beaten together, one pint mo- 
lasses, one half pound sugar, three quarters pound butter, six 
tea-spoonfuls of soda ; dissolve the soda in a little hot water, add 
spice to the taste. Stir in flour until as thick as for pound 
cake ; serve with rich sauce. — Mrs. J. A. Sowerton. 

GINGER PUDDING. 

Three eggs, one half pint molasses, one cupful sugar, one 
cupful lard, two table-spoonfuls of ginger, one half tea-spoonful 
soda, or one tea-spoonful of baking powder ; make into a thick 
batter ; put in a pan and set in a steamer over a pot of boiling 
Avater ; when done, set in the oven to dry ofl*. Serve with but- 
ter sauce. — 3Irs. Geo. Davis. 



84 PUDDING RECIPES. 



GINGER PUDDING. 

Six ounces of flour, six ounces of sugar, six eggs, eight ounces 
preserved ginger, one pint milk, six ounces butter ; put the 
milk, sugar and butter into a stew-pan, on the stove, and as soon 
as it begins to simmer, take off; put in the flour and stir the 
whole quickly, for about three minutes ; add the eggs gradually. 
The ginger should be cut into very small pieces ; grease the 
mould well, and pour in the batter ; steam it about one hour. 
Serve hot, with a custard sauce, seasoned with the syrup of 
ginger. This pudding can be made of pine-apple, chopped very 
fine. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

One half tea-cupful sago ; pour enough boiling water on to 
cover it, and let it stand fifteen minutes, then add one pint of 
milk, one tea-cupful sliced apples (good cooking apples) ; simmer 
the apples in a little water till tender ; one egg, sugar to the 
taste. Bake ; serve with sauce. — 3Irs, Barnes, Hot Springs, Ark. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Five table-spoonfuls of tapioca ; soak over night in one quart 
new milk, in the morning bring to a boil, then add one tumbler- 
ful of rich cream, one half tumblerful of wine, four eggs beaten 
separately, sugar and flavor to taste ; bake fifteen or twen-ty min- 
utes. When cold serve with cream, — 3Irs. Wash. FitMan. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Get the tapioca in lumps, put it in to soak over night ; then 
take one tea-cupful to a pint of new milk, sweeten and season 
to the taste ; one quarter of a pound of butter, four eggs well 
beaten (separately). Bake a half hour. — 3Irs. Ford. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak a cupful of tapioca (after washing it through several 
waters) in warm water three or four hours ; then pour over three 
pints of sweet milk, yellows of six eggs well beaten with ono 



rUDDING RECIPES. 85 



and one half cupfuls of sugar, one lialf tea-spoonful of salt, one 
lialf tea-spoonful of nutmeg; place ingredients in a pan and set 
it in another pan of bulling water on the stove, and let it cook as 
thick as custard ; then put it in the stove with something under 
it, to keep from scorching at the bottom ; let remain until it dries 
on top ; in the meanwhile, have a meringue made of the six 
whites and flavored to taste, pour on top and smooth over 
uicely. Brown slightly. — Mrs. Batterton. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One cupful of tapioca in a cupful of milk ; set it near the fire 
to swell ; stir often; add a cupful of cold milk, five eggs, two 
cupfuls of sugar, a little salt, one cupful of raisins ; spice 
delicately. — 3Ii<s Ilaives. 

SPONGE CAKE ROLL. 

Four eggs, beaten separately, one tea-cupful of sugar, one 
tea-cui^ful flour, one tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, mixed in 
flour ; one half tea-spoonful of soda, in a little water. Bake 
quickly in biscuit pan, turn out on damp towel, put in dressing 
and roll while warm. 

DRESSING FOR SPONGE CAKE ROLL. 

Take the pulp of three lemons and the rind of one, either 
grated or chopped very fine ; two table-spoonfuls of butter, six 
eggs beaten sej^arately, sugar to the taste, three fourths of a 
tea-cupful of cold water; put on the fire and stir constantly, 
until thick ; do not let it boil ; let it get cold, and use in place 
of jelly. — il/rs. Buchier Woodford. 

LEMON SPONGE CAKE PUDDING. 

One pint of white sugar, one quarter of a pound of buttei, 
three lemons, four Avine-glassfuls of water, yelks of four eggs ; 
cook down thick, and pour over sponge cake sliced in a pan ; 
beat the whites with two table-spoonfuls of white sugar to each 
white, and put it over the top of pudding ; let it remain in the 



86 



PUDDING RECIPES. 



stove just long enough to become a light brown. — 3Irs. Matt. 
Turncy. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Cut a sponge cake into four slices, across ; peel several 
oranges and cut them in slices, spread the bottom layer of cake 
with the oranges, cover with sugar, and so on, until you use all 
the layers ; make a meringue, smooth over the whole, and set 
in the oven to brown ; serve with sauce. — Mrs. Blanton. 

SCOTCH PUDDING. 

Five eggs, twelve sponge cakes grated, one tea-cupful of 
currants, one of raisins, one of sugar, one tea-spoonful of ground 
cinnamon, one table-spoonful of butter, three of marmalade, one 
tea-cupful of cream ; serve with or without sauce. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS OR MILK. 

Soak a tea-cupful of tapioca in one and one half pints of 
water over night. Pare and punch out the cores of ten apples, 
and fill the holes with white sugar. Grate lemon peel over 
the whole and pour one large coffee-cupful of boiling water over 
the apples. Then pour on the tapioca, having first thinned it to 
the consistency of custard, with boiling water. Bake one hour 
and serve with sugar and cream, or a butter and wine sauce. — 
Mrs. Charlton Alexander. 

COTTAGE PUDDI.NG. 

One cupfulsugar, one table-spoonful butter, two Qg^^, one 
cupful sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, or enough to make a 
tolerably stiff batter, one half tea-spoonful of soda, one of cream 
tartar, one of salt. Rub the butter and sugar together, add 
the two yelks of eggs, then the milk and soda, then salt, and add 
the two whites alternately with the flour ; bake in a mould. 
Serve with sauce. 



PUDDING RECIPES. 87 



WOODFORD PUDDING. 

Three eggs, one tea-cupful of sugar, one lialf tea-cupful of 
butter, one half tea-cupful of flour, one tea-cupful of jam or 
preserves, one tea-spoonful of soda dissolved in tlirec tea spoon- 
fuls of sour milk. Cinnamon and nutmeg to taste. Mix all 
well together and bake slowly in a pudding pan. Serve with 
sauce. — Mrs. Amos Turney, Jr. 

GERMAN PUFFS. 

One pint of milk, .two ounces of butter, five eggs, ten table- 
spoonfuls of flour. Bake in buttered cups. Serve with rich 
sauce. — il/rs. Amos Turney, Jr. 

PLAIN PUDDING. 

Four eggs beaten separately, one half pint of flour beaten in- 
to the yelks, alternately with the whites ; one quart of new 
milk, a small quantity of soda. — 3Irs. J. A. Uowerton. 

CAKE PUDDING. 

Spread sponge cake, cut in slices, with preserves or jelly. 
Take whites of six eggs beaten stiff with sugar, pour over cake ; 
set in stove to get thoroughly warm. — 3Iiss Halves. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE PUDDING. 

Heat three pints of milk to near the boiling point, stir into it 
the yelks of eight eggs, one large spoonful of corn starch, let it 
thicken a little, then sweeten and flavor to taste. Lay slices of 
sponge cake in a pudding dish, pour over them this custard ; let 
it bake, then have an icing made of the eight whites well beaten, 
and four table-spoonfuls of sugar; spread over the pudding when 
done, and brown slightly. — 3Iiss Ualleck. 

POUND CAKE PUDDING. 

One pound of sugar, two table-spoonfuls of butter, seven eggs 
(leave out five yelks), three and one half cupfuls of flour, one 
half cupful of sweet cream, one tea-spoonful of soda, two tea- 
spoonfuls cream tartar. — Jfrs. Geo. Davis. 



88 PUDDING RECIPES. 



CAKE PUDDING. 

One cupful of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, two cupfuls of 
sugar, five eggs, three and one half cupfuls of flour, one heaping 
teaspoouful of baking powder ; flavor to the taste. — 3Irs. Geo. 
Davis. 

MINUTE PUDDING. 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of flour, one half cupful of 
sour cream or buttermilk, three eggs, one half tea-spoonful of 
soda, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, a piece of butter the size 
of a large hen egg. Bake quickly ; serve with sauce. — Mrs. 
Crauford. 

SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

Weigh one pound of mashed potatoes, one half pound of butter, 
six eggs, one tea-cupful of cream, one half pound of sugar; 
spice and wine to taste. Serve with sauce. — Miss Hawes. 

JELLY ROLLS. 

Three eggs well beaten, one cupful of sugar, one and a half 
cupfuls of flour, two table-spoonfuls of sweet milk, half tea-spoon- 
ful soda, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar ; spread with jelly and 
roll. 

BISCUIT PUDDING. 

Twelve ounces of crumbled sponge cake, one pint of cream, 
twelve eggs, the rind of a lemon rubbed on sugar, four ounces of 
pounded sugar; pour the cream boiling on the crumbled cake, 
and let it steep for a few minutes ; then add the sugar, the eggs 
and lemon ; mix the whole together, pour the preparation into a 
mould spread with butter, and steam the pudding about one 
hour ; when done, dish up and pour custard sauce over it. 

JAM CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of flour, one and a half 
cupfuls of butter, one half cupful of buttermilk, two cupfuls of 
jam, six eggs, one tea-spoonful soda, one table-spoonful black 
pepper, one nutmeg grated, one ounce allspice, one ounce of 
cinnamon ; serve hot, with sauce. — Mvs. Jonaihan Oiven. 



PUDDING RECIPES. 89 



PRUNE MERINGUE. 

Put the prunes on in clear Avater and boil until soft, then 
take them out, and while warm, pour enough Madeira wine 
over (sweeten wine a little) to make a little syrup, as much as 
you wish ; froth the whites of seven eggs, in which put as much 
sugar as for icing ; put the prunes in a baking dish, smooth 
icing over them, and set in a moderate oven to brown slightly. 
—Mrs. Taylor. 

APPLE CAKE MERINGUE. 

Bake cake as for jelly cake, and have ready, apples strained 
through a colander, sweetened and seasoned to taste ; make 
several layers, having the layer of apples quite thick; cover the 
whole with a meringue of the whites of three eggs beaten stiff, 
one cupful of sugar, and the juice of one lemon. — 3Hss Spears. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 

Boil six or eight large apples till thoroughly done, strain 
through a colander ; sugar and nutmeg, or cinnamon to taste ; 
place the apples in a dish, and cover with the whites of three 
eggs, beaten to a stiif froth, into which has been stirred one cup- 
ful of sugar and the juice of one lemon. Bake a light brown. 
Serve cold, with or without sauce. — 3Ess K. Spears. 

OMELETTE SOUFFLE. 

Beat eight eggs separately very light, add gradually to the 
yelks three quarters of a pound of sugar, lemon to the taste ; stir 
in the whites lightly and bake quickly. Serve immediately, or 
it falls. 

APPLE SOUFFLE, 

Three pounds of acid apples, pared and quartered ; two lem- 
ons sliced with peeling on, two pounds of sugar ; cover well with 
water, and boil until the apples look clear ; lift them out to cool ; 
add one ounce of dissolved gelatine to the syrup, when it boils ; 
take out and strain over the apple-, and put in a cool place. 
Eaten with rich cream, whipped. — 2Ls. Blanton. 



90 PUDDING RECIPES. 



APPLE CREAM. 

Boil twelve apples till soft, take off the peel and press through 
a sieve ; add one half pound of sugar, whites of two eggs whipped. 
Beat together thoroughly, until it is very stiff and looks white. 
Heap up in a glass dish. 

APPLE DESSERT. 

Pare and core twelve apples, put in the preserving kettle, 
filling apples with sugar ; cover with one and one half table- 
spoonfuls tapioca, soaked over night in one quart of water ; 
juice and rind of one lemon ; cook till jellied. Eat with cream. 

CODDLED APPLES. 

Make a syrup of white sugar and water; throw in some 
stick cinnamon. Have the apples pared and the cores punched 
out. When the syrup boils, put in the fruit and let boil till 
tender. Nice dish for tea, to eat with cake. — 3Iiss Shoii. 

PEARS IN SYRUP. 

Pare and punch out the cores of firm, ripe pears. To two 
pounds of fruit, allow one pound of white sugar, add enough 
water to the sugar and boil, to form a syrup ; then put in the 
pears and boil till tender. Seal in jars, allowing an abundance 
of syrup, as the fruit absorbs it. — 3Iiss Sho7i. 

BLACKBERRY FLUMMERY. 

Four pints blackberry juice, three pints brown sugar, one 
pint rice flour mixed with one pint of cold water, stirred in — as 
thickened milk ; season with ground cinnamon. When done it 
will be the consistency of jelly. 

GOOD FRIDAY. 

One" half pound of chocolate, yelks of three eggs, one pint of 
cream or milk thickened with one table-spoonful of corn starch; 
boil up like a custard, then pour in a glass dish, and when cold 
beat the whites of the eggs with one half pound of sugar and 
put on the top. Serve cold. — 3frs. W. Payne. 



rUDDINO RECIPES, 91 



VIRGINIA PUDDING. 
Five eggs, reserving tlirce whites for sauce ; one pint of milk, 
one gill of cream or an ounce of butler, three table-spoonfuls 
of flour, a little salt ; bake one half hour. Sauce — Beat the 
three whites to a froth with one half pound of sugar ; flavor 
with wine or lemon. This is to be poui-ed on the pudding just 
before serving. Serve cold. — Mrs. Walter Payne. 

FRENCH PUDDING. 

One quart of sweet milk, ten heaping table-spoonfuls of flour, 
eight eggs, beaten separately and very light ; add the milk and 
flour gradually ; bake in a quick oven. Serve, with transparent 
sauce. — Mrs. George Davis. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

One half pint bread crumbs, one pound raisins, three pints ol 
boiled milk, six eggs ; pour the milk on the bread, adding one 
table-spoonful of ground cinnamon, one of mace, three of sugar, 
wine-glassful of wine or whisky, cream one half tea-cupful of but- 
ter with one tea-cupful of sugar. Serve with wine ; grate nut- 
meg on top. — Miss Nannie Abbott. 

VERY NICE PUDDING. 

The yellows of eight eggs, eight large spoonfuls of flour, one 
and one half pints milk ; beat and mix the yelks, flour and milk 
together ; have the Avhites beaten to a stifi" froth, and add the 
last thing. Bake rather quickly. — Miss Halleck. 

OXFORD PUDDING. 

One half pint bread crumbs, one \)mi milk, six eggs, two 
ounces butter, one half pint cream, one fourth pound currants 
or raisins, sugar and nutmeg to taste ; pour milk hot over the 
bread, add the butter, and Avhen cold add the Gggi^, stirring the 
whites in gently, last. Serve with or without sauce. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Make a light batter of three eggs, one cup of sour cream, a 
little soda and salt, flour to thicken ; take a half dozen ripe 



92 PUDDING RECIPES. 



apples, pare and chop fine, stir them in the batter, also a heap- 
ing table-spoonful of sugar. Have a frying-pan of hot lard, drop 
the mixture by spoonfuls; fry light brown. Sin-iukle with 
white sugar as they are taken up. — Miss F. SlioH. 

DELICIOUS FRITTERS. 

Take one quart of water and a piece of butter the size of a 
hen egg, boil a few minutes ; then stir in enough flour to make 
as thick as mashed potatoes ; pour this into a bowl and beat six 
eggs in it, one at a time ; add a little salt and nutmeg ; then fry 
in hot lard. 

FRITTERS. 

One quart of flour, one quart of buttermilk, two eggs and one 
half tea-spoonful of soda ; beat the eggs separately. Sift the flour 
and pour in the yelks of the eggs with the milk and a pinch of 
salt ; beat well and add the whites of the eggs last, and fry 
immediately in boiling lard till a light brown. 

Apple fritters can be made by the above directions, with the 
addition of ripe apples, chopped fine. — Kate Desha. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One pint of boiling water, melt in it one half pound of lard, 
and stir while boiling into this three quarters of a pound of flour ; 
boil until a thick paste is formed ; set the kettle in which you 
have the ingredients into a vessel of boiling water ; when, 
thick, take from the fire — when cool, add ten eggs and a little 
salt ; mix all well, drop with a spoon on buttered tins, some 
distance apart, and bake quickly. To be eaten with syrup. — 
Mrs. J. A. Hoivcrton. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound of raisins, one pound of currants, one half pound 
beef suet, one half pound of butter, one half pound of stale 
bread grated, one half pound of flour, eight eggs, one pound 
brown sugar, three quartei's of a pound of chopped apples, one 
glass Bourbon, one pint milk, one pint wine, two nutmegs 
grated, one table-spoonful mace, one of cinnamon, a pinch of 



rUDDING RECirES. 93 



salt ; cream, butter aiul sugar together ; heat eggs very light, 
separately ; add half milk to the -whites, stirring in flour and 
grated bread ; add creamed sugar and butter, then suet and 
fruit alternately, then spice and li(pior, then the balance of the 
milk, and stir the whole well together; if not stiff enougli, add 
flour or bread; boil six hours. — Bfrs. Judge Kinkead, Fayette. 

ECONOMICAL PLUM PUDDING. 

Two pints of flour, two tea-cupfuls of raisins, two of suet 
chopped fine, three of buttermilk, two of molasses, two tea- 
spoonfuls of soda (this pudding can be improved by the addi- 
tion of more fruit) ; boil or steam four hours. Serve with sauce. 
• — Mrs. Ann Ryland, Lexington. 

RAISIN PUDDING. 

One pound raisins, one pound sugar, one half pound butter, 
one pound flour, seven eggs beaten separately, one pint milk or 
cream, one wine-glassful wine or brandy ; flour the mould or 
bag and butter it well ; boil three or four hours. Serve with 
rich sauce. — Mrs. H. Buckner. 

RICE PLUM PUDDING. 

Three gills of rice, one quarter pound butter, one quarter 
pound sugar, one quart of milk, one tea-spoonful salt, six eggs, 
one and a half pounds raisins or currants, one half table-spoonful 
cinnamon, a little rose water, one grated nutmeg ; boil the rice 
with lemon peel in the milk, till soft ; mix butter, sugar and eggs ; 
dredge the fruit with flour and put in with the cinnamon, last; 
bake one hour and a half. — Mm E. 3Iitchcll. 

CREAM PUDDING. 

Four eggs beaten separately, one cupful of sugar, one halx 
cupful of butter, one cupful of sour cream, one cupful of sweet 
cream, one tea-spoonful of soda ; flour enough to make a batter 
as stiff" as for pound cake ; tea-spoonful essence of lemon. — Sallie 
Broo/cs. 



94 PUDDING RECIPES. 



THE QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

One pint bread crumbs ; add one quart of sweet milk, one cup 
sugar, yelks of four eggs, the rind of a fresh lemon, grated fine, 
a piece of butter the size of a hen egg ; bake till done. Beat 
the four Avhites to a stiff froth, adding onetea-cupTul sugar; stir 
in the juice of one lemon. When the pudding is baked, spread 
a layer of acid jelly over, then the meringue ; set in the oven to 
brown slightly. Serve with cold cream. — Mrs. Chambers Brent. 

THICKENED MILK PUDDING. 

One quart milk ; when it boils stir in enough flour to thicken 
it, like mush ; add a piece of butter the size of a hen egg ; when 
cold, add five eggs well beaten. Season to taste ; serve with 
sauce. — il/rs. Buckner. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

One pint rich buttermilk or sour cream, one tea-spoonful soda, 
two eggs beaten separately, two table-spoonfuls sugar and a 
little salt; stir in flour until as thick as batter for cakes. Grease 
a small baking pan and pour in half the batter, spread some 
fruit over it, either canned cherries or thinly sliced apples are 
nice, then add the reinainder of batter. Bake in a moderate 
oven ; serve hot, with rich sauce. — Miss Hallcck. 

SUNDERLAND PUDDING. 

Six eggs, three table-spoonfuls flour, one pint milk, a ])inch 
of salt ; beat the yellows well and add flour, then the milk, the 
whites last. Serve with sauce. — 31i$s H . 



SAUCES FOR rUDDlNGS EECrPES. 95 



SACrCJBS FOR FUOOIHGS. 



WHITE SAUCE FOR PUDDING. 

Whites of two unbeaten eggs and one cupful of white sugar 
beaten togetlier ; add one tea-spoonful of vinegar; beat well; 
then add three table-spoonfuls of wine, and just as it goes 
to the table, add two thirds of a cup of sweet cream or milk. — 
J/rs. Walter Payne. 

SAUCE FOR PLUM PUDDING. 

One coffee-cupful sugar, one of butter, beat well together ; 
break an egg in and mix well; put on the stove; stir till melted; 
add table-spoonful wine ; pour up immediately. — J/rs. Judge 
Kinkeacl, Lexington, Ky. 

WINE SAUCE. 

Three cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, one of wine. Set the 
cup in boiling water for one hour. — Miss Spears. 

COLD SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

Four ounces butter, six ounces sugar, the white of one egg, a 
wine-glassful of wine. Beat the butter and sugar until very 
white; beat the egg and add it, then the wine slowly; seasojti 
with fresh lemon or orange. — Jirs. Simms. 

SAUCE. 

One wine-glassful of thick paste made with corn starch ; let 
it cool ; a cupful of butter and one of sugar ; cream togetlu^r till 
soft. Put in with sugar and butter the yelk of one egg and 
mix well ; then add the paste and the white of the egg, beaten 
light; flavor to taste. — 3Irs. E. Lyle. 



96 CAKE EECIPE8. 



C :c!!l Jv ]K » 



CAKES. 

Use well balanced scales, as in cake-making much depends on 
the accuracy of the weights. If fruit is to be used, prepare it 
the previous day ; sift the flour well, and use sweet butter, which 
should be well washed in cold water, to extract the salt ; should 
cream of tartar or soda bi& used, sift carefully with the flour ; 
beat the yelks of eggs and sugar first, and then the whites, until 
they adhere to a knife blade or whisk; in cakes where butter is 
used the whites must be added last ; in sponge cake the 'flour 
should be beaten in last, adding but little at a time and beaten 
in on top, and not from the bottom. Never allow' the heat to 
diminish Avhile the cake is baking, or it will fall ; when the 
cake is done, it will leave the sides of the pan, or it may be 
pierced with a broom straw near the center, and if no batter 
adheres, it is done. Sponge cake requires a quick oven. Pound 
cake a moderate heat. Fruit cake should be baked more slowly 
still. Molasses cake is easily scorched. 

In baking cakes it is a good plan to fill a large pan with cold 
water and set it on the upper grate of the stove, to prevent 
them from burning or cooking too fast on top. Let it remain 
until the cakes are baked. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE. 

One and a quarter pounds of sugar, the whites of twenty eggs, 
ten ounces of flour, two tea-spoonfuls of cream of tartar, juice 



CAKE RECIPES. 97 



of one lemon; beat wliites until liglit ; add sugar; beat well ; 
add lemon juice ; mix cream of tartar with the flour and stir in 
the flour lightly; bake about an hour. — Mrs. Dr. Justice, 

WHITE SPONGE CAK^. 

Whites of twenty eggs, two goblets of flour, three of sugar, 
two tea-spoonfuls of lemon, one of cream of tartar; barely stir 
flour in ; bake quickly. This is the premium cake at the Bour- 
bon fair. — il/rs. Dr. L. D. Barnes. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE. 

Ten eggs (whites only), one and a half tumblers of sugar, one 
tumbler (heaping) of flour, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, one 
tea-spoonful essence of lemon. — Mrs. Wash. Fithian. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

Two eggs beaten separately, one cup (heaping) of flour, one 
cup of sugar, three fourths of a cup of sweet cream, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar ; beat hard for some 
time ; add whites the last thing. 

ICING FOR CAKE. 

Whites of three eggs well frothed, one pound of sugar wet 
with water, and boiled until almost candy. AVhile boiling, pour 
it over beaten whites ; flavor with lemon. — Mrs. Mary Duncan. 

YELLOW SPONGE CAKE. 

One pound pulverized sugar, half a pound of flour, twelve 
eggs, the juice and grated rind of one lemon ; use only four 
yelks; beat them until very light; then add the sugar and juice 
and rind of lemon ; beat this well, until it is bleached ; beat the 
twelve whites to a stifi" froth, and add them very gently to the 
yelks and sugar. At the last, sift the flour very lightly into 
the mixture. — Mrs. J. P., LexvAjton. 



98 CAKE RECIPES. 



YELLOW SPONGE CAKE. 

Three fourths of a pound of sugar, half a pound of flour, ten 
eggs (leaving out six yellows), the juice of one lemon. Put the 
flour in last. Beat the lemon juice into the yelks. — Mrs. Brutus 
J. Clay. 

YELLOW SPONGE CAKE. 

Use ten eggs, leaving out four yellows, and beating about half 
a tea-spoonful of tartaric acid into them. Add two tea-cupfuls of 
sugar, two tea-cupfuls of flour, and the whites of the eggs ; put 
in alternately with the flour. — 3Irs. JVilliam E. Shnms. 

SAVOY BISCUIT. 

Beat four eggs separately, then put them together and beat 
them again ; add a half pound of fine loaf sugar ; season with 
lemon. Lastly, quarter of a pound of flour stirred in slowly. 
Stir it all hard, and drop it on sheets of greased white paper. 
Put the cakes far enough apart not to run into each other ; 
sprinkle loaf sugar over the top ; bake quickly and roll them up 
while hot. They should be but lightly colored. — Mrs. J. H. 
Brent. 

WATER MELON CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, three and one 
half cupfuls of flour, one cupful sour cream, one tea-spoonful of 
soda. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream ; add flour, soda and 
sour cream ; lastl}^ the whites of eight eggs well beaten, and two 
drops of bitter almond. 

Measure out another portion as above, using the pink (or 
strawberry sugar) instead of the white, and the yelks of the 
eggs. Add raisins to the pink batter, to simulate seed ; pour 
boiling water over the raisins and let them stand to swell ; dust 
them with flour and mix in just befoi'e baking ; arrange the two 
colors in the cake-mould to suit foncy. 

POUND CAKE. 

Sixteen Avhites of egg, one pound white sugar, three quarters 
of pound butter, one pound flour. Cream butter ; then mix the 
sugar and put in flour and eggs alternately. Bake two hours. 



CAKE RECIPES. 99 



QUEENS CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, one pound currants, one 
half pound butter, five eggs, one nutmeg grated, one gill each 
of brandy and milk, one glassful of wine. — lUrs. Deigman. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One cupful butter, two of eugar, one and one half of pearl 
starch, tAvo cups of flour, one of sour cream, -whites of eight 
eggs, one tea-spoonful soda; dissolve the soda in a little whisky. 
— Mrs. Edwards. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, three quarters pound flour, one half 
pound butter, twelve eggs; cream the butter well ; Avork the 
flour into it, then the sugar, and whites alternately. — Mrs. Brent. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One cupful butter, three of sugar, three heaping cupfuls 
flour, Avhites of ten eggs, one tea-spoonful soda ; dissolve in one 
cupful sweet cream, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar ; flavor to 
the taste. Bake quickly. — 3Irs. Will Taylor. 

CHARLOTTE POLONAISE. 

Beat yelks of six eggs with two large spoonfuls of corn starch ; 
add one and one half pints cream ; boil slowly (stirring all the 
time, to prevent it from becoming lumpy) until it is thick, and 
perfectly smooth. Then divide the mixture, and to one half 
add from four to six ounces of chocolate, accoi'ding to taste ; 
SAVeeteh agreeably ; break uj) one quarter pound of macaroons 
into it ; give it a " boil up '' and set aside to cool. Have ready 
for the other half of cream mixture about one dozen bitter al- 
monds and one quarter pound SAveet almonds, blanched and 
pounded to a smooth paste Avith one quarter pound pounded 
citron ; stir in about one quarter pound sugar ; let it come to a 
boil; set aside to cool. 

Bake a sponge cake in jelly cake-moulds, and spread one cake 
Avith the chocolate mixture and another Avith the almond, pil- 



100 CAKE RECIPES. 



ing them up ; then cover the whole with a ineruiguc, and set 
in the stove to harden and brown very slightly. — Hiss Lucy 
Graddy 

WHITE CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three quarters pound 
of butter, the whites of fifteen eggs in summer (sixteen in win- 
ter), two thirds of tea-spoonful of soda, one tea-spoonful of 
cream of tartar. 

Hoiv to Mix It. — First, beat half of the whites to a stiff froth; 
add the sugar ; cream the butter thoroughly, and mix in the 
flour; put the soda and cream of tartar both in the flour; sift 
two or three times, then put all together, and beat well ; have 
the other half of the whites well frothed, and add, the last 
thing. — Miss Lutie J. Sinedley. 

AMBROSIA CAKE. 

Having made white cake, take for the filling one cup of but- 
ter, one cup of sugar, juice of three lemons. Cook until the 
consistency of honey ; spread between the cake as for jelly cake. 
— Mrs. J. A. Howerton. ■ • 

MRS. CLAY'S PREMIUM CAKE. 

Fourteen eggs — whites only, one pound of sugar, three fourths 
of a pound of flour, a half pound of butter; whisky and lemon 
to taste. 

WHITE CAKE. 

* 

Nine eggs — wdiites only, three tea-cupfuls of flour, two tea- 
cupfuls of sugar, three fourths of a tea-cupful of butter, half a 
tea-cupful of cream, half a tea-spoonful of soda, one and a half 
tea-spoonfuls of cream of tartar. — 3Irs. Jonathan Oiven. 

BEAUTIFUL WHITE CAKE. 

Five pints of flour, three and a half pints of sugar, whites of 
twenty-four eggs, a heaping pint of butter, three table-spoonfuls 
of whisky. Bake quickly. — Mrs. Alice Garrett. 



CAKE RECIPES. 101 



WHITE CUP CAKE. 

Ten eggs, four cups of flour, three of sugar, oue of butter, 
one tea -spoonful of cream of tartar, half of soda, stirred in dry 
flour, half tea-cupful of morning's milk. — 3Irs. N. B. Eio7i, Jr. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of twenty-four eggs, two cupluls of butter, four cup- 
fuls of sugar, six cupfuls of flour, one tea-spoonful of soda, two 
of cream of tartar ; cream the butter and sugar together; beat 
the whites to a stiff* froth ; add the flour alternately with the 
whites ; dissolve the soda in a little sour cream, and mix the 
cream of tartar in the flour. — 3Irs. J. A. Howerton. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of thirteen eggs, five tumblers of flour, two and a half 
of sugar, one of butter, one of sour cream, one tea-spoonful of 
soda. — 3I)'s. Oiarlcs Dcnirjlicriy. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, three fourths of a 
cup of butter, one of sour cream, four of flour, two tea-spoonfuls 
of baking powder. — Mrs. J. Z. Croxton. 

A NICE FLAVORING FOR CAKE. 

One tea-spoonful of lemon acid (juilverized) and one table- 
spoonful of brandy, mixed. — Mrs. Cunningham. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of .seventeen eggs, three quarters of a pound of butter 
(lightweight), onepound of sugar; beat butter and sugar together 
till very smooth andlight; one pound of flour (light weight), one 
level tea-spoonful of soda, two tea-spoonfuls of cream of tartar. 
W^hen the cake is all mixed, sift in the soda and cream of tartar ; 
mix the flour and eggs in alternately. — Mrs. W. IF. Fisher. 

WHITE CAKE, 

One half pound butter, one pound sugar, three quarters of a 
pound flour (good weight), whites of fourteen . eggs ; one half 
tea-spoonful soda, one tea- spoonful cream tartar. — Mrs. RobeH 
Stoner. 



102 CAKE RECIPES. 



WHITE CAKE. 

Oue pound flour, one pound sugar, Avliites of fourteen or fif- 
teen eggs, five eighths pound butter, one tea-spoonful bakhig 
jjowder put in flour. This cake will fill a two-pound mould if 
l)roper]y baked. 

A nice fruit cake can be made of this by the addition of oue 
half pound of raisins. — 3frs. Georgie Keller. 

TiP-TOP CAKE. 

Two eggs, one and one half cupfuls sugar, one tea-spoonful 
soda dissolved in a cujiful sweet milk, two and one half cupfuls 
flour, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, two table spoonfuls 
melted butter. — T'mnie. 

RICH FRUIT CAKE. 

^ One pound flour, one pound sugar, one fourth pound butter, 
thirteen eggs, two pounds raisins, two pounds currants, one of 
citron, wine-glassful brandy, two of wine, one nutmeg, tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon ; flour fruit well. Beat the eggs, into 
which stir all the ingredients ; bake three hours. — 3Irs. James 
Hughes. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
One pound of sifted flour, three fourths pound of butter, one 
pound of white powdered sugar, one dozen eggs, beaten sepa- 
rately, one pound of raisins, one half pound candied citron, 
one half pound almonds in the hull, one fourth pound figs, 
one fourth pound cream nuts, one wine-glassful of brandy, one 
ounce pulverized cinnamon, one fourth of cloves, allspice, 
mace and nutmeg. Cut the fruit, n^t too fine, adding the 
whites of eggs last. Bake in a slow oven. — Mrs. C. Harrison. 

TWO-POUND CAKE BY MEASURE. 

The whites of twenty-four eggs, seven tea-cupfuls of flour, four 
and one half of granulated sugar, two tea-cui^fuls of butter, one 
of sweet milk, a heaping tea-spoonful of cream of tartar. Have 
the pan warm and bake as quickly as possible. — Mrs. Dr. Justice. 



CAKE RECIPES. 103 



COCOANUT CAKE. 

Three cupfuls white sugar, one cupful butter, the whites of 
six eggs, five cupfuls of sifted flour, one cupful of milk, one 
cocoanut grated fine, one half tea-spoonful soda, two tea-spoon- 
fuls of cream of tartar mixed in the flour. Flavor with wine or 
brand}'. — 31rs. Diegman. 

SPRINGFIELD CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of 
flour, three eggs, one wine-glassful of wine, one of milk, one tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar, one half of soda. — Mrs. JBlanton. 

ECONOMICAL CAKE. 

One large cupful sugar, one half cupful butter, one cupful 
sour cream or milk, three and one half cupfuls of flour, one tea- 
spoonful soda, two of cream of tartar. — Miss Ilcdleck. 

TEN MINUTE CAKE. 

Two eggs, two tea-cupfuls sugar, two thirds of a cupful but- 
ter, one tea-spoonful soda, one of cream of tartar in one cupful 
sweet milk, and flour enough for batter. 

GINGER SPONGE CAKE. 

Half pint of molasses, one cupful butter, one cupful of sour 
cream, one table-spoonful of ginger, one tea-spoonful of soda, 
three eggs, five cupfuls of flour, one tea-spoonful cinnamon. — 
2Iiis Mary liedmon. 

SOFT GINGER CAKE. 

Two eggs, one tea-cupful sugar, one tea-cupful molasses, one 
tea-cupful buttermilk, one half tea-cupful butter, four tea-cup- 
fuls flour, one tea-spoonful soda, one table-spoonful ginger. — 
Mrs. Will Taylor. 

EXTRA GINGER CAKE. 

One and one half pints molasses, five table-spoonfuls ginger, 
one nutmeg grated, one and one half tea-spoonfuls of pulverized 
cloves, one and one half of cinnamon, one half tea-spoonful salt. 



104 CAKE RECIPES. 



two tea-spoonfuls sorla, one tea-cupful of lard, one and one 
half tea-eupfuls sour cream, six eggs well beaten, flour suffi- 
cient to make a stiff batter. Bake in tin or stove pans. It 
should be thoroughly beaten — the more the better; bake in a hot 
oven. — Mrs. Morroiv. 

SUPERIOR GINGER LOAF. 

Five tea-cupfuls of flour, one tea-cupful of brown sugar, two 
tea-cupfuls molasses, two tea-cupfuls sour cream, one tea-cupful 
of butter, six eggs, two table-spoonfuls of ginger, two of cinna- 
mon, two tea-spoonfuls of mace, one of cloves, one of soda, one 
pound of currants, one pound of raisins. — Mrs. John Ray. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

Whites of twenty-four eggs, two cupfuls butter, five cupfuls 
sugar, seven cupfuls flour, one tea-spoonful of soda, two of 
cream of tartar, and, if you like, add two pounds citron, half 
cupful of whisky or brandy. If wanted for fruit cake, add two 
pounds each kind of fruit. For flavoring a bride's cake, use the 
grated rind and juice of four large oranges. — Mrs. W. Jones. 

CORN STARCH BRIDE'S CAKE. 

Whites of fourteen eggs, four cupfuls of flour, one cupful of 
starch, three cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one cupful 
of sweet cream or milk, a half tea-spoonful of soda, one tea- 
spoonful cx'eam of tartar. — 3Hss 3Iattie Clay. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three quarters of a 
pound of butter, the whites of eighteen eggs; flavor with lemon ; 
beat very light. — Mrs. Geo. Davis. 

WHITE CUP CAKE. 

One and a half cupfuls of butter, whites of fifteen eggs, five 
and a half cupfuls of flour, three cupfuls of sugar, three table- 
s])oonfuls of buttermilk, half a tea-spoonful of soda; beat very 
light. — 3frs. Geo. Davis, 



CAKE RECIPES. 105 



STARCH CAKE. 

Three cofFee-cupfuls of butter, six of sugar, three of new milk, 
nine of flour, three of corn starch, four tea-spoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, two of soda, and the whites of eighteen eggs. Weight, 
three pounds. — 3Irs. James Hughes. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Three cupfuls of white sugar, one cupful of butter, three 
fourths of a cupful of milk, four cupfuls of flour, whites of ten 
eggs, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, a half tea-spoonful of 
soda ; mix butter and sugar, then eggs and flour alternately, 
then add milk ; beat w^ell ; mix cream of tartar and soda with 
flour. Bake in shallow tin pans. 

ICING FOR MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Whites of three eggs ; stir in sugar enough to make it stiff; 
put in a little tartaric acid to dry the icing ; flavor both icing 
and cake with Burnett's extract lemon. Spread icing between 
the cakes. — 3Irs. Dr. R. M. Adair. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Two thirds of a cupful of butter, whites of nine eggs, two cup- 
fuls of white sugar, four cupfuls of flour, half a cupful of milk, 
one tea-spoonful of baking powder. Divide in four parts and 
bake in jelly cake pans. For the Ichig — One pound of pulver- 
ized sugar, whites of four eggs. Dissolve one tea-spoonful of 
citric acid in two dessert-spoonfuls of alcohol, and add, after 
the icing is well beaten. Put in a little indigo, and flavor with 
lemon. Let the cakes cool before icing. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One cupful of corn starch, two cupfuls of flour, one cupful of 
butter, two cupfuLs of sugar, whites of seven eggs, nearly one 
cupful of rich cream, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, half a tea- 
spoonful of soda. The Icing — Beat the whites of four eggs ; 
boil one pound of sugar until it sinks in water ; then pour slowly 
over the egg; beat all the Avhile until nearly cold. Melt the 
chocolate in some of the egg and put in according to the taste. — 
Mrs. Taylor. 



106 CAKE RECIPES. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two cupfuls sugar, one cupful butter, three eggs, three cup- 
fuLs flour, three fourths of a cup of milk, half a tea-spooiiful of 
soda, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING FOR CAKE, 

Two ounces chocolate, one cup of sugar, three fourths of a cup 
of sweet milk ; boil till thick ; when cold put between cake. 

A GOOD CUP CAKE. 

Four cupfuls of flour, two of sugar, one of butter, one of 
buttermilk, five eggs beaten separately and very light, and one 
tea-spoonful soda. Bake in a quick oven ; when cold, ice it, and 
and cut in squares. 

Icing. — Boil one tea-cupful sugar to a thick syrup, and stir 
into the whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff" froth ; flavor with 
lemon. — 3frs. Geo. Davis. 

CUP CAKE. 

Six eggs, two tea-cupfuls sugar, one cupful butter, one cup- 
ful sour cream, three cupfuls flour, one half tea-spoonful' soda, 
one tea-spoonful cream of tartar. — Mrs. Allen Bashford. 

PUFF CAKE, OR CUP CAKE. 

Six eggs, three cupfuls sugar, two cupfuls sweet milk, one 
cupful butter, five cupfuls flour, two tea-spoonfuls soda, four 
tea-spoonfuls cream tartar, two tea-spoonfuls lemon extract. 

CUP CAKE. 

The "whites of eight eggs, four cupfuls flour, two cupfuls 
sugar, one cupful butter, one cupful sweet milk, two teas-poon- 
fuls of cream of tartar, one tea-spoonful soda ; beat butter and 
sugar together, until very light ; then add the flour and milk, 
then the eggs. Sift the soda and cream of tartar with the flour 
two or three times. — Mrs. Mary Ray. 

SMALL CUP CAKE. 

Two eggs, two cupfuls of flour, one cupful white sugar, one 



CAKE RECIPES. 107 



half cupful butter, one half cupful sweet milk, one tea-spoonful 
creain of tartar, half tea-spoonful soda, one tea-spoonful of 
vanilla. — Mrs. J. Hughes. 

NUT CAKES. 

One pound of nut kernels, one pound of sugar, whites of six 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth, two table-spoonfuls flour. — Miss Fan- 
nie Shropshire. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Take one quarter pound sweet almonds and one ounce of bit- 
ter almonds (or peach kernels), blanch and pound them one at 
a time, pouring on them occasionally a few drops of rose-water. 
Grate almonds on a small nutmeg grater, which is much less 
trouble than pounding them. Use three quarters of a pound of 
butter, one pouml of sugar, one pound of flour, the whites of 
seventeen eggs ; mix the butter, sugar and almonds first, then 
add flour and eggs, little at a time. — Mrs. Wash. Fithian. 

ROSETTE CAKES. 

Three eggs beaten lightly, three heaping tea-cupfuls of flour, 
three tea-cupfuls of sweet milk, one half tea-spoonful salt, a 
piece of butter the size of an egg ; let the pan be hot and well 
greased before pouring the batter hi, then bake twenty minutes. 
This quantity will make three dozen ; bake in muffin irons. — 
3Iiss Nannie. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls sugar, three and one quarter 
cupfuls of flour, one scant cupful of milk, five eggs, leaving 
out the whites of three ; grate the rind of two large oranges 
into the cake mixture with a part of the juice. Strain the 
rest of the juice irrto one pound of sugar ; have the whites of 
three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. When the cakes are cool, 
spread icing between, as in mountain cake. — Mrs. Hattie Kenney. 

GOLDEN CAKE. 

One pound of flour dried and sifted, one pound sugar, three 



108 CAKE RECIPES. 



quarters jjouncl butter, yelks of fourteen eggs, the rinds of two 
lemons grated, also the juice. Beat the sugar and butter to a 
cream, and add the yelks, well beaten and strained ; then add 
the lemon peel and flour, and one tea-spoonful of sal volatile 
dissolved in a little hot water. Beat well, and before putting 
into the oven add lemon juice, beating it in thoroughly. Bake 
in flat pans ; ice it immediately. — 3Iit>s Mary Eechnon. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

Half pint of molasses, one tea-cupful of brown sugar, half a 
tea-spoonful of soda, a little salt, two table-spoonfuls of ginger, 
one cupful of lard. Warm the molasses, stir soda in it, then 
the sugar ; mix all together, and roll out thin. — Mrs. George 
Davis. 

HARD GINGER CAKE. 

Six pints of flour, one pound of sugar, one pint of molasses, 
one pound of butter, five table-spoonfuls of ground ginger, one 
tea-spoonful of soda in six table-sj)oonsfuls of buttermilk. Mix 
well together ; roll out thin and bake quickly. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 

One and a half pounds of sugar, one and three quarter pounds 
of flour, one pound of butter, six eggs. Roll very thin and 
bake in a quick oven. — 3frs. George Davis. 

JUMBLES. 

Three cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one cupful sweet 

cream, three eggs, a half tea-spoonful of soda, two of cream of 

tartar, sufficient flour to roll nicely ; season Avith lemon. — Mrs. 

J. A. Howerton. 

JUMBLES. 

Two eggs, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, a little nutmeg, 

a half tea-spoonful of soda, half a cupful of butter ; stir in the 

flour until it will roll ; cut in round shapes with a hole in the 

center ; roll them in sugar. — Mrs. George Davis. 

DOUGH NUTS. 

Two jwunds of flour, one pound of sugar, a half pound of 
butter, six eggs ; flavor with rose water and spice. 



CAKE RECIPES. 109 



SUGAR DROP CAKES. 

One pound of sugar, whites of ten oggs, and yelks of seven, 
one pound of flour. Mix the sugar and yelks, then the flour, 
stirring the whites in last ; beat well, and drop thin on buttered 
paper. — ^frs. George Davis. 

CREAM CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two of sugar, three and a half of flour, 
one cupful of cream or rich milk, four eggs, one tea-spoonful of 
cream of tartar, a half tea-spoonful of soda. — 3Irs. Hughes, Phil- 
adelphia. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs, four cupfuls of flour, three cupfuls sugar 
(light measure), two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, one tea-spoonful extract of lemon. 

CREAM CAKE. 

For Cream — Two eggs, one cupful of sugar, two table-spoon- 
fuls of corn starch ; beat all together. Boil one pint of inilk, 
and season with vanilla bean ; just as the milk boils stir in the 
mixture, stirring all the time, until it thickens ; before it cools 
stir in a table-spoonful of butter. 

For Cake — Three eggs and one cupful of sugar beaten 
together, a half tea-sjioonful of soda dissolved in a tea-cupful of 
milk, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar and a little salt sifted 
with the flour, one and a half cupfuls of flour ; put in soda 
last. Bake in a very quick oven, in jelly cake pans, fifteen min- 
utes. This quantity makes three layers of cream and four of 
caie. Two or three table-spoonfuls of cream improves the cake. 

SILVER CAKE. 

One half pound of butter well creamed, one pound of sugar, 
the whites of fourteen eggs, three quarters of a pound of flour, 
one half tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, and one half tea-spoon- 
ful of soda. Beat the eggs to a stiff" froth, mix the butter, 
sugar and eggs ; sift carefully the cream of tartar and soda into 
the flour, which should be beaten in very lightly at the last. — 
Mrs. Brutus Clay. 



110 CAKE RECIPES. 



SILVER CAKE. 

Whites of six eggs, cream one tea-ciipful of butter, two of 
sugar, one of sweet milk witli one half tea-spoonful of soda, 
one tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, two full cups of flour. Bake 
quickly. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Three cupfuls of flour, two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
butter, one half cupful sour cream, four eggs and one tea-spoon- 
ful of soda. Beat the sugar and butter together, and break the 
eggs into it one at a time ; then add the flour, then the sour 
cream with the soda. 

For the Chocolate. — Use one quarter of a cake of chocolate, 
one cupful of milk, one cupful molasses, one cupful of water, a 
piece of butter the size of an egg, flavor with vanilla, and boil 
down until quite thick. — 3Iiss L. WilUcmis, Lex. 

SNOW BALL CAKE. 

One tea-cupful white sugar, one half tea-cupful butter, one 
half tea-cupful sweet milk, two cupfuls flour. Whites of three 
eggs beaten to a stiff" froth, one half tea-spoonful soda, one tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar, sifted with the flour. Boat butter and 
sugar thoroughly together, add the eggs, then the flour, then 
the milk and soda. — Ilrs. J. M. Jones. 

PORTUGAL CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of dried and sifted flour, a 
half pound of butter, whites of sixteen eggs, two table-spoonfuls 
of rose water, one pound of raisins, three tea-spoonfuls of the 
extract of nutmeg, one and a half pounds almonds (weighed 
before shelling), blanch and grate them, or pound in a mortar. 
Roll the almonds in part of the flour and stir them in just before 
baking. — Mrs. Wornall. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cupful of butter, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one cupful of molasses, one cupful of strong coffee, five cupfuls 



CAKE RECirEP. 1 1 I 



of Hour, one cupful raisins, one level tea-spoonful of soda, stirred 
into the molasses; nutmeg, allspice and cinnamon to the taste. 
Bake slowly. A little whisky improves it. — Mrs. Will Taylor. 

SPICED CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, three fourths of a i")ound 
of butter, six eggs, one table-spoonful powdered cinnamon, one 
of allspice, one of cloves, one wine-glass of brandy. Beat the 
butter and sugar together, add eggs and flour gradually, the 
brandy and spice alternately, and just befoi-e putting it into the 
stove dissolve a tea-spoonful of soda in a small tea-cupful of 
sour cream. Beat well before placing in mould. Bake as pound 
cake. — Mrs. Bijland. 

MARBLE CAKE, 

Whites of seven eggs, three tea-cupfuls sugar, one tea-cupful 
butter, four tea-cupfuls flour, one tea-cupful sour cream, a half 
tea-spoonful of soda. 

SPICED CAKE. 

Yellows of seven eggs, two tea-cupfuls brown sugar, one tea- 
cupful molasses, one tea-cupful butter, five tea-cupfuls flour, one 
tea-cupful sour cream, one tea -spoonful soda; spices to taste. — 
Mrs. Henry Buckner. 

BLACK AND WHITE MARBLE CAKE. 

"Whites of eight eggs, one half cupful butter, one of white 
sugar, one half of sour cream, two of flour, one tea-spoonful of 
cream of tartar, one half of soda. Yelks of four c^^i^, tea-cupful 
of brown sugar, one half cupful of molasses, one half of sour 
cream, two of flour, one half tea-spoonful of soda, one of cinna- 
mon, cloves, allspice, one quarter pound citron cut in slices. 
Mix in alternately, or have one half black and the other 
white- -J/iss. Iva McCarney. 

NICE TEA CAKES. 

One pound flour, one half pound of butter, one pound sugar, 
three eggs, one half tea-spoonful of soda in a half tea-cupful of 
sour cream or buttermilk, one nutmeg. — Mrs. J. P., Lexington. 



112 , CAKE RECIPES. 



TEA CAKES. 

Three eggs, three tea-cupfuls sugar, one tea-cupful butter or 
lard, one tea-cupful of buttermilk, one tea-spoouful soda dissolved 
in the railk, a tea-spoouful of ciuuaixion and nutmeg, flour 
enough for a stiff dough. — 3Irs. Eyland. 

TEA CAKES. 

Two and three quarter pounds of flour, one pound sugar, 
three quarters of a pound of buttei*, six eggs, three and one half 
tea-spoonfuls powdered hartshorn. Mix sugar and butter, and 
then beat in the eggs, three at a time. Dissolve hartshorn in 
one half tea-cupful warm water, and mix in with the flour ; roll 
and cut thin. — 3Irs. Barclay. 

DELICATE TEA CAKES. 

The whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one cupful 
white sugar, one half cupful sweet milk or cream, one tea-spoon- 
ful cream of tartar, one half tea-spoonful soda, two and one half 
cupfuls flour, a tea-spoonful of pounded or grated almonds, one 
half cupful butter. — Mrs. Turner. 

BLACK CAKE. 

Two and one half jiounds of butter, two and one half pounds 
of sugar, two dozen eggs, two pounds flour, two and one half 
pounds of currants, the same quantity of raisins (stoned and 
chopped), one pound of citron, one pound blanched or pounded 
almonds, one table-spoonful of cinnamon, one dessert-spoonful 
of mace, the same of cloves and nutmeg, one tumblerful of wine 
and brandy mixed. Brown the flour, mix with yeast, and luke- 
warm milk ; let it rise over night, then mix as for fruit cake. 
Mix the flour with new milk into a stiff dough, using one quarter 
pound of the butter, and a large tea-cupful of yeast; set it to 
rise the night before ; next morning cream butter and sugar 
together ; mix tlie yelks after being Avell beaten with the butter ; 



CAKE RECIPES. 113 



then adil the risen dough, working with the hands till perfectly, 
smooth ; add the spices and whites ; lastly, the fruits that have 
been rubbed iu flour. Bake three and one half hours. — Soutli 
Carolina. 

SUPERIOR BLACK CAKE. 

Ten eggs, one pound flour, one pound sugar, three fourths of 
a pound butter, two and one half pounds of raisins, one and one 
half of currants, thi-ee quarters pound citron, one half tea-cupful 
molasses, a gravy-spoonful of mixed spices, cinnamon, allspice, 
mace, nutmeg, one tumblerful of whisky or brandy, one half 
tumblerful of wine and a wine-glassful of rose water ; also one 
quarter pound of pounded almonds. — Mrs. SalUe Walker. 

BLACK CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, one and one quarter pound 
butter, thirteen eggs, three pounds raisins, two pounds of cur- 
rants, one pound of citron, one wine-glassful brandy, two of wine, 
one nutmeg, one tea-spoonful cinnamon, one half tea-spoonful 
mace and cloves (each). Just before putting into the stove, stir 
in a small tea-cupful of vinegar, Avith a tea-spoouful soda. — Mrs. 
Henry C. Buckner. 

BLACK CAKE. 

One pound of browned flour, one of butter, one of brown su- 
gar, twelve eggs ; beat butter and sugar to a cream ; having beat- 
en the eggs well, stir them in alternately with the flour ; add, 
gradually, two pound of raisins (dredged with flour), two pounds 
of currants, two table-spoonfuls of cloves, two of cinnamon, one 
of mace, two nutmegs, one tumbler of molasses, and one of 
brandy. Slice one pound of citron thin ; put a layer of batter 
in the mold, then several slices of citron, and so on till filled. 
Bake in a moderate oven four hours. — Mrs. Allen Bashford. 

CHOCOLATE OR JELLY CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, three of flour, three 
fourths of a cup of sour cream or milk, three eggs, one tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar, a half tea-spoouful of soda. 



114 CAKE RECIPES. 



Filling for the above Calce.— Two ounces of cliocolate, one cup- 
ful of sugar, three fourths of a cupful of sweet milk ; boil half 
done. — 3Iiss McCarneij. 

JELLY CAKE. 

Three and a half cupfuls flour, two and a half of sugar, one of 
butter, whites of twelve eggs, one tea-spoonful of soda, two tea- 
spoonfuls of tartaric acid. When the batter is well mixed, 
powder the acid very fine, sprinkle, and beat in well. — Mrs. Mary 

Cunningham. 

JELLY CAKE. 

Ten whites or five whole eggs, three tea-cupfuls of flour, two 

of sugar, one of butter, a half tea-cupful of sweet milk or 

cream, one tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, a half tea-spoonful 

of soda. — Mrs. Johnson Rogers. 

BISCUIT A LA CREME. 

Six ounces sugar, eight eggs, one pint cream, four ounces 
flour. Beat the cream, adding eight yellows ; the sugar and a 
little vanilla to flavor ; then beat the eight whites and mix with 
the other ingredients. Make small paper moulds, and bake in a 
moderate oven. Serve with any kind of jelly. — C. Hegman. 

WINE CAKE. 
One pound sugar, ten ounces butter, eight eggs, one pound 
and ten ounces of flour, one pennyweight of soda and two of 
cream of tartar, three fourths of a pint of milk, and lemon juice. 
Beat butter and sugar till light, adding eggs gradually ; then the 
milk, lemon juice, cream of tartar, soda, and flour. Dust the 
cake-moulds with sugar ; pour in the batter and bake in a mod- 
erate oven. — C. E. F. Ilcgman. 

CREAM CAKES, 

One pint milk, half jiound butter, twelve ounces flour, ten 
eggs. Place the milk and butter in a stew-pan ; when it boils 
stir in the flour ; keep it on the fire and stir constantly till the 
dough loosens from the bottom of the pan ; then add eggs. 
Bake in a hot oven in buttered pans. Cut open and fill with 
lemon cream. — C. E. F. Hegman. 



CAKE RECIPES. 115 



LADY CAKE. 

One and a half pounds sugar, one pound butter, one and a half 
pounds flour, one pint Avhites of eggs ; add almonds and lemon 
juice. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, adding gradually 
the eggs, the lemon juice and almonds ; then the flour as gently 
as possible. Bake in a moderate oven. — G. E. F. Hegman. 

MORAINES, 
Half pound almonds, ten yellows, a half pound of butter, 
twelve ounces sugar, two ounces citron, a half i>ound of flour, 
one pint of cream. Mash the almonds with the eggs in a mor- 
tar ; mix with all of the above ingredients ; beat the ten whites 
to a stiff froth ; mix all Avell together. Bake in small fluted 
moulds in a moderate oven. — C. E. F. Hegman. 

MILLE-ANS CAKE. 
A half pound of butter, half pound of sugar, half pound of 
flour, two ounces orange peel, two ounces almonds, a little lemon 
peel grated, four eggs ; beat butter and sugar very light, add 
the eggs, then the other ingredients. Bake in buttered pans, in 
a moderate oven ; do not set them too near each other, as they 
will spread. — C. E. F. Hegman. 



116 FILLING FOR CAKE RECIPES. 



Fl£^t.lHG FOR C^J^lS^u 



A BEAUTIFUL COLORING FOR CAKE. 

Equal portions of alum, cream of tartar, and cochineal, pounded 
fine and dissolved in water. — Mrs. Mat. Scott. 

ICING MADE WITH GELATINE. 

Two table-spoonfuls gelatine, one half pint of boiling water ; 
put on the stove and let it boil till well dissolved. Strain the 
mixture before using; pour it gradually on icing sugar, making 
a stiff paste. Season to taste. — Mrs. Smith Hawes. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Beat whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, gradually add three 
tea-cupfuls white sugar; beat very hard ; then add grated choco- 
late according to taste. — Mrs. Jones. 

LEMON JELLY. 

To put between cakes. Three ounces of butter, four eggs, 
four lemons; all the juice and the grated rind of two only, 
three fourths of a cupful sugar ; mix well together ; put in a pan 
and let it come to a boil ; be careful to stir all the while, or it 
may scorch. When cold, spread between cakes. — 3Iiss Mattie 
Clay. 

CREAM FILLING FOR CAKES. 

Boil nearly a pint of milk ; then stir into it two table-spoonfuls 



PILLING FOE CAKE RECIPES. 117 

of corn starch moistened with a little milk, two eggs, one cup- 
ful of sugar ; when nearly done add one half cupful of butter 
and flavor to taste. 

FILLING FOR JELLY CAKE. 

One quart of new milk, whites of five eggs, eight table- 
spoonfuls of flour, stirred and boiled to a thick paste. — 3Irs. Al- 
len Bashfonl. 

ICING TO PUT BETWEEN JELLY CAKES. 

Whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth, three tea-cup- 
fuls sugar ; pour over sugar one half pint of boiling water; let ib 
boil to the consistency of candy, then pour into the whites 
slowly, stirring all the while ; put between the cakes while 
warm ; season icing with anything you choose. — J/rs. John Bay. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

To be put between cake. Dissolve one cupful of sugar in 
the juice of one large lemon ; beat three eggs light, add and mix 
well ; put a piece of butter the size of a Avalnut in a pot over a 
fire ; when melted pour over the above, and cook till very thick, 
stirring constantly. 

MIXTURE FOR CAKE. 

Soak two boxes of gelatine one hour in as much water as 
will cover it ; heat a cupful of sherry wine, add the gelatine, 
and stir till dissolved ; beat the whites of ten eggs to a stiff" 
froth, add to this two cupfuls of sweet cream, well beaten ; stir 
in enough sugar to SAveeten, add one table-spoonful of vanilla; 
strain in the wine and gelatine when cool, but not stiflf; then add 
two grated cocoanuts, reserving enough to sprinkle on top of 
the cake. 

CUSTARD-SUBSTITUTE FOR JELLY. 

In one half jiint of sweet milk boil one inch of vanilla bean , 
dissolve two table-spoonfuls of corn starch in three table-spoonfuls 
of milk ; stir it with the half pint, sweeten to taste, and boil, 
stirring to prevent lumps ; spread between the layers of cake, 
when cold. 



118 FILLING FOR CAKE RECIPES. 

ANOTHER SUBSTITUTE FOR JELLY. 

Make au icing with three quarters of a pound sugar and whites 
of three eggs ; spread the cake with icing ; tiien sprinkle grated 
cocoanut on ; smooth Avith a knife, and so on till all the layers 
are used. loe the top and put iu to the stove a few minutes to 
harden. 



CUSTARD RECIPES. 119 



ClQST AR OS- 



WINE JELLY. 

Two pounds of sugar, oue pint of wine, one pint of cold 
Avater, one package of gelatine, juice of two lemons, grated rind 
of one, one quart of boiling water, one tea-spoonful of ground 
or a handful of stick cinnamon. Soak the gelatine in cold wa- 
ter ; add sugar, lemons and cinnamon ; pour on a quart of boil- 
ing water, and stir until the gelatine is perfectly dissolved. Put 
the wine in, and strain through a flannel bag. Wet the moulds 
with cold water and set away to cool. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

One half gallon morning's milk ; put into a kettle and allow 
to come merely to a boil. Have ready six eggs beaten lightly, 
sweetened with one coffee-cupful of sugar; strain through a fine 
towel on to the eggs and sugar, stirring rapidly. Scour the ket- 
tle nicely, and put the custard back on the fire and let it stay a 
few minutes, or until it scarcely boils, stirring gently, to prevent 
burning. Pour into a bowl and dip it up with a large ladle, 
pouring it up and down, until it is nearly cold. Froth one pint 
rich cream and put over the top. Season all with vanilla. — 
3Trs. 31aHln. 

TRIFLE. 

Soak sponge cake in wine, and pour over it some custard. 
Sweeten rich cream, Avhip to a froth, and lay on the top. 



120 CUSTARD RECIPES. 



SOLID CUSTARD. 

Three eggs, beaten separately, one pint morning's milk, one 
half ounce gelatine, sugar to taste, flavor with vanilla. The 
gelatine is dissolved in the milk, which pour while boiling upon 
the yelks, and stir till cool. Beat three whites to a stiff froth, 
and stir in ; mould and serve with cream. 

COLD CUSTARD. 

Two quarts of milk, two table-spoonfuls of liquid rennet. 
Season with vanilla. Make it two hours before using, and do 
not disturb it after the rennet is mixed in well. — 3frs. J. H- 
Brent. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

Two large lemons, three tea-cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of 
water, one half cupful of butter, five table-spoonfuls corn starch, 
six eggs ; slice the lemons and put them in the water ; let 
them boil till the strength is extracted, then dip them out and 
strain the water ; beat the yellows, butter and sugar together, 
and pour the water over them. Return to the fire and when 
ready to boil, stir in the starch. Beat the whites to a stiff" froth 
and stir in lightly after it is taken off* the stove. — Miss Belle 
Croxton. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Dissolve one ounce of gelatine in one pint of milk, by boiling; 
beat the yelks of four eggs (sweetened), and stir them in while 
the milk is on the fire; when this is cooked to the consistency of 
custard, strain into a bowl, stirring constantly. Season one half 
gallon cream with wine ; whip to a stiff" froth and beat it in, just 
as the custard (which should be seasoned with vanilla or rose 
water) begins to congeal ; have ready a glass bowl lined with 
sponge cake. — 3Irs. Brutus Clay. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

One quart of morning's milk, four 3'elks, sweetened to taste; 
boil till thick, care being taken to prevent curdling. When 
cool, season highly. Froth three quarts of rich cream and let it 



CUSTARD RECIPES. 121 



drain. Pour a little cold water over a box of Cox's gelatine 
and let stand about twenty minutes ; then pour over it a tea- 
cupful of boiling water, and set on the stove till thoroughly 
molted. "When milk-warm, stir it into the custard ; as soon as 
it begins to congeal, stir in the whipped cream very quickly ; be 
careful not to beat it. Be sure to stir the custard well from the 
bottom and sides, to prevent becoming lumpy. — Mrs. Mollie 
TalboU. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Dissolve in a pint of boiling water one ounce of gelatine 
(Cox's is best) ; boil until thoroughly dissolved. Beat the yel- 
lows of four eggs ; pour the gelatine upon them, stirring quickly ; 
pour both through a strainer upon half pound of sugar. Stir 
until cool and about to congeal ; then put in the whips from a 
quart of rich cream. Season to taste while the custard is cool- 
ing. 

FARINA CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Two quarts new milk, four eggs, two tea-spoonfuls farina, one 
half wine-glassful of whisky, one and one half tea-cupfuls of 
sugar ; beat the eggs, sugar and farina together till perfectly 
smooth ; pour the rafilk boiling upon it ; then cook till thick 
enough ; stir all the time. Season to taste. — 3Irs. Jonathan 
Owen. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE WITHOUT MOULDING. 

IMake a custard with the yelks of three eggs, a pint of morn- 
ing's milk in which a vanilla beau has been boiled ; sweeten to 
taste. Dissolve one half ounce of isinglass in one half pint of 
warm water and stir it into the custard. When the custard is 
cool enough, stir in a quart of rich cream that has been well 
whipped, and seasoned with wine and sugar. Put into a glass 
bowl before it is congealed ; lay on the top lady-fingers, and 
just before serving. beat the whites of three eggs to a froth, 
mix with whipped cream, and pile on top. In summer use more 
isinglass. 



122 CUSTARD RECIPES. 



VELVET CREAM. 

One coffee-cupful of wine, one half a box of gelatine, the 
juice and grated peel of one lemon, one and one half pints of 
milk and one coffee-cupful of sugar. Dissolve the gelatine in 
the wine over the fire, grate in the peel and add the juice of 
the lemon, and after it has dissolved, add the sugar; let it 
simmer, then strain ; add the milk and stir till cold, then put 
into a mould ; set in a cool place to congeal. — Mrs. Jones. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Pour one pint of cold water over one box of Cox's gelatine and 
let it stand one hour. Then add one and one half pints of 
boiling water, two tea-cupfuls of sugar ; when nearly cold flavor 
with vanilla ; churn up oue half gallon of rich cream and beat 
the froth into the jelly when almost cold. — Mrs. Harry Brent. 

FLOAT. 

Take whites of six eggs, five table-spoonfuls of acid jelly, and 
three table-spoonfuls sugar ; beat together untillight. Have a 
bowl three fourths full of well frothed cream, which has been 
flavored with wine and sweetened to taste ; place lightly on top 
of the first preparation. — Mrs. Eyland. 

BAKED CUSTARD. 

Beat six eggs ; sweeten to taste ; boil half a gallon of morn- 
ing's milk, let it cool, and then pour it over the eggs, stirring 
well. Pour into the baking dish and set in a pun of hot water 
to bake. Grate nutmeg on top. Serve cold, with cream, or 
without, as you prefer. — Mrs. M. T. Scott. 

BIBAVO. 

Boil for a few minutes, in one pint of Avater, one ounce of 
isinglass, one fourth of a vanilla bean, and a half pound of 
sugar. When the mixture is lukewarm, stir in three pints of 
thick cream, first beaten to a thick froth. Pour into a mould 
or a bowl. 



CUSTARD RECIPES. 123 



IRISH MOSS BLANC MANGE. 

Soak for geveral hours half a tea-cupful of Irish moss, chang- 
ing the uiitcr, drain -well, shaking the water from it. Put it into 
u kettle Avith half a gallou of new milk flavored with vanilla and 
sweetened to taste ; let it boil five minutes ; strain and pour into 
moulds. — 3Irs. Cunningham. 

ISINGLASS BLANC MANGE. 

Boil two ounces of isinglass in one and a half pints of new 
milk ; strain and pour iu one pint of cream, sweetened to taste; 
add one cup of rose water ; let it boil to the top of the kettle 
once, and let it settle ; then strain and pour into moulds. — il/rs. 
Cunningham. 

BLANC MANGE. 

Blanch one ounce sweet almonds, and one ounce of peach ker- 
nels ; when perfectly dry, grate them ; then mix with one quart 
of cream or milk; put into a pan with one ounce of isinglass; 
add the juice of a lemon; set on the stove and stir constantly, 
till the isinglass is dissolved; add eight ounces of sugar; re- 
move the scum as it rises. Strain through a sieve into a mould; 
set on the ice till ready for use. 

IRISH CREAM. 

Grate the rind and squeeze the juice of one orange into 
enough sugar to sweeten three pints of ci'eam ; whip to a froth. 
Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a pint of water, and just 
before it congeals, stir it into the whipped cream. — Miss Ella 
Harrison. 

AMBROSIA. 

Slice oranges or pine-apples in a glass bowl ; sweeten well , 
have a layer of the fruit and a layer of grated cocoanut, and 
so on, until the bowl is full. Grate cocoanut on toji. — Miss 
Elhert. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve one ounce of gelatine in one pint of water. Beat 
up the whites of six eggs, and after the gelatine has thorouglily 



124 CUSTARD RECIPES. 



dissolved, poiu* on it one pint of boiling water ; then stir in one 
pound of sugar and the juice of four lemons ; beat all together; 
continue beating until it begins to thicken ; then pour into a 
bowl ; afterward serve with sweetened cream, seasoned with wine 
and nutmeg. — 3frs. Dr. Powell, Louisville, Ky. 

ROCK CREAM. 

One tea-cupful of boiled rice, whites of six eggs, beaten stiff 
and sweetened to taste ; add three table-spoonfuls sweet, rich 
cream last. Flavor to taste. — J/rs. Hamilton. 

ANGELS FOOD. 

Beat the whites of six eggs to a froth ; a table-spoonful of 
powdered sugar to each white ; into which beat a red jelly, to 
give it a pretty color. Whip a pint of cream, sweetened and 
seasoned to taste. Pour the first preparation over it. Serve 
with cake. — il/rs. 3Iary White. 

ORIOLE'S NEST. 

Mould blanc mange in egg shells, having emptied and washed 
as many of them as will make a pretty nest. Having made a 
stiff jelly, partly fill a bowl with it, and place the egg shapes up- 
on it in such a Avay as to look well when turned out. All 
around and over the eggs, place long strips of preserved orange 
rind, to resemble straw. Melt a cupful of the jelly, reserved 
for the purpose, and pour over the whole. After it is thoroughly 
congealed, turn out upon a glass dish. 

ISINGLASS CREAM. 

Use three quarts of new milk, one quart of water, with five 
ounces of isinglass dissolved in it (which when cool pour into the 
milk), sixteen yelks of eggs, two and a half pounds of sugar, 
one glass Madeira wine ; mix them well, put through a jelly-bag, 
and mould. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

With one pint of cream mix six ounces of powdered loaf 



CUSTARD RECIPES. 125 



sugar, the juice of two lemons, and two glasses of white Avine. 

Add another pint of cream*, and stir the whole very hard ; boil 

two ounces of isinglass with four small tea-cupfuls of water, 

until it is reduced to one half; then stir the isinglass, lukewarm, 

into the other ingredients, and set aside to congeal. — il/rs. J. H. 

Brent. 

CALVES' FOOT JELLY. 

Split four feet and put the whole into a stewpan; pour one 

gallon of cold water over; boil till reduced to about one half 

then strain through a sieve, to remove the bones. When settled 

and cold, take off the grease from the surface and boil again 

with the following mixture ; six eggs, whipped in a little water, 

two pounds of sugar, and the juice of four lemons; stir all AveU, 

removing the scum as it rises. When thoroughly skimmed, set 

by the fire and pour one pint of Madeira, or any other kind of 

wine or liquor into it ; filter through a flannel bag. 

CALVES' FOOT JELLY. 

Cook the feet to a jelly, pour oflT the liquor, and put it to cool ; 
next day skim it carefully, and to one gallon of jelly add four 
pounds of sugar, the juice of twelve lemons and the sliced peel 
of two, the w'hites of twelve eggs well beaten, and the shells 
crushed, two or three sticks of cinnamon, three pints wine, a 
little brandy, if you wish it highly colored. Boil all together 
for some moments, then strain carefully through a flannel bag. 
— Mrs. J. P., Lexington. 

GELATINE JELLY. 

Upon a box of gelatine pour one pint of cold water ; let it 
stand until dissolved ; then pour on three pints boiling water, 
two pounds white sugar, one and a half pints wine, juice of three 
lemons and rind of two. Sti-ain through a flannel bag. — 3Irs. J. P. 

ISINGLASS JELLY. 

One quart of water, a half pint of Madeira Avine, two 
ounces isinglass, a half pound of sugar. Put the isinglass 
in cold water, and let it dissolve ; put in the above ingredients 



126 CUSTARD RECIPES. 



with the juice of two lemons. Let it boil gently five minutes, 
that it may throw up all the scum, which should be removed ; 
then strain through a flannel bag. It can be colored pink by 
the addition of a little cochineal. 

RUSSIAN JELLY, 

Put two thirds of the above colored isinglass jelly into a basin, 
partially imbedded in rough ice ; then whip the jelly with a whisk, 
until it assumes the appearance of a substantial froth and begins 
to thicken, when it must be immediately poured into a mould 
and kept in ice until served. 

ORANGES WITH TRANSPARENT JELLY. 

One half dozen perfect oranges. Make a hole at the stalk 
with a circular tin cutter, one half inch in diameter. Use a 
small spoon to remove all the pulp and loose pith from the in- 
terior ; then soak the oranges in cold water one hour, rinse again 
in cold Avater and drain on a cloth ; then set them in a deep pan, 
and surround with ice. Fill three with bright pink jelly, and 
the remainder with plain jelly. When it has become firm, wipe 
the oranges and cut into quarters. Serve on a glass stand. 



RECIPES FOR ICES. 121 



I C ]cj S « 



COCOANUT CREAM. 

Free the nut from the hull, grate the kernel, which, with the 
milk of the cocoanut, pour into one gallon of cream, which has 
already been pai'tially frozen. Freeze until hard. — J/i'S. R. A. 
Grimes. 

JERUSALEM CREAM. 

Grate tine not quite two cakes of chocolate, boil five minutes 
in one quart of new milk, stirring all the time ; let it become per- 
fectly cold ; add one gallon of rich cream made quite sweet. 
Freeze. 

ICE CREAM. 

Two quarts thick cream, one pound sugar, one pint new 
milk, into which cut a vanilla bean. Put on the fire, allowing 
milk and bean to boil .slowly; strain through a wire sieve, 
permitting the small seeds of the bean to fall into the cream. 
When it becomes cool, whij) all to a froth and freeze, cutting 
it down frequently as it freezes. — Mrs. Edward Taylor. 

ALMOND CREAM 

Blanch and pulverize one quart of almonds ; this should be 
done in a mortar, and a little new milk added to reduce the 
nuts to a fine paste. Use this with one gallon of cream, mixing 
the almonds in when the cream is nearly frozen. — 3Irs. P. T. 
Allin, Sr. 



128 RECIPES FOR ICES. 

ICE CREAM. 

One quart cream, one pint milk, pinch of Irish moss; wash 
the moss, put it in the milk, set it on the stove and stir until 
it becomesthick; strain through a sieve; set it on ice ; sweeten 
and flavor to taste ; then pour it into the cream, which has been 
2)reviously put into the freezer. 

LEMON CREAM. 

Pour two pounds sugar in one quart cream, grate the peel, 
and squeeze in the juice of eight large lemons, and add to sugar 
and cream. Let it stand two hours, then strain carefully and 
freeze. — Mrs. Payne. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD FROZEN. 

Break up and cook to a smooth paste, in water, one half pound 
of chocolate (Mailh^rd's vanilla chocolate is the nicest). Put one 
half gallon of new milk into a bain-marie ; when it comes to a 
scald, stir in the chocolate, then add four eggs (having first 
beaten them separately), carefully stirring all the time. Have 
in the freezer one quart of cream that has been beaten to a stiff 
froth, then add the chocolate custard, also a light half pound 
of sugar. 

BISQUE GLACE. 

]\Iake a rich ice cream ; take fresh egg kisses, and dry well ; 
roll fine, and as the cream freezes stir in. — Mrs. Cunningham. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Rub a pint of ripe strawberries through a sieve ; add one pint 
sweet, rich cream, sweetened with four ounces of powdered sugar. 
Freeze. — Miss Ella Mitchell. 

CARAMEL CREAM. 

Make a rich custard of one pint of morning's milk and six 
eggs. Have ready one and one quarter pounds of brow'n sugar, 
toasted (be careful not to burn it). Stir the sugar into the 
custard while both are hot. This will flavor one gallon of cream. 
— Mrs. W. Jones. 



RECIPES FOR ICES. 129 



CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 

To one gallon of cream, four tabic spoonfuls sweet chocolate; 
mix tiie chocolate like starch, and pour into the cream ; sweeten 
to taste and freeze. — Mrs. Taylor. 

ICE CREAM. 

To one half gallon cream, one ounce gelatine dissolved in a tin 
cup of water (cold). Put on the stove ; stir till it comes to a 
boil ; take it off and let it cool. Pour it into the cream ; stir 
constantly and thoroughly or it will become lumpy. — Mrs. W. 
Jones. 

BISQUE GLACE. 

One half gallon of cream, one and one half dozen macaroons 
(the macaroons must be stale, or if not, dried in the stove) ; 
pounded fine. Pour a little cream over them, and allow to 
stand until they soften; beat until very fine ; then add remainder 
of the cream, and freeze. It is not well to have the macai'oons 
too thick in the cream. — Mrs. W. G. Talbot. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 

Make a custard of one pint of milk, one i">int of cream and six 
eggs ; sweeten to taste. Beat smooth half a pound of almonds, 
add rose water to the almonds ; mix one quarter pound of raisins, 
seeded, one fourth of a pound of currants, an ounce of citron. 
Flour these well ; pour the custard (hot) over the fruit ; mix 
thoroughly ; when cool, add a pint of whipped cream. — Mrs. J. 
A. Howeiion. 

ICE PUDDING. 

Boil one and a half pints new milk with one tea-spoonful of 
gelatine ; beat five eggs, and mix them with the milk as for cus- 
tard. Use a tin mould with a cover ; oil it, and line with can- 
died fruits, such as plums, gi-een gages, etc. ; then pour the 
custard in very gradually, that the fruit may remain at the bot- 
tom. Put on the cover, and bury the mould in ice for a whole 
day, only turning it out the moment wanted. — Mrs. W. Jones. 



130 KECIPES FOR ICES. 



NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

Prepare a custard of one pint of cream, a half pint of milk, 
a half pound of sugar, an ounce of sweet almonds pounded, 
yelks of six eggs, half a stick of vanilla. Put them into a pan 
over slow fire ; stir until of the proper consistency, being careful 
not to let it boil. When cold, add a wine-glassful of brantly. 
Partially freeze ; then add one fourth pound of raisins, and a 
half pound of preserved fruit, cut small. Mix well, and mould. 
— 3frs. Green Clay. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

The day before you wish to use the pudding, seed two ounces 
of raisins, wash two ounces of currants, cut up two ounces of 
candied citron, two ounces candied ginger, pine-api)les, and any 
kind of fruit — candied peaches, apricots, cherries, orange peel, 
or plums. Pour over this fruit three wine-glassfuls of Maraschino 
cordial, and let it soak all night. Blanch four dozen large 
chestnuts, or almonds, in boiling ■water, and place them in the 
oven to dry ; w'hen cold, pulverize in a mortar with a half 
pound of sugar and a vanilla bean ; sift through a fine wire 
sieve. Have in a stew-pan one quart of boiling milk ; beat the 
yelks of twelve eggs until light ; then beat in the sugar, nuts, 
and bean ; stir all in the boiling milk. Let this mixture boil 
until it begins to thicken, then strain through a fine sieve; when 
cold, put it in a freezer, and freeze partially. Whip four pints 
of thick cream and stir it into the custard with the fruit already 
prepared ; also, mash up macaroons or meringues, and stir in 
at the same time. Freeze all -well together. — Mrs. Carrie Pres- 
ton Thornton. 

TOUTE FRUITE. 

One pint milk, one quart cream, yelks of five eggs beaten 
light with sugar, three cupfuls sugar, juice and grated peel of 
one lemon, a glass of light wine, one pound crystalized fruit, 
chopped; heat milk almost to boiling, and pour slowly over eggs 
and sugar, beating all together ; return to fire and boil ten miu- 



■RECIPES FOR ICES. 101 

utcs. AVhon cold, beat in cream, and half freeze before stirring 
in the finely chopped fruit, which beat in with the lemon and 
wine; cover, and freeze hard. 

TOUTE FRUITE. 

Blanch four dozen sweet almonds ; when cold, put them in a 
mortar with one pound of sugar and half of a vanilla bean ; 
|jound them well together and pass through a sieve into a sauce- 
pan, with the yellows of twelve eggs ; beat all well together and 
pour on them a quart of boiling milk, mixing well ; then stir 
over the fire until it thickens ; Avhen cold, freeze. Have two 
ounces currants, two ounces raisins, four ounces citron soaked in 
two wine-glassfuls of sherry the previous day. Beat one dozen 
meringues with one quart of whipped cream ; mix in the pre- 
pared fruit and stir into the frozen custard, and freeze again. 
— Mrs. A. Garrett. 

MADEIRA WINE SHERBET. 

Make a sweet sangaree of the best wine ; mix it with the white 
of an egg, well beaten, and freeze. 

ROMAN PUNCH ICE. 

Make one quart of sweet lemonade and freeze ; whip whites 
of four eggs to a froth ; mix sugar into it, as for kisses. AVhen 
the ice is beginning to settle, work this into it ; when almost 
hard enough put one glass of Jamaica rum into it, and mix well. 
— Miss Mary J. Eedmon. 

CHAMPAGNE ICE. 

Proceed as for Roman punch ; flavor it with a small bottle o^ 
champagne wine. 

PINE-APPLE ICE. 
. To a two-gallon freezer, one bottle of pine-apple ; make a 
rich syrup of three pounds of sugar ; use boiling water ; pour this' 
warm over the juice, and put all into the freezer. After it is 
well chilled, stir in the whites of five eggs beaten to a stiff" froth. 
The pine-apple should be chopped very fine. — 3Irs. Buckner. 



132 RECIPES FOR ICES. 



PINE-APPLE ICE. 

Two cans of fresli pinc-applcs ; chop the fruit very fine ; add 
the juice of two lemons, four tea-cupfuls of sugar, a half gallon 
of boiling ■water. When cold, add whites of two eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth, and freeze till firm. — Miss Kate James, Maysville. 

LEMON ICE. 

Eight fresh, juicy lemons ; roll tiU well bruised, and squeeze 
out the juice; add enough white sugar to make a thick syrup, 
also, a pint of cold water. Let this come to a boil, then set 
away to cool ; add water enough to make a good strong 
lemonade, then put into the freezer ; when nearly frozen, add the 
whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth ; stir well, and freeze 
till firm. — Miss Florence Short. 

SHERBET. 

Two cans of pine-apple, six lemons, whites of six eggs, five 
pints of water ; sugar to taste, 

SHERBET. 

One gallon of boiling water poured over a dozen lemons, let 
stand till cold ; then press all the juice into the water ; add 
three pounds of sugar, and the whites of twelve eggs while 
freezing. — Miss Kate Sjyears. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

For one gallon of sherbet, one and one half dozen oranges, 
three pounds of white sugar, nine eggs (whites only), tartaric 
acid to taste. Grate enough of the rind to make the sugar straw- 
colored when mixed with the oranges ; of this sugar make one 
half gallon of syrup, and pour it over the juice and pulp of the 
minced oranges ; add to this one quart of cold water ; strain into 
the freezer. When frozen to a mush, add the eggs well beaten ; 
finish as in any other sherbet. — Jean H. Daviess. 

RASPBERRY ICE. 

The juice of ripe rasjjberrics and a little water ; sweeten to 
taste. Add the juice of lemon ; strain the mixture through a 
fine sieve into a frcezei', and freeze. 



JKLLY FOR MEAT RECIPES. 1-'^' 



JB3L.Xuir FOR MBAT. 



JELLY FOR MEAT. 

Apple jelly can be colored red with liquid cocbiueal. 

WHITE PIPPIN APPLE JELLY. 

Prepare the apples, by peeling and coring, then drop into 
cold "water. Have a large flat tin pan on the stove with one 
quart of boiling water ; slice the apples quite thin, and drop in 
to the boiling Avater. Cook until tender; then strain without 
pressing through a colander, afterward through a flannel bag. 
Allow two pints of sugar to three pints of juice. Boil fifteen 
minutes quite rapidly. — 3Irs. Nortlicutt. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Gather the currants when just ripe. Pick them carefully 
from the stem ; press them thoroughly with the hands and strain 
(without pressing) through a flannel bag. One pound of sugar 
to one pint of juice. Put the juice into the kettle, and let it 
almost come to a boil : skim several times and then put in tlie 
sugar. Boil rapidly a few minutes. This makes the fairest 
jelly, but the quantity is not so great as when the currants are 
heated before straining. — ^J)•s. Martin. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY, 

Put in to a kettle and cover them with water; boil until they 
crack open ; strain thnugh a flannel bag. To each pint of juice, 
one pound of sugar ; boil hard fifteen minutes ; skim well. 
When done, put into glasses before it cools. — Mrs. Alice Garrett. 



134 JELLY FOR MEAT RECIPES. 

RASPBERRY JELLY. 

Take equal quantities of raspberries aud currants, one pound 
of sugar to one pint of juice. Make according to tlie recipes 
already given. Blackberry jelly can be made in same way. 

GREEN GRAPE JELLY. 

Pick the grapes from the stems, and put into a tin bucket 
that will hold about two quarts ; add a pint of cold water. 
Place this bucket in a vessel of boiling water, and leave till the 
fruit is thoroughly scalded. Press very gently through a flan- 
nel jelly bag. To one pint of juice, add one pound of white 
sugar ; boil ten minutes ; boil a pint at a time, and use a porce- 
lain-lined kettle. This will be light green or yellow. By add- 
ing a handful of ripe fruit, it will make a delicate pink. 



CONFECTIONERY RECIPES. 135 



COHFBCTIOH]BRir 



COCOANUT DROPS. 

One pound of grated cocoanut, one half jiound of white 
powdered sugar, whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Drop 
on buttered pans and bake. 

WHITE CREAM CANDY. 

Put eight pounds fine white sugar into a pan, and add one tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar ; pour over enough water to dissolve 
it. Melt in water a little Prussian blue, to color the sugar blue- 
white ; pour into the above and boil till done. Then pour it on 
a marble-top stand that has been Avell oiled ; turn the edges 
over into the middle, and form into the shape of a ball; fasten 
it to a hook driven into the wall; pull candy toward you, 
throwing it on the hook each time ; continue until perfectly 
Avhite ; then pull out into a long roll, and cut into sticks the 
required length. Flavor with vanilla. — Pliilip Nippert. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One half pound Baker's chocolate grated, one half pound 
butter, one half pint milk, three pounds brown sugar, one half 
bottle of vanilla. Stir the ingredients well, and cook for thirty 
minutes, stirring all the time ; add the vanilla a few minutes 
before taking off the fire. — 3Iiss Hanson. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One coifee-cupful rich cream, one cofi'ee-cupful brown sugar, 



136 CONFECTIONERY RECIPES. 

one of molasses, a j^iece of butter the size of a hen egg. Boil 
all twenty minutes ; then add seven even table-spoonfuls grated 
chocolate and boil until done. Pour into a buttered dish, and 
as soon as of the right consistency, cut or mark into squares. — 
Mrs. W. Jones. 

CREAM CANDY. 
Three pounds granulated sugar, one pint cream, one half pint 
water, two table-spoonfuls cider vinegar, one table-spoonful of 
butter. Boil very quickly; Avhen just done and ready to pour 
out, put in one tea-spoonful of vanilla. — 3Irs. Georgia Keller. 

CANDY. 

Four pounds sugar, water to dissolve, one tea-cupful of vine- 
gar, one large tea-spoonful of salt. Boil all together fifteen min- 
utes ; add two tea-cupfuls of cream, one eighth of a pound of 
butter; flavor with vaniiUi. — 3Irs. James Hughes. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

One cocoanut grated ; tlie whites of four eggs beaten to a 
stilF froth, one half pound sifted white sugar ; flavor with rose- 
water or lemon ; mix welh Have ready writing jjaper, well 
greased, with which to cover the bottom of baking-jjan ; drop 
the mixture in, in small heaps, an inch a part. Bake in a quick 
oven. When beginning to turn yellow, remove from the fire. 
— 3Jiss Ella Mitchell. 

COCOANUT PVIERINGUE. 

One pound powdered sugar, the whites of nine eggs beaten to 
a stiff froth. The sugar should be- worked in slowly, with a 
wooden spoon. Have ready a pan well greased and floured. 
Drop a. table-spoonful and sprinkle well with grated cocoanut. 
Bake in a slow oven, until a nice brown. — il/iss Fannie Shrop' 
shire. 

MERINGUES. 

Beat the whites of ten eggs to a stiff froth ; add slowly ten 
table-spoonfuls of granulated sugar, finely powdered ; when well 



CONFECTIONERY RECIPES, 137 

beaten togetlici-, and quite stiff, drop in the form of an eixg on 
to paper well buttered ; lay the paper on a tin pan in a warm 
oven ; when a light brown, take out, and remove with a spoon all 
that which is not baked ; tliis must be done carefully. Fill 
with whipped cream already sweetened and flavored ; lay two 
together. — Mrs. J. A. HoweHon. 

SIDE DISH OF ORANGES. 

Peel oranges nicely, and put them in melted isinglass ; then 
roll them in sugar. 

CHOCOLATE EGG KISSES. 

One pound of powdered sugar, whites of six eggs, two ounces 
grated chocolate ; mix the chocolate very gently and as quickly 
as possible, otherwise it will cause the mixture to become too 
liquid, if worked too much. Bake in a cool oven, in buttered 
pans, until solid. — C E. F. Hegman. 

MERINGUE. 

Whites of six eggs, one pound of powdered sugar, vanilla to 
taste. Beat the wliites to a stiff froth and gently mix the sugar 
in ; add the vanilla to eggs ; bake in a cool oven, in buttered 
pans. — C. E. F. Hegman. 

MIRLETONS AUX-AMANDES. 

One fourth of a pound of macaroons, two ounces almonds, a 
half pound sugar, quarter pound butter, whites of five eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, and a little vanilla. Line small patty- 
moulds with a thin layer of puff paste ; mash the macaroons and 
almonds ; mix with the other ingredients. Bake in a hot oven. 
Serve hot or cold. — C E. F. Hegman. 

FRANGIPANE A LA CONCURS. 

One quart of milk, a half pint of good brandy, one and a half 
pounds sugar, one quarter pound corn starch, eighteen eggs, 
a half pound of butter, two lemons. Line an earthen dish with 
puff paste ; boil the milk ; mix in a dish the eggs, sugar, 



138 CONFECTIONERY RECIPES. 

corn starch, the juice a.nd raid of the lemons, and the butter, 
heated. When the milk boils up, mix all and stir in briskly, 
until it thickens. Take off the fire, and stir in the brandy ; let 
it cool, and then pour into the paste. Bake in a hot oven ; 
serve hot, with wine or brandy sauce. — C. Ilegman. 

TARTLETTES MARIN. 

Make a round bottom from confectioner's paste ; bake half 
done in a moderate oven ; then take out and spread with crab 
apple jelly ; cover with meringue-; grate chocolate over, and 
then strew on grated almonds ; dust the whole with powdered 
sugar ; set in a moderate oven to brown slightly. — C. E. F. 
Hegman. 

MERINGUE TARTS. 

Make a small bottom of confectioner's paste ; bake in a mod- 
erate oven half done ; then spread a meringue over it with cur- 
rant jelly in the center; brown slightly. — C. E. F. licgmaii. 

MERINGUE PIE. 

Place a thin layer of puff paste in the pie-pan, and bake 
well; fill with quince marmalade; put a meringue over and 
brown slightly. — C. E. F. Ilegman. 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 

Place a thin layer of puff paste in the pie-pan, and bake ^\ell; 
then fill with lemon cream, made thus: one quart milk, a half 
jiound of sugar, quarter pound corn starch, six eggs, four lem- 
ons. Grate the lemons ; mix the juice with the sugar, corn 
starch and eggs ; put the milk on the fire ; while boiling add 
the above ingredients ; stir constantly and very rapidly until 
thick. — C. E. F. Hegman, 

WHITE TAFFY CANDY. 

Six pounds of white sugar, one half pound butter, one tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar ; boil until it cracks ; jiuU till light and 
Avhite. Flavor with vanilla. — FhUip NifpcH. 



CONFECTIONERY RECIPES. 139 

BROWN TAFFY. 

Six pounds New Orleans sugar, water sufficient to dissolve, 
half pound of butter; boil until it cracks ; when almost done 
stir constantly, to prevent burning. When done, pour on mar- 
ble and pull till a light brown color ; arrange in broad strips on 
the table. When cold, break into pieces. Flavor with lemon 
oil. 

ALMOND CANDY. 

Take any quantity of sugar, and boil until it cracks, using a 
little cream of tartar to prevent graining. Batter a marble 
slab, and place on it four pieces of iron or small bars, to prevent 
the sngar from running off the stone. Pour on the candy ; 
sprinkle with almonds ; cover the almonds again, etc., etc., 
making it as thick as you wish. When nearly cold, cut into long 
narrow strips. 

BURNT ALMONDS. 

Sift all the dust from one pound of almonds, add one pound 
of sugar, and place on the fire to boil until it cracks ; take off and 
stir with a spatula, that the sugar may grain and become hard 
and dry ; then put all into a coarse wire sieve and sift off all tlie 
loose sugar ; also, separate those which stick together ; put the 
almonds into the kettle and return to the fire, stirring until brown ; 
then take off"; boil again the grained sugar, till it cracks, then 
put in the almonds and stir with the spatula as before. Sift and 
separate a second time. Give them a third coat if you choose. 
Whilst boiling, use prepared cochineal to color the sugar. 

EGG KISSES. 

The whites of ten eggs, beaten to a stiff" broth ; one and a 
half pounds powdered sugar, gradually whipped into the eggs ; 
flavor to taste. Grease a pan slightly, and put a table-spoon- 
fid of the mixture in places over it ; sift a little sugar on toj), 
and brown in a slow oven. 



140 BEVERAGES. 



BBV3BRAGBS. 



CHAMPAGNE PUNCH. 

One bottle champagne, one half tumblerful of sugar, one 
wine-glassful of rum, and one half dozen lemons. — Col. W. E. 
Simins. 

WHISKY PUNCH. 

One gallon of Avhisky, six tumblerfuls of sugar and one half 
dozen lemons, 

CATAWBA PUNCH. 

Five bottles of wine, one wine-glassful of brandy, one tumbler- 
ful of sugar, and one half dozen lemons. — Col. W. E. Simms. 

SUPERIOR CATAWBA WINE. 

Cut the grapes and take off all that are imperfect or green. 
Mash them in a tub with a small mallet, having a leather tacked 
loosely over the end, stuffed with hay, to prevent mashing the 
seed.* Let stand all night and press the juice into open vessels ; 
let it stand until the scum rises, breaking in cracks, showing a little 
white foam. Skim it off. Have the cask fumigated with 
brimstone ; pour in the wine, adding two pounds sugar to one gal- 
lon of juice. Put the bung in very loosely and let stand three 
weeks ; then tighten and let remain till February, Drain off 
very gently, bottle, cork and seal; keep in a cool place. — 
Mrs. Col. Simms. 



BEVERAGES. 141 

CURRANT WINE. 

To one gallon of currant juice, aJd two gallons of water and 
three pound.-? of sugar. 

BLACKBERRY WINE. 

Three quarts of juice, one quart of water, three pounds of 
sugar; to be placed in large stone jars, nearly full, then covered 
Avith a muslin cloth f let remain till fermentation ceases. It is 
then to be bottled, care being taken to disturb the fluid as little 
as possible. — Mrs. Martin. 

STRAWBERRY WINE. 

Three pounds of sugar, one gallon of juice. Strain through 
a flannel and put away in a jug. Cover with thin muslin and 
let stand until spring. — Mrs. Brutm Clay. 

GOOSEBERRY WINE. 

Gather the berries when ripe ; mash them well and let stand from 
three to four days ; then strain, and to nine pints of juice add 
four pints of rain water ; to this quantity put four pounds brown 
sugar ; let stand from five to six weeks. Then strain and bottle. 
— Mrs. Dudley. 

BLACKBERRY WINE. 

Crush the ben-ies thoroughly ; to each gallon of berries add 
one lialf gallon rain water, let stand undisturbed twenty-four 
hours ; then strain off. To each gallon of juice add two pounds 
of sugar (white sugar). Put into a keg and let it stand till it 
ceases to hiss, then cork tightly. Let it stand four or six months, 
then draw off"; wash the keg and return. Let it stand six or 
twelve months. — Mrs. Volney Iliggins. 

GRAPE WINE. 
When grapes are ripe, grind and press them ; put the juice 
in a barrel ; to a barrel of juice, add forty pounds of white 
sugar. Place the barrel in a cool cellar ; tack a cloth over the 
bung hole. After it has ceased to ferment, bung it tightly, let 
it stand till next spring, when it is ready to bottle — 3Irs. Bedford. 



142 BEVERAGES. 



RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Two quarts of juice, two quarts of water, three pounds of 
loaf sugar ; let it stand in an open bucket more than a week, 
skim and put it in a jug ; tie a thin cloth over it, and let it stand 
two months. — IJiss Kate Spears. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

To every quart of juice add one half pound of sugar ; boil 
and Fkim well. "When cool, add one quart of whisky to every 
gallon of juice and sugar. Add spices of all kinds whilst boil- 
ing. — Miss E. Ifitchell. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

One quart of juice, one pound of sugar ; race ginger, mace, 
allspice, cloves, cinnamon, to taste ; boil and strain through a 
sieve ; when cold, to every gallon of juice add a quart of brandy. 

STRAWBERRY ACID. 

Put twelve pounds of fruit into a jar, and cover with two 
quarts water acidulated with five ounces of tartaric acid ; let it 
stand forty-eight hours ; then strain, and to each pint of clear 
juice add one and a half pints of powdered sugar ; stir until 
dissolved ; bottle and cork tightly. The wholeto be a cold pro- 
cess. — Miss Kate SiJears. 

EGG NOG. 

Six eggs, beaten separately ; one pound of sugar, two pints 
of rich cream, one pint of whisk}', one half pint of Jamaica 
rum ; beat the yelks well ; mix sugar and whisky together ; 
whip the cream ; add whites of eggs, and cream last. Kcserve 
a little whisky and cream for next morning. It is best made 
over night. — 3Irs. JonaOian Owen. 

EGG NOG. 

Beat the yellows of two dozen eggs very light, stir in as much 
white sugar as they dissolve, pour in two glasses brandy gradu- 
ally, to cook the eggs ; two glasses old whisky, one of peach 
brandy, two nutmegs, three quarts rich milk ; beat whites to a 
froth and stir in last. 



BEVEEAGES. 143 



PORTER SODA. 

Dissolve six pounds of sugar in a quart of water, add a bottle 
of porter ; let it simmer slowly ; dissolve four ounces of tartaric 
acid in a tumblerful of water, stir it in just before the syrup is 
taken off the fire. 

CURRANT SHRUB. 

The currants should be very ripe ; squeeze them ; to each 
quart one pound sugar ; put the currants into a kettle, boil ten- 
minutes, skimming well ; when cold, allow one gill of brandy to 
each quart of juice. Bottle and set away, sealing the corks. 
It improves by keeping. — 3Irs. Henry Buckncr. 

CREAM NECTAR. 

Six pounds of refined sugar, four ounces of tartaric acid, two 
quarts of water ; when warm, add the whites of four eggs, 
beaten to a stiff fi'oth ; be careful not to let it come to a boil. 
When cold, strain, and add one table-spoonful of lemon acid. 

Directions for Use. — Two table-spoonfuls of the above syrup 
to a glass filled two thirds full of water ; add a small quantity 
of carbonate of soda ; stir until it eflTervesces. This makes a 
delicious summer drink. — Miss Kate S2)ears. 

BLACKBERRY VINEGAR. 

One gallon of fresh berries, washed and picked ; pour over 
them a half gallon of good cider vinegar ; let stand twenty-four 
hours ; then strain. To each pint of juice add three fourths of 
a pound of sugar ; boil half an hour, and skim carefully. When 
cold, bottle, and cork lightly. When used, pour the depth of an 
inch in the glass ; fill with water, pounded ice, and season with 
nutmeg. This is a temperance drink. — 3£rs. E. McCarney. 

BEER. 

Two quarts of wheat bran, tAvo and a half gallons of water, 
a few hops, one pint of molasses, and one pint of yeast. — Miss 
Kate Spears. 



144 BEVERAGES. 

TO KEEP CIDER SWEET. 

When fermentation begins, draw the cider off, and rinse the 
barrel ; strain through a flannel cloth and return. Put into one 
pint of alcohol, one fourth ounce of oil of sassafras and one fourth 
of an ounce of wintergreen. Shake well and put in the cider. 
— Mrs. Davis. 

CHAMPAGNE CIDER. 

• Let the cider from good, sound apples ferment until palatable ; 
then draw off into a clean barrel, and add quarter of an ounce of 
sulphate of lime to every gallon of cider. Mix the sulphate in 
a bucket of cider, return to the barrel and shake well. Let 
stand until clear, when it is fit for use. — 31rs. Davis. 

APPLE WINE. 

Take cider, fresh from the press, and to each gallon add two 
pounds of good brown sugar ; after dissolving the sugar, strain 
it and put in a new cask (one that had held brandy or whisky 
should not be used) ; tack a piece of muslin or perforated tin 
over the bung, and let it thus stand for one week. After this, 
put in the cork lightly and let it remain thus two weeks longer, 
then fasten it tightly, to exclude the air. The vessel should not 
be filled — at least one eighth of the space should be left. It is 
not fit for use under two or three months ; then it should be 
drawn off, bottled, and sealed. This recipe makes wine equal to 
catawba. — Bev. D. P. Young. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

To twelve pounds of peaches add six pounds of sugar ; sprin- 
kle it over the fruit ; let remain six hours, then boil Avith the 
sugar until the fruit is tender ; put in one ounce of peach ker- 
nels ; boil with the fruit; when cold, put in peach brandy. — 
Mrs. Dudley. 

CURRANT WINE. 

One quart of currant juice, two quarts of water; add to each 
gallon of this mixture three pounds of nice, dry, brown sugar. 



BEVERAGES. 1 45 



Pour water over the skins and seeds tliat liave been squeezed ; 
strain this ; measure, and add to the currant juice. Do not fill 
the barrel. Leave the bung out until the wine has ceased fer- 
menting ; cover the hole with a piece of net, to keep out flies. — 
3Irs. J. HoiveHon. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 
Take fine, lai-ge freestone peaches, quite ripe; put them into a 
pan containing a weak solution of saleratus and water ; let them 
lie in it until upon trial the fuzz can be easily rubbed off with a 
coarse towel. To each pound of peaches allow a pound of loaf 
sugar ; have ready large glass jars with tight-fitting covers, in 
which place a layer of peaches, having first a layer of sugar in 
the bottom of each jar, and so on, alternately, until the jar is 
nearly full, the upper layer being of sugar ; then pour in the 
best white brandy until the jars are filled ; cover them closely, 
and set in a flat-bottomed kettle of cold water (the water must 
be a little below the top of the jars) ; place the kettle on the fire, 
the jars remaining until the peaches boil ; then set away j cover 
closely. — 3Irs . Mc Carney. 

PINE-APPLE SYRUP. 

One quart of syrup, boil until it balls ; add to this one pint 
pine-apple juice ; let it boil ; remove the scum and bottle. 

RASPBERRY SYRUP. 

One quart syrup, one pint juice ; j^repare as the above recipe. 
StraAvberry syrup can be made in the same manner, taking care 
to strain through a flannel bag, to remove sediment and seed. 

ORANGE AND LEMON SYRUP. 

One pint juice, two pounds sugar ; grate off the rind and 
mix with the juice ; boil and strain through a flannel bag ; bot- 
tle when cool. 

ESSENCE OF LEMON. 

Pare or grate the rinds ; put them into a bottle, and cover 
with alcohol ; cork tightly, and in fourteen days it will be ready 
for use. Orange essence made in same way. 



14G BEVERAGES. 

TEA. 

One heaping tea-spoonful of green tea is sufficient for two 
cups. The water for making it should be boiled quickly. The 
tea-pot should be scalded well with the boiling water, and a cup- 
ful of the water poured upon the tea, and set near the fire to 
draw. In five or ten minutes, pour on another cupful of water. 
This tea will be very strong ; persons liking it weaker can easily 
add more boiling water. Black tea should be boiled, and more 
of it used than in the case of green tea, which should never be 
allowed to boil. A mixture of black and green tea is most 
pleasant to the taste. 

TO MAKE GOOD TEA. 
First procure a good article of tea. Be sure the water is boil- 
ing ; heat the tea-pot by rinsing it out with boiling water ; put 
the tea in the pot and pour on all the boiling water at one time ; 
steep over boiling water or on a warm stove, but avoid boiling 
the infusion. All teas are impaired by boiling. The weight of 
a silver dime will make three cups of tea. as strong as should be 
used ; if made too strong the flavor will be obscured. Always 
use a china or stone tea-pot. Tannin, always present in the tea, 
readily combines with metals, hence metallic tea- pots neutralize 
the flavor of tea. Connoisseurs usually prefer black tea, and 
take it without milk, but mollified Avith loaf sugar ; no other 
should be used in tea. — The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co 

CHOCOLATE. 

Allow a heaping table-spoonful of grated or pulverized choco- 
late (made into a paste with a little water) to one pint fresh 
milk ; let it come to a boil, and sweeten to taste. It is some- 
times flavored with cinnamon or nutmeg. — Mrs. Ingles. 

BOILED COFFEE. 

Two heaping table-spoonfuls of ground coffee, one pint of 
boiling water ; first mix the coffee with the white of an egg 
and a little cold water; then pour on boiling water and boil 



BEVERAGES. 1 47 



fifteen miimtes. This quantity will make two cupfuls of coffee. 
— Mrs. Martin. 

GOOD COFFEE. 

One coffee-cupful of ground coffee, one egg (yellow and 
white), beat well; mix with pint of cold water, and pour into 
the boiler ; pour in two quarts of boiling water ; let all boil 
fifteen minutes ; then set the boiler off and pour in a tea-cupful 
of cold water. — 3Irs. Northcvit. 

DRIPPED COFFEE. 

Scald the dripper with boiling water. Put three ounces of 
coffee into the upper division, and pour upon it, at intervals, a 
little boiling water at a time, until one quart has been used, 
placing the dripper where the coffee will be kept perfectly hot, 
without boiling. If the holes of the jDercolator are so large as 
to allow the water to drip through very quickly, it will be ne- 
cessary to pour it through a second time. It should be used 
with boiling milk, at table, and is usually strong enough, when 
the cup is filled one half or two thirds with boiling milk. 



148 PRESERVES. 



FRBSBRVBS. 



SWEETMEATS. 

Cut and scrape the melons, lay them in salt and water twen- 
ty-four hours, then soak them in fresh water for one day; jiut 
them to green in a brass kettle, a layer of melon, between cab- 
bage or grape leaves, sprinkled with powdered alum. When 
they are sufficiently green, lay them in fresh water for twenty- 
four hours more, then make a weak syrup and boil them, letting 
them stand in it two or three days ; then make a fresh syrup, al- 
lowing two pounds of sugar to every pound of melon ; season 
with ginger. — Miss Spears. 

TO PRESERVE PEACHES. 

To one pound of fruit allow one pound of sugar ; make a 
syrup and skim it well. When it boils, drop into it the peaches, 
having peeled, seeded and cut them in half. Cook until the 
fruit is soft, but not longer. — 3Irs. Jones. 

HONEY. 

Four pounds of white sugar, one pint of water, one tea-spoon- 
ful of alum, one tea-spoonful of alcohol, and one and one half 
drops of oil of roses. Boil imtil all are dissolved. — 3Iiss Kate 
Spears. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

To seven pounds of fruit put nine pounds of sugar ; let them 
stand over night with the sugar on. Strain off the syrup next 
morning and boil until jelly; then add the fruit and boil till 
done. — Mrs. Ed. Taylor. 



PRESERVES. 149 

QUINCE PRESERVES. 

Parboil the fruit with the parings on, then peel and core. Use 
three pints of the water they are boiled in to tw) pounds of the 
fruit and two pounds of sugar. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

To one pound of fruit add three quarters of a pound of sugar ; 
set aside till a syrup is formed ; let the syrup be drained, put to 
boil and then drop in the fruit; boil from seven to ten minutes ; 
then take the fruit out, leaving the syrup to boil longer ; cork 
and seal. 

TO PRESERVE ORANGE PEEL. 

Squeeze the juice and make a syrup of it, soak the peel in 
fresh water, change the water twice a day, as long as the water 
is bitter. Boil in water till a straw can penetrate it, then take 
a pound of sugar to a pound of peel. 

PEACH PRESERVES. 

To fifteen pounds of cling-stone peaches take seven and one 
half pounds sugar ; put two or three quarts of water in a bottle, 
with one tea-spoonful of pearl-ash; let it dissolve thoroughly. 
When the water is hot, throw a few peaches in this preparation ; 
let them remain a few minutes. When taken out, with a coarse 
towel wipe off the skins, and throw them into cold Avater. To 
half the sugar, with as little water as possible to dissolve it, add 
a layer of peaches and let boil from twenty to thirty minutes; 
then take them out and put on a flat dish to cool ; gradually 
add the rest of sugar. When all are done, boil the syrup till 
it becomes rather thick ; add while in the kettle one half pint 
alcohol, which will cool and thicken it sufficiently to pour over the 
peaches, which must be put into jars. Do not cover till next 
day. — 3Iiss Ella 31itchell. 

In preserving peaches, it is better not to peel them. Leave 
the seed in by all means. 



150 PRESERVES. 

TO CLARIFY SUGAR FOR PRESERVING. 

To three pounds sugar add one and one half pints of water, 
and white of one egg ; mix before putting on the stove ; boil a 
few minutes, skimming well; let stand ten minutes, skim again ; 
then strain it. — 3frs. Jno. Bay. 

PEACH MARMALADE. 

Cut the peaches fine and mash to a pulp (they should be per- 
fectly ripe). To one pound of fruit allow three fourths pound 
of white sugar ; stir in the sugar well and boil, skimming and 
stirring a good deal, to keep it from burning. — 3Irs. Jones. 

TOMATO PRESERVES. 

Peel seven pounds tomatoes, add seven pounds sugar, let all 
stand over night; drain off syrup; boil, skimming well. Put in 
tomatoes, boil gently twenty minutes ; take out fruit with 
perforated skimmer. Spread on dishes ; boil syrup until it 
thickens, and add, just at the last, juice of three lemons. Put 
fruit in jars, and pour on the hot syrup, and when cold, seal or 
tie up. 

HOW TO MAKE MAPLE SYRUP. 

Add enough water to the sugar to prevent scorchmg ; when 
it comes to a good boil, break in an egg or two, according to 
the quantity of sugar. To one half gallon of sugar add one 
pint fresh milk; skim well and strain through flannel. — Mrs. 
Simms. 

WILD CRAB PRESERVES. 

Pour boiling water over the fruit, to remove the skin ; push 
the core out with a quill ; one pound of fruit to one pound of 
sugar. Cook some time. 

PEACH PRESERVES. 

Let the peaches stand a few hours, with three quarters of a 
pound of sugar to one of fruit, if the latter be sweet and good ; 
if not, pound to pound. No water. 



PRESERVES. 151 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Let tli9 berries stand a short time after washing and stewing, 
with the sugar over them ; one pound and a quarter to every 
pound of fruit. Boil until little dark. 

RASPBERRY PRESERVES. 

Raspberries should have one pound of sugar to one pound of 
fruit. Cook well. — Mrs. J. H. Brent. 

CHERRY PRESERVES. 

One pound of sugar to one of fruit ; some of the cherries 
stoned, but not all. Put the sugar to them and let them stand 
before cooking. — 3Irs. J. II. Brent. 

PLUM PRESERVES. 

One pound of sugar to one pound of fruit ; make a syrup, and 
put the fruit into it when it begins to boil thick. 

QUINCE PRESERVES. 

After preparing the fruit, boil it in water until quite clear ; 
one pound of sugar to one of fruit, adding just enough water to 
cover the fruit. They require some time to cook. — Mrs. J. H. 
Brent. 



152 FOOD FOR SICK — RECIPES. 



FOOO FOR SICK. 



THICKENED MILK. 

Make a powder, by beating the yelk of an egg, to which a 
pinch of salt has been added, very light, and mix it with sifted 
flour, until very stiff j after which, rub between the fingers, 
adding flour until perfectly dry. Continue the rubbing until 
the whole lump is reduced to a powder ; then take as much 
milk as is desired (milk fresh from the cow), and put on the 
fire in a vessel in which it will boil quickly. As soon as it boils 
throw on the surface a little of the powder, and let it remain 
there a moment before stirring down ; continue this process 
until it seems thick enough. This is eaten with either 
sugar or salt, and is extremely palatable and nourishing. — 3Irs. 
Withrow. 

ARROW-ROOT WITH MILK. 

One dessert-spoonful of arrow-root, stirred smoothly into a 
tea-cupful of cold milk; have ready, one pint boiling milk, into 
which pour the arrow-root ; continue to stir five or ten minutes, 
then take from the fire. — Mrs. Cunningham. 

CORN-MEAL GRUEL. 

Three table-spoonfuls of sifted corn-meal, moisten with a little 
cold water ; pour it in a pint of boiling water ; stir well ; cook 
about ten miuutes. 



FOOD FOR SICK — RECIPES. 153 

TAPIOCA JELLY. 

Wash the tapioca two or three times ; soak it five or six 
hours ; let it simmer in the same water with bits of fresh lemon 
peel, until it becomes quite clear ; then put in lemon juice, wine, 
and sugar. Three table-spoonfuls of tapioca to one quart water. 
— Miss Bettie Cooke. 

ARROW ROOT JELLY, 

Put rather more than one pint of water, sweetened with white 
sugar, over the fire ; also, season with brandy and nutmeg ; stir 
one large spoonful of arrow root into a tea-cupful of cold water ; 
pour it in when the water boils ; stir well, and boil four or five 
minutes. 

SAGO JELLY. 

Two table-spoonfuls sago to one quart of water ; soak in cold 
water one hour, and wash thoroughly ; let simmer with lemon 
peel and a few cloves ; add wine and sugar when nearly done. 

RICE JELLY. 

In preparing rice, pour on boiling water, and, when cool, rub 
it well between the hands several times. To a half pint of rice 
use one quart of boiling water ; continue to add water until the 
liquid looks like starch, and then strain. Cook rapidly. — Mrs. 
McAboy. 

A PREPARATION FOR THE SICK. 

The white of one egg, three tea-spoonfuls of sugar, half a glass 
of water, half a tea-cupful of cracked ice, a few drops of pepper- 
mint, or a sprig of fresh mint. Throw the ingredients from one 
tumbler into another, till the contents are thoroughly mixed. 

A NOURISHING PREPARATION FOR INFANTS. 

Half a pint of boiling water, three table-spoonfuls of new 
milk, one tea-spoonful of arrow root, a pinch of gelatine (dis- 
solved in a little hot water); mix milk, arrow root and gelatine 



154 FOOD FOR SICK — RECIPES, 

together, and pour all into the boiling water. Let it cook a few 
minutes ; take off and sweeten to taste. 

BLACKBERRY JELLY FOR SICKNESS. 

Two quarts blackberry juice, one pound loaf sugar, half an 
ounce nutmegs, half an ounce cloves, half an ounce cinnamon, 
half an ounce allspice. Pulverize the spices, if whole ; boil all 
fifteen or twenty minutes. When cold, add one pint of brandy. 
— Miss Ella Mitchell. 



REMEDIES — RECIPES. 155 



RBMBOIBS 



A GOOD SALVE. 

Three pounds cleaned rosin, quarter pound Burgundy pitch, 
quarter pound beeswax. Melt slowly, with care ; then add half 
an ounce of red pepper, one ounce of camphor, one ounce sweet 
oil, two ounces oil of sassafras. Stir all well together; pour all 
into a large tub of cold water, and pull until white 

TO CURE A FELON. 

As soon as the part afflicted begins to swell, wrap with cloth 
thoroughly saturated with lobelia. 

EXCELLENT BITTERS. 

Half a gallon of old whisky, one ounce gum aloes, one ounce 
rhubarb, half an ounce senna leaves, two drachms gum foctida. 
— Mrs. Ingles. 

A CURE FOR RHEUMATISM. 

Three ounces chloroform, four ounces alcohol, five ounces 
ether ; mix the chloroform and ether first, and in fifteen minutes 
add the alcohol ; then pour on a damp cloth and apply. 

ANTIDOTE FOR POISON. 
Mix a dessert-spoonful of mustard in a glass of warm water, 
and drink it immediately. Melted lard and sweet milk are also 

antidotes. 

FOR FLESH BRUISES, 

Eub well with lard, and biud rather tightly. 



156 REMEDIES RECIPES. 



A VERY FINE LIP SALVE. 

Take one tea-cuj^ful of fresh butter just from the churn, and 
half a pound of beeswax ; mix well and boil until dissolved ; 
strain and put into something to mould it in shape. This salve 
cures the worst chapped hands and lips in one night. 

POISON OAK CURE. 

Bathe the affected parts, long and well, in sulphur and cream ; 
in half an hour wash Avell in salt water. Repeat twice a day. 
Three or four applications will cure. — Mrs. George Davis. 

BREAST OINTMENT. 

One gill old whisky, old butter the size of a w'alnut, beeswax 
the size of a j)artridge egg, one tea-spoonful of black pepper ; 
stew until the whisky evaporates ; spread on a cloth and sprinkle 
black pepjier thickly over it. 

LEMON FOR A COUGH. 

Roast a lemon very carefully, without burning it ; when hot 
through, cut and squeeze in a cup, and sweeten to taste. 
When the cough is troublesome, take a dessert-spoonful. It 
gives great relief. 

A FINE RECIPE FOR A COUGH. 

Boil flaxseed in water until it becomes slimy, then strain and 
sweeten with rock candy, powdered as fine as possible ; season 
with the juice of fresh lemons. Take a wine-glassful whenever 
the cough is troublesome. 

REMEDY FOR SPRAINS. 

Take the root of the black locust tree and wash well, then 

scrape off' the skin and pound it until it is well mashed ; pour 

on enough strong vinegar to make it the consistency of mush, 

and apply with bandages to the sprained part. The mush 

should be kept damp, or be renewed at intervals of three or four 

hours. 

SCALDS OR BURNS. 

If a scald or burn is not deeper than the outer skin, make an 

ointment of sulphur and lard, stiff" enough to spread on a cloth. 

—Dr. Hall. 



REMEDIES — KECrPES. 157 



POISONOUS VINES. 

If poisoned by vinos, make a paste of sulphur or f^unpowder 
and milk. Apply night and morning until cured. — Dr. Hall. 

RELIEF FOR NEURALGIA. 

Apply to the part affected the oil of peppermint; saturate a 
piece of raw cotton with it, and rub very gently till the skin 
burns. It frequently relieves pain when everything else fails. 

FOR A COLD IN THE HEAD. 

Inhale spirits of ammonia every few minutes until the head 
is clear. 

FOR EAR-ACHE. 

Saturate a piece of raAV cotton with arnica, or put a few drops 
(warmed a little) into the ear. Sweet oil used in the same way 
is another remedy. 

REMEDY FOR BRUISES. 

Take fresh beef, pound quite thin, and bind it on the bruise. 

LIP SALVE. 

Take equal quantities of fresh butter, with no salt in it, and 
yellow beeswax ; melt and stir together. 

EYE WATER. 

Take one eg^, boil hard, cut open and remove the yelk; fill 
one cavity with pulverized sugar, the other with pulverized 
alum ; put the two i)arts together, put the whole in a cloth and 
squeeze out all the juice. — Mrs. Bruce, Carlisle. 

REMEDY FOR INFLAMED EYES. 

Take double-refined white sugar, pound it and sift through a 
piece of muslin ; boil an egg hard, and cut in two lengthwise, 
taking out the yelk. Put these whites in boiling water ; dust 
a very small quantity of the sugar on the eye-ball, and place 
the steaming cup over tlie entire eye. Repeat three times a day. 
— Miss Florence ShoH. 



158 REMEDIES — RECIPES. 

SALVE FOR BURNS. 

Yelk of one egg beaten until smooth, piece of alum the size 
of a pea, pulverized very fine, mixed with lard enough to make 
consistent. — Mrs. J. H. Brent. 

AN EFFICIENT APERIENT. 

One pound of figs chopped fine, one pound strained hoaey, 
half pound senna, rubbed fine and sifted. 

CURE FOR DYSPEPSIA, 

Two ounces ladies' slipper root, two ounces balm of Gilead, one 
ounce red percoon, two ounces gum turpentine ; add three pints 
fourth proof brandy ; let stand a few days before using. Dose, 
one tea-spoonful three times a day before meals. — G. Tucker. 



SOAP RECIPES. 159 



SOAPS, 



POTASH SOAP. 

To one pound of potash and two pounds of grease allow three 
gallons of water. Soak the potash in the Avater twenty-four 
hours, or boil until dissolved ; then add the grease, and boil un- 
til it thickens. — Mrs. Geo. Davis. 

SOAP. 

Six gallons of rain water, two and a half pounds of bar soap, 
shaved fine, two pounds of sal soda, six ounces of borax. Put 
the water on the fire with the above ingredients, and bring it to 
a boiling heat, when it is ready for use, — 3Iiss Kate Spears. 

SOAP. 

To four gallons of soft water add three pounds of soda ash, 
one and one half pounds of lime ; boil one hour and a half. 
Let the liquid stand until it can be poured off clear ; then add 
six pounds of grease. Boil it two hours and a half, and let it 
get hard in the kettle, then cut out in blocks and let dry. — 3Iiss 
Kate Spears. 

SOFT SOAP. 

Put the ashes in barrels, or a hopper, which is better. Pour 
water on every day ; drain it off", and if not strong enough, pour 
it back, or boil down till strong. Put straw in the barrels first, 
then pack ashes in ; when the lye is strong enough to strip a 
feather, put in grease until the lye ceases to absorb it. Cook 
until the soap looks thick. — Mrs. H. Brent. 



160 SOAP RECIPES. 

SODA-ASH SOAP. 

Ten pounds of soda-ash, five pounds of new lime, sifted ; boil 
in ten gallons of rain water for ten minutes, add twenty-five 
pounds of clear grease and boil two hours ; let stand until cold 
and cut out. — Mrs. Geo. Davis. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 161 



MISCB£j]L.AHBOCfS. 



POLISH FOR GRATES, OR TO PAINT BRICK HEARTHS. 

Take two or three spoonfuls of lamp black and make it into a 
smooth paste, with spirits of turpentine; then add copal 
varnish until the mixture is sufficiently thin to apply with a 
brush. This painting keeps very nice for a long time, by wiping 
it ofi' frequently with weak, tepid suds. — Rev. D. P. Young. 

TO MAKE SOAP. 

One and one half pounds unslacked lime, three pounds soda 
ash, seven gallons lye or rain water ; boil all fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Pour ofi" the lye clear, add seven pounds of grease ; 
boil two hours, or until done. Splendid soft soap. — Mrs. Taylor. 

A FINE WASH FOR THE HAIR. 

Dissolve in one quart of boiling Avater, one ounce borax, one 
half ounce of camphor. The ingredients should be finely pow- 
dered. 

FOR CLEANSING LACES. 

Pour a little pure and clear alcohol in a china bowl, or other 
deep, vessel that can be covered to prevent evajioration, into Avhich 
place the lace that is to be cleaned. Leave it some time, until 
tlie dirt has softened and settled at the bottom. Tlien, with per- 
fectly clean fingers, rub the lace gently in the liquid, until the 
stains shall have disappeared. If they can not be removed in 
this way, let soak longer. After the rubbing, squeeze the lace 



162 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 

as dry as possible and roll in a clean towel. Take one piece at a 
time while damp, and pick it open with the fingers, pulling out 
the edge very carefully with the nails. If one can take the 
the time to open each little hole on the edge, with a pin, it will 
have much the appearance of new lace. It should be kept 
damp while handling it. When the meshes are all opened, lay 
the lace between the leaves of a book and press till entirely dry, 
taking care to fold in and out among the leaves, so as not to be 
double at any point. Sometimes lace is so much soiled as to re- 
quire a gentle rubbing in soap-suds, before using the alcohol. 
In such case, do not rinse it. Black lace can be beautifully 
renovated by the above process. — il/rs. WUhrow, Danville, Ky. 

WHITEWASH, CALLED PARIS WHITE. 

Sixteen pounds of Paris white, one half pound transparent 
glue. Cover the glue with cold water at night; next morning, 
carefully heat it, without scorching, until the glue is dissolved. 
The Paris white is stirred into hot water, until it is the con- 
sistency of milk, and then the dissolved glue is added to it. 

ITEMS. 

One tea-spoonful of vinegar in a pint of limestone water, will 
antagonize all its ill cfTects upon the bowels of those who are 
unaccustomed to it. — Dr. Hall. 

As much powdered alum as will rest on a dime, stirred in a 
pail of "water, will clear it in five minutes. — Dr. Hall. 

A FINE WASH FOR THE SKIN. 

Put two table-spoonfuls of ammonia in a basin of water. — Dr. 

Hall. 

ITEMS. 

To keep oranges, lemons, and apples, wrap close in paper, 
keep in a dry, cool place. — Dr. Hall. 

Thaw frozen fruit and vegetables in cold water. — Dr. Hall. 

Cranberries covered with water, will keep for mouths in a 
ccUar. — Dr. Hall. 



IVnSCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 163 

FOR PACKING BUTTER. 

Ill one gallon of -water boil two quarts of salt until dissolved, 
then add one ounce of sugar and one ounce of saltpetre. 

FOR PACKING BUTTER. 

Work the butter until entirely free from milk ; pack veru 
UgJithj (in stone jars), in layers of about three inches in thick- 
ness; cover the whole Avith two inches of salt. — Mrs. Frank 

Bedford. 

BRINE FOR BUTTER. 

Three pounds of salt, six quarts of water, one pound of salt- 
petre, one pound and a half of loaf sugar. Mix all the ingre- 
dients and pour the water on them while boiling ; let it settle 
and cool; then strain through a coarse, thick cloth, to remove 
impurities. Wrap each roll of butter in a separate cloth, put 
into a jar, and pour over it this brine when entirely cold. — 
Mrs. A. Turneij, Jr. 

BRINE FOR BUTTER. 

IMake brine strong enough to bear an egg ; add a half pound 
of sugar and two table -spoonfuls of soda to each gallon ; strain, 
and pour it over the butter, which must be rolled in cloth, and 
kept under the brine. 

AMERICAN CEMENT. 

One pound of white glue, one pound of white lead, one pint 
of alcohol, one pint of rain water. In a tin dish, over the stove, 
put the Avater, alcohol, and glue, until the latter is dissolved ; 
then add the lead; stir until it Ls the consistency of cream. — 
Mrs. NoHhcott. 

SETTING COLORS WITH SUGAR OF LEAD. 

Dissolve one table-spoonful of lead in tw'o gallons of water ; 
put the goods in and let stand all night. 

BLEACHING WITH CHLORIDE OF LIME. 

Dissolve one tea-cupful of lime in three gallons of water; let 
stand till the water becomes clear; strain carefully; put the 



164 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 

goods to soak at niglit ; in the morning rub the stains ; if they 
are effaced, rinse thoroughly before washing. Where the stains 
are very deep, it may require being soaked a longer time in a 
little sti'onger mixture. 

TO CLEAN BLACK SILK. 

One tea-spoonful ammonia, one tea-spoonful turpentine in one 
pint of warm water ; sponge the silk on the right side, and 
iron on the wrong. — 3Trs. Johnson. 

TO CLEAN BLACK SILK. 

Boil an old black kid glove in a quart of water until it boils 
down to one pint. 

HOW TO SET THE COLOR IN BLUE OR GREEN CALICO. 

One tea-spoonful of turpentine, one tea-spoonful of hartshorn; 
put in the quantity of water required to wash a dress. 

WORTH KNOWING. 

One pound green copperas dissolved in one quart of water 
will utterly destroy all offensive odors. 

Ink stains should be immediately dipped in new, sweet milk. 

The sting of insects can be cured by using a paste of soda and 
water. A little powdered indigo mixed with water to a paste 
is also very good. 

A brass kettle should always be cleaned with a little salt and 
vinegar before using it. 

TO RENOVATE CRAPE VEILS. 

Take two towels and dampen them thoroughly, spread one of 
them out and put the veil on it, having first folded it in a square ; 
then place the other damp towel on top, and roll all smoothly ; 
lot it remain about half an hour, or until quite damp; then 
take out of the towel, and spread lengthwise to dry. 

TO CLEAN CARPETS. 

One pint of alcohol, one half pint of ammonia ; put enough 
in a small basin of water to feel sleek and to smell of it. The 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 165 

■water must bo changed several times, as it becomes very dirty. 
Use a scrubbing brush; have a clean, dry towel to wipe off. — 
3Irs. MoUic Webb. 

TO GLAZE SHIRT BOSOMS. 

To every quart of starch add a tea-spoonful of salt and one 
of white soap, scraped fine ; boil the starch (after adding hot 
water) until as thick as you wish. — 3Iiss E. Mitchell. 

TO EXTRACT INK FROM COLORED ARTICLES. 

Drop tallow on the stains, and then soak and rub the same 
with boiling milk. 

TO KEEP EGGS FOR WINTER USE. 

One pint of lime, one pint of salt, three gallons of water. 

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM MARBLE. 

Apply oxalic acid diluted with water, and rub well. If the 
marble is only slightly stained, it need not be very strong. 

TO CLEAN STAIR RODS. 

Diji a cloth in coal oil, then in flour of emery, and rub 
well ; then rub off Avith another cloth or a piece of i^aper, 

INK. 

Put two ounces extract of logwood, well pulverized, into a gal- 
lon of rain water ; let it come to a boil, stirring it well all the time. 
When cold, add sixty grains of bichromate of potash ; again 
stirring ; when cold, it is ready for use. The vessel which it is 
boiled in must be entirely free from grease. — Mrs. Ingles. 

PRESERVING BUTTER. 

Two quarts of salt, one ounce of sugar, one ounce saltpetre, 
eighteen poimds of butter ; work well in a mass and close it for 
use. Let it stand one month before using. — Miss Kate Spears. 

TO PREVENT CALICOES FROM FADING. 

Put three gills of salt in four quarts of boiling water ; put 



166 . MISCELLANEOUS EECIPES. 

the dresses in while hot, and leave until cold ; in this way the 
colors are rendered permanent. 

WASHING CLOTHES. 

Take one pound of washing soda, ten ounces of fresh lime to 
pour over it, one gallon of boiling water ; stir Avell ; when cold, 
bottle for use. 

To a large boiler of water, put one and a half pints of the 
above, the fourth of a bar of soap. Take the clothes out of the 
tub, where they have been soaking all night, and put them into 
the boiler. Pound them often. When well boiled, put in more 
clothes ; then wash well, and scald them in the first rinsing water ; 
rinse them in this and one other water. The recipe washes 
calico beautifully, but it must not be allowed to remain long in 
the water. 

A laundress gives the following recipe for doing up collars, 
cufis, shirt bosoms, etc. : Four ounces of white gum arabic, 
pounded fine ; put into a bottle and pour over it one quart of 
water, cork tightly and let stand all night. Pour it off carefully 
the next morning into another clean bottle ; keep it well 
corked. In using this, stir to two pints of fine starch two 
table-spoonfuls of this gum arabic water. This is very fine for 
washing white dresses and colored lawns. 

A NICE PAINT FOR PAVEMENT. 

One gallon of flour paste, not very thick, two pounds of 
Venetian red ; mix this thoroughly and apply to the pavement 
Avith a whitewash brush. 

SEALING WAX. 

Two ounces gum shellac, ten ounces resin, one ounce white 
chalk ; boil all this slowly until dissolved. — 31rs. A. Tarney, Jr. 

TO FRESHEN GRENADINE. 

Take one table-spoonful of powdered borax to one quart of 
water, and let it dissolve. * Sponge the grenadine on the wrong 
side, and press while damp. — 3frs. Avios Turney, Jr. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 167 

TO TAKE MARKS OFF FURNITURE. 

"White spots can be removed from varnished furniture, and 
rendered glossy, by applying alcohol Avith a sponge. It has 
nearly, if not quite, the effect of varnish and is much cheaper. 

SEALING WAX. 

Four ounces rosin, one ounce bcesAvax, one ounce Spanish 
brown, one tea-spoonful of j^laster of Paris. 

MUCILAGE. 

Dissolve four ounces of powdered gum arable in a pint of boil- 
ing water. 

HAIR OIL. 

Six ounces castor oil, two ounces cantharides, two ounces 
alcohol, one ounce bergamot. 

MATTING. 

Wash matting in salt and water to preserve it from turning 
dark. 

SAPOLIO. 

Sapolio is superior for cleansing marble stands and bureau 
tops. Dip an old tooth-brush in hot water, and with it make 
a lather of the sapolio (which can be purchased at any of the 
apothecaries). Rub hard and rinse in clean, cold water. 

TO TAKE OUT MILDEW. 

Get the driest chloride of lime, and for strong fabrics dissolve 
four table-spoonfuls of this in one half pint of water. Let the mil- 
dewed article lie in this solution fifteen minutes ; take out and 
work gently, and put at once in weak muriatic acid (one part 
acid and four parts soft water) ; for delicate fabrics the solution 
of lime should be made weaker — three or four times the quantity 
of water should be put to the lime. Let the article remain 
in five minutes, and then pour into the muriatic acid. 

A PRETTY EXPERIMENT. 

An acorn suspended l)y a tlircad, Avitliin half an inch of the 
water in a hyacinth glass, will in a few months burst and throw 



1G8 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 

out a root, and shoot upward with straight and tapering stems, 
covered with beautiful green leaves. 

VIRGINIA BRUNSWICK STEW. 

For a large family three gallons of water, to which add two 
chickens, which have been cut up, and one pound of fat bacon. 
The bacon must be cat up very fine before putting it in the 
water. As soon as the chickens are sufficiently cooked for the 
meat to leave the bones, take them out, and separate the meat 
from the bones. Return the meat to the water, then add half 
a gallon of Irish potatoes which have been boiled and mashed, 
one and a half pints of green corn cut off, one pint of green 
butter beans, one quart of tomatoes which have been skinned, 
and a good sized loaf of light bread. Season Avith black and 
red pepper, salt and butter. The bread must not be put in 
until the stew is nearly done. As soon as it begins to thicken 
it must be constantly stirred until it is done. If it should be too 
thick, add more water. Much depends on the judgment of the 
person who makes it. When properly made, no one is able to 
detect any of the ingredients. Squirrels are a very good sub- 
stitute for chickens. — Baher Blanton, Farmville, Va. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



1G9 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

■\V. H. Andrews ITS 

The Great Atlantic & Pacific 

Tea Co 181 

Bassett & Gaper 177 

Birdsey & Turner 180 

Burnet House 187 

Camargo Manufacturing Co. . 178 

J. ^V. Crura 188 

R. P. Dow 172 

Geo. W. Davis 177 

Duhme & Co 181 

Marcellus "W. Dyer 182 

Devou&Co 184 

W. W. Gill 176 

Gibson House 182 

Jno. T. Hinton 174 

W. A. Hill 176 

Jeffras, Seeley & Co 185 

Kitts & Werne 171 

Lewis & Livingston 170 

J. LeBoutillier & Bro 170 

T7m. Wilson McGrew, 

Second page of cover 
McChesney & Johnson 173 



PAGE. 

G. T. McCarney & Co 174 

R. C. McCracken 180 

Jno. A. Mohlenboff 186 

Robt. Orr & Co. 

Second page of cover 

Mrs. Pollocli; 175 

"Wm. H. Powell & Co 185 

J. R. Peebles' Sons 187 

N. B. Rion & Son 175 

P. H. Rose 176 

A. C. Richards 186 

J. C. Ringwalt & Co. 

Third page of cover 

Spears & Co 173 

Wm. Shaw 175 

The Singer MTg Co. 179 

Jas. Spillman & Co 183 

Jao. Shillito & Co 184 

"Wm. R. Teasdale 171 

Tuclf er's 177 

Ed Taylor Third page of cover 

Dr. Wm. Wasson .'. . 174 

J. Webb, Jr 179 

Walnut Street House 183 



170 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LEWIS & LIVINGSTON, 



IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 



Silks, French, German and English Dress Goods, 

MOUKNING DRESS GOODS, SHAWLS, MANTILLAS AND CLOAKS, 

Lace Points, Suits, L7ons Velvets, Millinery Goods, Dress Trimmings, &c. 
118 & 120 WEST FOURTH STREET, near Race, 

ciiVciTsr]VA.Ti, OHIO. 



Owr'^JDress 3IalHng JDepartTiaent 

IS IN CHARGE OF 

MISS OSBORN, MISS BELLE RAVIE. MRS. I'lTHIAN. 

Fashions Received Direct from Paris. 

Wedding Trousseaus, Evening Dresses, 31ourning Out- 
fits, Suits and Cloaks, tnade 2)roinptly to order 
in the highest style of art, at moderate prices. 

Sole Asrents for BOIJDIER'S KID GI.OVES. 



J. Le Boutillier & Bros. 

104 & 106 West Fourth Street, 
CINCINNATI, O. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

Mich Bla ck Silks, 

LACE GOODS, EMBROIDERIES, 

"Perinot" Ifid Oloves. 



OFFERING AT ALL TIMES THE NEWEST GOODS AT 
REASONABLE RATES. 



The Ladies of Central Kentucky are invited to examine when in the city, 
or orders will be personally attended to. 

J. LE BOUTILLIER & BROS., 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 171 



FRANK D. BARNUM. * UENRY L. WERN'E. 

KITTS & WERNE, 

DEALERS IN 

FINE WATCHES, CLOCKS, DIAMONDS, 

JEWELMY, 8ILVEMWAME, 

AND 

BEOlSrZES 

120 Main, between Third and Fourth, 

Sign OF THE Golden Eagle, LOUIS vILLE, K.I« 

ESTABLISHED IN 1835. 



Ladies^ Dress Dyeing 

BEESSES IH ALL FABEIOS CLEANED OE DYED. 

ALSO, 

CRAPE SHAWLS, CLOAKS, 

LLAMA LACE POINTS, RIBBONS, 

WOOL SHAWLS, FEATHERS, 

PIANO COVERS, KID GLOVES, 

CURTAINS, FRINGES. 



CLOTHING CLEANED, DYED AND REPAIRED. 

Goods received l)y p]xpross promptly attended to. 



SeS W^aluut Slretit, - Ciiieiiiiittti, O. 



172 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Tt. IP. 3DO"W, 

DEALER IN 

RAW AND REFINED SUGARS, 

Choice Green and Roasted Coffees, 



STANDARD BRANDS 



PINE-CUT, PLUG AND SMOKING TOBACCO, 

GUNPOWDER, OOLONG, JAPAN AND ENGLISH BREAKFAST 

T E .A. S. 

Best Brands of Rifle Powder, and all sizes Shot and Caps, 

American and French Candies; Oranges, Lemons, Citron, Raisins, Cur- 
• rants, Dates, Prunes, Figs, etc.; Apple Butter, Mince Meats, 
Cranberries, Jellies, and Honey; Baking Powder, 
Spices, Burnett's Flavoring Extracts, 

Fleiscliman & Co,'s Celebfaled Compressed least, 

California Peaches, Pears, Apricots, Green Gages, etc., in cans; Quintou 
Tomatoes, Tomato Catsup and Worcestershire Sauce; Canned and 
Pickled Salmon, White Fish, Codfish, and Mackerel; Flour, 
Meal, Graham Flour, Oat-meal, Cracked Wheat, Rice, 
Pearl Barley, Split Peas, Green Peas ; Eiomiuy, 
Shaker Corn ; Tapioca, Sago, Vermi- 
celli, Macaroni; 

Crackers— Cream, Lemon, Graham, Soda, Butter, Oyster, etc.; Crated and 

Graham Bread received daily; Choice Syrups and Pure Cider 

Vinegar; Glass, Stone, Wooden and Willow Ware. 



.CASH PAID FOR BUTTER, EGGS, BACON, AND ALL KINDS COUNTRY PRODU( E 



OPPOSITE BOURBON HOUSE, 

PARIS, KENTUCKY, 



ADVERTISEJIENTS. 173 



MAIN STREET, - - PARIS, KY. 



All kinds Country Produce taken in Exchange for Groceries. 



The Oldest Paper in Kentucky— Established in 1808. 



THE WESTERN CITIZEU 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY, BY 

PARIS, KY. 



Circulates in the Blue Grass region of Kentucky, and contains full 
reports of stock and other m;irkets. 
Terms of subscription, $2 00 per annum, in advance. 
Wedding and Visiting Cards, and every description of 

j-QB :p:E^iisrTi3^c3- 

Executed at Cincinnati prices. 

Address, IttcCHESNEY & JOHJ^SOI¥, 

PARIS, KENTUCKY. 



174 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



G. T, McCarney. T. H. Mitchell. 

G. T. MgCARNEY & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

^WOOT) "WORK, 

HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 

MAIN STEEET, PAEIS, KEKTUOKY. 

DTI. ^Wl^l. AV^SSON, 

DENTIST, 

MAIN STREET, PARIS, KENTUCKY. 

Dental Rooms over Jacob Spears & Son's Dry Goods 
Store, Oprosite the Court House Door. 



All Operations in the diRerent branches of the profession performed in 
the most judicious and slvillful miinner. Special attention triveu to the 
treatment of Children's Teeth, and Diseases of the Mouth and Gums. 



Any Keferenee will be Given that may ba Desired. 

JNO. T. HINTON, 

DEALER IN AND MANUFACTURER OF 

FURNITURE. 

FULL STOCK ON HAND AT ALL TIMES, 
INCLUDING CHOICE LINE 

CARPETS, 

WALL PAPEB, 3IATTRESSMS, JEtc, Etc., 

Undertaking very carefully attended to in every Branch. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 175 



WILLIAM SHAW, 

IVC I L ILj E I^ _ 



AND 

OTHER PINE GRADES FLOUR. 

PARIS, KENTUCKY. 

N. B. BION, Sr. N. B. RION, Jr. 

N. B. RION & SON, 

DEALERS IN 



PRODUCE, &c. 

Goods or Cash in Exchange for all kinds of 
Country Produce. 

Corner Main and Church Streets, 

PARIS, KY. 

Mrs. GUS. BROWER POLLOCK, 

EVERY VARIETY OF 

MILLINERY GOODS 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND, 

FRENCH HATS AND BONNETS, 

Ties, Ribbons, Flowers, Veils, Ruches, Bridal 
Wreaths, &e. &c., 

Main Street, next to Tucker's, 

PARIS, KY. 



176 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



BOTJK.BOIsr IMZ^I^BLE ^WOI^KIS. 



W. A. HILL, 



DEALER IN 



FOREIGN AND AMEEICAN MARBLES, 

Scotch Granite, Monuments, Tombs. Tablets, White Lime, Cement, 

Plaster Paris, White Sand, Hair, River Sand, Drain 

Pipe, Terra Cotta Chimney Tops, &c., &c.; 

Freestone Steps, Caps and Sills; 

Chimney Tops, Cistern Tops, 

AND 

BUILDING WORK OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

MAIN STREET, PAmS, KY. 



JP. H. Iv-OSJE, 

PHOTOaEAPHER 

THE CABINET AND GLACE PORTRAITS 

Corner Main Street and Public Square, 

pahis, ky. 
W. W. GILL, 

DEALER IN 

PROVISIONS AND FANCY GROCERIES, 

Odd Felloivs' Building, I*AItIS, KT. 



CAN FURNISH ALL ARTICLES CALLED FOR IN THE RECIPES, EMBRACED 
IN THIS BOOK. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 177 



GEO. W. DAVIS, 

DEALER IN 

Furnilufe, Cafpets, Matlresses, Wall Paper, k 



i>.A.i2.is, k:i^. 



Particular Attention Given to the Undertaking Business 
in all its Branches. 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

BOOTS & SHOES, 

S3CN OF BiC SHOE, 

MAIK STEEET, - PARIS, KT. 



DRY GOODS CHEAP. 

C3-0 TO 
AND BUY YOUR 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, TRIMMINGS, &c. 
CHEAP, 

MAIN STREET, - - - JPAIilS, KY, 



178 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CAMARGO MAKUFACTURING CO, 

PAPER HANGINGS 

AND 

WINDOW SHADES. 



H. H. BREffdEMAN, 

PROPRIETOR. 



57 W. FOURTH STREET, - CINCINNATI, 0. 

W. H. ANDEEWS, 

DRY GOODS, 

76 & 78 WEST FOURTH STREET, 

AND 

506, 508 AND 510 VINE STREET, 
OINCIJHNATI, O. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 179 



J. Webb, Jr., 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

STRAW GOODS, 

Ribbons, Flowers, Feathers, Velvets, Velveteens, 
Black Silks, Trimmings, Bonnet and Lin- 
ing Silks and Satins, Corsets, 
Laces, Crapes, and 



164- Fifth Street, het. Race and Ebn, 
CINCINNATI, O. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING CO/S 

Sewing Machines. 

— »-*~i — 

SALES FOR 1873, 

^ v^ ^ J ^C ^XI ^3Z J 
Being over 113,250 more Macliines 

Than were sold by any other Company, and OYER 14,190 MORE than by 

by any other FOUR Companies, and NEARLY ONE-HALE of the 

combined sales of twenty-one companies during that year. 



CINCINNATI OFFICE : 
eQ TVest Fourtli Street. 



180 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



N. D. BIRDSEY. C. F. TURNER. 

BIRDSEY & TURNER, 

DKALERS IN 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, 



CURTAIN MATERIALS. 

Lambrequins of the Newest Patterns Made to Order at 
THE Shortest Notice. 

JVo. 146 Maiti, between Fourth and Fifth Streets, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

RALPH c. Mccracken, 
SHIRT MANUFACTURER, 

AND DEALER IN 

GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS. 

No. 9 "West Fourth Street, 

Our Finest and Most Serviceable Shirts are Stitched 
and Setfed by Hand — made to order only. We keep in 
stock a cofn^ilele assorltnent of sizes and styles o/nia- 
chine-made Shirts at prices to suit every ofie. 

JV. 7i. — IV e cut Patterns fo7' Shirts to order that we 
will Guarantee that any Seamstress can put toffether 
and make a 7ieat fitting Shirt. 

No. 9 WEST FOURTH STREET, 

DIRECTLY OPPOSITE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

(STEEPLE WITH GOLD HAND,) 

AND NEARLY OPPOSITE CHAMBER OP COMMERCE, 

CINCINNATI, 0. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



181 



WALLINGFORD WARE, 

MANUFACTURED r.V 

SIMPSON, HALL, MILLER cSt COMPANY, 

WALLINGFORD, CONN. 

■\Vallingford Ware is sold by all first-class JowclorK, ami comprisps a full line of 
Tea Sets, CofFce Urns, Ice ritchors. Goblets, .Salveis, (Japs, Cako Uaskats, Castors, 
jButter Dishes, Vases, Card Stands, Toilit S'ts and Fancy Articles generally. Also, 
t lie most approved styles of Coraniunion Ware for C'liurclies. These poods arc niado 
from the best quality of White Metal, and are Heavily Plaied with Puro f>ilver. 
They are beautiful, serviceable and not expensive. Initials or full names engraved on 
them, same as on solid silver. 

For purposes of };ift-malcing there is no one class of goods which will serve to satisfy 
a greater variety of Av;nits than what is known as Electro-Plated Silverware. In the 
manufiicture of this class of goods America is far in advance of Europe, the workshops 
of Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co., atWallin^ford, Conn., alone prdducingagrfatcr variety 
of useful and elegant articles of Table Ware than the old cstablishinents of Christofle 
(Paris) and Eikington (Birmingham) combined. SenJ for Illustrated Catalogue, and 
please state where you saw the advertisement. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS, JEWELERS m SILVERSMITHS, 



w 



mmMT 




35 &. 37 VESEY STREET, NEW YORK. 



CENTRAL RETAIL BRANCHES: 



CINCINNATI, Ohio, 
COLUMBUS, Ohio, 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., - 
LOUISVILLE, Ky., 

SE^D FOR RETAIL. PRICE LIST. 

AN OIL CHROMO GIVEN WITH EVERY POUND OF TEA 



44 West Fifth Street. 

87 South High Street. 

18 Prospect Street. 

4 Bates House Block. 

- 121 Fourth Street. 



182 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



BARGAINS IN PINE HAIR 



Look at these Prices and Examine my Goods before Purchasing 

2 oz., 22 inches, $2. 4 oz., 26 inches, $4. 6 oz., 32 inches, $6. 

ALL LONG HAIR, SHORT STEM SWITCHES. 

4 oz., 26 inches, $9. 5 oz., 32 inches, $15. Natural Curls, $1, $2, 

and upward, to $10 each. Combings made into 

switches at Fifty Cents an ounce. 

MARCELLUS W. DYER, 

IMUPOKTEIl OF FIS^ErVCH HAIK, 

CORNER FIFTH AND VINE, Next to Weatherby's 



OLIVER n. GEFFROY. JOUN B. GIBSON. 

GIBSON HOUSE. 

GEFFROY i& GIBSON^, - Froprietors, 

"Walnut Street, between Fourth and Fifth, 

8am'l K. II. McGlasson, "k 

M.'f.^Yoi-ng, [in Office. ' CINCmiVATI, O. 

J. B. Kampe, J 



With pleasure we announce to the traveling public, that the new addi- 
tion to the GIBSON HOUSE is completed. 

The location is unsurpas.sed by that of any hotel in the city. Being situ- 
ated in the center of the business portion of the city, within one square of 
the Post-Office, Board of Trade Rooms, Chamber of Commerce, 
and directly oiipositc the Young Men's Mercantile Library, and 
convenient to all places of interest and amusement, makes the CiBSON the 
most desirable hotel in Cincinnati for lousiness men and the traveling pub- 
lic. All Street Railroad Cars pass our House, or wituin half 
a Square of it, to and from all Railroad Depots. 

No exertion will be sjiared to make the Gihson House tirst-class in every 
respect. Soliciting a call from you and your friends when you visit the 
city. 4 

January, 1875, GEFFROY & GIBSON, Proprietors. 



ADVERTISEHrENTS. 183 



ESTABLISHED IN 1S6I. 



JAMES SPILLMAN & CO. 
WHOLESALE GROCERS 

AND 

COMMISSION 3IERCHANTS, 

19 and 31 Pike Street, 

COYINGTON, KY. 



5@" "We keep constantly on hand a well selected stock of Gro- 
ceries, -which we offer at the lowest market price, and pride our- 
selves especially in suiting the Kentucky trade. 



WALNUT STREET HOUSE, 

WALNUT STREET, BETWEEN SIXTH AND SEVENTH, 

CINCINNATI, O. 



184 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOHN SHILLITO & CO. 

Importers of and Dealers in 

UPHOLSTERY GOODS, 

101, 103 & 105 West Fourth Street, 

C live 11^]^ AT I, O. 




WHOLESALE MILLINERY, 

CINCI]Sri^A.TI, o, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TRIMMED HATS AND BONNETS, 

FOB THE MILLINERY TRADE. 

The Millinery Trade can be supplied at all times with new and 
desirable goods at the Lowest Cash Prioe3. All orders attended to 
promptly and carefully. 

DEVOU & CO., 

137 Race St., bet. Third and Fourth, 
CINCINNATI, O. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 185 



Jeffras, Seeley & Co, 



IMPORTERS OF 



FII^E DRY GOODS, 

SILKS AND MILLINERY. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

CLOAKS, SUITS AND LADIES' UNDERWEAR, 

Hare at all times the Largest Stock and Lowest Prices. 

99 West Fourth Street, next to Post Office, 

CnVCINNA-TI. 



JLgrents for TTtEFOXJSSE S:iX> GlLiOVES. 

WM. H. POWELL. CHAS. LEVASSOR 

WM. H. POWELL & CO. 

Successors to POWELL & PIEEOE, 

Matters A Furriers^ 

54 WEST FOURTH STREET, 

CINCINNATI, O. 



186 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



A. 0. RICHARDS, 

MANUFACTURER OF FURNITURE, 

Warerooms, JVb. 12 East Fourth Street, 
CIJVCIJVJ^ATI, 0. 



Designing and Manufacturing Furniture for Dwellings 

A SPECIALTY. 



Pactory, Nos. 519, 521, 523, 525 and 527 W. Sixth St. 

im% A, nmitmwf, 

importer of 

FRENCH CHINA, GLASSWARE 

AND 

Bohemian, Lava, Pafian k Bisque Goods, German Pancj Goods, ici 

Nos. 46 and 48 WEST FIFTH STREET, 

CINCINNATI, O. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 187 



EST-A-BIjISHEX) 1840. 



JOSEPH H. PEEBLES' SOirS, 

GKOCSRS AUD xmfohtshs. 

Coffees and Teas Specialties. 

ENGLISH, FRENCH AND ITALIAN GOODS. 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CiaARS. 



AN INSPECTION OF OUK STOCK SOLICITED. 



N. E. COR. FIFTH AND RACE STREETS, 

EASTERN BRANCH, WESTEKN BRANCH, 

64 East Fourth Street. Seventh and Mound. 



BURNET HOUSE, 

Third and Vine Streets, 

CINCINNATI, o. 

To be remodeled and refitted with all modern improvements, early in 
1875, including "Otis Safety Elevators," which, with its CENTRAL LO- 
CATION, will make it the MOST CONVENIENT and COMFORTABLE 
Hotel in the city. 



188 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 



MANUMCTDBED r 



BY 



Geo. A. Geofgi. 




JAMESTOWN, 



IsT. -^. 



[stablishei 



1865. 



Are a work of art. showin<; scientific knowledge and artistic pro- 
ficiencj\ Their great reputation is the result of a careful study of all 
that constitutes 

A PERFECT INSTRUMENT! 

The invention of many important improvements peculiar to them, and 
the adoption of all others of recognized value. Among the chief points 
of their uniform excellence are, a 

Powerful, Resonant and Superb Tone, 

"Which, instead of deteriorating, improves by use; purity and perfect 
evenness throughout the entire scale, and 

GREAT DURATION OP SOUND, 

■which may be modulated at pleasure, from the softest whisper to a 
majestic grandeur and power. The touch is easy, even, elastic, respon- 
sive, and the action is remarkable for pliability and precision. None 
but the best and finest materials of every kind are used in their con- 
struc'Jon, and the employment of the most experienced artisans, place 
these instruments 

IN THE FOREMOST RANK 

of the few strictly first-class Pianos made. 

FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES, 

Manufacturers' lowest prices, &c., of the 
above, and other first-class Pianos, Church 
and Parlor Organs, and Musical Merchan- 
dise generally, address 

J. IF. CBTJM, General AgU, 

PARIS, K^. 




J. C. FvINGWALT. L. M. EINGWALT. A. R. RINGWALT- 

JOS. 0. RINGWALT & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

OAEPETINaS 

ALSO, 

OIL CLOTHS & IVIATTIIXOS, 

OF VAKIOUS WIDTHS AND QUALITIES. 



Our prices are as low as any in this market. QUALITY AND STYLE 
CONSIDERED, and we have a number of PRIVATE PATTERNS in 
different grades. 

No. 73 WEST FOURTH STREET, 
ci:ivci]vi\ATi. 



ED. TAYLOR, 

BMT G O OJDS, 

PAUIS, KY.