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Full text of "The Housewife's Companion"

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RADCUFFE COLLEGE UBRARYj 



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WOMEN'S ARCHIVES 

Transferred from 

HARVARD COLLEGE UBRARY 

1960 




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POMPI^IMEKTS OF 



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WHOLESALE 




440 

^A^HINQTON ^TF(EET, 

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TUB 



HOUSEWIFE'S COMPANION: 



Presented with the Compliments of 



A. SHUMAN & CO., 



Wholesale and Retail 



BOYS' CLOTHIERS, 



440 Washington Street, Boston. 



BOSTON: 
PUBLISHED BY LOCKWQOD. BROOKS & CO. 

roa TBB COMFILBRS. 

1878. 



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rtlbt- 



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Copyright 1878 by 
A. Brumak & Co. 



Compiled and Arranged by 
Henbt M. MXTnEVB. 






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PREFACE 



The aim of this little book is to indicate how to serve dishes, as 
well as to give cooking receipts, coupled with some very valuable 
information as to affairs generally. Too many receipts are avoided, 
although quite enough are furnished for any practical cook-book. 
There are generally only two or three really good modes of cooking 
a material, and one becomeB bewildered and discouraged in trying to 
select and practise from books which contain often from a thousand 
to three thousand receipts. 

No claim is laid to originality, " Receipts which have not stood the 
test of time and experience are of but little worth.^^ The authors have 
willingly availed themselves of the labors of others, and, having care- 
fully compared existing works, — adding here and subtracting there, 
— and having also experience in America and Europe, hope that they 
have produced a simple and practical book, which will enable a family 
to live well and in good style, and, at the same time, with reasonable 
economy. 



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INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Boys' and Children's Retail Department, 6 

"Don't like Short Pants "(trade mark), 12 

Exterior Retail Department A. Shaman &, Co., 54 

Boys' "Cadet" and "Harvard" Suits, 55 

(Cents' Spring and Fall Overcoats, 58 

Gents' Morning and Walking Suits, 59 

Gents' S. B. Cutaway Frock Suits, 60 

Gents'"Prince Albert" D.B. Frock and Vest, 61 

Gents' D. B. Sack Suits, 62 

Exterior Wholesale Department A. Shuman & Co., ... .63 

(Kent's Retail and Custom Department 64 

Boys' "Cossacque" Overcoat, 70 

Children's "Knickerbocker" Suits, 76 

Children's "SaUor" Kilts, 89. 

Children's Scotch Dress Kilts, * . 91 

Children's "Newport" Suits, 86 

Children's "Hub "Suits, 93 

Children's "Creedmore" Suits, 83 



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INDEX, 



Almanac, 14 

Bitters, Quinine, . . .89 
Baking Powder, . . .93 
Blankets, to clean . . .86 
Black Ink, .... 84 

Beverages, 74 

Bitters, 89 

Carload, what constitutes a . 81 
Chicken Salad, . . . .76 

Cakes, 67 

Census of Boston, . . .56 
Cooking as an accomplishment, 9 
Carving, Lessons on . .10 
Cooks' Weights and Measures, 13 
Card Etiquette, . . . 19 
Charlotte Russe, ... 62 
Cold Punch, . . . .74 
Consumption, Syrup for . . 91 
Double Thread Sewing, . . 15 
Distances of Cities from New 

York, 21 

Dishes for Baby, . . .78 
Decimal Table, .... 96 

Entrees 34 

Engravings, to clean . . 82 
*Eye Lotion, . . . .91 

Fish, 26 

Fire Alarm, . . . 25 to 37 
Feathers, to clean . . .84 
General Information, . . 92 
Gold Chains, to clean . . 82 
Glass Stoppers, to remove . 88 
Hack Fares, .... 43 
Horse Power, .... 88 
Household Recipes, .' . .80 
HairDresdng, .... 93 
Interest Table, . . . .17 
Ice Creams, . .' . .70 
Introductory Address, . . 7 
Insects, to kiH .... 62 

Joints, 45 

Lemonade, . . . .74 



Laws for the Million, . . 90 
Land Measure, . . . .72 

Maxims, 16 

Metric Measures, . . ..22 
Mince Pies, .... 54 
Man's Power, . . . .88 
Measures of Capacity, Dimen- 
sion of .... 84 
Mosquito Bite, Cure for . . 89 
Marble, to clean . . .93 
Nose, Bleeding of . . .92 
Oil Cloth, to clean ... 83 

Oysters, 30 

Potatoes, How to cook . . 77 
Port Wine Negus, . . .74 

Pastry, 52 

Presidents of the United States, 24 
Public Buildings, . . .38 

Poultry, 47 

Post Office Regulations, . • 49 

Puddings, 56 

Population of United States, . 65 
Population of Boston, . . 57 

Preface, 5 

Paint, to clean . . . .81 

Roasts, 45 

Ratesof Travel per hour, . 87 
Rose Water, . . . .92 

Soups, 13 

Salads, 75 

Square Measure, . . .72 
Silk, to clean .... 84 
Sticking Plaster, ... 90 
Toothache, Cure for . . .85 
Toast, Water . . . .91 
Vols an Vent, .... 53 
Wages, Table of ... 20 
Weights and Measures, . 71 to 75 
Weights of a Bushel of different 

things, .... 80 

Weights of a Cubic Foot of dif- • 

ferent substances, . . 79 



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THE 

START, RISE, AND PROGRESS 

OP 

A. SHUMAN & CO., 

"vsri3:oijESA.ijE oijOTI3:ier.s, 

Ho. 9 Sninineri to oomer of Washington Street 

RETAIL DEPARTMENT, 

440 Washington Street, Boston. 



Id 1864, FhilippSy Shuman A Co, commenced business in Boston, 
being at that time the pioneers of the speciality of Boys* Clothing at 
Wholesale in this section of the country. 

The great fire of Nov. 9, 1872, swept away their entire establish- 
ment, and destroyed their whole stock ; but the indomitable persever- 
ance and energy of this enterprising house came to the front, and but 
a few months later they had manufactured a new stock, and bad 
leased the premises then 234 Washington Street, and just vacated 
by Eempton, Stevenson & Co., and on the morning of the 3d of Feb- 
ruary, 1873, opened their Betail Estahlishinent in connection with 
their Wholesale, since which time, having paid strict attention to 
the requirements of the public, their vast experience as man- 
ufacturers of Boys^ Chihing, making and retailing only such goods 
as they felt confident would prove of value to tlie purchaser, has 
earned for them the high reputation they now hold us mcrcliants and 
manufacturers. 

On the morning of May 7, 1876, the fiery fifend once more laid his 
hand on their property, and caused them a serious loss, not only to 
stock, but the still gi'eater damage to their Spring and Summer trade, 
just then opening. 

Again, with the perseverance which has always characterized this 
firm, they went to work, and after refitting and redecorating their 
elegant premises, they reopened on Aug. 30, 1876, during which 
time, we might add, they held one of, if not t/ie most successful Fire 
Sales ever held in this country. Their business has extended now, 
till they felt compelled to embrace Youths' and Gentlemen's Clothing, 
and for this purpose used the second floor of their building, now 
numbered 440 Washington Street. 

On March 1, 1877, a still further change took place, Mr. Philipps 



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8 

retiring from the firm in consequence of ill-health, and the new firm 
and style being A, Shuman & Co., as it remains at present 

The immense influx of trade in every department, both Wholesale 
and Retail, now demanded more room, and in August, 1877, the present 
firm leased the property corner Summer and Washington Sti*eets, 
directly over Shreve, Crump & Low, anc} adjoining their retail depart- 
ment, where they carry on their extensive wholesale trade, cutting, 
and work-rooms Every floor in this building communicates with 
their retail house by iron-cased doors, and the two buildings are fitted 
up with speaking-tubes and electric bells, so that instant communi- 
cation can be had with any part of the two buildings. 

The ground floor in their Retail Department, No. 440 Washington 
Street, is used exclusively for Children's and Boys' Clothing ; is hand- 
somely lighted, and every comfort necessary for their patrons. Dress- 
ing and retiring rooms, and their Centennial show-case, the hand- 
somest in the country, calling forth the plaudits of every visitor to 
this department. 

The second floor, recently extended to the same length as the first, 
contains their Young Men's and Getitlemen's ready-made and ctcstom 
departments, and here may be found every conceivable shade and 
quality of fabrics, domestic and foreign, that one can call by name. 

Passing up to the third story, we find duplicate stock-rooms and 
custom work-rooms, — everywhere one cannot fail to notice the sys- 
tem and regularity that pervades each department in this well- 
organized concern. 

They now do a flourishing business both as retail, wholesale, and 
custom clothiers, and their work is only of the first-class order. 
Goods are never placed on their retail counters till they have had the 
strictest and most searching examination as to the sewing and make, 
and no garment is received into stock that will not *' pass muster '^ 
Their patrons are particularly requested to report any inattention on 
the part of employes, or any garment that may not prove satisfactory 
in wear. Honesty of purpose and high-minded dealing is always 
appreciated by our critical community. 

This is the cause of their constantly growing trade during the 
hardest of times, and this the Emporium where parents go with 
their b6ys with perfect confidence when in want of good and substan- 
tial goods ; and even gentlemen of late consider it their rendezvous 
for fashionable and well-made cut and trimmed garments at the 
popular house of A, Bhuman & Co, 



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COOKINa AS AN ACCOMPLISHMENT. 



The reason why cooking in America is, as a rule, so inferior, is not 
because American women are less able and apt than the women of 
France or England, and not because the American men do not discuss 
and appreciate the merits of good cooking and the pleasure of enter- 
taining friends at their own table ; it is merely because American 
women seem possessed with the idea that it is not the fashion to 
know how to cook ; that, as an accomplishment, the art of cooking is 
not as ornamental as that of needle-work or piano-playing. We do 
not undervalue these last accomplishments. A young lady of esprit 
should understand them ; but she should understand, also, the accom- 
plishment of cooking. A young lady can scarcely have too many 
accomplishments, for they serve to adorn her home, and are attractive 
and charming, generally. But of them all, — painting, music, fancy 
work, or foreign language, — ^is there one more fascinating and useful, 
or one which argues more intelligence in its acquisition, than the 
accomplishment of cooking P 

From innate coquetry alone, the French women appreciate the 
powers of their dainty table. Cooking is an art they cultivate. Any 
of the ?MtU monde are proud to originate a new dish, many famous 
ones doing them credit in bearing their names. 

Moral. 
Apply yourself to the practical remedy of your wrongs ; proceed to 
the reform of your domestic government, and turn your thoughts to 
that art which, coming into action every day in the year during the 
longest life, includes within its circles the whole philosophy of economy 
and order, the preservation of good health, and the tone of good society 
— and all peculiarly within your province. ^ 



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10 



LESSONS ON THE ART OF CARVING. 



Do not reproach us for not having said a word about carving ; we 
have not done so, as we think it not only an accomplishment, but, at the 
same time, something it is well to know a little about. It is rather 
difficult to give you a correct description without drawings, but a few 
general remarks m:iy be useful. 

Cut Beef, Veal, Ham, Tongue, and Breasts of Poultry with a sharp 
knife, very thin ; Mutton, Lamb, and Pork rather thicker. 

Never rise from your seat to carve ; never cut across the grain of 
the meat, that is, not across the ribs of beef, as we have seen some per- 
sons do ; but only those do so who do not know how to carve or 
appreciate the true flavor of the meat. 

Never place a fork through the back of a fowl, in order to carve 
the leg and wings, but run the knife gently down each side the breast, 
detaching the leg and wing at the same time. 

Never cut up the body of poultry at table, that should always be 
left ; but game should be cut up, as many epicures prefer the back- 
bone. For a sirloin of beef, the under part of the loin should always 
be cut when hot, and the ux)per part cut straight from the backbone 
towards the outside of the ribs ; by this plan you will not spoil the 
appearance of the joint. 

Ribs of Beef should be carved in the same way, cutting thin and 
slanting. 

Bound of Beef: cut a slice half an inch thick from the outside, and 
then carve thin slices, with a little fat. 

Aitch-bone, the same. 

Fillet of Veal, the same. 

Loin of Veal, carve as the Sirloin of Beef, serving some of the 
kidney and fat to each person. 

ShouldiBr of Veal, begin from the knuckle, cut thin and slanting. 

Saddle of Mutton will, if properly carved, serve a great many per- 
sons ; instead of cutting a long slice the whole length, put your knife 
9 under the meat and cut it away from the bone, then cut it like thin 



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11 

chops, serving lean and fat together ; according to the usual plan, a 
saddle of mutton will serve but few people, and the flavor of the 
meat is not so good as when served this way. 

Necks and Loins : the bones should be severed by a small meat< 
* saw, and not a chopper, and the bone cut through when serving, and 
carve slanting. 

Haunches are usually carved by making a cut near the knuckle and 
cutting a slice from that through the loin ; but by a plan I have 
adopted, I find that the meat eats better, and the joint goes farther. 
I carve it like the leg and saddle ; that is, I cut a slice out of the leg 
part and a slice from the loin, and serve together. This is more 
economical, but would not do for venison. 

Lamb. — For Leg and Shoulders, proceed as for Mutton. The Ribs, 
when well prepared and the bones properly separated, carve into 
cutlets, and serve with a piece of the brisket. 

Quarter of Lamb : the ribs should be sawed through, and the bones 
disjointed previous to cooking. The shoulder should be then nicely 
removed, and divide the ribs and serve one to each person. 



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12 



BON'T XiIKE SHOBT PAKTS, 




So his sister assists him to wear them out on the ffrindstone. 



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13 



SOUPS. 



Stock for All Kinds op Soup. 

Procure a knuckle of veal about six pounds in weight, which cut 
into pieces about the size of an egg, as also half a pound of lean ham 
or bacon ; then rub a quarter of a pound of butter upon the bottom 
of the stewpan (capable of holding about two gallons), into which 
put the meat and bacon, with half a pint of water, two ounces of 
salt, three middle- 
sized onions, with 1 I cold water, and 
two cloves in each, tiidbq cooki'S when upon tke 
one turnip, a car- xable of Weights and Measnres. P0^°* ^^ boiling, 
rot, half a leek, , ^ ,^ . ^ ' draw it to the cor- 
aad half a head of } '»^°'of"J^ii'e'i°eSliS?"^% ner of the fire, 
celery; put the pound and 7 ounces. where it must 
cover upon the ^ quart of granulated sugar = 1 gently simmer for 
stewpan, which ipiSTo? closely pacS butter = Sirce hours, carc- 
place over a sharp i pound. fully skimming off 
fire, occasionally Butter size of an egg = about 2 ^^^jy particle of 
stirring round its lo eggs = i pound. grease and scum ; 
contents with a J cupfuis of sugar = i pound. pass your stock 

■^^^A^^ a«vr^r>» «« S cupfuis of sifted flour =1 pound. fu «^ « «.u « fi«^ 

wooden spoon, un- i hoping tabie-spoonfiii = one- through a fine 

til the bottom of sixthof agiii. hair sieve, and it 

the stewpan is ^ «^i' =i£*^»i^ PJUJl^ ^ ^''"*' is ready for use 

covered with a , . . , ^ when required. 

wh 1 1 ft th i pki fih ^»- In my receipts, I prefer, ge" 

Wniie rniCKlsn eraUy, the use of terms of mes 

glaze, which will ure to those of weight, becau 

ncrhtlv ».Hhftrft tn ^^ former are more conve 

iigntiy aonere to j^^^ ^^^ ^^ m^ority of hous«. ^. 
the spoon ; fill up keepers. This^oup is en- 

the stewpan with | : | tirely the heredi- 
tary property of 
France, and is supposed to be so called from the months of tJune 
and July, when all vegetables are in full season; and to make 
it in reality as originally made, a small quantity of every descrip- 
tion of vegetables should be used, including lettuce and sorrel ; how- 
ever, some few sorts of vegetables mixed together make a most 
estimable soup. Weigh half a pound of the vegetables in fair pro- 
portions to each other ; that is, carrots, turnips, onions, celery, and 
leeks, which cut into small fillets an inch in length, and of the thick- 
ness of a trussing-needle ; when done, wash dry, and pass them in 
butter and sugar as before ; proceeding the same with the soup, add- 
ing just before it is done a little sorrel, cabbage-lettuce, or peas, if 
handy, but it would be excellent without eitlier. 



Julienne Soup. 



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14 



COMPLI1IENT8 OF ▲. 8HUXAN * GO. 



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Pbintaniere Soup. 

Cut a small (joanti^ of vei^etables, but rather less carrot and 
turnip, introducinff a little celery, leek, and young spring onions, 
add sufficient stocK, and cook till vegetables are done ; but ten min- 
utes before taking it from the fire, wash a few leaves of sorrel, which 
cut small and put into the soup ; in summer, a few fresh-boiled peas 
or French beans served in it is an improvement. 

In whatever shape you may cut the vegetables for soup, always be 
cautious not to 
cut some pieces 
larger than 
others, and the 
whole of them 
rather small than 
large; for if some 
pieces should be 
small and others 
large, the smaller 
pieces would be 
quite in puree, 
whilst the larger 
ones would still 
be quite hard, 
which would 
cause your soup 
not only to eat 
badly, but give it 
an unsightly ap- 
pearance, for the 
vegetable boiled 
to a pur^e would 









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make the soup 
thick. The above 
remark, although 
simple, is still 
very important. 

A SIMPLE MooK- 
TuBTLB Soup. 

Put four pig's 
feet, or calPs feet, 
and one pound of 
veal into four 
quarts of cold 
water, and let it 
simmer for five 
hours, reducing 
it to two quarts. 
Strain it, and let 
it remain over- 
night. The next 
day skim off the 
fat from the top, 
and remove the settlings from the bottom. About half an hour 
before dinner put the soup on the fire, and season it with half a 
tea-spoonful of powdered thyme, a salt-spoonful of mace, a salt- 
spoonful of ground cloves. Simmer it for ten minutes. Now make 
a rouz in a saucepan, viz., put in one ounce of butter (size of a wal- 
nut), and, when it bubbles, sprinkle in one and a half ounces of flour 
(one table-spoonful). Stir it until the flour assumes alight-brown 
color ; add tne soup, and stir all together with the egg-whisk. 



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CmcKEN Soup (Potage a la Reine). — Francatelli. 

Roast a large chicken. Clear all the meat from the bones, chop, 
and pound it thoroughly with a quarter of a pound of boilied rice. 
Put me bones (broken) and the skin into two quarts of cold water. 
Let it simmer for some time, when it will make a weak broth. 
Strain it, and add it to the chicken and rice. Now press this all 
through a sieve, and put it away until dinner-time. Take off the 



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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A GO. 



15 



grease on top ; heat it without boiling, and, just before sending to 
table, mix into it a gill of boiling cream. Season carefolly with 
pepper and salt. 

Bouillon served at Luncheons, Gebmans, etc. 

Purchase about six pounds of beef and bone (soup bones) for ten 
persons. Cut up the meat and break the bones ; add two quarts of 
cold water, and simmer slowly until all the strength is extracted 
from the meat. It will take about five hours. Strain it through a 
fine sieve, removing every particle of fat; and if there is more 
than ten cupfuls, reduce it by boiling to that quantity. Season only 

with pepper ^__ 

and sit. It I I cut as many 

is served in -^ NEW FEATUJRE* round scoops 

bouillon cups -^^'•'''*'^*>*^_ JiBf — « ^ possible, 

at luncheons, ^j^ .^mS^ ^^^^"^^^ m ^* ^ stew- 
at^ evening jBm^l^^ 1. * ■ pan with but- 

companies, yBSE>H^ '^^tfai»*»^|g^|fc^' B ter and sugar. 
Germans, etc. ^ -^ vjHJBaoil^^^^! ^ - ^^ ^^ light- 

r>% A _ ^^i dAA clear 

CLEAR ARTI- TI7K call attention to our new system of stock and fin 
CHOEIE Soup. ^^ tewing aU onr Garments with DouBU jgjj g^^p ^ 

Peel twelve '^T'f'^!'^''^T^7^'f^^l'\^^'^ in other re- 
Jerusalem ;mder.toodtomaterUllyB^^^^^ ^^. r^^^ 

artichokes ^"^^^ **' ^"^y" Clothing;-and tbat, most Im- -omaindpr of 
u- S 11 portantofaU, Beams warranted not to rip. remamaer 01 

Which well ^^^ „ ^ ,^„^^ ,^ ^^^^ ^^^^ either tur- 

wash, then nips, arta- 

choKes, o r 
carrots ma v be boiled, and mashed with a little butter, pepper, and salt, 
. and served as a vegetable, or reserved to make a soup pur6e ; the re- 
mains of other vegetables from the previous soups should also be re- 
served for flavoring of stock, instead of using the fresh vegetables. 



Macaroni Soup 

Is only an addition of macaroni to the stock-jelly. However, boil 
the macaroni first in salted water. When done, drain it, and cut 
it into about two or three inch lengths. Put these pieces into the 
soup when it is simmering on the fire, then serve it a few minutes 
after. Many send, at the same time, a plate of grated cheese. 
This is passed, a spoon with it, after the plates of soup are served, 
each person adding a spoonful of it to their soup, if they choose. 
They probably will not cnoose it a second time. 

Vegetable Soup without Meat {Puree aux Legumes) , 

Cut up a large plateful of any and all kinds of vegetables one 
happens to have ; for exwaple, onions, carrots, potatoes (boiled in 
other water), beans (of any kind), parsnips, celery, peas, parsley. 



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16 



COMPLIMBNTS OF A. 8HUMAN A CO. 



leeks, turnips, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, etc., always having 
either potatoes or beans for a thickening, iirst put into a saucepan 
half a tea-cupful of butter (clarified suet or stock-pot fat is just as 
ffood). When it is very hot, put in first the cut-up onions. Stir 
them well, to prevent from burning. When they assume a fine red 
color, stir in a largo table-spoonful of flour until it has the same 
color. Now stir in a pint of hot water, and some pepper and salt. 
Mind not to add pepper and salt at first, as the onions and flcfur 
would then more readily bum. Add also all the other vegetables. 
Let them simmer (adding more hot water when necessary) for two 
hours ; then press them through a coUendar. Return them to the 
range in a soup-kettle, and let them sinmier until the moment of 
serving. 

* ' ed: Cut with a 



Spring Soup. 

A stock with 
any spring 
vegetables 
added which 
have first been 
parboiled in 
other water. 
Those gener- 
ally used are 
peas, aspara- 

fus-tops, or a 
ew young 
onions. This 
soup is often 
colored with 
caramel. Or, 
HereisFran- 
catelli's re- 
ceipt for 
spring soup, a 
little simplifi- 



Keep good company or none. Never be 
idle ; if your hands cannot be usefttily em- 
ployed, Attend to the caltivation of your 
mind. Always speak the truth. Make 
few promises. Live up to your engage- 
ments. Good company and good conver- 
sation are the very sin e ws of virtue. CK>od 
character is above all things else. Tour 
character cannot be essentially injured 
except by your own acts. If any one 
speaks ill of you, let your life be so that 
none will believe him. Drink no intoxi- 
cating liquors. Ever live (misfortunes ex- 
cepted) within your income. When you 
retire to bed, think over what you have 
been doing during the day. Make no haste 
to be rich, if you would prosper. Never 
play at any game of chance. Avoid temp- 
tation, through fear you may not witn- 
stand it. Earn money before you spend it. 
Never run into debt unless you see a way 
to get out again . Never borrow if you can 
possibly avoid it. Do not marry until you 
are able to support a wife. Never speak 
evil of anyone. Be just before you are 
generous. Keep yourself innocent if you 
would be happy. Save when you are 
young to spend when you are old. Read 
over the above maxims at least once a 
week. 



vegetable -cut- 
ter two carrots 
and two tm-- 
nips into little 
round shapes; 
add white part 
of a head of 
celery; twelve 
small young 
onions, sliceo, 
without the 
green stalks ; 
and one head 
of cauliflower, 
cut into flow- 
erets. Parboil 
these vegeta- 
bles for Saree 
minutes in 
boiling water. 
Drain, and add 
them to two 
quarts of stock 
made of chick- 



en or beef (chicken is better). Let the whole simmer gently for half 
an hour, then add the white leaves of a head-lettuce (cut the size of 
a half-dollar, with a cutter) . As soon as tender, and when about to 
send the soup to the table, add half a gill of small green peas, and 
an equal quantity of asparagus-heads, which have been previously 
boiled in other water. 

French Pot-au-Feu. 

Out of this earthen pot comes the favorite soup and bouilli, which 

has been everlastingly famed as having been the support of many 

generations of all classes of society in France, — from the opulent to 

the poorest individual, — all pay tribute to its excellence and worth. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAN ft CO. 



17 



In fact this sou^ and bouilli is to the French what the roast beef and 
plum-pudding is on a Sunday to the English. No dinner in France 
IS served without soup, and no good soup is supposed to be made 
without the pot-au-feu. 

The following is the receipt : Put in the pot-au-feu six pounds of 
beef, four quarts of water, set near the fire, skim ; when nearly boil- 
ing add a spoonful and a half of salt, half a pound of liver, two car- 
rots, four turnips, ei^ht younff or two old leeks, one head of celery, 
two onions ana one burnt, with a clove in each, and a piece of pars- 
nip, skim again, and let simmer four or five hours, adding a little 
cold water 
n ow and 
then; take off 
part of the fat, 
put slices of 
bread into the 
tureen, lay 
fialf the vege- 
tables over, 
and half the 
broth, and 
serve the meat 
separate with 
the vegetables 
around. 



known. Sor- 
rel can be ob- 
tained, in sea- 
son, at all the 
French mar- 
kets in Ame- 
rica. 

For four 
quarts of soup, 
put into a 
saucepan a 
piece of butter 
the size of an 
egg, two or 
three sprigs of 
parsley, two 
or three leaves 
of lettuce, one 
onion, and a 
pint of sorrel 
(all finely 
chopped), a 
little nutmeg 
pepper, and 
salt. Cover, 
and let them 
cook or sweat 
ten minutes ; 

then add about two table-spoonftds of flour. Mix well , and gradually 
add three quarts of boiling water (stock would be better). Make a 
liaison, i.e., beat the yolks of four eggs (one egg to a quart of soup), 
and mix with them a cupful of cream or rich muk. 

Add a little chevril (if you have it) to the soup ; let it boil ten 
minutes ; then stir in me eggs, or liaison, when the soup is quite 
ready. 

Winter Pea Soup. 

Wash a quart of split peas, which put into a stewpan, with half a 
pound of streaky bacon, two onions in slices, two pounds of veal or 



SoKREL Soup 
(Soup a la 
Bonne Fern- 
me). 

This is a 
most whole- 
some soup, 
which would 
be popular in 
America if it 
were better 



INTEREST TABLE. 


SEVEN PER CENT. 


TIMX. 


•1 


•2 


t8 


^ 


•5 


$6 


•7 


•8 |9J$10 


#100 


♦1000 


Iday, 
































2 


19 


2 •• 
































4 


89 


3 " 




























6 


58 


4 " 


























8 


78 


5 " 


























10 


97 


6 " 

























12 


1.17 


7 " 
























14 


1.36 


8 " 






















2 


16 


1.56 


" 







1 












2 


2 


18 


1.76 


10 " 







1 










2 


2 


2 


19 


1.94 


11 " 







1 










2 


2 


2 


21 


2.14 


12 " 







1 








2 


2 


2 


2 


23 


2.33 


18 " 







1 






2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


25 


2.58 


14 " 







1 






2 


2 


2 


2 


8 


27 


2.72 


16 " 







1 






2 


2 


2 


3 


8 


29 


2.92 


Imo., 


1 




2 






4 


4 


5 


5 


6 


58 


5.83 


2 " 


1 




4 






7 


8 


9 


11 


12 


1.17 


11.67 


8 " 


2 




5 






11 


42 


14 


16 


18 


1.75 


17.50 


4 " 


2 




7 




12 


14 


16 


19 


21 


23 


2.33 


23.83 


5 " 


8 




9 




15 


18 


20 


23 


26 


29 


2.92 


29.17 


6 " 


4 




11 




18 


21 


25 


28 


32 


36 


3.50 


35.00 


7 " 


4 




12 


16 


20 


25 


29 


33 


37 


41 


4.08 


40.88 


8 " 


5 




14 


19 


28 28 


83 


87 


42 


47 


4.67 


46.67 


» 


5 




16 


21 


26 


32 


37 


42 


47 


63 


6.25 


62.50 


10 " 


6 




18 


23 


29 


86 


41 


47 


68 


58 


5.83 


68.83 


11 " 


6 




19 


26 


32 


89 


45 


51 


68 


64 


6.42 


64.17 


lyr.. 


7 




21 


28 


85 


42 


49 


66 


63 


70 


7.00 


70.00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 



COMPLlMBt^S OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



beef, cut into small pieces, and a little parsley, thyme, and bay-leaf, 
add a gallon of water, witli a little salt and su?ar, place it upon the 
fire, and when boiling, stand it at the side until the peas are boiled 
to a puree, and the water has reduced to half; then take out the 
meat, which put upon a dish, to be eaten with the bacon, keeping it 
hot, rub the soup through a hair sieve or tammy, put it into another 
stewpan, and when boihng, serve. The meat may also be served in 
the tureen if approved of. Maigre pea soup may also be made by 
omitting the meat, adding half a pound of butter, one quart of milk, 
and omitting a quart of water. 

two turnips, 
two larffe 
onions cut in- 
to small dice, 
and six cab- 
bage-lettuces 
if in season 
(the whole 
well washed) 
and let sim- 
mer until 
quite tender ; 
skim off all 
the fat, and 
serve either 
T\ith the meat 
in the soup 
or separate- 
ly. If in sea- 
son, a pint of 
froeii peas 
oiled in the 
soup is a 
great im- 
provement. 



Hodge- 
podge. 

Cut two 
pounds of 
ireshscra^of 
mutton into 
small pieces, 
which put in- 
to a stewpan, 
with three 
quarts of cold 
water and a 
table - spoon- 
ful of salt, set 
it upon the 
fire, and 
when boiling 
place it at the 
comer to sim- 
mer, keeping 
it well skim- 
med; let it 
simmer an 
hour, then 
add a good- 
sized carrot. 



INTEREST TABLE. 


SIX PEB CBIIT. 


TIMB. 


•1 


•2 


t8 


♦4 


*L 


#6 


♦7 


$8 


$9 


♦W 


•100 


#1000 


Iday, 
































2 


17 


2 " 































8 


83 


8 " 































6 


60 


<4 u 




























7 


67 


6 " 








t) 










1 








8 


83 


6 " 


















1 








10 


1.00 


7 " 


















1 








12 


1.17 


8 " 











1 






1 








18 


1.83 


9 " 











1 






1 






2 


19 


^ 1.60 


W •* 








1 


1 






1 




2 


2 


17 


1.67 


11 •• 








1 


1 






1 




2 


2 


18 


1.83 


12 «• 








1 


I 






1 


2 


2 


2 


20 


2.00 


13 " 








1 


1 






2 


2 


2 


2 


22 


2.17 


14 " 








1 


1 






2 


2 


2 


2 


23 


2.33 


15 •• 





1 


1 


1 




2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


26 


2.60 


Imo., 


1 


1 


2 


2 




3 


4 


4 


5 


5 


50 


5.00 


2 " 


1 


2 


3 


4 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1.00 


10.00 


8 " 


2 


3 


5 


6 




•9 


11 


12 


14 


16 


1.50 


15.00 


4 " 


2 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


14 


16 


18 


20 


2.00 


20.00 


6 " 


3 


5 


8 


10 


13 


15 


18 


2U 


23 


25 


2.50 


25.00 


6 " 


3 


6 


9 


12 


15 


18 


21 


24 


27 


30 


3.00 


30.00 


7 " 


4 


7 


11 


14 


18 


21 


25;28 


32 


85 


3.50 


35.00 


8 " 


4 


8 


12 


16 


20 


24 


28 32 


36 


40 


4.00 


40.00 


9 " 


6 





14 


18 


23 


27 


32l36 


41 


45 


4.60 


45.00 


10 " 


5 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


6.00 


50.00 


11 " 





11 


17 


22 


28 


33 


39 


44 


50 


56 


6.60 


55.00 


lyr.. 





12 


18 


24 


30 


36 


42 


48 


54 


00 


6.00 


60.00 



Oyster 

Soup. 

To one quart, 

or twenty-five oysters, add a half pint of water. Put the oysters on 
the fire in the liquor. The moment it begins to simmer ?not boil^ 
for that would shrivel the oysters), pour it through a colanaer into a 
hot dish, leaving the oysters in the colander. Now put into the 
saucepan two ounces of butter (size of an egg) ; when it bubbles, 
sprinkle in a table-spoonful (one ounce) of silted fiour ; let the roux 
cook a few moments, stirring it well with the egg- whisk ; then add 
to it gradually the oyster- juice, and a half pint of good cream (wiiich 
has been brought to a boil in another vessel) ; season carefully with 
cayenne popper and salt ; skim well, and then add the oysters. Do 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPUHKNTS OF A. SHCHAN A GO. 



19 



not let it boil, but serve immediately. An oyster soup is made with 
thickening ; an oyster stew is made without. 

Autumn Soup. 

Cut up four cabbage-lettuces, one cos ditto, a handful of sorrel, and 
a little tarragon and chervil ; when well washed and drained, put 
them into a stewpan, with two cucumbers finely sliced, and two 
ounces of butter, place them over a brisk fire, stirring occasionally, 
until very little liquid remains, then add two table-spoonfuls of flour, 
stirring it well in, then pour over three quarts of stock, made as 
directed, adding a quart of young and fresh green peas. Half an 
hour's boiling will sufSlce for this delicious soup, and the flavor of 

the vegetables ^ 

will tS fully set the stewpan 

preserved ; sea- CAMD ETIQUETTE. over a sharp 
son with a tea- ^_^=4^=^-> fire, moving the 

spoonful of salt «^ . .« . ^ , naeat round oc- 

and two of SU- ^The^»i^caUon.ofconier. turned on casionally, let 

gar. Upper right corner— viait remain until 

__ Upper left corner— Congratulatioli*. the bottom of 

Mulling A- Lower right comer- Adieu. TfT „^"jlTi "„ 

TAWWV SonP Lower left comer— Condolence. tllO Stewpan IS 

7i / Turning the entire left end— A oidl on COVCrcd with a 

Out up a the family. u^^«^:«u«.i ^ 

knuckle of veal V 8 ^. p.-pio«j, .n.w.r. ?w7^5^i~i 

which put into P- P- c- -To t-kc leave. ^eu *dcl three 

a stewDan with To send a card without calling, sifoi- laoie- spooniuis 

o J^™ J;^ K„; flee inability to call in person. of CUrry pOW- 

a piece Ot but- "Party calls'* should be made within der one ofoiir- 

ter half ° «"« ^^^ »<^»- 'i"*" «' *»^« ^^"^^ ' - 



pound of lean 
ham, a carrot, 
a turnip, three 
onions, and six 
apples, add half 
a pint of water; 



ry paste, and 
half a pound of 
flour, stir well 
in, and fill the 
stewpan with a 
gallon of water, 
add a spoonful 

of salt, the half of one of sugar, when boiling, place it at the corner 
of the fire, and let it simmer two hours and a half, skimming off* all 
the fat as it rises, then pass it through a tammy into a tureen ; trim 
some of the pieces of veal, and put it back into the stewpan to boil, 
and serve with plain boiled rice separate. Ox tails or pieces of 
rabbits, chickens, &c., left from a previous dinner, may be served in 
it instead bf the veal. The veal is exceedingly good to eat. 

Purine op Chicken. 

Ingredients : One and a half pounds of chicken, one and a half 
quarts of white stock (made witt veal), half a sprig of thyme, two 
sprigs of parsley, half a blade of mace, one shallot, a quarter of a 
pound of rice, and half a pint of cream. 

Roast the chicken, and when cold cut off all the fiesh ; put the bones 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 



GOMPLIMBMT8 OF A. SHUHAN A CO. 



into the white stock, together with the thyme, mace, parsley, shallot, 
and washed rice ; boil it until the rice is very thoroughly cooked. Li 
the mean time, chop the chicken ; pound it m a mortar ; then pass it 
through a sieve or colander, helping the operation by moistening it 
with a little of the stock. Strain the balance of the stock, allowing 
the rice to pass through the sieve. 

Half an hour before dinner, add the chicken to the stock and heat 
it ivithoiU boiling. Just before serving, add to it half a pint of boil- 
ing cream. Season with pepper and salt. ' 



Crab Soup. 

Open and cleanse twelve young fet crabs (raw), and cut them into 

two parts; 

parboil, and I soup. Stew a 

extract the TABLE OF WAGES BT THE WEEK, short time in 

meat from the the soup - pot 

claws, and the tw* *•*>!• ^ ^>*»«d upon the uroai c»icuution of ten three 1 a r &r e 

^ . «1 ,, noun per day. * o 

fat from the __: onions, one 

top shell. g ^„^ one Two Th«e Pour Fire Six cloVC of gar- 

Scald eight- I ^,„ ^ ^, ^ ^ ^ ^ lie, in one 

een npe to- £ spoonful of 

matoes; skin butter, two 

them and •» «« ;« }.o« J.6o |oo 2.« s.oo spoonfuls of 

squeeze the 5 08{ .83} 1.66} 2.60 8.88| 4.16} 6.00 lard, ana then 

pulp from the « 10 1.00 2.00 8.00 4.00 6.00 coo put in the to- 

seed, and chop 3 {a} liJ^J iSf 4.00 siaaf CMf sioo matoes, and, 

it fine; pour 9 15 i>6o 3.00 4.60 6.00 7.60 9.00 after stewine: 

boiling water J« jjj \^ l^ t:«o ?;«| l^\ }o.oo a few minutes^ 

over the seed 12 20 2.00 4.00 e.oo s.oo 10.00 12.00 aaa the meat 

and luice, and 1* 23J 2.83J 4.66| 7.00 9.83J ii.eei 14.00 from the crab 

^o^ivi pfVoJrt 16 26 2.60 6.00 7.60 10.00 12.50 16.00 /lowp fvT^r* 

having strain- jg 26| 2.66| 6.83J 8.00 io.66| 13.33J 16.00 claws, then 
ed it from the is so 8.00 6.00 9.00 12.00 16.00 is.oo the crabs, and 

rapH iidfl It tn 20 88| 8.83i 6.66} 10.00 13.88i 16.66} 20.00 lofif. fhA fat 

seea, use It to ^ ^i ^^t ^jjf ^^^ ^^^t ^^t ^^ last me lat 
make the from the back 

shell of the 
crab ; sift over it grated bread crumbs or crackers. Season with salt 
and cayenne and black pepper, parsley, sweet marjoram, thyme, half 
tea-spoonful of lemon juice, and the peel of a lemon ; pour in the 
water with which the seed were scalded, and boil it moderately one 
hour. Any firm fish may be substituted for the crab. 



Corn Soup. 

This is a very good soup, made with either fresh or canned com. 
When it is fresh, cut the com from the cob, and scrape off well all 
that sweetest part of the corn which remains on the cob. To a pint 
of corn add a quart of hot water. Boil it for an hour or longer ; then 
press it through the colander. Put into the saucepan butter the size 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN ft 00. 



21 



rJRINCIBAL CITIES. 

Their dlatance from New York, with the differ, 
ence in time. 



CITJES. 



Tdib wnmr 

12 O'CLOCK AT 
NEW TOBK. 



of a small e^^, and when it bubbles sprinkle in a heaping table- 
spoonful of sifted flour, which cook a minute, stirring it well. Now 
add half of the com pulp, and, when smoothly mixed, stir in the re- 
mainder of the corn ; add cayenne pepper, salt, a scant pint of boil- 
ing milk, and a cupful of cream. 

This soup is very nice with no more addition, as it will have. the 

gur© taste of 

two pounds), 
a chicken, a 
small slice of 
ham, a soup 
bunch (or an 
onion, two 
sprigs of 
parsley, half 
a small car- 
rot, half a 
small pars- 
nip, half a 
stick of cele- 
ry), three 
cloves, pep- 
per, salt, a 
gallon of cold 
water, whites 
and shells of 
two eggs, 
and caramel 
for coloring. 
Let the 
beef, chick- 
en, and ham 
boil slowly 
for f i V e 
hours; add 
the vegeta- 
bles and 
cloves, to 
cook the last 



the com; yet 
many add the 
yolks df two 
eggs just be- 
fore serving, 
mixed with a 
little milk or 
cream, and 
not allowed 
to boil. 
Others add a 
table - spoon- 
ful of tomato 
catsup. 

Amber Soup 
OR Clear 
Broth. 

This soup 
is served at 
almost all 
company din- 
ners. There 
can be no 
better choice, 
as a heavy 
soup is not 
then desira- 
ble. Ingre- 
dients : A 
large soup 
bone (say 



Albany, N.Y. . 
Baltimore, Md. . 
Boston, Mass. . 
Buffalo, N.Y. . 
Burlington, Iowa 
Charleston, 8. O. 
Chicago, 111. . . 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Detroit, Mich. . 
Galveston, Tezag 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Louisville, Ky. . 
La Crosse, Wis. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mobile, Ala. . . 
Montreal, Can. . 
New Orleans, La. 
Omaha, Neb. . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Portland, Me. . 
Q;iincy,IlI. . . 
Richmond, Va. . 
Salt Lake City, U.T. 
San Francisco, CaL 
St. Joseph, Mo. . 
St. Louis, Mo. . . 
St. Paul, Minn. . . 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 
Washington, D. C. . . 
White Mountains, N. H., 



144 

186 

231 

423 

1118 

6)5 

898 

744 

681 

664 

1822 

812 

852 

1214 

1229 

998 

1628 

396 

1483 

1420 

88 

431 

349 

1169 

356 

2464 

3302 

1391 

1089 

1347 

183 

226 



5 
8 

10 
18 
50 
47 
36 
31 
23 
27 
120 
34 
41 
50 
65 
40 
80 
19 
82 
56 

17 
15 
50 
20 
160 
192 
61 
45 
64 
8 
10 
13| 



12 1 
11 49 
11 50 
11 40 

10 51 

11 86 
11 6 
11 18 
11 80 
11 23 

10 86 

11 11 
11 14 
10 50 

10 56 

11 4 

11 

12 1 
10 56 

10 32 

11 55 

11 36 

12 15 

10 49 

11 46 
9 28 
8 46 

10 37 
10 55 

10 43 

12 

11 47 

12 10 



6 p.m. 
38 a.m. 
" 

24 " 
" 

22 " 

2 " 
16 " 

" 
£4 " 
68 " 
54 " 

4 " 

" 

" 
16 " 

2 " 
44 P.M. 

4 a.m. 

«« 

25 " 
" 
p.m. 
A.M. 

15 " 

" 
19 " 

" 

4 " 
46 " 

IP.M. 
53 A.M. 
80 P.M. 



hour, having 
first fried the 

onion in a little hot fat, and then in it stuck the cloves. Strain the 
soup into an earthen bowl, and let it remain overnight. Next day 
remove the cake of fat from the top ; take out the jelly, avoiding the 
settlings, and mix into it the beaten whites of the effgs with the 
shells. Boll quickly for half a minute ; then, placing Sie kettle on 
the hearth, skim oft carefully all the scum and whites of the eggs 
from the top, not stirring the soup itself. Pass this through the jelly 
bag, when it should be quite clear. The soup may then be put 



Digitized by VjOOQIC ' 



22 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN ft CO. 



aside, and reheated just before serving. Add then' a large table- 
spoonful of caramel, as it gives it a richer color, and also a slight 
flavor. 

MuLLAOATAWNY Soup {m Indian soup). 

Cut up a chicken ; put it into a soup-kettle, with a little sliced 
onion, carrot, celery, parsley, and three or four cloves. Cover it 
with four quarts of water. Add any pieces of veal, with the bones, 
you may have ; of course, a knuckle of veal would be the proper thing. 
When the 



pieces of 
chicken are 
nearly done, 
take them 
out, and 
trim them 
neatly, to 
serve with 
the soup. 
Let the veal 
continue to 
simmer for 
three hours. 
Now fiy an 
onion, a 
small car- 
rot, and a 
stick of cel- 
ery sliced, 
in a little 
butter. 
When they 
are a light 
brown, 
throw in a 
table-spoon- 
ful of flour ; 



The Metric System of Weights and Measures. 

LegaliMed by Ad of the MatHtchuutU 
LeffUlature, March 10, 1877. 



MEA8UBEB OF LENGTH. 



Metric denomina* 
tions and values. 



Metres. 



Mvriameter, 10,000 
Kilometer, 



Hectometer, 

Dekameter, 

Meter, 

Decimeter, 

Centimeter, 

MilUmeter, 



1,000 

100 

10 

1 

1-10 

1-100 

1.1000 



Bqnivalents in denominations 
in use. 



6.2187 milea. 

0.02187 mile, or 3,280 ft. 10 in. 
828 feet 1 inch. 

393.7 inches. 
80.37 inches. 

3.937 inches. 

0.3937 inch. 

0.0394 inch. 



MEASURES OF SURFACE. 



Metric denomina. 
tions and values. 



Bquivalents in denominations 
in use. 



SCOTC H 
COCK-A- 
LEEKIE. 

Trim two 
or three 
bunches of 
flne winter 
leeks, cut- 
ting off the 
roots and 

gart of the 
eads, then 
split each 
in halves 
lengthwise, 
and each 
half into 
three, which 

wash well in two or three waters, then put them into a stewpan, 
with a stock previously made as directed, and a fowl trussed as for 
boiling ; let the whole simmer verv gently at the comer of the fire 
for three hours, keeping it well skimmed, seasoning a little if* re- 
quired; half an hour before serving add two dozen French plums, 
without breaking them; when reader to serve, take out the fowl, 
which cut into neat pieces, place them in a tureen, and pour the leeks 
and broth over, the leeks bein^ then partly in pur6e ; if too thick, 
however, add a drop more brom or water. Should the leeks happen 
to be old and strong, it would be better to blanch them five minutes 
in a gallon of boiling water previous to putting them in the stock. 



Square metres. 
Hectare, 10,000 
Are, 100 

Oentare, 1 



2.471 acres. 
119.6 square yards. 
1560 square Inches. 



Stir it on the 
fire one or 
two min- 
utes ; then 
add a good 
tea-spoon- 
ful of curry 
powder. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



23 



1 prefer a young fowl ; but, should an old one be most hand^, 
stew it a short time in the stock before passing it. This soup will 
keep good several days, and would improve by warming a second 
time. 



THE METRIC SYSTEM (Continued). 

MEASURES OF CAPACITY. 



Metric denominaUoiw and values. 


Bqulvalents in denominations 
in use. 


Names. 


Number 

of 
Litres. 


Cubic Measure. 


Dry Measure. 


Liquid, or Wine 
Measure. 


Kiloleter or Stere, 
Hectoliter, . . . 
Dekaliter, . . . 

Liter, 

Deciliter, . . . 
Centiliter, . . . 
Milliliter, . . . 


1,000 
100 
10 
1 
1-10 
1.100 
1.1000 


1 meter. 

1.10 of a meter. 

10 decimeters. 

1 decimeter. 

1.10ofadecimet»r. 

10 centimeters. 

1 centimeter. 


1.308 cubic yds. 
2 bush., 3.85 pks. 
9.08 quarts. 
0.908 quarts. 
6.1022 cubic in. 
0.6102 cubic in. 
0.061 cubic in. 


264.17 gallons. 
26.417 gallons. 
2.6417 gallons. 
1.0667 quarts. 
0.845 giH. 
0.838 fluid oz. 
0.27 fluid dr>m. 



WEIGHTS. 



Metric denominations and values. 


Equivalents in de- 
nominations in use. 


Names. 


Number 

of 
Grams. 


Weight of what quantity of 
water at maximum density. 


Avoirdupois 
weight. 


Mlllleror Tonneau 
Quintal, . . . 
Myriagram, . . 
Kilogram or Kilo, 
Hectogram, . . 
Dekagram, . . 
Gram, .... 
Decigram, . , . 
Centigram, . . 
Milligram,. . . 






1,000,000 

100,000 

10,000 

1,000 

100 

10 

1 

1.10 

1-100 

1.1000 


1 cubic meter. 

1 hectoliter. 

10 Uters. 

1 liter. 

1 decaliter. 

10 cubic centimeters. 

1 cubic centimeter. 

10 cubic millimeters. 
1 cubic millimeter. 


2204.6 pounds. 
220.46 pounds. 
22.046 pounds. 

2.2046 pounds. 

8.5274 ounces. 

0.8527 ounce. 
15.432 grahis. 

1.5432 grains. 

0.1543 grain. 

0.0154 grain. 



Lentil Soup. 

Cut three onions, a turnip, and the half of a carrot into very thin 
slices, which put into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of but- 
ter, a few spngs of parsley, a sprig of thyme, and two bay-leaves ; 
add also two pounds of leg of beef, cut into small dice ; set the stew- 
pan upon the flro, stirring with a wooden spoon, until its contents 
are fried ra^er brownish, when add one quart of lentils, and three of 
water ; let the whole simmer until the lentils are very tender, when 
season with nearly an ounce of salt and half that quantity of sugar ; 
it is then ready to serve. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



COMPLIMENTS OP A. SHUMAK & CO. 



Vermicelli. 
Put a quart of clear stock into a stewpan upon the fire, and when 
boiling add two ounces of vermicelli ; boil gently ten minutes, and 
it is ready to serve. 

Potato Soup. 

Fry seven or eight potatoes and a small sliced onion in a sauU pan 
in some butter or drippings — stock-pot fat is most excellent for this 
purpose. When they are a little colored, put them into two or three 
pints of hot water (stock would, of course, be better ; yet hot water 
IS offcenest used) ; add also a large heaping table^poonral of chopped 



PBBSIDBNTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Names. 



Qoorge Washington, 
John Adams, . . 
Thomas JcflVirson, 
James Madison, . 
James Montoe, . . 
John Quincy Adams, 
Andrew Jackson, . 
Martin Van Buren, 
Wiliinm U. Harrison, 
John Tyler, . . 
James K. Polk, . 
Zachary Taylor, 
MUlard Fillmore, 
Franklin Pierce, 
James Buchanan, 
Abraham Lincoln, 
Andrew Johnson, 
Ulysses S. Grant, 
Rutherford B. Hayes, 



Bom. 



Feb. 

Oct. 

April 

Mar. 

April 

July 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

May 

Nov. 

April 

Feb. 

Dec. 

AprU 

Oct. 



22, 1732 
SO, 1735 

2, 1748 
16, 1761 

2,1769 
11,1767 
15, 1767 

5, 1782 

9, 1773 
20, 1790 

2, 1795 

24. 1790 
7,1800 

23,1804 

23. 1791 
12, 1809 
29, 1808 
27, 1822 

4,1822 



Inaugurated. 



April 30, 1789 

March 4, 1797 

" 4, 1801 

" 4, 1809 

" 4, 1817 

" 4, 1826 

" 4, 1829 

" 4,1837, 

" 4,1841 

April 6,1841 

March 4, 1845 

" 4, 1849 

July 10,1850 

March 4, 1853 

" 4, 1857 

" 4,1861 

AprU 15, 1866 

March 4, 1869 

" 5, 1677 



Con. in office. 



8 years 
4 " 



4 " . . 
1 month . . 

3 yrs. 11 mos. 

4 years . . 

1 yr. 4 mos. 

2 yrs. 8 mos. 
4 years . . 

4 yrs. 40 d'ys. 
8 yrs. 11 mos. 
8 years . • 



Died. 



Dec, 14, 1799 
July 4,1826 
July 4, 1826 
June 28, 1836 
July 4, 1881 
Feb. 23,1848 
June 8, 1845 
Dec. 27, 1862 
April 4,1841 
Jan. 17,1862 
Juno 15, 1849 
July 9, 1850 
March 8, 1874 
Oct. 8, 1869 
June 1, 1868 
April 15, 1865 
July 81, 1875 



parsley. Let it boil until the potatoes are quite soft. Put all through 
Sie colander. Return the puree to the fire, and let it simmer two or 
three minutes. When just ready to serve, take the kettle off the fire ; 
add plenty of salt and pepper, and the beaten yolks of two or three 
eggs. Do not let the soup boil when the eggs are in, as they would 
curdle. 

Brown Gravies. 

Rub an ounce of butter over the bottom of a stewpan which would 
hold about three quarts ; have ready peeled four onions, cut them 
into thick slices, with which cover the bottom of the stewpan ; over 
these lay about two poimds of beef from the leg or shin, cut into thin 
slices, with the bone chopped very small, add a small carrot, a tur- 
nip cut in slices, and a couple of cloves ; set the stewpan upon a 
gentle fire for ten minutes, shaking it round occasionally to prevent 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMBNT8 OF A. 8HUHAN A CO. 



25 



burning ; after which l^t it go upon a slow fire for upwards of an 
hour, until the bottom is covered with a blackish glaze, but not burnt ; 
-when properly done, and ready for filling up, you will perceive the 
fat that runs from the meat quite clear, ml up me stewpan with cold 
water, add a tea-spoonful of salt ; and when Upon ttie point of boil- 
ing, set it upon the comer of the fire, where let it simmer gently 
about an hour, skimming off all the fat and scum which may rise to 
tJie surface ; when done, pass it through a fine sieve into a basin, and 
put by to use for the following purposes : For every kind of roast 
meat, poultry, or game especially ; also to give a good color to soups 
and sauces. 

This gravy I I or a little pars- 

will keep sev- BoBton Pire-Alarm Telegraph. ley and fried 
eral days, by SPECIAL NOTICE. onion, or with 

boiling it thyme, or 

f^-vftrv other "^^ ^'^ ^^^^ ^^ alarm box it located near narslpv fl.1nn a 

every o t n e r ^^^,^ residence, and where the kev is kept, parsiey aione. 

Clay. should be known to all persons, both mule » "ttle Icmon- 

juiceand 

Receipt fob ter of common education. The Board of Fire grated J)ecl. 

"iri-kT>r«x« Ml? AT CommlHSloners recommend to all persons Break lU a 

J? UKO£'-iu.Ji<AX ^ho may see this notice that they make the j-aw Cffff and 
3aLLS. necessary inquiries to enable them, iti case . 1.9 

of need, cither to get the key and pull ihe spriUKie OVCr 

Take any box, or to direct others to do so. Time somo' flour; 

tinrl nf mpnt < saved In this way may sometimes prevent a ^^ii tUp^ :„ 

kmcl OI meat condagratlon. In cose of lire, follow these Z^\\ ^^^^ ,^^ 

or chicken, or diuectionb: balls the size 

both (that used Get the key to the nearest box to the fire. of a pigeon^S 

for making Open thebox-puU the hook all the way Qcrcr, Yry or 

.s down onc«, and let go. °o ,, •' . 

Ill Wait one full minute for the sound of the Saute tnem m 



the soup wiL 
answer) ; 
3hop it very 
&ne ; season it 
pvith pepper, 
salt, a little 
5hopped pars- 
ey and thyme, 



The fact that an alarm box it located near 
their residence, and where the kev is kept, 
should be known to all persons, both male 
and female ; and the simple manner of giv- 
ing an alarm In case of fire, should be a mat- 
ter of common education. The Board of Fire 
CommlHSloners recommend to all persons 
who may see this notice that they make the 
necessary inquiries to enable them, in case 
of need, cither to get the key and puil the 
box, or to direct others to do so. Time 
saved in this way may sometimes prevent a 
condagration. la case of Urc, follow these 
diuectionb: 

Get the key to the nearest box to the fire. 
Open the box— pull the hook all the way 

down oncet and let go. 
Wait one full minute for the sound of the 
bells. If you hear no sound ptill again, 
and the third time if you get no sound. 
If you fall the third time, go to the next 
nearest box and do the same there, — but 
do not touch any other box if the nearest 
one gives the alarm. 
After giving the alarm remain a while if po9- 
9ible by the box, so as to direct the lire- 
men to the fire. 



a little butter, 
or they may 
be cooked in 
boiling water ; 
or they may 
be egged 
and bread- 
crumbed, and 

xied in boiling lard. This is the most simple receipt. The French 
.ake much trouble in making quenelles , &c., for soup. Or, 

A simple and delicious addition is that of four or five table-spoon- 
Vils of stewed tomatoes. 



To Clarift Stock, if required. 

In ease, by some accident, your stock should not be clear, put it 
say three quarts^ into a stewpan, and place it over a good fire, skim 
irell, and, when ooiling, have ready the whites of three eggs (care- 
ally separated from their yolks), to which add half a pint of water; 
srhisk well together ; then add half a pint of the boiling stock grad- 
lally, still whisking the eggs ; then whisk the boiling stock, pouring 

2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



ooMPLiXKirrs of ▲• shuman a co. 



the whites of eg^, &c., in whilst so doing, which continue tinti] 
nearly boiling again, then take it from the fire, let it remain until the 
whites of e^gs separate themselves, pass it through a clean fine 
cloth into a basin ; — this must be taken as a rule for every kind of 
clear soup, which must be strictly followed by every person wishing 
to profit oy this little work. These principles, once learned, would 
be useful at all times, and save a ^eat deal of useless reference id 
the perusal of these receipts ; ana no person can make themselves 
answerable for the success of any individual in making soups if the 
instructions recommended be not strictly followed. 



FISH. 

then add a 
pint of vine- 
gar, a blade of 
mace, half a 
dozen pepper- 
corns, and one 
ounce of salt; 
let simmer, 
then add three 
pints of water, 
put in the sal- 
mon, which 
simmer gent- 
ly about half 
an hour, and 
leave in the 
marinade un- 
til cold, when 
serve with a 
little of the 
marin ade 
strained thro' 
a hair sieve 
in the dish. 
Trout, mack- 



Salmon in 
mabinade. 

Have two 
good slices of 
salmon cut 
about four and 
a half inches 
in thickness, 
in a stewpan 
have three 
onions cut in 
slices, as also 
a turnip, a 
carrot, a head 
of celery cut 
small, a good 
half a handful 
of parsley, two 
bay-leaves, 
and two oz. of 
butter; pass 
the whole ten 
minutes over 
a sharp fire, 

erel, herrinffs, 

sprats, and fillets of sole or brill are also very nice cooked in tne 
same manner. A part of the above marinade may be made at any 
time, and almost any kind of fish remaining from a previous dinner 
may be done the same, and eaten cold. 

Salmon, plain boiled. 

I prefer always dressing this fish in slices from an inch to two 
inches in thickness, boiling it in plenty of salt water about twenty 



The police, upon hearing the bells, will 
spring their ratUes and call the number of 
^eboz. 

Second Alarms.— No person will give 
alarms for the same fire (after the first 
alarm has been given), without an order 
from an Engineer, and the person so or. 
dered will be 9ure to go to the tame box 
from which the first alarm was'siven, and 
report the same to the Chief Engineer. 
J[/\ however t a fire breaks out while another 
is burning in a difi'erent section of the City, 
a Mcond alarm can be given by a Police 
Officer without waiting for an order from 
an Engineer. 

Cautions for Persons Holding Signal Keys. 

1. — ^Never open the box or touch the appar- 
atus except in case of fire. 

2.— Never sound the alarm for a fire seen at 
a distance. 

3.— Be reasonably sure there is a fire before 
sounding the olarm. 

4.— Be sure your box is locked before leaving 
it. 

6.— Never let the key go out of your posses- 
slon, except to some responsiDlc person to 

eve an alarm of fire, and be sure the key 
returned. 
6.— If you remove from your house or place 
of business, return the key to the Fire 
Alarm Office without delay. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAK A CO. 



27 



mirntites ; the whole fish may be boiled, or the head and shoalders of 
a large fish, but they require longer boiling. Salmon eats firmer by 
not being put into the water imtil boiling. Dress the fish upon a 
napkin, and serve with lobster sauce, shnmp ditto, or plain melted 
butter in a boat with fresh sprigs of parsley boiled a few minutes in 
it. A salmon weighing about ten pounds will require an hour's 
gentle boiling ; a head and shoulders weighing six pounds, half 
an hour. To broil salmon, dip each piece in flour, put it on a grid- 
iron, — fifl;een minutes will give it a nice pale color; it should be 
served with Dutch or caper sauce. 



StevtedEels, 
Sauce Mate- 
lote. 

Procure as 
larg'e eels as 
possible,. 
■which cut in- 
to pieces three 
inches long, 
and put them 
into a stew- 
pan, with an 
onion, a bou- 
quet of two 
bay -leaves, a 
sprig of pars- 
ley and thyme, 
six cloves, a 
blade of mace, 
a glass of 
sherry, and 
trwo of water ; 
let the stew-* 



List of the Numbers and Localities of Boxes. 

2 Corner Charter street and Phippe place. 

3 Comer Hull and Bnowbill streets. 

4 Causeway St. (B. & M. Freight Depot). 

5 Corner Causeway- and Lowell streets. . 

6 Corner Levcrctt and Willard streets. 

7 Comer Poplar and Spring streets. 

8 Mcrrimac House, Merrimnc street. 
Constitution Wharf, cor. Commorcial St 
(puplicate.) Hunover, cor. Clark street. 
Cor. Cooper and North Margin streets. 
Richmond, near Ilanover Rtreet. 
Cor. Commercial St.' ftYTS Eastern are. 
Cor. Commercial and Richmond streets. 
East end of Faneuil Hall. 
Comer Ilanover and Salem streets. 



Suincy House, corner Brattle square, 
a} market square (B. and M. Dopot). 
Corner Sudbury and Hawkins street. 
Cambridge street, comer Moss place. 
North Uussel) street (Church). 
West City Stables, Norih:Orovc street 
West Cedar, near Cambridge street 
River street (Engine House. No. 10). 
Spruce street, Club House.- 
Corner Beacon and Clarendon streets. 
Comer Beacon and Beaver streets. 
Comer Pinckney and Anderson streets. 
Corner Hancock and Myrtle streets. 
Beacon street, corner Somerset. 
Court square (Police Station No. 2). 
Comer India street and Central Wharf. 



pan be placed 
over a moder- 
ate fire to sim- 
mer about 
twenty min- 
utes, accord- 
ing to the size 
of the eels ; 
when done, 
drain upon a 
cloth, dress 
them in pyra- 
mid upon a 
dish without 
a napkin, with 
a matelote 
sauce over, 
made as di- 
rected for sal- 
mon sauce 
matelote, but 
using the 
stock your 
eels have been 
cooked in to 
extract all the 



make the sauce, having previously well boiled it to 
fat. 

Mackerel a la Mattre d'Hotel. 

Cut an incision down the back of a mackerel, close to the bone, 
season it with a little pepper, salt, and cayenne, if approved of, but- 
ter tho skin well, and place lie fish upon a gridiron over a moderate 
fire, for about twenty minutes, turning it over when half done ; when 
done, have ready two ounces of maitre d'hotel butter, half of which 
put in the incision at the back, previously putting the mackerel upon 
a hot dish without a napkin, spread the other haQf over ; place it in 
tiie oven a few minutes, and serve very hot. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIHEMTS OF A. 8HUMAN A GO. 



COD-FlSH. 

Fresh cod-fish is better boiled. The fish is so large that it is gen- 
erally boiled in slices. After it is well salted, horse-radish and vin- 
egar in the boiling water will improve the fish. Oyster-sauce is the 
favorite sauce for a boiled cod-fish. Capers might be mixed with the 
oyster-sauce. Some serve the fish with the sauce poured over it 
Any of the fish sauces may be served with fresh cod-fish. These 
slices may also be broiled and served with a maitre-d'hoiel sauce, or 
they may De egged and bread-crumbed, and fried in boiling lard. 



TURBOT. 

To cook it; 
cut an incision 
in the back, 
rub it well 
with a good 
handful of 
salt, and then 
with the juice 
of a lemon ; 
set it in a 
turbot kettle, 
well covered 
with cold wa- 
ter, in which 
you have put 
a good hand- 
ful of salt; 
place it over 
the fire, and, 
as soon as 
boiling, put it 
at the side 



Fire Alarm Telegraph— Continued. 

88 Comer Atlantic avenue and Long Wbarf. 

89 Mason street (Engine House Ko. 26). 

41 Ck>mer Washington and Milk streets. 

42 Comer Winter street and Central place. 

43 Comer Bedford street and Buffolk place. 

44 Eastern end Old Btate Douse, Btato St. 

45 Corner Federal and Franklin streets. 

46 Corner Milk and Oliver streets. 

47 Broad street, opposite Rowers Wbarf. 

48 N. Y. & N. E. U. K. btaUon, foot of Bum. 

mer street. 

49 Bummer street, opposite Hawley. 

61 Comer Purchase and Pcnrl streets. 

62 Comer Bedford and Lincoln streets. 

53 Comer Washington and Boylston fits. 

54 Corner Reach and Hudson streets. 

66 Comer Kneelnnd and South streets (Old 

O>lony Depot). 

57 Hudson street, (Quincy School). 

58 Harvard street ( U. & A. Freight Depot). 

59 East street (School House). 

61 Warrenton street, near Tremont. 

62 Corner Pleasant and Eliot streets. 

63 Berkeley Bt., near Commonwealth ave. 

64 Washington street and Indiana place. 

65 Corner Harrison avenue and Seneca St. 

67 Cor. Washington and Common streets. 

68 Cor. Harrison avenue and Wareham St. 

68 (Private) yard of Hinckley Locomotive 

Works, Harrison avenue. 

69 Comer Dover and Albany streets. 



drainer, and serve upon a napkin, with a few sprigs 
round, and lobster sauce or shrimp sauce, in a boat. 



(where it must 
not be allowed 
to more than 
simmer very 
slowly, or the 
fish would 
have a very 
unsightly ap- 
pearance) . A 
turbot of ten 
pounds weight 
will take about 
an hour to 
cook alter it 
has boiled 
(but, to he 
certain, ascer- 
tain whetiier 
the flesh will 
leave the bone 
easily) ; take 
it out of the 
water, let it 
remain a min- 
ute upon the 
of fresh parsley 



Smelts. 

Smelts are good salted, peppered, and rolled in salted corn-meal 
or fiour, and fried in boiling-hot lard, but better egged and bread- 
crumbed before frying. They should be served immediately, or they 
will lose their crispness and flavor. When served as a j;amish for a 
large fish, they should be fried in the shape of rings. This is easily 
done by putting the tail of the fish into its mouth, and holdings it 
with a pin. After it is fried, the pin is withdrawn, as the fried fish 
will hold its shape. Place these rings around the fish, with an addi- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMBirrS OF A. SHUHAN A CO. 



29 



tional garnish of parsley and lemon slices ; or the rings may be 
served alone in a circle around the side of a platter, with a tomato or 
a Tartare sauce in the centre. 

Shad. 

This delicious fish is undoubtedly best broiled, with a maitre^ 
cThotel sauce ; but it is good also cut in slices, and sauted. 

Trout. 

If large, they may be broiled, boiled, or baked. If boiled or 
broiled, serve the sauce Hollandaise with them. Professional cooks 
^nerally boil it in the court bouillon. Smaller trout are better 
egged, rolled 
in salted com- Rre Alarm Telegraph.-Coiitinued. i any flat fish is 

moal, ana OO (Duplicate.) Engine Ho. No. 8. (Har- USOd, begm at 

thrown into rl«oa avenao corner Brittol Bt.) the tail, and, 

Koi 1 1 n o- 1 arH " Comer Warren avo. and Berkeley St t pAni no- t h ft 

"^ii;"o ^*'^\ 72 Washington street, near Dover. f®rP^"q ^'^^ 

The trout is 73 Cor. Ubawmnt ave. and Waltbam St. knite close tO 

n. vprv n\c& ^^ Dedbam street (Police Station No. 5). thp hnriA at^n. 

a very nice ^^ Shawmnt avenue (Hose House No. 6). "^® T ' K 

tlSh lor an a2^ 78 Cor. Tremont St. and Rutland square. arate each 

g r a ti Ut or 78 South City Stables, Albany street. side of the fish 

Kf^wArl nn.11<Hl '* Corner Marlboro and Exotor streets. tiAaflvfrnm it • 

stewea, caiiea gj q^p yy canton and Appicton streets, neatly irom It , 

then en mate- 82 Northampton street (Eng. Ho. No. 23). then CUt each 
7n/>> ^ Corner Tremont and Cnmden streets. aid a in two 

lengthwise, 

J^IOED bUCES (Commonwealth Hotel.) fiat, :- ^^„« 

OF Fish, ^ Dartmouth St. (Engine House No. 22). "^" '" I OUT 

______ rp ' 89 Cor.. Boylston and Clarendon BtrecU. long piecCS. 

o ^^ JuncUon of Brighton and BrookUne Remove the 

MATO Sauce _ avenues.. skin Carefully. 

Alter havimg 
sprinkled pep- 



(FisharOr- 
lay,) 



Skin the fish 
and bone it, 
and cut it into 
even slices; or 
if a flounder or 



03 
119 
612 



631 
643 



Corner Tremont and Cnmden streets. 

Corner Beacon and Parker streets. 

Corner Castle and Albion streets. 

Corner Worcester st. and Lincoln pL 
(Commonwealth Hotel.) 

Dartmouth St. (Engine House No. 22). 

Cor.Boylston and Clarendon streets. 

Junction of Brighton and BrookUne 
avenues. 

Boston and Albanv Freight Yard, Hun- 
tington avenue Bridjre. 

Comer Tremont and Dartmouth Sts. 

Oasometcr, near Federal street Bridge. 

City Hospital ^for the sole use of that 
building). 

11 assacbusetts Oeneral Hospital. (Sole 
use.) 

Massachusetts Homosopatbio Hospital, 
East Concord street. (Sole use.) 



per and salt 
over them, 
roll each piece 
first in sifted 
cracker or 
bread crumbs, 

then in half a cupful of milk mixed with an egg, and then in the 
crumbs again. They are better fried in a saiUe pan in a little hot 
butter ; yet they may be sauted in a little hot lard, with some neat 
slices oi pork, or fried in boiling lard. 

Four tomato sauce on a hot platter, arrange the pieces offish sym- 
metrically on it, and serve immediately. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



Fkicassee of Otsteks (Oysters a la BouleUe). 



Put one quart, or twenty-five, oysters on the fire in their own 
liquor. The moment it begins to boil, turn it into a hot dish througii 
a colander, leaving the oysters in the colander. Put into the sauce- 
pan two ounces of butter (size of an e^g), and when it bubbles 
sprinkle in one ounce (a table-spoonful) of sifted flour ; let it cook a 
minute without taking color, stirring it well with a wire egg-whisk; 
then add, mixing well, a cupful of the oyster liquor. Take it from 
the fire and mix in the yolks of two eggs, a little salt, a very 

little cayenne - 

pepper, one Fire Alarm Teiegraph.-Continued. I » l^tfle firm, 

tea -spoonful SOUTH BOSTOH. drain them 

of lemon-iuice ,„. ^ « . ^ a . * upon a sieve, 

««^ y^«« ™,*- 121 Comer First and A streets. «5«.,.u:««. 4.ui 

and one grat- 123 Comer Broadway and l>orche8ter ave. catching the 
ingot nutmeg. (Engine House No. 15.) liquor la ano- 

Kpat it wpII • 124 Broadway (Police BtaUon No. 6). *Up- cfrp^rnnn • 

ijeai It well , ^25 Comer Dorchester ave. and Dorr St. ^®f SCewpan , 

tnen return it 126 Comcr Broadway and £ street (Sav- Q 6 t a C a the 

to the fire to ,„, ^*°«* %"^ ?""^f"l5)- beard from Ihe 

o-n,*. *u^ -rv«.«.« 127 Comer Eietith and E streets. ^„„«.^ j 

set the eggs, 128 Comer Dorchester avenue and Dor- OySterS, and 
Without allow- Chester street. t h r O W thcm 

ing it to boil. ^28 (Duplicate.) Um^ Ho. No. 10. (Dor- again Into 

f%^. • .1 Chester street. J -i'^. i- 

Put in the 129 Comer Sixth and B streets. their liquor; 

oysters. 131 Comer Eighth and Or streets. add half a 

132 Comer Broadway and Dorchester SL hlaHAnfrriaAo 

134 Corner Fifth and D streets. Diaae OI maCB, 

i?or^ A -r ^^^-.^ 135 Comer Eighth and K St reete. place a grain 

JliSCALOPED 136 CJorner First and K streets. \\r\nr\ ihp^ firp 

Oysters. 137 Fourth street, between K and L (Engine "^ j" uu« 111^, 

House No. 2). and, when 

Put two 137 (Duplicate.) Blind Asylum, Broad, boiling, add a 

dozen oysters 133 H^se'of Correction (Gate). Fim St. piece of butter 

with their 139 Comer n and Second streets. the Size of a 

liquor into a i« ^T^:^ ^%?,f:^^,',^'^ '''^'' walnut with 

Stewpan, 143 Comer Dorchester and 7th streets. W h 1 C h yoU 

place over a 146 Comer Fourth and O streets (Hose have mixed a 

fire, and when I ^^""^ ^°- ^^^' I tea-spoonful of 

flour; shake 
round over the fire until becoming thick, season with a little cayenne, 
and salt if required ; have an escolap shell, well buttered and bread- 
crumbed ; place the oysters in, sprinkle bread crumbs over, put it in 
the oven a quarter of an hour, pass the salamander over, and serve. 
The yolk of eggs may be added, and less flour. 

Fried Oysters. 

Drain the oysters in the colander ; sprinkle over pepper and salt, 
which mix well with them, and put them in a cold place for fifteen 
or twenty minutes before cooking. This is marinating them. When 
ready to cook, roll each one first in sifted cracker-crumbs, then in 
beaten egg mixed with a little milk and seasoned with pepper and 



" Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



COMPLIMEMT8 OF A. SHUMAN A GO. 



31 



piece of toast, 
and sauce over. 



salt, then in the cracker-crumbs again. You will please remember 
the routine : Jirst, the crumbs before the effg, as the egg will not ad- 
here well to the oyster without the crumbs ; now throw them into 
boiling-hot lard (as you would fry doughnuts), first testing to see if 
it is hot enough. As soon as they assume a light-brown color they 
should be drained, and served immediately on a hot platter. Oysters 
should not be fried until the persons at table are ready to eat them, 
as it takes only a few moments to fry them, and they are not good 
unless very hot. 

Stewed Otsteb. 

Blanch and beard the oysters as above ; Vhen done, put them with 
their liquor in 

a stewpan. Fire Alarm Telegraph.-Contlnued. IotsterCubrt. 

"With lour 146 American Steam Safe Work*, oor. N 

cloves, a blade *nd Sixth streets. Blanch and 

of mace, and Jfx ter-To^rT^t?*^''"*"' '"«'"' ^'^ beard six doz- 

a tea-spoonful 148 New York & New England R. R. Be- en of OySterS, 

of essence of pair Shop, Boston Wharf. leaving the 

anchovies, EAST bostom. oysters in 

with a little ISl Perry Honse (South). their OWn liq- 

oKirknnArl narq. ^^^ Corner Sumner and Lamson itreeti. ,,-.«. fi,pn nnf 

cnoppea pars- J53 ^^^g^ Webster and Orleans streets. ^1 r\V^,^^^ 

ley and cay- 154 Oomer Maverick and Meridian streets. tWO middlmg- 

f^nnA • li^t qim- ^^^ Corner Sumner and Bonier streets. siz^d onions 

enne , let Sim ^^^ ^^^^^ Decatur and Liverpool streets. ^Z ua- 

mar a minute, 153 corner Paris and Decatur streets. l^^tO Small Qice 

stir in two pats Wl Grand Junction Yard, R. R. Office. and 8(nUe it in 

r»f hntf^pr with ^^^ Cor. Bennington St. and Central square. - atftWnan 

01 DUtier Wltn 1^3 Oomer Chelsea and Marion streets. a S I e W p a n, 

which you ld4 Slmpson^s Dock, Marginal street. With an OUnce 

havft mixed a 1®* Marion street, Engine House No. 6. of butter* 

?«7f ^fot^Tv^« 1«7 Smith & Flshir's Forge Works, Maver- ^. ° ^^ « 1' 

half teaspoon- ick street. when done, 

ftll of flour, let 171 Porter's Wharf, Border street. mix in tWO 

fiimmpr a liftl a ^^2 Pottery Works, 146 Condor street *ojia . noon fnla 

Simmer a Uttie j-g oome/ Eagle and Gleridon streets. teas - pOOniUlS 

longer, lay the 174 Comer Brooks and Saratoga streets. Ot CUrry pOW- 

oysters in your "5 cheUea street. Hose House No. 6. der and one of 

jf «u „««« « 178 Banbom Tube Works, Saratoga street. ^„^„ « « „ * « 
dish upon a 173 Comer Moore and Saratoga strceU. CUrry paste. 



then add the 
oysters with 
their liquor. 



and keep stirring over the fire until the oysters become enveloped in 
a thick sauce, when turn them out upon your dish, and serve with 
rice separately. 

Spiced Oysters. 

Ingredients : Two hundred oysters, one pint of vinegar, a nutmeg 
grated, eight blades of whole mace, three dozen whole cloves, one 
tea-spoontul of salt, two tea-spoonfuls of whole allspice, and as much 
cayenne pepper as will lie upon the point of a knife. Put the oysters 
with their liquor into a large earthen vessel ; add to them the vinegar 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LOBSTEB 

Salad. 

Dress a bor- 
der of hard- 
boiled eggs, 
as directed in 
salad of game, 
fill the centre 
with some 
nice fresh sal- 
ad, then take 
the fiesh from 
a middling- 
sized lobster, 
which cut into 



82 COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAN 4 CO. 

and all the other in^dients. Stir all well toother and set tiiem 
over a slow fire, keepmg them covered. Stir t^em to the bottom 
several times. As soon as they are well scalded, they are done. To 
be eaten cold. 

Oysteks. 

Open and blanch delicately twelve middle-sized oysters, and pnt 
them in a stewpan with their own g[ravy, beard them, add a table- 
spoonful of milk or cream, and ^ive it a boil, then add half an ounce 
of butter in which you have mixed a salt-spoonful of flour, stir it 
in without _^^__^__^_____________________^ 

breaking the Fire Alarm Teiegraph.-Continued. H ^ ^a^ge slices 

oysters, put It 1 84 Comer Meridian and Princeton itreeU. 8-8 possible, 
over the cen- 186 Corner Putnam and Lexington streets. which put into 

tre of your ROXBURT district. a basin, and 

omelette, and 212 Comer Albany and Hampden streets. SeaSOn With 

proceed as be- f}* SfS'J^^gS^-r/A^I^S^'ti: » "«!« P«P- 

lOre. I 216 Comer Tremont and Cabot streets. per. Salt, Oil, 

and vinegar, 
after wiiich 
dress them 
pyramidically 
upon the sal- 
ad, and have 
ready the fol- 
lowing sauce : 
put the yolks 
of two fresh 
e^gs in a ba- 
sin, with the 
yolk of a hard- 
boiled one 
rubbed thro' a 
sieve, add half 
a salt-spoon- 
ful of salt, and 

half that quantity of white pepper, and commence stirring round 
with a wooden spoon with the right hand, holding a bottle of salad 
oil in the left, dropping it in by degi-ees and continually stirring, and 
when becoming thickish add a couple of spoonfuls of common vine- 
gar by degrees, still keeping it stirred, then more oil, proceeding 
thus until you have used tiiree parts of a pint of oil, and a corres- 
ponding quantity of vinegar ; by continually working, it will form a 
sUffish cream-looking sauce perfectly smooth ; add a little more sea- 
soning if required, and a tea-spoonful of chopped parsley, with hall 
that quantity of chopped eschalots, pour over the lobster and serve. 
Should the sauce curdle in making, the operation must be again per- 
formed, putting a yolk of an egg into another basin, working it with 



212 

213 
214 
215 
210 
217 
218 
219 
221 
231 
232 
234 



237 



241 
242 
243 
245 
246 
247 
248 

249 



Fire Alarm Telegraph.— Contlnuedt 
Comer Meridian and Princeton streets* 
Corner Putnam and Lexington streets. 

ROXBURT DISTRICT. 

Comer Albany and Hampden streets. 
Comer Noriolk Ave. and Hampden St. 
Comer Washington and Arnold streets. 
Comer Tremont and Cabot streets. 
Comer Ruggles and Parker streets. 
Comer Buggies and Tremont streets. 
Junction 'VV'ashington and Warren fits. 
Longwood avenue (Carpet Factory). 
Corner Clay and Elm wood streets. 
Eustis street, near Washington. 
Comer Eustis and Dearborn streets. 
Police Station No. 9, Dudley street. 
Corner Warren and Dudley streets. 
Corner Cabot and Culvert (Engine Ho. 

No. 13). 
Dudley street, Gas Company's office. 
Swett street, near old Hospital. 
Shawmut Ave. (Horse Itailmad Stable). 
Corner Warren street and Walnut Ave. 
Corner Clifford St. and Blue-hill Ave. 
Engine House No. 14, Centre street. 
Police Station No. 10, Pynchon street 
Longwood (Chemical Eng. Ho. No. 8). 
Corner Tremont and Francis streets. 
Repair Shop Boston and Providence B. 

R., near Buggies street. 
Burkhardt's Brewery, Parker street. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CO]I^LIMEirrS OF A. 8HUMAM A CO. 33 

a little oil until forming a stiffish paste, when stir in the curdled 
sauce by degrees until the whole becomes smooth. Always choose a 
cool place to make it in. 



Gratin op Lobster. 

Procure a good-sized lobster, cut it in half, detaching the head from 
the body ; take out all the meat, and save the four shells ; cut the 
meat into slices, then take a tea-spoonful of chopped eschalots in a 
stewpan, with a piece of butter the size of two walnuts, pass them a 
few minutes over the fire, add a table-spoonful of flour (mix well in), 

half a pint of 

milk, stir over I Fire Alarm Telegraph.-Continued. J>«^ter, put in 

the tire, boil- 251 Comer Highland and Oodar streets. tlie OVen tor 

inff about five 252 Comer Dale and Washington streets. twenty m i n- 

TTiSinfAa thPTi 253 Corner Warren St. and Blue-hill Ave. nfAo . HiQh on 
minutes, men 254 Comer Pynchon and Heath streets. ^^^ » ,^^" ^^ 

add the lob- 256 School House, Ueatb street. a napkin and 

Ster which 257 Comer Warren and Qulncy streets (Bq- serve. To 

' ..1 glne House No. 24). . -^ ' • 

season with a 25s Corner Tremont and Downer streets. glVe it a nice 

little cayenne, 259 Comer Centre and Parker streets. Color, USe the 

salt chopped iSJ £Sd"g"o7M'.^!fr8u«tHom."'^''- salamander. 

parsley, and 263 Corner Centre and Creighton streets, 

essence of an- ^^ Comer Walnut avenue and Munroe St. 

u^^«« . «*««^ 265 Corner Warren and Dale streets. LOBSTEB 

cnovies , Stana 267 Comer Parker street and Parker place. CHOPS. 

it again upon Dorchester district. ^^ . . i.. 

the fire, stir- 3^2 Comer Boston and Mt. Vemon streets. ^Ut half a 

ring until boil- Zn Comer Dorchester Ave. and Cottage St. pound Ot the 

ing, then stir J}J Engine House No. 21, Boston street. fleshofaboil- 

. *^\ 1-, r> 815 Comer Stoughton and Cottage streets. j i i_ . • j. 

in the yoik of sw Eng. Ho. No. 17, Meeting House Hill. ^d lObSter intO 

an effff ; take 317 corner Bird and Ceylon streets. Small dice, 

off thp fire fill ^^® Stoughton street Station (New York and p„|. *^^ ^„^ 

on ine nre, mi j^^^ England K. it.). ^J?^, ^^" "r^- 

the shells of 319 Norfolk avenue, near Railroad Bridget of butter m- 

the lobster, 821 Savin Hlll, nesir lUllroad depot. tO a S t C W- 

• 1 1 -u J 323 Glover's Corner. j , 

sprinkle bread 324 Comer Green and Bowdoin streets. pan, and When 

crumbs over, 325 Field's Comer. it bubbles 

with a little 826 Harrison square, near Railroad depot | sprinkle in 

two ounces of 
flour (one table-spoonful) . Cook it ; then pour in a cupful of boiling 
cream and the lobster dice. Stir it until it is scalding hot ; then take 
it from the fire, and, when slightly cooled, stir in &e beaten yolks . 
of three effgs, a grating of nutmeg, a little cayenne pepper, and salt 
to taste. Ketum the mixture to the fire, and stir it long enough to 
well set the eggs. Butter a platter, on which spread the lobster 
mixture half an inch deep. When cold, form it in the shape of chops, 
pointed at one end ; bread-crumb, egg, and crumb them again, and 
fry them in boiling lard. Stick a claw into the end of each lobster 
chop after it is cooked. Place the chops in a circle, overlapping each 
other, on a napkin. Decorate the dish by putting the tail of the lob- 
ster in the 6entre, and ita head, with the long horns, on the tail. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



84 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



Around the outside of the circle of chops arrange the legs, cut an 
inch each side of the middle joints, so that they will form two equal 
sides of a triangle. 

Lobster Curry. 

Procure a large boiled lobster, break the shell, and take out the 
€esh in as large pieces as possible, cutting the tall into about six 
pieces, and the claws of a proportionate size ; then cut two onions 
mto small slices, which put into a stewpan, with an ounce of butter, 
fry them of a light yellow color, then mix in a good table-spoonfol 
of mild currv 
paste (or haft I Fire Alarm Telegraph.-K:ontinued. I delicately ten- 

gowder ana 327 Adams etrcet, junction Neponect Ave. der ; add the 
alf paste), 328 Putnam's Nail Works, Port Norfolk. luice of half a 

onri o/l/T o ninf ^29 Comcf Picanant and flloughton strccts. l««,^-^ ««j 
and add a pint 341 corner Commercial and Preston streets. 1 e m O n , and 
of good broth, 342 Corner Neponsct avenue and Minot fcJt. Serve With ricO 
then boil it up ^. Corner Water and Walnut streets. separately. If 

., ri ^ 345 Comer Adams and Granite streets. ^ -^ ;* 

over the nre 348 Corner Dorchester ave. and Codman st. DO OVen, it 
until becom- 347 Corner Washington st. and Warren pi. may be Very 
ino" a 1 i f 1 1 o ^^^ Corner Richmond and Adams streets. r* t.'« i1 n « 1 1 i 

. r , ?• , , 351 Corner Washington street and Dorches- g r » a U a 1 I y 

thickish,when tor avenue. stcwed over a 

putinthelob- ?5J §"«l"*^g«"*«S*»-JJ»'E?'»Plt'V**^; slow fire, in 

*. .. ., 353 Engine House No. 19, Norfolk street. , . , -1 

Ster, stir the 354 Corner Norfolk and Madison streets. WhlCh Case it 

whole round, 356 Corner Washington and Norfolk streets. might Want 

fhpn onxrt^r ihfit 357 Engine House No. 18, Harvard street. moiQtPni««r^^ 

men cover me 353 Dorchester avenue, corner Centre st mOlSteningOC- 

Stewpan close- 359 Austin Farm, near Austin street. casionallj . 

Iv and put it ^^ Comer Harvard street and Blue-Wll ave. 

ii'« «,^i^^«4.^ 362 Mount Hope Cemetery. (Superinteu- 

m a moderate Kent's house.) 

oven half an CHARLESTOWH DISTRICT. T7XTrr'i>v:.T^r, 

hour, by which 4^3 Comer Bchool and Mam strceU. ENTREES, 

time the CUny 413 Comer W ashington and Union streets. _. ^ 

would be of a "'^^ Front, foot of Arrow street. JrLAIN LIME- 

*^..«.,.«« «,^«o:« *15 Fitchburg Railroad oflBce, in yard. LET. 

proper COnSlS- 4,0 corner Harvard and Main streets 

tency, and the 417 Comer chapman and Richmond streets. The fire must 

lobster very 418 Fitchburg Railroad Yard, Warren ave. | ^^ ^^^^ y^^^^ 

All cookery- 
books especially expatiate on the necessity of a pan to be used for 
'^omelets alone. Any clean, smooth iron spider, or mute pan, is a 

food enough omelet-pan. Put the pan on the fire to become heated ; 
reak the eggs into a kitchen basin ; sprinkle over them pepper and 
salt, and give them twelve vigorous beats with a spoon. This is 
enough to break all the yolks, and twelve beats was Mr. Riddle's 
rule. Now put butter the size of an egg (for five eggs) in the heated 
pan ; turn it round so that it will oioistcn all the bottom of the pan. 
When it is melted, and begins to fri/, poui^in the eggs. Holding the 
handle of the omoJet-pan in the left lurul. carefully and lightly with 
a spoon draw up the whitened egg from the bottom, so that all the 
eggs may be equally cooked, or whitened to a soft, creamy substance. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN ft GO. 



85 



Now, still with the left hand, shake the pan foi-ward and backward, 
which will disengage the eggs from the Dottom ; t^en shaking again 
the omelet a little one side, turn with a spoon half of one side over 
the other ; and allowing it to remain a moment to harden a little at 
the bottom, gently shaking it all the time, toss it over on to a warm 
platter held in the right hand. A little practice makes one quite 
dexterous in placing the omelet in the centre of the platter, and turn- 
ing it over as it is tossed from the omelet-pan. However, if one is 
unsuccessful in the tossing operation, which is the correct thing, ac- 
cording to the cooking professor, the omelet can be lifted to the plat- 
ter with a pan- 



cake - turner. 
It should be 
creamy and 
light in the 
centre, and 
more firm on 
the outside. 

I will speci- 
fy several dif- 
ferent kinds 
of omelets. 
A variety of 
others may be 
made in the 
same way, by 
adding boiled 
tongue cutinto 
dice, sliced 
truffles, cook- 
ed and sliced 
kidneys with 
gravy poured 
around, &c. 



419 
421 
423 
424 
425 
426 
427 
431 
432 
434 
435 
436 
441 
442 
451 
462 
453 
454 
461 
462 
463 
465 



New. 

523 

525 

524 

526 

521 



Fire Alarm Teiegraph.~Coiitinued. 
Comer Canal and Winchester streets. 
Corner City square and Chamber street. 
Corner Chelsea street and Henley place. 
Corner Tufts, Bunker Hill and Vlnests. 
Comer Concord and Bunker Hill sts. 
Wallace Court, corner WInthrop street. 
Corner Chelsea and Prospect streets. 
Comer Bunker Hill and Webster sts. 
Corner Walker and Russell streets. 
21 Medford street. 
Medford street (Waterman*s Mill). 
Corner Bunker Hill and Aubnm streets. 
Engine House No. 27, Blm street. 
Navy Yard, Water street gate. 
Holmes* Factory, Bedford street. 
305 Medford street. 
Corner Medford and Bunker Hill sts. 
Corner Arlington avenue and Alford st. 
Corner Gardiner and Main streets. 
Main street, Monument Hall Building. 
Main, foot of Baldwin street. 
Comer Cambridge and Brighton streets. 
W. ROXBURY DISTRICT, 

(Former nombering unchanged.) 

Old. 

4 Engine House No. 28, Centre st 

5 Corner Pond and Prince streets. 

6 Corner Prince and Perkins sts. 

7 Comer May and Centre streets. 
13 Jamaica Plain Railroad Station. 



Eggs with 
Cheese. 

Put into a 
stewpan about 
two ounces of 
grated Parme- 
san or Gruy ere 
or old Chesh- 
ire, with one 
ounce of but- 
ter, two sprigs 
of parsley, 
two spring 
onions chop- 
ped up, a little 
grated n u t- 
meg, and half 
aglass of sher- 
ry; put it on 
the fire, and 
keep stirring 
until all the 
cheese is well 
melted ; break 

six eggs in a basin, put them into the stewpan. stir and cook them on 
a slow fire ; when done, serve with fried sippets of bread round. 



Omelet with Herbs. 

Break six eggs in a basin or stewpan, and add to it a tea-spoonful 
of chopped parsley, and one of chopped eschalot or spring onions, 
half ditto of salt, and a pinch of pepper, and beat it well up together. 
Put into an omelet-pan, that is, a small frying-pan six in(3ies in 
diameter, two ounces of butter, which melt, then pour in the eggs, 
stir round with a spoon ; as soon as it begins to set, lightly move it 
to that part of the pan opposite the handle, so that it occupies only 
one third, hold it so that that part of the pan is the lowest, move wiw 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 



COMPLIMENTS OF ▲. SHUMAN 4 CO. 



Poached 
Eggs. 



lightly 
broken 
from a 
into it. 



513 
612 
528 
527 
537 

542 
546 
548 

514 
535 

534 
532 
518 



15 
18 
23 
24 

25 
81 
82 

84 

41 

42 
43 
51 



a spoon the outside edges over, and let it remain half a minute, so 
that it obtains a good color, turn it over on to the dish so that the 
bottom is at the top. They must not be too much done, and served 
very hot. They may be served plain, or with the addition of any 
gravy. 

Omelets of ham, Parmesan, &c., are all made as the above, with 
the addition that tliese articles must have been properly cooked pre- 
viously, and well chopped up, so as to mix well with the eggs ; beat 
them up well together, and cook in a pan the same way, or a little 
grated cheese may be added. This I beg of you to practise ; though 
simple, there 

is some art in 1 Fire Alarm Telegraph.-Continued. I enough (do 

making it. 5,3 14 Boylaton Bt. Railroad station. ^^^ let it ffCt 

sr Centre and Perkins sts. t O O hard), 
\t Bills Railroad Station. falcA nnt ihfi 

ir South and Key streeto. ^^^ ^^:, ^^ 
Ileal Engine House No. 4. ^gg With a 

►siindaie.) perforated la- 

Anif fliA ^*2 '^ central Railroad station. 5i^ ^_«-„ .a 

bait tne 54^ 31 Comer Spring and Gardner sts. °/®» ^^^ *^° 

water well; 543 82 Chomlcal Engine House No. 7, the ragged 

when it is Sim- „^ .. r^^^r^^-S^'l^^'Tr vr « pieces, and 

d514 84 Chemical Engine House No. 6. '\. .. ' 

^, rop 535 41 Comer Metropolitan avenue and Slip It on a 

each Poplar street. Small, thin 

p o. o. 534 42 Mount Hope Railroad Station. niPOA nf hnt 

® 6 6 532 43 Canterbury School House. P*^^® ^^ ^^^ 

saucer 518 51 CorScarboroughand Walnut St. buttered toast, 

Cook BRIGHTOH DISTRICT. cut neatly in- 
one egg at a 56I Brighton avenue. Cottage Farm Stafn. tO squares, 
time, throw- ^2 Brighton avenue, near Malvem street. When all are 
i^^ »»«rvf,^ii« W3 Chemical House 6, Allston. «^^w«^ ^^a 
ing carefully 664 Barry's Corner. jincUon of No. Har- COoked, . and 
With a spoon vard and Franklin streets. placed on 

thewaterfrom ^ SSrc^rS^ Lincoln s.r«,.. their separate 

the side over 568 Oak square. pieces ot toast, 

the Qggf to 671 Chestnut Hill avenue. Engine Ho. 29. sprinkle a lit- 

W h i t e n the gS Followed by Box Number, indicates tie pepper and 

top. when fire in West Uoxbury District (until Salt OVer each 

cooked just | rearrangement of that system). | one. Some 

put into the 
boiling water muffin lings, in which the eggs are cooked, to ^ve 
them an even shape ; they present a better appearance, however, 
cooked in the egg-poacher. Poached eggs are nice introduced into 
a beef soup — one egg for each person at table ; they are also nice 
served on thin, diamond-shaped slices of boiled ham instead of toast. 
Delmohico serves poached eggs on toast with sorrel sprinkled over 
the tops. 

Chicken Curry. 

Cut up a chicken into ten pieces, that is, two wings, two pieces of 
the breast, two of tlie back, and each le^ divided into two pieces at 
the joints ; then cut up a middling-sized onion into very small dice, 
which put into a stewpan, with an ounce of butter and a very sm^dl 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAN ft CO. 



37 



piece of garlic, stir them over the fire until satUed well ; then add 
two tea-spoonfuls of curry powder and one of curry paste, which well 
mix in ; then add half a pint of good broth, let it boil up ; then lay in 
the pieces of chicken, cover it over, and put to stew very gently for 
half an hour, stirring it around occasionally, if getting too dry add 
a little more broth (or water) ; when done, the flesh should part 
easily from the bones, and the sauce should adhere rather thickly. 
Season with the juice of half a lemon and a pinch of salt, and serve 
-with plain boiled rice upon a separate dish. Ducklings can be 
cooked in the same way. 



Fowl Saute. 

Pluck and 
draw a fowl, 
cut it into 
pieces, seven 
or eight, as 
^ou like, that 
IS, the two 
French wings, 
the two legs, 
the breast in 
one or two 
pieces, and the 
back in two; 
trim nicely; 
-putinto A satUe 
pan two ozs. 
of butter, put 
it on the fire ; 
when hot, lay 
in your pieces, 
add a tea- 
spoonful o f 



Fire Alarm Telegraph.— Continuedt 
189 Indicates a fire at Deer Island. 
198 Indicates a cail from Chelsea for 
sistance. 
23 Signal for DO school. 
11 blows indicates Police calL 



Regulations concerning Fire Alarms. 
First Alarm to be given by strikiiig three or 

more rounds. 
Second Alarm to be given by striking ten 

blows. 
Third Alarm to be given by striking twelve 

blows twice, thus: 12—12. 

In cases where the entire department are 
required, signal to bo given by striking twelve 
blows three times, thus : 12—12—12. 

In cases where Hook and Ladder Compa- 
nies only are wanted, signal to be given by 
striking ten blows once, with the No. of the 
Company struck twice, thus : H. & L. No. 1, 
10_1_1 ; H. & L. No. 2, 10-2—2; etc. 

If more than one Hook and Ladder Compa- 
ny is wanted, the signal will be given thus : 
H. & L. Nos. 1 and 3, 10— 1— 1-»-3; H. & L. 
Nos. 2 and 4, 10—2—2—4—4; etc, 

DAVID CHAMBERLIN, 
GREELY 8. C0RTI8, 
HENRY W. LONGLEY, 

Fire Commiasionere, 
JOHN P. KENNARD, 8upt, 



little garlic, is the celebrated dish of poulet a la Marengo, 



salt, a quarter 
ditto of pep- 
per, saute 
gently, turn 
over; when of 
a nice gold 
color and ten- 
der, pour off 
the fat of the 
pan, and add a 
glass of sherry 
and ten spoon- 
fuls of brown 
sauce, boil ten 
minutes long- 
er, but very 
slowly, and 
serve in pyra- 
mid ; sauce 
over. 

This done in 
oil, with the 
addition of 
twenty mush- 
rooms and a 



Rump Steak Pie. 

Procure two pounds of rumpsteaks, which cut into thinnish slices, 
and season well with pepper and salt ; dip each piece into flour, and 
lay them in a small pie-dish, finishing the top in the form of a dome ; 
add a wine-glassful of water, then have ready half a pound of half- 
puff paste, cut off a small piece, which roll into a band and lay round 
the cd^e of the dish, having previously wetted it with a paste-brush 
dippedin water, then roll out the remainder of the paste lo about the 
size of the dish, damp the band of paste upon the dish and lay the 
other piece over, make a hole with a knife at the top, press the edges 



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38 



COMPUMEMT8 OF A. 8HUMAN Sb CO. 



evenly down with yonr thumbs, trim the pie round with a knife, egg 
over the top with a paste-brush, and ornament it wilh the trimming 
of the paste, according to fancy ; bake it rather better than an hour m 
a moderate oven, and serve either hot or cold. 

Jugged Hare. 

Put about half a pound of butter, with ten ounces of flour, into a 
stewpan ; put it on the fire, and keep stirring it round until it has a 
yellow tinge ; then add a pound of bacon cut in square pieces, stir it 
a little longer on the fire ; the hare having been previously cut up, 
put it into the stewpan and stir it about until it becomes firm, when 
add four glasses 

°^/^^ ffi^^"f PUBLIC HALLS. I an old one, it 

ana sumcient ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^j,^ j^^ Washinirton st will take about 

water to cover American Hall. Sanford, near Washing- four hourS. 

it, — season, ton, Dorchester. 

anH ftf^t\ fwn Amory Hall, 603 Washington. 

ana aaa two Anawnn Hall. Atiawan ave., opp. Cen- ^u[rr>r^rrr^^ ^« 

bay-leaves and tral BtaUon, W. Roxbury. MmOTON OP 

four cloves and Armory Hall, Pearl, cor. High, Charles- BeEF. 

when half done, Armory Hail, Dorchester avenue, comer Peel and CUt 

about fifty but- Gibson, Dorchester. i-*.^ xu* «i:^p, 

ton onions or Ashland Hall, 1221 Washington. mto uun Slices 

ion onions, or Association Hall. South, corner Taft's pi., tWO large OUl- 

ten largo ones Rosiindaic. ons ^v^ them 

in slices, a ta- Athen»um. junction Pond, Cottage and . ' gfl^^^n „, 

i.i« ««^^«P.,i ^fi Pleasant, Dorchester. in a Siewpan or 

ble-SpoonlUl OI Bacon's Hal l,2185Washinffton. SaUCCpan, with 

brown SUerar: Beethoven Hall. rear 62l Washington. ^«.^ nnnf»«a nf 

lot it simmpr Roston Hall. 176 Tremont. ^P^ ^^^ 

ict ic simmer Bowdoin Hall, Bowdoin square. Salt butter; 

until It IS well Boylston Hall, over Boyiston Market. place it OVer a 

done and the S"™"^«*^ ^"",\^5o'?)JI?®''- slow fire kftPn- 

«« ^ A u ^ - Caledonian Hall, 125 Chauncy. Blow nre. Keep- 

sauce rather chandler naii,i 8 Essex. ing the onions 

thick ; dress up Choral Hall, 28 Union. Charlestown. stirrpH round 

and sauce over City Hall. School street stirrea rouna 

ana sauce over, ^.j^ jj^,,,^ Q^^y square, comer Harvard, With a WOodeu 

and serve. It Ohariestown. spoon until 

rather brown, 
but not burnt in the least, then add a tea-spoonful of flour, which mix 
well in and moisten with half a pint of water or broth if han<ly, sea- 
son with three salt-spoonfuls of salt, two of sugar, and one of pepper 
if water has been used, but if broth, diminish the quantity of salt, 
add a little coloring to improve its appearance; put in the beef, 
which you have previously cut into small thin slices, as free from fat 
as possible, let it remain upon the fire a few minutes to simmer, and 
serve upon a hot dish. To vary the flavor, a table-spoonful of vine- 
gar might be added, or half a glass of slierry. The above proportions 
are sufficient for one pound and a half of solid meat, and of course 
could be increased or diminished, if more or less meat. 



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OOMPLIMEKTS OF A. 8BUMAN ft CO. 



89 



Chicken Croquettes {Mrs, Chauncey L Filley), 

Ingredients : Two chickens and two sets of brains, both boiled ; 
one tea-cupful of suet, chopped fine ; two sprigs of parsley, chopped ; 
one nutmeg, grated ; an even table-spoonful ol onion, after it is chop- 
ped as fine as possible ; the juice and grated rind of one lemon ; salt 
and black and red pepper, to taste. Chop the meat very fine ; mix 
all well together ; add cream until it is quite moist, or just right for 
molding. This quantity will make two dozen croquettes. Now 
mold them to suit your fancy ; dip them into beaten egg, and roll 
them in pounded cracker or bread-crumbs ; fry in boiling-hot lard. 
Cold meat of any kind can be made into croquettes following this 

receipt, only 

substituting an puenc HAUS.-Contlnued. quettes, instead 

equal amount codman umi. 176 Trcmont. of brains. 

OI meat lOr the Colambia llall, Colombia, near Upbam*8 

ohif*k"Pn And of Corner. ^ 

K^;i«;? 1;^^ fr.i Concord Hall, 65 West Concord. CUTLETS WITH 

boiled nee lor congress Hall, SeO Main, Charlestown. TUTTfiwu/^rkMa 

the brains. Constitutional Liberty HaU, 64 Cbelaea, iKlUbUKUUMb. 

Cold lamb or co^o'lJ nXm Channcy. I^ for ten or 

veal IS especi- CurtIs Hall. Centre, opposite the monu. twelve CUtlctS, 
ally good in DoTet'^SrilMui^'obe.ter. So. Boston. take Say twenty 
croquettes. Dudley Hall, 2389 Washington. I T S n mUSn- 

Cold beef is Ea^ie naii, en Washington. rooms, cut off 

vprv 0-ood also ^"°^ ^**'*» ^"®*» "®*'' Centre. Jam. PI. xi^ ^ -i ™.««u 

very gooa aiso. Elmwood Hall, Oriole, near Walnut ave. \"6 ^l^S, waSU 

Many prefer Eison Haii, opp. Jamaica Plain station. them, and dry 
two cupfuls of 5^°"*?»i?TS*"*^^liy^*^'^*''''ri^"- on a cloth, put 

u 'i^Ji ^:«« Everett Hall, Davenport ave., Ward 20. . • . J^ ^ 

boiled rice Fancull Hall, Merch. row and F. H. sq. tWO patS Ot but- 

(fresh boiled Federhen Hall, 107 Cambridge. tcr in a Stew- 

anH still hot Fraternity Hall, 730 Washington. half n o-ill 

ana SUll noi Kreomasons* HaU, Tremont, comer of P?"' "^" ^ S."^ 

when mixed Boyi«ton. of water, the 

with the chick- Freemasons* Hall, Thompron square, juice of a lem- 
en) for the Friendship SSil, Bowdoln, near Geneva, on, a little Salt 

chicken cro- Dorchester. and pepper, sct 

on the fire ; boil 
for a few minutes, then add two table-spoonfuls of white sauce; 
when very hot add a liaison of the yolk of an egg, made as follows : 
Put the yolk in a cup, and mix well with two table-spoonfuls of 
milk, stir-well for one minute, put it in the middle of your pan ; if 
no white sauce, add a little milk to the mushrooms, and mix a little 
flour with half a pat of butter, and put it in, keep stirring until boil- 
ing ; dish up the cutlets, add the liaison, and serve ; or, still plainer, 
take the same number of mushrooms, wash well, cut in thin slices, 
put into a stewpan, with two pats of butter, half a tea-spoonful of 
flour, a little salt and pepper, the juice of a lemon, and a little water ; 
stew gently for ten minutes, serve pouring the sauce over or in the 
middle of the cutlets. They can bo served as cutlets k la jardiniere, 
with peas, with tomatoes, with artichokes, with spinach, k la poiver- 
ade, a la sauce piquante, with Brussels sprouts, and h la Soubise. 



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40 



COMPUMBNTS OF A. 8HUMAN « CO. 



Frogs Fried. 



A Plain Salmi of Pheasant. 

Should yon have a pheasant left that little has been cut &om, cut 
and trim it into neat joints, which put into a stewpan ; then in another 
stewpan put the bones and trimmings, chopped up very small, with 
an onion in slices, a little parsley, thyme, and bay-leaf, four pepper- 
corns, and a glass of sherry, boil altogether two minutes, then add 
three parts of a pint of brown sauce, and half a pint of broth (if. do 
brown sauce, add a spoonful of flour and a quart of broth or water 
and some coloring) ; let the whole boil until reduced to half, skim- 
min<^ it occasionally ; place a flne hair sieve over the stewpan con- 
tainmg the pieces of pheasant, through which pass the sauce, warm 
altogether 

fsntly, without I PUBLIC HALLS.- Continued. I and served with 

oiling, and Grand Army Hall. eie Washington. poached eggS 

when quite hot Orav's Hall. E. Broadway, corner L Upon the top, 

dress the pieces Guild's Haii.Wa8hin|rton,oor. Dudley. or it may be 

^^«4.i«. „5^« « Hampshire Hall, 712 Washington. ^^a^ z^*^\^^ 

neatly upon a UanionlaHall. Rockland, nwu- German, made mtO bOU- 

dish, pour the Westuoxbury. dins and cro- 

fln 11 r> A nvf>r nnr) Harvard Hall, 6 Bow, Oharlestown. nn a«x»«j jlq Hi- 

sauce oyer, ana Highland Haii. i9i warren. quettes, as ai- 

serve with sip- Horticultural Hall, 100 Tremont rected for tUT* 

pets of fried or Hospitaller Hall. 761 Washington. feev. 

f^«o<.«.^ u^^^A Howe's Hall, 876 West Broadway. '^ 

toastea Dreaa Hutchinson's Hall, ForestBill avenue. 

(cut into the institute Hall,l is Dudley. 

shape of hearts) ^montT^' ^^^ Appleton, near Ti 

around. Ivanhoe Hail, 16 Main, Charlestown. Put them VS. 

The remains John a. Andrew Hall, Chauncy, cor. galted boiling 
of pheasant, or Ken^y Halt, 93 Warren. water, with a 

other game, Kossuth Haii, io87 Tremont little lemon- 

mav also be Lawrence Hall, 724 Washington. in5n« «i«H hnil 

may aibo oe Lurllne Hall, 3 Winter. JUlce, ancl DOU 

m 1 n c e a and Lyceum Hall, East, cor. Whiter, Dorch. them three 

warmed in a Lyceum Hall, Maverick sq., E.Boston. minUteS: wipe 

imi« r^f fhc Masonic Hall, 33 Central sq., B. Boston. irl^ . j;U *u^« 

little Ot me Masonic Hall, junction Adlms and Dor- them ; dip them 

above sauce, Chester avenue, Dorchester. first in cracker- 

dust, then in 
eggs (half a cupful of milk mixed in two eggs and seasoned with 
pepper and salt), then again in cracker crumbs. When they are all 
Dreaded, clean off the bone at the end with a dry cloth. Put them in 
a wire basket and dip them in boiling lard to fry. Put a little paper 
on the end of each bone ; place them on a hot platter, in the form of 
a circle, one overlapping the other, with French peas in the centre. 
Serve immediately, while they are still crisp and hot. 

GiBELOTTE OF RaBBIT. 

Cut up a young rabbit into neat joints, likewise a quarter of a pound 
of streaky bacon in small dice, put the bacon into a stewpan, with two 
ounces of butter, and when a little iried put in the pieces of rabbit, 
which saute of a light brown color, moving them round occasionaJly 



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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAK A CO. 



41 



wiih a wooden spoon ; then add a good table-spoonAil of flour, work- 
ing it well in, moisten with a pint of water, season with a little pep- 
per and salt, and when beginning to simmer, skim off all the fat 
and add thirty button onions, a few blanched mushrooms, and a little 
brown gravy or coloring ; let simmer a «quarter of an hour longer, 
when take out the rabbit, which dress upon your dish ; reduce the 
sauce until it adheres to the back of the spoon, when pour it over the 
rabbit and serve. 

Roast Sweetbreads. 

Take the sweatbreads and. lay them in water at blood-hjBat, to dis- 

forge, for three to four hours ; then blanch them for two minutes in 
oiling water. 



put them into a 
stewpan with a 
few slices of 
carrot, onions, 
turnip, a little 
parsley, thyme. 
Day-leaf, six 
pepper-corns, a 
blade of mace, 
and a small 
piece of bacon ; 
cover over with 
a little broth or 
water, and let 
boil for twenty 
minutes ; take 
them out and 
dry them in a 
cloth, egg and 
bread-crumb 
them, tie them 



PUBLIC HALLS.-Continiied. 

Masonic Hall, Bartlett*s Building, oppo- 
site depot, Jamaica Plain. 

MavericK Hall, MuTcrick square. 

Mechanic Hall, 30 Bedford, o. Cbaimej. 

Meionaon, 78 Tremont. 

Montgomery Hall, 339 W. Broadway. 

Monmnent Hall, Hancock square. 

Mnsic Hall, 15 Winter. 

Nassau Hall, 833 Washington. 

New Era Hall, 176 Tremont. 

Oakland Hall, River, cor. Oakland. 

Odd Fellows* Hall, Tremont o. Berkeley. 

Odd Fellows' Hall, 25 Main, Charlestown. 

Odd Fellows' Hall, Elson Block, opposite 
depot, Jamaica Plain. 

Paine Memorial Hall, Appleton, near 
Tremont. 

Papanti Hall, 23 Tremont. 

Park Hall, 176 Tremont. 

Park Street Hall, Park, oor.'^xchange, 
Dorchester. 

Parker Memorial Hall, Berkeley, comer 
Appleton. 

Pierce's Hall, Clayton, Harrison square. 

Pilgrim Hall, Congregational House, 1 
Somerset 

Preble Hall, 176 Tremont 



on a spit, and 
roast a nice 
brown color for 
ten to fifteen 
minutes; or 
they may be 
browned in an 
oven, or fried 
in very hot lard 
for ten minutes, 
in which case 
they should 
stew a little 
longer; they 
may be served 
with plain 
gravy and a 
piece of toasted 
bread under, or 
a little melted 
butter and 



some Harvey's, 

Reading, or Soyer^s sauce, and a little catsup added to it, boiled and 
poured around it ; or with any of the sauces fricandeau. The heart- 
bread being generally so expensive, I seldom make use of it, but it 
may be blanched, larded, cooked, and served like the fricandeau, 
diminishing the larding and cooking according to the size of the 
bread, or it may be dressed as above, or, if a large throat-bread, it 
may be larded. 

Bubble and Squeak. 

I am certain you must know, as well as myself, of our hereditary 
dish called bubble and squeak ; but, like the preparation of other 
things, there is a good way and a bad ; and, as you prefer the former 
to the latter, proceed as follows : Boil a few greens or a savoy cab- 
bage (which has been previously well washed) in plain water imtil 



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42 



OOMPUMBNTS OF A. 8HUMAN A CO. 



tender, which then drain until quite dry in a colander or seive, put 
it upon a trencher and chop it rather fine with a knife, then for a 
pound of salt beef you have in slices, put nearly a quarter of a pound 
of butter into a frying-pan, in which saute the beef gently but not too 
dry ; when done, keep it het, put the cabbage in the frying-pan, sea- 
son with a little salt and pepper, and, when hot through, dress it 
upon a dish, lay the beef over and serve. 

Frftadella {twenty receipts in one). 

Put half a pound of crumb of bread to soak in a pint of cold water. 
take the same quantity of any kind of toast or boiled meat, with a 

little fat, chop 

it up like sau- pygnc HALLS.-Contlnued. s p o o n f ul of 

sage meat then Pniaaki Hall, Dorchester, cor. Fourth. salt, half the 

put your bread PjiWan Haii, i76 Tremont. Same of pepper, 

in a clean cloth, g2te%H^|;?'^;cen^*^"'^^ * ^^^*^® S^^ 

press it to ex- Rocbeater Uaii. 730 Washington. nutmeg, same 

tract all the Shawmut Haii, i76 Tremont. of lemon peel, 

water, put into gg^j^Sk.^'V^'^lS^^S:''""- stir continually 

a Stewpan two Town Hall, Washington, c. Norfolk, D. Until very hot; 

omices of but. ?ro^^^7i?iJ.\\'?o^jr^^^^ then add m 

ter, a table- Union Hall. is Boylston. cggs, ouc at a 

spoonful of Wadman Hall, 176 Tremont time, WcU miX' 

Phonnpd on- Waif s Hall, 390 West Broadway. ^j tno-Afh^r 

cnoppea on- Washington Hall. 133 Blackstone. ed together, 

ions, try tor two Washington Hail, Dorch.ave.,c. Boston. and pour on a 

minutes, then S"***?«^°.P?l!»^*^^^^'l?^T'®- dish to get cold. 

^AA 4.uJu^r.»A Waverly Hall, 16 Waverly block. )t;, ^^ i „ 

add the bread, webster Haii, 2150 Washington. Then take a 

stir with a Webster Hall, Webster, East Boston. piece aS bio* aS 

wooden spoon ^^"fe" g^;,'; ^eSj?erop'pUte Be.io. a small egg. 
until rather vue, Ward 23. and roll it to 

dry, then add Winthrop Saii, 406 Mrfn. Chariestown. the Same shape, 

xu*'^* «„♦ o«« Wood's Hall, Walnut, Neponset. mx« oaa«« oix«^ , 

tne meat, sea- Young Men's Christian Association, 68 flatten it a llt- 

son with a tea- BUot. tie, egg and 

bread-crumb 
over, keeping the shape, do all of it the same way, then put into a 
saute-pan a quarter of a pound of lard, or clean fat, or oil ; when 
hot, but not too much so, put in the pieces, and saute a very nice 
yellow color, and serve very hot, plain, on a napkin, or on a border 
of mashed potatoes, with any sauce or garniture you fancy. These 
can bo made with the remains of any kind of meat, poultry, game, 
fish, and even vegetables ; hard eggs or cold mashed potatoes may 
be introduced in small quantities, and may be fried instead of sauted, 
in which case put about two pounds of fat in the frying-pan, and if 
care is used it will do several times. This is an entirely new and 
very economical and palatable dish, and fit for all seasons, and if 
once tried would be often repeated. The only expense attending it 
is the purchase of a small wire sieve for the bread-crumbs. The 
reason 1 call it twenty receipts in one is, that all kinds of food maybe 
used for it, even shrimps, oysters, and lobsters. 



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GOMPLIMBKTS OF A. 8HUHAK A CO. 



43 



Made Dish from Joints that have been pbeviouslt sebyed. 

If from braised veal with vegetables : Cut it into slices abont a 
quarter of an inch in thickness, then put the remainder, vegetables 
and gravy, if any, in a pan ; if not, withnvater and a piece of glaze ; 
season with a little salt, pepper, suffar, a bay-leaf, ana the juice of a 
Quarter of a lemon ; simmer gently lor twenty minutes on a slow firfi ; 
dish the fillets in the form ofa crown, lay the vegetables in the mid- 
dle, pour gravy over and serve. Or, what remains cut into very 
small dice, leave none on the bones, put in a pan, shake a little flour 
over, season with a little salt, pepper, sugar, oay-leaf, and the juice 
of a quarter of a lemon, then moisten it with milk sufficient to make 
a sauce, warm 

it for ten min- I uacv cadcc I Poached effgs 

utes, add half JlAtR hAHtb, ^ g^^^l^ 

an ounce of ^^^ ^„^ ^^,^ paMenger from one * ^ith these. 

DUtter, stir it place to another within the city proper 

well and serve (except as hereinafter provided), or from 

vprv hot • or if SP® Pfc^® ^^ another within the limiu of Qx HEART. 

\K.Ly uuL, ur, 11 East Boston— or from one place to an. 

you prefer it other within the limits of South Boston This dish al- 

brnwn Iphva —or from one place to another within the ., . ^ . J^««. 

Drown, leave „^,^ ^^ ^^^^^ Highlands (formerly tho' not Very 

out tne milE:, Roxbury) the fare shall be Fifty Cents, recherche^ is a 

and throw a few and for every additional adult passenger, ^qq^ familv 

chopped mush- Fifty Cents. 6 J 

^^^JU^ „«^ lo For one adult passenger fh)m any ""®» ,^J^^ ^®" 

rooms ana es- pjace (within the city proper) south of markable for 

chalotS in, and bover street and west of Berkeley (^3 cheaoneSS 

Tnni«ff>n xirii-h street, to any place north of State* Court, t» * •4. • *^i 1 ' 

r\!i . an<» Cambridge streets; or from an^ Put it in luke- 

a little water, place north of state, Court, and Cam- warm Water 

to which add a bridge streets, to any place south of Do- ^^.^ hour to 

fow /It^o^^c /^f ver street and west of Berkeley street, "." ** uuur to 

leW arops OI ^he fare shall be One Dollar,— and for dlSgorge, then 

browning or a two or more passengers, Fifty Cents wipe it well 

oi^h<^Sr%!i "t; children under fonr year, of »«. ^idl a cloth. 
OUgnt never to ^^h an adult, no charge shall be made. and Stuff the 
he too thick. For children between four and twelve interior with a 

highly - season- 
ed veal stuffing* tie it up in paper, and pass a small spit through the 
sides, set it before a good fire tor about two hours to roast, keeping 
it well basted; when done take off the paper, and serve with any 
sharp sauce, or a little plain gravy. 

Fricassee op Chicken (Mrs. Oratz Brown). 

Saute a chicken (cut into pieces) with a little minced onion in hot 
lard. When the pieces are brown, add a table-spoonful of flour, and 
let it cook a minute, stirring it constantly. Add then one and a half 
pints of boiling water or stock, a table-spoonful of vinegar, a table- 
spoonful of sherry, a tea-spoonful of Worcestershire sauce, salt and 
pepper. When it is taken off the fire, strain the sauce, taking off 
any particles of fat ; mix in the yolk of an egg. Pour it over the 
chicken and serve. 



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44 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHITMAN « CO. 



A Common Pot-Pie op Veal, Beep, ob Chicken. 

Cut the meat into pieces, and put them into enough boiling water 
to cover them well ; add also two or three strips of pork. Cover tbe 
pot closely ; boil an hour, then season with pepper and salt to taste, 
and a little piece of butter. Just before taking out the ingredients <tf 
the pot to send to the table, put into it, when the water is boiling, 
separate spoonfuls of batter made with two eggs well beaten, two 
and a half or three cupfuls of buttermilk, one tea-spoonful of soda, 
and sufficient flour. The batter should be made just before it is 
cooked. It takes about three or four minutes to cook it, the water 
not to be allowed to stop boiling. The dish should then be serred 
immediately, or 
the dumplings 
will become 
heavy. 



HACK FAR£S.-Continued. 

years of age, when accompanied by an 
adult, Twentv-Flve Cents each. 

Between the bonrs of 12 o'clock at 
night and 6 o'clock in the morning, for 
one adult passenger, the fare »ball be 
double the amount allo'wed in the pre- 
ceding sections, and Fifty Cents for each 
additional adult. 

BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

For one adult passenger, from any 
place in the city proper, north of Essex 
and BoylBton streets, to any place in the 
Boston Highlands, or from any place in 
the Boston Highlands to any place in the 
city proper, north of Ksi^ez and Boyiston 
streets, the fare shall be Two Dollars 
and Fifty Cents, — for two passengers. 
One Dollar and Twenty-Five Cents each ; 
for three passengers. One Dollar each ; 
for four passengers, Seventy-Fiye Cents 
each. 

For one adult passenger, ftom any 
place in the city proper, south of Essex 
and Boylston streets, and north of Do. 
ver and Berkeley streets, to any place in 
the Boston Highlands, or from any place 



CmCEEX PiB. 

Cut up a nice 
plump chicken 
mto joints, 
which lay upon 
a dish, and sea- 
son lightly with 
chopped pars- 
ley, white pep- 
per, and salt; 
tlien lay the 
back, cut into 
three pieces, at 
the bottom of 
a pie-dish, with 
the two legs on 



or water, cover with paste, and bake, 
piece lightly in flour. 



either aide; 
have half » 
pound of cook- 
ed ham or ba- 
con in slices,* 
layer of which 
cover over, 
then lay in the 
two wings, and 
over them the 
breast, cut into 
two pieces, 
which, with the 
remainderof 
the ham or ba- 
con, form into 
a dome in the 
middle, pour 
half a pint d 
white sauce 
over, if handy, 
or a little broth 
If no white sauce, dip each 



Sheep's Tongues a la Mayonnaise. 

Boil half a dozen sheep's tongues with one or two slices of bacon, 
one carrot, one onion, two cloves, two or three sprigs of parsley, salt 
and pepper (some add two table-spoonfuls of sherry or port wine, but 
this may be omitted), and enough boiling water (or, better, stock) 
to cover them. Let them simmer about one and a half hours, 
replenishing the boiling water or stock when necessary. AVhen 
thoroughly done, skin and trim them neatly ; lay them between two 
plates to flatten them. A professional cook would glaze them with 
tiie stock boiled down in which they were cooked ; however, this is 
only for the sake of appearance. Arrange them in a circle around i 
dish, with a Mayonnaise sauce poured in the centre. 

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OOXPLIXSMTS OF A. SHUMAH A 00. 



45 



Beef Hash. 
Chop the cold cooked meat rather fine ; use half as much meat as 
>f boiled potatoes (chopped when cold). Put a little boiling water 
ind butter into an iron saucepan ; when it boils again, put in the 
meat and potatoes well salted and peppered. Let it cook well, stir- 
ring occasionally — not enough to make a purke or mush of it. It is 
not done before there is a coating at the bottom of the saucepan, 
from which the hash will free itself without sticking. The bash 
must not be at all watery, nor yet too dry, but so that it will stand 
auite firm on well-trinmied and buttered slices of toast, and to be 
thus served on 

^Pla^r. Voi- I HACK FARES,-Continued. I from which 

!a! Chicken or j^ ^^ ^^^^ Highland, to any place In they are taken ; 
turkey n a s n the city proper, touUi of Essex and that from a 

should be made goyl«on streets, and nortii of Dover and g^jg,!! well-fed 

i^ 4.u^ a „ w. A Berkeley Streets, the faro shall bo Two f .i VLr" *«3« 

in tne same Dollars,— for two passengers, one Dollar hcifcr I COn- 

Wray. each; for three passengers, seventy. Five sidcr the bcst. 

Cents each; for four passengers. Sixty. „„^ ..«in ™.«:«.u 

Two and a half Cents each. " ' ^ and Will WClgh 

• For one adult passenger, fh>m anyplace about twelve 

in the city proper, south of Dover and t» n n n rl a anA 

Berkeley streets, to any place in the Bos- P " " " " ^\ T~r 

ton Highlands, or from any place in the take aOOUt tWO 

- Boston Uigblnnds to any place in the hourS tO roaSt, 

DIBLOIK OF cily proper, south of Dover anil Berkeley A r^ r^ ^ ^ A i *> ^ 

Beef stretto, the faro shall be One Dollar and uepenuing 

Twenty.Five Cents,— for two passengers, much OU the 

Should never Sevemy-Flvo Ccnls each ; for three or ^j.^ Haviuff 

L V \i more passengers. Fifty Cento each. .21 j **«»*»»t5 

be less than For children under four years of aae. Spitted Or hung 

three of the with an adult, no charge shall be made. the joint, CO VCr 

bU^^.4> -miUa ^w*A ^OT children between four and twelve -^ ™.;*u Vw„4.*«,«,^^ 

short nbs, and years of age, when accompanied by an ^^ With buttered 

Vrill weigh adult, Twenty-Five Cento each. paper, and 

more or less ac- dorchester. place it about 

cording to the For one adult passenger, from one eighteen inches 

size ot the ox place to another within the Umito of from the fire; 

about one hour 
lifter it has been down, remove the paper and place the joint nearer 
the fire, and put half a pint of water, with a little salt, in the drip- 
ping-pan ; about a quarter of an hour before removing from the fire, 
dredge it with flour and salt from the dredging-box ; when taken 
from the fire, empty the contents of the dripping-pan into a basin, 
from which remove the fat ; pour the gravy in the dish, and then 
place the joint on it ; serve some scraped horse-radish separate. A 
X orkshire pudding is very excellent when cooked under this joint. 



JOINTS. 



FnxET OF Veal. 

Choose it of the best quality. Procure a leg, saw off the knuckle, 
take out the bone in the centre of the fillet, and fill up the cavity 
with some dressing, fold the udder and flap round, which fix with 
tl^ee skewers ; place half a sheet of buttered foolscap paper top 



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46 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAK « CO. 



and bottom, which tie over and over with plenty of string, rnn i 
spit through, fixing the fillet with a holdfast; set down to roast 
placing it rather close to the fire ten minutes, rub well over witl 
butter, then place it at least two feet and a half from the fire, ti 
roast very slowly, giving it a fine gold color ; a fillet weighing six 
teen pounds would require three hours roasting ; when done take i1 
up, detach all the string and paper, trim the top and set it upon yoni 
dish ; have a pint of melted butter in a stewpan upon the fire, tc 
which, when boiling, add four spoonfuls of Harvey sauce, and two 
of mushroom catsup, mix well, and pour round the fillet ; have also 
boiled nicely an ox-tongue, which skin and trim, dress upon a dish 
surrounded 

with greens or hack FARES.-Coiitinued. at the thigh- 

cabbage mcely ^„^ ^ (Dorchester), the fare shall be bone ; roast it 
boiled, ana One Dollar, —and for each addiUonal SOme little ulS* 
serve as an ac- ??alt passenger the fare shall be Fifty ^^^^^ f^.^^ the 
««,«^«« ,• ^ « « ♦ Cents; provided^ however, that between ^^^"^^ " /. . 

companiment the hours of eleven of tbe clock, p. m. fire at first 

to the fillet. and five of the clock^A. M.j^thefare shall bringing it 

nearer as it gets 

•^ y tww poaocuj^ctB, uiju lur cuuii nuuiuuuai ClOne • DEStC Hi 

KOAST LtEG OP passenger more than two, Fifty Cents. ivith a little 

Mutton. Fo^ o"® adult passenger from any , r" i .i/. 

•^ ^ _._,,„„„, r.^ « — ^ butter while 

roasting, or 
cover it with a 
sheet of well- 
buttered paper, 
which remove 
just before it is 
quite cooked. 
The leg of doe 
mutton is the 
best for rofist- 
ing ; should it 
be ewe, and 

intended for roasting, I proceed thus two or three *days before I want 
it. I make a small incision close to the knuckle, pushing a wo'den 
skewer close down to the leg-bone as far as it will go ; 1 then take 
one tablespoonful of port wine, if not handy I use catsup, and a 
teaspoonful of either treacle, apple or currant jelly, and mix thein 
together; I then remove the skewer, and run the mixture in it, 
closing the hole with two cloves of garlic. This joint I prefer to 
dangle, rather than put on the spit. 

Haunch op Venison. 

A good haunch of venison, weighing from about twenty to twen^j 
five pounds, will take from three to four hours' roasting before agow 
solid fire ; trim the haunch by cutting oft* part of the knuckle, ana 
sawing off the chine-bone ; fold the flap over, then envelop it "■ 

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Choose the 
s ame as the 
haunch. One 
about ei^ht 
pounds' weight 
will take about 
one hour and a 
half to roast; 
run the spit in 
at the knuckle, 
and bring it out 



HACK FARES.-Coiitinued. 

Ward 24 (Dorchester), the fare shall be 
One Dollar,— and for each addiUonal 
adult passenger the fare shall be Fifty 
Cents; providedt however, that between 
the hours of eleven of tbe clock, p. m. 
and five of the clock, A. M., the fare shall 
bo One Dollar and Fifty Cents for one 
passenger; Seventy-Five Cents each for 
two passengers, and for each additional 
passenger more than two, Fifty Cents. 

For one adult passenger from any 
point in Ward 24, north of Centre street, 
to any point in the city proper, south of 
Summer street and Beacon street, the 
fare shall be Three Dollars,— for two 
passengers, One Dollar and Fifty Cents 
each ; for three p issengcrs, One Dollar 
each ; for four passengers, Seventy-Five 
Cents each. 

For one adnltpassenger from any point 
in Ward 24 north of Centre street, to any 
point in the city proper north of Summer 
street and Beacon street, the fare shall 
be Four Dollars; for two passengers, 
Two Dollars each ; for three passengers. 
One Dollar and Thirty-Three Cents each ; 
for four passengers. One Dollar each. 



COHPLIHENTS OF A. SHUMAK « CO. 



47 



% flonr and water paste rather stiff, and an inch thick, tie it up in 
strong paper) four sheets in thickness, place it in your cradle spit so 
that it will turn quite even, place it at first very close to the fire 
antil the paste is well crusted, pouring a few laalefuls of hot drip- 
ping over occasionally to prevent the paper catching fire, then put it 
rather furtiier from the fire, which must be quite clear, solid, and 
have sufficient frontage to throw the same heat on every part of the 
venison; when it has. roasted the above time take it up, remove it 
from the paste and paper, run a thin skewer into the thickest part to 
ascertain if done ; if it resists the skewer it is not done, and must 
be tied up and put down again, but if the fire is good, that time will 
sufficiently cook it; glaze the top well, salamander until a little 
brown, put a 

frill upon the I hack FARES.-Continued. i it long enough, 

knuckle, and j.^^ ^„^ ^^^^ paweneer from any A Small turkcy 

serve very hot, point in Word 24 south of Centre street, of 8 e V e n or 
with strong to any point in tl»e citv proper south of e i ff h t pounds 
n-r-o^xT o«H Summer street and Beacon street, the /<.i5!L u«„i ««.i^« 
gravy, ana ^re shall be Five Dollars ; for two passen- (the best Selec- 
plenty of gers, Two Dollars and Fifty Cents each; tion, if fat) 
Frpnoh hpans "**" ^^^^^ p-issengers, One Dollar and ahmilH hprnitsf^ 
l?rencn oeans sixty-Six Cents each: for four passen- S^OUIQ DeroaS> 
separate. gers. One Dollar and Twenty-Five Cento ed Or baked 

each. three hours at 

For one adult passenger from any point i^„ci* A trar*rr 

in Ward 24 soutli of Centre street, to any leasi. A very 

point in the city proper north of Summer large turkey 

priTTT nrPV street and Beacon street, the fare shall alinnlH nnf hA 

rUUluLlil. i,e Six Dollars; for two passengers. ^^^^^^ ^Ot be 

Three Dollars each; for three passengers, COOkea a mm- 

ROAST Two Dollars each; for four passengers, utC leSS than 

XV v A D X Q^^ Dollar and Fifty Cento each. ^^„^ Ur.»,.e . « « 

Tttwttwv ^,-»i. / ^ « lour nours : an 

X u ttJ^iii 1. For children under four years of aee, ^vf«„ kr^ni. ;» 

rp, . . with an adult, no charge shall be made. exrra nour IS 

ine secret m For children between four and twelve preferable to a 

having: a good years of asre, when accompanied by an minnfp Ipss Tf 

roast Vkfy is ja;;H.U.af.r..ha.lbe halZ-the ,.te.for ™,j,«^^bas" 

to baste it of- The Baggage used by any perron In ed, they will 

ten, and cook traveling, shall be Free of charge. X)Ot beCOme 



dry. 



With much experience in hotel life, where turkeys are ruined by 
the wholesale, I have never seen a piece of turkey that was fit to eat. 
Besides being tasteless, thejr are almost invariably undercooked. 
First, then, after the turkey is dressed, season it well, sprinkling 
pepper and salt on the inside ; stuff it, and tie it well in shape ; 
either lard the top or lay slices of bacon over it ; wet the skin, and 
sprinkle it well with pepper, salt, and fiour. It is well, to allow a 
turkey to remain some time stuffed before cooking. Pour a little 
boiling water into the bottom of the dripping-pan. If it is to be 
roasted, do not put it too near the coals at first, until it gets* well 
heated through ; then gradually draw it nearer. The excellence of 
the turkey depends much upon the frequency of basting it ; occa- 
sionally baste it with a little butter, oftener with its own drippings. 
Just before taking it &om the fire or out of the oven, put on more 



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48 



COMPLIMEMTS OF A. 8HUMAN A CO. 



melted butter, and sprinkle over more flour ; this will iriake th^ skin 
more crisp and brown. While the turkey is cooking, boil the giblets 
well ; chop them fine, and mash the liver. When the turkey is done, 
put it on a hot platter. Put the baking-pan on the fire, dredge in a 
little flour, and when cooked, stir in a little boiling water or stock; 
strain it, skim off every particle of fat ; add the ffiblets ; season with 
salt and pepper. If chestnut stuffing is used, add some boiled chest- 
nuts to the gravy ; this is decidedly the best sauce for a turkey. 
Besides the gravy, always serve cranberry, currant, or plum jelly with 
turkey. These are more attractive molded the day before they are 
served. The currant or plum jelly is melted and remolded in a pre^ 
ty form. Boast turkeys are often garnished with little sausage-balls. 



Roast Goose. 

The goose 
should be abso- 
lutely young. 
Green geese 
are best, — i. e., 
when they are 
about four 
months old. 
In trussing, cut 
the neck close 
to the back, 
leaving the skin 
long enough to 
turn over the 



HACK FARES.— Continued. 

Ko owner, driver, or other person hav- 
ing charge of a hackney carriage, shall 
demand or receive more than the price 
or rate of fare herein established, under 
a penalty of not leas than Ten nor more 
than Fifty Dollars for each offence^ — 
and he shall forfeit his License, And 
for refusing to carry any passenger from 
any railroad station or steamboat land- 
ing, to any point within the city, the 
owner, driver, or other person having 
charge of such hackney carriage, shall 
be subject to a like penalty. 

The»e rules shall be kept posted In 
some con6i)icuous place in every licensed 
vehicle used for the conveyance of pas- 
sengers, under a penalty of Five Dollars 
for each and every day this regulation is 
not observed. 



back ; beat the 
breast-bone flat 
with the roll- 
ing-pin ; tie or 
skewer the 
legs and wings 
securely. Stuff 
the goose witii 
the following 
mixture: Four 
large onions 
(chopped), ten 
sage leaves, 
quarter of a 
pound of bread 
crumbs, one 
and a half ozs. 

of butter, salt and pepper, one e^ff, a slice of pork (chopped). Now 
sprinkle the top of the goose well with salt, pepper, and flour. Re- 
serve the giblets to boil and chop for the gravy, as you would for a 
turkey. Baste the goose repeatedly. If it is a green one, roast it at 
least an hour and a half; if an older one, it would be preferable to 
bake it in an oven, with plenty of hot water in the baking-pan. It 
should be basted very often with this water, and when it is nearly 
done baste it with butter and a little flour. Bake it three or Jfour 
hours. Decorate the goose with water-cresses, and serve it with the 
brown giblet gravy in the sauce-boat. Always serve an apple-sauce 
with this dish. 

Goose (to truss), 

Ha^ng well picked the goose, cut the feet off at the joint, and the 
pinion at the first joint; cut off the neck close to tlie back, leaving 
all the skin you can ; pull out the throat, and tie a knot at the end; 
put your middle finger in at the breast, loosen the liver, &c., cut it 
close to the rump, and draw out all the inside except the soal, wipe 
it well, and beat the breast-bone flat ; put a skewer in the wings, 



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COMPUHBNTS OF A. 8HDMAK « CO. 



49 



and draw the legs close up, runnins^ a skewer through the middle of 
botli legs and body ; draw the small of the \es close down to the side 
bone, and run a skewer through ; make a hole in the skin large 
enough to admit the trail, which, when stuffed, place through it, as 
it holds the stuffing better. 

PRAmiE-cmcKEN OB Grouse Roasted. 

Epicures think that grouse (in fact, all game) should not be too 
fresn. Do not wash them. Do not wash any kind of game or meat. 
If proper care be taken in dressing them they will be quite clean, 
ana one could easily wash out all meir blood and flavor. Put plenty 
of butter inside 

S* if nSesi BOSTON POST OmOE. I TSde'LC 

saxy to keep it Dbvonshirb Striiet, between pepper, and 

moist. Roast ^^"'^ ^^ ^^'•'^ salt, until it is 

the grouse half Office ogen from 7 j^ ^\^\}?''^ '•"■• like a paste: 

an TlOUr, and OnSanday..from9tolOA.M. ^^^ ^^^^ .J 

longer if liked pobtmastbb, Edward s. tobey. over hot but- 
thoroughly Dally Mall Arrangement tered toast, 

done; baste mails closk. Serve the 

them constant- Southern, TH and 12 m:, 2 and 8 p. m. ; groUSe on the 
Iv witli bnttpr and on Sunday at 754 P.M. 5>ocf anrrnnnH. 

ly Wim DUCier. Albany, and on the route, 1 A. M., and tOaSt, SUrrounU- 

When nearly 2p.m. ed with water- 

done, sprinkle Western. 4 a.m.. 2. 6, and 8 p.m. cresses. 

^^«« « i:<^i« Cape Cod, 6 A. M., and 8 p. M. 

OTCr a little Nantucket, 6 a. m. 

flour and plcn- Northern Mail. 5 and 11 A. M., 4^ p. 

tv of butter to Foreign Mail, via New York, day pi 

y \Z ^ vious to sailing, at 7 p. M. __.,, , , 

froth them. Eastern, 5 A. M.. and 2 and 7 P. M. Wild ducks 

After having whew dvm. should be 

boiled the liver ^^^^{^ midniTt"*** ^ ^' "" *^ '' **** cooked rare, 

of the grouse, Eastern MaU av^wies 7 A. M., and 2 and with or without 

minceand.8p. M. [ stufling. Baste 

them a few 
minutes at first with hot water to which have been added an onion 
and salt. Then take away the pan, and baste with butter, and a 
little flour to froth and brown them. The flre should be quite 
hot, and twenty to twenty-five minutes are considered the outside 
limit for cooking them. A brown gravy made with the giblets 
should be served in the bottom of the dish. Serve also a currant 
jelly. Garnish the dish with slices of lemons. 

Chicken, with Macaroni or with Bice. (French Cook). 

Cut the chicken into pieces ; fry or saute them in a little hot drip- 
pings, or in butter the size of an egg ; when nearly done, put the 
pieces into another saucepan ; add a heaping tea-spoonful of flour to 
the hot drippings, and brown it. Mix a uttle cold or lukewarm 
water to the rattx; when smooth, add a pint or more of boiling 

3 

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Wild Ducks. 



50 



COHPLIMBNTS OF A. SHUHAN A CO. 



water ; pour this oyer the chicken in the saucepan, add a chopped 
sprig of parsley, a clove of garlic, pepper, and salt. Let the chick- 
en boil hsdf or three-quarters of an hoar, or until it is thoroughly 
done ; then take out the pieces of chicken. Pass the sauce through a 
sieve, and remove all the fat. Have ready some macaroni which has 
been boiled in salted water, and let it boil in this sauce. Arrange 
tiie pieces of chicken tasteftiUy on a dish ; pour the macaroni and 
sauce over them, and serve ; or, instead of macaroni, use boiled rico, 
which may be managed in tiie same way as the macaroni. 



The following 
Carefully pluck 
them, and take 
the skin off 
the heads and 
necks. Truss 
them with the 
head under the 
wing. Twist 
the legs at the 
first joint, 
pressing the 
feet against the 
thigh. Do not 
draw them. 
Now tie a thin 
slice of bacon 
around each; 
run a small 
iron skewer 
through the 
birds, and tie it 
to a spit at both 



Snipe and Woodcock Roasted. 

is the epicure's manner of cooking them, not mine. 



POST OFnCE.-^ontinued. 

Albany Mail averagea 7 and 11>^ A. M., 

and 4>^ p M. 
Northern Mall averages 9}^ A. M., 7 P. M. 
Nantucket Mail averages 6^ P. m. 
Cape Cod Mail averages \\}i A. M., and 

6>iP.M. 

Canada Maib. 
Montreal, Canada Bast, close at 5 A. M., 
and A^ P. M. Due at 9% a. m., 11 P. M., 
West, 2 P. M. Due at 4^ P. M. 

Sunday Mails. 
• A Mail is made up on Sunday for Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Connecticut and 
iihode Island, New York City, and the 
South, and closes at 7^ P. M. Salem, 
Roxbury, Brookline, Chelsea, Cambridge, 
Cambridgeport, Charlestown, Lynn, at 
5 a.m. 

Money Orders, 

For any amount not exceeding $50 will 

be issued on deposits at this Office, on 

Sayment of the following fees : On Or- 
era not exceeding $10, — 5 cents. Over 
$10 and not exceeding $20, — ^10 cents. 



ends. Roast 
them at a good 
fire, placing a 
dripping - pan, 
with buttered 
slices of toast 
nnder them, to 
catch the trail 
as it falls.— 
Baste the snipe 
often with a 
paste-brush 
dipped in melt- 

'ed butter. Let 
them roast 
twenty min- 
utes ; tiien salt 
the birds, and 
serve them im- 
mediately on 
the pieces ot 

* toast. 



Ducks a l' Aubergiste (or Tavern-Keepers' Fashion). 

Truss one or two ducks with the legs turned inside, put them into 
a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter ; place them over a 
slow fire, turning round occasionally, until they nave taken a nice 
brown color, ada two spoonfuls of flour, mix well with them, add a 
quart of water, with half a table-spoonful of salt and sugar, let sim- 
mer gently until the ducks are done (but adding forty button onions 
well peeled as soon as it begins to boil), keep hot; peel and cut ten 
turnips in slices, fry them m a frying-pan in butter, drain upon a 
cloth, put them into the sauce, and stew until quite tender ; dress the 
ducks upon your dish, skim the fat from the sauce, which has attained 
a consistency, add some fresh mushrooms, poor round the ducks and 
serve. 

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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



51 



A Fricassee of Chicken. 

Cat two chickens into pieces. Reserve all the white moat and the 
best pieces for the fricassee. The trimmings and the inferior pieces 
use to make the grayy. Put these pieces into a porcelain kettle, 
with a quart of cold water, one clove, pepper, salt, a small onion, a 
little bunch of parsley, and a small piece of pork ; let it simmer for an 
hour and a half, and then put in the pieces for the fricassee ; let them 
boil slowly until they are quite done ; take them out then, and keep 
them in a hot place. Now strain the gravy, take off all the fat, and 
add it to a roux of half a cupful of flour and a small piece of butter. 
Let this boil ; take it off the stove and stir in three yolks of eggs 
mixed with two or three table-spoonfuls of cream ; also the juice of 
half a lemon. 

ho^-1 ^fLr ^'th« I POST OFnCE.-Continued. I DUCKLINGS 

n^!i« oif ;«^t Over $20 and not exceeding $80,-16 WITH 

eggs are in, or cents. Over $30 and not exceeding $40, T ft R v t P fl 

they will cur- —20 cenU. Over $40 and not exceeding J- u kxi x ir o 

Hip SfirifwAll $50,-26 cente. List of Money Order Ta n. vprv favnr- 

aie. btiritweil, offices may be seen at Post Office. Hours f^ a very lavor- 

keepmgithota from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Money orders ite dish among 
moment : then «f® issued from aii the stations, except the middle 

r^/^f,^;^ «U««*u« Dorchester, Mattapan, and North Cam- « i „ „ „ ^ « s ^ 

pour It over the bridge. classesin 

chicken and Money Orders Issued on the United France. Pro- 

serve Some of ^Zril;^:k^SXV::^l^!^ peed as in the 
the fricassees jrofe.-The i«ne to a .ingle applicant, laft, but instead 

with long and in one day, of more than three orders, 01 pcaS USB 
formidable payable at the same office, and to the a b O U t f O T t V 
_ . same payee, is positively forbidden. . « z» 

names are not f jr , 4^ jr pieces of good 

much more Collection and Carriers' Delivery. turnips cut into 

than wine or Letters collected from Street Boxes at moderate- sized 

mushrooms, or ^^^^^ "^^^^^^ "P°" ^»>^°* J ^^^^ »» ^^ square pieces, 

both, added to 'Coliected from boxes at Station A, having pre- 
thia rpopint Roxbury, also from Red Boxes at the vimmlv fripd 
UllS receipt. Metropolitan Railroad Station, Middlesex 7,^^^®^^^ ^ V ? ^ 
Railroad Station, Cambridge Railroad them Ol a light- 
Station, Old South Church, Old State yellow color in 

a little butter or 
lard, and drained them upon a sieve, dress the duck upon a dish as 
before, season the sauce with a little pepper, salt and sugar, reduce 
until rather tMcMsh, a thin sauce not suiting a dish of this descrip- 
tion ; tihe turnips must not, however, be in pur^e ; sauce over and 
serve. 

The remains of ducks left from a previous dinner may be hashed 
as directed for ^oose, and for variety, should peas be in season, a 
pint previously boiled may be added to the hash just before serving. 
The sage and apple must m all cases be omitted. 

Capon or Poulard a l' Estragon. 

I have been told many fanciful epicures idolize this dish. The 
bird should be trussed for boiling ; rub the breast with half a lemon, 



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52 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAK & CO. 



tie over it some thin slices of bacon, cover the bottom of a small 
stewpan with thin slices of the same, and a few trimmings of either 
beef, veal, or lamb, two onions, a little carrot, turnip, and celery, 
two bay-leaves, a sprig of thyme, a glass of sherry, two quarts of 
water, season lightly with salt, pepper, and nutmeg, simmer about 
one hour and a quarter, keeping continually a little fire on the lid, 
strain three parts of the gravy into a small basin, skim off the fat, 
and pass throug:h a tammy into a small stewpan, add a drop of gravy 
or coloring to give it a nice brown color, boil a few minutes longer, 
and put about forty tarragon leaves; wash, and put in the boiling 
gravy, with a table-spoonful of good French vinegar, and pour over 
the capon when you serve it ; by clarifying the gravy, it is an im- 
provement. All kinds of fowls and chickens are continually cooked 
m this manner 
in France. 
They are also 
served with 



rice. 



PASTRY. 

Puff Paste. 

Put one pound 
of flour upon 
your pastry 
slab, make a 
hole in the cen- 
tre, in which 
put the yolk of 
one e^g, and 
the j u 1 c e of a 
lemon, with a 
pinch of salt, 



POST OFFICE.^Continued. 



mix it wit^ 
cold water, 
(iced in sum- 
mer, i f con- 
venient) into a 
softish flexible 
paste, with the 
right hand dry 
it off a little 
with fiour until 
you have well 
cleare d the 
paste from the 
slab, but do not 
work it more 
than you can 
possibly help, 
let remain two 
minutes upon 
the slab; tiien 
have a pound 
of fresh butter 

from which you have squeezed all the buttermilk in a cloth, bringing 
it to the same consistency as the paste, upon which place it; press 
it out with the hand, then fold over the edges of the paste so as to 
hide the butter, and roll it with the rolling-pin to the thickness oi 
a quarter of an inch, thus making it about two feet in length, fold 
over one-third, over which again pass the rolling-pin ; then fold over 
the other third, thus forming a Square, place it with the ends tup and 
bottom before you, shaking a little flour both under and over, and 
repeat the rolls and- turns twice again as before ; flour a baking- 
sheet, upon which lay it, upon ice or in some cool place (but in sum- 
mer it would be almost impossible to make this paste well without 
ice) for half an hour ; then roll twice more, turning it as before, 
place again upon the ice a quarter of an hour, give it two more rolls, 



House, every hour from 7 A. M. to 7 P. M., 
at 9 p. M., and from Horse Railroad fBta- 
tious at midnight. 

Letters delivered by carriers, — Main 
Office, — 8, 11,2^^, 5. 

Sundays.— Letters collected from all 
boxes at 6 and p. m. ; also from Horse 
Railroad Stations at midnight. 

No carrier dcldvery on Sunday, but 
carriers* letters can be called far at the 
Carriers' Window between 9 and 10 a. m. 

Rates of Postage. 

IK THE UNITTTD STATES, AND TO THE BBFT- 
It»H MOBTU AMEUIOAN PBOVLNCEB. 

Letters in the United States, per ^ oz. 
(fraction same), 3 cents; must be pre- 
paid by i>o8tago stamps. Letters dropped 
for delivery only, 2 cents per K oz.; 
must be prepaid by stamps. To or from 
the Dominion of Canada, Prince Ed- 
ward's Island, Cape Breton, 3 cents per 
M oz., and Newfoundland, 6 cents, pre- 
payment required. 

Regiatered Letters^ 10 cents each, in 
addition to regular letter postage. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN « CO. 



53 



making seven in all, and it is ready for use when required, rolling it 
whatever thickness (accordin;^ to what you intend making) directed 
in th 5 following receipts. When I state that upwards of a hundred 
different kinds of cake may be made from this paste, 1 am sure it 
will be quite sufficient to urge upon every cook the necessity of pac- 
ing every attention to its fabrication, as it will repay for the study 
and trouble. 

Vols-au-Vent, • 

Of all things in pastry, require the most care and precision ; they 
that can. make a good vol-au-vent may be stamped as good pastry- 
cooks ; althongh many variations in working puff paste, all others 
are of secondary importance. Make a pound of puff paste, giving 
it seven rolls and a half, leave it an inch in thickness, make a mark 
upon the top 



either round or 
oval, and ac- 
cording to the 
size of your 
dish ; then, with 
a sharp-pointed 
knife, cut it out 
from the paste, 
holding the 
knife with the 
point slanting 
outwards; turn 
it over, mark 
the edges with 
the back of 
your knife, 
and place it 
upon a baking- 
sheet, which 
you have 
sprinkled with 



POST OFFICE.-<:ontinued. 

Postal Cards, one cent each. 

Ciroularst 1 cent for each ounce or 
fraction. 

Traneient newspaoers, periodicals, or 
any other articles of printed matter, ex- 
cept circulars, 1 cent for each 2 ounces or 
fraction. Newspapers, periodicals, and 
pam'p'hleta to regular subscribers, printed 
onCe a week or oftoner, 2 cents a pound ; 
less frequently than once a week, 3 cents 
a pound. Must be prepaid by stamps. 

All transient matter must be sent in a 
cover open at the ends or sides. There 
must be no word or communication writ- 
ten or printed on the same after its pub- 
lication, or upon the cover, except the 
name and address of the person to whom 
it is to be sent. There must be no paper 
or other thing inclosed in or with such 
printed matter. 

Parcel Postage.— AW articles of mer- 
chandise (except liquids, glass, &c., liable 
to injure, and are excluded, from the 
mails}, 1 cent for every ounce, not exceed- 
ing 4 pounds. 



water \ e g g 
over the top, 
then dip the 
point of the 
knife into hot 
water, and cut 
a ring upon the 
top a quarter 
of an inch 
deep, and half 
an inch from 
the edge of the 
vol-au-vent, set 
in a rather hot 
oven, if getting 
too much color, 
cover over with 
a sheet of 
f>aper, do* n ot 
take it out be- 
fore done, or it 



would fall, but 

when quite set, cut off the lid, and empty it with a knife ; be careful 
to make no hole in the side or bottom ; if for first course, it is ready ; 
but if for second, sift sugar all over, which fflaze with the salaman- 
der. Regulate the thickness of the paste from which you cut the 
vol-au-vent, according to the size you require it, the smaller ones of 
course requiring thinner paste. A vol-au-vent for entrees will take 
about half an hour to bake, and as the common iron ovens often 
throw out more heat upon one side than the other, it will require 
turning two or three times to cause it to rise equal ; it ought to be, 
when baked, of a light gold color. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHU^AN & CO. 



MiNCE-PlES. 



Meringues a la Cuilleree. 

Pound and sift one pound of lump su^ar, whisk the whites of 
twelve eggs very stiff, throw the sugar lightly over, and with a 
wooden spoon stir gently, perfectly mixing the sugar, then with a 
table or dessert spoon lay them out upon white paper in the shape of 
eggs, sift powdered sugar thickly over, let them remain ten minutes, 
then shake off the superfluous su^ar, place upon boards which you 
have wetted, and put them in a slow oven, just hot enough to cause 
them to be light and slightly tinged ; when the outside becomes quite 
crisp, take off the papers, by turning them topsy-turvy and lilting 
tlie papers from them, dip your spoon into hot water, and with it 
clear out the best part of tlie interior, dust them with powdered 
sugar, lay them 

upon a baking- I .^^i^ ^--^'^^-.^j^i u ii ~ I *^®y happen to 
sheet, and put T ii wi^_u JLj i^,j J stick to the pa- 

in to the screen y ^ g^ JgrMTMBlBHI^ pers, moistea 

to dry; they -" pLMM^^MwMW^ the papers witii 

may be made a |] >;™g^^^ ^g---- -- ^^__^ a paste -brush 

day or two be- P IW '""IWI 114 ^1 i^\ *^^ water un- 

fore they are | El' IKir : M i?2j •.-:^! demeath. 
required, if put 
away in a dry 

place ; to serve, ™-^-^^-— 

fill * them with ^ > ^^^Hl^^7^j'^ 1^ Ingredients: 

whipped cream 1 .''BE^ii^HB^Br B J Four pounds of 

flavored cither £ - ;^IHl^HHIIffll^|n ij ^ lean, cold boil- 
with vanilla or ^ ^B'l ff r ^^ ^^TO u ^^ meat chop- 
orange - flower Jt^^^Mg gjgrgfjgg ^^^K ped fine, nine 
(but do not ^^^hJ^^^^BH^^HW pounds of ap- 
make it too F ^^H^H^HI^^H i ^^^^ chopped 

sweet) .stick 1 ^MI^HJinPRH f| ^^^* ^^^ and a 

two together, m^" ™ f^y fTyvfJ^S^^ half pounds of 

dress in pyra- ^^^^^^^^ .<^^si^^ suet chopped 

mid upon a ■=*- 1.- ^ft^- -.-^ g^^ three lbs. 

napkin, and ekthancb to rbtail department, Qf nusins, two 
serve. Should | 440 Washington Street. | lbs. of currants, 

half a pound of 
citron sliced fine, five pounds of siigar* three tea-spoonfuls of ground 
cloves, ten tea-spoonfuls of grouna ckmamon, five tea-spoonfuls of 
ground mace, one tea-spoonful of ground black pepper, six table- 
spoonfuls of salt, one quart of cider and vinegar mixed with one 
quart of molasses. 

Mix all^ and add the juice and grated rinds of two lemons ; or, 
instead of cider, vinegar, and molasses, one quart of sherry and one 
pint of brandy may be substituted. Keep this mince-meat in stone 
jars ; add a little more liquor, if it should become too dry, when 
about to make pies. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



d5 



HARVARD. 




CADET. 



Cheesecakes. 

Under this head, in English cookery books, are a variety of re- 
ceipts, but, in fact, there is only one ; the others may all be denom- 
inated tartlets of one kind or the other, and require but little skill on 
the part of the cook to vary in an innumerable number of ways. 
The following is the plan in use in the farm-houses in the midland 
counties ; some which I have received from Stilton, and also from 
TuKford, in Nottinghamshire, are excellent. 

Take four quarts of milk and turn it with some fresh rennet ; when 
dry, crum- 
ble it and 
sitl it thro' 
a coarse 
sieve into a 
bowl, beat 
it well up 
with a 
quarter of 
a pound of 
butter imtil 
it is quite 
smooth (it 
may re- 
quire a lit- 
tle more 
butter, de- 
pending on 
the qual- 
ity of the 
milk) ; mix 
in another 
bowl the 
yolks of 
four eggs 
and a quar- 
ter of a 
pound of 



very fine 
sifted bis- 
cuit pow- 
der, the 
rind of four 
lemons, the 
juice of 
two, a 
quarter of 
a pound of 
powdered 
sugar, 
(some add 
a little 
grated nut- 
meg or cin- 
namon,) 
beat these 
all well up 
together 
imtil form- 
ing a stiff 
cream, 
then put it 
by degrees 
into the 
bowl with 
curd, and 

mix them well together ; line some tartlet-pans, previously buttered, 
with some paste, and place some of the above mixture in and bake 
quick. In some places milk is used instead of eggs. Should you 
not have rennet, procure some good milk, and turn it with the juice 
of a lemon or a tea-spoonful of soda or culinary alkali to a quart of 
milk ; drain the cm*a, and proceed as before. 

An Apple-Pie (Careme). 

Select fine apples ; pare them and take out the cores without break- 
ing them. Boil several whole in a stewpan with a little lemon-juice. 




Our "Harvard" and "Cadet" styles, 

For Boyi Eigkt to Twdre Tean cf Ag«, 

Are exhibited as In above cuts. These are also made 

np for School and Dress wear in all varieties of 

materials, and vary in price from $6 to $12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



COMPLmBNTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



u very little of the yellow part of the peel, some sugar, and enough 
water to cover them, until nearly done. Quarter omer apples ; put 
them also on the fire with a little water, lemon -peel, lemon-juice, 
and sugar ; boil these to a kind of marmalade ; add some butter and 
peach marmalade, and rub it through a colander. Have some pie- 
plates covered with puff paste ; fill the bottom with the marmalade, 
and put in four small apples (whole) to each pie, filling the cavities 
between with peach marmalade, rut two strips of crust (half an 
inch wide) across the pie, which will divide the apples. Bake in a 
quick oven. This is especially good served with cream. 



CENSUS OF 


BOSTON^ 1875. 


i 


1. 


P,9 


j 


1 
5 


1 


1 


P 


> 

1 


1 


1 


118 


3,666 


6,946 


14,807 


14,640 


29,847 


7,684 


6,364 


1,626 


2 


43 


1,969 


6,193 


11,964 


11,891 


23,866 


6,729 


3,826 


2,323 


8 


86 


1,482 


3,218 


6,946 


7,666 


14,601 


4,671 


8,469 


1,008 


4 


29 


922 


1,408 


4,833 


4,639 


9,472 


3,758 


2,890 


608 


5 


23 


656 


1,593 


3,806 


8,813 


7,618 


2,432 


1,671 


627 





99 


1,981 


2,892 


6,788 


8,919 


14,707 


8,980 


8,346 


284 


7 


67 


2,667 


6,766 


16,307 


16,794 


81,101 


8,201 


4,070 


2,222 


8 


66 


1,116 


2,218 


6,482 


5,868 


11,360 


8,929 


2,665 


624 


9 


106 


2,042 


3,236 


7,262 


9,649 


16,811 


4,931 


3,909 


771 


10 


73 


1,861 


8,288 


7,466 


9,273 


16,738 


4,936 


8,798 


772 


11 


162 


2,821 


8,422 


7,829 


10,634 


18,463 


4,964 


4,124 


605 


12 


225 


8,724 


6,212 


14,748 


16,452 


30,200 


7,694 


6,366 


1,498 


18 


89 


1,221 


2,216 


6,254 


6,280 


10,634 


2,807 


1,915 


898 


14 


164 


2,867 


3,898 


7,397 


8,966 


16,363 


4,302 


8,349 


693 


16 


170 


2.773 


4,980 


11,165 


12,367 


23,682 


6,087 


3,859 


1,667 


16 


221 


2,704 


3,326 


7,167 


8,621 


16,788 


4,277 


8,433 


608 


17 


74 


1,940 


2,424 


6,425 


6,358 


11,783 


3,096 


2,523 


875 


19 


66 


932 


1,282 


8,104 


8,096 


6,200 


1,850 


1,415 


420 


20 


87 


1,211 


2,124 


6,265 


4,856 


10,111 


2,853 


2,370 


760 


21 


47 


1,621 


2,660 


6,494 


6,095 


11,589 


8,226 


2,768 


681 


22 


68 


1,862 


2,692 


6,766 


6,091 


11,856 
341,919 


8,336 


2,796 


680 
19,894 


1,981 


40,817 


70,476 


162,262 


179,657 


95,687 


68,816 



Plum-Pudding. 

Ingredients: One cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, half a 
cupful of cream, half a cupful af rum, one cupful of ale, one cupful 
of suet (chopped), one cupful of fruit (currants and raisins), hailf a 
cupM of candied orange cut fine, six eggs well beaten, two grated 
nutmegs, one tea-spoonful of ground cinnamon, half a tea-spoonful 
of ground cloves, bread-crumljs. Beat the butter and sugar together 
to a cream. The bread-crumbs should be dried thoroughly, and 
passed through a sieve. Beat all well together before adding tJie 
bread-crumbs, then add enough of them to give proper consistency. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF ▲. SHUMAN 9b CO. 



57 



Put the pudding into a tin mold (not quite filling it), and boil it four 
hours. 

T'he Sauce. — Use equal quantities of butter and sugar. Cream the 
butter, then add the sugar, beating them both until very light. Add 
then the beaten yolk of an egg and a little grated nutmeg. Heat on 
the fire a large wine-glassful of sheriy wine diluted witn the same 
quantity of water, and when just beginning to boil, stir it into the 
butter and sugar. 





CENSUS OF BOSTON, 




Showing the Population, Honses 


and Families hi 1870 and 1875. 






Houses. 


Families. 


Popnlation. 


Old 














Wards. 




















1870 


1875 


1870 


1875 


1870 


1875 


E. Boston, 


1, 


3,077 


3,084 


93 


5,945 


25,516 


29,347 




2, 


2,137 


2,002 


:.,122 


5,493 


24,919 


23,8.J.) 




3, 


1,497 


1,517 


;..!41 


3,218 


15,001 


14,001 




*, 


912 


951 


].i02 


1,408 


10,217 


9,472 




6, 


819 


679 


'i,-.33 


1,593 


14,086 


7,618 




6, 


2,040 


l^.nso 


-.197 


2,892 


11,804 


14,707 




7, 


2,770 


-.734 


►J, 1 51 


6,756 


28,922 


31,101 




8, 


1,240 


1J71 


^,^40 


2,218 


11,278 


11,351) 




9, 


1,997 


2iT48 


2.708 


3,235 


14,143 


16,SII 




10, 


1,768 


i.y34 


2,494 


3,*288 


13,094 


16,7ri8 




11, 


1,9G6 


1^,173 


':ivU 


3,422 


14.618 


18,403 




12, 


2,607 


;;.:49 


;:..-.69 


6,212 


19,881 


30,J00 


Roxbury, 


13. 


1,170 


1,-60 


1,'<03 


2,215 


8,636 


l(J,5o4 


*• 


14, 


1,766 


J. .31 


-, "29 


3,393 


11,865 


16,363 


«( 


15, 


1,869 


Lj;.43 


■!,"34 


4,980 


14,852 


23,532 


DorchcBt'r 


,16, 


2,171 


Li.ii25. 


■;..65 


3,326 


12,261 


15,788 


W.Roxb'y 


,17, 


1,468 


:^,i«4 


].*^98 


2,4424 


8,686 


11,783 


Brighton, 


19, 


802 


Vi97 


'.■71 


1,?82 


4,970 


6,200 


Charleet'o 


20, 


1,626 


],'Jfi8 


:l.>:i47 


2,124 


10,067 


10,111 


tt 


21, 


1,288 


U;,68 


1.^63 


2,660 


8,277 


11,589 


it 


22, 


1,582 


I,p20 


-J 73 


2,692 


9,979 


11,856 


36,291 


42,748 


57,940 


70,475 1 1 292,472 


341,919 



Gelatine Pudding. 

Separate the whites and yolks of four eggs. With the yolks make 
a boiled custard (with a pint of milk ana sugar to taste) . Set a 
third of a box of gelatine to soak a few minutes in a little cold 
water, then dissolve it with three-fourths of a cupful of boiling 
water. When the custard has cooled, add the gelatine water and 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth ; flavor with vanilla, 
stir all together, and put it into a mold or molds. It will settle into 
three layers, and is a very pretty pudding, tasting much like a char- 
LoUe-russe, A pretty effect can be obtained by usmg Coxe's pink 
gelatine. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



58 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



Tapioca Cream. 

Soak a tea-cupful of tapiocar overnight in milk. The next day, 
stir into it the yolks of three eggs well beaten and a cupful of sugar. 
Place a quart of milk on the fire, let it come to the boiling-point, 
and then stir in the tapioca, and let the whole cook until it has thick- 
ened ; then take it off the fire, and stir in the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a froth. Flavor to taste. A small portion of the beaten 
whites of the eggs can be saved to decorate the top. Stir into the 

latter a little -. 

sugar, put it in- p k N T ^' keep stirring 

to a paper fun- u Ji. jn i ^ ^H ^^ ^^^ ^jj_ 

nel, press it out lS]P3?lll@ ®9Ld ^Sll til it becomes 

over the top of quite thick and 

the pudding ©. t* no longer tastes 

according to p "S [7^1 q t^ of the fiour and 

fancy, and g ^ ^^T % § detaches itself 

place it. in the ^ S T^ & 5 from the pan. 

oven a few 3*5 f^5% ^ ^*^ ^* will take 

moments to ^ -^ TiM^^A 1 § w a^^^t half an 

color. ^ \ hA I S" D hour, as the 

9 ^ \ '^^l L S S better it is done 

Souffle. B g U\ , ^ § > I'J^^Z^.'^ 

Q 2 STj \ / S z from the lire. 

Put in a stew- ^ M^l 1 g '^ stir in six eggs, 

pan a pint of g g T^l [ tS ^ one at a tunc, 

milk or water, < ^ I _LJ § § sift about two 

a teaspoonful of s S-' !t »^ ounces of 

sugar, two jj 11/ S^ sugar, until the 

ounces of but- § ^ 1 / S > paste is of the 

ter, a few drops ^ -^ ^ \ 1 ^ ^ stiffness of putf 

of essence of •§ ^ii -'-^s, ^ ^ paste; have 

vanilla, or any * ^^3iij-<i> « • ready a pan of 

flavor you hot fat, into 

please; give it O^3i32SI0IIA^iS® which you drop 

a boil, throw in t>T.ir»*^« <tft fr% <t<in ^7 ^ spoon 

some flour, Prices, $8 to $30. ^^^^^ pieces of 

paste, it will 

increase their size ; and when a nice color, take them out, drain, 
and dish on a napkin, with sifted sugar over. 

Croquettes op Rice. 

Well wash half a pound of the best Carolina rice, which put into a 
stewpan, witli a pint and a half of milk, and a quarter of a pound of 
butter, place it upon the fire, stir until boiling, then place it upon a 
slow fire, cover tiie stewpan, and let simmer very slowly until quite 
tender ; rub the rind of a lemon upon a lump of sugar, weighing a 
quarter of a pound, pound it in a mortar quite fine, add it to the rice. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMEKTS OF A. SOUMAN A CO. 



59 



with the yolks of five eggs (mix well), stir them a few minutes long- 
er over the fire until the eggs thieken, but do not let it boil, lay out 
upon a dish ; when cold fonn it into a number of small balls, or 
pears, or into long square pieces, according to fancy ; have three or 
four eggs in a basin well whisked, dip each piece in singly, and then 
into a dish of bread-crumbs, smooth them gently with a knife, dip 
them again into the eggs and bread-crumbs, put them into a wire 
basket, which put 

spoonfuls of com 
starch, a scant 
half-cupful of 
sugar, whites of 
three or four 
eggs, a little salt, 
fiavoring. 

Beat the eggs 
to a stiff fro£. 
Dissolve the com 
starch in a little 
of the milk. Stir 
the sugar into the 
remainder of the 
milk, which place 
on the tire. 
When it begins 
to "boil, add the 
dissolved corn 
starch. Stir con- 
stantly for a few 
moments, when 
it will become a 
smooth paste; 
now stir in the 
beaten whites of 
the eggs, and let 
it remain a little 



in a stewpan of 
very hot lard, fiy 
a nice light yel- 
low color, drain 
on a cloth, dress 
them pyramidi- 
cally upon a nap- 
kin, and serve 
with powdered 
sugar sifted over 
them. 

A Corn-Stakch 
PuDDixa. 

Many kinds of 
puddings can be 
made with this 
receipt by adding 
different fiavor- 
ings. I consider 
it a great success ; 
besides, it is very 
easily and quick- 
ly made. It may 
or may not be 
served with a 
boiled custard 
made with the 
yolks of the eggs. 

Ingredients: 
One pint of rich 
milk, two table- 




GElVTLElUBIf'S 



Walking & Morning Suits, 

Are made up In Single and D. B. 
Backs. S. B. Frock Buiu in 
Plain and Fancy Cas^imercs, 
Obeviotfl, and Scotch Mixtures, 
Tacht Cloth and Middlesex Flan- 
nel. Cunnot be excelled by cu»- 
toui'made garments. 



B. B. Sack Boits, $8 to $25. 



longer to cook 
the eggs. It can 
be flavored with 
vanilla, and put 
into a form. 



Apple Frttters. 



Mix one pound of fiour with half a pint of milk or water, then half 
a pound of butter melted in a stewpan, mix well together with a 
wooden spoon very smooth, thin it a little with table-beer or water, 
whisk the whites of three eggs very stiff, stir in gently ; have six 
apples, peeled, cut in slices about a quarter of an inch tliick, the 
cores taken out with a cutter, dip each piece in the batter, and fry in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



COilPLlMENTi OP A. bllUMAM ft CO. 



hot lard about six minutes ; to fry well, the fat should not be too hot 
at first, but get hotter as it proceeds ; they should be crisp, aiid of a 
nice golden color; serve on a napkin, and sift sugar over. 

Peach Fritters. 

Skim and cut m halves six ripe but fine peaches, take out the 
stones, have a batter prepared as the last, dip them in, fry, and serve 
the same. 



Apricot 
Fritters. 



Cut in halves, 
and proceed as 
above, and su^ar 
over until quite 
brown. 



Orange 
Fritters. 

Peel four 
oranges, divide 
them in quarters 
by tiie thin skin, 
without cutting 
the fiesh, and 
proceed as be- 
fore. 

Any other fruit 
may be done in 
the same way, 
and can, if re- 
quired, be soaked 
in wine or brandy 
previously, but 
they do not fry so 
well. 




Peel and quar- 
ter twelve good- 
sized apples, put 
them into a pre- 
serving-pan, with 
three-quarters of 
a pound of sugar, 
the tliin rind of a 
lemon in strips, 
the juice of an- 
other, and a wine- 
glassful of water, 
pass them over a 
sharp fire, and 
when tender lay 
them upon the 
back of a hair 
sieve to drain, 
then put six 
ounces of ri ce 
into a stewpan, 
with a quart of 
milk, place it 
upon the fire, stir 
until boiling, then 
place it upon a 
very slow tire to 
simmer very gently until quite tender, placing a little tire upon the 
lid ; if it becomes dry before it is tender, add a litttle more milk ; 
then add a quarter of a pound of sugar, a quarter of a pound of but- 
ter, and four eggs, stir them well in, stir over the fire until becoming 
a^ain thick ; when put it upon a dish to get cold, tlien form a stand 
with it upon your dish eight inches in diameter and three in height, 
but hollow in the centre, where dress some of the apples, more rice 
over, then more apples, forming a pyramid ; you have previously 
reduced the syrup drained from the apples, whicli pour over the 



S. B. Ontaway Frock Suit, 

Are made lo a variety of Fancy 
Oaesimeres, Plaids, Checks, 
Stripes, and Yacht Cloths, Diag- 
onals, &c., for either Dress or 
Baslnesa purposes, bound and 
unbound. 

Pbice. $10 to $25. 



Apples with 
Rice. 



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COMPLIMENTS OP A. SUDMAN ft CO. 



61 



whole, and garnish witli some very green angelica, forming any 
design your fancy may dictate. Apples with rice may be served hot 
as well as cold. 

Snow-Pudding. 

Cover one-third of a package of gelatine with a little cold water, 
and, when softened, stir into it a pint of boiling water ; add one cup- 
ftil of sugar, or sugar to taste, and either the juice of two lemons or 
half a tea-cupful of wine ; when cold, and beginning to thicken, add 
the well-beaten whites of three eggs. Beat jul lighuy and smoothly 
together, pour 

Soak the rice 
three or four 
hours in water ; 
drain, and put 
into a basin 
with the milk 
and salt. Set 
the basin in the 
steamer, and 
cook until tho- 
roughly done. 
Then stir in 
carefully the 
sugar, the yolks 

Rice \ I I ^^ ^^^ ^^.^,!:^ 

Croouettes \ \ I eggs, very httle 

IvROQUETTES. \ I ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

Ingredients: v*^-J^^^^ vorwitli extract 

To half a pound <i;s^y^ of lemon or 

of rice, one , vanilla. It 

quart of milk. For dress for gentlemen's wear, fresh lemon Is 

one tea-cupful £f Z^^^.^F Albert" p. B. used, add a lit- 
n „« « S^^^ Frock Suit is the acme of per- .^ ' , ^^tu 

ofsugar,avery fecUon m style and fit. It Is tie zest. When 

little butter, made up in Fine Foreign and cOOl enough tO 

yolks of one arid^cfVoS: handle form in- 

or two eggs Bound and unbound, as in Fig. tO small balls ; 

beaten, flavor- iii_ * ™ ^ ^ tt * press the thumb 

\ 1.4.1 Price, for Frock and Vest, : * av j. 

mg, and a little ^15 to $30. into the centre 

salt. j I of each ; insert 

a little marma- 
lade, or jelly of any kind, and close the rice well over them. Roll 
in beaten eggs (sweetened a little) and bread-crumbs. Fry in boil- 
ing-hot lard. 

TXPSY-PUDDING. 

Soak a sponge-cake baked in a form (or, in fact, dry pieces of 
cake of any kind can be used) in sherry-wine. When saturated 
enou^, so that it will not fall to pieces, pour over it a boiled cus- 



the mixture in- 
to a mold, and 
set it away until 
hard. Serve in 
the centre of a 
platter, with a 
boiled custard 
poured around, 
made with the 
yolks of three 
eggs, one pint 
of milk, and 
half a cupful of 
sugar. 



' 


^ 


1 


J 


1 


f ' 


^ 


For dress for gentlemen's wear, 
the "Pbince Albert" D. B. 
Frock Suit is the acme of per- 
fection in style and fit. It is 
made up in Fine Foreign and 
Domestic Diagonals, Broad- 
cloths, and Fancy Worsteds. 
Bound and unbound, as in Fig. 
11. 

Price, for Frock and Vest, 
$15 to $30. 



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62 



COMPLIMBNTS OF A. 8HUMAN A CO. 



tard, flavored with anything preferred. If placed in a glass dish, 
decorate with the beaten whites of the eggs poached, and with dots 
of jelly. If served in a common platter, squeeze the beaten whites 
(sweetened and flavored) through a funnel in any fancy shapes over 
the pudding, and put it into the oven to receive a delicate color. 



Charlotte-Russe. 

The sponge-cake may be made with four eggs, one cupful of 
sugar, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, and two even tea-spoon- 
fuls of yeast powder, or as described for sponge jelly-cake. 
To make an 



even sheet, pro- 
fessional cooks 
pass the cake bat- 
ter through the 
meringue bag on 
a large sheet of 
foolscap paper in 
rows which touch 
each other, and 
which run to- 
gether smoothly 
when baking; or, 
without the mer- 
ingue bag, it may 
be spread over the 
sheet as evenly as 

Cossible. When 
aked, an oval 
piece is cut to fit 
the bottom of the 
charloUe^SLH, then 
even-sized paral- 
lelo^ams are cut 
to ht around the 
sides. Fill with 




Our G-ontlemen'e D. B. Sack 
SuitH are made up in Yacht 
Cloth, Flannel, and Plain and 
Fancy Caissimeres, and Scotch 
Mixtures. 

Price, $10 to $20. 



cream made as 
follows: Whip 
one pint of cream 
flavored with 
vanilla to a stiff 
froth, and add to 
it the well-beaten 
whites of two 
eggs, and one- 
half pound of pul- 
verized sugar; 
mix it all lightly 
and carefully to- 
gether. Fill the 
charlotte pan, or 
pans, and put 
them into the ice- 
chest to set. 

Friar^s Omelet. 

Stew six or 
seven good-sized 
apples as for ap 
pie-sauce; stir in 



when cooked and still warm, butter the size of a pigeon's egg, and 
one cupful of sugar ; when cold, stir in three well-beaten eggs and a 
little lemon-juice. Now put a small piece of butter into a saute pan, 
and when hot throw in a cupful of bread-crumbs ; stir them over the 
fire until they assume a light-brown color. Butter a mold, and 
sprinkle on the bottom and sides as many of these bread-crumbs as 
will adhere ; fill in the apple preparation, sprinkle bread-crumbs on 
top, bake it for fifteen or twenty minutes, and turn it out on a good' 
sized platter, it can be eaten with or without a sweet sauce. 



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COMPLIXKNTS OF A. 8HUMAK A CO. 



68 



A. SHUMAN & CO. 
WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT, 




ITo. 9 SUMMER STREET, TO CORNER WASHINGTON", 

AND 

486, 438 & .440 WASHINGTON STREET. 



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G4 



COMPLIMEN'TS OF A. SUUMAN A CO. 




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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SUUMAN & CO. 



65 



PopQlatdon of the Principal 
Cities in the United States. 

Stars indicate the CensuB of 1875} 
other cities, Census of 1870. 



Rice Pudding. 

This receipt makes one of the plainest and best puddings ever 
eaten. It is a success where every grain of rice seems lying in a 
creamy bed. 

Ingredients : One cupful of boiled rice (better if just cooked, and 
still hot), three cupfuls of milk, three-quarters of a* cupful of sugar, 
a table-spoonful of corn starch, two eggs ; add flavoring. 

Dissolve the corn starch first with a little milk, and then stir in 
the remainder of the milk ; add the yolks of the eggs and the sugar 
beaten together. Now put this over the fire (there is less risk of 
burning in a custard-kettle), and when hot add the hot rice. It will 
seem as if there 
were too much 
milk for the rice; 
but there is not. 
Stir it carefully 
until it begins to 
thicken like boiled 
custard, then take 
it oflf the fire, and 
add the flavoring, 
say extract of lem- 
on. Put it into a 
pudding-dish, and 
place it in the 
oven. Now beat 
the whites of the 
egffs to a stiff froth, 
and add a little 
sugar and flavor- 
ing. Take the 
pudding from the 
oven when colored 



a little, spread the 
froth over the top, 
and return it to the 
oven for a few 
minutes to give the 
froth a delicate col- 
oring. 

Eye's Pudding. 

Ingredients : Six 
ounces of bread- 
crumbs, six ounces 
of sugar, six 
ounces of raisins 
o r currants, six 
ounces of butter, 
cut in small pieces, 
or beef suet 
chopped fine, six 
large apples 
chopped, one table- 
spoonfiil of flour, six egffs, one table-spoonful of cinnamon, one 
tea-spoonfdl of ground cloves. Flour the fruit. Mix eggs and 
sugar together, and the suet and the apples ; then mix all, adding the 
beaten whites of (he eggs the last thing. Boil it in a form or bag 
three hours, or bake it two hours. Serve with brandy-sauce. 

Bread Pudding. 
Soak some crumbled bread in milk. Put a layer of this (rather 
moist) in the bottom of a pudding-dish ; sprinkle over some raisins 
and a little cinnamon powder, then another layer of soaked bread- 
crumbs, raisins and cinnamon powder. Now beat up three eggs (to 
about a quart of soaked bread-crumbs) with two heaping table- 
spoonfuls of sugar ; mix into it a quarter of a cupful of rum, brandy, 
or wine, and pour it all over the pudding in the dish. Bake about 
twenty minutes. 



•Albany, N. Y. . . 

Allegheny, Penn. 

Atlanta, Ga. . . 
♦Auburn, N. Y. . . 

Augusta, Ga. . . 

Baltimore, Md. . 

Bangor, Me. . . 

Biddeford, Me. . . 
*Binghamton, N. Y. 
♦Boston, Mass. . . 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
♦Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
♦Buffalo, N.Y. . . 

Burlington, VL . 
♦Cambridge, Mass. 

Camden, N. J. . . 

Charleston, S. C. . 
♦Chelsea, Mass. . . 
♦Chicago, lU. . . . 

Cincinnati, Ohio, . 

Cleveland, Ohio, . 



. 86,013 
. 52,180 
. 21.789 
. 18,359 
. 15,389 
.267,854 
. 18,289 
. 10,282 
. 15,550 
. 341,919 
. 19,835 
. 484,616 
. 134,573 
. 14,387 
. 47,838 
. 20,045 
. 48,956 
. 20,737 
. 407,687 
. 216,239 
. 92,829 



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66 



COMPLniBNTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



Floating Islands. 

Separate the whites and yolks of four eggs ; with the yolks make 
a boiled custard with, say, a large pint of milk, four table-spoonfuls 
of sugar, and a flavoring of vanilla, essence of lemon, sherry wine, 
peach-leaves, or any of the usual flavorings. Beat the whites to a 
stiff froth, sweetening and flavoring them a little also. Wet a long 
spoon, turn it around in the beaten egg, taking out a piece of oblong 
shape ; poach it, turning it around in boiling water, or milk, which 
is better. When the custard is cold, pour it into a glass dish, and 
place these poached whites on top ; or make a circle of the whites in 
a platter, and pour the custard between. 



Suet Pudding. 

Ingredients: 
One cupful of suet 
chopped fine, one 
cupful of molasses, 
one cupful of sweet 
milk, one cupful of 
raisins, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, 
one small tea- 
spoonful of soda 
mixed in the mo- 
lasses, three and a 
half cupfuls of 
flour. 

Boil in a bag or 
form three hours; 
or, better, steam 
it. 1 1 m ay be 
steamed in tea- 



Population of the Principal Cities. 


(Continued.) 




•Cohoes, N. Y. . . . 


. 17,518 


Colambas, Ohio, . . 


. SI, 274 


Concord, N. XL . . 


. 12,241 


Covington, Ky. . . 


. 2;,M& 


Davenport, Iowa, . . 


. 2t>,U38 


Dayton, Ohio, ... 


. ;io 473 


Detroit, Mich. . . . 


. 79;S7T 


Dubuque, Iowa, . . 


. n,AU 


Elizabeth, N. J. . . 
•ElmIra,N.Y. . . . 


. 20MZ 


. 20,538 


Erie, Penn 


. la.ejii 


EvansviUe, Ind. . . 


. 2i,w3a 


*Fall River, Mass. . . 


. iJi^rjio 


•Pitchburg, Mass. . . 


. 12,239 


♦Flushing, N. Y. . . 


. v^.\.m 


Fort Wayne, Ind. . . 


. 17, Tift 


♦G-loucester, Mass. . 


. U,1U 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


. ie.60T 


Harrisburg, Penn. . 


. 2r^;04 


Hartford, Conn. . . 


. 37J43 


•Haverhill, Mass. . . 


. H,G28 


♦Hempstead, N. Y. . 


. J4,!iU2 


Hoboken.N.J. . . 


. 20,297 


♦Holvoke, Mass. . . 
Indianapolis, Ind. . 


. iii:2S0 


. 4V^U 


Jersey City, N. J. . 


. G2,i>43 



cups, filling them 
a little more than 
half full. Serve 
with brandy sauce. 

Tapio6a Pud- 
ding. 

Pare and core 
(with a tube) six 
or seven apples; 
lay them in a but- 
tered dish. Pour 
over a cupful of 
tapioca or sago, 
one quart of boil- 
ing water; let it 
stand an hour ; add 
two tea-cupfuls of 
sugar, a little 
lemon, vanilla, or 
wine ; pour this 



over the apples and bake an hour. Peaches (fresh or canned) may 
be substituted, and are an improvement. 

Egg Souffle, in Paper Cases, 

Make a boiled custard of cream with half a pint of milk, yolks of 
two eggs, three table-spoonfuls of sugar, a heaping tea-spoonful of 
flour, a very little butter, salt, and a flavoring of vanilla, or anytiiing 
else, as preferred. When it has just thickened a little, take it off the 
fire, and let it partly cool. Add then two raw yolks of eggs and 
four whites beaten to a stiff froth. Butter the paper cases, fin them 
with this preparation, and bake them ten or fifteen minutes in a 
moderate oven. 



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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN & CO. 



C7 



Rice-Cake with Pine-Apple. 

Prepare the rice as previously directed. Cut the pine-apple into 
dice, and boil them in syrup (water and sugar boiled ten or fifteen 
minutes) ; drain and mix them in the rice. Butter a plain pudding- 
mold or basin, and strew it with bread-crumbs ; put in the rice 
and pine-apple, and bake it ; when done, turn it out of the mold, and 
pour around it a sauce made as follows : Peel three large apples, 
cook them in one pint of syrup, sweetened to taste. When the ap- 
ples are quite soft, strain them through a sieve, and mix this syrup 
with that in which the pine apple was cooked ; boil, or reduce it 
until it coats the spoon. 



Pears with Rice. 

Peel and cut in 
halves eighteen 
small ripe pears, 
which put in a 
small preserving- 
pan, with three- 
quarters of a pound 
of sugar, a little 
water, and the 
juice of two lem- 
ons, stew them till 
tender, then lav 
them upon a dish 
to cool^ and mix 
three table-spoon- 
fuls of apricot mar- 
malade with the 
syrup ; have some 
rice prepared, with 



Population of the Principal Cities. 


(Continued.) 




Eansag City, Mo. . . . 
♦Kingston, N. Y. . . , 


82,260 


20,474 


Lancaster, Penn. . . . 


20,233 


♦Lawrence, Mass. . . . 


84,916 


Leavenworth, Kan. . . 


17,873 


Lewiston, Me. . . . 


. 13,600 


•Long Island City, N. Y 


15,609 


Louisville, Ky. . . . 


100,753 


•Lowell, Mass. . . . 


49,688 


•Lynn, Mass. . . . 
Manchester, N. H., . 


32/600 


23,536 


Memphis, Tenn. . . 
Meriden, Conn. . . 


. 40,226 


10,495 


•Milwaukee, Wis. . . 


100,775 


•Minneapolis, Minn. . 


. .32,720 


Mobile, Ala. . . . 


32,034 


Nashua, N.H.. . . 


. 10,543 


Nashville, Tenn. . . 


. 25,865 


Newark, N. J.. . . 


. 105.059 


•New Bedford. Mass. 


25,895 


New Brunswick, N. J. 


. 15.058 


•Newburgh, N. Y. . 


. 17,327 


•Newburyport, Mass. 


. 13,323 


New Haven, Conn. . 


. 50,840 


•New Lots, N. Y. . . 


. 10,765 


New Orleans, La. . 


. 191,418 



which make a 
stand, but not very 
high, dress the 
pears in a border 
in the interior, and 
again in the centre 
dress the remain- 
der of the rice in 
pyramid ; when 
ready to serve, 
pour the syrup 
over, and garnish 
tastefully with an- 
gelica round. 

Rice-Cake, with 
Peaches. 

When some rice 
is cooked in a 
steamer with milk, 
and is still hot, add 



a little butter, sugar, and one or two eggs. Butter a plain pudding- 
mold, strew the butter with bread-crumbs, and put in a layer of rice 
half an inch thick ; then a layer of peaches, and continue alternate 
layers of each until the mold is full. Bake this for about fifteen 
or twenty minutes in an oven ; when done, turn the cake out of the 
mold, and pour in the bottom of the dish a boiled custard-sauce 
flavored with wine, or any thing preferred. 



Orange Jelly (molded with Quarters of Oranges) . 

Ingredients : Eight oranges, two lemons, three-quarters of a box 
of gelatine soaked in half a pint of cold water, three-quarters of a 
pound of loaf sugar, one pint of boiling water, beaten whites and 



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68 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAN & CO. 



Rub the loaf sugar on the peels of two oranges and one lemon ; 
squeeze the juice from six or seven oranges and two lemons, and 
strain it. Take off the peel carefully from two oranges, leaving 
only the transparent skin surrounding the quarters, and separate afl 
tlie sections without breaking them. Soak the gelatine half an hour 
in half a pint of water ; boil the other pint of water and the sugar 
together, skimming all the time until no more scum rises ; then put 
in the sections of oranges, and when they have boiled about a min- 
ute take them out, and put them on one side. Pour this syrup over 
the soaked gelatine, adding the orange and lemon juice, the beaten 
whites and the shells of two eggs. Put it on the fire, and let it boil 
about a quarter of 
a minute without 
stirring; then, 
placing It at the 
side of the fire, 
skim off carefully 
all the scum at the 
top, and pass it 
through the jelly- 
bag. When half 
of the jelly is in 
the mold, put it on 
the ice, and let it 
set hard enough to^ 
hold the orange' 
sections, which 
place in a circular 
row around the 
edge of the mold ; 
then add enough 
more jelly to cover 
the sections ; when 



Population of the Principal Cities. 


(Continued.) 




Newport, Ky 


15,087 


♦Newport, li. I. . . 


71,028 


♦Newton, Mass. . . 


u;., i05 


Newtown, N. V. . . 


L^",^4 


♦New York, N. Y. . ] 


,uLii,i)37 


Norfolk, Va. . . . 


]i\-22Q 


Norwich, Conn. . . 


U)y^ 


Omaha, Neb. . . . 


I.i,083 


♦Oswego, N. Y. . . 


-'^p'i55 


Paterson, N. J. . . 


;;;5,^79 


Peoria. Ill 


■J.- ' U9 


Petersburg, Va. . . 


]S.:)50 


Philadelphia, Pa. . 


07^,022 


Pitteburg, Pa 

♦Portland, Me. . . . 


Jd'i,ii76 


i7.!J00 


♦Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 


ii>,a59 


♦Providence, R. I. . . 


100,676 


Quincy, 111 


24,052 


Reading, Penn. . . 


. 33,930 


Kiehmond,Va. . . 


. 61,038 


•Rochester, N. Y. . . 


. 81,673 


-Rome, N. Y. . . . 


11,922 


Sacramento, Cal. . . 


. 16,283 


♦Salem, Mass. . . . 


25,958 


♦San Francisco, Cal. . 


250,000 


♦Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


. 10,776 



this has hardened, 
pour over the re- 
mainder of the 
jelly, which should 
have been kept in 
a warm place to 
l^revent it from 
hardening. Alt 
the sections of 
orange may be put 
in with me first 
half of the jelly, 
as they will rise to 
the top, although 
they will not hold 
their places even- 
ly. Or, if J;ime is 
valuable, mold the 
jelly without tlic 
sections, and save 
them to garnish the 
jelly on. the dish. 



Punch Cake Souffle. 



Break ten eggs, put the whites in a copper bowl, and the yolks in 
a. basin, with four table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar, four of crushed 
ratafias, two of potato flour, a little salt, and a quarter of an ounce 
of candled orange-flowers, beat well together, whip the whites, 
which stir in lightly with the mixture ; well butter and bread-crumb 
the interior of an oval plain mold, butter also and bread-crumb 
a band of paper three inches broad, which tie round at the top of 
the mold, pour in the mixture, and half an hour before ready to 
serve stand it in a moderate oven (it will take about the above time 
to bake), when done turn it out upon your dish ; have ready a cus- 
tard of three yolks of eggs, to which you have added two glasses ot 
essence of punch, pour round the cake and serve. 

The above mixture may be baked in twelve small molds and 
dressed in pyramid, but then they would require more sauce. 



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COMrLIMENTS OF A. SHUWAN A CO. 



69 



Marmalade of Cherries. 

Procure a sieve of bright Kentish cherries, pull out the stalks and 
stones, and put the fruit in a preserving-pan, place over the fire, 
keeping it stirred until reduced to two-thirds ; have in another pre- 
serving-pan, to every pound of fruit, half a pound of sugar boiled to 
the sixth degree, into which pour the fruit when boiling hot, let re- 
duce, keep stirring until you can just see the bottom of the pan, 
when take it from the fire, and fill your lars as before. 

A plainer way is to take off the stalks and stone the fruit, place 
them in a pan over a sharp fire, and to every pound of fruit add 
nearly a pound of sugar, keep stirring until reduced as above, and 
let it get partly cold in the pan before filling the jars. 

slices over, then 
more cherries and 
ratafias, proceed- 
ing thus until the 
mold is three 
parts full ; have 
ready a qjaart of 
the custard, omit- 
ting half the qitan- 
tity of isinglass, 
pour it lukewarm 
into your mould, 
which close her- 
metically, and bury 
in ice and salt, 
where let it remain 
at least two hours ; 
when r e a d V to 
serve dip it in luke- 
warm water, and 
turn it out upon 
your dish; you 
have made about half a pint of custard, which keep upon ice, pour 
over the pudding when ready to serve, and sprinkle a few chopped 
pistachios over. 

Apples Saute in Butter. 

Procure a dozen russet apples, which cut into slices a quarter of 
an inch in thickness, peel and take out the cores with a round cutter, 
then put two ounces of butter in a saute-pan, spread it over the bot- 
tom and lay in your apples, with half a pound of powdered sugar 
and the juice of two lemons, stew gently over a moderate fire ; when 
done, dress them rather high in a crown upon your dish, melt three 
spoonfuls of reil-currant jelly in a stewpan, with which mix a glass 
of Madeira wine, which pour over them when ready to serve. 



Iced Cabinet 
Pudding. 

Have ready pre- 
pared, and rather 
stale, a sponge- 
cake which cut in- 
to slices half an 
inch thick, and 
rather smaller than 
the mold you in- 
tend making the 
pudding in, soak 
them well with 
noyeau brandy; 
then lay some pre* 
served dry cher- 
ries at the bottom 
of the mold, with 
a few whole rata- 
fias, lay one of the 



Population of the Principal Cities. 


(Continued.) 




Savannah, Ga. . . . 


. 28,235 


♦Schenectady, N. Y. • 


. 12,748 


Scranton, Penn. . . 


. 35,092 


♦Somerville, Moss. . 


. 21,868 


Springfield, III. . . 


. 17,364 


*Sprlugfield, Maas. . 


. 31,053 


8t. Joseph, Mo. . . 


..1»,5«5 


*St. Louis, Mo. . . . 


.400,000 


*8t. Paul, Minn. . . 


. 33,237 


♦Syracuse, N. Y. . . 


. 48,315 


♦Taunton, Mass. . . 


. 20,445 


Terre Haute, Lid. . 


. 16,103 


Toledo, Ohio . . . 


. 31,584 


Trenton, N. J. . . 


. 22,874 


♦Troy.N.Y. . . . 


. 48,821 


♦UUca,N.Y. . . . 


. 32,070 


Washington, D. 0. . 


. 109,199 


Waterbury, Conn. . 


. 13,106 


♦Watertown, N, Y. . 


. 10,041 


♦Watervliet, N. Y. . 


■.f<^ 


Wheeling, Va. . . . 


Williamsport, Penn. 


. 16,030 


Wilmington, Del. . 


. 30,841 


♦Worcester, Mass. . 


. 49,317 


♦Yonkers, N. Y. . . 


. 17,269 



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70 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



ICE-CREAM. 



Bavarian Cream, with Coffee. 

Throw three heaping table-spoonfuls of fresh roasted and ground 
Mocha coffee into a pint of boiling rich milk. Make a strong infusion, 
strain it, and add to it the whipped yolks of four eggs well beaten, 



with an even cupful of sugar. 

begins to thicken ; 

take it off the fire, 

and add to it, while 

still hot, half a box 

of gelatine which 

has been standing 

an hour on the 

hearth to dissolve 

in a little cold 

water. When just 

beginning to set, 

stir jt wefl to make 

it smooth, then add 

the pint of cream 

whipped. Mold it. 

Vanilla Ice- 
cream. 

Beat the yolks of 
eight eggs with 
three-quarters of a 
pound of sugar 
until very light. 
Put one and a naif 
pints of rich milk 
on the fire to scald, 
highly flavored 
wim the powdered 



Stir the custard over the fire until it 

vanilla-bean (say, 
one heaping table- 
spoonful) . When 
the milk is well 
scalded, stir it into 
the eggs as soon as 
it is cool enough 
not to curdle. Now 
stir the mixture 
constantly (the 
custard pan or pail 
being set in a ves- 
sel of boiling 
water) until it has 
slightly thickened. 
Do not let it remain 
too long and cur- 
dle, or it will be 
spoiled. When 
taken off the fire 
again, mix in a 
quarter of a box 
of gelatine, which 
has been soaked 
half an hour in two 
table-spoonfuls of 
lukewarm water 
near the fire. The 
heat of the custard 
will be sufficient to dissolve it, if it is not already sufficiently dis- 
solved. Cool the custard well before puttinff it into the freezer, as 
this saves time and ice. When it is in the freezer, however, stir it 
almost constantly until it begins to set; then stir in lightly a pint of 
cream, whipped. Stir it for two or three minutes longer, put it into 
a mold, and return it to a second relay of ice and salt. The pow- 
dered vanilla can be purchased at drug-stores or at confectioner's. 
It is much better than the extract for any purpose, and is used by all 
the best restaurateurs. 




Our " Cosaacque ** Overcoat for 
Boys 4 to 10 years, is made up 
iu fcJtripes, Plaids, Plain and Fan- 
cy Cassimeres. It can be used 
as an Ulster Overcoat or Cape 
Overcoat. It is a most stylish 
garment for either Spring, Fall 
or Winter wear. 

Price, $8 to $10. 



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COMPLIlCBirrS of a. SHUMAN a CO. 



71 



Lemon Ice Cream. 
Take the rind from six lemons as thin as possible and free from 
pith, squeeze the juice of the lemons into a su^ar-pan, with half a 
pound of sugar and half a pint of water, place it upon the fire and 
reduce until rather a thickish syrup, have a pint and a half of milk 
upon the fire, intx> which, when boiling, throw the rind of the lemons, 
cover over and let remain until half cold ; in another stewpan have 
the yolks of twelve eggs (to which you have added an ounce of 
sugar), with which mix the milk by degrees, and stir over the fire 
tillit adheres to the back of the spoon, when stir in the syrup and 
pass it through a tammy; when cold,#eeze as directed, addmg a 
pint of whipped cream when half frozen. 

Biscuit Glaces (Francatellt) , 

Ingredients : One pint of clarified syrup, twelve yolks of eggs, two 

whole eggs, a 

large wine- I being placed 

glassful of TABLES OF WEIGHTS, MEASURES, ETC. on a stove con- 
maraschino. MEASURES OF LENGTH. taiuiughot 

M i X t he ,2 inehe. make 1 foot ashcs) Until it 

whole of the 36 inchea, or 8 f-ct •• 1 yard. resembles a 
ingredients in 198 inche»,^r^i6>i ft, or j .. j^^ well prepared, 
an earthen ba- 7,920 inchei"orV) feet or 1 .. , *,,,«„„ fi^'Hi* sponge- 
sin : then pour 220 yds., or 40 rod- I * rariong. ^^^^ b a 1 1 OT. 
thft nrp nara- ^'^^ Inchea, or 6,280 ft., or ) ^:^^ ^.l „„„«« 

me prepara- i^go ^^^.^ or 820 J « imiie. ^^^^ tne paper 

tion m an egg- rods or s ftiriongs ) cases with the 

bowl that has — preparation 

been previous- gunter's chain. Mi<i smooth 

ly warmed 7 92.100 inches make 1 link. ^^er the tops, 

with hot water 792 inches, or « feet or 22 ; „ - ^^^ Place them in 

and^ipeddnr. „ .,J»f • «' i- "»"• t .. ^ ^- a tin pail or in 

J^r . , , «- Engineers generally use a chain 100 "^® Ireczer. 

souffle bnskly feet long, containing 120 links, each 10 inches SUrrOUUdod 

(the egg-bowl ^o°g- with ice and 

salt, and half a 
pound of saltpetre mixed, and let them remain well covered for 
three or four hours at least, before serving, without stirring them. 
Or, they may be frozen all together in one mold, and some sifted 
macaroon powder or grated chocolate sprinkled over the surface, to 
imitate a baked souffle,^ 

Blanc Mange. 
To one quart of milk add one ounce of isinglass, a quarter of a 
pound of sugar, a quarter of an ounce of cinnamon, a little grated 
nutmeg, half of the peel of a lemon, and a bay-leaf; simmer over a 
slow fie, stirring till the isinglass is dissolved, pass it through a 
napkin into a basm, and pour into a mold. This can be made any 
color or flavor that will not curdle the milk; the milk of bitter 
almonds may be added to flavor it. 

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72 



COMPUMENTS OF A. SHUHAN A CO. 



Omelette 
Souffle. 



Iced Pudding. 

Ingredients : One and one-half pints of custard coniposed of the 
yolks of four eggs, a pint of boiled milk, four table-spoonftils of 
sugar, a flavoring of vanilla, eight ounces of fruits, consisting of 
equal parts of dried cherries, pine apple, dried pears or apricots, all 
cut into veiT small squares. These fruits may be selected, or per- 
haps it would be more convenient to purchase half a pound of the 
French preserved dried fruits ; or add one ounce of candied citron 
sliced, two ounces of currants, two ounces of stoned and chopped 
raisins, and half a pint of ^eam whipped. Freeze the custard in 
the usual manner, then mix in the fruits and whipped cream. A gill 
of maraschino is an improvement to this pudding, but may be 
omitted. If added, it should be at the same time with the fruit. 

Put it into a . 

mold and I I three table- 

place it on ice Tables of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Continued), spoonfuls of 
and salt. square or land measure. lump sugar, 

Serve whip- 144 sqnare inches make 1 square foot. half a one of 

ped cream 1,296 square inches, J « i <« ^^a fecule of pota- 

around it. s9.a.4 Awe'lSSS; ' ^ or wheat 

or272J<8q.ft.,J «* 1 " rod. flour, and 

«o..A orsov^sq.yds > ten drops of 

.8,160 scjt^re in..^or orange-Aower 

orl,210square > " 1 " rood. water; beat 
Break six Jq^i^Jirod.'' well together; 

eggs, place 6,272,640 sq. Inches, orS whip the 

the yolks in 43,5M8q..feet, whites, begin- 

one basin and ylrdV^SHeor* ^ " »«''®- ning rather 

the whites in square rods,or slowly at first, 

another; add 640 squa>e'^rls -^ " 1 « mile, increasing by 

to the yolks | | degrees, until 

it forms a stiff 
froth ; then add the yolks, very gently beating up the whites as you 
add it ; have ready a silver or plated dish (for want of either, use 
tin), and butter it well ; place the mixture on it, and put it into a hot 
oven ; look that it rises ; if so, run a knife round it ; sift some sugar 
on it, place it in the oven again, and serve, when well raised, imme- 
diately. 

Macaroons. 

Blanch and skin half a pound of sweet almonds, dry them well in 
your screen, then put them into a mortar with a pound and a half of 
lump sugar, pound well together, and pass the whole through a wire 
sieve ; put it again into a mortar, with the whites of two eggs, mix 
well together with the pestle, then add the white of another egg, 
proceeding thus until you have used the whites of about eight eggs 
and made a softish paste, when lay them out at equal distances, 
apart upon wafer-paper, in pieces nearly the size of walnuts, place 



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COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HI7MAN A CO. 



73 



8omo strips of almonds upon the top, sift sugar over, and bake in a 
slow oven of a yellowish brown color; they are done when set quite 
firm through. 

Sponge Cake. 

This is the most perfect of sponge cakes when properly made. 

Ingredients: Ten effgs, one pound of pulverized sugar, half a 
pound of flour, juice of half a large lemon, with the rind grated. 

After all the ingredients are quite ready, i. e., the flour and su^ar 
sifted, the lemon-peel grated, the half lemon squeezed, and the tms 
buttered— the success of this cake is fn the beating of the eg^. 
Two persons should beat them at least half an hour, one beating Sie 
whites, and the other the yolka and half of the sugar together. 
Next cut the yolks into the whites, then stir in lightly me remainder 

of the su^ar, 

then the flour ter should be 

and lemon by Tablw of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Continued), evenly heated 
decrees. cubic measure. throughoutbe- 

The oven Employed in meararlng solid bodies, m the fore it begins 
heat should contenU of bin», Umber, stone, etc. tO rise. Wheii 

be rather wiod- i'^??J°Snw~ "*«M SIkS ''?*• baked, spread 

. /« , 27 cubic feet •• 1 cubic yd. j.r. t_ 

erate at first. 40 ft. of hewn, or 60 ft j .. iton over the cakes 

Much of the of round timber J -^w". ^ Wafer of 



Buccoss de- 
peails upon 
this, as the bat- 



1 tfQbic yd. 

Iton. 

1 cord foot 

Icord. 



icing slight! 



flavored 
vanilla. 



^htly 
with 



Pudding a la Eloise. 



It is made as follows : take half a pound of bread crumbs, which 
put in a basin, with two ounces of sago, six ounces of chopped suet, 
Bix eggs, five ounces moist sugar, and a tablespoonful of either 
orange, lemon, or apricot marmalade ; mix all well together, and 
oraament the bottom of the mold with green angelica in syrup, and 
Smyrna raisins, and fill up with the mixture. Place the mold in a 
stewpan containing water to half the height of the mold, and boU 
gently for two hours ; remove it from the mold, and servo with a 
sauce made of a tablespoonful of either of the marmalades, or of 
currant or apple jelly and two glasses of sherry poured over. This, 
1 assure you, received great praise from the little party of juveniles 
that I had the other day. 



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74 



OOMPLIMBlfTS OF A. SHlTMAJr ft CO. 



BEVERAGES FOR EVENING PARTIES. 



Lbmonade. 

Peel six lemons free from pith, cut them up in small pieces, and 
put them with two cloves in a bottle, with half a pint of hot water, 
and place it in a bain-marie, or stewpan, with boiling water, and let 
it stand by the side of the fire for one or two hours, taking care it 
does not boil ; remove it^nd let it remain until cold ; then take hall 
a pint of lemon-juice, half a pint of capillaire — if none, use sugar, 
that will make 

the same quan- I ] ing lime-juice, 

tity of syrup — Tables of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Contlmiod). more capil- 
to which add avoirdupois weight. • laire must be 

a few drops used by grocers, and employed for weighing USed. 

of orange- sugar, tea, coflTee, cheese, butter, etc 

flower water: 16 drams .... make l ounce. r«^»^ -0^,^^ 

<iHH thA iTifii- ^« ounces . ..." 1 pound. tX>Ll> PUNCH. 

aaa tne mm- ^ pounds . . . . « l quarter. -^ 

sion of the 4 quarters. ..." 1 cwt. Proceed as 

rind, stir well 20 cwt. . . ^^ . " 1 ton. above for lem- 

together, and wine measure. onade,butadd 

addtwoquartS Used to measure wine, alcohol, oil. etc. One pint of 

Of cold water 4^„, . . . . mak^lpint. jaPj"^^?,^, 

The acidity of 2 pints . ..." 1 quart. half a pint of 

some lemons *T*^ .... " JpHon. lemon -juice, 

is greater than H^'^}^"^, ; ; ; "JS/ one piit of 

others, in «8 " . . . . " ihogsVd. pale brandy, 

which case. l^J^ : : : " i^t o'l* p'°t 0' 

and also if us- pale rum, one 

table- spoonful 
ef arrack, and five quarts of cold water ; let it remain some time be- 
I6re it is decantered. 



Port Wine Neous. 

Take one quart of new port wine, of a fruity character, one table- 
spoonful of spirit of cloves, one teacupful of sugar, one lemon 
sliced, half a nutmeg grated, pour over tiiese two quarts of boiling 
water. 

White Wine Fillip. 

Take one bottle of sherry or Madeira, or champagne, or any other 
^od white wine, a gill of noyeau or maraschino, the juice of hsJf a 
lemon, add to it one quart of calfs foot jelly well sweetened and 
boiling hot, and serve immediately. 



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OOHK^IMIQCTS 07 A. SHUUAK A OO. 75 



SALADS. 

In an English book is told a story of a famons French salad-dress- 
er who began very poor, and made a fortune by dressing salad for 
dinners in London. He would go from one place to another in his 
carriage, with a liveried servant, and his mahogany case. This case 
contained all the necessaries for his business, such as differently per- 
fumed vinegars, oils with or Vithout the taste of Jfruit, soy, caviar, 
truffles, anchovies, catchup, gravy, some yolks of eggs, etc. I con- 
fess to a lively curiosity as to how these perfumed and scientific 
mixtures would taste ; however, we will be satisfied with the hun- 
dred and one ways of arranging our simple and delicious salads, 
within the 

comprehen- I some, refresh- 

Bion of all. Tables of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Continued), ing, and at the 

A French- mbasukk op timb. same time 

man thinks he co second. . . . i minute. post econom- 

cannot eat his eo minatet • • . i hour. leal dish. It 

dinner with- ^^\ly^ [ \ " i^Je^ is an accom- 

out his salad. 28 days \ ] I 1 lunar'month. plishment to 

It would be 28, 29, 30, or 81 days . 1 calendar month. knoW hoW tO 

wpll if pvprv 12 calendar months . lycar. Hrpqq a silnH 

wen II every sesdays . . . i common year. ^^^^^ a saiaa 

one had the SGG days . . . l leap year. Well, whlch IS 

same appreci- ???M ^?^ r^ • ,^ • J J""*"** especiallv 

7: K"^i^. 365 d., 6 h., 48 m., 49 b. 1 solar year. « o 1^ ^v. x « x x j 

ation ot this ses d., 6 h., 9 m., 12 s. . i sideriai year. prized by the 

most whole- fashionable 

; world. 

Fkench DBESsma. 

In^edients : One table-spoonful of vinegar, three table-spoonfuls 
of olive oil, one salt-spoonful of pepper, one salt-spoonful of salt, 
one even tea-spoonful of onion scraped fine. ' Many use tarragon 
vinegar, i, 6., vinegar in which tarragon has been soaked. 

Pour the oil, mixed with the pepper and salt, over the salad ; mix 
them together ; then add the vinegar and mix again. Chaptel says : 
" It results, from this process, that there can never be too much vin- 
egar ; from the specific gravity of the vinegar compared with the 
oil, what is more than needful will fill to the bottom of the salad- 
bowl. The salt should not be dissolved in the vinegar, but in the 
oil, by which means it is more equally distributed through the salad." 

This is the usual mode of mixing Uie salad ; but I prefer to mix 
the pepper and salt, then add the oil and onion, and then the vinegar ; 
and when well mingled, to pour the mixture over the salad, or place 
the salad over it, and mix tul together. It seems to me to be more 
evenly distributed in this manner. 

When preparing lettuce salad, choose the crisp, tender, centre 
leaves of head lettuce. 



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76 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAK ft CO. 



Chicken Salad. 

Boil a young tender^ chicken, and when cold separate the meat 
from the bones ; cut it into little square blocks or dice ; do not mince 
it. Cut white tender stalks of celery into about three quarter-inch 
len^s, saving the outside green stalks for soups; mix the chicken 
andcelery togeth- 
er; and then stir 
well into them a 
mixture in the 
proportion of 
three table-spoon- 
fuls of vinegar to 
one table-spoon- 
ful of oil, with 
pepper, salt, and 
a little mustard to 
taste. Put this 
aside for an hour 
or two, or until 
^'ust before serv- 
ing; this is called 
marinating the 
chicken; it will 
absorb the vine- 
gar, etc. When 
about to serve, 
mix the celery 
and chicken with 
a Mayonnaise 
sauce, leaving a 
portion of the 
sauce to mask the 
top. Reserve sev- 
eral fresh ends or 
leaves of celery 
with which to 
garnish the dish. 




Our Knickerbocker tuita for 
little Boys 4 to 10 years is 
suitable alike for either dress 
or every-day wear. It is made 
up in every kind of material, 
trimmed and untrimmed, bound 
and unbound, consisting of three 

ficces, Jacket, Pants and Vest, 
t is made in Fancy Cansimeres, 
Broadcloth, Tricots, Diagonals, 
light, dark, or medium ^liades. 
Price $5 to $12. 



Stick a little bou- 
(juet of these tops 
in the centre of 
the salad, then a 
row of them 
around it. From 
the centre to each 
of the four sides 
sprinkle rows of 
capers. Some- 
times slices or lit- 
tle cut diamonds 
of hard-boiled 
eggs are used for 
garuishing. 

Chicken salad 
is often made with 
lettuce instead of 
celery. Mari- 
nate the chicken 
alone; add it to 
the small tender 
leaves (uncut) of 
the lettuce the 
last moment be- 
fore serving ; then 
pour Mayonnaise 
dressing over the 
top. Garnish 



with little centre- 
heads of lettuce, 
capers, cold chop- 

f>ed red beets if you choose, or sliced hard-boiled eggs. Sometimes 
ittlo strips of anchovy are added for a garnish. When on the table 
it should all be mixed together. Many may profit by this receipt for 
chicken salad; for it is astonishing how few understand making 
so common a dish. It is generally minced, and mixed with hard- 
boiled eggs, etc., for a dressing. 



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COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN Sk CO. 



77 



THE ART OF COOKING A POTATO. 



To Boil Potatoes (Captain Kater to Mrs. Acton), 

Pare the potatoes ; cover them with cold water ; boil them gently 
until they are done. Pour off the water, and sprinkle salt over 
them ; then with a spoon take each potato and lay it into a clean 
warm cloth ; twist this so as to press all the moisture from the vege- 
table, and ren- ^ 

der it quite j I out the slight- 

round ; turn it Tables of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Continued), est trouble. 
<^a^efully into ^^^ weight. 

a disn placea ^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^,^^ ^j,^^j,^ platlnm, and 

Deioretnenre ; precioiu itonee (except diamonds) are eati- "M" * ottwt^ 

throw a cloth o..u.d. Pot^^oes 

over; and aomite. .... igndn. roTA-TUKS. 

when all are «|j;?„"J,eW I I IS?"^'"- ...Eyery »ne 

done, send 12 ounces .... 1 pound. thmks she can 

them to the j^ Pure gold !• 24 carats fine. The U.S. make SO sim- 

table immedi- standard for gold coin is nine-tenths pure pie a dish aS 

ately. Pot a- 9^{^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^, ^,^ ^pp,i^ ^ ^ ^^1^,,^ that of mashed 

toes dressed m of 3>^ grains troy, used in weighing dta. potatoes ; but 

this way are mon^B; it is divided into 4 paru cajied it is the excel- 

^ u ^ \^4.u ^rain« / 3>i grains troy are thus equal to 4 , *. A 

mashed with- gnons iiamond wei^u lence of art to 

^ produce good 

mashedas 
well as ffood boiled potatoes. In fact, I believe there is nothing so 
difficult in cookery as to properly boil a potato. 

To mash them, then, first boil them properly. Put into a hot crock 
basin, which can be placed at the side of the fire, half a cupful or 
more of cream, a piece of butter the size of an egg, plenty of salt 
and pepper, and let them get hot. One of the secrets of good 
mashed potatoes is the mixing of the ingredients all hot. Now add 
six or seven potatoes the moment they are done, and mash them 
without stopping until they are as smooth as possible ; then work 
them a very few moments with a fork, and serve them immediately. 
Do not rub egg over and bake them; that ruins them. Much 
depends upon mashed potatoes being served at table hot, and freshly 
made. They are very nice prepared a la neige. 



Ltonnaise Potatoes. 

Ingredients : Half a pound of cold boiled potatoes, two ounces of 
onion, a heaping tea-spoonful of minced parsley, butter the size of 
an egg. 

Slice the cold boiled potatoes. Put the butter into a saucepan, 



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78 



GOMFLIMEKTS OF A. SHUMAX A CO. 



and when hot throw in the onion (minced), which fiy to a light 
color ; add the sliced potatoes, which turn until they are thoroughly 
hot, and of light color also ; then mix in the minced parsley, and 
serve immediately while they are quite hot. The potato-slices should 
be merely moistened with the butter dressing. 



SOME DISHES FOR '^ABY,^ 



No particular diet can be recommended ifor the infant that is so 
unfortunate as to be deprived of its natural nourishment. What 

agrees with 

one is often similating and 

quite un sue- Tables of Weights, Measures, Etc. (Continued), i n d i g e s tible. 
cessful with to measdbb corn in tiie crib. It is often bet- 

another. Dif- ^S*!2i/L^i!i^!I^oJK«f'*£.i°.i^«5j-iHl?^ ter to attempt 

« ^ 1 • J ff nile will apply to ft crio of any Btze or kiiid. . \e 

terent kmdS Ot two cable feet of good, sound, dry com in » Change Ol 

diet can only the ear win make a basbel of sbelled corn, food than tO 

be tested J'»erjf*'«S"^t%r^rm'^'S^'irg,L': resorttomedl. 

Chlldren^S breadth, and beisbt of the crib inHde ; mol. Cmes. 

little illnesses W?»«!f"f?&45? **'!^?\1"*^**'®.P'[?' City babies 

««^ ^A.«« ♦u^ duct by the height; then divide the resnlt by ^.^.^'L^^ii- 

are often the two. and you have the number ol buthela oV generally 

result of food shelled corn In the crib. thrive poorly 

"ivhiph in thpir ^° measuring the height, of course the with nnw^a 

wnicn, in meir ^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^ totenaed. \V^ cows 

case, IS Unas- ' milk. Some 

can stand it, 
however, diluting it with a third water, adding a slight thicken- 
ing of rice, well boiled and mashed, and also a little sugar. Others 
thrive well on goat's milk, when no other kind will answer. The 
Borden condensed milk serves like a charm with very yoang 
infants in cold weather; but in warm weather its excessive sweet- 
ness seems to cause acidification when taken. In New York, where 
it may be obtained fresh, without sweetening, I have heard that it is 
more satisfactory. 

Some babies are rudd^ and strong with an oatmeal diet (oatmeal 
porridge strained and mixed with t£e mQk). This is especially suc- 
cessful in Ireland and Scotland. However, in the warm climate of 
many of our cities in summer, I have known the oatmeal diet to 
cause eruptions or boils. It is almost a crime to undert^.ke to bring 
up children artificially in warm summer climates. Manv a heart- 
ache is caused when, failing to supply the natural fooa, nothing 
would seem to agree with the. baby. 



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COMPLIMEIITS OF A. 8HUMAN * 00. 

Pap. 



79 



Pat a little butter into a saucepan for the purpose of keepinj^ the 
mixture from sticking. When it is hot, pour in a thin batter ofmilk 
and flour, a little salted ; stir well, and boil gently about five min- 
utes ; then add a little sugar. If the child is over three months old, 
an egg ijpy be mixed in the batter for a change. 



A USEFUL TABLE. 

▼SIOHTS or COBIO FEET OF DIFTBEBlfT BIIBSTAirCM. 

The followinr table, oomputed from actoal experlenoe, will be 
found very useral in calcalating the weight of load«, ete.,— or the 
weij^t of any of the articles mentioned in balk. It shows the 
weight per cable foot All that is necessary, therefore, is to 
measnre the bulk; ascertain the number of cubic feet in it; mul- 
tiply this by the weight per foot, and diTide by 2,000, when you 
will have the weight per ton. 

Sobfiance. Weight par eoblefiMt. 

Cast Iron 450 lbs. 

Loose Earth 05 ** 

Common Soil, compact 124 " 

Clay, about 185 " 

Clay, with stone* 180 <* 

Brick 125 " 

Ash, green 68 •• 

Ash, dry 60 " 

B«ech, green 68 ** 

Beech, dry 60 •« 

Oak, green 70 *< 

Oak, dry k 48 •* 

Elm, green 06 ** 

Elbi, dry 87 •« 

Cherry, dry 45 " 

Hickory, dry 62 •• 

YeUow l*lne, dry 84 " 

White Pine, dry 80 •• 

Poplar, dry 88 «• 

Watout,diy 42 " 



Wheat-flour and Cobn-mbal Gruel. 

Tie wheat flour and com meal (three-quarters wheat flour and one- 
quarter com meal) into a thick cotton cloth, and boil it three or four 
hours. Dry the lump, and grate it as you use it. Put on the fire 
cream and water (one part cream to six parts water), and when it 
comes to a boil, stir in some of the grated lump, rubbed to a smooth 
paste with a little water. Salt it slightly. Judgment must be uaed 
as to the amount of thickening. For a youuff infant the preparation 
should be thin enough to be taken in the botUe ; if the child is older, 
it may be thicker. If the child is troubled with constipation, the 
proportion of com meal should be larger ; if with summer com- 
plaint, it may be left out altogether. 



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80 



COMPUlfXMTS OF A. 8BD1IAN A CO. 



USEFUL HOUSEHOLD EECIPES AND RECEIPTS. 



To Cure Gastbalgia, ob Inflammation of the Stomach. 

1. Apply a poultiice of ice for ten minutes to the pit of the stomach. 
The ice most be chopped up in small pieces and inclosed in an india- 
rubber bag. 2. On removmg the ice apply a mustard plaster to the 



Weiglits of One Bnsliel of Different Things, 


A8 BECOONIZED BT THE I^ITS OF THE UNITED STATES. 


BiuImL Lbf. 


BiuheU Lbt.. 


Wheat ... 60 


Peas .... 60 


Shelled Cora 


. . 66 


Blue Grass Seed . 44 


Cora in Uie Ear 


. . 70 


Buckwheat • . 52 


Rye . 


. . 56 


Dried Peaches , 


. 83 


oSts . . 


. 82 


Dried Apples 


. 26 


Barley 

Irish Potatoes 


. . 47 


Onions 


. 57 


. 60 


Salt . 




. 50 


Bweet Potatoea 


. 65 


Malt . . 




. 88 


Wbite Beans 


. . 60 


Bran . 




. 20 




. . 6Q 


Turaips 




. 55 


Timothy Seed 


. 45 


Cornmeal 




. 48 


Flaxseed . 


. 66 


Fine Salt 




. 55 


Hemp Seed 


. 44 


Hnngarian^Grass Seed, 60 



same spot, and keep it on as lon^ as it can be borne. 3. A table- 
spoonful of pounded ice should oe taken every five minutes for an 
hour. The ice should be pounded with sugar and suddenly swal- 
lowed, and not be allowed to melt in the mouth. 4. Take a mustard 
bath three times a week, with two pounds of mustard in it. This is 
rather heroic treatment, but is highly recommended. 

For Fever and Inflammation. 

A very pleasant and cooling drink is made by macerating two 
sliced lemons with two ounces of sugar in one pint of boiling water. 
Drink it freely when cool. 

For the Itch. 

Liquor of benzine, flours of sulphur and white chalk, equal parts, 
half an ounce ; soft soap and lard, equal parts, one ounce. MaJse aa 
ointment and rub the whole body with it three nights in successioii, 
and then take a warm bath. The insect will be killed. 



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COMPUMBNTS OF A. SHUMAN * CO. 



81 



For a Sudden Cold. 

Take tincture of the chloride of iron and glycerine, equal parts ; 
one tea-spoonful in a wine glass of water. Sometimes a single dose 
will cure a cold, if taken ioimediately alter it begins. Three or four 
doses are all that will usually be required in any case. 

CuBB FOB Neuralgia. 

Make a poultice of our common field thistle by macerating the 
leaves, and apply it to the place of the pain. Make a tea of tiie 
same and drink it freely. 



How TO Treat a Stt. 
The sty is a small boil protruding from the eyelid, 
pass away of it- 



self, but its cure 
may be hastened 
by applying a 
warm poultice of 
bread and water 
in a small linen 
bag. Apply 
three '^r four 
times a dB,j, and 
each time foment 
the eye with 
warm milk and 
water. 

To Clean Paint. 

Smear a piece 
of flannel in com- 
mon whiting 



Wliat Oonstitates a Carloads 

In general, 20,000 poundB ii a carload, 
of 70 barrels of salt, 70 of lime, 00 of flour, 
60 of whisLey, 200 sacks of flonr, 6 cords 
of hard wood, 7 of soft, 18 to 20 head of 
cattle, 60 to 60 head of hogs, 80 to 100 ht^d 
of sheep, 6,000 feet of solid boards, 17.000 
feet of siding, 18,000 feet of flooring, 
40,000 shingles, ^ less hard lumber, 3^ 
less green lumber, 1.10 less of Joists, 
scantling, and all other largo lumber, 
340 bushels of wheat, 860 of corn, 680 of 
oats, 400 of barley, 860 of flaxseed, 860 of 
apples, 480 of Irish potatoes, 360 of sweet 
potatoes, 1,000 bushels of bran. 

Jt^ The foreffoing table may not be 
exactly correct, for the reason that rail, 
roads do not exactly agree in their rules 
and estimates, but it approximates so 
closely to the general avemge that ship, 
pers will find it a great convenience as a 
matter of reference. 



It will usually 

mixed to con- 
sistency of paste 
in warm water. 
Rub the surface 
to be cleansed 
quite briskly, 
and wash off 
with cold water. 
This will leave a 
clean bright sur- 
face. 

Aching Feet. 

To relieve 
aching feet, dip 
them in cold 
water for a few 
minutes, and 
then rub them 



briskly, or pull them. Some time since, we saw two boys who had 
walked from Lowell nearly to Boston on tiie railroad. One appeared 
to be about ten, and the other seven years old. The little one was 
very tired, and when he laid down the older one pulled his legs, first 
one and then the other. We asked him what he did that for, and he 
said it stopped their aching. 

Coughs and Bronchitis, 
The result of cold, can be cured by taking acetic syrup of sanguinaria 
and of lobelia. 

Torpid Liver 
And diseases of the bladder are cured by taking fifteen drops of 
Meooa oil in a table-spoonful of Scotch ale five times a day. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



C2 OOMPLUIBNT8 OF A. 8HUBCAK ft CO. 

Warts and Bunions. 

Warts and bunions may bo cored by applying Mecca oil, and 
wrapping the part in kid every night. 

Iron-Rust, Mildew, Etc. 

Iron-rust is removed by salt mixed with lemon-juice. Mildew by 
dipping in buttermilk and laying in the sun. Ink stains may some- 
times be taken out by smearing with hot tallow, left on when the 
stained article goes to wash. Freezing will take out old fruit stains, 
and scalding with boiling water will remove those that have never 
been over the week. 



To Clean Gold 
Chains. 

Put the chains 
in a small glass 
bottle with warm 
water, a little 
tooth powder, 
and some soap. 
Cork the bottle, 
and shake it for 
a minute vio- 
lently. The fric- 
tion against the 
glass polishes 
the gold, and the 
soap and chalk 
extract every 
particle of grease 
and dirt from the 



Quantity of Seeds required per Acre. 


Wheat .... liito2bu. 


OaU 




. . . 8 " 1 


Peas . . 






. 11 to 8 «« 


Buckwheat . 






K " 


Corn In drilla 






. 2 to 3 " 


Broom Com . • 






3tf " 


Rye . . , 






IK " 


Barley . 






. . 2 " 


White Beans. 






IK " 


Corn' sown . 






. 4 " 


Com In hills . 






. 4 to 8 " 


Potatoes 






10 to 15 " 


MiRet . . . 






K " 


Orchard Grass 






. 2 " 


Mixed Lawn Grasi 






. lto2 " 


Blue Grass . 






. 2 «« 


Ited Top 






1 to 2 pks. 


Clover, white 






. 4qU. 


Clover, red . 






. 8 " 


Timothy 






. 6 " 


Beets . 






. 3 lbs. 


RutaBagas . 






3i " 


CarroU . . . 






. 2 " 


Tobacco 






. 2 OS. 



interstices of a 
chain of the most 
intricate pat- 
tern; rinse it in 
clear cold water, 
wipe with a tow- 
ell, and the pol- 
ish will surprise 
you. 

To Clean 
Paint. 

Mix together 
one pound of 
solt soap, half a 
pound of finely- 
powdered pum- 
ice-stone, and a 
half pound of 
pearlash, with 

hot water, into a thin paste. Paint the mixture on whatever requires 
cleaning, with a brush, then in five or ten minutes wash it off with 
clean water. 

To Clean Engravings. 

Put clean pieces of phosphorus in a vessel partially covered with 
water. Moisten the engraving and hanff it over the air made by the 
phosphorus and water. It removes mildew and other stains Iroiu 
paper and walls. 

To Kill Insects on Plants, Etc. 

To kill lice and other insects on plants and animals, boil seven 
pints of water down to five pints, after having put into it three and a 
naif ounces of chips of quassia and five drachms of powdered saaoe- 
sacre. Apply it to the insects. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIHEMT8 OF A. 8HUMAN 4» CO. 



WASHma Colors. 

A spoonful of ox-gall to a gallon of water will set the colors of 
almost any goods soaked in it previously to washing. A teacup of 
lye in a pail of water will improve the color of black goods. Nankin 
should lie in lye before being washed ; it sets the color. A strong 
tea of common hay will preserve the color of French linens. Vine- 
^r in the rinsing water for pink or green calicoes will brighten 
uiem. Soda answers the same, &nd for both purple and blue. 



To Clean Tin- 
ware. 

An experienced 
housekeeper says 
the best thing for 
cleaning tinware is 
common soda. 
She gives the fol- 
lowing directions : 
Dampen a cloth 
and dip in soda 
and rub the ware 
briskly, afterwards 
wipe dry. Any 
blackened ware 
can be made to 
look as well 



as 



new. 



To Clean Oil- 
cloths. 

To ruin them, 
clean them with 
hot water or soap- 
suds and leave 
them half wiped, 
and they will look 
very bright while 




Oor "Creedmoor" snlta for 
little Boys 4 to 10 years of age 
consist of two pieces, Jacket and 
Pants, and is made in a variety of 
grades and styles of fabrics, such 
as Bcotch Cheviots, Fluids, and 
Fancy Mixed Caseimeres,— is the 
latest and most approved style of 
suit for school purposes, f rice 
$4 to $12. 



wet, but very din- 
gy and dirty when 
dry, and will soon 
crack and peel off. 
But if you wish to 
preserve them, and 
have them look 
new and nice, wash 
them with soft flan- 
nel and lukewarm 
water, and wipe 
perfectly dry. If 
vou want them to 
look extra nice, 
after they are dry 
drop a few spoon- 
fuls of milk over 
them, and rub them 
with a dry cloth. 

To Clean Silk. 

Pare three pota- 
toes, cut them into 
thin slices, and 
pour on them half 
a pint of boiling 
water. When cold 
strain the water 
and add an equal 



quantity of alcohol. Sponge the silk on the right side and iron on 
Uie wrong side. Cloth, velvet and crape may be cleaned in the same 
way. 

To Remove Ink Stains from Paper. 

Make a solution of cyanide of potassium in one tumbler and of 
oxalic acid in another. Dip a camePs-halr brush alternately in each 
and apply. 



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84 



OOMFUHKNTS OF A. 8HUMAN * CO. 



Table of Dimensions of Varions 
Measures of Oapadty. 



81ZB. 



To Wash Cauco without Fading. 

Dissolye a gill and a half of salt in two quarts of water. Put the 
calico into the liquid while hot, and leave it until cold. In this way 
the colors are made permanent, and will not fade when ailerwards 
washed. 

To Clean Feathers. 

Dissolve four ounces of white so^p, cut small, in four pounds of 
'moderately hot water, in a basin, and make the solution into a lather 
by beating with a 
small rod. Then 
introduce the fea- 
thers, and rub them 
well with the hand 
for five minutes. 
They are next to be 
washed in clean wa- 
ter as hot as the 
hand can bear it. 

To Make Good 
Black Ink. 

Take forty - two 
ounces of coarsely- 
powdered nutgalls, 
fifteen ounces of 
gum Senegal, eight- 
een ounces of sul- 
phate of iron, three 
orachms of aqua 
ammonia, twenty- 
four ounces of alco- 
hol ; digest these 
in eighteen quarts 
of rain water until 
the fluid becomes 
sufSlcienUy black. 



A Good Ointment. 

Boil an egg until 
it is pretty hard; 
take out the yolk, 
and rub in with 
enough pure glycer- 
ine to make a salve 
of the desired con- 
sistence. We have 
found this to be an 
ointment of superior 
efiicacy for sore nip- 
ples, chapped lips, 
and similar irrita- 
ble conditions of the 
skin. It is a stand- 
ard in our own 
practice, and it will 
keep free frorii ran- 
cidness in all wea- 
ther, and deserves 
notice by the pro- 
fession. 

Children's Colds. 

The following is 
an excellent and 
safe remedy: Take 
onions, slice thin, and sprinkle loaf sugar over them ; put in the oven 
and simmer until it makes a thick syrup. Very nice. Give a tea- 
spoonful as seems to be needed, ibur or five times a day. 

To Remove Stains from a Mattress. 

Make a thick paste by wetting starch with cold water. Spread 
this over the stain, first placing me mattress in the sun. Rub off in 
a couple of hours, and if the ticking is not perfectly clean repeat the 
process. 



IgaL 




iqt. 




6 " 
3 «« 






2 " 




1 " 




20 qU. 




16 " 




14 «« 




10 " 




1 pt. 




a qt 




1 pt. 




1 " . 






^;i 




3 pt. 




1 *• 




Pie. . 





In. 

I* 

7 
6 

18 

161 

14i 

2 

2 

I 
P 

81 



In. 

7 
4 
131 

10] 
8] 
13 

•1 
P 

6, 
6 

4 
8 
6 

I' 

n 



In. 

!' 
P 

121 

lUl 

8| 

n 

8 

H 

41 

^1 
3| 
8| 



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OOMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAH A CO. 



85 



To Cure Tooth- 
ache. 



A Strong Cement. 

A useful cement in uniting artificial teeth and for other purposes 
is made by taking five parts ^tta percha, one part white wax, and 
adding a few drops of oil of cloves. 

Another good cement can be made by dissolving one part of white 
wax in fifteen parts of benzine. Apply with a brush. 

Lemon for a Cough. 

Roast the lemon very carefully without burning it; when it is 
thoroughly hot, cut and squeeze into a cup upon three ounces of 
sugar, finely powdered. Take a spoonful whenever your cough 
troubles you. It is good and agreeable to the taste. Barely has it 
been known to 

fail of giving re- I I ,p «^^o/v«a 

lief. TotalStati8tlcsoftli6la8tU.8.0en8ii«. haviVahollow 

lie total population of the country Is tOOth allowinST 

»ut thirty-eight and a quarter miUions. .» ^ '.^ .^ «««„t 

:otal number of deaths in the current "10 air tO reacU 

tsus year, 492,263, or about 1,349 per the UCrVC, I 

A well-known ^S!?* , i^^. „„„v^, , iaa ^^r «. .v«„* would advise 

- ^ . ^ , , The births number 1,100,476, or about ^ , . ^i . 

dentist, who has 8,ooo per diem. that they get 

tried the remedy I?®y^°^°Ti*®'u^?*^'S??:^ some spirits of 

«« «^,n««. *^r>w.r»»'r» The dcaf and dumb, about 16,000. «:4.«^ JLa w>; — 

on some nervous The idiotic, about 24,000. nitre and mix 

people who have The insane, about 87,000, nearly one- with alum ; Sat- 

Old roots of third of whom are of foreign birth. urate a little COt- 

y, "°, Persons over 80 years of age number ^'■***^ . ^V . /^ j 

broken teeth, about 150,000. ton with it and 

and are too timid Persons over 90 year* of age number apply it tO the 

to permit an at- ^'^JJgL'^iver 100 years of age number cavity. If the 
tempt to remove about 3,600. pain extends up- 

them, makes the „«^^X°S?i?.»r;^*^^^-«»'- ward toward 

lOilOWing.pUDllC Of those over 90 years, the females are tlie CyC, or takes 

for the benefit of in excess by about 1,200. the form of neu- 

oll ^nrUr^ryy U yv^att Of those ovcr 100 ycars, the females -,„i„:„ •^«^,*,,%.-k 

all whom it may exceed the males by about 1,000. ralgia, procure 

concern: {_ | some horse-rad- 

ish leaves, take 
out the stems, wet them, and applv on the face over the pain, and I 
think you will get relief. If you have no radish, try beet leaves ; 
they may answer the same purpose. 

To Remove Grease Stains from Silk. 

Rub the spot briskly with brown paper. If this does not remove 
the stain, lav the silk upon the table with an ironing cloth under it, 
the right side of the silk next to the cloth ; then put a piece of brown 
paper over it and apply a flat-iron just hot enough to scorch the 
paper. 

To Feesebve Polished Steel from Iron Rust. 

Warm pure parafline, rub it on the polished surface, and then wipe 
it off with a woolen rag. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. 8HUMAK A CO. 



A GrOOD Deodorizeb. 
Take tincture of camphor and tincture of myrrh, of each three 
drachms ; soap liniment, two drachms ; acetic acid, twenty drops ; 
oil of pitch, one drachm. Mix and apply. 



Cleansing Blankets. 
It is quite as important to have the blankets on our beds clean as 
to have tlie sheets 

may be put. Borax 
is the oest cock- 
roach extermina- 
tor known. This 
troublesome insect 
has a peculiar 
aversion to it, and 
will never return 
where it has once 
been scattered. As 
the salt is perfectly 
harmless to human 
beings, it is much 
to be preferred for 
this purpose to the 
poisonons sub- 
stances commonly 
used. Borax is 
also valuable for 
laundry use. To 
about ten gallons 
of boiling water 
add a handful of 
borax, and vou 
need use only half 
the ordinary allow- 
ance of soap. For 
laces, cambrics, 
etc., use an extra 
quantity of this 
powder. It will not injure the texture of the cloth in the least. For 
cleansing the hair nothing is better than a solution of borax-water. 
Wash afterward with pure water, if it leaves the hair too stiff. Borax 
dissolved in water is also an excellent dentiMce or tooth wash. 



pure and white. 
The foul emana- 
tions which they 
absorb in time 
make the bed any- 
thing but sweet. 
The Boston Jour* 
nal of Ckemistry 
gives the following 
method of cleans- 
ing them : *' Put 
two large table- 
spoonfuls of borax 
and a pint of soft 
soap in a tub of cold 
water. When dis- 
solved, put in a 
pair of blankets, 
and let them re- 
main over night. 
Next day rub and 
drain t&em out, 
and rinse thorough- 
ly in two waters, 
and hang to dry. 
Do not ring them." 
But this is not the 
only domestic use 
to which borax 




Our ••Newport** or Bailor 
Blouse Buitfl for little Boys of 
8 to 10 years is made up usually 
in Blue or Gray Flannel or Yacht 
Cloth, plain or trimmed. It is a 
Tery desirable garment for Sum- 
mer wear, always in stylo, and 
is made up Biugle or Double 
Breasted. Price92.60 to $10. 



Paste for Labels. 
Melt one ounce of good glue with two ounces of white sugar and 
half an ounce of gum, in a dish on a spirit lamp, — the glue must 
have macerated two hours in water, — shake continually in four 
ounces of water ; boil till the mass is a fluid ; cover the labels with 
this paste, and let them dry. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMBMT8 OF A. 8HUMAK A CO. 



87 



To Prevent Chafing in Infants. 
Oxide of zinc and starch, equal parts ; dust over the chafed place. 
Or take subnitrate of bismuth, ana put it in a bag, and dust over ^e 
chafed places with it. 

Foe Cholera Infantum. 
Phosphate of lime, one oimce ; pulverized sugar, two ounces ; com 
starch, four ounces : mix. Add a tea-spoonful of equal parts of milk 
and water, and feed the child with it freely. 

For the Bite of a Mad Dog. 
Take the root of elecampane, one and a half ounces, slice or bruise 
it, and put it into 

a pint of boiling I I Feather beds are 

water, strain. Bates of Travel per Hoiir. injurious in eve- 

and drink it fast- . ,. — . ,, ry way to health, 

ing. Repeatthe 1 foTsJ'tJSS .' I I 1. 12"!?*^ and Should be 
dose if neces- a horse run* . . . . ' 20 „ dispensed with. 

fiirv This is A steamboat runs . . . 18 „ rT^^ mjinv 

sary. xnis is a sailing vessel rune . • 8 „ -^"® way many 

said to have siow rivers flow . . . 4 „ manage them is 

saved many from ^p* V*^^" ^/*^ v', ' • I " also very ab- 

u«j«^^i>^u';« A moderate wind blows . 7 „ „„«^ 4.u^'L -: ^ 

hydrophobia. a storm moves ... 36 ,, surd: they nse 

A hurricane moves . . 80 „ from them in the 

A rifle ball moves . . 1,000 „ momino- make 

Beds. sound moves . . . . 743 „ moniing, mah.© 

Light moves . . . 102.000 „ them up Steam- 
These are very Electricity moves . . 288,000 „ ing hot, close the 
necessary as well doors and win- 
as convenient -^ ^ « , v « j dows, and leave 
and comfortable. ^^'^ ^"^i^^ ^' °*"^ '^ * • all till bedtime. 
Like all other y* Then the scene is 
things in this Human Voiee . . . 150 yards, acted over again, 
world, however, Jiifl® • « • , • • • f»?SJ »» All beds should 
there are good S,?^"*. : '.^^ "„ be thoroughly 

and bad beds. aired after being 

used, that the 
gases and odor imparted to them from the human body may be re- 
moved. The room also should be well ventilated. There are many 
materials that make much more healthful beds than feathers, among 
which may be enumerated hair, husks, straw, springs, etc. Cotton 
will answer for some constitutions; but for most it is too heating. 
Many patients tell their physicians they cannot sleep on a bed made 
of cotton. It produces a restless, itching sensation, like that of in- 
sects crawling over the body. Hard beds are much to be preferred 
to soft ones, and that for more reasons than can here be stated. 

For Scukvt. 
Nitrate potash, one drachm at a dose, wiUi vinegar as a drink. 



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88 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



For all Nervous Diseases. 

Tincture of bitter orange peel, two ounces ; proof spirit, one pint. 
Macerate and percolate. Dose, one to two drachms. 

For Dyspepsia. 

Take one part of carbolic acid and five parts of water, and of this 
solution take twenty drops three times a day further diluted with 
water. 

To Remove a Glass Stopper. 

If a glass stopper won't move, hold the neck of the bottle to a 
flame, or warm it by taking two turns of a string and see-saw it ; 
the heat engen- 



dered expands 
the neck of the 
bottle before a 
corresponding 
expansion of the 
stopper. 

Bones in the 
Throat. 

The white of 
an egg is said to 
be a specific for 
fish bones stick- 
ing in the throat. 
It is to be swal- 
lowed raw, and 
will carry down 



Power of the Horse. 

Ahorse of average power produces the 
greatest effect in drawing a load when 
exerting a force of 187^ pounds, with a 
velocity of 2^ feet per second, working 
eight hoars per dav. A good horse can 
exert a force of 480 pounds for a short 
time. In calculating the strength tor 
horse machinerv the horse's power should 
be considered lOO pounds. 



Power of Han* 

A man of average power produces the 
greatest effect when exerting a force of 
31| pounds, with a velocity of 2 feet per 
second, for 10 hours in a day. A strong 
man will raise and carry from 250 to 800 
pounds. 



a bone with ease 
and certainty. 
There is also an- 
other fact touch- 
ing eggs which 
should be re- 
membered. 
When, as some- 
times happens 
by accident, cor- 
rosive sublimate 
is swallowed, 
the white of two 
eggs will neu- 
trsLlize the poi- 
son, and change 
the effect to that 
of a dose of cal- 
omel. 



To Curb a Felon. 



As soon as the felon begins, wrap the part in a cloth saturated with 
the tincture of lobelia. 

For Asthma. 
Take from fifteen to thirty drops of chloroform in any mucilagin- 
ous substance, such as gum arable or slippery elm bark. 

For Cancer. 
Citric acid, one drachm, and water, eight ounces, makes a soothing 
application for the pain of cancer. 

For Sleeplessness. 
Bromide of potassa in thirty or forty grain doses usually produces 
sleep in cases of functional derangement of the nervous system. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMPLIMENTS OF A. SHUMAK A CO. 



89 



For Piles. 
Cayenne pepper freely used with meals is a good remedy. 

Quinine Bittebs. 

Dissolve twenty-four grains in a drachm of alcohol, then add 
three ounces of simple, or orange-peel, syrup. Dose, one tea-spoon- 
ful three times a day to give an appetite. But a better preparation 
is the citrate of iron and quinine, as follows : Ferocitrate and quinia, 
one drachm, dissolved in proof spirits, and add an ounce and a hall 
of orange-peel syrup. Dose : a tea-spoonful. This is the best way 
to take iron and 



qumme. 

Red Centaubt 
Bittebs. 

Put an ounce 
dried into a pint 
of good spirit, and 
let it stand eight 
days. Dose: a 
tea - spoonful or 
two in a wine- 

flass of water, 
onic, and good 
for females in sup- 
pressed menses. 

CoLUMBO Bit- 
tebs. 

Take of colum- 
bo bruised, one 
ounce ; boiling 
water, one pint. 
Dose : a large 
wine-glass every 




Sailor Blouse Kilt for Children 
2^ to 5 years, is made in Fancy 
Plaids, Oassimeres, and Blue and 
Gray Fiunnel, and forms a com- 
plcto and unique little suit. 

Price, $3, $4, $5, $6 and $8. 



two or three 
hours. This is 
very useful in 
weak stomach 
and bowels. 

Dutch Bittebs. 

Of gentian and 
orange peel take 
two hundred and 
forty grains ; cin- 
namon, seventy 
grains; calamus, 
seventy grains ; 
birch root, thirty 
grains ; corian- 
der, one hundred 
and eighty grains. 
Reduce all the in- 

fredients to pow- 
er, jnacerate 
them eight days 
in good gin, and 
then add four 
ounces of simple 
syrup and three 



ounces of sugar. These bitters are useful in many cases of indiges- 
tion and loss of appetite. 

Fob a MosQurro Bite. 

Apply oil or vinegar, lime juice or spirits of camphor, or camphor 
mixture. 

Bites of Venomous Sebpents. 

Apply caustic potash to the wound ; or eau de luce is said to be a 
certain antidote against the bites or stings of the most venomous 



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COl^UMENTS OF A. SHUMAK A CO. 



serpents or spiders. Lint wet with either of these should immedi- 
ately be applied to the injured part, and renewed as often as it be- 
comes dry. Or a poultice made of quicklime and soap should be 
applictl to the bitten part, and as much cayenne or ted pepper, mixed 
in spirits, swallowed every hour, as the stomach will bear. Or a 
free use of whiskey may be made ; or the juice of plantain and hore- 
hound, in doses of a table-spoonful, may be taken every hour ; or the 
blood may be freely sucked from the wound. A tight li^ture should 
be put around the leg or arm when a person is bitten m the loff or 
hand. If a toe or finger is bitten, cutting it off may save ihe body. 

Sticking Plaster. 

Common sticking plaster can always be procured at the shops, and 
it is useful for 



many purposes. 
When this is 
used in dressing 
a wound, it 
should be ap- 
plied by straps, 
one-half being 
fastened on one 
side of the wound 
and the other on 
the skin on the 
other side of the 
wound, drawing 
it tight and hold- 
ing it firmly till 
the warmth of the 
part secures it. 

To Stop P^m. 
Take rye flour 



LAWS FOB THE MILLIOlSr. 

A note dated on Sunday is void. 

If a note be lost or stolen, it does not 
release the maker ; he must pay it. 

An indorser of a note is exempt from 
liability if not served with notice of its 
dishonor within twenty-four hours of tts 
non-payment. 

Notes bear interest only when so 
stated. 

Each individual in partnership is re- 
sponsible for the whole amount of the 
debts of the firm. 

Ignorance of the law excuses no one. 

An agreement without consideration is 
void. 

Signatures In lead-pencil are good in 
law. 

A receipt for money is not legally con- 
clusive. . 

Contracts made on Sunday cannot be 
enforced. 

A contract made with a minor is void- 
able. 

A contract made with a lunatic is void. 



and vinegar, as 
thick as for buck- 
wheat cakes, half 
a tea-spoonful dt 
mustard ; grease 
the pan well and 
bake it — apply 
to the pamful 
part. 



For Scrofula 
Swelling. 

TaJ^e one pound 
of boiled carrots, 
one ounce of 
flour; mix with 
hot water enough 
to make a poul- 
tice and apply. 



For Gangrene. 



Take one pint of warm milk, one gill of yeast, and slippery elm 
bark finely powdered, enough to make a poiutice. 

Cooling Wash. 

Sugar of lead, one drachm ; soft water, half a pint. This wash is 
very cooling to an inflamed part. 

For Eruptions on the Skin. 

Tabe baberry, lobelia, and yellow dock, fine ; add a table-spoonful 
to one pint of spirits, 'apply ofi;en. 



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COMFLIMEMTS OF A. SHUMAK ft CO. 



91 



Foe Discoloeation op the Skin, 

Or spots which are often troublesome, either of the following washes 
may be used : — 

Sulphuret of potassa, commonly called "liver of sulphur," one 
ounce in a pint of water. 

Weak sulphuric acid — ** white vitriol," — ^two drachms in one pint 
of water. 

Sulphate of zinc, half an ounce to one pint of water ; or the sulphur 
water may be used, half an ounce to a pint of water. 



Toast Water. 

Take a slice of 
fine stale bread, 
cut thin, and care- 
fully toasted on 
each side, brown- 
ed, but not burnt. 
Put it into a stone 
jar and pour over 
it as much boiling 
water as you wish. 
Cover the jar, and 
when cool it is fit 
for use. It is nour- 
ishing, and very 
valuable for weak 
Stomachs. 



Cinnamon Water. 

Steep one pound 
of cinnamon bark, 
bruised, in a gal- 
lon and a half of 
water and one pint 
of brandy for two 
days. Then distil 




Take a peck of 
tamerack bark, — 
which has been 
taken from the tree 
without rossing, — 
spikenard root, 
one-half pound ; 
dandelion root, 
one-fourth pound; 
hops, two ounces. 
Boil these suffi- 
ciently to get the 
strength in two or 
three gallons of 
water ; strain, and 
boil down to one 
gallon ; when 
blood warm, add 
three pounds of honey and three pints of best brandy ; bottle, and 
keep in a cool place. Dose : drink freely of it three times a day, 
before meals, at least a gill or more, according to the strength and 
age of the patient. This has raised many a person from an almost 
certain death-bed, and sent them rejoicing through many years of 
life and health, to bless their friends and enjoy their pleasant com- 
pany. 

Eye Wash, or Water. 

Powdered borax, one ounce ; pure water, one quart. Mix, and let 
it stand six hours. Useful in sore eyes, sore nipples, canker, etc. 



Bcotch Dress Kilt (3 pieces), 
for Children 3 to 6 years, forms a 
handsome costume, and is made 
in Blue Broadcloth handsomely 
trimmed, or Mixed and Fancy 
Oassimeres, full box - plaited 
skirts. Price, $5, $8, and $10. 



off one gallon. It 
is an agreeable 
aromatic water, 
possessing the fra- 
grance and virtue 
of the spice. 

Syrup for Con- 
sumption. 



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COMPLIMBKTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



Rose Wateb. 

Take of fresh gathered roses, six pounds ; water, two gallons ; 
distil off one gallon. It is valued chiefly on account of its fine flavor. 

Stains by Iron Rust. 

Wash the clotti in suds and rinse. While wet rub ripe tomato juice 
on the spots, 
another suds. 



Place it in the sunshine until nearly dry, then wash in 



To Cause Hens to Lay Eggs. 

Feed them with fresh malted barley mixed with warm water, 
cold weather throw in a little cayenne. 



In 



Sweet Breath. 

Take two ozs. 
of concentrated 
solution of chlor- 
ide of soda. To 
two tablespoon- 
fuls of water 
add ten drops 
of the soda, and 
rinse the mouth 
freely. Take a 
mouthful and 
keep it in two or 
three minutes, 
and repeat. Use 
the same prep- 
aration for ill- 



GENERAL INFOBMATION. 

The circumference of a circle equals 
the diameter multiplied by 8.1416, the 
ratio of the circumference to the dhune- 
ter. 

The area of a circle equals the square 
of the radius multiplied by 8.1416. 

The area of a circle equals one quarter 
of the diameter multiplied by the cir- 
cumference. 

The radius of a circle equals the dr- 
cumfercnee multiplied by 0.159155. 

The radius of a circle equals the square 
root of the area multiplied by 0.56419. 

The diameter of a circle equals the cir- 
cumfcrence multiplied bv 0.31831. 

The diameter of a circle equals the 
square root of tho area multiplied by 
1.12838. 

Tho area of an eclipse equals the pro- 
duct of both diameters and .7854. 



smelling feet or 
other unpleasant 
odors. 

Liquid Black- 
ing. 

Take ivory 
black five ozs., 
molasses, four 
ozs., sweet oil, 
three -fourths of 
an ounce; titur- 
ate until the oil 
is perfectly kill- 
ed, then stir in 
gradually vine- 
gar and beer bot- 
tom, a quarter of 
mixture is com- 



a pint of each, and continue the agitation till the 
plete. 

To Drive Off Eats. 
Use carbolate of lime freely wherever they are most troublesome. 

For Erysipelas. 

Take ten grains of sulphate of soda to one ounce of water. Apply 
on lint to the affected surfeice, and beyond it. 

For Bleeding at the ISTosb. 
Apply tansy leaves to the nose, or smell them. 

To Destroy Warts. 
Mix equal parts of powdered rosin and verdigris, and apply. 



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93 



To Clean Marble. 

Apply with a brush a thick coat of gma arabic ; expose it to the 
snn, and in a short time if it does not peel off, wash the marble with 
clean water. 

Liquid Glue. 

Crack up the ^lue and put it in a bottle ; add to it common whiskey, 
shake up, cork tight, and in a few days it will be ready for use. 



To Beautift the 
Teeth. 

Dissolve two 
ounces of borax in 
three pounds of 
boiling water, and 
before it is cold, 
add one tea-spoon- 
ful of the spirits of 
camphor, then bot- 
tle for use. A ta- 
ble-spoonful of this 
mixture, mixed 
with an equal 
quantity of tepid 
water and applied 
daily with a soft 
brush, preserves 
and beautifies the 
teeth, extirpates 
all tartarous adhe- 
sions, arrests de- 
cay, induces a 
healthy action of 
the gums, and 
makes the teeth 
pearly white. 




Our celebrated •* Hub ** suit, «h) 
popular with parents, is also la 
constant demand. Tills little 
garment is in Jacket and Pants ; 
the former, being doable breast- 
ed, is made in a variety of goods 
specially suited to school wear. 
Price $8 and $10. 



Varnish fob Lea- 
ther. 

Take two parts 
by weight of rosin, 
and one of india 
rubber, and heat 
them in an earth- 
enware vessel till 
they are fused to- 
gether, after which 
Siey should be stir- 
red till they are 
quite cold. A little 
boiled linseed oil 
may be added 
while the materials 
are hot. 

A Good Bakino 
Powder. 

Mix six parts of 
carbonate of soda, 
four parts tartaric 
acid, two parts of 
fine su^ar, and one 
partoi salt. 



Hair Dressing. 

Mix one ounce of pure glycerine with six of water, and add a few 
drops of bergamot. Anotoer good dressing for the hair is made by 
dissolving one ounce of castor oil in eight ounces of strong alcohol. 
Add a few drops of bergamot or lavender. 

For Bites and Stings op Insects. 

Dissolve an ounce of borax in a pint of pure or distilled water. 
If necessary double the amount of borax. 



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<X>UPLIV1:KT& of a. SHUHAN a C30* 



To Remote Jbdn Rust, Etc,, from MiJEBtifi. 
Wash tiie spots with a Bolatioa of oxalic acid. 

To PREVENT ItCHINO IN SkTS DISEASES, 

Take equal parts of glycerine and yolk of egg. Mix thoroughly 
and apply to the affected part. 

A SuEB Cure foe Boit^, 

Dr, Simon, a physician of Lorraine, states that as' soon as the chai^ 
acEeristic culminating point of a boil makes its appearance, he puts 
in a saucer a 

thimbleful of tt^ *i,pn nllowq 

comphorated al- GENEEAL I^FOBHATIOH. ^| sarf^e ta 

cchol, and dip- ThenrBaof a trlangl* equals the bMe fjrv lilacin'*' a 
ping the ends of mnltlpliiid hy one.half it* nliitude. sTi o-Tif Vrinftrm- nf 

iiTfl mi.lrllA fin The Bide of an inscribed cqiillfiteral SJlgUt COatmg Oj 

flJS OJiumo nn- irlangle t-qnala the di«met«i' of the clPela camphorated 

gers with the umUipJieri hy 0. sa , ol i V e oi 1 o v e r tb(a 

Jili^™^!^?!^ J-L^ ' the m^eter of '^(^^lo^mumpuTbr affected surface, 
inflamed surface, o.707l He states that 

especially the -- - - - -. - 

central portion, 
repeating the 
operation eight 
or ten times, 
continuing the 
rubbing' at each 



time tor about 
half a minute. 



The vren. of a triangle equals the baafl 
mnltlplli^d hy ane-.ha.lf lt& Aliitude. 

The Bide of ari InecTibed cqnllnternt 
trLtini^le cqnale the diameter of the clt^la 
DinUipJIerl hy O.Sa, 

The EJde of an liucrlhed square equals 
the diuueter of a circle inaltJpUcd hv 
0.7071. 

The Bide of an ii^Htrihed square equals 
the circumference of the ciroie mulUpLied 
hy 0,225. 

The circumferenca of a cfrcte mulll- 
piled by <i.'2S/2 equale one side of a square 
of the same at^a. 

The side of a square equals the dlom- 
eterof a circle of the same area multi- 
plkd hy 0.S8S2. 

The solidity of a sphere equals Its sur- 
face multiplied hy oue^ith of its diaxa- 



one such appli- 
cation in almost 
all such cases 
causes boils to 
dry up and dis- 
appear. The 
application 



should be made 
at morning, at 
noon, and in the 

evening. He avers that tha same treatment will cure whitlows and 
all injuries of tips of fingers. As soon as pain and redness appear 
the fin":ers should bo soaked for ten minutes in camphorated sweet 
oil. The relief is said to he immediate, and three applications are 
giraerally enough to afford a cure. 

To Make Sand Soap. 

Melt any white soap and mix thoroughly with it seven or eight 
parts of finely sifi^ed white sand. When cold, mold it into balls. 

To Curb Chilblains. 

Cut an onion in slices and with these rub the chilblains thoronghly 
every night before a good fire imtil they disappear. 

To Remove Paint from Clothing. 
Use coal naptha or benzine ^.^.^.^^^ ^^ Google 



COMPLIMBNIS OF A. SHUMAN * OO. 



95 



Ventilated Cellars. 

The cellar should be thoroughly ventilated, whenever the temper- 
ature outside is above the freezing point. This is absolutely neces- 
sary for the health of the family. The fruit and vegetables will also 
keep better. It is very convenient to have a thermometer hanging 
in the cellar, and whenever the temperature rises above forty-five 
degrees, a door or window, or both may be opened, even on the cold- 
est days, for a few minutes, provided the stream of cold air does not 
fall directly on anything easily affected by frost. How long you may 
Bafely reduce the temperature in the cellar depends on its construc- 
tion. If it is a ** warm cellar,^^ it will do no harm to keep the doors 
and windows 



open until the 
temperature o f 
the cellar is 
down to within 
a few degrees of 
freezing; but if 
the cellar is at 
all liable to 
freeze in cold 
weather, it will 
not be safe to 
reduce the tem- 
perature so low, 
because, if a 
very cold, windy 
night should fol- 
low, the potatoes 



GEHEBAL INFOEMATIOlSr. 

The tnrface equals the product of Uie 
diameter and circamference. 

The surface of a sphere equals the 
square of the diameter muIupUed hy 
3.1416. 

The surface equals the square of the 
circumference multiplied by 0.3183. 

The diameter of a sphere equals the 
square root of the surface multiplied hy 
0.56419. 

The square root of the surface of a 
sphere multiplied by 1.772464 equals the 
circumference. 

The diameter of a sphere equals the 
cube root of its solidity multiplied hy 
1.2407. 

The circumference of a sphere equals 
the cube root of its solidity multiplied by 
8.8978. 



the same cellar were not injured. 



might be frozen. 
Should there be 
danger of this, 
a kettle or two 
of boiling water 
sprinkled about 
the cellar floor 
before going to 
bed, will do 
much to prevent 
frost. Water in 
freezing gives 
out heat. And 
we have had our 
cistern in the 
cellar freeze over 
an inch thick, 
while potatoes in 



Don't Waste Soap-Stjds. 



It is well to have grape vines planted so that the waste liquids from 
the wash-house can be used to fertilize them. If there is any food, 
tiie vine especially loves, it is the soapy liquids which accumiuate on 
washing days in families. Vines drenched every week with these 
liquids will flourish astonishingly, and extend themselves so as to 
cover large buildings, every branch bearing fruit. A distinguished 
Ohio horticulturist says that his family of ten persons eat a ton of 
grapes, fresh and canned, during the year ; and he thinks it not only 
nays in the matter of health, but pays also in the saving of grocers' 
ills through the diminished desire of pastry, and other rich food. 

Medical Value op Asparagus. 

A medical correspondent of an English journal says that the ad- 
vantages of asparagus are not sufficiently estimatea by those who 



Ei 



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COMPLIMEKTS OF A. SHUMAN A CO. 



suffer with rhemnatisin and ^out. Slight cases are cured in a few 
days by feeding on this delicious esculent, and more chronic cases 
are much relieved, especially if the patient avoids all acids, whether 
in food or beverage. The Jerusalem artichoke has also a similar 
effect in relieving rheumatism. The head may be eaten in the usual 
way, but tea made trom the leaves of the stalk, and drank three or 
four times a day, is a certain remedy, though not equally agreeable. 

Worms in Flower Pots. 

Many ladies are puzzled how to get rid of the detestable worms 
that will infest the earth in their flower-pots. The following recipe 
is recom- 



mended to 
destroy the 
pests. *'Put 
one ounce 
of ammonia 
in one gal- 
lon of warm 
water, and 
water the 
plants with 
it once a 
week; they 
will be free 
from these 
worms and 
be beautiful 
and green. 
To kill the 
little bugs 
that get on 
the olean- 
der, take a 
fiece o f 
ime the 
size of a 
hen's Qggt 



TJl.JBTjJSI 

SHOWING THE DECIMAL VALUE OF THE DIVISIONS 
OF A FOOT, VIZ., INCHES AND PARTS OF INCHES. 



Parts. 


Decimal. 


Parte. 


Decimal. 


lU in. 


= .9583 


^ 


in. 


= 


.2083 


11 in. 


= .9166 


2 


in. 


— 


.1566 


lOJ in. 


= .875 


H 


in. 


= 


.125 


10 in. 


= .8333 


1 


in. 


~-~ 


.0833 


n in. 


= .7916 


¥ 


in. 


^^ 


.0871 


9 in. 


== .75 


in. 


= 


.0729 


8i in. 


= .7083 


if 


in. 


zz: 


.0677 


8 in. 


= .6666 




in. 


— 


.0625 


7J in. 


= .625 


in. 


7~~ 


.052S 


7 in. 


= .5833 


A 


in. 





.0520 


6i in. 


= .5416 


\S 


in. 


~~ 


.0468 


6 in. 


= .5 


X 


in. 





.0416 


5J in. 


= .4583 


Ti 


in. 


~~ 


.0364 


5 in. 


= .4166 


i 


in. 





.0312 


U in. 


= .375 


in. 


—"' 


.026 


4 in. 


= .3333 


i 


in. 





.0208 


3Jin. 


= .2916 


in. 


— ~ 


.0156 


3 in. 


= .25 


* 


in. 


= 


.0104 



White glue, 
one pound, 
white zinc, 
ten pounds, 
paris white, 
five pounds, 
water suffi- 
cient. Soak 
the glue 
over night 
in three 
quarts of 
water, then 
add as much 
water again, 

and heat on a water-bath till the glue is dissolved. In another pail 
put the two powders and pour on hot water, stirring all the time, 
until the liquid appears like thick milk. Mingle the two liquids to- 

f ether, stir thoroughly, and apply to the wall with a whitewash 
rush. 



dissolve i t 
in about two 
quarts of 
water, and 
wash the 
stock and 
branches of 
the tree." 



FlNI^ FOR 

Rooms. 



THB END. 



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A. S H U M A N & CO. 



W^holesale Department, 




No. 9 Summer Slr^et, lo corqer Wasiiingioo Slreel, 



A.-U 



Mn, 4.ta ami 4^tO WASnil(m*6lt>m*REET. 



y^i - I- ♦ 



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