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Full text of "The Howler"

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 


THE Z. 


SMITH 


REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




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CALL NO. 






ACCESSION NO 

105110 


1957 








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WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 





DITORS 

Kitty Booth Doug Graham 

INESS MANAGER 

Dave Welton 



19 5 7 





1957 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 




PUBLISHED BY WAI 
WINSTON-SALEM, 



IRES 



CST COLLEGE 
H CAROLINA 







In gratitude lor his many years of 
devoted service to Wake Forest College, 
I he Howler of 1957 is dedicated to 
Dr. William E, Speas. 

Fifty years ago, in the spring sun- 
shine of the magnolia-studded campus 
of Wake Forest College, he received 
his 15. A. degree, a Phi Beta Kappa 
graduate. He later received the M.A. 
from The Johns Hopkins University, 
and then the Ph.D. from Cornell. 

The influence of Dr. Speas has been 
far-reaching in the realm of physics, 
including a past presidency of the 
North Carolina Academy of Science, 
hut he is best known to students and 
alumni as one of the most quoted pro- 
fessors of all time. Though a scholar of 
unusual ability, he maintains an under- 
standing of students and a kinship with 
them in stud;, that have become his 
trademark. 

Continually youthful in spirit. Dr. 
Speas truly seems to gain as much en- 
joyment from each lecture demon- 
stration and lab experiment as his 
students, chuckling in his unforgettable 
manner when he finishes the demon- 
stration. 

He has long been an advocate of a 
balanced program for Wake Forest, 
sttessing, among other things, the im- 
portance of cultivation of the fine arts. 
Incidentally, his three daughters, Alice, 
Melinda, and Frances, are all accom- 
plished musicians. 

It is to men such as him that Wake 
Forest owes her place of greatness in 
the educational world of today, and 
it is with a true spirit of tribute that 
we congratulate Dr. William F. Speas 
on his thirty-seven years of outstanding 
work here. Wc feel honored to have 
know n him. 



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() THK STUDENTS of Wake Forest who converged upon a 
campus still wearing irs figurative- price tags and cellophane 
covers, "From the forest of W'ike to the hills of Forsyth" 
became a familiar slogan. The 195" Howl kr is a living tableau 
of what these students saw and what they did in a year of 
new beginnings. The greater number of these stuients had 
spent a year or more exploring the forest of Wake, and now 
they bravely encamped upon the rorsythian hills ready to 
right the enemy of College traditions, whether the foe was 
real or imaginary. As the year rolled by, the collegiate warriors 
laid down their weapons and joined the ranks of those students 

who either did not know enough of the old college to right or, w ho looked at the 

problems of removal realistically and acted accordingly. 

For certain, the year was as much one of adjustment as the former had been 
one of preparation. And aside from personal adjustments common to all college 
students, there were those matters pertaining to faculty and administration. 1 he 
"one big happy family" had increased tremendously, so the older children had 
to make way for the younger and to teach them by the precepts of experience. 
There were adjustments to the many and varied facilities which the old campus 
could not afford; and there were adjustments to the town of Winston-Salem, to 
the "modified Georgian" campus, even to the weather. But most of the children 
and most of their playhouse came out unscathed from the experience, and both 
student and campus finally felt as if each belonged to the other. 

To take one final look at this first year, the start has visited each of the build- 
ings on campus and has looked them over inside and out. I herefore, from the 
steeple of Wait Chapel, the cupola of Z. Smith Reynolds Library, the balconies 
of Revnolda Hall, and the innumerable stairways running up and down the entire 
campus, the scene unfolds. 

But because the College is certainly more than a mere group of buildings — and 
fortunately less than some untouchable Utopia — this volume seeks to capture 
from the bonds of time and space some of the spirit that is still Wake Forest and 
will ever continue to be. 



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THEWAKE FOREST FLAME 

H'j^v /'Wi7 ww li'crf talking of the Dead 

In terms of light. "Our paths were dim," they said, 

'And we were prone to stumble day by day 
Till our preceptors pointed out the way, 

Then lifted high their lamps that we might find 
And use the boundless riches of the mind 

And heart and soul —nor were content to stop 
But burned their lamps down to the oil's last drop. 

That faint spark we possessed when first we came 
Grew, with their help, into a constant flame 

Wake Forest spirit! Loyalty aglow! 
These valiant ones embodied both, and so 

God grant our flame makes bright the path ahead. 
Continuing the radiance they spread!" 

I'm m Earnshaw. 




WMBDOM 



/ N 



MEMORIAM 



Dr. George Washington Paschal, 87, 
author of the three-volume History of Wake 
Forest College and Greek professor from 
1896 to 1940, died June 13, 1956. At 
various times he had also been college 
registrar and director of athletics. 

In 1940 he "retired" and "began work." 
He had four books published and com- 
pleted the manuscripts for three more. A 
man who wrote so extensively, who 
attended all the college's athletic events, 
who helped found the Wake Forest chapter 
of Phi Beta Kappa, and who (at one time) 
edited the Biblical Recorder naturally caused 
all those around him to marvel that he 
found the time and energy to do so much. 





Dr. C. Chilton Pearson, Professor 
Emeritus of Social Sciences, retired in 
1952 after thirty-six years of loyal service 
ro the school. He has been described as 
"the best scholar ever at Wake Forest" 
and as having a "brilliant, analytical mind." 
His concise thinking and his "ability to 
separate significant matters from unim- 
portant details" influenced both faculty and 
students. 

Versatile in many respects, he developed 
the Social Science Department of the 
school, headed the first fraternity council, 
led in establishing the book store, and 
served as chairman of the faculty com- 
mittee on athletics. Dr. "Skinny" Pearson 
died November 26, 1056. He remains "a 
man Co be remembered. 



The man who had probably taught more 
law students than an)- other teacher in 
North Carolina, Professor Edgar W. Tim- 
berlake, died January 19, 1957, at his 
home in Wake Forest. Fifty of his seventy- 
five years had been spent in the service 
of the College. 

Nicknamed "Toe" by his students, he- 
was considered an authority on real 
property law and legal ethics. He tried to 
make law as simple as possible, and always 
put his students at ease. When a correct 
answer was given in class, he would 
exclaim, "Absolutely correct:" Aside from 
teaching law, he was dean of the college 
from 1919 to 1922, a superintendent of the 
Sunday school, member of the City 
Council, a Mason and a Shriner. 




;4nd so begins 




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'IIIIMPMHIIliniilillll 




1 ENTZ 





An aerial view of the- campus showing 
met rical a r ran%ement ■ 




Moving in 





Typical of man) of our professors and their families. Dr. and Mrs. Allen Easle, 
begin the tiring task of unpacking and moving into their new home 



Jimmy Pou-ell Chairman of Student Chapel 
Committee, strikes a Tuesday morning pose. 



The first graduation on this e.ur im campus — a moment long awaited b) 





mnam 




Students take time to meet in the Snack Bar between classes for a moment of refreshment before the next grueling Imur. 
Fans huddle under umbrellas at Bowman Gray Stadium during one of Wake Forest's home games— (Photo by Frank Jones ) 




I I 




" Madame Zombie" predicts the dubious future .it the Sfl 
Halloween Carnival. 



Dr. Louis Untermeyers poetry lecture ivas one of the 
of the Concert-Lecture Series. 




15 






7 In- music nf S.im Donahue u\is featured at the Homecoming 
Dance. 



Ann BnJv.es oj Lattimore, S. ( .. sponsored In SPE Fraternity, accepts he; 
title oj Miss Demon Deacon for 1956 from Ann Cutter oj Arlington, Va 



Homecoming . . . Couples listen and dance to the Music oj Bills May's Orchrst, 







Id 




Pete Barium J Deacon quarterback, fades back for a pass against on-rushing State men in homecoming game. Score: 14^0 favor II . F 





Homecoming brings ex-Deacon DeVos back to his post 



Majorettes and cheerleaders mix it up after a T.D. 




17 




III 



Another lost week end. 





Students sled to shafts (exams) . 



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Mid-Wmten bring the mum of Woody Herman for dual dance week end and Saturday afternoon concert lirld in the Memorial Coin 



I he Squall he/ore the i 



In a scene from the "Came Mutiny Court Martial" Lt. 1. (,. 
Willie Keith, questioned by Lt. Keefer, says. "They 
dropped the whisky into the water and 1 was out HIO." 




DEDICATION 



FOREWORD 



IN MEMORIAL 



WAKE FOREST 1956-1957 



ADMINISTRATION 

President Tribble; Administrative Officials; Board of 
Trustees; Administrative Assistants; Business Fraterni- 
ties; Kappa Mu Epsilon Fraternity; Alpha Phi Omega; 
Literary Societies; Outstanding Seniors; Seniors. 



I 

5 

6 
8 

21 




LIBRARY 

Librarian and Staff; English, History, Modern Language 
and Classical Language Professors; Future 1 cachets; De- 
bating; Language Fraternities; Phi Alpha 1 heta; Omicron 
Delta Kappa and Tassels; Who's Who and Phi Beta 
Kappa; Orientation Committee; Politics; Social Stand- 
arils; I louse Presidents; College "Theater, Juniors. 




SCIENCE 

Biology, Physics, and Chemistry Professors; Alpha 
Fpsilon Delta, Beta Beta Beta, ( iamma Sigma Epsilon; 
Physics Club; Science Candids. 




98 



RSI 



LAW 



Dean of Law; Law Professors; Third Year Law; Second 
Near Law; lirsr Year Law; liar Association; Law Fra- 
ternities. 




106 



CHAPEL 

College Chaplain; Religion, Psychology and Philosophy, 
Sociology and Music Professors; Secretary of Baptist 
Student Union Association; B.S.L'. Council, Religion 
Organizations; Choirs; Sophomores. 




116 



GYM 



Football; Basketball; Baseball; Swimming; Cross 
Country; Wrestling; Track; Golf; Tennis; Men's 
Intramurals; Women's Intramurals; Athletic Organiza- 
tions; Army R.O.T.C; Scabbard and Blade; Cheer- 
leaders, Band, Majorettes; Magnolia Court and Festival; 
Freshmen. 



136 



FRATERNITIES 



I.l-'.C; Alpha Sigma Phi; Delta Sigma Phi; Kappa 
Alpha; Kappa Sigma; Lambda Chi Alpha; Pi Kappa 
Alpha; Sigma Chi; Sigma Phi I'psilon; Sigma Pi; Thcta 
Chi, 




194 



Reynolda Hall 




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PRESIDENT TRIBBLE 



Ten years of planning, saving, compromising, 
and patient waiting were culminated in the removal 
of Wake Forest College from Wake to Forsyth 
County. 1 he driving force behind our arrival here 
was none other than President Tribble. From the 
time he entered office, succeeding Dr. Thurman D. 
Kitehin, to the registration ot the summer session, 
1956, he gave of his time, energy, and efforts to 
make this idea a reality. The taxing burden of 
moving has finally been lifted from his shoulders. 
The school is now here in Winston-Salem and 
classes are in session. During the years of planning. 
the personality of Dr. Tribble permeated the 
campus, affecting every phase ot campus life with 
its spirit of rugged determination to complete a 
task once begun. This new campus is a constant 
symbol of his unselfish efforts to realize the dream 
that has been so long in the hearts of the faculty, 
students, and Southern Baptists. Now the adminis- 
trative problems arising will be concerned w ith the 
continued grow th and expansion of the new campus. 
As the new problems are met and solved, President 
Tribble can look back and find inspiration in having 
accomplished a job unique in North Carolina col- 
legiate history. 



■MM 



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Dr. Ozmer L. Henry, \r 
College Physician 




HaroldS. Moore 
Supt. of Buildings and Grounds 





Mrs. Ruby M. Sheridm 
Manager of Dining Halls 







Thomas P. Gl 
Director of Residences 



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Administrative Assistants art, [eft to right Barefoot, Hamrick, Miller, Petty, Blevins, Jennings, 
Fussell, Casey, Drage. 

House lionesses are, left to right Mrs. Melinda Overby, Mrs. 1.. R. O'Brian, Mrs. Eupht 
Madry, Mrs. Mary Lily Ec 




FACULTY: ALL UNDER ONE ROOF 



£> $L a 




Dr. Games M. Rogers, Dean of the School of Business Adminii 




Dr. hey C. Gentry, Chairman of the Math Depa 




Members of the Business facultyare, hirst row Miss Bateman. Dean Rogers. 
M,ss Wall. Second row Ramsey, Hilton, Scott, Thomas, Levis, Heath. 





Members oj the Student Legislature are, front: 
Weston, Braddoek, Austin, Killian, Cella, King 



\rd, T. Ward, Hobh 
ii, Kitchin, Thomas. 



Baxter— President of Wi 



WOMAN'S GOVERNMENT 




All undergraduate women of the Wake Forest student 
family are members of the Woman's Government Associ- 
ation, more popularly known as W.G.A. The Executive 
Board of W.G.A. is made up of thirteen girls nominated 
and elected by the coeds. For the second consecutive year, 
it served as the Women's Honor Council as well as the 
Executive Board, which enforces the regulations pertaining 
to the coeds' campus life. 

I he Social Standards Committee of W.G.A. seeks to 
uphold the high standards of conduct and to plan a well- 
balanced social program. 



Wembei 
Second 



King, Frances 
wianne Long, h 



Kitty Booth, Phillip Ann Gardner, Carol In 



Own, Reta Peoples, Barbara Sue Cook. 




Members of the Honor Council are, seated: Green, Bah, Hughes, Killim, Barrwick. Standing: Tovmsend, Snipes, Herring, Graham, Harvey, Durhm 

David Hirano— President of the Student Body. 
t £~ jp ff >*K~ * Officers of the Student Body are: Secretary, Dee Hughes; treasurer, Jackl 

*#** » V « ~VC' ' Murdoch; vice-president. Bill Starlmu. president. David Hit 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

From all sections ot Student Government ap- 
peared the desire to accomplish something of value 
for the students they represented. Despite obstacles 
that constantly reared their ugly heads, the member 
groups worked toward an end of continuing the 
best standards of Student Government. 

President of the Student Body Dave Hirano 
worked with Bill Starling, Dennie Baxter, and 
David Hughes in trying to co-ordinate the activities 
of their groups into a unity of purpose. 

Hirano and other campus leaders were successful 
in getting student body co-operation to avert a 
Carolina-Wake Forest football game riot. College 
representatives attended the State Student Legis- 
lature. And Honor Councils upheld the tradition 
of the Honor System. 

Most of the effort was spent in dealing with the 
complaints ot students and faculty. Time was 
consumed in cither routine business or in special 
investigations. More than ever, it was a "thankless 
task." 




Members of the Editorial Staff are: Goerlick, Shaw, Aycock, Duncan, Julian, Motherly, Briaegar, Cenley, Rooks, Poole, Braddock, Griffin, Hale, Tut 




©lb #olb anb placfe 



There were new offices for the Old Gold and Bhtck staffers to haunt this 
year, new gripes to write about, and new "thrillers" to report. One thing 
was not new— that persistent stamina which all newspaper workers seem to 
possess was still present; that undying energy which makes possible the 
All-Amcrican rating the paper has so often won in past years lived on. The 
paper faithfully covered the campus just as the magnolias used to do. 

Moving into its forty-first year of keeping students informed on the latest 
Deacon doings, the paper maintained the high standards for which it is noted. 
Perhaps the person most responsible for its achievements this year was Lloyd 
Preslar, the editor. He and his hard-working staff spent many hours, often 
long into the night, pounding out the stories which students rushed to read 
on Monday mornings. While the ink was still wet on the current issue, the 
weekly round of putting out the next edition would start, and the staff once 
again dismissed that hoped-for eight-hours' sleep with a shrug. 



32 



■MHBZa 





Bimnm \I.wjv/t 



Bill Connelly 
Managing Editor 



Members oj the Circulation ami Business Staffs are: Weathers, Odom, Butler, Rice. Lewis, Miliums, and Walhe 




33 




Dal, Holland, H, 




THE STUDENT 



Dottie Hraddock: Edit 



I he sctnny: has changed, the printer is different, but 
The Student remains to keep fun, fiction, and features 
circulating at Wake Forest. In spite of the extra burden 
nt new surroundings, seven issues were produced to 
set a new record. 

Co-editors Charles Richards and Dottic Braddock, 
u ith the help of a fine staff, have shed "blood and tears" 
to create a superior magazine appealing to all types of 
students. 



Members o] the Editorial Staff are: Herring, Fitzgerald, Heard, Umpley, Smith, Walton, and Watherl) 




l l 




Charles Richards, Editor 



In January a special Seventy-fifth Anniversary issue 
was released. In this issue the history of The Student 
since its beginning seventy-five years ago was interest- 
ingly covered. 

Although creative contributions from the student 
body were small, the magazine did not decrease in 
literary quality. The staff obligingly worked overtime 
to produce numerous masterpieces. 




Editorial Heads are: Lynn Laughrun, Production Manager; Hrrr 
Walton, Art Editor; Phoebe Pridgen, Circulation Manager; and 
Ji-rry Motherly, Associate Editor. 






Doug Graham, Co-Editor 




Km\ Rimili, Co-Editor 



36 



As school closes in the spring. Wake Forest stu- 
dents not only look forward to a diploma, or a 
vacation, hut they also expect another symbol of 
the year's completion. This expectation is fulfilled 
in each student's acquisition of his copy of The 
Howler. The yearbook is one of the most treasured 
Wake Forest traditions. What other collection of 
pictures, captions, and stories could recall so many 
memories? 

The yearbook does not "iust grow," as Topsy 
says. It is the result of long hours of planning, 
headaches over layout, frantic rush for advertise- 
ments, panicky scheduling of pictures, midnight-oil 
copy-editing, and meticulous typing. Early in the 
tall the campaign for Howi fk Help begins. 
Throughout the staff meetings, individual responsi- 
bility to this student project is stressed. The 
"Demon Deacon" taskmaster of Howler produc- 
tion forces sacrifices of leisurely week ends as 
well as entertaining TV programs, but. these de- 
mands are justified. The start needs no more reward 
than is offered when a student eagerly examines his 
brand-new How i fk and voices approval and admira- 
tion for a job well done. 





B. /- L'pchurch, Assistant Pho- 
tography Editor; Gloria Flippin. 
Assistant Editor; Ann Cornwell, 
Assistant Photography Editor. 




Barbara Howell, Photography Edit 



Jam- lewis, Associate Edit 



Members of the Editorial Staff are. seated: Scott. Murpliey. Williamson. Lewis, Kerley. Phillips. Standing: Clark. Councilman, Knott. Freeman, Haztltu 
Dedmon, Kttchin. Barge, Cutter. 





Iln.,1,, begins preschool work midst luxury of furnitui 



U I 1)1) worked hard and finally 



Members oj the Howler Business SujJ are, seated Aim Tyner, fai 
Wilcox. StarxW. Fred Coward, Ed Blackburn. 





Station Manager 



WFDD 



THE VOICE OE WAKE FOREST 



Although radio station \\ FDD was uprooted Irom its small 
green shack a block from the old Wake Forest campus and 
tucked away in a second-story corner of Rcvnolda Hall in the 
heart of the new campus, the "Voice ot Wake Forest" continued 
to rule the air waves for listening students. Transmitting diffi- 
culties forced the station into silence for almost three months, 
however, in spite of the pre-movc preparations made on the 
old campus and the installment of equipment in the station's 
three new sound proof studios by the staff prior to school's 
opening in the fall. The problem was finally solved by placing 
transmitters in the college dormitories — the only location where- 
most of the station's programs can be picked up. One ot WFDD's 
most popular shows, "Deaconlight Serenade,'' has a wider 
receiving area because it is broadcast by local radio station 
WAIR through WFDD facilities. 

With WFDD operating on an increased budget, station 
manager Tommy Bunn and business manager Forrest Roberts 
have been able to improve the station's equipment. Using its 
two recently purchased tape recorders, WFDD now sends the 
"Voice of WFC" throughout North Carolina by supplying 
recordings of campus life to radio stations all over the State. 



39 





Members oj the \\ 11)1) Staff, top to bi 
Myers, lack-sun. 



Matney, Willis. Beatty, Williams, Ketchie, Daniel. Ezzell, Show, Patterson, Mackie. Standing in fr 




RHO TAU SIGMA 
HONORS "THE VOICES" 

Rhn Tan Sigma appeared rirst on the 
Wake Forest campus in the spring of 
1956 m honor the campus radio enthusi- 
asts. The chapter, one of the first to 
he formed in the nation, immediately 
elected Raleigh's Jimmy Capps, popular 
disc jockey of "Our Best to You," as 
an honorary member of the local group. 
The infant organization had the handi- 
cap of innumerable problems involved 
in re-locating the station in the Winston 
area. Members were kept busy as they 
worked against many difficulties trying 
CO meet the pleas of eager students and 
get W'l'Dl) on the air once again. 

The fraternity functions to give its 
members a broader understanding of 
commercial radio operation with the 
immediate goal of improving local 
radio conditions. In addition, the mem- 
bers gained information and insight into 
the future of radio and the career 
possibilities it affords. 



BEHIND PUBLICATIONS 



The lights burn late in five rooms of 
Reynolds Hall, which, in student lingo, are 
called "Pub Row." Here Wake Forest 
writers and radio men work diligently to 
provide the student body with news, litera- 
ture, entertainment, and student opinion. 

A publications board made up of the 
editors and business managers of The 
Howler, Old Gold and Black, and The 
Student and the station manager of W 11)1) 
set the standards for the pens and voices of 
the students. 

Working with the staffs ot the publi- 
cations and radio station is a faculty board. 
Dr. Folk advises the frenzied staff ot Old 
Gold and Black, while Dr. Wilson soothes 
and counsels the Howlers. The "Voices 
of Wake Forest" owe their rounded tones 
to the tutelage of Professors Shirley and 
Walton, and Dr. Smiley is always available 
for consultation with the Student starT. 

The members of pub board are Lloyd 
Prcslar and John W'agster of Old Gold and 
Black; Dottie Braddock, Charles Richards, 
and Dale Holland of the Student, Doug 
Graham, Kitty Booth, and Dave Welton of 
the Howler; Tommv Bunn and Forest 
Roberts of W FDD. 





/ the Alpha Kappa Psi H„s 



Thi Officm oj Alpha Kappi 
lohntm, Henderson. 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI: FIRST 
IN ACADEMIC STANDING 

The C lamma Delta Chapter of Alpha Kappa 
Psi business fraternity has been active since 1950. 
The Wake Forest chapter boasts a membership 
nl forty students enrolled in the School of Business, 
and it ranks first in academic standing over the 
hundred other chapters in the country, With 
I'.stus White presiding over this scar's (unctions, 
the fraternity has gone a long way towards ful- 
filling its purposes of promoting public interest 
in business mechanics, fostering research in 
commerce, and advancing courses leading to a 
degree in business. The group left campus to 
make overnight tours of industries in Charlotte 
and the < )ld Gold tobacco factors in Greensboro. 

During April members toured government instal- 
lations and business rirnis of Norfolk. Virginia. 
As a gift to the college, the chapter gave two 
glass-enclosed bulletin boards for student and 
faculty use. I he new chapter room in the basement 
of Northwest dormitory has been the center of 
the group's activities. 

Vlalon Smith ami I stus White attended the 
National Convention in Detroit where Harlowe 
Curtice, president of General Motors, wis 
initiated as an honorary member. 



DELTA SIGMA PI: TOURS 
ARE HIGHLIGHT OE YEAR 

Gamma Nu is the local chapter of Delta Sigma 
Pi, the national business fraternity. Since its 
establishment in 1950, the chapter has strived to 
aid alumni to secure better positions and more 
opportunities in the business world. I he 
"Detasig," the national fraternity's publication, is 
instrumental in this service, rendering invaluable 
aid tn its subscribers. 

These future businessmen have taken trips 
this \ear to Burlington Mills and Sears Roebuck 
and Company in Greensboro. Other projects 
during the Near included trips to Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Company and Western Electric 
in Winston-Salem. Among visiting speakers at 
the regular meetings this year were John Watting- 
ton. President of Wachovia Bank and I rust ( J>.. 
and Dr. Richards of the Political Science Depart- 
ment. J. I.. Memory, Jr., and Mr. frank O'Stein, 
Vice-President of the First National Bank of 
Winston-Salem, also talked to the group. 

This year the fraternity elected Thomas 1.. 
league to serve as president. Other officers were 
(ieorgc M. McDaniel, Jr., secretary; William ( .. 
Starling, first vice-president; Joe Crump, second 
vice-president, and Joe \. Walluork, treasurer. 




I II 





Kappa Mu Kpsilon, honorary mathematics fraternity, 
under the leadership of JoAnne McMillan, functioned in 
1956-1957 as one of the most active organizations of its 
type on campus. Participation was encouraged by having 
senior members conduct the programs with interest dis- 
cussions from their own knowledge. A highlight of the 



year, socially speaking, was the Christmas party at Forsyth 
hish Camp, where food and fun reigned in the festivities. 
Making a real contribution to the college, the fraternity 
presented the library with a book series. The World of 
Mathematics, in honor of Professor "Pop" Carroll, former 
beloved friend and teacher of main' of the members. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



•n of Alpha Phi Omega who sponsored lite Student Directory, the Book Exchange and Blood 
ear are, rirsr row: Adylette, McCollough, Fitts, Styers, Hmson. Second row: Capt. Palmer, 
Wilkinson, Owens, Stevens. Third row: Col. Peyton, Major Daiies, Roberts. Palmer. 





DELTA KAPPA NU 
THE BUSINESS BRAINS 

Delta Kappa Nil. the local business fra- 
ternity for coeds, was organized for those 
girls who plan to obtain either a major or a 
minor from the Wake Forest School of Busi- 
ness. 

The girls have made a fine beginning on 
the new campus under the leadership of their 
president, Ann kitchin. The regular meetings 
featured speakers from various local business 
concerns. Particularly memorable was the 
talk given by a representative from Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Company. Members enjoyed 
several informal parties during the year. 

With Miss Joyce Bateman as adviser. 
Delta Kappa Nu sponsored a dictaphone class 
during second semester. Invited to join were 
all those interested in the operation of this 
machine. 



Members of Delta Kappa Nu are: Weaver. Hawkins, Brown, Kitchin, Speaker, Mas Joyce Bateman, Hurler. Adams, Rice, Holfield, Ashley, Hurt 




45 




Philomathesian 



One nt tin. oldest traditions of Wake Forest 
College is the literary society. Through the years 

the two societies have been rivals in ;ill pluses of 
public speaking from debate to poetry readings. 

Robert Fitzgerald assumed his duties as the 
first president of the Philomathesian Literary 
Society on the new campus. I he first vice-president 
and program chairman was Charles Richards. 

At the bi-monthly meetings, members heard 
.such guest speakers as Dr. David Smiley in a 
review of literature. A dual purpose of gaining a 
broader view of literary and musical topics and of 
developing better speaking abilities was accom- 
plished through member participation on programs. 
I he big features of the year were the speaking 
contests between the Phi's and the l.u's for the 
coveted cup. Just before summer vacation. Phi 
members held their spring banquet and aired their 
after-dinner speaking accomplishments. 







Euzelian 



I u/.clian Literary Society, older 
of the two literary groups, met 
every other Wednesday night to 
give opportunities to all interested 
in forensics. Sueh student-planned 
programs as mock debates, informal 
discussions, dramatic readings, and 
extemporaneous speaking stimulated 
greater interest in the literary 
fields. Highlights of the year's 
activities were the two Founder's 
Day meets, which brought together 
the I Us and their old-time rivals. 
the Phi's, in verbal battles for 
individual and society awards. Dur- 
ing the tall, the Eu's won the 
Society Trophy for the second 
straight time, l.arrv \\ illiams was 
the first semester president, and 
Sam Harvey presided during the 
spring semester. 




Larry Williams, president of Euzelian Soi 




Djud Hir.vw. Student Body 
president; lr.lder m campus 
life and in religious activities. 




Bill Starling, outstanding in 

campus affairs; vice-presi- 
dent of Student Body and 
ODK. 



Kitty Booth, Co -Editor of 
Howler; cheerleader; active 
in WGA; versatile campus 
leader. 






Walt Ward. Senior Class Presiden 
campus politics and student gove 

Dee Hughes, outstanding m 
scholarship and leadership; 
chief majorette; Magnolia 
Court Queen. 


,- outstanding h 

nment activities 






«tt 


SENIORS 







Lloyd Prcslar. Editor of 
"Old Gold and Black" and 
'55 Handbook; President of 
Publications Board. 




49 




Walt Ward, Preside! 





Aim Kitclim, Santa 



Km Hill, Vice-President 



SENIORS: FIRST CLASS TO GRADUATE FROM NEW CAMPUS 



The Senior Class did not rest on its laurels tor 
being the- first class to graduate from the new 
campus; they busied themselves immediately and 
gave the students fun and food at the Fall Carnival. 
In the spring they made themselves guests of honor 
at several "Exclusively Senior's" parties. When 



the time came for electing the Ten Outstanding 
Seniors, it was indeed difficult to narrow the list. 
The Class of '57 gave more than the traditional 
gift to the school they gave their leadership, 
friendship, and scholastic achievement for four 
vears. 



first row: 

John Howard Abernathy, B.A. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
David Watson Adcock, B.B.A. 
Robert M. Allen, Jr., B.B.A. 



John Matthews Arnold, B.S. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Physics Honoi 



Fuquay Springs 
Winston-Salem 



Chalybeate Springs 



Larry Hugh Austin, B.A. Charlotte 

Delta Sigma Phi; Delta Kappa Alpha; Band; Mars Hill College 1,2. 

Don R. Averitte, B.S. Fayetteville 

SiKiiKi Phi Epsilon; Phi Epsilon Kappa. Treasurer 4; Senior Intra- 



mural Ma 
and Ue 



uuials; "Who's Who in American Colleges 



50 




SENIORS 



first rttir: 

A. Larry Aydlett, B.A. Durham 

Delta Sigma Phi; R.O.T.C.; Rifle Team 1, 3; Alpha Phi Omega, 

Treasurer 2. 3. President 4. 



Patricia Anne Barbour, B.B.A. 
Walter Shepherd Barge, B.A. 



Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4. Pn 
dent 3; Scabbard and Bl 
mittee 4; Drill Team 3; 
Universities"; Regi 



Winston-Salem 

sident 3, 4; Rho Tau Sigma 3, 4, Presi- 
de 3, 4; Chairman Military Ball Com- 

■ Who's Who in American Colleges and 

1 Commander R.O.T.C. 4. 



Sally Patterson Barge, B.A. Winston-Salem 

(dee Club 1. 2; Church Choir 1. 2; W.G.A ; Women's Honoi 
Council; Howler 3; Phi Alpha Theta 4; Future Teachers of 
America 4. 

Velma Ann Barlow, B.S. Kannapolis 

Band 1. 2, 3, 4; W.R.A., President 4, Secretary 3; Intramural 
Manager 3, 4; Physical Education Major's Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Publicity 
Chairman 2, Treasurer 3; Strings 3, 4; Social Standards 4; Mari- 



Thomas L. Barnes, 



Buie's Creek 



Billy Ray Barnes, B.S. Landis 

Football. All American 4; Baseball; Monogram Club; Sigma Phi 

Kpsilon. 



Bob Bartholomew, B.S. Rocky Mount 

Kappa Alpha I, 2, 3, 1; Football 1, 2. 3, I. All American 3, 4. Most 
Valuable Player 3. 

Lloyd F. Baucom, B. S. Marshville 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1. 2, 3, 4; "Old Gold and Black" 1, 2. 3; Scab- 
bard and Blade 3, 4; International Relations Club 2, 3; Phi Delta 
Phi 4; Student Bar Association 4. 

Mary Denise Baxter, B.S. Hopewell, Va. 

Band 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2; Canterbury Club 1, 4; W.R.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Westminster Fellowship 2, 3; Tennis Champ 3; Badminton 3; 
Woman's Government, Junior Representative, President 4; Little 
Theater 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2; ■Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities" 4; Tassels 3, 4; White Jackets: Kappa 
Mu Epsilon, 2. 3, 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Rodney G. Beals, B.A. Goldsboro 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1. 2. 3, 4, President 4; B.S.U. Council 3, Ex- 
tension Captain 4; Student Honor Council, Secretary 4; State 
Student. Legislatue 4; Tennis 1, 3. 

Virginia Anne Beatty, B.A. Spindale 

W.R.A. 1, 2; Y.W.A. 1. 2, 3. 4; Officer 4, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Touring Choir 2, 3, 4; French Club 2, 3, 4, Officer 2, 4; WFDD 3, 
4, Staff Librarian, Announcer; Rho Tau Sigma; Sociology Club 
3; Future Teachers of America. 



Wingate 
esident 4: Intramural 1, 2. 3, 4. 



George W. Beck, B.S. 

Sigma Chi. Pledge Trainer 3, Vii 

Claude J. Benner, B.A. Raeford 

Theta Chi; Eta Sigma Phi; Phi Alpha Theta; B.S.U.; College 
Choir; Touring Choir; Intramurals; Student Government. 




f I P <** €% 





**r» 




kdik 



George P. Bunn, B.B.A. 


( lastalia 


Louis A. Burney, B.A. 


Wilmington 


Paul Burns, B.B.A. 


Roxboro 


Kappa Upha 1, 2. :;, 1: [ntramural Golf Chi 


mp 1. 


seventh row: 




William D. Burns, B.S. 


Belmont 


Kappa Sigma; Biology Assistant; Intramura 


s. 


Joe Howard Burt, B.S. 


Enfield 


Alpha Epsilon Delta; Beta Beta Beta. Sigmi 


CI,.; Varsity Tennis; 


Monogram Club 




Edward Gilbert Burroughs, B.S. 


Winston-Salem 


Physics Honor Society, Secretary-Treasurer 


Choir. 



Frank A. Bennet, B.B.A. 
Kappa Sigma; Scabbard ai 
Captain •'•!; All State Rifle 

Charles J. Biggers, B.S. 



Hannah B. Blackwell, B.A. 
Chapel Choir; Touring Choir; Y.W.A. Sigma l'i Alphi 
Kappa, Mars Hill College I. 2. 



Curtis H. Blackwell, B.B.A. 



Iiufhn 
ise Hill 



s Club; Scabbard and Blade; In 
Kitty E. Booth, B.A. Morganton 

Cheerleader 2. 3. 4: Howleb Editorial Staff 1. 2. Photography 
Editor 3, Co-Editor, 1; V.W.I; W.R.A.; 'Old Gold an. I Black" 
Staff I. 2; Publications Board t; Secretary I; Sigma l'i Alpha 3, -(; 
Phi Alpha Theta :!. 1; Future Teachers of America :',. 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Tassels. 3, Sec.-Treas., t Westminster Fellowship 3; 
Wesley 4; Concert I ture Committee 3; Strings 3, 1; House Presi- 
dent 4; Magnolia Court :i. I; l'i Kappa Alpha Dream Girl 2; "Who's 
Who in American Colleges ami Universities;" Phi Beta Kappa. 

third row: 

Dorothy Lynne Braddock, B.A. Morganton 

W.R.A.; Tennis Team 1; WFDD 2. Howleb 1; "Student,' 5 Asso- 
ciate Editor 2. Co-Editor 3; "Old Gold ami Black" Staff 1, 2, 3; 
Social Standards 3; Legislature 1, 3; Student Handbook Staff 3; 
"Strings" 2, 3; Publications Hoard 3; "Who's Who in American 

Colleges and Universities" 3; Woman's Handl k Editor 3; 

Magnolia Court 1, 2; Miss Wake Forest Summer Session 3, li.S.U. 
Choir. 

John H. Brantley, B.B.A. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Alpha Kapp 
2, 3; Basketball Manager 2, 3, 4; 

Willis M. Brickhouse, B.B.A. Aulander 

Delta Sigma Pi. 

fourth row: 

Mary Elise Bridger, B.S. Bladenboro 

St. Mary's College 1, 2; Howleb Staff 3, 4; "Old Gold and Black" 
Editorial Staff 3; Y.W.A. 3, 4; Sigma Pi Alpha 3, 4; Young Demo- 
crats Club 3, 4, Secretary 1; Student Social ( lommittee 4; S.O.P.H. 
I. Pledge Master 4; W HA 3. 4; College Theater 4. 

Franklin Britt, B.S. 



Raleigh 

4; Interfraternity Council 
;ram Club 2, 3, 4! 



Clu 



David D. Britt, B.A. 

Ministerial Conlerem 



lift I, 



Dorothy Jean Bryan, B.S. 

Y.W.A. ; W.R.A.; I'hilomathesian Society; 
Business Staff; "Student." Business Staff: 
Circulation Staff; Strings; Young Demo 

William W. Bryan, B.B.A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Thurman M. Bullock, Jr., B.S. 



umberto 

Ashevill 



Raleigh 
ib; Howlek 



•Old Gold and Bla 
rats Club. 



>ke Rapids 




52 



SENIORS 



first i 



Salem, X. J. 
ma Sigma Epsilo 



Vivian A. Butler, B.S. 

Beta Beta Beta 3; Little Theatre 1, 

3; Social Standards Committee 3; Y.W.A. 1. 2; W FDD 1 2. Con- 
tinuity Director2; B.S.U. 1. 2. 3; Sigma Chi Sweetheart 3; Howler 
3; The Musicians 1, 2, :i: Bowman Gray School of Medical Tech- 
nology 4. 



Clive Raymond Buttermere, B.A. 
Mars Hill College 1. 2: Ministerial Ci 



Asheville 
iference I. 2, 3, 4; B.S.U. 



Carolyn Lee Cabe, B.A. Canton 

Physical Education Major's Club 1, 2. :i, 4. Treasurer 1, 2. Social 
Chairman :i. 4; Tumbling Club 1. 2; W.Ii.A. 1. 2, :S. 4. Publicity 
Chairman :i ; Sociology Club 1. 2. :i. 4; Y.W.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Howlek. 

Miriam Allred Canipe, B.A. Winston-Salem 

Sigma Pi Alpha, Officer 4; W.R.A.; Honorary Varsitj Basketball, 
Tennis; B.S.U. Executive Council Secretary; Womens < lovernment, 
Freshman Representative, Treasurer. Secretary; "Who's Who in 
American ('"lieges and Universities"; Tassels. 



Mable Louise Cash, B.A. 
Mars Hill College 1,2: Sigma 
Club 4. 

Virginia Marietta Chamblee 
Sigma Pi Alpha. Secretary 

Teachers of America, Tresau 

sistant; Philomathesian Societ 

Betty Lou Chester, B.A. 

Mars Hill College 1, 2; B.S.U. 
Glee Club; Phi Beta Kappa 



Wilmington 
Pi Alpha A. 4; Religious Education 

Richmond. Ya. 
Treasurer, Vice-President ; Future 
rer; Y.W.A.; W.R.A.; English As- 
y; Sin. lent" Staff; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Lenoir 
; Y.W.A; W.R.A.; Sigma Pi Alpha; 



Robert D. Chester, B.A. Lenoir 

Ministerial Conference, President; B.S.U Council; Philomathesian 
Society; Photography Club. 



Ann Laurine Clark, B.A. Yadkinville 

French Club 3; "Student" Staff 3, 4; Sigma Pi Alpha :i. 4; Spanish 
Assistant 3, 4. 



Hilda Lane Clark, B.A. 



John T. Coates, B.B.A. 
Sigma Chi. 



George P. Coghill, B.B.A. 
Sigma Pi. 



Billy T. Collins, B.B.A. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Intramurals 



Richard L. Collins, B.A. 



Rocky Mount 






ft ft P £ k ? j? 



53 



SENIORS 



Robert Joseph Cook, B.A. Avon Park, Fla 

B.S.U.; Eta Sigma Phi; Ministerial Conference. 



Joseph T. Crawley, B.B.A. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



William S. Coppedge, B.A. Rocky Mouut 

ThetaChi, First Guard 4, Librarian, Assistant Treasurer 3. 



Bobby Lloyd Crook, B.S. 
Theta Chi, First Guard 1. 



Clarence L. Corbett, B.A. 
Phi Epsilon Kappa 



Roy B. Costner, B.B.A. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon I. 2, 3, I: Ban, I 1, 2, 3, 1. 



Allan Jack Cottrell, B.S. Pfafftown 

Alpha Sigma Phi I, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Alumni Secretary 4, 
[nterfraternity Council 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Seahliani and Blade 
4; Student Party Treasurer 3, 4; Intramurals. 



Joe Henry Crump, B.B.A. Hickory 

Delta Sigma Pi, Vice-President I; Theta Chi; Intramurals. 

Francis H. Crumpler, B.A. Roanoke Rapids 

Ministerial Conference 1. 2, 3, 4; B.S. If. Council 3; Philomathesian 
Society, 4; 

Earl D. Crumpler, B.A. 



Roanoke Rapids 



Joe Badgett Currin, B.S. Roxboro 

Beta Beta Beta; Pi Kappa Alpha; Gamma Sigma Epsilon; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta; Young Democrats Club; Intramurals. 



Thomas D. Council, B.S. 



T. Jefferson Covington, B.B.A. Wadesboro 

Sigma Pi; Interfraternity Council, President :i. 



Louise Clark Curry, B.S. 



Winston-Salem 



W.R.A. 1, 2, 3, Vice-President 2; Whit.- Jackets I, 2, 3; Glee 
Club 1. 2; College Theatre 1, 2, 3, Beta Beta Beta 3; Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon 3; Social Standards Committee I, 2; Y.W.A. 1, 2; 
German Club 1. 2; B.S.U. 1, 2, .'(; Howler 2; The Musicians 1, 2, 
3; Tumbling Club 1. 2; Bowman Gray School of Medical Tech- 
nology 4. 




first row: 

Charles H. Doggett, B.B.A. 
Kappa Alpha I, 2, 3, 4; Golf Team 1; Wre 


rtling Te 


Grei 
mi Ca] 


nsbon 
tain 3 


James E. Douthitt 




Brys 


n Cit\ 


Simon M. Downs, Jr., B.S. 
Theta Chi, Treasurer 2, Chaplin 2. Histor 
Cluli 1 ; Choir 4. 


in 3; Ba 


nd 1: ( 


lantoi 


C. Clark Drake, B.S. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 




Kai 


napoli 


David Jerry Drum, B.A. 
Sigma Pi Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4. Secretary 


i; Band 


A 
I, 2, 3 


shevilli 
West 



Erastus J. Durham, Jr., B.S. Roarii 

Sigma l'hi Epsilon; Young Democrats Club; Intramural 

third row: 



ig Hi 



I Iku 



Charles D. Edwards, B.A. 

Delta Kappa Alpha 3, 4, President 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4. Vice- 
President 4; Band 1, 2. 3, 4. Vice-President 4; B.S.U Executive 
Council; Eta Sigma Phi 2. 3, 4: l'hi Beta Kappa 

Donald E. Edwards, B.B.A. Rocky Mount 

Kappa Alpha, Scabbard and Blade. 

Wade L. Edwards 



Beta Beta Beta. Alpha Epsilo 
3; Square and Compass Club 



i Delta, Biology Lab As 
Intramurals 2, 3. 



William G. Egerton, B.B.A 
Margaret Feeney, B.S 



stant 2, 



dilda 



Charlotte 
Beta Beta Beta"; 'W.R.A. 1. 2: "Old Cold and Black" 2. 3; West- 
minster Fellowship. Secretary-Treasurer: Biology Assistant 2, 3; 
Bowman Gray School of Medical Technology 4. 



Edward E. Ferguson, B.A 

l'hi Alpha The 
Delta Kappa 
Beta Kappa. 



1 la\ clock 
mathesian Society; Ministerial Conference; 
I'res. 4; Kappa Eta Xu; Intramurals; Phi 



mth B.,st, .n. Vi 
[■rack 3, 4; Intel 



fifth row: 

Carroll D. Ferrell, B.A. 

Cross Country 3, 4; Indoor Track 3, 4: Oi 
national Relations Club. 

Marjorie E. Fisher, B.S. Rockwell 

Alpha Kpsilon Delta; Beta Beta Beta 3. 4. Secretary 4; Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon 3, 4; Philomathesian Society, Secretary 2. Vice- 
President 3; International Relations Club, Vice-President 4; 
W.R.A.; V W A : German Assistant; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Gloria B. Flippin, B.S. Pilot Mountain 

Alpha Kpsilon Delta 2. 3, 4. Historian 3, Secretary 4; Beta Beta 
Beta 3, 4. Historian 4; Gamma Sigma Kpsilon 3, 4; Sigma Pi 
Alpha 3, 4: Tassels 4; Howi.kr Staff 3, 4. Assistant Editor 4: 
"Old Gold and Black" Circulation 3; French Club; Band 1, 2; 
W.< i A. Summer 1,3; B.S.U. Executive Council. Secretary Summer 
1. 3: Physics Cluli 2; Y.D.C.; Phi Beta Kappa. While Jackets, 




55 




Douglas B. Curtis, B.B.A. 

Richard A. Daniels 

Football 1. 2, 3, 4; Track 2. 

Gordon M. Davis, B.S. 



Smith Portland, Maine' 
4; Monogram Club. 



Robert L. Davis, B.S. Wadesboro 

Sigma Pi. President :!. 4; Kappa Mu Kpsilon 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 4: Scabbard and Blade 3, 4. 



Akron, Ohio 
3, 4; B.S.U. 1; WFDD 2, 3; 



Phillip L. Deaton, B.S. 

International Relations Club 1, 
Debate 1: Intramurals 1, 2. 

Shirley Burrus Dilthey, B.A. Thomasville 

Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2. 3, 4j Future Teachers of America 4; SOPH. 




sixth row: 
William E. Gray 



Daylon T. Greene, B.A. 
Ministerial Conference; Pi 



m-Salem 
rig Hope 



Albert O. Griffin, B.S. Winston-Salem 

Tennis Team, Alpha Epsilon Delta 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 4. 



seventh row: 

John J. Groff, B.A. Reidsville 

Jack Norman Grose, B.B.A. Winston-Salem 

Delta Sigma Phi, President 4: WFDD Announcer 4; Delta Sigma 
Pi; Mar.- Hill College I, 2; Intramurals 3, I: Rho Tau Sigma. 

Caryl Joy Guth, B.S. Elkin 

Alpha Epsilon Delta; Beta Beta Beta; Kappa Mu Epsilon; W If A ; 
Intramurals Chi Sigi Magnolia Festival 3; H S I\ Greater Council; 
V.W.A ; Religious Empha.-i- V\ ock ( •„„„„iit,,. :!; ('.-Chief Chapel 
Monitor 1; Mars II ill I, 2; White Jackets; B.S.TJ I utension Team 
3; B.S.U Choir; Archery Champion; W.H \ Vice-President 1. 



first row: 

Howard C. Fodrie, B.S. Beaufori 

President Sophomore Class; Student Legislature 2; Student ( 'ounril 
3; Lambda Chi Alpha; Inter-fraternity Council 3; Intramurals 
1. 2, 3, 4; Freshman Baseball; Euzelian Society; Alpha Phi Omega' 
"Old Cold and Black" 1, 2, 3; Little Theatre 1; Orientation Com- 

Joseph Harold Fortenberry, B.S. Start ex S C 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Phillip Ann Gardner, B.A. Roanoke Va 

Hollins College 1, 2: Chapel Choir 3, 4; B.S.U. Choir 3, 4; Social 
Standards Committee 3; German Club 3, 4; B.S.U. Executive 
Council 3. 4; Extension Teams 2, 3, 4; East Dorm President 4; 
W.R.A. 2. 3, 4; Orientation Committee 4; Magnolia Opera 2, 3, 4; 
Student. Buildings and Grounds Committee 4. 

Robert D. Garren, B.S. \sheville 

Tennis Team 1, 2, :i, 4; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4. Treasurer I: 
Monogram Club 3, 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 3. 

Frank E. Garver, B.S. Shelby 

University of North Carolina 1, 2; Delta Kappa Alpha. 

Martha Cook Gentry, B.A. Moultrie Ga 

W.R.A. 1, 2, 3; V.W.A. 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Debate Team 1; Howler 
Editoral Staff 1; Little Theatre 1. 2, 3, 4; So.aal Standard Com- 
mittee 2, 3, 4; Pi Kappa Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4; 
Alpha Psi Omega, Secretary 3, 4; Legislature 3; Alpha Sigma 
Sweetheart 4; S.O.P.H. 4; "Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities" 4; Chapel Committee 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

third row: 



Marvin D. Gentry, B.S. 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Vice-1 



King 
ident 3, President 4; Physics Society 4. 
Jon Gerdes, B.S. Wilmington 

Basketball Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Track Team 2; Cross Country 2, 3; 
Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2. 3, 4; "Student" Business Staff 3:' Inter- 
national Relations Club 2, 3; Gamma Sigma Epsilon. 



Jacob L. Gerrald, B.A. 

Ministerial Conference: 



Future Teache 



Galivants Ferry, S. C. 
i of America. 



Union, S. ('. 



Oxford 
ion Council: Ministerial Con- 



John A. Gerring, B.S. 

Monogram Club; Sigma Chi; Go 
Paul G. Gillespie, B.A. 

Delta Kappa Alpha; B.S.U. Mil 

fcrence: Mars Hill College 1, 2. 

James R. Gilley, B.B.A. Winston-Salem 

Monogram Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

fifth row: 

Sylvia M. Gilley, B.S. Winston-Salem 

Physical Education Major's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vicc-Prcid.-nt 4: 
W.R.A. 1, 2, 3, I, Softball 1, 2, 3. 4, Volleyball 1, 2. 3. Basketball 
1, 2, 3. 4, Tennis 1, 2, 3. 4. Archery 4, Table Tennis Champ 2. 3; 
Student. Council 2; Secretary of Freshman Class: Eta Sigma 




SENIORS 



first row: 

Walton Bell Guthrie, Jr., B.B.A. 
College Theatre; WFDH. 

Glenn H. Hagerty 

Boyce R. Haigler 

Ann Mason Hardy, B.S. 



Duquesne, Pa. 

Pageland, S. C 

La Grange 



Beta Beta Beta; W.RjV.; Y.W.A.; Bowman Gray School of Medical 
Technology 4. 



Jimmie T. Harris, B.A. Raleigh 

Ministerial Conference 4; Intramurals :i, 4; Intramural Manager 4. 



Albert Ray Hartness, B.S. Statesvil 

Beta Beta Beta 3. 4; Gamma Sigma Epsilon 3, 4; Alpha Epsilo 
Delta 2, 3, I; WFDD 1, 2; German Club 1, 2. 



Judith A. Harvell, B.A. Wallace 

Religious Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y.W.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
4: B.S.C. Greater Council 4; Eta Sigma Phi :s, 4. 



John H. Hasty, B.A. 

Kappa Alpha; WFDD An 



Edna Hawkins, B.S. 



Charlotte 
Talent Show. 



Kappa Mu Epsilon 3, I. Secretary 1; Delta Kappa Xu 4; Futur 
Teachers of America I; W R A I: V W A ; Mars Hill I. 2. 



Mary Adeline Hawkins, B.S. Lenoir 

Mars Hill College I. 2; Physical Education Major's Club 3, I. 
Secretary 3, President I; Maritimers 4; W.R.A. 3, 4; Intramurals 
3, 4; Future Teachers of America 



James H. Hayes, B.B.A. 
Delta Sigma Phi, Treasu 



James R. Hayes, B.S. 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Jane Lewis Hebel, B.S. 
B.S.U. Choir: Kappa IN 



Harold A. Hedgecock, B.S. 



North \Vilk.-sl„ 



I; Intramurals 



Raleigh 



Martinsville, V: 



Sigma Chi; Choir I. 2, :i, I; College Male Quartet 3; Touring 
Choirii. 4: Officer's Club 3; B.S.U. 













Richard M. Henderson, B.B.A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi Secretary; Philomathesian 
Choir; Glee Club; Male Octet; Male Quartet; 

Helen Ruth Hendrix, B.S. 

Business Staff WFDD I, 2, Manager 2; Math 
"Student" Staff 1; Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, I; K 
2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Rho Tau Sigma 3, 4, S 
Club 3; Future Teachers of America 3; Dean 
1, 2; V'.W A 2; B.S V Choir 2 

Robert C. Hensley, B.S. 



SENIORS 


second row: 






Society; Touring 
"Messiah " 


Kenneth Hill, B.S. 

Kappa Alpha; Vice-President Sen 
President; Kami 1, 2, it, 4; Suinn 
Legislature; Legislature Member, 


ir ('las 
i II. ,i 


Ocala, Fla. 
; B.S.U. Council Vice- 
II Council; Chaplin of 


Charlotte 


William M. Hill, B.S. 




Louisburg 


appa Mu Epsilon 
■cretan 3; French 
b List 3; W l: A 


Edwin Kendell Hines, B.B.A. 




Winston-Salem 



Ash, 



Darlene Herman, B.A. Kannapi 

( Iheerleader 2, 3, t; "Old ( lold and Black" Staff 1 . 2. 3, I; "Studei 
3; WFDD 2. 3; W K A I. 2, 3, 4; Y.W A ; Student Chapel Co 
mittee 3; Little Theatre 2; W.G.A. I, 2. 3, 4; Band I 



Roger W. Herrmann, B.A. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; WFDD; Intra 

Owen F. Herring, III, B.A. 

Vice-Presidenl Student Body 3; 
Council I, WFDD 1, 2, 3; B.S.U. 

Barbara Hill, B.A. 
Little Theatre, Hist 



Pittsburg, Kai 
ter; Cheerleade 



"Student," Edit. 



Kannapolis 
i 3; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4; Philomathesian 
Society I, 2, Critic 2. W.R.A Vice-Presidenl 3; Religious Edu- 
cation Club, Vice-President, President 3 ; Ilmvi.KH Business 
Staff 3; "Old Gold and Black" Circulation 2, 3, I; Glee Club 3, 4; 
B.S.U. Council 2, 3; "Strings" 2, 3, 4. Social Chairman I 



Jim Darrell Hinson, B.A. Trinity 

Cullom Ministerial Conference, President 4; Senior Men's Honor 
Council 4; Alpha Phi Omega Chaplain 4. Secretary 3; Rho Tau 
Sigma 3, 4. Treasurer; WFDD I, 2, 3, 4, Announcer 1. 2. 3, 4. 
News Editor 4; College Traveling ( Ihoir 1 ; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; B.S.U. 
Council 4; Religious Emphasis Week Committee 3. 



David Y. Hirano, B.A. 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, I; Tom in 
1, 2. 3; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4; 
Chairman; Philomathesian Li 
Blade, 2nd Lt. 3, 4; Vice-Pn 
dent Junior Class; Student 
American Colleges and Oniv, 

Emily Kate Hockaday, B.S. 
Campbell College I, 2. 



Honolulu, Hav 
3, 4; College Thea 
ive Council 4. Vespi 



Delta Kappa 4. 
Creedmoor 



Josephine Holcomb, B.A. Favetteville 

Sigma Pi Alpha 1,2, 3, 4; Pi Kappa Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Social Standards 
2, 3; Y.W.A. 1, 2; Philomathesian Society 1, 2, 3; Debate 1, 2; 
German Club 1, 2; International Relations Club 1, 2; Student 
Assistant in German and History Departments; B.S.U. 1, 2; 
W.R.A. I, 2; Phi Beta Kappa. 




first row: 

Eleanor Elizabeth Hurt, B.A. 
Delta Kappa Mu, Secretary 
Maritimers 4; Future Teachei 

Suzanne Husky. B.S. 

Y W A. 1, 2, 3; W I! A 1. 2 
Strings. 

Jimmie Icard, B.A. 



Rockv Mount 
Howler Photography Staff 2; 
I America; Y.W A ; Strings 3, 4. 



ipolvi 



Lloyd F. Jackson, B.A. Jacksonville 

Sara Dunreath Jarrat, B.A. Fast Bend 

Kuzelian Society, Young Democrats Club; German Club 2; Music 
Assistant 4; Glee Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Little Theatre 1, 2. 3, 4; West- 
minster Fellowship 1. 2, 3, 4; Touring Choir 1. 2. 3, 4; Alpha Psi 
( Imega 

Robert S. Jeffords, B.A. Germanton 

Theta Chi, Secretary 2. Vice-President :i. President 4; Interfra- 
ternitv Council •'!. 4; Secretary 4. "Old Gold and Black" Business 
Staff 1, 2, Business Manager 3; Orientation Committee I; Young 
Democrats Club 2, :); Sociology Club 3; Philomathesian Society 
1 ; Kta Sigma Phi. 

third row: 

M. Carol Jennette, B.A. Westminster, Md. 

Sweetheart of Sigma Chi 4; Student Government, Legislature 2. 
Student Orientation Committee 2. Calendar Committee 4: Build- 
ings and ( [rounds Committee 1; Magnolia Court 2. 3, 1: I Iheerleadei 
1. 2, 3, 4; W.G A.; Dorm President 4; (dee Club I. 2. :i, 4: Touring 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Four Flats 1, 2. :!: W.R.A.; Intramural White 
Jacket 1, 2. 3, 4; Tumbling Team 2; Little Theatre; B.S 1'. Execu- 
tive Council, Publicity Director 4: Philomathesian Societv 1. 4; 
Eta Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4; Maritimers 4; -Who's Who in American 
('..lieges and Universities." 



Edward J. Jennings, B.B.A. 


Galax, Va. 


Joseph Bryan Johnson 


Greens o 


fourth row: 




Clyde F. Jones, Jr., B.B.A. 

Kappa Sigma; Young Democrats Club: 1 
Club 


Siler City 
iiieriiati.inal Relations 


Fred Jones 


( Ireensboro 


Noah Wilson Jones 




fifth row: 




William E. Jones, B.A. 

Gardner-Webb ('..liege 1, 2; Ministerial C 
Philomathesian Society 4: German Club; 


Hendersonville 

.mere 3, 4; B.S.U.; 

nternationa] Relations 


Club; Intramurals 3, 4. 




Walter E. Jordon, Jr. 


Raleigh 


William C. Keith, B.S. 


Elizabethtown 



Kappa Sigma; Beta Beta Beta; Biology Assistant. 





Wilkes Richard Holcomb, Jr., B.B.A. Fsyet 

Sigma Pi; Delta Sigma Pi :;. 1, Philomathesian Literary Society 
2, 3, 4. Treasurer 3, R.O.T.C Drill Platoon 2. Color Guard 2. 3 

Dale Voss Holland, B.B.A. Germanton 

Appalachian State Teacher's College 1; Business Manager Student 



4; Pul.l 



Bo 



.1 :i. 1; Delta Sigma l'i :i, 4; Theta Chi. 



William James Horn, B.A. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Footba 
seventh row: 



Shi 



I. 2, 



4 Baseba 



:i. 4. 



Chester Harris Howe, B.A. 

Kappa Sigma. Sec 2; Cant. 



Sm Di.go 7. Calif, 
bury Club, President 4; Chapel Choir; 
•simian Orientation Com :i: Student Calendai 
Com Chairman 4: B.S I". Executive Council 4. 

Garnette DeFord Hughes, B.A. Ahoskie 

Student Body See 4: W.G.A. 4; Soci 1 Standards Chairman 4; 
Tassels 4. Vice-Pres. 4; Majorette 2. :i 4. Chief 4; Freshman and 
Junior Class Sec.; Student Legislature Sec . o : Freshman Orientation 
Com. 4; Sigma Pi Alpha; French Club: Glee Club; Touring Choir; 
Religion-in-Lil'e Week Com. 1, :S, English Asst. 2; French Assl 3, 
4: "Who's Who"; Magnolia Court 1, 2. 3, 4. Maid of Honor :i. 
Queen 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Jean Elizabeth Hurst, B.A. Durham 

Spanish Assist. 2, :!. 4; Sigma Pi Alpha Program Chmin. 4; Phi 
Alpha Theta Secretary :•;. Historian 4: FT. A. :i, 4: 'Student" 4; 
W.R.A, 1, 2; Y.W.A. 1. 2. 




I. 



Lucia Ricardo Lambert, B.S. Albemarle 

Flora Macdonald College I, 2; Kappa Mu Epsilon 1; VV.R.A. 3, 



Mary Leona Lamm, B.A. Boiling Springs 

Sigma I 'i Alph'i 3, I: Touring Choir 3, 1; Glee Club 3, -I: H.S.I'. 

Gary A. Langhorst, B.A. Oakland, Calif. 

( l, rlotte College 1,2; Lambda Chi Alpha 3, I: WFDD Staffs, I; 
Assistant Station Manager I: Ministerial Conference 3, I: [tho 
Tau Sigma 3 I 



seventh row 

Thera Ann Lanier, B.A. 
Hubert Eddis Lanier 
Ronald Laurin 



Bruce A. Ketner B.S. 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Secretarj 


Rockwell 
: Gamma Sigma Epsilon. 


William D. Ketner, B.S. 


Rockwell 
a Sigma Phi. 


Carolyn E. Killian, B.A. 
B.S.U. Council; Christian Ed 


Statesvttle 
ication and Service Club, President 1. 


Joseph H. Killian, B.A. 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Paul Killian, B.S. 

Kappa Alpha; Student Legisl 
Traffic Commission; Electioi 


Franklin 
iture; Beta Beta Beta, Vice-President; 

s ('(ininiitt.ee; Biology Assistant. 


Frederick Ray Kinder, B.A. 
Wrestling 3. 


Warwick, Va. 



third row: 

Jo Ann King, B.A. Moncks I !orner, S. ( '. 

V.W A I. 2, 3, 1; W.I! A 1,2,3, 4; Tri Pi; College Choir 1, 2,3.4; 
Woman's Government Association, Corresponding Secretary 3, 
Vice-President t; Christian Education Club I, 2, 3; Euaelian 
Literary Society 3; B S.U. Choir I. 2. 3, 4; B.S.U. Executive 
( louncil, Secretary 4; Big Sister 2, 

Nancy Harolyn King, B.S. St. George, S, C, 

Gamma Sigma Epsilon 2. 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Kappa 
Mu Epsilon 2. 3, 4. Secretary 3, Hist,, Han 4; Physics Honor Society 
2. 3, I, Vice-President I; German Club 1, 2: College Theater 2, 3, 
I; \\ I! A I; Treasurer W.G.A. Summer 1954; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Hugh Phillip King Durham 

fourth row: 

Joyce Broadwell Kingman, B.A. Winston-Salem 

College Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4. Business Manager 4: Howler Pho- 
tography Staff 3; Y.W. A. 1, 2, 3; Sociology Club 3; Future Teachers 
of America 3; W.R.A. I. 2. :',; Big Sister 2, 3; Magnolia Festival 
2. 3; Student Legislature 4. 

Alexander B. Kingman, B.B.A. Winston-Salem 

University ol Massachusetts: W FDD 3; Alpha Kappa Psi; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, Social Chairman 3; Intramurals 2, 3, 4. 

Colvin L. Kirkman, B.A. Liberty 

fifth row: 

Margaret Ann Kitchin, B.A. Maxton 

Y.W. A., Secretary 3; W.R.A. ; Delta Kappa Nu, Social Chairman 
:'<, President 4; Future Teachers of America; Student. Legislature; 
Secretary Senior Class; Howler Staff; Strings; WFDD Staff. 



Jack Kenneth Ladner, B.S. 

Track 2, 3, 1; Football 2. 3, I: Phi Epi 
President 4; Monogram Club 2, 3, 4; " 



Martha R. Lamb, B.S. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kappa, Historian 4, 
i's Who in American 




SENIORS 



Dick R. Lavender. B.S. 
Intramural Basketball; Beta Beta Beta, Re 
3, President 1. 



Robert L. McColl, B.A. 
Ministerial Conference 



Raeford 
Club; Sunday School Class 



Bob W. Lawing, B.A. Gastonia 

Sigma Chi; President I 

Barbara Ledbetter, B.A. Winston-Salem 

Glee Club 1. 2, :i, 4, Treasurer 2: Touring Choir I. 2. :i. 4; Church 
Choir 1,2,3, 4: B.S.U. Choir 4; Opera Workshop 1,2,3, 4; < lerman 
Club 1; College Theatre 2. 3, 4. Secretary 4; Philomathesian Liter- 
ary Society 3; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4; Sigma Pi Alpha 3, 4; Social 

Standards Commitl 1: B.S.U. Musi,' Director Summer l!)5li, 

Tassels. 

William F. Lee, B.B.A. Rocky Mount 

Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Drill Team; Intramural Sports. 

Tucker R. Littleton, B.A. Swansboro 

Eta Sigma Phi; Beta Beta Beta; Phi Beta Kappa. 



J. Lawrence McCollough, B.A. Durht 

Alpha Phi Omega; Scabbard and Blade; College Chapel Chi 



George M. McDaniel, Jr., B.B.A. 

Delta Sigma Pi, Secretary 



Ardell H. McDonald, Jr.. B.A. 



Jack McGinley, B.S. 

Sigma Chi; Baseball; Phi Epsilon K 
Intramurals. 



Morehead Cit\ 



Blackwood, \. J. 



Marianne Long, B.A. Winston-Salem 

W.G.A.; Town Representative 4; College Theater 4; Y.W.A 
:i, 4, Town Representative 4; Christian Education and Service 
Club :S; (dee Club :i: Touring Choir :i; B.S I' Choir I; Mars Hill 
College 1. 2. 



Rosalin Louise Mcllwain, B.A. Hilton. S. C. 

Future Teachers ol America; Young Democrats Club; ■did Gold 
and Black" Circulation Staff; Phi Alpha Theta; Sigma Pi Alpha; 



Charles Emory McCall, B.S. Lenoir 

Sigma Chi Social Fraternity; Alpha Epsilon Delia; Beta Beta 
Beta. President; Kappa Mn Epsilon; Gamma Sigma Epsilon; 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



Isaac A. Mel. am, Jr., B.A. Marioi 

Band; Orchestra; B.S.U.; .Ministerial Conference; Delta Kappi 
Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa. 




f> r 





first row. 




SENIORS 


second row: 






Joanne McMillan, B.S. 




Greensboro 


Jocelyn Gail Martin, B.A. 




Zebulon 


Flora Macdonald College 1, 2; Ka 
Y'.W.A. 3, Program Chairman 4 
i; The "Student" 3, 4; "Old Gold a 
Of America 3, 1; Math Assistant 1 


ipa Mu E 

W 1! A 
a.l Black" 


isilon 3, President 1; 
3, Social Chairman 
3, 4; Future Teacher 


Mars Hill 1, 2: Sigma 1'i Alph 
Club :). 4; Social Chairman 4. 

Ray D. Mauney 


i; Y.W.A 


.; Religious Education 
CherryviUi 


Donald Russell McNair, B.S. 




Windsor 








Ann Penny Madison, B.A. 




Raleigh 


Norris Wesley Mayberry 




Wilkesborc 


Kappa Mu Epsilon; B.S.U.; Gli 
Education Club 2, :<; Euzelian Soi 
Dance Club. 


■ Club 2 
iety, Mer 


Y.W.A.; Religious 
< lit li College 1, Folk 


Frank E. Medford, B.S. 




Hampton, Va 



Jonesvillc 



Kay Louise Madison, B.S. 

Mars Hill College 1. 2; Delta Kappa \u :;. I. Vice-President :{, 4; 
Christian Education and Service Club :•',. 4. Publicity- Chairman I: 
Thr "Student" Circulation Staff :i; B.S.U. Executive Council I 



Anne Bynum Marshall, B.B.A. 



Joe I. Marshall, B.B.A. 



Ernest Haywood Marshburn, B.A. 



Ministerial Confe 
Theatre3; Intram 
Team 4. 



Philomathesian Society 1. 2; College 
2, :i, 4; llS.l".; Maritime™ 4; Swimming 



Theta Chi Assistant Treasurer; Alpha Epsilon Delta; Kappa Mu 
Epsilon; Beta Beta Beta; Chemistry Assistant. 



George G. Miller, Jr., B.S. Siler City 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1.2, :t, t; M .cram Club :t, 4; Baseball 1.2, :t, I. 



Janice Lola Miller, B.A. Statesville 

Christian Education and Service Club; Y.W.A. 



Joe T. Millsaps, B.A. Winston-Salem 

Sophomore Class President; Junior Class President; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. President :t; B.S.U. Council :i; Orientation Chairman 4; 
State Student Legislature 2, 3, 4. 







Jack Murdock, B.S. Raleigh 

Basketball 1. 2, :i. 4; Monogram 2. 3, 4. President 4; Honor Council 

2, 3; Treasurer Student Body 4. "Who's Who in American Colleges 
:iml I'liivcrsities" 4; < tmieron Delta Kappa 4; I'lii Epsilon Kappa 

3. 4; Orientation Committee 4. 



Oren Eugene Muse, B.B. A. C 
Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Psi. 


iarlotti 


Dewey R. Myers, B.A. Portsmoi 
Sociologj Club; WFDD Sports Staff; Intramurals. 


Ih. Va 


second row: 

Raymond C. Needham, B.A. St 
Eta Sigma Phi; Delta Kappa Alpha. 


inevilli 


Jane Norton, B.S. Arling 
Chapel Choir 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Caiilerl.ur> Club 1. 


on, Va 


Paul S. Odom, B.A. 

Ministerial Conference, Choirster, Vice-President. 


1 lu-.i t 


third row: 




Eddie Mac Page 


llahla\ 


Janet C. Parker, B.A N 
Greensboro College 1. Glee Club 2, 3, t. Touring Choir 
Young Democrats Club 2. 3; "Old Cold and Black" Cir 
Staff 3; Sociology Club 2. 3; Strings 2, :i, 4. President 4 
Teachers ol America 4: W.R.A. 2, 3, 4. 


» Ben 

2. 3, 4 
■ulatioi 

Future 



Eckner B. Pearce, B.B. A. 



fourth row 

Larry A. Pearce, B.S. Salemburg 

Delta Sigma Phi; Glee Club; Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities"; Alpha Epsilon Delta; Beta Una Beta. Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon Howleb 1. 2. Editor 3; "Old Cold and Black" 
2; Student Handbook Committee. 



Lois Faye Pearce, B.A. 

Sociology Club 3; Future Teachers of America 1 

William R. Pearce, B.S. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Vice-President; College Chi 
dent 4; Opera Workshop. 



Mante 



Wende 
1 . 2, 3, 4. Pies 



fifth row: 

Shirley Leona Peele, B.A. Lewiston 

Y.W.A.; W.R.A.; French Club; Sociology Club; WFDD; Future 
Teachers of America; Strings. 

Mary George Pennell, B.A. Asheville 

Mars Hill College 1. 2; Y.W.A. 3, 4; B.S.I". Greater Council 4; 
College Choir :i, 4; Young Democrats Club 4. 

Kenneth Rogers Phillips, B.S. Bakersville 





Bob J. Mooneyham, B.B. A. 

Lambda Chi Alphi, Social Chairman 
Alpha Kappa Psi Vi President 3, 4. 

Harold H. Moore, B.S. 
Baseball 1. 2. 3, 1: Moi 



Int-rlrite 
ocial Chiii 



Robert E. Morgan, B.B. A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Footbal 



, nil, 



Club 2, 3, 4. 
2, Baseball 1. 



Smithfiel 1 
Asheboro 



John T. Morrow, B.A. Itock Hill, S. C. 

Sigma Chi I. 2. 3, 4; Delta Kappa Alpha 3, I; Eta Sigma Phi 3. 4; 
Phi Alpha Theta 3. 1; -Ministerial Conference 1. 2, :i, 4; \ oung 
Democrats Club 3; B.S.U. 1. 2. 3, 1; Extension Team Captain 4; 
Intramurals; Greek Assistant 4. 

Robert W. Morrow, B.A. Catawba 

Ministerial Conference 

John H. Motsinger, B.A. - Winston-Salem 



63 




MM 




11Xlh run 

Forest C. Roberts, Jr., B.B.A. Gastonia 

Delta Sigma Phi; Delta Sigma Pi, Rho Tau Sigma; WFDD Business 
Manager; [nter-Fraternitj Council 

John E. Roberts, B.A. Louisville 

Sigma Chi, Treasurer 3, Vice-President 3; Delta Kappa Alpha 
3 1 Vice-President 3; Eta Sigma Phi I. 2, 3, I, Vice-President 1; 
Alpha Phi Omega I. 2; "Student" 3, I; Howler Sports Editor 
.; Ministerial Conference 1, 2, 3, 1, Pianist 3, 1; Young Democrats 
Club 2; Intramurals 1, 2. 3, ): Latin Assistant -t; B.S D. Greater 
Council 1; "Old G 1.1 an. I Black" I. 

John Franklin Roberts, B.A. Rutherfordton 

Theta Chi; Itho Tan Sigma; Alpha Phi Omega; WFDD 



Thomas Roberts, B.A. 



Ape; 



Elba Jeanette Rouse, B.A. Kinsd 

( 'ambell ( lollege 1, 2; V W A ::. I. Program ( lhairman :!. Presidei 
I ICuzelian Societ\ :i: B.S.U. Council I: College Theater t; Gli 
Club; Future Teachers ..I America :; 



M. Jacqueline Rowe, B.S. 

W.R.A.; Y.W.A.; Howler 3; B.S.!". 



Raleigh 



Joan Pierce, B.A. 
Sigma I'i Alpha; Religion- 
Beta Kappa. 


n-Liic Week Planning C 


Wilmington 
ommittee, Phi 


Ernest W. Poe, B.B.A. 
Delta Sigma Phi; North C 


irolina State 1, 2. 


Durham 


Lee Poindexter, Jr., B.S. 




Franklin 



Kernels 



Joyce Ann Porter, B.S. 

Beta, Beta, Beta 3; Eta Sigma Phi 2, 3; W.R.A. 1, 2. 3; Philo- 
mathesian Literary Society I, 2, 3, President 2, Secretary 3; 
College Theatre 2, 3; Alpha l'si Omega 3; Chapel Choir 1. 2, 3; 
Touring Choir I. 2, 3; Y.W.A. 1, 2, Marshal 2, 3; B.S.U. 1, 2, 3. 
Executive Council 2, Bowman Gray Gray 
nology 4. 

John D. Poston, B.A. 



Of Medical Terh- 
( lharlotte 



William M. E. Powers, B.B.A. 
Sigma Chi. 



Mc 



Lloyd Thomas Preslar, B.A 
"Old Gold 
dent 



High Point 
litor I: Omicron Delia Kappa 4; Presi- 
Publications Board -1; "Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities" 4; Men's Honor Council 3; Student Handbook 
Editor 3; Scabbard and Blade 3. 4. 

Charles E. Reeves, B.B.A. Hickory 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Alpha Kappa Psi; Intramurals. 

Doris Faye Reeves, B.A. Jacksonville 

Phi Alpha Theta 3. 1; Future Teachers of America 3. 4; Inter- 
national Relations 1, 2; Y.W.A. 



fourth row: 

Kathryn Elizabeth Reid, B.A. 

Mars Hill College I. 2; "Stud 

Vice-President i 
Jacland F. ReVille, B.A. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Treisur 

2, 3; Freshman Orientatii 



Roanoke, Va. 
Typing StalT 3, 4; Dormitory 



3, President 4; Interfraternity Council 
tion 2; Football I; Intramurals 

Judith Ann Rice, B.A. Raleigh 

Delta Kappa Nu 3. 4, Reporter 4; Young Democrats Club 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; Future Teachers of America 4; 
•Old Gold and Bkck" Business Staff 3, Circulation 4; V.W.A. 

3; I'hilomatliesian Society 3. 



J, fill 



Burga 



Raymond Ray Rich, Jr., B.B.A. 

Alpha Kappa l'si 

Charles H. Richards, B.A. Youngsville 

"Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Concert- 
Lecture Committee; Editor, "The Student" 4; Howler Assistant. 
Editor 3: "Old Gold ami Black" 3, 4; Eta Sigma Phi; English 
Assistant; Creek Assistant; Phi Bela Kappa 
William R. Richardson, Jr., B.B.A. Charlotte 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, President I: Kho Tau Sigma. 




(.4 



SENIORS 



Brunson M. Sally, Jr., B.S. 



Kappa Sigma, Seer 
leader 2, 3, Head C 



rv 4: Inter-Fraternity Council 3, 1: Chei 
rleader 4 



Joseph Merrill Sanders, B.A. 
Mars Hill 1, 2. 



Pisgah Forest 



Donald L. Scalf, B.S. Jam. 

Sigma Chi 3, 4; Basketball 2. 3; Track 2. 3, 4: Student G 
incur :;, ]. Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, 4. 

Marcus L. Scruggs, B.S. Fayet 



Mary Esther Seay, B.A. 

Choir 1, 2. 3, 4: Touring Choii 
Cl„ ii- I. 2, 3, 4; Westmii ster F. 
Sigma I'i Alpha 2. 3, I Social 
Standards Committee 1: Howusi 

Sheo Fu Seen, B.S. 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Pledgemaster 

Nell Haynes Sharpe, B.A. 



Charlotte 
ir Flats 2. 3; Church 
French Film Club 4: 
. President 4; Social 
rs t; Phi Beta Kappa. 



' llcensl 



Lexingtc 



Beta Beta Beta 2. 3, 4: Sigma Pi Alpha 3, 4; Religious Education 
Club 1. 2. Secretary-Treasurer 2: Christian Education ami Service 
Club :>. 4: Y.W.A. 1. 2, 3. 4. Missions Chairman :!; B.S.U. Greater 
Council 2; Philomatliesian Society 4; Future Teachers of America 
4; Dean's List '■'>- 



— md >"i 

Patrick M. Sharpe, B.A. 

William M. Shelton, B.A. 

Tony J. Siceloff, B.S. 

Phi Epsilon Kappa. Vice-Presid 

Frederick L. Simpson, Jr., B.A. 



Winston-Salem 



:it : Intranmrals. 



Charlotte 



Philomathesian Society, President; College Choir: College Theater. 
President: Alpha l'-i Omega; Board <>i Traffic Appeal-: Orientation 
Committee; B.S.C. President; Summer School 4: "Who's Who In 
American Colleges and Universities." 



Kenneth G. Small, B.A. Concord 

Ministerial Conference; Intramurals :i: Future Teachers of America 



Charles V. Smith, B.B.A. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Helen C. Smith, B.A. 



Raleigh 



Touring Choir: Church Choir; Chapel Choir: Sigma Pi Alpha 
Social Standards Committee: Philomathesian Societv: Englisf 
Assistant; B.S.U. Executive Council; Phi Beta Kappa! 







£!l (T) £?* 

£% ML ill 






SENIORS 



first row: 

Malon R. Smith, B.B.A. Asheboro 

Stella Lou Smith, B.A. Asheboro 

Mars Hill College 1, 2; Christian Education and Service Club 3, 
1. Vice-President; Sigma Pi Alpha 3, 4; V.W.A. 



William H. Smith, B.B.A. 



Kapp, 

Intcn 



in, House Manager 2; Ch( 
il Relations Club. 



Mary Ellington Smithwick, B.S. 



Kiiffin 
rleader 2; Delta Sigma Pi; 



Smit.hrieM 



Chapel Clioir 1, 2, 3; Traveling Choir 1, 2, :): Beta Beta Beta 3; 
Gamma Sigma Epsilon 3; German Club I, 2; W.R.A. 1, 2, 3, 
Publicity Chairman 2; White Jackets 2, 3. V.W.A. 1, 2; Howler 
3; "Old Gold and Black" 3; The Musicians 1, 2, 3; Westminister 
Fellowship 1, 2, 3; Bowman Gray School of Medical Technology -1 



Charles L. Snipes, B.B.A. Carolina Beach 

Freshman Class Vice-President; Orientation Committee 2, 3; 
Men's Honor Council 4; Kappa Alpha Vice-President 3. 



Tony J. Stafford, B.A. 

Mars Hill College: Cross-Count ry, Ministe 
Theatre; French Club; German Club 



Barbara Leigh Stanley, B.S. 



Belmont, 
ce, Little 



Albert Conrad Stallings, B.B.A. 

Kappa Sigma. 



William G. Starling, B.B.A. Smithfield 

Kappa Sigma 1, 2. 3, 1. Guard 2. Vice-President 3, President t. 
Treasure! Freshman Class; Tennis Tram; Men's Honor Council, 
President 3; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Scab- 
bard and Blade 3, 4, President 4; "Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities" 4; Student Body Vice-President 4. 



Joseph W. Stepusin, B.S. 



Monogram Club 2. 
ball 2. 3. 4 



Jack Stewart, B.A. 
Theta Chi. 



4; Phi Epsilon Kappa Secrets 



Charles E. Stines, B.A. 
Carson-Newman College I, 2; Ministerial Coi 



John C. Stokoe, B.S. Delma 

Varsity Baseball 2. 3. 4; Sigma Chi Fratei nil \ 1.2,3, t; Mo 
Cluh 2. 3, 1, Vice-President 4. 



Frederick B. Storey, B.S. 

R.O.T.C. Marching Band; Southerner's 1) 





4tl 

A tf J* ft « 




first row 

Julia Lou Teachey, B.A. Teachey 

W.R..A. 1. 2; French Club 2, ;i, 4; International Relations Club 
2, •'!. 1. Social Chairman :i; Kuzelian Literary Society 3, -1: Future 
Teachers of America 2, 3, 4: Christian Education and Service 
Club :S, 4: French Assistant 4; Y.W.A. 2. 3. 

Thomas L. Teague, B.B.A. Greensboro 

Kappa Alpha; Delta Sigma Pi; Intramural Sports 1. 2. :t. 4. 

Johnny M. Tew, Jr.. B.S. Winden 
Biology Assistant; Intramurals. 

xtconii row: 

Majorie Louise Thomas, B.A. 

l'i Kappa Delta, President 2. :i; Alpha Psi 

4; Sigma l'i Alpha :!. 1; Philomathesian Liter: 

Vice-President 2. :i. Critic :{; International 

Future Teachers of America 4: Varsity Debate 

lege Theatre 1. 2. 3, 4; "Old Gold and Black 

American Colleges and Universities" 4; Tai 

I; B.S.U. 1. 2. 
Larry P. Thompson, B.A. 

Sigma Chi Fraternity; Ci 

Young Republicans Choir 

Omega: German Chile 
James C. Todd, Jr., B.B.A. 

Kappa Sigma Guard; Int 



Lincolnton 
. President 
I 1.2. 3, 4. 
Club 2. :t: 
I, 3, 4;Col- 
Who's Who in 
, 4, President 



.1 I 



Cla 



ulent Legislature 1. 



Theatre; Scabbard and Blade; 
; Intramural Sports; Alpha Psi 



a I Sports 1, 



third row 

Murphey F. Townsend, Jr., B.S. Lumberton 

Sigma Chi; Interfraternity Council President. \*ice-President ; 
Alpha Kpsilon Delta. President; Beta Beta Beta; Senior Honor 
Council; Young Democrats Clul>; Orientation Committee .1. 4: 
Student Chapel Committee 3; Intramurals. 

Robert G. Townsend, Jr., B.S. Grayson, Kv. 

Sigma Phi Kpsilon 1. 2, :t, 4. 

Roy Webster Tuck, B.B.A. Raleigh 

fourth row: 

William P. Tucker, B.S. Louisville, Kv 

Theta Chi, Vice-President 4; Gamma Sigma Kpsilon; Kappa Mu; 

Student Legislature 4; Varsity Basketball :i, 4; Monogram Chili 

t; Freshman Orientation 4. 

Phillip Brooks Turlington, B.B.A. Salemburg 

Susie Elizabeth Tweed, B.A. Ashcville 

Sigma Pi Alpha 2. :t, 4. Secretary 4: Phi Alpha Theta :i, 4: W.R.A. 
:S. 4; Y.W.A. 2. 3, 4; B.S.U. 1, 2. 3, 4; Future Teachers of America 
:t. 4; International Relations Club 3, 4, Seeretarv 4; Student 
History Assistant 3, 4; Glee Club 1. 2, 3. 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

fifth row: 

Thomas E. Umphlett, B.B.A. Hertford 

Chowan Junioi College 1. 2. 



Worth B. Utley, B.S. 
Robah Carl Veach, B.S. 



Dunn 
Mayodan 





sixth row: 

Howard Lee Stultz. B.A. Xorlina 

Robert B. Suggs, III, B.S. Belmont 

Kappa Sigma; College Band I. 2; Cheerleader 3. 4; Intramurals; 
International Relations Club 1, 2. 

Howard L. Sumerford. B.A. 



Royce Kilmer Swinson, B.S. 

Ph. Kpsilon Kappa. 



Robert E. Talley, B.A. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, ( hai 



an Student Part\ 



James C. Tate, B.S. 
Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 



Dudley 
Bradenton, Fla. 

Lexington 




tfi*4ii 



tiifctiflfl 





Betty Lou Wells, B.S. 
Sociology Club; Eta 



Phi; Future Teachers of Ami' 



David Monroe Welton, B.B.A. Ottawa Ontario, Canada 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Howleb Staff 3, Business Manager 4. 

Carl R. Westbrook, B.S. Raleigh 
Mara Hill I, 2; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Mildred Vick Wheeler, B.A. Jackson 

Chowan College; VIVA :;, I; Christian Education and Service 
Club 3, I; B.S.U Chun :;. Sociologj Club 3. 

James D. Whetstone. B.A. North, S. C, 

Mars Hill College I, 2; Sigma Chi 3, I: Ministerial C rence 

3, I. Alpha Phi Omega I: [ntramurals 3. I 

William R. White, B.A. Laurinburg 

Alpha Sigma Phi; Interfratcniitv Council 2, I. 



John W. Wagster, B.A. Columbia 

Sigma Chi 2. 3, 4; "Old Gold and Black," Editorial Staff 
Business Manager 4; Delta Kappa Alpha 3, 4; Eta Sign 
3, 4; Orientation Committee 3, 4: B.S.U. Council 2; Delagi 
State Student Legislature 3; Interim Council 4: Intramural 
'" Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club I, 2; College Choir 2; C 



Mi 



al Conl. 



William S. Walker, B.S. 
Phvsics Honor Society, 1 
3; Band; German Club; 



Statesville 
'si.l.'iii 1; Kappa Mu Epsilon, Treasurer 
le Southerners; Phi Beta Kappa. 
Lindsay S. Wall, Jr., B.A. Winston-Salem 

Kappa Alpha, Kappa Mu Epsilon; Eta .Sigma Phi, Baseball I; 
Willi). Sports Director; Math Assistant; Latin Assistant; Intra- 



:ds 1, 






High P. 



George Wallace, B.S. 

Football I, 2. I. 
Jackson Wallace 

Norman Vincent Wallace, B.S. Estera, Fla. 

third row: 

Joseph N. Wallwork, B.B.A. Greensboro 

Band I. 2. 3. 4; Assistant Manager Baseball Team 1; Delta Sigma 
Pi, Treasurer .'i, 4; Scabbard ami Blade; Dramatics Club 1; Young 
Republican Club 



Varsity Ki 
iology Club 



Thomasvill 

ll.all Manage. 

Hampton, Vi 



Thomas M. Ward, B.A. 

Delta Sigma Phi, Sergeant of Ar 
Intramurals, Football, Basketball; 

Thomas S. Ward, Jr., B.S. 

fourth row: 

Walter A. Ward, Jr., B.S. Asheville 
Kappa Alpha 1,2, 3, 4; Student Legislature 1,2, 1. Speaker Pro-tem 
4; Men's Honor Council 3, Secretary; Senior Class President; 
German Club I, 2; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities" -I ticron Delta Kappa 3, I. Secretary I; Beta Beta 

Beta 2. 3, 4; Debate Squad I, 2; ('..liege Hand I ; Pi Kappa Delta 
1, 2, 3, 4; Orientation Committee 4; History Assistant 2; I.F.C. 3. 

Billy T. Watkins, B.S. Mayodan 

Kappa Sigma 2, 3, 4; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4: College Theatre 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity Football Manager 4. 



Mary Ellen Watts, B.A. 



id B 



Ma 



, 2; W.K A 1, 2, 4; Christiar 
4; Tumbling Club 1, 2; B.S.U 



I: I'll: 



Durhai 
Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4: Future Tea. hers . 
men! Assistant 4; Y.W.A. I. 



Nancy Ruth Weaver, B.A. 

Delta Kappa Nu 3, 4; Sign 
America 3, I; Speech Depai 
Sylvia Mangum Weaver, B.A. Durham 

W.G.A . Executive Cabinet 2. 3; Woman's Honor Council ;i. Sum- 
mer Council 4; Orientation Committee 3, 1: French Club 2, :i: 
"Who's Wlio in American Colleges anil Universities"; Student 
Legislature 2; Future Teachers of America 2, 3, Vice-President 3. 



Thomas C. Webb, B.A. 



Cala 



Va. 




SENIORS 



first row: 

Patti Moore Whitehurst, B.A. 



Joseph Ray Whitley, B.B.A. 



Wilmingto 



Pi Kappa Alpha, President , Treasurer; Chapel Speaker; "Student"; 
Little Theatre; Deacon; Candidate lor Student Body President; 

"Who's Win) in Ameriean Colleges anil Cuivei-sities," 



Leslie D. Wilson, Jr., B.S. 



Sigma 1'i Epsilon, Secret 
Summer Honor Council. 



Frederick Samuel Wolf, B.S. 
Sigma Chi: [ntramurals 



Mount Olm 
College Choir; Intramural Spurts 



Mi ii 1 1 ginnery. Ala 



Ernest R. Wiggins, B.S. London, Kv 

Monogram Club :;. 4: Varsity Basketball 2, M, 4; Phi Epsilon 

Kappa 3, 1. 



James E. Womble, B.A. 



Ruekv Mount 



Campbell College; Ministerial Conference, Sociology Club, Mari- 
timers. 



Charles William Wiggs, B.A. 



Patsy Wilhelm, B.S. Albemarle 

Strings; W.R.A. Secretary, Vice-President; "Old Gold and Black"; 
Women's Sports Writer; Hand; Glee Club; Chapel Committee; 
"Student" Typing Staff; Maritimers. 



Miriam Woodlief, B.A. Henderson 

Howleb; W.G.A.; Y.W.A.; [ntramurals, Basketball, Volleyball; 
Euzelian Society; White Jackets; College Theatre; English Assist- 
tant; French Club; S.O.P.H. Future Teacher's of America. 



Jack R. Williams, B.B.A. 
Basketball 1. 2, :i, 4. 



Johnston City, 111. 



Phyllis Carolyn Yates, B.A. Charlott. 

Mars Hill College. Women's College; Choir; "Messiah" 4; Y.W.A., 
Missions Chairman. 




Smitk Reynolds Library 





(\uhon /'. West, Ubr 



Imih crams for those exams in the solitude of the vast library. 




Dr. Broadus fonts. Chairman of English Dtpa 





FACULTY: A WORLD OF BOOKS AT THEIR FINGERTIPS 




English Dtpa 



:d fonts. Wood, Snuggs. Aycock. Standing Walton, Ktnion, Shirlty, Folk, Hovrrtn, Brown, Drake, and Wilson. 




Members of the History Department are, first row: Jumper, Smiley. Second row: Strmipe, Clams, Perry. Third row Kraraj, Huckaby, Tillei 



The English Department, under the direction of Dr. 
Broadus Jones, is certainly one of the most populated, if 
not popular, departments on the campus. Through its doors 
pass many eager English majors, as well as reluctant induc- 
tees to the basic required courses. This year many new 
professors joined the enlarged English staff. Upon entering 
the department, students are magically transformed into 
Canterbury pilgrims, Shakespearean spectators, or critics 
of Whitman philosophy. Themes and term papers arc 
promptly administered, though not so eagerly completed. 
Would-be writers join the ranks of amateur journalists and 
turn out lines of carefully typed copy. Trying to diagram 
their difficulties in advanced grammar arc future English 
teachers. 

Trudging up flights of steps to the fourth floor of the 
Library, one finds himself suddenly balancing in mid-air 
on a narrow "catwalk." Venturing across the structure, 
one comes to the doors of two of the busiest offices on cam- 
pus. One of them could be called a main public relations 
agency for the college. This is none other than Professor 
Shirley's office from which he directs the Wake Eorest 
Debate Team, which has proudly matched its wits with 
students from Boston to Miami. In the other office one- 
would probably find notices of try-outs, rehearsals, and 



committee meetings. This office serves as the center of 
activity for College Theater productions. Speech and 
dramatics offer practical experiences in the fields of public 
speaking and development of creative arts. Those acquainted 
with the department have even coined such mottoes as 
"Remember the Fox" (Speech 55) and "The play's the 
thing" (Speech 57). Future play directors and New York 
producers learn the "ropes" through first hand experiences 
in play direction and production in their 1 heater courses 
under Professor Walton. 

Elsewhere in the Library, activities are tagged with 
dates (strictly historical) and "mapped out" in bold colors. 
The History Department attracts many majors in both 
history and political science. This aspect of the college 
curriculum provides unequalled opportunities for parallel 
reading plus ways to capture gems of wisdom through 
student reporting. The department, under the supervision 
of Dr. Henry Stroupe, added to its faculty new professors 
and new courses this year. Classes in the recently installed 
Russian History course were tilled to overflowing both 
semesters. Other courses covered the range of human 
accomplishments from the period of Mesopotamian civiliza- 
tion to World War II and the post-war era. 



Dr. Harold Parcell, Chairman of Modern Language Dip 





Dr. Cronje H. Earp, Chairman of Classical Language Dept. 



Members of the Language Departments are, front row: Parcell, Heilman, TMett, Robi 
Harris {classical language), Sturgill, Couch, Shoemaker. 



()• Flaherty, Saunders. Second row: Keaton, Parker, Delgado, 




74 




Mrs. Ins Richardson, \l 



Mildred Brown, Mrs. Knit Barber, Mrs. Shelby Greene, 
r, Mrs. Darlene Eynon, Mrs. Kathryn Earley, Mr 

Izurj Yarton. 



irltm West. Mis: 
Doroth) Rewle) 



BOOKS, LANGUAGES, AND THE PEOPLE WHO USE THEM 



Wake Forest's "Tower of Babel" is also located in the Library Building. 
Sounds of French, Spanish, and guttural German, plus Southern accents, 
issue from the classrooms of the Modern Language Department, headed 
by Dr. Harold D. Parcell. Courses in grammar, literature, and conversation 
are offered to all students — those who are iust beginners all the uav up 
to those who are proficient enough to work as interpreters for the United 
Nations. 

1 he Classical Language Department, under the direction of Dr. Cronje B. 
Earp, is very helpful to those young men on campus known as "Greeks." 
I he study of Greek has proved invaluable to them in identifying their 
own fraternity sections. The works of Caesar and I.ivv live again in that 
language which only the unlearned call "dead." 

Sixty-five student workers assist the regular library staff in the three- 
service centers cf the new library— Circulation, Periodicals, and Reserve. 
As the nine moving vans, containing 4,500 boxes of books, slowly rolled 
up to the new campus, the staff, made up of both old and new member*. 
faced a mammoth job of unpacking, sorting, and cataloguing. Under the 
able direction of Mr. Carlton Prince West, the chief librarian, the library 
was ready for use by the time the summer session began. 

Away from the bustle and noise of the main campus, students pursued 
their quest for knowledge in the well-lighted, pleasant surroundings of the 
tour reading rooms. Soundproof carrclls in the stacks provided space for 
individual research. Many books will be added as the years pass. Perhaps 
some dav the stacks will be rilled. 



stands pensively 



75 






r J 




» t"j 


HDH 




jgl 





( 




wferj «/ Who's Who are, sc. 
r,i, PnwAir, Braddock, and Hn 



Hush,; 
Not pu 



rYagfo 



6toA. Standing 
Jennette, Ladner, McGinley 



'-.mil,. Thomas, Simpson, Willim 
Murdock, Richards. Starling 



Powell, 



SELECT FEW ARE HONORED BY WHO'S WHO, OMICRON 



Each year Wake Forest recognizes its student leaders by 
conferring upon them membership in the national organiza- 
tion Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. This 
fall twenty-four upperclassmen were elected lor their out- 
standing achievements in publications, athletics, religious 
organizations, student government, and scholarship. To ob- 
tain membership in Who's Who is nor easy, because ir is 
opened onlv to those who have given their time, interest, 
and enthusiasm t" wholehearted participation in college life. 



Twice this year the wooden kev of ()I)K appeared in 
front of the chapel. On the key were placed the names of 
men who had proved themselves worthy of recognition by 
Omicron Delta Kappa, national honorary leadership fra- 
ternity. Wade up of only three per cent of the male enroll- 
ment, the fraternity places emphasis upon the development of 
the well-rounded man, both as a present member of his col- 
lege community and as a prospective contributor to a better 
society. Bruce McDaniel was president lor the year. 



Mtmbers of ()I)K arc: Wilson, Ward, Preslar, Hirano, Stroupe, Hughes, and Murdock. 





Tlwsr selected for membership in Phi Beta Kippa are, first row, left to right: Kitt> Booth. Denn\ Baxter, Harolrn King, Gloria Flipptn, Susie Tweed, 
Helen Smith. Dee Hughes, Esther Seay, Isaac \AcLam, Hannah Blackwell, Mrs. Belt) Chester. Second ro« Tucker Littleton. (Juries Edwards, Mrs. Jose- 
phine Holcomb, William Walker, Marietta Chamblee, Marjorie Fisher. Charles McCall, Edward Ferguson. Those not present when the picture -_.u madt 
.ire Thomas Bine. .Mrs. Martha Cook Gentry, loan 1'irne. and Charles H. Richards. 



DELTA KAPPA, PHI BETA KAPPA, AND TASSELS 



A very impressive initiation service is held each spring 
in which a small percentage of the senior class is inducted 
into Phi Beta Kappa, the national honorary scholastic 
fraternity. This is perhaps the most gratifying and the most 
treasured reward a student can achieve in his college career. 
F.ach member is presented a small key containing the letters 
"PBK." L'pon receiving their keys, the initiates pledge 
loyalty to the society's distinguishing principles: Friendship, 
Morality and Literature. 



Wake Forest's leading ladies are honored each year by 
being tapped for membership in Tassels, the sister organiza- 
tion on campus of ODK. Chosen from four per cent of the 
female matriculates, these women are outstanding in leader- 
ship, scholarship, and character. New members are chosen 
according to a point system for rheir extra-curricular 
activities, as well as their scholastic standing. 

Two formal initiation services were held this year as the 
new lv tapped members were brought into the inner circle. 



I 



?ht Flippin, Hughes. Thomas, Gc, 



Booth. Canipe, lei 



\ 



V 




Members of the Ym 
McNeal, Weathers, Walk 
^Carpenter, Hill. 



Second r.m Johnson, May, Haywood, Hutchins, Wilcox, 
rt, Hedrick, Barwick, Edtvards, Graham, Bryan, Wiggins, 



Inlnnn Ray Hcndran, State Y.D.C. V, 





w > r 


£mi $Z' 


lifi j 


rr ~^"^. 


1 ' 




J^Bb ]i 


ffisr 


^^^^^^BMI^^^Wp' ^ 




I Eg 







YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB 



1 lie Young Democrats Club had two joint meet- 
ings with the local County Club this year, with 
approximately KM) people attending. Special guests 
from the surrounding County Clubs and repre- 
sentatives from various college clubs in the state 
were united to attend these meetings. Mr. Terry 
Sanford, former State Senator and now State Y.D.C. 
President, spoke to the group at the February 
dinner meeting. At the second joint dinner meeting 
held in the spring, a panel discussion concerning 
"What happened in November? How and What 
we must do in the future" 
Wake Forest club president Bo 
this controversial discussion. 



i as featured. I he 
Riddle moderated 

Last year's Wake forest's Y.D.C. president. 
Johnny Ray 1 lendren, was honored at the organiza- 
tion's state convention by being elected State Secre- 
tary. |ohnny Ray has been active in the Wake forest 
chapter since his freshman year and has served on 
many state-wide Y.D.C. committees. Now, as a 
senior in l.iw School, he puts aside the legal books 
to keep minutes of all the state-wide executive com- 
mittee meetings and to keep all presidents of over 
100 Y.D.C.'s in North Carolina up to date on their 
duties and on happenings within the State Y.D.C. 
setup. 



78 



HOUSE PRESIDENTS, SOCIAL 
STANDARDS ENRICH CO-ED LIFE 

Under the chairmanship of Dec Hughes, the Social 
Standards Committee functioned to provide the coeds with 
a well-rounded and pleasurable year. Wake forest's female 
counterparts of l.F.C. gave the girls their leap-year "big 
chance" at the Christmas dance— one of those affairs where 
everybody had a "ball." Dick Collins and his orchestra 
were featured at the event, which was held in the ballroom 
of the Robert E. Lee Hotel. All girls drew names to de- 
termine whose spirits they would secretly try to boost 
during exam week. They played "Miss Hush," surprising 
their sister coeds with everything from bubble gum to 
self-composed poetry. In February, the committee sponsored 
a reception honoring the faculty. 

Four capable coeds played the combined roles of mother, 
friend, hostess, counselor, and judge as they performed the 
difficult tasks of house presidents. Familiar pleas were: 
"What will I ever tell my folks, Lynne"?; "Whew 1 
You're here, Phillip Ann. I need a permission slip", "But 
what'll I do now, Carol?"; "Kittv, do we have to. . . ,?" 



Nous, 
Philli 

Kitty 



President 
' A. Gar, 
Booth, Ea 
Laughrur, 
JermetU, 



Members of Social Standards are, s 
HnrJai. Holfield, Seay, AycocK Walto, 



>, Smith, Standing: 




79 





Members of the ) 


"eung. Hem 


mats Club are: First row 


VIcLan 


b, Reeser, 


•rickett, . 


cott. Bridge 


, Second n 


VI /»/;wv 


«. U 


WcNeal, Weathei 


r. Walker, 


Finch. Branch, Kinlaw,C( 


ok, Dovi 


is. fhirdr 


>w: Woe 


1. Rice, Stei 


,||7, //,-,/n, 


/■. Barui/a 


, Edii 


Carpenter, Hill. 





















„/, Hutchins, Wilcox, 



hlinm Ray I If mi 



Si ale Y.D.C. Set 




YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB 



The Young Democrats Club had two joint meet- 
ings with the local County Club this year, with 
approximately 100 people attending. Special guests 
from the surrounding Cnuntv Clubs and repre- 
sentatives from various college clubs in the state 
were invited to attend these meetings. Mr. Terry 
Sanlord, former State Senator and now State Y.D.C. 
President, spoke to the group at the February 
dinner meeting. At the second joint dinner meeting 
held in the spring, a panel discussion concerning 
"What happened in November? How and What 
we must do in the future" was featured. The 
Wake Forest club president Hob Riddle moderated 
this controversial discussion. 

Last year's Wake Forest's Y.D.C. president, 
Johnny Ray Hendren, was honored at the organiza- 
tion's state convention by being elected State Secre- 
tary. Johnny Ra\ has been active in the Wake Forest 
chapter since his freshman year and has served on 
many state-wide Y.D.C. committees. Now, as a 
senior in I, aw School, he puts aside the legal books 
to keep minutes of all the state-wide executive com- 
mittee meetings and to keep all presidents of over 
100 Y.D.C.'s in North Carolina up to date on their 
duties and on happenings within the State Y.D.C. 
setup. 



7N 



HOUSE PRESIDENTS, SOCIAL 
STANDARDS ENRICH CO-ED LIFE 

Under the chairmanship of Dec Hughes, the Social 
Standards Committee functioned to provide the coeds with 
a well-rounded and pleasurable year. Wake forest's female 
counterparts of I.F.C. gave the girls their leap-year "big 
chance" at the Christmas dance— one of those affairs where 
everybody had a "ball." Dick Collins and his orchestra 
were featured at the event, which was held in the ballroom 
of the Robert I'.. Lee Hotel. All girls drew names to de- 
termine whose spirits they would secretly try to boost 
during exam week. They played "Miss Hush," surprising 
their sister coeds with everything from bubble gum to 
self-composed poetry. In February, the committee sponsored 
a reception honoring the faculty. 

Four capable coeds played the combined roles of mother, 
friend, hostess, counselor, and judge as they performed the 
difficult tasks of house presidents. Familiar pleas were: 
"What will I ever tell my folks, Lynne"?; "Whew! 
You're here, Phillip Ann. 1 need a permission slip", "But 
what'll I do now, Catol : ", "kittv, do we have to. . . . ; " 



Phillip 

Kilty ft 



■i. Gardner, East B 
nth. East A 
mghrun. West A 



Members of Social Standards are, seated Gentry, Cutter, Hughes {chairman). Smith. Sta 
Hnr.im, Holfield, Seay, Aycock, Walton, Ledbetter. 




79 





LANGUAGE HONORARIES: SIGMA PI ALPHA, ETA SIGMA PHI 



["hose students who prove themselves outstanding in 
the French, Spanish, and German languages have the oppor- 
tunity of becoming members of the modern language fra- 
ternity, Sigma Pi Alpha. Their meetings are planned around 
programs which give members a better outlook and knowl- 
edge of the people, customs, and languages of the countries 
which interest them. This year Esther Seay served as presi- 
dent of the society. 



Beta lota chapter oi the national classical language 
honorary fraternity, Eta Sigma Phi, honors those upper- 
classmen who have excelled in the study of Latin and Gtcek. 
\ew members were rapped in the spring and initiated in 
a formal ceremony. The old members honored the initiates 
at an informal out-of-doors party. C. J. Bennet was elected 
to serve as president of the society, and Dr. Cronic B. Earp 
was the faculty adviser. 





PHI ALPHA THETA 

\\ itli a chapter organized on this campus only last .spring. 
Phi Alpha Thcta is making its first appearance among the 
annals of Wake Forest College honorary societies. The 
Fpsilon Sigma chapter of Phi Alpha Theta was chartered 
to recognize Wake Forest students who excel in the field 
of history. The chapter grew this year with the formal 
initiation of more new historians. Walt Barge presided over 
the group, and Mr. Wayland Jones was the faculty adviser. 



FUTURE TEACHERS 

Future Teachers of America is the professional club on 
campus for those students who arc planning careers in 
education. It was first organized on the Wake campus in 
1954. The members heard outstanding educational leaders of 
North Carolina speak. The programs were designed to give 
members more insight into the opportunities afforded them 
in their future careers. I his year Johnny Nettles presided, 
and Dr. Herman Preseren was adviser. 





PI KAPPA DELTA 



DEBATE TEAM 



Meeting at intervals throughout the year, Pi Kappa Delta, the 
honorary forensic society on campus, is composed of students who 
have shown themselves outstanding in inter-collegiate oratory or 
debate. This year, with David Hughes as president and Professor 
Franklin Shirley as adviser, the society sponsored the Fighth Annual 
Novice Debate Tournament on campus for new debaters and assisted 
the Debate Team in other tournaments. All activities were planned 
with the society's purpose of stimulating progress in and furthering 
the interest of inter-collegiate speech activities (irmly in mind. 

On April 14th, Professor Shirley and several of the society's 
members attended the National Pi Kappa Delta Convention in 
Brooking, South Dakota. 




Members of the Debating Team are, seated: Gardiner, Thor, 
Standing: Carroll, Waldrop, Hughes, Burleson, Myers, Bentley. 



Wake Forest's Debate Team 
brought prestige and renown to 
the school as it traveled from 
Miami to Dartmouth. Varsity 
member of the team, David 
Hughes, was selected as the 
top debater at the Ninth An- 
nual Cross-Examination Tourna- 
ment held at the University of 
Pittsburgh in December. David 
competed against more than 200 
top debaters from all over the 
nation and earned the highest 
rating any debater has received in 
history of that tournament. I lughes 
also won the highest individual 
debating award at the First Annual 
Dixie ("lassies Tournament, which 
was held here on campus. 

In order to train freshmen de- 
baters, the debate fraternity spon- 
sored a Novice Debate Tourna- 
ment in October. Participating in 
all of the major inter-collegiate 
tournaments in the last, the team, 
minus many of its more experi- 
enced members, made a good 
showing and gave its freshmen 
members a chance to compete 
w ith seasoned debaters. 

Wake forest was host to the 
annual Atlantic Coast Conference 
Tournament in March, during 
which the team debated against 
the same schools our athletic 
teams competed against m a 
dillcrcnt way. 



82 



ORIENTATION COMMITTEE 
WHO WAS GREENEST? 

"Just shoot them a dose of that ole Wake Forest 
spirit, and that's all they'll need": these were the 
essential words of advice given to the Orientation 
Committee to help them in their tremendous ioh. 
Even the committee felt like D.P.'s when first 
arriving on the new campus after the westward 
move, which made freshmen and transfers of us 
all. But the sight of a few old faces and friends 
and one rousing stanza of "Oh Here's to Wake 
Forest" and the committee was at home again, 
ready to welcome the onrush of new students. 
Becoming patient parents of the Deacon "family," 
they attempted to answer the flood of questions 
about school codes and procedure and to relate 
the facts of life at college. Although it was hard 
keeping pace with the freshmen, the committee 
successfully whirled them through a week of 
"gettin' to know you's," honor, friendliness, indoc- 
trination speeches, conferences, and I.Q. tests. As 
customarv. the schedule was highlighted by a 
square dance in the gym and a reception for the 
purpose of introducing the faculty to their new 
students. 1 he week was climaxed by an organ 
recital in the Chapel. Finally they were ready for 
the arrival of the "Old- Timers" and a mass assimi- 
lation process began. 



The Orientation Committee was, first row : Hughes, Gardner. 
Laugh-run, Barwick, Townsend, McLamb, Mtllsaps, Clark. 
Second row: Britt. Krtnrr. Hejrick. Tucker, Williams, Ward. 
Third row: Bermer, Murdock, Tuttle, Shaw. 




DEBATE TOURNEY 

Varsity Debaters Bentley, Black-well, Hughes, and Grubbs prepa 
far their first meet at l.S.C. 



I.R.C. 




Members of the lntematmn.il Relations Club are: Tweed, loan, 
Daves. Ingle, Denmark. Hams. Manning, Harvey, Hughes, 
Shaw, Allen. Their purpose is to promote better understanding of 
international affairs ami how they affect the United States. 




I f 




/ mlc Theater mrmbm are, first row Gattis, McDuffie, Ledbetter, Jarrette, Lampley, Simmons, Tuttle, Thomas, Wilkinson, Richardson, Simpson. Seated 
II alker, McNeil, Finch, Willard, Roust, Walker, Myers, Isenhower, Smith. Standing Rice, [card, Hocutt, Woodward, Hudson. Morgan, Pierce, Pitcher, 
Burnt, Peek, Wiggins, Davis, Saunders, Kingman, Davis. 



COLLEGE THEATER: A YEAR OF FIRSTS 



Alpha Psi Omega members are, left to right farrett, Ledbetter, Lampley, Simpson, 




Professor Walton 
strikes a characteristic 
pose as he flips 
through the script 
during try-outs. 




H^HHHM 



"THE INNOCENTS" 

The Wake Forest College The- 
ater season opened with \\ illiam 
Archibald's suspense drama "The 
Innocents," an artful production 
which called for every ounce of 
talent the cast of four could 
render. Judging from the audi- 
ence's approval, the cast and 
crew succeeded in their first 
experiment in arena work. I he- 
production w as more than the 
creation of a supernatural illusion 
and ghost story. The quality of 
presentation was such that the 
original complexity ot character 
was retained, allowing tor a 
diversity of psychological inter- 
pretation. 



The teasing Flo 





•Win has he come back. Mrs. Grose? Sol . . . Not . 



of the faiiuh she left behind 



■It's too dark to be pleasant. Put a candle there 
:.i all is familiar and you're not afraid." 



1 



'■ »1 





'Tell than to take then filthy hands off 



Antigone, my darling, I love 




"ANTIGONE" 
MODERN AND IN THE ROUND 

The Arena Theater attracts Wake Forest students whose enthusi- 
asm for stage productions, heightened imaginations, and willingness 
to work contribute to the successful productions such as were 
evident in the past year. 

It was a new experience tor the casts and crews of the College 
Theater to work in a theater-in-the-round. This form ottered an 
opportunity for experimentation in a difficult stage medium. 1 he- 
theater was successful in presenting the necessary intimacy while 
sustaining proper aesthetic distance. The Arena Theater gave the 
director new horizons in which to create theatrical illusion, or a 
willing acceptance as real of a perception that does not correspond 
with reality. Since the actors had little or no scenery and props to 
assist development of characterization, it was necessary that the 
acting be especially convincing and dynamic. Lighting and makeup 
also had to be adapted to suit the new medium. The arena style- 
Stage is probably the legitimate theater's only method of putting 
the audience in the laps of the actors, a relationship tried by Cinerama 
or Todd-A-O on the movie screens. 

The director fulfilled the major prerequisite tor arena style- 
directing, use of free play of imagination, in the outstanding pro- 
duction of "Antigone,'' an adaptation of Sophocles' tragedy. In 
order to emphasize the timeless meaning of the 2,400-year-old play, 
"Antigone" was presented on a three-tiered platform unburdened 
by scenery and props; the actors themselves were costumed in 
formal evening attire to heighten the desired effect. Cast in the title 
role was Marjorie Thomas; King Creon, the male lead, was por- 
trayed by Tolbert Wilkinson. 

Enthusiasm for the theater prompted the production of more- 
plays than had been previously attempted. An innovation lor Wake- 
Forest audiences was the spting presentation of a musical comedy, 
"Pajama Game." This musical incorporated only one of the phases 
of drama that was represented on the theater calendar tor 1956-57. 
A combination of classic and modern drama completed the schedule 
of productions: "The Innocents," "Antigone," and "The Caine 
Mutiny Court Martial." 





/_/. Commander Queeq, being questioned by defense attorney, Lt. Greenwald declare 
the habit of dwelling on such things." 



'THE CA1NE MUTINY" 

The- College Theater's third production of the year was "The Caine 
Mutiny Court Martial" by Herman Wouk who manipulated his char- 
acters with profound dexterity to enthrall play-goers with a wonderful 
example of the inter and intra-personal relations of different personality 
types in a unique and delicate situation. 

The all-male cast was led by Eddie Hudson as the defense attorney 
Barney Greenwald; (lil Whedbee portraying Challee, an intelligent but 
uninformed prosecutor; and Bob Talley as the unfortunate Captain 
Queeg, a paranoid caught up in the strange trial. I he production crew 
was unique, as it was made up completely of the fairer sex. 



Greenwald n, Lt. Steve Maryci: "You won't go to the brig.' 



In thi dramatic sc 
says, "Strange as 






JUNIORS 



Junior Class Officers reviewing 
the year's activities are Dickie 
Newsome, President; Roivland 
Thomas, \ 'ice-President; and 

Mary Brit!, Secretary. 




dtlferfrl 



James C. Adams 


W 


nston-Salem 


Carol Ahn 




Asheville 


Jimmy Warren Aheron 




Leaksville 


Ann Elizabeth Alexander 




Greensboro 


Abner Alexander 


W 


naton-Salem 


Donald D. Almond 




Albemarle 


John Dallas Allgood 


W 




William Allred 


W 


nston-Salem 


M. Vaughan Anderson 




Tarboro 


James Kiml Andrews 




Newton 


Donald Armfield 




( Ireensboro 


William D. Arrowood 




Concord 


Norma Satterfledl Ashley 




Salemburg 


George Willis Austin 




Smithfield 


Benjamin H. Averett 




Oxford 


Sara Jane Aycock 


W 


nston-Salem 


Robert J. Baird, Jr. 




High Point 


Charles W. Baker 


Fu( 


nay Springs 


Richard William Baker 




Colerain 


Al Gehrig Baker 




Colerain 


David Caldwell Barefoot 




Wilmington 


Clifton B. Barham, Jr. 




Leaksville 


P. C. Barwick, Jr. 




Kinston 


Doris Jane Barr 




K3ng 


Duane Sue Batts 




Magnolia 



CLASS OF '58 



Herbert Wayland Baucom, III 


Oxford 


Peyton S. Beddingtield 


Bunn 


Richard M. Bennet 


Winston-Salem 


James C. Bethune, Jr. 


Raleigh 


Henry G. Beveridge, Jr. 


Gastonia 


John Ellis Biggers 


Grover 


Jane Ann Blake 


Lumberton 


Elizabeth Ann Bolton 


Rich Square 


William Boyan Booe 


Winston-Salem 


Ruth Ann Bordeaux 


Fayetteville 


Andrew Johnson Borders, Jr. 


Charlotte 


Don Bostic 


Shelby 


Wiley F. Bowen 


Hoffman 


Henry C. Bowers, III 


Knightdale 


Herbert Carroll Boyd 


KittreU 


Gloria Ann Boyles 


Mt. Airy 


Jeanne A. Bradley 


Waynesville 


Nicholas Burton Bragg 


Oxford 


Joe D. Branson 


ThomaaviUe 


George Wilbur Braswell 


Emporia, Va. 


Mary Stevenson Britt 


Mount Olive 


Richard Troy Brittain 


Camerton 


K. A. Brown 


Charlotte 


David Robert Bryant 


Greensboro 


Charles Parker Bullard 


( !ary 


Thomas Cade Bunn, Jr. 


Wendell 


Carolyn Myers Burden 


Aulander 


Jo Ann Burge 


Winston-Salem 


Elizabeth W. Butler 


Roanoke Ra,pids 


Jo Butler 


Charlotte 


Douglas Dwight Cabiness 


Shelby 


David Harding Caldwell 


Newton 


Charles Walter Carpenter 


Canton 


Wendell Carr 


Muncie, Ind. 


Henry Thomas Carson 


Tallahassee, Fla. 


Gene Reid Carter 


Kelford 


R. Paul Caudill, Jr. 


.Memphis. Term. 


Robert L. Cecil 


Lexington 


Frank Willard Chance 


King 


John Charles Clark 


Statesville 


James M. Clark, Jr. 


Winston-Salem 


Calvin Greer Clifton 


Darlington 


Parrish Clodfelter, Jr. 


Randleman 


Robert Harold Clodfelter 


Lexington 


Billy Ray Cobb 


Durham 





O ^i <*> 







EMtitodh^M 





JUNIORS 



fipfip f, 

Ah .wM.^b.. Ifl , , rfi£ 
"> p> f\ 





William Small Cobb, Jr. Memphis, Ti 

Henry Cambell Cole Fayettei 

Samuel Lee Cockerham El 

Marjorie Elizabeth Colmer Greensl 

William Connelly Morgan 

Walter Clerk Conner Hi.l. Squ 

Sybil Hinkle Copeland Thomas^ 

Henry Ellis Copple Moe 

William Broughton Corbett I >i 

Sylvia Corless Charlesl S, 



Ann Huffman Cornwell 
Robert Francis Corwin 
Emily Councilman 
Robert Willis Coyner 
Robert P. Craft 

Cecil L. Craton 
Jerry Walton Creech 
Isabelle Crook 
Patricia Curtis 
Barbara Nathene Dail 

Gary Frank Daniel 
Earnest Lee Davis 
William Lee Davis 
Malbert F. Davis, Jr. 
Lawrence Cleveland Davis 

Frank Earl Daye 
William C. Denmark 
Avery Jake Dennis 
Sandra Eleanor Dent 
Delmer Lama Dowda 

Gail G. Downer 
Sara Ellen Dozier 
Thomas R. Dudley 
John Rochester Earle 
Willie M. Earley, Jr. 

John Alsa Eberhart 
Talmidge Hamrick Edwards 
Warren Hackney Ellis 
Kenneth Sawyer Etheridge 
George Fairbanks 

Syrus James Faircloths 
Tilden Bryan Falls 

Mary Elizabeth Farmer 
Jean Faulkner 
Charles N. Fitts 



Morganton 

Dover, N. J. 

Burlington 

Winston-Salem 

Pinetops 

Raleigh 

Fayetteville 

Vanceyville 

Rowland 

Edenton 

Spindalf 

Jacksonville 

Danville, Va. 

Mt. Airy 

Shelby 

Maiden 
Goldsboro 
Louisburg 
Reidsville 



Durhar, 

Tokyo, Japai 

Shelb; 

Louisburi 

Ahoski 



Raleigh 

Monroe 

Lumberton 

Norfolk, Va. 

Wallsburg 



Shelby 

Asiieville 

Nashville 

Roanoke Rapids 



^^^^■1 



LASS OF '58 



Julian R. Flaherty Raleigh 

James H. Floyd Timmonsville, S. C. 

Nancy B. Fogleman Charlottesville, Va. 

James Summers Forrester Wilmington 

James R. Fowler, Jr. I.r\int;t"ii 



Janet Gail Francis 


Clyde 


Richard Ellis Frazier 


Louisburg 


Edna Freeman 


Greensboro 


Mary Francis Fulp 


Lewisville 


Ronald Fulp 


Archdale 


Carroll Franklin Gardner 


Dobson 


Albert Frank Garner 


Whaleyville, Va. 


Hallie Leon Galtin, III 


Raeford 


Jack Leonard Gentry 


Booneville 


James Harrison Gibbs 


Marion 


Peggy Marie Gilliam 


Winston-Salem 


Buddy Roger Glance 


Canton 


Robert Frank Goerlich 


Union, N. .1. 


Donald C. Golding 


Winston-Salem 


Douglas Adrian Graham 


Salisbury 


Caroline Green 


Thomasville 


Samuel Allen Green 


Lawndale 


Edwin B. Gresham 


Greensboro 


Fletcher J. Grubbs 


Winston-Salem 


Will Johnson Gupton 


Rocky Mount 


Vonnie Baxter Hamrick, Jr. 


Forest City 


Peggy Harmon 


Charlotte 


Grady Mack Harmon 


Charlotte 


James L. Harrell 


Norfolk, Va. 


Richard S. Harris 


Washington, D. C. 


Douglas R. Harris 


Troy 


William Styron Harris, Jr. 


Goldsboro 


Lloyd H. Harrison 


Ahoskie 


J. Coell Hauser 


Winston-Salem 


James Hilliard Hawley 


Winston-Salem 


Sarah Jeanette Haywood 


Rockingham 


Margaret Hazeltine 


Dana 


John Frederick Hebel 


Taos, N. Mex. 


Walter Worth Hendrix 


Charlotte 


Wayland C. Hedgepeth 


Whiteville 


Louten Hedgepeth 


Lumberton 


Robert C. Hedrick 


Lexington 


Miles Carter Hedrick 


Rocky Mount 


Jeff B. Helms 


Morganton 


Norman Clyde Herndon 


Walkertown 









J". I** t 
t A* J Alt 




v: 



V 






til *MA\* 




**4 





SUP &l^ 




fcj, 




1 ^Ak 

p p e> 



Rebecca Anne Hester 




High Point 


Vollie Woodrow Hicks 


Hi. 


hmond, Va. 


Benjamin J. Hillman 




Galax, Va. 


Lester F. Hill, Jr. 




Mt. Airy 


Robert M. Hines 




Raleigh 


James Lee Hobbs 




Clinton 


Charles Franklin Hodges 


Wi 


nston-Salem 


Raleigh Alton Holt 


Nesmith, S. C. 


Winfred Dale Holt 




Loris, S. C. 


John Banner Horton 




Vilas 


Sammie Joe Hauser 


Wi 


nston-Salem 


Barbara Ann Howell 




Oakboro 


Walter Lewis Howell 




Raeford 


Edward V. Hudson 




Cramerton 


David Franklin Hughes 


N 


ewman, Ga. 


Dot Hughes 


W 


est Jefferson 


James Melvin Hunter 


Wi 


nston-Salem 


Carolyn Allen Hunter 


Wi 


nst.in-Salcm 


Edith Carolyn Hutchins 




Canton 


Homer Larry Ingle 




I Ireensl 


Elaine James 




Asheboro 


Ralph E. James 




Asheville 


Samuel M. James 




Liberty 


James B. Jeans 


E 


Imporia, Va. 


Paul C. Jenkins 




Cramerton 


Troy J. Jernigan 




Ahoskie 


Darwin T. Johnson 


Wi 


nston-Salem 


Donald E. Johnson 




Raleigh 


Luther C. Johnson 




Elkin 


Rae Johnson 




Rose Hill 


Richard G. Johnson 




East Bend 


Celia Marie Jolley 




Spindale 


Oscar Jones 




Mt. Olive 


Helen Seifert Kafer 




New Ben. 


Oscar A. Kafer 




New Bern 


Jerry M. Keeter 




( Iramerton 


Wesley L. Keith 


Wi 


nston-Salem 


Betty Sue Kerley 




Louisburg 


Alvin Paul Kitchen, Jr. 




Wadesboro 


Carolyn A. Kistler 




Charlotte 


Bettye Sue Knott 




Oxford 


Emil F. Kratt 




Matthews 


Robert B. Ledford 




Charlotte 


William P. Lee 




Lexington 


Denver Hartford Lennon 




Evergreen 



CLASS OF '58 




Charles C. Lethcoe 


Charlotte 


M. Diane Lackey 


Silver Springs, Md. 


Rebecca G. Lampley 


Charlotte 


Don J. LaNier 


Durham 


John H. LaRue 


Galax, Va 


Carolyn V. Laughridge 


Mt. Airy 


Joe C. Layell 


Elkin 


Thomas J. LeVines 


Alexandria, Va. 


Harriett Jane Lewis 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


Jane Carol Lewis 


Winston-Salem 


William H. Lewis 


Cascade, Va 


Jane R. Linder 


Bessemer ( 'ity 


Ted B. Lockerman 


Clinton 


Mary Ellen Loftis 


Brevard 


Coy E. Long 


Hallsboro 


James C. Long 


( lastonia 


Gail F. Love 


Asheville 


Daniel W. Lovelace 


Canton 


Joe Baxter Lovelace 


Foresl Citj 


Billy Wade Lovingood 


Murphy 


Joseph Lawrence Lynch 


Winston-Salem 


Richard G. McCall 


Harrisburg 


Richard A. McCoy 


Hickory 


Charles Macon 


Raleigh 


John B. Malone 


Macon, Ga. 


Joseph J. Mamlin 


Asheville 


William Marlowe 


Statesville 


Barbara Massey 


( Ireensboro 


Jo Ann Mask 


Hickory 


George B. Mast 


Sugar Grove 


Charles Edward Matthews 


Roseboro 


Jimmy David Matthews 


Bessemer City 


Penny May 


Spring Hope 


Van B. Meadows 


Hot Springs 


Sandra Melville 


Winston-Salem 


George C. Mewborn 


La Grange 


John C. Mick 


Riverside, N. .J. 


Bernell G. Miller 


Beulaville 


Edward W. Miller, Jr. 


Bennettsville, S ( '. 


William A. Miller 


Cumberland, Md. 


John G. Mills 


Wake Forest 


Howard Mims 


Raleigh 


Elver Clair Modlin 


Williamston 


James E. Morhorn 


Enfield 


Adron Durant Moore 


Wallace 





P p p 



i 










p (.;-■ fi 

t M ft/Ml 




l^l^K 



mm 





JUNIORS 


Charles Edward Moore 


Charlotte 


Robin 0. Moore 


Carrollton, Ga, 


William D. Moore 


Home, Italy 


Henry D. Morgan 


Gary 


Luther R. Morris 


Ahoskie 


Thomas H. Morris 


Hum, 1 


Charles Hampton Munn 


WeavervUle 


Anna Murphrey 


Roanoke Rapids 


James R. Musgrave 


Goldsboro 1 


Jack D. Naylor 


Mocksvillc 


Herbert Hampton Newsom 


Ahoskie 


William H. Norman 


Winston-Salem 


Robert L. Northcutt 


""" ' 


Wayne K. Nunn 


Co„e„ni 


Richard D. Ogburn 


Winaton-Salem 


David G. Ogilive ( Hiv 


rsity Heights, Ohio 


Joan Owen 


Cant,,,, 


Arthur R. Palmer 


Raleigh 1 


Gregory V. Pappas 


Winston-Salem 


Horace S. Patterson 


Belton 


Jimmy T. Patterson 


Mt. Airy 


William Thomas Peace 


Rutherfordton 


Reta J. Peoples 


Ya.lkllivllle 


Jerry L. Perkins 


Lexington 1 


William O. Perry 


Ridgecrest 1 


Anne R. Phillips 


Pinnacle 


Bobbie E. Phillips 


McLeanaboro, III. 


Charles T. Phipps 


Raleigh ' 


Jerald J. Pierce 


Durham 


Vern N. Pike 


Bloomfield, N. .1. 


Carole J. Pinnix 


Yadkin ville 


Emerson W. Pitts 


Winston-Salem 


Lloyd Harold Plemmons 


Biltmore 


Billie L. Poole 


Roseboro 1 


Imogene Carol 


Tl K.svillr 


Eleanor Powell 


Lenoir 


William L. Powell 


Raleigh 


Lemuel P. Price 


Monroe 


Elizabeth C. Prickett 


lillllu.Kl,,,, 


Phoebe Ann Pridgen 


Atkinson 


George L. Proctor 


Rocky Mount 


Jesse Allan Proctor 


Shelby 


George B. Purvis 


Fairmont 


Roy M. Rawls 


Roanoke Rapids 


Bob J. Ray 


Granite Falls 







CLASS OF '58 






Mary E. Redwine 




Rural Hall 


John W. Reed 




North, S. C. 


Nancy Reeser 




Leaksville 


Warren J. Reid 


W 


nston-Salem 


Thomas H. Reins 




Wilkesboro 


Tevis E. Rennie 




Flint, Mich. 


Purvie 0. Revels 




Shelby 


William L. Revels 




Pembroke 


Ruby A. Rhyne 




Elkin 


Joseph Willis Richardson 




Wake Forest 


Herbert L. Ridgeway 




Raleigh 


Willis G. Rimmer 




Charlotte 


Coy H. Robertson 




Spindale 


Edgar L. Robinson 




Hamlel 


Jack B. Robinson 




Greensboro 


Robert J. Robinson 




Asheville 


Sue F. Robinson 




Raleigh 


Richard George Rogers 


W 


nston-Salem 


Thomas J. Rogers 




Tabor City 


William C. Rogers 


Fu 


[uay Springs 


George E. Rose 


1 


ocky Mount 


Beth Scott 




I iermanton 


Guy L. Scott 


\\ 


nston-Salem 


Ed Wright Scruggs 




Cliffside 


Howard B. Seymour 




Concord 


William G. Shepherd 


W 


nston-Salem 


John G. Shields 


s 


otland Neck 


William B. Shope 




Greensboro 


Evin H. Sides 




Concord 


Don C. Silcox 


L 


luisville, Ky. 


Lawton A. Simmons 




Spnn 


William P. Sing 




Charlotte 


Bill M. Sitton 


H 


jndersonville 


Bobby Bruce Smathers 




Canton 


Allen J. Smith, Jr. 




Aberdeen 


Don Erskine Smith 




Gastonia 


Lemuel H. Smith 




Raleigh 


Nancy J. Smith 




High Point 


Robert T. Smith, Jr. 


Fuquay Springs 


William Tunis Smith 


Fuquay Springs 


Henry V. Spainhour 




Rural Hall 


Melinda Babb Speas 


\Y 


nston-Salem 


Shannon Spivey 




Tabor City 


Robert H. Squires 




Burgaw 


Paul C. Stedman 




Mooreaville 




&&?.££ 








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p p p rlfS 

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JUNIORS 






4k * A l,M'l 




James Stephens 


Leaksville 


Robert W. Stevenson 


Thomasville 


Hunter Lee Stone 


Greensboro 


Ronnie Phillips Stone 


Charlotte 


Donald J. Stoner 


Winston-Salem 


Samuel Patrick Stuart 


Winston-Salem 


Matthew Gray Styers 


Winston-Salem 


Charles E. Summers 


Wilkesboro 


Thomas L. Swatzel 


Hickory 


Gordon B. Tayloe 


r irginia Beach, Va. 


Gerald Thomas Taylor 


Havelock 


Jimmy L. Taylor 


Zebulon 


Perry Teague 


Greensboro 


Rowe William Teague 


Taylorsville 


Eleanor Jean Tedder 


Winston-Salem 


Benjamin S. Tench 


Virginia Beach, Va, 


John David Thomas 


Roanoke, Va. 


Roland Hayes Thomas 


Siler City 


Thomas W. Thomas 


Rocky Mount 


Jimmy A. Tinkham 


Norfolk, Va. 


Frederick E. Turnage 


Rocky Mount 


Alexander R. Tuten 


New Bern 


Alan Tuttle 


Greensboro 


Charles 0. Tyndall 


St ml man 


Bettie Jane Upchurch 


Greensboro 


Larry Bruce Vanhoy 


Rockwell 


Mary Jane Vaughn 


Bel Air, M,l. 


Martha Ann Voyles 


Charlotte 


Nancy Kathryn Waddell 


Sparta 


Ralph A. Walker 


Morganton 


Gene Holland Wall 


Lexington 


Janie Lee Wall 


Burlington 


Thomas L. Wallace 


Cerro Gordo 


Annie Bert Walton 


Jacksonville 


Elizabeth Hadley Watkins 


Durham 


Billy R. Watkins 


Rockingham 


Dudley Ray Watson 


Kinston 


Charles Thomas Waugh 


Mooresville 


Sue Blount Weathers 


Winston-Salem 


Joseph Bernard Webb 


(I: lax 


Nancy Mae Webster 


Winston-Salem 


James Randolph Welborn 


Winston-Salem 


Anne Davis Wells 


Rose Hill 


Gayle Wells 


Wat ha 


Joe Irvin White 


LaGrange, (la. 



CLASS OF '58 



Davis Henry Wilcox, III 


Kingsporl 


. Term. 


Hildreth Floyd Wilkins 


Winsto 


-Salem 


Linda Carol Willard 


Pilol \l 


mntain 


Barbara Virginia Williams 


X. 


u Bern 


Durward R. Williams 


Chevy Cha 


se, M.I 


Larry Williams 


l;,i 


lingtoB 


Michael F. Williams 


( !re 


tnsboro 


Roger H. Williams 


Xc 


w Bern 


Ronald W. Williams 


St; 


tesville 


Harold O. Wilson 


Delr 


,v. Fla. 


John Nevin Wimer 


Norf 


ilk, V;l. 


June E. Wolfe, Jr. 


M 


. Olive 


Tommy C. Womble 




( lary 


Bobby D. Workman 


Tli. ii 


uisvillr 


Raymond Weaver Wrenn 


Rocky 


Mount 


Elaine Davis Wright 


Dov 


■i. Del. 


John Davis Wright 


Pitma 


i. X. J. 


James L. Powell, Jr. 


Ore 


nsl 





ft 





Riynolda Hall at Night. 






nit;. j~ 







Science Building 





1 

J 




p 

J 




p p 

ll 6 



One of the more difficult operations of the entire 
removal program was the resettlement of chemistry, 
physics, and biology into their respective positions 
in the science building. Although some of the 
dreamed-ot facilities are built-in conveniences in 
the new quarters, many of the pieces of equipment 
seen throughout the building are veterans of previous 
years of service, well-remembered from days gone 
by. Biology professors have forsaken their specimen- 
hunting grounds around Wake Count)', and are 
searching the area for replacements, as well as 
listing and classifying the trees around us. 

To meet the increased enrollment in the sciences, 
several members have been added to their faculties. 
Biology presents Dr. R. L. Wyatt and Dr. J. E. 
Davis; chemistry, Dr. P. J. llamrick; and physics. 
Dr. L. A. Hall, returning to his alma mater. Dr. 
T. J. Turner has recently undertaken the chair- 
manship of the Department of Physics. 

As routines and prodecures become established 
several members of the science faculties are resum- 
ing or beginning research projects, one of the most 
interesting aspects of teaching in a science field. 
Dr. Turner is continuing his work in solid-state 
physics, Dr. Hamrick and Dr. Miller each have a 
project in organic chemistry, and Dr. Wyatt and 
Dr. Allen are doing biological research. 





Biology Department: Drs. Elton Cocke. John Davis, 0. C. Bradbury, Grady Knit, Raymond Wyatt, Charles Allen 



FACULTY: SCIENCE IN A MODERN SETTING 





Dr. C. S. Black, Chairman of the Chemistry 
Depa 





Physics Department: Drs. Alton Hall. William Speas, T. I. Tumc 



Chemistry Department: Drs. Harry Miller, I W. Nowell, I. C. Blaleck, C. S. Black. 





Members oj A.E.I), are, first row : Medford, Pomdexter, Gatlm, Bine, Harrison, Corwin, II ilkinson, Munn, R. Moore, Dr. Bradbury, Tovmsend. Second 
row: Sweden, Flippin, Fisher, Guth, Silcox, Forrester, Frazier, I'. Moore, Poston, Keith, Griffin, Pearee. I InrJ row : Helms, Taylor, Reed. 

CONVENTIONS HIGHLIGHT THE YEAR FOR SCIENCE HONORARIES 



Members of Gamma Sigma Epsilon are, kneeling: II'. Ketner, Silcox, Medford, brazier, Tounsend, Forrester, lours. Gatlm. Standing: Flippin, Usher. 
King, Corwin, B. Ketner, Muiin, Harrison, Helms, Poston, Peterson, Bryant. 





Members of Beta Beta Beta are, seared: .">/; 
Killian, Clark, Gatlm, Hartness, Littleton. 

BETA BETA BETA 
Beta Beta Beta, the honorary biology fra- 
ternity, has approximately thirty-four mem- 
bers. With Dr. E. C. Cocke as their adviser, 
they were busy first semester getting settled 
on the new campus. In the spring the Wake- 
Forest Tri-Betes played host to the District 
Beta Beta Beta Convention. 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 
Alpha Epsilon Delta is the honorary fra- 
ternity lor outstanding pre-medical students. 
This year they sponsored a chest x-ray unit 
and a blood bank and held the National 
Pre-medical-Pre-dental Convention here on 
campus. Dr. Bradbury is the adviser. 

GAMMA SIGMA EPSILON 
Every year those students who have- 
painstakingly labored over hot bunsen burners 
and smelly test tubes are honored by being 
tapped tor Gamma Sigma Epsilon, the honor- 
ary chemistry fraternity, llarolyn King 
presided over the bi-monthly meetings, which 
featured lecturers from various colleges. 

PHYSICS HONOR SOCIETY 

Students who have distinguished themselves 
in the Physics Department arc initiated each 
year into the Wake Forest Physics Honor 
Society. The society, with Bill Walker as 
president, has as its aim the establishment of 
a chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, national physics 
fraternitv. Dr. Turner is adviser. 



Members of Physics Club are, hirst row Bryant, Burroughs, King, hues, Arnold 
Second row Gentry, Dr. Turner, Walker, Dr. Hall. 



fN pfi 





Lab assistant Burroughs explains wonders of electricity to i 



SCIENCE FACILITIES IMPROVED 

The sciences at Wake Forest occupy a building on the 
southwest corner of the campus. Originally planned for the 
chemistry department, the building has proved inadequate 
in the first year of use. 

Modern laboratories, beautiful classrooms, and an air 
of efficiency characterize this corner of the campus. I he 
laboratories are equipped with comfortable furniture and 
spacious storage facilities. A large lecture-type auditorium 
occupies the center of the budding and provides a place 
for group lectures and motion pictures. The physics labora- 
tories are located on the ground floor; classrooms, biology 
and chemistry laboratories are on the first floor; a science 
library, a meeting hall for science fraternities and faculty 
ottiees are on the second floor. 

Until buildings are completed to house the physics and 
biology departments, all three sciences will continue in 
cramped quarters. 



1(14 





It takes .< keen rye for organii lab, .1 keen mind for organic 



Chemistry students keep \lr. Hluhe. Supply Room Manager, bus} passing out Corks, Tubing, Ethanal, etc 




Law Building 




■iti 




// Weathers, Dean of Law School. 



Law Faculty members m: Let, Divine, Sktmore, Dean Weathers, Wiggins, Scarlett, Webster. 





THIRD YEAR LAW 



I Ik- dreams of boyhood are almost a reality 
as the third year law students approach the 
exam t<> end all exams their bar examination. 
Each case lias been briefed with an eye to the 
future, fur there is the determining possibility 
that any case might appear on the liar or might 
influence the outcome of a future decision. Thus, 
the third year is more than just a cramming 
session; and the pure art of learning is no light 
matter. Now is the time each must determine 
individually the responsibilities of his chosen 
profession, and lattice is no longer a word to 
use lightly, hut a thing to he wrestled w irh in 
earnest. 

1 lurd year students Sam Johnson, A. A. 
Coutras, and Edgar Bain prepared to prove the 
adage, "Practice makes perfect," as they repre- 
sented Wake Forest in the Regional Moot Court 
contest which convened here in November. 



Edgar R. Bain, B.S., LL.B. Lillington 

Phi Delta Phi; Studenl Bar Association; Regional Apellate 
Mont Court Team 

Jeff D. Batts, B.B.A., LL.B. Wilson 

Phi Alpha Delia, District Justice; National Moot Court Com- 



M. Alexander Biggs, Jr., B.B.A., LL.B. 

Phi Alpha Delta; Student Bar Associate 

First Vear Law ( 'la- 
Clarence Calvin Boyan, B.A., LL.B. 

Phi Delta Phi; Student Bar Association. 

Wayne M. Brendle, B.S., LL.B. 

Phi Delta Phi, Student liar Association. 

Angelo A. Coutras, LL.B. 

Phi Alpha Delta; Studenl Bar Associati 



tan ; Moot Court; V 



Payette 
Pi; Treaf 



Charlotte 
Class Secre- 



il Moot Court Competiti 



Fred G. Crumpler, Jr., LL.B. 
I'ln Delta Phi; Student Bar As 



Daniel Laurence Downing, B.S., LL.B. 
Phi Alpha Delta. 



Johnie Ray Hendren, B.B.A., LL.B. Statesville 

Sigma I'ln Epsilon; Phi Alpha Delta, Justice 3, Young Democrats 
Club, Secretary I. President 2, State Secretary 3 







J. Sam Johnson, Jr., B.A., LL.B. Shiloh 

Phi Delta Phi, Excl uer; Sin, In, i Bar Association; First Place 

in Nathan Burkan Copvrighl Competition; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Phi Beta Kappa; National Moot Court Competition 

Mitchell T. King, B.A., LL.B. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Phi Alpha Delta 



Senior Class Vice-President 



Clarence M. Kirk, B.S., LL.B. Knightdale 

Phi Alpha Delta; First Year Class President. Scorn. i Year Class 
President; Third Year President Student Bar Association. 

Edward Allen Lassiter, B.S., LL.B. Sunbury 

Phi Alpha Delta, Student Hat- Association. 



James H. Limer, LL.B. 
Phi Alpha Delta. 

Archie E. Lynch, Jr., B.A., LL.B. 

William Leroy Morris, B.S., LL.B. 

Phi Alpha Dicta; First Year Class President. 



Buies Creek 
Linclnton 



Grady Ray Motsinger, Jr., B.S., LL.B. 
Phi Delta Phi; Kappa Alpha. 

Willis E. Murphrey, III, B.A., LL.B. 



Hugh R. Owen, B.A., LL.B. 

Phi Delta Phi; Student Bar Association 

James Guy Revelle, Jr., B.A., LL.B. 

Kappa Alpha; Phi Delta Phi. Historian 2. f 
P.ii Association; Omicron Delta Kappa 'Wh< 

( 'olleges and Cllivel sit ies " 



Robert C. Rogers, B.S., LL.B. 
Student Bar Association Treasu 



I; Phi Alpha De 



Joseph F. Schweidler, B.S., LL.B. 
Phi Alpha Delta. Student Bar Vssociati 



Keith Y. Sharp, A.B., LL.B. 
Phi Alpha Delta; Senior Class Tr 



Jerry G. Tart, B.S., LL.B. Newton Grove 

Phi Delta Phi; Student Bar Association. 

Howard Fabing Twiggs, B.S., LL.B. Raleigh 

Kappa Alpha: Phi Delta Phi Magister; Omicron Delta Kappa: 
Student Bar Association; "Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities." 



Koanoke Rapids 



Charles B. Vickory, Jr., A.B., LL.B. 
Phi Delta Phi; Student Bar Associati 



Pleasant G 



£ p <p p El 









& {SI 



SECOND YEAR LAW 








Second ) cat Law officers are: Stewart, Gray, Barefoot and I h, 



Napoleon B. Barefoot 
James T. Boone 
William Earl Britt 
Charlie B. Casper 

Thomas L. Cherry 
Edd Wolfe DeArmon, Jr. 
Luther J. Eubank, Jr. 
Daniel W. Fouts 



Wilmington 

Sharpsburg 

McDonald 

New London 

Ahoskir 

Washington, I). C. 

New Bern 

Burns ville 



Burrill M. Gray 


Winston-Salem 


Arnold Max Harris 


Boiling Springe 


Wade M. Hobson 


Boonville 


Olin R. Hunter 


Huntersville 


Hilliard E. Kinlaw 


A.N.Irn 


Alton W. Kornegay 


Gamer 


Leslie B. McDaniel 


Spring Lake 


Don M. Pendleton 


Vole 


Graham A. Phillips 


Warsaw 


Robert E. Riddle 


Mars Hill 


George W. Saintsing 


ThomasviUe 


Ernest C. Selvey, Jr. 


Charlotte 


Frank Stewart 


Charlotte 


John C. Stroupe 


Hickory 


Walter L. Travis 


High Point 


Fred M. Upchurch 


Greensboro 


James R. Wills 


Greensboro 


Harold R. Wilson 


Dunn 


James M. Yelton 


Bakersville 



110 



FIRST YEAR LAW 




Barbara Jane Bailey 
Marion Wilson Benfield, Jr. 
William Christopher Blossom 
Presley Bell Brawley 


Winston-Salem 

Cms.U' 
Rocky Point 
Mooresville 


Theodore Cecil Brown 
Ernest F. Cashion, Jr. 
Walter C. Clark, Jr. 
George E. Clayton 


Raleigh 

Sanford 

Asheville 

Pottstow II 


Harold D. Coley 
John Costulis 
Willard T. Cox 
Cicely Ann Darr 


Raleigh 

Belhaven 

Clarendon 

Winston-Salem 


Koy E. Dawkins 
James C. Davis 
Ronald C. Dilthey 
James M. Farris 


Rockingham 

China Grove 

Syasset, N. V, 

Mayodan 


Robert W. Fisher 
Pinkeny Carroll Froneberger 
Leslie Gray Frye 
Alonso H. Gainey 


1 'allton 

Gaatonia 

Clemmons 

Winston-Salem 


Rossie Garnet Gardner 
Harold Gleitz 
Ralph E. Goodale 
George Goodwyn 


High Point 

Wiggins. Miss. 

Winston-Salem 

Tarboro 


James Hodges 
Hal Haire 
Major Harding 
Donald B. Haskins 


Thorofare, N. .1. 
Elizabethtown 

Charlotte 
Greensboro 


H. John Hatcher 
J. Marshall Haywood 
George B. Herndon 
Fredrick S. Hutchins 


Morgan ton 
Rockingham 

Winston-Salem 
Winston-Salem 




are, left to right: Clayton. President; 
Bailey, Secretary; Goodall, Vice-President; Haywood, Treasurer. 











p ^ ^ 





FIRST YEAR LAW 


John H. Isert 


Monticello, Ky. 


Cecil C. Jackson 


Asheville 


Bobby E. James 


Albemarle 


Jerry L. Jarvis 


Winston-Salem 


Edmond Lowe 


High Point 


Vance McCown 


Tryon 


Carroll H. Matthews 


Arlington, Va. 


Roy R. Mitchell 


Greensboro 


William C. Moore 


Winston-Salem 


Joe H. Morris 


Laurinburg 


Jack Morton 


Albemarle 


William B. Rogers 


Tabor City 


Granville A. Ryals 


Lillington 


Richard J. Sapp 


Reyndlda 


Edsel W. Sholar 


Rooky Mount 


Edward A. Squires 


Burgaw 


Arnold M. Stone 


Winston-Salem 


James R. Sugg 


Now Bern 


Jack Webster 


Madison 





In the "pride of the Law School," aspiring lawyers get their first taste of courtroom procedures from the "mock" truth held hire 



Clarence Kirk mates j point during "Moot" Court. 




Law student takes .1 quid- glance away from studies toward co-ed d 





Members of I'ln Delta Phi honorary laiufr 



PHI DELTA PHI 



Officer* oj Phi Delta Phi are: Upchurch, His 
Magister; Johnson, Exchequer. 



Revelle, Clerk; Twiggs 




The Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity captured the 
scholarship trophy fur the tenth time in ten years 
and placed it triumphantly in the new Ruffin Inn. 
A stag "lemonade" bust was staged for the rirst 
year students. At the October dinner meeting 
Judge Hubert Olive spoke on "Legal Ethics." 
"Trial Tactics in Criminal Cases" was the topic 
of Mr. Frederick Hutchins at the November 
meeting. 1 he year was crowded with Saturday 
night socials, which the Wives' Club was respons- 
ible lor decorations and refreshments; the winning 
ol the Independent League football championship; 
and, of course, "the pulling down of the books!" 



Mrs. Sarah Motsin 





Phi Alpha Delta, one of the two legal fraternities, 
packed up its books and moved from the quiet 
surroundings of the legal corner at Wake Forest 
to Archie's Firecracker Blvd. This year Johnny 
Ray Hendren served as president of the I dgar 
Timberlake Chapter. The PAD's played host to 
the District Fraternity Conclave held here in 
Winston-Salem, and two members of the chapter 
won top offices — Jeff Batts being elected District 
Justice, and Tom Cherry, District Treasurer. 
.Members entertained "prospectives" at smokers 
and held a workshop for the new men. 



\hss CicelxArm Da 



PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Officers of Phi Alpha Delhi are: Hendren. Justice; Ridden, Veep Justice; 
Britt, Secretary; DeArmon, Treasurer: Barefoot, Marshal. Dr. Timberlake. 
the fraternity advisor for main years, is shown in the portrait. 






Wake Chapel 



tm 



HBHHHBHB1 

















f 

[ 






p 

J 



Dr. I. Glenn Blackburn, Chaplai 





Dr. I Allen Easley, Chair- 
man of the Religion 11,- 
partment. 



Edgar II. Christman, Di- 
rector of Religious Activities 



Dr. Albert C. Reid, Cha, 
man of Philosophy-Ps 
chology Depa 





FACULTY: THEY INSPIRE 

Housed in Wingate Hall arc the Philosophy 
and Psychology Department, the Religion Depart- 
ment, the Music Department, and the B.S.U. 
offices. Perhaps this is the budding most frequently 
visited by the majority of students. Downstairs 
is the Paul Pnee Davis Memorial Chapel, which 
is used constantly liy different religious groups tor 
vespers, morning watches, and special services. 
Sounds of scales and exercises being sung and 
played drift down the hall from the practice rooms 
and into the B.S.U. office where Kd Christman 
directs the activities of this organization and is a 
friend and counselor to many students. In the next 
office Dr. Glenn Blackburn tackles the many tasks 
incumbent upon a college chaplain. I veil on Sun- 
days, Wingate is buzzing with Sunday School 
classes and B.T.U. groups. 




llr. Thane McDonald, 
Director of Music. 



Religion Department. Seated: Drs. Herring, Easley, Griffin. Stand- 
ing Dra. »wt, Angell, Via, Hamrick. 





Y.W.A. officers. Seared left to right Nance, Tucker, Paschal, McMillan, Rouse, Smith. Wallace, Aycock. Standing left to right Harvell, Dm 
Bordeaux, Privette, Black-well, Beatty, Strickland. Huskins, Julian, leary. 



120 




RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS PLAY 
IMPORTANT ROLE IN STUDENTS' LIFE 

I he Baptist Student Union is the great co-ordinating force on the Wake- 
Forest campus, its mechanical hands clicking quietly and effectivel) behind 
various spiritual, intellectual and social activities. Those who devote time, 
energy, and loyalty to the phases of the B.S.L". movement are working toward 
a collegiate program for the fullest student benefit and interest possible, foremost, 
the B.S.L'. is the religious co-ordinator. In addition to attending special morning 
meditations preceding Thanksgiving and Christmas, students were given the 
opportunity to draw aside after a possibly chaotic day for a period of meditation 
at Evening Vespers. These services were planned and presented this year by 
a committee headed by Dave Hirano. Teams piled into the wagon and took oft 
in all directions for week-end church revivals, where students sang, preached, 
entertained and spread Baptist love and college spirit. Through other channels 
such as the inviting Y.W.A. supper meetings and the activities of the Religious 
Education Club, the B.S.U. reached its ringers of spiritual growth. 

"You're Here — What Now : " w as the theme of discussion for the first campus- 
w ide supper forum held in the Magnolia Room. A later forum was held in con- 
nection with the issues of the national presidential election. A special service lor 
the students was the karch All {Calendar, presenting the month's activities. 
Students listened to out-of-town football games with as much enthusiasm as if 
the\' were in the stadium during the "Listen" parties staged in the TV lounge. 
Heralding the approach of the Christmas season, B.S.U. ers caroled the campus 
and faculty row. Soon after, in anticipation of exams, they celebrated with a 
"Schizophrantic" costume part)'. 

The "brain trust" of all this — and more — activity was the executive council, 
which held a special retreat at Reynolda Park to outline the Spring schedule. 



Christian Education and Service Club: To sponsor extensie 
nent church vocations is the purpose oj this organization. 



rkers for churches, and to prepare students to take their plate 




Extension team members are: Smith. 
Up, In, r,li, Williams, Ledbetter, Perry, 
hums. Hirano. 




•W¥ 




Officers of the three religious organizations other than Baptist on campus are: Wesley. Left to right; Mark Hawthorne, Treasurer; Harlyn Cools, So 
tary; Jimmy Hobbs, Vice-President and Ralph fames. President; Westminster: Reid Crocker, President, and Magdalen Hetez, Vice-President; Cantei 
bury: Chester Howe, President, and Syh-ia H.nket. Secretary. 



The Cullom Ministerial Conference. These are the ministers of the future— today rhe\ listen, tomorrow they lead. 





THE MUSICAL MINDED 



I he Wake- Forest College Chapel Choir composed 
of 85 selected voices under the capable direction of Dr. 
I hane McDonald has provided music for the Thursday 
Chapel services and several other programs throughout 
the Near. I he I Xth annual Vesper Service, featuring 
G. F. Handel's "The Messiah," was presented before 
the Christmas holidays, I he choir was accompanied in 
this presentation by the College Little Symphony, 
James Good, pianist, and Dr. Paul Robinson, organist. 
Also for the first time this year, a choir was organized 
in summer school. They closed the summer session with 
a performance of Pergolesi's "Stabat Mater." 

I he College louring Choir, composed of 38 voices 
chosen from the Chapel Choir, made its tenth annual 
tout during the spring vacation. I hey traveled as far 
north as Westminster, Maryland, performing for churches, 
schools, and various organizations. A highlight of the 
Choir's preliminary performances in and around Winston- 
Salem was an exchange concert with the Winston-Salem 
Teachers' College. The choir hopes to continue this 
exchange program as a tradition for succeeding Wake 
Forest choirs. 

The music program was also enhanced this year by 
a male quartet, the "Singing Deacs," which made several 
appearances including a televised performance. 



Ijmg will students remember the melodious sounds which Dr. Paul Robinson 
produced from tlir many-thtnisanded piprd organ. 



The Touring Choir sprni their spring, vacation spreading the Wake Forest family sph 



Maryland, Virginia, and Washington. 



IF 



I 



# /K 



%■ % 



CO 
t I L 



BLLAl 




y& &&£& aa a cm n 



r , t f I t#*f4 *lt**l M | ft 

#/m ****** *****.**.* -' 



fft4ft/ k f/ s yS+% 



m 







'/"/«• U'.r/v Form CW/fg* Ou/v/ <7//«r: 77a iv«m tuAiVA have floated from the choir loft to pluck the heartstrings oj the student body 




Singing Dcaa: Dr. McDonald, Director and Pianist. Left to right: Henderson, Geer, R. Stone, T. Sto. 



125 




H.S.U. Choir furnished musii for special Sunday night -worship services. Directed In Dr. McDcmald and \liss Phillip Ann Gardne 



I espers, along with the curtain of night, closes a day of classes and studies for the students in the Paul Price Davis Chapel. 




~ 



V W 





RETREAT HELD 
AT CAMP HANES 

Before registration lines be- 
gan to form for the opening 
61 file fall semester on the 
new campus, a hundred Wake 
Forest students were already 
getting a taste of 7 :00 reveille 
and classes. The only dif- 
ference in the "pre-school" 
event and the real thing was 
that the activities were en- 
tirely voluntary — even to the 
sunrise hikes and self-imposed 
lectures. 

I he cause of all this excite- 
ment was the annual retreat 
sponsored by the Baptist Stu- 
dent Union. All students in 
the college were invited to 
attend the conference held at 
Camp Hancs. Rctreaters ar- 
rived at the camp located at 
the foot of Sauratown Moun- 
tain on September S. Activities 
packed into each day ranged 
from charades and chatting to 
sermons and seminars. 

They reaped from their 
four days' stay there a harvest 
of fellowship, inspiration, and 
information for the new school 
year. 




Fireside devofurmls end mother perfect day . 
Dm of the highest peaks if the r,r,r.,r reached />< //„■ earl) morning riser 





SOPHOMORES 



With hearts steeped in past traditions and with eyes 
fixed on the new campus and new traditions, the sophomore 
class approached their second year at Wake Forest with 
mixed emotions. As the year rolled on, they found a deeper 
meaning to college life, as they learned to discard the super- 
ficial covering that had attracted them as freshmen. Most 
of all they learned that a college does not depend upon old 
or neu buildings, upon magnolias or lack of magnolias, 
rather that it depends on one the individual. Organizing 
plots to steal the old bell, working on the Talent Show, and 
taking part in every phase of campus life, the sophomores 
reached the halfway mark of their college careers. 



Sophomon clan officers are: \t.u- 
lean McLamb, Secretary; Richard 
Odnni, President; Earl Shall), Vice- 
President. 




Mil 





Martha Kay Adams 
Glenn J. Adcock 
C. Elaine Anderson 
Robert L. Alphin 
William B. Apple 

Barbara Ann Avard 
Billy F. Avery 
John A. Bahnson 
Thomas A. Baucom 
Hugh M. Beam, Jr. 

Cooper B. Beasley 
James E. Benbow 
Ray W. Benneld 
Albert D. Benton 
James H. Black, Jr. 

Edward S. Blackburn 
William L. Blackwell 
Wallace D. Blalock 
Nancy C. Blossom 
Betty L. Bolt 

Dewey E. Bovender, Jr. 
Rodley K. Bowman 
Thompson S. Boyd, Jr. 
Robert H. Boyles 
Howell W. Branch 



( !ary 

Greensboro 

Weldon 

Wendell 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Morganton 

Winston-Salem 

Oxford 

Roxboro 

Four links 
Easl Bend 
Statesville 



Elkin 

Pine Hall 

Winston-Salem 

Burgaw 

Charlotte 

Wins -Salem 

Taylorsville 

ilendale Springs 
ThomasviUe 
Lumberton 



CLASS OF 


'59 


Minnie F. Branch 


Roekj Mounl 


John S. Braswell 


Mocksvilli 


Donald E. Bratton 


Concord 


David E. Bright 


Newton 


Jerry Brinegar 


Winston-Salem 


Ernest N. Brisson 


Greensbon 


Olin Broadway 


Raleigh 


Barbara Ann Broadway 


Lexington 


James E. Brown 


Durham 


Mary L. Brown 


Wallaci 


James G. Brown 


Littleton 


Wilma A. Brown 


Trout man 


Bryon A. Bullard 


Charlotte 


Howard Bimti 


Providence 


Louis F. Burleson 


Badin 


William S. Butler 


Morgan ton 


Harold S. Cain 


Boone 


Janice W. Caldwell 


Newton 


Ethel W. Caldwell 


Maiden 


David W. Calloway 


Winston-Salem 


David N. Canady 


Hope Mills 


Thomas K. Carlton, Jr. 


Salisbury 


Fred M. Carmichael 


New Bern 


Clarence W. Carter 


Winston-Salem 


Robert W. Carswell 


Orlando, Pla. 


Doris A. Cash 


Winston-Salem 


Jo Ann Cass 


Winston-Salem 


Earl Catlett 


Krai, kluit,,.i 


Roy Q. Church 


Statrsvlll,. 


John Cella 


Raleigh 


Caudell W. Clark 


Mebane 


Nancy C. Coley 


Rocky Mount 


Aushin Cook 


Winston-Salem 


Barbara Sue Cook 


Salisbury 


George L. Counts 


Welch, W. Va. 


David H. Craver 


Lexington 


Earl R. Crocker 


Charlotte 


Robert F. Crumpler 


Raleigh 


John E. Crutchfield 


Winston-Salem 


Anne V. Cutter 




Hubert L. Dail 


Edenton 


Felix B. Dalton 


Shelby 


John H. Daniel, Jr. 


Raleigh 


B. Howard Daniels 


Norfolk, Va. 


Mack T. Daniels 


Chester, Va. 




r p 






P P 






f 




SOPHOMORES 


Robert W. Daughtridge 


Rocky Mount 


Robert L. Davis 


Snow Hill 


Richard B. Day 


Klkin 


Robert L. Deal 


Atlantic City, N'. J. 


John J. Dean, Jr. 


Louisburg 


Charles B. Deane 


Rockingham 


S. Raches Dedmon 


Shelby 


Charles N. Dempsey 


Lowesville, Va. 


Robert H. Demsey 


Raleigh 


Darrell F. Dennis 


Ashevffle 


Franklin D. Denny 


Pilot Mountain 


Carolyn Ann Dickson 


Winston-Salem 


Philip A. Diehl 


Charlotte 


James M. Dixon 


Spindale 


Jerry A. Donevant 


Winston-Salem 


Jean Downs 


Canton 


David L. Drummond 


Winston-Salem 


Charles R. Duncan, Jr. 


Radford, Va. 


George R. Dunn 


Raleigh 


Harvey R. Durham 


Thomasville 


Emory B. Eary 


Wake Forest 


Addison B. Edwards 


Greensboro 


S. Bruce Edwards, Jr. 


Beaufort 


Barbara A. Edwards 


Hertford 


Theron G. Egley 


Albany, X. Y. 


James F. Elam 


Charlotte 


Wayne Ellingham 


Clemmons 


Jo Anne Ellington 


Greensboro 


Baron S. Elrod 


( Iramerton 


Martin N. Erwin 


Lexington 


Mary Mel Farris 


Lexington 


Raymond B. Farrow 


Wilmington 


Joe D. Featherston 


Cramerton 


William R. Featherson 


Forest City 


Joseph W. Ferguson 


Salem, Va. 


Elizabeth A. Finch 


Ml. Airy 


Shirley Rose Fisher 


Bladenboro 


Homer B. Fitch, Jr. 


Carrboro 


Robert E. Fitzgerald 


Lexington 


Larry E. Foltz 


Winston-Salem 


David L. Foster 


Whiteville 


Malcolm T. Foster 


FayetteviUe 


John T. Foster 


Wilkesboro 


Glenn E. Fos 


Burnsville 


L. Judy Freeman 


Asheboro 



■ 



CLASS OF 


'59 


Jane G. Freeman 


Salisbury 


Jerry W. Fulp 


\\ inston-Salem 


Keifer L. Gaddis 


< lastonia 


Junious M. Gaftney, Jr. 


Statesville 


Alan K. Gardner 


Winston-Salem 


Dinah Gattis 


Burlington 


J. Frank Geer 


Rutherfordton 


Richard L. Gilbert 


( rreensboro 


William R. Goldston 


Wake Forest 


James C. Gordon, Jr. 


Winchester, Va. 


Bill E. Grant 


Marshville 


Murray C. Greason, Jr. 


Winston-Salem 


Jerry T. Greene 


Winston-Salem 


Marsha Greenshields 


Arlington, Va. 


Charles T. Griffin, Jr. 


Edenton 


Elizabeth A. Griffin 


Winston-Salem 


Edwin R. Groce 


Yadkinville 


Robert C. Guthrie 


Beaufort 


Sylvia L. Hackett 


Baltimore, Md 


Edward M. Hairfield 


Morgantoo 


Durrow C. Hall 


Charlotte 


George W. Hamrick 


Lattimore 


Phillip B. Harris 


Fayetteville 


William E. Harrold 


Winston-Salem 


Samuel E. Harvey, Jr. 


Salem, Va. 


Rosalie Hawkins 


Cliffside 


Martha L. Haworth 


Lumberton 


Edna M. Haynes 


Lexington 


Gray S. Haynes 


Winston-Salem 


Williams H. Heins, Jr. 


Sanford 


James Helms 


Winston-Salem 


Henry A. Helms, Jr. 


Raleigh 


Thomas Helms 


Morganton 


John Nance Hendley 


Ansonville 


William D. Herring 


Rocky Mount 


Billy Dean Hester 


Burlington 


Jack D. Hester 


Belews Creek 


John R. Heydt lira, 11 


•y Beach, X. J. 


Miles L. Higgison 


Waycross, Ga. 


William E. Hines Charleston, W. Va. 


Mark W. Hodges 


Boone 


Barbara A. Holfeld 


Gastonia 


Jeral A. Holleman 


Raleigh 


Frederick A. Honrine 


New Bern 


Charles Home 


Shelby 



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SOPHOMORES 


Dewey Hornaday 




Hamlel 


Lamar E. Houston 




Franklin 


Palmer E. Huffstetler 




Kings Mountain 


Nancy C. Hughes 




SVesI Jefferson 


Charles D. Humphries 




China Grove 


Frederica Isenhour 




Jacksonville, Fla. 


Barbara A. Jackson 




Thomasville 


Edwin G. Jenkins 




Fayetteville 


William C. Jennette, Jr. 




Westminster, Md. 


Richard A. Johnson 




High Point 


Hubert A. Jones, Jr. 




Wake Forest 


Sandra M. Jones 




Kannapolis 


Bobby F. Jones 




Wake Fores! 


Glenn C. Jordan 




StatesviUe 


Norman B. Kellum, Jr. 




New Bern 


Sue Killian 




Linwood 


John W. Kimball, Jr. 




Salisbury 


Georgia King 


M 


incks Corner, S. ('. 


William H. Kirk 




Martinsville, Va. 


Jean Kirkham 




Wilmington 


James A. Knight 




Guilford College 


John J. Ladd 




Gastonia 


Benjamin H. Lancaster, 


Jr. 


StoneviUe 


William 0. Landen 




Wilson 


Alfred R. Lanier 




Wallace 




Li 



June L. Laughlin 
Bobby J. Lawrence 
Floyd G. Lawson 
Roy A. Ledford 
Luther E. Ledford, Jr. 

Leah Lee 

Charles A. Leggette 
William B. Lennon 
D. Leon Lewis 
Hughie E. Lewis 

M. Bruce Liles, Jr. 
Walter E. Lowery 
James B. Lutz 
Charles H. McClain 
Jack V. McCraw 

Vernon B. McDaniel 
Milliam McDume 
Marlene McLamb 
Clifton R. McLaurin 
Rex C. McMillan 



Charlotte 

Graham 

Crisfield, Md. 

Shelby 

Wendell 

Rocky Mouni 

Tabor City 

Wilmington 

( lastonia 

Warsaw 

Monroe 

McFarlan 

Uwndale 

Asheville 

Gaffney 

Gr Bboro 

Kannapolil 

Salemburg 

Fayetteville 

Raleigh 



CLASS OF 


'59 


Nancy McNeill 


High Point 


James W. Mackie 


Wake Forest 


Thomas D. Malcolm 


Orlando, Fla. 


George D. Maier 


Bridgeton, N.J. 


John M. Mangum 


Pageland, S < ' 


Earl Marlowe 


Kins- Mountain 


Harry N. Martin, Jr. 


Asheville 


Jerry Matherly 


Greensboro 


Ted Matney 


Volney 


Paul M. Matthews 


Hertford 


James R. Medlin 


Monroe 


Jerry W. Meeks 


High Point 


Charles G. Melton, Jr. 


Henderson, Ky. 


Cecil Merritt 


Whiteville 


Hannah L. Miller 


Cliffside 


Marion C. Miller 


Lawndale 


James B. Minor 


Winston-Salem 


Holland V. Moore 


Shelby 


E. Jean Moore 


Maiden 


Vivian Morgan 


( Ireensboro 


William D. Moricle 


Reidsville 


Phillip R. Morrow 


Catawba 


Margaret B. Moses 


Wake Forest 


Richard H. Moser 


Winston-Salem 


Karl K. Munn 


Roek Hill, S C. 


M. June Myers 


Canton 


Hansel C. Neathery 


( iowen, ( »kl:i. 


Janie L. Neathery 


Winston-Salem 


Jerry L. Newsome 


Winston-Salem 


Jerry V. Nostrandt 


DanviUe, Va. 


Daniel R. Odom 


High Point 


Richard B. Odom 


Ahoskie 


Joyce Ann Odom 


Derita 


William H. Olive 


Durham 


Harry E. Orr Pomptun Plains, X.J 


Robert H. Owen 


( 'union 


William F. Owens, Jr. 


Winston-Salem 


Harry Oxendine 


Pembroke 


Henry C. Pace, III 


Leaksville 


Dan Padgett 


Mooresboro 


A. Stephany Painter 


Forest City 


Charlie T. Pappendick 


Roanoke Rapids 


Joan F. Parcells 


Petersburg. Ya. 


Earl B. Parker, Jr. 


Vicksburg, Miss. 


William D. Parrish 


Winston-Salem 



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SOPHOMORES 




\ 



****** 

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• iilt 




Vance A. Pascal 
William E. Patillo 
Donald W. Pennell 
Sarah C. Perryman 
Jackie D. Phillips 

James W. Pickard 
Helen C. Pilcher 
Thurman M. Pittman 
William A. Pope, III 
Alexander Poston 

James M. Price 
Shirley Putman 
David A. Rawley, Jr. 
Archibald W. Reeser 
Tom C. Revis 

S. Harry Roberts 
Diane C. Roberts 
Joseph C. Robinson 
Albert R. Rogerson 
Charles S. Rooks 

Thomas S. Royster 
Garth L. Rucker, Jr. 
John M. Russell 
James A. Sanders 
Arnold R. Sasser 

Douglas S. Sasser 
Stephen L. Sasser 
Mary A. Satterwhite 
Robert H. Saunders 
James K. Scott 

Beverly F. Seawell 
Lonel Earl Shaw, Jr. 
Robert M. Sitton 
Frank B. Skinner 
Charles B. Slaughter, Jr. 

Barbara J. Sleath 
William Smith 
David E. Sorrell 
Robert E. Stafford 
Horace D. Steadman, Jr. 

Joe B. Stewart 
Jerry J. Stephenson 
John E. Stone 
Joyce K. Strickland 
Zoe C. Styers 



Valdese 

Burlington 

Concord 



( Ireensborc 
Charlotte 



Durhi 
Kings t. 'IV, 



Henrietta 

High Point 

Leaksville 

Ashevffle 

Shelby 

Winston-Salem 

Newport News, Va. 

Edenton 

WhiteviUe 

Oxford 

Tarboro 

Concord 

( lharlotte 

Ellerbe 



Wake Forest 



Rockingham 

Weldon 

Washington, I). (' 

Smithfield 



Wi 



Catawba 
Bmithneld 
Siler City 
Smithfield 

Gastonia 



HfiBtf 



CLASS OF '59 



Robert V. Suggs 
Rudolph Sugg 
Marvin Swartz 
Joseph H. Talley 
Mary T. Tamer 

Robert M. Taylor 
Neil A. Thaggard 
Larry A. Thompson 
Marvin W. Thompson 
James O. Threlkeld 

Hans O. Tiefel 
David L. Toothman 
Nancy L. Tuttle 
Ann Tyner 
James R. Van Hoose 

James R. Vaughn 
D. Gaynelle Walker 
Barney W. Walker 
Karen H. Walker 
Bobby G. Walker 

Ralph Wallace 
Charles L. Warwick 
James O. Watson, Jr. 
Van Watson 
Robert M. Weatherman 

Joel A. Weston 
Thomas G. Whedbee 
Winfred E. Whicker 
Raymond H. White 
William N. Wiggins 

Virginia A. Wilcox 
Tolbert S. Wilkinson 
David E. Willey 
Curtis Williams 
Henry G. Williams, Jr. 



John B. Young 
Frances M. Youngblood 
Johnny A. Yount 



Lumberton 

New Bern 

Winston-Salem 

Roanoke Rapids 

Winston-Salem 



Binghamton, N. V. 

Front Royal, Va. 

Walnut Cove 

Leaksville 



Kannapolis 
Asheville 
Leaksville 
Lillington 

Morganton 



High Point 
Winston-Salem 

Winston-Salem 

Ahoskie 

China Grove 

Suffolk, Va. 

Tarboro 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Wake Forest 

Hinton, W. Va. 

Lexington 

Annapolis, Md. 



Weston A. Willis 


Jacksonvilli 


Ralph M. Wolfe, Jr. 


Winston-Salem 


Polly Wood 


Raleigh 


Wilbur F. Woodall, Jr. 


Spindal, 


Mary Elizabeth York 


Mount Ain 



Wilmingto 
Columbia, Teni 






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1 



William Neal Reynolds Gymnasium 




Marjorie Crisp and Dorothy Casey— Women's Physical Education. 





Hill Gibson, Athletn /). 



Gibson, P. E. Staff 



In charge of the best facilities in many years, 
Athletic Director Bill Gibson has worked dili- 
gently during the year in an effort to stimulate 
interest and participation in the sports program, 
which is so important to the College curriculum. 

I he Physical Education Department planned 
and sponsored the most successful intramural 
program in the history of the College, in addi- 
tion to their classroom duties. 



Men's P.E. Stafl Left to right: L. R. Hooks, Jordan, H,pps, Dr. Long, Dr. Steele, Ha, 




FOOTBALL 

Extensive Planning is 

the Keynote for 

Success. 




Coaching staff. Left to right: Barbour, Wable, Gibson, Hiettiio, Hildebrmd. 
Seated: Head Coach, A turn. 



Co-Captains of the 1956 Deacon Football Team are Bill Barnes and David Le 



ill 




Stories are written about the 
Deacons, but they rarely 

stress the drama of 

preparation. These pages 

portray those days. 



The Wake Forest coaching staff counted their 

hrsr year as very successful. Even with a small and 
undermanned squad, they were able to lead rile team 
to a 2-5-i record which gained for Head Coach Amen 
the "Coach of The Year" award in the Atlantic 
( 'oast Conference. 



■HM 




1957 Foothill Tram. Kirsr row: Barms, Brewster, Johnson, Claxton, Moore, Smothers, Hillenbrand, Horn, Lee, Carpenter, Daniels. Second row Caesar, 
Dalrymple, Swatzel, Barbour, Ladntr, Warn, Butler. Rollins, Thompson, Martin. Ledjord. Third row: Peagrum, Lewis, Ladd, D. Lee. McDaniels, Orr, 
H. Lew, Spach, Hems, Brooks. Fourth row: Hams, Manager; Wallace, Toothman, White, Paley, Dennis, DeSimone. Cluappetta, Rmj, Herring, Cecil, 
Manager. 



PRACTICE 





Line charges forward. 



A hole ,s opened. 






4^*4 




Ralph Brewsu 



FACES 

Football is serious. The tension and 
anxiety is reflected in coach and 
players. 



Htfore whistle— Pep talk. 






Taping a trick h, 




Manager applies blacking. 



GAME TIME 



Deep Concentration. 




l^ast minute details. 





PRAYER . . . 



. . . AND GO 





Barnes picks up yardage and speed around 



base. {Photo by Thomas Iman) 



Wake Forest vs. Maryland 



A sophomore halfback led the Maryland 
Terrapins on a 60 yard scoring drive in the 
first half to defeat the Deacons 6-0. 

Except for the score, the Terrapins were 
out-passed, out-punted, out-run, and generally 
out-played by Wake forest. 

Barnes led the- Deacons, with 161 yards 
rushing, to within the Maryland 1? yard line 
four times, but fate would nor let them score. 

Three fumbles were costly to the Deacons, 
stopping Wake drives at the Maryland I" and 
39 yard lines, and starting Maryland on their 
scoring drive. 

Line play was the most exciting part of the 
game as the Deacons beat the heavier, over- 
manned Terps into the turf, and forced them 
ro spend the afternoon on their end of the 



Even in defeat the 
a fine show ing. 



W.i 



Forest team made 



Dalrymple takes ,: hand-off from quarter- 
back Carpenter and heads dovmfield. 





Wake Forest 
vs. 

Clemson 

1 he Clemson Tigers, with orange blossoms in 
their eyes, invaded Bowman Gray Stadium and 
carried away a 17-0 victory over Wake. 

It was a bad afternoon for the Deacons, as they 
were only able to reach into enemy territory four 
times, and then they could get no closer than the 
Clemson 30 yard line. 

Most of the game for the Deacs was spent in 
trying to keep the Tigers away from the Wake 
goal line. I hey seemed to be successful except in 
the second quarter when a long pass set up the 
first touchdown, and in the fourth period when a 
nl yard drive set up the second score. 

Coach Amen had nothing but praise for the 
Clemson team, saying that it was the best team 
that Wake had played. 

I Ten though stopping the Wake team, Clemson 
was unable to stop Barnes as he racked up 73 yards 
rushing. 



jmi short of a first down 



Wake Forest vs. 

North Carolina and 

N. C. State. 

Dick Daniels and Charlie Carpenter combined 
to block a Carolina extra point attempt, the result 
of a Tar Heel third quarter touchdown. This TD 
came only after Wake had halted them successively 
on the 1 5 and 4 yard lines. 

In the fourth period the Deacons began to roll, 
and led by Barnes, both as a ball carrier and a 
decoy for Dalrymplc. they drove 96 yards for the 
score. The conversion was missed; the final 
score, 6-6. 

Fourteen thousand Homecoming tans watched as 
Carpenter used Barnes as a decoy on two scoring 
plays which led to a 1 5-0 victory over N. C. State. 

In the first period it was a faked off-tackle 
handotf to Bullet Bill and a 55 yard pass to Brewster 
for the score. Then in the second period it was 
another off-tackle fake to Barnes and a pitchout 
to Daniels which gave Wake their second touch- 
down of the game. 




■■■^■■■■1 
Carolina is tupped up as Dxnich tic 



(Photo b) Frank Jones) 




Vete Barium, Damm quarterback, fights far yardage against State in Homecoming game in which He. 



nphed -ith a 13 



145 






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George Johnson, tackle 



1 1 m Dalrymple, halfback 



Dick Daniels, halfback 



Wake Forest vs. Duke 

Even in .i cold stead} rain the Deacons were unable 
to halt the crunching power of the Duke ground attack 
which led to a 26-0 defeat of the Deacs. \r times the 
Deacons used an eleven man line bur could nor keep 
the Blue Devils from scoring four times. I Ik- terrible 
conditions caused the Deacons to tumble twelve times 
and lose eight oi these fumbles. 

BoClaxton, guard Pete Brabant, quarterback Frank Thompson, taM 




* 



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146 





■fullback " Bullet Bill Bai 



Wake Forest Colin 



I football ph 



Barnes Makes Look First String Ail-American 



:,/,/;,• \l»„Tt, center Charlie Carpenter, quarterback 



C5 




Wake Forest's alumni were thrilled again this year as sports 
writers across the nation praised a Wake foothall star. "Just 
call him Bill Barnes, All- American," predicted one writer, and 
that is exactly what the blond fullback from I.andis proved. 
His tame especially resounded tor him when his home town 
honored him with "Bill Barnes Day." 

He began hy dashing 67 yards tor a touchdown on the opening 
play of the season and went on to lead the A.C.C. in nearly 
every offensive department. His 1010 yards rushing was second 
in the nation. In the conference Barnes topped the list in rushing, 
total offense, scoring, punt returns, and kickofl returns. 

Noted the "Outstanding Player of the Year" in North Carolina 
by the United Press, he was All-Conference, "Outstanding 
Player in the Region" for All-American tor the Associated 
Press, first string on the Look Magazine All-American Squad, 
"Outstanding Player for the South" in the North-South .All- 
Star foothall game in Miami, Florida, and co-captain of the 
Wake Forest squad. 

In addition, Barnes was the second-round choice of the 
Philadelphia Eagles of the National Professional Football 
League and appeared on the Perry Como television show. 




Basketball 
in Coliseum 



The new Memorial Coliseum 
located <>n North Cherry Street 
about one quarter of a mile from 
the Wake Forest campus served 
as the home playing Moor for 
the Demon Deacons this year. 
The Coliseum, which has a 
seating capacity oi 8,600. for 
basketball games, was opened 
last year. The arena is equipped 
with ample dressing rooms and 
Hrst-class facilities. All 10 home 
games were played here during 
the vcar. 



/ tension ran high in basketball as the Deacons ended with a fine record. 



Four Seniors Led Deacons to Impressive Wins 



ifter beating Shite in the semi-finals. Wake Forest Deacons found themselves facing a strong Carolina team. Tarheels -non 63-!!. 





l956-!7 Basketball Tram. Front row; Tinker. Wiggins, Williams 
Gilley, Murdoch Seal/. Second row: Gram, Broadway, Bowers, Cox 
Greason, Gerdes. I hirJ row: Head Coach Greason, Odom, Reed, Can 
Stepusm, Ladd, Assistant Coach, McKhmey. 



Assistant Coach Horace "Bones' McKt) 





Head Coach Murry Or, 




Season's Record 



Wake 


Forest 


79 


George Washington 


66 


Wake 


Forest 


63 


\. C. State 


73 


Wake 


Forest 


53 


Maryland 


59 


Wake 


Forest 


60 


Virginia 


55 


Wake 


Forest 


66 


Colgate 


59 


Wake 


Forest 


55 


Florida 


53 


Wake 


Forest 


58 


Auburn 


48 


Wake 


Forest 


7 3 


Alabama 


50 


Wake 


Forest 


74 


DePaul 


68 


Wake 


Forest 


73 


N. C. State- 


66 


Wake 


Forest 


5 5 


North Carolina 


63 


Wake 


Forest 


72 


George Washington 


54 


Wake 


Forest 


67 


Temple 


59 


Wake 


Forest 


64 


Seton Hall 


55 


Wake 


Forest 


75 


South Carolina 


71 


Wake 


Forest 


77 


Duke 


59 


Wake 


Forest 


7 3 


Virginia 


58 


Wake 


Forest 


81 


Clemson 


70 


Wake 


Forest 


49 


South Carolina 


55 


Wake 


Forest 


93 


Clemson 


70 


Wake 


Forest 


69 


North Carolina 


72 


Wake 


Forest 


64 


Duke 


75 


Wake 


Forest 


62 


Maryland 


58 


Wake 


Forest 


1(11 


Eastern Kentucky 


76 


Wake 


Forest 


64 


North Carolina 


69 


Wake 


Forest 


71 


N. C. State 


75 


Wake 


Forest 


66 


N. C. State- 


57 


Wake 


Forest 


S9 


North Carolina 


61 



Big Jim Gilley battlts for a rebound against George Washing- 
ton i'i Deacons' first home game. The Dejioiu -^oti yj-f'd. 



Joe Ladd, Fo, 



Ernie Wiggins, guard 




Jackie Murdock, guard 


^ 


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Murdock drives through State defense for two more points as Seitz, No. 88, looks hint in the eye. (Photo h) Frank Jones) 



lack Williams, Forward 



Jim Gilley, Centei 



Wendell Carr, Forward 





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Deacs Rated Nationally 



I he Deacons began their rise to national promi- 
nence with the winning ot their second consecutive 
Carrousel title during the Christmas vacation. 

Immediately alter this win, the Deacons returned 
to Winston-Salem and trounced nationally-ranked 
Alabama. 

I hen Wake invaded Raleigh and the tamed Dixie 
('lassie. In this, the most important holiday tourna- 
ment in the nation, the Deacons defeated DePaul 
and gained a particularly satisfying win in the 
semi-finals over N. C. State. The Deacs met the 
nation's No. 2 team in the finals, and lost to Caro- 
lina by a score of 63-55. 

Wake swept through the North and returned 
home as they continued to move toward the top 
in the national ratings. 



Cirr (tonchinx hMl) and GiUey bank Duke's flues Clement fa-, 
a rebound. Smre: W. F. 77; Duke 99. (Photo /'i Frank fanes) 








Basketball can be rough. "Floegie" and "Bone:" bend ovt 
Hank Bowers as he lies in pain after hitting the deck m Duke game 



Wiggins buckets fwo despite effurts of Metzger of Virgh 
(Photo by Frank lanes) 





Assistant Coach -Hones" VIcKinne) shows Ins usual anxiety as Head 
Coach Murray G reason shows Ins usual composure. (Photo by Irving 
Grigg) 



* I / i i 




Gene Hooks, in his first year as the II, .1 
Deacons to another successful year. 



Co-Captains oj the IDS? Baseball team: George ililler and 11,11 H, 




From Gore Field to Ernie 
Shore Field— Baseball 



I he 1956 Wake baseball team is an outstanding 
example of the fact that the hardest part of winning a 
national championship in baseball is winning the A.C.C. 
championship. 

Except tor the loss of one starter from the 1955 
N.C.A.A. champions, the team was intact and was only 
able to compile a 7-5 Conference record while gaining a 
13-5 overall record. All of the losses were at the hands 
of ('(inference foes. 

1 he Deacons were able, however, to win their second 
successive Dixie ("lassie title by bearing Loyola, N. C. 
State, and Michigan. 

Heading up the pitching staff were Lowell Davis, 
Jack McGinley, and John Stokoe. Backing these were 
Buck I'lchter, Bill Walsh, and Bill Lovingood. Covering 
the infield were frank McRac at first base, "Cocky" 
Moore and lack Bryant at second base, and Bill Barnes 
ar third base. 

( )n the recieving end was the All-American catcher 
Linwood I loir. 

In the outfield were three experienced performers, 
Al Baker, Luther McKeel, and George Miller. 

Leading the team in the all-important batting depart- 
ment were McRac with a .419 average, Miller with a 
.40K average, McKeel with a A IN average, and Barnes 
and Baker both hitting at .310. 

Vith several returning veterans being helped by 
promising graduates ol the freshman squad, the 1957 
edition of the Deacons should again prove to be a cham- 
pionship contender. 



The 



19 


56 


RECORD 




Opponents 






Wt 


Delaware 






1 


Michigan State 






6 


Loyola (South) (Dixie 


CI 


ssic) 


1 1 


N. C. State (Dixie CI. 


ssic 


) 


10 


Michigan (Dixie Class 


c) 




s 


East Carolina 






12 


South Carolina 






12 


N. C. Srare 






7 


Maryland 






8 


Virginia 






4 


Duke 






2 


U.N.C. 






9 


N. C. Srare 






2 


Virginia 






5 


Duke 






7 


U.N.C. 






? 


Clemson 






14 


South ( 'arolina 






1 1 



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/->,!«(• \/<K.k. fonftng batter for the 1956 Deacons, lines j sharp s'mgle 
atamst Clemstm m a 14-0 w'm. 





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Home safe by the proverbial mile, Linivood Holt scores .is Georgt 
Miller awaits his turn. 



155 





The 1957 Baseball Tram, first row: Barms, Mick. Fitch. Eddison, Stokoe, H. Moore, Skinner, Baker. Sccnnd r.m Guthrie, McGmley, \Ac Million, 
Scruggs. Muse. Stanley. Billiard. Williams, hulitcr. Third row Revels, Coach Hooks, \1. Miller. Miller. Lawrence, Lovmgood, Tench, Phillips, 
and manager Proctor. 




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157 




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Hill Chip* 



Alex Willis gulps fo 




First Tank Team 

Wake Forest added another varsity sport in tins eventful vcar of 
1957. Coach Ralph Steele, former Ohio State diving ace, directed 
Ins all new Deacon squad through a promising hut unwinning, season. 

Clemsotl provided the first opposition, followed by meets with 
Virginia, Maryland, fast Carolina. Duke and the big wind-up at 
the A.C.C. tournament, held in Chapel Hill. I lats off to the rirst 
swimming team in school history composed of Chris ( ilenn, Ernie 
Marshhurn, Sam Elmore, Bill I leans, Charles Duncan, Jim Day. 
Larry Smith. Alex Willis, Bruce Smith, Bill Chipman, George 
freeman, Henry Snow, Boh Fitzgerald and manager John Frctcr. 



1957 Record 



Wake Forest 1 8 

Wake Forest 9 

Wake forest I ! 

Wake Forest 8 

Wake forest 7 



Clemson 65 

Maryland 65 

East Carolina 6i 

South Carolina 3 5 

Duke 71 



Coach Ralph Steele's 19!7 



■ighti linns. Uarshhurn, Chipman, Duncan, and Willis 



! 



k 





yffiy 4*jg> ^* 








r 5i \1 




£ 



va^^.V 




VS&' to 






19 57 Freshman and Varsity Cross-Cnntry Trim Left 
/»r,/.,«. Stevens', Cook, fortes, 



iht. from 
eer. I hir.l 




fo/mjwi, Cm. Coach Jordan, Broad-well, Slaughter. Second row : O 
K«rt, FWnrf/, Frazier, Miliums. Medlin, Bullard, Cobb. 



Cross Country Shows Improvement 



The Deacon cross-country team ended irs season with the best record 
in the history of the spurt here at Wake. The 2-7 record gave them sixth 
place in the Conference. The Deacs were able to beat South Carolina and 
Clemson, while losing very close meets (which could very well have- 
gone cither way) to State, Duke, Virginia, and Richmond. 

Senior Captain Ferrell, juniors Frazier, Keith, Williams, Bullard, 
Cobb, and sophomore Medlin led the team. 



Cross-Country Men, Hub Medlin and Put Frazier keep in step on foui mile 






Wrestlers Have Better Year 



1957 Record 



For the rirst time this year the wrestling team had the facilities 
needed tn have home matches. I he team took advantage of this 
by scheduling two matches here, against N T . ('. Srare and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Veterans from last year's team who were baek this year were 
sophomore Tom Carlton in the 127 pound class, who was undefeated 
during his freshman year and for the first four matches of this year, 
Lloyd Harrison in the 137 pound class. Bob Jones in the 157 pound 
class, and John Ashburn in the heavyweight class. 



Wake Forest 


1 i 


U.N.C. 17 


Wake Forest 


IS 


N. C.State 14 


Wake forest 


! 


Virginia 31 


Wake Forest 


3 


Duke 27 


Wake Forest 


3 


Appalachian 31 


Wake Forest 





Maryland 34 


Wake Forest 


5 


\ irginia Tech 35 


Wake Forest 


19 


Pfeiffer 15 




iil 



Track Men Perform Well 
Despite Lack of Facilities 



Leading the 1956 Deacon track team was Jack Ladner, who 
set a new A.C.C. record in the javelin event with a heave of 
206' 7 '9", and who was undefeated during the season. 

Other steady and outstanding performers were Jim Dal- 
r\ tuple, in the hurdles, Dick Daniels in the sprint series, 
Carroll Ferrell and Captain Bill Summerlin in the distance 

events. 

Returning lettcrmen to the 1957 team will he l.adner, 
Dalrymple, Ferrell, Dick Frazier, and Bob Williams, all of 
whom will form the core of the thin chads. 




Medlin and Ferrall, tap Deacon ./» 





Coach Jordan gives the signal ,ts Jennette gets sd to run. Jack Ladner, record javelin thrower in tin- A.C.C. 

Dick Frazier lunges forward as he p.nscs the baton to Hob Williams in .1 practice relay. 




I SS ^^-^5 ,^ ] " m , '.' •"amtl^^^^k 




^ m 



k 



^^^w-""' 




A chip. a ,ime, a put are practiced at the Old Town Country Club by Deacon golfers Ralph James, John Gerring. and Sonny George. 



Deac Golfers Top Contender 



1956 Record 



Coif, although a comparatively young sport at Wake, has made 
great strides in the last few years. 

The 1956 golf team began their season finding themselves the 
holders of the A.C.C. championship. The team also was holding 
a streak of 16 triumphs in a row. They extended their winning 
streak to 25 before losing to U.N.C. This was the only loss of the 
year and gave the team an 11-1 record. 

Gerring, Kerfoot, Turner. Wiechman, and Coach McKinney 
guided the team to second place in the Conference just behind U.N.C. 

With the returning lettermen and some experienced sophomores 
and iiiniors, the 1957 team is also expected to he a championship 
contender. 



Wake Forest 


23 


Northern lllinoi 


i 4 


Wake Forest 


25 


Virginia 


2 


Wake Forest 


22 


Ohio Universit) 


5 


Wake Forest 


16L, 


Duke 


10 


Wake Forest 


22 


Boston College 


5 


Waki 1 - in .1 


1 5 1 •» 


South Carolina 


11'., 


Wake Forest 


19 


Clemson 


H 


Wake Forest 


26 


N. C. State 


1 


Wake Forest 


17 


Clemson 


10 


Wake Forest 


8 


U. N. C. 


19 


Wake Forest 


18 


Maryland 


9 


Wake 1 -'oresr 


22 1 ■> 


N. C. State 


4L, 



19S7 Golf Team. Front row, left to right: Tommy Helms. Ralph fames. ReJ Sapp. Back row: Dave Ogihie, John Gerring, and Sonny George. 










,. 



»<i. 



1 




( at-like quickness and aggr, 



keeps tins Deacon doubles duo of Walt Co 



id George Cox working hard during a pr, 



Lettermen and New Coach Aid Net Changes for 1957 Season 




a\. Fa* 

Walt Conner 



I 



The 1956 tennis team will go down in the records as one 
of the most successful units in recent years. The Deacs 
closed out their season with a fine record ot 6-6-1 in dual 
meets . 

Standouts for the Deacons during the season were Al 
Griffin, Jasper Memory, Jr., Joe Burt, and Bob Garren. 
These four men represented Wake Forest in the A.C'.C. 
tournament. 

The team was coached by Harry Chaffin. a student in 
the Seminary. He predicted that the 1957 team would be 
even stronger with Burt and ( larren, both lettermen, 
returning along with men from the 1956 freshman squad. 



— 

1 




Gary Damtl 


*T. 




George Cox 






Ml ^M. m. 



n 



r> 



rn. 



KfcG'mty, Brittand Dickson take advantage oj swimming offered m Physical 

Education. 




Women's Intramurals 

Intramurals fur women arc sponsored by the Women's Recreation 
Association. The intramural program consists of tournaments in 
volleyball, basketball, tennis. Held hockey, Softball, and swimming. 
.Many girls develop good body co-ordination, better health, and 
posture by participation in these events. Also coeds learn recreational 
sports which can be carried over into later life through this program. 



HolhfaU, Hawkins and Homer count up the score after a round of archery 




% 




Monogram Club 

ie varsity lettermen and athletic activities of 
Wake Forest are combined in the Monogram Club. 

Led liv President Jack Murdock, Vice-President 

John Stokoe, Secretary Bob Williams, Treasurer Buck 

liter, and Faculty Adviser Dr. Herman Preseren, 

Club has been quite active on campus this year. 

1 hey sponsored the Miss Demon Deacon contest 
tor the selection of the Homecoming Queen, the Old 
Gold and Black basketball pre-season game between 
the varsity and the freshmen, and the Old Gold and 
Black football game in the spring between the varsity 
and alumni. 

For the first time Monogram Club members were 
able to play host in their own newly furnished club- 
room. 




A lew coeds on campus are proud owners ol 
White Jackets, complete with the W.i 
Forest emblem. I hese jackets are the material 
awards for the accumulation of one hundred 
points through participating in individual and 
team sports. As soon as the first fall breezes 
blow, the jackets make their appearance, and 
they are still permanent wardrobe fixtures at 
graduation rime. After winning a jacket, the 
next goal is to earn enough points for a Wake 

rest blanket. 



Hull, Gilley, Guth, Barlow, 
Huskey, Bolt. On wall 
Aycoek, Jcrmettt, Wilhelm, 
Woodlicf, Hawkins, S,„l, 
Strickland, Cabi. 



ssw IgsSSSsr'' -S 51 




Fraternity and independent men test their endtn 



• 






9." 
13^ 




% 




> - 


i 


J 


Mi 




-mm. 




Intramural sports such as badminton keep these two coeds Fabii 
Broadway and Caryl Guth on their toes in a doubles mate 



P.E.K. members, seated Ladner. Haglier, Stepmin. McGinley, Lovingood, Sicelofi, Borers. Azmtte. 
Standing: Coach Steele, Coach Jordan, Coach Hietikko. Swinson, Dr. Barrow, Murdoch, Coach llipps 



P. E. Fraternity 



Phi Epsilon Kappa is the only 
national fraternity for men stu- 
dents and teaehers or healrh, 
physical education and recreation. 
The Alpha Lambda Chapter was 
installed at Wake Forest College 
in April, 1949, and has been an 
outstanding organization for social 
and professional companionship 
and leadership. Dr. Harold M. 
Barrow, one of the charter mem- 
bers of the chapter, was this 
year's sponsor. 





Army RQTC 




Cadets present arms during annual msp, 



Tuesday, 1:00 I'. I/., cadets prepare for ceremonial parade 



*sil±A 



1, : 



feL. 







\luun, Ren Avery, Dick Aver-,, jnJ I'lnl H.i 




"Company Ten-Hut!" Cadet 1st Lt. Roger Herrmann 
yells oniers to his R.O.T.C. unit during Jrill. 



Training Future Officers 



I Ik- Army R.O.T.C. has as its purpose the training of students for positions of 
leadership in the Army in time of national emergency. The successful completion 
ot a four-year Army R.O.T.C. course leads to a commission as .1 second lieutenant 
in the Army reserve. In the classroom, emphasis is placed on giving the prospective 
officer a general background knowledge of military subjects activities essential 
to all of the Army's fifteen arms and services. Maximum effort is mule to arouse 
the students' interest through the use of weapons, illustrations, training films, 
practical exercises, and models. Drill and Exercise of Command facilitate develop- 
ment of those essential characteristics of leadership such .is self-confidence, initiative, 
loyalty, and the ability to think clearly, make wise decisions, and inspire others 
to work for the success of any endeavor. 



169 




R.O.T.C. Faculty. Seated left to tight: 1st. Lt. DesRoches, Maj. Davits, Col. Peyton, Capt. SingkUry, Opt. Palmer. Standing, left to right Sg 
Mconey, Deloach, Gam, Gionda, Webster, Bailey, McBroom. 



R.O.T.C. Rifle Team Members are. Kneeling left to right: Black, Veach, Ferguson, Young, Hodges. Standing Crumpler, Baxter, Hairfield, Bennett, 



Steadman, Sergeant Deloach, Cooch. 





Scabbard and Blade members are, left to right, front Smith, Ellis, Carter, Barge, Starling, Harrison, Bennett. Second row Johnson, Wall-wort, Sty 
Garren, Almond, Northcrett, Mast, Blanton. 1 hird row I each, Baucom, Taylor, Davis, Goerlich, McCulIough. Fourth row Edwards, I'll,, was, Willis, 
Kennedy, Lewis, Smith, Avenue, Preslar. 



Scabbard and Blade: Honorary Military Society 



The purposes and ideals of Scabbard and Blade, the 
honorary military society, are: to raise the standard of 
military education in colleges and universities, to unite- 
in closer relationship their military departments, to 
encourage and foster the essential qualities of good and 
efficient officers, and to promote friendship among cadet 
officers. 

Officers for the Fall semester were Bill Starling, 



President; Lloyd Baucom, Vice-President; Bob Green, 
Secretary; Dave Hirano, I reasurer. 

Those elected for the Spring semester were Row land 
Thomas. President; Paul Kennedy, Vice-President; 
Bob Williams, Secretary; Bob Xorthcutt, Treasurer. 

For the first time the men of I. Company held a Mili- 
tary Ball in the Spring. Coed sponsors were presented 
representing the different R.O.T.C. units. 



Display 



i It, R.O.T.C. cadets. 




171 




' 




Cheerleaders jump Iiiu.Ii in an effort i 



What would football season be without the 
flashy band and spirited cheerleaders to yield the 

rhythmic praises of "Dear Old Wake Forest"' 
Spectators at athletic contests were entertained 
by the versatile majorettes strutting and dancing 
in front of the band, which played and performed 
precision routines. Clowning Deacons climbed 
from goal to goal encouraging the team to bring 
the pigskin over the line for that all-important 
T. I). The football team played their hearts out, 
while the cheering crowds consumed barrels ot 
popcorn and gallons of hot coffee, and the band, 
majorettes, and cheerleaders did their utmost to 
keep the "old" spirit alive. 



The prettier suit- of the foothill g. 






\l'.R.A. members are 


first r 


,w Broadway 


Guth, Barlow, Huskej 


, Green 


; Hallifield. 1 


Bridger, Butter, Britt, 
Lee, Jackson.] 


Willi,, 


ns. Fourth rm 



'/v. Hobby, Laughridge, Flippin, Pileher. Second row: Johnson, Weathers, McMillan, Strickland, 
i : Kitchin, Satterwhite, Hawkins, Tucker, Myers, Johnson, Booth, Sauners, Rowe, Walton, Tweed, 
Woodlicf, Hutchms, Wood, Freeman, Seven, Huskins, Sain, H. Smith, Wallace, Edwards, Coley, 



W.R.A.: MAGNOLIA SPONSORS 




The Woman's Recreation Association added fun, fellowship, 
and exciting competition in intramurals to Wake coeds' daily 
routines. The four Greek letter teams "rushed" the freshman 
girls and invited them to share the club's games and picnics. 
Individual sports such as tennis, ping-pong, and badminton were 
emphasized along with the team intramurals in Softball, basket- 
ball, and volleyball. With Ann Barlow as president, the W.R.A. 
undertook its biggest activity, the annual Magnolia Festival. 



The committei members for planning the 19S7 Magnolia Festival 
arc, left to right: <'.irvl Guth, Paul Caudill, tend Barbara Hill. 
Absent were Dr. McDonald and Jimmy Powell. 




the deep South frolic mi lawn in Magnolia Festival dm 



171 



RECOLLECTIONS OF 
LAST YEAR'S FESTIVAL 



May came in smiling on the old campus, 
and students flocked out-of-doors to see 
Hilda Maulden crowned Magnolia Queen 
of 1956. The pageant held in honor of the 
coed royalty was one of reminiscence. 
Past Magnolia Queens were presented, 
and dances from their Festivals were 
performed on the sunny campus. 

There was sadness as well as joy <>n 
that day. Never again would the old 
magnolia trees frame this court of beauty, 
music, and dance. Climaxing the day w as 
the Magnolia Ball. Coeds and their escorts 
danced to dreamy music and watched the 
formal presentation of the day's royalty. 

The pageant ended Wake Forest's mag- 
nolia week with its sidewalk art exhibit, 
band concert, operetta, and the Shake- 
spearean production of " The Merchant of 
Venice." 





fejMfc. 



Magnolia 




DEE HUGHES 



Queen 




Court 




ANN BRIDGES 



Maid of Honor 




vX 




KITTY BOOTH 




THE QUEENS 




CAROL IENNETTE 





Emnmz 



NANCY WADDELL 





L'NE AYCOCK 





MARLENE McLAMB 





ANN TYNER 






LLEW BAUCOA 



ATTENDANTS 



CAROLE BROW X 







r- (!) p 

P j P f ;■ G 




FRESHMEN 



Making W T .ik(_- Forest College 
oar school, instead of simply .! 
school, was the primary project 
for the class of 1960. Much of 
the future of W.F.C. lies in the 
hands of this all-new class on 
the all-new campus. Theirs is 
the task of mellowing the new- 
ness into a spirit of loyalty and 
praise. Off to the proper start, 
they exhibited enthusiastic par- 
ticipation in the elections and 
selected a capable slate of 
leaders. 










Freshmen (lass off 


errs are: Bill Wil- 


, lumson, Legislator 


Jean Hobby, Secri- 


^JH tary; lor Grubbs, 


I'rr shir nt; Tommy 


Ward, Vice-Prcsidi 


in. 


Ben'G. Alderman 


Alcolu, S. C, 


E. Raymond Alexander, Jr. 


Winston-Salem 


Jasper D. Alexander 


Winston-Salem 


Nancy L. Alexander 


Lenoir 


John A. Alford 


Fayetteville 


Edward M. Allen 


Mt Airy 


Thomas Ray Allen 


Pinnacle 


Lisa Carolyn Anderson 


Greensboro 


Anthony L. Angel 


Winston-Salem 


Coleman G. Arendall 


Bassett, Va, 


Martha G. Arnold 


Thomasville 


Donald Edward Austin 


Sanford 


Douglass M. Bailey ( 


Ilarksburg, W. Va. 


Lois Elaine Bailey 


Everetts 


Rex L. Baker 


Rural Hall 


Herbert W. Bare 


Pittsboro 


Donald Ray Baucom 


ftidian Trail 


Frances L. Baucom 


Monroe 


Carl J. Beacham 


Jacksonville 


Kirby Franklin Beam 


Casar 


Sally F. Beard 


( rreenville 


George R. Bell 


( freensboro 


Thomas K. Bernard 


Winston-Salem 


Peggy E. Berrier 


Winston-Salem 


Edith M. Berry 


Morganlon 



wm 



CLASS OF '60 




LaVenta Ann Berry 


Valdese 


Wilburn Earl Berry 


Drexel 


F. Lewis Biesecker 


Lexington 


Janet Margaret Binkley 


Wake Forest 


Frederick Stanley Black E 


imtli Boston, Va 


Noble G. Blackmail 


Wilson 


Barbara J. Blackmon 


Lillington 


Ruby Kathleen Bodenheimer 


Hanes 


August Emory Boette 


Columbia, S. C. 


Edgar L. Boggs 


t Ireensboro 


Carlton Gene Booker 


Reidsville 


John Marshall Bostic B 


niii'ttsville, S. C. 


Bruce N. Boteler 


Teaweck, X. J. 


Christopher Lewis Bramlette 


Canton 


Lionel F. Branscomb 


Winston-Salem 


Barbara Branson 


Wake Forest. 


Robert Ray Bray 


Elizabeth City 


Bobby Wayne Brendell 


Boone 


Dwight T. Bridges 


Lattimore 


John W. Bridges 


Belmont 


Shirley Ann Bridges 


Belmont 


F. Dale Bridgewater 


Salisbury 


Sandra L. Bright 


Winston-Salem 


Betty Jane Brednell 


tii > ■ 


Vicki J. Brinegar 


Winston-Salem 


Mary Lee Britt 


Murfreesboro 


Fabian Amelia Broadway 


Raleigh 


Clarence W. Broadwell 


Fayetteville 


Billy G. Brown 


Winston-Salem 


Carole Estelle Brown 


Klkin 


Ronnie Wayne Brown 


Winston-Salem 


James Henry Bunn 


Washington, Pa. 


Richard L. Burleson 


Badin 


David H. Butler 


Lexington 


Leroy Conrad Butler 


Feldy, Conn. 


Vada Ann Byers 


High Point 


Nancy T. Cable 


Franklin 


James T. Campbell 


Germanton 


John H. Cantrell 


Morgan ton 


Mary Louise Carrigan 


Burlington 


Kay Carroll 


King 


David Allen Carroll 


Shelby 


Nancy Lou Carroll 


Canton 


Raleigh F. Carroll 


Roseboro 


Carolyn Carter 


Wadesboro 


Jack A. Carter 


New London 


Joey M. Carter 


Kannapolis 


Kay Linda Cartner 


Concord 


Andrea Chalverus 


Columbus, Ga. 


Tommy L. Chambers 


Winston-Salem 





FRESHMEN 



▲it At 




Sylvia D. Cheek 
Martha J. Clifford 
Boyd F. Collier 
Barbara Clarie Cook 
Marilyn M. Cook 

Luther D. Cooke 
Arnold G. Cope 
Judith L. Cottrell 
Fred L. Coward 
Michael E. Cox 

G. George Createau 
Joe D. Creech 
Joseph W. Creech 
Ann L. Crittenden 
Annette Crosby 

Thomas R. Crowder 
Janet L. Crutchneld 
Jacqueline Ann Culler 
Joseph R. Cumby 
Aubrey G. Currie 

Dudley Banks Currin 
Mary A. Dale 
O. Thomas Dancy 
Barbara A. Daniel 
Tempie L. Daniel 

James L. Davis 

Whitman Davis 

Max Eugene Deal 

Shirley C. Dean 

Mary Livingston Doggett 

Allen C. Dotson 
Bobby Downing 
Allen E. Doyle 
William B. Dunnagan 
Margaret A. Dutton 

James C. Eagle 
Raymond E. Ebert 
Eloise C. Ellis 
Julian S. Elmore 
Thomas F. Elmore 

Richard F. Everhart 
James Ezzell 
William H. Fahringer 
Kathleen Louise Faircloth 
Patricia K. Faires 

John B. Fanning 
Farrell Gray Anderson 
Patricia A. Farson 
Helen France Fisher 
Margaret Fisher 



Kannapolie 



Winston-Salem 
Winston-Salem 



Pfafftown 

Sumter 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Nashua 

Smithfield 

Four Oak* 

Raleigh 

Thomasville 



Raleigh 

Kernersville 

Raleigh 

Clemmons 

Laurel Hill 



Rocky Mount 

Henderson 

Winston-Salem 

Roanoke Rapids 

Wilson 

Cliffside 

Radford, Va. 

Hickory 

Louisburg 



Or 



si, ,m 



Badin 

Levattown, Pa. 

Winston-Salem 

Winston-Salem 

( Ireensboro 



Spencer 

Winston-Salem 

Spruce Pine 

Elkin 

Burlington 

Winston-Salem 

Rocky Mount 

Stroudburg, Pa. 

Wake Foresl 

Charlotte 



WUmington 

Rockingham 

Charlotte 

Whiteville 

Charlotte 



CLASS OF '60 

Robert E. Fitzgerald 
Gloria D. Flake 
Charles M. Forbes 
Linda Sue Ford 
Charles A. Forte 



Walter S. Foster 
Lawrence D. Foust 
Ferrell Joseph Fouts 
George Wells Freeman 
John Charles Freter 

Cullie Funderburk 
Mary Jo Futrell 
Betty Ann Galloway 
Ellen Patricia Gay 
Karl Ray Gentry 

Sylvia Jones German 
Gene Glascoe 
Arthur Walter Glenn 
Betty Jean Goodwin 
Troy Michael Gordon 

Vergil Harding Gough 
James Lee Graham 
Robert Francis Greene 
Virginia E. Greene 
Claire Helen Greer 

Geraldine Gresham 
Hugh D. Griffin 
Philip A. Griffiths 
Helen Janice Grossman 
Joseph Glenn Grubbs 

Martha Gullick 
David Warren Hadley 
Mary Kathryn Hale 
William Alford Hall 
John Crawford Hamilton 

Mary Priscilla Hamrick 
Clifford B. Hardy 
Gayle Harmon 
Richard George Harper 
Helen Lynda Harrell 

Patricia Gay Harrell 
Frank B. Haskell 
Billy H. Hauser 
Guthbert Toso Hauser 
John Phillip Hauser 

Richard Doub Hauser 
Mark Douglas Hawthorne 
Jo Ann Hayes 
Joseph Allie Hayes 
James W. Heath 



Albemarle 

Clinton 
Ireensboro 

Klkin 



ngt, 



X. Y. 



Welch, W. Va. 

Pleasant Garden 

Winston-Salem 

Cantui, 

Bridgeport, Ohio 

Matthews 

Pine Level 

Charlotte 

Winston-Salem 

Roxboro 

Boomer 
Valdese 

Klkin 
Spartanburg, 8. C. 

Kannapohs 

Winston-Salem 

Beaufort 

Blowing Rock 

Henderson 

High Point 

Raleigh 

Louisburg 

Raleigh 

Kannapolis 

Kerneisville 

Charlotte 

Emporia, Va. 

Winston-Salem 

Rural Hall 

Richmond, Va. 

Canton 
Franklin Park 

la.kettstown, X. J. 
< 'lenilnoiis 
Plymouth 

Ahoskie 
Lanham, Md. 
Winston-Salem 
\\ inston-Salem 
Winston-Salem 

Westfield 

Wilmington 

Purlear 

North Wilkesboro 

Winston-Salem 




m 





MrnM** 



P P 



p p p 





FRESHMEN 


Julian Franklin Heath 


L 


>uisvillp. Ky. 


Phyllis Hedrick 


\\ 


inston-Salem 


Emma Jane Hedrick 




Raleigh 


Frances Gray Helms 




Charlotte 


Mary Ada Hendricks 




Wake Forest 


Richard Wayne Henning 


w 


inston-Salem 


William Daniel Herring 


Rocky Mount 


Robert Allen Hewett 




Greensboro 


Helen Whelan Hicks 




Franklinton 


Emily Sue Hill 




Marsh ville 


Robert A. Hill 




MoorcsviUe 


Jerome William Hillebrand 




Durham 


Edward Gray Hine 


\\ 


inston-Salem 


Billy Gray Hinshaw 




Boonville 


Dixie Linda Hobbs 




Raleigh 


Jean E. Hobby 




Cary 


Margaret C. Hocutt 




Norwood 


Hiram Jackson Hodges 




Hyatts, Mil. 


James O. Hodges 


Th 


irofare, N. J. 


Nelda Gray Holder 




Lowgap 


James Benson Holland 


\\ 


inston-Salem 


Betty Lou Hollifield 




Asheville 


Charles William Holman 




Lenoir 


Clark Mason Holt 




Reidsville 


Donald Lee Holt 




[.oris, S. C. 


Ben L. Honeycutt 




Cliffsirle 


Iris LaRae Honeycutt 




Lexington 


Maruice W. Home 




Whiteviue 


Barbara Elizabeth Horton 




Chariot ti- 


Sara Elizabeth Houser 


Kii 


gs Mountain 


Roy L. Hughes 


( Siarl 


.tt,-svill.-. Va. 


Joyce Humphries 




Roxboro 


Deane Hundley 




Wallace 


James Wilton Hunt 




WhiteviUe 


Cornelia Huskins 




Lenoir 


Bruce C. Hutchison 


W 


irrenton, Va. 


Stephen L. Ingram 




Durham 


Robert Gerald Jackson 




Atlanta, Ga. 


Judith E. Jeffneys 




Ilau River 


Margaret J. Jelks 


Wan 


Shoals, S. ('. 


John E. Jenson 


Bio 


tmfield, N.J. 


Jimmie D. Jetton 




Vale 


Frank M. Jewell 




Ft. Bragg 


Mary Ann Johnson 




Ml. Airy 


Robert R. Johnson 




SmithfieW 


Jerri Jolly 




Ayden 


Billy Owen Jones 




Raleigh 


Edwin G. Jones 


( 


(affney, S, C. 


Frances L. Jones 




Cleramons 


Hillary H. Jones 




Lexington 



CLASS OF '60 




Paula Jones 


Beaufort 


Samuel David Jordan 


Charlotte 


Frances Estelle Joyce 


Mayodar, 


Wanda L. Joyce 


East Bend 


Elizabeth Ann Julian 


Anderson, S (', 


Charles H. Keller 


Lenoir 


James Haywood Kennedy 


Raleigh 


Edward C. Kimel 


Winston-Salem 


Luther D. Kimrey 


Albemarle 


Anna Ruth King 


Wallace 


James King 


( ireensboro 


John H. King 


SmithSeld 


William L. King 


Aaheboro 


John Alex Kinlaw 


Lumberton 


Linda L. Kinlaw 


Fairmont 


Jerry William Kirkman 


Kernersville 


Martha Lane Kiser 


Emporia, Va. 


Grady W. Kiser 


King 


Paul F. Kittinger 


Winston-Salem 


Alan R. Kneeland 


Washington, III' 


Judith E. Knight 


Charlotte 


Jeanne Knott 


Wendell 


Reginald Clifton Koontz 


LewisviUe 


Wayne C. Koontz 


Welcome 


Betsy Lackey 


Shelby 


Timothy Lam 


Hong Kong .China 


Dianne Lancaster 


Kelly A. F. B., Tex. 


Tommy L. Laughrun 


Forest City 


Marcus S. Lawrence 


Ciffside 


Carl D. Lawson 


Lawsonville 


Joseph G. Lawson 


Winston-Salem 


Lawrence L. Leary 


Gastonia 


Willa L. Leary 


( 'harlot te 


James R. Lee 


Shelby 


Woodley G. Lee 


Wilson 


Lewis J. Leone 


White Plains, X. Y. 


Edward R. Lewis 


Calypso 


Arthur E. Lippert 


Altoona, Pa. 


Randall W. Listerman 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Nancy Rebecca Long 


Winston-Salem 


Jerry G. Lovell 


Clinton 


Carroll C. Lupton 


( Ireensboro 


Willis C. Maddrey 


Roanoke Rapids 


Janice E. Martin 


Lexington 


Margaret R. Martin 


Danbury 


Pansy M. Martin 


Danbury 


Zeno Martin 


Raleigh 


Robert Harold Maryott 


Union, \ J. 


Rowland L. Matteson 


Oxford 


Bonnie Lee Matthews 


Canton 







p p p 






<p 9 







flp fl r e. 

ii&4 h «*^fe4t 

o o r> -,- n 








FRESHMEN 


Dianne Mattocks 


Jacksonville 


George May 


Draper 


Robert Joseph Mayberry 


Winston-Salem 


William T. McCall 


Cloverock, N. V. 


Elaine McCrary 


High Shoals 


Joseph J. McEvoy 


Waynesville 


Sue Ann McGahey 


High Point 


Robert W. McGhee 


LouiBburg 


Lynda McGinty 


Belmonf 


Calvin M. Mckeel 


Powellsville 


Charles Allen McKenzie 


Winston-Salem 


Nancy J. McLeod 


Burlington 


William K. McRae 


Proctorville 


Gerald W. Medlin 


Kannapolis 


Dennis O. Medlock 


Cambridge, Md. 


Robert L. Meredith 


Colonial Heights, Va. 


Frederick T. Merola 


Mi. Vernon, X. Y. 


Charles B. Merryman, Jr 


Bethesda, Md. 


David W. Metcalf 


Winston-Salem 


John W. Midkifl 


Mt. Airy 


Donald Burton Miller 


Englewood, X. J. 


John Thomas Mills 


Mooresville 


Joanne Harriett Mink 


Winston-Salem 


Beverly A. Mitchell 


Greensboro 


Gerald E. Mitchell 


Youngsville 


Peggy Mitchell 


Spartanburg, S. C. 


James C. Moon 


Hamlet 


Geraldene E. Moore 


Charlotte 


John Richard Moore 


Louisburg 


Kay Frances Moore 


High Point 


Robert H. Moore 


Findlay, Ohio 


Jackie Payne Morgan 


t torapeake 


Robert F. Mull 


Lake Lure 


John C. Munn 


Candor 


Elwyn G. Murray 


Hose Hill 


Julia E. Nance 


Kannapolis 


Donald Lee Nanney 


Forest City 


Billy J. Neighbors 


Pittsboro 


Harry V. Nelson 


HuntersvUle 


Robert Lee Newsom 


King 


Earnest Y. Nichols 


Mt, Airy 


Austin Donald Norman 


Winston-Salem 


Ann M. Nuckols 


Montgomery, Ala. 


Jerry W. Odom 


Tarpon Springs, Kla. 


Terry L. Odom 


Rocky Mount 


James M. O'Neal 


Weldon 


Nathan F. Orovitz 


Asheville 


Robert B. Outland 


Rich Square 


Charles E. Parker 


New Bern 


Lloyd J. Parker 


Emporia, Va. 



CLASS OF '60 




Millard Benton Parrish 


Lancaster, S. C. 


Sherman Russell Parsons 


Ml. Airy 


Carolyn F. Paschal 


Greensboro 


Patricia Pearce 


Baltimore, Md. 


Elwood C. Peele, Jr. 


Burlington 


Stuart D. Peoples 


Louisburg 


Ronald A. Peterson 


BurnsviUe 


George W. Pettigrew 


Raleigh 


Betty Susan Phillips 


S hern Pines 


Bynum H. Phillips, Jr. 


Kannapolis 


Elizabeth Jane Phillips 


Winston-Salem 


Jimmy H. Philpott 


Baseett, Va. 


George C. Piatt 


High Point 


William R. Pleasant 


Angier 


Janie Dale Poole 


Thomasville 


Bobby R. Pope 


Spindale 


James S. Pope 


Salisbury 


Kenneth E. Porter 


Winston-Salem 


Raymond N. Porter 


Sanford 


Mary Frances Price 


Leaksville 


Helen Jo Prince 


Loris, S. C. 


Janice M. Priode 


Harrisonburg, Va. 


Dottie G. Privette 


Zebulon 


Charles H. Pruden 


Windsor 


George B. Pruden 


Raleigh 


June C. Pugh 


Graham 


Willie G. Ragsdale 


Winston-Salem 


John E. Ramsey 


Bassett, Va. 


Sylvia N. Ransdell 


Lenoir 


Peggy J. Rasberry 


( Iharlotte 


Larry J. Reavis 


Winston-Salem 


James D. Redding 


Winston-Salem 


Robert R. Redwine 


Charlotte 


Darlene L. Rice 


Whiteville 


Helen Jean Richardson 


Winston-Salem 


John F. Riley 


Spencer 


John T. Rogers 


Laurinburg 


Peggy Patterson Rogers 


Winston-Salem 


Frederick S. Rolater 


Ml. Pleasant 


Pat A. Rose 


Wilson 


Dorcas A. Rothrock 


Thomasville 


Rhodes T. Rumsey 


Reidsville 


Barbara A. Safriet 


Kannapolis 


Barbara J. Sain 


Hildebran 


Thomas H. Sandberg 


Columbus, Ohio 


Gordon Ernest Sanders 


Elizabeth City 


Patricia M. Scott 


Durham 


George G. Seigler 


Roanoke, Va. 


Michael L. Sellars 


Winston-Salem 


Bruce W. Sellers 


Hamlet 





fi p p 

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FRESHMEN 


Hessie Lou Severt 


West Jefferson 


Judith G. Shaw 


Siler City 


Robert E. Shervette 


Enfield 


Jerry Norman Simpson 


Boonville 


Sylvia E. Sums 


Winston-Salem 


Robert E. Singleton 


Henderson 


Hal F. Slaughter 


Winston-Salem 


William Vanoy Small 


Tabor City 


Barbara Ann Smith 


Mooresville 


Bruce Smith 


Ml Holly, N. J. 


Frank Julian Smith 


Lumberton 


Gay Lynn Smith 


Omaha, Neb. 


Joseph W. Smith 


Aberdeen 


Kermit Wayne Smith 


Newton 


Larry Dale Smith 


Fairchance, Pa. 


William Dwight Smith 


Coats 


William Max Smith 


Wingate 


Wilton R. Smith 


Fuquay Springs 


Alfred J. Smits Pol 


Washington, N T . Y. 


Bruce N. Snellings 


Fredericksburg, Va. 


Wallace Ciaton Snipes 


Swcpsonvillo 


Helen W. Snow 


Dobson 


Henry F. Snow 


Winston-Salem 


Ruth Ellen Sorrell 


Nelson, Va. 


Winfred E. Spaugh 


Winston-Salem 


James R. Spoon 


Dobson 


Donald W. Stafford 


Kernersville 


William Scott Stamey 


Taylorsyjlle 


Charles Michael Steadman 


Mooresville 


Dale O. Steele 


Charlotte 


Russell Lee Stephenson 


Wilson 


Shelton B. Stevens 


Matthews 


Wm. P. H. Stevens 


( Shatham, N. .1. 


Bobby D. Street 


Connelly Springs 


Helen R. Sturkie 


Cheraw, S. C. 


James L. Swisher 


Kernersville 


Clarence R. Tate 


Goldsborq 


Frederick M. Tate 


Foresl City 


John P. Tatum 


Winston-Salem 


Phil Anthony Templeton 


Boone 


Ronald Edward Thomas 


Burlington 


Grover Thompson 


Hoffman 


Jane Thompson 


Dobson 


Robert Floyd Thompson 


( Ireenville 


Barbara Jean Tice 


( creensboro 


James Marshall Todd 


WaynesviUe 


Anne O. Torrey 


Washington, I). C. 


Martha Elaine Towe 


Charlotte 


Carmean Tribble 


Tallahassee, Fla. 


David Leigh Tschorn 


Augusta, Ga. 



CLASS OF '60 




Saundra Reata Tucker 


Badin 


Harold Douglas Turner 


Fries, Va. 


James Thomas Turner 


Richmond, Va 


Samuel Franklin Vance 


Kemersville 


William Camp Vann 


Norfolk, Va. 


Thomas Vaughn 


Rocky Mount 


Thomas Waddell Hill 


East Flat Rock 


Bobby Dean Wagoner 


Hamptonville 


Charles Thomas Waldrop 


Ft. Bragg 


Charles Robert Walker 


Thomasville 


Luther Walker 


Fayetteville 


Grace Marie Wallace 


Elizabeth City 


Hugh Emmette Wallace 


Rocky .Mount 


Jeanette Estelle Wallace 


Hamptonville 


Eddie Roy Walters 


Bladenboro 


George Thomas Ward 


Anhevillo 


Holland Douglas Warren 


Thurmond 


Barbara Cornwell Warlick 


Raeford 


Walter Lee Warfford 


Winston-Salem 


Helen Elizabeth Watkins 


Oxford 


John W. Watkins 


Southern Pines 


James Franklin Watterson 


Bladenboro 


Carolyn Jean Webb 


Wilmington 


James H. Webb 


Charlotte 


Lois Jeanette Weeks 


Fayetteville 


Ann Gibson Weir 


Asheville 


James Opie Wells 


Brevard 


David Oliver Wesley 


Winston-Salem 


Jerry Wayne West 


Winston-Salem 


Annie Morrison Wheless 


Louisburg 


Anne Adelaide Whicker 


China Grove 


Betty Ray Whitaker 


Voungsville 


Doris Patricia White 


Oxford 


Glen Lane White 


Laurinburg 


Joanne White 


Winston-Salem 


Millison Anne Whitehead 


Murfreesboro 


James Mills Wiggins 


Louisburg 


Marshall Winston Wiggins 


Ybungsville 


Frank Eugene Wilhelm 


Mooresville 


Hildreth Floyd Wilkins 


Winston-Salem 


C. Reid Williams 


Sumter, S. C 


Lynwood Asheley Williams 


Dunn 


Vaughn McKay Williams 


Madison 


Martha Ann Williamson 


Greensboro 


Sarah Elizabeth Williamson 


Cerro (ionic 


William Joseph Williamson 


Greensboro 


Edward T. Wilson 


Pineville, Ky. 


Virginia Cleveland Wood 


Winston-Salem 


Margie Lee Woodall 


Reidsville 


Ray Marshall Woodlief 


Henderson 





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Patricia Woodward 
Adam Alexander Young 
Edwin Ogburn Young, III 
Carolyn Lee Yow 


Wilkesbor 

Lexingto 

Henderso 

WUmingto 


Special Student 
Thomas D. Coppedge, Jr. 


Winston-Salei 



Freshmen candidates pander their chances for success in the early fall election for class offin 








"JOE AND 
JANE COLLEGE" 



u 



' 



'Hit! there ain't a girl near here.'" 




Ho gets a shine to it/ipr, 
all the "Janes." 



. . . Oh, iL-ell, no benches 
or magnolias! 



The training table 
for the athletes? 



"Standing on the corner, watching all the 
'girls' go by! " 




So this is the way they get their A*i 




Fraternity mm and coeds in formal 
aline meet in the parlor of the 
girl's dorm and prepare to leave 
lot Mid Winters Jam,'. 






GREEKS RUSH 

Fraternity suctions, crowded with 
rushees and rushers and filial with smoke, 
were rhe settings fur rhe open houses. 
While attempting to "snow" all potential 
fraternity men, the rushing groups pro- 
duced much hull about the virtues of their 
chapters. The poor, gullible rushees swal- 
lowed this and seemed impressed, but 
srill all rushers had ro "sweat" pledges 
until flic last minute. 

These anxious moments continued, and 
rhe outcome was unccrrain until rhe last 
second when those who had been treated 
like kings were made pledges and treated 
accordingly. The climax of this period 
of hard work, known as rushing, had 
come, and pledge night featured both 
extreme happiness and disappointment. 
However, every fraternity got many of 
the boys it wanted as pledges. 



IFC: NEW RULES 

[he Interfraternity Council was face 
\\ irh draw ing up new rushing rules that 
would be suitable for the Greeks in their 
new territory. 1 hese rules were complete 
and accepted. 

Fraternity men enjoyed the 
planned by the Council for Homecoming 
and Mid-Winters, following the defeat 
of N. C. State, the Creeks danced to the 
ndics of .Billy May's Band in the Coli- 
seum. Mid-Winters featured Woody 
Herman and his Band, who provided 
rhythms for Friday and Saturday nights. 

New York City's Waldorf Astoria was 
the site of the National I.F.C. Convention 
at which the Wake Forest representatives 
honored the Wake Forest Council by 
receiving the rank of third in the nation 
on the basis of activities for the past year. 
Now the local group is working hard in 
an effort to improve realationships among 
W. F. C.'s social fraternities. 





John M. Barnes, Allan J. Cottrell, William L. Davis, Carroll O. Ferrell, Marvin D. Gentry, Bruce A. Ketner. 

second row: 

William D. Ketner, Robert V. Nostrandt, Ernest W. Poe, Sheow F. Seen, Dudley R. Watson. 




Alpha Sigma Plii Fraternity was founded on 
December 6, IS45, at Yale University as a sopho- 
more society by three freshmen, Louis Manigault, 
Stephen Ornish Rhea, and Horace Spangler 
Weiser. When the existence of Alpha Sigma Phi 
was announced to the Yale campus, the junior 
fraternities welcomed the new fraternity as an 
added link in the political chain they were forging 
in the scramble tor college honors and men. But 
the rival Sophomore society was fearful of and 
antagonistic to Alpha Sigma Phi, for Kappa Sigma 
Thcta had been the only sophomore socictv on the 
campus since I Sis. The Beta .Mil Chapter of Alpha 
Sigma Phi came to Wake Forest College in 1932. 
In 1954 there were a total of seventy-eight chapters 
of Alpha Sigma Phi. Today the fraternity is the 
tenth oldest social order and is nineteenth in number 
of members among the fifty-nine fraternities of the 
National Interfraternity Conference. Alpha Sigma 
Phi has fifty-five active chapters and thirty-four 
alumni chapters geographically situated throughout 
the I'. S. and the District of Columbia. At Wake 
Forest the chapter is a true brotherhood in which 
brothers and pledges participate to bring about an 
atmosphere of kindred spirit ami social progress. 

Brothers and pledges put much of their energy 
and talent into their attractive Homecoming 
decorations shown on tins page, which won for 
them third place in fraternity competition. The 
Alpha Sigs always look forward to their annual 
Christmas party, which was a tremendous success 
this past holiday season. Another long awaited and 
frolicsome hall was the "Apache Party." Alpha 
Sigs enjoyed their partying throughout the year 
but also displayed their serious sincerity. 



NHi 





Alpha Sig officer! are: Jessie Castaner, Vice-President; Hill Davis, Treasurer; Bruce Reiner 
Secretary; Marvin Gentry, President. 



Alpha Sigma Phi 




Mrs. Martha Cook Gentry 
A studious group of Alpha Sigs .it their usual work. 






Delta Sig officers are: Tom Ward, Sgt.-at-Arms; Bill Connelly, Secretary; Bob Weatfo 
Vice-President; lack Grose, President; Jim Ham, Treasurer. 




Delta Sigma Phi 





5. 



i ? i m 



Elver C.Modlin, James W. Mohorn, Earl B. Parker, William D. Parrish, Larry A. Pearce, Forest C. Roberts. 

second row 

Thomas J. Rogers, Gerald T. Taylor, Thomas M. Ward, Robert Weatherman, Bobby D. Workman, John D. 

Wright. 




John M. Arnold, Larry H. Austin, A. Lawrence Aydlette, Olin H. Broadway, William T. Collins, William A. 
Connelly, James S. Forrester, William R. Goldston, Jack N. Grose. 



James H. Hayes, John F. Hebel, Ralph E. James, Donald E. Johnson, Wesley L. Keith, Hughie E. Lewis, James C. 
Long, Earl Marlowe, Cecil P. Merritt. 



Since the historic year 1899, when a handful of 
students in New York City got together to form a 
"new" kind of organization — a 20th Century fra- 
ternity — Delta Sigma Phi has blossomed into one of 
Greekdom's most progressive, solid and respected 
brotherhoods. 

Delta Sig members, now numbering in the thousands, 
have graduated from their "laboratories of leadership" 
and hue gone out into all parts of the world and in 
all walks oi life proudly wearing the diamond-shaped 
pin of the Sphinx. 

I he reactivation of Beta Lambda Chapter began 
during spring examinations in 1956. Two groups 
functioning as local fraternities had decided to affiliate 
with a national fraternity, and Bill Collins, member 
of the old Chapter, interested them in Delta Sigma 
Phi. Collins with National Representative Ken knopp 
laid the plans for reactivating the organization. Active- 
rushing began during the examination period, and 
by the end of the summer 10 men had been initiated 
and 12 more had pledged. Since then the Chapter has 
grown to 34 members and 17 pledges. Jack Grose 
was named hrst president of the fraternity and has 
served f >r this school term. 

The social life duting Beta Lambda's first year 
sparkled. Numerous parties at the Chapter House 
gave that much needed impetus for academic pursuits. 
At the top of the list of socials was the Coronation 
Ball in Durham with Alpha Epsilon and the E.C.C. 
and High Point Colonies. Beta Lambda's Dream Girl, 
Dianne Rousseau, was sponsor for the Chapter. 

Delta Sigma Phi boasts many well-known alumni. 
Among these are Fritz Crisler, Ted VVeems, and John 
Scott Trotter. 





Mickey V. Anderson, Richard O. Avery, Robert T. Bartholomew, James C. Bethune, W. Boyan Booe, Paul L. Burns, Sam Butler, 
Thomas K. Carlton, Gary F. Daniel, Charles R. Duncan, 

Donald E. Edwards, George F. Fairbanks, Murray C. Greason, John H. Hasty, Louten R. Hedgpeth, Robert C. Hedrick, Jeff R. 
Helms, Thomas H. Helms, Norman B. Kellum, William O. Landen, Paul Killian. 




K A "i in an Ed Sullivan mi.lv hall. 
The results of the morning .titer the night befo 




Washington and Lee University was the home for 
the first Kappa Alpha chapter, which was founded 
there in 1865. On January 8, IKS I, five men organized 
Tau Chapter of Kappa Alpha Fraternity on the Wake 
forest campus. The fraternity operated as a "sub 
rosa" organization for many years because of a college 
regulation forbidding the existence of fraternities. 
Several tunes the fraternity was discovered and each 
nine rhe members ot Kappa Alpha were given the 
choice of surrendering the charter or leaving school. 
A series ot rebirths, discoveries, and deaths followed 
for a period of forty-one years. On October '>, 1922, 
rhe \\.\x fraternity restrictions were removed by rhe 
college, a charter was re-granted to Tau Chapter. 
Kappa Alpha had sixteen members and was the only 
national chapter on the campus. The installation of the 
chapter was in rhe hands of Prof. R. B. White, Dr. 
Hubert Poteat, John II. Kerr, Jr., and Carroll W. 
Weathers, now Dean of the Wake forest School of 
Law. The work of the first leaders in making Kappa 
\lph.i a solid, closely-knit fraternity has always been 
an inspiration to all of its members. 

The K.A.'s parried after football games and held 
various social atiairs throughout the year. Along with 
Homecoming and Mid- Winters, rhe young men had 
a gala time at the Old South Hall. Nor onl) have the 
K.A.'s of Tau Chapter been acme, bur also rheir 
national alumni have shown rheir merit. 

Ten of Kappa Alpha's most prominent alumni arc 
Billy Joe Patron, Dr. I luberr Poteat, Morgan Beatty, 
Par Boone, J. Edgar Hoover, Randolph Scott, Dr. 
Cary MiddlecofT, Admiral Richard E. Byrd, Rev. 
James 1,. Duncan, and Gen. Frank Armstrong. 



fciMHI 



H 




Kappa Alpha 





William F. Lee, Jackson V. McCraw, John C. Mills, James L. Powell, George E. Rose, Robert T. Smith, Albert C. Sneeden, 
Charles L. Snipes. 



Horace D. Steadman, Robert W. Stevenson, Hunter L. Stcne, Perry Teague, Thomas L. Teague, Jimmy A. Tinkham, Lindsay S. 
Wall, Walter A. Ward. 




£5 ?*y 

mm w~ Ap 



W. H. Olive, Herbert L. Ridgeway, Thomas S. Royster, Brunson M. Salley, E. Clayton Selvey, Patrick M. Sharpe, John G. Shields, 
Frank B. Skinner. 

second row: 

William H. Smith, A. Conrad Stallings, William G. Starling, Jerry J. Stephenson, Robert B. Suggs, James C. Todd, Billy T. 

Watkins, Joel A. Weston. 




G. James Adcock, Ben H. Averett, Frank A. Bennett, Wiley F. Bowen, W. David Burns, Glenn R. Clark, Ronald C. Dilthey, 
John R. Earle, J. Frank Geer, Edwin B. Gresham, Lloyd H. Harrison. 

Chester H. Howe, David F. Hughes, Bobby F. Jones, C. Frank Jones, William C. Keith, L. Bruce McDaniel, Ray D. Mauney, 
Henry Morgan, Robert L. Northcutt. 



In the year 1400, Kappa Sigma had its traditional 
founding by I'manual Chrysoloras at the University 
of Bologna in Italy. This society was organized for 
the purpose of protection against the mayor of Bologna 
and his bold robbers. Then in December 1869, George 
Miles Arnold, John Covert Boyd, William Grigsby 
McCormick, Frank Courtney Nicodemus, and Ed- 
mund Law Rogers established the first American 
chapter of Kappa Sigma. Collectively this group was 
known as the "Five friends and Brothers," and their 
purpose for this American founding was, in the words 
of these early brothers, "to enioy and increase the 
pleasures which are onlv to be obtained by the inter- 
course of congenial spirits." It was not until 1939 
that a local fraternity on the old campus obtained a 
charter and became the Delta Omega Chapter of 
Kappa Sigma. 

The K. Sigs arc proud to boast such outstanding 
national alumni as I'stes Kefauver; Johnny Mack 
Brown and Philip Carey, both well-known movie 
actors; song writer Hoagy Carmichael; Warren 
Austin, ex-representative to the United Nations; and 
Harold W. fribble. Several brothers of the local 
chapter have held outstanding positions while taking 
part in the activities of the college. Worthy of mention 
are Brunson Salley, head cheerleader; Bruce McDaniel, 
president of ODK; Bill Starling, vice-president of 
the student bodv and president of Scabbard and Blade, 
and David Hughes, outstanding debater, chairman of 
the Men's Honor Council, and president of the Inter- 
national Relations Club. Memorable affairs of the 
past social life to be remembered are the gangster 
ball, a hillbilly party, a party for under-privileged 
children, and manv week end dances. 




Kappa Sik* and data enjo} special program of the evening . . .TV 



A highlight of the year andfunfm all— the K.<pp., Sig costume / 





Al G. Baker, David C. Barefoot, Lloyd F. Baucom, Rodney G. Beals, Johnny H. Brantley, Thomas C. Bunn, Louis A Burny 
Gene R. Carter, John R. Cella, Walter C. Conner. 

Henry E. Copple, Philip A. Diehl, Harvey C. Eden, Raymond B. Farrow, Joseph W. Ferguson, Howard C. Fodrie, Jon H Gerdes 
Richard L. Gilbert, William E. Grant. 




Lloyd takes j spin in a cool sort of way during /rat. pi 



Composite pictures are always d feature as old brothers are pointed 

mm 




On the campus of Boston University in 1909, three 
law students founded the lirsr chapter of Lambda 
Qn Alpha. In the 46 year history of the fraternity, 
it has grown until it has over I SO chapters. Lambda 
('hi merged with another top-ranking national fra- 
ternity, I beta Kappa Nu. Genera] headquarters for 
the brotherhood was established in Indianapolis, 
Indiana. In 1924, a chapter of Theta Kappa Nu was 
founded on the campus at Wake Forest, North 
Carolina. As the chapter grew, the upper echelon of 
Theta Kappa Nu and Lambda Chi Alpha began plans 
lor uniting. 1 he Wake Forest chapter officially be- 
came Theta Tau /eta of Lambda Chi Alpha in Sep- 
tember of [939. At the present. Lambda Chi Alpha, 
on a national scale, is composed of fifteen geographical 
divisions, ninety-two alumni associations, and one 
hundred and sixteen contact secretaries. It is the hope 
of Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity to build, in the 
brothers and pledges, a spirit of brotherhood, a sense 
of responsibility, and a feeling of co-operation, as 
well as providing a basis for social activities. 

Numerous social activities w ere planned by Fred 
Turnage, who was elected president in January, 
Highlights of the '56-'57 social year were Home- 
coming; \lid-W inters, the White Rose Hall, held in 
observance of founders' Day, March 21; and the 
Intcr-'/.eta, a dance that found Wake forest Lambda 
Chi"s joining with brothers and pledges from Duke, 
L. X. C, N. C. State, and High Point at the Ocean 
forest Hotel, Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Harry S. Truman, Al Capp, Frankie Lame, and 
Rev. Lee Turtle are all noteworthy and well-known 
alumni of the national fraternity. 








Lambda Chi Alpha 




Mrs. Howard C. Fair, 






£* V j* 










I 1 



James R. Hayes, Charles D. Humphries, Gary A. Langhorst, M. Bruce Liles, Jimmy D. Matthews, Joe T. Millsaps, Bob J. 
Mooneyham. 



James R. Musgrave, William R. Pearce, George B. Purvis, Roland H. Thomas, Frederick E. Turnage, Alexander 
R. Tuten, Ralph A. Walker. 







Pi Kappa Alpha 



Mrs. Wariarmt II hedbn 




Richard G. McCall, John M. Mangum, E. Winston Miller, C. Edward Moore, Arthur R. Palmer. Charlie T. Pappendick, 

•Jerald Pierce, William L. Powell. 

second row 

David A. Rawley, Jacland F. ReVille, Charles V. Smith, Robert E. Talley, John David Thomas, Thomas G. Whedbeej Joseph 

R. Whitley. 



^■^^ 




James C. Adams, Robert M. Allen, Robert L. Alphin, Joe B. Currin, Douglas B. Curtis, B. Howard Daniels, John A. Eberhart, 
Samuel B. Edwards, James R. Fowler, Charles T. Griffin. 

Douglas R. Harris, E. Ken Hines, Robert M. Hines, William B. Hines, Jerald A. Holleman, E. Garth Jenkins, Walter E. Jordan, 
Oscar A. Kafer, John W. Kimball, Luther E. Ledford. 



["he six Founders of Pi Kappa Alpha had fresh in 
their minds the memories of the Civil War when they 
established their chapter in 1868. Their problems 
were in some measure similar to those of the rest of 
the South in its woes of reconstruction. Life at the 
University of Virginia at that time was simple and 
devoid of many things now considered collegiate; 
friendships were peculiarly warm and ideals were 
keenly cherished. As one of the Founders has stated, 
they little imagined the great oak tree that was to 
grow from their planting, but they planted well and 
deeply in the subsoil of friendship and idealism. Later 
when the local Pika chapter was granted a charter 
from the national office to a group at Wake Forest, 
it became the ( lamma Phi Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Let us review some of the activities of the local 
chapter for the past year. 

Pika parties started late hut ended with many 
fine affairs, climaxed by the Dream Girl Ball. Florida's 
gift to the Gamma Phi Chapter, Mrs. Marianne 
Whedbee, proved to be a true dream girl. Jac ReYille 
attended the national convention, and Oscar Kafer 
went to the l.F.C. national convention. All brothers 
enjoyed the year under the capable advice of their 
Alumnus Counselor, Or. C. B. I'arp. 

Pi Kappa Alpha's alumni of national interest in- 
clude Senators John Sparkman from Alabama ami 
Wayne Morse from Oregon; General Courtney 
Hodges, retired, Commanding General of the First 
Army 1944-1949; George Russell, Treasurer of 
General Motors; John D. Sheaffcr, Vice-President 
of Sheaffcr Pen Company; Fess Parker, movie star; 
and Tommy Byrne, New York Yankees baseball 
player. 




boys of the Red Shield's Club in theii .<nnii.il Christmas pa 
Riding the Wolfpack "//»//«■".' 





George W. Beck, Charles J. Biggers, Henry C. Bowers, Fred M. Carmichael, Caudell W. Clark, John T. Coates, Warren H. Ellis, 
Kenneth S. Ethridge, James H. Floyd, John A. Gerring, Major B. Harding. 

Harold A. Hedgecock, James L. Hobbs, William C. Jennette, Bob W. Lawing, Charles E. McCall, Jack McGinley, Thomas D- 
Malcom, Thomas H. Morris, John T. Morrow, Charles H. Munn, Heber H. Newsome. 




The founding of Sigma Chi Fraternity occurred at 
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, on June 28, 1855. 
Founders of that chapter were Thomas Cowan Bell, 
James Parks Caldwell, Daniel William Cooper, 
Benjamin Piatt Runkle, Isaac M. Jordan, Franklin 
Howard Scobey, and William Lewis Lockwood. The 
first six of these men, disgusted bv the prevalent 
fraternity policy under which a chapter dictated the 
choice and vote of its members in campus elections, 
broke away and joined Lockwood in a constructive 
protest against artificiality, sham, and pretense in 
fraternity programs. The local founding of the Delta 
Nu Chapter was in November 1948. I he petitioning 
group was known first as the Esquire Club and then 
/eta Chi. Today the brothers are proud of their 
national association and enjoy an active campus life. 

The social season of the year opened in the new 
Sigma Chi house with dances and open houses and 
was highlighted by the "Sewers of Pans" I [ome- 
coming part>'. "The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" was 
the feature of serenades for girls at Wake Forest, 
Salem, W. C, High Point, and the X. C. Baptist 
Hospital. Sweetheart Carol Jennette reigned over the 
annual Sweetheart Ball at the Robert E. Lee Hotel. 
On campus, athletes of the chapter won their third 
consecutive fraternity league football championship 
and went on to take the all-campus intramural football 
crow n. 

Sigma Chi has prominent men in athletics, enter- 
tainment, public office, literature, business, and edu- 
cation. Some of these widely known men arc John 
Wayne, Fony Trabert, Dickie Hcmric, Howard 
"Hopalong" Cassidy, Grover Cleveland, Booth Tark- 
ineton, and L. (I. Balfour. 






Sigma Chi officers are: /j.a Co,,--.!.,. Questor; Marvin Gray, MaRister, George Beck, Pro-( tmml, 
Major Harding, Armotator; Bob Laving, Consul. 



Sigma Chi 




Miss Carol Jcmiettf 




P ^ a 



Richard B. Odom, William M. Powers, John W. Reed, John E. Roberts, Garth L. Rucker, Donald L. Scalf, Tony J. Stafford' 
John C. Stokoe, Ronald P. Stone. 



Gordon B. Tayloe, Larry P. Thompson, Murphy F. Townsend, John W. Wagster, James D. Whetstone, J. Curtis Williams, 
Larry C. Williams, Harold O. Wilson, Frederick S. Wolf. 





Sig Ep officers are: Bob Williams, Historian; Hill Richardson, President; Clarke Drake, Veep 
Durald Wilson, Secretary; Dave Welton, Compt. 




, " 




% 



7< v 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Miss Elizabeth Tayloi 




Robert H. Owen, Henry C. Pace, Jerry L. Perkins, Vern N. Pike, Alexander Poston, Charles E. Reeves, William H, Richardson, 
Douglas S. Sasser, Marcus L. Scruggs, William P. Sing, Bobby B. Smathers. 



Robert E. Stafford, J. Carson Tate, Robert G. Towsend, Roy W. Tuck, Billy R. Watkins, Dave M. Welton, Winfry E. Whicker. 
Robert D. Williams, Weston A. Willis, L. Durald Wilson, Ralph M. Wolfe. 




J. Howard Abernathy, Don R. Averitte, Clifton B. Barham, Plato C. Barwick, Roy B. Costner, Joseph T. Crawley, C. Clark 
Drake, Thomas R. Dudley, Erastus J. Durham, Harrey R. Durham, Tilden B. Falls, J. Harold Fortenberry. 

Douglas A. Graham, Ronnie M. Guthrie, M. Carter Hedrick, Walter W. Hendrix, Roger W. Herrmann, Charles A. Horn, W. 
James Horn, Joseph H. Killian, A. Barry Kingman, William P. Lee, George G. Miller, Robin O. Moore. 



In the year 1901 a group of twelve young men at 
the University of Richmond banded together to form 
a fraternal organization known as the Saturday Night 
Club. A short time later the name or rhis group was 
changed ro Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Since thar rime Sig l.p alumni have included Ben 
Hibbs, editor of the Saturday Evening Post; fed Mack, 
TV personality; Woody Herman, orchestra leader; 
and Governor Theodore R. Mckcldin of Maryland. 

Highlights of the year for the Zeta Chapter were 
Sweetheart Dance, and the annual Carolina's Sig Kp 
Ball. Ann Bridges, coed, was elected queen of last 
year's Ball. 








Sig Eps Barham, Willis, Owen, Horn. Pike, and Moore gather around the old 

player piano as Stamey gets ready t<> pump away on mu of their favorite tunes. 





John S. Braswell, George P. Coghill, T. Jefferson Covington, Robert L. Davis, Robert L. Deal, David J. Drum, Malcolm T. Foster, 
John R. Heydt, Mark W. Hodges, W. Richard Holcomb. 



John B. Horton, James A. Knight, Clifton R. McLaurin, Ronald O. McLaurin, Harry N. Martin, George B. Mast, George C. 
Mewborn, Stephen L. Sasser, Larry A. Thompson, Tolbert S. Wilkinson. 



I his year marks the sixtieth anniversary of Sigma 
Pi, which was founded at Vincennes University in 
Vincennes, Indiana. Expansion as a national began in 
1908 when chapters from Illinois and Ohio State 
merged with the chapter at Vincennes to embark the 
young fraternity on its national program. Today, 
Sigma Pi has fifty-two active chapters covering areas 
mainly on the west coast of California, the midwest, 
and northeastern sections of the country. However, 
with eleven chapters in the southeast, Sigma Pi is 
on the move to activate more chapters in this section 
of the country. At present, three schools in the Atlantic 
Coast Conference have Sigma Pi Chapters: Maryland, 
N. C. State, and Wake forest. The Alpha-Nu Chapter 
of Wake forest was founded in l l '2S and chartered 
as Delta Sigma Chi. I he chapter was reactivated on 
May 12, 1940, as Alpha-Nu. 

Sigma Pi Fraternity ranks high among all national 
fraternities in the United States, and Alpha-Nu 
Chapter has placed number three in efficiency out of 
fifty-two chapters. All brothers have enjoyed a 
successful first year here on the new- Wake Forest cam- 
pus, with credit due to capable officer leadership and 
co-operation by all. The year was begun with com- 
plete new furnishings tor the chapter room, office, and 
lounge, and some new furnishings for the den, a 
good report from Brothers Bob Davis and Jerry Drum, 
who attended Sigma Pi Convocation in Pasadena, 
California; so many alumni being seen during Home- 
coming, Mrs. Jo Holcomb elected fraternity sweet- 
heart, the Orchid Hall at the El-Camrey Room, the 
annual Softball game with Rho Chapter at N. C. 
State; and the substitute party at the "rocks." 




Hk * nH 


V 


^B^~ jH 


t 







Sigma Pi officers are: George Ne-wborne, House Manager; Ray WcLaurm, 4th Counsellor 
Ronny McLaurin, Ird Counsellor; George Wast, 2nd Counsellor; Steve Straim, 1st Counsellor 
Robert Davis, Sage; Richard Johnson, Herald. 




Sigma Pi 




Sigma Pi's admire Eqsuires calender girl of the month be], 






Theta Chi officers are: Harve) Squires, Treasurer; C. J. Bermer, Pledge Marshal; Bill Tucke 
I ice-President; Otis Sizemore, Secretary; Bob Jeffords, President. 




Theta Chi 



\4iss Barbara Unveil 




first row: 

Frank E. Medford, William O. Perry, Lee Poindexter, J. Mike Price, J. Frank 

Roberts. 

second row: 

Don C. Silcox, Robert H. Squires, Jack Stewart, Ben S. Tench, William P. 
Tucker. 



*«£ 




Claude J. Benner, James E. Brown, Louis F. Burleson, William S. Coppedge, Robert F. Corwin, Bobby L. Crook, Joe H. 
Crump, Simon M. Downs, Robert G. Edison, Theron G. Egley. 

Baron S. Elrod, Buddy R. Glance, Miles L. Higgison, Dale V. Holland, Edward L. Houston, Robert S. Jeffords, Luther C. Johnson, 
Richard A. Johnson, William H. Kirk, Daniel W. Lovelace. 



The Gamma Omicron Chapter of Theta Chi Fra- 
ternity was founded nn May IS, 1948, in the lower 
Barracks Quadrangle at Wake Forest, N. C. Active 
in the founding of Gamma Omicron were Dr. 
Hubert M. Poteat, now Professor Emeritus of Wake 
Forest College, and the Honorable 1 had I lire. As 
of January 1, 1957, there were 32 actives in Gamma 
Omicron and 14 pledges. The 13 seniors leave the 
responsibility of carrying on their noble traditions 
and also their social I if.- to the lower classmen. 

Much socializing is done by the brothers of Theta 
Chi in every realm. The fall semester was highlighted 
by the formal rushing smoker early in the year and 
especially by the "Sword and Serpent Ball" which 
was held on the roof of the Robert E. Fee Hotel 
during Homecoming week-end. Numerous parties in 
the chapter room and other outings led the brothers 
to Christmas and the annual stag party, when gifts 
were exchanged. The outstanding feature of the spring 
term was the annual "Dream Girl Ball" where ( lamma 
Omicron's dream girl was selected. The entire year 
was rilled with serenades, parties, picnics, open houses, 
and other events which were enjoyed by everyone. 

Distinguished past members of Theta Chi across 
the nation are 1 had Furc. North Carolina Secretary 
of State; Sammy Kaye, Willard Waterman, "The 
Great Gildersleeve"; John Cecil Holm, playwright 
and actor; Robert M. Fuoss, executive editor of the 
Saturday Evening Post; Crawford H. Greenewalt, 
president of tht largest chemical industry in the world; 
John Sloan Dickey, president of Dartmouth Uni- 
versity; and Thor Olson, former American and world 
middleweight wrestling champion. 




' takes is great "Concentration 



The Theta Chi Da 




S&?1 




often thought of as an end in 




Graduation 



Friends and families converged upon the spring-green 
campus set amidst the rolling hills of Forsyth County 
to witness the culmination of four years of work, worry, 
and play tor the graduating class of 1957. For many, 
their graduation is a time of sorrow, to others a joy, 
hut to all it is an achievement, a realized goal, a triumph. 
Graduating seniors from Wake Forest in previous 
years have gone on to become outstanding leaders in 
our nation as well as in North Carolina. Every indication 
is that the seniors of '57 will carry on and even surpass 
this tradition. Only the setting for this graduation is 
different from those in past years. The proud spire of 
the new chapel towers over the academically robed 
procession as it winds past the stately columns and down 
the long aisle to the thundering strains of the chapel 
organ. Many of these seniors are already seeing beyond 
the walls of the chapel and visualizing what lies ahead 
for them — some are planning weddings; others, careers; 
still others will soon be serving in the military services. 
The ceremony over, the members of the rirst graduating 
class on the new campus emerge as new alumni and 
alumnae of Wake Forest College. 



■M 




The Last Graduation 

From the Old 

Campus. 



And so ends 




LU ill 




August 12, 1956, saw two heads tent ever scattered 

lay-out sheets, hands husy with rulers ,'rd erasers, two 
minds trying ro visualize the events which would take 
plac-e at Wake Forest in its new home. This was the begin- 
ning of the 1957 Howler. But our foresight didn't predict 
that our new surroundings would bring about so many 
changes. Starr members worked diligently producing new 
lay-outs, cutting copy and righting toward our goals — 
putting our a good book, and getting it out on time (the 
yearly slogan of all year book staffs). We sincerely hope 
that the students will be proud of their 195" Howi.fr— a 
book which is symbolic of the beginning of a new chapter 
in the history- of Wake Forest College. 

Our thanks and appreciation go to those who have- 
rendered valuable services to the production ot the book. 
Mr. William Oliver Smith and Mr. Tommy Graham of 
Edwards and Broughton Company for their assistance 
and co-operation in printing the book; Miss Doris Leeper 
and Mr. Walter Dargan of the Southern Photo Process 
Engraving Company' for their advice concerning layout and 
production problems; Mr. A. F. Smith of Smith Studio for 
the portrait photography; Dr. F. G. Wilson, our adviser, 
who showed a special interest in its production, and Mr. 
Irving Grigg, his wife, and Farry Austin ot Gngg Studio 
for their co-operation, interest, and time spent, in making 
the photographs. Others who have contributed to the book 
are: Frank Jones, of the Journal and Sentinel, whose pictures 
appear throughout the book; Worth Copeland. bursar, 
Eugene Olive, who gave the color plates for the pictures 
appearing on pages 2 and 24, also from the camera ot Mr. 
Grigg; Russell Brantley and Marvin Francis tor statistics 
and pictures; Dottie Braddock of the Student, who wrote 
the foreword, Mrs. F. B. Iarnshaw, who wrote the poem 
on page 6; and Coppedge Studios, who made the pictures tor 
the members of the Magnolia Court. 

The fifty-fifth volume of the Howler was edited pri- 
marily on a table !7}/£ inches by 9 feet, a good, hardwood 
desk, and an equally hard floor. The printing was done by 



the Fdw ards and Broughton Company ot Raleigh. Body 
copy is set in 10 on 12 point Janson. Captions are in 8 on 1(1 
point Janson italics. Heads are is and 56 point Bodoni, and 
14 and 24 point Stymie are used in the athletic section. A 
total of 1,979 students, including fraternities and law. were 
photographed for the 195" Howler. In addition to the por- 
traits the book contains 44S other pictures, all of which 
were engraved bv Southern Photo Process Fngraving Com- 
pany of Atlanta. The natural light photos appearing in the 
football section are the work of Irving Grigg and his 35mm 
camera. The black Cordova grain cover, embossed with a 
two-tone color design, was manufactured by Kingscratt. 
Inc.. of Fvingsport, Tennessee. 

The editors regret that some important events ot this 
vear will not appear in the book, but in order for the Howler 
to come out on time, the line had to be drawn somewhere. 
Such things as the College Theater's outstanding production 
of "The Paiama Game" (a sellout tor ten performances), 
the Military Ball; and the Preaching Mission headed by 
Dr. Harold Cooke Phillips of Cleveland, Ohio, would have- 
added to the book. 

Without the hard work put forth by outstanding start 
members the '57 Howler would not have been possible, 
lane Lewis deserves credit for long hours ot beating out 
manv pages of copy on borrow ed typewriters and proofing 
it before sending it to the printers. Barbara Howell gets a 
well earned vote of thanks for her w ork in contacting the 
clubs and individuals and getting them together for rhur 
pictures. B. J. L'pchurch and Ann Cornwell also served 
very well in this capacity. Thanks to Beth Scott tor the manv 
hours spent at her tvpew nter working on senior activities 
and many other pieces of cop) . ( dona Fhppin worked hand 
in hand with the co-editors (one in particular). She- 
gave unselfishly other time, talent, and energy to all phases 
ofl low i ik production. A special, thank you. We are grateful 
to Dave Welton for one of the finest jobs ever done by a 
business manager of the Howlkk. And to all who had a 
part, thanks. 



IM)K\ 



ADMINISTRATION 


BUILDING 24-49 


Psychology 


110 


Phi Alpha Delta 


115 


Alpha Epsilon Delta 


102 


Religion 


110 


Phi Beta Kappa 




26-29 


ROTC 


170 


Phi Delta Phi 


1 14 


Alpha Kappa Pei 
Alpha Phi Omega 
Alpha Sigma Phi 
Aquatics < Hub 
Athletic Director 


12 


Sociology 


1 10 


Phi Epsilon Kappa 


107 


14 


First Year Law Class 


111, 112 


Philomathesian Literary Society 


40 


[98, 199 

hill 
137 


Football 
Forensics 

Fraternities 


138-147 

SO 

104-217 


Pi Kappa Alpha 
Pi Kappa Delta 
Pub Board 


20S, 200 
82 
41 




Freshman 1 lass 


182-102 


Pub Advisors 


41 


B.S.U. Council 


120 


Freshman Kin lion 


12, 13, 102 


Physics Club 


103 


B.S.U. Retreat 


127 


Freshman Orientation C 


immittee 83 






B.S.U. Choir 


120 


Future Teachers 


81 


Religious Organizations 


120-123 


liar Association 


112 






Rl IT( ' 


108-171 


Baseball 


154-157 


Gamma Sigma Epsilon 


102 






Basketball 


148-153 


Golf 


162 


SCIENCE 


08-105 


Beta Beta Beta 


103 


Graduation 


218, 210 


Second Year Law 


1 10 






GYM 


130-171 


Senior Class 


50-00 


CHAPEL 


1 16-127 


Homecoming 
Honor Council 
Howler 


- 


Seniors, Outstanding 


48, 49 


Cheerleaders 
Christian Education 
Chapel Choir 


1 72 

md Service 121 
125 


31 
30-37 


Sigma Chi 

Sigma I'h, Epsilon 

Sigma Pi 


210, 211 
212, 213 
214, 215 


Cn>ss Country 




Inter-Fraternity Counci 


107 


Social Standards Committee 


70 


Cullom Ministerial Ci 


nference 123 


IRC 


83 


Sophomore class 


128-135 


Delta Kappa Alpha 


122 


Intramurals 


10 1. 165 


Student, The 
Student Body Officers 
Student Legislature 
Swimming 


34-35 
31 


Debate Team 
Delta Kappa Nu 
Delta Sigma Phi 


45 
200, 201 


Junior Class 
Kappa Alpha Order 


07 
202, 203 


30 

158 


Delta Sigma Pi 

Dramatics 


43 
84-87 


Kappa Mu Epsilon 
Kappa Sigma 


44 

204, 205 


Tassels 
Tennis 


163 


Eta Sigma Phi 


80 


Lambda Chi Alpha 


200, 207 


Theta Chi 


216, 217 


Euzelian Literary Soc 


ety 47 


LAW 


100-113 


Third Year Law 


MIS. 100 






Law Classes 


108-112 


Track 


101 


FACULTY 




Law Fraternity 


114. 115 


Ti Hiring < 'le 'ii 


124 


Biology 


Inn 


LIBRARY 


70-87 






Business 


20 


Library Staff 


75 


Westminster Fellowship 


123 


Chemistry 


00-101 






WFDD 


30, 40 


Education 


20 


Magnolia Court 


170-181 


White Jackets 


166 


English 


72 


Magnolia Festival 


174. 175 


"Who's Who Among Students 


In 


1 1 1-1 Ml \ 


73 


Majorettes 




American Universities" 


76 


Law 


107 


Mid-Winters 


20 


Womens' Government Associati 


m 30 


Math 


20 


Miss 1 )e n Deacon 


16 


WHA 


174 


Modern Language 


110 
00 
137 


Monogram Club 


100 


Wrestling 


160 


Music 

Physics 

Physical Education 


"Old Gold Ami Black" 
Omicron Delta Kappa 


32, 33 
70 


Young Women's Auxiliary 


120 



STAFF 



Co-Editors . . . 




Editorial Staff . 


Elba House 




Kitty Booth 






Doug Graham 




Barbara Williams 
Alan Tuttle 


Associate and Copy 


Editor . . . 

Jane Lewis 




Linda Willard 
B. J. Upchurch 


Assistant Editor . . 


Gloria Flippin 




James Peterson 
Becky Lampley 


Typing Editor . . . 


Belli SCOW 




Freddie Isenhour 


Typing Staff . . . 


Marl ha Williamson 




Jane Freeman 
Ann Cutter 




Beth Hurt 




Betty Sue Kerlev 




Marlean McLamb 




Betty Sue Knott 




Ann Kitchen 




Emily Councilman 




Joan Parcells 




Mary Ann Satterwhite 




Emory Earp 
Rachel Dedmon 




Ann Phillips 
Pal Farson 




( larolyn Paschal 




Don Averitte 




Millison Whitehead 




Jane Aycock 




Ann Julian 




Carter Hedrick 



Photography Editor . 
Photography Staff . . 
Business Manager 
Business Staff . . . 

Fraternity Editor . . . 
Athletic Editor . . . 
Captains Editor . . . 



Barbs 
B. .1. 

Am 
Da 



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Ulll^WV ill 



New University Center 

of the 

Greater Wake Forest College In 

Winston-Salem 



Built 

By 

George W. Kane 



Contractor 



DURHAM 
111 Corcoran St. Bldg. 



ROXBORO 
Roxboro Bldg. 



GREENSBORO 
603 Jefferson Standard Bldg. 

HENDERSON 
231 South Garnett St. 



Compliments and Best Wishes 
from 



N. E. BREWER COMPANY 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Supplying 

Water and Sewer Lines 

Storm Drains and 

Steam Tunnels for 

The New and Greater Wake Forest College 

In Winston-Salem 




WMW 










|7J \|3 1 | 1 J- -IB ^ J^gl^ |p | 1 1 A I 



-* --->-.,.,-''/.'. 



New Law Building 

of the 

Greater Wake Forest College In 

Winston-Salem 

Built 

By 



FOWLER-JONES CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 



Winston-Salem, North Carolina 




The New Library Building 

of the 

New and Greater Wake Forest College 

In Winston-Salem 

With 

Plumbing and Heating Equipment 

Supplied and Installed 

By 

W. H. SULLIflH COMPMY, INC. 

GREENSBORO, 1. 0. 



J^*B 



Compliments of 



Owen Concrete 
Company 



Plant — Reynolda, N. C. 




Quarry Operated By 
W. E. GRAHAM AND SONS 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
Phone PA 3-3656 



Who Furnished 

Crushed Stone for Construction of 

Streets, Parking Lots and Drains on 

the New Campus of 

The Greater Wake Forest College in 

Winston-Salem 




J. BENNETT 

Excavating and Grading Contractor 



NO JOB TOO LARGE OR TOO SMALL 



Office Phone PA 3-2500 



2910 Ivy Avenue 



Winston-Salem 




We are proud to hove furnished and installed two Erie 
City 60,000 LP Steam Generating Units complete with 
Dust Collectors, Fans, Stokers, Stacks, Copes-Vulcan 
Combustion Controls and Soot Blowing Equipment in 
the new Wake Forest College Steam Plant. 

DILLON SUPPLY COMPANY 

Raliiuli — Durham — Rocky Mount — Goldsboro 



■■Ml 



COMPLIMENTS AND BEST WISHES 

From 

WALL COAL AND OIL CO. 

1726 N. LIBERTY STREET WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



SUPPLYING 



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}ht{j&.vi aqcwefle. Pwwcck eMiws w&t o^ alL\ 





We appreciate the confidence of our 
many thousands of customers who 
prefer our Holsum Bread and made it 
an outstanding favorite in this area 
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REPRESENTATIVES IN BOTH THE MEN'S b GIRLS' DORMS 



SeUStatters 




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Wake Forest Campus 
Downtown Winston-Salem 



rn nn r 




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ON THE CAMPUS 



STALEY'S 



STALEY'S RESTAURANT 

ON BEAUTIFUL REYNOLDA ROAD NEAR THE CAMPUS 



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STALEY'S DRIVE IN 

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STALEY'S RESTAURANT 

LOCATED AT 426 SOUTH STRATFORD ROAD 



WALTER ELMORE, MANAGER PHONE PA2-9118 



STALEY'S GRILL 

LOCATED AT 2985 WAUGHTON EXTENSION 



LUM TUTTLE and ROBERT WILLIAMS, MANAGERS PHONE PA 4-0334 




VARSITY 
DRIVE IN 

VARSITY SKY-CASTLE 

Featuring Nightly 

• DON EARL SHAW SHOW 

• STAR-LITE SERENADE 



JACK LUCAS — INVITES YOU OUT TO ENJOY 

THE VERY BEST OF FOOD AND 

YOUR SELECTION 

OF MUSIC 



IMPROVE YOUR GAME 

AT THE 

MERRIWETHER 

GOLF RANGE 

TELEPHONE PA 5-9228 

Located on East Polo Road 
Across Front the College 

• OPEN DAILY — 1 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT 

» COMPLETE LINE OF GOLF EQUIPMENT 
FOR SALE 



BILL BARNES 

ALL-AMERICAN 

WAKE FOREST 

SELECTS 

CLOTHES 

AT 



of^aftc ^forest 




bg)T) 





VARSITY 

SHELL SERVICE 

PHONE PA 5-9231 

Cherry Street and Polo Rood 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



FREE PICK UP b DELIVERY FOR 
WASHING • LUBRICATION 

ROAD SERVICE 



POLO GRILL 

AND RESTAURANT 

Corner Polo Road and Cherry St. Ext. 



Specializing In 

STEAKS -:- FRIED CHICKEN 

SEAFOODS 

COUNTRY HAM 



We Also Serve the Best 
SANDWICHES and SHORT ORDERS 




WELCOME 

It Will Be Our Pleasure to 

Serve ^ou 

SEALTEST MILK and 

ICE CREAM 



2221 Patterson Ave. 



Phone PA 2-4161 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

from the 

WINSTON-SALEM 

AUTOMOBILE AND TRUCK 

DEALERS ASSOCIATION 



Since 1929 Students Meet At 

MORRIS 
SERVICE 

401 W. FOURTH STREET 

SANDWICHES 

SODAS 

SNACKS 

NEXT TO CAROLINA THEATER 



One of North Carolina's 


Leading Men's and 


Boys' Stores 


• 


Noted for its LEADERSHIP in 


Style, Quality, and Good Service 




^Jzanfc ^f. Jikitfi Co. 




Sin 


art Fashions for Men and 


3oys 


WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



O'HANLQN 

DRUG STORE 

* fte*aML PRESCRIPTJ0N 





DIAL PA 2-7168 

400 N. Liberty 

COMPLETE DRUG NEEDS 

COSMETICS 

BABY SUPPLIES 

SICK ROOM SUPPLIES 

CAMERAS — FILMS 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Established Over 50 Years • City Wide Delivery 

O'HANLON DRUG STORE 

LIBERTY & FOURTH STREETS 



WE CALL FOR /C..^\ ROAD SERVICE 
AND DELIVER \*J^**/ DIAL PA 3-5531 

C. E. MOTSINGER, Manager 

BUENA VISTA 
GULF SERVICE 

Corner Buena Vista and Reynolda Roads 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

21 Years Experience in 

Cleaning Motors, Washing, 

Greasing, Polishing, and Waxing 

TIRES, BATTERIES AND ACCESSORIES 
OF ALL KINDS 



Visit Us 

For Your School and Art Supplies, 

Gifts, Books, and 

Office Furniture 

425-427 N. Trade St. Phone PA 5-0213 



IHMKLES BOOK STORE 




For the Finest in Smart 
Clothes 



mm 



°t Winston-Salem 



MORE LEISURE PER DAY. ..MORE HOME ENJOYMENT PER DOLLAR! 



COMPLETE 

GENERAL £$ ELECTRIC 
KITCHEN-LAUNDRY 



* MEAL-GETTING IS MAGICALLY EASY! 

Food is kept fresh and handy on the revolving shelves of the 
Refrigerator-Freezer . . . automatically cooked to perfection with 
the Built-in Oven and Calrod » Surface Units. After-eating drudgery 
ended with automatic Dishwasher and Disposall.® 

* WASHDAY ALL BUT DISAPPEARS! 

Famous G-E Filter-Flo » Washer and Automatic G-E Dryer take over 
washday. Gets clothes clean. Day and night drying convenience. 

* COSTS AT LITTLE AS $20.00 A MONTH 
AFTER A SMALL DOWN PAYMENT! 

Have a wonderful G-E Kitchen-Laundry in any of five Mix-Or- 
Match colors, or white. Ask about our tailored-to-your-needs 
finance plan ... with up to 5 years to pay. 



ASK YOUR G-E DEALER FOR FREE KITCHEN PLANS 

WALKER MARTIN, INC. 

DISTRIBUTORS 




North Carolina 
Equipment Company 




I NTERNATIONAL 
Construction Equipment 



RALEIGH - GREENVILLE - WILMINGTON 
GREENSBORO - CHARLOTTE - ASHEVILLE 



Phillips 



66 



Congratulations to the Senior Class 

FLITE FUEL GASOLINE 

AND 

TROP ARTIC MOTOR OIL 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

Bryan-Cooper Oil Company, Inc. 

WAKE FOREST ROAD RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. D. BRYAN, PRESIDENT 



Grertings from 



ZINZENDORF LAUNDRY 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



IN WINSTON-SALEM 
It's 

MOTHER AND DAUGHTER 
FASHIONS 

FOR THE VERY NEWEST 
IN FEMININE APPAREL 



Compliments of the 

K & W 

Cafeteria 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



POWER TO THE CLASS OF '57! 




We're proud of you . . . proud, 
too. of the chance to serve a 
new generation of young 
Piedmont citizens. 
Our best to you as you move 
forward, in a free and respon- 
sible community where 
vout own will and effort ire 
the measure of achievement. 



DUKE POWER COMPANY 



•~w.:::::::: 




.■■.^^^^^■.^•.^•.■.^■.■.^■.^^^^^^^^^^■.■.^^v.■.■.^■, 



WAWAVAVAWAW.VAWAWAVA\W.W 

Recollections of Quality Remains 

Long After Price Is Forgotten 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Summit Street Pharmacy 

Foot of Summit Hill Overlooking 
Hanes Park 

Your Prescription Our First 
Consideration 

Phone PA 2-1144 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Congratulations 

to 

The Class 

of 

1957 

BON-TON CLEANERS 

Winston-Salem's "Most Fashionable" Cleaners 

849 Reynolda Road 

PHONE PA 3-8281 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



ROMINGER FURNITURE 
COMPANY, Inc. 



Established 1900 



Mrs. E. R. Cunningham 
Chairman of Board 



J. W. Cunningham 
President 



OLDEST • LARGEST • BEST 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE 
H 







M 



E 



RESTAURANT 

STEAKS — SEAFOODS 
AIR CONDITIONED 



Fifth and Cherry Streets 

Opposite Robert E. Lee Hotel 

WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 



BOBBITT'S COLLEGE 
PHARMACY 




Registered Pharmacist 

PROMPT DRUG DELIVERIES 
Dial PA 3-1867 

100 Lockland Avenue 



LAUNDRY 

5c* DRY CLEANING 



LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING 
FREE MOTHPROOFING 

HAT RENOVATION 
CUSTOM MADE HATS 



451 W.E.BIvd. 



Phone PA 4-9271 



Enduring 

Jeweler's Gifts 

express your 

sentiments best! 

Make our store your store for your needs in 
Fine Jewelry, Silverware, Etc 

We Specialize in all kinds 
of Repair Work. 



if e invite your 
charge account. 




416 West 4th St. 



BEACON HILL MOTEL 

Tttadvw Wtotd 



l' L . MILES NORTH OF THE 

CAMPUS AT THE FORK 

OF HIGHWAY 421 AND 

HIGHWAY 67 



WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 
TELEPHONE WA 4-8551 

Mr. & Mrs. L. C. Barnes 
Owners & Managers 



WELCOME TO WINSTON -SALEM 




WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Visit Us At 

H. L. GREEN COMPANY 

Liberty through to Trade Street 

Air Conditioned 

New • Enlarged • Modern 



Phone PA 5-1305 



P. O. Box 5231 



A Fine 60 Room Motor Hotel Court 

RADIANT HEAT : AIR CONDITIONED 

SOME TV 
TILE TUB SHOWER : TELEPHONES 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE RATES 

OUR POLICY — NO TIPPING 

1 BLOCK OFF U.S. ROUTE 158— WEST 
On Cloverdale Avenue — in City 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

George B. Kempton, Jr., Manager 



J&oax & Castle 



"Greensboro's Most Popular 
Sandwich Shop" 

Spacious 
Parking Ground 

WEST MARKET ST. EXT. 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



THE FIVE 

SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

SEMINARIES 

Invite you to higher training for 
SUPERIOR CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Louisville, Ky. Duke K. McCall, Pies. 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Ft. Worth, Tex. J. Howard Williams. Pres. 
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 

New Orleans, La. Roland Q. Leavell, Pres. 
Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary 

Berkeley, Calif. Harold K. Graves, Pres. 
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Wake Forest. N. C. Sydnor L. Stealey, Pres. 

A call to preach is a call to prepare" 




QUALITY OIL COMPANY 

Distributors of Shell Products 

SERVING YOU THROUGH YOUR 
FRIENDLY SHELL DEALERS 

"Service Is Our Business" 



SPECIALIZING IN FLATTOPS and CREW CUTS 

INDIVIDUAL HAIR STYLISTS — IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL 

Carolina Hotel Barber Shop 

LOWER LOBBY CAROLINA HOTEL PHONE PA 2-3615 

OPEN DAILY 8 A.M. -5:45 P.M. SATURDAY 5:30 P.M. 

EXPERT BARBERS TO SERVE YOU 

M. G. LAWING. Manager 



ra m r 



LENTZ 



TRANSFER b STORAGE CO. 

200 BROOKSTOWN AVENUE 

LOCAL MOVING 
NATIONWIDE MOVING 
HOUSE GOODS STORAGE 

AGENT OF 

ALLIED VAN LINES 

WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE PART 

OF OUR CITY 



"Winston-Salem's Oldest and 

Largest Hardware Store" 

• QUALITY 

• SERVICE 

• SATISEACTION 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS EOR: 
Photographic Equipment 

Sporting Goods 
Housewares & China 
Building Supplies 
Delta Power Tools 

Phone PA 2-1112 

BROWN ROGERS DIXSON 

"The Best Place to Get It" 



Voaler ServL 



°9 



ervice 



Dependable Service Since 1858 



Dial PA 2-6101 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 



FRANK VOGLER & SON'S 



Ff inston-Salenii North Carolina 




JJ<)(M(Jc-Q)/tuH id Uom pam ] 

FOURTH AT SPRUCE STREET 

WINSTON- SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



RADIOS 



RECORDS 



TOYS • GIFTS 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

SPORTING GOODS 

HOBBY AND 

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 



1 our 



COLLEGE SHOP 




COMPLETE NATURAL SHOULDER STYLING 
(Often Imitated — Never Equalled) 
• SHETLAND SPORT COATS 

PLAIN OR PLEATED SLACKS 
• SHETLAND SWEATERS 

PLUS — A complete line of suits, sport coats and 
slacks that are styled with you in mind, with all the 
accessories. We feel certain that we will be able to 
cater your every need and desire in young men's 
clothing and furnishings. 



BEST WISHES FROM 

THE COLLEGE INN 

839 Reynolds Road, Winston-Salem. N. C. 
Specializing in : 

SPAGHETTI 

PIZZA PIE 

STEAKS 

SALADS 

Private Room for Parties * For Reservations Phone PA 2-9932 

WJWWYWWWVYWWWWiNEXT DOIIRWAWWWMWMMWW, 



DEACON'S HEN 




Located in the World's Tobacco Capital 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Douglas Boyle 

General Manager 



WHEN YOU ARE DOWNTOWN PARK 
INDOORS AT 

DOWNTOWN GARAGE 



NEXT TO THE REYNOLDS BUILDING 
600 CAR CAPACITY 

USE OUR BUDGET DEPARTMENT 
AND BUY THE FAMOUS 

• U. S. ROYAL TIRES 

• GULF GASOLINES 

• WILLARD BATTERIES 

• ACCESSORIES 



HELPING TO BUILD ^^ ISm*^ 



THROUGH: 

* Agricultural Development 

* Community Improvement 

* Industrial Expansion 



(CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY) 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

WINSTON-SALEM'S 
FINEST THEATRES 



WINSTON 

THE CAROLINA IS THE LARGEST 
BETWEEN WASHINGTON AND ATLANTA 

THE WINSTON IS ONE OF THE 

NEWEST THEATRES IN 

THE CAROLINAS 



FRITTS MOTOR COMPANY 

BROOKSTOWN AVENUE AT BURKE STREET 

GENERAL REPAIR 

and 

BODY WORK 



24 HOUR WRECKER SERVICE 



Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

PHONE PA 3-1677 

NIGHT PHONE PA 2-4398 



Your (cSSO) Serv 



ice 



WELCOME WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Lubricating 
Washing 
Oil Change 



Tires 

Auto Accessories 

AAA Service 



OUR BUSINESS IS SERVICE 

AMMONS ESSO SERVICE CENTER 

Reynolda Road 
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



WELCOME TO 

WINSTON-SALEM 

\^ e Have Been Headquarter? 
Since 1900 

FOR SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

ART SUPPLIES 

EATONS FINE LETTER PAPERS 

BILLFOLDS - BIBLES - BRIEF CASES 

Guaranteed Fountain Pens From $1.00 Lp 

All Latest Publications 
Office Equipment and Supplies 



418 N. Liberty Street 



DIAL PA 2-7197 



Watkins Book Store 



VISIT OUR NATURAL NOOK 
FOR COLLEGE CLOTHES 



IVY TYPE 



SUITS, SPORT COATS 
AND FURNISHINGS 

fJ§^V\or man ^tocktonH nc. 

XiS>7 ' « 11 N. Cherry St. W inston-Solera" 



w 



DIXIE RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 


INC. 


235 N. Church St. 


PHONE PA 5-3521 




.... — -»•>»- — . 

We Are Happy to Have 


Supplied Wake 




Forest College With 


All of the 




Necessary Kitchen 


Equipment 





TAXI 
BLUE BIRD 

CAB CO., INC. 

DIAL PA 2-7121 

Prompt 
Courteous — Efficient 

BAGGAGE TRANSFER 



Welcome to 
Winston-Salem 



Merita Bakeries, Inc. 



1115 W. Liberty Street 

Bread and Cakes 

Stay Fresh 

Longer 



THE BAHNSON COMPANY : AIR CONDITIONING 

Over forty years of experience 
in industrial, commercial and 
institutional air conditioning. 



We are pleased to have furnished and installed 

the air conditioning systems at the new 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

LAW BUILDING 

WAKE FOREST CHAPEL 

UNIVERSITY CENTER 

GYMNASIUM 




on> 



COMPANY 



m 



MAYFLOWER STORAGE 

No job is too big or TOO SMALL 




HENDREN and GOODWIN 
TRANSFER CO. 

MOVING - STORING - PACKING - SHIPPING 

2712 N. LIBERTY PHONE PA 3-4086 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



VISIT OUR 

Beautiful 

DAIRY 
BAR 

On 

South Stratford Rd 




?a/nn<ete. fiatby 



WINSTON SALEM 



CAMEL CITY LAUNDRY 


• 
SANITONE DRY CLEANING 


FOR FASTIDIOUS PEOPLE 


* 

281 S. STRATFORD ROAD 



Dramatized Portraits 

For The 

Discriminating 




PHONE PA 2 8137 • 118' 2 WEST 3rd STREET 
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



TOWN AND COUNTRY 
GULF gulf SERVICE 

REYNOLDA AT OLD TOWN ROAD 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PHONE PA 3-3122 PA 5-9576 

WASHING $ 1.50 

SIMONIZING 10.00 

LUBRICATING 1.25 

Complete Brake Service and 
Other Minor Repairs 

TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 
ROAD SERVICE 

FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY 



(ft 



"Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Or Your Money Back" , - 



t -* tip- "i*^ **t&^Z :! * sr ~mE, 



Your Complete, One-Stop ^^i^^^ll^s* ******* 




Shopping Center 

SEARS in WINSTON-SALEM 



801 West Fourth Street 



Free Roof-Top Parking 



W^K^^M 



SEE THE '57 FORD 
AT 

HULL-DOBBS CO 



633 N. LIBERTY ST. 



King of the FT ild High Trades 




"My date is so 
handsome in 
his TUXEDO!" 

And he RENTED IT! He says it is 
so convenient to choose from 
the large selections of freshly 
cleaned and pressed garments 
in several up-to-the-minute 
styles! The fitting is perfection 
itself, with a maximum of in- 
formal comfort in formal wear! 
Next time you have a formal 
date (and make it soon), rent 
formal wear! 



THE FORMAL HOUSE 



207 W. 3rd STREET 
PHONE PArk 4-8471 



For 


the Smartest Fashions 




For All Occasions . . . 




Shop at Winston-Salem's 




Leading Specialty Shop! 


L. 


ROBERTS 




Winston-Salem. N. C. 




Ann I \,u;. class «*/ I"', 



MONTALDO'S 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



PARRISH 

TIRE 
COMPANY 

646 N. Cherry Street 
PHONE PA 3-1037 



GENERAL 



TIRES 
TUBES 
BATTERIES 



Kraft System Recapping 




Pepsi-Cdla Bottling Company 
of Winston-Salem 

1664 STADIUM DRIVE 



i-S-S-S-SPARKLE! 
Have a Coke! 




COCA-COLA COMPANY 
OF WINSTON-SALEM 



The 1957 Howler 



Is Hound in a 



KINGSKRAFT COVER 



Manufactured By 

Kingsporr Press, Inc. 

Kingsport, Tennessee 



IDEAL 














YOUR BEST 


PLACE 


TO 


SHOP 


AFTER ALL 


WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 














"Home Owned 




— Home 


Operated" 



Welcome Wake Forest College 

Compliments of 

CITY BEVERAGE DELIVERY SERVICE 

23 BURKE STREET 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Phone PA 5-1481 — PA 2-2774 



rf= & 



mumm^n 



GALLINS VENDING CO., Inc. 



1133 WEST FIRST STREET 



PHONE PA 4-6327 WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



WE AUTOMATICALLY SERVE YOU DAY AND NIGHT 
THRU VENDING 

CIGARETTES • COFFEE & HOT CHOCOLATE 

CANDY • SANDWICHES 

CAKES • MILK 

and ORANGE JUICE 



IS£ 



aiHi 



Drink DrP&PP en 



THE FRIENDLY "PEPPER-UPPER" 
.THAT NEVER LETS YOU DOWN! 




DR. PEPPER BDTTLINB CD. 

REYNDLDA RDAD 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Belk^ Stevens Co, 

^ our Friendlv Department Store 



Congratulations 
To the '57 Graduates 



The Home of Belter Values 

CORNER OF FIFTH & TRADE STREETS 
WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 



Welcome to the 

Students of 

Wake Forest College 

TOWN AND CAMPUS SHOP 

417 NORTH CHERRY STREET 



Specialising in Clothing and 
S/jortsiveur for the 1 ounger Man 



ON CAMPUS YOUR 

WAKE FOREST 
BARBER SHOP 



F. M. WILLIS, PROPRIETOR 



FLORSHEIM 

STANLEY'S, INC. 

ON TRADE STREET 

STANLEY'S 

THRUWAY— 

THRUWAY 

SHOPPING 
CENTER 




NEW ASIA RESTAURANT 

I Incorporated) 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE FOOD 

Orders Prepared to Take Out 

W D. Tarn, Manager 
PHONE PA 4 1356 315 W. FIFTH ST. 



STOLTZ MOTOR SERVICE 

CULF SERVICE AND PRODUCTS 

Bethabara and Cherry Streets 

PHONE PA 4-3635 

• COMPLETE AUTO AND TRUCK REPAIRS 

• BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

AND BALANCING 

• WRECKER SERVICE 

NIGHT PHONE PA 2-8984 



A^4 

*l FflSHON 5H0P 



WHERE SMART 
WINSTON-SALEMITES SHOP 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



JSBH 




mm 



TEAK 
HOUSE 

AT TWO LOCATIONS 

I. LOCKLAND AVENUE 

PHONE PA 2-0005 

FEATURING OUR FAMOUS SALADS & STEAKS 
AND ITALIAN FOODS 

II. STRATFORD ROAD 

PHONE PA 4-4107 

FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE PA 5-9426 

FEATURING OUR FAMOUS SALADS & STEAKS 
AND FRESH SEA FOODS 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 




for the best brands in the land! 



men's clothing and accessories • women's ready-to-wear 



shoes for men and women 



women's fashion accessories 



beauty salon 



women's fashion foundations 



for labels that hang by more than a thread 

shop Anchor in person or by phone 

PA 4-3611 — free delivery within city 
OPEN AN ANCHOR CHARGE ACCOUNT 




The Portraits in This 
Yearbook If ere Made By 



SMITH STUDIO 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Official Portrait Photographers 

For the 

"1957 HOWLER" 



"Portraits and Application Pictures 

may be ordered from us from your 

School Annual Negatives." 



12 East Hargett Street 
RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



PIITI-KUI.UIUS 



JjO-l the 



1957 Howler 



kleie Made kf 



SOUTHERN PHOTO PROCESS liUIIIIIU CO. 

ATLANTA. 81. 



OAKCREST FLORIST 

314 Friendship Circle 
Just off East Polo Road 

Phone PArk 3-7139 



Serving the College Students' Every 
\eed in Quality Flowers 

CORSAGES TABLE DECORATIONS 

BOUQUETS WEDDING DECORATIONS 

POTTED PLANTS CUT FLOWERS 
FUNERAL DESIGNS 

We Wire Flowers Anywhere 

CALL US DAY OR NIGHT 
PROMPT CITY WIDE DELIVERIES 

Ralph and Eleanor Lyon 
Owners 



Compliments 



of 



A FRIEND 



BE CERTAIN 

TO PATRONIZE 

YOUR 

ADVERTISERS 

IN 1957 



MMH