(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Idea:a sign of the times"


CLASS 



BOOK. 



V\\A^\ 



J= w^ 



'/ '\~ 



i 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/ideaasigno4181910unse 



PROCESSED Bt! 
BAJ?SOW LAB 

LOT # ,?^ L 



WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPY 



THE ^ IDEA 



Vol. IV 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 
January 1, 1910. 



No. 1 




-THE c J TV HAL L King. Smelus, the 

Smoke of i/^peNpiHG. rSArri-e 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING7S0ME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A. YODER, 
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICHMOND, VA, 

=========== PRINTED AT ANYVy/'HERE. ===:= 



Prizes for Boys— December-January Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest 
number of Ideas in December and January. Prizes were recent- 
ly given out for the November contest. A handsome watch 
was the first prize, and first quality stag handle pocki^t knives 
were given to the nine boys selling the nine next largest num- 
bers. One boy sold 226 Ideas in the month, thus making, at 
2 cents each, $4.52 besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure 
the first prize. 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7'h AND MAIN STS. 

We h ve in our Kail Stock, a d are 
showing hpeciiil puod values in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHtS, J.WtLRY, SILV[RWARE, CUT G'iSS, Etc 



-.1 



\0 HOUSEKEEPERS... 



You wish the best Flavoring Extracts, Essences and 
Spices for your Table. 

The best Soap, Perfumery and Toilet Requisites for 
your family and guests. 

The best Steel Enameled, Rubber and Glass Goods for your sick. 

We have them as low as they can be sold, as well as Medicines 
of unexcelled quality, which conform strictly to the United States 
Pure Food and Drug Law. 

You want information as to what is best to give medical students 
at Christmas, January 1st or at Commencement Exercises. This wc 
can give you of the most satisfactory character. 

A. H. ROBINS' PHARMACY, 

200 EAST MARSHALL STREET 
RICHMOND, VA. 

50 YEARS EXPERIENCE. OOO * DBLIVBRED ANVWHBRB IN TH8 CITY. 




THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



Vol. IV JANUARY 1, 1910 No. 1 

5 Cents a Copy $2.00 a Yeab 

Published Weekly on Saturday by Adon A. Yoder, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909 at the Post Office at Richmond, Va. 



Lynch-Law and Mayor Richardson 

The Times-Dispatch, in an article to-day, December 28th, calls 
the lynching at Hurley, in Buchanan County, "The State's 
Disgrace" and "a black blot on the State's reputation," and 
starts off by saying that '^ Virginia's fine record for observance 
and respect for the law has been broken." Now, Tiie Idea 
thoroughly agrees with this sentiment of respect for law and 
frowning down disregard for law and, of course, the gross crime 
of lynch-law, but we have no respect for a paper that is so 
cowardly as to condemn disregard for the law in Buchanan, 
but uphold it in Richmond by refusing to expose it or sanction 
the exposal of it right under its own nose. We have no respect 
for a paper that will condemn the sovereign people way off 
in BuclT,anan, hundreds of miles from Richmond, and where 
that paper has almost no circulation, for taking the law in their 
own hands and yet will not condemn a public servant in its 
own town who openly violates his oath of office and takes the 
law into his own hands, not in passion and the heat of the 
moment, but deliberately and knowingly, and weakly says that 
he, a servant of the people appointed by the people to carry out 
their law, should not regard that oath but should refuse to 
execute the law whenever lie thought best so to do. 

JMayor Richardson of Richmond, a lawyer, an ex-Common- 



2 THE IDEA. 

wealth's Attorney, and now Chief Executive of this city, is 
encouraging lawlessness in this State by daily disregarding the 
laws of the State which he has sworn to execute. 

The Liquor-Selling-on-Sunday Law is violated every Sunday 
and he knows all about it. The selling-without-a-license laws 
are violated every day by those who enjoy especial protection 
from the ]\Iayor and his executive department, and he knows 
all about it. The laboring-at-a-trade-on- Sunday law is openly 
violated every Sunday by hosts of merchants who claim that 
Sunday is their biggest day, and the Mayor knows all about it. 
The house-of -ill-fame law is openly violated every hour of every 
day under the especial protection of his police department, and 
he knows all about it. All these violations have been forcefully 
brought to his attention and to the attention of the Common- 
wealth's Attorney both publicly and privately by the editor of 
this paper and he has no excuse for refusing to do the will, the 
law, of the people who elected him just for that purpose. 

The Idea claims that the people, who are sovereign in the 
democratic State of Virginia, have much more right to take the 
law into their own hands than any servant of the people has. 
for the people are the rulers and the law is their creature, while 
the Mayor is simply a creature and servant of the law and under 
the law, in a double sense. The order is this : The People, The 
Law, The Servants of the Law. And who will dare say that the 
people who make the law have not more right to set it aside than 
the servants who are made by that law. Yet the Richmond 
Times-Dispatch, "Supreme in Virginia," condemns the people 
for taking the law into their own hands and refuses to raise a 
voice in condemnation of a petty servant, who, bj'- his acts, is 
bringing not only disgrace on the city, but what is far worse, 
bringing into contempt our democratic institutions and bringing 
about a reign of crime and disregard for all law and order. 

Norfolk used to be regarded the lawless community of this 
State, but Richmond is rapidly gaining the reputation of being 
the most lawless and politically corrupt city in the State, because 
its public servants have no respect for the laws made by the 
legislature and as a body of office-holders run Richmond to suit 
themselves, protecting whatever crime they will, defying the 
people and the peoples' representatives. 



THE IDEA. 



Sophie Malloy An Old Offender 



It does not yet appear that the Lee woman, given a heavy 
sentence for running a house of ill fame, had been up before 
as a frequent violater of the law, but Sophie Malloy, whom 
Justice John gave a light sentence, had frequently been up for 
criminal offenses in Justice John's court, though she generally 
got off. The criminal docket of the police court for May 8, 1905, 
shows that Sophie Malloy was charged on a warrant with un- 
lawfully selling spirituous liquors at 2224 East Main Street, 
without a license, on Sunday, May 7, 1905. And notice how 
the case turned out. The case was continued until May 20th, 
and the record says: "Bailed in the sum of $500, with W. P. 
Leaman as surety," and on the 20th the case was marked "dis- 
missed." This W. P. Leahman is the same one who figured so 
conspicuously in the recent trial of this same woman, at which 
time he was also a member of the Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee of the City. 



CONWAY 



Conway, the barkeeper, who shot a man in cold blood on 
Broad Street recently and was freed on instructions from the 
judge, was, besides being a murderer, also guilty of carrying 
concealed weapons. 

The Police Department saw to it that the editor of this paper 
was searched for concealed weapons, though he had done no 
wrong and did not carry concealed weapons, but because Tor- 
rence was not alive enough to pay fifty cents to a justice of the 
peace for a warrant, Conway was not charged with that offence 
at all. We wonder why the police did not act in this case. 

Is it because Conway was a barkeeper? for the barkeepers 
and their allies, the gamblers and the bawdy houses, enjoy 
special privileges in Richmond. 



THE IDEA. 



Engineer Boiling and The Flume 



Just the other day the Times-Dispatch gave great praise to 
Engineer Boiling on the occasion of the completion of the 
flume. On December 20th that paper had a large picture of 
Engineer Boiling on the first page and over it in big headlines 
this legend, "Flume Stands Final Test, Justifying Boiling's 
Plan." To those who know the history of this flume building, 
and most Kichmonders Imow it (including the apparently igno- 
rant Times-Dispatch), this article was a mockery and a farce, 
for the taxpayers of Richmond know too well that "Boiling's 
Plan" was a glaring and expensive failure and was absolutely 
wrong both in design and in construction, both of which were 
under Boiling's direction. The present flume is not Boiling's 
plan, but is the plan forced on the city after Boiling's flume 
"busted" and fell to pieces. It was shown then that Boiling's 
plan, even if it had been constructed with proper care under 
Boiling's inspection, was absolutely faulty. 

Engineers are wondering still what made a man supposed to 
be an engineer design such an absurd and impractical shape for 
a flume when it has been "universally recognized for centuries 
that a round conduit alone would equalize the pressure. 

How can a city expect anything like an economical and busi- 
ness management if the biggest paper in the town stoops so low 
as to praise most the man who makes the biggest blunders. The 
present engineer is a failure in almost all his big undertakings. 
He is undoubtedly an excellent fellow personally, but as an 
engineer he's a failure and a most expensive one for the tax- 
payers. 



Whose Trial? 



Instead of its being a trial of A. A. Yoder, the libel case is 
turning out to be a trial of Justice John and the Police Depart- 
ment. 



THE IDEA. 

ROTTEN ! ! 



As shown in the last number of The Idea, Captain Barfoot 
regarded a disorderly house and a house of ill-fame as identi- 
cally the same, for he stated on the witness stand that after "he 
suspected the Molloy house of being a house of ill-fame" he 
swore out a warrant ''charging her with keeping a disorderly 
house," and when the warrant was produced it read: "Sophie 
Molloy did unlawfully keep and maintain a certain house of 
ill-fame, resorted to by divers persons, both male and female, for 
purposes of prostitution and lewdness." Therefore, The Idea 
was exactly right in saying that the two women referred to 
were warranted on "similar" charges. Attorney Harry Smith 
tried to show that the charge against the Molloy woman was 
different in spite of the bare faced fact that evidence was given 
in the trial of the Molloy woman which showed that she did 
operate "a house of ill-fame" and Justice John knew it when 
he sentenced the woman, for it had been shown clearly not fif- 
teen minutes before he passed sentence. 

Mr. Meredith so entangled the witnesses of the prosecution 
that by their own testimony The Idea has been entirely vindi- 
cated and was shown to be abundantly justified in all its state- 
ments and inferences and criticisms. It shows how hard up 
the case of the prosecution is when they are forced to try to 
prove that a disorderly house is not the same as a house of ill- 
fame when exactly the same kind of evidence was given in both 
eases and by the same parties. 

Not only do the police of Richmond regard a disorderly house 
and a house of ill-fame the same, but the press dispatches of 
December 7th show that this holds true elsewhere as well. 

On December 7th the press dispatches state that a woman in 
Atlanta confessed to being engaged in the white slave trade and 
the papers state the woman ' ' had two tickets to Columbia which 
she said had been sent to her for the girls' use by the keeper 
of a disorderly house there." 

This shows that all over the country the terms "disorderly 
house" and "house of ill-fame" are synonomous, and The Idea 



6 THE IDEA. 

has nothing to retract or change in its charges that on similar 
charges two women were treated entirely differently, and it still 
looks rotten to us, especially since we know what we do. Our old 
English professor used to call this kind of talk "a distinction 
without a difference. ' ' Rotten ! Rotten ! ! 



There won't be any need for the Editor putting any of his 
own witnesses on the stand in the Hustings Court, if the prose- 
cution 's witnesses get as balled up up there and help him out 
as much as they did in the Police Court. 



THE TRIAL 

{Continued) 
Last Week's Idea Closed with the Conclusion of Captain Sowell's 

Testimony. 



Isaac Rheinheimer and Cabell T. Fitzgerald next were in- 
troduced to show that Mr. Gordon left the room before the 
woman plead guilty on the second warrant, but as it makes 
no difference about this, as The Idea simply stated that the 
conversation was had "during the course of the trial," and 
there was only one trial, the woman pleading guilty to the 
second charge without a trial, it is not worth while to print 
their evidence. 



Chris Manning Under Fire 

Denies Everything 

Q. (Reads) "Chris Manning sat, and Douglas Gordon 
stood, behind Justice John, and engaged him in conversation 
during the course of the trial." Is that so? A. I sat on the 
chair right there at the rear of the Police Justice. Q. Mr. 
Ellett's chair, is it not? A. The chair that Mr. Ellett occupies 
very frequently. I never opened my mouth to Justice Crutchfield, 



^ THE IDEA. 7 

nor did Justice Crutchfield open his mouth to me. Q. And you 
deny positively that you said anything to him about the Malloy 
woman, in any way, shape or form? A. Most emphatically. Q. 
Do you recall whether Douglas Gordon was here during the 
trial of this Malloy woman for keeping a disorderly house? A. 
Yes, sir, I remember very distinctly what happened that day. 
"We came into court — Mr. Gordon and myself — came to court 
together; we went to see the Chief of Police and was told he 
was here. Q. Did you know that case was going to be tried 
that day? A. No, sir. "We came into court, and the Chief was 
in the case — they were trying the case for selling liquor, and 
Mr. Gordon said to me, ''I have an engagement with Mr. Ches- 
terman at the Builders' Exchange. Come on, and go." I said, 
''No, I believe I will wait and see what they do in this case. 
He left while they were trying the case for selling liquor. Q. 
Did he speak to Mr. Crutchfield while he was in here? A. He 
did not. Q. And you say you did not? A. I did not. 



"Don't Protect" But Could Not Answer Why 
He Did Not Enforce Law. 



Did not Know the Malloy Woman^ but said 
he had Called. 



Cross Examination. 



By Mr. Meredith: 

Q. It does appear that you and Mr. Gordon were in 
court when each one of these cases — the Lee case and the Mal- 
loy case — was being tried. A. We were in court when they 
were trying the Maggie Lee case; I was in court while they 
tried both cases against the Malloy woman; Mr. Gordon did 
not remain to hear the case for selling liquor finished, against 
the Malloy woman. Q. Do you protect these houses from being 
molested? A. I do not. Q. Why have these people not been 



8 THE IDEA. 

arrested, when yon have the photographs and locations of them? 

Question objected to by Mr. Smith; objection sustained by 
Justice, after long argument by counsel. 

Q, How long have you known Miss Sophie ]\Ialloy? A. I 
have never known her — only the house. Q. Have you ever 
spoken to her? A. Once in my life. Q. Then you knew her. 
How long have you Imown her? A. I think about two years 
ago I spoke to her. Q. "Whereabouts? A. At her house. Q. 
You were in her house? A. Yes, sir. Q. Were you in the 
house that the Police Justice has denounced as the worst in 
town? A. I was in the porch of that house. Q. AVhat were 
you doing there, in the porch? A. I went there to make an 
inquiry. Q. And you saw her and knew her. Were you not 
raised in that neighborhood? A. I was born in that neighbor- 
hood, and lived there up to the time I was seven years old. 
Q. How far off from the Malloy house? A. I was born right 
across the street from it. Q. And never knew Sophy Malloy? 
A. No, sir. Q. Had you ever heard of her reputation before 
this Conway trial? A. Yes, sir. Q. What was her reputation? 
A. Her reputation was not good. I had heard it ever since 
her mother's death. Q. When did that take place? A. I can 
not say. I suppose six or seven years ago. Q. What had you 
heard? A. That liquor was sold there. I know the police 
had the place in court two or three times. I remember being 
in the police station one morning when Police Officer Johnson 
said he wanted to go into her house, and someone jumped on 
his back and prevented him; but I never heard of this house 
being mentioned as an assignation house, until about six or 
eight months ago. Q. Did you ever hear of colored women 
going there? A. I heard that men and women went there for 
the purpose of — Q. I did not ask you the purpose — I will come 
to that by and by. Did you ever hear of colored men and women 
going there? A. No, sir. Q. Did you ever hear of colored 
women going there? A. I have heard her name mentioned in 
connection with a colored man — a man out on First Street. 
Q. What was his name? A. I don't know, sir; I just heard 
of it. Q. You heard of it out yonder? A. No, sir; a man named 
Moseley. when the liquor license was up — a colored man named 
Moseley. when the liquor license question was up — a colored man 



THE IDEA. 9 

named Moseley, who occupied the place formerly occupied by Jim 
Baker, on north First Street — a policeman testified that there was 
some white women in there, and I heard this woman's name 
mentioned as being in there with colored men. Q. That is the 
lady who occupies the house? A. Yes, sir. Q. Did you ever 
hear of white women going in that house? A. Never, as I told 
you, until about six or eight months ago. Q. You are police 
commissioner from what ward? A. Jeifferson Ward. Q. In 
what ward is that house? A. Jefferson Ward. Q. You say 
you were in court that morning ? A. Yes, sir. Q. Accidentally! 
A. Yes, sir. Q. You staid after you got here? A. Yes, sir. 
Q. And you say you didn't say a word to the Justice? A. Not 
a word. Q. Did you sit up there on the bench? A. I sat back 
in Mr. Ellett's chair. Q. Was there one warrant against that 
woman that morning, or two? A, I could not tell you. There 
were two charges. 

Mr. Meredith: We would like to see the warrant, to see if 
the two charges were on the same warrant. (Addressing the 
Justice) You say I cannot go any further with him than ask 
him about this particular occasion — ^the Malloy business. 

The Justice: Anything pertaining to the Malloy business. 

Mr. Meredith: I want to ask this witness if he don't know 
that there are any number of houses of ill fame in the city of 
Richmond, that are thoroughly located, and that the police 
don't make arrests — in accordance with the rulings or instruc- 
tions from the Police Board. 

Mr. Smith: We object. 

Mr. Meredith: You have ruled on it, but I wanted to get 
it in the record. 

The Justice: It has no bearing on this case. 

The Justice: There are. two separate and distinct warrants. 

Mr. Meredith: I have no further questions. There is no 
use of my keeping the witness any longer. Your honor has 
cut us off in our examination. 

Witness here stood aside. 



10 THE IDEA. 

Gordon On The Stand 



GORDON ON THE STAND, SAYS, ''I DID NOT SPEAK TO 

HIM NOR HE TO ME," BUT DOES NOT DENY 

A CONVERSATION TOOK PLACE, AS 

THE IDEA CHARGED. 



W. DOUGLAS GORDON, being duly sworn, testified as follows : 
By Mr. Smith: Q. Mr. Gordon, were you in court when Sophy 
Malloy was tried on this charge ? A. Not on the charge of keep- 
ing a disorderly house. Q. Have you ever asked Mr. Crutch- 
field to be light on her, or interfered in her behalf in any way, 
shape or form? A. I never spoke to Mr. Crutehfield about her 
in my life, nor about any case on earth, except I have walked 
up here in front occasionally and begged for leniency — especial- 
ly Captain Fowler and I have walked up several times and 
asked him to turn small boys over to him — Captain Fowler. 
Q. Were you interested in any way, or in any manner, shape 
or form, in what his decision was in the Malloy case? A. Not 
in the very least. Q. Did you speak to Mr. Crutehfield during 
the trial. A. No, sir ; I came in and this young Mr. Rheinheimer 
opened the gate for me, and I tip-toed in because he was engaged 
in trying the case, and sat directly behind him; I don't think 
he could have seen me; at any rate I did not speak to him or 
he to me; I had an engagement down at the Builders' Exchange, 
of which I am the secretary, and could stay only a few minutes, 
and I tip-toed out of that door (indicates) before he pronounced 
his decision in the liquor selling case, and I did not know what 
his decision was until later in the day. 

CROSS EXAMINATION. 

By Mr. Meredith: We are restricted from asking Mr. Gor- 
don the questions we desired to ask Mr. Manning, are we? 

The Justice: Yes, sir; the court adheres to the same ruling. 

Mr. Meredith: We are cut off from our testimony, unless 
we put Mr. Yoder on, and I do not propose to put him on imder 
these circumstances. I will though, ask him a few questions. 



THE IDEA. 11 

Adon A. Yoder on the Witness 
Stand. 



stands By His Statements— Shows Up the Ring— Had No Malice 



Meredith Again Overruled By Police Justice.* 



Q. You made certain allegations there as to what took place: 
were they made up on information and belief, or what took 
place in your presence, so far as what took place at that trial? 

A. That is what took place in my presence. 

Q. You have stated in here — I suppose there is no denial of 
the fact that Maggie Lee was fined $100 and sent to jail for 
thirty days? 

Mr. Smith : I don't know ; I was not here. 

Commonwealth's Attorney: That is true. 

Q. Did you witness the hearing of the Sophy Malloy case ? 

A, Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you hear both cases tried — the liquor case and the 
other one? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. When you came in were they in the midst of the trial, or 
had they begun? 

A. I think they had just begun; I came in while the trial 
was on. 

Q. Did you hear the testimony? 

A. I don't know really how far they had gone, but I think I 
heard most of the testimony, 

Q. "Was there any testimony brought out at that time about 
the Conway trouble — or did that occur on a previous occasion, 
do you know? 

A. Yes, that testimony was brought out at that time, in con- 
nection with the charge of whiskey selling. 

Q. Was it heard through? 

A. It was heard through. 

Q. Do you recall what it was? 



12 THE IDEA. 

A. I have heard several of those trials, and the evidence was 
pretty near the same in most of them, and I am not sure I could 
separate them, because they were so near alike ; but I thinl: ]Mrs. 
Gentry was on the stand when I came in — Mrs. Gentry or Mrs. 
Torrence — that is my recollection about it. 

Q. Did they testify to anything about buying liquor in that 
house ? 

A, Yes, sir. 

Q. "What was the testimony, as well as you can recall it? 

A. Mrs. Gentry testified that money was offered for beer, and 
that the woman brought in beer first, and a "kick" was made 
that the beer was not good and she would have to bring in some 
Anheuser-Busch beer, I think it was; that the woman said she 
didn 't have any of that and would have to send out for it ; and 
it was raining — 

Q. That is what Mrs. Gentry said? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Said that in the presence of the Police Justice ? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Well, what else? 

A. The evidence was given that the other beer was brought in 
three times after that. 

Q. Do you recall what defence was made in regard to the beer? 

A. The defence was made that one dollar was given for the 
four times, and that was a dozen, and she didn 't make any money 
on the transaction, and, therefore, she was not guilty. 

Q. And yet the testimony before the justice, on which he 
entered a verdict in her favor, was that ]\Irs. Gentry said she 
didn't have the other kind of beer and would have to send out 
for it? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And that she had given a dollar for it, and did not make 
any money on it? 

A. Yes, sir, 

Q. Did you hear then the other ruling, about keeping this dis- 
orderly house? 

A. I heard the charge. I was under the impression they were 
under one warrant, because the question came up — Mr. Pollock 
brought up the question, ''Shall we try them together, or try 



THE IDEA. 13 

them separate, ' ' and my- impression was that they were under 
one warrant; but it seems there were two warrants. 

Q. Now, what took place in the trial of that charge ? 

A. There was no evidence given ; it was very brief, and the 
plea was entered that she was guilty, and a fine was imposed. 

Q. Had you heard the previous testimony in regard to these 
women being down there? 

A. Yes. 

Q. That had been given before the justice before that? 

A. Yes, sir, 

Q. As to these women meeting young men down there? 

A. Yes, sir, 

Q. Did you hear the justice make any remark about the char- 
acter of that house? 

A. Yes; he said it was one of the worst, or perhaps the worst, 
in the city — I have not got the exact words. I think he said, 
"This is one of the worst houses in the city." 

Q. You have made the statement in this article of yours that 
Mr. Manning and Mr. Gordon both spoke to the Police Justice 
during the trial. Is that a fact, or not? 

A. That is not exactly the statement. The statement is that 
there was a conversation in which they entered. Now, I did not 
hear any words pass. 

Q. Here is the thing: ''Chris Manning sat, and Douglas Gor- 
don stood, behind Justice John, and engaged him in conver- 
sation during the course of the trial." Do you swear that is a 
fact? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Beyond all shadow of a doubt? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you see it? 

A. I saw it. 

Q. And you stand to it, now? 

A. Yes, sir. Now, it is possible that l\Ir. Gordon did not speak, 
but they had their heads together, and Justice John did address 
Mr. l\Ianning, and from their attitude and motions, Mr. Man- 
ning answered him. They had their heads together and Mr. 
Gordon leaned over and was in the conversation. I suppose from 



14 THE IDEA. 

that it could be said he was in the conversation, whether he 
opened his mouth or not. 

Q. And that is what you describe took place? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Have you misrepresented any fact that took place at that 
trial? 

A, Not that I know of. 

Q. Did you give it exactly as it happened? 

A. Exactly as it happened. I had no reason to give it other- 
wise. 

Q. Have you any malice towards the Police Justice? 

A. None, sir. 

Q. Did you have any malice towards Mr. Crutchfield? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Have you ever had any quarrel with him, except so far as 
criticizing his official conduct? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Have you ever done any act to hurt him personally? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Have you ever said anything against him personally ? 

A. No, sir. I criticized his official acts. 

Q. I ask you the same questions in regard to Mr. Manning. 
Do you know Mr. Manning? 

A. No, sir. 

(Mr. Smith objected to the line of testimony. Objection over- 
ruled. ) 

Q. I think I asked you what were your relations towards the 
Police Justice — whether they were personally antagonistic, or 
whether you had any ill-will towards him. 

A. No, I had none. 

Q. What is your object in writing these articles, or what do 
you do it for? 

A. To clean up corruption and evils here. 

Q. And you regard it as your right to attack evil wherever 
you see it, in public channels? 

A. Certainly, sir. 

Concluded Next Week' 



lolfc 



3on 



DC 



30E 



DO 



o 



Are You Interested 
in any of the fol- 
lowing Matters ? 



1. In Selling, or Secur- 
ing Tenants, for real or 
leasehold property. 

2. In Buying, or Secur- 
ing a Lease on real or lease- 
hold property. 

3. In Placing your Fire 
Insurance with the strong- 
est and most liberal compa- 
nies in the United States. 

4. In Making or Secur- 
ing Loans on Real Estate, 

5. In strictly Legal work 

requiring the services of a 
capable and conscientious 
lawyer. 

6. In Collections requir- 
ing prompt attention and 
untiring efforts. 



If any of these things 
interest you, I offer you 
the best facilities that this 
City affords. 



My work is characterized 
byPromptness, Efficiency, 
and Conscientiousness. 



My charges are based en- 
tirely upon Results, and 
for these are in every case 
Lower than the Lowest. 



I have splendid facilities 
for handling Out-of-Town 
Work through Bonded 
Attorneys located in every 
part of the United States. 



Don't conclude that one 
Attorney or Real Estate 
Agent is as slow as another. 
Let me show you that I am 
different. 



SAMUEL WANT 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law 

819 East Broad Street Phone Monroe 2837 

OPEN AT NIGHT 



30E 



DC 



30E 



16 THE IDEA. 



WANTED — A young woman to solicit advertising 
and subscriptions. One with some business ex- 
perience preferred. Good pay to right party. 
Address with recommendations and statement 
of experience. 
THE IDEA, No. 904 Capitol St., Richmond, Va. 



'Tis the constant drop of water 

Wears a hole in solid stone; 
'Tis the constant gnaw of Towser 

Masticates the hardest bone; 
'Tis the constant wooing lover 

Carries oflF the cooing maid; 
And the constant advertiser 

Is the man who gets the trade. 

— South Bethlehem Globe. 



For T{eliable 



FURNITURE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



Cash or Credit 



1418-1420 E. Main St. 



^^mjy it^mm 



PRIZES 




m^m^^^^ 



FOR 

BOYS 



» 



**THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboyr who get the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
other prizes to those who sell the most copies. 

The Contest vill begin T»ith the 1st of December and boys desiring to com- 
pete should begin today to work for their weekly subscriptions. 

Boys sh*uld leave their names at the time of getting^ their papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their sales. 

Some time ago THE Idea gave away a Watch and nine other valuable 

prizes, and the winning boys did good work. One boy selling 

112 copies of The Idea of one issue. There is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



J 




Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We D^e Seventy- One Colors 
O^// Work Done As It Ought To Be 

2225 E. Clay St 




A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



j^^t^^^ 



32 NORTH LOMBAROY STREET 

RICHMOND, VA. 

estimates cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving, Halls, Vestibules, Basements, Ac. 



PHONE 1821 



The Editor has known Mr. Ewing personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, satisfactory dealing Is unexcelled. 



if 



WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPY 



THE ^ IDEA 



Vol. IV 



A S IGN OF THE TIMES 

January 8, 1910 



No. 2 




WHEN VOL' SEE A DIRTY FACE IN THE MIRROR 
DON'T- WASH THE MIRJIOR, WASH YOUR FACE 

FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STAND^ 



BEING SOME SERMONETi'Lb t^LBLL^HED Wllkei iuK emi 

COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND. VIRGINLA, By ADON A 

VODER. EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST RICH 

MOKD VA. PRINTED AT EVERYWHERE 



3 , for Boys—December-January Contest 

Ten pri7es will be grven to the ten boys selling the greatest 

II I it AS in December and January. Prizes were recently 

vfnoiu or tr.e November contest. A handsome watch was the first 

i/.e, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 

lioys'selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 

'he month, thus making, at 2 cents each, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7'h AND MAIN STS. 

We h 've in our Kail Stock, and are 
shuwiug special good values in 

DIAMONDS, WAKHfS, IrWtlBY, SIlVfRWARE, CUT GLASS, flc 

We iDvite your inspection 





HOUSEKEEPERS.... 





You wish the best Flavoring Extracts, Essences and 
Spices for your Table. 

The best Soap, Perfumery and Toilet Requisites for 
your family and guests. 

The best Steel Enameled, Rubber and Glass Goods for your sick. 

We have them as low as they can be sold, as well as Medicines 
of unexcelled quality, which conform strictly to the United States 
Pure Food and Drug Law. 

You want information as to what is best to give tnedical students 
at Christmas, January 1st or at Commencement Exercises. This we 
can give you of the most satisfactory character. 

A. H. ROBINS' PHARMACY, 

200 EAST MARSHALL STREET 
RICHMOND, VA. 

50 YRARS FXPEBI^NCB. OOO » DBUIVBRED ANVWHBRB IN TMB CITY. 




THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV JANUARY 8, 1910 NO. 1 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, a. Richmond, Virginia 



Further Testimony by the 
Editor of The Idea 



In Which He Stands by His Published 
Charges of Corruption 

The testimony of the Editor of THE IDEA was continued as fol- 
lows, the examination still being conducted by Mr. Meredith: 

Q. In regard to Mr. Sianning and I\Ir. Gordon, ^vi^i you tell 
hi:, hcnoi' whether you have ever had occasion to feel personal 
animosity towaid them — whether they have ever dene anything 
to yon to create in your heait any f.n^cr or indignation? 

A. No, sir, none whatever. 

Q. Have they ever ecmc acrcr:^ your path in any persdial 
manner? 

A. I have never met either cne — except Yn. Gordon; he came 
to me iati:ei to do a favor, eg if anything I would be iaelined 
in^t the opposite. 

Q. And you claim that in writing the::e things that you stated 
the fact", and then ccmmcnted en them as you thought waa right 
und?i' the circumstances. ? 



2 , THE IDEA 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Eid you know at the time that these bawdy houses were 
existing in the city of Richmond? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Did you know they were existing here in such a way that 
anybody who waTited to could find them? '. 

A. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Smith: I make the same objecticn. 

The Justice : You are getting off, I think, again. The ruling 
oj' the court was that you must confine yourself to this Malloy 
case. Now you are going into"tlie various houses. 

Mr. Meredith: No, sir, I am showing this: That the circum- 
stances which to( k p'aee there that mornirir;', together with what 
he knew existed in this city, justified the comments that he made. 
That his knowledge of this thing v.a3 such as to lead him to 
believe w^hen he saw:.wh"t tock p^ace in his presence — one woman, 
with cn'y one charge against her, fined,-^$100 and sent to jail 
for. 30 days; and another woman, who was charged with two 
offences and keeping a place which was described by the Police 
Justice as one of the worst in town, and where it was proven 
married women met yoi.ng m.en. and y-kere she sold liquor to 
them, and they vrere having all kind^ of debauchery — that woman 
war. fined $100 and not given a jail sentence — whether it was dis- 
cretionary with the Police Justice, or net; and whether the wit- 
ness arrived at a wrong conclusion or not, that is not the ques- 
tion, or whether or not he had the right, or was justified, as the 
result of these two trials, in making the comment upon them he 
did. I am offering it for the purpose of showing the knowledge 
he had, and the justification he had for making those comments. 

The Justice : That w^ould be going outside of this case. 

Mr. Meredith : I don 't know what you mean by this case. 

The Justice : M^ell, the particular and specific charge per- 
taining to the Malloy case, and what transpired about the Malloy 
case, in this court. 

(Note.— The objection was further argued at considerable 
length; and at the conclusion fo the argument the Justice ruled 
that the testimony could not be introduced.) 



THE IDEA 3 

Cross-Examination. 
By Mr. Smith : 

Q. Ml-. Y('(ler, l:nw Umg have yon lived in Richmond? 

A. Tl is time abont six months — nearly seven months. 

Q. Did yon start publisliing the paper as soon as you got here? 

A. Ye3. 

Q. How 1( ng had you been here before you commenced pub- 
lishing this paper— "The Idea"? 

A. Two or three weeks. 

Q. You came here to publish the paper, did you not? 

A. Yes. 

Q. You l-ad practically n:ade up your mind to publish a paper 
of this sort before you came here, hadn't you? 

A. Yes; I had been publishing a paper of this sort. 

q. Not in Richmond? 

A. Of course not. 

Q. In Lynchburg, I believe? 

A. Y^e^;. 

Q. And yen had made up your mind to come down here and 
publish the same sort of paper? 

A. Ye:. 

Q. Did you knov/ much about the conditions in Richmond, 
before yen came here, that you thought it was necessary to 
publish a paper of this sort ? 

A. I did not know very much about the conditions. 

Q. Still ycu thought it was a good field to show up corruption, 
although you didn't know much about it? 

A. I understood it was a very bad place, and I found it out. 

Q. And yet you came here? Knowing it was a very bad place, 
you thought you would come down 1 

A. Yes. 

Q. You could have gone anywhere else? 

A. Of course I could. 

Q. And yet you chose to come to this very bad place? 

A. Very bad politically; very good otherwise. 

Q. Did you own any property here? 

A. No. 

Q. Did you have any family down here that you were inter- 



4 THE IDEA 

ested in, and tl.at yc u thought it was neces,:;ary to come here 
and protect ? 

A. No. 

Q. Encwing :t was a bad place, yen thought it was a good 
f eVl to ccme to pubirii this paper? 

A. Yes. 

Q. You had no tang-ib^^e interest whatever down here? 

A. No. 

Q. Not a dollar's worth cf interest in the city, as far as I 
understand. Not evpn a voter here. 

A. No, but I am a citizen of Virginia, though. Richmond is 
my capital city. 

Q. A very bad pace, and yet ynu have come here. 

A. In one Fev..;e it is very bad. 

Q. And you l:ave adveitir.eei it to the whole world as a cor- 
rupt city? 

A. Politically, T did. 

Q. Now, Mr. Yceler, ycu head ycur article '"Reign of Crime." 

A. Yes. 

Q. That reign of crime refer.s, of course, to Judge Crutch- 
fie^d and to those rther gentVmen vrho you say are in a combina- 
tion with him — that Jrdc"e CrutchfieJd and the Police Com- 
niissicners are engaged in a reign of crime. 

A. That is the inference. 

Q. Is that true ? 

A. To a certain extent it is true. That is only a part of it. 

Q. This is only ?n introduction to the reign of crime? 

A. I refer to more than one thing in that article, if you will 
read it. 

Q. Is this article here inteneled to prove that there is a reign 
of crime in the city of Richmond? 

A. It seems to do it, of course. 

Q. Then you intended to prove by this article that there was 
a reign of crime in the city of Richmond? 

A. To a certain extent there is. 

Q. And that the Police Justice is a part of that reign of 
crime? 

A. Yes. 



THE IDEA. 5 

Q. And you still believe every Avord of this is true, do you ? 
A. I know^ it. 

Q. You know it is all true novp^ ? 
A. Yes. 
{Concluding testimony in this case will he found on page 12.) 



Pointed Questions 

From A Clay Ward Citizen 

Richmond, Va.. Decemebr 4, 1909. 
Mr. Editor : 

Dear Sir, — I read an article in last issue which was very in- 
teresting in regard to the annexed territory. There could have 
been much more said along that line. I notice the writer calls 
the attention of the Annexation Committee of Manchester to 
the condition of a large part of the annexed territory of Clay 
Ward. I will add that it might be a good plan for that body 
of citizens of Manchester to go over some of this part of Rich- 
mond alid see the conditions existing. I would suggest that if 
they come to bring along a pair of stilts and a couple of life pre- 
servers if they come after a hard rain, or they might be 
drowned. There are no culverts to carry off the water, and it 
is especially dangerous to come at night without a lantern. I 
would like to see one of our councilmen risk a trip on a dark 
night after a rain from Robinson and C'ary streets, out Cary to 
the city limits on one side and back to Robinson street on the 
other side ; then take Floyd avenue for the same distance, and I 
will bet a dinner at the JefFerson Hotel that he will not make 
the same trip a seeoud time withoTit a gun, a lantern and a bull 
dog, and I hardly believe he will do it then. I wonder what all 
that iron pipe lying on the ground along Eloyd avenue is for. 
Can it be water pipe ? I wonder if it is to be used for any pur- 



6 THE IDEA. 

pose, or is it simply a bluff to keep the people along that street 
in a good humor. This is indeed a funny state of affairs. On 
one side of Floyd avenue the people have city water and on the 
other side they have none. This looks like one-sided legisla- 
tion to me. I also notice something being said in reference to 
opening up the street through the Sheppard Farm at a cost of 
some $40,000. Well, I won't say much against that, as that 
street will not run away, but will remain there for a long time, 
although it would not take many streets like that to eat up our 
one million and a half dollars of bonds just issued. I wonder 
how much the new boulevard is exnected to cost ? And I also 
wonder how much it will benefit the real estate dealers? Also 
how much the tax payers are to be benefited? I also wonder 
how much property along this proposed boulevard is owned by 
members of the aldermen and eouncilmen of this city ? I wish 
to say, Mr. Editor, if this boulevard is commenced to be built 
before something is done for the people along the streets that 
improved property is now located, that we, the unjustly taxed 
citizens of the southwestern part of the annexed territory of 
Clay Ward, shall apply to the courts for an injunction, which 
we should have done when the Doctor Sheppard matter went 
through. 

Thanking you in advance if yon will publish this, T am. 
Cordially yours, 

A Regular Reader. 



WHERE ? ? 



Three weeks ago The Idea was printed at Elsewhere, Va. 
Two weeks ago The Idea was printed at Somewhere, Va. 
One week ago The Idea wp.s printed at Anywhere, Va. 
This Aveek The Idea is printed at Everywhere, Va. 



THE IDEA. 



The Bryan Papers Again 

Garbled and Misleading Reports of Saloon 
License Case 



On the occasion of the transferring of a saloon licence from 
Marshall street to Broad street recently by the Hustings Court 
the two Bryan papers tried to discredit the anti-saloon advocates 
of the city in the eyes of the public by giving distorted and 
highly-colored reports of the proceedings which, being only 
partly true and in many places absolutely untrue, did make the 
people think that they were a lot of fools instead of being what 
they are, the most conscientious and self-sacrificing workers 
for the moral and material betterment of Richmond and Vir- 
ginia. 

The evening paper held the women of the W. C. T. U. up to 
public scorn by their unfair report and the morning paper by 
giving unwarranted prominence to certain proceedings and un- 
fair reports of other proceedings used the representatives of this 
same W. C. T. U. to make an uncalled for and vicious attack 
on the high-toned President of Smithdeal College, one of the 
most fearless fighters against the saloon and other evils that 
Richmond possesses. 

The morning paper, the Times-Dispatch^ moreover, tried to 
create the impression that Professor Smithdeal and others were 
willing for ulterior motives to sanction the granting of a sa- 
loon license. 

The real facts are these : President Smithdeal, the Rev. Mr. 
Fowler, Judge Turpin, the Editor of this paper. Dr. Eorsyth, 
and many other high-toned Christian gentlemen all testified that 
if any place was suitable for a bar they could see no reason why 
this was not as suitable as others, and many testified that this 
location was more suitable than others, because it was right un- 



8 THE IDEA. 

der the shadow of the office of the Chief of Police, was further 
from any church than any of the three other large hotels, and 
was on a main tlioroughf are, where the police, as well as the citi- 
zens, could see that it was well conducted. Dr. Forsyth at first 
made objection based on a misunderstanding of the case, but 
stated on being corrected, "then my objection does not hold." 

Many of the witnesses summonsed by the Commonwealth and 
the Police Department who vigorously opposed the license tes- 
tified in favor of the transfer, not having any objection to make 
to the particular location, since the license would be held by 
some bar anyhow. Among these were many of the young ladies 
of the Life Insurance Co. of Virginia, who had made objection 
on a false idea of the location of the bar, and the Editor of this 
paper, who stated that he thought no place was suitable for the 
sale of whiskey, but that since hotel saloons were generally less 
disorderly than others, he thought the location more suitable 
than the one on Marshall street from which the license was be- 
iug transferred, and by which his wife and children must pass 
in going daily to market, for Marshall street has less police pro- 
tection than has Broad. 

The News-Leader's brief reference to the editor contained 
not only a false statement that ''he was not called as a wit- 
ness for the Commonwealth" ; but also gave a most erroneous 
account of his stand on that occasion. The Editor of this paper 
has always fought, is always fighting, and always will fight the 
saloon and strong drink evil more persistently and strenuously 
and uncompromisingly than any one he knows of, and these 
false reports published by the News-Leader and the Times-Dis- 
patch as to his attitude towards the saloon are nothing more 
nor less than deliberate and malicious attempts to discredit 
The Idea and all others who oppose evils in Eichmond. 

It is due the men who took the stand on that -occasion to state 
that the conception that readers would get from the daily papers 



o c 



3on 



DC 



noE 



510 



o 



Are You Interested 
in any of the fol- 
lowing Matters ? 



1. In Selling, or Secur- 
ing Tenants, for real or 
leasehold property. 

2. In Buying, or Secur- 
ing a Lease on real or lease- 
hold property. 

3. In Placing your Fire 
Insurance with the strong- 
est and most liberal compa- 
nies in the United States. 

4. In Making or Secur- 
ing Loans on Real Estate, 

5. In strictly Legal work 

requiring the services of a 
capable and conscientious 
lawyer. 

6. In Collections requir- 
ing prompt attention and 
untiring efforts. 



If any of these things 
interest you, I offer you 
the best facilities that this 
City affords. 



My work is characterized 
byPromptness, Efficiency, 
and Conscientiousness. 



My charges are based en- 
tirely upon Results, and 
for these are in every case 
Lower than the Lowest. 



I have splendid facilities 
for handling Out-of-Town 
Work through Bonded 
Attorneys located in every 
part of the United States. 



Don't conclude that one 
Attorney or Real Estate 
Agent is as slow as another. 
Let me show you that I am 
different. 



[olE 



SAMUEL WANT 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law 

819 East Broad Street Phone Monroe 2837 

OPEN AT NIGHT 



30E 



DC 



lOE 





o 

D 



310 



10 THE IDEA. 

that they were there in the interest of furthering the sale of 
whiskey is absolutely false. 

The News-Leader s account of the trial, beginning on page 
1 and continuing for more than a column of page 10, never 
even mentioned the fact that the question was whether a license 
should be transferred, much less that it was whether it should 
be transferred from a family liquor store next door to the 
market house, within two blocks of which there are eighteen 
bars, to a hotel to be conducted by Mr. S. T. Akinson, whom 
the Chief of Police said conducted one of the most orderly places 
in the city in the shape of the bar at the Richmond Hotel, which 
is so quiet that many frequent passers-by never know of its exis- 
tence. 



Saunders Libel Suit 

Date Set for Hearing 

The suit for $25,000 damages' brought in the early fall by 
Clyde W. Saimders against the Editor of The Idea and the 
Williams Brothers, who, as the Williams Printing Co., were 
doing the printing at the time, will come up in the Law and 
Equity Court on February 1st. 



The Criminal Libel Trial to be Heard Jan- 
uary 24th 

The trial of A. A. Yoder for criminal libel on warrant sworn 
out by Douglas Gordon and made in the name of Gordon and 
Manning, Commissioners, and Justice Crutchfield for defama- 
tion of character (and so forth, for several pages) will come up 
in the Hustings Court on January 24 on appeal from the Police 



THE IDEA. 11 

Court, where the Editor was fined $100 and sentenced fifteen 
days in jail after a farce of a trial in which his evidence was 
almost entirely ruled out by the justice, Griggs, who did not 
know the law, it being his first hearing. 



Sam Kaufman Back in Town 

Gambler Exiled "Forever" Back But Not 
Put in Jail 



Some time ago Sam Kaufman was arrested twice for oper- 
ating a gambling joint on l^inth street. On the first charge he 
was dismissed, although the evidence appeared to disinterested 
parties sufficient to convict. Later he was sent to jail on the 
second charge, after which Gilbert Pollock and Justice John 
appeared before the Governor and begged for a pardon on the 
ground that Kaufman had a family to support and the Gover- 
nor pardoned him on the "condition that he would leave the 
S'tate and remain forever away." Last Sunday we learned that 
he was back here again, at large walking the streets as usual. 
Monday the writer himself verified it hj seeing him. He is 
well known to the police, who know that he is back, and yet no 
attempt is made to have him serve out his time. 

It seems strange (?) that Justice John and Gilbert Pollock 
should put themselves out so much to vouch for a gambler who 
has proven himself on oath to be unworthy of belief and turn 
him at large on the community on his (a gambler's) promise 
to stay forever away from Richmond ! 

Gilbert Pollock must have known that aftec Kaufman was 
once free he could not be recommitted to jail, even if he vio- 
lated his word. 

Thus is Justice John used to further the ends of injustice. 



12 THE IDEA. 

Dead Fish In Settling Basin 

When the settling basins were drained preparatory to repair- 
ing them hundreds and hundreds of fish died and decayed on 
the floor of the basins as the shallow pools dried up. 

After decomposing there the basins were repaired, but the 
basins were never carefully washed out, and so when the water 
was turned on, about Christm.as, the citizens all over town got 
sick. One doctor reported some thirty cases in a short time 
in his own practice of vomiting and other disorders of the di- 
gestive tract. In many places whole families were sick. In 
the home of the writer all six save he were sick. 

In most cases the malady was not acute enough for a physi- 
cian, but there was hardly a home in which one or more were 
not affected. Dr. Levy, of the Health Department, stated that 
it could not be attributed to the alum, only a little of which was 
used, but no one mentioned the dead fish, although those in 
charge must have known the conditions 

We wonder why it is that no one in authority took it in his 
own hands to see that the basins were thoroughly cleansed be- 
fore sendisg this poisoning filth into the homes of 100,000 peo- 
ple as drinking water. 

Testimony in Libel Case 

(Continued) 

Aiter much crosslfiring aud a vain effort on the part of the 
prosecuting law;^'er to entangle and confuse the witness the testi- 
mony in the case was concluded as follows: 
By ilr. Smith : 

Q. You did mean that these two men, Gordon and Manning, 
were here for the purpose of influencing the judge in his de- 
cision in this case? 

A. I say I had the right to infer that. 

Q. And that is what you meant — you don't deny it, do yuu ? 

A. I have not denied anything I said. 



THE IDEA 13 

Q. ^nd yen believed it was true — in fact y<!n stated it was 
true, altei you were arrested on this libel. 

Mr. Meredith: 1 desire to call your honor's attention to this 
fact— that they are bringing out this, that when he wrote this 
article he ba.ieved it to be true. I call your honor's attention to 
that, because the courts have said that is a material thing. 

yii-. Smith : I want to show that two weeks after he was ar- 
restee', en this criminal warrant, he reiterated that this article 
y.Sii, true — did you not? 

A. Net aftei' I w^as arrested; 1 had written it before. 

Q. Ycu allowed it to be published after you were arrested. 

A. Certainly. 

Q. You had alloweel it to go to the public — 

A. That article w^as wTitten to show there w^as something else 
there — soniebcdy else, as well. 

Q. I can net find the place I am thinking of ; I think it must 
I'av^ been in the editicn of the 20th. A^ou do remember that ycu 
wrotp ?n article after this one, in which you said that this article 
heaeled "Reign of Crime," w^as true. 

A. What is that? 

Q. AVhat day w-ere you arrested? 

A. I den't know. 

Mr Meredith : Sergeant, can you tell from your recorel the 
day Mr. Yoder was arrested? 

The Clerk: The case was called November lt6h. The warrant 
was issued on November 15th. 

Q. I as-k you, Mr. Yoder, is it not a fact — oh ! here it is. Did 
ycu. state in an article in your issue of November 20th — this w-a". 
after you w^ere arrested — the case was called on November 16th. 
that w^as Tuesday, and you go to press on Friday, I believe, and 
your paper is issued on Saturday — you w^ere arrested Monday 
night, I understand : Now% did you not nearly a week afterward", 
state that "The Idea's" statements, however, were true — re- 
ferring to this article? Now, I ask you, a week after you were 
arrested for this particular libel — 

A. There has been no libel. 

Q. Didn't you reiterate that the stateemnts in the alleged libel 
were true? 

A. That is a different thing. 



14 THE IDEA 

Q. Didn't you a week after you were arrested for this libel on 
tho^e gentlemen, reiterate in a subsequent article, nearly a week 
aftei .ycur arrest, that the statements in this article complained 
of were true? 

A. Yea. 

Q. Mr. Aleredith has undertaken to prove that when you said 
"corrupt" ycu did not necessarily mean money. 1 wish you 
would Icck at tliis caitoon here, and see if you have not got a 
picture cf the police eommissicners, with the word ''Graft," and 
a bag- 01 gold being spilled. Had yoii ever heard of that inter- 
pretation of the word "corrupt" until INIr. Meredith gave it here 
in court? Eid you write the word "corrupt" in the sense that 
r\Ir. JMeredith explains it? 

A. Certainly. 

Q. I ask you why you put a cartoon in your paper, and why 
rndei tlie police commisoisenrs you put "Graft," and have a bag 
of gold of silver bursted, at their feet ? 

A. That is very consistent with what I had to say.. The ear- 
tooni.^t did that. , ,.tT<-^*. ; J-„ 

Q. Then you are not responsible for your cartoonist? 

A. I did not say that. 

Q. Your cartoonist drew that, but you published it. 

A. I certainly did, and I am responsible for that, and every 
word in it. 

Q. And that is inconsistent with Mr. Meredith's definition of 
tlie word "corrupt," isn't it? 

A. No, it is not. 

Q. Well, we will leave it to the judge. 

A. That is a specified case there of corruption. 
By Mr. l\Ieredith : 

Q. AA'hat is that referring to? 

A. To the present form of government. (Laughter.) 
By Mr. Smith : 

Q. So you meant to imply that there was ''graft" amongst 
the police commissioners; is that what you meant? 

A. That is what you mean? 

Q. I did not ask that ; I am not on the witness stand. I asked 
you if you meant there was "graft" amongst the police com- 



THE IDEA 15 

missioners ? 

x\. Are you talking about that buck, or caitocn? 

Q. I am talking about ''Tee Idea," of which you have the di-.- 
tinguished honor of being the editor. You meant by this cartoon 
that there was "graft" among the police commissioners? 

A. That is naturally what he meant, and I am respon">ible for 
it. 

Q. Your cartoonist gets his inspiration from what yen write. 

A. There is graft and money consideraticn ; but that has noth- 
ing to do with this specific charge. One is a specific case, and 
the other is general. 

Q. In the very number you refer to this trial, h the cartoon, 
which speaks of police commissioners and graft and a l)ai: of 
money; is it not? 

A. I have not looked to see ; I think it is. I v, ill take your 
M'ord — for that much. 

Q. (Reads) "Printers harassed — may refuse to print." "Is 
the freedom of the press only a name in Virginia." "A.n appeal 
to the people." This was after your arrest — in your insue of 
November 27th. The cartoon is there, with money in a ba^"- 

The witness here stood aside. 



REV. TILDEN SCHERER 

introduced as a witness on behalf of defendant, d;:"}' s-.vo:n, 

testified as follows: 
By Mr. Meredith : 

Q. You are a minister of the gospel? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. "What denomination? 

A. Presbyterian. 

Q. "Where is your church located? 

A. Corner of 19th and Franklin Streets, Richmt nd. 

Q. What is about your attendance there? 

Mr. Smith: AVe object to that. 

The Justice : The court rules that it really has no bearing, br.t 
if you ask the gentleman his occupation I see no objection to ad- 
mitting that. 



16 THE IDEA 

Mr. IMeredith : I want you to tell his hcnor whether there has 
been a house of ill-fame right across the street from your church, 
and which you have tiied for the last twelve or eighteen months 
to get rid of, but that you can not get the police to gst rid of it, 
that they won't do it. 

Mr. Smith: I ask if you refer to the IMalloy place? 

Mr. Meredith : I do not. 

The Justice : Ycu Avill have to confine ycurself to the IMalloy 
case. 

Commonwealth's Attorney: I M'ould like to have that infor- 
mation, if your hcnor please? 

Mr. Meredith: If the Commonwealth's Attorney is so liberal, 
it does seem to me that he should let us have the whole thing. 

iCommon wealth 's Attorney : I want that, because that is out- 
! ide 01 the "Red Light District." 

Mi'. Meredith: Tell me what the "Red Light Li::trict" is. 
What are its limits? 

CommcneAvalth 's Attorney: The Chief of Police will have to 
teR you that. 

(Chief of Police Werner was here recalled to the stand.) 

Mr. Meredith: What are the limits of the "Red Light Dis- 
trict?" Major? 

INIr. Smith: Are you going into that, judge? 

The Justice : No, cii'. The ruling of the court is that you 
must confine yourself to the Malloy case; that is all there is 
about it, gent'emcn. I am not going any fuither than that. 

Evidence ends here. 

(Decision of the justice.) 

The Justice : I want to say, gentlemen, before rendering my 
decision in this case, that an attack of this kind upon an indi- 
vidual is bad enough, but when it comes to attacking the courts 
of this Commonwealth, thereby attempting to destroy the foun- 
dation of the judiciary, it is simply outrageous and should not 
he tolerated. A person guilty of such should be punished, and 
I am going to punish the accused in this case ; I find him guilty, 
and fine him cue hundred dollars and sentence him to fifteen 
days in the city jail. 

Mr. Meredith : I take an appeal. 



For T^eliable 



FURNITURE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



:CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 

Cash or Credit 1418-1420 E. Main St. 




w ^ <^» « —^^^i^i 



E S 






FOR r 

THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboy who fret the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
oifier prizes to those who sell the most copies. 

The Contest vill begin with the 1st of December and boys desiring to com- 
pete should begiii today to work for their weekly subscriptions. 

Boys should leave their names at the time of getting their papers so that 
i we may keep an aecurats record of their sales. 

Soma time ago The Idea gave awa>^ a Watch and nine other valuable 
' prizes, and the winning boys did good work. One bor selling 

112 copies of The Ti:>ea of one issue. There is good 
money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



J 




ALFRED L. W^ ALTON, Jr. 




Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We JDye Seventy- One Colors 
cyin Work Done As It Ought To Be 

2225 E. Clay St 



Phone Mad. 6030 






A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 





WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPY 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol IV 



January \5, 1910 



10* o 



■< 



Crooked Methods 



Police Protection 



of Gamblers Exposed. 



FOR SALK AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONEll'ES PUBLISHED WEELLY LOR EHL 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VHiGlNTA. By ADON A. 
VODER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICH- 
MOND. VA. PRINTED AT EVERYWHERE 



Prizes for Boys—December-January Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest 
niimbe of IDEAS in December and January. Prizes were recently 
given out or the November contest. A handsome watch was the first 
prize, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 
boys selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 
the month, thus making, at 2 cents each, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 



JEWELER J.S.JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 

We hMve in our Fall Stock, ai d ara 
showing special gfood values in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHfS, I WtlHY, SIIVKWARE, CUT 6'JISS, Etc 



HOUSEKFEPtRS.... 




We invite your inspection 



ri^^%ltfMh^«tfi^i«HiK*i 



'h^iW 



"^ 



You wish the best Flavoring Extracts, Essences and 
Spices for vour Table. . 

The best Soap, Perfumery and Toilet Requisites for 
vour family and (Quests. 

The best Steel Enameled, Rubber and Glass Goods for your sick. 

We have tht-m as low as thev can be sold, as well as Medicines 
of unexcelled quality, which conform strict.y to the United States 
Pure Food and Drug Law. 

You want informarion as to what is best to give medical students 
at Christmas, January 1st or at Commencement Exercises. This we 
can give you of the most satisfactory character, 

A. H. ROBINS' PHARMACY, 

200 EAST Marshall street 

RICHMOND, VA. 



50 YEARS EXPBRILNCB. 



r^^ 



OOO » DBLIVBRBD ANVWHBRP 1*4 TMB CITY. 



\r-<s^^ 



^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV JANUARY 15, 1910 NO. 3 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, at Richmond, Virginia 

The Last of the Trial 

Justice John Shown up* 

Smiths Brow Beating Amounts to 
Naught. 

Below We Print the Last Evidenc in the Criminal Libel 
Case A. A. Yoder on the Stand. 



Cross-examination by H. M. Smith. 

Q. Notwithstanding the testimony that has been given here, 
you still believe that Sophy Malloy's place is under the protec- 
tion of the Police Department. You still believe that in the face 
of this testimony, do you? 

A. I have not said anything about that. 

Q. You say you still believe this article : now I ask you if you 



2 THE IDEA 

still believe this Sophy INIalloy 's house is under the protection of 
the Police Department? 

A. I have not said anything about "Is"; that article was 
written several weeks ago. 

Q, I ask you do you believe now that this place is under tlic 
protection of the Police Department, or that it was? 

Mr. Meredith: AVhat interest have we whether it is now? 

A. It has changed a whole lot since then. 

The Justice: He wants to prove that he believed what he 
wrote there. 

Mr. Meredith : That is, at the time he wrote it. He asks the 
question now. 

Witness: The article was true when I wrote it; I don't know 
what it is right now. 

The Justice : Mr. Smtih, you had better ask him as to what 
it was at the time he wrote it. You can not question him as to 
what he believes now. Confine yourself strictly to this paper. 

Q. "When you wrote this article you stated that this assigna- 
tion house had been operated for years. How can you state 
that that has been operated as an assignation house? 

A. I got my information from the justice. 

Q. In other words, you inferred that it was a notorious assig- 
nation house, and had been operated for years— 

A. From what he said, and what appeared in the trial, 

Q. That is all the evidence you had? 

A. About that particular house, at that time, it was. 

Q. And though there was not enough evidence for him to con- 
vict of keeping an assignation house — 

A. There was evidence enough for him to convict, and he 
said so. 

Q. Did you not hear him say when on the stand that there was 
not evidence enough? 

A. He said that he could have issued a warrant — 

Q. He said he could if there had been evidence sufficient. 
Didn't you hear him say there was not evidence sufficient to 
convict ? 



THE IDEA 3 

A. I say the evidence was similar to the evidence in the case 
in which he did convict. Therefore, I am right. 

Q. So 3'ou are still right that he was wrong in his decision? 

The Justice : You can not bring the question up now ; but at 
that time, when he wrote that article. 

Q, Did you draw the inference that because you differed with 
Judge Crutchfield, that he was wrong in his decision? 

A. Because I differed? 

Q. Yes; did you form your conclusion, because you differed 
with him, that therefore he was wrong? 

A. Because I heard the testimony, and I know of certain con- 
dition. 

Q. 1 say, after the testimony that you heard here in this court- 
room you went home and wrote that he had decided the ease 
wrong, did you? 

A. Yes, sir, certainly. 

Q. And that there was something corrupt behind it; that is 
what you meant, is it not? 

A. I referred to other conditions as well. 

Q. Did you not mean that he gave a wrong decision on the evi- 
dence, and that there was something corrupt behind the decision? 
That there were corrupt influences; that his decision was a cor- 
rupt decision? That is what you meant, is it? 

Mr. Meredith : He has not said so. 

The Justice: Just answer the question. 

Mr. Smith : I am asking him if that is what he meant in this 
article. 

A. The words are very plain: if you will read them you will 
see that. 

Q. I ask you on cross-examination, if you did not mean that 
his decision was corrupt? 

A. I did not say so, 

Q. I ask you if you meant it? 

A. That is another question, which I refuse to answer. 

Q. All right. Now, you still say that Mr. Manning and 
Douglas Gordon — one sat and one stood behind Justice Crutch- 



4 THE IDEA 

field and engaged him in conversation during the course of the 
trial? 

A. Yes. 

Q. You still say that what you said it true? 

A. Yes, I have said it twice. 

Q. You say that the combination of ^Manning, Gordon, Pollock 
and Leaman, with Justice John, is responsible for the fact that 
this notorious creature who has operated for years in the same 
place, and known to the police as the worst kind of a joint for 
the ruination of young girls and the illegal of married women 
with other men — what is your foundaiton for that statement, 
that it was known to the police — 

A. That evidence had come out in the court. 

Q. You heard the testimony here of the police officers, didn't 
you? Did any evidence come out that this place was known as a 
notorious assignation house? As 1 understand, Mr. Crutchfield 
testified that no evidence came out — that she plead guilty. 

A. Evidence came out in a trial, which I understood was a 
part of that trial. I understand now it was on a separate war- 
rant, but tried at the same time. 

Q. Did that one transaction of those women on this particular 
occasion, or any other, justify you in saying that this notorious 
creature had operated for years in the same place, and known to 
the police as the worst kind of a joint for the ruination of young 
girls, and the illegal meetings of married women with other men? 

A. No; coupled with Justice John's statement and other evi- 
dence that appeared in the trial. 

Q. What evidence that appeared in the trial? 

A. Justice John said that it had been a notorious place for 
years. 

Q. He said he made that statement in connection with and 
referred to the fact of their selling liquor — referring to it as a 
' ' speak-easy. ' ' 

Mr. Meredith: No, he said he knew about that house — that 
was on the trial of the woman for keeping a disorderly house. 

Mr. Smith: He said distinctly that he referred to the fact 
that it was a "speak-easy." (Continued to page 10 



THE IDEA 5 

Police Protect 

GAMBLING HOUSES. 

The Editors Private Papers Stolen for 
a Purpose* 

When the Editor was arrested in November on the crimi- 
nal libel charge he could not fully understand why, even after 
his strenuous protest, his private papers were confiscated. 

Recent development howe\er, show what the game was. 

A certain prominent slick politician whom the Idea, had 
exposed had reason to believe that the editor had the copies 
•of certain letters which implicated him and so this politician 
sought to get a friend of the editor's to obtain under false 
pretences these letters from the editor for a certain consider- 
ation. 

He failed in this attempt however and when the editor 
was arrested soon after Geo. Pollock, Brother of Gilbert Pollock 
and partictular friend of the slick politician referred to, im- 
mediately proceeded to appropriate the editors papers and to 
read them contrary both to the law and to the practice among 
gentlemen and it does not require a Soloman to see why. in 
view of these fact§ and what followed. 

On the person of the editor there were besides pri^ ate cor- 
respondence, certain memoranda concerning a gambling 
house that operates boldly with the knowledge of the police. 

On these papers were the names of certain citizens who 
knew the character of this gambling joint. 

One of these citizens was approached a few days later by the 
owner of the gambling house and false charges were made 
against him in reference to giving information to the editor 
-and then the owner of the joint said to the citizen words 



6 THE IDEA. 

about to this effect. "I knew within an hour after Toder's' 
arrest what was on his papers." 

Now, Mr. Pollock after reading the editor's papers said 
they would be sealed in the editors presence. This he soon 
pren tended to do. Now this dirty transaction shows just 
what the Richmond Police department is being- used for, not 
for the arrest of crooks and the breaking up of the gambling 
joints bat. for th3 protection of gambling joints in their vio- 
lation of the law. 

The owner of this protected gambling joint which oper- 
at3s as a club frequently cashes checks of the young men of 
good standing and reputation in the town. Just the other 
day he cashed one for a young clerk for a large amount re- 
presenting a big slice out of his hard earned savings. 

The check was payable to cash as such checks generally 
are, and of course represented the young man's losses. 

There are three of these thriving "clubs" as well as many 
smaller joints operated for illegal gambling and they 
vary in respectability from a low dive to a gentlemanly ( ? ) 
alTair. 

Th3 po'ics dBpartmant knows all about th.3m, but fails to 
act. When there is anything crooked in any department it 
need not be charged to the men at the bottom. The men in. 
charge are the ones to blame. And the law places the Mayor 
in charge of the police department, tho the Police Boards 
has usurped much of the weak Mayor's authority. 



Next Week 



The Mayor Shown up^ 

Next Week The Idea will publish some very interesting 
correspondence with the Mayor which will cast some lighten 
the question. Why are not the laws enforced? 



THE IDEA. 



Cartoons. 



We regret that we have to appear this week without our 
casual cartoon. 

Next week our cut will be "Executing The Law" 




New Shop. 



We have had much trouble lately in getting out The Idea 
from the New Shop just as we desired. It gives us pleasure 
to announce that we are not now depending on outside prin- 
ters to print The Idea. Thanks to a good friend who was 
kind enough to put up the money, The Idea is now being 
printed from a shop under our own control and there is no 
longer any possibility of The Idea's discontinueing publica- 
tion. 

If any one wants to sue now he can sue to his hearts 
content. 

Last week the stapling machine failed to work and so 
some subscribers had to be content with a loose cover. 

Very shortly things will be going more smoothly. 

The Idea started publication in July 1906 in Lynchburg, Va. 
and came out ' 'Semi-occasionally" as the exigencies of the time 
demanded. During last year it came out monthly until the 
removal in June to Richmond since which time it has appear- 
ed regularly each week. The Idea is here to stay and unless 
.you subscribe you may miss a number and that number may 
be the one you want. 

Better subscribe today. $2.00 a. year, $1.00 six n:onths. 



THE IDEA. 



Cunnin^liam. 



Now that January 1st has passed let the Council or the 
Mayor do their or his duty and "reomve from office" accord- 
ing- to law, the city collector for "wilful perjury." 

There need now be no longer any excuse for this refusal to- 
act on any ones part, for it can not be said that "if we re- 
move now he would go into office on January 1st." 

The real trouble lies in the unwillingness to do his duty on 
the part of the Mayor simply because his duty is a little dis- 
agreeable. 

All along- this has been an Alphonse and Gaston game of 
politeness between the Mayor and the Council, neither one 
wanting- to take the responsibility. Now since the Council 
has closed the incident as f o"^ as they are concerned the whole 
matter rests with the Mayor who should have been man 
enough to assume it in the first place. 

Will the Mayor do his duty now? It is a matter of com- 
mon belief that he will noo, because of Mr, Cunningham's 
influence by virture of membership in secret org-anizations. 

Prominent men have stated to the editor of this paper that 
th^y as msmbars of such organizations were ashamed to say 
that such membership alone w^as responsible for the fact that 
Mr, Cunningham was retained in office contrary to law and 
the sworn duty of the Mayor. 

Let it also be noticed that the investigating committee sim- 
ply charged Mr. Cunningham with three per cent interest on 
the money he quietly borrowed from the taxpayers. If you. 
and I get a responsible endorser, even then we have to pay 
twice that amount, six per cent, and in advance at that. 

The action so far is virtually a statement on the part of the 
city to its employees that if they ever ,want to misappropri- 
ate any of the taxpayers money they may go ahead and do it 
and if they get caught they may get off by paying three per 
cent interest. 



10 THE IDEA. 

By the way we have not seen it in the papers yet that this 
three per cent has yet been paid. 
And the people have to submit until election time. 



The Defense Fund* 

Mean while the crooks are doing their level best to break up 
this paper by making us expend a thousand dollars or so in de- 
fence when the law is absolutely altogether on our side. 

The question is will the citizens stand by and refuse to aid 
in their work of cleaning up Richmond. 

Much has already been raised for the legel defence of this 
paper but more will be needed and any assistance may be 
telephoned to Rev. Tilden Scherer or left at the office of The 
Idea 904 Capitol Street. Phone Madison965-J or Monroe 2708. 



Some people think its awful to call a lie a lie. We think its 
The thing to do, when the awful thing of telling the lie has 
already been done. 



Testimony in Libel Case* 

( Continued. ) 

A. Whatever he was referring to, he said it in the second trial, 
at the time of convicting the woman. 

Q. And that justified you in saying that it had been operated 
for years and kno\Mi to the police as the worst kind of a joint ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. That is all the authority you had for it ? 

A. That was not all. 

PRINT IT RIGHT. 
Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure. 



THE IDEA. 11 

Q. What pvideiice did you have to show that it was under the 
l)ioteetion of the Police Department — this Sophy Malloy place? 

A. I have proved that they are protecting houses all about 
town. 

Q. All over townl 

A. Yes. 

Q. Or in one particular part of the to^^^a? 

A. All over the town. 

Q. You have proved that? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. That they are protecting them? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Give us the names of some of the houses all over tOAvn. 

A. I don't know them by name. 

Mr. Smith: I am getting outside the question. 

Mr. Meredith : Don 't stop him, justice. He is going into the 
very matters I want him to. 

The Justice : Both of you must confine yourselves strictly to 
this charge. 

Q. You say it is a shame on the fair name of the city that such 
bold schemes can be pulled off openly in courts of justice. Now, 
I would like to know if you had any evidence that Mr. Manning 
or Mr. Douglas Gordon, either one, brought any influence to 
bear on Justice John, whatsoever, as to the punishment that he 
would impose against Sophy Malloy? 

A. The evidence as I gave it there. 

Q. That is all the evidence you had? 

A. No, that was not all ; you have cut me off from giving all. 

Q. Do you say that there was an apparent reluctance of the 
judge in passing sentence on Sophy Malloy? 

A. Do I say it there ? 

Q. Yes. You meant that, did you? 

A. Certainly. 

Q. That he did not want to punish her at all? 

A. The sentence shows he did not. 

Q. That is what you meant then — that he didn't want to pun- 
ish her — ■ and that the lightness of the verdict was due to the 



12 THE IDEA 

presence of the police commissioners — you meant that, did you? 

A. Certainly — and others; you just take half of it. 

Q. Well, you are charged here with libeling the police com- 
missioners. You meant there was no question but what the police 
commissioners were very much interested in the outcome of the 
trial of Sophy Malloy ? That is what that language means, is it ? 

A. Read it out. 

Q. (Reads) ''It would have opened the eyes of the citizens 
if they could have seen the interest that the political powers 
had in the outcome, as evidenced by their presence and position 
in the Police Court." 

A. That stands for what it is worth. 

Q. You meant by that that they were standing there to influ- 
ence Justice Crutchfield in his decision? 

A. I meant exactly what I said. 

Q. That is what it says, don't it? 

A. If you say so. "When you fire questions so very fast at me, 
it, of course, is hard for me to keep up with the trend of your 
thought, and I might be caught in a technical error at any 
time ; therefore, I tell you to confine yourself to the publication. 

Q. I say you meant by this that these police commissioners 
were here to influence, by their presence, ]\Ir. Crutchfield in his 
decision of the Sophy Malloy case, didn 't you ? 

A. I meant what the article said. 

Q. Is not that what the article said ? 

A. Read it out. 

Q. You have it before you. Suppose you read page 9, and say 
if that is what you meant ? 

A, I meant what I said. 

Q. Did you mean that they were here by their presence to influ- 
ence the judge in the decision of the case ? 

A. (Reads) "Her place has enjoyed the favors of those who 
have a strong influence with the police commissioners and the 
court, and it would have opened the eyes of the citizens if they 
could have seen the interest that the political powers had in the 
outcome, as evidenced by their presence and position in the 
Police Court." That is very clear. 



THE IDEA. le 

Q. Now 1 ask you W you meant by that, tluit t!:cy v,( ro lierc 
for the purpose of — 

A. I said I had a right to thiuk from thcMr |)o; itioii tl.at tluy 
had an interest in the outeonie of it. 

Q. And that is what you mcar.t by your a^itiele, that they v.'ere 
here to influence the judg-e in his decision? 

A. I did not say they were here to intlr.ence lii ; deci i n. 

Q. And you did not mean that? 

A. If I said that I meant it. 

Q. You say the judge occupied a very unccmfortah'e pr .ii.( n 
between his duty, and his desire to p'ease the powers th:.t be. 
You mean the "powers that be" were the comminsionenj, ar.u ng 
others? They were among the '"powers that be"? 

A. Certainly they were. 

Q. ^'Janiiins' aun Douglas were among tliO "power:; that be." 
Therefore, lie ocup ud a very rneomfoitab^e politic n br-t.veen 
hi.? duty on the one hand, and his desire to please the [)o\verr: that 
be, on the other. Is not tlial there? 

A. Yes. 

Q. So then you did mean that thof;e two mm were br: e for the 
purpose of iniiueneing tlie Judge in his dceiFiicn of the caw? 

A. I say I had the right to infer that. 

Q. And that is what you meant — yru d'u't d(ny it, do y{u? 

A. I have not denied anything I said. 

Q. You have the right to say that ycu didn't menn that, i.f' you 
want to — I give you the chance to do it. You dcn"t dony it, at 
all. Now, do you know that en c( nvii-tici*! of keeping a lic>u::e of 
ill-fame a jail punishment was compulsory, under the statute? 
Did you know that at the time you wrote this article? 

A. No. 

Q. So, then, when you wrcte this aiticle ycu didn't know 
even what the law was, and undeitcok to criticise the juntice, 
without knowing what the law was. 

A. I did not criticise him on the lav:, bi'.t en the evidence. 

Q. Didn't you criticise him on the punishment? 

A. Certainly. 

Q. And when you wrote that article you d"d ir t talc'^ tlie 
trouble to find out — you say ycu didn't know tliat jail puni;;h- 



14 THE IDEA. 

nu-nt was eomptilsory for keeping a house of ill-fame, and not 
e?ompiilr.oiy for a cTisoiderlr house. 

A. T did net know it, and did not care, and do not care yet. 

C^. You write these articles without knowing or earing whether 
t; :ey are correct^ or not. 

A. About little things I do not care. 

Q. Thin.gn like that you don't cr.re whether you know them or 
IK t, and you undertook to criticize the judge without knowing 
tie IriW '^n which he acted, and yea say you don't care. 

A. I did not say what you have said, by a long shot. 

Q. The stenographer's report is there, and if you think any 
injustice has been done you I am willing to stop and have it 
lead. You believed it was true when you wrote it, didn't you? 

A. Certainly T did. 



Welcome! 

TO THE VIRGINIAN, 

The Idea wishes co extend a most hearty welcome to Richmond's; 
new daily paper THE VIRGINIAN which wifl very shortly appear^ 

We rejoice to note that the subscription sohcitors are being so, 
heartily received and are finding the people so anxious to help with 
their money. 

It is evident that this turning to the Virginian willhurt very serious- 
ly the other two Evening papers and may even send one or both to 
^hi wall or else make them reform after seeing the error of their way, 
and yet they have none but themselves to blame for the dissatisfaction 
of the public with their actions. 

We do not rejoice over their tribulations-, but we do rejoice over the 
success of the new paper. 

Knowing who the backers and editors of The Virginian are, we do 
not hesitate to bespeak for them, a hearty reception at the hands of the 
Richmond and Virginia public. 

May this clean, fair and square paper have a long life of usefu 
prosperity. 

Agam Welcome! The Virginian, 



THE IDEA. .15 



Abuse. 



The Richmond afternoon papers have worked themselves up into a 
frensy over the approaching advent of the new daily and have railed 
much against it, even before it was born, because its backers through 
the Christian Advocate have dared to tell the truth, which they term 
'abuse,' about them. To call a snake a snake, or a goose a goose, or 
a skunk a skunk, or a fool a fool is not abuse; it may be distasteful to 
the snake or the goose or the skunk or the fool but it is not abuse, 
and the truth, the disagreeable and sometimes even hurtful, should be 
told wheneven its telling will help the cause of right. 

Let the papers keep quiet if they do not want to acknowledge to the 
public by their bark that they are hit even more than the public knows. 



Thanks. 



A few days ago "a stranger" left $5.00 at THE IDEA oflflce for the 
defence fund. Such contributions have also been left on former oc- 
cassions. We desire te extend to these contributors and also to others 
who have so kindly given their aid to the Editor in his fight against 
municapal evils, our heartiest thanks, for the friends of justice have 
nobly responded and about three hunded dollars has already been 
raised, This amount will be almost enough for the defense in the 
■criminal libel case. The Saunders suit case however will come up on 
Febuary 1st and that means more money for defense, then too two 
other civil suits are pending against the printere of THE IDEA the 
legal expense of which the editor feels morally responsible for, and in 
order that these cases may be fought with no expense to the pointers 
The Williams Printing Company, and in order that the obligations 
may not so embarrass this paper as to force the editor into some bet- 
ter paying business in order to pay them, the people are again ac- 
quainted with the facts and earnestly urged to stand by THE IDEA 
in its fight, which is their fight for better things. 

Surely if the editor is willing to be misrepresented and abused and 
misunderstood and assulted and sued and locked up on false charge 
and financially embarrassed in order that the people may have then' 



16 THE IDEA. 

cause represented and their public affairs watched and thefr wicked 
servants called to account. — surely then the people whose fight this is 
will delight to stand between the editor ard his oppressors at least in a 
financial way. The editor has never dared to make known what it 
has cost him. either in money or in the trials of domestic life to main- 
tain his stand of opposition to evil. It has cost; and has cost much, and 
it will cost always to fight evil but THE IDEA WILL continue the 
fight and will show up the crooks and has never yet called on those 
whom it desired to held until AFTER it had accomplished much 
good for them. 

We solicit now again your help, not in the name of the editor but in 
the name of good government and in the name of those who suffer 
through the evil deeds of crooks and grafters and those who line their 
pockets with the peoples money. Don't bother about the editor, he 
can make a living at other callings, but for the sake of yourself and 
your city help l^HE IDEA. Contributations may be left with Tilden 
Schearer, Ginter Park, City, or at The Idea oflRce. 



\ 

Rough Language. 

The Idea has been critizised, sometimes by its friends for the harsh 
manner in which it has gone after evil and for the publication of cer- 
tain evidence which to say the least was not very elegant. 

In answer to such criticism let it be said that while other most ex- 
cellent people have been standing on their dignity for fear they would 
do something out of place The Idea has accomplished much good and 
has already put to route so much evil that if its work should cease to 
day it could point to its accomplishments and not feel ashamed nor 
have any regrets over its cause. 

We are proud of what this paper has done, not for the language it 
has had to use, but for the good the crooks know it has done. 

The forces of evil know ten times as well as the forces of right wha^ 
this paper has done and the crooks are trembling in their boots today 
not knowing where thev will get it next. 



ALFRED L. WALTON, Jr. 



FRANK L. HUTCHESON 



Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We D^e Seventy- One Colors 
c^n Work Done As It Ought To Be 

Phone Mad. 6030 



2225 E. Clay St 






A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



^f:;:^ 



32 NORTH LOMBARDY STREET 

RICHMOND, VA. 

estimates cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving, Halls. Vestibules, Basements, Ac. 



The Editor has known Mr. Ewing personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, satisfactory dealing is unexcelled. - 



^VY^«or-^('S:< 




For T{eUable 



FURNITURE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



C«sh or Credit 



1418-1420 K. Mam St. 



^ 
C 



5*fe^"'-'"«^rf!*S«*IX» ■ ^'f^'ytfSf^''^^ 



P R I Z 



F* 



« 



Vn^^tff^PHM^^^^ 






iMa^Hjii lijiii iii^1P||gir(ii ar^ 



*'THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboy who jjet the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
otner prizes to those who sel the most C0i)ics. 

The Contest vill begin with the 1st of December and boys drsinni^ to com- 
pete should bcj^ifl today to work lor their weekly subscriptions. 

Boys should leave their names at the time of petting ihctx papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their sales. 

Seme time ago The Idea gave away a Watch and nine other valuable 

prices, and the winning boys did good work. One bov selling 

112 copies of The Idea of one issue. There is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



■ » i" »# i ■ i»^%^" ■%<» 



BP^^»»W%itfl^|0Wl<%l|g^|TlW ^t0i 




WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPY 



THE 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV 



January 22, 1 9 JO 



No. 4 



Xto<am>Qa<ams>QQ<miK>a]>0mto6&<imK>aaaam>et>^MmQr>mm>Gt><aam><io<atBi>^o<am><i^<^^ 



I Some Hot Correspondence 



with the Mayor. 



Qo^H>QDaHii>o£>«HH>ao«HDfl»<aH>a»<aH>Qo<aK>oD<BB»cD<«B(id<aas>Q»<aabc&o8cs>ci>tiafi(^cC} 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR EHE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND. VIRGINIA, By ADON A. 
VODER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICH- 
MOND, VA. PRINTED AT WONDERWHERE, VA. 



Prizes for Boys—December-January Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest 
number of IDEAS in December and January. Prizes were recently 
given out or the November contest. A handsome watch was the first 
prize, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 
boys selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 
the month, thus making, at 2 cents each, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 

We haye in our Fall Stock, and are 
showing special good Taluee in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JfWElRY, SILVERWARE, CUT GLASS, Etc. 

We invite your inspection 



' 



'i 




HOUSEKEEPERS. 



You wish the best Flavoring Extracts, Estences and 
Spices for your Tabic. 

The best Soap, Perfumery and Toilet Requisite* for 
your family and guests. 

The best Steel Enameled, Rubber and Glass Goods for jrour sick. 

We have them as low as they can be sold, as well as Medicines 
of unexcelled quality, which conform strictly to the United States 
Pure Food and Drug Law. 

You want information as to what is best to give medical students 
at Christmas, January 1st or at* Commencement Exercises. This we 
can give you of the most satisfactory character. 

A. H. ROBINS' PHARMACY, 

200 EAST MARSHALL STRBBT 
RICHMOND, VA. 

so YEARS EXPBRIENCa OOO •» DBLIVBRBD ANYWHBRV <*l THB CITY. 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV JANUARY 22, 1910 NO. 4 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, at Richmond, Virginia. 



Some Hot 

Correspondence. 

S. L, Ledman and Mayor 
Richardson, 



Mr. S. L. Ledman the well known Main Street Shoe Man 
having noticed the continued and open violation of the Sun- 
day closing law wrote on the fourteenth of last month to the 
Mayor a dignified and respectful letter calling his attention 
to these \iolations and asking for information as to how 
to proceed to see that the law was enforced. His letter fol- 
lows below : 



2 THE IDEA 

Mr* Ledman^s Letter, 

December 14, 1909. 
Hon. D. C. Richardson^ 

City. 
Sir:- 

I desire to call your attention to the many fruit and 
soda-water stores that are run wide open on Sunday, and 
would like to ask, if you are the proper one to whom this re- 
port should be made ? 

If so, would like to ask your Honor; why they are al- 
lowed this privilege, when there is a law forbidding- any one 
to do business of this kind on Suijday. 

Have they any more right to keep open on Sunday 
than I would have? 

If you are not the proper one to report this matter to 
please advise me whom I shall take the matter up viith. 
Your prompt reply will be appreciated. 
Yours very truly, 

S. L. LEDMAN. 



The Mayor Dodges 

Tells the Merchant to Com- 
municate with ChieL 



On the same day Mayor Richardson replied to Mr. Ledman 
that if he, Mr. Ledman, would play policeman and appear 
against anyone, such one would be "reported to court," 
adding "If the police do not investigate your complaint 
please let me know. " Below we print this letter of the Mayor. 



THE IDEA 3 

The May or^s Reply* 

December 14, 1909. 
S. L. Ledman, Esq., 

Richmond, Virginia. 
Dear Sir:^ 

In answer to your letter of December 14th, I de- 
sire to say that some time ago I wrote a letter to the Chief of 
Police calling his attention to alleged violations of the law 
prohibiting work on Sunday, and directing him to report all 
such cases to the court. 

If you will communicate to the Chief of Police, 
either in person or by letter, that any person is keeping his 
place of business open and doing business on Sunday, the 
matter will be investigated; and if the evidence justifies, the 
party will be reported to the court. If the police do not in- 
vestigate your complaint please let me know. 

Very respectfully, 

D. C. Richardson, Mayor. 



Mr. Ledman, 

Chief Werner. 



Mr, Ledman, seeing that the Mayor did not desire to en- 
force the law, called on the Chief of Police and asked him to 
look into the matter. 

The Chief became indignant at his attention being called 
to his lack of law enforcement for he knows as well as every 
other citizen that Richmond is a wide open town on Sunday 
and Sunday selling goes on under the eyes of the police each 
Sunday. 



4 THE IDEA 

The Chief refused to act, pretending to be ignorant of the 
lack of law enforcement by asking Mr, Ledman where this 
thing was going on to which Mr. Ledman replied ' 'all over 
Town." Then the Chief asked in what particular place and 
Mr. Ledman informed him he did not come to make any com- 
plaint against any particular merchant for many were guilty, 
but starting near his store he said that, beginning with 7th 
and Main there were two stores right on the corner open 
every Sunday. Then the Chief said he would summons Mr. 
Ledman to appear against these merchants to which Mr. 
Ledman replied that he would not appear as he had no com- 
plaint to make of these men more than of others, and that he 
had made his statement only to help the police who were 
paid to do this work to see where the law was violated. Mr. 
Douglas Gordan then came into the room and told the 
Chief to go ahead and summons Mr. Ledman, to which Mr. 
Ledman vehemently protested. This shows how the police 
department succeeds in protecting the violators of the law by 
summonsing into court any citizen who dares suggest to 
them that they are not doing their duty. 

Mr. Ledman was summonsed into court and told Justice 
Crutchfield how it all came about, read the correspondence 
with the Mayor and stated he had no complaint to make to 
the Chief against these men but had called on the chief at 
the instance of the Mayor, who had directed him so to do in 
order simply to show that the laws were being violated all 
over town. 

The Police Justice fined the merchants charged the small 
sum of $5.00 each but did not require any bond of them to 
keep the peace as the law provides and so these same mer- 
chants have been open as usual since then. 

The following week Mr. Ledman wrote again to the Mayor 
showing him how his, the Mayor's suggestion to see the Chief 
had amounted to nothing as far as breaking up the law vio- 
lations was concerned, and put the question again up to the 
Mayor in the following letter. 



THE IDEA. 



Ledman to 

The Mayor. 



LETTER NO. 2. 



Shows up the Police Depart- 
ment Protecting Criminals* 

December 22, 1903. 
Hon. D. C. Richardson, 

Mayor of the Gity of Richmond, 

City Hall 
Sir- 
Following up our recent correspondence in reference 
to violations of the law prohibiting w^ork on Sunday I have 
called on the Chief of Police and as a result two merchants 
on Main street were fined in the police court last week. 

I write now to let you know that I am informed that 
these and many other merchants were open again last Sun- 
day and that there appears to be no attempt on the part of 
your Police Department to break up this business by enforc- 
ing the law. When complaint is made the one calling atten- 
tion to it is compelled to go into court and testify to that fact 
but the Police Department, even after conviction, lets the of- 
fender violate the same law on the next Sunday and doas not 
■even arrest him again altho they know his offence which is 
committed openly before their eyes every Sunday, 

Being convinced therefore that complaints made to the 
Chief are not followed up by due action on the part of the 
Department I again bring the matter to your attention and 
beg to ask if it is not in your province to see that the Depart- 
ment does act in the premises. (Continued on page 8.) 



THE IDEA 



Auditor Warren 

Won't Show Wine BiK. 



Taft Day Jefferson Hotel Bill of $2,83 1 .25 

Is None Of The People's Business, 
Thougfh The People Furnish The Coin. 



At the ti-ne of the meeting of the Taft Celebration committee to 
pass on the bills amounting to nearly $7,000.00 for the expenses of 
that days reception of the President, The idea showed the people how 
Mr. Qrundy of that committee attempted to have the committee pro- 
ceedings secret but failed in this, did not read out any itemized state- 
ment of his part of the expenditures altho one of the members asked 
for it. The committee however passed on it without having it public- 
ly read. The Idea at the time promised to look into the matter and 
get the detailed figures showing how much was spent for wines and 
other drinks, 

A few days ago we called on the clerk of that committee for these 
figures and he referred us to the auditor to whom the bills had been 
sent. 

We went to the auditor's office and a clerk there told us that they 
were very busy and asked that we call on- the following morning, lliis 
we did, and this time 'we were referred to the auditor himself. The 
Auditor, Mr. Warren, asked that a written request be made for the 
information. On our proposition to do so then and there, he sent for 
the papers, but before they arrived, changed his mind and said he 



THE IDEA 

would not show them without a written order from the council finance 
committee. 

We asked if he would state thai in wntinii as he had asked us to do. 
He said he would. On returninc^ to the office a letter was addressed 
to the auditor requesting him for his reasons in writing for refusing to 
let a citizen see this itemized bill. 

Instead of answering in writing as we understood him to say he 
would, he discourteously sent back word that he would not enter into 
any correspondence on the subject. It thus appears that there is not 
only something,in that bill which the committee is ashamed to make 
public but it appears evident to the editor that the auditor had special 
instructions not to let this matter out and that this so embarrased him 
as to make him act in the manner he did. 

Will the people stand for this .' Is it your business how your money 
is spent ? 

Can the council spend your money for wine feasts and refuse to let 
you know the details of it? Is this America or is it Russia.' 

If t+iey had done rightly would they not gladly make it public.'' 
Men love darkness rather than light only because their deeds are 
<evil 

It was a shame, e\'en if they had the right, to welcome a President 
whom they knew would not drink, with a drink ieasu 

The editor saw at least one Councilman on that occasion drunk. 

Its like the sot who got drunk to welcome the preacher. Was the 
celebration for Taft or for councilmen anyway. 

Let the people know how much these wines cost. And let them know 
how ALL their money is spent. Its their business MORE than it is 
the council's. 

We were referred to the finance committee, a thing which does not 
•exist except on occesion of meetings. Bes'des the finance com.mittee 
had nothing to do with this expenditure. The council itself did this 
through a special committee which has gone out of existence. 

No one has a right to keep this matter from the people and no 
-reason exists for it except shame of their unwarranted acts. 

Let the Auditor explain. 

Meantime let us say ; THIS IS NOT THE LAST OK THIS. 



8- THE IDEA. 

May r also ask that you let me know what action you 
take so that I may act accordingly, for I have determined tO' 
find out who is responsible for such open and flagrant viola- 
tion of the law. 

Very respectfully yours, 

S. L, LEDMAN. 



The Mayor Refuses to Act. 

Wants Ledman to do what he the 
Mayor had taken oath to do* 

Admits beingf Guilty by saying: ** Applies to Me«'^ 



December 22, 1909: 
S. L, Ledman, Esp., 

Richmond, Va, 
Sir:- 

In answer to your letter of December 22nd, which was; 
received this afternoon, I desire to say. — 

If you know that any person has violated the law in lab- 
oring at his trade or calling- on Sunday, it is your duty to re- 
port it to the Police Department, and I will see that the com- 
plaint is investigated. 

If you know of any dereliction of duty on the part of any 
officer or member of the Police Force, make your complaint 
to me, and I will see that the charge is investigated by the 
Board of Police Commissioners, 

I despise the covert threat in your letter so far as it 
applies to me. 

Yours truly, 

D, C. Richardson— Mayor. 



THE IDEA. 9 

This shows that the Mayor is merely a figure head, afraid 
to do what he has sworn to do, backing out of his sworn duty 
by resenting any inquiry on the part of a sovereign citizen 
into his own affairs as conducted by his servant the Mayor, 



Ashamed of Mayor 

Ledman Replies* 

Shows Up The Mayor* 

Citizens Must Enforce Law Instead of Mayor and J 25 

Able Bodied Policemen Who Are Paid by the 

People to Enforce the PeopIe^s Laws. 



January 8, 1910. 
Hon. D. C. Richardson, 

Mayor of Richmond, Va. 
Sir:- 

In reply to your letter of the 22nd, I have to say that 
your statement referring me to the police department com- 
pletely begs the question for it was because of their practical 
refusal to act that I wrote to you as per your former 
letter. 

You state that you "will see that the complaint is inves- 
tigated" if I report that "any person has violated the law in 
laboring at his trade or calling on Sunday;" this is exactly the 
complaint I made to you in my last letter. 

I showed that the law was violated, and that I reported 
it to the police department, and yet there has been no at- 
tempt to enforce the law which is sufficient to break up 
this Sunday selling if the law was enforced by those who are 
sworn to do so. 



10 THE IDEA. 

I am informed that many of these confectioners were 
open again on the following Sunday as usual and not a single 
one was reported. 

You state you "will investigate any dereliction of duty 
on the part of any officer" if I "make complaint to you." 

I did that very thing in my last letter to you but the 
charge does not appear to have been investigated. 

And I ask again why is it that your police department 
don't report these parties. 

If a citizen can see the law is being violated why can't 
the ones that are paid by the tax payers and sworn to en- 
force the law see that the law is being violated every Sunday 
and report same to court Without having a citizen to do the 
duty of a paid and sworn officer who sees the law violated 
every Sunday. 

From the tone of the latter part of your letter I infer 
that you do not like to be approached on this question and 
have no desire to help citizens ascertain why their public ser- 
vants, in charge of whom you are, do not obey their laws. 

I wrote to you as a sovereign citizen to his public ser\ ant 
and for reply I get an evasive answer unbecoming a servant, 

I do not know of any threat ever made in my letter ap- 
plying to you or to any one else but your reference to such a 
thing leads me to believe that you think you are the one re- 
sponsible for the fact I refered to of lack of law enforcement 
for that is the only part of my letter that I can see you 
could possibly have had in mind when you, wrote your last 
sentence. 

The law is sufficent. and you have sworn to enforce the 
law, but it is evident to me that if the law^ in this case is en^ 
forced it will have to be done by the citizens. 

I am ashamed of you for allowing this open violation of 
our Sunday laws^ 

Yours truly, 

' -S. L. LEDMAN. 



THE IDEA. 11 



Son of Chief -Police 



Testifies for Criminal. 



When Charles White, tnenotorious negro who has been sell- 
ing cocaine on Seventeenth street for years with the know- 
ledge of the police, was being tried recently in the Hustings 
Court, officers B. H. Werner, son of the Chief, and Wiltshire 
and Smith all went on the stand to testify for White. 

We have been informed repeatedly ever since starting 
The Idea that the only reason White had not gotten his de- 
serts long ago was that he "stood-in" with the police and 
ugly stories have been going around that he could do what 
could not be done by others simply because he had a pull, and 
it is even stated that many favors were granted him while 
under arrest and in jail, as he has often been during his law- 
less career, by those high up in the governmental affairs of 
the city. ^ , 

It begins to look exceedingly like there must be some truth 
in these repeaded rumors where the son of the Chief of 
Police can go on the stand in defence of the most notorious 
law violator in the city. 

It is a matter of common knowledge that White's place has 
long been cocaine headquarters, and there are many who 
thinks that The Idea's attacks on crime and vice and The 
Ideas exposure of the criminal alliance between the Police De- 
gartment and crime is responsible for the fack that White 
The Cocaine King is at last convicted. 

Notice that Pollock was attorney for white. 



12 THE IDEA 

Extract From a Letter* 

I have been following the details of your trial very closely, 
and am very much gratified that you were so completely at 
home in all the answers tho the queries of your tormentors. 
If I were able I would give you more substantial assistance 
than I do. 

Yours sincerely, 

A FRIEND. 



Do You Shave? 

WHY A NOTICE OF INFRINGEMENT WAS SERVED ON 

THE "SHARP-0" CO. OF 308 MUTUAL BUILDING, 

RICHMOND, VA., BY THE GILLETTE SALES CO. 

THE GILLETTE SALES CO. say that the "SHaRP-O" CO. 
is infringing on their patent when they resharpen dull Gillette blades. 
That you can not have Gillette blades sharpened after they get dull. 
Now, does the Gillette Sales Co. own the blades you shave with and 
pay for, or do you? For the past three years The Sharp-O Co. has been 
sharpening all makes of safety razor blades for 30c. per dozen and their 
work has proved entirely satisfactory to every one that has had work done 
by them. They have thousands of letters from nearly every State in the 
United States testifying to the merits of their work and it is for this 
reason that the notice was served on them. If they had done bad work 
do you suppose that The Gillette Sales Co. would have tried to stop 
them. It is because that The Sharp-O Co, does its work too well and 
that they are hurting'the trade of the Company that raised the price of 
blades from 50c, to $L00. If you want to save money and get the 
best shaves that you ever had in your life send or take your blades to 
the companys office at 308 Mutual Building or leave them at T. A. 
MILLER'S (Inc.) 519 E. Broad St. and you will never regret it. All 
Safety Razor Blades are 30c. per dozen. Old Style Razors l5c. each. 
Work guaranteed. (Adv.) 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure- 



THE IDEA. n 



Whiskey Dominated Papers* 



Some Plain Talk^ 

Richmond Seems to be peculiarly cursed with whiskey 
papers. The Times-Dispatch and The News-Leader in par- 
ticular have done their level best to defend this monster evil 
•even to the extent of being decidedly unfair to those who 
dared disagree with them by publishing erroneous reports of 
their attitudes and spoken words and by withholding from 
the people such info!"mation as would lead to argue for an 
■abolitation of the saloons. 

We have had occasion in the past to call attention to the 
position which another little whiskey sheet, The News Bul- 
letin, published weekly, takes on the question. This little 
paper on a former occasion made a vicious attack on the 
editor of The Idea by publishing an editorial false statement. 
In their edition of last week are two edjtorials, from which 
we quote below, the one putting President Smithdeal and the 
•other putting the editor of this paper in a false light before 
the people. The first makes it appear that "Mr. Smithdeal" 
"withdrew his objections" "to the operation of a bar" and 
•calls it "serious mistake," 

As we learn it, every objection that Mr. Smithdeal has ever 
-had to bars he still has and he has withdrawn and taken 
back nothing. He has always been a consistent and persist- 
ent enemy of the saloon and has not let up one whit in his 
fight by refusing to be used by a malicious police depart- 
ment to help oppose the transfer of a bar lisence from a bar 
•on Marshall street to one on Broad street. 

This same News Bulletin then proceeds to malign and 
slander the editor of this paper for doing exactly what many 
'of the best merchants and professional men in the city did, 
Jiamely, refuse to be used by a malicious police department 
to destroy the value of a hotel property by falsely stating- 



14 THE IDEA 

that the location was not as suitable as another on Marshall 
street for a saloon. The News Bulletin sarcastically states 
' 'Mr. Adon A. Yoder the man of many parts, editor of The 
Idea and general reformer of men and things has at last 
found something which he can heartily endorse. —This lauda- 
ble object is a bar room." 

We desire to state so that he who runs m.ay read that that 
statement is a lie, for the editor of The Idea has never hearti- 
ly endorsed any bar-room and never will. We will state 
further that no newspaper man in the city could easily be 
ignorant of the fact that that etatement is a he for altho the 
public in general may have gotten the wrong impression of 
the proceedings referred to, it was well known among news- 
paper men for a long time that the question was not one of 
endorsing a bar-room but of trar^sferring a bar license from 
Marshall street to Broad Street. 

We don't know and don't care at this writing who wrote 
that editorial for the paper had some 26 editors when we last 
counted the list, but we want to state that he showed which, 
side of the great moral fight he was on by attacking, not the 
other gentlemen who took the same stand as the editor but 
he attacked only those two who are the greatest foes of 
whiskey and saloons. When one spends his energies fighting 
such men you don't have to get a microscope to tell how 
soaked in whiskey his sentements are. 

Wilber Griggs^ Unfit 

\Vilber Griggs who sat as police Justice in the trial of the editor was 
as we stated formerly legally unqualified to sit as justice in any trial. 

Morally he was unfit because he had stated that because of The 
Idea's former criticism of him the editor should be run out of Richmond. 
(We have evidence for the witness stand to this effect.) 

When one has criticised another it is contrary both to justice and to 
court practice for such a one to sit as judge over the other. 

Yet Griggs did this and the proceedings of the trial showed his un- 
fitness. When the editor gets a fair legal trial he has no fear of not 
being aquitted. 



THE IDEA. 15 

Woods Election. 

Contrary Both to Justice and 

The Spirit of the Law* 
Richmonders Monopolise State Offices* 

People all over the state are indignant at the fact that the 
penitentiary board, one of which was Jas. B. Wood, has re- 
cently elected as head of the state penitentiary this same Mr. 
Wood their fellow-member. 

Especially are they indignant because the board composed 
'entirely of Richmond men had before them the name of E. M. 
Milstead of Newport News who it appears was much better 
qualified for the work than Mr. Wood, v/ho is employed in 
the C. & 0. offices here. 

Even if Mr. Wood were quahfied for the work he would be 
morally inelligible to the offiics for it is contrary to the spirit 
of our institutions for a person to have anything officially to 
do with the deciding of any question in which hs has a per- 
sonal financial interest. And yet it can not be denied that 
Mr. Woods membership in the board alone is responsible for 
the influence that elected him superintendent. 

Moreover it is safe to assume that Mr. Wood is not fit for 
such responsible work because of the fact that when one has 
served in a subordinate capacity till old age he can't adjust 
himself to a work calling for decision and leadership. 

The vote stood Easley, Patton and Cohen for Mr. Wood, 
and only one, Mr. W. B. Bradley, for Mr. Milstead, altho Mr. 
Wood did cast his complimentary ( ?) vote for Milstead after 
working against him. 

-Such action is properly called two-faced. 



16 THE IDEA. 

As we g'o to press we are delighted with tlie notice recently 
out that ex-Senator A. F. Thomas, that forceful a^id fearless 
statesman of Lynchburg, will very shortly issue from the presses 
of The ISTeale Publishing lyC, of 'New York, his profound but 
intensely interesting booli;, "The Slavery (of ProgTess," on 
which he has teen working for some time. 

Senator Thomas, in his conversation and writing, reminds 
one of the writings of Thomas Jefferson, so filled is he with a 
broad wisdom of the fundamentals of government, an ardent 
love of the people, and an abiding faith in our democratic in- 
stitutions. 

It has been our valued pleasure to talk wuth the Senator along 
the lines of his present book, and we predict for him not only 
its hearty reception wherever true knowledge of a remedy for 
the evils of American progress is desired, but also a brilliant 
and honored career in the official and advisory service of his 
country just as soon as the American people are aroused to their 
need for the sendees of a man. 



We are glad to say that The Idea has printed the last of the 
evidence in the Police Court trial. We have skipped much that 
was immaterial, but felt it dne the Editor and the people to 
know not only the truth of the trial in which they are so vitally 
interested, but also how unfair the Eiehmond daily papers are 
in reporting such cases. In this detailed report by one of the 
best court stenographers in the State of Virginia we have shown 
an absolutely correct report of the trial, which furnishes the 
people with an entirely and radically different view of the case 
from that given by the biased and one-sided reports furnished 
in the Richmond daily papers, which would delight to see this 
paper destroyed because it not only furnishes the truth about 
the political crooks, but about their methods of suppression of 
the news and distortion of the facts. 



ALFRED L. WALTON, Jr. 



FRANK L. HUTCHBSON 



Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We D^e Seventy- One Colors 
cy^n Work, Done As It Ought To Be 

3325 E. Clay St 



Phone Mad. 6030 



)rAm 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



^^^==^(^"^f===^ 



32 NORTH LOMBARDY STREET 

RICHMOND, VA. 



FHONE leti 



e«timat«s cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving, Halls, Ve«tibules, BasemenU, Ac 



The editor has known Mr. Swing personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, sstisfactory dealing is uneicelled. 



For Reliable 



FURNITURE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 

Cash or Credit 1418-1420 E. Main St. 




"THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboy? who get the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
other prizes to those who sell the most copies. 

The Conteit vill begin with the 1st of December and boys desiring to com- 
pete should begin today to work for their weekly subscriptions. 

Boji sheutd leave their names at the time of getting their papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their sates. 

Some time ago The Idea gave away~ a Watch and nine other valuable 

prices, and the winning boys did good work. One bov selling 

112 copies of The Idea of one issue. There is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



m^^^m>m^ 



VVTEEKLY 



THE COPY 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



VoLIV January 29, J910 



No. 5 




- Executing The Law* - 

iOR S-\r.r AT AT I 

BKING SOiME SER\iONE'rn::S FLiiL. V L LKLY FOR THF 

COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, \LKUiNIA, By ADON A 

YODER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER. 904 CAPITOL ST.. R" '^ 

Movo VA PRivrrn \t woNnrRwnFRr v\ 



Prizes for Boys— February-March Contest 

Ten pri/.es will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest 
number of IDEAS in December and January. Prizes were recently 
i^iven out for the November contest. A handsome watch was the first 
prize, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 
boys selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 
the month, thus making, at 2 cents each, .$4.52, besides the watch. 

Stllin^j Ideas pays the boys well ^^ '^" ^^ they do not secure the 
!'. ijt prize. 

JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 

We hiive in our I*r11 i5V»«k. awd are 
ehowiDg special K^iod values in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHfS, J WfllTf, SILVERWARE, CUT G' ASS, Etc. 

We invite ywa-r in8pt<etion 




^ For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. ^• 

^ For dry or falhng Hiir, Dandruff and diseased Scalp, use ^ 

^ Regal Hair Tonic. f 

'^ For troublesome Coughs use Phlorizine. ^ 

^ For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodon e Liver Pills . ^ 

(^ For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters (> 

A ^ 

'J and I odide Sars a parilla. \ 

(> -— ^ 

A For the Best Medicines Extant, Go to ^ 

; - A. H. ROBINS, - t 

^ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. ^ 

d More than 50 Years Eeperience. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



Vol. IV JANUARY 29, 1910 NO. 5 



l^ivE Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, a: Richmond, Viroinia. 



Law Not Enforced, 

It is a Farce of the Worst Sort 

Who is Responsible? 



Some months ago the writer stopped on the corner of 
First and Broad streets on a Sunday night after the close of 
Thurch services. 

A few feet away the clerks in a store were selling their 
wares without any attempt at concealment other than the 
lowering of the curtains on one «ide of the room. 

A policeman in full uniform was standing near and in such 
position that a simple turn of the head would have enabled 
4iim to see the transactions going on inside. 



1 THE IDEA 

The writer addressed the officer about as follows" r 

"Officer, is it not' against the law for these stores to be^ 
selling their goods in this way on Sunday?" 

I wish that every citizen of this community who has any 
self-respect or any respect for the law of the land would take 
note of this officor's reply. Here it is :• 

"Yes, it is Against the Law, but so Long as They 
Keep Their Curtains Down we Don't Bother Them." 

There we have the situation in a nutshell. 

Is it any wonder that crime is rampant; that criminals^ 
flourish under the nose of decent citizens and within easy 
grasp of the sworn officers of the people's laws ? 

Does anybody think for an instant that that patrolman was; 
acting upon his owm responsibility and initiative when he put 
that very remarkable construction upon the law and his duty 
as an officer of the law ? 

If not upon his own responsibility, then upon whose respon- 
sibility or authority was he acting, or refusing to act ? 

Naturally, we think of the Chief of Police first. 

Do we really believe the Chief responsible for such in- 
structions to the force ? 

My inquiries into the matter justify my belief that the; 
Chief is not responsible. 

Who then ? Naturally those next in authority above the' 
Chief— the Mayor of the city and those associated with him. 
on the board of Police Commissioners, 

Apparently the matter must rest finally with them. 

In discussing this question it must be borne in mind that 
the writer has nothing to say about the justice, or expediency,, 
or wisdom of the law which prohibits a citizen from laboring" 
at his trade or calling on the Sabbath day or compelling or 
permitting his servants or employees to so labor. 

The great big outstanding fact is that The Law Does so- 
Prohibit and prescribes a definite penalty. 

How long will law-abiding citizens stand for this sort of 
thing ?~LAW- 



THE IDEA. 



Police Officials Usurp 

Court Authority^ 



Executive vs^ Judicial 



The duly elected and solemnly sworn representatives of the 
people of tbe state of Virginia have met in the Virginia As- 
sembly, and have enacted a clear and postive lavv^ on the sub- 
ject of Sunday selling and have prescribed a definite penalty 
for its violation. 

Furthermore, thfe organic law of the state has created end 
defined the nature of certain offices which are solemnly 
charged with the duty of enforcing the laws enacted by the 
representatives of the sovereign citizenship. 

This same organic law has created and clearly define i the 
nature of certain courts which are solemnly charged with the 
administration of justice and the interpetation of the law as 
it applies to any particular case brought before it. 

Legislative. 

Executive, 

Judicial. 

Anybody who knows the first principles ol' a democratic 
.government knows the definite and distinct existence of these 
•three departments of governmental machinery. 

He knows too, something of the emphasis that has been 
laid, and rightfully laid, upon the importance of confining 
these three departments to their respective duties— one must 
^not assume the duties of the other nor interfere with the 
'^ther in the performance of its duty. 

(Continued on page 15.,) 



THE IDE/?. 



Mild Means 

Don't Work 



Harsh Criticism Necessary* 



In view of the grand farce that is being- played with the; 
people's laws, by the people's sworn and paid officers, under 
the eyes of the people themsleves, the Mayor's letters to Mr.- 
S. L. Ledman, the respectable, law-abiding, tax-paying shoe 
merchant, as published in last week's IDEA, are most re- 
markable documents, 

Msny good people criticise A, A, Yoder and his pubhcation 
for saying such harsh things about such courteous, gentle- 
manly and refined officials as our present Mayor, 

Mr, Lsdman's experience in this case shows how exceed- 
ingly difficult It is for anything remedial to be accomplished 
by mild and ordinary means. I have had practically the 
same experience with the police department. Courteous pro- 
test has been made from time to time against certain condi- 
tions; the Chief of Police has always been courtesy personified;; 
he has seemed perfectly frank and anxious to accommodate,, 
but the evils have gone on just the same and the mild pro- 
tests have come to naught until the harsher language and. 
more personal attacks have appeared in this paper, 

I in no sense desire to raise a great "hullaballoo" about 
the awful enormity of Sunday selling. Personally it doesn't 
matter a "baubee" to me whether the merchant's sell on. 
Sunday or not. I don't have to buy unless I choose so to do,. 
But my contention is that such a perverted and dangerous, 
idea of law and law enforcement as is suggested by the 
statement of the policeman quoted at the beginning of the 



THE IDEA 5 

3lft'icle erttitled "lyaw not Enforced" in this issue — such .in idea as this 
disseminated anion<f the ;»eople, especially amonjf those who are crimi- 
nally inclined already, and tau<iht to our children as they (,'ro\v up, 
strikes at the underlying first principles of law and order and iiood 
•citizenship. 

If the people don't want this or any other law let them instruct 
their repfesentarives in the Legislature to repeal it. But the people 
^ave said through representatives that they do want it. Then the sworn 
■executives officers should enforce it or resign. 

Let us see where this remarkable attitude toward law enforcement 
■leads to : 

I counted one night in half an hour fifty-nine seperate and distinct 
houses almost within a stone's throw of each other, which bore the re- 
iputation of being houses of ill-fame. 

In addition to these fifty-nine in this vicinity there were others in 
'Other places that I knew about and doubtless still others that I did not 
know about. 

To my own mind there is no worse crime in the category of crime 
than this of running houses of ill-fame and trafficking in the virture of 
boys and girls (for it is this and nothing more.) The law plainly for- 
bids it and prescribes a penalty. 

Yet here they are, wide open, with their signs on the doors, and men 
■and women coming and going by day and by night. Officers in uni- 
form stop and talk with these women at their doors. 

And that remarkable body, the Board of Police Commissioners, of 
^vhich the Mayor is an ex-office member, presumes to say that it is not 
well or wise or prudent to enforce the people's law on this subject. 
"The people have made the law; the people have chosen us and (in 
•the case of the Mayor, the Chief and the Force) pay us salaries to en- 
force their laws, but we don.t think it wise, so long as these women do 
■not keep a "rough house" or become too brazen in their crime." 

I'hat is some government for you ! That is law enforcement of a 
-high order ! That rs realisation of official responsibility and an illus- 
■tration of a most remarkable conception of the fact that a "public office 
is a public trust" ! That conduces all right to law and order and the 
■diminution of crime ! That is a splendid idea of good citizenship to 
Aian-d down to our children] 



€ THE ITJET^ 

But let us see further : 

I went privately and in the most courteous manner possibfe 
to the Chief of Police and brought these matters to his atten- 
tion and protested against them: 

I stated to him as I now state to the people of Richmond', 
(and there are hundreds of men in Richmond who know 
I tell the plain, fact) that these criminal places are notorious- 
violators of the laws prohibiting the sale of intoxicants with- 
out a license; and that I could bring sworn evidence to prove' 
this fact. 

Furthermore, that they not only sell \\ithout a license but 
sell on Sunday, thus adding another to their already double 
crime. 

What did the Chief do? Nothing. Nor did he undertake to- 
do anything. 

Here is your courteous protest! Absolutely worthless, as; 
was that of Ledman to the Mayor.. 

It is not a question with me as to whether or not The Idea 
always tells the truth— it would be a marvelous exception, 
among secular publications if it did— but the fact remains 
that the people have been sitting quietly all these years until 
this remarkable state of affairs has gotten so into the com- 
mon atmosphere and somebody has gotten such a grip on the 
inside regime that nobody apparently has the nerve even tO' 
protest, howeAer much he may disapprove. 

I contend that A. A. Yoder and his publication— or some- 
thing of the sort— is absolutely necessary to create a senti- 
ment to counteract what to my mind is a most dreadful state 
of affairs. 

I have absolutely no- apologies to offer for espousing the 
cause of law and order and good citizenship and COMMON 
RIGHT. 

More about these questions later for the fight is just 
begun, —LAW. 



TViii TdEA. 

Our Old Friend 



V * 



Still a Factor in our Legislative Halls, 



The other day we meandered over to the House of Dele- 
'gates to see how the wise men were conducting things and 
you can imagine our surprise on seeing ex-city committee- 
man Clyde W. Saunders promenading around the Speaker's 
stand, leaning on the clerk's desk, and finally, during debate 
on the floor^ going up behind the Speaker's desk and sitting 
-down on the floor where few could see him, and engaging 
the Speaker Mr. Byrd in a heated argument. 

Now be it known that the day or so before in was an- 
nounced in the daily papers that all outsiders except repre- 
sentatives of the press would be rigedly excluded from the 
hall, so we began to wonder why our friend Clyde had such 
a pull and was so important a personage. On inquireing we 
found that Mr. Saunders had the contract for printing the 
house bills but since that offered no reason for his personal 
appearance in the legislature we made further inquirJBs and 
behold what we learned. 

We learned that the House has a printer and the Senate 
has a printer. The House printer piints tlie house docu- 
ments and the Senate printer prints the Senate documents. 

Now in the past when a Senate document would come over 
to the House it has been known to somehow or ether g-et 
marked as if it were a House document and therefore the 
House printer w^ould print it instead of the Senate printer 
who should have had the work. 

In vievk- of this fact do you wonder at seeing our friend, the 
enemy, Mr. Clyde W. Saunders, hovering over the clerk's 
desk, sitting in the clerk's chair or argueing SUBROSA with 
.•Speaker Byrd. (Continued on .page 10.) 



THE IDEA 



Executinsf ? 



the Law. 



J he worcf execute according to the dictionary has two meanings which 
are alnnost exactly opposite and contradictory the one to the other. 

The one meaning is to enforce and thus make alive; while the other 
meaning is to destroy or kill. 

The Mayor, D. C. Richardson, has evidently gotten the wrong pior 
bv the ear m executing the law in Richmond. Instead of enforcing it 
and thus giving effect and life to it he kills the law. destroys it, makes 
it of no effect, EXECUTES it in it's secondary sense. 

He has taken an oath to execute the laws of the commonwealth and 
he kno^vs he is violating that oath when he executes the laws by de- 
stroying the laws of the commonwealth as he is doing by refusing to- 
enforce the Sunday laboring law, the house of ill-fame law, the liquor 
selling on Sunday law and the liquor selling without a license law. 

These laws he not only refuses to enforce but by his actions he en- 
courages aids and abets in the violation of these laws and thus becomes 
a law breaker himself, a party to the crime. 

The Idea has shown that the executive branch of the government in 
Richmond is actually protecting criminals in breaking ehese four laws 
and yet the Mayor sleeps on. 



A Bushel of Corn. 



From a bushel of corn a distiller gets four gallons of whiskey which 
retails at $16; the government gets $4.40; the farmer who raised the 
corn gets 40c; the railroad gets $1.00; the manufacturer gets $3.60; 
the retailer gets $7. the consumer gets six months and the policeman 
gets paid for running him in. 



THE IDEA. 



To the Legislature 




In making; laws would it nor be of inestimable value to first provide 
some way of carryintr them into effect. Your laws recently enacted 
are defied before your very eyes by the Mayor of Richmond, a very 
yood sort of a fellow, neijjatively, but postively worth nothinsj;, without 
back bone to do anything until the powers that be have spoken their 
favor, and therefore a menace to the community. 

Consider a moment your position. You create the office of Mayor, 
prescribe his method of election and his duties and require his oath to 
perform your bidding in statute expressed. 

After getting into office he throws his oath and your laws overboard 
and brings into contempt your enactments and you the legislative, the 
people in representation quietly look on. 

Unless the sworn officers of the law enforce the law how can it be 
expected that Virginia will be a law abiding and law respecting 
communitv. 



The Saunders Suit. 



The Saunders suit against the publisher and the printers of The Idea 
for $25,000.00 will come up in the Law and Equity Court on 1 ues- 
day next, February 1st. 

Look out for some interesting developments and incidentally the 
putting of the kibosh on all these suits against citizens for talking about 
their public servants. 

Now is the time to begin to think who you will have as councilmen 
for the next term. 

The evil forces must be opposed and must be beaten. Pollock, 
Mills, Huber, Peters. Pollard and others must go. Who will you 
have to succeed them. 



10 The Idea. 

Our Old Friend Clyde Saunders, 



(Continued from page 7.) 

Again a feVv days later this same printer man Mr. Saundery 
was much in evidence around the Speaker's desk and after 
some rather officious promenading around the sacred pre-- 
sincts he took a seat next the clerks desk. 

Very soon Mr. Cox, member of the House from Richmond 
arose in his seat and moved the printing of 500 copies of a 
certain bill or resolutian. The bill wass passed without dis- 
sent, and Mr. Saunders arose, rather significantly Vv^e must 
confess, and left the hall. Nov^ we would enquire why if 
was neccesary to print 500 copies when the House has only 
100 members and the Senate only 40. 

When the printing bill runs into the extra vagent thousands 
then you may understand w^hy The Idea opposes such men 
as Clyde Saunders ever touching any of the people's busi- 
ness. Maybe you had better ask your legislator to look into 
this business for you.— But perhaps he is under obligations 
to Clyde W. Saunders. 



The Three Spenders, 
ills Pollard Grundy 

The Finance Committee of the City Council has just nam^ 
ed a sub-committee of three to formulate the, budget for 1910^ 
That sub-committee is as follov^s : 

Chairman H. R. Hollard, Jr., Barton H. Grundy, and 
Morgan R. Mills. 

The Journal in announcing the sub ^ committee, adds; 
"These appointments are generally satisfactory to the Coun-' 
eil." 

Now many of the people do not know how important that. 



' IHK IDEA. 11 

little announcement is nor do they know how significant that 
little remark of the paper's is, for they do not know exactly 
what "formulate tne budget for 1910" means. 

A word of explanation is neccessary. 

We do not hesitate to say that that committee announce- 
m.ent is perhaps the most important one made in the past 
twelve months, for that committee is the one which decides 
how the City's Money will be spent during the coming year. 

Its duty is to apportion among the various departments the 
expected receipts of the City Treasury. 

And notice who compose that committee: First; H. R. 
Pollard Jr. , the last man for the office by reason of the fact 
that his many private interets as a real estate man make him 
an improper one to determine how the city's funds shall be 
spent. Next; Barton Grundy, who besides being recognized 
as very extravagent with the city's money is by far the most 
undemocratic member of the city council. He it is who had 
charge of the wastful expenditures for wine feasting on the 
Taft celebration day, and then so hushed the matter up that 
to this day the people do not know how their money was 
spent. Thirdly and lastly; (Angels and Ministers of grace ! 
defend us ! ) Morgan R. Mills one of the two smoothest men 
in the city council. 

These three, Pollard, Grundy and Mills are to apportion the 
city's millions for 1910. As the court cryer says "God save 
the commonwealth," so say we "God save the city" from 
such a committee. 

You see this sub-committee gets in its work and reports to 
the Secret meeting of the finance committee and that com- 
mittee's report some night about 11 or 12 o'clock goes rail- 
roading through a sleepy and tired council and the work is 
done for 1910. 

Still there are some people who do not seem to care enough 
about how their city is run to study the commission form of 
government which would never make it possible for men of 
such standing and no direct responsibility to all the people to 
ha\e the deciding of such important questions. Again we 
say "God save the city." 



12 THE IDEA 



Eat no Meat! 



Now that the Meat Trust is heiiinnin<j to scjueeze the life blood 
out of the poor by forcing the price of meat clear dp to the ceiling,. 
let every patriotic citizen join with the labor organizations and. even 
if they can afford to eat meat, boycott the Meat Trust by refusing to 
buy meat for a season. 

"If eating meat caiiseth my brother to' offend I wfll eat no meat 
while the world standeth " has another and potent meaning today. 

CITY POLITICS, 



Ramof has it that Clyde Saunders i?; slated for the Penitentiarv' 
Board in place of J. B. Wood and that Morgar R. Mills is booked foi' 
\Vood's place on the Board of Aldermen. Go to see your Alderniani 
today and protest against the election of Morgan Mills whcse candi-' 
dacy has already been announced. 

He knows that despite his tremendous following among fhe city em-- 
ployees and the machine element The Idea will most likely beat 
him for council re-election next Spring. 

If however he succeeds Wood on the Aldermahic Board he will 
hold over, for the board is not elected this year in toto as the council 

(S. 

It is also sincerely hoped that Jifdge .Mann will not only ncrt appoint 
Saunders on the Penitentiary Board but will see Ccc it that some other 
part of the state has something to- do with the running, of the States 
Penitentiary besides a few Richmonders, 



The Criminal Libel Case^^ 

The Crmiinal Libel Case against the Editor of The Idea brought: 
by Manning, Gordon and Crutchfield was postponed from January' 
24th to February 11th. 




THE IDEA. 13 



anchester 



So we can go into Debt. 



The other day th3 papers reported opposition on the part 
of Messrs J. P. Branch, N. W. Bowe, James Caskie and 
others to annexation on the ground of increase in taxes. In 
Mondays paper, and on the first page this time mind you, 
The Times-Dispatch quotes an interview with H. R' Pollard, 
Jr. in which he claims that as a result of annexation, Rich- 
mond would b3 abb to increase her bonded indebtedness. Now 
we would enquire whether any foal can't see that increasing 
indebtedness is not the same as raising taxes, and whether in 
the long run it must not raise the tax rate in order to pay the 
debt. Debt is the bane of government exactly the same as 
of individuals and Richmond has already overstepped the 
legal limits of its bonded indebtedness by a twisting of the 
law on the part of the City Attorney H. R. Pollard, father of 
this H. R. Pollard Jr. Now we are asked to annex Manches- 
ter in order that we may borrow more money. 

Just last year alone the city of Richmond borrowed more 
money that its total receipts from taxes and licenses com- 
bined. Just think of it. Its like a man making a salary of 
$1,000.00 a year going in debt at the rate of $1,000.00 a 
year. Richmond is in debt already more than ten million 
dollars and yet the chairman of the finance committee Mr. 
Pollard would have us annex Manchester so that we can go 
into debt more. 



14 THE IDEA. 

Richmond paid in interest on bonded debt last yeai* about 
$400,000 which is nearly one-fourth of its total receipts froin 
taxes and licenses, which after all is the only real income of 
the city. Its like a man making $100.00 a month spending 
$25.00 of it in interest on his debts. 

This is what our bunglesome city government has brought 
us to and now the chairman of the finance committee, which 
by the way holds its meetings in secret^ asks us to annex 
Manchester so that we can go into debt even more. When 
you have to pay out one-fourth of your income for interest, 
and your tax rate is $1.40, that means that your tax rate is 
about 35c. more than it would be if you were not in debt. 
Altho we are paying 35c. out of $1.40 in interest, they tell us 
We must annex Manchester in order to pay more interest, 
and all this in spite of the fact that according to law Man- 
chester can not be annexed in time to show her population in- 
the next census as an increase to Richmond. 

Understand us, on general principles we are in favor of 
annextation, but not with the present cumbersome extrava- 
gent unecomonical government which is corrupted by waste 
and graft. 

When Richmond gets a decent form of government, then 
will be time to annex Manchester. 

When Richmond can run its own affairs then will be time 
to try to run Manchester's. 

Richmond must get better men in ber councils before ft can 
get a better form of government and it will be a few yearsi 
yet before the Richmond Government is either morally or 
physically able to undertake greater things. 

The Richmond city government is at present rotten not 
only in form but in many instances in personell, and it is up 
to the citizens to get government by commission before they 
agree to the annexation of more territory for the corrupt 
politicians to grow fat on-. 



THE IDEA. 15 

Police Officials Usurp Court Authority* 



(Continued from page 3.) 

Going back now; The Legislature of Virginia has said that 
no person shall babor at his trade or calling on the Sabbath 
day except in works of necessity or charity. A penalty is 
prescribed for the violation of this law. 

These executive officers ( in Richmond they are the Mayor, 
now Hon. D. C. Richardson; the Chief of Police, now Major 
Louis Werner; and possibly by some stretch of imagination 
the Board of Pohce Commissioners, now Messrs Manning, 
Gordon, Duke, Landerkin, Walsh, Thomas and McCarthy, ) — 
are solemnly charged and sworn to look out offenders against 
this law and bring them before the proper judicial officer, who 
in this case is the Police Justice Hon, John J. Crutchfield. It 
is the duty of this latter officer to hear the evidence in the 
case, and inflict or refuse to inflict the prescribed penalty, as, 
under oath, he deems the law and the e^ idence to demand. 

If any person feci himself aggrieved by the decision of the 
judge in the police court he has the right to appeal to the 
higher courts of the state where the whole question may be 
passed upon again. 

It is with these courts to say in what cases and to what ex- 
tent the prescribed penalty shall be inflicted. It is with them 
and not with the police officers to say what are and what are 
hot "works of necessity and charity." 

We submit that for a policeman, his Chief or the Mayor or 
the Board of Police Commissioners to arrogate this authority 
to themselves before the question is passed upon by the courts 
is aiming a blow at the foundation of all principles of demo- 
cratic government. 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure. 



16 THE IDEA 



Afraid of t 




It is reported that a noted crooked politician whom The Idea has beeil 
.lambasting was asked on the street recently why he did not also sue 
when the others sued Yoder recently, and he replied that he had too 
much sense; that Yoder was going to prove every thing he said about 
the others and if he sued him he might prove it on him too. 

The Crooks don't doubt the truth of The Idea's statements, its the good 
people who have been fooled by the daily papers into believing, thai 
Richmond politicians were about to sprout wmgs. 



^Tommy-Rot.' 



i have not gone deliberately to search out every establish-' 
ment that sells its wares in Richmond on Sunday, but I have 
had occasion to keep my eyes open in passing* up and down 
and venture that a conservative estimate of the number of 
habitual and open violators of the Sunday laws in this city 
is one hundred. 

To say that the Mayor, the members of the Board of Police 
Commissioners, the Cheif of Police, and e\ery patrolman on 
the force does not know of this state of affairs is simply so' 
much "tommy-rot." A ludicrous piece of child's play was- 
enacted a few weeks ago When the order was sent out for 
the stores to close up on a certain Sunday. Some closed and 
some did not, some merchants were arrested and fined and 
some were not. The next Sunday the Whole business wa& 
going full swing and the policemen stated that they had no' 
further orders in regard to the matter. This is execution of 
the law with a vengeance ! — LAW- 



u 



ALFRED L. WALTON, Jr. FRANK L. HUTCHEmom 

Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We D^e Seventy- One Colors 
^11 Work Done As It Ovght To Bo 

2225 E. Clav St. 




A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



32 NORTH LOMBARDY STREET 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Cttlmatas ch««rfully fiv«n on Sidewalk 
Paving, Hall«, V«»tibul«ft, BatamanU, Ac. 



PHONE lati 



Tho editor has known Mr. Ewln* prtm^mkhf for tha last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that Ki« reputation for nrst-class work 
and straight (onftard, satisfactory dealing is unexcelled. 



For ^eliahle 



FURNITUBE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



CMh or Credit 



1418-1420 E. Main St. 



>«^^«M^^^^ 



PRIZES) 



BOYS 



» 



"THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboy y»fcio get the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
other prizes to those who sell the most copies. 

Tke Conteit *ill bagin with the 1st of December and boys desiring to com- 
pete ikoalil ba(in t*4>7 to work for their weekly subscnptiona. 

Mmj% akauU Imit* their aaniAa %i the time of getting their papers so that 
w« aiay k«a^ an atcurata record of their sales. 

Maia ykwM af» T%% i>»4 pav* away a Watch and nine other valuable 

prisea, aad tka winniay kaya did %t)o6. work. One boy selling 

lit a«ipi«a cf TNB Ibea af one is^ue. There is good 

■ioacjr in it far tba boya beaidca the prizes. 



^t^^^m^^ 



J 



WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPT 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 

Vol. IV February 5, J9I0 



No. 6 



Clyde 




FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISPIED' WEEKLY FOR THE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A. 
YODER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICH- 
MOND, VA, PRINTED AT WONDERWHERE, VA. 



Prizes for Boys—February-March Contest 



Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest 
number of IDEAS in December and January. Prizes were recently 
given out for the November contest. A handsome watch was the first 
prize, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 
hoys selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 
the month, thus making, at 2 cents each, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES 

7'h AND MAIN STS. 

We h:iTe in our Fall Stock, and ar« 
Bbowmg special good ralues in 

DIAMONDS, WATCllB, JWILIY, SllVKWARf, CUT G'-ASS. Etc 

We invite your inspection 









For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. 
For dry or falling Hair, Dandruff and diseased Scalp, use 

Regal Hair Tonic. 
For troublesome Coughs use Phlorizine. 
For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. 
For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters 

and Iodide Sarsaparilla. 



For the Best Medicines Extant, Go to 

- A. R ROBINS, 



200 E. MARSHALL ST. 

More than 50 Years Eeperience. 



THE IDEA 

A Si^. of the Times 



VOL, IV FEBRUARY 5, 1910 NO. 6 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Yeak 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YoDER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va, 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, at Richmond, Virginia, 



Richmond's Debt to 

The . 



An Appeal on the Merits of 



s 



By Rev. Tiiden Scheref. 

The good people of Richmond are in the debt of THE 
IDEA more than they can ever pay. 

Since this publication commenced its work a few months 
ago the attention of the people has been turned towards law 
enforcement and law and order as not before in years. 

The writer can testify to the good that has been done. 



7 THE IDEA 

Sunday closing has been agitated and now begins to iocjk 
like a fact. 

Gambling has been driven more under cover £ind it is re- 
liably reported that some of the joints have closed up shop 
entirely because of their threatened exposure by this paper. 

The immorial house question has been brought prominently 
before the public end the people are talking about it. Ih^ 

writer has knowledge of the fact that the position thi& 
publication has taken on this question is becoming the posi- 
tion of some of the best people in the city. The officials are 
having their attention directed to this matter in a very posi- 
tive way and there promises to be vast improvement in the 
moral atmosphere in which our boys and girls must be 
brought up. 

Itjis the writer's further conviction that THE IDEA'S agita - 
tion of matters involving the city's finances has already sav- 
ed much money to the tax-payers and will result in saving 
much more in the future. 

Many most excellent people have objected to Mr. Yoder's 
way of going about things; have said that he is too harsh, too' 
indiscriminate in his attacks, etc. For the sake of argument 
at least these criticisms may be addmitted, but in the 
writer's humble judgment most people make some mistakes. 
In the writer's further judgment harsh terms have been 
necessary to accomplish the end in view. Conditions which 
seem to me intolerable in a law abiding communi-ty have 
grown up under the noses of us who have been inclined to 
obey the law ourselves and let the other fellow do as he 
pleases. 

We ministers have been trying to preach as pure a gospel 
in the Richmond pulpits as might be heard anywhere, and 
we trust we have lived in some measure the gospel we Iftve 
preached. Now and then w'e rriay' have entered a mild^ gen- 
tlemanly, courteous, half-apologetic protest against condi- 
tions but we haven't been taken really seriously. The evils 
ha\e gone on and even increased^ 



THE IDEA .3 

The thieving boy in our apple tree has laughed at us when we have 
cast the soft turf at him. Our friend has discovered our failure and 
has been shying :j few stones at the ro<i;i.ie and with ijiuch more ap- 
preciable effect. 

Whatever apoh)p;ies others mxy feel like making for Mr. ^ oder 
and his work, the writer has none to make. These matters have 
been carefully considered and it is my studied conviction that this pub- 
lication is working in the interest of RIGHT as opposed to 
WRONG, in the interest of GOOD as opposed to EVIL; that no 
innocent party , has su'^ered unjustly; that many innocent people have 
been protected from imposition and injury; that 
MUCH DEFINITE AND PRACTICAL GOOD HAS BEEN 
ACCOMPLISHED 

and that, these things being true, the people of Richmond owe it to 
A. A. Yoder that h? be given a fair opportunity to continue hi? 
work. 

Practically every body knows that repeated efforts have been made 
by men who, to put it mildly, do not bear savory reputations in the 
com.munity, to put this publication out of business both by personal 
assaults upon the editor and by legal expenses in the courts when, as I 
believe the event will prove, no fair court will uphold their 
contentions. 

Certain respectable, law abiding citizens met and appointed me to 
receive funds to pay the expenses of these court proceedings so that 
Mr. Yoder might not be hampered in his work. The response was 
generous and cordial but 

THE SUM RECEIVED THUS FAR IS NOT SUFFICIENT. 
This money is held for the expenses of defense alone. It is not need- 
ed and is not wanted by Mr. Yoder to pay the running expenses of 
his publication. Thi generous patronage of the paoplehas been suf- 
ficient thus far for that. But if the ordinary income of the paper must 
be called upon to meet these legal expenses the continuation of the 
paper will be problematical. 

I CLAIM THAT THIS IS THE FIGHT OF THE LAW 
ABIDING PEOPLE OF HIGH MORAL IDEALS AGAINST 
LAXITY IN LAW ENFORCEMENT, AGAINST IMMOR- 
(Continued on page 14.) 



4 THE IDEA. 



Retired Manufacturer Wt 



Editm* of The Idea i 

Surely there is need of some such paper as 'yours m Rich- 
mond. 

Our daily 'papers seerrt to have but one mission, that is the 
defence of the liquor traffic, all other matters are but inci- 
dental, such as g'ood roads and the annexation of Manches- 
ter and the number of saloons and jug houses which Man- 
chester will be allowed. 

I wonder if these papers do not really get their animus for 
their pro liquor zeal in the liquor patronage they receive, and 
do they not flatter themselves that from the use of the space 
they sell to the liquor men g'oing into dry territory the 
great jug" trade is made possible, and this mianhood distroy-- 
ing traffic is fastened on many who would otherwise be com- 
paratively safe from its balefull in fluence. Surely the love of 
money which induces the papers to publish and men to en- 
gage in the debauching and ruinous traffic is surprising in 
this age of the protection of home and the many screen? 
devised to protect young manhood and womanhood, that the 
rriost potent enemy of our race can find friendship and advocay 
from our daily papers which the people must read or fail to 
keep up with current events. 

It is a comfort lam sure to the 'great mass of the good 
people of our city and state that soon there will be a clean 
paper published in Richmond, one without seductive lipuor 
advertisments, and prize fighting news and stuff of this 
brutalizing character to the exclusion of nearly everything go- 
ing on in the moral world for the uplift of mankind, and 
making of this sinful world better. 

Our present cities publications proceed on the theory that 
nothing but what caters to the lowest instincts (^f mankind 



THE IDEA. .5 

is readable or interesting-. Only for fear of outraging the 
mora! sentiment of ths community, the work of very con- 
spicous conventions and citizens meetings are given place, and 
then to often destroy the good puri/oses of the work they aim 
to accomplish. So far as known our news papeis have never 
raised a cry against sensual shows and vile insinnuations put 
before the eyes of our women and children in the moving 
picture shows, and on the stage. But when the vile stuff 
was too flagrant to pass, it was not the reporters of the press 
to move its suppression, Vs^hen it is known that the owners of 
these papers and employers in many instances are professed 
Christians it surprises us to know where they get their low 
standards of morals. Certainly not from the Christian's 
Bible. It is not surprising that with the support of the press 
g-enerally that the terrible liquor traffic for centuries boldly 
defied legislation and all the moral agencies employed to curb 
its power. Not until the Anti-saloon League with the power 
of God behind it did this iniquitous monster cringe and beg 
for quarters, promising obedience to law and decant conduct. 
But it is toj lat3; th3 slogan has gone forth "the saloon must 
go." 

Few know the alarming extent of damage this traffic does. 

We are debauching even the heathen lands and the uplift- 
ing, christianizing woi;k of our Godly missionaries; is largely 
undone and thousands of others would be reached except fp^ 
the counteracting influence of the soul and body destroying 
decoctions, which so-called christian nations send, and all for 
blood money derived therefrom, a srd splatch on our 
boasted ci\ilization, certainly no argument is neccessary to 
convince any man who loves his fellow man to enter a re- 
lentless warfare against such a traffic, a traffic which blights 
every home, and is a menace to the entire world. 

Certainly it is surprising that any inteligent man should 
defend it, or any good man engage in the traffic. 

The writer knows from long and sad experience the truth 
of the matter referred to. 

Yours for mankind. 



THE IDEA, 




Justice John Fines the People for 

the Crime of the President 

of the Fire Board 



Tfia'fsday^s (last vP'eek) pftrpers tell Ms that Chas,- F. Ta>IoT was- ai'-- 
rested for exceeding the speed limit and evidence given showed thaf 
the aiTto v.as going so fast afong the main street of Richm-ond that the* 
bicycle pohceman could not keep up with it and Dr. Reade,' council- 
man, te^ified that he nevei saw a- car going as fast before (n his? 
fife. 

It was a cfeaf case of reckless and dangerous driving and gi'oss vio-- 
fation of the law with absolutely nor excuse for if, biit since" Captairt 
Taylor was an office holder of the city, Justice John saw a way of ap-' 
pearing to fine the offender while actually doing nothing of the kind,- 
by fi'rfin'g Captain Taylor, "aS^ President of the Board of Fire Commis-^ 
sionersr" $50. Off. 

Now what does that meafi i^ VVelt it simply means according lOthe^ 
Journal that the people pay the bill : that is. you and I jrre fined for' 
^hat Captain Taylor did. 

Jtrstice John had !)0 right m the first place to fine a man as ar* 
official.' When a crime is committed it is committed not by a boarc^ 
but by an individual,- a crime from it* nature can not be an official act' 
it must be a private act, and Justice John knows that the people' 
should not pay for thesins of an individual even if that individual ^'ere* 
at the time doing an official neccessity 

E-ven if Captain Taylor had been going to a iire he would have*.' 



THE IDEA 7 

been subject ;o the speed liir.it law, (or as far as fires are concerned he 
js no more than any other citi'/.en. 

He is nor a member of the fire deparJinent and the fire Chief alone 
has le^al authority on such occasion. 

The trouble is that the fire board and the police board seem to 
think ihey own this town and are therefore not only above the law 
themselves but have authority to set aside the law for others. 

The Journal says: — 

It was learned this afternoon that the line would be paid out of the 
fund of the Board of P^ire Commissioners, which means that the cit)' 
not only imposes the fine, but will have to pay it, a swapping of dol- 
lars between the funds of the Fire Department to the Police Court 
receipts. 

It is also reported that Mr. Taylor defied the ordinance and "' in- 
formed the court that the speed limit would not be respected in the 
f iiturev 

Altho Mr, Taylor attempted to excuse himself the ne\i day he did 
not deny but reaffirmed according to the Journal that report by saying 
that "I meant to imply that when I thought the occasion demanded it 
and when the emergncy presented itself I or my associates would dis- 
regard the speed ordinance." 

We submit that if all Richrnond were on lire Captain Taylor would 
have no more right than any other private citizen to exceed the speed 
Simit or violate any other law. 

His business is not to put out fires, its to look after the business 
management of the department. 

Here in Richmond however a condition of affairs exists which does 
not exist in other cities of the State. 

The Fire Board usurps the functions of the Chief and the Fire De- 
partment and oversteps the legal limits prescribed for it and under- 
takes to take to itself all the privileges and duties of firemen; 

Likewise the Police Board usurps the powers of the Police Depart- 
ment and undertakes to instruct the police contrary to their oaths thus 
even usurping also the functions of the legislature by openly defying 
the laws and prohibiting subordinates from doing their duty. 

When will the citizens awake and demand of their servants that they 
become law abiding citizens instead of law breakers and tyrants and de- 
stroyers of the law? 



$■ THE IDK/k 

How Much Did You Get? 
Clyde Saunders^ Chris Manning 



For some time past the Stvift Company Meat Packers have 
been attempting to get permission to construct a large plat- 
form from their establishmient out across the side-walk space 
so that they might use this space to load cars on without the 
use of skids, etc. 

The bill after being d-uly urged by Chris Manning and 
other lobbyists who were often on hand at the committee 
meetings, was finally passed by the two bodies of the council 
but was vetoed by the M-ayor, who held that the council had 
no right to gi'ant such a privtlege. 

After the Mayor's veto however the proposed plan came 
again before the council. On the night the Mayor's veto 
came up before the aldermen for consideration Clyde Saun- 
ders and Chris Manning who were together in the Telephone 
Company graft (ea^^h on oath admitting having received $^ ^OOO 
in that deal) were mueh in evidence, shaking bands with 
the members, cornering some, argueing with others, taking 
others into tee cloak room and making themselves so prom- 
inent on the fl-oor during the sessions of the body that Pres- 
ident Wood had to rap for order and make the remark "too' 
much electioneering. Gentlemen," 

The question finally came up and the vote Was taken With 
enough votes tO' pas& it over the Mayor's veto and immediate- 
ly Messrs. Saunders and Manning with beaming faces left the 
halL 

Now The Idea would enq.uire,. How much did you get- 
Messrs. Saunders and Manning for your ' 'perfectly legiti- 
mate" work on that occasion ? Surely if your influence 
with the council is worth a thousand apiece to the Telephone 
Company you will not give it away to others without. "A 
little sliee, ' ' as Manning formerly put it, from somebody. 



TH1<. IDEA, '^ 



Put *Em Out/ 

Fai 




! 



Is it fair for tlie police to close Messrs. Roccicholi and Bian- 
«cini on Ttli and main and let other merchants open on Sun- 
day^ 

Last Sunday these two were closed wliile stores all over 
town were open. 

The papers say that others were "reported" by the police. 
Why were they not stopped by the police ? If you or I vio- 
late any law we are not sirapl.v "reported'" we are arrested 
and stopped. 

The officers are sworn to "enforce the law, :not to report the 
violator and let him keep on violating. 

These pretences towards doing sworn duty by the polce 
department are utterly absurd. They do not want to en- 
force the law and Justice John does not want to enforce the 
law for be has not yet (January 31st) made a single one of 
these places forfeit auy bond. 

The pohce could 'stop every place in town in two weeks if 
they wanted to and the law makes it their bounden duty so to 
■do but they are "a law unto themselves" and legislative en- 
actments amount to nothing with the Mayor and Police D.- 
partmett of Richmond. 

The papers here encourage this open law breaking by 
making light of what they call these blue-laws, when they 
'know very w^ell that this Sunday closing lav7 is in no sense a 
blue-law. 

It Was passed by ti^e legislature just session before last in 
response to urgent demand on the part of the people. 

Its a live law and there is absolutely no excuse for its beiaig 
ojpenly violated. 



10 THE IDEA. 

The Police Board when their pohcy is to practically fn- 
struet the force to ignore this law is guilty of a crime not 
simply against the people of Richmond but against the State 
of Virginia and if the Mayor thinks he is simply a figure head 
and can not gret the police to enforce this law because he 
can not even dismiss them without the approval of the board, 
he has far more effective remedy; he can remove the police 
board and put it up to the council to get another one. Is he 
man enough to do it? No. Hardly, You see the ring that 
elects the council also elected him and his hands are absolutely 
tied. 

The people will never get any progress made except through 
their individual efforts or from public indignation until they 
put the gang out, the Mayor and the Council included. 

Meantime let the people uphold the Rev. Mr, Atkins and Mr, 
Ledman the Merchant in their attempt to have the law en- 
forced. 



The Criminal Libel Case 



The appeal from the Police Court in the Manning, Gordon and 
Crutchfield warrant proceedings will came up before Judge Harrison 
of Winchester m t:he Hustings Court on next Friday February 11th at 
1 1 o'clock 



Gov* Mann on Law Enforcement*. 



"k should be the concern of all connected with the legislative- 
judicial and executive branches of the government, to see to it that the 
laws are promptly and justly enforced. 

How is that, Mayor Richardson? 



^^btinif>^bSliSb«l><ili>^i>aHii>«4'b^iii&a!>ataii>(i» 

I ANNOUNCEMENT 



I The rapidly increasing demand made on my time by "j 
i my strictly legal work (writing for law books, and office § 
1 practice), a^id by my other concerns, has prevented me i 
§ from giving my personal attention to the real estate de- t 
I partment that I contemplated establishing in connection | 
§ with my law offices, and I am therefore compelled, in § 
I justice to my clients and patrons, to give up this branch 
4 of my work. 

i This change takes effect February first, after which 
I time all persons having property still in my hands will 
I be personally notified of its status. 

§ The secret of my success in my office practice has 
1 been prompt, efficient and conscientious service, and a 
f notable capacity for SETTLING CASES OUT OF 
I COURT. I 

't ^ .5. 

I SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO COL- I 
I LECTIONS. OUT OF TOWN BUSI- 
1 NESS HANDLED THROUGH BOND- 

I ED ATTORNEYS LOCATED 

1 EVERYWHERE. 



t - SAMUEL WANT - * 

I Attorney and Counsellor at Law i 

I 819 E, Bread St 'Phone Monroe 2837, 

I PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER AND NOTARY 

^ IN OFFICE, 



I WANTED:-- A substamiai ground for the time-worn * 
1 objection to advertising by lawyers. | 



n THL nJKA 



44 



Official Discourtesy/* 



Police Discovers a New Name for 
Neglect of Duty. 



Sunday before last The Rev. H. P. Atkins noticed tfiat the' 
two stores recently fined for being" open on Sunday were a& 
wide open as ever and so- he made complaint to a policeman: 
on the corner and that policeman, officer Newman, refused 
to mak€ the arrest, on the grounds' as he stated that the' 
store was not in his beat, his beat was on one side the street 
and the store was on the other, and he stated that it would. 
be discourteous to the officer in. charge of the other beat for 
him to cross the street and make an arrest, tho he had taken 
an oath to see that all laws are enforced and to even make 
arrest beforehand wherever such arre&t would prevent the 
violation of law. And the same law has clothed him with, 
jurisdiction not only across the street but all over town and 
one mile into the country and at all times of the day or night 
whether he is even on duty or not, and such duty is exercis- 
ed all over town whenever a policeman sees fit to exercise 
it. 

The truth is the subordinate officer was in an embarrasing 
position for his oath said one thing and his orders demanded 
another. 

The Richmond Police are Practically Instructed to Violate 
Their Oath of Office and They Know too Well That if They 
Dared Attempt to Enforce the Law Their Jobs Would not be 
Worth 30e. with the Present Law Breaking Police Board. 



THE IDEA. n 

o 1 he Legislature. 



Perhaps the most importa?it piece of legislation demanded 
at this session of tne General Assembly is the change in the 
constitution permitting Virginia cities to do away with the 
\vard system of government and to adopt the commission in- 
stead of the old coundlmanic form. Since the cities of the 
state in convention assembled ha\e taken such concerted 
action and have appointed a committee to see to the passage 
of a proper bill it is already almost assured that the proper 
laws will be made. The Idea was perhaps the first Virginia 
;paper to take any decided stand in favor of Commission Gov- 
-ernment, and has pressed this matter before the paople, first 
in Lynchburg nearly four years ago and for the past eight 
months in Richmond continually and persistently, and we do 
not doubt that it is for this reason at least in part that Lynch- 
burg is now taking the initiative in pushing this matter be- 
^fore the legislature. 

Lynchburg has not been infested as Richmond and Nor- 
folk have by well organized grafiers and yet it has suffered 
much from the cumbersomeness and extra vagence and delay 
-occasioned by the worn out councilmajiic form of govern- 
ment. 

The proposed change provides for election at large instead 
of by wards, and where this plan has . been tried it has been 
found of untold benefit it that it insures the election of good 
men and secondly, it renders such men amenable to the will 
•of the people because they are directly responsible to the whole 
body of the people for their position. 

By having a small body of paid councilmen instead of a 
large body of anpai^rf councilmen the city can, and does 
'easily command experts and men well informed to do its 
work, and because they are paid and are experts the city saves 
untold amounts which -formerly were wasted or stolen. 



14 THE IDEA 

Just recently in one of our large cities a plumbing' co|i- 
tractor offered a merchant a slightly used boiler, originally 
worth $500.00 for $200.00, A little later the m.erchant decided 
he would like to have the boiler and called up the plumber 
and found that the boiler had been sold to the City School 
Board for $350. 00. On telling a member of the board of the 
occurrence he replied that the board was under the impres- 
sion that they were saving $150.00 on the bwler whereas 
they found they were being charged $150.00 more than the 
price to outsiders. 

By all means let the legislature change the constitution sO' 
as to permit government by a small body, elected by all the 
poeple. 



Richmond's Debt to The Idea. 



(Continued from page 3>.} 

ALITY, AGAINST CRIME, k ought to be a fight of the par- 
ents and older brothers and sisters, 

•FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE INNOCENT BOY- 
HOOD AND GIRLHOOD OF OUR COMMUNITY. 

in (his contention I am RIGHT or WRONG. Those who be- 
lieve with me are asked to send further contributions to the undersign- 
ed for this cause. The fight against present conditions is just begun. 
There will be no let up until the victory is won. Will you have a 
hand in that victory .'' 

Address all con^munications to 

TILDEN SCHERER, 

Ginter Park, Richmond, Vz. 



Print it Right* 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure. 



THE IDEA. 15 




ew 




From the vituperation that the Journal is emitting over 
the advent of The Virginian we judge that the Journal's ex- 
istence is already seriously threatened. 

The way Rix^.hmonders have subscribed to the new evening 
paper ought to show the old papers here what The Idea has 
been claiming that there is a genuine demand for a clean and 
fair daily paper here. 

It must be exceedingly gratifying to the management of 
the neVv paper to be so heartily received by the public. 

If the other afternoon papers had been at all decent and 
fair, Richmond people would not be breaking their necks in 
their haste to subscribe to another one. 

Advertisers too seem to be sick of the old papers' policies 
for The Virginian could not nearly accommodate all the re- 
quests for space in their first number of sixteen pages. 

If the people did not already know tliat The Virginian was 
to be a clean paper they would strongly suspect it because of 
the enemies it made even before it made its initial ap- 
pearance. 

When the wishy-washy Journal attacks anything people 
begin to suspect that the thing attacked has some mighty 
good qualities else why should the Journal attack it. 

For our part The Idea rejoices over the new arrival altho 
The Virginian will doubtless occupy a part of the field that 
this paper has attempted to fill, for our first consideration is 
not the success of this paper (for we can make a howling 
financial success out of it by selling out to the crooks) but it 
is '*the common good" at which we aim, and we ha"ve every 
reason to believe that the new paper is the rasult of similai' 
desire. 

All honor to the backers of the new enterprise and all 
welcome to The Virginian, Richmond's only clean or fair 
daily paper. 



THE IDEA, 



State- Wide. 



The whiske.yites and their powerful allies and sympathizers^ 
the so-called conservative business men, tell us that altho 
nine-tenths of the state is dry they should not be allowed to 
put the whiskey business out of the state, simply because 
the law won't be enforced in spots. 

Let us gently remind them that the laws are not enforced 
in Richmond today and yet they would not dare to suggest to 
repaal these laws simply because the executive authority 
here refused to abide by his oath and carry out these laws. 
Laws passed just a few years ago are already dead letters as 
far as Richmond's Mayor is concerned, and yet the legislature 
has before it today bills making these same laws more 
stringent. —Speaker Byrd's White Slave Law for instance.— 

Who would say don't let's make that law simply because 
Richmond has a Mayor that will not enforce it. 

What is needed in Virginia is more law and better law 
but greatest of all executives who will enforce the law. 

Let us have a dry and decent and respectable state even if 
here and there a Mayor can be found who refuses to abide by 
his oath. 

One of the greatest arguments for putting the state dry is 
right here in the fact that the whiskey business has so got- 
ten hold of the machinery of elections and of governments 
that laws effecting them can not be enforced until their ne- 
farious traffic has been destroyed by more laws. 

Put whiskey out and then the laws already enacted will be 
enforced, for it is only by the corrupting influence of the 
saloons in politics that evil men ever get a chance to occupy 
the offices of government. 

Let us have state-wide prohibition if for no other reason 
simply because it will make politics decent, and then put 
out of commission that muck-raking little sheet The Idea. — 
Selah ! 



ALFRED L. WALTON, Jr. FRANK L. HUTCHESON 

Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We Dye Seventy- One Colors 
nyiU Work Done As It Ought To Be 

Phone Mad. 6030 



2225 E. Clay St 




A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



32 NORTH LOMBARDY STREET 

RICHMOND. VA. 

estimat«s cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Pavlno. Halls, Vestibules, Basements, dc 



PHONE leti 



The editor has known Mr. Ewing personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, satisfactory dealing is unexcelled. 



For T{eliaUe 



FURNITURE. FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



Cash or Credit 



1418-1420 E. Main St. 




**THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboyr who get the greatest number of weekly subscribers and 
other prizes to those who se.l the most copies. 

The Contest vill begin with the 1st of December and boys destripp to com- 
pete should begin todaj to work for their weekly subscriptions. 

Boys should leave their names at the time of getting their papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their sales. 

Some time ago The Idea gave away^ a Watch and nine other valuable 

prices, and the winning boys did good work. One bov selling 

112 copies of The Idea of one ispue. There is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 




WEEKLY 



THE COPY 




IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV 



February 12, 1 910 



No. 7 



Ihe 




:erestiiig Matter 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 
.COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A. 
YODER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICH- 
MOND, VA, PRINTED AT WONDERWHERE, VA. 







Prizes for Boys—February-March Contest 

Ten prizes wil! be given to the ten boys sellinj^ the greatest 
number of IDEAS in December and January. Prizes were recently 
jriven out for the November contest. A handsome watch was the first 
prize, and first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine 
boys selling the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in 
the month, thus making, at 2 cents e2(^, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 

F^' "^r** r'^ii* I Bf" iiiii '•'V iiii^/M iii'*>r°-TTV''ttri**»-'-\iwrt'*frijtijy>i«Tif;™'>--'*^ M^^a^nwmif^f^^t^' 

JEWELER. J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

H 7^^ AND MAIN STS. W ' 

^ We huve in our Fall Stofk a d ars ^J^ 

f showing HpecJHl K^wi values in ^ ' 

i C!r:3r;CS, V/AOTSJ WLLRY JWFAVAPI, CUT G A:S, Qc. t ' 

We )DVile vour inspectioa > 



_ - ''^k- <3^ ^^^ <^ ^^^ "^^ ^^i- ^^ ^^ '^^ ^^ '^^^ ^^^ '^^ "^^ *^^ '"'^ "^^ "'>*' "^^ *^^ '^^ ^^^^ * 

1^ For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothin g Balm. ^ 

J For dry or falling Hair, Dandruff and diseased Scalp, use ^ 

^ Regal Hair Tonic. ^ 

y For troublesome Coughs use Phlorizine. \ 

^ . f 

k For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. ^ 

^ For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters r 

d 

\ and Iodide Sarsaparilla. \ 

^ ^ ( 

j if 

A For the Best Medicines Extant, Go to f 

I - A. H, ROBINS, - i 

# 200 E. MARSHALL ST, 1 

^ f 

S More than 50 Years Eeperience. ^ 



1. £JL JL^ EM^ ELaI^L 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV FEBRUARY 12, 1910 NO. 7 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va, 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, at Richmond, Virginia. 



News Paper-Lies. 

The Journal Fights for the Whiskey Peo- 
ple by Deceiving the Public* 



On the third page will be found an exact copy of an 
article on the first two columns of The Evening Journal of 
January 21st. 



In our opinion this is about as clear a case on its face of 
deliberate attempt to deceive the public as can easily be 
found. It looks like the whiskey interests can start any kind 
of a lie they want to and the whiskey soaked papers immed- 
iately take it up and use it to hurt the cause of those who 
oppose the evil. • 



2 THE IDEA 

Here are five absolutely false "statements made by The 
Journal based on what that paper knew was an absolutely 
false report and they knew the report itself was absolutely 
false for under the same headlines they printed the denial of 
the report by the one man in Virginia recognized as authority 
on such subjects, J. D. McAllister, Secretary of The Anti- 
Saloon League of Virginia who said, "No Truth in Report " 
*'A Canard, pure and simple." 

The first false statement is: — 

' 'Give Five Millions to fight De rnon Faim, "This was not true. 

The second false statement is: — 

"Rockefellers Money will be spent in Virginia." This 
statement was not only false irt fact but would also be false 
even if THE Report Had Been True, for the report only 
said that Part of the money was "to be used in starting 
newspapers In Various States, Among Them Being Vir- 
ginia, Florida and Washington." 

Read the live statements themsehes and then form your 
ow^n opinion as to The Journal's veracity. 

The fifth statement is false because the report did not say 
this fund will be expended in Virginia, Florida and Washing- 
ton, it said in various states Among Them Virginia, etc. 
That report might be true if Virginia, Florida and Washing- 
ton got one cent each, while The Journal said they'd get all 
of five million dollors. 

No Wonder a prominent Richmond Preacher, Rev. Asbury 
"Christian got up on the floor of the Anti-Saloon League Con- 
vention last month and in discussing the false reports of The 
Evening Journal concerning that convention, characterized 
that paper or the reporter as "utterly incapable of telling 
the truth," 

We are persuaded that the only reason that Virginia has 
permitted this most stupendous evil of the ages to fasten it- 
self on her so long is the fact that the papers 'have thrown 
their all powerful influSncd'in molding public opinion on the' 
side of so base an evil as to depend for its very existence on 
a campaign of lies. 

We wonder if The Journal can state ' ' ONLY Headline; 
Wrong.. ' ' 





< 



Prohibition Papers to Be 

Started to Help 

Cause 



SECRET LEAKED OUT 



This Big F-nna Will Be Expended 

in Virginia, Florida and Wash* 

ington, Is the Report — Yo\m^ 

Rockefeller WiU Not 

Talk 0^ Subject. 



(By Joui-Aal's Lease^ Jl'^ire.) 
NOKFOLk, VA., Jan. 21. — -John 
D. KcxiseleUer, a^^c-ordlng to re- 
liable reports, has secretly given 
.<^p,DOO,«00 to heJp fsght tiie sa- 
loon. Part of the money is to be 
nsed in establishing newspapers 
in various States, among them 
being-. Virginia, Florida' and Wasli- 
iiigton. 

John D., Jr., Refuses to Talk. 
(By Journal's Lieased Wire.) 

iS'EW YOBK. Jan. 21.-— John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr., refused to deny 
<Jr affirm the report from Norfolk, 
¥»., that his father had given $5,- 
006,000 - to aid prohibition news- 
papers. 

"'Xo Truth in Report."' — McAllsler. 

"A eaaard, pure and stmpi^".'* 

tVben the snbstAncc of the aU4Kfe 
vrirc ivas imiiarted to tfe^ llt^v. J. 
Tt. Mo Allster, field secretary of tSie 
'VC-ginla Auti-gnSoon "Ij^aKue, tbtA 
morning;,, he gave escpressiojs to the 
cIsaracteriKation noted al»pv«. 

Mr. Mc A lister *ria -Been at His ot-^ 
fice at the headqiiartei^ of tKe Anti- 
Salooa L.easu«, on East FraaMla 
'Eir^oi. 

"Ah far as we are eoncerned," 
lie pontiuued, "there is al>sol?itely 
nothing :in the report. The report 
Ijoi's '-my, evei- and amoti, but Is In- 
Va¥la6ly discredit**.' It wgwB las* 
srSvcn jjronjJncnce li the State of 
liliRols, Hjiit ■was snxbaeqMeutly re- 

■\Vhen Tie Jotimal mun pointed to 
that part of the dls^atcb w&icfe fc:a« 
reference to tfeo establishlEg ot 
netysitapers throiji^Uout the Sonth 
to tnrSiier the cav*® <*' temperasce, 
Mr. MeAHster rcciUed: "ll'g aU 
poppycoefe.'' 

"TIta report has been n»»cislf5irtwE- 
rd out of the vs-SpIe"' clotfc^ a»d, aa 
far as the VlrgtBijj Aiati-9aj©f>n 
Ijeaguc is concerned, there Is a^'o- 
lutoly ni3t the «S«g:hte.st -v^ffltiso ol 
truth to ft," was h' artlng sho^ 



(From THE JOURNAL Richmond.) 



THE IDEA 



'^ People Have the Right to De- 
cide '' Says Gov* Mann. 



The Journal of Tuesday the first, in big headh'nes announc- 
ing the Governor's inaugarating address begins:— "Gover- 
nor Mann Stands by Local Option," 

We read that long message over and could not find the 
faintest allusion to Local Option or the slightest shadow of a 
reason for that false statement at the head of that article. 

Governor Mann did however say this: — 

' 'I simply reiterate my steadfast opposition to the saloon, 
and my confidence in the people of Virginia, who have the 
right to settle this question as to them shall seem best." 

To our mind that means that the people have the right to 
vote on this question and everybody knows that Governor 
Mann will vote *'dry" and that local option is the whiskey 
people's platform, while **The Saloon Must Go" is the slogan 
of all who believe in fighting this mammoth eviL 



Justice John Tires of It* 



On Tuesday before last Justice John Crutchfield, on fining' 
sevei*al violators of the Sunday laws made the remark that 
he was going to break up this business as he was tired of so 
much talk about lack of law enforcement in Richmond, 
It is rather late in the day for him to be waking up. 
What do you think of a court that will wait for the public 
to get as *' mad as a hatter " before he will attempt to have 
the law respected^ 



thl: idea. 

Undertakers in the Council 



Did you ever stop to wonder why there are so many under- 
takers in our city council? Is it because it is possible for 
them to fix the prices at which one will have to pay for 
hacks at a funeral. Plans are now on to raise the rate. 

Its gotten rotten when the trusts make it come high to live 
and the undertakers make it come higher to die. 



The Council is contemplating giving some $30,000 to im- 
prove Bryan Park way out north in the country somewhere 
by building roads and walks and other frills for the delecta- 
tion of the idle rich while poor tax-payers all over town 
can't get either sidewalks or street paving in front of their 
doors, tho they have paid h iri earnad taxas for many many 
years. 



February 5, 1910 
Mr. A. A. Yoder, 

Richmond, Va. 
Dear Sir: — 

I notice this morning from The Virginian that you 
will enter suit against The Times-Dispatch, and I am very 
glad indeed to hear it. 

I happened to hear your examination regarding the 
erasing the name of Manning, and the Judge promptly ruled 
the question out I remember very distinctly, and I trust you 
will be able to show them up in the proper light if there is 
any way to do it, and also sincerely trust that you will be 
able to make them pay damages. 

I herewith enclose you check for $25.00 which I sub- 
scribed sometime ago to your defense fund, and it gives me 
great pleasure to do so. 

With best wishes, I am. 

Yours truly, 

R. S. BARBOUR. 



6 THE IDEA, 

See next weeks IDEA for a complete reputation of the con- 
terhptible insinuations against the editor of The Idea. We 
can promise it will be worth reading. It is to late to get in 
this issue. 







The Times-Dispatch 




The Times-Dispatch of February 4> 1910 in reporting the 
proceedings in the civil libel case went out of their way to 
make m large bold headlines on the front page of that paper 
three insulting and absolutely false statements about the 
editor. 

There were eight large headlines of these falsehoods and 
yet when we called their attention to it by announcing our 
purpoee to sue them th-at paper came out the next day and 
stated "only headline wrong'* which is another false state- 
ment for there were eight headlines wrong besides all 
through the body of the article were malicious falsehoods 
against the editor. 

The very first statement in the body of the article is false- 
namely, that the editor admitted that his charges were 
based on hearsay and that he had no evidence to support 
them. 

Thats a lie. We stated that all our charges, or opinions, 
were based on grand jury reports etc, etc, and not hearsay 
and our evidence which completely proved them was actually 
introduced in court and went to the jury. 

Every statement in the alleged libel was proven to be ab- 
solutely true. 



THE IDEA. 7 

To snow their malice toward this paper The Tirfies-Dis- 
patdi the next morning went a step further and stated that 
the question asked the day before to which that paper said I 
had anjiwered yes, v/as asked again and objected to by coun- 
sel before the editor replied, when they knew that before it 
was objected to the editor answered "No, emphatically No." 
Then that paper continued its libelous attack by continually 
mserting in its supposed account gross falsehoods. 

This has led us to d-etermine to sue The Times-Dispatch. 

Our letters elsewhere in this number will show our purpose 
in that matter. 

Count that day last whose low-descending sun 

Views from thy hand no worthy action done. —Selected, 




Reputation. 



Who said Satmders had a g'ood reputation ? 

Five or six politicions who seemed to be afraid they'd loose 
'cheir jobs if they did not. 

It was amusing to see them squirrfi when Mr. Merideth 
:asked them the pointed question "Do you mean to tell the 
jury that Mr, Saunders' general reputation in the community 
is not that of an evil influence ?" 

They gave such answers as this, — "Well Mr. Meredith I 
don't know all the people in Richmond." "He has the re- 
pute ti on of being smcoth " etc. 



THE IDEA 



Some Plain Talk. 



The Editors Private Affairs. 



Since the name of Mr. J. M. Atkinson has been dragged 
into the libel suit brought by Clyde W. Saunders, and since 
the news papers, by their imperfect and, in the case of the 
Times-Dispatch, absolutely false and misleading articles, 
have damaged this paper and its editor I feel it a duty I owe 
to the public and myself and all concerned to make the fol- 
lowing statement of facts, altho the matter is purely a private 
and personal one. 

The editor of The Idea met Mr. J. M. Atkinson in Lynch- 
burg last Spring for the first time. Mr. Atkinson suggested 
that since Richmond was a larger place and was much more 
corrupt than Lynchburg politically The Idea could be a self 
sustaining paper there and accomplish more good, 

I told him that I had been considering going to Richmond 
for that purpose expecting to keep up the Lynchburg fight 
also from Richmond but w^as unable at that time to make 
the change. 

He stated that he would lend me the money to make the 
change in location if I would go to Richmond and fight along 
the same lines that I was fighting in Lynchburg, 

I said that I would not do so because I realized that my 
ideas were radical and I had refused several offers to edit 
news papers in other places simply because I did not want to 
feel that any one had the remotest personal interest in my 
paper for fear it would handicap me in my work. I told him" 
that I would rather edit a little 2x4 paper all my ov/n thaw 



THE IDEA. 9 

'edit tV.e Ibiggest paper in the country if anyone else had any- 
thing to do with deciding the policy of the paper. 

He staled that he would agree that if I should accept his 
loan it would be with the emphatic understanding that he 
should have absolutely nothing to do with the policy of the 
paper and that to keep me from feeling handicapped by the 
loan I should not even promise to pay at any certain date, 
but only as soon as the success of the paper would permit it. 

After considering the situation and talking to former 
Richmonders in Lynchburg I decided to come to Richmond 
•and as soon as convenient Idid so. 

In justice to Mr. Atkinson and myself let me say that he 
has lived up to his agreement and I have lived up to mine 
altho his ideas and mine are at radical variance on many 
questions. 

Now as to the malicious imputations conveyed in the ques- 
tions, asked by the council for Mr. Saunders in the suit, 
■concerning the erasing of Mi'. Manning's name from The 
Idea of Ausust 14. 

The Facts Are These* 

On Friday August 13th, the same being the day on which 
the papers were to be sold in the afternoon, Mr, J. M. Atkin- 
son came by the office in the morning and asked to see a 
copy. This 1 let him do. 

He read it over, made some comments, and then coming to 
the name of Mr. "Manning," "Marked for Slaughter" he 
asked what 1 had against Manning to have him marked for 
slaughter. 1 told him that Mr. Manning was caught in' the 
gambling house at the time m.any were arrested shortly be- 
fore at the races at the fair gronnds and that 1 had heard 
that Mr, Manning had furnished plumbing to the city while 
he was police commissioner. He stated he heard that it w^as 
not Mr. Manning but instead another one of the police com- 
missioners who was caught at the .gambling den when the 
raid was made. 



10 the: idea. 

On hearing this I said that 1 would hate to iump a fellow ofl erro- 
neous information and that 1 had better cut that out and if 1 found that 
he deserved it I certainly would go for him 'later. 

So I put all my force to work erasing Mr. Manning's name and even 
got two guests in the hotel (1 was stopping at the Park Hotel then,) 
to help in the work. 

As to the base insinuation that I did this an the promise that Mr. 
Manning would withdraw any objections he might have to the Park 
Hotel Lisence I denounce it as an infamous slander for I did not know 
that Mr. Manning had anything to do with granting bar lisences and I 
will state further that I will look into this matter and see how Mr. 
Manning can have anything to do with granting such lisences and if he 
used his political power to influence the findings of Judge Witt who 
alone is supposed to grant whiskey lisences. then indeed there is some- 
thing rotten in politics in Richmond and 1 for one am going to learn 
something about it. 

They are indeed letting the cat out of the bag by admitting in their 
excessive ardor that such men as Manning have any weight with 
Judge Witt. 

Suffice it to say for the present that ! did not know that Manning 
had any such power and that the erasing of Manning's name was be- 
cause 1 believed I was about to scorn the man on false information. 
Let me state further that 1 soon found other grounds for marking 
Manning for slaughter and also found that certain officials were indeed 
caught by the officers of the law in the gambling den when it was 
pulled and that they got off while the scape goats who were arrested 
paid the fines in the County Court, and the papers made no mention 
of the mames of the men higher up, who were most guilty and who^ 
it is rumored, paid the fines of the fellows placed under arrest. 

This with other equally bad information about certain men higheit 
up is my reason for exposing them just as soon as the facts were es- 
tablished. 

Furthermore: altho I learned from others, (for Mr. Atkins: n verj 
wisely refrained from talking his affairs to me.) that Mr. J. M. Atkinson 
was not a member of the Liquor Dealers Association and was there- 
fore opposed by the organized bar-keepers of the town and altho I 
learned that a."? soon as be was deprived of his bar lisence that Usencer 



THE IDEA 11 

was obtained for " Dutch Leaman to whom as political leiitenant The 
Idea has paid its respects, still I decided not to fight this dirty dea' 
against Mr. Atkinson but kept away from it altho at times 1 feared I 
was not doing my duty in refusing to expose it simply because expos- 
ing it might hurt me by having base motives attributed to me. 1 pub- 
lish these facts now simply to show that instead of The Idea's being 
used to fight Atkinson's battles it has not fought injustice to him as 
much as it has fought injustice to others. 



The Saunder's Suit. 



The Jury Not to Blame. 



After seven days of trial in the libel suit Judge Ingram 
on Tuesday read instructions to the jury which compelled 
them, even if all though the verdict should be "not guilty" 
to render a verdict for the plaintiff Mr. Saunders. Accord- 
ing to their oath they had to render a verdict according to 
the instructions even if they believed we had proven every 
statement made and the instructions were wrong. If one 
jurior stood out for $20,000 damages, the amount asked for, 
and all the other six stood for no damages the compromise 
verdict would have been $20,000 divided by seven making 
$2,859. It therefore appears that the jury was for the de- 
fendent but had to give the mominal damage because some 
one at least thought Saunders ought toha\e something. 

The Supreme Court will decide this question as to in- 
structions. 



12 THE IDEA. 

From "The 




• • « 



>f 



ays 



Sue. 



Mr. Yoder sends the following; communication, to The 
Richmond Virginian; 
Editor of The Richmond Virginian, 

Sir:— Immediately on the conclusion of the present court 
proceeding's, I will take steps towards entering suit against 
the publishers of the Times-Dispatch for (yne of the many 
false statements contained in that pai>er of this morning:. 

This is the clearest cut libel I have ever noticed. The 
statement referred to is "Yoder admits in Saunders' libel 
suit that Manning's na.me was stricken out on promise to aid 
Atkinson's petition." 

The court records will show that this was one among many 
questions which the court refused topennit to be answered^ 
on the ground that they had no bearing on this suit, although 
the editor was prepared and anxious to answer no,, and thus 
deny all the malicious imputations. 

1. The statement is untrue. 

2. The slander is against a private citizen. 

3. It is made with actual malice in fact. 

4. It is a report of a trial. 

ADOK A. YODER. 



Print it Right* 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure. 



THE IDEA, n 




•-1<l»-»^-<B» 



If al5 the returns are in and counted The Idea will give 
^Way rjiext Saturday the prkes to those carriers who have 
Isold the most copies for December and January. 

Last week began the Prize Contest for Fcbraar:v- an4 
March, 

The boy selling the largest nmriber of Ideas in these two 
months, will receive a handsome watch and and the next 
nine 'boys will receive nine other useful and valuable prizes. 

Get busy toda^y for the contest. 

And don't hang around on Broad and Main streets. The 
boys who sell the most are those who work up a line of 
customers in the otRces and stores and, above all. in the 
homes of the .people. 



Practic 




We are glad to note the fact that the honored pastor of 
-i\llee Avenue Christian Church the Eev. H. P. Atkins has 
felt it his right and duty to look into the gross lack of en- 
forcement of our Sunday Laws to the extent of c^Jli.ng a 
:policeman's attention to their violation, and then when given 
a non sensicai reply, following it up in the courts. This man 
■Roccioli who ws^ recently also reported by Mr^ Le»iman is an 
old offeaider. He was arrested for violating laws governing 
'trade some two years ago but under Justice John he has 
found that it pays to ignore the law, for not only have the 
(Police iDeen instructed not to see such \iolations but also 
Justice Crutchfield does not use the weapon of the law given 
him to break up such (;ffences against the acts of the legis- 
l^ature. 



H- THE IDE.A 




Throw Up Dust to B& 



A 



cioua cue issue. 



To the Headers of THE IDEA:- 

This letfer is not written far the purpose of trji'ng^ to win 
over any of the opponents of this publication. They have 
seemed to be looking for a chance to throw up their hands in 
holy ho-rror and say "I told you so." It might be shown as 
clear as day therefore that there was absolutely nothing 
ques-tionable in the relations between A. A. Yoder and, J. M, 
Atkinson and they would be of the same c^inion as form- 
erly. 

This lettei' is written to the friends of this cause as a sim- 
ple statement of the facts in the cas-e by a friend who is 
familiar with them with the perfect assurance that such 
statement is all that Mr. Yoder's friends desire. 

When I first became acquainted with Mr, Yoder and com- 
menced to take an active stand in sympathy with his work L 
had heard nothing of his relations with J, M, Atkinson. But 
he voluntarily told me the circumstances of those relations 
with perfect frankness. He asked my advice about making- 
such frank statement to the public in THE IDEA, stating- 
that he had absolutely nothing to conceal from the public, 
that he had always made it his habit and had found it best tO' 
take the public into his entire eoiifidence. With other 
friends I advised him that such statement was not necessary^ 
that it was simply a private business affair in v\'hich the pub- 



'THE IDT- A V> 

lie was not interested and did not expect him to reveal. 
Whether this was wise advice or not docs not concern the 
question. 

The whole work of this paper has been cTitirely open and 
above boiird and there is nothing in its policy to justify ac- 
cusation of impure motives which the enemies of the publi- 
cation have been so eager to bring. 

Many people have been found ready to condemn A. A. 
Yoder and his publication. Many have been found willing 
to defend their friends who have been criticised, but 

I HAVE YET TO FIND THE FIRST ONE WHO WILL 
COME OUT INTO THE OPEN AND ADVOCATE 
AS RIGHT THE PRINCIPLES AND CON- 
DITIONS WHICH THIS PAPER HAS 
BEEN FIGHTING. 

On tlie part of tbe friends of this paper let me say that we 
shall persistently refuse to allow the throwing up of dust to 
becloud the main issue befoi'e the public eye. That issue is 
clearly dravs/n between 

HONESTY and DISHONESTY 

MORALITY and IMMORALITY 

RIGHT and WRONG 

LAW ENFORCEMENT and CONTEMPT FOR LAW. 

The helplessness and innocency of the writer's own un- 
'conscious babe and the beauty and purity of the boyhood 
and girlhood of the whole community cry out to the fathers 
."and mothers for the cleansing of the moral atmosphere which 
these little ones must breathe in the coming years. It is 
not a question v/ith me as to whether this thing CAN be 
•done, but 

SHOULD IT BE DONE ? 
and where is the man who will come out like a man and say 
that it -shouldn't be done ? 

TILDEN SCHERER. 



16 TEE IDEA. 

Unfair to Tax-Payers* 

High Sctiool Bounded hfr 

Four Muddy Roads. 



ft IS hoped that, the Finance Coimni'ttee will fea^e enough 
ixmsideration f(i>r the eitizens who have been paying' taxes 
f&r years to ©rder sorrxe paving on Clay and Marsiiall streets 
m the neighborhood of The New High SchooL 

This is one of the eldest residence sections of the city and 
yet it has beefii neglected for generations. 

The coL3ncil does not hesitate to- imp-rove the ?3ew West-end 
Sho this property has paid almost no taxes intO' the treasury 
and yet here we have a fine New High School in the very 
heart of the city and enly one block from Broad street and'. 
not tw© Mocks from Capitol sqiiare bounded on all four sides 
by m^iddy roads which are not only a nuisance for the riding; 
public but which, besmirch the crossings and sidewalks sc 
much that it is a distinct nuisance to pedestrians who use; 
this section so mucliv 

Children also- going to- this High School have had to- wade^ 
in mud nearly every day this winter^ ail because we have a. 
council which v/ill waste money in the West-end and refuse 
to spend anything' in the old section of the city. 

We wcaider v/hat travelers to Richmond think when they 
are shown John. MarshalFs old Hom,e flanked by muddy road 
ways tho situated as it is, 

A Real Estate Man, H R, Pollard Jr, is head of the Fin- 
ance Committee. 




ALFRED L. WALTON, Jr. 



tJi 



FRANK L. HUTCHESON 



Jefferson Chemical Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 



No Cleaner Can Clean 
A Cleaner Suit Cleaner 
Than A Clean Cleaner 
Can Clean 



We Dye Seventy- One Colors 
^yin Work Done As It Ought To Be 

Phone Mad. 6030 



O 2225 B. Clay St 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



<L^^^^(g 



^■^f^^ 



1^ O fITH 1.0WI B A11DY ST Rt ET 

nkGHMOfiD,y%. 

Cstimatas cheerful^ flWen on Sidewalk 
fvvins. Halls, VvsUbulos, BavemerHs, Ac* 



^WOTl« 1Bl!t 



Tha Bailor has Vnown Wr. 1?wtno piersonaTty Tot ihc Tasi twenty year*, 
land he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class worfc 
•ltd straii^ forward, satisfactortr d&alln^i is uncxceMcd. ■■ -rv , g.r„. -. 



For 1{eliable 



FURNITURE, FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



Ca'sh or Credit 



1418-1420 E. Main St. 




'THE IDEA" WILL GIVU PRIZES TO 

NcwsLoy who (jrt the grearest numbtrof weekly subscribers and 
otnei prizes to those who se.l the most cpi)ies. 

The Contest vill begin with the let of December and boys desiring to com- 
pete should bej^iH today to work for their weekly subscriptions. 

Boys should leave their names at the time of getting their papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their saies. 

Some time ago The Idea gave away a Watch and nine other valuable 
' prires, and the winning boys did good work», One boy selitng 
1 12 copies of The Idea of one issue. .There is guod 
money in it for the boys besides the prizes. ;, 




5c 



WEEKLY yjfli THE CX)PY 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV February 19, 1 9 JO No. 8 



The Trial of the Editor 



^ 'jt ^ 



His Word to the Public. 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. By ADON A 
YODER. EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, 904 CAPITOL ST., RICH- 
MOND, VA. PRINTED AT WONDERWHERE. VA. 



r'' 






We wish to announce to our manj^ customers that we are now Z 

^ loe;ited in our store at No. 6:8 Erst rlrin St.. ?nd are fully tl 

S cqiJpped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES § 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait'' for 30c. per dozen. We I 

I . also GRIND RAZORS, ■SCI&SORS, CARVING AND FOCKET g 

I KNIVES, and any kind Ol a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely | 

g guarantee our work to piease you in every respect. Give us a § 

i trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- | 

g ports in this line of v/ork. g 



Razors Horned And Set 1 5c. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



Tho Pdltor has known Mr. Ewlng personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that ^\s reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, satisfactory dealing is unexcelled. 



O 



THE ''SHARP-0" CO. f 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. I 

Q!>«Ba>Ci>Ci^S>a!>CHB>C0aESS>0;3!>^^<3E>{aBB>QD^BaDCi><aB>C:>(^B><33;>a^S><:DaBD<3E>@!B>QDaBE>ca 

A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR ^ 

•a NORTH LOMBARDY STREET PHOfMBIBtl 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Cstimatas cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving. Halls, Vestibules, Basements, dc 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV FEBRUARY and 26, 1910 Nos. 8 and 9 



FIVE Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



The Lynch- 
burg Matter. 

r. Glass Contradicts Himself. 



(1). Yoder on stand Saturday "He withdrew that suit 
just as soon as he saw I was going to keep on and prove it. " 

(2). Glass' Paper Sunday, "Yoder himself under date 
of July 17th, 1906, in a letter to Mr. Glass confessed the 
falsity of his charge." 

(Glass explained no further.) 

(3). Glass' letter of 20th July, 1906, "The charge you 
retract is not by any means the only or most objectionable. 



THE IDEA 

In confining your retraxit to only one you reiterate the 
rest." 

(4). Yoder's letter to Glass, July 24th, "I did not make 
any other statements the untruth of which I am aware of. . 
I of course have nothing further to retract." 

(5) . Glass, on the stand Monday, ' 1 regarded the state- 
ments Yoder retracted as the most serious." 

(Now read No. 3) . 

(6). Yoder, later, "There were (5) five separate edito- 
rials concerning Mr. Glass. Only one was retracted. The 
mo t offensive ones, which he said were both false and most 
offensive, were never retracted. because they were true." 

Mr. Glass wrote he would publish my letter if I did re- 
tract. He stated on the stand that he never published my 
letters. The Idea published all three of them in August, 
1908. If Mr. Glass had regarded my letter as an apology for 
the alleged libel he would have pifblished them, as he said 
he would." 

Mr. Scherer in his letter to me of last Sunday, said, "Mr. 
Glass read me your letter of July 17th, in which you made 
the most unqualified retraction of an apology for the charges 
published." And gave this as a reason for doubting me, 

I will simply state that I never have, as these three letters 
show, made such retraction of and apology for the charges 
published. Mr. Scherer was simply misled by Mr. Glass' 
statement which did not give all the facts. Everything the 
Editor said has been confirmed by further evidence and 
events. 

A letter from Lynchburg says that a member of the J. P. 
Bell Co. had just substantiated my testimony and added: 
"Glass dropped the matter because you had him on the 
hip." 



"There is no happiness, there is no liberty, there is no enjoymenr of 
life, unless a man can say, when he rises in the morning, I shall be 
subject to the decision of no unwise juds^e toda) '" — DANILL. WEB- 
STER. 



thp: id fa 



Public Stenographic Report* 

( Brought from last page. ) 



of which 1 a;Ti avvire of. I OF COURSE HAVE NOFHING FURTHER 
TO RETRACT. 

I do want to say, however, that the .Tiagazine was written with no 
such animus as you seem to atttibute to me, and that personally 1 have 
never had any illfeeling towards you, and 1 think that if you will take 
time to re-read it you will see that the motive which is apparent 
throughout the whole number is anything but VICE. 

I fee! that tha people have a grievance and the "'Idea" was on the 
dife.isive of tham of whom 1 am oris, rather than on the offensive to 
you, or anybody else. 

Respectfully, 

A. A. YODER. 

Q. That ended the correspondence, did it not.f* 

A. That ended the correspondence with Yoder. • 

Q. In which he declined to retract any charge he made.? 

A. Well, in which he said he had not made any. 

Q. 1 do not see that he said that. 

A. 1 do. 

Q. Well, that is your conclusion. He had not retracted the offen- 
sive.? you said. 

A. 1 don't think he had — not the offensive. A charge can be very 
offensive without being in law libelous: but his other charges 
were so absolutely false, and known to be by the community that 
I did not care to go into any argument or correspondence about 
them. 1 have never taken any notice of Mr. Yoder. at all. 

Q. You wrote this letter to Mr. Yoder.? 

A. 1 did. 



THE IDEA 

Q. in which you say to him that "it is not by any means the most 
objectionable misrepresentation concerning me, contained in the 
pamphlet.,' 

A. Exactly. 

Q. Now, Mr. Glass, is not this the charge as to which he retracted 
his allegation, to the extent of saying that he was mistaken, in 
supposing you were a member of the Council: 
(Here reads from 'The idea' the article beginning 'The Hon, 
• Carter Glass, while on a trip to Richmond. &c---and ending" 
"owned all the newspaper facilities of the town.) 
Now did he retract any statement in there except the fact that 
you were a member of the Council, and it turned out that you 
were a clerk of the Council.'' 

A. Well, if you want my opinion of it — 

Q. Did he make any retraction except that one? 

A. That, in Mr. Yoder's admission, was the kernel of the offence- 
He states here in his letter "Had 1 realized when 1 wrote -that 
you were not a voting member of the Council, and were in no 
way responsible for the acts of that body, 1 of course would not 
have written" that article." 

Q. Yes, sir, his idea being that you were a member of the Council; 
but that being clerk of the Council that would not justify his 
comment. 

A. He so states. 

Q. 1 say did he apologize for a smgle fact.' Did he retract a single 
fact that he alleged, except that you were a member of the 
Council.'' 

A. He retracted the offensive suggestion contained in the article. 



Print it Right* 

Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



THI£ IDEA 



Public Stenographic Report 



Of the Evidence in Reference to Glass* 



YODER ON THE STAND— SATURDAY. 

Q. Is it not a fact that your attacks upon Mr. Carter Glass, 
editor of a paper there, were so personal and so false 
that he instituted a suit for damages against the pub- 
lisher of your paper, the Bell Book and Stationery Com- 
pany? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. It is not true? 

A. No, sir, I can tell you Vv^hat is true though, 

MR. SMITH: You have answered my question. 

WITNESS: I am not questioning the words, at all. The 
words you read I think are absolutely correct, there is 
no question about that. If you would read the whole 
article, you could see what I mean much better. 

MR. SMITH: I was talking about the Bell Book & Station- 
ery Company case, you understand. 

WITNESS: Now what is your question? 

MR. SMITH: I will re frame my question then and try to 
suit you. 

(Counsel for defendant objected to the question being 
reframed, and insisted that the witness be allowed to 
finish his answer to the question as originally put.) 
THE COURT: I allow the witness to give a full answer to 
the question that has been asked, but he must confine 
himself to the question; I don't want him to go back to 
any former question. 
(The Stenographer here read over the previous question. ) 



THE IDEA 

A. The truth is that I criticized Mr. Glass \ery severely for 
his action as a public official, and he entered suit imme- 
diately against the Bell Book & Stationery Company. He 
withdrew that suit just as soon as he saw I was going to 
keep on and prove it. 

Q. Is that your answer? 

A. That is my answer. 

Q. Is it not a fact that he dropped the suit on condition that 
a public apology was made to the people of Lynchburg, 
and the Bell Book Company paid all the expenses of that 
suit? 

A. No, sir; I am quite sure that all of that is false. 

Q. You say that the Bell Book Company made nO apology 
to Mr. Glass? 

A. I do not know of any such apology. 



NA/EEKLY PRICE LIST 

R. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-j C. N. PARKER 

OET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond. Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag - , < 44 Winner Condensed Milkj per can . H 

Obelisk. Flour, per bag . ... 44 3Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 2>* 

Dunlop Flour, per bag . , . 44 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, per bag ... 44 Good Mackerel ....,,. O'y 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 23 Smoked Shoulder, per !b. . . . 14 

Good Lard, per lb . 15 cDc-r-iAT 

Round Beef Steak, per lb. . . . 15 SFtClAL 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not mentioned are in line with our low prices. 



THIC ID FA 

Q. And you state then positively that the Bell Book Con^i ary 
made no apology, and that they did not pay Mr. Csii* r 
Glass' expenses in connection with his bringing the suic ! 

A. I don't know. You ask me to state positively — I will 
tell you what the Bell Company told me. 

MR. SMITH: I will let you tell that if you will let me tell 
what the Bell people told me. 

MR. MEREDITH: No, sir, I don't care about that. 

WITNESS: I can state what is a well known fact about it. 
I can state what is known in Lynchburg about it. 

MR. SMITH: Well, if you state what is known in Lynch- 
burg, and will allow us to state what is known there, 
too— 

THE COURT: I don't think any such statements as that 
are necessary, 

Q. It is a fact though that a suit was brought by Mr. 
" Carter Glass against the publishers of "The Idea" is it? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And it is a fact that that suit never came to trial, but 
was dismissed? 

A. Yes, sir. 

■Q. And you say that it was dismissed because Mr. Caiter 
Glass was afraid to face the issue and found out you 
were going to prove the truth of your assertions, and 
from cowardice withdrew it? 

A. I think that is true — but I did not say that. 

Q. That is very characteristic of Mr. Glass, is it not —cow- 
ardice? 

THE COURT: I rule that question out. 

BY MR. SMITH: 

Q. Mr. Yoder, on last Saturday, during the progress of this trial, 
stated that it was true that you had brought a suit against the j, 
P. Bell Book Company — a civil suit for damages on account of 
this publication in "The Idea", and that it was true that you had 
<lismissed it, but that it was not true, so far as he knew .that the J. P. 
BeJIJ Company or anybody else had even offered any apologies or 



THE IDEA 

retr.irtion which led to its withdrawal; but on the contrary, you 
dis nissed it because you were afraid rf the case Cime to a trial, he, 
Yoder, would prove the charo;es against you. ( Notice the falsi- 
ties in this quebJtion.-— Ed.) 

MR. MEREDll'H : He did not say "or anybody else"; he said not 
by the Bell Book Company or himself. 

NOTE. I said 1 did not know of such by Bell and that 1 had not re- 
tracted the charges m alleged libel.— -The Editor. 

MR. SiVIITH: Very well — 1 will put it that way then. Now state 
vrhether that is true. 

A. It is absolutely untrue. 

Q. Will you state whether the J. P. Bell Company did make an 
apology and withdrawal, and whether A. A. Yoder. himself, 
made an apology .? 

MR. MEREDITH : Are they in writing. 

WITNESS : 1 have them here 

MR. SMITH : I will ask you to read them. 

A. I will stare, with the permission of the Court, that after waiting 
for three days after the publication of this pam;>hlet — 

Q. What was the date of that pamphlet c 

A., Oh, somstime about— I would say about the 12th of 
July, 1905. After waiting about three days after the 
circulation of the pamphlet, containing what I claimed 
to be a libel, I authorized my attorneys to institute suit 
against the J. P. Bell Company, as the only respon- 
sible pei-sons connected with ths circalation of thit 
pamphlet. Thereupon, on July 17th — 

Q. That was after the suit had been broug'ht? 

A. That was after the suit had been instituted, I received 
this letter, signed Adon A. Yoder: 

(Here reads letter dated Lynchburg, Va., July 17th 1906,. 
from Adon A. Yoder to Carter Glass, Editor the News. ) 

Q. Now will you read the letter of the Bell Book Company? 

A. Later on, on August 23rd, 1906, the J. P. Bell Company 
wrote me this letter: 



THE IDEA 

'<Here reads letter referred to.) 

Now shall I read my reply to that letter? 
MR, SMITH: Just as these gentlemen say. Do you object 

Mr Meredith? 
-MR. MEREDITH: Yes, sir, I object 



CROSS-EXAMINATION, 
By MR. MEREDITH: 

Q. Is there anything else connected with this matter that would 
throw light on Mr. Yoder's statement on the stand, as to whether 
he had retracted his statement — or have you given all the infor- 
mation in your possession? 

A. Well there are a good many things that throw light on the sub- 
ject. 

'Q. Is it not a fact that there were other charges against you, and ihat 
he did not apojogixe for them ? 

A, It is a fact that there were other comments in the pamphlet, but it 
is also a fact that that particular charge was made the basis of the 
libel suit. 

Q. Anything else? 

A. No, sir; there were other defamatory comments ni the pamphlet. 

Q. They were all put in the declaration, were they not? 

A. I dont know that a declaration was ever drawn. 

Q. The basis of it was this article? 

A. The basis of it was that article, yes — that charge of a corrupt 
transaction. 

Q. Let lis see if you regarded that as the most serious charge ; do 300 

say that was the most serious charge against you? 
A. I think so. 

'Q. Let us see if you did not say to the contrary. Have .you your 

letter to Mr. Yoder? 
A. I have it here. 
Q, Was it published? 



THE IDEA 

A. In Yoder's pamphlet, yes. 

Q. Was not the letter you have just read from Mr. Yoder 
to yourself published? 

A. In Yoder's pamphlet, yes. 

Q. There was no secrecy about that, was therer 

A. Not at all. 

Q. Didn't he publish your repty-f* 

A. Yes. 1 have it here. 

Q. Just rollow it as 1 read, and see if I am correct. 

A. Very well. 

Q. You have not been asked about the letter I am now ^oingtoread 
to you — by the Commonwealth's Attorney? 

A. No. 

MR. SMITH: Did 1 know anything about it? 

WITNESS: No. 

Q. Then did you only give partial information to the Common- 
wealth Attorney? 

A. I got here only ten minutes before Court opened. 

Q. Did you not read to Mr. Scherer on yesterday only a part of the 
letter you read here this morning? 

A. Yes, and 1 told him so. 1 did not read it all because I supposed 
he had the long distance 'phone at a cost to himself. 

Q. So what you read to Mr. Scherer is only a part of the letter you 
read this morning? 

A. That is right, and I so told him. 

Q. Did you read any other letter? 

A. Yes, Bell's letter in full. 

Q. Did >ou read your reply to Yoder's letter? 

A' I did not. 

MR. MEREDITH: Now let us see what that said. 
(Mr. Meredith reads.) 
(Small capitals are ours. — Editor.) 



THE IDEA 

Lynrhburi,', Va., July 20ih. 1^06. 
Mr-. A. A. Yoder. 

Lyvnchburfj, Va. 

Sir: — 

1 have your letter of the 17th inst., retfactmg, regretting and ad -Hit- 
ting the injustice of certain of the offensive personal references to me 
made in an anonymous pamphlet issued from the presses of the J, P. 
Bell Company of this city, the authorship of which pamphlet you 
acknowledge^ 

1 note your request that 1 publish in the *Ne\vs" your withdrawal 
of the charge made in the pamphlet concerning a business transaction 
in which 1 was engaged 8 years ago, and your attempted exoneration 
of the J. P. Bell Co. from culpability in the premises. 

Responding specially to these points in your letter. 1 have to say that 
THE CHARGE YOU RETRACT and for which you offer to apolo"- 
gize publicly IS NOT BY ANY MEANS THE ONLY OR MOST OB- 
JECTIONABLE MISREPRESENTATION concerning ine contained 
in the pamphlet. You have charged, in terms, that 1 am "controlled 
by the Lynchburg Traction and Light Co." and, have quite as br.)ad!y 
intimated that there is between that Company and my newspaper a 
despicable and CORRUPT COLLUSION to suppress facts and with- 
hold proper comments upon the conduct of this Company. 

These charges are as untrue as the one you re- 
tract, and a casual inspection of the recent files of the NEWS or 
■the most incidental inquiry would have sulliced to show the vice of 
your suggestion. 

In your letter you profess willingness to make amends for whatever 
^'errors or mistakes" you have made, as well as to make pul^lic ac- 
knowledgement thereof. If you are as anxious as you profess to be to 
<lo me no unjustice and to right any wrong already done me, your re- 
traction should embrace unqualifiedly all the misrepresentation.s of fact 



THE IDEA 

•concerning me contained in the pamphlet; OTHERWISE YOU CAN 
SCARCELY EXPECT me to PUBLISH YOUR LETTER, because BY 
CONFINING YOUR RETRAXIT specifically TO ONLY ONE of a 
series of misstatements of fact, YOU RE\ TERATE THE REST. 

1 do not feel concerned about your criticisms of the course of the 
NEWS so far as such criticisms are not based upon misstatements of 
fact involving my personal character, and such a retraction as I have 
indicated will, if made, be published in THE NEWS. 

As to the J. P. Bell Company, it has expressed no regret and offered 
no apolagy for its part in publishing these defamatory charges; but as 
1 am informed asserts its right to print whatever is paid to print about 
anybody, no matter how seriously such publication may afi'ect the rep- 
utation of a citizen. In view of this remarkable attitude, 1 have taken 
the only course as to this Company which seems to promise me re- 
dress and vindication. 

Respectfully 

(Signed) CARTER GLASS 

MR. MEREDITH: To that, Mr. Yoder replied as follows, d-d he 

not, sir 
WITNESS: 1 don't know that have that letter here. 1 have seen 
it though, and 1 will verify the correctness of it. Go ahead. 
(Mr. Meredith reads letter referred to.) 

Lynchburg. Va.. iuly 24th, 190 
Mr. Carter Glass, 

City, 
Dear Sir: — 

In reply to your letter of the 20th, the tone of which to say the least 
is unworthy of the occasion. 1 have to say that inasmuch as the 
"idea" did not charge that YOU were controlled by the Lynchburg 
Traction and Light Co., nor make any other statements the untruth 

( Carried to page three.) 



Prizes for Boys—February-March Contest 

'I"en prizes will be ^iven to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for the 
November contest. A handsome watch was the first prize, and first quahty 
stag hindle pocket knives were gixen to the nine boys selling the nine next 
hirgest numbers. One l)oy sold 226 copies in the month, thus making, at 
2 cents each, .$4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pa\s the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 

f JEWELER J.S.JAMES OPTICIAN 

7h AND .\JAIN STS. # 






Wf h ve m "ur f hII Stoi'k a d are 
•~li.>\vi|!^ -pefi.il If' od valufa m 

mm^, WAicHvS, J wn, s;lv[rwar[, cut c: ass, Etc 

We iDMte V' ur insp»c'iion 



aiWr^h rtmiam^r^tikt 



t^ For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. ^ 

\ For dry or falling Hair, Dandruff and deseased Scalp, use \ 

A Regal Hair Tonic. a 

i) For troublesom. Cough use Phlorizine. I* 

d ) 

A For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. a 

^ For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters r 

d ^ 

\ and Iodide Sarsaparilla, a 

i ::zm — __ i 

A For the Best Medicines extant, Go to /) 

\ - A. a ROBINS, - i 

{ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. i 

i) More than 50 Years Experiance. ( 



For 'Reliable 



FURNITURf. FLOOR 
COVERINGS, STOVES 
AND HEATERS :-: :-: 



CALL ON: 



JONES BROS. & CO. Inc. 



( <%h or Credit 



1418-1-120 K. Main St. 




P R I Z 




» 



"THE IDEA" WILL GIVE PRIZKS TO 

NcwsLoy who tiet the greatest number of weekly »iub>t fibers and 
otnei prizes to those who se.l the most copies. 

The Contest vUl bepin with the Istof December and boys r'e-trinij 'o corn- 
pete should bemii today to work lor iheii weekly sijbSL-npinjtis 

Boys should leave their names at the time of getiinfj their papers so that 
we may keep an accurate record of iheir sales. 

Some time ago The Idea gave awav" a Watch and nine (>ther valuable 

prizes, and the winning boys did good work. One bov selling 

112 copies of The Idea of one issue. Therp is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



5c 



WEEKLY xJG THE COPT 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV March 5, 1910 No. JO 



— <»» ^ 



Edited at 



City Jail. 



•m- ■■»» 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 
YODER, EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 
CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND, VA. 



Prizes for Boys— February-March Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for the 
November contest. A handsome watch was the first prizei aftd first quality 
stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine boys selling the nine next 
largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies iti the months thus rnaking, at 
2 cents each, $4.52, besides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 

1 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. 

^ We huve Id oar Pall Slock at d arc 

Jt- showing opecijil jfood valut-s in 

I DIA!i:ONDS, WAKKlS, J WLIRY. Sliy[nWAR[, CUT 6 ASS, flc 

We invite y<<ur inipectioa 
© ^^^ 'sgfc. ^^, ^^^ <^, -v^ <;^ -"^^ -5;^ -v^ '^^ '^;i. <^ -^^ <:^ -^^ -'^^ -'^^ ^;;i. -s^ ^5^ '^^ -5*. "5^ ^^ "<•. ^^ ® 

^ For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. ^ 

i For dry or falHng Hair, Dandruff, and deseased Scalp, use \ 

\ Regal Hair Tonic. a 

^ For troublesoma Coughs use Phlori^ine. (> 

A ^ 

\ For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. a 

(J For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters ^ 

1 and Iodide Sarsaparilla* /. 

^ miz; . — ^ 

i For the Best Medicines extant, Go to a 

5 - A. a ROBINS, ^ I 

( 200 E. MARSHALL ST. i 

^ More than 50 Years Experiance. ^ 

^ _. __ ( 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV MARCH 5, 1910 No. 10 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Sunday Selling. 



Hj^HE IDEA is being fought against, not because it has 
■'• slandered any one, but because it has contended for law 
enforcement and has thus hurt the finances of those busi- 
nesses which rely for their profits on their ability to freely 
and openly violate the law with the knowledge and sanction 
of those who have sworn to enforce the law. 

Three weeks ago, after a long campaign conducted by this 
paper, the stores of Richmond were closed up tight on Sun- 
day in accordance with the law. 

The very next Sunday they were open again because in the 
meantime it appeared that The Idea would likely stop pub- 
hshing because of the o\erwhelming odds aligned against it. 

The Idea has stood and will stand for all law enforcement. 
If the law is not good, change the law, but keep on enforc- 
ing the ones you've got and stop making hypocrites and liars 



2 THE IDEA 

out of the officers of the law who swear to do one thing' and 
are then forced to do another because they "have no in- 
structions". When the people of Richmond will say that 
they regard the private instructions of others more Weighty 
than the law itself, then and only then will we refuse to 
fight this battle which means so much to our own progeny. 



To the People. 



The fight agaiilst existing evils will continue but if it is to be effec- 
tive it will cost something for defence, not to keep the editor out of 
jail, — don't worry about him. He don't mind paying the price when 
he considers the great victory in arousing the people as these trials 
have done by ©xposing the deeds of those who protect the violators of 
the laws while they are sworn to enforce those laws. Tho the burden 
has been hard to bear because of the sorrows imposed on the family cf 
the editor, those burdens can not be shared by you, but you can help 
just a little by helping to bear the financial burdens of this fight which 
has cost us almost SSOQ.OQ so far. This has been raised with the excep- 
tion of about $50.00. by friends. 

If others desire to help pay this $50.00 and the expense of reversing 
in the Supreme court, the action in the civil case brought by Clyde 
Saunders, they may do so by sending word to 524 A. North 8ih St.^ 
The Idea's temporary office. - , ' !1 ^ .^ . . 

If however you cant love your enemies or if you have any malice 
towards any individual \Ve have felt called on to expose pleasa do us 
the favor not to offer to help us fight municipal evils, for under the 
present instructions the editor may have to go to jail on your account 
alcho when you give your 5c. piece we do not know you have it in for 
the rascals we are after. Just be careful for our sake, for we can't know 
how you feel till after it's too late. 



THE IDEA 



Whiskey Men here 

From all over Country 
To Work on Legislature 



A drummer who knows the whiskey salesmen tells us that Murphy. s 
Hotel is crowded with whiskey salesmen from all over the coutry. 
These men are here to see that our legislature does not pass any legis- 
lation such as is now before it. 

The whiskey people pretend to believe in local option, in letting the 
people of any locality settle this question for themselves, while all the 
time the brewers of Milwaukee and the distillers of Kentiicky are de- 
scending on Richmond with their pockets full of money to see to it 
that Virginians do not get what they are demanding of their legislature, 
namely, the right to have a vote on this big question. 

WEEKLV PRICE LIST 

R. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-J C. N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag ... 44 Winner Condensed Milk, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, per bag . ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 28 

Dunlop Flour, per bag ... 44 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, per bag ... 44 Good Mackerel 05 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck , . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITV BUTTERLNJE, per lb. 23 Smoked' Shoulder, per lb. ... 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cpirpTAT 

Round Beef Steak, per lb. ... 15 SfiLd.-vi. 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not m3ntion3d are in line with our low prices. 



THE IDEA 

The Truth* 



We have established in court fhe truth of and the justificatioti for ail 
articles which have been made the basis of actions in court against uS 
altho the daily papers which have been bitter and maliciously false in 
their reports of the recent trials, have tried to make the people believe 
that our publication has made false statements, by printing that we 
"failed to substantiate charges' and similar misleading and untrue 
statements. 

Let it be known that we did fail to substantiate in court at least one 
hundred charges which we have made against political crooks here fof 
the simple reason that we have not been called on to substantiate 
them. 

The law required us to prove the truth oi onlj' those articles charged 
against U3 as libeloirs. We did not attempt to prove them altho we 
stand ready at all times to do so When their truth is propefly chal^ 
lenged- 

It is a remarkable fact that the prosecution has offered no evidence^ 
even about matters we were not called on to prove* which even tended 
to show falsity of our charges except in the unimportant details of two 
minor afTairs. and even then they so failed to make their point that they 
did not even dare refer to it in their long and denunciatory and bittef 
final speeches. They spent all their oratory in villffication and abuse 
which had no foundation in the evidence but had to be resorted to be- 
cause of the weakness of their cause. . 

The daily papers have danced in glee at theif opportcrnfty to make 
the {>eople believe that in some detail The Idea was not correct,, 
(altho their reports were false) and yet these same papers are daily 
filled with lies and libelous lies, but their inability to be truthful and 
accurate Js being so generally recognized that the offended parties are 
tiring of asking that the falsities be corrected for they consider that it is 
not so harmful after all for a Well known liar to tell a lie about them. 

The reason The Idea has so many suits is because it has the repu-- 
tation- of telling, only the truth.. 



THE IDEA 



Important. 



Tho money was lent the editor of this paper to begin operations here 
it was lent with the understanding that it was to be paid back when 
the paper made it back which we then expected to be inside of one 
month. Since the paper has not made anything and since the fact of 
the loan has been used by others to have the editor sentensed to jail 
and fined fifty dollars and costs, forty eight more; and since Mr. Atkin- 
son has all along held that we did not owe him anything and since, 
altho up to this time we have felt obligated to him to the extent of the 
loan, we are not now in any way morally or financially obligated for 
this loan; — since all this is now the case, The Idea will continue its 
fight with the same methods and policy which have governed it since 
it began in July, 1906 and which have continued with no change or 
alteration whatever in all that time. 

Our financial obligation to Mr. Atkinson which was the reason for 
the court instructing against us can no longer be so used because that 
obligation has been annulled. 



Will YOU help The Idea take the Saunders case to the Supreme 
Court; or are you satisfied to let it be said that no citizen of Richmond 
has a right to criticize a man running for office .? 

The court held that Saunders could be criticized if he had made 
mistakes but if he had made bad mistakes which showed him 
morally unfit, The Idea could not say so. The Supreme Court has 
held otherwise. Will you help us let them decide this case.? 



Slaves* 



They are slaves who fear to speak 

For the fallen and the weak. 
They are slaves who dare not be 

In the right with two or three. — Lowell. 



THE IDEA 

The Motive, 



Judge a man's motives by his works and not by what his etledile? 
say about him. 

They gay we Were after money. While the Editor waS borrowing 
money he did not even pay his own personal and running expenses 
but went into debt for them. 

While publishing; this paper we hare made a thin summer suit do 
winter service and in all other things, for the lack of money we have 
denied ourselves what we had formerly considered necessities in order 
to keep up a fight again»t evil. 

They say our motives were base. We knew when we began that 
it meant perhaps a jail sentencev perhaps assassinationf perhaps more. 

We have taken the jaJl sentence and two assaults and villianous? 
slander which have robbed us of fjfiends and conii<ience and today we 
can look back and say we rejoice at the course we have pursaed,- 

Can a tree bring forth fruit both good and evil? 

"I have done many good deeds among, you. For which of these da 
you stone me". 



A Mistake? 



Our friends fell us we mak-e a mistake in- fTightirJg 3cf boldly aS W 
fay ourselves liable to harm. 

This is not a mistake. 

One can not make a real fighf without gettmg on the firing line and' 
sometimes getting hit. If you don't get hit may be you arn't a reaF 
soldier after all. maybe you are where they don't fight, back in the 
commissary department.- 



THE IDEA 7 

The man who is not a coward is the one that is wounded and kill- 
ed. The stay-at-home don't get shot. J. E. B. Stuart is honored be- 
cause he got hit. He put himself on the danger line. The Idea is 
on the danger line and what care we if we get hit or if our paper is 
killed. When it dies it will die fighting for right and will not be 
ashamed. 

But remember we have fired some shots ourselves which we dare 
believe, from the consternation in the camps of evil, have hit soine- 
thins. 



Make Richmond a Great City* 

"What makes a city great and strong.? 

Not architecture's graceful strength, 
Not factories' extended length, 

But men who see the civic wrong, 
And give their lives to make it right. 

And turn its darkness into light." 

Fresh air and light are wholesome to those who can stand 
them. 

If fresh air hurts you then you are sick. 

If these breezy lines hurt you, YOU need a doctor. The 
trouble is not in the fresh air furnished by this paper, it's 
with you. 

- Notice it's the sick people (morally) that complain. Bet- 
ter see a preacher instead of paying a lawyer when The Idea 
hits you. 



Print it Right. 

Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



THE IDEA 



Why the two 

Cases were lost. 



The Saunders case was lost only because the judge instruct- 
ed the jury, whatever they thought about the merits of the 
case, to give damages to Saunders. 

We feel confident that this judge will be reversed by the 
Supreme Court. When the instructions Were read, we told 
Mr, Meredith not to argue the case. 

The last case was lost because neither Mr. Meredith nor 
the editor was physically able to either bring out the evidence 
that we had planned to bring out or the evidence in regard 
to the Atkinson loan, which would have proven that our arti- 
cles criticizing Judge Witt and others were not only not in- 
spired by Atkinson but were directly contrary to Atkinson's 
wishes. We were too exhausted by loss of sleep from nurs- 
ing during these trials three sick children at night, and by 
the intense strain of the court proceedings, to even attempt 
a defence. 

The prosecution very unfairly forced the issue when they 
knew we were unable to defend because they realized in that 
their only hope. 

Mr. Meredith for the first time in his life begged a post- 
ponement on the ground of his worn o^t condition. We were 
too exhausted to even think about showing: 

1. The connection between a certain crooked politician and 
the Molloy woman. 

2. Between this crooked politician and the other women of 
ill fame. 

3. A certain city official and the Molloy woman, 

4. The crooked politician and the city official. 

5. The crooked politician and a crooked lawyer. 

6. This crooked lawyer and the women — and much other im- 
portant testimony. We just made a bust because flesh 
and blood has a limit to its endurance. 



THE IDEA 9 



Thanks 



I'he Editor desires to express sinoerest thanks to the hosts of friends 
who stood by him in his trials and who visited him in jail. We did 
not know we had so many friends until they besieged us with kind- 
nesses and fruits and flowers and visits and letters and messaj^es of 
confidence and sympathy to such an extent that we have actually not 
found time to read the daily papers or answer our mail since the sen- 
tence began. 



Announcement. 



Last week and this week The Idea has been handicapped 
by the incarceration of the editor. Next week we'll be back 
to normal. Be sure and get these numbers. Subscribe to 
The Idea today, only $2.00 a year, $1.00 for six months 



Dangerous to Talk in Richmond, 



Jast think of it ] 

With ninty-nine percent of the citi/.ens of Richmond the best in the 
World and yet so dominated by one percent of those with no principle 
that IT IS DANGEROUS for the people to talk among themselves 
about their own affairs* From The Idea June i2, 1909^ 



Thou earnest not to thy place by accident; It is ihe very place 
God meant for thee. — Frenchv 



10 THE IDEA 

No. 14 South 8th Street 



Below Main Street on eig-hth street there are two houses 
the characters of which are well known in Richmond. 

Mr. Manning-, Police Commissioner, testified on the wit- 
ness stand that these two houses were in ' 'the red light dis- 
trict" altho he had previously defined *'the red fight district" 
as being the Mayo and Franklin street section. 

The Editor then went on the stand and showed that one of 
these two houses, No. 14 S. 8th, was rented for immoral pur- 
poses by Jas. R. Gordon, father of Douglas Gordon, the po'ice 
commissioner who was offended because we charged a cor- 
rupt alliance between the police department and the trade in 
vice. That evidence was introduced to show that we were 
justified in our assertion of a corrupt alliance as defined 
by Webster, Here is what our Webster's dictionary 
says of the word corrupt: We give the complete list of 
definitions, 

CORRUPT 1. Changed from a sound to a putrid state; 
unsound. 2. Depraved; not g^enuine or correct, v. t. 1. To 
chang-e from a sound to a putrid or putresent state, or from 
good to bad; to defile. 2. To entice from rectitude or duty. 
3. To falsify. 4. To spoil. -v. i. 1 To putrify; to rot. 2. To 
become vitiated: 

Now that is all ojr dictionary of 744 papes says about cor- 
iTipt. It don't mention money consideration at all. But Mr. 
Hariy Smith did find in some dictionary some where a secon- 
dary or tertiary or quarternary definition of corrupt which 
showed that the word sometimes referred to money altho 
this was not its natural or primary meaning. 

It the light of this secondary meaning-, notice what Mr. 
Manning said on the stand. He said that the landlords gouged 
these women by raising rents. Now in view of that and in 
view of the well known fact that these houses do rent for 
two and three times what they would otherwise rent for you 
may draw your own conclusion as to whether The Idea was 



THE IDEA 11 

justified in calling this a corrupt alliance even in the sense, 
not used by us as is evident from the connection, of there 
being" a money consideration. 

We however were not convicted for want of justification 
for our charges but the court held that the alleged malice of 
another must be imputed to us-. 

Notice that we have violated no statute law but were sim- 
ply convicted on the ruling of the judge on a doctrine which 
is new ih such eases in Virginia and this law was not so made 
by the judge until after the alleged offej^ca was committed. 



Our Courts* 



"The idea 'Sometim'es expre'ssed that ]udg:e"S on the hench are ahove 
'criticism in a democracy like otirs is not tenable. Our courts require 
the most consta-nt sfcrutiny and the sharpest solicitude on the part of 
'citizen's to ^eep them above 'suspicion, k woidd be ridiculous . . . to 
•assume that political lawyers . , . are suddenly transformed into hum- 
an paragons, . , ■. The Ameficaft bench will be respected purely ON 
ITS MERITS, and not through the preaching of the doctrine ofexag- 
■gerated respect for the'Coarrs regardless of the character and conduct 
-of the judges."— Editorial Jan'y Review of Reviews. 

The Idea ha-s frequently criticized owr courts whenever we felt they 
deserved it and we Vv'ill continKe to do so whenever we please in spite 
'of judges "preaching the doctrine of exaggerated respect for the courts 
regardless of the character and conduct of t-he judges." The character 
■and conduct X3f judges is perhaps the most important thing any democ- 
racy has to consideF, altlio Harr>' Smith, DEFENDER oF THE 
•C O U R T S, and the GOO'D NAME political of Richmond 
actually triedto make the jury believe '4:hat llie Idea had committed 
a crime in showing t-hat Judge VVit4: had sentenced Conway to the 
penitentiary and later satisfied himself that Conway's reputation, — not 
trharacter, mind you. — but reputation, was good, and granted such a 
■wian a license to sell poison, W^he-e-e-we. Next! 



12 THE IDEA 



Kill The Idea. 



Kill its Advertisers too* 



Just bafore g'oing' into the trial on the libel wari*ant the 
prosecution made the astounding proposition that they would 
agree to a postponement of the trial if we w ould agree to 
stop publishing The Idea in the meantime. On the advice of 
counsel we had offered to stop publishing anything about the 
parties, Manning, Gordon and Crutchfield in the meantime if 
they would agree to a postponment until we could rest up for 
the trial. 

This was not agreed to, and their counter proposition shows 
that the real object of the opposition to The Idea is to kill 
The Idea because it turns on the light. 

Likewise our advertisers have been intimidated and black- 
mailed by those unprincipled parties who do not believe in 
the freedom of the press when the press fights those evils by 
which they gain their profits. 

One of our advertisers recently received a letter telling him 
that he and his child would be found in some alley with 
their throats cut if his Ad in The Idea was not discontinued. 

If you do not want The Idea destroyed and the good work 
it has begun all undone, you can help The Idea defend itself 
in court by your financial help. 

We ask no help for our personal needs. We can, we be- 
lie\e keep the wolf from the door, but the fight against evil 
is your fight and we will do more than our part if you will do 
yours only half way. We need at least $500.00 to take the 
Saunders suit to the supreme court. About $500.00 has been 
given so far and no one has felt the burden except us. Do 
your part and Good Old Richmond will be able to throw off 
its fearful political disease. 



THE IDEA 15 

VILE LANGUAGE. 



We have never heard such vile and slanderous and foul 
language as was emitted by Smith and Scott, defenders of 
the good name of Saunders and Manning, et a's, in the 
recent trials. The Idea employed men of such high charac- 
ter as to be morally incapable of such base methods. Such 
men a^ Saunders and Manning needed just such men as 
•Smith and Scott. 

When .your client is guilty, better throw mud at the othei^ 
fellow^ 



IN JAIL. 



"I'd rathei*be the Editor of The Idea in jail than some folk's 
I know out of jail" From The Idea, Nov. 4. 1903. 



The Policy of The Idea* 

When T:HE IDEA hegsm publication, in Lynchburg four 
years ago, we had already discovered the seat of lack of law 
'enforcement, and the attendant evils of our city governments, 
in the system which put so much power into the hands of an 
llrresponsible police looard. So that in our first number in July, 
1906, before we knew Richmond had any similar troubles, we 
had published the article printed below concerning the police 
board. Policeman Short had arrested a man for violating 
the law, had put him in the van and had taken him to police 
headquarters, according to instructions which he dared not 
■disobey. Now it happened that the arrested one had 



14 THE IDEA 

friends high up in authority and so the officer was ordered 
to apologize to the lawbreaker for putting him in the van. 
The Idea therefore wrote: 

IN THE IDEA, JULY, 1906. 

When officer Short obeyed the law as he should have done, 
th3 WEEK KNEED POLICE BOARD, instead of commending the 
Oscar's obadience and discharging the chief for ever making 
such a rule, made the officer apologize. 

The chief by not upholding his subordinate in the discharge 
of his sworn duty, and taking the blame upon him^self for 
ever making such a fool rule, showed his lack of courage and 
unfitness for office. The Board admitted that the chief was 
to blame by ordering that the rule in question be annulled, 
but for some inexplicable reason saddled the responsibility 
on the minor officer, and added insult to injury by making 
him publicly apologize to a law breaker whom he had arrest- 
cl. All honor to officer Short. All dishonor to Chief Pendleton 
and Messrs. Watts, Adams and Harvey, (The police board.) 

In that same number of The Idea we condemned those in 
authority for the red light evil and showed their responsibil- 
ity for it. 

We showed up the daily papers in their connection with 
the \iolation of the law and exposed the connection of Judge 
Christian with the renting of bar rooms. All this was years 
before we ever heard of Richmond's crooked ring or knew of 
the one to whose malice they now charge The Idea's fighting 
such evils. When we came here we continued the fight along 
the same lines exactly, and used exactly the same methods, 
and after finding the same officers guilty we exposed them. 

The biggest diiference b3twe3n the fight here and in 
Lynchburg is this, the first person we found it ncccssr.ry 
to harshly criticize was one Clyde W. Saunders, reputed po- 
litical boss. In Lynhburg we showed up the police board 
and the court, both of which were in alliance with crime or 
worthy of harsh criticism. 

Here, though we believed Judge Witt a much cleaner man 
than the Lynchburg Judge, we finally found in the Conway 



THE IDEA ' 15 

matter and the 18th Street bar license matter, that he too 
deserved the harshest criticism and so we printed it although 
we knew that to print such criticism was against Mr. Atkin- 
son's wishes, for at that time he was applying for a license 
in Judge Witt's court and it was generally known that At- 
kinson had lent me money and Atkinson expressed to me his 
regret after I had printed, — he did not know before it came 
out,— and his belief that it might hurt him. 

I expressed to him my regret that what my paper might 
do should hurt in any way one who had helped me, but I told 
him that I felt it my duty to expose wiong wherever I found 
it and so when the Conway affair came up and it appeared 
that Judge Witt had sentenced this man to the penitentiary 
and afterwards granted him a license to sell whiskey, after 
satisfying himself that the man had a good reputation, I again 
■felt it my duty to show up this gross inconsistency, and wiote 
two editorials about it, although Mr. Atkinson after each ar- 
ticle had been published indicated his belief that my publica- 
tion was hurting him. 

The charge that I fought or failed to fight, (I do not know 
which they charge me with) Chris. Manning and those con- 
nected with him and their connection v.ith the red light dis- 
trict for any other motive than the big one which is appar- 
ent to all readers of The Idea, namely, for the common good, 
is so absurd in view of his reputation here that I do not deem it 
worthy of reply at this time. Suffice it to siy that The Idea 
Was fighting these evils and those responsible for them years 
before these victims of such conditions and circumstances 
were ever known to be guilty by the editor and that the pol- 
icy of this paper in no way changed because of a loan from 
any one, (although the temptation is of course great to even 
fail to do a duty because of a desire not to hurt one who had 
done a favor to us, ) and will in no way change in the future 
although today we are under no financial obligations to Mr. 
Atkinson. 

Therefore we shall oppose evil in the future with the same 
zeal as vv^e have in the past, although we realize that the bur- 
den in grief and tears and financial loss and desertion and 
distrust of friend and loved ones is more grievous to bear 
than any one who has not experienced it can imagine, for 
that same "duty" which R, E. Lee said was the sub'imest 
word in the English language impells us as with an irresisti- 
hle power to do those things which hurt us to the quick 



16 THE IDEA 

Warning* 

If yaii are g'O'nj into any mereintile businsss to make 
money, you can borrow money from anybody and it's all 
right, but if you are going- to fight evil, ah! that's another 
matter, you are not permitted to borrow from any man, for 
all that other man's supposed malice, although he has never 
been tried and convicted on any such charge, may be imput- 
ed to you and you'll be sent to jail. Ever since the days of 
the Carpenter-Preacher of Galilee it has been the practice of 
evil doers when exposed, not to show that they were inno- 
cent, nor that the accuser was guilty of any wrong but to 
retreat behind such statements as this: "That crazy reform- 
er is nothing but a carpenter who came down here from Gal- 
ilee, and besides he accepts the hospitality of, and is a friend 
of publicans and sinners." 

They said he was crazy. 

They said he was a reformer, 

1 hey said he was a poor man. 

They said he had no authority, he was not of the priesthood. 

They said he was an outsider and meddler from Galilee. 

They said his friends were sinners. 



A Hot Shot. 



Have you ever noticed how long it takes for a moderate 
drinker to find out that he has any bad habits. — Christian 
Hearald. 



Nothing that any one else does really matters. It is what YoU do 
that will count." 



"Learn the luxury of doing good." 



Q(!>ttilDd'i>aiii>QDdMi><iL><fl>»<!Cit>(iMK>d&<4tti>€t>dsK^<}battlB>«b(ZBa^ 

I 



I 



"FOR MEN ONLY 



ff 



I We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now 

I located in our store at No. 018 East Main St., and are fully 

f equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET 

i KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely 

Q guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a 

I trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- 

g perts in this line of work. 

Razors Horned And Set tSc. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE "SHARP-O*' CO. 

618 EAST MAIN STREET. 

^!><3SID<ri><aHI&<!E><a9&OS(aH><3!Si><fi:K><]D<aRIE>aO(3ZZI>aD<aBCD<HDDC3:><SSa><!D<aHD<]2>aBI>C& 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRjQlCTOR 

«1 NOflTH UOMBAROY STREET PHONK 18«1 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Cttlmat«s cheerfully Qlven on Sidewalk 
Paving, Hafis. Vestibules, BasemcnU, Ac 



The Editor has known Mr. Ewlng personally for th« last twenty years, 
'dnd he takes pleasure in stating that his reputBtion for first-class work 
<W»d straight forward, satisfactory dealing is unMcetled. 



PROMPT SERVICE. POLITE ATTENTION. 

TELEPHONE 738. 



JOHN W, GOODE 

(Formerly with G. Watt Taylor) 

- - FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, - - 

FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES, CANNED GOODS, 
FRUITS, TOBACCO, CIGARS, Etc. 



2520 E. BROAD ST., 



RICHMOND, VA. 




^*TI!E H)EA'* WILL GIVE F\RiZES TO 

NcwsLuy v\ho get the greatest number of weckiv subscribers and 
otnci prizes to thoi.e who sc ) the most copies. 

The Contest vUl begin with the 1st of Decembrr and boyi riestrinif toconv> 
pete should *^eh«ii today to work tor their weekly si.bocnptiona. 

Boys should leave their names at the time of getting ihc.r papers so that 
we may keep an acrurate record of their sates. 

Soma time ago The Idka gave away^ a Watch and nine nther valuable 

prises, and the winning boys did good work. One bov ^.riling 

112 copies of The Idea ot one issue. Thvre is good 

money in it for the boys beaidea the prizes. 



w^mm m n 





WEEKLY 



5c 



THE COPT 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV 



March J2, 1910 



No. n 



OLLING BUCKLES 

And Other Matters of 
Interest inThis Number 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 

COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 

YODER, EDITOR. PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 

CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND, VA. 



Prizes for Boys--February-March Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for theJ 
November contest. A handsome watch was the first prize, and first quality 
stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine boys selling the nine next 
largest numbers. One boy sold 226 copies in the month, thus making, at 
2 cents each, $4.52, be-sides the watch. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do tlot secure the 
first prize. 



JEWELER 



J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 



'e have in oar Fall Stock, and s,t9 
showing (specitil good values in 



lAI^Oi^DS, WAKHLS, J WO, S!lV[r.WAn[, COT G ASS, lit M 

We invite vuur inspection 





<^ ->^ -<;^ <;^ -<3^ -^^ -^^ -'i^. <^ ^;^ •^;^<^ ^ 

For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. 



For dry or falling Hair, Dandruff and deseased Scalp, -use 
Regal Hair Tonic. 

For troublesome Coughs use Phlorizine. 



For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. 



^ For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters ^ 



and Iodide Sarsaparilla. 



For the Best Medicines extant, Go to 

- A. H. ROBINS, 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. 



- -^v"^:^ '^is- '^v'TSy " 



More than 50 Years Experiance. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV MARCH 12,1910 No. 11 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 




kles 



City Engineer Makes Another 

Costly Error for the Tax 

Payers to Pay 



T AST FALL, under the direction of the City Engineer, 
•*— ' the City began an enormous sewer along Ninth street 
and up Broad street for many blocks. The contracting firm of 
L J. Smith & Co. did the work. When the job was turned 
over to the city recently and put to use it developed that the 
sewer was not a sewer and would not carry off the sewer age but 
was soon filled up or broken and that the job was an im- 
mense failure. 



1 tMK IDEA 

When the council wanted to know what the trouble \vAS^ 
our genial engineer, Mr, BolHng attempted to use his old 
excuse and told them that the sewer had "buckled." 

Now when we look into the meaning of Mr. Boiling's 
buckles we find that he told us that the failure, of the so-call- 
ed cement floor out at the settling basin was due to the ac- 
tion of the sun which had caused it to "buckle'\ while the 
real cause was that the stuff Was rotten, there not being' 
enough cement in it to hold it together. In other words the 
city had thrown away its money by not em-ploying an engin- 
eer competent to handle the job. 

Next the streets in Fairmount buckled up and ran all over 
the neighboihood to the ccst to the city of rr.Eny thcusgnds of" 
dollars more because Mr. Boiling had not looked after his job.^ 

And now we find sawars, parhaps 25 feet under ground, 
"bu2kling," and the engineer says the contractor is to blame 
and the contractar s^ays he lived up to contract. 

At the meeting of the Coun<!il Committee on Streets ou 
Mar. 3rd, the engineer's report which censured the inspector 
of the job, was read. 

And right here We wish to' rriake a points 

When the flume broke the blame was placed on incrompe- 
tent inspectors'. When the Fairmount blunders were made' 
the blame was placed an subordinate engineers. 

And now when- the saw'er buckles they teil us- it w'as the" 
incompetency of the inspector. 

Naw when a larg-e business concern finds that the subordi-' 
nates in a certain department are con^tinually going wrong' 
you know what th-at concern does. It does not waste its time' 
directly with the individuals whom the foreman says were 
Wrong. Oh no. That business concern gets a new foreman' 
for that job. And that is where the trouble lies in the engin-- 
eering department. 

The reason that the city has lost its thousands and tens of' 
thousands with rotten flumes and settlin^g basins and survey- 
ing blunders and sewers is that the job is too big for the msn> 
in charge. Mr. Boiling may be the best man in the world 
morally and socially but if he is not engineer enough to man-- 
age Richmond's engineering business it's time to getanother^' 



THE IDEA 3 

engine:r, even if ths coancilmen who elect happen to belong 
to the same club and are closely associated with the engineer. 

This keeping a man in office because he's "a good fellow" 
has cost Richmond hundreds of thousands of dollars and the 
papers wont dare use their inflaence to correct the evils be- 
cause they are dominated by men who likewise are good club 
members. Richmond city government should be managed 
as a big business without regard for social qualifications and 
with regard only to economy and efficiency. 

Even if I. J. Smith & Co. are to blame for the "buckling'' 
sewer, the city engineer is also responsible, for it was done 
under him as engineer and his duty as engineer is just that 
thing. Of Course his duty is not to build sewers, it is to see 
that his hands or the contractor's hands do it right. If it was 
no: done right he certainly is to blame whether others are 
Ox' not. , 

Foolish Street Car Rules 

The Passenger and Power Co. has made an extremely fool- 
ish and disconcerting rule in ordering that cars be stopped 
for passengers at some corners on the near side of the street 
and at others on the far side. 

YJe had often wondsred why the management Vv'as so 
wasteful of time as to stop on both sides of the street as they 
usedtodo, and now we wonder again thatthsy do not £63 the 
needless confusion occasioned by stopping on the near side 
at 1st street, on the far side from 1st up to 7th, and on the 
near side again at 7th, 8th and 9th streets. 

Much more time must always be lost, as long as there is 
this bungle, by waiting for passengers to cross from one side 
to the other, than would be lost by always stopping only on 
the far side for passengers and coming to. a second's stop 
only (not for the entrance or exit of passengeis) on the near 
side of track crossings. 

This is the method adopted in other cities and is the only 
one that will avoid confusion, dissatisfaction and delay, es- 
pec"ally on the part of that portion of the public which does 
not travel enough to keep famihar with the rules. 



THE IDEA 

Mafor hemphill 



In the first editorial in the Times-Dispatch fiom the pen of 
Major Hemphill he took particular pains to state that he did 
not believe in sumptuary laws. Now do you know what he 
meant by that little remark? Why shoukl he have made it 
anyway? There must have been a reason for it. 

Are there any sumptuary laws in contemplation in Virginia? 

The only laws that Virginia has ever passed or ever will 
pass of this nature are those prohibiting the consumption of 
harmful and poisonous drugs. On the theory that alcohol is 
such a poison a large part of Virginia has legislated its sale 
out of existence and within the next few years the State will 
banish it forever from her borders. Now everybody knows 
that the major had in mind nothing but the whiskey question 
when he wrote that line, and also everybody knows that the 
major is enlightened enough to believe in sumptuary laws 
that prevent the consumption of other poisons, such as co-- 
caine and morphine, altho tney may sometimies be wisely 
taken to the bodily comfort of the consumer. Therefore ev- 
erybody knows that the major did not mean he did not be-- 
lieve in sumptuary laws but that he really meant he was a 
whiskeyite all over. He really meant he was wet, and know-- 
ing that such a position needed some other ground on which 
to rest, for every real brainy whiskeyite realizes the utter 
unreasonableness of his position, ^he just jumped over the 
real question— it was too embarrassing to state his position 
exactly in plain English — and said he did not er-a-er-a-a-be-- 
lieve in sumptuary laws, you know. 

Likewise everybody realizes that the Times-Dispatch ha» 
done a wonderful and valuable work for the cause of the 
whiskey people and they know that if the major had not been 
one who-a-did not believe in a-ra-sumptuary laws, the Su- 
preme never would have hired him to write editorials. You. 
get The Idea? Thank you. 



f HE IDEA S 

The Red Ligh^ District No. 2 

Altho Mr. Manning said on the witness stand that it was 
the policy of the polic2 board to show no quarter to assigna- 
tion houses, still it is a notorious fact that the house No. 14. 
S. 8th St., which with the one ocross the street comprises a 
little red light district separate from the main one, is one of 
the worst assignation houses in town, ranking with the Mol- 
loy house and others which we will not name at this tjm^ 
but will show up later on. 

An Awful Crime 

The Times-Dispatch has just hired a man from South Car- 
olina to edit their paper and we learn that the man has actu- 
ally come here altho he was not a tax payer of Richmond and 
not even of the State of Virginia, and so far as we can learn 
had not a dollar's worth of interest in the town. This is the 
awful crime for which the Times-Dispatch censured the edit- 
or of The Idea, altho he had a direct interest in the govern- 
ment of his capitol city, especially when his own state laws 
were baing violated openly by the officials of that city. 

Now of course Major Hemphill is not to be blamed or cen- 
sured if he never owned a cent's worth of property here and 
never does do so. 

We merely publish this to show how hard up the prosecu- 
tion apd persecution of The Idea got that they had to use 
such stuff as argument against us. If we had done any real 
wrong whatever you know the opposition would not have 
thought of resortir^g to such argumept to discredit us. 

The best citizens that come here, and a large part of Rich- 
mond's best citizens were not born here, are v^ise enough to 
come here before they buy a cent's worth of property here. 
They are not so foolish as to buy property without seeing it. 

No, neither Mr. Hemphill nor the editor of The Idea is to 
be blamed for making Richmond his home before becoming 
a tax payer to the city. 



THE IDEA 

Petty Persecution. 



A short time back, in December of JanUaity, a retiresentative of^ tfit' 
city called at the writer's home and told his wife that he had come ui 
cut off the water. He was asked for what cause as the Water rent was 
paid in advance. The water mart said he did not know', but that he 
had orders to cut it of? and must obey. Thereupon the receipt was 
produced which showed that the water had been paid for up to a cer-^ 
tain time in the future. The water man said he could not help that;; 
he must obey orders. 

So without even telephoning to the city hall to see rf any mistake 
had been made he proceeded to cut off the W'atef. 

Now it happened that the servant needed water for washmfj; and there 
was a fire in the range, so for fear of trouble the writer's wife immedtately' 
betook herself to the writer's o-ffice and informed him of the high- 
handed proceedings. Thereupon the writer repared to the city halJ 
and demanded to know the cause of such actions. 

There he was told that it was a mistake and that they thought the 
house was vacant. 

Knowing, that k is human to err he was inclined to" accept the ex-^ 
planation and drop the matter, but since he has seen how the whole" 
ring has worked incessantly ro damage him in every way fair or fout 
which it could command, he had a right to think that it was nothing, 
more than a piece of petty persecution. 

If the reason for the cutting off was the sup|)osed vacancy of the' 
house the water man certainly found out it was not vacant when he 
turned it off. 

If the department had any desire fo keep from Working a wrong tc 
the writer it should certainly have sent a man vvith common courtesy 
enough to telephone a-rwl frnd out the trou>ble after being shoWn a re-^ 
ceipt which must have made him kn^ow be was in error. 

It is dangerous to criticize in- Richmond. Among others we have" 
felt called upon to Criticize Mr, Morgan R, Mills chairman of the' 
Water Committee of the Council. 

But we must not draw any inferences from these circumstances s<# 
we will leave it with you- 



THE IDEA 



XT WEEK 



Th2 Idea will hz straight from the shoulder. It will 
contain, among other live matter, an open address 



fci 



TO IlICIIMONO MOTHERS," 



A dignified, refined treatment of a vital, burning 
question, ' and should be read by every mother in 
the community. 

There v^rill be nothing to offend the "Great or the 
near great" or the most modest — but 

IT \A/ILI_ BE TO THE POINT 



FIVE ONE DOLLAR BILLS 

As Extra Prizes to the five boys selling the biggest num- 
ber of Ideas next week. 

GET THEM PROMPTLY AT THE USUAL PLACES. 



WANTED, 



"7"^^ RENT Small house or flat in suburbs, Barton 
^ax^,„^^^x.,-^ — Heights preferred. 



The Glass Mattef 



On Saturday, Jnly 7th, 1906 the first ntimber of The Idea contaifi'' 
fng five articles concerning Carter Glass appeared in Lynchbiirg, Va. 

On Sunday, July 15th, a notice appeared in Glass' paper, Th«? 
News, saying that Mr. Glass through six attorneys had on the day 
before instituted suit against the Bell Co. for $25,000 damages, for'" 
publishing a "pamphlet makmg s^urridous references to' Mr. Glass 
and to other well known citizens." 

Two days later, on July 17th, we wrote Mr, Glass retracting one 
6f the five articles because in that Ovit: we had called Mr. Glass rf 
member of, while he was only clerk of the ctty cotincil, 

On the same day, the 17th, Mr. J. P. Bell writing for the Bell C6', 
<\'toie an article to Mr. Glass stating; "W^ did ti6t sell the pamphleS 
Or put it in circulation, and the responsibility for its circulation rests 
solely with its author,^ whose identity is well known/' 

On the 20th Mr. Glass Vvrote to (he editor of The Idea, 'Th^ 
statement you retract is not by any means the only or the most offen^ 
sive one." 

On the 24th the editor replied: "I have nothing ffirjher ih retrain/' 
thus reiterating the truth of the articles referred to. 

On Aug- 26th, one month later. The News pri*nted a* fertile r frort^ 
the Bell Co. of Aug. 23rd saying: "We regret our connection with 
(he pamphlet and disclaim any share in or responsibility for the things 
stated or sentiments expressed therein" aud that The Idea was "print' 
ed for the author,^ as any matter brought to our house is printed, in 
the usual course of business and the management had no knowledge 
of its contents." 

It is thus seen that the Bell Co.-npany did not mak^ any apology 
for any wrong done but simply explained to Mr. Glass that the\ had 
done nothing to apologi^ze for. Therefore the editor was right when 
he said on the stand that he thou.ght' that the Bell Co. had not apolo- 
gized and Mr. Glass' letter of the next day, the 24th, shows that no 
apology had been made, for if he regarded it as an apology he surely 
would not have written, as he did in his reply to Mr. Bell. "I accept' 
your EXPLANATION and" exprei'.ion of regret/' 



TOE IDEA q 

HI me liame jjaper, (NewB> Aug. 26th) Mr. CjUiss states thai ir\ 
•:etter withdrawing one of t^e statenre'nts made was refused pub!ivati< n 
'^n his paper on the grounds that the withdrawal of but one of many 
statements amounted -merely to a reiteration "of the rest. 

It Vill therefore be easily seen that neither Mr. Bell nor the edimr 
has acknowledged the falsity of, nor acknowledged any wron}i;in prini- 
'mg or publishing what Mr. 'Gla;ss termed, "The most offensive" stau- 
'ments concerning him. And the editor was exactly right in stating on 
'the witness stand that Vie beheved Mr. Glass dropped the suit because 
the editor woiild prove th« tfuth of his statements. 

In thfs connection Viave yoQ noticed that neither The Leader nor 
•the Times-Dfspatc^h nor The Joarnat has yet published my letter to 
Mn Glass stating I would not retract the mosi offensive statemenis 
•concerning Mr. Glass, altho each of them published the other two 
betters, thus deliberately putting the editor of The Idea in a false hulu 
Ijefore the people. 

The Virginian alone finally published this third letter. 

It Was read in court when the iirst two \^e^e read. 



Messenger Boys in Temptation 



In our legalized'^?) red light district n^essenger bov's in short pants 
vnay be seen both day and night With telegrams and written messages 
'(for the women of the midnight worW> 

You know the men who patronize these places do ivot like to send 
their own messengers for fear of -detection, so they get a telegraph 
messenger. Thus are otir hoys brought into contact with the n^t st 
horrible a^pe^cts of sin and the influences which at'their age are most sure 
to blight and destroy their morals. And the police know all about :!. 
but what can they do.' They have irsft iictions not to tnforve ihe l;t\v 
ftSm the 'men who give them their jobs, the police boards 



10 TflT ruo 

^^To Jail for Tellmg. the TrutR^^ 

Wfiile in the cfty jaiT tfie' editor rceei'ved'tfte fbllowing let- 
ter wKicL so affected liutK. that fit is- deei.T)«d worthy of pabli- 
eit-iwiv 

Among tne many mes's'ages' of cheer wliiefi made ©ar con- 
finement easy to bear none was so- valued as tMs. 

When one has the unsolicited-- con-fidenee of ehildreH— and 
she editor Eas always numbered the children am€«ig liis inti- 
matfi friends, — fee cannot fee far wroiig.. 

ISSr Carrin-gton. St. . Richmond. Va.- Feb.. 17. 1910.- 
Ur. A don. A, Yoder:^ 

I am a littte boy often: and I know you wvlT wonder why E 
fim writing to you,, bnt I just want to let yoa know that some 
of tb>e school boys are thinkin-gof you. IVe peadyotir paper? „ 
?.]so yoiar tri-al in- the newspapers and I must say they have- 
pi't grven you a fair trial by any means, I have been talking: 
this over witli my Ir-ttle eomxadeS' and they all agree that youi 
haven't had a fair deaf^ and I've wondered why some of the 
good and fair minded men of this- town haven.' t^ come to^your 
aid. When I read Mr, Smith,' s speech, where'he called you 
so many bad, ugly names it made me boil, for I knew you. 
did not deserve it, and I wondered when he knelt at his bed. 
Hde that night if he didn't ask God to forgive him for calling: 
his fellow man sucb dirty names when he did not deserve rt. 

But Mry Yoder, it don't hurt a man tobe sent to jail for 
telling the truth,, it will only serve tO' increase your business.. 

Now Mr.. Yoder, I will close, hcping God will be with you: 
and direct you in all your undertakings, and prosper you ini 
your business which I believe He wilL 

I am your little school bo^>' fri^end. 

L, J. B. 

P. S. I am at home now' on the sick h'st but hope to be 
all right soon, then I will write you again. You can print 
my letter if yoa want to, to let the grown up men know what 
a school boy thinks of the way an honest man has been treat- 
ed. Mr Yoder, I am going to send you some stamps as I 
don't reckon those mean men that put you in jail gave you 
any, L. 



*The Times-Dispatch Maligns McAlister Again 

'l)n last Sunday Bev. J. D. McAlister, Sec'y. of the Stiito 
(Anti -Saloon League delivered an address at the East End 
Baptist Gh rch. On Monday morning I'h^ Ximes-DispaTxli 
in a false account -of that meeting said: 

Pursuing this argument as t-o revenue, Mr. McAlister st i'd : 

'Twenty-siuX Senators sat in their chamber in the Stat« 

'Capitol on Friday ev-ening and said to. the 35,000 petilionei;s, 

'We recognize no right on your part to a vote. We will kctp 

•this thing that .pays heavy -license and that pays our cam- 

.paigjQ expenses. ' " 

In Monday evening's Virginian Mr. McAlister den-ounced 
vas false that statement in these words: 

'*i did not say that 'twenty-six senators sat in their cl'xam- 
berin the State Capitol on Friday eveni^ig and said to the 
35,000 petitioners "We recognize no right on your part !■© a 
vote. We will keep this thing that pays heavy lic?i>ses ^ind 
ipays OUT campaign expenses. " I did say that twcnty-t;ix S( n- 
■ators by their votes denied 35,000 petilioneis ihe privilege oi 
voting on the afeoiition of the saloon- a most fertile sou loe of 
revenue. 

In the raeanlinis two ser^atoi'S got up in tlie senate and br- 
ing misled by this false report -of t-he Times- Dispatch, Mr. 
Keezell said, *'IF CORRECTLY quoted I regard the statement 
(above -quoted^ as an unwarranted insult &md falsehood." 
(Words in paretheses ara oure. — Ed. ) 

In view of the statement ef Mr. McAlistcT any one can see 
J hat this trouble in the senate Was caused, not by vvhat Mr. 
l-^cAlistersaid, 'but by ihe false report put out by the Times- 
Di-Spatc'h. 

To add insult on insult the Times-DispMch the nexi day 
ignored Mr. McA lister's denial of their false charge and reit- 
erated the statement about him in spiteof that denial. Thus 
the Times^Dispatch of Tuesday said: 

Mr. McAlister had also said, in refetrrng to tiie Senato' s 
who" voted against the Strode measure, that they had den el 
to the 35,000 petitioners the right to vote, and hsd s id they 
would "keep this thing which makes revenue and which 
pays our campaign expanses. " 

This base slander against Mr. McAlister is in keepi^ng wi;h 
the policy of that base wliiskey paper for this same supreme 
gave a false repoit of tlais snme preacher's remarks lastsuir.- 
mer at Grove Ave. Baptist Church and the pas^o'- and boaid 
of deacons publicly denounced the Times-Dispatch -ar-ticle as 
^absol-uteb' false. 



n ruK IDEA 

Richmond Girk in Whiskey Shops 

K(« Ion<4' sirrre; fhe writer was t^alkrng down Marn street at the 
m<vrn?ng office «>pen5n<; hour when he noticed a neafi? dressed yoErng 
K(vni>sn' come otjif; txom fhe postoffiice and proceed rw f r©Kt o^ hrm down* 
^Ihi'iw street, 

.■\ftef \ralfii'nfj a few hfocks the grrf crossed f&e strset and entered, 
Co^ oar amazetnenj, wha? appeared to he a bfar room, fm both windows 
nere hlied whh bottled whiskeys and tiines and wfthin the room couy 
1>e seert rott- after row of whiskey barrels and the other paraphernalia 
of a large whisker ^tise. The wrrtet stopped amd waited, wonderimg 
»>n \t'haf mission .1 totrng Fajdy entered ssich a pface. 

The gi'rl after a jrreetTny so two men wtthira passed ©n f» r'Sie reaf 
w hife we waited and wondered, 

.\y we waited two other yountj women appeared .-rnd entered th^ 

sune place afld as neither they nor fhe first one came <)qi|i, ^tmr^^rm^ijtix 

the better of us. so we inquired and found tliat tSie conf<grn oper-r 

;«ed 3 \aT^e mail order biaisiness and these RichcnoKd young wwneiai 

were entgaj^ed in seflin'*,' whiskey by marl. 

We went on our way, saddened in heart w think that thrsnemend- 
fnis evf{ had gotten so respectable, because by our votes we make h 
Ifgal, that our girb have gone to selling whiskey and our great daily 
papers make ^a, protest. 

Surely the time has come p banish the business when our women 
have become so contaminated by it. 

15efore cominti; to Richmond, we were talking with a prominent 
Richmond busine.'is man on the question of the liquor business and he 
stated that he had had no protest to make against the saloon busmess 
and its consequences, but that he thought that it was only a question 
of time when the men of Virjjinia would put it away forever because 
of its evil effect on their women. 

He said that he had noticed that in (he social life of Richmond the 
drinking of strong drink by the women was becoming alarmingly prev- 
alent and that the awful feature of it to him was that the women who 
took it seemed to lose their regard for their virtue, and that he thought 
(hat the men of Virginia would banish the liquor evil because of then 
chivalrous regard for cheif women and in defense of their homes. 
No comment necessary, for our readers are not fools. 



THE mrA n 

Acknc wkdgme n t, 

Some time ago we received a contribution of $2.00 by mt.il 
horn Manchester, we think, to be expended in defence of 
the editor. When we desired to acknowledge receipt of it, wo 
could not find the letter and since we have not yet been able 
to locate it, v/e take this means of expressing thanks and 
hope that the donor will get hold of this paper. We sincerely 
thank our unknown friend, and also the one who sent a like 
amount last Saturday and those who have sent such contri- 
butions to the cause in the past in anonymous letters and by 
anonymous messengers. 



Th 



nanics* 

We desire to publicly thank those friends of the cause who 
of their own vclition raised $71.25 which they handed over 
to the editor to fay the fine and costs in the recent trial. 



WEEKLV price: LIST 

k. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4!)3o-J C. N. PARKER 

G^T IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag , . 44 Winner Condensed Milk, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, per baa; • ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes , 2^ 

Dunlop Flour, pjr bag . . , 4i 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, per bag . . .44 Good Mackerel O") 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck . . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia llerring Roe, per Can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 2:^ Smoked Shoulder, per lb, ... 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cppriaT 

Round Beef Steak, per lb, . . . 15 fet'tL.lAL 

t*ork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 4.ic, per bag. 

-All Goods not mentioned are in line wuth our low prices. 



14 THE IDEA 

Letter to Times-Dispatch 



On th3 day (Sanday Feb. I3"th. ) on which the Times-Di's- 
patch published the dispatch from Lynchburg which appear- 
ed to be contradictory to ojr evidence on the stand of the. 
diy foefm-e in reference to the Glass suit, we went in persoD 
to the Times-Dispateh office and carried then] the three let- 
ters which pass€d between Carter Glass and the editor of 
The Idea so that by publishing them the people might not be 
deceived into believing that we had made a misstatement.. 
The editor of the Times-Dispatch point blank refused to see 
lis or to accept our letter which would have set this whole 
matter right. We publish below that letter. 

This incident will show that the Times- Dispatch is not only 
unfair but deliberately and willfully determined to damage 
us all they can. If it had not been for the deliberate unfair- 
ness of that paper v/e are persuaded that alt ho the editor 
was too sick to defend himself still there would have been 
8uch a demand in the air for fair play that the verdict of the 
jury would have been different. Every one knows that no 
jury under the sun can fail to be influenced by the publica- 
tions in the papers which create the atmosphere by which 
they unconsciously determine their verdict. 

It is reasonable to suppose that when our best friends v/ere 
daceived, as they afterwards acknowledged, the jury should 
also be deceived. 

The Times-Dispatch has not, up to this day published these 
three letters. They prefer to have the people deceived, for 
only by deceiving them can they help kill The Idea. 



-Richmond. Va., Febry. 13th. 1910. 
tildito^s Times-Dispatch'. 

Citys 
Dear Sifsi— 

I make below a statertient con tradictinii your dispatch fio-.Ti 
Lynchburg in this morning's paper, which I trust you will be 
fair enough to publish as yo i did that base misrepresenta- 
tion in bold type on your first pagr>« Your paper sa s in quoting 
'the dispatch from Lynchburg "Yoder himself under date of 
'July 17th, 1906 in a letter to Mr. Glass confessed the falsity 
of his charge." 

As a matter of fact I did not retract the charges mr.de 
against Mr. Glass, but I stated to him in the letter of July 
17th that i had made an error in my paper in calling him a 
member of the Council while I should have said Clerk of tl:c 
Council. Neither he or I regarded this as a retraction of tl.e 
'charges, a^id he wrote me on July 20th that if I would meke 
such a retraction as he indicated it would be published in the? 
"News". This of course I declined to do in a letter to him 
dated July 24th, 1906, and Mr. Glass did not dare publish my 
letters, though I published all the correspondence, and the 
reason he did not publish them was because I did not admit 
I he falsity of my charges, although your reported dispatch 
f]om the Advance of Lynchburg says I did. I ci. close here- 
with the three letters, which passed between us. 

Yours respectfully, 

ADON A. YODER. 



Print it Right* 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
■Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
Toe 2708, 



16 THE IDEA 

The Malicious Times-Dispatch 



To show how maliciously unfair a paper The Times Dis- 
patch is, we print the following". That paper, supreme in its 
hatred for The idea, gi'abbsd at the opportunity to hurt the 
editor in his recent trial by publishing Mr. Scherer's repudi- 
ation of the editor rn the morning of the last day of the trial 
when it wrs calculated to have great weight with the jury. 

A few days later, however, when Mr. Gcherer found he 
had been miisled into censuring us and desired to set himiself 
right with the people by making a public acknowledgment 
of his eu'or, this same paper, the Timies-Dis^patch, failed 
to print his letter of retraction. In the light of this failure 
to be fair perhaps the people can understand why that paper 
printed such false reports of that trial. 

Yoj not only gat a ons-sided repart from th? self-styled 
Supreme but one is easily persuaded that the Supreme is ma- 
liciously false and one-sided when it will noticeably fail 
to correct a wrong and exceedingly damaging and harmful 
report when the one who had given the original information 
wished to make a proper correction. 

To an outsider the Times-Dispatch sometimes appears to 
be a fair minded paper but to Richmonders the truth is ap- 
parent that the Supreme is the greatest enemy to moral re- 
form that the forces of right have to encounter in their con- 
tests with evil. 

Former ardent admirers of the beloved Joseph Bryan daily 
acknowledge that the paper has woefully degenerated under 
the management of his sons, whose ideals, if they have any, 
are, as far as their paper shows tham, so different from those 
of their father. 

Knowing from expsrience what a biased paper the Su- 
preme is, we predict that Major Hemphill, the new editor, 
will not long remain with it, for if he is the man he appears 
to be from what the papers say about him, he must have 
some opinions of his own and such a one cannot be led about 
long by the narrow minded and unfair policy of the Bryan 
boys. 



Q!>(tti&(iE>(aii>{)i><siii><ii><iSi&ciSb<iiaiii>«s><sii^ 



I V/e wish to announce to our many customer's that we are now 

i located in our store at No. 618 East Main St, and are fully 

§ equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES § 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We | 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET § 

I KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely 

9 guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a 

S trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- 

g parts in this line of work. 

I — _ — ' - — 

Q Razors Honed And Set 1 5c. Each, 

I Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 

« ' 

I THE " SHARP -O" CO. 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. 

A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR , 

tl NORTH LOMBARDY STREET PHONE 1081 

RICHMOND. VA. 

C«tlmat«s cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
fNivihg. Halls, Vestibules, Basements, Ac 



The editor has known Mr. Ewing personatly for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class work 
«i»rd straight forward, satisfuctory dealing is unekcelled. 



PROMPT SERVICE. 



POLITE ATTENTION. 



TELEPHONE 738. 



""•^r^ '^'4S^■t^ '^gxmt»' 



JOHN W, GOODE 

(Formerly with G. Watt Taylor) 



- - •- FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, 

i FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES, CANNED GOODS, | 

FRUITS, TOBACCO, CIGARS, Etc. 



2520 E, BROAD ST., 



RICHMOND, VA.. 




"THE IDKA" WILL GIVE PRIZES TO 

Newsboy who tret the greatest number of wetkiy subscribers and 
otnci prizes to those who se 1 the most copies. 

The ConteBt vill bepin with the 1st of Decembrr and bovs desiring to com- 
pete should Sckiii today to work for theii wr-ekiy subPcripnons. 

Bcya should leave their names at the time of getting their paper* so that 
we may keep an accurate record of their sales. 

Soma time ago The Idea gave away a Watch and nine other valuable 

prizes, and the winnitig boys did good work. One bov sellmg 

112 copies of The Ii ea ot one issue. There is good 

money in it for the boys besides the prizes. 



5c 



WBBKLY vJP THB OOFT 

HE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OP THE TIMES 



Vol. IV March 19 19J0 No. J2 



AN ADDRESS TO 

Richmond Mothers 

ON A 

Burning Question 

In which Some Plain Things Are 
Said in a Way Not to Offend, 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THl 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 
YODER, EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 
CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND, VA, 



;,v ■,,; 



',, ..,. 'c.t^,.<.iij;-feii'<.'.io 



Prizes for Boys— February-March Contestj 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for the 
December-January contest. A handsonpe fountain pen was the first prize, and 
first quality stag handle pocket knives were given, to the nine boys selling 
the nine next largest numbers. One bloy sold 491 copies in the two months. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys Well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 




J. S. JAMES 

7'fa AND MAIN STS. 

We have in our Foil Stock, «ud art 
showing special 4i;ood Toluea in 



* DIAMONDS, WAIOIES, JWaHV. S!IVB!WA8£, 0)1 GUSS, ftc 

W« mytte jui^ inspection 




•dCtftiMa 



mmih^ 



For Chapped hands and Lips and Rough Skin use Soothing Balm. ^ 

For dry or falling Hair, Dandruff and deseased Scalp, use ? 
Regal Hair Tonic. 

For ti'oublesoma Coughs use Phlorizine. 



For Dyspepsia and Indigestion, use Copodone Liver Pills. 
For Pimples and Skin Eruptions, use Aromatic Tonic Bitters 
and Iodide Sarsapariik. 



For the Best Medicines extant, Go to 



,(( 



A, H. ROBINS, 

200 E. MAlf^^MrL, ST. 

More/thaia! 50 Years Experiance. 



THE IDEA 

A Sig^n of the Times 



VOL. IV MARCH 19, 1910 No. 12 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 A Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by Adon A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

AN ADDRESS TO 

RICHMOND MOTHERS 

ON A 

Burning Question 

In which Some Plain Things Are Said 
In a Way Not To Offend. 



'' I 'HE IDEA makes no apology for placing this discussion 
•'• of a very delicate subject before the mothers of Ridb^ 

mond and community. 
We do have apologies to offer because of conditions which 

make such discussion necessary. 
We are well aware of the fact that there are lots of good 

peoplCp who because of a mistaken sense of modesty, wifl 
(Contined on page 4) 



2 THE IDEA 

Prominent Richmonder 

Expresses Confidence 

Which^^Grows asCircumstances Develop^^ 

From among the many expressions of confidence in the ed- 
itor we ha\e selected the following clipping from a very 
prominent merchant, who, besides his letters, has given 
more substantial help in our hours of trouble. 

There are none that can realize all that is conveyed in 
that last paragraph. 

The editor's private family affairs are not the proper sub- 
ject of detailed discussion in these pages, and yet if one has 
any imagination and can stop and think what it might mean 
in sacrifice to have to makea frail wife and children suffer with 
him, and perhaps more than he, the heavy burdens which 
have been his lot, then surely one cannot say that the editor 
of The Idea is moved by base motives. 

Mr. A.»A.- Yoder, 

'City. 
Dear Sir: 

I am certainly gratified to know that a boy ten years old 
can see deeper and further into the real value of truth than 
the average business man or citizen of Richmond appears to 
I5)preciate. ,^Ypu have had my jnost hearty sympathy in all 
of your trials, and you would have received much more sub- 
stantial support had tbeen in position to render such. 

I feel especially for you in your family affliction, as from 
what I can learn and he^r from" reliable sources this is a 
far greater burdelf t6'*Vou than all the mountains of 
slander that could be heaped upon you by the combined forc- 
es of mammon. ' So ydii^sefe ttier^ is one at least who has not 
lost confidence, but it rather grows in strength as circum- 
gtances develop. 



THE IDEA 



Harry Smith 



During the trial of the editor for libel, recently, la"wyer 
Harry Smith desiring to prejudice the jury against us by im- 
putations stated that he would show that the letters Mr. Led- 
man wrote to the mayor, and which were published in The 
Idea, concerning lack of law enforcement on his part were 
written by the editor, and that "this man Yoder is going 
about instigating the citizen to censure the mayor" and that 
Mr. Ledman in this case wrote to the mayor, not of his own 
accord, but was put up to it by Yoder to make news matter fear 
his paper. Since the judge ruled out any testimony by us 
along this line we did not have the opportunity of telling the 
jury what we now state to the public that not only did Mr- 
Ledman undertake this correspondence of his own free wili 
and accord, but that the editor of this paper knew nothing 
whatever about it until Mr. Ledman had been summoned to 
appear in court against a law violator after the correspond- 
ence had begun and after Mr. Ledman had communicated 
with both the rfiayor and the chief of police. 

This is but one Harry Smith's many attempts to damage 
the editor by such imputations. 

He was guilty of a like unmanly act when he attempted to 
mislead both the editor and the jury by asking the editor 
whom he meant in a certain sentence quoted from The Idea 
and the edftor happened to remember that the line in ques^ 
tion was not his but a line from an article in the Review of 
Reviews, referring to some man up in New York state, and 
Harry Smith tried to lead the jury into believing that we 
wrote that about Justice John, altho if he had dared to read 
the whole article out when he asked the question the jury 
would have seen his purpose. 

This is the kind of stuff we had to fight, and not beir^ 
used to such methods and not having lawyers who would 
adopt such methods, we being physically exhausted and play- 
ed out, were unable to defend against them. 



THE IDEA 
An Address to Richmond motker g 



i 

(Continued from first page) 

tkrow this issue of The Idea into the fire — where doubtless 
many issues have gone before — and with a "more holy than 
thou " air will take a solemn oath that the dirty sheet shall 
never come into their home again. But; you know, we are 
used to this sort of thing and take it for granted. We have 
Jong since come to the conclusion that a man must make a 
■ort of nuisance of himself to lots of people in order to ac- 
uomplish results along certain moral lines. 

We have come to as equally definite conclusion that there 
is a demand for the airing before the public of certain great 
moral questions which are usually avoided in the public 
prints. ' 

At the outset we wish to pay our respects once more to the 
dafly press. They would no more think of taking up such a 
discussion as this in their columns than they would think of 
handling fire with ungloved paim. But listen: 

They take up every bit of scandal and parade it before the 
public in glaring headlines. 

If there is a divorce proceeding in the courts where those 
«f so-called high society are involved they^ will send into* 
your homes the miserable details of the disgusting perform- 
amces of some faithless wife or fickle husband. 

They go just as far as the law will allow them in picturing' 
the details of the adventures of a tawdry chorus girl of the 
Evelyn Thaw stripe and in so doing set a-going in the mind 
ctf many an innocent child a desire for the big worid of gaiety 
and adventure—a desire which leads inevitably to untold hor-' 
wrs for some of your own daughters who, foolish and ignor-^ 
aast, fall the victims of such unprincipled criminals as Stan- 
lord White. 

These same newspapers which pose as moulders of public 
thought come into your homes almost daily flaunting before 
yoor children the picture of some millionaire's daughter whc 
eloped with a chauffeur or a hotel waiter^ and your boy* 



THE IDEA 5 

and girls are told in big headlines and glowing articles of 
how these two wretches have been running around the coun- 
try as man and wife; and the spice of adventure is run in and 
exaggerated until the wayward child is made into a sort of 
heroine whose story will always find a sympathetic heart 'm 
some one of the innocent children of your own household 
who will be led unconsciously to an imitation of the wayward 
adventuress. 

These same nice newspapers jump at an opportunity to 
drag some young girl of your own community into big head-, 
lines and by gross exaggerations and unwarranted and con- 
temptible insinuations bring both the child and her distressed 
parents into humiliation before the public. 

So it is with cases of assault, with trials for breach of 
promise, and in a thousand and one other ways, every sense 
of refineriient and modesty is outraged by the daily press™ 
under the guise of giving the people the news, or, forsooth, 
of publishing the details of crime in order to deter others 
from crime. But with the guise stripped off it is a mean 
catering to a public taste that has been largely perverted by 
these very papers in a desire for that kind of sensationalism 
which will increase their circulation and ultimately their ad- 
vertising patronage. 

Yet these are the papers that throw up their holy hands in 
holy horror if any one attempts to go into print with a direct 
and pointed discussion of a question which is fraught with 
more far-reaching dangers to our homes and to society than 
any other question of the day. 

Perhaps in our zeal for what we believe in from the bottom 
of our heart we have made mistakes. We have certainly been 
made to suffer sufficiently for those mistakes in persecution 
and insults and mortification to which we and our family 
have been subjected. 

Nothing but a profound sense of duty could persuade us to 
continue this fight. That there are miserable wrongs being 
perpetrated daily by unfair and unholy social and political con- 
ditions presses upon us with an overwhelming conviction. 
Whether or not we will be able to right these wrongs is nott 



6 THE IDEA 

the question for any man but the coward. We shall "fight 
the good fight" whether victory or defeat shall be our portion. 
Going now more directly to the root of the matter we wish 
to say in terms that no man need misunderstand that the 

EXISTENCE OF A DIFFERENT STANDARD OF MOR- 
ALS FOR THE SEXES IS A DOWNRIGHT OUT- 
RAGE OF THE WORST SORT. 

We say further that the evils which result from this differ- 
ent standard of morals are fraught with deadly dangers to 
our homes and to society. 

It is high time some voice were raised in protest against 
this deadly and outrageous and cowardly system of morals. 
Our voice may be ever so feeble but it shall be raised— and 
those holy, holy men, many of whom— shall we say most of 
whom- -are themselves the guiltiest of the guilty may rele- 
gate us to realms of the damned at their liking. 

We have been made tired— oh, so abundantly and nause- 
atingly tired — of all this balderdash about "manliness"' and 
''chivalry" and the "unwritten law" on the partofmenwho 
pose as the protectors of their own mother.-, daughters or 
sisters when the vast majority of them are themselves as 
fiendishly guilty as Satan in their outrages upon other men's 
daughters and sisters who have no protectors. We make no 
distinction here between the wretch who knocks the tender 
fruit from the tree and the thrice wretched coward who feeds 
his Itist upon the bruised fruit that has fallen. Some man 
must be the original criminal in the first place and every 
subsequent party to the crime is equally guilty. 

And yet these are some of the "chivalrous" gentlemen 
who object to having these "matters aired— when as God is 
our witness our sole motive is to air them for the public good 
and for the protection of our own little ones who are just as 
dear to us as your children are to you. 

Once more we say that it is cowardly, unfair and unmanly 
for a man to set up and maintain one standard of morals for 
himself and insist upon a different standard for those of the 
c^pposite S9X. 



THE IDEA 7 

It is the height of unmanliness and injustice for the man 
of impure habits and unclean life to insist upon foisting him- 
self upon society and at the same time insist upon driving 
from society those of the opposite sex who have fallen vic- 
tims to the miserable machinations of this man or some oth- 
er of his kind. 

Would we lower the standard now demanded of our wo- 
manhood? By no means, but we say that the very conditions 
against which we are protesting are inevitably lowering that 
standard, and herein lies our danger.^ 

Turn loose a race of men of debased tastes and perverted 
morals upon society and the inevitable result will be the tear- 
ing down of the very-bulwark of the state, of society and of 
the home — the exalted sweetness and purity of our girlhood 
and womanhood. 

W/9 would in no sense lower the standard for our woman- 
hood — we would rather raise it yet higher — but we would so 
put the mark upon every male moral delinquent that his 
downfall would be just as complete and his disgrace just as 
pronounced as is now that of his hapless victim. 

We would say to the man : What you demand of that sweet, 
innocent girl whose hand you seek in marriage she shall have 
the right to demand of you. 

We believe our divine Creator so constituted us as to make 
this the only right and fair standard, and it is sheer effront- 
ery for any fair minded and manly man to deny it. 

We make this broad statement to those mothers who have 
sons and daughters just blooming into the beauty and sweet- 
ness of the young life — not one of those children whom you 
love as your own life is safe in the present condition of soci- 
ety. We know that there are many good women who, in 
their own innocency, will indignantly deny this statement 
and this imputation of wholesale moral delinquency on the 
part of the men of the community. But we make it with a, 
profound conviction that it is amply justified by our knowl- 
edge of facts and conditions. 

Next week we will continue this discussion and ask sA 
least your careful reading and fair consideration. 



THE IDEA 



WiU Eat Up The Journal If- 



Letter concerning the industrial war in Philadelphia in which some 
questions are put to The Evening Journal. 

Abingdon, Va., 3-12-10. 
Editor The Idea: — 

Apropos the Strike Situation in Phila., 1 want to put some questions 
to The Richmond Evening Journal, that friend of Union labor who 
sings the "identity-of-interest" refrain and counsels its readers to "Vote- 
her straight" for the Democrat Machine at all elections: Why have 
cbere never been any laws enacted to enable labor to get a living wage 
without being compelled to "Strike" for it? 

Then when compelled to strike in order to secure living wages and 
conditions, why is it that the entire machinery of the law is always 
avalable to CAPITAL in defeating the strike; the custodians of the 
taw being lined up solid for capital and bristling with enmity toward 

labor? 

/ 

Why are the "friends" of labor, who have been elected, largely 
by the labor vote, either as "Democrats" or "Republicans", al\vays 
found to be the active partisans of capital in trampling their labor con- 
stituents into submission in time of strikes? 

How can a news-paper honestly advocate the theory o" "identity of 
interest of capital and labor" and advise its "labor" readers to vote a 
Democratic or a Republican ticket at elections, seeing that the minions 
of these parties are always the puppets and partisans of capital; ready, 
when elected, to use their office and legal powers to crush these poor, 
innocent trusting souls who so guilelessly voted them into office? 

If the "Journal" can answer these questions satisfactorily 1 will agree 
ro eat the entire edition. 

Very truly, 

B. M, DUTTON. 



THE IDEA 9 

Don^t fool yourself into thinking that you can kill an idea anyhow. 

Truth and right can not die. They some how have life in themselves. 
Lies and error alone die. They some how or other kill themselves. 

Another thing about the truth is this, that it does not care about re- 
sults. It can wait for them for it knows that Truth is immortal and 
will live in spite of hell itself, and that wrong and error and falsity are 
kin to death and cannot live, foi they' have no immortal part. Their's 
is to cease to be. 

It should be your concern to see that you are not deceived by error 
and wrong. For their work is simply to DECEIVE mortal men so 
that they may not accept the truth and take on immortality. When 
you know the truth, 'The truth shall make you free," free from the 
bondage of sin, — free from the law of death. "Turn ye, Turn ye, for 
why will ye dia^"" 



And The Idea is not dead yet. 



Letter From Danville^ 



Danville, Va., 

March 12, 1910 
Adon A. Yoder, Esq. 

904 Capitol St., 

Richmond. Va. 
Dear Yoder : — 

It gives me pleasure to see that you are pressing forward 
with your "Idea" and have not succombed to the adverse forces trying 
to press you to the wall — You have my best wishes and if you get in a 
very tight place and want ($5.) five dollars to keep the paper going — 
let me hear from you. 

Yours truly 

W. M. 



10 THE IDEA 

The Idea Sued Again 



On last Tuesday both commissioners Manning and Gordon entered 
suit against the editor and the Williams Printing Company for$10,000^ 
damages each. 

Thus it can easily be seen that these men simply want to destroy 
The Idea by legal fees. 

If they were simply after vindication, whatever that may mean to 
ithem, they would be sa isfied with the criminal case. But- no, the or- 
der has gone forth that The Idea must be destroyed by suits or other- 
wise. 

Bur we think we will play theoi a. trick this time. We may just 
j;defend ourselves and not waste our money in lawyer's fees when the 
■Courts are against us anyhow. 



An Appeal to the People 



The editor begs to apologize to those friends who would 
have stood by us in carrying the fight to the Supreme Court 
for accepting the verdict of the Hustings Court in our recent 
trial. 

We did it only because we were too fagged out to decide 
what to do, and besides it appeared that our friends had de- 
aerted us at the time. 

We earnestly beg those who care for the future welbeing 
of justice in their city to uphold us in our present fight against 
the ring which is determined to down us. The Saunders suit 
Is yet unsettled, and there are two suits on entered by Man- 
ning and Gordon. 

If you want to help defeat the bosses and free Richmond 
from existing evils, now is the time your contribution to the 
cause can help much. If you are not satisfied with men in 



THE IDEA 11 

office who use their position to persecute and harrass and 
arrest and lock-up and sue and fine and jail and assault, then 
it is time to send your assistance to A. P. Davis, Sec'y., care 
of Idea office, 904 Capitol St. , Richmond, Va. 
Do it now for yourself and your children. 



Money Given Away 



Pmes for Boys* Four Different Contests* 

On last Saturday The Idea gave away prizes to the twelve boys sell- 
ing the largest number of Ideas in the December- January prize con- 
test. Only ten prizes were offered but so many of the boys did well 
that twelve were given away. 

The first prize, a handeome fountain pen, was won by Joseph 
Anderson. ^ 

The eleven additional prizes were first quality two blade pocket 
knives. 

The February-March contest will be up with next Saturday's sales, 
tho it will probably be two weeks later before all the returns are in 
and counted. 

Besides these bi-monthly prizes a friend of The Idea's has offered 
to give away 5 one dollar bills to the five boys selling the largest num- 
ber of Ideas today ,| March l^th. 

If you can't stick to it long enough to get a two month's prize, v^hy 
not get busy today and earn a dollar or two besides an extra dollar. 

HERE^S YOUR CHANCE, BOYS 

Next month, April, The Idea will give away in addition to the regu- 
lar two-monthly prizes a suitable prize to every boy who sells as many 
as twenty copies of The Idea in each of the five Saturdays in chat month. 
By this means you can get a prize even if the other fellow does beat 
you selling. AJl you have got to do is to sell twenty Ideas each Satur- 
day in April. -> 



12 THE IDEA 

The Hard-Up Prosecution of The Idea 



The attorneys for the prosecution against the ecfitor of this paper 
stated to the jury that we had libelled even the jodges of the Sapreme 
Court of the United States. 

We knew it was false bat we did not know what could even have- 
suggested such a slander against as until it developed that they referr- 
ed to a leter addressed to The Idea by a former candidate for the po- 
sition of State Supt. of Education and published in The Idea in which 
the writer of th« letter had criticized the Supreme Co»ri for a certain. 
Tank and unjust decision. 

In the first olace, the criticism was not a libel. 

In the second place, it was not ours but was vouched for by one 
whose name was duly signed to the article. 

In the third place, judges are not only not above criticism^ bat are 
more the subject for criticism than others, both 'because of their pow- 
ers and responsibility and because of the mess of a fix in which our 
laws are that makes it possible for a judge who goes wrong to do such 
permanent hurt to the people. 

This paper is not concerned with the errors and sins of prrvafe indi- 
viduals, but the higher up the public official, the more careful will 
The Idea be to examine into and :rftrcize just as severely as we feel 
the occision may warrant, and because judges have so great power. 
The Idea will jump them quicker and more harshly than others. 

They, above all, should be just and true and when they are not jusi 
and true The Idea will be after them in spite of little 2^4 "defenders; 
of the courts" with their exaggerated notions of **dignity of office." 

There should be no such thing as '"DIGNITY OF OFFICE" which 
would keep the people from critictsing those who go wrong, but there 
should be such a regard for the DIGNITY OF ACTUAL PUBLIC 
SERVICE that public servants would be above going wrong. 

Away with this absurd pride of office and give us more pride oi 
justice. 



THE IDEA 13 



The Very Idea 



if you don't like The Idea, read the profane "I Swear" or 
the Spineless Supreme or the decadent and indecent evening 
sheet owned by the Supreme. 

They are all in the same boat. 

The first, we understand, has already died after living for 
«ight days on its ability to extract money under false pre- 
tences. The third, we understand, is on its last le.gs and the 
second is so mad at its prospects of losing revenue by the 
advent of a rival which is exposing its sins to the public that 
it has so fallen into all manner of vile abuse and pernicious 
teaching to save its own hide that it is unfit to be read. 

If you want to know what is really going on but which the 
other papers think they cannot afford to print for fear of 
offending their advertisers and some of their friends in office 
then you get The Idea, the livest paper in the state. 

■t^^^i^l I ■ I I I I " I II I I ' ^'1 I I II I II I II I'lin. 

WEEKLY PRICE L.JST 

51. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-] C N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GRCOERIES 

^20 N. 26th Street Eichmond, Va. 

-Gold Medal Flour, per bag , . 44 VCHnnet Condensed Milk,, per can , 11 

'Obelisk Flour, per bag . ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 28 

Dunlop Flour, per bag , .41 6 Bars Octagon Soap . . . . 25 

'Clover Leaf Flour, per bag . . 44 Good Mackerel ....... 05 

Arbuckle CofFee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck - 25 

'Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 23 Smoked Shoulder, per lb, , . 14 

"Good Lard, per lb 15 cpprrai 

;Round Beef Steak, per lb. . . , 15 lyftClAL 

■;?ofk Steak, per lb .18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

«AJ1 Goods not mentioned are in line with our low price«L 



14 THE IDEA 

LIBEL 

If The Times- Dispatch is so evilly inclined as to basely mis- 
represent the Rev. J. D. McAlister, State Sec'y of the Anti- 
Saloon League, as they continue to do by publishing absolute- 
ly false reports of his utterances and that too when they have 
so many readers who are in sympathy with the League and 
who must censure them for their unfairness and be driven 
away from that paper by this means, it can easily be under- 
stood why this same Supreme (?) will be ten times as false in 
its reports of the trial of the editor who had exposed the un- 
fairness and falsity of this supreme on many occasions and 
who had consequently gained the intensest enmity and ill- 
will of this self-exalted, misrepresentative sheet, the foe of 
all things good when it costs a sue to stand for the right. 

The Times-Dispatch seemed to take a peculiar delight in 
making the people believe that the editor had said exactly 
Opposite to what he did say, and in making evidence^ which 
if correctly reported would have helped him, by manipula- 
tion and distortion damn him and hold him up to scorn. 

The editor of this paper knows nothing so outrageous and 
contemptably mean as to poison the minds of a man's friends 
against him by base lies and slanders, especially when the 
one so outraged because of lack of funds to defend himself 
is practically at the mercy of his more powerful enemy. 



Advertisers in Idea, Get Results 

Advertisers in The Idea tell us that they find this paper the 
best advertising medium they have ever tackled. 

You see its this way: we don't employ an advertising man 
and don't have time to solicit ads; therefore we don't have 
very many advertisements. As a result the readers read all 
our ads there being only about five pages of ads in each 
number. 

Write today for rates or call Monroe 2708. 



THE IDEA 15 

A PRIZE 

Find the Innocent 



W« dont claim to be without error,, atid yet will give a prize to tine 
wazn or woman, boy or girl, infant or aged, bond or free, black, white 
<or yellow, sane or insane, high or low., rich or poor, good,, bad or in- 
different, or any body or any thing eke in creadon that will find one 
innocent person that The Idea has criticized^ 



Why we haven't done anything but hit a ^ew of tlie biggest rascals 
:yet. When we get after the lesser lights and the smaller fry there 
«nay be some grounds for a difference of opinion. But you'd better 
wait for' that before you decide that this paper has dome anything 
wrong. I 

If this paper hits yoii, don^t get mad. It's a heap cheaper to get 
Tight, and then you'll feel so much better when you come down to 
die. And remember that whether The Idea gets you or not, there's 
one thing that will get you, and that's cold, scrawny fingered Death. 
Better get right. 



Print it Right 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office.^ The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



WANTED, 



"^C^ RErSlT Small house or flat in suburbs. Barton 

— — Heights preferred. 



16 THE IDEA 

The Times-Dispatch^ Like the. Devifj 
Quotes Saripture 



Nof content with using their news columns to hurt the eaase of the 
good people of Virginia who are fighting for the preservation of the 
kome and the happiness and comfort and financial welfare of all the 
citizens of the state by banishing this expensive and nefarious evil from 
the state,— not content with this method, The Times-Dispatch of re- 
cent date, Tuesday, March 8th, fights the cause of the whiskeyites 
in its editorial columns by using the method of the Devil of old m 
tempting the Master^ in using scripture to make an argument for e\il 
against McAlister, 

Just think of it, a papef with the reputation of the Times-Dispatch 
quoting the Bible against a minister of the gospel because he is en- 
gaged in the greatest and most practical v/ork any ohurch has ever 
dared to undertake. 

So long as the preachers preach beamiful theories the Times-Dispatch 
says, "Amen," but just as soon as a preacher follows the Master, who 
went about doing good" the '^'^holier-than-thoia" Supreme m Virginia ■ 
begins to quote scripture m the interest of the saloon. 

The religion that does not interfere with the sins of the worfd bus 
is simply a matter of theory, seems to be all thai the Tiroes-Dispatch 
dares sanction. 

The Devil fought God by quoting: scripture to Jesus. 

The Times-Dipatch fights the good by quoting scripture t& McAI- 
mex. 



Street Car Accident 



Mrs. S. L Llewellyn was thrown from a street car on Mam streef,. 
»fce 19th of August last. Will the lady who spoke to her just before 
she fell send address, also anyone who saw the accident. It will be 
semembered that she held on to the handlebar and ran along for sever- 
al feet before falling. Address S, L LLEWELLYN, Richmond, Va., 
R. F. D.'No. 3, Box 100. 



! 'TOR MEN ONLY" 



i 



We wish to announce to our riiany customers that we are now 
located in our store at No. 618 East Main St, and are fully 
equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES 
in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We 
also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVINg ^ND POCKET 
KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely 
guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a 
tnal and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- 
I perts in this line of work. 



Razors Honed And Set 1 5c. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE "SHARP-O" CO. | 

618 EAST MAIN STREET. ! 

^!><HB»<m<aB>4D<BHD0D<BHD<lQl><aBB>«»aHI><>I><H»ai>atflDa04aBB0S3f><B8I><ll>aB^ 

A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 

«• NORTN LOMBARDY STREET FHOMC 1SC1 

RICHMOND, VA. 

C«Umat«s cheerfully Qiven on Sldewatli 
tavlng. Hall*, Vestibules, Basements, dc. 



Th« editor has knovn Mr. fwJng personally for the hist tventy years, 
and he takes pleasure in statins that his reputation for first-class w«r9i 
Mid stralflht forward, satisfactory dealins is uneicefled. 



PROMPT SERVICE. 



POLITE ATTENTION. 



TELEPHONE 738. 



JOHN W. GOODE 

(Formerly with G. Watt Taylor) 



- - FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, - - 

FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES. CANNED GOODS, 

FRUITS, TOBACCO, CIGARS, Etc. 



2520 E. BROAD ST., 



RICHMOND, VA. 



LOOK BOYS! I 



! 



MANY PRIZES 

Be sure and read the article in this number on prizes for 
ii,,=i^i^^i SEULEVO IDEAS ^^^^^^^^^^^^7.^ 

EVERY BOY CAN WIN 



Free Automobile Ride to the Five Boys selling the largest 
number next week. 



5c 



WBBKLY xJC T^iOt OOiFY 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV March 26, 1 9 10 No. J 3 



More Straightforward 
Talk on Live Matters. 



FOR Sale at all news stands 



BEING some SERMONETTES PBBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 

COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND. VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 

YODER. EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 

CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND. VA. 



Prizes for Boys— February-March Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for the 
December- January contest. A handsome fountain pen was the first prize, and 
first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine boys selling 
the nine next largest numbers. One Iwy sold 491 copies in the two months. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they db not secure the 
first prize. 

^^^^*0^^mt^^t^mi^^^^fm$0^^ m i t^mm immm ^^ii» I immm ^ i 



I 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

^ y^h AND MAIN STS. 

jj^ We hare io our Fall Stock, and ar« 

^ showiDg; special food Taluea in 

f DIAMONDS, WATCntS. lEWaRY, SIlVQtWARf, CUT iM. Etc. 

We inTite your inipuctioD 



1 



' '<^'^- ''^^"^W^- "^^"^^ '^^''^ "^V^:^ 9 

HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet r 

wants, in Drugs and Medicines 2) 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, ^ 

A Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

f Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

A. R ROBINS, - i 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. ^ 

jk Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. i 

t _ . . _ _ . . _ f 



Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 



,-^y-«>'^i.-^:> -^>'4K>'«>'^>^«:^'^'^y'<lb-'^'^y'^>^-4b-'^y-^>'e 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV MARCH 26, 1910 No. 13 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Councilmen to Be Elected 



Have you noticed how all live questions die, when the pol- 
iticians have their way with the papers, just before election 
time? A daily paper announces that the change in form of 
city government will be brought up again "after primary." 
The Idea will bring it up "before primary." 
The papers quote Mr. Cutchins: "I concluded it would be 
better to wait until after the primary, not caring to make 

THE PROPOSITION AN ISSUE IN THE CAMPAIGN. 

Now The Idea has this to say: That unless men are elected 
at this primary who will vote for a better and much more 
simplified form of city government for Richmond, then Rich- 
mond can not hope for any permanent betterment in the 
near future . 

Even if good men are elected to office and the same old 
outlandish council of 56 men is continued, the evils which 
beset Richmond today will as naturally beset Richmond in 
the future and tho three-fourths of the council be good men 



2 THE IDEA 

still Richmond will have a rotten and expensive government, 
for it is so easy with the present plan for a few organized 
crooks to get even good men to do their bidding. 

Let this be the issue in the campaign: Do you favor the 
present worn out and cumbersome and expensive form of gov- 
ernment, or do you favor a small council elected at large by 
all the voters? 

The ward system must go, or else Richmond will continue 
to be dominated by crooks and grafters. 



Manchester Annexation 



By all means let the people vote against annexation for 
this great big reason: However good a thing it would be un- 
der an economical form of government it can not be success- 
fully denied the greater the city the greater the per 
CENTAGE OF WASTE under a wasteful and corrupt govern- 
ment. 

Richmond is politically rotten and altho Manchester may 
be likewise, still the sum total of corruption wo. Id be greater 
under consolidation because of the larger field for crooked 
WARD POLITICS which is the basis of the evils of our pres- 
ent system. Abolish the ward system : Elect all officers at 
large: Reduce the number of councilmen to five or six. and 
then and only then will it be wise to enlarge the bounds of 
the city. 

If the corporation be on a sensible responsible business 
basis then the larger the unit the greater the efficiency and 
economy. 

If it be extravagent and wasteful then the smaller the 
unit the less the percentage of waste. 

Neither the people of Richmond nor of Manchester can af- 
ford to increase the opportunity for the grafter. Don't lis- 
ten to a newspaper which has opinions because it pays, but 
think for yourselves. 



THE IDEA 3 

The Junior Editor of The Idea 

The other morning as our 5-year old boy awoke he turned 
over in bed and said: "Papa, you know what I'm going to do 
when I get (to be) a man?" We answered, "No, Harry 
What are you going to do? " 

"I'm going to sell Ideas", he said, "I'm going to have ^n 
office like you and sell Ideas every week." 

" But, Harry," we replied, "suppose they put you in jail» 
like they did me?" 

" I don't care if they do, papa. That don't make any dif- 
.ference, when you have't done any wrong." 

Now, this boy had been to see us in jail and had brought 
comforting words showing that he was proud rather than 
ashamed that his father dared suffer for the right. And as 
we talk to boys and young men all over the city we rejoice 
that they are being awakened and are realizing that it costs 
to fight for the right and that the evil is well organized and 
powerfully intrenched, but they are awakening to their duty 
and will yet, tho the editor of this paper should die today, 
rescue their government from the hand of the spoiler. 

Did you ever think of this, that the more this paper is 
fought against the sooner will Richmond throw off those wlxo 
are opposed by it ? 

The greatest enemies the crooks in Richmond ha\e are 
themselves. 

If. they did not fight back The Idea's work would not have 
as early good results. 

But when they help the good work by getting mad and 
telling on themselves, then look out for an early remedy. 



4 THE IDEA 

SUNDAY CLOSING 

FAIR PLAY 

The other day Biancini paid a fine in the Hustings Court for being 
3en on Sunday. The court put him under bond of $100.00 to keep 
the peace. 

Now ahho it has been found that bonds in Richmond don't amount 
to much and bondsmen are not always held up to their bond, still we 
believe this will deter the offender for a while. 

We wonder though why it is that Bianini alone is put under bond. 
Why don't Justice John put these other offenders under bond and 
keep them from continuing to violate the law as they do each Sunday. 
It is not fair to put Biancini under bond and let a merchant on Broad 
street three blocks away violate the law every Sunday without even a 
fine. 

The evil newspapers of Richmond are continually talking of blue 
laws and classing this law just made among the out of date laws and 
telling the people that a law which does not have public sentiment 
behind it should not be enforced. 

Notice what Gov. Folk of Missouri said about that the other day. 

'Laws can be enforced in large cities and towns as well as any place 
if the officials want them enforced. An official can't get around en- 
enforcing the laws on the ground that public sentiment doesn't support 
the laws. PUBLIC SENTIMENT IS SUPPORTING THE LAW OR 
THE LAW WOULD BE REPEALED AT THE STATE LEGISLAT- 
URE." 

The real trouble is that when an official don't want to enforce the 
law he says public sentiment don't wan: it enforced ahho public sen- 
timent is just the reason the law was made. 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



THE IDEA 



More Plain Talk 

To Those Having Boys and 
Girls To Raise in Richmond 

A Delicate Question Handled in a 
Straightforward Way 

Due to the exhausted condition of the editor he has had to have a 
part of the editorial work done by another. This article is contribut- 
ed — The editor. 



/Continuing the discussion commenced in last week's 
^^-^ Idea we wish to take up this week other phases of this 
social evil question. 

That there is such an evil of giant proportions abroad in 
the land is admitted by all, as we saw last week. 

That the existence of this evil is dangerous to the home 
and to society we also saw. 

We discussed at some length last week the attitude of the 
press on this question and showed that they are responsible 
in large measure for the aggravation of deplorable conditions. 

We wish this week to look more definitely at the causes of 
the prevailing corruption of society and the home. 

The primary cause, as we believe, of the widespread exist- 
ence of the social evil is the maintenance of wide open hous- 
es devoted to the business of prostitution. This is putting 
the case very frankly and bluntly but it is all that can be 
made out of it. Certain women of the vilest possible char- 
acter rent houses in certain quarters of the city. They rent 
these houses from some of the most prominent people in the 
community. The owners of this property, some of them. 



6 THE IDEA 

stand high in social, church and business circles. They rent 
through the intermediary of real estate concerns, of course, 
but they rent just the same and in so doing they are held by 
the law to be criminals and are liable to severe penalty. Say 
what you please about it these men are parties to the busi- 
ness of prostitution. It is a notorious fact that they reap an 
enormous harvest from the outrageo s rents charged these 
women. 

Listen parents! Who pays these respectable property own- 
ers these enormous rents? Is it the woman who runs the 
place? Where does she get the money? From the poor way- 
ward child who has been ensnared to become an inmate of 
these places and pays her own blood money to her mistress 
at an enormous rate. And your boys who when they are out 
of your sight and you think they are among the right sort of 
companions are taken to these places and started upon a 
career of dissipation fraught with awful consequences. And 
this blood money goes in large part into the pockets of some 
of your respectable neighbors who own this property. 

Part of this money derived from the prostitution of our 
boys and girls goes into the coffers of the miserable wretches 
who run these houses, to be spent by them in dissipation or 
laid up by them in the savings banks. It is a well known 
fact that some of these women who are engaged in this ne- 
farious traffic have savings accounts up in the thousands of 
dailars. 

Their stock in trade is VIRTUE — the virtue of your boys 
and girls without respect to age, or position. 

These creatures put their names on their doors in bold let- 
ters. They send out bright lights and gay music from their 
houses and their inmates sit in their doors in suggestive garb 
and manner, by these means advertising their wares. 

Each new boy that they can entice from the purity of the 
mother's home and the mother's bosom they send out as one 
Haore emissary to prey upon the daughter of your neighbor 
and once that daughter is started on the downward way the 
odds are that she will become one more inmate of the house 
of prostitution, thereby adding one more source of revenue 



THE IDEA 7 

to the keeper of the house and to the respectable owner of 
the house. 

Oh, you ask if it is possible that these things are true in 
this land of churches. "Why do not the authorities pass 
laws upon this question to protect our children from any such 
evils." 

The legislature of this great commonwealth of Virginia has 
done that very thing and has pronounced the most severe 
punishment upon both those who conduct these houses and 
these who own the property in which they are conducted. 

Here is the law in the former case: 

"If any person keep a house of ill- fame resorted to for the 
purpose of prostitution or lewdness, he shall be confined in 
jail not exceeding one year and fined not exceeding $200; and 
in a prosecution for this offence, the general character of 
such house may be proved." 

But do you ask how it is possible for these houses to run so 
openly in violation of this law for such a nefarious purpose. 

Go to the man who has been elected to the highest office 
in your city and ask him WHY! 

Go to those men who have been elected by your council- 
men — who themselves are the creatures of your ballots— 
that body of men called Board of Police Commissioners and 
ask them WHY! 

Go to the man who has been elected by this board as the 
head of the great police force which is solemnly sworn to 
protect you and yours and ask him WHY! 

Ah, they will tell you that they think it unwise to attempt 
to enforce this law. That they have gotten together and have 
decided upon a better plan. They will tell you that it is a 
public necessity that your boys be debauched and that your 
neighbor's daughters be the means of that debauchery and 
that therefore it is best to have these houses wide open where 
this necessary debauchery can be carried on with grrat facility. 

Oh yes, they will tell you that our representatives in the 
legislative halls made these laws but "we think it better not 
to try to enforce them." This thing has always existed and 

(Continued on page 11) 



THE IDEA 



Police Board. 

At It Again. 



THE IDEA has all along charged that the Police Depart- 
ment was exerting a corrupt and undue influence over 
the administration of justice in Richmond by forbidding the 
police force doing their duty by instructing them not to en- 
force the laws which they had sworn to enforce. 

This is the case with the house-of -ill- fame evil; This is 
the case with the Sunday-closing-laws; This is the case, it 
now develops, with the auto-speeding-law. 

In the police court on Friday of last week, it developed 
that certain Police Commissioners had instructed the 
police and it was the understanding among autoists that the 
law against speeding should be ignored, even to the letting 
of autoists run at almost twice the legal speed limit. 

And these Police Commissioners appeared in the police 
court and not only spoke for the violators of the law but re- 
quested Justice John to dismiss the offenders. 

Now the point is this, that Justice John did actually dis- 
miss these offenders after such request by a police commis- 
sioner if the newspaper report be true, and it has not yet 
been denied. 

This is exactly the state of affairs which we charged ex- 
isted in the Malloy case. We charged that the "interest 
police commissioners and political powers had in the outcome" 
"was evidenced by their presence and position in the police 
court, " and that "the corrupt alliance was shown by the pres- 
ence of the police commissioners and others." 

Here we have a similar case. The corrupt alliance is ac- 
knowledged by the commissioners when they state that the 
department, (which in law has nothing to do with law en- 
forcement whatever) had no intention to hold autoists strict- 



THE HOEA ^ 

Sy TeBpons'ible and, according- to Justice John's -vv'ords, '"has 
;allowed them to go almost twice as fast." 

And here also we have tflie Justice tettitig -off the violatoi-s 
ttecaiiise the police ceramissicners acte<^ as they did. 

Yet the editor of this pa|)er is sentenced to jail for stating 
just suek faots as these -all because a trial was forced on hin:i 
whezi foe was physically too week and mentally exhausted to 
'.even attempt to defend himself against base misrepresentat- 
'ions of his charges. 

Now it behooves us to state tliat no -one would e\en think 
from this article 'jr from tlie former one that we had sug- 
gested for a moment that Justice John got -any n^ney for his 
decision or that the term corrupt alliance meant that the 
violators of the law paid to the police department for immun- 
ity and there would be no occasion for even stating this here 
if it were not for the fact that attorneys for the prosecution 
tried to make it appear tliat we had done that very thing and 
were it not for the further fact that if that were libel this would 
be too if we did not state more clearly than we would ordin- 
•arily think it nessessary that our use of the word corrupt was 
the ORDINARY primary use of that word as defined by our 
authority Webster. 

It is just this assumption of authority fey the police com- 
mission which is not only corrupt in itself but is the source 
of corrupting the streams of justice in regard to all our laws 
3n that it lets down the bars to violation of any law by taking 
law enforcement out of the duly constituted executives of 
the law and puting it into the hands of a Ixjard which is not 
only not directly responsible to the people but which also acts 
in secret, and secrecy is an ally of the devil himself. 

In the auto speeding case the justice was in a quandary. 
He either must fine, according to law $50,00 or dismiss the 
cases. And BECAUSE the police department had undertaken 
to annul the law by changing in practice the speed limit and 
was thus in effect doing away with law the justice must 
either act contrary to law, which he did, or else punish all 
for a small offence which would work a hardship on the pub- 
lic because the public had been given to understand by the 



10 THE IDEA 

department that the faw would not be enforced and if the departnient 
bad a right to let off the women of cnme on Mayo street, surely is 
bad a right to chan,ye thss law of speeding in favor of law respecting 
citizens. 

Now, th'oitlie principle of letting the pofic? roinmissionera have any- 
fhir?]^ to do v/ith the ustice's decision or the sworn duty of the police- 
Or the chan5^m<> of duly made laws ia both pernicioas and anarchistic, 
^till The Idea woufi perhapjs not have anything to say aboat thiscom- 
paratfvely minor offence of the Justice in going contrary to law. 

The po-irrt however is that the bars are 1st down to an evil influence 
on lavr enforcement and that is the rnflaerKre of the police board. 

Now^ in the IVIoIloy caae when Justice John appeared to- be influ- 
enced by the presence and p>o&ition of police ccfmmis^ioners in the 
court we felt h time tO' censure all parties concerned BECAUSE THE 
DECISION rendereti appeared to be DECIDELY UNJUST in treating 
two dtfTerem prostitutes uaalike on the same offence. 

The Idea does not attempt to be so particular as to jump one for a 
technical ignoring of law if the action is not unjast BUT when such ac- 
tion makes one party suffer heavily and lets off easily a more guilty 
offender then will this paper protest in no ancertain terms, tho the ed- 
itor has to suffer for it. 

The pofice commissioners admitted a rotten, corrupt aHiance with 
law violators by rgrvoring their oaths of office and establishing contrary 
to law two or more Red-light districts. "Their presence and posi- 
tioTj" in court, we believed, helped influence the judge in his decision 
Just as- their open defence of their instructions nullifying the speed 
limit law, according to the words of the Justice, did influence him m 
that case. 

If the editor had fef the fact that he had borrowed money in the 
dim and distant past keep him from exposing such evils he would have 
been unworthy of his position as editor. 

No, The Idea has done its duty and will continue so to do as long; 
as ft lasts. 

Just suppose The Idea bad l^egun operating here and refused to 
expose such public men as are known to be crooks; then the people- 
would have krvown what would have been true, that we were out for 
the coin and not to accomplish good. Just as they know by such ac- 
tions on the part of certain daily papers they know that their object is 
to make money, but such is not a base object for them, tho if The- 
Idea, made money it would be considered a nefarious crime. 



THE IDEA n 

More Plain Talk 

(Continued from page 7^ 
therefore will always exist It is a necessary evil thai youi- 
boy and your neighbor's daughter should be sold body and soul 
for the sake of the greed of the keepers of the houses and the 
owners of the property and for ' 'the protection of the home 
and of society," That is the sort of argument they use to 
justify their position and their violationof their solemn oath 
of office. 

What J Is it necessary for the protection of your home and 
your neighbor's home that that dear child whom you love as 
your own life should be ruined forever? 

Tell us, mothers, you who have ofFerd your very lives a^ a wiUmg 
sacrifice to bring into the world those pure, innocent, little ones ac your 
knee, do YOU think it a necessary evil that any one or all of them 
should be prostitutes for the protection of society? if so, which one 
will you pick out and thus offer as a gift "for the protection of society.'' 

"Oh no, not MY child," you exclaim as you gather them to your 
mother heart. 

Your neighbor's child then, ehl No, mothers, you don't think that 
either. You know that the whole miserable argu nent is damnable; 
that it is cowardly, that it is hut an excuse on the part of dissipated, 
immoral men, cowardly men for the round of vice of which they are 
guilty, but for which they would drive you as an outcast from your 
own home and children. 

On this subject we are simply heart sick and sore and we are led to 
exclaim with the man of God of old; 

'^HOW LONG? OH LORD, HOW LONG?" 



FOLK ON LAW ENFORCEMENT. 



"'A dozen aggressively righteotis men can brmg about law and order 
where lawlessness and disorder have prevailed. The business man 
who fears to give his support to any movement towards law enforce- 
ment for fear it will injure his business, is just as much a coward as 
the soldier on the battlefield who turns his back to the enemy and 
flees for safety. 



12 THK rn^.^ 

Times-Dispatcli 

News Suppressor^ 

Treated The Editor of The' Idiea ''Veiy Unlbtrl^r kdeed*'^ 



We pabfished' aboat three weeks a.'gos stafemeM sftowin-g how the 
Tirries-ETrspatch wrHfulfy and maliciously injured this paper by with- 
holding tfcfe nov^s aWat th« retractiea of t&e Rev. Tildan Sc^re? frorn 
the people". 

Likewise' Mr. !^. S. B'arbotrr of S^oath Boston was deceived hy the- 
Times- Dispatch im«y a hasty decision that the editor of The Irfea bad- 
made 3 mis-staferifenT, arnd was quoted' by the Times^EJispatcfe as hav-- 
ing gone back on the editor. 

Later Mr. Barbour sent a letter tcr fhe Tintes Uispztch refracting' 
his former position after he ioxmd oiif the truth about the Glass matter 
This letrer that paper refused to pubiish arid retirrned tc Mr. Barbour... 
Ws quote from I^lr. Barboar's letter ©f March 14, 1910. 

"I note what you" say about the Times-Dispatch not publishing the' 
last statement of Mr. Scherer, and yois' may state the same Shing from' 
me^ as I sent both th^ TJFHes-Di'spatch asad tl^e Leader a copy of my 
corrected statement, atid the T.-0. returned the piece to me refusing: 
publica-tion. I think they have treated you very onfairly indeed. With 
best wishes I am/'^v 

There are in Richmond mafiy people who have gotten false rmpres- 
.sions about this paper and about recent trials from the Times-Diapatcb 
wbjeh refused to give them the truth about us prefsrriTiig to give only 
such haflfwafy evrdence as would hurt us and as a result that paper has 
made soTfle friends of the Idea think we were wrong in our public cen- 
sures of polstica} wrong doers. A half truth is worse than a ffe and 
the Times-Dispatch has taken a delight m telling half-tristh about us 
for which we trust they shall yet have to answer in heavy damoge- 
besides for ihe absoTate falsehoods which they printed about «,$.. 



THE IDEA 13 

WEEKLY PRICE LIST 

R. L PARKER Phone Madison 4935-J C. N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GRCOERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag ... 44 Winner Condensed Milic, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, per bag . ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 28 

Dunlop Flour, per bag , . .44 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, |;er bag ... 44 Good Macicerei 05 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck . -15 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 2:5 Smoked Shoulder, per lb. . . . 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cppr'iai 

Round Beef Steak, per ib. . . . 15 iftt^i.-^u 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not mentioned are in line with our low prices. 



POLICY 



Before and after Taking The Idea 



From the records of Justice John Crutchfield's court we take the 
following extracts. 

These show that in February 1908 one Marshall Hanis was jailed 
one day and fined $20 on the same charge, of selling policy, on which 
in last August one Davy Mims was fined $50 and jailed for 30 days. 

Now The Idea would like to enquire of Justice John why this 
difference.'' Why was Davy given 30 times as much jail sentence and 
2 1-2 times as much fine as was Marshall? 

We enquire to know. 

Will Justice John kindly answer.^ 



u 



THE rUEA'' 



rhe records' read almost idemitr»% even as to the wording of tiie- 
warrants, except th:it the one fined less ssem? to have been guilty of 
the greater cV5rae for his wafrraivti seema^ to pover a muititade of sins 
extending- over perhaps a year's dm© whils Davy's crime, according 
to the v/arrant, cavered' onty onie d^ay. 

How genilie reader, notice that Yfie Idea was horn BETWEEN the- 
limes- of the fining of the tv/o culprits. 

We wond'er if this- facr has anything:: tO' io ^vith the large fine lasr 
August. Or IS there 3oms other raasottt 

. vvstice John — ^Your move. 

TH-H: record*^ Ho,. I. 



Feb; 14. 1'908; 

Nam®- 
Marshall tlarris 



CRARQE 

On warrant, dy iHiiawfuIly set upv 
promote and be cor^cerned m a cer- 
tain lottery or raffle caMed "Policy" 
for money or other thing? sf value 
within* 12 moRths liast past.- 



RESULT 

Girilry- Fined 
$^2^ an-d senten- 
ced to jail one- 
(■1> day^ 



THE RECO^RB No, 2. 

eHAKGE- 

Oh warrant, did'an^awfuHy set upr 

promote and be concerned inacer- 

rairr game of rhance known as pol- 

I icy on the l'4th' d'ay of August, | 

Tn looking further over the record's we found only one other arresf 
for policy and that one was before we came here. That violator was- 
lined only $20 and jailed for one day. 



Aug. it 1909 

Name' 
I>avy Mims' 



RESULT 

Fined $50 
J^ied 30' days 



f>*o body seems to know and it makes no difference anyway whom 
the Times- Dispatch or the News-Leader borrows money from.. 

But it makes a big diflEerence whom The Idea borrows money 
from. 

And the reason is this: The Idea is frghring' evil,, while the two papers 
mentioned are "business enterprises", that is, they are after making" 
money and whatever is such a business enterprise is all right. 

Just let the Times-Dispatch fight evil as this paper is doing and 
light soon it will be a very important question (for the crooks) as tC' 
where they got the money,- 



THE IDEA 15 



Wm* Jennings Bryan. 

On The Saloon, 



^'Organized agaitrst pnvate virtue and public morals.'^ 

Not a question of local option because when a community attempts 
to deal with the (Question **lt must engage in a war with a foreign 
power" 

Whenever a community attempts to deal with the saloon question, 
instead of having to deal with one of its own citizens, it finds itself in a 
struggle with great corporations, which operate over a large area, and 
have a pecuniary interest in cultivating the appetite for drink; instead 
of settling the question by consulting its own voters, it must engage in a 
war with a foreign power, 

' The saloon — not every one, but as a rule — is in alliance with vice. 
It is constantly used to debauch politics, and to prevent the intelligent 
•consideration of public questions. Th« liquor interests interfere m all 
matters that may even remotely affect their interests. They made 
themselves odious at the last session of the Nebraska I^yegislature, The 
democrats had a majority in both branches for the first time in the 
State's history, and the splendid record of the Legislature has but one 
blot on it, and that blot was put there by the liquor interests. 1 hey 
controlled enough of the senators to prevent the submission of the ini 
tiative and referendum. They were willing to deny to the people or 
the State the right to express themselves on any question rathef than 
risk the use of the initiative and referedum for the submission of the 
liquor question. Insolence, arrogance and imprudence cannot go 
farther. 

The democratic party cannot afford to act as the mouthpiece of the 
liquor interests. It can have nothing In common with the selfish, 
mercenary and conscienceless crusade that the liquor interest have or- 
ganized against the home and the State — against private virture and 
public morals."— The Commonerv 



16 THE IDEA 



Money Given Away 



Prizes for Boys* Four Different Contests, 

On last Saturday' The Idea gave away prizes to the twelve boys sell- 
ing the largest number of Ideas in the December-January prize con- 
test. Only ten prizes were offered but so many of the boys did well 
that twelve were given away. 

The first prize, a handeome fountain pen, was won by Joseph 
Anderson. 

The eleven additional prizes were first quality two blade pwcket 
knives. 

The February- March contest will be up with next Saturday's sales, 
tho it ^viil probably be two weeks later before all the returns are in 
and counted. 

Besides these bi-monthly prizes a friend of The Idea's has offered 
to give away 5 one dollar bills to the five boys selling the largest num- 
ber of Ideas today, March 19th. 

If you can't stick to it long enough to get a two month's prize, why 
not get busy today and earn a dollar or two besides an extra dollar. 

KERENS YOUR CHANCE, BOYS 

Next month. April, The Idea will give away in addition to the regu- 
lar two-monthly prizes a suitable prize to every boy who sells as many 
as twenty copies of The Idea in each of the five Saturdays in chat month. 
By this means you can get a prize even if the other fellow does bear 
you selling. All you have got to do is to sell twenty Idea* each Satur- 
day in April. 



WANTED, 



"T"C^ RENT Small house or flat in suboirbs, Barton 

' Heights preferred. 

Address X care The Idea Office, Richmond, Va- 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 

•t NORTH LOMBARDY STREET PHONC latl 

RICHMOND. VA. 

lUllmatvs cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving. Halt*, Vestibules, Basements, Ac 



j "FOR MEN ONLY" ! 

I We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now 

i located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are fully 

§ equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET 

I KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely 

g guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a 

I trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- 

g perts in this line of work. 

1 

I Razors Honed And Set 1 5c. Each. 

I Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



I 

o 

I 

I THE ''SHARP-O" CO. f 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. | 



Ttte fidltor has known Mr. Cwlng personally for the last twenty years, 
and he takes pleasure in stating thet his reputation (or first-class work 
tnd straight forward, satisfactory dealing Is unexcelled. 



PROxMPT SERVICE. POLITE ATTENTION. 

TELEPHONE 738. 



JOHN W. GOODE 

(Formerly with G. Watt Taylor) 



- - FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, - - 

FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES, CANNED GOODS, 

FRUITS. TOBACCO, CIGARS, Etc. 



2520 E. BROAD ST., - - - RICHMOND, VA, i 



i LOOK BOYS! \ 

5 MANY PRIZES } 

^ Be sure and read the article in this number on prizes for ^ 

i SKU.IN( i IDKAS t 

J EVERY BOY CAN \N\M J 

# , . i 



5c 



WEBKLY v?C TTHB CX>PT 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV April 2, I9I0 No. 14 



l 

The City Council 

And 

Who To Elect 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 

BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 

COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 

YODER, EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 

CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND, VA. 



Prizes for Boys— February-March Contest 

Ten prizes will be given to the ten boys selling the greatest number of 
Ideas in February and March. Prizes were recently grven out for the 
December-January contest. A handsome fountain pen was the first prize, and 
first quality stag handle pocket knives were given to the nine boys selling 
the nine next largest numbers. One boy sold 491 copies in the two months. 

Selling Ideas pays the boys well even if they do not secure the 
first prize. 

JEWELER J.S.JAMES OPTICIAN 

^ yih AND MAIN STS. « 

j^ We have in our Fall Stock, and arc W 

^ showing special good ralueB in ^ 

f DIAMONDS, WATCHBJLWflSY, SIlVffiWARf, CUT 6'iSS, fie f 

I We invite your inspection 



HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet 



i 



wants, in Drugs and Medicings ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites. Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

- A. R ROBINS, - t 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. | 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV APRIL 2, 1910 No. 14 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Yeak 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Pollock and Mills 



Must Be Beaten 



ON April 21st the citizens of Richmond will be called upon 
to elect an entire new council of 35 members, five from 
each ward, and one-half of the board of aldermen. 

It therefore behooves each qualified voter to examine care- 
fully the candidates in his ward and see who has proven fit 
for re-election and who not, and who of the new candidates 
is capable and fit and who is not. 

Whatever is done with other councilmen let the citizens of 
Jefferson Ward defeat Morgan R. Mills and let the citizens 
of Madison Ward defeat Gilbert Pollock. 

These two men have done more than any others to thwart 
the will of the people in the past. These two have been re- 
sponsible for the election by the council of men whom the 
people have found unworthy of their positions. 



THE IDEA 

MILLS AND MANNING 



Morgan R. Mills is the man who nominated C. Manning 
for the position of police commissioner in 1907, after Mr. 
Manning had been indicted by the grand jury for misde- 
meanor in connection with the election frauds and after 
Manning had confessed in 1903 to having accepted between 
1,100 and 2,000 dollars from the Bell people for his services 
fn getting through the council an ordinance favorable to that 
company. 

Mr. Manning stated before the council investigating com- 
mittee that on a trip to New York Mr. Chipley, representa- 
tive of the Bell Co., "took us to the Waldorf and gave us an 

excellent dinner - we were wined and dined 

and smoked very fine cigars Mr. Chipley 

employed us (Saunders and Manning) jointly and he never 

stipulated any sum He gave us a thousand 

dollars between us, and afterwards he gave me some more. 
I think he probably gave me more than Mr. Saunders. 

Question— He said he thought he gave you $2,000.00. 

Answer — Well, Mr. Chipley was mistaken in that. He 
gave me $500 at first; he gave me $500 again and then I think 
he gave me $100. 

Question — Ii was for your services in advocating the pas- 
sage of the ordinance? 

Answer — Yes, sir And I went around to 

see the friends I had in the city council. 

Question— What friends in the city council did you solicit? 

Answer— I think about everybody in there in an offhand 

way I saw practically all the Jefferson 

ward delegation, and probably the Marshall ward delegation 
and such other friends as I had in the council that I felt I 

had any influence with My friends told me 

there was nothing wrong in it, that I had a right to accept 
money for my services. I took an interest in politics and 

had a right to do it I saw no impropriety 

in my getting just a small slice of it." 



THE IDEA 3 

Now this man Manning", who saw no impropriety in "get- 
ting just a small slice of it", $1,100 or more, for his political 
influence, is nominated by Morgan R. Mills and the ring-de- 
vised plan is carried through the council by the weight of 
the political influence of Morgan R. Mills and then this same 
Morgan R. Mills has the assurance to ask the voters of Jeff- 
erson ward to again return him to the council. 

Let the Church Hill people heep their eyes open and vote 
for one who will put into offices of trust men who have re- 
gard for their oaths of ofl^ce and who after swearing an oath 
to enforce the laws will not turn around and decide that it is 
not wise to enforce them — decide that their opinion must 
hold precedence over the supreme law of the land. This 
same Mr, Manning could not get elected by popular \ote, as 
a police commissioner and yet through the influence of such 
influential politicians as Morgan R. Mills, he is retained in 
office to set aside the people's laws. 

Then the voter wants to know how he can help it. The 
only way he can help it is to see to it that men are seated 
who will not vote for such men. 

The council elects police commissioners and the people elect 
the councilmen. 

Get good councilmen and you will not have to bother about 
gett ng good police commissioners. 

And when your councilmen elect police commissioners who 
do not regard their oflficial oaths then it is time to enquire 
what the trouble is with the councilman and what is his mo- 
tive in putting bad men in office. 

The Idea does not hesitate to say that after a careful con- 
sideration of the workings of the city council it has not yet 
been able to find any member who is more hurtful to the in- 
terests of the people than the two men. Pollock and Mills. 



If you have a plenty of money and edit a paper you are all right. 
But if you have to borrow money you'll have to go to jail, that is, of 
you amount to anything. 



THE IDEA 



Ring Methods 

In Attempting to Suppress The Idea 

Manning and Gordon Make Money at 

the Editor^s Expense 



Bring Action Against the Editor in the Name of the 

Commonwealth and then Collect Fees for their 

Own Pockets 

nr'O SHOW that the work of police commissioners in insti- 
■*• tuting action against the editor for criminal libel was in 
order to break up The Idea instead of in the interest of law 
and order as they pretended by swearing out a warrant in 
the name of the State, we print herewith copy of a section of 
the books of the Clerk of the Hustings Court. This shows 
how these commissioners have put money| in their pockets, 
collected from the editor. 

Mr. Manning, an officer of the state, collected 3.00 from 
the editor for testifying against the editer in his own (Man- 
ning's) behalf. 

Mr. Douglas Gordon collected $3. 00 in witness fees for his 
own pockets for summoning himself to appear against the 
editor altho he never took the witness stand. 

Likewise these men, Manning and Gordon, summoned 
many others, who had nothing to do with the case and who 
never appeared as witnesses, to appear in court and collect 
three dollars or so. 

It looks like an attempt to pile up court expenses. 

For instance, no one under the sun can tell why W. J. 
Griggs was summoned to appear, and yet, altho he never 
went on the stand, still because these commissioners sum- 
moned him the editor had to pay three dollars to him. 



THE IDEA "5 

Likewise to F. I. Gentry and J. F. Wiley, police officers, 
three dollars and two and a half respectively were paid by 
the editor simply because it appears that the police commis- 
sioners were so anxious to put The Idea out of commission 
that they summoned those who had nothing to do with the 
case, and who never offered any testimony. 

The question, therefore, is this: If these men were doing 
this work for any other than personal motives of malice to- 
wards the editor would they have collected these witness 
fees? 

Notice this, too, that all but three of these witnesses, who 
got money for their appearance, were office holders of the 
city of Richmond and nearly every one held his position 
under Messrs. Manning and Gordon and it was on such tes- 
timony that the editor was convicted in a trial forced on him 
at a time when he was too exhausted to defend himself. 

Below is the 

List of Witnesses and Fees Collected 

All except the first three are office holders, every one of 
whom has official relations with Messrs. Manning and Gordon. 



I. Reinheimer 


$1.50 


W. A. Barfoot 


$3.00 


C. T. Fitzgerald 


2.00 


R. B. Sowell 


3.0D 


C. W. Tyler . 


2.00 


W. Douglas Gordon 


3.00 


J. J. Crutchfield 


3.00 


C. Manning, Jr. . 


3.00 


W. J: Griggs 


3.00 


Louis Werner 


■ ZOO 


J. T. Wiley . 


2.50 


F. I. Gentry 


3.00 




Total 


$31.00. 


»^ 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



THE IDEA 



City Politics 

Gilbert Pollock and Others 



The voters of Madison ward have an opportunity of a 1 fe- 
time in the contest for councilmen to put out Gilbert Pollcck. 
No one should be permitted to appear to be a representative 
of the citizens whose livelihood, as far as external appear- 
ances go, is gained in opposition to the laws of the city, and 
that too in a police court presided over by a justice elected 
by the council of which he is one. 

We make no bones of saying that Justice John being hu- 
man cannot help being influenced in his decisions by the 
knowledge of the fact that the man pleading before him has 
a tremendous say as to not only what his salary shall be, but 
also as to whether he shall even get that salary at all after 
the next election. 

The very greatest piece of good that can be gained at this 
election is this, to defeat G. K. Pollock at the polls. You can 
bet your last dollar he has been looking after his political 
fences and now it is up to the citizens who must finally de- 
cide this question to look after their interests enough to put 
in office a man who regards their interests, and one who will 
not be used by the ring to vote the way the ring leads. 

What a pity that the council is to lose Mr. E. A. Barber 
from Madison ward. Mr. Barber does not offer this time for 
election unless the citizens insist on it. 

We shall have to wait till next week to show up the politi- 
cal cHque in Jefferson ward and to advocate a good man to 
succeed the real estate agent, H. R. Pollard, Jr., in Leeward. 
Remember Pollard is the man, who since coming into the 
council has done a wonderful "land office" business and has 
used his position as councilman to get through special legis- 
lation which would help land booms at the expense of the old 
tax payers of the city. 



THE IDEA 7* 

In the Boird of Aldermen contests the bout between Gunst 
and Ellett will need attention and the three cornered fight 
batwean Adams, Melton and Moody in Jefferson is also to be 
looked into. 

In this ward a scheme is on to put into the council the old 
ring by nominating a bunch of weaklings to split the opposi- 
tion vote. 

Many of those whose names were listed in the Times-Dis- 
patch as being candidates are not candidates and are not run- 
ning for office. It is evidently a political scheme and many 
seB in it the hand of Morgan Mills Past Master in the politi- 
cal game. 



The Editor in Court* 



The editor of this paper has never yet been found guilty by the 
Supreme Court and has never yet been found innocent by a lower 
court. 

Every time an appeal has been taken the decision has been changed. 
And the reason is this; The lower courts will always go against .us 
even when they go directly contrary to law for they are in close touch 
with the political ring which we are exposing and they can not afford 
to' offend the powers that be. We were sentenced to j^ail in Lynch- 
burg but the Supreme Court reversed the lower judge and if we 
could have appealed in the two cases recently tried here we are sure' 
the lower courts would be reveised because THE IDEA" HAS VIO- 
LATED NO LAW, but has done its duty. We expect to be soaked 
by the lower courts but we will continue to do our duty in spite of 
them and in spite of all the other a,gencies of evil in the community., 



THE IDEA 

Still Another Red-Light District* 



Altho Manning, Police Commissioner, on the witness stand defined 
the red-light district which the police commissioners had secretly set 
zpart as a place in which the law might be violated with impunity as 
being on Mayo and Franklin Sts. and not extending beyond Broad St, 
still he later ad nitted that there was another little red light district 
upon 8th Street, nearly a half mile away from the older section. 

Now t "lere is a place on the north side of Broad which is more no- 
torious as an assignation house than perhaps any other in the city, the 
Molloy house not excepted. This place is on the corner of Broad 
street and Jail Alley. It is a very large brick structure containing 
many rooms and operated by a woman. Entrance is made from the 
alley side which may be approached either from Broad street or from 
Marshall street, and those less bold use the latter route, sometimes 
leaving conveyances up by the Medical College. 

A remarkable fact about this house is that entrance can not be had 
through the front door, as an iron fence has been built into and across 
the ,T»arble steps. 

This was done at the time that word was sent forth from police 
headquarters that none of these houses would longer be permitted on 
Broad street. 

Just by this little subterfuge this notorious place has been permitted 
to exist for years right on Broad street. 

Like most such houses even the stranger can readily detect the nat- 
ure of the place. 

The blinds are always closed in the day time and the place is quiet 
and orderly while the sun shines. 

■ As midnight approaches, however, the place is lit up with brilliant 
lights in which scarlet plays an important part. 

Ask any old rounder and he will tell you the nature and the name 
of the owner of the place. 

A few weeks ago when the writer left the city jail at midnight it 
was raining and a well equipped carriage stood on the corner of Broad 
and Jail Alley at this house waiting for the revellers to come out. 



THE IDEA 9 

And yet the police department pretends to be anxious to break up 
these places. 

If the police department wanted to break up such places this place 
would have been the first one to wo and there would have been no. 
secret compromise with the owner on the condition that she stop up 
the front entrance. 



The News-Leader 

Lottery Scandal 



Alon^ back in the summer of last year The Idea under the headinj.^ 
of "The News-Leader Scandal" exposed the corrupt deal of that paper 
m C)Tclactin:j an unfair and misle idia(^ contest for subscribers. At the 
last moment of the contest the paper allowed Mr. S. M. Bowman to 
put up $3,000 or so for subscriptions and thus win the first 3ri7.e ap- 
parently without doing a lick of work in soliciting bonafide subscrip- 
tion. 

Such a kick was raised at the time by those who had entered the 
contest in good faith and had spent weeks of time and labor in actual 
work of solicitation, that the whole matter was throun into th^ couiis 
and now Colonel B. (). James. Speciil Commissioner to investigate 
the case declares the whole affair a lottery as defined by law and it 
looks as iho the News-Leader will be debarred from the mails as a 
result of it for the federal laws against lotteries are very strict indeed. 

Colonel James in his report states according to The Virginian, the 
only paper which on March 29th, had dared say anything about the 
rinding of the commissioner, that he does not hold either the editor or 
the owner of the paper responsible ror the misrepresentations made as 
he believes they were made withcuit their knowledge. That is indeed 
a new doctrine in Virginia, that an editor or owner of a paper con- 
ducting a lottery can get off by claiming ignorance. 

If "misrepresentations" were made concerning the campaign the 
paper certainly must have known because were they not the agent 
through which the misrepresenting was done.^ 



10 THE IDEA 

, Was it not the columns of The News-Leader that alone advertised 
the contest ? 

Can it be that the decision of the commissioner is influen:ed by the 
fact that Col. James owes his election as secretary of the common- 
wealth CO the activity of the editor of The News-Leader in opposing 
his most powerful opponent's nomination by the State Committee? 

It looks like the really responsible parties in any fraud in Virginia 
are never brout^ht to justice if they haopen to have influence in politics. 

The commissioner refers to "tricks" and ''subterfuges" and "fraud- 
ulent practices" and "misrepresentations" and decides that the whole 
scheme was a "lo:tery" and says that "Because the 'ules and condi- 
tions governing the contest were frequently changed after the contest 
was in progress, and because of various misrepresentations and misun- 
understandings it is impossible to determine who really won by the 
original terms, since, says the commissioner, "the subtle terms of this 
shrewdly disguised lottery make it difficult to classify it with other and 
different lotteries." 

As a result all the men, women and children who spent time, labor 
and money with the promise of reward will have to lose everything 
they put into the contest because they were deceived by a public 
newspaper. 

Tne prizes are declared confiscated to the state and the end is not 
yet. 

Tho the people who took part in the affair are not morally to blame 
still they should have expected nothing more from a paper whose 
moral standards are so perverted as to deliberately fight for a perpetu- 
ation in Virginia of the most nefarious traffic that ever cursed a peo- 
ple — the legalized alcoholic beverage traffic. 



^^^ ^ j^i^ 



THE IDEA 11 

Carlton McCarthy 



The Live Wire, Speaks to Men 

Kichmond has had one Mayor, — perhaps more, but cer- 
tainly one, —and that one is Carhon McCarthy, the uncom- 
promising foe of evil. 

Some years ago Carlton McCarthy edited a paper called 
"The Live Wire", which same live wire not only burnt a 
way for him into the hearts of his fellow citizens but burnt 
alive many evil doers and eventually earned for the editor 
the title most appropriate to him, of the Live Wire Ma^or of 
Richmond. 

On Monday night, Nov. 21st, Carlton McCarthy gave a 
characteristic speech at the First Baptist Church. 

The occasion was the meeting of the Men's I eague of that 
church, of which Carlton McCarthy was the first president 
about forty years ago. 

In this speech he showed the lack of organization on the 
part of workers for right as contrasted with the- well laid 
plans of organized evil. His text was, 'The children of this 
world are more wise in their generation than the children of 
Light." And among other things he said: 

"They are organized; they are equalized; they are capital- 
ized." 

Referring to the dime theatre he said: "Doing more harm 
than anything that has happened in all my life in Richmond." 

"Many of you don't know it, and yet the charter of the 
city has put it into your power to prevent it; not simply to 
stop it, but to prevent it. If you know that such a house is 
being built you can actually stop work on it." 

Referring to the whiskey business, he said: "The otl^er 
day a great big giant of a fellow, over six feet tall, (mean- 
ing Senator Keezeli) and chairn an of Finance Ccnr.n ittee of 
the State, got up on the fl(ior of the Senate and said that the 
State of Virginia could not get along without the revenue 
from whiskey licenses. And I say, if that's true, then fare- 



12 THE IDEA 

well, old Virginia; let her rip. If the government can't be 
run without it, the I say it ought to stop running." 

"The liquor business constitutes all the things the devil 
desires." 

Referring to the organization and capitalization of the 
forces of evil and the lack of plan and money in the carrying 
out of good deeds he said about these words: "I have sat in 
this church at the annual church meeting and seen brother 
X of sainted memory, get up and tell the church with much 
humihation and long-facedness that the church found itself 
at the close of another year eleven hundred dollars in debt, 
and that some plans should be made to raise that amount, " 
and that the church after much solemnity and pious looks 
and prayers would raise a part of it, when there were sitting 
in that meeting five or six men any one of whom could have 
paid the whole amount and not missed it. and would the next 
day go down to his office and write a check for expense ac- 
count for a much larger sum and forget it before dinner." 

Then he added; "I sometimes think that if the devil is a 
humorist, he must have an awful good time in a church 
meeting." (Much laughter.) 

After that wonderfully inspiring talk, the papers came out 
the next day, as far as we could find, with no comment on 
the best speech heard in Richmond for many a day. 

And the reason is this: The daily papers of Richmond have 
done their level best to kill McCarthy as a political factor 
and they think they have accomplished it if they can keep 
his beneficent acts out of the public eye. 

It is an indisputable fact that whenever any good man 
gains office or power in Richmond he is assassinated by the 
daily papers of the city, who twist his utterances and make 
the people believe he did and said things which never entered 
his brain, and by their nefarious slanders the press of Rich- 
mond has stolen from an office in which he was working un- 
told good the best public servant Richmond has ever had, 
and has deliberately twisted his statements so that good men 
of the community have been led to believe he was reckless 
and fanatical, when a more careful and exact and conscien- 
cious worker for the public good has not offered himself for 
office in this generation. 



THE IDEA 13 

How to Run Richmond 



Ask Your Candidate for Council if He 
Will Vo-e for This. 



Since the legislature has acted favorabi}' on such legislation as is 
necessary to make it possible for Richmond to have government by 
commission one naturally wants to know more about whit it is. 

The following will give a good idea of how it works. 

It is clipped from The Times-Dispatch of a recent date and pur- 
ports to bean interview with Judge Sweeney. Mayor of El Paso, Tex- 
as, which is governed by a small council of five men who are elected, 
not by wards, but by the whole city, thus making each one responsi- 
ble to all the citizens. 

If Richmond had su -h a system, the mayor would be mayor indeed 
and Richmond would besides have better streets and sewers and more 
public improvemen s and save a barrel of money every year WITH- 
OUT GOING INTO DEBT. 

In 1907, bv the consent of the Legislature, we adopted the com- 
mission form of government, and have never regretted it. I was select-, 
ed Mayor, or chairman of the commission, and I am now serving my 
secand term of office. 1 was re-elected without opposition. 

"The commission consists of a Ma\or and four Aldermen, all elect- 
ed from the city at large. The Ma\or is clothed with full authority, 
and is held responsible to the peoDle for the conduct of all branches 
of the municipal departments. He is personally respcTnsible for the 
finances of the city and the conduct of all the officers except the Coun- 
cilmen. Each Alderman, or commissioner, is made chairman of cer- 
tain departments of the government, and is in authority over them, 
under the direction of the Mayor. 

Mayor is General Manager 

"It makes a legislative body of five men, and practically does away 
with the old idea that a city council is a village debating society. We 



14 THE IDEA 

proceed on the assumption that the city is a corporation, similar to 
business corp,orations, and that the Mayor is the (general manager, or 
superin: -ndent ot directors. This body is elected and put in charge 
by the stockholders — the citizens. The city being i corporation, and 
usually the biggest within tr»e corporate limits, there is no reason why 
the application of a little common sense in managing it on a business 
basis should be detrimental. 

The legislative body being small and compact, enables citizens to 
place ras;jjnsibility. The lack of nunbers in the legislative body has 
a tendency to make the councilmen considerably more cautious in the 
exercise of their authority in voting away the people's money, or pass- 
ing foolish legislation. In the commission form of government it is 
possible to misapply moneys or to use poor judgment; but each indi- 
vidual member realizes that vast lesponsibilities rest upon him, and 
this in itself is calculated to make him use better judgment and act 
with more discretion in the discharge of the fiinitions of his office. 

' Each alderman is responsible for the expenditures of money in his 
department, and upon him devolves the duty of seemg that each em- 
ploye does his dut>. By the charter, the Mayor is required to devote 
his entire time to the city's interests, and each alderman is required to 
work six hours each day. In EI Paso the Mayor receives a salary of 
$250 per month, and each alderman receives .$150 per month. The 
compensation to the Mayor in our ity is insufficient, by reason of the 
fact that if he is capable of managing the affairs of the city, he is cap- 
able of earning a larger sum in other pursuits. 

How El Paso Has Grown 

Since the commission form of government became effective in El 
Paso, we have by the application of business methods saved the city 
approximately .$50,000 a year in expenditures. We have acquired 
about forty acres or park purposes, and have enlarged the fire depart- 
ment, taking it from a vokiteer basis and making it a paid department. 
We have erected four hre engine houses, and equipped the same, 
with money from the general fund. I'hese were the first buildings of 
a public nature ever erecced w ithout the assistance of a bond issue. 

**We have built and extended sanitary sewers over various portions 
of the city without special levies or bond issues. During the past three 



THE IDEA 15 

years we have built thirt,v miles of paved streets, which may appeal to 
Richmond. When 1 assumed the duties' as Mayor the city values on 
the tax books amounted to $15,000,000. They will total .$29,800,000 
today. I will resii^n as Major when 1 return, and my only reason is 
that 1 cannot hold the position at the present salary." 



*'HE CARRIED LOVEr 



"All day he toiled, from dawn till sable nijjht. 

But whistled as he worked along his way: 
And people wondered how one toiler might 

Winnow such gladness from each busy day. 

None ever guessed even half the joy he knew 
Nor yet how well he played life's little part; 

To him the skies above were ever blue 
Because he carried love vithin his heart." 

NA/EEKLV PRICE LIST 

R. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-J C. N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per ba^ . . . 44 Winner Condensed Milk, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, prr baiJ; . ... 41 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned roniatoes . 'lb 

Dunlop Flour, per baa; . , . 44 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, ,.er bag ... 44 Good Mackerel 05 

Arbuckle Cotfee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb . 17 Old Virginia Heriing Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUFTERINE, per lb. ^.i Smoked Shoulder, per lb. ... 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cpc/Mai 

Round Beef Steak, per lb. ... 15 SKtcl.^l, 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not mentioned are in line with our low prices. 



16 thf: idea 



Money Given Away 



Prizes for Boys. Four Different Contests* 



A few weeks a^o The Idea give away prizes to the twelve boys sell- 
ing the largest number of Ideas in the December-January prize con- 
test. Only ten prizes were offered but so many of the boys did wel3 
that twelve were given away. 

The first prize, a handeome fountain pen, was won by Joseph 
Anderson. 

The eleven additional prizes were first quality two blade pocket 
knives. 

The February-March contest will be up with next Saturday's sales, 
tho it vill probably be two weeks later before all the returns are in 
and counted. 

If you can't stick to it long enough to get a two month's prize, why 
not get busy today and earn a dollar or two besides an extra dollar. 

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE, BOYS 

This month, April. The Idea will give away in addition to the regu- 
lar two-monthly prizes a suitable prize to every boy who sells as many 
as twenty copies of The Idea in each of the five Saturdays in that month. 
By this means you can get a prize even if the other fellow does bear 
you selling. All you have go: to do is to sell twenty Ideas each Satur- 
day in April. 



WANTED, 

T"(3 RHIINIT Small house or flat in suburbs, Bartoi) 

:, "■ ■ " — — — Heights preferred. 

Address X care The Idea Office, Richmond, Va. 



O9<mm>cdmm>(ia0mK><!f><amKiOo<iiKK><it><mm><i\><mm>Qt><mm>at><mm>(iO^<^^ 



"FOR MEN ONLY" \ 

We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now g 

located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are fully i 

equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES | 

in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We I 

also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET | 

KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely | 

guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a § 

trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- I 

perts in this line of work. g 



Razors Honed And Set 1 5c. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



The Editor has known Mr. Cwlng personalty for the last twenty yeara, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for nrst<clasa work 
•wd siraiaht forward, sitisfactory dealing Is unr.tceilcd. 



I THE "SHARP-O" CO. f 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. I 

a _ a 

A. H. EWINQ 

J. 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 

•t NORTH LOMBAROY STREET PHONCletl 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Catlmates cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving. Halls. Vestibules. Basements. Ac 



PROMPT SERVICE. POLITE ATTENTION 



TELEPHONE 738. 



JOHN W. GOODE 

j (Formerly with G. Watt Taylor) 



FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES, 

FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES, CANNED GOODS, 
5 FRUITS, TOBACCO, CIGARS, Etc. 5 



2520 E. BROAD ST., - - - RICHMOND, VA. 



e-^- 



I LOOK BOYS! \ 

\ ^ ■ s 

\ MANY PRIZES | 

^ Be sure and read the article in this number on prizes for ^ 

i -EI^:mmME SELLING IDEAS r::::::,:::::::.::::::.:,. ^ 

(? ' $ 

I EVERY BOY CAN \A/IN j 



5c 



WEEKLY ^%S THE COPl 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol IV April 9, 19 JO No. J 5 



This Paper Stands for 

MAN INTERESTS 

Instead of 

MONEY INTERESTS. 

That's why the courts go against us* 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



BEING SOME SERMONETTES PUBLISHED WEEKLY FOR THE 
COMMON GOOD AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, By ADON A, 
YODER, EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND PRINTER 904 
CAPITOL STREET, RICHMOND, VA. 



0!>^^><i!><mm)<io<mM><is><mK>Q>i'wam>Go<3mB)eo^mm><ii><am>Go<am>o<i>!><aaB>GO<am><i?><mm><iommD<sO 

I Print it Right, I 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
I roe 2708, 
& „ 




t^f-men^^^^^at^^^^ 



m^^^tfnt^^^^ 



J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 



1 



7'h AND MAIN STS. 
We hnve in our Fall Stock, a' d art 



showing special good values in 

DIAMONDS. WAICHfS, I WfUiY, SIlVERWARf, CUT 6' ASS, Etc 

We invite your inspection 






't^iiii m m^fm,^tt^^mimwm0m^,^at 



^a^^k, 



HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet 



wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, 
Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, 
Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisite.-, Delicate 
Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. 



- A. R ROBINS, 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 
Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. 






THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV APRIL 9, 1910 No. 15 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail nutter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Corrupt Politics 

In Richmond 



'' I 'he idea has made a most minute and careful study of 
* political trickery in Richmond and has obtained a fund 
of information which proves to the mind of the editor 
beyond a shadow of a doubt that Richmond today is almost 
as crooked politically as Pittsburg, where not only many 
councilmen have been caught but where many business men 
and even bankers are found to be guilty of bribery and cor- 
ruption in the worst meaning of that term. 

The Idea does not publish except when it has actual evi- 
dence. It does not act on hearsay and never has, despite 
the lies of the Times-Dispatch to the contrary. 

We have enough actual evidence in hand to assure us of a 
far-reaching and corrupt bribe taking conspiracy against 



2 THE IDEA 

the people on the part of the people's chosen representatives 
in the council. 

Some of our evidence we are not able at this time to show 
to the people. Some of it is not advisable yet to print for 
reasons best known to ourselves. The big fact, however, 
remains, and what we have already shown in the past proves 
it, that politically Richmond is rotten to the core. 

From time to time, as the digestion of the people can 
stand it, we will expose such a state of affairs as shall de- 
mand a complete examination and a putting out of the ras- 
cals and a change in the form of government which will 
make it almost impossible for a similar condition to recur. 



For Scott and 

Smith, Lawyers 

The Editor As Preacher, 



During the reoent trials of the Editor, attorneys Scott and Smith 
took advantage of a priviledged occasion to make false statements :or - 
cerning the editor and to malign him in language which neither one of 
them would have ever dared to use without the protection of the 
courts, and courts, at that, presided over by men with whom they 
were on intimate terms when the editor was a stranger to both. 

In their cowardly attacks they tried to make the people believe that 
because the editor used the term "sermonettes" on the cover of The 
Idea that he was a "sneaking hypocrite" "wearing the livery of heaven" 
and working in the interest of the devil by making money out to The 
Idea (tho we have never made anything out of it, but have lost money.) 

Now perhaps a little truth about such affairs will be in order. 



THE IDEA 3 

The Editor of this paper is a duly accredited Baptist preacher having 
been rormally commissioned and authorized by his church to do "the 
work of the Gospel Ministry" "by preaching" and he has today that 
commission in his possession, and has for twelve years to the best of 
his ability carried out that commission and for a part of that time has 
engaged at a tremendous cost to himself in the most effective kind of 
preaching, namely the publishing of The Idea whereby he has been 
able to reach many thousand peo Die each week rather than a few hun- 
dred as a pastor of a hurch. 

In other words he has laid aside "the clerical robes," which were 
his by right, because he could preach more effectively through a paper 
than he could from a pulpit, in that as a preacher in a pulpit he f;lt 
handicapped by those who would be hiring him to preach. 

And he had the best authority under the sun for his course. 

Jesus himself though "a high priest forever" did not clothe himself 
in priestly robes or preach from the pulpit as a member of the formal 
priest-hood but as a man to his fellow men, he went about doing good 
and not calling on an organized church to pay him for his services and 
thus handicap his work. Paul himself likewise made his own living 
and said what he pleased, fearing no man and bowing to no influential 
church member who might ADVISE him to be careful about censur- 
mg iny certain evil. And both men wee ostracized and killed be- 
cause they dared say things which those in authority did not want to 
be said. 

No; instead of coming with the livery of Heaven ! and doing the 
works of Hell as Lawyer Scott so debased himself as to state, the 
editor has laid aside the "livery of Heaven" and taken on the livery of 
Hell, the same kink of clothing that ordinary lawyers wear in order 
that he might preach more effectually; and it is just because his preach- 
ing is effectual that it has been found advisable to get such lawyers as 
Smith and Scoct to oppose him. 

The Great Teacher -nust have had in mind just such men as these 
when he said "woe unto you also, ye lawyers ! for ye lade men with 
burdens grievously to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the bur- 
dens with one of your rtngers. Woe unto you! for ye built the sepul- 
chers of the prophets, and your fathers killed them." 

Yes the editor is a preacher and if he ever finds he can accomplish 
more in a pulpit than he can as a publisher he will go back to the 
pulpit tho he has been turning down every invitation to preach in pul- 
pits, and he has many such requests, because he has not had time to 
spare from his more important work of preaching to a larger field 
thro.igh this independent, non-denominational, truth telling paper. 



THE IDEA 



Times-Dispatch Tommy Rot* 
Hypocrisy 



A PAPER that will one day advocate the whiskey business 
■**■ and the next day say it does it to protect "the Church'' 
from the evil of entering politics is nothing more nor less 
than a hypocrite. 

Any one who can read The Times- Dispatch and put two 
and two tDgethar knows full wall that that paper has no 
concern whatever for the future of the church as it pretends 
to have, and that its chief concern is for the bar room which 
furnishes so much to the support of that paper. 

That paper is trying to make people believe that as soon as 
the church advocates moral laws that that means a union of 
church and State when the editor of that paper knows, if he 
is neither a baby nor in his dotage (we strongly suspect he 
is in his dotage) that there is no more union of church ard 
state in the Anti-Saloon League's fight for better liquor 
laws than there is a union of the Chamber of commerce and 
the state when some bar keepers who are members of that 
body petition the legislature for lower licenses. 

Fighting saloons has nothing to do with this tommy rot 
talk of a union of church and state. 

There is, however, an actual union in Virginia of church 
and state and if The Times-Dispatch were at all sincere it 
would be concerned about this union which makes the state 
of Virginia help support the churches by giving them each 
year to support these churches the money which is due frcm 
them in taxes. We do not tax church property in Virginia 
and this constitutes an open union of church and state, and 
every man, whether a church man or not, is forced by 
this union to support the churches. 

(Continued on page 13.) 



THE IDEA 



The Old Lady 

of Bank Street 



We have noticed that the daily papers have been terming 
The Virginian "The Old Lady of Governor Street." 

If one w\]\ read the sensible, logical, reasonable editorials 
of The Virginian and then turn to the dodging, evasive, 
wordy, garrulous editorials which have crowded the pages 
of The Times-Dispatch since they annexed a certain female 
editorial writer from the hot house of South Carolina, he 
will soon conclude that the old lady lives not on Governor 
Street, but in the musty rooms of The Supreme on Bank 
Street where the Bryan boys caress and court her and let her 
drink wine *to her bodily comfort" and to the silly loosen- 
ing of Her editorial tongue. 



Bowling Errs Again 



The same kind of a blunder that Bowling made in not get- 
ting releases from damages due to grading from property 
owners in Fairmount he repeated out on Taylor Street as 
developed in the council the other night. 

It appears that the work was done half way in that the 
engineer got releases from some but failed to get releases 
from three other owners and now these owners are present- 
ing their claims to the city. 

But our council still retains Mr. Bowling, a jolly good club 
fellow, but absolutely not big enough for his job. 



6 THE IDEA 

Correction 

In last week's Idea we censured Manning and Gordon for summon- 
ing F. 1. Gentry as one "who never offered any testirrony". 

We are since informed that F. 1. Gentry did appear as a witness 
but that C. W. Tyler did not. The editor had to pay C. VV. Tyler 
$2.00 for being summoned to appear against him for 4 days altho we 
do not know who Tyler was nor for what he was summoned. 

Our criticism was of the police commissioners for acting for the 
purpose of putting The Idea out of commission by excessive court ex- 
penses. Our censure, it will be seen, was not applicable to the case 
of Gentry but was to the case of Tyler which we did not mention. 



The Idea Has a ^^Wonderful Following^' 
in Lynchburg 

(Letter from Richmond Traveling Man) 

Dated at Carroll Hotel, Lynchburg, Va, 
Mr. Adon A. Yoder, 

Richmond, Va. 
Sir:- 

1 came to Lynchburg yesterday and went to a news stand to get one 
of your papers, and 1 was told that they were all sold, sold in a few 
hours after they got in Lynchburg. 

1 find that you have a wonderful following here among the best 
class of people, in fact 1 was astonished to learn how many friends you 
have made of late. 

The people of Lynchburg are glad to get the truth, and they, like 
the people of all other places, want the truth and honor the man 
who is brave enough to just tell it. 

Hoping you are well, 1 am 
Yours truly, 



THE IDEA 7 

Mills Misleads 

the Council 

Says Councilman Lynch 

At the last council meeting Morgan Mills opposed the appropria- 
tion for adjusting damiges to property owners on Taylor Street, stating 
that the street committee should not come before the council and ask 
for more money right after the budget had been passed and that this 
appropriation neant (a big expenditure in) additional appropriations for 
the street department. 

Mr. Lynch replied that this money could not be taken from the 
street department funds and that "Mr, Mills knows that he is mis- 
leading this council when he makes the statement he does." 

It looks like Mr. Mills is afraid he won't get re-elected on the 21st 
and he therefore finds it necessary to appear to be looking after the 
fifiances of the citizens by showing up the street committee, when by 
Mr. Lynch's exposal he really showed up himself. 



THE IDEA 



Red Hot Again and Cartoons 

The Idea has been having troubles. Due to printing arrangements 
the editor found he could not print what he wanted to. It gives us 
pleasure to announce, however, that arrangements have been made 
whereby the editor can speak out boldly as formerly. 

The Idea in the future will be alive as ever. You can't afford to 
miss it. 

Next week we expect to have a cartoon again. Due to some dirty 
work of our enemies we have had to do without them for the past 
few weeks. 

Watch next week's Scarlet Cover. 



THE IDEA 



Manning on Stand 

In The Libel Case. 



MR. MEREDITH: What do you mean by the seggregated dis- 
trict. 
WITNESS: The red light district which is recognized by the 
poHce department ? 
Q. What are the bounds of that red light district ? 
A. The bounds of the red light district are Mayo Street from Broad 
to Franklin, and on Franklin to Governor; it was from 15th to 
Locust Alley (Locust Alley was taken in), but on account of the 
conditions changing and manufacturing establishments coming 

down there, it was restricted below the Alley . 

Q. And houses of ill fame are allowed nowhere except in the Red 
Light District, and the police are instructed rigidly to break up 
everyone outside of that district .'' 

A. Yes, Sir 

Q. Mr. Manning, you have spoken of the time that this policy was 
adopted, that there were houses all over town. I would ask you 
whether there were houses on 8th Street between Main and Cary 
at that time? 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Have those houses been broken up ? 
A. No, sir; those houses are in the Red Light Diatnct. 

MR. MEREDITH : Does the Red Light District go up to 8th 

St.? 
WITNESS : Oh, no, sir; those houses thit were there — 
MR. MEREDITH: That is just a little seggregation then — a 

little "Red Light District" by itself? 
WITNESS: Yes. 

MR. MEREDITH: Oh, I see. Wherever we strike such a 
house, we know that it is in one of these little seggregated Red 
Light Districts? ,,,..,.. 



THE IDEA 9 

A. We ruled what should be the Red Light District, and all outside 
of that should not be. 

Q. Then you ruled what you have described — 15th and Governor 
and Franklin and Mayo, and so on — and at the same time you 
cut a little slice out on 8th Street, and said that should be a suiall 
Red Light District? Did you do that ? 

A. My recollection of that thing is, there was a woman in one of those 
houses there. I think she owned the house — 

Q. You could not break the house up there because she owned the 
house ? 

A. No, that is not it, let me explain. My understanding of tie mat- 
ter was that the inmates were put out, and this woman lived 
there; and the real reason that this district was put up was that 
when we put these women there some of these landlords on 
Mayo Street commenced to raise the rents, and gentlemen told us 
about it, and we proposed to deal square — we didn't propose to 
stand for those landlords gouging those women ; they raised the 
rents there, and citizens and real estate agents — 

Q. Never mind telling what others said to you. 

A. I am going to tell it — I have nothing in the world to eonce: 1 — 
and then we allowed them to stay in these two houses — thrte 
houses. 

Q. So in order that these women on 8th Street would not ha\e to 
move where they would be charged a higher rent, you took that 
little slice and made a Red Light District of it ? 

A. I didn't say that; I said we opened up that territory to let them 
come in there, 

Q. So as to create competition in rents; isn't that so? 

A. I said, so these landlords could not gouge these women. 

Q. So you opened U3 this territory at 8th and Mara on account of the 
high rents on Mayo and those other streets ? 

A. Not on 8th Street near Main; on 8th Strteet below the alley in 
the middle of the block, near Cary. 
We wonder why neither the Leader nor the Journal nor The 

Times-Dispatch dared publish the three letters between Carter Glass 

and the editor of The Idea. Because the three letters showed we 

were right and Glass was waong. And Glass is a politician, a foli- 

rician. 



JO THE IDEA 

Our Dear Friend, 
Clyde Saunders 



On last Monday night a councilman asked where the copies 
of the Mayor's Annual Message were, which were ordered 
printed and distributed to members. He was informed that 
they were still in the hands of the printer. Now the city 
printer is Clyde W. Saunders and the council has had so 
much trouble in getting him to print its work in anything 
hke a reasonable lime that they ordered the Mayor's Messsge 
printed separately from the regular book form in which it is 
usually included. This was evidently ordered because last 
year it was some time in the fall before the previous year's 
reports were turned over by Mr. Saunders to the council. 

Dae to giving the printing to ex-political-boss Saunders, 
we get these reports printed nearly a year late, and, when it 
is desired to have a small part of the work rushed through 
in order to expedite the business of the council, we find that 
April has come and the Mayor's message is already three 
months old and yet the councilmen have not gotten copies. 

If the council waits till the year is about over before being 
able to study the Mayor's message what is the use of having 
a city printer at all and what is the use in the Mayor wast- 
ing his time in writing an annual message. 



The Elections 



Ths Political ring says The Idea has already defeated two 
political bosses. After April 21st we hope to hear them say 
that at least two other of the inside ring crowd, namely, 
Mills and Pollock, have gone down and that by their defeat the 



THE IDEA 11 

city will be able to appoint better men to those cfRces \^h]ch 
councilmen fill. The great trouble in opposing brd men for 
office is that in some of the wards no good men are offering 
themselves in opposition. 

The papers of Saturday morning, the date on which this 
Idea will appear will tell who the candidates are, j.:r on Fii- 
day night all will have to have paid up. After that 1 he Idi a 
will be better able to advise whom to oppose. 

There is no use wasting powder in opposing a candidate 
who has no opposition at the polls. 

Let the citizens of Lee ward put up a man against Follaid 
by all means. 

Pollard may be all right when his interests don't conflict 
with the citizens'but no man whose interests conflict with the 
people's, as do his, should be allowed to be so tempted, es- 
pecially since he has shown he can't stand the tem.ptaticn, 
as he did in the matter of the real estate deal out beyond the 
Soldiers' Home. 

Mr. Green of Monroe, the other real estate man, in the 
council is not as green as his name wonld indicate whtn it 
comes to looking out for special interests. 



Engineer Bowling 

Doubly Responsible 

Elections may be an evil and yet they serve onj good pur- 
pose. They put old councilmen on guard and in defending 
themselves they let the cat out of the bag, i. e. they are lia- 
ble to tell on the othar fellow to clear their own skirts. 

On last Monday night at the regular monthly council meet- 
ing, Mr. Lynch felt called on to defend the Street Commit- 
tee, and in his defence he showed that in addition to the 
errors made by the engineering department in giving the 
wrong grades in Fairmount, which errors cost the city so 
mach in refilling where excessive grading had been done— 



12 THE IDEA 

in addition to this error Mr, Lynch stated that the city would 
not have had to pay the big damage claims row pending and 
not yet adjusted, caused by injury done by the city to prop- 
erty fronts in the Fairmount section, if Mr. Bowling had 
acted according to law and settled this matter by agreement 
with property holders before the grading was done. It seems 
that the law requires that the engineer enter into agreement 
with property owners ns to damages to be paid for property 
injured before the work is ordered so that the city may not 
go it blind and find themselves liable for heavy charges due 
to the fact that the city is at the mercy of the property hold- 
ers if the matter is not settled beforehand. 

It thus appears that Mr. Bowling is not only responsible 
for the expensive errors in grading, which the poor taxpay- 
er has to pay, but is also responsible for the large damage 
suits which the city must pay because he, Mr. Bowling, did 
not proceed according to law. 

In addition to this Mr. Bowling made the biggest bust of 
all in the Fairmount affair when he ordered the streets to be 
graded down even to the corrected le\ els which are now the 
establ shed street levels for this section. It was altogether 
unnecessary and expensive in that less grading would have 
made a ten times better job. 

The city council is so unwieldy and there is such conflict 
of responsibility between the council and the committees 
and the departments that it would be next to impossible to 
get that body to get a new engineer. 

There is no responsible head to the thing. 

It was orignally intended that the mayor should be respon- 
sible for all the affairs of the city to the extent of having 
each department directly responsible to him, but who ever 
dreamed of mayor Richardson looking into or having any 
weight in determining the duties of the city engineer. 

The whole councilmanic system is a mess and it blunders 
on and repeats its own blunders and by the nature of its con- 
stitution it is physically unable to redeem itself. 

Meantime Bowling blunders on and the people pay the 
bill. 



THE IDEA 13 

Times -Dispatch Tommy Rot.— -Hypocrisy. 



(Continued from 4th page.) 

This is union with a \engeance but since it don't bother 
The Times-Dispatch's income they have nothing to sa^ in 
opposition. 

Now what does this mean? It means that The Time^- 
Dispatch don't give a continental dam for the bug? too of a 
theory concerning church and state, but does care a trcrrend- 
ous lot whether its editors and owners may be guilty of iLe 
moral crime of debauching the life of Richmond by hav ng 
whiskey legally sold from the bars of the clubs to which they 
belong, and yet escape being called guilty of a legal crime 
by continuing the present nefarious union of the liquor traffic 
and the state. 

Altho the Anti-Saloon League has never sanctioned ?ny 
such thin^ as a union of church and state The Idea wou'd 
prefer the rankest kind of a union between chuich and stgte 
to the present nefarious union, which actually exists to tl e 
corrupting of all the functions of the state, between the bf se 
saloon and the state, and this same Times-Dispatch desires 
this union on the part of the state with the saloon, as it 
shows by advocating license, rather than an imaginary union 
of the state and the church. 

By their own words they admit that when they are called 
on to choose this day whom they will serve they piefer that 
their government make a union with the saloon and the 
devil, rather than make any union with the Church an God. 

The Times-Dispatch is serving the devil when it pretends 
to be looking after the interests of the church while at the 
same time it looks over the list of its advertisers and says:— 
"It will hurt business, especially our business with the sa- 
loon folks." 

"Ye can not serve God and mammon.'' You (^an't look 
after the church and the bar room business at the same time. 

In the first place, the Anti-Saloon League is not the 
church. 



14 THE IDEA 

In the second place, it has all along kept out of partizan 
politics; and, 

In the third place, it has no desire to and never will desire 
t > form any union between itself or the church and the state. 

The papers are fretting- themselves over the so-called 
withdrawal of the Anti-Saloon from the Democratic party. 

The Anti-Saloon never was in and never will be in the 
De nosratic or any other party, any more than the So- 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is in the So- 
cialist or Republican or Populist or Democratic or Labor 
Party. 

There are Republicans and Democrats and Socialists and 
independent voters in the Anti-Saloon League and they are 
going to keep on fighting the evils of the union between the 
state and the saloon and vote for clean, decent, moral men 
who will give the people a square, demociatic chance to de- 
cide their own moral questions until they get a decent legis- 
lature that mon't sell out to the whiskey men as the last leg- 
islature did, and until Virginia has put this hellish corrupter 
of the state, the saloon, out of existence forever. Akd the 

NEXT LEGISLATURE IS THE ONE THAT IS GOING TO DO IT. 

Politicians in the Richmond Churches 

It is extremely amazing to read this Times- Dispatch dis- 
cussions on the church losing ''its high spiritual function", 
and its tearful remark, "When the church gets into politics, 
politics will get into the church," when the real truth of the 
matter is that here in the large Richmond churches the poli- 
cians have gotten into the churches just to keep the church- 
es from doing anything towards purifying the politics of 
Richmond and that is Richmond's greatest trouble today, 
the politicians run Richmond churches and in some notable 
cases use their church affiliations to help build up a crooked 
political machine to keep them in office. 

There is not a political crook that we know of in Rich- 
mond that is not a good(?) church member and most of them 
hold offices in the churches and church societies. 



THE IDEA 15 

The business of the church is to save the woild, politics 
and the state included. 

You know they intimated to Jesus that He must not talk 
to the fallen woman because He might be contaminated, 
altho He said He came to call sinners, not the righteous, to 
repentance. 

If there is anything wrong with our laws that's exactly 
where the church belongs and if the church is to keep awry 
from helping the world through its laws then the tocner the 
church dies the better, for the good that don't reach to the 
state is no good. 

Let the crooks run the churches and tell the preachers 
what to say and what not to say and The Time- Dispatch of- 
fers no protest, but let the preachers breathe a word about 
the evils of government and The Times-Dispatch thows up 
its editorial hands in holy horror. Meantime the people say 
"We'll take a hand in this matter next election day." 



Why It Costs So Much. 

Watered Stock Holders Get It. 



Here is the clearest cut, most definite, truthful stateme^l 
of the high cost of living that we have seen p'inted. Study 
it a moment and you will see that it is absolutely correct. It 
is from the Denver Daily Express: 

In a word. If $70,000,000,000 has been artificially added 
to the capitalization of the nation's industries, then to earn 
5 per cent, on this fiction somebody must pay $3, 500, COO', dOO 
per year more than things are worth. "^ ^^ 

That's added to the cost of living, isn't it ? ^'''^ ^^ 

That means about ten millions a day to start with. '"' '' 
So don't let them get you to cussing the faimer. x\W&^^ 
bjtcher. nor the housewife, nor yourself- — Exchange "' ^- 



16 THE IDEA 

Canada carries papers at one-fourth cent a pound and 
makes nearly a million dollars a year profit on its postal 
system. Our government of grafters charges one cent a 
pound— four times as much— and loses $17,000,000 a year! 
Do you see the point?— Ex. 



There seems to be a job for every man so soon as he gets 
elected to the legislature or.city council. — Ex. 



Money Given Away 



Prices for Boys* Four Different Contests* 



A few weeks a^o The idea gave away prizes to the twelve boys sell- 
ing the largest number of Ideas in the December-January prize con- 
test. Only ten prizes were offered but so many of the boys d\d well 
that twelve were given away. 

The first prize, a handeome fountain pen, was won by Joseph 
Anderson, 

The eleven additional prizes were first quality two blade pocket 
knives. 

If you can't stick to it long enough to get a two month's prize, why 
not get busy today and earn a dollar or two besides an extra dollar. 

KERENS YOUR CHANCE, BOYS 

This month, April, The Idea will give away in addition to the regu- 
lar two-monfhly prizes a suitable prize to every boy who sells as many 
as twenty copies of The Idea in each of the five Saturdays in chat month. 
By this means you can get a prize even if the other fellow does beat 
you selling. All you have got to do is to sell twenty Ideas each Satur- 
day in April, 



I "FOR MEN ONLY" | 

I We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now I 

I located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are fully i 

I equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES § 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We | 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET f 

I KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely | 

% guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a | 

I trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- | 

§ perts in this line of work. - g 



Razors Honed And Set 1 5c. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



o 

! 

I THE "SHARP-O" CO. f. 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. | 

a A 

QE><9HDCE>^^i><3E><3iH>€E>^BDtiQf>aHl><3E>^^l>Cf>QBE>Ci><^B><]{><BaD<30E><^H><I^<BH>^^^BB>CD<^E>C|;} 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 



^^^^^(^ 



^^f^^ 



•t NORTH LOMBARDY STREET PHONE 1811 

RICHMOND, VA. 

C»t<miit«s cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving. Ha Ms. Vestibules, Basemenu, Ac 



The Editor has known Mr. Pwing personnily for the last twenty yeara, 
and he takes pleasure in stating that his reputation for first-class worii 
aad ttraipht forward, s»lisfnc»orv deaiing Is uneicelled. 



WEEKLY PRICE LIST 

R. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-J C. N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag ... 44 Winner Condensed Milk, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, per bag . ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 28 

Dunlop Flour, per bag . .,.446 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, per bag ... 44 Good Mackerel 05 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck , . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 23 Smoked Shoulder, per lb. ... 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cpi?/^TaT 

Round Beef Steak, per lb. . . . 15 i^ftiL.i.'M. 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not mentioned are in line with our low prices. 



IlOOK BOYS! I 

{ «? i 

\ MANY PRIZES | 

J Besides the Prizes for Selling the Greatest Number of \ 

^ Copies, The Idea will give a Prize to every } 

A boy who Sells Copies each week in April, \ 

5 EVERY BOY CAN WIN \ 



5c 



WBBKLY OP THE COPY 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



VoLIV April 16, 1910 No. 16 



Election Number 

Pollock, 
... Mills, 
Other Warm Subjects 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



Being some sermonettes published weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. ■- ■ '■- ' ~~~~. 



Oi><VB><!l><lH>(]I>OBK>(iD<HH>G4>I><HHD<iD<]^Dai><^H>(i!><l^B>CD<BH>C<{>I><^H>Ct><BH>(!0<^H>aD<HH>fl1 



Print it Right. 



•!• 



I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea g 

f Presses will do it at a most reasonahlp ficrnrp 'PVinnp Mnn. f 



* 



Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



I roe ^ivo, , I 

a a 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

^ 7th AND MAIN STS. J| 

^ We have in our Fall Stock, and arc W 

X* showing special gfood values in ^ 

f DIAMONDS. WATCHES, I.WILIY, SIlVmAK, CUT 6 ASS, Etc I 

We invite jour inapection 



f HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet r 

^ f 

A wants, in Drugs and Medicin s A 

V Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

i d 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, \ 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisite., Delicate ^ 

T Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

J - A. R ROBINS, - \ 

\ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

^ i 

^ Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

^ Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV APRIL 16, 1910 No. 16 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday-by ADON A. YODER, 

904 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va, 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



^jffow the S^olitical ^oss 

Worked 



Strong 9/fenialli/ — J'eehle ^orall^ 

backed hi/ iPuhlic Servics Corporations 
^nd Jlequor Snteresis 

THE business men generally leave the management of 
party machinery to the grafting elements, the gamb- 
ling elements and the criminal elements. When a 
special interest man wishes to acccmplish anything in the 
way of securing certain laws or of obtaining the ncminaticn 
of any person, the general custom is to send for one of the 
bosses and make arrangements through him upon a business 



1. THE IDEA 

'■ ■ i 

kisis of so much money. These bosses are usually men of 
strong mentality but of feeble morality. They eommonly 
have behind them the piablie service corporaticn interests 
and the liquor interests. They are the connecting link be- 
tv.i'een the criminal rich and the eriminal poor. They serve 
the rich by obtaming- franchises fo^r them and by securing 
them privileges in the -vt'ay 6f permission to violate law. 
They serve the poor by goin^ ori their bonds when aTresteds, 
by procuring employment for them, and by acts of iehaiity.' 

The above paragraph was written by Governor Folk, of 
Missouri, and he had never known of the political bossism 
of Richmond, and yet it sounds as tho he were writing about 
th'c; investigations of corruption here when Manning and 
Leaman and Saunders confessed to being the tools of The 
Bell Telephone Company, for money, to get certain legisla- 
tion through the council. ' ' ' 

It is weH known that some of the slickest and crookedest 
politicians Richmond has eter known have'gained office "by 
acts of charity" and by procuritig employment for the peer,, 
as they find that a cheap method of buying votes. Lea man 
was active in g^oing bond for criminals, such as the Molloy 
Wo'-ntin; Manning through the police force managed the 
liqi^or interests, and all three,' Saunders, Manning and Lea- 
man "served the rich by obtaining franchises for them. "" 
Yes, Richmond is j'ust as crooked poiltieally as Pittsburg or 
Albany or Philadelphia or San Francisco or New York or St," 
Louis. The only difference is that vi^hen political corruption- 
ists are fexposed here the papers which in other cities are the 
means of purifying the government are here used to white- 
wash the whole affair and helpl put in jail the one that ex- 
poses the crooks, by a campaign of lies, deceiving the people 
into thinking that the crooks are saints and the man that 
exposes them a devilish sinner. 

If The Idea had undertaken a campaign "for the public 
good" and not exposed such men as Saunders and Leaman. 
and Manning and Pollock and Mills and not criticized Justice- 
John and the mayor and the city engineer, then indeed 
would it be right to suppose that there was some ulterior 



THE IDEA y 

• It ' > 

motive but no one should believe that the motive was wrriig 
simply because some of the crooks had done an injury to oi,e 
."who had loaned money to the paper especially sircelhc Idea 
liad been exposing exactly the same crooked methods ihiee 
years before it ever borrowed the money in question or even 
heard of the lender. 

Ex-Gov, Folk writes further in the Saturday Evening Post 
of the composition of political party committees like the one 
here dominated by crooks. He says "The political c( mmit- 
ties in populous centres are made up in most part of repre- 
sentatives of special interests. Nearly every man is there 
not as the agent: of th« party to do what he can for the pul 13 
but as the agent of special interest against Tiir. public. 
, The different party committeemen are generally known as 
belonging to this or that boss or special interest. They are 
merely dummies for the seekers of privilege. Such a thing 
a^ their having minds of their own is practic 'lly unheard of. 

The (immediate task, therefore, iri municipal government 
is to wipe away so far as possible the barriers to the rule of 
the people imposed by special interests." 

SoverTijnent hi/ Commission 

S:^ the i/iemecij/f uai/^ J'oik, 

*'The best plan that has been devised thus far is the commission torm 
of government. Under this plan a certain number of commissior-- 
ers — say five — are elected, and the entire control of the city is in thtir 
hands. They constitute the law-making body, appoint the other offi- 
cials and have direction of the law-enforcing power. The corrmis- 
sion plan of city government is a s mplified foim of ^cvenn^ent, ard 
the simpler government can be made the more government for the 
people there will be. The more complicated government can he 
made, the less government for the people there will be and the more 
government for special interests. The above-mentioned plan reduces 
the nu Tiber of elective oflficers. Those who have though: most on 
the subject of government have come to the conclusion that the!e aiP 
too many oflficers elected. When there are a large number of names 



4 THE IDEA 

on the ballot the average voter probably only knows one or two of 
them and must vote blindly as to the rest. Special interests, however, 
keep men employed to look after these matters for them, and they are 
always fally advised as to the attitude and possibilities of every can- 
didate, no matter how many candidates there may be. So the fewer 
officers to be elected the more they will represent the will of the peo- 
ple, and the larger the number of officers to be elected the less they 
will represent the people, and the more they will be the result of trade 
on the part of special interest. Where the commission plan of gov 
ernment has been tried it has been found most satisfactory. In the 
city of Des Moines they have been operating under this idea for 
more than a year, with great saving to the taxpayers and improvement 
in the civic conditions. No one c^n be in that city long without be- 
ing told of the delight of the citizens with their system. The same is 
true of Galveston and of Kansas City, Under this plan political par- 
ties are dispensed with." 

**lf government of the people is to survive, it must be saved by the 
efforts of the patriotic citizens who want nothing for themselves save 
the advantages that accrue from the general public weal. If the peo- 
ple learn to appreciate this, learn to know the dangers that threaten our 
future, and learn the strength that rests with the voters, they can take 
the government of city, state and nation m their own hands whenever 
they wish to do so. 



Petersburg Subscribers 



Since our Petersburg subscribers have had so much trouble 
in getting their papers, we would suggest that they might 
do wall to send a dollar for a six months subscription which 
will be mailed direct each week. This is the cheapest and 
surest way to get The Idea, Same price everywhere in the 
U. S. $2.00 a year or $i.00 for six months. 



Judging by what it will buy, it looks like the republicans 
have given us a fifty cent dollar. — Ex. 



THE IDEA 



THE ELECTION 

Jefferson Ward 

and Mills 



For the Board of Aldermen the two old members, Adams 
and Melton, are both up for re-election and they are both 
machine men, though one of them, Melton, don't amount to 
much, the only thing we ever saw him do being to voice the 
wish of the machine in nominating in the Board of Aldermen 
W. E. Griggs to try the editor the same night that Morgan 
R. Mills nominated the same Griggs in the joint session. We 
notice city employees canvassing for Melton. This is a bad 
sign. 

The third aspirant for the board, Mr. T. J. Moody, is said 
to be an old confederate soldier a,nd a merchant with prop- 
erty interests on Church Hill. We learn the ring is against 
him and that must mean he is a good man. He certainly can 
be no worse than the present ring crowd. 



Scratch Mills 



Of the aspirants for the council in Jefferson only two old 
members are worthy of returning, they are Lynch and 
Hirshburg. 

Fairmount should be represented by Jeter and of the rest 
E. C. Davidson seems to he the most able and fit. 

By all means scratch Mills and do not let the vote be so 
divided that the ring can put him in. Vote for Hirshburg, 
Davidson, Jeter, Lynch and one other. 

(Continued on 12th page) 



THE IDEPi 
CouTiciimsn and the Urajtion Company 



VLy. Bliley ^oH ap in the coumeFl at the last meeting afid- 
spoke for the Passenger and Power Company in reference 
to giving them certain streets in the West End which they 
hav'e already blocked and practically eonfiseated. 

Mr. Bliley, who is councilman from Monroe Ward, said 
that m as much as the Car Co, was spending so much money 
in that section, "We owe them some consideration", as if 
those people who have no money to invest should have no^ 
eonsideration at the hands of the council. 

We do not doubt that many couneilmen do OWE the Power 
Co. some consideration,, but it is a dead sure thing that the 
people of Richmond do not owe anything to the Car Co. 

We have given away to them already franchises worth 
millions of dollars and have nothing in return and now they 
are already asking for a continuation of their franchises, 
when we ought to sell these franchises at a reasonable sum 
to these car companies and z^t some returns for these' valua- 
ble considerations. 

This Car Company certainly mast have had some council- 
men under obligation to them, when it is seen how Gilbert 
Pollock succeeded in railroading their bill through the coun- 
dl last M-onday night,. 

7lfho Said Clt/de Saunders Was Out of 

^Politics? 



We are informed that the candidates for city offices who 
desired to get the nam.es of voters in their wards have been 
unable to secure same from the Registrars or from the Clerk 
of the court, but are being told that Mr. Clyde Saunders ha& 
not yet printed the lists and if one desires to get them he 
must go and ask Mr. Saunders for ihem. 



THE IDEA ■? 

Thus Mr. Saunders' power in Richmond politics can be 
seC'ii, 

One must ask a favw of Clyde before he can stand any 
show of winning, because no candidate can be successful and 
fail to put himself before the voters of his ward. 

We also notice in the papers of Saturday last that Chair- 
man, Miles M. ]\iartin and Clyde \V, Saunders "were pres- 
ent in Mr, Goode's office when the noon hour struck, waiting 
to see whether any new m€n entered at the eleventh hour", 
■for the race for council and the board of AldeiTD.en. 

Clyde is still a power in city polities, and nothing but a 
change of form of government will ever put him out. 



SPo/iii'cs 



97^adioon Ward, Silbori iPoUocL 

Since there is no contest in the Board of Aldermen for Madison 
Ward the voters are for:unate in having the fi^ht singled down and 
confined to the Common Council and the issue clearly defined and 
free from complications. ;»^,:f«''-^ 

The fight is simply between the seven candidates o'fFeriTig'.i'n the 
Common Coanci! and five are to be elected. Of these seven, four 
are present members, Mr. Barber alone of the present council not of- 
fering for re-election. Of course those who have the city's interest at 
heart will scratch Pollock and since Mr. Burke seems to be largely a 
figure head, taking no aggressive part in legislation, and not always 
voting right v/hen he is present, it would be wise for the citizens to 
scratch these two and thus not waste their powder by dividing their 
allegiance between all the candidates. 

By all means beat Pollock. 

We need not enumerate to the voters of Madison Ward the politi- 
cal sins of Mr. Pollock. 

Suffice it to say" that we can not point to a man in the whole coun- 
cil who has done more to help appoint bad men and to help enact 



8 



THE IDEA 



such ordinances as would be against the interest of the people and in 
favor of the interests of the few who enjoy his favor. He is a man of 
influence in the council for two reisons the one is his ability and 
social qualities which have entirely too much weight in so large a 
council and the other is his utter lack of regard for the duties of his 
position. He is in office for Pollock's interest and not for the interest 
of the citizens of Madison Ward nor for the citizens of Richmond at 
iarge. 



Out for Political Blood 

AND AINT MILLS GOING SOME? 




,/.^< ^?--.^'^^^.' 







The Idea After Two More Scalps 



THE IDEA 9 

Who Owns the Albemarle? 

See Next Week's Idea About Gambling: Houses 

^Tbls agreanent made this twelfh day of Atigust 1908, hj oJid between 
<31yde V, Saunders, A, T. Griffith and J« W. Salomon, parties of the 
■first part, and A. H, Johnson and Robert Whittet, Jr., parties of the 
second part, all of Richnond, Vlrgiirla. 

WIIMESSETH: ae said parties of the first part for and In consider- 
ation of the stm of Twenty Poiir Hundred Dollars agree to sell and convey 
■to the said parties of the seoond part, one hrmdred and f J-fty shares of 
the capital stock of the Albemarle Club of the City of Rlctanond, Va, 

The said parties of the first part hereby actaowledge the receipt 
'Of One Oliousand Dollars, to th«n In teand pedd ly the said parties of 
the second part, as the first payment on aocotint of this agreaaent and 
the said parties of the second part agree to pay the remainder of 
Fourteen Huhdred Dollars, aB follows, viz.: 

One note ft>r Poiarteen Hundred Dollars, dated Aiagust 12th 1908, at 
three months, drawi by A, H. Johnson to his own order and endorsed by 
ilm and Robert TOilttet, Jr.. 

It is further agreed that in event of default in the payment of the 
above described note, the said parties of the first part may wlthont 
process of law take possession of said stock. 

It is farther agreed that the One Hundred and Fifty Shares of Stock 
above described shall remain in the cu«tody of Clyde V. Saunders, as 
"^fTrustee, until the above descrllied note Is fully paid. 

WITflESS the following Signatures and Seals :- 









'A::u:d^d:^l 




10 THE IDEA 



^nci the Tjhree !Pie Committees 



The three most important committees of the city council 
are: — 

(1) The Finance Committee, 

(2) The Water Committee, 

(3) The Street Committee. 

These are the three pie committees of the council, and 
membership on these committees is most sought after by 
those most anxious to "serve the people." 

The dominance of the finance committee is a most valuable 
asset and would be worth a fortune to an unprincipled man. 

This committee is presided over by Real Estate Agent, H. 
R. Pollard, Jr., and Morgan Mills is an influential member. 
W. H. Adams and Barton Grundy are also members. This 
committee holds its sessions in secret and most of its v.oi k 
is done by sub- committees, which meet when and where 
they like. 

The second commjttee is the Water Committee, which is 
valuable because it is the means of building up a powerful 
political machine, in that this committee has to employ so 
many hands for the water department and all of these hands 
are walking delegates for Morgan R. Mills, the chairman 
and dominant influence on this committee. 

The third committee is the Street Committee, which is in 
charge of the employm.ent of the large force of street hands, 
and Mr. G. K. Pollock is Sub-chairman and dominant influ- 
ence in the common council, while W. H. Adams of the Ald- 
ermen is chairman, and Grundy and Whittet and Bliley are 
members. 

Now when any matter pertaining to these departments 
comes up in either branch of the council it is referred to one 
of these committees and acted on there. 



THE IDEA 11 

After going: to committee, however, of which there 
are about twelve members, the matter is usually referred to 
either a selected sub- committee or if it pertains to a ward, it 
is referred to a '"Ward" committee, and just here is where 
the evil of the ward system comes in, and where the crooked 
ward politician comes in. 

Now, these little sub-comm.ittees are all powerful, simply 
by common consent, because it is impossible to do the enor- 
mous amount of work of the council either in the full com- 
mittees or on the floor of the council for they have only one 
regular meeting each month, and these sub- committees meet 
any when, anyhow, anywhere to suit themselves and it gen- 
erally suits them to get together for business down on Main 
street. 

^Politicians' JVeadquarters 

Now there are three places on Main street which are head- 
quarters for the politicians. 

One of these places is the office of Morgan Mills in the 
Chamber of Commerce, where Mr. Mills conducts— well, 
we'd be glad if any one would tell us exactly w^hat Mr. Mills 
doss conduct or do except engage in politics, (we notice he 
has the contract to furnish steel girders for the ficticious 
bridge to Church Hill, which a company which has violated its 
contract, is supposed to be going to build. We notice this com- 
pany has enough inff uence in the council not to have to for- 
feit its bond.) 

Well, in this office of Morgan R. Mills, away from the 
gaze of the public, much city business is transacted and then 
the council when called on to vote is treated to a grandstand 
speech by the earnest and silver-tongued Mills, who some 
how or other gets the council to vote his way. 

The second political stamping ground is at Pollard's news 
store on Main street, where politicians of all stripes and hues 
and shades may be seen taking a social drink and fixing up 
their interests. 

The third place is Crenshaw's Cigar Stand on the corner 
of 11th and Main. 



12 THE IDEA 

Here and at Pollard's the clans gather and Pollard and 
Adams and other councilmen discuss city finances and im- 
provements with Saunders and Manning and Leaman, whose 
influence with councilmen is worth thousands of dollars. 

So if one really wants to know who runs Richmond he 
must observe not council meetings, oh, no! they are simply 
for the public, and the public has nothing to do with the real 
running of Richmond, —he must note the ward heeler snd 
the political boss and the ambitious politician at their woik 
on Main street from whence Richmond is steered by men 
whose chief asset is politics and whose services to the party 
are valued at thousands of dollars annually. 



THE ELECTION 



(Continued from 5th page) 
HENRY WARD— A SORRY LOT 

Henry Ward has such a sorry lot for council that it hardly 
matters whether one votes or not in that ward, 

LEE WARD 

In the council Pollard should be scratched, Cutchins and 
Ratcliffe should be returned, 

MADISON WARD 

Scratch Pollock; Burke stands for the whiskey inter- 
ests. Fuller works for The Home Brewing Co. 

CLAY WARD 

In the aldermanic board Mitchell and Cottrell, both old 
members, should be returned. 

In the council Umlauf and Richardson are two of the high- 
est men in the whole city government, while Powers votes 
with the ring, and Glenn has none too good a record. 
MARSHALL WARD 

J. R. Grimes, an old ringster and father-in-law of Mann- 
ing, should be scratched for the aldermen. 

It will be a job for the people to elect their five good men 
out of the eleven aspirants for council. 




THE IDEA 13 

7/s ^Responsible 

for //fanning 

9/fannin£f and jCeamariy friends* 



If one should attend police court and be careful to notice 
what goes on in the halls and rooms adjacent thereto he will 
find Messrs Manning and Leaman in close conference as they 
are apparently bosom companions. Just the other day the 
writer almost ran into these two who were walking arm and 
arm in the basement of the city hall. 

Mr. Manning testified on the stand that Leaman had gone 
on Manning's bond as he did at the time Manning was in- 
dicted for complicity in the election frauds and that he, Man- 
ning, had been on the bond of Leaman. Now a few weeks 
ago we showed that Mr. Leaman had gone on the bond of the 
MoUoy woman. 

In the telephone graft investigation which was so neatly 
whitewashed by the council with the aid of the daily papers 
here, — Leaman testified as follows:— 

Page 2:0. 
Question — You were asked if you went on any trips, and you 

said oh no. You were paid here. 
Answer — I thought he meant did I get any money here, or 
in New York. You see My Friend Manning was ahead 
of me; He was in New York many times. 

Page 285. 

Question— What do you mean by your friends getting the 

best of you? 
Answer— My Friends Mr. Manning, Mr. Saunders, and 
so on. 

Question — They got more than you did? 
Answer — By the papers. 



H THE IDEA 

(^isstion— That is the rigi-etful pari of it, I suppose? 
Answer— Ye3, sir. ,,,,,..: ^,' . ,, ,, 

These incidents serve to show how intimate Leaman, Man- 
ning and Saunders vy^re and to^show how Mr. ,Mi|lls wipio 
nominated Mr. Manning for ofRcQ is thus indirectly connect- 
ed with the ring which does not care whether it violates t,he 
law or not. The way to get at the evil in the policy depart;- 
ment and the lax law-enforcement is to put put of office such 
men as Mills who are responsible for such men as Manning 
being in office. Don't try to doctor the effect. Doctor the 
cause. 

Tha citizens of Jefferson ward owe it to the people of 
Richmond to put Mr. Mills on the shelf at the election next 
week. 



WHEN man objects to being trampled on the masters say 
he is dangerous to society. —Ex. 



W. G. MAHONE 

GROCER AND FEKl) DEiVLER 



\ SCRATCH, BABY CHICK FEED, MEAT MEAL | 
I SCORCHED WHEAT, OYSTER SHELLS, ^ | 

I ' BONE-TONIC, &c., kc. 

S06 TO SI 6 BROOKE AVENUE 



5 



THE IDEA 15 

Idea Office Moved 

r - •■■.., 

New Quarters in Ford Hotel. Two Blocks from 
5 Former Location 
No. U06 Capitol Street 

'" The Idea has moved two blocks down Capitol Street into 
the old Ford Hotel Building. 

The pu'lisher will be glad to meet his friends and all the 
friends of the cause of good government in the new location, 
No. 1106 Capitol Street' 

Please notify all carriers of the change. 



Subs:ribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



THIS IS TO SAY TO VOU 

, • THAT , _ ", - ^7- ' ^ t. - , 

i ' ' . ......... --- ^ \ '. ' .i y, .1" . ," ' . 

THE IDEA PRINT SHOP 

Will be glad to idoi all I or a part of your 
Printing in an up-to-date manner and at a 

REASONABLE COST 

CALL. UP MONROE ^TOS 

And let us call on you with prices. 

ADON A. YODER 



16 THE IDEA 



Forsaken, 



The day is done ; The night begun ; 
The stars have Ht them one by one 
In feeble mock'ry of the Sun. 

All nature's still ; all's quiet, till 
The melancholy whippoorwill 
Sends forth his wail of omen ill. 

At night's behest, each to his nest, 
All birds have flow^n away to rest 
Save him of all birds most unblest. 

The day is done ; The night begun ; 
The Moon has risen where the Sun 
Thelve hours before his race had run. 

And I am night : But ne'er by light 
Of moon or star is my soul bright, 
For clouds of darkness make it blight. 

Yes! night am I ; But the wild cry 
E'en of whippoorwill near by 
Nor lightnings flash across the sky, 

My lids ne'er wake, mine ears ne'er shake, 
For I am ripe for Death to take 
And I await him and his Lake. 

Sun of my day! Light of my way! 
My moon! My stars! My brightest ray! 
My music sweet! Thou hast said "nay." 

My day is done ; My night begun ; 
My stars have hid them one by one 
In feeble mock'ry of the Sun. 

LYNERADO. 



i 



"FOR MEN ONLY" 

We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now 



i 

2 we wisn to announce to our many cusiunieis Liiat we axe iiuw | 

I located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are fully I 

§ equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES § 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We I 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET i 

I KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely I 

@ guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a @ 

I trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- I 

§ perts in this line of work. g 

I I 

5 Razors Honed And Set 15c. Each. I 

I Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. | 



THE '^SHARP-O'' CO. 

618 EAST MAIN STREET. 



Qj}<mmKii><Mm><io<mm><ioamm><iOo<am><io<^m><iDaam><i!><^m><io<amD<iOi> 



A. H. EWINQ 

CEMENT PAVING 
CONTRACTOR 

^^^:^^(^^^^==^^ 

8t NORTH LOMBARDY STREET PHONKietl 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Cstlmatas cheerfully given on Sidewalk 
Paving. Hall». Vestibules. BasemenU. Ac 



The editor has known Mr. ewlng personally for the last twenty year*, 
and he takes pleasure in statino that his reputation for first-class work 
and straight forward, satlsfactorv dealing Is uneicelled. 



,4>> 



WEEKLY PRICE LIST 

R. L. PARKER Phone Madison 4935-J C. N. PARKER 

GET IT AT 

PARKER BROTHERS 
GROCERIES 

520 N. 26th Street Richmond, Va. 

Gold Medal Flour, per bag ... 44 Winner Condensed Milk, per can . 11 

Obelisk Flour, per bag . ... 44 3 Large Cans Uncle Ned Tomatoes . 28 

Dunlop Flour, per bag ... 44 6 Bars Octagon Soap 25 

Clover Leaf Flour, per bag ... 44 Good Mackerel 05 

Arbuckle Coffee, per lb 17 Large Irish Potatoes, per peck . 25 

Church-Hill Pride Coffee, per lb. . 17 Old Virginia Herring Roe, per can 10 

PURITY BUTTERINE, per lb. 23 Smoked Shoulder, per lb. . . . 14 

Good Lard, per lb 15 cpi?/^TaT 

Round Beef Steak, per lb. . . . 15 bFt(„lAL 

Pork Steak, per lb 18 A Good Flour at 43c. per bag. 

All Goods not mentioned are in line with our low prices. 



iLOOK BOYS! i 

I MANY PRIZES | 

\ Besides the Prizes for Selling the Greatest Number of \ 
7 7 

^ Copies, The Idea will give a Prize to every ^ 

A boy who Sells 20 Copies each week in April. \ 

} EVERY BOY CAN WIN J 

'9 



WBSKLY 



5c 



THB CXDPT 



THE 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol IV 



April 23, 1 9 JO 



No. 17 




This little magazine is not afraid 
of the Devil himself. Don't the 
ittle Red thing beat the Devil 
anyhov^r ? 

FOR Sale at all news stands 




Being some sermonettes published weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. ■• • ■•■■'■•■ •■ ■ ■ ■• ~ ~ 



OP<WM><ll><WM><il><MB><ll><WM><l«i»l>'^BK><li)<lWPap<— )CI><— >qDqMD<l«i»!><— >qP<^M>q!> aMB> 0P<iMP<lO 



f Print it Rie:ht l 

I I 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea | 

i Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- ' 



* 



I roe 2708, I 







1 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICL\N 

7th AND MAIN STS. 9 

We haye in oar Fall Stoek, and arc V 

ahowing apeeial food ralues in ^ 

DIAMONDS, WATOIES, KWElltY, SIlVmWARE, CUT GUSS, (tL f ' 

We invite your inapeetion ' 



^•^^^■•■^-•■•"^«**<M«%i«aM%i0^a«MNrfMa^tfaRMai^^tfHhirf^^«k,«Mki«M«i^<MM«Miita^ 



►--^fc. ^^-"^ -^ '^-'^^ '^. '^^ '^- '^^ * 

* . ^ 

7 HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet f 

i wants, in Drugs and Medicings ^ 

^ Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, r 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

i Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

V Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

# ■ \ : — i 

i 

J - A. H. ROBINS, - I 

i 200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

J Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

A Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV APRIL 23, 1910 No. 17 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Office jffolders Owners of 
Samblin^ Jrfouse 

ZjAe Albemarle Club 



It has been a matter of common knowledge that the Albemarle 
Club was nothing but a high class gambling joint and drinking place. 

Just the other day a prominent young business man was asked if he 
knew anything about the Albemarle Club and his reply was just what 
nine out of ten of the people who keep posted know, that it was a 
gambling joint. 

Now, one naturally wonders why this place has enjoyed freedom 
from molestation at the hands of the police, when they know very 
well, not only the reputation of the place, but from what we know of 
happenings of the past, the very character of the place itself. 



2 THE IDEA 

Novv if yoj will look on page 13 and see who did own it and who 
they sold it to it will be readily understood why it has not been broken 
up. Clyde Saunders, Dem. City Committee Chairman, and Andy 
Griffith. Policy King and bar-keeper, were partners in the ownership, 
as they are now in the race horse deal. They sold to Ro. Whittet, Jr. 
aad A. H. Johnson, a gambler from Lynchburg. 

Rob't. Whittet was made President, and Ruskell, Sergeant-at-Aims 
of the council, was made Ser'ty., tho Johnson put up the money, as is 
shown by checks and information in our possession. 

Below we print t vo pages from a book kept by Johnson showing 
who playedv how much they put up and what they won or lost, in a 
poker game, 

Dunken 25, W. 70.00 Johnson 50, 100. W. 11.00 

Mules 25, 50, W. 1.00 Breil 25. 50, VV. 6.50 

Jenkins 25. 50. 75, 100. L. 79.70 West 50, 100, W. 40.00 
Davis- 25, 50, 75, L. 79.00 Burnett 25, L. 8.00 

Crawford 25, 50, 100, W. 12.00 J. and M. 25, 
Leaman 25, W, 40.00 Coffman 25, 50, W. 2.00 

Ruskell 25, 50, 55, 100, L. 94.00 Green 25, 50, L, 35.50 
Dykes 25. W. 69.00 Dabney 25, W. 30.00 

Medley 25, L, 23.70 Sampson 25, W. 16 

Ruskell 25. VV. 73.50 
Pollock 25, W. 46.00 
Krug 25, 50, 75, L. 4S.50 
Weaver 20, 25.50 
Griffith 25, 50, L. 34.50 
Nash 25 
Battle 20 
This \s so warm that vre will save the rest for another time. 



npELL you what you do. Go to the phone right now and 
*■ call up Monroe 2708 and say, " Come by my place of 
business some time in passing-, I may have some print- 
ing for you."" Do it right now. You won't regret it. There's 
the phone right there. Don't you see it? We have some new 
type; just the thing for business stationery. The Very Idea, 
Phone Monroe 2708. 



THE IDEA 



Where Are They? 



^ » mt > m* 



Tune, Highland Laddie. 

Where and oh! where has the "I Dare"— " I Swear" 
gone? 

Tell me, Daisy, truly tell, 

Have the " Yodeler" and " Facts" gone to Hades? 

The "I Dare" Burlesque, The Yodeler and Facts 
are three little publications which have appeared in the past 
twelve months to champion the cause of the whiskey inter- 
ests and crooked politicians, but the public of Richmond 
would not have them, so they all died after one or two issues 
each, while The Idea alone is left to tell the story of their 
demise. Some how or other the people are anxious to hear 
the truth and will read this paper because they know that 
it champions the cause of the people against the elements of 
greed and oppression and corruption in the ccnrrrunity. 



The Boy Problem 



The newsboy problem in the Summer is always a big one 
because the boys long to play and therefore cannot always 
be relied on to bring the paper when it is wanted. They 
will play ball and we don't blame them. 

Just last week some of the best supporters of the paper 
had to go out and find a copy at the newsstands because the 
boys did not appear with their copy. 

We therefore suggest that you send us today your sub- 
scription, $2.00 for a year or $1.00 for six months, and if you 
send us five subscribers we will give you $2.00 for the work. 
How is that for a money making proposition ? 



Send us your ad. today. The people read Idea ads. Also 
send us your printing. Help the good work along. 



THE IDEA 

Petersburg Boys Prize 



Get The Idea at The Brandon Book Company's in Peters- 
burg. 

The Idea will give to the Petersburg boy who sells the 
most Ideas in April, beginning this week, April 23rd, a hand- 
some Stag Handle pocket knife, which will be on exhibition 
in the Brandon Book Store windows, Sycamore Street. 



uictories of !Peace» 



The editor is glad to notice that the old Philologian Liter- 
ary Society of Richmond College, of which he had the honor 
to be an officer some time in the last century, has again car- 
ried off the Orator's Medal in the annual contest between 
the Philologian and Mu Sigma Rho Societies.- 

The "Victories of Peace " was the subject of the winning 
oration and we rejoice to note that such a subject was chosen 
by the bost orator of Richmond College. 

The difference between Peace and War is the difference 
between Heaven and . Hell, and as Jesus was an infinitely 
greater man than Napoleon so it takes an infinitely greater 
amount of manhood and courage and fidelity and bravery to 
fight the world's great battles of peace than to fight 
the battles of war. 

A hog, a brute, a devil can be brave in physical warfare, 
but only a man,— a godly man,— can fight the battles of 
peace, where man fights alone and often against his loved 
ones for th? grait cause of right, and where he is misunder- 
stood and often slain and the laurels come only after death 
and therefore faith alone in the eternal justice and love of 
right of divinity makes a man stand firm in such a conflict. 

Many man can lead a charge on the field of carnage, but 
few there be who are able to storm hell intrenched in church 
and state and society, and having done all are able to stand. 



THE IDEA 



False Prophets 



WHEN The Idea began publication last June, various and 
sundry enemies of the right in the shape of the cham- 
pions of the evils which this paper attacks immedi- 
ately began to knock us by saying that The Idea would not 
last six weeks. Six weeks rolled by and The Idea was strong- 
er than before and then the anvil chorus gave us six months 
and finally six months of usefulness passed by and The Idea 
still lived and was booming more than before. Then the 
knockers said that since the paper would not die of itself, 
they would kill it anyhow by breaking the editor by court 
proceedings and by punishing him with jail sentences and 
assaults and intimidation of his advertisers and dirty work 
of harrassing his news boys and publishing false reports 
concerning his past and present doings and by a campaign 
of villification and trickery and lying. 

Now this is to say that in spite of all these woiks of the 
Devil and his allies this paper is still alive and has a propo- 
sition to make to you. 

When the paper began we made a bid for subscriptions 
but realizing that our constituency was not acquainted with 
the writer and therefore had no assurance that the paper 
would live, that campaign was abandoned for the time, until 
we could become fully established and prove not only our 
right to live, but that The Idea would live. Now after almost 
a year's time we present our claims again to the reading 
public and solicit your subscriptions. The Idea has a great 
work before it and in order that you may keep posted with 
the movement for better conditions it will be well to keep up 
with this publication. 

In view of the difficulty of getting the boys to deliver reg- 
ularly we call your attention to page 12 on which we make 
an offer of The Idea for less than four cents a copy. 



THE IDEA 



A Walk Through 
Mayo Street 

Names Removed from Doors 

indecent Exhibits and Proposals from 

Windows 



OUR attention has recently been called to the many im- 
provements in the condition of affairs in Mayo Streeet, 
We were told that the police department, stirred up 
by the exposures of The Idea, had made some more stringent 
rules for these women of the mid-night world. 

Last June when The Idea began its work, this section was 
a veritable hell on earth, even in the day, for women thinly 
clad would openly solicit men on the street in the presence 
of the police. For a while last Fall we noticed this practice 
had been checks d and shades were placed at all the windows. 

On last Monday afternoon we went through Mayo Street 
again, and though the shades were at the windows still, 
these common women have gone back to their practice of 
soliciiing men from the windows, as formerly. On the east 
side of Mayo, between Broad and Grace, a scarlet woman 
openly invited the writer to enter. Down nearer Main, a 
yellow girl stood in the porch way and called out sickly 
terms of endearment to the passersby. 

Between Grace and Franklin, a young girl was hanging 
out of a window indecently exposing her breasts below the 



THE IDEA 7 

danger line for the benefit of her trade in vice, and such ex- 
posure under such circumstances could rot butbeatrcrrcnd- 
ous temptation to any man who is a man. We found, as we 
had been told, that the names had been removed fiom. the 
transoms and doors, where they had been placed to direct 
the way of the drunken patrons in search of their mistresses. 

No longer were "Maggie and Rose" permitted to adver- 
tise their location. And the "Hartman" woman's sign was 
down, and 'Tolly" and "Emma's" names were to be seen 
no more. 

After ten P. M. we went back. 

On the north side of Broad, Anna Clarkson's place, which 
we wrote up some weeks back, was doing business as usual 
and the police knew all about it, tho Chris. Manning says it 
is not in the red light district. Entrance is had from the 
side street, and two neatly dressed white men were standing 
in the doorway of the negro woman's house. 

Besides this being a notorious assignation house it is also 
a common whore house as well, and she keeps her white 
girls too. Soon a white girl opened the door ^nd after a f< w 
words of inquiry invited the men to go up "totheficnt 
parlor. ' ' 

If the police departmient were not protectirg this wen' en, 
she could easily be broken up. 

Down on Mayo a fearful rough house was in progress and 
mere boys were vying with their elders in making the rounds 
of debauchery, all with the sanction and piotection srd f£- 
therly approval of the police commissioners. Enough! 
Enough! Enough! When will the laws of the commonwealth 
of Virginia be enforced in the ancient capital, the home of 
the blue-blood aristocracy of the Old Dominion? 



There are just two periods in a man's life, when he don't 
understand women; Before and after marriage. —Selected. 



Subs:ribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months. $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



8 THE IDEA 

Some Hot Talk 

The Spineless, Sexless Press. 
For Men 

'* I ^ HE other day, a friend of ours said to us, "Why don't 
"*■ you say something nice about somebody sometimes. 
Pick out some of the good men in office and compli- 
ment them." And our reply was that The Idea was called 
into being simply because the papers were doing nothing 
but throwing boquets and whitewashing, and that there was 
no need for another paper to do that work, the field was 
overcrowded already, and if these papers had been doing 
the disagreeable duty which they owed to the people this 
paper never would have been born. 

They, like the selfish beings that they are, have undertak- 
en only the pleasant work and have neglected the work of 
scouring and cleaning and carrying out of the slops of the 
city for the more agreeable work of entertaining the compa- 
ny and flattering their m.asters, this retaining their position 
as servants, tho the real work of their position is entirely 
neglected. The work of scouring and cleaning, which they 
have dodged, is so burdensome that we have no time for 
soft words. When the house is garnished and swept, we 
may find time to throw a few boquets, meanwhile we will 
leave this feminine occupation to the spineless, nerveless, 
sexless, effeminate, cascareted, castrated, de(y)odoriz€d 
papers which might lose a subscription if they criticised a 
cook. 

We are not in competition with them; ours is a man's work 
and sometimes more than a man can stand alone. 

Men of Richmond! will you help or will you continue to be 
afflicted with female troubles? 

We rejoice that some are arousing. How about you? 



THE IDEA 



Smutty Talk 



^TT'HE black ink we use in printing The Idea costs 10 cents 
■■• a pound and the paper costs 4 1-2 cents a pound. 
When we do a job of printing stationery for you, we 
use ink that costs 50 cents a pound, 5 times as much as this 
ink, and paper of a quahty to suit, say 15 cents a pound bond. 
We tell you this so you won't judge the looks of our job work 
by the looks of the printing in The Idea, which is done with 
cheap materials. We us^ a different press, inks, care and 
everything else in doing work for you. Send us your job 
work today, or phone Monroe 2708. 



Police Commissioner 



Using Black Jack 



The papers of last week tell us that police commissioners. 
Manning and Gordon, attempted to subdue a drunk on the 
street last Friday and that Mr. Douglas Gordon, Police Com- 
missioner, used a black jack, and since Mr. Gordon has not 
denied the report, we take it for granted that it is true. 

The proceedings of subduing of the prisoner are reported 
to have been disgraceful, and certain prominent citizens who 
were spectators found it necessary to sharply reprimand the 
conduct of police commissioners. 

Now, the matter of using a black jack is worthy of atten- 
tion. We are informed that it is unlawful, not simply to 
carry such a concealed weapon, but that the law so frowns 
on this practice that it is unlawful even to sell a black jack. 

And yet we have a police commissioner who has taken an 
oath to support the laws of the state utterly disregarding 



10 THE IDEA 

such laws, and in company with others, as is reported, using 
such a weapon as a black jack on a prisoner. 

He would have had no right to carry this weapon even as 
a policeman and in spite of the purported decision of some 
attorney a police commissioner is not a policeman. Might as 
well say that a councilman is such an officer because he ap- 
points the poHce cammissioner, or say that the citizen is a 
policeman because he appoints the councilman who appoints 
the commissioner who appoints the police. 

The legislature in making a poHce commission never 
dreamed of such officers going about with black jacks or any 
form of police authority, no more than it contemplated that 
the School Board should be regarded as teachers and du.w 
any emoluments as such. The trouble is that police commis- 
sioners have no regard for the law and have such influence 
with those whose duty it is to er force the law that they csn 
violate the law with impunity and instruct the police to 
ignore the law, contrary both to their oaths and the swcin 
oaths of the policemen themselves, as conmissicner M?rn- 
ing confessed the commissioners were doing in refeience to 
the red light evil which they protect in their reign of ciime 
in the city of Richmond. 



Small Pox Spreads 

From the Red Light District. 



Sunday's papers tell us of the spread of the dread disease 
of Small Pox all over the city from Locust Alley, the abode 
of crime and debauchery, permitted and practically legalized 
by the police commissioners contrary to law. 

From this dirty, vile hole this vile disease threatens to 
fasten itself upon the com.m.unity, all because these be neve- 



THE IDEA 11 

lent commissioners thought these filthy creatures deserving 
of their care and solicitous protection. 

Locust Alley, be it remembered, is a continuation of Mayo 
S'.raet, and is a part of the baudy-house section, set apart by 
the police commissioners for the purposes of prostitution 
and lewdness, so Chris. Manning said in the libel case, tho 
there is no official record of such action. 



Tj/ie Jrfealth i)epartment 

iPost ^^9^eas/es" Card after Victims <^re 

Well. 



Some time ago the writer's boys caught the measles. On 
the first visit by the physician it was reported to the health' 
department and after about three weeks from the first break- 
ing out the last case was over and the boys were out and at 
play. Then there appeared on the scene a representative of 
the Health Department, who said another would come later. 
In the course of the same day the second officer came and 
put up his '* Measles" sign, altho the measles had gone. 
The sign read that the public was warned of the presence of 
measles. This was not true, for there was no measles. It 
further said that the victims should be kept in the place in 
which they were "isolated". Now it happened that the boys 
at that time were "isolated" (?) in the back yard. 

We would not keep them there and of course the depart- 
ment does not mean what it says, it simply means that some- 
body must collect some fees for putting up the measley old 
sign. 



We are going to get behind some Richmond Preachers 
soon. Better read The Idea. 



12 THE IDEA 

LOOK, BOYS AND GIRLS! 



Make $2.00 for Few Minutes Work 



If any person will send us 5 subscribers at $2.00 a year, 
cash with subscription, we will give him $2.00 for the work. 

Or if you send us 5 one dollar, ..six months subscriptions, 
we will give you one dollar. Almost any live boy or girl or 
man or woman can go right in his own neighborhood and 
make a dollar or two in an hour's time. You just try it and 
see. The Idea will try to have cartoons in each issue and 
besides will always be interesting and helpful and stand for 
good government and good men in office and will expose the 
evil wherever it is found. 

Your subscription will help much in the fight for better 
.things and you will also find it a cheaper £.nd safer way o:^ 
getting The Idea. Subscribers have their papers mailed to 
them every Friday evening, and by subsci ibing the paper 
costs less than four cents a copy, making a saving of seventy 
cents during the year. 

Cut out the coupon below and mail it today with the price 
and The Idea will commence with any number you desire. 
We have saved out several copies of all back numbers. Do 
it now. 



1910 
THE IDEA, 1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 
Enclosed find (sloo) for which please send The Idea for 

/ONEYEAR \ . 
VSIX MONTHS/ to 

Name 

Street & No - 

Post Office 



THE IDEA 13 

Who Owns the Albemarle? 

This agreement made this twelth day of August 1908, by and between 
Clyde W, Saunders, A, T. Griffith and J. W. Salomon, parties of the 
first part, and A. H. Johnson and Robert Whittet, Jr., parties of the 
second part, all of Richmond, Virginia. 

WITNESSETH: The said parties of the first part for and in consider- 
ation of the sum of Twenty Pour Hundred Dollars agree to sell and convey 
to the said parties of the second part, one hundred and fifty shares of 
the capital stock of the Albemarle Club of the City of Richmond, Vs. 

The said parties of the first part hereby acknoiwledge the receipt 
of One Thousand Dollars, to them in Jrand -paid by the said parties of 
the sejcond part, as the first pajment on account of this agreement and 
the said parties of the second part agree to pay the remainder of 
Fourteen Huhdred Dollars, as follows, tIz.: 

One note for Fourteen Hundred Dollars, dated August 12th 1908, at 
three months, draim by A. H, Johnson* to his own order and endorsed by 
him and Robert Whittet, Jr.. 

It is further agreed that In event of default In the paynent of the 
above described note, the said parties of the first part may without 
process of law take possession of said stock. 

It is further agreed that the One Hundred and Fifty Shares of Stock 
above described shall ranaln in the custody of Clyde W, Saunders, as 
Trustee, until the above described note is fully paid. 

WITNESS the following Signatures and Seals :- 

e^ CXf , ^<yaAAAAMAy\n (SEAL) 




^,(VC^^^^;^ fSEAL) 

fSEAL) 




SZI7 



14 THE IDEA 

The Cowardly 
Richmond Papers 



npHE other day the "Supreme" said editorially that the 
■■■ people get just as good government as they deserve, 
and censured the people for not taking a more active 
part in the government of the city. The Idea thinks the 
people of Richmond "deserve" the best government in the 
world and are extremely interested in the management of 
their city, but they have no forceful leader in the press of 
the city, w^hich has backbone enough to rrake a firm stand 
for clean men for office or to oppose crooks in of!:ce. Just 
this morning we have the "Supreme" wasting its space in 
two long editorials on New York City politics, one concern- 
ing the enforcement of Sunday laws there and the other 
concerning the police for not breaking up the murders in 
Chinatown, and here it is right before election time and not 
one word about good government in Richmond and when 
they do have to mention politics here they are always sure 
not simply not to censure the rascals in politics but even to 
go further and white wash them when caught. 

What the people of Richmond want is clean and efficient 
government in Richmond, and since the people of Richmond 
are not concerned in the crookedness in New York, we won- 
der if The Times-Dispatch writes these editorials for the 
benefit of the poor, benighted New Yorkers. We doubt 
if one in every one hundred thousand of the people of that 
city have ever heard of the little Times- Dispatch. 

This morning paper will delight in cussing out the mayor 
of Chicago or New York or Boston by name and will damn 
Governor Hughes or Governor Crothers or the goverr or of 
any other, state than Virginia, but did a single reader of The 



THE IDEA 15 

Times-Dispatch ever hear of that paper ever censuring a 
governor of Virginia or a mayor of Richmond, except the 
only real mayor Richmond ever had, namely, Carlton McCar- 
thy? No. Let The Times-Dispatch show a little interest 
in the people of Virginia or of Richmond by taking an active 
stand for clean men in Richmond City offices and it will find 
ic an easy matter with its big equipment to give Richmond 
in two year's time a grand, economical, clean, decent gov 
ernment. But The Times-Disdatch is afraid it will lose as a 
subscriber the cousin of the father-in-law of the brother of 
the neighbor of some crooked politician. In other words, 
the Richmond papers are cowards and afraid to take a stand 
for good men. 



Every man is the architect of his own fortune, and he 
needs plenty of sand.— Selected. 



Subs:ribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 

riO^V DO YOU LIIvE THIS TYI^E 

FOR 

jCetter jrteads 

AND 

SS US in ess Cards? 
\a/e: \a/ant your business 

AND ARE READY TO DO YOUR WORK 
PHONE MONROE STOS, OR ADDRESS 

Uhe Sciea !Pr/ni Shop 
OFICE, 1106 CAPITOL STREET 



16 THE IDEA 



W. G. MAHONE 

OROCER AIND FEED DEALER 

iPoulirj/ Supplier 

\ SCRATCH, BABY CHICK FEED. MEAT MEAL 
SCORCHED WHEAT, OYSTER SHELLS, 
BONE-TONIC, &c., &c. 

SOS TO SIS BROOKE AVENUE 
THIS IS TO SAY TO YOU 

THAT 

THE IDEA PRINT SHOP 

Will be glad to do all or a part of Muir 
Printing in an up-to-date manner and at a 

REASONABLE COST 

CALL UP MONROE ^TOS 

And let us call on you with prices. 

ADON A. YODER 



WANTED! 
1 000 Men and Women 

Who want to look their best at all times, thus gaining the 
distinction which only the well dressed enjoy, to have their 

Clothes Cleaned and ^Pressed 6y 

''our monthly PLAN' 

It is unique, in as much as it relieves you of all bother and 

worry, while it keeps all your clothing in the best possible 

condition. 

IT IS CHEAP, which is only one of its many good features. 

Call up or drop us a card and our Mr. Wilburn will see you 

and give you the particulars. 

PHONE, MONROE 3310 
irurltan Cleaning and 2)j/e Tlforks 

WILBURN BROS.. PROPRIETORS 

2-404 EAST BROAD STREET 

All work called for and delivered promptly in any part of the city. 

harbour J^i^ffffy Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South SSostonj Vir£fin/a 



All Styles of Buggies, Surries and 
Farm Wagons can be seen at our 
Repository, 

Jfoenni^fer^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
You build up your State when you buy home made goods. 



LOOK BOYS! 



MANY PRIZES 

Besides the Prizes for Selling the Greatest Number of 

Copies, The Idea will give a Prize to every 

boy who Sells 20 Copies each week in April. 

EVERY BOY CAN \A/IN 








Reproduced from last week by request. 



5c 



WBBKLT OC THB OOPT 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV April 30, 19 JO No. J 8 



^ « ^ » 9» 



Justice Crutchfield 

Engineer Boiling 
I B. Wood 
Red Light Evil 
Election Talk 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



Being some sermonettes published weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. . _ __ _ 



I Print it Right, I 

I ! 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea s 

i Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 

$, * 

I roe 2708, a 



J. S.JAMES OPTICIAN 

7«»> AND MAIN STS. 

We hnve in our Kail Stock, and ar« 
showing; special good values in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, I WaSY, SllVfRWAH, CUT GIASS, Etc 

We iDvite your inapectioD 




^ HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet f 

A wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ 

# Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, r 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate f 

f Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

- A. H. ROBINS, - j 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. ! 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

i Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. f 

^ ^ 

9' 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV APRIL 30, 1910 No. 18 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

What the Election 
Means. 

The People Disgusted. 

"* I ^HE Election returns of last week carry some tremend- 
■■■ ous lessons to those who are interested in the govern- 
ment of the city. 

In the first place, the results show the election of the ring 
crowd. 

With few notable exceptions the ring elements won on 
Thursday of last week. 

In the second place, the results show that the people did 
not care enough about results to register their votes at the 
polls. 



2 THE IDEA 

Out of a population of nearly 100,000 only about 5,000 
votes were polled. , -g ■ --^ •; 

This is a most significant fact. .: I --* f 

Another notable fact is this: That one candidate was 
elected with only 230 votes to his credit. 

Just think of that fact for a moment. Due to our rotten 
ward system 230 men may decide who is to run the city of 
Richmond, —230 men may put into the council of the city a 
man to represent and legislate for ICO.CCO people, tho all of 
the other 100,000 may think him unfit for oflfice. 

This is the big lesson Richmond people need to lesrn, that 
the ward system is a failure and however much they may 
desire good government they can never obtain it so long as 
it is possible for the elements of evil to decide their elec- 
tions as they can do and do do under the ward-grab plan. 

And this should be known, that a council elected under 
the ward system never will abolish the ward system. 

It is a matter of universal regret to the progressive ele- 
ment of the city that the most ardent supporter of the gov- 
ernment by commission idea was defeated in Lee Ward. 

Men of ad^anced ideas of government are defeated and 
men whose only qualifications are that they have the support 
of the ring and the special interests are elected. 

If Richmond is ever to enjoy a better government, it will 
not get it through the council of the council's own accord. 
It will get it through the expressed will of the people in or- 
ganized effort displcyed. 

Now is the time to organize for the future. The people of 
Clay Ward are awakening. Let their example be followed, 
let the people of the city arouse themselves and throw off 
this ancient, worn out. extravagant, inefficient, cumbersome 
form and substitute a modern, up-to-date, business-like plan 
in its place. 

The reason the ring crowd is again t the change is that it 
will work the ruin of the control of the machine over the 
city government. If the plan is pdopted in its entirety, it 
will do away with party politics in city affairs. 

Why should it be that a man must be of a certain stripe of 



THE IDEA i3 

political faith before he can have anything to do with the 
government of the city ? 

What has the tariff got to do with running Richmond any 
how? 

Cut national politics out of city affairs. 

Do away with party primaries. 

Let elections be at large. 

Install the initiative and referendum and the recall. 

But the people must organize first. 



Justice John 



This Monday morning, April 25th, Justice John Crutchfield 
of the police court, arrived at the east entrance to City Hall 
in company with W. P. (Dutch) Leaman. The writer has 
frequently seen Leaman in Justice John's ofRce in conversa- 
tion with the justice, and on a recent occasion after Manning 
and Leaman had left the court, the Justice came out and 
called, "Where's Chris, and Dutch ? " 

Now a record of these little incidents may seem trivial to 
those who do not understand, and yet it is just this intimacy 
between the judge of the police court and these who protect 
women of ill-fame in their vile and unlawful acts that makes 
people have a right to infer that when it comes to 'a trial 
these protected creatures do not get their deserts. Call to 
mind that W. P. Leaman went on the bond of the Molloy 
woman on a former occasion and that he was in court when 
the Molloy woman was given a light sentence and that Man- 
ning, police commissioner, who admitted he acted unlawfully 
in establishing a red light district, was also on hand in the 
police court, and one can readily see why Justice John's de- 
cisions are questioned and why The Idea feels it its duty to 
show to the public these acts of its public servants and draw 
reasonable and harsh inferences therefrom. 



[ THE IDEA 

,2{ jCittle Widow Sa a 7)an^eroua Tjhin^ 



Did you hear of the Widow Malone, 

Ohone ! 
Who lived in the town of Athlone, 

Alone ! 
Oh, she melted the hearts 
Of the swains in them parts, 
So lovely the Widow Malone, 

Ahone ! '% 
Of lovers she had a full score 

Or more; 
And fortunes they all had galore 

In store; 
From the minister do\yn 
To the clerk of the tow n 
All were courting the Widow Malone 

Ohone ! 
All were courting the Widow Malone 



T»T' 



As the candle to the moth; as the molasses- jug to the pes- 
tiferous fly, so is a handsome widow to the heart of man. 
He comprehendeth not the treacle-sweet depths of her, neilh- 
er is he able to resist the pale flame of past pathos which 
seemeth to envelope her. She giveth subtlety to the simplest 
of her charms, and from man she extracteth even the little 
wisdom which he hath. 

A wholesome fear of widows is the beginning of true 
knowledge, but fool men despise both wisdom and instruc- 
tion. 

Behold now a wise friend who sayeth : Young man, if 
widows entice thee, consent thou rot. If one of them sayeth 
unto thee, "Come, button up my glove," or "Tighten thou 
the latchet of my shoe. " lend not thine ears to her request, 
neithei' bend thy knee before her to do her bidding. For, 



THE IDEA '5 

lo ! her feet are shod with satin and sleek cunning, and she 
knoweth well every step of the way that leadeth to the cita- 
del of your heart. Should she smile sweetly at you, saying, 
"Let us two together make a rare-bit after the play to- 
night," harden thou thy heart against her, and— ostensibly 
for thy stomach's sake, —refuse to be beguiled. For as the 
yellow cheese melteth and curdleth in the chafing-dish, so 
wilt thy heart melt within thee and thy liberty pass forever 
from thy keeping when thou beholdest her in the ruflfies of 
her dainty cooking apron. Foolish virgins may let their 
lamps go out from lack of oil; but a wise widow attendeth 
carefully to the alcohol in her spirit-lamp. 

Wisdom crieth without; she uttereth her voice in the 
streets. But what male creature has discretion enough to 
hearken unto her? How long, oh, ye simple ones, will ye 
let yourselves be fooled? Surely in vain the net is spread in 
the sight of any bird; but silly man, dazzled by the gleam in 
a pretty widow's eyes, walketh blindly into the pit which 
she diggeth for his feet. 

It hath been truly said that a widow's degree of blandish- 
ment is conservatively estimated at twenty-five spinster- 
power; yea, her dominion over men is as wine unto water 
when compared with the influence exercised by a simple 
miss. She walketh in the light of past experience, and no 
other torch is needed to guide men's feet unto her. A maid- 
en may blush or blunder herself into a good life's settlement; 
but the waj of a widow is blazed straight through to her 
goal. In the handling of men she maketh no mistakes. She 
hath learned the uses of silence; yea, and as acceptable 
offerings of frankincense and myrrh are her spoken words 
to the vanity of men. The wisdom of the Spinx is hers when 
it comes to devising means of getting what she wants, and 
the inestimable value of judiciously administered food as a 
subjugating force in woman's dealings with men is exceed- 
ingly well known unto her. 

Behold now, even a widow without means is a thing of 
beauty and a joy forever to the average man; but when 
riches are added unto her, she becometh as a priceless ruby 



6 THE IDEA 

in his sight, and all other things that can be desired are not 
to be compared unto her. Length of days— without work,— 
she holdeth for him in her right hand; and in her left hand 
he seeth visions of riches and lasting peace of mind. The 
hearts of all her male friends cleave mightily unto her, and 
surely, she will do them, — up brown,— all the days of her 
life. She stretcheth out her hands to the poor creatures; 
yea, she reacheth forth her hands and draws them in— by 
the dozen — so that sometimes it happeneth that the net 
whereby she catcheth them breaketh in twain from its own 
great weight. 

But when she catcheth them she seeketh straightway to 
teach them wisdom, and she worketh willingly on them — 
with her eyes. She openeth her mouth with full knowledge 
of what men want to hear, and her breath, sweet with the 
honey of flattery, is as incense in the nostrils of her lovers. 
She looketh well to the ways of men, and in her heart is a 
deep, deep understanding of them all. Having already con- 
ducted various experiments in the psychological laboratory of 
matrimony; she feeleth herself competent to pass perfect 
judgment on that least of all complex creations-man. But 
whether it was worth her while to go through with so 
much to learn so little she can never quite decide. 

A widow is always well dressed. She is like the merchant 
ships; she bringeth her merchandise from afar. Her hand- 
maidens make her covering of rich embroidery; her clothing 
is silk and fine Hnen. In chiffon-cloth and sashes, she gaz- 
ethconfidingly up into the eyes of men, and lo ! ! destruction 
as a whirlwind cometh immediately upon him. Thenceforth 
shall he eat of the fruit of his own recklessness, and his days 
shall be long in the meshes of the web that is of her weav- 
ing. 

My friend, if thou wishest for true happiness walk not in 
the way with the widows; refrain thy feet from following in 
their path. Also hearken unto the homely voice of the im- 
mortal Mr. Weller as he earnestly entreats, "Samivil, Sami- 
vil, bevare of the widders." — Marion Banister. (Selected.) 



THE IDEA 



The Ring's Way 

Government by Slate 



^ *m* ^ 



In many of the wards slates were made by the ring for 
the election last week and it worked exceedingly well, as it 
generally does. Below we print a duplicate of the slate 
which was circulated to voters in Jefferson ward. Only one 
party on the slate failed of election and he was a new man 
that the ring desired to put in, and if one will look at the re- 
turns he will see the ring almost succeeded in getting him 
through, for the man he was opposed to just did slide in. It 
is next to impossible for even an old councilman to beat a 
slate without expending much money to do it, and it is even 
harder for an outsider to get in without the sanction of the 
ring. Good men know this and that's why they will so sel- 
dom offer for office. 

For Board of Aldermen 

WILLIAM H. ADAMS 

H. W. MELTON 

For Common Council 

JOHN HIRSHBERG 

JOHN J. LYNCH 

MORGAN R. MILLS 

C. A. WESTON 
C. H, WILTSHIRE 



See next week's Idea for more about protected gambling 
houses. 



.8 THE IDEA 

The Second Baptist Church 



All Hell and The Times- Dispatch— (now don't censure us 
for referring to Hell and mentioning the Devil by name for 
it is this false modesty and miserably cowardly soft talk 
which refuses to tell on him in plain English that has per- 
mitted his Satanic Majesty to run this old world so long) so 
we say plainly again — All Hell and The Times. Dispatch are 
jubilant today ov^r the action of the Second Baptist Church 
of this city in refusing to let the Anti-Saloon League use 
their church edifice for a Field Day occasion, which is noth- 
ing more nor less than a time of preaching the doctrine of 
sahation from the liquor evil, the greatest enemy the 
churches of God ever had. 

There is no use in quibbling over theories of the functions 
of the church, let's face the big fact that today organized 
Christian eifort has been set back and saddened, and the 
liquor business has been given a new impetus and life by 
the action of a Church of Christian people. There is the 
issue. Face it like men. 

Answer this question: Why did The Times-Dispatch, the 
best organ the whiskey people ever had in Virginia, so re- 
joice as to give this bit of news the most prominent heading 
and position in a recent issue? It is for no other cause than 
that they saw in it a great victory for the whiskey business 
over the forces which make for right in the community. 

You don't find politicians jumping up in holy horror and 
yelling, "Separate Church and State", when the churches 
are called on to fight the great tuberculosis evil, altho it 
means legislation — State law, mind you — and the spending 
of State money to establish sanatoriums and fight the dread 
plague. And why? Well, it's just because it don't interfere 
with business(?) Ahl that's a good word! A name to conjure 
with. Business ! Business ! 

And just as soon as a business is hurt, then we have all 



THE IDEA ^f 

manner of excuses made why the Churches should not enter 
p'olitics. 

Carlton McCarthy said the other day in a speech in the 
East End, "Religion and Morality, Law and Government, 
and consequently Politics, are .inseparable. " Look at that 
carefully. Should churches be separated from religion ? 
Can Religion and Morality be separated ? Can morality be 
separated from the laws of any state ? (Law is nothing 
but the codifying of the morals of a people). Can Law and 
Government be separated ? Can Government be separ^te^ 
from politics ? 

If it is not the Church's business to run both Politics and 
the Government, then The Bible is but old wives' tales, just 
what the whiskey people would have it anyway. 

The Messiah came in fulfillment of the prophecy, "And 
the government shall be upon his shoulders." McCarthy 
also said, " It is the function of the Church to conquer and 
to rule." Did He not pray, "Thy Kingdom come and thy 
will be done on earth"? 

Are we not told that He shall come ' 'Whose right it is to 
rule"? 

, Has anybody any right to rule except the Church, * 'the 
bride of Christ", the "joint heir" to the kingdom? If He 
and the Church are to rule by right as " King of Kings" and 
Lord of Lords and men, how can Religion and Politics be 
separated? 

If the Bible means anything, it means that brotherly love 
which shall not stop at creeds, for "Faith without works is 
dead", but which shall act through all means to help men 
in some tangible way and the only way that universally 
touches men is their government. The Time of Judgment 
according to Holy Writ, means a time when His Government 
shall be established in the earth and the Mighty Councelor 
and Prince of Peace shall judge and rule the world in right- 
eousness. And that so-called Christian is but a weakling 
who can not see that God, through His messengei's and rev- 
elations to men has clearly shown them His plan to establish 
through them a government by which all the nations of the 



to THE IDEA 

earth shall be blessed. And all the signs of the times indi- 
cate an early return to power of God's chosen and peculiar 
people. 

But to get to the point: We feel that we have a peculiar 
right to talk about this action of the Second Baptist Church 
because of two facts: The one is that the editor is a Baptist 
and thus tho criticism of the action of a Baptist Church is 
embarrassing and therefore no base motive can be attrib- 
uted. The other is that the pastor of this church, Dr. W. 
R. L. Smith, has a particularly warm spot in the heart of 
the writer because of the intimate personal relations both 
between Dr. Smith and the family of the writer for many 
years in Lynchburg, and between the writer and Dr. Smith's 
most charming and intellectual wife who was his Sunday 
School teacher in the infant class of College Hill Church 
some twenty-odd years ago, and the kindnesses of the Doc- 
tor himself to the writer in the past. 

Tho it is embarrassing, we still feel it our duty to say that 
this action of the Second Church ard this tendency of the 
wealthy churches to cast cold water on the action of the 
Anti-Saloon League in its beneficent work, the most practi- 
cal and godly that Christian people have ever engaged in, 
can not be too harshly condemned. 

Tho the body took this action quietly and ostensibly in the 
interests of the church (for fear it would be contaminated 
by correcting evil) still the good people of Richmond have the 
right to infer, as they are inferring, and as is the talk in every 
quarter that this action is the result of the fact that promi- 
nent Virginia politicians have had a great weight in molding 
the sentiment of the members in opposition to any stand be- 
ing taken against the liquor evil. 

We have no hesitancy in saying that no recent action of 
any church body has done more to set back the final consum- 
mation of a clean State both morally and politically than this 
action of the Second Church. 

God save the church that can not take a firm stand in the 
front ranks in man's greatest conflict against man's great- 
est enemy. 



THE IDEA }} 

It is a remarkable fact that small churches and poor 
churches where m^sn of wealth and politics do not belong 
never have any difficulty in declaring their allegiance to the 
organized efforts of good men to fight evil. 

Many monied men in our churches begin to have fits when- 
ever any organized effort is ever put forth to fight evil when 
it hits any of the financial interests of the community. 



Don't get so mad as to stop reading The Idea because yoii 
can't agree with all we say. This paper would not be worth 
anything if it said things to please you or even its own edit- 
or. We are mad with ourselves because we have to write 
some things which we don't like to say, but a clearly defined 
duty to the public makes us do things as we have done in 
this number, to hurt our own financial interests and drive 
away friends. The paper that always pleases can't ?.cccm- 
plish much good. 



Subscribe to The Idea today; $1.00 or six months. $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 

now DO YOV LIKE THIS TYPE 

FOR 

jCetter Jreac/s 



SSustn ?ss Cards ? 

WE \A/ANT YOUR BUSINESS 
AND ARE REAOY TO DO YOUR WORK 
PHONE MONROE 2TOS, OR ADDRESS 

Jjhe Sciea Sprint Shop . 
OFFICE, 1106 CAPITOL STREET 



h THE IDEA 

The Red Light District 

Money Making BUSINESS 



We learn from reliable sources that a certain house of ill 
fame in the Red Light District keeps about 12 girls to whom 
room and board are furnished at $15.00 a week each, making 
$180.00 a week, or $810.00 a month as income to the proprie- 
tor, a well known man who does business in the name of the 
woman in charge. 

You see it would very seriously hurt BUSINESS to break up 
this traffic in the virtue of women. No wonder our busi- 
ness (?) government refuses to enforce the law when it is 
violated in the name of business. 

Besides this $800.00 a month there is an enormous profit 
in selling liquor without license, especially at night and om 
Sundays when the other places of dispensing whiskey and 
beer are closed. The whiskey traffic and prostitution go to- 
gether and in Richmond they are great revenue producing 

BUSINESSES. 



The Albemarle 



Inasmuch as A. H. Johnson, formerly of The Albemarle, 
has been unjustly criticized for going back on his friends, 
we feel it due hrm to state to the public that Johnson was 
not responsible for all that exposal and that he attempted 
to shield certain ones -we exposed and that certain papers 
and information came into our possession entirely without 
his knowledge. 



THE IDEA 13 

LOOK, BOYS AND GIRLS! 



Make $2.00 for Few Minutes Work 



If any person will send us 5 subscribers at $2.00 a year, 
cash with subscription, we will give. him $2.00 for the work. 

Or if you send us 5 one dollar, six hionths subscriptions, 
we will give you one dollar. Almost any live boy or girl or 
man or woman can go right in his OA\n neighborhood and 
make a dollar or two in an hour's time. You just try it and 
see. The Idea will try to have cartoons in each issue and 
besides will always be interesting and helpful and stand for 
good government and good men in office and will expose the 
evil wherever it is found. 

Your subscription will help much in the fight for better 
things and you will also find it a cheaper and safer way of 
getting The Idea. Subscribers have their papers mailed to 
them every Friday evening, and by subscribing the paper 
costs less than four cents a copy, making a saving of seventy 
cents during the year. 

Cut out the coupon below and mail it today with the price 
and The Idea will commence with any number you desire. 
We have saved out several copies of all back numbers. Do 
it now. 



1910 

THE IDEA, 1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 
Enclosed find (sioo) for which please send The Idea for 

(ONE YEAR \ , 
SIX MONTHS/ to ■ 

Name 

Street & No. 

Post Office 



14 THE IDEA 



Anna Maguire 



The Richmond White Slave Trade 



TtlE story of Anna Maguire, the little nine years old 
white girl who was being kept by a negro woman in 
old Jackson ward, has many lessons for thoughtful 
men and women in that it discloses to the public gaze a 
frightful state of affairs in the legalized so-called maternity 
homes of Richmond. Many people do not know that today 
there are in Richmond, operated by disreputable women, sc- 
ealled homes, really assignation houses, where a man may 
send the girl he has ruined, and wheie the child will be dis- 
posed of either by murder or neglect or by giving away to 
some negro or by selling the child on the New Orleans whore 
house market. 

And these so-called maternity homes opeiate under a state 
charter and when it has been known by the police that they 
were immiOral meeting place? still the law so piotected them 
that they could not be broken up, but could simply be re- 
moved to another section. 

Richmond has become notorious throughout our South-land 
as the hot-bed of this nefaiious trrffc, and Florida and New 
Orleans look to Richmond for their regular quota of bastaid 
children. 

Thanks to the legislature these chartered maternity homes 
will now no longer be permitted to operate in the dark, but 
may be closed where their practices are criminal. 

But why does the legislature permit them to exist at all ? 

On the corner of Fifth and Leigh streets such a place is 
operated by a woman of many names and it is reported that 
here white infants have been seen neglected and left in the 
back yard while their inhuman or unfortunate parents trust- 



THE IDEA 15 

ed, perhaps, that they had been given a goodhomeand weie 
properly cared for. 

Now back of all this nefarious business is a cause or causes, 
and certainly one cause of this is the immense illegal trsfF.c 
in virtue which the Richmond Board of Police Commission,- 
ers is responsible for down on Mayo street. ' 

Here immorality is legalized by the Board until its damna- 
ble influence permeates the whole fabric of Richmond society 
and girls of good families are taken to these vile lesorts and 
the maternity home, which makes it easy to cover their sins, 
is the next step in crime. 

Just a few weeks ago the country was shocked by the 
account of the inhuman treatment of a consignment of ba- 
bies from a Richmond maternity horre to Floiica. 

Now the question The Idea wants to ask is this : Is it not 
about time that Richmond people weie getting tired of this 
reputation for lawlessness and immorality which Richmond 
is getting in the land ? 



J. B. Wood 



J. B. Wood, formerly a clerk of the C. & 0. Railway Com- 
pany which exerts a strong influence in Richmond politics, 
and President of the Board of Aldermen, and now recently 
elected by the board of which he is a member, as head of 
the Scate Prison, is reported to have made a talk ai Venable 
St. Baptist Church in which he said that all he was he owed 
to Verable St. Church. Many assented to this, so the story 
g03s, for it is well known that many Richmond politicians 
have used their church associations as stepping stones to of- 
fice. It is also said, however, that one who heard him re- 
marked that he should have said that all he was he owed to 
Venable St. Church and Clyde W. Saunders, for belt known, 
Wood was generally recognized as a Saunders man and he 
astounded even some of his best friends when he went on 
the witness stand and testified more unqualifiedly than any 
other witness to the good reputation of Clyde W. Saunders 
and also when he accompanied Clyde to the Governor's Man- 
sion to bsg His Excellency for a piece of political pie for ex- 
boss Clyde. 



16 THE IDEA 



W. G. MAHONE J 

OROCEU AND FEED DEALER 

!roulirj/ Supplier 

\ SCRATCH. BABY CHICK FEED, MEAT MEAL \ 

SCORCHED WHEAT, OYSTER SHELLS, 

BONE-TONIC, &c., &c. 

S06 TO 816 BROOKE AVENUE 



THIS IS TO SAY TO VOU 

THAT 

THE IDEA PRINT SHOP 

Will be glad to do all or a part of your 
Printing in an up-to-date manner and at a 

REASONA BLE COST 

CALL UP MONROE 2T08 

And let us call on you with prices. 

ADON A. VODER 



HAVE YOU TRIED OUR 

"MONTHLY PLAN" 

FOR HAVING YOUR 

Clothes Cleaned and ^Pressed? 

It is cheap. It saves you all bother and worry and keeps your clothing 
in the best possible condition ALL THE TIME. 

We send for and deliver work in any part of the city. 

Phone, call or drop us a card and we will gladly give you all particulars 

Star Cleaning dc ^ress/ny Club 

IITH AND BROAD STREETS 

PHONE, MADISON 4034 



harbour ^u^^t/ Company 

NA/HOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South ^ostonj Virginia 



All Styles of Buggies, Surries and 
Farm Wagons can be seen at our 
Repository, 

jVoenni^er^uizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond^ - - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
You build up your State when you buy home made goods. 




MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 



I "FOR MEN ONLY" j 

I We wish to announce to our many customers that we are now g 

I located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are fully I 

I equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR BLADES § 

I in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per dozen. We I 

I also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING AND POCKET | 

I KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, and we absolutely I 

@ guarantee our work to please you in every respect. Give us a § 

I trial and we will prove to you and convince you that we are ex- I 

g perts in this line of work. g 



I Razors Honed And Set 15c. Each. I 

I Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. | 

f THE ''SHARP-0~CO. f 

I 618 EAST MAIN STREET. I 

Qt><^m><ii><mK><it>am><io<^m><iQo<^m>Qo<^m>ao<mm>Qoaim><io<mm><iiio<»m>Qo<a^D6!><mm>Gf><mm><iO 






oc 



WBEKLT C:»C TKB OOFT 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OP THE TIMBS 



Vol. IV May 7, I9I0 No. J9 



The Trial 

Newspaper Lies 

The Grand Jury 

Solomon on the Social Evil 

Police Commissioners 

Ring politics 



FOR SALE AT ALL NEWS STANDS 



Being some sermonettes published wccfMy for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. ^^-■^■■- ■:;.-■■:.../;..■..■■■:;-.-— -;.vv.-^ 



ai>aaD«i><aaH><n>(BBB><iMaHxs4>i><aB>a&< 



»0!><BH><l9<HB>C»i>I><l 



><i&a9HiHU>4Bn>«0 



Print it Right 

Leave your<: Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 




^ HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet 

A wants, in Drugs and Medicines 

i Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, |lubber Water Bottles, 
Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, 
Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate 
Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. 



. A. R ROBINS, 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. 



Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 
Phone Madison 1888, if busy, Madison 5272. 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV MAY 7, 1910 No. 19 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

The Idea's Victory 

Police Commissioners 

Surrender y^asse^ 

i/iolate the State Constitution and Were 
Suiitj/ of ^ridery 

OEVERAL months ago The Idea exposed the fact that po- 
^ lice commissioners were violating the constituton of the 
State in accepting passes from the Va. Railway and 
Power Company. 

In court H. M. Smith of counsel for Manning and Gordon, 
attempted to excuse these men on the ground that they 



2 THE IDEA 

were members of the police force. 

At that time we were too exhausted to show the utter 
absurdity of this contention. 

They tried to excuse themselves on the ground that the 
city attorney had at some time in the past, in decidir g an- 
other qaestion, made the parenthetical remark, viz., (which 
includes members of the board) which was on its face 
nothing but a horseback opinion and as such should have 
had no weight with the board. 

Now, even if the city attorney had given as his careful 
opinion of the law that the commissioners were members of 
the Police Force that would have given them no moral right 
for them to accept passes, neither would it have carried a 
legal right, for the Supreme Court alone can giv© a binding 
opinion on such questions. 

The truth is that this police board has absolutely no regard 
for the law of the land, as they have admitted on the wit- 
ness stand in taking the ground that the House of 111- fame 
Law should not be enforced if they thought wise to establish 
a place of law breaking on Mayo and Franklin streets. 

The law plays out when it comes to these men elected to 
help those whose duty it is to enforce the law. 

Old Richmond is still asleep but woe unto the politicians 
when she. awakes in her wrath and shakes off the corruption 
and rottenness. 



A Born Kickei^ 



\iV i 



npHE IDEA was ijorn in the objective case. It came a 
■*■ kicking and if it ever dies, it will die a kicking. 

We feel it our duty to object to and kick against every 
evil that shows its head and if there 'is anybody under heav- 
en that don't like it he can lump it. 



Subscribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



THE IDEA 



Jefferson Ward 

Ring Politics 



"PVERY few days another link in the chain that binds 
^^ Richmond under ring rule is discovered. 

The Idea in the past has shown that Manning and 
Saunders had wonderful influence as ring politicians. 

In Jefferson Precinct on primary election day Hancock 
Manning, brother of Chris. Manning, Jr., was election judge 
and Manning himself was active at the polls, while Clyde 
Saunders, Ex-Boss of the City Committee, visited, in an au- 
tomobile, the voting places. 

Now this first Jefferson comprises the foreign and illiter- 
ate quarters of this ward and one can readily see the value 
to the ring to have a man to help the illiterate mark their 
ballots. 

The Idea would also inquire why it is that this voting 
booth is placed right in the bar room section of the precinct 
instead of in Broad street or away from the evil influences 
of the saloon. 

All men know the relation of the saloon to elections and 
that evil politicians have always used the saloon and the 
treating habit to advantage on election day. The purchasa- 
ble and the easily influenced vote goes to the treater, and 
the political boss works this to the limit. 

Likewise Second Jefferson voting place is next to a bar on 
Main street near 22nd, not far from the Molloy house and 
Botto's fake club and gambling joint. A well known ring 
politician used this to advantage on election day by treating 
the crowd to drinks. 

No one kicks when you mix whiskey and politics to the 
poisoning of the State but every crooked politician applauds 
when some good Christian (?) brother cries out against the 
union of religion and politics. 



THE IDEA 



Persecuting Jews 



YVTHENEVER anyone says anything to the credit of the 

^ Jew there is always some fellow around to stick up 
his nose and curse the Jew, and half the time he will 
attribute his hatred of the Jew to his concern for Christian- 
ity, as if it were Christian to hate the race which alone 
could produce the founder of such a religion of love. Just 
now the whole world is being again shocked by the reports 
of heathen massacres of Jews in Roumania, supposed to be 
a Christian nation, and the dispatches tell us that horrible 
atrocities are being perpetrated on these unfortunate people 
and that those who are not butchered outright are being 
torn away from their homes and herded and shipped away 
like cattle, while our government that pretended to beat 
Spain in the interests of oppressed Cubans, does not dare 
do a thing when the oppressed are the greatest race the 
world has yet produced. And the reason is that it was to 
the interests of certain commercial enterprises of the coun- 
try to fight Spain, but it would not help these same enter- 
prises to take up for the Jew. 

We wonder why it is that people who claim to reverence 
the Bible and make it the guide of their lives, can not see 
that God has promised to curse them if they curse his chos- 
en people, the Hebrews, and that the whole world has ad- 
vanced in all that is highest and best almost solely in so far 
as it has profitted by the teachings of Jews. History does 
not show us another people that has done one-tenth for the 
world that this ancient but virile race has done: 

When I consider what Jesus and David and Daniel and 
Moses and Abraham have done for the world, I bow in rev- 
erence to the Jew and my spirit cries out, "Hail! oh, Israel, 
I, the Gentile salute you. " 

This persecution of the Israelites is not confined to Europe. 



THE IDEA 5 

The same spirit that sneers at them here would also murder 
them if not restrained by law— law, too, that got inspiration 
and its molding from the Bible of the Jew. 

Did you ever th nk that if we had as much self-control as 
the Hebrew our jails would be empty, our poor houses would 
be closed, our insane asylums would not exist and our hos- 
pitals would be few and far between. 

The Jew is the best citizen Richmond has today and if the 
rest of us were as peaceable our taxes would be decreased 
for we'd have no need for so many police and courts of 
justice. 



Jewish jCawj for America 



IT WAS SOLOMON, the Jew, who said, "He that ruleth 
his spirit is better than he that taketh acity, "— Self 
mastery is better than success in war. And it was the 
great Jew, Jesus of Nazareth, who taught that self- 
control which would turn the other cheek to the assailant 
who struck in the face. 

Now, The Idea does not commend all the characteristics 
of the Jew nor of any race of men, but it does desire to call 
attention to the fact that the Jew alone can control himself 
under oppression and that the Jew alone has accepted as 
law the only code which has ever kept a race pure and the 
only code which has outlived in toto the nationality of the 
people whose it was and is. 

As a result of his divinely given law the Jew is today the 
only thorough bred race on the face of the earth. 

While most races die before their nationality departs, this 
race has survived and due solely to their laws has rerr.ained 
pure hundreds of years after their land has been made des- 
olate. 

Most races because of unwise laws crumble from within 
and bring their own down fall and thus through their own 



6 THE IDEA 

sins disintegrate and pass away. The reverse is true of the 
Jew. 

Though outside powers jiave scattered among all nations 
this peculiar people, still as a people their observance of 
wise laws has kept them a distinct and separate and pure 
blood. 

And now the lesson for us is this: The signs of the times 
indicate the early return of the Jews to power and separate 
national existence and if the other peoples of the earth de- 
sire any national existence in competition with them they 
will have to adopt laws modelled after Jewish laws. Our 
laws terjd to concentrate the wealth of the world into the 
hands of the few. The Jewish law prohibited such a condi- 
tion by making a Jubilee Year every 50 years, in which 
things sold during the preceding years reverted to the origi- 
nal owner. 

"The land shall not be sold forever: for the land is mine; 
for ye are strangers and sojourners with me. And in all the 
land of your possession ye shall grant a redemption for the 
land. 

If thy brother be waxen poor and have sold away some of 

his possession if he be not able to restore 

it to himself then that which is sold shall remain in the hand 
of him that hath bought it until the year of jubilee: and in 
the jubilee it shall go out, and he shall return unto his poss- 
ession." — 25th chapter of Leviticus. 

We cannot claim to be either civilized or Christianized 
until we get to where the Jew had gotten 40CO years ago. 



The Journal, tho sometimes fair to us, gave on May 4th, a 
false report of the trial of that date and put in the mouth of 
the editor words, phrases and sentiments which he never 
dreamed of and which were libelous and contemptably ma- 
licious. 



Subscribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



THE IDEA 



The Trial 



A Travesty 

Say the Preachers 



/^N MONDAY afternoon the editor was arrested on war- 
^^ rant for circulating matter "tending to corrupt the 
morals of the youth." Mr. W. C. Smith, the first man 
asked, tho the daily papers tried to get the people to think 
otherwise, went on our bail bond. On Tuesday the case was 
postponed till Wednesday when it came up for trial and then 
the farce began. Chief Werner was introduced as witness 
and began to set forth that The Idea was printed on such 
and such a date, etc. This form of proving the distribution 
and circulation of The Idea was dispensed with by the editor 
who as counsel for himself admitted the responsibility for 
the whole thing. 

CHIEF WERNER CROSS EXAMINED 
Can Name No One Who Thought the Article a Vio- 
lation OF Law 

Major Werner stated that on complaint of citizens he 
swore out the warrant. He was asked,— 
Q. "Did any minister of the gospel make any complaint?'* 
Answer, "No." 

Q. "Did any W. C. T. U. organization, one of whose ob- 
jects is the purification of the young, make any com- 
plaint?" 
Answer, "No." 

(Continued on page 11.) 



S THE IDEA 

Not Indicted by 

Grand Jury 

Newspaper Report False As 

Usual In Report About 

The Idea. 



^ < » » — 



THE papers of Monday and Tuesday state that the editor 
of The Idea was indicted by the Grand Jury. This is 
not true. One paper states, however, that the Grand 
Jury "instructed" Major Werner to swear out warrant. 
The Idea would simply say that it seems evident that the 
grand jury, tho composed almost entirely of politicians, 
could find no cause for indictment and there their duty 
ceased. 

It is not their function to "instruct" the Chief of Police 
in his duties, though such a proceedure may have been gone 
through with because Major Werner did not desire to take 
the responsibility of warranting with no more cause than 
he had. 

No one believes that Major Werner is responsible for this 
action any way. 

The Idea has been after those back of Major Werner who 
have been and are attempting to suppress this paper. 

The Police Board is Chief Werner's master and he dares 
do very little without their bidding and direction. 



THE IDEA 



7j/ie S^ec^ Xi^ht district 



VJiscussed 6j/ Solomon 



For at the window of my house I looked through my case- 
ment, and beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among 
the youths, a young man void of understanding, passing 
through the street near her corner: and he went the way to 
her house, in the twilight, in the evening, in the black and 
dark night: and, behold, there met him a woman with the at- 
tire of an harlot, and subtil of heart. (She is loud and stub- 
born; her feet abide not in her house: now she is without, now 
in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner. ) So she caught 
him, and kissed him, and with an impudent face said unto 
him, I have peace offerings with me; this day have I payed 
my vows. Therefore came I forth to meet thee, diligently 
to seek thy face, and I have found thee. I have decked my 
bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with 
fine linen of Egypt. I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, 
aloes, and cinnamon. Come, let us take our fill of love until 
the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves. For the 
goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey: he hath 
taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at 
the day appointed. With her much fair speech she caused 
him to yield, with the flattering of her lips she forced him. 
He goath after her straightway, as an ox goeth to the 
slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks; till a 
dart strike through his liver; as a bird hasteth to the snare, 
and knoweth not that it is for his life. 

Hearken unto me now therefore, ye children, and attend 
to the words of my mouth. Let not thine heart decline to 
her ways, go not astray in her paths. For she hath c£<fat 
down many wounded; yea, many strong men have been 



10 THE IDEA 

slain by her. Her house is the way to hell, going down to 
the chambers of death. 

The above is a quotation from the 7th chapter of Proverbs 
by Solomon the King, Poet, Philosopher. 

Thus is described not simply the street wherein the harlot 
dwells but the house and even the bed itself and it is so plain 
as to be offensive to some, but who would dare say that it 
tends to the corrupting of the morals of the youth of the 
city. 

Dr. McDaniel read this passage recently to a cultured au- 
dience composed largely of women and children. I defy you 
to compare it with the article for which the editor of this 
paper is now on trial. 

The most offensive word w^e used was whore-house and 
jet the word whore, whoredom or whore-monger is found 
in profusion in the Bible; notably in Leviticus, Deuteronomy, 
Proverbs, Ezekiel, Jeremiah, Hosea, Ephesians, Hebrews, 
Timothy and Revelation, and the word harlot is found in 
Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Prov- 
erbs, Joshua, Kings, Ezekiel, Hosea, Matthew, Corinthi- 
ans and Revelations. 

And The Idea was far more guarded in the use of such 
words than the sacred writers are and let no one say that 
The Idea whose whole existence has been to uphold the 
standard of morality tends to corrupt unless he is willing to 
go back on the Bible itself. 



Another Lie 

The Times-Dispatch of May 5th stated that the f ditor of 
The Idea "drew comparisons between himself and Jesus 
Christ." This is absolutely false, like many of their malic- 
ious reports concerning the editor's trials. If we were able 
to employ lawyers we would sue them for heavy damages. 
We are informed we have an excellent case against them 
and if anybody wants to help us carry it through we will 
whack up on the proceeds. 



THE IDEA It 

THE TRIAL. Major Werner on Stand. 

(Continued from page 7.) 
Q. "Did any Christian organization of any description 

make any complaint?" Answer, "No." 
Q. "Did any Sunday School superintendent make any 

complaint?" Answer, "No." 
Q. "Did any woman make any complaint?" Ans. "No." 
Q. "Did any police commissioner?" Answer, "No." 
Q. "Did any officer of any Christian organization or any 

organization whatever make complaint?" Ans. "No." 
Q. "Did any member of any church make complaint?'' 
Answer, "Yes, a member of Second Baptist Church." 
Q. "Who was it?" Ans. "Can not tell." 
Q. "So you can not give a single name of a single party 

who has made complaint that The Idea was coirupting 

the morals of the youth?" Ans. "No." 
Q. "Did this member of the Second Church make complaint 

before or after my criticism of the action of thatchuich 

on last Saturday?" Ans. "After." 
Q. "When? Ans. "Monday last." 

Q. "But you can not name a single person?" Ans. "No." 
Then the editor attacked the credabiiity of the witness by 
showing that Article 2790 of the Code, which immediately 
precedes the one on which warrant against the editor w£s 
based was the law prohibiting the existence of the houses cf 
ill fame against which he, the editor was leading the fight 
in the article cited in the " warrant. And he stated that it 
was evident that he v/as ariested, not because his article 
was obscene, but because it attacked the chief, who swore 
out the warrant, for his refusal to enforce the house of ill 
fame law. The chief w^as then asked if he knew that the 
very terms he objected to in The Idea were found in nearly 
every book of the Bible, and if he knew that the seventh 
chapter of Proverbs describes not only a red light distiicr 
street but even the houses and the beds themselves, and 
then he read Solomon's description of the ways of such w c- 
men (this we print elsewhere in this issue) and he was asked 
if he regarded that as obscene or any part of the Bible rs 
obscene, tho many passages were more plain than that. He 
replied, "No." (Concluded next issue.) 



12 THE IDEA 



Who Are the Grand Jurymen 
That ^Instruct'' Chief Police? 



A Bunch of Politicians 



Chas. F. Taylor (Foreman) is chairman of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners and a politician of long standing. 

J. J. Lynch, Councilman from Jefferson Ward. 

Mark Gunst, resigned Councilman from one ward and just 
elected in the primary from another ward. 

Fred. H. Garter, Councilman from Marshall ward. 

A. C. Harman, Legislator from Richmond. 

R. T. Hill, colored. 

J. A. Curtis, Legislator from Richmond, and two others, 
identity unknown to us. 



7j/ie Sciea ^Protects 



7)oes T^ot Corrupt 

We are reliably informed that whenever The Idea shows 
up this red light business this section has a season of hard 
times,— that as a result men fear to go there lest the police 
will perchance enforce the law. It is thus seen that instead 
of The Idea corrupting the youth, it on the other hand pro- 
tects them, and it is rumored around that because it does 
hurt the common woman's business their protectors have 
gotten busy to kill The Idea for "business reasons." The 
red light business and the whiskey business would move 
hell to stop The Idea. 



THE IDEA 13 

LOOK, BOYS AND GIRLS! 



Make $2.00 for Few Minutes Work 



If any person will send us 5 subscribers at $2.00 a year, 
cash with subscription, we will give him $2.00 for the work. 

Or if you send us 5 one dollar, six months subscriptions, 
we will give you one dollar. Almost any live boy or girl or 
man or woman can go right in his own neighborhood and 
make a dollar or two in an hour's time. You just try it and 
see. The Idea will try to have cartoons in each issue and 
besides will always be interesting and helpful and stand for 
good government and good men in office and will expose the 
evil wherever it is found. 

Your subscription will help much in the fight for better 
things and you will also find it a cheaper and safer way of 
getting The Idea. Subscribers have their papers mailed to 
them every Friday evening, and by subscribing the paper 
costs less than four cents a copy, making a saving of seventy 
cents during the year. 

Cut out the coupon below and mail it today with the price 
and The Idea will commence with any number you desire. 
We have saved out several copies of all back numbers. Do 
it now. 



1910 

THE IDEA, 1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 
Enclosed find (| r§§) for which please send The Idea for 

/ONE YEAR \ , 
VSIX MONTHS/ to 

Name 

Street & No. 

Post Office 



14 THE IDEA 



Play Ball 



TN the State League, Richmond, and in the College League, 
•*• the University of Virginia, both have the unenviable rep- 
utation of being hoggish. Whether we like it or not, 
the other cities in the state regard Richmonders as conceit- 
ed, and the University boys as selfish and unfair to their 
rivals. 

This article, however, is intended primarily for Richmond 
and is written in the interests not simply of clean base ball 
but of loyalty on the part of Richmond rooters, who seem 
at times to be so hoggish that if a player makes an error he 
is subjected to an unmerciful roasting which hurts rather 
than helps the team. 

Manj a good player has been discouraged by insulting and 
uncalled for remarks from the spectators just at the tim.e 
he most needed encouragement. 

Richmond fans should learn that the team needs cheers 
when they are losing far more than when they are winning. 

We firmly believe that Richmond's tad showing last year 
was largely caused by the discouragement given the team, 
and especially the manager, when they needed helpful en- 
couragement most during a slump. 

No white man or black man or red or yellow man should 
ever be expected to stand what the Richmond public gave 
to Perry Lipe last year and if the same spirit is to prevail 
this year manager Lawlor cannot be expected to land the 
pennant for the capitol city. 

It is a matter of regret that but recently a visiting team 
felt called on to score the Richmond public for their disloy- 
alty and ungentlemanly attitude and criticism to their own 
team. 

As a one time base ball manager the editor knows that the 
only time rooting is much needed or does much real appre- 
ciable good is when the other side is winning. 

Let's help the Richmond Team win in 1910. 



THE IDEA 15 

"FOR MEN ONLY" 

We wish to announce to our many customers that we are 
now located in our store at No. 618 East Main St., and are 
fully equipped to put your OLD DULL SAFETY RAZOR 
BLADES in perfect condition, "while you wait" for 30c. per 
dozen. We also GRIND RAZORS, SCISSORS, CARVING 
AND POCKET KNIVES, and any kind of a sharp edge tool, 
and we absolutely guarantee our work to please you in ev- 
ery respect. Give us a trial and we will prove to you and 
convince you that we are experts in this line of work. 

Razors Honed And Set 15c. Each. 
Mail Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention. 

THE ^^SHARP-O^^ CO. 

618 EAST MAIN STREET. 



Ha^v DO YOU like this type 

FOR 

jCetier Jreads 

^us/ness Cards ? 

\A/E \A/ANT VOUR BUSINESS 
AND ARE READY TO DO YOUR WORK 
IPHONE MONROE aVOS, OR ADDRESS 

Tjhe Sdea !Print Shop 
OFFICE, 11 OS CAPITOL. STREET 



THE IDEA 



Cut This Out 

25c ^^^^^ 9//oney to &ou 25c 

Uhe Sdea iPrint Shop 

Will accept this coupon as 25 cents in part payment of your 
iirst job of printing, amountirg to one dollar or more, given 
to us. Have your cards, stationery, envelopes, etc., printed 
in and up-to-date, down-to-date, neat manrer. 
Call up Madison 6075, today. 1106 Capitol Street. 

ADON A. YODER, The Very Idea! 



THIS IS TO SAY TO VOU 

THAT 

THE IDEA PRINT SHOP 

Will be glad to do aJl or a part of your 
Printing in an up-to-date manner and at a 

REASON ABLE COST 

CALL UP MADISON SOTS 

And let us call on you with prices. 

ADON A. YODER 



HAVE YOU TRIED OUR 

"MONTHLY PLAN" 

FOR HAVING YOUR 
Clothes Cleaned and iPressed? 

It is cheap. It saves you all bother and worry and keeps your clothing 
in the best possible condition ALL THE TIME. 

We send for and deliver work in any part of the city. 

Phone, call or drop us a card and we will gladly give you all particulars 

Star Cleaning 6c Stress in ff Ciub 

IITH AND BROAD STREETS 

PHONE, MADISON 4034 



harbour ^a^yy Company 

WHOLESAL-E MANUFACTURERS 

South SSostonj Virginia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jVoenni£^er^Sizemore Co* 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 




MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

WANTED! 
1 000 Men and Women 

Who want to look their best at all times, thus gaining the 
distinction which only the well dressed enjoy, to have their 

Clothes Cleanod and S^rec^aed dy 



a 



OUR MONTHLY PLAN" 

It is unique, in as much as it relieves you of all bother and 

worry, while it keeps all your clothing in the best possible 

condition. 

IT IS CHEAP, which only one of its many good features. 

Call up or drop us a card and our Mr. Wilburn will see you 

and give you the particulars. 

PHONE, MONROE 2310 

iPuritan Cieaninq and j^j/o Works 

WILBURN B*fROS.. Proprietors 

2-404 EAST BROAD STREET 

All work called for and delivered promptly in any part of the city- 



WEEKLY 



THE OOPT 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 

Vol. IV May 14, I9J0 



Na20 



RICHMOND'S C(AE)ZAR 




"On what meat doth this our C^SAR feed that he is grown so 
great? .... Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world like 
a Colossus; and we petty men walk under his huge legs and peep about 
to find ourselves dishonourable graves. ' ' — Act 1, Scene 2. Julius Caesar. 



I Print it Right. I 

f ! 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea I 

f Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- | 

I roe 2708, | 

a . a 

^— ^>^ >■ w % ■ *m » > i^>^% I k.T » m m n i^t^m t^^ m h p^^^m^ 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

K 7th AND MAIN STS. 

^ We have in our Fall Stock, aud art 

vc^ showing special good values in 

1 DIAMONDS, WATCHES, J' WBRY, SIlVERWARf, CUT G'ASS, Etc 

We inyite your inspection 



1 




^ HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet ^ 

) ^ 

i wants, in Drugs and Medicinss A 

9 Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, \ 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

V Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

\ - A. H. ROBINS, - \ 

\ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. | 

J Goods delivered anywhere in the city. ^ 

A Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. - ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV MAY 14, 1910 No. 20 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



CHIEF WERNER 

Guilty of Misfeasance In Office 

Admits His Guilt in Presence of Commonwealth's Attor- 
ney, Folkes, Who Does Nothing 



/^N the witness stand last week, Louis Werner. Chief of 
^^ Police of Greater Richmond, in reply to a question by 
A. A. Yoder, counsel for himself, admitted that he 
was violating his oath of office in refusing to enforce the 
statute prohibiting the existence of houses of ill fame. 

The house of ill fame law is the one immediately preced- 
ing the obscene literature law. He admitted he was not 
trying to enforce the former law but was posing as a moral 
teacher in enforcing the latter, altho not a single soul could 
be found to stand with him and say The Idea had violated 
that statute. 

When he admitted his guilt, Minetree Folwkes sat there 



2 THE IDEA 

and lo3ked at him and instead of prosecuting him, the Chief 
of Po!ic3, prostituted his oratorical gifts by turning upon 
the editor of The Idea and pretending to do his duty to the 
commonwealth by prosecuting the editor who had done no 
legal nor moral wrong but whose sole offence was that he 
was breaking up the red light evil by bringing to public at- 
tention the malfeasance in office of those who were sworn 
to enforce the laws. Justice John showed he had determin- 
ed to stop The Idea if it were possible to do so by a harsh 
sentence, and he showed his prejudice by his attitude to- 
wards the editor all through the trial and his utterly uncalled 
for and unjudge-like. and therefore unjust, remarks in pass- 
ing judgment. 

To a spectator it looked like a conspiracy on the part of 
all those who are responsible for the rotten condition of af- 
fairs in Mayo Street to forever put an end to any opposi- 
tion to their protection of criminals. 

The trial was a complete farce and the editor of this pa- 
per took an appeal from the unheard-of sentence of $100.00 
fine, 30 days in jail and $500.00 bond to keep the peace for 
12 months. 

We desire to state right here that we will pay no more at- 
tention to the decisions of this petty police justice than we 
would pay to the blowing of the wind or the crowing of a ban- 
tam rooster. 

Oh! no the Idea has not corrupted any bod3''s morals and never 
will but it hasldone something, and that is, it has put dynamite under 
the Chief of Police and the Police Board and they are so hot in the 
collar that Justice John says "The Idea must be stopped." Well 
we'll see about that. 

Yes the Idea is very offensive to the crooks because it breaks up 
their business of crime. 



No! The Editor of the Idea is not on trial but John Crutchfield, 
Louis Werner and the Police Board are on trial for their official 
lives. Watch the result. 



THE IDEA 3 

Pollock and Wise 

Mayor Richardson has gotten his eyes sufficiently opened to start an 
investigation into the conduct of Messrs Pollock and Wise council- 
men who are charged in the mayor's message with receiving $500.00 
for their services as counsel for certain dairy interests before the Board 
of Health. 

The points to be noticed are, first that the money was placed in the 
hands of Mr. Deitrick by a dozen dairymen with the understanding 
that it was to be paid to Messors Pollock and Wise after the proposed 
ordinance had become law and that the money so raised was paid the 
day after the accomplishment of this desired plan. 

Second, That the Chief officer of the board of health before which 
Messrs. Wise and Pollock appeared to secure the recommendation of 
the passage of the desired ordinance, gave an order to his inspectors 
'not to use any strenuous efforts to detect" the violation of the ordinance 

in question. 

Third. That the Health officer receives his position and pay at the 
hands of the council of which Messrs. Pollock and Wise are members. 

The whole matter was summed up by Mr. Umlaut when he said 
that he could not understand why milk dealers should be required to 
pay $500.00 to attorneys to convince the Health Board that a good 
feed is wholesome. 

Now if is already clear from admissions of the men charged that 
they are guilty of acts certainly unethical and unbecoming councilmen 
supposed to look after the interests of the citizens as opposed to spe- 
cial interests. 

They most likely have violated no law, but a man may be guilty of 
a very serious breach of ethics and morals and be within the limits of 
the law. 

Let not the citizens think that this committee, appointed, as shown 
in the resolution, at the request of Pollock and Wise themselves, will 
ever do anything but vindicate these councilmen. 

If the council will whitewash the tax collector who openly violated 
law, can they be expected to do otherwise with their own associates 
who, however much they may have broken faith with the people, 
have not broken a statute. 



THE IDEA 



Richmond Mothers 

Back The Idea 



Below we print part of a letter sent by a Christian Mother enclos- 
ing a contribution for the fight which The Idea is making for the 
right against wrong. 

This is but a sample of many such messages of cheer which we 
have received from the Christian womanhood of Richmond, 

We are frank to state thit but for such moral and material help 
The Idea would have been both financially and otherwise unable to 
bear the burdens of oppression and contumely which have been heaped 
upon us.'' 

Heaven bless the valiant men and the faithful women and the hope- 
ful boys who have stood by us and held up our hands in a conflict 
which at ti.T\es we felt was more than man could stand. 

City, May 9, 1910 
Dear Sir: 

I need not tell you how sorrowful I was, and am, over this last 
persecution, and wonder why the Christian men do not rally as they 
should and stop this oppression. If the righteous men of our city 
only WOULD do their :hristian duty justice and right would prevail 
in your case. Bear up my friend, and God keep you stout-hearted 
and ALWAYS brave in every good cause. M'y best wishes are yours, 
my prayers also, that our Father may make you a wondrous power to 
uplift and raise poor fallen humanity to a true vision of their duty and 
their obligation to God and man. 

God bless you in your up hill work prays your friend. 



Subscribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



THE IDEA 



The Trial 

A Travesty 

Say the Preachers 



(Continued from last issue) 
MAJOR WERNER ON THE STAND 

He thus was forced to admit that words in themselves 
were not obscene and did not come under the law unless their 
use was in such a connection as to tend to corrupt. 

Then the editor contended that inasmuch as The Idea 
tended to break up these houses and thus prevent immoral- 
ity, the paper did not tend to corrupt but had an opposite 
tendency; namely, to enforce the law and raise the moral 
standard. 

At this point the justice indicated that as far as he was con- 
cerned he had made up his mind and no cross-examination 
was necessary. There was therefore nothing else for the 
editor to do but to say that in view of the statement of the 
justice he would not proceed further in the police court. 

Werner left the chair, and then after argument by Yoder 
and Folkes, Justice John said he had determined to break 
up this and he was going to pass such a sentence as would 
keep The Idea from appearing again; so he fined $100.00 and 
sentenced 30 days ir jail and demanded $500 bond to keep the 
peace, after delivering so un-called-for and bitter and malic- 
ious a denunciation as to call forth the most severe criticism 
of the spectators in court. A prominent minister stated 
that it was a travesty and he would not stay in Richmond if 
such decisions had to stand. Another minister termed it a 



6 THE IDEA 

mockery and an utter farce, while another stated that now 
was the time to have the chief indicted for misfeasance in 
office in that he admitted on the stand he had violated his 
oath of office in not breaking up these houses of ill fame 
which called forth the article in question in The Idea. 

An appeal was taken to the higher court and the case will 
come up sometime in June. Mr. W. C. Smith, the friend of 
all good causes, went the required bonds of $800.00. 



Uhe ^iy ^our Suiitj/ Ones 

Mayor^ D. C. RicKardson; Commonwealth's Attorney, 

Minetree Folkes; Chief of Police, Louis Werner; 

Police Justice, J. J. Crutchfield 



These four men, as pointed out by The Idea in the past, 
have proven themselves unworthy of their positions and 
guilty of misfeasance in office. 

The mayor is the chief executive of the city and has sworn 
to see that all the laws of the city and state are enforced. 
Instead of doing this he has permitted a police board, which 
has no authority in law whatever, to permit the existence 
contrary to law, of protected houses of ill fame where de- 
bauchery and criminal lewdness reign and where whiskey is 
sold without license, and on Sundays and after licensed sa- 
loons have closed; of wide open gambling joints which are 
in so close touch with the police department that they oper- 
ate without molestation; and of open flagrant violation of 
the Sunday closing laws. 

The commonwealth's attorney, Mr. Folkes, has been in- 
formed of all these violations and has been offered and given 
proof of most of them but has refused to act, tho sworn so 
to do. 



THE IDEA 7 

The chief of police has confessed on the witness stand his 
crime and yet, because of a police board in sympathy with 
him, still feels secure in his position tho he has violated his 
oath of office. 

Justice John Crutchfield instead of putting a stop to the 
lawless acts of the chief [and the police board has joined 
them in attempting to suppress the only paper, which would 
dare expose them in their criminal alliance, and him in his 
utterly unjust decisions in that he openly refuses to treat all 
violators of the law alike and publicly says that he will 
do and can do as he pleases in his court and if there is any 
one who don't like it he can take an appeal, just as if justice 
could be subserved by any such high handed action or as if 
it did not cost very much to an innocent man to have to em- 
ploy lawyers and pay court fees in the higher courts. 

No! these men must go. Richmond is worthy of a better 
class of servants. Richmond, one of the best towns in the 
world, is gradually being corrupted by a small band of poli- 
ticians who, by their permission of open and debasing and 
nefarious crimes are undermining the morals of the city and 
the state. The time has come for the people to wrest their 
government from the hands of the political spoiler, back of 
whom will always be found the whiskey interests, who buy 
elections, and bribe juries and corrupt judges. 



The Unpardonable Sin 

In Richmond you can be a crook all you want to, that is, if you 
stand in with the powers that be but woe unto you if you dare tell on 
the crooks, that's the unpardonable sin in Richmond. 

The Idea is about the livest suppressed paper jou ever 
saw. When The Idea stops it will be because the 2x4 poli- 
ticians are no more and not because they want to kill it. 

Go to the phone right now and call Monroe 2708 and say 
you would like to have us call and give you prices on printing. 
Help the good work along. 



8 THE IDEA 

Moving Presses Causes Trouble 



8 Pages this Week, 16 Pages Next 



Due to the moving of The Idea Print Shop from Ginter 
Park to our new quarters at 1106 Capitol Street we are una- 
ble to get out more than 8 pages this week. Next week we 
will be in full swing and will have among other stuff a per- 
sonal communication from the editor. 



Richmond Loan Sharks, Richmond Gambling Houses. 



Will be treated by name and in an ideal way next week. 
Besides there will be other warm stuff and we are counting 
on a cartoon that will point a moral and adorn a cover. 

HOW DO 1l OT^' LIIvE THIS TYI^E 

FOR 

jCetter jrfeads 



business Cards ? 

WE WANT VOUR BUSINESS 
AND ARE READY TO DO YOUR WORK 
PHONE MONROE 2TOS, OR ADDRESS 

Tjhe Sdea Sprint Shop 
OFFICE, 1106 CAPITOL STREET 



HAVE YOU TRIED OUR 

"MONTHLY PLAN" 

FOR HAVING VOUR 

Clothes Cleaned and ^Pressed? 

It is cheap. It saves you all bother and worry and keeps your clothing 
in th3 bast possible condition ALL THE TIME. 

We send for and deliver v^ork in any part of the city. 

Phone, call or drop us a card and we will gladly give you all particulars 

Star Cleamn^f dc y^ress/ny Club 

11th and broad streets 

phone, madison 4034 



uJarbour ^uyyi/ Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South SBostonj Vir^finia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 



s^T] 






J^oenn/^er^fS/zemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 

Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3n West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

WANTED! 

1 000 Men and Women 

Who want to look their best at all times, thus gaining the 
distinction which only the well dressed enjoy, to have their 

Clothes Cieaneci and !Pre:^:ied 61/ 

''Ori^ MOrSTIII.Y PLAN ' 

It is unique, in as much as it relieves you of all bother ard 

worry, while it keeps all your clothing in the best possible 

condition. 

IT IS CHEAP^ which is only one of its many good features. 

Call up or drop us a card and our Mr. Wilburn will see you 

and give you the particulars. 

PHONE, MONROE 2310 

iPuritan Cleaning and 'Dye 2lfor/cs 

WIUBURN BROS.. PROPRIETORS 

a404 EAST BROAD STREET 

All work called for and delivered promptly in any part of the city. 



?r 



Vol. IV 



May 21, I9I0 



No.2J 



THE ^ IDEA 

A SIGN OF THE TIMES 

A WALK THROUGH MAYO STREET 
OR HELP THE BLIND 




None so blind as those who will not see. 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



I 

Q o 

Qf><mm><ii><am><iovm>Go<mK><i'%'t><a^a!><amD<ii>amt>Gf><mm><i!}<mm}Q'i'f><^^>oi><mm><ii><mm>«o<am>QO 



L 



JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

?»» AND MAIN STS. 

We have id our Fall Stock, «ud arc 
Bhowing apeoial {food values in 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, ilWElRY, SILVERWARE, CUT GIASS, Etc 

We invite your inspection 



i HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet f 

i wants, in Drugs and Medicines ^ 

i Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

i f 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

^ Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

* i 

J - A. R ROBINS, - i 



200 E. MARSHALL ST. ) 

^ Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

J Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 

* i 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV MAY 21, 1910 No. 21 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10* 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



What The Papers 

Say 

The Yoder Case 

T*\OWN in the city of Richmond a would-be reformer has 
^-^ struck a snag. Justice Crutchfield, of police court 
fame, has just imposed the severe penalty of a fine of one 
hundred dollars and a jail sentence of thirty days. 

This reformer is one Adon A. Yoder, the publisher of a 
pamphlet called the "Idea." 

We know nothing of Mr, Yoder or his pamphlet. We have 
not read the article which brought down upon his head the 
wrath of Justice Crutchfield, but from some things we have 
been able to pick up here and there, the finding in this case 
is one of the grossest outrages ever perpetrated. 

Taking a perspective view of this case, it is recalled that 



2 THE IDEA 

some months ago this man Yoder published in his pamphlet 
a story which reflected upon the official character of some of 
the city officials 

This act of Yoder's seems to have nettled Richmond offi- 
aldom, and notice was served on Yoder that he must stop 
the publication of his pamphlet. But he did not stop. In a 
later issue he published a story of the tenderloin district of 
Richmond. For this he was snatched up, fined one hundred 
dollars and sentenced to jail for thirty days, and required to 
give a heavy bond to keep the peace. 

It is to be presumed that if Yoder had not published that 
story respecting these officials, nothing would have been 
done for the publication of the latter story. Admittedly, 
the story of the tenderloin district was true. He was not 
called to answer for the untruthfulness, but this drastic 
handling by the court was upon the frivolous pretext that 
the story pointed out the location of the district and tended 
to corrupt the morals of the youth of that city. 

It is difficult to conceive how the publication of such a sto- 
ry could operate to the corrupting of the morals of the youth 
of the city. It might be argued with a show of reason that 
the article in question really pointed out the shoals upon 
which the moral character of the youth might be wrecked, 
and against which he is warned by the article in question. 
On the face of the proceedings, it would seem that Yoder, 
under the national Constitution, was clearly within his 
rights, and that he had not abused the freedom of the press 
in exposing the character of houses which the officials, in 
the dereliction of duty, permit 

It matters not how dark a man may be painted, when 
he is in the right simple justice demands that he be upheld. 
If Yoder has violated the daw, then every newspaper 
IN Virginia is likewise guilty.— Roanoke World. 



Subs;ribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months, $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



THE IDEA 



Richmond Papers 
Obscene 

Complaint Is Made to Chief by One who 
Sends His Name Tn Writing^ Yet 
Chief Does Not Arrest the Editor 



Below we print a copy of a letter which was sent to the 
chief of police on last Tuesday. . The editor of the paper has 
not been arrested tho the article referred to was so vile that 
The Idea will not copy it. The; Richmond dailies are privi- 
leged characters, while The Idea must be suppressed because 
it has dared expose official wrong- doing. 

In Richmond the all-important question is not, " Has he 
done any crime ? " It is, "Does he stand in with official- 
dom?" 

May 17, '10. 
Chief Police Werner, 
Richmond, Va. 
Dear Sir: 

I am inclosing a clipping from one of the Richmond dailies 
of the 16th, of which I desire to make complaint as an ob- 
scene publication. This paper comes into my family and is 
read by my children as well as the grown ups and I desire 
to protect them from the bad effects of such publications. 

I see from the dailies that you have recently jacked up 
another publication in Richmond for a similar offense, on 
complaint of some one whose name so far as I know you did 
not give. 

I am a citizen of this State and a tax payer in Richmond 
and think I have the same right to complain of this article 
as your unnamed citizen did of Mr. Yoder's 
Yours respectfully, 



THE IDEA 



Throttling Free Speech 



'^Crutchfield^s Delicate Sensibilities 



ft 



'Ladylike Police Department Scandalized'' 



(Editorial The Bedford Bulletin) 

"The publishing of your pamphlet in Richmond must stop. 
The community will tolerate it no longer," 

Is this really the Twentieth Century, or have we returned 
to the Dark Ages? Can it be possible that such words were 
really uttered by a police judge in Richmond, Va., U. S. A., 
Wednesday, May 4th, 1910?i Shall we presently awake 
to find that a horrible nightmare has been trying to strangle 
us ? 

We do not know Mr. Yoder, and he may be all that his 
enemies say he is, but we have heard of Judge Crutchfield, 
and the delicacy of his sensibilities is well known. It must 
have been an awful shock to a man whose language is as 
sweet and pure as the perfumed breath of a princess of the 
blood to read such obscene literature as that put out by the 
Idea, whose editor, by the way, we also learn from the dis- 
patches, is a Baptist minister, and claimed that he had pub- 
lished nothing that could not be found in every part of the 
Bible. 

But the sanctified judge is shocked, the refined and lady- 
Kke police department scandalized and its morals corrupted, 
and this journal of free speech *'must be stopped." We do 
not know what the people of Richmond think of Mr. Yoder 
and his Idea, but it is beginning to look to the remainder of 
the State as if he is being made the victim of police perse- 
cution. 



THE IDEA 



Yoder and His Supporters 



(Editorial from The Virginian.) 

The many letters which the Virginian has published and :ontinues 
to publish in support of Mr. A. A. Yoder's crusade against corruption 
and corrupting influences in city life go to show that there is a grow- 
ing demand in Richmond for the suppression of vice and for rigid en- 
forcement of the law against all forms of immorality and against all 
persons and establishments that promote it. These persons love their 
city and its good name. They have a tender solicitude for the youth 
of both sexes and they are at war with debauchery in all its ramifica- 
tions. They desire and demand that the government shall be pure and 
that it shall promote purity by protecting the innocent from evil influ- 
ences, as far as that is possible. They desire and demand that Rich- 
mond shall be a clean city, where allurements that tend to debase the 
young shall be reduced to the minimum. They believe that Mr, 
Yoder is working to that end and they do not understand why those 
who are confessedly violating the written law should be allowed to 
continue their traffic while Yoder is condemned by the Police Justice 
for his manner of exposing them. They do not understand why the 
Chief of Poliece who admitted on the stand that the law was not en- 
forced should have gone unrebuked, while Yoder was given a jail sen- 
tence for publishing the fact. They do not understand why there should 
be such zealous regard for the law against the publications which tend 
to corrupt the morals of the young, and so little regard for the law 
against those establishnents whose business it is to corrupt morals. They 
do not understand why the exposure of a vice should be deemed more 
demoralizing than the vice exposed. 

Believsng as they do in the honesty of Yoder, and the sincerity of 
his purpose, they think that he has been harshly dealt with and per- 
secuted and that the determination to suppress his paper is prompted 
not so much by a desire to protect the youth of the city from obscene 
literature as to protect the officers of the law from exposure. 

Without going into the merits of Yoder's case which is to be 
reviewed in a higher court, we present this view of his supporters, who 
are men and women of character and good intentions, by way of 



6 THE IDEA 

emphasizing that the editor of The Idea, whatever may be his motive, 
has started an agitation which has brought many to serious reflection 
and aroused into action the forces of righteousness. If he has revealed 
the existance of vice, he has also revealed a wholesome sentiment 
against it, and a powerful and wide spread demand for reform. The 
burden of proof is upon the officials. It is for them to show that they 
are employing the best means of suppressing, or minimizing the vicious 
resorts whose existance they do not deny. 

The forces of righteousness are aroused, we repeat, and it is but a 
step from rally to organization. The forces are in sufficient strength 
and leaders are not lacking. 



Ohy Conjiatenci/ TJhou ^rt ^ ^ewei 



(Editorial from Clinch Valley News.) 

Mr. Yoder has been again sentenced to jail and fined, not for slan- 
dering the virtuous this time but for exposing the not virtuous. Rich- 
mond has as many open, shameless dens of vice, perhaps, as any city 
of its size, their location, nature and all are well known and unsup- 
pressed, but the city dont propose to be told of it's sin. The news- 
papers flaunt divorce proceedings, Harry Thaw trials in detail and no 
body screams, but "A sudden spasm of offended chastity" rends the 
air when a citizen of that city cries out against its own festering, foul 
smelling rottenness, and puts the offender in jail. Consistency is a 
rare jewel in some parts of this great country. Vice and crime are 
jubilant and happy. They have, or seem to have the protection 
if not vindication, of the courts. 



A mild mannered young man, whom one would never sus- 
pect of having any thoughts of violence, stopped us on the 
corner the other day and said, "You ought to get a shot 
gun and go down and clean out the whole police business.'^ 



WANTED.— A boy in Petersburg to handle The Idea, on 
a good commission basis. 



THE IDEA 7 

Due to the pressure of work and breakdowns incident to 
getting started in our new location, The Ford Hotel, the 
largest building devoted exclusively to printing in the city, 
we are unable to complete the articles on Loan Sharks and 
other important matter which will be reserved for a future 
number. 



Stories of Graft 



In Police Department 



For the last six months stories and rumors have been 
coming to us concerning graft in a deal in buying horses for 
the police department in 1908. Finally an opportunity to 
investigate these rumors presented itself and below we give 
the facts in the case. 

It appears that about April, 1908, when the police depart- 
ment put on extra mounted police, one P. M. Houston sold 
a horse to the police department for $165.00. A police Cap- 
tain and a private consummated the deal through a merch- 
ant on Franklin Street, near the market. 

The horse was delivered through the merchant, who was 
authorized to make collection for the same. 

When application was made for the pay at police head- 
quarters, the merchant was informed, that since all checks 
were made for $175.00 he would have to hand over $10.00 to 
make the difference. This $10.00 was handed over and the 
check for $175.00 was delivered. Now The Idea wants to 
know who got the $10.00 and why it was necessary for the 
city to have to give a $175.00 check for a $165.00 horse. It 
is up to the police department. 



8 THE IDEA 

Crutchfield's Court and Other 
Comments 

(Contributed by a Spectator.) 



The court presided over by the "One John " is a decorous 
establishment, a place where many gather for amusement at 
the expense of the poor unfortunates. On the occasion of 
the recent trial of the editor of this paper there was seated 
behind the Justice, one on the right and the other on the 
left, two Solomons, lineal descendants of the m.an who was 
endowed with supernatural wisdom, and whose judgments 
have never been questioned, yet it doth not yet appear what 
they were there for, nor that their counsel was sought or 
their presence even recognized. From indications which 
convinced all unbiased observers advice was not needed, as 
the case had been prejudged, all protestations to the con- 
trary but poorly concealed the facts. Well, the end is not 
yet. 

The editor in his honest efforts to better conditions in 
Richmond has had very much to discourage him. Having 
already been heavily fined and imprisoned as a common fel- 
on, besides having civil suits to defend, having his motives 
impugned and vile epithets hurled against him by lurid at- 
torneys, with an honest conviction that his path of duty 
was plain to defend the cause of civic righteousness which 
was the animating purpose from the very inception of the 
paper, with very few friends to render any comfort or en- 
couragement in his efforts, you can but faintly imagine with 
what delight I read the editorial in The Virginian, that fear- 
less, clean and superior news paper, and also the many 
friendly notices which that paper was so ready to publish 
and then the friendly expressions I everywhere hear, which 



THE IDEA 9 

would ha\e been so cheering in the months past. But above 
all the recent court trial, so flagrantly unjust, awakened 
the city to look into conditions which they seemed at least 
unconcerned about before. 

Don't let the work of purifying our fair city abate till all 
law is enforced punctually. No compromise or subterfuge 
will answer. Violators of law of whatever class or station 
must be exposed. Very many do not take The Virginian as 
there are two other evening papers. So I hope you will copy 
the editorial referred to, and also some of the communica- 
tions to that paper. 



If your enenly, who is not of the best reputation, should 
come to me and tell me things calculated to hurt you, and 
then your friend, whom I know to be a gentleman, should 
come to me and deny those reports, whom should I believe ? 

Think of this and then remember that The News-Leader, 
The Times-Dispatch and The Journal have all proven them- 
selves enemies to The Idea. Better accept their news re- 
ports with a great big dose of salts. 



Who Owns the Albemarle? 



$528.50 

Due A. H. Johnson Five hundred and twenty eight dol- 
lars for payment on Stock. 
March 10, 1909. 

GEO. C. RUSKELL. 

Mr. A. H. Johnson put up the money and ran the place. 
What did Mr. Ruskell, the Sergeant at Arms of the Council 
put up? Why was it necessary that Alderman Whittet and 
Sergeant Ruskell should be officers anyway. 

Let him that hath ears hear what The Idea sayeth to the 
people- 



10 THE IDEA 

Up in Lynchburg where everybody has known the editor 
for the last 25 years they are saying, " Adon went down to 
Richmond and fell among thieves. " 



Radical Ti/ethocis 

Some Words for the 9/fealy TTfouthed 



We are continually hearing those who see the great good 
The Idea has accomplished, saying that they can not ap- 
prove of the methods of this paper nor the way the editor 
says things. To them we want to say that neither do we 
approve of their methods nor the manner in which other 
papers say things, and we have a right to disapprove of 
their easy going, genteel, conservative (?) methods, for such 
methods don't bring results. No one has a right to disap- 
prove of our methods for the big reason that our methods 
alone are working a revolution in Richmond, which has been 
practiced on by easy going teachers to no avail from time 
immemorial. 

Let those who are so anxious to censure us for our radical 
methods first show some results of other'methods. The Big 
Fact Remains That THE IDEA'S radical methods have ac- 
complished more reform in one year than the soft, genteel, 
easy, fraid-you-going-to-hurt-somebody methods of Rich- 
mond's hundreds of preachers have accomplished along the 
same lines in twenty-five years. And the preachers are by 
far the best people in the community, too, but they just 
don't use the right method,— THE IDEA'S Radical Meth- 
od — that's all. Radical evils require radical remedies. Jesus 
called men liars and sons of their father, the devil, who was 
a liar from the beginning. We got our method from Him 
and wont accept any other method as superior. No, if you 



THE IDEA 11 

think THE IDEA'S methods wrong, you just mark it down 
that the trouble is with you and not with THE IDEA. Hon- 
estly now, can you look and see how Richmond's shame and 
corruption is crumbling before the attacks of THE IDEA 
and say our methods are wrong? Scratch your thick head. 
Youv'e got a think coming to you. 

^^ Truth Hurts'' ^Preposterous'' 

To us at this distance it looks very much like a case of the 
' truth that hurts. " It strikes us as preposterous. From 
what we have been able to gather it looks as if the Richmond 
police authorities are grasping at the shadow and missing 
wilfully, deliberately and shamefully, the substance.— South- 
side Sentinel. 

Too Much Truth 

If Yoder is to be fined and imprisoned, and bound over 
to keep the peace, for criticising and denouncing a cess pool 
of moral corruption what should be the penalty inflicted up- 
on the municipal officers of the city of Richmond for permit- 
ting the same to exist. 

Those who are viewing the Yoder controversy from a dis- 
tance are beginning to think that the chief objection to his 
(Yoder) pamphlet is that it contains too much of that article 
known as truth, pure and simple. — South Boston News. 

"THE IDEA of you straining your eyes trying to 
see the Comet through glasses that do not correct your 
eye defects. 

THE IDEA of you trying to see the "Comet" as you should 
without first consulting DR. RAYHORN, THE EYE 
SIGHT S PEC I AL.I ST, and getting glasses that 
will not only correct your eye defects but enable you to 
see as you should, but will relieve you of that disagreea- 
ble headache, nausea and nervousness, if attributable to 
EYE STRAIN. 

Ill East Broad St. Office days, Mon., Wed. and Friday. 



12 THE IDEA 

The last trial of the editor is regarded by all a farce and a 
travesty, but that is because some of the friends of the right 
SAW IT. We want to say that that trial is but a sample of 
what can be seen in that court any day, and it was just such 
a travesty that called forth the article concerning the Mol- 
loy woman's trial. 

This last trial ought to show the people that our former 
critic sm must have been a just one. We know it was. 

And that's not all. 

Poor, friendless people of Richmond get just such deals 
handed them every day and no one pleads their cause except 
The Idea, which has fought openly for them for a year. 

Go and see for yourselves. We are not the only one un- 
justly treated. 



u/erner cua/c/ny up 

Some iPertinent Questions 



The Idea would enquire why this sudden animation of the police 
force in stopping the vile den of a pool roorn at 16 East Broad Street. 

According to the papers the police admit that it has been a notorious 
nuisance where murder ancj fights ^P(l carousing and drinking and in" 
decency and lew<iae5si>grt'e pjev'ailed so long that merchants have had 
to complain continually thiii decent, people could not walk by the vile 
spot at any time of day, as one paper pluts itv f But now they say it must 
go. Why did they not say so sooner? Why did they wait until The 
Idea thundered for a year that the police department was rotten, until 
private citizens and preachers had to organize before the police even 
pretend to do their duty. 

The Idea had faith and has faith that all things will be well after 
a little while and that the papers will all come across and join in the 
fight and finally publish to the world how we "killed the bar." 



" None of these things move me." 



12 THE IDEA 



The Power Co. 

An Incident 

The Idea Has to Deposit $10 for the Privilege (?) of 
Letting the Virginia Railway and Power Co. Make 
Money by Furnishing Electric Currrent. And why? 



The Idea has just gotten installed in new quarters and in 
so doing had to have electric current to run the presses. 

We went to the Power Co. to have the current cut in and 
asked to be shown a contract. 

The regular contract was shown and we asked if any initial 
payment were necessary and were told no. On reading the 
contract we found that nothing was required in advance. 

When, however, we came to sign up the contract we 
found that in addition to the regular printed form there had 
been added in in writing words requiring that we put up 
ten dollars deposit to be held by the company till the con- 
tract was carried out. Now if this were customary with 
others we would have no kick coming, but since it is not and 
since others with no better financial standing are not requir- 
ed to make deposit we have a right to suspect ulterior mot- 
ives and to inquire into the whyness of the wherefore of the 
unusual procedure. 

Now be it known that The Idea has found it necessary to 
show up the dealings of this company and to conter d for 
some regard for the rights of the citizens in the matter of 
the proposed blanket franchises which this company is ask- 
ing for. This company desires an extension of the valuable 
street car franchises which the city has given away to them 
in the past. Some of these franchises are soon to run out. 
The company is planning to have a single blanket franchise 
granted them by a subservient council so that they may per- 



14 THE IDEA 

petuate themselves in the community and obtain under our 
ancient councilmanic system what they know they can never 
hope for if they wait till the city is managed in the interests 
of the tax payer by a commission which is the great hope 
and plan of those who know how a city can be run economi- 
cally. 

This company will take occasion as some of the minor 
franchises expire to rush through the council a fran- 
chise comprising all the minor franchises before these others 
expire and this company knows that The Idea will oppose 
them in their plans as the city should not give away these 
valuable privileges but should sell them, as other cities are 
doing to the highest bidder. 

This accounts for the fact that the company would gladly 
handicap The Idea by unreasonable and unusual demands on 
us and for the further fact that lawyer Guigon, attorney for 
the company, was in police court and exercised himself so 
much against The Idea at the recent trial of the editor. 

We are reliably informed that it was Guigon'splan to have 
the editor put under heavy bond, and we know that when a 
certain party was arranging for our bond this same Guigon 
went to him and tried to discourage his efforts, thus showing 
that he was desirous of suppressing freedom of the press in 
Richmond because he knew that the acts of his company 

could not stand the light of day. 

The Idea has every force of evil in the community to fight 
because the crooks and the special interests all know that 
The Idea will fight all manner of evil regardless of any effect 
on The Idea itself. 

If you want your battles fought fearlessly and boldly stand 
by The Idea and don't let any enemy of the right fool you in 
to thinking that all the good The Idea is accomplishing is 
done for ulterior motives. 

When crooks begin to be concerned about motives of oth- 
ers, you can rest assured that some good is being accom- 
plished which will hurt their evil works. And yet there are 
some people, good people too, that prefer to believe what 
evil politicians tell rather than what those who oppose evil, 
who have no base monetary motives, say. 



THE IDEA 15 



Organize 



When The Idea began publication a year ago, we printed 
an editorial urging the formation of a citizens' league whose 
object should be the enforcing of present laws and the en- 
actment of better laws, in other words, the boosting of 
Richmond by making it the best governed and most law 
abiding city in the nation. 

We realized, and so stated at the time, that Richmond 
was in other respects a most excellent city, but that politi- 
cally it was rotten, the ninety-nine per cent, of good citizens 
having permitted the one per cent, of evil ones to completely 
dominate the situation. At the time of that first agitation 
of the question the people were not sufficiently aroused to 
do anything; they as a self conscious unity were not aware of 
the depths of degradation to which their political affairs had 
descended. So The Idea began its campaign of publicity to 
show the citizens conditions as they existed. This the daily 
papers, as we then stated, could never afford to do because 
it would antagonize friends and political and business asso- 
ciates. The Idea was willing to pay the price if it could ac- 
complish the result. One year has elapsed and tho condi- 
tions are no worse, and even not nearly so bad as they were 
a year ago, yet the truth has brought its harvest and Rich- 
mond is awakening from its long sleep. 

The Idea therefore urges now again the formation of a 
non-partisan citizens league which shall stand for a cleaner 
and better governed city so that Richmond shall be a place 
fit for the rearing of our young, and from a business stand- 
point attractive to investors because of the fact that its rev- 
enues are wisely and economically expended and its taxes 
thus, if not actually, yet practically, reduced. 

By all means let the solid citizenship of the capital organ- 
ize for Greater and Cleaner Richmond. 



16 THE IDEA 



Snciecent ^apera 



Nearly every day some friend calls our attention to ob- 
scene news items or vulgar and obscene patent medicine ad- 
vertisements in some of the daily papers. 

These papers continue to print corrupting, obscene, 
vulgar, degrading, suggestive ads. for money, mind you, 
(prostitution of the basest sort) such ads. as no man, not 
even a patent medicine fakir would ever dare insult this pa- 
per by offering for publication, so well known is the policy 
of this paper as to clean advertising. 

Yet these papers can continue this actual corrupting of the 
morals of the youth while mothers bring this vile stuff to 
the editor of The Idea and beg us to use our influence in 
stopping the sending such indecent literature into their 
homes for their boys and girls to read. 

But our highminded chief of police permits the dirty work 
to go on and his delicate sense of decency is not offended 
because they have never shown up the chief and the police 
board in their true colors. 



The Joke of the Season 

It is the Joke of the season that the chief of police, who 
keeps in his office the likeness of several hundred lewd 
women whose traffic in vice he illegaly protects and who 
presides over the police department, which permits dens of 
iniquity and gambling hells and obscene shows and every- 
thing else that goes to make up what the professional crook 
calls "a wide open town," — we say it is the joke of the sea- 
son to see this man throw up his official hands in holy horror 
for fear the morals of the youth would be corrupted. 

We don't know how to account for it. Truly the comic 
must have done did it. 



We Want 
Your Printing 



^fim^ 



TJhe Sciea Sprint Shop 



IS NOW LOCATED AT 

1106 Capitol Street 

IN THE OLD FORD HOTEL BUILDING 
JUST ONE BLOCK FROM THE PLACE WHERE WE ALL GET 
FAKED, VIZ. : THE CITY HALL 



jVeip the Work of Cleani'n^f !/iichmond 

BY PHONING US TODAY TO COME 
BY AND GIVE YOU PRICES 

PHONE, MONROE 2T08 



OTOR CYCLES 



AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 



3U West Broad Street 



Phone Madison 3945 



harbour S^nffffj/ Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South i^ostoTij Vir£finia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

JVoenni£^er^SizQmore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 




Vol. IV 



May 28, 1910 



No. 2: 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



THE WAY OF THE LOAN SHARK 




In Richmond a band of Salary Loan *' Bankers" violates the law 

by oppressing: the poor. 
They charge, contrary to law, enormous, exorbitant interest taizs 

which put the poor salaried mian at their m.eicy. 



9 9 

Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



« 



I 

a ^^^ ^^^ ___ .,^_^ ,^^ ,^^ -^^ ..^^ .^_ ^__ ° 

CI2>OSr>Gl><aSE>0!>(^H>Q&<aH>a!>^^0E><HH>CCl>^^0i>aB&<iO!><BiB><ID<^H><)D<^H><n><HHDCl><BBDflO 

I JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. | 

S ^ We are showing special good values in J § 

g ^ diamond:)) 7l/atcAej, ^ewelri/, y § 

i Oiluerware, Cut S/asSj Stc, i 

I We invite your inspection | 

DsaaE>CD(aBS>Ql>C::^>C!>CSSD0^aaDaO<BH>aQD<^H><ID<lHB><iO!>^HDaD<HB>CDaiH>CI>(^H><ID(HH>aQ 

HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet f 
^ 

wants, in Drugs and Medicines h 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, \ 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 



- A. R ROBINS, - I 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

i 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. J 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. h 

i 

■9 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV MAY 28, 1910 No. 22 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Peculiar Court 



Procedure 



How Pollock ^Tixed Things 



ff 



■P\R. LEVY said that Gilbert Pollock, counsel for dairy rr. an 
•*-^ Taylor, begged that he, Dr. Levy, withdraw his prose- 
cution of Taylor before the Hustings Court on the 
grounds that Taylor was a poor man and could not stand the 
fine of $100.00 and that after his agreeing to the verdict of 
$20.00 for Taylor, thus saving "poor" Taylor, $80.00 on Tay- 
lor's plea of guilty, he heard that Pollock got $180.00 for 
his fee from Taylor. 



2 THE IDEA 

Pollock on cross questioning- Dr. Levj'' asked him if he 
(Levy) did not know that he, Pollock, had to get the war- 
rant amended so as to leave out the "second offence" clause 
before he eould have the judgre agree to only a low fine. 

We don't know what the good citizens of Richmond think 
but as for us something is certainly wrong when a coun- 
cilman-lawyer can "fix things", as he expressed it in the 
investigation Monday night, with the judge, by having the 
warrant changed, and the small fine agreed to before the 
TRIAL. Richmond is bad off and Richmond don't seem to 
know it. But Richmond is waking up, slowly waking up, 
tho the Richmond papers don't dare bring out these little 
points which are fraught with such tremendous conse- 
quences to our democratic institutions. 



How Crime Is 

Protected 



If one will look in the window of Paolo Michelli at 410 E. 
Broad Street, he will see on the west wall of that bar a cer- 
tificate which states that the holder, P. Michelli, has con- 
tributed to and is a member of The Police Benevolent Asso- 
ciation. This certificate is in a frame and in a prominent 
position. 

We are informed that a large per eentage of the bar keep- 
ers of Richmond are likewise members of this organization 
which is an insurance order for the benefit of retired police 
or the widows of deceased police. 

Now we are told by a man who knows of his own person- 
al knowledge that these bar keepers call attention of police- 
men who would report them to the fact of this membership 



THE IDEA 3 

and that these certificates are used to protect the bar keep- 
ers from molestation by the police. 

It is not strange that members of The Police Protective 
Association should expect protection ficm the police snd it 
is a matter of common belief that many holders of thes cer- 
tificates paid for the same just in order to secure leniency 
at the hands of the police. 

Indecent Pictures 

HOW about the indecent, obscene and vulgar pictures of 
half nude women in the windows of Broad and Main 
Street stores ? 

Some of these stores have these indecent exhibitions, 
which are much worse than the scenes THE IDEA feebly 
described, strung up in profusion in their display windows 
where young boys linger and gaze to their moral undoing 
and to the incitation of their baser natures. . 

All this goes on with Major Werner's approval and the 
his attention has been called to it b^ the women in the pa- 
pers of the day still he refuses to act. 

It is all right for merchants who don't offerd the police 
board to violate the law. It is all right for these lewd women 
to indecently expose their peisons on Mayo Street but it is a 
high crime for one who has exposed the police department 
to tell the people these evils exist. 

Wake up, Old Richmond, and get a police department that 
will regard the law and a justice that will be just. 

7 

Prizes for Boys 

THE IDEA will give a handsome prize to all boys who sell 
20 or more copies of The Idea each week of the month of 
May or June. The April prizes were given out recently. 
About 20 boys earned a ball or a knife. Get THE IDEA at 
Waller's on Jefferson Ave., Church Hill; or at Abbott's, 
Manchester; or at The Model News Co., 513 W. Broad; or at 
The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St., Saturday morning 
from 6 o'clock on. 



4 THE IDEA 

The Case Against Wise and 

Pollock 



As we go to print, after two sittings of the Special Coun- 
cil Committee appointed to investigate the rurrois re- 
garding the wrong doing of Messrs. Wise and Pollock 
several facts of importance have come out. 
The inquiry shows: — 

(1) That Wise and Pollock did sell their services to cer- 
tain dairymen for $500.00 to get them the privilege of feed- 
ing distillery swill to milk cows. 

(2) That Wise and Pollock were members of the city 
council at the time. 

(3) That Wise and Pollock never appeared before the 
Board of Health to get that board to "discriminate between 
fresh swill and sour swill", tho they claim that their fee 
was for the purpose of getting the board to so discriminate. 

(4) That they knew that the ordinance prohibited the 
use of ALL swill. 

(5) And that for any order that Dr. Levy or the board 
might make to be legal the ordinance must be amended. 

(6) That the law clearly prohibited fresh swill because, 
as dairymen testified, cows will not eat sour swill under any 
circumstances. 

(7) That the objection to swill is not that it may be fed 
sour, but that it, fresh swill, because of its condition, can 
not easily be fed in any sanitary manner as it is so largely 
liquid and in a state of easy decomposition— it gives an odor 
when it comes in contact with wood as in the mangers which 
absorb it. It must slop on the floor and walls and wood 
work and on the ground, where it sours and draws flies. 

(7) That the dairymen paid for the right to use swill. 
(9) That Dr. Levy did not grant any right or permission 
to use swill UNTIL the ordinance was passed. 



THE IDEA 5 

(10) That the board itself did not grant any such per- 
mission. (So testified members Gordon, Levy and Oppen- 
heimer. ) 

(11) That the payment of $500.00 was made after the 
ordinance was passed. 

(12) That Mr. Wise rushed the ordinance through the 
council by personally asking Dr. Read to present the ordi- 
nance and call for an immediate vote. 

(13) That this talk about getting the board to discrimin- 
ate without the ordinance being amended is bosh. 

(14) That this talk about a distinction between fresh 
swill and sour swill is a product of the fertile brains of 
Messrs. Pollock and Wise and that neither dairymen nor the 
board had ever made the distinction before. 

(15) That Dr. Levy stated that Clyde W. Saunders ap- 
peared before the board in order to get this thing arranged. 

(16) That Dr. Levy's salary was raised $500. 00 just about 
this time. 

WATCH AND CHAIN 



Prize for Petersburg Boys 

C. T. Jones, No. 101 W. Washington Sireet, will have THE 
IDEA for sale in Petersburg in the future and boys may get 
copies from him at 3c. a copy. 

A Petersburg merchant has kindly oifered to give a watch 
and chain to the boy who sells the greatest number of Ideas 
in the month of June, Boys, get busy! This means money 
for you whether you win the prize or not, £nd ore of you 
must win. 

Nerve 

It takes a good deal of nerve for a young man to ask his sweet- 
heart's father for her, but ic takes more for the old man to give her to 
him. — Exchange. 



THE IDEA 



The Trouble and 



e Remedy 




It might appear that Pollock and Wise reasoned that Dr. Levy and 
his board could instruct their inspectors to act contrary to law just as 
Chris. Manning and the police board inctruct the police to act contrary 
to law (and one board has as much ri^ht as the other so to act) and 
that they accepted the $500,00 for getting Dr. Levy and the board so 
to act, if it did not appear that the board did not so act and that Wise 
himself knew that the board would not get what he was paid to give 
without a change in the ordinance and that he himself. Wise, actually 
got Dr. Read to present in the council the amendment to the ordi- 
nance and to rush it through the council. 

This matter looks to us mighty bad for Wise and Pollock. How 
it will appear to the council committee is another question. 

From the serious looks on the faces of the investigating committee 
it looks like we might hope for a finding that will break up such 
practice in the future by making an example of these men. 

The trouble with the whole thing however will come after the com" 
mittee makes its report. The committee can only recommend action 
to the council itself. The council which as a whole will not have heard 
all the evidence may be befuddled by smooth speeches for the defene 
and thus whitewash the whole affair as they so often have done in the 
past with the aid of the daily papers. 

Here is the trouble wnth the whole unwieldy councilmanic system. 
After finding the trouble the remedy can not easily be applied. Rich- 
mond can't be run right until a small paid council elected by all the 
people has full power and full responsibility in all such matters. 

Read that last sentence again. That's Government by Coommis- 
sion. Council should be (1) Small, (2) Paid, (3) Elected by all, not 
by wards, (4) Full Power, (5) Full Responsibility. 



XHE IDEA 7 

Another Assistant Engineer Needed 

Another assistant engineer is needed to inspect the bad 
condition of paving or whatever material is used on the 
street railway road beds. 

In many places it is ruinous to wheels and rubber tires to 
cross the tracks, as the Passenger and Power Co. is not re- 
quired, as they should be, to run their tracks on a level with 
the street paving. This leaves a sharp edge to break up 
buggy wheels and also make a rut between the track and the 
paving in which wheels of vehicles are caught and twi&ted 
and broken. It appears that the Car Co. can do anything 
and still neither the police nor the engineer's department 
does anything to protect the citizens against their hairr.ful 
acts. 



The Wise-Pollock Matter 



At the third sitting of the Council Investigatiig Conmit- 
tee it developed that although the daii jrrtn hzd tried to get 
the right to use swill still nothing was done until Janusry 
this year when our old friend, Clyde Saunders, Ex-Ecss cf 
Richmond, appeared before the Health Board, and stianire 
to say this third sitting of the investigation brought cut this 
fact that the Board instructed Dr. Levy to draw an amend- 
ment to the swill ordinance on the very night that Clyde 
Saunders appeared before them and asked that it be 
done. Whenever the cojncil begins to investigate they dis- 
cover powerful politicians at the bottom. 

Ex-Mayor, Carlton McCarthy said on the witness stand 
in the Saunders Libel Suit that Clyde Saunders "exerted a 
mysterious influence for evil" over the politics of Richmend. 

It looks like his influence still exists, and will exist until 
the people of Richmond arise in their strength and declare 
for better things and pitch the whole ring crowd overboard. 



THE IDEA 



The Journal 



Shall We Believe the Editorial 
or the Reportorial Columns? 



O 



|N May 5th, The Evening Journal printed the followirg 
in its editorial column : 

IN THE SPIRIT OF ''FAIR PLAY" 

Editor Richmond Evening Journal: 

I have read your excellent paper since first publication 
without missing a copy, and if you will pardon me, would 
like to ask you a plain, straightforward question : Do you 
consider language used in Mr. Yoder's publication, the Idea, 
vulgar and obscene, and why are you trying to down him? 

FAIR PLAY. 

The Journal has a very decided opinion concerning the 
language employed in Yoder's pamphlet of April 23d, but in 
fairness to the publisher thereof, who has appealed from, 
the Police Court sentence. The Journal will not express that 
opinion, certainly until the appeal has been heard in the up- 
per court. 

If reproducing, as faithfully as we know how, the evi- 
dence in the Yoder trial constitutes the offense described by 
our correspondent as "trying to down him" (Yoder), then 
The Journal is guilty. We know of no act on our part that 
would justify the conclusion that The Journal is "trying to 
down him." 

Here The Journal says, "we will not express an opinion." 
Over on the first page, however, where everybody could see 
it and because it is in the news columns which people read 



THE IDEA 9 

because they think they are getting, not the opinions of a 
writer, but the news of the day, this same paper undertakes 
to injure THE IDEA before the public and prejudice the 
public against it by saying in reference to this same matter 
that "The concensus of opinion seems to be that . . . 
in the name of decency the law should stop it." 

That this is not the concensus of opinion is clearly shown 
by the many letters from citizens which this same paper and 
The Virginian and The Leader have printed commenting on 
this affair not one of which has ever given the remotest 
suggestion that THE IDEA'S article referred to was inde- 
cent or obscene. On the other hand, the papers have con- 
tinually printed letters, sermons and editorials protesting 
against the action of Justice John in declaring THE IDEA 
obscene, and protesting against the decision on the ground 
that it was nothing but an attempt to suppress THE IDEA 
because THE IDEA had dare expose political rottenness in 
Richmond. 

In The editorial above quoted, The Journal claim.s that 
they reproduced faithfully the evidence in the trial. That 
statement is absolutely false, as those who were present 
know that this paper put in quotations, words and senti- 
ments which it claimed we spoke which were as far from 
the truth as Fiddler's Green is from Heaven, Likewise The 
Journal made it out that Justice John said things which he 
apparently never dreamed of and which we must confess 
were slanderous and insulting to that unblushing gentkrr.an. 



JUSTICE JOHN 
Has He Changed? 

-^m ■ < <»» ^ 

About twelve years ago, while a student at Richmond Col- 
lege, at the solicitation of fellow students who told us of the 
One John's peculiar methods of administering justice to 



10 THE IDEA 

those so unfortunate as to appear before him, the writer ac- 
companied by some of these fellow students paid a visit to 
Judge Crutchfield's court, and among other interesting inci- 
dents of that visit the following occurred, and being brief 
is worthy of mention here. 

On the call of his name, a young man came forw^ard and, 
as he approached Justice John called in a harsh manner, 
"Well, what are you doing in this town ? " The young man 
answered, "I came here looking for work." "Give him ten 
days on the rock pile", was the quick verdict of Justice 
John. The young man opened his mouth to saj; something 
while the spectators opened their mouths and eyes in amaze- 
ment that one should be so harshly sentenced without the 
semblance of a trial, while an officer pushed aside the pris- 
oner and the next case was being called before the harden- 
ed frequenters of the court began to snicker at the "practi- 
cal joke" of the inimitable one. 

When we came back to Richmond again, a year ago, we 
were told that we should expect a great change in the police 
court, as the Justice had been converted and joined a church. 

We heard, however, of the same peculiar kind of decisions 
which had distinguished his career in the past and so we 
went to see for ourselves. 

We found the same levity, the same harshness, and, to 
our minds, the same injustice and disregard for decoious 
legal procedure that howsoever much the judge's heart has 
been changed, the habits of his legal mind are the same as 
they were twelve years ago and THE IDEA has repeatedly 
in the last year's time given in detail specific instances of 
this justice's unjust decisions. No, the old saying, "You 
can't teach an old dog new tricks", seems to have a parallel 
in the case of Justice John, whose sayings and habits of 
mind as far as we are able to discern are not changed in the 
last twelve years. It is hard to make a just judge late in 
life out of one whose character bas been fixed by association 
with men of the baser sort, as was the case with this man, 
who for years conducted a bar room, in old Jackson ward, 
patronized largely by negroes of the criminal element. 



THE IDEA 11 

The Promotion 

of Policemen 

Does Merit Win? 



/^UR attention has been frequently brought to the fact 
^•^ that those who have been promoted from patrolmen 
to higher positions in the police force were so often of 
the hail-fellow well met variety instead of the more sub- 
stantial, exact, business like variety. While young men who 
stood in ha\e been pushed rapidly to the front some of the 
oldest and best men on the force have never been promoted 
at all, but though nothing can be said against them and tho 
they have shown themselves efficient, intelligent and of the 
highest character, are still serving after 20 or 30 years of 
hard work in their original positions as privates of the force. 

THE IDEA would enquire why such officers as Crump, 
Talley, Vest, Shields, Duggins, and Kuhn and others, some 
of whom have served nearly 30 years, are still patrolling 
their beats as privates, while new men of untried ability 
have been pushed forward and promoted over the heads of 
these men. 

If meritorious service does not win in the Richmond Pohce 
Department, what does? 



Announcement 



The Loan Shark matter is crowded out this week by the 
Pollock-Wise Investigation. 



12 THE IDEA 



Another Idea Victory- 
Red Light District Moving 



It was testified on the witness stand by C. Manning, Jr., that there 
were two red Hght districts. 

We are informed that J. B. Gordon, father of Pohce Commission- 
er Douglas Gordon, who rents this place has gjven orders that this 
shall be no more. At any rate the women are on the move and some 
have recently located in Red Light Section No. 1. A little more light 
on this stupendous protected criminal evil and Section No. 1 will like- 
wise vanish and be gone where the woodbine tvvineth and the whang 
doodle mourneth for his first love. 



Libel Suits 



Set for September 



The two libel suits against the Editor and the Williams Printing 
Co. for $10,000,00 brought by Douglas Gordon and C. Manning, Jr. 
have been set for next September, in Judge Ingram's Law and Equity 
Court. The appeal from Justice John's decision on the warrant charg- 
ing "corrupting the youth" will be set by the Hustings Court on June 
6th for some day later in the month. 



A Woman 

A woman is a person who will carry a purse two feet long, wear a 
hat a yard wide and trot a mile in search of a piece of lace the length 
of her finger. — Exchange. 



THE IDEA 13 

A Woman's View of Yoder 



From The Virginian 



Editor of The Virginian : 

Sir, — Will you allow a mother, who is also a " white-ribborer," to 
express her opinions concerning Mr. Yoder's publication and late 
trial ? 

I have read "The Idea" since almost the first copy, and have dis- 
cussed its contents with many ladies, and all have seemed glad that 
some one had courage enough to attack these evils and to lay the 
blame for their existence where it belongs. 

It is true that his word-pictures have not always been elegant and 
polite; but where could elegant and polite language be found to de- 
scribe a thing so vile? And if found, would nor its elegance and polite- 
ness rob it of its force.'' To do effective work the sword point must 
not be garlanded with flowers, not wrapped with velvet. 

If leprosy existed in certain precincts cf the city, would it not be fool- 
ish for any one to speak of it as merely a "cutaneous ifTection." or in 
"irritating rash," lest some ones oversensative nerves be shocked, or 
lest it hinder business to have the truth known? and it would be just 
as sensible to condemn a person for calling it leprosy and picturing the 
loathsome condition as a warning, lest "our youth" might cat h the 
disease by reading about it. as it is to condemn Mr. Yoder for telling 
the truth concerning these evils and calling things by their real names, 
lest the reading of them "corrupt the morals of our youth." 

This love and solicitude for the "morals of our youth" is too thin 
a cloak to hide the real reason for this persecution of Mr. Yoder. It 
is always dangerous to denounce sin in those in authority. It cosr John 
the Baptist his head, and it came near costing St. Paul his liberty, if 
not his life, when his preaching endangered "the craft" of the Ephe- 
sian silversmiths." "Our craft is in danger" was there excuse for their 
animosity against Paul ; and preaching that strikes at any nefarious 
traflfic, whereby money is easily made, always meets with opposition. 



14 THE IDEA 

If Mr. Yoder's publication had been aimed at the condition of 
things in New York or Chicago, and had hit no one here, there would 
have been no outcry made against obscene language and no fear felt 
that it might "corrupt the morals of our youth." There is an old say- 
ing that seems to apply nicely here : "It is the hit dog that howls." 

It is true the description of these evils does not make pleasant read- 
ing : but do away with the evil and such exposures would not be pos- 
sible. The time is at hand when "things done in secret shall be 
revealed," and God is back of all such revelations. 

If the reading of these things will "corrupt our youth" and sully the 
purity of our "wives, daughters and sisters," what will the conditions 
themselves do for our sons, husbands, fathers and brothers who come 
in contact with them daily? Said a fifteen-year-old boy : "We don't 
have to read Mr. Yoder's book to learn of these things; we can see 
them for ourselves." Just think of it ! And then out of "solicitude 
for the morals of our youth" punish him whose pen is warning against 
these evils and still let the evils exist, putting a premium on vice and 
punishing virtue ! 

May God pity the wives, daughters and sisters who are so easily 
corrupted that can be injured by Mr. Yoder's warnings against sin ! 
Are they not in greater danger of corruption by associating with men 
who uphold and condone and are responsible for the existence of the 
evil.'' 

This city needs a thousand Adon A. Yoders and a few Judge Lind] 
seys. Then it needs men enough with clean manhood to say "We 
will have a clean city," and who will not rest until such officials are 
in office as shall see that the laws are enforced ; and if there are no 
laws stringent enough on our statute books, to stir up our Legislature 
until such laws shall be passed— laws that make the WRONGDOING 
a crime to be punished, NOT THE EXPOSURE OF THE 
WRONG. 

Oh ! Christian men and women, let us not only hope, but let us 
work and pray to hasten the day when this city shall be a safe place 
for our sons and daughters, when NOWHERE within its borders may 
be found a place where the innocent youth and the purest and most 
modest maiden may not go without seeing and hearing that which 
brings the blush of shame to the cheek or sullies the white purity of 

the soul. 



THE IDEA 15 

If the officials who are so solicitous for the morals of our youth" 
would investigate soTie of the postal cards that are sold in the stores 
and sent through the mail they would find that which would do more 
toward corrupting morals than Mr. Yoder's warnings against sin. 
Cards have come to my home addressed to my young sons so full of 
evil suggestions that I threw them in the fire, without letting those to 
whom they were addressed see them. 

If Mr. Yoder's methods were not the wisest, should not his motive 
be taken into consideration ? 

How differently will the Great Judge deal with us, before whom Mr. 
Crutchfield himself will have to appear — the Judge who looks beyond 
actions to motives. "By Him actions are weighed," says the Bible; 
and it is not wealth nor worldly honor or position that will be put in 
the opposite scale, but the motives that prompted the actions. 

I wonder if Mr. Crutchfield would want to be judged there as he 
judged Mr. Yoder. 

Satin would be pleased could no man be found courageous enough 
to attack sin and call it by name, and he knows well that smooth, 
velvety, flowery talk never turns any one from the evil way, That is 
why he rages so when some one is found who dares do battle against 
him. But, oh! the pity of it, when those who should set their faces 
like a flint against these evils are yielding themselves to his service as 
protectors of these same evils; and "his servants ye are to whom ye 
yield yourselves servants to obey"' 

Thank God for the ministers and the noble men who have taken a 

stand for truth, virtue and justice! May their numbers increase! 

A RICHMOND MOTHER. 
Richmond, Va., May 11. 



The Truth 

In a few thousand years more the people of this world may tolerate 
the whole truth and nothing but the truth if they keep on improv- 
ing. — Exchange. 



Subscribe to The Idea today; $1.00 for six months. $2.00 a year. 
Send subscription and any complaints to Idea office, 1106 Capitol St. 



16 THE IDEA 

Politics, Swill and Baby Food 



CPECTATORS at the two first sittings of the Pollock-Wise 
^ Investigating committee noticed that on these cccasicrs 
Messrs. Clyde W. Saunders and W. P. Leaman sat im- 
mediately behind Gilbert K. Pollock and during the investi- 
gation engaged him in conversation. 

When the political influence of these men who were de- 
feated for re-election to the City Committee "by THE 
IDEA" last fall, but who are still actively engaged in poli- 
tics, is remembered, their presence is significant, but we 
did not know how significant it was until it developed that 
Clyde Saunders had appeared before the boaid to get the 
board to in some way have this swill fed to milch cows. 

Now remember that Saunders is both a politician and a 
dairyman and that his partner in the dairy farm is Andy 
Griffith, whiskey man and milk man. 

Notice how politics and whiskey get into legislation cv€n 
when the question is that of the harmless temperance drink 
and baby food, even cow-milk. 



IT is proper to ask if these lawyers got any fee from the 
distillery people for getting the "permission to feeddistilleiy 
waste." 



After all, swill is swill, howsomever sweet she may be. 



Who knows but that certain politicians wanted this swill 
ordinance changed in order to help out the whiskey makers, 
those who were here and those who were coming here. It's 
a fine thing for them. 

They don't care how many cows are made sick by it; of 
course they don't, when it don't even matter with them how 
many men they make sick physically, morally and financially 
by the evil ferment. 



We Want 
Your Printing 



Tjhe Scfea Sprint Shop 



IS NOW LOCATED AT 

1106 Capitol Street 

IN THE OLD FORD HOTEL BUILDING 
JUST ONE BLOCK FROM THE PLACE WHERE WE ALL GET 
FAKED, VIZ.: THE CITY HALL 



jffelp the Tllor/c of Ctean/ny !/i/chmonci 

BY PHONING US TODAY TO COME 
BY AND GIVE YOU PRICES 

PHONE, MONROE 2T08 



MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

311 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

!^arbour S^nffffy Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South S3ostorjj Virginia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 



J^oenni^fer^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 




All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Vol. IV 



June 4, 1910 



No. : 



THE 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



DESPITE THE FACT THAT OUR ENEMIES 
PROPHESIED THE IDEA WOULD NOT LAST 
SIX WEEKS, THE IDEA HAS BEEN PUBLISH- 
ED IN RICHMOND FOR ONE YEAR WITH 
THIS NUMBER. WE THEREFORE ANSWER 
OUR CRITICS BY SAYING— 




Cock-a-doodle-doo ! 



.^^^ 



ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



I Print it Right. f 

! ! 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 2 

I Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 

I roe 2708, | 

a o 

JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

7th AND MAIN STS. I 



, ,, We are showing special good values in .{ § 

1 * !D/am9/?c/c^j Tl/a^cAecfj ^ewelri/f y § 

1 Silverware, Cut S/asSj Stc. \ 

I We invite your inspection | 

O __ ,^_v <-_V .^_V ^^_V ,^_V <^_« ^^_ <^_ *■ 

HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet r 

wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei. Delicate ^ 

P lav wrings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

- A. a ROBINS, - \ 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

i 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV jbNt: 4, i9io " !;,':. V. ... No.23 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdON: A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Dr. Levy and 
the Health Board 

THE IDEA for last week in summing up the evi- 
dence in the Wise-Pollock Investigation before the 
Special Council Committee mentioned as the last fact in that 
summary, "That Dr. Levy's salary was raised $5€0.C0 just 
about this time." 

At that time we had only the testimony of Jas. R. Gordon 
to go on who made the statement on the stand. The fact 
seemed somewhat significant to us in the absence of further 
knowledge concerning the details of the raising of this sal- 
ary, and yet being impressed with the highmindedness of 
Dr. Levy a-, shown in his testimony and with his excellent 
showing before the committee we were not willing to believe 
that Dr. Levy had been guilty of any wrong in this matter 
or that the salary raising had aught to with the passage of 
the swill amendm.ent. 



2 THE IDEA 

It therefore gives us great pleasure to state that after 
looking into the matter we are fully peisuaded that the rais- 
ing of Dr. Levy's salary had nothing whatever to do with 
the matters now under investigation and that it was merely 
a coincidence that the matter of raising his salary came be- 
fore the council at about this time. 

The subject had been before the various council commit- 
tees for about a year and due to the red tape of our outland- 
ish form of government it had taken a long time to get back 
to the council for final passage. 

It had finally come to the council proper from the finance 
committee about a month before this time but was laid on 
the table for one month in order to h&\e a larger attendance 
at its passage. It seems that it was unanimously passed at 
this time. 

The Board had recommended a raise of $1000.00 per an- 
num but the council had cut the raise to $500.00. 

It is thus seen that the matter of an increase in Dr. 
Levy's salary had its origin long before Wise and Pollock 
were ever employed and that the two ordinances had no 
connection with each other. 



ONE LAW FOR FULTON 

Another Law for Broad Street 

Mayor Dodges Responsibility 



T AST week the Mayor issued a letter to the Chief of Po- 
■*-' lice directing that the Sunday Law be enforced down in 
Fulton where the members of the Fulton Baptist Church 
had made complaint. 



THE IDEA 3 

In the same letter, recognizing the lawless conditions 
elsewhere throughout the city, the Mayor practically assured 
these violators of the law that as far as he was concerned 
they might continue to openly violate the law so long as there 
was no specific complaint lodged by anybody which he felt 
WEIGHTY enough to notice. Various citizens have complain- 
ed often to the Mayor of the conditions on Broad and Main 
streets and he has refused to act but has in one instance 
directed the complainant to do police duty and make a spe- 
cific charge and appear against his will against a fellow 
merchant for selling on Sunday. 

THE IDEA has repeatedly called the attention of the 
Mayor to this law-breaking by even citing the names and 
numbers of the places violating, and the editor in person 
last summer appeared before the Mayor and called his atten- 
tion to the flagrant and open violation of this and two other 
of the state laws in this city. The Mayor took no acticn 
but now tells us he will do it if the public does a little police 
duty and makes complaint, the very thing he and his police 
force are hired for. 

Citizens should not be expected to busy themselves doing 
police duty and encurring enmities by reporting law viola- 
tions, and yet the Mayor hides his violation of his oath of 
ofl^ce behind the lame excuse that the law, forsooth, is a blue 
law, when as a matter of fact it is new and fresh, having 
been recently made more stringent by the Legislature. It is 
as much his sworn duty to see that this law is enfciced as it 
is to sign and approve city ordinances, and if anything, the 
former is even more his duty for he has sworn to enforce 
first of all the laws of his state. It would be just ^.s much 
the Mayor's province to say that marder or any other crime 
might be committed on Broad so long as citizens did not 
make one concerted complaint. Law is law, and duty is 
duty, however displeasing the duty or however cut-ofdate 
the Mayor may think the law is. 

This is a question for the legislature alone to decide and 
not for an executive officer who has agreed to abide by the 
laws provided for his governance. 

(Continued on page 14) 



THE IDEA 

Lines to the Grand Jury 

^ tm* ^ 

reverend, virtuous sages, how must we, 
Who stand amazed your wisdom rare to see. 
Be thankful to kind Heaven for sending you. 
The wicked town's lost virtue to renew ! 

For many a day the city's been renowned 
Because of infants dead in alleys found. 
" Poor babe I sexton, come take it away, 
And let the matter drop. At whose door lay 

The lustful crime, the heartless murder done. 
Why trouble to find out, or fix upon 
The guilty the disgrace they sought to flee? 
'Tis lucky for the brat it cannot see 

The kind of life it must have followed here. 
And then we must not know too much, for fear 
Tom, Dick or Harry, or some other friend 
Might meet with incovenience in the end ! '^ 

Year after year, the chosen few who stand — 
Solemnly sworn t'enforce the law's demand^ 
Have treated certain laws as plainly writ 
As any other laws, though scarcely fit 

For table-talk, or youth's too curious eye, 
As not included in the oath whereby 
Commissioners and Mayor, Judge and Police, 
Are bound before high heaven without release. 

Are statutes faulty? Well, suppose they are, — 
Is perjury a trifle? Better far 
Some lack of pleasures for the lawless sort. 
Some extra work and trouble for the ccurt, 

Until a better law can be devised. 
Than have the truth thus publicly despised. 
Nay,, more, 'tis but too widely understood 
That no mere care for other people's good 



THE IDEA 

Makes public officers thus basely dare 
To break the oath they are required to swear; 
But slavish fear of what some boss may do, 
And knavishness less pardonable, too, 

Are more than half the secret of the shame 
Of Law's sworn guardians being so to blame. 
Now comes one Yoder — self-appointed, he. 
As spokesman of the folks who wish to see 

An end of public lies, and crooked ways, 
And rampant vice, and negligence that "pajs." 
Quoth Yoder, "What! How's this? What do I see? 
Virginia's laws ought to enforced be. 

But here are flagrant breaches known to all, 
And officers refuse to heed my call." 
Some other deeds that mayhap break no law. 
From public gaze still willingly withdraw. 

The fussy Yoder drags them into light. 

And says he's only just begun to fight. 

"What makes him act so queer we cannot tell, 

But this performance does not please us well; 

So knock his head off, —put him in the jug,— 

Do anything to make him shut his mug, " 

Say various and sundry parties hit. 

But Adon quits his fussing not a bit. 

He comes right out with some things he has found 

About the dens where infamies abound. 

Not picturing them in jest, nor with a view 

To lure men to the snare, 'tis very true; 

But still he publishes the facts, the place; 

And sure, to somebody that brings disgrace. 

The Grand Jury in solemn conclave sits, 

To deal out justice as each case befits. 

*' Infamous places, violated oath, 

We're used to, —so just pass them over, both. 

But, Chief, go catch this wicked Yoder man; 

To ruin the country's his deliberate plan. 



THE IDEA 

Innocent youth coald never, never know 
Of Mayo Street,, till Adon Yodered so! " 
Thus the demand of Justice wins the day. 
And tlie Chief Captain hastens to abey, 

—Coiiributed. 




Sec. 3745 Code of Virgima. 



If any execath e; legislative^ or Judicial oiReer accept ib 
this State, ch* if,, being resident in this State, sueh officer 
shall ^o out of tkis state and accept,, and afterwards return 
to and reside in this state, any gift or gratuity, or any prom- 
ise to make a gift or do any act beneficial to such officer under 
any agreement, or with an understanding that his vote,, 
opinion or judgment shall be gi?en on any particular side of 
any question, cause or proceeding which is or may be by 
law brought before him in his official capacity, or that m 
such capacity he shall make any particular nomination of 
appointment, he shall,, upon conviction, be confined in the 
penitentiary not less than one nor more than ten years, and 
shall forfeit his office and be forever incapable of holding 
any post mentioned in section one hundred and sixty- two.'' 
(Any governmental office, city, county or state.) 

This is the law which Mayor Richardson referred to when 
on the witness stand he testified that when he ordered the 
investigation of the conduct of Messrs. Wise and Pollock he 
thought the act in question was a *' criminal offence," 

The question is, should these men be confined in the peni- 
tentiary for accpting $500.00 "with an understanding that 
(Continued on page 11, 



THE IDEA ^ 



How Commissions 




From The Literary Digest. 

WHEN 60 American cities, representing over 3, COO, OCO 
people, decide that the management of their affairs is 
henceforth to be a business proposition and not a political 
game, and when they actually adopt, in its essential feat- 
ures, the plan of "government by commission" in order to 
achieve this desired result, one "splendid victory" has, ac- 
cording to Everybody's, been won for the American people. 
In the current number of this magazine Mr. Charles Edward 
Russell shows the results in five municipalities which are 
governed by commissions, and points out what he believes 
to be the advantages of this "method of common sense 
and democracy" over the ordinary "thumb-hand" manage- 
ment of civic affairs. We are reminded that, as a rule, the 
American city is "unsightly to look at, plundered by cc]}:c- 
rations and political ruffians, misruled where it is not cor- 
ruptly ruled, and bungled, boggled, and manhardled in all 
its most important affairs." Moreover, 'in thirgs visible 
and invisible, " the city government "certifies to its own 
abominable failure; for most American cities are badly 
paved, badly lighted, badly built, badly sewered, have an 
expensive water-supply and a police force that thrives often 
upon an alliance with vice, sometimes upon an alliance with 
both vice and crime." 

This, therj, is a "fair summary of the situation in rrost 
of the American cities." But there are scrr.e 60 odd con- 
spicuous exceptions, 80 of which have "tested the new idea 
sufficiently to furnish a basis for estimating what modem 
and sane methods are worth when applied to a modern mu- 
3:jicipality," Of these, five typical cities are selected for ex- 



8 THE IDEA 

amination: Galveston, Houston, Des Moines, Sioux Falls and 
Cedar Rapids. Under the plan adopted by the two Texan 
cities, Galveston reduced its annual expenses nearly one- 
third, saved $1,000,000, and became, in every way, "a bet- 
ter city to live in." Houston, in its iirst year under the new 
plan, paid off $400,000 debt and reduced the tax-rate, while 
making the greatest public improvements in the history of 
the city. The Galveston plan destroyed the old ward lines, 
and placed the government in the hands of five men with 
practically autocratic power. About all the people could do 
was to defeat a commissioner for reelection when his term 
expired. An improvement on this plan was devised by for- 
mer United States Senator Pettigrew, of South Dakota, and 
passed by the legislature of that State. While all power was 
vested in five commissioners, each in charge of a depart- 
ment of the city's affairs, and elected by the city at large, 
there were added certa n features, making them subject at 
all times and in all ways to the will and direction of the peo- 
ple. These features — the referendum, initiative, and re- 
call — "obliterated the one fault in the Galveston plan and 
put all responsibility definitely upon the people," This plan 
is now in apparently successful operation in Sioux Falls, S. 
D., and, in a slightly modified form, in Des Moines and Ce- 
dar Rapids, la: 

"In Des Moines, the general disgust with the old method of gov- 
ernment was so great that when the question ot adopting the new was 
being agitated, placards appeared in the streets bearing only the words: 
*lt Can't Be Any Worse Than This.' and all men knew and appre- 
ciated what was meant. After a year of the new plan, the Des Moines 
Register and Leader, a newspaper of conspicuous fairness, reviewing 
the advantages and disadvantages of the innovation, concluded that 
'Des Moines is, in fact the most economically and most honestly man- 
aged city of its size in the Middle West.' ..... 

"Cedar Rapids affords probably the best and clearest illustraiton of 
the practical workings of the new idea. 

"In the first year of business democracy the city retired $60,000 of 
bonds, enlarged and improved the park system, increased the police 



THE IDEA 9 

force, repaired or rebuilt the fire apparatus, enlarj^ed the fire service, 
built a new fire station, and fitted out the policemen and firemen in 
new uniforms. It cleaned the streets (for the first time in the city's 
history), repaired more old pavements and constructed more new ones 
and with them built more sewers, watermains, sidewalks, curbs, and 
roadways than had ever been constructed in any previous year in Cedar 
Rapids. It began a new bridge across the Cedar River, and bought 
an island on which the city is to erect handsome municipal buildings 
out of the savings effected by the new system and without the issue of 
a dollar's worth of bonds." 

The source of this great change Mr. Russell finds to be in 
the essence of the commission plan. Instead of being chosen 
by wards, or districts and acting only for their constituen- 
cies, the agents of the community are employed under the 
new plan to transact its business and execute its will. And 
each commissioner is simply running his own department to 
the best of his ability for the people who employ him. "No 
foolish, medling board of aldermen, no ignorant and vicious 
political boss, no party, no convention, no campaign com- 
mittee, no outworn system of ofiice tenure stand between 
him and his employers." Altho these experiments are young 
and may by some be deemed not conclusive, the writer enu- 
merates several achievements of the new plan which he con- 
siders "fairly well established." These are: 

"1 It abolishes party politics from local affairs. 

"2. It eliminates the boss, the grafter, and the political machines. 

"3. It views a municipality as a great business enterprise and pro- 
vides accordingly for its effective management. 

"4. It recognizes definitely the failure of representative government 
and subsitutes therefor a system of democracy; it recognizes the fact 
that there is no wisdom but collective wisdom. 

"5. It establishes direct responsibility for every public act. 

"6. It seems to be swift, efficient, economical, and adapted to a 
rational community in the twentieth century. 

"7. It abolishes a raft of useless offices, sinecures, jobs, and polit- 
ical rewards, and substitutes organization, method and work." 



10 THE IDEA 

The Loan Sharks 

Richmond Iifested with Bold Violators of 

the Laws 



In this and the next issue THE IDEA will show how the 
Salary Loan Sharks, of which there are several concerns 
doing business boldly in Richmond, charge from 200 to 500 
per cent, interest on loans to poor men, and then when these 
men see how they are being robbed and refuse to be further 
mulcted they are intimidated into further troubles by 
threats of publicity and fear of the courts, where, as a mat- 
ter of fact, these sharks will never go. 
' If the Commonwealth's Attorney will push this matter, 
we will give him sufficient evidence to rid Richmond of this, 
one of the greatest evils of the day. 

"We hand you the money without delay, at a rate lower 
than offered by any other loan company in the city." 

The above is a statement on the folder of 4 pages issued 
by The Capitol Loan Co., 606 E. Broad St., Richmond, Va., 
and distributed broadcast all over the city. The copy before 
us was placed under the writer's door. This company re- 
cently loaned a young man ten dollars and took his notes 
paj'able in one, two and three months for $4.50 each, thus 
charging $3.50 interest on $10.00 for the average time of the 
loan 2 months, which is at the rate of 210 per cent, (figured 
thus, 2 mo. at $3.50 equals $21.00 for 12 mo. or 1 year. $21.00 
is 210 per cent, of $10.00). 

At the end of the 1st month, January 1st, the young man 
could not pay the $4.50 due, so he was told his loan would 
be renewed in full by the month by paying $2.00 interest. 
He paid $2.00 and gave a note for 1 month for $12.00. Each 
month found him in a similar fix, so they renewed his note 
each month including the present month on the payment of 
$2.00 interest each month. He has therefore, on a loan of 
$10.00 paid already $12.00 interest and the Capitol Loan Co. 
holds his note $12.00 still. This is interest at the rate of 240 
per cent, and his principal, $10.00, is now $12.00, yet due. 
(Continued next vreek.) 



THE IDEA 11 

BRIBERY 

(Continued from page 6. ) 

their vote, opinion or judgment" should be given on any 
particular side of any question, cause or proceeding, which 
was or might be brought before them in their oflRcial capac- 
ity." 

Since lawyers might disagree as to the interpretation of 
the statute, we will not give an opinion on this point but 
leave it for the reader to decide. 

We will, however, state that it is clearly the intention of 
the statute to keep legislators from being influenced in get- 
ting any legislation passed by having previously accepted 
money for services which would be incompatible with their 
duty to vote on any measure before the council. 

Massrs. Wise and Pollock clearly stand guilty of a breach 
of morals and ethics in, using thier influence, while they 
were councilmen, with Dr. Levy, who is appointed by and 
whose salary is fixed by the council, to get him to make a 
ruling, whether he had a right to or not, without the amend 
ment of the ordinance, on the matter of feeding swill. 

There is the crux of the whole matter and Wise and Pol- 
lock by their own admissions stand guilty. 

The council committee should not be guided in their find- 
ing by a consideration as to whether the legislature had hap- 
pened to make a law fitting the offence but should deteim- 
ine whether these men have offended. 

We should have men in our legislative bodies not like 
Senator Lorrimer, of Illinois, who, after admitting his 
wrong doing, tries to get off because there is no law to fit 
his case, but men who shall be so highminded as to refuse 
to accept any fee for any service which would unfit them 
for performing their sworn duty before that body, or for 
any service as attorney before any board created by the 
council of which they are part. 

The council cannot afford to countenance such acts by 
permitting these men to retain their seats in that body. 



12 



THE IDEA 

Prize for Petersburg Boys 



T. C. Jones, No. 101 W. Washington Street, will have THE 
IDEA for sale in Petersburg in the future and boys may get 
copies from him at 3c. a copy. 

A Petersburg merchant has kindly offered to give a watch 
and chain to the boy who sells the greatest number of Ideas 
in the month of June. Boys, get busy! This means money 
for you whether you win the prize or not, and one of you 
must win. 




Sec article on page 10, entitled Loan Sharks. 



THE IDEA 13 



More Blind 



Stupidity 



A TTENTION of the city tax payers is called to the ab- 
■**■ surd way their money is wasted. North Sixth Street 
from Leigh to Baker was equal to any cross street in the 
ward. This street is lightly traveled as its terminus is a 
gulley but two squares farther north. In this street are 
many vacant lots, and the improvements consist of one story 
shacks, a wood yard, etc., yet this street was ploughed up 
through a deep gravel surface one foot or more thick to be 
replaced by granite blocks, and the gravel was carted away 
to be placed in other parts of the city, where property values 
are tribble what they are in this section. We will cite a 
number of localities where gravel and clay are the only mate- 
rial employed adjacent to the most highly valuable and tax- 
ed property in the city. Commencing with Fourth Street 
North and South of Broad, west of Fourth, there are many 
such streets, mud in winter and rainy seasons and dust in 
summer and dry seasons to the damage and annoyance of 
this great retail business section. If any real explanation 
can be made either by the engineering department or by the 
selfish ward representatives who regard it their only duty 
to get all they can for their ward regardless of what or 
where the real need is, and absolutely indifferent to the city's 
best interests as a whole. Surely such insane management 
calls for some more intelligent method of city government. 
If there is any place where a commission is needed to man- 
age municipal affairs it is Richmond. Our councilmen in 
rare instances give their time and make the sacrifices they 
do from patriotism or the public good, but to subserve their 
own private interests or protect some special line of business 



14 THE IDEA 

which they know reads men on watch. We can but hope 
that there will be an early awakening to the real condition, 
a condition where the office holders are our masters instead 
of our servants as contemplated in their selection, a con- 
dition of the officers and the politicians manipulating mat- 
ters to their own liking. Events of late but demonstrate 
that they are overreaching themselves, and thus hastening 
their elimination from power. So mote it be. 



ONE LAW FOR FULTON, ANOTHER LAW 
FOR BROAD STREET 



(Concluded from page 3) 

It looks like a case of a servant putting himself above his 
master. 

The law as the expression of the people's will is the mas- 
ter and should be obeyed, above all by one employed just 
simply to execute the law. 

Now the question is not whether the Mayor thinks one 
should not take a drink of soda-water on Sunday. The law 
has settled that as far as selling is concerned and it is his 
to obey. 

Now, we have no narrow fool notions about what ought 
to be the law, but we have some decided opinions as to the 
duty of a mayor to enforce all laws whatever he may think 
of their advisability. If the Sunday law is not a good one, 
let the legislature change it. But so long as it is on the 
books let it be enforced. The only way to get rid of a bad 
law is to show it up by enforcing it. 

This alone is law. 

The Mayor's position is anarchy — no law. 

To our mind it is preposterous for an executive officer, 
and especially one who is a lawyer, to arrogate to himself 
the right to decide whether a law is good or not and act en 
his individual conception. He has entirely exceeded his 



THE IDEA 15 

powers and his police department has over-stepped the 
bounds of the law in this as in the permission of the open 
red light social evil and the selling of whiskey on Sunday. 

The papers tell us we are to have a "sane" observance of 
the Sunday laws. 

That simply means no observance. Nothing tickles law 
violators more than to have newspapers or preachers to 
keep quiet or stand for "sane law enforcement" for they 
know if the leaders will go no further than that they can 
rest assured that they can do practically as they please. 

No, the attitude of the executive towards all crime should 
be "Thou shalt not." All else is confusion. 



Why the Lions Did Not Eat Daniel 

The colored preacher was telling his people about Daniel 
in the Lions' Den and he said: 

" When Daniel drap down mongst de lions de all come up 
to him and smelled him and says, "We want meat; we don't 
want no back bone." 

We are glad to notice that Justice John has taken a trip 
through Locust Alley (on May29td). It is not Justice John's 
business, however, to break this up. Let the Mayor and the 
Chief take this trip and then just read their oaths, that's 
all. 

We call especial attention to the verse, elsewhere printed 
in this number, written, on reading that the Grand Jury, 
composed almost entirely of politicians, had "instructed" 
the Chief of Police to swear out a warrant against the editor, 
of THE IDEA, by one whose learning and poetic ability 
speak for themselves. 

See us first ^ ^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



16 THE IDEA 



Newspapers and Preachers 



A preacher came at a newspaper editor in this way: You editoisdo 
not tell the truth. If you did you could not live; your newspaapers 
would be a failure. The editor replied: You are right and the minister 
who will at all times tell the truth and under all circumstances tell 
the whole truth about his members, alive or dead, willnot occupy his 
pulpit more than one Sunday, and then he will have to leave town in 
a hurry. The press and the pulpit go hand in hand with white-wash 
brushes and pleasant words, magnifying little virtues into big ones. 
The pulpit, the pen, and the gravestone are the great saint-making 
triumvirate. And the great minister went away looking very thought- 
ful while the editor turned to his work, and told of the unsurpassing 
beauty of the bride, while in fact — well, she was as "lovely" as all 
brides ought to be. — Exchange. 



WHY? 

"A wise old owl lived in an oak; 
The more he saw the less he spoke. 
The less he spoke the more he heard. 
Why can't we be like that old bird?" 

Prizes for Boys 

THE IDEA will give a handsome prize to all boys who sell 
20 or more copies of The Idea each week of the month of 
May or June. The April prizes were given out recently. 
About 20 boys earned a ball or a knife. Get THE IDEA at 
Waller's on Jefferson Ave., Church Hill; or at Abbott's, 
Manchester; or at The Model News Co., 513 W. Broad; or at 
The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St., Saturday morning 
from 6 o'clock on. 



Wild oats are a pecular grain which are sown with a bottle and 
reaped with a patrol wagon. 



We Want 
Your Printing 



TJhe Siofea Sprint Shop 



IS NOW LOCATED AT 

I 106 Capitol Street 

IN THE OLD FORD HOTEL BUILDING 
JUST ONE BLOCK FROM THE PLACE WHERE WE ALL GET 
FAKED, VIZ. : THE CITY HALL 



JVetp the Work of Cieanin£f i/ii'chmond 

BY PHONING US TODAY TO COME 
BY AND GIVE YOU PRICES 

PHONE, MONROE 2T08 



MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 

Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3U West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour S^iiffffj/ Company 

\A/HOL.ESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South iBoston, Virginia 




H 






If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jVoenni'^er^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Vol. IV June n, t9I0 No. 2 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Pollock and Wise 
Immoral Plays 
The Red Light Evil 
Salary Loan Sharks 
The Trial 
Hot Talk About Richmond Courts 



5 CENTS A COPY $1.00 A YEAR 

Being some sermonettes published Bi- Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. _ — — — 



I Print it Right. I 

I ! 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea g 

I Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 
I roe 2708, | 

a « S, 

Q!)<BH><;t>^iH>CDaH>flD<l^<il><^H>fl!>^^«Ci><^B>a!>CMB><iQD<aBD<iD<^H><il>^^<!0<HK><]f><^H><90 

f JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN I 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. I 

§ i;^ We are showing special good values in ^ | 

^ diamond:), 7l/aic/iecfj ^ewelrj/, Y « 



Silverware^ Cut S/asSj Stc, \ 

I We invite your inspection | 

0E><aH>Q{>^iH><i!>a^B><ID<l^K>tiO<^H><ID<^H>«Oi><BHD«DaBK>QQ[>aBDaD^^<ID<^H>«D(^H>a!>^HD<lQ 



©<^'^.<^'<^' 



Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 



HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet ^ 

wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei. Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

- A. R ROBINS, - I 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. f 

i 
i 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. h 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV JUNE 11,1910 No. 24 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

The Loan Sharks 

Richmond Infested with Bold Violators of 

the Laws 



(Continued from last week.) 

^^THER legitimate Loan Companies charge 6 per cent. 
^^ The Capitol charges 240 per cent. Therefore the Cap- 
itol Loan Company's statement at the head of this article is 
absolutely false. 

THE IDEA has information concerning such illegal inter- 
est rates charged by The Richmond Guarantee Co., 1C8 N. 
9th Street, The Tidewater Loan Co., corner Franklin and 
9th Street and D. H. Tolman on Main Street. They will be 
exposed in another number. 

Within a few days recently two deaths were reported in 
the Richmond daily papers as the result of the Loan Sharks' 



2 THE IDEA 

work. In the one case a Washington victim of the loan 
shark committed suicide. In the other case an Alabama 
negro victim shot two loan sharks. Next week we will 
quote the law and expose other dirty methods. ^• 

DRIVEN TO SUICIDE BY "LOAN SHARKS.'' 

Washington D. C. Man Forced to Borrow from One 

To Pay Another. 

Washington, D. C, April 11. — The double clutch of a "loan shark" 
combination by which he was forced to borrow money from one to pay 
another led George W. Chandler, a train dispatcher, to commit sucide 
according to a statement issued today by Co'oner Nevitt. Chandler 
borrowed a small sum from a "ten-per-center," and soon found that his 
debt was increasing so rapidly that he could not meet it. He shor 
himself Thursday and died last night. 

It is probable that Chandler's case will be cifed in the present effort 
to drive out hordes of "sharks" who prey upon the department em- 
ployes and every month collect large sums of government money. 

ALABAMA ALWAYS FAIR. 

Driven half crazy by a white 53 1-3 per cent, loan shark, an 
Alabama negro shot two of them dead. Sympathy with the debtor 
prevailed, and the shooter has not been lynched. There is still a sense 
of fair play in Alabama. — Brooklyn Eagle. 



Duty 



I slept and dreamed that life was beauty ; 
I awoke and found that life was duty; 
Was then my dream a shadowy lie ? 
Toil on, sad heart, courageously. 
And thou shalt find the dawn to bt 
A worthy light and truth to thee. 



THE IDEA 



S^ub/ic :^cts of \ 

iPub/ic Servants 

!Publie iProperti/ 



About a year ago we stated that the Idea would always regard the 
public acts of public servants as public property but would have noth- 
ing to do with any man's private affairs. 

Now since some seople seem unable t.o distinguish between public 
and private let us state that we not only regard official acts as rightful 
subjects or criticism but the law has always held that public acts whether 
offlical or individual are proper subjects for criticism. The Idea 
draws the line when it comes to PRIVATE affairs but will not hes- 
itate to expose the P JBLIC affairs of officials. 

Likewise some do not seem to understand the difference between 
personal affairs and private affairs. Even official and public acts are 
nearly always personal acts and no paper stops because an act is per- 
sonal. Every day the papers deal with persons and without person, 
alicies no paper would be readable. The daily papers however go 
further and pry into the private affairs both of private individuals and 
public offlcals. The Idea does not. It has repeatedly refused to touch 
on the private affairs even of those who were guilty of public wicrgs. 

The Idea will not hesirate to be personal because when a wrong is 
done some person is responsible. 

Don't get an impression that the Idea ever has or ever will deal 
with strictly private affairs of anyone. We always keep not only with- 
in the limits of the statute and common law but regard that newspa- 
pers and publications should have higher ideals and also keep within 
the limits of the strictest moral and ethical codes. 

No we wonc unearth private affairs but woe unto those whose acts 
of wrong doing become of a public nature for then we propose to ex- 
pose them and if need be harshly, at least harshly enough to accom- 
plish the good result desired. 



THE IDEA 



Immoral Plays 



In tbe last several months complaints have come to us from moth- 
ers and fathers as well as from preachers and others concerning the 
indecent exhibitions permitted to go on on the stages, of the Broad street 
10 cent shows which are patronized so largely by women and chil- 
dren in the afternoons and evenings. 

We have made it a point to attend several of these performances 
and have been astounded at the immorality openly permitted before 
the eyes of the people of the city. 

We have scarcely attended a single one of these plays which did 
not have either some subtle suggestion tending to lead the young into 
the most criminal vises or some indecent exposure of the person by 
some unnatural female actor. 

In the past two weeks we have attended two of the largest of these 
houses and in both cases ve found a most degrading performance, and 
these performances are mu.'h worse than they were a year ago. 

On these occasions we saw things unfit to describe even before old 
people and certainly this paper will not attempt to detail the lewd 
scenes before those of tender years. 

At the Bijou two weeks ago after an exceedingly immoral act three 
young women near us got up and left "disgusted" as they stated. 

As this article was being written the following clipping from a daily 
paper was handed in by a preacher. It describes an act at the Bi?ou. 
If the Idea had first printed it we might have to be sentenced to jail. 

"And then appeared "The Girl With the Auburn Hair." Marjorie 
Davis this is the name of the dancer, took the house completely off its 
feet. Attired in something thinner than the stuff that dreams are made of 
the dancer fortified herself against cold weather with flesh colored 
tights and a wealth of pleasant smiles. If the cool weather contin- 
ues she will need a raincoat. 

The Police permit such performances in Richmond Broad Street 
theatres but must send to jail The Idea Man if he for sooth, tells 
what he actually sees, and he wont tell all he sees, the women and 
children have the permission of the police to see that for themselves. 



THE IDEA 5 

A business man and large advertiser wonders if these theatres have 
to pay IS much for advertising space as the business men who are 
building up the city. It is astonding how much space in the daily 
papers is consumed by these ads which do all they can to tare down 
the city and its institutions. 



Pollock and Wise 

Gtiiltyt Say the Committee 



The Times-Dispatch Whitewashes 

Let the Council Dismiss 



Although the Times Dispatch, on the day after the report of the 
Investigating Committee was made, came out in large headlines at the 
top of the first column of the first page in these words "Pollock and 
Wise Held Guiltless." It is evident from Mr. Pollock's indignation that 
he does not regard the report as holding him "guiltless." 

"The character of Mr. Wise and myself have been assailed" The 
Journal reports Mr. Pollock as stating. 

The Idea printed on May 1st, before the Investigating Committee 
was appointed, "they most likely have violated no law, but a man may 
be guilty of a very serious breach of ethics and morals and and be 
within the limits of the law." 

The committee on June 5th reported, "We deprecate, as hurtful to 
the efficient and faithful representation of a constituency, for members 
of either branch of the Council to engage their services for compensa- 
tion, as was admittedly done in this case, to obtain pesmission of such 



6 THE IDEA 

officer for the suspension of the enforcement of an ordinance duly enacted 
by the legislative branch of the city government. 
MAKE IT UNLA^VFUL 

We are satisfied, and so report, that such practice should be made 
unlawful, so that hereafter there may not be a recurrence of such con- 
duct as has been developed by the evidence in this case. One hurtful 
effect, at least, in this particular case, was, by the coi fession of the 
gentlemen themselves, to incapacitate them for duty in voting on 
the ordinance in question. 

To our minds the committee failed of its full duty in not recomend- 
ing to the council some action as to Messrs Wise and Pollock. They 
report their fndings and make recommendations as to locking the stable 
in the future but make no effort, — to carry out the figure, — to recover 
the stolen horse. 

It strikes us that men who while members of the council accept a 
fee to get an ordiance of that council nullified as they confess by one 
whqm they elect to office are unfit for further service in that body and 
the committee should have saddled the responsibility and recommended 
their dismissal. It is up to the council to take action, not the action 
M', Pollock demands, but dismissal from the body. 

If the papers would do their duty to the public and let their headlines 
tell truth there would be no difficulty in having a clean city, but so lon^ 
as the daily papers try to cover up and whitewash the council will do 
nothing. The papers realize that public opinion rules the day so they 
manufacture public opinion to suit themselves by concealing the truth 
under false headlines. 

If Justice John desires to render any lasting service to the city of 
his birth let him "suppress" The Times Dispatch for telling fibs in- 
stead of attempting to put the Idea out of commission for telling the 

truth. 

Meantime it is up to the council to dismiss Pollock and Wise and 

up to the people to elect others in their stead on June 14th, which is 

next week. 



Money is the thing that lubricates the machinery of com- 
merce, and makes lusty lads become rash and roguish rascals. 
Richmond has many men who are money mad.— June Jenks. 



THE IDEA 



Srand Stand S^lai/ 

6y Tlfajor Werner 

jCula iPenn Arrested 



At last our doughty chief of police has been aroused to 
action bj^ The Idea. Word went forth on last Saturday that 
a raid should be made Saturday night and run in all the ille- 
gal whiskey sellers in the Mayo street red light district. 

But some how or other the news leaked out and so we are 
told, the order was rescinded. Sunday night however a little 
raid was made and the women being on the lookout ard the 
officers not being as anxious as they might ha^e been, for 
we are informed that others sold Sunday night as usual, 
only one woman was caught. This woman Lula Penn, an 
old offender and reputed mistress of a certain ring politician 
with evil reputation, was hailed into court and fined. 

Now in the past Judge Chrutchfield has been jailing those 
caught selling whiskey without hcense, but in this case the 
offender was freed because as he stated this practice 
had been permitted so long it would not be just to put this 
woman in jail and not get the rest when they had not been 
molested in the past. The Justice thus admitted that it is 
known to the police as The Idea has all along contended 
that whiskey is daily sold in these fast houses. 

In other words it was a confession that we have openly 
permitted this so long that we are to blame and therefore 
should not put all the blame on che unfortunate caught. —The 
big question is tho who are we? that have been permitting all 
this law violation so long, and the answer is, Major Werner 
andthePolice Board, the persistant protectors of these evil 
women, the unrelenting foes of those who would expose them. 

Our police department is certainly in a bad fix, but they 
will get right as The Idea shows them the way. 



THE IDEA 



PERSONAL 

The Past and the Future 

The Idea To Become Bi- Weekly 



THO THE IDEA was born in Lynchburg 4 years ego 
next July 4th, still The Richmond Idea is only one year 
old. This number is the first in the second year, THE 
IDEA having started June 6th, 1909. 

Looking back over the year which has been a most stren- 
uous one we can say that we have no complaints to make as 
far as results are concerned. We expected to have to pay 
for the results attained. The editor has been twice assaulted 
in person and often maliciously assaulted in the daily press, 
he has been twice arrested on warren ts sworn out by those 
who would suppress him, once in the night, when his private 
papers were illegally taken from him and he was hurried 
away in a patrol wagon and locked up in a station cell, be- 
fore he could get in communication with bondsmen ; his bond 
was made excessive; he has had five suits entered against 
him for libel; he has been fined and sentenced to jail three 
times; for lack of funds he has accepted one sentence un- 
justly gi\en and has one still pending in the courts; his life 
has been threatened openly in court while his assailant 
was not even reprimanded, he has been illegaly put under 
bond to keep the peace, the lower court being reversed in 
one case and the other will be likely reversed this month. 
He has been subject to misunderstandings, slander and abuse, 
and desertion by friends but has quietly stood his ground, 
violated no law and today is glad he has done what he has 
because of the many evidences of the good accomplished 



THE IDEA ^ 

which daily come to^his attention. The standard of honor 
and integrity among public officials has been raised ; policy 
gambling has been almost entirely wiped out, two noted 
political bosses have been downed, and most important such 
a wholesome public interest in civic affairs has been aroused 
as will ere long ensure a more economical and better arrang- 
ed administration of the city's government and more exact 
law enforcement. Despite innumerable burc'ers whichhehas 
had to bear which he can not mention here he feels that the 
fight has been worth while, and he can look back and 
say not only is he "not ashamed" but is glad the work was 
undertaken, and today, tho he may never be understood he 
is firmly convinced not only that his work has been worth 
while, but he has adopted the only method which could 
bring results, namely; plain statements of the unvarnished 
truth in language intended to be understood. 

NOW AS TO THE FUTURE 

As many know, and certainly as we have always found, 
THE IDEA can never be a howling financial success tho our 
enemies have lied in saying we were in it for the money. 
While it would be perfectly right for us to edit a paper for 
money just as it is to run a shoe store for money, still with 
our experienced ability to make money in other lines we'd 
be a fool to edit THE IDEA "for money" when editing it 
means loss of money and persecution by so-called courts of 
justice and infamous slanders by unprincipled daily papers. 
But we need not dilate on such things. There are some 
people who are incapable of understanding one who does 
not measure his actions by the base standard of the dollar. 

Just as the dog can not understand the intellectual pleasure 
one gets from reading Plato so also these stri vers after filthy 
lucre can not appreciate nor even conceive of the pleasure 
of doing something which will have its weight for 
good after the doer has been forgotten, unless it brings a 
financila reward and certainly unless it don't cost a price or 
a cross greivous to be borne. But to the point. The editor is 



10 THE IDEA 

worn out. The work has been so taxing that he is physically 
unable to continue it on its present strenuous scale. It has 
already made him neglect proper care in wording and con- 
struction. It has robbed him of time to sufficiently inform 
himself by reading to give the people a paper worth while. He 
must confess that often his pride has been hurt by having to 
put out a paper which was such a botch from the gramma- 
tical and literary standpoint. 

His time also has been so taxed that the financial end has 
not been looked after. The Idea has not paid, mainly be- 
cause too little attention has been given to that part of the 
work. All the advertising we now have has come to us, we 
have not gone after it. But for the free gift of friends who 
have come to us begging the priviledge as they express it to 
"help the good work along" THE IDEA would have had 
to change long before this. Some how or other as money 
has been needed some kind friend often unknown to us has 
come to us or has brought or mailed a contribution of one or 
five or twenty or more dollars and thus the work has con- 
tinued. The editor does not feel it right to continue on 
this basis. He has come to the point where he has got to 
make a living and pay his debts. 

The Idea in the future will therefore be published every 
other week and the editor will thus have time to lock after 
his advertising and his printing and hopes to make 
enough out of them to keep the Idea going whether 
it in itself pays or not. The yearly subscription list has not 
been pushed, most all of the circulation beirg weekly pay- 
ments to boys. The three, six and twelve months subscrip- 
tions will be doubled in length of time unless the subscriber 
requests otherwise. 

By regaining his former strength and by having time to 
get out of the ruts and resume his reading on which a writer 
must depend to keep his paper fresh and interesting and up 
to date, the editor hopes to make THE IDEA not only more 
pleasant to the reader but worth more as well. 

We'll pay some one a neat cammission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St., Phone Monroe 2708. 



THE IDEA 11 

Extracts of an Act of the General 
Assembly of Virginia 

Approved March 12, 1906 



Sec. 4. If it be agreed in writing by the borrower and the lender 
at the same time the loan is made, the lender may charge for in- 
vestigating the secutity or title and closing the loan, a fee of not more 
than fifty cents where the amount borrowed is five dollars or less; noj; 
more than seventy-five cents where the amount is more than ten dol- 
lars; and not more than one dollar where the amount borrowed is 
more than ten dollars and not more than twenty dollars ; and not more 
than one dollar and a half where the amount borrowed is more than 
twenty dollars and not more than thirty-five dollars ; and not more than 
two dollars where the amount borrowed is more than thirty-five dol- 
lars, which said fee may be charged, if so agreed, upon original loan, 
or any renewal thereof; provided, however, that no fee whatever shall 
be allowed on any renewal or extension, which occurs within sixty 
days from the time of making the loan or from the time of the last 
renewal, and provided further, tbat the fee provided for in this section 
shall not be charged on any renewal made after the expiration of four 
months from the date of the original loan, but that all renewals made 
after said four months shall be at fees not greater than one-half of the 
amounts herein provided. And provided further, that any loan which 
shall be made between said parties within ten days after the payment 
of a pre-existing loan of approximately the same amount, shall in all 
cases be construed prima facie to be a renewal of said pre-existing loan. 
No ORIGINAL LOAN SHALL BE SPLIT UP INTO SMALLER 
LOANS IN ORDER TO INCREASE THE FEES ALLOWED; but if 
two or more loans be made at or about the same time between the 
same parties they shall be construed to be BUT ONE ORIGINAL 
LOAN, unless the contrary clearly and unequivocally appears. 



12 THE IDEA 

i^aN^oom 

J'or Out '-Cast Women and 7)runken 7/fen 

We are reliably informed that on Fourteenth street there 
is kept by a woman of large means a large house of ill fame 
which numbers among its attractions almost a dozon girls 
and a magnificent ball room where at midnight drunken men 
and debauched women make merry in lewd revelries all with 
the knowledge and fatherly protection of our wise police 
board who insult our legislature by telling us that they won't 
break up this district because they don't think it wise to 
molest this "neccessary" evil in its brazen effrontery of 
decency and law. 

THANKS. 

Anonymous as well as other contributions have been re- 
ceived by us for defense in the courts and to be used in the 
work we are undertaking. We have been so swamped with 
work that time has not been taken to express our .incere 
thanks to these good friends known and unknown who have 
been so kind to us. 

A large batch of mail lies unanswered on the table for 
want of time to answerd it. . Meantime thank you, and 
again, thank you. 

Boys In The Red Light District 

Down in the red Hght district it's a frequent sight to see 
messenger boys taking messages into these disreputable plac- 
es. Here we are told that many of them are enticed into sin 
by these vile females while those not personally induced to 
criminality are lured by what they see in the vice and degra- 
dation which is so openly permitted to tempt them. 

In the name of the boys of the city THE IDEA protests 
against the "policy" of fostering crime which The Police 
Board has adopted. 



THE IDEA 13 

^^Let the Galled Jade Wince/' 



^^Sounds Like Yoder Is Doing Something^^ 



(Editorial Augusta County Argus.) 



We got this from Ricomond dated May 30th: "Justice John 
Crutchfield today fined thirty-nine women and thirty-six men $10 and 
cnsts each and 90 days in jail on the charge of not having a visible 
means of support. The arrest took place on Saturday in a raid by the 
police and the disired end is to clean out Cunningham alley. 

The fines each amounted to $10.70, the total being $892,50 while 
the total of the jail sentences amounts to 18 years and 6 months." 
This sounds to a man up a tree like Yoder, the editor and publisher 
of the pampltet called '"The Idea. A Sign of the I'imes." who has 
twice been fined and'sent'to"jail by this same "Justice John," the "Un- 
cle Joe" of the police court of 'Richmond, is doing something as a 
reformer. He demands a cleaner city and says so in "spade" words, 
no matter what official he shows up as derelict in his duty. A man 
who spends much of his time in Richmond recently told us thar Yoder 
with tiis little piper had credit for having broken up the "soiled dove" 
business in the lurid light district of lower Broad street. Go ahead, 
Yoder, give 'em "hot stuff." "Let the galled jade wince:" — June 
4, 1910. Augusta County Argus. 



Prices for Boys 

THE IDEA will give a handsome prize to all boys -who sell 
20 or more copies of The Idea each week of the month of 
May or June. The April prizes were given out recently. 
About 20 boys earned a ball or a knif€. Get THE IDEA at 
Waller's on Jefferson Ave., Church Hill; or at Abbott's, 
Manchester; or at The Model News Co., 513 W. Broad; or at 
The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St. , Saturday morning 
from 6 o'clock on. 



14 THE IDEA 

Hot Talk About 
Richmond Courts 

^ « < ■ » ^ 

MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE 



\ 



"After cool, quiet consideration, we give it as our opinion that in the 
last five or ten years there have been few or none of the juries that 
have decided the cases tried in Richmond or Manchester that can be 
cited to have been strictly legal juries. First the juries are not prop- 
erly sumnoned, and next they are compelled by their fear of the cour^ 
officers to bring in a verdict that will suit wirhout any regard as to 
what is right and just in the case." 

The above from a recent editorial in the Richmond (Manchester) 
Bee contains language about as strong as that usually employed by 
Yoder. 

There is something radically wrong in dealing with lawlessness in the 
Richmond Courts, or the Bee has slandered all who are connected 
with the Courts from the judges down. The idea that the juries are 
compelled by their fear of the court offlcers to bring in a verdict to 
suit, without regard to what is right or just, is one of the gravest 

charges that we have ^ver read in a Virginia newspaper 

— Editorial in South Boston News. 



Squirrels and Rats 



About the only apparen-t difference between a rat and a squirrel is 
the tail. If one will notice some of the squirrels in the capitol square 
which have lost the fur from their tails one will have to take a second 
look to convince him that the caricature of a squirrel is not realy a rat, 



THE IDEA 15 

Now since so many of these squirrels are without a distinctive cau- 
dal appendage the qiifstion arises as to why these curtailed "varmints" 
anyway. 

We understand thai some $300.00 or $400 00 a year is appropriated 
by the state for the keeping of these squirrels and yet from the looks 
of the vermin infested creatures their box homes must be foul and un- 
fit for habitation. 

If these rodents were properly cared for there would be no vermin 
to infest them and they would be beautiful to see instead of being 
without fur as a result of parasites. 



The Trial 

*Date 9?ot 2/et Jixed 

+ .- 

Witt Wll 9fot Sit 

On June 7th, Judge Witt announced that he would not sit 
in the case of the Commonwealth vs. A. A. Yoder on appeal 
from Justice Crutchfield's fine and jail sentence for "cor- 
rupting the youth", and that Governor Mann would be no- 
tified and as soon as a judge is designated by him and a 
date fixed for the appeal in the Hustings Court the editor 
would be notified. It is expected that this trial will come 
off about the 20th or 25th of the month. 



Truth the Invincible 

Truth, crushed to earth, will rise again — 
The eternal year of God are hers ; 

But error, wounded, writhes in pain 
And dies among its worshipers. 

— William Cullen Bryant. 



16 THE IDEA 

SUNDAY THEATRICALS. 

Notice the immoral Bijou asking the Mayor for the privelege of 
giving religious or educational performances on Sunday. If there is 
anyone who can believe them capable of educating any one let him 
read elsewhere in this number the article on immoral plays. 

No it is clear that they merely desire to increase their weekly pat- 
ronage by getting the public "educated" into coming into their evil 
house. 

A house that will permit such shows as they have permitted for the 
last three weeks is vile and Ex-Mayor McCarthy would not have tol- 
erated it a minute. 



WATCH AND CHAIN 



Prize for Petersburg Boys 

T. C. Jones, No. 101 W. Washington Street, will have THE 
IDEA for sale in Petersburg in the future and boys may get 
copies from him at 3c. a copy. 

A Petersburg merchant has kindly offered to give a watch 
and chain to the boy who sells the greatest number of Ideas 
in the month of June. Boys, get busy! This means money 
for you whether you win the prize or not, and one of you 
must win. 



Let us print your tickets for your Sunday School and Moonlight 
excursions. The Idea Print Shop is doing some of the prettiest 
printing you ever saw. Phone us today for prices. Monroe 2708. 

See us first ^ ^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



We Want 



Your Printing 



^fM^ 



7j/ie Sclea u^rrnt o/iop 



IS NOW LOCATED AT 

1106 Capitol Street 

IN THE OLD FORD HOTEL BUILDING 
JUST ONE BLOCK FROM THE PLACE WHERE WE ALL GET 
FAKED, VIZ. : THE CITY HALL 



jVelp the Work of Cleani'n£f i/iichmond 

BY PHONING US TODAY TO COME 
BY AND GIVE YOU PRICES 

PHONE. MONROE 2"708 



MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3U West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour ^u^^j/ Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South i^oston, Vir£finia 



'A 



■Mr^ 



If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jffoenni£fer^uizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Voirv 



June 25, 1 9 10 



No. 



^..> 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OF THE TIMBS 




iL- 



TOP THe- 

DONT M0LE6T 

i/iWDY Houses 
LOAN <3HaRKS 

§umoax Sellers 
indecent shows' 



LAW ENFORCEMENT IN RICHMOND 



5 CENTS A COPY 



$1.00 A YLAR 



Being some sermonettes published Bi- Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by A don A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 

1106 Oapitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. —v;;.-;^-; -■■■:.;;;:;;;.----:.-.;;;;;;;- ----v;^-.-- 



I 



Print it Right. 



9 

i 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea | 

I Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 
I roe 2708, a 

a ^ 

Oj>< jiiii> qp<am>qf)<3BBPC&<M>0'|»a^^PGD<BaB><ii><MBP0P<^g><3P<^a>q<i»D^BP<!D<^»>qpc^M>qp<^»)<3O 

OD<BB><]D<9BDqD<!EIE>tiD<^BS><i!>(^K>QP^^D(iQP<^BDQD^nD<lQE><aEB>qD<^H><ll>aHK>qO^BDCD<^H>qQ 

I JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. I 

§ Mi We are showing special good values in 'L I 

B ^ f7)' ;. 0/i^±^L^ ^ {/ y„.. Cf': 9 



diamond:), W ate he:), ^etve/n/j 
Silverware, Cut Slass, Stc, 



e<^,<:^<:^':^,' 



<9 

I 



We invite your inspection | 

a <a 



HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet ^ 

wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

r 

- A. a ROBINS, - I 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV JUNE 25, 1910 No. 25 

Five Cents a Copy $1.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

A Remarkable 

Letter 



THE following letter, written from the Jefferson Hotel 
by a visitor who claims Texas as his home, shows such 
a remarkable insight into local affairs and is so straightfor- 
ward and to the point that we print it in the hope that it 
will arouse the young men of the city to such action as will 
ultimately purify old Richmond of its foul political ring. — 
Editor. 

June 13th, 1910. 
Who I am, what I am, why I am is nobody's business. 
Thanks for the applause; likewise the grunts. 
Now, I have no grouch against any one nor has any one 
against me. I do not care if Richmond gees tack to what 
it was when grandpa Byrd staked it out, or the granite 



2 THE IDEA 

boulders under the city's soil turn to gold and diamonds ovf r 
night. I am neither a scavenger nor a bird-of-paradise. 

For fifty years I have known Richmond; for forty I have 
known that it has been owned, body, soul and entrails by a 
corrupt political ring more powerful in it's ramifications than 
the old Tweed ring of New York City. 

Look around you; see how the politicians live; what they 
have; but how and where did you get it, gentlemen? If you 
are honest, your hands not soiled, your souls not tainted, 
then stand up in meeting and tell us where did you get it? 
The few who have no property are either simple fools, men 
who drink and gamble their money away, or, perhaps, hon- 
est men. 

"J't'accuse", said Zola when he forced a revision of the 
Dreyfuse court-martial. 

How many of your judges are not at least occasional 
drunkards? How many sit on the bench without the famil- 
iar odor of booze on their breath? Is a half drunk man ca- 
pable of dispensing justice? Is he ? 

Would any railroad allow an engineer to take out a train 
if he were half or wholly drunk? A man may be drunk with 
liquor, mahgnant malice or servile fear to his political boss. 

Is it impossible to hope for regeneration? Has Ri'chmond 
fallen too low for redemption? It is the young man's cru- 
sade. We 'must appeal to the young man and woman to 
force the powers of a moral Resurrection ! 

Richmond's political road is worn into ruts. Honesty's 
wagon is either mired in the chuck holes of corruption or 
the road is so dusty that the driver cannot see the impend- 
ing collision ahead. 

Boys, you have got to cut a new road; you have got to 
hew jour way into leadership; you have got to "ring out the 
old and ring in the new." 

The sooner you have a house cleaning the better. 

Don't attempt to reach extremes; just reach out and sweep 
with all the power at your command. You may leave some 
of the filth behind but you will take away the big lumps. 



THE IDEA 3 

The tumor is full of corruption; it must be amputated; it is 
a nasty job but you are the doctors and it is up to you; and 
if you are not moral cowards you will do it, too! 

The legislature should pass an act that any decree ren- 
dered by any court of justice or equity shall be null and a oid 
if the judge on the bench has had a drink of any alcoholic 
liquor or has been under the influence of a narcotic drug 
within 24 hours next preceeding the opening of the trial. 

This is no total abstinence talk, because the writer takes 
his drink whenever he cares to do so, which is seldom. 

Nothing can save Richmond from the Ring except gov- 
ernment by commission. Galveston, Texas, has tried it— it 
is a success. 

Richmond, Ifke Russia, is in the hands of despotic absolut- 
ism, in the hands of a machine, which, for political prest- 
ige, claims to be the Democratic Party; but in truth is only 
the Inquisition by the Forty Thieves and their satellites. 

Arise, ye freemen, and do your duty. 

K. Lamity Bill. 



Lessons In Richmond Geography 



Ques., — Where is the Home of the Governor of Virginia? 
Ans., — Just across the street from The Idea Office. 
Ques., — Where is the office of the Maj'or of Richmond? 
Ans., — Next door to the office of The Idea where we'll do your 
printing on short notice, see? The Very Idea! 



Phone us to call for your printing. We have time to do it quickly 
now and can promise you up to date clean neat work on paper that 
talks and with inks that show up. You need some visiting cards? Huh? 



Be sure and read the article on page 4. It may open your eyes both 
concerning juries and concerning barrooms. 



4 THE IDEA 

Obscene Pictures 
In Francioni's Bar 

Large Oil Paintings of Nude 

Women Decorate Hall Walls 

Yet Police Do Notliing 

FRANCIONI'S place, the entrance front of which is a bar 
with a restaurant attached, is on Broad Street, between 
First and Second Streets. Adjoining the main rocm is a 
hall on the walls of which are two large oil paintings, one, 
about ten or more feet tall by about five feet wide, which 
portrays a perfectly nude woman holding a large snake in 
her arms and entwined about her form. 

The serpent, howe\er, in no sense acts as a dress to con- 
ceal. 

A few feet away in the same room is another painting 
representing a woman reclining on a couch. This painting 
is perhaps four by eight feet or more. The figure is devoid 
of dress, except as to a gauzy veil which might as well not 
be there. 

When the writer visited this place, which is called by 
some a "political" bar, whatever that may mean, a city 

ofliicial was being served at the bar, and Mr. , who is 

frequently seen at city hall in the court rooms, where he 
serves on juries, and who was on the jury which, according 
to instructions of the court, awarded damages against THE 
IDEA in the Saunders libel suit, this man was sitting in the 
bar room taking life easy. 



THE IDEA 5 

Moreover, we are reliably informed that this Mr. Gardner 
stood out for large damages while five out of seven were in 
favor of no damages or, when the court ruled otherwise, of 
just nominal damages, one dollar or so. 

It is thus seen, to diverge from the subject of this article, 
that tho 5 out of 7 jurors may think a man innocent, still 
the opinion of the judge may decide him guilty and make 
him suffer accordingly. Moreover, it is also worth noting 
that it is this practice of frequently putting on juries fre- 
quenters of bar rooms that makes people say that in Rich- 
mond "juries are fixed", and those who have had experience 
with the courts here are continually coming to us and telling 
us by all means never to consent to letting a Richmond jury 
decide a case for us, as it is dangerous to our interests just 
because of such possibilities. 

But to return to the subject: This place, run by Francioni, 
which is decorated with obscene and vulgar and lewd pict- 
ures, is permitted by Major Werner, while THE IDEA must 
be suppressed for trying to make the police enforce the lav s 
against obscene and indecent expositions by arousing a sent- 
iment among the people in favor of law enforcement by 
telling them just how the police wink at the violations. 

Major Werner says we must not tell what they permit to 
exist for fear THE IDEA, the only paper in Richmond 
whose object is the moral betterment of the community, will 
corrupt somebody's morals, and yet Major Werner, whose 
officers inspect these bar rooms and make reports as to con- 
ditions, permits this flagrant law violation. 

Truly it seems that whiskey men can do anything in Rich- 
mond. Ex-Mayor McCarthy had a bar room broken up for 
keeping such pictures on the wall. 

Betides, a bar is the last place under the sun that should 
be permitted to display such nudity. 

. The fancy of a man inflamed with drink runs wild, and he 
sees, not only double, but in distorted vision, these unlawful 
sights which have no eflfect for good on even a sober man. 

Let Major Werner enforce the law against obscenity in 
the bars and red light districts and THE IDEA will of its 



6 THE IDEA 

own sweet will quit "corrupting the youth" and fold its 
tents of exposure of wrong and retire to more pleasant and 
profitable employment. 

Meantime THE IDEA will stand, as it has always stood, 
for law enforcement, despite the attempt of interested par- 
ties to becloud the issue by side questions and by discussions 
as to the wisdom of the laws and such tommy rot as "nec- 
essary evils." The term is in itself a lie. A necessary 
thing cannot be evil. Those who use the term admit it is 
an evil and thus admit it is "unnecessary" or else their 
brains are addled. 

And the moral to our rambling story is this: That in Rich- 
mond the whiskey men and the criminal dealer in the virtue 
of women are permitted by the police department to con- 
tinue in the most heinous crimes, while the one who dares 
tell on them in the interest of the morals of the youth of 
the city must be suppressed and jailed and assaulted and in- 
sulted and harassed and so maligned and Hbelled that the 
freedom of the press is but a name and the seal of the Old 
Dominion is forgotten in Richmond, proud home of rebellion 
and revolution against rotten and oppressive governments. 



!People Rebuke !PoNoc/c, 

^ *m * ^ 

JUNE 14th, was election day and following it the papers 
of the city in giving accounts of the election stated that 
Pollock got as many votes as the other candidates in his 
ward, and actually gave the number of votes supposed to 
have been polled. 

Now THE IDEA learns these published reports were 
false and that as a matter of fact Pollock ran behind the 
rest of the ticket in Madison Ward, altho those voting knew 
he would be elected as there was no opposition. Voters 
openly scratched Pollock's name and stated at the polls they 
would never vote for him, and yet the papers try to make 



THE IDEA 7 

it appear that the honest voters of Madison Ward who cast 
their ballots on the 14th, all voted for Gilbert Pollock. Then 
these same papers turn around and tell us that the people 
get just as good men as they v^^ant or deserve when they 
know that the people get just as evil men as these papers 
want them to have, because it is impossible to elect good 
men to office without the aid of these papers. 

Yet these same papers actually make good men beheve it 
is of no use to try to elect good men to office by making 
them believe that Gilbert Pollock got as many votes as oth- 
ers on election day. 

No; the cause for bad government in Richmond is not the 
voter, but is right in the offices of the owners of The Times- 
Dispatch and The News-Leader and The Journal, which, as 
watchmen, have given false reports of the night, and when 
the people have cried out to be warned, if any enemy ap- 
proached, they have refused to give the warning, becsuse 
they were in "cahoot" with the enemy; and the enemy has 
come and done his deadly work, and thus the blood of the 
people will be required at the hands of the watchmen. Truly 
the papers have many sins to answer for. 



Richmond Rotten at the Core 

Dr. McDaniel last Sunday preached against the evils of the city. 
The Times-Dispatch reported the morning sermon but would not 
dare print the evening one which "said things." 

He said; 'It is not pleasant for one to speak so plainly about the 
deplorab le conditions in the city that we love, but to kee p sil ent is a 
sin. To submit without a protest is to stifle conscience and betray a 
trust. The conditions which I saw convince me that Richmond is an 
apple beautiful without but rotting at the core. The social impurity 
and moral degradation are indescribable and unspeakable." 

Since writing the article on page 13, we learn that the movement 
started to do something for better Richmond has not been dropped, 
but will yet wake up and clean up the political and moral rottenness 
of the city. 



THE IDEA 



Reputation 
Assassinated by 
News-Leader 

Paper Publishes Libelous Report Concern- 
ing Prof* Sturgis^ Principal Chimborazo 
School^ and Then Refuses To Make 
Correction After Seeing Mistake 

Recalls Times-Dispatch's Unwarranted Publication 
Concerning The Idea. 



PERHAPS the one evil, which has caused more unhappi- 
ness and bitterness in Richmond than any other outside 
of the whiskey evil, is the false publication evil of some of 
the Richmond daily papers. These papers do not hesitate 
to blacken, irreparably, a man's reputation, with no founda- 
tion, whatever, for their outrageous treatment, if by so do- 
ing they can make a yellow journal story that will sell 
their paper to a sensation loving public. 

Just recently The News-Laeder, under date of June 9th, 
published, in bold headlines, at top of the first page a 
story concerning the alleged brutal actions of one of Rich- 
mond's most high-toned gentlemen teachers. Prof. Sturgis, 
the principal of the Chimborazo High School. 



THE IDEA 9 

One can imagine the feelings of Prof. Sturgis on Thursday 
afternoon when he read the "s;coop" in the evening paper 
charging him with being a brute, i. e. with ha^ing "inflict- 
ed brutal punishment," altho it appears that The News- 
Leader got its version of the affair from the city hall and 
not from a single soul that had witnessed the whipping un- 
less it relied on the boy whipped. 

Certainly none of the teachers of the school were inter- 
viewed nor was the Professor himself. A prominent mer- 
chant who knows Professor Sturgis intimately, describes 
him as being a most mild mannered, hightoned gentleman 
of exceptional ability and gentility, and a man of most 
refined and sensitive nature. 

Yet The Leader published to the world that this man was 
"brutal", and then, when, the next day, it was found that 
Prof. Sturgis had done his duty and the father of the boy 
stated to the school board that he was satisfied to let the 
matter drop, because the charge was not true; this same pa- 
per absolutely refused to correct its false report. We 
learn that the paper has been acquainted with all the facts 
and that they know that Prof. Sturgis was not guilty as 
they painted him, and yet not one word have they said in 
retraction, but are willing to let this damaging report, 
which may actually ruin, financially, this man, go uncor- 
rected, all because they prefer not to admit they have done 
wrong. 

Thus do these molders of public opinion in Richmond make 
or destroy a man at will regardless of the untold suffering 
such false charges will continue to give to a wife and child- 
ren and the man himself. 

There is another Httle incident in connection with this af- 
fair which is v^orth noticing, and that is that it is reported 
that Gilbert Pollock and W. P. Leaman and John Crutchfield 
together made an examination of the back of the boy. Let 
him that hath ears hear and understand for hereby hang 
many tails. 



Get ready for the glorious 4th of July. 



10 THE IDEA 



Nolle Pressed 



Which, being interpreted is, ^We admit that we gave 
you a dirty deal and we want to get out of it before 
we lose our jobs by it/* 

Case Against A* A* Yoder Quashed In 
Hustings Courts June 2Jst. 

ON last Tuesday, June 21st, Commonwealth's Attorney, 
Folkes, arose in the Hustings Court and stated, "After 
carefully considering" the case of the Commonwealth 
against A. A. Yoder he had decided to nolle pross it. It 
will be remembered that this is the case in which the de- 
fendant was charged by Chief of Police, Werner, on war- 
rant, with circulating matter "tending to corrupt the mor- 
als of the youth." 

In Crutchfield's court, after a complete farce of a trial in 
which the only witness introduced showed how maliciously 
he, the chief, had blundered, the judge instead of throwing 
the case out of court, very harshly vented his spleen against 
the defendant in an utterly uncalled for tirade and enteitd 
a fine of $100, a jail sentence of 30 days and a bond of $500 
to keep the peace, altho, even if the editor had been guilty, 
he had not broken the peace and therefore could not legally 
be put under bond to keep it. On that occasion Common- 
wealth's Attorney, Folkes, made a bitter speech denouncing 
the defendant. Now he comes forward and admits that he 
had no case. 

Now we want to know what excuse this man has to offer 
for having a man sentenced to jail and heavily fined when 
the commonwealth had no case against him. We want to 
know why he did not "carefully consider" before the barm 
was done. The damage has now been wTOught and it has 



THE IDEA 11 

been published to the world that the editor of this paper is 
an immoral man whose writings should be suppressed be- 
cause they "corrupt the youth." Why did he not "consid- 
er" before harming and actually hurting the health of an 
innocent wife who has spent three weeks in bed, largely as 
a result of that unjust action of "The Commonwealth" 
(God save the commonwealth) in the persons of Louis Wer- 
ner and Minitree Folkes, who would suppress THE IDEA 
because it showed them up as ^iolating their oaths of office. 

THE IDEA would enquire whether it is not high time to 
rid the community of men who would do such a foul deed 
and that too in the name of the state of Virginia whose proud 
history they have shamed. 

THE IDEA would enquire whether John Crutchfield 
should longer be permitted to preside over the police court 
where through malice or ignorance he can blight the repu- 
tation and destroy the liberty and happiness of those so un- 
fortunate as to have to appear before him. THE IDEA 
would enquire, how about the innumerable cases of injustice 
of this court which THE IDEA has exposed and the count- 
less number which we have not even heard of who have dai- 
ly had grievous burdens to bear and long jail sentences to 
endure because they did not know how to appeal or had not 
the money to employ a lawyer. 

In the name of all that is decent THE IDEA calls on the 
citizens today, as it did long before its editor had ever felt 
in person the weight of unjust decisions, to blot out forever 
this outrage which, in the name of justice, is daily perpe- 
trated in the police court of Richmond. 

Let no one think that THE IDEA alone is persecuted. 
The stench of this court has spread all over the nation. 

We do not know whether it is the state of his health or 
the disposition and habits of a lifetime, (most Hkely both) 
that has rendered this man incapable of being a just judge. 
We have been sent to jail for a former criticism of this 
court and we stand today to say that every word of that 
criticism was tme, and, as occasion may demand, we will 
reiterate it, and we propose to stand for the right just as 
long as breath shall last however much we be lied against 
by newspapers which fear the truth, or courts or police or 
officials whose acts cannot stand the light of day. 



12 THE IDEA 

Extracts of an Act of the General 
Assembly of Virginia 

Approved March 12, J 906 



Sec. 5. Any interest charged by the lender to the bor- 
rower in excess of the present legal rate of interest, or any 
fee, fine or charge whatever charged by the lender against 
the borrower, whether for negotiating a loan or for com- 
missions, examinations, attorney's fee, or any other bonus, 
or additional charge whatsoever, to those allowed in section 
four of this act, shall be considered as a payment on the 
principal of said loan, and the same shall be ciedited with 
the additional charge or excess, and the license of the per- 
son, firm or corporation making such additional or excessive 
charge may,- in the discretion of the Circuit Court of the 
county or Corporation Court of the corporation wherein 
such business was licensed, be revoked. 



Two old cronies went into a drug store in the down town 
part of New York City, and, addressing the proprietor 
by his first name, one of them said: 

"Dr. Charley, we have made a bet of the ice-cream sodas. 
We will have them now, and when the bet is decided the 
loser will drop in and pay for them." 

As the old fellows were departing after enjoying their 
tomperance beverage, the druggist asked them what the 
wager was. 

"Well," said one of them, "our friend George bets that 
when the tower of the Singer Building falls, it will topple 
over toward the North River, and I bet that it won't."— Ex. 



THE IDEA 13 



A Question 



1^ 



In the name of many men who have asked us the question, 
we desire to put the question to the committee of five ap- 
pointed by the meeting at Seventh Street Christian Church 
sometime ago, — What has become of the movement protest- 
ing against municipal evils? 

There are many who would like to know. We know that 
the members of that committee have been seen by the ene- 
my, but we are not yet willing to believe that a few smooth 
words have converted them to silence, as The News-Leader 
reports. 

In the name of the great body of the people who desire 
better conditions here, we desire to state that the moral 
forces of the community are looking to that committee to 
DO SOMETHING, and they do not believe in pleasing the ene- 
mies of righteousness by waiting for "a more convenient 
season." 



WATCH AND CHAIN 

Prize for Petersburg Boys 

T. C. Jones, No. 101 W. Washington Street, will have THE 
IDEA for sale in Petersburg in the future and boys may get 
copies from him at 3c. a copy. 

A Petersburg merchant has kindly offered to give a watch 
and chain to the boy who sells the greatest number of Ideas 
in the month of June. Boys, get busy! This means money 
for you whether you win the prize or not, and one of you 
must win. 

Let us print your tickets for your Sunday School and Moonlight 
excursions. The Idea Print Shop is doing some of the prettiest 
printing you ever saw. Phone us today for prices. Monroe 2708. 



14 THE IDEA 

BLACKMAIL 

D* H* Tolman and Other Loan 
Sharks Who Violate the Law 



THIS Salary Loan business is the most ingenious and re- 
lentless system of blackmail and extortion appearirg 
in our present civilization. It is a crafty ad\ant£ge of the 
need of honest men taken by unscrupulous rroney-lendeis. 

. Every salaried man and every salaried 

man's v^ife should read and remember. — Editorial in Pear- 
son's Magazine. 

D. H. Tolman, who conducts a salary loan business on 
Main Street, is called "The Emperor of American Salary 
Loan Sharks." Starting with a small capital he has become 
a multi-millionaire by his illegal , business of charging exor- 
bitant interest on loans to poor men. 

"One of Tolman's sons, who conducts the Cleveland 
branch, was convicted of usury in the Ohio Circuit Court, 
and was only saved from the penitentiary by a successful 
appeal to the higher courts." 

Tolman operates offices in sixty-eight cities and the papers 
and pulpits of many of these cities are exposing him and 
fighting against his unlawful taking advantage of unfortu- 
nate people who are deceived into borrowing money from 
him. 

His seductive advertisements lure men into his offices by 
promising "easy payments", "without security", etc. 

One Richmond young man, in need of money to pay doc- 
tor's bills, etc., borrowed from Tolman's agency $31.25 and 
was induced to sign five notes, to be paid monthly, for $9.45 
each. 



THE IDEA 15 

On later calculating the cost he found that he was 
paying more than 200 per cent, per annum. Now there is a 
clear cut law in Virginia against this robbing the poor, but 
the average poor man can't get a lawyer to help him out of 
trouble, so when he refuses to pay the exorbitant rate he is 
quickly haled into court, and because he is not prepared to 
fight, the loan shark wins and the poor man's furniture is 
sold to pay the rich robber of the poor. 

Just the other day, four separate judgments were render- 
ed in the civil justice's court in the city hall against poor 
people in favor of these extortionists. 

This is occurring almost daily in the city of Richmond, 
and yet none of the daily papers or religious papers are tak- 
ing the side of the poor and oppressed and exposing this 
awful condition of affairs. Men commit suicide and women 
and children starve for want because their earnings go to 
these wealthy robbers who, somehow or other manage, tho 
doing an unlawful business, to win their cases in court. 

And remember that perhaps fifteen of these concerns are 
doing a thriving business in this city. 

When a salaried clerk gets into the meshes of these men's 
nets he has to keep paying for fear if he does not he will lose 
his position by having his boss know of his borrowing. And 
young men who have been posted tell us that foremen in 
some of the large establishments of this city act as agents 
of these illegal money lenders and when a man is turned off 
and goes to the office for his pay, he finds the loan shark 
already there with his note, which is deducted from his sal- 
ary before he gets the balance due him. 



WHY? 



There are still some people in Richmond, we are told, who 
condemn the writer because, before going to housekeeping 
he stopped at the Park Hotel, the only prominent hotel in 
the city which did not have a bar room in connection with 
it. 

Wonder what they would have said if we had stopped at 
Murphy's. 



16 THE IDEA 

jCoan ohar/cs 



Dispatches from Atlanta tell of the crusade against salary Loan 
Sharks being carried on by the press and the pulpit and the police. 
Why can not Richmond do likewise and put away these blood suck- 
ers that infest the city and live off the poor from whom they wrest 
their scant earnings. 

Let the daily papers and the preachers take up the fight. 

The Idea has done the pioneer work but needs the help of the 
preachers and the papers. 

We'll pay some one a neat commission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St., Phone Monroe 2708. 



7)o 2/ou Shave? 

Dull Safety Razor Blades sharpened 2 1-2 cents each; Old 
Style Razors Honed and Set 15 cents each; Carving, Butch- 
er and Pocket Krjives 10 and 15 cents each; Scissors Ground 
10 and 15 cents each; Razors concaved 35 cents; Clippers 
Sharpened 35 cents. 

All Kinds of Edg:ed Tools Sharpened by Experts. 
WORK GUARANTEED 

THE ^^SHARP-0^^ CO. 

608 East Main Street 



We Want 
Your Printing 



uhe Sdea ^rint Shop 



IS NOW LOCATED AT 

J I 06 Capitol Street 

IN THE OLD FORD HOTEL BUILDING 
JUST ONE BLOCK FROM THE PLACE WHERE WE ALL GET 
FAKED, VIZ. : THE CITY HALL 



J^etp the Work of Ctean/n^r !/iichmond 

BY PHONING US TODAY TO COME 
BY AND GIVE YOU PRICES 

PHONE. MONROE 2V08 



MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

!^arbour ^n^ffy Company 

\a/hoi_e:sai_e manufacturers 
South i^oston, Vir^finia 











If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

j^oenni^er^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Vol. IV July 9, 1910 No. 2b 

THE ^ IDEA 

A SIGN OF THB TIMES 

Who Lied? 

Folkes and Crutchfield Scored 

Dr* McDaniers Sermons 

Police Board Guilty 

Robbing the Dead 

Jury Duty Degenerated 

Richmond Justice 



5 CENTS A COPY $1.00 A YEAR 

Being some sermonettes published Bi-Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
llOS Capitol Street, Richmond. Virginia. ••■-''- --"" --^^^^ - -^--tM-m 



I JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN I 

i 



; - ; 7th AND MAIN STS. 

M\ i We are showing sj^ecial good vahies in , 4. « 

§ % , 2)iamondj, ^Lfaichec^^ jewelry ^ 9 § 

1 Silverware* Cut Slass, utc. \ 



We invite your inspection 
QDaHDo&<aH>ao<BH>ct><aBE>o[>an9>cD<saE>c!C>i><ae>QE>«aK>cO><aH>CD<aB>o!>ciiBDCD«iE><!DaEa>GO 

0!><BBD<iD<iaD<iD<^BD<3l><BH><l4*l>^Hi>C!>aaB8>Cu4aD<!D(^BDai><SBB>C<{«E><BB>C!><B&aDCD<BHD<3DaBE>«0 

! Print it Right. 



I 

I Leave your Job Printing at Th^ Idea office. The Idea 

1 Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
I roe 2708, ,^^ ,.,. ^. ^, 

a _ • - ' M 

Qf><aiK>OI><aH><)!><^K><ii>C^K><i4*<><3nE>C!><Bi0>CD<gH>C!><anE)<iO<3Z9a>O<}'O<3aR><3[><S3E>Ct>C9^SQ!><BaD<iO 

^ ■ ^ 

i HEA DQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet ^ 
^ _ _ ^ 

k wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ ^ 

^ Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, \ 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisite:, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

- A. H. ROBINS, - J 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy. Madison 5272. ^ 

'9 



AlCTl 3\VV 









I 



X4v 



;;aidp=P^ 



Jfeq' Wr ^ y 



f#= 






^--.f i-fn-irfv. n; /■■iNo.,26 



^iSs^J*=iaSii^& 



■■■-^.4- 



■^iw : ^^ o C":fiting4- 






k, ^♦..Eq^tqred asseoqjid clfiss mail matter T\»h^ 10, IQO^, Richmond, Vii;ginia, ." 



'51 A? vIHT i{'.Vn_iTSiO«:i oFj'i 















(•-7 



'I .il) Oi ji;>o^il'' aj 



"^N ' M^NivAY-, June 27,th, The i TimeerDiarijatch ( ha(i afi 
editorial entitled * 'Sunday': in Richmond'.',, Jp which 
•3tha.t paper took) occasion; to ;refiKr>t<)AA^hatit termed "tl^^ 
well nigh complete .cessation of^ all worldly .fmploj''m;€nt;S'^, 
while the writer of these lines, tho he knew an exactly op- 
posite condition existedl but ^til]., . not having fully realized 
just how far the law'was opeiiiy Violated, made a tcur of 
inspection and found, to his'utter amazement, not only diug 
-Vtdr^d^Wd' coiifectionetks- wide Open andemploying eijttra 
•'help to supply the young with tobaccos, anddrinks, behind 
^Whaded'dooTs and windows, butheialso found grocery stores 
vtflung- wide open and proprietors in their week day garb 
"■s'ell&g'^y thing and everything' absolutely 'regardless of the 
'law and with no attempt at 'concealment. In spite of all 
^hts> The Times-Dispatch editorial stated further, "We do 
not believe that there is a town in the. country where there 



2 THE IDEA 

is a better disposition to obey the law, .... where 
there is less regard for the carnal, and where men and 
women live more uprightly." 

Truly the garrulous old lady of Bank Street must be losing" 
her eyesight or her mentality must be affected by the mint 
juleps which her whiskey paper delights so much to praise. 

We hate to believe she deliberately lies. In the very same 
issue of the "Supreme*' is an account of Dr. MeDaniel's 
sermon in which he gives some of the causes of what he 
termed one week before, the moral rottenness of Rich- 
mond. Dr. McDaniel, and Dr. McDaniel with the canny 
Scottish name, is regarded as a conservative and not a sen- 
sational preacher, finds the city rotting at the core and 
her streets filled with "lovers of pleasure rather than lovers 
of God", while the big Richmond paper, with its imported 
editor, finds a cessation of worldly employments and a 
disposition to obey the law and little REGARD FOR the car- 
nal. m4 \A/ 

Now, "Somebody falsified to me*' and^knowing what we 
do, it was not Dr. McDaniel. We believe in boosting the 
town in which we live, but we don't believe in descending- 
to deceit to do it. When a paper deliberately discredits a 
preacher of the gospel by false, contradictory editorials, 
thus undoing the work of the ministry, then it is time the 
people were consigning the paper and its editor to limbo or 
South Carolina or some other hot place. 



Newspaper Liars* 

Some newspaper men are terrible liars. In writing of a 
cyclone out west one of them said it turned a well inside 
out, a cellar upside down, moved a township line, blew the 
staves out of a whiskey barrel and left nothing but a bung 
hole, changed the day of the week, blew a mortgage off the 
farm, blew the cracks out of the fence and what was still 
more unreasonable, knocked the wind out of a politician. — 
Sandy Valley News. 



THE IDEA 



Richmond Justice 



TT now seems that the little leaven which Editor Yoder, of 
•*• The Idea, hid in the Richmond measure of meal is leav- 
ening the whole mass. The mustard seed which Yoder 
planted has grown into a tree toward which the birds are 
flocking wherein to build their nests. 

Yoder it seems, according to a communication to the 
Richmond Journal, was "jailed for a truthful (an undenia- 
ble verity) description of most deplorable conditions exist- 
ing in the city" (Richmond). The communication fuither 
states that "the officers of the law who permit such condi- 
tions go scott-free," and characterizes this part of the pro- 
ceedings as "absolutely absurd, amusingly ridiculous, in- 
conceivably inconsistent," etc. 

To the legal mind it would seem far stranger that Yoder 
should be judged by one of the very men whom he had ac- 
cused — should be convicted on the "opinion" of the very 
man whom he had charged with being derelict in his duty. 
For it was on the "opinion" of Richmond's chief of police 
that the language Yoder used in one of his charges against 
that chief ought not to be printed, that Yoder was con^ ict- 
ed. From the accounts of that trial which come to our no- 
tice, we cannot learn that the truth of Yoder's charges was 
ever denied. 

But Yoder has done his work. The better element has 
united. A mass meeting is to be called. The voice of the 
people is to be heard. Meanwhile it behoves all parties who 
have prominently appeared on the stage of action, to re- 
member that no man should be punished for the opinions of 
another, and that — 

"No man should sit in judgment in his own case."— Ex, 



We'll pay som'e one a neat commission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shops 1106 Capitol St., Phone Monroe 2708. 



4: THE IDEA 

Jufy ERity^ Degener algji O 

In Richmond/ Men Make Jury Service 

Since the article in our last; issfu^e,, i-eferring, to Mr. jGardi* 
n0r as being frequently pn the jvirjes of the City HaU Gpurts 
we passed by the Circuit Court room June 21^ and 031 lookini^ 
in, whom shpi^l4 ^e see l^ut Mr, ,tJardner sitting onii^r;y ip 

that court? _ ,.-:i;j;n.aoj t>.dT .{D:io:ndoiii> ''vjio yiij ni ^l 

Now, get th^se incidents together. Mr. Gaiidn^r|w^§^Ui^ 
man on the jury that tried the Saunders libel case. wli<^ 
stood out for Jarge dan;iages. Mr,, Gardnp^: is often-see^J]p( 
city hall court rooms, appareijUy waiting, fof a job, .Mr.^ 
Gardner w&s sitting in Francioni's .bar, t^lf ing, it easy, 1^ ben 
the writer ir^spect^d that place; and discovered tli^e indecen^ 
picture^ describee^ in thejiasli nypaber, M;ri ;PS^^.4^-^i^e!?&^ 
on jury duty Junp,21st, in the Circuit Court ^i •,,,,-{,:,, .^^r-rt 
^ We are reliably informed that Mr. Gardner |s yery^t^ft^ 
on Richmond juries. , . , ; , .;. , , i , ;. -,.-,, 

Now, it is^ just this , frequent , serving on juries, of s^^Q^ 
men as this, who hang around city hall and apparently hayg 
nothing else to do, that has brought Kichmopd courts into 
disrepute, and has coined the phrase, "professional jurors.',' 

THE IDEA wants, to register a^ kick against having a suit 
for $25,000 decided against hin;i by a man of this kind. ,, ^ 

We do not think it necessary to draw any further inferr 
euces from.tJiese facts, but we wJU state this; that there are 
those herein Richmond, ^^ho, say that Mr, Gardner, who 
evidently, from his actions frequents these cpurts for the 
money there is in it, could not afford to decide in a way-dis- 
pleasing to the powers that be. 

The state x)f affairs depicted in this article isy perhaps the 
most serious THE IDEA has yet been called upon to dfselos^^ 



THE IDEA 5 

It is high time that the sovereign citizens of the city were 
demanding of the papers of the city, to whom they look to 
post them as to their affairs, that they cease their criminal 
negligence before our courts are entirely, as some already 
say they are, in the hands of special interests and crooked 
politicians. 



A Hot Potato 

Folkes and Crutchfield Scored 
"Not Fit To Hold Office" 

^^Spineless Richmond Papers/^ 

^^Fatherly Maliciousness of Justice Crutchfield'^ 



(The Bedford Bulletin of June SOth, has some pointed 
things to say about Richmond officials and papers. It would 
be well for Richmond people to read carefully and see how 
outsiders look on the lawless procedure of the capitol city. — 
Editor.) 

"The case against Adon A. Yoder has been nolle prossed 
in the Richmond Hustings Court and dismissed. As stated 
in the Bulletin some time ago, this case has always looked 
like police persecution. Yoder said things the officials did 
not like, and they started out to use their official power to 
break him up. He had also said things the spineless Rich- 
mond papers did not like and they stood by and rooted for 
the "breakers". The whole affair, however, never had a 



6 THE IDEA 

leg to stand on, and after all the great speech of Common- 
wealth's Attorney Folkes in the Magistrate's court, and 
after all the "fatherly" maliciousness of Justice Crutchfield 
in hammering a man with an excoriating lecture while the 
pDiie3 figaratively held him pinioned without power of 
retaliation, they have dropped the case like a hot potato. 
Either the prosecuting attorney wilfully persecuted Yoder 
before the justice or he was wilfully false to his duty in his 
statement in the Husting Court. In either case he is not fit 
to hold public office and remain a servant of the people, and 
the police iydge is in exactly the same position. " 



Police Board Guilty 

Rough House On Mayo Street 



Some time since, a stranger with a large roll of money on 
his person, dropped into Richmond and was lured into a 
house, on Mayo Street, operated by one Laura Turner. 

The story goes that while there he was doped and beaten 
into insensibility and robbed of his roll of money, amount- 
ing to between three and four hundred dollars. When he 
came to his senses, he was pretty badly battered up, and it 
is said he could not "navigate" at all but had to be removed 
to a hospital, where, after about three weeks, he sufficiently 
recovered to get out on crutches and find a magistrate, be- 
fore whom he swore out a warrant against one Laura Turn- 
er for selling whiskey without a license and for maintaining 
a disorderly house. 

So in execution of the warrant, said Laura Turner was 
arrested, but before the case came to trial the stranger man 
had disappeared, and rumor has it that he got his money 



THE IDEA 7 

back before his departure. It is pointed out that it is cheap- 
er for a keeper of such a place to pay for such losses sus- 
tained when there is danger of a trial than to submit to a 
case in court, for these women know that according to law 
they have no right to operate and that it is but by the kindly 
permission of the police department that they can exist and 
flourish off the bounty which wealth pays for professional 
crime. Meantime the case has been postponed fromi time 
to time and no one expects it e\ er to come up. Thus the 
real facts will not be made public. 

Now, the point to be made is this; that THE IDEA'S 
claim that this red light district is nothing but a hot-bed of 
crime is true; that instead of lessening crime this district 
only furnishes a place for crime to flourish; that the pro- 
tection, in crime, of these women, by the police board, con- 
trary to all law, is not only a violation of their oaths of 
office, but is a direct sanction of all manner of devilment, 
and is a bid for vice to increase its hold on the community. 

These women are not only openly engaged in the most de- 
basing vice a woman can fall into, but they put the police 
department in the position of openly encouraging murder, 
robbery and felon j-, because in breaking these latter up 
they would have to be breaking that which they are licens- 
ing and thus acknowledge themselves in error. So what do 
we find? We find these other crimes committed and no one 
punished and the protected dive still enjoying the fatherly 
protection of the police board, headed by the mayor, all of 
whom took a solemn oath to break up all such houses of ill 
fame, is thus morally and legally to be held to account for 
all the kindred crimes committed with their acquiesence. 



Writer^s Cramp 



"Pa, what is writer's cramp ? " 

'"It's being cramped for mone\', my son. All writers suffer from 
it." — Red Hen, 



THE IDEA 



Rich Undertakers. 

Robbing the Dead* 
Richmond Undertakers Trust* 

Undertakers Increase the Cost of Funerals 

By Getting In the Council and then 

Ask about Six Prices for Burial 

Caskets* 



w 



''HILE all who have had occasion to deal with the un- 
dertakers of Richmond realize that they have to p£y 
an exorbitant price for burial caskets, still since deaths are 
not frequent occurrences in any families they do not know 
that in Richmond there is practically an undertakers' trust, 
the members of which, including nearly all the establish- 
ments of the city, maintain by agreement, excessive prices 
for funerals. 

It is a well known fact among those who have investigat- 
ed that all of the big undertaking establishments charge 
125 or more dollars for a $50.00 casket. 

Four of these big undertakers are members of the city 
council and that is considered by many as a reason for the 
fact that no laws are enacted regulating the cost of funer- 
als and curtailing these excessive fees. Just recently one 
undertaker drew up, and got another to present in the coun- 
cil, an ordinance which is still pending in that body, increas- 
ing the charge for hack hire at funerals from $3.00 to $3.50. 

Almost every way one turns in looking into Richmond 



THE IDEA 9 

law making, one finds special interests in the council who go 
there largely, and often solely, to have laws made to suit 
their special business. There are many such laws on the 
Richmond statute books which practically legalize robbery 
on the part of special privileged classes. 

There is on the table before us a newspaper clipping, show- 
ing how a municipal court jury in Chicago cut in two the 
charge of an undertaker who was getting rich off the igno- 
rance of the poor as to the cost of caskets. The undertaker 
admitted that a casket costing $53.50 was billed to mourning 
relatives at $400.00. 

We are informed that here in Richmond the same kind of 
practice goes on and it is getting so that a man can't afford 
even to die. 

Likewise ugly rumors are going around concerning the 
burial of the dead from the hospitals. 

A certain councilman, who is an undertaker, gets nearly 
all the business from these places and in some instances 
even before the relatives can have any say whatever in the 
matter. We have made some careful inquiry into this mat- 
ter and the whole thing looks exceedingly ugly to us, and it 
looks like it pays some people very handsomely to be in the 
council. 

When our investigation into this phase of the burial busi- 
ness is complete we expect to make public some startling 
discoveries. 

In regard to the hack hire matter, it is of interest to know 
that four of the five councilmen undertakers are also inter- 
ested in the ownership of hacks as well, Mr. Fred Richard- 
son alone of the five not being so interested. 

Now as to the cost of funerals, it is learned that a casket 
the cost of which complete is less than $20.00 is charged for 
by these undertakers at the rate of $50.00, besides other 
services. 

One casket which cost the director less than $60.00 com- 
plete was billed at $350.00 and the bill was paid. 

It is even stated that all members of the Richmond Fun- 
esal Directors Association agree to certain minimum rates 



10 THE IDEA 

to be charged, thus effecting a combine to hold up the price 
so that they are thus able to make exorbitant profits on all 
caskets sold. It is a notable fact that the undertakers of 
Richmond are all getting rich, or rather have most of them 
all gotten rich in the business of fleecing people when they 
are least able to bear it. If there is one time when a man 
needs money most it is at the death of a member of his fam- 
ily; the doctor is to be paid, the nurse is to be paid and the 
druggist is to be paid, besides much time has often been 
lost from work and the income is sometimes completely cut 
out. With all this to bear it is unpardonable that undertak- 
ers should conspire to make him pay five or six prices for a 
decent burial, just because there exists a trust in the burial 
business. 

It is high time that these politicians who love the people 
so much at election time, were doing something for the poor 
by starting a public investigation into the high cost of dying. 

If one wants to really make Rome howl, just let him offer 
such a resolution in the council and then watch how under- 
takers' friends bury the bill for favors rendered by the un- 
dertakers in getting through favored legislation for them. 

One has only to watch these members of the city council 
in their various committee meetings to get disgusted with 
their methods of doing business. They vote wath a remark- 
able unanimity on nearly all questions of importance and it 
certainly looks like a case of "I tickle you, you tickle me", 
while the poor man becomes poorer and the rich man richer. 



Councilmanic Graft 



The story comes from the Fairmount recently annexed 
territory that a certain councilman who is a contractor had 
a contract for some w^ork over in that section and that he 
sent no sand along for the job. When the time came for the 
sand his helpers were seen out in the streets gathering up 
city sand, which is contrary to law. A citizen passing by 



THE IDEA 11 

asked the employees of the contractor if they did not know 
that it was against the law to take sand from the streets, 
to which one of the workmen replied, ' 'That don't make any 
difference, the boss is a member of the council, and they 
won't get him." 



The Police Department 



Horse Graft 



Some time ago we told the story of the police department buying 
horses for $165 and giving a check for $175.00 in payment therefor. 
Soon after our publication a policeman called at THE IDEA office 
and said to our foreman he could tell something about that affair. 
The writer was not in and not having heard any more from the 
policeman this is written to ask if any one can give us any light 
on the matter. If there is no graft here we want to know it. 

The silence of the police board makes it look like a genuine case of 
somebody getting $10.00 of the tax payers' money on each horse thus 
sold. 

If there is no stealing going on, it's up to the police department to 
let the people know all about the shady transaction. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only a dollar a year on the bi- 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 

See the next number of THE IDEA for a real live article on 
Justice John. 

UAe ^dea iPrint Shop's S^hone 

IS 

MONROE 2TOS 

GO RIGHT NOW AND CALL UP YODER AND ASK HIM TO COME 
BY AND SEE IF YOU HAVE NOT SOME PRINTING FOR HIM 



12 THE IDEA 



Hurt Richmond? 



What do you think of that low born con'imercialism that 
would refuse to clean up Richmond just because the clean- 
ing up makes public how vile Richmond has gotten? The 
papers state that Dr. McDaniel said last Sunday night that 
his sermons had been criticised because they might "hurt 
Richmond." After all, that's the only reason THE IDEA 
has not met with the approval of the "business interests." 
It's because it hurts some of their businesses to turn the 
light on. 



Norfolk Editor Answered 

"I understand that a Norfolk editor says that all this talk 
about Richmond is not so, but I explain that by answering 
that if a man left here to live in Norfolk, no wonder he 
thinks Richmond is likeheaven."— Times-Dispatch's Report 
Dr. McDaniel's sermon last Sunday. 



In a letter from Lynchburg recently the finest mother in 
the world wrote, "Does not McDaniel expect a fine and a 
lock up for his Sunday Sermon ?" A- friend tells us to an- 
swer that the Dr. is safe as the One John is a member of 
his church. 

But seriously, it is only by vicarious suffering that great 
good is accomplished and it would be a great day for Rich- 
mond if the citizens could be aroused to a realization of act- 
ual conditions, even at the expense of putting some preach- 
er in jail for telling the truth. About two years ago a 
preacher was arrested on Broad Street for preaching against 
the sins of Richmond, and just as sure as any preacher gets 
at the real bottom of Richmond's crookedness he will have 
to go to jail for it. We dare any one to try it. 



TOEJDJBAr 13 

A Word from Judge^ Lindsay, 

of Denver. 

^'rnsdT wo nS[l ! ^.^-^ — ^H tbdT ^Q.'' 

I know now thatrwhatever attempts- tnay be made to dis- 
credit ms, in the future, by the organization of vice and pow- 
^ that will try to crush me here, as it has crushed so mkriy 
before me, the cause for which we have fought will not h^ 
imperiled; All the efforts of ,| bribed, juries and boughf 
judges —with the power of wealth impelling the villainiejB 
pf weakness, with the functions of the state so often in th§ 
hands of the agents of injustice— will not be sufficient tf 
injure the cause, whatever injury it may succeed in doing 
to any advocate. The. individual is of no importance — hif 
success or h,is failure, his happiness , or his suffeiring, his 
t^riumph or his disgrace. But the cause in\^lves jt(feej^§i^<?fi<^ 
,or the failure of our wonderful deniocracy — r. ggennstioi 

We are, movipg fo^rward agair^st ; evil, against injustic^^ 
,Our,success is as sure as our cause is just. No conspiracy 
of confusion or corruption can long delay it. No person^ 
defeat can, now so much as retard it. The people of thif 
gQUijtry are still "right"; they are for the right; andc^g 
gigt)^ pause, once they endorse it, is resistible. We SHA^j^ 

^^^■§ar3d ^^ilsuDBia ais YSflt aB b9a9jri -aitn9 sd :ton bluow 
ei 9:§b9[woni{ -xv^f^i^^ Wr* ^ "il^^ £^' a^' ; ■ *^rs:0D b9n9irfsif 
;ti li^nu Ii79 1 WcH Worm the r HCC [ briB ,i9woq 

asff Av^ai aHT / j| iz-ih at 

^ '3 f!'TR^'Ide&t'*^wMch heretofore has beenpiabhshed ^egki":^ 
fet' Richmond, will hereafter be issued bi-weekly. The Idia 
contains good reaiding, and especially some of it is pretty 
t:J warm, stuff", im regai^d - to the doings in our capitol cityl 
It should have a wide circulation throughout this state 41 
weir:BS:3the city lof Ilichmond. The price of The Idea is only 
$L'00 a.yeai* and is well worth the price. —The Mecklenburg- 
Times. . , . - . ._,../... ... ; 



14 THE IDEA 

A Sermonette 

^^By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them 



ft 



WE would ask those who have censured THE IDEA so 
much for its method of attack on evils whether they 
do not think we are more than justified by the results at- 
tained. Does any one think that the preachers of Richmond 
would have ever been able to see how evil the life of the 
city is, if THE IDEA had not told them, especially since 
the other papers were continually telling them otherwise. 
Just Monday before last, The Times-Dispatch had an edito- 
rial calculated to make people believe that Richmond is the 
purest city to be found, while on another page was an ac- 
count of Dr. McDaniel's sermon on the cause of Richmond's 
rottenness, which he had so truly depicted a week before 
when he said that Richmond was rotten to the core. 

We claim not to be immodest and we trust it will not be 
considered that we have over-stepped the bounds of modesty 
when we state our belief that were it not for this paper these 
sermons on municipal evils would never have been preached 
as they are being preached all over the city and the people 
would not be enlightened as they are gradually being en- 
lightened concerning the evil at their doors. Knowledge is 
power, and Richmond can never rid herself of evil until it 
is first kept informed concerning its evil. THE IDEA has 
turned on the light. That very turning on of the light has 
already sent many of the powers of darkness to cover, and 
now that the preachers are taking up the fight it is hoped 
they will continue until there will be no work for THE 
IDEA to do. 

In leaving the First Baptist Church, after one of Dr. 
McDadiel's recent sermons, a prominent official of another 
church said, ' 'McDaniel won't keep his job long if he keeps 



THE IDEA 15 

up at that rate. His people will get rid of him." THE 
IDEA thinks that that is not true, but that altho it is un- 
safe for preachers to be bold in many of the churches, still 
we believe that statement is a libel on the First Church. If 
that statement is true, then Richmond is more rotten than 
Dr. McDaniel or THE IDEA either has ever dared depict it. 

Dr. McDaniel shocked and offended some who heard him, 
and THE IDEA has never been ashamed to plead guilty to 
the charge of offending the senses of some, but it is better 
far to offend the delicate sensibilities of some than to per- 
mit evils to grow, under our very noses, to damn and de- 
stroy our youth and undermine and corrupt the morals of 
the entire community. Richmond has already sunk so far 
in crime that we sincerely believe that nothing but the 
millenium itself will ever cure it. 

The political and moral and social life of the community 
has been so corrupted that the very constitution of the city 
has been weakened and Richmond of itself cannot recover 
itself. 



It takes courage to work on in silence, and wait, perhaps, 
until after you are dead for the justification of your acts 
which nobody understands and which you can not explain 
without injuring another. —Success. 

THE IDEA is one of these ding fool, cranky, anti-sin, anti-saloon 
papers that are published for the fun of taking a crack at sin and in its 
fight for the right will tell the truth about conditions as they are even 
if it looses every advertiser it has. We may lose money, and by slan- 
der we may lose reputation, but we are not so foolish as to lose our 
own self-respect or integrity. When this paper sins, it sins because 
it can't help it, and not because there's money in it. We are such a 
blamed fool that we don't believe it pays to gain even the whole 
world and lose your own self. 

Phone us to call for your printing. We have time to do it quickly 
now and can promise you up to date clean, neat work on paper that 
talks and with inks that show up. You need some visiting cards? Eh ? 




m> fWB lOEiA. 

-mjBiriodiir.LdSi^Yi \Jt\f lViCi/UII«>fnifii Aaai 

^I ^J.^fMir^ jvir'T 'mH ifi-> 1 vrrnnT tfT-^rfr'->ti;i.T Ir.rft 'Vs">il'-.(l ov/- 
nKiW^^ recently endorsed Yadar'e \Mork in th^^Hneof a clea'n- 
,f?*j(;ity.. He uses, plain A^ordg, yet not more' siDntliari lue* In 
^J^qid.testamentpart <^f the iHoly Bible. ; Before ';we said 
oV^iTiSr^hem boti stuff. ^^H" Now V^eadd ■'Ijay.rtm; MalDUff,:';' 
•j^j^^f a J<?r|l> an<irf(!5^0R» -rAugustat Gouttty >Argiasi> ■ -ir.d') 3 1 1 1 
-I3q o) fiu.il 'i^iDS to 3: K:ttiMRn.>a ';;f',; ':M:-,'i-> '"IJ h:r,)Tto o:tiJjt 
-eb ban arnBb ot .asaon yjnov fuo lobnu .woiij oi ?Ah/<) lirn 

io aIi5iofn orlt i<I"'^"^'R^A'"k'ry''''pri-.A ^^^"^^'^- "^"'^ '^^'^^^ 

ib1 oa jlnna 7j>i^3il« O^Wyriff^^lvU.S^ujftimoo otiJftD nrO 
erft ;tijd -jifiikjon isdt svsiLad-Jibifjonia ow .1J5(|J omhf) rri 

TFyou don't like T^E fe'&i; ^r^aci^ '*^ I'^f^^^^^^^ 

''X'n^lttiA«-Tli«-Anl^K^ ■ 'te^*thn^^i^^n'tp'^^f^lif^rPi^ 'Villi: "the V fivt 

H 

aii-,iqK'> loM nj:.j U07. fi:)h(// i)aj:; ;^.hni;ia-i mmi.j vF)odon rioidV'^ 

Dull Safety Razor "BTades sharpened 2 1-2 cents each; Old 

nStyie Razors Honed ahd-S^I; 15- tents each"; Carving, tJu'tch- 

^fef a^d Pocket Kf^ ivei^^ iH AnS'l^'feiitk 'ekijii; Stis^df ^ ^rotin'd 

16 and ,15 cents each; Razors concaved 35 cents: Clippers 

^Sh^rpe^ned ^ jC^^^n^S. ,f j^ gn: ■>•/; ttid ,no(lnt;iq97 saol Yf.rrt MW 19b 

jKfit i9qF.q no iiov/ 1 -ii , ■ . ■■■■■.h (I .n-i iif)v i.-intmq nr) bnn won 
^fi::! "ijbiK'J^^nijiaiv 016O8 East iMajn Stireetft Kjini rftiv/ hm-. zMiil 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NEW BOOK, 480 pages, 32 pages of Striking Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POSTAGE EXTRA 15 CENTS 

.A. Complete and Detaikc! 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic m Young Girls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepc-is 
of Dives. 

How To Sa\e Your Bg\ 
or Girl. 

Chapters by the Fol- 
iDwing PersQCiSL 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago. 111.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkm. Asst. 
U. S. District Attorney. 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe-. 

W. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 

^^ ^^ i^ 

A WHITE SLAVE 

Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd. Suppression of White 
Slave Traffic, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Slave's Own Story; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In N^w York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order. Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE! VOUNG 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Wanted. 




MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 

Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 



harbour S^i/ffffy Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South ^ostorij Vir^finia 






m ^ 

>=^*£;3t^ x^ 7^-^=--* ] 



If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jVoenni^er^Si'zemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Vol. IV 



July 23, I9J0 



Na27 



THE ^ IDEA 



A SIQN OP THE TIMES 




John Crutchfield 



SEE ARTICLE ON PAGE 1 



""fJi 



o 

JEWELER J, S* JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. | 

I ^ We are showing special good values in S | 

g ^ 7)eamond:)f Tlfatchea, ^eweiri/j y i 

1 Silverware^ Cut Slass, €tc, 1 

I We invite your inspection | 

OD<HB><)D<aHD00(HHD<n><HV<»><aK><I&<a[»0ODaBB0t>«HDaQDaBH>«D4BH>«0<3HB><)D<BH><ID<HHD<!O 
Ol><aH>4l><BH>QI><aHD<n><aM>4<i*D<HH>0D<HB><]D(HBD4DaBB>ao<HBD«4«<i^0D<HB>0»<aHDCD<HH>aO 

I Print it Right. I 

Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea | 

Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 

roe 2708, I 

A ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ___. ^ 

\ ^ 

f HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet ^ 

k wants, in Drugs and Medicines ^ 

f Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps^and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. \ 

\ - A. R ROBINS, - { 

\ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

\ t 

\ Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

A Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV JULY 23, 1910 No. 27 



Five Cents a Copy $1.00 a Year 

Published Bi- Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 
' ( 1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 
Entered as secon4><^lAss mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



John Crutchfield 

An Interview and A Study 

Police justice Puts the Writer Under Bond To Keep 

the Peace and then Insuhs Him and Attempts 

To Make Him Forfeit that Bond. 



COMETIME ago THE IDEA printed a statement of the 
^ fact that John Crutchfield had kept a bar on Marshall 
Street, and was, therefore, such a man as to be unfit to 
administer justice in the police court. Just previous to 
that publication the Justice had put the writer under bond 
to keep the peace, tho he had never broken the peace, as 
the Commonwealth admitted later by quashing the warrant 
before it came before the higher court. 



2 THE IDEA 

While the bond was still pending, however, Justice Crutch- 
field waited on the City Hall steps for the writer and called 
him into the ante-room of the Mayor's office and insulted 
him in such language as is unfit to be printed in this paper, 
cursing and calling his statements made lies. 

The writer kept his head until an apology was oifered, 
which came an hour later, and thus refused to be led into 
any "breach of the peace", for which he would surely have 
been fined, and his bond would have been confiscated, altho 
Justice John has repeatedly said the lie was the first blow. 
Thus he struck the first blow in an assault, but failed to 
have another chance to suppress this paper, as he said he 
was determined to do when he fined and sentenced and 
bonded the editor. 

The Justice admitted that he wanted the writer to fight 
by saying he would have given $50.00 if we had struck him, 
but since, after he had been forced to admit the truth of 
the publication in question, he had apologized for making 
the assault, we thought we would let the matter drop. 

Since then, after careful deliberation, we have decided to 
make public the facts, because we think the people have a 
right to know just what manner of man this Justice is, who 
while posing as a merciful judge, jealous of the peace of the 
city, is really guilty of a breach of the peace himself, while 
his decisions against the writer are but the fruit of his mal- 
ice, because his past acts have been exposed. The writer 
of these lines has gone to jail for criticising the rank injus- 
tices of this petty official, and as long as these injustices 
work a hardship on the innocent he will continue to expose 
them, tho the corrupt political ring succeed in their nefari- 
ous attempts to put him in jail again. 

What we said then was true, and we will continue to tell 
the truth, regardless of whom it hurts, if thereby we can 
enlighten the voters towards getting fit men into office. 

On the occasion of this interview, Justice John demanded 
to knov why we continued to get after him, to which we 
replied that we regarded him as unfit for the position he 
(Concluded on page 7.) 



THE IDEA 



A Sermonette 

^^ Whatsoever Ye Would That. Men 

Should Do Unto You^ Do Ye Even 

So Unto Them/^ 



T Tp in my native city, nestled where the cloud croMned 
^ peaks of the beauteous Blue Ridge mountains cast 
their evening shadov^^s o'er a liberty loving people: 
Up in my mountain home, where the very air seems filled 
with thoughts of freedom: Up in Piedmont Virginia, in the 
goodly town of Lynchburg, I spent a happy childhood; 
—happy, because I was always dreaming of life as it should 
be and as it would be if man would permit it; — happy be- 
cause I lived among the clouds and listened to Nature's 
teachings and because of a parentage such as few enjoy. 

But a change came over the spirit of my dreams. Stories 
of the dying in sin of those for whom Christ died, dying to 
eternal hell because no one had told them the story, which, 
believing, would bring them salvation; stories the preach- 
ers told, made me sad. So I said I'd save them by carrying 
them the good news, and I went away to school to prepare 
myself to teach them God's word. 

As I studied the sacred writings I found that they did not 
teach that one should live in an eternal hell because he hsd 
not heard of a certain plan of salvation, but I found it did 
teach of the Son of a certain King, who became poor that 
we might be made rich,— of a God who died that others 
might live. 



4 THE IDEA 

T TP in my native city I thought and read and learned. 
^ Up in my mountain home I stood in the evening time 
and watched the toilers come home, no, not home, they 
had no homes, — merely places to sleep, often miserable and 
squalid. Their homes were over in the sweating, steaming, 
deafening, foulsmelling tobacco and shoe and cotton facto- 
ries. . ' 

But I watched them, watched them at evening time with 
their sunken cheeks and thin faces and emaciated forms and 
stooping shoulders and weary and saddened countenances 
and lustreless eyes and slow and tired walk. Then I watch- 
ed them in the morning with the same careworn fdipms, 
with a little more hope ^nd determiation in their faces, with 
a little less sadness in their eyes, and I said, "Oh! that I 
had a fortune, what pleasure woiild "be mine. I'd give it 
to thF poor and they and I Would be happy", and I planned 
how far a million dollars would go and how much I could do 
if som3 bachsbr millionaire uncle would leave me 
even just a small fortune. And I wondered Why God let 
things be as they were and what He would have me do any 
how. And as I wondered I read what He did do when He 
came on earth, and I found He did not cohie with money 
fonthe poor, but, on the other hand. He came as a poor 
man himself with not even a home in which to sleep, not 
even where 'to lay down His head. He brought not riches 
to the poor; i)ut He* g:aVe his time aifid His love, and His 
teachings and Himself to the poor. And when the rich 
young man wanted to know what he should do, He told him 
to ^t rid of his money by giving it to the poor, not because 
giving the money was the thing, but because while he had 
the money he could not do much service, the money was the 
evil in the way. If it were a good thing, Christ would have 
had it in abundance to give to the poor himself. 

No, He told the young to sell his possessions so that he 
could "come and follow me." As long as he had the money 
it would be his master; if he gave it away, then he could 
use his life for the world. 

So I said, "I am just as rich as Jesus was and freer to 



THE IDEA 5 

follow Jesus than the man of money. Maybe if I had, and 
most likely, judging from what I knew of other good men 
that had it, it would be my master and I could not give it 
up and never could follow Jesus. But being already poor, I 
said, "I will follow Him." 

So I looked again at the sorrows of the poor, and told my- 
self I would do what Jesus did, give my life to the conflict 
of right against wrong. 

With wealth I might be a slave, with poverty I must be 
free, —free to do for the right as no rich man can. 

IDUT what would Jesus do? "As ye would that men 
■"-^ should do unto you, do ye even so unto them." If I 
were they what would I desire of a man in my condition? 
They were sheep without a shepherd; in poverty and igno- 
rance and social and industrial servitude, not knowing how 
to better their condition, and being so enthralled that of 
themselves they must sink deeper in the depths of misery 
and slavery, unable to lift themselves up, because of ignor- 
ance. And I, what would they have me to do? I was fortunate 
enough to be free from their bondage of factory life. I was 
educated in the best schools of the state. I had learned to 
think and to reason and I thought I saw a remedy, in sm.all 
part for their evil condition, tho to apply it meant to sacri- 
fice ambition, to undergo persecution, to give up all that the 
flesh holds dear; in short, to take up a cross grievous to 
bear, but withal to follow Jesus, the Great Teacher, who 
went about doing good in poverty. 

So I waited not for riches to enslave me. I was free, and 
I thought I knew what they would have me do, and Jesus 
said, "Do ye even so to them." That looked like duty to 
me, and I had prayed that God would show me my duty, 
and as I realized that God chose to be poor when He came as 
Jesus to earth, I prayed that I might never be enslaved 
by wealth, and tho I have been tempted often, God has 
heard that prayer and I am still free, without money, the 
Devil's chief weapon, but with the sword and the aimor of 
the Master. 



6 THE IDEA 

And how should I do for these poor, whom to feed is to 
feed Christ, and follow His command? Well, the work is 
too big for one man or many men, but my part is only so 
much as I can do, so I must do that, beginning now, contin- 
uing even unto death. 

AND thus THE IDEA began uncovering the evil as Jesus 
Himself did it with such effective preaching as would 
bring back the fire of the enemy. You know Jesus was per- 
sonal, and turning directly to the evil doers he called them 
to their faces, liars and devils, and the rulers took counsel 
together and killed him for it. That was His plan. To fight 
baldly and fearlessly, regardless of the consequences to 
Himself. Am I not foolish if I adopt any other method. 

And remember this. His life accomplished most and 
will accomplish mast only centuries after His death. 
Had He given away the wealth of the world, He could not 
have accomplished anything lasting. His method is right. 
And you are a fool if you don't know it. Has that big liar, 
the devil, deceived you by the lust of riches? Jesus called 
the successful business man a fool, and He said, "Woe un- 
to you that are rich" for you have already gotten yours and 
"you shall hunger." 

NOW, don't drop this and say, "Is Yoder crazy? " They 
said Jesus was, because they could not understand his 
standards of life, and once when he got through tell- 
ing them about rich men and the Kingdom of Heaven, his 
very disciples were astonished "out of measure" "at his 
words", and Jesus seeing that they were unable to under- 
stand him, called them "children", and never did succeed 
in showing them what he meant. We sometimes hear peo- 
ple condemn this paper for citing its own acts to point a 
moral. We would say that no one has a right to preach how 
a thing should be done unless he is willing to first go and 
do it. THE IDEA knows it is right and has the aidhoriiy to 
say, "Go thou and do likewise." Jesus did not say, "follow 
somebody else." He said, "follow me." 



THE IDEA 



John Crutchfield 



(Continued from page 2.) 

held, and so we say now that as long as this unfit man holds this po- 
sition his unjust decisions will not only of right be the subject of our 
criticism, but we shall regard it a duty to expose his and all other 
crimes against society whenever he or any other attempts to treat those 
without a pull differently from those who stand in with the corrupt 
ring that dominates this city. 

At the interview with the police justice, in which the assault above 
I'eferred to was made, and in which the police justice used language 
"manifestly tending to corrupt the morals of the youth", if they 
should hear it, after the justice had cooled off, he stated that the car- 
loon of him "astride the narrow world like a colossus", which THE 
IDEA printed a few weeks before, was the best thing this paper ev- 
er got out, and he was so tickled with seeing himself as the Czar of 
Richmond, that be went into ecstacies over it. We cite this to show 
how easily flattered the man is ^nd how self-important. No one can 
correctly estimate the man without realizing first of all his conceit and 
the value he himself puts on himself. 

Those lawyers who flatter, win their cases before the "One John." 
Those who will not flatter find it unprofitable to practice in h's court. 
Many lawyers in this city, who would otherwise practice in criminal 
cases in the higher courts, refuse to take criminal cases because it 
means they must start before Justice John. 

A very prominent attorney recently gave this as the reason for his 
dropping all criminal cases, tho he said he would like that class of 
practice. 

While, occasionally, other lawyers practice before the police court, 
it is a notorious fact that Gilbert Pollock and Harry Smith get almost 
all of this business, and this foulsmelling basement court room is ap- 
parently their sole habitat, for they can be found there almost every 
court day, apparently waiting for some petty criminal's practice or 
money. 

The fact that it profits only such men as Smith and Pollock to 
(Carried to page 10.) 



THE IDEA 



Suit Against the 
Times-Dispatch 

Must Answer for Damage Done 

the Editor's Name and 

Business 



LAST Winter when The Times-Dispatch published deftm- 
atory and false accounts of the proceedings in the tri- 
als against the editor of THE IDEA, we stated that 
immediately after the trials we would take steps Icokirg 
toward entering suit against that paper for malicious libel. 
We took those steps but found ourselves unable financially 
to follow up the matter at that time, and so it had to be 
temporarily dropped. 

Recently, however, we put a representative out to solicit 
subscriptions to THE IDEA and it was discovered that 
many people who had never read a correct account of the 
trial, had read the false accounts printed by The Times- 
Dispatch and belie\ed them, and our reputation had been so 
damaged by these malicious, scurrilous and defamatory re- 
ports that we have decided to enter suit just as soon as the 
necessary funds can be raised. 

A friend has offered to help in this matter, and we write 
this to ask any others who want to see this lying paper 
stopped in its defamation of good causes, to subscribe to 
that fund. 

For details please communicate with the publisher of 
THE IDEA, 1106 Capitol St., Richmond, Va. 



THE IDEA 9 

It will be remembered that The Times-Dispatch published 
a slight retraction of one of their malicious reports against 
us but that retraction was only a partial one of the libels 
printed the day before. Papers throughout the state reprint- 
ed the first article but, of course, did not reprint the re- 
traction, so the damage was done all over the state and 
south, where THE IDEA does not reach, and so could not 
rectify the wrong. 

Not only have we been humiliated in the community be- 
fore those who did not have time to get at the exact facts, 
but the advertising and subscription end of THE IDEA has 
been damaged, and so we desire to have it settled in the 
proper courts that The Times-Dispatch has persistently, 
wilfully and maliciously lied in order to help destroy a pub- 
Hcation which paints some of their advertisers and them- 
selves in their evil doing. 



Pollock Eulogizes 
Boiling 



LACK of space in the last issue, prevented our noting the 
fact that on the occasion of the re-election of officers 
for the city for the ensuing year, G. K. Pollock, ring 
politician of police court influence and fame and of distillery 
swill cowfeed notoriety, made an extended eulogy of Engin- 
eer Boiling, builder of the flim-flam flume and buckling 
blunderer of the settling basin and the Broad Street sewer 
and the Fairmount, and every other mount, mess, all of 
which have wasted and will waste for the taxpayers hund- 
reds of thousands of dollars of hard earned money. We 
make mention of this to show how a desirable (?) official is 
always in need of the praise of his fellows. 



10 THE IDEA 

Citizens are not continually hearing the piaises of Trees- 
urer Pace nor Commissioner of Revenue, Hawkins sung by 
cheap politicians nor corrupt ring newspapers. 

It is a notable fact that since The Idea has exposed the 
bungles of the engineering department and the crookedness 
of the police department, the newspapers have been filled 
with boosts and praises of these, the two most bunglesome, 
extravagant and, in case of the police department, corrupt, 
divisions of our citj; government. 

Just recently, the suit of the city against the contracting 
company which built the first flume was decided by the 
court in favor of the contracting company, thus making the 
city pay for two flumes and not a single paper had a word 
of condemnation for Mr. Boiling, whose mistake it was. 
Fairmount citizens at each term of court are winning suits 
against the city for hundreds and thousands of dollars for 
the egregious blunders of grading in that section. Yet, no 
condemnation of Boiling on the part of the daily press of 
the city is heard, while the papers put in large caps the 
fulsome efliusions of praise of a cheap politician who by 
words of flattery of fellow office holders would continue his 
hold on his job. 

John Crutchfield 

(Continued from page 7.) 

plead before him ought to give a good idea of the kind of 
man the unfortunate prisoner has to deal with. 

Another fact that seems to accentuate the eccentricities 
and exaggerate the injustices of this justice is his physical 
condition. The justice is suffering from serious disorders 
which have, according to his own words, necessitated the 
surgeon's knife more than 100 times. 

One cannot begin to be just whose mind is constantly re- 
verted by suffering from an impartial consideration of the 
facts before him. When he feels well, which is seldom, he 
seems utterly unable to send a man to jail when the offence 



THE IDEA 11 

demands it. When he is feeling very badly, woe to the un- 
fortunate who chances to come before him for trial. Often 
have we seen him refuse to listen to a prisoner and send 
him to jail on what he had previously heard from a police- 
man or a lawyer or on another trial. So autocratic has this 
petty official become that he seems to utterly forget that he 
is an officer of the law, while he uses his position to vert 
his personal animosities or to serve the purpose of his polit- 
ical friends or to carry out the unlawful policies of munici- 
pal departments. 

If you chance to gain his disfavor and are brought before 
him the very best thing you can do is to bow to him as a 
servant to his master and flatter him with obeisances and 
servile homage and thus you may tickle him into mitigation 
of punishment bat never into justice which is his sworn 
duty. 

In short, Justice John deserves a nurse to attend him and a 
fiddle to amv^e him rather than weighty duties to perform. 



Police Raid Red 

Light District 



The Police Department is at last making a feint at break- 
ing up the illicit sale of intoxicants in the red light district 
of Mayo Street and Locust Alley. Several of these women 
were raided last Tuesday night and are up before Justice 
John Wednesday as we go to press, and yet we understand 
that somebody over about Sev^ Pines said that THE IDEA 
would not accomplish anything. 



12 THE IDEA 



^ollin^ and the Street;:) 



npHE IDEA a year ago exposed the costliness of the 
•*• methods of city departments in not acting together in 
their various duties. The engineer would pave a 
street, then the sewer hands would come along and tear it 
up, then as soon as they had made a mess of repairing the 
job, the water department would rip up the whole business 
and lay water pipes, only to be followed, perhaps, the next 
week by the gas department, thus, not only inconveniencing 
traffic, but making untold expense for the taxpayer, and ul- 
timately leaving the streets in a botched and ruined condi- 
tion within a few weeks or months after being newly paved. 
At that time, denial was made by certain councilmen, that 
conditions were as we had pictured them, altho we cited 
specific instances where this was true. Lately, however, 
we find the papers filled with reports of attempts on the 
part of the Mayor and Engineer to right this state of afi'aiis. 
Thus it is seen that it takes our outlandish form of govern- 
ment about a year to do anything after the trouble is clearly 
pointed out, and it yet remains to be seen whether, after 
the trouble is ascertained, anything will be done to remedy 
it until government by a body of four or five takes the place 
of government by a council of sixty-four. 



A flea and a fly got caught in a flue, 
Said the fly to the flea, "What shall we do? 
Said the flea to the fly, "Let's flee;" 
Said the fly to the flea, "Let's fly." 
So they flew through a flaw in the flue. 



We are pleasing those for whom we do job printing. Try 
us on your next order. Phone Monroe 2708. 



^ 7 , T^HE ide;a 13 

A Frank Saloonkeeper 



l^AN^A^ City, Mo., claims ito have the frankest saloon- 
"'■^ keeper in the United States. He keeps the Temple 
Bar Saloon arid advertises his business in a remarkable 
manner. Accoi^ding to a story recently sent out from thef*e, 
he^has cards printeqL bearing the following words. 

'-Friends and neighbors: I am grateful for past favors, 
and having supplied my store with a fine line of choice 
liquors, allow me to jnform you that I shall continue to 
make Drunkards, Paupers and Beggars for the sober, indus- 
trious, respe^c^able, part of the community to support. My 
liquors will excite riot, robbery and bloodshed. ' 

'They will diminish your comforts, increase your expens- 
es and shorten life. I shall confidently recommend them as 
sur^ to multiply fatal accidents and incurable diseases. 

"fhey will deprive some of life, others of reason, many 
of cjia^acter and all of » peace. They will make fathers 
fiends, wives widows, children orphans, and all poor. I will 
train your sops in .infijdelity, dissipation, ignorance,' lewd- 
ness, and every pth^i; vice. I will corrupt the ministers of 
religio^^ obstruct the gospel, defile the ehUrch and cause as 
much temporal ajriji eternal ; death as I dan.i But I have a 
family to, support— the, business pays-v the public encourages 
it. I have paid my license and the traffic is lawful; and if I 
don't sell it somebody will. I know the Bible says: "Thou 
shalt not kill," "no drunkard shall enter the Kingdom of 
Heaven," and I do not expect the drunkard-maker to fare 
any better, but I want an easy living and I have resolved 
to gather the wages of iniquity and fatten on the ruins of 
my species. "I shall, therefore, carry on my business with 
energy, and do my best to diminish the wealth of the nation 
and endanger the safety of the state. As my business flour- 
ishes in proportion to your sensibility and ignorance, I will 
do my best to prevent moral purity and intellectual growth. 

"Should you doubt my ability, I refer you to the Pawn- 



14 THE IDEA 

shops, the Poorhouse, the Police Court,, the Hospitals, the 
Penitentiary and the Gallows, where you will find many of 
my best customers have gone. A sight of them will con- 
vince you that I do what I say. 

"Allow me to inform you that you are fools, and that I 
am an honest saloonkeeper." 



jCet the S^eople J^now 

Jffow 9/fuch Ss Spent in Wines and SSooze 



AT a recent meeting of the Council Committee on Ordi- 
nance, Charter and Reform, Chairman Umlauf charg- 
ed councilmen with getting intoxicated on trips taken 
on the river at the expense of the city and with buying 
wine to be paid for out of city funds, if the newspaper re- 
ports be true. Below we print a clipping from one of the 
daily papers, and we fail to see any denial of the report. 

Just last fall' when Taft was here, a council committee 
had the audacity; to order costly drinkables to get drunk off 
at the Jefferson Jlotelr and certain councilmen got so tipsy 
on that occasion tha^ they could not talk or walk straight, 
and one in particular made a fool of himself at the audito- 
rium because he felt so good over the effects of the cham- 
pagne imbibed. 

When the editor of this paper called on the City Auditor 
to find how much of the $6,000.00 spent for that day's fes- 
tivities went for strong drink, the auditor refused to divulge 
this councilmanic secret, and in the committee Barton 
Grundy attempted to conceal the reports of that day's 
proceedings by an executive session. 

After the rest of the committee overruled that motion, 
even then Mr. Grundy, sub-chairman in charge of the ban- 



THE IDEA 15 

quet, hushed up the drink part of his report, and the details 
were never publicly made known, not even in committee. 

Yet we are told that Richmond is wiseb and economically 
run, while councilmen admit it is so crookedly run that they 
are not willing for the people who pay the bills to know how 
corrupt it all is. 

In the name of the decent people of the city THE IDEA 
calls on councilmen to come out in the open and if they are 
determined to get drunk at the city's expense, let them have 
the nerve to let the people know how much of their money 
they drank up. They acknowledge their wrong by being 
ashamed to turn on the light. Men love darkness rather 
than light because their deeds are evil. 

Today councilmen are insolent enough to go against the 
will of the people. One year from today and THE IDEA 
will have made it so hot for them that they will not dare to 
cover their crimes. 

Here is the newspaper clipping:— 

■'Mr. Umlauf after describing the unpleasant conditions under 
which the employes concerned must toil, drew a comparison between 
their unhappy lot and that of certain city officials. He mentioned, in 
particular a certain trip down the river, taken by a party of which he 
was a member. Some of the party he charged came home intoxicated. 
On other trips, taken supposedly on city business, and paid for out of 
city funds, he charged that wine was purchased." 



We'll pay some one a neat commission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St., Phone Monroe 2708. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only a dollar a year on the bi- 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 

TJhe Sdea !Print Shop*s iPhone 

I s 

MONROE 2VOS 

GO RIGHT NOW AND CALL UP YODER AND ASK HIM TO COME 
BY AND SEE IF YOU HAVE NOT SOME PRINTING FOR HIM 



16 THE IDEA 



Cliff Weq 

Commissioner 



THE IDEA regrets to note the election of Cliff Weil as 
Police Commissioner, as he is reicbgnized as one who stands 
for nothing. He is in the cigar' busih^lsfe, which caters to 
the trade of the saloons', and it is pointed 6ut fhat a police 
commissioner should be in such a position as to be under no 
obligations to that class of the community which is the rec- 
ognized breeder of 80 per cent, of all the crimes of the city, 
and, therefore, which could profit most by having friends 
on the police board. The bars stand for a "wide open" 
town. Cliff Weil will stand with the bars,' as the past board 
has always done. 



^o 2/ou Shave? " 

Dull Safety Razor Blades sharpened 2 1-2 cents each; Old 
Style Razors Honed and Set 15 cents each; Carving, Butch-j 
er and Pocket Knives 10 and 15 centseach; Scissors Ground 
10 and 15 cents each; Razors concaved 35 cents; Clipper^ 
Sharpened 35 cents. 

All Kinds of Edgfcd Tools Sharpened by Experts, 
cA . WORK GUARANTEED 

THE ^^SHARP-O^^ CO. 

^08 East Main Street 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NEW BOOK, 450 pages, 32 pages of Striking Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POSTAGE EXTRA 15 CENTS 

A Complete and Detailed 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic in Young Girls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepers 
of Dives. 

How To Save Your Boy 
or Girl. 

Chapters by the Fol- 
bwing Persons: 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkin, Asst. 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe; 

W. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 

^^ ^^ ^^^ 

A WHITE SLAVE 

Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd, Suppression of White 
Slave Traffic, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Slave's Own Story; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In New York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order. Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE VOUNC5 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Warvted. 




;*■' 



M\frOR CYCLES 



"^ 



AND 

BICYCLES 



ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :. 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3U West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 



!^arbour ^i^ffffj/ Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South iSoston, T/irgr/n/a 

......■,.>-.. .... ...... — —-r^ If you want a first class Bugrgy, 

I Surrey or Farm Wagon 

i don't fail to call on 



'f^ 



m 



sjffoenni£fer^Sizemore Co» 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Vol. IV 



July 30, 1 9 10 



No. 28 



THE ^ IDEA 

A SIGN OF THE TIMES 

EXTRA EDITION 




CARLTON McCarthy 

A FIGHTER FROM \A/AY-BACK 

SEE ARTICLE ON PAGE 12 



ODCS3&>CD4^B><39<SSH><3i>tiB&><iD<BB><iD<BBDflOl><HDQ0<BB>GQi>9IH><3i>9BB>aDQBH>4D<l^D4D^IB><i9 

I JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. | 

§ r%- We are showing special good values in J § 

I ^' #1 

§ n x)iamoncic>y 2lfatcke;^y yewelruy y § 

\ Oilvorwarey Cut SlasSy £tc, | 



We invite your in'spection 

QD<lBSS&<iD<aBE><i[><2^9><iD(Z^S>CDOBE>a&<BD>CO!><fflB&<iDCBS>C0DC&BB><iD^3EI>QE><^H>CDCBB>a!><BK>(iO 
{|)CBEDQE><9SK><iO<9EiB>CDaBEi>a^i>(BB><]D<HBB>Ot>^9B>CD<BaDCD<ZBDC*{*l>^BS>CE><9BDCDSm>CD<9BB>QCI 



Print it Right. 

I i 

Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses v^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



0!>(38B>QE><B3&>fl!><nB>CDaBB>(3<|>D<aBB>CD<9B><IDQai><!!><BB><iD<aSI&>C<f«DCIISS>QD^^S>C!><Z&E!>'ti!>O&Bl><iQ 

V HEADQUAR TERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet r 

i ^ 

i wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines 2) 

r Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei, Delicate ^ 

V Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

J ' '~~ i 

\ - A. H. ROBINS, - J 

\ 200 E. MARSHALL ST. \ 

* i 

^ Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

A Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV JULY 30, 1910 No. 28 



Five Cents a Copy $1.00 a Year 

Published Bi-Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia, 



Graft of the Dead. 



r\N June 16th, at 2::0 A. M., a little girl died at the Shel- 
^^ tering Arms Hospital. The father immediately ar- 
ranged with an undertaker to take charge of the buri- 
al services. Before 3 o'clock, so we are informed, less than 
an hour after death, the undertaker called up the hospital 
to get the body. He was told that undertaker Bliley had 
gotten the body and gone with it. 

After some trouble, the indignant father and the under- 
taker he had employed, succeeded in making the Bliley es- 
tablishment return the body. 

On inquiry, the nurse in charge gave the information, 
"We send all of our strangers up to Mr. Bliley." On inqui- 
ry of two well known undertakers, we learn that Bliley and 
Bennett, and perhaps one other, get practically all of the 
bodies of those dying at the five large hospitals of the city, 
unless relati\es make plans beforehand. Both Bliley and 
Bennett are members of the city council. 



2 THE IDEA 

Now, THE IDEA wants to know how these undertakers 
succeed in getting a monopoly on this trade. Do they do it 
through the management of the hospitals or do they pay 
nurses for their services in any case? 

It is reported that a nurse, or nurses, at one of the hospi- 
tals, at least, gets a fee from a certain undertaker for each 
body turned over to him. 

However it be, it is not just that undertakers who have 
been here for years should be discriminated against in a 
matter of the burial of the dead, in favor of those who 
will stoop to questionable acts. 

Three weeks ago we said, "It is even stated that all mem- 
bers of the Richmond Funeral Directors' Association agree 
to certain minimum rates to be charged, thus effecting a 
combine to hold up the price so that they aie able to meke 
exorbitant profits on all caskets sold." 

Later a member of that association called on us and told 
us that that agreement had gone out of date. 

Now, altho the undertakers claim that no such agreement 
now exists, still we are unable to find ^here the prices have 
been lowered in a single instance, except as was the case 
before when an undertaker as an act of charity might re- 
duce the price or even give away to the poor a casket for 
burial. 

As far as the average man is concerned he is the victim 
of excessive undertaker's charges and THE IDEA would 
advise all who may be about to die, and that means you, 
to look around and select an undertaker before hand v^ ho 
is not a member of the association. We understand that 
those outside the association charge considerably less. 
Don't wait till you are dead and your little $1000. 00 insur- 
ance policy is eaten up in burial fees. 



Phone us to call for your printing-. We have time to do it quickly 
now and can promise you up to date clean, neat work on paper that 
talks and with inks that show up. You need some visiting cards? Eh ? 



THE IDEA 



An Accident 



TVyTHILE in the midst of the article on Carlton McCarthy, 
" on Monday of this week, the writer got up to exam- 
ine a paper cutter on which the pressman was adjust- 
ing the hammer, which had become loose. As he passed 
within range of the handle, which had been re-inforced by 
a 2 1-2 inch galvanized pipe about 5 feet long, it came doA^n 
at full speed andstra3k him on the head, knocking him to the 
floor and leaving a cut 1 1-2 inches long, which Dr, Pitt 
sewed up a little later. 

We seldom write articles in praise of any man because our 
work has been confined almost entirely to political lines, and 
very few men in politics are worthy of praise. On one 
occasion we undertook to praise office holders and after- 
wards found we had made a blunder. It is a sad state of 
affairs when one is more likely to be right by condemning 
than by praising the public servants of his city or state. 
We have made a most careful study of the political life of 
Carlton McCarthy and believe that he is about the clear ti:t 
man in public life in Virginia today, but we are at a loss to 
know the significance of that fate which literally struck us 
down while attempting to praise an officeholder of Yii gin ia, 
especially since nothing of more consequence than political 
machinery has attempted to crush us while condemning office 
holders. 



Important Notice! 



NEXT week's issue will contain an article of much more 
than usual interest and importance. JBe sure ard spt^k 
for this number. 



4 THE IDEA 

Lynchburg Whiskeyites Plan- 
ning A Big Steal 

^ «» I » 

Some year and a half ago when Lynchburg went dry by a tremend- 
ous majority certain whiskey interests did their best to steal the elec- 
tion by fraudulent registration and criminal collusion with certain offi- 
cers of election. 

The writer knows exactly what he is talking about for he was one of 
those who prevented by challenge and proper legal methods the act- 
ual steal of perhaps more than 100 votes on election day. The whis- 
key p>eople knew they were going to win by fair or foul means until 
they found much to their surprise men determined to break up their 
crooked work. This same crooked bunch knowing that the drys 
have gotten wise to their illegal stealing have this year determined to 
steal the election in an apparently legal manner. 

We learn that the taxes of about four hundred negroes were recent- 
ly paid by the whiskey men and that a large bunch of purchasable 
white voters were likewise qualified to vote and duly registered by the 
agent of the whiskey interests and so to many it is a foregone conclu- 
sion that, tbo at least three fifths of the men and ninety five percent 
of the women want Lynchburg to stay dry and are well pleased* with 
the dry state of affairs, still Lynchburg wsll likely go wet this fall be- 
cause the people dont and cant rule when special interests don't want 
them to. 



Whew-e-e ! 



WHAT do you know about this? Rob't. Whittet, Jr., 
President of the Albemarle Club, was acting Mayor 
of the city of Richmond while Mayor Richardson was 
away in Baltimore. Stop and think. Stop and think, and 
then you may be able to draw some conclusions for your- 
selves. 



THE IDEA 



Street Car 
Accidents Increase 

Due to Company's Action in 
Changing Runs of Motor- 
men and Conductors 



"DECENT statistics of accidents on the Richmond lines of 
'*^ the Virginia Passenger and Power Company show an 
enormous increase in accidents over former periods. 
Employees of the company and friends of employees of the 
company have frequently reported to us this state of affairs 
and each time they attributed it to the fact that the car 
company has adopted a policy of changing the runs of mo- 
tormen and conductors, thus giving a motorman, experierc- 
ed on one line, a completely new work to learn. A man is 
taken from a Main Street line, for instance, and put on a 
Broad or Clay Street line. He has learned the road of the 
Main Street line and knows the track and the traffic condi- 
tions and the time he has to make. Then he goes to Broad 
Street where he knows nothing of any of the conditions, 
Unfamiliarity with the road bed or inexperience with cer- 
tain grades and crossings, switches or turns results in de- 
railment or smash up and the motorman 's pay is reduced 
and he has to climb up again to his old salary. It is the be- 
lief among those who have observed this working of the 
changes made by the company that it is done in order to 
reduce the pay of the older and higher priced men, because 



6 THE IDEA 

it is cheaper to have these accidents as long as the company 
officials stand in with the powers that be and thus succeed 
in getting out of paying damage suits, than it is to pay the 
higher wages of experienced men. 

This frequent changing of runs often necessitates the re- 
moval of the home of the motorman and the expense and 
inconvenience and reduction in pay all tend to make him 
dissatisfied and thus leave entirely the service of the com- 
pany, his place being filled by a new man whose pay is ma- 
terially less. 

This policy of the car company has been carefully watch- 
ed for some time and it is a most significant fact. 



A Lesson for the Poor Man 

Some Talk on Political Parties 



N^ 



fOW let us notice just what it means. It is a well known 
fact that it is becoming harder and harder each year 
for a man handicapped by lack of means to forge 
ahead or e\en make a living than it was a few years ago. 

Strong men with indomitable will start out with the hope 
and bouyancy of youth, believing, as they have been taught, 
that an honest man who has energy can make a name for 
himself. He soon finds that the real question is can he even 
make a bare living. And if sickness or misfortune comes, 
he frequently finds that he can't even do that. Then hope 
and youth and pleasure in life fade as he finds his wife and 
loved ones suffering for necessities or forced to deny them- 
selves the pleasures and comforts they were wont to enjoy, 
and life becomes a drudgery and his body becomes prema- 
turely old. We need not carry the picture further. These 
are facts so intensely familiar to the even casual observer 
that they need no illustration here. The fact is the thing 



THE IDEA 7 

and the cause of it is in our social state, which makes it 
necessary for the representatives of invested money to use 
every means to reduce expenses in order to uphold the prof- 
its of the concerns they manage. Competition demands 
that each concern give dividends as large as possible, else the 
stockholder's money is not forthcoming and the concern 
must go by the board. 

Take again the car company. The directors insist that 
the officers give an economical and close management, for 
they must have a certain dividend declared so that stock 
will bring a certain price. 

And, we might as well face the issue, it is paid for in the 
homes and the lives of men. Now there are many men who 
can easily see that the tendency is to make this state of af- 
fairs more acute and to thus crush the working man more 
and more every year. The large industrial centres are reek- 
ing with the suffering in the homes of ablebodied men who 
desire and are willing to do more than their share of the 
world's work. Yet industrial conditions have oppressed 
and are oppressnig more and more the poor working man 
without capital to such an extent that it looks very much as 
if a serious revolution, not only here in America, but all 
over the world, must come about in the next few years. 
Working men are beginning to see the cause of it all and 
just as soon as they realize how they are being treated, 
something serious is sure to follow. As we have remarked 
in these columns several times in the last four years, we 
confidently expect a bloody revolution in the not distant fu- 
ture. History shows us that great eras come to climax only 
this way. 

Revolution is hell, and it is a great pity that the greed of 
the owners of the wealth and power of the country will not 
stop and study and re-adjust the business of the world to 
the conditions of modern society without waiting for war 
to do it. If they only would save themselves they could, 
but the desire for gain has blinded their eyes and there is 
no hope but in war. Already the clanking of the armaments 
(Continued on 11th page.) 



THE IDEA 



The Gamblers 

Botto's, Manhattan^ Albemarle 



DOWN on lower Main Street, there has been running for 
years a gambling den called Botto's Club. Here the 
games go on without molestation by the police, altho 
they are well informed about the situation and could easily 
make a raid, which would break up the joint. Saturday 
night is the beginning of the big time with them, and the 
games go on through the night and Sunday and Sunday 
night. Besides being the resort of many who do nothing 
but live off their winnings, this club, so called, is the gamb- 
ling place of many poor men, with families, whose earnings 
are wasted each week. Not long since, a poor woman, in 
destitution for the necessities of life, finding that her hus- 
band had lost his money at Botto's, went to this place and 
on threat to expose it, actually succeeded in getting back 
from the proprietor a part of her husband's losses. 

This, we are told, is a frequent occurrence. Whenever 
one of these fake clubs gets up against such a determined 
man or woman it finds it cheaper to pay back than to run 
the risks of publicity and the woman, of course, does not 
desire to go to court and so she lets the matter drop after 
getting back a part of her money. All of these fake clubs 
have bars in connection with them, and if a man is not in a 
gambling mood when he enters, the treating gets him full 
of booze, and then when his will is gone, he becomes 
a fool, and a fool and his money are soon parted, while the 
gambling joint proprietor gets rich and the poor man's wife 
and children sufl:er at home, and it is said that certain 
police authorities get a rake off for not ordering these places 
broken up. 



THE IDEA 9 

At any rate when the writer was arrested at night last 
fall and his private papers taken from him by George Pol- 
lock, police officer, in Chief Werner's office, and brother to 
Gilbert K. Pollock, he had some memoranda in his pockets 
concerning the Manhattan fake club and gambling joint on 
West Broad Street. The proprietor of that club boasted 
that a half hour after Yoder's arrest he knew all about the 
information found in Yoder's pockets. Now THE IDEA 
wants to know who's the traitor to the people. Who is it 
that arrests those who are about to expose evil, in order to 
rob them of their means of breaking up crime and in order 
to protect the criminal in his vice. We are firmly of the 
opinion that the Richmond police department is about as 
crooked as a fish hook, or else they would break up in a few 
hours all these gambling hells which are run wide open here 
and support such a horde of bloated gamblers, who turn 
night into day, and late in the mornings swaim from their 
beds and swoop down on the cheap lunch houses on Main 
and Broad Streets, there to spread their nets for more suck- 
ers to skin. 

On East Broad Street, over the Kirk-Parrish Co., No. 

is the home of the Manhattan Club, a semi-respectable 
joint, where young clerks of good families are robbed of 
their belongings by sharp professionals, who seem to be un- 
der the especial watch care of the police. 

You know if one inquires why these places are not broken 
up, he is told that it is so hard to get evidence against them. 
A story comes to us that some time past a Richmond police 
captain not only refused to break up a certain well known 
dive, but actually sent the proprietor of the joint a box of 
cigars with his apology for making an ari-est in his place on 
warrant sworn out by a man who had been drugged and 
robbed. 

But to return, the Manhattan has operated for years and 
the police know all about it and don't break it up, when, if 
they really found it hard to get deadwood on them, could 
eaily stop the whole business by putting a trustworthy offi- 
cer at the door who could take out his note book and take 



10 THE IDEA 

down, in plain sight of all who desire to enter, the name or 
description of each one who tried to get in. They know that 
this or any of a dozen other well tried methods would soon 
make it unprofitable for such places to keep open, but they 
stand in and do nothing, because they want to. It evidently 
pays them better to keep quiet. 

The third place where gambling goes on unhindered, is 
the Albemarle Club, patronized by society folk and moneyed 
men and politicians. This place was exposed by THE IDEA 
some time ago. 

Besides these three, there are various and sundry clubs 
and dens in the city which do thriving business, some in 
connection with barrooms, some in connection with assigna- 
tion houses, outside of the sacred precincts of the red light 
districts Nos. 1 and 2, some in the rear of stores or restau- 
rants, some behind barber shops and similar places. Of 
course gambling will go on in many places without the 
knowledge of the police, but there is absolutely no excuse 
for these open places, known to the police and enjoying im- 
munity and even protection. 

Let the police department wake up. Let Mayor Richard- 
son do his sworn duty and take charge of law enforcement 
in Richmond instead of doing absolutely nothing but make 
speeches of welcome. 

A city the size of Richmond needs a head to it; one who 
will find out where and why the laws are broken instead of 
leaving everything to subordinates, while crime and vice 
and debauchery and lewdness thrive under his very nose. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only a dollar a year on the bi- 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy yoa most want. 

Vhe Sdea Print Shops !P/ione 

IS 

MONROE 2-708 

GO RIGHT NOW AND CALL UP YODER AND ASK HfM TO COME 
BY AND SEE IF YOU HAVE NOT SOME PRINTING FOR HIM 



THE IDEA 11 

J^ jCesson for the !Poor 9/fan 

(Concluded from 7th page. ) 

is sounding, and if it must come, let it come. The sooner 
it is over with the better. 

Competition must be substituted by co-operation. Capi- 
tal, the root of all evil, must be replaced by credit. The 
w^ar that is temporary hell is better than the peace that is 
eternal slavery. 

Nov^r w^atch some fool throw up his hands and say, "An- 
archy" or "Socialism." If this be anarchy, make the most 
of it. If it be Socialism, then God help Democracy and Re- 
publicanism. Names are nothing. 

My father, a Pennsylvanian, used to vote a Republican 
ticket and I, a Virginian, a Democratic ticket and either 
name was good enough and stood for popular government, 
but when party machinery goes back on the people by whose 
permission it exists, then it is time to get new machinery. 

Bob Ingersoll once said the Republican party was going 
his way, and therefore he was a Republican, but just as 
soon as it turned aside that he would "keep right on." 

We think the Republican party has long since turned 
aside, and it often looks like the Democratic party is in the 
same boat and if the Democratic party can't stand and 
wont stand for what we say in this paper, it has already 
deserted the people, who will do well to "keep right straight 
on", even if all parties desert them. 

When the government, run in the name of the people, 
commences to stand for special interests as opposed to the 
people then it is the duty of the people to tear it down and 
build one that will do that whereunto it is sent. The An- 
archist stands for no law. THE IDEA stands for law by, 
for and of the people, under any name you choose. 



We'll pay some one a neat commission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Capitol St,, Phone Monroe 2708. 



12 THE IDEA 

Carlton McCarthy 

The Mark Twain of Virginia 



TT is easy to get the idea that a wit or humorist has no 
■'■ serious thoughts and to treat his humor as lacking in 
seriousness and his work as only of value as a mirth 
producer. As a matter of fact the greatest humorists are 
the most conscientious and serious minded of men and their 
lives are deep and they are the true philosophers. 

The King's Fool was by far a brainier man than the king, 
and the king's being a true fool without the wit was the 
greatest reason for the existence of the office of court fool 
held by another. Likewise the world's great wits adopt 
this method because of the need of it in the mental equip- 
ment of those whom they would teach. 

Paul got off a fine bit of humor when he spoke of the 
"foolishness of preaching." The world is so lacking in se- 
riousness that great men have to "put an antic disposition 
on" to ever get the frivolous minded to take their medi- 
cine, and often after taking the medicine they turn and de- 
stroy the doctor who gave it, tho it has produced, in part, 
the effect desired. Every now and then we see papers who 
can't see a joke actually discussing the sanity of Shake- 
speare's Hamlet. Only the wise are great jokers. 

The sincere appear the most eccentric. They have not 
time to conceal. They are too great to worry over the ap- 
pearance of consistency. They are so true themselves that 
they take for granted that others are likewise wise and sin- 
cere. Their motto is "Esse quam videri," — "To be rather 
than to seem." 

Carlton McCarthy is a great humorist. If he told the 
people what he knows without seasoning it with wit, it 
would not be listened to; it would be too deep and dry. The 



THE IDEA 13 

world don't want to go to school. It wants the vaudeville. 
So the teacher must amuse the infants. 

Carlton McCarthy is telling Virginians through The Rich- 
mond Evening Journal, some valuable things; telling them 
in a charming style, in a happy vein, and we learn that 
there are some who are reading his letters just for the 
pleasure of it who do not see in them the lessons a great 
teacher has for his fellow Virginians. 

There is undoubtedly no man in Virginia better equipped 
both by nature and by training to tell Virginians how to run 
their state than Ex-Mayor McCarthy. Since he has an- 
nounced his candidacy for Governor of Viiginia, if the pa- 
pers of the state know a good thing when they see it, they 
will copy, from The Journal, McCarthy's li\e wire contri- 
butions just for their literary value, for even if they are 
opposed to the election of any man who is not of, for and 
by "the machine," they can't afford to fail to print these 
serio-humorous letters which bid fair to become the Ex- 
Mayor's most valuable contribution to literature, tho he 
might wish to be remembered for other writings. 

These letters are of two-fold value; first, for their insight 
into the business affairs of the state, of which we voters 
are so densely ignorant and with which no man is more fa- 
miliar than McCarthy; and second, for that peculiarly deli- 
cate tho piercing subtle humor which marks all his writings 
and by which the big heart of the man soothes the sting his 
sharp thrusts have made. 

McCarthy the serious, McCarthy the humorist, is Virgin- 
ia's biggest governorship timber for the next election. If 
the papers will do their part to the people by giving due 
publicity to his campaign, the people can be counted on to 
elect him to office. 



fSee us first ^ ^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



14 THE IDEA 

Public Pays for Private Work 
of Policemen 



Wednesday, July 27th, 1910. 
We have not had time to look up this, but we believe it is 
true. We are informed that for the last two weeks or so 
one half of the night police force have been off regular duty 
and have been doing work out at the fair grounds for the po- 
lice picnic to be held today, Wednesday, July 27th. We are 
told that at one station from which 16 men go out each 
night on patrol duty only 8 have been doing this duty. Now 
the question for the police is this: If the city, or any sec- 
tion of it, can get along with one half the force, why is it 
that the board is asking the council for 25 more men? An- 
other question: What right has the board to direct that 
policemen continue to draw pay from the city treasury 
while they are doing work which is none of the citizens's 
concern, merely their own private ends being served by an 
annual picnic. 

Wanted 

We've the telegragph wireless, 
The church that is spireless, 
The gas that is fireless; 
Yet these we desire less 
Than roads which are mireless, 
Than hobos who're tireless, 
Campaigns that are liarless. 
And statesmen who're hireless. 

— Exchange, 

YOU have not heard anybody say there was no graft in 
buying horses for the police department, have ycu? It 
is up to somebody to come out in the open. 



THE IDEA 15 



Crutchfield 



WE failed to state last week that while the editor and 
Justice Crutchfield were in conversation in the May- 
or's ante-rooom, Chief of Police Werner twice passed 
through the room, and tho we do not know what signifi- 
cance it had, still it looked like he was on hand to protect 
the One John and arrest the publisher of THE IDEA in 
case of the fight expected. 



A Strange Disposition 



(An old clipping.) 

The Hustings Court of Richmond dismissed the case 
against A. A. Yoder, pubHsher of the "Idea," without trial. 
Yoder was tried in the Police Court on a warrant charging 
him with circulating obscene literature and fined and placed 
under bond. His offense consisted in exposing disorderly- 
houses. He appealed to the Hustings Court and after con- 
ference between the judge, the Chief of Police, the Com- 
monwealth's Attorney and Yoder, the case was nolle press- 
ed. It was a strange disposition of the case, and to an out- 
sider, it appears as though the authorities deemed it unwise 
to go into a trial that would further expose an unsavory 
situation.— Newport News Times-Herald. 



Right and Wrong 

It requires something of a hero to give up when he is 
wrong and a good deal of a family man to give up when he 
is right. —Puck. 



16 THE IDEA 

Peculiar Argument 

The other day up in Lynchburg we heard of a property owner 
who said that he was going to vote wet this fall because a tenant he 
had had left Lynchburg to go to Roanoke to live because he could 
not get his beer in Lynchburg. This left his house vacant four 
months and cut off the property owner's rent $100.00. And yet we 
hear men in Richmond say prohibition dont prohibit. It seems to 
have prohibited this man from getting his beer all right all right. 

We notice this too that every day or so some blind tiger is caught 
in Richmond. If Richmond were "dry" you would hear this 
given as evidence that prohibition dont prohibit' and these whiskey 
soaked papers would be putting these little arrests in large headlines 
whereas now they put them in the most inconspicuous places in their 
papers. 

My! but these newspapers will have a lot of sins to answer for, all 
built on the one big sin of covetuousness, or money madness, which 
they call "business enterprize." 

^uil Safety S^azor !^lacies 

2 1-2 CENTS EACH 

Let our experts put your old dull blades in perfect 

condition for above price. 

OLD STYLE RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15c EACH 

SCISSORS AND KNIVES SHARPENED 

Work Guaranteed 

SPECIALS 

AS LONG AS THEY LAST 

$2.50 Razors reduced to $1.25 

$2.00 " " " $1.00 

$L50 " " " $ .75 

$1-50 Razor Strop $ .75 

$1.00 Bottle Eau de Quinine Hair Tonic $ .49 

$ .75 Jar Vie- Veer Massage Cream . $ .49 

Imported Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Lotions and a Full 

Line of Toilet Supplies at Reduced Prices. 

THE ^'SHARP-O" CO. 

608 East Main Street 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NZW BDDK, 430 pa2:es, 32 pages of Striking Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POSTAGE EXTRA 15 CENTS 

A Complete and Detailed 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic in Young Girls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepers 
of "Dives. 

How To Save Your Boy 
or Girl. 



Chapters by the Fol- 
bwing Persons: 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkin, Asst. 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe; 

W. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 




A WHITE SLAVE 



Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd, Suppression of White 
Slave Traffic, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Slave's Own Story; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In Naw York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order. Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE VOUNG 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Warned. , 



MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $ J 50.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3U West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour ^u^f^i/ Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South SSostoJij Virginia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

Jffoenni^fer^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond^ - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops, 




Vol. IV August 6, mo No. 29 

THE ^ ID 




A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Sophie MoUoy and the 

Police Department 
People's Money Wasted 
Graft In Swearing Warrants 
Letter from A Socialist 
Political Undertakers 
A Sermonette 



5 CENTS A COPY $2.00 A YEAR 

Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common gcod at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. . ... n. , v —^ 



Ol><XH>CE><lHi><IDai^^E><i^K>€E>^^i>CD^HD<30l><HH>CD<^H>COD^IH><]I>^^i><3E><^H>QE>^HDQE><B^<lQ 

f JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 
We are showing special good values in J 

2)iamoncijy Watcher, ^ewelrj/y y 

Silverware^ Cvt Siass^ €tc, 

I We invite youi inspection | 

(= a 

ClE><l^D<}D<^H>G!>^^DCD<3iaD<i!><aH><3D<^B><3OE><BB>fiDaH>cQ!><^H>QDaHD0D<HK>fi!>4^E><iD<^H><iQ 

09<figK><iD^iB><iDCBIB>(3E>aVfl<i>D<^K><iD<iiK>()l7aHDCI><^H>aD<aHB>Q^I><Ba>QDaHDQD<aOC&aaB><ia 

f Print it Right. * 

I Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 

\ Presses v^^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
•I* 

roe 2708, 



Q!><^H><i&<l^B>a!>^HD<3[>^H><i<{>E><^B>flD^H><iD(flH>a!>«K>CD<aM><]<}>D<B^aD^aD(JE>CBB>CE><BB><l3 

HEADQUARTERS for your sick M^ants; your family and toilet ^ 

f 
wants, in Drugs and Medicines (k 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, \ 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, \ 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei. Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 
i 



A. a ROBINS, - i 

200 E. MARStlALL ST. ) 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV AUGUST 6, 1910 No. 29 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by AdoN A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



More Waste of 
People's Money 

Broad Street Tom Up Again 

Some Pointed Remarks About the City Government 



JUST a few months ago Broad Street was torn up for many 
blocks to put in a big sewer. The trenches had hardly 
been covered up when it was found that the sew^ers had 
buckled and the work had to be torn up and repaired. 

Now we find along the same side of the same street tren- 
ches being dug again for perhaps another of the various 
and sundry separate departments of the city government, 



2 THE IDEA 

which never work together. A business man coming to his 
office on the car this morning (Thursday) said that he had 
seldom seen the time when some part of Broad Street was 
not torn up and if any business man attempted to run his 
business as uneconomically as the city does he would not 
last two months. 

Whenever you see a street torn up, tho it may look like 
a little thing, if you look to see how much it costs, you will 
nearly always find that the council has appropriated hund- 
reds or, perhaps, many thousands of dollars for the work. 
If there were anything like care in this business, 50 per 
cent, of the money spent could be saved and instead of hav- 
ing muddy or extremely dusty thoroughfares runnirg 
through the heart of the city, Richmond could have all its 
main streets well paved and kept clean. 

While on the street question, THE IDEA wants to enquire 
what has become of the street cleaning department any- 



way 



As we look out our office door today toward Capitol 
Square, Richmond's front yard, so to speak, right where 
the city's best efforts toward cleanliness should be expect- 
ed, nothing but a littered and filthy mess greets the eye in 
Capitol Street. 

If Washington finds it profitable to have a man at the 
head of the street cleaners who can get things clean and 
keep them so, why can't Richmond, the pride of Virginia 
and the Southland, at least keep its front walks and drive 
ways clean. 

Richmond is known to be the most unhealthy city in the 
state as far as lung and throat troubles are concerned, and 
we wonder how much of this is chargeable to the dirty 
streets and filth laden atmosphere that Richmonders must 
breathe. 

The secrecy of all this lack of decency and order and the 
cause of the vvaste of money in Richmond is to be found in 
the large council of 64 members. 

Very few Richmonders, perhaps, reahze that this city has 



THE IDEA 3 

iaall probability tha largest city council in the United 
States. 

IMPORTANT! 

A Virginia Weekly Magazine 

What THE IDEA is doing for Richmond, what Collier's 
is doing for the nation, there should be a paper to do for 
Virginia. 

All who know the dependence of daily papers on adver- 
tisers know that no daily can ever be such a progressive af- 
fair. The whole country is honey-combed with graft and 
high political crimes and most of the States are enough 
awake to unearth it all and turn OAer a new leaf. Virginia, 
however, is behind the times for lack of a fearless paper 
that will make it its business to expose the evils that exist 
and take a forward stand for high ideals in public life. A 
local paper like THE IDEA must always be handicpped for 
lack of means, because it finds it difficult to get local adver- 
tisers for various reasons. A State paper, however, cculd 
draw its financial support from the large out of tovn adver- 
tisers who find it profitalDle to support the big magazines of 
the CDuntry. Such a paper should be a financial success 
from the beginning. THE IDEA will not undertake this 
work but there are many men here who desire to do so and 
in order to try the situation we hope you will answer the 
followino!' questions, cut out the coupon nnd mail immedi- 
ately to THE IDEA, 1106 Capitol St., Richmond, Va. 

Q. Would you like to see a progressive State weekly 
magazine in Virginia? Ans. 

Q. Would you take stock in such a magazine? Ans. 

Q. Give names and addresses of those who might be in- 
terested. Ans. 

Remarks : 

Please cut this out now and answer the questions and 
write out any suggestions. What do you think of it any 
way? In this way you may have a hand in the coming of a 
better day in Old Virginia. 



THE IDEA 



Western Union Boys Rowdy 



CHARLES Hagan, the well known news carrier and paper 
dealer, whose form is familiar to pedestrians on Bro£(i 
and Main Streets, is continually being roughly treated 
by the Western Union Go's. boys. He claims he can get nc> 
satisfaction from the police, who ignore his appeals. At one 
time the Postal boys also participated in their annoyances 
and rowdy acts, but complaint to the Postal authorities put 
a stop to it. Complaint has been made to the Western Un- 
ion management but to no avail. We make this public for 
Mr. Hagan's benefit in order that friends of his may inter- 
cede with the telegraph company's management and re- 
strain these unruly urchins who resort to force and ruffian- 
ism to torment one who cannot defend himself against them. 
Boys who find they can do injustices with impunity are 
likely to become a criminal expense to the State in future 
years. 



Church Hill 

News BoySt Look! 

Fine Watch Given Away 



We have secured a fine watch which we will give away to 
the boy selling the largest number of IDEAS for the next 
two weeks, Saturday the 13th and Saturday the 20th on 
Church Hill. Get IDEAS at Waller's. 



THE IDEA 5 

The Cost of Hell's Beverage 

"If anyone will ask for government statistics at Washing- 
ton he will find that the direct cost for drink in 19C6 was 
o\er $1,600,000,000, while the indirect cost in taking care of 
the product of the saloon in the way of jails, poorhouses, 
asylums, court fees for criminals, etc., is as much more, or 
in round numbers about $3,000,000,000. If anyone wants 
facts, here are a few. We will take the round number of 
$ ,600,000,000 as the direct cost of the traflfic to the country 
and change it into silver dollars and see what we can do 
with it. Very few people can comprehend the enoimous 
amount of $1,000,000 until used comparatively. If we were 
to take this 1,600,000,000 dollars and undertake to put a 
border around the State of Pennsylvania, laying at the rate 
of 30,000 a day, and had we begun at the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence, it would occupy the time of a 
man until 1921, to finish the job, or 145 years, and it would 
go around the State 2 1-2 times. If we wanted this amount 
loaded on to wagons and hauled away it would take 3,070 
teams, from each of the 76 counties of Pennsylvania, 233,- 
323 teams, each hauling a ton, to carry it. If the same is 
loaded on cars, each car carrying 20 tons, it will take 50 
trains of 50 cars each, and 500 engines to haul this liquor 
bill for one year in the United States. If piled one upon 
the other, allowing .1') to the inch, it would make a column 
252 miles high. It is 2 1-2 times more than all the bank 
stock of the United ii'tates. It is more than all the products 
of corn, wheat, oats, barley and rye by 300,000,000. The 
drink bill for Chicago alone is $75,000,000, while the bank 
earnings of the country are less by several million. It is 
400,000,000 more than all the railroad earnings of the coun- 
try. 

More Facts 

Our drink bill is six times larger than our traffic revenue, 
12 times the amount of the gold products, and 16 tim.es the 



6 THE IDEA 

value of the siher products. It is five times as much as the 
annual product of gold, silver, iron, zinc, lead, copper, alu- 
minum and quicksilver. 

The Chicago Tribune says: "The saloons of the United 
States are responsible for 53,0CO murders that have been 
committed in this country during the last 10 years." Two 
thousand five hundred babies are smothered yearly by 
drunken mothers, 5,000 suicides, 60,000 fallen girls, 3,CC0 
wives are murdered by drunken husbands. Over 7,CC0 ad- 
ditional murders take place, 580,000 growing boys contract 
the drink habit yearly to keep the 250, tCO saloons of the 
United States running. — Exchange. 



A Letter from a Socialist 



Richmond, Va., 7-30-10. 
Editor The Idea:— 

I have just read in today's issue of your publication, your 
article entitled, "A Lesson for the Poor Man — Some Talk 
on Political Parties." I like the tone of this article; it is 
terse, vigorous, pointed and absolutely tiue. You use a 
phrase that should become a classic of the epoch we are 
rapidly approaching: "The war that is temporary hell is 
better than the peace that is eternal slavery." 

All great transition-epochs in human affairs have evolved 
phrases, voicing the spirit of the times, which have been 
engraved upon the archives of subsequent history. This 
phrase deserves to live in the memory of every man who 
reads it. Let all ponder well its portentuous import — "war 
that is hell is better than eternal peace that is slavsiy." If 
the masters of the bread decrees that bloodshed and 
carnage must be the ransom for the emancipation of hu- 
manity from the death-dealing and race destroying system 
of wage slavery under which we are toiling and groaning, 
why then, so be it. But, let us not pit the issue on the bul- 



THE IDEA i 

let until we have tried the ballot. If, when by the arbitra- 
ment of the ballot, the majority have decreed a change or 
revolution from the present chaotic and anarchical sj&ttm 
of privately owned production property for the profit and 
emolument of the few and the impoverishment and enslave- 
ment of the many, to a system of public o\^nelship and co- 
operative production for use that profit and exploitation 
may be eliminated and the wage slave set free, the ruling 
c'ass declines to sumit to the will of the majority, peaceful- 
ly expressed, and themselves precipitate carnage in the ef- 
fort to retain their mastery, why then let the carnage 
come— the consequences be what they may. 

But, brother, let me call your attention to one grave fact, 
a fact well understood and duly appreciated by the Social- 
ists; men who have not learned to vote straight cannot he de- 
j)ended on to shoot straight. A man who votes his master's 
ticket will use a gun in defence of his master. A m.an who 
will vote to continue his bondage may be relied upon to 
shoot to continue it; so there you are, and what are you go- 
ing to do about it? A revolution precipitated befoie the 
masses are educated to understand their tiue econcmiic po- 
sition and class interests would result in a useless and hope- 
less carnage and end by the ignorant masses shooting them- 
selves into a despotism more terrible and abject than before. 
The Dick Military la.w, passed in 1902, and more recently 
ratified by special legislative enactment in each State, — one 
Democrat (?) legislature railroaded a bill through in two 
hours ratifying it — is a c.nning measure devised by the rul- 
ing class for forestalling incipient revolution. By its pro- 
visions each man — some professionals excepted— between 
■ the ages of 18 and 45, is subject to military duty at the call 
of the military authorities upon pain of court m>artial and 
military discipline — shooting. 

It would require a well educated and organized people to 

resist the drastic despotism potential in this infamous law, 

and it would be suicidal folly to precipitate a revolution 

before such education and organization can be completed. 

(Continued on page 13.) 



THE IDEA 



The Spirit 

of Christianity 

A Sermonette 



"Verily I say unto you except a corn of wheat fall into the 
ground and die it abideth alone, but if it die it bringeth forth 
much fruit. He that loveth his life shall lose it, and he that 
hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal." 

When Jesus said, "Take up your cross", He did not 
mean that man should go about with a piece of wood on his 
shoulder, nor did He mean, as we've so often heard preach- 
ers explain, just as they often explain all the backbone out 
of the other teachings of Jesus, that He meant that any of 
life's burdens were crosses and that when one bears his 
part of church expenses or pays his share to any of the 
evangelical enterprises of the church he is thus f)ilfilling' 
the command and bearing his cross. We are continually 
hearing men who can't follow Jesus all the way, continual- 
ly tearing tbe standard down to their measure instead of 
admitting that the standard is too high for them. 

How often have you heard d preacher with a text as plain 
as the nose on your face, spend a half hour telling you that 
the text did not mean exactly what it said, but meant some- 
thing else; and then you went away remarking how learned 
a discourse you had heard, — you knew it took a learned iteb 
to get out of that plain text a meaning you had never 
dreamed of. 

To one who makes a careful study of Jesus the remarka- 
ble thing is not the depth of the "doctrines" of Justificaticn 
or Sanctification or any other -ation, but the simplicity and 



THE IDEA 9 

plainness of His good news to men, and the radical differ- 
ence between His preaching to GIVE up this life and all its 
so called pleasures and the preaching of others to GET 
something out of life. The spirit of Christianity is giving. 
The spirit of this world is getting, and altho we call our- 
selves a Christian nation, we don't know enough about 
Christianity to recognize it when we see it, for whenever 
we find a man who don't worship the dollar but who, on the 
other hand, has a hobby like Jesus had of doing good and 
giving his life for others, we regard him as a fool and say 
he is a crank. 

No, Jesus did not mean go about with a chip on your 
shoulder, but when He said, "Take up your cross and fol- 
low Me", He meant to say, "Do something to get hung 
for." "Do something to be electrocuted for." "Do some- 
thing to be pubhcly and ignominiously executed for." 

The cross was the emblem of legal execution by the State 
for crime, and yet we hear the absurd explanation that it 
meant give something to charity, etc. And if a man does 
follow Jesus today, he will be subject to the same kind of 
persecution. 

Let a man today preach against the rulers and the merch- 
ants and the lawyers and expose them as "liars" and 
"thieves" and "hypocrites", (and Je&us calkd meri to their 
faces by these very names) and he will be cried out against 
for his life and if the powers get a chance they will put 
him to death "between thieves." 

"Except a grain of wheat fall in the ground and die it 
abideth alone", unless it gives up its life it stays alone— bW 
one— single, "but if it die it bringeth forth much fruit. " 
One grain instead of staying single, — all one, —alone, may, 
by dying, become a hundred grains, it may "bear much 
fruit", and that is the test of Christianity, "that ye bear 
much fruit." 

This is the mystery of God, that death brings forth life 
and life "more abundantly", and only by taking up the 
cross of death can the crown of eternal life be gained, for 
Jesus said that he that loveth his life shall lose it and he 



10 THE IDEA 

that hateth his Hfe in this world shall keep it unto life eter- 
nal. If you ask a professing Christian if he believes what 
Jesus said and he'jl tell you of course he does and then he'll 
show you that he don't by making it his business to succeed 
in this life, — "to provide for old age" or to insure himself 
respectable clothing or a good table, altho Jesus said, "take 
no thought what you shall eat or what you shall put on" 
for after these things do the nations seek. I know there 
are a lot of men who think they know more than Jesus 
knew about it, but they will wake up some day and find 
themselves sadly mistaken. 

They may think Jesus did not know, but Jesus says they 
are deceived by the lust for money into thinking this little 
human existence is it, when eternity is the true reality and 
after all this life is but a sleep and a forgetting. This life 
is not the food to be eaten, but only the seed to be sown 
for a harvsst time to come. If the seed be eaten or con- 
sumed in the cares of this life it can not bring forth fruit. 

No doubt shortsighted Hell rejoiced aver the death of Je- 
sus, not knowing that in the harvest every knee shall bow 
and every tongue shall confess him King of Kings. 

Be not deceived. God is not mocked, whatsoever a man 
soweth that shall he also reap. He that soweth to the flesh 
shall of the flesh reap corruption, — death. He that loveth 
this life shall lose it, and he that soweth to the Spirit shall 
of the Spirit reap life everlasting. 

The fact that the spiritual life does not bring fruit such 
as the fleshly senses can appreciate, deceives some into 
thinking that the spiritually minded are not wise. 

The fact that this fleshly worldly does reward the evil 
doer and gives the lie to the saying, "Honesty is the best pol- 
icy" leads some to believe that it don't pay to be good or to 
do g(o]. 

Jesus never taught that it paid in this life's treasures to 
be a Christian, 

The men who have followed Jesus most closely have all 
been rank failures as this world counts success. 

The apostles of Christ's time and the martyrs who went 



THE IDEA 11 

to the stake and the tombs and the persecutions in later 
days found it did not pay to be Christians, neither does it 
pay in these times to follow Jesus, if one expects his pay in 
money or esteem or worldly goods. But when one dies, as 
all must, and finds that the accumulations of this life must 
corrupt and pass away and that none can go with him to the 
grave or the unknown life beyond, then he will wake up to 
know that after all honesty is the best policy and that to 
have saved his life he should have died for the right. If this 
Httle paper shall have to die for the right it shall count it 
all joy. 



Phone us to call for your printing. We have time to do it quickly 
now and can promise you up to date clean, neat work on paper that 
talks and with inks that show up. You need some visiting cards? Eh? 



"Dull Safetj/ !^azor blades 

2 1-2 CENTS EACH 

Let our experts put your old dill blades in perfect 

condition for above pi ice. 

OLD STYLE RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15c EACH 

SCISSORS AND KNIVES SHARPENED 

Work Guaranteed 

SPECIALS 

AS LONG AS THEY LAST 

$2.50 Razors reduced to $1.25 

$2.00 " " " $1.00 

$L50 " " " $ .75 

$1-50 Razor Strop $ .75 

$1.00 Bottle Eau de Quinine Hair Tonic $ .49 

$ .75 Jar Vie- Veer Massage Cream . $ .49 

Imported Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Lotions and a Full 

Line of Toilet Supplies at Reduced Piices. 

THE "SHARP-O" CO. 

608 East Main Street 



12 THE IDEA 

Sophie MoUoy 
and the Police 
Department 



'HpHE papers of Monday tell us that on last Sunday Sophie 
*• Molloy, who Justice John says operated the worst 
house in town, and who for years has kept open out- 
side the red light district and known to the police an assig- 
nation house where whiskey was also sold, was arrested for 
selling liquor without license. 

This Sophie is the one whom the police power of the city 
of Richmond protected from jail last fall and because THE 
IDEA exposed them in it the editor was arrested and put 
in jail. 

What we said about it then was the truth, the whole truth 
and nothing but the truth, and we are here to repeat it 
whenever we please. 

Sophie was freed because she stood in, tho she was steep- 
ed in crime. We went to jail because we attempted to break 
up this crime. She was put under bond. We wonder why 
we hear nothing of the forfeiture of that bond. 

The Times-Dispatch has this to say:— 

SOPHIE MOLLOY ARRESTED 

Charged With Selling Liquor Without a License 

Sophie Molloy, a well-known character in police circles, 
was arrested yesterday by Policemen Napier and Spur en a 
charge of selHng liquor without a license^. The warrant for 



THE IDEA 13 

the woman's arrest was sworn out upon "information re- 
cei\ed, " and it is said that the officers will be able to pro- 
duce two witnesses who will testify that the woman sold the 
intoxicants. 

Sophie Molloy figured extensively in the trial of James 
Conway, charged with the killing of Robert Torrence." 

Those who would reform must go to jail for it while So- 
phie, the criminal prostitute, must keep her liberty because 
for some unknown reason she enjoyed protection. 



A Letter from a Socialist 



(Continued from 7th page.) 

To educate the people and organize them, to the end that 
they may emancipate themselves, peacefully if possible, 
otherwise if necessary, is the mission of the SociaHst Party. 
The Capitahst System is rapidly nearing its culmination, 
and when the crisis comes, if there be not enough people 
educated to understand and cope with the situation, a reign 
of terror must ensue. Men will not starve peacefully. Self- 
preservation is the first law of nature, and hungry men 
would become elemental demons, battling for bread. But 
without training, organization and a definite programme, 
the carnage would be in vain. The wasters of bread would 
get their well-fed hirelings to drum along the hungry mob 
with gatling guns and dynamite, and the Nation would take 
a plunge backward into the night of feudal despotism more 
dark and terrible than the world has yet seen. That such 
dire calamity be averted, and the evolution of civilization 
continue until the world reaches the heights of co-operation 
and brotherhood, it becomes the duty of each man, endow- 
ed by nature with honesty and intelligence, to take a part. 
The times need men — men who will not let their immediate 
economic interests stultify them— men who will not, for 



14 THE IDEA 

their own selfish ends, sell the human race into eternal 
bondage. Men who are fearless in prcclaimirg the tiuth 
to their benighted brothers in terms too forceful and plain 
to be misunderstood. Upon such men the fate of a world 
depends. B. M. Button. 



Holiday, 

August the 10th 

Grocers Plan a Big Time 

Annual Excursion^ to Buckroe^ Will Give 
Away Many Valuable Prizes 

Contrast Between Grocers* and Police Picnics 



^T*HE Retail Grocers' Association will go on their 10th 
■■• Annual Excursion on next Wednesday, August 10th, 
and those who go with them are not only promised a 
pleasant day at the beach at a low cost, but bills are out 
announcing that presents will be given to every one that 
goes. 

The Southern Biscuit Works will distribute full sized box- 
es of cakes and crackers to all who go, and the Southern 
Manufacturing Co. will give away postal cards and other 
valuable souvenirs while several hundred dollars' worth of 
special prizes will be given to those who happen to have the 



THE IDEA 15 

luckj; numbers on their tickets. These valuable prizes in- 
clude a suit of clothes, a barrel of flour, half cord of wood 
and many other things. 

The Grocers always carry a big crowd en their excursions 
and they thus defray, in part, the expenses of their organi- 
zation. 

What a contrast in methods of making money there is 
between the Police Benevolent Association, which gives 
away poisonous booze to all who will ask for it at their an- 
nual picnic which costs $1.00 to enter. Besides this, just 
this year gambling, literally under the very nose of the po- 
lice, went on at their picnic this summer. Several games of 
Poker were in progress in one building. 



Political Undertakers Get the 
Coroner's Business 



The reasons why undertakers are in the council increase. 
It is now learned that two undertakers, Bliley and Bennett, 
are the favored ones when a death occurs which has to come 
before the City Coroner. Bliley and Bennett are councilmen 
and it is stated that their political influence is responsible 
for the fact that nearly all deaths of strangers in the city, 
which come before a coroner's jury, help to enrich these 
undertakers. 

No wonder the best citizens seldom run for oflfice when 
they have to oppose men who use their office for private 
gain and who thus will exert themselves beyond what is 
proper to gain a seat in the council. 

Tjhe y^ea Sprint Shop's S^hone 

1 s 
MONROE 2"70S 

GO RIGHT NOW AND CALL UP YODER AND ASK HIM TO COME 
BY AND SEE IF YOU HAVE NOT SOME PRINTING FOR HIM 



16 THE IDEA 

Graft In Swearing Warrants 

Complaints have come to our ears for a year concerning 
the Justices of the Peace. There are three Justices for each 
ward of the city, making twenty four Justices in all. Of 
these twenty four duly elected by the people we learn'that 
two get about 80 per cent, of all the work. 

Justice McCarthy at the 1st police station and Justice 
Purdy at the second police station aie always in evidence on 
warrants and bonds, earning many fees, while the other 
Justices have in many cases not made enough money to pay 
for their primary election fees, much less other election ex- 
penses. 

It is a notorious fact that when a man has committed a 
crime and a poHceman appears, int€?d of arresting the of- 
fender he finds the offended and infoims him it will be nec- 
essary to swear out a warrant before he can make an ar- 
rest, which is not true, and then he telephones for McCar- 
thy or Purdy who swear out the warrant and collect EOc for 
the same. 

McCarthy has a brother who is a police commissioner and 
it is said that this is one reason why he is so often called on. 
Policemen desirous of retaining their jobs please commis- 
sioner McCarthy by making his brother's business prof- 
itable, for 'Squire McCarthy has no other business but to 
wait for crimir als to furnish him a living. Much of his time 
he spends at police headquarters, waiting for business. 

'Squire Purdy, in the west end, seems to enjoy the special 
favor of the Chief, for when the Chief wants to have a 
warrant sworn he calls on Purdy. It is stated that tho oth- 
er Justices live near the station, still Purdy is always called. 
It is even learned that while other Justices are in the station 
house itself Purdy is phoned for to collect the fee and police- 
men have been known to do electioneering duty for him at 
election time, thus using the power of their influential fosi- 
tions with voters . who desire to please them for favors ob- 
tainable. 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NSW BOO:C, 4S0 pages, 32 pages of St.ik'ag Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POSTAGE EXTRA 15 CENTS 

A Complete and Detailed 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic in Young (jirls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepers 
of Dives. 



How To Save Your Boy 
or Girl. 

^^ i^* ^^- 

Chapters by the Fol- 
bwing Persons: 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkin, Asst. 
U. S. Distiict Attorney, 
Chicago, III.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe; 

VV. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 




A WHITE SLAVE 



Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd, Suppression of White 
Slave TraflRc, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Sbve's Own Stcry; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In New York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order. Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE VOUNG 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Warned. 



OTOR CYCLES 




AND 



BICYCLES 



ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 



harbour S^i/yyy Company 



WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 



South S3 OS ton, Virginia 



If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 



1 ■ ■■ 


';, -- — ~~"^~^ 


1 






^:-^- 



J^oennt£fer^Oi'zemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 




All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops, 



Vol. IV August 13, 1 9 JO No 

THE ^ IDEA 



A SIGN OP THB TIMES 



.g^yg^ 



A Red Hot Number 
Must We Quit? 



.35^^^ 



5 CENTS A COPY $2.00 A YEAR 

Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia.^-'^-----'^^^^^^^^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^"^^^^^^^^^^^^-'^^^^ 



t3o<^Kt><if><mm>co<mKDGo<mK>Qi><iKK>Gs><amDQQo<aBK>of><^m>aO!><^K><ii><mtK><i!><^K><i9a^m><ii><^aDaQ 



f JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN I 

i 



7th AND MAIN STS. 
I ^ We are showing special good values in ' -, - 

g ^ 2)iamonci:j, 2l/aicAe:^j ^ewelrj/, y § 

I Oi'lverwarCf Cut Slass, Sic, 1 

I We invite your inspection I 

Q Ci 

[><■■> C D (■■> i> (■■> « D <HB> <i D <■■> a i><^H> <i Q D OHB> a D O^D C Q l><^H> <3 D ^^ Q ^iH> <i !><^H> a !><■■> C Q 
O!>a^DaD<HH>aD<iBD<ID<aH><34>i><B^0!><I^Dai>aaH><ID<^H>aD<^H>C<I>0aHDaD^HDQ!><^H>aD<aHDaQ 

Print it Right. I 



2 Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea s 

" Presses v^^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 

I roe 2708, | 

O , Q 

Oi><lHD<iD<l^K>a!><^H>(ID<HH><]<i>D<HH>QD<aH>CD<^H>«D(^H>aDaHk><!4>E>aiH>CI><^H>0»<^V(!D(^B>«O 

{ HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet \ 

} ' — ^ 

A wants, in Drugs and Medicines a 

V Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitej, Delicate ^ 

f Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

# i 

i # 

i - A. H. ROBINS, - I 

} 200 E. MARSHALL ST. I 

K Goods delivered anywhere in the city. ^ 

i Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. 5 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 
VOL. IV AUGUST 13, 1910 No. 30 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

ff^olloc/c T/Jooh the Council 

^isO'-iPollock ytffair Whitewash Complete 



/^N Thursday of last week the council met to play the last 
^-^ act in the now famous Pollock-Wise Swill Investiga- 
tion and to put the final touches of whitewash on the 
dirty affair. It will be remembered that Pollock and Wise, 
councilmen of the city of Richmond, received a fee of $500.- 
00 for their services in "getting permission from the Health 
Board," as they expressed it, for dairymen to use distillery 
swill, contrary to law, in feeding milk cows. 

Though this in itself was contrary to morals and e\en le- 
gal ethics, and tho they should have been punished for it by 
being dismissed from the council, still it further appeared 
that they were hired by the dairymen to get them the right 
to feed the swill (1) When they knew it was contrary to 
law, (2) They interested themselves in and had passed an 
ordinance changing that law, (3rd) They were paid after 



2 THE IDEA 

the ordinance was passed. For all this, the council commit- 
tee after a stormy investigation, decided simply to recom- 
mend that such lawyers be prohibited by ordinance from 
appearing before any committee or department or court of 
the city in which the city is interested. When the ordi- 
nance as drawn by the city attorney for the council com- 
mittee embodying this idea came before the council, that 
subservient body instead of listening to the committee which 
heard the evidence, and the city attorney, simply voted as 
Pollock "demanded", for he is a wise politician and an able 
speaker and the councilmen are all "good friends" with him 
and when he said, "I demand" of the good men in this 
body, only a half dozen or so had the courage to vote against 
him, and, therefore, practically all the work of the investi- 
gating committee was undone for Pollock, whose character 
very few councilmen respect at all, but whose ability they 
all seem to worship, had led them by the nose to do what 
their common sense directed they should not do. 

Pollock is a master in the art of flattery, always smooth 
and self-controlled, he rubs the fur of his mental under- 
lings, though moral s;aperiors, the right way and they, for 
fear of offending somebody, vote as he wishes them to. 
Here is a sample of the palaver he gave them: 

"I need no recommendation from these gentlemen who 
are trying to drive me from council. I am going to demand 
even-handed justice. I am going to depend on the honest, 
intelligent members of this body to defeat this ordinance. 
It is an insult to the integrity of the courts. I will not be 
dri>en from this Council. I ask only justice, and I expect 
to get it," 

Just think of it: Gilbert Pollock exhorting a city council 
of Richmond, Va., U. S. A., to come with him up to a high- 
er plane of justice and honesty, Pollock protecting the 
council from "insulting the integrity of the courts." 

Thus did Pollock, the slick, apply the whitewash to his 
own hide, and we fancy as he went home that night he 
laughed in his sleeve at the way he had wooled the council. 



THE IDEA 3 

or as one of the papers puts it, ''created a profound effect 
on his auditors." 

So Justice John's son-in-law, as Pollock is called in police 
circles, may continue to practice before the One John with 
whom he has so much influence and whose salary he has eo 
great a weight in increasing in the council. 

When one hires Pollock, he hires a man who hires the 
judge and the chances are he'll win. 

This means much money for G. K. Pollock, of the smooth 
tongue, and the slick hair, and the devious ways. 



A Walk Through Mayo Street 



/^N Monday of this week, the writer walked again 
•^^ through Mayo Street, the place where crime and de- 
bauchery and vice run rampant under the careful protection 
from the law on the part of the police board. 

There seems to be an improvement in the general condi- 
tion of affairs, altho women hung from the windows "dis- 
playing their breasts below the danger line," as on the for- 
mer occasion, reported a few months ago in these columns. 
These words in quotations above are the ones used then, 
at which Justice John seemed to take especial offence, and 
for which he said he was going to put a stop to THE IDEA. 
Let it be known to the Justice and all whom it may concern 
that this paper, as long as it can financially exist, will con- 
demn in the harshest terms these evils and expose the chief 
and the major and police justice and Commonwealth's At- 
torney in their criminal alliance with vice and debauchery, 
and when THE IDEA shall cease to be, the tongue and the 
pen of the writer of these lines will continue to exert them- 
selves for purity and righteousness and will continue to ex- 
pose as traitors and cowards and corruptionists those who 
violate theiroaths of office. 



THE IDEA 



Wholesale Arrests 

Negroes Treated Like Cattle 



OINCE the police department has been stirred up by the 
^ publicity of THE IDEA, they are making a pretense 
at being most zealous of the morals of the city and 
wholesale raids have taken place and negroes, herded to- 
gether like cattle, have been hurried away to jail after be- 
ing hustled out of their beds at midnight, absolutelj with- 
out any warrant or right to search their premises, the only 
excuse being that some petty thieving had been going on 
while the police were taking a picnic or preparing for it, 
while the real reason seems to be that the police depart- 
ment, knowing how any action against negroes is applaudecT 
by the great ''Supreme" and its satellites, was anxious to 
reinstate itself in the good graces of the people by appear- 
ing to be zealous guardians of law and order. Now, THE 
IDEA inquires to know whether it is unlawful to live in any 
section of the great and prosperous city of Richmond? 
These negroes, male and female, were taken into custody 
with no other charge than that they lived in a certain street 
and the papers, in extenuation of the action of the police, 
said that among them were many who had been before the 
police department before. We would enquire, since when 
has it been lawful to arrest a man twice on the same charge 
or simply because he had given trouble in the past. 

Should a man be subject to the whims of the police sim- 
ply because he had been made to suffer once for a violation 
of law? 

We don't know how it strikes other people, but it certain- 
ly sounds to us more Hke the accounts of Russian persecu- 
tion of Jews than it does like orderly American procedure. 



THE IDEA 5 

It looks like the Richmond police department delights in 
showing its authority, but never delights in enforcing the 
law. 

Notice also that when a raid is made it is not in any rec- 
ognized red light district w here police commissioners have 
special interests and where the lav^s are openly violated, 
well know^n to the police. 

If one should be arrested simply because he lived in a 
given locality that locality surely ought to be the one in 
which to reside means you are a prostitute, and where rents 
are exorbitant simply because for prostitutes to live else- 
where means that they will not enjoy the favors of the be- 
neficent police board under the wise (?) management of C. 
Manning, Jr., confessed bribe taker. 



Assinated 

By Police and Press 

The Idea Must Stop Publishing 

At Least for a While 



T^VER since early in the spring, newsdealers all over the 
^-^ city have told us of intimidations by representatives of 
the machine element of the city which have made it 
unprofitable for them to handle THE IDEA. 

Petitions have been circulated among the dealers to get 
them to agree to stop handling this paper and many believe 
that the warrant against the writer for corrupting the mor- 
als of the youth was mainly to have a means of stopping 
the dealers from handling THE IDEA by threats of like 
treatment. 



6 THE IDEA 

At any rate, many dealers stopped at that time, and it is 
learned that they were told by representatives of the police 
department that they would be airested if they continued 
to sell THE IDEA. 

Tho dealers may have known that they could not be brok- 
en up on so flimsy a charge, still they felt it unwise to draw 
the enmity of those in authority against them. 

Newsdealers who sold on Sunday were likewise appr cach- 
ed and told that THE IDEA was after breaking up their 
business by having the laws against Sunday selling (nitictd. 

In this and various other ways best known to unprinci- 
pled crooks, whose businesses depei.d on lawlessness orpat- 
ronage or police protection of cr.me, great pressure h£ s bt tn 
brought to bear on all who dared handle THE IDEA until 
not a half dozen dealers in the city will handle it, tho their 
sympathies be with it. At one time about 80 dealeis Lold 
THE IDEA regularly. 

By thus cutting down our mean of distribution many reg- 
ular buyers of THL IDEA have been unable to secure the 
paper. Boys have been treated in the seme manner and 
every low and vile means imaginable has been used to kill 
TBE IDEA so that the circulation has been cut down about 
500 in the last three months. 

This, together with the fact that the printing busjihess on 
which we have had to rely has been dull for the summer and 
the writer has been so completely run down by the multifa- 
rious duties of editing, publishing, printing and other cares 
as not to be able to make the paper what it should be— all 
these have combined to our financial hurt, until THE IDEA 
today is so handicapped as to be unable to meet the demands 
on its treasury and so will have to discontinue publication 
with this number, at least for the present or until sufficient 
funds can be secured to continue operation. 

The editor, too, is completely exhausted physically and 
must take a rest of a week or so at least. 

By the first of September it is hoped that the publication 
may be resumed. At that time an attempt will be made to 
get back at work. Meantime we desire to thank the many 



THE IDEA 7 

friends whose contributions have made the paper so far 
successful for their acts of kindness, and to assure all sub- 
scribers that if they will wait a little while the paper will 
resume its attack on graft and greed and political corrup- 
tion. THE IDEA is about $70.00 behind and while the dull 
summer continues cannot afford to keep on at a loss, nor 
can it operate without a loss while its editor is so physically 
exhausted as to be unable to do proper research work. 
Meantime some means must be de\ised to meet our finan- 
cial obligations and to get a much needed rest. 

In the fall we trust Richmond will wake up. 

Later -on Thursday night — at a meeting of friends con- 
sisting of two ministers, a college professor and two busi- 
ness men, it was decided to resume publication of THE 
IDEA in the fall and to call a public meeting to organize to 
carry on the work. 



Policy 



A FTER many months of cessation of business, the large 
•^*' policy shops are gradually beginning to ply their trade 
in a guarded way among the people. 
When THE IDEA exposed the Griffin ank Hatke policy 
games, being protected by the police, they were warned and 
the police saw to it that they kept quiet. But this meant a 
serious curtailment of revenue, and great pressure has 
been brought to bear on the police authorities to get them 
to close their eyes as of yore, and not see the evidences of 
crime as they have been persuaded to do in the prostitution, 
whiskey selling and Sunday violation cases. Through fear 
of exposure, the police found it expedient to keep down the 
Hd, but of late the pressure has been great and the preach- 
ers have apparently rested on their oars, and so the nefari- 
ous and insidious gambling has broke loose afresh and prom- 



8 THE IDEA 

ises to soon get back into its old position of complete police 
protection. 

How long, how long, will it be ere Richmonders organize 
to fight corrupt politics, the cause of Richmond's public 
shame. 



More About 
Justices of Peace 



THE ramifications of the machine influence on every 
phase of political life are simply amazing, and one can 
hardly turn around without having to bump up against the 
fees of some machine politician. McCarthy and Purdj are 
certainly making big money, not only in legitimate fees, 
but in occupying positions in which they can fix excessive 
bonds for their friends to furnish for poor unfortunates who 
chance to be arrested. 

It was Purdy who changed the bond fixed for $500.00 up 
to $1000.00 when the editor was arrested last fall for alleged 
hbel, and it was Purdy who swore out the warrant for chief 
Werner when the editor was arrested this year on the So- 
cratic charge of "corrupting the morals of the youth." 

In all the charges preferred against us we do not know 
of a one in which either McCarthy or Purdy has not collect- 
ed a fee. 

Now, in the name of the other 22 Justices, THE IDEA 
wants to know why they should be discriminated against? 

These servants of the people, some of them, need the 
money which they were elected to draw, while others pile 
up fees to riches because of favoritism or something infi- 
nitely worse. 



THE IDEA 



A Remedy for 
Machine Politics 



By A. Leo Weil 



Mr. Weil, as president of a large body of citizens organized to rid tlie city of 
graft and bribery, was primarily responsible for the awakening of public opinion 
whicli resulted in the wholesale house-cleaning of the municipal government of 
Pittsburg. 

Wherever a city is governed by a political machine, there 
you will find systematic graft, bribery, and corruption. The 
machine is built upon patronage and privileges from which 
it exacts tribute with which to maintain the organization. 
The grantor of patronage and privilege expects a return on 
his investment— and takes it. 

Under our form of government, political organization is 
as necessary for cities as for tne state or the nation. The 
machine, working for selfish interests, commands support; 
an organization, working unselfishly for the public interest, 
appeals for support. Result: the machine, a thoroughly or- 
ganized, tvell-officered army with ample means, against the 
disorganized public. There are more honest than dishonest 
men in every community. Not all supporters of the ma- 
chine are loyal; some vote because of its power ' of retalia- 
tion, some from a desire to be with the winners, some be- 
cause of the hopelessness of resistance, a large number be- 
cause it represents in name their political adherence in na- 
tional politics. The machine, therefore, continues, though 
always, in every city, in the minority. 

The remedy, as I see it, is to teach the majority. Changes 
in city government by selecting fewer representatives — a 
short ballot; the prevention of national party names in 



10 THE IDEA 

municipal elections; improvements in election machinery or 
in registration and other laws to qualify voters^these may 
all help, but in the last analysis, to dislodge the machine 
the majority must he organized. A small number of men, 
even one man, of determination and means, moved by the 
purest motives, seeking no office, only the public good, can 
by intelligent investigation demonstrate that misgovern- 
ment by the machine means not merely waste of public 
moneys, fraudulent contracts, grafting, and political cor- 
ruption, but spells, in burning letters, debauchery, degra- 
dation, partnership with prostitution, immunity of vice, 
protection of criminals, lax sanitation, disease-breeding ten- 
ements, and a lowering of the moral tone of the community, 
the greatest of all the evils. If by your voice you extol vir- 
tue and by your vote you uphold vice, the young are more 
apt to follow the vote than the voice. Those great financial 
and insurance-company scandals that shook and shamed 
this nation were a reflex of the conventional conscience of 
our great cities where graft, bribery, and corruption pre- 
vailed. Demonstrate what machine misgovernment means, 
and enough righteous men will be found to save the city. 

The remedy, therefore, in my opinion is: first, investiga- 
tion; second, demonstration; third, publication; and fourth, 
organization, but organization thorough, intelligent, and 
permanent. Such an organization need not be of an inde- 
pendent political party; it may work within or without the 
regular party; that depends upon the conditions in each 
city. Such an organization of the better elements, with a 
determination to take an active part in city elections, can 
dominate the situation, break up the machine, divorce mu- 
nicipal from state and national elections, and restore to our 
cities the control of their own affairs." 

The above is from The Cosmopolitan of this month, and 
is so applicable to the case of Richmond that we reproduce 
it and commend it to the careful consideration of every vot- 
er. THE IDEA has "investigated" and has "pubHshed". 
It remains for the good people of Richmond to "organize^'. 



THE IDEA 11 

"thoroughly and permanently." Have you got the nerve? 
The machine is all bluff. All you have got to do is to call 
the bluff. If the good people of Richmond could know how 
much the slight organization already formed has already 
done, they would exultantly push forward and clean up the 
bunch of political rascals that continue to rob and misman- 
age and debauch the fair Capital of Virginia, The work is 
before you. It's up to YOU. ORGANIZE. 



Richmond Crime 

Some Facts 



Assignation and Bawdy Houses and Blind Tigers are in 
operation all over Richmond and one can get a member of 
the sporting fraternity to point out such places in every 
section, the high toned West End in particular, and to prove 
by conclusive evidence that his information is true and yet 
the police department would have you believe that ignoring 
the law and making a hot bed for these criminals by segre- 
gating them, as they pretend to do, is the best policy, tho 
the law says otherwise; while as a matter of fact thamore 
women confined in a public red light district the greater the 
number of outside houses of shame, because the pulicity of 
their shame shows others the way of crime and creates and 
fosters the disregard of moral and civil law. The Red Light 
policy is a failure in Richmond, as is shown by the low ebb 
of morality in all walks of life. 



fScG US first ^ ^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



12 THE IDEA 



Church Hill 

News Boyst Lookl 

Fine Watch Given Away 



We have secured a fine watch which we will give away to 
the boy selling the largest number of IDEAS for the next 
two weeks, Saturday the 13th and Saturday the 20th on 
Church Hill. Get IDEAS at Waller's. 



^ull Safeti/ !7iazor SSlades 

12L 1-a CENTS EACH 

Let our experts put your old dull blades in perfect 

condition for above price. 

OLD STYLE RAZORS HON^ID AND SET, 15c EACH 

SCISSORS AND KNIVES SHARPENED 

Work Guaranteed 

SPECIALS 

AS LONG AS THEY LAST 
$2.50 Razors reduced to .. .. .;t. ,v $1.25 
$2.00 ♦' - :'..., ,., , $L00:< 

$L50 " •* ♦• . . .. •. ; ,$ .75 -.: .... 

$1-50 Razor Strop ... .''. . I $.75 
$L00 Bottle Eau de QuinIHe Haii- T6ni(i'$''.49' " 
$ .75 Jar Vie-Veer Massage Cream . $ .49 
Imported Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Lotions. and a Fuli' 
Line of Toilet Supplies at Reduced Prfces. '^' ^" ' 

THE ''SHARP-O'' CO. 

608 East Main Street 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NEW BOOK, 430 pages, 32 pages of Striking Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POSTAGE EXTRA 15 CENTS 

A Complete and Detailed 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic in Young Girls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepers 
of Dives. 

How To Save Your Boy 
or Girl. 

Chapters by the Fol- 
lowing Persons: 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, III.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkin, Asst. 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe; 

W. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 

A WHITE SLAVE 

Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd, Suppression of Whitfe 
Slave Traffic, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Slave's Own Story; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In New York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order, Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE VOUNG 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Warned. 




iOTOR CYCLES 



AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $J50.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 



3n West Broad Street 



Phone Madison 3945 ^ 



iSarbour SSuyyy Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South Boston, Vir£finia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jVoenni^fer'^Oizemore Co. 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 




Vol. iV September 10, 19 JO ,' 

^ , 4V' 



THE ^ IDE 



h 



A SIGN OP THB TIMES 



-15^^ 



Leading Article on 

C. Manning, Jn 

Also Other Subjects Handled With Gloves Off 



^^ 



5 CENTS A COPY $2.00 A YEAR 

Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virgnn ia . .■.:.■..---:::----■/;::;:::;:/::/:/;;::/:::.-/::;;.■:;.;.■.■■;:.■.. 



f JEWELER J, S* JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I , 7th AND MAIN STS. | 

I t^ We are showing special good values in J * 

g ^ ^lamondOf Watche:), ^ewelrj/j y § 

I Silverwarey Cut S/asSj £tc, 5 

1 We invite your inspection | 

A ^^^ ^^_» ^^^ „^^ „^^ <^_v >__^ <^_v ^_^ >^^ .^^ __ _^ ** 

I Print it Right. I 

! ! 

2 Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea g 
§ Presses vv^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- § 
I roe 2708, I 

a ^^^ ,^__ ,^_ <^^ .^^ ** 

HEADQUARTERS for your sick w^ants; your family and toilet f 

wants, in Drugs and Medicines ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. \ 
i 

i 

. A. R ROBINS, - I 

200 E, MARSHALL ST. i 



<31oods delivered anywhere in the city. 



Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. f 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV SEPTEMBER 10, 1910 No. 31 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by Adon A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered ai second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

The Issue 
Up to the Courts 

C. Manning to Answer for 
Violation of Oath 






TVTEDNESDAY: As this goes to the printer, THE IDEA 
^ rrlanagertient has decided to wait no longer for the 
good citizens (?) to start a crusade against vice in 
Richmond, but to take the initiative and bring into court 
the guilty partis against whom proper evidence has been 
obtained. ^-. 



2 THE IDEA 

To that end Mr. C. Manning, Jr., will be proceeded 
against this week, as he has publicly admitted on the stand 
that he has taken action as a police commissioner to prevent 
the police department from doing their sworn duty in regard 
to houses of ill fame. Regardless of the question as to 
whether it might be best or not for the Legislature to per- 
mit such evils under police regulation, Mr. Manning will be 
proceeded against for violating his oath in preventing police 
from carrying out the law already passed by the legislature. 
The legislature never has seen fit to regulate (?) the red 
light e\il but has enacted a law requiring city police to 
bring to justice all of those who keep houses of ill fame. It 
has made a Commonwealth's Attorney for each city and 
made him swear to lawfully see that the laws are enforced. 
It has devised a Mayor who swears to enforce all the laws 
by means of the police under him. It has decreed a police 
board to have general supervision over methods of provid- 
ing for a sufficient and equipped force of police but with no 
authority to change any law. 

C. Manning, Jr., testified that he had, as police commis- 
sioner, instructed (?) police to ignore the law in certain sec- 
tions and also testified that the police department had been 
instructed to keep an accurate tabulation of the women in 
these protected districts. To that end the chief of police 
has in his office today pictures of each woman who occupies 
one of these houses of ill fame in the so called red light dis- 
trict. He is thus made by the action of the police commis- 
sioner an aider and abettor of criminals and by the action 
of a petty commissioner is transformed from a guardian of 
the law into a party to the crime. As Mr. Manning is the 
only one who has publicly admitted his guilt in this matter 
he is the only one against whom, with the present court, 
we can supply sufficient evidence to convict. 

Those guilty should be proceeded against for misfeasance 
in offiicebut the Commonwealth's Attorney, Minitree Folkes 
who heard Manning's admission of guilt has shown that he 
will not proceed against him and it has therefore seemed 
best to swear out a warrant against Manning. 



THE IDEA 3 

Of course it is expected that the whitewashers will hy 
some hook or crook of legal procedure throw the whole 
matter out of court. We look for that but we want them 
thus to show their partyship to the evil, which the machine 
crowd is supporting. Justice Chrutchfield, who admits that 
the commissioner has violated the law but who insists that 
as he is only a judicial officer he can do nothing until a case 
is brought before him, will most likely, in order to save his 
own hide, refuse to try the case, or else find some techni- 
cality on which to dismiss it. 

Thoitisthe duty of the Commonwealth's Attorney to 
prosecute this case, as he has already shown that he is with 
the ring and against any good move THE IDEA may make 
cannot be relied on to push the case. 

In spite of all this we have decided to put it up to the 
courts in order that the people may see how those -w hem 
they have elected to work for them are really more con- 
cerned about doing the will of Mayo Street and the crooked 
politicians and business men whose interests are at stake 
down there than they are about doing the will of the sov- 
ereign people who have made laws to guide, them. The is- 
sue is clearly drawn. It is, has a petty police commissioner 
or even an executive officer a right to make laws to suit 
himself in utter defiance of all laws already made. 

It's up to them. Now watch them dodge and delay. 

Meantime let the people be educated by this publicity 
crusade to see the causes and after a while may be the 
preachers and leaders will make a start for pure govern- 
ment.^ And that brings us to another subject, namely: 
Richmond Preachers! Need a Little Dynamite. See page 14. 



Many large cities have from 3 to 5 councilmen only, and 
Biltimore, which everybody knows is badly managed 
enough and' h'a« «• large, unwieldy council, is aiflicted with 
only about forty, while Richmond groans under the burden 
of 64, and when we take in. Barton Heights or Highland 
Park it will be 72; enough to legislate for the universe, 
enough in calibre td*h:ffi a 6ider press, that is those who do 
the actual running. 



THE IDEA 



A Blunder 



In our last issue was an article headed — Assinated. We 
don't know what "Assinated" means. Nor did we notice 
the blunder until after the edition had been disposed of. 
What we intended to say was "Assassinated" and the type- 
setter left out three letters and the proof reader failed to 
detect it. 

Thus, "The best laid plans of mice and men 
Gang aft agley, 
And leave us naught but grief and pain 
For promised joy." 



A Dead Bar-Keeper 



The other day Mr. B., a saloon keeper, died and the papers in giv- 
ing announcement of it simply stated the time and the place, and the 
date of the funeral and a list of the relatives but the kind relative or 
friend had too much consideration for his family to state that M. B, 
ran a bar-room. Perhaps, too, the notice would be sent to distant 
relatives from whom shame had kept the fact that Mr. B, ran a bar- 
room. What a shame that so-called Christian men, for "business" 
reasons or for "personal liberty" reasons will vote to make it not only 
possible but legal and profitable for a man to engage in a business 
the very name of which his friends and family are ashamed to men- 
tion in the presence of death. 



Well, THE IDEA is back on the job and there'll be something 
doing before we take another vacation. 



We'll pay some one a neat commission to get ads. for us. Write or 
phone The Idea Print Shop, 1106 Caipitol St,, Phone Monroe 2708. 



THE IDEA 5 

Sophie 

Beloved of the Powers that Be 



IT seems that every attempt to break up the criminal 
operations of Sophie Molloy results not in the punish- 
ment of Sophie but on the other hand in the punishment 
of those engaged in the attempt. 

Early in August two officers attempted to catch Sophie 
selling whiskey, as she has been a notorious breaker of the 
prohibition laws for years. 

It was given out that at last a clear case had been worked 
out and that certainly Sophie would get her deserts this 
time. 

Before the trial, however, it became rumored around that 
Sophie had issued her challenge to the powers that be and 
had defied them to do anything to her, threatening that if 
she were punished somebody higher up would have to 
suffer. 

Then word came to us, before the trial mind you, that 
there was not sufficient evidence to convict and that Sophie 
would go free, as formerly. 

On August 16th Sophie was tried. Gilbert Pollock ap- 
peared as counsel for her. A negro was witness against 
her. He was arrested and put in jail for perjury and So- 
phie went free. 

In view of all the circumstances in the case it is confi- 
dently believed that the agents of the prosecution were 
tampered with and that the case against Sopie was "fixed" 
in order to protect somebody else "higher up." Sophie, 
according to the One John, has operated for years one of 
the worst places in the city, and yet she always goes scot 
free. 



6 THE IDEA 

It has been the common talk of the street that this place 
was patronized by politicians and public officials. 

G. Manning, Jr., testified that he had been there, tho he 
said he had been only on the porch. The porch, however, 
is on the second floor. He did not mention that. W. P, 
Leaman, who with Manning and Saunders received about 
$1000.00 for his influence with councilmen, was seen at the 
former trial of Sophie carrying messages between council- 
man Pollock, who represented Sophie, and a negro man, 
presumably the one who is reputed to be the parairour of 
Sophie, white in color. 

With such men having a conversational acquaintar ce it is 
no wonder that Sophie goes free, and the witness against 
her is put in jail. 

Such are the ways of crooked politics in RichmoEci, the 
ring ridden. 

It is, indeed, an exceedingly dangerous business to tam- 
per with Sophie's illegitimate business. Policemen may be 
losing their official heads next if they make any pretext to- 
wards a real earnest attempt at putting Sophie out of her 
nefarious occupations. 



Automobile Wreck 

Result of Strong Drink 



Last week the town was shocked by the story of a fatal automobile 
ride after a wine supper. 

The ride resulted about an hour after midnfght in the immediate 
death of one of the participants and the later death of another and the 
evidence clearly points to the fact that, as usnal, strong drink was the 
cause of the wild ride to death and yet some people are big enough 
fools to argue that the "personal liberty" of man should not be re- 
stricted ao that he can not endanger the Irves of himself and others. 



THE IDEA 



A Nuisance 



On Saturday of last week a large dog was killed on North First 
Street and was left on the side of the car track. On Sunday decompo- 
sition had rendered the carcass a distinct nuisance to passers-by. On 
Monday afternoon occupants of a street car had to hold their noses 
as the car sped by. On Monday night a part of the defunct canine 
had been removed but what was left won't bear description here, as it 
seems the body v/as in such a state as to render it impossible to re- 
move it in toto and those whose duty it was evidently did not want 
to be soiled with the job so parts were left to the insult of the neigh- 
borhood and the many passers-by to Barton Heights. On Tuesday 
morning the nuisance was not abated and so now at Tuesday noon we 
write to enquire whether anybody knows why the grand and glorious 
bunch of politicians whe run this town don't devise some up-to-date 
means of insuring to the citizens of Richmond at least pure air to 
breathe uncontaminated by foul smells which could easily be gotten 
rid of. This is a frequent occurrence or THE IDEA would not 
make mention of it. 

Later. — About an hour after writing the above we walked into a 
barber shop and as we took a chair the proprietor was telling the gen- 
tleman he was shaving of the above affair and he said that the resi- 
dents in the vicinity of 1st Street where the dog was killed had to 
keep their windows and doors closed Sunday and Monday so all per- 
vasive was the awful stench. 



Had we never loved so kindly. 
Had we never loved so blindly, 
Never met, and never parted, 
We had ne'er been broken hearted. 

— Robbie Burns of Scotland. 



I came not to send peace but a sword. — Jesus. 



I beseech you therefore brethren by the mercies of God that you 
present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, 
which is your reasonable service, — Said of Tarsus. 



THE IDEA 



How The Times- 
Dispatch Lies 

Some Straight Talk to the 
Richmond Public 



/^N May 3rd, last, The Times-Dispatch in its zeal to de- 
^-^ stroy this paper by any means fair or foul published 
almost a column of a false account of the arrest of 
THE IDEA Editor. 

In bold, black headlines about a half inch tall was the 
following: 

Grand Jury Has Yoder Arrested 

This was lie number one. 

The body of the article began tJius: "At the instance of 
the Grand Jury Caief Warner yesterday afternoon swore 
out a warrant against A. A. Yoder, etc.". This was lie No, 
two, for Major Werner on the witness stand testified that 
not only did the Grand Jury not have the publisher arrest- 
ed but that he alone was responsible for the arrest. Then 
follow three separate and distinct lies against the publish- 
er, and two half truths which are worse than lies — all cal- 
culated and evidently intended to hurt him in the commu- 
nity, and the papers containing these malicious and defam- 
atory slanders were circulated all over the state and nation 
to the damage of the reputation and finances of the pub- 
lisher. 

Furthermore, this is but one of a long series of damna- 
ble outrages which this paper has perpetrated on the 



THE IDEA 9 

publisher by false publications, evidently simply because 
the publisher of THE IDEA exposed the corruptions of the 
rotten government of Richmond and Virginia for which the 
crooked machine, of which The Times-Dispatch is the 
mouth-piece and of whose crimes it is the whitewasher, is 
responsible, and because THE IDEA dared to expose the 
falsity of the reports which this same supreme published 
containing a speech of the Secretary of the Anti-Saloon 
League at Grove Avenue Baptist Church and which the 
pastor of that church pubHcly denounced as false. 

THE IDEA lays these facts before the Virginia public so 
that they may calmly consider what is the real cause of the 
dirty condition of political affairs in the state and so that 
the good people who believed these false reports and the 
other cowardly lies which the publishers of The Times- 
Dispatch printed and from which many good people conclu- 
ded that the editor of THE IDEA was a rascal and a liar, 
may judge for themselves whether the publisher of THE 
IDEA is unworthy of belief, or what he claims to be, one 
who has given and is giving the best years of his life to the 
cause of making Virginia a fit place in which to rear his 
and your children. 

As it is it takes a man of some nerve and faith in the de- 
sire of the good people of Richmond to cleanse their city of 
the foul smelling political and hence moral rottenness, the 
stench of which is filling the nostrils of the state, to peimit 
his children to continue to live in this city's confines, where 
to walk the streets, in which crime is protected and foster- 
ed and where virtue is oflficially denounced and suppressed, 
is to become contaminated and besmirched. 

If we did not have faith in the good people to soon arise 
in their might and put away these evils we would not con- 
sent to live here, and if we find that there is not enough 
backbone in the city to drive the thieves out of their politi- 
cal temple we shall shake the dust of the corrupt city from 
our feet to the joy of the crooked politicians and the "Su- 
preme" and seek a purer atmosphere, for we happen to 



10 THE IDEA 

have a family which we have no right to sacrifice for any 
people. 

Wake up, you bone heads! Get a broom and sweep away 
the whitewash and the filth which it so feebly conceals. 



Leg Shows 



TVTE have observed that those most prone to affect a shock at the 

' • mention of the name of man's locomotive member are often 

the ones who would not shrink at immodest and immoral 

sights. In their desire :o cover up innate immodesty they go to the 

extreme of affecting manners which the most modest do not use. 

Those sturdy peoples which are known for their abhorrence of un- 
seemly deeds are, without exception, given to the use of such terms as 
leg with the same lack of evil thought as they would have in using 
the words arm or head. 

When one proclaims his modesty from the house tops, better 
watch him. ' ' 

It's the man who proclaims, "I won't steal nothin," that will steal 
the clothes off your back: It's the man who says, "Now. I'm going 
to tell you the whole truth", that is puckering his mouth for a lie. 

And the moral to this prelude is this? Don't proclaim your own im- 
modesty to the world by being shocked at our use of the term 'leg 
shows." 

Thus beginneth our story: 

The tone of the sermons of today shows that the preachers at least 
think that immorality is on the increase, and the careful student sees 
its cause in the publicity of leg shows, if you please, with which the 
citizens of our towns amuse themselves at the cheap theatres. Here 
boys and girls are early sent on the road to the Devil by indecent ex- 
posure, though most often tights instead of skin is in evidence, tho it 
might as w^ell be the skin, as one cannot tell the difference. 

When a pretty girl dancer with stockings up above her knees and 
short flaring skirts kicks at the ceiling and displays what looks like 



THE IDEA 11 

human flesh and about tep rows of rowdy, boisterous men and boys 
tear down the house in their applause there is no use in patting your- 
self on the back and consoling yourself that the exposition was highly 
moral just because you have been told that what you saw was cloth, 
when the effect was the same as if there were no tights. 

Now, this is plain talk, but you know that these immoral shows 
which are exhibited nearly every night at several Broad Street vaude- 
ville houses are populating the red light districts of our country with 
young girls and are making boys in knee pants patrons of bawdy 
houses. 

It is, indeed, shocking to one who has been reared in a pure atmos- 
phere to see children, boys and girls of respectable people, gazing 
unblushingly at lust producing acts on which their imaginations may 
feast for days. 

It is a veil known fact that whenever an actor "goes the limit", 
the house does its biggest business. It seems to be the plan of each 
management to see how far they can go and still not be hounded by 
the police or censured too much by their more conservative patrons. 

Now there would be no occasion for such an article as this if it 
were not for the fact that Richmond is doubly damned with vile 10 
cent shows and whether you attend or not, gentle reader, you and 
your people and I and my people are influenced by every evil that 
affects any body else in the community. 

Sometime ago we made an attack on this evil and the manager of 
The Colonial Theatre met the writer and stated that The Colonial 
was an exception "ro the rule; that they made it a point to permit noth- 
ing unclean or objectionable. We told him that we had heard that 
his was cleaner than the rest and that we had reference to The Lubin 
and The Bijou. 

Last week, however, we paid a visit to The Colonial and the chief 
attraction, judging from the applause, was nothing but a leg show. 

A prominent student of social conditions of this and other cities 
stated this week that the same element that is responsible for the low 
vaudeville in Richmond is also interested in keeping the red light 
district open. 

Those engaged in mission work in the slums tell us that very fre- 
quently after the shows are over the actors and actresses repair to the 
(Concluded on page 13.) 



12 ' THE IDEA 

Why the Police Don't Enforce 
the Law 



A new policeman stood at the station house door and 
looking across the street at a store which was open on Sun- 
day, he said to an older member of the force: "I'm going 
to pull that place next Sunday." To this the older officer 
replied: "You'd better not, if you want to hold your job." 
The store continues to stay open on Sunday and the new 
policeman holds his job, and the mayor, who swore he would 
enforce the law, — well, he winks the other eye, while "Hell 
enlarges herself." 

Fake Club 



Up on Second Street, between Marshall and Broad, is 
run what is called a Jewish Club, which is not a Jew- 
ish Club, but is a gambling resort patronized by Gen- 
tiles. This place has been reported to the police, who have 
done nothing. Many men may be seen to enter, especially 
on Saturdays and Sundays, and not leave till late in the 
night, or often till between 5 and 6 A. M. The rattling of 
chips and cursing and vile language can be heard by pass- 
ers-by and by the neighbors, to whom the place has become 
a public nuisance. 

Now, THE IDEA man is no detective, tho he keeps his 
eyes open, neither does he employ any one to do detective 
work, and yet he has known of this place, and the police 
have too, for several weeks, yet it seems so strange that 
the much praised police department permits such things to 
thrive all o\er the city and pleads that they can't break up 
such evils. 



THE IDEA 13 

common houuses on Mayo and lower Franklin Streets where the 
young men whose animal natures have been awakened by the vile 
performances also sneak away to turn the night into revelry and de- 
bauchery and to unfit themselves physically, morally and financially 
to become husbands and fathers. 

All this is the result of the lawmaking of cheap politicians to whom 
we commit our city affairs and who run the city for private gain and 
who set aside State laws because they think it best not to enforce 
them. 

Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only two dollars a year on the 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 

fSee us first ^ ^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



"Dull Safety ^azor ^/ades 

2 1-2 CENTS EACH 

Let our experts put your old dull blades in perfect 

condition for above price. 

OLD STYLE RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15c EACH 

SCISSORS AND KNIVES SHARPENED 

Work Guaranteed 

SPECIALS 

AS LONG AS THEY LAS 

$2.50 Razors reduced to $1.25 

$2.00 " " "..... $L00 

$L50 " " " $ .75 

$1-50 Razor Strop $ .75 

$1.00 Bottle Eau de Quinine Hair Tonic $ .49 

$ .75 Jar Vie-Veer Massage Cream . $ .49 

Imported Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Lotions and a Full 

Line of Toilet Supplies at Reduced Prices. 

THE '^SHARP-O'' CO. 

608 East Main Street 



14 THE IDEA 

Richmond Preachers 

Need a Little Dynamite 



"VVTHETHER it be true or not there is certainly a growing 

" belief among the people that preachers in general in 
planning what they shall say consider too much the 
question, "How will it effect my standing with my congre- 
gation?" or "How will it effect my prospects for the 
future?" 

Such beliefs as these are being expressed all too fre- 
quently by the most thoughtful citizens in the community, 
citizens who have the highest regard for the Christian 
ministry and citizens whom it pains to see the decay of ef- 
fective Jesus like preaching. It is generally accepted that 
the larger and more wealthy the church the more subservi- 
ent is the preaching, the higher the salary, the less ag- 
gressive the sermon. _ 

It is becoming entirely too common in these days to hear 
preachers talk about salary as if that were the chief con- 
cern of their ministry. One frequently is shocked to: hear 
a preacher say, "Brother So and So is doing fine. He's get- 
ting $2000.00 a year and a parsonage," or "They could not 
interest me. I'm already getting $300.00 a year more than 
that church pays." Now, THE IDEA will always stand 
for better pay to preachers, for the average preacher has 
to scrimp to make both ends meet, but the point we wish 
to make is this, that it is the pastors of the large city 
churches whom we hear make such remarks and that it is 
these city pastors who, to judge from their own preaching, 
are quiet on those evjls which affect the business success of 
prominent members of their congregations. 

Now, if a preacher who is getting $2000.00 a year is offer- 
ed $3000.00, while all other things are equal, and he needs 
more than $2000.00 and he is sure that he won't let $3000.00 



THE IDEA 15 

hurt him any more than $2000.00 does, then let him take 
the larger salary, but what THE IDEA desires to see is that 
preachers, the last people under the sun who should adopt 
worldly tendencies, are not only being moved too much by 
the salary question but are also being moved by other pure- 
ly worldly considerations. 

The attitude of the Richmond preachers toward the work 
of the Anti-Saloon League and towards other great moral 
movements to which certain influntial members are opposed 
is doing much to make Christian men despair for leadership. 
The great body of the good people today in Richmond are 
tremendously earnest in their desire to abolish from Rich- 
mond the whiskey traffic and its allied evils, crooked poli- 
tics, stealing, gambling, decrease, adultery and criminal 
bestiality, and yet it is a most patent fact that Richmond 
preachers seem to be afraid to "Stand up for Jesus" and 
fight this evil in any effective concerted manner whatever. 
They will join hands in any good cause that won't stir up 
the Devil among the politicians and business men but when 
a fight is oh that may cost them something the word goes 
that "Now is not an opportune time to raise the issue. Je- 
sus of Nazareth was always ready to meet the issue, in sea- 
son and out of season, and Faul taught not simply to wear 
defensive armor but to use the sword as well, and just so 
long as Richmond preachers keep quiet and fail to meet the 
Devil in his aggressive and open challenge to the manhood 
of Richmond, just so long will vice and crime and debauch- 
ery and lewdness increase their following more fastly than 
the churches. 

It has indeed pained us much to note the situation liere 
and we have hoped for a year that something might happen 
to make it unnecessary for THE IDEA to preach to the 
preachers, but when vice is dominant in a community so 
largely filled with churches as Richmond is the leaders in 
the community should be held to account for their steward- 
ship and regardless of our personal feelings of sincerest 
love for all preachers in general and many Richmond 



16 THE IDEA 

preachers in particular, the time has come when THE IDEA 
feels to longer keep quiet would to be to teti&y a trust. 

To the end that good may come THE IDEA will from now 
on attempt to put dynamite even under the preachers and 
if needs be shock them into action. The preachers don't 
mind talking a little in the right direction but they seem to 
be so afraid that their sword will really cut scmethirg and 
perhaps from lack of experience in fighting as an aggress- 
ive soldier they fear it will cut themselves. 

They had better stop singing, "Forward into Battle", 
and get into the fight. 

THE IDEA will shortly have a red hot sermonette for 
the Praiehers. Bitter read it. It will most likely hit 
the layman and even the politician and the crook too. 

Hospital Graft Again 

In a former number we showed up the pull certain councilmen had 
with the hospitals. Since that time a friend called by to tell us that 
an acquaintance of his, an old lady, was thought to be dying in one of 
the local hospitals. 

Finally, life appeared to be entirely gone and one of the nurses re- 
marked, "The woman in number is dead. Telephone Bliley 

and get that freezer of cream." 

' i;: 

Amazing Rottenness ' ; ,;; 

Friday morning: As we go to press on the last form of 
THE IDEA, it begins to look as though Richmond is so 
crooked that a justice cannot be secured to swear out the 

warrant against Commissioner Mannin g. Three justices 

have been seen so far and not one will perform his duty . 
Each gives as his reason that to do his duty in this matter 
will deprive him of the business he has already. This one 
incident aught to arouse Richmond people for it shows how 
all-powerful the ring is and how officers of the law may be 
ruined by doing their duty when that duty dipleases the 
machine. Will nothing but judgment day wake up the 
citizens? 



Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls 

Or War On the White Slave Trade 

A NiW BDDX, 430 pa^es, 32 pag:es of Striking Pictures 
PRICE $1.50. POl TA E EITIA 15 CENTS 

A Complete and Detailed 
Account of the Shameful 
Traffic in Young Girls. 

How They Are Deceived 
and Procured for Keepers 
of Dives. 

How To Save Your Boy 
or Girl. 

Chapters by the Fol- 
bwing Persons: 

Hon. Howard A. Simms, 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. H. H. Parkin, Asst. 
U. S. District Attorney, 
Chicago, 111.; 

Hon. Clifford Roe; 

W. A. Coote; 

Chas. N. Crittenden, and 
many others. 

A WHITE SLAVE 

Chapter 1st, History White Slave Traffic; Chapter 2nd, Suppression of White 
Slave Traffic, A White Slave Clearing House; A White Slave's Own Story; 
The Auctioneer of Souls; The White Slave Trade In New York City; 
Conditions in London; and 25 other Interesting Chapters. 
Price $1.50 cash or certified check or Money Order. Postage 15c. extra. 

ORDER FROM Miss SUSIE YOUNG 

FAITH RESCUE COTTAGE FOR GIRLS, Care 806 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. Agents Warned. 




MOTORCYCLES 

" AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3 J J West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour S^ny^y Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South ^osiorij Virginia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 



jVoenni£fer^Sizemore Co* 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 




Vol. IV September 17, 1910 



N 



THE ^ IDE 



1- 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



The Manning Case . . 


. Page I 


Pollock and I'he Judge 


. " 3 


Manning Insults Editor 


. " 8 


Jesus, The Bold . . . . 


. '' 10 


On To The Grand Jury . 


'' 13 


A Plea for Coarseness . . 


'' 14 


The Duty oi A Citizen . , 


. " 15 



And Other Short Articles ^ ^ ^ ^ 



5 CENTS A COPY 



$2.00 A YEAR 



Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by A don A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1103 Cipitol Street, Richmond, Virmnia 



I 



I 



f JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN 

7th AND MAIN STS. 
We are showing special good values in 

$ I 

Oilverwarey Cut Slass, Stc, 

I ■ We invite your inspection 

o _ 

QDK^IDCID^^ <i !><■■><] i><lHK><i!><^K>0D<^K><]O!>(^H>CD«iH>cQi><aHD<30<i^<iD<^H>CD<^K>C!><i^<iQ 

rd<^B>aDaBD0!>^^aD<^H>«4>&<aH><]D<liH>Clt><HH>QD^^0t>CHBC<i>l>(nB>Ci><aBBQD^HDa!><^H>aO 

§ Print it Right. I 

I i 

Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 

I roe 2708, | 

a * 

0!>(^HD(iD^aKQ!><l^i><!!><aH>(i<f>l><^BD<iE><BHD(![>aHi><i!><^H>fiD<^B><]^[>a^CD^HD<iE><^H>CD<BHD<]9 

7 HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet f 

^ f 

i wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines ^ 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, \ 

Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 

Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei, Delicate ^ 

Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. \ 

- A. H. ROBINS, - J 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. ^ 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV SEPTEMBER 17, 1910 No. 32 



FIVE Cents a Copy • :$2.00 a Year 

Published V/oekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered a? second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Why the Case 
Against Manning 
Was Dismissed 

The Expected Happens 

[]','. "Nyai^rant; Was Properly Drawn 

Publisher saw it was impossible to press the case after 

' ' Comrrionwealth^s Attorney got behind the technical 

point that to interfere with an officer is to 

ijhysically interfere 

'^ ■ : — ' .-^ .». ^ . ' — '- ■ > 

\Y7EBSTER'S Dictionary says that to interfere is (2) To 

^ take a part in the concerns of others; to interpose. 

G. Manning, Jr. has confessed that he took a part in the 



2 THE IDEA 

concerns of the police force and interposed his instiuctiors 
between the police and their sworn duty and prevented 
them from carrying out the law. 

When the case against C. Manning came up on postpone- 
ment before Justice John on Wednesday of this week the 
Commonwealth's Attorney, Mr. Folkes, advised Justice 
Crutchfield to dismiss the case because, he held, that to in- 
terfere meant to offer physical violence, while everbody 
knows that the most serious interference that can be offer- 
ed in any case is not physical but moral. Mr. Manning is 
a police commissioner and as such has a voice in deciding 
who shall be chief of police and his unlawful instiucticrs 
to that chief has caused the chief to refuse to enforce the 
law and yet Mr. Folkes says he has not "interfered" with 
him "according to law." The warrant did not charge that 
Manning had violated the little statute on interference but 
the w-arrant was drawn under the common law and does 
not cite the statute in question at all. 

"The test whether or not a crime is a crime at common 
law is not whether precedents for so treatirg it can be 
found in the books but whether it injuriously effects the 
public policy and economy." — Bouvier's Law Dictionary 
page 420. 

The Commonwealth's Attorney, howe\er, took a position 
at variance with the law books and thus there was nothing- 
else to do but accept the inevitable. 

Thus it is that there seems no way of stopping public of- 
ficials in Richmond from their criminal actions and even 
the State's Attorney seems afraid to take any stand 
against evil on the part of public officials even after he has 
been relieved of the embarrassment of first drawing up the 
warrant. 

He, Minitree Felkes, advises us that we have the "privi- 
lege" of bringing the matter before the Grand Jury but he 
himself absolutely refuses to act when the matter is 
brought before him in his official capacity. 

The writer has now three times offered to the State's At- 



THE IDEA 3 

torney evidence enough to, if properly pushed by him, 
place the responsible parties not in jail but in the peniten- 
tiary, and yet I, a citizen, must take all the responsibility 
of the prosecution and must endanger even my life in the 
interests of the State because sw^orn officers rufuse to abide 
their oaths. 

Justice John dismissed the case after which the publisher 
and complaining M^itness stated to the court that he would 
bring the matter before the Grand Jury. 

Last week THE IDEA said, "Of course it is expected 
that the whitewEshers will by seme hook or crook of k^e-l 
procedure throw the whole matter out of court. We lock 
for that but we want them to thus show their partyship to 
the evil which the machine crowd is supporting. The Com- 
monwealth's Attorney cannot te relied on to push the 
case" and so it turned out. 

Just think of it, Mr. Folkes can't conceive of Mr. Mann- 
ing's legally interfering with the police except by physical 
force. Gee whiz! 



Pollock and the Judge 



"Is this the 'vorce lawyer's office?" said the old-schcol 
darkey at THE IDEA office door. 

No. Who are you looking for? " was the reply. 

"De Jedge up here at the police court told me to come 
down here to Mr. Odell's— or something like that— office to 
see about getting a 'vorce." 

Idea man. — "Somebody must be putting up a joke on ycu 
or me; there's no lawyer around here." 

Darkey. — "Well de Jedge said down here in the Ford 
building next to the fectionery stoie." 

Idea man. — "Oh, I see. You mean lawyer Pollock's of- 
fice on the side of the Ford building next to the confection- 
ery store. ' ' 

(Continued on page 14.) 



THE IDEA 



A Sermonette 

For You 



TDENEDICT Arnold was i'delicate. Judas Iscarrot was given to 
^"^ smooth salutations, but John the Baptist was uncouth and Jesus 
of Nazareth shocked the modesty of polite society. Savonarola 
made people mad; Sam Jones told truth so plainly that they called 
him vile. 

It takes delicate, polite, conventional men to betray, but course, 
fearless, unconventional, uncouth shocking, dynamic men to jar men 
back into right paths. 

De :eit comes clothed in delicate finery. Truth is naked. 

What Richmond needs is another Sam Jones to tell them the naked 
truth and shock into action the preachers and the people. 

The road to Hell is down grade and easy going. 

The road to Heaven is up hill and hard. Dut, for God's sake, man, 
look where you are going. I for one will choose the up grade to 
better things. 

If you prefer Hell, slide! Any fool can do that, but the man who 
will prefer Death to Life just for one little slide is indeed a fool and 
a motley fool at that. Christianity means a climb against the tide 
and fro.tt the standpoint of the worldly slider it's rough work. 

Yes, the slider thought Jesus, The Happy, was a fool when he 
might have slid into worldly kingships. But, poor fool, he did .not 
know that this brief life is but a span in the vast eternity of liife 
made for him and you and me. 

From the view point of the world, true Christianity is always catch- 
ing Hell now. And it's all because the poor fools can't see they've 
been blinded by the deceitfulness of sin. 

"Turn ye, turn ye. Why will you die.'' " 



Notice the prizes for boys offered on cover. THE IDEA out 
every Saturday. ? 



THE IDEA 



Vote, Man, Vote! 



Vote, man, vote! 
If you think the gang embezzes people's power 
Do not stay at home and grumble by the hour, 
Nor, in feeble spite, turn on your neighbors sour.— 

Go and vote, man, vote! 

Vote, man, vote! 
When you catch "the ring" in any fraud or trick, 
If you do not vote you have no right to kick; 
You can break it up; then go and knock it quick. 

With a vote, man, vote! 

Vote, man, vote! 
Where there is a wrong there's sure to be a right; 
When you do not vote 'tis but yourself you spite 
Do not be a sneak and keep out of the fight — 

Go and vote, man, vote. 

Vote, man. vote! 
Do not call yourself a live American, 
Nor pretend to love your country or your clan; 
Never claim to be a "decent sort of man" 

Till you vote, man, vote! 

Vote, man, vote! : . 

'Tis the noblest thing that any mar can do -.^ 

For himself and home and all that's good and true. ' ''^ft 

If you are a man — a man all through and through — > 

You will vote, man, vote! 

Vote, man, vote! 
It's a sacred trust that you must never break; 
For your country's good, and for your honor's sake, 
Never sell yourself, nor any bargain make, 

When you vote, man, vote! 

—Minnesota Issue. 



THE miiA^ , ? 

Rotten Norfolk 

Wakmg Up 

A Lesson for Richmond 



I 7R0M the way. Ijhe Norfolk people, last Monday, hissed 
." "^ Tom Martin, t)ie oiggest 'political boss 'Virginia has 
^" 'tever been saddled witk, it looks as tho the men down 
'there "meant to.clean up the ici-oo'ked machine that has had 
things 'its own way fqi;- sp long. i , , 

Report has it that, the yotmg 'men of that town are out 
Yor an organization with the mbtto; "Political honesty/' 

There is great need in Richmo'ud for exactly the same 
thing, bnt there never was a tow'n, so' it seems, that would 
take mofe outrageous treatrhf nt at the hands of organized 
grafters, after th^ people have been' shown, where and who 
the grafters are, than Richmond. ' ' , 

The voters seem to be absolutely at a loss to know what 
to do or abjectly in fear of the bunch that seen^ to own 
them body and soul. ' ; . » 

We have yet to read, of a more cringing, boot-licking, 
subservient bunch of voterp thaii we find here. They' seem 
to fear to talk politics above a' whisper, lest some saloon 
h-anger-on may go and tell Clyde Saundersor, Chris, Mann- 
ing, Tom Martin's machine workers in the cijty. , 

Let Richmond people wakie up and come out into the op- 
en knd the foul political rottenness that poisons the atmos- 
phere will vanish like darkneiss before the. sunshiny. 

But just as long as they sit idly by and say, "I'm afraid 
it will hurt my business" so long will Richmond rot at the 
core. 



THE IDEA 



^* ^ 



Times-Dispatch 

Straddler 



" I 'HE other day The Great Supreme (by the way the morning 
■*■ straddler seems to have recently gotten sick of using that con- 
ceited name for itself) came out in an editorial strongly com- 
mending Andrew Carnegie for his brief statement against strong drink 

Just a few days before we noticed this same "Supreme" dilating on 
the effects of the mint-julep and thus commending the very same 
poison which they later condemn. 

We suppose that what the two-faced paper really means is this: 
"It's all right for me, The Times-Dispatch man to have all the 
booze 1 desire but the working man must not have it, for if he does 
he'll break up my presses and won't be as valuable to me, whose 
slave he is." 

Next to the cowardly crime of taking neither side of a moral ques- 
tion is the contemptible, deceitful vice of being on either side of the 
ques'-.ion, just as public opinion or expediency pulls the jumping jack 
string. 

, For appearance,s sake be a man and face the music if you are al- 
ways on the wrong side. 

If one must be wrong let him be wrong right. 

Don't be a spy and say you are for us while you are an enemy in 
the camp. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only two dollars a year on the 
weekly basis. If you don't yoxi may miss the copy you most want. 

tS&e i/s first «^ «^ ^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



THE IDEA 



Manning Insults 
The Publisher 

Crutchf ield Does Not Punish for 
Contempt 

News-Leadcr^s Account Was False 



ON Saturday of last week on the appearance in court of 
C. Manning, Jr., on a charge of interfering with an 
officer in the performance of his duty, Mr. Manning 
became so indignant at the thought of the appearance of 
Commonwealth's Attorney Folkes against him that he im- 
mediately lost his head and cried out, "This man is noth- 
ing but a buzzard." (He did not say, as the News-Leader 
printed it, "A scurrilous, human buzzard." The Leader 
seems to have great difficulty in telling the truth.) 

At that remark Justice John rebuked C. Manning, Jr., 
but he did not do what he should have done, namely, fine 
him for contempt of court. 

The publisher of THE IDEA was in this same court room 
openly insulted by Dutch Leaman on a former occasion but 
Leaman was not arrested. We wonder how many days the 
publisher of THE IDEA would have had to spend in jail if 
he had used such language "in the presence of the court." 

In the Law and Equity Court Judge Ingram permitted 
attorney Scott, last winter to villify and disgracefully in- 
sult the editor and did not even rap his gavel for order, and 
yet when the court on that occasion announced that it would 



THE IDEA 9 

adjourn and those in attendance began to leave, the publish- 
er of THE IDEA put his hat on his head and this same 
judge Ingram harshly reprimanded him and announced that 
he had not yet formally adjourned the court. Then he ad- 
journed the court. 

In the Richmond Courts if the much despised publisher 
of THE IDEA dares do anything more than bow the knee 
to the all important judges he endangers his liberty but 
members of the ring may treat him as unlawfully as they 
please and the courts may be brought into the direst con- 
tempt by them but the judges simply refuse to carry out 
the law and punish for the offence which is more than one 
against the individual,— it is one against the very dignity 
of the State itself. 



Treason 

Chapter 179^ Code of Virginia 

Of Offences Against the Sovereignty of 

the State 



Sec. 3658. Treason Defined: Treason shall consist only 
in levying war against the State, or adhering to its enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort, or establishing, without au- 
thority of the legislature, any government within its limits 
separate from the existing go\ernment, or holding or ex- 
ecuting, in such usurped government, any office, or profess- 
ing allegiance or fidelity to it, or resisting the execution 
of the laws under color of its authority; and such treason, 
if proved by the testimony of two witnesses to the same 
overt act, or by confession in court, shall be punished with 
death. (1377-8 P. 270.) 



10 THE IDEA 



Jesus— The Bold 



T_TIST0RY tells us that several centuries ago there arcse 
■^ ■■• in an eastern country a priest who went into the 
churches of his native city on the Sabbath .day and 
preached to the people and his preaching was so forceful 
that history tells us that the people were astonished and 
offended at it and so he left his native city to preach in oth- 
er places. 

In a nearby city his preaching was again so bold that the 
people said, "This is hard talk. Who can stand it?" And 
some of his friends deserted him, for his language was 
harsh, and the rulers censured him for not obeying certain 
fo. ms of the law and he turned upon them and censured 
them by calling them hypocrites, End going into other cities 
he fired into the rulers and showed up their sins and warn- 
ed the people against them, and wherever he went the rul- 
ers opposed him until he was constrair.ee to renaik, "Ite 
world hates me because I say of it, 'Its \\oiks £ie evil.' " 
And going into his capital city to preach, seme said, "He 
is a good man", and others said, "Not so; he is deceiving 
the people." But of the multitude many believed him tho 
the rulers sent officers to arrest him for they said, "This 
man came down here from Gallilee." And he got more 
harsh and more personal in his preaehirg toward them and 
told them, "You are of your father, the devil. He was a 

murderer from the beginning He, is a liar and 

the father thereof . " And they said, "You've got a devil; 
you're crazy." And they took up stones to throw at him, 
but he got away from them. And the people, were divided 
about him. Some said he was crazy while . others said, 
"Can a crazy man do the works he does." 

So they took up stones again to stone him, and he said, 
"Many good deeds have I done, for which of these deeds do 
you stone me?" And they replied, "We don't stone you 



THE IDEA 11 

' . I . ! , 
I' 

f9r your good worji ^biiit for your talk, for slander. " So he 
had to leave the cit<y. ' " ' ' v ' 

On another occasion he took dinner with a ruler and they 
got into an argument because' he did not observe a certain 
ceremony and the priest begah'to curse the ruler, saying; 
"Woe unto you, Politicians, for you love the chief seats in 
{he churches and the greetings in the market places." And 
when he went out the ring crowd began to press upon him 
vehemently to provO|ke him to say many things, laying wait 
^for him to catch ihim in some statement and whatsoever he 
did they watched ^nd took word tO the rulers about him. 

Finally bhe r.ulers l^aa a meeting and took council how 
'they might put him, to dea,th. And they charged him with 
^'having as friends at his table pi!iblicans and sinners. , 

.AttheTri^I 

( Chris. Manning was there ' " 

/) Dutch Leaman Was there 
, Clyde Saunders w^s there 
]) Douglas (jbrdon was there 
, ; Harry Smith was there 
! V ^Dave Richardson was there 
! T. H. Eilett was there 
;,, Rex Griffin was there 
Clyde Saunder^ wppt on Chris. Manning's bail in police court last 
Saturday. ■ '" ' 

The City;^Council 

(What An Old Man Said the Other Day In The Idea 
: Office) 

■'I've hotrce'd for the- last 50 years that you put a man in there with 
an old rusty suit of clothes on and a worn out hat and in a week or 
ten days he's dressed in fine clothes. If there was not something in 
it they would not climb up so fast." 



12 THE IDEA 

The reason some good people don't understand the pub- 
lisher of THE IDEA is that tho he would sacrifice his repu- 
tation for a principle he will not sell his character for a 
world. 

Whom the Gods Would Destroy 
They First Make Mad 

It begins to look like the ring would be broken when the 
ringsters get mad and talk "Buzzard" in court. 

Contempt of Court 

Section 3768 of the Code of Virginia limits the power cf 
judges to punish summarily for contempt and gives only 
five cases. The first refers to Misbehaiior in the presence 
of the court. 

The third refers to Obscene or insulting language used in 
the presence of the court in respect to any proceeding in such 
court. 

Under the head of either one of these cases the justice 
could have fined C. Manning twenty dollars and imprisoned 
him ten days. 

In Lynchburg a petty judge, Frank P. Christian, fined 
the editor of THE IDEA fifty dollars and sentenced him to 
jail for 15 days, and it cost him nearly $500.00 to defend 
himself against the unlawful proceeding, although he had 
never violated any contempt statute. Ex-Gov. Montggue 
and Senator Strode defended him before the Supreme 
Court. 

No. Whenever we get pfunished by the courts it is be- 
cause we have not the money to carry the case to the Su- 
preme Court, which has never decided against us and never 
will lawfully do so, because we always keep within the 
limits of the law. 



THE IDEA 13 



Preachers 



WE ARE a little disappointed over the reception which has met 
our roasting the preachers. Everywhere we go we hear peo- 
ple saying, "I'm so glad you've gotten af*:er the preachers, 
they need it. They have not stood by you in your fight and they are 
people above all others whom the people have a right to expect to 
keep Richmond clean. I hope you will put dynamite into them. 
They are afraid of the politicians." This is the line of talk we hear, 
and worse than this. Preachers would be surprised to know from 
what quiet, thoughtful men these sentiments come. We are, indeed 
disappointed to know that it is universally recognized by laymen that 
the preachers, the watchmen, posted to tell us of the night, are recre- 
ant to their duty. 

If the preachers are worthy of half the criticisms we hear heaped 
upon them, no wonder Richmond is fallen so low. We are glad to 
say that we know a few preachers in Richmond that are bold enough 
to openly fight public evils when it is unpopular but their number is 
not legion, and according to our little knowledge of the methods of 
the Master there is not one who dares follow Him in that. The peo- 
ple are like sheep without a shephead, utterly without leadership. An 
opportunity of the ages for a man. . "VYhb; 'will l-tse , up (^r me 
against the evil doer.?" - i ) i = ii r i.ic _ ; u.' O 

' ' "? r: • i ) ; ' -i ! 7 i ■ u- • • uv.i 

Folkes 



' *L fc 



As predicted in THE IDEA last week, Folkes sided with 
the evil doers against the right and took advantage of a 
very doubtful legal technicality to save C. Manning's hide. 
When there was no case against THE IDEA publisher as 
he himself afterwards was forced to admit, he let the 
(Continued on page 16.) 



14 THE IDEA 

POLLOCK AND THE JUDGE. 

(Concluded from page 3.) 

Then a bystander spoke out and said to the old man that 
if he wanted a real good divorce lawyer he could find him 
at No. so-and-so on street, to which the darkey re- 
plied, "No, I reckon I better go to see Mr. Pollock. 'Cause 
he phoned down dar to him and he told m^e to go dar." 

We advised him too that he certainly hsd better go there 
then. 

Now stop a minute, good citizen, ard considei : 

(1) Pollock is councilman. 

(2) The council decides Crutchfield's salary. 

(3) Pollock gets the bulk of the pol'ce court practice. 

(4) Yet the darkey says, "De jedge" diiected him to go 
to find Pollock. 



The New York Globe of last week gave about 3 inches to 
the rotten situation in Richmond. 



A Plea for Coarseness 

Tlie most enduring, the most subtle, the most dangerous, 
of human instincts is the instinct that ccnrmands us to shut 
our eyes to whatever is unpleasant, even if it be the tiuth. 
The rebellious Jews said to their prophets, "Prophesy not 
unto us right things, speak unto us smooth things, prophe- 
sy deceits." 

The doctrine of the divine right of kings, prostitution, 
alcoholism, child-labor, all the cancerous diseases that 
spread because of the human tendency to let well-enough 
alone, all the evils that sap the strength of nations and of 
men, are sweet and subtle, are tender and delicate. To end 
them we must be bitter and brutal, rough and coarse. The 
tyranny that endures is a delicate tyranny, the successful 
lie must be a delicate lie; but truth to triumph, must be 
tough.— Reginald Wright Kauflfman in The Cosmopolitan. 



THE IDEA 15 



The Duty of a Citizen 



It is not only the right but the duty of a citizen to make com- 
plaint of any misconduct on the part of officials to those charged with 
supervision over them, and their right and privilege to discuss the fit- 
ness or misconduct of such officials with tax payers in the town in 
which they live." 

So spoke the Supreme Court of the State of Virginia in the Gate- 
wood Garrett Libel case. (106 Va. 552.) 

Tho all other citizens neglect their clear duty as sovereign citizens 
THE IDEA will feel perfectly at ease in making complaint of any 
misconduct on the part of police commissioners or of any other offi- 
cers to the courts, who are charged with general supervision over all 
the functions of the State. 



^uli Safetj/ ^azor blades 

2 1-2 CENTS EACH 

Let our experts put your old dull blades in perfect 
condition for above price. 
OLD STYLE RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15c EACH 
SCISSORS AND KNIVES SHARPENED • 
Work Guarante€:(^ , . ^ . i 
SPECIALS 
AS LONG AS *rHEY' LAS 
$2.50 Razors f educed tJo .' j . . ., $1.2o 

$2.00 ." " '' $Loa' 

'$L50 '*' • " " $ .75 

$1-50 Razor Strop $ .75 

' i$1.00 Bottle Eau de Quinine Hair Tonic $ .49 
$ .75 Jar Vie-Veer Massage Cream . $ .49 
Imported Perfumes, Toilet Waters, Face Lotions and a Full 
Line of Toilet Supplies at Reduced Prices. 

THE '^SHARP-O" CO. 

608 East Main Street 



16 THE IDEA 

ON TO THE GRAND JURY ^" 

(Concluded from page 13.) 
crooks use him, on a little misdemeanor warrant tco, to 
deliver a tirade of prosecution against us and helped Crutch- 
field con\ict us and he also did the same thing on a libel 
warrant. 

When, however, a warrant was issued against Manning, 
a fellow-ofRcer, in the name of the commonwealth too, Mr. 
Folkes hied himself away to the country, and then when he 
did return refused to prosecute altho he admits a crime was 
committed. 

Our next move will he to take the matter before the grand 
jury, most likely, on a charge of misdemeanor in office 
against Mr. Folkes himself 

From Thanatopsis 

Yet not to thine eternal resting place 
Shalt-thou retire alone— nor couJd&t thoiTwish 
Couch more magnificent, thou shalt lie down 
With patriarchs of the infant world— with kings, 
. . The powerful of .the eart^, the wise, the gocd, .,j 
Fair forms,, and hpary, seers of ages past, 
I All in one mighty sepul^lij^ ...... 

. .J . . .; Arid what ^iI J tl^V with dra\^ ^'^ 

Unlieeded from the living, ahd'sp frien'd' '' 
Take note of thy departure? All that breathe 
Will share thy ctestiny. '""The ;gay will laugh 
When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care 
Plod on, and each one as before will chase 

His favorite phantom. 

So live that when thy summons comes to join 
The innumerable caravan, that moves 
To that mysterious realm, where each shall take 
His chambeir in the silent hails of death. 
Thou go not like thequarry slave at night, 
Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave 
Like one who wraps tHe'drajpery of his couch 
About him, and lies down, to pleasant dreams. 

—William Cullen Bryant, 



MOTOR CYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3\\ West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour ^u^^^i/ Company 

\A/HOI_ESAL-E MANUFACTURERS 

South S^ostorij Vtr£fi'nia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

jrfoenni£fer^Sizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 




uo Advertiser:) 

t awt from a letter to the publisher of The Idea from The 
let .^xerchants Association: 

i 
^ "Regarding the approval of THE IDEA ?s an adver- 
uising medium, I beg to say that if it has a paid circula- 
, t' jn and is entered at the post-office as second cla^s mat- 
er, it is all right and does not require the approval of 
Lhe association for its members to use it. I haven't a 
copy of the paper before me but presume itcom^plies 
with both requirements, and if so any of our members 
are free to use it as an advertising medium without any 
approval from the association, 
^ W. A. CLARKE, Jr., Secrtary 

THE IDEA has a paid circulation and is entered at the post-office 
under dat jf July 10, 1909, as second class mail matter. 

It's the best advertising medium in toum. Write us for rates. 

A. A. YODER 



^ 



6 WATCHES FOR BOYS 



THE IDEA will give awiv to the si\ boys selling the largest number of 
IDEAS in their sections six handsome watches as follows: — 

One watch each will be given to each of the six boys who sell the 

greatest number of IDEAS from the followitig six IDEA stations: 
West End— Model News Co., 519 W. Broad 
Church Hill — Waller's Store. Jefferson and Clay 
Down Town — Idea (3fHce, 1106 Capitol Street 
Manchester — Abbott's Store, Hull Street 
Petersburg — Jones' Store, 101 Washington 
Lynchburg — Shepherd's 900 Main Street 



WEEKLY 5c ^^^ ^^^^ 



THE^lDE 



/k 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES 



Vol. IV September 24, 19 JO 



Nc. 



TOO CROOKED FOR HIM 




Ex-Police:— "Thej made me swear I'd ^nforce the law, and 
V then told m e they'd fire me if ! did it:*' 

^^ilg^«je,^i^iJisPG^ttes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia ^r-^:::^::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::^^^^^ 



I JEWELER J. S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. 1 

I 5^ We are showing special good values in 4 ^ 

§ ^ 2)/amo72c/zfj Watchec^y ^ewelrj/, ^ § 

I Silverware, Cut Slass, Stc» i 

I We invite your inspection I 

A ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ a 



Of>fiHH><ia<^H><l!>C^K><]D<^H>C<j*!>^^D<!f>aHE>(ll>aUD<ID<^H><ID(aBDQ4>!>OB>CD(BH>dOaBH>CO<^H><lO 

I Print it Right. I 

! ! 

2 Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea § 

f Prpssps va\\\ Ho it flt a ninsf rpiisonnhlp fi cm rp 'PVinnp Mon- f 



Presses will do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



- A. a ROBINS, 

200 E. MARSHALL ST. 

Goods delivered anywhere in the city. 
Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. 



♦ 



I roe x^ioo, I 

a ^^^ „^^ ._^ .,^i_v ..^_^ .___ ._^^ <^^ ._^ ..^^ .__^ <^^ .^—i. ** 



HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet 
wants, in Drugs and Medicines 

Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, 
Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, 
Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei, Delicate 
Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. 



i 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. -IV SEPTEMBER 24, 1910 No. 33 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia, 

_ ^ __ __ ^ _ — . 

Minetree Folkes 

Crawfish 



T AST Fallv.ve(ne year ago, the publisher of THE ILFA 
'■-' went td'see Minetree Folkes about the lack of law en- 
forcement in Richmond, referring to Sunday selling, 
selling whiskey without license, and flagrant violation of 
the House of 111 Fame Statute. On the question of houses 
of ill fame Folkes gave as his reason for not proceedirg 
against them that while in a general way everybody knew 
that they existed, yet he could not go on the witness stand 
and swear that of his own knowledge such was the case in 
any given instance. . At that time we did not know that the 
direct evidence that would convict in court was on file in 
the office of the Chief of Police and that these houses were 
practically licensed as such houses of ill fgme by the police 



2 THE IDEA 

department and that the Common -wealth's Attorney of 
course knew that the chief of poHce kept a picture gallery 
of all these scarlet women in the red light district. 

Finally this evidence came out in court and we-found that 
the reason given by Folkes for not proscuting these women 
was not the real one for he was present at the trial and it 
could no longer be said that he was ignorant of the action 
of the police board in openly licensing this vice. He did 
not take any action after he heard the evidence and today, 
six months after, he has still refused to prosecute these 
women and the police who protect them in the violation of 
their oaths. 

This shows conclusively that Folkes himself, the State 
officer whose prime business is to see that State laws are 
not ignored, is just as gailty as Manning, who confessed 
that he, as a police commissioner, kept the police from ar- 
resting these women. Captain Barfoot testified on the 
stand that if he caught a woman running a house of ill 
fame in the red light district he would simply take her pic- 
ture and Folkes heard it, and yet he don't knoiv that these 
houses are houses of ill fame. 

It is just as plain as daylight to any one with eyes, that 
Folkes is a party to the crime of protectir g people against 
the law of the land while sworn to do exactly the opposite. . 

The other day when we called again to get him to prose- 
cute Manning, Folkes not only showed by his turning the 
case out of court (before the evidence was heard) that he de- 
sired to protect his fellow office holder, Manning, but hei 
showed by his talk that he did not want to break up this 
evil at all, tho he knew it was his sworn duty to do so, and 
he again said to us that he had not been down there to sre 
and he personally could not swear that the law was violat- 
ed, in spite of the testimony of Manning and Barfoot and 
Werner the Chief. 

The real truth is that Minetree Folkes, to save his own 
hide, will craw-fish out of his duty even when it is placed 
before him officially. Just because if he did not the ring 



THE IDEA 3 

would tell him at next election they did not want him and 
everbodyin Richmond knows that the ring comes mighty 
near electing its man. 



Police Commissioners Want 

More Money for 30 

More Police 

How They Can Reduce the Force 



Now comes the report that police commissioners want 
more money for 36 more policmen. 

If they would attempt to eliminate vice with the force 
they have instead of encouraging crime by attempting to 
regulate it they would have so little work to do that they 
could cut down the force instead of increasing it. Other 
cities find they can do with less police and have vastly less 
criminal expense when they enforce the law, but crooked 
politicians have so pulled the wool over the eyes of the peo- 
ple that some of them think they can't do without this pro- 
tected evil. 



Josiah Quincy on the Impeachment of Public Officers in 
January, 1768: 

**Woe unto the Land when the Greatness of the Criminal 
shall dismay his Accusers, and his Authority shall make the 
righteous Man to tremble; when the enormous Power of Guilt 
shall exalt itself above the Judgment. Seat and bid Defiance to 
the Tribunal of Justice!" —'Reprinted from a former number 
of IDEA. 



4 THE IDEA 

Graft In Automobile Ambulance 
Keeping for the City 



TV7E DARE the Council Committee on Relief of the Poor 
" to show to the public an itemized statement of the 
$256.93 for repairs and oil for the month of August, 
stating to tuhom all this money went. 

It ought not to cost the city more than about 5'fO.CO or 
$60.00 a month to keep up a horse ambulance and the horse 
is almost as speedy as the automobile ought to go through 
the streets of the city. Besides, this $256.93 is exorbitant 
and there is a leak somewhere. 

We understand also these large bills unnecessarily made 
are paid over to a favored few who chance to stand in with 
those in charge and that the work is not let out to the low- 
est bidder. 

The economy that would come if one councilman were 
paid to give his time to such things would brirg a vast 
saving to the city, but this extravagant dealirg will con- 
tinue to exist just so long as bills can be made without 
check by men not directly responsible to the people but who 
are responsible only to a committee which gets no pay and 
which never sees the bills, perhaps, until the thing bought 
is worn out. 

The party responsible that pays the bills should also be 
in such close touch with the situation as to know beforehand 
what is to be bought. This can only be attained by having 
a small body of paid councilmen elected by all the citizens 
(not by wards) and who give all their time to the city in- 
stead of their worn out evening hours, perhaps two hours 
per month. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only two dollars a year on the 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 



THE IDEA 



On Preachers 



(If you read this half way you won't know what we are driving at. 
Put your thinking cap on. — Ed.) 

TESUS called the Scribes and Pharisees, the religious D. 
) D's and Preachers and Teachers of his day, hypocrites 
and then turned to his followers and told them to do what 
these same scribes told them to do. 

His denunciations of these men were so drastic and harsh 
and fierce that one would expect to find these men the most 
evil minded men. But Jesus cited no crimes that they did 
and admitted that their preaching was gccd. 

One naturally wonders why the Master so severely cen- 
sured them and the question comes were these religious 
teachers any different from tlie preachers of cur cwn day 
and time. 

Let's see what he charged them with. He said they made 
broad their phylacteries— made a show of religious forms 
and 'apparel— just what modern day preachers are doing, 
even wearing clothes entirely different from ether pec i le 
to place themselves above others. He also said they loved 
the chief places in the synagogue and at feasts, and it is a 
fact well known by all who associate with preachers that 
they as a class are worldly minded enough to be miOved by 
many petty jealousies and sordid desires to he fiist in the 
eyes of men, to have a large charge, etc. etc. 

Now for other men to have such worldly desires is but 
natural but it is not natural for spiiitual leaders to lay 
stress on physical or external things and such things aie 
carnal and opposed to spirituality and therefore a worldly 
minded preacher is simply a hypocrite, how^ever gccd his 
preaching may be and however orthodox his talk and con- 
versation may be. 

The point is this: that the good men of Christ's d^y were 



6 THE IDEA 

called hypocrites and we are thoroughly convinced that Je- 
sus would censure today church leaders and preachers just 
as much as He did nineteen centuries ago, because any class 
of men set up as religious leaders is always found guilty of 
the same faults. Jesus did not found any external church 
organization and set up no preacher above any people. He 
called all Christians to the same humility of life and meas- 
ured all men by service and not by position. 

He openly denounced preachers who let themselves be 
called Rabbi or Father, equivalent in our day to Rev., Dr., 
and Father, And yet we call ourselves Christians and pay 
no more attention to his teachings on these subjects than 
we pay to the blowing of the wind. Just what Jesus said 
of the preachers of His day is applicable today. Do what 
they tell you to do but don't follow their example. They 
are good men, the best class of men on earth as a class, yet 
absolutely opposed in their practices to the standards Jesus 
set up, namely, the standard of menial and humble service 
— service means deeds, it don't simply mean correct teach- 
ing. 

Jesus came dressed like other people, a man among men, 
and the sel"vant should not be greater than the Master. 

Organized Christianity's mistake came in setting up a 
priesthood, the very thing that Jesus came to overthrow. 
He called every Christian to be a witness and there is no 
class distinction in the church of Christ, which as far as 
Christ Himself taught, never was an external organization. 

The God of Christianity is Spirit and those who would 
worship Him must worship in Spirit. The Form of Relig- 
ion always has and always will destroy the Spirit of it. 
Therefore, Christian, do not look to churches to fight evil 
(until it becomes popular for they are carnal organizations 
and will do any good work when it becomes popular). The 
true effectual fight against any evil is always made by in- 
dividuals, the glory is reaped by so-called Christian organ- 
izations afterwards,— after the organinization has found it 
pays to get in the band wagon. 

Whether the majority of the members of the churches 



THE IDEA 7 

realize it or not our formal churches have beccme ccirirer- 
cialized and cannot be used to fight any evil until the men 
who pay the preacher will permit it, and just as it takes 
worldly minded men to make worldly treasure— money— 
worldly men practically dictate the policy of the churches 
as such. The good the members of churches are doing 
through their churches is in spite of the men of means 
whose desires so largely govern the actions of pulpit and 
organization. 

With all due respect to those good men among the church 
ministry whose aid we have had so far as they felt they 
could give it, we are forced to conclude that Jesus opposed 
the action these good men have taken and called it hypo- 
critical because He knew, as many of them are finding out, 
that however good they may be they can never live the 
ideal Christian life and serve the carnal order by becoming 
the hired teacher of that order. 

From our knowledge of those preachers whose ciF.cial 
connection, as pastors, with churches h£s held thtm t£ck 
in rendering their best service, we are constrained to feel 
the deepest sympathy for those who still endeavor to occu- 
py those positions which Jesus called hypocritical, and still 
render Christian service. 

TN Richmond it is a noticeable fact that the women of the 
"*■ red light district go to a certain chosen few at the mark- 
ets for their provisions and it is also alleged that these wo- 
men are forced to do their trading at certain furniture 
stores and dry goods stores. All of this, it is rumored, be- 
ing a part of the political machine graft that has beenfcund 
on investigation to appear in other citits as a result of the 
understanding between women of ill fame and the police. 



See us first ^ ^ %^ 

See us before placing your order for printing 

PHONE MONROE 2708 



THE IDEA 



Craft and Graft 



(Written for The Idea by a preacher.) 

npHERE are some things so closely allied in the world 

■■■ that to touch one you touch both. Sin and wrong do- 
ing are so deeply intrenched in many places that to 
touch it in one place is like touching the electric button 
which the little girl touched in New York that blew up 
Hellgate. We read and hear of graft in political circles, in 
commerce and in contracts, but no one seems willing to 
publicly denounce graft in the pulpit. But sir, we beheve 
that graft has reached the man in cloth; and that it pays 
to keep silent about certain issues and certain crafts. 

The world knows, the devil knows, and everybody else 
knows we are living in days when men can take a seat in 
the meeting house and stay there unmolested and carry on 
questionable business undisturbed. For instance, I heard 
of a preacher sometime ago who said he had a whiskey drum- 
mer a member of his steepled house crowd, whcm he was 
afraid to "turn out", afraid he would go to the bad. Think 
of it! A whiskey peddler go to the bad. How much lower 
in sin could a man drop than to peddle distilled disgrace 
and damnation, a stuff that will starve innocent childhood, 
make a brute of the father and drive the poor mother to 
desperation. And think of a preacher who will allow this 
to go on unmolested under his nose. 

Not only this, but things equally as vile. I heard of a 
leading church in this city whose clerk was a wholesale 
whiskey dealer, 

A few months ago with two other missionaries I vis- 
ited a Mayo street sporting house. The woman who keeps 
the dive was a native of South Carolina. We read the Bible 
and prayed with this poor erring woman. Then I asked 
her what rent she paid for the house. She told me she was 
paying $12.50 per week for the house ready furnished in- 



THE IDEA 9 

eluding an automatic musical organ; but she had been pay- 
ing $15.00 per week; and she told whom she rented from, a 
firm in the real estate buiness, the leading member of the 
firm was also, I understood, a leading member of one of the 
up town city churches. Does he collect this rent from this 
poor fallen woman in this immoral traffic in lust and dis- 
ease and take any part of it up town and put it to salary of 
the man who refuses to cry aloud and spare not. 

Every man knows this business is perpetuated only by re- 
fusing to expose it and yet, sir, while sin abounds, and like 
the frogs in Pharaoh's kingly house, everywhere these men, 
leaders of the people behind the sacred desk, are as silent 
as an Egyptian mummy about these things. Who will dare 
to expose these conditions as they ought to be exposed.^ 
Who? who? who? 



One Law for the Politicians 

Another for Private 

Citizens 



/^N Wednesday, the 14th, Justice John dismissed the 
^^ case brought by the publisher of THE IDEA against 
C. Manning, Jr., for interfering with an officer on 
the advice of Folkes that Manning did not "interfere" ac- 
cording to law. On Thursday, the next day, the 15th, the 
same Justice John fined a man $10.00 and the papers say 
it was on the "technical" charge of "interfering with an 
officer',, tho the evidence did not show any interference 
either according to law or in any other way. If there were 
any interference why call it the "technical charge? " 

Also why is it that technicalities are allowed against a jjri- 
vate citizen and not allowed against a ring politician? And 



10 THE IDEA 

the answer is that the ring politicians in Richmond can use 
the courts and the officer s of the law to suit themselves. 

If you call that treason or libel or contempt of court, get 
mad. Then swallow it. In the case of the Manning war- 
rant there was actual interference; in the other case there 
was neither moral nor physical interference. 



Is It Wise To Break 

Up the Red Light 

District? 

Police Surgery Decreases 90 Per Cent* 
Criminal Cases Decrease One Third 

Police Stop Guarding Criminals and Protect Tax Payers 



(George K. Turner, recognized authority on municipal problems, and known 
in the magazine world for his accurate and clear cut delineations of American 
city reform movements, wrote in last May's McClure's a most interesting and 
instructive article on the City of Des Moines and what it has accomplished under 
the plan of government by a small paid council elected at large, commonly called 
Government by Commission. Below we quote what he writes concerning the 
Red Light District and the result of breaking it up.) 

Hamery, in charge of the Department of Public Safety, started for 
the Red Light district — first, to prevent illegal liquor-selling there, 
and then to break up the "vice trust." 

This so-called "vice ^rust" was the product of of the policy of seg- 
regation in Des Moines. For fifty years the city-had kept its frontier- 
town quarter of brothels, and accepted the easy doctrine that a segre- 
gated district is a necessity of city life. In theory, this district was 



THE IDEA 11 

supposed to keep vice from the rest of the city; in practice, two-fifths 
of the vicious women were confined to the district, and the rest scat- 
tered across the town. 

THE CITY'S SHARE 

On the last day of each month the women appeared in police court 
and paid their ten, fifteen, and twenty-five dollar fines — the younger 
and more prosperous treating easily with the Chief of Police, and the 
older and more broken pleading with the police judge to remit the 
city's share until they could save it from their earnings. 

Two months in the year — at Christmas-time and just before elec- 
tion — the city and the Red light district exchanged courtesies. The 
city, on its part, remitted the monthly fines; while the police came 
back from the Red Light district at Christmas-tide bearing holiday 
burdens — for the Chief of Police, good-sized diamonds; for the men, 
various luxuries — at times a gunny-bag full of boxes of cigars slung 
over the shoulders of the sergeant who did the collecting. How much 
more was taken by the police is not exactly known; nor the exact 
contribution of the Red Light district to the various city ad- 
ministrations at election-time. Both were ample; and the influ- 
ence of the district on the morals and the service of the police force 
was the worst. This thing went on undisturbed from year to year; it 
was one of the established institutions of the city 

Some years ago the railways and the business interests in the local- 
ity of the former segregated district demanded its removal. At that 
time Levich was chief professional bondsman, picking up, through 
his relations with the police, a considerable income by bailing out 
prisoners. Being close to the police, he and a few others — largely his 
own relatives — learned in advance where the police proposed to locate 

the new district of segregation Levich 

and his friends owned some property there, and they soon leased oth- 
er places for from five to fifteen dollars a month. The immoral wo- 
men were herded into the district by the police. The members of the 
**vice trust" who were in the city officials' confidence, . , . . . 
leased them to the women at a scale of prices ranging from three to 
five dollars a day, payable strictly in advance. Every night, Billy 
Watt, the collector for Levich, went nown the street with a satchel 
(Continued on page 14.) 



12 THE IDEA 



One Law for Rich 
Another for Poor 

Wagon Driver Locked Up 

Automobilist Simply Reported 
for the Same Offence 



"WTHEN a wealthy automobilist is guilty of reckless speed- 
" ing in the streets of the city, the practice is to sim- 
ply take his number and report the offender. 

Frequently the owner who is summonsed into court tes- 
tifies that he was not in the car at the time, — that it was in 
the hands of others, —and the guilty party is thus not even 
summoned into court. 

The difference in the treatment accorded a poor wagon 
driver the other day was so marked as to astound those who 
believe in equality before the law. A poor man was driv- 
ing his wagon along Broad street when his line got caught 
under the horse's tail. The horse ran two blocks before he 
was stopped. Then a policeman placed the driver under ar- 
rest, put handcuffs on him, left his horse in the street, took 
him to the station, locked him up, did not allow him to tel- 
ephone to friends, and it was 8 o'clock the next morning be- 
fore he could arrange bail. Then he came into police court 
without having time to get witnesses for himself. The po- 
liceman alone appeared against him, — only one witness, — 
and the only charge was reckless driving. On this charge 
and after such Russian like procedure, the driver was fined 



THE IDEA 13 

$10.00. Tlien he had to go to Bliley's Livery and pay Bli- 
ley, the councilman, for keeping his horse. On the wagon 
■was a gum coat and whip when the arrest was made. When 
the owner got out his coat and whip were gone, his money 
was gone in fine to the city and feed to the councilman and 
he had spent from noon one day till 8 A. M. the next in the 
police station, all because by accident be Lad, %a hcjs, tech- 
nically violated a statute for the violation of which on the 
part of a wealthy autoist the rich man is sometimes report- 
ed and then, perhaps sometim.es fined. ISowlBElDPA 
does not contend that the rich man should be treated like 
this poor man was treated but it does conterd that tKe poor 
man should be afforded the same justice that the rich man 
was afforded. 

The Law should know no difference in rich and poor, 
bond or free, black or white or yellow. 

From our close observance of the proceedure of police 
and courts in Richmond, it depends almost altcgcthei en 
your standing with the powers that be whethei jcu £tt 
justice or not. The poor man catches it while the rich gees 
free. The friend of politicirns is protected in crime while 
the enemy is punished without crime. The Virginia negro 
known to the judge somet'm.es gets justice while the North 
Carolina negro is convicted at birth. 



Oafetj/ !/iazor blades Sharpened 

BV SPECIAL PROCESS 30C. PER DOZEN 

RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15 CENTS 

Scissors, Carving Knives and All Sharp Edged Tools Put 
IN PERFECT CONDITION 

Special Prices on High Grade Imported Razors, 
Perfumes and Toilet Articles ;;;;:;:::;;:;:;:;;:;;;;:;:::;:: ;:^;;;;;;;:;:;;;;:;. 

THE ^^SHARP-O^^ CO. 

BARBER SUPPLIES AND GRINDING 
608 East Main Street 



14 THE IDEA 

Is It Wise To Break Up the Red Light District? 

(Concluded from page 11.) 

slung across his shoulder, collecting his rents and taking the proceeds 
of the automatic pianos, which, by order of the police, furnished the 
only music in the street, and were owned and operated by the 
"trust." 

The combination that controlled the houses soon controlled their 
trade as well in groceries, liquor, and the general necessities of life. 

Under the stringent enforcement of the Iowa statutes, and the 
friendly understanding with the local law officials, the "vice trust" 
not only had the segregated district in its control, but, if the women 
at work there should attempt to escape, it could, generally speaking, 
bring them back. 

Mose Levich's relations with the police, as the chief recognized 
professional bondsmon at the police station, were very close. This 
odd extra official of the city stalking about the corridors of the police 
station early attracted the restless and inquiring mind of the new man- 
ager of the department. Councilman Hamery. He soon discovered 
another established custom that seemed to him very strange. He 
found that the papers of candidates aspiring to the police force, under 
civil service, bore the name of Mr. Levich as a guaranty of their good 
moral character. Hamery refused to accept this guaranty, began a 
general investigation, and secured copies of the leases controlled by 
the "vice trust," and affidavits from women who had left the district 
and had been brought back again by the process of law. He then 
placed the whole sensational story of the "vice trust" in the waiting 
hands of the newspapers, and started proceedings before the grand 
jury. 

There was at that time not one of the five councilman who wanted 
to wipe out the Red Light district system in Des Momes, or who was 
much disturbed over the situation discovered there. The majority 
believed in and advocated the general policy of segregation. 
But, unexpectedly, over their heads and against their wishes, public 
opinion forced a clearing of the town. 

For some time before the election, the Register and Leader — 



THE IDEA 15 

always foremost in local reforms — had advocated wiping out the dis- 
trict. On exposure of the conditions, both this papei and the News 
called for a general clean-up. The women of the city were aroused, 
held a mass meeting, invited Councilman Hamery before them, and 
read him the laws of Iowa on vice. 

"Are you, or are you not, going to enforce the law?" they asked. 

The Newspapers asked each of the other councilmen the same 
question. They evaded it. 

"Ask Hamery; he's head of the police," they said. 

Hamery stood alone. Everybody's attention was focused upon him. 
For a week he refused entirely to discuss the question: he was busy 
with prosecuting the "vice trust"; he could not decide; he doub'.ed 
whether it could be done. 

Then at last he gave in. 

"I couldn't be the one man that stood between those people and 
the law," he said. 

And so, after three generations, the Red Light district of Des 
Moines was closed. 

Sheer force of public opinion had compelled a revolution in the 
morals of the town — simply because, under the new system of gov- 
ernment, it found at once the man who was responsible, and forced 
him to act. 

Once started, Councilman Hamery plunged into the work of clear- 
ing up Des Moines with his usual thoroughness. The segregated 
district was closed on the day appointed, September 15, 1908. Wo- 
men left the city by the car-load, and ever since they have been con- 
stantly and persistently hunted from the town. 

Public opinion, again voiced by the newspapers, was largely respon- 
sible for starting a futher movement against old 'practices in the 
department and police court, some six months after the vice cam- 
paign. 

Professional bondsmen still appeared at that time in the police sta- 
tion, making their profits from prisoners of all kinds, with the toler- 
ance of the police. It was a custom too old to attract attention. 

"Why should the city of Des Moines hold prisoners while these 
bond sharks go through their pockets?" inquired the Register and 
Leader one morning. And this old scandal was immediately abolished. 

The result of this change has been a very marked advance in civ- 
ilization in Des Moines. The city doctors at the police station esti- 
mate that the amount of police surgery made necessary by murders, 
assaults, and suicides has decreased to a small percentage of what it 
was ('"not over ten per cent." one doctor says) when the Red Light 
district continually sent in its stream of cases. The streets are rrore 
orderly; and the amount of general crime has noticeably decreased. 



16 THE IDEA 

Lawrence De Graff, the prosecuting attornej' until the beginning 
of this year, and since then judge in charge of the session of the dis- 
trict court, states that the annual business in that court deer eased 
a full third almost immediately upon the closing of the Red 
Light district. The criminals and semi-criminals who are 
friends or parasites of these vicious ivomen have left the toivn. 
The professional thief, who, traveling between larger places like Chi- 
cago and Kansas City, found the Red Light district of the smaller 
city a convenient hiding-place, no longer comes into Des Moines. 
There have been practically no burglaries or "hold-ups" in the city 
for over a year. This is not all due to the closing of the Red Light 
district, but, estimating the indirect effect upon the police force as 
well as the direct influence, a very great share is traceble to it. 

"In former times," says Assistant Chief A. H. Day, of the police 
force, * 'we kept twice the men guarding the criminals in the 
Red Light district while they were committing crimes that ive 
did protecting taxpayers and their families up in the residence 
district. Now we make it our only business to protect the tax- 
payers against the criminals. ' ' 



One on Manning 

'm »^t mm .' ■ — 

When the publisher was after Manning in police court, 
Manning, stung, sang out, "This man is nothing but a 
buzzard." We would ask, what do buzzards get after, and 
what particular piece of rotten carrion was the publisher 
after that day to make Manning call him a bujzard? 

If Manning did not mean to call himself corrupt, why did 
he call his pursuer a buzzard? Yes, there m^ust be some- 
thing rotten around when a man yells out in public that the 
buzzards are after him. • - 

The truth will out sometimes. 



THE IDEA will be out each week from now on. Watch 
the cartoon next week. It's rich. 



MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

31 \ West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 



!^arbour S^n^ffy Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South SSostcrij u/r^/n/a 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 






jVoenni^fer-'Oi'zemore Co. 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 



All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 





rtoon Man 



He has some ideas up 
leeve and will give us a 
live cartoon every week 




fSBKB 



6 WATCHES FOR BOYS 



THE IDEA will give away lo I'^e six boys selling the largest number of 
IDEAS in their sections six-handsome watches as follows: — 

One wa^tch each will be given to each of the six boys \v ho sell the _ 
greatest number of IDEAS from the following six IDEA stations: For. 
tH(§' 4 vWeks beginning September 24th. 

ro ti-^? ^^^^ End— Model News Co.. 519 W. Broad 



i"^^ 



K GRurch Hill— Wariei's Store, Jefferson and Clay 

Down Town — Idea Offlce, 1106 Capitol Street 
l95ni58 rilf.^^l^lhchester— Abbott's Store, Hull Street 
-;„,V-t»"\7 Eetersburg — Jones' Store, 101 Washington 
Lynchburg — Shepherd's 900 Main Street 



WEEKLY 5c ^^^ ^OPY 



THE ^ IDE 



I ^ 



Vol. IV 



A SIQN OP THE TIMES 

October J, 1910 



N.'-. 



RICHMOND POLITICS 




M{ V^i'^^ 



Manning says the buzzards are after him 



Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and printer 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. I ; . . v ~ 



f JEWELER J, S. JAMES OPTICIAN I 

I 7th AND MAIN STS. | 

I 5^ We are showing special good values in J § 

g n i)iamoncl:^y Watche:^^ yewelru^ Y § 

I OilverwarGy Cut Slass, £tc, i 

I We invite your inspection | 

Q!>(aH><il><^H>«D(l^<ii>a^B>CD<aBa><3i>^aDO{3i><BBD<iD<fiaD<iCl!><BB>CD<aH><3D<^a>CI>(HB><iD<aBDClO 
OD<^H><l&^^CD<aH> <]D<HK><i<i*i><^K><!D<iHD<it> OmXi !><■■> (3D<3BK>(i4>i><^K>QO<i^»<iD(^B>aD<aiK><iO 

Print it Right. I 



s Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea | 

' Presses w^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- f 

I roe 2708, | 

a o 

f HEADQUARTERS for your sick wants; your family and toilet V 

} ^ 

i wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines A 

V Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, r 
\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, / 
^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisites. Delicate ^ 

V Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 
^ # 

t - A. a ROBINS, - i 

I 200 E. MARStlALL ST. ^ 

^ t 

^ Goods delivered anywhere in the city. \ 

^ Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. ^ 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 



VOL. IV OCTOBER 1, 1910 No. 34 



Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YODER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 



Grand Jury 



Will It Be Fixed? 



WE have been told that there is no use in trying to take 
the charges against Manning before the Grard Jury, 
as that tribunal will be fixed so that we can not get 
an unbiased hearing, just as was the case recently ^\h6n 
the Grand Jury was composed almost entirely of officehold- 
ers under the machine government of Richmond. 

This one thing is true, that the jury which tried the civil 
libel case in the Law and Equity Court had on it a so-called 
professional juror who makes it a practice of hanging 
around City Hall just to make mone> by jury service and 
he is often on juries there and he did standi for heavy dam- 
ages against us when a majority of the jury was with us. 



2 THE IDEA 

It is also true that the jury in the Hustings Court m hicb 
tried the criminal libel charge had on it two, if not jr.oie, 
intimate friends of C. Manning, Jr., ere of the ccn-jlfin- 
ants, and one of these was recently seen collectir.g bills in 
the Red Light district. 

In view of these facts we are assured by those who sey 
they know that there is no hope of bringing any action be- 
fore a g-rand jury against any one of the ring crowd in Rich- 
mond, however guilty he may be. 

From the treatment we have experienced at the hands of 
so-called courts of justice in Richmond, we can hardly ex- 
pect anything like a fair treatment befoie a grand jury, 
and yet we are not prepared to belitAe until we see it done 
that Judge Witt will deliberately impanel, or peimit to be 
impanelled, a jury selected for its hostility against THE 
IDEA and its desire to protect police commissioners in crime. 

Next week the people may know for themselves. What- 
ever they do now will only hasten the day when Richmond 
will throw overboard the nefarious ring which has every 
office holder in the city afraid to speak his honest convic- 
tions for fear some political crock will get his job for serv- 
ices rendered to the machine. 



On Government Wrongs and 
How To Destroy Them 

Virginia^ the Machine Ridden^ vs. Oregon 
The People Governed 



IN State governments Pennsylvania, Virginia and New 
York may be taken as examples of the ultra conserva- 
tive, out of date, machine ridden, boss ruled States, 
while Oregon may be taken as the example of the most up 



THE IDEA 3 

t) date, modern, properly governed, boss elimirj-Ud State. 
In Virginia neither are the men elected nor the l^ws erf cl- 
ed which the people desire. In Oregon the people can and do 
get the men and the measures they want, and Hon. Jona- 
than Bourne, Jr., Senator ficm Oregon, in a speech in the 
U. S. Congress, May 5th, 1910, told why and how the peo- 
ple have succeeded in actually running their own govern- 
government. This speech may be had by writing to the 
Government Printing Office and calling for Dceinert Ko. 
41504-9003. It is intensely interestirg srd shcii'c, U in the 
hands of every student of popular government. 

He says: ''Oregon has the best system of popular gov- 
ernment in the world today. The Australian Ballot, Regis- 
tration of voters, Initiative and Referendum, Direct Pri- 
mary, Corrupt Practices Act, Recall, an absolute govern- 
ment by the people." 

Below we print a few extracts from Senator Bournes' 
speech;— 

"I think all will concede that the times seem awry. Un- 
rest exists throughout the civilized world. People cie 
speculating as to the causes. Daily uncertainty grows 
stronger as to future events. 

In my opinion, the basic cause is that people h£ve <!i 
confidence in many of their public servants and bitterly le- 
sent attempted dictatorship by "would be" political basses 
and representatives of special interests who desire co di- 
rect public servants ar.d legislaticn for theii c\a n selfish 
interests rather than assist in the enactrrent of laws guar- 
anteeing justice to all and special privileges to none. 

Successful and permanent goveirment rrust lest prima- 
rily on recognition of the rights of men and the abs ) ute 
sovereignty of the people. 

Popular selection under the present stage of evolution of 
<9ur Government can be obtained only by direct primary 
laws and complete elimination of convention and caucus 
nomination of public officert . 

Time was when a few self-constituted leaders in Oregon 
politics arrogated to then.selves the preic^^ii\( s cf gov- 



4 THE IDEA 

ernment and made their assumption effective through illic- 
it combinations and the use of money in any and every 
quarter where necessary to their purposes of control — that 
is, they commercialized ccnventicrs, legislatures, and the 
administrative branches of the city, county and state gov- 
ernment. It was not a condition peculiar to Oregon. It ob- 
tained, and I believe still obtains in a more or less flagrant 
degree, in every State in the Union; and it had its boldest, 
most unscrupulous executive genius in Boss Tweed, who, 
recognizing the opportunity of the crook in government by 
party through convention nomiraticrs, declared he did not 
care who elected the candidates so long as he had t]ie pow- 
er to nominate the ticket. 

Revolting against the conditions, the State which I have 
the honor, in part, to represent, has evolved the best- 
known system of popular government, and, because of this 
conviction, I take this opportunity of presenting not only 
to the Senate, but to the country a brief analysis of the Or- 
egon laws bearing upon the question, with my own deduc- 
tions as to the improvement they show and the merits they 
possess. 

AUSTRALIAN BALLOT LAW. 

Oregon in 1891 adopted the Australian ballot, which in- 
sures secrecy, prevents intimidation, and reduces the op- 
portunity for bribery. This, of course, is a prerequisite to 
any form of popular government. 

INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM. 

Oregon's next step in popular government was the adop- 
tion of the initiative and referendum amendment to the 
constitution, which amendment was adopted in June, 1902, 
by a vote of 62,024 to 5,668. It provides that legislative au- 
thority shall be vested in a legislative assembly, but that 
the people reserve to themselves the power to approve cr 
reject at the polls any act of the legislature. An initiative 
petition must be signed by 8 per cent, of the legal voters, 
(Continued on page 14.) 



THE IDEA 5 

Francione's Nude Pictures 

Taken Down 



S3ME timea^o THE IDEA published the fact that in 
Francione's place, a well known stag hotel and bar- 
room arrangement on Broad near 1st street, were two 
mammoth oil paintings of nude women, evidently put there 
to draw men in to spend their money in vice. The very act 
of having these pictuies in his possession was a violation 
of State law, and having them placed in connection with a 
barroom was a gross violation of the moral law against 
corrupting the morals of citizens. And yet it was permitted 
well known to the police, whose duty it is to regularly in- 
spect these places. 

Recently, however, we are informed that the walls are 
no longer decorated, as before, with these vile exhibitiors, 
— that the police have forced them to be lemoved. 

The point is this, that the police find it unprofitable to 
enforce the law until they are forc€c to it b> publicity. Let 
the people organize for action and the laws in Richmord 
will be speedily enforced. 



Daniel Webster on the Bible 



"If we abide by the principles taught in the Bible, our 
country will go on prospering and to prosper; but, if we 
and our posterity neglect its instructions and authority, no 
man can tell how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us 
and bury all our glory in profound obrcurity. The Bible is 
the book of all others for lawyers as well as divines, and I 



6 THE IDEA 

pity the man who cannot find in it a rich supply of thought 
and rule of conduct. I believe Jesus Christ to be the ton 
of God. The miracles which He- wrought establish in my 
mind His personal authority and render it proper for me to 
believe what he asserts." 



The Duty of 

Officers 

Law Enforcement Is What You 
Pay Them for, Says Judge 



A great many men, both in cities and counties, entrusted with the 
^ ^ enforcement of law, seem to have a vital misconception as to 
their duty. It is one of the cardinal doctrines of the Anti-Sa- 
loon League that laws should be enforced by the officials who have 
been chosen to enforce them. In the great majority of cases, how- 
ever, these officials take the ground that they have no duty in the 
matter until some private citizen has made complaint. This is espe- 
cially true in regard to violations of the liquor law. We believe it is 
the duty of the officials, and not of the citizens, to make complaint; 
and we are glad to see that this opinion is upheld by Judge Grant, 
of the Supreme Court of Michigan. Here is what he has to say on 
the subject: 

I want to tell you right here that the next time a law officer says it 
is not his business to make complaint, and tells you if you will sign 
the complaint he will set the machinery of the law in motion, that 



THE IDEA 7 

you can assure him thai it is not the duty of an> private citizen to do 
this. It is not safe for any private citizen to attack three kinds of 
law-breakers — keepers of houses of prostitution, gamblers and liquor 
dealers who sell unlawfully. The suppression of their illegal busi- 
ness is not the concern of private citizens Every police oflfi- 

cei has the power of government behind him; and lawbreakers know 
that if they kill the officer, they never can kill the oflfice — that as soon 
as any one officer is out of the way there is another in his place. 
Liw enforcement is what you pay the officers for, and it is their du- 
ty, and not a private citizen's. 

Still, no doubt, it will be necessary in a multitude of cases for pri- 
vate citizens to make complaint against violators of liquor laws, until 
we can secure officials who will both see and do their duty in this 
matter. It is the duty of officers to make complaints against violators 
of law. It is the privilege of any citizen, however, to go into court 
and make affidavit or give information concerning violations of law. 
The failure of the officer does not always excuse the private citizen 
from responding to the privilege which he has urder the statute. Cn 
the other hand, officers should not complain when private citizens 
are slow to make complaints when it is primarily the officer's duty to 
do it. — American Issue. 



A Joke on Norfolk 

Clyde Saunders Investigating 
Fraud 



It looked like a huge joke to us when it developed that the inves- 
tigation of alleged fraud in the second district was to be done, not at 
the hands of the grand jury, but at the hands of the State Democratic 
Committee, the most nefarious political machine in the State of Vir- 
ginia, whose members hold their positions by virtue of these same 
fraudulent practices and who have been able to maintain themselves 
(Continued on page 11) 



THE IDEA 



How the Crooks 
Run Richmond 

The Ring Intimidates Justices 
of the Peace 



VERY few people know how really desperate the ring- 
crowd in Richmond has gotten and to what vile and 
dirty methods they will resort to carry their point 
and, when one gets into their way, to put him out of com- 
missior. As was stated in THE IDEA for two weeks ago, 
we had all kind of trouble in getting a Justice of the Peace 
to swear out a warrant for Chris. Manning, simply on the 
ground that the ring would ruin the man that did it. Fveiy 
Justice appealed to seemed to realize his duty to swear it 
out but was unwilling to do it because it would hurt him. 
To show that they regarded it as their duty, one justice 
went so far as to try to get another justice to do it for us, 
he not being willing to do it, but realizing that it ought to 
be done and he ought really to do it. 

Mr. Starke, who finally swore out the warrant, told us 
frankly that he felt he had no right as a justice to decline, 
but that he was sure it would hurt him as a justice and he 
would like to have time to consider it and asked that we 
wait until the following day. This we did and he, after 
getting advice, reported the next morning that it was go- 
ing to hurt him but that he had found he had no right un- 
der his oath to decline, and so he would have to act for us. 

We hated to put a man in such a position, but as it was 



THE IDEA 9 

not a, peasonal matter at all, but simply a matter of a just- 
i J }'s official duty, we felt we had a right and and a duty to 
ask the justice to issue the warrant. 

Now since the warrant was issued, we learn that Mr. 
Starke has been informed that he will not be re-elected at 
next election time, and when he asked what else he could 
do, he was told he should have bluffed Yoder cff. 

Yet Richmond people will sit back and do nothing while 
their government passes into the most corrupt ring that 
ever dominated a city, a ring that will chop off a man's of- 
ficial head because he dares do his duty; a ring that will 
ruin a man because he would not work a bluff contrary to 
his oath of office; a ring just as bad and as conupt as the 
Norfolk gang of political thieves that have stolen elections 
from time immemorial, 

Norfolk people, however are waking up. Richmond peo- 
ple prefer to sleep because so many politicians live here 
that everybody here has some friends enjoying the favor 
of the ring and it would hurt them to stop the rotten deal- 
ing. 

Yes, "Ephraim is joined to his idols" but we will not let 
him alone. 

THE IDEA'S publicity will yet start an investigation 
that will startle even the ring crowd itself with its disclos- 
ures. 



Prizes for Selling Ideas 

Six Watches Given Away 



Since by an oversight some of the announcements of the 
prizes did not state when the contest for the prizes for sell- 
ing IDEAS would begin and close, there has resulted amis- 
understanding on the part of the boys. The contest began 
last Saturday and continues 4 weeks. It is not too late to 



10 THE IDEA 

enter the contest. Six handsome watches will be given 
away to the six boys who sell the largest nin-.ber of IDE-AS 
in the six districts outlined on the back page of the cover. 
Read it and get busy. 



Big Political Meet- 
ing On Sunday 

At Chamber of Commerce 

Attended by the Mayor Who Makes a 

Speech 



It is being talked all over town that Sunday night before 
last at the Chamber of Commerce there was some kind of 
a jolly crowd, estimated at 500 strong, gathered together 
for pleasure at the Richmond Chamber of Commerce. May- 
or Richardson is reported to have made the biggest speech 
of his life, not at church on this Sunday night, oh no, but 
with a jolly good crowd at the Chamber of Commerce. 

It is hard to get an accurate account of what really went 
on for the participants seem to be ashamed tohave it known 
Just what was done or just what the object of the meeting 
was, as is evinced by the fact that the papers make no 
mention of the affair. 

Generally when the Mayor makes a speech to a half doz- 
en men The Times-Dispatch dilates on the eloquence of His 
Honor, "the mare", as they call it in Richmond. But this 
time all is silence, and so THE IDEA would ask for enlight- 
enment. 



THE IDEA 11 

Was The Supreme actually ignorant of the whole pro- 
cepding? Or were the T. D. men there "on the inside", 
and if they were why did not the Monday issue of the morn- 
ing whitewasher give all the news? If these rumois going 
around are not true, then it's up to somebody to say so, or 
else let the public believe that the Mayor of Richmond at- 
tended a big secular meeting on Sunday. 



If you don't like THE IDEA, read the Manchester Bee. 
It won't hurt you, if it does Howie. 



A jOKE ON NORFOLK 

(Continued from page 7) 

in power so long just simply because they have been able by fraudu- 
lent practices to sell government positions to the highest bidder. 

This we say was bad enough but when Clyde Sau^^s, political 
boss of Richmond, and who by his own confession wal^iilty of re- 
ceiving hundreds of dollars for his political influence at election time, 
was made a member of that committee, then the joke became so seri- 
ous a one that no decent paper should have failed to give the commit- 
tee the horselaugh, and yet the papers of this State feel so heavily the 
hand of political graft upon them, tho they all knew what kind of in- 
vestigation Clyde Saunders would like to have, never dared to point 
out this breach of faith with the people by the State Committee. 

Just think of it, Clyde Saunders of the State crooked machine in- 
vestigating another part of that machine! 

The political boss of Richmond investigating boss politics in Nor- 
folk! What a farce! 

If that investigating committee is of no better breed of politicians 
than Clyde is, then it is high time Norfolk were realizing that a 
beautiful coat of pure whitewash awaits their nasty fraudulent mess 
administered by Clyde and his pals, pastmasters at the art of electing 
the man the people don't want. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only two dollars a year orl tKfe' 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 3 



12 THE IDEA 

Sold Nearly Three Times as 

Many Ideas in Evening as 

in Morning 

A Secret for Idea Boys 

How One Boy Makes Good Money 



On a recent Saturday we told one of THE IDEA boys 
that if he would go out in the evening to sell ILEAS he 
would make more money, as most of the boys sold only a 
few hours. in the morning and then quit, and that later in 
the day tK© men from the shops and big industrial plants 
who had gotten paid off at 12 o'clock would be out but could 
not find an IDEA, as no boys were on the streets in the af- 
ternoon. The boy was out in the morning that day and 
then went out again in the evening after the other boys 
had stopped selling, and he sold nearly 3 times as many in 
about 2 hours time in the evening about supper time as he 
sold all the morning. 

Now if you want one of those watches you had better get 
a move on you and try Main or Ercrd Street taiker 
shops in the afternoon or evenings when the other boys 
have stopped selling. Do you know that every Saturday 
afternoon men come into THE IDEA office and tell us some 
thing like this: "Is THE IDEA out today? I came all the 
way down Broad Street and did not see a boy, so came here 
to see if I could get one." 

There are just lots of men who want IDEAS Saturday 
evening that can't get them because the boys step sellirg 
them in the morning after the big rush is over and befcre 
the second rush starts in the afternoon. 



THE IDEA 13 

Right Shall Rule 

Short is the triumph of evil, 
Long is the reign of right; 

The men who win 

By the aid of sin, 
The nation that rules by might, 
The party that lives by corruption, 
The trickster, the knave, the thief, 

Miy thrive for a time 

On the fruits of crime, 
But their seeming success is brief. 

Yet know that the truth shall triumph. 
That evil shall find its doom; 

That the cause of right 

Though subdued by might, 
Shall break from the strongest tomb: 
That wrong, though it seems to triumph. 
Lasts only for a day; 

While the cause of truth 

Has eternal youth. 
And shall rule o'er the world for aye. 

— Sele:ted. 



Idea Boys 

Driven from Street by Police 



For some time past the boys who sell IDEAS on the street have 
brought us complaint that police had ordered them on Saturdays 
while they were selling IDEAS, to leave the places at which they 
were accustomed to sell papers. 



14 THE IDEA 

The action of the police in thus persecuting bo.vs who sell IDEAS 
not only hurts sales at such points but it makes ihese boys thus per- 
secuted loath to sell IDEAS at all, when they kno-v it puts them "in 
bad" with the police, and this is quite a serious matier with small 
boys who have no pull or influential friends. 

THE IDEA has been time and time again subjected to costly per- 
secution by this rotten Richmond police department, all because it 
has dared uncover the misfeasance in office of those who run things 
in Richmond. 



ON GOVERNMENT WRONGS AND HOW TO 
DESTROY THEM 

(Continued from page 4. ) 

as shown by the vote for supreme judge at the last preced- 
ing general election, and filed with the secretary of stale 
not less than four months before the election. 

A referendum petition need be signed by only 5 percent, 
of the voters and filed with the secretary of state within 
ninety days after final adjournment of thelegislatuie which 
passed the bill on which the referendum is demanded. The 
legislature may itself refer to the people any act passed ty 
it. The veto power of the governor does not extend to ^ry 
measure referred to the people. 

STATE PUBLISHES PUBLICITY PAMPHLETS 

In addition to the publicity incident to the circulation of 
the petitions, the law provides that the secretary of state 
shall, at the expense of the State, mail to every registered 
voter in the State a printed pamphlet ccntainirg a tiue 
copy of the title and text of each measure to be submitted 
to the people. 

Thef initiative develops the electorate, placing directly 
upon them the responsibility for legislation enacted under 
its provision; the referendum elevates the legislature 
because of the possibility of its use in case of undesirable 
legislation. Brains, ideas, and arginnent, rather than money, 
intimidation and logrolling govern the standards of legislation. 



THE IDEA 15 

OREGON'S EXPERIENCE SATISFACTORY 

Since that amendment was adopted, the people of Oregon ha\e 
voted upon 23 measures submitted to them under the initiative, 5 
submitted under the referendum, and 4 referred to the people by the 
legislature. Nineteen measuies were submitted at one election. 
That the people acted intelligently is evident fiom the fact that in r.o 
instance has there been general dissatisfaction with the result of the 
vote. The measures submitted presented almost every phase of leg- 
islation, and some of them were bills of considerable length. 

Results attained under direct legislation in Oregon compare so fa- 
vorably with the work of a legislative assembly that an effort to re- 
peal the initiative and referendum would be overw helmingl}' defeat- 
ed. No effort has ever been attempted." 



Huche Kuche at the Fair 
Dug Gordon^ Secretary 

Last year THE IDEA had occasion to censure the officers of the 
P'ai- Association for permitting vile and obscene exhibitions, Huche 
Kuche shows, too base to describe in this paper. The reason given 
for permitting these corrupting immoral plays and the wide open 
gambling at the fair is that the fair will not pay unless these things 
are permitted, and then too it happens only once a year, they say, etc. 
Tommy rot! 

We notice that this year a police commissioner is given a paying 
job with the Fair Association and i*: is pointed out that this was done 
to keep the police from enforcing the law. It seems it is always prof- 
itable for business men to engage in the trade in vice and crime for 
gain and they go on unmolested, but if a poor woman for riecessity 
engages in it out side of the Red Light district she is sentenced to jail 
and publicly branded as a criminal, as was recently done in police 
court with a woman on Venable Street who had not made the proper 
acquaintance with the police commissioners as the Mayo Street 
wenches have. 



16 THE IDEA 



Applaud McCarthy 



Ex-Mayor McCarthy made one of his characteristic speeches last 
Wednesday night at the Y, M. C. A., under the auspices of the 
Commission Government League. 

Round on round of applause greeted his humorous thrusts at un- 
principled politicians, whom he said were traitors and should be treat- 
ed as traitors in the army are treated — shot. 

The Times-Dispatch seemed to have it in so much for any clean 
public man that it simply said of him the next day: "Former Mayox 
McCarthy also discussed the Commission Government Plan." 

Among other things, McCarthy said: "If the city of Richmond 
had held on to its water rights and street railway franchises, theie 
would be no tax in Richmond today." 

"Wipe out the city council entirely and turn all your legislative and 
administrative affairs over to five men and I think I can prove to any 
man that the city would save three hundred thousand dollars a year 
and I am confident the amount saved would be double that." 

"It costs the city of Richmond ,$500,000 annually to run the city 
debt of 9 million dollars." 

The postmaster of Houston, Texas, spoke first and showed how 
his city had reduced the tax rate 10 cents each year since the plan 
was adopted. It started at $2,00 and has been reduced to $1.70 and 
the city has in the meantime paid all its large indebtedness and 
made wonderful improvements and saved money. 

Postmaster Strong said that by the commission plan gcod men 
were sure to be elected because the ward political machines 
could not get in their dirty work, as the 5 men were elected by all 
and not by wards, thus the commissioners or aldermen as they are 
called, are not responsible to a machine but to all the people and are 
men of ability and integrity. 

The Mayor apportions the administration of afTairs arrong the oth- 
er 4 councilmen who are responsible to him and each one has abso- 
lute and entire control over his department. 



Minetree Folkes and The Fair, two warm subjects for next week. 



MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOTOR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THOR & RACYCLE 

TOMPKINS, 

3n West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour Jjny^y Company 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South Boston, Vir^fi'nia 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

%^oe7in/^er^Oizemore Co, 

No. 1433 East Main Street 
Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class -and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops, 




t Pan, 
.^rtoon Man 






z has some ideas up 

"cve and will give us a 

live cartoon every week 





'■*?* 



6 WATCHES FOR BOYS 

THE IDEA will jjive away to the six boys sellinj^ the largest number of 
IDEAS in their sections six handsome watches as follows: — 

One watch each will be ^iven to each of the six boys who sell the 
greatest number of IDEAS from the following six IDEA stations: For 
the 4 weeks beginning September 24th. 

West End— Model News Co.. 519 W. Broad 
Church Hill — Waller's Store, Jefferson and Clay 
Down Town — Idea Office, 1106 Capitol Street 
Manchester — Abbott's Store, Hull Street 
Petersburg — Jones' Store, 101 Washington 
Lynchburg — Shepherd's 900 Main Street 



WEEKLY 5c T'HE CO 'Y 



THE ^ IDE 



A SIGN OP THE TIMES 



Vol. IV October 8, 1910 



DEAD! 



Being some sermonettes published Weekly for the common good at 
Richmond, Va., by Adon A. Yoder, editor, publisher and priTncr 
1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Virginia. 



O0<^H>00<HK>0!><^K><3!><^H>aD<HH><3Da^D<]Oi>^^E><i!><lBB>0Oi><HH>CE><^BDCE>aiaD<3D(^H>a><BH>c9 

S ^ 

I JEWELER J, S. JAMES OPTICIAN f 

I 7th mD MAIN STS. 1 

I ^ We are showing special good values in J § 

I ^ i)iamonci:Jy WatcheOy ^ewelri/y y § 

f Silverware, Cut S/ass, £tc, i 

I We invite your inspection I 

A ^ 

Oj>(CHDCD<^H>Ci><^BDCD<9H><!<{*i>^^D<iD<iBH>cm<a^eCi><9BDaD<^H>G4*i><B9D<3!>^:H>0D<BK>aE>aBS><iS} 



Print it Right. 



Leave your Job Printing at The Idea office. The Idea 
Presses w^ill do it at a most reasonable figure, 'Phone Mon- 
roe 2708, 



I 

a e, 

Oi><^H><3{>«H>CDaBDaDai^««i*0aHD<iDaH>«DaH>Ci>^iH><iD<^K)<i<i'!><^H><IE>aaD(iD^HBGD«S><}SI 



.9 

V HEADQUARTERS for your sick w^ants; your family and toilet r 
A ^ 

i wants, in Dr ugs and Medicines a 

V Sick Feeders, Bandages, Crutches, Rubber Water Bottles, f 
\ Bags and Sheeting, Douches, Thermometers, Supporters, a 
^ Trusses, Cushions, Toilet Soaps and other requisitei, Delicate ^ 
7 Flavorings and Fine Perfumery Extracts. f 

# # 

{ - A. H. ROBINS, - t 

} 200 E. MARSHALL ST. } 

^ i 

J Goods delivered anywhere in the city. J 

A Phone Madison 1388, if busy, Madison 5272. A 



9 



THE IDEA 

A Sign of the Times 

VOL. IV OCTOBER 8, 1910 No. 35 

Five Cents a Copy $2.00 a Year 

Published Weekly on Saturday by ADON A. YoDER, 

1106 Capitol Street, Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second class mail matter July 10, 1909, Richmond, Virginia. 

The Grand Jury 

Who They Are 

Two Catincilmen^ One Legislator^ 

One Politician Who Bailed Manning 

One Close Friend of Manning^s and 

Three Others 



L. Z. MORRIS, Foreman, who bailed Manning when he 
was arrested recently. 

E. H. FERGUSON, Councilman. 

F. H. GARBER, Councilman. 
A. C. HARMAN, Legislator. 



2 THE IDEA 

W. C. CAMP, Close Friend of Manning-. 

A. J. DAFFRON. 

LEVIN JOYNES. 

R. G. RENNOLDS. 

The latter three unknown to the writer. 

The above is the list of the grand jurymen for the Octo- 
ber term, called together after THE IDEA hadanrjci.i c( d 
that it would prefer charges against C. Manning, Jr. 

Notice again who they are: 

First is L. Z. Morris, who went on C. Manning's bail 
band when the publisher recently swore out a warrant 
against Mr. Manning for the offences which are now to be 
brought before this grand jury, and who is an cfficei of the 
Police Beneolent Associaticn under Manning. 

Next are councilmen Garber and Ferguson, and Mr. 
Manning admitted having received $1000.00 from the Tele- 
phone Company at the time Clyde Saunders received about 
the same amount "for his influence with councilmen." 

Fourth is A. C. Harmon also a member of the politico ] 
ring, and who is elected by the same crooked party machin- 
ery that elects other partisans to cffice in Richmond. 

Fifth is W. C. Camp, who admitted openly in our hear- 
ing that he could borrow $100.00 from Manning if 
he wanted it, and said that "Manning isn't such a bad fel- 
low." 

Thus five out of the eight grand Jurymen are either per- 
sonal or political friends of Chris, Manning. 

Now THE IDEA would inquire how this happened. Who 
packed the jury? Minetree Folkes says it's Judge Witt's 
business to select the jury. 

The question is did Judge Witt intentionally place Mann- 
ing's friends in entire control of the grand jury or did he 
leave this Job to underlings who could be influenced to so 
fix a jury. 

This matter is very similar to the granting of special fa- 
vors by Judge Witt to an ex- convict in granting license to 
sell whikey to Conway whom he himself had sent to the 
penitentiary, and who shot a Kf n dcwn in cold blood on 



THE IDEA 3 

Broad Street, this city, and got off scot free. Did the 
judge do it or did he leave his duty for others to perfoim, 
and is this the reason that crooked lawyers can say to bar- 
keepers, "If you will pay me so much money I will see to 
it that you get a license to sell whiskey"? 



Manning Case Presented to the 
Grand Jury 



October 3r, 1910. 
To the Grand Jury of the City of Richmond: 
Dear Sirs: 

I desire to bring to your attention certain evidence of 
misdemeanor or misfeasance in office on the part of one, 
and perhaps more, members of the board of police commis- 
sioners of the city. If you will look into the evidence which 
I can furnish, you will find that Mr. Manning has testified 
on the witness stand that he and other members 
members of the board of commissicreis have established 
two sections in this city in which houses of ill fame might 
exist contrary to law and that the police were instructed 
not to enforce the law within the indefinite confines of these 
two sections of the city. Chief of Police Werner corrobor- 
ated the testimony of Manning to the effect that he did not 
enforce the law in these sections bi^ause of instructions 
from members of, or the whole, board and that the occu- 
pants of these houses of ill fame were required by the po- 
lice department to have their pictures taken under the 
rules of the department and that a file of these pictures 
with other data concerning these worr.en was kept by the 
police department on record. 

This evidence is a matter of record in the hands of ste- 
nographer 0. Raymond Brown of the Mutual Buildirg, who 
(Continued on page 5.) 



THE IDEA 



How the People 
Rule in Oregon 

The Initiative and Referendum 

Direct Primaries* Corrupt Practices Act* 
The Recall 

(Extracts from Speech by Senator Bourne of Oregon in 
the Senate, May 5, 1910.) 



PEOPLE INTELLIGENT AND FAIR. 

The people are not only intelligent, but fair and honest. 
When the initiative and referendum was under considera- 
tion it was freely predicted by enemies of popular govem- 
ment that the power would be abused and that capitalists 
would not invest their money in a State where property 
would be subject to attacks of popular passion and tempo- 
rary whims. Experience has exploded this argument. 
There has been no hasty or ill-advised legislation. The peo- 
ple aet calmly and deliberately and with that spirit of fair- 
ness which always characterizes a body of men who earn 
their living and acquire their property by legitimate means. 
Corporations have not been held up and blackmailed by the 
people, as they often have been by legislators. "Pinch- 
bills" are unknown. The people of Oregon were never be- 
fore more prosperous and contented than they are to-day, 
and never before did the State offer such an inviting field 
for investment of capitol. Not only are two transcontinen- 



THE IDEA 5 

tal railroads building across the State, but several intei ur- 
ban electric lines are under construction, and rights of 
way fof others are in demand. 

DIRECT PRIMARY. 

In my opinion the Direct Primary is the only practical 
method of fully securing to the people their right to choose 
their public servants. 

CONVENTION NOMINEE UNDER OBLIGATION TO 

A BOSS. 

Under the convention system the members of a party del- 
gate their power of selection of candidates to the members 
of a convention. To my mind this system is most perni- 
cious, because the party electorate feels that its lefjcrsi- 
bility cea-es with the selection of its convention dellegatcs. 
Hence the responsibility of citizenship is weakened end 
shif tlessness encouraged. 



MANNING^S CASE PRESENTED TO GRAND 

JURY. 

(Continued from page 3.) 
was employed as court stenographer in the C£se of alleged 
criminal libel brought by Messrs. Manning, Gorden £rd 
Crutchfield in the police court and taken on appeal to the 
Hast ngs Court. 

The testimony of Manning, Capt. Barfoot and Chief Wer- 
ner in these two trials will clearly establish the guilt of 
Mr. Manning, and tho it is likely that the other members 
of the police commission at the time the instructions 
were given are likewise guilty still I am not aM^are of suffi- 
cient evidence to convict therr, tho Mannir g's own testin c- 
ny establishes his position. 

The evidence in the trials mentioned shews tl et the 
board took no recorded official action in the case, though 
the controlling influences of the board had brought the 
proper pressure to bear on the police to keep them frem 
their sworn duty. 



6 ' THE IDEA 

As a sovereign citizen of the City and State and in the 
name of thousands of other such citizens I make protest to 
you, the representatives of the people in their fG^(r( if n 
capacity, against this prostitution of the arms of the State 
law on the part of those sworn to enfoice it. (And the pres- 
ent police con:missioneis havirg rr.£ce themselves police- 
men are sworn to enforce the law themselves— this the y 
not only do not do, but th^y prevent the police, by reason 
of their appointive and dismissirg power over the police, 
from their duty.) 

Since you may be disposed to look lightly on this chaige 
because of false newspaper reports which stated that the 
Commonwealth's Attorney said that there was not si fficiert 
evidence to warrant a trial, let me state that Mr. Folkes 
said there was not evidence to sustain a charge of "inter- 
fering with an officer." on such a warrant, which is an en- 
tirely different matter. 

The following witnesses heard the evidence in question 
and they on proper examination will establish the charges 
made: Lawyers S. S. P. Patterson and C. V. Meredith, 
0. Raymond Brown, C. Manning, Jr., Capt. Barfoot, Chief 
Werner and myself and if neccessary I can fnmish others. 
I am very truly yours, 

ADON A. YODER. 

P. S. The evidence will likewise establish the fact of the 
guilt on the part of the Chief of Police of non-feasance in 
office and gross neglect of official duty and violation of his 
oath, and I therefore also hereby prefer this charge against 
Chief Louis Werner, altho the real moral crime is in the 

board. 

Yours truly, 

ADON A. YODER. 



"How does it happen," inquired the stranger, "that all 
the improvements are being made in this one stieet?" 

"It does not happen at all, sir," replied the guide, who 
was showing him about the place, majestically. "This is 
the street I live in. I am chairman of the street commit- 
tee."— Ex. 



THE IDEA 



DEAD! 



After many trials and tribulations, fscirg a less to l?e 
publisher in the last few months of about $100.00, THE 
IDEA is no more to appear as a weekly publication in 
Richmond. 

After trying every conceivable plsn to hurt or destroy 
both this paper and its publisher, while the good people — 
so-called— stood by, with few kindly exceptions, consentirg 
to its death, the enemies of THE IDEA, in the guise of 
friendship have succeeded at last by a dastardly trick of 
passing on us a worthless check which embarrassed us 
financially at a critical mioment, in so crippling this paper 
that it is found absolutely necessary to discontinue publi- 
cation with this issue. , ' 

While advised to call on our friends for help we have 
never had the nerve to ask aid for the continuance of THE 
IDEA because it did not seem right or proper so to do. 
Aid has been asked in the past in carrying on legal fights 
which were certainly in large measure the causes of the 
people aginst the ring. 

While we personally have gratefully received from the 
good people of the city much help in publishing THE 
IDEA, it has not been solicited by us. To all who have 
thus helped in the cause of purity and cleanliness snd kw 
enforcement we tender our sincere thanks. 

We are financially embarrassed and do not know which 
way to turn. THE IDEA presses and equipment, encum- 
bered by debt, worth $1000.00 new and now in excellent 
condition, are for sale at a reasonable figure. Meantime 



8 THE IDEA 

we will continue a general printing business at the old 
stand, 1106 Capitol Street. If this does not pay, the pub- 
lisher will look for a position at bcokkccpir g, £t \Ahich he 
was employed in the People's National Bar.k, Ljrchli:]g, 
for three years, and as head bookkeeper for a hige whole- 
sale lumber concern for two years. 

We had hoped to find a hearing in peacably oustirg the 
rascals from the contiol of the happiness of the pec pie. 
The people seem too blind to see and we shall have to wait 
to take our part in armed resistance towards which events 
are rapidly tho unnecessarily tending. 

Parties desiring a real live lecture on "The Signs of the 
Timeg", by the publisher of THE IDEA may write for 
terms. 



Wife (reading): "Isn't this funny, my dear? Here is sn 
article which says they have found a new species of birds 
in Australia which have four legs. Now, what ever co jcu 
suppose they want four legs for! " 

Husband (yawning): "They are probably politicisrs, iry 
love, and by this beautiful dispensation of their Creator 
they are enabled to stand on both sides of the fence at the 
same time." 



A Correction 

On page 2 of this issue the paragraphs concerning A. C. 
Harman and W. C. Camp are, we learn, incorrect, as A. C. 
are not the initials of the party we were informed they 
were. The gentleman who made the statement attributed 
to Mr. Camp was not on the jury. 

The financial trouble of this week msde us neglect e cr- 
recting copy before it got into print. P. G. Rennolds is al- 
so a councilman, — making thiee. 



THE IDEA 



A Word for the 
"Human Buzzard" 



^ *9t ^ 



Editor of The Virginian: 

Sir, — I was greatly amused at the title Mr. Manning gave 
to Mr. Yoder at the trial of Mr. Manning. I wonder if he 
realized what he was admitting when he applied the epi- 
thet "Buzzard" to Mr. Yoder. He virtually admitted that 
the city was full of corruption, since the buzzard is always 
a sign of rottenness to be removed. Had this been a clean 
city there would have been no attraction for the buzzard." 

We have a law protecting the buzzard-bird, since he acts 
as a scavenger, and removes that which if left, would pois- 
on the atmosphere and injure us physically. So also should 
the human buzzard be protected by law, since he is striv- 
ing to do away with that which poisons both the moral and 
the spiritual nature. 

Since we are to fear more that which can cast both soul 
and body into hell, than we are that which can only harm 
the body, let all good people unite in protecting the moral 
buzzards who strive to rid our city of all that can pollute 
the moral atmosphere. 

While there is a likeness to the work of the feathered 
"buzzard" in what Mr. Yoder is doing, yet there is also a 
great dissimilarity. The buzzard-bird revels and delights 
in filth and corruption, and it is not for the sake of cleans- 
ing the atmosphere for the good of the human race, that 
he feeds so ravenously on corruption, but it is because he 
dehghts in it. Not so with Mr. Yoder, but because the 
evils he is attacking are repulsive to him, and as he knows 
to all right-minded people, with a pure unselfishness he 
wades into the filth, and does his best to eliminate the cor- 



•a 



10 THE IDEA 

ruption, not because his soul delights in it, but becr.i:E€ of 
the good he hopes to do otheis. 

Would there were more who were willing to give their 
time and talents, 

"For the cause that lacks assistance, 
For the wrongs that need resistance, 

For the future in the distance and the good that they may 
do." A. R. C. in Virginian. 



Vile^ Obscene^ Debauching^ Las- 

civiouSt Lewdt Bawdy Shows^ 

Worse than Ever at the Fair 

Richmond Business Men Sell the Virtue 
and Morals of the Youth for Money 



If the preachers of Richmond could have heard the vile 
"grizzly bear" song of six citv boys in short pants, stsndirg 
within hearing of women and children at the fair and then 
heard their vulgar, indecent, vile remarks sbcut how they 
were going to spend the night, we can not but believe they 
would preach in no uncertain tones against the vile shows 
which the fair association hired to make mcr.ey for tHm. 

Last year we saw for the first tim.e one of these demor- 
alizing shows. This year we saw and heard for the last 
time. 

Four girls went through with the so-called muscle dance, 
"for men only" while a degenerate man handled the cur- 
tain and by the most unheard of remarks accentuated the 
vice of the actions of the base and debauching dances. 

The females sang the grizzly bear song, which could not 



THE IDEA 11 

help but have a most potent weight in starting many a young 
man to the vices of the red light district, while young men 
and boys and older men and negro women (there were a 
few such in the throng that stood 2 feet from the low plat- 
form) moved beyond all self-control, shouted to the muscle 
dancers, who occasionally held their hands before their 
eyes in apparent shame, in the most obscene terms and 
phrases it has ever been our lot to hear. The writer has 
gotten to the age of self-control and the events of those 
few minutes so burnt themselves into his memory that Ae 
can never forget the deep damnation of the scene. As he 
came out a plain clothes policeman went in, but the shows 
continued, we learn, till this time, —Friday.) All with 
whom we talked say that the shows are viler this year than 
ever, and it's all because certain rich men of Richmond, 
namely, Henry Fairfax, Samuel Cohen, Alfred B. Williams, 
L, 0. Miller, 0. J. SinU, Dyig. Gordon and Mark Lloyd, 
will do for money that which violates every law of decency 
and morality as well as the statutes of the State, and for 
which parties who don't stand in would have to deservedly 
go to jail. Meantime the papers keep quiet and even The 
Virginian, "the clean paper for the home" of Wednesday 
afternoon had a long article telling of the delights of Wa- 
hoo lane and did not dare to warn the people against the 
vice which the writer of that article must have seen, to 
have written as he did. 

The prophet of old told the King of his crimes, saying, 
''Thou art the man." 

You, Messrs. Fairfax, Cohen, Williams, Miller, Sands, 
Gordon and Lloyd are the men who are guilty. You men 
high in the affairs of the city. You high in the church and 
society are guilty of what must be in the sight of God the 
most contemptible and heinous of sins, namely, debauching 
the youth of the city. 

Did you see that drunk, bowing and scraping and paying 
court to the half dressed figure in Miller & Rhoads' window 
during the fair? Well, he'd just been to the Huche Kuche 
show and had lost his reason entirely. 



12 THE IDEA 

Transfer Man Fined 

Express Company^s Fine Remitted 



The other day Transfer Man, David W. Dawson, was arrested on 
side street for letting his horse stand with his head facing contraiy 

the Ellett Ordinance, and in police court next morning was fined 
5.00, altho a horse hitched to a buggy was standing near by at the 
same time and its owner not even reported, because according to the 
driver the police said it was out of his jurisdiction. On the same 
morning in court other fines for the same offence were remitted, es- 
pecially against the Express Company, because of the foolishness of 
the ordinance, but when the driver asked after court to have his fine 
remitted too, he was told no, because he had no business asking a 
policeman why he did not report another violator. Such is justice in 
the goodly town of Richmond. 



Subscribe to THE IDEA today, only two dollars a year on the 
weekly basis. If you don't you may miss the copy you most want. 

Oafeti/ i/iazor blades Sharpened 

BV SPECIAL PROCESS 30C. P ER DOZEN 

RAZORS HONED AND SET, 15 CENTS 

Scissors, Carving Knives and All Sharp Edged Tools Put 
IN PERFECT CONDITION 

Special Prices on Higfh Grade Imported Razors, 
Perfumes and Toilet Articlesvfr. n v;.;;.;;::v;;;;;.;;;;. ;; .;.;;.;;;:;;;;:;;;;;;:: 

THE ^^SHARP-O^^ CO. 

BARBER SUPPLIES AND GRINDING 
608 East Main Street 



MOTORCYCLES 

AND 

BICYCLES 

ONLY PLACE IN CITY THAT HAS 
A STOCK OF MOT'OR CYCLES :: 

PRICES FROM $150.00 UP 
Sole Agents for MERKEL-LIGHT-THQR & RACYCLE 




TOMPKINS, 

31 1 West Broad Street Phone Madison 3945 

harbour ^u^^i/ Company 

NA^HOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

South iSoston, Vir^fin/a 

If you want a first class Buggy, 

Surrey or Farm Wagon 

don't fail to call on 

J^oenniger^Sizemore Co, 

^\ \ '"' I No. 1433 East Main Street 
J Richmond, - Virginia 

All work first class and fully guaranteed. 
Write to us for prices on Automobile Tops. 



Watch Dan^ 

'^ Cartoon Man 

^^^^ 

He has some ideas up 
his sleeve and will give us a 
real live cartoon every week 




6 WATCHES FOR BOYS 



THE IDEA will give away to the six boys selling the largest number of 
IDEAS in their sections six handsome watches as follows: — 

One watch each will be given to each of the six boys who sell the 
greatest number of IDEAS from the following six JDEA stations: For 
the 4 weeks beginning September 24th. 

West End— Model News Co.. 519 W. Broad 
Church Hill — Waller's Store, Jefferson and Clay 
Down Town— Idea Office, 1106 Capitol Street 
Manchester — Abbott's Store, Hull Street 
Petersburg — Jones' Store, 101 Washington 
Lynchburg— Shepherd's 900 Main Street 



\ 



VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY 



1000135149 



XEZC EOR -CfHCUMIiigi 



#