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Full text of "IHC Titan oil tractors"

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IHC 

TITflN 

OIL 

TRACTORS 




International Harvester Company of America 

(Incorporated) 

Chicago :: USA 



A 105 E 



K^^^^roimd T£ie h^qi»/3 




Working in Turkestan 



Clearing land in Australia 



Ti^n Ih^ctops ^re Mzse. 



^iA fUe Jii^n Ih^ctoi' 




Titan 18-35 in Rans. 



Starting a wheat field in Arj^ontine 



I lltan lO-Jb in fvansas .jvrti mis o *»>»«:*ii. i leiu m rt^rj^cniine 

pfi everi/^ Civilized Coun^t^ 




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Cheaper Farming 




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An expensive farm power 



Increasing Cost of Horse Power 

The American I'armiT of todiiy is face to face with 
the power problem. It has been slowly developint;- in 
the last few years and recent conditions have brought it 
more forcibly to the front. Farm power is usually the 
horse and in the i)ast it has proved a very satisfactory 
power. Slowly durinjr the last few years, but more 
rapidly within the past year, the farm work has in- 
creased more in volume than hoi'ses have in numbers. 
This, together with the large numlier of horses (78,799 
in five months in 1914 alone) that are now Ijeing shipped 
out of the country, has stimulated the price of 
horseflesh far above the actual value that can be obtained 
from it on farm work. The maintenance of horses has also increased enormously. Feed has 
gone up and is becoming more scarce in many localities, and horses must be fed every day in 
the year. Horses and their feed require large Iniildings for housing and protection. Building 
operatiinis are not only expensive, Ijut the buildings filled with hay and other inflammal)le 
material are a Iiigfire risk — so much so that farm barn insurance is extremely high, there 
being no adequate fire pi-otection within reach. 

Decreasing Cost of Oil Power 

Contrasted with the increasing cost of animal power is the decreasing cost of tractor power. 

The first machines operated on steam — a reliable, Init 
— =r' expensive form of power. Then came the gasoline trac- 

tor cutting the cost of power below that of the steam 
tractor and animal power. Now we have the Titan oil 
tractor which operates on kerosene, distillate, solar oil, 
and other cheap fuels which can be bought in most 
localities for aljout half the cost of gasoline — and the 
Titan oil tractor uses less kerosene than the old tractors 
did gasoline and delivers just as much and far more 
reliable power. 

There is another feature of Titan oil tractors which 
must l)e considered — while horses must be fed all the 
year around, the expense of a Titan stops with the 
work. It costs nothing to keep, yet it is ready at a 
moment's notice to start work again. The winter 
quarters of a Titan need be only a small shed. 




Horses eat all the year 'round 



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Titan Does Better Work 






Average plowing by horses 




With a Titan you can plow deep 



3 



Tractor Does Better Work than Horses 

F. L. Peterson, of the Californiji University f;ii-m, says: "In an actual experiment a yain of 
2U0 per cent, which was made in tlie pi-odiictiveness of a certain area, I'MI i)er cent was found 
to be due to better plowing' and harrt)\viny, tji) jier cent to better cultivation, and the rest to 
better seed." 

Horses cannot be iJushed harder to produce these results. In the spring- when they are 
needed for jjlowing, they are soft and weak from their winter's inactivity. Care must also be 

taken not to overwork the mares in foal. It takes 
more power, applied at the right time, to get 
the maximum yield. It must be a Titan oil 
t ractor. A Titan oil tractor will plow deeper and 
keep it up twenty-four hours each day at the 
same i)ac(\ till its job is comi)leted. A leading 
agricultural paper quotes that it is impossible 
to get several drivers to plow furrows of the 
same size. This cannot be true of a Titan. It 
is a machine. The si)eed is the same at all 
times. The plows are set and mechanicall.v 
maintained at required depth; the width of the 
furrows is fixed liy the rigid plow frame. 
Therefore, the work must be uniform in every 
l)articular, and the same kind of a job can be 
done at the close of a d;iy as at the stai-t. This 
is true also for disking, harrowing, seeding, and 
all other work done by a Titan. The result 
A Tiun 12-25 does a clean, uniform job is an evBii Stand and a yield of greater value. 




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A Titan Gets Through On Time 

Saves Many Wasted Hours 






A Titan 30-60 plowing 28 acres in a ten -hour day 




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Plowing and seeding in one operation with a Titan 




It does not take lony to cut the crop with a Titan 



Getting tlirough on time with a Titan oil 
tractor does not mean a hurried, skimped job. 
It means when horses are standing idl.v in the 
sliade or in tiie barn, exhausted from the heat 
and work, the Titan goes right along. It travels 
ail day in the same re!ial)le and etficient manner, 
never slackening or skimping the work. Never 
a year comes but what you are rushed with some 
of your work. jNIany times a few days saved 
means money in your pocket. If you have 
gotten beliind in your work or you think the 
weather or soil conditions will not be ideal for 
working very long, you can work a Titan night 
and day — even Sundays, if you want to. It has 
no feeling and does not need a rest every hour 
or so, or at night. The only time it loses, is a 
few minutes' stop to grease bearings and to fill 
up with fuel, oil, and water once or twice a day, 
and it is ready to start again at the same pace. 
.Much time is also saved in the morning and 
night which is given to tiie care of horses. 
AVhen you <iuit for the night, the tractor stops 
in its tracks and is ready to start in the morning 
where it left off the night before. Not only is 
time saved l)y the tractor, but it does work in 
weather tiiat is injurious for horses and does it 
as well as in good weathei', and the operator does 
not sutfer as he is protected by the spacious cab. 

The Titan has another feature that saves 
much time and is used with success in the North- 
west. On virgin land, where it is desiralile to 
plow shallow, disks, harrows and oftentimes grain 
lb-ills are also attached to the engine, making a 
perfect seed bed in one operation. This can also 
l)e accomi)lished where deeiier plowing is advis- 
able by using fewer bottoms. 





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A Titan Saves Labor 

A Titan Saves Labor at Every Job 




when the horses' work is done you still have 
to take care of them 



going over the 
disking and harrowing can be done in one operation. 
Another big saving of labor is the time spent in taking 
care of horses. Tiiey must be fed and watered tliree 
times a day and bedded at night all the .year 'round, 
while all the care a tractor needs is a little cleaning 

every day or 
^. ^ two and a good 

oiling every 
day, and then 
only when it 
is being used. 
When .\()U come 
to think of it, 
you are really 
working as 
much for your 
horses as they 
work for you, 
and your time is 
„ , „ ^ , ^ far more valu- 

You work all the year tor your horses to get i i ._! ._! • 

a few months' work alllo tlum tllCirS. 



A saving of labor always means a saving of money. 
It is the system on which all modern factories and in- 
dustrial corporations run. A man with a team can plow 
only about two acres a day, or seed only about sixteen 
acres a day. This same man on a Titan 3()-6(^t-H. P. 
tractor could plow nearly thirty acres or seed over one 
hundred acres a day. Not only does a man increase 
his capacity and control more work with a Titan, but 
liis job is much easier. He sits in the cab in the shade 
and makes the tractor work for him. He has ncj trouble 
lifting the plows out at the end of the furrow — the 
modern power lift plow takes care of that. All he 
does is pull a rope and the plows lift automatically. 
When it is time to put them in he again pulls the rope 
and they drop in and start plowing. Then, instead of 
ound several times, the plowing. 





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tractor in its little shed needs 
no attention 





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Titan Oil Tractors Do a Great Variety of Work 







Titan 12-25 reeling off the acres 




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Titan 30-60 making a good seed bed 




Seeding a big acreage 




Saving the grain with a Titan 



Grubbing and Plowing 

Clearing l:in<l is easy \v(irk for a 'J'itaii. The 
large machine will handle two 24;-inch <j;rai)l)ing- 
plows, plowing twelve inches deep through 
brush land and small saplings, cutting the roots 
and turning them over. Tiie.v are also exten- 
sively used for clearing operations, pulling up the 
smaller trees and removing the larger stumi)s. 
For plowing they are the ideal power, doing a 
clean, even job in any kind of soil at any de|ith 
the plows will go, and doing it in far shorter 
time than can be equalled by any other power. 
They are one-man outfits. 

Disking and Harrowing 

After the plowing the seed bed is of next 
importance. A thorough l)re;iking up of the 
jilowed ground is of great value to obtain the 
best results from a good job of plowing. This 
takes power, and must be done quickly. It is 
just the kind of work that a Titan will help you 
with. You can load it up with double disks, 
land rollers or packers and harrows all at once. 
No need to go over the same ground twice. Then 
the disks and packers can be weighted down 
good to secure the maximum results without 
taxing the tractor. 

Seeding 

Seeding is an operation that must be done on 
time in order to insure a maximum .vield. A\'ith 
a Titan this is always accomplished. A Titan 
can be crowded — it will work overtime or nights 
without injur.v, and in case the plowing or har- 
rowing has been delayed, the seeders can Ijo 
attached after the plows or harrows, and the seed 
drilled in at the same time without going over 
the ground again. 

Harvesting 

When the grain is rii)e there should be no 
dela.y. In the heat of the summer horses or 
mules cannot be worked to their limit, and it is 
also hard on the drivers. Their limit is only ten 
to twelve acres a day to the binder, and in heav.v 
grain it taxes the teams to the utmf)st. A Titan 
oiJ ti'actor is not susceptible to the heat and flies 
or bothered by the lieavy grain. It will work 
all da.v without rest, cutting its thirty to sixty 
acres a da.v according to its si/.e, and get the job 
done before the ^ram is pvera-ij)e. 




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3 



Titan Oil Tractors Do a Great Variety of Work 




A Titan 18-35 threshing the crop 




An 18-35 Titan making the farm profitable 




Haulini^ til. < inp tu market with a Titan 30-60 



J 




Titan 30-60-H. P. tractor and elevating grader 



Threshing 

Titan oil tractoi-s fiirnisli the steady, reliable 
power necessary for the job at less cost than 
any other power. There are no sparks to look 
out for, no boiler to tend, no coal or water 
waji'ons with their drivers to pay for. Just fill 
Lip with fuel, oil, and water in the morning-, and 
a Titan will run all day with very little atten- 
tion or care; in fact, the operator can help the 
threshing gang most of the time. 

Belt Power 

Titan oil tractors are i)articularly adapted for 
belt work. Their speed variation is very slight, 
due to their multi-cylinder construction, throt- 
tling governor and perfect balance. Their heavy 
flywheels are an aid to close regulation. Titan 
front trucks are narrow, so that their is no inter- 
ference with the belt. On a Titan the operator's 
difficulties are i-educed to a minimum. There 
is no fire to keep up or other work around the 
engine other than to see that it is well lubricated 
every hour or so. On a Titan you never have 
to wait for steam — you have the engine's maxi- 
mum i)Ovver at your instant Cf)n:mand. 

Hauling 

There is no better power for hauling than a 
Titan oil tractor. They have sufficient weight 
for tractive power, but are light enough to cross 
the avei'age bridge without danger or work on 
country roads without miring. They do not 
i'C(|uire extra wagons for hauling fuel or water; 
in fact, they I'equire very little water for a day's 
oi)eration. The operator is comfortably jjro- 
vided for. The platform is spring-mounted, and 
a spring seat is part of the regular equipment. 

Road Work 

The success of Titan oil tractoi's on road 
W(ji'k is country-wide, and the saving effected 
liy their use over steam and hoi'se iJower is re- 
markable. They perform all the work of road 
l>uilding. Digging up old roads, grading with 
all t.\pes of graders, hauling stone and gravel, 
operating stone crushers, concrete mixers and 
asphalt machines are some of the jobs that Titans 
are being used for. Man.v townships, counties, 
and contractors have pui-chased Titans, and they 
alwa.vs make good. 




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Titan 12-25-H. P. Oil Tractor 





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side of Titan 12-25-H. P. four-cylinder oil tractor 



Equipment: t'nmpletely equiiiped ready to run includini^- built-in Iriction clutch pulley, magneto, 
oil can, can of lubricating oil, and necessary tools. 

Special accessories: Kerosene lieadlight, acetylene headlight, special size pulley, 4-incli rear wheel 
extensions — cab curtains and sand lugs can be furnished at extra cost. 



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Titan 18-35-H. P. Twin Cylinder Oil Tractor 




Titan 18-35-H. P. oil tractor — pulley side 

Equipment: Completely equipped ready to run including friction clutch pulley, batteries, magneto, 
front wheel extensions, oil can, can of lubricating oil, and necessary tools. 

Special accessories: Kerosene headlight, acetylene headlight, special size pulleys, 10-inch rear wheel 
extensions — cab curtains can be furnished at extra cost. 



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Clutch side of Titan 30-60-H. P. oil tractor showing starter 



Equipment: Completely equipped ready to run including friction clutcli pulley, batteries, magneto, 
front wheel extensions, oil can, eau of lubricating oil, and necessary tools. 

Special accessories: Kerosene headlight, acetylene headlight, special si/,e pulleys, 10-inch rear wlieel 
extensions — cab curtains can be furnished at extra cost. 





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Construction of 12-25-H. P. Oil Tractor 




Titan 25-H. P. four-cyiinder oil-burning power plant 

Four-cylinder design: The Tiliin ::^.")-H. P. power plant is a disliuctly superior type of 
four-cylinrler eiiyine, developed especiidly to burn kerosene and stand up under the severe 
conditions imposed on an engine used for farm work. It gives you every advantage known to 
modern designing and has many new and exclusive features which add to its economy and 
reliability. It is a far more suljstantial construction than the automobile type motors and much 
easier to get at. The cylinders are horizontal, which is a big advantage in l)urning oil, and set 
across the machine so the power is delivered direct through spur gears without bevel gear. The 
four-cylinder construction and slower nnjtor speed makes it practically free from vibration 
and prolongs its life. The working parts are completely enclosed in dust-tight crank case, 
which prevent excessive wear, yet it is an easy engine to get at. The crank case cover is 
removable, exposing all the principal parts for inspection or adjustment. 

Cylinders: The cylinders are cast in pairs and are Ijolted to a substantial one-piece dust- 
tight crank case with a' removable cover. Both the intake and exhaust manifolds lead from the 
cylinders so that the cylinder heads ai-e left free. 

Cylinder heads: The cylinder heads are cast in pairs, each covering two cylinders, and 
can l)e removed without disturliing other parts. The removal of the cylinder heads gives the 
operator a clear view of the valve heads and pistons. The only pai'ts attached to the cylinder 
heads are the spark plugs. This makes it a simple matter to remove them as they are always 
in plain sight and reach. 

Only one mixer: One mixer with two fuel needle valves and a single water needle valve 
is used on the Titan l-2-2r, tractor so that the adjustments are reduced to the minimum. This 
also enables the oi)erator to reduce the fuel consum|>tion by ol)taining a finer adjustment. For 
starting a hot air drum with a hot and cold air damper and two feed supply cups— one for 
gasoline and one for oil — are provided. The mixer will handle any of the cheap fuels such as 
kerosene, distillate down to 39" Baume, gas oil, solar oil, or motor spirits and will also burn 
gasoline or naphtha. 

13 




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(Construction of 12-25-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 

Fuel supply: The tractor i.s i)rovided with two fuel tanks — a .six-yallon gasoline tank 
for startinj;-, and a thirt.v-two-gallon oil tank, which is sutlicient for an all-day run. Two fuel 

pumps are also provided for pumping the fuel to the 
supply cups, one for gasoline and one for oil. 

Governor: A flyi)all throttling t.ype governor is 
used which operates a butterfly valve on each branch of 
the intake manifold. This type of governor controls the 
amount of fuel mixture entering the cylinders and not 
only keeps the engine running at a iierfectly steady 
sjieed, but varies the amount of fuel in proportion to 
the load. 

Ignition: Tli(> ignition is juni]) si>ark. the current 
licing iiirni^hed by a high-grade gear driven magneto 

The magneto used enables you to start as easily as 
on batteries — eliminating all battery eriuipment and the 
troubles they are heir to. This magneto has an auto- 
matic starting device which enables the magneto to 
fuinish a good si)ark for starting. When the engine 
starts, this device is automatically thrown out of action. 

Lubrication: The motor is lubricated liy an auto- 
matic force-feed oiler with twelve feeds. The transmission is luliricat- 
ed by another automatic force-feed oiler with five feeds. These 
automatic force-feed oilers are the newest design with all woi-king 
parts enclosed and running in oil. These lubricators are valveless 
and there are no springs en- liall valves to give trouble. They will 
force oil in any temperature and against a pressure of 2,(iu0 lbs. 
They protect you against dry bearings. At the same time no oil 
is wasted. 

Cooling: The motor is water cooled. The water is circulated 
through the cylinders and a vertical tube radiatoi- by a belt-driven 
rotary pump. A lielt-driven fan is also provided to aid radiation. 
This method gives perfect cooling and is very economical of water. 

Frame: The frame is constructed of steel. It is spring hung 
on the trucks so that the engine rides easy, even on rough ground. 
This also saves the tractor, and prolongs its life. 

Transmission: A\'ith the Titan 12-25 you have two speeds for- 
ward antl one reverse at your command, all controlled by a single 
The gears run in oil in a 




Titan oil mixer 




Magneto 



lever, 
cover 



The doulile chain drive 




Engine oiler 



Transmission oiler 

u 



dust-tight case with a removable 
to the rear wheels is also tightly 
encased. This method of driving 
eliminates gear troubles and gives 
the engine a more elastic load. 
An automatic force-feed oiler lubri- 
cates the bearings. 

Rear Axle: The rear axle is 
provided with adjustment plates 
which can be shifted from rear to 



3 



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(Construction of 12-25-H. P. Tractor— Continued) 





Transmission with cover removed 



front side of the axle bearings if it is desirable to tighten the driving chains. This method 
pi-cvents one side from being tightened more tlian tlie other, thus throwing tlie axle out of 
alignment. Note the spring mounting built like a Pullman ear. 



J 




Rear axle showing spring mounting 

15 



^ 



Reliable Draw-Bar Power 
Steady Belt Power 



This Titan Oil Tractor is Mechanically Ahead 

of the Age. Its Exclusive Features Save 

You Money, Time and Labor 




Titan 12-25-H. P. Oil-Burning 
I Four-Cylinder Tractor 




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(Construction of 12-25-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 




Steering: The automobile type steering' device makes steei'in<>" easier and tar more jiositive 
than tiie old chain type. The castings are high-grade steel and the front axle is well trussed. 
Operators who have handled the heavy old type tractors will be agreeably surprised by the 
Titan 12-25. Its light weight and spring mounting make it very easy riding. The short 
wheel base and automobile-steering device enalilcs it to turn very short. The t\vo-si)eed trans- 
mission gives the operator a high power low speed for tough plowing and hills, and a lirisk 
speed for road work, light farm work, etc. 

Lightweight: Light weight in the Titan 12-2.")-H. P. tractor does not mean flimsy C(m- 
struction, l)ut merely that tlie design has eliminated much weight, and the generous use of 
steel castings has not only reduced weight, l)ut increased the strength. 

Cab : The cab is roomy and provided with a comfortable seat for the operator, placed on 
the right side, giving a clear view ahead when i)l(iwing, and within easy reach of the operating 
levers, brake lever, etc. 




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Rear view of Titan 12-25-H. P. oil tractor 

18 








Construction of Titan 18-35-H. P. Oil Tractor 




Power plant of Titan 1 8-35-H. P. oil tractor 



The Titan IS-li.'i-H. P. tractor has lieen dosiijnod for those who need a more ijowerful 
tractor than the 12-25-H. P. si/e. This tractor lias OTan.v new and exclusive features of 
design which increases its sphere of usefulness and gives it many advantages over the ordinary 
type of tractor. Although this tractor is lighter in weight for its power than many others, no 
strength or draw-bar power has been sacrificed. Steel has been used generously in its con- 
struction, so that in reality it is much more rigid than the heavier type of tractors. The 
engine has been designed with a cast-iron dust-tight crank case for protecting the pistons and 
cylinders, crank shaft, etc., from dust. 

For road work, the two-speed transmission and automobile type steer gives it a decided 
advantage, and tlie lighter weight permits the crossing of bridges, unsafe for heavier tractors. 
For threshing, this tractor has no siii'ierior. It gets over the road fast, requires little attention 
while operating, and the throttle governor and twin cylinders hold the engine to a steady speed 
at all loads. The speed can also be varied to suit conditions liy a speed regulator controlled 
from the cab. The comfort of the operator has been given special attention and ever^' pos- 
sible convenience has been provided. 

19 




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(Construction of 18-35-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 




Titan combined gasoline engine and air compressor starter 
fits in compartment in front of cooling tank 



Self -Starting device: This consists of a complete little gasoline engine and air-compressor 
power plant and an air starting system. The gasoline engine and compressor are located nndcr 
the forward part of the water tank and consist of a K-II. P. air-cooled engine geared to a 
small air compressor mounted on the same base. This outfit is completely enclosed by doors to 
keep out the dust, which, when opened, exposes the entire outlit to view, and gives easy access 
to the parts. The air compressor pumps air into a storage tank, located between the forward 
part of the truck sills, and from the tank it is piped to the left-hand cylinder of the large engine 
and enters the cylinder through an automatically-operated valve. For starting the engine, 
mixer is adjusted' the same as starting by hand, then the air valve is thrown into gear and the 
compressed air enters the cylinder and operates it the same as the gas. When the fuel ignites, 
the air valve is held closed. The air tank will hold enough compressed air for starting several 
times and a gauge is located near it which shows air pressure in the tank. A\'ith this outfit, 
there is no turning the engine over by hand. 

Detailed Description of Titan 18-35-H. P. Oil Tractors 

Power plant: Twin-cyliiKlcr oil engine, 35-11. P. 

Ignition: Make-and-ljreak, batteries to start, gear-driven magneto when running. 

Lubrication: Twelve-feed automatic fcn-ce-feed oiler operated from cam shaft. 

Governor: Fl.\ -ball throttling governor operating butterfly valve in mixer. 

Cooling: Belt-driven centrifugal pump and siu-ay type cooling tank. 

Starter: Complete H-li- P. air-cooled engine and air compressor and air storage tank. 

Steering: Automobile type with narrow front trucks. 

Transmission: Sliding gear type with two speeds ahead, 3.6r) and 2.13 miles per hour and slow 

s|u'r(l rc\('r--(> 
Double gear drive: The strain is etpial on each side. 
Gear lubrication: Automatic force-feed oiler. 

Cab: Two-i)iece removable cab, curtains on special order, and seat, Si)ring hung iilatform. 

20 



) 



Construction of Titan 30-60-H. P. Oil Tractor 



3 




Titan 60-H. P. oil-burning power plant 



J 



Power plant: The twin cylinder 60-11. P., fonr-oycle engine used on this tractor has 
established a remarkable record for strength and durability. The design is simple and all parts 
are easily accessible. A sheet metal case incloses the engine and is equipped with seven doors 
for easy access to all working parts. 

Valves: The valves are mounted flush in the cylinder head so that there are no valve 
pockets or projections in the cylinder other than the ignitor. 

21 




s sd (S ^n^^M ©aE^ ^i^^(D^(S)i^: 



(Construction of 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 



Cooling system: The engine is water-cooled 
by means of a radiator and a centrifug-al type 
circulating pump. The cylinders and jacket walls 
are not cast integral, so that, should occasion 
require, the cylinder liners may be easily taken 
out. 





Removable cylinder liner 



Ignition: The ignitors for both cylinders are 
operated by an eccentric rod through a bell crank. 
This eccentric receives its motion from the cam 
shaft. This rod also operates the mechanical oilers 
and the fuel pumps. The ignition current for running is furnished lay a magneto, gear driven 
from the cam shaft. For starting, batteries are furnished. 

Engine gears: All cam gears are steel, machine cut. and are located inside of the crank 
case. They are mechanically oiled, and protected from dust and dirt. 

Governor: The governor is of the fly-ball. spring-conti'oUed throttling design operating a 
butterfly valve in the intake manifold. A small rod operated iiy a crank conveniently located 

near the cvHnder liead permits the speed to be 
varied from 2Tu R. P. M. to 3.")(( K. P. M. 

Crank shaft: The crank shaft is made from 
a solid steel ingot and runs in three extra large 
removable balil)itt bearings. 

Connecting rods: Connecting rods are drop- 
forged steel, carefully machined and polished. ()n 
the crank end of the rod is a divided bearing box 
which can be removed without removing the piston 
or wrist pin. The wrist pin bearing has a phosphor 
bronze bushing which can be easily adjusted liy 
the bolts located in the head. 

Note the three massive crank-shaft bearings 

Fuels: Titan tractors are oil tractors and 
need no change for operation on the difi'erent grades of oil fuels. Many kerosene engines 
have been designed, but the Titan holds the distinction of being the first kerosene tractcjr that 
has successfully overcome all ditticulties in a simple and efl'ective manner, dehvering its 
maximum power on kerosene, distillate, solar oil, gas oil, motor spirits, gasoline, motor 
spirits or naphtha. 

Fuel mixer: The fuel mixer is especially adapted for operation on the lower grade 
fuels, and will operate on kerosene, distillate, solar oil, gas oil, gasoline, motor spirits or 
naphtha equally well. 

The design is very simple. It consists of two separate constant level fuel cups, each 
supplied with fuel by' a fuel pump, one pumping from the small gasoline tank for starting 
and the other from the large oil tank for operating. The two .supply cups are connected 
with the needle valve and spray nozzle by a valve so the engine can be started on gasoline 
and run for a few minutes till the engine is warmed up and then switched to the cheaper fuel 
by simply turning the valve handle which connects the supply cups with the needle valve. 

One of the strong features of the mixer is the perfect control of the air supply to the mixer 
and the automatic supplying of water when operating on low grade fuels. An adjustable valve 
is provided in the air pipe for regulating the hot air from a drum around the exhaust ])ipe. 
This makes it possible to vary the temperature of the air to the mixer to meet the varied 
conditions of weather. A third air inlet is provided with a spring controlled poppet valve, 





s iHi (S ^H^^^M ©HE^ ^m^(D'^(mm,' 




(Construction of 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 





\ 



-"I 



J 



which only lulmits ;iir when the engine is 
operating" under load. When this valve 
opens and admits air, water is also admit- 
ted, both in proportion to the load on the 
engine. 

The complete mixer is so simple and 
so near automatic that it requires practi- 
cally no attention after starting. 

Fuel pumps: The fuel pumps are 
located so that the operator can pump up 
a supply of fuel l)y hand from the platform 
or from the ground. The pumi)s are of 
the plunger type with ball valves. All 
parts of the pumps are brass with the 
exception of the i)lungers and lialls, which 
are of steel. 



Complete 60-H. P. mixer and 
hot air drum 

Starting engine : The start- 
ing engine is a complete little 
power plant in itself, equipped 
with its own gasoline tank and battery box. It is of 
the four-cycle type of design, air cooled, with an 
enclosed crank case. Jump spark ignition is used, 
the current being furnished by batteries and a jump 
spark coil. 

For starting, the mixing valve on the tractor is 
set for gasoline and the compression relief cam is thiown in. The .small starting engine is 

started and allowed to run free for a minute 
till up to speed, then the lever rotating the 
eccentric bearing on the starting engine is 
pulled up till the friction pulley is pressed 
against the large engine flywheel. This 
rotates the large engine at a sutHcient speed 
for starting and the mixers can be adjusted 
at leisure. When the large engine starts, the 
starting engine is tilted back and stopped. 

Transmission : An examination of the 
transmission will reveal many good features. 
All the gears and pinions are cast steel. The 
di'iving pinion is in the i)est location to with- 
stand all strains. This pinion is feather- 
keyed l)y two large keys to the clutch sleeve 
so that, although it may be easil.v shifted 
from forward to reverse position, it is securely 
held on the sleeve. Note that there is no over- 
hanging of working parts. Every gear is 

2.3 



t 




Sectional and side views of fuel pumps 




Flywheel side of starter showing eccentric bearing 




um. (D ^n^^^M ©Ea^ ^i^A(D^(g)i^i 




(Construction of Titan 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 

close to a bearing. The clutch, even thouyh it is located on the end of the crank shaft exten- 
sion, is in a good location, because the strains produced when it is thrown in are torsional, 
hence it is merely a ([uestion of making the crank shaft heavy enough to witlistand them. The 
intermediate gear shaft is exceptionally short — only nine inches long, and has ami)le bearings. 

Forward speed: When the lever is shifted for forward speed the i)inion on the engine 
crank .sliafL meshes directly with the bull gear on the countershaft and the i)inion on the 
countershaft meshes with the differential gear on the rear axle. 

Reverse: The action of the reverse is just as positive as that of the forward sjjced and 
is accomplished by means of sliding gears. The driving pinion of the clutch spider sleeve 
may be shifted to mesh with the intermediate gear on the intermediate gear shaft just l)elow 
the crank shaft extension. This shaft also carries the reversing i)inion which meshes with 
the large countershaft gear. This metliod of reversing is practically the same as that used on 
autiiiudbiles. 






Forward speed 



Neutral 
Showing operation of transmission 



Reverse 



Belt work: When the engine is used for belt work, the driving pinion may be shifted 
to a neutral position on the clutch si)ider so that none of the transmission gears will 
revolve, or, the driving pinion may be moved to a neutral position and the clutch thrown 
in so that the clutch sleeve and driving pinion revolve as integral parts of the crank shaft. 
In this way, even though the driving pinion is revolving, there is absolutely no wear of any 
transmission part. 

The intei'mediate gear shaft is short, and has ample Itearings and supports at both ends to 
hold it absolutely in correct alignment with the crank shaft and countershaft. 

The differential gears: They are made of steel, of ample proportions, and of the simplest 
design known to motor vehicle and traction engine construction: they are located in the right 
hand drive wheel, in the large driving gear, which is free to revolve and which carries the four 
bevel pinions. Two bevel gears, one on each side, mesh with these pinions — one bevel gear 
being keyed to the axle to which the left hand driver is keyed; the other being bolted to the 
right hand driver which revolves freely on the axle. M'hen going ahead, both bevel gears 
revolve at the same rate and the pinions on the drive gear are at rest. In turning, when one 
wheel has a tendency to go slower, the pinions revolve on the bevel gear connected with the 
slow moving wheel "and transmit a faster motion to the ojiposite bevel gear connected with the 




2 iHi (S ^n^^^K ©112^ ^i^^(S'^(5)im: 



(Construction of Titan 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 





outer wheel. Tliis construction n^lioves the strain on the wheels and axles, allowing one driver 
to revolve faster than the othei-, although the power applied to each is the same. 

Truck frame: The truck frame 
consists of heavy steel channels, 
which are continuous from front 
t<J rear, and a heavy steel bearinjr 
frame riveted to the channels. A 
special quality of 9-inch steel 
channels is used, thus providing a 
frame ami)ly strong to withstand 
all strains to which it may lie sub- 
jected. The two large steel hear- 
ing castings riveted to this frame 
liold both the main axle and the 
countershaft bearings. 

The engine frame is riveted to 
the 9-inch channels so that it 
practically Ijecomes an integral 
pai't of the truck frame. This 
construction is cleai-ly shown in 
the accompanying illusti-ation. 

Rear axle : The rear axle is 
made of cold-rolled steel, 4/^ 
inches in diameter and HlH inches 
long. It runs in two extra long 
babbitted bearings, one being 21 
inches long and the other 16 inch- 
es long. This axle is a live axle, 
having the left-hand driver keyed 
to it, wliile the right-hand driver is bdllcd to tli(> outside bevel g(>ar of the differential and is 
fi'ee to revolve. Tlie inside bevel gear of the differentia! provides a bearing for the I mil gear 
and is keyed to the axle. 

Bearings: All bearings are of liberal propoiiions and carefully hand-scraped to a perfect 
fit. The two real- axle bearings give;>7 inches of bearing surface — the left-hand bearing being 
21 inches wide and the right-hand, IG inches wide. 

The left-hand countershaft bearing is 10 inches wide, and the right-hand. 12 inches — a total 
of 22 inches of bearing for this shaft. Rear axle, bevel pinion, intermediate gear, crank shaft, 
and the lower half of the countershaft bearings are of supei'ior babbitt. The bull gear flushing 
and the upper half of both right-hand and left-hand countershaft bearings are special bearing 
metal. This special bearing metal is used on the C(juntershaft bearings because it is this 
half of the bearing that is subject to all of the wear and strain. 

Front trucks: The front trucks are narrow, the wheels being attached to steel kiuu-kles 
of the autonidbile tyi)e. The steering knuckles are provided with grease cups. 

Steering: Titan 3<)-60-II. P. tractors are equipped with an automoliile type steering 
device, which msikes steering much easier than the chain-to-axle method, and permits the 
front truck to be made narrow so the wheels will not interfere with a low Ijelt when used 
for threshing. The truck is made exceptionally strong and is rigidly trussed, so there is no 
danger of In-eakage. 



Differential 

View showing driving pinion, large driving gear, and 
differential gears, with outer gear removed 



25 




2 I^"^^^ ^S^^M ©aS^ ^I^A(D^(Q)I^^ 




(Construction of Titan 30-60-H. P, Tractor — Continued) 



12-INCH BEARING 




Main frame of the Titan H. P. tractor. Note that both countershaft and main axle have extra long 
bearings and are held in the same casting, which prevents the gears from getting out of alignment 



Wheels : Tlie wheels are fitted with cast iron hubs. The siK)kcs are of fiat bar steel, up-set 
at the outer ends and riveted to the tires and hubs. This construction insures wheels of great 
duraliility and strength. The face of the drive wheels is 2-i inches and they are eciuipped with 
proper sized Injrs. The edges are re-enforced by small steel channels bent in and riveted. A 
simple and effective differential gear relieves the wheel hubs from all torsional strains. The 
left-hand driver is keyed to the live axle and therefoi-e revolves with it. The riuht-hand driver 
is free to revolve on the axle and is bolted to one half of the differential. The other half of the 
differential provides a bearing for the large driving gear, and is keyed to t.he axle. When 
turning corners the differential gear provides for the difference in rotation of the wheels and 
distributes the power proportionately to each, although rotating at different speeds. The front 
wheels are provided with six-inch extensions as part of the regular equipment. 

Oiling: The 30-60-H. P. Titan tractor is luljricated with two mechanical oilers — one a 
10-feed oiler and the other a -l-feed oiler. The lu-feed oiler oils all the engine licarings and the 
cylinders. The 4-feed oiler lubricates the gears only — the differential gear, countershaft gears 
and pinion. Two oilers are used, so that when the engine is being used for belt work the oiler 
for the gears can be shut off', so there is no oil wasted. The countershaft bearings, front truck 
wheels, rear drive wheels, intei-mediate gear shaft, and differential pinions are all provided with 
grease cui)S. 

The cups for oiling the countershaft and main axle i)eaiings are provided with rods and 
handles which extend Ijack to the operator's platform so that he may keep these parts well oiled 
without leaving his position. 

2f> 



3 




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(£13 




(Construction of 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 





1 1 ^ih 



3 




Front view of Titan 30-60-H. P. oil tractor 



J 



Filling pipes : The filling" jiiiics for the fuel tanks are conveniently located on the belt 
side just forward of the flywheel. They are equipped with large funnel tops with removable 
bi'ass gauze strainers. 

Drawbar: A swinging draw bar eciuippcd with a spring draft gear is provided. This 
prevents the load from being jerked along and also saves the tractor fi'om undue strain in 
starting loads. 

Cab: The cab is all steel and made with the view of greatest comfort and convenience for 
the operator. The platform is spring hung to relieve the operator of vibration. The windows 
are equipped on special order only with waterproof curtains, so the cab can lie completely 
enclosed when operating in the rain or sleet, or when left out in the field. A comfortable spring 
seat is provided so the operator can see where the front wheels are running. 

27 




H Sa (S ^H^AM CS)IIE^^ ^I^A(S^(0)1^: 



^;:^ 




(Construction of Titan 30-60-H. P. Tractor — Continued) 

Operating levers: There are two oiJcniting levers — one for tlirowiny the clutch in and 
one for the reverse. The levers are conveniently located. Tiic movement of the front wheels 
is controlled l),v a steering wheel which is within easy reach of the right hand of the operator. 

The brake is operated by a foot pedal located just below the steering wheel. 

Convenience and accessibility: This tractor has a large, roomy platform, and all parts 
of the engine have Ijeen arranged with regard to convenience and accessibility. The tool and 
battery boxes are on the left, out of the way of the operator. The filling pipes are only w-aist 
high, and are placed on the right-hand side of the engine towards the front, which makes it an 
easy matter to fill the fuel tank. All the operating levers, the mixing valve, si)eed-changing 
crank and battery switch are within arm's reach of the operator standing at the steering wheel. 




Rear view of Titan 30-60.H. P. oil tractor 



28 




2 m. (S ^a^iP^M, ©iia^ ^i^acs^cS)^' 



-^^^ 



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3 



to entiiiore tl 
Ije furni.sh('( 



le clutch and pulled out to reloaso 
on special order: 



Extension tires : For traveling over wet oi- 
soft ground, ten-inch extension tires can be fur- 
nished on special order for all Titan tractors. 
The.v are detachable and can be put on or taken 
off in the field. The.v are braced with spokes 
and securel.v bolted both to the wheel tire and 
to the hub. In ordering be sure to state the 
size of the engine they are to be used on. 

Slip-over tires: For traveling over paved 
i-oads (u- forgeneral work where onl.v beltpower 
is needed, slip-over tires can be furnished on 
special order for the rear wheels of all Titan 
tractors to keep the lugs from digging into the 
road. These tires are made in four pieces, liolt- 
ed to the wheel tire, and can easily be put on or 
taken oft' in the field. 

Pulley : All Titan tractors are eiiuipped with 
the I H C friction clutch pulley so tlitit the 
power can be shut oft' or turned on to the ma- 
chine being driv(>n, without stopping the engine. 
It is of the external, three-shoe clutch type, and 
is oi)erated by a hand-wheel, which is pushed in 
t. The following special sizes of this pulley can 




18 35-H. P. 


30-60-n. p. 


Diiim. 


Face 


Diniii. 


Faoe 


luchfs 


Inches 


Inches 


Inc.hes 


18 


r2y. 


28 


lOJ^ 


20 


12M 


:m 


W'A 


22 


12^ 


28 


rzH 


24 


12^ 


30 


12M 


26 


12M 


-- 






Headlight: For plowing or hauling at night, an oil head- 
light can be furnished on special order. Kerosene headlight 

Extreme height 28 inches 

Diameter of case 18 inches 

Depth of case - - 12 inches 

Size bottom board -9 x 15i inches 

Diameter of glass - 1^ inches 

Reflector — Copper, silver i)late(l. 

Inside rlimensions of reflector, 131 inches in diameter: fi inches deep. 
Net weight, 3T pounds. 

29 








Titan Oil Engines — 30 Types, 15 Sizes 
The Most Complete Line of Engines Built 




Vertical skidded 



T. C. Stationary 



Pumping 





Vertical stationary 



Pumping 




T. C. Skidded 



H. C. Skidded 






T. C. Mounting 






H. C. Mounting 




Nonpareil skidded 




Air>cooled gasoline 




H. C. Portable 



V X 




Spray in u 



Sawing 



Spraying 



Send for Our Titan Oil Engine Catalogue 







"d^ 






= GRAIN MACHINES = 

E BINDERS = 

= HEADERS = 

= REAPERS S 

E HEADER-BINOERS = 

I HAY MACHINES = 

E MOWERS = 

E RAKES H 

= HAY PRESSES ^ 

= SWEEP RAKES = 

5 HAY LOADERS = 

= STACKERS = 

= TEDDERS S 

= SIDE DELIVERY RAKES = 

= COMBINED SWEEP RAKES = 

^ AND STACKERS = 

i CORN MACHINES E 

= PLANTERS = 

= PICKERS = 

= BINDERS = 

= ENSILAGE CUTTERS = 

E CORNSTALK RAKES E 

S STALK CUTTERS = 

= SMELLERS = 

= CULTIVATORS S 

^ HUSKERS AND SHREDDERS = 

= TILLAGE I 

S DISK HARROWS = 

S CULTIVATORS = 

= SPRING-TOOTH HARROWS = 

= PEG-TOOTH HARROWS E 

= COMBINATION HARROWS = 

1 GENERAL LINE 1 

= MOTOR TRUCKS ^ 

= FEED GRINDERS = 

= KNIFE GRINDERS = 

S BINDER TWtNE = 

= THRESHERS = 

S STONE BURR MILLS S 

S GRAIN DRILLS E 

= CREAM SEPARATORS = 

5 OIL AND GAS ENGINES = 

S MANURE SPREADFRS = 

= FERTILIZER SOWERS = 

S OIL TRACTORS = 

5 FARM WAGONS AND TRUCKS. = 

ilillllllMIIMIIIIIiriMIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllHinilllllllir. 











31 



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BRANCH HOUSES 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 



UNCOnPORATEOl 



nillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMninillllltMIIIIMIIIMIIIIII mil Illlllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIMMIIIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMIIIIIIIIII MMIIIIIIIIIMMfi; 




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ABERDEEN. S 0. 
ALBANY, N Y. 
ATLANTA. GA. 
AUBURN N, Y 
AURORA. ILL. 
BALTIMORE. MD. 
BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
BISMARCK. N, D. 
BOSTON. MASS 
BUFFALO N Y 
CEDAR FALLS. lA. 
CHARLOTTE. N C 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 
CLEVELAND. OHIO 
COLUMBIA S C 
COLUMBUS OHIO 
CONCORDIA. KAN 
COUNCIL BLUFFS lA 
CRAWFORD. NEB 
DAVENPORT. lA 
DENVER. COLO 
OES MOINES. lA 



DETROIT. MICH. 
DUBUQUE. lA. 
EAST ST LOUIS. ILL. 
EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 
ELMIRA. N Y 
EVANSVILLE. IND. 
FARGO. N D. 
FT DODGE. lA. 
FT WAYNE. IND. 
GRAND FORKS. N D. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICH 
GREEN BAY. WIS 
HARRISBURG. PA 
HELENA. MONT 
HUTCHINSON, KAN 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND 
JACKSON. MICH 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA 
KANKAKEE, ILL. 
KANSAS CITY. MO. 
KNOXVILLE. TENN 
LANSING. MICH. 



LINCOLN. NEB. 
LITTLE ROCK. ARK, 
MADISON. WIS. 
MANKATO. MINN, 
MASON CITY. lA. 
MEMPHIS. TENN 
MILWAUKEE. WIS 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 
MINOT. N D. 
NASHVILLE. TENN. 
NEW ALBANY. IND. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
OGDENSBURG. N Y 
OKLAHOMA CITY.OKLA. 
OMAHA. NEB 
PARKERSBURG. W VA. 
PARSONS, KAN 
PEORIA. ILL. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
PITTSBURGH. PA 
PORTLAND, ORE 
QUINCY ILL, 



RICHMOND. IND 
RICHMOND. VA, 
ROCKFORD, ILL, 
ST. CLOUD. MINN. 
ST JOSEPH. MO. 
ST LOUIS. MO. 
SAGINAW. MICH. 
SALINA. KAN. 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 
SIOUX CITY, lA. 
SIOUX FALLS. S D. 
SOUTH BEND. IND. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
SPRINGFIELD. MO. 
TERRE HAUTE. IND, 
TOLEDO. OHIO 
TOPEKA. KAN. 
WATERTOWN. S. O. 
WICHITA. KAN. 
WINONA. MINN. 






For catalogues or special information see IHC dealer or write nearest branch house ^ 

.tIiiieI li'H 



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Sold by 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 

( Incorpuiated) 

CHICAGO USA 




For further information write International Harvester Company of America 
Chicago, III., or write our nearest branch house. 



u|iiiiimmiiimiuiiiiiiuiiMHiiUHniHiiiiMiiiMiiinuMiiiM[HrinMMiMi:iiniiniiiinunn 



BRANCH HOUSES 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA 



IINCORPORATEDI 



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[iiiiiiiiupiili 



ABERDEEN. S. O. 
ALBANY. N Y. 
ATLANTA. GA 
AUBURN. N. Y 
AURORA. ILL. 
BALTIMORE. MO. 
BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
BISMARCK. N. O. 
BOSTON. MASS 
BUFFALO. N Y. 
CEDAR FALLS. lA 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 
CLEVELAND. OHIO 
COLUMBIA. 5 C 
COLUMBUS OHIO 
CONCORDIA. KAN 
COUNCIL BLUFFS. lA 
CRAWFORD. NEB. 
DAVENPORT lA. 
DENVER. COLO 
DES MOINES. lA. 



DETROIT. MICH. 
DUBUOUE. lA. 
EAST ST. LOUIS. ILL. 
EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 
ELMIRA. N. Y 
EVANSVILLE. IND. 
FARGO N D. 
FT DOOGE. lA. 
FT WAYNE. IND. 
GRAND FORKS. N. D. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICH 
GREEN BAY WIS. 
HARRISBURG. PA. 
HELENA. MONT 
HUTCHINSON. KAN. 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 
JACKSON. MICH. 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 
KANKAKEE. ILL 
KANSAS CITY. MO. 
KNOXVILLE. TENN. 
LANSi.NG. f.VCH. 



LINCOLN. NEB. 
LITTLE ROCK. ARK, 
MADISON. WIS. 
MANKATO. MINN. 
MASON CITY. lA. 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS. 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 
MINOT. N D. 
NASHVILLE. TENN. 
NEW ALBANY. IND. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 
OKLAHOMA CITY.OKLA. 
OMAHA. NEB. 
PARKERSBURG. W VA. 
PARSONS. KAN. 
PEORIA. ILL. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA 
PITTSBURGH. PA 
PORTLAND. ORE 
QUINCY. ILL. 



RICHMOND. IND. 
RICHMOND. VA. 
ROCKFORD. ILL. 
ST. CLOUD. MINN. 
ST JOSEPH. MO. 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 
SAGINAW. MICH. 
SALINA. KAN. 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
SIOUX CITY. lA. 
SIOUX FALLS. S. D. 
SOUTH BEND. IND. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
SPRINGFIELD. MO. 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 
TOLEDO, OHIO 
TOPEKA, KAN. 
WATERTOWN. S. D. 
WICHITA. KAN. 
WINONA, MINN. 



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