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Full text of "The Illio"

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Contents 




Introduction 


1 


Li f estates 


18 

I 


Entertainment 


98 


Sports 


114 


News 


142 


Groups 


202 


Seniors 


342 


Index 


430 






Illio82 



University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

Volume 89 

Copyright 1982 by Illini Publishing Company 

All rights reserved. 






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rhe University of Illinois is, above all, 
big. Students often complain of being 
"just a number." Is it too impersonal? 
Only on the surface. There is one trait that 
the University has-diversity--that enables 
students to find within it something to 
meet their personal needs. By reaching 
out to others, almost any student can find 
those who share his interests as well as 
those who will challenge his attitudes. 
Whoever you are, you can find a place at 
the University. And perhaps someone else 
who shares your lifestyle. 




Brian Coleman 




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Randy Stukenberg 






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m ttending school is hard work. We must 
/m choose classes and a major to try to 
** prepare for a career. In addition to 
studying and meeting the demands of 
others, we must manage our personal 
problems and responsibilities as well. 
Some come here knowing what they want 
to do and choose accordingly from what 
the University has to offer. Others come in 
an effort to find a focus for their lives. 
Some do find it; others leave still sear- 
ching. Although academic challenges 
seem stiff, it is through accepting them that 
we discover things about the world around 
us-and about our own ideas and priori- 
ties. 




Randy Stukenberg 







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Brian Coleman 



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m part from the academia for which the 
M University of Illinois is famous, there is 
/» another aspect of college life. Often 
labeled as "crazy college kids", we break 
from strict schedules and roles to take part 
in activities of a different sort. We party, we 
play, and we look for ways to clear the air 
and shake off daily responsibilities- 

rhaps in preparation to confront them. 



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0rganized sports. To some, they are 
almost as important as the educational 
instruction at the University: a sports 
career may affect the future of an athlete 
much more than his performance in the 
classroom. To others, sports are an impor- 
tant source of revenue. To onlookers, the 
pageantry of a game provides entertain- 
ment. Most students consider games to be 
just good fun. Yet, researchers often say 
sports events represent basic American 
values, reinforcing territoriality, power and 
skill. We honor those who fight for an Illini 
victory and that which symbolically repre- 
sents us-the good old orange and blue. 




James L. Novy 













^f urrounded on all sides, we still can be 
m alone to dream our own dreams, 
M- make our own plans, or live our own 
lives. We strive to be individuals, set apart 
from the masses. Group activities are im- 
portant; they draw students together to 
work on a project, plan an activity, or just 
have a good time. Together, students can 
fulfill needs for companionship. But even 
at a University of 35,000 students, mo- 
ments come when students can be them- 
selves. A crowd-with room for solitude. 




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Brian Coleman 



Fet does physical separation really set 
us apart from the masses? It takes 
more than that-we must draw on our 
own individuality to be more than just 
another student who attends a large 
Midwestern university. All students come 
to the University to "go to college", but 
each student draws on his or her own 
culture, background and goals to define 
the college experience in a way another 
might not. 






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Brian Coleman 



FF/e venture from home to Champaign- 
mM/ Urbana to attend school, bringing lit— 
■■ tie curios and remembrances of 
friends and family. Sometimes we return 
to them, leaving the University world for a 
weekend, a month, or even a year. We go 
home and we find that we have become a 
stranger in a familiar place. It makes us feel 
different somehow from those at home, a 
little special. We return, again to be what 
seems like just a face in the crowd. But we 
find that this has become our home, that 
people recognize us as individuals, that we 
do have a place among the masses. 




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rhe University wears a face: sometimes 
it is cold and frightful, sometimes 
warm and friendly. Within this setting, 
we make our homes and live our lives. We 
collect friends and bits of the University 
that make our college experience unique. 




John C Stein 









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It's curious the way students view their 
lifestyles at the University. Ask a Chicago 
city-dweller and he might complain about 
being stuck in the cornfields with very little 
to excite his interest. But talk to someone 
from downstate Illinois, and he might re- 
mark on the large number and great vari- 
ety of people here and the many opportu- 
nities available both through school and 
through the community. 

Students of varying interests converge in 
Champaign-Urbana to attend the Universi- 
ty. It's a world of contradictions, of action 
and reaction. Along with the preachers on 
the Quad come the hecklers in the crowd. 
The College Republicans sit at a booth in 
the Union, while the Young Socialist Alli- 
ance distributes literature outside. Some 
students sit in the library poring over 
books, while others sit in the bars pouring 
down beer. 

We've tried to include as many lifestyles 
as possible in the following pages. You may 
find some familiar activities, a part of your 
own lifestyle at the University. And you'll 
probably find some surprises, because 
there are enough different ways of life here 
at the University to encompass 35,000 stu- 
dents from all over the state, the nation, 
the world. 

Life styles. 




Educations abroad 



They come from places as near as Can- 
ada and as far away as Nigeria. They bring 
with them a bit of their own language and 
culture, adding a touch of the cosmopolitan 
to the University environment. 

There are 1,608 foreign students at the 
University. They represent 93 different 
countries. Most are in graduate programs; 
only 247 are undergraduates. Although 
they come from countries as diverse as 
Columbia, India, Greece and Canada, 53 
percent of the foreign students are from 
the Far East. Most of them, 279, are from 
Taiwan. 

Why do they come to the United States? 
And why to this University in particular? 

Carole Van Osdol, director of the Office 
of International Student Affairs, said that 
many foreign students travel to Champaign 
to study the physical sciences, particularly 
engineering or computer science, because 
those are the fields for which the University 
is most noted. "It makes sense that they 
come here for what they can't get at 
home," she said. 

Some students are sent here either by 



their governments or by their employers 
One Venezuelan was sent by his govern 
ment to learn English. When he complete: 
language courses, he will study engineer 
ing. 

Shigetoshi Morimitsu works for a Japa 
nese grain company that receives much o 
its corn, oats and soybeans from the Unite< 
States. He is studying English to becorm 
more proficient in international busines 
dealings. At the same time, he has th« 
opportunity to observe the agriculture 
techniques in this area. 

DIFFICULTIES 

Language and cultural barriers com 
pound usual student problems — adminis 
trative hassles, entry requirements, hous 
ing difficulties and homesickness — for th< 
foreigners. Van Osdol said that a minimum 
of English ability is required for admissio: 
to the University, but some department 
may waive this requirement. This waive 
frequently creates a hardship for the sti 
dent. 

Foreigners who have studied English fo 
only a short time feel great frustratio 




Brian Colerru 



20 

Foreign Students 



in Champaign 



/hen trying to communicate. They can say 
nly what they can express in English, and 
s Morimitsu said, "It may be only 60 per- 
ent of what you are thinking." 

Being so far from home, foreign students 
2el homesickness very keenly. Van Osdol 
aid that many of the foreigners come from 
ountries in which a large, extended family 
till is common. 

But Gilberto Velasco, a Venezuelan, said 
lat there are many diversions in the Unit- 
d States and many types of entertainment 
d take one's mind off of family and friends 
t home. 

Some programs in Champaign-Urbana 
re designed to help the foreigners combat 
Dneliness and isolation. The American 
lost Family program, sponsored by the 
lhampaign-Urbana International Hospital- 
y Committee, and programs within de- 
artments, such as the Association of Inter- 
ational Students in Education, provide 
upport for the foreign students. 

Food also can be a problem for foreign- 
rs . Because many of them live in dormi- 
Dries, they eat only the institutional food 
zrved there. Many leave with a distasteful 
npression of American cuisine. Velasco 
poke of one Japanese student he knew 
'ho had a crate of food from Japan sent 
ere every week. 

Van Osdol thinks, however, that there 
re enough specialty food stores in Cham- 
aign-Urbana to supply foreigners with fa- 
liliar food. "Very often," she said, "men 
ho never paid much attention to cooking 

their own countries become excellent 



cooks here." 

STRESS . . . AND SUPPORT 

Natural disasters and crises in their own 
countries, which may cut communications 
with family and friends, cause a lot of stress 
for foreigners. As a result, dealing with the 
University and with life in a strange country 
can be very intimidating. 

T. M. Lebbie, president of the Associ- 
ation of International Students in Educa- 
tion, stressed the need of foreign students 
to band together for mutual support. New 
students especially need a group to help 
them adapt to American culture and strug- 
gle through administrative red tape. "The 
United States is a very complex place to 
live," he said, "and the University is a very 
complex place to get educated." 

Chandana Bose, a graduate student in 
economics, agreed that the University can 
be somewhat overwhelming. "It was so big 
and impersonal," she said of her arrival 
here from India. "Every time I went some- 
where for help, they just handed me some 
maps and forms. But then I got to know the 
people in my department, and they were 
very helpful and friendly." 
VISIONS OF AMERICANS 

Their impressions of American people 
vary, but for the most part, foreigners find 
Americans to be friendly and outgoing. 
Bose thinks Americans work hard. "It 
amazes me how they can work so hard and 
do so many other things. They always have 
a hobby in addition to working. In India, 
most people just concentrate on making a 
living." 




The mass media spreads American cul- 
ture throughout the world. American tele- 
vision, movies, music, and clothes are very 
popular in Japan and Venezuela, according 
to Morimitsu and Velasco. Morimitsu said 
that visiting the United States, especially 
the West Coast, is very popular among 
young people in Japan. 

The image young Japanese have drawn 
from media representations is that of the 
free-wheeling Californian wearing cut-off 
jeans, roller skating and smoking marijua- 
na. "But it is not like that here," he said. 

This vision gives foreigners an unrealistic 
expectation of life in the United States. 
"They (Venezuelans) think U.S. is para- 
dise," said Velasco. "They think if you go 
there, you will enjoy, you will be happy." 

One common illusion concerns the econ- 
omy. Some foreigners are surprised by the 
cost of living here. They think that, be- 
cause American clothes are cheaper here 
than in their own countries, everything else 
also will be cheaper. "After you live here 
three months," said Velasco, "you realize 
the value of the American dollar." 

In general, Van Osdol believes that for- 
eign students have taken advantage of an 
opportunity which American students tend 
to ignore. She thinks Americans have mis- 
conceptions of life in other countries. "The 
world is getting smaller," she said. "We are 
more interdependent. We must be aware 
of other people who believe that their cul- 
ture, their religion and their way of life is 
just as important as ours." 

Morimitsu said that there has been a 
recent movement among the Japanese to 
get away from the American influence and 
return to Japanese culture. And, he added, 
not all Japanese adapt to the American 
lifestyle. "Maybe 70 percent of Japanese 
students never fit in with Americans. But I 
like America." (jjJ] 

— Amy Kloss 



Opposite top: The International Fair is an opportunity for 
various foreign student associations to educate others 
about their native costumes, culture, and geography. With 
native costume covering his Western clothing, Yemi Ogun- 
rinola, a freshman, displays the mixing of cultures that 
occurs when foreign students come to the United States. 

Opposite bottom: Ellen Lityo, a graduate student, and 
Herman Susangobeng, an anthropology student, offer in- 
formation on Indonesia at the 1982 International Fair held 
in the Union Feb. 26-27. 

Left: Pakistani students Rubing Aziz and Rizwan-Ud-Din 
display a collection of Pakistani craftsmanship at their 
booth at the 1982 International Fair. 



Brian Coleman 



21 

Foreign Students 



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Above right: Physical coordination as a part of Kung Fu is 
demonstrated to student Rick Welch, a sophomore, by 
instructor Clark Brooks (left). 

Right: Winter joggers Laura Zoot and Michael Squidman, 
both freshmen, and Celeste Hill, a senior, find the Armory 
track is a haven where they can stay in shape without 
risking injury on the snow and ice outside. 



22 

Armory 




Still active 
I at the age of 67 



Thousands pass by the Armory every 
day and yet, except for those two hectic 
days called on-campus registration, most 
people rarely venture inside. Sixty-seven 
years ago, however, most people made it a 
point to go see the Armory. 

"When it was constructed in 1915, the 
Armory had the largest unobstructed floor 
of any structure in the entire world," said 
Judy Rowan, assistant director of public 
affairs for the Office of Space Utilization. 




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"Then, during World War I, a concrete 
floor was laid for the Army Training Corps 
housed there and a second floor was added 
to provide sleeping quarters for the 4,000 
men, literally making it the 'largest bed- 
room in the state,'" said Rowan. The con- 
crete was later blasted out to provide the 
earth floor necessary for Reserve Officers' 
Training Corp drills. 

Although no soldiers currently live there, 
the ROTC still uses the building and, ac- 
cording to Jack Tarkoff, a junior in Com- 
merce and a building supervisor for Space 
Utilization, the Armory frequently is in use 
by other groups as well. 

"There's always something going on," 
said Tarkoff. "Usually it is used for sports 
like track, baseball or tennis, but the Illin- 
ettes, the Sky Diving Club, the Society for 
Creative Anachronism and the Frisbee 
Club work out there, too." 

Yet its size and accessibility, as well as 
being advantages, also are disadvantages. 
Tarkoff pointed out that, besides being one 
of the most utilized buildings on campus, 
the Armory also is the campus building 
most vandalized. "It's so big and there are 
so many hallways and rooms that it's hard 
for us supervisors to keep track of every- 
body and everything," he said. 

Aside from all the time reserved for 
groups and team practices, the Armory 
also has free time for individuals who wish 
to take advantage of the building's facili- 
ties, which include a track. 

"I come over here all the time in the 
winter," panted one avid runner, "because 
the track is bigger than the one at IMPE. 

"It's kind of fun to space out while I'm 
going around and around and to imagine 
what all this big old place has seen." ^jl\ 

— Cindra Kay Bump 



Left: The Society for Creative Anachronism adds an un- 
usual touch to the Armory floor action as members David 
Lame (left) and George Ludwig, both sophomores, battle it 
out in a sword fight. 

Above left: The Armory track is for runners of all shapes 
and sizes. Noriyuki Takekoshi's strides aren't yet long 
enough to enable him to keep up with the taller runners on 
the track. 






23 

Armory 




The Homecoming parade, Friday, Oct. 23, displayed many 
colorful and unusual floats. Phi Kappa Psi and Delta Delta 
Delta entered their float in the annual Homecoming float 
competition. 

The Young Illini performed its annual Homecoming show at 
the Krannert Center. "Gotta Move," a musical about trav- 
eling, featured Jenny Klinker, a senior. 




Randy Stuk.« 



24 

Homecoming 





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On October 23, 1981, Bill Killam and 
ana Yocom were crowned Homecoming 
ing and Queen of the University of Illi- 
ois. Yet unlike other kings and queens 
ho inherit their crowns, Killam and Yo- 
om earned theirs. 

Both Killam and Yocom have been ac- 

ive in the University's Greek system as 

./ell as in other activities on campus. A 

lember of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity, 

lillam has served as external vice presi- 

ent for the Interfraternity Council. Major- 

lg in agricultural economics, Killam was 

hairman of the College Agriculture Career 

xpo 1981 and president of Alpha Zeta, an 

gricultural scholastic honorary. 

Yocom, a transfer student from Western 

linois University, is a member of Kappa 

lpha Theta sorority. "I wanted to join a 

jrority because I thought it would be the 

2st way to meet people and get in- 

Dlved," she said. Yocom was Atius-Sa- 

lem Sing chairman for her house's show. 

An agricultural communications major, 

ocom is a member of Agriculture Com- 

unicators for Tomorrow, Omicron Delta 

appa, a leadership honorary, and Gamma 

gma Delta, a agricultural honoraries. She 

Jso was chairman of the Student News and 

formation Bureau and Ag Day publicity 

lairman in the Spring of 1981. 

Both Killam and Yocom said they were 

rprised when their houses nominated 

tjem to run for Homecoming King and 

(|ieen. Any group or organization may 

minate as many candidates as they like. 

ter that, it is the candidate's responsibil- 

ij to complete the application form. Yo- 

m felt hesitant about filling out the appli- 

tion. Killam didn't feel that way at all. 

"I didn't have any hesitations about ap- 

Il/ing," Killam said. "I didn't think I'd win. 




I was only proud to represent my fraternity 
and the College of Agriculture." 

After a parade and a pep rally on the 
Quad during which Killam and Yocom 
were crowned, a weekend of fun began. 
First, they attended a reception Friday 
night, then a Saturday morning brunch, the 
Homecoming football game against Wis- 
consin, and finally a dinner at the Presi- 
dent's mansion. Although the entire week- 
end was memorable, both Killam and Yo- 
com have their favorite moments. 

Yocom said the highlight of her weekend 
was returning to her sorority after winning. 
"There was a big congratulations sign, and 
everyone was outside singing," she said. 

Killam also remembers returning to his 
house to find everyone waiting to congratu- 
late him, along with cards, telegrams and 



Honored to represent the University, Bill Killam and Jana 
Yocom spent an exciting weekend of activity as Homecom- 
ing King and Queen. 

flowers from friends and house alumni. 
"The best part was seeing my parents," he 
said. "This time I know I made them proud 
of me." 

Both Killam and Yocom look forward to 
returning to a rural environment similar to 
the ones in which they were reared. Killam 
would like to work in agriculture marketing 
or farm management, but eventually he 
would like to return to his family's farm in 
Jacksonville, 111. Yocom, reared in Jersey- 
ville, 111., hopes to work in public relations 
or agricultural finance in a small town. [TjJ] 

— Diane Wintroub 



25 

Homecoming 



Is there a cure for 



When Cablevision arrived in Champaign 
Urbana two years ago, boob-tube fans re 
joiced in the variety of programs it brough 
to the area. 

But all good things have their dark side 
As the use of Cablevision became mor 
widespread, a new kind of sicknes 
emerged — Cablephobia, the fear of tun 
ing off the tube and thus missing the ne> 
episode of ''General Hospital. " For man 
television freaks, those cable wires becam 
the lifeline to the outside world. Here 
one student's story: 

I was mesmerized. I couldn't tear myse 
away from the set. One program after ai 
other passed before my eyes — "Th 
Love Boat," "Bewitched," "Gomer Pyle, 
"The Pink Panther," and "Charlie's Aill 
gels." 

I switched the channel and instantly b. 
came engrossed in the PTL Club. I didn 
even realize it was in Spanish. I switche 
the channel again and caught the end < 
"Every Which Way But Loose" for th 
sixth time. I had memorized every line j 




26 

Cablevision 



31int Eastwood's face, but I didn't even 
ecognize my roommates anymore. My all- 
light vigils in front of the television contin- 
led. I couldn't sleep for fear of missing 
The Rat Patrol." 

School? Finals? Tests? I didn't even re- 
nember what classes I was taking. Who 
;new what my major was or what my social 
ecurity number was? I was obsessed, my 
dentity lost inside the worlds of "Bullwin- 
;le" and "The Twilight Zone." 

My days turned into a jumble of "Dus- 
y's Treehouse," "Card Sharks," "The 
>rady Bunch," and "Championship Kara- 
2." I took notes when "FYI" came on, I 
heered when "That Girl" got her kite in 
ne air, and I started sending in postcards 
3 Bozo's Grand Prize Game. 

When my roommates found me hum- 
ming along with the test patterns, they 
new the time had come for drastic mea- 
ures. They picked up the phone and 
ialed 1-800-TVS-HOCK. It was the 
ablewatchers Anonymous hotline num- 
er. 

They told the crisis volunteer my story, 
len handed me the phone. "Hello?" I 
:ammered. Surprise ran through me 
hen another human voice answered back. 
'ho did she sound like? Finally it hit me. 
arol Brady! "How're Bobby and Cindy?" 
yelled into the phone. The volunteer ig- 
ored my question and asked me what my 
ime was. 

"My name's Betty and I'm here to win 
ig prizes," I answered. 

I heard sirens outside. "Dr. Welby!" I 
:reamed in delight, running to the door. 
|y roommates grabbed me and held me 
:ill while two men in white jackets buckled 
re to a stretcher. 

I woke up to find myself in a white, 
lidded room. I looked around quickly, no 
llevision! I started to scream. Cries of 
l i4onty! Monty!" and "Take door number 
tree!" bounced off the walls. 

I don't remember much of what's hap- 
i ; :ned since then. I'm in therapy now. They 
on't tell me how long this will last. I may 
rver be cured. Oh, for one last look at 
ijck the Bruiser . . . . g| 

— Amy Kloss & Marianne Eterno 

— Illustrations by Steve 

Sonnenleiter 




27 

Cablevlsion 



28 

Museums 




reasures tucked away 



The Natural History Museum, on the 
third and fourth floors of the Natural Histo- 
ry building, Green Street and Mathews 
Avenue, displays every bird found in Illi- 
nois, as well as Indian artifacts and wildlife 
characteristic of Illinois. 

Since 1868, the museum has educated 
both the community and students ranging 
from kindergarten to college. Students in 
biology, art, geology and anthropology 
benefit from the exhibits, which were ac- 
quired by the University at the beginning of 
the century. 

The museum offers free admission, guid- 
ed tours by appointment, and a wide vari- 
ety of exhibits that are both visually and 
historically interesting. [T|l] 

— Karen Heithoff 




29 

Museums 



Parents: Part Of Mini Pride 



The message isn't carried on a charging 
steed. It comes instead in Cadillacs, Mer- 
curies, Oldsmobiles and station wagons 
packed with homemade pastries and cloth- 
ing for the coming season. 

"The dads are here! The moms are here! 
The parents have come!" 

The University sets aside two weekends 
each year to give students special opportu- 
nities to honor their moms and dads. In the 
fall, there's Dad's Day, complete with a 
football game, the Illini Union Board's "Ca- 
sino Night" and parties especially for Pop. 
Springtime brings Mom's weekend, with 
fashion shows and craft sales. Particular 
concerts have become weekend traditions: 
the Men's Glee Club performs every Dad's 
weekend. The spring musical, sponsored 
by the Illini Union Board, is presented dur- 
ing Mom's weekend, as is the Atius-Sa- 
chem Mom's Day Sing. 

Aside from all the activities and enter- 
tainment, there are other things that typify 
parental visits. Anyone who has tried to eat 
at any number of fine dining establishments 
— among them the Boar's Head, the 
Round Barn and Jumer's — has found you 
had better stake out a table long before the 
game is over or make a reservation weeks 
in advance if it's a parent's weekend. 

Campustown is busier, too. Tom Shaw, 
manager of Alexander's Sporting Goods 
on campus, said there is an increase in sales 
and crowd size during parent's weekends. 

"Football weekends in general are fifty 
percent bigger that non-football week- 
ends," Shaw said, "but Dad's Day is about 
twenty percent bigger than that." 

Alexander's prepares for the special 
weekend by designing and selling a Dad's 
Day shirt. Florist shops along Green Street 
advertise corsage and boutonniere specials 
to students who wish to adorn their moms 
and dads with flowers. 

In addition to offering something with 
which everyone may please their parents, 



the Dad's Association sponsors a contest to 
choose a dad of the year. 

This year's King Dad was Richard Scan- 
Ian of Champaign, better known as profes- 
sor and sometimes Roman gladiator in 
Classical Civilization 111. Scanlan was en- 
tered in the contest by his four daughters, 
all of whom attend the University. 

But even a dad not chosen for the honor 
can have a pleasant visit at the University. 
Some dads even get into the act of enter- 
taining other dads: fathers of Illini cheer- 



leaders tumble around to spell out D-A-I 
during halftime, and Illinette dads must lim, 
ber up to be able to cancan through thj 
Marching Illini show with their dancinJ 
daughters. 

Of course, parents are welcome to vis : 

any weekend during the school year, fcjl 

the campus is never a dull place. But it onlj 

is appropriate that there is something extr 

set aside on special days for Mom and Dae 







James L. I* [ 



30 



Parents 




h Ijbeque at his fraternity house gives Scott Goffstein and 
>»s ad Sandy a chance to eat and converse before the 
og all game. 

I"h| strain of a high-scoring game takes its toll on Illini 
h(| leaders' dads as they do enough push-ups to equal the 
cq during the Dad's Day football game on Oct. 3. 



Brian Coleman 



31 



Parents 



IDtoirm 






John C- Stein 

Dorm food rarely changes and neither do the jokes about 
its quality. Sherri Skambraks, a freshman, tries to forget 
about the taste of her hamburger by concentrating on a 
book instead. 



9/10/8] 
Dear Mom and Dad, 

I thought it was about time you hearc 
from me. Sorry I haven't written sooner 
but I have been very busy. 

As you probably noticed when yoi 
brought me down to the University, th« 
increased-capacity dorm room is prettv 
small for four people. It was built for onlv 
three. With all the beds, desks and clos 
ets, and the mini-refrigerator you told m( 
to rent (we could use some things to pu 
into it, but can't afford to buy groceries 
HINT, HINT), we had only two feet o 
walking space. 

The four of us have got on each other' 
nerves, but we generally have solved ou 
small disagreements. 

First, we argued about how to decoratt 
the room. Trish and Bev wanted to ham 
red netting and red mobiles with heart 
from the ceiling. Bev covered the roor 
with those dime-store "love" posters 
Trish used the remaining wall space fc 
pictures of her boyfriend. 

My third roommate, Heather, wa 
mad that she didn't have a place for hi 
unicorns and rainbows. By the time ever; 
one finished, I didn't even have a place c 
my own closet door for my one Zig£ 
poster. 

After a hall census was taken, Tri; 
and Bev had to move out of the roor 
Because they put everything up wi 
Scotch Tape, there are several patches | 
paint missing. I hope I don't get blam«. 
for the damage. 

The RA (Resident Adviser) told us tvij 
remaining roomies how to get the extt 
furniture out of the room. Then v 
bought some plants, and a guy I know;* 
going to teach us how to build a loft-bl 
so that we can put a couch in the rooi 

We haven't seen our RA since we ha. 
our furniture moved into storage. Si\ 
keeps a board on her door with spac; 
marked for when she is studying, goi} 
out, sleeping, etc. A while ago, I hada 
question for her, but every time I checki 
her message board, she was either d 
somewhere or sleeping. 

Some people who were very helpil 
were the Illini Guides. They were the si- i 
dents moving my boxes out of the caro 
my fourth-floor room. Most of them w<e 
freshmen last year. They organized pia 
parties and dances so all the new stude s 



32 

Dorm Life 



living in the dorm could meet each other. 
The Guides also took groups of freshmen 
to buy textbooks. 

There have been so many fun things to 
do. I was elected a hall officer, so I have 
been planning activities for the other resi- 
dents. Everyone is willing to participate 
because we all want and need to make 
new friends. We currently are planning a 
tailgate party with some guys from one of 
the coed dorms. 

I visited some friends living in a coed 
dorm. I think it would be harder to study 
:here than in my all-girls residence hall. 
The coed dorms seem much noisier. 

Yet, most people live in coed dorms. 
They think the coed dorms are more fun 
han the single-sex halls. Mostly older stu- 
dents (sophomores and juniors) live in 
hese places. The freshmen live in the 
forms that are the longest walk from 
:ampus. 

I don't want to hurt your feelings, but I 

km really enjoying my new-found inde- 

>endence. However, I'm not enjoying the 

• afeteria food and the laundry rooms. 

i Some of the cafeterias have continuous 

'neal service, but during prime meal 

ours, I still have to wait a long time to 

[at. The food is not too bad, but I'm 

etting a little tired of peanut-butter-and- 

!>lly sandwiches and the salad bar. When 

n> my care package coming? 

I was just faced with the biggest dilem- 
i |ia of my college life. Before I went to 
i ed, I looked in my dresser drawer and I 
idn't have any clean socks. I went to the 
k t.undry room and every washing machine 
« i the laundry room was broken, so I had 
' borrow some Top-Siders from my 
| Jighbor and pretend I was preppy. 
M It was too bad I missed your half-dozen 
i« hone calls last Wednesday, but I really 
Wis studying in the lounge until 2:30 in 
Stj2 morning. 

is jDon't be angry with me, but I made a 
jrffv mistakes balancing my check book. I 
Bought I had $100 more than I did. So 
>oriw I have to pay $5 for each of the 6 
ibd checks I wrote in campustown. Guess 
I have to look for a job. 
el; |1 have megathings to do this week, as 
isUial. I'll be looking forward to your next 
cJfjl. 
]l ! Love always, 

your daughter at the 
University of Illinois 

— Nancy Shaw 




. ,::!"wiw 



wm 




John C. Stein 

A necessary evil, doing laundry is a new chore for many 
dorm dwellers. Gail Field, a freshman, sorts her clothes in 
the laundry room at Bromley Hall. 

Students sometimes search for the long-awaited letter or 
check from home in their mailboxes at the CRH Snackbar. 



John C. Stein 



33 

Dorm Life 




34 

Political Organizations 



HH 



&$&£ 



■HH^MI^MHHMk 



The left, the right 

and everything 

in between 



Not everyone's a Democrat, and we're 
ot all Republicans either — particularly at 
le University of Illinois. Here, students 
in exercise almost any political belief or 
eology through the multitude of political 
id issue groups on campus. 

That is not to say the University is void 
: all Democrats and Republicans. As a 
atter of fact, they form two of the largest 
olitical groups on campus. 

Ralph Billings shouts to a room full of 
ollege Republicans, "What's GOP?" 

"Growth, Opportunity and Progress!" 
le students respond. 

"Louder!" 

And the group responds more loudly, 
Browth, Opportunity and Progress!" 

Billings, a junior in agricultural econom- 
i, is president of the College Republicans. 
[ is a group comprising sometimes be- 
teen 35 and 50 active members. 

According to Billings, the group, or 

lub" as he prefers to call it, is "just a 
[flection of what the national party is." 
'"I support President Reagan" was the 
t2me that guided their activities over the 
^ar — usually social functions with politi- 
II overtones. 

The College Democrats is a more issue- 
cented group. 

Yet President Robert Barry, a junior in 
2onomics, claims his group is the more 
> :cessful when it comes to getting out the 
v/:es, a major goal of both groups. 

\ less well-known group, but a large 
3 >up nonetheless, is the Young Americans 
:<; Freedom. 

The "Yaffers" is a non-partisan conser- 
iiye group started by William F. Buckley 
r:he 1950s. The group is not associated 
Ah any political party and is not bound to 
sviport any candidate. 

;rhe Yaffers at the University reorga- 
jpd in the spring of 1979 after a brief 
alence from campus. The group's goal, 
a'lording to President Ross Herbert, soph- 
sjore in finance, is to inform people of 
c(|iservative philosophy and to combat 
rrjny liberal policies that the members find 
Actionable. 



The Students for a Libertarian Society is 
unique to the other three groups. First, its 
members are mostly graduate students, 
many of them having completed their edu- 
cations. Second, meetings are not held reg- 
ularly, and they are usually informal discus- 
sions at a local restaurant. Third, members 
of the SLS are not required to join the 
Libertarian Party. 

The purpose of the group is to have the 
members educate each other on issues and 
to discuss Libertarian literature. 

The SLS, a national organization, was 
organized in 1978 and competes ideologi- 
cally with both the Yaffers and the Young 
Socialist Alliance, according to President 
Jeff Dimit, a junior in engineering. 

While leftist in some views, the group is 
considered more conservative in others, 
such as its economic views. However, the 
group is undeniably radical. "We want to 
live in a society without government," Di- 
mit said. 

The College Republicans, College 
Democrats, Yaffers, and the SLS all op- 
pose what they consider harassing students 
on the Quad with literature or petitions. 
They try to reach students through booths 
in the Illinois Union foyer or through the 
speakers they sponsor. 

The groups who use the Quad as a major 
source of publicity are the Young Socialist 
Alliance and the Friends of the Spartacus 
Youth League — groups both radical and 
leftist in nature. 

Of course, on any day you could find 
any one of a myriad of issue-oriented 
groups campaigning on the Quad. There 
are students who organize to support the 
Polish union, Solidarity; a group called the 
Young Americans for Morality; and a 
group that organized to save the Mississip- 
pi River. 

You can find at least one group on either 
side of an issue. For every member of Stu- 
dents for Environmental Concerns, there is 
a member of Students for Nuclear Power. 

The Abortion Rights Coalition is a pro- 
choice informational group. Members 
speak before church groups, University 



classes, and anyone interested in informa- 
tion about abortion. The group has a re- 
source center in its office at the Union 
where literature from many national pro- 
choice organizations is available, including 
literature from its own national affiliate, the 
National Abortion Rights Action League. 

On the other side of the issue are HLA 
(Human Life Amendment) and L.I.F.E. 
(Life is for Everyone). HLA is a political 
group working for passage of the Human 
Life Amendment. It also supports various 
political candidates. 

L.I.F.E. is an informational group edu- 
cating people on abortion issues. It con- 
cerns itself with communications work, 
publishing a biweekly newsletter and spon- 
soring speakers such as Dr. Mildred Jeffer- 
son, former president of the National Right 
to Life group. It also makes presentations 
to church groups, dormitories, sororities, 
and health groups. 

A new group that sprung up in response 
to the Moral Majority is the Students for 
Separation of Church and State. Last year 
several students discovered they shared 
the same view with regard to the issue and 
decided to organize a campus group. Lisa 
Braddock, a senior in leisure studies and 
president of the group, said the group was 
formed "to reach out to others who share 
our feelings on the topic." 

There are also a multitude of groups that 
support the oppressed in foreign countries. 
One such group is the Central American 
Solidarity Committee. Its purpose is to 
educate the public about U.S. involvement 
in Central America. The group also spon- 
sors fund-raising activities to help both Sal- 
vadorian refugees and the Democratic Re- 
volution Fund. 

With so many students from so many 
different backgrounds and in so many dif- 
ferent majors all actively involved in politi- 
cal groups and issues, political activism no 
longer seems a thing of the past. [9] 

— Linda Jo Hoekstra 

— Illustration by Steve 

Sonnenleiter 



35 

Political Organizations 



STUDENT SOLDI MIS 



Who are these people in drab olive 
green, and what are they doing here? Are 
they soldiers? Students? Or both? 

They're members of the AROTC, Army 
Reserve Officer's Training Corps, a pro- 
gram designed specifically for college stu- 
dents. It allows students to earn a college 
degree and at the same time to receive a 
commission as an officer in the United 
States Army. 

Students have different reasons for join- 
ing AROTC. Some view the program as a 
career opportunity, while others consider it 
a way to finance their educations. 

Still other students join not for personal 
reasons, but for what they see as the bene- 
fit of the entire nation. Patriotism draws 
these students to the Army ROTC. Tony 
Pusateri, a junior, said "The Army is the 
most honorable profession in the world — 
that's why I joined. The only reason I'm 
here is because it's the most important 
thing in the whole United States; it always 
has been." 

The AROTC program teaches two key 
principles: leadership and organization. 
The department offers such courses as in- 
troduction to military science, land naviga- 
tion, military tactics, military operations, 
and military leadership. 

One of the requirements of the Army 
ROTC is a field training exercise, or FTX. 
During the FTX, cadets apply their class- 
room learning and their lab skills in a simu- 
lated combat situation. 

But the AROTC is not all work. For fun, 
the cadets hold a formal military ball and a 
Christmas party. Other social activities in- 
clude picnics and athletic tournaments. 

Army ROTC is a University program 

that offers a unique opportunity to college 

students. How else could you join the army 

and go to college at the same time? jjjjj 

„, — Amy L. Jake 

do 

ROTC 




iitor's note: Illio photographer John C. Stein accompa- 
ed the University AROTC cadets on their field training 
cercise in the fall of 1981. 

We left Champaign-Urbana at zero sev- 
n-hundred. The date was 10/10/81. The 
IS Is, lis, Ills, and IVs filed into the buses 
>r their year's first Field Training Exer- 
se. The gear was loaded — complete 
ith half-tents, packs, and C-rations. We 
loved out. 

They were issued M-16 and A-l semi- 
utomatic rifles and M-60 machine guns. I 
ad my O-M 1 camera. 

They fired countless magazines and belts 
f practice ammunition. I shot, too, but I 
sed the real stuff, Kodak Tri-X Pan Film. 

These were the AROTC cadets on their 
ill field training exercise, or FTX. During 
lis two-day excursion in the field, and the 
oodlands of Marseilles, 111., cadets were 
troduced to battlefield survival methods, 
jniors and seniors polished their skills and 
>ok charge of the operations. 



During this "weekend of war," I hiked 
where the cadets hiked, ate the same C- 
ration meals, and searched for land mines 
as did everyone else. The highlight of the 
weekend was the ride in the Bell UH-1 
(Huey) helicopters. We were briefed by the 
first sergeant of the Illinois National Guard 
on chopper safety. Then, with the doors 
wide open, the pilots headed for the tree 
tops. 

This FTX was a combined exercise be- 
tween the University of Illinois and Illinois 
State University cadets. Working, training 
and teaching together, cadets focused on 
the vital aspects of warfare. 

Classrooms were held in the forest. To- 
pics ranged from how to conduct platoon 
and squad maneuvers to methods of slap- 
ping on a gas mask in nine seconds or less. 

Naturally, all battle maneuvers call for 
explosions, and Mike Hebner, the battalion 
commanding officer, did just that. Smoke 



grenades added a realistic touch to tactical 
assault drills. 

A tank also is an integral part of any war 
training. One must always check beneath 
the hood of any used M-60 Tank. Inspect- 
ing the treads of your tank also is recom- 
mended. 

Throughout their ITT (Individual Tactics 
Training), the cadets were never at a loss 
for fight and enthusiasm. Strict discipline 
must come as second nature to a cadet. It 
was all part of army training, training that 
progressed into the night. 

When it was all over, I had seen more 
than just Army ROTC cadets and war 
games. I had observed a closely knit group 
of students, friends and partners working 
together. They were very proud to be do- 
ing what I had seen them doing. 0£] 

— John C. Stein 




John C. Stein 

37 

ROTC 



FIELD TRAINING: 
A DIFFERENT KIND 

OF CLASSROOM 



V / 



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\ i 



:&W#- 




I 



r 



■-■' 



I 



kiSk ^4S!2S^~- 



; ■■ ,: 



f^.^ ' 






? 



X 



r 









^ 



SK: 



IR 






x* 1 




| 

'V 




\ 







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an 





\j(, ■ 1 






Keeping 
the country 

clean 



James Watt, The University, The Army 
Corp of Engineers, chemical companie 
and Ronald Reagan all have at least on< 
thing in common: they have earned th 
antipathy of Students for Environmenta 
Concerns (SECS). 

Nationally, environmental groups are e> 
periencing a renewed interest in ecologies 
concern, action, and enthusiasm. This r< 
newal largely has been a result of newl 
perceived threats to the environment. 

Secretary of the Interior Watt ho 
moved to sell federal lands, which will a 
low increased off-shore drilling, and to di; 
mantle the National Parks and Forests, L( 
cally, the University has invested mor 
than $1.2 million in a reconversion of th 
University's Abbott Power Plant to a co 
burning facility that the group bel 
jeopardize air quality in Cham 
bana. 

The Army Corp of Engineers 



40 

Environmental Groups 




>osed a plan that would fill in- millions of 
cres of backwater wildlife habitat along 
he Mississippi River basin. It now appears 
hat for years chemical companies have 
een dumping toxic wastes in many places, 
hereby threatening all types of life forms. 

On top of all this, SECS is ired by Rea- 
; an and his administration's underfinancing 
if the Environmental Protection Agency. 

The aims of these powerful interests are 
apposed by the students who compose 
>ECS. Housed and supported by the Urn : 
ersity YWCA on Wright Street, SECS is a 
road-based coalition of many environmen- 
ai interests. , 

! Students run the whole show, from the 
'rass roots up. They govern the organiza- 
lon, raise money, and select the research 
ssues. Students form committees to w«rk 
,n issues, organize other students, testify 
t hearings and work to educate people 
bout the environment. Students meet with 



University officials, organize statewide let- 
ter writing campaigns and lobby the legisla- 
ture. .*, 

Students put out the SECS newsletter, 
manage the SECS office, and set policy for 
the organization. 

SECS is working on a local, statewide, 
and national basis to protect the environ- 
ment and to preserve natural resources. 
For instance, SECS is trying to persuade 
the University and the State of Illinois to 
install scrubbers in the Abbott' plant, allow-, 
ing for the burning of more Illinois coal. 

The group also is working toward better 
disposal of solid waste in Champaign-Ur- 
bana through reuse and recycling. Other 
projects include working to preserve the 
Illinois prairie and to establish support for a 
strong Clean Air Act. 

Another SECS committee is organizing 
opposition to the Army Corp of Engineers' 
plans for the Mississippi River basin. 



One committee is studying the energy 
efficiency of University buildings and an- 
other part of SECS is working to expose 
and strengthen regulation of toxic waste 
dumping. 

While some members organize political 
efforts, others work to form a statewide 
coalition of student environmental groups. 

The 400-member group may not win all 
its battles on all its fronts. Because of past 
successes such as the stopping of dams 
from flooding millions of acres of land, the 
starting of the Community Recycling Cen- 
ter, and the lobbying in Congress, the Illi- 
nois Legislature, and the local city councils 
on numerous pieces of legislation, it seems 
likely that this group of concerned students 
will one day achieve its goals, \" 



Kurt Becker 






ab 









^T 



-"Hi * 






SB £ 



/ 



Opposite: Helping clean a trail at Busey Woods is A<M 
member Scott Trippel, a senior. 

Right: An A$fi pledge, Jennie Frestel, a freshman, gathers 
garbage from the trails. 

Below: The trails at Busey Woods get face lifts as Mark 
Crain and John Hein, both seniors, shovel mulch during the 
cleanup. 




Sharon Basst) 




42 

Service Organizations 




Sharon Basso 



Good deeds and good times 



Roberts' Rules of Order are followed, 
nd you'd never know it. 

The meeting continues, but the social 
hatter from the back almost drowns out 
fficer reports. Paper wad wars take place 
'om opposite ends of the long room, and 
ccasional cracks from a guy with a jester's 
lap on his head receive widespread ap- 
'roval from the 50 or so fraternity mem- 
ers present. 

A different kind of meeting? You bet — 
,i a different kind of "fraternity." 
i Alpha Phi Omega (A$fi) is a national 
oeducational service fraternity that man- 
ges to have fun while doing good deeds. 
Jhe University of Illinois and the surround- 
Ig area have reaped its benefits for the 
ast 50 years, and A$Q, which is founded 
jn friendship, leadership and service, is still 
ping strong. 

"We call ourselves a fraternity because 

though we are a service organization, and 
jiat is our main idea, we are also a social 
organization, " Claire Wilkinson, a junior in 
'panish and the fraternity's public relations 
jfficer, said. 

i A<M2 is probably most noted for its Ugly 
llan (or Maiden) on Campus contest, a 



costume contest that was returned to the 
University after interest in it died in the 
1950s. 

A candidate is sponsored by a fraternity, 
sorority, dormitory floor or campus organi- 
zation. Pictures are taken of candidates in 
their costumes, and for 10 cents a vote, the 
student body decides who is the ugliest. 
This year more than $1,000 went to 
Roundhouse, a runaway facility of the Chil- 
dren's Home and Aid Society of Illinois in 
Champaign. 

When A$Q members are not busy with 
the ugly man contest, they put their efforts 
into reading for the blind, doing mainten- 
ance work for area charities, donating 
blood and making huge vats of gelatin des- 
sert for brave souls to jump in at the Vin- 
tage Champaign festivities. 

But even after donating 4,000 hours to 
5,000 hours of service each year, the fra- 
ternity still has plenty of time left for social 
activities. 

"It's the social program that makes us a 
fraternity and not just a service organiza- 
tion," Wilkinson said. 

Parties, hayrides and meetings for din- 
ner on Sunday evenings are just some of 



the fraternity's activities. Friday Afternoon 
College Klub for Undergrads, a happy hour 
better known as FACK-U, is also quite pop- 
ular. 

Members said the main reason they be- 
came interested in A<M2 was the fact that 
many of their friends are involved. 

"Even if it wasn't an A$fi 'thing' . . . 
they could find all their friends at our par- 
ty," Wilkinson said. Another reason she 
believes members become involved is that 
they have a "grudging obligation" to help 
out. 

"They don't like to admit they feel good 
about themselves when they help little old 
ladies across the street," she added. 

President Charlie Svoboda, a senior in 
civil engineering, said he has enjoyed meet- 
ing a diverse group of people through 
AM. 

Group projects and volunteering have 
also taught him something. 

"It's interesting. It's unique. And it's see- 
ing how well off you are at times," Svo- 
boda said. [2] 

— Karen Padgitt 



43 

Service Organizations 



A major concern 



Some people may say that they're here 
for the beer. Others may despair at being 
stuck in the middle of the Central Illinois 
cornfields. 

But when it comes down to the reality of 
the situation, most people come to the Uni- 
versity because of its reputation as a top- 
rated academic institution. Students from 
all over the world compete for entrance 
into the hundreds of curricula offered by 
the University — some seek a liberal edu- 
cation, others a job. 

According to R. Bruce Hinley, assistant 
dean of admissions in LAS, a student's 
choice of a major tends to reflect the cur- 
rent job-market demands. Careers that of- 
fer stability and financial security have the 
most appeal for today's student, he said. 

Because of this, the popularity of pro- 
grams in engineering and business has in- 
creased in the last five years. Enrollment in 
preprofessional curricula also has risen. 

Majors that have declined in enrollment, 
according to Hinley, are those in the hu- 
manities, such as English and philosophy. 

Some students use job-market trends 
and forecasts to help them decide what 
fields to enter. Education is a good exam- 



ple, Hinley said, of a major program re- 
flecting current job-market trends. As the 
demand for teachers has eased in the past 
few years, enrollment in the College of 
Education has dropped. However, Robin 
Swain, a counselor in the Career Develop- 
ment Office, said, "Don't listen to job-mar- 
ket forecasts because they vary greatly ev- 
ery couple of years." When planning for a 
career, a student must be aware of his 
interests and goals, and incorporate that in 
the job search processes. 

"Just because you're an English major 
doesn't mean that you won't find a job. It's 
a myth that your major predicts your ca- 
reer. It's your person. Your employer will 
look at your skills, abilities, and interests." 

One of the requirements that Swain 
thinks students should eventually face is 
that they plan carefully for their degree. 
She advises students to manage their col- 
lege courses, leaving enough room for al- 
terations if necessary. 

Many students, however, consider the 
University preparation for their careers, 
rather than their specific academic choices. 

Tali Arbel, a senior in Engineering, noted 
the diversification of degree choices in the 




Engineering College. "The Engineering 
College is unique in its diversification of 
degree choices." She thinks she's well pre- 
pared either to find a job as an engineer or 
to go to graduate school. 

The size of the University bothers some 
students. John Thompson, a senior in LAS, 
said, "Classes are far, far too large, which 
hurts people's learning. Aside from that, I 
think the quality of our faculty is very 
high." About his future, he said, "I'm not 
sure, but I think I'd like to get a job in the 
chemical engineering industry and then go 
to grad school in environmental engineer-; 
ing." 

Claudia Nocker, a junior in Education,' 
isn't bothered by the size of her classes. 
"The Education school is great because it is 
small and much more personal than most 
other colleges. You can build up a good 
rapport with the teachers and get to know 
your peers well," she said. Nocker plans to 
teach elementary school for a while and' 
then go back to school for her master' 
degree. 

Jean Olivero, a senior in Commerce, 
thinks that the use of teaching assistants 
helps combat the problems a large universi- 



44 

Academics 






:- :v , •;:>•<• 



\NSS 



ty has. "I love the TA system because 
they're younger than the professors and 
can relate better. In a school this size, they 
really help keep the system organized." 

Kim Weil, a recent graduate with a de- 
gree in English, believes that her education 
nere gave her a sound academic back- 
ground. However, "If you don't under- 
stand the structure as a freshman, you may 
lave trouble later on. I think they ought to 
Dffer a course on how to use the system," 
Weil added. 

Some students change majors and ca- 
reer choices during their stay at the Univer- 
sity . 

Chris Hower, a senior, changed her ma- 
or from graphic design to art education. 
'The Graphic Design Department is fantas- 
:ic but highly competitive, which made me 
decide it wasn't for me," Hower said. 

Whatever their interests, students can 
nost likely find a curriculum to match at 
:he University. How their major is chosen 
ind how it is applied is something left to 
:he individual. M\ 

— Sue Smiley 




45 

Academics 




A religious revival 

in the 80s 



Brian Colemar! 



It's taking tough political stands and 
challenging science once again. And no one 
can agree whether it's a legitimate renewal 
of faith or the last gasp of a dying beast. 
EVANGELISM 

In the last decade, Christian evangelism 
has been gaining momentum in the United 
States. Evangelists, who by "spreading the 
Word" stress the reconciliation to God 
through Christ, differ from fundamental- 
ists. Not all evangelists are fundamental- 
ists, or those who interpret the Bible literal- 
ly, but fundamentalists are evangelists. It is. 
evangelism that has given birth to the 
"electric church," (evangelistic televisior 
and radio programs) and has rekindled the 
controversy over whether creationisrr 
should be taught in public schools. Also 
the 1980 elections saw evangelism flex its 
political muscle in the form of the Mora 
Majority, a lobbying group headed bv, 
preacher Jerry Falwell. 

New evangelical churches and fellow 
ships have popped up on the University o 
Illinois campus. The most recent group 
proclaims "Jesus is Lord" in an enormou: 
banner draped across the front of wha 
used to be the Alpha Sigma Phi house 



Religion 




Below: Father Ken Przybyla, priest at St. John's Catholic 
Church, celebrates mass at the auditorium where it was 
relocated because of construction on the church. 



Randy Stukenberg 

Above: Hare Krishnas, with their unusual clothing and 
hairstyles, create a great deal of interest when they set up 
on the south side of the Union. 

Left: The newest Christian fellowship on campus is Mara- 
natha, located in a house formerly occupied by Alpha 
Sigma Phi fraternity. The banner on the front boldly pro- 
claims their message. 

Right: Students enjoy the informality and community feel- 
ing of the Catholic mass on Sunday afternoon. With hands 
joined, students end the mass by singing the "Our Father." 



Maranatha, 211 E. Armory St., Cham- 
paign, leased the house in August 1981 
with an option to buy. 

Maranatha, founded in 1974, is a Chris- 
tian group with 65 churches in six coun- 
tries. The church on Armory also houses 
evangelist group members. 

"Our purpose is to reach all students 

with the gospel of Jesus Christ and to train 

them and discipline them to reach others," 

I James Muffet, one of its two directors, 

said. 

WHY PEOPLE TURN TO RELIGION 

Harry Johnson, a professor of sociology, 

|gave one explanation. "In general, religion 

1 is connected with fundamental identity 

problems of individuals and societies," he 

said. 

These identity problems exist today, 
'■ Johnson said, because the individual in so- 




ciety feels threatened by the chang- 
ing role of the sexes and by the power of 
science and technology. A person ques- 
tions the fundamental worth of our coun- 
try, especially because of the Vietnam War 
and worries about the possibility of a nucle- 
ar holocaust, Johnson said. 

These pressures lead to strain and anxi- 
ety, and an individual finds an outlet for 
such stress in religion, Johnson said. 

Shoemacher pointed to similar forces 
that may have caused what seems to be a 
turning to religion that has occurred in the 
last decade. 

"In the beginning of the 1970s, it be- 
came clear that all the social movements of 
the 1960s hadn't solved the country's 
problems. People lost faith in our country's 
institutions and in the country itself," he 
said. 



Randy Stukenberg 

The problem, Shoemacher said, is that 
some evangelists have attractive, simplistic 
theologies that "turn the Bible into a book 
of magic." Evangelists take the Biblical pas- 
sages, he said, relate them to a political 
issue and claim to have found the divine 
truth on the subject. Shoemacher cited the 
Moral Majority as an example. 

"I think the Moral Majority is very dan- 
gerous and has tendencies toward real 
right-wing repression. They believe they've 
got the truth from God on everything. Any- 
one who is that confident is dangerous," 
Shoemacher said. 

These troubled times have given rise to 
more than just a new evangelism. The Rev. 
David Turner, the priest at St. John's 
Catholic Church, 604 E. Armory, Cham- 
paign, thinks religions is stronger in the 
1980s. 



47 

Religion 



Religion • • • 

RELIGION ON CAMPUS 

More than 60 religious institutions and 
organizations affiliate themselves with the 
University. The groups range from the So- 
ciety of Friends (Quakers) to the Three 
Hierarchs Greek Orthodox Church and to 
the Bahai Center. 

Many of the churches offer more than 
daily and weekly services. Hillel, the Jew- 
ish foundation on campus, 503 E. John St., 
Champaign, orders kosher meat and bread 
for its members who want to do their own 
cooking. It also offers dinners and lunches, 
social activities and information on Jewish 
and Israeli interests. If a Jewish student 
encounters anti-Semitism, he can go to Hil- 
lel for support. Rabbi Stephen Sniderman 
said that anti-Semitic incidents in Cham- 
paign-Urbana are "nothing all that vital and 
serious, but enough to make the lives of 
individuals incomfortable at times." 

The Community United Church of 
Christ, Sixth and Daniels Streets, Cham- 
paign, invites guests to lecture on compara- 
tive religions. The McKinley Foundation 
does charity work such as sponsoring refu- 
gee families and reading to the blind. 
WHAT STUDENTS ARE SAYING 

For many students, however, established 




religion doesn't enter their weekly sched- 
ules. 

"I just don't seem to find the time," Guy 
Percy, a senior in Commerce, said. 

"I don't believe in established religion in 
general," Dave Rhoades, a freshman in 
LAS, said. 

But even these students don't complete- 
ly escape religion. If they haven't been ap- 
proached by a CARP member (a devotee 
of Sun Myung Moon) or heard the Hare 
Krishnas chanting on the Quad, they 
couldn't have missed Max, the evangelist 
who stands behind the Illini Union and 
quotes passages from the Bible. 

Some students find Max entertaining. 

"It appears more like a three-ring circus 
than anything," Larry Overzet, a junior in 
Engineering, said. 

Several students saic they feel a special 
need for religious services. "Students are 
too wrapped up in their activities and 
schedules," Sue Sneider, a sophomore in 
hospital dietetics, said. 

Matt Nilles, a sophomore in LAS, said, 
"Kids at school look at it as an outlet, a 
way for them to deal with their own prob- 
lems — academic and social." 



Randy Stukenberg 

LEADERS EXPRESS OPINIONS 

Opinions differ among church leaders, 
too. Rabbi Sniderman said the majority of 
college students are too busy, but that 
many are "lonely, lost people" in college. 
Many of them need to turn to clergymen, 
he said. 

Doug Kleber, an elder in Rescue Shop, a 
Christian evangelical fellowship, 910 W. 
Oregon Ave., Urbana, was more stern, say- 
ing students should fulfill a need for reli- 
gion. He did not acknowledge other reli- 
gions. 

"There's a need for Jesus Christ. He's 
the way and the truth and the life. There's 
no purpose or direction for living without 
Him," Kleber said. 

Evangelists, like Kleber, are part of a 
large movement that at times is tied up 
with broad, controversial issues. Many reli- 
gions have a tendency to go beyond the 
spiritual life of the individual. 

But religion is something personal. Stu- 
dents who attend church summed up why 
they go in five words: "It makes me feel 
good." [jjj] 

— Paula Benson 8 
Marianne Schmid 



48 

Religion 



The Hare Krishnas attempt to educate people about their 
religion through preaching and distribution of pamphlets. 

Doug Kleber (right), a former semi-professional football 
player for the Cleveland Browns, has now dedicated his life 
to "spreading the Word" through evangelism. He is an 
elder in a Christian fellowship called the Rescue Shop. 




Religion 



In step ...... 

witt^ II 4 lllii i 



"And now, Ladies and Gentlemen 
Let's give a warm welcome to the March- 
ing Mini!" 

As thousands of cheering fans stand up, 
Illinois' famous Orange and Blue stream 
onto the field. The 300 who make up the 
Marching Mini come from all parts of the 
state and country, are all ages and study a 
multitude of subjects ranging from advertis- 
ing to zoology. But these diversities make 
little difference when the band members 
are on the field as the unified Marching 
Mini. 

Bob Belser, a graduate assistant who 
writes music and helps direct the band, 
said, "You don't find this closeness in 
many other marching bands. There's a 
pride here that makes it (the band) good 
they feel a dedication to the group." 
The band members practice at least 12 
hours a week during football season. Also, 
the band has a practice camp during the 
fall New Student Week. 

On days of home football games, mem- 
bers arrive at the field at about 8 a.m. 

Dave Wesolowski, one of five cymbal 
players, said, "I know everyone in the 
band. I enjoy it. Sure, it's hard work, but a 
lot of my friends are here it's exciting 

at football games." 

Each member earns one hour credit a 
semester, but that hardly compensates for 
the hours spent marching on the practice 



field in both the muggy August heat and 
the chilling November winds. "It's a lot of 
fun. The staff is good. The music is good. 
It's a thrill to know 60,000 people like us. 
It gives us a lot of spirit," said Steve Enda, 
a senior in LAS. 

Organizing 300 people into perfect let- 
ter formations is not easy. According to 
Bob Belser, "There's a lot of planning for 
the teaching, but members of the band are 
not exposed to a lot of Mickey Mouse." 

Dr. Harry Begian became director of 
bands in 1970, and since then has conduct- 
ed the band "like a family," Belser said. 

Under Begian, Gary Smith directs the 
Marching Mini with precision, discipline, 
and enthusiasm. With Smith's type of disci- 
pline, Belser said, "we can treat people 
like humans there's not a lot of yell- 

ing." 

Begian and Smith work with students 
through other students. Graduate assis- 
tants Belser and Timothy Montgomery 
work with various music arrangers, drum 
majors and section and squad leaders to 
roll out the final masterpiece: perfectly co- 
ordinated, spirit-inspiring Marching Mini. 

However, music arranger Greg Smith 
stressed that "one thing is that every mem- 
ber of this band is treated as an equal. That 
in itself makes us a strong, cohesive 
group." 

Jane Groft, a junior in communications, 



£ 



said, "I love it. I've been in the band evei 
since I can remember. I love the music 
You make friends with the people yoi; 
meet and work with. You work hard, bui 
the end result is always good. That's re 
warding. And it's exciting. It's a thrill be 
yond belief when the entire stadium is or 
its feet." 

Ann Bronsen, a senior in computer sci 
ence, remembers her first year in the band 
"I don't think I was homesick once as e 
freshman — I was too busy!" Bronser 
adds, "It's fun, you're involved. You know 
everyone in your section." 

Jerry Body, a freshman in LAS, said, "1 
do it for the squad snacks." Because th« 
mellophone section opted not to purchase 
section T-shirts, they take turns bringinc 
snacks to the practices. 

Enda said that "everyone is helpful anc 
nice. Having all the people pulling togethe 
as a unit is a great coed experience. Bein< 
able to do this it's a blast, and it make 
so many people happy." 

The loyal fans of the Fighting Mini love 
and support the Marching Mini, too. To 
gether the band members parade anc 
stomp through sun and cold to keep the 
spirited crowds pulling for an Mini victory; 

— Ginger Hopkins 



The band's half-time sparkle is provided by the Illinettes, 
shown here at the Syracuse game. 




John C. Stein 



50 

Marching Mini 




Randy Stukenberg 







TMtfrwr 





Above: Tubas aren't just for playing, as Dick Lindberg, 
a senior, demonstrates during a band practice. 

Left: Steve Enda, a senior, crashes his approval of the 
action on the field. 

Below: A member of the Marching [Mini's snare line does 
his part in a half-time formation. 




Fashionable fad or classic 



Is it a fashion? 

Is it a lifestyle? 

Or is it a put-on? 

Actually, it's prep, and depending on 
whom you talk to, it's either the conserva- 
tive statement of the 80s or the pinnacle of 
snobbishness. 

Slowly but surely, the University has 
been making the prep transformation. 
Over the past two years, alligators have 
been multiplying as fast as rabbits. Top- 
Sider deck shoes have covered the feet of 
thousands. And monograms have been 



sprouting up on sweaters, wallets, key 
chains, etc. 

Prep — born in New England — seems 
misplaced here in Corn County, U.S.A., 
especially since preppies are supposed to 
love the ocean and our nearest body of 
water is Boneyard Creek. But an under- 
ground army of preppies has been in the 
Midwest all along, claiming that it doesn't 
wear preppy clothes, but those it considers 
to be classic. 

Margaret Oakes, a senior in Liberal Arts 
and Sciences, has dressed conservatively 







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all her life. "I don't think about dressinc 
prep when I go to my closet in the morn 
ing," Oakes said. "Trying to be preppy i: 
dumb. The clothes I buy are classic, they're 
comfortable, and they last." 

Oakes never buys faddish clothes be 
cause she doesn't want her investment out 
dated. She said she'd rather spend $20C 
on a quality jacket that will last. 

"What people call preppy clothes ar«| 
classic clothes. They're good clothes anc 
they look good on people, so I'll keep 
buying them." 

Here in Champaign-Urbana, Redwooc 
and Ross, Bachrach's and Bergner's De 
partment Store stock their shelves foi 
preppies. Crew-neck sweaters, plaid skirts 
tweed jackets and Izod Lacoste shirts lint 
the aisles. 

Yet many preppies do their shoppinc 
out of town — way out of town, in places 
such "as Evanston, 111., and Freeport, Maine 
Catalog stores such as Land's End (Evan 
ston) and L.L. Bean (Freeport) have a lone 
history of catering to prep clientele. 

Ed Messett, a sophomore in Liberal Arts 
and Sciences, has shopped by catalog M 
his life. From Morton Grove, Messett be 
lieves what people are now calling prep is 
more of a lifestyle with which people grow: 
up. 



The preppy look is right for all seasons as Suzie Ramm, a 
sophomore, shows with her classic sportswear. 

Izod (alligator) shirts and vibrant colors, like those worn by 
Nancy Denigny and Jane Babcock, freshmen, appeared or 
campus as the preppy look gained popularity. 



*( 



clothing? 

"The clothes I buy have to have two 
things," Messett insists. "They have to be 
comfortable and they have to look good. 
And 1 won't spend the money if I don't 
think they'll last a while." 

Messett separates himself from what's 
known as the pseudo-preppy — someone 
who's treating prep as a fad. Often they 
are seen sporting tigers or dragons on their 
shirts instead of alligators. Or they wear 
Bass Top-Siders instead of the original 
Sperry Top-Siders. Messett believes, "If 
you can't do it right, why bother?" 

As with other college fashions, mass 
marketing has invented all sorts of preppy 
gimmicks over the past two years. There's 
the "Official Preppy Handbook" (the num- 
ber one best-seller here at the Big U for 
seven weeks); "The Official I Hate Prep- 
pies Handbook"; "The Preppie Joke 
Book"; "Save An Alligator — Eat A Prep- 
pie" buttons; preppy posters; preppy sta- 
tionery; and preppy calendars. 

How far all this preppiness will go is 
uncertain. Even when prep as a college fad 
goes out, prep as a lifestyle will remain for 
some. Since the fad is already in its second 
■year, there's a good chance it'll last an- 
other year or two. 

Wouldn't that be a hoot, Muffy? H 
— Tom Hasse 




sordinated from head to toe, Amy Finer, a sophomore, 
ows her taste for classic plaids and penny loafers. 

shn Kallal, a freshman, knows blue jeans have a place in 
e preppy look when matched with a v-neck sweater, a 
itton-down collar shirt and ever-popular top-siders. 




John C Stein 



55 

Preppy 




New Wave 



New Wave. Some could either take it or 
leave it. Some politely detest it so as not to 
appear "out of it" and still retain their 
personal integrity. Some live it. On this 
campus, over the past few years, New 
Wave has affected more people than just 
about any other movement in a long time. 
By 1978, New Wave was fairly well es- 
tablished. The Talking Heads, for many, 
Szn't such an enigma. Still, on campus 
hard-core artsy-craftsy "open-mind- 
individuals adopted weird hairdos, silly 
bizarre clothes, jerky, kinetic dancing. 
Slowly the wave washed over more and 
more people and groups, permeating many 
more aspects of social life. A few of the 
more liberal people of the conservative fra- 
ternity and sorority set timidly introduced 
The B-52s to their parties in the form of 
"Rock Lobster." And The Pretenders' 
(really more of a straight rock band than a 
New Wave band) popularity indicated that 
many "wouldn't-be" New Wavers didn't 
hold that much against the movement. 

Then came the colored hair, the chic 
clothing. Thin ties became staid and 



gauche. Many of the original New Wavers 
seemed disapponted at the bastardization 
and commercialization of what they saw as 
a state of mind, a way of life. 

Indeed, at this point in time, it's rather 
meaningless to call some band "New 
Wave;" the term is too ambiguous. The 
most conservative, most passive listener of 
music can come out and say, "Sure, I like 
New Wave. It's a lot of fun. 'Planet Claire,' 
you know?" 

But for the purist, New Wave just isn't 
what it used to be. Gone are the days of its 
truly being avant-garde, not just for the 
sake of being avant-garde. New Wave par- 
ties almost seem dated. Sure, they're still 
good ground for being off-the-wall, forget- 
ting inhibiting conventions and doing your 
own thing without fear of ridicule. 

Yet the initial magic is gone. And this is 
only logical since New Wave originally 
meant change. It was almost a jazz answer 
to the predictably "polished" rock of the 
middle 1970s. It improvised. It explored. It 
set its own rules. And, in doing so, it at- 
tracted a lot of attention (and hence, mar- 



ketability) to itself. Insincere versions of the 
original flooded the market, confusing what 
was real and what was imitation. 

A few bands with real principles, such as 
the Gang of Four, The Talking Heads and 
The Clash, still retain their individuality. 
And a lot of new bands that aren't trying to 
sound like the established originals, but 
that are pushing their own brand of "Pop- 
ish New Wave," such as Squeeze, XTC, 
and The Police, have taken up the reins. 

And the public has been able to adapt. 
When not getting too hung up on whether 
or not New Wave is really all that new any 
more, the "New Wavers" of today are still 
having a good time listening to today's 
original music, dressing the way they really 
want to and dancing the way they feel (not 
just inanely po-going around in unison). 

The New Wave of yesterday is no longer 
New Wave today. Rather, it is what's hap- 
pening now. Call it Now Music. [§j] 

— Byron Geannopoulos 

Catching the New Wave are senior Edd Bailey, opposite 
page, sophomore Carol Rzepecki, left, and senior Juliet 
Schwalbach, right, at The Bar in Champaign. 







57 

New Wave 




John C. Stein 



58 

Quad 



Invasion of the campus snatchers 



Information concerning numerous sight- 
ings of strange beings on the University of 
Illinois campus has been brought to our 
attention. Are you aware of these aliens? 

Not always obvious to the average eye, 
the aliens have been observed around the 
Quad. Keep your eyes open and your mind 
alert. Otherwise, you too will fall victim to 
a dirt-bike wheelie. 

Other hazards of which to be wary are 
the rolling wheels of sidewalk skaters. The 
skaters appear innocent enough, but when 
it comes to cement areas, you had better 
be ready to fight or switch. 

It has been theorized by top men in the 
campus Space Port arcade that, in a few 
quarters time, we may have to compete 
with the aliens for the top prize — owner- 
ship of Campustown. 

All suspicions point in this direction, for 
they number some of the best galaxian gun- 
men this side of the universe. It is reported 
that veteran University gunmen welcome 
their new competition as the added num- 
bers will open new space frontiers. They 
did, however, complain that the new pilots 
tend to take up too much space time. 

In reply, the new pilots explained that 
the added space piloting sharpens their 
sensorimotor skills that would become slug- 
gish should they lower themselves to the 
mindlessness of the boob tube. A prevailing 
phobia seems to be the fear of death by 
boredom. 

It also has become apparent to fast food 
junkies that their good ol' hamburger 
stand, R. McDonald's Place, has become 
inhabited by members of this invading soci- 
ety. No longer can a meal be enjoyed with 
intellectual pleasure in the once-scholarly 
atmosphere. 

With a tear in the corners of their eyes, 

60 

Campustown 



the old patrons exclaim that a Big Mac may 
never be the same. But time goes on, and 
the new must replace the old, a fact that 
has been recorded throughout history. 

There must be something mesmeric 
about the place, for not one could explain 
why he spent so much time at this particu- 
lar hamburger place. 

Recognize a few of them now? They are 
the younger generation of Champaign-Ur- 
bana, those we call the Townies. You may 
have seen them chucking quarters into pin- 



ball and video games alongside the college 
addicts, or you may have dodged them on 
the Quad. 

Whether downstairs in the Illini Union or 
in line at McDonald's, they are around. 
Sometime, why don't you stop and say 
"hi?" Remember, here you are the real 
alien. M\ 

— Jodi Paul 



Rick Hicks, an Urbana resident and a Parkland College 
student, shows off his recently acquired '56 Chevy. The car 
has traveled more than 103,000 miles. 






James L. Novy 

A group of local residents, who attend the University and 
Parkland College, appear to be aliens invading Campus- 
town. Actually, they were stopped by a traffic light as they 
cruised Wright Street. 

Jay Stevens (left) and Jerry Grimes, of Rantoul High 
School, battle over a game of electronic football in Space 
Port in Campustown. 



James L. Novy 



61 

Campustown 



A touch of class in the 







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62 

Allerton 



cornfields 



Allerton Park, 1,500 acres of wood- 
lands, gardens, meadows and a 20-room 
mansion, is located four miles southwest of 
Monticello and 26 miles from campus. Rob- 
ert Allerton donated the park to the Uni- 
versity in 1946. The park is an educational 
and research center as well as a forest and 
wildlife preserve. 




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- #* 



Personalities 



Not just another student 



The doorbell rings and Paul Lewis is 
rudely awakened from his catnap on the 
comfortable living room sofa. Even with his 
hair mussed, he is a good looking man. 
Wearing jeans and a gray Bourbon Street 
"Drinking Team" T-shirt, a chain around 
his neck, and a tattoo on his right arm, 
Lewis smiles somewhat sheepishly as he 
answers the door. 

Lewis, a freshman in agricultural eco- 
nomics, appears to be an average Universi- 
ty student — with one exception. At 24, 
he has a Medal of Honor, various other 
honors, keys to cities — and the memory 
of 444 days of captivity in Iran. 




Brian Coleman 



On Nov. 4, 1979, militant Iranians seized 
the American embassy, just 14 hours after 
Lewis arrived as a guard from Budapest, 
Hungary. 

"The first 30 days were very intense; 
there was a lot of interrogation and 

they weren't sure what was the reaction of 
the United States," Lewis said. "When it 
originally happened, I wasn't really fright- 
ened or anything. It just didn't sink in. I 
thought it was going to be pretty much like 
the February takeover — they'd come in 
and shoot the place up." 

But the hostages' hopes that the ta- 
keover would end quickly soon vanished. 

"We used to set dates we thought would 
be likely times to be released," Lewis said. 
Christmas, Easter, election day and Ronald 
Reagan's inauguration were all possibilities, 
he added. 

Lewis believes the election of Reagan 
led to the freeing of the hostages because 
the Iranians feared the then president- 



elect. 

During the time Lewis was captive, he 
learned a great deal about the Iranians, 
including their thought process. 

"I don't think it's cultural or geographi- 
cal or religious. It's a different thinking pro- 
cess. They're very paranoid," he said. 

Lewis said that many of the hostages 
spoke to their captors with assertiveness 
and insults. 

"The more you let them intimidate you, 
the more they would. Some people 
stopped speaking as soon as one of them 
walked in the door," Lewis said. "When we 
found out they really weren't going to do 
that much to you, of course, we just ig- 
nored them." 

At one time, the hostages were never 
certain whether or not the militants would 
harm them. 

"They lined us up against a wall a couple 
of times," he said. "I think it was just a 
scare tactic. A lot of guys thought it was a 
mock execution. I wasn't really sure what 
they were going to do. I didn't think they 
would shoot us in a closed hallway but 




Brian Coleman 



there's always a doubt." 

As their fear that they would be harmed 
decreased, their hopes for freedom in- 
creased. In December 1980, the captives 
were moved to a place where they could 
receive both mail and magazines, as well as 
utilize private bathrooms. Before that, they 
could shower only every five to seven 
days. 

When the hostages were released, Lewis 
was surprised by the support the hostages 
received from United States citizens. 



"I went to the White House and I wa: 
impressed. I talked to the President . . 
but the thing that was really impressive wa 
the people that got out on the street wh< 
didn't have to. Senators and congressmei 
and certain bureaucrats have to," he said 

Yet with all the celebrations, honors an< 
medals, Lewis is not satisfied. 

"I'd feel a lot better if I got some mon 
straight answers," he said. 

Some of the "straight answers" fo 
which the hostages are looking could onl; 
come from Jimmy Carter. 

Lewis said the former president apolc 
gized, but Carter never said what cor 




, 



Brian Coleman 



vinced him to allow Shah Mohammed Rez 
Pahlavi of Iran into the United States 
Later Carter said he thought the Irania 
government would protect United State 
citizens stationed there. Lewis argues ther 
was virtually no Iranian government. 

Lewis has no regrets about his years wit 
the military. 

"When I finally went down to get m 
discharge, it was kind of hard to walk oi 
because I really did enjoy it. When 

was 20 years old, I had 65 people the 
worked for me. You don't get that kind c 
experience in Champaign at that age, 
Lewis said. 

Lewis, who was married in August 198] 
plans to attend school and work for hij 
uncle's insurance company. 

Will he ever re-enlist? 

"If World War III broke out, I'd probabl 

go ahead and go back in. Other than that, | 

think I've already fulfilled my obligation. 

— Karen Padgett J 



64 

Paul Lewis 



A renaissance woman 



ij It's not easy to own your own record 
abel, Kristin Lems admits. You get stuck 
idoing everything. 

On campus, Lems is known for her mu- 
ifsic. She performs in local bars, at feminist 
activities, and at political rallies; she also 
las written more than 150 songs. 

She has sold thousands of records as 
■A/ell, but it has been "a long, tedious pro- 
:ess," Lems said. "I'm running the opera- 
:ion on a zero publicity budget. I depend on 
word of mouth, good concerts, good criti- 
:ism. 

Since 1978, Lems has produced two al- 
bums, writing and recording the songs, de- 
signing the albums and searching for com- 
panies that would agree to press and pack- 
age the records. 

Her distribution network — which in- 
cudes a handwritten mailing list of 7,000 
jiames, her warehouse, and her shipping 
jind billing center — is based on the top 
jloor of an old brown house on West 
Springfield Avenue — her home. 

Included among her musical accomplish- 
ments is the founding of the National Worn- 
en's Festival at the University. For five 
l/ears under her direction, the festival pro- 
vided a "supportive learning atmosphere" 
lor hundreds of women musicians from 
imateurs to stars like Holly Near and Me- 
issa Manchester, Lems said. 
, Lems is more than just a musician, how- 
ever. Her range of interests is reflected in 
the many other roles she performs: poet, 
editor, feminist, activist, student, and 
-eacher. 

Lems currently is working on a degree in 
teaching English as a second language. As 
>art of her work on this, her second mas- 
er's degree, she is teaching an English 
.ourse to foreign students. 

'I enjoy working with foreign and minor- 
;:y students. They seem less cynical and 
lass likely to take their education for grant- 
Id than other students," Lems said. 

The 30-year-old Lems also is a journal- 
it. She started in 1975 as the founder of 
n alternative campus newspaper, The Stu- 
lent Advocate. "We tried to give the Daily 
llini a run for their money. They just didn't 
over student rights issues," she said. Now 
working as an editor for The Weekly, Lems 
iccasionally writes news analyses and re- 
'iews. 



"I'm at peace with my three careers, 
even though they may take their toll on my 
social life," Lems said. "I also think I'm 
pretty damn good at all of them," she ad- 
ded with a laugh. 

Lems considers herself an activist. "I ad- 
vocate social and economic equality, both 
here and abroad," she explained. She be- 
lieves these goals are incompatible with 
capitalism. 

"The United States stands for free enter- . 
prise, not democracy," Lems said. "I love 
what this country could be, but there must 
be many changes." 

Lems believes her music is the best con- 
tribution she can make toward achieving 
social change. Her feminist and political 
songs have been admired for both their 
sensitivity and humor. "The metaphors in 
songs can tell so much. A song can often 
create the type of impact a speaker rarely 
can," Lems said. 

Music also provides Lems with greater 
artistic satisfaction than do other media. 
She enjoys the "immediate feedback" of 
public performances. 

"As a poet, I would have a poem pub- 
lished, and maybe six months later one 
person would tell me they'd read it and 
liked it," Lems said. 

"When I'm singing, I can watch the faces 
in the audience, listen to the noises they 
make — laughter, agreement — and after- 
wards they come swarming up to talk. It's 
an organic process, a living art that keeps 
me growing as an artist," she added. 

Lems credits her mother, a concert pia- 
nist, for developing her interest in music. In 
her mother's honor, Lems named her re- 
cording company Carolsdatter, emphasiz- 
ing their close relationship. The company 
trademark depicts mother and daughter 
seated together at the piano. 

"If feminism comes from one's life ex- 
periences, I guess watching how my moth- 
er raised us alone had a great influence on 
me," Lems said. 

Lems predicts music will be her top pri- 
ority for the next five to ten years. In an 
effort to broaden her reputation, Lems is 
trying to interest other female recording 
artists in her songs. 

Another album, perhaps of songs from 
other nations, may be in the future, along 
with more concert appearances. 



Through her music, Lems will also con- 
tinue to work for the women's movement 
and other social issues. "It's a chance to 
take part in shaping history," she said.jVJ 

— Roxie Peterson 




John C. Stein 
Performing at a local bar in Campustown, Kristin Lems 
vocalizes her beliefs about women's rights through her 
song. Having produced two records and more than 150 
songs, Lems owns and manages her own recording com- 
pany. 



65 

Kristin Lems 



P^BHHL ^i 



"People remember Garcia's. Garcia's will 
always be a Champaign-Urbana tradition." — 
Joe Ream. 

In April, 1971, two University of Illinois 
graduates opened a pizza parlor, hoping to 
raise money to start their own recording stu- 
dio. Ten years later, Ralph Senn (at left in 
picture), and Joe Ream — known around 
campus as the "Flying Tomato Brothers" — 
are still making pizza by the pan. 

As University students, Senn and Ream 
were members of The Regiment, a rock band 
that played top-40 songs. "The money we 
saved from playing is where we got our initial 
capital for Garcia's," Senn said. 

The "brothers" chose to invest in pan pizza 
because they realized the potential market. 

"When we were in college, frats would al- 
ways send their pledges to Chicago for Uno's 
and Due's pan pizza," Senn said. "No mistake 
about it, there was a definite market." 

Hence, Garcia's Pizza in a Pan was born. 
The name Garcia's came from Ralph's high- 
school nickname, "Garcia Tomato." 

Besides making pizza in Champaign, Senn 
and Ream also have restaurants in Rantoul, 
Decatur, Normal, Peoria, 111., and in Lafayette 
and Bloomington, Ind. The "brothers" prefer 
towns with populations of about 50,000 be- 
cause the restaurant can afford to dominate 
the media, as well as the skies, in such towns 
with the profits from one store. 

"In '74 when Joe got his pilot's license, we 
became the Flying Tomato Brothers. But that 
really didn't mean much until we got the bal- 
loon," Senn said. 

Senn and Ream knew someone in Cham- 
paign-Urbana who sold hot-air balloons, and 
jokingly said they'd buy one if it looked like a 
tomato. A week later, the joke was on them 
when plans for a balloon shaped like a tomato 
were presented to them. The Flying Tomato 
Brothers had something to fly. 

Over the years, Senn and Ream have seen 
changes in the University's students. When 
Garcia's first opened, the controversy over 
the Vietnam War had peaked and the Greek 
system was struggling. 

"Now things are basically back to normal," 
Senn said. "Students are more conservative, 
more pragmatic. They're coming to college 
for academic and job-related reasons." 

And, of course, students keep coming to 
Garcia's for pizza. "We started out as an inno- 
vation," Senn said. "Now we're a tradition." 

— Diane Wintroub H 



66 

Ralph And Joe Tomato 



A slice of tradition 








Personalities 




Running things smoothly 

'There's never a dull moment," said average student," Levy said. "I frequently For the administration, the major weakness 



tanley R. Levy, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
ent Affairs. 

This is understandable considering the 
ange of departments that he supervises: 
)ean of Students, Psychological and Coun- 
eling Center, Illini Union, Housing Divi- 
ion, McKinley Health Service and Hospi- 
al, International Student Affairs, Financial 
ud, Health Professions Information, Ca- 
eer Development and Placement, and Stu- 
ent Discipline. 

Originally from Winthrop, Mass., Levy 
ttended the University of Michigan for 12 
ears and in 1964 received his doctorate in 
ounseling. He served as a dean of stu- 
ents at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., 
efore coming to the University in 1968. 
ince then, Levy has held five different 
ositions with the University. 

The nature of Levy's position requires 
im to work with other administrators. His 
onnection with the students tends to be 
mited to those students who are active in 

udent government or the Greek councils. 

"I have to work consciously to meet the 



go to the residence halls or fraternities and 
sororities to hear what people have to 
say." 

Over the years, Levy has witnessed 
some changes in students. He came to the 
University at a time when students were 
restless. 

"It was a time of political activism and 
great stress," said Levy. "The major issues 
were civil rights and the Vietnam War. I 
wouldn't say that students are passive to- 
day, but they certainly aren't as politically 
outspoken as they used to be. 

"Today, students are interested in jobs 
and careers. Their energy is focused on 
campus and community. Students are 
more realistic and hence less idealistic — a 
balance between both would probably be 
best. 

"The greatest strength of this University 
is the high quality of its students and facul- 
ty. This is one of the finest public institu- 
tions in the country," Levy said. "But 
along with academic quality comes aca- 
demic pressures — a resulting weakness. 



is a lack of finances. We have few re- 
sources with which to do a lot. 

"In a historical sense, this University has 
one main weakness. It is not a heteroge- 
neous mix of cultures and backgrounds. An 
overwhelming majority of the students are 
from Illinois and most of these students are 
from the Chicago area. 

"Too many students spend too much 
time with high school friends, which really 
is too bad. They're not open to new peo- 
ple, new cultural experiences," Levy said. 

"It's all too easy to be consistent," he 
added. "And that simply does not lead to 
personal growth." 

According to Levy, the experiences that 
lead to personal growth are valuable after 
graduation. He hopes graduates will not 
forget the challenges and excitement of 
college. "Don't get locked in once you 
leave," he said. "Don't get into a job and 
forget all the rest." M\ 

— Diane Wintroub 



67 

Stan Levy 



A 

pride 

that 

makes 

them 

black 

Of the 35,152 students at the Universi- 
ty, 1,200, or about four percent, are black. 
Unfortunately, the University doesn't al- 
ways cater to such a small number of cul- 
turally distinct students, and blacks fre- 
quently have to search for their own aca- 
demic and social outlets. 

The roots of black life at the University 
are deep. Many blacks have completed 
their education here, but black involve- 
ment, like most components of black life, 
began in earnest during the turbulent six- 
ties. 

Back then, black students and the Black 
Student Association faced serious housing 
and financial woes, but the blacks perse- 
vered. 

Years later, the blacks still are compet- 
ing with Illinois' finest. Academically, black 
students are often forced to realize that 
their level of education, although it may be 
superior by black standards, still leaves 
them far behind their white counterparts. 
Thus, the academic grind becomes one of 
studying and more studying, very seldom 
to get ahead and more often just to 

68 

Black Students 




catch up. 

It is the serious student who makes it 
through the University, the student who 
realizes that determination, purpose and 
strength of character are needed to offset 
the years of academic deficiencies. But the 
studying may not be as tough today as it 
was in the past. 

Nathaniel Banks, assistant director of 
the Afro-American Cultural Program, said, 
"Academically, black students are in better 
shape than their predecessors. Statistics 
(achievement and intelligence tests) show 
that they're more intelligent and should be 
able to survive at the University." 

Students realize that this world of all- 
nighters, midterms and finals is part of their 
life, and they accept it. However, many 
can't cope with the social arena in which 
they find themselves. They are unhappy, 
they say, because of the "cultural shock" 
of coming from a big-city life (Chicago, in 
most instances) to a small-town existence. 

Aletha Rice, a junior in retail manage- 
ment, said, "This is a sorry existence be- 
cause there aren't enough social events 



Randy St-jkentf 

geared to blacks." 

Dwight Kyles, a senior in agricultu; 
economics, added, "It's books, headach- 
and dealing with the white majority." 

Columbus Jenkins, a junior in accou< 
ing, said, "It can be enjoyable at times, b 
on many occasions, you have to use all 
your physical strength to show your mem 
capabilities." 

Donna Lewis, a freshman in microbio! 
gy, said, "Black life isn't all it should be 
the U of I. Parties are a nice diversion, b 
we must realize that we have to book, to 
It's our responsibility to take part in all tl 
activities and resources that this Universi 
has to offer." 

Socially, blacks perceive themselves 
being only a minute entity. Like all st 
dents, blacks need to unwind and to rela 
There is also a need to sit down and co 
verse with someone who can understar 
their anxieties and relate to their fear 
There is a need to be with one of their owi 

As such, Black Student Governmen 
and the Black Greek Letter Associatk 
play important roles in black life at tl 




Islilil 




Randy Stukenberg 

diversity. Both groups seek to provide a 
iense of belonging. Both attempt to pro- 
ide that friendly face that so many need to 
ze at the end of a grueling day, and both 
>ek to create a sense of unity and goodwill 
Tiong black students. 

The Black Student Governments are 
(art of each residence hall and function in 
pnjunction with, but separate from, the 
all governments. These units attempt to 
dd the black slice of life to residence hall 
ling. 

The same is true of the Black Greek 
etter Association, which is the umbrella 
rganization for the nine black social frater- 
ties and sororities on campus. 

These organizations, like the Black Stu- 
ant Governments, sponsor events intend- 
ed to enlighten the black experience, ex- 
arience that could be broadened if blacks 
eren't so alienated from their white sur- 
pundings. Because of this feeling, blacks 
pn't get involved in the total campus pic- 
^ire and miss out on much. There are 
'any valuable resources that are never 

pped by black students. Krannert is left 



Opposite: Interaction between blacks and whites on cam- 
pus is the exception rather than the rule, but the barriers 
can be overcome through personal effort. Ray Coates stop 
to chat with Lesley Frooman as she cleans the window 
display of Follett's on Green Street. 

Left: Arthur McClellan is a member of Phi Beta Sigma, one 
of the black fraternities on campus around which much of 
the social life for blacks on campus revolves. 

Below: Black students stand out from and sometimes feel 
overwhelmed by the white majority at the University. 




unexplored, the Cultural Program is used 
only by a precious few, and the Afro- 
American Studies Program still is not uti- 
lized to its fullest potential. 

So what is black life at the University? 

It's the Illini Union Ballroom, the north 
side of the Quad, picnics, pizza, skating, 
neophytes, bid whist, swimming, basketball 
at IMPE, football, Eusa Nia, Ebony Umoja, 
Manama, Maji, B.A.T.S., FAR, PAR, The 
Cultural Center, EOP, Afro-American 
Studies, Bruce Nesbitt, Elaine Copeland, 
Derek Harper, Mike Martin, Joe Smith, 
Michael Toney, Michael Jeffries, William 
Mills, Tony Yates, Chester Fontenot. Rhe- 
toric 104, Tab Bennett, John McClendon, 
Lisa Robinson, Larry Gibson, Nathaniel 
Banks, Clarence Shelley, "tipping," 
"creeping," "dogs," gossip, Alphas, Del- 
tas, Ques, AKAs, Kappas, Sigma Gamma 
Rhos, Sigmas, Zetas, Iotas, B.A.C., coping, 
groping and a whole lot more. 

It's a world of contradictions: striving for 
a position in society, yet not understanding 
the rules of that society; seeking a better 
relationship with the adjacent Champaign- 



Randy Stukenberg 

Urbana community, but not knowing how 
to go about it; reaching for academic excel- 
lence, yet yearning for more social options; 
wanting to maintain an identity, but some- 
times forgetting that they must still assimi- 
late into the bigger world around them; 
trying to be socially progressive, while 
combatting internal apathy; fighting for ma- 
turity, but acting like children. Again, it's 
this and a whole lot more. 

On the surface, black students are no 
different from other students. They all seek 
personal fulfillment and academic advance- 
ments. The problems and differences, how- 
ever, lie in the paths that are taken to reach 
this plateau. 

Blacks have had to fight for centuries for 
everything that they've obtained. This per- 
severance has instilled in them a sense of 
pride, pride that motivates them to hold 
onto those accomplishments that make 
them special. Pride that makes them Black. 

This pride is so deep in tradition that one 
student, when asked about life at the Uni- 
versity, replied, "Black life is life." [jj[] 
— Steven T. Birdine 
69 

Black Students 







Above: Toting purple shields, gold bricks and gold boots, 
Omega Psi Phi pledges march on the Quad during initiation 
rites. 

Top: Pinned with ribbons in the house colors, pink and 
green, Alpha Kappa Alpha pledges step in line down the 
Quad. 



Filling the void 



The mainstream of social and cultural 
[e eludes many black University students. 
Ihus, many seek to learn about black-ori- 
ited issues through diverse organizations 
n campus. 

The Afro-American Cultural Program 
pd the Afro-American Studies Program 
re the two University departments that 
<tend to black students the opportunity 
>r cultural and academic enlightenment. 

The Afro-American Cultural Program, 
ider the direction of Bruce Nesbitt, spon- 
>rs several workshops geared for black 
:udents. These workshops include the 
mnimove Dance Troupe, the Griot News- 
tter and the Black Notes radio show, as 
ell as drama and photography work- 
lops. 

1 The Cultural Program also brings to 
impus many black lecturers, celebrities 
,id black shows. This year, the Joseph 
olmes Dance Troupe and the Ebony Fa- 
aion Fair were presented by the program. 

The Afro-American Studies Program 
oncentrates on academics. Supervised by 
1-ofessor Gerald McWorter, the Program 
(>velops and teaches courses, including 
hn-Africanism and Marxism and the 
lack Experience. 



In order to promote their specific aca- 
demic interests, students have formed such 
organizations as Minority Accounting Stu- 
dents and Black Engineering Students As- 
sociation. The purpose of these organiza- 
tions is for students to advise other stu- 
dents with the same academic goals. 

Two other black groups are the resi- 
dence hall Black Student Unions and 
Black Greek Letter Organizations. The 
Central Black Student Union and its re- 
spective B.S.U.s organize cultural and so- 
cial events in the dormitories. The C.B.S.U. 
concentrates on events for Black History 
Month in February. 

C.B.S.U. also sponsored the Cotton 
Club, a highly successful talent show. The 
B.S.U.s cooperate by hosting receptions 
for the prominent blacks who visit the cam- 
pus, giving students the opportunity to 
meet and talk with these people. Also, the 
B.S.U.s sponsor parties and activities such 
as backgammon tournaments and intramu- 
ral sports. 

The Black Student Unions were devel- 
oped by the Housing Division during the 
late sixties because blacks thought the resi- 
dence hall governments were ignoring the 
needs of black students. 



. mini i I 

IS IIIHHI 




Various black fraternities and sororities 
are service, academic and social organiza- 
tions. Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma 
Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho and Zeta Phi 
Beta sororities are geared toward working 
on community service projects and organiz- 
ing social events. Alpha Kappa Alpha, for 
example, has worked for Women's Wheels 
and has organized Akalympics in which all 
the black Greeks are invited to participate 
in a day of sporting events. 

Alpha Phi Alpha, Iota Phi Theta, Kappa 
Alpha Psi, Phi Beta Sigma and Omega Psi 
Phi, the black fraternities, also are commit- 
ted to community service. All of these or- 
ganizations donate money to black groups, 
including the United Negro College Fund 
and the NAACP. 

In addition, there are two black business 
organizations on campus — Iota Phi Lamb- 
da sorority and Sigma Iota Delta fraternity. 

All of these black organizations repre- 
sent the diverse interests of the black stu- 
dent population. And while they needn't 
substitute for mainstream campus activi- 
ties, they provide the atmosphere and 
goals on which many black students want 
to concentrate in their extracurricular ac- 
tivities. [§[] 

— Holly Hancock 



Students pledging Omega Psi Phi must be initiated through 
a variety of ceremonies often performed on the Quad. 



Freelance photograph by Cecil Lucey 



71 

Black Students 



lending 
the bar 

"I love it. I really do." 

"You're never bored, that's for sure." 

"The tips are great!" 



"It's a lot of fun." 

The people who made these comments 
have three things in common. They're stu- 
dents, they work at the bars and, be they 
bouncers, bartenders or waitresses, they 
love it. 

Almost everyone at sometime in his col- 
lege life pays a visit to one of the campus 
bars, but very few ever work in one. 

Denise Jones, a senior in ALS, finds her 
job appealing. "I waitressed at T-Birds dur- 
ing the summer and really enjoyed it be- 
cause the people were so laid back," she 
said. "I was really surprised at the tips, 
too. 

"Their summer crowd is different than 
the school-year group. Things aren't so 
hectic and everyone's pretty easygoing. It 
was a lot of fun." 

Pam Carothers, a senior in retailing, has 
been a bartender at Kam's since August. 
"Kam's is the first bar I've ever worked 
at," she said, "and I thought it might be 
kind of hard at first to learn how to mix 
everything. 

"At the time, though, we didn't serve 
many fancy drinks, and I found that a lot of 
it was just common sense. Now we've start- 
ed serving Pina Coladas, Daquiris, Mai Tais 
and a few specialty drinks at the front bar, 
and those are really fun to make. 

"Kamakazis and Watermelons are a bit 
complicated, and they're a challenge too." 

When asked if she felt that bartenders 
make the tips that waitresses do, Pam said 
that she "used to do pretty well. First se- 
mester our drafts were 90 cents and bottles 
were 95 cents, so we got a lot of the 
change from those. But now, both prices 
have gone up to a dollar, and there aren't 
many tips. 

"The best tips of the entire year are on 
Dad's Day and Mom's Day. You can easily 
make 45 to 50 dollars on those nights." 

For her, "work is always fun, but the last 
day of classes is especially great because 
everyone is so wound up, it's unbelievable. 
Probably the funnest day is Homecoming, 
when all the alums come back. Then every- 
one hits Kam's because it's so traditional." 

Henry Iovino, a junior, also worked at 

72 

Bars 



Above: Not a two-fisted drinker, but rather an ambidex- 
trous bartender, Joe Scarpelli, a graduate student, helps 
Gwen Conrad, a junior, serve the drinks at O'Malley's at 
Fourth and Green streets, the newest of the nine bars in 
Campustown. 



James L. Novy 

Below: "Home of the drinking (and eating) Illini," Kam's 
on Daniel Street serves food and drink to Sarah Conway, a 
freshman, Carin Cosgrove, a junior, Carol Cosgrove, a sen- 
ior, Kathleen Knowland and Alisa Smith, both juniors, and 
Jeff Haggerty, a senior. 




Kam's the fall semester, but "took time off 
to try and be a student" second semester. 

"I worked at Pia's Lounge (on West 
Springfield Avenue) first and then, last 
summer when the owners purchased 
Kam's, I switched over," he said. "I tended 
bar, bounced, and did a little bit of everyth- 
ing. I was in charge of the keg route, so I 
did a lot of delivering for parties and stuff. 

"Bouncing was fun, kind of like a game," 
he smiled. "You can tell a lot of times when 
people have fake IDs, just by the way that 
they act. Doctored IDs are real easy to 
spot, too. I think the younger kid i ever 
caught trying to get in was 16." 

John O'Neill, a junior in electrical engi- 
neering and a bouncer at Cochrane's on 
Daniel, said he once caught a 14-year-old 
trying to get into the bar. "He didn't even 
know the name of the guy's ID he was 
using. I turned him down and then, as he 



James L. Novy 

was leaving, I asked him out of curiosity 
how old he was. He turns around and says, 
'14.' I told him, 'Nice try.'" 

"I've been a bouncer for a semester and 
a half," said O'Neill, "I worked at Dooley's 
before it became COD's, and then just 
stayed on after the changeover. Dooley's 
was a lot rowdier. 

"I don't throw people out as often here, 
not that I throw many people out anyway. 
Usually if you just say something, they'll 
calm down." 

Sometimes, O'Neill said, persons leave 
before anyone can throw them out. "Last 
year at Dooley's," he recalled, "this one 
guy crawled on top of the bar, stood up, 
dropped his pants and mooned everyone. 

"We didn't have to throw him out, 
though," O'Neill said. "He just got down, 
pulled up his pants and left." [ijj] 

— Cindra Kay Bump 




lurphy's pub on Green Street offers students a place to 
lax both inside and out. The "Irish" bar is furnished with 

iDod benches carved with the initials of many who've 
unk there. 



James L. Novy 



73 

Bars 



Reading, writing 
and Principles of Camping 



Does the old phrase "two's company, 
three's a crowd" sound like a description 
of life with your roommate and his or her 
girlfriend or boyfriend? 

Maybe Crowd Behavior 410 could show 
you how to join the fun. 

Is Gross Human Anatomy 421 really all 
that gross? Is all you need for a "B" in 
Field Trip 206 a permission slip from your 
mommy and your milk money? 

Perhaps pre-med students could im- 
prove their bedside manners with a semes- 
ter in Storytelling 309, just another one of 
the many possibilities in that 475-page 
book known as the "Courses Catalog." 

The possibilities are virtually endless. It 
is, however, difficult to tell just what a class 
will be like from the two- or three-line cata- 
log descriptions. Consider, for example, 
Organic and Traditional Vegetable Garden- 
ing 190. Nowhere does it say "visual aids 
include Professor Splittstoesser lecturing 
with his wife's pet snake, Benjamin, coiled 
around his neck." 

Yet, occasionally he does just that. 

"The class is aimed at home gardening," 
Splittstoesser explained, "and only about 
25 percent of the class are (agriculture) 
majors. We plant a spring and summer 
garden and grow unusual fruits, like pink or 
yellow or pear-shaped tomatoes, that the 
students can take home for transplanting. 

"I've been teaching since 1972, and it's 
a lot of fun," he said. "Benjamin enjoys it, 
too. I'm pretty crazy." 

David Dodillet, a junior in Commerce, 
heard about the class from friends. "I took 
the class after some guys in my house, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, took it," he said. "It's kind 
of fun. We grow stuff and the professor 
tells a lot of jokes and talks about his wife 
and kids a lot." 

Dodillet also has taken Classical Civiliza- 
tions 111, a very popular class about 
Greek mythology taught in the Auditorium 
by Professor Richard Scanlan. 

"It's a class of storytelling," said Dodil- 
let, "and Scanlan is the best. Even a person 
with no previous interest in mythology 
would love it." 

Chris Rank, a sophomore in Engineer- 



Engaging in the ceremonial tea service gives Jan Marion 
and Ray Ruemmele, both seniors, a first-hand experience in 
Japanese culture. Performing the ceremony is visiting lec- 
turer James West. 



ing, agreed. "He's the only person I know 
who can hold an entire auditorium of stu- 
dents captivated for an entire hour, twice a 
week," he said. 

Besides telling stories, Scanlan often 
dresses up to portray mythological charac- 
ters, including his famous Priest of Apollo. 

Clad in a large cape with the letter "A" 
across it and a wreath of laurel leaves, 
Scanlan jumps around on the stage and 
predicts winning scores for home basket- 
ball and football games. "He not only 
teaches mythology," said Pam Coon, a 
sophomore in biology, "but he inspires 
school spirit as well." 

If Greek culture isn't quite your cup of 
tea, then perhaps a course in Japanese tea 
ceremony is just the class for you. Accord- 
ing to instructor James West, "The pur- 
pose of the class is to offer an alternative to 
book study of Japan and to give students a 
real, complementary feel for the culture. 

"In the lab, we actually perform the tea 



ceremony. To take off your shoes and real- 
ly participate gives a 3-D feeling that you 
just can't get from an abstract paragraph in 
a book." 

Billiards class, taught by Tom Ross, is 
another popular elective. With an expert 
like Ross, who has won the University Bil- 
liards Tournament three years in a row, the 
Big Ten Tournament in 1980, the Regional 
Tournament in 1980 and 1981 and placed 
second in a national collegiate competition 
in 1981, it's easy to see why. 

"The game itself is really too hard to 
learn in just 16 weeks," Ross explained, 
"but I start with the basics and progress to 
some heavy strategy." 

If diving into a pool game isn't for you, 
either, then how about a walk through the 
woods? Principles of Camping 140 will 
show you how to do so. 

"It's such a great class," said Tanya 
Rodda, a senior in forestry and recreation. 
"It was a ball. Really fun. We did some 




74 

Unusual Electives 



John C. Stein 



cross country skiing and repelling, where 
you descend down a cliff with a harness 
and a system of ropes and pulleys. And 
besides that, the class as a whole really 
gave me some things to think about." 

Repelling is a big event in the semester, 
agreed instructor Thomas Kettelkamp. 
"We descend down the east face of Stoner 
Mountain, better known to everyone as the 
football stadium. It's about a 60-foot wall 
straight down," he explained, "so it really 
is pretty scary. I don't require students to 
do it, but they must be there to at least 
^atch." 

While Stoner Mountain is exciting, Ket- 
elkamp believes "the highlight of the 
:ourse is our weekend camping trip to 
Shawnee National Forest and the solo 
leeping experience, in which each student 
;ets food and eight personal articles, not 
icluding a book or pencil or anything like 
hat, and spends the night alone in the 
woods. 

"A lot of students never have been in 



the deep woods before, especially alone, 
so I really think it's scarier for most than 
the repelling is. 

"Although they don't have a pencil or 
paper to catch up on their last three 
months of letter writing or something, I'm 
sure that at first it's still not too bad. 

"But after four or five hours, after 
you've counted all the trees and stuff and 
run out of things to fiddle away the time, 
you get bored. And when you get bored, 
you start doing inward things," Kettelkamp 
said. "You start reflecting, and a lot of 
good things happen." [Ipl 

— Cindra Kay Bump 



Billiards requires more than being able to pocket the ball. 
Instructor Tom Ross shows Liz Raemont, a junior, how to 
set up a "force draw shot" during a PE 102 class. 

In preparation for the tea ceremony, instructor Kimiko 
Gunji shows (clockwise from her right) Steven Taxman, a 
senior, Laura Ryan, a sophomore, Jean Lake, a senior, and 
Glenda Lawson, a junior, how to fold a Chakin — a tea 
cloth used for drying the tea bowl. 




WW 



FROM OUR 

own 

BhCKYMD 



Monday Morning 

Everyday life 

empty, incomplete 
Routines 

in a rut 
so deep, 
The walls rise to meet 
Blocking the sun. 

There has to be more. 
A breath of fresh air, 
A sunny, spiraling magic 

-somewhere 

beyond our walls. 
I can almost taste it 
The wanting making my mouth thirst. 

Yet, ever elusive, 
it fades 
away. 
I grab 

only to encounter glass. 
Disillusioned, 
I crawl back 
to the 
bottom 
of 
my 
rut. 

— Lucy Logsdon 



^u^.^kxw ~ 







Hot Summer, No Roses 

She weathered up and down. 
He weathered nowhere. 



#iT 



They came together in searing heat. 
They fell apart in scorching rain. 

Separate, they struggled. 
Together, they fought. 

Hot summer, no roses. 
— Marianne Eterno 



Gene Hollander 




Gene Hollander 



77 

Student Contributions 



In March 1981, I went to Washington, 
D.C., to interview James S. Brady, the 
presidential press secretary (and 1962 Uni- 
versity of Illinois graduate). I did this assign- 
ment for the University of Illinois Alumni 
News and for a journalism class. 

While in Washington, I did some sight- 
seeing. And I was most impressed with the 
huge Alexander Calder mobile that hangs 
from the ceiling of the new East Building of 
the National Gallery of Art. The mobile's 
constant movement reminded me of the 
city. 

1 interviewed Jim Brady on March 19. 

Eleven days later he was shot in the 
presidential assassination attempt. 

During my emotional reaction to all of 
this, the mobile kept haunting me. I knew 
that, no matter what happened to the city 
or anyone living there, the mobile would 
never stop moving. 

So I wrote this poem. Alexander Calder 
died before he could name this creation, his 
last major composition and one of his lar- 
gest mobiles. I gave it a name. 

I feel more optimistic now. Jim Brady 
survived and is making a steady return to 
health. He, too, will not stop moving. 



Alexander Calder's Untitled Tears 
In The Nation's Capital 

This creation, his last and untitled, a gift for the new art gallery, is a 
reflection of the city. His giant mobile hangs in asymmetrical but perfect 
balance, outstretched rods holding triangular shapes like the city's streets 

and sidewalks ever-moving but precarious, fragile always altered by 

changing configurations like the city on the world's edge. 

Now the mobile comes to me, swinging its triangles into altered reality 
like the six shots fired from the pistol in instant replay images of black and 
red of blood spattered on the sidewalk and dripping through a dark grate 

below it. 

A sculpture, three stories high and seventy-six feet across, it comes to me 
. . . like the images on a tiny screen again in its sparse, cold and 

altered state, repeating triangles in black and red like the news bulletins. 

I am walking around in a bad dream while the mobile continues its circular 
path above me . ever-moving, twisting, balanced so precariously like 

the city on the world's edge. The beauty I once saw is altered by shadows of a 
new vision I want it to stop to push away all the ugly images but it 
comes to me the gleaming triangles of black are bodies on the sidewalk, 

the red ones are tears dripping with blood. 



— Maryann 




Gene Hollander 



78 

Student Contributions 







fROM OUR OWN 
BhCKYMD 




ML? 



Free Treats 

Max the preacher shook a gloved fist 

and puffed out words in cold clouds. 

His knit cap, too small for his head, 

would surely snap off soon and join the wind, 

just like his message: 

"If you deny His word, you'll end up in a lake of fire!" 

A deep frown creased his brow 

as the knit cap moved upward another inch. 

"Whooo-eee lake of fire " they heckled. 

"We like it hot!" they jeered. 

I heard someone shout, "But what about the Jews?" 

Max didn't answer. He slammed the Bible shut 

and threw his cap on the brown grass below. 

And from his pulpit, he looked down on the students, 

and sighed. 

The sigh, like the thinning crowd, 

merged with the March wind. 

But then, "Wait!" Max called, "I have something 

just for you," as he reached into his magic bag. 

Then I wondered why all the little hecklers rushed 

forward 

to get theirs, like free treats from the ice cream man. 

As Max the preacher pressed a tiny booklet into each 

palm, 

I forced my empty hands into the folds of my coat 

pockets, 

and walked away. 

— Maryann L. Brandy 



79 

Student Contributions 




From ghoulies and ghosties 

and long-leggity beasties 

and things that go bump 

in the night 

Good Lord deliver us! 

-Cornish Prayer 






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51 






Halloween 




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OtisV club 




Aria Speedwagon members John Fillwack, Tony Hopp 
Scott Christensen and Michael "Opie" Miller display thei 
appreciation for the drama of opera. 



82 

Clubs 



From academic organizations such as the 
Chinese Institute of Engineers, cultural 
groups like the Southwest Pacific Student 
Association and religious organizations 
such as Knights of Columbus to social 
groups such as Women Library Workers, 
this campus has an activity or group to 
appeal to almost everyone. 

For the student yearning to get involved 
in something "different," there are groups 
that provide just that chance. Take, for 
example, the "Hawaii Five-O" Club. Meet- 
ing at 11 p.m. Monday through Friday in 
418 Taft Hall, this club provides members 
with a good excuse for a study break and a 
chance to watch Steve McGarret in action. 

The group has fifteen regular members, 
with nine or ten members attending at a 
time. Using a system of actives and 
pledges, the group hopes to increase its 
membership. A little sister rush may be 
held in the future. 

In an ambitious mood, the club applied 
to the SORF board with a request for fund- 
ng- 

It had hoped to buy a color television 
;et, a limousine with a bar, and uniforms. 

The club's main function involves keep- 
ing statistics on the activities of Hawaii 
Five-O's main characters. With categories 
such as Steve gets a woman, Steve says 
"the rock" and Steve leaves the car door 
open, the statistical sheet provides an en- 
tertaining and informative record of each 
episode. 

A typical club meeting finds the mem- 
Ders grouped around the television set in 
President Dave East's room. East was 
2lected president because he owns a televi- 
sion set. Attired in red "Antioch, Home of 
:he Sequoits" hats, the members speculate 
about the "kills" to come and complain 
about the commercials. When the program 
goes into full swing, shouts of "Uh-oh, 
5teve found a clue!" ring out. 

One of the program's highlights is greet- 
ed by shouts of "The clearboard!". This is 
a Plexiglass board that Steve McGarret 
uses on the show to plot his investigative 




strategies. Its appearance is noted on the 
statistical sheet, and the members settle 
down to await the end of the episode and 
the final "kill." 

Asked why the club was formed, East 
said, "I think Steve provides a role model 
for young, impressionable minds." 

During the last commercial break of the 
program, members talk about the end-of- 
the-year luau. The menu is the main topic 
for discussion and is finally settled upon 
when the group votes for pizza and beer. 

The meeting draws to a close with 
shouts of "A kill, it's a kill!" as McGarret 
blasts a suspect. 

A slightly smaller, but just as interesting, 
group is Aria Speedwagon. With four offi- 
cers and one member, the group's purpose 
is to foster appreciation of opera. As Sec- 
retary Tony Hopp, a sophomore in LAS, 
explained, "We appreciate the fact that 
opera sucks." 

The club meets for "informal get-to- 
gethers," but there are plans for activities 
such as opera hops, monthly effigy burn- 
ings of prominent opera stars and member- 
ship drives. "We could double our mem- 
bership at any time," said Vice President 
Michael "Opie" Miller, a senior in Engi- 
neering. 

The club members decided not to apply 
to SORF for funds because 50 percent of 
the board and 100 percent of the members 



Sharon Basso 

President of the "Hawaii Five-O" club, Dave East, a sopho- 
more, and club member Jeff Schleusener, a freshman, 
mark up "a kill" on the official statistical sheet. 

at large got their SORF refunds. Lack of 
funds doesn't stop this group, however. 
With a poster donated by Figaro's, Aria 
Speedwagon produced a Beverly Sills dart 
board. Plans for a Pavarotti and Sutherland 
dart board are in the offing. 

The club pooled its funds and managed 
to raise enough money to send 20 percent 
of the group — one member — to an 
opera to reaffirm the club's belief and 
stand on opera. The opera chosen was 
Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Pirates of Pen- 
zance." 

"Most people that go to see opera don't 
even understand it," said President John 
Fillwalk, a sophomore in LAS. 

"We might not seem like this is impor- 
tant, but it's a very important part of our 
life. I've been to LaScala, you know, the 
one in Milan," said Treasurer Scott Chris- 
tensen, a sophomore in Agriculture. "This 
organization is a sleeping giant." 

The group was the SORF Director's 
choice for most inventive organization 
name for the 1980-81 school year. Secre- 
tary Hopp summed up the club's activities: 
"We started out as an almost serious orga- 
nization and degenerated into bizarreness. 
Now we're just wallowing," he said, (tjJJ 

— Marianne Eterno 



83 

Clubs 



■'■.;■•■ 



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The final days 



You can always tell when they're com- 
ing. 

Dorm lights stay on all night, even when 
it's not the weekend. 

Students stock up on the necessities — 
coffee, Coke and potato chips. 

Pizza delivery numbers become glued to 
the telephone, and one practically has to 
call ahead and make reservations for a seat 
in the library. 

FINALS. 

And how do students cope? 

"Well, I just try to live normally," said 
John Shapland, a junior in industrial engi- 
neering. "I attempt to get the same amount 
of sleep and I study at the undergrad." 

Wes Curtis, a junior in finance, also finds 
it helpful to go to the library. "It's not so 
easy to pick up the phone there," he said. 



But not everyone disappears into the 
library's study carrels. "I usually study at 
Kam's in the afternoon," said Chris Kle- 
mick, a junior in Agriculture, "and go to 
IMPE for breaks." Alex Riedy, a graduate 
student in nuclear engineering, finds that 
he studies better in the familiar surround- 
ings of his apartment. "I just stay at home 
and drink lots of coffee. 

"And then I take a lot of asprin to get rid 
of all the headaches from all the coffee," 
he said, grinning. 

Michelle Conrath, a freshman in Agricul- 
ture, can sympathize. "If the sheer anxiety 
doesn't get you shaking," she said, "the 
caffeine surely will." M\ 

— Cindra Kay Bump 




■ * 



«W„ 



fljW 




John C. Stein 

Students grab any spot available for studying during finals 
week. Victor Fleischer, a junior, and Eric Murzyn, a senior, 
make themselves comfortable in the south lounge of the 
Illini Union. 



84 

Final Examinations 








John C. Stein 



idying, studying and more studying. Brian Davis and While his fellow students work feverishly to finish their 

ry Kaskowitz, both seniors, demonstrate that many stu- exams on time, Mike Guilette, a junior, appears calm and 

its forget their normal routine and live on coffee, No-Doz collected as he completes his test in the last few minutes 

i junk food during finals week. available. 




John C. Stein 



85 

Final Examinations 




• 



Ml 




The mood hits you. It's time to put down 
the pencil, pick up the paper and see 
what's happening around town. But what 
can you do in Champaign-Urbana? Plenty. 

If you want an evening of enjoyment in 
elegant surroundings, the Krannert Center 
for the Performing Arts provides music, 
theater, opera and dance productions by 
both University groups and touring com- 
panies. Across town, the Assembly Hall 
houses a variety of musicals, comedy 
shows and concerts, as well as sporting 
events. Everything from the Ice Capades to 
Frank Zappa appears in this versatile per- 
forming arena. 

And in between there's Mabel's, Na- 
ture's Table, the Armory Free Theater and 
an array of campus films. 

If only the book could have audio. We 
hope the sight will bring to mind the sound 
and recollect for you the entertainment of 
1982. 

Entertainment 






Jazz Festival '81 



At the end of March 1981, Star Course 
presented its third annual Jazz Festival, an 
effort to bring a variety of musical forms to 
the University. The third jazz fest spanned 
a three-day period, featuring lectures, mov- 
ies, and performances by jazz dancers, 
Chuck Green and Sandman Sims, saxo- 
phonist Arnette Cobb, and local sax man 
Ron Dewar. 

All performances featured the Universi- 
ty jazz bands, directed by Prof. John Gar- 
vey. One of the festival nights was dedi- 
cated to Dewar — a gifted saxophonist 



who is a Champaign resident. He often 
played in a combo at Nature's Table, a club 
in Urbana. During the jazz fest, Dewar was 
featured in big band and combo settings. 

Cobb, another saxophone great, was the 
featured performer during the festival. 
Cobb, from Houston, at one time played 
with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra. 

Cobb's raw, yet powerfully seductive, 

sax style received standing ovations during 

his performances. His peculiar brand of 

humor made for a warm, intimate evening. 

— Byron Geannopoulos [tjJj 







John C. Stein 



Above: In one of his more moving passages, Arnette Cobb 
transfixes his audience. Cobb was the featured artist during 
one evening of the University of Illinois Jazz Festival. 

Right: Local sax great Ron Dewar was the featured per- 
former at the University Jazz Festival. Dewar, who used to 
play at Nature's Table, is considered one of the better sax 
players of our time. 



88 

Jazz Festival 




I 




Signifying the battle between good and evil, Tony Licocci, a 
senior in LAS (left), and Steve Griggs, senior in FAA, per- 
form a passage of a composition written by a University 
Jazz Band member. 

The University Jazz Band #1, led by Prof. John Garvey, 
features Ron Dewar (second sax from left). 



John C. Stein 




-lohn C. Stein 



89 

Jazz Festival 



From Champaign to fame 




John C- Stein 



Speedwagon 

April 21, 1981 



They were once asked to record in Con- 
necticut. Unfortunately, no one bothered 
to tell them that the recording was for a 
pimple-cream commercial. For its effort, 
REO Speedwagon was paid $100. Today, 
the band members are millionaires. 

"They used to practice in a garage down 
the block from my house," said Carl, a 
resident of Champaign who asked that his 
last name not be used. "It was 1968 or '69, 
and I remember listening to them at night 
after my mother made me go to bed. They 
were pretty loud," he said. 

The band, at that time comprising Alan 
Gratzer, Neal Doughty, Greg Philbin, Terry 
Latrell, and Gary Richrath, played the local 
bar circuit and picked up quite a following. 
REO became so successful in the Midwest 
that, in 1970, Epic Records signed the 
band to a ten year "no-out" contract. 

In 1971, lead singer Latrell left the 
group and was replaced by Kevin Cronin, 
lead singer for the Chicago area band Fus- 
chia. Latrell went on to form Starcastle. 

Cronin sang with REO until 1973, when 
he was fired from the band because of 
personality clashes. He was replaced with 
local singer Mike Murphy. Murphy lasted 
until 1976, at which time he was fired and 
Cronin was asked to rejoin the group. 

"They sure have changed," Carl recalls. 
"They used to have Dan Fogelberg open 
their concerts for them, and, get this, they 
used to play a Rolling Stones song, 'Sym- 
pathy for the Devil,' for their encore." 

The local phone company also remem- 
bers the early days of REO Speedwagon, 
but not as fondly. During their early years 
together, the band members used to 
change their phone numbers every two or 
three months to be, in the band's own 



words, "cool". 

In 1975, after its manager, Irving Azoff, . 
left the band to devote his time to the 
Eagles, REO relocated in Los Angeles, 
hoping to strike it big on the West Coast. 
The band took with it John Baruck, Azoff's 
former assistant, as its new manager. 

The band's big breakthrough came in 
1977 with the release of its live album 
"You Get What You Play For." All of its 
previous albums had been produced by 
outsiders, but with this album, the band 
took on the job itself. The album became 
the first million-seller for REO. Since then, 
the group has produced its own albums, of 
which all have become either gold or plati- 
num. 

Philbin quit REO in 1977 and was re- 
placed with Bruce Hall, at that time the 
bass player for the Jesse Ross Band. Hall 
previously had played with Purple Haze 
and the Silver Bullet Band, in which all 
REO members have played at one time or 
another. 

The band members still keep in touch 
with their Champaign roots. Everyone in 
the band is a member of the Champaign 
local of the Musicians Union, having joined 
when the band was just starting out. In 
1981, the members were suspended from 
the union for failing to pay their dues. For- 
tunately, a check was quickly dispatched to 
Champaign, and the band members were 
reinstated. 

"Back the:i, I never realized that these 
guys would be so famous. If I had known, I 
would have run down the street and asked 
for their autographs," said Carl. "I mean, 
just think about it. One of the biggest rock 
bands in the nation started right here! 



— Marianne Eterno 



i 




John C Stein 



90 

REO Speedwagon 




John C. Stein 



John C. Stein 



tenny Rogers & Crystal Gayle 

lay 13, 1981 



91 

Kenny Rogers & Crystal Gayle 



Journey 

October 2, 198I 




Randy Stukenberg 




Randy Stukenberg 



92 

Journey 



_JHH- 



■ 



1 



//" * 



^ * 



V 



f^f * 



*fL ■ • 



mes L. Novy 



Afef 




Ramones 

October 1, 1981 

Dan 
Fogelberg 

October 10, 1981 



Sharon Basso 



93 

Ramones/Dan Fogelberg 




James L. Novy 



Moody Blues 

Friday, October 23 



/V 




96 

Pat Metheny/ Moody Blues 




Pat Metheny 

Thursday, October 



Z9 



James L. Novy 




97 

Pat Metheny/Moody Blues 







John C. Stein 



98 

Earth, Wind And Fire 



Earth, Wind and Fire 

December 1, 1981 




hn C Stein 



99 

Earth, Wind And Fire 



**0*mw- 



* m 



-:*■.■>■ 



e» 



; 










The Grateful Dead 

December Z, 1981 



100 

The Grateful Dead 




James L. Novy 



Frank Zappa 

November 21, 1981 




James L. Novy 



101 

Frank Zappa 



Play school 



| "I think the system works. It turns out 
a quality people doing quality work," said 
I Michael Eterno, a 1981 graduate in Fine 
and Appled Arts. The "system" that works 
is the University Theater and the "quality 
people" are recent graduates such as Beth 
Henley and Phil Huber. 

The University Theater is housed in the 
Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 
and is staffed by the faculty from the Uni- 
versity's Department of Theater. Any stu- 
dent enrolled in the University can audition 
for a part in the productions that the the- 
ater puts on. However, students not en- 
rolled in the department are prohibited 
from working on the "behind scenes" tech- 
nical aspects of the productions. 

The University Theater strikes a bal- 
ance between tragedy and comedy in the 
five plays it puts on each semester. Plays 
are chosen in the spring for the entire com- 
ing school year. The faculty of the depart- 
ment meets and selects the plays it would 
most like to direct and design. These then 
are submitted to the University Theater's 
board of directors, which, in turn, votes on 
its preferences. 

Auditions for all plays are held at the 
same time in the beginning of the fall se- 
mester. Production meetings for a show 
performed in January start in November, 
giving the actors, directors and designers 
two months to prepare the show. 



Top: A touch of makeup here and there transforms Debra 
Brown into an eccentric wife in "She Stoops to Conquer" 
presented Oct. 29 to 31 and Nov. 4 to 7. 

Left: Even lions get hungry as Mark Schmetterer shows as 
he takes a break from rehearsal. 

Opposite Left: Set-breaking for "She Stoops to Con- 
quer" requires much manpower but was handled quickly 
and efficiently by the set crew. 



The University Theater offers a profes- 
sional program for students interested in 
persuing a career in theater. "The faculty 
are all very knowledgeable. They know 
what they're doing," Eterno said. 

The Theater also provides students with 
a chance to work with the best technical 
equipment available. "There's a chance for 
the students to become spoiled, working 
with all the top-notch stuff," Eterno said. 
"After all, they're housed in a $23 million 
facility built with the best technical systems 
available. 

The excellence of any university pro- 
gram is measured by the success of its 
graduates. In this light, the University The- 
ater seems to be a program that works. 
Beth Henley, who was involved in the pro- 
gram while she was in graduate school here 
during the 1970s, recently won the Pulitzer 
Prize for her play "Crimes of the Heart." A 
television network is considering making a 
movie out of the play. 

Phil Huber, who graduated from the 
school of Fine and Applied Arts in 1980, is 
employed as the technical theater director 
at Loyola University in Chicago. Other suc- 
cessful graduates include Brian Rehr, pro- 
duction stage manager at the Cricket The- 
ater in Minneapolis, Minn., and Scott Ber- 
field, employed at the Goodman Theater in 
Chicago. 

The Board of Producers tries not to re- 
peat plays more than once every five or 
ten years. It also tries to alternate the selec- 
tions between newer plays and more classi- 
cal works. It believes that this approach 
benefits the students and the audiences. 
The University Theater is, after all, a learn- 
ing experience for the students. It's nice 
that other students also can benefit. [^J] 

— Marianne Eterno 

103 

Theatre Department 




Randy Stukenberc* 



The Miss Firecracker Contest 

by Beth Henley 

Cat on a 

Hot Tin 

Roof 

by 

Tennessee Williams 




John C. Stein 

Above: Big Daddy (Bruce Heck) is seated before his family 
at his birthday celebration. The plot concerns the impend- 
ing death of Big Daddy and the problems it creates in the 
life of this Southern family. 

Top: Dressed to rehearse her "Star Spangled Banner" tap 
dance for the big contest, Carnelle (Patrice Donnell) eyes 
sister Elaine (Anne Shapland) and brother Delmount (Rob- 
ert Stormant) as they argue. 



104 

The Miss Firecracker Contest/Cat On A Hot Tin Roof 



A Midsummer Night's Dream 

by William Shakespeare 




John C. Stein 




The King and Queen of the fairies, played by Miles Marele 
and Janet Burrows, reign over the forest in which much of 
the action takes place. 

As a contrast to the main action, "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream" contains a play within a play. Francis Flute (Brian 
Stafford) acts out his part in the tragedy of "Pyramus and 
Thisby," which becomes comic through the bumbling inep- 
titude of the players. 



•*» it/fit* ' ME-' il 

A*. -.16 

John C. Stein 



105 

A Midsummer Night's Dream 



George 
Faber 



106 

George Faber 




Take Five 



9 *«* 




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* 


1 



Local Sounds 



That paper that was due last week final- 
ly is finished, and your friends have been 
pestering you to go with them to listen to 
some music. Sounds good; you deserve it. 
But you're tired of "good oP rock 'n roll." 

If you're game for some foot stompin', 
head over to Panama Red's to catch Cham- 
paign's own Appaloosa. This country-rock 
band, made up of Steve Morrison, Michael 
Garcia, Steve Strong, Mark Hutchison, Ray 
Wiggs and Howard Golub, keeps the audi- 
ence dancing and screaming with songs 
ranging from Pure Prairie League selec- 
tions to selections from the Grateful Dead. 

A typical Appaloosa audience is a mix- 
ture of townspeople and University stu- 
dents, country and preppy alike. Girls in 
tight jeans and high heels walk past you 
while guys in Levis and boots step up to the 
bar to order another beer. 

All of a sudden the crowd around you 



James L. Novy 




Appaloosa 



Brian Coleman 



stands up and starts singing along as the 
band breaks into "Up Against the Wall, 
Redneck." 

The band gets an even more enthusiastic 
reaction to another crowd pleaser — 
"Why Don't We Get Drunk and Screw?" 
The crowd drowns out the band as they 
scream out the words to the chorus. 

Explaining why he's in the band, Howard 
Golub borrows a line from the Three 
Stooges: "I do what I like and I get paid for 
it." 

In the mood for something a little quiet- 
er? Try Nature's Table. Across from the 
Krannert Center, Nature's Table offers the 
finest in local jazz music seven nights a 
week. 

As the night's combo plays on the corner 
stage, people sit around the small tables in 
the dark, homey interior. There usually 
isn't much shouting or screaming going on, 
but that doesn't mean the audience isn't 
enjoying the show. Eyes closed, feet tap- 
ping and heads bobbing, the crowd mem- 
bers move along with the rhythm of the 
jazz combo. Nature's Table is a good place 
to unwind. 

Now you say you feel like dancing? 
Across town at Mabel's Restaurant and 
Tavern, the dance floor is packed as 
George Faber entertains his fans with his 
unique brand of rhythm-and-blues pop 
rock. 

Faber and his band, Stronghold, made 
up of Paul Haney, Jimmy Henderson, Jeff 
Klaven and Andre Valentino, play to a dif- 
ferent crowd than the one at Nature's Ta- 
ble. Leather and new-wave clothes are 
prominent in the audience, and the mixed 
drinks outsell the beer. 

Faber moves across the stage with a 
combination of jazz dance and martial arts. 
A few girls in the audience squeal with 
delight when he takes off his leather jacket 
and tosses it aside. Then, the lights dim and 
the crowd quiets down as Faber begins one 
of the crowd's favorites, "When a Man 
Loves a Woman." 

An upbeat tempo resumes with the next 
song, and soon even the ddlorman is danc- 
ing. Audience members get involved, jump- 
ing onto the dance floor at the start of 
"Right Back Where the Teardrops Fall." 

Tom Ross, a senior in Commerce, said, 
"George Faber is the slickest, most profes- 
sional performer in town. Hot tuna!" M\ 

— Marianne Eterno 

107 

Take Five /Appaloosa 



Combo Audio 



The 

beat 

of local 

bands 



An education does not consist solely of 
classes, homework, and exams. Parties, 
bars and entertainment are important in- 
gredients of a well-rounded education. 

On any given weekend night, the aver- 
age night-lifer can catch a band at bars like 
Mabel's, Panama Red's, or Studio One for 
a relatively nominal fee. 

One of the most fresh, indeed, most sin- 
gular of the local bands is Combo Audio. 
The group usually plays at Mabel's and 
regularly attracts large crowds. Its music, 
filled with catchy breaks and rhythms, is 
modern and original, yet very danceable. 

Started in December of 1980, the band 
— Tom Broeske, John Kellogg, and Rick 
Nuehaus — has progressed rapidly in the 
past ten months. The music is still fresh, 
the stage performance is tighter, and the 
band's following is growing. 

Although they have played in Chicago 
and have been warmly received there, the 
band members find Champaign-Urbana a 
"thriving music community." They don't 
believe that stagnation, the bane of many 
local bands, can occur here, since the mem- 
bers frequently react to the many different 
types of people in the audience. 

Another band, The Rave, which has 
gone through a major image change, re- 
tains its heat-oriented, melodic sound. The 
Rave of old played at street dances and 
Mabel's three years ago. The new Rave, 
formed only six months ago, has expanded 
its territory as far north as Chicago and as 
far south as Memphis. 

The band's newest addition, David Ad- 
ams, allows for a much broader, more me- 




; 



Iodic range of material as vocal harmonies 
can be exploited better with two singers. 
Adams joins original members Brian Cook, 
Garrett Oostdyk, and "Tom." The band 
doesn't feel it fits the image of a local band. 
The members have a great time on stage, 
as do the people watching the band or 
dancing to its music. 

A third band, still 'local' yet pressing for 
wider recognition, is the Vertebrats. Com- 
prised of Jim Wald, Ken Draznik, Matt 
Brandabur, and Roy Axford, the Verte- 
brats first started playing at Mabel's in No- 
vember of 1979. 

At that time, when people were "pogo- 
ing," the majority who had not yet seen the 
Vertebrats thought that the group was just 
another spin-off New Wave band. But this 



Brian Coleman 

was not just another bandwagon band. 

Its original 'new-pop' music is reminis- 
cent of the early 1960s Yardbirds, Bea- 
tles, and Credence. The music is energetic 
and very danceable, but above all, fun. 

Indeed, the Vertebrats' gigs at Mabel's 
seem to epitomize the good times of col- 
lege. The group's enthusiasm, while not as 
destructive as that of groups such as the 
Sex Pistols, reverberates back and forth 
between the band and the audience. 

But for those of us who are able to see 
these veritable gold mines in intimate set- 
tings at low prices (sometimes even for 
free), we are fortunate. If they weren't 
around, college life in Champaign-Urbana 
wouldn't be the same. ^\ 

— Byron Geannopoulos 



108 

Combo Audio 



«&fi 




Brian Coleman 



The Vertebrats Mabel's 



109 

The Rave /The Vertebrats 



Imagination comes alive 



What do you do on a Saturday night 
when you're sick of Cochrane's, can't han- 
dle hearing the Vertebrats play "Wild 
Thing" one more time, don't want to shell 
out $3.50 for a movie and can't stand the 
thought of studying? If you're up for some- 
thing interesting, creative, innovative (and 
free!), it's time to check out the Armory 
Free Theater. 

The Armory Free Theater, which holds 
weekend performances in the Armory, is a 
division of the University's theater depart- 
ment. Managed by Karma Ibsen-Riley, a 



local playwright and a graduate student in 
fine arts, the Armory Free Theater pro- 
vides Champaign-Urbana with an alterna- 
tive to the more traditional theater offered 
by Krannert. 

With rows of metal chairs and barren 
black walls, simple stage settings and eclec- 
tic costumes, everything about the Armory 
Free Theater suggests "alternative." It's a 
place where students and community mem- 
bers volunteer their time to put together 
productions ranging from light comedy to 
theater for the deaf. 



Working with a budget of only $750 a 
year, the theater puts on about 24 shows 
every year. The speech communications 
department pays for three slots a semester 
to reserve the theater for its use. Mark 
Crowell, a graduate student in speech com- 
munications, manages those three shows. 
Riley selects the shows from a list of pro- 
posals, and the director of each show then 
holds the auditions, which are open to all 
students and community members. 

"It works out pretty well," said Crowell. 
"We usually get about 50 people audition- 









110 

Armory Free Theater 



: III 



v. 



K-* 







ing for 16 parts." 

The theater stresses experimentation. 
One form that this experimentation takes is 
the chamber theater — the staging of fic- 
tion such that the narrator remains outside 
of, but at the same time participates in, the 
action of the narrative. It allows the audi- 
ence to hear the thoughts of the narrator in 
addition to hearing the dialogue of the 
characters. 

Because they are working with such a 
restrained budget and limited space, al- 
most everything that goes into these shows 
;ome from the imagination. The actors 
Tiust use only their own verbal and visual 
skills to create a character, while the audi- 



ence must use its imagination to create the 
scenery that surrounds the characters. 

And the mixture works. A few potted 
plants in a wooden box become the lush 
Kew Gardens in England, two undergrad- 
uates become English adolescents walking 
through the garden, and a woman in black 
becomes Virginia Woolf, narrating her sto- 
ries to the audience. 

Actors are attracted to the Armory Free 
Theater because of the creative freedom it 
gives them. "Even though the facilities 
aren't very sophisticated, it's still my favor- 
ite space to perform in," said Crowell. The 
flexibility of a free space with few props 
provides an excellent atmosphere for ex- 



perimenting with different forms of the- 
ater. "I love to throw a bunch of creative 
people into a blank space and see what 
happens," said Riley. 

Selections this year included "God;" 
"Fishing," a play about hippies; and a per- 
formance by an Afro-American studies 
class. 

The Armory Free Theater is a different 
experience in theater. Experimentation 
and imagination combine to give both ac- 
tors and audience a chance to create 
"free" but equal quality theater. [j{J] 

— Amy Kloss 



Chairs become a train car in which Lisa Rubin portrays an 
ild lady whose private life is imagined by another passen- 
er. 

\ few potted plants in the theater set the scene for Ralph 
Kennedy and Steve Whiting to stroll through "Kew Gar- 
lens." 




Judy Jones creates a character acted by Christine Allen 
(right) in "An Unwritten Novel" performed Oct. 2-3. 



This scene from "An Unwritten Novel" illustrates the 
simple sets and costumes used in Armory Free Theater 
productions. 



Ill 

Armory Free Theater 




4 



H 



eabME 




i 

IT 



• 1 






112 

Films 



Escape through 
the celluloid 



As you slide into your seat, engulfed in 
lackness, the day's pressures begin to lift 
ff your shoulders. Your eyes, fixed on the 
creen, become the receptors of bright im- 
ges. You forget about tomorrow's exam 
r the unfinished paper on your desk, 
'ou're in the grips of a fantasy that lifts 
ou out of the reality of college life. 

For college students, movies are more 
lan a form of entertainment. 

"Movies are total escape," said Amy 
leyrhoff, a senior in accounting. "Stu- 
ents spend all day long studying and ana- 
/zing. That's the last thing they want to do 
i their spare time. Film is a medium that 
equires very little from the audience in the 
/ay of effort." 

"When you watch movies, you leave 
our problems and escape to another 
/orld," said Suzy Belfsky, a freshman in 
.AS. 

Champaign-Urbana residents can choose 
rom any number of movies on a weekend, 
"he choices range from foreign films to 
ecent releases and from X-rated movies to 
he classics. 

But the choices are more limited on cam- 
>us. In a year of financial woes, more and 
nore students are turning to movies pre- 
ented by the Illini Union Board, a group 
hat sponsors movies on campus for a low- 
r cost. 



ines form at the Co-Ed Theaters on Green Street as 
:udents await a chance to buy a ticket and get away from 
leir daily concerns. 



"IUB's movies are cheap, half the 
price," said Mike Sarata, a senior in ac- 
counting. "They're as good as you can 
expect." 

Some people expect a lot more. Robert 
Carringer, associate professor of cinema 
studies, said he thinks IUB doesn't repre- 
sent student preferences. It is willing to 
show movies that only bring in money, he 
said. 

"The Union could program a real diver- 
sity, but they don't do it," Carringer said. 

However, Kurt Willmann, associate pro- 
gram director for the Illini Union Board, 
said that IUB is an organization that is not 
funded by student fees, and yet it provides 
many free programs to students. There- 
fore, it has to make money to provide 
these programs and has to look at which 
movies students want to see the most. 

The movies that college students choose 
usually are based on sex and violence, Will- 
mann said, adding that the action-packed 
and X-rated films draw the largest crowds. 
"I don't have statistics to back it up, but 
that does seem to be true," he said. 

"I can see that X-rated and violent films 
are probably the most popular on cam- 
pus," John Galligan, a senior in Engineer- 
ing, said. "It doesn't turn me on to witness 
sex and hardcore stuff. But for some stu- 
dents who don't have enough sex and vio- 
lence in their own lives, it's an outlet," he 
said. 

And while some groups, such as Women 
Against Pornography in the Media, would 



like to see the sexually oriented and violent 
films taken off campus screens, those films 
are big money for other groups. 

"If you're going to show one film, an X- 
rated film is one that would bring a big 
audience," Willman said. 

Of course, the recently released movies 
also do well. When blockbusters such as 
"Ordinary People," "Body Heat" and 
"Raiders of the Lost Ark" come to cam- 
pus, students will wait in line to see them. 

But these movies not only are competing 
with the many groups showing films on 
campus. They also are competing with Ca- 
ble t.v. and Home Box Office, which bring 
recently released films into the home. 

"There's a limited variety of films on 
campus compared to what I can get in my 
own living room on HBO. It's also a lot 
more convenient and a lot less expensive," 
said Linda Miller, a senior in interior de- 
sign. 

Willmann said the added competition of 
HBO has hurt attendance at movies pre- 
sented by IUB. But seeing a movie on your 
television screen, with the distraction of the 
surrounding environment, still can't match 
up to the real escape provided by a the- 
ater. For this reason, students still will 
come to see movies, even when they've 
been shown on HBO that week, Willmann 
hypothesized. 

"I can't see HBO replacing movie the- 
aters," Miller said. "There is something 
about seeing a movie that is like nothing 
else in the world." [§[] 

— Lauren Silverman 
113 

Films 






X*^*> 






S 



?»*-.. 



News. It's happening all around us. It's 
happening to us. We see it in black bold 
headlines and we watch the news on televi- 
sion as the cameras bring the world to 
Champaign-Urbana. 

Sometimes we don't care about the 
news. AWACS bores us — it's just more 
alphabet soup from the government, like 
ABSCAM and OPEC. 

But some days the news hits us directly 
and affects our lives. We grumble at dinner 
about Reagan's cutbacks on student loans; 
we wake up at 3 a.m. to watch the royal 
wedding. 

Whether we're avid followers of the 
news or we use our newspaper to swat 
flies, the news influences every moment of 
our lives. 

In 1982, there was a lot of news that 
made us happy. More often, however, it 
made us sad. Bullets gunned down Reagan, 
Lennon and the Pope. The Chicago Re- 
gional Transportation Authority stranded 
angry commuters as the CTA system was 
derailed by political disagreements. Cham- 
paign's campustown received a facelift as 
new businesses moved in and old ones 
moved out. 

These news events and more have been 
capsulized in this section of the yearbook. 
In many cases, we asked students about 
news of the world, the nation, the commu- 
nity and campus in an effort to determine 
its effects on them. As you read, remember 
the news in 1981 — and remember its 
effects on you, the student. 






Sympathy 
for Solidarity 

On Dec. 13, 1981, the boom fell on the Polish people and 
their independent trade union, Solidarity. The imposition of 
martial law eliminated all of the reforms achieved by the union in 
its 17-month lifespan and elicited a cry of sympathy and outrage 
from persons around the world. Some University of Illinois stu- 
dents participated in the outcry. 

Martial law in Poland — what did it mean? For the "Iron 
General" of Poland, Wojciech Jaruzelski, it meant establishing 
stability and control over an increasingly restless people. 

For the Polish people, it meant forced loyalty oaths, strict 
curfews, almost no telephone service, limited travel between 
cities, no meetings, frequent identity checks, censored mail, 
nearly bare grocery-store shelves, price increases of 400 percent 
for necessities, farmers being forced to sell grain to the govern- 
ment if they want seed for next year, and police and soldiers 
everywhere. 

For many Solidarity members, intellectuals and thousands of 
workers, it meant being "detained" in prisons and labor camps. 
For Lech Walesa, detained Solidarity leader and "Time" maga- 
zine's Man of the Year, it meant not being able to see or attend 
the christening of his youngest child, who was born Jan. 27, 
1982. 

Martial law also meant watching the Gdansk agreements — 
allowing a 42-hour work week, free access to the media, im- 
proved working conditions and accurate information on the state 
of the economy — go down the drain. 

"It really gets me mad — this time it was really working," said 
Anna Miecznikowski, a senior in LAS. "They made so much 
progress and then the guillotine fell." 

Anna and her brother Jan, a sophomore in Engineering, 
learned to speak Polish before they learned English from their 
parents, natives who fled to England after World War II. 

Anna's parents ended up in Chicago, where they reared their 
family. "My father was in the Polish army during the war," Anna 
said. "It wasn't too cool for him to stay in communist Poland." 

All of Anna and Jan's other relatives are back in Poland. Most 
of them live on a farm, but one uncle resides in the port city of 
Gdansk, the birthplace of Solidarity. 

"My father sends our relatives money," said Jan. "My aunt 
says there's no soap, no laundry detergent, no stuff like that. 
They have salt mines in Poland, but my grandma has no salt on 
her table. It all goes to Russia." 

"With so much world support and a Polish Pope, the Commu- 
nists have to do things underhanded," Anna added. "But if 
Russia ever does invade Poland, I hope someone like the U.S. 
steps in. And the Polish people will fight back. They always 
have." 

Anna and Jan both would like to visit Poland again. The last 
time they were there was ten years ago. "The language and the 
culture have survived being divided up three times over the last 
few hundred years," Anna said. "They're too stubborn to let go 
of it, and I want to go see it first hand." 

Debbie Moty, a freshman in LAS, despises the communist rule 
in Poland. "They've got the Polish people trapped," she said. 

116 

Nation /World 




Brian Colema 

"It's so sad, though — I sure couldn't live like that, but I'd real 
like to know the culture." 

Moty's grandparents left Poland 50 years ago as Mr. and Mr 
Motykiewicz. "My grandpa still keeps in touch with people 
Poland," she said. "He writes them and sends them money ar 
stuff they can't get in Poland, like embroidery yarn." 

Moty thinks Americans don't comprehend what life is like U 
the Polish people. "I felt really bad for the people there," si; 
said. "But it's probably not as big a shock as it would be if: 
happened to us — they've been through it before." 

Therese Dynia, a junior in LAS, felt a surge of Polish nations 
ism with the onset of martial law in Poland, "All of a sudden it H 
me," Dynia said. "The Russians control everything, and it's & 
covered up," she said. "The U.S. is the only country that cou' 
really help, but they don't want to get involved with Russia. 

Dynia added that many Poles feel "a deep hatred of Russiai 
— even more than that they felt for the Germans who comm 
ted atrocities in World War II." 

On campus and around the world, support for the Poli.' 
people under martial law has been nearly unanimous. On Chris 
mas Eve, a candle was lit as "the light of freedom" and placed 
a White House window. President Reagan's Christmas messac 
denounced a "Polish government that wages war against its ou 
people," and he later pledged economic sanctions on the Polij 
government. 

The campus chapter of the Young Americans for Freedom, i 
a Jan. 29 rally on the Quad, called for a total trade cutoff wri 
the Polish government and direct aid to the people of Polanc 

Also on campus, the CARP committee for a free Poland he 
speeches and discussions of the Polish situation and distribute 
leaflets asking others to join in raising a voice asking for justic< 

Even though Dynia agreed with the intent of these actions, sr 
feels helpless. "I wish I could do something, but I just don't kno 
what anyone can do," she said. "But something is going t 
happen if someone doesn't give soon." 

According to Jan Miecznikowski, that something "may b 
World War III." g 

— Abby Obenchai 






NATION/WORLD 



Disasters strike the nation 



Seventy-eight people died in the Janu- 
ary Washington, D.C., crash of an Air Flor- 
ida jet when it didn't reach the proper take- 
off altitude and crashed into the icy Poto- 
mac river. 

Without the crew's knowledge, snow 
and ice had frozen on the wings of the 
doomed jetliner. On tapes recovered from 
the plane, the pilot and co-pilot joked and 
laughed with each other during the takeoff. 

Then: "God, look at the instrument 
reading. That's not right." 

"We're going down." 

"I know it." 

The crash of ripping metal also was re- 
corded. 

From the ground, the blue and green 
jetliner suddenly lurched out of the gray 
mist, onto the bridge, and into the river. 

Only five survived the first major U.S. 
airline crash in 26 months. 

Then in February, another airline disas- 
ter, but on a lesser scale, occurred. A 
World Airways DC-10 skidded off the run- 
way at Boston's Logan International Air- 
port and into Boston Harbor. 

The nose of the airplane was sheared 
off, but authorities initially thought there 
were no casualties as they ignored a man 
who said he saw people splashing in the 
dark waters. 

When the final count was completed, 
two men were missing and presumed 
drowned. 

Other disasters, not related to jetliners, 
also occurred this past year. In July 1981, 
a skywalk in the Kansas City Hyatt Regen- 



cy Hotel collapsed, leaving bodies trapped 
under tons of concrete and steel. The even- 
ing, which began as a tea dance, ended 
with 113 dead. 

In January, California fell victim to dev- 
astating mudslides. Torrential Northern 
California rains drenched hillsides until 
they collapsed in an avalanche of mud. 
Homes and roads were destroyed, 31 were 



killed, and more than $300 million of dam- 
age resulted. 

The reporting of disasters and calamities 
is a never-ending job. The year 1982 was 
no exception. Other tragedies included the 
Atlanta, Ga., murders of young black boys 
and the report of a radioactive leak at an 
Ontario, N.Y., nuclear power plant. [jp| 

— Cindy Atoji 



The controversy 

over creation education 



In Arkansas, students who paged 
through textbooks showing man as a de- 
scendent from apes also had to be exposed 





to the first 11 chapters of the Book of 
Genesis. But the teaching of creation along 
side of evolution was disrupted by an 
American Civil Liberties Union suit. 

The ACLU charged that the Arkansas 
law requiring creationism to be taught vio- 
lated the Constitution. 

A federal district judge agreed with the 
ACLU, overturning the state law on Jan. 5. 
The judge said creationism is "a hodge- 
podge of limited assertions." 

But on the same day, the Mississippi 
state senate approved a bill that permits 
the teaching of scientific creationism in 
public schools. In addition, creationists are 
working to draft a bill that will eliminate the 
loopholes and the weaknesses in the Ar- 
kansas law. 

The battle over the beginning has only 
begun. M\ 

— Cindy Atoji 



Sharon Basso 



AT&T temporarily disconnected 



Uncle Sam disconnected Ma Bell. In 
1982, the Justice Department broke up 
American Telephone and Telegraph's 
monopoly over the telephone service. 

The action ended an eight-year-old anti- 
trust suit. The government succeeded in 
slicing away $80 billion of assets from the 
world's largest corporation. AT&T's phys- 
ical assets total $119 billion. 

Under the agreement, AT&T will let go 
of 22 local phone companies. Neverthe- 
less, Ma Bell will be left with its long dis- 
tance operations, Western Electric Manu- 



facturers and Bell Laboratories research 
branch. The breakup is not expected to 
hurt Ma Bell much as the Justice Depart- 
ment, in return, agreed to clear obstacles 
that were blocking the company from ven- 
turing into the cable television and home 
computer fields — the money-making mar- 
kets of the future. 

For consumers, the immediate results of 
the breakup of AT&T likely will mean high- 
er local bills, but lower prices for long- 
distance calls. The long-range results of the 
decision may touch more than the pocket- 



book, however. 

Ma Bell already has the country wired 
with phone lines. And now that she can 
enter the telecommunications industry of 
cable and home computer systems, the 
Justice Department, some experts predict, 
soon will have another antitrust suit to file 
against AT&T. 

AT&T is reaching out to everyone; in 
spite of the fact that some of the com- 
pany's powers have been curtailed, others 
have been enhanced. Ml 

— Cindy Atoji 



117 

Nation/World 



Soundworks, zam damagec 

Fire guts buildings 




Photographs by Randy Stukenberg 

The fire at Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity, 301 E. Armory, left 64 members suddenly homeless in February. 



The wailing of sirens and plumes of blac 
smoke filled the winter campus air twice i: 
the same week as fire swept through Sigm 
Alpha Mu fraternity and The Soundwork 
record store. 

No one was injured seriously in either c . 
the February fires, but damage at Sammie 
was estimated at $200,000. Smoke an 
fire damage in the Campustown fire wal 
even greater. 

The fraternity fire started in a seconcj 
floor bedroom and spread rapidly, almos 
destroying the interior of the three-stori 
building. 

House members watched helplessly a 
the building at 301 E. Armory Ave., Charrj 
paign, and their possessions were con 
sumed in the flames. 

In the early morning of the next dav, i 
firemen again responded in the bitter col i 
when a fire began in the basement belo\ l 
The Soundworks record store, 625 t 
Green St., Champaign. 

Materials left in the basement after thj 
store's remodeling apparently acted as kirj 
dling for the blaze. 

The first floor of the new record store 
which opened in August, caved in from th 
fire. Water from the spray of fire hose 
flowed down Green Street and froze, clo< 
ing streets from Fifth to Healey. 

Smoke also damaged Moria Silver an 
Gold Jewelry., The Owl's Nest, Silk De 
grees, International Gallery and Zorba' 
Greek Restaurant, where a scrawled hanc 
written sign joked, "Not serving smoke 
gyros." 

Local businessmen came to the aid c 
the 64 homeless Sammies. Clothing store 
gave them discounts, restaurants provide* 
free pizza on the night of the fire, and th 
University replaced identification card 
free of charge and gave emergency loan 
with fee waivers. Many fraternities and sc 
rorities also provided housing and support 

Business was soon back to normal ii i 
Campustown. Stores reopened, adverts 
ing discounted merchandise in fire sales 
Jay Sandlow, a junior in LAS and presiden 
of Sammies, hoped his fraternity als( 
would soon return to normal. "The hous< 
will return," he vowed. [!$[] 

— Cindy Atoj 



118 

Campus Round-up 



CAMPUS ROUND-UP 




Slack students rally on the Quad, protesting WPGU-FM's decision to cancel a soul music show. 

Musical dispute at WPGU 



Steve Buyansky 



WPGU-FM and black students hit a jar- 
ing note over the elimination of black pro- 
gramming on the student-run station. 

The conflict began with the cancellation 
if a soul music show, a decision that black 
tudents thought was racially motivated. In 
irotest, blacks rallied together, marching 



into the station and on the Quad. 

Trying to reach an agreement, officials 
from the Illini Publishing Co., which owns 
the station, met with representatives of the 
black students. A federal mediator oversaw 
negotiations between the two groups. 

WPGU's program director and general 



manager have threatened to resign after 
the conflict ends. After several meetings, 
WPGU and blacks still disagreed over both 
black representation on the IPC Board of 
Directors and the hours of ethnic program- 

min s- H r . . A . .. 

— Cindy Atoji 



Parker charged with felony 



A night on the town: $12,096 of Univer- 
;ity money bought Robert Parker mixed 
Irinks, bubble bath and female companion- 
ihip. Or so witnesses testified during a five- 
lay trial of the former University vice 
^resident for business affairs. 

Parker was accused of using $630,000 
)f University Foundation money to write 
:hecks for everything from a car for a 
lightclub dancer to theater tickets. 

His defense was insanity. Two psychia- 



trists testified that Parker suffered from 
paranoia psychosis. They said he had false 
ideas that Ronald Brady, Parker's supervi- 
sor and a University vice president, abused 
him and had illegal business ties. 

A third doctor disagreed. He said that 
Parker was aware of what he was doing 
when reportedly he paid $400,000 to four 
Chicago-area women. 

The jury was unable to reach a verdict at 
the end of the week-long February trial. 



Parker will be retried on several counts of 
felony theft. 

In an attempt to get the lost money 
back, a University representative filed four 
lawsuits. The suits were against UD Corpo- 
ration for cashing checks without the two 
signatures required, Parker for illegally 
transferring funds, and two insurance com- 
panies, which are supposed to cover the 
financial loss. [jjJ] 

— Cindy Atoji 



119 

Campus Round-up 









Merging 
of the minds 

Just off the Eisenhower Expressway, with the Sears Tower in 
sight, students run across the walkway and jam into elevators to get 
to classes held in odd-shaped, modern buildings with prison-like 
windows. 

West one mile, on the other campus, students dressed in white 
coats briskly walk down Taylor Street with biochemistry on their 
minds. 

As of September 1, the Chicago Circle and Medical Center 
campuses will be one — the University of Illinois at Chicago. 

The University Board of Trustees unanimously voted to unite the 
two campuses at its November meeting. 

"The long-term interests of the University, including the long- 
term best interests of our Chicago campuses, will be best served if 
the two Chicago campuses are united under the leadership of a 
single chancellor," said University President Stanley O. Ikenberry. 

One chancellor, senate, student government and student trustee 
are just a few of the possibilities for the combined campuses. 

The University has been considering the merger for a long time. 
Former University president John Corbally first proposed the merg- 
er in 1978. 

But it wasn't a serious undertaking until Ikenberry recommended 
the formation of the committee to Study Consolidation of the 
Chicago Campuses, which met for the first time on April 15, 1980. 
One year later, the committee gave its recommendations to the 
trustees. 

Four public hearings were held before the committee made its 
decision to support the merger. 

The administration hopes that the merger of the two campuses 
will help people recognize the University's presence in Chicago. 

But the committee says that both campuses will face major 
problems in the next few years. Circle's enrollment is expected to 
decrease 10 percent by 1990. At the Medical Center, programs are 
being cut drastically, and funding for programs in the future looks 
bleak. 

"One of the reasons consolidation is so important," said Dr. 




Bundled against the autumn wind, a nursing student hurries out of the University of Mini 
School of Basic Medical Sciences in Chicago. 






Edward Cohen, dean of the Basic Medical Sciences at Chicag 
Medical Center, "is that in 10 to 20 years, the University will be in 
stronger position to gather resources. Together, the two campust 
will be in a better position to compete for research dollars." 

No one expects the change to be made in a day. As Ikenben 
said, "The merger is an evolutionary concept. We aren't compelle 
to run with it." [J] 

— Theresa Grimah 



Winter 
woes 



The words on a hot-selling sweat shirt 
during the winter of 1982 said it all: "I 
survived the coldest day in history." 

It was Sunday, January 10, a day when 
the mercury dipped to 26 below zero and 
the wind chill was estimated to be 81 below 
zero. Drifting and blowing snow added to 
the bone-chilling day and the whole nation 
sank into hibernation as even Florida shiv- 
ered in 20-degree temperatures. 

Sunday also was the first day of the 

120 

Campus Round-Up 



spring semester New Student Week, but 
many students postponed making the 
move back to Champaign to avoid icy 
roads and snow drifts. When Chicago resi- 
dents did attempt to make the long haul 
from the suburbs to Champaign, their au- 
tos crawled past stalled cars and dingy 
snow mounds. 

The weather thawed a little in late Janu- 
ary, but the cold still put a damper on bar 
hopping and book buying. 

"I had a backpack and bag full of books, 
and it was so cold, I wanted to run home," 
said Eve Goodrick, a junior in advertising. 
"But it actually hurt to breathe while I was 
walking, and it was even worse running." 

Anna Borek, a junior in nutrition, shiv- 
ered at the memory of waiting in the cold 



at Mabels. "We were hoping to get in 1 
see Captain Rat play. My feet were free 
ing — and we were inside the building, 
she said. 

A temporary thaw defrosted the sno 
piles into dingy puddles of water, but tr 
warm weather didn't last long. Subzei 
temperatures froze a slick sheet of ice ov< 
sidewalks. Students slid and stumbled 1 
class, falling on patches of ice. 

"I've had enough of this weather," sai 
Glenn Gersh, a senior in Engineerin 
"When I graduate, I'm moving to Califc 
nia." g] 

—Cindy Ato 

Snowbound bicycles, abandoned until Spring, lie frozen 
the 12 inches of snow that were dumped on Champak 



CAMPUS ROUNDUP 



A campus musical memory 



The short, creative life of singer, song- 
writer and dedicated humanitarian Harry 
Chapin tragically ended July 16, 1981. A 
car crash on New York's Long Island Ex- 
pressway took the life of the 38-year-old 
musician. 

He left behind ballads of love and auto- 
biographical story songs, more than $5 mil- 



lion given to charity raised from eight years 
of benefit concerts, and a lot of special 
memories for the people of Champaign- 
Urbana, the town Chapin often referred to 
as his "favorite gig." 

"None of the people who knew him un- 
derstood his love for the community. He 
never lived in Champaign-Urbana or at- 




tended the University," said an Illini Week 
article following Chapin's death. Neverthe- 
less, every year for the past ten, Chapin 
returned to C-U to perform for the annual 
Zeta Beta Tau spring dance marathon. 

He also was a regular performer at the 
University Auditorium, which he preferred 
over the Assembly Hall because of its 
smaller size and more intimate nature. Cha- 
pin's last concert in the Auditorium was a 
two-show performance in December 1980. 
His final appearance at the University was 
April 4, 1981, for the dance marathon. 

In 1978, while in town for the marathon, 
Chapin surprised the University students 
by slipping on a work shirt and apron and 
serving pizza at the Wright Street Garcia's 
while chatting with the customers. Ralph 
Senn, co-owner of Garcia's, remembers the 
performer being remarkably cheerful while 
working. "He was moving five times faster 
than anyone else," Senn said. 

"It's often baffled me," Senn added, 
"but Harry Chapin wanted to come here 
and it was very flattering. He adopted the 
town, and the town adopted him." 

Perhaps best remembered for his hits, 
"Cats in the Cradle," "Taxi," and "Se- 
quel," Chapin will continue to live in mem- 
ory, particularly for the children he helped 
to feed when he worked to organize World 
Hunger Year in 1978. 

This year, ZBT donated its profits to 
World Hunger, and on August 3, the Ur- 
bana City Council voted to name a city 
street for the singer. "Chapin Street" now 
runs a block beside Washington School. 

— Cindra Kay Bump El 



Photograph courtesy of the Daily Illini 









Brian Coleman 






\L 1 \ -»~, 


■ 1 Ivf* <ow 







121 

Campus Round-Up 






Old places with new faces 



Returning University students may not 
have been able to get a decent meal at 
Record Service, formerly the sight of 
Grunt's Restaurant, but they still could buy 
a bit of happiness for less than a dollar at 
the Campus Five Cents to $1 Store — if 
they used quarters, that is. The store sold 
out last fall to Space Port, a new gallery of 
pinball and video games. 

Also missing from the familiar Green 
Street stretch was Flynn's Menswear, 
which was sold in 1981. 

It is the loss of these stores and the 
renovation of other spots on campus that 
has led to the barrage of change commonly 
referred to as "The Campustown Facelift." 

St. John's Catholic Chapel closed 
through the fall semester for remodeling 
and the installation of new lighting and ven- 
tilation systems. Other changes in the 
Chapel's physical appearance include mar- 
ble aisles, refinished oak pews, a glass-en- 
closed foyer, and the addition of a specially 
designed 42-rank organ. Church masses 
were celebrated temporarily in the Audito- 
rium during the remodeling. 



The Champaign Residence Hall Snack 
Bar was reborn under the theme "Illini Or- 
ange." According to Bill Donaldson of the 
Department of Interior Design for Housing, 
the prime reason for the snack bar's 
change was energy conservation. "The 
tinted glass cut down on the window light 
but also added a cosmetic change," he 
said. 

Taft-Van Doren residence halls also re- 
ceived a new appearance from energy con- 
servation. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity began to 
restore its house's interior this year after a 
fire last spring resulted in $300,000 of 
damages. During first semester construc- 
tion, a few members continued to live in 
the fraternity. Others returned in January 
to the house that, when completed in 
1926, had been built and furnished for a 
cost of $90,000. 

The Sig Ep house was not the only build- 
ing getting a new look on the inside. Work 
continued on the English building, giving 
the colonial style architecture a taste of 
modern design. The center of the building 



now has crisp white walls, a skylight and! 
contemporary styling. One student said the 
new design was a "drastically needed, 
cheerful change." 

Meanwhile, construction continued on 
the Agricultural Engineering Science build- 
ing as red metal beams which were erected 
stood stark against the blue sky and gray 
tombstones across Pennsylvania Avenuej 
According to Doug Bauling, coordinating 
engineer for the project, the building will 
house offices, classrooms and laboratories 
for the food sciences, forestry and agricul-j 
tural engineering departments. 

The Agricultural Engineering building 
will have a unique physical design, with a 
long linear appearance. On the inside, stu- 
dents will walk past exposed heat, water 
and gas pipes; these mechanical utilities, 
which are usually hidden, instead will be an 
integrated part of the building's interior. 
The completion date for the building is 
tentatively set for the fall semester of 
1983. 5| 

— Cindra Kay Bump 




Pinball addicts take off with delight inside Space Port, 611 
E. Green St., Champaign, a new amusement arcade. The 
bright blue and silver aluminum exterior glitters, luring in 
video-game experts and Space-Invader pros. 



122 

Campustown 






CAMPUSTOWN 




John C. Stein 



Inside Blimpie's Sandwiches, 404 E. Green St., Champaign, 
employees Andy Kurtz and Sue Aplington make a specialty 
sandwich. 



123 

Campustown 




ICAf 
EXEF 
ANY 
BOO 



Sharon Basso 



Fascinations 
and fads 

1982 was the year of the Rubik's Cube, 
a colorful puzzle game invented by Erbo 
Rubik, an architect and teacher in Buda- 
pest, Hungary. 

Professor Rubik designed the cube to 
help his students visualize spatial relation- 
ships in three dimensions. The puzzle's 
popularity spread rapidly; it turned up as a 
keyring, the subject of books, and even as 
a work of art in the New York Museum of 
Modern Art. 

Students at the University weren't im- 
mune to cube fever. Over winter break, 
Mike Pippin, a junior in electrical engineer- 



ing, said, "I started playing with a cube and 
ended up staying up all night trying to fi- 
gure out how it works." 

1982 also was the year of video games; 
the wailing of the Defender and the chal- 
lenge of getting Pac Man, a dot-gobbling 
yellow disk, frequently would draw stu- 
dents to the Union for a quick tension- 
releasing game between classes. 

The beeping, blinking aliens even glowed 
on television sets at home, as electronic 
companies featured everything from ten- 
nis, poker and backgammon cartridges to 
games such as Space Invaders and Pac 
Man. 

"I like playing Asteroids and pretending 
I'm Luke Skywalker," laughed Matt Mirza, 
a senior in speech communications. 

The binge-purge syndrome of food 
abuse was another addiction in 1982, and 



Marilyn Kohl, a clinical counselor at th< 
University Psychological and Counselin< 
Center, said that 20 percent of college fe 
males suffer from this compulsive eatin< 
disorder or gorging on food and thei 
throwing it up. 

"Misuse of food is similar to misuse o 
alcohol — and it may even be more wide 
spread," she said. "Even when someoni 
still doesn't overeat, then vomit, they ma; 
have other bad food habits, like fad diet 
ing." Looking as slender as Brooke Shield: 
was the goal of best-selling books such a: 
the "Beverly Hills Diet" and Richard Sim 
mons' "Never Say Diet." 

In finance, Individual Retirement Ac 
counts and All-Savers Certificates were th< 
latest innovation in personal money man 
agement. Reagan's new tax laws mad( 
both investments a real asset for savers 



124 

Trends 



TRENDS 




James L. Novy 

3anks pushed IRAs by advertising that an 
ndividual could retire as a millionaire by 
loarding $2,000 a year. "My uncle Xe- 
oxed copies of an article about IRAs and 
massed them out to me and his other neph- 
ews, saying that it was a great idea," Mirza 
;aid. 

Another fad of 1982 included the Sony 
Valkman, a portable stereo with almost 
^nnoticeable earphones and a clip-on cas- 
ette deck and radio. The Walkman ran as 
aggers, weightlifters and aerobic dancers 
•anted, pumped iron and stretched their 
;ay — with music piped into their ears — 
ito better shape in the American fitness 
raze. 

But the craving for Ronald Reagan's jel- 
;beans and pink Chu-Bop bubble gum in 
liniature record album packages canceled 
ut many of the calories lost by exercising. 



Sharon Basso 



The fashion world went in two direc- 
tions: the metallic look, with gold belts and 
sweaters laced with silver threads, and the 
preppy look of Top-siders and Izods. Stu- 
dents danced to Kim Carnes' "Betty Davis 
Eyes," went to see "Raiders of the Lost 
Ark" and talked about the Rolling Stones' 
tour of the United States. 

New newspapers sprung up in the 
Champaign-Urbana area, with the "Illini 
Times" making its debut as a weekly and 
the "Weekly" refining its content of under- 
cover reporting and flashy graphics. 

Soap operas changed from daytime tele- 
vision fare to nighttime scandal with the 
emergence of "Dallas," "Dynasty" and 
"Flamingo Road." The adventures of the 
rich flickered across the screen in plots of 
lust, violence and treachery. 

The Moral Majority tried, with mild suc- 



cess, to get advertisers to censor these pro- 
grams, and Jerry Falwell stirred religious 
controversy with his crusade to improve 
the moral decency of America. 

There also was an increased interest in 
science, as science television shows lured 
viewers with an inside look into black holes 
and molecules. New science magazines 
such as "Omni," "Science Digest" and 
"Discover" dotted newsstand shelves. And 
technology entered the home as an increas- 
ing number of families bought home com- 
puters. 

When you remember bobbie-socks and 
duck tails, miniskirts and peace signs, re- 
member 1982: stuffed pizza, new wave 
music, generic products and Miss Piggy. 

—Cindy Atoji H 



125 

Trends 



Sadat's death 
causes turmoil 

The main result of Anwar Sadat's assas- 
sination on Oct. 6, 1981, was the rise of 
questions. Who was responsible? How did 
they get past security? Will Hasni Mu- 
barek, the new Egyptian president, keep 
the peace? The balance of power in the 
Mid-East rested to a large extent in Sadat's 
hands, and with his death, that balance was 
in question. 

Anwar Sadat was killed, during a review 
of a military parade on the anniversary of 
the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, by four men 
who were accused Moslem fanatics. 

The assassination was perfectly timed. 
While Sadat and the others had their atten- 
tion focused on six jet fighters, a truck, 
part of the parade, stopped. Three uni- 
formed men approached the stand, and 
Sadat stood to salute them. The men 
opened fire while a fourth threw grenades. 
In the end, five were killed and 28 wound- 
ed, including four Americans. Sadat died 
two hours after the attack. 

The initial world reaction was one of 
shock and horror. Ronald Reagan said, 
"The memory of this good and brave man 
will vanquish you (the killers). The meaning 
of his life and the cause for which he stood 
will endure and triumph." Reagan sent 
three former presidents, Richard Nixon, 
Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, to attend 
the funeral. He himself did not attend for 
security reasons. 

The reaction of various students also 
was one of horror. Moira Keating, a law 
student, said, "It was pretty tragic and wor- 
risome that the relations between Egypt 
and the United States have such uncertain- 
ty." Mike Pollard, another law student, 
said, "The world has lost one of its stron- 
gest peacemakers, but now Egypt will real- 
ize that peace must come through an entire 
nation, not just one man." Willie Seid, a 
junior in ALS, added, "Sadat was one of 
the stabilizing factors in the Mid-East. It will 
take a lot of years and a lot of work, by 
everyone, to make up for his death. It is a 
terrible setback for peace in the Middle 
East." 

Sadat's presidency began with the death 
of former Egyptian president Gamal Abel 
in 1970, which promoted Sadat from vice 
president to president. Known merely as a 
blind follower of Nassar, he surprised the 
world with his vigorous leadership, expel- 
ling the 17,000 Soviet military advisors 
present in Egypt at that time. 



126 

Middle East Crisis 




He also instigated the 1973 Arab-Israeli 
war, which eventually ended with peace 
between the countries and which was 
sealed with the Camp David accords. Sadat 
and Israeli Prim Minister Menachem Begin 
shared the Nobel Peace Prize for their ef- 
forts. 

Sadat will be remembered mainly for the 
peace that he initiated with Israel, the first 
Egyptian-Israeli peace in 31 years. 

Egypt's new president, Hasni Mubarek, 
has reaffirmed Egypt's policies. The ques- 
tions about the Middle East's future, how- 
ever, can really be answered only by Mu- 
barek's actions. [§J] 

— Rachel Russell 



The AWACS 
controversy \ 

The U.S. sale of five Airborne Warnin 
Control System (AWACS) planes to Sauc 
Arabia was a political victory for the Rec 
gan administration. But the $8.5 millio 
deal, which also included missiles, fut 
tanks and a tanker aircraft, struck fear int 
Israel. 

After the October 1981 sale, there wer 
worries that Saudi Arabia would us 
AWACS planes against Israel. Some pre 
tested that the planes could be used for a 



Middle East 




tensive attack and not only for defensive 

rposes. 

David Pilosof, a native Israeli and a gra- 

,ate student in chemistry, is afraid that 

2 Reagan administration made a blunder 

th AW ACS. 

"The United States miscalculated and 

ted naively. Saudi Arabia is not a stable 

untry. They have internal problems and 

2ir regime could collapse, just like Iran. If 

{it happened, AWACS could be used 

jainst Israel." 

But Bisher Jordaneh, a Palestinian from 

irdan and a senior in Engineering, disa- 



greed. "AWACS can't be used offensively. 
Israel has nothing to do with the Arab and 
American relationship. And the AWACS 
trade was strictly business: Saudi Arabia 
wanted technology and America wanted 
oil." 

Even miles away from their home coun- 
tries, Pilosof and Jordaneh carry the Mid- 
dle East conflict with them as well as the 
age-old controversy of whether to recog- 
nize Israel as a state. 

"There will never be peace in the Middle 
East until Arab nations accept Israel as a 
state," said Pilosof. 



Jordaneh, in reply, thought of his grand- 
father, buried in Israeli-ruled Jerusalem, a 
land where he now is not welcomed. 

"The moment I say Israel exists, I will 
cease myself to exist. We want our old 
country back." 

The Middle East crisis continues. |r] 

— Cindy Atoji 

— Patricia Hoffman 

— illustrated by Cindy Atoji 



127 

Middle East Crisis 



ENGLAND _. 



The 

marriage 

of the 

century 

Once upon a time in London, England, a 
splendid prince and his beautiful princess 
were married and lived happily ever after. 
Unlike fairytales, this wedding was real, a 
fantasy come to life. 

On July 27, 1981, in St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral, three-quarter of a billion people 
watched as Prince Charles and Lady Diana 
Spencer were pronounced husband and 
wife in the wedding of the century. 

In her pure silk white gown adorned with 
mother-of-pearl sequins, the bride ex- 
changed vows with the groom with little 
mishap, and while strains of "God Save 
The Queen" echoed through the cathedral, 
the couple strolled down the aisle. 

Cheers from the exuberant crowd out- 
side Buckingham Palace greeted the royal 
couple. 

As in a fairytale, a glistening coach, 
groomed horses and a kaleidoscope of 
red, white and blue-uniformed guards wait- 
ed to parade the couple past an ecstatic 
crowd. 

With a click of the dial, the modern fairy- 
tale wedding entered the homes of 705 
million people in 61 countries — for seven 
and one-half hours. 

What prompted viewers to get up so 
early, still sleepy-eyed, to watch and hear a 
royal fairytale? University students tuned 
in for several reasons. 

"When my mom and some of my broth- 
ers and sisters said they were getting up at 
4 a.m. to watch the royal wedding, I 
thought they were crazy. And yet, the 
more I thought about it, the more I thought 
it would be a neat experience to watch 
such a big event as it actually was occur- 
ring. So, there I sat at 4 a.m. watching what 
turned out to be the most glamorous and 
large-scale celebration I've ever seen," said 
Cheryl Geib, a junior in Social Work. 

Several students voiced the same opin- 
ion of the wedding as did Art Gunther, a 




freshman in Business: "The only reason I 
watched the royal wedding was because 
the media hyped it up so much that I be- 
came interested in the celebration." 

Kim Brosnan, a senior in Education, 
watched the marriage with an exchange 
student from England. "His knowledge of 
the wedding increased my curiosity, and 
we decided to watch it. I'm glad we did 
because the stations edited a lot of the 
events when shown the next day." 

Freshman Michael S. Lippe created his 
own fairytale wedding. "I was unable to 
watch the royal wedding because I was at 
camp," he said. "Since four counselors at 
camp came from Great Britain, we decided 
to act out our own royal weddings. We had 
costumes and scenery, too." 



Those students devoted their attentio 
to the royal fanfare. But not everyone wa 
so interested. 

"Oh? Was there a wedding?" aske 
Steve Young, a senior. 

"I basically didn't watch the royal wee 
ding because it was so early," said senid 
Eric Walljasper. "But also because I was s 
tired of all the media hype it was getting. 

With a click of the dial, students an 
millions of other viewers were able to en 
their part in the fairytale. The royal coupk 
however, will continue to attract the atteij 
tion of reporters around the world fc 
years to come. [IjJ] 

— Margaret Uhlaril 



128 

England 



ENVIRONMENT 








onservationist 
"Watt's Wrong!' 



James Watt evoked controversy the mo- 
ment President Reagan nominated him for 
Secretary of the Interior. The controversy 
continues. 

And so does he. 

Although there was grass-roots opposi- 
tion to Watt all over the United States, the 
Senate confirmed his nomination relatively 
quickly. But, for conservationists, that was 
only the beginning. 

For starters, Helen Parker, treasurer of 
the Champaign County Audubon Society, 
calls Watt's policies "an unmitigated disas- 
ter." She says Watt is a reflection of the 
philosophy that values "short-term eco- 
nomic gain over long-term stability." She 
added, ''Certainly, I and many other peo- 
ple feel that the overall good of the natural 
ecosystem is a higher good than making a 
few dollars." 

One of Watt's primary goals is opening 
public lands for increased energy develop- 
ment, mining, grazing, testing and other 
resource uses. He is especially concerned 
with finding more fossil fuel deposits to 
meet the energy needs of the United 
States. 

Watt has dismantled and rearranged 
some of the structure of the Department of 
Interior. Bruce Rittmann, assistant profes- 
sor of environmental engineering and chair- 
man of the local chapter of the Sierra Club, 
said, "He (Watt) wanted to eliminate five 
regional offices of mining. He wanted to 



make sure strip miners did it right." 

The national Sierra Club . activated a 
"Replace Interior Secretary Watt" cam- 
paign and has one million signatures on 
petitions asking for Watt's resignation. 
Most environmental groups, even conser- 
vative ones, are clamoring for him to re- 
sign. 

Because environmentalists find Watt's 
policies distasteful, environmental groups 
have thrived. Rittmann said, "The mem- 
bership of the Sierra Club has gone up 25 
percent since Watt came in." 

Sandra Ellmann, coordinator of Students 
for Environmental Concerns, said, " . . 
environment groups are tending more to- 
ward political action. People realize 
they've got to do more grass-roots organiz- 
ing" because of Watt's policies. 

Watt and his policies have spawned a 
variety of slogans and jokes, most notably 
"What's Wrong? Watt's Wrong!" Garry 
Trudeau pokes fun at Watt's policies in his 
comic strip, "Doonesbury," and conserva- 
tionists become ruffled by many of Watt's 
comments, such as, "I don't like to walk, I 
don't like to paddle." 

Yet there are those who are pleased 
with Watt's actions. 

Don McClarey, a third-year law student 
and office manager for Young Americans 
for Freedom (YAF), said it is time to put a 
halt to the environmental programs initiat- 
ed in the mid-1970s. 



Those policies were "not so much trying 
to preserve our wilderness," McClarey 
said, "as to increase acreage." He added 
that the current debate about Watt's pro- 
grams is a matter of the "weighing of con- 
servation interests and development inter- 
ests." And under Watt, development inter- 
ests take precedence. 

Charles Fleischmann, a junior in political 
science and chairman of the Conservative 
Caucus, said that his group "would like to 
see the development of America's re- 
sources to meet our growing energy 
needs." He affirmed the caucus' support of 
Watt. "Our stand is to support Watt's 
stand on resources and to make sure the 
environment is protected," Fleischmann 
said. 

Fleischmann thinks "there'll be a contin- 
ued emphasis on development of our na- 
tion's resources." 

Rittmann said that if Watt is able to carry 
out his plans, "there are going to be a lot of 
battles," both within Congress and in law- 
suits. Rittmann thinks that if Watt is frus- 
trated in his plans by Congressional pres- 
sure or public opinion, he might resign. 

Parker said there is "a lot of speculation 
as to how long Watt is going to last," add- 
ing that if she could have a bolt of lightning 
come down and strike someone, well, 
"Watt's at the head of my list." . J] 

— Joyce Hodel 



Randy Stukenberg 



129 

Environment 



( - 



SPACE 



Shuttling in a new space era 



"I think it's great!" said John Dickel, a 
professor of astronomy. "As an astrono- 
mer, I want to study objects both in and 
outside the solar system. The shuttle is an 
opportunity to launch our space tele- 
scope." 

The shuttle will not only give astrono- 
mers a better view of the cosmos, but it will 
also help meteorologists predict and under- 
stand weather. Even fisherman will benefit: 
with radar from the shuttle, the migrations 
of fish can be followed. The shuttle could 
also unravel the secrets of physics, result- 
ing in safer and better nuclear reactors. 

The possibilities of the shuttle are almost 
unlimited. . 

"The complexity of the shuttle is incredi- 
ble," said Steve Lacata, a junior in aero- 
space engineering. Lacata was in a work- 
study program with the National Aeronau- 
tics and Space Administration and has 
worked on the test shuttle Enterprise. 

"The technology is almost all new. Be- 
cause of this, people should have more 
patience with the problems and delays," he 
said. 

Sometimes being second is a first. The 
Columbia space shuttle made a first when it 
was launched a second time. No other 
space vehicle has ever been reused. 

The first flight of the Columbia was on 




April 19, 1981, after a two-year delay that 
was capped by a computer breakdown on 
the day of the launch. The problem was 
solved, and astronauts John Young and 
Bob Crippen took off, orbiting Earth 36 
times in 54 V2 hours. A repeat flight was 
manned by Joe Engle and Richard Truly 
and lasted two days. 

The Columbia is a workhorse, servicing 
satellites and assisting various experiments. 
The shuttle eventually will transport a 
space research telescope into space. Ex- 
periments will be conducted in medicine, 
electronics, metallurgy and astronomy. 
The space research telescope will allow 
scientists to view 350 times more of the 
universe than they now can. 

The Columbia soon will have a sister 
ship, the Challenger. It is scheduled to be 
ready sometime in June 1982. 

Sophomore Frank Oriold, president of 
the Astronomy Club, said "The shuttle is 
all we have to hope for (in space explora- 
tion) until the nineties." 

With their enormous complexity and 
amazing possibilities, the Columbia and her 
sister will likely search the farthest frontiers 
of man §\ _ Rach el Russell 




Possible variations in chemical composition from one part 
of Saturn's ring to another are shown in these Voyager II 
pictures. The photographs were taken with special comput- 
er-processing techniques from a distance of 5.5 million 
miles. UPI photographs courtesy of the Astronomy Club. 




130 

Space Exploration 



LAW _ 




ustration by J.B. Lieb 



One of the summer's hottest arguments was how 
Supreme Court nominee Sandra O'Connor would 
vote on upcoming cases. By mid-September, the 
smoke had not cleared -- not enough for a single 
voting pattern to be visible. 

The wide range of speculation that followed was 
reflected in the opinions of campus political organi- 
zation members. 

"The press made her more pro-choice than she 
is" -- Wendy Schapiro, a member of the Abortion 
Rights Coalition. 

"I'm pleased she is not a Phyllis Schaffly." - Neil 
Fox, a representative of the Democratic Socialist 
Organizing Committee. 

"Justice O'Connor is pro-abortion." - Ellen 
McFall, a member of Life is for Everyone. 

"She's an exceptional nominee. She'll crack 
down on capital punishment." - Greg Parrish, ex- 
ecutive director of the College Republicans. 

"Although she is far from being a liberal, she is 
not nearly as conservative a nominee as Reagan 
could have selected. She was selected just because 
she is a woman, but we approve her appointment." 
- Robert Berry, president of the Illinois College 
Democrats. 

"I'm pleased she's not as conservative as others 
Reagan could have chosen." - Joy Frankel, a mem- 
ber of the Women's Student Union. 



High court overturns tradition 



A new female Supreme Court justice 
ook her seat on Oct. 5, 1981, and by 
loing so ended 191 years of male judiciary 
radition. The name Sandra Day O'Connor 
vas inked across the pages of American 
listory. 

A former Arizona Court of Appeals 
udge, Justice O'Connor succeeded former 
fustice Potter Stewart, who retired in 
.981. 

Much speculation about the nomination 
ollowed Stewart's resignation. On July 7, 
'resident Reagan kept his campaign prom- 
se to appoint a woman to an opening on 
he Supreme Court when he nominated the 
il-year-old O'Connor. 

The uproar that followed echoed across 
ie land. Pro-life organizations and the 
loral Majority said her voting record 
iroved that she favored abortion. Rising to 
er defense, supporters emphasized her 
evotion to precedent and legal process. 

The controversy surrounding her nomi- 
ation centered on one topic — how would 
be vote on the abortion issue? Inflamed 
pecial interest groups and the media bur- 
owed in to her judicial record for some 



indication as to how she might rule on the 
issue. 

The sea of controversy crested on Sept. 
9 during the three-day Senate Judiciary 
Committee hearings. 

Justice O'Connor said that she personal- 
ly opposed abortion but that her opinion 
wouldn't influence her voting. 

In the end, liberals and conservatives 
joined forces, and on Sept. 21, the Senate 
unanimously confirmed her appointment. 
Neither a staunch conservative nor a liber- 
al, Justice O'Connor is likely to become 
one of the Supreme Court swing votes. 

University students, including those in 
the law school, favored the appointment, 
believing it to be a step in the right direc- 
tion for women. However, students said 
they didn't have a clear idea of what her 
opinions were. 

Second-year law student Susan Tone 
said she thought Justice O'Connor was as 
qualified as the male candidates Reagan 
could have selected. 

Dan Slack, a second-year law student, 
added, "Having a female perspective on 
the Supreme Court will keep it from get- 



ting stale." 

Students' views on Justice O'Connor's 
political tendencies and her stand on abor- 
tion were as varied as those of the rest of 
the country. "She's politically conserva- 
tive," said Howard Karger, a student in 
Social Work, adding that he was surprised 
that O'Connor wasn't anti-abortion. 

Steve Mogge, a student in LAS, disa- 
greed, "Justice O'Connor has a liberal 
viewpoint." 

But Tom Murray, also in LAS, thought 
that she had a constructionalist viewpoint 
and that her first responsibility was to the 
Constitution. 

Although O'Connor received the ap- 
proval of the American Bar Association, 
she did not receive the organization's high- 
est rating. Nevertheless, the Senate over- 
whelmingly approved O'Connor as the 
121st Supreme Court justice. 

Mindful that this nominee is a woman, 

many wondered about the precedent that 

may have been set. Feminist organizations 

hope O'Connor isn't a token justice. [Iff] 

— Kay Shipman 

131 

Law 



i 



Rising costs 

squeeze 

student 

finances 



Worry, worry, worry. Everyone seems 
to worry about something. Sue worries 
about grades, Jim worries about his rela- 
tionship with his girlfriend. Brian worries 
about the lack of meaning in his life. Jan 
worries about being too fat. Yet beneath 
the priority anxieties is a dormant worry 
that fills students with panic when it awa- 
kens — the worry about money. 

In general, the majority of students do 
not consider money or bills to be a major 
problem. Budgeting their funds and deny- 
ing themselves luxuries gets these students 
through the year. Yet some students are 
not as free to fulfill all their material de- 
sires. About 60 percent of all students can- 
not even afford the basic necessities. Their 
tuition, books, food, shelter and clothing 
are provided by some kind of federal aid. 

Patty Joe, a senior, receives aid from 
Pell Grants (formerly called Basic Educa- 
tional Opportunity Grants), Illinois State 
Scholarship Commission Monetary 
Awards, and Illinois Guaranteed Loans. 

"Without them, I wouldn't be here," 
says Patty. "My parents aren't rich and 
even if they were, I'd rather not take their 
money. I value my independence, and I 
don't feel it is my parents' responsibility to 
put me through college." 

Like those of many students, Patty's pri- 

132 

Inflation 



mary source of funds has been monetary 
loans. She has been at the University for 
four years and has obtained a $2,500 
Guaranteed Student Loan each year. Upon 
graduation, she will have six months to 
begin repaying the $10,000 loan. 

It sounds like a huge debt, but the loan 
terms lighten the load. Payments will be 
$200 a month at seven percent interest, 
and Patty has up to 10 years to discharge 
the debt. The prime rate in October was 
about 19 percent. Also, repayment of 
loans is a good way to achieve top-notch 
credit ratings. 

If Patty goes to graduate school, the loan 
is deferred. If she becomes disabled, the 
loan is canceled. 

"My boyfriend has an even better deal," 
Patty says. "Bill is from Jersey County, 
and a rich woman there left a trust fund 
when she died just for students from that 
county. Bill gets his loans from that. The 
loans are interest-free and there's no set 
amount or deadline for payment." 

In spite of her debt, Patty is not worried 
about the burden. "It's not important to 
me now, I guess, because college is not a 
real environment. I'm sure I'll worry about 
it more when I graduate." 

Patty rents an apartment this year. She 
lived in a dorm for her first three years on 




Freelance Photograph by Patricia Hoffrru 




Mm 

m 0^^ 



INFLATION 



campus. According to Patty, "It costs me 
less money to live off campus; dorms are 
so expensive. I have a roommate, so my 
rent now is $100 a month. Utilities are 
about $15 a month and food is about $10 a 
week. That's a lot less than the almost 
$900 a semester charged for living in a 
dorm." 

No, Patty does not take her aid for 
granted. She worked at food service in her 
dorm for two years and now works at a 
snack bar. Her hands are not callous from 
overwork, but her brown eyes look tired. A 
work schedule that ends at 3 a.m. and a 
class schedule that begins at 8 a.m. do not 
provide her with a soft life. 

And she is not a big spender. "I treat 



I 



rf* 



myself every other paycheck and buy an 
album or something — nothing big. I just 
buy what's on sale usually." Patty has a 
car, a '69 Chevy, but walks to school. Gas 
is not cheap. 

Extra sources of income do not put her 
on the pillow of comfort and luxury. Rising 
college costs alone are like hungry piran- 
has. 

In 1977, when Patty was a freshman, 
tuition for an Illinois resident was $586 a 
year. Now it is $682, a $94 increase. Ser- 
vice fees are up $42, text books are up at 
least $60, and housing and meals are up 
$500. The estimated total cost for one 
year at the University is $4,300. Worse, 
this amount is projected to take a soaring 



leap next year. 

Inflation has left its mark on virtually 
everything. Vending machines, Illini Union 
cafeteria prices, clothing costs, and re- 
quired personal item costs each have in- 
creased. Their cumulative effect means 
that student incomes barely cover costs. 

"My boyfriend," says Patty, "worked 
eight hours a day last summer teaching 
swimming and then put in a six-hour shift at 
a local restaurant just to afford increased 
college costs." 

In defense of rising fees, college adminis- 
trators say they are trapped in a spiral of 
uncontrollable prices, faculty wages, and 
Social Security taxes. 

Employees at the financial aid depart- 




Freelance Photograph by Patricia Hoffman 

Above: Inflationary times have Marc Kramer, a junior in 
LAS, watching his pennies at McBride's Drug Store on 
Green Street. 

Left: Many students find cashiering and other jobs on a 
campus a way to keep money in their pockets. 






133 

Inflation 



Rising costs 

ment say students are worried about mon- 
ey. Naturally, they see students in a mo- 
ment of panic and financial despair. 

One employee explains, "When stu- 
dents are here, they're usually hurting for 
money. They don't know how they're go- 
ing to pay the rent, buy food, or pay for 
books. They're worried about the money 
they don't have right then and there." 

Patty has had her moments of despair 
over money, too. "My loan application was 
processed late this year," Patty recalls. "I 
guess they were changing their forms. Any- 
way, I had bills that could not wait — and 
no money. Each day I'd rush for the mail 



hoping that the loan money was there, I'd 
get upset and think, 'What am I going to 
do?' It was pretty bad there for a while." 

All this talk of inflation and monetary 
woes is not entirely negative. Patty is 
lucky. 

It was in 1978 when all students, regard- 
less of family income, became eligible for 
government-guaranteed student loans. In 
addition, Reagan's program of educational 
cutbacks will not be felt until 1982. 

The guaranteed loans are already up to 
nine percent interest this year. Next year, 
eligibility requirements will be based on 
family income. Students whose parents 



earn more than $30,000 a year will have t 
show "need" to obtain a loan. 

The Pell grants now require a family t 
contribute 14 percent. Recipients wou! 
also be required to personally earn a min 
mum of $750 a year. Patty's timing wa 
perfect. 

Patty realizes this and is glad she will b 

out this year. "I feel sorry for next year 

students. I think it will be tough for then 

Cutting financial aid is not cutting fat, it I 

cutting lean." [5] 

— Patricia Hoffman 

Campustown's annual fall sale gives students an edge c 
rising clothes prices. 



■%mm. < ** 8 




O 1 oil ? 









INFLATION 



Price comparisons: 1977-1981 



Record album 




1977 $4.19 

1981 $6.99 



Twelve pack 




1977 $3.29 

1981 $4.29 



Concert ticket 



At> NUT ONE. 



AD^ ^~T Q»JE 



1977 $6.00 

1981 $9.00 



Bass shoes 




1977 $23.00 

1981 $32.95 



Sweater 



1977 $9.99 

1981 $20.00 



Hamburger 





1977 38$ 

1981 58c 



Film - 12 exposures 




Nylon backpack 




1977 $1.09 

1981 $3.50 



1977 $6.99 

1981 $10.00 



Four-pack bulbs 




1977 4 for 88$ 

1981 $1.89 



Illustrations by Hillary Lamphear & Lee Levin 

135 

Inflation 



Financial crunch 
slows transit systems 



Crisis (kri'sis) n. 1. any crucial situation 
2. the state of the nation's mass-transit sys- 
tems. 

"Financial" and "crisis" were the buzz 
words for several metropolitan mass-transit 
systems in 1981, particularly for the Chica- 
go area's Regional Transportation System. 

The Chicago financial crunch began May 
27, 1981, when the RTA, funded by the 
state through Cook County sales-tax rev- 
enues, went broke. Consequently, the RTA 
could no longer subsidize local transit ser- 
vices, resulting in the shutdown of a few 
bus and railroad companies, the elimination 
of lightly-traveled routes and, of course, 
increased fares. 

Many University of Illinois students from 
Chicago were irritated by the summer cut- 
backs and higher fares. 

"Although the increased fares did not 
prevent me from taking the CTA (Chicago 
Transit Authority), I was definitely upset," 
said David J. Solar, a sophomore in Com- 
merce. "Since my only way downtown was 
to take the Howard Street 'El,' I had no 
choice but to scrounge around the house 
for more money to take the train." Some 
transit companies increased fares by more 
than 50 percent. 

The increases forced some students to 
look for others way to get to work. "I used 
to take the Chicago and NorthWestern 
from Glencoe to Chicago, but it became so 
expensive that I joined a car pool," said 
Richard T. Box, a freshman in Engineering. 

John McAndrew, a freshman in LAS, 
found the higher fares so outrageous that 
he bought a new car. "I relied on the CTA 
buses every day to get to school and to 
work," he said. "After transferring four 
times, 1 spent $1.20 and that included a 
reduced student pass. Without the pass, 
the fares would add up to $3.60." 

McAndrew added, "I stopped riding the 
CTA partially because of these increased 
fares and overcrowded buses. I found (the 
car) a lot more convenient than the buses." 

Plagued by several deficits, increased 
fares and dismal service, the crisis is far 
from being resolved. In fact, the worst is 
yet to come. 

The Reagan administration plans to 
phase out federal operating subsidies to 



mass-transit systems by 1985. The subsi- 
dies run at $1.1 billion and account for 
more than 13 percent of transit operating 
revenues. 

Some students think the state or local 
governments should step in and rescue the 
RTA. Others disagree. 

Sean Forrest, a sophomore in Com- 
merce, said taxes should be increased to 
save the system. "The RTA appears to 
waste too much money and doesn't spend 
it wisely. They have several transit lines 
that actually are not being used." he said. 

"Also, the RTA lacks an efficient and 
organized system of keeping track of col- 
lected fares. I guess they feel they can 
spend as much as they want because the 
government knows the nation needs a 
mass-transit system," Forrest added. 

Glen Gersh, a senior in aeronautical engi- 
neering, had a unique analysis of the 
problem. "I rode the Milwaukee Road to 
work downtown and heard many reasons 
from commuters why the fares increased. 
In particular, the Milwaukee fares in- 
creased because authorities wanted to 
make room for freight trains. Thus, by jack- 
ing up the prices, commuters were forced 
to either pay more or find alternate means 
of transportation. 

"The latter action would eventually 
phase out the need for the Milwaukee 
Road and create space for freight lines. I 
think a solution to this crisis would be the 
government allowing individual transit lines 
to make their own restrictions. 

"This way, they will be able to work out 
the fare problems and still be able to com- 
pete with other mass-transit systems." 

Many Champaign students from Chicago 
suburbs said they did not feel the effects of 
the RTA-CTA crisis. However, they were 
aware of the problem and offered their 
perspectives. 

Jeff Greenfield, a freshman in biology, 
thinks advanced planning is the answer. 

"From what I've heard about the RTA- 
CTA situation, I believe it could have been 
avoided if enough foresight and planning 
had been done," he said. "But since it has 
occurred, I feel only the users of the sys- 
tem should have to support the system. I 
wouldn't be opposed to paying the high 



fares for the times I'd ride." 

The RTA-CTA crisis was not only a cor 
cern of Chicago area politicians. Downstatl 
officials argued with Chicago Democrat 
about a downstate plan to abolish the RT/ 
altogether. 

Springfield offered the CTA $425 mi 
lion over the next three years. Chicag 
Mayor Jane Byrne wanted an addition 
$45 million, however, and the entire dec , 
collapsed. University students from Centre 
Illinois felt downstate residents should a; 
sist in the RTA crisis. Monte Flack, a fresl 
man in Agriculture, thinks state taxe 
should be used to help the RTA. But man 
downstate residents questioned whether d 
not Chicago residents could be counted o 
to help the downstate residents if the: 
needed assistance. This concern influence 
many downstaters who are against sur. 
porting the upstate RTA-CTA system. 

Locally, Champaign-Urbana's Mas 
Transit District has not been affected s< 
verely by the RTA crisis. Fares were raise 
to 40 cents, but no bus lines were shi 
down. Also, Champaign students thougl 
the MTD service did not falter. 

"I feel the RTA crisis has not affectei 
the MTD. Although the fares were raised, 
feel it's still inexpensive and convenient q 
ride the MTD buses. I ride the bus to g 
shopping and they are usually on scheduii 
as well as uncrowded. They even run ever! 
half an hour," said Karen Mahnke, a senic 
in LAS. 

Larry Kraus, a junior in LAS, reiterate! 
Mahnke's thoughts. "The MTD is fairlj 
inexpensive and you can get to and fror 



just about anywhere with little wait. Th 
MTD has enabled me to go places I couli 
not have gone otherwise," he said. 

The MTD, like the CTA, is funded b 
local subsidies. However, it has not expe 
ienced the harsh and controversial pro! 
lems associated with the Chicago trans 
systems. 

Once the outstanding means of transpo 
tation in the nation, the RTA, CTA an 
MTD no longer can be sure of their destine 
tions. The mass-transit system may be d< 
railed by its own crisis. [TjJ] 

— Margaret Uhlaril 



1 



136 

CTA/RTA Crisis 



TRANSPOR TATION 




Andrea Liss 




Andrea Liss 

Above Left: Trudging through the September drizzle, 
Chicago commuters head home for the evening as the CTA 
shuttles its passengers through the slick streets. 

Left: The Chicago skyline dwarfs businessmen pouring out 
of office buildings and over the Chicago River bridge. 

Above: Crammed like sardines in a metal CTA box, Chica- 
go commuters begin their daily 5 p.m. rush down Jackson 
Street to Union Station, where they will face more crowds, 
lines and frustration in the bustling train station. 



Andrea Liss 



137 

CTA/RTA Crisis 



ZZ$ 




Brian Coleman 



A generic WHAT? 



They sit together silently, side by side. 
Huddled together on the cold, orderly gro- 
cery shelves, they wait, proudly displaying 
their bold green stripes, until some money- 
conscious consumer takes them home. 
"Beer," they state simply in plain block 
letters, or "Breakfast Drink" or "Potato 
Chips," or "bus?" 

Yes, thanks to the combined efforts of 
Eisner food stores and the Champaign-Ur- 
bana Mass Transit District, University stu- 
dents have been able to ride on the world's 
first — and for now, only — generic bus. 

How did this ingenious idea originate? 
Months of closed door meetings, perhaps? 
"Well," said Tom Costello of the MTD, 
"one evening five people were sitting in a 
little pub in Pesotum discussing generic 
products, and someone said that about the 
only thing they didn't have was a generic 
bus. So " 

The idea took off from there, according 
to Roy Brazlton, Eisner's vice president of 
marketing. "Tom contacted me one day 
about the idea, and we're really thrilled 
with the coverage the bus has received," 
he said. "The AP wire service picked up on 
it, and the story appeared all over the Unit- 
ed States." 

The bus itself is a 1960 model that had 
more than a million miles on it when it 
received its coat of white paint and, of 
course, green stripes. 

The bus also has a list of "ingredients" 
painted on the side, including "1 fare box," 
"assorted Homo sapiens," and the state- 
ment "no artificial flavorings or preserva- 



tives added." The bus weighs 320,000 
ounces. 

In keeping with the economical generic 
theme, the bus has no "extras" such as air 
conditioning and travels all regular MTD 
routes to offer the reduced fare rates of 25 
cents to as many riders as possible. Be- 
cause normal bus fares are 50 cents, Eisner 
reimburses the MTD for the difference in 
exchange for the advertising. On occasion, 
free samples of generic products are of- 
fered to passengers. 

Upon first spotting the bus, many look 
with amazement or a disbelieving second 
glance. Others either laugh or point out the 
bus to friends. "It's kind of funny," said 
Costello. "Our bus drivers tend to get real- 
ly self-conscious because everyone will 
point at it or smile when it drives by. Little 
kids will even get on their bikes and follow 
the bus around the neighborhood." 

"I couldn't believe it the first time I saw 
it," said Kevin Remington, a resident of 
Weston Hall. "The guy across the hall spot- 
ted it first and came back to tell us about it, 
but he's always making up crazy stories so 
nobody believed him." 

Costello said that he's glad the people of 
Champaign-Urbana have received the bus 
so well. "People talk about it as 'their bus' 
or 'our bus,' and it's really made everyone 
aware of the MTD," he said. Ml 

— Cindy Bump 

The largest generic product on record — a Mass Transit 
District bus — stops in front of Altgeld Hall on Wright 
Street. The bus alternates among all of the MTD's routes so 
that as many persons as possible get a chance to ride it. 



Air travel 



Those who enjoyed the movie "Super- 
man II" last August and good-naturedly 
emerged from the theater to point at the 
sky and exclaim, "It's a bird. It's a plane! 
It's " almost didn't have any planes in 

the air about which to exclaim. With the 
Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organi- 
zation on strike, and the Reagan adminis- 
tration's prompt firing more than 12,000 
of the striking air controllers, the state of 
air travel was uncertain for a while. 




138 

Generic Bus/Air Controllers Strike 






TRANSPOR TATION 



stymied by controllers 9 strike 



"It's hard to say exactly to what extent 
le strike hurt us," said Albert Broom, co- 
wner of Mid-America Travel. "Of course, 
's been a pain in the neck because of the 
onfusion, inconvenience and the rearrang- 
ig of itineraries, but it's difficult to put a 
ollar value on our income loss. Most trav- 
l plans are flexible enough the few 

nanges haven't made that much differ- 
nce." 

Students, when asked about the strike, 





V 



generally agreed with Broom's observa- 
tions. 

"My folks almost didn't go to Greece," 
said Marie Zvetina, a sophomore in LAS, 
"because they were afraid they wouldn't 
make it back home. It finally all worked 
out okay, though." 

Jan Stradley, a sophomore in LAS, 

noted that "a friend of mine had plans to 

fly to Spain, but almost didn't go because 

she had to wait day to day to see what the 

situation was." 

1 The key word in most responses was 

1 "almost," but as the holiday season drew 

| near, Broom voiced concern for what could 

really happen. 

"We've had incredibly good weather 
since the strike," he said last October, 
"and right now operations are running 
about 75 percent the normal rate. With 
winter, however, the first of December 
may bring a cut back to 50 percent of 
normal air traffic. That would really hurt." 

Dennis Potten, president of Franklin 
Travel, said that "the initial announcement 
did affect us, but not too terribly. Long- 
term effects, however, are quite serious. 
We're looking now to tremendous in- 
creases in cost. With the supply of seats 
going down, of course, prices will go up." 

The most noticeable local side effects of 
the strike were the discontinuation of all 
Ozark flights out of Willard Airport to Chi- 
cago and the dismissal of eight employees. 
Ken Smith, resident manager of Ozark at 
Willard, said, "Before the strike, we were 
moving around 200 people through here a 
day. Now we're down to less than 100. 
We could handle more, but we have to 
work with the decisions of the Chicago and 
St. Louis airports." 

Smith explained that "prior to the strike, 
the management people instructed and 
taught the controllers. Now the manage- 

Kathryn Murphy of Champaign, a member of the Profes- 
sional Air Traffic Controllers Organization, pickets in front 
of Willard Airport. 



ment supervisors are still here, but the con- 
trollers themselves aren't working. Basical- 
ly, the supervisors have taken over the 
controllers' jobs." 

With the general public voicing concern 
over the safety of air travel, the media 
began reporting increased incidents of 
"near misses." Or, as comedian George 
Carlin pointed out in a monologue, "They 
ain't near misses, they's near hits!" 

Potten, however, stressed that there are 
always so-called "near misses," but they 
are usually at still reasonably safe dis- 
tances. "I doubt there has been a major 
increase in them," he said. "The strikers 
may just be seeing to it that when they do 
occur, they are publicized in order to call 
more attention to their situation. Things 
have been operating safely and it will con- 
tinue that way," he added. 

In spite of these safety concerns, Presi- 
dent Reagan's firm stance on the situation 
was approved of by most students. "The 
law is the law, and they broke their con- 
tract," one student said. "I have no sympa- 
thy for the fired strikers at all. Reagan was 
justified in what he did, and he's handled 
the whole situation well." 

As of October, however, the three- 
month-old strike showed no sign of ending. 

Potten hypothesized that because of the 
long-term appearance of the strike, "many 
fired strikers may eventually venture out 
on their own to get their jobs back, and 
hopefully Reagan will let them." 

With midterms finished and finals week 
looming ahead students began looking to 
winter break for relief. 

Students planning on air travel over the 
holiday began crossing their fingers and, as 
one thoughtful engineering student put it, 
"If this mess goes on much longer, Santa 
may be the only one flying anywhere this 
Christmas." [IjJ] 

— Cindy Bump 



139 

Air Controllers Strike 









The angry scrawl of a frustrated youth, spraypainted in the 
alley between Walnut and Neil streets in Champaign: ; 
possible sign of violence simmering beneath the city's calrr 
facade. 



"Own a piece of American history" — 
claims a sign promoting Colt guns. Rifles, 
guns are all on sale at Lorry's Favorite 
Street in Champaign. 



own a gun prcj 
bullets and sho 
Sports on Mai 




James L. Novy 



James L. Novs 



Guns: a question of control 



// anyone wants to do it, no amount of 
protection is enough. All a man needs is a 
willingness to trade his life for mine. — 
John F. Kennedy. 

Several tragic shootings in 1980 and 
1981 have propelled the issue of handgun 
control into the spotlight. 

Former Beatle John Lennon was shot 
and killed on Dec. 9, 1980, in front of his 
home in New York City. President Reagan, 
his press secretary, James Brady, a secret 
service agent and a policeman were shot 
on March 30, 1981, as they left a Washing- 
ton, D.C., hotel. 

A gunman wounded Pope John Paul II in 
St. Peter's Square in Rome on May 13, 
1981. A month later, blanks were fired at 
Queen Elizabeth as she led a mounted pa- 
rade through London, startling her and her 
horse and scaring millions of television 
viewers. 



140 

Gun Control 



In each case, there was chaos, terror, 
and sometimes death by a man with a gun. 
Some University students are concerned 
about murder by handgun. They blame le- 
nient handgun laws for such violence. 

"We see important figures like Reagan 
and the Pope as being in a protective bub- 
ble, and it's a scary thing when that bubble 
breaks," said Susan Snowdem, a graduate 
student in business. 

George Stewart, a graduate student in 
chemistry, said, "I don't think handgun 
laws are regulated tightly enough. I'd be in 
favor of handgun registration." 

Almost anyone can buy a handgun in 
Illinois. You must be 21, have an Illinois 
Firearm Owners Identification card, sign a 
pledge that you are not a drug addict, men- 
tal patient, or felon, and wait a three-day 
"cooling-off" period before the gun is 
yours. Many students want these restric- 



tions strengthened. 

"The purpose of guns is to kill peole. 
The fewer there are in the general popula- 
tion, the better off we'll be." said Tom 
Rentfrow, a junior in LAS. "It's not just 
'criminals' that murder with guns — it's 
also people like jealous husbands." 

Andy Tucker, a freshman in Engineer- 
ing, said, "At this stage, anyone can buy a 
handgun. There should be some type of 
screening." 

The government estimates as many as 
50 million people in the United States may 
own handguns. Only one of 52 students 
talked to said he owned a gun. In all, 19 j 
persons said their families owned one or 
more guns, including both handguns and 
hunting rifles. 

No one said he or his family has ever 
needed to use a gun against another per- 
son. Nevertheless, several students who 



_ GUN CONTROL 




ipose stricter gun control laws said there 

a need for people to have guns. 

"It's in the Constitution that we have the 

jht to bear arms," one student said. 

"his kind of handgun control is none of 

a government's business." 

Carol Bradley, a freshman in Agricul- 

'e, said, "It's not really fair. They want to 

ndemn all handgun owners because of a 

n maniacs." 

"Registration of handguns would not be 

ective legislation," said Sybil Snyder, a 

Dhomore in Agriculture. 

Alex Cohen, a freshman in Engineering, 

reed. "If people want guns, they'll get 

im anyway." 

"More gun control is necessary, but now 

not the time," said another student. 

he percentage of people who'd disre- 

rd stricter laws is too high, and the gov- 

lment couldn't enforce it. The law would 



break down at both the enforcement and 
the citizens' end." 

The shootings of Lennon, Reagan, and 
the Pope stirred up the issue of gun control 
but apparently did not change students' 
minds. Most students said the shootings 
either reinforced their views or made them 
more aware of the issue. 

"An important figure being shot brings 
reality up front," said Betsey Polston, a 
senior in LAS. "Still, there are many peo- 
ple killed with handguns that no one hears 
about." 

Bill Cole, a senior in Agriculture, said, 
"These shootings really didn't change my 
views — they were isolated incidences. 
Any 'kook,' no matter what the laws are, 
can get a gun and blow away an important 
person." 

It is unlikely that handgun laws will 
change soon. In places such as California 



James L. Novy 



and New York City, where handgun laws 
are strict, people can easily buy guns in the 
next city or state. Morton Grove, a Chicago 
suburb trying to ban the sale, manufacture, 
and possession of handguns, will likely face 
the same problem. 

The Illinois General Assembly and the 
U.S. Congress probably will not pass any 
harsher handgun laws for awhile. Presi- 
dent Reagan, after being shot with a hand- 
gun, said that he is still against gun control. 

The National Rifle Association, one of 
the nation's strongest lobbies, also has suc- 
cessfully blocked attempts to pass stricter 
federal laws. Surveys indicate that most 
Americans think the United States needs 
stricter handgun-control laws. ^\ 

— Abby Obenchain 



141 

Gun Control 




While Illinois sports traditionally haven't 

been noted for the general quality of play, 

there never has been any lack of quantity 

-- there are enough teams at the Universi 

ty to please any fan. 

And during the last few seasons, the Illi- 
nois sports teams have shown some qual 
ity, too. The basketball and football teams 
have brought the fun of big-time college 
athletics back to campus with exciting play 
and winning seasons. 

But there are other winners at the Uni 
versity that have gone unheralded. The 
fencers have been the most successful of all 
the school's teams over the last 25 years, 
while gymnastics, baseball, cross country 
and women's basketball quietly have devel- 
oped winning teams as well 

However, the objective of college athlet 
ics shouldn't be solely to win. It's most 
important function should be to give the 
athlete a chance to participate in his or her 
sport. And with everything from lacrosse 
to fencing offered at Illinois, the athlete and 
spectator alike should have no problem 
finding a team that suits their interests 



Surviving 
the sanctions 






1981-82 was the year the focus of Illi- 
nois athletics left the courts and playing 
fields and shifted to the courtrooms and 
meeting chambers. Although the athletic 
program continued to improve overall, this 
undoubtedly will be remembered as the 
year that almost wasn't. 

Proposed sanctions against Illinois re- 
garding the Dave Wilson case and adminis- 
tered by the Big Ten on May 3, 1981, 
threatened to destroy the athletic program 
for years to come. 

After repeated problems with getting 
the University to comply with Big Ten rules 
and with stopping Wilson from playing, the 
Big Ten put Illinois on a three-year proba- 
tion. The sanctions barred the school from 
participating in any postseason event in 
any men's sport for two years and denied 
all conference revenue for two years, a loss 
that would have cost the University an esti- 
mated $2 million. 

Illinois students, administrators and fans 
reacted with outrage to the sanctions. Illi- 
nois Chancellor John E. Cribbet called the 



* 



punishment "excessive and punitive." Fans 
responded by calling for Illinois' departure 
from the Big Ten. 

The Big Ten sensed the imminent trou 
ble with the sanctions and allowed the Uni 
versity a two-month grace period, movinc 
the effective date of the sanctions frorf, 
July 1 to September 1. The delay gave 
both sides a chance to try to smooth oul 
differences. 

The turning point in the affair came or. 
June 25, when U.S. District Judge Robert 
Morgan denied Wilson's request for an exL 
tension of the injunction that had allowec 
Wilson to play through the 1980 season.'. 
Morgan dismissed Wilson's lawsuit against: 
the Big Ten at the same time. On July 26 
Wilson announced his plans to enter th€ 
National Football League's supplemental 
draft. 

With Wilson gone, the case's stumblinc 
block was removed. Illinois was able tc; 
straighten out its internal affairs and proce 
dures sufficiently, according to the Big 
Ten, resulting in a reduction of the penal 

it 
; i 
ji 
h 



t 



I 



144 

Sanctions 



w 



ies. On August 5, the Big Ten faculty re- 
presentatives announced only the football 
earn would be penalized. The team was 
>ut on a one-year probation during which 
ime it could neither participate in post- 
eason play nor receive conference televi- 
ion revenues. 

A collective sigh of relief was uttered by 
he University, although no one was happy 
vith the penalties that remained. "We all 
lave to live with situations we don't agree 
vith," Cribbet said. "The punishment does 
lot always fit the crime." 

"I'm not elated because obviously I'd 
loped we would have no sanctions at all. 
Jut I'm very pleased by the substantial 
eduction." 

After facing the prospect of a punish- 
nent that would have crippled the athletic 
>rogram for the next five to ten years, 
housands of fans were pleased by the re- 
luction. But the one-year probation still 
2ft most Illinois fans wondering what ex- 
actly was the problem in the first place. 

Illinois hadn't made the kinds of mistakes 
ome other universities have made over 
he last few years. There were no mass 
ecruiting violations or transcript falsifica- 
ions of which the Pacific 10 Conference 
nd Arizona State had been accused. 

From the beginning, Illinois' problem 
./as unique, and the heart of the matter 
evolved around Dave Wilson. The ques- 
lon centered on exactly how many years 
f playing eligibility Wilson had. 

Wilson had broken his wrist in the first 
ame of the 1977 season for Fullerton Ju- 
ior College. Having participated in only 
iree plays, Wilson sat out the rest of the 
2ason and dropped out of school. But the 
iree plays still counted for one season of 
ligibility, according to conference rules. 

Wilson came to Illinois with the belief 
lat he would probably have only one sea- 
3n of eligibility, and this was reaffirmed by 
le National Collegiate Athletic Associ- 
tion in January 1980, although it left the 
nal decision to the Big Ten. 

On May 4, 1980, the Big Ten eligibility 
ommittee ruled Wilson could play in the 
ill if he had 51 credit hours, the Big Ten 



minimum for a junior. At the request of 
Athletic Director Neale Stoner, Illinois de- 
cided to appeal the Big Ten ruling, hoping 
Wilson could gain an additional year of 
eligibility by not counting his 1977 season. 
It was a request the Big Ten had often 
granted in past cases. 

The Big Ten upheld its ruling that Wilson 
had only One season of eligibility left, but 
also said that in order to make sufficient 
progress toward graduation, he had to ac- 
quire senior status (a minimum of 78 
hours). Because Wilson hadn't gone to 
school after being injured in 1977, he was 
far short of senior status. He therefore 
would be unable to play until 1981, and he 
consequently sued the Big Ten. 

Stoner made it clear to Wilson that he 
was on his own with the lawsuit, but it was 
a point that was never clear to the Big Ten. 
From then on, tensions between the Big 
Ten and Illinois escalated and took on 
many more complicated features. 

The rest of the Big Ten hadn't been 
pleased with some of the shuffling that had 
taken place at Illinois over the last few 
years, such as the hiring of Californians 
Stoner and Mike White along with a foot- 
ball staff that included two assistants from 
Arizona State and two others from Oregon, 
both schools that were penalized by the 
Pac 10 for transcript violations. 

To further taint the case, the memory of 
Illinois' slush fund scandal 14 years earlier 
was still fresh in most people's minds. The 
Big Ten also felt Illinois had loose faculty 
control over athletics, and was wary of the 
importation of California junior college 
players under White. 

Illinois also made a clerical mistake, sub- 
mitting to the conference the high school 
transcripts of the wrong David Wilson, a 
David B. Wilson who had attended the 
same high school and junior college and 
who also played football. Yet it was a mis- 
take that seemed obviously unintentional. 
David B. Wilson's grades were only margin- 
ally higher than David C. Wilson's, and the 
transcripts weren't actually required any- 
way. 

The rhetoric of Illinois throughout the 



case added to the tensions. Wilson's law- 
yer, Robert Auler, continually antagonized 
the conference throughout the affair; and 
as the case developed, the Big Ten began 
to believe Illinois was giving Wilson more 
support than Stoner's initial "hands off" 
policy suggested. 

To the Big Ten, the central question was 
why Illinois, as a voluntary member of a 
conference, couldn't abide by conference 
rules. The Big Ten felt it had to demon- 
strate that its members must abide by 
league rules. The climax came with the stiff 
penalities administered May 2 by the Big 
Ten. 

However, the general reaction to the 
penalties was that the Big Ten had gone 
overboard. The next three months saw 
concessions made on both sides. The road 
to reconciliation was made considerably 
easier by Wilson's departure. 

The final outcome was the reduction in 
the sanctions on August 5. Both parties 
had done an adequate job of saving face 
and of mending a rift that threatened to 
make the Big Ten a conference of nine. 

Wilson didn't do too badly, either. He 
was the first draft choice of the New Or- 
leans Saints on July 8 in the NFL supple- 
mental draft; and as a result of injuries to 
starting quarterback Archie Manning, he 
has already seen action. 

One can only hope things work out as 
well for Illinois. Aside from the financial 
loss of one season's worth of television 
revenues (approximately $500,000), the 
athletic program has escaped relatively un- 
scathed. A lottery for the Athletic Associ- 
ation set up by Governor Thompson in 
September may eventually recover the fi- 
nancial losses. 

One conceivable positive aspect of the 
ordeal is the support the University may 
have gained as a result of the crisis. There 
exists suddenly a spirit and pride for Illinois 
unseen in recent years. 

But there are still scars, and one can be 
sure Illinois will act much more carefully in 
the years to come. [IjJ] 

— Mike Zahorik 
— Photograph by James L. Novy 



145 

Sanctions 










No bowl 
of roses 

The sanctions imposed on Illinois by the 
Big Ten weren't supposed to have mat- 
tered. So what if the team wouldn't be 
allowed to play in any bowl games? The 
Illini hadn't been in a post-season game 
since 1963, and after going 3-7-1 in 1980, 
there was little reason to think Illinois 
would be a bowl-caliber team in 1981. 

Most people figured Illinois would roll 
over and hide after it was belittled by the 
Big Ten. The Illini would simply assume its 
place near the bottom of the conference. 

But as everyone knows by now, the 
sanctions did matter. Instead of rolling over 
for the rest of the league, Illinois posted a 
7-4 mark, its best record in 18 years. And 
because of the sanctions, the Illini were 
denied what would have been a certain 
bowl bid. 

However, the excitement of a successful 
Illinois football season could not be tainted. 
"This was my most satisfying year in 
coaching," White said at the end of the 
season. "Almost every phase of the team 
was improved." 

Statistically, Illinois had one of the finest 
years of its history. The Illini averaged 410 
yards a game and scored more points than 
any team in school history, registering at 
least 20 points every Big Ten game. 

A record average home crowd of 
62,365 saw the Illini win all five of their 
home games for the first time since 1951. 
Illinois finished third in the Big Ten with a 
6-3 record, its most conference wins since 
1946. 

"We changed the entire attitude and 




John C. Stein 

chemistry of the team this year, and we 
were fairly darn consistent," White said. 
"Those are two things to point to with 
pride for the future." 

Once again, the focus at Illinois was on 
its high-powered passing offense led by 
Tony Eason, the first team quarterback for 
the Associated Press All-Big Ten team, and 
receivers Oliver Williams and Mike Martin. 

Eason was the most prolific passer in Big 
Ten history, erasing most of the records 
Dave Wilson had set a year earlier. The 
Illini had the best one-two combo in school 
history, Williams and Martin. Williams 
caught 38 passes for a 20-yard average 
and six touchdowns, while Martin averaged 



19.7 yards on 34 catches and had five 
touchdowns. 

The defense was improved, contributing 
more than its share throughout the season 
Except for the 70-21 loss to Michigan, the 
Illini defense bent, but didn't break, allow 
ing an average of 22 points in the other ter 
games. 

Illinois opened the season with a 26-6 
loss to Pittsburgh, the number one team ir 
the nation most of the second half of the 
season. The Illini bounced back with a 27 
17 victory at Michigan State the next week 
end. 

The team then won two important home 
games against Syracuse and Minnesota 



146 

Football 



r 




le Illini played poorly, but still managed a 
'-14 win over the Orangemen. Illinois 
>wned a scrappy Minnesota team 38-29 
'o weeks later to record its first win 
>ainst a team picked during the preseason 

do well in the Big Ten. 

The Illini experienced setbacks at Pur- 
le and Ohio State the next two weeks, 
inois may have been a little overconfident 

its 44-20 loss to the Boilermakers, but it 
so caught Purdue on one of its finest days 
1 season. Some questionable officiating 
ade the 34-27 loss to the Buckeyes hard 

accept, since the Illini played tough in 
olumbus for the second year in a row. 

The high point of the season came in the 



next two weeks at home against Wisconsin 
and Iowa. For two weeks in a row, Illinois 
knocked off the Big Ten leader, defeating 
Wisconsin 23-21 on Homecoming and 
pounding Iowa, the eventual Rose Bowl 
representative, 24-7 in the team's best 
game of the season. Both games were 
played in front of capacity Memorial Stadi- 
um crowds. 

The low point of the season followed in 
dramatic fashion the next Saturday as the 
Illini fell to Michigan 70-21 in a bizarre 
blowout. Illinois played one of its best first 
quarters ever, taking a 21-7 lead over the 
Wolverines. Yet, Illinois matched that with 
its worst three quarters ever, giving up the 

(continued) 



John C- Stein 

Opposite Top: Darrell Smith tries to evade an Indiana 
tackier in the 35-14 Illini win Nov. 14. 

Opposite Left: A pleased fan shows some of the renewed 
spirit at Memorial Stadium this season. 

Opposite Right: Tim McAvoy (86) and Calvin Thomas 
wait on the sidelines behind Coach Mike White. 

Above: Adam Linger gives punter Chris Sigourney some 
practice handling snaps on the sidelines. 



147 

Football 



▼"*!• «• 1*1 



m 



No bowl ••• 

most points in school history in front of 
105,000 in Ann Arbor. 

The Mini showed their character against 
Indiana, refusing to give up after the beat- 
ing of a week earlier. Illinois scored three 
second-half touchdowns to beat the Hoo- 
siers 35-14. The team closed out the sea- 
son on the road with a 49-12 victory over 
winless Northwestern. 

"Where other teams stubbed their toe, 
we didn't," White said. "We beat the 
teams we had to in the middle of the Big 
Ten. But we're still a long way from Michi- 
gan and Ohio State." 

The way the Big Ten season went this 
year, with Iowa going to the Rose Bowl, 
Illinois may not be that far away. And next 
season, the Mini won't have sanctions to 
keep them home. M\ 

— Mike Zahorik 

Right: The Illinois defensive line of Mark Butkus (53), Dan 
Gregus (92), and Terry Cole (91) jump on a fumble recov- 
ered by Pete Mulchrone (96) during the 35-14 victory over 
Indiana Nov. 14. 

Below: Illini quarterback Tony Eason hands off the ball to 
running back Calvin Thomas as Darell Smith leads a block 
in an Illini homecoming victory over Wisconsin. The Illini 
running game blossomed by the end of the season. 

Below right: The Illinois defense rejoices after winning a 
battle in the trenches during the 23-21 Illini victory Oct. 23 
at Memorial Stadium. 






Brian Coleman 




Randy Stukenberg 



An AU-American boy 



Quite simply, it would be very hard to 
have a better season than the one Illinois 
quarterback Tony Eason had. Anybody 
who can make people forget about the 
legendary feats of Dave Wilson has accom- 
plished something little short of spectacu- 
lar. 

Eason is the model quarterback, almost 
too good to be real. He has a strong arm, 
excellent mobility and vision, exceptional 
football intelligence and the ability to lead a 
team. To put the icing on a hefty slice of 
cake, Eason is modest, clean-cut and 
doesn't smoke or drink. He is an All- Ameri- 
can if there ever was one. 

Eason's final statistics for 1981 are an 
indication of superb ability. The junior 
completed 61 percent of his passes for 
3,360 yards and 20 touchdowns. He set 
Big Ten single season records for passing 
yardage, total offense and touchdown 
passes. Also, he broke most of the school 
records Dave Wilson set last season. 

Most important, as Eason will tell any- 
one, Illinois had a 7-4 record after going 3- 
7-1 last season. The team aspect of football 
can't be emphasized enough, but no one 
player is more responsible for Illinois' suc- 
cess than is Eason. 




Randy Stukenberg 



"I've had other Ail-American quarter- 
backs, and Tony is certainly in that class," 
said Coach Mike White. In fact, Dallas 
Cowboys' General Manager Tex Schramm 
already has labeled Eason as a sure number 
one draft choice. 

But there wasn't a flock of colleges at 
Eason's door after he finished his two years 
at American River College in Sacramento, 
Calif., in 1979. 

"Things just kind of fell through," Eason 
said. "Illinois was the only school interest- 
ed in recruiting me. I feel very fortunate. I 
kind of walked in the back door." 

Without ever seeing a film of Eason's 
performance, White took him on the rec- 
ommendation of two West Coast connec- 
tions. The high praise Eason received was 
good enough for White, who offered Eason 
a scholarship. 

Eason was redshirted for the 1980 sea- 
son while Wilson was grabbing headlines on 
and off the field. The extra season gave 
Eason a chance to learn White's complicat- 
ed system. 

"I think it helped a great deal," Eason 
said of last season. "I learned a lot on the 
sidelines. Listening to the headphones, I 
learned what was wrong on the field, and 
hopefully I won't make the same mis- 
takes." 

"It was very competitive between us, 
but I have to feel Dave and I are still very 
good friends," Eason said. 

Eason has no one but himself to credit 
for his success, however. At 6-foot-4, 205 
pounds, Eason has the size and arm of a 
classic drop-back quarterback. And he has 
a good throwing touch. 

"The amazing thing about Tony is that 
he doesn't waste any throws," White said. 
"He throws a lot of different passes well. A 
lot of guys are good at long passes or 
better at short routes or quick passes, but 
Tony can throw them all. That's why his 
completion percentage is so high." 

Tony Eason set some high standards 
during the 1981 season. Excited Illinois 
fans will look on to to see what he can do 
next year. ^ 

— Mike Zahorik 

Tony Eason displays the form that made him the most 
prolific passer in Big Ten history. 



149 

Football/Tony Eason 




Brian Coleman 



150 

Football 



Wisconsin 



TIME OUTS LEFT 




Opposite top: Filling the shoes of Dave Wilson was no 
problem for Tony Eason as he demonstrates the form that 
made him one of the leading passers in the nation during 
the 1981-82 season in a 24-7 victory over Iowa Oc. 31. 

Opposite bottom: Iowa fullback Eddie Phillips is stymied 
by Illinois defensive end Willie Young, while linebacker 
Jack Squirek (34) adds a hit in the 24-7 Illini victory Oct. 
31. 

Left: The Illini break through a banner on Homecoming. 
October 23. The new stadium scoreboard highlights the 
background. 

Below: Illinois running back Darrell Smith is swarmed by 
offensive linemen (from left) Dennis Flynn, Troy McMillan 
and Mike Carrington as Wisconsin defenders look on de- 
jectedly in Illinois' 23-21 victory on Homecoming day, Oct. 
23. 



Randy Stukenberg 




Randy Stukenberg 



151 

Football 



Building a quarterback resume 



Illinois head football coach Mike White 
has built one of the most impressive quar- 
terback resumes in the country. 

During stop-offs at Stanford, California 
and Illinois, White has groomed such out- 
standing signal callers as Craig Morton, Jim 
Plunkett, Steve Bartkowski, Vince Ferra- 
gamo and Dave Wilson. 

The latest in line is Tony Eason — whom 
Dallas Cowboys' vice president Gil Brandt 
already has labeled a National Football 
League first-round draft pick. 

"Mike White taught me a lot," said Bart- 
kowski, the eight-year Atlanta Falcon vet- 
eran. "He really understands the passing 
game. When you look at College as a stop- 
off to the pros, you're tempted to go to a 
throwing school, and he definitely has the 
reputation of throwing the ball." 

When Bartkowski played under White, 
the quarterback legacy was still in its build- 
ing stages. But when Dave Wilson came to 
Illinois in 1980, the Mike White passing 
legend was riding on its crest. 

"Mike is very well known out West," 
Wilson said. "His offensive philosophy is 
receptive to any quarterback, especially 
when you hear famous names like Jim 
Plunkett and Steve Bartkowski. He runs a 
pro-style offense, and the best quarter- 
backs want to go to a school where they 
throw a lot." 

Tony Eason, who still has another year 
of eligibility at Illinois, is White's current 
quarterback prodigy. Eason, like most of 
White's signal callers, is a California native 
who always has had the utmost respect for 
his coach. 

"Coach White is a dynamic individual," 
Eason said. "You always have confidence 
in him. I followed him at Cal, so I knew of 
his quarterback ties. Cal was in big trouble 
when he got there, but he turned them into 
a Rose Bowl team." 

It was out West in the San Francisco Bay 
area where White was first introduced to 
the passing game. During the late 1950s, 
White played tight end for California under 
former Illini coach Pete Elliott. White was 
elected captain during his senior year by a 
squad that included soon-to-be Minnesota 
Vikings quarterback Joe Kapp. 

"Offense has always fascinated me," 
said the 44-year-old White. "My prefer- 
ence for passing goes down to my person- 
ality. At Stanford, (former head coach) 
John Ralston and I realized that is what you 
have to do to win. We were beating our 
heads against the wall trying to run against 
USC and UCLA. We had to throw." 

152 

Football 




Brian Colei 



White is careful not to take too much 
credit for the success of his quarterback 
disciples. When Morton played for Califor- 
nia, White was the freshman coach. How- 
ever, White was still a key factor in recruit- 
ing Morton. White was the offensive coor- 
dinator at Stanford, and he called the plays 
for Plunkett. White was the head coach at 
California when he had Bartkowski and 
Ferragamo, and at Illinois when he had 
Wilson, but he attributes much of their suc- 
cess, as well as Eason's, to the quarterback 
coaches who worked with the players. 

White has always worked with or hired 
outstanding coaches. He and Philadelphia 
Eagles head coach Dick Vermeil were assis- 
tant coaches at Stanford from 1965-68. 

"Mike is a very intense, sincere coach," 
Vermeil said. "He has always been able to 
develop respect from his players. But the 
number one quality of any great coach is 
his leadership ability. A lot of guys know a 



lot about football, are good administrators 
but are unable to succeed because they 
never get around to being good leaders. 
Leadership is an area Mike has always ex- 
celled in." 

Leadership is a quality White looks for 
when he recruits a quarterback. "Temper- 
ment and leadership are prerequisites," 
said White. "Physical size and throwing 
ability are important, but leadership is the 
key." 

Bill Walsh, head coach of the resurgent 
San Francisco 49ers, also has made a big 
impact on White. The pair's ties date back 
to 1960 when they were assistant coaches 
together at Cal-Berkeley. Later, they were 
assistants at Stanford, and Walsh hired 
White as the 49ers offensive line coach in 
1978-79. Walsh calls White his closest 
friend. 

"Illinois has found the one — and maybe 
only — coach who can bring them out of 





le doldrums," Walsh said. "His thorough 
ass system has replaced a stodgy, conser- 
ative Illinois offense." 

Walsh has some insight into White's suc- 
ass with quarterbacks: "A lot of coaches 
on't have his (White's) knowledge of the 
uarterback position. They don't use quar- 
srbacks effectively. A lot of coaches might 
ave a quarterback as good as Mike's, but 
ley duck the challenge. Mike isn't afraid 
) utilize the full extent of his quarterback's 
ilents. Give Mike full credit." 

White, who majored in business adminis- 
iation, never might have entered the 
oaching profession had it not been for his 
id coach, Pete Elliott. The California na- 
pe was trying to decide whether to go to 
jaduate school or to law school when El- 
)tt encouraged him to return to Cal to 
Income a graduate assistant coach. 

"Through his experience, Mike has 
lined a great knowledge of the passing 



game," said Elliott, who coached Illinois to 
its last Rose Bowl victory in 1964. "He 
does a good job choosing personnel, and 
he's always been associated with talented 
coaches like Bill Walsh and John Ralston." 

It's upgrading programs, not furthering 
the quarterback regime, of which the 1980 
Big Ten coach of the year runner-up is the 
most proud. 

"Rebuilding situations are the area we 
take the most pride in," said White. "Stan- 
ford was 0-10 and just about ready to give 
up on football the year before we got 
there. 

"Cal-Berkeley wasn't the most ideal foot- 
ball atmosphere either, but we were able to 
win a conference championship in four 
years." 

Illinois is ahead of schedule in White's 
rebuilding process. The Illini, which has 
shattered all kinds of offensive and atten- 
dance records during White's first two sea- 



Above: In a familiar scene for Illinois fans, quarterback 
Tony Eason drops back to throw against the Iowa defense, 
while fullback Calvin Thomas (42) and offensive tackle Bob 
Stowe prepare to block, in the 24-7 Illini victory October 
23. 

Opposite: Illinois center Greg Boeke (63, on the ground) 
has trouble containing Minnesota defenders, and conse- 
quently running back Joe Curtis is tackled. Nevertheless, 
the Illini won 38-29 on October 3. 

sons, has returned to the upper division of 
the Big Ten. 

White recognizes that Illinois will have to 
be a more balanced team in order to get to 
Pasadena. "Offense sells tickets," he said, 
"but defense wins games." 

Winning is the bottom line, but it is hard 
to ignore a cast of heroes such as Morton, 
Plunkett, Bartkowski, Ferragamo, Wilson 
and Eason. It's an honor role that shines 
brighter as White's career grows longer 
and better. jjjJ] 

— Chip Cirillo 
153 

Football 



Learning how to win 




John C Stein 



1980 should have been a rebuilding year 
for the Illinois baseball team. It's a story 
that has been heard too many times from 
various losing Illinois teams over the years. 

But in this case, there's a nice twist — 
the Illini skipped the rebuilding year and 
reversed its record from 18-33 in 1980 to 
35-24 in '81. Illinois finished the Big Ten 
season with an 11-3 record, good for sec- 
ond place in the West Division and a spot in 
the Big Ten playoffs in Ann Arbor, Mich., 
May 16 and 17. 

However, the magic left the team in Ann 
Arbor. A week layoff immediately before 
the playoffs seemed to throw the team's 
timing off; Illinois lost its first game to even- 
tual champion Michigan 4-3 and was elimi- 
nated by Minnesota 2-0. 

Nevertheless, it was a remarkable sea- 
son for a team that wasn't expected to do 
well. Coach Tom Dedin made the presea- 
son prediction that the team would win its 
division, and the laughter could be heard 
immediately thereafter from those who had 
seen Illinois lose consistently over the last 
decade. In the end, Dedin and his ball- 
players had the last laugh. 

Certainly no one was expecting much 
from the team after its dismal performance 
on its spring trip. Facing some of the top 
schools in the Southwest, Illinois went 4- 
12. The poor record was the case of a 
young team playing too many tough teams 
in too many days. 

Back at home, however, Illinois slowly 
built up both its record and its confidence. 
The Illini won 14 of the next 17 games, 
winning seven games in a row during one 
period. 

Illinois sailed through the Big Ten regu- 
lar season, wracking up some impressive 
statistics in the process. 

The Illini led the Big Ten in fielding, was 
second in team pitching with a 3.09 
earned-run average and was third in team 
hitting at .303. 

Opposite Top: Illinois centerfielder Dave Rear smacks a 
hit against Northwestern during the four game series May 
2 and 3, 1981 

Above: Pitcher Rick Filippo picked up the victory as the 
Illini swept the Northwestern series. 

Left: Shortstop Rob Pullen makes the stop, while second 
baseman Brian White makes the out against the Wildcats 

155 

Baseball 



I- 




Right: Brian Bock, who hit an Illinois record 11 home runs 
last season, eyes another one against Valparaiso. 



156 

Baseball 



John C Stein 



Learning • « 

The team had a powerful front half of 
the order with Tim Richardson, Todd 
Schmitke, Brian Bock, Brian White, and 
Dave Rear all hitting better than .310. 
Bock hit an Illinois record 11 home runs, 
and the team stole a record 112 bases. 

For once, the team also had some pitch- 
ing to back up the offense. Rick Filippo 
finished the Big Ten season with a 1.47 
ERA, tops in the league. Freshman Jeff 
Innis gave the team excellent relief help 
with seven saves and a 2.48 ERA, the low- 
est on the team for all games, including Big 
Ten play. 

But it all came undone in the playoffs. 



Illinois was a delicately-balanced team 
that was knocked off kilter by the week lay- 
off before the playoffs. It was finals week. 

"The timing was not good," Dedin said. 
"Being away as long as we were screwed 
up our timing. We got good pitching and 
pretty good defense, but just nothing with 
the bats. The bats kind of died on us." 

Even so, Illinois gave Michigan, who 
eventually advanced to the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association World Series, all 
it could handle. The Illini had only one hit 
in the first five innings before coming up 
with three in the sixth for two runs and two 
more hits in the seventh to score the 




John C. Stein 

1 Above: Dave Rear, who was second on the team in stolen Below: First baseman Dave Rear catches the throw from 
bases, steals another one against Valparaiso. second baseman Brian White to record another out. 



final run. 

The layoff didn't help Filippo much, ei- 
ther. He gave up 11 hits and all four runs in 
five and two-thirds innings. 

There was even less noise from the hit- 
ters the next morning in the 2-0 loss to 
Minnesota. White and Bob Kopale had two 
hits each, providing the only offense for the 
team. The Illini were lucky to be as close as 
they were. The Gophers stranded 12 run- 
ners in the game as Illinois turned two 
clutch double plays. 

Randy Conte and Innis turned in good 
performances on the mound, but there was 
nothing to support them. 

It was a mysterious irony for the Illini to 
face: the pitching, which had been ques- 
tioned most of the year, was the team's 
strength while the highly-touted bats fal- 
tered. 

"The pitchers pitched great for us all 
year," Kopale said. "That was supposed to 
be our weak point, and it turned out to be 
our strong point." 

Though Dedin wasn't happy with the 
team's performance in the playoffs, he rec- 
ognized the great season Illinois had. 

"This group has learned how to win," 
Dedin said. "I'm disappointed we didn't 
win, but they gave us a hell of a year." 
— Mike Zahorik [Ml 




John C Stein 



157 

Baseball 



Intramurals: 



Something 
Sor everyone 



^9|1K:' ' 'MP'"'!-' ""It 






H 






Brian Coleman 




John C. Stein 



158 

intramurals 



y 






Brian Coleman 




159 



Intramurals 



Building 
the student body 



Remember the recreation house or 
neighborhood gym when you were a kid? 

The University has the ultimate recrea- 
tion house-gym, the Intramural and Phys- 
ical Education Building, or IMPE as it's 
known to students. If it's an indoor sport, it 
probably can be played at IMPE. Equipped 
with 23 racquetball-handball courts, eight 



full basketball courts, a jogging track, in- 
door and outdoor pools, pingpong and 
pool tables, weight, archery, camping, golf 
and combat rooms, IMPE could keep a 
person exhausted for days. 

While the University exercises our 
minds, no one can say it doesn't give us a 
place to exercise our bodies, too. 




IMPE 



^AJl».-- 







161 

IMPE 



Quickness keeps them on 



1981-82 was supposed to be an off year 
for the Illinois basketball team. Lost to 
graduation and the National Basketball As- 
sociation draft were Eddie Johnson, Mark 
Smith and Derek Holcomb, the muscle of 
the Illini the previous season when the 
team advanced to the regional champion- 
ship of the National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation tournament. Understandably, Illi- 
nois was not highly regarded before the 
season began. 

Indeed, "Playboy" magazine tabbed the 
team to finish ninth in the Big Ten, while 
the writers at the annual Big Ten press 
luncheon predicted sixth place for the Illini. 

Illinois had only two frontliners returning 
— inexperienced Bryan Leonard and er- 
ratic, foul-prone James Griffin. The team 
wasn't tall, strong or deep enough on the 
front line, and experts figured the long, 



grueling Big Ten season would get the best 
of the team. 

But size often is overemphasized in bas- 
ketball — it's the basic skill of the players, 
not just height, that is important. And while 
Illinois lacked size, it compensated for it 
with speed and brains. 

In Derek Harper, Perry Range and Craig 
Tucker, the Illini possessed a backcourt 
that was both the best in the conference 
and as good as any in the country. Illinois 
coach Lou Henson decided to go with his 
best players and started all three. 

The experiment proved to be a success, 
and with the help of surprisingly strong 
play from Griffin at the center spot, Illinois 
remained in the thick of the Big Ten race 
throughout the season, never falling below 
the sixth spot. 

For the fourth consecutive year, Hen- 



son's Illinois teams won at least 15 game 
and once again, the Illini performed well 
non-conference play, entering Big Ten pla 
with a 7-2 record. 

The Illini finished the season with a r 
10 mark, 10-8 in the Big Ten, and qualifie 
for the National Invitational Tournamen 
Illinois was in the race for an NCAA Tou 
nament bid until the last two weeks of th 
season, when the team lost two road game 
in a row. 

Illinois opened the season with thre 
tough games against Loyola, Kansas Stat 
and Missouri. The backcourt combined fc 
60 points, and the Illini had its second be; 
offensive output of the year, nipping Lov 
ola 87-83 in overtime at the Rosemont He 
rizon. 

Revenge was gained in Champaign in th 
next game against Kansas State, the tean 




Randy Stukenberg 



162 

Men's Basketball 



that had beaten Illinois in the NCAA re- 
gional championship last season. This time, 
the Illini controlled the game with a bal- 
anced attack and upset the Jayhawks 55- 
49. 

But Illinois caught the other end of re- 
venge when it returned to the Checker- 
dome in St. Louis to play Missouri, whom 
the Illini had beaten by 22 points a year 
earlier. The Tigers, who later were ranked 
number one in the nation for a week, 
pulled away in the overtime period to beat 
Illinois 78-68. 

Illinois won its Illini basketball classic on 
December 11 and 12 for the third consecu- 
tive year by beating Army and Texas 
A&M. Griffin was the most valuable player 
in the tournament, scoring a career-high 27 
points in a 76-63 victory over Texas A&M. 

St. Louis and North Dakota State posed 



few problems for the Illini as the team 
chalked up two more wins before playing 
at the Blade-Grass City Invitational in Tole- 
do, Ohio. Illinois disposed of Bowling 
Green in the first round, but also played its 
worst game of the year, losing 71-51 to 
Toledo in the championship game. Tucker 
went 2-19 from the field, the start of a 
slump that would last throught the first 
month of the Big Ten season. 

Northwestern helped build Illinois' confi- 
dence in the opening Big Ten game at Ev- 
anston. The Wildcats fell 60-50, making it 
the fifth victory over NU for the Illini. At 
Iowa City, the Illini played poorly, but only 
lost 56-50 to conference powerhouse 
Iowa. 

The loss to Toledo was the team's most 
embarrassing one, but a 51-50 Ohio State 
overtime victory in Champaign was the 



most painful. The Buckeyes went scoreless 
for more than ten minutes in the second 
half and overtime periods, but the Illini 
made several mistakes in the last 30 sec- 
onds of the second overtime period, allow- 
ing Ohio State to score four straight points 
and win at the buzzer. 



Opposite: Illinois freshman George Montgomery battles 
for a rebound with Ohio State's Grencille Waiters and 
another Buckeye during Illinois' heartbreaking 51-50 over- 
time loss to the Buckeyes Jan. 14. 

Below left: Craig Tucker soars high for a jump shot 
against Michigan Jan. 30, the game in which Tucker scored 
21 points to break out of a month-long slump. 

Below: The Orange and Blue bird is escorted off the court 
after being loudly booed by the fans during the Ohio State- 
Illinois game. The O-B bird was supposed to be the team's 
mascot, but one half of the fans sent him flying south for the 
season. 




John C- Stein 



163 

Men's Basketball 



eeping on 



Illinois rebounded with a 55-51 victory 
over Michigan State at the Assembly Hall, 
but again lost in the final seconds in the 
next outing, this time to Indiana, 54-53. 
Illinois now was 2-3, and the preseason 
predictions seemed to be coming true. 

But the team showed its character on the 
road, winning at Minnesota and Purdue. 
The Illini defeated the fifth-ranked Gophers 
64-57 behind Griffin's 19 points and de- 
stroyed a lackluster Boilermaker team 63- 
48. 

Back in Champaign, the winning streak 
was extended to four games with romps 
over Michigan and Wisconsin. The Illini 
may have become a little heady by that 
time, however, and the Wolverines brought 
them down to Earth in Ann Arbor, 58-53, 
one week after having lost to Illinois. Indi- 
ana made it a sweep in Bloomington, down- 
ing Illinois 73-60. 

The Illini continued to play erratically at 
Wisconsin and against Purdue in Cham- 
paign. Illinois survived a late Badger rush 
to win 68-60, but it couldn't overcome the 
worst half in Assembly Hall history — 12 
points in the first 20 minutes — and lost 
52-44 to the Boilermakers. 

The loss dropped Illinois to fifth place in 
the Big Ten with Minnesota, ranked eighth 
in the nation, due in town. 

It would have been easy for the team to 
collapse and fall out of the conference 
race, and no one would have been sur- 
prised after the way the Illini had played 
against Purdue the previous game. But Illi- 
nois rose to the occasion and played one of 
its best games of the season, beating Min- 
nesota for the second time 77-65. 

Tucker put on one of the most impres- 
sive performances of any Illinois player in 
the last few years, hitting 11 of 15 field 
goals and scoring 32 points as he downed 
the Gophers almost single-handedly. 

Illinois played a terrible first half at 
Michigan State Feb. 25 and lost 56-47. 
Two days later at Ohio State, the Illini 
managed to stay in the game until the final 
minutes but still lost 63-53. 

The team returned home for the final 
two conference games, coming back from a 
16-point second-half deficit to beat Iowa 

164 

Men's Basketball 



73-67 in overtime and downing Northwes- 
tern 85-65. 

Off the court, the Illinois basketball pro- 
gram was even more impressive. The Illini 
pulled off an almost unbelieveable feat, re- 
ceiving commitments from four top Illinois 
high school players by December 1981, 
four months before the official signing date. 

King's 6-10 center Efrem Winters and 
Quincy's 6-2 guard Bruce Douglas, both of 
whom were rated among the top ten play- 
ers in the nation, will enroll at Illinois this 
fall, along with all-staters Doug Alten- 
berger, a guard from Peoria-Richwoods, 
and center Scott Meents from Herscher. 

Illinois avoided an off year during the 
1981-82 season, and with the recruitment 
of these prep standouts, the Illini should be 
a contender for Big Ten and national titles 
in the years to come. [Ip] 

— Mike Zahorik 



Right: An Illini huddle gives coach Lou Henson a chance to 
discuss game strategy with the team. 

Opposite: Derek Harper slips the ball by Minnesota's 
Randy Breuer to score a basket and help maintain Illinois' 
lead in the final moments of the 77-65 Illini victory Feb. 20. 

Below: Michigan's Eric Turner has position according to 
the referees, and Perry Range is called for the charge 
in the Illinois victory Jan. 30. 




Randy Stukcnbcrg 




John C- Stein 




John C. Stein 



165 

Men's Basketball 



Mini guards dazzle Big 



Illinois' football and basketball teams de 
parted from traditional strategies with con- 
siderable success during the 1981-82 
sports season. 

Illinois football coach Mike White proved 
many critics wrong when he successfully 
instituted a pass-oriented offense in a run- 
oriented conference. 

On the basketball court, Illinois coach 
Lou Henson sent in a smaller, quicker team 
featuring a three-guard offense against the 



rest of the physical, powerful Big Ten. 

But while White switched to a passing 
offense by choice, Henson's unconvention- 
al move was made out of necessity. The 
muscle from the 21-8 1980-82 team - 
forwards Mark Smith and Eddie Johnson 
and center Derek Holcomb — had been 
graduated. The only returning frontliners 
were center James Griffin and forward 
Bryan Leonard. 

Illinois was loaded in the backcourt, how- 



ever. Returning were sophomore play 
maker Derek Harper, who was elected tc 
the 1981 NBC-TV all-freshman team, anc 
two seniors, defensive standout Pern, 
Range and scoring ace Craig Tucker. 

While Henson may have preferred a feu 
more experienced big men to give the tearr 
some front-line bulk, he was pleased with 
the results of the experimental three-guard 
offense. Preseason predictions indicated Il- 
linois would be mauled in the tough Big 




John C Stein 



James L. Novy 



166 

IHint Guards 



Ten 



Ten conference and would be lucky to fin- 
ish in the middle group of teams. 

As it turned out, Illinois never fell out of 
the top six of the conference throughout 
the season, and most opponents found 
themselves having to adjust to the excep- 
tionally quick trio of Illini guards. 

In the two Illinois-Minnesota games, Min- 
nesota entered both contests ranked in the 
top ten in the national polls and featured a 
big lineup with 7-foot-4 Randy Breuer in 
the center spot. But the Illini were a little 
too quick for the Gophers in both games 
and swept the series. 

"Before the season began, I was anxious 
to see how our offense would work out," 
Harper said. "I'm pretty pleased with the 
way things have gone." 

The key to the success of Illinois' three- 
guard offense was the distinct talents of 
each of the guards and the way each com- 
plemented the other. 

With Harper running the team, the Illini 
has one of the best floor generals in the 
country, and he led the Big Ten in assists. 
But Harper also was a very capable re- 
Dounder and defensive player who could 
;ome up with a big steal when needed. 

In his first three years, Range had been 
lailed by Henson as one of the best defen- 
sive guards in the country. But Range also 
emerged as Illinois' most consistent offen- 
sive player this year, scoring in double fig- 
ures in all but 4 games, and one of the most 
kccurate shooters in the Big Ten. 

Tucker was an excellent ballhandler and 
'ransition player who provided the scoring 
ind the "big plays" for the Illini throughout 
he year. Although he got off to a slow start 
n the Big Ten season, he made up for it 
lown the stretch. His 32 points against 
Minnesota Feb. 20 was an Illinois season 
ligh. 

The three gave the Illini as versatile and 
alented a backcourt as any team in the 
ountry, and they were crucial to Illinois' 
urprising success in 1981-82. M\ 

— Mike Zahorik 



Opposite left: Craig Tucker hurls himself at the basket 
nd Michigan's Thad Garner during Illinois' 79-61 win. 

eft: Derek Harper soars to block the shot of Michigan 
tate's Ben Tower, but is called for a foul during Illinois' 55- 
1 victory Jan. 16. 

ight: Craig Tucker scores two of his 12 points during 
iinois' 72-37 rout of Army in the first round of the Illini 
lassie. 




167 

Illini Guards 






Simple improvement 




Basketball is a simple game for James 
Griffin, Illinois' senior 6-foot-10 center. 

If he's open, he shoots; if not, he passes. 
If the ball comes his way, he grabs the 
rebound; if a shot comes in his direction, he 
tries to block it. 

In his own manner, Griffin has been sim- 
ple and effective for Illinois this year and 
one of the biggest reasons for Illinois' 
somewhat unexpected success on the bas- 
ketball court. 

Before the season began, the center po- 
sition commonly was listed as Illinois' prob- 
lem area. In his first three years, Griffin was 
noted for his tendency to foul out quickly, 
his erratic though sometimes deadly shot 
and his poor defense. 

But to the surprise of everyone except 
Griffin himself, the lanky center has blos- 
somed into the kind of player he was ex- 
pected to be when he arrived at Illinois four 
years ago. Back then, coach Lou Henson 
billed him as "one of the top ten high 
school players in the country." 

Griffin certainly wasn't being mentioned 
in the same breath as preseason all-Big Ten 



Left: James Griffin goes up for a shot, but the ball doesn't 
because of the quick hands of a Minnesota defender during 
the Illinois victory Feb. 20. 




candidates Randy Breuer of Minnesota and 
Russel Cross of Purdue. 

But with the burden resting squarely on 
his shoulders, Griffin responded. He has 
had his best games against top centers and 
has provided consistent play in the middle 
throughout the season. 

"I'm not surprised," Griffin said. "I ex- 
pected to be up there with the rest of the 
top centers in the Big Ten." 

Griffin is not an imposing figure who 
powers his way toward the basket. His 
main weapon is an unusual fall-away jump 
shot from behind his head, and when Grif- 
fin is hot, his shot is practically unstoppa- 
ble. 

"I've always shot that way," Griffin said. 
"Not too many people can stop it. I've 
always had confidence in my shot." 

In his two meetings with 7-4 Breuer, 
Griffin has been able to put his shot in over 
Breuer's long arms to score 33 points. He 
scored a career high 27 points over Texas 
A&M's highly regarded 6-11 Rudy Woods, 
and he scored 30 points in the two games 
against Cross. 

"I play them all the same every night,"' 
Griffin said. And while Griffin has been 
among the top ten in Big Ten scoring with a 
14-point average, he also has played well 
in other areas. 

He has fouled out of only one game, 
while averaging 33 minutes a game, and he 
has played good defense and rebounded 
well, ranking third in the conference in re- 
bounding and blocked shots. 

"Defense and rebounding have been my 
biggest improvements," Griffin said. "You 
have to have the desire to do those things 
well. I'm just thinking more on my feet this 
year." 

Griffin's all-around play has been invalu- 
able for Illinois since the team uses onlyj 
two front-line players. Griffin has kept op- 
ponents honest inside, making things easier 
for the three guards. 

"There's no doubt about it, Griff's been 
the key for us," Henson said. "He's been 
the most consistent and most solid player 
we've had all season." [ijJ] 

— Mike Zahorik 



Left: Craig Tucker and James Griffin celebrate at the free 
throw line during the Illinois win over Minnesota Feb. 20. 

Right: James Griffin dunks the ball on Minnesota's Randy 
Breuer (45) in Illinois' 77-65 victory Feb. 20. 




John C. Stein 



169 

James Griffin 



Tough competition helps 
lacrosse team improve 



Led throughout the year by a potent 
offense, the Illinois lacrosse club had its 
best season in years. 

The club posted a 6-4 record for the 
year, in spite of playing against some of the 
best teams in the Midwest. 

"Our games were against probably all 
the good teams in the area," club member 
Steve Heinen said. "We feel this is the best 
method to improve ourselves, and it obvi- 
ously helped us." 

The club began its schedule away from 
home — very far away — in Tampa Bay, 
Fla. The tournament there featured some 
of the best East Coast teams, and Illinois 
was outclassed and outplayed, dropping 
two games by large margins. 

"Though we lost," club member Mark 
Vilchuck said, "we received a lot of good 
experience from those games. We had 
many players who needed some playing 
time, and they got it in Florida." 

Once back home in Champaign, the 
team quickly posted two victories over 



what were expected to be tough oppo- 
nents. 

The club came back from an early deficit 
to defeat Washington (St. Louis) University 
17-12, and returned the next day with a 
19-7 victory over the Chicago lacrosse "B" 
team. 

"We played excellently in those games," 
club member Harry Calcutt said. "I've 
played on a lot of lacrosse teams before, 
but never on a club with such a strong 
attack." 

Joining Calcutt on the attack were Steve 
Bissell and Bob Kline, both veteran la- 
crosse players. These three provided most 
of the firepower for the offense throughout 
the season. 

Illinois dropped its next contest to Lake 
Forest 14-13, the second year in a row 
Lake Forest nipped the Illini. But the team 
bounced back to beat Northwestern and 
started to roll, winning two more games at 
home over Iowa and Purdue. The two wins 
brought Illinois' home record to 4-0. 







"The game against Iowa was the best 
game we played all year," Kline said. "We 
put everything together. We were able to 
keep the ball in our end a good part of the 
game. We get sort of a rhythm going and 
then we're hard to stop." 

The club's play began to slip after the 
Iowa game, as the Illini turned in lackluster 
performances for its final three outings. 
Illinois narrowly defeated Windy City la- 
crosse club and lost to Michigan and Albion 
(Michigan) College. 

"It wasn't a good way to finish the sea- 
son," Vilchuck said. "We had a lack of 
cohesion in these games. We really should 
have beat Albion." 

However, Vilchuck called the 1980-81 
season a success. "We had a great year," 
he said. "We were radically different com- 
pared to last year's team. We came a long 

way." M\ 

— Alan Friedman 

llinois' John McAnally gets by an Iowa defender to score in 
an Illini victory against the Hawkeyes April 4, 1981. 




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4* 







Left: Goalie Marvin Perez deflects an Illinois State shot, 
and defenseman Tom Adams attempts to clear it in a win 
over the lcebirds Jan. 18, 1981. 

Below: Skating by an Iowa State defender, Illinois' Paul 
Fryling advances the puck with Bob Havlir trailing in one of 
the club's five losses to the Cyclones on Oct. 31, 1980. 




John Zich John Zich 



Cyclone hits 
Illinois hockey team 



There's no doubt that the Illinois hockey 
:lub had its share of internal problems dur- 
ng the 1980-81 season. Yet this was one 
:eam that legitimately could point to exter- 
nal factors to explain its losing record — 
lamely, the presence of Iowa State on its 
schedule. 

The Cyclones whipped everybody in 
sight, including the Mini, and went unde- 
feated in Central States Collegiate Hockey 
J-eague play. If you subtract the five Iowa 
State losses from Illinois' 7-13 record, 
:hings don't look quite so bad. 

But not good enough, as far as the Mini 
'players are concerned. "It was disappoint- 
ing," forward Bob Havlir, the team's sec- 
bnd leading scorer, said. "When we started 
:he season, we thought we would do well in 
:he conference. We couldn't get un- 
packed, though, and we never put it to- 
gether." 

Illinois finished last out of four teams in 
the CSCHL, and the only league team it 



beat all season was Illinois State. The Mini 
had a poor start in its opening two home 
games after being creamed by the Cy- 
clones. 

The club improved over the second half 
of the season, but still couldn't win. Appro- 
priately, Illinois played its best game of the 
season in a losing effort February 15 at 
Iowa State. The game was tied after two 
periods, but the Cyclones scored two goals 
in the third to win 5-3. 

Illinois couldn't repeat that performance 
in the league tournament, however, and 
was bombed once again by Iowa State 9-2 
to close the season. 

"We had talent and we shouldn't have 
played as poorly as we did," coach Mark 
Roszkowski said. 

Havlir thought part of the problem was 
the team's poor start against Iowa State. 
"If you get off to a good start, things go 
well," he said. "If you get off to a bad start 
like we did, things just seem to get worse." 



The team also was hurt when, in the 
middle of the season, forward Lee Archam- 
bault broke his leg. Senior goaltender Roy 
Smogor never returned to the form of his 
previous seasons after injuring his ankle 
early in the season. 

The future, however, looks brighter for 
Illinois because Iowa State has left the 
league, moving up to a varsity level sport, 
where it belonged throughout last season. 
Hockey should become fun again for Illi- 
nois. 

However, there was yet another loss 
from which the Mini will not easily recover. 
Senior forward Pete Lovett was killed in a 
motorcycle accident June 18 in New York. 
Lovett represented the fun-loving spirit of 
the hockey team, and although he didn't 
play during the 1980-81 season because of 
an injury, he left his mark on the club. 

"He was one of the biggest leaders on 
the team," defenseman Jon Peters said. 
— Mike Zahorik |Wl 



171 

Hockey 






Game, set (records), match 



1981 was a record-breaking year for the 
Illinois men's tennis team. 

In coach Jack Groppel's last season at 
the helm, the Illini had its best overall re- 
cord in five years, as it ran up an 18-12 
mark. The Illini finished seventh in the Big 
Ten meet after compiling a 4-5 conference 
record. 

Transfer students and freshmen were 
important additions to the Illinois squad. 

Jack Conlan, from the University of Ala- 
bama, and Joe Daw, from Tulane Universi- 
ty, played both singles and doubles for the 



Illini. Conlan, an Ohio native, split most of 
his time between first singles and first dou- 
bles, while Daw played in the fifth and sixth 
singles spots, as well as at second doubles. 
Freshmen Barry Waddell and Neil Ad- 
ams had impressive records in their first 
season with the Illini. Waddell saw most of 
his action at number two singles and ran up 
an exceptional 29-12 record. Adams 
wasn't far behind, finishing the spring sea- 
son with a 23-15 singles mark. Also, Ad- 
ams' 21 wins in one season at the number 4 
spot was a new Illinois record. 



Todd Black played in the third spot for 
the Illini, but just couldn't seem to get out 
of the blocks, as he struggled to an 8-23 
singles record. 

Aurora's Scott Sommers fought a nag- 
ging foot injury and managed an 18-9 sin- 
gles mark, playing chiefly in the number 5 
position. Those wins gave Sommers, a sen- 
ior, 49 career victories at Illinois and 
moved him into a tie for sixth place on the 
all-time Illinois win list. Sommers may be 
able to break the number-one mark of 68 
before he leaves the University. 




Left: New head coach Brad Louderback observes a prac- 
tice along with trainer John C. Han. 



John C. Stein 

Above: Team captain Todd Black returns a shot during a 
practice. 



John C. Stein 



172 

Men's Tennis 



Guy Schalin and Tom Henderson also 
saw quite a bit of singles action for the Illini. 
Schalin filled in at fourth, fifth, and sixth 
singles and finished with a 13-6 mark, while 
Henderson played at both the number five 
and six positions on his way to a 7-6 re- 
cord. 

Doubles seemed to be an area of confu- 
sion for the Illini, as Groppel used a total of 
21 different combinations in the three posi- 
tions. 

The number-one spot was held by Con- 
an and Sommers for most of the spring 
season, and the pair had an even 9-9 re- 
cord. Waddell and Daw were the most of- 
ten used team in the number-two slot, and 
they rolled up a solid 13-8 mark. 

Third doubles was a position with which 
Groppell experimented. In 35 matches at 
lumber three, the Illini used 14 different 
pairs, gathering an impressive 22-13 over- 
all record. 

The fall half of the 1981-82 season 
found Illinois with a new head coach, 24- 
year-old Kansas native Brad Louderback, a 
former assistant at Clemson University. 
'Louderback inherited a veteran team from 
oroppel, added freshmen Adam Ambielli 
and Peter Bouton and stormed into the fall 
Reason adding enthusiasm, as well as phys- 
cal and mental toughness, to the Illini 
squad. 

Illinois opened its fall season with a pair 
bf dual meet victories over Illinois State 
and Sangamon State. After finishing in a tie 
tor sixth at the Clemson University Fall 
Classic in Clemson, S.C., the Illini traveled 
:o Carbondale, where it placed second in 
:he Illinois Intercollegiate Championships. 

Louderback was pleased with the 
squad's early season performance, but 
[definitely was looking forward to the 
rougher competition the Illini face during 
ts Big Ten schedule in the spring. 

Louderback is anticipating breaking a 
]ew more records. M\ 

— Kevin McPherson 



dumber one singles player Scott Sommers follows through 
)n his backhand. 



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John C. Stein 



173 



Men's Tennis 



>» 



wzm&m 



mz. 



Change of spirit, 
change of 



pace 



Spirited, energetic, confident, talented, 
hard working — these traits are difficult to 
find in an individual and even harder to 
combine into a successful unit. But with the 
arrival of new coach Mary Tredennick, the 
Illinois women's tennis team seems to be on 
the road to doing just that. 

With an impressive fall beginning, the 
team appears to be on the right track to 
winning. Illinois won its first eight matches 
in the fall, something that probably 
wouldn't have been possible without the 
encouragement and motivational efforts of 
Tredennick. 

The players acknowledged their coach's 
energetic spirit. "Mary brings the team 
spirit," senior netter Dorothy Hogan said. 
"She pushes us to work hard, but does it in 
a fun way." 



Tredennick was appointed head tennis 
coach in replacement of Linda Pecore. 
Tredennick is a graduate of Austin College 
in Texas, where she played tennis. She 
later attended Texas Tech. 

Tredennick then went to Trinity College 
and helped coach the junior varsity men's 
and women's tennis teams. There she 
learned additional teaching and coaching 
techniques. 

Conditioning is one of Tredennick's se- 
crets. One player said that the team prac- 
tices every day for at least three hours and 
stays in shape in the Armory during the 
winter by working out at least four days a 
week. This schedule keeps the team tuned 
up for the spring meets. 

"If they don't practice, we aren't going 
to win," Tredennick said. "I place empha- 



sis on the individual. If individuals practice 
hard and win, then the entire team will 
profit." 

Her philosophy seems to be paying off. 
The Illini cruised through the first part of its 
fall schedule, polishing off Sangamon 
State, Western Illinois and Augustana by 9- 
scores. 

Against tougher opposition, Illinois fared 
just as well. Eastern Illinois, Southern Illi- 
nois-Edwardsville and SIU-Carbondale all 
fell to the Illini by scores of 7-2, 6-3, and 6- 
3 respectively. 

Compared to last year, the players sense 
many differences — not in just having a 
new coach, but in the attitude of the team. 

"I think the team works a lot harder than 
it did last year, and we seem to have more 
enthusiasm and spirit," sophomore Susan 




Women's Tennis 



Hutchinson said. "I'm more relaxed and 
have less pressure put on me." 

Hogan felt the positive changes as well. 
"A definite change in spirit occurred this 
season," she said. "We are getting to know 
each player on the team and we're working 
as a team, not just concerned with ourself . 
Also, the incoming freshmen have helped 
this team a lot." 

With five freshmen recruits, the team 
has the strength to surpass the 1980 fall 
record of 6-16. 

With Tredennick's tough practices and 
the players' determination to lead the Big 
Ten, success can't be far behind. But as 
freshman Kelley Rickard said, "As long as 
you put forth all your effort to win, that's 
what counts in tennis." [§[] 

— Margaret Uhlarik 

Left: Number one singles player Kelley Rickard stretches 
for a shot in an Illinois win against Southern Illinois-Ed- 
wardsville, Sept. 25, 1981. 

Below: Heide Nichols concentrates on a return against 
SIU-Edwardsville. 

Right: With a hard backhand, Kathy Kewney continues a 
volley against SIU-Edwardsville. 




James L. Novy 

Sue Hutchinson serves the ball in a meet against Illinois 
State, Sept. 12, 1981. 



John C. Stein 



175 

Women's Tennis 



Overcoming 
injury and fatigue 




Micky O'Neil escapes from a scrum during Illinois' match 
against Southern Illinois October 3 at Illini Meadows. 



Playing in the shadow of a successful 
past is not easy, as the Illinois rugby club 
learned during the spring and fall semes- 
ters of 1981. The Illini couldn't reach the 
heights of the 1979 club that placed third 
in the National Collegiate Championship 
Rugby Tournament. 

The club's development throughout the 
semester was retarded by a lack of organi- 
zation, and Illinois finished a disappointing 
spring semester with a loss in the opening 
round of the Mid-American Cup. 

By the fall semester, Rod Ivey had been 
elected president of the club. His discipline 
was the right medicine at the right time. 

The club opened the fall semester with a 
bang. It had more than 90 loyal members, 
according to coach Hamish Fraser. It also 
moved to a new field at Illini Meadows. 

The club defeated some noteworthy op- 
ponents such as the Cleveland rugby club 
| and the Peoria rugby club, the latter win 
| qualifying it for the Illinois Union Tourna- 
•| ment, which it also won with a 15-0 victory 
= over Springfield in the final match. Joe 



VandenBranden scored all 15 points on 
penalties. 

But after the tournament, the ruggers 
seemed to lose motivation for the rest of 
the season. The players went through the 
motions after the big tournament as if they 
already had reached their goal for the sea- 
son. 

Injuries also contributed to the decline in 
the play of the team. As many as seven 
members were out with injuries at one time 
during the season, which made it difficult 
for the club to play up to par. Long road 
trips to places such as Indianapolis and the 
Quad Cities took an effect as well. 

The result was that the ruggers lost four 
successive weekend matches on the road. 
Yet those four weeks in October weren't 
indicative of the club's strength because it 
never played with a full roster of its top 
talent. 

Fraser added that the poor performance 
was due to "fatigue" from the trips. Illinois 
also had problems with referees, and end- 
ed up protesting a match and grumbling 
over a couple of other contests. 

In the end, however, the club still man- 
aged a successful season with an 11-5 re- 
cord, m 

— Mike Martinez 



The scrum half gets ready to grab the ball during Illinois' . 
24-0 victory over Southern Illinois. 




llinois rugby club's Bruce Gillingham evades Southern Illi- 
nois opponents in the Ruggers' 24-0 victory October 3 at 
llini Meadows. 



Randy Stukenberg 



176 

Rugby 







s$^«^ 



Tough schedule 
toughens Mother Ruggers 



Improved. 

That describes the Illinois women's 
jgby club's fall season. 

From the standpoint of wins and losses, 
le Mother Ruggers wound up the regular 
aason at 8-7 after a sub-. 500 performance 
1 the spring. If it weren't for an unusually 
Dugh schedule, the team would have sub- 
racted at least two or three digits from its 
3ss column. 

For instance, take what happened to the 
lub on Oct. 10. Its second of two sched- 
led home meets was canceled for reasons 
nat deservedly belong in the "Guinness 
>ook of World Records." 

Both the Mother Ruggers' opponents 
hat weekend couldn't make it to their 
latches — Michigan State, because mem- 
ers of the team had to catch up on their 
tudying, and Indiana, because it forgot it 
ad promised to make the trip. 

What resulted was a hastily put-together 
oad trip to Chicago where the Illini wound 
lp facing the number-one, and -four ranked 



teams in the Midwest, Chicago and Lake- 
shore respectively. Two weeks later, the 
team was introduced to the teams ranked 
number two, Madison, and three, Minneso- 
ta. Indeed, the Great Schedule Maker In 
The Sky must have had something against 
the club. 

"We could have had a better record this 
season if we had played teams that weren't 
as good," head coach Fran Rivkin said. 

Joan Barth, Rivkin's assistant, agreed. 
"You can't really look at our record with- 
out looking at our schedule," she said. 
"We went against some top-ranked 
teams." 

However, both coaches agreed that 
playing good teams improved the Mother 
Rugger's play. "The team really kept going 
against some tough opponents," Rivkin 
said. "I think we've become a better team 
because of it." 

"We could have had a few more wins, 
but our playing has really improved," 
Barth said. "We did very well as far as our 



team skills were concerned." 

There were some individual success sto- 
ries as well. Barth, full-center Pat Standley, 
and club president Janet Yanney qualified 
to play on the Midwest Select-Side squad, 
an all-star team of Midwest ruggers that will 
compete in matches throughout the coun- 
try this winter. 

According to Rivkin, having the players 
make the Select-Side team was the "high 
point of the season." 

"It was nice because they wouldn't have 
made the team without having a good team 
behind them," she said. 

The team also finished in a respectable 
sixth place in the annual Midwest tourney, 
held at Purdue on Oct. 17 and 18, which 
was one of the best finishes in recent years. 

— Mark Balthazar W\ 



A member of the Illinois women's rugby club is tackled by 
Purdue opponents in the Boilermaker's 6-4 win April 25, 
1981. 



A soccer 
coup 

Dave Nelson, president of the Illinois 
soccer club, leaned back in his chair on the 
Union patio and took a very long puff on 
his cigar. The smoke wafted upwards and 
formed a small cloud over his head. 

A revolutionary Nelson's not. 

Yet the lanky, long-haired blond took on 
the task of revolutionizing Illini soccer after 
undergraduate club members voted to cre- 
ate a multicoach staff rather than a single 
"technical adviser." 

As a result, Nick Rzhevshy, who pre- 
ferred to be called a technical adviser rath- 
er than a coach because of the position's 
negligible salary, quit after his five-year as- 
sociation with the club. 

Team members were dissatisfied with 
last year's situation in four areas: club orga- 
nization, social unity, team spirit and com- 
munication. 

"We want to build up the level of the 
undergrads that come to us," said Tony 
Byrne, one of the Illini's new player- 
coaches. "It wasn't organized, and I didn't 
feel that the younger people were getting 
any better. We want within the club a feel- 
ing where everybody belongs." 

Little did Nelson and others realize the 
hidden problems inherent in new regimes. 
Everyone loves to fight for change, but 
when he wakes up the next morning and 
there's actual work to be done, he's not as 
eager. 

The team was unorganized at the begin- 
ning of the season without a "figurehead" 
coach. Players were not attending prac- 
tices regularly. Also, decision-making was 
hampered by the decentralization. 

Illinois began the season by losing two 
games in a row. First, it was surprised 3-0 
by a strong revamped Wisconsin squad, 
and then it took a hard loss to Lewis and 
Clark Junior College, 2-1. The club quickly 
improved its record to 1-2 with a 2-0 white- 
wash of Purdue. Goalie Don Madvig 



178 

Men's Soccer 




1 John Zich ' 



earned the shutout. 

Then the storm hit as Sangamon State, 
Indiana State, Bradley, Indiana, who was 
ranked second in the nation at the time, 
and Ohio State each defeated the Illini, 
dropping its record to 1-8. "A team's going 
to have its ups and downs, but why does it 
always have to be down?" Nelson asked. 

Things began to change after that. Illi- 
nois beat Vincennes, 1-0, and Illinois 
State's B-team, 3-1, in the same weekend. 
The Illini split the next weekend, beating 
Loyola of Chicago and losing to Northwes- 
tern, both by 2-0 scores. 

The final ray of hope, which made the 
season worthwhile for those who stuck it 
out, was the best performance of the sea- 
son: a 5-1 victory over Vincennes. That 
victory put the Illini at 4-8 heading into the 
final week of the season. 

For Nelson, maybe it's first the Illini, 
then the world, jjjj] 

— Zack Nauth 

Above: A member of the women's soccer club (right) fights 
for a ball with a Wisconsin opponent in Illinois' 2-1 victory 
October 24. 

Right: Andy Deutschmann positions himself between the . 
ball and an Indiana State defender in a 3-0 Illinois loss 
October 3 at the First Street and Gregory Drive field. 




The 

best 

EVER 



Vhat started out as a disappointing season 
or the Illinois women's soccer club turned 
rito its best campaign ever. 

"Our team last fall was pretty good," 
Illinois coach Rob Krumm said, "but I think 
his team is better. We played a lot better 
han we did last season." 

The Illini fall season started in Schaum- 
>urg, 111., at the Illinois Women's Soccer 
-eague Tournament, a post-season tour- 
ley for the Chicago-area teams. The club's 
nexperience was evident throughout, and 
llinois failed to score in all six games. How- 
;ver, the defense played well enough to 
lold its opponents scoreless in three 
james, and the club finished the tourna- 
nent with an 0-3-3 mark. 

"It took us a while to get going," Krumm 
said. "We needed some time to get a bal- 
anced lineup." 

The team soon made up for its dismal 
start, not losing its next eight games before 
ailing to a tough Florrisant Valley College 
blub, 1-0. 

Illinois also captured the mid-season Illi- 
lois Collegiate Women's Soccer Cham- 
Dionship Tournament with wins over Illi- 
nois State and Eastern Illinois. 

The highlight of the season, however, 
A/as the Illini's 2-1 win over Wisconsin. 

At Wisconsin, women's soccer is a varsi- 
:y sport — that means the team is support- 
id by university athletic funds. 

"The win over Wisconsin was definitely 
:he high point of our season," Krumm said. 
'It was the best game we played." 

Co-captains Sharon Fine and Margie Lo- 
pez paced the Illinois scoring attack all sea- 
son and, along with club president Polly 
Knowlton, gave Krumm a solid nucleus 
around which to build. 

Krumm took this core and added to it 
;/oung players such as goalkeeper Linda 
Rowan, who held her opponents to four 
goals in the eight game stretch, and Katie 







t 



4 



) 



* i % 



% 



i 




^^^^^k, 

W^^' 

m^^ 




Kodama, a native of Hawaii whose solid 
play at center fullback led the Illinois de- 
fense. By doing so, he built the club into a 
potential power in Illinois soccer. 

"I think the season was successful," 
Krumm said. "Our passing game devel- 
oped really well. It was also good to see 
balanced scoring from our front line. The 
midfielders, Cathy (DiCola) and Theresa 
(Rortvedt), also played well, which is really 
important. From the start of the season, we 
really improved." M\ 

— Doug Lee 



Illinois women's soccer club president Polly Knowlton high- 
steps a kick in the 2-1 Illinois victory over Wisconsin Oct. 
24. 



179 

Women's Soccer 



tip* 



A season-long 
roller coaster ride 



Illinois golf coach Ed Beard probably had 
to pinch himself at different times during 
the 1981 fall schedule to make sure he 
wasn't on a never-ending roller coaster 
ride. 

Team members seemed to display their 
worst efforts only a week before their best 
efforts. Those best efforts included first- 
place finishes in the University of Wiscon- 
sin's Badger Fall Invitational, the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Championship and the Pur- 
due Invitational. 

The Illini opened the season with a trip 
to the East for the Yale Fall Classic. Play- 
ing against the likes of Duke, South Caroli- 
na and Maryland, the Illini finished eighth 
out of 32 teams. Mike Chadwick's three- 
day total of 73-75-74-222 was good for 
fifth place in the individual standings. 

Moving from the Yale Classic, which 
Beard termed "uneventful," the Illini trav- 
eled to Cherokee Golf Club in Madison, 
Wis., for what Beard called a tune-up for 
the Butler National Intercollegiate Golf 
Classic in Oak Brook, 111. 

The team must have put the right spark 
plugs in its motor: it came away from the 
Badger Invitational with its first victory of 
the fall. Greg Peterson paced the Illini with 
a 74-77-151 total. 

The following week, the Illini hosted the 
Butler Classic. The tournament was billed 
as a potentially exciting event, with en- 
trants such as the 1980 National Collegiate 
Athletic Association Champion Brigham 
Young and tough teams such as Oral Rob- 
erts and Ohio State. 

But the team held its own, claiming a 



fifth-place finish behind Ohio State. Greg 
Peterson continued his hot play by finishing 
third. 

It was a weary Illinois squad that played 
the following day in the Illinois Intercolle- 
giate Championship in DeKalb. But the 
weariness wore off quickly, and the Illini 
claimed a five-stroke victory in the 36-hole 
event, which was shortened because of in- 
clement weather. 

"We were playing our best round of the 
tournament," Beard said. "We could have 
won by thirty shots if they would have 
counted the final round." 

Chadwick found a rejuvenated putter 
and returned to the form he had displayed 
at Yale, recording a 77-70-147 total. 

The fatigue finally caught up with the 
Illini the next week. At the Ohio State Fall 
Classic, Illinois turned in what might have 
been its worst showing of the fall. "We 
weren't in the right frame of mind," Beard 
said after his club finished 10th out of 13 
teams. 

But Illinois was in the right frame of mind 
the next week as it closed the season with 
an impressive victory in the Purdue Invita- 
tional. The tournament mostly consisted of 
Big Ten teams, including powerhouse Ohio 
State. 

Capturing first place, the Illini finished 
seven strokes in front of Indiana and 23 
ahead of Ohio State. Illinois' Doug Dechert 
fired two consecutive even-par 72 rounds 
along with a 78 to tie for second place. The 
Illini placed four players in the top 10 to 
close out a satisfying, although nerve- 
wracking, fall season. [ljj| 

— Del Gilpin 




George Smith drives the ball with his iron during an lllinoi: 
golf team practice at the University golf course in Savoy 



180 

Men's Golf 



Digging holes too deep 




During the 1981 fall schedule, the Illinois 
women's golf team looked like it had been 
tutored by Arnold Palmer rather than by 
coach Paula Smith. The team had a knack 
for digging big holes for itself and then 
mounting a charge on the final day in a 
frantic attempt to climb out of them. 

The only problem was that even Arnie 
couldn't have overcome some of the team 
member's holes. 

Probably the best example of the Illini's 
grave-digging ability came in the meet 
around which it had geared the fall season, 
the Illinois Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women State Championship 
at Rend Lake, 111. The Illini fired the lowest 
total of the final round, but finished seven 
strokes off the pace set by champion Illi- 
nois State. 

Terrie Berto had her best performance 
of the year as she recorded a 77-83-160 
total, good enough for third place. Mary 
Ellen Murphy, who played number one 
most of the year, finished fourth. 

The Illini had opened the season with an 
impressive showing at the Indiana Invita- 
tional. With the intention of finishing in the 
top three, Illinois accomplished that goal 
with a third-place finish behind the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky and Indiana. 

The Illini suffered a letdown when it trav- 
elled to West Lafayette, Ind., for the Pur- 
due Invitational. Despite lOth-place fin- 
ishes by Jill Ittersagen and Murphy, the 
Illini, playing in 28-degree weather, fin- 
ished seventh out of 14 teams. 

When the Illini traveled to Mount Pleas- 
ant, Mich., the next week, they might have 
expected even cooler weather. But one 
thing the Illini didn't expect was the oppor- 
tunity to face Ohio State. 

The Illini were in second place after two 
rounds and thus were paired with the first- 
place Buckeyes in the final round. 

The Illini slipped to sixth out of 17 teams 
after the match, but as Smith said, "I think 
you can always learn something from the 
best." 

In the team's finale, the Tiger Fall Clas- 
sic at Columbia, Mo., the Illini ran into 
some fast company. The Illini finished 
fourth. 

"I think Missouri is probably on its way 
to nationals, and Nebraska isn't too far 
behind," Smith said. "It's nice to be able to 
say you were right behind them." [§[] 

— Del Gilpin 



Practice makes perfect as Mary Ellen Murphy, top golfer 
on the women's team, proves at the Savoy course. 



181 

Women's Golf 



The 

final 

run 



Marianne Dickerson finally received her 
reward. After a career of frustration and 
disappointing results in the big meets, the 
Illinois senior finished sixth in the AIAW 
National Cross-Country Championship 
Nov. 21 in Pocatello, Idaho. 

Dickerson turned in a time of 18:10 on 
the 5,000 meter course to become Illinois' 
first woman cross-country All-American. 
"You just have one day like that in your 
life, and mine just happened to be on Sat- 
urday," Dickerson said. 

The cold, windy weather and the hilly 
course helped Dickerson. "I'm more of a 
strength runner, so it was to my advan- 
tage," she said. "I knew it was a strength 
course, so I went out slow and then started 
picking off people one by one." 

But Dickerson and her coach, Rob Cass- 
leman, did not expect her to do so well. "I 
was looking for her to finish in the top 25, 
but I was surprised she did so well," Cassle- 
man said, "But when you look at it, she ran 
with the people she's run with all year." 

Dickerson's accomplishment was a fit- 
ting close to a women's cross-country sea- 
son that ended on an upswing. Illinois fin- 
ished ninth for the second year in a row at 
the Big Ten meet, but came back the next 



Above: Cathy McGlone, one of two Illinois runners to 
qualify for two national cross country championships, 
races in the second place Illini performance at the state 
championships October 31 in Normal. 

Right: Michelle Vogel (41) and Sue Pierce (35) help Illinois 
to a second place performance at the state championships 
in Normal October 31. 




weekend and placed second in the state 
meet. In the Midwestern regional meet, Illi- 
nois beat the state champion, Western Illi- 
nois, and finished fifth. 

"We came a long way over the season," 
Cassleman said. "The Big Ten meet was a 
disappointment, but the state meet was a 
breakthrough." 

Illinois probably would have won the 
state title if not for a mistake. Illinois did 
not submit its roster in time and was forced 
to choose one of its runners from a bunch 
of names in a hat to sit out the race. 



Freelance photograph by Ann Henri 

None other than Dickerson was picked 
Illinois lost the meet by four points, anc 
Dickerson, the 1980 state champion, sure 
ly would have made up the difference. , . 

Illinois was a young team. By the end oi 
the season, the Illini had only two veteran 
runners Cathy McGlone, a sophomore, anc . 
Dickerson. 

"The fact that we performed well the 
last couple of meets" Cassleman said 
"makes me very optimistic about nex 
year." g] 

— Mike Zahorik 

Freelance Photograph by Ann Henr^ 




4 









,«*£ 



*A£t 



i. : ■■ 



182 

Womens' Cross Country 



**- 



Spikers pitter out at end of season 



At the start of the season, it was knock- 
lg on the door. By the end, it was caught 
,/ith only one foot inside of the door. 
• The women's volleyball team finished 
le year with a 17-25 record, which was no 
idication of how things began for the Illini. 

Toward the end of September, the team 
i;as involved in a quadrangular meet at 
'urdue. Although the Illini lost to the Boi- 
>rmakers, who were nationally ranked at 
,ie time, the team defeated Indiana and 
3wa. 

The next match at Illinois was against 
umber 10 Northwestern, and the Illini 
tood up to the Wildcats in an exciting five- 
ame contest. That was the start of a string 
f impressive victories over foes such as 
lissouri, Louisiana State and Purdue. It 
Doked as if Illinois finally was playing up to 
:s potential. 

Then the Big Ten Conference members 
ame to town for the Big Ten Champion- 
hips. The Illini was being touted as the 
iossible spoiler of the tournament, with 
Jorthwestern and Purdue in the top spots. 
Jut the team completely crumbled and lost 
our games in a row. Illinois ended up tak- 
ig ninth in the conference tournament. 
Michigan placed first. 

The Illini couldn't get it together after 
hat, and the remainder of the season gen- 
rally was a disappointment. The team lost 
o Northwestern, Rutgers, and Penn State 
m the road, but managed to beat soundly a 
alented Pitt team. 

Number one ranked Hawaii visited 
Champaign and it needed only three games 
o dispose of Illinois. The Illini scored only 
light points in the entire match, as the 
Rainbows thoroughly outclassed the team. 

Although the season did not go as well as 
ixpected, there were some bright spots, 
'he Illini showed off its only recruit, Kelly 
>ee from Monticello, 111., and as always, the 
>lay of Karen Collymore and Kim Lenti 
vas steady and outstanding. 

Illini coach John Blair was not particular- 
y happy for the season to end. He thought 
hat his team was starting to play better in 
he final tournament at Chicago Circle and 
hat it finally realized its potential. 

Illinois showed a great deal of promise at 
he start of the year. It defeated some na- 
ionally ranked teams, but inconsistent play 
>rought the team down. Perhaps next year 
he large corp of experienced Illini juniors 
will overcome this inconsistency and find 
he door open all the way. [j|f] 

— Anne Carlsen 





Illinois' Margie Schwarz goes up to block an Ohio State 
volley while teammate Kim Lenti looks on during the Illini 
loss to the Buckeyes in the Big Ten Volleyball Champion- 
ship October 23 at Kenney gym. 



mm 

Randy Stukenberg 



183 

Volleyball 



Resilience 

pays off 

for harriers 



At the start of the cross country season, 
Illinois had three specific goals. Even 
though only one of those three was real- 
ized, however, that one goal more than 
compensated for the default of the other 
two. 

The first major objective the Illini aimed 
for was first place in the Illinois Intercolle- 
giate championships; it finished second, 
nudged out by Southern Illinois 40-38. 

Illinois was a slight favorite to win the Big 
Ten Championships — major goal number 
two — but they didn't. A surprising Wis- 




184 

Mens' Cross Country 



consin squad with talented freshmen domi- 
nated the rest of the conference. 

The Illini still had a chance to make up 
for a slightly disappointing season with a 
strong showing at nationals, and this time 
the team rose to the occasion. 

Led by excellent performances from 
stalwarts Kerry Dickson and Pete Ffitch, 
both of whom earned All-American status 
at the National Collegiate Athletic Associ- 
ation meet, Illinois sailed to a 10th place 
finish. 

By obtaining that position, Illinois indis- 
putably can be called one of the ten best 
teams in the nation, the major objective for 
which the Illini strived from day one. 

"Overall, I think we had an excellent 
season," head coach Gary Wieneke said. 
"From a coaching standpoint, the impor- 
tant ingredient this team had was its resil- 
ience." 

Wieneke said the team's morale could 
have folded when it encountered the set- 
backs, but the runners always bounced 
back and were ready to go at it again. 

"It's what you do after you lose that 
determines how long it is going to be before 
you win." Wieneke said. 

Illinois' season almost ended slightly be- 
fore Wieneke and the Illini anticipated. The 
team had some trouble with the hilly 
Dretzka Park Golf Course in Milwaukee, 
Wis., the site of the District IV qualifying 
meet; as a team, Illinois did not have a 
banner day. 

Prior to the tabulation of the results after 
the meet had ended, Wieneke thought the 
team may not have run well enough to 
qualify. But the Illini squeaked into one of 
the three qualifying spots. 

Can you look for more of the same from 
Illinois next year? Wieneke said it is too 
early to tell. 

Most other people would probably say 
yes. The team has five of its top seven 
runners returning, including All-American 
Dickson, who finished 30th in the nation. 
Jon Schmidt and Ffitch, who finished 52nd 
at nationals, will have graduated and will be 
missed. 

But Wieneke expect to fill the void with 
freshman Mike Patton and sophomore 
Craig Bauer. Illinois' successful showing at 



Left: Illinois' Mark Cappelle (111) strains to keep up with 
the pack at the NCAA District IV Cross Country Cham- 
pionships in Milwaukee. 

Illinois' Jon Schmidt (435) descends a hill at the National 
Championships in Wichita, Kan., November 23. 



nationals also should help Wieneke to lure 
some of the Midwest's finest high school 
runners, but the Illini will not need to de- 
pend on a good recruiting year. 

"We anticipate a super recruiting year," 
Wieneke said, "but we have a very solid 
base regardless of what our recruiting addi- 
tions are." 

So once again it appears all the ingredi- 
ents are there. Illinois has a good program 
and good coaching. More important, it re- 
turns a strong core of runners who gained 
some valuable experience this year on how 
to win. [Ijj] 

— Steve Carlson 



Dean J. Meador 




185 

Mens' Cross Country 



A mixture for success 



A solid mix of the veterans and newcom- 
ers in 1981-82 led the way to the Illinois 
women's basketball team's best season 



ever. 



Despite losing its last two games, Illinois 
qualified for the NCAA tournament for the 
first time ever. 

The Illini sprang out of the blocks and 
sprinted to a 10-0 record before it was 
stopped Jan. 2 by St. John's University, 
84-77. An early season victory over Drake 
gave the Illini its first-ever national ranking, 
and the team managed to move up to num- 
ber 12 before dropping a pair of games to 
Big Ten opponents Wisconsin and Michi- 
gan State. 

In its best game of the season, the Illini 
squared off with the third-ranked Long 
Beach State 49ers Jan. 13 at the Assembly 
Hall and came away with a heart-stopping 
97-91 win in triple overtime. The Assembly 
Hall also was the site of the first annual 
Arby's-Illini Classic on Jan. 22-23. The Illini 
sent the home fans away happy as it rolled 
over Eastern Michigan, 107-73, and Kent 
State, 89-62. 

The next hurdle on the Illinois schedule 
was the Big Ten Championship, which was 
held in East Lansing, Mich., on Feb. 12-14. 
The Illini, forced to play without leading 
rebounder Lynnette Robinson, fell to a big- 
ger Ohio State squad in the tourney final, 
69-66. The automatic NCAA bid went to 
OSU, and the Illini was forced to fight for 
an at-large berth. 

With Robinson back in the lineup and the 
team at full strength, the Illini came back to 
trounce Notre Dame Feb. 16, 83-53. 

The Illini then came from behind to de- 



Opposite: Strong inside play from freshman center Ken- 
dra Gantt, seen here putting in a layup during the Illinois 
loss to Northwestern, was a key to Illinois' success this 
season. 

Right: Lynette Robinson shoots a jump shot over a North- 
western defender in Illinois' 95-90 overtime loss to the 
Wildcats Feb. 2. 



feat Southern Illinois on Feb. 19, 73-55, in 
an emotional home finale for seniors Lisa 
and Lynnette Robinson and Pat Morency. 
A record crowd of 2,043 watched the 
game. 



The Illini charge was led by Wade Tro- 
phy nominee and District Four academic 
All-American Lisa Robinson and her sister 
Lynnette. Sophomores Kim Brombolich 
and Diane Eickholt and junior college trans- 







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186 

Women's Basketball 




James L. Novy 



Women's Basketball 



success 

fer Cindy Stein rounded out the starting 
five for most of the season. 

Kendra Gantt, a 6-foot-3 freshman cen- 
ter who averaged in double figures, came 
off the bench to spark Illinois in many 
games, including the 10-point comeback 
against Long Beach. 

Yet Illinois coach and Coach-of-the-Year 
nominee Jane Schroeder stressed team 
play rather than individual accomplish- 
ments as the factors contributing to the first 
20-win season in Illini history. Individual 
accomplishments by both veterans and 
newcomers alike were important, but the 
way the team worked together proved to 
be the decisive element in the success of 
the Illini. g] 

— Kevin McPhcrson 



Right: An opening gives Cindy Stein the perfect opportu- 
nity to shoot a field goal during the Illinois victory over 
Eastern Michigan Jan. 22. 

Bottom: Kim Brombolich (33) passes the ball inside to 
Dianne Eickholt while Michele Vossen looks on in the dis- 
tance during Illinois' 89-62 win over Kent State in the 
championship game of the Arby's-lllini Classic Jan. 23. 




John C. Steir 




Sharon Basso 



188 

Women's Basketball 



Doubling 

the season's wins 




It began as a fairy tale and finished with a 
happy ending. 

A pair of twins, Lisa and Lynnette Rob- 
inson, from the small town of Annawan, 111., 
enroll at Illinois and join the women's bas- 
ketball team. 

They play well, but the team finishes 
with a 9-12 record their first year as Illini, 
and after a coaching change, finishes 6-21 
the next year. 

Things begin to turn around during their 
year as juniors as the twins and teammate 
Pat Morency, the team assist leader, pace 
Illinois to its first-ever 20-win season and 
set the stage for their senior campaign. 

As their final season progressed, the 
twins both led a more balanced Illini attack 
to ten straight wins and began rewriting the 
Illinois record book. 

Lynnette broke former Illini Eddie John- 
son's all-time rebounding mark Jan. 23 at 
home against Kent State when she grabbed 
her 832nd board. She also holds women's 
career and single-season records in field- 
goal accuracy (50.3 percent and 55.1 per- 
cent respectively). 

"I didn't know I did it," she said after 
breaking the record in her 95th Illinois 
game. "I guess I can jump pretty good. 
We're supposed to block out, which I don't 
always do. But blocking out helps." 

Lisa also shattered an Eddie Johnson 
record for Illinois basketball by scoring her 
1,693rd point Jan. 29 at home against 
Ohio State. Lisa holds every Illini women 
career and single-season scoring record, in- 
cluding most points, field goals made and 
attempted, free throws made and attempt- 
ed and free-throw percentage. 

"I didn't realize I was this close (to the 
record) until everybody started making a 
big deal about it," she said. "I don't think it 
will last long. There are a lot of good play- 
ers around here." 

Unfortunately for next year's team, the 
graduating Robinsons and Morency were 
three of them. The fairy tale finished with a 
happy ending, but sadly, it must end. [ijJ] 

— Doug Lee 



As teammates Cindy Stein (25) and sister Lisa Robinson 
look on, Lynnette Robinson shoots the ball over an Eastern 
Michigan opponent during the 107-73 Illini win Jan. 22 in 
the first round of the Arby's-lllini Classic. 



John C. Stein 



189 

Robinson Twins 



Starting 

on the 

right foot 

Every athlete and every athletic team 
strives for one thing each year — to make 
it to the national meet. 

A few members of the Illinois track team 
wasted no time in earning their tickets to 
the indoor national meet at the Silverdome 
in Pontiac, Mich., this spring. 

Before the start of the official indoor 
season, seven Illini competed in the East- 
man Invitational in Johnson City, Tenn., 
and of those seven, Jon Schmidt and co- 
captain Mike Lehman started the year by 
qualifying for the national meet. 

Lehman's 63-feet-lV2-inch throw was 
three feet longer than the national qualify- 
ing standard. In addition, the Illini shotput- 
ter did nothing but improve all year long. 

In the Illinois Intercollegiate meet Feb. 5 
and 6 at the Armory, Lehman unloaded a 
66-1 Va throw, which was the best throw in 
the nation at that point in the season. The 
next week in Nebraska, Lehman threw 66- 
7Va, but Ohio State's Kevin Akins ex- 
ploded with a 70- 3 /4 throw for a new nation- 
al best at that point. 

"We were all in the same area," Lehman 
said of the nation's top shotputters. "So I 
wasn't really thinking about the furthest 
distance in the country because there al- 
ways was someone who could throw a little 
longer sometime." 

Schmidt made qualifying for the NCAA 
a habit. In his first three meets, Schmidt 
qualified for three different events, the 
1,000-yard, mile and 880-yard runs. And 
later in the year, Schmidt also qualified in 
the two-mile relay. 

Schmidt's great range gave him the ad- 
vantage of picking what he wants to run at 
nationals. 

"I'll probably run only one race at the 
nationals," he said. "I have to pick one that 
week. It might look like I set out to qualify 
all year, but it's just fun to run different 
races." 

With the Illini Classic and the Big Ten 
meet still remaining, Schmidt, Lehman, co- 
captain Tom Stevens (1,000-yard run), 
Kerry Dickson (mile and two-mile runs) and 
the two-mile relay team of Vic Shockey, 
Greg Reynolds, Stevens and Schmidt al- 



190 

Men's Track 



Above: The strain of his efforts shows on Mark Schmidt's 
face as he clears the high bar during the Illinois Intercolle- 
giates Feb. 5 and 6. 

Right: Illinois sometimes finds itself chasing the SIU Salu- 
kis. Kirby Wilson trails the pack in the 60-yard dash during 
the Illinois Intercollegiates Feb. 5 and 6. 



ready had qualified for the NCAA. All of 
the qualifyers, except Reynolds, had made 
the trip to the nationals before. Thus, head 
coach Gary Wieneke was optimistic. "We 
anticipate a higher national placing than a 
year ago," he said. 

Illinois had a squad laden with super- 
stars, but it also was weak in a number of 
areas. Because of that, Wieneke didn't ex- 
pect the Illini to repeat as Big Ten indoor 
champs. But Illinois did find some depth in 
areas it didn't expect. 

"The surprise of the year has been 
Reynolds, without a doubt," Wieneke said. 
"He's added some depth that we just 
didn't count on." M\ 

— Steve Carlson 






Randy Stukenberg 




Randy Stukenberg 



Women's track 

High-caliber 
improvement 



"Improvement was the key to our whole 
season," Illinois women's track coach Jessi- 
ca Dragicevic said of the 1981-82 indoor 
team. "Several individuals with great capa- 
bilities emerged as national-caliber ath- 
letes." 

The biggest names throughout the year 
for Illinois were co-captains Kathy Angel 
and Kathy Pannier, seniors Becky Kaiser 
and Marianne Dickerson, juniors Veegee 
Elsen, Charlene Dale and Lisa Plummer, 
sophomores Wendy Meyle and Rhea Rod- 
gers, and freshmen sensations Rolanda 
Conda and Gretchen Grier. 

Behind the performances of these ath- 
letes, the Illini broke more than a dozen 
school records, set various meet records at 
other schools and sent a number of com- 
petitors to the Association for Intercolle- 
giate Athletics for Women national indoor 
meet March 12 and 13 in Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. 

As a team, Illinois turned in a respect- 
able showing at every meet on its schedule, 
but it was most successful in its own Illini 
Invitational Feb. 12 and 13 in the Armory. 

"Our invitational has been one of our 
better meets over the years, and this year 
was no exception," assistant coach Rob 
Cassleman said. "We produced some of 
the best efforts of the season at the meet." 

On a day when several invitational re- 
cords fell, the host Illini set four school 
marks and qualified two runners — Grier 
in the 600-meter run and Dickerson in the 



two-mile — for nationals. Also, Illinois cap- 
tured one first place, three seconds, and 
four thirds in a field of 23 teams. 

Grier's winning time of 1:21.8 in the 
600-yard run headed the list of outstanding 
Illinois performances as she broke school, 
meet and Armory track records. Dicker- 
son finished fourth in the two-mile run 
among a field of 25 runners with a 10:29.3 
clocking. 

Amy Kopko (60-meter hurdles), Conda 
(300-yard run), and the mile relay team of 
Pannier, Grier, Conda, and Jayne Glade 
set the other three Illinois records. Kopko's 
record came during the pentathlon compe- 
tition in which she placed second. 

Other top individual finishers for the Il- 
lini at the Invitational were Elsen (second) 
in the mile, Lisa Plummer (second) in the 
high jump, Rodgers (third) in the shotput, 
and Kaiser (third) in the 60-yard dash. The 
distance-medley relay team also captured 
third place. 

Good performances by many individual 
track team members provided empirical 
proof for Dragicevic's contention that sev- 
eral of her athletes developed into winners 
of national caliber. 

Many of these winners are returning 
next year. 

Then, the key to success should not be 
improvement. Rather, it should be fulfill- 
ment of a great potential. [jjJ] 

— Phil Rockrohr 



191 

Women's Track 



Injuries zap Mini strength 



Illinois women's gymnastics coach Bev 
Mackes set her team's goals fairly high be- 
fore the start of the season. But that was 
before she knew Mary Amico, one of the 
Illini's top all-around gymnasts, would miss 
the season. 

Besides Amico's illness, there were sev- 
eral minor injuries that were just major 
enough to keep the team from being at full 
strength. 

The women started out their home sea- 
son at Huff Gym, taking top honors with a 
high score of 133.2. The victory was out of 
a four-team field which included Bowling 
Green State, Illinois State and Iowa State. 

Connie Reid finished that meet in first 
place, with teammates Heidi Helmke and 
Karen Brems right behind her. Unfortu- 
nately for Illinois, the results of that meet 
were not indicative of things to come. Reid 
and Helmke later would receive injuries 
that would put them out for a chunk of the 
season. 

The Illini traveled to Michigan and Michi- 
gan State the next weekend and could not 
top 130 points. Brems was the only all- 
around athlete to compete at Michigan 
State, and she took fifth place. Brems 
moved up to third place at Michigan. 

Illinois greatly improved its team score 
in a meet with Indiana State, racking up a 
score of 135.65 points. The Sycamores 
were just a little bit better, however, with a 
137.55. After that competition, the Illini 
looked as if it was headed in the right direc- 
tion. 

Iowa came to Champaign at the end of 
January, and the Illini handily outscored 
the Hawkeyes 133.0 to 126.6. Brems had 
an outstanding day as she scored 8.8 on 
her floor exercise and a 9.0 on the beam. 
Helmke, after a short layoff, went the dis- 
tance in that meet, managing second place. 
Brems had the number one score in that 
meet. 

The Illini entered the Big Ten champion 
ship in Ann Arbor, Mich., in sixth place. 
Mackes had hoped that her team would 
boost itself to the fourth spot, but it ended 
up in the same place in which it had start- 
ed. In the individual portion of the cham- 
pionship, only Brems found herself in the 
finals. She received an 8.95 on the floor 
exercise to qualify for that honor. [IjJ] 

— Anne Carlsen 

During the halftime of the Illinois-Ohio State basketball 
game, Karen Brems, a sophomore, performs an exhibition 
on the beam. Brems took fifth place in the competition at 
Michigan State earlier in the season. 

192 

Women's Gymnastics 




Randy Stukenbcrg 



Rolling 

in the victories 



It's a Saturday afternoon in late Janu- 
ry in Minnesota, and the Illinois Ms. Kids 
re down by one point to the Twin-Cities 
oiling Gophers. 

Four seconds remain in the wheelchair 
asketball game, and an alley-oop pass is 
irown to guard Sharon Hendrick. But the 
ass is a little high, and the ball slips off her 
ngers as time runs out. 

The Ms. Kids lose 31-30. 

Although the result may indicate other- 
'ise, Illinois coach Brad Hendrick said that 
ame was the Ms. Kids' best performance 
f the season. 

"The main thing for me is that the worn- 
n execute the offense and make good 
asses," coach Hendrick said. "If that hap- 
ens, I'm happy." 

Normally when a coach considers a de- 
Bat to be a highlight, the season is auto- 
latically termed unsuccessful. That wasn't 
le case for the Ms. Kids, which lost most 
f its games against men's teams. Once 
gain, it proved itself to be one of the 
ation's top women's wheelchair teams. 

Hendrick expects the success to contin- 
e, as every Ms. Kid is scheduled to return 
ext year. 

"To have a team as young and as youth- 
al as this one augurs well for the team in 
le future," he said. 

The Illinois Gizz Kids, the men's wheel- 
hair team, also seems to have a bright 
ature — if it can stay together. As the 
eason wore on, the team was losing play- 
rs almost as fast as Northwestern loses 
Dotball games. 

Hendrick, who also coaches the Gizz 
ads, said the team started with eleven 
'layers, but five of them (Gordon Lau, Chi- 
^/en Chang, Bruce Olson, John Cox and 
lal Krause) quit for various reasons. 

The departures forced Hendrick to use 
Dur first-year players in the starting lineup, 
'he Gizz Kids' inexperience was evident 
/hen it lost two frustrating home games in 
)ecember to a seasoned Wisconsin- 



Whitewater team. 

However, the Gizz Kids went on a four- 
game winning streak in January and even 
beat Whitewater in a rematch. 

Hendrick stressed that his players make 
up a sound nucleus and could well be on a 
level with perennial power Southwest (Min- 
nesota) State if everyone returns. "I'm 



amazed at the way the younger guys have 
improved and how their maturity has 
shown through," he said. |^J 

— Renny Zentz 



Sue Johnson attempts to steal the ball from a male Gate- 
way Gliders opponent during the Ms. Kids loss February 
21. Most of the Ms. Kids losses came against men's teams. 




James L. Novy 

193 

Ms. Kids/Gizz Kids 



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194 

Men's Gymnastics 






\ 







Building strength 
under pressure 



After claiming the Big Ten gymnastics 
;hampionship in 1981, the 1982 edition of 
he gymnastics team had a tough act to 
ollow. But if early second semester perfor- 
nances are any indication, it could be sit- 
ing atop the Big Ten once again after the 
dust clears from this year's championship 
neet. 

The Illini had been trying to reach the 
270-point plateau all year because coach 



Yoshi Hayasaki thought it would take at 
least that kind of performance to win an- 
other Big Ten championship. 

The Illini started its climb toward that 
goal February 13 at the Indiana Invita- 
tional. The Illini downed Indiana 263.55 to 
250.20 and also bumped off Iowa 267.40 
to 254.55. Four Illini scored better than 
9.5, including Kari Samsten with a 9.65 on 
the high bar. 




Hayasaki expected more from the Illini 
in that meet and contends that the team fell 
short of its goal because of a lack of mental 
preparation. "I think it has a lot to do with 
the mental side," Hayasaki said. "I think 
that we let down psychologically some- 
times." 

Responding to Hayasaki's criticism, the 
team almost reached the coveted 270 
mark Feb. 18 when it scored 269.45 
against Southern Illinois' 226.35. 

But what seemed to be holding the team 
back was a lack of confidence in the pom- 
mel horse competition, in which specialist 
Kevin Oltendorf recorded only a 9.15 and 
Samsten came in with a low of 7.6. "I think 
I have just been thinking about it (the pom- 
mel horse) too much," Samsten said. 

Hayasaki had been doing some thinking 
on his own part and offered another expla- 
nation. "We have been looking into other 
events more," he said. "I think that psy- 
chologically we need to work on this event 
in pressure situations." 

And pressure situations are what Haya- 
saki and the team experienced during the 
early spring season. Hayasaki expected 
that the Illini would need to do well in the 
Chicago Circle and Big Ten meets in order 
to have a chance at making nationals again. 
"We don't have that high of an average," 
he said in February, "We haven't shown 
the (National Collegiate Athletic Associ- 
ation) committee anything yet." [§[] 

— Del Gilpin 

Gilmarcio Sanches executes his routine on the pommel 
horse in a meet against Iowa and Wisconsin Jan. 24. 

Opposite: Jeff Mitchell maintains his form on the rings 
during the meet against Iowa and Wisconsin. 

195 

Men's Gymnastics 



Down on their backs 



No one really could tell just how good 
the Illinois wrestlers were during the 1981- 
82 campaign. 

When the Illini would score an impres- 
sive win, it would come back and blow a 
meet against a ranked team. At one point, 
Illinois lost four matches in a row — three 
to ranked teams including top-ranked Iowa 
— after winning its first two dual meets of 
the season. 

The losses to Iowa and Michigan State 
during the streak were shutouts. The re- 
cord made some Illini wrestling fans won- 
der about the strength of coach Greg John- 
son's program. 

Granted, Johnson had a lot of bad luck 
during the season, such as wrestlers being 
out with skin diseases and an altercation 
with one of his wrestlers, but his team 
hasn't given many signs of progress in his 
four years at the helm. And the times Illi- 
nois has shown progress immediately were 
overshadowed by poor performances. 

Illinois did manage a winning dual meet 
record at 8-6, but success in wrestling is 
measured by a team's performance in tour- 
naments. Whenever Illinois wrestled 
against quality teams in tournaments, it 
lost. 

In the Illini Open, Illinois placed five 
wrestlers in the finals and lost four of the 
first-place matches. Over Christmas break, 
the Illini won a handful of matches in the 
prestigious Midlands tournament, but not 
enough to be called respectable. 

Going into the Big Ten meet at Ann 
Arbor, Mich., Johnson still felt good about 
placing a few wrestlers into the NCAA 
tournament, something that Johnson al- 
ways had been able to do. But getting out 
of the Big Ten basement was the first prior- 

ity. 

"Last year, we had three guys go to 
nationals whereas the teams in front of us 
only had one," Johnson said about the Big 
Ten meet. "But those teams put (more) 
guys in the finals and we didn't, and that 
was the difference in the point total. That's 
why we finished last." 



Bruce Cochran (158 pounds) and Trent 
Taylor (167 pounds) both were shooting 
for a return trip to the national tourna- 
ment, but there were those who looked for 
their first taste of championship competi- 
tion. They included Dan Unruh (150 
pounds), Greg Close (190 pounds) and 
Keith Paloucek (heavyweight). 

Another possible qualifier was freshman 
Phil Callahan (126 pounds). Callahan was a 
pleasant surprise for the Illini. Academic 
difficulties, however, kept him from reach- 
ing his full potential. 



Some thought the Illinois wrestling pro- 
gram was turning around. But the question 
was how much longer Johnson had to com- 
plete the turnaround. [|jl] 

— Mike Martinez 



Opposite right: Illinois fencer Ron Hockstrasser, (right) 
gains control over a Purdue opponent during a meet on 
Feb. 6, which Illinois won. 

Bottom: Illinois' Dan Unruh (150 pounds) wrestles to a 
10-0 win over Northern Illinois opponent Greg Sebahar on 
Feb. 12. Unruh was one of the team's top wrestlers in 
1981-82. 




196 

Wrestling 




Sharon Basso 



Achieving perfection with ease 



It's not easy being humble, but the Illi- 
nois fencers had to try their best to achieve 
that goal during 1982. 

As defending Big Ten champs and win- 
ners of 28 conference titles, the Illini wasn't 
figuring to be a well-kept secret among any 
of its opponents. But apparently none of 
the team members listened. Despite losing 
key fencers at saber and epee, Coach Art 
Schankin's squad breezed through 15 
matches without a loss and was the favorite 
to win its third consecutive Big Ten title. 

Northwestern was the only squad that 
came close to beating the Illini, losing 15- 
12 in the sixth match of the year. The Illini 
flew through the remainder of the season 
and even tallied a shutout — the equiv- 
alent of a baseball no-hitter. 

"A shut out is almost an impossibility," 
Schankin said. "It's been years since we 
tried to shut out anybody." 

It was that kind of season for the Illini. 
No matter what the team did, it just 
couldn't avoid being invincible. 



"We did a lot better than we thought we 
would," Schankin said. "Any coach that 
says he isn't happy with a 15-0 record is 
nuts." 

Contributing heavily to the Illini's perfect 
record was the foil squad, led by seniors 
Mark Snow, Nick Leever and Eddie Kai- 
hatsu. Schankin has said his foilsmen were 
"the number one foil squad in the Midwest, 
at least," and its 127-8 season record may 
have proved that assertion. 

Snow attributed his success to Schankin, 
who also was a champion foilsman. 

"He's a fantastic coach," Snow, the de- 
fending conference champion, said. "We 
couldn't have had a better one." 

Replacing Snow and Leever may not be 
an easy task — especially Snow, who, ac- 
cording to Schankin, "gave (the team) a 
tremendous four years. 

"It'll be very difficult to squeeze in a 
potent one-two combination (like those 
two)," he said. 

Before the season started, replacing 



1981's two top epee men, Paul Heald and 
Mike Pacini, threatened to be the Illini's 
biggest problem. But lanky 6-foot-4 sopho- 
more Ron Hochstrasser and senior Rich 
Hainsworth were pleasant surprises. 

"We thought we were gonna be hurt- 
ing," Hochstrasser said, "but I think we 
pulled things out pretty well." 

"Epee was a big question mark," Schan- 
kin said, "but now we should be very solid 
for next year." 

The graduation of 1981 team captain 
Sukhoon Kim left an important gap at sa- 
ber, but senior Larry Warshaw ably filled 
Kim's role as top saberman. 

But before long, Schankin will have to 
replace this year's graduating seniors. If he 
fails, the Illini may have no choice but to 
humble themselves next year. (jjJ] 

— Mark Balthazer 



197 

Fencing 



-W=> 




John C. Stein 

Building on a solid base 



Illinois took some dives this year — off 
the boards, that is. 

This year's swimming team record, 6-9 
overall and 2-4 in the Big Ten, was about 
the same as last year's 6-8 and 2-4 marks. 

While the regular season is almost mean- 
ingless because the Big Ten standings are 
based on the performances at the confer- 
ence championship, the Illini nonetheless 
had three qualifiers for post-season diving 
competition. 

The season won't end at the Big Ten 
championship for sophomore Craig Skun- 
berg, senior Andy Klapperich and fresh- 
man Arthur Hill. They qualified for nation- 
als. 

Skunberg broke both the one-meter and 
three-meter Illinois records (for 11 and six 
dives respectively) this year. The high- 
board mark had stood since 1975. 

Other high points of the season included 
victories over Eastern Illinois, Bradley, 
Northwestern and Purdue. Also, the Illini 
captured first when it hosted the five-team 
Illinois Intercollegiates and placed third in 



the 15-team Saluki Invitational. 

Although the divers were at the fore- 
front, the results of a good recruiting year 
for the swimmers only partially was seen 
during the regular season. As the team 
ended the dual meet season, Illinois could 
look with pride at freshmen Danny Banks, 
Tom Saaf and Hill. 

Banks, from California, was the Illini's 
only record-breaking swimmer during the 
regular season. Banks dashed off a 2:10.42 
in the 200-yard breaststroke during a dual 
meet at Iowa, shattering a 1976 record. 
Banks later topped that with a 2:09.7 ef- 
fort at the Saluki Invitational. 

Saaf came to the United States as a for- 
eign-exchange student from Sweden during 
his senior year in high school. His strengths 
are the backstroke and the individual med- 
ley. He placed fifth in the 400-meter IM at 
the national championships. 

He was heavily recruited by most Illinois 
schools, Brigham Young, Louisiana State, 
Georgia, Iowa State and Mississippi. But he 
said he chose Illinois for the academics and 



the coaching. 

But the academics caused Saaf the mosl 
trouble as he had language problems ir 
some of his classes and was ineligible for 
the second semester. 

Hill is the only Illinois state diving cham 
pion to come out of Chicago. He rarely 
placed first in a meet, but was always at the 
heels of the number-one diver Skunberg. 

The time Hill did take first was on the 
one-meter board in a dual meet against 
Michigan State. He outperformed his op- 
ponent, Mike Brown, who placed sixth in 
that event at the 1981 Big Tens. 

"I love watching the top guys dive," said 
Hill. "When you see them hit the water 
with hardly a splash, it really gives you 
something to aim for." 

And Illini swimmers are aiming for bigger 
and better things with its foundation of 
freshmen. [9] 

— Scott Heiberger 



Above: As if posing as Greek statues, the swimmers 
prepare to start a race in a meet against Indiana held Feb. 5 
at the Intramural Physical Education Building. 



198 

Men's Swimming 



Making the turn 



The Illinois women's swim team under- 
went a positive reversal in its Big Ten re- 
ord this year and shattered 16 team re- 
ords as it headed into the Big Ten cham- 
)ionship. 

The Illini finished 4-2 in the conference, 
:ompared to 2-5 in 1981. The team was 5- 
l overall. Possibly its biggest achievement 
vas winning the five-team Illini Invitational 
n which the team nipped a Southern Illi- 
lois squad destined to finish high in the 
^CAA championship. 

With victories over Eastern Illinois, Wis- 
;onsin, Purdue, Northwestern and Iowa, 
he team was optimistic that it could swim 
Dut of the Big Ten cellar. 

The scroll that lists the record-breaking 
eats is long. 

Freshman Kim Nicholson set five individ- 
jal marks. These were in the 100-yard 
•reestyle, 200-yard backstroke and the 
100-, 200- and 400-yard individual med- 
eys. 



Nicholson accomplished all of this during 
the first semester, yet she and her sister 
Karen didn't return to the University after 
Christmas break. The Nicholsons said the 
main reason for leaving was their wish to 
swim on a team with an established pro- 
gram. But there wasn't much communica- 
tion among them, the rest of the team 
and coach Don Sammons. The Nicholsons' 
departure appeared hazy from Illinois' 
view. 

There was nothing hazy about senior div- 
er Robin Duffy's season. It was clearcut 
excellence. 

Duffy broke the one- and three-meter 
Illinois marks (for 11 and six dives), which 
she herself had set the previous two years. 
She took fourth on both boards at the zone- 
diving championship, giving herself a berth 
in the Association for Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics for Women's national championship. 

Sophomore Susie Hamann rewrote 
three long-distance marks — the 500-, 



1,000- and 1,650-yard freestyles. Her 
1,650-yard effort was instrumental in Illi- 
nois' Illini Invitational win, as it was the last 
event. 

Karen Nicholson added a 50-yard back- 
stroke record, and freshman Mary Wylie 
broke the 100-yard backstroke by more 
than six seconds as she blazed to a time of 
55:89. 

Two relay records also fell. The 400- 
yard freestyle team of the Nicholson twins, 
Laurie Pederson and Bonnie Bergsma and 
the 400-yard medley team of the Nichol- 
sons, Pederson and Pam York did the jobs. 

Despite the exit of the Nicholsons, three 
of Illinois' four conference wins came with- 
out them — an encouraging sign that Illi- 
nois might be turning a corner. [IjJ] 

— Scott Heiberger 



An Illini team member swims the butterfly in a meet against 
Northwestern and Indiana Jan. 23. 





Brian Coleman 

200 

Mini Spirit 





.0 



People laughed when Illinois' athletic de- 
partment plastered the slogan "The 80's 
belong to the Illini" all over campus begin- 
ning in the spring of 1980. At that time, the 
Illini's athletic program had quite a way to 
go before it could lay claim to the eighties. 

But that slogan did say something — 
that the Athletic Association, under the 
leadership of new athletic director Neale 
Stoner, was going to do everything it could 
to take the eighties and make them belong 
to the Illini. And all of a sudden, after the 
1981-82 sports campaign, that slogan 
didn't sound so funny anymore — in an- 
other year or two, it possibly could become 
true. 

Illinois teams were winning, and the spir- 
it and support for Illinois athletics that 
seemed almost nonexistent during the sev- 
enties was back with full force in the eight- 
ies. 

"Fifty or 60 years ago, people were 
proud to wear orange and blue to games, 
but that pride died out for a long time," 
sports information director Tab Bennett 
said. "Now a 60-year-old alumni boldly will 
wear his orange pants and cap despite how 
silly it looks." 

The raw statistics provided more tangi- 
ble proof of increased support. The foot- 
ball team finished the season with a 7-4 
record, the best mark since 1963, and 
probably would have gone to a bowl game 
if not for the one-year probabtion stem- 
ming from the Dave Wilson eligibility dis- 
pute. The Illini also set an all-time home 
attendance record, averaging 62,365 in its 
five home games, all of which Illinois won. 

The basketball team continued to draw 
well. The team won more than 15 games 
land qualified for post-season play for the 
(fourth year in a row. During the 1981-82 
'home season, the Illini averaged approxi- 
mately 15,400 fans a game, the fourth year 
'in a row the team has averaged more than 
|15,000 a game at the Assembly Hall. 

Illinois also won conference titles in in- 
door track, fencing, and gymnastics during 
Ithe 1980-81 sports season and had a num- 
ber of top teams during the 1981-82 sea- 
son in baseball, women's basketball, gym- 
nastics, track, cross country and fencing. 
j "There has been a rallying of pride, a 
[new Illini spirit," Bennett said. "There's 




If® trfe MM 



been such a drought here, almost like the 
current situation with the Chicago Cubs. 
The Illinois fan has a thirst that has been 
quenched with the performances of the 
football, basketball, track, gymnastics and 
other teams." 

"The interest and enthusiasm of the fans 
has improved immeasurably," basketball 
coach Lou Henson said. "It is so much 
better than it was five or six years ago. 
Assembly Hall is becoming a tough place to 
play." 

This new spirit peaked during the foot- 



While improvements 
have come on the various 
fields and courts, Illinois 
also has received more 
Grants-in-Aid revenue from 
supporters during the last 
few years. In 1979, Grants- 
in-Aid revenue totaled 
$700,000. In 1980, it in- 
creased to $950,000. And 
in 1981, revenues totaled a 
whopping $1.4 million. 



ball season with the development of the 
Dave Wilson controversy. In fact, the "Illi- 
nois versus the rest of the Big Ten" atti- 
tude that grew from the probation prob- 
ably served to increase fan support. 

"It crystallized the issues and brought all 
of us together," athletic director Neale 
Stoner said. But it would have been short- 
sighted to give the Dave Wilson affair all of 
the credit. If one had to point at the start of 
this renewed Illinois spirit, probably it be- 
gan during the 1978-79 basketball season, 
which the team launched both by winning 



15 straight games and by being featured in 
numerous national publications. 

The continued success of the basketball 
team and the improvement in other sport 
teams during the next few seasons brought 
about increased fan support. And this sea- 
son's surprising football team capped it all 
off. 

"The football team broadened the 
scope," Bennett said. "College football is a 
ritual that happens every Saturday. Foot- 
ball stays with you, and there are six days 
for the word to spread all over the country 
until the next game." 

The root of Illinois' recent success in 
athletics is Stoner's new administration. 
Stoner replaced Cecil Coleman in Novem- 
ber of 1979, and during the same year, 
President Stanley Ikenberry and Chancel- 
lor John Cribbet took office. They mutually 
recognized that Illinois needed a new atti- 
tude in sports. 

Before, Illinois coaches talked of being 
respectable," Bennett said. "The new ad- 
ministration wouldn't tolerate that. They 
got teams to start thinking they have a 
chance at the championship. The coaches 
began to take more pride in preparing their 
teams. And there was the timeliness of 
Stoner and Chancellor Cribbet and Presi- 
dent Ikenberry all coming in together. 
They recognized that Illinois needed to 
have a more consistent winning attitude 
from top to bottom, from Ikenberry all the 
way down to the swimming coach." 

Illinois always has had the potential for a 
large swelling of support. The University 
has beautiful facilities for most sports, a 
great location centrally placed among Chi- 
cago, St. Louis and Indianapolis, and a 
huge body of alumni throughout the state. 

"Ray Elliot (Illinois football coach from 
1942-59) used to talk about the mystique 
of Illinois," Bennett said. "The spirit never 
dies, it's just not as revved up as it could 
be. Once a follower, always a follower. 
Elliot called Illinois a sleeping giant." 

The giant is awakening. M\ 

— Mike Zahorik 

Opposite: The dance of Chief Illiniwek, done by Scott 
Christensen, brings the spirit of victory to home football 
and basketball games. The steps, which are based on an 
actual Indian dance, are performed at the halftimes of all 
home games. 



201 

Illini Spirit 



M aettfjfaij 



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John C. Stem 

K. s ._ 



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In the following pages, you will find the 
various groups that are representative of 
our campus. These students have been 
brought together by similar interests and 
have concentrated their efforts in working 
toward a common goal. 

We set aside these pages to represent 
any type of group ranging from national 
and local honor societies to fraternities and 
sororities to groups- of friends who want a 
lasting remembrance of the college years 
they spent together. 

The variety of people and the activities 
in which they are involved are what make 
the University unique. 



I IJ JM GREEKS 

A rocky past, a rosy future 



Looking at the University of Illinois 
Greek system today, with its active social 
life, philanthropies and trend-setting 
clothes, one may be totally unaware of its 
rocky past. The Greek system on campus 
fought many battles with several of the 
University's regents and the Board of 
Trustees before winning the right to build, 
grow and flourish. 

Within five days after the University 
opened, literary societies, in some regards 
precursors of fraternities and sororities, 
were formed by the first regent, John M. 
Gregory. A typical meeting of a literary 
society included orations, declamations 
and debates by the members. 

But restlessness was aroused among the 
students as the strict academic discipline 
left little time for leisure. Looking for some- 
thing new and different, they formed secret 
societies. 

As early as 1872, an unofficial chapter 
of Delta Tau Delta was founded. This se- 
cret society remained on campus until it 
was discovered by University professors in 
the spring of 1876. In June of that year, 
the Board of Trustees passed a resolution 
condemning secret societies, asking that all 
societies disband. 

A change of regents in 1880 gave new 
hope to the fraternities. The newly-ap- 
pointed Regent Peabody did not warn 
against the secret societies. Taking this as a 
nod of affirmation, a group of men at- 
tempted to reorganize Delta Tau Delta. 
Another group took steps creating a chap- 
ter of Sigma Chi. Rivalry between the two 
beginning fraternities led Peabody to de- 
mand their dispersal and to impose an anti- 
fraternity pledge upon all students entering 
the University as of January 1, 1882. Be- 
fore admission into the University, each 
student was required to sign an oath prom- 
ising not to join or to be connected in any 
way to a secret society during his academic 
years. Failure to uphold the oath was pun- 
ishable by expulsion from the school. 

This remained in effect until 1891 when 
Peabody left the University and acting Re- 
gent Thomas Burrill requested that the 

Board of Trustees abolish the antifraterni- 
ty pledge. This cleared the way for the 
arrival of fraternities and sororities at Illi- 

204 

Illlrti Greeks 



nois. 

On Dec. 14, 1891, Sigma Chi became 
the first fraternity to receive the official 
University approval. 

Kappa Sigma and Phi Kappa Sigma fol- 
lowed, bringing with them the first sorority, 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Early fraternities and sororities filled a 



social need in addition to providing needed 
housing space for the growing student 
body. 

Since then, the University of Illinois' 
Greek system has grown to be over 75 
houses strong, the largest in the world. M\ 

— Jodi R. Paul 






s%*» 





K 2 

H'B 1 RATS 1\ D H i! V I I H£l DO 



&QcjkjpMcjtjpMe^^ 



Courtesy of the 1897 Illio. 



Wanted: 

little sisters 




<r 



——&- 






Each year as New Student Week gets 
nderway, the Quad's barren summer 
idewalks quickly become a collage of col- 
red squares and masking tape. New stu- 
ents, who might otherwise be found star- 
lg at the unfamiliar buildings or diligently 
tudying their campus maps, can often be 
bserved walking instead with their eyes 
eemingly plastered to their feet. 

Chances are some of them are female, 
nd those deeply contemplative expres- 
ions on their faces aren't the result of 
cholarly philosophizing. Instead, they are 
ae result of the intense concentration re- 
uired as they try to remember the numer- 
us addresses of those infamous social 
vents known as "little sister rush parties." 

What attracts girls to fraternity "little 
ister" programs? 

"Well, I enjoyed getting out and r eo- 
eople," said Paula Van Dyke, a fr 1 in 
1 LAS. 

The basic idea behind "little sisters" is 
or fraternities to attract a group of girls 
/ith which to have exchanges or parties. 

"Sorority exchanges are great, but 
ley're a one-shot deal," said Mark Scott, 
ttle sister chairman for Phi Kappa Theta. 
You see the girls from a sorority once; 
laybe a couple of guys will get dates, and 
lat's it. Little sisters are more permanent 
nd hopefully can become closer friends." 

"It's an opportunity to meet girls who 
sually aren't in sororities," pointed out 
heta Xi's little sister programmer, Dan 
onergan, "which is good because Greeks 
2nd to be limited as to whom they see." 

Most little sister parties are held the first 
>w weeks of school. "We invite everybody 
) a second party to see who's interested 
nough to come back," explained Loner- 
an. "At the second party, the guys try to 
et to know the girls and selected ones are 
ailed back. 

"Out of maybe 300 from the first party, 
sually 50 or so will join the program. Girls 
re given big brothers, who call them for 
arties and who are supposed to become 
omeone the girls can get closer to, like 
eing their best friend in the house." 

In general, girls are assigned big broth- 
ers, but at Phi Kappa Theta, said Scott, 
iris "choose who they would like their big 



II 



7 




brother to be." John Bailey of Kappa Sig- 
ma said that their little sisters "get a per- 
manent pledge dad, but big brothers are 
switched every semester." 

Examples of various little sister activities 
include walkouts, 'round-the-world drink 
parties and rack-outs. 

"Rack-outs usually occur unexpectedly, 
early some morning after a late-night par- 
ty," explained Scott. "The girls trash the 
house, bang on pots and pans to wake us 
up and then take the guys out to break- 
fast." 

Walkouts, that common practice of so- 
rority and fraternity pledges, also can be a 
little sister event. "Girls will come to the 
house and kidnap the guys, taking them to 
another chapter house for the weekend," 
Scott said. "It's great." 

While many girls enjoy the opportunities 
little sister programs offer, others have de- 
cided it's "not for them." 

"I didn't like the parties I went to," said 
one girl. "They're so crowded, and I don't 
like the feeling of being looked over or 
'chosen' to come back." 

Another girl said that once she had 
joined one house's program, she felt that 



Little sisters and big brothers often have a special kind of 
bond. Nadine Goodman, a freshman, and her big brother 
Larry Kaskel, a sophomore, stay together at a Pi Lambda 
Phi hayride. 

"little sisters were nothing more than a 
dating service. Either you found a boy- 
friend at the house, or you were nothing 
more than a wallflower." 

Whether or not little sister programs are 
the way to improve your social life is your 
choice. Nonetheless, out of the nearly fifty 
fraternities at the University, the opportu- 
nity is certainly there. 

"A lot of girls just see the signs and 
come through for the heck of it," said 
Scott, "which is super; they can meet ev- 
eryone and decide if they'd like to come 
back or just enjoy the party." 

For those who become a little sister, 
Scott added, "it can be a lot of fun." [jj[] 

— Cindra Kay Bump 



205 

Illlni Greeks 



Opposite: Cheered on by her teammates, Mary Beth Fa- 
gerson, a sophomore, runs a relay race during Sigma Chi's 
Derby Days. 

Right: Playing drinking games can be a fund raiser as well 
as being a fun raiser. Jim Engstrom, a freshman, who won 
Pi Lambda Phi's Quarters Tournament at Kam's, is 
watched closely by referee Jeff Materski, a sophomore. 

Below: Doug Lindsey, a senior, anticipates the "cream 
face" he will have when Jackie Walters, a sophomore, 
throws the pie in one Derby Days' event. 




Brian Coleman 




206 

Philanthropies 



James L. Novy 




For the love of mankind 



Pies in faces. Tricycle races. Dancing for 
lours. Sitting on poles. Smashing cars. 
Splashing in swimming pools. Male beauty 
contests. 

And they say the "Greeks don't want no 
: reaks." 

What ties all these absurdities together? 
rhe answer is found in one word — philan- 
:hropy. 

If you have taken Classical Civilization 
100, you know that "phil" means love, and 
hat "anthro" means mankind. 

Almost every fraternity and sorority in- 
dents, plans, organizes and conducts a phil- 
anthropy for some charitable organization, 
»uch as World Hunger Year, the Multiple 
Sclerosis Society, the YWCA "Little Pal" 
urogram or the Beckwith Living Center. 

The major problem with the philanthrop- 
c effort is coming up with a unique way to 
jet people involved and to raise money at 
:he same time. So, you see walk-a-thons, 
3ike-a-thons and even sit-a-thons. 

Alpha Chi Omega sorority and Theta Xi 
raternity sponsored a 170-hour pole sit for 
:he National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 
rhe event lasted one week and grossed 
Tiore than $7,000. Each member of the 
louses took two-hour shifts sitting high 
atop the pole. For their love of mankind, 
:he participants braved heat, rain, dark of 
light and drunken college students return- 
ng from the bars. 

Zeta Beta Tau fraternity sponsors an an- 
lual dance marathon. This event has be- 
:ome a tradition and has featured live en- 



tertainment from stars such as Harry Cha- 
pin and Kool Ray and the Polaroidz. Over 
the past nine years, according to Jeff 
Youngerman of Zeta Beta Tau, the mara- 
thon has raised about a half-million dollars 
for the National Association for Retarded 
Citizens and World Hunger Year. 

The dancers, after dancing for almost 
three consecutive days, come home giddy, 
exhausted, and feeling pretty good about 
themselves. Stacy Schultz recalled her first 
words upon arriving home from the 1981 
dance marathon: "I need a pan of hot wa- 
ter for my feet, and some No-Doz ... I 
think I'll pull an all-nighter." 

Sigma Chi's Derby Days is another phil- 
anthropy project that has achieved nation- 
al recognition. The week's activities in- 
volve sorority girls in a pie throwing con- 
test, a pizza eating contest, a volleyball 
tournament, a beauty pageant and a Derby 
chase. 

Each sorority pays an entry fee to par- 
ticipate in the events, to enjoy refresh- 
ments and to have a lot of fun. John Mad- 
den of Sigma Chi was hit in the face with a 
pie. "It's a good thing I like whipped 
cream," he said. The proceeds go to differ- 
ent charitable organizations. 

Delta Gamma sorority gives the guys a 
chance to compete in its annual Anchor 
Splash. In this philanthropy, fraternities or- 
ganize teams to compete in swimming re- 
lays and a Mr. Anchor Splash contest. 

Kate Cleary of Delta Gamma recalled 
some of the things that went wrong: "The 



key didn't fit in the Huff pool door, so the 
guys had to break a window in order to 
swim. One group of guys insisted on jump- 
ing off the balconies into the pool, and all 
the girls ended up being tossed into the 
water." The proceeds went to benefit Con- 
servation and Aid to the Blind. 

The Phi Psi 500 is a tricycle race featur- 
ing girls dressed up in imaginative cos- 
tumes. Encouraged by their coaches, they 
speed through obstacle courses set up on 
the Quad in hopes of capturing the Phi Psi 
500 title. The proceeds from this annual 
event go toward the YWCA Community 
Service Volunteer (Little Pal) program, 
which matches underprivileged children or 
orphans with big pals. 

While the tricycles crashed, the Sigma 
Phi Epsilon pledges sold smashes. For a 
quarter, which benefited the Heart Associ- 
ation, passersby could take two swings at 
an old auto. 

The celebrated male beauty contest 
called "Deepher Dude", sponsored by Del- 
ta Phi Epsilon, is another philanthropy 
event that Greeks enjoy. One "Deepher 
Dude" candidate said, "All I want is to be 
Deepher Dude." 

As the Dudes keep reigning, the tricycles 
keep crashing, and the pies continue flying 
through the air, the Greeks will keep rais- 
ing thousands of dollars for charitable orga- 
nizations. They will work hard, have a little 
fun and give their philanthropy that "good 
ol' college try." I^J] 

— Ginger Hopkins 



207 

Philanthropies 



Greek Week 1981! 




September 20-26 

ian Coleman -^^^^^- 




Established 1906 



Acacia 



501 E. Daniel, Champaign 




Front row: Sully, Marco, Sapper, Lew, Mitsch, Kirtch, T.P., Bob, Lerch. Sec- Doc, Deck, Vidal, Gorman, Tastie, Sluggo, Ossie, Danny K., O'Leary, Snake, 

ond Row: Ort, Gorge, Aussie, Steve, Coves, Rat, Stuke, Bud, Maki, Boc, Max. Paul, Tone, JR., Munch, Beebes, Stu, Boo, Skate, London, Butts, Mones. 

Third Row: Wickers, Gordon, Koumhead, Myrna, Fuzzy, Cou, Izod, Chicken Missing from photo: Stosh, Seves, Smitty, Sloanberg, Dropkick, Devo, Gator, 

Legs, Binz, Trax, Tim, Kevin, Sub, Todd, PH. Back Row: Nolan, Ski, Barber, Jim, Barger, B.J., Kes, T. Laffs, Sponge, Snapper, Don, Rickshaw. 



210 

Acacia 



Alpha Chi Omega 



904 S. Lincoln, Urbana 



Established 1899 




Front row: Cindy Adams, Julie Teuscher, Laurie Vacala, Mary McClenahan, 
Sheri Stuart, Sandy Serio, Karin Usedom. Second row: Mary Ha, Colleen 
Caplet, Wendy Wray, Jean Bajadek, Lisa Holzl, Mrs. Hutson, Sandy Hughes, 
Beth Nigro, Lisanne Babicz, Julie Siegrist, Kathy Hopkins. Third row: Ellen 
Pinter, Margie Mueller, Susan Beaupre, Ginger Hopkins, Colleen Mason, Julie 
Gustafson, Stacy Schultz, Carol Kazuk, Mar Burg, Joy Kovacic. Fourth row: 
Barb Laraia, Lynn Russo, Debbie Hopper, Anna Marie Carey, Carmel Scopelite 
Cheryl Hofbauer, Mimi Sponder, Diane Pospisil, Diane Bowman, Susan Psaltis 
Jane Haley, Jean Saunders, Elizabeth Sanders, Linda Kassner, Beth Crowcrowft 
Danielle Winkle, Nancy Lencioni, Lisa Hultquist, Dawn Cheney, Mary Johanne 
son, Amy Shay, Juli Ashley, Jill Engdahl, Sue Bridger. Back row: Juli Bark 
Sheila Holley, Jodie Collins, Linda Fritts, Julie Halliday, Debbie Kresser, Lor 



Siegert, Patti Pace, Betsy Sproul, Debbie Lemons, Laurie Miller, Anita Krogh, 
Susan Schroeder, Ginger Foster, Bonnie Scheffler, Tami de Werff, Sue Moore, 
Sarah Trainer, Julie Armstrong, Julie Bajadek, Jan Wolfe, Deb Mountsier, Suzi 
Caplet. Missing from photo: Terri Abruzzo, Chris Cacci, Darlynn Faatz, Tracy 
Gill, Jennifer Jagusch, Tracey Lindberg, Tara Miller, Meg Pishler, Sherry Revers, 
Elizabeth Sullivan, Ellen Walton, Deb Barclay, Kristin Berg, Hettie Buechner, 
Laura Downing, Laura Duebner, Peggy Fritts, Debbie Fulmer, Barb Gluchman, 
Angela Hansen, Lori Jackson, Ellen King, Patti Maddock, Angel Mann, Kit 
Manning, Kelly Mayoras, Angela Niebergall, Eileen Ryan, Sara Schwefel, Anna 
Sepulveda, Linda Skoog, Stacy Thomas, Jill Thome, Ann Tobin, Sally Voorhees, 
Mina Carey, Nancy Erickson, Connie Ficek, Linda Smith, Donna Swanson, Cheryl 
Skoog, Liz Schroer, Ginger Mariani, Tracy Citrano. 



211 

Alpha Chi Omega 



Alpha Chi Rho 

Established 1916 311 E. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: Bob Cristy, Ed Roland, Mike Belo, Gary Matecak, Renee Moomey, 
(house sweetheart), Dale Marquart, Mike Hughes, Vince Kurr, Jeff Klein. Second 
row: Bob Horvath, Steve Neufeldt, Terry Kuhn, Andy Maczko, Kevin Anets- 
berger, Tom Bode, Mike Butler, Mike Schmitz, Dan Talken, Kevin McDonald, Jim 
Sperelakis, Jim Jaskowiak, Gary Schmitz. Third row: Jim Camel, John Keller, 



Joe Idaszak, Line Hobson, Rick Muff, Bob Cook, Dick Sukor, Glenn Smith, Mark 
Bradel, Greg Remec, Scott Sloan, Dave Culp, Kurt Pollman. Back row: Joe 
Hansen, Bill McDermott, Gerry Nehrkorn, Chris Barnes, Jeff Mitchell, Mike 
Berger, Jim Ludwig, Jeff Wilson, George Wadley, Carlos Garcia, Brad Bokoski. 



212 

Alpha Chi Rho 



Alpha Delta Phi 



310 E. John, Champaign 



Established 1912 




Front row: Tom Caddick, Tom Hill, Mike Kirk, Blase Demonico, Ralph Souder, man, Todd Harris, Dave Licenberg, Chester Bryniarski, Jim Bohlen, Ross Wei- 
Kevin Devanye, Ken Timmins, Scott Rubemeyer, Gary Leopardo, Hunt Walor, gand, Pat Simpson, Jerry Swords, Larry Serituk, Ed Scherer. Fourth row: Dave 
Dominic Venturi, Steve Spears. Second row: Larry Earl, Mark Klugiewicz, Mike Rutledge, Joe Kager, Ken Stone, Clint Whybark, Andy Dorn, Gary Dillman, Jim 
Bass, Dave Gilmartin, Terry Schanl, Greg Jacobs, Dan Smith, Chuck Vermillion, Welsch, Chuck Kirk, Joe Siefkas, Pat Hickey, Nick Icknayan, Blake Linders, John 
Bob Okuma, Ken Baxter, Mike Hargett, Ben Oosterbaan, Greg Martin. Third Peisker, Craig Gallimore, Russ Wood. Back row: Phil Colletier, Al Gienko, Rich 
row: Dave Meisenheimer, Dave Driskell, Andy Grey, Kevin Horcher, Tim Her- Lord. 



213 

Alpha Delta Phi 



Alpha Delta Pi 



Established 1912 



1202 W. Nevada, Urbana 




Front row: Laurie Blazej, Linda Vavak, Regina Dorff, Tara Pisik, Rory Losos, 
Lisa Hogan, Ines Barrett, Sandy Neier, Julie Warrick, Mary Wick, Stephanie Iten, 
Teri Danosky. Second row: Carole Hetfleisch, Margaret DeYoung, Marianne 
Scholl, Marianne Roesler, Molly Schaefer, Mary Pepping, Monica Schlenzig, 
Michelle Owens. Third row: Julie Free, Kathy Borkowski, Rhonda Johnson, Jill 
Scrimager, Julie Grannell, Julie Keverian, Mary Iuorio. Fourth row: Sue 
Olendski, Heidi Dusenbury, Bev Gaitens, Patti Masek, Lisa Nelson, Sue Stadt- 
lander. Debbie Quick, Collette Martini, Amy Miller, Mari Beaman, Connie Katris, 
Janet Foran, Sandi Gold, Nancy Loboda, Cindy Hasse, Lori Slabeszerski, Pam 
Goodey, Mindy Creidi. Fifth row: Jodi Juricic, Wendy Harryman, Cindy Stimp- 
son, Allison Maxwell, Andrea Purkel, Margie Budd, Barb Percy, Mary Beth May, 
Vicki Kirby, Nancy Miller, Catherine Nicholson, Debbie Inlow, Phoebe Hartzell, 



Lynn Rapp, Eileen O'Shea, Lynette Erhart. Sixth row: Katy Flynn, Linda 
Martini, Debbie Spears, Joyce Grabher, Jennifer Hruska, Lynn Shiera, Lisa 
Mitchell, Andrea Behegan, Karen Rojc. Cheryl Laske, Mary Jachimiec, Mara 
Silverman, Julie Simer, Carol Benzing, Carol Clements, Carol Phillips, Laura 
Crouse, Terri Lauten, Mary Anne Backer. Seventh row: Sara Bartells, Lauren 
Kocsis, Anne Tompkins, Kim Kreis, Margaret Durkin, Vicki Baenziger, Sue 
Goldberg, Jane Durkin, Barb Cunningham, Cindy Harmon, Maureen Reilly, Mary 
Beth Robinson, Jan Phillips. Back row: Diane Glittenberg, Jenine Cannell, Janice 
Backer, Mary Fitzgerald, Gail Chilla, Martha Luse, Julie Carlson, Lisa Noble, 
Heidi Dalenberg, Kathy Dudka, Cindy Morley, Marianne Stanke. Missing from 
photo: Kim Couri, Mary Gill, Carole Laude, Amy Bernstein. 



214 

Alpha Delta Pi 



Alpha Epsilon Pi 

110 E. Chalmers, Champaign Established 1920 




Front row: Sheldon Gilbert, Charles Pap, Glen Spear, Dave Kliff, Ron Asher, 
Dave Coren, Mark Friedman, Jay Cohen, Mark Feinmehl, Sam Boxerman, Ken 
Barrish, Daniel Wickell, Rick Mawrence, Tom Goldblatt. Second row: Barry 
Leb, Neil Kane, Craig Kaufman, Gary Malkin, Rob Kahn, Wes Nissen, Dave 
Kaufman, Larry Aronson, Mark Putterman, Greg Simon, Brad Lippitz, Steve 
Malkin, Jay Brickman, Bob Handler, Ken Shapiro. Third row: Howard Dan- 



Photograph supplied by Alpha Epsilon Pi 
zyger, Mike Imber, Phil Falk, Marc Taxman, Keith Bell, Fred Silberberg, Dave 
Rabin, Bill Peltin, Andy Sachs, Scott Sinar, Al Palmer, Steve Kolb, Al Burack, 
Steve Taxman, Steve Samuels. Back row: Phil Rasky, Ariel Eselevsky, Art 
Edelstein, Bob Shelist, Phil Gordon, Bruce Hecktman, Mike Kaufman, Stuart 
Wagner, John Worsek, Jon Cooper, Ron Jacobson, Mark Edelstein, Steve Tobin, 
Paul Klein. 



215 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 



Alpha Gamma Delta 



Established 1918 



1106 S. Lincoln, Urbana 




Front row: Mary Kirsanoff, Diane Hettinger, Chris Maas, Donna Crane, Susan 
Lindahl, Sue Lippe, Sue Miller. Second row: Michele Finn, Sue Brownson, 
Lynne Drassler, Roxanne Pittan, Clare Connor, Rita Karlove, Mrs. Van Eman, 
Cindy Heerens, Bettie Elliott, Amy Horvath, Stephanie Schwietert, Julie Wickert. 
Third row: Marcy Tietz, Annette Sperelakis, Suzie Sables, Benita Cotter, Maggie 
McCook, Judy Thompson, Sue Hitch, Hope Huntsinger. Fourth row: Lynn 
Wojcik, Michelle Lehman, Kathy Armstrong, Christie Richardson, Sue Kercher, 



Sue Nick, Dawn Lelko, Beth Anne Baird, Anita Petersen, Suzanne Kucera, Maria 
Weil, Nancy O'Kane, Gayle Gatch. Fifth row: Nada Pedersen, Becky Fey, Diane 
Thompson, Jane Tsatsis, Beth Eastman, Kim Eriksen, Mary Margaret Brosnahan, 
Anita Stamat, Nancy Johnson, Kathy Donohue, Anna Szado, Jody Seibert. Back 
row: Jill Mecklenburger, Jamie Frillman, Alicia Ambrosini, Judy Lee, Sally Lin- 
dahl, Stephanie Dodson, Tana Cordigan, Mary Loughran, Nancy Anderson, Amy 
Weliver, Kerry Schmidt, Sharon Brooks. 



216 

Alpha Gamma Delta 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



58 E. Gregory, Champaign 



Established 1908 




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Front row: Jeff McWard, Mark Cox, Phil Gill, Dave Maurer, Jim Hamman, Mark 
Gossett, Brett Miller, Craig Fink, Mike Zook, Eric Bowles. Second row: Jay 
Weber, Paul Pauling, Alan Anselm, Dave Bauer, Scott Bicknell, Scott Paul, Roger 
Huisinga, Carl Neubauer, Bill Bliler, Jeff Dollahon, Ron Crawford, Lee Denzer. 
Third row: Larry Pellikan, Phil Doll, Bob Messier, Mike Long, Mark Fecht, Dean 
Espenschied, Dan Schmidt, Ben Edmund, Bill Killam, Fred Helms, Rich Hardy, 
Craig Long, Jim Gill. Fourth row: Rod Morris, Jeff Adams, Don Knoche, Jim 
Erickson, Al Warren, Tim Main, John Weberpal, Drew Carls, Steve Harrell, Don 



Pellikan, Dave Howard, Dave Harrell, Dave Ott. Fifth row: Dave Fitzpatrick, 
Jon VanTress, Steve Zimmerman, Rick Clary, Dave Rolf, Gail Young, Dirk Rice, 
Steve Sandberg, Randy Stukenburg, Jamie Willrett, John Hurst, Brice Rosendale, 
Todd Armour. Back row: Eric Kahle, Jim Lewis, Bob Rowe, John Foley, Mark 
Bemis, Doug Schroeder, Scott Jeckel, Steve Bemis, Scott Friedland, Craig 
Schlueter, Ned Larson, John Milton. Missing from photo: Larry Rhodes, Randy 
Shimkus, Doug Johns, Wade Hegland, Dirk Gunderson, Steve Stice. 



217 

Alpha Gamma Rho 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 



Established 1921 



401 E. Daniel, Champaign 




.- 



Front row: Shawn French, Steve Gillan, Mike McCool, Thorn Connor, George 
Jones, Andy Drom, Chris Rohrer, Dan Mer, Matt Diamond, Bob Mattson, Ralph 
DePasquale. Second row: Mike Courtney, Dave Weddige, Kris Reitz, Mike 
Koch, Jim Wilson, Pat Merkle, Basil Salaymeh, Clay Summers. Third row: Alan 
Shontz, Tom Waters, Christopher Kreid, Randy McCool, Ben Hasan, Matt Ben- 
son, Bryan Cruwys, Tim Driscoll, Skip Laubach, Tom Kingsley, Dave Martinez, 
Andy Vanagunas, George Grauer. Fourth row: Ron Binkowski, Chris Hansen, 
Steve Hall, Jeff Siegel, Steve Landene, Matt Pausch. Fifth row: Craig Church, 
Pat Herron, Brent Howard, Mark Montgomery, Eric Joswiak, Dave Samyn, Jim 



Diamond, Bob Markgraf, Rich Miletic, Brad Hopp, Steve Mayes, Dave Hopwood. 
Back row: Scott Jardine, Greg Adams, Steve Hinderliter, Gerry Swienton, Alan 
Dodds, Bob Campbell, Scott Gerts, Gary Rockow, Bob Whitney, Eric Rohrback, 
John Bourke, Tracy Kasson, Gary Harvey, Bob Lindholm, Waylon Jennings, Jeff 
Kaplan, Jim Gliottoni, Dennis Uhlir. Missing from photo: Jerry Edwards, Bill 
Golden, Mike Guerin, Gregg Vanwyk, Phil Bierman, Roger Carlson, Lance Marco, 
Jeff Porter, John Cahill, Steve Coates, Chuck Frankiewicz, Jack Thomas, Rick 
Van Egeren, Roger Nulton, Randy Golden, Dan DalDegan. 



218 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 



Alpha Omicron Pi 



706 S. Mathews, Urbana 



Established 1911 




Front row: Nancy Kim, Carrie Thornburg, Sue Stroznickas, Kim Schultz, Nancy 
Hejza, Kim Coogan, Wendy Spreenberg, Robin Faulkner, Tracy Prater, Karen 
Scott. Second row: Jodi Firfer, Theresa Slagel, Kathy Siverly, Carol Siverly, 
Beverly Piatt, Cindy Hallman, Liz Jacobucci, Grace Niewold, Marcy Sadler, 
Beverly Anderson. Third row: Amy Harbert, Sherri Angotti, Beth Juco, Lisa 
Smith, Carol Drewno, Susan Alcorn, Wendy Feik, Lori Chapman. Fourth row: 
Amy Lauder, Julie Pfeiffer, Shellagh Callahan, Lynn Marshall, Linda Kleczewski, 
Ann Banting, Michelle Smith. Fifth row: Sue Maguire, Donna Naborowski, 
Debbie Kodros, Laura Leonard, Ellen Vogl, Cheryl Sheedy, Laura Faynor, Lynn 
Berman. Sixth row: Julie Whalen, Mary Branecki, Becky Humage, Paula Naff- 
ziger, Mrs. LeGrand, Heidi Hoffee, Cathy St. Denis, Kim Donahue, Jennifer 
Wachs, Becky Meyer. Seventh row: Vicky Marsik, Kathy Bugaiesk, Susan 
Barclay. Eighth row: Meg Donatelli, Janet Drover, Kathy Kucaba, Mary Ellen 
Ahem, Maggie Barton, Robin Davenport, Karen Wooley, Ivette Lafita. Ninth 



row: Lynn Wiehe, Lisa Jesse, Aimee Blum, Sue Kolzow, Jill Morrison, Suzanne 
Dawson, Susan Debrunner. Tenth row: Amy Fairchild, Maureen Foellmer, 
Karen Charhut, Abby Herget, Connie Barton, Kristy Guiney, Mary Udelhofen, 
Jana Oltendorf, Annette Gulley, Dotty McGillian. Back row: Connie Steiner, 
Kerri Molnar, Jackie Moss, Susie Lyon, Martha Willerton, Jane O'Brien, Steph- 
anie Herbolsheimer, Donna Sokolis, Sue Erickson. Missing from photo: Jean- 
ine Gzerniak, Joyce Deatrick, Debra Guscott, Linda Jo Hoekstra, Michelle Koh- 
nen, Kathy Kryzak, Collette Moore, Anne Theisen, Lisa Woll, Nancy Budney, 
Vicki Castle, Jean Hildreth, Laura Hull, Lisa Mademan, Denise Muehl, Cindy 
Sarver, Debbie Simon, Ann Shoen, Jean Craig, Becky Davison, Sandy Dunavan, 
Patty Elliot, Mary Hager, Lee Litt, Pam Marines, Lorelei Milo, Sue Oberndorfer, 
Kathy O'Keefe, Nancye Rempert, Sara Sever, Carol Shuman, Marge Smith, Joan 
Stumpf. 



219 

Alpha Omicron Pi 



Established 1922 



Alpha Phi 



508 £. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: Mo Murphy, Stacey Abeles, Nancy Gasmann, Heidi Krautwurst, 
Alice Aubel, Molly Molander. Second row: Katie Chrystal, Kathy Pelletieri, 
Laura Lenz, Karen Clark, Kathy Goodwin, Pat Shannon. Third row: Olivia 
Martinez, Karen Rubin, Lawrie TenPas, Debbie Porter, Kathy Carr, Natalie 
Overturf, Myrosha Dziuk, Julie McLean. Fourth row: Kelly Gastell, Renee 
Jaworsky, Laura Diven, Mrs. Barlage, Tami Hitchcock, Laura Lower, Tammy 
Hart, Noreen Valente. Fifth row: Carol Ruda, Unknown, Lisa Yoder, Laura 
Hughart, Patti Deegan, Marlise Russell, Ellen Garippo, Karen Brinkman. Back 
row: Patti Bystrom, Rita Forster, Mary Rose Dombrowski, Jeannie Clifford, Mary 
Wilhelm, Debbie Mastella, Kelly Abeles, Maureen Kenney, Mary Lyman, Lisa 
Askin, Crystal Chew, Laurie Peard, Patti Bradley, Kendra Klein, Lynda Ooster- 
baan, Tracey Blousky, Judy Reese, Mo Mukai, Joy Irving, Alicia Jilek, Caroline 
Tonkin, Elayne Victor, Eileen Rajala, Sue Brady, Suzy Walsh, Deanne Miresse, 

220 

Alpha Phi 



Sherry Seliga, Debbie Elliot, Teresa McDonald. Missing from photo: Lauren 
Anderson, Jean Arola, Kim Backs, Molly Bargh, Kathy Blessman, Trudy Boehme, 
Kat Case, Kelly Chapman, Debbie Cihak, Debbie Cummins, Vicki DalSanto, Elsa 
Fisher, Julie Foerkolb, Laura Fox, Jeanne Hall, Cheryl Hays, Allison Hodge, Lisa 
Howey, Karen Ingalls, Linda Ippolito, Jill Ittersagen, Marianne Joyce, Kallie 
Kendle, Kathy Kenney, Julie Koren, Stephanie Leese, Martha Linn, Jenny Mee- 
den, Jenny Nemec, Peggy O'Connell, Ginny O'Connor, Nancy Philips, Pam 
Postlewaite, Terri Pucin, Sue Reedy, Jane Rubin, Cindy Sasse, Patty Schlemmer, 
Susan Show, Pam Swanson, Carol Unterberg, Linda Vissers, Lu Ann Wingert, 
Kitty Zeller, Sue Hutchinson, Sue Wandke, Mary Ann Pusateri, Therese Izzo, 
Melissa Tjelta, Mina Shida, Sue Sweeney, Pam Devero, Maureen Madden, Brid- 
get Reidy, Karen Leese, Eileen Sexton, Ginny Fess, Lisa Casten, Joanne Mukai, 
Anne Hyde, Kathy Hearty, Marcy Barrett, Gita Tewari. 



Alpha Rho Chi 



1108 S. First, Champaign 



Established 1914 




Front row: DeAnn Whitney, Brian "Checkbook" Jones, Velrie Pang, Mike 
"Roundabout" Anderson. Second row: Garrell Bevirt, Julie Schulte, Suzi Ge- 
guzys, Don "P.J." Pojman, Janet Bastien, Steve "Slushy" Suslick, Adrianne 
"Ace" Burkland, Nancy Woo, Roni Inouye, Scott "Dictionary" MacKay, Nancy 
Doherty. Third row: Diane Feiler, Michel Paillet, Ellen Bailey, Dave Robinson, 
Jeanette Frieh, Chris "Hyp" McComas. Fourth row: Bob "Lude-man" Pfing- 



sten, Gerry "Compass" Olen, Maria Burkland, Betsy O'Beary, Bruce Webber, 
Karen Derdzinski, Martha Murray, Jeff "Diz" Dismer, Nancy Auth, Our Lady of 
Mystery, Felicia Spinella, Mark Flock. Back row: Mike "Hellooo" Martini, Bruce 
"Born to Run" Christensen, Bill "The Stranger" Verthein, Joe "Camu" Lempa, 
Tim "Party God" Flock. 



221 

Alpha Rho Chi 



Alpha Tau Omega 

Established 1895 1101 W. Pennsylvania, Urbana 




Front row: Robert Lyman, Tom Thompson, Jim Thompson, Larry Eppley, Duff 
Weatherington, Rich Ellis, Jay Springman, Billy Rolander, Jay Teuscher, Don 
Lyon, Paul Lundstedt, Greg Ewert, Todd Taylor, Nick Zambole, Gary Carter, 
Scott Rice, Bryan Leonard. Second row: Mike Lyman, Suds McDermott, Jeff 
Burkett, Dave Given, Tim Compall, Tim Johnson, Steve Weissenstein, Dave 
Nauber, Paul Lauschke, Todd Halamka, Blake Miller, Mark Houska, John Geiser, 
Pete Lantero, Jeff Johnston, Louie Montana, Chris Kennedy, Mike Buchner, Pat 
Panico, Mike Serio, Greg Credi. Third row: Jim Haiduck, Tony Leonardi, Mike 
O'Brien, Steve Pignataro, Todd Berkley, Doug Ederle, Tom Siegel, Dan Ander- 



son, Jeff Clark, Dave Bryant, Dave Miller, Tom Flaherty, Don Balder, Eric Hintz, 
Brad Roderick. Back row: Rob Buchner, Tom Buckley, Shawn Donavan, Dan 
Barry, Steve Kodros, Paul Keane, Larry Becker, Mike Dobrich, Mike Mason, Joe 
Venkus, Kent Knebelkamp, Mike Stine, Frank Maxwell, Tom Auld, Ed Conlon, 
Hal Houser, Doug Leddon, Greg Kilrea, Eric Skoog. Missing from photo: Dave 
Bone, Kevin Butler, John Cochrane, Scott Cochrane, Kevin Corley, Keven De- 
Phillips, Barry Fortcamp, Jim Gregory, Bill Hanusa, Dave Keller, Dean McAllis- 
ter, John McAndrew, Laine Mount, Mike Napoleon, Jeff Sanfilippo, Rick Schoon- 
over, Scott Weiler, Paul Zalatorius. 



222 

Alpha Tau Omega 



Alpha Tau Omega Seniors 

1101 W. Pennsylvania, Urbana 




Front row: Dribbles, T , Guf. Second row: Coc, Roger, Pic, Duff. Third row: Campus, Spock, Pisan, Indiana Jones, Tish, Zam. Missing from photo: Lumpy, 
Suds, Lymo, Awesome, Rolls, J.T., "E," Deano, Stretch, Naps. Back row: Karin, Don D. Paul Lyon, Richmo. 



223 

Alpha Tau Omega Seniors 



Established 1925 



Beta Sigma Psi 



706 W. Ohio, Urbana 




Front row: Dave Hewitt, Wayne Aldrich, Greg Wyss, Steve Eisner. Second row: Mark Hischke, Dave Johnson, Larry Braden. Back row: Gary Showers, 

row: Dave Zilz, Don Tappendorf, Steve Sehy, Paul Rescino, Warren Hecht, Tom Scott McKorkle, Don Metzler, Mark Haertling, Roy Wendte, Brian Bunte, Jim 

Esch, Terry Brakhane, Paul Zierath, Mike Schmale. Third row: Bill Curtis, Steve Andrew, Eric Johnson, Dave Dankert, Jon Peppier, Carl Maeder, Dave Nuern- 

Geske, Kevin McMillan. Fourth row: Eric Moxon, Ron Hulen, Andy Hunt. Fifth berger, Brian Otto, Kevin Kothe, Joel Kahling. 



224 

Beta Sigma Psi 



Beta Theta Pi 

202 E. Daniel, Champaign Established 1902 




Front row: Don Fagerson, Rick Lehmkuhl, Andy Hale, Chris Huber, Fred Bell, 
Chip Barber, Duffy Bresnan, Greg Wilson, Tony Dilulio. Second row: Steve 
Klimkowski, Dave Locasio, Bill Pistorius, Tom Kiley, Paul Franke, Andy Harden, 
Les Meier, Denton Green, Tom Stables. Third row: Greg Perrine, Sander 
Peterson, Jeff Fischer, Dan Podeschi, Monty Ruff, Dave Nehf, Chris Esposito, 
Tom Meyer, Jack Dugan, Larry Slight, Jeff Howard. Fourth row: Phil Johnson, 
Dave Shepherd, Walter Koenig, John Kallal, John Karkazis, Tim Crane, John 
Kriesel, Mike Langan, Rob Phillips, Kurt Hamilton, Randy Cunningham. Fifth 



row: Dave Miller, Greg Curtis, T.J. McKula, Joe Mikes, Mike Nordstrom, Al 
Howe, Andy Klapperich, T.C. Doyle. Back row: Brian Kinney, Greg Hnilicka, Al 
Lannspach, Nick Svarnius, Jeff Clarkin, Bill Becker, Steve Roberti, Tom Whalen, 
Pete Cook, Steve Cook, Paul Gilstrom, Joe Belmonte. Missing from photo: 

Gregg Cothern, Craig Drablos, Bryan Dunnivant, Tim Endsley, Sam Grebe, Bob 
Kumaki, Ken Langlois, George McWeeney, Gary Messenger, Tom Shepardson, 
Steve Sullivan, Dave Williams, Brett Wilson. 



225 

Beta Theta Pi 



Established 1900 



Chi Omega 

907 S. Wright, Champaign 




Front row: Vicki VanFossan, Sue Hoffman, Lynn Heugal, Alison Shontz, Amy 
Odom, Doris Jagodzinski, Gretchen Hippler, Charmaine Atkenson, Marianne 
Lanman, Kim McMillan, Jill Jackson, Andi VanBerkum, Karen Vyneman, Cathy 
Adams, Jenny Klinker, Pam Carothers, JoAnn Detloff, Wendy Carson, Maria 
Rakerd, Lisa Cowell, Vicki Weiland, Kathy Motter, Traci Gosnell. Second row: 
Sue Marie Maussbaum, Lois Zukowski, Helen Savadakis, Conni Reitz, Gwen 
Hoerr, Mary Palmer, Holly Gutenkunst, Carolyn Arden, Ro Carsello, Kathy 
Dunn, Mona Hartman. Third row: Connie Parratto, Sue Burlingham, Paula 
Zukowski, Eilleen Callahan, Edie Walton, Jean Lundgren, Cathy Jelinek, Lesa 
Rau, Julie Caldwell, Catie Crackel, Beth Zimmerman, Sue Dunn, Anne Carlson, 
Georgia Wolf, Sarah Getschman, Tara Snyder, Nancy Cleland, Kathy Williams, 



Caroline Becker, Amy Ackerman, Jackie Darrah, Mary Perona, Donna Larson, 
Sue Stewart, Denise Myers, Lisa Clark, Julie Newsome, Laurie Anderson, Lyndell 
Fechter, Karen Lorenzen, Gwen Conrad, Midge Christy, Sheryl Smith, Kathy 
DeValois. Back row: Karen Nelson, Lauren Schultheis, Cheryl Pugliese, Janice 
Cieslar, Julie Fredenberger, Kathy Hannula, Sue Beach, Liz Forsyth, Jill Chichi, 
Maria McCarthy, Robyn Carothers, Sue Korgie, Jackie Hayden, Linda Maloney, 
Carolyn Burlingham, Lynn Mirabella, Diane DiPrima, Sue Steinam, Pam Ginnado, 
Jane Ehrhardt, Tammie Johnson, Lynn Toljanic, Tamara Cleland, Bernadette 
Stendabeck, Dorothy Ling, Jana VanFossan, Sally Sternal, Kara Kenney, Anne 
Ackerman, Caroline Panico. Missing from photo: Gina Bellino, JoDee Colon- 
ius, Jane Novak, Sue Retzer, Diane Swenson, Barb Stuemke. 



226 

Chi Omega 



Chi Psi 

912 S. Second, Champaign 



Established 1912 




Front row: Steve Groth, Kurt Carlsen, Ken Pietrzak, Angelo Oandasan, John 
Brandt, Rob Korman. Second Row: Bob Fuentes, Matt Raymond, Pete Kamin, 
Tim Healy, Mike Walden, Mike Millhaem, Stephen O'Donnell, Paul Skidmore, 
Jeff Cazel. Third row: Don Meeker, Brad Daniels, Pete Perez, Dave Stewart, 
John Seagren, Steve Loar, Al Reszka, George Hidzick, Dave Negley. Fourth 
row: John Cullen, Ron Serota, John Wendorf, Greg Paw, Jim Steinbrenner, Brian 



Kemp, Marty Hirsch, Jeff Bowman. Back row: Lance Loughry, Gary Goggin, 
Mike McCowin, Mike Cook, Ron Mulach, Rich Kerman, John Salat, Glenn 
Guither, Ken Klingenberg. Missing from photo: Mark Wylie, Steve Brodsky, 
Jim Baska, Charles McNeil, John Craig, Scott Stokoe, Mike Berquist, John 
Pilaimo. 



227 

Chi Psi 



Delta Chi 



Established 1923 



1111 S. First, Champaign 







_ 



sLsa 



Front row: Andy Chacon, Roy Godosar, Mike Lubinski, Mike Gilley, Lonny 
Lemon, Dave Brinks, Gary Crossland, Jeff Starwalt. Second row: Greg Cazel, 
John Bowman, Tom Golaszewski, Mark Palit, Anthony Giannola, Edwin Erickson, 
Brad Sargent, John Penn, Dave Levine, Delph Gustitus, Dave Hill. Third row: 
Mark Abbott, Jim Pucin, Eric Kasza, Mark Borelli, Bob Ryan, Rusty Wenzel, Jeff 
Asbury, Scott McGrath, Randy Smith, Ken Collier, Paul Parry, Brad Taylor. 
Fourth row: Doug Berg, Don Flood, Scott Christensen, Larry Rufer, Tom Lyons, 
Mike Blaha, Harold Miles, Tim O'Meara, Ken Nelson, Gary Marchioni, Bill Slezak, 



Tim Richardson. Fifth Row: John Kelly, Bob Caruso, Jim Petges, Russ Schinde- 
hette, Ty Mayoras, Tim Leahy, Mrs. Boyd, Steve Lampson, Jamie Thompson, 
Greg O'Berry, Mark Lyons, Tom Sweeney, Tom Knuth, Dan Frederickson. Back 
row: Tim Murphy, Craig Abolt, Greg Heckman, Steve Arnold, Phil Martin, John 
Fleming, Steve Hogan, Eric Pohlman, Dan Davis, Joe Chiczauski, Mark Walter, 
Bob Kopale. Missing from photo: Gary Huffman, Tom Hogan, Todd Montgom- 
ery, Don Thorpe, Jeff Hill, Pat Herrman, Mike Swinton, Doug Hargis, Matt 
Ehrhart, John Schmidt. 



228 

Delta Chi 



Delta Delta Delta 



508 E. Chalmers, Champaign Established 1920 




Front row: Jenny Turner, Amy Browning, Martha Torrance, Peggy Scully, Ann 
Gould, Kathy Gans, Annie Olano. Second row: Jenny Long, Susie Terando, 
Lynn Kathe, Julie Bolerjack, Sally Stawick, Amy Parsons, Phyllis Leitner, Maggie 
McGrath, Vesna Spasojcevic, Julie Applegate, Lisa Seaton, Debbie Martinek. 
Third row: Missy Cunningham, Gail Nelson, Rebecca Shapland, Sharon Law- 
rence, Julie Reynolds, Wendy Bell, Laura Velus, Nadine Jacquat, Sue Miller, Andi 
Rempert, Stephanie Nagy, Chris Emery, Lori Kuo, Fourth row: Nancy Hardy, 
Mary Marchuk, Patti Bennett, Lyn Vinarcsik, Cheryl Faulhaber, Kathy Fischer, 
Wendy Jonas, Margaret Sullivan, Marie Driscoll, Lori Elledge, Fifth row: Betsy 



Lane, Kaki Dillon, Lisa Marie Paul, Joanne Buchanan, Margaret Pai, Phyllis Tom, 
Linnea Chap, Cindy Staples, Dawn Bone, Linda Randall, Clare O'Connor, Sue 
Savio, Laurie Haffner, Beth Savio, Kathy Brewbaker, Marion Bronson, Janna 
Foor, Cecilia Fogerty, Holly Bishop. Sixth row: Joanne Lattal, Mary Strategos, 
Terri Frisbie, Martha Marchuck, Lori Mattick, Grace Chen, Melissa Jaeckel, Bev 
Stewart, Ann Parsons, Laurie Graham, Kelly Keck, Sue Ferguson, Peggy Young, 
Becky Muhl, Kris Campbell, Julie Ray, Carol Stuff, Lori Proctor, Carol O'Neill, 
Meg Scanlan, Amy Patton, Paula Blanchette, Maureen Brown. Back row: Marga- 
ret Frisbie, Margaret Oakes, Cindy Hayse, Terri Ortworth. 



229 

Delta Delta Delta 



Delta Gamma 

Established 1906 1207 W. Nevada, Urbana 



'.-' i 






— 


****** «■"•*» —my 







Front row: Lisa Bunse, Pam Gans, Jackie Walters, Sarah Cioni, Diana Samard- 
zija, Laura Patterson, Karen Gans, Denise Holtzman, Lisa Bontems, Jill Rogich, 
Monica McCarthy, Lynne Thieme, Julie Rose, Jane Harmon, Cheryl Byers, Alison 
Gigl, Jeanne Bailey. Second row: Lori Zimmers, Paula Williams, Miriam Watts, 
Joy Buck, Leslie Marciniak, Debbie Buytendorp, Ann Marie Burda, Liz Weber, 
Betsy Parks, Alice Taylor, Lynn Joy, Kathy Sobczak, Elaine Weaver, Cheryl 
Weber, Nancy Green, Stacey Caldwell, Sally Studwell, Nancy Bremhorst. Third 
row: Debbie Kuykendall, Sandy Glass, Jill Holden, Lori Selbach, Beth Bergman, 
Gretchen Boch, Julie Kunetka, Anna Simari, Ami Rosenstock, Cindy Ward, Debra 
Werry, Tracy Neisius. Fourth row: Jane Robbin, Germaine Agnes Ward, Lynn 



Hagman, Carrie Burnett, Cathy Mitchell, Ruth Johnson, Beth Lindgren, Lynette 
Daniels, Janice Kennedy, Cam Zeller, Holly Petrie, Pat Eslinger, Debbie Bennett, 
Judy Buhay, Lisa Shmikler, Laurie Petrus, Marty Blum, Brenda Bechtel, M.J. 
Scarim, Cindy Ruer, Lisa Triplett, Mary Beth Sova, Jackie Stibich, Mary Nicolau, 
Donna Suarez. Fifth row: Julane Lantz, Karen Kreitling, Tracy Bleuher, Kate 
Cleary, Angie Burbules. Cheryl Fiets, Renee Powell, Sharon Elliot, Kim Weiler, 
Jodie Eiser, Alice Mary McCracken, Julie Wilson, Lynn Jesse, Debbie Kosco, Kelli 
Essig, Karen Stanton, Chrysanthe Stellas. Back row: Donna Bleming, Donna 
Angus, Rose Dudek, Joy Lockmiller, Beth Schuler, Siobhan Hardiman, Beth 
Woodruff, Sloan Donnellan, Sheila Burgess, Barb Egan. 



230 

Delta Gamma 



Delta Phi 

1008 S. Fourth, Champaign 



Established 1920 




Front row: Barry Pangrle, Bill Thomas, Bob Burd, Jack Spesard, Mike Farrel. Grissom, Joe Shake, Doug Walston, Lance Loveless. Back row: Rick Goldenson, 
Second row: Tim Hayes, Tim Kilberg, B.J. Klingenberg, Alex Waite, Tim Joe Rothermel, Jack Brown, Dave Denby, Bruce Denby, Glenn Theilen. 
Pastornak, Doug Dillow. Third row: Rick Welch, Doug Gaines, Ted Drilling, Jeff 



231 

Delta Phi 



Delta Sigma Phi 



Established 1919 



110 E. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: Gary Stone, Lou Flores, Randy Wojcieszak, Mark Chidichimo, Bill 
Owens, Rocky Lupardus, Lou Palacios, John Sanfillippo. Second row: Mike 
Rubin, Pete Thomas, Karl Aavik, Laura Newton (house sweetheart), Marc Shu- 
man, Steve Kivett, Brad Lyons. Third row: Israel Desierto, John Pellouchoud, 
Kurt Warkenthiem, Mark Walsh, Al Rago. Fourth row: Jordan Plofsky, John 
Heneghan, Tim Enright, Pat Quinn, Lenny Davenport, Steve Cycyota. Fifth row: 
John Pierre Petras, Steve Goldsher, Mark Haerr, John Unik, Brad Walton. Sixth 
row: Paul Gawin, Dave Underwood, Andy Hanas, Bill Johnson, Mike Smith, 



Albert Kersten, Bill Dunlop, Rick Robinson. Seventh row: Randy Muench, Mike 
Madigan, Jim Curley, Greg Allen, Terry O'Brien, Mark Cieslar, John Lund. 
Eighth row: Dave Edquist, John Kachoyneaus, Todd Mosher, Dan O'Donnell, 
Kurt Kaalaas, Bob Schaller, Rick Marshall, Pete Falstad, John Boma, Norm 
Heske. Shawn Hickey, Dave Peach. Back row: Mark Herbert, Mike Seghetti, 
Doug Stimmel, Steve Linn, Jeff Braun, Joe Dicola, Scott Andrle, Rich Tomei, Joe 
Dunk, Chip Powell, Dave Engle, Joel Glassman, Mike Schmidt, Steve Langer. 



232 

Delta Sigma Phi 



Delta Upsilon 



312 E. Armory, Champaign 



Established 1905 




Front row: Ron Camin, Jim Hurd, Claudio Marcus, Al DeRiemacker, Scott 
Dworschak, Chuck Carey, Dan White. Second row: Andre Quattrochi, Steve 
Kennedy, Jim Seiler, Bob McKirgan, John Locallo, Mark Brozio, Patrick Catt, 
Kevin Kinsella, Scott Parker. Third row: Matt Bettenhausen, Brent Rushing, 
Steve Baumann, Greg Perry, Ernie Smith, Craig Zelent, Ed Palekas, Kevin 
Cuthbert, Brent Reiske, Kevin Lewis, Kevin Full, Jeff Durham, Joe Pickett, Dave 



Full. Fourth row: Joe Pancrazio, Dave Hansen, Jim Hahn, Dale Esworthy, Scott 
Wells, Jim Nagle. Fifth row: Tom McCarthy, Jeff Bowes, Joe Borrelli, Craig 
Milkint, Larry Maloney, Paul Skarr, Eli Pars, Dave Painter, Frank Kosinerz, Jamie 
Sturtewagen, Dave McElroy, Andrew Schwartz. Back row: Jeff Coyle, Perry 
Meronyk, Dave Mica, Chris Browne, Mike Medema, Dave Sommer, John Turcza, 
John Kuedaras, Dan Gibbs. 



233 

Delta Upsilon 



Established 1921 



Delta Zeta 

710 W. Ohio, Urbana 




Front row: Cyn Tanner, Audrey Palekas, Joyce Long, Jan Baker. Second row: 
Marie Boyd, Patsy Brattin, Lynda Bode, Cathy Retzlaff, Carol Sonoc, Nancy 
Wenzel, Sharon Grabher, Anne Siemer, Beth Wendel, Beryl Schnierow, Terri 
Tarsitano, Mary Murphy, Claire Sadej, Stephanie Storkel, Mary Klees. Third 
row: Mrs. Fox, Kathy Jovanovic, Sarah Woods, Lynn Farley, Lori Lovelace, 
Donna Stauffacher, Heidi Graepp, Sue Ronchetto, Tanya Tussing, Lynelle Hin- 
den, Korey Jeska, Amie Summers, Cathy Alcala, Peggy Hewing. Fourth row: 
Anne Helmick, Kathy Wright, Renee Velasquez, Holly Ulrich, Kim Mason, Cathy 



Nott, Robin McCorkle, Carol VanBuskirk, Sue Seilheimer, Betsy Reddy, Lisa 
Abderhalden, Carol Kowalski, Valerie Bauer. Fifth row: Kim Arrington, Laura 
Trojan, Maribeth Jackson, Ruth Staley, Margaret Rapp, Mary Hayes, Karena 
Klopp, Dianna Dunn, Lea Anne Wild. Back row: Jenny Henderson, Kathy 
Palansky, Lisa Derieg, Jerrie Merrideth, Lisa Blaydes, Leanne Lovelace, Kathy 
Flack, Annette Brown, Gillian Menees, Debbie Mastorakas, Marj Martin. Missing 
from photo: Sue Naffziger, Renee Robertson, Kim Callihan, Paula Chilson, 
Connie Cirks, Faye Licata. 



234 

Delta Zeta 



Farmhouse 



809 W. Pennsylvania, Urbana Established 1915 




Front row: Kent McKee, Mike Smith, Kirk Farney, David Bitting, Bruce Green- 
wood. Second row: Tom Skowera, Brian Folkerts, Nick Budd, Mark Goodwin, 
Glenn Tomaszewski, John Downey, Terry Beebe, David McMurtry, Jim Oliver, 
Rick Firkins. Third row: Doug Frailey, Rex Clark, Bob Barclay, Ron Firkins, Bill 
Lee, Keith Dintelmann, Kevin Haas, Rod Davis. Fourth row: John Benz, Darren 
Downing, David Miner, Rodney Becker, Paul Harroun, Scott Bidner, Brett Madi- 
son, Ralph Brubaker, Scott Davidsmeier, Dan Williams. Fifth row: Brian Bell, 
Mike Pierce, Steve Sinn, Keith Vollmar. Sixth row: Rich Lenty, Dean Lemen- 



ager, Gary Baker. Seventh row: Brent Hoist, Brian Hayes, Kreg Gruben, Jay 
Litchfield, Stan Maddock, Tim Yerkey, Eric Eeten, Howard Knapp. Eighth row: 
Greg Curtin, John Ackerman, Bob Jackson, Steve Heiderscheit, Chuck McNett, 
Ken Quinn, Back row: Kyle Fulling, Doug Punke, Rod Chesnut, Jack Pallardy, 
Kris Hoult, Jim Bergfeld, Steve Hadley, Barry Aves, Doug Anderson, Shannon 
Behimer, Dean Grimes. Missing from photo: Ron Lawfer, Doug Zehr, Marvin 
Sprague. 



235 

Farmhouse 



Established 1934 



4-H House 

805 W. Ohio, Urbana 




Front row: Carol Behme, Julie Shaffer, Linda Ford, Dot Mathews, Shelly 
VonBruenchenhein, Judy Vyduna, Sue Vandermyde, Jill Klindera. Second row: 
Mary Butterfield, Donna Wargel, Jean Kruger, Laurie Vial, Sue Malenius, Mrs. 
Thatcher, Mary Haden, Georgia Mayfield, Debbie Brooks, Karen Anderson. 
Third row: Dianne Crumrine, SuAnn Holmstrom, Jana Fairow, Mary Everly, Jill 
Heberer, Barb Baylor, Carole Comer. Fourth row: Martha Butterfield, Anna 
Graf, Cindy Mayfield, Janet Goodwin, Sue Bremer, Debbie Dowd, Marie Shaw, 



Pam Gady, Sherry Plocher, Monica Irle, Connie Reeser, Lori Pierce. Fifth row: 
Melisa Borgic, Elaine Ottosen, Audrey Hepner, Diane Myatt, Jan Richter, Sharon 
Chamberlain, Mary Millard, Nancy Flick, Hope Stevenson, Carla Gray, Stephanie 
Stevenson, Cornelia Schupbach. Back row: Anne Hathaway, Jane Unkraut, 
Jane Hough, Stacia Jones, Debbie Boston, Mary Kay Flick, Kathy Zeigler, Kris 
McConchie, Noreen Nelson, Becky Rundquist, Cheryl Bicknell. Missing from 
photo: Michele Harbeck. 



236 

4-H House 



Gamma Phi Beta 

1110 W. Nevada, Urbana Established 1913 




Front row: Ellen Baker, Jackie Sapiete, Suzanne Yario, Mary Drumm. Second 
row: Edie Walicek, Nancy Barickman, Heidi Grant, Lynda Glyman, Maureen 
Mulvihill, Katie Price, Mary Lutz, Kathy Oakley. Third row: Janice Teng, Terri 
Sudges, Cathy Jewell, Angie Phipps, Missy Poshard, Dawn Herro, Jeanette 
Rawclau, Tracy Torrison, Beverly Kerin, Cathy Ditto, Shelly Eddingfield, Karen 
Butler, Cathy Weber, Kendra Kett. Fourth row: Stevie Matthews, Sharon Ja- 
cobs, Jody Kennedy, Julie Skelton, Anita Mittra, Julie Loving, Laura Morris, Lena 
Dohse, Healy McCrea, Heather Herman, Nina Casten, Amy Hinton, Danae Hoby, 
Betsy Wynne, Ann Hoffbeck, Debbie Stephens, Ellen Perry. Fifth row: Debbie 
Hyde, Millicent Ku, Kristi Lauritsen, Denise Hyde, Susie Schweighart, Jennifer 
Poshard, Jill Patterson, Barb Rice, Jessica Eichstaedt, Irene Freutel, Kitty Fo- 
garty, Sarah Flanigan, Jo Marie Fredricks, Martha Campbell, Maria Ladle. Sixth 
row: Laura Mayle, Mary Kay Starwalt, Lydia Benjamin, Barb Box, Barb Bulczak, 



Amy Hass, Lisa Manion, Mary Jane Eidler, Sue Dickrell, Maura Berkelheimer, 
Monica Mulvihill. Seventh row: Sue Tjarksen, Martha Baits, Linda Bielfeldt, 
Jane Conarchy, Barb Liebovich, Karen Seggerman, Karla Rubenacher, Donna 
Cunningham, Laurie Klebau, Cheri Clark, Beth Adelhelm, Angie Jordan, Polly 
Peabody, Nancy Ellis. Eighth row: Bonnie Weis, Paula Temple, Leslie Holliday, 
Susan Hurthle, Mary Ann Vaci, Debbie Bahr, Barbie Currie, Becky Lautensch- 
lager, Adrienne Neely, Gina Ross, Lori Westphal, Peggy Kloss, Mary Lohse, Kiki 
Stonitsch, Julie Hansen, Jane Lawicki, Diane Luce, Beth Ann Chicoine, Yvonne 
Beaumont. Back row: Laura Newton, Julie Cormier, Gail Pesavento, Susie 
Range. Lisa Buchanan, Sherry Manale, Beth Vondrak, Janine Solal, Lori Paul, 
Cheryl Siemienas, Linda Lindquist, Lori Zanello, Ann Mahoney. Missing from 
photo: Terry Doyle, Cathy Dungan, Maria Hanratty, Charlene Jamison, Laura 
Kofoid, Kay Komie, Shaun Martin, Gail Workman. 



237 

Gamma Phi Beta 



Mi-Dell of A r L 

Established 1949 303 E. Chalmers, Champaign 




Photograph Supplied By Alpha Gamma Sigma 

Front row: Joe Palen, Ron Robbins, Rich Pingsterhaus, Bob Nelson. Second Basting, Dave Carroll, Randy Tillman. Sixth row: Lester Janssen, Scott Bracke- 

row: Doug Zumaris, Mike Dumoulin, Dennis Gvillo, Randy Beazly, John Dallas, busch, Tom Weber, Ken Smiciklas, Bill Casady, Wayne East, Lanny Dobbels. 

Eric Ifft, Larry Pfeiffer, Brian Freed. Third row: Phil Hanna, Steve Scates, Scott Back row: Darryl Fringer, Neil Brammeier, Dave Conrady, Mike Carlson, Ron 

Plocher, Rick Campbell. Fourth row: Ron Navis, Dave Geiger, Jim Behrends, Recker, Fred Salzman, Frank Albert, Mark Weinheimer, Brian Wood, Dave 

Jeff Johnson, Tom Mueller, Pat Dumoulin. Fifth row: Scott Fechtig, Brian Halsey, Raymond Price, Tony Waldhoff. 



238 

Mi-Dell Of Alpha Gamma Sigma 



Kappa Alpha Theta 



611 E. Daniel, Champaign 



Established 1875 




Front row: Susan Wright, Maureen Goodman, Jeni Sinclair, Karen Clifford, Jana 
Yocom, Cindy Stocco, Kim Morton, Sue McPherson, Cheryl Projahn, Julie King, 
Kathy DiGiulio, Ann Harding, Linda McKeon, Patti McDonald, Kay Ceresa, Millie 
Varchetto, Kathy dinger, Jan Pipenhagen, Teri Hewing, Mary Pat DeHoff, 
Elaine Karacic, Kathy Brown. Second row: Linda Klawitter, Luanne Ulbrich, 
Karla Miller, Nancy Harding, Dawn Anderson, Eileen Lawler, Mary Goodman, 
Heather Hale, Mrs. Andrews, Kathy Crigler, Lauren Biszewski, Diane Boundy, 
Janet Arends, Janet Mutter, Tammy Hrizak, Laura Hartman. Third row: Sue 
Penrod, Faith Amarantos, Lori McKiernan, Maureen Cronin, Kim Murdock, Dawn 
Henninger, Sioban Nora, Valerie Ratts, Tricia Oskielunas, Michelle Santucci, Kim 
Janisch, Karen Kosbab, Jill McQuality, Kristin Lampadius, Jane Schneider, Cathy 



Egan, Tammy Gough, Mary Skrna. Fourth row: Janet Wheeler, Laura McKeon, 
Linda Kosek, Linda Kedzierski, Julie Toland, Joy Schmitz, Mary Swiderski, Julie 
Hagle, Andrea Wendrow, Kelly O'Neal, Yon Kim, Elaine Gem, Jana Pasiuk, 
Holly Miller, Lynn McGovern, Laura Hasen. Fifth row: Lisa Ladle, Lori Wiec- 
zorek, Amy Bibee, Debbie Park, Pam Davis, Molly Mangan, Carolyn Parker, 
Karen Sprogis, Iren Ustel, Sheila McNichols, Linda Liscano, Sandy Milo, Cindy 
Frisina, Susie Schneider, Carol Cosgrove, Margaret Goodman. Back row: Kim 
Greene, Clare Gibbs, Kristin Bergeson, Linda Strepek, Heidi Lagessie, Linda 
Geisel, Gloria Jesko, Lisa White, Marsha Joseph, Julie Ehret, Julie Ulstrup, Ann 
Larson, Jodi Chidester, Sarah Conway, Lora Hall, Kathleen Knowland, Carin 
Cosgrove, Alisa Smith. 



239 

Kappa Alpha Theta 



Established 1923 



Kappa Delta 

1204 S. Lincoln, Urbana 




1 mil— 



Front row: Mimi Ozga, Michelle Neal, Dede Clay, Lesa Pace, Kathy Roderick, 
Tricia Smith, Jody Anderson, Monique Ronayne, Carla Hill, Susan Lang, Carolyn 
Menninger, Carolyn Strong, Natalie Porter. Second row: Mary Schmidt, Renee 
Fisk, Sue Shimoyama, Donna Freudenberg, Veronica Weiss, Kelly Heidkamp, 
Kathy O'Grady, Julie Allen, Helena Stachowak, Diane Predick, Terri Nighs- 
wander, Molly Bryden, Patti Davitz, Janis Kirsch, Cheryl Gecko, Kelly Speer. 
Third row: Kara Tack, Gerri Marku, Kathy Berry, Carol Knauf, Kathy Loughran, 
Jan Gardener, Amy Beeler, Lisa Heidorn, Kristen Furlong, Jenny Nolan, Julie 
Rittmiller, Michelle Downing, Cathy Twohig, Sherri Stransky, Laura Adams, Mary 
Zagone, Julie Ozga. Fourth row: Lee Price, Julie Dockendorff, Nancy Wysocki, 



Marybeth Hanley, Laura Florek, Monica Dean, Jean Sentman, Miss Neibrugge, 
Nora Haymaker, Dawn Amendola, Nancy Hepp, Ingrid Lang, Evonne Derrick, 
Barb Grimes, Arlene Wind, Linde Hartley. Fifth row: Shaun Juliano, Sandi 
Menconi, Chris Oberle, Sheila Johnson, Ann Fornaciari, Laurie Leyden, Cheryl 
Karnatz, Laurie Ladd, Julienne Pieriacci, Amy Corrigan. Sixth row: Kathy 
Hughes, Liz Talbot, Jan Knapp, Kathy Barley, Julie Egan, Julie McLeod, Jenny 
Nyman, Pam Latham, Susie Atwood. Back row: Gail Jaeckel, Linda Leyden, 
Debbie Cochonour, Joy Montgomery, Maggie Pfister, Michele DiMarco, Leila 
Contento, Stacy DiMarco, Jenny Lagergren, Francis Anderson, Adele Hendrix, 
Janet Swan. 



240 

Kappa Delta 



Kappa Delta Rho 



1110 S. Second, Champaign 



Established 1921 




Front row: Jack Zumwalt, Paul Kory, Eddie McVey, Scott Voigt, Jeff Hirsh, Dave Swanson, Kent Cornelius, Dan Tempas, Greg Tiberend, Steve Harkins, 

Jose Valez, Greg Lynn, Gary Lynn. Second row: Jim Shoultz, Arnie Manaois, Darren Bray, Guy Allen. Back row: Nick Primm, Dan Burns, Tim Popp, Mike 

Dave Whittaker, Paul Shafer, Mike Goetze, Gerry Robinson, Thor Von Danian, Schnoor, Todd Bergman, Steve Maske. 
Paul LoPresti, Earl Allen, Eric Cornelius. Third row: Dean Dau, Bill Armbruster, 



241 

Kappa Delta Rho 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Established 1899 



1102 S. Lincoln, Urbana 




Front row: Sue Detwiler, Laura Schumm, Kathy Harris, Nancy Pine. Second 
row: Ann Lawrence, Karin Carlson, Sue Gebert, Christy Hogan, Carrie White, 
Ann Davenport. Third row: Sandy Borowski, Joanne Schumm, Betsy Oberle, 
Terri Frey, Ann Scanlan, Sharon Murphy, Cindy Carver, Gail Chaney, Belinda 
Bonsall, Julie Keller, Kathleen Beynon. Fourth row: Christy Costigan, Tracy 
Carmody, Sue Penn, Cathy Gilliam, Elisa Moyer, Beth Gilliam, Donna Schultz, 
Katie Gallivan, Robin Hartley. Fifth row: Traci Imming, Lisa Griffin, Kerry 
Hogan, Kathy Kersting, Liz Boniecki, Kerstin Goerndt, Penny Johnson, Maureen 
McNamara, Tricia Nash, Carolyn Graan, Londa Jorgensen. Sixth row: Jenny 
Pankus, Betsy Steffen, Jane Moody, Janice Griffin, Lisa Tenant, Kelly Forsyth, 
Sarah Smith, Sue Rohe, Karen Rapponotti, Judy Hanson, Kristin Grouwinkel, 
Lisa Wendland, Sue Paletti, Paula Damgaard, Sue Jorgensen, Mary Prioletti. 



Seventh row: Laurie Miller, Fanee Lekkas, Cindie Welsh, Molly Murphy, Teri 
Chapman, Pam Randa, Katie Ellis, Tammy Jaffe, Laura Murin, Laura Carmody, 
Cathy Burns, Amy Sheppard, Desiree Fornell, Kipley Bruketa, Holly Erskine, 
Kathy Liberatore. Eighth row: Beth Miller, Jane Strunk, Carol Klitchman, Lori 
Resler, Kris Callahan, Sheila Cronin, Susie Wilke, Barb Coughlan, Joyce Hamil- 
ton, Laura Banick, Francie Casey, Kim Barnes, Margaret Magruder, Mary Beth 
Fagerson, Lisa Gordon, Laura Brown. Ninth row: Felice Johnson, Susie Porter, 
Stacy Wood, Nini Mesdag, Kate Koester, Ann Dondanville, Barb Morrison. 
Tenth row: Suzie Ramm, Lisa Fabiano, Teri Coghlan, Annette Dieperveen, 
Karen Pszanka, Therese Casey, Mary Beth Martensen, Julie Falkenstrom, Nancy 
Cunningham. Back row: Diane Nash, Libby Little, Pat Borelli, Denise Domas. 



242 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Vfci. 



Kappa Sigma 



212 E. Daniel, Champaign 



Established 1891 




Front row: Courtney Penn, Jeff Rogers, Al Ono, Boyd Baker, Jim Fortcamp, 
Amos, Jeff Forrester, Ken Smith, Andy Andrews, Tad Diercks, Jay Sowinski. 
Second row: Mike Gust, Morris Danielson, Rich Cassin, Derek Mlacnik, Bob 
Derrough, Kurt Rechner, Rex Rev, Mark Anderson, Charles Rayburn Barnett III, 
John Bailey, Bill Vespa, Barry Jackson, Dennis McBride. Third row: Joel 



Photograph Supplied By Kappa Sigma 

Kratochvil, Chuck Bareis, Wayne Smith, John Russell, Ed Schwartz, Alex An- 
drade, Ray Ruemmele, Rich Segall, Tim Fernandez, Rob Sarmiento, Doug De- 
Vore, Jim Steffen, Mark Watts, Chuck Besjak, Steve Langer, Jerry Hutchinson, 
Eric Kizer, E.J. Keeley. Back row: Mike Floyd, Greg Black, Tom Fleischer, 
Kenneth Byron Graves, Dave Musielewicz, Bill Venvertloh, Tracy Lancaster. 



243 

Kappa Sigma 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



Established 1915 



209 E. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: Mike Graff, Ron Coleman, Stu White, Ernie Meuller, Dan Nelson, 
Mark Petty. Second row: Scott Hilk, Joe Ritter, Mark Beldon, Chris Anchor, 
Mike Salva, Bill Kapraun, Mike McWilliams, Chris Venezia, Mark Jones, Dave 
Noble. Third row: Mark Beckman, Bob Larkin, Mark Murphy, Bruce Bronson, 
Tim Lorentz, Mark Dickerson, Al Lebow, Scott Vandenberg, Frank Ritter, Jim 
Daleo, Ed Whitehead, Rick Stuart, Jim Pallesasse, Marty Babcock, Kurt Petonke, 
Jim Mickelson, Mike Owens, Bob Leick, Ron Bordeaux, Mike Madonia, Bob 
Young, Cecil Herbsleb, Mike Finn, Steve Robinson, Tom Osran, Greg Waite, 



Steve Davis. Back row: Glen Rinker, Eric Dusenbury, Bob Barlow, Rob Giles, 
Brian Potter, Vern Francission, Tom Clarke, Tom Rose, Ted Wallhaus, Tom 
Kittler, Rob Flesher, Tom Wallhaus, Kevin Walker, Ron Chamberlain, Todd 
Merkel. Missing from photo: Dave Kristo, Melvin Baxter, Bill Hilton, Bill 
Wright, Chris Scalia, Jon Jankowski, Mark Jankowski, Gary Stading, Jim Hart- 
ney, Jon Schmerld, Tom Fabian, Jim Conlan, Bernie Kavanaugh, Bryan Prolich, 
Jim Kanabay. 



244 

Lambda Chi Alpha 



Nabor House 

1002 S. Lincoln, Urbana Established 1939 




Front row: Steve Miller, Greg Neisler, Eric Wilkey. Second row: Keith Jeffries, 
Curtis Newport, Tim King. Third row: Brian Groth, Lee Allen, Mark Jacob, 
Andrew Allen, Chris Anderson. Fourth row: Russ Nation, Kelly Beaty, Doug 
Ruckman, Kraig Krause, Kenny Eathington, Harold Gates. Fifth row: Brian 



Millard, Scott Shafer, Doug Ray, Charles Bane, Rick Swearingen. Back row: 
Mark Ringhouse, Edward Glaser, Nathan Langham, Bob Campion. Missing from 
photo: Randy Bimes, Tim Damron, Jim Erlandson, Ron Krausz, Jeff Elsas, Jim 
Farley, Mark Hull, Jim DeSutter. 



245 

Nabor House 



Phi Delta Theta 



Established 1893 



309 E. Chalmers, Champaign 




Front row: Tom Fletcher, Scott Evans, Walt Smith, Chris Andreas, Tom Parkes, 
Pete Goodheart, Bob Foran. Second row: Bruce Anderson, Mark Hurwitz, Dick 
Medinsky, Jon Eastman, Dave Astro, J. Danger Krebs, Joe Shushinski, Rob 
Tilman, Kent D. Brown. Third row: Toma Iuorio, Tony Federighi, John Smith, 
Dan Alter, Paul Fryling, Todd Traina, Chris Sperry, Jeff Sturgeon, Steve Hands, 
Tim McCarthy, Dave Meyers, Steve Conroy, Carl Eichstaedt. Fourth row: Rob 



Havlir, Tim Crawford, Wally Simpson, Bob Johnson, Jack Wolf, Pat Morrissey, 
Tim Sweeney, Bill Blue, Clint Rehtmeyer, Eric Rehtmeyer. Back row: Bob 
Weissenborn, Mel Kingsley, Dave Wood, Scott Zust, Bill Carney, Ken Ross, Jeff 
Fryling, John Staton, Ken Zlotkowski, Mark Oscanbocker. Missing from photo: 
Dave Kissel, Ted Proctor, Russ Johnson. 



246 

Phi Delta Theta 



Phi Gamma Delta 



401 E. John, Champaign 



Established 1897 




Front row: Bradd Easton, Chuck Coughlin, Pat Flood, Ken Bruhns. Second 
row: Dennis McNamee, Dave Kelly, Gary Voyda, Tom Klimmeck, Craig Landon, 
John O'Malley, Don Graham, Peter Wright. Third row: Craig Karraker, Paul 
Benson, Pete Sershon, Stu Oswald, Dan Conrath, Tom Fox, John Shemroske, 
Charlie Ieuter, Scott Lieske, Terry Palmer. Fourth row: Tom Williams, Mike 
Bruhns, Andy Olcott, Joe DeAngelis, John Sullivan, John Broderson, Todd 
Montgomery, Pat Hagerty, Doug Walker, Mike Dillon, Ted Woerner. Fifth row: 



Tom Quinn, Tory Daugherty, Kevin O'Neill, Greg Baluk, John Hiser, Bill Luttke, 
Mike Bierk, Greg Bishop, Gil Likes, Steve Spontak, Terry Wilson, Ken Caniglia. 
Back row: Ron Welk, Jeff Ben, Mike Lee, Dean Bartolone, Scott Rathbun, Tim 
Filbert, Kris Ravencroft, Tim Doody, Doug Bishop, Jim Arnold, Jay Lofgren, 
Brett Jacobson. Missing from photo: Paul Scruggs, John Quinn, Nick Leever, 
Larry Thompson, Pat Morris, John Hagerty. 



247 

Phi Gamma Delta 



Established 1904 



Phi Kappa Psi 

911 S. Fourth, Champaign 




Front row: A. Chiappctta, M. Crescenzo, Ted Breckenfelder, Doug Scanlan, D. 
Delesandro, John Picchiotti, M. Carter, Christian Hallen, Henry Thomas French, 
Bernard Leininger, Nick Kokoris, Dave Nettleton, Bill Corry, Eric Avram. Sec- 
ond row: Randall Harmer, Daniel Tynan, Randall Conte, Mark Porst, Tim 
Walters, J. Munger, Todd Raufeisen, Lee David Cirillo, King Davis, T. Murphy, 
J. Scarpelli, Scott Frandsen, T. Connolly, Curt Bailey, Robert Jaret, M. Valentino. 
Third row: Thomas Bahn, D. Kelly, Ryk Holden, Didier Glattard, Dave Weso- 
lowski, Dale Todd, James Derry, Paul Raymond, Andrew Larson. Fourth row: 
Eric Branz, B. Swanson, Michael McGrath, J. Patterson, M. Heller, Laurence 
Smith, Daniel Rudd, John Hudgins, S. Nieslawski, David Baecklandt, J. Maurides, 
Mark Picchiotti, Joe Ruggiero, Bill Hamrick, Andrew Corcoran, Sam Reinkens- 



meyer, Ken Crain, James Sanfilippo, M. Jacobs, Ron Davies, James Downes, 
Guido, M. Saladino, John Chiodo, James McNichols, Reid Tennant, Bill Forster, 
Steve Sonnenleiter. Fifth row: Chris Niemann, David Pasquinelli, Jon Taylor, 
Greg O'Neill, Gary Ballesteros, Mark Ebeling, Michael Bleuher, Daniel Hartnett, 
Jeff Keck, Brian Kernan, Mike Hanratty, B. Kane, Jeff Kenyon, Allan Sutherland, 
Richard Swanson, Kerry Crain, Joe Green, G. Coffey, Bill Enriquez, Kevin 
Bontemps. Back row: Jim Gross, Andrew Mihm, Tom Broeren. Missing from 
photo: J. Demarco, John O'Donnell, Bill Whiting, Paul Kilgallon, Brian Wexler, 
Tom Kay, Stephen King, R. Mendoza, B.D. Salen, Mike Trusner, Abraham 
Pachikara, J. O'Neall, Bernard Gizzi, Paul Moreschi, Mike Burczhak, Anthony 
Pasquinelli, Jim Glavin, Tim Broeren, Peter Voss. 



248 

Phi Kappa Psi 



Phi Kappa Sigma 

313 E. Chalmers, Champaign Established 1892 




Front row: Mike Shuwal, Don Shawler, Ken Hadlock, Roger Loomis, Mark Jim Johnston, Paul Jaros, Steve Ruzicka, Jon Bowser, Chris Finan, Paul Yeh, 

Calvino, Mike Frank, Pete DeVries, Jeff Wurtz. Second row: Brad Austin, Mark Mejia. Back row: Bill Seymour, Garrett Pittman, Jim Ireland, Stan Drake, 

Angelo Anton, Pat Hoppel, Mark Krantz, John Antuna, Tom Mosinski, Kurt Rich Wahls, Vance Tammen, Mike Mullikin, Gary Orsinger, Wayne Wahls. Miss- 

Weisenborn, Dan Schnake, Matt Caruso. Third row: Bill McElligot, Bill Dehaan. ing from photo: Trevor Axford, Dave Marseille, Mike Psak, Ron Hoppel. 



249 

Phi Kappa Sigma 



Established 1921 



Phi Mu 

302 E. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: Nancy Koch, Juli Lembitz, Diane Rakich, Anita Urborg, Karen 
Deighan, Sue Langfield, Sue Sislow, Vikki Woolard, JoAnna Carney, Sheree 
Taylor. Second row: Kathy Rohrback, Tina Winkler, Sara Spring, Sharon Lucus, 
Cindy Pavetto, Laleigh Doorandish, Kathy Lamb, Sue Wingerden, Donna Stanc- 
zyk, Carolyn Ohlwein. Third row: Carla Davis, Jeanne Chen, Sue Ficek, Sherri 
Fisher, Laura Thomas, Tracey Leibold, Mary Ellen Bishop, Tami Stark, Lisa 
Heron, Mary Jean Londrigan. Fourth row: Andi Levinson, Mindy Tyner, Cindy 
Retzlaff, Kristin Peterson, Linda Splitt, Dana Pearson, Janice Eubank, Nancy 
Bayer, Mary McDonnell, Tammy Hillhouse, Cheryl Thomas, Denise McPheron, 
Ju Mei Wei, Kim Casey, Ellen Patterson, Chris Charlton. Fifth row: Julie Meyer, 



Janet McBride, Lynette Schafer, Nancy Stehr, Jenny Gierat, Sue Schwitzenberg, 
Cathy Landeene, Pattie Spalt, Laurie Kozan, Eleanor Tungett, Sherry Kilian, 
Robin Neal, Karen Daugherty. Sixth row: Sue Thomas, Cara Miller, Gerriann 
Fagan, Mary Ann Boyle, Cindy Gerling, Beth Blair, Christy Scott, Cathy Cahill, 
June Chang, Lori Fandel, Dorothy Kramer, Lois Wagman, Marika Nogacz, Trish 
Gomez, Judy Busanelli, Dena Yager, Yvonne Ammon, Kim Bauer. Back row: 
Kim Pricer, Angie Gateley, Kelly Hible, Suchada Chaven, Kathy Traffanstedt, 
Jenny Ansbro, Cheryl Raymond, Karen Kobernus, Monica Bartus, Grace Dreas, 
Sue Leander, Vicki Von Bergen, Steph Stevens, Jody Frahm, Chris Morong. 



250 

Phi Mu 



Phi Sigma Kappa 



1004 S. Second, Champaign 



Established 1910 



r 






£NfaJG!isi^* 




Front row: Mike Conn, Tim Daw, Bill Glass, Scott Lapcewich, Chris Allen, Dave 
Kaplan, Fidel Garcia, Greg Maycock, Jay Leonard, Pete Schwarz, Dave Alongi, 
Jim Helbig, Earl Keegan, Greg Ryan. Second row: Tim Loftus, Brian Shay, Mike 
Biarnesen, Paul Gill, Todd Goll, Bruce Brown, Dane Relle, Norval Copeland, 
Carrie Compton, Dave Bielfeldt, Paul Cameron, Brian Welker, Dave Lensch, 
Greg Facktor, Dave Schultz, Mark Gier. Back row: Neal O'Hara, Bob Provost, 



Greg Lowry, Brad Welker, Ted Chien, Art Havbold, Chuck Lawson, Bryan 
Perfetti, Zack Church, Rick Bigelow, John Williamson, Stu Lewis, Brian Mc- 
Donald. Missing from photo: Jim Augur, Steve Bilsland, Bill Brandemeyer, 
Melvin Czeschin, Jim Eynon, Damon Gunn, Pete Hassler, Kyu Hur, Dan Iverson, 
Dave Kagan, Keith Lukowicz, Donn Pall, Randy Pollack, Dave Roach. 



251 

Phi Sigma Kappa 



Phi Sigma Sigma 



Established 1923 



902 S. Second, Champaign 




Front row: Lori Furmanski, Karin Flock, Cindy Pawlowski, Jeanne Margala, 
Barb Rendall, Susie Miller, Betsy Kwedar, Donna Retzlaff, Betsy Freeman, Eliza- 
beth Morf, Agnes Corona, Katherine Stocker. Second row: Mary Margala, Suzie 
Ahlberg, Susan Montella, Laurie Wright, Pam Herbach, Dori D'Anna, Debbie 
Johnson, Jenny Levinson, Susan Kaplan, Liz Maloney, Sheila O'Donnell, Carol 
Moenning. Third row: Karyn Wilner, Cathy Grace, Cindy Swift, Devida Hollen- 
berg, Gerri Rogier. Fourth row: Liz Stal, Julie Faber, Tracey Sandler, Sandi 
Beaton, Linda Paddock, JoAnne Blumberg, Diane Reineman, Mary O'Day, Den- 
ise Mylniec, Diane Feiler, Susan Muirheid, Karen Fillingim, Tina Casperson, Carol 
Moran. Back row: Beth Hoffee, Cara DiMonte, Cathy Mildice, Lori Long, Sue 
Mason, Mary Ellen Minarik, Lori Frazier, Carol O'Keefe, Leah Tannenwald, 



Sharon Beinlich, Sharon Bedore, Jean Clemency, Rose Vivo, Donna Callahan, 
Amy Hawes, Jari Simpson, Tracy Harrington, Julie Baker, Sharon Wells, Heidi 
Hartmann, Marty Caracci, Julie Rennick. Missing from photo: Mindy Baldwin, 
Debbie Barbeau, Marcia Bellows, Clara Bernetti, Joan Bockhorst, Nan Bockhorst, 
Kim Brown, Mary Cannon, Karen Cave, Jeanne Cahill, Kyra Cambron, Helen 
Chronis, Melissa Coretz, Rosanne Cronin, Monica Gallagher, Barb Gam, Belinda 
Gans, Sue Gans, Kim Gricius, Carol Gumm, Vicki Hofbauer, Chris Hower, Debbie 
Klass, Laura Larrabee, Karen Lamb, Kathy Lawes, Melanie Martini, Susan Ma- 
son, Tracey Meyer, Robin Mierendorf, Laurie Mohr, Pat Norkus, Charlene Num- 
rych, Carolyn Noble, Carole Pilotte, Tracy Solida, Mariana Sorich, Kathy Steen- 
land, Melodi Walker, Beth Yaeger. 



252 

Phi Sigma Sigma 



Pi Beta Phi 

1005 S. Wright, Champaign Established 1895 




Front row: Mary Loula, Holly Stine, Kim Venetos, Janie Husa, Jenny Kelley, 
Julie Harmon, Laura Smith, Debbie Snead, Loraine Sproul, Cathy Missimer, Gail 
Eby, Sue Tarnawa, Nancy Repp. Second row: Chris Olson, Mo Brille, Karen 
Brandon, Maria Anagnostopoulos, Cindy Reilly, Gail Gareiss, Dawn Sames, 
Theresa Hutchison, Kim Stinson, Joanne Wiedow, Kate Cooney, Vicki Virgin, 
Sue Fenstermaker, Colleen Casserly, Debbie Hopwood. Third row: Heather 
Cartwright, Lisa Koryta, Betsy Fiden, Lori Manning, Carla Karraker, Julie Clag- 
gett, Jill Dowell, Kay Turner, Debbie Guhl, Marianne Gombar, Jodi Frankoveglia, 
Laura Roy, Karen Grunden, Jacci Stearns, Edith Muroga. Fourth row: Caroline 
Tazzioli, Kathy Robins, Kathie Flynn, Colleen Lynch, Renee Kalinski, Kathy 
Sullivan, Libby Zook, Kim Taylor, Ann DePaolis, Julie Dean, Carrie Thorton, 
Deanna Butler, Julia Allen, Barb Bitner, Katy Houlihan, Abby Didrickson, Connie 
Lukeman. Fifth row: Terri Perlman, Paula Perconti, Donna Ross, Chris Schaus, 
Pam Byrne, Julie Perry, Cheryl Tubis, Georgia Vlamis, Chris Stier, Georgie 
Danehower, Brooke Coker, Vicki Homer, Wynn Walters, Suzy Montague, Lori 



Parlier, Linda Colburn, Lisa Smith, Kathy Guinan. Back row: Ellen Goodman, 
Bridget Donlan, Christie Pearce, Sue Hill, June Carlson, Julie Stranski, Nancy 
Short, Heidi Cartwright, Lori Lovekamp, Carole Giegerich, Wendy Havelka, Gina 
Szyszkiewicz, Peggy Dorrance, Loretta Long, Janet Barczak, Cissy O'Connor, 
Debbie Marx. Missing from photo: Susie Aeshliman, Amy Couture, Judy 
Schmidt, Judy Skeehan, Debbie Hack, Ellen DePaolis, Trish Hanlon, Mindy 
Lefstein, Joanne Nielson, Lisa Thomas, Beth Ann Wurtsbaugh, Lily Ziff, Beth 
Claggett, Tina Dubson, Suzanne Hoffman, Erin Callin, Betsy Cronin, Beth Fan- 
ning, Kathy Fenstermaker, Lisa Fisher, Holly Gilfand, Linda Hunt, Carol Loula, 
Marj McLoughlin, Missy Menguy, Claire Nester, Charlene Noble, Laura Norton, 
Debbie Patterson, Robin Simonds, Erin Simpson, Alice Barnard, Chris Dowdy, 
Ruth Hansell, Dodie Lovejoy, Kathy Lonson, Jill Nicolette, Mary Riley, Barb 
Tate, Karen Cohen, Kathy Dart, Nancy Hamman, Peggy Marr, Kim Pritchard, 
Carla Rendina, Lisa Valentino, Donna Whalen, Denise Pecina. 



253 

Pi Beta Phi 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

Established 1917 102 E. Chalmers, Champaign 




Front row: Pete Tannenwald, Brian Kennedy, Mike Rude, Eric Johnson, Dan 
Walsh, Mark Bucksath, Mark "Two-tone" Stetter, Steve Schmitz, Kevin Lucas, 
Chris Farlow, Larry Ring, Kurt Anderson, Brad Meyer, Mike Black, Doug Black, 
Jim Williamson. Second row: Jim Liska, Andy Deutschmann, Gary Pritchard, 
Matt Guthrie, Pat Walsh, Ted Moorman, Bill Birkbigler, Scott Barnett, Corky 
Morgan, Mark Wild, Mike Stringer, Dave Beck, Terry Griffin, Chris Clifford, Pat 
Schramm, Bob Zerfas, Dave Ashley. Third row: Mike Parks, Gene Griffin, Neal 



McQuality, Mark Nealon, Rob Anthony, Jeff Welna, Dave List, John Schoone, 
Van King, Walt Ciosek, Dennis Johnson, Brian Innis, Mike Nelsen, Paul Metta, 
Scott Brandt, DuWee Engstrom. Missing from photo: Chuck Priebe, Kerry 
Smith, Tim Gallager, Joel Hartman, Alex Peterson, Matt Doherty, Mike Bishop, 
John Dow, Dave Tarizzo, Jeff Thieme, John Bodeman, Mikey Toomey, Dane 
Kamin, Tom Caffery, Mark Hianik, Dave Melone, Scott Sandroff, Kevin Cody, 
Tom DeSchepper, Jim Falloon, Steve Foertsch. 



254 

Pi Kappa Alpha 



Pi Kappa Phi 

306 E. Gregory, Champaign Established 1921 




Front row: Mark Hampton, Mike Pitts, Gary Gongwer, Dick Lindberg, Greg Chris Gaffney. Fifth row: Dave Raiman, Mike "Crash" Shaner, Mike Kelly. 

Clark, Jim Parsons, Gary Boltinghouse. Second row: Kevin Clark, Dave De- Back row: Phil Whipple, Pat Breen, Bill Meyering, Mike McDermott, Ian Reeve, 

Muro, John Cox, Tom Harvengt, Dave Meyer, Dennis Wodarz, Paul Bruckner, Dennis Freese, Tim Jones, Pete Maier. Missing from photo: John Guzolek, 

Pat Bruckner, Tony Konsky. Third row: Geoff Bouc, Mike Murdy, Warren Steve Weiss. 
Guthrie, Paul Swanson, Brent Frank, Dave Ross, Stewart Jacobson. Fourth row: 



255 

Pi Kappa Phi 



Pi Lambda Phi 






Established 1941 



1105 S. First, Champaign 




Front row: Tau Delt Torpedo, Maury Fertig. Second row: Ken Kasten, Mark 
Zisook, Lee Lygiros, Scott Goldenberg, Artie Zaben, Terry Younger, Billy Schil- 
ler, Howie Simon, Mark DeMar. Third row: Eric Schonman, Brad Dennison, 
Chuck Braverman, Steve Chodash, Scott Goffstein, Phil Rosenberg, Bill Keller 
Mike Stever, Adam Botther, Lar Kaskel, Glen Krandel, Dave Klein, Ed Winter, 
Jeff Metersky. Fourth row: Harvey Bernstone, Chris Schauwecker, Jeff Z. 



Gross, Dave Levine, Eliot Tokowitz. Back row: Steve Holland, Scott Leibold, 
Dave Walner, Jeff Richman, Dave Ellison, Rich Rudy, Danny Weisberg, Pete 
Schonman, Bruce Maker, Kevin Salem, Paul Foxman, Doug Weisz, Dave Kazen, 
Michael Kaminsky. Missing from photo: William Feldman, Paul Lapping, Jon 
Kazen, Doug Lublechek, Brian Coleman, Lindsey Rabushka, Bill Winett, Gummo, 
Bo Dimond, Bob Speiler, Pete Kaminsky, Brian Walter. 



256 

Pi Lambda Phi 



Psi Upsilon 

313 E. Armory, Champaign 



Established 1910 




Front row: Eric Ruttencutter, Gary Young, Jim Rank, Chuck Sentman, John 
Glessner, Bill Kelly, Paul Barr. Second row: Dale Peterson, Alan Reid, Mike 
DeWeger, Dave Chen, Eric Frystak, Randy Renn, Marc Miller. Third row: Jeff 
Sokol, Karl Langhammer, Steve Kammerer, Ben O'Connor, Jeff Wurtz, Larry 
Perlin, Kevin Chandler, Tim Hansen, Dave Kanzler. Back row: Matt Costigan, 



Dick LaBarge, Chris Rank, Mike McEnerney, Rick Wallace, Doug Jelm, Chris 
Klemick, Mark Rewerts, Joe Barr, Tom Hope, Joe Hoane, Rich Baron. Missing 
from photo: Jim Adams, Gene Anderson, Adam Boris, Mike Castle, Ray Collins, 
Doug Dunbar, Lew Finkelstein, Kent Grunden, Brent Lanman, Greg Marshall, 
Tim Miller, Craig Novak, Chris Scott, Dan Slack, John Snowden, Dan Wojnowski. 



257 

Psi Upsilon 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Established 1899 211 E. Daniel, Champaign 







Front row: Brian Kelly, Carter Ruehrdanz, Kurt Clemmensen, Mike Sparacino, 
Dave Harris, John Lindstrom, Dave Heilmann. Second row: Dave Foote, Jeff 
Hunt, Joe Petrey, Dave Bielefeld, Bryan Miller, Jim Clewlow, Scott Schwefel, 
Pete Dressier, Glenn Suzukida. Third row: Bob Salata, Bill Mitchell, Andy Ratts, 
Kevin Colbert, Cal Wessman. Fourth row: Mike Gordon, Louis Jumonville, 
Dwight Simpson, Bruce Osman, Jim Levis, Bruce Fales, Dave Impey, Carl 
Schlehofer, Ron Jacobs, Bob Prihoda, Tom Wareham, Ron Sapienza, Steve 



Flickenger, Mark Arghonsky, Tom Harris, Jamie Wareham, Chuck Feeney, Brian 
Zenger. Back row: Doug Gerrard, Mark Olson, Ed Heller, Ken Hallman, Andy 
Hick, John Epifanio, John Shimkus, Dave Venkus, Chris Clemmensen, P. C. 
Berndt, Brad Beale, Dave Stukel, Jeff Liljeberg. Missing from photo: Bill 
Cooler, Mike Marsch, Scott Ferguson, Brett Heinrich, Matt Chellino, Brad Dick- 
son, Chuck Kohler, Greg Bradley, Mike Dix, John Banta, Steve Rembos, Pete 
Petry, Ed McDermed, Tony Russo, Tom Dillavou, Jay Leverenz, Dave Walker. 



258 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Sigma Alpha Mu 



301 E. Armory, Champaign 



Established 1918 




Front row: Berky, Ellie, Shnoogums, Shnufs, Porker, Razor, Ollie, Newms, Schmabes, Boor. Fourth row: Ike, Vish, Human E, Glove, Sutker, Goone, Bak's, 

HBK, Sporty, Lehms. Second row: Sauce, Nubs, Whip, Mertz, Go-Go, Loibs, Viv. Back row: Baygood, Sperm, Spills, Coe, Swine, Gore, Shmidtty, Kauf, 

BJ, Popeye, Gubs, Marki, Keesh, Milner, Kaplan. Third row: Lu, Bino, 1-94, Minnie, Buck. Missing from photo: Lazar, Boots, Marks, Lirtz, Ox, Chief, Use, 

Skippy, Keats, Meat, PLA, Shades, Pine-dog, Gids, Brownie, Brodes, Mush, Synchef, Weiner, Grad, Lamb-chops, Axelrad, and of course APX. 



259 

Sigma Alpha Mu 



Established 1881 



Sigma Chi 

410 E. John, Champaign 




Front row: John Sutton, Craig Boyd, Bob Larson, Paul Lawrence, Jeff Kane, 
Kevin Young, Pat Kennedy, Steve Randell, Dave White, Mark Walsh, Brad 
Kirchhofer. Second row: Tony Mason, Doug Cain, Dave Veatch, Robb Sackett, 
Rob Kohlhagen, Dan Cumminskey, Todd Antonelli, Brian Hart, Tim Romani, Rich 
Cline, Chip Jones, Tim Rohner, Mark Michels, Jeff Mullins, Jon Henricks, Ben 
Runkle, Bill White. Third row: John Madden, John Kazuk, Lew Schwartz, Ken 
Schlemmel, Jim Carris, Brad Stephens, Paul Carroll, Mark Gusmano, Gregg 



Photograph Supplied by Sigma Chi 

Swanson, Greg Peterson, Aaron Henderson, Dan McMahon, Eric Anderson, Mike 
Luzenske, Gary Watkins, Scot Walsh, Dave Knapp, Mike Mapes, Peter Michels, 
Warren James, Doug Sasso, Tony Moczynski, Don Holmes, Don Pescara, Ken 
Fewkes, Stuart Walker, Pat Bowden, Isaac Jordan. Back row: Rob Andrews, 
Paul Lencioni, Neil Kirchhofer, Dave Filkin, Judd Walker, Bill Woodruff, Casey 
Welch, Eric Meyer, Bill Schroeder, Pat Fitzgerald. 



260 

Sigma Chi 



Sigma Kappa 



303 E. John, Champaign 



Established 1906 




Front row: Jude Mager, Kathy Klas, April Lukas, Judy Couch, Sue Guenther, 
Stephanie Bender, Maureen Memler, Beth Sholar. Second row: Lynn Miles, Sue 
Conroy, Nancy Kindred, Laura Hass, Sue Woodburn, Jeannine Muhs, Sue 
Maxey, Sue Abendroth, Karen Krasowsky, Kathy McCauley, Jill Kasza. Third 
row: Leslie Nottingham, Patty Zimmerman, Laura LaMar, Sherry Floyd, Jane 
Engle, Ann Spoto, Lisa Fosse, Barb Barnicle, Kim Anderson, De DiNicola, Karen 
Kerby, Tammy Wells, Deanne Gloppen. Fourth row: Pam Cullinan, Tracy 
Thomas, Tracy Lovestrand, Mary Beth Walker, Lisa Czuback, Julie Sienko, Leslie 
Harrison, Jane Sinclair, Nancy Minster, Linda Lattin, Mary Knaff, Jenny Franke, 
Lori Kocimsky. Fifth row: Kathy Willes, Cindy Sinclair, Hanah Clark, Ann 



Coletti, Peggy Ampe, Phyllis Dixon, Ceil McKee, Dinu Mistry, Karen Bender, Sue 
Smith, Jeanne Perri. Sixth row: Cynthia Kalina, Jeanette Bidlack, Jule Beilfus, 
Liz Eadie, Monique Morneou, Debbie Fromm, Sue Bezanes, Lyn Karnstedt, Nora 
Tong, Carolyn Guest, Maria Agnes, Linda Jankowicz, Eileen Neylon, Jane Couch, 
Kathi Sinus, Mary Beth Wills, Sally Cook, Kathy Symzack, Melina Sharp, Sue 
Reynolds, Kristen Cole. Back row: Desann Moody, Lynn Catchpole, Cyndie 
Balch, Diane Dodillet, Kim Frey, Ann Fruchterman, Jennifer Brown, Sheila 
Donaldson, Sue Ruso, Laura Bailey, Lori Young, Debbie Bergman, Peggy Henne- 
berg, Peggy Walsh, Allison McGown, Linda Hoglund, Sue Graham, Kathy Gib- 
bons, Janet Ku. 



261 

Sigma Kappa 



Sigma Nu 

Established 1902 1009 W. Pennsylvania, Urbana 




Front row: Carey Harbison, Tom Jones, Bennett Braun, Bill Nagle, Randy 
Altheide, Dave Simpson, Steve Cox, Bob Damkroger, George Scholhamer, Ted 
Rothschild. Second row: Lloyd Fischer, Andy Brandenburg, Bryan Francis, Paul 
Feeney, Don Chambers, Jeff Carlson, Jeff Forester, Scott Malik, Dave DiVen- 
anzo, Ken Ward, Cassius, Henry Iouino. Third row: Jim Walsh, Bias Gonzalez, 



Jeff Grammer, Craig Adler, Steve O'Donnell, Bill Mackin, Gregg Cook, Mark 
Bonsack, Brian Bonkowski, Tom Anderskow, Jeff Baum, Steve Franke, Larry 
Kohout, John Stephens, Ken Harris. Back row: Jim Ferguson, Dan Rizzolo. 
Missing from photo: Joe Hale, Greg Buchanan, Scott Ward, Steve Berry, Greg 
Frantzis. 



262 

Sigma Nu 



Sigma Phi Delta 

302 E. Gregory, Champaign Established 1928 




Front row: Chris Rudolphi, Jeff Norton, Mark Weidinger, Richard Schwerdt- 
feger, Bill Tai. Second row: Brad Dewey, Tony Wilson, Jeff Masters, Greg 
Bardel, Mark Oldenburg, Mark Fier, Matt Steger. Third row: John Christensen, 
Chuck Worner, Steve Mason, Paul Sutenbach, Keith Brandau, Chip Yocum, Ron 
Carmichael. Fourth row: Gary Davis, Mark Shaw, Tom Kusnierz, Vittorio Poco, 



Scott Morrison, Tom O'Brien, Ray Prill. Back row: Kirk Vanden, Don Nelson, 
Rich Lenzen, Dave Schneider, Herschel Workman, Tim Copeland, Joe Welinske. 
Missing from photo: Bill Broersma, Mike Burke, Bill Coverick, Dan DeYoung, 
Rich Ekblaw, Bill Paul, Bill Reinert, Larry Smith, Marc Van Dyke, Kevin Thomp- 
son, Russell C. Smith, Jr. 



263 

Sigma Phi Delta 



Established 1907 



Sigma Pi 

901 S. Second, Champaign 




Front row: Steve Koomar, Tim Loughran, Phil Stern, Phil Roggio, Larry Appel- 
baum, Jeff Berman. Second row: Tom Berry, Greg Witt, Doug Bower, Tim 
Bunker, Larry Wolfson. Third row: Jeff Roberts, Tim Turcich, Roger Marshall, 
Randy Wimmer, Aaron Slovin, Jeff Calvin, Kirk Allen, Kirby Wiese. Fourth row: 
Steve Northrup, Bruce Landreth. Fifth row: Doug Contario, Kevin Landmann, 
Rick Peterson, Tony Chruszch, John Rapacz. Sixth row: Mike Norlock, Duane 



Lindquist, Dirk McCoy, Mike Barenberg, Mike Baker, Tom Pawlowicz, Greg 
Wroblewski, Greg Johnson, Louis Laros, Dave Hruska, Bruce Church. Back 
row: Mike Mendelson, Dan Kikuchi, Steve Albright, Carl Hasenmyer, Chris 
Henderson, Don Lockwood. Missing from photo: Tom Belczak, Jim Conster- 
tina, Jim Duft, Jeff Moore, Jon Delhey, Joe Jaruseski, Terry Smith, Al Swaringen, 
Mark Wisthuff, Bill Hardas, John Pauss. 



264 

Sigma Pi 



Sigma Pi Seniors 



901 S. Second, Champaign 




Front row: F. F. Frog, R. R. Rooster, Y. Y. Yak, L. L. Lion. Second row: P. P. 
Platypus, L. L. Lobster, M. M. Mustang. Third row: S. S. Sandpiper, B. B. Bobcat. 
Back row: M. M. Moose. Missing from photo: W. H. Hippo, M. M. Mole, O. O. 
Orangutan, R. R. Rhino, G. G. Giraffe. S. S. Stallion, G. G. Gnu. 



Front row: Bruce Church, Rick Peterson, Randy Wimmer, Kirby Wiese. Second 
row: Mike Mendelson, Tim Bunker, Steve Koomar. Third row: Aaron Slovin, 
Greg Witt. Back row: Larry Wolfson. Missing from photo: Jeff Calvin, Jim 
Constertina, Jon Delley, Joe Jaruseski, Greg Johnson, Roger Marshall, Al Swarin- 
gen. 



265 

Sigma Pi Seniors 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Established 1979 112 E. John, Champaign 




Front row: Betty Moser, Mary Concialdi, Beth Tepper, Laurie Stephanini, Sue 
Reynolds, Betty Wen, Lisa Kincaid, Stacey Modlin, Chris Hankes, Lisa Gunther, 
Marge Resce, Hillary Gilfand, Nancy Woo, Lisa Kurtz, Joanne Danhoff, Jeanne 
Hausman. Second row: Shari Becker, Karin Dommermuth, Mary Jo Atten, 
Betsy Jaeger, Tiina Auksi, Deanna Ferguson, Beth Klawitter, Amy Kurland, Pam 
Creagh, Susan Lee. Third row: Donna Tomasetti, Tracy Rehbein, Nancy Baird, 
Pam Wilk, Diane Ricketts, Lani Mohr, Lisa Howerter, Nancy Shaw, Crystal 
Snodgrass, Susan Budney, Janet Marx, Gaye Ortgiesen, Dee Dee Falcon, Mary 



Van DeVelde, Sue Gerhke, Linda Jones. Back row: Cindy Lou Niehaus, Betsy 
O'Berry, Elene Zografos, Betsy Vail, Vickie Dodds, Jodi Palonis, Debbie Loverde 
Sarah Salstrand, Chris Sedlacek, Martha Head, Jill Craver, Terry Stevenson, Lisa 
Faletto. Missing from photo: Kathy Boehmer, Mary Constantino, Peggy Dom 
mermuth, Tracy Friend, Joanna Hogan, Sue Holub, Sue Kichefski, Carolyn Joy 
Lisa Key, Jackie Klimala, Katie Kodama, Peggy Kozol, Stephanie Lambert, Carol 
McClurg, Karen Meyers, Mary Pat Phillips, Nancy Olson, Sandi Petras, Kristi 
Seitz, Sue Sinha, Joan Solon, Monica Watkins, Karen Wilcznski, Sandy Vache 



266 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

47 E. Chalmers, Champaign Established 1953 




^Jt^Sy^A. ifmfrn* 



. 



'•-;'. , • ' -. . ' ' • ' ■ ,. 



Front row: Doug Lewellyn, Mike Johns, Mike Balice, Tom Morrison, Keith Irace. Piper, Mark Bruce, Kirk Braun, Joe Freda. Back row: Wynn Smiley, Ken Lalla, 
Joe LaCognata. Second row: Todd Allen, Jeff Huck, Scott Farrand, Jim Valete, Dave Nelson, Steve Lalla, Kevin Noble, Stan Sword, Andy Foort, Gene Winter- 
Mark Krikau, Nick Valenziano. Third row: Steve Hawkins, Steve Hultquist, Jeff halter, Mike Meiners. Missing from photo: Ken Clark, Don Deegan, Mark 
Batzli, Jim Elzinga, Bill Goretzke, Bob Czarnik, Bill Heinrich. Fourth row: Bruce Gorski, Jeff McClusky, Dave Nosal, Jeff Ross, Steve Schaefer. 



267 

Sigma Tau Gamma 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Established 1912 308 E. Armory, Champaign 




Front row: John Parker, Tom Bastion, Mike Milz, Gary Walgren, Mike Mota, Joe 
Mota, Joe Clayton, Pete Redondo, Bob Canty, Mark Jacquot, Mario Alberico. 
Second row: Jim Bialek, Kevin Lorenzen, Bill Fry, Martin Alberico, Tom Ritzert, 
Shelby Butts. Third row: Paul Reger, Chris Geering, Carl Miklas, Pat Carrico, 
Steve Stanula, Paul Bidawid, Tom Billeter, Bob Haennicke, Jeff Brincat, Craig 
Tabor, Craig Harding, Chuck Wichlac. Fourth row: Phil Schaefer, Joe Molinare, 
Harold Sunken, Tom Coleman, Maurice Sword, Jim Carroll, Dave Nirshl, Steve 



Pittelli, Keith Lorenzen, Brian Courtney, Chris Mann, Norm Wandke, John Blake. 
Back row: Tony Sladek, Byron Lewis, John Yeager, Glenn Siegel, Mark Chapin, 
Jim Mazzocco, Todd Aschbrenner, Dave Dodillet, Ron Koenig, Mike Harten- 
berger, Frank Powers, Jim Heinzen, Brian Jordan, Marios Karayannis, Gerard 
Mikols, Greg Jacobs, Chuck Urban. Missing from photo: Mike Corson, Ed 
Dvorsky, Paul Endres, Steve Gnuse, Steve Inouye, John Kelleher, Brad O'Brien, 
Mark Reid, Mike Reid, Steve Schwefel. 



268 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Theta Xi 

205 E. Armory, Champaign 



Established 1922 




fin lump! ii» 



11*1 i'MA 
' I'l' 




Front row: Scott Lavis, Dan Lonergan, Tom Stewart, Dave Hirsch, Dave Gear- 
hart, Bill Richter, Art Barnes, Dave Darden, Jim Nikoleit, Tim Ryan, J. B. Condill, 
Paul Williams, Mike Sparks, Joe Thomas. Second row: Chuck Voijta, Ken 
Allison, Tom Sobolak, Barry Moore, Steve Lilagin, John Hayes, Dennis Doheny, 
Jon Toman, Dale Spradlin, Larry Gorman, Larry Browne, Jeff Button, Frank 
Cederblade, Ned Sheppard, Dan Doheny, Bill Kaczynski, Todd Davies, Ron 
Miller, Chris Doyle, John McCrory, Brian Hunter, Eric Stoffer, Dale Bennett, 



kiiiHU 
Photograph Supplied by Theta Xi 

Greg Meves, Al Schmitt, Kevin Forsman, Gerry Fischer. Back row: Kevin Foran, 
Bill Alber, Bart Kort, John Malantis, Doug Alba, Andy Schorr, Tom Wake, Chuck 
Spencer, Keith Steiger, Mike Gasiecki, John Harris, Tom Noland, Brian Weider, 
Pete Mori. Missing from photo: Mitch Stierwalt, Art McKeague, Paul Pittman, 
John DeLaurenti, Paul Fina, Bruce Hamilton, Kevin Mahan, John Peters, Tim 
Weidman, Jerry Szabella, Chris Moore, Kirk Cavanaugh, Jeff Gaylord, Jay Burr, 
Don Nelson, Todd Ryan, Harry Arger, John Gelhard. 



269 

Theta Xi 



Established 1907 



Triangle 

112 E. Daniel, Champaign 




Front row: Scott Vredenburg, Todd Sulpar, Brad Hunt, Paul Dees, Chris Wegs- 
cheid, Dan Klausner, Bernie Biagini. Second row: Ray Klouda, Jim Sprague, Jay 
Crain, Pat McGovern, Randy Drummond, Mike Nixon. Third row: Joe LeDuc, 
Bill Ortyn, Doug Franz, Curt Wang, Chuck Tinsley, Doug Ballard, Ken Arm- 
strong, Lee Messersmith, Greg Lyons, Eric Lohrenz, Scott Dye, John Asheim, Mic 
Giess, Charles Choi, Jon Strittmater, John Wayne, Bernie Gauf. Back row: Al 



Scaletta, Jim Rozak, Dan Varble, Dan Burg, Kevin Lucht, Dulie Reavill, Steve 
Olson, Dave Cryder, Scott Briggs, Greg Chapman, Yoric Knapp, Gary Welk, Ray 
Rogers, Bud Theisen, Scott Berger, George Hubbard, Andy Ladd, Mark Handzel, 
Mark Myers, Craig Jorgensen, Mike Crabb. Missing from photo: Jeff Rohrer, 
Chuck Engels, Loch Miwa, Pat Newman, Dan Lutter, David Taylor, Craig Elder, 
Mike Lewis, Jim Kemnetz, Ed Bernson, Jim Westlund, Gary Monetti. 



2?@ 

Triangle 



Zeta Tau Alpha 



1404 S. Lincoln, Urbana 



Established 1921 




Front row: Jo Sokachitch, Kelly Wara, Sherri Isaacson, Miriam Maxwell, Laura 
Drew, Kory Kopec, Kim Beck, Diane Richardson, Trish Durkin, Sandy Corsello 
Second row: Sabrina Manhart, Maureen Donahoe, Angel McCoy, Cyndy Pow 
ers, Suzette Keefe, Mary Montgomery, Sandy Smith, Carol Lynn Coglianese 
Denise Briley, Michelle Collins, Annette Bouslog. Third row: Terri Carmona 
Jeanne Tanquary, Silvia Mariano, Julie Spengel, Chris Johanson, Denise Kras 
nowski, Gina Veri, Bobbi Ventling, Delia McCulley, Nancy Covey, Lori Bouslog 
Barb Nale. Fourth row: Trish Wilkins, Liz Brown, Claudia Meyers, Jane Sin 
nema, Aleen Beich, Carol Johnson, Sherri Wallace, Laura Larson, Joan Tosh 



Sharon Wendt, Susan Chato, Marie-Elise Lessing. Fifth row: Barb Gorenz, Delia 
Gossett, Sarah Lower, Diane Zanin, Nancy Stearns, Sonia Block, Karen McNeely, 
Melinda Anderson, Petey Garrison, Charlotte Drevant, Jeanne Hosty, Eileen 
Donahoe, Eileen Hagedorn, Joanne Scappaticci, Julie Brozio. Back row: Laura 
McHugh, Micki Koncel, Ginger Carlson, Jill Furr, Sue Knepler, Becky Zilm, Karen 
Kazlo, Lisa Searcy, Chris Hogan, Amy Moore, Mary Ellen Martin, Sandi Williams. 
Missing from photo: Michele Bene, Sherry Chen, Min Kim, Dawn Paris, Andy 
Miles, Nicki Kobe. 



271 

Zeta Tau Alpha 



Alpha Delta Phi Little Sisters 



310 E. John, Champaign 

Front row: Pam Postlewaite, Marianne 
Lanman, Lois Lane, Dawn Sames, Chris 
Emery, Joyce Hamilton, Francie Casey, 
Tracey Joyce, Gina Gagliardo, Donna 
Deegee. Second row: Natalie Wood, 
Donna Crane, Beth Juco, Kathy Gib- 
bons, Lori Kocimski, Judy Heidkamp, 
Jody Hanely, Julie Meyer, Annie Olano, 
Nancy Crawford, Cecilia Fogerty, Mar- 
garet Oakes, Jeanne Bailey. Third row: 
Hope Singer, Hollie Adler, Laurie Blazy, 
Lisa Smith, Teresa Nelligan, Linda 
Smith, Allison McGowen, Lynn Miles, 
Julie Grothe, Maureen Brown, Karen 
Grothe, Sara Hill, Pamela Derk, Sharon 
Zavacki. Fourth row: Mindy Epstein, 
Renee Levitt, Beth Kress, Mindy Ep- 
stein, Elizabeth Conley, Cheryl Lamm, 
Julie Meyer, Jan Nelson, Sue Brady, Liz 
Brynzarski, Mary Lorr, Lisa Dominico. 
Back row: Diane Rakich, Raquel Welsh, 
Laura Hastings, Jenny Nijman, Cindy 
Sasse, Christi Richardson, Elizabeth Sul- 
livan, Liz Talbot, Chris Campbell, Lauri 
Mattick, Linda Kuo, Nancy Stehr, Lori 
Kuo. Missing from photo: Beth Miller, 
Lori Miller, Mary Grace Vermillion. 




Alpha Delta Pi Seniors 



1202 W. Nevada, Urbana 

Front row: Amy Miller, Carole Het- 
fleisch. Monica Schlenzig, Mary Ann 
Schaefer, Jill Scrimager, Katy Flynn. 
Second row: Carol Clements, Rhonda 
Johnson, Janet Foran, Sue Goldberg, 
Rory Losos, Connie Katris, Mary Jahi- 
miec, Lisa Hogan, Cindy Harmon, Bev 
Gaitens, Phoebe Hartzell, Jane Durkin. 
Back row: Janis Crawford, Julie Gran- 
ell, Pat Fox, Terri Lauten, Laura 
Crouse, Karen Rojc, Cheryl Laske. 
Missing from photo: Sharon Bennett, 
Kathy Burich. 




272 

Alpha Delta Phi Little Sisters/Alpha Delta Pi Seniors 



Alpha Epsilon Phi 




904 S. Third, Champaign 
Established 1920 

Front row: Lenore Weiss, Ellen Sim- 
mons, Debbie Goldberg, Andy Benjamin, 
Missy Friedman, Lisa Goodman, Susie 
Regal, Dori Graham, Sheryl Levin, Liz 
Caplan, Joanne Aronson, Monique 
Levy, Helene Silverman, Beth Small, 
Betsy Solochek. Second row: Sue Lam- 
bert, Ellen Mayer, Ellen Lebovitz, Andi 
Friedman, Janet Mostow, Beth Fink, Liz 
Landsman, Anne Grim, Karen Schwartz, 
Gail Field, Maria Weinstein, Julie Levin, 
Shari Greco, Tammy Blackman, Lauren 
Berg, Leslie Kaufman. Third row: Jack- 
ie Kessler, Marlene Reiser, Sue Blu- 
menthal, Eydie Pollan, Lauren Schuver, 
Tracy Magad, Ellen Rubin, Lisa Frish- 
man, Stacey Steinberg, Lori Cohen, Car- 
ol Dorf, Lisa Glaser, Kim Kuttner, Susie 
Levitt, Dawn Projansky, Pami Small, 
Laura Mayer. Back row: Amie Leibo- 
vitz, Ellen Gradman, Sue Rosen, Rhona 
Pine, Shari Cherny, Lauren Tepper, 
Caryn Block, Roberta Solomon, Linda 
Slutsky, Karen Shechter, Nancy 
Schmidt, Robin Spira, Caryn Salzman, 
Gail Loveman, Sheara Baum, Karen Le- 
vie, Wendi Marcus, Ileene Paset, Marsha 
Solot, Pam Brownstein, Jodi Berman, 
Cheryl Cooper, Nancy Weil, Gail Benja- 
min, Jill Mishkin. 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 




Established 1913 

Front row: Laura Willis, Nancy Love, 
Jeanne Thompson, Linda Curry, Deb- 
orah McKenzie, Rochelle Phillips, Holly 
Hancock. Second row: Malera Traylor, 
Darcia Merritt, Pamela Cash, Pamela 
Randall, Vanessa Tinch, Jacqui Smith, 
Gail Swain, Sandra Smith, Pat Lewis 
(graduate advisor). Back row: Michelle 
Weathersby, Doreene Curtis, Vasanta 
Doss, Kathryn Jackson, Glenda Lawson, 
Charon Bolden. Missing from photo: 
Lolita Smith, Paula Williams, Yolanda 
Harris, Patricia Owens. 



273 

Alpha Epsilon Phi /Alpha Kappa Alpha 



Alpha Phi Alpha 



Established 1917 

Front row: Maurice Hurst, Michael Ter- 
ry, Jeffrey Barkstall, Carl Williams. 
Back row: Terrence Pope, Cranston 
Sparks, Steven Avery, Stanley Pruitt, 
Keith Jackson. 




Alpha Omicron Pi Seniors 



706 S. Mathews, Urbana 

Front row: Amy Lauder, Kathy Ku- 
caba, Janet Drover. Second row: Shari 
Angotti, Linda Klewchezski, Wendy 
Feik, Donna Sokolls, Ann Banting, 
Cheryl Sheedy, Joyce Deatrick. Back 
row: Lynn Wiehe, Abby Herget, Ann 
Theisen, Meg Donatelli, Liz Jacabucci, 
Lisa Jesse. Missing from photo: Maria 
Hoekstra, Carol Siverly, Ivette Lafita. 




274 

Alpha Phi Alpha /Alpha Omicron Pi Seniors 



Alpha Phi Seniors 




508 E. Armory, Champaign 

Front row: KBJ, Maha-ha-ha-hachek, 
LA Goodbye, Seglia. Second row: Car- 
ol, Lishly, Doobers, Ippo. Third row: 
Debbles, Irene Rajahal-la-la, Sue, Mo, 
Suzy, Jeanne. Fourth row: Willie 
Wonka, Jules, Judy, Chew-bopaweenie. 
Back row: Jen-mo, Patti, Rigga Snigga 
Pigga, Squirt, Laurie, Noreen. Missing 
from photo: Katrina, Chickie, Louie, 
Elayne, Oost, POC, Vickie D., Terri, 
Cheryl. 



Alpha Rho Chi 




Versailles Chapter 

Front row: Mike Ross, Lori Naritoku, 
Nancy Chikaraishi. Back row: Kurt M. 
Neubek, Steve Krong, Mike Petti, Kim 
Fisher, Mark Paschke, Marshall Arne. 



Photograph Supplied by Alpha Rho Chi 



275 

Alpha Phi Seniors/Alpha Rho Chi 



Alpha Xi Delta 



715 W. Michigan, Urbana 
Established 1905 

Front row: Stephanie Hammond, Nan- 
cy Marcus, Michele Morey, Colleen Sum- 
mers, Jill Harley, Laurel Comisky. Sec- 
ond row: Terina Forshier, Lori McCall, 
Andrea Sorenson, Monica Ferrill, Liz 
Brucker, Phyllis Wiencek, Kris Barr. 
Third row: Nano Johnson, Colleen Aus- 
tin, Amy McLaughlin, Nancy Siemetz, 
Kelley Kries, Laura Mclnerny, Mary Pat 
Meenahan, Gayle Edmunds, Kate 
Hurckes. Fourth row: Tami Vaughn, 
Ann Sikorcin, Dot Millard, Martha Gep- 
pert, Joanne Dipert, Patti Rickert, Rox- 
ane Cullinan, Katrine Vange, Nancy Le- 
betski, Lynn Compton, Sandy Seyfert. 
Fifth row: Holly Stec, Jane Sondger- 
oth, Stassi Henson, Martha Murray, Lin- 
da Kania, Jane Nealis. Back row: Kathy 
Schleicher, Linda Blowers, Janelle Gray- 
son, Jenny Gullett, Barb Chase, Cindy 
Snyder, Tracy Tarbuck. Missing from 
photo: Kathy Duschean, Mary Pechnyo, 
Susan Michaels, Mary Chiachiaro. 




C & Judy's 

Chi Omega Kitchen Crew 

Masterwaiters: Yours truly Tom & 
Frank, Geoff "Mohammad" Bouc, Rob 
"Bouncer" Erickson. Masterwashers: 

Alberto "Pancho," Stanley "Don Qui- 
xote" Clark. The Favorite: Greg "Al- 
ways Serious" Bridgestock. Potheads: 

Ron "Never Been " Bernat, 

Andy "Do Ya Want The Job Or Don- 
cha" Moran, Paul "If Not Deluxe" Wil- 
son. Missing from photo: Kellies, 
Hoosemouch, Dean "Soon To Be Mike" 
Wickland, Judy (Gewday), Ciella (Saye), 
Miliss, Philly Sue, Rags, Kim "Scrubbs" 
Bouc, Puke, Moans, Mrs. Laird, and nu- 
merous Sue E.'s. 




276 

Alpha Xi Delta/C & Judy's 



Chi Omega Seniors 




907 S. Wright, Champaign 

Front row: Kim McMillan, Sue Hoff- 
man, Carol Klimmeck, Lynn Prichard, 
Gretchen Hippler, Marianne Lanman, 
Jenny Klinker, Andi VanBerkum, Char- 
maine Atkenson, Terri Favell, Lynn 
Heugal. Second row: Lisa Cowell, 
Joanne Detloff, Kathy Motter, Kathy 
Dunn, Alison Shontz, Maria Rakerd. 
Back row: Cathy Adams, Vickie Wei 
land, Karen Vyneman, Karen Feuersch 
wenger, Tracy Gosnell, Pam Carothers 
Jill Jackson, Amy Odom, Wendy Car 
son. Missing from photo: Gina Bellino 
Doris Jagodzinski, Karen Lorenzen. 



Chi Psi Seniors 




912 S. Second, Champaign 

Front row: Marco DeStinkshun, Perry 
Mecium, Hal O. Tosis, Rex Karrs. Sec- 
ond row: Nye Geria, Juan Morefore De 
Rhode, Monty Zuma. Back row: Juan 
Corona, Hanz Zoff, Daryl Lickt, Mel 
Odius, Rod N. Reel, Denny Hittme. 
Missing from photo: N. M. E. Agent, 
Q. Tipp, Ben Z. Dreene, Sambo, Zak, 
Space, Jethro, Dusty Biter. 



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HuLj 



277 

Chi Omega Seniors/Chi Psi Seniors 



Delta Chi Little Sisters 






1111 S. First, Champaign 

Front row: Nancy Cleland, Holly Bishop, 
Barb Stuemke, Ro Carsello, Lisa White, Yon 
Kim, Kathy Fisher, Phillis Leittner, Sharon Le- 
vin, Debbie Hopper, Mary Strategos. Second 
row: Angella Barboules, Martha Goodman, 
Mary Smith, Allison Maxwell, Laura McKeon, 
Faith Amaratos, Carrie Scully, Amy Browning, 
little sister chairmen Mark Abolt and Tom 
Sweeney, Colleen Lennihan, Karen Segger- 
man, Cheryl Siemienas. Third row: Margaret 
Goodwin, Kathy Houser, Daryl Sutula, Kathy 
Harris, Terri Frey, Terri Gunther, Lu Ann Win- 
gert, Amy Haas, Ami Rosenstock, Sandy Bur- 
gess, Alicia Ambrosine, Laura Mailey, Mary 
Kay Starwalt, Kerry Hogan, Kathy Kersting, 
Kipley Bruketa, Fourth row: Sherri Angotti, 
Linda Klawitter, Suzie Wright, Michelle Ander- 
son, Pam Gady, Teresa Stevens, Gloria Casey, 
Gloria Jesko, Rena Oliver, Lynn Nemeth, Sue 
Dissette, Linda Mueller, Terri Ludwig, Lori 
Proctor, Lori Fondel, JoAnne Blumberg, 
Marci Conway, Cheryl Lee, Anne Samari. 
Back row: Kate Koester, Margarette Ma- 
gruder, Chris Callahan, Lisa Bushman, Sue 
Bronson, Beth Klawitter, Mari Beaman, Moni- 
ca McCarthy, Holly Petrie, Terri Zouvas, Joan 
Drennan, Laura Brown, Donna Schultz, Teri 
Chapman, Kathy Liberatore, Shari Anderson, 
Linda Hunt, Chris Morong, Dori D'Anna, Ker- 
ry Schmidt, Linda Tortorici, Nada Peterson, 
Jill Fillippo, Lynn Schierra. Missing from 
photo: Sue Rohe, Janice Griffin, Rory Losos, 
Janet Foran, Traci Imming, Diane Nash, Tri- 
sha Nash, Beth Miller, Laura Ginett, Amy 
Shepard, Karen Avery, Helen Savidakis, Caro- 
lyn Menninger, Chrisy Hogan, Lori Resler, 
Stacy Wood. 




Delta Kappa Epsilon 



402 E. Armory, Champaign 
Established 1904 

Front row: John DeSalvo, Mark 
Spiotta, Gary Kahen, Brian Bequette. 
Second row: Carlos Rodriguez, George 
Lyons, John Geary, Mike Fogarty, Mike 
Schneider. Third row: Tom Kauffman, 
Jim Reinhart, Rob Fleck, Mark Willis, 
Tim Harris, Mike Pascale. Fourth row: 
Steve Alvey, Randy Kiner, Rich 
Siepker, Neal O'Shea, Eric Bedell, Bill 
Swanson, Dave Mizell, Jim Personius, 
Jack Neale. Fifth row: Ron Bose, Bob 
Lyons, Jeff Edberg, Andy Stein, Dennis 
Reinhold, Nader Amir, Mick Balogh. 
Back row: Andy Rasmussen, Pete 
Stockmal, Mark Liberman, Jeff Everett, 
Tom Baum, Steve Sexauer. Missing 
from photo: Ralph Nolte, Matt 
Krueger, J. R. Hainesworth, Joel Kop- 
los, Tony Bedinghaus, Marty Fogarty. 




278 

Delta Chi Little Sisters/Delta Kappa Epsilon 




Delta Phi Epsilon 



907 S. Third, Champaign 
Established 1925 

Front row: Paula Mazliach, Lynn Grossman, 
Meryl Poticha, Lori Woolf. Marlene Cohen, 
Jodi Treitler, Linda Rubin, Lisa Prinz, Pam 
Kushnir, Ellen Midler, Arleen Grundland, Su- 
san Marks. Second row: Joyce Boehm, Cari 
Shore, Sue Konopken, Dorinne Gomberg, 
Judi Caplan, Sue Shrifter, Donna Kaluzna, 
Maria Goldberg, Hope Singer, Randi Feder, 
Mindy Moline, Gigi Zorn. Third row: Sue 
Sneider, Marlene Greenberg, Amy Yale, Ellen 
Seldin, Laurie Sneider, Lori Kleiman, Andrea 
Gordon, Robin Gomberg, Kathy Gracey, Julie 
Meyers, Robyn Morris, Ellen Pollak, Joyce 
Chams, Hollis Friedman, Ifaat Arbel, Karyn 
Becker, Judi Katz. Fourth row: Elyse Holz- 
heimer, Robin Mandelson, Lisa Klopman, Au- 
dri Evans, Lori Mercola, Kathy Rubiner, Ellen 
Licari, Karen Topel, Jenny Simon, Natalie Gil- 
bert, Terri Richard, Debbie Weiss, Susan Har- 
ris, Debbie Picker, Sue Bornstein, Cheryl 
Lamm, Renee Levitt, Sara Rosenfeld. Fifth 
row: Beth Joksimovic, Stacey Berman, Myn- 
dee Gomberg, Michele Glass, Laura Orleans, 
Debbie Grossman, Judy Wexler, Robin Berg- 
man, Ronnie Berk, Lisa Friedman, Allison 
Levy, Barb Perlman, Laurie Kahan, Beth Still 
man, Randi Warshawsky, Susan Lubeck, Jack 
ie Strauss, Lori Leibow, Debbie Kreisman 
Back row: Julie Schwalbach, Ilene Fullet 
Lisa Greenfield, Darlene Weiss, Marcy Gold 
farb, Susan Handler, Pam Weiss, Karyn Sugar 
Jamie Jenlinek, Julie Bernson, Ilene Goldstein 
Laurie Sherman, Beth Silver. 



Photograph supplied by Delta Phi Epsilon 



Delta Sigma Phi Seniors 




110 E. Armory, Champaign 

First row: Jordan Plofsky, Brad Lyons, 
Jeff Braun, Rick Robinson. Second row: 
Dean Rochester, Randy Wojcieszak, 
Ralph Hoover, Mark Cieslar. Back row: 
Lou Palacious, Karl Aavik, Steve Linn, 
Scott Andrle, John Sanfillipo, Rick Mar- 
shall, Doug Stimmell, Jeff Powell, Dan 
O'Donnell, Albert Kersten, Bob Schaller, 
Mark Ollander. 



279 

Delta Phi Epsilon/Delta Sigma Phi Seniors 



Delta Sigma Theta 



Established 1932 

Front row: Juanita Alexander, Daphne 
Sam, Kimberly Walker, Belinda Davis, 
Latrise McHaskell, Pamela Jones, Nat- 
alie Parker. Second row: Sharon Wil- 
liams, Sheila Arnold, Staci Yandle, Kar- 
ren Reed, Debora Edwards, Karen Walk- 
er. Back row: Vera Davis, Caroline 
Walters, Barnetta Woodson, Susan 
Fletcher, Tisa Morris, Dena Ratliff. 
Missing from photo: Nancy Triplett, 
Valerie Richard, Denise Hoskin, Char- 
lene Johnson. 




Delta Tau Delta 



713 W. Ohio, Urbana 
Established 1872 

Front row: Tony Michelini, Greg 
Niemczyk, Brad Baise, David Overberg. 
Second row: David O'Donohue, Jay 
Marr, Dean Kondelis, Frank Hogg, Paul 
Ylvisaker. Third row: Greg Peterson, 
Greg Kazarian, Rod Lovett, Rob Knight, 
Bob Aldendifer, Jeff Young. Fourth 
row: David Robertson, Steve Seyller, 
Rob Rattray, Pete Hahn, Eric Melulis, 
Matt McDermand. Back row: Chris 
Aliapoulios, David Boone, Pat McLaugh- 
lin, Todd Schaeffer, Mike Lisk. 




Delta Sigma Theta/Delta Tau Delta 



Evans Scholars 




1007 S. Third. Champaign 
Established 1951 

Front row: Fiszer, Adamus, Pankow 
McCormick, Clancy, Dwyer, Casaletto 
Niersbach, Curley, Nelson, Schefflcr 
Keegan, Tully. Second row: Blaz, Kis 
sane, Ofenloch, Lazier, J. Byrne, Mag 
nus, Smykowski, Heckman, Lawlor 
Sharpe. Third row: Figiel, Bruhn, Ga 
lassini, Kantor, Aartz, Manassa, Fergu 
son, Ewers, Mazzetta, Narcisi, Regan, B 
Doherty, Payne, Schick, Forbes, Cressy 
Moran, Halm. Fourth row: Duffin 
McMahon, Regan, Goling, T. Murphy 
Volkenberg, Scheinberg, McAuley, Hen 
kel, Reed, Galioto, T. Byrne, Griffin 
Horvat. Fifth row: M. Schertler, Rubak 
Creed, Zimmer, Lusk, Matt Czyl, O'Con 
ner, Clark, Driscoll, Ryan, Close, Sun 
dling. Back row: Seiwert, O'Brien 
Heinz, Benzinger, Russell, Dasher, Flaha 
ven, Marshalla, Boatright, D. Galioto 
Missing from photo: Torhan, Bourke 
M. Murphy, Eckardt, Reichling, Mike 
Czyl, B. Schertler. 



Gamma Phi Beta Pledges 



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1110 W. Nevada, Urbana 

Front row: Maureen Mulvihill, Irene 
Freutel, Lisa Manion, Tracy Torrison, 
Amy Hinton, Eddie Waleczek. Second 
row: Ellen Perry (pledge trainer), Jean- 
ette Rauclau, Monica Mulvihill (assistant 
pledge trainer), Kay Komie, Amy Haas, 
Cathy Ditto, Maura Barkelhamer, Healy 
McCrea, Karla Rubenacker. Third row: 
Cathy Dungan, Charlene Jamison, 
Heather Herman, Gina Ross. Fourth 
row: Kathryn Weber, Ellen Baker, Jessi- 
ca Eichstaedt, Suzanne Yario. Fifth row: 
Nancy Barickman, Julie Skelton, Lynda 
Glyman, Nina Casten, Barbara Rice. 
Sixth row: Jill Patterson, Terry Doyle, 
Mary Drum. Seventh row: Beverly 
Keim, Laura Kofoid, Heidi Grant, Donna 
Cunningham. Back Row: Mary Jane 
Eidler, Angela Phipps, Dawn Herro. 
Missing from photo: Lina Dohse, 
Shelley Eddingfield, Danae Hoby, Melis- 
sa Poshard, Jackie Sapiente. 



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281 

Evans Scholars/Gamma Phi Beta Pledges 



Kappa Alpha Theta Seniors 



611 E. Daniel, Champaign 

Front row: Kay Ceresa, Tammy Hri- 
zak, Janet Mutter, Eileen Lawler, Diane 
Boundy, Mary Goodman, Patti Mc- 
Donald, Kathy Brown, Dawn Anderson. 
Second row: Laura Hartman, Millie 
Varchetto, Janet Arends, Kathy Crigler, 
Sue McPherson, Kim Morton, Laura 
DesEnfants, Lauren Biszewski. Third 
row: Debbie Boudinot. Fourth row: Ali- 
son Smith. Fifth row: Kathy Olinger. 
Back row: Mary Pat Dettoff, Jan Pip- 
penhagen, Linda McKeon, Heather 
Hale, Teri Hewing, Elaine Karacic, Jana 
Yocom, Cindy Stucco, Cheryl Projohn, 
Julie King, Kathy DiGuilio, Anne Har- 
ding. Missing from photo: Marianne 
Dickerson. 




Kappa Delta Seniors 



1204 S. Lincoln, Urbana 

Front row: Lee Price, Carolyn Men- 
ninger (pictured), Kathy Roderick. Sec- 
ond row: Kris Oberle, Julie McLeod, 
Susie Atwood, Molly Bryden, Mary Za- 
gone, Janis Kirsch, Laura Adams, Jan 
Knapp, Joy Montgomery, Julie Egan. 
Back Row: Nancy Carroll, Cathy 
Grimm, Brenda Dycus, Stacey DiMarco, 
Jody Anderson, Halina Stachowiak, 
Christy Beseman, Diane Predick, Kathy 
Loughran, Frances Anderson. Missing 
from photo: Lynn Hunsaker, Jan 
Freund, Cyndi Haug, Katie Hunter, Elise 
Long, Laura Rosch. 




282 

Kappa Alpha Theta Seniors/Kappa Delta Seniors 



Phi Beta Chi 




52 E. Armory. Champaign 
Established 1978 

Front row: Lisa Lamar, Elizabeth Ed- 
wards, Kadi Krell, Barbara Halboth, 
Maureen Wilson Second row: Lynn 
Levin, Marcia Roinila, Sara Tappendorf, 
Kathy Perkinson. Third row: Mary 
McWilliams, Nancy Bachert, Beth Scan- 
Ian, Kathy Batterman, Kathi Grafe. 
Back row: Dianne Roux, Karen Padgitt, 
Lydia Grebe, Cindy Anderson, Janet 
Cross, Karen Vallow, Lisa Kolls. Miss- 
ing from photo: Melanie Hettesheimer, 
Ellen Hilgendorf, Carol Johnson, Kathy 
Roberts. 



Phi Kappa Tau 




310 E. Gregory, Champaign 
Established 1916 

Front row: Tom Smiles, Jim Walsh, 
Craig Nelson, Jim Nagle, Rick Johnson, 
Bob Galante, Jim Pranske. Second row: 
Dennis Williams, Fred Heinrich, Kevin 
Connolly, John Cashman, Mike Griffin, 
Jeff Smith, Steve Kowal. Third row: 
Bill Tan, Dan Malinowski, Roger Stelk, 
Steve Budorick, Jeff Haggerty, Steve 
Edwards. Fourth row: Curt McPherson, 
Jeff Havel, Jim Zidek, Dennis Miltner, 
Dave Gravlin, Peter Casady, John Car- 
ney, Steve Hastings, Mike Tully, Sam 
Papandreas, Mark Funk, Greg Knudson, 
Dan Makeever, Mike Harrison, Mark Ha- 
mill. Fifth row: Mark Saviski, Chris Ill- 
man, Peter Carlson, Todd Sheppelman, 
John Bishop, John Ardis, Tim Kalafut, 
John Romuk, Dan Colbert, Mike Col- 
bert, Mike Lynch, Tom Boldt. Back 
row: Bob Varney, Joe Rooney, John 
Hart, Mike Mulka, Craig Shannon, John 
Servatius, Bob Goss, Adam Weinstein. 
Missing from photo: Jim Ahem, Bill 
Triantafel, David O'Neil, Mike Rockwell, 
Denis O'Malley, Tim Moriarty, Bob 
Groves, Brian White, Bill Groves, Chris 
Williams, Dave Groeber, John Van 
Cleaf, Mark Bronson, David Murphy, 
Paul Wheeler. 



283 

Phi Beta Chi/Phi Kappa Tau 



Phi Kappa Theta 



1106 S. Third, Champaign 
Established 1912 

Front row: Gregg Gunderson, John Po- 
letto, Tom Novey, Mark Schmidt, Tom 
Bourbulas, Griff Shaw, Gerald Fitzgib- 
bon, Shawn Costello, Mike Jennings. 
Second row: Jim Hagel, John Flod- 
strom, Dave Van Matre, Tim Mahoney, 
Scott Menzel, Steve Junkel, Ed Wilsek, 
Rich Montgomery, Jim Brandt. Third 
row: Mark Scott, Jim Zografas, Sean 
Raney, Ron Dierker, Craig Campbell, 
Mike Peters, Jim Jenkens, Eric Webster, 
Chris Fielitz. Back row: Brad Kamp, 
John Hixon, Randy Ramey, John Ander- 
son, John Dierker, Pat Francissen, Gary 
Wallberg, Tomas Capurka, Dave Storm. 
Missing from photo: Duane Emanus, 
Brian Lycan, George Hornbrook. 




Phi Kappa Theta Little Sisters 



1106 S. Third, Champaign 

Front row: Chris Riccio, Mary Harmon, 
Cathy Panepucci, Penny Post, Jenny Le- 
vinson, Shirley Fine, Kass Plain, Linda 
Eggert. Second row: Nicolette Kobe, 
Missy Abbey, Kathryn Flack, Laura Tro- 
jan, Lynn O'Shea, Maureen Mahoney, 
Maureen Swade, Diane Svatos, Joan 
Drummond, Laurie Mohr, Terri Egan, 
Debbie Jacobsen. Third row: Sue Mar- 
kle, Julie Fara, Diane Reineman, Sarah 
Salstrand, Janet Murray, Fanee Lekkas, 
Robin Rymarcsuk, Debbie Johnson, 
Missy Baker, Laura Abernathy. Back 
row: Lisa Hajek, Mary O'Grady, Janet 
England, Noelle Pfeiffer, Ann Boerner, 
Rose Vivo, Tammy Brockmeyer, Lisa 
Ruwe, Pat Norkus, Kim Beck, Janna 
Foor, Kay McNab. 




284 

Phi Kappa Theta/Phi Kappa Theta Little Sisters 



Phi Mu Seniors 



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302 E. Armory, Champaign 

Front row: Karen Deighan, Sharon Lu- 
cas, Kathy Lamb, Mary Jean Londrigan, 
Diane Rakich, Tandy Mellard, Lorena 
Nowers, Sheree Taylor. Back row: Sue 
Sislow, Julie Lembitz, Tammy Hillhouse, 
Vikki Woolard, Tina Winkler, Lynette 
Schaefer, Mary McDonnell, Laleh Door- 
andish, Sue Langfield, Kim Gacki. 



Phi Sigma Kappa Seniors 




1004 S. Second, Champaign 

Front row: Jim Eynon, Pete Hassler, 
Jay Leonard, Paul Cameron, Earl Kee- 
gan, Tim Daw, Dave Kaplan. Second 
row: Bill Glass, Rick Bigelow, Bryan Per- 
fetti, Bruce Brown, Mike Biarnesen, Bri- 
an Welker, Paul Gill. Missing from 
photo: Chuck Lawson, Todd Goll. 



285 

Phi Mu Seniors/Phi Sigma Kappa Seniors 



Pi Beta Phi Seniors 



1005 S. Wright, Champaign 

Front row: Julie Stranski, Lori Sproul, 
Terri Perlman, Vicki Virgin, Ellen Good- 
man, Colleen Casserly, Jacci Stearns, 
Kathy Sullivan, Jill Dowell, Ellen Depao- 
lis. Second row: Deanna Butler, Gail 
Garris, Barb Bitner, Kim Venetos, Chris- 
tie Pearce, Lisa Koryta, Kathy Guinan. 
Third row: Trish Hanlon, Colleen 
Lynch, Sue Hill, Janie Husa, Joanne 
Wiedow, Sue Fenstermaker, Debbie 
Hopwood. Fourth row: Kathy Flynn, 
Betsy Fiden, Georgia Vlamis, Julia Allen, 
Lisa Thomas, Carla Karraker, Heather 
Cartwright. Back row: Chris Schaus, 
Donna Ross, Laura Roy. 




Sigma Chi Seniors 



410 E. John, Champaign 

Front row: Todd Black, John Sutton, 
Mark Walsh, Brad Kirchhofer, Jeff Pa- 
terson, Jeff Mullins, Bill McDonnell, Pat 
Kelly. Second row: Craig Boyd, Pat 
Kennedy, Jeff Kane, Doug Lindsay, 
Dave White. Back row: Steve Randell, 
Doug Cain, Paul Lawrence, Tony Ma- 
son, Kevin Young, Dave Schrader. 




286 

Phi Beta Phi Seniors/Sigma Chi Seniors 



Sigma Delta Tau 




1104 W. Nevada, Urbana 
Established 1926 

Front row: Traci Fertel, Cindy Doppelt, Gail 
Rosenberg, Ellie Saltzberg, Sara Matuk, Susie 
Bloomenkranz, Debby Fertig, Ruthy Goldberg, 
Sherry Druth, Linda Berstyn. Second row: 
Debbie Martin, Laurie Ruttenberg, Mara Sala- 
mon, Marcy Lukatsky, Laurie Gordon, Sharon 
Resis, Julie Weinberg, Cheri Nabat, Susie 
Spiegleman, Susan Menaker, Ellen Levy, Ro- 
chelle Lichtenstein, Judy Baizer, Gwen Rosin, 
Mrs. Harriet Jensen. Third row: Donna Har- 
ris, Andy Stern, Cheryl Rosenberg, Stephanie 
Shapiro, Lisa Cooper, Janet Stern, Mindy 
Fink, Lori Wilsey, Lisa Weisner, Leslie Broder, 
Sue Kennedy, Karen Turk, Debbie Millman, 
Esther Cohen, Bari Roden, Jamie Coren, Amy 
Lapine, Maria Grant, Gerri Finer, Leslie Her- 
man, Beth Schmarak, Laura Herman, Judy 
Newmark, Mindy Abramson, Cindy Cohen. 
Fourth row: Mindy Glanz, Wendy Cohen 
Elyse Listick, Carolyn Mendel, Pam Lubelfeld 
Bonnie Pazzol, Deanna Glass, Carol Goodman 
Janet Cohen, Amy Listick, Merle Rosen, Pam 
Maimed, Marcy Wellek, Joyce Gothelf, An 
drea Wexler, Bonnie Kaufman, Sharon Green 
field. Stairs: Debbie Schwartz, Sue Berman 
Gita Tanner, Alisa Cohen, Dina Kaplan, Julie 
Lapping, Nadine Goodman, Eva Zieger, Merle 
Fishman, Cheri Schwartz, Elana Rubenstein 
Jill Leboyer, Nanci Heller, Nancy Milgrom 
Jodie Perlow. Balcony front: Linda Katz 
Laura Moch, Jill Schaum, Laura Levy, Betsy 
Schonman. Balcony back: Marcy Spiegle 
man, Suzy Wernick, Maria Edelman, Julie Pon 
itch, Debbie Frisch, Marcy Fine, Lynne Hirsh 
Shana Goldman, Barbara Wagner, Sue Dree 
bin. 



Sigma Gamma Rho 




Established 1969 

Front row: April Johnson, Sandra 
Carter, Mildred Johnson, Alessandra 
Halliburton, Tonia Schaffer. Back row: 
D'Lynn Roberson, Kimberly Stewart, 
Burnell Biggers, Pamela Nickson, Lisa 
Causley, Debra Davis, Karin Lovelady. 



287 

Sigma Delta Tau/Sigma Gamma Rho 



Sigma Kappa Seniors 



303 E. John, Champaign 

Front row: Maureen Memler, Steph- 
anie Bender, Sue Russo, Sue Wood- 
burn, Sue Guenther. Second row: Jude 
Mager, Laura Hass, Tammy Wells, Les- 
lie Nottingham, Karen Kraskowsky, Sal- 
ly Cook, Liz Barkus, Mary Riggs, Pam 
Cullinan. Third row: Janet Ku, Lori 
Young, Janine Muhs, Sue Bezanes, Sue 
Abendroth, Jane Scott, Jule Beilfuss, 
Kathy Willis, Deanne Gloppen, Laura 
LaMar, Sheila Donaldson, Eileen Ney- 
lon, Robin Brown. Fourth row: Sue 
Conroy, Kathi Sinis, Maribeth Wills, 
Lynn Catchpole, Dee DiNicola, Ceil 
McKee, Dinu Mistry. Back row: Nancy 
Kindred, Allison McGown, Jane Engle, 
Lynn Miles, Lisa Fosse, Jane Couch, 
Peggy Mroz, Beth Janas. Missing from 
photo: Peggy Ampe, Jeanette Bidlack, 
Karen Kerby, Lisa Wells. 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 



1105 S. Fourth, Champaign 
Established 1903 

Front row: Jim Lindley, Dave Feeley, 
Mike Ray, Greg Smith, Pete Diamond. 
Second row: Jay Dawson, Mark 
O'Bryan, Blaine Fischer, Ed Chien, Jim 
Kelly. Third row: Ron Sebonia, Chuck 
Vinci, Kevin Forrest, Mike Cushing. 
Fourth row: Doug Thompson, Dave 
Boots, Tim Gourley, Joel Gomberg 
Roger Rossi. Fifth row: Joe Balla, War 
ren Deason, Todd Babcock, Cory Stew 
art, Dave Toy. Back row: Ted Clark 
Jeff Milling, Paul Stewart, Tim Brown 
ing, Bruce Maxfield. Missing from 
photo: Dan Settergren, Jeff Oestreich, 
Joe Schwaal, Joel Kaufman, Tim Ver- 
beke, Tom Clark, Jeff Vinyard, Gregg 
Josephson, John Hauck, John McAnally, 
Jon Tubbs, Bruce Heuton. 




288 

Sigma Kappa Seniors/Sigma Phi Epsilon 



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112 E. John, Champaign 

Front row: Vickie Dodds, Joanne Dan- 
hoff, Susan Budney, Jill Craver, Terry 
Stevenson, Beth Klawitter, Mary Jo At- 
ten, Lisa Kincaid. Back row: Nancy Ol- 
son, Jeanne Hausman, Debbie Loverde, 
Stacey Ann Modlin, Martha Head, Gaye 
Ortgieson, Cindy Lou Niehaus, Susan 
Lee, Nancy Woo, Betty Moser, Chuck 
"Senior Mascot" Krause. Missing from 
photo: Karin Dommermuth, Lisa Fa- 
letto, Linda Jones, Shari Becker, Betsy 
Jaeger, Jackie Klimala, Amy Kurland, 
Lisa Kurtz. 



Tau Epsilon Phi Seniors 




105 E. Armory, Champaign 

Front row: Mike Brottman, Scott Wax- 
man, Robert "Bosh" Stolar, Scott Solo- 
mon, Al Perl, Dave Guggenheim. Sec- 
ond row: Scott Ford, Chuck Ginsberg, 
Jeff "Fred" Slepian, Jay Abrams, Au- 
brey Miller, Kenny Miller. Back row: 
Steve Sigmond, Larry Horwich, Gary 
Portugal, Clark Golembo, Rory Levitan, 
Mike Wendrow, Walt "Boxcar" Mir- 
anda, Cary Rosenthal. 



289 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Seniors/Tau Epsilon Phi Seniors 



Concert Choir 

School of Music Ensemble 




Front row: Amy Anderson, Laurie Reisig, Beth Shinall, Jennifer Hruska, Anne 
Dellos, Margo Stone, Mary Glezen, Ruth Shaffer, Martha Hasten, Laureen Jane- 
czek, Trisha Mason, Laura Drane, Julie Bolerjack, Jenny Turner, Nora Steindler, 
Ellen Baker, Dr. Leonard Rumery. Second row: Tom Spencer, Steve McMillen, 
Jim Quandt, Ron McCutchan, Wes Burghardt, Paul Castree, Tom Staggs, Merrill 
Miller, Jim Gnaster, Jeff Arena. Third row: Deborah Guscott, Laura Nichols, 



Angela Stramaglia, Liz Talbot, Liz Varenyi, Ann Dondanville, Nancy Strohmeyer, 
Kristi Gleim, Pat Downey, Helen Sparks, Carole Guse, Paula Temple, Cathy 
Reed, Mary Dornbush, Carolyn Trelka. Back row: Steve Trost, Matt Dirst, Bruce 
Heuton, Mike Mueller, Scott Vana, Marty Pazdioch, John Snowden, Tony Le- 
Fever, Shane Tomko, Greg Massa. Missing from photo: Kirk Ongman, Artie 
Pearson, Sandy Phillips, Beth Dwinnels, Jeff Schroeder, John Noreyko. 



290 

Concert Choir 



Future Leaders 
of America 

Paradise Valley Residence 



tikkvh ^ 




Front row: Denise Jaunsen, Jerry Moores, Pam "Sweetness" Meek- 
ley, Ken "Sea-Sick?" Bauwens, Diane Panfil, Breezly, John Butler, 
Terry Sopkin, Brian "A.J." Thill, Luccy-Luccy. Second row: Joe 
"Tree Climber" Gabriel, Nancy Blumenthal, Wayne Bartholf, Linda 
Vitt, John Lemonidis, Dave "Biff" Gardner, Steve Miller, Tim "Down- 
town" Ryan, Missy Hoit, John Hoevel, Barry Barrett, Jeff "Ace" 



Mussay. Third row: Buzz Selden, Laura "Kissing Bandit" Venegoni, 
John "Shitface" Schneider, Steve "Biscuit" McKim, Scott "Muffin" 
Meyer, Lauren Perotti Back row: Kyra Cambron, Dan "Action" 
Pych, Kathy Krippner, Phil Zemog. Missing from photo: Kevin 
Sommers, Katy Heiser, Matt Rhoades, Mary Deluca, Ron "Scootie" 
Skutecki, Lance "Video Surfer" Blayney, Kris Zschonke. 



291 

Future Leaders of America 



Oglesby Penthouse 



Social Organization 




Front row: Ed Baumann, John Siena, Mike Pennock, Bill Macadam, Steve 
Scheller, Chuck Paustian, Trent Petrie. Second row: Bob Chayer, Odie Wil- 
liams, Jay Hinkle, Kevin Strysik, Bob Sheehy, Kevin O'Connor, Tom Numrych, 
Larry LaSusa (R.A.), Dick Justice (R.D.). Third row: Russ Hinkle, Mike Skubic, 
Kevin Dehaan, Mike Roundtree, Jeff Javier, Jim Jacisin, Steve Burns, Rick 
Rohrer, Alex Cohen, Frank Infanger, Glenn Ross. Fourth row: John Nemec, 



Keith Sprain, Mark Feingold, Scott Grimes, Tom Zipsic, Nick Clark, Mark Zehr, 
Steve Ruby, Terry Donohue. Fifth row: Craig Eichelkraut, Andy Kollmann, Mike 
Baudino, Mark Matusik, Tom Scanlan, Jon Glass, Scott Velders, Craig Washing- 
ton. Back row: Charlie Fisher, Jerome Hubacek, Al Sanborn, Dave Johnson, 
Rob Wasiclewski, Tom Lorenzen, Chris Sawyer. 



292 

Oglesby Penthouse 



Presby House 

Independent Women's Housing 







Front row: Jittima Vongchindarak, Regina Alex, Dorothy Evans, Susan Taylor, 
Julie Houska, Emily Chien. Second row: Dorey Riegel, Mary Anderson, Janet 
Butterfield, Jaye Nichols. Third row: Laura Boehner, Mary Zwoyer, Lisa Bills, 
Kathy Meloche, Libby Keen, Karen Malone. Fourth row: Lisa Heit, Elaine 
Swango, Beth McCurdy, Teresa Simpson, Amy Axt, Sue Nonneman. Fifth row: 



Jane Campbell, Beth Mullins, Linda Dow, Linda East, Elizabeth Dobson, Jan 
Hartman, Mary Allen. Back row: Natalie Dowell, Lauren Hinkston, Marcy 
Rubenking, Evelyn Peters, Kathy Brademas, Sharon Vanhorn, Donna West. 
Missing from photo: Denise Flora, Jenny Fischer, Rosemary Shull, Heidi Yoos. 



293 

Presby House 



Senate Student 
Association 

UIUC Senate Representatives 




Front row: Tim O'Meara, Marianne Roesler, Nancy Shumacher, Amy Kurland. 
Second row: Tom Hasse (secretary), Margaret Bessette (president), Dave Full 
(treasurer), Bill Ward (external vice president), Rob Perbohner (internal vice 
president). Third row: Gayle Edmunds, Janine Toman, Jeanne Hausman, Nick 
Nicholson, Kevin Cleary, Erin Callin. Fourth row: Greg Allen, Jean Lake, Joe 



Kania, Todd Beanblossom, Dave Hipp, Sheila Foran, Chuck McCaffrey. Fifth 
row: Chip Walgren, Matt Doherty, Jim Filkins, Dave Shipman, Jan Hund, Mike 
Maloney. Back row: John Patterson, Robert Zurawski, Greg Fitzgerald, Jim 
Ensign, Dave Palmer, Bill Herst. 



294 

Senate Student Association 



Technograph 

University Engineering Magazine 




Front row: Kevin Wenzel (production editor), Mike Schavietello (copy editor), 
Raymond Hightower, Gunnar Seaburg, Brian Booth (features editor). Second 
row: Randy Stukenberg (photo editor), Amy Moore, Jane Nealis, Jeff Donofrio, 
Larry Mallak. Back row: Langdon Alger, David Juliffs, Ed Mast (faculty advisor). 



Charley Kline (assistant copy editor), Michael Lachman (editor). Missing from 
photo: Jim Lee (business manager), Mindy Moline, Chris Stephan, Dina Keever, 
Steve Hannon, Karen Powers. 



295 

Technograph 



Varsity Men's Glee Club 



School of Music Ensemble 




Front row: Bruce Greenwood, Shawn Anderson, Keith Chew, Steve Eisner, 
Steve Jacobson. Second row: Dave Kaplan, Mike Kazmerski, David Barkley, 
Keith Craft, Bryan Stafford, Larry Cohen, Scott Rawls, Daryl Miller. Third row: 
John Wright, Tom Swartz, Paul Rausch, Jordan Greene, Bill Green, Mark Meyer, 
Kent Campbell, Barry McCarthy. Fourth row: Greg Beagle, Craig Milkint, Dave 
Martin, Andy Sigle, Steve Casper, Jim Montanus, Paul Sirvatka, Keith Price. 
Fifth row: Ken Rubin, Mark Deubner, Dave Verdun, Steve Tynor, Kevin Allen, 



Todd Berkley, Mark Heigler, Andy Brandenburg. Sixth row: Joel Miller, Jim 
Mayer, Brad Austin, Joe Siefkas, Andy Gray, Charlie Bane, John Peisker, Gerald 
Weichbrodt. Seventh row: Jim Hurd, John Carney, Bruce Boyd, Gary LaForge, 
Kyle Fulling, Mark Henrikson, Ray Turner, Tom Steiglemann. Back row: Tim 
Heck, Stephen Kammerer, Kirk Ongman, Dave Nelson, Dale Hohm, Ralph 
Brubaker, Ted Mather, Mr. William Olson. Missing from photo: Dave Harris, 
Mark Brandon, Jim Toepper, Dan Pedersen. 



296 

Varsity Men's Glee Club 



Versailles Program 



Department of Architecture 




Front row: Deborah Ridgeway, Kimberly Fisher, Gail Cuffe, Robert Cuffe, 
Michael Tardrew, Mark Paschke, Nancy Chikaraishi, Nihad Al-Bahrani, Michael 
Rabens, Agnes, Professor Alec Notaras, Gendarme A., Gendarme B. Second 
row: Marshall Arne, Anthony Chin, Neal Schmidt, Joel Cluskey, Laura McNellis, 
Robert Collins, Howard Partridge, Michael Petti, Michael Downey, John Vasilion, 
David Lesniak. Third row: David Ligon, Mark Zdeblick, David Patton, Randall 
Cetin, David Tichy, Sarah Lane, Michael Ross, Jeffrey Sloan, Joseph Coath, 
Victor Krasnopolsky, Ricardo Diaz, Corrine Vlahos. Back row: Dennis Stevens, 



Photograph supplied by Versailles Program Group 

Bruce Ferguson, Alan Camp, Michael Lindstrom, James Stanley, Professor Hub 
White, Steven Rhodes, Keith Krolak, James Clarkson, Mark Kelly, Laura Naris, 
Robert Weddle, Mark Killough, David Greuenke. Hidden: Kurt M. Neubek, 
Professor Mark Keane, Fredrick Lowe, Douglas Greenfield. Missing from 
photo: Professor Nancy McNabb, Daniel Baigelman, Michele Borowski, Elizabeth 
Bousky, Timothy Bruce, Robert Carlton, Steven Elliott, Thomas Hammer, 
Robert Hart, Rebecca Jacobs, Madhu Kerwell, Steven Krong, Joy Ligon, Windy 
Ligon, Joseph Meyer, Lori Naritoku, Daniel White. 



297 

Versailles Program 



Advertising Club 



Front row: Pam Krachmalnick (vice 
president), unknown, Susan Lubeck, Sue 
Bornstein, Dina Kaplan. Second row: 
Amy Lapine (president), unknown, Dave 
Rasmussen, Andrea Mandelkern. Third 
row: Mary DiFiglio, Lisa Holden, Miriam 
Ehrlich (treasurer), unknown, unknown, 
unknown, unknown. Fourth row: 
Yvonne Winans, unknown, Jeff Rhodes, 
unknown. Fifth row: Barb Hendricks, 
Fran Silverstein, Janet Paradiso, un- 
known, Karen Tochman, unknown. 
Sixth row: Unknown, Mary Hayes, 
Amy Horowitz, Maggie McGrath, Bob 
Pries. Back row: Unknown, unknown, 
Mary Strategos, unknown, unknown, 
Tim Leahy, Chris Schaus (social coordin- 
ator), unknown, Pam Entrikin. 




Alpha Kappa Psi 



Professional Business Fraternity 

Front row: Anne Fogarty, Sharon Pusa- 
teri, Debbie Loverde, Nancy Woo, Linda 
Magnesen, Norma Kono. Second row: 
Jeanne Martin, Mary McGarry, Myra 
Bank, Ellen Burroughs, Laura Staffaroni, 
Nancy Lewandowski, Tracey Bowsky, 
Frances Prindiville, Mark Pearson, 
Duane Schnabel. Third row: Richard 
Mueller, Monyca Price, Bernice Karalis, 
Isa Dohse, Roberta Solomon, Sheila Ly- 
ons, Cheryl Schwartz, Barbara Perlman, 
Julie Worner, Debra Davis. Fourth row: 
Michael Loeffler, Craig Vallorano, Nan- 
cy Repp, Jim Pollak, Kim Schiermeyer, 
Elissa Polan, Lisa Wisniewski, Beth 
McMillan, Debbie Klass, Ellen Hilgen- 
dorf, Jenifer Riassetto, Maureen Mukai, 
Janet Norcom, Cynthia Shapiro, Nancy 
Dechert. Fifth row: Deborah Goumas, 
Julianne Wickert, Cynthia Zafis, Linda 
Miller, Carol McClurg, Karin Bell, Joan- 
na Huziej, Colette Martini, Marilyn 
Groner, Wesley Curtis, Marcy Maslov, 
Jean Lake, Philip Falk, Alan Irgang, Da- 
vid Kozurek, Mark Niehaus, Keith Wilier- 
man. Sixth row: Philip Kinney, Mike 
Nichols, Howard Grill, Lawrence Fraher, 
Steven Obendorf, Allen Priest, Dan 
Voelker, Gene Zamiska, Lawrence Schu- 
bert, Michael Goldman, Mark Shull, Mar- 
garet Bernier. Back row: Tim Howell, 
Aaron Slovin, Walker Filbert, Tom 
Schnur, Brian Wilson, David Faxon, Clif- 
ford Gutmann, Keith Abrams, Tom 
McGuire, Mitchell Weiss. 




298 

Advertising Club/Alpha Kappa Psi 



Alpha Lambda Delta 




National Freshman Honorary 

Front row: Tom Ting (senior advisor), 
Laurie Gordon (junior advisor), Dennis 
Uhlir (treasurer), Sue Grube (secretary), 
Sue Melchiore (tutoring chairperson), 
Cathy Nott (historian). Back row: Karen 
Valles (vice president), Joe Belmonte 
(president). 



Photograph supplied by Alpha Lambda Delta 



Alpha Phi Omega 




National Service Fraternity 

Front row: Mary Paolella, Daina Titenis, 
Dave Bartelsmeyer, Laurel Comisky, Sharlene 
Matten, Scott Trippel, Maurice Westmore- 
land. Second row: Nathan Wauthier, Becky 
Wauthier, Alex Elliott, Marcie Sacks, Debbie 
Dunn, Charlotte Stern, Keith Johnson, Chris- 
tine Simon, Kim Walshon, Martha Gregory. 
Third row: Don Wauthier, JoAnne Turner, 
Claire Wilkinson, Jackie LaBrasca, Renee 
Loeb, Donna Gerol. Fourth row: Randie 
Lerner, Karen Rosenthal, Beth Kaufmann, 
Carl Hylin, Amy Horowitz, Hale Hollings- 
worth, Jean Zanella, Gene Hollander, Andria 
Goldberg, Selim Sekili, Karen Harrison. Fifth 
row: Jeff Headtke, Sue Mea, Sue Turski, Tom 
Sevier, Mike Cohen, Andrea Gebel, Pat Sta- 
pleton, Ron Gothelf, Larry Samuelson, Steve 
Smith, Laura Manson, Marty Millburg, Andrew 
Stern. Sixth row: Debbie Robin, Suzanne 
Robinson, Karyn Lawrence, Dan Zinnen, Mar- 
gie Elkins, John Heim, Paul Coad, Doug To- 
ben, Lori Mattson. Seventh row: Ken 
Mayber, Christine Salvator, Jennifer Frestel, 
Kevin Krause, Louann Peterson, Judy Zier, 
Dan Wentz, Stacie Maslov, Bob Healy, Rene 
Malaise, Mark Slavin, Judi Wallach, Howard 
Chodash, John Palmieri. Back row: Ducky 
Sherwood, Mike Ruth, Stacie Greby, Charlie 
Svoboda, Karen Mahnke. Missing from 
photo: Bernie Banks, Donna Brazas, Sue But- 
ler, Mike Dabrowski, Paul Goldberg, Steve 
Jones, Dan Knierim, Kent Kowalske, Laurie 
Mayrent, Brad Mickelson, John Savage, Ken- 
dra Zier, Mark Crain, Larry Dobkin, Dave 
Hotchner, Shira Kaplan, Jeff Kotz, Steve La- 
sik, Risa Prodanovic, Nanci Wallach. 



299 

Alpha Lambda Delta/Alpha Phi Omega 



Alpha Zeta 

Honorary Agriculture Fraternity 
Morrow Chapter 



Front row: Eric Kahle, Craig Long, Gail 
Young, Donald Knoche, Bette Flaglor, 
Bill Lee, Dr. Charles N. Graves, Dr. J. 
Kent Mitchell, Dr. James B. Gibb Sec- 
ond row: Carl Dumoulin, Carol Lynn 
Coglianese, Frances Anderson, JoAnne 
Malcomson, Mary Anne Backer, Andrea 
Sorenson, Nancy Fey, Karen Bejster, 
Debra DeToy, Janet Gunnerson. Third 
row: Dwight Boehm, Brent Myers, Mark 
Fecht, Michael Long, Brian Folkerts, 
Juanita Hazlett, Ann Burkey, Lori 
Pierce, Rita McCavley, Alex Martin, Bill 
Killam, Phil Markwalder. Fourth row: 
Gerald Ray Nehrkorn, Mike Keller, Eric 
Malaker, Matt Benson, Rex Clark, Mary 
Hand, Kraig Krause, Mark Kollmann, 
Kent Bohnoff, Jim Selk. Back row: 
Doug Schroeder, Mark Bemis, Steve 
Stice, Terry Beebe, Kent Olson, Jon 
Downey, Rick Firkins, David Bitting, 
Herb Newman. 




AIESEC 



Exchange Program 

Front row: Julie Paglino, Maggie Ber- 
nier, Bill Major. Second row: Kathy 
Brozek, Kevin Fletcher, Sue Savio, 
Diane Sommers, Carol Moenning, Sandi 
Beaton. Third row: Kathy Gibbons, 
Joanne Murray, Sue McLain, Jan Como, 
Greta Nelson, Cheryl Sergreskitten, Ju- 
lie Keller, Sandy Deneson, Joan Henkel, 
Marie Osmond, Petey Garrison. Fourth 
row: Kim Venetos, Mary Fry, Mary Mon- 
roe, Ellen Garbow, Susie Seat, Becky 
Muller, Keith Amendola, Fernando Car- 
ranza, Tim Shay, Kathy Rice. Fifth row: 
Bill Lackner, Dave Hayes, Lorene Wu, 
Don Civgin, Tom Lonergan, Carl 
Scheunemann, Jim Trippon. Back row: 
Liz Cooper, Betsy Ross, Candace Kid- 
ston, Beth Fogarty, Marcy Maslov, Kim 
Netter, Renee Pesetti, J. W. Thompson, 
Eileen Moy, Bill Valtos. Missing from 
photo: Brian Berry, Mike Broderick, Tim 
Cage, Nora Cosgrove, Isa Dohse, Kathy 
Egan, Denise Egelston, Ellen Finnerty, 
Vickie VanFossan, Dave Darden, Ann 
Gibbons, Bill Graf, Jim Hornbostel, Dave 
Jallits, Chuck Jeffrey, Pat Kale, Audrey 
Lavender, Jose Machalanski, Cynthia 
Morley, Debbie Murray, Janet Paradiso, 
Vickie Pieper, Jill Pruemer, Merle Ro- 
sen, Janice Stein, Jacqueline Stibich, 
Mary Strategos, Margaret Terando, 
James Toepper, Mary Tripsas, Chris 
Van Wassenhove, Maria Ward. 




mm 

Alpha Zeta /AIESEC 



ASID 




American Society of 
Interior Designers 

Front row: Alena Skala, Jack Gutten- 
tag, Betsy Lee. Second row: Tim Tem- 
ple, Dawn Szalacha, Debbie Steenrod, 
Michele Gulatto, Merri Jo Kozuck, Vikki 
Woolard, Denise Jaunsen. Third row: 
Marj Maxheimer, Noreen Kane, Marlene 
Berka, Carla Fox, Maureen Miller, 
Sandy Mattioda. Fourth row: Peggy 
Walsh, Sue Merkel, Lisa Glaser, Michele 
Conrath, Donna Carlucci, Sharon Ben- 
nett. Fifth row: Beth Shapiro, Victoria 
Newberry, Dawn Owens, unknown, Cyn- 
thia Wu, Julie Browne, Anne Costello. 
Back row: Leslie Ann Bradley, Fred 
Gollay, Diane Panfil, Sandy Gold, Craig 
Steingraber, Barb Bailey. Missing from 
photo: Barbara Grimes, Cheryl Daube, 
Donna Dean, Joan Dicks, Wendell Erks- 
kine, Kelli Essig, Thomas Fabian, Mary 
Fairlamb, Dawn Frandsen, Lois Good- 
win, Nancy Green, Randy Grussing, Ka- 
ren Levie, Marilyn McWilliams, Laura 
Mark, Linda Menich, Jane Moody, De- 
bra Nogaj, Kim Schaab, Jodi Schallman, 
Robin Spira, Lauren Tepper, Georgia 
Wiegand, Catherine Missimer, Nancy 
Bennett, Kirsten Anderson, Sandra 
Baer, Doreen Brokaski, Debra Dioszegi, 
Deanna Dix, Donna Dodson, Cindy Eng- 
land, Amy Finer, Lori Higgins, Stasia 
Locke. Lillian Matanioros, Deanne Mir- 
esse, Kerri Molnar, Sally Ann Mueller, 
Julie Sanes, Diane Shierry, Nancy Spitz, 
Catherine Steltzer, Holly Stine, Kathy 
Walder, Joan Zaeske. 



ASLA 




American Society of 
Landscape Architects 

Front row: Brian Marr, George Bello- 
vics, John Schiera, Matt Brooks, John 
Vann. Second row: Mike Hoffman, Cin- 
dy Murray, Al Shimashita, Jeff Trimble, 
Lori Selbach, Charlie Fischer, Sandy Wil- 
liams, Kathy Whitman, Stephanie Ger- 
hardt, Jill Thome, Kim Backs, Gary Un- 
terburg, Jean Loftus, Bob Strietmater, 
Pam Postlewaite, Lois Beardsley, Dan 
Bishop. Third row: Bill Ferguson, Mark 
Weir, Ken Golulb, Peter Wodarz, Rob 
Eggers, Mike Gleason, Brad Radakovich. 
Fourth row: Dave Kenyon, Jeff Bulin, 
John Walsh, Christine Esposito, Jim Ur- 
ban, Liz Hobbs. Fifth row: John Ma- 
jeski, Mike McBride, Joe Polaschek, 
Joann Joshu, Bob Krueger, Dawn Grun- 
wald, Mark Henderson. Sixth row: Jeff 
Fessler, Katie Hunter, Linda Doak, Mi- 
chelle Norman, Brett Haugland, Lorena 
Nowers, Frank Solinko, Dennis Swin- 
ford, Bruce Brown. Back row: Martin 
Dahmm, Terri Sudges. 



301 

ASID/ASLA 



Atius 



Sophomore Activities Honorary 

Front row: Michele DiMarco, Joseph 
Ritter, Brett Madison (president), Brice 
Rosendale, Kim Stinson, Peggy Young. 
Back row: Dave Dungan, Sally Sternal, 
Sherry Plocher, Janet Goodwin (vice 
president), Dan Doheny, Liz Talbot, 
Kathy Siverly (secretary), Howard Wal- 
gren, Alan Friedman, Jeff Wilson (trea- 
surer). Missing from photo: Joe Bel- 
monte, Brian Hart, Ed Messett, Andy 
Morrison, Linda Wachholz, Kurt War- 
kenthien. 




The Barn 



Front row: Ron Bernat. Second row: 
Rich Drennan, Bill Leslie. Back row: 
Paul Wilson, Phil Carlin, Joe Trunk, 
Andy Moran, Mike Angel. Missing 
from photo: Napoleon Solo, Ray Mil- 
land, Uwe Blab, John "I'm not an ani- 
mal" Merrick, Fabian, Hugh Beaumont, 
A Decatur Man, Hipshot Percussion, 
Howard Sprague, C. K. Dexter Haven, 
Fred Mertz, Bobby Knoop. 




302 

Atisis/The Barn 



Beta Alpha Psi 




National Accounting Fraternity 

Front row: Unknown, Cindy Reilly, 
Rhonda Niemiec, Kathy Klas, unknown, 
Robert Fillipi, Ruth Goldberg, Debbie 
Cosmer. Second row: Jan Roper, 
Dianne Hart, unknown, Mike Kelch (vice 
president of membership), Susan Kenne- 
dy (recording secretary), Kris Linde- 
meier (vice president of programs), Lisa 
Cooper (corresponding secretary), un- 
known, unknown. Third row: Mary De- 
Hoff, Lynn McGovern, Emily Chien, Tim 
O'Donnell, Don Krause, Bob Battaglia, 
unknown, Jeanine Czerniack, Brent 
Johnson, unknown, Helene Silverman, 
Andy Benjamin, Maureen McNamara, 
Carolyn Crowder, Lisa Penney. Fourth 
row: David Boone, unknown, unknown, 
Tom Cameli, unknown, Ed Roland, Mau- 
ry Fertig, unknown, Greg Sells, Joe Lee, 
Terry Olsen. Fifth row: Unknown, 
Kathi Smith, Pam Bruns, June Knudson, 
Doug Hanson, Debbie Walker, Doug Pe- 
terson (president), Dave Kendric, un- 
known, Keith Abrams, unknown, un- 
known. Back row: Richard King, Bernie 
Egan, Michael Serota, Scott Solomon, 
Bill McMenamic, Dan Drew, Bob Seiden- 
berg, unknown. 




Busey Hall 

University Residence Hall 

Front row: Laura Whitlock, Karen 
Friese, Becky Whitlock. Second row: 
Diane Egelston, Debbie Kusek, Mary 
Sidhu, Karen M. Eberhart, Jean Reiher, 
Mary Phillips, Linda Tripp, Kelly Gil- 
more, Jennifer Jacobs. Third row: Jen- 
ny Stout, Laurie Perkins, Lorna Tucker, 
Lynne Eddington, Karen A. Eberhart, 
Linda Faust, Amy Olson, Carol Tobin, 
Sandy Soderberg, Beth McQueen, Mari- 
lyn Michael, Amy Levin, Bev Peterson. 
Fourth row: Carla Schmittler, Aurora 
Ramirez, Hortencia Fernandez, Cindy 
Bump, Ruby Kalra, Michele Kerr, Kathy 
Weber, Sandy Graese, Donna Johnson, 
Robin Rymaresuk, June Wong, Judi 
Rose, Donna Engels, Laura Cadagin, 
Chris Gorman, Mona Qureski, Donna 
Hammelman. Back row: Christine Kay, 
Marie Zvetina, Janis Stradley, Teresa 
Collins, Diane McCarthy. Missing from 
photo: Carla Helaszek, Felicia Wilborn, 
Alice Barnard, Marcy Sadler, Gloria An- 
gell, Chris Sctiramm, Sue Kalidonis, Car- 
ol Palackdharry, Mary Jo Pye, Jennifer 
McKenna, Jan Robertson, Shari Cal- 
hoon, Nancy Nakagawa, Jean Merrill, 
Janice Backer. 



303 

Beta Alpha Psi/Busey Hall 



Central Black Student Union 



Coordinator of the 

Black Student Governments 

Front row: Kenneth Gunn, Mathelia 
Ewing, Constance Coe, Rhonda 
McBride. Second row: Michelle Sus- 
berry, George Morrison, Candice Ander- 
son, James Easter. Back row: Donna 
Elliot, Kim Jones, Adrianne Stanley, 
Evonne Smith. 




Photo supplied by Central Black Student Union 



Cheerleaders 



Front row: Phil Bierman, Kathy Bu- 
gaieski, Judy Buhay, Jerry Edwards, 
Bob Kumaki, Jim Hahn. Second row: 
John Barnes, Steve Coates, Jill Rogich, 
Kris Abel (co-captain), Ross Deutsch (co- 
captain), Mary Beth Martensen. Back 
row: Len Cryer, Kelly Sineni, Liz 
Schroer, Tracy Neisius, Nancy Green, 
Chuck Frankiewicz. Missing from 
photo: Dan Fredrickson. 




304 

Central Black Student Union/Cheerleaders 



Commerce Council 




Front row: Sue Cosbey, Jane Bowman, 
Gladys Chachachek, Mary Wilhelm, Patti 
Bradley. Second row: Suzanne Kucera, 
Laurance Ring, Charles Edelstein. Third 
row: Kristin Furlong, Michelle Downing, 
Laura Florek, Debbie Cochonour, Kelly 
Speer, Lisa Heidorn, Laurel Wolak 
Fourth row: Eva Sobolewski, John 
Turcza, Julie Rittmiller, Daniel Zol- 
kowski, Nora Cosgrove, Mary Drumm, 
Jill Blardinelli, Sue Maxey, Jan Nelson. 
Fifth row: Gary Alan Fusz, Rich Ma- 
ture Debbie Cummins, Steve Regal, 
Caroline Tonkin, Gregg Harwood. Sixth 
row: Wayne Stoffer, Greg Bradley, Cal 
Wessman, Pat O'Reilly, Bernie Adolf, 
Lisa Keenan. Back row: William Glass, 
Becky Muller, Keith Amendola, James 
Corydon, John Van Proyen. 



Commerce Council Board 




Sue Cosbey (program director), Hal Bru- 
no (public relations director), Laureen 
Mathews (external vice president), John 
Turcza (internal vice president), Eva So- 
bolewski (president), Terry Stevenson 
(treasurer), John Van Proyen (secretary), 
Pat Staudt (external vice president). 



305 

Commerce Council/Commerce Council Board 



Cow Pi Moo 



Social-Charitable Organization 

Front row: Alan Abbott, Paul Rescino 
Steve Berne, Brian Scott, Sherri "Pres' 
Isaacson, Pat Stapleton, Helen Zeidler 
Scott Champion. Back row: Bessie, El 
sie, Flossie, Ferdinand, Gershwin F 
Missing from photo: A herd of thou 
sands. 




Delta Sigma Omicron 



Disabled Students Organization 
Students Service Fraternity 

Front row: Barbi Baum, Donna Robin- 
son, Peter Garceau, Larry Loescher, 
Ann Cody, Jeff Hately. Second row: 
Pam Stearman, Mike Luber, Mark Curl, 
Sharon Hedrick, Sue Johnson, Candice 
Johnson, Jim Gallo. Third row: Hal 
Krause, Brad Hedrick, Dan Robinson, 
Bob Dover, Marty Morse, Mike Witte. 
Fourth row: Debbie Hopkins, Rene 
Keres. Back row: Kevin Bartgis, Bill 
Mramor. 




306 

Cow Pi Moo/Delta Sigma Omicron 



Delta Sigma Pi 




Professional Business Fraternity 

Front row: Craig Church, Carolyn 
Crowder, Nancy Irvine, Frank Sclaveni- 
tis. Second row: Lynn Hockman, Don- 
na Craft, Colleen Collins, Eileen 
Schwarz, Sue Korte, Diane Snow, Gaye 
Ortgieson, Carole Laude, Cathy Gibson, 
Vicki VanFossan. Third row: Richard 
Moore, Tom Bahn, Dave Miner, Joe Mill- 
er, Pete Lazzari, Wayne Stoffer, Scott 
Goldstein, Rachelle Milleur, Judy Linds- 
kog, Nancy Beck, Diane Oster, Ann Loo- 
mis, Catherine Nicholson, Bruce Bellile, 
Suzanne Dawson, Dan Zolkowsky. 
Fourth row: Dan Makeever, Tim 
Drazba, Bob Pape, Lina Paskevicius, El- 
len Bonk, Craig Bartell, Jamie Thomp- 
son, John Miley, Ron Strong, Greg Brad- 
ley, Scott Kyrouac, Paul Johnson. Back 
row: Mike Kazmerski, Jetaun White, Sue 
Erickson, Karen Scott, Ann Hoffbeck, 
Leigh Ann McGee, Sandi Nardi, Bill Har- 
ris, Jeanne Skelton, Terri Cross, Tom 
Ponsonby. 



Daily Mini Display Advertising 






Front row: Sue Gehrke, Gary Walgren, 
Jill Lambert, Ann Guggemos (business 
manager), Betsy Baker (national ad man- 
ager), Kristin Lampadius, Wayne New- 
man, Ileene Paset, Lauren Berg, Linda 
Wroble, Jim Falloon. Back row: Bill 
McCabe, Steph Meyer, John Ambrose, 
Sue Pryde, Murphy, Bill Shaw (ad direc- 
tor), Cathy Bantz, Cindy Caravello, Scott 
Oppenheimer, Sandy Haworth (sales 
manager), Beth Small. Missing from 
photo: Julia deVeaux, Dawn Henninger, 
Jim Mazzocco, Ellen Mrazek, Karen Pna- 
zek, Henry Possley, Sandy Serio, Mary 
Beth Stephany, Brian Thill, Julie 
Volchko. 



307 

Delta Sigma Pi/Daily Mini Display Advertising 



Daily Illini Editorial Staff 



Front row: Toni Giovanetti, Miles Har- 
vey, Valli Herman. Second row: Ira 

Kleinberg, Julie Wurth, Michael Burke. 
Third row: Veronica Rusnak, lleana Go- 
mez, Corey Brost, Mick McNicholas. 
Fourth row: Lucy Piton, Jean Franc- 
zyk, Theresa Grimaldi, Donna Gordon. 
Back row: Mike Zahorik, Mark Ludwig. 




Daily Illini Editorial Staff 



Front row: Dean Olsen, Bob Blanchard. 
Second row: Amy Ragsdale, Paola Boi- 
vin, Zack Nauth, Dave Hawkins. Third 
row: Amy Ferko, Cheryl terHorst, Lisa 
Wells, Leigh Bickelhaupt. Back row: 
Paul Budin, Neal Sternecky, Doug Lee, 
Tim Healy, Paul Swiech, Carl Walworth. 




Daily Illini Editorial Staff 



Daily Mini Editorial Board 




Mick McNicholas, Valli Herman, Dean 
Olsen, Amy Ferko, Paola Boivin, John 
Zich, Donna Gordon, Lisa Wells, Tim 
Healy, Cheryl terHorst, Paul Swiech, 
Paul Budin, Julie Wurth, Jean Franczyk, 
Neal Sternecky, Corey Brost, Zack 
Nauth, Carl Walworth, Michael Burke, 
Mark Ludwig, Toni Giovanetti. Missing 
from photo: Larry Doyle, John Hill- 
burg, Steve Buyansky. 



Daily Mini Executive Council 




Front row: Ellie Dodds (office man- 
ager), Cheryl Sullivan (edit production 
manager), Julie Wurth (editor-in-chief). 
Back row: Almario Salonga (accoun- 
tant), William Shaw (advertising direc- 
tor), Dean Olsen (managing editor), Ann 
Guggemos (business manager), Debbie 
Schamber (advertising production man- 
ager), Sandy Haworth (sales manager), 
Mark Ludwig (chief copy editor), Gail 
Becker (assistant office manager), Kay 
Rosborg (accounts receivable manager), 
Tim Anderson (assistant general man- 
ager), Alice Niepert (classified advertis- 
ing manager), Richard Sublette (general 
manager and publisher), Kathy Prichard 
(librarian). Missing from photo: Geof- 
frey Bant (production manager), Ann Ol- 
son (circulation manager), Jeff Paine 
(photo facilities manager). 



309 

Dally Illini Editorial Board/Daily Illini Executive Council 



Daily Mini Office Staff 



Front row: Almario Salonga (accoun- 
tant), Terri Virag, Ellie Dodds (office 
manager), Andrea Gardon, Dick Sublette 
(publisher), Rod Polte, Jeff Paine (photo 
facilities manager). Second row: Tha- 
biti Harris, Ami Chamberlain, Gail 
Becker (assistant office manager), Dean- 
na Schub, David Leong. Third row: Alli- 
son Smith, Paul Parker, Mark Patterson, 
Jenny Kelly, Kathy Prichard (librarian). 
Fourth row: Meg Donatelli, Chris 
Schaus, Debbie Neese, Alice Niepert 
(classified advertising manager). Back 
row: Alicia Banks, Kay Rosborg (ac- 
counts receivable), Janet Wahlfeldt (as- 
sistant classified manager), Susan Myr- 
oth, Maria Hoekstra. Missing from 
photo: Linda Jo Hoekstra, John Klages, 
Barb Klein, Joe Loconte, Susan Pietrick, 
Becky Smith, Cheryl Stahl, Lisa Wis- 
niewski. 




Daily Mini Photo Staff 



Front row: Dan Westergren, Mark Fra- 
ser, Gene Hollander, Doug Middleton, 
Anne Ryan, Jeff Spungen. Second row: 
Gary Chin, Fred Beuttler, Eric Alten- 
berg. Dean Meador, Bob Sullivan. Back 
row: Mark Simon, Karlis Ulmanis, Dave 
Boe, Steve Buyansky. Standing: John 
Zich. 



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310 

Daily lllini Office Staff/Daily Illini Photo Staff 



Daily Mini Production Staff 




Front row: Cheryl Sullivan, Dan Masini, 
Bob Sullivan, Dave Hawkins. Second 
row: Elisa Moyer, Judy Gambetta, Melo- 
dy Sublette, Julie Salefski, Gerta Soren- 
sen. Back row: Joe Solon, Geoff Bant, 
Debbie Schamber, Janet Welch, Mary 
Cory, Steve Pearson, Chris Kreger, Beth 
Beauvais. Missing from photo: Eric 
Altenberg, Toni Arcus, Dominique 
Bouvier, Amy Clark, Allison Dunn, Ann 
Guggemos, Lisa Harty, Lee Horwich, 
Sharon Jacobs, Susan Jacksack, Lissa 
Kurland, Mike Lachman, Sue Lundgoot, 
Dean Meador, Linda Toenjes. 



Feckmanari Tribe 




Post Nuclear Age Fecks 

Front row: Max Starfeck, Jim the O, 
The Boston Feck Strangler, Walter 
"Nanook" Brooks, Boy with Brain in a 
Feck, Jeff "Disco" Donnelly, Don "The 
Wonder Feck" Carrell, Heavy Metal 
Feck, Tom Cortese (N.M.I.). Back row: 
Illiniman (in his hand is a small (homuncu- 
lus of David W. Archer), Bret "Saheb 
Willie" Daniels, Bbyll Smith, World's 
Second Slowest Man, H. R. Mad Dog, 
Hamir the Hermit, The Great Beast, 
Anonymous Feck, and, underneath them 
all, Mac the Wonder Jalopy. Missing 
from photo: Gladys Davis, because the 
picture was too silly for her, and Richard 
"Du-Wop" Palmer, Ph.D., who was too 
silly for the picture. Dee-Dee Sweeney 
absolutely refused on grounds of incrimi- 
nation, and we didn't tell Paul Silver 
about it, so he is noticeably absent. 



311 

Daily lllini Production Staff/Feckmanari Tribe 



Field and Furrow 



Agronomy Club 

Front row: Brian Freed, Brian Folkerts, 
Dave Bitting, Dave Conrady, Laurel 
McKee, Kathy Haskins, Leslie Christen- 
son. Second row: Ellen Heiniger, David 
Painter, Jill Heberer, Jim Oliver, Greg 
Curtin, Scott Bidner, Glenn Tomas- 
zewski, Kent Olson. Third row: Ann 
Cannell, Dave Whitaker, Earl Allen, Ann 
Hellman, Scott Fiedler, Mark Pieper, Bill 
Lee. Fourth row: Tom McKie, Curt 
Zehr, Stacy Hess, Paul Scruggs, Lori 
Halvorson, Joan Swank, Jane Hansen, 
Marie Boyd, Robert Beck. Fifth row: 
Georgine Paris, Laura Bartoszek, Ken 
Dziuk, Christel, Felicia Spinelli, Chuck 
Fehr, Deb DeToy, Paul Fehr, Anderson. 
Sixth row: Kevin Hahn, Glen Semple, 
Paul Georgen, Martha Potter, Lorna 
Tucker, Laura Craft, Sarah Muirhead, 
Peter Robertson, Colleen Winkels. Sev- 
enth row: Janet Cross, Tom Mueller, 
Ron Recker, Mark Weinheimer, Ken 
Smiciklas, Karen Geiger, Mike Cavan- 
augh, Dean Grimes, Paul Nichols. 
Eighth row: Steve Scates, Bruce Luzzi, 
Ralph Esgar, John Stough, Keith Frie- 
drich, Jim Lutz, unknown, unknown. 
Back row: Bruce Vascilas, Darrell A. 
Miller, Ambrose W. Burger. 




Field and Stream 



Front row: Tim Nolan, Mark "Stretch" 
Pfefferman, Mark Maska, Dr. C. L. 
Charles I. Second row: Dan Caplice, 
Thomas Kelly IE, Little Richard Yeh, 
Maureen Sweeney, Mary Anderson (Kel- 
ly), Y-vonne Ammon, Kurt Janvrin, GE, 
Jeff Kriz, EE, Linda Drone, Kevie Harte, 
EE. Back row: Carl Weber III, Erica 
Guzalo, Mark Stallman, Jama Morse. 
Missing from photo: Karen Wein- 
gartz, Dorene Olson, Mrs. Dan Caplice 
(who wishes to remain anonymous), Ja- 
net Hedrick, Mary Kerr, Marlin Perkins, 
Mark Kelly, Gary Gluck, Pat and Max, 
Lowell Getz. 




312 

Field and Furrow /Field and Stream 



Flag Corps 







>■ 



Front row: Pam Trzepacz, Michelle Em- 
bling, Pat Norkus, Mary Cannon (co-cap- 
tain), Bettie Elliott, Cheryl Littlefield 
(captain), Sue Miller, Marie-Elise Lessing, 
Maureen Madden, Mary Lyman, Carol 
Louie, Joann Hogan. Back row: Laura 
Diven, Angie Jordan, Kat Case, Sue Be- 
vert, Mary Kirsanoff, Cindy Heerens, 
Debbie Simon, Lorelei Milo, Jeff Storey, 
Kitty Zeller, Laura Fox, Cheryl Fizer, 
Peri Snyder, Diane Glittenberg. 



The Girls Next Door 




Performing group 

from Women's Glee Club 

Front row: Kate Sullivan, Barb 
Stuemke, Lydia Benjamin. Back row: 
Helen Sparks, Kim McFarlane, Jill 
Aherns, Katie Price, Jan Richter. 



313 

Flag Corps /The Girls Next Door 



Graduating Super Seniors 



Friends from A to Z thanking all 
those who made this farewell mes- 
sage possible. Phillip Charles "Califor- 
nia Dreamer" Zinni, Laura Ann "The 
Greek" Adams. 




Graphic Design Seniors 



Front row: Eric Walljasper. Second 
row: Chris Senese, Kris Abel, Liz Fisch 
burg, Ellen Mrazek, Rona Garde, Mim 
Jen, Donnie Johnson, Mark Duebner 
Third row: David Colley (instructor) 
Doris Kogan, Kerry Grady, Jeff Batzli 
Peggy Ampe, Jill Narcisi, Amy Fister 
Gina Bucheri, Cheryl Smith, Nancy 
Kerns, Nancy Bard, Karen Wade, Betty 
Jo Owen, Wendy Fischer, John Sherman 
(instructor). Back row: Lou Goldberg, 
Jacki DiCola, Liz Chin, Karen Gafrick, 
Abby Herget, Paula Peterson, Jody Al- 
stad, Julie Scheibel, Missy Huff, John 
O'Connor, Joe Rausch. 




314 

Graduating Super Seniors /Graphic Design Seniors 



Happy Hour at Halfway House 




Theme of the day: 
"Growing Up" 

Front row: John Caton, Debbie Hall, 
Kerry "Varmint" Field (whoa), Al Matis, 
Lizzy, Jerry "Numbknuts" Robinson, 
Larry "Go Redbirds" Holmes, Ginny, 
Jeff "Bird" Berton (How fast does a sub- 
marine go?), Craig Flowers (in picture). 
Second row: Randy "Touch the Tip" 
Crowe, Jeanette Harms, Missy, Agnes 
"Squeaky" Greco, Gail "Kinky" Plozay. 
Third row: The Noid, Lori "This place 
is filthy" Goddard, Shelley "Call me any- 
time" Watts, Paul's friend, Another 
Paul's friend, Val "Sneakin' Pekin" Keg- 
ley, Tom "Dekedog" Donovan, Kathy 
Missimer, Dan "Triscuits" Schaper, Kim 
"The Fox" Venetos, Dirk "Mark 
Aguirre" Andreas, Sally Hepp, Paul 
"Give that man a Blue Ribbon" Ladwig. 
Back row: Leeeeee Sporleder and 
Larry, "Right Hand Man" Lister as the 
beaver. Missing from photo: Reggie 
Jackson, Stanley O. Ikenberry, Buster 
Hymen, Marti "No Strings Attached" 
Donovan, Dua Bong, Yet another Paul's 
Friend, Laura "Machete" Robinson. 



Hendrick House 




Second Floor 

Front row: Gregg Homerding, Pam Ho- 
man, Leslie Pisoni, Bernie Engel. Sec- 
ond row: Phill Gulley, Randel Chow, 
Terry Schmidt, Mark Kaczkowski, Jeff 
Fergus. Back row: Jerry Fellows, Peter 
Au-Yeung, Ed Blomberg. 



315 

Happy Hour at Halfway House/Hendrick House 



Hendrick House 



Fifth Floor 

Front row: Dennis Grzesiak, Jim No- 
vak, Phil Mattix, Kathy Conley, Kevin 
Mueller. Second row: Steve Martin, 
Joyce Paschall, Jayne Hertko, Sharon 
Trocke, Tim Schramer, Phil Hardin. 
Third row: Sandy Rozsypal, Dave Se- 
lig, Michael Selig, Mark Alexa, Greg Ei- 
senhauer. Back row: Norm Knicl, Kevin 
Stupay, Tim Hetzler, Dan Juffernbruch, 
John Blomberg, Konrad Kaeding. 




Hendrick House 



Sixth Floor 

Front row: Dennis Tajer, Ed Chan. 
Second row: Rae Ann Gerstung, Nancy 
Sprick, Pat Donahue, Clare Discher, Gay 
Caspary. Third row: Sean McCarthy, 
Kim Kuras, Sue Cherney, Marty Eppel, 
Dan Graham, Groundhog Slayton, Lon 
Hoegberg, Charles Muchmore. Back 
row: Jeff Bryan, Greg Heaton, Jim Goss- 
wein, Terry Drewes. 




316 

Hendrick House 



Horticulture Club 




Front row: Joe Schmiedel, Brad Beh- 
rens, Jeanette Seif, Suzanne Dahm, Ter- 
ry Smith, Jim Yonan, Cathy Walker, Ju- 
lie Styczenski. Second row: Glenn 
Szmurlo, Richard Miyazaki, Julie Re 
velle, Brian Shmaefsky, Tami Russell 
Peggy Orkild, Dave Sanford (advisor) 
Third row: Bob Balek, Tracey Swi 
derek, Brad Austin, Becky Meyer, Vick 
Ward, Karen Ingelmanson, Linda Win 
ter. Fourth row: Dan Anderson, Chuck 
Frazzetto, Janet Cahill, Dan Cummings, 
Theresa Sunblade, Sue Wambeke, Gail 
Swanson. Back row: Steve Cook, Steve 
Kooyenga, Todd Meyer, Damien Bres- 
nan, Gregg Schafer, Ladean Goodwin, 
Heather Young, Miriam Hall, Chuck 
Becker, Amy Hicok, Janine Muhs. Miss- 
ing from photo: John Anderson, Rob 
Boyce, Mike Busboom, Steve Cackler, 
Denise Cahill, Bozema Chudzinski, Brian 
Corr, Donna Droste, Darryl Fringer, 
Pam Geimer, Natalie Gongaware, Jack 
Gruber, Kim Hartman, Todd Hausman, 
Janet Henley, Mary Jaskula, Mark Ko- 
hajda, Jan Krusemark, Katherine Lough- 
lin, Dennis Martin, Sam Martin, Ken 
McPheeters, Susan Mulgrew, Diane No- 
land, Lisa Pasiuk, Rebecca Raper, Lynn 
Rowe, Steve Ruzicka, Gary Szmurlo, 
Sharna Trier, Paul VanOteghem, Laura 
Williams, Joanne Hochnadel, Laura 
Mayle, Keith Dintlemann, Tim Pflederer, 
Tom Schafer. 



Mini Greek Newspaper 




Linda Jo Hoekstra, Elisa Moyer, Debbie 
Stephens, Julie Falkenstrom, Belinda 
Bonsall, Tim Leahy, Stacey Modlin, Bri- 
an Wexler, Mike Seghetti, Joanne 
Schumm, Suzie Ahlberg. Missing from 
photo: Tammie Blackman, Ann Marie 
Burda, Jeff Calvin, Eric Cornelius, Linda 
Ippulito, Trish Lane, Robert Lawless, 
Beth Klawitter, Mary Beth Martensen, 
Paul Shafer, Allison Smith, Vince 
Thompson. 



317 

Horticulture Club/Illini Greek Newspaper 



Mini Pride 



Front row: Alan Dodds, unknown, Bry- 
an Cruwys, Brad Kirchhofer, Dan Cum- 
miskey, unknown, Bill Lee. Second 
row: Dave Filkin, Jack Dugan, Eric 
Kahle, Pete Severson, Nancy Cunning- 
ham, Cheryl Byers, Leslie Hancock, Su- 
san Schramm, Don Knoche. Third row: 
Unknown, Brent Hoots, Neil Kirchhofer, 
Aaron Henderson, Beth Bergman, Kevin 
Haas, Bob Barclay, Jon Downey, Laura 
Hughart, unknown, Mark "Shiek" Good- 
win, Jim Hallene, Valerie Ratts, Kevin 
Willmann, Jane Robbin, unknown, Mar- 
lene Harshfield, unknown, Sally Stawick, 
Janine Solal, Elizabeth Sanders, Lynn 
Russo, Becky Meyer, John Sutton. 
Back row: Sue Jorgensen, Bob Larson, 
Carrie White, Londa Jorgensen, Mark 
Gossett, Steve Harrel, Dave Harrel, Teri 
Chapman, Stacy Wood, Stacey Modlin, 
Chris Sedlacek, Paul Lencioni. 




mini Ski Club 



Front row: Mike Warner, Betty Moser 
(vice president), Greg Olsen, Dave Sa- 
myn (president), Bob Brown. Second 
row: George Reilly, Rich Sunden, Tom 
Jops, Mark Bradel, Sue Kocour (treasur 
er), Tamara McKinney, John Rejman 
Third row: Russ Ericksen, Bob Wallace 
Lesa Rau, Bob Lindholm, Phil Mahre 
Jay Jelinek, John Hitzman, Suzie Chap 
stick, Janice Sierzela, David Jacob 
Fourth row: Kit Kreid, Osamu Na 
kagawa, Chubbs, Bob Meyer, Don Juan 
Peggy Fleming, Greg Zolkowski, Sue 
Horsley, Cathy Stelzer. Fifth row: Hans 
Hinterseers, Jeff Penn, Barb Hendricks, 
Mike Farney, Jeff Greenfield, Trudy 
Boehme, Ingemar Stenmark, unknown 
Tom Tenor, Stein Eriksen, Jim Inness 
Mark Mahre, Martha Gregory, Franz 
Klamner. Missing from photo: Ray Gi 
lius (secretary), Steve Shapiro, Phil Fa 
sel, Mark Schulz, Bill McDermott, Dave 
Grethen, Steve Shellenbaum, Tarn 
Wzientek, Mike Coward, Kevin Murphy 
Randy Jahn, Heiko Henning, Steve Hef 
felfinger, Emily Hoag, Heidi Hoffman 
Kiyoshi Kawaguchi, Nancy Schumacher 
Tony Zuccarino. 




318 

Illini Pride /Mini Ski Club 



Mini Union Board 




Front row: Nancy Olson, Steve McKe- 
ever, Julie Thompson. Second row: 
Craig T. Hauser, Theresa McDonald, 
Barb Gluchman, Denise Diaz. Third 
row: Mark Branch, Jan Mason-Rauk, Su- 
san Budney, Marge Tingley, Robert 
Todd, Rosemary Stevenson, Susan Yung 
Maul. Back row: Robert Thomas, Vince 
Tamayo, Maurice Marongiu, Robert Min- 
drum, Shelley Slade, Kurt Wilmann, 
David Weedon. Missing from photo: 
John Banta, Judie Fair, Tom Kelly, 
George Lowrey, Tony McShane, Marge 
Resce, Rachel Sullivan. 



Illio Contributors 




Byron Geannopoulos, Nancy Shaw, 
Cindra Kay Bump, Steve Sonnenleiter. 
Missing from photo: Diane Wintroub, 
Marianne Eterno, Linda Jo Hoekstra, 
Kurt Becker, Karen Padgitt, Sue Smiley, 
Paula Benson, Lucy Logsdon, Mike Mar- 
tinez, Kevin McPherson, Alan Friedman, 
Chip Cirillo, Abby Obenchain, Patricia 
Hoffman, Kay Shipman, Rachel Russell, 
Joyce Hodel, Margaret Uhlarik, Mari- 
anne Schumm, Ginger Hopkins, Tom 
Hasse, Jodi R. Paul, Roxie Peterson, 
Steve Birdine, Maryann L. Brandy, Mark 
Bulthazer, Zack Nauth, Doug Lee, Del 
Gilpin. 



319 

Illini Union Board/Illio Contributors 



IEEE 



Institute of Electrical 
and Electronic Engineers 

Front row: John Hinz, Eugene Lin, Ma- 
rie Ruhnke, Alan Harvath, Kathleen Bur- 
ich, Curt Schreiber, Gert Ivory, Roger 
Richards. Second row: Dave Wickcliff, 
Jane Boas, Liz Brauer, Kurt Kallman, 
Brian Stephens, John Keller. Third row: 
Hooman Houshmand (treasurer), Robert 
Scheurer (membership chairman), Mikie 
Nixon (programs chairman), Sue Kwon 
(president), Bill Tai (secretary), Ray 
Klouda (vice president), Rosanne Hinz 
(Engineering Open House chairman), 
Brad Hunt (publicity chairman), John 
Soethe (activities chairman), Bias Gonza- 
lez (Engineering Open House chairman), 
Joseph Trunk (Engineering Council re- 
presentative). Fourth row: Bruce 
Schmukler, Liz Crowley, Kent Tinucci, 
Doug Primack, unknown, Keith Dierk- 
ing, Adrienne Pracht, Janice Pryst. 
Fifth row: Unknown, Bruce Rash, Mark 
Bonsack, unknown, Thomas Ting, Chris 
Tinan, Ted Michorczyk, Todd Beanblos- 
som, Jeff Flitman, Tim Graff. Sixth row: 
Unknown, Russ Northrup, unknown 
Gary Monetti, Stan Hutchinson, un 
known, unknown, George Scholhamer 
unknown, Steve Housholder, unknown 
Mike Schroeder. Back row: Doug De 
vore, Jim Bales. Kurt A. Kaczmarek 
John F. O'Connor, Bob Damkroger, Mi 
chael R. Michalica, Herb Preinitz. 




Interfraternity Council 



Front row: Dave Kahn, David Hirsch, 
Stacey Modlin, Bob Schaller, Nancy Har- 
dy, John Walden. Back row: Steve 
Koomar, Bill Killam, Jim Bremhorst, Jay 
Springman, Brett Madison, Russell Sny- 
der (advisor), David Denby, Mark Gos- 
sett, Rob Anthony. Missing from 
photo: Margaret Goodman, Bob Lyman, 
Lisa Triplett, Hunt Walor. 




320 

lEEE/Interfraternity Council 



Junior Panhellenic 




Executive Council 

Front row: Laurie Graham (philanthro- 
py chairman), Suzie Ramm (secretary), 
Janice Griffin (publicity), Chris Sedlacek 
(campus affairs chairman), Laurie Wright 
(president). Back row: Jenny Long 
(special projects chairman), Sharon 
Greenfield (rush chairman), Susan Bud- 
ney (development advisor), Sally Sternal 
(vice president), Kiki Stonitsch (treasur- 
er). 



Kappa Alpha Psi 




Greater Beta Chapter 

Front row: Charles E. Newman, Ken- 
neth Jones, Scott H. Perkins, Steven 
McKeever. Second row: Juan Gardner, 
Garrie Allen, William Mills, H. Maurice 
Douse, William Stratton. Third row: 
John Hill, Solomon Jones, Warren Rob- 
erts, Martin Stratton. Fourth row: Karl 
Vick, Taylor Fuller, Colby Fletcher, Mi- 
chael Cottrell. Back row: Jason Ber- 
trand. Missing from photo: Warren C. 
Washington, Michael McNeil, Michael 
Wallace, Ashley Gregory, Charles Allen. 



321 

Junior Panhellenic/Kappa Alpha Psi 



Koinonia 



Christian Cooperative House 

Front row: Kenric Johnson, Doug Dun- 
bar, Tim Manning, Tony Malone, Byron 
Schafer, Jon Byron, Dave Thomas. Sec- 
ond row: Craig Chamberlain, Lincoln 
Fuson, Mark Sanders, Dean Anderson, 
Baird Shattuck, Gordon Trapp, Al Es- 
kew, Eric Gustafson, Alan B. Craig, Jim 
Crail. Third row: Ed Rule, Charles Gus- 
tafson, John Baldoni, Mike Hedge, Perry 
Baker. Back row: Mark Stecher, Larry 
James, Trace Nelson, Charles Hahn, 
Marty Sarsany. Missing from photo: 
Jeff Hedge. 




Main Liners 



Group of nuts, drunks and friends 

Front row: Bill Scoon, Lori Gordon, 
Howard Schusteff, Jo Podagrosi, Janet 
Hund, Betsy Kemp. Second row: Cheri 
Clark, Mike Schmerbauch, Donna Ha- 
chiya, Tim Lenahan, Glen Sachtleben, 
Sam Reinkensmeyer. Back row: Bill 
Forester, Todd Hoepker, Tony 
Wojtowicz, Steve Heinen, Cathy Gen- 
dron, Barb, Peggy Ward. 




Koinonia /Main Liners 



Marching Mini Drum Line 




Front row: Buzzy Lungcookie, Brian 
Leonardson, Karen Hediger, Joe Jaru- 
seski, Jeff Trimble, Teddi Sotiropoulos, 
Steven Dressel, Andy Ratts. Second 
row: Tim Harris, Steve Enda, Tom 
Kundmann, Mark Robbins, Mike Boy- 
kins, Dave Wesolowski, Kevin Thomp- 
son, Joe Rogers, Craig Taylor. Third 
row: Dale Hallerberg, Al Swaringen, 
Mark Wisthuff, Doug Daley, Mike La- 
hey, Andy Stein, Dave Flynn. Fourth 
row: Jamie Frillman. Back row: Jeff 
Macy, Dan Wentz, Jon Pollack. Missing 
from photo: Tom Eifert. 




Ma-Wan-Da 



Senior Honorary 

Front row: Maria Hoekstra, Stacey 
Modlin, Susan Savio, Abby Herget. Sec- 
ond row: Peggy Scully, Sue Tjarksen, 
Erin Callin, Janet Stiven. Third row: 
Adlon Jorgensen (advisor), Mary 
McClenahan, Cynthia Mayfield, Jill Jack- 
son. Fourth row: Russell Snyder (advi- 
sor), Kim McMillan. Fifth row: Bryan 
Leonard, Steven Koomar, David Hirsch, 
Jacqueline Gelb. Back row: Maury Fer- 
tig, Tim Leahy. Missing from photo: 
Pat Borelli, David Brown, Mary Crum- 
rine, Karin Dommermuth, Josh Grafton, 
John Hayes, Robert McKirgan, Ray- 
mond Morrison, Perry Range, Timothy 
Rollins, Edmund Seebauer, Carol Schus- 
ter, Julie Wurth. 



323 



McKinley Health Advocates 



Front row: Larry Rudnick, Sheila 
Swann, Nora Rowley, Mary Ellen Shane- 
sey, Ira Wrestler, Fran Miles, Dave Ver- 
million. Second row: Greg Zolkowski, 
Mark Knapp, Mike Hernandez, Karen 
Mahnke, Laurie Gierat, Pam Nickson, 
Bill Meyering, Roxanne Walton. Back 
row: Kathy O'Grady, Leila Contento, 
Nancy Keys, Lauren Spear, Carolyn 
Scharf, Craig Smith, Fern Bernstein-Mill 
er, Paula Swinford (advisor), Bruce John 
son. Missing from photo: Lori Argo 
Bob Dewey, Mary Lohse, Laura Lyons 
Laura McDonald, Christine Haag, Mar 
tha McNabb, Sandy Oleusky, Betsy Pol 
ston, Mel Hess, Mark Pfefferman, Beth 
Conwell, Kurt Metzler, Maria Mooshil 
Mary Ann Nederost, Kathy Armstrong 
Tana Cordogan, Matt Diamond, Mari 
anne Joyce, Jenny Pankus, Carol Ruda 
Jim Sperelakis, Mary Kay Starwalt, Den 
nis Uhlir, Jan Snow-Godfry, Kim Kerbel 
Bill Parizek, Gail Workman. 




McKinley Health Center Board 



Front row: Lauren Spear, Andrea 
Stern, Diana Francis, Bill Burkey, Jim 
Marks. Second row: Ellen Levy, Marcy 
Lukatsky, Randy Kahan, Gail Workman 
(chairperson), Dr. David Owen. Third 
row: Leslie Broder, Mike Nordstrom, Dr. 
Stephen Soboroff, Craig Smith (vice 
chairperson), Carolyn Palmer, Julie 
Schneider, David Preskill, Charlotte 
Bossi, John Schmerold, Robert Mangen, 
Paula Swinford, Shawn French, Bob 
Todd. Missing from photo: Ann Ol- 
dendorf (secretary), Laura Brinkley, Ter- 
ry Cosgrove, Mary Ellen Shanesey. 




324 

McKinley Health Advocates/McKinley Health Center Board 




Mortar Board 



National Senior Honorary 

Front row: Beryl Schnierow, John Pat- 
terson. Second row: Robert Day, Bob 
Kumaki, Londa Jorgensen, Colleen Cas- 
serly. Back row: Kevin Kinsella, Jon 
Downey, Kirk Farney, Margaret Bes- 
sette, Joseph Alwan, Matt Bettenhau- 
sen, Bruce Heuton, Richard Cavenaugh, 
Bill Killam. Missing from photo: Karla 
Berman, Susan Budney, Jeanne Czer- 
niak, Jonathan Higgins, William Howard, 
Brad Kirchhofer, Jonathan Kron, Kath- 
leen Perkinson, Lee Smolen, David 
Spellberg, Ed Wynn. 




No-Tel Motel 



Luxurious Deluxe Motel, offering 
indoor/outdoor swimming pool, 
saunas, hot tubs, and beyuteful air- 
conditioned rooms with ocean 
view. 

Front row: Elvis "the pelvis." Second 
row: Felice Levin, Sue Ranft (after). 
Third row: Sue Ranft (before), Mark 
Jahnke, Nancy McGuire. Back row: 
Ben "Zekie Ramone" Travis, Tina, Dr. 
Steve Harnack, Uli Giefing, Avra, Dick 
"Dick" Carr, Clash, Lynn Tittsworth, 
Mr. Mixmaster, Randi Besser. Missing 
from photo: Mick Jagger, John 
"Dumbo" Dombrowski. 



325 

Mortar Board/No-Tel Motel 



The Orient Express 



Intramural Volleyball Champions 

Front row: Nancy Maxfield. Second 
row: Lisa Palmer, Joan Barker, Lorrie 
Crossett, Bill Mark. Third row: Roger 
Ozima, Ellen Bailey, Nancy Hegan, Keri 
Griffith, Sue Shebelski, Andi Reiman, 
Cyndee Bronars. Back row: Dave La- 
mar, Ken Lam, Jim Arrigo, Dave Gar- 
ner, Penny Anderson, Alex Kuritza. 
Missing from photo: Guy Blaylock, 
Kim Eng, Don Hagemaster, Nikki Jab- 
lonski, Wendy Jones, Ed Kaihatsu, Mary 
King, Debbie Kish, Barb Klein, Eric Man- 
uel, Tricia O'Connell, Leanne Ono, Lin- 
da Paddock, Sarah Salstrand, Heidi 
Schlatter, Nancy Toyama, Willow War- 
ren, Sonia Yuen. 




The Other Guys 



Performing group 

from Varsity Men's Glee Club 

Front row: Paul Rausch, Paul Sirvatka, 
Bruce Boyd, Ray Turner, Andy Gray. 
Back row: John Wright, Craig Milkint, 
Tom Swartz. 




326 

The Orient Express/The Other Guys 



Out To Lunch Bunch 




Social Partying Honorary 

Steve Hadley, Gary Vyneman, Rod Da- 
vis, Barry Aves, Mark Sprague, Kris 
Hoult. 



Panhellenic Council 




Executive Board 

Front row: Adlon Jorgensen (advisor), 
Gen Horton, Betsy Graham, Anne 
Hathaway, Julie Koren, Susan Budney. 
Back row: Stacey Modlin, Londa Jor- 
gensen, Peggy Scully, Kim McMillan, 
Kathy Guinan. 



327 

Out to Lunch Bunch/Panhellenic Council 



Panhellenic Presidents' Council 



Front row: Leslie Broder, Londa Jor- 
gensen, Stacey Modlin, Sue Tjarksen, 
Gen Horton. Second row: Deanna But- 
ler, Tammy Hillhouse, Ann Tobin, Patri- 
cia Masek, Sue Konopken, Jana Fairow, 
Kathleen Perkinson, Kathy Brown. 
Back row: Maureen Memler, Ginger 
Carlson, Anne Siemer, Vicki Sowinski, 
Alicia Jilek, Christy Beseman, Peggy 
Scully. Missing from photo: Cathy Ad- 
ams, Ann Davenport, Karin Dommer- 
muth, Kelli Essig, Kathy Fischer, Nancy 
Hegza, Betsy Kwedar, Laura Mclnerney, 
Lynn Pivar. 




r ,' 1 



Phi Beta Sigma 



Social Service Fraternity 

Front row: Michael Boykins, Kenneth 
Coleman, Darrell Hines, Raymond Tol- 
bert, Anthony Baylis, Gregory Taylor. 
Back row: Derek Hobson, Richard Hen- 
ry, Frederick McLaurin, Bernard 
McLaurin, Valdimir Talley. Missing 
from photo: Clint Allen, Donnie 
Brown, Charles Dawson, Troy Garrett 
El, Kevin Lyles, John Washington. 




Panhellenic Presidents' Council /Phi Beta Sigma 



Phi Gamma Nu 




Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 




Professional Music Fraternity 

Front row: Peter Lipari, Daniel Dona- 
hue, John Noreyko. Back row: Nicho- 
las Tripsas, Michael Wheat, Christopher 
Claussen, Raymond Garton, Terrence 
Melbourn, Russel King, Edward Klint, 
Charles Gessert, Scott Duff, Timothy 
Haskett, Steven Griggs, Rickey Oeth, 
Thomas Kenny. Missing from photo: 
Robert Bass, Thomas Clark, Daniel Kel- 
ly, Christopher Peters, James P. F. Vo- 
koun. 



329 

Phi Gamma Nu/Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 



Plato Operators 



Toolers Local #6500 

Front row: Steve Gray, Heather Green- 
berg, Peter D. Pruyne. Second row: 
Dan Hahn, Don Appleman, Sean Emery, 
Jim Riggs, Jeff Johnson, Dave Sides. 
Back row: Kris Gunsalus, John Van- 
antwerp, Mike O'Hara, Jerry Bucksath, 
Lorelei Williams, Dirk Grunwald, Sheri 
Britten. 




Pre-Law Club 



Sam Amirante (guest speaker), Heather 
Cartwright (chairman of honorary), Ka- 
ren Harrison, (vice president for public- 
ity), Melissa Coretz (treasurer), Mark P. 
Miller (president), Len Tao (newsletter 
editor), Beth Hoffee, (vice president for 
programs). 




330 

Plato Operators /Pre-Law Club 




The Pup Club 

Friends 

Front row: Maureen "Moldilocks" Mu- 
kai, Gina "Googley Eyes" Smith, Kim 
"I.C. Counselor" Smith, Donna "Want 
some b-day cake?" Edstrom. Back row: 
Sue "Duds" Dunn, Isa "Li'l King 
Queen" Dohse, Noelle "Just five more 
minutes" Gaffney, Jenny "Hot yet cold" 
Rackley, Janie "Hane-face" Gerdes, Lin- 
da "Peotone-Chief" Schmidt. Missing 
from photo: Janet "Snorkey" Norcom, 
Mr. "I don't run on batteries" Magoo. 



Rancho Destructo 




Front row: Barb "Boobie" Leja, How- 
ard "Hey! Who stole my pool" Duck, 
Marianne "Pooh-Poohs" Pagliari. Sec- 
ond row: Terry "McMom" McMahon, 
Ellen "El-B" Finnerty, Carolyn "C 
McGee" Cosentino. Third row: Mary 
"MaryBarrett" Barrett, Sandy 
"Grandma Butthead" Haidle. Back 
row: Rita "Ri-Ri" Himmes, Linda "Lush- 
face" Klosterman. Pictured but miss- 
ing: Mail "There's no place like home" 
Box. 



331 

Pup Club/Rancho Destructo 



Sachem 



Junior Activities Honorary 

Front row: Fred Levy, Jean Kruger, 
Susan Alcorn, Jim Marks. Second row: 
Martha Gregory, Mark Gossett, Lisa 
Howey, Don Knoche. Third row: Jane 
Novak, Laurie Wright, Judy Vyduna, 
Linda Jankowicz, Kevin Cuthbert, Gary 
Walgren. Back row: Jim Sperelakis 
Ben Hasan, Laurie Gordon, Joe Kania 
Katherine Wright, Rex Clark, Tim Dam 
ron. Missing from photo: Karen Harri 
son, Tim Heck, Linda Jo Hoekstra, Ran 
dy Kahan, Van King, Terry Markus, Lyn 
ette Marshall, Mary Beth Martensen 
Craig Milkint, Rob Perbohner, Marge 
Resce, Lewis Schwartz, Steve Yencho. 




Staff Friends, Roomies and Lovers 



Front row: Einstein C. Stein, Leah Tan- 
nenwald, Rolph, Leslie Schenck, Pat Sa- 
pienza, Everett C. Stein. Back row: 
Mike Meyer, Carl VanDril, Jack "Action 
Jackson" Wilson, Ben "Bucko" Broham- 
mer, Karen Terneus, Stan Levantuzkan. 




John C. Stein 



332 

Sachem/Staff Friends, Roomies and Lovers 



Stan Bur dick Family 




Front row. Stella "Bass Net Shoes" 
Burdick, Stacie "No Pickle, Binky" Bur- 
dick. Back row: Stan "Maturity 
A. AT." Burdick, Stacia "Comtrex 
O.D." Burdick, Stuart "Thong Alert" 
Burdick, Stephanie "Sick Party Animal" 
Burdick. Missing from photo: Corky 
Morgan. 



Still Lazy After All These Years 




Group of Friends and Neighbors 

Front row: Dave "I Might Graduate" 
Poindexter, Kristen "B.B." Alexander, 
Renee "The Only Freshman in the Pic- 
ture" Kasperkiewicz, Mark "Boxcars 
and a Beard" Friedman, Paul "I Want 
To Be Sedated" Budin, Darice "The Girl 
Next Door" Lulinski, Jeff "Jeffy" Hiatt, 
Debbie "Mai Tai?" Hiatt, Mary "Just 
Plain Mare" Siadak, Amy "Lil' Giant" 
Hicok, Forrest "Ralph The Wonder- 
grad" Mohler, Janet. Missing from 
photo: Mike "Too Drunk to F — k" Pil- 
latsch, Ray "I Finally Graduated" Belair. 



333 

Stan Burdick Family/Still Lazy After All These Years 



Star Course 



Front row: Norma Torres, Jim lnskeep, 
Gwen Hoerr, Byron Geannopoulos, Jim 
Carris, Amy Ackerman, Helen Savida- 
kis. Second row: Rodney Morris, Ter- 
rie Albano, Sebrina Haynesworth, Janet 
Koren, Alison Piatt, Kathy Gould, Julie 
Sanes, Dave Nehf, Andy Hale, Robin 
Glink, Dave Priest, Nick Thompson. 
Third row: Anne Cadigan, Debbie 
Keith, Jeff Arena, Ann Spoto, Sue Born- 
stein, Pam Egloff, Susan Wiener. Fourth 
row: Eric Jacobson, Sidney Burton, 
Dave Thompson, Lisa Thalji, Lisa Ka- 
berna, Gregg Harwood, Cheryl Burleigh, 
Debbie Fulmer, Carol Snoad, Dan Sher- 
man, David Gilmartin, Laurance Serituk, 
Scott Delaney, Peggy Young. Fifth row: 
Jim Glass, Tina Zarkadas, Carol Bertsch, 
Sharin Levine, Mary Pierce, Lora Hynes, 
Kevin Gilbert, Elisa Cicinelli, Dennis Uh- 
lir, Bob Hammer, Leigh Horwitz, Brian 
Johnson, Jeff Patt, Laurie Graham, Joe 
Belmonte, Kitty Creswell, Bob Bartosch, 
Cheryl Skoog. Sixth Row: Tim Stege- 
man, Paul Magelli, John Avila, Noah 
Stern, Mike Martini, Lance LeVine, Sue 
Gray, Brad Lippitz, Marc Taxman, John 
Worsek, Julie Kay, Bill Krupowicz, Rog- 
er Tauchman, Paula Van Dyke, Christine 
Kay, Bob Wilson, Warren Arnold. Back 
row: Mike Wierec, Dave Ven Horst, 
Mark Haerr, Jane Neumiller, Jim Millar, 
Jim Ahem, Jeff Andreasen, Debbie 
Grieser, Jim Cunningham. 




Star Course Managers 



Front row: Gwen Hoerr, Jm Ahem, 
Sue Wiener. Back row: Cheryl Skoog, 
Bob Bartosch, Debbie Keith, Anne Cadi- 
gan, Jim lnskeep. Missing from photo: 

Warren Arnold. 




334 

Star Course /Star Course Managers 



Stratford House 




Christian Cooperative 

Front row: Cathy Sutschek, Julie But- 
ler, Gini Shaffer, Lisa Reynolds, Nan 
Layborne, Jill Hashbarger, Denise Din- 
gee, Tanya Rodda, Beth Stalzer. Sec- 
ond row: Barb Sarsany, Margaret Fa- 
letti, Nina Wilcock, Dianne Miller, Betsy 
Heien. Third row: Amy Holland, Mary 
Kay Sharp, Kathy McNair, Anne Vree- 
man, Sally Lincoln, Laura Koertge. 
Fourth row: Holly Emanuelson, Jana 
Lindstrom, Kathy Murrell, Lynne 
Wagler, Sharon Dold, Kim Brosnan, 
Mary Rose Fabish. Back row: Donna- 
Jeanne Schneider, Terry Schneider. 



Student Alumni Association 




Front row: Bob Lumsden (advisor), 
Corky Morgan, Bill Stitt. Second row: 
Dave Hirsch, Tamara DeWerff, Dan Do- 
heny, Edith Muroga, Mona Hartman. 
Third row: Andre Quattrochi, Colleen 
Casserly, Sean Joyce, Vicki Virgin, Den- 
nis Doheny, Van King, Lori Mattick, 
Debbie Hopwood. Fourth row: Jim 
Hallene, Al Howe, Claudio Marcus, Bri- 
an Hart, Mary Beth Martensen, Margaret 
Oakes, Andy Larson, Chip Jones. Back 
row: Lisa Hogan, Terri Lauten, Tim 
Leahy, John Sutton, Dirk Gunderson, 
Jane Harmon. Missing from photo: 
Charmaine Atkinson, Roz Baudendistel, 
Pat Borelli, Susan Budney, Heather 
Cartwright, Nancy Cunningham, Ann 
Davenport, Sue Detwiler, Sue Erickson, 
Kelly Forsyth, Cathy Gilliam, Josh Graf- 
ton, John Hayes, Gen Horton, Londa 
Jorgensen, Jane Lawicki, Jim Nikoleit, 
Steve Rembos, Carla Rendina, Sue 
Schramm, Betsy Steffen, Gary Walgren, 
Stacy Wood, Beth Woodruff. 



335 

Stratford House/Student Alumni Association 



Student Government Association 



Front row: Willie Seid, Sarah Mayer 
(president), Don Krause. Second row: 
Ingrid Vitrungs, Sue Hitch, Gail Work- 
man, Larry Corcoran, Lisa Braddock, 
Sharon Perlman, Carlos M. Rodriguez, 
Margaret Oakes, Chris Huber, Mary 
Margaret Brosnahan. Third row: Jeff 
Buckles, Craig Milkint, David Levenstam 
(treasurer), Sue Bezanes, Karen Pnazek, 
Lori Windhorst, Kathy Durkin, Karin 
Dommermuth, Kelly Forsyth, Beth 
Emme, Hank Kelly. Fourth row: Mark 
E. Duban, Jeff Warmoth, Colleen Reid, 
Jim Snyder, Tom Hasse, Tom Schenck, 
Shari Cartwright, Bill Fry. Back row: 
Jane McElroy, Brian Heller (vice presi- 
dent), Jim Rinck, Al Baltis, Ted Light- 
foot. Missing from photo: Mary Bar- 
ber, Michele DiMarco, Julie Egan, David 
Egeland, Kevin Fisher, Tim Gourley, 
Chic Groebe, Jesse Hargrove, Dane Ka- 
min, Richard Keck, Jim Kelly, John 
Klages, Nick Kokoris, Mary Lou Kost, 
Amy Levin, Joel Maloney, Carolyn Men- 
ninger, Barbara O'Connell, Sue Price, 
Kathy Roderick, Karen Ross, Stacy 
Schultz, Tim Schultz. 




Tae-Kwon-Do 



Instructor: Mr. Robert Speyer. Black Belt: James 

Nightingale. Darrick Coles. Brown Belt: Arthur Ru 
bin, Paul Lapping, Richard Lendhardt, Toby Burke 
Howard Schusteff, Lynn Campbell, Steve Bouchard 
Tim Treacy, Pat Cannal, Lynn Crowe, Elizabeth Rae 
mont. Blue Belt: Brian Hemper, Elizabeth Smith 
Craig Kukeljski, Diane Craemer, Eric Larson, Mau 
reen Maart, Steve Greenberg, Jonas Rupkalvis, Mark 
Schmetterer, Thomas Kingsley, Barry Sharpe. Green 
Belt: Gerasimos Marinos, Lynne Pederson, Bruno 
Behrend, Sue Campbell, Michael Kaye, William Whit- 
ing, Joseph Green, Mark Braun, Mark Herbert, Mi- 
chael Pippin, Michael Gilley, Mark Schuler. Yellow 
Belt: Peter Ziemkowski, Susan Craemer, Azelia Kang, 
Edmund Yep, Walker Kirby, Suzanne Zak, David Chu- 
bin, Sherry Stransky, Raymond Momsen, Kouroush 
Khosravi, Brian Terry, Mark Schaeffer, David Curtis, 
Avery Nelson, Michael O'Connor, Martin O'Brien, 
Mark Hill, James Edfors, John Gillono, Julie Rotter, 
Richard Harlovic, Tony Sladek, Michael Driscoll, Mar- 
garet Teranado, John Stephan, Lynn Krajnovich, Pat- 
rick Panico, Christopher Turich, Christopher Mann, 
Chuck Gollay, Craig Lieberman, Ronald Norwood, 
Lorrie Crossett, Steve Fruhling, William Pellico, Bar- 
bara Bogdanowicz, Michael Lamar, Louis Montana, 
Bruce McLoughlin, Brian Staunton, Andrew (Jyeda, 
Patrick Seymour, Robert Griffin, Adam Boris, Jasna 
Jovanovic, Donna Felsecker, Kathleen Gust, Jim 
Welch, James Giel, Pam Cauley, Gary Smith, Daniel 
Sowsan, Dennis Moy, James Bury, Jeff Harris, Robert 
Harris, Kathleen Hall, Paul Raymond, John Beatty, 
Douglas Essex, Harlan Husmann, Harry Byrne, Ste- 
phan Wegner, Stephan Voltrael, Gerard Swienton, 
Gary Kinsel, Vicky O'Hearn, Carol McClurg, Kevin 
Connor, Carl Wegner, Daniel Peterson, Leonard 
Pucker, Jamie Hermann. 




Photograph supplied by Tae-Kwon-D 



336 

Student Government Association/Tae-Kwon-Do 




Tau Beta Pi 



National Engineering 
Honor Society 

Officers: John Patterson (president), 
Robert Day (vice president), Dave Peter- 
son (general secretary), Mary Yen (re- 
cording secretary), Mark Haertling (cor- 
responding secretary), Jeff Kenyon 
(treasurer), Erica Guzalo (cataloger), 
Marty Hirsch (Engineering Council re- 
presentative.) 



Thursday Night Club 



the DEAD 20NI 




Front row: Fredo, Petie, The Man 
From Plaid, Zwaggie. Second row: Big 
"C", Christie, Family Man, Idleheit, Mr. 
Innocent, The Ape. Third row: Sandy 
K., Sandy B., Beth, Leslie. Fourth row: 
Danno, Lisa. Fifth row: Donna, Jill, Jill, 
Fast Eddie. Back row: M. L. Dale, Ski, 
Janice, Putz, Diek. 



337 

Tau Beta Pi/Thursday Night Club 



Torch 

Junior Scholastic 
Activity Honorary 



Front row: Mary Butterfield, Susan 
Retzer. Second row: Kelly Mayoras 
(secretary), Katie Price, Jane Novak 
(president), Randy Kahan, Lydia Benja- 
min (selection chairman), Mark Fecht. 
Third row: Martha Butterfield, Linda 
Jo Hoekstra, Linda Jankowicz, (scholar- 
ship chairman), Susan Erickson, Susan 
Alcorn, Mona Hartman, Elisa Moyer, 
Laurie Wright, Amy Ragsdale (historian). 
Fourth row: Joseph Alwan, Mark Be- 
mis, Terry Markus (treasurer), Rex 
Clark, Tim Damron. Missing from 
photo: Kenneth Eathington, Karen Har- 
rison, Van King (vice president, Steve 
Lockman, Laurie Patterson, Kevin 
Pinski, Lewis Schwartz. 




Trelease 4 



Front row: Toni Young, Yuri Fujita, 
Lisa Bryan, Judy Davis. Second row: 
Kerry Saltmarsh, Sue Schneider, Geor- 
gia Majors, Stephanie Hammond, Linda 
Curry, Kristin Schaefer, Carla Bridges, 
Colleen McKenna, Toni Vyborny. Third 
row: Mary Malone, Janis Kropsch, Don- 
na Fish, Kathy Rafayko, Karen Robin- 
son, Viki Janes, Pam Cools, Carol 
Klinsky, April Minor. Back row: Les- 
lie Waite, Helen Harland, Holly Han- 
cock, Kristen Margarites, Steph Waibel, 
Deb McClary, Jennifer Yeh, Ellen Grim- 
shaw, Cindy Gesinski. 




338 

Torch/Trelease 4 




Volunteer Mini Projects 




Board of Directors 

Front row: Anne Fogarty, Mark Wein- 
stein, Laura Hiestand, Karla Berman. 
Second row: Tali Arbel, Sherry 
Shuwal, Shari Block, Anna Marie Olano, 
Frank Sclavenitis. Third row: Sheryl 
Streder, Patty Kocurek, Susan Connelly, 
Peg Mroz, Mary Pat Regan, Jane Novak. 
Back row: Mary Tripsas, Mike Luthy, 
Bill Nichols. Missing from photo: 
Sharon Deters, Carol Marcus, Sherri 
Moss, Maureen Zilliox. 



339 

Tribe Of Illini/Volunteer Illini Projects 



Wescoga 

Women's Cooperative 

Front row: Ivy Kamphausen, Cindy 
Barry, Glori Dunker. Second row: 
Kathy Sommers, Sue Ann Claudon, La- 
dean Goodwin, Pat Rhea, Myra Kuhn, 
Laura O'Brien, Judy Simonson. Back 
row: Sharon Quigley, Sarah Lower, 
Hsaio Chang Chan, Mary McLernon, Ja- 
net Grobstein, Roxana Daniels, Teresa 
Crook. Missing from photo: Betsy 
Patterson, Renee Gootee, Meredith, 
Horn, Dorothy White, Veegee Elsen. 




Women's Glee Club 



Front row: Beth Ann McKee, Mary 
Anne Martonosi, Sharon Groth (accom- 
panist), Nina Monahan (director), Connie 
Osborne, Helen Sparks. Second row: 
Crystal Ray, Marie Ruhnke, Jasmin Ra- 
mos, Jennifer Klinker, Tracey Jones, 
Theresa Westermeier, Carol Streit- 
berger, Nancy Dolan. Third row: Melo- 
dy Laible, Constance Haile, Annette Sil- 
vio, Susan Taylor, Barbara Stuemke, 
Sandra Seyfert. Fourth row: Jane Ma- 
lone, Margo Stone, Anita Mittra, Tracy 
Woody, Janet Baum, Veronica Cha- 
chula, Julie King, Ingrid Graudins. Fifth 
row: Kim Kieffer, Katrine Vange, Jill Ah- 
rens, Katie Price, Jane Rubin, Carol Win- 
ters. Sixth row: Angela Wappel, Lisa 
Olsen, Theresa Zilligen, Judith Rose, 
Lisa Noble, Jill Klindera, Kim McFar- 
lane, Wendy Proulx. Seventh row: 
Katherine Stout, Andrea Behegan, Cin- 
dy Vigliocco, Carin Menzer, Linda Cole- 
man, Renee Sommerfeld. Eighth row: 
Kathy Kieffer, Lydia Benjamin, Deborah 
Sambo, Sherry Kumro, Brenda Patrick, 
Jenine Cannell, Judy Fox, Janice Rich- 
ter. Back row: Lori Mavis, Suzanne 
Dawson, Renee Werner, Janet West. 
Missing from photo: Carole Comer, 
Monica Demoll, Nancy Jaffe, Diane 
Heinrich, Sheri Moeckler, Therese 
Krohn, Kathleen Sullivan. 




340 

Wescoga/Women's Glee Club 



WPGU-FM 107 




Front row: Dave Weinstein, Pam Bres- 
nan, A! Strauss, Sandy Scheld, Grant 
Prentice. Second row: Stacy Paphitis, 
Diana Fish, Jon Ginoli, Ellen Garbow, 
Mari Szatkowski, Mark Gluskin, Veroni- 
ca Rusnak, Miriam Share. Third row: 
Sue Munsterman, Mary DiFiglio, Bob 
Slade, Robin Neal, Todd Slewinski, Leah 
Rosen, Ellen Pollak, Jomarie Fredericks. 
Back row: Susie Schlag, Jon Kamer- 
man, Dave Priest, Glenn Lyons, John 
Slocum, Brian Rorbeck, unknown, 
Chuck Allen, unknown, Langdon Alger, 
Todd Berkley, Dillard Gilmore, Greg 
Heiden, Mark Vernon, Mark Thurow, 
Mr. Mop. Missing from photo: Dano 
Krulewitch, Marilin Morgan, Jon Grubbs, 
Tim Endsley, Reed Engdahl, David Con- 
royd, Margy Mueller, Jeff Steinberg, 
Mike Mclnerney, Greg Cleveland, Greg 
Sraders, Steve Harr, Marty Jencius, Jon 
Kuchta, Phil Manicki, Andy Regal, Jay 
Shatz, Dave Lacascio, Nancy McCor- 
mick, LeeAnn Morris, Phil Yastrow, and 
a cast of thousands . . . 



WPGU-FM 107 Managers 




Front row: Sandy Scheld (promotion), 
Grant Prentice (production), Reed Eng- 
dahl (programming), Miriam Share (pro- 
duction), Margy Mueller (business), Dave 
Weinstein (general manager), Diana Fish 
(sales), Al Strauss (programming). Back 
row: Dave Conroyd (business), Pam 
Bresnan (promotion), John Slocum (co- 
pywriting), Dano Krulewitch (public ser- 
vice), Jeff Steinberg (news), Tim Endsley 
(sales), Jon Grubbs (engineering). Miss- 
ing from photo: Jon Ginoli (WDBS su- 
pervisor), Mark Gluskin (sports), Jon Ka- 
merman (programming), Mark Thurow 
(news), Mark Szatkowski (news), Veroni- 
ca Rusnak (WDBS), Cedric Ball (WDBS), 
Greg Cleveland (business). 



341 

WPGU-FM 107/WPGU-FM 107 Managers 








mm 






•'S"'-' 



Graduate school, a job, marriage — sub- 
jects for which choices must be made as a 
senior faces the inevitable question of 
"What next?" 

Looking to or preparing for an uncertain 
future can both frustrate and excite a stu- 
dent. Some students think they have cho- 
sen to do what they will enjoy and what will 
offer them fulfillment; others aren't so 
sure. Such contemplation is frightening — 
and it's fun. 

It's also fun to recall the past and to 
remember those unforgettable moments 
you've spent at school. Sometimes it seems 
as though you've aged more than four 
years. You've filled your head, to what 
surely must be the brink, with facts, figures 
and philosophies. Sometimes it seemed so 
difficult, but through it all there was time 
for letting loose. 

A freshman four years ago might have 
spent a weekend evening at Boni's in 
Lando Place, sipping a beer at the then- 
legal drinking age of 19. During more seri- 
ous moments, he might have considered 
the implications of the newly-established 
SORF and SEAL funds, and his battered 
campus map would not have included the 
Agricultural Engineering building or the 
construction site of the new Administration 
building. 

A student's senior year is a time for both 
anticipation and reflection. It's a time ex- 
perienced after learning not necessarily all 
there is to know, but how much there is to 
know and how much of that there is yet to 
be discovered. 

Seniors 















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"its; 



Agriculture 

l * '; I '' : - ■ A 






r 



, . » *>.. t "■■■ —r tJm 






• i 









Randy Stukenbei 




THOMAS HENRY ABEL, Illiopolis 
NANCY ACCOLA, Westchester 
DEAN ACKERMAN, Champaign 
TERESA AGEE, Aurora 
DEAN R. ANDERSON, St. Charles 
FRANCES ANDERSON, Urbana 



KELLY ANDERSON, Chicago 
MELINDA ANDERSON, Lynn Center 
JANET ARENDS, Melvin 
DEVON ATKINSON, Geff 
TAMMY BAKER, Trilla 
BILL BECKER, Urbana 



CHARLES BECKER, Blue Island 
TERRY BEEBE, Scales Mound 
BRADLEY BEHRENS, Harvard 
SHARON BENNETT, Lisle 
MATTHEW BENSON, Geneva 
STEVEN BERNE, Wilmette 



BARBARA BITNER, Litchfield 
ROBERT BITTING, Tiskilwa 
KATHY BLESSMAN, Western Springs 
WILLIAM BLUE, Jacksonville 
PATRICIA BORELLI, Monticello 
MARIE BOYD, Belleville 



LESLIE BRADLEY, Homer 
JUDITH BRENNAN, Park Ridge 
ANGELA BROCK, Sandwich 
ROBIN BROWN, Northfield 
JEFFREY A. BRUNOEHLER, Mendota 
STANLEY BURGESS, Stewardson 



MARIA BURKLAND, Rochelle 
ANN BURKEY, Walnut 
MICHAEL BUTZ, Kankakee 
KAREN CARDINALE, Urbana 
MICHAEL CARLSON, Princeton 
DONNA CARLUCCI, Cicero 



PAUL CARNEY, Normal 
PAMELA CAROTHERS, Naperville 
KATHRYN CASE, Naperville 
LESLIE CHRISTENSEN, Sandwich 
CURT CLAPPER, Sadorus 
SUE ANN CLAUDON, Avon 



HARLAN CLEMMONS, Penfield 
DIANA CLOYD, Humboldt 
CAROL COGLIANESE, Lockport 
JO ELLEN COLLINS, Flossmoor 
DAVID CONRADY, Palmyra 
ERIC CORNELIUS, Penfield 



PHYLLIS L. CROFT, Wilmette 
WILLIAM CURTIS, Melvin 
MICHAEL CZYL, Evergreen Park 
SUZANNE DAHM. Lincoln 
ROBERT DAIBER, Highland 
JOANNE DANHOFF, Joliet 



345 

Agriculture 



DEAN DAU, Bonfield 

PATRICIA DELANEY, O Fallon 

TERRY DEMPSEY, Peoria 

DAVID DENBY, Girard 

LEE DENZER, Bloomington 

JAMES DESUTTER, Woodhull 



DEBRA DETOY, Sherrard 

LAURA DEVLIN, Flossmoor 

RONALD DIAMOND, Decatur 

DEWAYNE DILL, Tremont 

LANNY DOBBELS, Cambridge 

VICKIE DODDS, Urbana 



PHILLIP DOLL, Bushnell 

JONATHAN DOWNEY, Putnam 

DONNA DROSTE, Godfrey 

MICHELLE DROZD, Schaumburg 

MICHAEL DIMOULIN, Hampshire 

TROY DUNCAN, Moweaqua 



CATHERINE ECKENSTEIN, Orland Park 

ROSS ECKSTEIN, Ivesdale 

LINDA EILKS, Oakford 

NELSON ENRIETTO, Auburn 

KEVIN ERTMER, Elizabeth 

KELLI ESSIG, Washington 



MICHAEL EVANS, Canton 

MARY FAIRLAMB, Lake Zurich 

KIRK FARNEY, Forrest 

ALAN FEDRIGON, Mattoon 

CHARLES FEHR, Roanoke 

PAUL FEHR, Roanoke 



WENDY FEIK, LaMoille 

SUE FENSTERMAKER, Sycamore 

JENNIFER FERRARO, Glenview 

RICHARD FIRKING, Kingston 

MICHAEL FITZGERALD, Urbana 

BETTE FLAGLOR, Northbrook 



NANCY FLICK, Jacksonville 

BRIAN FOLKERTS, Rutland 

LISA FOSSE, St. Charles 

CHARLES FRAZZETTO, Chicago 

BRIAN FREED, Lexington 

JAY FRYE, Havana 



ERIC FRYMIRE, Oneida 

SUSAN GALLETTA, Palatine 

VICKY GAWENDA, Lemont 

ANDREA GEBEL, Glenview 

ARLETTE GHARAKHANI, Champaign 

GREGORY GIERTZ, Bellflower 



EDWARD GLASER, Morton 

CYNTHIA GLOCK, Barrington 

ILENE GOLDSTEIN, Glenview 

TODD GOLL, Peoria 

LADEAN GOODWIN, Belleville 

MARK GOODWIN, New Lenox 




.Ok §1' 



!!-6 
Agriculture 




BARRY GOSNELL. Marshall 
NANCY GREEN. Palos Heights 
VICTORIA GUIDO, LaGrange 
JANET GUNNERSON, Benson 
SANDY HAIDLE, Palatine 
HEATHER HALE, Park Ridge 



SCOTT HANNAH, Polo 

JANICE M. HARDER, Chicago 

CYNTHIA HARMON, Bradford 

STEVEN HARRELL, Carthage 

SCOTT HARRIS, Atwood 

LAURA HARTMAN, Arlington Heights 



ANNE HATHAWAY, Galva 
KENNETH HAYSE, Mt. Vernon 
LAWRENCE HEACOCK, Farmer City 
JUDITH HEIDKAMP, Niles 
STEPHEN C. HEINEN, Winnetka 
TERI HEWING, Philo 



AMY HICOK, Peoria 
FREDRICK HOLHUBNER, Urbana 
BARBARA HORSCH, Gibson City 
DWAINE HORSCH, Gibson City 
JANE HOUGH, Mt Morris 
JACQUELINE HUI, Urbana 



JANE HUSA, Jacksonville 
JOY HUTCHCRAFT, Springfield 
BILL JEFFREYS, Chester 
KYLE JENNER, Mascoutah 
DIANN JENNINGS, Camp Point 
MARYANNE JETER, Roselle 



CATHERINE JEWELL, Byron 
ANNE JOHNSON, DeKalb 
GREG JOHNSON, Rantoul 
MARK JOINER, Bridgeview 
WENDY JONAS, Stickney 
TERRY L. JONES, Jacksonville 



MICHAEL JORDAN, Farmersville 
JEFFREY KAPLAN, Urbana 
MICHAEL KELLER, O Fallon 
BILL KILLAM, Jacksonville 
RANDALL KINER, Mt Prospect 
JULIE KING, Victoria 



LISA KIRCHER, Decatur 
LINDA KLOSTERMAN, Champaign 
MARK KOLLMANN, Watseka 
DEBRA KORACH, Morton Grove 
DALE KORICH, Omaha, NE 
DIANE KOZEL, Flossmoor 



MERRI JO KOZUCK, Belvidere 
PAUL KRAMER, Harvey 
ANTHONY KUENSTLER, Olney 
THOMAS KUHN, Grand Ridge 
ROBIN KURLAND, Highland Park 
JOHN LABARGE, Clarendon Hills 



347 

Agriculture 



Know your weed 

Planting chickweed is one requirement 
Rich Burns, a graduate student, fulfills for a 
weed identification class. 




Randy Stukenberg 



LISA LAMAR, Louisville, KY 

KARL LANGHAMMER, Wheaton 

THERESA LAUTEN, Mundelein 

JONI LERNER, Skokie 

PAUL LEVON, Evanston 

JAMES LEWIS, Delavan 



LINDA LOCKE, Western Springs 

JOYCE LONG, Peoria 

NANCY LOVE, Chicago 

LORI LYON, Champaign 

MARY ELLEN MACHALA, Oak Lawn 

PAM MACHE, Lake Forest 



DOUGLAS MAIN, Altona 

BARBARA MAINE, Belleville 

JOANNE MALCOMSON, Mt. Prospect 

HELEN MARTIN, Chicago 

SAMUEL J. MARTIN, Bradley 

THOMAS ALEX MARTIN, Winchester 




348 

Agriculture 




MARJOR1E MAXHEIMER, Lincoln 
CYNTHIA MAYFIELD, Cantrall 
LAURA MAYLE, Mt. Prospect 
TIMOTHY MCCARTHY, Oak Park 
RUSSELL MCCORD, Naperville 
MICHAEL JOHN MCFERON, Pekin 



CECILE MCKEE, Chicago 
KENT MCKEE, Varna 
THOMAS MCKIE, Oneida 
BARRIE MCVEY, Glen Ellyn 
SAM MEERS. Olney 
ROGER MERKEL, Leland 



NANCY METTAM, Danville 
MARK MICHELMAN, Palatine 
LYNN MILES, Gifford 
JULIE MILLER, Seymour 
LAURIE MILLER, Barrington 
LINDA MILLER, Highland Park 



MARK MILLER, Mt Olive 

NANCY MILLER, Skokie 

JOSEPH G. MIOUX, Carlyle 

DEANNE MIRESSE, Glenview 

ANNA M. MOLLENKAMP, Des Plaines 

KIM MORTON, Taylorville 



DAVID MUELLER, Taylor Ridge 
JANINE MUHS, Wheaton 
WILLIAM MURPHY, Calumet City 
R. GORDON MYERS, Griggsville 
GERALD NEHRKORN, Pinckneyvill 
CYNTHIA NIEHAUS, Jacksonville 



LESLIE NOTTINGHAM, Lansing 
AMY ODOM, Libertyville 
LYNNEA OGLESBY, Lake Fork 
JAMES OLIVER, Jacksonville 
MARY OLSON, Park Ridge 
KATHLEEN O'NEILL, Homewood 



DAWN OWENS, Champaign 
MARIANNE PAGLIARI, Park Ridge 
DIANE PANFIL, Chicago 
LAURIE PEARD, Homewood 
BEVERLY PETERSON, Abingdon 
SCOTT PETERSON, Galva 



WALTER POND, Batavia 
TIM POPP, Waterman 
CHERYL PROJAHN, Palatine 
PATRICIA REINERT, Mt Prospect 
CATHY RETZLAFF, Lansing 
MARK REWERTS, Urbana 



LARRY RHODES, Carlinville 
CAROLYN RIZZO, Orland Park 
LAURA ROBERTS, Decatur 
DEBRA ROBERTSON, Quincy 
RICHARD ROBINSON, LaSalle 
TANYA RODDA, Urbana 



349 

Agriculture 



GWEN ROSIN. Deerfield 

PATRICIA ROTHE, Brighton 

REBECCA RUNDQUIST, Butler 

SARA SANNY, Glen Ellyn 

WENDY SCHIFF, Urbana 

KARL SCHLENHOFER, Riverside 



MIKE SCHMEBAUCH, Lindenhurst 

JOSEPH SCHMIEDEL, Cedar Rapids, IA 

JULIET SCHWALBACH, Lincoln 

JILL SCRIMAGER, Mattoon 

SHERRI SELIGA, Hinsdale 

JAMES L. SELK, Watseka 



JAN SEMTNER, Chicago 

LEORA SHIELDS, Foosland 

TRACEY SHULL, Effingham 

MARLA SIEGEL, Skokie 

JANICE SIERZEGA, Niles 

SUE SISLOW, Prairie View 



GARY SMITH, Tokyo, Japan 

MARTHA E. SMITH, Ursa 

MAUREEN SPECK, Edwards 

MARVIN SPRAGUE, Hull 

NANCY STEARNS, Arlington Heights 
DEBORAH STEENROD, Peoria 



KEVIN STOLL, Chestnut 

SHERYL STRATER, Mattoon 

JOHN SUTTON, Gridley 

JOANIE SWANK, Cary 

BRADLEY SWANLUND, La Moille 

TRACEY SWIDEREK, LaGrange 



GERARD SWIENTON, Chicago 

GLENN SZMURLO, Chicago 

BRIAN THOMPSON, Atlanta 

GLENN TOMASZEWSKI, Peru 

TODD TRAINA, Chicago 

CONSTANCE TUCCI, Chicago 



DIANE TVETER, Barr 

PAUL VAN RADEN, Forreston 

JAMES VAN VOOREN, Atkinson 

LAURIE B. VIAL, Blackstone 

CHARLES VOIGT, Gurnee 

KAREN VYNEMAN, Sheffield 



CATHY WALKER, Watseka 

PATRICIA WALSH, Tinley Park 

BARBARA WEAS. Griggsville 

MICHELLE WEATHERSBY, Chicago 

ELMA WEE SIT, Alsip 

BRAYON WEISER, Oak Park 



TAMMY WELLS, Danville 

ROY WENDTE, Altamont 

JACQUELINE WERNICK, DeKalb 

DONNA WEST, Omaha 

DONNA WILLIAMS, Hinsdale 

SCOTT WILLIAMSON, St Joseph 




350 

Agriculture 




The grass 
is always greener 

Bluegrass is among the experimental plants 
grown in the agriculture greenhouses near 
Pennsylvania Avenue. 




Randy Stukenberg 





JAMES WILLRETT, Malta 
LUANN WINGERT, Elk Grove Village 
LOUISE WOLTERING, Breese 
BRIAN WOOD, Tower Hill 
SUSAN A. WOODBURN, Pontiac 
VICTORIA L. WOOLARD, Beecher 



JANA YOCOM, Jerseyville 
GAIL YOUNG, Erie 
LORI YOUNG, Buckley 
KATHLEEN ZEIGLER, Sterling 
GEORGE ZWILLING, Sumner 



351 

Agriculture 




Brian Coleman 







LAURA ADAMS, Sandwich 
JULIA ALLEN, Shelbyville 
STEPHANIE BENDER, Urbana 
JAN BLITT, Skokie 
RICHARD BODMER, Downers Grove 
BETH BORUSZAK, Highland Park 



LISA BRADDOCK, Savoy 
JEFF BRADEMAS, Champaign 
JANET BRATSCHUN, Villa Park 
JANA BROWN, Robinson 
KIPLEY BRUKETA, Barrington 
ROBERT CAGLE, Beardstown 



DAWN CARLSON, Lansing 

STEVE COATES, Cary 

DIANE D1NICOLA, Dolton 

JAN DROVER, Batavia 

KAREN DUCKWORTH, Champaign 

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT, Glencoe 



STEVEN ELSNER, Park Ridge 
JAMES ENSIGN, Champaign 
RACARA FRANKLIN, Maywood 
LORI GARRETT, Urbana 
KATHY GUINAN, Petersburg 
LESLIE HARRISON, Urbana 



PHOEBE HARTZELL, Carthage 

LYNN HEUGEL, Evansville, IN 

MARK HURWITZ, Wheeling 

ELIZABETH JACOBUCCI, Chicago Heights 

TODD JOHNSON, Chatham 

DENISE JONES, Moweaqua 



CARLA KARRAKER, Normal 
ANDY KLAPPERICH, Glendale, WI 
DEEANN KNOLLENBERG, Lincoln 
ANTHONY KRAINIK, Des Plaines 
LAURA LAMAR, Wheaton 
KATHY LAMB, Urbana 



BARBARA LEJA, Bolingbrook 
LONNY LEMON, Aledo 
CAROLYN LEMSKY, Glenview 
ELLEN LEVY, Skokie 
LIBBY LITTLE, Bloomington 
KELLY LONG, Eldorado 



MICHELLE MAHONEY, Champaign 
CRAIG S. MANKOWSKI, Cicero 
TERESA MCDONALD, Palatine 
PATRICK MCMULLAN, Cahokia 
MAUREEN MEMLER, Downers Grove 
FRANCES MILES, Franklin Park 



AMY MILLER, Evanston 

PATRICIA MORENCY, West Dundee 

TRUDY MORRITZ, Northbrook 

JANET MUTTER, Crete 

JILL NACHBAR, Highland Park 

MICHAEL NAPOLEON, Chicago 



353 

Applied Life Studies 



All wrapped up 

Doug Weisz practices first aide on Dave 
Walner as he applies an elastic bandage to 
prevent further injury to Dave's ankle. 




354 

Applied Life Studies 




Brian Coleman 




PATRICIA NASH, Barrington 
SUSAN OBRIEN, Aurora 
KAREN OCONNELL, Chicago 



MARGARET OCONNELL, Chicago 
AUDREY M. PALEKAS, Worth 
DARRYL PENDELTON, Chicago 



JENNIFER ROBERTS, Springfield 
KATHERINE SCHAUBLE, Woodstock 
LINDA SCHMIDT, Peotone 



MICHAEL SHERIDAN, Racine, WI 
MARY SKUDLAREK, South Bend, IN 
CAROL SONOC, Sterling 



LAUREN SPEAR, Chicago 
DOROTHY SPENCE, Decatur 
ROBERT SPIELER, Highland Park 



SHEILA SWANN, Chicago 
JANINE TOMAN, Western Springs 
MALERA, TRAYLOR, Chicago 



KARIN USEDOM, Rockford 
SANDRA VOORHEES, Hinsdale 
KIRBY WIESE, Highland 



PHILLIP CHARLES ZINNI, Addison 

ANNE ZISHOLTZ, Cedarhurst, NY 



355 

Applied Life Studies 




2 
a 

o 

o 


21 



2! 
d 

w 

X 

o 

o 
as 

o 

3 




f|||pi 

1970 : 

A.E.A. 




Sharon Basso 




MICHAEL ABLES, Glendale Heights 
MICHAEL ABRAHAMSON, Willowbrook 
JAY ABRAMS, Morton Grove 
KEITH ABRAMS, Morton Grove 
JULIE ACHLER, Hazel Crest 
TINA ACHTIEN, Elmhurst 



CATHY ADAMS, Manchester, MO 
DAN ADAMS, Aurora 
GERALD AHERN, Flossmoor 
JAMES AHERN, Flossmoor 
ROBERT ALDENDIFER, Lincoln 
MORRIS ALLEN, JR., Chicago 



BRUCE ANDERSON, Chicago 
MICHAEL ANDERSON, Chicago 
JANEEN ANIOL, Palatine 
JULIE APPLEGATE, Decatur 
MICHAEL ARNDT, Urbana 
KIMBERLY ASSELMEIER, Valmeyer 



NANCY BACHERT, Montgomery 
RONALD BACKS, Granite City 
MARTHA BAITS, Rockford 
DANA BALSAMELLO, Westville 
ANN BANTING, Libertyville 
CHARLES BARBER, Pittsfield 



CHARLES R. BARNETT III, Springfield 
MARY BARRETT, Arlington Heights 
ROBERT J. BATTAGLIA. Evergreen Park 
BARBARA A. BAUM, Pittsburgh, PA 
ANDREA BEAUVAIS, Libertyville 
DEBORAH BECKER, Dieterich 



WARREN BEEBE, Lake Bluff 
MARTIN BEHN, Highland Park 
KARIN BELL, Chicago 
ANDREA BENJAMIN, Highland Park 
CURTIS BENNETT, Quincy 
DONNA A. BENNETT, Danville 



ERIC BENNETT, Markham 

MERIE BERNARDI, Barrington 

CHRISTINE BESEMAN, Lockport 

MARGARET C. BESSETTE, Antioch 

DANIEL BEST, Chatham 

MATTHEW R. BETTENHAUSEN, Tinley Park 



RICHARD C. BIGELOW, Batavia 

LAUREN BISZEWSKI, Chicago 

KURT BITTNER, Bloomington 

JILL BIZAR, Morton Grove 

JONATHAN BOGUE, Crete 

KATHRYN A. BORNHOLT, Carol Stream 



DIANE BOUNDY. Melvin 
PHILLIP A. BOUNSALL, Champaign 
ROSE BRADFORD, Chicago 
JOHN BRANDT, Clifton 
MARK BRAUER, Altamont 
CARL BRIDGES, Oak Brook 



357 

Commerce and Business Administration 



BRIAN J. BRILLE, Riverside 

DAVID BROWN, Waukegan 

KATHY BROWN, Wheaton 

KATHY BROZEK, Chicago 

HAROLD BRUNO III, Chevy Chase, MD 

MARIO BRUNO, Oak Lawn 



MICHELLE BRUSSEAU, Arlington Heights 

MARK BRUTZKUS, Skokie 

SUSAN BUDNEY, Darien 

HETTIE BUECHNER, Wheaton 

MARIAN BURG, Oak Brook 

VICKI BURKLACH, Glenview 



SANDRA BUSSEY, Downers Grove 
PAMELA BUSWELL, Watseka 
DEANNA BUTLER, Springfield 
DEBRA BUTLER, Harrisburg 
MARIANNE BUTZEK, Hillside 
PAMELA BYRNE, Northbrook 



LAURA CADAGIN, Springfield 

THOMAS CAMELI, Homewood' 

KRIS CAMPBELL, Peoria 

STEPHEN R. CAPPELLIN, Springfield 

KATHLEEN M. CARENS, Woodridge 

CHARLES CAREY, Elmhurst 



BRENDA J. CARLTON, Urbana 

GEORGE CARP, Westville 

WENDY CARSON, Peoria 

HEATHER CARTWRIGHT, DeKalb 

THERESE CASEY, Springfield 

COLLEEN CASSERLY, Champaign 



ANN CHAMPION, Moline 

ANNA CHENG, Leawood, KS 

ALBERT CHIAPPETTA, Calumet City 

RICK CHIN, Elgin 

CATHERINE CHRISTIE, Champaign 

CRAIG CHURCH, Palatine 



THOMAS CLAEYS, Arlington Heights 

THOMAS CLARK, Chicago 

TROY CLARK, Morton 

THOMAS COADY, Greendale, WI 

CURTIS A. COFFER, Bloomington 

JANET COHEN, Skokie 



MARCIE COHEN, Deerfield 

TOBE MICHAEL COHEN, Skokie 

PATRICIA COLLINS, Elmwood Park 

SUSAN CONROY, Glenwood 

RANDY CONTE, Hickory Hills 

CATHY J. COOPER, Joliet 



JUDY COOPER, Skokie 

LISA COOPER, Glencoe 

CAROLYN COSENTINO, Western Springs 

MICHAEL COTTRELL, Chicago 

VALENTINA CRABTREE, Wilmette 

DONNA CRANE, Glencoe 




358 

Commerce and Business Administration. 







KATHRYN CRAVER, Homer 
PAMELA CREAGH, Winnetka 
LAURA CROUSE. Darien 
DOROTHY CULHANE, Oak Park 
KATHERINE CUNDIFF, Herrin 
NANCY CUNNINGHAM, LaGrange 



JAMES CUSTER, Peoria 
KRISTINA CZART, Bolingbrook 
JEANINE CZERNIAK, Chicago 
VICKIE DALSANTO, Dolton 
THOMAS DAMICO, St. Charles 
MORRIS DANIELSON, Des Plaines 



RODNEY DAVIS, Strawn 
DANIEL A. DEBOER, Hinsdale 
JAMES DEBRUZZI, Des Plaines 
NANCY DECHERT, Morton Grove 
MARY DEHOFF, Chicago 
CHARLES DEMURO, Elmhurst 



H. BRAD DENNISON, Peoria 
MARIE DEVEREUX, Winfield 
KATHLEEN A. DIGIULIO, Joliet 
ISA MARIE DOHSE, Elmhurst 
DENISE DOMAS, Arlington Heights 
SHEILA DONALDSON, Peoria 



MEG DONATELLI, Hinsdale 
PHILLIP DONENBERG.Skokie 
RAYMOND DONOVAN, Chicago 
LALEH DOORANDISH, Champaign 
VASANTA DOSS, Chicago 
MARK DOTY, Arlington, TX 



CRAIG DRABLOS, Champaign 
TIMOTHY G. DRAZBA, Kildeer 
RICHARD DRENNAN, Chicago 
DANIEL DREW, Peoria 

MARK EAST, Hoffman Estates 
WALT EBNER, Morton Grove 



NANCY ECKERT, Eureka 
CHARLES EDELSTEIN, Lansing 
BERNIE EGAN, Midlothian 
EDWIN EHRGOTT, Peoria 
SHARON ELLIOT, Rockford 
RICHARD ELLIS, Princeton 



KIMBERLY K. ENDERS, Elmhurst 
LAWRENCE EPPLEY, Dundee 
ALLAN EPSTEIN, Creve Coeur, MO 
BRUCE EVERAKES, Wilmette 
TERRI FAVELL, Elmhurst 
RANDI FEDER, Deerfield 



JAMES FERGUSON, Champaign 
MAURY L. FERTIG, Waukegan 
LINDA FESS, Champaign 
VIRGINIA FIALKOWSKI, Chicago 
WALKER FILBERT, Geneva 
ROBERT FILIPPI, Chicago Heights 



359 

Commerce and Business Administration. 



JAY FINE, Niles 

LEWIS FINKELSTEIN, Wakefield, MA 

LARRY FINNEY, Bismarck 

KATHY FISCHER, Glen Ellyn 

DIANA FISH, Mascoutah 

DENNIS FLYNN, Munster, IN 



KATHERINE FLYNN, Munster, IN 

WILLIAM FORSTER, Arlington Heights 

CYNTHIA FRASZ, Champaign 

TERRI FRIEDMAN, Lincolnwood 

ANDREW FURST, Kenilworth 

GARY FUSZ, Schiller Park 



KIMBERLY GACKI, Morton Grove 

JACKIE GAINES, Champaign 

JOHN GALLAGHER, Evanston 

PAMELA GANS, Joliet 

LAURA GARDNER, Kempton 

GAIL GAREISS, Oak Lawn 



GINA GARGANO, North Riverside 

DAVID GARNER, Vernon Hills 

KARA GARNER, Sesser 

GARY GASBARRA, Frankfort 

HENRY W. GAUWITZ, JR., Lacon 

BYRON P. GEANNOPOULOS, Northbrook 



JOHN GEARY, Woodridge 

MICHAEL GEROUL1S, Lombard 

SHARI GINDIN, Morton Grove 

CHUCK GINSBERG, Lincolnwood 

STEWART GLASS, Highland Park 

WILLIAM J. GLASS, Geneseo 



PAUL MATTHEW GLAVIN, Rockford 

RAMON GLINER, Decatur 

MARK GLUSKIN, Homewood 

STEVEN GNUSE, Altamont 

MARIANNE GOETZ, Wheaton 

DEBRA GOLDBERG, St. Louis, MO 



STEVEN GOLDBERG, Northbrook 

RICHARD GOLDENSON, Glenview 

MICHAEL GOLDMAN, Morton Grove 

MARY FRANCES GOODMAN, 

Barrington Hills 

BARBARA GORENZ, Peoria 

STEVEN GOTHELF, Arlington Heights 



MICHAEL GOULD, Freeport 

JOAN GRIFFIN, Oak Forest 

HOWARD GRILL, Chicago 

IRL GRODSKY, Olivette, MO 

MARILYN GRONER, Lincolnwood 

SUE GUENTHER, Palatine 



DAVID GUGGENHEIM, Lincolnwood 

HILARY GUTHMAN, Champaign 

JAMES HAGEL, Ocean Springs, MS 

LYNN HAGMAN, Rockford 

CHRISTIAN HALLEN, Essex Fells, NJ 

JAMES HALLIDAY, Flossmoor 




360 

Commerce and Business Administration 



The business 
of studying 

Business students find the Commerce Li- 
brary, which carries many resourceful per- 
iodicals, to be well-suited to their needs. 





BRADLEY HALVERSON, Urbana 
GREGORY HAMILTON, Tinley Park 
ANNE HARDING, Rockford 
STEPHEN HARDY, Belleville 
DIANE HART, Skokie 
JANICE HARTMAN, Normal 



GREGG HARWOOD, Springfield 
LAURA HASS, Chicago 
SETH HEMMING, Geneva 
BRUCE HEUTON, Watseka 
PATRICK HICKEY, Villa Park 
JEFF HICKS, Chicago 



JEAN HILDRETH, Mattoon 
DAVID A. HIRSCH, Barrington 
MARIA HOEKSTRA, Clarendon Hill 
JUNE HOLLOWAY, Mt Prospect 
JAMES HOOD, Gibson City 
WILLIAM N. HOWARD, Chicago 



361 

Commerce and Business Administration 



CATHY HUNSAKER, El Paso 

JOHN HURD, Wheaton 

JOANNA HUZIEJ, Chicago 

DEBRA K. HYDE, Champaign 

YONG IM, Montgomery 

JANIS INMAN, Jonesboro 



LINDA IPPOLITO, Glenwood 

VINCENT IUORIO, Palatine 

MARY IVORY, Arlington Heights 

MARY JACHIMIEC, Orland Park 

JILL JACKSON, Naperville 

BETSY JAEGER, Palatine 



LYNN M. JANEWAY, Champaign 

ALICIA JILEK, Western Springs 

CAROL JOHNSON, Arlington Heights 

GARY JOHNSON, Rockford 

GREGG JOHNSON, Western Springs 

RHONDA JOHNSON, Sycamore 



ROBERT JOHNSON, Barrington 

SEAN JOYCE, Lincolnshire 

MARILYN KALFEN, Lincolnwood 

PETE KAMIN, Hinsdale 

PETER KAMINSKY, Flossmoor 

JEFF KANE, Springfield, VA 



ELAINE KARACIC, Park Ridge 
BERNICE KARALIS, Northlake 
SHEILA KARNEY, Crystal Lake 
GEORGE KAWASAKI. Chicago 
MIKE KELCH, Clifton 
PATRICK KENNEDY, Deerfield 



SUSAN KENNEDY, Glencoe 

MARY PAT KENNEY, Springfield 

JOHN KENT, Naperville 

MICHAEL KENT, Naperville 

JANET KIEFNER. Joliet 

STEPHANIE KIMBLE, Chicago 



NANCY KINDRED, Morton 

RICHARD KING, Savoy 

KEVIN KINSELLA, Elk Grove Village 

CHARLES KIRK, Villa Park 

THOMAS KISSINGER, Rockford 

BETH KLA WITTER, Arlington Heights 



LAURA KLEBAU, Oak Forest 

MARY KLEES, Chicago 

JULIE KNUDSON, Pontiac 

JAMES KOENIG, Chatham 

EVA KONDRACKI, Peotone 

NORMA KONO, Chicago 



MICHAEL KONSTANT, Oaklawn 

STEVE KOOMAR, Peotone 

STEPHAN KOPECH, Skokie 

JULIE KOREN, Des Plaines 

LISA KORYTA, Palatine 

JOY KOVACIC, Lockport 




362 

Commerce and Business Administration 




JEFF KOVARIK, Hinsdale 
KAREN KRASOWSKY, Morton Grove 
DONALD L. KRAUSE, Skokie 
LORRAINE KUO, Champaign 
PAUL LADWIG, Western Springs 
JEAN LAKE, Clarendon Hills 



MICHAEL LANGAN. Champaign 
SUSAN LANGFIELD, Schaumberg 
AMY LAUDER, Downers Grove 
EILEEN LAWLER, Midlothian 
PAUL LAWRENCE, Bloomington 
JOSEPH LEE, Downers Grove 



KYONG M. LEE, Mt. Prospect 
ROBIN LEE, Glen Ellyn 
SUNNY LEE, Chicago 
YVETTE LEFLORE, Chicago 
NANCY LENCIONI, Wheaton 
MATTHEW LERNOR, Rockford 



ALAN LEV, Skokie 
DAVID LEVENSTAM, Chicago 
SHARON LEVINE, Northbrook 
GAYLE LIEBMAN, Chicago 
DORIS LINCOLN, Barrington 
KRISTIN LINDEMEIER, Decatur 



DOUGLAS LINDSAY, Rockford 
SUZANNE LIPPE, Lincolnwood 
MORIAG LISK, Glenview 
ROLAND LIWAG, Palatine 
STEVE LOAR, Peoria 
JOHN LOCALLO, Chicago 



ROGER LOOMIS, Kewanee 
DEBBIE LOVERDE, Palatine 
JOHN LUBECKER, Arlington Heights 
PAUL LUNDSTEDT, Arlington Heights 
ROGER LUNDSTROM, Glen Ellyn 
MICHAEL LUTHY, Peoria 



DANIEL J. LYMAN, Lincolnwood 
DON LYON, Arlington Heights 
SHEILA LYONS, LaSalle 
MELINDA MACGREGOR, Wilmette 
FRANKLYN MAGIDSON, Northbrook 
TERESA MAHACHEK, Lake Zurich 



LINDA MARESH, Darien 
BRIAN MARLIER, Moline 
DALE MARQUART, Effingham 
DEBORAH MARTINEK, Elmhurst 
MARCY MASLOV, Morton Grove 
LAUREEN MATHEWS, Winona Lake, IN 



DEAN MATT, Downers Grove 
RICH MATURO, Franklin Park 
PATRICIA MAUER, Libertyville 
KENNETH MAYBER, Morton Grove 
CRYSTELLE MAYEDA, Sycamore 
MARGARET MAYER, Evanston 



363 

Commerce and Business Administration 



Job jitters 



Commerce students can sign up for on- 
campus job interviews which give them 
practice interviewing and sometimes a start 
in their career. This student, waiting out- 
side a room in the Mini Union, looks over 
some information before going in to meet 
the interviewer. 




364 

Commerce and Business Administration 




LAURIE MAYRENT, Lincolnwood 
STEPHEN MCCLARY, Clarendon Hills 
CAROL MCCLURG, Evanston 



PAUL MCENTIRE, Streamwood 
DEBORAH MCKENZIE, Chicago 
ROBERT H. MCKIRGAN, McNabb 



SUSAN MCLAIN, Downers Grove 
JULIE MCLEOD, Assumption 
TERRY MCMAHON, Park Ridge 



SUSAN MCPHERSON, St. Charles 

MARIE MCWARD, Owaneco 

DAVID MECKLENBURGER, Highland Park 



PAMELA MECKLEY, Naperville 
ROBERT MENCKE, Barrington 
DWAYNE M. MENSER, Bradley 



DAVID MEYERS, Westchester 
AMY MILLER, Arlington Heights 
MICHAEL MINER, Northbrook 



GEORGE MOCOGNI, Highland Park 
STACEY MODLIN, Moline 
JEFF MOORE, Bridgeport 



JAMES MORETTINI, Springfield 
MARILYN MORGAN, Hinsdale 
PETER ALAN MORI, Dolton 



JAMES P. MORLEY, Arlington Heights 
LISA R. MORRIS, Mattoon 
KATHLEEN MOTLEY, Sherman 



365 

Commerce and Business Administration 



THOMAS MOWERY, Chicago 

ERNEST MUELLER, Aurora 

MAUREEN MUKAI, Des Plaines 

MIKE MURPHY, Oak Lawn 

SCOTT MURRAY, Melrose Park 

JERRY MURRIN, Hinsdale 



GLENN NAGEL, Oak Lawn 

SUSAN NEUNABER, Bethalto 

MICHAEL K. NICHOLS, Stickney 

RHONDA NIEMIEC, Elmwood Park 

STEVEN OBENDORF, Polo 

GREGORY O'BERRY, Canton, MI 



RICHARD O'CONNOR, Kankakee 

TIMOTHY O'DONNELL, Chicago 

JEAN OLIVERO, Dalzell 

NANCY E. OLSON, Lombard 

LYNDA OOSTERBAAN, Homewood 

GAYLE ORTGIESEN, Dixon 



CONSTANCE OSBORNE, Park Forest 

STEVEN OWENS, Lombard 

ROBIN PALENSKE, Woodstock 

ALAN PALMER, Chicago 

MICHAEL PALMISANO, Franklin Park 

DENNIS PANG, Chicago 



KATHLEEN PANNIER, Evanston 

PEGGY PARMLEY, River Forest 

KAREN PAUL, Downers Grove 

CRAIG PAULL, Skokie 

ESTHER PE, Danville 

POLLY PEABODY, Champaign 



MARK PEARSON, St. Charles 

JEFF PENN, Palatine 

LISA PENNEY, Flossmoor 

KATHLEEN PERKINSON, Thawville 

DAN PERNA, Batavia 

ELLEN C. PERRY, Wilmette 



RENEE PESSETTI, Franklin Park 

JOHN PETERS, Park Ridge 

DOUGLAS PETERSON, Des Plaines 

KURT PETONKE, Crawfordsville, IN 

PETER PETRY, Champaign 

DIANE PIEROTH, Oak Lawn 



MICHAEL PILLATSCH, Oswego 

JAN PIPENHAGEN, Roselle 

JAMES PIZZO, Naperville 

ELISSA POLAN, Skokie 

JAMES POLLAK, Highland Park 

CINDY POLLARD, Northbrook 



RUSSELL POMERANTZ, Glenview 

THOMAS PONSONBY, Urbana 

GAIL PORTUGAL, Northbrook 

DIANE POSPISL, Park Ridge 

THOMAS PRESPERIN, Mt. Prospect 

MONYCA PRICE, Skokie 




366 

Commerce and Business Administration 




ALLEN PRIEST, Mt. Carmel 

JAMES PUCIN, Highland Park 

CHARLES PULL1CH, Villa Park 

ANGELA PUN, Chicago 

MARK PUTTERMAN, Elk Grove Village 

EILEEN RAJALA, Waukegan 



STEVE RANDELL, Urbana 
DAVID RAPHAEL, Skokie 
DEBORAH REESE, Deerfield 
SUSAN REGAL, Highland Park 
CHARLES O. REILLY, JR., Calumet City 
SAM REINKENSMEYER, Hoyleton 



GARY RIEDERMAN, Skokie 
ANN ROBINSON, Hoopeston 
LYNNETTE ROBINSON, Annawan 
SUSAN RODERICK, Springfield 
ANNE M. RODINO, Northbrook 
PATRICK ROESER, Saginaw, MI 



WILLIAM ROGERS, Braidwood 

ED ROLAND, Springfield 

WILLIAM R. ROLANDER, Lake Forest 

DEBRA ROMAN, Brookfield 

JANET ROPER, Litchfield 

TOM ROSE, Arlington Heights 



CAROL RUDA, Chicago 

MARK RUSTEMEYER, Arlington Heights 

MORRIS B. SACHS III, Flossmoor 

LILIBETH SADLER, East Brunswick, NJ 

BRAD SASSATELLI, Taylorville 

KIM SAUNDERS, Summit 



JOHN SAVAGE, Rochester, MN 
SUSAN SAVIO, Glenview 
ANNE SCANLAN, Champaign 
KIM SCHIERMEYER, Orion 
BRIAN T. SCHINDERLE, Plainfield 
JANICE SCHNEIDER, Skokie 



DAVID SCHOEMAKER, Colona 
JOHN SCHOONE, Springfield 
JEFFREY SCHROEDER, Peoria 
LAWRENCE SCHUBERT, Glenview 
SANDRA SCHWABE, Lake Zurich 
STEPHANIE SCHWIETERT, Mt. Prospect 



GREGORY SELLS, Arlington Heights 
MICHAEL J. SEROTA, Skokie 
JOHN SEVERSON, Hoffman Estates 
RICHARD SHAFER, Charleston 
SHERRY SHERMAN, Yates City 
MARY SHUMACHER, Edwardsville 



ANNE SIEMER, Rockford 
BETH SILVER, Des Plaines 
DEBRA SILVERMAN, Glencoe 
HELENE SILVERMAN, Skokie 
JAN SIMUNDZA, Clarendon Hills 
JUDY SKEEHAN, Greenwich, CT 



367 

Commerce and Business Administration 



CHERYL SKOOG, Hinsdale 

JEFF SLEPIAN, Peoria 

AARON SLOVIN, Skokie 

KIM SMALL, Waukegan 

ALLISON A. SMITH, Godfrey 

LEE SMOLEN, Niles 



RICHARD SNYDER, Champaign 

EILEEN SOHN, Skokie 

SCOTT SOLOMON, Peoria 

MARIA SOWARDS, Champaign 

CRANSTON SPARKS, Chicago 

JEAN SPEER, Mt. Prospect 



SARAH SPRING, Glencoe 

JEFFREY SPUNGEN, Winnetka 

CHERYL STAHL, Mt. Pulaski 

PATRICIA STANTON, Chicago 

PATRICK STAUDT, Buffalo Grove 

MARK STECHER, Niles 



KAREN STEIGER, Lincoln 

TERRY STEVENSON, Catlin 

J. D. STEWART, Petersburg 

SUZANNE STEWART, Libertyville 

JACQUELINE STIBICH, Chicago 

CURTIS STOELTING, Marshall 



STEPHANIE STORKEL, Oak Lawn 

STEVEN M. STRUTTMANN, Decatur 

MARY SULLIVAN, Glen Ellyn 

CLAY SUMMERS, New Albany, IN 

JAMES W. SUNDLING, Riverdale 

CHARLES ALLAN SWARINGEN, 

Elizabeth City, NC 



LINDA TALIANI, Oak Brook 

BARBARA TAUBE, Chicago 

MARK TAVILL, Schaumburg 

MICHAEL TELFORD, Woodridge 

BARB TESTA, Willowbrook 

RON THALHEIMER, Evanston 



SANDY THOMPSON, Urbana 

THERESA THOMPSON, Western Springs 

VINCENT THOMPSON, Downers Grove 

MARIA TINAGLIA, Palos Park 

VANESSA T1NCH, Chicago 

SUSAN TJARKSEN, North Muskegon, MI 



ANN TOBIN, Oak Lawn 

DALE TODD, Morton Grove 

THERESE TRAUT, Highland Park 

JOHN TRENTACOSTE, Franklin Park 

WILLIAM TRIANTAFEL, Chicago 

LINDA TRIEFENBACH, Crystal Lake 



TODRA TRIER, Oak Brook 

SCOTT TRIPPEL, Oak Forest 

JAMES TRIPPON, Oswego 

SHARON TROCKE, Palatine 

LAURA TURK, Park Ridge 

JOHN VAN PROYEN, South Holland 





a* 




368 

Commerce and Business Administration 




NANCY VENDRZYK, Streator 
KIM VENETOS, Glenview 
JOHN VERLAUTZ, Pontiac 
WILLIAM VESPA, Springfield 
DANIEL VISHNY, Lincolnwood 
SANDRA VITALE, Broadview 



GEORGIA VLAMIS, Palos Hills 
DALE VLASTNIK, Peru 
DANIEL VOELKER, Peoria 
CHARLES VOJTA, Mt. Prospect 
DEBRA WALKER, Carthage 
THOMAS WALL, Crystal Lake 



JAMES WALSH, Hinsdale 
SUZY WALSH, Downers Grove 
DAVE WARRINGTON, Hampshire 
LARRY WARSHAW, Wilmette 
MICHAEL WEBSTER, Joliet 
SCOTT WEINGART, Wilmette 



DAN WEINSTEIN, Champaign 
DAVID WEINSTEIN, Skokie 
MARK WEINSTEIN, Skokie 
BONNIE WEIS, Morton Grove 
CYNTHIA WELSH, Barrington 
THOMAS WENDT, Northbrook 



MITCHELL WENGER, Morris 
NANCY WENZEL, Westchester 
ROBERT WERNER, Downers Grove 
JULIANNE WICKERT, Peoria 
LYNN WIEHE, Centralia 
MARY WILHELM, Trenton 



NATALIE WILK, Hazel Crest 
WENDY WILKINSON, Evanston 
KATHLEEN WILLES, Mt Prospect 
PAUL WILSON, Chicago 
DENISE WIMBERLEY, Rantoul 
SUZANNE WINGERDEN, Naperville 



DEBBIE WISEMAN, Chicago 
LISA WISNIEWSKI, Chicago 
GREG WITT, Arlington Heights 
ANTHONY WOJTOWICZ, Nashville 
MARGARET WOLBER, Champaign 
LARRY WOLFSON, Highland Park 



NANCY WOO, Chicago 
ANGELA WOOLFOLK, Chicago 
BETH WRIGHT, Mattoon 
LORENE WU, Oak Brook 
JANICE YAFFE, Indianapolis, IN 
NICHOLAS ZAMBOLE, Palatine 



JILL ZATLOUKAL, Brookfield 
MARY JO ZWICKERT, McMurray, PA 



369 

Commerce and Business Administration 




mmun ications 




NANCY ADAMS, Macomb 
CYNTHIA ATOJI, Downers Grove 
SUSAN ATWOOD, Lindenhurst 
CATHY BANTZ, Fithian 
TERRI BENVENISTE, Highland Park 
LEIGH B1CKELHAUPT, Peoria 



ROBERT BLANCHARD, Belleville 
BELINDA BONSALL, Milan 
MARY ANN BRANDY, Danville 
MARLA BRODERSON, Louisville, KY 
COREY BROST, Springfield 
CHERYL BYERS, Rochester 



CINDY CARAVELLO, Rolling Meadows 
WILLIAM CIPOLLA, Rochelle 
DONNA CRANE, Dolton 
LINDA CURRY, Chicago 
JAMES DALEO, Lake Zurich 
NANCY DAUM, Peotone 



LINDA DEYOUNG, Lockport 
TIMOTHY DUFFIN, Evergreen Park 
DEBORAH ELLIOT, Rockford 
LISA FEHER, Skokie 
ELIZABETH FIDEN, Champaign 
RUTH FINKEL, Evanston 



SUSAN FISHER, Skokie 
MELISSA FRIEDMAN, Lincolnshire 
JACQUELINE GELB, Houston, TX 
JONATHAN D. GILPIN, Springfield 
PAMELA GINSBURGH, Rockford 
CHRIS GONDA, Urbana 



THERESA GRIMALDI, Elmhurst 
ANA GURDIAN, Peoria 
REBECCA HAEFNER, Bloomingdale 
SHEILA HANDLER, Skokie 
THOMAS HASSE, Sauk Village 
SANDRA HAWORTH, Chicago 



MICHELLE HAYSE, Chicago Heights 
TIM HEALY, Champaign 
AUDREY HOWARD, Wauconda 
JAMES HURD, Homewood 
KAREN HURST, Peoria 
SHARON JACOBS, Morton Grove 



STEWART JACOBSON, Woodridge 
LORI JAFFE, Olympia Fields 
BRENDA JOHNSON, Westmont 
CHRISTINE JONES, Chicago 
NEIL KALIN, Wilmette, 
DAVID KAPLAN, Springfield 



DEBRA KAPLAN, Northbrook 
DIANE KASTIEL, Hoffman Estates 
CATHY KERN, Hampshire 
KAREN KLAGES, Park Ridge 
PAMELA KRACHMALNICK, 
Creve Coeur, MO 
HEIDI KRAEMER, Mt Prospect 



371 

Communications 



KATHERINE KUCABA, Downers Grove 

ROBERT KUMAKI, Dolton 

LAURA LARRABEE, Mattoon 

LAURA LARSON, Riverside 

JOHN P. LAURENCE, Danville 

TIMOTHY LEAHY, Hinsdale 



DONNA LIEBMAN, Northbrook 

CELESTE LILLY, Itasca 

ANDREA LISS, Chicago 

CAROLE LOUIE, Chicago 

MARK LUDWIG, Arlington Heights 

JUDE MAGER, Downers Grove 



NANCY MCCORMICK, Crystal Lake 

LAURY MCDOWELL, Oak Brook 

KIMBERLY MCMILLAN, Arlington Heights 

DEAN MEADOR, Champaign 

STEPHANIE MEYER, Beardstown 

ANDRE MITCHELL, Glenview 



MINDY MOLINE, Wilmette 

ARTHUR MORA, Chicago 

ROBIN MOSIOR, Libertyville 

DAVID NADIG, Glenview 

DONALD NELSON, Morton Grove 

JAMES L. NOVY, Lombard 



ABIGAIL OBENCHAIN, Woodstock 
BETSY OBERLE, Washington 
DEAN OLSEN, Chalmette, LA 



SCOTT OPPENHEIMER, Flossmoor 

KAREN PADGITT, Arlington Heights 

MARY SUE PENN, Des Plaines 



JENNIFER RACKLEY, Arlington Heights 

JOHN RAUSCH, Hoffman Estates 

JEAN RICHARDS, Springfield 



WILLIAM RILEY, Paxton 

KAREN ROJC, Glen Ellyn 

VIVIAN ROSS, Chicago 



JULIE SALEFSKI, Springfield 

CHRIS SCHAUS, Burr Ridge 

RHONDA SCHICKEDANZ, Belleville 




372 

Communications 




SHARI SCHLACHTER, Des Plaines 
BERYL SCHNIEROW, Highland Park 
DEANNA SCHUB, Urbana 
ALISON SCHONTZ, Springfield 
JOHN M. SIMPSON, Urbana 
BETH SMALL, Wilmette 



BETSY SOLOCHEK, Niles 
BETH STEFFEN, Park Ridge 
RONA STEINHANDLER, Niles 
CHRISTINA STEPHAN. Elk Grove Village 
DEBORAH STEPHENS, Macomb 
SUZANNE STOECKER, East Peoria 



CYNTHIA SWIFT, Decatur 
SHEREE TAYLOR, Carbondale 
CHERYL TERHORST, Buffalo Grove 
LAURA VENEGONI, Christopher 
LISA WELLS, Kankakee 
JANET WELSH, Oblong 



GENEACE WILLIAMS, Joliet 
MARIBETH WILLS, Westmont 
JANICE WINEK, Sheffield 
JULIE WURTH, Fairview Heights 
JOHN YAEGER, JR., Hinsdale 
LISA ZWEIG, Northbrook 




Headlines 
and deadlines 

An editing class gives journalism students a 
chance to practice their skills under dead- 
line pressure. Carole Unterberg, a junior, 
quickly types a story to meet her deadline. 



James L. Nouy 



373 

Communications 




JACI ACKERMAN, Champaign 
CINDY ADAMS, Lockport 
MARY ANDERSON, Bloomington 
CHARMAINE ATKENSON, Palos Park 
CHRISTINE BALDINI, Bloomington 
TAMBRYN BARRY, Newman 



ALAYNE BAUM, Park Forest 
STARLEY BAXTER, Champaign 
KARLA BERMAN, Skokie 
DEANNA BERNHARD, Carpentersville 
SHARON BERNSTEIN, Skokie 
RANDI BESSER, Morton Grove 



DEBBIE BOUDINOT, Wheaton 
DEBRA BROMLEY, Elk Grove Village 
ROBIN BULWA, Wilmette 
BETH BURIAN, Mt. Prospect 
LAURA BURKE, Wheaton 
GINA BURRAFATO, Palos Park 



MARY BYSTROM, Addison 
CINDY CALHOON, Effingham 
BRENDA CANTRELL, Xenia 
JOANNA CARNEY, Palos Heights 
TERI CHAPMAN, Sterling 
BARBARA CHEYNE, Peoria 



DAWN CHRISTENSEN, Arlington Heights 

BRENDA CLAY, Chicago 

MARY CLER, Pesotum 

KATHRYN CONNERS, Western Springs 

SALLY COOK, Lawrenceville 

JANICE COOPER, Orland Park 



JANE COUCH, Normal 

NANETTE COUTURE, Northlake 

DEBBIE COVEN, Northbrook 

LISA COWELL, Depue 

NANCY CRAWFORD, Pickneyville 

JENNIFER DAEBEL, Hoffman Estates 



PEGGY DREVENY, Woodridge 
PATRICIA DURKIN, Chicago Heights 
DAVID DWYER, Hillside 
JANE ENGLE, Barrington 
KIT FEIGE, Mt. Prospect 
RANDI FISHER, Highland Park 



PATRICIA FITZPATRICK, Libertyville 
SUSAN GANS, Elk Grove Village 
MAUREEN GARVEY, Winfield 
VIRGINIA GAUWITZ, Lacon 
SUSAN GEBERT, Mt. Prospect 
MARGARET GOEPPINGER, Chicago 



MARLA GOLDBERG, Skokie 

SUSAN GOLDBERG, Evanston 

MARCIE GOLDSEN, Skokie 

LISA GOODMAN, Skokie 

JEANNE GREENWOOD, Country Club Hills 

PAT HALVERSON, Elmhurst 



! . ! .. ■ 4. ! 



375 

Education 



MARGARET HAMILL, Palatine 

LOREN HAVRANEK, Rolling Meadows 

KATHY HERBSTER, Chicago 

LAURA HERRIOTT, Fisher 

RITA HIMMES, Villa Park 

SUSAN HOFFMAN, Elmhurst 



CAROL SUE HOPWOOD, Champaign 

ANDREA IDELMAN, Evanston 

KAREN ISENSTEIN, Lincolnwood 

LORI JACKSON, Frankfort 

MICHELLE JACOBS, Deerfield 

PAM JOHNSON, Rockford 



KENNETH JONES, Urbana 

DONNA KALUZNA, Skokie 

SHARI KAPLAN, Hoffmann Estates 

CONSTANCE KATRIS, Oak Lawn 

GABRIELLE KEECH, Carpentersville 

MARY JEAN KENES, Orland Park 



LISA KINCAID, Libertyville 

LINDA KLECZEWSKI, Oglesby 

NORMAN KNICL, Dixon 

LINDA KNOEBL, Schiller Park 

PAULA KRAL, Chicago 

AMY KURLAND, Palatine 



SANDRA KUYPERS, Palos Park 

STEPHANIE LAMBERT, Marseilles 

MARIANNE LANMAN, Munster, IN 

JOANNE LATTAL, LaGrange 

JULIANN LEMBITZ, LaGrange 

ELIZABETH LOCALLO, Chicago 



COLLEEN LYNCH, Wheaton 

MARY FRAN MADDEN, South Holland 

MICHAEL MAHONEY, Elk Grove Village 

NANCY MAIBUSCH, Elmwood Park 

BARBARA MALINA, Skokie 

ELLEN MAMOSER, Des Plaines 



LINDA MARSHALL, LaGrange 

COLLEEN M. MCCARTHY, Lombard 

SCOTT MCGATH, Freeport 

LINDA MCKEON, Skokie 

KATHERINE MELOCHE, Naperville 

THOMAS MEYER, DeKalb 



JAMA MORSE, Elmwood 

HELEN MUCKENHIRN, Northfield 

DIANE MURPHY, Rockford 

IRIS NIERENBERG, Highland Park 

SALLY NIESES, Park Ridge 

DAVID PALMER, Madison, WI 



DAWN PARIS, Danville 

RICHARD PATE, Danville 

JODI RAE PAUL, Minooka 

MINNIE PEARSON, Champaign 

JULIE PETERSEN, Hoopeston 

LYNN PRICHARD, Glen Ellyn 




376 

Education 





CLAUDIA PRIDJ1AN, Palos Heights 

SUELLYN PRYDE, Pekin 

GAIL RAWDIN, Champaign 

DEBORAH SUZANNE ROBERTS, Mt. Carroll 

ANNA ROGACHUK, Libertyville 

DIANNE ROUX, Dallas, TX 



BRYAN RUFF, Plainfield 
JULIE RUSSELL, Edwardsville 
RON SAWIN, Orland Park 
PATRICIA SCHLEMMER, Columbia 
JUDY SCHMIDT, Mt Prospect 
RANDI SCHRAIBER, Skokie 



KARLA SCHUETTE, Riverdale 
DEB SCHWARTZ, Lincolnwood 
THOMAS E. SCOTT, Champaign 
ROBYN SEIDEL, St. Louis, MO 
ELYSA SELAN, Chicago 
CONNIE SEMROU, Elk Grove 



JOANNE SHADEL, Chicago 
ALISON SMITH, Waseca, MN 
KATHERINE STIH, Champaign 
LISA THOMAS, Danville 
LORRI THORMEYER, South Holland 
DEBORAH TUTT, Skokie 



LORI UJKA, Orland Park 
LYNN VANDERHOOF, Des Plaines 
MICHELE VAN QUATHEM, Moline 
VICKI VIRGIN, Lebanon 
NANCI WALLACH, Lincolnshire 
CHERYL WEBER, Oak Lawn 



LYNN S. WEINSTEIN, Northfield 

ALICIA WERNTZ, Freeport 

LAWRENCE WESTERLUND, Buffalo Grove 

VICKI WEXLER, Skokie 

LAURA A. WILLIS, Urbana 

JEANETTE WILSON, Rock Falls 



SUSAN WOODWORTH, Paxton 
CYNTHIA ZYZANSKI, Lansing 



377 



Education 




KARL AAVIK, Bloomington 
SUSAN ABENDROTH, Westmont 
PEYMAN AGHSSA, Tehran, Iran 
MICHAEL T. ALBERTS, Belleville 
GREGORY ALLEN, Antioch 
JAMES ALLEN, Decatur 



DAVID ANDERSON, Geneseo 
MARTHA ANDERSON, Cary 
SHAWN ANDERSON, Geneseo 
DIRK ANDREAS, McHenry 
LEE ARCHAMBAULT, Bellwood 
JEFFREY ARNOLD, Belleville 



STEVEN ARSHONSKY, Des Plaines 
FARID ASSAD, Champaign 
DARA AZARBARZIN, Encino, CA 
JOHN BAILEY, Woodstock 
JOSEPH M. BAK III, Schaumburg 
JOHN BALLENT, JR., Elmhurst 



CARLA BARRY, Park Forest South 
THOMAS BARTOLOMUCCI, Chatham 
MARLA BASS, Springfield 
KENNETH BAUWENS, Chicago 
SCOTT BECKER, Libertyville 
DONALD BEE, Park Forest 



EUGENIA BELLING, Arlington Heights 
DAWN BELT, Chicago 
ROBERT L. BENDER, Urbana 
DANIEL BENNETT, Quincy 
JULIE BENOIT, Bourbonnais 
RON BERGSMITH, Byron 



MARK BERNETT, Quincy 
RICHARD BERRY, Edwardsville 
JEFF BERTON, Oglesby 
RODNEY BETTENHAUSEN, Manhattan 
MICHAEL BIARNESEN, Wildwood 
DAVID BIENEMAN, Springfield 



BARRY BIGGS, Mattoon 
RICHARD J. BISKUP, Elmhurst 
ERLING BJERGA, Elmhurst 
DAVID BLACKBURN, Calumet City 
JANE BOAS, Hillsboro 
MARK BODUCH, Lenoir. NC 



BERNARD BONO, Glenview 
MAUREEN BOSCH, Kildeer 
SUSAN BOTTS, Quincy 
RICHARD BOURKE, Burbank 
STANTON BRADEN, Chicago 
ELIZABETH BRAUER, Oakford 



WILLIAM BROERSMA, Palos Hill 
WALTER BROOKS, Northbrook 
PETER F. BROWN, Crete 
MICHAEL BRUHNS, Chicago 
MOLLY BRYDEN, Quincy 
ALAN BUDRIS, Park Ridge 



379 

Engineering 



DAVID BURGE, Centralia 

E. KATHLEEN BURICH.Lisle 

KEVIN BUSH, Milan 

MARC BUSSAN, Geneseo 

LARRY BUTTERFIELD, Naperville 

JOHN BUZZARD, Winnebago 



WAYNE CALDER, Palatine 

DEAN CAMERON, Centralia 

RONALD CAMIN, Glenwood 

TOM CAMPBELL, Lawrenceville 

ROBERT CAMPION, Camp Grove 

ROBERT CANTY, South Holland 




A woman's place 

Even though the College of Engineering 
makes up fifteen percent of the students, 
only 20 percent of the college enrollment is 
women. Kim Cieseil writes up a lab for 
Physics 107, a required class for all engi- 
neering students. 




Brian Coleman 



MARK CAPELLE, Highland 

DANIEL CAPLICE, Westchester 

PAUL CARDONE, Monee 

JAMES M. CARLSON, Lynn Center 

DAVID CARTER, Downers Grove 

RICHARD CAVENAUGH, Deerfield 




380 

Engineering 




VICTOR C. CHAN, Chicago 

MEEAE CHOI, Skokie 

JOHN CHU, Urbana 

JIM CHYNOWETH, Western Springs 

KEN ClOFFI, Park Forest 

DOUGLAS E. CISKOWSKI, Champaign 



PAUL CIZEK, Downers Grove 
JUDITH CLACK, Varna 
CRAIG CLARK, Virden 
ANDREW CLAUS, Downers Grove 
MICHAEL CLEARY, Beecher 
MICHAEL COBLENZ, Houston, TX 



BRUCE COCHRAN, Glen Ellyn 
ABIGAIL COHN, Wilmette 
C. KEVIN CONNOLLY, Bensenville 
RICHARD CONRATH, Kincaid 
GLENN COOK, Rolling Meadows 
KIRK COOPER, Evansville, IN 



MAURICE CORCORAN, Oak Lawn 
JUDSON COSTAS, Moline 
MARK COURTNEY, Matteson 
STEPHEN COWAP, Champaign 
STUART M. CRAIG, Elliott 
MARK CRAIN, Herrin 



RANDY CROWE, Skokie 
DAVID CRYDER, Joliet 
MARK CUTSHALL, Des Plaines 
WAYNE DAHL, Crystal Lake 
JEROME DALEIDEN, Arlington Heights 
ROBERT DAY, Portsmouth, RI 



MICK DEDINSKY, Joliet 
ROBERT DELAND, Mascoutah 
PAUL DEMOULIN, Decatur 
ELLEN DEPAOLIS, Palatine 
THOMAS DESCHATELETS, Palatine 
ALLEN DERIEMACKER, Glen Ellyn 



DOUGLAS DEVORE, Bloomington 
ROBERT DEWEY. Palatine 
KEITH DIERKING, Rockford 
STACY DIMARCO, Oak Brook 
JUDY DING, Mahomet 
THOMAS DIRIENZO, Woodridge 



KEVIN DISBROW, Warrensburg 
TIMOTHY DIXON, Springfield 
JANET DMITROVICH, Dolton 
DARCY DODT, Northbrook 
THOMAS DOEBELE, Chicago 
THOMAS DONOVAN, Glenview 



KEVIN DOOLEY, Chicago 
JOY DORETHY, Pekin 
DAVID DORIA, Yorkville 
LARRY DOWNEY, Ohio 
SHIRLEY DRAPA, Park Ridge 
RANDALL DRUMMOND, Morton 



381 

Engineering 



NEIL DUBEY, Park Forest 

STEVEN DUBOIS, Addison 

TERESA DUFFIELD, Freeport 

PAT DUMOULIN, Hampshire 

RORY DUNN, Skokie 

JANE DURKIN, Chicago 



MARTIN EBERHARD, Berkeley, CA 

ROBERT ECKARDT, Champaign 

JANICE ECKSTROM, Arlington Heights 

EDWARD EGAN, Oak Lawn 

ROBERT EHLERS, Savanna 

JEANNE EHRENBERG, Chicago 



CARL L. EICHSTAEDT III, Barrington 

MARTIN ELLENBY, Skokie 

MITCHEL ELWELL, Chillicothe 

LINN ENOCKSON, Palatine 

JOHN EWAN, Peoria 

DONALD FAWCETT, Glenview 



NICHOLAS FIDUCCIA, Chicago 

DENNIS FIEBRANDT, Wheaton 

ANN FIECHTL, Quincy 

CHRISTOPHER D. FINAN, Elmhurst 

RUSS FISCHER, Roanoke 

VERNON FRANCISSEN, St. Charles 



ROBERT FREDERICK, Niles 

DAVID FRIEDLAND, Libertyville 

BEVERLY GAITENS, Dolton 

JOSEPH GALKOWSKI, Romeoville 

JOHN GALLIGAN, Arlington Heights 
RALPH GALLO, Park Forest 



TERRY GARINO, Staunton 

JAMES GARRETT, Champaign 

TIMOTHY GAUMER, Sterling 

PATRICIA GAVINO, Skokie 

GILBERT GEIMAN, Browning 

GLEN GEISS. St. Charles 



JAMES GERBER, Broadview 

NICHOLAS GERONTES, Peoria 

GLENN GERSCH, Round Lake Park 

ALFRED GHARAKHANI, Champaign 

GERALD GIBBS, Henry 

ROBERT GILES, Peoria 



MICHAEL W. GILLMAN, Arlington Heights 

CHERYL GINSBURG, Morton Grove 

DALE GOETSCH, Frankfort 

STEPHEN GOLD, Northbrook 

STEVEN GOODENOUGH, Morrison 

MARC GOODMAN, Evanston 



CHUCK GOODE, Virden 

HUGH GRAHAM, Gurnee 

MARY GRAY, Downers Grove 

MICHAEL GREAT, Chicago 

TIMOTHY GREENHAGEN, Kewanee 

BRUCE GREENWOOD, Chatham 




382 

Engineering 




KYLE GRISWOLD, Chicago 
JANET GROBSTEIN, Coal City 
PHILLIP GULLEY, Cisco 
MARK GUSTAVUS, Freehold, NJ 
WARREN GUTHRIE, Chicago 
MARK HAERTLING, Albuquerque, NM 



JOHN HAKE, Urbana 
JAMES HALDER, Aurora 
JEANNE MARIE HALL, Hazel Crest 
STEVEN HANDS, Clarendon Hills 
JAMES HANSEN, Oakbrook Terrace 
TIMOTHY HANSEN, Deerfield 



MIKE HARMON, Brimfield 
DAVID HARMS, Richmond 
KEVIN HARTE, Oak Lawn 
TRACEY HARTJE, Glenview 
GARY HARTZLER, Minonk 
ALAN HARVATH, Thornton 



PETER A. HASSLER, Elmhurst 
JEANNE HAUSMAN, Skokie 
RONALD HEDGCOCK, Clinton 
DOUGLAS HEDGER, Lockport 
CYNTHIA HEERENS, Mt. Prospect 
JAMES HEIDECKER, Chicago 



JOHN HEIM, Elburn 

DUANE HENDRICKS, Clarendon Hills 

ANDY HERLACHE, Arlington Heights 

SCOTT HERR, Danville 

JEFFREY HIATT, Urbana 

GEORGE HIDZICK, Long Grove 



MARVIN HILL, Thomson 
LARRY HIMMELBLAU, Wilmette 
MARTIN HIRSCH, LaGrange Park 
W. JOHN HOENER, Quincy 
STEVE HOFFMAN, Naperville 
CHRISTIANE MARIE HOGAN, 
Mt. Prospect 



KAREN HOLLIDAY, Trenton 
MICHAEL HOUGHTON, Tinley Park 
STEVEN HOUSHOLDER, Lombard 
PAUL HUBBELL, Country Club Hills 
RUTH HUBBELL, Country Club Hills 
LARRY HUETTEMAN, Palos Park 



BRADLEY HUNT, Downers Grove 
DANIEL HUTCHINSON, Waukegan 
THOMAS R. IMBURGIA, Morton Grove 
NANCY IMON, Chicago 
CYNTHIA ISEMAN, Urbana 
GERTRUDE IVORY, Arlington Heights 



WILLIAM JACKSON, Amherst, NY 
STEVEN JACOBSON, Rockford 
ROBERT JAMES, Homewood 
MARK JANKOWSKI, Urbana 
KURT JANVRIN, Morrison 
GLEN JAROSS, Sandwich 



383 

Engineering 



Lab dynamics 

The thermodynamics lab in the Mechanical 
Engineering building offers a place for stu- 
dents to test and learn about fluids and 
other materials. 




384 

Engineering 






PETER JARRELL, Naperville 
SCOTT JENNINGS, Arlington Heights 



Brian Coleman 





j| * f 






\ 












WAYNE I. JEONG, Chicago 
BRIAN JOHNSON, Arlington Heights 



GERALD JOHNSON, Fairview Heights 
KARIN B. JOHNSON, Springfield 




RIMAS JUCHNEVICIUS, Arlington Heights 
JOHN JUNA, Brookfield 




KURT A. KACZMAREK, Palatine 
GLEN E. KAEMMERER, JR., O Fallon 



STEVEN KAIN, Oswego 
PUNIT KALRA, Elk Grove 



JOHN RANG, Urbana 

KASRA KASRAVI, Tehran, Iran 



JOHN H. KELLER, Granville 
THOMAS KELLY, Alsip 



JEFFREY KENYON, Villa Park 
MARY KERR, Chatham 



385 

Engineering 



TIMOTHY KILBERG, Sterling 

JOUNG H. KIM, Chicago 

THOMAS KINGSLEY, Peoria 

DAVID KIRBY, Palos Heights 

MICHAEL KIRK, Deerfield 

DEBORAH KISH, Peotone 



ISIK KIZILYALLI, Istanbul, Turkey 

MATHIAS KLEMP, Highland Park 

TONY KLOK, Chicago 

SUSAN KOCOUR, Bensenville 

WILLIAM J. KOKUM, Libertyville 

ADENA KOLOM, Chicago 



WILLIAM J. KOPRIVA, Glen Ellyn 

EUGENE KORNOTA, Chicago 

KENT KOWALSKE, Dunlap 

THOMAS KRAMER, Kankakee 

PAUL KRAUSE, Darien 

JEFF KRIZ, Glen Ellyn 



JANET KU, Elmhurst 

JAMES KUES, Aviston 

MARY KUHLMAN, Downers Grove 

MARK KUNKEL, Granville 

RITA KUPCIKEVICIUS, Chicago 

THOMAS KUSNIERZ, Elgin 



SUSAN KWON, Bonne Terr, MO 

RICHARD LABARGE, Elmhurst 

MICHAEL LACHMAN, Des Plaines 

ALEX LAM, Champaign 

CHUONG LAM, Chicago 

TOM LAMPO, Silvis 



DAVID LANDERS, Downs 

RANDALL LANE, Sullivan 

MOON LEE, Chicago 

CAROL LENART, Chicago 

MICHAEL LENIHAN, Virden 

CHARLES LENTS, Hoffman Estates 



PAUL LESLE, Lombard 

REGINA LESTER, Chicago 

KEVIN LEWIS, Glen Ellyn 

MARK LIBERMAN, Knoxville, TN 

TOM LICHTI, Morton 

DAVID LIEFELD, Deerfield 



EUGENE LIN, Kenilworth 

DAVID LIPARI, Westchester 

LARRY LISTER, Peru 

THOMAS LIU, Urbana 

JEFFREY LIVERGOOD, Sullivan 

JAMES LODGE, Urbana 



KEVIN LOFTUS, Chicago 

JEFFREY LOGAS, Granite City 

SCOTT LOHNES, Pekin 

DOUGLAS LONGMAN, Geneseo 

KEVIN LUCHT, Wood River 

RICHARD A. LYONS, Champaign 




386 

Engineering 




JOHN MAGERKO, Sugar Grove 
JEFF MALONEY, Addison 
JEAN MANNING, Glenview 
GONZALO MARIANO, Illinois City 
SILVIA MARIANO, Illinois City 
WILLIAM MARK, Chicago 



ANTHONY MASS, Joliet 

YASUSHI MATSUSHITA, Tokyo, Japan 

JIM MAYEDA, Champaign 

TERESA MCCARTHY, Hoffman Estates 

ANDREW MCCARTNEY, Deerfield 

JOSEPH MCCAULEY, Normal 



SCOTT MCCLATCHEY, Watseka 
TOM MCCONNELL, Delavan 
BRIAN MCDERMOTT, Hanover Park 
MICHAEL MCDERMOTT, Chicago 
DAVID MCGINNIS, Chicago 
KEVIN D. MCGINNIS, Edwardsville 



LAURA MCKINNON, Pleasant Hill 
SCOTT MCKORKLE, West Chicago 
BRUCE MCLOUGHLIN, Palatine 
DANIEL MCMILLEN, Urbana 
CHAD MCNAIR, Glen Ellyn 
DON MEEKER, Lena 



KEITH MEYER, Keyesport 
BRAD MICKELSON, Rockford 
BRUCE MILLER, Minooka 
ELIZABETH D. MILLER, River Forest 
JOY MONTGOMERY, Normal 
AMY MOORE, Naperville 



THOMAS E. MORONI, Herrin 
SCOTT MORRISON, Hickory Hills 
LINDA MOY, Morton Grove 
CRAIG MOYNIHAN, Princeton 
DEBRA MRAZEK, Arlington Heights 
MITCHELL MUELLER, East Peoria 



SCOTT MUELLER, Peoria 
JACKSON MUI, Chicago 
JEFFREY B. MULLINS, Champaign 
BRIAN MURPHY, Morton 
MICHAEL MURPHY, Champaign 
DAVE NEGLEY, Peoria 



DONALD NELSON, Palos Hills 
DENISE NETZEL, Kankakee 
NHI H. NGUYEN, Champaign 
NICHOLAS A. NICHOLSON, 

Arlington Heights 

STEVE NICOSON, Beecher 

ROBERT NIEMEIER, Peoria 



DAVID NIERMANN, Chester 
JIM NIGHTINGALE, Rock Island 
MICHAEL NIXON, Argenta 
WILLIAM NOVAK, Homewood 
JEAN O'BRIEN, Waukegan 
RAYMOND OCHS, Ste. Marie 



Fully equipped 

The laboratory facilities on the engineering 
campus offer students a chance to use 
state-of-the-art equipment. 




383 

Engineering 






J > 









PAUL OH, Schaumburg 
MARK OHLS, Champaign 














Us, 





MICHAEL OLIN, Chicago 
ARTHUR OLSEN, Mt. Prospect 



NEIL ONDERA, Crestwood 
STEVEN ONISHL Mt. Prospect 



JIM O'REILLY, Champaign 
DAVID ORR, Pekin 



TOM ORTLIEB, Rolling Meadows 
CHRISTOPHER R. OWEN, DeKalb 



ROGER OZIMA, Chicago 
ADAM PAJERSKI, Chicago 



BARRY PANGRLE, Elk Grove Village 
GARY PANOZZO, Naperville 



MARK PAPAMARCOS, Barrington 
PAUL PAPIERSKI, Niles 



JOEL PARKINSON, Baraboo, WI 

JAMES PARSONS, Arlington Heights 



389 

Engineering 



JOHN PATTERSON, Hinsdale 

THOMAS M. PAWELKO, Addison 

JANET PEARSON, Sycamore 

PAUL PEJSA, Brookfield 

JEFFREY PENTERIS, Lemont 

LARRY PERLIN, Skokie 



DAVID PETERSEN, Dolton 

THOMAS PETERSON, Woodstock 

SHAHRAM PEZESHK, Tehran, Iran 

VICTOR PHANEUF, Urbana 

GREGORY PIETROCZYNSKI, Chicago 

KENNETH PIETRZAK, Dolton 



JAMES PLYMALE, Lebanon 

LARRY POGLITSCH, Rolling Meadows 

TINA POLGAR, Franklin Park 

KATHRYN POLKOWSKI, Shawano, WI 

FRANCIS POWERS, Lombard 

JAMES PRACHAR, Chicago 



ADRIENNE L. PRACHT, Barrington 

MARK PTAK, Chicago 

THOMAS J. QUEVILLON, Naperville 

JOHN RANDALL, Bloomington 

PHILLIP RASKY, Skokie 

JOHN REDDING, Mundelein 



JOHN REDER, Mt. Prospect 

PAUL REDMAN, Bensenville 

RANDALL REDMAN, Grand Ridge 

JUDITH REESE, Burr Ridge 

GREGORY REYNOLDS, Belleville 

GREGORY REYNOLDS, Ames, IA 



SARAH RICE, Cherry Valley 

ROGER RICHARDS, Ottawa 

LARRY RIEKE, Bonfield 

LEE RIESER, Wheaton 

JOHN RITZERT, Darien 

DAVID ROBERTSON, Champaign 



BILLY ROGERS, JR., Litchfield 

RONALD ROMAN, Roselle 

DANIEL ROONEY, Evanston 

JAY ROSENSTEIN, Northbrook 

STEPHEN ROSS, Urbana 

RICHARD ROSZKO, Coal Valley 



THOMAS RUARK, Bourbonnais 

CHRIS RUBAK, Palatine 

JONAS RUPKALVIS, Western Springs 

ANDREW RUSSO, Edwardsville 

MOHAMAD SAADEGHVAZIRI, Tehran, Iran 

MARK SANBORN, Woodridge 



WILLIAM A. SANTIC, Calumet City 

MARY ANN SCHAEFER, Taylorville 

NORBERT SCHERTZER, Schaumburg 

RALPH SCHMIDT, Urbana 

RONALD L. SCHMIDT, JR., Mt. Prospect 

P. BRUCE SCHMOLZE, Glenview 




390 

Engineering 




CHRIS SCHNEIDER, Rock Island 
JOHN SCHNEIDER, Hoffman Estates 
ERIC SCHOW, Glen Ellyn 
DAVID SCHRADER, DeKalb 
CURTIS SCHREIBER, Homewood 
NANCY SCHUMACHER, Aviston 



PHILLIP SEEBERG, Chicago 
MICHAEL SEGAL, Morton Grove 
WILLIAM SEIDEL, Rockford 
JOHN SEVERIN, Glenview 
JAMES SHANNON, Glenview 
DENNIS SHAW, Palos Heights 



JAMES SHERLOCK, Evergreen Park 
JOHN SHIMKUS, Flossmoor 
GARY SHOWERS, Peoria 
JOEL SIGNORELLI, Lisle 
MATTHEW SIMON, Chicago 
WALTER SIMPSON, Chicago 



CRAIG SLEMP, Chicago 
THOMAS E. SMILES, Oak Lawn 
DIANE M. SMITH, Matteson 
KEITH SMITH, Manhattan 
ROGER SMITH, Flanagan 
JOHANNES SOEHN, Skokie 



KIHO SOHN, Chicago 

NATHAN SOLOMON, Des Plaines 

YOON-DONG SONG, Schaumburg 

ELIZABETH SOPIRA CROWLEY, Normal 

MATTHEW SPEARS, Wheaton 

LEE SPORLEDER, Dover 



MARK STALLMANN, Rockford 
RICHARD STARKOVS, Sterling 
DAVID STARWALT, Newton 
GREGORY STARZYK, Urbana 
JOHN STATON, Bloomington 
RICHARD ST. DENIS, Chicago 



MARK STENCEL, Wheaton 
DAVID W. STENGEL, Urbana 
HOPE STEVENSON, Monmouth 
PAULENE STROUP, Orion 
LINDA STRUWE, Chicago 
RICK STUART, Elgin 



SHARON STUCHLY, Chicago 
ROLLIN SUBLETT, Wheaton 
DOUGLAS SUGAI, Chicago 
JOHN SULLIVAN, Oak Park 
SUSAN SUN, Urbana 
PAUL SUTENBACH, Chicago 



CHARLES SVOBODA, Tolono 
JOHN SWANSON, Park Ridge 
DALE SYLVAN, Glenview 
HANK SZUBZDA, Chicago 
DOUGLAS TACKITT, Montgomery 
PAUL TAMURA, Chicago 



391 

Engineering 



Early birds 



For Dave Boots and Ed Chien, a day's 
studying begins early. At 8 a.m., the usual- 
ly-crowded Undergraduate Library is al- 
most vacant. 




James L. Novy 



DEBRA TAYLOR, Pekin 

DAN TEICH, Springfield 

MICHAEL TERRY, East St. Louis 

KAREN A. THOLE, Breese 

JAMES B. THOMPSON, Springfield 

KENNETH TIMMINS, Arlington Heights 



THOMAS TING, Urbana 

TIM TOKARS, Chicago Ridge 

WILLIAM J. TREFZ, Rockford 

KWONG-SING TSANG, Urbana 

MIKE TRICK, Champaign 

MARK UDELHOFEN, Wheaton 



DENISE VANWYK, Alton 
DAVID VENNERGRUND, Urbana 

DAVID VERGARA, Olympia Fields 

DALE VISE, Mascoutah 

DALE VIVOLI, Aurora 

CHARLES VOEGELI, Hanover Park 



GARY VROMAN, East Peoria 

MARK WAGNER, Frankfort 

MARK WAGNER, Freeport 

THOMAS J. WALDRON, Rolling Meadows 

DOUGLAS WALKER, Fairbury 

MARK WALSH, Tupelo, MS 




392 

Engineering 







THOMAS WALTON, Downers Grove 
MARK WATTLEY, Chicago 
KEITH WATTS, Barrington 
MARK WDOWIK, Bensenville 
CHRIS WEGEHENKEL, Hamilton 
KAREN WEINGARTZ, Rock Island 



PAUL WEISS, Skokie 
BRIAN WEITH, Overland Park, KS 
THOMAS WEIZEORICK, Lisle 
BRIAN WELKER, Macomb 
DAVID WENDLAND, LeRoy 
ELIZABETH WERDER, Sun City, AZ 



THOMAS R. WHEELER, Riverdale 
CHRISTOPHER WHITE, Danville 
DAN WHITE, Mundelein 
LARRY WHITE, Urbana 
STUART WHITE, Naperville 
DARREL WICHMAN, Baileyville 



PETER WILBERSCHEID, Buffalo Grove 
MICHAEL WILLIAMS, Westchester 
DAVID M. WILSON, Urbana 
JACK WILSON, Lombard 
LISA WILSON, Champaign 
STEVE WILSON, Darien 



MICHAEL WISCONS, Elk Grove Village 
REBECCA WISNIEWSKI, Melrose Park 
KEN WOHEAD, Naperville 
RANDAL WOJCIESZAK, Palatine 
JON WOJTOWICZ, Rockford 
EARL WOODS, Freeport 



HOWARD WOOLARD, Pekin 
KEVIN WOOLEY, Normal 
SCOTT WOZNIAK, Wheaton 
DAVID WRIGHT, Rockford 
MARK WYLIE, Bloomington 
ROBERT WYLIE, Macomb 



JULIE YANG, Chicago 

JAMES HEROLD YECK, St. Charles 

MARY YEN, Urbana 

LISA M. YOUNG, Mt. Prospect 

HYUNHWA YU, Champaign 

KENNETH ZAHROBSKY, Kankakee 



GERALD ZANER, Flossmoor 
STEVEN ZEHNER, Lawrenceville 
NANCY ZENTZ, Rockford 
JOHN ZIMMER, Skokie 
KARL ZIMMERMAN, Rockford 
JAMES ZOGRAFOS, Willow Springs 



393 

Engineering 



VJVA 




Fine and Appli 



John C. Stein 




KRIS ABEL, Macomb 
JODY ALSTAD, Tucson, AZ 
MARGARET AMPE, Oak Park 
CYNTHIA K. ANDERSON, Springfield 
LINDA BABAT, Lake Forest 
SONIA BALACKY, Calumet City 



NANCY BARD, Deerfield 
MARY LYNN BARTOSZ, Glenview 
DIANE BATISTICH, Lemont 
JANET E. BAUM, Tinley Park 
ANDREW BEILFUSS, Downers Grove 
JULIE BERNSEN. Highland Park 



RAY BEST, Oak Lawn 

R. ANDREW BRANDENBURG, Milmine 

JEFFREY BRAUN, Palatine 

BRUCE BRINEY, Joliet 

JAMES BUCCIFERRO, Joliet 

GINA BUCHERI, Oak Park 



GEORGE BURGARD, Princeton 
LAURA CAIN, Arlington Heights 
ELIZABETH CHIN, Inverness 
ELIZABETH CIMA, South Holland 
LISA COMAN, Crete 
JOHN J. CONNOLLY, River Grove 



STEVE CUNNINGHAM, Delavan 
MARTIN DAHMM, Lincoln 
LAURA DESENFANTS, Urbana 
CELINE DESPATIS, Barrington 
JACQUELINE DICOLA, Park Ridge 
RAYMOND DONATO, Franklin Park 



DAVID DOVE, Sorenot 
JILL DOWELL, Colfax 
CHRISTOPHER DOYLE, Flossmoor 
MARK DUEBNER, Mt Prospect 
JEAN DUPREY, Harrington Park, NJ 
CARL EDSTROM, Hoffman Estates 



KRYSTEN ERICSON, Chicago 

RUSS ERICKSON, Bensenville 

LISA FALETTO, Peru 

JEFFREY FESSLER, Quincy 

KAREN FEUERSCHWENGER, Naperville 

ROBERT FINIGAN, Frankfort 



AMY FISTER, Manchester, MO 
SUSAN FOSTER, Minneapolis, MN 
GEORGE FREEMAN, Urbana 
YURI FUJITA, Cameron 
DAVID J. FULL, Genoa 
STEVE FUNK, Decatur 



RONA GARDE, Springfield 
PATRICIA GESKE, Rolling Meadows 
LISA GLASS, Galesburg 
DEANNE GLOPPEN, Elk Grove Village 
LOUIS GOLDBERG, Lebanon, NJ 
KENNETH GOLUB, Skokie 



395 

Fine and Applied Arts 



ROBERTA GOOCH, Edwardsville 

ELLEN GOODMAN, Skokie 

DEBBIE GOTTLIEB, Park Forest 

THERESA GRABOWSKI, Barrington 

KERRY GRADY, Savoy 

ROBERT GREENBLATT, Loves Park 



BETH GREENWALD, Glenview 

RICHARD GROELING, Morton Grove 

DAWN GRUNWALD, Rolling Meadows 

CATHERINE GULICK, Hickory Hills 

LYNN HAHN, Evergreen Park 

JULIE HARRIS, Lincoln 




Wood worker 

Cutting with a band saw, this student cre- 
ates a three dimensional wood sculpture 
for a composition class. 




John C. Stein 



TIMOTHY HASKETT, Henderson, KY 

MARK HENDERSON, Springfield 

ABBY HERGET, Aurora 

STEPHANIE HERRITZ, Oregon, WI 

JOSEPH HOERNER, Belleville 

MILISSA HUFF, Oak Park 




396 

Fine and Applied Arts 




JACQUELINE HYNES, Homewood 
MIMI JEN, St. Louis, MO 
DONNIE JOHNSON, Bradley 
TRANG JOHNSON, Champaign 
JOANN JOSHU, Millstadt 
NANCY KERNS, Champaign 



JENNIFER KLINKER. Mt. Prospect 
MARK KRANTZ, Westchester 
KEITH RONALD KROLAK, Morton 
MARGARET KRULL, Oak Lawn 
JOHN K. KVEDARAS, Homewood 
MARTIN LEIBROCK, Park Ridge 



JOHN LEISTER, Chatham, NJ 
CHERYL LEWIS, Chicago 
MONICA LEWIS, Downers Grove 
JOY LOCKMILLER, Monticello 
KATHLEEN LOUGHRAN, 
Geneva, Switzerland 
DIANE LUCE, Benlomond, CA 



STEVEN LUSTIG, Skokie 

MICHAEL MAGGERT, Paris 

ARTHUR MAHANNA, Arlington Heights 

MARY MARTIN, Palatine 

PHYLLIS MASTRO, Lombard 

ELISE MATUSEK, Grayslake 



MICHAEL MCBRIDE, Decatur 
PATRICK MCCARTY, Hinsdale 
EDWARD MCGINN, Chicago 
CAROL MILLER, Skokie 
DANIEL K. MOORE, Oak Brook 
KATHRYN MOTTER, Leaf River 



ELLEN MRAZEK, LaGrange 
DONNA MURRAY, Darien 
TIMOTHY NEUMANN, Downers Grove 
LAURA NICHOLS, Naperville 
SCOTT NOBUYAMA, Mt Prospect 
LORENA NOWERS, Atkinson 



JOHN O'CONNOR, Evanston 
KIRK ONGMAN, Homewood 
KIMBERLY PAARLBERG, Homewood 
LINDA PANKRATZ, Waukegan 
BRIAN PEARCE, Park Ridge 
ALICE PEINSIPP, Westchester 



BRYAN PERFETTI, Highland 
CHRIS PETERS, Glenwood 
PAULA J. PETERSON, Geneva 
BRIAN POLAND, Kankakee 
JOSEPH POLASCHEK, Urbana 
BARBARA POMPEI, LaGrange Park 



IVY PONCHER, Encino, CA 
SUSAN PYLE, Washington 
PAMELA RANDALL, St. Louis, MO 
LAURA ELLEN ROY, Wheaton 
JULIE S. RUTTENBERG, Evanston 
PAUL SAINER, Elmhurst 



397 

Fine and Applied Arts 



BONNIE SCHEFFLER, Saginaw, MI 

JULIE A. SCHEIBEL, Arlington Heights 

KAREN SCOTT, Arlington Heights 

LISA SEATON, Washington 



SANDRA M. SERIO, Park Ridge 

ALLAN SHIMASHITA, Crestwood 

RICHARD SIPIN, Naperville 

JOHN SKACH, Westchester 



ROBERT SPERLIK, JR., Berwyn 

SUSAN SPRANDEL, Oak Park 

JACALYN STEARNS, York, PA 

CHRYSANTHE STELLAS, Northfield 



LARRY STEVIG, Morton 

RUSSELL STILLEY, Marion 

DOUG STIMMEL, Gibson City 

MARGO STONE, Creve Coeur 



DONNA SUAREZ, Urbana 

TERESA SUDGES, Aurora 

LISA TENNANT, Rockford 

JULIE TOMISEK, Cicero 



JOHN TRESTON, Springfield 

LISA TRIPLETT, Barrington 

MICHAEL VOIGT, St. Charles 

KAREN WADE, Glen Ellyn 



TRACY WADE, Robinson 

WIDNEY WALKER, Herrin 

ERIC WALLJASPER, Urbana 

JOHN P. WALSH, Oak Lawn 



ANGELA WAPPEL, East St. Louis 

LENORE WEISS, Northbrook 

PHILLIP S. WHIPPLE, McHenry 

DEBBIE WIECHMAN, Rantoul 




IDA R. WILSON, Paris 

ALBERTINA YU, Champaign 

NABIL ZAHRAH, Lebanon 



398 

Fine and Applied Arts 




Artistic reflections 

The senior studio painting class allows stu- 
dent artists like Viki Ford-Boski, a senior, 
to create projects of individual expression. 



John C Stein 



399 

Fine and Applied Arts 




t 



s&- 



4 ^M»-- *Y 



^ 




jy 




Liberal Arts 
d Sciences 



James L. Novy 




ALAN ABBOTT, Bartlett 
KAREN ADLER, Glenview 
REBECCA ALLISON, Virden 
PEGGY AMAN, Decatur 
THOMAS ANDERSKOW, Des Plaines 
ALAN ANDERSON, Urbana 



EDWIN ANDERSON, Hinsdale 
FRANK ANDERSON, Chicago 
JEROME D. ANDERSON, Homewood 
JODY ANDERSON, Chicago Heights 
LAUREN ANDERSON, Bradley 
KAREN ANDRE, Skokie 



WILLIAM ANDREA, Skokie 
MARK ANDREASEN, Petersburg 
SHERRY ANGOTTI, DeKalb 
ANTONIA ANOS, Oak Brook 
CYNTHIA ANTONION, Olympia Fields 
JEFFREY APPEL, Niles 



JULIA D. ARMSTRONG, Hinsdale 
KATHY ARMSTRONG, Oak Brook 
MARY JO ATTEN, Glencoe 
STEVEN AVERY, Chicago 
TREVOR AXFORD, Urbana 
AMY AXT, Peoria 



CATHERINE AYAPPA, Springfield 
SHERON BABCOCK, Chicago 
DAWN BAER, Chenoa 
JUDI BAIZER, Skokie 
JANET BAKER, Aurora 
CONSTANCE BALEK, Hinesville, GA 



PHILLIP BALOG, Waukegan 
MIKLOS BALOGH, Aurora 
BABAK BANAPOUR, Champaign 
SHARON BECKER, Hoffman Estates 
MICHAEL BELO, Des Plaines 
ERIC BERG, Skokie 



MICHAEL BERGER, Central Falls, RI 
ROBERT BERK, Chicago 
CAROL BERNSON, Champaign 
JANICE BERSANO, Urbana 
SUZANNE BEZANES, Northbrook 
RICHARD BISHOP, Danville 



GREGORY BLACKWELL, Metropolis 
ELIZABETH BLAHOUS, Sandoval 
RICHARD BLAIR, Oswego 
JOEL BLATT, Skokie 
BETTY BOGG, Hinsdale 
ALEXANDER BOGGIO, Oak Forest 



JOHN BOMHER, Mokena 

ELLEN BONK, Chicago 

THOMAS D. BOURBULAS, Oak Lawn 

DIANA BOWES, Wheaton 

MARY ELLEN BOYLAN, Glen Ridge, NJ 

JAMES BRANDT, Clifton 



401 

Liberal Arts and Science 



BRIAN BRAUN, Park Forest 

MAUREEN BRENNAN, Orland Park 

ROBIN BRIGHT, Champaign 

CYNTHIA BRONARS, Bensenville 

MICHAEL BROTTMAN, Skokie 

REGINALD BROWN, Maywood 



B. BRUEDERLE, Arlington Heights 

JOHN BUCCIFERRO, Joliet 

DAVID BUCKNER, DeKalb 

DEBRA BUDNIK, Chicago 

TIM BUNKER, Addison 

DENNIS BURNS, Joliet 



SUSAN CAGANN, Champaign 

SUZANNE CAIN, Highland Park 

NANCY CALLAHAN, Mundelein 

KIMBERLY CALLIHAN, Rockford 

ERIN CALLIN, Glendale Heights 

RISA CALMENSON, Livingston, NJ 



KENNETH CAMACHO, Park Ridge 

JAMES CAMEL, Palatine 

PAUL CAMERON, Geneva 

TOD CANTOR, Northbrook 

LAURA CARAVELLO, Rolling Meadows 

DIANE MARY CARDELLA, Chicago 



KARIN CARLSON, Mt. Prospect 
KENNETH A. CARLSON, Joliet 
VIRGINIA CARLSON, Elmhurst 
VICKI CARRIS, Deerfield 
WILLIAM CARROLL, Westchester 
GARY CARTER, Clarendon Hills 



KATHRYN R. CARTER, Morton 

FRANK CATALANO, Rockford 

MICHAEL COVINSKY, Skokie 

SUSAN CENTERS, Peoria 

KAY CERESA, Peru 

BARBARA CHABNER, Skokie 



KIMBERLEE CHAMBERLAIN, Oak Lawn 

MATTHEW CHAPMAN, Park Forest 

SCOTT CHARBONNEAU, LaGrange Park 

SUSAN CHATO, Urbana 

JEAN CHEUNG, Morton Grove 

MARY CHIARCHIARO, Westchester 



EUGINE CHOI, Mt Prospect 

DIANE J. CHRISTIAENS, Chicago 

JULIE CHRISTIANSEN, Rock Island 

TOM CHU, Danville 

ULRIC CHUNG, Peoria 

TRACY CITRANO, Hoffman Estates 



JACQUELINE CLARK, Chicago 

STANLEY CLARK, Park Forest 

THOMAS CLARK, Lake Villa 

KEVIN CLEARY, Beecher 

CAROL CLEMENTS, Jacksonville 

STEVEN M. CLOCH, Skokie 




402 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 




VICTORIA CLYDE, Midlothian 
DOUGLAS COBB, Champaign 
LARRY COHEN, Skokie 
LAURA COLEMAN, Oak Forest 
MICHAEL COLEMAN, Northbrook 
NANCY COMBS, Barrington 



ROBERT COMO, Oak Park 
KELLY COOPER, Westmont 
LIZABETH COOPER, Evanston 
CATHERINE COPELAND, Naperville 
JAMES CORBETT, Ames, IA 
LAWRENCE CORCORAN, Evanston 



VALERIE CORNELIUS, Penfield 
ANN COSGROVE, Kenilworth 
NORA COSGROVE, Spring Valley 
GREGG A. COTHERN, Western Springs 
MICHAEL COURTNEY, Ottawa 
GREGORY CRABB, Danville 



JAMES CRAWFORD, Gurnee 
KATHRYN CREMERIUS, Mt. Prospect 
SHARON CROST, Glenview 
KEVIN CRUM, Joliet 
GARY CULLEN, Downers Grove 
PAM CULLINAN, Lombard 



RITA CURRAN, South Holland 
WILLIAM DACHMAN, Skokie 
STEVEN DANLEY, Highland Park 
RAYMOND DARDANO, LeRoy 
PATRICIA DAVIS, Decatur 
STEPHEN DAVIS, Champaign 



VERA DAVIS, Springfield 

JOYCE ANN DEATRICK, Downers Grove 

KAREN DEIGHAN, Normal 

DANIEL DEJANOVICH, JR., Libertyville 

ALINA DE LA PAZ, Elmhurst 

JOLIE DE MERCURIC Geneva 



CHRISTINE DEMICK, Sparta 
SARA DENHAM, Park Ridge 
JOANNE DETLOFF, Wood Dale 
PHILIP DETRANA, River Forest 
ELIZABETH DEVITA, Rockford 
PETER DEVRIES, Palos Heights 



JOE DIAMOND, Lincolnwood 
DENNIS DICKEY, Decatur 
SILA DIKICI, Ottawa 
DINO B. DIMAIO, Melrose Park 
KEN DIRST, Mt. Prospect 
LAURA DIVEN, Hoffman Estates 



ELIZABETH DOBSON, Champaign 
GREGORY DODSON, Sterling 
MARK P. DOESCHER, Libertyville 
KARIN DOMMERMUTH, Murphysboro 
SUZANNE M. DONAHUE, Buffalo Grove 
DARYL DONALD, North Chicago 



403 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



STEVEN DONALDSON, Rockford 

SUZANNE DONOVAN, Oak Park 

MARY ANN DOYLE, Palos Hills 

LYNNE DRASSLER, Waukegan 

MAUREEN DRISCOLL, Elmhurst 

DONALD DRUCKER, Homewood 



TINA DUBSON, Springfield 

JAMES DUMONT, Granite City 

KATHLEEN DUNN, Morton Grove 

ERIC EARL, Chicago 

JON EASTMAN, Palos Heights 

JOHN ECK, Elmhurst 



LYNNE EDDINGTON, Worden 

PAUL EDER, Oak Park 

DONNA EDSTROM, Chicago 

JULIE EGAN, Park Ridge 

MARGARET ELKINS, Dolton 

KAREN EMMONS, Manteno 



SUE ENGROFF, Urbana 

EILEEN ENK, Orland Park 

ENRICO ESGUERRA, Chicago 

DAVID ESTES, Springfield 

AMY EVANS, Taylorville 

DOROTHY EVANS, Champaign 



GREG EWERT, Urbana 

BRENDA FABISCH, Chicago 

MARY ROSE FABISH, Buffalo Grove 

DONALD FAGERSON, Niles 

JANA FAIROW, Easton 

MARGARET FALETTI, Clarendon Hills 



JOAN FALOONA, Chicago 

STUART FERBER, Highland Park 

BONNIE FERGUSON, Pekin 

J. SCOTT FERGUSON, Belleville 

TINA J. FIDEL, Skokie 

SCOTT FIDUCCI, Rockford 



KAREN FILLINGIM, Champaign 

PAUL FINA, Riverside 

ELLEN FINNERTY, Lombard 

ROSS FISHMAN, Highland Park 

ERIN FLANNIGAN, Springfield 

CRAIG FLETCHER, Erie 



SUSAN FOLEY, Mattoon 

JANET FORAN, Monticello 

STANTON FORMAN, Kansas City, MO 

KEVIN FORREST, Deerfield 

PAMELA FOX, Champaign 

DARYT FRANK, Chicago 



JOSEPH FREDA, Villa Park 

PETER FREEBECK, South Holland 

CHRISTOPHER FREED, Wilmette 

JOSEPH B. FREY, Des Plaines 

STUART FRIEDMAN, Homewood 

JOE GABRIEL. Westchester 




Liberal Arts and Sciences 




NOELLE M. GAFFNEY, Chicago Ridge 
JANET GANDY, DuQuoin 
DAVE GARDNER. Glenview 
JUDY GARDNER, Des Plaines 
ANDREA GARDON, Elgin 
MARK A. GARRETT, Urbana 



Under construction 

College isn't always books and lectures. 
Julie Barry, a senior, constructs a pencil 
holder for a vocational technical training 
class. 




Randy Stukenberg 




SHARON GEIL, Mahomet 
CAROLYN GEORGE, Springfield 
JURIS GERMANAS, Lisle 
CHRISTINE GILBERT, Champaign 
NATALIE GILBERT, Lincolnwood 
WARREN GILLENWATER, Tuscola 



MARGARET GILLESPIE, Buffalo Grove 
NANCY GINOS, Hillsboro 
MARIA GLADZISZEWSKI, Chicago 
GENE GLAUDELL, Elmhurst 
KENNETH GLAUDELL, Elmhurst 
JAMES GLENN, Mattoon 



405 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



LAYNE GOLAN, Chicago 

ALLAN GOLDENBERG, Skokie 

LARRY GOLDMAN, Northbrook 

RICHARD GOLDSMITH, Flossmoor 

TERESA GOLDSTEIN, Elmhurst 

JULIE GOLETZ, Galesburg 



DAPHNE GOLLIHER, Energy 

JOHN GOODELL, West Chicago 

LISA GOODENOUGH, Morrison 

JOYCE GOTTLIEB, Morris 

ANN GOULD, Freeport 

KATHRYN GOULD, Wilmette 



SHARON GRABHER, Champaign 

DONALD GRAFFY, Hanover Park 

DORI B. GRAHAM, Highland Park 

STEPHEN GREB, Palatine 

LYDIA GREBE. Champaign 

AGNES GRECO, Tinley Park 



LORETTA GREPO, Chicago 

GERALD GRESIK, Palos Heights 

LISA GRIFFIN, Barrington 

TERRY GRIFFIN, Arlington Heights 

TIMOTHY GROSCHE, Matteson 

DANIEL GRUDZ1EN, Arlington Heights 



AMY GUDBRANDSEN, Lake Forest 

DAVID GUNTO, Round Lake Beach 

CHRIS HABISOHN, Hoffman Estates 

LEW HAGES, Belleville 

BARBARA HAGGERTY, Taylorville 

CYNTHIA HAMILTON, Belleville 



JOHN HAMPILOS, Chicago 

BETSY HAMRICK, Palos Park 

JOHN HAN, Vernon Hills 

HOLLY HANCOCK, Chicago 

TRISH HANLON, Arlington Heights 

MARY HANRAHAN, Elmhurst 



GREGORY HANSON, Arlington Heights 

MICHELLE HAROULES, Boston, MA 

PATRICIA HARRIS, Burbank 

STEPHANIE HARRIS, Chicago 

WANDA HASZ, Chebanse 

MELISSA HART, Wilmette 



JEFF HATCH, McHenry 

JOHN HAUCK, Shelbyville 

LINDA HAY, Arlington Heights 

DAVID HAYES, Mt Prospect 

JO HAYES, Shelbyville 

JANET MARIE HEDRICK, Marengo 



MARCIA HEIL, Carlyle 

BRETT HEINRICH, Downers Grove 

NANCY HEJZA, Park Ridge 

JOAN HENKEL, Sublette 

RICHARD HENRY, Champaign 

JAMES HERDEGEN, Bensenville 




406 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 





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HBP*.' ■■ & 


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DAVID HERTZ, Kankakee 
ROBERT HESKETH, Carbondale 
MELVIN HESS, Kankakee 
BRYAN HICKMAN, Glenview 
SCOTT HILK, Berwyn 
CELESTE HILL, McLeansboro 



JUDITH HILL, Chicago 
SUSAN HILL, LaGrange 
THOMAS HILL, Chicago 
TAMMY HILLHOUSE, Normal 
CONSTANCE HINK, Villa Park 
DOUGLAS HINRICHS, Petersburg 



GRETCHEN HIPPLER, Bettendorf, IA 
RANDI HIRSCH, Chicago 
LISA HIRSCHFIELD, Maplewood, NJ 
LAWRENCE HOEHNE, Ingleside 
JOHN HOEVEL, Homewood 
BETH HOFFEE, Springfield 



DOROTHY HOGAN, Belleville 
JAMES HOLCOMBE, Deerfield 
ELIZABETH HOLPUCH, Shorewood 
LAURA HOOD, Naperville 
DEBORAH HOPWOOD, Petersburg 
GENEVIEVE HORTON, Kankakee 



LARRY HORWICH, Wilmette 
TAMMY HRIZAK, Chicago 
ERIC HU, Wheaton 
CHRISTOPHER HUBER, Hillsboro 
ROBYN HUFFMAN, Virginia 
CHARLES HUGHES, Waukegan 



MARY HUGHES, Urbana 
LISA HUMKE, Urbana 
THOMAS HUSSEY, Wilmette 
STEVE HUTTO, Bellflower 
DONNA HYOSAKA, Chicago 
JAE HYUN, Chicago 



DAWN IACOBUCCI, Westmont 
JOSEPH IDASZAK, Elmhurst 
THEODORE INGRASSIA, Rockford 
DEBBIE JACKSON, Kewanee 
KATHRYN JACKSON, Evanston 
RENEE JANKOVICH, Coral Springs, FL 



SANDRA JARRAD, Roanoke 
KEVIN JEFFAY, Glen Ellyn 
STEPHANIE JEFFERSON, Champaign 
MICHELLE JENKINS, Deerfield 
MARTIN JENNINGS, Hickory Hills 
LISA JESSE, Prairie View 



DONNA JOCHHEIM, Oak Lawn 
KAREN JOHNS, Buffalo Grove 
DANIEL JOHNSON, Crystal Lake 
JENNIFER JOHNSON, Des Plaines 
NANCEE JOHNSON, Taylorville 
LINDA S. JONES, Peru 



407 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



SOLOMON JONES, Chicago 

LONDA JORGENSEN, Champaign 

EDWARD JOZWIK, Chicago 

KAREN KAIKARIS, Chicago 

EDWARD KAJIWARA, Elk Grove 

WILLIAM F. KALTER, Marengo 



STEPHEN R. KAMMERER, Geneva 

AZALIA KANG, Urbana 

JOYCE KARASEK, Villa Park 

RITA KARLOVE, Glenview 

CATHERINE KASPER, Chicago 

LESLIE KAUFMAN, Highland Park 



MICHAEL KAUFMAN, Chicago 

MARY KAWELL, Northbrook 

MICHAEL KAYE, Lincolnshire 

CAROL KAZUK, Park Ridge 

EARL KEEGAN, Elk Grove Village 

VALERIE KEGLEY, Pekin 



DAVID KELLY, Naperville 

KAREN KERBY, Danville 

KATHLEEN KIEHL, Belleville 

DAVID KIESLER, Morton Grove 

ELLEN LOUISE KING, Hinsdale 

JULIE KING, LeRoy 



STEPHEN KING, Elk Grove 

SUZANNE KING, Olympia Field 

BRAD KIRCHHOFER, Franklin Grove 

KATHRYN KIRCHOEFER, Champaign 

JANIS KIRSCH, Quincy 

VALERIE KIRSCH, Bourbonnais 



CHRISTOPHER KISBERT, New Bedford, MA 

JODI M. KLEVATT, Northfield 

HOWARD W. KLICKMAN, Downers Grove 

CAROL KLIMMECK, Palatine 

AMY KLOSS, Mt. Olive 

SUZANNE KNAPIK, Chicago 



JANET KNAPP, Wheaton 

LISA KNELL, Yorkville 

LEAH KNOX, Springfield 

JACK KOBERSTINE, Lombard 

STEVEN KOCH, Highland 

PATRICIA KOCUREK, Downers Grove 



STEVEN KOLB, Chicago 

LINDA KORACH, Morton Grove 

STEPHEN KORMAN, Wood Dale 

LAURA KORYTA, Palatine 

MARK KOVAL, Country Club Hills 

KAREN KRALJ, Chicago 



STUART KRAUSKOPF, Chicago 

KELLY KRESS, Mundelein 

DEBRA KRESSER, Highland Park 

KEVIN KRIPPNER, Park Ridge 

ROBERTA KRUGER, Manteno 

DEBORAH KUSEK, Orland Park 




108 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



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SM 




BR1TTAN KUSTOM, Palos Heights 
RUANNA KUYKENDALL, Champaign 
BETSY KWEDAR, Springfield 
LISA LABHART, Mahomet 
DANTE J. LAIO, Oglesby 
CAROLE LANDMAN, Skokie 



CAROL ANN LANGE, Dolton 

CLIFFORD LANGENFELD, Garden Grove, CA 

ELIZABETH LAPLANTE, Arlington Heights 

CHERYL LASKE, Grayslake 

A. J. LAVALLIE, Urbana 

GIN LEE, Chicago 



SUSAN LEE, Springfield 
TIMOTHY LENAHAN, Niles 
LORA LENNERTZ, Steger 
KIM LENTI, Blue Island 
ROBERT LEON, Ft Worth, TX 
CHERYL LERNER, Chicago 



WILLIAM LESLIE, Chicago 
LORI LEVIN, Rock Island 
SHERYL LEVIN, Morton Grove 
MONICA LHOTKA, Elmhurst 
ROCHELLE LICHTENSTEIN, Chicago 
CONSTANCE LIDDY, Naperville 



BOB LIN, Chicago 
CHARLES LIN, Mt. Prospect 
GARY LINCENBERG, Glenwood 
STEVEN LIPTON, Park Forest 
REGINA LOCKINOUR, Chicago 
AMY LONG, Marine 



DONALD LOSEFF, Oakbrook Terrace 
ROSEMARY LOSOS, Arlington Heights 
JAQUELINE LOW, Newton 
TIM LOWERY, Winfield 
KATHRYNN LOYET, Collinsville 
MICHAEL LUBINSKI, Palatine 



KEVIN LUCAS, Arlington Heights 
SHARON LUCAS, Bloomington 
DEBORAH LUST, Winnetka 
BEVERLY LYLE, Park Ridge 
MARK LYSEK, Des Plaines 
MICHAEL LYSTER, Northbrook 



WILLIAM MACKIN, Rolling Meadows 
PATRICIA MADDI, Naperville 
PATRICIA MADDOCK, River Forest 
KAREN MAHNKE, Olympia Fields 
JOSEPH MALAMBRI, Palatine 
MARIE MCCARREN, Elmhurst 



MARY MCCLENAHAN, Park Forest 
MARY MCDONNELL, Bloomington 
OWEN J. MCGAREL, Chicago Heights 
MARY MCGARRY, Joliet 
MARK MCGUIRE, Warrenville 
STEVEN B. MCKEEVER, Chicago 



409 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Choose your card 

Finding a resource in the third largest li- 
brary system in the nation can be a formi- 
dable task. Dina Axotis, a sophomore, uses 
one of the many card catalogues in the 
system. 




Liberal Arts and Sciences 




James L- Nouy 




MARGARET MALLOY, Glencoe 
ALLAN MALMED, Northbrook 
LAURENCE MALONEY, Westchester 



ROBIN MANDELSON, Glenview 
ANTHONY MARBURY, Danville 
ELIZABETH MARCHESCHI, Orland Park 



MARY MARGALA, Chicago 
MICHAEL MAROVICH, South Holland 
ANDREA S. MARSHALL, Oglesby 



DUANE MARTIN, Addison 
SHARON MARTIN, Arlington Heights 
ANNETTE MARTINEZ, Wheaton 



MARY MARTONOSI, Manlius, NY 
DEBORAH MASTELLA, Columbus, OH 
GAIL MASTERSON, La Salle 



GARY MATEJCAK, Joliet 
SHARLENE MATTEN, Carbondale 
RANDY MATUSZEWSKI, Joliet 



HEATHER MAULSON, Normal 
LAURA MCALPINE, Chicago 
KATHLENA MCNAIR, Glen Ellyn 



TERESA MCNAMARA, Springfield 
KAREN MCNEELY, Cary 
ANTONY MCSHANE, Wilmette 



MARY MCWILLIAMS, Calumet City 
JENNIFER MEEDEN, Park Forest 
DAVID MEES, Decatur 






411 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



ALICE MEISENHELDER, Downers Grove 

MICHAEL MENDELSON, Champaign 

MARY MENGEL, Naperville 

LINDA MENICH, Niles 

MICHAEL MENIS, Glenview 

DIANE MEYER, Forest Park 



WILLIAM MEYERING, Chicago 

THOMAS MEYERS, Park Forest 

ANNA MIECZNIKOWSKI, Schenectady, NY 

ROBIN MIERENDORF, Chicago 

BEVERLY MILLER, Skokie 

KAREN MILLER, Chicago 



MARK MILLER, Decatur 

MARK MILLER, Palatine 

MARK MILLER, Wilmette 

ROBERT MILLER, Cicero 

SUSAN MILLER, Geneva 
SUSAN MILLER, Green Valley, AZ 



LINDA MINKEL, Chicago 

KENNETH MINTZ, Highland Park 

MATTHEW MIRZA, Chicago 

DINU MISTRY, Champaign 

CATHRYN MITCHELL, Normal 

KIMBERLY MITCHELL, Homer 



JOHN MIYAZAKI, Woodridge 

JOANNA MOORE, Bolingbrook 

CAROL MORAN, Palos Hills 

PATRICIA MORAVEC, Hinsdale 

DAVID MORAWSKI, Chicago 

KEVIN MORRIS, Palatine 



RAYMOND MORRISON, Streater 

JULIE MORROW, Darien 

ELIZABETH MOSER, Westmont 

CHRISTOPHER MOSKALUK, Midlothian 

SHARON MOSS, Glenview 

JAMES MOSTEK, Chicago 



MILDRED MOTLEY, Urbana 

CYNTHIA MOTTIN, Collinsville 

NANCY MRAZEK, Berwyn 

MARY MURPHY, Naperville 

JOANNE MURRAY, Urbana 

KATHRYN MURRELL, Champaign 



JEFF MUSSAY, Glenview 

JOSEPH NAKAO, Chicago 

KATHLEEN ANN NEACY, Arlington Heights 

KATHERINE NEE, River Forest 

DANIEL NELSON, Des Plaines 

GAIL NELSON, Niles 



PETER NICHOLSON, Westchester 

MARY TERESE NICOLAU, Park Ridge 

JOANNE NIELSEN, Godfrey 

DEBRA NISSEN, Palatine 

PAULA NITTI, Elmwood Park 

JANET NORCOM, Fairfax, VA 



412 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 





JON NORCROSS, Aurora 
BARBARA NOYSZEWSKI, Oak Park 
MARGARET OAKES, Decatur 
ANGELO OANDASAN, Chicago 
KAROL O'BRIEN, Decatur 
JOHN OGLESBY, Eldorado 



KATHLEEN OLINGER, Morton 
NANCY OLSEN, Glenview 
CLYDE ONO, Des Plaines 
SONDRA OSBORNE, Chicago 
ALAN OSHIRAK, Palatine 
MARARET PAI, Westmont 



JULIA PAJOWSKI, Chicago 
MARK PALIT, Champaign 
KURT PALMER, Elmhurst 
PHILLIP PALMER, Rockford 
CAROL PANDAK, Mt. Prospect 
MARY PAOLELLA, Melrose Park 



JANET PARADkSO, Steger 
LYLE F. PARKS, Taylorville 
JOSEPH PARLANTE, Hillsboro 
CHRISTINE PEARCE, Flossmoor 
JULIE PENFIELD, Ottawa 
DEBORAH PENN, Decatur 



VICTOR A. PEREZ, Wilmette 
TERRI PERLMAN, Morton Grove 
BRUCE PERLOW, Skokie 
GREGORY PERRY, Berwyn 
GAIL PESAVENTO, Lockport 
ERIK PETERSON, Ivesdale 



LOUANN PETERSON, Centralia 
WENDY PETERSON, Oak Park 
MARK PFEFFERMAN, Glen Ellyn 
DOUGLAS PFEIFFER, Lawrencevill 
MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Decatur 
JOSEPH POELL, Belleville 



LEAH POGEMILLER, Joliet 
SUSAN POLAN, Reseda, CA 
PATRICE POLITE, Galesburg 
ELIZABETH POLSTON, Evanston 
GARY PORTUGAL, Northbrook 
JENNIFER POSHARD, Champaign 



TERI POWER, Deerfield 
PATRICK POWERS, Posen 
DIANE PREDICK, Arlington Heights 
GRANT PRENTICE, Danville 
ELAINE PRIDGEN, Matteson 
GRENVILLE PRIDHAM, Champaign 



ELISABETH PRIEST, Park Ridge 
STANLEY PRUITT, Urbana 
MICHAEL PSAK, Round Lake 
TERRI PUCIN, Waukegan 
LINDA PURCELL, Park Forest 
MARLA RAKERD, Salem 



413 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



SUSAN RAMSEY, Park Ridge 

VALARIE J. RAND, Chicago 

KAVITHA RAO, Olympia Fields 

JOHN RATEIKE, Mt. Prospect 

SUSAN RAY, Mundelein 

JAMES REBBE, Petersburg 



LOUIS RECTOR, Quincy 

SUSAN REEDY, Villa Park 

KEVIN REGAN, River Forest 

MARY PAT REGAN, Park Forest 

JAMES REICH, Lincolnshire 

COLLEEN REID, Downers Grove 



STEVEN REID, Oregon 

RICHARD REILLY, Oak Forest 

KATHRYN REINHARD, Lincolnwood 

ANDREA RENNHAK, Warrenville 

JOSEPH REVAY, Park Forest 

KYM M. RICH, Spring Grove 



RONALD RICHARDS, Glen Ellyn 

GAIL RIEGER. Villa Park 

MARY BETH RILEY, Palatine 

JAMES ROACH, Elmhurst 

JANE ROBBIN, Joliet 

BRIAN ROBINSON, Decatur 



DEAN ROCHESTER, Granite City 

KATHLEEN RODERICK, Buffalo Grove 

CAROL ROGERS. Northbrook 

BILL ROLOFF, Lake Zurich 

BRIAN ROONEY, Evanston 

JOSEPH ROONEY, Riverside 



JOSE ROQUE, Deerfield 

HOLLY ROSE, Highwood 

MERLE ROSEN, Morton Grove 

DIANE ROSENFELD, Skokie 

MARC ROSENTHAL, Flossmoor 

DONNA ROSS, Oak Lawn 



MIRIAM ROTH, Chicago 

SHARON ROTOLO, Batavia 

BETH RUBIN, Chicago 

KENNETH RUBIN. Westchester 

MORTON RUBIN. Skokie 

JANET RUEGGE. Bethalto 



SUSAN RUSSO, Chicago Heights 

WILLIAM RYAN, Elk Grove Village 

ABBAS SAFFARI-FARD, Champaign 

AMI SALK, Skokie 

CAROLYN SALTER, Champaign 

STEVEN SAMUELS, Skokie 



CYNTHIA SARNA, Mt. Prospect 

EDWIN SAUER, Gibson City 

MARGARET SAUNDERS, Oak Park 

STEVE SAUNDERS, Geneva 

CAROLYN SCHARF, Chicago 

MARK SCHEUNEMANN, Chicago 




414 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 




KAREN SCHIED, Prospect Heights 
MONICA SCHLENZ1G, Barrington 
NINA SCHLOSS, Wilmette 
MARK SCHMIDT, Bensenville 
SIEGFRIED SCHMIDT, Dixon 
MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ, Rosamond 



CLAUDIA SCHNEIDER, Steeleville 
JOHN SCHNEIDER, Rolling Meadows 
JAMES SCHOPP, Niles 
HARWELL SCHRADER, Granite City 
MARY SCHRAN, Champaign 
WILLIAM SCHULTZ, River Forest 



HOWARD SCHUSTEFF, Niles 
CINDY SCHWARTZ, Cahokia 
STEVEN SCHWEFEL, Kewanee 
FRANK SCLAVENITIS, Glenview 
WILLIAM SCOON, Sparland 
JANE SCOTT, Arlington Heights 



JOSE SEGURA, Chicago 
PAUL SEIWERT, Villa Park 
PETER SERSHON, Elmhurst 
PETER SEVERSON, Rockford 
SCOTT SEYMOUR, Skokie 
LYNNE SHANER, Urbana 



LIZABETH SHANFIELD, Skokie 
SOPHIA SHANG, Wilmette 
TAMAR SHASHA, Peoria 
CHERYL SHEEDY, Palatine 
PATRICIA SHIELDS, Brookfield 
MARY SIADAK, South Holland 



JAMES SIEGEL, Deerfield 
PAULINE SIEGEL, Elmhurst 
SHERYL SIEGEL, Chicago 
FRED SILBERBERG, Hazel Crest 
SHANE SILHAN, Chicago 
ELLEN SIMMONS, Highland Park 



HOWARD L. SIMON, Skokie 
SUZANNE SIMON, Northbrook 
LINDA SKLENAR, Bolingbrook 
THOMAS SKOWERA, McNabb 
BARBARA SLAW, Palatine 
KELLY SLIFER, Taylorville 



ARLENE SMALLS, Chicago 
WILLIAM SMART, Columbus, OH 
CRAIG SMITH, Crete 
JENNIFER SMITH, Hinsdale 
MARC SMITH, Glenview 
MICHAEL SMITH, Skokie 



REGINA SMITH, Elmhurst 
ROYCE SMITH, Mabelvale, AR 
KAREN SMYKOWSKI, Calumet City 
MICHAEL SNOW, Taylorville 
ELLEN SOMBERG, Northbrook 
MARY BETH SOVA, Minooka 



415 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 





Book work 

Many students like Tim Gilhooly, a senior, 
find that a heavy class schedule literally can 
weigh you down with thick books. 



416 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



James L. Novy 




TOM SOWIN, Des Plaines 
VICTORIA SOWINSKI, Springfield 
VESNA SPASOJCEVIC, Niles 
JAY SPRINGMAN, Alton 



LARRY SPRUNG, Skokie 
HALINA STACHOWIAK, Park Ridge 
ABBY STACKER, Tiskilwa 
ROBERT STAHLKE, South Holland 



STUART STANTON, Northbrook 
CAROL STARR, Lake Forest 
KATHRYN STEENLAND, Riverside 
KAREN STEINER, Glenview 



TIMOTHY STEPHAN, Grand Blanc, MI 
JANET STERN, Highland Park 
JANET STIVEN, Roselle 
KIM STOCKING, Arlington Heights 



LAURA STORER, Orland Park 
SHERYL STREDER, Dallas, TX 
SHERI STUART, Frankfort 
SHERRI STUBBS, Morton 



EDWARD STUDZINSKI, Chicago 
MICHAEL STEUER, Los Angeles, CA 
JOHN STUPARITZ, Oak Lawn 
BARRY STURM, Glenview 



RON STURM, Hoffman Estates 
STEVEN M. SURANOVIC, Frankfort 
THOMAS SWEENEY, Rolling Meadows 
PHYLLIS SWIDLER, Glenview 



CYNTHIA TANNER, Ursa 
DONALD R. TAYLOR, Aurora 
THOMAS TAYLOR, Peoria 
MARK TEGGE, Oak Park 



MARGARET TERANDO, Evanston 
JAY TEUSCHER, Urbana 
JULIE TEUSCHER, Rockford 

ANNE THEISEN, Deerfield 



417 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



LYNNE THIEME, Lansing 

JOHN THOMAS, Libertyville 

JEANNE THOMPSON, Chicago 

THOMAS THOMPSON, Chicago 

SHAWN THORNTON, St. Charles 

ANGELA TISDALE, Hazel Crest 



DAVID TOY, LaGrange Park 

PHUC TRAN, Chicago 

CYNTHIA TRIEBOLD, Champaign 

MARY TRIPSAS, Phoenix, AZ 

CAROLYN TUBBS, O Fallon 

CREED TUCKER, Champaign 



DAVID TULSKY, Northbrook 

BONNIE TUNICK, Skokie 

CLIFFORD J. TURNER, Palos Heights 

PHILLIP TWADDLE, Flossmoor 

MARY ANN TYMEC, Woodstock 

DAN TYNAN, River Forest 



DAVID TYSON, Elmhurst 

SCOTT UKNES, Schaumburg 

ROBERT UNFER, Des Plaines 

ANITA URBORG. Skokie 

JEFF URS, Godfrey 

LAUREL VACALA, Lombard 



CURT VADEBONCOEUR, Kankakee 

NOREEN VALENTE, Blue Island 

E. SCOTT VANA, Arlington Heights 

ANDREA VANBERKUM, Elk Grove 

KEELY A. VANDIVER, Bolingbrook 

GREG VANGEISON, Urbana 



CARLA VERSCHOOR, Barrington 

BLAZE VESOLOWSKI, South Holland 

PATRICIA VEST, Decatur 

ELAYNE VICTOR, Oak Park 

CYNTHIA VIGLIOCCO, Coal City 

INGRIDA VITRUNGS, Elmwood Park 



JAMES VONDEBUR, Urbana 

DAVID WACKROW, North Riverside 

ROBERT WALBERG, Arlington Heights 

JOANNE WALKER, Champaign 

TERRY WALKER, Jacksonville 

LYNN WALLOCK, Elmhurst 



PATRICK WALSH, LaGrange 

CAROL WAMBOLDT, Bloomington 

KELLY WARA, East Moline 

KRYSTAL WARDEN, Kewanee 

ALAN WASKIN, Skokie 

REBECCA WAUTHIER, Urbana 



ARI WAX, Chicago 

ELAINE WEAVER, Niles 

AMY LAWRENCE WEBER, Champaign 

DANIEL WEIDMAN, Glenview 

ANNETTE WEINGARTNER, Chicago 

ERIN WELKER, Bolingbrook 




418 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 




KEVIN WELLS, Naperville 
DUANE WESTERBERG, Park Forest 
MARY WESTFALL, Watson 
TERRY WESTPFAHL, Rockton 
LORI WESTPHAL, Joliet 
CARRIE WHITE, Champaign 



ROBERT WHITE, Hoffman Estates 
SHARON WHITE, Palatine 
JENNIFER WHITEHEAD, Glen Ellyn 
NANZELLA WHITFIELD, Chicago 
CHERYL A. WHITLOW, Chicago 
MARYANNE WHITWORTH, Edwardsville 



RICHARD WIEDER, Wilmette 
JOANNE WIEDOW, Oak Park 
KIM WIETIES, Carlinville 
CHERYL WILLE, Crystal Lake 
RITA WILLIAMS, Chicago 
LISA WILLIAMSON, Crystal Lake 



LORI WILSEY, Skokie 
DAVID WILSON, Bolingbrook 
THOMAS WIMBISCUS, Spring Valley 
PEGGY WINGO, Evanston 
TINA WINKLER, Dieterich 
PHILIP WINTERS, Park Ridge 



DIANE WINTROUB, Omaha, NE 
DEBRA WISNIEWSKI, Wauconda 
GARY WOJCIK, Barrington 
J. KEVIN WOLFE, Urbana 
MARK WOODARD, St Joseph 
RANDY WRIGHT, Cahokia 



EDWARD WYNN, Savoy 
BRIAN YAGODA, Palatine 
JEFFREY YALOWITZ, Skokie 
BRUCE YAMAMOTO, Chicago 
MAUREEN YAMASHIRO, Chicago 
LISA YEH, Champaign 



MARY ZAGONE, Oak Brook 
JAMES ZAJAC, Downers Grove 
JEAN ZANELLA, Joliet 
DANIEL ZENDER, Lockport 
JOHN ZIELINSKI, Westmont 
JUDITH Z1ER, Kewanee 



DANA ZIMMERMAN, Oak Park 
HARALYN ZIMMERMAN, Skokie 
GREGORY ZOLKOWSKI, Chicago 
NANCY ZUZULY, Dolton 



419 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



teH treatm£ ! 




SOCIRi i/uuKH 



John C. Stein 




Quick draw 

Helping people is what social work is all 
about. Elaine Dyke, a sophomore, gives 
Jenny Birger some help with her drawings. 



John C. Stein 




KATHY BERGGREN, Barrington 
JEANETTE BIDLACK, Mt. Prospect 
CAROL BLAU, Skokie 
RHONDA CHRISTIANSEN, Glen Ellyn 
KATHLEEN COUTRE, LaGrange 
KELLY CROGHAN, Carmi 



DORINNE GOMBERG, Skokie 
JUDITH HAYNER, Freeport 
JANET M. HUND, Waukegan 
LAURA BRYANT JAMISON, Champaign 
KRISTAN KODES, Champaign 
SUZANNE KOENIG, Skokie 



SHARON MAIS, Peoria 
MARGARET MERKEL, Niles 

ANNE MILLARD, Dayton, OH 
JAN NOONAN, Danforth 
MICHAEL OHM, Schiller Park 
PHYLLIS RICHARDSON, Decatur 



MARY RIGGS, Lombard 
KAREN ROBERTS, Normal 
SUSAN SHRIFTER, Skokie 
SHERRY H. SHUWAL, Skokie 
VIRGINIA VERMILLION, Philo 
CINDY WALLACH, Skokie 



421 

Social Work 



Illio Business Staff 




Harry Zan 



Janice Schneider, Business Manager; Richard O'Connor, Sales Manager; Jacqueline Gelb, Advertising Manager. 



422 

Illio Business Staff 



Illio Business Staff 



# 




Harry Zanotti 

Office Managers: Front row: Amy Kurland, Debbie Kaplan. Second row: Alan Dodds, Therese Casey. Back 
row: Joanne Schumm. 



423 

Illio Business Staff 



Illio Editorial Staff 




John Van Proyen, Production Manager; Laurie Wright, Managing Editor; Nancy Adams, Editor-in-Chief. 



Harry Z 



424 

Illio Editorial Staff 






Illio Editorial Staff 




Andrea Liss, Photo Editor; Amy Kloss, Features Editor; Cindy Atoji, News Editor; Mike Zahorik, Sports Editor. 



Harry Zanotti 



425 

Illio Editorial Staff 



Ulio Editorial Staff 




David Nadig, Copy Editor; Nancy Minster, Index Editor; Paul Verstrate, Seniors Editor; Katherine Wright, Groups 
Editor. 



Harry Zari( 



426 

Ulio Editorial Staff 



lllio Editorial Staff 




Production Assistants: From front: Missy Friedman, Karen Heithoff, Laurel Wolak, Lori 
lanning. 



Harry Zanotti 



427 

lllio Editorial Staff 



Ulio Photo Staff 




Album cover photograph by Jeff 



428 

Ulio Photo Staff 



Mini Publishing Co. Board 




Front row: Scott Solomon, Ellie Dodds (recorder), Albert Spenadel, Sarah 
Toppins, Janice Schneider (Illio business manager), Julie Wurth (Daily Illini editor- 
in-chief). Second row: Mark Ludwig (Daily Illini chief copy editor). Ken Perry 
(board vice chairman), Paul Monson (board secretary), Robert Reid, Richard 
Baader, Gene Gilmore (board chairman). Back row: James Lee (Technography 
business manager), Sandy Haworth (Daily Illini sales manager), Tim Anderson 



(assistant general manager), Ann Guggemos (Daily Illini business manager), Dean 
Olsen (Daily Illini managing editor), Nancy Adams (Illio editor-in-chief), Richard 
Sublette (general manager and publisher). Missing from photo: Michael Lach- 
man (Technograph editor-in-chief), David Weinstein (WPGU general manager), Al 
Strauss (WPGU program director). 






429 

Illini Publishing Co. Board 



h 





















Index 




Allen, Greg 232, 294, 379 


Andrea, William 401 




Barkus, Liz 288 








Becker, Gail 307, 310 






Allen, Guy 241 


Andreas, Chris 246 


JL. 1L I. 


Barlow, Bob 244 


Becker, Karen 279 




ana 


Allen, James 379 


Andreas, Dirk 315, 379 


h h h 


Barn, The 302 


Becker, Kurt 41 




Allen, Julia 253 


Andreasen. Jeff 334 


u u u 


Barnard, Alice 253 


Becker, Larry 222 






Allen, Julie 240, 286, 353 


Andreasen, Mark 401 




Barnes, Art 269 


Becker, Rodney 235 






Allen, Kevin 296 
Allen, Kirk 264 


Andrew, Jim 224 
Andrews, Andy 243 




Barnes, Chris 212 
Barnes, John 304 


Becker, Scott 379 






Becker, Shari 266, 289 






Allen, Lee 245 


Andrews. Mrs. 239 




Barnes, Kim 242 


Becker, Sharon 401 




A Midsummer Night's Dream 


Allen, Mary 293 


Andrews, Rob 260 


B-52s 57 


Barnett, Charles Rayburn III 


Beckman, Mark 244 




105 


Allen, Morris 357 


Anetsberger, Kevin 212 


Baader, Scott 429 


243, 357 


Bedell, Eric 278 




Aartz, Adamus 281 


Allen, Todd 267 


Angel, Mike 302 


Babat, Linda 395 


Barnett, Scott 254 


Bedinghaus, Tony 278 




Aavik, Karl 232, 379 


Allerton 62, 63 


Angotti, Sherri 219. 401 


Babcock.Jane 54 


Barnicle. Barb 261 


Bedore, Sharon 252 




Abbey. Missy 284 


Allison, Ken 269 


Angus, Donna 230 


Babcock, Marty 244 


Baron, Rich 257 


Bee, Donald 379 




Abbott Power Plant 40 


Allison, Rebecca 401 


Aniol, Janeen 357 


Babcock, Sheron 401 


Ban, Joe 257 


Beebe, Jerry 235 




Abbott, Alan 401 


Alongi, Dave 251 


Anos, Antonia 401 


Babcock, Todd 288 


Barr, Kris 276 


Beebe, Terry 300, 345 




Abbott, Mark 306 


Alpha Chi Omega 207, 211 


Ansboro, Jenny 250 


Babicz, Lisanne 211 


Barr, Paul 257 


Beebe, Warren 357 




Abel. Kris 304. 314, 395 


Alpha Chi Rho 212 


Anselm, Alan 217 


Bachert, Nancy 283, 357 


Barret, Ines 214 


Beeler, Amy 240 




Abel, Thomas 345 


Alpha Delta Phi 213 


Anthony, Rob 320, 254 


Backer, Janice 214 


Barret, Mary 291, 331 


Begian, Dr. Harry 50 




Abeles, Kelly 220 


Alpha Delta Phi Little Sisters 


Anton, Angelo 249 


Backer, Mary Anne 300 


Barrett, Mary 357 


Behegan, Andrea 214, 340 




Abeles, Stacey 220 


272 


Antonelli, Todd 260 


Backs, Kim 301 


Banish, Ken 215 


Behimer, Shannon 235 




Abendroth, Susan 261, 288, 


Alpha Delta Pi 214 


Antonion, Cynthia 401 


Backs, Ronald 357 


Barry, Carla 379 


Behme, Carol 236 




379 


Alpha Delta Pi Seniors 272 


Antuna, John 249 


Baecklandt, David 248 


Barry, Cindy 340 


Behn. Martin 357 




Abernathy, Laura 284 


Alpha Epsilon Phi 273 


Aplington, Sue 123 


Baer, Dawn 401 


Barry, Dan 222 


Behrend, Bruno 336 




Abies, Michael 357 


Alpha Epsilon Pi 215 


Appaloosa 107 


Baha'i Center 48 


Barry, Julie 405 


Behrends, Jim 238 




Abolt, Craig 228 


Alpha Gamma Delta 216 


Appel, Jeffrey 401 


Bahn, Thomas 248, 307 


Barry, Robert 35 


Behrens, Bradley 317, 345 




Abolt, Mark 228, 278 


Alpha Gamma Rho 25, 217 


Appelbaum. Larry 264 


Bahr, Debbie 237 


Barry, Tambryn 375 


Beich, Aleen 271 




Abortion Rights Coalition 35 


Alpha Kappa Alpha 70, 273 


Applegate, Julie 229, 357 


Baigelman, Daniel 297 


Bars 72, 73 


Beilfus, Jule 261, 288 




Abrahams, Brian 259 


Alpha Kappa Lambda 218 


Appleman, Don 330 


Bailey, Barb 301 


Bartell, Craig 307 


Beilfuss, Andrew 395 




Abrahamson, Michael 357 


Alpha Kappa Psi 298 


Appelson, Bruce 259 


Bailey, Curt 248 


Bartelsmeyer, Dave 299 


Beinlich, Sharon 252 




Abrams, Jay 289, 357 


Alpha Lambda Delta 299 


Arbel, Ifaat 279 


Bailey, Edd 57 


Bartgis, Kevin 306 


Bejster, Karen 300 




Abrams, Keith 298, 303, 357 


Alpha Omicron Pi 219 


Arbel, Tali 44 


Bailey, Ellen 221, 326 


Barth, John 177 


Belair, Ray 333 




Abramson, Mindy 287 


Alpha Omicron Pi Seniors 274 


Archambault, Lee 171, 379 


Bailey, Jeanne 230, 272 


Bartholf, Wayne 291 


Beldon, Mark 244 




Abruzzo. Terri 211 


Alpha Phi 220 


Arden, Carden 226 


Bailey, John 243, 379 


Bartkowski. Steve 152 


Belfsky, Sue 113 




Acacia 210 


Alpha Phi Seniors 275 


Ardis, John 283 


Bailey, Laura 261 


Bartolomucci. Thomas 379 


Bell, Brian 235 




Academics 44, 45 


Alpha Phi Alpha 174, 274 


Arena, Jeff 290, 334 


Baird, Beth Anne 216 


Barton, Connie 219 


Bell, Fred 225 




Accola, Nancy 345 


Alpha Phi Omega 42, 43, 299 


Arends, Janet 239, 282, 345 


Baird, Nancy 266 


Bartosch, Bob 334 


Bell, Karen 357 




Achler, Julie 357 


Alpha Rho Chi 221. 275 


Arger, Harry 269 


Baise, Brad 280 


Bartosz, Mary Lynn 395 


Bell, Karin 298 




Achtien, Tina 357 


Alpha Sigma Phi 47 


Arghonsky, Mark 258 


Baits, Martha 237, 357 


Bartoszek, Laura 312 


Bell, Keith 215 




Ackerman, Amy 226, 334 


Alpha Tau Omega 222 


Argo, Lori 324 


Baizer, Judi 287, 401 


Bartus, Monica 250 


Bell. Wendy 229 




Ackerman, Anne 226 


Alpha Tau Omega Seniors 223 


Aria Speedwagon 82 


Bajadek. Jean 211 


Baruck, John 90 


Bellile, Bruce 307 




Ackerman, Dean 345 


Alpha Xi Delta 276 


Arizona State 144 


Bajadek, Julie 211 


Baseball 154, 155, 156, 157. 


Bellino, Gina 277, 379 




Ackerman, Jaci 375 


Alpha Zeta 300 


Armbruster. Bill 241 


Bak, Joseph 379 


186, 187, 188, 189 


Bellovic, George 301 




Ackerman, John 235 


Alstad, Jody 314, 395 


Armory 22 


Baker, Betsy 309 


Baska, Jim 227 


Bellows, Marcia 252 




Adams, Cathy 226, 277. 328, 


Altenberg, Eric 210 


Armory Free Theater 110, 111 


Baker, Boyd 243 


Basketball 162, 163, 164, 165, 


Belmonte. Joe 225, 299. 334 




357 


Altheide, Randy 262 


Armour, Todd 217 


Baker. Ellen 237, 290 


166, 167 


Belo. Mike 212, 401 




Adams, Cindy 211, 375 


Alvey, Steve 278 


Armstrong, Julie 211, 401 


Baker, Gary 235 


Bass, Maria 379 


Belser, Bob 50 




Adams, Dan 357 


Alwan, Joseph 325, 338 


Armstrong, Kathy 216, 324, 


Baker, Jan 234, 401 


Bass. Mike 213 


Belt, Dawn 379 




Adams, Greg 218 


Aman, Peggy 401 


401 


Baker, Julie 252 


Basso, Sharon 28, 29, 42. 43. 


Bemis, Mark 217, 300, 338 




Adams, Jeff 217 


Amarantos, Faith 239, 278 


Armstrong, Ken 270 


Baker, Mike 264 


56, 82, 83, 93, 124. 188. 


Bemis, Steve 217 




Adams, Laura 240, 282, 353 


Ambielli, Adam 172 


Army Reserve Officer Training 


Baker. Missy 284 


356, 361, 365, 374, 428 


Ben, Jeff 247 




Adams, Nancy 31, 371, 424, 


Ambrose, John 309 


Corps 36,37 


Baker, Paul 259 


Bastien, Janet 221 


Bender, Karen 261 




445 


Ambrosini, Alicia 216, 278 


Arndt, Michael 357 


Baker, Perry 322 


Basting, Brian 238 


Bender, Robert 379 




Adams, Neil 172 


Amendola, Dawn 240 


Arne, Marshall 297 


Baker, Tammy 345 


Bastion, Tom 268 


Bender, Stephanie 261, 288. 




Adams, Tom 171 


Amendola, Keith 300, 305 


Arnold, Jeffrey 379 


Balacky, Sonia 395 


Bastolone, Dean 247 


353 




Adelhelm, Beth 237 


Amir, Nader 278 


Arnold, Jim 247 


Balch, Cyndie 261 


Batistich, Diane 395 


Bene, Michele 271 




Adler, Craig 262 


Amirante, Sam 330 


Arnold, Steve 228 


Balder, Don 222 


Battaglia. Bob 303, 357 


Benjamin, Andrea 357 




Adler. Hollie 272 


Ammon, Yvonne 250. 312 


Arnold. Warren 334 


Baldini, Christine 375 


Batzli, Jeff 267, 314 


Benjamin. Andy 273, 303 




Adler, Karen 401 


Ampe, Peggy 261, 288, 314, 


Aronson. Joanne 273 


Baldoni, John 322 


Baudino, Mike 292 


Benjamin, Gail 273 




Adolf, Bernie 305 


395 


Aronson. Larry 215 


Baldwin, Mindy 252 


Bauer, Craig 184 


Benjamin, Lydia 237, 313, 338, 




Advertising Club 298 


Anagnostopoulos, M. J. 253 


Arrigo, Jim 326 


Balek, Bob 317 


Bauer, Dave 217 


340 




Aeschliman, Susie 253 


Anchor, Chris 244 


Arshonsky, Steven 379 


Balek, Constance 401 


Bauer. Kim 250 


Bennett, Curtis 357 




Afro-American Cultural Center 


Anderskow, Thomas 401 


Asbury, Jeff 228 


Bales, Jim 320 


Baum, Alayne 375 


Bennett, Dale 269 




68 


Anderson, Alan 401 


Aschbrenner, Todd 268 


Balice, Mike 267 


Baum, Barbi 306, 357 


Bennett, Daniel 379 




Afro-American Cultural Program 


Anderson, Amy 290 


Asheim, John 270 


Ball, Cedric 341 


Baum, Janet 340, 395 


Bennett, Debbie 230 




71 


Anderson, Beverly 219 


Asher, Ron 215 


Balla, Joe 288 


Baum, Jeff 262 


Bennett. Donna 357 




Agee, Teresa 345 


Anderson. Bruce 246, 357 


Ashley, Dave 254 


Ballard. Doug 270 


Baum, Sheara 273, 395 


Bennett, Eric 357 




Aghssa, Peyman 379 


Anderson, Chris 245 


Ashley, Juli 211 


Ballent, John 379 


Baum, Tom 278 


Bennett, Patti, 229 




Agnes, Maria 261 


Anderson, Cindy 283. 395 


AS1D 301 


Ballesteros, Gary 248 


Bauman, Ed 292 


Bennett. Sharon 272, 301, 345 




Ahern, Gerald 357 


Anderson. Dan 222, 317 


Askin, Lisa 220 


Balog. Phillip 401 


Baumann, Steve 233 


Benoit, Julie 379 




Ahem, Jim 283, 334, 357 


Anderson, David 379 


ASLA 301 


Balogh, Miklos 401 


Bauwens, Ken 291, 379 


Benson, Matt 218, 300, 345 




Ahern, Mary Ellen 219 


Anderson, Dawn 239, 282 


Assad, Farid 379 


Balogm, Mick 278 


Baxter, Ken 213 


Benson. Paul 247 




Ahlberg, Suzie 252, 317 


Anderson, Dean 322, 345 


Asselmeier, Kimberly 357 


Balsamello, Dana 357 


Baxter. Starley 375 


Benson. Paula 46 




Ahrens, Jill 313, 340 


Anderson, Edwin 401 


Astro, Dave 246 


Balterman, Kathy 283 


Bayer. Nancy 250 


Benveniste, Terri 371 




AIESEC 300 


Anderson, Eric 260 


Astronomy Club 130 


Baltis, Al 336 


Baygood, Randy 259 


Benzing, Carll 24 




Air Controllers 139 


Anderson, Frances 240, 282, 


Alius 302 


Baluk, Greg 247 


Baylis, Anthony 328 


Bequette, Brian 278 




Alaimo, John 227 


300, 345 


Atkenson, Charmaine 226, 277. 


Banapour, Babak 401 


Baylor, Barb 236 


Berfield, Scott 103 




Alba, Doug 269 


Anderson, Frank 401 


375 


Band 50,51 


Beach. Sue 226 


Berg. Doug 228 




Al-Bahrani, Nihad 297 


Anderson, Jerome 401 


Atkinson, Devon 345 


Bane, Charles 245, 296 


Beagle, Greg 296 


Berg. Eric 401 




Albano, Terrie 334 


Anderson, Jody 240, 282, 401 


Atten, Mary Jo 266, 289, 401 


Banick, Laura 242 


Beale, Brad 258 


Berg, Kristen 211 




Alber, Bill 269 


Anderson, John 284 


Atoji, Cynthia 120. 126. 371, 


Bank. Myra 298 


Bealty, John 336 


Berg, Lauren 273. 309 




Albenco, Mario 268 


Anderson, John 317 


425. 117. 118, 119, 125, 


Banks, Alicia 310 


Beaman, Mari 214 


Bergfeld. Jim 235 




Alberico, Martin 268 


Anderson, Karen 236 


127 


Banks, Bernie 299 


Beanblossom, Todd 294, 320 


Berger, Mike 212. 401 




Albert, Frank 238 


Anderson, Kelly 345 


Atwood, Susie 240. 282, 371 


Banks, Nathaniel 68 


Beard. Ed 180 


Berger, Scott 270 




Alberts, Michael 379 


Anderson, Kim 261 


Aubel, Alice 220 


Banta, John 319, 341 


Beardsley, Lois 301 


Bergeson, Kristin 239 




Albnght. Steve 264 


Anderson, Kurt 254 


Augur, Jim 251 


Banting, Ann 219, 357 


Beaton. Sandi 252 


Berggren. Kathy 421 




Alcala, Cathy 234 


Anderson, Laurie 22, 401 


Auksi, Tiina 266 


Bant, Geoff 311 


Beaton. Sandy 300 


Bergman, Beth 230 




Alcorn, Susan 219, 332, 338 


Anderson, Mark 243 


Auld, Tom 222 


Bantz, Cathy 309, 371 


Beaty. Kelly 245 


Bergman, Debbi 261 




Aldendifer. Robert 280, 357 


Anderson, Martha 379 


Auler, Robert 144 


Barbeau, Debbie 252 


Beaumont, Yvonne 237 


Bergman, Robin 279 




Aldrich, Wayne 224 


Anderson, Mary 293 


Auram. C. 248 


Barber, Chip 225, 357 


Beaupre, Susan 211 


Bergman, Todd 241 




Alex, Regina 293 


Anderson, Mary 375 


Austin, Brad 249, 296, 317 


Barber. Mary 336 


Beauvais, Andrea 357 


Bergsmith. Ron 379 




Alexa, Mark 316 


Anderson, Mary 312 


Austin, Colleen 276 


Barboules, Angella 278 


Beauvais, Beth 311 


Berhard, Deanna 375 




Alexander, Kristen 333 


Anderson, Melinda 271. 345 


Auth, Nancy 221 


Barclay, Bob 235 


Beazly, Randy 238 


Berk, Robert 401 




Alger, Langdon 295, 341 


Anderson, Michelle 278 


Avery, Karen 278 


Barclay, Deb 211 


Bechtel, Brenda 230 


Berk, Ronnie 279 




Aliapoulios, Chris 280 


Anderson. Mike 221, 357 


Avery, Steven 401 


Barczak, Janet 253 


Beck, David 254 


Berka, Marlene 301 




Allen, Andrew 245 


Anderson, Nancy 216 


Aves, Barry 327 


Bard, Nancy 314, 395 


Beck, Kim 284 


Berkelheimer. Maura 237 




Allen, Chuck 341 


Anderson, Penny 326 


Avila, John 334 


Bardel, Greg 263 


Beck, Kim 271 


Berkley, Todd 222. 296, 341 




Allen, Charles 321 


Anderson. Shari 278 


Axelrod. Lee 259 


Bareis, Chuck 243 


Beck, Nancy 307 


Berkowitz. Mike 259 




Allen, Chris 251 


Anderson, Shawn 296, 379 


Axford. Trevor 249, 401 


Barenberg, Mike 264 


Beck, Robert 312 


Berman. Jeff 264 




Allen, Christine 111 


Anderson, Tim 307, 429 


Axt, Amy 293, 401 


Barickman, Nancy 237 


Becker, Bill 225. 345 


Berman, Jodi 273 




Allen, Clint 328 


Anderson, Tom 262 


Ayappa, Cynthia 401 


Bark, Julie 211 


Becker, Caroline 226 


Berman, Karla 325. 339, 375 




Allen, Earl 241, 312 


Andrade, Alex 243 


Azarbarzin, Dara 379 


Barker. Joan 326 


Becker, Chuck 317, 345 


Berman, Lynn 219 




Allen, Game 321 


Andre, Karen 401 


Azoff, Irving 90 


Barkley, David 296 


Becker, Deborah 357 


Berman, Stacey 279 


■ 



430 

Index / A Midsummers Night's Dream - Berman, Stacey 







Berman, Sue 287 


Blardinelli, Jill 305 


Boyd, Craig 260, 286 


Brown, Jack 231 


Burlinngham, Carolyn 226 


Campbell, Sue 336 




Bernard!, Merie 357 


Blatt, Joel 401 


Boyd, Marie 234. 312, 345 


Brown, Jana 353 


Burlingham, Sue 226 


Campbell, Tom 380 




Bernat, Ron 302 


Blau, Carol 421 


Boykins, Michael 323, 328 


Brown, Jennifer 261 


Burnett, Carrie 230 


Campion, Bob 245. 380 




Bemdt, P. C. 258 


Blazej, Laurie 214 


Boylan, Mary Ellen 401 


Brown. Kathy 282 


Burns, Dan 241 


Campus 119. 120 




Berne. Steven 306, 345 


Blazy, Laurie 272 


Boyle, Mary Ann 250 


Brown, Kathy 239 


Burns, Cathy 242 


Campustown 60,61.122,123 




Bernett, Mark 379 


Blessman. Kathy 345 


Brackebusch, Scott 238 


Brown, Kathy 328, 358 


Burns, Dennis 402 


Caniglia, Ken 247 




Bernetti, Clara 252 


Bleuher, Michael 248 


Braddock, Lisa 35 


Brown, Kent 246 


Burns. Rich 348 


Cannal, Pat 336 




Bemhard, Deanna 375 


Bleuher. Tracy 230 


Braddock, Lisa 336, 353 


Brown. Kim 252 


Burns, Steve 292 


Cannell, Ann 312 




Bernier, Margaret 298 


Bliler. Bill 217 


Bradel, Mark 212 


Brown, Laura 242, 278 


Burr, Jay 269 


Cannell, Jenine 214, 340 




Bernsen, Julie 395 


Blitt. Jan 353 


Brademas, Kathy 293 


Brown, Liz 271 


Burrafato, Gina 375 


Cannon, Mary 252, 313 




Bernson, Carol 401 


Block, Caryn 273 


Bradel, Mark 318 


Brown, Maureen 272 


Burnll, Thomas 204 


Cantor, Tod 402 




Bernson, Ed 270 


Block, Shari 339 


Brademas, Jeff 353 


Brown, Peter 379 


Burroughs, Ellen 298 


Canrrell. Brenda 375 




Bernson, Julie 279, 395 


Block, Sonia 271 


Braden, Larry 224 


Brown, Reginald 402 


Burrows, Janet 105 


Canty, Bob 268, 380 




Bernstein, Amy 214 


Blomberg, John 316 


Braden, Stanton 379 


Brown, Robin 288, 345 


Burton, Sidney 334 


Capelle, Mark 184 




Bernstein, Fern 324 


Bloomenkranz, Susie 287 


Bradford, Rose 357 


Brown, Steve 259 


Bury, James 336 


Caplet, Collen 211 




Bernstein, Sharon 375 


Blowers, Linda 276 


Bradley, Carol 140 


Browne, Chris 233 


Busanelli, Judy 250 


Caplet, Susie 211 




Bernstone, Harvey 256 


Blue, Bill 246, 345 


Bradley, Greg 305, 307 


Browne, Julie 301 


Busboom, Mike 317 


Caplan, Judi 279 




Berquist, Mike 227 


Blum, Aimee 219 


Bradley, Leslie 345 


Browne, Larry 269 


Busey Hall 303 


Caplan, Liz 273 




Berry, Brian 300 


Blum, Marty 230 


Bradley, Leslie Ann 301 


Browning, Amy 229, 278 


Busey Woods 42 


Caplice, Daniel 312, 380 




Berry, Kathy 240 


Blumberg. Joanne 252, 278 


Bradley, Parti 305 


Browning, Tim 288 


Bush, Kevin 380 


Cappellin, Stephen 358 




Berry, Richard 379 


Blumenthal, Nancy 291 


Bradley, Patty 220 


Brownson, Sue 216 


Bushman, Lisa 278 


Capurka, Tomas 284 




Berry, Robert 131 


Blumenthal, Sue 273 


Brady, Sue 220, 272 


Brownstein, Pam 273 


Bussan, Marc 380 


Caracci, Marty 252 




Berry, Steve 262 


Board of Trustees 204 


Brakhae, Terry 224 


Brozek, Kathy 300, 358 


Bussey, Sandra 358 


Caravello, Cindy 309, 371 




Berry, Tom 264 


Boas, Jane 320, 379 


Brammeier, Neil 238 


Brozio, Julie 271 


Buswell, Pamela 358 


Caravello, Laura 402 




Bersano, Janice 401 


Boch, Gretchen 230 


Branch, Mark 319 


Brozio, Mark 233 


Butkus, Mark 148 


Cardella, Diane 402 




Berstyn, Linda 287 


Bock, Brian 155 


Brandemeyer, Bill 251 


Brubaker, Ralph 296 


Butler, Deanna 253, 286, 358 


Cardinale, Karen 345 




Berto, Terrie 181, 339 


Bockhorst. Joan 252 


Brandenburg, Andy 262, 296, 


Bruce, Mark 267 


Butler. Debra 58 


Cardone, Paul 380 




Berton, Jeff 379 


Bockhorst, Nan 252 


395 


Bruce, Timothy 297 


Butler. John 291 


Carens, Kathleen 358 




Berton, Jerry 315 


Bode. Linda 234 


Brandon, Karen 253 


Brubaker, Ralph 235 


Butler, Julie 335 


Careswell, Kitty 334 




Bertsch, Joe 334 


Bode, Tom 212 


Brandon, Mark 296 


Brucker, Liz 276 


Butler, Karen 237 


Carey, Chuck 233, 358 




Beseman, Christy 282, 357 


Bodeman, John 254 


Brandt, Jim 284, 401 


Bruckner, Pat 255 


Butler, Kevin 222 


Carey, Mina 211 




Beseman, Christy 328 


Bodmer, Richard 353 


Brandt, John 227, 357 


Bruckner, Paul 255 


Butler. Mike 212 


Carlin, Phil 302 




Besjak, Chuck 243 


Boduch, Mark 379 


Brandt, Scott 254 


Bruederle, J B 402 


Butler. Sue 299 


Carls, Drew 217 




Besser, Randi 325, 375 


Body, Jerry 50 


Brandy, Keith 263 


Bruhns, Ken 247 


Butterfield. Janet 293 


Carlsen, Ann 183 




Bessette, Margaret 294, 325, 


Boe, David 310 


Brandy, Maryann 78, 79, 371 


Bruhns. Mike 247. 379 


Butterfield. Larry 380 


Carlsen, Kurt 227 




357 


Boehm, Dwight 300 


Branecki, Mary 219 


Bruketa. Kipley 242. 278, 353 


Butterfield, Martha 236, 338 


Carlson, Ann 192 




Best, Daniel 357 


Boehm, Joyce 279 


Branz, Eric 248 


Bruno, Hal 305 


Butterfield, Mary 236, 338 


Carlson, Anne 226 




Best, Ray 395 


Boehme, Trudy 318 


Bratschun, Janet 353 


Bruno, Harold 358 


Button, Jeff 269 


Carlson, Dawn 353 




Beta Alpha Psi 303 


Boehne, Laura 293 


Brattin. Patsy 234 


Bruno. Mario 358 


Butts, Shelby 268 


Carlson, Ginger 271, 328 




Beta Sigma Psi 224 


Boeke, Greg 153 


Brauer, Elizabeth 320, 379 


Brunoehler, Jeffrey 345 


Butz, Michael 345 


Carlson, James 380 




Beta Theta Pi 225 


Boerner, Ann 284 


Brauer, Mark 357 


Bruns. Pam 303 


Butzek, Marianne 358 


Carlson, Jeff 262 




Betrand, Jason 321 


Bogdanowicz, Barbara 336 


Braun, Bennett 262 


Brusseau, Michelle 358 


Buyansky. Steve 139. 310, 119 


Carlson, Julie 214 




Bettenhausen, Matt 233, 325, 


Bogg, Beth 401 


Braun, Brian 402 


Brutzkus, Mark 358 


Buytendorp, Debbie 230 


Carlson, June 253 




357 


Boggio, Alexander 401 


Braun, Bruce 285 


Bryant, Mike 222 


Buzzard, John 380 


Carlson, Karin 242. 402 




Bettenhausen, Rodney 379 


Bogue, Jonathan 357 


Braun, Jeff 232, 395 


Bryden. Molly 240, 282, 379 


Byers, Cheryl 230, 371 


Carlson, Kenneth 402 




Beurtler, Fred 310 


Bohlen, Jim 213 


Braun, Kirk 267 


Brynarski, Liz 272 


Byrne, Harry 336 


Carlson. Mike 238, 345 




Bevert, Sue 313 


Bohnhoff, Kent 300 


Braun, Mark 336 


Bryniarski, Chester 213 


Byrne, Pam 253, 358 


Carlson, Peter 283 




Bevirt, Garrell 221 


Boivin, Paola 305, 309 


Braverman, Chuck 256 


Bryon, Jeff 316 


Byrne, Tony 178 


Carlson, Roger 218 




Beynon, Kathleen 242 


Bokoski, Brad 212 


Bray, Darren 241 


Bryon. Lisa 338 


Byron, Jon 322 


Carlson, Steve 185, 190 




Bezanes, Sue 261, 288, 336, 


Bolden, Charon 273 


Brazas, Donna 299 


Bucciferro, James 395 


Bysrrom, Mary 375 


Carlson, Virginia 402 




401 


Boldt, Tom 283 


Brazlton, Roy 138 


Bucciferro, John 402 


Bysrrom, Parti 220 


Carlton, Brenda 358 




Ri»gini, Bernie 270 


Bolerjack, Julie 229, 290 
Boltinghouse, Gary 255 


Breckenfelder, Ted 248 
Breen, Pat 255 


Buchanan, Greg 262 
Buchanan, Joanne 229 




Carlton, Robert 297 
Carlucci, Donna 301, 345 




Bialek, Jim 268 




Biamesen, Mike 251, 285, 379 


Boma, John 232 


Brelfeldt, Linda 237 


Buchanan, Lisa 237 


ccc 


Carmichael. Ron 263 




Bibee, Amy 239 


Bomher, John 401 


Bremhorst, Jim 320 


Bucheri, Gina 314, 395 


Carmody, Laura 242 




Bickelhaupt, Leigh 308, 371 


Bone, Geoff 255 


Bremhorst, Nancy 230 


Buchner, Bob 222 


Carmody, Tracy 242 




Bicknell, Cheryl 236 


Bone, Dave 222 


Bremer, Sue 236 


Buchner, Mike 222 




Carmona, Terri 271 




Bicknell, Scott 217 


Bone, Dawn 229 


Brennan Judith 345 


Buck, Joy 230 
Buckles, Jeff 336 




Carney, Bill 246 




Bidawid, Paul 268 


Bonk! Ellen 307. 401 


Brennan, Maureen 402 




Carney, Jo Anna 250, 375 




Bidlack, Jeanette 261. 288, 421 


Bonkowski. Brian 262 


Bresnan. Damien 317 


Buckley. Tom 222 


C and Judy's 276 


Carney, John 283. 296 




Bidner, Scott 235, 312 


Bonlecki, Liz 242 


Bresnan, Duffy 225 


Buckner. David 402 


Cablevision 26,27 


Carney, Paul 345 




Biefeldt, Dave 251 


Bono. Bernard 379 


Bresnan, Pam 341 


Bucksath. Jerry 330 


Cacci, Chris 211 


Carolsdatter 65 




Bielefeld, Dave 258 


Bonsack. Mark 262, 320 


Brewbaker, Kathy 229 


Bucksath. Mark 254 


Cackler, Steve 317 


Carothers, Pam 226, 277, 345 




Bieneman, David 379 


Bonsall, Belinda 242,317, 371 


Brickman, Jay 215 


Budd, Margie 214 


Cadagin, Laura 303, 358 


Carothers, Robin 226 




Bierk, Mike 247 


Bontemps, Kevin 248 


Bridges, Carl 357 


Budd, Nick 235 


Caddie k, Tom 213 


CARP 48 




Bierman, Phil 218, 304 


Bontems, Lisa 230 


Bridges. Carla 338 


Budin. Paul 308. 309, 333 


Cadigan, Anne 334 


Carp. George 358 




Big Ten 144, 146, 155, 172 


Boone, David 280, 303 


Briggs, Scott 270 


Budney. Nancy 219 


Caffrey, Tom 254 


Can, Dick 325 




Bigelow, Dave 251 


Boorstein, Mark 259 


Bright, Robin 402 


Budney. Susan 266, 289, 319, 


Cagann, Susan 402 


Carranza, Fernandy 300 




Bigelow, Rick 285, 357 


Booth, Brian 295 


Briley, Denise 271 


321, 325, 327. 358 


Cage, Tim 300 


Carringer. Robert 113 




Biggers, Burnell 287 


Boots. Dave 288 


Brille, Brian 358 


Budnick. Debra 402 


Cagle, Robert 353 


Carrington, Mike 151 




Biggs, Barry 379 


Borclay, Susan 219 


Brille, Mo 253 


Budorick, Steve 283 


Cahalan, Harry 330 


Cams. Jim 260, 334 




Billeter, Tom 268 


Bordeaux, Ron 244 


Brincat, Jeff 268 


Budris, Alan 379 


Cahill. Cathy 250 


Cams, Vicki 402 




Billings, Ralph 35 


Borelli, Pat 242, 323, 345 


Brinckman, Karen 220 


Buechner, Hettie211, 358 


Cahill, Denise 317 


Carrko, Pat 268 




Bills, Lisa 293 


Borgic, Melisa 236 


Briney, Bruce 395 


Bugaieski, Kathy 219. 304 


Cahill. Janet 317 


Carroll, Dave 238 




Bilsland, Steve 251 


Boris, Adam 336 


Brinkley, Laura 324 


Buhay, Judy 223, 304 


Cahill, Jeanne 252 


Carroll, Jim 268 




Binkowski, Rob 218 


Borkowski, Kathy 214 


Brinks, Dave 228 


Bulczak, Barb 237 


Cahill, John 218 


Carroll, Nancy 282 




Birdine, Steve 69 


Bornholt, Kathryn 357 


Britten, Sheri 330 


Bulin, Jeff 301 


Cain, Doug 260, 286 


Carroll, Paul 260 




Biries, Randy 245 


Bornstein, Sue 279, 298, 334 


Brock, Angela 345 


Bulthazer, Margaret 177 


Cain, Laura 395 


Carroll. William 402 




Birkbigler, Bill 254 


Borowski, Michele 297 


Brockmeyer, Tammy 284 


Bulwa, Robin 375 


Cain, Suzanne 402 


Carsello, Ro 226, 278 




Bishop, Dan 301 


Borowski. Sandy 242 


Broder, Leslie 328 


Bump, Cindra Kay 22, 72, 74 


Calcurt, Harry 170 


Carson, Wendy 226, 277, 358 




Bishop, Doug 247 


Borrelli, Joe 233 


Broersma, William 379 


84, 120, 122, 138, 139, 


Calder, Wayne 380 


Carter, David 380 




Bishop, Greg 247 


Boruszak, Beth 353 


Broder, Leslie 287, 324 


205, 303 


Caldwell, Julie 226 


Carter, Gary 222, 402 




Bishop, Holly 229, 278 


Bosch, Maureen 379 


Broderick, Mike 300 


Bunier, Maggie 300 


Caldwell. Stacey 230 


Carter. Katherine 402 




Bishop, John 283 


Bose, Ron 278 


Broderson, John 247 


Bunker, Tim 264, 265, 402 


Calhoon. Cindy 375 


Carter, M. 248 




Bishop, Mary Ellen 250 


Bossi, Charlotte 324 


Broderson, Maria 371 


Bunse, Lisa 230 


Call, Kathy 220 


Carter, Sandra 287 




Bishop, Mike 254 


Boston, Debbie 236 


Brodsley, Steve 227 


Bunte , Brian 224 


Callahan, Chris 278 


Cartwright, Heather 253, 286, 




Bishop, Richard 401 


Bother, Adam 256 


Brody, Dave 259 


Burack. Al 215 


Callahan, Donna 252 


330, 358 




Biskup, Richard 379 


Botts, Susan 379 


Broeren, Tom 248 


Burbules, Angie 230 


Callahan, Eileen 226 


Cartwright, Heidi 253 




Bissell, Steve 170 


Boudinot, Debbie 282, 375 


Broeren, Tim 248 


Burczhak, Mike 248 


Callahan, Kimberly 402 


Cartwright, Shari 336 




Biszewski. Laura 239, 282, 357 


Boundy, Diane 239, 282. 357 


Broersma, William 379 


Burd, Bob 231 


Callahan. Kris 242 


Caruso, Bob 228 




Bitner, Barb 253, 286, 345 


Bounen, John 228 


Brohammer. Ben 332 


Burda, Ann Marie 230, 317 


Callahan, Nancy 402 


Caruso, Matt 249 




Bitting. David 235, 300, 312 


Bounsall, Phillip 357 


Bromley, Debra 375 


Burg, Dan 270 


Callahan. Shellagh 219 


Carver, Cindy 242 




Bitting, Robert 345 


Bourbulas. Tom 284, 401 


Bronars, Cynthia 326, 402 


Burg, Marg211 


Callin, Erin 253, 294, 323, 402 


Casady, Bill 238 




Bittner, Kurt 357 


Bourchard, Steve 336 


Bronsen, Ann 50 


Burg, Marion 358 


Calmenson, Risa 402 


Casady, Peter 283 




Bizar, Jill 357 


Bourke, John 218 


Bronson, Bruce 244 


Burgard. George 395 


Calvin, Jeff 264, 265, 317 


Case, Kathryn 313, 345 




Bjerga, Erling 379 


Bourke, Richard 379 


Bronson, Kim 128 


Burge, David 380 


Calvino, Mark 249 


Casey, Francie 242, 272 




Black Students 70. 71 


Bousky, Elizabeth 297 


Bronson, Mark 283 


Burger, Ambrose W, 312 


Camacho, Kenneth 402 


Casey, Gloria 278 




Black. Doug 254 


Bousky, Tracey 220 


Bronson, Sue 278 


Burgess, Sandy 278 


Cambron. Kyra 252, 291 


Casey, Kim 250 




Black. Greg 243 


Bouslog, Annette 271 


Bronxon, Marion 229 


Burgess. Sheila 230 


Camel, Jim 212, 402 


Casey, Therese 242, 358, 423 




Black. Mike 254 


Bouslog, Lori 271 


Brooks, Debbie 236 


Burgess. Stanley 345 


Cameli, Thomas 303, 358 


Cash, Pamela 273 




Black, Todd 172. 286 


Bouton, Pete 172 


Brooks, Sharon 216 


Burghardt. Wes 290 


Cameron, Dean 380 


Cashman, John 283 




Blackburn, Brian 259 


Bowden, Pat 260 


Brooks. Walter 379 


Burian, Beth 375 


Cameron, Paul 251, 285, 402 


Caspary, Gay 316 




Blackburn, David 379 


Bower, Doug 264 


Broom. Albert 138 


Burich. Kathy 272, 320, 380 


Camin, Ron 233, 380 


Casper, Steve 296 




Blackman, Tammy 273, 317 


Bower.Jon 249 


Brosnahan, Mary Margaret 216, 


Burke, Laura 375 


Camp, Alan 297 


Casperson, Tina 252 




Blackwell, Gregory 401 


Bowes, Diana 401 


336, 341 


Burke. Michael 308. 309 


Campbell. Bob 218 


Casserly, Colleen 253, 286, 




Blaha, Mike 228 


Bowes, Jeff 233 


Brosnan, Kim 335 


Burke. Toby 336 


Campbell. Chris 229, 272 


325, 335, 358 




Blahous. Elizabeth 401 


Bowman, Jane 305 


Brost. Corey 308, 309, 371 


Burkett. Jeff 222 


Campbell, Craig 284 


Cassin, Rich 243 




Blair, Beth 250 


Bowman, Jeff 227 


Brottman, Mike 289, 402 


Burkey, Ann 300, 345 


Campbell, Jane 293 


Cassleman, Ron 149 




Blair, John 183 


Bowsky, Tracey 298 


Brown, Bob 318 


Burkey, Bill 324 


Campbell, Kent 296 


Castle, Vicki 219 




Blair, Richard 401 


Box, Barb 237 


Brown, Bruce 251, 301 


Burklach, Vicki 358 


Campbell, Kris 358 


Caston, Nina 237 




Blake, John 268 


Boxerman, Sam 215 


Brown, David 323, 358 


Burkland, Adrianne 221 


Campbell, Lynn 336 


Castree, Paul 290 




Blanchard, Robert 308. 371 


Boyce. Rob 317 


Brown, Debra 103 


Burkland, Maria 221, 345 


Campbell, Martha 237 


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 104, 




Blanchette, Paula 229 


Boyd, Bruce 296, 326 


Brown, Donnie 328 


Burleigh, Cheryl 334 


Campbell, Rick 238 


105 



















431 

Index / Berman, Sue - Cat On A Hot Tin Roof 









Catalano. Frank 402 


Chudzinski. Bozema 317 


Colburn. Linda 253 


Corley, Kevin 222 


Cullen, John 227 


Davis, Vera 403 




Catchpole, Lynn 261, 288 


Chung. Ulric 402 


Colbert, Dan 283 


Cormier, Julie 237 


Cullinan, Pam 261, 288, 403 


Davison, Becky 219 




Caton, John 315 


Church, Bruce 264, 265 


Colbert, Mike 283 


Cornelius, Eric 241, 317, 345 


Cullinan, Roxanne 276 


Daw, Joe 172 




Cart, Patrick 233 


Church, Craig 218, 307, 358 


Cole, Bill 141 


Cornelius, Kent 241 


Culp, Dave 212 


Daw, Tim 242, 285 




Cauley, Pam 336 


Church, Zack 251 


Cole, Kristen 261 


Cornelius, Valerie 403 


Cummingham, Nancy 242 


Dawson, Charles 328 




Causley, Lisa 287 


Chynoweth, Jim 381 


Cole, Terry 148 


Corona, Agnes 252 


Cummings, Dan 317 


Dawson, Jay 288 




Cavanaugh. Kirk 269 


Cicinelli. Elisa 334 


Coleman, Brian 20, 100, 107, 


Corrigan, Amy 240 


Cummins, Debbie 305 


Dawson, Suzanne 219, 307, 




Cavanaugh, Mike 312 


Ciecko, Cheryl 240 


120, 124, 144. 149, 200, 


Corsello, Sandy 271 


Cummiskey, Dan 260 


340 




Cavenaugh, Richard 325, 380 


Cieslar, Janice 226 


205, 206, 256, 342, 352 


Cory, Mary 311 


Cundiff, Katherine 359 


Day, Robert 325, 381 




Cave, Karen 252 


Cieslar. Mark 232 


355, 378, 380, 385, 389, 


Cosbey, Sue 305 


Cunningham, Donna 237 


Dean, Julie 253 




Cazel, Greg 228 


Cima, Elizabeth 395 


428, 444, 446, 447, 2, 4, 


Cosentino, Carolyn 331 


Cunningham, Jim 334 


Dean, Monica 240 




Cazel, Jeff 227 


Cioffi, Ken 381 


12, 13, 14, 16, 55, 63, 64, 


Cosgrove, Ann 403 


Cunningham, Missy 229 


DeAngelis, Joe 247 




Cederblade, Frank 269 


Cioni, Sarah 230 


96, 97, 109, 101. Ill, 


Cosgrove, Carol 239 


Cunningham, Nancy 359 


Deason, Warren 288 




Centers, Susan 402 


Ciosek. Walt 254 


116, 121, 142, 150, 152, 


Cosgrove, Nora 300, 305, 403 


Cunningham, Randy 225 


Deatrick, Joyce 219, 274, 403 




Central American Solidarity 


Cipolla, William 371 


158, 160, 161 


Cosgrove, Terry 324 


Cunningham. Steve 395 


Deboer, Daniel 359 




Committee 35 


Cirgin, Don 300 


Coleman, Kenneth 328 


Cosmer, Debbie 303 


Curl. Mark 306 


Debrunner, Susan 219 




Central Black Student Union 


Cirillo, Chip 153 


Coleman, Laura 403 


Costas, Judson 381 


Curley, Jim 232 


Debruzzi, James 359 




304 


Cirillo, Lee David 248 


Coleman, Linda 340 


Costello, Anne 301 


Curran, Rita 403 


Decher, Doug 180 




Central States Collegiate 


Ciskowski, Douglas 381 


Coleman, Michael 403 


Costello, Shawn 284 


Currie, Barbie 237 


Dechert, Nancy 298, 359 




Hockey League 171 


Citrano. Tracey211, 402 


Coleman, Ron 244 


Costello, Tom 138 


Curry, Linda 273. 338, 371 


Dedin, Coach Tom 155 




Ceresa. Kay 239, 282, 402 


Cizek, Paul 381 


Coleman, Tom 268 


Costigan, Christy 242 


Curtin, Gary 235 


Dedinsky, Mick 381 




Cetin, Randall 297 


Clack, Judith 381 


Coles, Darrick 336 


Costigan, Matt 257 


Curtin, Greg 312 


Deegan, Patti 220 




Chabner, Barbara 402 


Claeys, Thomas 358 


Coletti, Ann 261 


Cothern. Gregg 403 


Curtis, Bill 224 


Deegee, Donna 272 




Chachula, Veronica 340 


Claggett, Beth 253 


Colker, Ken 228 


Cotter, Benita 216 


Curtis, David 336 


Dees, Paul 270 




Chacon, Andy 228 


Claggett, Julie 253 


College Democrats 35, 131 


Cottrell, Michael 321 


Curtis, Doreene 273 


DeHaan, Bill 249 




Chadwick, Mike 180 


Clapper. Curt 345 


College Republicans 19, 35, 


Couch, Jane 261, 288, 375 


Curtis, Greg 225 


Dehaan, Kevin 292 




Challenger 130 


Clar, Cheri 237 


131 


Couch. Judy 261 


Curtis, Joe 153 


DeHoff. Mary Pat 239, 303, 




Chamberlain, Ami 310 


Clark, Cherf 332 


CollerJer. Phil 213 


Coughlin. Chuck 247 


Curtis, Wesley 298 


359 




Chamberlain, Craig 322 


Clark, Craig 381 


Colley, David 314 


Court. Kim 214 


Cushing, Mike 288 


Deighan, Karen 250, 285, 403 




Chamberlain, Kimberlee 402 


Clark, Greg 255 


Collins, Colleen 307 


Courtney. Brian 268 


Custer, James 359 


Dejanovich, Daniel 403 




Chamberlain, Ron 244 


Clark, Hannah 261 


Collins, Jo Ellen 345 


Courtney, Mark 381 


Cuthbert. Kevin 233, 332 


Deland, Robert 381 




Chamberlain, Sharon 236 


Clark, Jacqueline 402 


Collins, Jodie 211 


Courtney, Mike 218, 403 


Cycyota, Steve 232 


Delaney. Patricia 346 




Chambers. Don 262 


Clark. Jeff 222 


Collins, Michelle 271 


Coutre, Kathleen 421 


Czarnik, Bob 267 


Delaney, Scott 334 




Champion, Ann 358 


Clark, Karen 220 


Collins, Patricia 358 


Couture, Amy 253 


Czart, Krisrjna 359 


De La Paz. Alina 403 




Champion, Scott 306 


Clark, Kevin 255 


Collins, Robert 297 


Couture, Nanette 375 


Czerniak. Jeanne 303, 325, 359 


DeLaurenti, John 269 




Chams, Joyce 279 


Clark, Lisa 226 


Collins, Teresa 303 


Coven, Debbie 375 


Czeschin, Melvin 251 


Delesandro. D. 248 




Chan, Ed 316 


Clark, Nick 292 


Collymore, Karen 183 


Covey, Nancy 271 


Czuback, Lisa 261 


Delhey, John 265 




Chan, Hsaio Chang 340 
Chan, Victor 381 


Clark, Rex 235, 300, 332, 338 
Clark, Stanley 402 


Columbia Space Shuttle 130 
Coman, Lisa 395 


Covinsky, Michael 402 
Cow Pi Moo 306 




Dellos, Ann 290 
Delta Chi 228 






Chandler, Kevin 257 


Clark. Ted 288 


Combo Audio 108 


Cowap, Stephen 381 


J *t -rl 


Delta Chi Little Sisters 278 




Chaney, Gail 242 


Clark, Thomas 358 


Combs, Nancy 403 


Coward, Mike 318 


nun 


Delta Delta Delta 24, 229 




Chap, Linnea 229 


Clark, Tom 288 


Comer, Carol 236, 340 


Cowell, Lisa 226, 277, 375 


If CI It 


Delta Gamma 207, 230 




Chapin, Harry 120 


Clark, Tom 402 


Comisky, Laurel 276, 299 


Cox, John 255 




Delta Kappa Epsilon 278 




Chapin, Mark 268 


Clark, Troy 358 


Commerce Council 305 


Cox, Mark 217 




Delta Phi 231 




Chaplick, Ira 259 


Clarke, Tom 244 


Commerce Council Board 305 


Cox, Steve 262 




Delta Phi Epsilon 207. 279 




Chapman, Greg 270 


Clarkin. Jeff 225 


Community United Church of 


Coyle, Jeff 233 


Dachman, William 403 


Delta Sigma Omicron 306 




Chapman, Matthew 402 


Clarkson. James 297 


Christ 48 


Crabb, Mike 270 


Dabrowski, Mike 299 


Delta Sigma Phi 232 




Chapman, Ten 242, 278, 375 


Clary, Rick 217 


Como, Jan 300 


Crabb, Gregory 403 


Daebel, Jennifer 375 


Delta Sigma Phi Seniors 279 




Chapman, Lori 219 


Clash 57 


Como, Robert 403 


Crackel, Catie 226 


Dahl, Wayne 381 


Delta Sigma Pi 307 




Charbonneau, Scott 402 


Claudon, Sue Ann 340. 345 


Compall, Tim 222 


Craemer, Diane 336 


Dahm, Martin 395 


Delta Sigma Theta 280 




Charhut, Karen 219 


Claus. Andrew 381 


Compton, Carrie 251 


Craemer, Susan 336 


Dahm, Suzanne 317, 345 


Delta Tau Delta 204, 280 




Charlton. Chris 250 


Claussen. Christopher 329 


Compton, Lynn 276 


Craft, Donna 307 


Dahmm, Martin 301, 395 


Delta Upsilon 233 




Chase, Barb 276 


Clay, Brenda 375 


Conarchy, Jane 237 


Craft, Keith 296 


Daiber, Robert 345 


Delta Zeta 234 




Chato, Susan 271, 402 


Clay, Dede 240 


Concert Choir 290 


Craft, Laura 312 


Daily lllini Display Advertising 


DeMar, Mark 256 




Chaven, Suchada 250 


Clayton, Joe 268 


Concialdi, Mary 266 


Craig, Alan B 322 


309 


Demarco, J. 248 




Chayer, Bob 292 


Cleary, Kate 207, 230 


Condill, J. B. 269 


Craig, Jean 219 


Daily lllini Editorial Board 309 


DeMercurio, Jolie 403 




Chechachek, Gladys 305 


Cleary, Kevin 294, 402 


Conlan, Jack 172 


Craig, John 227 


Daily lllini Editorial Staff 308 


Demick. Christine 403 




Cheerleaders 304 


Cleary. Michael 381 


Conley. Elizabeth 272 


Craig, Stuart 381 


Daily lllini Executive Council 


Democratic Socialist Organizing 




Chen, Dave 257 


Cleland. Nancy 278 


Conley, Kathy 316 


Crail, Jim 322 


309 


Committee 131 




Chen, Grace 229 


Cleland. Tamara 226 


Conlon, Ed 222 


Crain. Jay 270 


Daily lllini Office Staff 310 


Demonico. Blase 213 




Chen, Jeanne 250 


Clemency, Jean 252 


Conn. Mike 251 


Crain, Ken 248 


Daily lllini Photo Staff 310 


Demoll. Monica 340 




Chen, Sherry 271 


Clements, Carol 214. 272, 402 


Connelly, Susan 339 


Crain, Mark 299, 381 


Daily lllini Production Staff 311 


Demoulin, Paul 381 




Cheney, Dawn 211 


Clemmensen, Chris 258 


Connolly, Kevin 283, 381 


Crain, Kerry 248 


Dallas, John 238 


Dempsey. Terry 346 




Cheng, Anna 358 


Clemmensen, Kurt 258 


Connolly, John 395 


Crain, Mark 42 


DalDegan, Dan 218 


Demuro, Charles 359 




Cherney. Sue 316 


Clemmons. Harlan 345 


Connolly, T. 248 


Crane, Donna 216, 371 


Daleiden, Jerome 381 


Demuro, Dave 255 




Cherny, Shari 273 


Cler, Mary 375 


Conner, Thorn 218 


Crane, Tim 225 


Dalenberg. Heidi 214 


Denby, Bruce 231 




Chesnut, Rod 235 


Cleveland. Greg 341 


Conners, Kathryn 375 


Craver. Jill 266, 289 


Daleo, Jim 244, 371 


Denby, Dave 231. 320, 346 




Cheung. Jean 402 


Clewlow. Jim 258 


Connor, Clare 216 


Craver. Kathryn 359 


Daley. Doug 323 


Deneson, Sandy 300 




Chew, Crystal 220 


Clifford. Chris 254 


Connor, Kevin 336 


Crawford, James 403 


DalSanto, Vickie 359 


Denham, Sara 403 




Chew, Keith 296 


Clifford. Jeanine 220 


Conrad, Gwen 226 


Crawford, Janice 272 


Dambrowski. Mary Rose 220 


Denigny. Nancy 54 




Cheyne. Barbara 375 


Clifford. Karen 239 


Conrady. Dave 238, 312, 345 


Crawford, Nancy 272. 375 


Damgaard, Paula 242 


Dennison. Brad 256, 359 




Chi Omega 226 


Cloch. Steven 402 


Conrath, Dan 247 


Crawford, Ron 217 


D'Amico, Thomas 359 


Denzer, Lee 217, 346 




Chi Omega Seniors 277 


Cloyd, Diana 345 


Conrath, Michele 301 


Crawford. Tim 246 


DamKroger, Bob 262. 320 


DePaolis, Ann 253 




Chi Psi 227 


Cluskey, Joel 297 


Conrath, Richard 381 


Creagh, Pam 266. 359 


Damron. Tim 245, 332, 338 


DePaolis, Ellen 253, 286, 381 




Chi Psi Seniors 277 


Clyde, Victoria 403 


Conray. Steve 246 


Credi, Greg 222 


Danehower, Georgie 253 


DePasquale. Ralph 218 




Chiarchiaro. Mary 276. 402 


Coad, Paul 299 


Conroyd, David 341 


Creidi, Mindy 214 


Danhoff, Joanne 266, 289, 345 


DePhillips, Kevin 222 




Chiang, June 250 


Coady. Thomas 358 


Conroy, Sue 261, 288, 358 


Creland, Nancy 226 


Daniels, Brad 227 


Derdzinski. Karen 221 




Chiapetta. Albert 248, 358 


Coates, Ray 69 


Conservative Caucus 129 


Cremerius, Kathryn 403 


Daniels. Lynette 230 


DeRiemacker, Al 233, 381 




Chicci, Jill 226 


Coates, Steve 218, 304, 353 


Constertina, Jim 265 


Crescenzo, M. 248 


Daniels. Rozana 340 


Derk, Pamela 272 




Chicoine, Beth Ann 237 


Coath, Joseph 297 


Conte, Randy 155, 248, 358 


Cribbet, Chancellor John E 144 


Danielson. Morris 243. 359 


Derrick. Evonne 240 




Chiczawski, Joe 228 


Cobb, Alex 141 


Contento, Lelia 240, 324 


Crigler, Kathy 239, 282 


D'Anna, Dori 252, 278 


Derrough. Bob 243 




Chidester, Jodi 239 


Cobb, Douglas 403 


Conway, Marci 278 


Crippen, Bob 130 


Dankert, Dave 224 


Derry, James 248 




Chidichimo, Mark 232 


Coblenz, Michael 381 


Conway, Sarah 239 


Croft, Phyllis 345 


Danley, Steven 403 


DeSalvo, John 278 




Chien. Ed 288 


Cochonour, Debbie 240, 305 


Conwell, Beth 324 


Croghan. Kelly 421 


Danzyger, Howard 215 


Deschatelets. Thomas 381 




Chien. Emily 293. 303 


Cochran. Bnjce 381 


Conydon, James 305 


Cronin, Betsy 253 


Dardano. Raymond 403 


DeScheffer, Tom 254 




Chien. Ted 251 


Cochrane. John 222 


Coogan, Kim 219 


Cronin, Kevin 90 


Darden, Dave 269, 300 


DesEnfants. Laura 282. 395 




Chikaraishi, Nancy 275, 297 


Cochrane. Scott 222 


Cook, Bob 212 


Cronin. Maureen 239 


Darrah, Jackie 226 


Desierto. Israel 232 




Chilla, Gail 214 


Cody, Ann 306 


Cook, Glenn 381 


Cronin. Rosanne 252 


Dart, Kathy 253 


Despatis, Celine 395 




Chin, Anthony 297 


Cody, Kevin 254 


Cook. Gregg 262 


Cronin. Sheila 242 


Date, Charlene 339 


DeSutter, James 346 




Chin. Elizabeth 314, 395 


Coe, Mark 259 


Cook. Mike 227 


Crook, Teresa 340 


Dau, Dave 241 


DeSutter. Jeff 245 




Chin, Gary 310 


Co-ed Theater 113 


Cook. Pete 225 


Cross Country 182, 184 


Dau. Dean 346 


Deters. Sharon 339 




Chin, Rick 358 


Coffer, Curtis 358 


Cook. Sally 261. 288. 375 


Cross. Janet 283, 312 


Daugherty. Karen 250 


Detloff. JoAnne 226. 277. 403 




Chodash, Howard 299 


Coffey, G. 248 


Cook, Steve 225, 317 


Crosse, Terri 307 


Daugherty, Tory 247 


Detoy. Debra 300, 312, 346 




Chodash, Steve 256 


Coghlan, Barb 242 


Cools, Pam 338 


Crossett, Lome 326, 336 


Daum. Nancy 371 


Detrana. Philip 403 




Choi, Eugine 402 


Coghlan, Teri 242 


Cooney, Kate 253 


Crossland, Gary 228 


Davenport. Ann 242, 328 


Dettoff. Mary Pat 282 




Choi, Meeae 381 


Coglianese, Carol Lynn 271, 


Cooper, Janice 375 


Crost, Sharon 403 


Davenport, Lenny 232 


Derwilier. Sue 242 




Choi, Charles 270 


300, 345 


Cooper, Jon 215 


Crouse, Laura 214. 272, 359 


Davenport. Rocin 219 


Deubner, Mark 296 




Christensen, Bruce 221 


Cohen, Alex 292 


Cooper. Cheryl 273 


Crowcrowft Beth 211 


Davidsmeier, Scott 235 


Deutsch, Ross 304 




Christensen, Dawn 375 


Cohen, Alisa 287 


Cooper. Kathy 358 


Crowder, Carolyn 303, 307 


Davies. Ron 248 


Deutschmann, Andy 178, 254 




Christensen, John 263 


Cohen. Cindy 287 


Cooper, Kelly 403 


Crowe, Lynn 336 


Davies, Todd 269 


DeValos. Kathy 226 




Christensen, Leslie 312, 345 


Cohen, Esther 287 


Cooper, Kirk 381 


Crowe, Randy 315, 381 


Davitz, Parti 240 


Devaney, Kevin 213 




Christiaens, Diane 402 


Cohen. Jamie 287 


Cooper. Lisa 287, 303 


Crowell, Mark 110 


Davis, Bob 341 


Devereux. Marie 359 




Christiansen, Julie 402 


Cohen, Janet 287, 358 


Cooper, Lizabeth 403 


Crowley, Liz 320 


Davis, Carla 250 


DeVita. Elizabeth 403 




Christiansen, Rhonda 421 


Cohen, Jay 215 


Cooper, Luz 300 


Crum, Kevin 403 


Davis, Dan 228 


Devlin. Laura 346 




Christiansen, Scott 82, 228 


Cohen, Karen 253 


Coor, Brian 317 


Crumrine, Dianne 236 


Davis, Debra 287. 298 


DeVore. Doug 243, 320, 381 




Christie, Catherine 358 


Cohen, Larry 296, 403 


Copeland, Catherine 403 


Crumrine, Mary 323 


Davis. Gary 263 


Devries. Pete 249, 403 




Christy, Bob 212 


Cohen, Marcie 358 


Copeland, Tim 263 


Cruwys. Bryan 218 


Davis, Judy 338 


Dewar, Ron 88,89 




Christy, Midge 226 


Cohen, Marlene 279 


Corbett. James 403 


Cryder, Dave 270. 381 


Davis, King 248 


DeWeger, Mike 257 




Chronis, Helen 252 


Cohen, Mike 299 


Corcoran, Andrew 248 


Cryer, Len 304 


Davis. Pam 239 


DeWerff, Tamara 335 




Chruszch, Tony 264 


Cohen, Tobe 358 


Corcoran, Larry 336. 341. 403 


Cuffe, Gail 297 


Davis. Patricia 403 


Dewev. Brad 263 




Chu, John 381 


Cohen, Wendy 287 


Corcoran, Maurice 381 


Cuffee, Robert 297 


Davis. Rodney 327, 359 


Dewey, Robert 324. 381 




Chu, Tom 402 


Cohn, Abigail 381 


Cordigan. Tana 216, 324 


Culhane, Dorothy 359 


Davis. Ron 235 


DeYoung, Linda 371 




Chubin, David 336 


Coker, Brooke 253 


Coretz, Melissa 252, 330 


Cullen, Gary 403 


Davis. Steve 244, 403 


DeYoung. Margaret 214 


432 














Index / Catalano, Frank 


De Young, Margaret 



























Diamond, Jim 218 


Dooley, Kevin 381 




Engdahl, Reed 341 


Fawcett, Donald 382 


Fish, Diana 341, 360 








Diamond, Joe 403 


Doorandish. Laleigh 250, 285, 




Engels, Chuck 270 


Faxon, David 298 


Fish, Donna 338 






Diamond, Matt 218, 324 


359 


eee 


Engels, Donna 303 


Faynor, Laura 219 


Fisher, Charlie 292 






Diamond, Pete 288 


Doppelt, Cindy 287 


England 128 


Fecht, Mark 217, 300, 338 


Fisher, Kathy 278 






Diamond. Ronald 346 


Dorethy, Joy 381 




England, Janet 284 


Fechter, Lyndell 226 


Fisher, Kevin 336 






Diaz, Denise 319 


Dorf, Carol 273 
Dorff, Regina 214 




Engle, Dave 232 

Engle, Jane 261, 288, 375 


Fechtig, Scott 238 
Feckmanari Tribe 311 


Fisher, Kim 275, 297 
Fisher, Lisa 253 






Diaz, Ricardo 297 




Dickel, Professor John 130 


Doria, David 381 




Engle, Joe 130 


Feder, Randi 279, 359 


Fisher. Randi 375 






Dickerson, Marianne 182, 282 


Dorm Life 32, 33 


Eades, Ronald 123 


Engotti, Sherri 278 


Federighi, Toni 246 


Fisher, Sherri 250 






Dickerson, Mark 244 


Dom, Andy 213 


Eadie, Liz 261 


Engroff, Sue 404 


Fedrigon, Alan 346 


Fisher, Susan 371 






Dickey, Dennis 403 


Dombush, Mary 290 


Earl, Eric 404 


Engstrom, DuWee 254 


Feeley, Dave 288 


Fishman, Brad 259 






Dickson, Kerry 184, 339 


Dorrance, Peggy 253 


Earl, Larry 213 


Enk, Eileen 404 


Feeney, Chuck 258 


Fishman, Lisa 273 






Di Cola, Cathy 179 


Doss, Vasanta 273, 359 


Eason, Tony 146, 148, 149, 


Enockson, Linn 382 


Feeney, Paul 262 


Fishman, Ross 404 






Dicola, Jacki 314, 395 


Doty, Mark 359 


151, 153 


Enrietto, Nelson 346 


Feher, Lisa 371 


Fisk, Renee 240 






Dicola, Joe 232 


Doughty, Neil 90 


East, Dave 83 


Enright, Tim 232 


Fehr, Chuck 312, 346 


Fiskann, Merle 287 






Dickrell, Sue 237 


Douse, H. Maurice 321 


East, Linda 293 


Enriquez, Bill 248 


Fehr, Paul 312, 346 


Fister, Amy 314, 395 






Didrickson, Abby 253 


Dove, David 395 


East, Mark 359 


Ensign, Jim 294, 353 


Feige, Kit 375 


Fitzgerald, Greg 294 






Diercks, Tad 243 


Dover, Bob 306 


East, Wayne 238 


Entrikin, Pam 298 


Feiler, Dianne 221, 252 


Fitzgerald, Mary 214 






Dierker, John 284 


Dow, John 254 


Eastman, Beth 216 


Environment 129 


Feingold, Mark 292 


Fitzgerald, Michael 346 






Dierker, Ron 284 


Dow, Linda 293 


Eastman, Jon 246, 404 


Epifanio, Jeff 258 


Feinmahl, Mark 215 


Fitzgerald, Pat 260 






Dierking, Keith 320, 381 


Dowd, Debbie 236 


Easton, Brad 247 


Eppel, Marty 316 


Felsecker, Donna 336 


Fitzgibbon, Gerald 284 






DiRglio, Mary 298, 341 


Dowdy, Chris 253 


Eathington, Kenny 245, 338 


Eppley, Larry 222, 359 


Fenstermaker, Kathy 253 


Fitzpatrick, Dave 217 






DiGiulio, Kathy 239, 282, 359 


Dowell, Jill 253, 286, 395 


Ebeling, Mark 248 


Epstein, Allan 359 


Fenstermaker, Sue 253, 286, 


Fitzpatrick, Patricia 375 






Dilulio. Tony 225 


Dowell, Nate 293 


Eberhard, Martin 382 


Epstein, Mindy 272 


346 


Fizer, Cheryl 313 






Dikici, Sila 403 


Downey, John 235 


Eberhart, Karen M. 303 


Erhart, Lynette 214 


Ferber, Stuart 404 


Flack. Kathryn 284 






Dill, Dewayne 346 


Downey, Jon 300, 325, 346 


Ebner, Walt 359 


Erickson, Edwin 228 


Ferguson, Bill 301 


Flack, Monte 136 






Dillman, Gary 213 


Downey, Larry 381 


Eby, Gail 253 


Erickson, Jim 217 


Ferguson, Bonnie 404 


Flag Corps 313 






Dillon, Kaki 229 


Downey, Michael 297 


Eck, John 404 


Erickson, Nancy 211 


Ferguson, Deanna 266 


Flaglor, Bette 300, 346 






Dillon, Mike 247 


Downey. Pat 290 


Eckardt, Robert 382 


Erickson, Russ 395 


Ferguson, J. Scott 404 


Flaherty, Tom 222 






Dillow, Doug 231 


Downing, Darren 235 


Eckenstein, Catherine 346 


Erickson, Sue 219, 307, 338 


Ferguson, Jim 262, 359 


Flanigan, Sarah 237 






Dimaio, Dino B. 403 


Downing, Laura 211 


Eckert, Nancy 359 


Ericson, Krysten 395 


Ferguson, Sue 229 


Flannigan, Erin 404 






DiMarco, Michele 240, 336 


Downing, Michele 305 


Eckstein, Ross 346 


Eriksen, Russ 318 


Ferko, Amy 308 


Heck, Rob 278 






DiMarco, Stacy 240, 282, 381 


Doyle, Chris 269, 395 


Eckstrom, Janice 382 


Eriksen, Stein 318 


Fernandez, Hortencia 303 


Fleischer, Tom 243 






Dimit, Jeff 35 


Doyle, Maryann 404 


Edberg, Jeff 278 


Erikson, Kim 216 


Fernandez, Tim 243 


Fleischman, Charles 129 






DiMonte, Cara 252 


Doyle, T.C. 225 


Eddingfield, Shelly 237 


Erlandson, Jim 245 


Ferragamo, Vince 152 


Fleming, Donna 230 






Dimowd, Bob 256 


Drablos. Craig 359 


Eddington, Lynne 303, 404 


Erskine, Holly 242 


Ferraro, Jennifer 346 


Fleming, John 228 






Ding, Judy 381 


Drake, Stan 249 


Edelman, Maria 287 


Ertmer, Kevin 346 


Ferrill, Monica 276 


Fletcher, Colby 321 






Dingee, Denise 335 


Drane, Laura 290 


Edelstein, Art 215 


Esch, Tom 224 


Fertel, Traci 287 


Fletcher, Craig 404 






DiNicola, Dee 261, 353 


Drapa, Shirley 381 


Edelstein, Charles 305, 359 


Eselevsky, Ariel 215 


Fertig, Debbie 287 


Fletcher, Kevin 300 






Dintelman, Keith 235, 317 


Drassler, Lynne 216, 404 


Edelstein, Mark 215 


Esgar. Ralph 312 


Fertig, Maury 256, 303, 323, 


Fletcher, Tom 246 






Dipert, Joanne 276 


Drazba, Tim 307, 359 


Eder, Paul 404 


Esguerra, Enrico 404 


359 


Rick, Mary Kay 236 






DiPrima, Diane 226 


Dreas, Grace 250 


Ederle, Doug 222 


Eskew, Al 322 


Fess, Linda 359 


Flick, Nancy 236, 346 






Dirienzo, Thomas 381 


Dreebin, Sue 287 


Edfors, James 336 


Eslinger. Pat 230 


Fessler, Jeff 301, 395 


Flitman, Jeff 320 






Dirst, Ken 403 


Drennan, Joan 278 


Edmund, Ben 217 


Espenscheid, Dean 217 


Feuerschwenger, Karen 277, 


Rock, Karin 252 






Dirst, Mat 290 


Drennan, Rich 302, 359 


Edmunds, Gayle 276, 294 


Esposito, Chris 225, 301 


395 


Hock, Mary 221 






Disbrow, Kevin 381 


Dressel, Steven 323 


Edquist, Dave 232 


Essex, Douglas 336 


Fewkes, Ken 260 


Hock, Tim 221 






Discher, Clare 316 


Dressier, Pete 258 


Edstrom, Carol 395 


Essig, Kelli 230, 328, 346 


Fey, Becky 216 


Hodstrom, John 284 






Dismer, Jeff 221 


Drevent, Charlotte 271 


Edstrom, Donna 331, 404 


Estes, David 404 


Fey, Nancy 300 


Hood, Dan 228 






Dissert, Sue 278 


Dreveny, Peggy 375 


Edwards, Elizabeth 283 


Esworthy, Dale 233 


Ffitch, Pete 184 


Hood, Pat 247 






Ditto, Cathy 237 


Drew, Dan 303, 359 


Edwards, Jerry 218, 304 


Eterno, Marianne 27, 77, 83, 


Fialkowski, Virginia 359 


Hora, Denise 293 






Diven, Laura 313, 403 


Drew, Laura 271 


Edwards, Steve 283 


90, 103, 107 


Ficek, Connie 211 


Horek, Laura 240, 305 






DiVenanzo, Dave 262 


Drewes, Terry 316 


Eeten, Eric 235 


Eterno, Michael 103 


Ficek, Sue 250 


Hores, Lou 232 






Dixon, Phyllis 261 


Drewno. Carol 219 


Egan, Barb 230 


Eubank, Janice 250 


Fidel, Tina 404 


Howers, Craig 315 






Dixon, Timothy 381 


Drilling, Ted 231 


Egan, Bernie 303, 359 


Evans Scholars 281 


Fiden, Betsy 253, 286 


Hoyd, Mike 243 






Dmitrovich, Janet 381 


Drimack, Doug 320 


Egan, Cathy 239 


Evans, Amy 404 


Fiden, Elizabeth 371 


Hoyd Sherry 261 






Doak, Linda 301 


Driscoll, Marie 229 


Egan, Edward 382 


Evans, Audri 279 


Fiducci, Scott 404 


Hynn, Dave 323 






Dobbels. Lanny 238, 346 


Driscoll, Maureen 404 


Egan, Julie 282, 336, 404 


Evans, Dorothy 293, 404 


Fiduccia, Nicholas 382 


Hynn, Dennis 151, 360 






Dobkin, Larry 299 


Driscoll, Michael 336 


Egan, Kathy 300 


Evans, Michael 346 


Fiebrandt, Dennis 382 


Hynn, Kathy 214, 253, 272, 






Dobrich, Mike 222 


Driscoll. Tim 218 


Egan, Terri 284 


Evans, Scott 246 


Fiechtl, Ann 382 


286, 360 






Dobson, Elizabeth 293, 403 


Driskell, Dave 213 


Egeland, David 336 


Everakes, Bruce 359 


Fiedler. Scott 312 


Foellmer, Maureen 219 






Dockendorff, Julie 240 


Drom, Andy 218 


Egelston, Denise 300 


Everett, Jeff 278 


Feik, Wendy 219, 274, 346 


Foertsch, Steve 254 






Dodds, Alan 218, 423 


Drone, Linda 312 


Eggers, Rob 301 


Everly, Mary 236 


Field and Furrow 312 


Fogarty, Anne 298, 339 






Dodds, Ellie 307, 310, 429 


Droste, Donna 317, 346 


Eggert, Linda 284 


Ewan, John 382 


Field and Stream 312 


Fogarty, Marty 278 






Dodds, Vickie 266, 289, 346 


Drover, Janet 219, 274, 353 


Egleston, Diane 303 


Ewert, Greg 222, 404 


Field, Gail 33, 273 


Fogarty, Mike 278 






Dodillet, Dave 268 


Drozd. Michelle 346 


Egloff, Pam 334 


Eynon, Jim 251, 285 


Field, Kerry 315 


Fogary. Beth 300 






Dodillet, Diane 261 


Drucker, Donald 404 
Drumm, Mary 237, 305 


Ehlers, Robert 382 
Ehrenberg, Jeanne 382 




Fielitz, Chris 284 
Fier, Mark 263 


Fogelberg, Dan 92, 93 
Fogerty, Cecel 229 






Dodson, Stephanie 216 




Dodt, Darcy 381 


Drummond, Joan 284 


Ehret, Julie 239 


£ £ £ 


Fiets. Cheryl 230 


Fogerty, Cecilia 272 






Doebele, Thomas 381 


Drummond, Randy 270, 381 


Ehrgott, Edwin 359 


1 1 f 


Filbert, Tim 247 


Foley, John 217 






Doescher, Mark 403 


Druth, Sherry 287 


Ehrhardt, Jane 226 


tit 


Filbert, Walker 298, 359 


Foley, Susan 404 






Doheny, Dan 269, 302, 335 


Duban, Mark 336 


Ehrhart, Matt 228 


9 § § 


Filippi, Robert 359 


Folkerts, Brian 235, 300, 346 






Doheny, Dennis 269, 335 


Dubey, Neil 382 
Dubois, Steven 382 


Ehrlich, Miriam 298 




Filippo, Rick 136 
Filkin, Dave 260 


Fondel, Lori 278 
Foor, Janna 229, 284 






Doherty, Matt 254, 294 


Eichelkraut, Craig 292 








Doherty, Nancy 221 


Dubson, Tina 253, 404 


Eichstaedt, Carl 246, 382 


Faatz, Darlynn211 


Filkins, Jim 294 


Foort, Andy 267 






Dohse, Isa 298, 300, 331, 359 


Duckworth, Karen 353 


Eichstaedt, Jessica 237 


Faber, George 107 


Fillingim. Karen 252, 404 


Football 146, 147, 148, 149 






Dohse, Lina 237 


Dudek, Rose 230 


Eidler, Mary Jane 237 


Faber, Julie 252 


Fillipi, Robert 303 


Foote, Dave 258 






Dolan, Nancy 340 


Dudka, Kathy 214 


Eifert, Tom 323 


Fabiano, Lisa 242 


Fillippo, Jill 278 


Foran, Bob 246 






Dold, Sharon 335 


Duebner, Laura 211 


Eilks, Linda 346 


Fabisch, Brenda 404 


Fillwack, John 82 


Foran, Janet 214, 272, 278, 






Doll, Phil 217, 346 


Duebner, Mark 314, 395 


Eisenhauer, Greg 316 


Fabish, Mary Rose 335, 404 


Films 112, 113 


404 






Dollahen, Jeff 217 


Duff, Scott 329 


Eiser, Jodie 230 


Facktor, Greg 251 


Fina, Paul 269, 404 


Foran, Kevin 269 






Domas, Denise 242, 359 


Duffield, Teresa 382 


Elder, Craig 270 


Fads 124 


Finals 84 


Foran, Sheila 294 






Dombrowski, John 325 


Duffin, Timothy 371 


Elective classes 74, 75 


Fagen, Gerriann 250 


Finan, Chris 249, 382 


Ford, Linda 236 






Domenico, Lisa 272 


Dumont, James 404 


Elkins, Margie 299, 404 


Fagerson, Don 225, 404 


Fine, Jay 360 


Ford, Scott 289 






Dommermuth, Karin 266, 289, 


Dumoulin, Carl 300 


Elledge, Lori 229 


Fagerson, Mary Beth 206, 242 


Fine, Marcy 287 


Foreign Students 20, 21 






323, 328, 336, 341, 403 


Dumoulin, Mike 238, 346 


Ellenby, Martin 382 


Fair, Julie 319 


Fine, Sharon 179 


Forester, Bill 322 






Dommermuth, Peggy 266 


Dumoulin, Pat 238, 382 


Elliot, Alex 299 


Fairchild, Amy 219 


Finer, Amy 55 


Forester, Jeff 262 






Donahue, Daniel 329 


Dunavan. Sandy 219 


Elliot, Bertie 216. 313 


Fairlamb, Mary 346 


Finer, Gerri 287 


Forman, Stanton 404 






Donahue, Eileen 271 


Dunbar. Doug 322 


Elliot. Debbie 220, 371 


Fairow, Jana 236, 328, 404 


Finigan, Robert 395 


Fornaziari, Ann 240 






Donahue, Kathy 216 


Duncan, Troy 346 


Elliot, Patty 219 


Falcon, DeeDee 266 


Fink, Beth 273 


Fornell, Desiree 242 






Donahue, Kim 219 


Dungan, Dave 302 


Elliot, Sharon 230, 359 


Fales, Bruce 258 


Fink, Craig 217 


Forrest, Kevin 288, 404 






Donahue, Maureen 271 


Dunk, Joe 232 


Elliot, Steven 297 


Faletti, Margaret 335, 404 


Fink, Mindy 287 


Forrest, Sean 136 






Donahue, Pat 316 


Dunker, Glori 340 


Elliott, Elizabeth 353 


Faletto, Lisa 266, 289, 395 


Finkel, Ruth 371 


Forrester, Jeff 243 






Donahue, Suzanne 403 


Dunlop, Bill 232 


Ellis, Katie 242 


Falk, Phil 215, 298 


Finkelstein, Lewis 360 


Forsan, Nickie 300 






Donahue, Terry 292 


Dunn, Debbie 299 


Ellis, Nancy 237 


Falkenstrom, Julie 242, 317 


Finn, Michele 216 


Forshier. Terina 276 






Donald, Daryl 403 


Dunn, Kathy 226, 277, 404 


Ellis, Rich 222, 359 


Fallon, Jim 309 


Finn, Mike 244 


Forsman, Kevin 269 






Donaldson, Shelia 261. 288, 


Dunn, Rory 382 


Ellison, Dave 256 


Falloon, Jim 254 


Finnerty, Ellen 331. 404 


Forster, Bill 248 






359 


Dunn, Sue 226, 331 


Ellman, Sandra 129 


Faloona, Joan 404 


Finney, Larry 360 


Forster, Rita 220 






Donaldson. Steven 404 


Duprey, Jean 395 


Elsas, Jeff 245 


Falstad, Pete 232 


Finoni, Chris 320 


Forster, William 360 






Donatelli, Meg 219, 274, 310, 


Durham, Jeff 233 


Elsen, Veegee 340 


Fandel, Lori 250 


Fire, Shirley 284 


Forsyth, Kelly 242, 336 






359 


Durkin, Jan 272, 382 


Eisner, Steve 224, 296, 353 


Fanning, Beth 253 


Firfer, Jodi 219 


Forsyth, Liz 226 






Donato, Raymond 395 


Durkin, Kathy 336 


Elwell, Mitchel 382 


Fara, Julie 284 


Firking, Richard 346 


Fortcamp, Barry 222 






Dondanville, Ann 242, 290 


Durkin, Trish 271, 375 


Elzinga, Jim 267 


Farley, Jim 245 


Firkins, Rick 235, 300 


Fortcamp, Jim 243 






Donellan, Sloan 230 


Duschean, Kathy 276 


Emanuelson, Holly 335 


Farley, Lynn 234 


Firkins, Ron 235 


Fosse, Lisa 261, 288,346 






Donlan, Bridget 253 


Dusenberry, Heidi 214 


Emanus, Duane 284 


Farlow, Chris 254 


Fischburg. Liz 314 


Foster, Ginger 211 






Donnell, Patrice 104 


Dusenbury, Eric 244 


Embling, Michelle 313 


Farmhouse 235 


Fischer, Blaine 288 


Foster, Susan 395 






Donnenberg, Phillip 359 


Dworschak, Scott 233 


Emery, Chris 229, 272 


Farney, Kirk 235, 325, 346 


Fischer, Charlie 301 


Foulkner, Robin 219 






Donofrio, Jeff 295 


Dwyer. David 375 


Emery, Sean 330 


Famey, Mike 318 


Fischer, Gerry 269 


Fox, Carla 301 






Donovan, Marti 315 


Dycus, Brenda 282 


Emme, Beth 336 


Farrand, Scott 267 


Fischer, Jenny 293 


Fox, Judy 340 






Donovan, Raymond 359 


Dye, Scott 270 


Emmons, Karen 404 


Fascination 124 


Fischer, Kathy 225, 328 


Fox, Laura 313 






Donovan. Shawn 222 


Dziuk, Ken 312 


Enda, Steve 50, 51, 323 


Fasel, Phil 318 


Fischer, Kathy 229, 360 


Fox, Neil 131 






Donovan, Suzanne 404 


Dziuk, Myrosha 220 


Enders, Kimberly 359 


Faulhaber, Cheryl 229 


Fischer, Lloyd, 262 


Fox, Pamela 404 






Donovan. Tom 315, 381 




Endsley. Tim 341 


Faust, Linda 303 


Fischer, Russ 382 


Fox, Pat 272 






Doody, Tim 247 




Engdahl, Jill 211 


Favell, Terri 277, 359 


Fischer, Wendy 314 


Fox, Tom 247 











433 

Index / Diamond, Jim - Fox, Tom 



Fox, Rima 234 
Foxman. Paul 256 
Fraher, Laurence 298 
Frahm, Jody 250 
Frailey. Doug 235 
Francis, Bryan 262 
Francis, Diana 324 
Francissen, Pat 284 
Francissen, Vern 244, 382 
Franczyk, Jean 308, 309 
Frandsen, Scott 248 
Frank. Brent 255 
Frank, Daryt 404 
Frank, Mike 249 
Franke, Jenny 261 
Franke. Paul 225 
Franke, Steve 262 
Frankel, Joy 131 
Frankiewicz, Chuck 218, 304 
Franklin, Racara 353 
Frankoveglia, Jodi 253 
Frantzis, Greg 262 
Franz, Doug 270 
Frasz, Cynthia 360 
Frazer, Mark 310 
Frazier, Lori 252 
Frazzetto. Chuck 317, 346 
Freda, Joe 267, 404 
Fredenberger, Julia 226 
Frederick, Robert 382 
Fredericks, Jomarie 237. 341 
Frederickson, Dan 228, 304 
Free, Mary 214 
Freebeck, Peter 404 
Freed, Brian 238. 312, 346 
Freed, Christopher 404 
Freeman, Betsy 252 
Freeman, Goerge 395 
Freese, Dennis 255 
French, Henry Thomas 248 
French, Shawn 218, 324 
Frestel. Jeannie 42, 299 
Freudenberg, Donna 240 
Freund, Jan 282 
Freutel, Irene 237 
Frey, Joseph 404 
Frey, Kim 261 
Frey, Terri 242. 278 
Friedland, David 382 
Friedland, Scott 217 
Friedman, Alan 170, 259, 302 
Friedman, Andi 273 
Friedman, Hollis 279 
Friedman, Lisa 279 
Friedman, Mark 215 333 
Friedman, Missy 273, 371, 427 
Friedman, Stuart 404 
Friedman, Terri 360 
Friedrich, Keith 312 
Frieh, Jeanette 221 
Friends of the Spartacus Youth 
League 35 

Friese, Karen 303 

Frillman, Jamie 216, 323 

Fringer. Darryl 238, 317 

Frisbie, Margaret 229 

Frisch, Debbie 287 

Frishi, Terri 229 

Frisina, Cindy 239 

Fritts, Linda 211 

Fritz, Peggy 211 

Fromm, Debbie 261 

Fruchterman, Ann 261 

Fruhling, Steve 336 

Fry. Bill 268. 336 

Fry. Mary 300 

Frye, Jay 346 

Fryling, Jeff 246 

Fryling, Paul 171. 246 

Frymire. Eric 346 

Frystak. Eric 257 

Fuentes. Bob 227 

Fujita. Yuri 338, 395 

Full. Dave, 233, 294, 395 

Full, Kevin 233 

Fuller, Taylor 321 

Fuller, llene 279 

Fulling, Kyle 235, 296 

Fulmer. Debbie 211 334 

Funk, Mark 283 

Funk, Steve 395 

Furlong, Kristen 240 305 

Furmanski, Lori 252 

Furr, Jill 271 

Furst, Andrew 360 

Fuson. Lincoln 322 

Fusz, Gary Alan 305, 360 



QQQ 



Gabriel, Joe 291, 404 
Gacki, Kim 285, 360 
Gady, Pam 236, 278 
Gaffney, Chris 255 
Gaffney, Noelle 331, 405 
Gafrick, Karen 316 
Gagliardo, Gina 272 
Gaines, Doug 231 



Gaines, Jackie 360 
Gaitens, Bev 214, 272, 382 
Galarte, Bob 283 
Galkowski, Joseph 382 
Gallager, Tim 254 
Gallagher, John 360 
Gallagher, Monica 252 
Galletta, Susan 346 
Galligan, John 113, 382 
Gallimore, Craig 213 
Gallivan, Katie 242 
Gallo, Jim 306 
Gallo, Ralph 382 
Gam, Barb 252 
Gambetta, Judy 311 
Gamma Phi Beta 237, 281 
Gams, Pam 230 
Gandy, Janet 405 
Gang of Four 57 
Gans, Belinda 252 
Gans, Karen 230 
Gans, Kathy 229 
Gans, Pamela 360 
Gans, Sue 252, 375 
Garant, Maria 287 
Garbow, Ellen 300, 341 
Garceau, Peter 306 
Garcia, Carlos 212 
Garcia, Fidel 251 
Garcia' s 66 

Garde, Rona 316. 395 
Gardener, Jan 240 
Gardner, Dave 291, 405 
Gardner. Juan 321 
Gardner, Judy 405 
Gardner, Laura 360 
Gardon, Andrea 310, 405 
Gareiss. Gail 253, 360 
Garfinkel, Glenn 259 
Gargano, Gina 360 
Garino, Terry 382 
Garippo, Ellen 220 
Gamer, Dave 326, 360 
Garner, Kara 360 
Garrett, James 382 
Garrett, Lori 353 
Garrett, Mark 405 
Gams, Gail 286 
Garrison, Petey 271, 300 
Garton, Raymond 329 
Garvey, Maureen 375 
Garvey, Professor John 88,89 

Gasbarra, Gary 360 

Gasiecki, Mike 269 

Gasmann, Nancy 220 

Gastell, Kelly 220 

Gatch, Gale 216 

Gateley, Angie 250 

Gates, Harold 245 

Gauff, Bernie 270 

Gaumer, Timothy 382 

Gauwitz, Henry 360 

Gauwitz, Virginia 375 

Gavino, Pat 382 

Gawenda, Vicky 346 

Gawin, Paul 232 

Gayle, Crystal 91 

Gaylord, Jeff 269 

Geannopoulos, Byron 57, 88, 
108, 334, 360 

Gearhart, Dave 269 

Geary, John 278, 360 

Gebel, Andrea 299, 346 

Gebert, Sue 242, 375 

Geguzys, Suzy 221 

Gehrke, Sue 309 

Geib, Cheryl 128 

Geiger, Dave 238 

Geiger, Karen 312 

Geil, Sharon 405 

Geiman, Gilbert 382 

Geimer, Pam 317 

Geisel, Linda 239 

Geiser, John 222 

Geiss, Glen 382 

Gelb, Jacqueline 323, 371. 422 

Gelhard, John 269 

Gendron, Cathy 322 

Generic Bus 138,139 

George, Carolyn 405 

Georgen, Paul 312 

Gerber, James 382 

Gerdes, Janie 331 

Gerhardt, Stephanie 301 

Gerhke, Sue 266 

Gerling, Cindi 250 

Germanas. Juris 405 

Gem, Elaine 239 

Gerol, Donna 299 

Gerontes, Nicholas 382 

Geroulis, Michael 360 

Gerrard, Doug 258 

Gerring, Chris 268 

Gersch, Glenn 382 

Gersh, Glenn 136 

Gerstung, Rae Ann 315 

Gerts, Scott 218 

Gesinski, Cindy 338 

Geske, Patricia 395 

Geske, Steve 224 

Gessert, Charles 329 

Getschman, Sarah 226 

Getz, Lowell 312 



Gharakhani. Alfred 382 
Gharakhani. Arlette 346 
Giannola, Anthony 228 
Gibbons, Ann 300 
Gibbons, Kathy 261, 272, 300 
Gibb, Dr. James B. 300 
Gibbs, Claire 239 
Gibbs, Dan 233 
Gibbs, Gerald 382 
Gibson, Cathy 307 
Gideon, Jerry 259 
Giefing, Uli 325 
Giegerich, Carole 253 
Giel, James 336 
Gienko, Al 213 
Gier. Mark 251 
Gier, Susan 341 
Gierat, Jenny 250 
Gierat, Laurie 324 
Giertz, Gregory 346 
Giess, Mic 270 
Giffand, Hillary 266 
Gigl, Alison 230 
Gilbert, Christine 405 
Gilbert, Kevin 334 
Gilbert. Natalie 279, 405 
Gilbert, Sheldon 215 
Giles, Rob 244, 382 
Gilfand, Holly 253 
Gilhooly, Tim 416 
Gill, Jim 217 
Gill. Mary 214 
Gill. Paul 251. 285 
Gill, Phil 217 
Gill, Tracy 211 
Gillan, Steve 218 
Gillenwater, Warren 405 
Gillespie, Margaret 405 
Gilley. Mike 228, 336 
Gilliam, Beth 242 
Gilliam, Cathy 242 
Gillingham, Bruce 176 
Gillono, John 336 
Gillus, Ray 318 
Gillman, Michael 382 
Gilmartin, Dave 213, 334 
Gilmore, Dillard 341 
Gilmore, Gene 429 
Gilmore Kelly 303 
Gilpen, Jonathan 371 
Gilpin, Del 144, 181, 195 
Gilstrom, Paul 225 
Gindin, Shari 360 
Ginett, Laura 278 
Ginnado, Pam 226 
Ginoli, Jon 341 
Ginos, Nancy 405 
Ginsberg, Chuck 289, 360 
Ginsburg, Cheryl 382 
Ginsburgh. Pamela 371 
Giovanerti, Toni 308. 309 
Gippen, Del 180, 181 
Girls Next Door 313 
Given, Dave 222 
Gizz Kids 192 
Gizzi, Bernard 248 
Gladziszewski. Maria 405 
Glanz, Mindy 287 
Glaser, Edward 245, 346 
Glaser, Lisa 273 
Glass, Bill 251, 285 
Glass, Deanna 287 
Glass, Jim 334 
Glass, John 292 
Glass, Lisa 395 
Glass, Michele 279 
Glass, Sandy 230 
Glass, Stewart 360 
Glass, William 305, 360 
Glasser, Lisa 301 
Glassman. Joel 232 
Glattard, Didier 248 
Glaudell, Gene 405 
Glaudell, Kenneth 405 
Glavin, Jim 248 
Glavin, Matthew 360 
Gleason, Mike 301 
Gleim. Kristi 290 
Glenn, James 405 
Glessner, John 252 
Glezen, Mary 290 
Gliner, Ramon 360 
Glink, Robin 334 
Gliottoni, Jim 218 
Glittenberg, Diane 214, 313 
Glock, Cynthia 346 
Gloppen, Deanne 261, 288, 

395 
Glover, Larry 259 
Gluchman, Barb 211, 319 
Gluck, Gary 312 
Gluskin, Mark 341, 360 
Glyman, Lynda 237 
Gnaster, Jim 290 
Gnebe, Sue 299 
Gnuse, Steve 360 
Goddard, Lori 314 
Godosar, Roy 228 
Goeppinger, Margaret 375 
Goetsch, Dale 382 
Goetz. Marianne 360 
Goetze, Mike 241 
Goffstein, Scott 31, 256 



Goggin, Gary 227 
Golan, Layne 406 
Gold, Sandi 214, 301 
Gold, Stephen 382 
Goldberg, Andria 299 
Goldberg, Debbie 273, 369 
Goldberg, Lou 316, 395 
Goldberg, Maria 279, 375 
Goldberg, Paul 299 
Goldberg, Ruth 287, 303 
Goldberg, Steve 360 
Goldberg, Sue 272, 375 
Goldblatt, Tom 215 
Golden, Bill 218 
Golden, Randy 218 
Goldenberg, Allan 406 
Goldenberg, Scott 256 
Goldenson, Rick 231, 360 
Goldfarb, Marcy 279 
Goldman, Larry 406 
Goldman, Michael 298, 360 
Goldman, Shana 287 
Goldsen, Marcie 375 
Goldsher, Steve 232 
Goldsmith, Richard 406 
Goldstein, llene 279, 346 
Goldstein, Neil 259 
Goldstein, Scott 307 
Goldstein, Teresa 406 
Golembo, Clark 289 
Goletz, Julie 406 
Golf 180, 181 
Goll, Todd 251, 285, 346 
Gollay, Chuck 336 
Gollay, Fred 301 
Golliher, Daphne 406 
Golub, Ken 301, 395 
Gombar, Marianne 253 
Gomberg, Dorinne 279, 421 
Gomberg, Joel 288 
Gomberg, Myndee 279 
Gomberg, Robin 279 
Gomez. Ilena 308 
Gonda. Chris 361 
Gongaware, Natalie 317 
Gongwer, Gary 255 
Gonzalez, Bias 262, 320 
Gooch, Roberta 396 
Goodell, John 406 
Goodenough, Lisa 406 
Goodenough, Steven 382 
Goodey, Paul 214 
Goodheart, Pete 246 
Goodman, Carol 287 
Goodman, Ellen 253, 286. 396 
Goodman. Lisa 273, 375 

Goodman, Marc 382 

Goodman, Margaret 239, 320 

Goodman, Martha 278 

Goodman, Mary 239, 282, 360 

Goodman. Maureen 239 

Goodman. Nadine 205, 287 

Goodwin, Janet 236, 302 

Goodwin, Kathy 220 

Goodwin, LaDean 317, 340, 
346 

Goodwin, Margaret 278 

Goodwin. Mark 235, 346 

Goone, Rob 259 

Gootee, Renee 340 

Gordin, Mike 258 

Gordon. Andrea 279 

Gordon. Donna 308. 309 

Gordon, Laurie 287, 299. 332 

Gordon. Lee 259 

Gordon, Lisa 242 

Gordon, Lori 322 

Gordon, Phil 215 

Gorenolt, Kerstin 242 

Gorenz, Barb 271, 360 

Goretzke, Bill 267 

Gorman, Chris 303 

Gorman, Larry 269 

Gosnell, Barry 347 

Gosnell, Traci 226, 277 

Goss, Bob 283 

Gossett, Delia 271 

Gosset, Mark 217, 320, 332 

Gosswein, Jim 315 

Gotelf. Joyce 287 

Gothelf, Ron 299 

Gothelf, Steven 360 

Gottlieb, Debbie 396 

Gottlieb, Joyce 406 

Goude, Chuck 382 

Gough, Tammy 239 

Gould, Ann 229, 406 

Gould, Kathy 334, 406 

Gould, Larry 259 

Gould, Michael 360 

Goumas, Deborah 298 

Gourley, Tim 288, 336 

Graan, Carolyn 242 

Grabher, Joyce 214 

Grabher, Sharon 234, 406 

Grabowski, Theresa 396 

Grace, Cathy 252 

Gracey, Kathy 279 

Grad, Gary 259 

Gradman, Ellen 273 

Graduating Super Seniors 314 

Grady, Kerry 316, 396 

Graepp, Heidi 234 



Graese, Sandy 303 
Graf, Anna 236 
Graf, Bill 300 
Grafe, Kathi 283 
Graff, Mike 244 
Graff, Tim 320 
Graffy, Donald 406 
Grafton, Josh 323 
Graham, Betsy 327 
Graham, Dan 315 
Graham, Don 247 
Graham. Dori 273, 406 
Graham, Hugh 382 
Graham. Laurie 229, 321, 334 
Graham, Sue 261 
Grammer, Jeff 262 
Granell. Julie 214, 272 
Grant. Hiedi 237 
Graphic Design Seniors 314 
Grateful Dead 210 
Gratzer, Alan 90 
Graudins. Ingrid 340 
Grauer, George 218 
Graves, Dr. Charles N 300 
Graves. Kenneth Byron 243 
Gravlin. Dave 283 
Gray, Andy 296. 326 
Gray, Carla 236 
Gray, Mary 382 
Gray, Steve 330 
Gray, Sue 334 
Grayson, Janelle 276 
Great, Michael 382 
Greb, Stephen 406 
Grebe, Lydia 406 
Greco, Agnes 406 
Green, Denton 225 
Green, Joe 248 
Green, Nancy 230, 347 
Greenblatt, Robert 396 
Greene, Kim 239 
Greenhagen, Timothy 382 
Greenwald. Beth 396 
Greenwood, Bruce 235. 382 
Greenwood. Jeanne 375 
Gregory. Jim 222 
Grepo, Loretta 406 
Gresik. Gerald 406 
Grey, Andy 213 
Griffin, James 168 
Griffin, Janice 242 
Griffin. Joan 360 
Griffin, Lisa 242. 406 
Griffin. Terry 406 
Grill, Howard 360 
Grimaldi, Theresa 120, 371 
Grimes, Barb 240 
Grimes, Dean 235 
Grissom. Jeff 231 
Griswold. Kyle 383 
Grobstein. Janet 383 
Grodsky, Irl 360 
Groeling, Richard 396 
Groner, Marilyn 360 
Grosche. Timothy 406 
Gross, Jim 248 
Groth, Brian 245 
Groth, Steve 227 
Grouwinkle, Kristin 242 
Gruben, Kreg 235 
Grudzien. Daniel 406 
Grunwald. Dawn 396 
Gudbrandsen. Amy 406 
Guenther, Sue 360 
Guerin, Mike 218 
Guggemos, Ann 429 
Guggenheim, David 360 
Guidok, Victoria 347 
Guinan, Kathy 353 
Guiney. Kristy 219 
Guither. Glenn 227 
Gulick, Catherine 396 
Gulley, Annette 219 
Gulley, Phillip 383 
Gunn, Damon 251 
Gunnerson, Janet 347 
Gunt, David 406 
Gurdian, Ana 371 
Guscott, Debra 219 
Gust, Mike 243 
Gustafson, Julie 211 
Gustitus, Delph 228 
Gustavus, Mark 383 
Gutenkunst. Holly 226 
Guthman, Hilary 360 
Guthrie, Warren 383 
Gvillo. Dennis 238 
Gymnastics 144. 192 
Gzerniak, Jeanine 219 



hhh 



Ha, Mary 211 
Haag. Christine 324 
Haas, Amy 278 
Haas, Kevin 235 
Habisohn. Chris 406 
Hachiya, Donna 322 



Hack, Debbie 253 
Haden, Mary 236 
Hadley, Steve 225, 327 
Hadlock, Ken 249 
Haefner, Rebecca 371 
Haenncke, Bob 268 
Haerr, Mark 232, 334 
Haertling, Mark 224, 383 
Hafner, Laurie 229 
Hagedom, Eileen 271 
Hagel, James 284, 360 
Hagemann, Brad 339 
Hagerty, Pat 247 
Hages, Lew 406 
Haggerty, Barbara 283, 406 
Hagle, Julie 239 
Hagman, Lynn 230, 360 
Hahn, Charles, 322 
Hahn, Dan 330 
Hahn, Jim 233, 304 
Hahn, Kevin 312 
Hahn, Lynn 396 
Hahn. Pete 280 
Haidle, Sandy 331, 47 
Haiduck, Jim 222 
Haile, Constance 340 
Hainesworth, J.R. 278 
Hajek, Lisa 284 
Hake, John 383 
Halamka, Todd 222 
Halboth, Barbara 283 
Haider, James 383 
Hale, Andy 225, 344 
Hale, Heather 239, 282, 347 
Hale, Joe 262 
Haley, Jane 211 
Halliday, Julie 211 
Hall, Bruce 90 
Hall, Jeanne Marie 383 
Hall, Laura 239 
Hall, Steve 218 
Hall, Debbie 314 
Hall, Kathleen 336 
Hall, Miriam 317 
Hallen, Christian 248, 360 
Hallene, Jim 335 
Hallerberg, Dale 323 
Halliburton, Alessandra 287 
Halliday, James 360 
Hallman. Cindy 219 
Hallman, Ken 258 
Halloween 81 
Halsey, Dave 238 
Halverson, Bradley 361 
Halverson, Pat 375 
Halvorson, Lori 312 
Hamill, Margaret 376 
Hamill, Mark 283 
Hamilton, Bruce 269 
Hamilton, Cynthia 406 
Hamilton, Gregory 361 
Hamilton, Joyce 27, 242, 272 
Hamilton, Kurt 225 
Hamman, Nancy 253 
Hammelman. Donna 303 
Hammer, Bob 334 
Hammer, Thomas 297 
Hammon. Jeff 217 
Hammond. Stephanie 338 
Hampilos, John 406 
Hampton, Mark 255 
Hamrick, Betsy 406 
Hamrick, Bill 248 
Han, John C. 172, 406 
Hanas, Andy 232 
Hancock, Holly 71, 273, 338, 

406 
Hand, Mary 300 
Handler. Susan 279 
Handzel. Mark 270 
Handler, Bob 215 
Handler, Sheila 371 
Hands, Steve 246, 383 
Hanely, Jody 272 
Hankes, Chris 266 
Hanley, Marybeth 240 
Hanlon, Trish 253, 286. 406 
Hanna. Phil 238 
Hannah. Scott 347 
Hannon, Steve 295 
Hanrahan, Mary 406 
Hannula, Kathy 226 
Hanratty, Mike 248 
Hansell, Ruth 253 
Hansen. Angela 211 
Hansen. Chris 218 
Hansen. Dave 233 
Hansen. James 383 
Hansen. Jane 312 
Hansen. Joe 212 
Hansen. Julie 237 
Hansen, Timothy 383 
Hanson, Doug 303 
Hanson. Greg 406 
Hanson, Judy 242 
Hanusa, Bill 222 
Happy Hour at Halfway House 

315 
Harden. Phil 315 
Hargrove. Jesse 336 
Harbert. Amy 219 
Harbison. Carey 262 
Harder. Janice 347 



434 

Index / Fox, Rima - Harder, Janice 































Hardey, Nancy 229 


Haworth, Sandra 307, 309, 


Heron, Lisa 250 


Hoffee, Beth 252, 330, 407 


Huffman, Gary 228 


Ireland, Jim 249 




Harden, Andy 225 


371.429 


Herr, Scott 383 


Hoffee. Heidi 318, 219 


Huffman, Robyn 407 


Irgang, Alan 298 




Harding, Anne 239, 282, 361 


Hay. Linda 406 


Herriott, Laura 376 


Hoffman, Mike 301 


Hughart, Laura 220 


Irle, Monica 236 




Harding, Nancy 239 


Hayden, Jackie 226 


Herritz, Stephanie 396 


Hoffman, Patricia 132, 133, 


Hughes, Charles 407 


Irvine, Nancy 307 




Hardman, Siobhan 230 


Hayes, Brian 235 


Herrman, Pat 228 


134 


Hughes, Kathy 240 


Irving, Joy 220 




Harding, Craig 268 


Hayes, David 300, 406 


Herro, Dawn 237 


Hoffman, Sue 226, 253, 277, 


Hughes, Mary 407 


Isaacson, Sherri 271, 306 




Hardy, Nancy 320 


Hayes, Jo 406 


Herron, Pat 218 


376 


Hughes, Mike 212 


Iseman, Cynthia 383 




Hardy, Rich 217 


Hayes, John 269,323 


Herst, Bill 294 


Hoffman, Steve 383 


Hughes, Sandy 211 


Isenstein, Karen 376 




Hardy, Stephen 361 


Hayes, Kenneth 347 


Hertko, Jayne 315 


Hogan, Chrisy 242, 271, 278, 


Hui. Jacqueline 347 


Iten, Stephanie 214 




Hare Krishnas 47.48,49 


Hayes. Mary 298 


Hertz, David 407 


383 


Huisinga, Roger 217 


Ittersagen, Jill 181 




Hargett, Mike 213 


Hayes, Tim 231 


Heske, Norm 232 


Hogan. Dorothy 174, 407 


Hulen, Ron 224 


luorio, Mary 214 




Hargis, Doug 228 


Haymaker, Nora 240 


Hesketh, Robert 407 


Hogan, Joann 313 


Hull. Laura 219 


luorio, Toma 246 




Harjje, Tracey 383 


Hayner, Judith 421 


Hess, Melvin 324, 407 


Hogan, Kerry 242, 278 


Hull, Mark 245 


luorio, Vincent 362 




Harkins, Steve 241 


Haynesworth, Sebrina 334 


Hess, Stacey 312 


Hogan, Lisa 214, 272, 335 


Hultquist, Lisa 211 


Iverson, Dan 251 




Harland, Helen 338 


Hayse, Cindy 229 


Hettinger, Diane 216 


Hogan, Steve 228 


Humage, Becky 219 


Ivey, Rod 176 




Harley, Jill 276 


Hayse, Michelle 371 


Hetfleisch. Carole 214, 272 


Hogan, Tom 228 


Human Life Amendment 35 


Ivory, Gertrude 320, 383 




Harlovie, Richard 336 


Hazlett, Juanita 300 


Hetzler. Tim 315 


Hogg, Frank 280 


Humke, Lisa 407 


Ivory, Mary 362 




Harmer. Randall 248 
Harmon, Cynthia 272, 347 


Heacock, Lawrence 347 
Head, Martha 266, 289 


Heugal, Sue 226 
Heugel, Lynn 277, 353 


Hogluna, Linda 261 
Hohm, Dale 296 


Hund, Janet 294, 332, 421 
Hunsaker, Cathy 362 








Harmon, Jane 230, 335 


Headtke, Jeff 299 


Heuton, Bruce 288, 290, 325, 


Hoit, Missy 291 


Hunsaker, Lynn 282 


• • • 




Harmon, Julie 253 


Healy, Bob 299 


361 


Holcombe, James 407 


Hunt, Andy 224 


III 




Harmon, Mary 284 


Healy, Tim 227, 308, 309, 371 


Hewing. Peggy 234 


Holden, Jill 230 


Hunt, Bradley 270, 320, 383 


III 




Harmon, Mike 383 


Heaton, Greg 315 


Hewing, Terri 239, 282, 347 


Holden, Lisa 298 


Hunt, Jeff 258 


J J J 




Harms, David 383 
Harms, Jeanette 314 


Heberer, Jill 236, 312 
Hebner, Mike 37 


Hewitt, Dave 224 
Hezler, Tim 315 


Holden, Ryk 248 
Holhubner, Frederick 347 


Hunt, Linda 352 
Hunter, Brian 269 








Harnack, Steve 325 


Hecht, Warren 224 


Hianik, Mark 254 


Holland, Amy 335 


Hunter, Katie 282, 301 


Jacabucci, Liz 274 




Harnett, Daniel 248 


Heck, Bruce 104 


Hiart, Debbie 333 


Holland, Steve 256 


Huntsinger, Hope 216 


Jachimiec, Mary 214, 272, 362 




Haroules, Michelle 406 


Heck, Tim 296, 332 


Hiatt. Jeffrey 333, 383 


Hollander, Gene 76, 77, 78, 


Hur, Kyu 251 


Jacisin, Jim 292 




Harr, Steve 341 


Heckman, Greg 228 


Hible, Kelly 250 


299, 310 


Hurckes, Kate 276 


Jackson, Barry 243 




Harrell, Dave 217 


Hecktman, Bruce 215 


Hick, Andy 258 


Hollenberg, Devida 252 


Hurd, Jim 233, 296, 371 


Jackson, Bob 235 




Harrell, Steve 217, 347 


Hedgcock, Ronald 383 


Hickey, Pat 213, 361 


Holley, Sheila 211 


Hurd, John 362 


Jackson, Debbie 407 




Harrington, Tracy 252 


Hedge, Mike 322 


Hickey, Sharon 232 


Holliday, Karen 383 


Hurska, Jennifer 290 


Jackson, Jill 226, 277, 323, 362 




Harris, Bill 307 


Hedger, Douglas 383 


Hickman, Bryan 407 


Holliday, Leslie 237 


Hurst, John 217 


Jackson, Keith 274 




Harris, Dave 258, 296 


Hediger, Karen 323 


Hicks, Jeff 361 


Hollingsworth, Hale 299 


Hurst, Karen 371 


Jackson, Kathryn 273, 407 




Harris, Donna 287 


Hedrick, Brad 306 


Hicks, Rick 60 


Holloway, June 361 


Hurst, Maria 274 


Jackson, Lori 211, 376 




Harris, Jeff 336 


Hedrick, Janet 312, 406 


Hicok. Amy 317, 333, 347 


Holmes, Don 260 


Hurt, Linda 278 


Jackson, William 383 




Harris, John 269 


Hedrick, Sharon 306 


Hidzick, George 227, 383 


Holmes, Larry 34 


Hurthle, Susan 237 


Jacob, David 318 




Harris, Julie 396 


Heerens, Cindy 216, 313, 383 


Hiestand, Laura 339 


Holmstom, SueAnn 236 


Hurwitz, Mark 246, 353 


Jacob, Mark 245 




Harris, Kathy 242, 278 


Heffelfinger, Steve 318 


Higgins, Jonathan 325 


Holpuch, Elizabeth 407 


Husa, Jane 253. 286, 347 


Jacobs, Greg 213, 268 




Harris, Ken 262 


Hegan, Nancy 326 


Hightower, Raymond 295 


Hoist, Brian 235 


Husman, Harlan 336 


Jacobs, Jenifer 303 




Harris, Patricia 406 


Hegza, Nancy 328 


Hildreth, Jean 219, 361 


Holtzman, Denise 230 


Hussey, Thomas 407 


Jacobs, M. 248 




Harris, Robert 336 


Heidkamp, Judith 347 


Hilgendorf, Ellen 283, 298 


Holzheimer Elyse 279 


Hutchcraft, Joy 347 


Jacobs, Michelle 376 




Harris, Scott 347 


Heidecker. James 383 


Hilk, Scott 244, 407 


Holzl, Lisa 211 


Hutchinson, Daniel 383 


Jacobs, Rebecca 297 




Harris, Stephanie 406 


Heiden, Greg 341 


Hill, Carla 240 


Homecoming 25 


Hutchinson, Sue 339 


Jacobs, Ron 258 




Harris, Susan 279 


Heiderscheit, Steve 235 


Hill, Celeste 407 


Homer, Vicki 253 


Hutchinson, Jem; 243 


Jacobs, Sharon 237, 371 




Harris, Thabita 310 


Heidkamp, Judy 272 


Hill, Dave 228 


Hood, James 361 


Hutchinson, Stan 320 


Jacobson, Beth 247 




Harris, Tim 278, 323 


Heidkamp, Kelly 240 


Hill, Jeff 228 


Hood, Laura 407 


Hutchinson, Susan 174, 175, 


Jacobson, Debbie 284 




Harris, Todd 213 


Heidorn, Lisa 240, 305 


Hill, John 321 


Hope, Tom 257 


339 


Jacobson, Eric 334 




Harris, Tom 258 


Heien, Betsy 335 


Hill, Mark 336 


Hopkins. Debbie 306 


Hutchinson, Theresa 253 


Jacobson, Ron 217 




Harrison, Karen 299, 330, 332, 


Heil, Marcia 406 


Hill, Marvin 383 


Hopkins, Ginger 207, 50, 211 


Hutlquist, Steve 267 


Jacobson, Steve 296, 383 




338 


Heilman, Dave 258 


Hill, Judith 407 


Hopkins, Kathy 211 


Hutto, Steve 407 


Jacobson, Stewart 255, 371 




Harrison, Leslie 61, 288, 353 


Heim, John 299, 383 


Hill, Sara 272 


Hopp, Brad 218 


Huziej, Joanna 298, 362 


Jacobucci, Liz 219, 353 




Harrison, Mike 283 


Hein, John 42 


Hill, Susan 253, 286, 407 


Hopp. Tony 82, 83 


Hyde, Debbie 237, 362 


Jacquet, Nadine 229 




Harrison, Paige 341 


Heinen, Steve 170, 322, 347 


Hill, Tom 213, 407 


Hoppel, Pat 249 


Hyde, Denise 237 


Jacquot, Mark 268 




Harroun, Paul 235 


Heiniger, Brett 406 


Hillel 48 


Hoppel, Ron 249 


Hylin, Carl 299 


Jaeckel, Gail 240 




Harryman, Wendy 214 


Heiniger, Ellen 312 


Hillhouse, Tammy 250, 285, 


Hopper, Debbie 211, 278 


Hynes, Jacqueline 397 


Jaeckel, Melissa 229 




Hart, Brian 260, 335 


Heinrich, Bill 267 


328, 407 


Hopwood, Carol 376 


Hynes, Lora 334 


Jaeger, Betsy 266, 289, 362 




Hart, Diane 303, 361 


Heinrich, Diane 340 


Himmelblau, Larry 383 


Hopwood, Dave 218 


Hyosaka, Donna 407 


Jaffe, Lori 371 




Hart, John 283 


Heinrich, Fred 283 


Himmes, Rita 331, 376 


Hopwood, Deborah 253, 286, 


Hyun, Jae 407 


Jaffe, Nancy 340 




Hart, Melissa 406 


Heinzen, Tim 268 
Heisler, Mark 296 


Hinden, Lynelle 234 
Hinderliter, Steve 218 


335, 407 
Horcher, Kevin 213 




Jaffe, Tammy 242 
Jagodzinski, Doris 226, 277 




Hart, Robert 297 




Hart, Tammy 220 


Heit, Lisa 293 


Hink, Constance 407 


Horn, Meredith 340 


• • • 


Jagusch, Jennifer 211 




Harte. Kevin 312 


Heithoff, Karen 29, 427 


Hinkler, Jay 292 


Hornbostel, Jim 300 


III 


Jahn, Randy 318 




Harte, Kevin 383 


Hejza, Nancy 219, 406 


Hinkston, Lauren 293 


Hornbrook, George 284 


Jahnke, Mark 325 




Hartenberger, Mark 268 


Helbig, Jim 251 


Hinley, R. Bruce 44 


Horowitz, Amy 298, 299 




Jake, Amy L. 36 




Hartley, Linde 240 


Heller, Brian 336, 341 
Heller, Ed 258 


Hinriches, Douglas 407 
Hinterseers, Hans 318 


Horsch, Barbara 347 
Horsch, Dwaine 347 




Jallits, Dave 300 
James, Larry 322 




Hartley, Robin 242 




Hartman, Heidi 252 


Heller, M. 248 


Hinton. Amy 237 


Horsley, Sue 318 


lacobucci, Dawn 407 


James, Robert 383 




Hartman, Janice 293, 361 


Heller, Nancy 287 


Hintz, Eric 222 


Horticulture Club 317 


Ibsen-Riley, Karma 110 


James, Warren 260 




Hartman, Joel 254 


Heilman, Ann 312 


Hinz, John 320 


Horton, Genevieve 327, 328, 


Icknayan, Nick 213 


Jamison, Laura Bryant 421 




Hartman, Laura 239, 282, 347 


Helms, Fred 217 


Hinz, Rosanne 320 


407 


Idaszak, Joe 212, 407 


Janas, Beth 288 




Hartman, Mona 219, 335 


Heltesheimer, Melanie 283 


Hipp, Dave 294 


Horvath, Amy 216 


Idelman, Andrea 376 


Janelzek, Laureen 290 




Hartzell, Phoebe 214, 272, 353 


Hemming, Seth 361 


Hippler, Gretchen 226, 277, 


Horvath, Bob 212 


IEEE 320 


Janes, Viki 338 




Hartzler, Gary 383 


Henderson, Aaron 260 


407 


Horwich, Larry 289, 407 


Ieuter, Charles 247 


Janeway, Lynn 362 




Hartzman, Kim 317 


Henderson, Chris 264 


Hires, Darrell 328 


Horwitz, Leigh 334 


Ifft, Eric 238 


Janisch, Kim 239 




Harvath, Alan 383 


Henderson. Mark 301, 396 


Hirsch, David 269. 320, 323, 


Hosty, Jeanne 271 


Mi-Dell 238 


Jankovich, Renee 407 




Harvengt, Tom 255 


Henderson, Tom 172 


335, 361 


Hotchner, Dave 299 


Wineries 50 


Jankowicz, Linda 261, 332, 338 




Harvey, Gary 218, 320 


Hendricks House 315, 316 


Hirsch. Marty 227, 383 


Hough, Jane 236, 347 


Mini Greek Newspaper 317 


Jankowski, Mark 383 




Harvey, Miles 308 


Hendricks. Barb 298, 318 


Hirsch, Randi 407 


Houghton, Michael 383 


Mini Pride 318 


Janrin, Kurt 312 




Harwood, Gregg 305, 344, 361 


Hendricks, Duane 383 


Hirschfield, Lisa 407 


Houlihan, Kathy 253 


Mini Ski Club 318 


Janssen, Lester 238 




Hasan, Ben 218, 332 


Hendrix, Adele 240 


Hirsh, Jeff 241 


Hoult, Kris 235, 327 


Mini Union Board 319 


Janvrin, Kurt 383 




Hasen, Laura 239 


Heneghan, John 232 


Hirsh, Lynne 287 


Houser, Hal 222 


Illinois Guarenteed Loans 132 


Jardine, Scott 218 




Hasenmyer, Carl 264 


Henkel, Joan 300, 406 


Hischke, Mark 224 


Houser, Kathy 278 


Illinois State Scholarship 


Jaret, Robert 248 




Hashbarger, Jill 335 


Henley. Beth 103 


Hiser, John 247 


Houshmand, Hooman 320 


Commission 132 


Jaros, Paul 249 




Haskett, Timothy 329, 396 


Henley, Janet 317 


Hitch, Sue 216 


Housholder, Steven 320, 383 


Illio Business Staff 422, 423 


Jaross, Glen 383 




Haskins, Kathy 312 


Henneberg. Peggy 261 


Hitchcock, Tami 220 


Houska, Julie 293 


Mio Contributors 319 


Jarrad, Sandra 407 




Hass, Amy 237 


Henning, Heiko 318 


Hitzman, John 318 


Houska, Mark 222 


Illio Editonal Staff 425, 426 


Jan-ell, Peter 385 




Hass, Laura 261, 288, 361 


Henninger, Dawn 239 


Hixon, John 284 


Howard, Audrey 371 


Illio Photo Staff 428 


Jaruseski, Joe 265, 323 




Hasse, Cindy 214 


Henricks. Jon 260 


Hnilicka, Greg 225 


Howard, Brent 218 


lllman, Chris 283 


Jaskowiak. Jim 212 




Hasse, Tom 54, 294, 336, 371 


Henrickson, Mark 296 


Hoane, Joe 257 


Howard, Dave 217 


Im, Yong 362 


Jaskula, Mary 317 




Hassler, Pete 251, 285,383 


Henry, Ann 182 


Hoag, Emily 318 


Howard, Jeff 225 


Imber, Mike 215 


Jaunsen, Denise 291, 301 




Hastings, Laura 272 


Henry, Richard 328, 406 


Hobbs, Liz 301 


Howard, William 325, 361 


Imburgia, Thomas 383 


Javier, Mike 292 




Hastings, Steve 283 


Henson, Stassi 276 


Hobson, Derek 328 


Howe, Al 225, 335 


Imming, Tracy 242, 278 


Javorsky, Renee 220 




Hasz, Wanda 406 


Hepner, Audrey 236 


Hobson, Line 212 


Howell, Tim 298 


Imon, Nancy 383 


Jazz Festival 88, 89 




Hatch, Jeff 406 


Hepp, Nancy 240 


Hoby, Dana 237 


Hower, Chris 44, 252 


IMPE 160, 161 


Jeckel, Scott 217 




Hately, Jeff 306 


Hepp, Sally 314 


Hochnadel, Joanne 317 


Howerter, Lisa 266 


Impey. Dave 258 


Jeffay, Kevin 407 




Hathaway, Anne 236, 327, 347 


Herbach, Pam 252 


Hockey Club 171 


Howey, Lisa 332 


Inflation 132, 133, 134. 135 


Jefferson, Stephanie 407 




Hauck, John 288, 406 


Herbert. Mark 232. 336 


Hockman, Lynn 307 


Hrizak, Tammy 282, 407 


Infanger, Frank 292 


Jeffrey, Chuck 300 




Haug, Cyndi 282 


Herbert, Ross 35 


Hockstra, Maria 274 


Hruska, Dave 264 


Ingelmason, Karen 317 


Jeffreys, Bill 347 




Haugland, Brett 301 


Herbolsheimer, Stephanie 219 


Hodel, Joyce 129 


Hruska, Jennifer 214 


lngrassia, Theodore 407 


Jeffries, Keith 245 




Hauser, Craig 319 


Herbsleb, Cecil 244 


Hoehne, Lawrence 407 


Hu, Eric 407 


Inlow, Debbie 214 


Jelinek, Cathy 226 




Hausman, Jeanne 266, 289, 


Herbster, Kathy 376 


Hoegberg, Lon 315 


Hubacek, Jerome 292 


lnman, Janis 362 


Jelinek, Jamie 279 




294, 383 


Herdegen. James 406 


Hoekstra, Linda Jo 35. 219, 


Hubbard, George 270 


Innes, Jim 318 


Jelinek, Jay 318 




Hausman, Todd 317 


Herget, Abby 219, 274, 316, 


317, 332, 338 


Hubbell, Paul 383 


Innis, Brian 254 


Jelm,, Doug 257 




Havbold, Art 251 


323. 396 


Hoekstra, Maria 310, 323, 361 


Hubbell, Ruth 383 


Innis, Jeff 155 


Jen, Mimi 316, 397 




Havel, Jeff 283 


Herlache. Andy 383 


Hoener, W. John 383 


Huber, Chris 225. 336, 407 


Inouye, Roni 221 


Jencius, Marty 341 




Havelka, Wendy 253 


Herman, Heather 237 


Hoepiller, Todd 322 


Huber, Phil 103 


Inskeep, Jim 334 


Jenkins, Columbus 68 




Havlir, Bob 171, 246 


Herman, Jamie 336 


Hoerner, Joseph 396 


Huber, Tom 341 


Interfraternity Council 320 


Jenkins, Jim 284 




Havranek, Loren 376 


Herman, Laura 287 


Hoerr, Gwen 226, 334 


Hubert, Steve 123 


Interviews 64, 65 


Jenkins, Michelle 407 




Hawaii Five-0 Club 83 


Herman, Leslie 287 


Hoevel, John 291, 407 


Huck, Jeff 267 


IPC Board 429 


Jenner, Kyle 347 




Hawes, Amy 252 


Herman, Tim 213 


Hofbauer, Cheryl 211 


Hudgins, John 248 


louino, Henry 262 


Jennings, Diann 347 




Hawkins, Dave 308. 311 


Herman, Valli 308, 309 


Hofbauer, Vicki 252 


Huetteman, Larry 383 


Ippolito, Linda 317, 362 


Jennings, Martin 407 




Hawkins, Steve 267 


Hernandez, Mike 324 


Hoffbech, Ann 237, 307 


Huff, Milissa 316, 396 


Irace, Keith 267 


Jennings, Mike 284 



















435 

Index / Hardey, Nancy - Jennings, Mike 




















Jennings. Scott 385 


Junkel, Steve 284 


Kaufman, Leslie 273, 408 


Kim, Min 271 


Kobe, Nicolette 271, 284 


Kreitling, Karen 230 




! Jennings, Waylon 218 


Justice 131 


Kaufman, Mike 215, 408 


Kim, Nancy 219 


Kobernus, Karen 250 


Krell, Kadi 283 




Jeong, Wayne 385 


Justice, Dick 292 


Kaufman, Steve 259 


Kim, Yon 239, 278 


Koberstine, Jack 408 


Kress, Kelly 408 




Jeska, Korey 234 




Kaufman, Tom 278 


Kimble, Stephanie 362 
Kincaid, Lisa 266, 289, 376 


Koch, Mike 218 
Koch, Nancy 250 


Kresser, Debbie 211, 408 




Jesko, Gloria 239, 278 




Kaufmann, Beth 299 


Kriesel, John 225 




Jesse, Lisa 219, 274, 407 


WWW 


Kawaguchi, Kiyoshi 318 


Kindred, Nancy 261, 288, 362 


Koch, Steven 408 


Krikau, Mark 267 




Jesse, Lynn 230 


h h h 


Kawasaki, George 362 


Kiner, Randall 278, 347 


Kocimski, Lori 261, 272 


Krippner, Kathy 291 




Jeter, Maryann 347 


n n it 


Kawell, Mary 408 


King, Ellen 211, 408 


Kocour, Susan 318, 386 


Krippner, Kevin 408 




Jewell, Catherine 237, 347 




Kay, Christine 303, 334 


King, John 332 


Kocurek, Patricia 408 


Kriz, Jeff 312, 386 




Jilek, Alicia 220, 328, 362 
Jochheim, Donna 407 




Kay, Julie 334 
Kay, Tom 248 


King. Julie 239, 282, 347, 308 
King, Julie 347 


Kocvrek, Patty 339 
Kodama, Katie 179 


Krohn, Therese 340 




Krolak, Keith 297, 397 




Joe, Patty' 132 
Johanneson, Mary 211 


Kaalaas, Kurt 232 


Kaye, Michael 336, 408 


King, Richard 362, 303 


Kodes, Kristan 421 


Kron, Jonathon 325 




Kaberna, Lisa 334 


Kazarian, Greg 280 


King, Russel 329 


Kodros, Debbie 219 


Krong, Steve 275, 297 




Johanson. Chris 271 


Kachoyneaus, John 232 


Kazen, Dave 256 


King, Stephen 248, 408 


Kodros, Steve 22 


Kropsch, Janis 338 




Johns, Karen 407 


Kaczmarek, Kurt 320, 385 


Kazlo, Karen 271 


King, Suzanne 408 


Koenig, James 362 


Krough, Anita 211 




Johns, Mike 267 


Kaczynski, Bill 269 


Kazmerski, Mike 296, 307 


King, Tim 245 


Koenig, Ron 268 


Kruger, Bob 301 




Johnson, Anne 347 


Kaeding, Konrad 315 


Kazuk, Carol 211, 408 


King, Van 254, 335, 338 


Koenig, Suzanne 421 


Kruger, Jean 236, 332 




Johnson, April 287 


Kaemmerer, Glen 385 


Kazuk, John 260 


Kingsley, Mel 246 


Koenig, Walter 225 


Kruger, Roberta 408 




Johnson, Bill 232 


Kagan, Dave 251 


Keane, Mark 297 


Kingsley, Thomas 218, 336, 


Koertge, Laura 335 


Krulewitch, Dano 341 




Johnson, Bob 246 


Kager, Joe 213 


Keane, Paul 222 


386 


Koester, Kate 242 


Krull, Margaret 397 




Johnson. Brenda 371 


Kahan, Laurie 279 


Keats, Steve 259 


Kinney, Brian 225 


Kogan, Doris 316 


Krupowicz, Bill 334 




Johnson, Brent 303 


Kahan, Randy 324, 332, 338 


Keck, Jeff 248 


Kinney Philip 298 


Kohajda, Mark 317 


Krusemark, Jan 317 




Johnson, Brian 334, 385 


Kahen, Gary 278 


Keck, Kelly 229 


Kinsel, Gary 336 


Kohlhagen, Rob 260 


Kryzak, Kathy 219 




Johnson, Bruce 324 


Kahle, Eric 217,300 


Keck, Richard 336 


Kinsella, Kevin 233, 325, 362 


Kohnen, Michelle 219 


Ku, Janet 261, 386, 288 




Johnson, Candice 306 


Kahling, Kevin 224 


Kedzierski. Linda 239 


Kirby, David 386 


Kohout, Larry 262 


Ku, Millicent 237 




Johnson, Carol 271, 283, 362 


Kahn, Dave 320 


Keech, Gabrielle 376 


Kirby, Vicki 214 


Koinonia 322 


Kucaba, Kathy 219, 274, 372 




Johnson, Daniel 407 


Kahn, Rob 215 


Keefe, Suzette 271 


Kirby, Walker 336 


Kokoris, Nick 248, 336 


Kuchta, Joe 341 




Johnson, Dave 224, 292 


Kaidaris, Karen 408 


Keegan, Earl 251, 285, 408 


Kircher, Lisa 347 


Kokum, William 386 


Kucera, Suzanne 216, 305 




Johnson, Debbie 252, 284 


Kain, Steven 385 


Keeley, E. J. 243 


Kirchhofer, Brad 260, 286, 325, 


Kolb, Steve 215, 408 


Kuedaras, John 233 




Johnson, Dennis 156, 254 


Kajiwara, Edward 408 


Keen, Libby 293 


408 


Kolbert. Kevin 258 


Kuenstler, Anthony 347 




Johnson, Donna 303 


Kalafut, Tim 283 


Keenan, Lisa 305 


Kirchhofer, Neil 260 


Kolls, Lisa 283 


Kues, James 386 




Johnson, Donnie 316, 397 


Kale, Pat 300 


Keeshin, Neil 259 


Kirchoefer, Kathryn 408 


Kollman. Andy 292 


Kuhlman, Mary 386 




Johnson, Eric 224, 254 


Kalfen, Marilyn 362 


Keever, Dina 295 


Kirk, Chuck 213, 362 


Kollmann, Mark 300, 347 


Kuhn, Myra 340 




Johnson, Felice 242 


Kalin, Neil 371 


Kegley, Val 314, 408 


Kirk, Mike 213, 386 


Kolom, Adena 386 


Kuhn, Terry 212 




Johnson, Gary 362 


Kalina, Cynthia 261 


Keith, Debbie 334 


Kirsanoff, Mary 216, 313 


Kolzow, Sue 219 


Kuhn, Thomas 347 




Johnson, Gerald 385 


Kalinski, Renee 253 


Kelch, Mike 362 


Kirsch, Janis 240, 282, 408 


Koncel, Micki 271 


Kukelski, Craig 336 




Johnson, Greg 264, 265, 347 


Kallal, John 55, 225 


Keller, Bill 256 


Kirsch, Valerie 408 


Kondelis, Dean 280 


Kumaki, Robert 304, 325, 372 




Johnson, Gregg 362 


Kallman, Kurt 320 


Keller, Dave 222 


Kisbert, Christopher 408 


Kondracki, Eva 362 


Kumro, Sherry 340 




Johnson, Jeff 222, 330 


Kalra, Punit 385 


Keller, John 212, 320, 385 


Kish, Deborah 386 


Kono, Norma 298, 362 


Kundmann, Tom 323 




Johnson, Jeff 238 


Kalra, Ruby 303 


Keller, Julie 242, 300 


Kissinger, Thomas 362 


Konopken, Sue 279, 328 


Kunetka, Julie 230 




Johnson, Jennifer 407 


Kalter, William 408 


Keller, Mike 300, 347 


Kittler, Tom 244 


Konsky, Tony 255 


Kunkel, Mark 386 




Johnson, Karin 385 


Kaluzna, Donna 279, 376 


Kelley, Jenny 253 


Kivett, Steve 232 


Konstant, Michael 362 


Kuo, Linda 272 




Johnson, Keith 299 


Kam's 206 


Kelly. Bill 257 


Kizer, Eric 243 


Koomar, Steve 264, 265, 320, 


Kuo, Lori 229, 272, 363 




Johnson, Kenric 322 


Kamerman, John 341 


Kelly, Brian 258 


Kizilyalli, Isik 386 


323, 362 


Kupcikevicius. Rita 386 




Johnson, Mildred 287 


Kamin, Dane 254, 336 


Kelly, D. 248 


Klages, John 336 


Kooyenga, Steve 317 


Kuras, Kim 315 




Johnson, Nancee 407 


Kamin, Pete 227, 362 


Kelly, Dave 247, 408 


Klages, Karen 371 


Kopale, Bob 228, 155 


Kurland, Amy 266, 289, 294, 




Johnson. Nancy 216, 276 


Kaminsky, Pete 256, 362 


Kelly, Hank 336 


Klamner, Franz 318 


Kopec, Kory 271 


376, 423 




Johnson, Pam 376 


Kammerer, Stephen 257, 296, 


Kelly, Jenny 310 


Klapperich, Andy 225, 339, 353 


Kopech, Stephan 362 


Kurland, Robin 347 




Johnson, Paul 307 


408 


Kelly, Jim 288, 336 


Klas, Kathy 261, 303 


Koplos. Joel 278 


Kuritza, Alex 326 




Johnson, Penny 242 


Kamp, Brad 284 


Kelly, John 228 


Klass, Debbie 252, 298 


Kopriva, William 386 


Kurr, Vince 212 




Johnson, Phil 225 


Kamphausen, Ivy 340 


Kelly, Mark 297, 312 


Klausner, Dan 270 


Korach, Debra 347 


Kurtz, Andy 123 




Johnson, Professor Harry 131 


Kane, B. 248 


Kelly, Mike 255 


Klawitter. Beth 266, 289, 317, 


Korach, Linda 408 


Kurtz, Lisa 266, 289 




Johnson, Rhonda 214, 272, 


Kane, Jeff 260, 286, 362 


Kelly, Pat 286 


362 


Koren, Janet 334 


Kushnir, Pam 279 




362 


Kane, Neil 215 


Kelly, Thomas 312, 319, 385 


Klawitter, Linda 239, 278 


Koren, Julie 327, 362 


Kusek, Deborah 303, 408 




Johnson, Rick 283 


Kane, Noreen 301 


Kemnetz, Jim 270 


Klebau, Laurie 237, 362 


Korgie, Sue 226 


Kusnierz, Thomas 263, 386 




Johnson, Robert 362 


Kang, Azalia, 336, 408 


Kemp, Betsy 322 


Kleber, Doug 48, 49 


Korich, Dale 347 


Kustom, Brittan 409 




Johnson, Ruth 


Kang, John 385 


Kemp, Brian 227 


Kleczewski, Linda 219, 376 


Korman, Rob 227 


Kuttner, Kim 273 




Johnson, Sheila 240 


Kania, Joe 294, 332 


Kemper, Brian 336 


Klees, Mary 362 


Korman, Stephan 408 


Kuykendall, Debbie 230 




Johnson, Sue 306 


Kania, Linda 276 


Kenbril, Dave 303 


Kleiman, Lori 279 


Kornota, Eugene 386 


Kuykendall, Ruanna 409 




Johnson, Tammie 226 


Kanzler, Dave 257 


Kenes, Mary Jean 376 


Klein, Bob 170 


Korte, Bart 269 


Kuypers, Sandra 376 




Johnson, Tim 222 


Kapcan. Susan 252 


Kennedy, Brian 254 


Klein, Dave 256 


Korte, Sue 307 


Kuzuck, Merri Jo 301 




Johnson, Todd 353 


Kaplan, Dave 251, 285, 296, 


Kennedy, Chris 222 


Klein, Kendra 220 


Kory, Paul 241 


Kvedaras, John 397 




Johnson, Trang 397 


371 


Kennedy, Janice 230 


Klein, Paul 215 


Koryta, Laura 408 


Kwedar, Betsy 252. 328, 409 




Johnston, Jim 249 


Kaplan, Debbie 371, 423 


Kennedy, Jody 237 


Kleinberg, Ira 308 


Koryta, Lisa 253, 286, 362 


Kwon, Susan 320, 386 




Joiner, Mark 347 


Kaplan, Dina 287, 298 


Kennedy, Pat 260, 286. 362 


Klemick, Chris 257 


Kosbab, Karen 239 


Kyles, Dwight 68 




Joksimovic, Beth 279 


Kaplan, Jeff 218, 347 


Kennedy, Ralph 111 


Klemp, Mathias 386 


Kosco, Debbie 230 


Kyrouac. Scott 307 




Jonas, Wendy 229, 347 


Kaplan, Larry 259 


Kennedy, Steve 233 


Klevatt, Jodi 408 


Kosek, Linda 239 






Jones, Brian 221 
Jones, Chip 260, 335 


Kaplan, Lenny 259 
Kaplan, Mark 259 


Kennedy, Susan 287, 303, 362 
Kenney, Kara 226 


Klewcheski, Linda 274 


Kosinerz, Frank 233 






Klickman, Howard 408 


Kost, Mary 336 


W W V 




Jones, Christine 371 


Kaplan, Shari 376 


Kenney, Mary Pat 362 


Klimala, Jackie 289 


Kothe, Kevin 224 


III 




Jones, Denise 353 


Kaplan, Shira 299 


Kenney, Maureen 220 


Klien, Jeff 212 


Kotz, Jeff 299 


III 




Jones, George 218 


Kappa Alpha Psi 321 


Kenny, Thomas 329 


Kliff, Dave 215 


Kovacic, Joy 211, 362 


■>■>■> 




Jones, Judy 111 


Kappa Alpha Theta 25, 204, 
239 


Kent, John 362 


Klimkowski. Steve 225 
Kiimmeck. Carol 277. 408 


Koval, Mark 408 
Kovarik, Jeff 363 






Jones, Ken 321, 376 


Kent, Michael 362 






Jones, Linda 266, 289, 407 


Kappa Alpha Theta Seniors 282 


Kenyon. Dave 301 


Klindera. Jill 236 


Kowa, Steve 283 






Jones, Mark 244 


Kappa Delta 240 


Kenyon. Jeff 248, 385 


Kline, Charley 295 


Kowalske, Kent 299, 386 


LaBarge, Dick 257, 386 




Jones, Solomon 321, 408 


Kappa Delta Seniors 282 


Kerbel, Kim 324 


Klingenberg, B. J. 231 


Kozan, Laurie 250 


LaBarge, John 347 




Jones, Stacia 236 


Kappa Delta Rho 241 


Kerby. Karen 261, 288, 408 


Klingenberg, Ken 227 


Kozel, Diane 347 


Labhart, Lisa 409 




Jones, Steve 299 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 242 


Kercher, Sue 216 


Klinker. Jennifer 24, 226, 277. 


Kozuck, Merri Jo 347 


LaBrasca, Jackie 299 




Jones, Terry 347 


Kappa Sigma 204, 243 


Keres, Rene 306 


340, 397 


Kozurek, David 298 


Lacascio, Dave 341 




Jones, Tim 255 


Kapraun, Bill 244 


Kerin, Beverly 237 


Klinsky, Carol 338 


Krachmalnick, Pamela 298. 371 


Lacata, Steve 130 




Jones, Tom 262 


Karacic, Elaine 239, 282, 362 


Kerman, Rich 227 


Klint, Edward 329 


Krainik, Anthony 353 


Lachman, Michael 295, 386, 




Jones, Tracy 340 


Karalis, Bernice 298, 362 


Kern, Cathy 371 


Klitchman, Carol 242 


Krajnovich, Lynn 336 


429 




Jops, Tom 318 


Karasek, Joyce 408 


Kernen. Brian 248 


Klok, Tony 386 


Krai, Paula 376 


Lackner, Bill 300 




Jordan, Angie 237, 313 


Karayannis, Marios 268 


Kerns, Nancy 316, 397 


Klopman, Lisa 279 


Kralj, Karen 408 


LaCognata, 267 




Jordan, Brian 268 


Karbre, Rita 216 


Kerr, Mary 312, 385 


Kloss. Amy 20, 27, 110, 408, 


Kramer, Dor., ,y 250 


Lacrosse Club 170, 171 




Jordan, Isaac 260 


Karger, Howard 131 


Kerr, Michele 303 


425 


Kramer. Heidi 371 


Ladd, Andy 270 




Jordan, Michael 347 


Karkazis, John 225 


Kersten, Albert 232 


Kloss, Peggy 237 


Kramer, Mark 133 


Ladd, Laurie 240 




Jorgenson, Craig 270 


Karlove, Rita 408 


Kersting, Kathy 242, 278 


Klosterman. Linda 331. 347 


Kramer, Paul 347 


Ladle, Lisa 239 
Ladle, Maria 237 




Jorgenson, Adlon 323 


Karnatz, Cheryl 240 


Kerwell, Madhu 297 


Klouda, Ray 270 


Kramer. Thomas 386 




Jorgensen, Londa 242, 325, 


Karndel, Glen 256 


Kessler, Jackie 273 


Knaff, Mary 261 


Krannert Center 103 


Ladwig, Paul 314, 363 




327, 328, 408 


Kamstedt, Lyn 261, 362 


Kett, Kendra 237 


Knapp. Yoric 270 


Krantz, Mark 249, 397 


Lafita, Ivette 219, 274 




Jorgensen, Sue 242 


Karraker, Carla 253, 286, 353 


Keverian, Julie 214 


Knapik, Suzanne 408 


Krasnopolsky, Victor 297 


LaForge, Gary 296 




Joseph, Marsha 239 


Karraker, Craig 247 


Kewney, Kathy 175 


Knapp. Dave 260 


Krasnowski, Denise 271 


Lagergren, Jenny 240 




Josephson, Gregg 288 


Kaskel, Lar 256 


Keys, Nancy 324 


Knapp, Howard 235 


Krasowsky. Karen 261. 288, 


Lagessie, Heidi 239 
Lahey, Mike 323 




Joshu, Joann 301, 397 


Kasper, Catherine 408 


Kezch, Mike 303 


Knapp, Janet 282, 408 


363 




Jouricic, Jodi 214 


Kasperkiewicz, Renee 333 


Khosrani, Kousrani 336 


Knapp, Mark 324 


Kratochvil, Joel 243 


Laible, Melody 340 




Journey 92, 93 


Kasravi, Kasra 385 


Kidston, Candance 300 


Kneblekamp, Kent 222 


Krause, Chuck 289 


Laio, Dante 409 




Jovanovic, Jasna 336 


Kassner, Lisa 211 


Kieffer, Kim 340 


Knell, Lisa 408 


Krause. Donald 303, 336, 363 


Lake, Jean 294, 298, 363 




Jovanovic, Kathy 234 


Kasson, Tracy 218 


Kiefner, Janet 362 


Knepler, Sue 271 


Krause, Hal 306 


Lalla, Ken 267 




Joy, Lynn 230 


Kasten, Ken 256 


Kiehl, Kathleen 408 


Knicl, Norman 376 


Krause, Kevin 


Lalla, Steve 267 
Lam, Alex 386 




Joyce, Marianne 324 


Kasten, Martha 290 


Kiesler, David 408 


Kniel, Norm 315 


Krause, Kraig 245 




Joyce, Sean 335, 362 


Kastiel, Diane 371 


Kieffer, Kathy 340 


Knierim, Dan 299 


Krause, Larry 136 


Lam, Chuong 386 
Lam, Ken 326 




Joyce, Tracey 272 


Kasza, Eric 228 


Kiimmeck, Tom 247 


Knight, Rob 280 


Krause, Paul 386 




Jozwikn, Edward 408 


Kasza, Jill 261 


Kikuchi, Dan 264 


Knoche, Donald 217, 300, 332 


Krauskoff, Stuart 408 


Lamar, David 326 

LaMar, Laura 261, 288, 348 

LaMar, Laura 353 

LaMar. Lisa 283 

LaMar, Michael 336 

Lamb. Karen 252 

Lamb. Kathy 250. 285. 353 




Juchnevicius, Rimas 385 


Kathe, Lynn 229 


Kilberg, Tim 231, 386 


Knoebl, Linda 376 


Krausz, Ron 245 




Juco, Beth 219, 272 


Katris, Connie 214, 272, 376 


Kiley, Tom 225 


Knollenberg, DeeAnn 353 


Krautwurst, Heidi 220 




Juffernbruch, Dan 315 


Katz, Judi 279 


Kilgallon, Paul 248 


Knowland, Kathleen 239 


Krebs, J. Danger 246 




Juliano, Shaun 240 


Katz, Linda 287 


Kilian, Sherry 250 


Knowlton, Polly 179 


Kreger. Chris 311 




Juliffs, David 295 


Kaufman, Bonnie 287 


Killam, Bill 25, 217, 300, 320, 


Knox, Leah 408 


Kreid. Christopher 218 




Jumenville, Louis 258 


Kaufman, Craig 215 


347, 325 


Knudson, Julie 362, 303 


Kreid, Kit 318 




Juna, Joha 385 


Kaufman, Dave 215 


Killough, Mark 297 


Knudson, Greg 283 


Kreis, Kelley 276 


Lambda Chi Alpha 244 




Junior Panhellenic 321 


Kaufman, Joel 288 


Kim, Joung 386 


Knuth, Tom 228 


Kreisman, Debbie 279 


Lambert, Julie 309 







436 

Index / Jennings, Scott - Lambert, Julie 



Lambert, Stephanie 376 
Lambert, Sue 273 
Lamm, Cheryl 272, 279 
Lampadius. Kristen 239, 309 
Lamphear, Hillary 135 
Lampo. Tom 386 
Lampson, Steve 228 
Lancaster, Tracy 243 
Landeene. Cathy 250 
Landene, Steve 218 
Landers, David 386 
Landman. Carole 409 
Landman, Kevin 264 
Landon. Craig 247 
Landreth, Bruce 264 
Landsman, Liz 273 
Lane, Betsy 229 
Lane, Mois 272 
Lane, Randall 386 
Lane, Sarah 297 
Lane, Trish 317 
Lang, Ingrid 240 
Lang, Susan 240, 339 
Langan, Mike 225, 363 
Lange, Carol Ann 409 
Langenfeld, Clifford 409 
Langer, Steve 232, 243 
Langfield, Sue 250, 285, 363 
Langham, Nathan 245 
Langhammer, Karl 257, 348 
Lanman, Marianne 226, 272, 

277. 376 
Lannspach, Al 225 
Lantemo, Pete 222 
Lantz. Julane 230 
Lapcewich, Scott 251 
Lapine, Amy 287, 298 
LaPlante. Elizabeth 409 
Lapping, Julie 287 
Lapping, Paul 336 
Laraia. Barb 211 
Larkin, Bob 244 
Laros, Louis 264 
Larrabee, Laura 252, 372 
Larson, Andrew 248, 335 
Larson, Ann 239 
Larson, Bob 260 
Larson, Diane 226 

Larson, Eric 336 

Larson, Laura 271, 372 

Larson, Ned 217 

Lasik, Steve 299 

Laske, Cheryl 214, 272, 409 

LaSusa, Larry 292 

Latham, Pam 240 

Lattal, Joanne 229, 376 

Lattin, Linda 261 

Lattrell, Terry 90 

Lauback, Skip 218 

Laude, Carole 214, 307 

Lauder, Amy 219, 274, 363 

Laurence, John 372 

Lauritsen, Kristi 237 

Lauschke, Paul 222 

Lauten, Terri 214, 272, 335, 
348 

Lautenschlager, Becky 237 

Lavallie, A. J. 409 

Lavender. Audrey 300 

Lavin, Dan 259 

Lavis, Scott 269 

Law 131 

Lawes, Kathy 252 

Lawicki, Jane 237 

Lawler, Eileen 239, 282, 363 

Lawless, Robert 317 

Lawrence, Ann 242 

Lawrence, Karyn 299 

Lawrence, Paul 260, 286. 363 

Lawrence, Sharon 229 

Lawson, Chuck 251, 285 

Lawson, Glenda 273 

Laybome, Nan 335 

Lazar, Dan 259 

Lazzani, Pete 307 

Leahy, Tim 228, 298. 317. 
323, 335, 372 

Leander, Sue 250 

Leb, Barry 215 

Lebetski, Nancy 276 

Lebovitz, Ellen 273 

Lebow, Al 244 

Leboyer, Jill 287 

Leddon, Doug 222 

LeDuc, Joe 270 

Lee, Betsy 301 

Lee, Bill 235, 300, 312 

Lee, Cheryl 278 

Lee, Doug 179, 308 

Lee, Gin 409 

Lee, Jim 295, 429 

Lee, Joe 303, 363 

Lee, Judy 216 

Lee, Kyong 363 

Lee. Mike 247 

Lee, Moon 386 

Lee. Robin 363 

Lee, Sunny 363 

Lee, Susan 266, 289, 409 

LeFever, Tony 290 

LeFlore, Yvette 363 

Lefstein, Mindy 253 

LeGrand, Mrs. 219 



Lehman. Dave 259 
Lehman, Michelle 216 
Lehmkuhl, Rick 225 
Leibold, Scott 256 
Leibold, Tracey 250 
Leibovitz, Ann 273 
Leibow, Lori 279 
Leibrock, Martin 397 
Leick, Bob 244 
Leininger. Bernard 248 
Leister, John 397 
Leitner, Phyllis 229, 278 
Leja, Barb 331, 353 
Lekkas, Franee 242, 284 
Lelko, Dawn 216 
Lembitz, Julie 250, 285, 376 
Lemenager, Dean 235 
Lemon, Lonny 228, 353 
Lemonidis, John 291 
Lemons, Debbie 21 1 
Lempa, Joe 221 
Lems, Kristen 65 
Lemsky, Carolyn 353 
Lenahan, Tim 322, 409 
Lenart, Carol 386 
Lencioni, Nancy 211, 363 
Lencioni, Paul 260 
Lendhardt, Richard 336 
Lenihan, Michael 386 
Lennertz, Lora 409 
Lennihan, Colleen 278 
Lensch, Dave 251 
Lend, Kim 183, 409 
Lenti, Rich 235 
Lents, Charles 386 
Lenz, Laura 220 
Lenzen, Rich 263 
Leon, Robert 409 
Leonard, Bryan 222, 323 
Leonard, Jay 251, 285 
Leonard, Laura 219 
Leonardi, Tony 222 
Leonardson, Brian 323 
Leong, David 310 
Leopardo, Gary 213 
Lerner, Cheryl 409 
Lerner, Joni 348 
Lerner, Matthew 363 
Lemer, Randie 299 
Lesle, Paul 386 
Leslie, Bill 302, 409 
Lesniak, David 297 
Lessing, Mary Elise 271, 313 
Lester, Regina 386 
Lev, Alan 363 
Levartuzkan, Stan 332 
Levenstam. David 336, 363 
Levey, Edan 259 
Levi, Mike 259 
Levie, Karen 273 
Levin, Amy 303 
Levin, Felice 325 
Levin, Julie 273 
Levin, Lori 409 
Levin, Lynn 283 
Levin, Mike 259 
Levin, Sharon 278 
Levin, Sheryl 273, 409 
Levine, Dave 228, 256 
Levine, Lance 334 
Levine, Lee 135 
Levine, Sharon 334, 363 
Levinson, Andi 250 
Levinson, Jenny 252, 284 
Levis, Jim 258 
Levitan, Rory 289 
Levitt, Renee 279 
Levitt, Susie 273 
Levon, Paul 348 
Levy, Allison 279 
Levy, Chancellor Stanley R. 67 
Levy, Ellen 287, 324, 353 
Levy, Fred 259, 332 
Levy, Laura 287 
Levy, Monique 273 
Lewandowski, Nancy 298 
Lewellyn, Doug 267 
Lewis, Byron 268 
Lewis, Cheryl 397 
Lewis, Donna 68 
Lewis, Jim 217, 348 
Lewis, Kevin 233, 386 
Lewis, Mike 270 
Lewis, Monica 397 
Lewis, Pat 273 
Lewis, Paul 61, 62, 63, 64 
Lewis, Stu 251 
Leyden, Laurie 240 
Leyden, Linda 240 
Lhotka, Monica 409 
Liberatore, Kathy 242 
Liberman, Mark 386 
Licata, Faye 234 
Licenberg, Dave 213 
Lichtenstein, Rochelle 409 
Lichti, Tom 386 
Licocci, Tony 89 
Liddy. Constance 409 
Lieb, J. B. 131 
Liebman, Donna 372 
Liebman, Gayle 363 
Liebovich, Barb 237 
Liefeld, David 386 



Lieske, Scott 247 
Life is for Everyone 35, 131 
Likes, Gil 247 
Lilly, Celeste 372 
Lin, Bob 409 
Lin, Charles 409 
Lin, Eugene 386 
Lincenberg, Gary 409 
Lincoln, Doris 363 
Lindahl. Sally 216 
Lindahl, Susan 216 
Lindberg, Dick 51 
Lindberg, Tracy 211 
Lindemeier, Kristin 363 
Linders, Blake 213 
Lindgren. Beth 230 
Lindquist, Linda 237 
Lindsay, Douglas 363 
Lindsey, Doug 206 
Ling, Dorothy 226 
Linger, Adam 147 
Linholm, Bob 218 
Linn, Steve 232 
Lipari, David 386 
Lipari, Peter 271 
Lippe, Michael 128 
Lippe, Sue 216, 363 
Lippitz, Brad 215 
Lipton. Steven 409 
Liscano. Linda 239 
Lisk, Moriag 363 
Liss, Andrea 137, 167. 372, 

425, 428 
Lister, Larry 386 
Litchfield, Jay 235 
Lift, Lee 219 
Little, Libby 242, 353 
Little Sisters 205 
Liu, Thomas 386 
Livergood, Jeffrey 386 
Liwag, Roland 363 
Loar, Steve 227, 363 
Loboda, Nancy 214 
Local Bands 106, 107 
Locallo, Elizabeth 376 
Locallo, John 233, 363 
Locasio, Dave 225 
Locke. Linda 348 
Lockinour, Regina 409 
Lockmiller, Joy 230, 397 
Lodge, James 386 
Lofgreh, Jay 247 
Loftus, Kevin 386 
Loftus, Tim 251 
Logas, Jeffrey 386 
Logsdon, Lucy 76 
Lohnes. Scott 386 
Lohse, Mary 237 
Londrigan, Mary Jean 250 
Lonergan, Dan 205 
Long, Amy 409 
Long, Craig 217 
Long, Jenny 229 
Long, Joyce 234, 348 
Long, Kelly 353 
Long, Mike 217 
Longman, Douglas 386 
Loomis, Roger 249, 363 
Lopez, Margie 179 
LoPresti, Paul 241 
Lord, Rich 213 
Lorentz, Tim 244 
Lorenzen, Karen 226 
Lorry's Favorite Sports 140 
Loseff. Donald 409 
Losos, Rory 214, 409 
Louderback, Brad 172 
Loughran, Kathy 240, 397 
Loughran, Mary 216 
Loughry, Lange 227 
Louie, Carole 372 
Love. Nancy 348 
Lovelace. Lori 234 
Loveless, Lance 231 
Loverde, Debbie 363 
Lovett, Pete 171 
Loving, Julie 237 
Low, Jacqueline 409 
Lower, Laura 220 
Lowery, Tim 409 
Lowry, Greg 251 
Loyet. Kathrynn 409 
Lubecker, John 363 
Lubinski, Mike 28, 409 
Lucas, Kevin 409 
Lucas, Sharon 250, 409 
Luce, Diane 237, 397 
Lucey, Cecil 70, 71 
Lucht, Kevin 386 
Ludwig, Jim 212 
Ludwig. Mark 372, 429 
Lukowicz. Keith 251 
Lund, John 232 
Lundgren, Jean 226 
Lundstedt. Paul 222, 363 
Lundstrom, Roger 363 
Lupardus, Rocky 232 
Luse, Martha 214 
Lust, Deborah 409 
Lustig. Steven 397 
Luthy, Michael 363 
Luttke, Bill 247 
Lutz, Mary 237 



Luzzi. Bruce 312 
Lyle, Beverly 409 
Lyman, Daniel 363 
Lyman, Mary 220 
Lyman, Mike 222 
Lyman, Robert 222 
Lynch, Colleen 376 
Lynn, Gary 241 
Lynn, Greg 241 
Lyon, Don 222, 363 
Lyon, Lori 348 
Lyon, Susie 219 
Lyons. Brad 232 
Lyons. Mark 228 
Lyons, Richard 386 
Lyons, Sheila 363 
Lyons, Tom 228 
Lysek, Mary 409 
Lyster, Michael 409 



mmm 



Maart. Maureen 336 

Maas, Chris 216 

Mabel's 107, 108 

Macadam, Bill 292 

MacGregor, Melinda 363 

Machala. Mary Ellen 348 

Machalanski, Jose 300 

Mache, Pam 348 

Mackey, Scott 221 

Mackin, Bill 262, 409 

Macy, Jeff 323 

Maczko, Andy 212 

Madden, John 260 

Madden, Mary Fran 376 

Madden, Maureen 313 

Maddi, Patricia 409 

Maddock, Patricia 409 

Maddock, Stan 235 

Mademan, Lisa 219 

Madigan, Mike 232 

Madison, Brett 235, 302, 320 

Madock, Patty 211 

Madonia, Mike 244 

Madrig, Don 178 

Maeder, Carl 224 

Maffet, James 46 

Magad, Tracy 273 

Magelli. Paul 334 

Mager. Jude 261. 288, 372 

Magerko, John 387 

Maggert, Michael 397 

Magidson, Franklyn 363 

Magnesen, Linda 298 

Magruder, Margarette 242, 272 

Mahached, Teresa 363 

Mahan, Kevin 269 

Mahanna, Arthur 397 

Mahnke, Karen 136. 299, 324, 
409 

Mahoney, Ann 237 

Mahoney, Maureen 284 

Mahoney, Michael 376 

Mahoney, Michelle 353 
Mahoney, Tim 284 
Mahre, Mark 318 
Mahre, Phil 318 
Maibusch, Nancy 376 
Maier, Pete 255 
Mailey, Laura 278 
Main Liners 322 
Main, Douglas 348 
Main, Tim 217 
Maine, Barbara 348 
Mais, Sharon 421 
Majeski, John 301 
Major, Bill 300 
Majors, Georgia 338 
Makeever. Dan 283, 307 
Malaise, Rene 299 
Malaker. Eric 300 
Malambri, Joseph 409 
Malantis, John 269 
Malcomson. JoAnne 300, 348 
Malenius, Sue 236 
Malik, Scott 262 
Malina, Barbara 376 
Malinowsi, Dan 283 
Malkin, Gary 215 
Malkin, Steve 215 
Mallak, Lany 295 
Malloy, Margaret 411 
Maimed, Allen 411 
Malmud, Pam 287 
Malone, Jane 340 
Malone, karen 293 
Malone, Mary 338 
Malone, Tony 322 
Maloney, Jeff 387 
Maloney, Joel 336 
Maloney, Larry 233, 411 
Maloney, Linda 226 
Maloney, Liz 252 
Maloney, Mike 294 
Malten, Sharlene 299 
Malter, Bruce 256 



Mamoser, Ellen 376 
Manale, Sherry 237 
Manaois, Arnie 241 
Mandelkern, Andrea 298 
Mandelson, Robin 279, 411 
Mangan, Molly 239 
Mangen, Robert 324 
Manhart, Sabrina 271 
Manicki, Phil 341 
Manion, Lisa 237 
Mankowski, Craig 353 
Mann, Angel 211 
Mann, Christopher 268, 336 
Manning, Archie 144 
Manning. Jean 387 
Manning. Kit 211 
Manning, Lori 253, 427 
Manning, Tim 322 
Manson, Laura 299 
Mantenson, Mary Beth 304 
Mapes, Mike 260 
Maquire, Sue 219 
Marantha 46. 47 
Marbury, Anthony 411 
Marcheschi, Elizabeth 411 
Marching Illini 50, 51 
Marching Illini Drum Line 323 
Marchioni, Gary 228 
Marchuk, Martha 229 
Marchuk, Mary 229 
Marciniak, Leslie 230 
Marco, Lance 218 
Marcus, Carol 339 
Marcus, Claudio 233, 335 
Marcus, Nancy 276 
Marcus, Wendi 273 
Marele, Miles 105 
Maresh, Linda 363 
Margala, Jeanne 252 
Margala, Mary 252, 411 
Margarites, Kristen 338 
Mariani, Ginger 211 
Mariano, Gonzalo 387 
Mariano, Silvia 271, 387 
Marines, Pam 219 
Marinos, Gerastimos 336 
Mark, Bill 326, 387 
Markgraf, Bob 218 
Markle, Sue 284 
Marks, Jim 259. 324, 332 
Marks, Susan 279 
Marku, Gerri 240 
Markus, Terry 259, 332. 338 
Markwalder. Phil 300 
Marlier, Bnan 363 
Marquart, Dale 212, 363 
Marongiu, Maurice 319 
Marovich, Michael 411 
Marr, Brian 301 
Marr, Jay 280 
Marr. Peggy 253 
Marseille. Dave 249 
Marshall, Andrea 411 
Marshall, Linda 376 
Marshall, Lynn 219 
Marshall, Lynette 332 
Marshall, Rick 232 
Marshall, Roger 264, 265 
Marsik, Vicky 219 
Martensen, Mary Beth 242, 

317, 332, 335 
Martin, Alex 300 
Martin, Dave 296 
Martin, Debbie 287 
Martin, Dennis 317 
Martin, Duane 411 
Martin, Greg 213 
Martin, Helen 348 
Martin, Jeanne 298 
Martin, Mary 397 
Martin, Mary Ellen 271 
Martin. Mike 146 
Martin, Phil 228 
Martin, Sam 317, 348 
Martin, Sharon 411 
Martin, Steve 315 
Martin, Thomas 348 
Martinek. Debbie 229, 363 
Martinez, Annette 411 
Martinez, Dave 218 
Martinez, Mike 176 
Martinez. Olivia 220 
Martini, Colette 214, 298 
Martini, Linda 214 
Martini, Melanie 252 
Martini, Mike 221, 334 
Martonosi, Mary Anne 340, 411 
Marx, Debbie 253 
Marx, Janet 266 
Masek, Parti 214, 328 
Masini, Dan 311 
Maska, Mark 312 
Maske, Steve 241 
Maslov, Marcy 298. 300. 363 
Maslov. Stacie 299 
Mason, Colleen 211 
Mason — Rauk, Jan 319 
Mason, Mike 222 
Mason, Steve 263 
Mason, Sue 252 
Mason, Susan 252 
Mason, Tony 260, 286 
Mason, Trisha 290 



Mass, Anthony 387 
Massa, Greg 290 
Mast, Ed 295 
Mastella, Debbie 220, 411 
Masters. Jeff 263 
Masterson, Gail 411 
Mastro. Phyllis 397 
Matejcak, Gary 212. 411 
Materski. Mike 210 
Mather, Ted 296 
Mathews, Dot 236 
Mathews, Laureen 305, 363 
Matis, Al 314 
Matsushita, Yasushi 387 
Mart, Dean 363 
Marten, Sharlene 41 1 
Matthews, Stevie 237 
Mattick, Laurie 229. 272, 335 
Mattioda, Sandy 301 
Matrix, Phil 315 
Mattson, Bob 218 
Mattson, Lori 299 
Maruk, Sara 287 
Maturo. Rich 305, 363 
Marusek, Elise 397 
Marusik. Mark 292 
Maruszewski. Randy 411 
Mauer, Patricia 363 
Maulson, Heather 411 
Maurides, Demitrios 248 
Maussbaum. Sue Marie 226 
Mavier, Dave 217 
Mavis, Lori 340 
Ma-Wan-Da 323 
Mawrence, Rick 215 
Max 48 

Maxey, Sue 261, 305 
Maxfield, Bruce 288 
Maxfield, Nancy 326 
Maxheimer, Marjorie 349 
Maxheimer, Mary 301 
Maxwell, Allison 214, 278 
Maxwell, Frank 222 
Maxwell, Miriam 271 
May, Mary Beth 214 
Mayber, Ken 299. 363 
Maycock, Greg 251 
Mayeda. Crystelle 363 
Mayeda, Jim 387 
Mayer. Ellen 273 
Mayer, Jim 296 
Mayer, Laura 273 
Mayer, Margaret 363 
Mayer, Sarah 336, 341 
Mayes, Steve 218 
Mayfield, Cindy 236, 323, 349 
Mayfield, Georgia 236 
Mayle, Laura 237, 317. 349 
Mayoiis, Ty 228 
Mayoris, Kelly 338 
Mayrent, Laurie 299, 365 
Mazliach, Paula 279 
Mazzocco, Jim 268 
McAllister, Dean 222 
McAlpine, Laura 411 
McAnally, John 170, 288 
McAndrew, John 222 
McAndrew, John 136 
McAvoy, Tim 210 
McBride, Dennis 243 
McBride, Janet 250 
McBride. Michael 301, 397 
McBride's 133 
McBrath, Scott 228 
McCabe, Bill 309 
McCaffery. Chuck 294 
McCall, Lori 276 
McCarren, Marie 409 
McCarthy, Barry 296 
McCarthy, Colleen 376 
McCarthy, Mary 226 
McCarthy, Monica 230 
McCarthy, Sean 315 
McCarthy, Teresa 387 
McCarthy, Tim 246, 349 
McCarthy, Tom 233 
McCartney, Andrew 387 
McCarty. Diane 303 
McCarty, Patrick 397 
McCauley, Joseph 387 
McCauley. Kathy 261 
McCavley, Rita 300 
McClarey, Don 129 
McClary, Debra 338 
McClary, Stephen 365 
McClatchey, Scott 387 
McClellan, Arthur 69 
McClenahan, Mary 323, 409 
McClurg, Carol 298, 336, 365 
McComas, Chris 221 
McConchie, Kris 236 
McConnell, Tom 387 
McCook, Maggie 216 
McCool, Mike 218 
McCool. Randy 218 
McCord, Russell 349 
McCormick, Nancy 341, 372 
McCowin, Mike 227 
McCoy, Angel 271 
McCoy. Dirk 264 
McCracken. A. M. A. M. 230 
McCrea, Healy 237 
McCrory, John 269 



437 

Index / Lambert, Stephanie - McCrory, John 



















McCully, Delia 271 


McPherson, Kurt 283 


Middleton, Doug 310 


Mohr, Laurie 252, 284 


Muckenhirn, Helen 376 


Neacy, Kathleen Ann 412 




McCurdy, Beth 293 


McPherson, Kevin 173 


Midler, Ellen 279 


Molander, Molly 220 


Muehl, Denisa 219 


Neal, Michelle 240 




McCutchan, Ron 290 


McPherson. Sue 239, 282, 365 


Miecznikowske. Anna 412 


Moline, Mindy 279, 295, 372 


Mueller, David 349 


Neal, Robin 250, 341 




McDurmond, Matt 280 


McQuality. Jill 239 


Mierendorf, Robin 252, 412 


Mollenkamp, Anna 349 


Mueller, Ernest 366 


Neale, Jack 278 




McDermott, Bill 212, 318 


McQuality, Neal 254 


Mihm, Andrew 248 


Molnar, Kerri 219 


Mueller, Kevin 315 


Nealis, Jane 276, 295 




McDermott. Brian 387 


McQueen, Beth 303 


Mikes, Joe 225 


Momsen, Raymond 336 


Mueller, Linda 278 


Nealon, Mark 254 




McDermott, Michael 255, 387 


McShane, Antony 319, 411 


Miklas, Carl 268 


Monahan, Nina 340 


Mueller, Margie 211 


Nederost, Mary Ann 324 




McDermott, Scott 222 


McVey, Barrie 349 


Mikols, Gerard 268 


Moneffi, Gary 270, 320 


Mueller, Margy 341 


Nee, Katherine 412 




McDonald, Brian 251 


McVey, Eddie 241 


Mildice, Cathy 252 


Money 132, 133, 134, 135 


Mueller, Mike 290 


Neely, Adrienne 237 




McDonald, Kevin 212 


McWard, Jeff 217 


Mileg, John 307 


Mongomery, Todd 228 


Mueller, Mitchell 387 


Neese, Debbie 310 




McDonald, Laura 324 


McWard, Marie 365 


Miles, Andy 271 


Monroe, Mary 300 


Mueller, Richard 298 


Negley, Dave 227, 387 




McDonald, Patti 239, 282 


McWilliams, Mary 283, 411 


Miles, Frances 324, 353 


Monson, Paul 429 


Mueller, Scott 387 


Nehf, Dave 225, 334 




McDonald, Teresa 220, 319, 


McWilliams, Mike 244 


Miles, Harold 228 


Montana, Louie 222, 336 


Mueller, Tom 238, 312 


Nehrkom, Gerry 212, 300, 349 




353 


McWorter, Professor Gerald 71 


Miles. Lynn 261, 272, 288, 349 


Montanus, Jim 296 


Muench, Randy 232 


Neier, Sandy 214 




McDonald's 60 


Mea, Sue 299 


Miletic. Rich 218 


Montague, Suzy 253 


Muff, Rick 212 


Neisius, Tracy 230, 304 




McDonnell. Bill 286 


Meador, Dean J. 185, 310, 372 


Milgrom. Nancy 287 


Montella, Susan 252 


Muhl, Becky 229 


Neisler, Greg 245 




McDonnell. Mary 250, 285, 40! 


Mecklenburger, David 365 


Milkint, Craig 296. 326. 332 


Montgomery, Jay 387 


Muhler, Forrest 333 


Nelligan, Theresa 272 




McDowell, Laury 372 


Mecklenburger, Jill 216 


Millar, Jim 334 


Montgomery, Joy 240, 282 


Muhs, Janine 288, 317, 349 


Nelsen, Mike 254 




McElligot, Bill 249 


Meckley, Pamela 291, 365 


Millard. Anne 421 


Montgomery, Mark 218 


Muhs, Jeanine 261 


Nelson, Avery 336 




McElroy, Dave 233 


Med School 120 


Millard. Dot 276 


Montgomery, Mary 271 


Mui, Jackson 387 


Nelson, Bob 238 




McElroy, Jane 336, 341 


Medinsky, Dick 246 


Millborg. Marty 299 


Montgomery, Rich 284 


Muirhead, Sarah 312 


Nelson, Craig 283 




McEnerney, Mike 257 


Medema, Mike 233 


Miller. Amy 272, 353. 365 


Montgomery, Timothy 50 


Muirheid, Susan 252 


Nelson, Dan 244, 269, 412 




McEntire, Paul 365 


Meeden. Jennifer 411 


Miller, Aubrey 289 


Montgomery, Todd 247 


Mukai, Mo 220, 298, 331, 366 


Nelson, Dave 178, 267, 296 




McFall, Ellen 131 


Meeker, Don 227. 387 


Miller, Becky 305 


Moody Blues 96. 97 


Mulach, Ron 227 


Nelson, Donald 372, 263 




McFarlane, Kim 313, 340 


Meenahan, Mary Pat 276 


Miller. Beth 272, 278 


Moody, Desann 261 


Mulchrone, Pete 148 


Nelson, Donald 387 




McFeron, Michael 349 


Meers, Sam 349 


Miller. Beverly 412 


Moody, Jane 242 


Mulgrew, Susan 317 


Nelson, Gail 229, 412 




McGarel, Owen 409 


Mees, David 411 


Miller. Bruce 387 


Moomey, Renee 212 


Mulka. Mike 283 


Nelson, Greta 300 




McGarry, Mary 298, 409 


Meier, Les 225 


Miller, Bryan 258 


Moore, Amy 271, 295, 387 


Muller, Becky 300 


Nelson, Jan 272, 305 




McGath, Scott 376 


Meiners, Mike 267 


Miller, Cara 250 


Moore, Barry 269 


Mullikin, Mike 249 


Nelson, Karen 226 




McGee, Leigh Ann 307 


Meisenheimer. Dave 213 


Miller, Carol 397 


Moore, Chris 269 


Mullins, Beth 293 


Nelson, Ken 228 




McGillian, Dotty 219 


Meisenhelder, Alice 412 - 


Miller. Darrell A. 312 


Moore, Collette 219 


Mullins, Jeffrey 260, 286, 387 


Nelson. Lisa 214 




McGinn, Edward 397 


Mejia, Mark 249 


Miller, Daryl 296 


Moore, Daniel 397 


Mulvihill, Maureen 237 


Nelson, Noreen 236 




McGinnis, David 387 


Melbourn, Terrence 329 


Miller, Dave 225 


Moore, Jeff 365 


Mulvihill, Monica 237 


Nelson, Trace 322 




McGinnis. Kevin 387 


Melchiore, Sue 299 


Miller, Dave 222 


Moore, Joanna 412 


Munger, J. 248 


Nemec, John 292 




McGlone, Cathy 210 


Mellaro, Tandy 285 


Miller, Debbie 214 


Moore, Richard 307 


Munsterman, Sue 341 


Nemeth, Lynn 278 




McGovern, Lynn 239, 303 


Meloche, Katherine 293, 376 


Miller. Dianne 335 


Moore, Susan 211 


Murdock, Kim 239 


Nesbitt, Bruce 210 




McGovern, Pat 270 


Melone, Dave 254 


Miller, Elizabeth 387 


Moorman, Ted 254 


Murdy, Mike 255 


Nester, Claire 253 




McGowan, Allison 261, 272, 


Melvlis, Eric 280 


Miller, Holly 239 


Moors, Jerry 291 


Muroga, Edith 253, 335 


Netter, Kim 300 




288 


Memler, Maureen 261, 288, 


Miller, Joe 307 


Mooshil, Maria 324 


Murphy, Brian 387 


Nettleton, Dave 248 




McGrath, Maggie 229, 298 


328, 353 


Miller, Joel 296 


Mora, Arthur 372 


Murphy, David 283 


Netzel, Denise 387 




McGrath, Michael 248 


Menaker, Susan 287 


Miller, Julie 349 


Moran, Andy 302 


Murphy, Diane 376 


Neubauer, Carl 217 




McGuire, Mark 409 


Mencke, Robert 365 


Miller, Karen 412 


Moran, Carol 252, 412 


Murphy, Jane 339 


Neubek, Kurt M. 275, 297 




McGuire, Nancy 325 


Menconi, Sandi 240 


Miller, Karla 239 


Moravec. Patricia 412 


Murphy, Kathryn 139 


Neufeldt, Steve 212 




McGuire, Tom 298 


Mendel, Carolyn 287 


Miller. Kenny 289 


Morawski, David 412 


Murphy, Kevin 318 


Neuman, Timothy 397 




McHeigh, Laura 271 


Mendelson, Michael 264, 265, 


Miller, Laurie 242 


Morency, Patricia 353 


Murphy, Mark 244 


Neunaber, Susan 366 




Mclnerney, Laura 276, 328 


412 


Miller, Laurie 211, 349 


Moreschi, Paul 248 


Murphy, Mary 412 


New Wave 56, 57 




Mclnerney, Mike 341 


Mendoza, R. 248 


Miller, Linda 298, 349 


Morettini, James 365 


Murphy, Mary Ellen 181, 339 


Newman, Charles 321 




McKeague, Art 269 


Mengel, Mary 412 


Miller, Lori 272 


Morey, Michele 276 


Murphy, Mike 90, 366, 387 


Newman, Herb 300 




McKee, Beth Ann 340 


Menguy, Missy 253 


Miller, Maureen 301 


Morf, Elizabeth 252 


Murphy, Mo 220 


Newman, Pat 270 




McKee, Cecile261, 288, 349 


Menich, Linda 412 


Miller. Mark 257, 412 


Morgan, Corky 254, 335 


Murphy, Molly 242 


Newman, Wayne 259, 309 




McKee, Kent 235, 349 


Menis, Michael 412 


Miller, Mark 349, 412 


Morgan. Judge Robert 144 


Murphy, Sharon 242 


Newmark, Judy 287 




McKee, Laurel 312 


Menninger, Carolyn 240, 278, 


Miller, Mark P. 330 


Morgan, Marilyn 341, 365 


Murphy, T. 248 


Neumiller, Jane 334 




McKeever, Steven 319, 321, 


282, 336 


Miller. Merrill 290 


Mori, Peter Alan 269, 365 


Murphy, Tim 228 


Newberry, Victoria 301 




409 


Menser, Dwayne 365 


Miller. Michael 82. 83 


Moriarty. Tim 283 


Murphy. William 349 


Newport, Curtis 245 




McKenna, Colleen 338 


Menzel, Scott 284 


Miller. Nancy 214, 349 


Morin, Laura 242 


Murray, Cindy 301 


Newsome, Julie 226 




McKenzie, Deborah 273, 365 


Menzer, Carin 340 


Miller. Robert 412 


Morley, Cindy 214, 300 


Murray, Debbie 300 


Newton, Laura 232 




McKeon, Laura 239, 278 


Mer, Dan 218 


Miller, Ron 269 


Morley, James P. 365 


Murray, Donna 397 


Newton, Laura 237 




McKeon, Linda 239, 282, 376 


Mercola, Lori 279 


Miller, Steve 245, 291 


Morneou. Monique 261 


Murray, Janet 284 


Neylon, Ellen 261, 288 




McKie, Thomas 312, 349 


Merkel, Margaret 421 


Miller, Sue 229, 252, 412 


Morns, Laura 237 


Murray, Joanne 300, 412 


Nguyen, Nhi H. 387 




McKiernan. Lori 239 


Merkel, Roger 349 


Miller, Sue 216, 313. 412 


Morong, Chris 250, 278 


Murray, Martha 221, 276 


Nichols, Heide 175 




McKim, Steve 291 


Merkel, Sue 301 


Miller, Tara 211 


Moroni, Thomas 387 


Murray, Scott 366 


Nichols. Laura 397 




McKinley Health Advocates 324 


Merkle, Pat 218 


Millerd. Mary 236 


Morris, Kevin 412 


Murray, Tom 131 


Nichols. Michael 366 




McKinley Health Center Board 


Merkle, Todd 244 


Milleur. Rachelle 307 


Morris, LeeAnn 341 


Murrell, Kathryn 335, 412 


Nicholson, Catherine 214 




324 


Meronyle. Perry 233 


Millhaem. Mike 227 


Morris, Lisa 365 


Murrin, Jerry 366 


Nicholson, Nicholas 387 




McKinley Presbyterian Church 


Merritt, Darcia 273 


Milling. Jeff 288 


Morris, Robyn 279 


Museums 28, 29 


Nicholson, Peter 412 




46,48 


Mesdag, Nini 242 


Millman, Debbie 287 


Morris, Rod 217, 334 


Musielewicz, Dave 243 


Nick, Sue 216 




McKinney, Tamara 318 


Messersmith, Lee 270 


Mills, William 321 


Morrison, Barb 242 


Mussay, Jeff 291, 412 


Nicolau, Mary 230, 412 




McKinnon, Laura 387 


Messet, Ed 54 


Milo, Lorelei 219, 313 


Morrison. Jill 219 


Mutter, Janet 239, 282, 353 


Nicoson, Steve 387 




McKirgan, Bob 233, 323, 365 


Messier, Bob 217 


Milo, Sandy 239 


Morrison, Raymond 323, 412 


Myatt, Diane 236 


Niebergall, Kelly 211 




McKorkle, Scott 224, 387 


Metersky, Jeff 256 


Miltner, Dennis 283 


Morrison, Scott 263, 375 


Myers, Denise 226 


Niehaus, Cynthia 349 




McKula, T. J. 225 


Metta, Paul 254 


Milton, John 217 


Morrison, Tom 267 


Myers, Gordon 349 


Nielsen, Joanne 412 




McLain, Susan 300, 365 


Mettam. Nancy 349 


Milz. Mike 268 


Morrissey, Pat 246 


Myers, Mark 270 


Nieman, Chris 248 




McLaughlin, Amy 276 


Metzler. Dan 224 


Minarik, Mary Ellen 252 


Morritz, Trudy 353 


Myroth. Susan 310 


Niemeier. Robert 387 




McLaughlin, Pat 280 


Metzler. Kurt 324 


Mindrum, Robert 319 


Morrow, Julie 412 




Niemiec, Rhonda 366 




McLaurin, Bernard 328 
McLaurin, Frederick 328 


Meves, Greg 269 
Meycroft, Ann 113 


Miner, David 235, 307 
Miner, Michael 365 


Morse. Jama 312, 376 
Morse, Marty 306 




Nierenberg, Iris 376 




Niermann, David 387 




McLeod, Julie 240, 282, 365 


Meyer, Becky 219, 317 


Minkel, Linda 412 


Morton, Craig 152 


nnn 


Nieses, Sally 376 




McLernon, Mary 340 


Meyer, Bill 255 


Minor, April 338 


Morton, Kim 239, 282, 349 


Nieslwski, S. 248 




McLoughlin. Bruce 336, 387 


Meyer, Bob 318 


Minster, Nancy 261, 426 


Mortor Board 325 


Niewold, Grace 219 




McLoughlin, Man 253 


Meyer, Brad 254 


Mintz, Kenneth 412 


Moser, Betty 266, 289, 318 




Nighswander. Terri 240 




McMahon. Dan 260 


Meyer, Dave 255 


Mioux, Joseph 349 


Moser. Elizabeth 412 




Nightingale, Jim 387 






McMahon. Terry 331, 365 


Meyer, Diane 412 


Mirabella, Lynn 226 


Mosher. Todd 232 




Nigro. Beth 211 




McMenamic, Bill 303 


Meyer, Eric 260 


Miranda, Walt 289 


Mosinski, Tom 249 


Nabat, Cheri 287 


Nilles, Matt 48 




McMill. Kim 226 


Meyer, Joseph 297 


Miresse, Deanne 220, 349 


Mosior. Robin 372 


Nabor House 245 


Nissen, Debra 412 




McMillan, Beth 298 


Meyer, Julie 250, 272 


Mirza. Matthew 412 


Moskaluk, Christopher 412 


Naborowski, Don 219 


Nisson, Wes 




McMillan, Kimberly 372 


Meyer, Keith 387 


Mishkin, Gail 273 


Moss. Jackie 219 


Nachbar, Jill 353 


Nitti, Paula 412 




McMillan, Kevin 224 


Meyer, Mark 296 


Miss Firecracker Contest 104, 


Moss, Sharon 412 


Nadig, David 210, 372, 426 


Nixon, Michael 387 




McMillan, Kim 277, 323, 327 


Meyer, Mike 332 


105 


Moss, Sherri 339 


Naffziger, Paula 219 


Noble, Carolyn 252 




McMillan, Troy 151 


Meyer. Scott 291 


Missimer. Cathy 253, 314 


Mostek, James 412 


Nagel, Glenn 366 


Noble, Dave 244 




McMillen, Daniel 387 


Meyer, Stephanie 309, 372 


Mistry, Dinu 261, 288. 412 


Mostow, Janet 273 


Nagle, Bill 262 


Noble, Lisa 214 




McMillen, Steve 290 


Meyer, Todd 317 


Mitchell. Andre 372 


Mota, Joe 268 


Nagle, Jim 233, 283 


Nobuyama, Scott 397 




McMullan, Patrick 353 


Meyer, Tom 225, 376 


Mitchell. Bill 258 


Mota. Mike 268 


Nagy. Stephanie 229 


Nocker. Claudia 44 




McMurtry, David 235 


Meyer, Tracey 252 


Mitchell, Cathy 230, 412 


Mother Ruggers 177 


Nakagawa, Osamu 318 


Nogacz. Marika 250 




McNab. Kay 284 


Meyering. Bill 324 


Mitxhell. Dr J. Kent 300 


Motley. Kathleen 365 


Nakao, Joseph 412 


Nolan, Jenny 240 




McNabb, Nancy 297 


Meyerling, William 412 


Mitchell, Jeff 212 


Motley, Mildred 412 


Nale, Gina 271 


Noonan, Jan 421 




McNabb, Martha 324 


Meyers, Claudia 271 


Mitchell, Kimberly 412 


Motter, Kathy 226, 277, 397 


Napoleon, Mike 222. 353 


Nora, Sioban 239 




McNair, Chad 387 


Meyers, Dave 246, 365 


Mitchell, Lisa 214 


Motrin, Cynthia 412 


Narcisi, Jill 316 


Norcom, Janet 412 




McNair, Kathlena 335, 411 


Meyers, Julie 279 


Mittra, Anita 340 


Mount, Laine 222 


Nardi, Sandy 307 


Norcross, Jon 413 




McNamara, Maureen 303 


Meyers, Thomas 412 


Miwa, Loch 270 


Mountsier, Deb 211 


Naris, Laura 297 


Nordstrom, Mike 225 




McNamara. Teresa 411 


Meyle. Wendy 339 


Miyazaki, John 412 


Mowery, Thomas 366 


Naritoku, Lori 275, 297 


Nottingham. Leslie 261, 288, 




McNamee. Dennis 247 


Mica. Dave 233 


Miyazaki. Richard 317 


Moxon, Eric 224 


Nash, Diane 242, 278 


349 




McNamura, Maureen 242 


Michael, Marilyn 303 


Mizell, Dave 278 


Moy, Dennis 336 


Nash, Tricia 242, 278, 355 


Novak, Jane 226, 332, 338, 




McNeely, Karen 271, 411 


Michaels, Mark 260 


Mlachik, Alan Derek 243 


Moy, Eileen 300 


Nation, Russ 245 


339 




McNeil, Charles 227 


Michaels, Susan 276 


Mlyniec, Denise 252 


Moy. Linda 387 


National Collegiate Athletic 


Novak, William 387 




McNeil, Michael 321 


Michalica, Michael R. 320 


Mocinare, Joe 268 


Moyer, Elisa 242. 311, 317, 


Association 144 


Novy, James L. 6. 18. 24. 30. 




McNeills, Laura 297 


Michelini. Tony 280 


Mock, Laura 287 


338 


National Rifle Association 141 


54, 73, 86, 97,109,428, 




McNett, Chuck 235 


Michelman. Mark 349 


Mocogni, George 365 


Moynihan, Craig 387 


National Round Up 118 


60, 61, 72, 93, 101, 107, 




McMicholas, Mick 308, 309 


Michels. Peter 260 


Moczynski, Tony 260 


Mramor, Bill 306 


National Women's Festival 65 


124, 140. 141, 166. 175. 




McNichols, James 248 


Michelson. Brad 387 


Modlin, Stacey 266, 289, 317, 


Mrazed. Nancy 412 


Natural History Museum 29 


186, 187, 192, 206, 370, 




McNichols, Sheila 239 


Michorezyk. Ted 320 


320, 323, 327, 328, 365 


Mrazek. Debra 387 


Nature's Table 210 


372, 373, 392, 400. 411. 




McPheeters, Ken 317 


Mickelson, Brad 299 


Moeckler, Sheri 340 


Mrazek. Ellen 316, 397 


Nauber, Dave 222 


417,444 




McPheron, Denise 250 


Mickelson, Jim 244 


Moenning, Carol 252, 300 


Mroz, Peg 288, 339 


Nauth, Zack 178. 308. 309 


Nowers, Lorena 397 




McPherson, Ken 186 


Middle East 126 


Mogge, Steve 131 


Muchmore, Charles 315 


Navis, Ron 238 


Noyszewski, Barbara 413 

















438 

Index / McCully, Delia - Noyszewski, Barbara 



JSuemberger, Dave 224 
Nulton. Roger 218 
Nyman, Jenny 240 



000 



Oakes, Margaret 54, 229, 272. 

335, 336, 413 
Oakley, Kathy 237 
Oandasan, Angelo 227, 413 
O'Barry, Greg 228 
O'Beary, Betsy 221, 266 
Obenchain, Amy 141, 372 
Obendorf, Steven 298, 366 
Oberle, Betsy 242, 372 
Oberle, Chris 240. 282 
Obemdorfer, Sue 219 
O' Berry, Gregory 366 
O'Brian, Jane 219 
O'Brien, Jean 387 
O'Brien, Karol 413 
O'Brien, Laura 340 
O'Brien, Martin 336 
O'Brien, Mike 222 
O'Brien, Susan 355 
O'Brien. Terry 232 
O'Brien, Tom 263 
O'Bryan, Mark 288 
Ochs. Raymond 387 
O'Connell, Barbara 336 
O'Connell, Karen 355 
O'Connell, Margaret 355 
O'Conner, Ben 257 
O'Conner, Clare 229 
O'Conner, John 316 
O'Conner, Michael 336 
O'Connor, John 320, 397 
O'Conner, Justice Sandra 131 
O'Connor, Cissy 252 
O'Connor, Kevin 292 
O'Connor, Richard 366 
O'Day, Mary 252 
Odom, Amy 226, 277, 349 
O'Donnell, Dan 232 
O'Donnell, John 248 
O'Donnell, Sheila 252 
O'Donnell, Stephen 227, 262 
O'Donnell, Timothy 303, 366 
O'Donohue, David 280 
Oestreich, Jeff 288 
Oeth, Ricky 329 
Oglesby, John 413 
Oglesby, Lynnea 349 
O'Grady, Kathy 240, 324 
O'Grady, Mary 284 
Oh, Paul 389 
O'Hara, Mike 330 
O'Hara, Neal 251 
O'Hearn, Vicky 336 
Ohls, Mark 389 
Ohlwein, Carolyn 250 
Ohm, Michael 421 
OKane, Nancy 216 
O'Keefe, Carol 252 
O'Keefe, Kathy 219 
Okuma, Bob 213 
Olano, Anna Marie 272, 339 
Olcott, Andy 247 
Oldenburg, Mark 263 
Oldendorf, Ann 324 
Olen, Jerry 221 
Olendski, Sue 214 
Olevsky, Sandy 324 
Olin, Michael 389 
Olinger, Kathy 239, 282, 413 
Oliver, Jim 235, 312, 349 
Oliver, Rena 278 
Olivero, Jean 44, 366 
Olano, Annie 229 
Olsen, Arthur 389 
Olsen, Dean 307, 308, 309, 

372 
Olsen, Greg 318 
Olsen, Lisa 340 
Olsen, Mark 258 
Olsen, Nancy 413 
Olsen, Terry 303 
Olson, Amy 303 
Olson, Chris 253 
Olson, Dorene 312 
Olson, Kent 300, 312 
Olson, Mary 349 
Olson, Nancy E 289, 319, 366 
Olson, Steve 270 
Olson. William 296 
Olszewski, Leon 341 
Olszewski, Lisa 341 
Oltendorf, Jana 219 
O'Malley, Denis 283 
O'Malley. John 247 
O'Meara, Tim 228, 294 
Omega Psi Phi 70, 71 
Ondera, Neil 389 
O'Neal, Kelly 239 
O'Neall, J. 248 
ONeil, David 283 
O'Neil, Kevin 247 



ONeil. Micky 176 

O'Neill, Carol 229 

O'Neill, Greg 248 

O'Neill, Kathleen 349 

Ongman, Kirk 296. 397 

Onishi, Steven 389 

Ono, Al 243 

Ono, Clyde 413 

Oosterbaan, Ben 213 

Oosterbaan. Lynda 220. 366 

Oppenheimer, Scott 309, 372 

O'Reilly. Jim 389 

O'Reilly, Pat 305 

Orient Express, The 326 

Oriold, Frank 130 

Orkild, Peggy 317 

Orleans, Laura 279 

On, David 389 

Orsinger, Gary 249 

Ortgiesen, Gayle 266. 289, 307, 

366 
Ortlieb, Tom 389 
Ortworth, Terri 229 
Ortyn, Bill 270 

Osborne, Constance 340, 366 
Osborne, Sondra 413 
Oscanbocker, Mark 246 
Osman. Bruce 258 
Osmond. Marie 300 
O'Shea, Eileen 214 
O'Shea, Lynn 284 
O'Shea, Neal 278 
Oshirak, Alan 413 
Oskielunas, Tricia 239 
Osran, Tom 244 
Oster, Diane 307 
Oswald, Stu 247 
Other Guys, The 326 
Ott, Dave 217 
Otto, Brain 224 
Ottosen, Elaine 236 
Out to Lunch Bunch 327 
Overberg, David 280 
Overturf. Natalie 220 
Overzet, Larry 48 
Owen, Betty Jo 316 
Owen, Christopher 389 
Owen, Dr. David 324 
Owens. Bill 232 
Owens, Dawn 301, 349 
Owens, Michelle 214 
Owens, Mike 244 
Owens, Steven 366 
Ozga, Julie 240 
Ozga, Mimi 240 
Ozima. Roger 326, 389 



PPP 



Paarlberg, Kimberly 397 
Pace, Lesa 240 
Pace, Parti 211 
Pachikara. Abraham 248 
Pacific 10 Conference 144 
Paddock, Linda 252 
Padgitt, Karen 43, 283, 372 
Pagliari. Marianne 331, 349 
Paglino, Julie 300 
Pai, Margaret 229, 413 
Paillet, Michael 221 
Paine, Jeff 310, 428 
Painter, Dave 233, 312 
Pajerski, Adam 389 
Pajowski, Julia 413 
Palacios, Lou 232 
Palekas, Audrey 234, 355 
Palekas, Ed 233 
Palen. Joe 238 
Palenske, Robin 366 
Paletti, Sue 242 
Palit, Mark 228, 413 
Pall, Donn 251 
Pallardy, Jack 235 
Pallesasse, Jim 244 
Palmer, Al 215, 366 
Palmer, Carolyn 324 
Palmer, David 294, 376 
Palmer, Kurt 413 
Palmer, Lisa 326 
Palmer, Mary 226 
Palmer, Phillip 413 
Palmer, Terry 247 
Palmieri, John 299 
Palmisano, Michael 366 
Palonis, Jodi 266 
Panama Red's 107, 108 
Pandak, Carol 413 
Panepucci, Cathy 284 
Panfil, Diane 291, 301, 349 
Pang, Dennis 366 
Pang, Valerie 221 
Pangrle, Barry 231, 389 
Panhellenic Council 327 
Panhellenic Presidents Council 

328 
Panico, Caroline 226 
Panico, Pat 222, 336 



Pankos, Jenny 242 
Pankratz, Linda 397 
Pankus. Jenny 324 
Pannier, Kathleen 339, 366 
Panozzo. Gary 389 
Paolella. Mary 299, 413 
Pap, Charles 215 
Papamarco, Mark 389 
Papandreas, Sam 283 
Pape, Bob 307 
Paphitis. Stacy 341 
Papierski, Paul 389 
Paradiso, Janet 298, 300, 413 
Parents 30, 31 
Paris, Dawn 271, 376 
Paris, Georgine 312 
Parizek, Bill 324 
Park, Debbie 239 
Parker, Carolyn 239 
Parker, Helen 129 
Parker, John 268 
Parker, Paul 310 
Parker, Scott 233 
Parkes, Tom 246 
Parkinson. Joel 389 
Parks, Betsy 230 
Parks, Lyle 413 
Parks, Mike 254 
Parlante, Joseph 413 
Parlier, Lori 253 
Parmley, Peggy 366 
Parratto, Connie 226 
Parrish. Greg 131 
Parrish. Ray 341 
Parry, Paul 228 
Pars, Eli 233 
Parsons, Amy 229 
Parsons, Ann 229 
Parsons, James 255, 389 
Partem, Maggie 219 
Partridge, Howard 297 
Pascal, John 259 
Pascale, Mike 278 
Paschell, Joyce 315 
Paschke, Mark 275, 297 
Paset, lleene 273, 309 
Pasiuk, Jana 239 
Pasiuk, Lisa 317 
Paskevicius, Lina 307 

Pasquinelli, Anthony 248 

Pasquinelli, David 248 

Pastornak, 231 

Pat Methany 96, 97 

Pate, Richard 376 

Patrick, Brenda 340 

Part, Jeff 334 

Patterson, Betsy 340 

Patterson, Debbie 253 

Patterson, Ellen 250 

Patterson, J. 248 

Patterson, Jeff 286 

Patterson, Jill 237 

Patterson, John 294, 325, 390 

Patterson. Laura 230. 338 

Patterson, Mark 310 

Patton, Amy 229 

Patton, David 297 

Patton, Mike 184 

Paul. Jody 60, 204, 376 

Paul, Karen 366 

Paul, Lisa Marie 229 

Paul, Lori 237 

Paul, Scott 217 

Pauling, Paul 217 

Paull, Craig 366 

Paull, Mike 259 

Pausch, Matt 218 

Paustian, Chuck 292 

Pavetto, Cindy 250 

Paw, Greg 227 

Pawelko, Thomas 390 

Pawlowicz, Tom 264 

Pawlowski, Cindy 252 

Pazdioch, Marty 290 

Pazio, Joe 233 

Pazzol, Bonnie 287 

Pe, Esther 366 

Peabody, Polly 237, 366 

Peabody, Regent 204 

Peach, Dave 232 

Pearce, Brian 397 

Pearce, Christine 253, 286, 413 

Peard, Laurie 220, 349 

Pearson, Dana 250 

Pearson, Janet 390 

Pearson, Mark 298, 366 

Pearson, Minnie 376 

Pearson, Steve 310 

Pechnyo, Mary 276 

Pecina. Denise 253 

Pecore, Linda 174 

Pederson, Dan 296 

Pedersen. Nada 216, 278 

Pederson, Lynne 336 

Peinsipp, Alice 397 

Peisker, John 213, 296 

Pejsa, Paul 390 

Pelletier, Kathy 220 

Pellico, William 336 

Pellikan, Don 217 

Pellikan, Larry 217 

Pellouchoud, John 232 

Peltin. Bill 215 



Pendelton, Darryl 355 

Penfield, Julie 413 

Penn, Courtney 243 

Penn, Deborah 413 

Penn. Jeff 318, 366 

Penn, John 228 

Penn, Sue 242 

Penney, Lisa 303, 366 

Pennock, Mike 292 

Penny, Mary Sue 372 

Penrod, Sue 239 

Penteris, Jeffrey 390 

Pepping, Mary 214 

Peppier, John 224 

Perbohner, Rob 294, 332 

PerconB, Paula 253 

Percy, Barbi 214 

Percy, Guy 48 

Perez, Marvin 171 

Perez, Pete 227 

Perez, Victor 413 

Perfetti, Bryan 251, 285, 397 

Perguson, Bruce 297 

Perino, Maria 79 

Perkins, Laurie 303 

Perkins, Scott 321 

Perkinson, Kathleen 283, 325, 

328, 366 
Perl, Al 289 
Perlin, Larry 257, 390 
Perlman, Barb 279, 298 
Perlman, Sharon 336 
Perlman. Terri 253, 286. 413 
Perlow, Bruce 413 
Perlow, Jodi 287 
Perna, Dan 366 
Perong. Mary 226 

Perotti, Laura 291 

Perri, Jeanne 261 

Perrine, Greg 225 

Perry, Ellen 237, 366 

Perry, Greg 233, 413 

Perry, Julie 253 

Personius, Jim 278 

Pesavento, Gail 237, 413 

Pescara, Don 260 

Pesetti, Renee 300 

Pessetti, Renee 366 

Peters, Chris 397 

Peters, Evelyn 293 

Peters, John 171, 269, 366 

Peters, Mike 284 

Petersen, Anita 216 

Peterson, Alex 254 

Peterson, Beverly 303, 349 

Peterson, Dale 257 

Peterson, Daniel 336 

Peterson, David 390 

Peterson, Douglas 303, 366 

Peterson, Eric 413 

Peterson, Greg 180, 260, 280 

Peterson, Julie 376 

Peterson, Kristen 250 

Peterson, Louann 299, 413 

Peterson, Paula 316, 397 

Peterson, Rick 264, 265 

Peterson, Roxie 65 

Peterson, Sandy 225 

Peterson, Scott 349 

Peterson, Thomas 390 

Peterson, Wendy 413 

Petges, Jim 228 

Petonke, Kurt 244, 366 

Petras, John Pierre 232 

Petrey, Joe 258 

Petrie, Holly 230 

Petrie, Trent 292 

Petrus, Laurie 230 

Perry, Peter 366 

Petti. Michael 275, 297 

Petty, Mark 244 

Pezeshk, Shahram 390 

Pfefferman, Mark 312, 324, 413 

Pfeiffer, Douglas 413 

Pfeiffer, Julie 219 

Pfeiffer, Larry 238 

Pfeiffer, Noelle 284 

Pfingsten, Bob 221 

Pfister, Maggie 240 

Pflederer, Tim 317 

Phaneuf, Victor 390 

Phi Beta Chi 283 

Phi Beta Sigma 69, 328 

Phi Delta Theta 246 

Phi Gamma Delta 247 

Phi Gamma Nu 329 

Phi Kappa Psi 24, 248 

Phi Kappa Sigma 204, 249 

Phi Kappa Tau 283 

Phi Kappa Theta 205, 284 

Phi Kappa Theta Little Sisters 
284 

Philanthropies 206 

Philbin, Greg 90 

Phillips, Carol 214 

Phillips, Mary 303 

Phillips, Michael 413 

Phillips, Rob 225 

Phillips, Rochelle 273 

Phi Mu 250 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 329 

Phi Mu Seniors 285 

Phipps, Angie 237 



Phi Psi 500 207 

Phi Sigma Kappa 251 

Phi Sigma Kappa Seniors 285 

Phi Sigma Sigma 252 

Pi Beta Phi 253 

Pi Beta Phi Seniors 286 

Pi Kappa Alpha 254 

Pi Kappa Phi 255 

Pi Lamba Phi 206, 256 

Picchiotti, John 248 

Picchiotti, Mark 248 

Picker, Debbie 279 

Pickett, Joe 233 

Pieper, Mark 312 

Pieper, Vickie 300 

Pierce, Laurie 236 

Pierce, Lori 300 

Pierce, Mary 334 

Pierce, Mike 235 

Pierce, Sue 182 

Pierciacci, Julienne 240 

Pieroth, Diane 366 

Pietroczynski, Gregory 390 

Pietrzak, Ken 227, 390 

Pignatero, Steve 222 

Pillatsch, Michael 333, 366 

Pilotte, Carole 252 

Pine, Jeff 259 

Pine, Nancy 242 

Pine, Rhona 273 

Pingsterhaus, Rich 238 

Pinski, Dave 259 

Pinski, Kevin 259, 338 

Pinter, Ellen 211 

Pipenhagen, Jan 239, 282, 366 

Pippen, Michael 336 

Pishler, Meg 21 

Pisik, Tara 214 

Pistorius. Bill 225 

Piton, Lucy 308 

Pittan, Roxanne 216 

Pittelli, Steve 268 

Pittman, Garrett 249 

Pittman. Paul 269 

Pitts, Mike 255 

Pivar, Lynn 328 

Pizzo, James 366 

Plain, Kass 284 

Planet, Claire 57 

PLATO Operators 330 

Piatt, Alison 334 

Piatt, Beverly 219 

Plocher, Scott 238 

Plocher, Sherry 236, 302 

Plofsky, Jordan 232 

Plotnik, Gary 259 

Plozay, Gail 314 

Plummer, Lisa 339 

Plunkett, Jim 152 

Plymale, James 390 

Pnazek, Karen 336 

Poco, Vitorio 263 

Podegrosi. Joe 322 

Podeschi, Dan 225 

Poell, Joseph 413 

Pogemiller, Leah 413 

Poglitsch, Larry 390 

Pohlman, Eric 228 

Poindexter, Dave 333 

Pojman, Don 221 

Polan, Elissa 298, 366 

Polan. Susan 413 

Poland, Brian 397 

Polaschek, Joseph 301, 397 

Poletto, John 284 

Polgar, Tina 390 

Police 57 

Polite, Patrice 413 

Political Organizations 34, 35 

Polkowski, Kathryn 390 

Pollack, Ellen 279, 341 

Pollack, Jon 323 

Pollack, Randy 251 

Pollak, James 298, 366 

Pollan, Eydie 273 

Pollard, Cindy 366 

Pollman, Kurt 212 

Polston, Betsey 141, 324 

Polston, Elizabeth 413 

Polte, Rod 310 

Pompei, Barbara 397 

Pomerantz, Russell 366 

Poncher, Ivy 397 

Pond, Walter 349 

Ponitch, Julie 287 

Ponsonby. Thomas 307, 366 

Pope, Terrence 274 

Popp. Tim 241.349 

Porst. Mark 248 

Porter, Debbie 220 

Porter, Jeff 218 

Porter, Natalie 240 

Porter, Sue 242 

Portugal, Gail 366 

Portugal, Gary 289, 413 

Poshard, Jennifer 237, 413 

Poshard, Missy 237 

Pospisl, Diane 366 

Post, Penny 284 

Postlewaik, Pam 272, 301 

Poticha, Meryl 279 

Potter, Brian 244 

Potter, Martha 312 



Powell, Chip 232 

Powell, Renee 230 

Power, Teri 413 

Powers, Cyndy 271 

Powers, Francis 390 

Powers, Frank 268 

Powers, Karen 295 

Powers, Patrick 413 

Pracher, James 390 

Pracht, Adrienne 320, 390 

Pranske, Jim 283 

Prater, Tracy 219 

Predick, Diane 282, 413 

Preinitz, Herb 320 

Pre-Law Club 330 

Prentice, Grant 341, 413 

Preppy 55 

Preskill, David 324 

Presperin, Thomas 366 

Pretenders 57 

Proes, Bob 298 

Price, Katie 237, 313, 338, 340 

Price, Keith 296 

Price, Lee 240, 282 

Price, Monyca 298, 366 

Price, Raymond 263 

Price, Sue 336 

Pricer, Kim 250 

Prichard, Kathy 307, 310 

Prichard, Lynn 271. 376 

Pridgen, Elaine 413 

Pridham, Grenville 413 

Pridjian. Claudia 377 

Priebe. Chuck 254 

Pries, Bob 298 

Priest, Allen 298, 367 

Priest, David 334, 341 

Priest, Elisabeth 413 

Prihoda, Bob 258 

Primm, Nick 241 

Prince Charles 128 

Prindiville, Frances 298 

Prinz, Lisa 279 

Prioletti, Mary 242 

Pritchard, Gary 254 

Pritchard, Kim 253 

Proctor, Lori 229, 278 

Prodanovic, Risa 299 

Projahn, Cheryl 239. 349 

Projansky, Dawn 273 

Projohn, Cheryl 282 

Proulx, Wendy 340 

Provost, Bob 251 

Pruemer, Jill 300 

Pruitt, Stanley 274, 413 

Pruyne, Peter D. 330 

Pryde, Suellyn 309, 377 

Pryste. Janice 320 

Przybyla, Reverend Ken 47 

Psak. Mike 249, 413 

Psaltis, Diane 211 

Psi Upsilon 257 

Pszanka. Karin 242 

Ptak. Mark 390 

Pucin, Jim 228, 367 

Pucin, Terri 413 

Pucker, Leonard 336 

Pugliese, Cheryl 226 

Pullen, Rob 155 

Pullich. Charles 367 

Pun, Angela 367 

Punke, Doug 235 

Pup Club, The 331 

Puper, Bruce 267 

Purcell, Linda 413 

Purkel. Andrea 214 

Pusateri, Sharon 298 

Pusateri, Tony 36 

Putterman, Mark 215, 367 

Pych, Dan 291 

Pyle, Susan 397 



qqq 



Quad 58, 59 
Quade, Chip 339 
Quandt, Jim 290 
Quattrochi. Andre 233. 335 
Quevillon. Thomas 390 
Quick, Debbie 214 
Quigley, Sharon 340 
Quin, Tom 247 
Quinn, Ken 235 
Quinn. Pat 232 
Qureski, Mona 303 



rrr 



Rabens, Michael 297 
Rabin, Dave 215 
Rabinowitz, Richard 259 
Rabushka, Lindsey 256 



439 

Index / Nuernberger, Dave - Rabushka, Lindsey 









Rackley, Jennifer 331, 372 


Remington, Kevin 138 


Rockwell, Mike 283 


Ruggiero, Joe 248 


Saunders, Margaret 414 


Schnake, Dan 249 




Radacz, John 264 


Rempert, Nancye 219 


Rodda, Tanya 335, 349 


Ruhnke, Marie 320, 340 


Saunders, Steve 414 


Schneider, Chris 391 




Radakovich, Brad 301 


Rendall, Barb 252 


Roden, Bari 287 


Ruiteneuiter, Eric 257 


Savage, John 299, 367 


Schneider, Claudia 415 




Raemont, Elizabeth 336 


Rendina, Carla 253 


Rodeo 52, 53 


Rule, Ed 322 


Savidakis, Helen 226, 278, 334 


Schneider. Dave 263 




Rago, Al 232 


Renn, Andy 257 


Roderick, Brad 222 


Rumery, Dr. Leonard 290 


Saviski, Mark 283 


Schneider, Donna Jeanne 335 




Ragsdale, Amy 308, 338 


Rennhak, Andrea 414 


Roderick, Kathy 240, 286, 336 


Rundquist, Becky 236 


Savio, Beth 229 


Schneider, Jane 239 




Raiman, Dave 255 


Rennick, Julie 252 


Roderick, Susan 367 


Runkle, Ben 260 


Savio, Sue 229, 300, 323, 367 


Schneider, Janice 367, 422, 




Rajala, Eileen 367 


Rentfrow, Tom 140 


Rodriguez, Carlos 278, 336 


Rupkalvis, Jonas 336 


Sawin, Ron 377 


429 




Rakerd, Maria 226, 277, 413 


REO Speedwagon 90 


Roesler, Marianne 294 


Rush, Marc 259 


Sawyer, Chris 292 


Schneider, John 291, 391 




Rakich, Diane 250, 272, 285 


Repp, Nancy 253, 298 


Roester, Mananne 214 


Rushing, Brent 233 


Scalerta, Al 270 


Schneider, John 415 




Ramey, Randy 284 


Resce, Marge 266, 319, 332 


Rogachuk, Anna 377 


Rusnak, Veronica 308, 341 


Scanlan, Anne 242, 367 


Schneider, Julie 324 




Ramirez, Aurora 303 


Rescino, Paul 306 


Rogers, Jeff 243 


Ruso, Sue 261 


Scanlan, Doug 248 


Schneider, Mike 278 




Ramm, Suzie 54, 242, 321 


Rescue Shop 48, 49 


Rogers, Joe 323 


Russel, Marlise 220 


Scanlan, Meg 229 


Schneider, Susie 239, 338 




Ramones 92, 93 


Resis, Sharon 287 


Rogers, Kenny 91 


Russell, John 243 


Scanlan, Professor Richard 30 


Schneider, Terry 335 




Ramos, Jasmin 340 


Resler, Laurie 242 


Rogers. Ray 270 


Russell, Julie 377 


Scanlan, Tom 292 


Schnierow, Beryl 234, 325, 373 




Ramsey, Susan 414 


Rester, Lori 278 


Roggio, Phil 264 


Russell, Rachel 130 


Scanlon, Beth 283 


Schnoor, Mike 241 




Rand, Valerie 414 


Reszka, Al 227 


Rogich. Jill 230. 304 


Russell, Tami 317 


Scappaticci, Joanne 271 


Schnur, Tom 298 




Randa, Pam 242 


Retzer, Susan 338 


Rogier, Gerri 252 


Russo, Lynn 211 


Scarim, M. J. 230 


Schoemaker, David 367 




Randall, John 390 


Retzlaff, Cathy 234, 349 


Rohe, Sue 278 


Russo, Sue 288 


Scarpelli, J. 248 


Scholhamer, George 262 




Randall, Pamela 273, 397 


Retzlaff, Cindy 250 


Rohne, Sue 242 


Ruter, Larry 228 


Scates, Steve 238, 312 


Scholl, Marianne 214 




Randall, Linda 229 


Retzlaff, Donna 252 


Rohner, Tim 260 


Ruth, Mike 299 


Schaefer, Kristin 338 


Schoman, Eric 256 




Randell, Steve 260, 286, 367 


Rev, Rex 243 


Rohrback, Eric 218 


Rutledge, Dave 213 


Schaefer, Lynette 285 


Schomm, Laura 242 




Raney. Sean 284 


Revay, Joseph 414 


Rohrback, Kathy 250 


Ruttenberg, Julie 397 


Schaefer, Mary Ann 272, 390 


Schonman, Betsy 287 




Ranft, Sue 325 


Revelle, Julie 317 


Rohrer, Chris 218 


Ruttenberg, Laura 287 


Schaefer, Molly 214 


Schonman, Pete 256 




Range, Perry 323 


Revers, Sherry 211 


Rohrer, Jeff 270 


Ruwe, Lisa 284 


Schaefer, Phil 268 


Schontz, Alison 373 




Range, Susie 237 


Rewerts, Mark 257, 349 


Rohrer, Rick 292 


Ruzicka, Steve 249, 317 


Schaeffer, Mark 336 


Schoone, John 254, 367 




Rank, Chris 257 


Reynolds, Gregory 390 


Roinila, Marcia 283 


Ryan, Anne 310 


Schaeffer. Todd 280 


Schoonover, Rick 222 




Rank, Jim 257 


Reynolds, Gregory 390 


Rojc, Karen 214, 272, 372 


Ryan, Bob 228 


Schafer, Dave 10, 11 


Scoplite, Carmel 211 




Rao, Kavitha 414 


Reynolds, Julie 229 


Roland, Ed 212, 303 


Ryan, Eileen 211 


Schafer, Byron 322 


Scholhamer, George 320 




Raper, Rebecca 317 


Reynolds, Lisa 335 


Rolander, Billy 222 


Ryan, Greg 251 


Schafer, Gregg 317 


Schopp, James 415 




Raphael, David 367 


Reynolds, Sue 261, 266 - 


Rolf, Dave 217 


Ryan, Tim 269 


Schafer, Lynette 250 


Schorr, Andy 269 




Rapponorti, Karen 242 


Rhea, Pat 340 


Rollins, Timothy 323 


Ryan, Tim 291 


Schafer, Tom 317 


Schow. Eric 391 




Rash, Bruce 320 


Rhoades, Dave 48 


Romani, Tim 260 


Ryan, Todd 269 


Schaffer, Tonia 287 


Schrader, David 391 




Rasky, Phil 215, 390 


Rhodes, Jeff 298 


Romuk, John 283 


Rymarczuk, Robin 284, 303 


Schalin, Guy 172 


Schrader, Harwell 415 




Rasmussen. Andy 278 


Rhodes, Larry 349 


Ronayne, Monique 240 


Rzepecki, Carol 57 


Schaller, Bob 232, 320 


Schraiber, Randi 377 




Rasmussen, Dave 298 


Rhodes, Steven 297 


Ronchetto, Sue 234 


Rzhevshi. Nick 178 


Schamber, Debbie 307, 311 


Schram, Pat 254 




Rateike, John 414 


Riassetto, Jenifer 298 


Rooney. Joe 283 




Schanl, Terry 213 


Schran, Mary 415 




Rathbun, Scott 247 
Rattray, Rob 280 


Riccio, Chris 284 
Rice, Aleltha 68 


Roper. Jan 303 
Rorbeck, Brian 341 




Schaper, Dan 314 
Schapiro, Wendy 341 


Schreiber. Curtis 320, 391 
Schroeder, Bill 260 






Ratts, Andy 258, 323 


Rice, Barb 237 


Rortvedt, Theresa 179 


sss 


Scharf, Carolyn 324, 414 


Schroeder, Doug 217. 300 




Ratts, Valerie 239 


Rice, Dirk 217 


Rosborg, Kay 307, 310 


Schauble, Katherine 355 


Schroeder, Jeffrey 367 




Rau, Lesa 226 


Rice, Kathy 300 


Rosch, Laura 282 


Schaum, Lill 287 


Schroeder, Mike 320 




Rausch, Joe 316 
Rausch, John 372 


Rice, Sarah 390 
Rice, Scott 222 


Rose, Judi 303 
Rose, Judith 340 




Schaus, Chris 253, 298, 310, 


Schroeder, Susan 211 
Schroer, Liz 211, 304 






372 




Rausch. Paul 296, 326 


Rich, Kym 414 


Rose, Julie 230 




Schauwecker, Chris 256 


Schub, Deanna 310, 373 




Rave 108 


Richard. Terri 279 


Rose, Tom 244 




Schaver, Lauren 273 


Schubert, Lawrence 298, 367 




Ravencroft. Kris 247 


Richards, Jean 372 


Rosen, Leah 341 


Saadeghvaziri, Mohamad 390 


Schavietillo, Mike 295 


Schueter, Craig 217 




Rawclau, Jeanette 237 


Richards, Roger 320, 390 


Rosen, Merle 287, 300 


Sables, Suzie 216 


Scheffler, Bonnie 211, 399 


Schuette, Karla 377 




Rawdin, Gail 377 


Richards, Ronald 414 


Rosen, Sue 273 


Sachem 332 


Scheibel, Julie 399 


Schuler, Beth 230 




Rawls. Scott 296 


Richardson, Christie 216, 272 


Rosenberg, Cheryl 287 


Sachs, Andy 215 


Scheitall, Julie 316 


Schuler, Mark 336 




Ray. Crystal 340 


Richardson, Diane 271 


Rosenberg, Gail 287 


Sachs, Moms B. Ill 367 


Scheld, Sandy 341 


Schulte, Julie 221 




Ray, Julie 229 


Richardson, Phyllis 421 


Rosenberg. Phil 256 


Sachtelben, Glen 322 


Scheller, Steve 292 


Schulteis, Laura 226 




Ray, Lesa 318 


Richardson, Tim 155, 228 


Rosenberg, Scott 259 


Sackett. Robb 260 


Schenck, Leslie 332 


Schultz, Donna 242, 278 




Ray, Mike 288 


Richman, Jeff 256 


Rosendale, Brice 217, 302 


Sacks, Marcie 299 


Schenck, Tom 336 


Schultz, Kim 219 




Ray, Susan 414 


Richter, Bill 269 


Rosenfeld, Sara 279 


Sadler, Lilibeth 367 


Scherer, Ed 213 


Schultz, Pete 251 




Raymond, Cheryl 250 


Richter, Dave 259 


Rosenstock, Ami 230, 278 


Sadler, Marcy 219 


Schertzer, Norbert 390 


Schultz, Stacy 210, 211, 336 




Raymond, Matt 227 


Richter, Jan 236, 313, 340 


Rosenthal, Cary 289 


Saffari-Fard, Abbas 414 


Scheunemann, Carl 300 


Schultz, Tim 336 




Raymond, Paul 336 


Rickert. Patti 276 


Rosenthal, Karen 299 


Sainer, Paul 397 


Scheunemann, Mark 414 


Schultz, William 415 




Ream. Joe 66 


Ricketts. Diane 266 


Rosin, Gwen 287 


Salamon, Mara 287 


Scheurer, Robert 320 


Schulz, Mark 318 




Rear. Dave 155, 157 


Ridgeway, Deborah 297 


Ross, Betsy 300 


Salat, John 227 


Schewfel, Sarah 211 


Schumacher, Nancy 294, 318, 




Reavill, Dulie 270 


Riederman, Gary 367 


Ross, Dave 255 


Salata, Bob 258 


Schewfel, Scott 258 


391 




Rebbe, James 414 


Riedl, Carrie 341 


Ross, Donna 253 


Salaymeh, Basil 218 


Schickedanz, Rhonda 372 


Schumm, Joanne 242, 317, 




Rechner, Kurt 243 


Riegal. Dorey 293 


Ross, Gina 237 


Salefski, Julie 311, 372 


Schied, Karen 415 


423 




Recker, Ron 238, 312 


Rieger, Gail 414 


Ross, Glen 292 


Salem, Kevin 256 


Schiera, John 301 


Schupback, Cornelia 236 




Rector, Louis 414 


Rieke, Larry 390 


Ross, Karen 336 


Salen, B. D. 248 


Schiermeyer, Kim 298, 367 


Schusteff, Howard 322, 336, 




Redding, John 390 


Rieser, Lee 390 


Ross, Ken 246 


Salk, Ami 414 


Schierra, Lynn 278 


415 




Reder, John 390 


Riggs. Jim 330 


Ross, Michael 275, 297 


Salonga, Almario 307. 310 


Schiff, Wendy 350 


Schuster, Carol 323 




Redington, Nancy 339 


Riggs. Mary 288, 421 


Ross, Tom 107 


Salstrand, Sarah 266. 284 


Schiller, Billy 256 


Schwabe, Sandra 367 




Redman, Paul 390 


Riley, Mary 253 


Ross, Vivian 372 


Salter, Carolyn 414 


Schindehette, Russ 228 


Schwalbach, Juliet 57, 279, 350 




Redman, Randall 390 


Riley, MaryBeth 414 


Rossi, Roger 288 


Saltmarsh, Kerry 338 


Schinderle, Brian 367 


Schwaal, Joe 288 




Redonda, Pete 268 


Riley, William 372 


Roszkowski, Mark 171 


Saltzberg, Ellie 287 


Schlachter, Shari 373 


Schwartz, Andrew 233 




Reed, Kathy 290 


Rinck, Jim 336 


Roszypal, Sandy 315 


Salva, Mark 244 


Schlag, Susie 341 


Schwartz, Cheri 287 




Reedy, Susan 414 


Ring, Larry 254, 305 


ROTC 36, 37, 38, 39 


Salvator, Christine 299 


Schlehofer, Carl 258 


Schwartz, Cheryl 298 




Reese, Deborah 367 


Rinker, Glen 244 


Rothbart. Dave 259 


Salzman. Fred 238 


Schleicher. Kathy 276 


Schwartz, Cindy 415 




Reese, Judith 390 


Ritter, Frank 244 


Rothermel, Joe 231 


Samardzida, Diana 230 


Schlemme! Ken 260 


Schwartz, Deb 287, 377 




Reeser, Connie 236 


Ritter, Joe 244, 302 


Rothschild, Ted 262 


Samari, Anna 278 


Schlemmer, Patricia 377 


Schwartz, Ed 243 




Reeve, Ian 255 


Rittman, Bruce 129 


Rotter, Julie 336 


Sambo, Deborah 340 


Schlenaig, Monica 214 


Schwartz, Karen 273 




Regal, Andy 341 


Rittmiller, Julie 240, 305 


Roundtree, Mike 292 


Sames, Dawn 253, 272 


Schlenofer, Karl 350 


Schwartz, Lew 260. 332. 338 




Regal, Steve 305 


Ritzert, John 390 


Roux, Dianne 283, 377 


Samuels, Steve 215, 414 


Schlenzig, Monica 272, 415 


Schwartz, Margaret 183 




Regal, Susan 273. 367 


Ritzert, Tom 268 


Rowan, Linda 179 


Samuelson, Lan-y 299 


Schleusener. Jeff 83 


Schwartz, Pete 251 




Regan, Kevin 414 


Rizzo, Carolyn 349 


Rowe, Bob 217 


Samyn, Dave 218, 318 


Schloss, Nina 415 


Schwarz, Eileen 307 




Regan, Mary 414 


Rizzolo, Dan 262 


Rowe. Lynn 317 


Sanctions 144. 145 


Schmale, Mike 224 


Schwefel, Steven 415 




Regan, Mary Pat 339 


Roach, Dave 251 


Rowley, Nora 324 


Sandberg, Steve 217 


Schmarak, Beth 287 


Schweighart, Stephanie 216 




Reger, Paul 268 


Robbin, Jane 230 


Roy, Laura 253, 397 


Sandborn, Al 292 


Schmerbauch, Mike 322, 350 


Schweighart, Susie 237 




Rehbein, Tracy 266 


Robbins, Mark 323 


Rozak, Jim 270 


Sanborn, Mark 390 


Schmerold, John 324 


Schwerdtfeger, Richard 263 




Reich, James 414 


Robbins, Ron 238 


RTA Crisis 136, 137 


Sanders, Elizabeth 211 


Schmetterer, Mark 103, 336 


Schwietert, Stephanie 367 




Reid, Alan 257 


Roberson, D'Lynn 287 


Rubemeyer, Scott 213 


Sanders, Mark 322 


Schmidt. Dan 217 


Schwitzenberg, Sue 250 




Reid. Colleen 336, 414 


Robert, Steve 225 


Rubenacher, Karla 237 


Sandler, Tracey 252 


Schmidt, John 184, 185 


Sclavenitis. Frank 307. 339. 




Reid, Steven 414 


Roberts, Deborah 377 


Rubenking, Marcy 293 


Sandlon, Jay 259 


Schmidt, John 228 


415 




Reidl, Carrie 341 


Roberts, Jeff 264 


Rubenstein, Elana 287 


Sandroff, Scott 254 


Schmidt. Judy 253, 377 


Scoon. William 322, 415 




Reiher, Jean 303 


Roberts, Jennifer 355 


Rubin, Arthur 336 


Sanes, Julie 334 


Schmidt, Kerry 216, 278 


Scott. Brian 306 




Reilly, Charles Jr. 367 


Roberts, Karen 421 


Rubin, Ellen 273 


Sanfillipo, James 248 


Schmidt, Linda 331, 355 


Scott, Christy 250 




Reilly, Cindy 253. 303 


Roberts, Kathy 283 


Rubin, Jane 340 


Sanfillipo, John 232 


Schmidt, Marianne 46 


Scott. Jane 288, 415 




Reilly, George 318 


Roberts, Laura 349 


Rubin, Karen 220 


Sanfillipo, Mike 222 


Schmidt, Mark 415 


Scott. Karen 219, 307, 399 




Reilly, Richard 414 


Roberts, Warren 321 


Rubin, Ken 296 


Sanford, David 317 


Schmidt, Mary 240 


Scott, Mark 205, 284 




Reiman. Andi 326 


Robertson, David 280 


Rubin, Linda 279 


Sanny, Sara 350 


Schmidt, Mike 232 


Scott, Thomas 377 




Reineman, Diane 252, 284 


Robertson, Debra 349 


Rubin, Lisa 111 


Santic, William 390 


Schmidt, Nancy 273 


Scrimager, Jill 214. 272, 350 




Reinert, Patricia 349 


Robertson, Peter 312 


Rubin, Mike 232 


Santucci, Michelle 239 


Schmidt, Neal 297 


Scruggs, Paul 312 




Reinhard, Kathryn 414 


Robin, Debbie 299 


Rubiner, Kathy 279 


Sapiente, Jackie 237 


Schmidt, Ralph 390 


Scully, Carrie 278 




Reihhart, Jim 278 


Robins. Kathy 253 


Ruby. Steve 292 


Sapienza, Pat 332 


Schmidt, Ronald Jr. 390 


Scully. Meg 229 




Reinhold, Dennis 278 


Robinson, Ann 367 


Ruckman, Doug 245 


Sapienza, Ron 258 


Schmidt. Siegfried 415 


Scully, Peggy 323, 328 




Reinkensmeyer, Sam 322, 367 


Robinson, Dan 306 


Ruda, Carol 220, 324 


Sargent, Brad 228 


Schmidt. Mark 284 


Seaburg, Gunnar 295 




Reinstein. Ernie 259 


Robinson, Dave 221 


Rudd, Daniel 248 


Sarmierto, Rob 243 


Schmiedel. Joseph 317 


Seagren, John 227 




Reisig, Laurie 290 


Robinson. Donna 306 


Rudem. Mike 254 


Sarna, Cynthia 414 


Schmitke, Tom 155 


Searcy, Lisa 271 




Reiske, Brent 233 


Robinson, Gerry 241 


Rudnick, Larry 324 


Sarsany, Barb 335 


Schmitt, Al 269 


Seat, Susie 300 




Reisser, Marlene 273 


Robinson, Karen 338 


Rudolphi, Chris 263 


Sarsany, Marty 322 


Schmittler, Carla 303 


Seaton, Lisa 229, 399 




Reitz, Conni 226 


Robinson, Laura 314 


Rudy, Rich 256 


Sarver, Cindy 219 


Schmitz, Gary 212 


Sebonia. Ron 288 




Reitz, Kris 218 


Robinson, Lynnette 367 


Ruehrdanz, Carter 258 


Sassatelli, Brad 367 


Schmitz, Joy 239 


SECS 35, 40, 41 




Rejman, John 318 


Robinson, Rick 232, 349 


Ruemmele, Ray 243 


Sasse, Cindy 272 


Schmitz, Mike 212, 415 


Sedlacek, Chris 266, 321 




Religion 46, 47, 48, 49 


Robinson, Steve 244 


Ruer, Cindy 230 


Sasso, Doug 260 


Schmitz, Steve 254 


See, Kelly 183 




Relle, Dane 251 


Robinson, Suzanne 299 


Ruff, Bryan 377 


Sauer, Edwin 414 


Schmolze, P. Bruce 390 


Seebauer, Edmund 323 




Rembert, Andi 229 


Rockow, Gary 218 


Ruff, Monty 225 


Saunders, Jean 211 


Schmuhler, Bruce 320 


Seeberg, Phillip 391 




Remec, Greg 212 


Rockrohnr, Phil 191 


Rugby Club 176 


Saunders, Kim 367 


Schnabel, Duane 298 


Segal, Michael 391 

















440 

Index / Rackley, Jennifer - Segal, Michael 































Segall, Rich 243 


Sherwood, Ducky 299 


Sinclair, Cindy 261 


Smolen, Lee 325, 368 


Sprague, Marvin 350 


Stephens, Brian 320 




Seggerman, Karen 237, 278 


Shetsky, Linda 273 


Sinclair, Jane 261 


Smykowski, Karen 415 


Sprain, Keith 292 


Stephens, Debbie 237, 317, 




Segheta, Mike 232, 317 


Shiattuck, Baird 322 


Sinclair, Jeni 239 


Sneider, Laurie 279 


Sprandel, Susan 399 


373 




Segura, Jose 415 


Shields, Leora 350 


Sineni, Kelly 304 


Sneider, Sue 48 279 


Spreenberg, Wendy 219 


Stephens, John 262 




Sehy, Steve 224 


Shields, Patricia 415 


Singer, Hope 272, 279 


Sniderman, Rabbi Stephen 48 


Sprick, Nancy 315 


Stern, Andrea 287, 324 




Seibert, Jody 216 


Shiera, Lynn 214 


Sinn, Steve 235 


Snoad, Carol 334 


Spring Concerts 90, 91 


Stern, Andrew 299 




Seid, William 336 


Shimashita, Allan 301, 399 


Sinnema, Jane 271 


Snodgrass, Chrystal 266 


Spring, Sarah 250, 368 


Stern, Charlotte 299 




Seidel, Robyn 377 


Shimkus, John 258, 391 


Sinus, Kathi 261 


Snow, Diane 307 


Springman, Jay 222. 320, 417 


Stern, Janet 287, 417 




Seidel, William 391 


Shimoyama, Sue 240 


Sipin, Richard 399 


Snow, Michael 415 


Spirit 200 


Stern, Noah 334 




Seidenberg, Bob 303 


Shinall, Beth 290 


Sirvatka, Paul 296, 326 


Snow-Godfrey, Jan 324 


Sprogis, Karen 239 


Stern, Phil 264 




Seif, Jeanette 317 


Shipman, Dave 294 


Sislow, Sue 250, 285, 350 


Snowdem, Susan 140 


Sproul, Betsy 211 


Sternal, Sally 226, 302, 321 




Seiler, Jim 233 


Shipman, Kay 131 


Siverly, Carol 219, 274 


Snowden, John 290 


Sproul, Loraine 253, 286 


Sternberg, Mark 259 




Seishon, Pete 247 


Shmaefsky, Brian 317 


Siverly, Kathy 219, 302 


Snyder, Cindy 276 


Sprung, Larry 417 


Sternecky, Neal 308, 309 




Seiwert, Paul 415 


Shmikler, Lisa 230 


Skach, John 399 


Snyder, Jim 336 


Spungen, Jeffrey 310, 368 


Stetter, Mark 254 




Sekill, Selim 299 


Shoemacher, Reverend Steven 


Skala, Alena 301 


Snyder, Richard 368 


Squeeze 57 


Stevens, Dennis 297 




Selan, Elysa 377 


46 


Skarr, Paul 233 


Snyder, Russell 320, 323 


Squirek. Jack 151 


Stevens, Jay 61 




Selbach, Lori 230, 301 


Shoen, Ann 219 


Skeehan, Judy 253, 367 


Snyder, Sybil 141 


Sraders. Greg 341 


Stevens, Steph 250 




Selden, Buzz 291 


Sholar, Beth 261 


Skelton, Jeanne 307 


Snyder, Tara 226 


St, Denis, Cathy 219 


Stevens, Teresa 278 




Seldin, Ellen 279 


Shontz, Alan 218 


Skelton, Julie 237 


Sobczak, Kathy 230 


St. Denis, Richard 391 


Stevenson, Hope 236, 391 




Seliga, Sherri 220, 350 


Shontz. Alison 226, 277 


Skidmore, Paul 227 


Sobolak, Tom 269 


St. John's Catholic Church 46, 


Stevenson, Rosemary 319 




Selig, Dave 315 


Shore, Cari 279 


Sklenar, Linda 415 


Sobolewski, Eva 395 


123 


Stevenson, Stephanie 236 




Selig, Michael 315 


Short, Nancy 253 


Skoog, Cheryl 211, 334, 368 


Soboroff, Dr. Stephen 324 


Stables, Tom 225 


Stevenson, Terry 266, 289, 




Selk, James 300, 350 


Shoultz, Jim 241 


Skoog, Eric 222 


Soccer 178, 179 


Stachowiak, Helina 240, 282, 


305, 368 




Sells, Gregory 303, 367 


Showers, Gary 224, 391 


Skoog, Linda 211 


Society of Friends 48 


417 


Stever, Mike 256 




Semple, Glen 312 


Shramer, Tim 315 


Skowera, Tom 235, 415 


Soderberg. Sandy 303 


Stacker, Abby 417 


Stevig, Larry 399 




Semron, Connie 377 


Shrifter, Susan 279, 421 


Skrna, Mary 239 


Soehn, Johannes 391 


Stadtlander, Sue 214 


Stewart, Bev 229 




Semtner, Jan 350 


Shull, Mark 298 


Skubic, Mike 292 


Soethe, John 320 


Staff Friends 332 


Stewart, Cory 288 




Senese, Chris 316 


Shull, Rosemary 293 


Skudlarek, Mary 355 


Sohn, Eileen 368 


Staffaroni, Laura 298 


Stewart, Dave 227 




Senn, Ralph 66 


Shull, Tracey 350 


Slabeszerski, Lori 214 


Sohn. Kiho 391 


Stafford. Brian 105, 296 


Stewart, George 140 




Sentman, Jean 240 


Shumacher, Mary 367 


Slack, Dan 131 


Soigourney, Chris 147 


Staggs, Tom 290 


Stewart. J. D. 368 




Sentman, Jim 257 


Shuman, Carol 219 


Slade, Bob 341 


Sokachitch, Jo 271 


Stahl, Cheryl 368 


Stewart. Kimberly 287 




Seoulveda, Anna 211 


Shuman, Marc 232 


Slade, Shelley 319 


Sokoz, Jeff 257 


Stahlke, Robert 417 


Stewart, Paul 288 




Sergreskitten, Cheryl 300 


Shushinski, Joe 246 


Siadek, Tony 268, 336 


Solal, Janine 237 


Stal, Liz 252 


Stewart, Sue 226, 368 




Serio, Mike 222 


Shuwal, Mike 249 


Slagel, Theresa 219 


Solar, Richard 136 


Stallmann, Mark 312, 391 


Stewart. Tom 269 




Serio, Sandra 399 


Shuwal, Sherry 339, 421 


Slavin, Mark 299 


Solida, Tracy 252 


Stalzer, Beth 335 


Sabich, Jackie 230, 300, 368 




Serituk, Larry 213, 334 


Siadek, Mary 333, 415 


Slaw, Barbara 415 


Solinko, Frank 301 


Stamat, Anita 216 


Stice, Steve 300 




Serota, Michael 303, 367 


Sides, Dave 330 


Slayton, Groundhog 315 


Solochek, Betsy 273, 373 


Stan Burdick Family 333 


Stier, Chris 253 




Serota, Ron 227 


Sidhu. Mary 303 


Slemp, Craig 391 


Sololis, Donna 219, 274 


Stanczyk, Donna 250 


Stierwalt, Mitch 269 




Sershon, Peter 415 


Siefkas, Joe 213, 296 


Slepian, Jeff 289, 368 


Soloman, Roberta 273 


Standley. Pat 177 


Stih, Kathenne 377 




Servatis, John 283 


Siegel, Glenn 268 


Slewinski, Todd 341 


Solomon, Nathan 391 


Stanke, Marianne 214 


Still Lazy After All These Years 




Settergen, Dan 288 


Siegel, James 415 


Slezak, Bill 228 


Solomon, Roberta 298 


Stanley, James 297 


333 




Sever, Sara 219 


Siegel, Jeff 218 


Slifer, Kelly 415 


Solomon, Scott 289, 368, 429 


Stanton, Karen 230 


Stilley, Russell 399 




Severin, John 391 


Siegel, Maria 350 


Slight, Larry 225 


Solon, Joe 311 


Stanton. Patricia 368 


Stillman, Beth 279 




Severson, John 367 


Siegel, Pauline 415 


Sloan, Jeffrey 297 


Solot, Marsha 273 


Stanton, Stuart 417 


Stimmel, Doug 232, 399 




Severson, Peter 415 


Siegel, Sheryl 415 


Sloan, Scott 212 


Somberg, Ellen 415 


Stanula, Steve 268 


Stimpson, Cindy 214 




Sevier, Tom 299 


Siegel, Tom 222 


Slocum, John 341 


Sommer, Dave 233 


Staples, Cindy 229 


Stine, Holly 253 




Sezauer, Steve 278 


Siegert, Laurie 211 


Slovin, Aaron 265, 264, 298, 


Sommerfeld, Renee 340 


Stapleton, Pat 299. 306 


Stine, Mike 222 




Seyfert, Sandy 276, 340 


Siegrist, Julie 211 


368 


Sommers, Diane 300 


Star Course 88 


Sanson, Kim 253, 302 




Seyller, Steve 280 


Siemanias, Cheryl 278 


Small, Beth 273, 309, 373 


Sommers. Kathy 340 


Stark, Tami 250 


SBtt, Bill 335 




Seymour, Bill 249 


Siemer, Anne 234, 328, 367 


Small, Kim 368 


Sommers, Scott 172, 173 


Starkovs, Richard 391 


Saven, Janet 323, 341, 417 




Seymour, Scott 415 


Siemienas, Cheryl 237 


Small, Pami 273 


Sommers, T. J. 259 


Starr, Carol 417 


Stocco, Cindy 239 




Seymour, Patrick 336 


Siemetz, Nancy 2776 


Smalls, Arlene 415 


Sondgeroth, Jane 276 


Starwalt, David 391 


Stockes, Katherine 252 




Shadel, Joanne 377 


Siena, John 292 


Smart, William 415 


Song, Yoon-Dong 391 


Starwalt, Mary Kay 237, 278, 


Stocking, Kim 417 




Shaey, Bob 292 


Sienko, Julie 261 


Smiciklas, Ken 238, 312 


Sonnenleiter, Steve 27, 35, 248 


324 


Stockman, Pete 278 




Shafer, Paul 241, 317 


Siepker, Rich 278 


Smiles, Thomas 283, 391 


Sonoc, Carol 355 


Starwatt, Jeff 228 


Stoecker, Suzanne 373 




Shafer, Richard 367 


Sierra Club 129 


Smiley, Sue 44 


Sonog, Carol 234 


Starzyk. Gregory 391 


StoelHng, Curtis 368 




Shafer, Scott 245 


Sierzega, Janice 318, 350 


Smiley, Wynn 267 


Sopira, Elizabeth 391 


Staton, John 391 


Staffer, Eric 269 




Shaffer, Gini 335 


Sigle, Andy 296 


Smith, Alisa 239 


Sopkin, Terry 291 


Staudt, John 305 


Staffer, Wayne 305, 307 




Shaffer, Julie 236 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 258 


Smith, Allison 282, 317, 368 


Sorensen, Gerta 311 


Staudt, Patrick 368 


Stokoe, Scott 227 




Shaffer, Ruth 290 


Sigma Alpha Mu 259 


Smith, Allison 377, 310 


Sorenson, Andrea 276, 300 


Stauffacher, Donna 234 


Stolar, Robert 289 




Shake, Joe 231 


Sigma Chi 204, 207, 260 


Smith, Cheryl 316 


Sorich, Mariana 252 


Staunton, Brian 336 


Stall, Kevin 350 




Shapiro, Cynthia 298 


Sigma Chi Seniors 286 


Smith, Craig 324, 415 


Sotiropoulos, Teddi 323 


Stawick, Sally 229 


Stone, Gary 232 




Shapiro. Stephanie 287 


Sigma Chi Derby Days 206, 


Smith, Dan 213 


Souder, Ralph 213 


Stearman, Pam 306 


Stone, Ken 213 




Shaner, Lynne 415 


207 


Smith, Darrell 147, 151 


Sova, Mary Beth 230, 415 


Stearns, Jacci 253, 399 


Stone, Margo 290, 340, 399 




Shaner, Mike 255 


Sigma Delta Tau 287 


Smith, Diane 391 


Sowards, Maria 368 


Stearns, Nancy 271, 350 


Stoner, Neal 144 




Shanesey, Mary Ellen 324 


Sigma Gamma Rho 287 


Smith, Elizabeth 336 


Sowin, Tom 417 


Stec, Holly 276 


Stonitsch, Kiki 237, 321 




Shanfield, Lizabeth 415 


Sigma Kappa 261 


Smith, Ernie 233 


Sowinski, Jay 243 


Stecher, Mark 322, 368 


Storer, Laura 417 




Shang, Sophia 415 


Sigma Kappa Seniors 288 


Smith, Gary 50„ 336, 350 


Sowinski, Victoria 328, 417 


Steenland, Kathy 252, 417 


Storkel, Stephanie 368 




Shannon, Craig 283 


Sigma Nu 262 


Smith, George 180 


Sowson, Daniel 336 


Steenrod, Deborah301, 350 


Storm, Dave 284 




Shannon, James 391 


Sigma Phi Delta 263 


Smith, Gina 331 


Space Exploration 130 


Steffen, Beth 373 


Stormant. Robert 104 




Shannon, Pat 220 


Sigma Phi Epsilon 207, 288 


Smith, Glenn 212 


Space Port 60, 61, 112 


Steffen, Betsy 242 


Stough, John 312 




Shapiro, Beth 301 


Sigma Pi 264 


Smith, Greg 50, 288 


Spalt, Pattie 250 


Steffen, Jim 243 


Stout, Katherine 340 




Shapiro, Ken 215 


Sigma Pi Seniors 265 


Smith, Jacqui 273 


Sparacino, Mike 258 


Stegef, Matt 263 


Stout, Jenny 303 




Shapiro, Steve 318 


Sigma Sigma Sigma 289 


Smith, Jeff 283 


Sparks, Cranston 274, 368 


Stegeman, Tim 334 


Stowe, Bob 153 




Shapiro, Wendy 131 


Sigma Tau Gamma 267 


Smith, Jennifer 415 


Sparks, Helen 290, 313, 340 


Stehr, Nancy 250, 272 


Stradey, Jan 303 




Shapland, Anne 104 


Sigma Tau Sigma 266 


Smith, John 246 


Sparks, Mike 269 


Steiger, Karen 368 


Stradley, Jan 138 




Shapland, Rebecca 229 


Sigmond, Steve 289 


Smith, Kathi 303 


Spasojcevic, Vesna 229, 417 


Steiger, Keith 269 


Stranski, Julie 253 




Share, Miraim 341 


Signorelli, Joel 391 


Smith, Keith 391 


Spear, Glen 215 


Steiglemann, Tom 296 


Stransky. Sherri 240, 336 




Sharp, Kay 335 


Sikorcin, Ann 276 


Smith, Kerry 254 


Spear, Lauren 324, 355 


Stein, Andy 278, 323 


Strategos, Mary 229, 278, 298, 




Sharp, Melinda 261 


Silberberg, Fred 215, 415 


Smith, Ken 138 


Spears, Debbie 214 


Stein, John C. 4, 11, 14, 16, 


300 




Sharpe, Barry 336 


Silhan, Shane 415 


Smith, Ken 243 


Spears, Matthew 391 


22, 32, 33, 37, 38, 39, 50, 


Strater, Sheryl 350 




Shasha, Tamar 415 


Silver, Beth 279, 367 


Smith, Kim 331 


Spears, Steve 213 


51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58, 59, 


Stratford House 335 




Shatz, Jay 341 


Silverman, Debra 367 


Smith, Laura 253 


Speck, Maureen 350 


65, 66, 74, 75, 80, 81, 84, 


Straton, John 246 




Shaw, Bill 307, 309 


Silverman, Helene 273, 303, 


Smith, Laurence 248 


Speer, Jean 368 


85, 88, 89, 90, 91. 94, 95, 


Stratton, Martin 321 




Shaw, Dennis 391 


367 


Smith, Linda 211 


Speer, Kelly 240, 305 


98, 99, 102, 103, 104, 


Strauss, Al 341 




Shaw, Griff 284 


Silverman, Lauren 210 


Smith, Linda 272 


Speery, Chris 246 


105, 114, 120, 122, 123, 


Strauss, Jackie 279 




Shaw, Marie 236 


Silverman, Mara 214 


Smith, Lisa 272 


Speiler, Bob 256 


146, 147, 154, 155, 156, 


Streder, Sheryl 339, 417 




Shaw, Mark 263 


Silverstein, Fran 298 


Smith, Lisa 219 


Spellberg, David 325 


157, 163, 164, 165, 166, 


Streitberger, Carol 340 




Shaw, Nancy 210 


Silvio, Annette 340 


Smith, Lisa 253 


Spellberg, Phil 259 


172, 174, 175, 186, 332, 


Strepek, Linda 239 




Shaw, Nancy 266 


Simari, Anna 230 


Smith, Marc 415 


Spenadel, Albert 429 


394, 396, 399, 420, 421, 


Strietmater, Bob 301 




Shaw, Tom 30 


Simer, Julie 214 


Smith, Marge 219 


Spence, Dorothy 355 


428, 444, 445, 446 


Stringer, Mike 254 




Shawler, Don 249 


Simmons, Ellen 273, 415 


Smith, Martha 350 


Spencer, Chuck 269 


Stein. Janice 300 


Strittmater, Jon 270 




Shay, Amy 211 


Simon, Christine 299 


Smith, Mary 278 


Spencer, Lady Diana 128 


Steinam, Sue 226 


Strmaglia, Angela 290 




Shay, Brian 251 


Simon, Debbie 219, 313 


Smith, Michael 415 


Spencer, Tom 290 


Steinberg, Jeff 341 


Strohmeyer, Nancy 290 




Shay, Tim 300 


Simon, Greg 215 


Smith, Michelle 219 


Spengel, Julie 271 


Steinberg, Stacey 273 


Strong, Carolyn 240 




"She Stoops To Conquer" 103 


Simon, Howie 256, 415 


Smith, Mike 235 


Sperelakis, Annette 216 


Steinbrenner, Jim 227 


Strong, Ron 307 




Shebelski, Sue 326 


Simon. Jenny 279 


Smith, Mike 232 


Sperelakis, Jim 212, 324, 332 


Steindler, Nora 290 


Storey, Jeff 313 




Shechter, Karen 273 


Simon, Mark 310 


Smith, Paula 181, 339 


Sperlik, Robert 399 


Steiner, Connie 219 


Stroup, Paulene 391 




Sheedy, Cheryl 274, 415 


Simon, Matthew 391 


Smith, Randy 228 


Spesard, Jack 231 


Steiner, Karen 417 


Stroznickas, Sue 219 




Shelist, Bob 215 


Simon, Suzanne 415 


Smith, Regina 415 


Speyer, Robert 336 


Steingraber, Craig 301 


Strunk, Jane 242 




Sheltenbaum, Steve 318 


Simonds, Robin 253 


Smith, Roger 391 


Spiegleman, Marcy 287 


Steinhandler, Rona 373 


Struttmann, Steven 368 




Shemroski, Dan 247 


Simonson, Judy 340 


Smith, Royce 415 


Spiegleman, Susie 287 


Stelk, Roger 283 


Struwe, Linda 391 




Shepard, Amy 278 


Simpson, Dave 262 


Smith, Sandra 273 


Spieler, Robert 355 


Stellas, Chrysanthe 230, 399 


Strysik, Kevin 292 




Sheperd, Dave 225 


Simpson, Dwight 258 


Smith, Sandy 271 


Spinella, Felicia 221, 312 


Stelzer, Cathy 318 


Stuart. Rick 244, 391 




Sheppard, Amy 242 


Simpson, Eric 253 


Smith, Sarah 242 


Spiotta, Mark 278 


Stencel, Mark 391 


Stuart, Sheri 417 




Sheppard, Ned 269 


Simpson, Jari 252 


Smith, Sheryl 226 


Splitt, Linda 250 


Stendabeck, Bernadette 226 


Stubbs, Sherri 417 




Sheppelman, Todd 283 


Simpson, John 373 


Smith, Steve 299 


Sponder, Mimi 211 


Stengel, David 391 


Stucco, Cindy 282 




Sheridan, Michael 355 


Simpson, Pat 213 


Smith, Sue 261 


Spontak, Steve 247 


Stenmark, Ingemat 318 


Stuchly, Sharon 391 




Sherlock, James 391 


Simpson, Teresa 293 


Smith, Terry 317 


Sporleder, Lee 314, 391 


Stephan, Chris 295, 373 


Student Advocate Newspaper 




Sherman, Dan 334 


Simpson, Wally 246, 391 


Smith, Tricia 240 


Spoto, Ann 261, 334 


Stephan, John 336 


65 




Sherman, John 316 


Sims, Sandman 88 


Smith, Walt 246 


Spradlin, Dale 269 


Stephan, Timothy 417 


Student Alumni Association 335 




Sherman, Laurie 279 


Simundza, Jan 367 


Smith, Wayne 243 


Sprague, Jim 270 


Stephanini, Laurie 266 


Student Contributions 77, 78, 




Sherman, Sherry 367 


Sinar, Scott 215 


Smogor, Roy 171 


Sprague, Mark 327 


Stephens, Brad 260 


79 









441 

Index / Segall, Rich - Student Contributions 



Student Government 
Association 336 

Students for a Libertarian 
Society 35 

Students for Separation of 
Church and State 35 

Studio One 108 

Studwell, Sally 230 

Studzinski, Edward 417 

Stuemke, Barb 278, 313 340 

Stuer, Michael 417 

Stuff, Carol 229 

Stukel, Dave 258 

Stukenberg, Randy 3, 4, 6, 7, 
9, 10, 14, 25, 41, 47, 48, 
49, 51, 92, 104, 106, 112, 
118, 129, 148. 149, 164, 
183, 190, 191. 193, 217. 
295, 348, 351, 405 

Stumpf, Joan 219 

Stuparitz, John 417 

Stupay, Kevin 315 

Sturgeon, Jeff 246 

Sturm. Barry 417 

Sturm, Ron 417 

Sturtewagen, Jamie 233 

Styczenski, Julie 317 

Suarez, Donna 230 

Suarez, Donna 399 

Sublett, Rollin 391 

Sublette, Richard 307, 310, 429 

Sublette, Melody 311 

Sudges, Terri 237. 301, 399 

Sugai. Douglas 391 

Sugar, Karen 279 

Sukor. Dick 212 

Sullivan. Bob 184. 310, 311 

Sullivan, Cheryl 307, 311 

Sullivan, Elizabeth 211,272 

Sullivan, John 247, 391 

Sullivan, Kate 313 

Sullivan, Kathy 253, 340 

Sullivan, Margaret 229 

Sullivan, Mary 368 

Sullivan, Rachel 319 

Sulpar, Todd 270 

Summers, Amie 234 

Summers, Clay 368 

Summers, Colleen 276 

Summers, Greg 218 

Sun, Susan 391 

Sunblade, Theresa 317 

Sunden, Rich 318 

Sundling, James 368 

Sunken. Harold 268 

Suntario, Doug 264 

Suranovic, Steven 417 

Suslick, Steve 221 

Sutenbach, Paul 263, 391 

Sutherland, Allan 248 

Sutker, Al 259 

Sutschek, Cathy 335 

Sutton, John 260, 335, 350 

Sutula, Daryl 278 

Suzukisa, Glenn 258 

Svarnius, Nick 225 

Svatos, Diane 284 

Svoboda, Charlie 43, 299, 391 

Swade, Maureen 284 

Swain, Gail 273 

Swain, Robert 44 

Swan, Janet 240 

Swango, Elaine 293 

Swank, Joanie 312, 350 

Swanlund, Bradley 350 

Swann, Sheila 324, 355 

Swanson, B 248 

Swanson, Bill 278 

Swanson, Dave 241 

Swanson, Donna 211 

Swanson, Gail 317 

Swanson, Greg 260 

Swanson, John 391 

Swanson, Pat 255 

Swanson, Richard 248 

Swaringen, Al 265, 323, 368 

Swartz, Tom 269, 296, 326 

Swearingen, Rick 245 

Sweeney, Maureen 312 

Sweeney, Tim 246 

Sweeney, Tom 228, 278, 417 

Swiderek, Tracey 317, 350 

Swiderski, Mary 239 

Swidler, Phyllis 417 

Swiech, Paul 308, 309 

Swienton, Gerry 218, 336, 350 

Swift, Cindy 252, 373 

Swinford, Dennis 301 

Swinford, Paula 324 

Swinton, Mike 228 

Sword, Maurice 268 

Sword, Stan 267 

Swords, Jerry 213 

Sylvan, Dale 391 

Synchef, Abdy 259 

Szabella, Jerry 269 

Szado, Anna 216 

Szalacha, Dawn 301 

Szatkowski, Man 341 

Szmurlo, Gary 317 

Szmurlo, Glenn 317, 350 

Szyman, Janet 236 

Szubzda, Hank 391 



Szymczak, Kathy 261 
Szyszkiewicz, Gina 253 



ttt 



Tabor. Craig 268 

Tack, Kara 240 

Tackitt, Douglas 391 

Tai, Bill 263, 320 

Tajer, Dennis 315 

Take Five 107 

Talbot, Liz 240, 272, 290, 302 

Taliani, Linda 368 

Talken, Dan 212 

Talking Heads 57 

Talley, Vladimer 328 

Tamayo, Vince 319 

Tammon, Vance 249 

Tamura, Paul 391 

Tan, Bill 283 

Tannenwald, Leah 252, 332 

Tannenwald, Pete 254 

Tanner, Cyn 234, 417 

Tanner, Gita 287 

Tanquary, Jeanne 271 

Tao, Len 330 

Tappendorf, Don 224 

Tappendorf, Sara 283 

Tarbel, Tali 339 

Tarbuck, Tracy 276 

Tardrew, Michael 297 

Tarizzo, Dave 254 

Tarnawa, Sue 253 

Tarsitano, Terri 234 

Tate, Barb 253 

Tau Beta Pi 337 

Tau Epsilon Phi Seniors 289 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 268 

Taube, Barbara 368 

Tauchman, Roger 334 

Tavill, Mark 368 

Taxman, Marc 215, 334 

Taxman, Steve 215 

Taylor, Alice 230 

Taylor, Brad 228 

Taylor, Craig 323 

Taylor, David 270 

Taylor, Debra 392 

Taylor, Donald 417 

Taylor. Gregory 328 

Taylor, Jon 248 

Taylor. Kim 253 

Taylor, Sheree 250, 285. 373 

Taylor, Susan 293, 340 

Taylor, Todd 222 

Taylor, Thomas 417 

Tazzioli, Caroline 253 

Tegge, Mark 417 

Teich, Dan 392 

Telford, Michael 368 

Tempas, Dan 241 

Temple, Paula 237, 290 

Temple, Tim 301 

Teng, Janice 237 

Tennant, Lisa 242, 399 

Tennant, Reid 248 

Tennis 172, 173, 174, 175 

Tenor, Tom 318 

Tepper, Beth 266 

Tepper, Lauren 273 

Terando, Margaret 300, 336, 
417 

Terando, Susie 229 

terHorst. Cheryl 308, 309, 373 

Terneus, Karen 332 

Terry, Brian 336 

Terry, Michael 274, 392 

Testa, Barb 368 

TeuPas, Laurie 220 

Teuscher, Jay 222, 417 

Teuscher, Julie 211, 417 

Thalheimer, Ron 368 

Thalji, Lisa 334 

Theater Department 103 

Theilen, Glenn 231 

Theisen, Anne 219, 417 

Theisen, Bud 270 

Theta Xi 205, 207, 269 

Thieme, Jeff 254 

Thieme, Lynne 230, 418 

Thiesen, Ann 274 

Thill, Brian 291 

Thole, Karen 392 

Thomas, Bill 231 

Thomas, Calvin 147, 148, 153 

Thomas, Cheryl 250 

Thomas, Dave 322 

Thomas, Jack 218 

Thomas, Joe 269 

Thomas, John 418 

Thomas, Laura 250 

Thomas, Lisa 253, 377 

Thomas, Pete 232 

Thomas, Robert 319 

Thomas, Stacey 211 

Thomas, Sue 250 

Thomas, Tracy 261 



Thompson, Brian 350 
Thompson, Dave 334 
Thompson, Diafie 216 
Thompson, Doug 288 
Thompson, Governor James 

144 
Thompson, J. W. 300 
Thompson, Jamie 228, 307 
Thompson, Jeanne 273, 418 
Thompson, Jim 222, 392 
Thompson, John 44 
Thompson, Judy 216 
Thompson, Julie 319 
Thompson, Kevin 323 
Thompson, Nick 334 
Thompson, Sandy 368 
Thompson, Theresa 368 
Thompson, Tom 222, 418 
Thompson, Vincent 317, 368 
Thormeyer, Lorri 377 
Thornburg, Carrie 219 
Thome, Jill 211, 301 
Thornton, Carrie 253 
Thornton. Shawn 418 
Three Hierarchs Greek 

Orthodox Church 48 
Thrope, Don 228 
Thurow, Mark 341 
Thursday Night Club 337 
Tiberend, Greg 241 
Tichy, David 297 
Tietz, Marcy 216 
Tilman, Rob 246 
Tillman, Randy 238 
Timmins, Ken 213, 392 
Tinaglia, Maria 368 
Tinch, Vanessa 273, 368 
Ting, Thomas 299, 392 
Tingley, Marge 319 
Tinsley, Chuck 270 
Tinucci, Kent 320 
Tipsas, Nicholas 329 
Tisdale, Angela 418 
Titenis. Diana 299 
Tjarksen, Sue 237, 323, 328. 

368 
Tjnan, Daniel 248 
Toben, Doug 299 
Tobin. Ann 211, 328, 368 
Tobin, Steve 215 
Tochman, Karen 298 
Todd, Dale 248, 368 
Todd, Robert 319, 324 
Toeper, James 296, 300 
Tokars, Tim 392 
Tokowitz. Eliot 256 
Toland, Julie 239 
Tolbert, Raymond 328 
Toljanic. Lynn 226 
Tom, Phyllis 229 
Toman, Janine 294, 355 
Toman, John 269 
Tomasetti, Donna 266 
Tomaszewski, Glenn 235, 312, 

350 
Tomei, Rich 232 
Tomisek, Julie 399 
Tomko, Shane 290 
Tone, Susan 131 
Tong, Nora 261 
Tonkin, Caroline 220, 305 
Toomey, Mikey 254 
Topel, Karen 279 
Topin, Carol 303 
Toppins, Sarah 429 
Torch 338 

Torrance, Martha 229 
Torres. Norma 334 
Torrison, Tracy 237 
Tortorici, Linda 278 
Tosh, Joan 271 
Townies 60 
Toy, Dave 288, 418 
Track 190, 191 
Treaey, Tim 336 
Traffanstedt, Kathy 250 
Traina. Todd 246, 350 
Trainer, Sarah 211 
Tran, Phuc 418 
Trapp, Gordon 322 
Traut, Therese 368 
Travis, Ben 325 
Traylor, Malera 273, 355 
Tredennick, Coach Mary 174 
Trefz, William 392 
Treitler, Jodi 279 
Trelease 4 338 
Trelka, Carolyn 290 
Trentacoste, John 368 
Treston, John 399 
Triangle 270 
Triantafel, Bill 283, 368 
Tribe of Illini 339 
Trick, Mike 392 
Triebold. Cynthia 418 
Triefenbach, Linda 368 
Trier, Sharna 317 
Trier, Todra 368 
Trimble, Jeff 323 
Trimble, Jim 301 
Triplett, Lisa 230, 320, 399 
Tripp, Linda 303 
Trippel, Scott 42, 299, 368 



Trippen, Tim 300 
Trippon, James 368 
Tripsas, Mary 300, 339, 418 
Trocke, Sharon 315, 368 
Trojan, Laura 284 
Trost, Steve 290 
Trudeau, Garry 129 
Truly, Rich 130 
Trunk, Joe 302, 320 
Trusner, Mike 248 
Trzepacz, Pam 313 
Tsang, Kwong-Sing 392 
Tsatsis, Jane 216 
Tubbs, Carolyn 418 
Tubbs, John 288 
Tubis, Cheryl 253 
Tucci, Constance 350 
Tucker, Andy 140 
Tucker, Creed 418 
Tucker, Lorna 303, 312 
Tully, Mike 283 
Tulsky, David 418 
Tulsky, Steve 448 
Tungett, Eleanor 250 
Tunick, Bonnie 418 
Turcich, Tim 264 
Turcza, John 305 
Tureza, John 305 
Turich, Christopher 336 
Turk, Karen 287 
Turk, Laura 368 
Turner, Clifford 418 
Turner, Jenny 229, 290 
Turner, Joanne 299 
Turner, Kay 253 
Turner, Ray 296, 326 
Turner, Reverend David 46 
Turski, Sue 299 
Turza, John 233 
Tussig, Tanya 234 
Tutt, Deborah 377 
Tveter, Diane 350 
Twaddle, Phillip 418 
Twohig, Cathy 240 
Tymec, Mary Ann 418 
Tynan, Dan 418 
Tyner, Mindy 250 
Tyner, Steve 296 
Tyson, David 418 



uuu 



U2 94 

Udelhofen. Mark 392 

Udelhofen, Mary 219 

Ugly Man Contest 43 

Uhlark, Margaret 128, 136, 174 

Uhlir, Dennis 218, 299, 324, 

334 
Ujka, Lori 377 
Uknes, Scott 418 
Ulbrich, Luanne 239 
Ulmanis, Karlis 310 
Ulstrup, Julie 239 
Underwood, Dave 232 
Unfer, Robert 418 
Unik, John 232 
Union 60 

University Theater 103 
Unkerburg, Gary 301 
Unkraut. Jane 236 
Urban. Chuck 268 
Urban, Jim 301 
Urborg, Anita 250, 418 
Urs, Jeff 418 
Usedom, Karin 211, 355 
Uslander, Bob 259 
Ustel, Iren 239 
Uyeda, Andrew 336 



vvv 



Vacala. Laurie 211, 418 
Vaci, Mary Ann 237 
Vadeboncoeur, Curt 418 
Vail, Betsy 266 
Valente. Noreen 220. 418 
Valentino. Lisa 253 
Valentino, M. 248 
Valenziano, Nick 267 
Valete, Jim 267 
Valez, Jose 241 
Valles, Karen 299 
Vallorano, Craig 298 
Vallow, Karen 283 
Valtos, Bill 300 
Vana, Scott 290, 418 
Vanagunas, Andy 218 
Vanantwerp, John 330 
VanBerkum. Andi 226, 277, 
418 



VanCleaf. John 283 
VanDenberg, Scott 244 
VandenBranden, Joe 176 
VanDerhoof, Lynn 377 
VanDevelde, Mary 266 
VanDiver, Keely 418 
VanDril, Carl 332 
VanDyke, Paula 205, 334 
VanEgeren, Rick 218 
VanEman, Mrs. 216 
VanFossan, Jana 226 
VanFossan, Vicki 226, 307 
VanHorn, Sharon 293 
VanMatre, Dave 284 
Vanden, Kirk 263 
Vanetos, Kim 253 
Vange, Katrine 276, 340 
VanGeison, Greg 418 
Vann, John 301 
VanOteghem, Paul 317 
VanProyen, John 305. 368 
VanQuathem, Michele 377 
VanRaden, Paul 350 
VanVooren, James 350 
VanWassenhone, Chris 300 
VanWyk, Denise 392 
VanWyk, Greg 218 
Varble, Dan 270 
Varchetto, Millie 239, 282 
Varehyi, Liz 290 
Varney, Bob 283 
Vascilas, Bruce 312 
Vasilion, John 297 
Vaughn, Tami 276 
Vavek. Linda 214 
Veatch, Dave 260 
Velders, Scott 292 
Velus, Laura 229 
Vendrzyk, Nancy 369 
Venegoni, Laura 291, 373 
Venetos, Kim 300. 314. 369 
Venezia, Chris 244 
VenHorst. Dave 334 
Venkus. Dave 258 
Venkus, Joe 222 
Vennergrund, David 392 
Ventling. Bobbi 271 
Venturi, Dominic 213 
Venvertloh, Bill 243 
Verbeke, Tim 288 
Verdun, Dave 296 
Vergara, David 392 
Verlautz, John 369 
Vermillion, Chuck 213 
Vermillion, Dave 324 
Vermillion, Mary Grace 272 
Vermillion. Virginia 421 
Vernon. Mark 341 
Verschoor, Carla 418 
Versrrate. Paul 426 
Vertebrats 108. 109 
Verthein. Bill 221 
Vesolowski. Blaze 418 
Vespa, Bill 243, 369 
Vest, Patricia 418 
Vial, Laurie 236, 350 
Vick. Karl 321 
Victor, Elayne 418 
Victos, Elayne 220 
Vigliocco, Cynthia 340, 418 
Vilchuck. Mary 170 
Vinarcsik. Lyn 229 
Vinci, Chuck 288 
Viner, Mike 259 
Vinyard, Jeff 288 
Virag, Terry 310 
Virgin, Vicki 253, 335, 377 
Vise. Dale 392 
Vishney. Mike 259 
Vishny, Daniel 369 
Vit, Linda 291 
Vitale. Sandra 369 
Vitrungs. Ingrida 336, 418 
Vivo, Rose 252, 284 
Vivoli, Dale 392 
Vlahos. Conine 297 
Vlamis, Georgia 253. 369 
Vlastnik, Dale 369 
Voegeli. Charles 392 
Voelker, Daniel 298, 369 
Vogel. Michelle 182 
Vogl. Ellen 219 
Voight. Charles 350 
Voight. Michael 399 
Voight. Scott 241 
Vojta. Chuck 269, 369 
Volleyball 183 
Vollmar. Keith 235 
Voltrael. Stephan 336 
Volunteer Illini Projects 339 
VonBergen. Vicki 250 
VonBruenchenhein, Shelly 236 
VonDebur, James 418 
Vondrak. Beth 237 
Vongchindarak. Jittina 293 
VonTress. John 217 
Voorhees, Sally 211 
Voorhees, Sandra 355 
Voss, Peter 248 
Voyager II 130 
Voyda, Gary 247 
Vredenburg. Scott 270 
Vreeman, Anne 335 



Vroman, Gary 392 
Vrona, Dave 288 
Vyborny, Toni 338 
Vyduna, Judy 236 332 
Vyeda, Andrew 336 
Vyneman, Karen 226, 277, 
327, 350 



WWW 



Wachs, Jennifer 219 
Wackrow, David 418 
Waddell, Barry 172 
Wade, Karen 316, 399 
Wade, Tracy 399 
Wadley, George 212 
Wagler, Lynne 335 
Wagman, Lois 250 
Wagner, Barbara 287 
Wagner, Mark 392 
Wagner, Mark 392 
Wagner, Stuart 215 
Wahldfeldt, Janet 310 
Wahls, Rich 249 
Wahls, Wayne 249 
Waibel, Steph 338 
Waite, Alex 231 
Waite, Greg 244 
Waite, Leslie 338 
Wake, Tom 269 
Walberg, Robert 418 
Walden John 320 
Walden, Mike 227 
Waldhoff, Tony 238 
Waldinger, Brenda 339 
Waldron, Thomas 392 
Walgren, Chip 294 
Walgren, Gary 268, 309, 332 
Walgren, Howard 302 
Walicek, Edie 237 
Walker, Cathy 317, 350 
Walker, Debra 303, 369 
Walker, Doug 247, 392 
Walker, Joanne 418 
Walker, Judd 260 
Walker, Kevin 244 
Walker, Mary Beth 261 
Walker, Melodi 252 
Walker, Stuart 260 
Walker, Terry 418 
Walker, Widney 399 
Wall, Thomas 369 
Wallace. Bob 318 
Wallace, Michael 321 
Wallace, Rick 257 
Wallace, Sharon 271 
Wallach, Cindy 421 
Wallach, Judi 299 
Wallach, Mike 299 
Wallach, Nancy 371 
Wallberg, Gary 284 
Wallhaus, Ted 244 
Wallhaus, Tom 244 
Walljasper, Eric 128. 316, 399 
Wallock, Lynn 418 
Walner. Dave 256 
Walor. Hunt 213, 320 
Walsh, Dan 254 
Walsh, Jim 262, 369 
Walsh, John 301, 399 
Walsh, Mark 283 
Walsh, Mark 232. 260. 392 
Walsh, Patrick 418 
Walsh. Patrick 350 
Walsh, Peggy 261, 301 
Walsh, Scott 260 
Walsh, Suzy 220. 369 
Walshun, Kim 299 
Walston, Doug 231 
Walter, Mark 228 
Walters, Jackie 206 
Walters, Lynn 253 
Walters, Tim 248 
Walton, Brad 232 
Walton, Ellen 211 
Walton, Roxanne 324 
Walter, Brian 256 
Walters, Jackie 230 
Walton, Edie 226 
Walton, Thomas 393 
Walworth. Carl 308, 309 
Wambeke, Sue 317 
Wamboldt, Carol 418 
Wandke, Chris 268 
Wang, Curt 270 
Wappel, Angela 340, 399 
Wara, Kelly 271, 418 
Ward, Bill 294 
Ward, Cindy 230 
Ward, Germaine Agnes 230 
Ward, Ken 262 
Ward, Maria 300 
Ward, Peggy 322 
Ward, Scott 262 
Warden, Krystal 418 
Wareham, Jamie 258 
Wareham, Tom 258 



442 

Index / Student Government Association - Wareham, Tom 

















Wargel, Donna 236 


Weiss, Paul 393 


White, Mike 144, 146, 147, 


Wilson, Julie 230 


Wright, Beth 369 


Zafts, Cynthia 298 




Warkenthiem. Kurt 232 


Weiss, Veronica 240 


149, 152 


Wilson, Lisa 393 


Wright, David 393 


Zagone, Mary 240, 282, 419 




Warmoth. Jeff 336 


Weissenborn, Bob 246 


White, Robert 419 


Wilson, Maureen 283 


Wright, John 296, 326 


Zahorik, Mike 145, 149, 157, 




Warner. Mike 318 


Weissenstein. Steve 222 


White. Sharon 419 


Wilson, Paul 302. 369 


Wright, Katherine 332, 426 


162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 




Warren. Al 217 


Weith, Brian 393 


White. Stu 244, 393 


Wilson. Steve 393 


Wright, Laurie 252, 321, 332, 


168, 171, 182, 200, 308, 




Warrick, Julie 214 


Weizeorick. Thomas 393 


Whitehead, Jennifer 419 


Wilson, Terry 247 


338, 424 


425 




Warrington, Dave 369 


Welch. Casey 260 


Whitehead, Jim 244 


Wilson, Tom 218 


Wright, Peter 247 


Zahrah, Nabil 399 




Warshaw, Larry 369 


Welch, Janet 311 


Whitfield. Nanzella 419 


Wilson, Tony 263 


Wright. Randy 419 


Zahrobsky, Kenneth 393 




Warshawsky, Randi 279 


Welch. Jim 336 


Whiting, Bill 248, 336 


Wimberley, Denise 369 


Wright. Susan 239 


Zajac. James 419 




Warshawsky, Mike 259 


Welch. Rick 231 


Whitlock. Becky 303 


Wimbiscus, Thomas 419 


Wright. Suzie 278 


Zak, Suzanne 336 




Wash. Pat 254 


Welinske, Joe 263 


Whitlock, Laura 303 


Wimmer, Randy 264, 265 


Wroble, Linda 309 


Zalatorius, Paul 222 




Washington, Craig 292 


Weliver, Amy 216 


Whitlow. Cheryl 419 


Winans, Yvonne 298 


Wroblewski, Greg 264 


Zambole, Nick 222, 369 




Washington, John 328 


Welk, Gary 270 


Whitman. Kathy 301 


Wind, Arlene 240 


Wu, Cynthia 301 


Zamiska, Gene 298 




Washington, Warren C. 321 


Welk, Ron 247 


Whitney. Bob 218 


Windhorst. Lori 336 


Wu, Lorene 300, 369 


Zanella, Jean 299, 419 




Waskin, Alan 418 


Welker, Brad 251 


Whitney, Dean 221 


Winek, Janice 373 


Wurth, Julie 307, 308, 309, 


Zanello, Lori 237 




Wasklewski, Rob 292 


Welker, Brian 251, 285, 393 


Whittaker, Dave 241 


Winett, Bill 256 


323, 373, 429 


Zaner, Gerald 393 




Waters, Tom 218 


Welker, Erin 418 


Whitworth. Maryanne 419 


Wingerden, Sue 250, 369 


Wurtsbaugh, Beth Ann 253 


Zanin, Diane 271 




Watkins, Greg 260 


Wellek, Marcy 287 


Whybark. Clint 213 


Wingert, LuAnn 220, 278, 351 


Wurtz, Jeff 249, 257 


Zanotti, Harry 423, 425, 426, 




Watt, James 40, 129 


Wells, Kevin 419 


Wichlac, Chuck 268 


Wingo, Peggy 419 


Wylie, Mark 27, 393 


427 




Wattley. Mark 393 


Wells, Lisa 288, 308, 309, 373 


Wichman, Darrel 393 


Winkels, Colleen 312 


Wylie. Robert 393 


Zappa, Frank 101 




Watts. Keith 393 


Wells, Scott 233 


Wick, Mary 214 


Winkle, Danielle 211 


Wynn, Betsy 237 


Zarkadas, Tina 334 




Watts, Mark 243 


Wells, Sharon 252 


Wicke, Susie 242 


Winkler, Tina 250. 285, 419 


Wynn, Edward 325. 419 


Zatloukal, Jill 369 




Watts. Miriam 230 


Wells, Tammy 261, 288, 350 


Wickell. Daniel 215 


Winter 120 


Wysocki, Nancy 240 


Zavacki, Sharon 272 




Watts. Shelley 314 


Welna, Jeff 254 


Wickert, Julie 216. 298, 369 


Winter, Ed 256 


Wyss. Greg 224 


Zdeblick, Mark 297 




Wauthier, Don 299 
Wauthier, Nathan 299 


Welsch, Jim 213 
Welsh, Cindie 242, 369 


Wicklift, Dave 320 
Wiechman, Debbie 399 


Winter. Linda 317 
Winterhalter, Gene 267 


Wzientek, Tami 318 


Zehner. Steven 393 
Zehr, Curt 312 








Wauthier. Rebecca 299, 418 


Welsh, Janet 373 


Wieczorek. Lori 239 


Winters, Carol 340 




Zehr, Mark 292 




Wax, Ari 418 


Welsh, Raquel 272 


Wieder, Richard 419 


Winters, Philip 419 


u u u 


Zeidler. Helen 306 




Waxman, Scott 289 


Wendel. Beth 234 


Wiedow. Joanne 253. 419 


Wintroub, Diane 25, 66, 67, 


If H H 


Zeifas, Bob 254 




Wayne, John 270 


Wenderf, John 227 


Wiehe, Lynn 219, 369 


419 


v ^ 7 


Zeigler, Kathy 236, 351 




Wdowik, Mark 393 


Wendi, Sharon 271 
Wendland, David 393 


Wiencek, Phyllis 276 
Wieneke, Gary 184 


Wiscons, Michael 393 
Wiseman, Debbie 369 




Zelert, Craig 233 
Zeller, Cam 230 




Weas, Barbara 350 


Yaeger, John 373 
Yaffee, Janice 369 


Weatherington, Duff 222 


Wendland, Lisa 242 


Wiener, Susan 334 


Wisniewski, Debra 419 


Zeller, Kitty 313 




Weathersby, Michelle 273, 350 


Wendrow, Andrea 239 


Wierec, Mike 334 


Wisniewski, Lisa 298, 369 


Yager,' Dana 250 
Yagoda, Brian 419 
Yale, Amy 279 
Yalowitz, Jeffrey 419 
Yamamoto, Bruce 419 


Zemog, Phil 291 




Weaver, Elaine 230, 418 


Wendrow. Mike 289 


Wiese, Kirby 264, 265, 355 


Wisniewski, Rebecca 393 


Zender, Daniel 419 




Webber, Bruce 221 


Wendte, Roy 224 


Wieties, Kim 419 


Wisthuff, Mark 323 


Zenger, Brian 258 




Weber, Amy Lawrence 418 


Wendt, Thomas 369 


Wilberscheid. Peter 393 


Witt, Greg 264, 265, 369 


Zentz, Lenny 193 




Weber, Carl 312 


Wendt, Tom 350 


Wilcock, Nina 335 


Witte, Mike 306 


Zentz, Nancy 393 




Weber, Cathy 237 


Wenger, Mitchell 369 


Wild, Mark 254 


Wodartz. Peter 301 


Yamashiro Maureen 419 


Zeta Beta Tau 207 




Weber, Cheryl 230, 377 


Wenn, Betty 266 


Wilhelm. Mary 220, 305, 369 


Woerner. Ted 247 


Yang, Julie 393 
Ysrio SuzQnnc 237 


Zeta Tau Alpha 271 




Weber. Jay 217 


Wentz, Dan 299, 323 


Wilk, Natalie 369 


Wohead. Ken 393 


Zich, John 170, 171, 309, 310 




Weber, Kathy 303 


Wenzel, Kevin 295 


Wilk, Pam 266 


Wojcieszak, Randy 232, 393 


Yastro, Phil 341 


Zidek, Jim 283 




Weber. Liz 230 


Wenzel, Nancy 234, 369 


Wilkey. Eric 245 


Wo)cik, Gary 419 


Yeager, Beth 252 
Yeager, John 268 
Yeck, James Harold 393 


Zieger, Eva 287 




Weber, Tom 238 


Wenzel. Rusty 228 


Wilkens, Trish 271 


Wojcik, Lynn 216 


Zielinski, John 419 




Weberpal. John 217 


Werder, Elizabeth 393 


Wilkinson, Claire 43, 299 


Wojtowicz, Anthony 369 


Ziemkowski, Peter 336 




Webster, Eric 284 


Werff, Tamida211 


Wilkinson, Wendy 369 


Wojtowicz, Jon 393 


Yeh, Jennifer 338 


Zier, Judith 299, 419 




Webster, Michael 369 


Werner. Renee 340 


Wille, Cheryl 419 


Wojtowicz. Tony 322 


Yeh, Lisa 419 


Zier, Kendra 299 




Weddjge, Dave 218 


Wemer, Robert 369 


Willerman, Keith 298 


Wolak, Laurel 305, 427 


Yeh! Paul 249 


Zierath, Paul 224 




Weddle, Robert 297 


Wernick, Jacqueline 350 


Willerton, Martha 219 


Wolber, Margaret 369 


Yen! Mary 393 
Yencho Steve 332 


Ziff, Lilly 253 




Wee Sit, Elma 350 


Wemick, Suzy 287 


Willes, Kathleen 369 


Wolf, Georgia 226 


Zilligen, Theresa 340 




Weedon, Divead 319 


Werntz, Alicia 377 


Williams, Carl 274 


Wolf, Jack 246 


Yep, Edmund 336 
Yerkey, Tim 235 
Yluisaker, Paul 280 


Zilliox, Maureen 339 




Weekly 65 


Werz, Doug 256 


Williams, Cathy 226 


Wolfe. Jan 211 


Zilm, Becky 271 




Wegehenkel, Chris 393 


Wery, Debra 230 


Williams, Chris 283 


Wolfe. Kevin 419 


Zilz, Dave 224 




Wegner, Carl 336 


Wescoga 340 


Williams, Dan 235 


Wolfson. Larry 264. 265, 369 


Yocum, Jana 25, 239, 282, 351 


Zimmer, John 393 




Wegner, Stephan 336 


Wesolowski, Dave 50, 248 323 


Williams, Dennis 283 


Woll, Lisa 219 


Yoder, Lisa 220 


Zimmerman, Beth 226 




Wegscheid, Chris 270 


Wessman, Cal 258, 305 


Williams, Donna 350 


Woltering. Louise 351 


Yonan Jim 317 


Zimmerman. Dana 419 




Wei. Ju Mei 250 


West. Donna 293, 350 


Williams, Geneace 373 


Women's Glee Club 340 


Yoos, Heidi 293 


Zimmerman. Haralyn 419 




Weichbrodt, Gerald 296 


West, Janet 340 


Williams, Laura 317 


Women's Student Union 131 


Young Americans for Freedom 
35, 129 


Zimmerman, Karl 393 




Weider, Brian 269 


Westerberg, Duane 419 


Williams, Lorelei 330 


Wong. June 303 


Zimmerman, Patty 261 




Weidinger, Mark 263 


Westergren. Dan 310 


Williams, Michael 393 


Woo. Nancy 221. 266, 289, 


Young Americans for Morality 
35 


Zimmerman, Steve 217 




Weidman. Daniel 418 


Westerlund, Lawrence 377 


Williams, Oddie 292 


298, 369 


Zimmers, Lori 230 




Weidman, Tim 269 


Westermeier.Theresa 340 


Williams, Oliver 146 


Wood, Brian 238, 351 


Young, Bob 244 

Young, Gail 217, 300, 351 

Young, Gary 257 

Young, Heather 317 

Young lllini 24 

Young, Jeff 280 

Young, John 130 

Young, Kevin 260 

Young, Lisa 393 

Young, Lori 261, 288. 351 

Young, Peggy 302, 334 

Young, Peggy 229 

Young Socialist Alliance 19, 35 

Young, Steve 128 

Young, Toni 338 

Young, Willie 151 

Younger, Terry 256 

Youngerman, Jeff 207 

Yosum, Chip 263 

Yu, Albertina 399 


Zinnen, Dan 299 




Weigand, Ross 213 


Westfall, Mary 419 


Williams, Paul 269 


Wood. Dave 246 


Zinni, Phillip 355 




Weil, Kim 44 


Westlund, Jim 270 


Williams, Paula 230 


Wood. Natalie 272 


Zipsic, Tom 292 




Weil, Maria 216 


Westmoreland, Maurice 299 


Williams, Rita 419 


Wood, Russ 213 


Zisholtz, Anne 355 




Weil, Nancy 273 


Westpfahl, Terry 419 


Williams, Sandi 271, 301 


Wood, Stacy 242, 278 


Zisook, Mike 256 




Weiland, Vickie 226, 277 


Westphal, Lori 237, 419 


Williams, Tom 247 


Woodard, Mark 419 


Zlotkowski, Ken 246 




Weiler. Kim 230 


Wexler. Andrea 287 


Williamson, Jim 254 


Woodburn, Sue 261, 288, 351 


Zogratos, Elene 266 




Weiler. Scott 222 


Wexler. Brian 248. 317 


Williamson, John 251 


Woodruff, Beth 230 


Zografos. Jim 284, 393 




Weinberg, Julie 287 


Wexler. Judy 279 


Williamson, Lisa 419 


Woodruff, Bill 260 


Zolkowski, Gregory 318, 324, 




Weiner, Mark 259 


Wexler, Vicki 377 


Williamson, Scott 350 


Woods, Earl 393 


419 




Weingart. Scott 369 


Whalen, Donna 253 


Willis, Kathy 261. 288 


Woods, Kathy 234 


Zolkowsky, Dan 305. 307 




Weingartner, Annette 418 


Whalen. Julie 219 


Willis. Laura 273. 377 


Woodworth, Susan 377 


Zook. Libby 253, 421 




Weingartz, Karen 312, 393 


Whalen, Tom 225 


Willis. Mark 278 


Woody, Tracy 340 


Zook, Mike 217 




Weinheimer, Mark 238 


Wheat, Michael 329 


Willman, Kurt 113. 319 


Woolard, Howard 393 


Zoot, Laura 22 




Weinstein. Adam 283 


Wheeler. Janet 239 


Willrett. Jamie 217, 351 


Woolard, Vikki 250, 285, 301, 


Zorn. Gigi 279 




Weinstein, Dan 369 


Wheeler, Paul 283 


Wills. Maribeth 288 


351 


Zouvas, Terri 278 




Weinstein, David 341, 369, 429 


Wheeler, Thomas 393 


Wills, Mary Beth 261, 288, 373 


Woolen, Karen 219 


Zuccarino. Tony 318 




Weinstein, Lynn 377 


Whipple, Phil 225, 399 


Wilner, Karyn 252 


Wooley. Kevin 393 


Zukowski, Lois 226 




Weinstein, Mark 339. 369 


Whitaker, Dave 312 


Wilner. Mitch 259 


Woolf, Lori 279 


Zukowski, Paula 226 




Weinstien. Maria 273 


White, Bill 260 


Wilsek, Ed 284 


Woolfold, Angela 369 


Zumaris, Doug 238 




Weir, Mark 301 


White, Brian 155, 157, 283 


Wilsey, Lori 287, 419 


Wordarz. Dennis 255 


Yu] Hyunhwa 393 
Yung Maul, Susan 319 
YWCA 40 


Zumwalt, Jack 241 




Weis, Bonnie 237, 369 


White, Carrie 242, 419 


Wilson, Bob 334 


Workman, Gail 324, 336 


Zurawski, Robert 294 




Weisberg, Danny 256 


White, Christopher 393 


Wilson, Brian 298 


Workman, Herschel 263 


Zust, Scott 246, 393 




Weisenborn, Kurt 249 


White, Dan 233, 297, 393 
White, Dave 260 


Wilson, Dave 144, 151, 152 
Wilson, David 393 


Worner, Chuck 263 
Worner. Julie 298 




Zuzuly, Nancy 419 
Zvetina. Marie 138, 303 




Weiser, Brayon 350 




Weisner, Lisa 287 


White, Dorothy 340 


Wilson, David 419 


Worniak, Scott 393 


111 


Zweig, Lisa 373 




Weiss, Darlene 279 


White, Hub 297 


Wilson, Greg 225 


Worsek, John 215, 334 


Zwickert, Mary Jo 369 




Weiss. Debbie 279 


White, Jetaun 307 


Wilson. Ida 399 


Worth, Ron 259 


Zwilling, George 351 




Weiss, Lenore 273, 399 
Weiss, Mitchell 298 


White, Larry 393 


Wilson, Jack 332, 393 
Wilson, Jeanette 377 


WPGU 341 
Wray. Wendy 211 




Zwoyer, Mary 293 
Zyzanski, Cynthia 377 




White. Lisa 239 






Weiss, Pam 279 


White, Lisa 278 


Wilson, Jeff 212. 302 


Wrestler, Ira 324 


Zaben, Artie 256 





















443 

Index / Wargel, Donna - Zyzanski, Cynthia 




James L. Novy 



m lot of things happened this year, a lot 
/M of things changed. But every year is 
** different, and change, after all, is real- 
ly nothing new. Although the University of 
Illinois is a large and seemingly staid in- 
stitution, the diversity of people and their 
interests and concerns serve to promote 
the dynamism of the University. Changes 
occurred because of this diversity of indi- 
viduals. Changes also occurred as a result 
of events beyond human control. 



John C Steir 







ii I 

ii 



mi 
till 



/.3Sw 



Suf 



/*> 



fhis year, many things happened as a 
result of the cdncerns and motivations 
of individuals: a programming deci- 
sion by student-run WPGU radio led black 
students to unite and protest the cancella- 
tion of a soul music show; the Student 
Organizations Resource Fee Board was 
the object of an intense refund campaign 
instigated by the Coalition for a New Be- 
ginning, which protested the acquisition 
and allocation of the fee; following the 
efforts and opinions of student leaders 
over the past several years, Vice Chancel- 
lor Stan Levy announced his support of 
reducing the 60-hour rule — requiring stu- 
dents with less than junior standing to live 
in University or. University-approved 
housing — to a level of 30 hours. 



WW&ny things took place without hu- 
Imm man e ^ ort or c o ntr ol y et - they great- 
■*" ly influenced the lives of many stu- 
dents. No one will forget the winter of '82, 
which dumped more than 12 inches of 
snow onto Champaign-Urbana, sent cold 
air masses into the Midwest and deep 
South, and plunged temperatures to re- 
cord-low extremes. The winter weather 
made fire-fighting tricky, as University and 
city fire departments battled three fires in 
February, including ones at the newest 
merchant in Campustown — Soundworks 
— and at the Sigma Alpha Mu and Kappa 
Sigma fraternities. The latter fires raised 
the total number of fraternity fires to three 
since Sigma Phi Epsilon received exten- 
sive damage during a blaze in the summer 
of 1981. ' 



J 





£1 hanges also occurred at the University 
■ as a result of actions taken by outside 
\J forces. Many students felt the pinch of 
a tight economy as Reaganomics curtailed 
financial aid and prices increased. 
Changes in state and national political and 
ecological views brought on the sugges- 
tion of converting the Abbott Power plant 
to a coal-burning facility, giving rise to the 
controversy as to whether costly scrubbers 
should be installed to control pollution. 



Brian Coleman 





■ jrany things would not have 
njm occurred this year unless stu- 
IwM dents had taken some sort of 
action, action which furthered their 
own interests and needs and influ- 
enced other students either in a big 
way or in such a way that influenced 
one segment of the University. If, 
from the outside, the University as an 
institution seems little changed, on 
the inside students are affected by 
the influence of the diversity it har- 
bors. 

introduction and closing by Nancy Ad- 
Amy Ross and Laurie Wright 



Staff 

Editorial Staff 




Nancy Adams Editor-in-chief 




Laurie Wright Managing Editor 




John Van Proycn . Production Manager 




Andrea Liss Photo Editor 




David Nadig Copy Editor 




Amy Kloss Features Editor 




Mike Zahorik Sports Editor 




Cindy Atoji News Editor 




Kathy Wright Groups Editor 




Paul Verstrate Seniors Editor 




Nancy Minster Index Editor 




Missy Friedman . Production Assistant 




Karen Heithoff . Production Assistant 




Lori Manning . . . Production Assistant 




Laurel Wolak . . . Production Assistant 




Marianne Eterno .... Index Assistant 




Sharon Basso Photographer 




Brian Coleman Photographer 




James L. Novy Photographer 




John C. Stein Photographer 




Randy Stukenberg .... Photographer 




Business Staff 




Janice Schneider . . Business Manager 




Richard O'Connor . . . Sales Manager 




Jacqueline Gelb . Advertising Manager 
Therese Casey Office Manager 






Alan Dodds Office Manager 




Debbie Kaplan Office Manager 




Amy Kurland Office Manager 




Joanne Schumm .... Office Manager 





Illio '82, the magazine-style yearbook at 
the University of Illinois, Urbana-Cham- 
paign, was published by the Illini Publishing 
Co., Tim Anderson, publisher. It was print- 
ed by Josten's/American Yearbook Co. of 
Topeka, Kan., on 80 lb. Mead's dull enam- 
el paper. End sheets are 65 lb. coverweight 
in Ivory with Chocolate brown ink. Cover is 
a four-color lithograph and brown ink, with 
a clear-coat process. Cover photograph 
taken by John C. Stein, printed by Gamma 
Labs of Chicago, 111. Body copy set 11/12 
Souvenir. Headlines were set in Souvenir 
and a variety of other display types. Press 
run was 5000. 

Senior portrait photography was done 
by Delma Studios of New York. Group 
photographs were taken by Harry Zanotti 
of Creative Images, Urbana, 111., except 
where noted. 

Color printing was done by Heller Stu- 
dios of Champaign, 111. and by Brian Cole- 
man and John C. Stein, staff photogra- 
phers. 



A very special thanks to Dick Sublette, 
who for 11 years was publisher of the Illio. 
Best of luck at UCLA — you'll be missed. 

Special thanks also go to those photog- 
raphers, Brian and J.C., who helped us out 
immensely in the clinch and came through 
with "shining colors." Also thanks to Mike 
Hackleman for once again being at the II- 
lio's beck and call to guide a gang of half- 
crazed students (F.U.B.A.R.) through a 
hectic year to produce this publication; to 
Gerald Schneider of Delma Studios for his 
ideas and support; to all the writers and 
illustrators who devoted time and energy 
to get their names in print; to John, for the 
contribution he made in the memory of his 
father; to Baskin-Robbins and Garcia's for 
providing us nourishment; to friends, 
lovers and roommates who suffered 
through the deadlines almost as much as 
we did; and to the students at the Universi- 
ty for whom we went through all of this — 
enjoy. 



Colophon 







_ 



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^|H|^H 





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