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Full text of "Illustrated Catalogue of the Rare and Beautiful Ancient Faǐences, Glass, and ..."

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ON FREE VIEW 
AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 

MADISON SQUARE SOUTH, NEW YORK 

BEGINNING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st, 1911 



RARE AND BEAUTIFUL 

Ancient Faiences and Glass 



BELONGING TO 



Messieurs Tabbagh Freres 

PARIS— NEW YORK 



TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE 

ON MONDAY AND TUESDAY AFTERNOONS 
MARCH 6th and 7th, at 2.80 o'cloce 



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0S8 ,oW 
TO r . • ' ! 

At the Am:.;.> • .• ! hiks 

ox THf M- lii:- • . ■ : ■ 



THE SALE WILL BE CONDL'CTK.- i'\ •! ■ '■-,' V. KlhllV, • -V 

THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIA 1 luS. Managkks 

NEW Y O H K 
I9I1 



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'' ' i M !'' \\ \.\i- !:>. ill. \ •- 
! ■> i ! ABBAGH I RKHES 

•1 ; .AM) NKW VOIIK 
TO Hi. r SALE 

At THE Am 1.1; i. ; : 'i'.r.T.ERIES 

ON THE APTEHNl • • M ! ID 

CAT-\LmirKn BY Mr. Huba( r'. 'i'.'-' .■ 



THE .SALP. WILL BE CONDL'CTEO BY MR. THOMAS E. KIRBY, (>F 

THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Manageks 

NEW YORK 
1911 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



RARE AND BEAUTIFUL 

Anciejn^t Faiences, Glass 

AND OTHEE OBJECTS 

BELONGING TO 

Messieurs TABBAGH FEEEES, 

'OF PARIS AND NEW YORK 
TO BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE 

At the American Art Galleries 
on the afternoons herein stated 



Catalogued by Mr. Horace Townsend 



THE SALE WILL BE CONDUCTED BY UR. THOMAS B. KIRBY, OP 

THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers 

NEW YORK 
I9II 



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CONDITIONS OF SALE 

1. The highest Bidder to be the Buyer, and if any dispute aritet betteeen 
two or more Bidden, the Lot to in dispute shali be immediately put up agtun 
and re-sold. 

it. The Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid which it merdy 
a nominal or fractional advance, and therefore, in hit judgment, likely to affect 
the Sate injuriously. 

8. The Purchasert to give their names and addretsei, and to pay down 
a cash deposit, or the whole of the Purchase-money, if required, in default of 
which the Lot or Lots to purchased to be immediately put up again and re- 
told. 

4. The Lots to be taken away at the Buyer's Expente and Ritk within 
twenty-four hours from the concluGion of the Sale, unless otherwise specified 
by the Auctioneer or Managers previous to or at the time of Sale, and the 
remainder of the Purchate-money to be absolutely paid, or otherwite settled 
for to the satisfaction of the Auctioneer, on or before delivery; in default of 
which the undersigned wiU not hold themtelvet responsible if the lots be lost, 
stolen, damaged, or destroyed, but they will be left at the sole risk of the 
purchaser. 

5. White the undersigned will not hold themselves responsible for the 
correctness of the description, genuineness, or authenticity of, or any fault 
or defect in, any Lot, and make no Warranty whatever, they will, upon re- 
ceiving previous to date of Sale trustworthy expert opinion in writing that 
any Fainting or other Work of Art is not what it is represented to be, use 
every effort on their part to furnish proof to the contrary; failing in which, 
the object or objects in question will be sold subject to the declaration of 
the aforesaid expert, he being liable to the Owner or Owners thereof for 
damage or injury occasioned thereby. 

6. To prevent inaccuracy in delivery, and inconvenience in the settle- 
ment of the Purchases, no Lot can, on any account, be removed during the Sale. 

7. Upon ftalure to comply mth the above conditiont, the money de- 
potited in part payment shtiU be forfeited; all Lots uncleared within one day 
from conclusion of Sale {unless otherzmse specified as above) shall be re-sold 
by public or private tale, without further notice, and the deficiency (if any) 
attending luch re-sale thall be made good by the defaulter at this Sale, together 
with all charget attending the tame. This Condition is without prejudice to 
the right of the Auctioneer to enforce the contract made at this Sale, mthout 
tuch resale, if he thirds fit. 

8. The Undersigned are in no manner connected with the buiineii of the 
cartage or packing and shipping of purchases, and although they will afford 
to purchasers every facility for employing careful carriers and packers, they 
wiU not hold themselves retpontible for the actt and charget of the partiei 
engaged for such services. 

The AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, MAvAcsEa. 
THOMAS E. EIRBY, Anc-nONEEB. 



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A NOTE PREFATORY 

A distinguisbed English writer on Art has said "the Persians of the Tenth 
to the Seventeenth Centuries were perfect masters of all the decorative arts to 
a degree possessed, probably, by no other race or age." A writer of no less dis- 
tinction has further declared that "the Saracens contrived to introduce some ele- 
ment of distinctive originality into almost every branch of artistic work." 

A Collection mainly composed of examples of the Arts of these two races 
must, therefore, be of especial interest to a community which has never yet failed 
to appreciate all that is beautiful and noteworthy in decorative art. Doubtless 
these Faiences, to many of which the finger of Time has added their last touch of 
radiance; these Glasses, enamelled, with jewel-like effect, in many colors; these 
Miniatures, painted with so loving a patience, and these Manuscripts, in which 
mere calligraphy has been elevated to a fine art, will, to some of us, appeal with 
almost the shock of a revelation. 

Our modem delight in Oriental Art is as keen, though doubtless not so fresh, 
as that of Italy of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, but we have hith- 
erto sought it rather in the farthest Orient than in the nearer East whence 
Medieval Europe received its inspiration by way of the Mediterranean and the 
bordering lands of Asia Minor. 

The first impulse, then, will be to compare with the more familiar Porcelains 
of China these Vases and Lamps from Haroun-al-Raschid's pleasure city of 
Rakka, and these Bowls from forgotten Rhages. 

Such a comparison may be left with confidence to those who will study, 
for instance, the unsurpassable decorative value of the tiny beaker-shaped Vase 
from Rhages, with its ceramic perfection and the human interest in its storied 
bands of the history of a long buried past. 

Of a character so peculiarly their own that any comparative estimate would be 
futile are the Saracenic Enamelled Glosses, the painted Miniatures and the lUu- 
minated Manuscripts, while the iridescent glasses of the Pre-Christian era, with 



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their gorgeous rainbow colors, the Persian, Turkish and Caucasian Rugs of the 
Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries all demand consideration mainly on account 
of their exceptional quality. 

There remains to be said a word concerning those by whom this Collection has 
been patiently gathered together and is now offered for s^e. 

In Europe, to the Directors of the National Museums and to Connoisseurs 
and Collectors in general, the names of the Messieurs Tabbagh are familiar. It 
was their father, M. Joseph Tabbagh, who, a score of years ago, first introduced 
into Europe that Rakka ware which now forms so prominent a feature in all notable 
Collections of Persian FMence. It was their brother, the late M. Alexandre Tab- 
bagh, who, by his diseoTeries on the site of the great city of Ray or Rhages, made 
the world acquainted with what may almost be accounted as one of the lost Cer- 
amic arts. The Louvre Museum in Paris, the British Museum in London, the 
Royal Museum in Berlin, and the Metropohtan Museum of Art in New York all 
possess among their choicest treasures, examples whose provenances must be re- 
ferred to the Brothers Tabbagh. 

In placing on public sale, therefore, this CoUection of Peraan, Saracenic, and 
other Objects of Art, MM. Tabbagh Fr^res are offering from an entirely new 
viewpoint a glimpse through that "Golden Window of the East," to which the 
eyes of American art-lovers have for so long been turned. 

Horace Townsbnd. 



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CATALOGUE 



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ANCIENT GLASSWARE 

It would be difficult to over-estiniate the extent and variety of the glass- 
making industries of the Ancients, just as it is impossible in our own day to 
rival the iridescent beauty which centuries of immurement have added to those 
examples of the craft which have come down to us through the ages. Whether 
or no the credit of the actual discovery of glass must be given, as it was by Fhny, 
to the Phoenicians, or whether they derived their knowledge from the Egyptians, 
it is at least certain that they practiced the art of glass-making and trafficked 
in it to an enormous extent, and that for centuries Syria was a chief centre of 
the industry. It seems likely, then, that the majority of the examples of ancient 
glass which have been disinterred in the countries of Asia Minor, by far the 
largest majority are of Phoenician manufacture, those which date before the 
Fourth Century B.C. betraying an Eg}'ptian, and those of later date a Greek, 
influence in their forms. It is, however, neither for their archseological interest, 
their technical perfection, or their beauty of form that these tiny vases and bottles 
are chiefly valued by the collector of our own times. They captivate rather by 
the accidental beauty which Time has imparted to them. But this is a beauty 
which varies, and among the many thousand examples wliich have so far been dis- 
interred it is only here and there that a piece is found that displays a real perfec- 
tion of iridescence. When such as these shown by the MM. Tabbagh present 
themselves, with their radiant surfaces reflecting shades of ruby-like red, peacock 
blue, or emerald green as they are turned this way or that, the enthusiasm of the 
collectors of "Iridescences" is readily to be understood. A word may be said as 
to those specimens of antique glass which rely on their ori^nal beauty for ac- 
ceptance. Such, for instance, are the Murrhine vases, interesting examples of a 
lost art; the Egyptian Essence Bottles, with their feather-like decoration, or the 
Alexandrian Cameo Portrait, exquisitely representative of one of the most admir- 
able phases of Grajco-Roman art. 



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FIRST AFTERNOON'S SALE 

MONDAY, MARCH 6th, 1911 

AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 

BEGINNING AT 2. SO O'CLOCK 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

In order that the public may form an adequate conception of the Persian and 
Saracenic Arts in their supremest manifestations MM. Tabbagh Freres have been 
induced to include in this collection many objects of a character absolutely unique. 
In view of this they have therefore been permitted to place upon some of these 
objects an "upset price." This will be announced in each case at the time of the 
sale and the pieces so reserved are identified in the catalogue by an asterisk or *. 
With the exception of the aforementioned specimens the sale of the coDection will 
be absolutely without reserve or restriction. 

The American Abt Association. 

PHCENICIAN GLASS OF A FINE IRIDESCENCE 
AND OTHER ANCIENT GLASSWARES 

1 — Vase 

^gypto-Phoenieian of the Fourth Century B.C. White glass. Crater- 
shaped, with flat base and rim. A curious thorn-shaped excrescence deco- 
rates one side. Partially coated with a silvery patina revealing a rich iri- 
descence. 

BHghl, 9^ iiKhtt. 

2 — Bowx 

Gneco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Greenish-white glass. Coupe- 
shaped and decorated around the exterior of the body with a pattern of ver- 
tical ribs dying away around the base. 

Height, 2 5-IC inch**; diam»t«r, 4% ineht 



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8 — EwEB WITH Handle 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Fear-shaped, 
with straight side, annular foot and round, applied, loop handle. Partially 
coated with a yellowish patina, revealing a pearly iridescence. 

HMfht, S% i>ek#f. 

4— Vase 

Grseco-Roman of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Pear-shaped, 
body, with annular foot and long cylindrical neck, surrounded by a pro- 
jecting band below the rim. Partially covered by a silvery patina, reveal- 
ing a silvery iridescence. 

Stifkl, &Vi JMkM. 

5 — Vase 

Gneco-Phcenidan of the Fourth Century, B.C. White glass. Globular- 
shaped body and wide cylindiical neck. The body decorated with a band 
of pinched out ornamentation. Partially coated with a dark copper-col- 
ored patina, revealing a high and exceedingly beautiful iridescence. 

6 — Essence Bottle wrrn Handles 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Dark Blue glass. Ampulla- 
shaped, with two applied handles. Coated partially with a silvery patina, 
but otherwise in original condition. 

B*igKt, 3% InoftM. 

7 — Pebfume Bottle 

Syrian of the First Century, B.C. Amber-colored glass. Fashioned natu- 
relistically in the form of a dried date. Retains its original surface, except 
in one portion, which is touched with a silvery iridescence. 

8 — Essence Bomx 

Egyptian of the Third Century, B.C. Dark blue glass. Tubular- 
shaped, with rounded end and two projecting ears or handles. Decorated 
around the body with a pattern of strught and zig-zag horizontal stripe. 



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and around the neck with a spiral stripe of yellow enamel glass. The 
lower part of the body reverses this treataient, the ground being yellow with 
stripes of the blue ground in reserve. 

B»ifht, 6% iM>li4t. 

9 — Vase 

Graeco-Fhoenician of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Straight sides 
inclined outward, and cylindrical, slightly flaring, neck. Coated with a white 
patina, revealing a fine silvery iridescence. 

Hrifkl, 3% inch**. 

10— Vase 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. Greenish-white glass. 
Globular body, with cylindrical neck. Entirely covered with a fine pearl- 
like iridescence. 

Height. 3% inchtt. 



11 — Vase with Handu: 

Greeco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Li^t greenish glass. Flat 
amphora shape, with incurved base and flat applied handle. Partially 
coated with a brown patina, revealing a fine peacock-blue iridescence of a 
striated character. 

BMgkl, «<4 {>elU>. 

12— Vase 

Grffico-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Oviform 
body, with annular foot and long cylindrical neck, surrounded by a pro- 
jecting band below the slightly flaring rim. Almost entirely coated with 
a silvery iridescent patina. 

HHfht, t% (mAm. 

18— Vabe 

Gneco-Phoenician of the Second Century. Blue glass. Cantharus-shaped, 
without handles. Covered with a very beautiful iridescent^. 

BMffht, m Inch**. 



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14 — ^Vase with Handle 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Am- 
pulla-shaped, with cylindrical necl^ wide rim and wide flat handle. Deco- 
rated with a band of pinched-out ornamentation around the neck. Partially 
coated with a dark patina, revealing a very rich iridescence of purple, green 
uid sang-de-boeuf red. 

Blight, «% tmckM. 

15— Vase 

Graeco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Aryballus 
shape, with foot, two round loop handles of blue glass and a ring of blue 
glass applied under the rim. Partially coated with a whitish patina, reveal- 
ing a beautiful silvery iridescoice. 

Btigk$, S% {MdfcM. 



16 — Essence Bottle 

Egyptian of the Second Century, B.C. Dark blue glass. Amphora- 
shaped, with pointed end and two projecting ears or handles. Decorated 
with white enamel glass in horizcmtal bands of loops forming the so-called 
"basket-work" pattern, characteristic of the early Egyptian glass. 
From the Homberg Collection Sale in 1908. 

HHfkt, 4% (mJU*. 

17— Vase 

Grsco-Pho^cian of the Second Century, B.C. Greenish glass. Pear- 
shaped body, with long cylindrical neck and flaring rim. Partially covered 
with a whitish patina, revealing a silvery iridescence with an unusual mot- 
tled effect. 

18— Vase 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Crater- 
shaped, with the body pinched into a hexagonal shape, and wide flaring 
mouth. Partially covered with a dark patina, revealing a high iridescence. 

HMfkt, 9% iMdU*. 



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1ft — Vabe with Handles 

Gneco-Roman of the Second Centiny, B.C. Green glass. Globul&r 
fonn, with short neck and two broad, flat loop handles. Partially coated with 
' a white patina, revealing a mottled iridescence. 



20— Vase 

Gneeo-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Globular 
body and wide flaring neck, ornamented with shallow flutings. The bottom 
is deeply hollowed upward. Partially coated with a dark patina, revealing 
a fine silvery iridescence. 

Htiffht. 3U iiwftM. 

21 — ^Va8e with Handle 

Graeco-Phcenidan of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Bottle-shaped, 
with cylindrical neck, flaring mouth and flat applied handle. Body deco- 
rated mth a moulded reticulated and diamond-shaped pattern. Partially 
coated with a very dark patina, revealing a flne silvery iridescence. 

Bright, 5% iucktt. 

22 — Twin Phiau fob Essences 

Gneco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Green glass. Of Egyp- 
tian columnar form, pressed together with a spiral band of glass filament 
around the body and an applied zig-zag ornamentation of a glass spiral 
around the double rim. Coated with a silvery patina, revealing a fine irides- 
cence. 

Htfffht. 4% (iMfcM. 



28 — ^Vase with Handij» 

Grsco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Globular 
Aryballus-like form, with small cylindrical neck and two applied handles. 
PartiaUy coated with a yellowish patina, revealing the iridescent surface of 
the glass. 

BHgkt, 4% lwlU>. 



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Grsco-Roman of the Third Ceotury, B.C. Greenish-white glass. Bulb- 
ous body, with cyhndrical neck. Coated with a whitish patina, which ex- 
poses a silvery iridescence. 

Bright. 4^ todU*. 

25— Vase 

Graeco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Am- 
pulla-shaped, with long cylindrical necfc. Entirely coated with an extraor- 
dinarily rich iridescence. 

Btifkt, S^ fausfew. 

26 — ^Vase with Handle 

Grseco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Amphora- 
shaped, with foot and two applied handles around the neck, and ccmnecting 
the handles is a ring of appUed glass. Partially coated with a whitish patina, 
revealing a beautiful silvery iridescence. 

Bttfkt, T (iMrk#f . 

27 — EwEE WITH Handle 

^gypto-Fbcenician of the Third Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Pitcher- 
shaped, with lip and flat applied handle. Decorated with a thread of white 
glass entwined around the lower part of the body. From Damascus. 

lUvMtrated Bright, % t-\* fwAM. 

28 — ^Vase with Handle 

Gneco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Amphora- 
shaped, with foot, pinched rim and narrow flat handle, with boss at junc- 
tion with the body. Entirely coated with a fine silvery iridescence. 

Erifkt, S^ tedU«. 

2»— Vase 

GrKco-FbcBnician of the Second Century, B.C. Green glass. Pear-shaped 
body, with cylindrical neck and flat rim. Decorated with carved ribbings of 
glass and with the neck closed by a thin web of glass pierced with a hole, 
possibly for dropping purposes. Partially coated with a silvery patina ex- 
posing the ori^nal surface of the glass. Bright, t jmAm. 



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so — Bowl oe Vabe 

Alexandrian, First Century, B.C. Golden amber-colored glass. Globular 
shape, with flaring rim and decorated around the body with parallel vertical 
ribbings in relief. Coated with a silvery patina, revealing the glass in its 
original condition without iridescence. 

Bright, 1% ineht*; dtmnetgr, 9% iiteh**. 

81 — Twin Phiau with Handle 

Grsco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Greenish-blue glass. Tubu- 
lar form, united and surrounded by a spiral filament of glass, and with a 
large loop handle of striated glass for the purpose of carrying and suspen- 
sion. Partially coated with a silvery iridescent patina, revealing the clear 
glass. 

Hrifht, 5% laeAff. 

82 — Vase with Handles 

Gneco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Dark blue glass. Globular- 
shaped, with curved neck, flaring rim and two applied, round and curved 
loop handles. Partially coated with white and yellow patina, revealing the 
ori^nal surface of the lapU-UvsvU like glass. 

Bright, 3^ inehtt. 

88 — Vase with Handles 

Greek of the Third Century, B.C. Greenish-white glass. Ampulla-shaped 
with two handles. Partially coated Mith a creamy white patina, revealing a 
very fine silvery iridescence. 

Uluatrated Bright, »% *«*«. 

84 — Essence Vase 

Syrian of the First Century, B.C. Amber-colored glass. Made in the 
form of a dried date, realistically treated. Entirely covered with an excep- 
tionally fine silvery iridescence. 

Ltngth, 9% JnoAM. 

85 — ^Bowx 

JEgypto-Phcenician of the Fifth Century, B.C. Dark blue glass. Coupe- 
shaped. Made in imitation of lapU-lazuU. Partially coated with an irides- 
cent patina, revealing the original surface of the glass. 

Bright, 9% Ineh**; diamtttr, 3% inoht. 



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86 — Essence Bottle with Handle 

^gypto-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. Dark green alabastrene 
glass. Amphora-shaped, with pointed end and one flat applied loop handle. 
Decorated with a pattern in white enamel glass of horizontal rings, straight 
and of zig-zag form; coated in places with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Htigkt, (% imchM. 

87 — Bottle 

Saracenic of the Ninth Century, A.D. White gloss. Globulw body, with 
long slender bulbous neck. Covered with a very remarkable mottled irides- 
cence and patches of dark brown. 

Htigkt. 7% imekt*. 



88 — Vase with Handle 

Grteco-Phoenician of the Second Century. White glass. Dome-shaped 
body, with cylindrical neck, flaring rim and applied twisted loop handle. 
The neck is decorated with an applied spiral filament of glass. Partially 
coated with a dark patina, reve^ng a very high silvery iridescence. 

BrigU. SK iBchM. 



89 — Vase with Handles 

Grffico-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Olive-green glass. Am- 
phora-shaped, with foot, cylindrical neck and two curved applied handles. 
The handles are united by a ring of applied glass running around the neck. 
Partially coated with a creamy white, partly iridescent patina, revealing 
the original surface of the glass. 

lUuitrated ^''**'' ^''i '■'^*"- 

40 — Vase 

Gneco- Roman of the Second Century. White glass. Amphora-shaped, 
with foot and flaring neck. Decorated with spiral flutings around neck, 
which die away on the upper part of the body. Partially covered with a dark 
patina, revealing a fine golden iridescence. 

Btigkt, S% tneht. 



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41— Vase 

Grseco-Phcenician of the Third Century, B.C. Green glass. Rhyton- 
shaped, with pointed body and cylindrical neck with rim. Coated with a 
dark patina, revealing a very beautiful dark iridescence. 

Htisht, 3 11-16 inehM. 



42 — GrOBLET 

Alexandrian of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Beaker-shaped, 
witli curved sides. Partially coated with a dark patina, revealing a fine sil- 
very iridescence. Evidently a drinking cup. These are of extremely rare 
occurrence. 

HMffkt. * 11-18 tnehu. 

43 — Vase for Essences 

Egyptian of the Fifth Century, B.C. Dark green and white glass. Quad- 
rilateral amphora shape, with rounded base and cylindrical neck. Decorated 
with a "bird's feather" pattern in white enamel glass, incorporated with the 
surface, hut not extending throughout the whole thickness. The white en- 
amel is partially iridescent but otherwise the bottle is as fresh as when it 
left its maker's hands. 

Height, 4% inekt*. 

44 — Twin Phials 

Grteco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Green glass. Tubular 
form, with an applied ornamentation of a glass filament at the side. Par- 
tially coated with a yellowish patina, revealing a rich iridescence and por- 
tions of the original surface. 

alight, 4y« fM«hM. 



45 — ^Bottle 

Egyptian of the Third Century, B.C. Yellowish-white glass. Semi-globular 
or dome-shaped, with bulbous cylindrical neck and projecting rim. Of 
heavy moulded glass which shows a remarkably beautiful dark iridescence. 

SMfht, S 11-15 tne\»t. 



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46 — Bowl 

^gypto-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. Cup-shaped and deco- 
rated with a pattern of concentric whorls of white enamel glass. From 
Damascus. 

lUtlttrated Brijht, IV^ {«cA«f; aameUr, 3% inch**. 

47 — Bottle 

Grseco-Phaenician of the Third Century, B.C. Greenish glass. Bulbous 
body with long cylindrical neck, with rim curiously mottled; whitish iridescent 
patina, exposing a surface also of mottled iridescence. 

Btight, 5Vi t»olt**- 

48 — Vase 

GrBBco-Phoenician of the Third Century, B.C. Amber-colored glass. Sphe- 
rical body, with narrow neck and double rim. Coated with a white patina 
which reveals a fine golden iridescence. 



4»— Vase 

Grteco-Phoenician of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Bottle- 
shaped, with the body pinched inwards, forming seven depressions. Coated 
with a white patina, revealing a beautiful silvery iridescence. 

Httffht. «% imAm. 

50 — Vase with Handles 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A.D. Rose-colored moulded glass. Am- 
phora-shaped, with foot and two applied bandies. Decorated with a pat- 
tern of flutings aroimd the upper and lower portions of the hody, sepa- 
rated by a band of Greek scroll ornamentation in relief. Partially coated 
with a dark patina, revealing a slight iridescence. 

Htight, 9% inektt. 

51 — Medusa Bottle 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A.D. Ruby-colored moulded glass. 
Pear-shaped, with narrow cylindrical neck. Decorated on either side with 
a "Medusa" head in relief, divided by two branched ornaments, also in re- 



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lief. These Medusa bottles, with either a single or double head, derive their 
origin from the "Janus" vases of the Greeks, and date from the beginning 
of the Roman Empire. 

Ilhutrated ^•'?*'' ^'^ *"**•*■ 

.52 — Bowl ob Vase 

Alexandrian, First Century, B.C. Gk>Iden amber-colored glass. 
Cup-shaped. Decorated around the exterior of the body with parallel ver- 
tical ribbings in relief. The interior and portions of the exterior coated 
with a silvery patina which reveals the glass in its original condition with- 
out iridescence. 

Bright , 3% fttchM; diamater, V/^ i*ck*». 

58 — EwEB WITH Handle 

Grffico-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Greenish glass. Pear- 
shaped body. Cylindrical neck with pinched-out lip to rim and applied 
rectangular handle. Partially coated with a very dark patina, revealing a 
high silvery iridescence. 

Bright, 9% iuchw. 



54 — Vase with Handles 

Grasco- Phoenician of the Third Century. White glass. Flattened spherical 
shape, with cylindrical neck and two appUed handles, connected by a ring 
of glass applied around the neck. Partially coated with a silvery patina, 
revealing a very high and effective iridescence. 

HHght, G% inch$$. 

55 — Bowl 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. Thick greenish glass. 
Cup-shaped, with foot and applied decoration of a filament of glass form- 
ing a meander pattern in relief around the under part of body, and a spiral 
line of colored glass around the upper part. Partially coated with a yel- 
low patina, revealing a fine, rich dark iridescence, espedally on the rim, re- 
flecting bri^t blues, greens and piuT>les. 

Bright, 1% inchM; iiomttgr, 9% iiKhu. 



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56 — Vase with Handles 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A.D. Rose-colored glass. Amphora- 
shaped, with foot and cylindrical neck, and two applied handles. Decorated 
with a pattern of horizontal ribbings surrounding the body. Of moulded 
glass. Coated with a dark patina, revealing a slight iridescence. 

Htight, 3% inchu. 

57 — Vase with Handle 

GrsBco-Phflenician of the Third Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Bottle- 
shaped, with bulbous body, cylindrical neck and applied curved handle. Par- 
tially coated Mdth a dark patina, which displays a curious mother o' pearl- 
like iridescence. 

Htight, 3V, inchei. 

58 — ^Dbinkino Gi^ss 

Grteco-Roman of the Second Centurj', B.C. Green glass. Conical shape, 
with a round knop and spreading ogre-shaped foot. Coated with a whitish 
iridescent patina which exposes an iridescent surface. 

Height, S S-10 inchtt. 



59 — Vase with Handle 

Grffico-Phoenician of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Hydra- 
shaped, with cylindrical neck, flaring rim, and round and curved applied 
hfuidle. Decorated with a spiral thread of glass applied around the rim. 
Partially coated with a yellow patina, revealing a fine silvery iridescence. 

Bright, Svi inthe: 

60 — Vase 

^gypto-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. White glass. Flattened 
body, resembling the medieval pilgrim bottle in form, with long cylindrical 
neck. Partially coated with a heavy dark patina, revealing a very fine 
golden iridescence. Vases or bottles of a similar shape, but lacking the long 
neck are frequently found in collections of early Egyptian glass. 

Bright, 6% inek**. 



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61— Vase 

Grseco-Phoenician of the Foiuth Century, B.C. White glass. Aryballus- 
shaped body and flaring rim. Decorated with an applied horizontal band 
of pierced work around the upper part of body below which is an elaborate 
applied ornamentation of glass filament in a pattern of four six-pointed 
stars, separated from each other by two circles. Coated with a dark pa- 
tina, revealing the original surface of the glass. 

Illustrated "*""■ ^'^ •"'*"■ 

62 — Bowl 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A.D. Greenish glass. Cup-shaped, 
with heavy rim and base hollowed upward. Partially coated with a whitish 
iridescent patina, revealing the original surface of the glass. 

Height, 1% inchn; dtameter, 3^ inebti. 

68 — Essence Vase 

^gyptO'Phoenician of the Fifth Century, B.C. Sapphire-blue moulded 
glass. Amphora-shaped, with long cyUndrical neck. Decorated with white 
enamel glass, applied in waved horizontal lines around the body and in a 
spiral form around the neck. Sliglitly iridescent, but otherwise presenting 
the original appearance. 

Height, 3% inehte. 

64 — Vase 

Graico- Phoenician of the Fourth Century. White glass. Bulbous-shaped, 
with spreading neck. Of thick glass, with pinched-out excrescences around 
the body. Partially coated with a dark patina, revealing an extraordinarily 
high and very beautiful iridescence. 

Height. 3% im*M. 



65 — Essence Vase 

Syrian of the First Century, B.C. Amber-colored glass. Made in the 
form of a dried date, realistically treated. Entirely covered with a very 
beautiful silvery iridescence. 

Length, 3% tnehee. 



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66 — Bottle 

Grteco-Roman of the Third Century. Rose-colored glass. Globular body and 
narrow cylindrical neck. Completely covered with an exceptionally fine sil- 
very iridescence. 

Bmght, S% inehet. 

67 — Vase foe Pebfume 

Alexandrian of the Second Century, B.C. Ruby-colored glass. Amphora- 
shaped body, with foot. Decorated with patterns formed by twisted fila- 
ments around the body, with a fine vertical ribbing, and with filaments of 
clear glass interlaced so as to form an octagonal openwork foot. There 
is an appUed ring of glass around the neck, pinched out so as to form seven 
small projections. The iridescence the surface has assumed is of an excep- 
tional richness, running from rich sang-de-hoeuf red to bright peacock blue. 

IUu»trated B«igkt, s% **;*». 

68 — Flat Bowl 

Phoenician, about Second Century, B.C. White glass. Tazza-Uke form. Par- 
tially coated with a heavy dark patina, revealing over almost the entire sur- 
face a superb iridescence of a silvery character, showing bright greens and 
reds in the reflections. 

Bnght, I^ inckei; ^amtUt, 6^ inehti. 

69 — BoTTU; WITH Handu: 

Alexandrian of the Second Century, B.C. White glass. Square form, with 
roimded corners, a circular neck and fiat applied loop handle. Covered, 
where the overlying patina has fallen away, with a remarkably beautiful sil- 
very iridescence, showing strong reds, peacock blues and greens in its reflec- 
tions. 

IUu»trated ^•'?*'' '>i *«*''■ 

70 — Vase 

^gypto-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. Greenish glass. Dome- 
shaped body with spreading neck and fiat rim. Of thick glass partially 
coated around the neck with a dark patina revealing on the surface of the 
body an exceptionally rich golden iridescence. 

Height, 3% inchti. 



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71 — Vase 

GrsBCo-Roman of the Third Century, B.C. White glass. Graceful ovi- 
form shape, with wide mouth. Partially coated with a heavy dark patina, 
revealing, where this has fallen away, a fine silvery iridescence of excep- 
tional beauty, showing rich reds, greens and blues in the reflections. 

lUiuttrated Bright, *% teoft«*. 

72 — Vase 

Alexandrian of the Second Century, B.C. Ruby-colored glass. Pear-shaped 
body, with long cylindrical neck and flat rim. Decorated with waved lines, 
forming a striated pattern of white enamel, which is incorporated with the 
surface of the ruby glass. Partially coated with a dark patina, but otherwise 
entirely covered with an iridescence which enhances rather than destroys 
the eflfect of the original coloring and pattern. 

Illustrated ^'^'"- "1* *"**"■ 

78 — ^Vase 

Grteco-Phoenician of the Fourth Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Glob- 
ular-shaped body and wide flaring neck. Decorated with shallow perpendicu- 
lar flutings around the body. Partially coated with a dark patina reveahng 
a silvery iridescence. 

Htight, S^ tnek0t. 

74 — Vase with Handles 

Grffico-Roman of the Third Century, B.C. Rose-colored glass. Athe- 
naic-shaped, with oviform body and two round applied handles, which do 
not directly oppose each other. Coated with an exceptionally fine irides- 
cence. 

Illustrated ^*^*'' »% '"**"• 

75 — Bottle 

Sidonian of the Eleventh Century, A.D. White glass. Hexagonal-shaped 
body with cylindrical neck and widely flaring rim. Decorated with moulded 
ornamentations of incised and rehef patterns. Two of the sides have a her- 
ring-bone pattern and two a diamond-shaped pattern of crowned lines. Of 
the remaining sides, one has a Greek cross in high relief with a sort of stele 



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representation beneath it, the other has a pattern of a cross in a circle, with 
three perpendicular lines below it and an indistinguishable ornamentation 
above. Possibly the entire figure is a variation of the familiar "Labanim" 
or sacred standard of the Rcnnan Empire. This bottle was probably made in 
a Syrian workshop to the order of a Crusader. 

Illustrated "**?*'- *'*' *"**"• 

76 — Pehfume Vase 

Syrian, with Byzantine influence, of the Second Century, A.D. White 
glass. Oviform-shaped body on foot, with long cylindrical neck and flat 
rim. The decoration is of applied filaments of glass forming a spiral 
around the upper part of neck. Below is a deep band of twisted and 
pinched-out work, formed of thicker threads of glass. Around the bowl 
runs a band of a tortuous pattern between thin horizontal lines, all formed 
in filaments of glass. The entire surface is covered with a dark patina which 
reveals a golden iridescence in places where it has scaled off. 

lUrutrated "•*?*'' ^"^ *•**"■ 

77 — MuEHHiNE Bowl 

Alexandrian, First Century, A.D. Multi-colored glass. Open coupe- 
shaped. Whitish ground, with mottlings of dark brown, spotted with 
cream color. Though the surface has been affected byiong immurement and 
is partially overlaid by a brownish patina, the original coloring and the 
characteristic patterning of the inlaid glasses are plainly apparent. 
Illustrated 

Height, 1% inehet; diam«t»r, 3^ iitehta. 

Q This bowl and the succeeding one (No. 78) are extraordinarily well pre- 
served and perfect specimens of the famous Mitrrhine glass of the ancients. 
Commonly known as "Mosaic glass," this particular variety may almost be 
classed as among the lost arts, the nearest approach to it, in comparatively 
modem times, being the Millefiori glass of the Venetian Sixteenth Century 
artificers. So highly esteemed was the glass in the first century of the R(»aan 
Empire, that Pliny relates that tlie Consul Petronius gave 80,000 sestertiae 
for a small bowl of Alexandrian workmanship, and when he was on his death 
bed broke it into fragments, so that it should not fall into the hands of Nero. 
The meaning of the name Mttrrheut, applied by the Roman to this glass, is 
doubtful, but it was probably derived from the mythical precious stone the glass 
was supposed to resemble. 



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78 — MuBfiHiNE Bowl 

Alexandrian, First Century, A.D. Multi-colored glass. Open coupe- 
shaped. Green ground, marbled with a lighter green and set with irregular 
oviform spots of yellow and white surrounded by fine hnes of rich red. Al- 
though the general surface has been changed by immurement and is partially 
covered with a light patina, there are many places in which the original char- 
acter of the glass has been so preserved, that it is in the same condition as 
when it left the craftsman's hands. 

Illustrated 

Hriyht, 1 Il-lfi inchM,- Mamtter, 3% tttchti. 

79 — Bowl 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A.D. Opaque white glass. Coupe- 
shaped. Formed of a cream-colored opaque glass in simulation of Ala- 
bastre. Though of one color throughout, this should without doubt be 
classed with the Alurrhine glasses as regards both its date and its place of 
manufacture. 

lUuatrated 

Bright, 1% inchei; dtamattr, 3% inthti. 



MISCELLANEOUS OBJECTS 

80 — Seal 

Bahylonian. Terra-cotta of the Fifth Century, B.C. Semi-wheel-shaped and 
entirely covered with incised inscriptions of cuneiform characters. 

Ltngtk, 1% Inch**; width, 1% inchti. 



81 — Cabved Ivoey 

Persian. Fatimite epoch of the Ninth Century. Representing an elephant 
carrying a howdah, in which, originally, were figures of men and women. 
It stands on an oval base and was probably one of the pieces of a Set of 

Blight, 1% inthi*. 



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82 — Bowl with Handi,es 

Greek. Of the Second Century, B.C. Glazed terra-cotta. Crater form, with 
two horizontal and ringed handles. The body is decorated with figures of 
lions and ribbon festoons in relief under a surface of dark green stanniferous 
glaze. The interior is lined with a yellow glaze of the same character. 
lUiatrated 

Height, SVa ittchei; diamsltr, Sy^ inehtf. 



88 — Statuette 

Greek. Probably Tanagran of the Third Century, B.C. Of terra-cotta 
with hollow body. Representing the seated figure of a young mother 
dressed in a flowing himation over which is a cloak fastened below the neck 
with a brooch. She holds in her lap a nude infant, of which the head is un- 
fortunately wanting. The attitude is graceful and natural, and the entire 
figure, with its characteristic pose, suggests the Italian Renaissance sculp- 
tors' treatment of the Madonna, The statuette is free from any trace of 
coloring. 

Bright, 6% {w>kM. 



84 — Lamp 

Grseco-Roman of the Second Century, B.C. Red terra-cotta of conven- 
tional form, with roxmd oil receptacle and triangular-shaped flat handle. The 
centre is decorated with a rosette pattern in relief, the flat surface of the 
handle with a representation in low relief, of Leda caressing Jupiter in the 
form of a Swan. 



85 — Paik of Eakrinos 

Persian. Grold and enamel work of the Seventeenth Centiiry. Dome-shaped 
pendants hanging from a melon-shaped, six-lobed bead, and fringed with 
small pearls hanging from gold hoops. The entire surface is beautifully 
decorated in translucent and painted enamels, with floral designs and min- 
iature portraits d jour on a chased gold ground. The portraits are of Per- 
sian ladies. 

B*ifkt, 1% inchM. 



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86 — Paib of £abbing8 

Persian. Gk)ld and enamel work of the Seventeenth Century. Bell-shaped, 
hexagonal pendants hanging from conical dome-shaped beads, both fringed 
with small leaf-shaped pendants of gold and pearls. The surfaces are dec- 
orated in translucent and painted enamels d jour on a chased gold ground in 
a pattern of flowers, and red and green leaves. 



ANTIQUE METAL WORK 

87 — Bowl 

Saracenic. Engraved bronze of the Ninth Century. Low amphora-shaped, 
with two bands of inscriptions in cupid characters, the spaces between the 
letters filled with a floral pattern. Around the rim a band of palm lei^ pat- 
tern. 

BMgU, *% ineh»$; 4iam4t»r, A^ inch**. 



88 — Statuette 

Graeco-Roman. Cast bronze of the Third Century, B.C. Figure of Venus 
arranging her coiffure. Coated with a dark green patina. 

Bright. a% buhM. 

89 — Statuette 

Grfeco-Roman. Cast bronze of the Third Century. Figure of Hermes 
with winged cap and holding a purse in one hand. Coated with a flne green 
patina. 

BHgkt, 9% imihtt. 



90 — EwEE with Handle 

Greek. Cast bronze of the Third Century, B.C. Amphora-shaped, with 
small neck, long lip and curved handle with beardless mask at the point of 
junction with the body. Coated with a very fine green patina. 

lUtutrated Hright. i% inch**. 



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91 — ^BowL WITH Handle 

Roman. Cast bronze of the Second Century, B.C. Spherical form, with 
loose handle swinging from two masks appliqu^ at the sides. The cover is 
decorated with a cinquefoil rosette in relief, covered with a heavy green 
patina. lUuitrated 

H»iffkt, 3% inehst; <U(>m*t»r, *% ImJU*. 

92 — Bowl 

Persian. Bronze ciaeU of the Fourteenth Century. Circular flat-shape, 
supported on six feet in the form of lions. The outside rim is decorated with 
a pattern of six medallions breaking across a band of inscriptioD in Cufic 
characters. The upper flat surface of the rim has a similar decoration. In 
the centre of the interior are seven medallions arranged in a circle, and with 
figures of birds; around this is a buid of ornamentation consisting of six 
winged lions and six medallions with figures of birds. There is an outer 
border of a diamond pattern. The whole is covered with a fine green pa- 
tina, due to age and immurement. 

BMght, 3<4 inekt; diomettr, 7% iiteh**. 

98 — Old Mobtab fob Pounding Coffee-beans 

Persian. Fatimite work of the Thirteenth Century of cast bronze. Deco- 
rated around the body with figures, in high relief, of eagles, the wings out- 
stretched and the bodies fashioned into the hkeness of human faces. Round 
bosses in relief separate these figures. 

lUwtrated 

Btigkt, 4V. IimAm; diam*t»r, A^ teekM. 

94 — Statuette 

Grseco-Roman. Cast bronze of the Third Century, B.C. Figure of Venus, 
with hands raised, arranging her coifiFure. Standing on circular bronze 
base. Coated with a green patina. 

Bttfht. 4M imdut. 

95 — Statuette 

Roman. Cast bronze of the First Century, B.C. Seated female figure 
pouring from a flask held in one hand into a shell-shaped receptacle in the 



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other. At her side is the trunk of a tree around which a serpent is coiled 
and at her feet a dove. At the back of the base is a small flat handle. 

Httght, S% imehM. 



96 — STATtJETTE 

GrKco-Roman. Cast bronze of the First Century, B.C. Figure of a 
winged Eros resting on one foot with arms outstretched. On a circular base 
of yellow marble of later period. 

Illustrated ^•^** "' *™^' ''i ***^ 



97 — Statuette 

Greek. Cast bronze of the Third Century, B.C. Figure of Aphrodite hold- 
ing a fruit in one hand, the other arm upraised. On a circular contempor- 
ary bronze base. Coated with a fine green patina. 

lUiutrated ^•^*'' '% *»"*"• 



98 — Vase 

Saracenic. Mosul work of the Thirteenth Century of brass, cigeU and in- 
laid with silver. Globular body with wide cylindrical neck. Decorated 
with a chased diaper pattern inlaid profusely with silver. 

lUuitrated ^•^«' »H (i^w. 

Q The main characteristic of the Saracenic metal-work, of which this and 
the succeeding pieces form notable examples, was the lavish use of a silver 
inlay. This silver inlay was set in, by slightly undercutting the surrounding 
edges of the brass or copper, and did not rely on the use of pins or solder 
to secure it. The result is that in a majority of cases the silver, retained by 
so delicate a hold, has disappeared. The Bright inlay was ori^naUy rendered 
more brilliant by the contrast of surrounding lines filled with a bituminous 
composition, still more evanescent than the white metal inlay. The centre of 
the art from the Ei^teenth Century onward was Mesopotamia, and the name 
of Mosul, from the city which formed its chief seat, has been attached to all 
work of this date and character. The free use of the human figure in the 
decoration, though contrary to the tenets of the Koran, was a characteristic 
of the artists under the small dynasties of Mesopotamia. 



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99 — ^BoiTL 

Saracenic. Mosul work of the Fourteenth Century of brass, ci»ele and in- 
laid with silver. Low form, the sides inclined inward. Decorated around 
the body with circular and obloid panels of chased, engraved and inlaid 
work. The circular panels are filled with a diaper of key pattern, the ob- 
loid ones with repeated inscriptions in cursive characters. "To the glory of 
the Sxdtan el Dahar." Around the rim runs a border of an interlaced pat- 
tern. lUmtrated Diam^ur, 7% *-<a^. 



100 — Bowl 

Saracenic. Mosul work of the Fourteenth Century of brass, ci$elS and in- 
laid with silver. Low form, the sides inclined inward. Decorated around 
the body with circular and obloid medallions, with backgrounds and fillings 
of interlaced scroll work. The circular medallions have representations of 
horses and horsemen, the others are filled with eulogistic inscriptions in 
cursive characters "The great Sultan, the just, the prosperous, the Sultan el 
Dahar" and "Made for the Sultan " The under portion of the body is dec- 
orated with a pattern of heart-shaped pendentives in chased work. Around 
the rim runs a border of an interlaced scroll work with silver inlays. 

Illiuttrated Dtam*t^. »% *«»*.. 



101— Bowl .. -.-^.^.^^.- 

Saracenic. Mosul work of the Thirteenth Century of brass, ci$elS and in- 
laid with silver. Low form, with side inclined inward. Decorated around 
the rim with a running inscription in Cufic characters, "The great Sultan, the 
just, the prosperous, the glorious el Mansour," and with figures of a Sultan 
on horseback with his hawk on his wrist, and with an interlaced pattern. 
lUustrated Bfam#(«-, u«^ **:**». 



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BOKHARA FAIENCE OF THE 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 



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THE FAIENCES OF PERSIA AND THE CAUCASUS 

Within the last few years the world seems to have awakened to the con- 
sciousness of the appealing beauty of Persian faiences, and with that conscious- 
ness has come an increase of knowledge concerning them. It seems hut yester- 
day that so omniscient a Ceramist as M. Jacquemart characterized its study as 
one "full of doubt and hesitation," and thought worthy of serious consideration 
the theories of those who denied to Persia an art of faience at all, but attributed 
to Rhodes or Syria, those exquisite examples which, during the last six centuries 
had found their way to Europe. A land which for centuries was the battle- 
ground of the Near East, its cities once flourishing centres of the arts and of 
trade, now mere heaps of ruins, it is below the soil of Persia and not on its sur- 
face that evidences of its past civihzation are to be sought. Less than a decade 
ago the lustreless ware of Ray or Rhages was only known to us by a few broken 
fragments of a bowl carefully preserved in the British Museum. Of the lustred 
ware from the same ateliers there were a few examples, one of the finest of which, 
now in the Louvre Museum, once adorned the collection of the late Charles A. 
Dana of this city. Even now of the lustreless ware the really fine pieces may al- 
most be counted on the fingers of one hand. It is this which makes the appear- 
ance in this collection of the beaker-shaped vase with its frieze-like processions 
of exquisitely decorative figures, of supreme importance. But before the discov- 
ery of this Rhages faience, the ware of Rakka had attracted general attention 
which was not lessened when it appeared that a majority of the finest pieces had 
suffered, if not a "sea-change," then a "land-change," which, by coating them with 
a patina of a varying silvery iridescence, had placed them in a decorative class 
peculiarly their own. The presence of so many superlative examples of Rhages 
and Rakka faiences gives this collection a peculiar cachet of distinction, but the 
faiences of other ateliers of hardly less importwice are well represented also. 
That, for instance, of Sultanabad, once a flourishing capital, but now hardly more 
than a large village, and those of Kaschan and of Diarbekir. Crossing the bor- 
ders of Persia to the mountains of the Caucasus the wonderfully decorative en- 
amelled plates of Bokhara and of Daghestan, and the flower of them all — ^the 
faience of Koubatcha, with its ivory-like glazes and its gem-like enamel decora- 
tions, form an exceptionally interesting group. 



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BOKHARA FAIENCE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

102 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white crackled glaze stopping short of the base, and decorated in blue, brown 
and green enamel overglaze. In the centre a pattern of a circular medal- 
Uon of criss-cross work in blue, with a green border, surrounded by two ob- 
loid medallions of white reserve and dark blue scrolled pattern outlined in 
green, and two double-lobed panels of white reserve with a pattern of 
feathers and circles in light blue. All on a ground of dark brown 
hatching. The rim has a border of chequer pattern of alternate blue and 
white squares. Reverse of rim is decorated with six spiral ornaments in al- 
ternating blue and brown. 

iHnnMltfr, 19Vi inehtt. 

^ Under the Dynasty of the Timurides the arts of Bokhara Hourished as 
at no other period. For ages reckoned as the chief centre of Moslem erudi- 
tion, it was at Bokhara that some of the finest manuscripts were written 
and illuminated. There the most exquisite tissues and carpets were woven, 
and, as the examples in this collection serve to prove, it was there, too, that 
the most effectively decorative fuence was fashioned. 

108 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white vitreous glaze leaving the greater portion of the reverse unglazed, and 
decorated with blue, brown and green enamel colors. The centre is occu- 
pied with a chequered pattern in blue and white reserve surrounded by dia- 
mond pattern, the rim has a border of crossed diagonal brown hnes over a 
chequered pattern of blue and white. 

DtamtUr, ISVi inchtt. 



Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Fourteenth Century. Covered with a white 
vitreous crackle glaze stopping short of the base, and decorated overglaze 
in brovm, green and blue. The centre is occupied with a medalhon sur- 
rounded by hght conventional leaf forms and scrolls. The rim has a bor- 
der of squares outhned in green and filled in with blue and brown fleurettes. 

IHamtt4T, 13^ IimAm. 



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105 — Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Corered with a fine 
white vitreous glaze and decorated, overglaze, in green, brown and blue 
enamel colors. The surface is occupied with a quatrefoil figure in blue, hav- 
ing for centre a square of blue and white chequered pattern, the other 
spaces being filled with cross-hatchings, in brown, and blue spirals. The 
rim is decorated with a meander pattern in green, and the reverse is covered 
with a fine turquoise-blue crackle glaze stopping short of the base. 



106 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Centiuy. Covered with a 
white glaze and decorated, overglaze, in enamel colors of brown, blue and 
green. The surface is occupied with a pattern in the characteristic quatrefoil 
form, with a round centre of chequered pattern in brown and white reserve, 
the spaces between being filled with scrolls and rosettes. Rim decorated 
with a chequered border in brown and white reserve. The reverse is covered 
with an ivory-white crackle glaze stopping short of the base. 

DtamtUr, 11% htOt*. 



107 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white glaze decorated in brown, blue and green enamel colors. The centre 
is occupied with a pattern of four circular medallions, formed by a scroll 
pattern in dark green and filled with a pattern of brown fleurettes. 
The groimd is filled in with blue fleurettes and the rim has a chequered pat- 
tern border of squares in white reserve and blue. The reverse is covered 
with a fine turquoise-blue glaze, having a pattern of imbrications in lines 
incised in the paste and filled with brown. 

108 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with » 
greenish glaze stopping short of the foot and decorated in colored enunels. 



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The centre is occupied with a pattern of eight panels formed by radiating 
spaces filled with irregular-shaped spots of greenish reserve outlined in 
brown. Around the inner rim runs a broad band of quatrefoiled figures in 
reserve, outlined in brown, on a blue ground. The exterior is decorated 
with a broad band of dentated pattern in blue and brown enamels and by 
leaf forms in blue and brown, arranged symmetrically. 

J>Um*t4r. U imekf. 

109 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with an 
ivory-white glaze stopping short of the foot and decorated in colored en- 
amels. The centre is occupied with a pattern of mauresque interlacements 
in white reserve, outlined in brown on a blue ground with cinquefoiled 
flowers of white reserve and fillings of brown. Around the rim Is a deep 
border of dentated pattern in blue, brown and white reserve, with a nar- 
rower band of meander pattern in light blue with dark blue and brown 
fillings. The reverse is decorated with a band of dentated pattern of blue and 
brown and with brown and blue leaf forms. 

Diam*t*r, U i»ek*t. 

110 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan fmence of the Seventeenth Century. The interior cov- 
ered with a white glaze, with decorations of colored enamels. The centre 
is occupied with a pattern of alternate stripes of brown hatchings on a blue 
ground and of a diamond-shaped diaper pattern of blue with brown and 
green leaf forms on a ground of white reserve. Around the inner rim is a 
border of a chequered pattern in brown on a blue ground. The reverse is 
covered with a rich turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and dec- 
orated with a pattern of curved and crossed lines incised in the paste and 
filled in with brown color. 

Ill — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a fine 
white vitreous g^aze, decorated witii enamel colors of blue and brown. The 
centre is entirdy occupied with a chequered pattern in squares of blue and 



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brown, and the rim is decorated with a double border of diagonals and 
scrolls in white reserve on a ground of blue with brown fillings. The re- 
verse is covered with a very fine turquoise-blue glaze, with an unusual 
scroll pattern of incised lines filled in with brown. 

DiamtUr, Ifi^ tttekta. 



KASCHAN FAIENCE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

112 — EwEB WITH Handle 

Persian. Kascban faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
pointed lip and flat curved handle. Covered with a fine turquoise-blue 
crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated with a pattern in 
black. Around the body and neck are bands of scrolled and leaf ornamen- 



tation. 



^ Kaschan, a Bmall city of Fersia, lying between Teheran and Ispahan, 
and founded in the Ninth Century by Zobeida, the wife of Haroun al Raschid, 
was noted by the Arabian geographer Yacout, as early aa the Thirt«aith Cen- 
tury, for its artistic industries. Four centuries later it was still an artistic 
centre. It was Markoud of Easchan who wove the world famous Mosqae 
carpet of Ardebil in the year 1636, and, until the end of the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury, the faience of Kaschan was noted throughout Persia. 



118 — Deep Plate 

Pnsian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a rich 
Persian blue glaze stopping short of the base, running into very heavy drops 
and decorated overglaze in black. The centre is occupied with a medallion 
of a floral pattern outlined in black. Around the rim runs a deep border 
of six rosettes separated by a diaper of scrolls, all in black line. The re- 
verse has a band of scrolled ornamentation in black hne. 

114— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Centmy. Pear-shaped body 
with cylindrical neck. Covered with a cream-colored vitreous glaze stopping 



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short of the base and decorated in blue and dark green. Around the body is 
a decoration of fine panels of irregular size filled with conventional patterns 
of three blossomed flower forms. Above this is a band of chequered pattern 
in green lines with blue dots at the intersections and a band of scrolled 
work in diagonal panels. The rim is decorated with a band of chequered pat- 
tern of green hnes with blue dots at the intersections. 

Height, 9% JaeJU*. 

115 — Vase with Handles 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Oviform-shaped, with 
bulbous neck and two round loop handles. Covered with a thick vitreous 
white glaze stopping short of the base and running into drops, and decorated 
overglaze in black and blue with a conventional flower and leaf pattern, the 
neck with leaf -shaped reserves of white on a blue groimd. 

Bttffht. 10y« inehei. 

116— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Ovoid form, with 
turned-over rim. Of a dark brown body covered with a glaze of a lighter 
brown stopping short of the base and decorated with patterns in rehef and 
overglaze painting. Around the body is a pattern formed by four large 
leaf-shaped panels filled with relief ornamentation of scrolled work, height- 
ened by lines of brown. These panels are divided by two quatrefoiled ro- 
settes treated in a similar manner. Around the neck are four small loop han- 
dles, applied, evidently for purposes of suspension. 

Btight, 9% iiuAt$. 

117— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with cylindrical neck. Covered with a thick turquoise-blue glaze stopping 
short of the base. 

) Brtfht, 9% fMJUf. 

118— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan fuence of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with cylindrical neck. Covered over a dark body with an ivory-like glaze 
stopping short of the base and decorated overglaze in blue. Around the 



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body runs a pattern in three horizontal divisions of conventionalized rock 
and foliage forms. The neck is decorated with a diamond pattern of lines 
and dots. 

119— Vase 

Persian. Kasehan of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped, with cylin- 
drical neck. Covered, over a dark hrown body, with a lighter brown crackled 
glaze decorated in blue and black. Around the body are conventional moun- 
tain forms surmounted by pagodas and trees in blue, outlined in black uid 
arranged so as to form a symmetrical pattern, and divided by quatrefoils 
of blue and black. Around the neck is a roughly drawn chequered pattern 
in black and blue. 

B*ight, iaeJU*. 

120— Vase 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Globular form, with 
tall cylindrical neck. Covered with a fine turquoise-blue crackled glaze run- 
ning into drops at the base. 

Htlght, lOVi inckM. 

121— Vase 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Oviform shape, 
with lipped rim. The body of dark brown paste is covered with a trans- 
parent glaze having an underglaze decoration of blue rock forms and 
branches of foliage arranged in three horizontal bands. 

Httffkt. 10% htcktM. 

122— Vase 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with low cylindrical neck. Covered with a clouded white glaze with imder- 
glaze decorations of blue. Around the lower part of the body a pattern of 
conventionalized landscape forms with foliage. Above this is a band of dia- 
mond chequered pattern and a deep band of scrolled patterns formed by 
dots. 

RMgkt, 11% iitckt*. 



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128 — Ewer with Handle 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with cylindrical neck and flat, striught handle. Covered with a very fine 
plain turquoise-blue glaze. 

H*ight, 13 inelt^t. 

124 — Jab with Handles and Spout 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Straight slightly 
curved sides with three loop handles and a curved spout. Covered with a 
greenish-white glaze and decorated overglaze vrith a floral pattern in blue 
and black of four vertical panels around the body and a band of a floral 
scrolled pattern below. 

Htight, S^ i*eU*! fUamtUr, 7 fxtJU*. 

125— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Oviform-shaped body, 
with low cylindrical neck. Covered with a thick white vitreous glaze stop- 
ping short of the base and decorated in brown lines and blue fillings vrith a 
pattern around the body of white quatrefoil reserves, having a centre 
scroll ornament on a ground of intricated pattern. The upper portion of 
the body has a pattern of leaf-forms in white reserve on a blue ground. 

126 — ^Vase with Handles 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Club-shaped body, 
with spreading rim and two flat curved handles. Covered with a fine tur- 
quoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base. One handle slightly restored. 

B»ig\t, 90 IhcAm. 

127— Vase 

Hispano-Mauresque. Spanish lustred faience of the Sixteenth Century. 
Oviform-shaped body, vvdth hpped rim. Decorated on a ground of Hght yel- 
low glaze with an overglaze decoration in copper color displaying a very 
conventional treatment of carnation blossoms and leaves. A band of spiral 
omunentations encircles the rim. 

B«ff At, »% iMfcM. 



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RHODIAN AND DAMASCUS FAIENCE OF THE 
TWELFTH TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

128 — Deep Plate 

Saracenic. Damascus fuence of the Twelfth Century. Scalloped edge. 
Covered with an ivory-white vitreous glaze stopping short of the base and 
decorated, overglaze, in green, brown and blue. The centre is occupied with 
a pattern of a blue palmette surrounded by foliage forms in purplish-brown 
and green in a scalloped space of white reserve on a blue ground. The rim 
has a border of panels of brown spirals on a blue ground with alternating 
panels of white reserve. The reverse is decorated with a scrolled pattern 
in green with blue dashes. 



129 — CiRCULAB Plate 

Saracenic. Rhodian faience of the Sixteenth Century, with polychromatic 
decoration. The centre is occupied with a design of flowers and birds in 
blue, red and green enamels on a ground of light green glaze, with an all- 
over pattern of trefoiled spirals. The border is of reserved panels filled 
with a scroll design and separated by a pattern of spirals in brown enamel. 
The reverse is decorated with blue and brown spirals and flourishes ar- 
ranged symmetrically. 

DiamtUr, 11 faukM. 

180 — CiBcuLAE Plate 

Saracenic. Damascus faience of the Sixteenth Century, decorated in two 
colors. The centre is occupied with a pattern of a large flower in solid blue 
enamel with green leaves and fleurettes. The border is of a pattern of 
white reserves on a dark blue ground. The reverse is decorated with a scroll 
pattern in blue. 

tHimtttr, 11% fiwlw. 

181— Plate 

Saracenic. Damascus faience of the Sixteenth Century. Polychromatic 
decoration. The centre is occupied with a bold pattern of tulips in dark 



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blue with green leaves. The border has reserves of white on a blue ground, 
with a pattern of blue spirals. The reverse is decorated with a scroll pat- 
tern in blue. Diam*Ur. 11% jmAw. 



CAUCASIAN FAIENCES OF THE TWELFTH TO THE 
SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

182— Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Twelfth Century. Saucer-shaped. 
Covered with a fine ivory-white crackled glaze and decorated overglaze in 
red, dark green, blue and yellow enamels. The centre is occupied with a 
pattern of leaf forms in yellow, green and red enamels, with spaces of white 
reserve. The leaf forms are also occupied by circles of white reserve with 
blue dots outlined in black in the centre. 

Diam*tsr, TVi inokt. 
Q It is only of recent years that Koubatcha has rendered up to the West- 
ern World the examples of faience which have been treasured for centuries in 
that mountainous district of the Caucasus. The; are the more especially 
interesting as they seem to supply a hitherto needed hnk in the evolution of 
what until now has been the unique decorated pottery known as Rhodian ware 
of the Sixteenth Century. 

188 — Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Twelfth Century. Covered over a dark 
brown body, with a fine ivory-white crackled glaze stopping short of the 
base, and decorated in colored enamels. The centre is occupied with a me- 
daUion bordered by a line of pale green and filled with a pattern of a two- 
blossomed flower in green and yellow enamel, with green and blue leaves 
and cinquefoiled smaller blossoms in dark red. The border is divided into 
panels by blue stems with green leaves. The panels are occupied by floral 
forms in dark red and yellow outlined in green. 

Dbm*tfr, 7y, i,ek*t. 

184 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with an 
ivory-white crackled glaze. Decorated in the centre with a partridge in blue 



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and yellow, surrounded by a floral scroll pattern of two palmettea in green, 
blue and brown. The rim has a border of an intricated pattern in brown 
with blue centre to the scales. Reverse has two lines of dark green. 

Dianttter, gy^ imclut. 



185 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
fine greenish-white glaze. Decorated in black with white reserves. In the 
centre is a long-tailed bird surrounded by foliage and flowers on a ground 
of spirals, a broad border of quatrefoils and scrolls surrounds this also with 
a ground of spirals. The reverse is decorated with six quatrefoils in black 
line and in panels formed by radiating lines of black. 

Diam*UT, 9% inchM. 



186 — ^Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
vitreous ivory-white crackled glaze stopping short of the base, and deco- 
rated with a pattern in blue overglaze. In the centre is a conventional 
treatment of a landscape with two pylons in the foreground, and a bird 
perched on the branch of a tree. The border has a pattern of highly con- 
ventionalized leaf forms in blue on a white ground. The reverse of the 
rim is divided by blue lines into spade-shaped compartments. 

t>iam4t4r, n% teeJU*. 

187 — ^Deep Plate 

Caucasiui. Daghestan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Flat rim, with 
scalloped edge. Entirely covered with a fine white vitreous glaze decorated 
in blue. In the centre is a pattern of six rosettes in a cinquefoil arrange- 
ment on a white groimd entirely filled with a pattern of small scrolls. 
Around the side is a band of similar ornamentation with ten rosettes. The 
flat rim is decorated with a pattern of spiral and small scrolls and around 
the reverse is a rosette and scroll-work treatment similar to that of the in- 
terior. 

DtanuUr, 11% inehii. 



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188 — Low Vase with Handles 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Coupe-shaped, 
with two curved handles. Decorated on a ground of white crackle glaze, 
which stops short of the base. Around the rim, with a pattern of cinque- 
foil flowei^, scrolls and sprays, and around the body with panels of fruits 
and flora] sprays in brown, yellow and light and dark blue overglaze. 

Hsigkl, 6% inchet; diameUr, 6% InehM. 

139 — Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with an 
ivory-white crackle glaze, with a polychromatic overglaze decoration in en- 
amels. The centre is occupied with an arabesque pattern of red and blue 
flowers and leaf forms of green and red, with yellow and red fleurettes in 
thickly applied enamels. The rim is decorated with a border of scroll design 
in dark brown, with cinquefoil flowers, in red and yellow, and green leaves. 

lUtiStrated DIameUr, 13 inche*. 

140— Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a thick 
ivory-white crackled glaze and decorated in the centre in enamel colors with 
a pattern of two palmettes of green with red centres, four smaller ones of 
red with blue centres, and blue lancet-shaped serrated edged leaves arranged 
around a large palmette of yellow, with a red and blue centre. The ground 
is filled in with a pattern of cinquefoil flowers with blue centres. The bor- 
der is divided, by blue lines, into ten spade-shaped compartments filled with 
patterns of red and yellow blossoms and green leaves. 

lUuatrated DiamtUr. 13% inch**. 

141 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with an 
ivory-white crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated in colors 
and enamels. The centre is occupied by an octagonal medallion formed by 
a broad line of translucent blue and filled with a pattern of flowers and 
leaves in greens, dark blue and red enamel. From each angle of the oc- 



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tagon blue lines radiate to the edge, dividing the deep rim into eight spade- 
shaped panels which are filled with patterns of green fruit forms with sprays 
of red flowers. 

Illustrated DtanuUr. ISH ineh^. 

142 — Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with an 
ivory-white crackle glaze, with a polychromatic overglaze decoration in en- 
amels. The centre is occupied with a pattern of a centre rosette, sur- 
rounded by six smaller rosettes in red and yellow with blue leaves. The rim 
is decorated with panels of white reserves with patterns of red and yellow 
flowers and green foliage on a ground of dark blue imbrications over a 
light blue filling. 

lUtutrated Diam*i0r. ia% <»&«.. 

148 — ^Deep Pi^te 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a 
very fine ivory-white crackled glaze stopping just short of the base, and 
decorated in blue overglaze. The centre is occupied by a medaUion with 
the bust portrait of a woman painted in blue and seen in three-quarter view. 
She wears a very voluminous turban-hke headdress and is surrounded by a 
background of oak leaves in white reserve on a blue ground. The medallion 
is bordered by a scroll work pattern in blue, outlined in dark blue with a 
filling of a darker blue. A curious interest attaches to this plate in that 
the face, which is very carefully drawn, yet lacks a mouth. In all these 
Koubatcha portraits the mouth is, as a rule, merely indicated by two small 
strokes, but its entire omission, evidently a purposeful one, is interesting. 

Illustrated Diamtt«r, ISy, ineht*. 



PERSIAN AND MESOPOTAMIAN FAIENCES OF THE 
EIGHTH TO THE FOURTEENTH CENTURIES 

144— Vase 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Beaker-shaped, 
with narrow cylindrical neck. Covered with a very fine blue crackled vitreous 



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...ig the deep riti. 
.lUerns <if ^rt-on friiji i 



i-iience of tin Sixteenth C' 
...a.c, with a poiv Ir-^'H-^'-r ■ 
■ )i occupied with ii \ -.'.:. 
Her rosettfs in in] ,., ' ;. 
■ >: panels of white rev i;i . •-.. - . 
It'll foliage on a gmiiJ") ■•! I- '■ 
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,...11. Koiibateha raitri.-t-..f ttiL- .^.^i,,■r.th Cent;.,-. tu-.t-i.-l .■.; . 
iiiLf ivory-white crackici! vi-i^'" '■i 'I'i'i'iK just -.. i i.l' the Im - 
■ 'ltd in l»hie overglaze. 1 i.f <rtihe is (m;ii;iii' •! '\ a inedallii:' 
■ l.fist portrait of a uoinan [(.iiir.cd in bhie and sti.!! >\i {Iij*-e-quar1< . \ 
■■■■ wears a very vohuiiiiin'is Imi-i'i-like hcjidilr. s-. afl :^ >inrround.il 
■■■I'jkgroinid of oitk li aM s iii v.'ljite rt-si jvt nn a blue ;i:-.iin.i. The ni(..l-'' 
i8 bordered by a $rvu]i wmk pattern in Miie, oiilliiT.t in .b.rk blue »v;i 
tilling of a (linker Lmi- . A ciiri'His interest attaches t.) nils plate in :!..■ 
the face, wliich is ve:\ iMirTnliy )lrawn, yt-t Lieks a mouth. In all thex. 
Koubatcha portraits the- rnontli is, m a rtde, merely inll-ated by two sma". 
strokes, but its entire omission, evidenlly a piirpostful one, is interesting. 
Illustrated Diam'Ur. is-, .«a,. 



IKRSfAN AM) MESOPOTAMIAN FAIENCES OF THE 

Eicnrn lo the fourteenth centuries 



.id faience of the Fouiteenth Century. Beaker-shape.i, 
! K'al neck. Covered willi a very fine blue crackled vitreoi's 



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glaze stopping short of the base and running into large drops. Decorated 
with a leaf-shaped spot of greenish glaze on the body. Absolutely unaf- 
fected by immurement. Height, 4,% incku. 

Q Sultanabad, formerly the capital of one of the eastern provinces of Persia, 
was during the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries noted for the quality 
and beauty of decoration of its faience. It is, however, only of recent years 
that these finer products of the Sultanabad atehers have found their way into 
European collections. It is esteemed as almost on an equality with the faiences 
of Rakka and Rhages. 

145 — ^BowL 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Coupe-shaped. 
Covered with a turquoise-blue finely crackled glaze stopping short of the 
foot and decorated overglaze in black enamel. The interior is occupied with 
an interlaced pattern in fine lines of blue reserve, forming a hexagonal 
star-shaped centre, with an outer border of interlacements. Around the 
upper flat surface of the rim is a line of blue reserve. The black enamel has 
been allowed to flow over the rim and down the exterior in irregular lines. 

Height, 3% inchet; diameter, 6 inchti. 
146 £WEB WITH Ha14DLE 

Persian. Semi-porcelainous faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear- 
shaped, with flaring neck and twisted handle. Covered inside and out with 
a fine cream-colored glaze. The exterior is covered with an uneven overglaze 
of purplish hue. 

Height, 3% imehee. 

147 — Smail Plate 

Persian. Semi-porcelainous lustred faience of the Sixteenth Century. Cov- 
ered entirely with a very fine white glaze, decorated overglaze in copper 
lustre. The centre is occupied with a design of cypress trees, flowers and 
leaves. Around the inner rim runs a band of spiral ornamentation. 

Diameter, S% inehe*. 

148 — Ewer with Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with wide cylindrical neck and round curved handle. Covered with a tur- 



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quoise-blue vitreous glaae stopping short of the foot in large drops, and with 
an underglaze decoration of black. Around the body are traces of a panelled 
pattern with scrolled ornaments in black line, and around the neck is a 
Cufic inscription. Coated almost entirely with a very fine silvery patina of 
an iridescent character, running to coppery reds and golden reflections. 

HHgkt, 6 inchu. 

Q The Mesopotamian city of Rakka, situated on the Biver Euphrates, be- 
tween Aleppo and Bagdad, is historically interesting as having been the 
seat of government and the residence, when he forsook Bagdad, of the Caliph 
Harun-er-Rachid, better known to us as the Haroun al Kaschid of the 
"Arabian Nights." At the courts of the Caliphs the arts always flourished, 
and we have the evidence of contemporary writers that this was the case at 
Rakka. For long, however, all that was known to the Western World of 
Rakka faience were the fragments of cups, vases and plates brought westward 
by Armenian merchants, and evidently the refuse of the potters* kilns of the 
ancient city. It was M. Joseph Tabbagh who a score of years ago first intro- 
duced to the Museums of Europe this beautiful ware, rendered even more 
beautiful by the patina of gleaming silver which long immurement has added 
to well-nigh every piece. Technically this Rakka ware has been described by 
Professor Migeon as of a rather coarse white paste covered with a transparent 
siliceous glaze running into heavy drops at the foot and decorated in lustrous 
tones of blue and purplish brown, with Cufic inscriptions, elementary foliage 
and conventional llower-forms. 

149 — ^BowL 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. The centre is dec- 
orated in gray and black enamels on a ground of white glaze, with a pattern 
of two long-tailed birds having a background of foliage in green and blue 
enamels. The border is of an imbricated pattern in black. The reverse is 
decorated with a pattern of dashes of blue and hues of black enamels. Very 
slight restoration at rim. 

Htight, 3% inckti; dianMltr, 9 Inc&O. 

150 — Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Covered with a 
thick vitreous greenish-white glaze stopping short of the base and running 
into heavy drops. Decorated with a pattern in blue and black overglaze. 
Almost entirely coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Hrigit, 1% ineh*$; (HanM(«r, A% ineh*t. 



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151 — ^EWEB WITH HaI^DLE 

Persian. Sultanabad fiuence of the Fourteenth Century. Bottle-shaped, 
with slightly flaring neck and curved handle. Decorated with a thick tur- 
quoise-blue glaze, leaving part of the base exposed and ornamented with a 
pattern in black of vertical panels of scroll work. Partially coated with a 
sdlvery iridescence due to inunurement. Handle and portion of rim restored. 

Height, T^ inehei 

152— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with tapering cyUndrical neck and rim. Covered with a cream-colored 
vitreous glaze stopping short of the base and decorated underglaze in blue. 
Around the body is a broad band of scrolled and floral decoration, and 
around the neck a pattern of geometrical design. Partially coated with a 
golden patina of an iridescent character. 

HtigU, TK ineUi 

158 — Vase with Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Eleventh Century. Globular shape, 
with wide rim with lip and two flat loop handles. Covered with a thick 
greenish-blue glaze stopping short of the base with heavy drops, and dec- 
orated with horizontal incised hnes around the base and rim. Partially 
coated with a silvery patina. 

H^gXt, 8 %nc\**. 

164— Bowi. 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Twelfth Century. Straight sides and in- 
curred rim. Covered with an irory-white glaze stopping short of the base 
and decorated as to the interior with a pattern formed by double-crossed 
bars of blue and green, the spaces between being filled with arabesque pat- 
terns in blue and black overglaze. The reverse is decorated with a ^g-zag 
border and double vertical Unes of blue and black. 

EMg\t, 3% tMftM; MamtUr, T% ituskt*. 

155 — EwEE WITH Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Fear-shaped body, 
long neck with pinched lip and flat, straight handle. Covered inside and 



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out with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and 
running into heavy drops below. Traces of a pattern in black around the 
body. Coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Baigkt, IVt iiMAM. 

156— Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Straight flaring 
sides. Covered with a heavy turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the 
base and decorated with a pattern of black line overglaze. The interior en- 
tirely, and the exterior partially, coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Height, SYt inektt; dia7n«t»r, T/^ ineht: 

157 — Vase wfth Handles 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Amphora-shaped, 
with wide cylindrical neck and three flat curved handles. Covered with a 
thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and running 
into heavy drops. Coated with a fine silvery patina. 

Height, nYt inehet; diamtter, 9% inch*: 

158 — Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Ra,kka faience of the Twelfth Century. Open form with 
straight side. Covered with a thick Persian blue vitreous glaze stopping 
short of the base and running into thick drops, and decorated overglaze 
with a pattern in black of radiating hnes forming panels filled with a leaf 
ornamentation. Partially coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Height, aiy, itichee; diameter, %% inchte. 

159 — Vase with Handles 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Globular form, with 
wide mouth and two flat handles. Covered inside and out with a fine tur- 
quoise-blue crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated over- 
glaze with a pattern in black lines of palmettes around the body. An inscrip- 
tion in cursive characters runs around the neck. 

Height, Va i*ek*t. 

160 — EwEE WITH Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
cylindrical neck, spout-shaped lip and fiat handle. Decorated with a coat- 



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ing of thick turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and with an 
overglaze ornamentation of a pattern in black. Almost entirely covered 
with a silvery iridescence. Handle restored. 

Bright, 0% inehtt. 

161 — Vase with Handle 

Babylonifui faience of the Eighth Century. Oviform body, with wide 
tapering cylindrical neck and two flat ear-shaped handles. Covered entirely 
with a thick blue glaze showing signs of an overglaze decoration of black lines. 
Around the body are vertical shallow flutings, which on each side are ar- 
ranged in a conventional feather-like pattern. Coated with a yellowish patina. 

Bright. II jmAm. 

162— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Damascus faience of the Twelfth Century, Cylindrical 
shape, with narrow neck. Covered with a vitreous greenisb-white glaze 
stopping short of the base. Decorated, both over and underglaze, with -a 
roughly drawn scroll pattern around the neck and lower part of the body. 

Bright, IS^ inchM. 

168 — Watee Ewee 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Bulbous-shaped 
body, with cylindrical neck, straight spout and flat curved handle. Covered 
with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and 
running into heavy drops below. Coated vrith a silvery iridescent patina. 

HMffkt, 1 hK^ui. 

164— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Covered with a 
fine white vitreous glaze, with a decoration in dark green, blue and black 
overglaze. The centre of the interior is occupied with a six-lobed pattern of 
green and blue interlacements. Around the interior rim is a broad border 
of panels formed by blue lines with the upper spaces filled with black dots. 
Around the reverse is a pattern of vertical hnes. 

'^''■^i-'^'-Z? •'■^'!' * ■ ■ Bright, 4 fMftM; (HiHMMr, 8% fiwfeM. 



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165 — Jug with Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
wide cylindrical neck having a spout-shaped rim and round handle, with 
projecting thumh-piece. Decorated with a coating of thick turquoise-blue 
glaze which extends over the base. Almost entirely covered with a silvery 
iridescence. Handle restored. 

Btifht, 9% imAm. 

166— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Straight flaring 
sides. Covered with a coating of turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the 
base. The interior is decorated with a scroll pattern in black line, divided 
into four panels by bands of reticulated pattern. The reverse is decorated 
with vertical lines which simulate flutings. 

Httgkt, 3^ tnetur; 4imiut»r, B% tedkM. 

16T— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faVence of the Eleventh Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with wide tapering cylindrical neck, covered with a turquoise-blue vitreous 
glaze stopping short of the base and decorated overglaze in black. Around 
the upper part of body runs a band of Cuflc inscription in panels and a 
pattern of vertical dashes. 

BMgkt. 7K fwhM- 

168 — Ewer with Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Tenth Century. Fear-shaped, with 
wide neck and curved handle. Covered with a fine turquoise-blue vitreous 
glaze stopping short of the base in thick drops and decorated, overglaze, in 
black. The body is surrounded by vertical panels of black hues filled with 
a pattern of scrolls and dots. Around the neck are bands of dentated and 
scroU pattern, and a panelled pattern filled with scrolled and dotted work. 
Partially coated with a silvery patina which runs to a coppery lustre around 
tile neck. 

HMgkt, 8 inchM. 

169— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Conventional 
mosque-lamp form, with foot, cylindrical neck and wide spreading rim. 



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Covered with a greenish-white vitreous glaze stopping short of the foot and 
decorated with a pattern in dark blue. Around the body is a band of 
scrolled, floral and leaf ornamentation having above it a band of conventional 
scroU and meander pattern. The exterior of the spreading rim is decorated 
with a pattern of pointed leaf forms and the interior with fleurettes arranged 
symmetrically. Partially coated with a silvery iridescent patina, which, how- 
ever, allows the decoration to be clearly seen. 

B0igkt, 7Vt inehst, 

170 — Vase with Handles 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Amphora-shaped 
body, with two flat curved handles. Covered inside and out with a thick 
vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and running into 
heavy drops. Coated with silvery patina. 

Htiglit, 9% fiukM. 

171— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Bulbous 
form, with cylindrical flaring neck. Covered with a thick vitreous glaze 
stopping short of the base and rmming into heavy drops below. Decorated 
in brown and blue overglaze, with a panneled pattern around the body and a 
band of zig-zag pattern around the neck. 

Htigkt, 7^ inehet. 

172 — Ewer with Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped body 
on foot, with narrow cylindrical neck having a disk-like rim attached to the 
round looped handle. Covered with a very fine turquoise-blue glaze stop- 
ping short of the foot and decorated with patterns in relief. Around the 
upper part of the body are rosettes in rehef of dots arranged in a circle 
around a centre. At the junction of the neck with the body is a broad band 
of Cufic characters in relief. Partially coated with a very fine silvery patina 
of an iridescent character. 

EMght, 9\i inek»t. 

178 — EwEE WFTH Spout and Handle 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped body 
with cylindrical bulbous neck, straight spout and flat handle. Covered with 



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a fine Persian blue vitreous glaze stopping short of the foot and decorated 
underglaze in black. Around the body is a pattern of foiir panels formed by 
heavy black lines and containing circular disks of sohd black; around the 
upper part is a band of Cufic inscription in black. A very slight patina ex- 
hibits itself in places, otherwise the ewer presents its original appearance. 

Btight, T inch**. 

174— Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Straight sides in- 
clined outward. Covered with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping 
short of the bottom and running into drops and decorated with a design in 
black line overglaze. Coated with a superb silvery iridescent patina. 
Slightly restored. 

Se^ht, i% inchM; diamtttr, 9% incht$. 

175 — Jug with Handle 

Syrian. Damascus faience of the Sixteenth Century. Globular shape, with 
cylindrical neck and curved round handle. Decorated on a ground of thick 
green glaze, which stops short of the base with a conventional floral pattern 
in red, gold and white. Around the neck runs an Inscription of cursive 
characters in gold and red. Perfect condition. From the Homberg Col- 
lection Sale in 1908. 

Htigkt, 6% inckt. 

176 — Vase with Handles 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Eleventh Century. Pear-shaped body, 
with wide cylindrical neck and two straight flat loop handles. Covered 
with a turquoise-blue vitreous glaze which stops short of the base. Coated 
with a most decorative iridescent silvery patina running into golden tones. 

Htlffkt. ineitt. 

177— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Straight sides in- 
clined outwards. Covered with a fine vitreous grayish glaze, with decora- 
tions in black and white enamels. The interior is occupied with a pattern of 
four birds with long tails conventionally treated and in white enamel so 
handled as to give the effect of modelling. The entire space between is fiUed 
with a conventional foliage treatment in black and white enamels. The ex- 



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terior is decorated with vertical flutings in heavy white enamel, having in 
the centre of each a pattern of a vertical stem with small buds. 

Blight. 4% tmekM,- diam»t*T, 10 inektt. 

178— Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Round foot 
and gauffered edge. Decorated in brown, blue and green on a ground of 
light green vitreous glaze. Around the interior runs a pattern of wave 
forms in green with green disks, an inscription of cursive characters in blue 
"By Patience you will Succeed," and a border of volute in brown. The ex- 
terior is decorated in a pattern of lines and spirals in brown. 

Btlgkt, S% InchM; diam*t4r, 7% foekM. 

179— Bottle 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
long cyhndrieal neck. Decorated on a foundation of dark blue thick glaze 
with an elaborate pattern, in gold, white and red enamels, of circular medal- 
lions divided by leafed branches, the entire ground being occupied with a 
pattern of scroll work in white on gold. The decoration has scaled off in 
places revealing the blue glaze beneath. Neck slightly restored. 

E*tght, 18^4 i»eh4t. 

180— Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages faience of the Twelfth Century. Curved side and 
high foot. Covered with a very beautiful turquoise-blue glaze; decorated in 
enamels having a fine crackle on the exterior and stopping short of the foot. 
The centre of the interior is occupied with a cross-legged seated figure of a 
woman in a red costume, decorated with a pattern of white lines. One hand 
is upraised, the other rests on her hip. The inner rim is decorated with 
four figures of women seated cross-legged, two with folded arms and two play- 
ing instruments. Between these figures are four ornaments of conventional 
foliage interlacements in red and gray. There is an outer border of black 
with panels of Cufic inscription in li^t gray. Around the exterior runs a 
Persiwi inscription in cursive characters of black. Has been slif^tly re- 

-ffjj^ H»{gkt, »^ IhoAm; OiamttfT, t% iMhM. 

Q Some twenty years ago the English artist, Henry Wallii, in hia impor- 
tant work on Persian lustred vases, first called attention to the lustred ware 
produced in the ateliers of Ray or Rhaget, lying a little to the nnth of 



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Teheran, a citj which in the Twelfth Century divided supremacy with Bag- 
dad, but fell in the Tartar invasion of the Thirteenth Century. More recently, 
Professor Gaston Migeon, of the Louvre, reasoned from the analogy of cer- 
tain small fragments in the British Museum that there must have been, anterior 
to the lustred ware of the Twelfth Century, a lustreless ware of exceptional 
character. Only three years ago the late M. Alexandre Tabbagh demonstrated 
the truth of M. Migeon's theory by his researches on the site of the buried 
city of Ray. He brought thence bowls, plate and vases, some of them abso- 
lutely intact, others, unfortunately, more or less damaged, which point to 
the existence at Ray, under the Sassanides, of a school of potters whose deco- 
rative sense, and whose technical skill have hardly been rivalled in the subse- 
quent history of the art It is to this unique group, disinterred from under 
the tumuli of drifted sand which alone mark the site of the former city of 
700,000 inhabitants, that this and the subsequent noteworthy examples of Ray 
faience belong. 



181— Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Eleventh Century. Fluted 
form, on stem, with scalloped edges. Polychromatic decoration of figures 
and patterns outlined in black, filled in with colored enamels in flat tints. 
The centre medallion contains a figure on horseback with dying birds sur- 
rounded by a border of conventional leaf forms and interlacements. The 
figure is in colors of blue, green, red, brown and black, and the border in 
green, red and blue. Around the exterior runs a Persian inscription in blue. 
Has been restored. 

Htight, 3% inch**; iiamtUr, 9 tuck**. 

182— Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Eleventh Century. Poly- 
chromatic decoration on a peacock blue ground of figures and patterns out- 
lined in black and filled in with colored enamels in flat tints of red and 
green. In the centre of the interior is a circular medaUion, bordered with a 
design of quatrefoils, of a Queen seated on her throne, with two attendants 
and two pheasant-like birds. Around the inner rim is a border of four 
scrolled ornaments and four figure subjects, each consisting of two seated 
figures. An inscription in Cufic characters is also here interwoven. Around 
the outer rim runs an inscription in cursive characters. Has been restored. 

H»tgkt, »% IwlUt; tUamtfr, 6^ inekt. 



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183 — Large Vase with Handles 

Iklesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Amphora-shaped, 
with cyHndrical neck and three flat cun-ed handles. Covered with a thick 
vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and running into 
heavy drops. Coated with an unusually decorative silvery patina. 

Height, 33^^ inchet; diameter, 15% inehu. 

184 — Labge Vase with Handles 
Similar to preceding. No. 188. 

185 — Tabouret ' 

Persian. Rakka faience of the Thirteenth Century. Of the conventional 
hexagonal shape, simulating wood-work in its design. Covered with a 
thick vitreous turquoise- blue glaze. The sides have panels above and below 
with Cufie and cursive inscriptions, and panels with a honeycomb pattern 
a jour in the centre. The lower panels bear an inscription which runs 
"Made by me, Mohammad Ali, in the year 652." This date corresponds to 
the year 1254 of the Christian era. The entire talmuret is covered with a 
beautiful silvery iridescent patina. Has been slightly repaired. 
Illustrated 

Height. 17 inrhfu'iMdth of lop, 13% inchei. 



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THE PERSIAN ART OF MINIATURE PAINTING 

Though, in our acceptation of the word, the Persians had no well developed 
Schools of Painting, the graphic arts were by no means neglected by them. Their 
energies in this direction were merely confined to one channel, the art of Minia- 
ture-painting or Book-illustration. But within this self-prescribed limitation their 
art was supreme. Of the calligraphy and illumination with which their manu- 
scripts of Poems, Tales and Legendary Histories were adorned, this is not the 
place to speak. The miniatures, however, which illustrated these volumes, now so 
jealously treasured in the world's great Ubraries, have an interest entirely their 
own. They are the product of one or other of the three great schools of paint- 
ing, which in Persia succeeded each other from the beginning of the Thirteenth 
to the end of the Seventeenth Century, corresponding to the three great dy- 
nasties which ruled the land of Iran during the five centuries — Mongolian, the 
Timuride and the Sefevoean. The initial influence of the Mongolian conquerors 
persisted so strongly that almost to the last traces of it are evident in the work of 
the Persian artists, whose own individuality, however, was strong enough almost 
entirely to transform the models upon which they relied for their initial inspira- 
tion. In their supreme sense of pattern, in the decorative value of their effects 
of color juxtaposition, and above all in- their poetic feeling these Persian painters 
were a law unto themselves. Less appreciable perhaps, but artistically more val- 
uable was the Hindu influence which arrived with the Dynasty of Timur and his 
successors, while under the Sefevoean rulers, the art arrived at its climax, borrow- 
ing, not only from the Farther East, but from their western neighbors of the 
Mediterranean seacoast. Of some of the artists (and especially of those who 
flourished in the reign of Shah Abbas I, the Louis XIV of Persia) we know the 
name of Djahangir, for instance the brilliant pupil of the founder of the school, 
Oustad, and of the great Behzad of Herat, to whom was given the name of 
Kemal (of the Perfect), but for the most part we must be content to take these 
pictures with their mosaic-hke brilliancy of color, these delicate wash dravnngs, 
and these portrait studies so full of character, on their own merits. Nor are these 
merits hidden under a bushel. 



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PERSIAN MINIATURES, CHIEFLY FROM MANUSCRIPTS 
OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

186 — ^MlKIATUBE 

Indo-Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: In a palace court yard 
two bayaderes are dancing before the Shah and his guest, who sit on a pil- 
lared balcony fanned by two attendants. On a species of platform below 
them sit the musidans and an attendant who is filling a wine cup out of a 
blue porcelain flask. The courtiers sit on either side of the Shah. The 
dancing girls accompany their steps by castanets and are attended by two 
elderly females. Early Seventeenth Century. 

Bright, S% inehM; width, S<^ tttehM. 
187 — MiNIATUBE 

Persian. From the same Manuscript as preceding (No. 186). Painted in 
gold and colors. Subject: Interior of Palace with musicians playing before 
the Shah Ismail, and members of the harem looking out of windows at ade. 
Landscape background. Sated, 624 A.H. (1518 A.D.) and signed. 

Bright, nVt iifhtt; kngth, 7% JxftM. 

Q The Mahometan era, dated from the flight of Mahomet from Mecca to 
Medina, 16th July, 622 A.D. But as the year of the Hegira is a lunar wie, 
it never exactly corresponds with the year of the Christian era. 

188 — MiNIATUBB 

Persian. Subject: Combat in a landscape on the banks of a river, painted 
in gold and colors, between a shah on horseback and two lions and a tiger. 
Framed. From a manuscript dated 958 A.H. (1551 A.D.) 

Bright. iVt inchti; width, *% 1n«Km. 
189 — ^MiNIATUBE 

Persian. From a Manuscript. Fiunted in gold and colors. Subject: Court 
yard of palace with landscape as background. Before him, the seated Shah 
Ismail, is laid the dead body of a prince. The courtiers and the Shah him- 
self are in attitudes of grief. Framed. Dated, 924 A.H. (1518 A.D.) and 
signed. ' 

Bright, 10^ i»eku; width, 1% {imAm. 



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190 — MlNIATUKE 

Indo-Fersian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject arranged in two sepa- 
rate diTisions. In the upper panel are two oral portraits of a young bride 
and bridegroom. In the lower a dervish, clothed in a voluminous robe of 
transparent gold embroidered muslin and adorned with bracelets, rings and 
necklaces, receives the homage of a young man In a dress of rich red with 
gold embroidered turban and girdle. The background is occupied by a 
blue sky with cloud effects in white of unusual treatment. Signed. Sev- 
enteenth Centiuy. 

HHgkt. 6 inelui; width, 3 Utokt*. 



-MiNIATUBE 

Indo- Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: Two ladies in a gar- 
den with a flock of peacocks. Background, a grove of trees. A lake in the 
foreground. Framed. Seventeenth Century. 

Htiffht, S% tnektt; vMth, 6% (wAm. 



-MmiATOEE 

Indo-Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: A hermit seated on 
a tiger skin in front of his cell, overshadowed by a tree. In the foreground 
a pool with lotus flowers. Peacocks and other birds. Backgroimd, a rocky 
landscape with partridges. Heavy cloud effect in blue sky. Framed. 
Seventeenth Century. 



198 — MiKIATUSE 

Indo-Persian. Painted in gouache with heightening of gold. Subject: 
An Indian fakeer in a rocky landscape seated on a tiger skin in front of 
his cell, which is of wood, under the shade of a tree. In the background 
partridges and other birds are seen among the rocks, while in front of the 
saint are peacocks, flamingoes, ducks in pairs. The foreground is occupied 
by a pool of water with lotus flowers and leaves. Seventeenth Century. 

Httgkt, liMfcM; vMtk. a% JiMshM. 



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194 — ^MlMIATUBB 

Persian. Fainted in gold and colors from a Manuscript. Subject: A game 
of polo with four players and a row of spectators in tlie backgroimd. From 
a manuscript dated 956 A.H. (1551 A.D.) 

Mttfht, 6% JnoAm; vidth, 4^ imekst. 

1 95 — Miniature 

Persian (Mongol school). Painted in a wash of India ink. Subject: A 
lion secured hy a collar and chain. Signed and dated. Sixteenth Century. 

HMffkt, 6% laelUt; wUth. 1\ tmdui. 
196 — ^MlNUTUKE 

Indo-Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: Portrait of a lady hold- 
ing a porcelain cup. Landscape bacl^round. Illuminated border. Framed. 
Seventeenth Century. 

Ht^ht. TH imeh4$; width, sy, laek4$. 
197 — ^MlNIATUEE 

Persian. Painted in a Sepia wash. Subject: A mythical monster, fomied 
like a dragon with human hands, attacking a camel. Mounted on a sheet 
of paper illuminated with an elaborate arabesque pattern in gold and 
colors. 

HMgkt. * iMohw; iMth. 4 tmelm. 
198 — MlNIATUSE 

Persian. From same Manuscript as preceding (No. 197). Painted in gold 
and colors. Subject: The funeral of two dead warriors attended by the 
Shah and a crowd of mourners. Dated, 958 AH. (1551 A.D.) 

Bright, 0% incktt; vMti. t^ hxA-. 
199 — MiMIATUBE 

Persian. From same Manuscript as preceding (No. 198). Painted in gold 
and colors. Subject: Palace court yard with company of musicians play- 
ing before the Shah and Malek (or Queen). Through openings at either 
side are seen the members of the harem. Signed and dated, 924 A.H. 
(1518 AD.) 

Bttght, 11% imehtt; vtdth. 7% tmoh-. 



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200 — MiNIATUBE 

Indo-Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: On the marble paved 
terrace of a Palace two Bayaderes, one Hindu and one Persian, are danc- 
ing with clasped hands. They are costumed in the typical dress of their 
class, embroidered tights covering the lower limbs from the ankles upward, 
the rest of the body swathed in folds of filmy draperies. Two trees of 
heavy foliage synunetrically placed rise at the edge of the terrace with three 
slender flowering shrubs in full blossom; beyond these again stretches a 
lawn-like expanse of greenery fading at the extreme top of the picture into 
a sky of grays and purples. 

A peculiar species of opalescence is imparted to this little miniature by the 
skiUful appositions of its low-toned color scheme, giving it a special signifi- 
cance among the works of its school. Seventeenth Century. 

Height, 7% inehtt; vMlA, t% inch**. 



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SECOND AFTERNOON'S SALE 

TUESDAY, MARCH 7th. 1911 

AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 

BEGINNING AT 2.80 O'CLOCK 

BOKHARAN FAIENCE OF THE SEVENTEENTH 
CENTURY 

201 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faTence of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
thick vitreous white crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated, 
overglaze, with enamel colors of blue, green and brown. In the centre a 
circular medallion filled with alternate squares of blue and white reserves, 
and surrounded by an eight-rayed pattern of leaf forms in blue, with ro- 
settes of alternate green and brown with white reserves in the triangular 
spaces. A border of green dentations and an outer border of alternate 
squares of blue and white reserve ornament the rim. 

DbmtUr, IS imehst. 



202 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
vitreous ivory-white crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated 
overglaze with enamel colors of blue and brown. In the centre is a cir- 
cular medallion Med with a chequered pattern of blue lines with brown 
fleurettes. The rim is decorated with a chequer pattern of alternate blue 
and white squares, the white reserves having small brown fleurettes. The 
reverse of the rim has a roughly drawn pattern of leafage in alternate blue 
and brown. 



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20S— Platb 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Centuiy. Corered with a 
white vitreous glaze and decorated, overglaze in blue, brown and green. The 
centre is occupied with a palm-leaf figure in brown, green and blue sur- 
rounded by a scroll pattern in blue. The rim is decorated in a chequered 
pattern of squares of white reserve and blue. 

Diamtttr, 14 iHthtt. 



204 — Deep Plate 

Persian faience of the Seventeenth Century. Heavy semi-porcelainous body 
covered entirely with a thick celadon glaze. The decoration is confined to 
a simple fluting of the sides. An interesting attempt to reproduce a Chinese 
porcelain model of the school of celadon glazes which were so eagerly ac- 
quired by the Persian nobles and rulers of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. 

DiamtUr. IS trndut. 



206 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white vitreous crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated, over- 
glaze, in blue, with touches of brown. The centre is occupied with a pat- 
tern, transversely divided, of asters on carved stems, with serrated lancet- 
shaped leaves. The rim has a double scrolled border in blue. 

JMamtUr, 13^ iacJUi. 

206 — Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered, stopping 
short of the base, with a greenish-white vitreous glaze, with an overglaze 
decoration in blue and black. In the centre is a fish-shaped space com- 
pletely filled with a pattern of rosette-like flowers, the remainder of the 
ground being occupied with blossoms of hyacinths and tulips. The inner 
rim has a border of drcles in white reserve on a blue ground. The reverse 
of the rim is decorated with four roughly drawn scroll ornaments in blue. 

DiamvUr. 19^ i»cku. 



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207 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
greenish-white crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated over- 
glaze in blue, green and brown. The centre is occupied with a pattern of 
mauresque design in white reserve on a blue ground. Around the rim is a 
chequered pattern in blue, brown and green. The reverse is decorated with 
a band of dentated ornamentation in blue and brown and with palm leaves 
in blue and brown arranged symmetrically. 

DIameUr, IS IwiAm. 

208 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar, Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white crackled glaze stopping short of the base and decorated in blue, green 
and brown enamels. The centre is occupied with an arabesque pattern of 
mauresque design in white reserve, outlined in brown on a blue ground with 
fillings of brown. Around the inner rim is a chequered pattern in white 
reserve and blue, and a meander pattern in green and blue. The reverse is 
decorated with bands of scrolled and dentated ornamentation in blue and 
brown. 

Diamtttr, li ittehtt. 

209 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white glaze with an overglaze decoration in cobalt blue of a very unusual 
double scrolled pattern with closely set rosette-like flowers and trefoil leaf 
forms. The rim is decorated with a scroll pattern in green. The reverse, on 
a groimd of white crackled glaze stopping short of the base, is decorated 
with a rough pattern of radiating shapes in brown and blue. 

DkaiuUr, 17% tnehti. 

210 — ^Deep Plate 

Tartar. Bokharan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
white vitreous glaze and decorated overglaze with blue, brown and green 
enamels. The centre is occupied with a pattern of blossoms of asters and 
peonies and foliage, the border with a meander pattern in white reserve on 



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a blue ground. The reverse is covered with the white glaze stopping short 
of the base and decorated with a roughly drawn pattern in brown and 
green. 

IHam4Ur, 1S% iucXtt. 



KASCHAN AND DIARBEKIR FAIENCES OF THE 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

211 — EwEB WITH Handle 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Bottle shape, with 
cylindrical neck, long spout and round curved handle. Covered with a 
turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and decorated overglaze in 
black with a pattern of floral sprays and patched line work. 

SMgkt, 6% iitehM. 

212— Vase 

Kurdistan. Diarbekir faience of the Seventeenth Centiuy. Globular form, 
with tall cylindrical neck. Covered entirely with a fine turquoise-blue 
crackled glaze running over the base in drops. 

Bright, 9\ ittolm. 

218 — Vase 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Globular-shaped, 
with cylindrical neck. Covered with a white vitreous glaze stopping short 
of the base in heavy drops and decorated in black and blue. Around the 
body is a pattern of quatrefoiled panels with centre rosettes in blue and 
green, outlined in black and divided by sprays of conventional foliage. 
Around the upper part at the junction of the rim with the body a pattern 
of large leaves in white reserve on a blue ground. 

Bright, BVi incAM. 

214— Vase 

Persian. Kasehan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Gallipot shape. 
Covered with a fine turquoise-blue glaze with an overglaze pattern in black 
line of birds, rosettes and conventionalized fiowers. 

Bright, 1% inehM. 



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215— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Oviform shape, with 
lipped rim. Corered with an ivory-white glaze with an overglaze decora- 
tion in blue of conventionalized fruit trees and bird forms. A broad band 
of trefoil pattern in reserve on a blue ground below the rim. 

Bttfht, Iiy4 iuetui. 

216 — ^Vase with Handles 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Bulbous body with 
high flaring neck, one large flat handle and three small loop handles. Cov- 
ered with a thick vitreous glaze stopping short of the base and decorated 
overglaze in black, blue and green, with a pattern of large blossoms, buds 
and leaves. 

Bright, UK {mcAm. 

217— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Oviform shape, with 
high neck. Covered with a thick vitreous ivory-white glaze stopping short 
of the base and decorated overglaze in blue, with a Pavilion having a branched 
and fohaged tree on either side, and with a rectangular panel having a 
roughly drawn bust portrait of a man in full face. Around the rim a border 
of arched panels filled with a medallion ornamentation. 

Ht^ht. 11 ImAm. 

218— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
cyhndrical neck. Covered with a clouded brown and white vitreous glaze 
decorated in dark brown lines. Around the body is a chequered pattern of 
waved lines, the diamond-shaped spaces filled with roughly drawn quatre- 
foils. There is a border of a similar pattern at the junction of the rim with 
the body. 

Bright, 10 i»ckn. 

219— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped, with 
cyhndrical neck. Covered with a yellowish clouded glaze decorated over- 
glaze in blue and black. Arowid the body is a pattern of curved lines in 



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black, forming heart-shaped paneb and occupied by quatrefoiled rosettes 
of light blue enamel. Around the neck is a pattern of leaf forms in blue 
with black hues. 

Bttght, ID teokM. 

220— Bowl 

Persian. Easchan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Straight sides, In- 
chned outward. Covered with a fine turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of 
the base, with an overglaze decoration in black. In the centre is a pattern of 
radiating panels filled with a roughly drawn looped pattern. The sides of 
the interior are ornamented with a pattern of vertical arched panels filled 
with simple leaf forms. The exterior is decorated with similar panels and a 
border of a crossed pattern. Has been slightly repaired. 

Htigkt, A% inc\tt; dUututtr, lOVi tnek4i. 

221 — Sheebeet Bottle 

Kurdistan. Diarbekir faience of the Sixteenth Century. Pear-shaped. Cov- 
ered with a fine white glaze and decorated overglaze in rich blue, with a 
scrolled pattern of peony blossoms and leaves, having below a panelled bor- 
der and above a border of trefoiled mauresque character. Mounted with a 
rim, spout and lid of brass having a repousse pattern. 

Bright, 1« inch**. 

222— Vase 

Persian. Easchan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Elongated pear- 
shaped body. Covered with a brownish crackled vitreous glaze. Decorated 
overglaze in indigo-blue and brown lines. Around the body are disks out- 
lined in brown and overlapping so as to form a pattern of intrications. In 
the centre of each is an eight-rayed figure dotted with blue. Around the 
rim runs a chequered pattern of brown lines with blue quatrefoils at the 
intersections. 

Htigkt, IS tnehg*. 

228 — Vase with Handles 

Persian, Easchan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Oviform shape, with 
bulbous neck and four handles (one missing). Covered with a white vit3«- 



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ous glaze stopping short of the bottom and decorated, overglaze, in black, 
blue and green, with a pattern, around the body, of a three blossomed 
flower arranged in quatrefoiled panels and in the spaces between. The neck 
and upper part of body have a pattern of the same blossoms arranged in 
pairs. 

Bright, 1S7^ AmAm. 

224— Vase 

Persian. Kaschan faience of the Seventeenth Century. Pear-shaped body. 
Covered with a clouded brownish crackled vitreous glaze, decorated in blue 
enamels. The body has a pattern of three stemmed floral forms of blue dots, 
and around the upper portion at its junction with the rim a band of scroll 
pattern in blue dots. The rim is solid blue. 

BMffht, 9Y, ituAtt. 

225 — ^Laboe Vase 

Persian. Kaschan ffuence of the Sixteenth Century. Oviform shape. Cov- 
ered with a white glaze unevenly distributed, having an overglaze decora- 
tion of landscape subjects and pagodas roughly outlined in black and filled 
in with a work of a lighter tone of greenish black. The strong Chinese in- 
fluence displayed in the decoration is noticeable. 

Hrifkt, Uyt inekti. 



226 — Laboe Vase with Handi^es 

Kurdistan. Diarbekir fiuence of the Seventeenth Century. Club-shaped, 
with two flat curved handles. Covered with a fine turquoise-blue glaze, 
stopping slightly short of the base. One handle restored. 

Bmg\t, 86 Imeht*. 

227 — Vase 

Kurdistan. Diarbekir faience of the Seventeenth Century. Oviform shape, 
with tipped rim. Decorated in a single firing with a double glazing, the 
under coat of bluish-white and the outer coat of cobalt blue applied so as 
to present a mottled effect. The Chinese influence is apparent. 

Bright, SH i»eht». 



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RHODIAN FAIENCE OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

228 — CiBcuLAB Plate 

Saracenic Rhodiar faience of the Sixteenth Century, with polychromatic 
decoration. The centre is occupied with a design of tulips and peonies in 
red and blue enamels and of serrated leaves in green enamels. The border 
is of reserved panels with green leaf forms divided by a pattern of spirals on 
a blue groimd. The reverse is decorated with spirals and scrolls in blue 
and brown arranged symmetrically. 

lUmtrated Dtamtur, 10% tntu*. 

229 — Plate 

Saracenic. Rhodian faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a fine 
white glaze with polychromatic overglaze decorations in enamels. The cen- 
tre is occupied with a palmette-shaped medaUion having a blue ground, with 
a floral design in reserves of white and green and red enamels. This is sur- 
rounded by a border of green imbrications with flowers in white reserve. 
The rim is decorated with a border, black and blue spirals on the white 
ground. The reverse has a pattern of blue and green fleurettes arranged sym- 
metrically. 

lUuatrated i>i^m»ur. 11% i»«»«. 

280— Plate 

Saracenic. Rhodian faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a fine 
white glaze with polychromatic decorations, overglaze, in enamels. The centre 
is occupied by a palmette-shaped medaUion with flowers in white reserve and 
red enamel on a green ground. This is surrounded by two lancet-shaped ser- 
rated leaves in green springing from a common base and by two sprays of 
corn-flower in blue. The rim is decorated with a border of black spirals on 
a dark blue ground. The reverse has a pattern of spirals and fleurettes of 
blue and green outlined in black and arranged symmetrically. 

Illustrated Dtam»t*r, n% inekM. 

281— Plate 

Saracenic. Rhodian faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a fine 
white crackle glaze and decorated overglaze with enamel colors of red, green 



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and black. The centre is occupied with a palmette of red and green and 
floral branch motiTes with cinquefoil flowers in white reserve with red cen- 
tres springing from lancet-shaped leaves. The border is decorated with an 
imbricated trefoil pattern in white reserve on a blue ^und with centres of 
red enameL 

lUugtrated zMmmiw, iivi ibcAm. 

282 — Plate 

Saracenic. Rhodian faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a fine 
white vitreous crackle glaze and decorated in the centre in enamel colors with 
a pattern of two double curved palm leaves outlined in black and reserved 
in white on a ground of a green imbricated pattern, enclosing a large pal- 
mette of white reserve with a red centre, also on a ground of green im- 
brications. The rim is decorated with a pattern of blue and black spirals on 
reserves of white. The reverse has a pattern of blue and green fleurettes 
arranged symmetrically. 

JUiutrated Dfam-Kr, 11% *-«*«. 



CAUCASIAN FAIENCE OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

288— Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a fine 
ivory-white crackled glaze. Decorated in the centre with a medallion por- 
trait of a man with a flat cap, shown in full face painted in dark green 
overglaze, within a circular border of blue and surrounded by sun-rays in yel- 
low, outlined in green. 

J>iam4UT, TK iMhM. 

284 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a 
fine ivory-white crackled glaze. Decorated in the centre with a medallion 
portrait of a man shown in full face painted overglaze in olive-green, within 
a circular border of dark blue and surrounded by sun rays of alternate 
green, brown and yellow outlined in green. 



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285 — Bowl 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. The centre is oc- 
cupied with a pattern of three flowers in blue and yellow with green leaves. 
The border is an imbricated pattern of brown lines with yellow touches on 
a ground of blue. 

Httgkt, 4 imehti; <Iiam<t#r, TVi faokM. 

286 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Daghestan fuence of the Seventeenth Century. Covered with a 
fine white crackled glaze. Decorated in a pattern of deep translucent blue 
overglaze. In the centre is a bare crouching beneath a flowering shrub, 
and surrounded by a deep border of floral medallions and floral scrolls. The 
outer rim is decorated with spirals on a ground of diagonal lines. The re- 
verse is decorated with a scrolled meander pattam. 

DiamtUr, l§% mkAm. 

287 — ^Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. The centre is oc- 
cupied, on a white ground, with a pattern in light and dark blue of birds and 
scrolls arranged zig-zag fashion and based on a Chinese motive. The border 
is in blue and the edge is scalloped. 

DliMMtM-, 13^ laehM. 

288 — BonLE 

Caucasian. Daghestan faience of the Sixteenth Century. Square shape, with 
short cylindrical neck. Decorated on a ground of pure white glaze on two 
sides with an elaborate pattern in brown and blue enamels of warriors on 
horseback, surroimded by floral motives and on two sides by a design of palm 
leaves symmetrically disposed. In perfect condition. 

Briffkt, lO^i iMtkM. 

289 — Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a 
fine white vitreous glaze stopping short of the base, with a polychromatic 
overglaze decoration in enamels. The centre is occupied with a pattern of 
four conventionalized flowers with blue centres and yellow leaves, four cin- 



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quefoiled flowers and four groups of green leaves. The rim is decorated 
with a ground of green imbrications on blue, a quatrefoiled pattern of 
white reserve on dark blue and six panels of white reserve. 

lUuttrated Diamtttr. 13 <<MkM. 

240— Plate 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a 
vitreous gray glaze stopping short of the base and decorated in white, red 
and blue enamels. The centre is occupied with a mauresque pattern of ro- 
settes and conventional leaf forms in red, blue and white with a border of 
arabesques in white and blue. The scalloped rim is decorated with a 
chequered pattern in red, blue and white. The reverse has a scroll border in 
white. From the Homberg Collection Sale. 1908. 

Illustrated OiamtUr. is ineht*. 

241— Plate 

Caucasian. Koubateha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Covered with a 
vitreous ivory-blue crackle glaze with polychromatic overglaze decorations in 
enamels. The centre is occupied with a large conventional floral medallion 
surrounded by a border of conventionalized floral design in a reserve of light 
blue on a black ground. The rim is decorated with a diamond pattern in 
reserves of light blue. Keverse is decorated with a scroll pattern in blue. 
Rim slightly restored. 

lUuatrated Diam»t»r, is ineku. 

242 — Deep Plate 

Caucasian. Koubateha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Circular form. 
Covered with a fine yellow crackled glaze. The centre is decorated over- 
glaze with a pattern of flowers and lancet-shaped serrated leaves in a tre- 
foil arrangement in dark blue, green, black and brown colors and red and 
white enamels. The border is decorated with an imbricated pattern out- 
lined in black and filled in with white enamel. The only decoration on the 
reverse consists of two fines of black. From the Homberg Collection Sale. 
1908. 

Illustrated DlamtUr, 14 ta«hM. 



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248 — ^BowL 

Caucasian. Koubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Straight sides in- 
clined outward. Entirely covered with a vitreous ivory-white crackled 
glaze. In the centre of the interior is a decoration painted in dark brown 
overglaze of a flowery shrub on the branches of which perches a nightin- 
gale with open beak. This decoration is encircled by a border of simple 
lines and a border of double lines encircle the inside edge of the rim. The 
exterior is treated with a very individual and unusual form of decoration. 
This consists of four diamond-shaped medaUion-like figures formed of four 
double scrolls enclosing a diamond-shaped figure with four star-like orna- 
ments at the points. These medallions are separated by a triple branched 
ornament of flowers and foUage rising from a disk-like base. All the or- 
namentation is in relief and in the glaze of the body, touched here and there 
with spots of blue enamel glaze, the background being formed by a black 
secondary glaze throwing the design into very strong and effective relief. 

Illustrated Bright, 4 inekt; tUamttw, 10% indtt*. 



FAIENCE TILES OF THE FOURTEENTH TO THE 
SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

241 — Panel of Tiles 

Persian. Sultanabad fuence of the Fourteenth Century. Of the charac- 
teristic "Star and Cross" shapes which fit together so as to form a C(»itinuous 
pattern. The stars are six-pointed, covered with a fine ivory-white glaze and 
decorated with a pattern in relief of primular blossoms and leaves arranged 
in a conventional pattern. The pattern is in white reserve on a black over- 
glaze painted ground. The crosses have pointed arms of equal length and 
are covered with a fine turquoise-blue glaze. The panel consists of six 
stars, two complete crosses, six half crosses and four quarter crosses, sixteen 
in all. 

BMgkt fter Mm, 7^ tmclut,- krifht oroM filM, 7% tmek*t. 

245 — FsAMED Panel of Tiles 

Caucasian-Eoubatcha faience of the Sixteenth Century. Panel consists of 
nine square tiles of two different patterns. Each tile is surrounded by a 



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border of an eight-poiBted figure in a red line with lancet-shaped leaves in 
blue filling the outer interstices. When placed in position these borders 
form a pattern of cross-shaped figures with blue centres outlined in red and 
with red circles at the intersections. Within these borders each tile has the 
portrait of a female holding a spray of flowers in her hand. In one case she 
is represented at three-quarter length in a red and blue costume and facing 
to the ri^t. In the other she is shown in bust length only in a blue robe 
with a voluminous turban and facing to the left. 

lUuttrated ^^ (."f "o* tue), ry, inehu. 

246 — Framed Panel of Tiles 

Syrian. Damascus fiuence of the Fourteenth Century. Panel consists of 
four large square tiles surrounded by a border consisting of four square and 
eight oblong tiles. The centre tiles are covered with a white glaze, deco- 
rated with a pattern painted overglaze in blue, green and brown enamel of 
a double curved band of rosettes in reserve on a blue ground; frames, 
branches of hyacinths, carnations and tulips, and a central convention^ 
floral motive in blue with a green centre. The border is of double pointed 
leaf forms in reserve on a blue ground, arranged so as to form triangular 
panels enclosing a flgure of a three-lobed flower form in white reserve. 
There is an outer narrow border of a "counter-change" pattern in green on 
a white ground. 

Illustrated S*"* of pan»l, SS JmKm by S9 inekw. 



PERSIAN AND MESOPOTAMIAN FAIENCE OF THE 
EIGHTH TO THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY 

i7 — BwEE WITH Handle 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Globular form, 
with cylindrical neck and round handle of rectangular form. Covered in- 
side and out with a fine turqumse-blue crackled glaze, stopping short of the 
base and decorated overglaze with a pattern in black line of scrolled me- 
dallions around the body and smaller medallions around the neck. 

Bftfht, <>4 ImAw. 



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248 — EwEE WITH Handle 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Fear-shaped, cy- 
lindrical neck, spout-shaped lip and flat handle. Decorated with a coating 
of thick peacock-blue glaze and with an overglaze ornamentation of a pat- 
tern in black. Almost entirely covered with a silvery iridescence. In per- 
fect condition. 

HMght, T% i»ekM. 



249— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad lustreless faience of the Fourteenth Century. Ground 
of vitreous turquoise-blue glazing. The interior is coated with a very heavy 
dark blue glazing with a pattern of five lines of reserve turquoise-blue. This 
secondary glazing is carried over the edge and in some places has been al- 
lowed with evident intention to run down the exterior in heavy gouttes. 
The exterior is of the pl^ turquoise glaze. 

Htigkt, 3% i%ehM; diamettr, %% melui. 



250 — Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Amphora-shaped, 
without handles. Decorated with a peacock-blue thick glaze stopping short 
of the base. Largely iridescent. Lip of neck slightly broken. 

Brig\t, 6^ hicAm. 

251— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad lustred faience of the Fourteenth Century. Covered 
with a fine white vitreous glaze, with an overglaze decoration of yellow and 
dark blue showing metallic reflections. The centre of the interior is occu- 
pied with an ornamentation of a quatrefoil design of interlacements in blue 
on a groimd of yellow with conventional leaf designs in reserves of white. 
Around the interior rim is a border of meander pattern on a ground of 
white reserves. The exterior is decorated with an inscription of cursive 
characters in blue and a pattern of scrolled lines in yellow. Has been 
broken and mended, but not restored. 

Bright, 9% imcAm; diamaetr, 0^ imchM. 



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252 — Deep Plate 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Decorated on a 
cream-colored ground with a central floral rosette in dark blue, green and 
brown surrounded by sprays of foliage in green and brown, and quatrefoil 
medallions in dark blue. A foHated border of green and blue lines and a 
scalloped border of blue, green and brown around the outer rim. Reverse 
decorated with medallions and leaf forms arranged symmetrically. Slightly 
iridescent. 

DIaneUr 9'/, inche: 

258 — CoutE 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Straight flaring 
sides. Decorated on a ground of thick white glaze in the centre with a 
spotted deer in reserve surrounded by leaf forms of green on a rich blue 
ground; the sides with a pattern of leaf forms and scrolls arranged in ver- 
tical panels. The reverse is decorated with dashes of dark blue _and black 
dots with lines of black. Partially covered with silvery iridescence. Rim 
slightly broken. 

Illustrated Diameter. 5% inchet. 

254 — Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Eleventh Century. Coupe- 
shaped, with straight sides. Covered with a turquoise-blue glaze decorated 
overglaze with colored enamels. The centre is occupied with a medallion pat- 
tern of red, white and gold soft enamels. Around the inner rim runs a 
band of panelled decoration formed of lines and filled with a scroll pattern 
of red, white and gold enamels. Aroimd the outer rim runs a band of in- 
scription of cursive characters in red enamels. Rim slightly restored. 

Height, S'/g incket; diamtttr, iy, inchtt. 

255 — Vase with Handles 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Globular body with 
cyhndrical neck and four handles. Decorated with a thick turquoise-blue 
glazing running in drops at the base, and with an inscription of cursive 
characters in black around the neck and body. Largely covered with a fine 
silvery iridescence. Two handles and part of neck restored. 

Illustrated ^•^i'*'- * '"**"■ 



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256 — Vase with Handles 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Centurj'. Pear-shaped body, 
with wide cylindrical neck and four flat looped handles. Covered with a 
fine turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the foot in large drops, and dec- 
orated in black. Around the body are traces of a panelled pattern formed 
by black lines. Around the rim runs an inscription in Cufic characters of 
black. Nearly entirely coated with an unusually fine silvery patina of an 
iridescent character. Handles restored. 

Illustrated B^ght, Sy, inche.. 

257 — Inkstand 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Thirteenth Century. Oblong shape 
covered with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze and decorated in relief 
with a conventional interlaced pattern. The centre panels of the longer 
sides are pierced in the form of a turned balustrading and the ends have cen- 
tre panels of a pierced chequer pattern. The inkstand has four cylindrical 
feet and the top has two circular depressions to receive the vessels contain- 
ing ink or color. Almost entirely covered with a superb silvery iridescent 
patina. One foot slightly restored. 

Illustrated 

Height, 9 inchea; width, 6Vi incbei; length, 13% inekt*. 



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258 — ^BOWL 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Curved flaring sides 
and flat rim. Covered with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping 
short of the base and decorated with a scrolled and floral pattern in black. 
Partially coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

Bright, aVt inek**; dlamtt»r. 10^ incht*. 

259 — Small Mosque Lamp 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Of the conventional 
lamp form with globular body and flaring neck. Covered with a thick 
vitreous glaze of turquoise-blue stopping short of the base and running into 
heavy drops. The body of the lamp is fluted, having in relief a reticulated 
pattern d demi jour, and three projecting loops to which the chains or cords 
for hanging purposes were attached. The entire surface is coated with a sil- 
very iridescent patina. 

Bright, a ImrhM. 



260— Dish 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Covered with 
a fine white vitreous glaze and decorated in enamel colors overglaze. The 
centre is occupied with a pattern of six-pointed stars in white reserve on a 
brown ground, with palm-leaf forms in white reserve. The rim is decorated 
vrith a panel of inscriptions of cursive characters in brown alternating with 
panels of a scroll pattern and dots, between two bands of plain blue. The 
outer rim has a band of roughly drawn scroll ornamentation in brown. 
Slight restoration to rim. 

BrifM, »Va tnehet; diatMtw, 8% iinih»t. 

261— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Curved sides. The 
interior is decorated on a groimd of turquoise vitreous glaze with a design 
of conventionahzed fish and palm leaves with floriated scrolls. The exterior 
is divided into four panels by upri^t stems spreading into leaf forms. In 
each panel is a flower-shaped medallion in black. 

Bright, 3Vt i'mht*; diamtltr, S% inOit. 



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262— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Centiury. Pear-shaped, with 
flaring rim. Decorated with a coating of turquoise-blue glaze. Nearly en- 
tirely coated with a fine silvery iridescence. 

Illustrated "•*'*'• '' *•***■ 

268— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Pear-shaped body 
with flutings, flaring neck with scalloped rim. Decorated with a very fine 
plain turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and without other 
ornamentation. Largely covered with a fine silvery iridescence. In perfect 
condition. 

Illngtrated "•^*'' «^ *»**«■ 

264 — ^Vase oh Bottle 

Persian. Sultanabad faience of the Fourteenth Century. Fear-shaped 
body with long cylindrical, slightly bulbous neck. Covered with a dense 
peacock-blue glaze with decorations of gold and of red and white enamels. 
The upper part of the body is decorated with a pattern of arabesque de- 
signs and with bands of gold and white scrolls with dots of red and horizontal 
lines of red. The lower portion has a fluted pattern of white lines. Neck 
slightly restored. 

Illmtrated ^•*?*'' "% *«**•■ 

265 — Sepulcheal Model 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Oblong shaped, 
with sides pierced with a pattern of lions and other animals. The interior 
is occupied by eight figures of men and women ranged around a circular 
table on which is displayed fruit, and which is flanked by two wine flasks. 
The whole is covered with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze. Largely 
coated with a silvery iridescent patina. 

HMght, S ineh4»; h»gtk. 6 IikAm; wtdtk, 4 inek**. 

266 — ^BowL 

Persian. Sultanabad lustred ffuence of the Twelfth Century. On a ground 
of bright yellowish glaze is an inscription around the inner edge of cursive 



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characters in blue, with a design of a scroll pattern and pahn leaves in yel- 
low. The exterior is treated with a design in panels of roughly drawn scrolls. 
Cracked and reptured, but not restored. 

Illustrated ^"3**' ^^ '"**"'■ «'*«"•'"«"■' »% '"**«■ 

267— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad lustreless faience of the Fourteenth Century. On a 
ground of blue vitreous glazing is a design in gold, white, red and black en- 
amels of four triangular-lobed figures filled with a pattern of spirals and 
disks with curved rays. The exterior is painted with white lines in a fluted 
effect. Slightly restored. 

Illustrated ^"i'*'' ^ii i«eha$; diamst^r, 6% »•«*»». 

268 — Tabouret 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Hexagonal shape 
standing on cylindrical feet, with flat top. Covered with a turqudse-blue 
glaze decorated with patterns in relief and pierced. The sides decorated 
with two bands of inscriptions, the upper one of Cufic the lower one of cur- 
sive characters. Between these are panels with a reUef and pierced design 
of a honeycomb pattern. Ogee-shaped brackets starting from the feet sup- 
port the sides. The top is ornamented with a relief and pierced design of 
six-pointed stars and honeycomb pattern and there are two projecting han- 
dles shaped as birds. Coaled with a silvery patina of an iridescent char- 
acter. Has been restored. 

Btight, 10 ittehtt. 

269 — Vase 

Persian. Sultanabad lustred faience of the Fourteenth Century. Albarello 
shaped, with incurved sides and wide mouth. Covered with a vitreous glaze 
of turquoise-blue, stopping short of the base with a simple decoration of 
plun horizontal bands in black. 

lUttstrated ^•'»*'' »» *"•*"• 

270 — Vahe 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Twelfth Century. Albarello-shaped 
and hexagonal with incurved sides and cylindrical rim and base. Covered 



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with a vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and running 
into heavy drops. Decorated with an overglaze ornamentation in black. 
Coated with an exceedingly fine nlvery iridescent patina. Bim slightly re- 
stored. 

BMgkt, 9^ tecAM. 

271— Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Melon- 
shaped. A beautiful vase of very unusual form. Decorated in brown on a 
ground of greenish vitreous glaze, with conventional fieur-de-Ug-hke forms 
symmetrically arranged and with vertical lines of brown between the fiut- 
ings. Slightly restored. 

lUuatrated Bright, t% jwAm. 

272 — Vase and Covee 

Mesopotamian. Rakka fuence of the Ninth Century. Goblet-shaped, with 
dome-shaped cover. Decorated on a ground of thick vitreous green glaze, 
with inscriptions of cursive characters in brown and blue overglazes. Shows 
a marked iridescence. Finial of cover restored. 

H tight, 6% ihcAm. 

278 — MosftUE Tile 

Persian. Bay or Rhages faience of the Eleventh Century. Coated entirely 
with an exceedingly fine stanniferous glaze of turquoise-blue with decora- 
tions in rehef, outlined in brown and gilded. A broad border with conven- 
tional Saracenic flower forms in high relief with a band of Cufic inscrip- 
tions occupies the lower portion. Above is a border of six-pointed stars in 
brown, outhned and gilded. Below a border of interlaced pattern in brown 
outhne and gilded. In the centre are two conventional interlaced leaf 
forms in brown outline and gilded. 

Bb4, 13% tncht tq»ar4. 
274 — EWEE 

Mesopotamian. Rakka faience of the Ninth Century. With handle and 
spout. Ground of blue vitreous glaze decorated in brown and dark blue. 
Inscription of cursive characters in brown, "Prosperity and glory are to be 



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preferred." Body divided into panels by lines of dark blue with a dark blue 
medallion in the eent3% of each. £nd of spout missing. Otherwise intact. 

Btfght, 1 inche*. 



275 — ^BOWL -ffTTH COTEE 

Mesopotamian. Bakka lustred faience of the Twelfth Century. Dome- 
shaped with cover ending in a double spherical finial. Covered with a vit- 
reous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of the base and decorated in black. 
A pattern around the body of four t3%foil arched panels fotmed by black 
lines having in the cent3% of each a conventional lamp form and with the 
soffit filled in by a pattern in black. Nearly entirely coated with a fine 
silvery iridescent patina. 

lUuatrated s^ght (vitk oovm-), 7 inek«*. 

276— Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Str&igbt sides, 
a medallion of bold ornamentation in brown with reserves of the greenish 
vitreous glaze and divided into four panels of unequal size by lines of blue. 
In the two larger panels are ornaments of palm-leaf form, in the two smaller 
are inscriptions in Cufic characters. In the centre of the bottom is 
a medallion of bold ornamentation in brown with reserves of the greenish 
glaze. The exterior is decorated with a band of double spiral pattern and 
with Cufic inscriptions in brown. One slight restoration. 

lUuatrated Bright, 6^ i»olut; dl<tm*tur, 9% IwAw. 

27T— Bowl 

Persian. Bay or Bhages faience of the Eleventh Century. Covered with a 
fine grayish-white glaze and decorated overglaze in blue, brown and black 
enamels. The centre is occupied witii two seated figures very conventionally 
drawn on either side of a conventional "Tree of Life." Above them are two 
birds and on either side a branch of the characteristic Bhages treatinent of 
foliage and blossoms. Aroimd this centre medallion is a narrow diamond 
border of blue lines with brown dots and a broad border of dogs and other 
animals in light and dark blue and brown outline, with conventional curved 



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branches of foliage and blossoms. Around the inner rim runs a band 
of Cufic inscription in dark blue, with light blue leaf forms. Aroimd the 
reverse of the rim runs a band of cursive inscription. Partly restored. 

Illustrated BMgkt, 35^ ImAm; Ham»UT, 8^ fttofcM. 

278— "Vase 

Mesopotamian. Rakka fuence of the Ninth Century. Pear-shaped. Cov- 
ered with a thick vitreous deep blue glaxe, stopping short of the bottom in 
heavy drops and decorated with a pattern in relief. The bold decoration is 
of scrolled conventional floral forms with an inscription in Cufic characters. 
Coated over the greater pMl; of the surface with a very fine silvery irides- 
cent patina forming an admirable contrast with the translucent blue of the 
glaze. Rim restored. 

279j^Vasb with Hamole 

Babylonian faience of the £ighth Century. Hydra-shaped, with three small 
loop handles. Made of reddish baked earthenware, body covered with a 
deep variegated turquoise-Uke glaze stopping short of the base and deco- 
rated with an ornamentation in reUef, consisting of four semi-circular pan- 
els on the upper portion filled with a pattern of four volutes starting from 
a central stem which ends in a floral form of beads and carved lines. 
Around this main pattern is a band of beaded rosette forms. 

Illustrated Brtght, as tMh**. 

PALMYRENE SCULPTURES OF THE SECOND 
CENTURY. A.D. 

280 — ScuLPTUKED Bust 

Palmyrene. About the Second Century, A.D. Bust, sculptured in a hard 
limestone, of a beardless young man, apparently a portrait. With incised 
inscription in Greek characters along the lower front part of the base. 
This, as well as the succeeding four lots (Nos. 281 to 284) was exhxmied 
from the ruins of Palmyra (known to the native as Tadmor), some 150 
miles northeast of Damascus in an oasis of the desert separating Syria 
from Iran. 



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This bust is very evidently a copy of a good Greek original and was made 
by a Palmyrene artist, probably during the Roman occupation under Had- 
rian at the beginning of the Second Centmy, A.D. 

Illustrated BHgM, as h«h«. 

281 — ScuLPTUEED Figure 

Palmyrene, about the Second Century, A.D. Represents a half length fig- 
ure of a bearded man, evidently a poet, his left band clasping a roll of manu- 
script, his right hand raised to support the chin in an attitude of medita- 
tion. A very close copy of some good late Greek ori^nal. At the back are 
the usual traces of an inscription. 

Illustrated Bttfkt, as i»ck*«. 

282 — SCUI-PTUBED FiGUBE 

Pahnyrene, about the Second Century, A.D. Portion of a figure which 
originally formed part of the architectural embellishment of a building. It 
represents a youth or woman with long curling hair falling over the shoul- 
ders and costumed in a peplum-like cloak, fastened over the right shoulder 
with a round metal clasp and carved into the semblance of a conventionalized 
lion's head at the left shoulder. Traces of an inscription on the flat back- 
groimd above the shoulders. 

Illustrated Stight, n ikAm. 

Note. — Though bearing the typical attribute of Hercules, the lion's skin, 
this figure seems too youthful to be that of the legendary hero. Possibly it 
represents Queen Omphale of the neighboring Lydia, who on antique gems is 
frequently represented as carrying the lion's skin and also the club of her lover 
Hercules. 



288 — ScuLPTtJEED Figure 

Palmyrene, about the Second Century, A.D. Represents the upper portion 
of the figure of an aged man with a long beard and features of a strongly 
Semitic character. He clasps to his breast with the right hand a bunch of 
grapes, and is clothed in a gaberdine-sort of garment with full sleeves. Evi- 
dently the work of a Palmyrene artist and possibly a portrait. 

Illustrated BMght, U huihe*. 



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284 SCULPTUBED FlGUBB 

Palmyrene, about the Second Century, A.D. Portion of a figure sculp- 
tured in a hard limestone, originally part of a group in high relief decorating 
the facade of a building. It represents a Roman Legjcmary with armor 
resembling that of the soldiers on Trojan's columns. In front of him and at 
the level of his waist is the head of another figure, a woman, strongly Se- 
mitic in character, with an elaborate head-dress of curled hair arranged in 
rows. On the flat background above the Le^onary's shoulders are traces of 
an incised inscription. 

Illustrated Bright, k {««»*«. 



PERSIAN MINIATURES CHIEFLY FROM MANUSCRIPTS 
OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

285 — Miniature 

Persian. Painted in outline with Indian ink, heightened with touches of 
transparent watereolor. Subject: A young girl and her royal lover are 
seated on a bank of flowers overshadowed by an almond tree in blossom on 
a branch of which sits a long-tailed bird. An attendant approaches them 
from the left, while the foreground is occupied with a group of three young 
girls — a dancer and two musicians — one of the latter playing on a long sin- 
gle pipe, the other on a tambourine. The effect of this very beautiful min- 
iature is gained entirely by its skillful composition, the happy placing of 
the figures in the flowery landscape, and by the consummate grace and 
movement of the line. It carries with it a curious suggestion of the art of 
Thirteenth Century Italy. Sixteenth Century. 

EMfkt, 7% iHehM; vtda, 4V« biellM. 
286 — ^MlNIATUBB 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From the same manuscript as the 
preceding (No. 285). Subject: Men in a Turkish bath, with the varioiis 
operations of the bath realistically shown. Framed. From manuscript dated 
042 A.H. (1585 A.D.) 

Hriffkt, 10% htekt*; vtdtK 6% ittcht. 



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287 — ^MnSIATUBE 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From a manuscript. Subject: A 
battle piece with many figures in a rocky landscape. Calligraphic descrip- 
tion in panels top and bottom. Framed. From manuscript dated 942 A.H. 
(1585 A.D.) 

Height, ]OVi inehet; vidtk. S% IneAw. 

288 — ^Double Miniatuse 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From the same manuscript as the 
preceding (No. 287). Subject: The miniature, though painted on two facing 
pages, consists of one subject only — ^A Royal Hunt. It is divided hori- 
zontally into three portions. A foreground of a green, ilower-bedecked 
meadow, through which runs a streamlet, a background of an open desert 
dotted with cactus-like plant forms, and ending in conventionalized moun- 
tain forms and a golden sky against which green trees are silhouetted. Fore- 
ground and background are completely occupied with the figures of the 
Shah and his courtiers on horseback and armed with bows and arrows, fol- 
lowing the game which consists of deer and hares, save in one instance where 
a cavalier attacks, with a gold handled mace, a fiercely snarling wild boar. 
Against the sky appear the heads of the spectators, who survey the scene with 
Uvely expressions of interest. Despite the almost fonnally decorative treat- 
ment, the character in the faces is cleverly differentiated, and the action of 
each figure admirably displayed. Each miniature is surroimded on three 
sides by an ornamental border which thus forms a complete bordering 
around the double page. This border consists of exquisitely illuminated 
mauresque forms in gold and colors. Of the school of, and attributed to, 
the famous miniaturist, Behzad. Framed. Manuscript date 895 A.H. 
(1489 A.D.) 

Illustrated ^*'^*'' "'i '•"*"' '^**' *"w *^*"- 

289 — MiNIATUBE 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From a manuscript history of Shah 
Nameh. Subject: Foreground, a palace court yard with a prince killing a 
man who lies prostrate with his hands behind him. Background, a room 
in the palace with two ladies of the harem. Framed. Fr«n manuscript 
dated in the Sixteenth Century. HtitU, lovi ImAm; tMtk, a^ {««kM. 



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290 — Miniature 

Persian. Fainted in gold and colors. From same manuscript as preced- 
ing (No. 289) . Subject: From his throne, standing under an elaborate can- 
opy in a tent formed of rich handings, the Shah has descended and is stab- 
bing a prostrate foe. Warriors and courtiers stand around him and in the 
rocky landscape which forms the background. Framed. From manuscript 
dated in the Sixteenth Century. 

Htight, 10^4 tnehti; wUlA, S^^ ineh«t. 
291 — MmiiTUBE 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From a manuscript. Subject: A 
Shah seated in a kiosk placed in the palace garden, with flowering trees in 
the background, is approached by two attendants, one of whom tenders him 
a bowl of water with one hand, while in the other he holds a perfume 
sprinkler. On the tiled space which siurounds the kiosk are placed 
golden bowls of fruit and confections. In the foreground is the usual highly 
conventionalized treatment of a fountain and stream of water. Signed and 
dated A.H. 1487. 

Illustrated ^**i'*'- ^y' '*''"'' "**'*' *^ '"«*••■ 

Note. — This miniatm*e and the following were evidently intended to form 
a double page of the book, for they are surrounded on three sides only with 
an elaborate illuminated border in gold and colors of a mauresque design stur- 
rounded by an outer border simulating blue and white tiling. They rep- 
resent the very climax of the notable Fifteenth Century school of Persian 
miniaturists and are attributed with excellent reason to the head of that 
school, the celebrated Behzad. 



292 — MlNIATUSE 

Persian. Painted in gold and color from the same manuscript as preceding, 
(No. 291). Subject: Under a tree among some rocks which rise from a 
flowery meadow a poet sits and plays on a lute-like instrument to the ac- 
companiment of a yoxmger man who plays a species of tambourine. An- 
other man in a red robe stands on the edge of a brook which nms through 
the meadow and occupies the foreground. In the background, silhouetted 



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against the sky of flat gold, stands an attendant with a horse having a yel- 
low saddle cloth. In the school of Behz£d. Signed and dated A.H. 898. 

(1487 A.D.) 

lUuttrated BMg\l, 9% i»cht*: width. &% inch**. 

298 — ^MmiATUBE 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. From the same manuscript as the 
two preceding (Nos. 291 and 292). Subject: A formal landscape is divided 
horizontally into two parts by the usual conventionalized fountain and 
streamlet. In the background under a conventional maple tree with red 
and blue leaves two men, one with a white beard, are holding a conversa- 
tion. To the right a young girl plays on a tambourine. In the foreground 
on either side of an almond tree in blossom a master and his pupil read from 
manuscripts. The entire field is ^Ided and dotted with flowers and two 
tiny pools of water. Dated 898 A.H. (1487 A.D.) 

Illustrated BMgM, 11 inch**,- iMth, S% IwAm. 

294 — ^MlNIATUSE 

Persian. Punted in gold and colors. From the same manuscript as the 
preceding (Nos. 291, 292 and 298) . Subject: In a formal landscape, sitting 
on a Persian rug between two cypress trees, a Shah holds in his hand a fruit 
taken from a gold dish in front of him. On the left sits a young prince 
and on the ri^t stands a minister who addresses the Shah. In the fore- 
groimd is a group of four figures, one feeding a hawk which he carries upon 
his gauntleted wrist. The olive-green field, dotted with red flowers, ends 
with a conventional hilly treatment in the upper portion. Above it rises a 
golden sky with conventional cloud forms in blue and white. Dated 898 
A.H. (1487 A.D.) 

lUuatrated ^•'**'' " •"***' *"**■ "i *"*«• 

295 — MiNIATUEE 

Persian. Painted in a fine brush line of Indian ink with light washes of 
color. Subject: An oriental dance. The two male dancers are accompa- 
nied by four musicians, while an old man keeps time by clapping his hands. 
Mounted with a contemporary border of arabesque pattern in gold and col- 
ors. Signed with the seal of "Ali Kali." Sixteenth Century. 

Httfkt, i imek**; tMtk, 6% teolU*. 



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296 — MmiATUBE 

Persian. Painted in colors without gilding. Subject: A white bearded and 
white turbaned sheik seated under a tree and in front of a dove cot with 
two doves reads from a book to a younger man who sits before him. In the 
foreground a youth crouches at the edge of a pool of water. A deep blue 
sky fading to white on the horizon occupies the background. Mounted 
with a margin of arabesque pattern in gold. Signed "Abou el Hassan." 
Seventeenth Century. 

Height, T ineiU*; oUlh, 4 inc&w. 



297 — Miniature 

Indo-Persian. Fainted in outline with washes of India ink heightened by 
touches of color and gold. Subject: A Queen is dressing after her bath 
in a streamlet which covered with waterfowl occupies the foreground. She 
sits on the rocky bank while two attendants hand her ointments and refresh- 
ments. In the middle distance an older woman with a mirror in her hand 
keeps guard over the crown and outer garments of the Queen. In the dis- 
tance a prince on horseback with an armed attendant on foot carrying his 
purse pauses to watch the scene. The .horse of the Queen occupies the lower 
right-hand comer. The delicacy and fineness of the draughtsmanship of this 
miniature are remarkable. It is mounted with a wide margin of gold flecked 
cream-colored paper. Sixteenth Century. 

Height, 7 ineke$; leidtk, 5Vi inchM. 



298 — MiNlATUBE 

Persian. Painted in washes of bluish-black, heightened by colors and gold. 
Subject: A poet with his book of verses under his arm and his writing tab- 
let and ink bottle in front of him sits under a flowering tree and listens 
to the song of the bul-bul. Conventional cloud forms and a hilly landscape 
in the backgroimd. A border of fine arabesque work in gold surrounds the 
niiniatxu*e, which is mounted with a Sixteenth Century border of scroll de- 
signs with conventional birds in black on a yellow ground. Seventeenth 
Century. 

a»ight, 6% inchM; vMik. 3^ inclt**. 



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299 — MiNIATUEE 

Persian. Painted with a wash of India ink. Subject: Two camels fighting. 
Mounted with a contemporary border of arabesque pattern in gold and col- 
ors. Signed "Hadji Kamtorin" (the Humble). Sixteenth Century. 

H*tffM, 4 huhMj vMth, 5% imckM. 

800 — Miniature 

Persian. From a manuscript painted in gold and colors. Subject: In the 
tiled court yard of a palace a young man on his knees before a young woman 
seizes her by the hem of her red robe and tenders her a cup of wine from 
a porcelain jug which stands in front of him. In the background a con- 
ventional landscape with a cypress tree, dmond tree in bloom and a blue 
sky. Mounted with a border of gold flecked paper and painted to 
simulate the grain of wood. Manuscript dated 838 A.H. (1434 A.D.) 
Made for Sultan All el Mahali. 

Btighl, 4% ImcAm; tridth, a\ Inehu. 

301 — Pebsian Manuscbipt 

Without title, containing a miscellaneous collection of those stories of Kings 
in which the Persians delighted. The authorship of these is uncertain. The 
manuscript is dated A.H. 925 (A.D. 1519) and is written in the Nastalik 
style of Persian script by Shah Kasim, as appears by the colophon. There 
are two columns to the page, with illuminated head-pieces to the sections and 
gold panels. Margins sprinkled with gold. There are two full-page min- 
iatures very beautifully painted in gold and colors. 
"A" A Persian Orpheus piping on the rocks to his flock of goats. 
"B" The story of Farhad and the fair Shirin. The lovers are seated on a dais 
under a canopy and the King holds a cup he has just filled from a blue 
and white wine bottle to her lips. Landscape background. 
It is interesting to find from the colophon that this book was written for 
Husain Khan of Syria, under whose direction the magnificent Shah Namah 
in this collection (No. 8S4) was written. Bound in lacquered board with a 
panel of floral decoration and arabesque border of the late Eighteenth Cen- 
tury. 



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Note. — This, and all other Manuscripts in this Collection, has been sub- 
mitted to Professor A. V. Williams Jackson of Columbia University, the lead- 
ing authority in this country upon Oriental Literature and Languages. The 
descriptions, translations and attributions here offered have received his unquali- 
fied endorsement. 

Q FoBseEsing in their Nastalik or cursive script a handwriting which for 
flexuous elegance is unrivalled, the Persians carried the art of manu- 
script to a point excelled bj no other nation. The scribes who indicted the 
poems of Sa'di and Hafiz and the histories of the Shahs were hardly less 
esteemed than the poets and historians whose works gave them an opportu- 
nity to exercise their art. They were indeed held higher than either the 
miniaturists who painted the superb pictures which so oft«i accompany these 
manuscripts, or the illuminators who surrounded the text with their wondrous 
arabesques of colors and of gold. To us, however, the chief interest of these 
laboriously indicted volumes lies not so much in the script, much as we may 
admire the facility of its curves and the perfection of its patterning, as in the 
illuminated chapter-headings and borders and the beauty of its miniature illus- 
trations. 



— Pebsian Manuscript 
TheBustan (or "Fruit Garden") of Sa'di. Manuscript dated A.H. 921 
(A.D. 1515), written by Abd ul Fakir Mahmud, son of Nizam ad Din, in 
the Nastalik style of Persian script — two colxmms to a page, bordered by 
gold and blue lines. There are three full-page miniatures, one of them dou- 
ble, in the Mongol-Persian style which are attributed to Djami. 

"A" Double page miniature. The picture of a king having no reference to 
the text. 

"B" The story of King Dura and his groom. The King, who had lost his 
way, met his own groom and not recognizing him prepared to shoot 
him, thinking him to be a robber. The groom protested, "Oh King, 
you expect me to know every horse among the thousand in your sta- 
bles, yet you cannot recognize one of your own retinue." 

"C" Hatam and the Assassin. The King of Yaman (Arabia) sent a man 
to kill Hatam, who, however, treated the would-be assassin so hospitably 
that the latter finally paid him homage. 



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A seal on the front page testifies that this manuscript was formerly owned 
by the Amir Nizam of Tabriz, Persia, who received it as a gift from Mirza 
Mustafa Khan Baha ul Mulk of Urumiah, Persia. 

Bomid in a cut, sunk and stamped leather binding of the Sixteenth Cen- 
tury. Lacquered and gilded, and with designs of trees, birds and animals in 
the panels. 

Pagt wk*. ff^ Uteiut by 6% JnckM. 

808 — Pebsian Manuscript * . , 

The Kuhat Sa'di Farsi, or complete works of Sa'di of Persia. Written 
and dated A.H. 919 (A.D. 1518) in the Nastaiik style of Persian script, 
three columns to a page and with 28 foUos of introduction preceding the 
Gulistan (or Rose Garden), and the other works of Sa'di. The calhgraphy 
is of the most exquisitely elaborate character, the preface, for instance, be- 
ing in panels of white reserve on a gold ground. The headings are in 
mauresque panels illuminated in gold and colors, and the columns are di- 
vided by vertical panels, also illuminated in gold and colors. There are 
four exquisite miniatiares which have been attributed, with excellent rea- 
son, to the celebrated Bebzad. 
"A" A crowded figure composition with jugglers performing, etc., having 

no reference to the text. 
"B" A pardoned criminal thanks the King for the mercy shown to him. 
*'C'* The King and his attendants taking their pleasure in a Persian garden. 
"D" An early game of polo. 

Bound in a cut, sunk and stamped leather binding with gilt arabesque or- 
namentations of the early Sixteenth Century. Sa'di (1184-1292) was one 
of Persia's two greatest poets. In addition to the Bustan and Gulistan, 
his works include the Diwan or collection of Lyrics, as well as a number of 
Elegies, Odes, Quatrains (Rubaiyat) and Moral Epigrams. 

Pag* tis*. 9^ inehtt by 5% IikAm. 

804 — Pebsian Manuscript 

The Makhzan al-Asrar (or Treasury of Mysteries), composed about A.D. 
1165 by the Persian Romantic Poet Nizami (1140-1208). Written and 



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dated A.H. 056 (A.D. 1540), by an anonymous calligraphist, in the Per- 
sian style of script, with headings and title page illuminated in gold and colors. 
There are four columns to a page, enclosed in ornamental borders of red and 
blue, with arabesque panels illuminated in gold and colors. Wide margins 
sprinkled in gold. Five miniatures, two double pages and one single page, 
in gold and colors, in the school of Behzad. 
"A" (1) The King and his Court 
(2) Preparations for a Feast. 

"B" King Anushirvan and the Owls. Riding one day King Anushirran 
saw two owls sitting on a ruin and talking to each other. He sent his 
vizir to find out the subject of conversation. "They are arranging a 
marriage," said the vizir, "and the one insists on five ruined cities as 
the bride's. 'Easily done,' was the reply, 'if this bad administration 
continues I'll soon be able to ^ve you a hundred ruined cities.' " The 
King at once set about reforming his government. 

"C" (1) A scene in the Royal Garden. 
(2) The King receiving Messenger. 

Bound in lacquered boards with a scrolled floral pattern in gold of early 

Nineteenth Century manufactm-e. 

Pagt ih9, IS inehM by 7% tuekM. 



MISCELLANEOUS OBJECTS 

805 — Cushion Covee 

Damascus weave of the Seventeenth Century. Silk damask with cut velvet 
pile in red and green on a yellow background. In a chequered pattern 
forming squares with sexfoiled rosettes of alternating colors and with top 
and bottom panels of a conventional flower pot and flower pattern. An 
inner border of a six-pointed star pattern. 

L»ngtk, 31 htehMs vMth, 23 AmAm. 



806 — Cushion Covee 

Similar to preceding (No. 305). 



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807 — Cushion Coves 

Damascus weave of the Seventeenth Century. Silk damask with cut velvet 
pile in red, green and blue on a yellow ground. In the centre an oval me- 
dallion of chequered pattern in red and green, surroimded by a field of red 
and green fleurettes arranged in a diaper pattern. Panels at- top and bot- 
tom of conventional floral garlands. At the sides of the field a border of a 
scroll pattern in yellow between two stripes of blue fleurettes. 

Lmgth, 37 inehat; width, 93 iitek«t. 



808 — Cushion Covee 

Resembles the preceding (No. 807) with some slight differences in coloring. 



809 — Cushion Coveb 

Damascus weave of the Seventeenth Century. Silk damask with cut velvet 
pile in red, green and blue. The field is occupied with an arabesque pattern 
in red of flowers and leaves springing from a central rosette. Top and bot- 
tom panels of a flower and scroll pattern in red. At the sides a border 
of conventional fohage in blue on a yellow ground between two stripes of 
green fleurettes. 

Length, 37 mehtt; mdth, S3 inehu. 



310 — Embboidered Panel 

Armenian work of the Sixteenth Century. Oblong panel of embroidery and 
appliqu^ in silks, satins and gold and silver thread. Representing the Vir- 
gin and Child, enthroned and attended by two saints with angels and cheru- 
bim. From the Holy Ghost, represented by a dove, a ray of hght descends 
upon the crowned head of the Virgin. The Byzantine influence, persisting 
through so many centuries, is curiously marked in the style of this embroid- 
ery. Mounted on an ample field of peacock-blue silk, embroidered in col- 
ored silks. 

8h» of pa»ih 31 ineh»i by IS iiteftM; ttsa of tWc fUld, T9 i»eK** by 59 tmifui. 



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811 — EccLEsuffiicAL Embboidebt 

Armeman work of the Seventeenth Century. A wide strip of embroidery 
in colored silks and gold thread forming the collar of an ecclesiastical vest- 
ment. In the centre is the Saviour and on either side of Him, in semi-cir- 
cular arched niches, six Apostles carrying their emblems. An Armenian 
inscription runs around the bottom. The design is strongly Byzantine in 
character. 

Ltngtk, S8 inchM; tDidlh, S iwAm. 



812 — EccLESiASTiCAi. Embboidebt 

Armenian work of the Seventeenth Century. A cylindrical biretta or of- 
ficiating priest's cap. Embroidered in colored silk and gold thread. Around 
the sides, between two strips of Armenian inscriptions, the Saviour and 
the twelve Apostles are ranged in semi-circular arched niches. The crown is 
a design of cherubim and seraphim symmetrically arranged. As in the pre- 
ceding (No. 311), the Byzantine influence is very perceptible. 

Bright, 6% inehM; dianuttr, 7^ Inekw. 



818 — ^Ecclesiastical Cbown 

Armenian work of the Seventeenth Century. Formed of hinged plates of cop- 
per of arched form each surmounted by a Greek foliated cross and painted with 
figures of the Saviour enthroned and the twelve Apostles on gold ground. 
Under the central figure is an inscription in Armenian characters. 

Ltnffth whtn optned, 95 I'nehM; height, 4^ fiwftM. 



814 — Ecclesiastical Cbown 

Armenian work of the Seventeenth Century. Of silver and silver wire 
strung with turquoise and coral beads and set with imitation jewels. 
Around the body and on a network of silver wire are figures of saints 
painted with gold backgrounds on arched panels of copper, while above are 
four medallions each having the emblem of an evangelist painted on a gold 
background. 

Beight, 9 bu!h4i; dlamttsr, 8 fMdUt. 



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OBJECTS OF SPECIAL RARITY 



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EXPLANATORY 

In calling attention to the objects on which the MM. Tabbagh Freres have 
been permitted to place an "upset price" it seems not unfitting to point out that 
these are not only the most admirable examples of Persian and Saracenic art 
which have probably ever been placed upon sale in this country, but that of some 
of them it is more than doubtful whether their equals will ever be seen again. The 
tombs and tumuh of Persia seem to have rendered up their last ofiFerings of the 
art of Rakka and of Rhages. The enamelled glass of the Saracens, save for the 
world-famous collection of Mosque Lamps in the Cairo Museum, is known to us 
only by some half dozen examples in public and private collections, and it is need- 
less to add that there are not in the world two manuscript volumes bearing the 
autographed comments of those great Emperors of India, Jahangir the Magnifi- 
cent and Jahan the Great. 

Of the collection of miniatures it must be said that they have been patiently 
and laboriously gathered together during the past ten years by M. Emil Tab- 
bagh, primarily for his own pleasure and delectation, and that they represent 
those which have most appealed to him of the many hundreds which have passed 
through his hands. 



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UNIQUE EXAMPLES OF RHAGES, RAKEA AND SULTANABAD 
FAIENCES, SARACENIC ENAMELLED GLASS, ILLUMI- 
NATED MANUSCRIPTS AND PERSIAN MINIATURE 
PAINTINGS 

*816— Vabe 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faieDce of the Ninth Century. Sweliing pear- 
shaped body, with tapering cylindrical neck. Light colored paste corered 
with a thick cream-colored vitreous glaze stopping short of the base, where 
it runs into large coagulated drops. Decorated with patterns in low re- 
lief and orerglaze colors. Around the body is a pattern of large branches 
of lancet-shaped foliage with central flowers of a fieur-de-lu character, all 
in relief and colored in brown and blue. The ground is completely cov- 
ered with a powdered pattern of dots in brown. Around the neck runs a 
band of scrolled meander pattern in brown between two bands of solid 
brown. Slightly restored. 

lUustrated ^*^**' " ***•*■ 

Q Thie aad the succeeding vase (No. S16) are typical of the Rakka vasee, 
which were the first to reach Europe some few years ago. When M. Migerai 
wrote his exhaustive "Manual of Moslem Art" m 1907 he notes only three 
of these vases as being known, two in private collections in Paris and one 
which exactly resembles No. 816 in the celdi>rated collection of Mr. du Cane 
Godman in England. 



•816— Vabe 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Swelling pear- 
shaped body, with cylindrical neck and turned-over tim. Light colored 
paste covered with a thick vitreous turquoise-blue glaze stopping short of 
the base, where it runs into heavy coagulations. Decorated in a pattern 
in low relief with black overglaze coloring. The body is divided into ver- 
tical panels by straight buids in relief, and with a pattern of conventional 
palm-leaf forms, painted overglaze in black. The ground between is cov- 
ered with a powdering of dots in black. Slightly restored. 

lUtutrated BHgM. is (mw. 



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•817— Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Reversed pear- 
shape body, with incurved sides. Covered with a greenish-white crackled 
glaze, which stops short of the foot and runs into heavy drops, and deco- 
rated with an uuderglaze pattern in brown and blue. Around the body 
runs a broad band of a pattern formed by four oval medallions which are 
occupied with a palmette form in blue surrounded by palm leaf-shaped fol- 
iage in white reserves. Between the medallions are poetic inscriptions in 
spaces of white reserve following the shape of the letters and on a ground 
of a pattern formed by spirals in brown. The inscriptions are such as this: 
"May eternal happiness befall our land of Irak." Two deep bands of 
brown with a narrow band of white reserve encircle the rim and around the 
under part is a band of brown with a waved line beneath it. Carved teak- 
wood stand and cover. 

Illustrated ^•*J'*'' *«• '"**•''■ *«*«»«■. ^Vi *«*••■ 

Q This bowl, which is in absolutely perfect condition, is one of the few 
pieces of Rakka faience which have come to us untouched by the finger of 
Time. It fonned one of a group of three pieces of precisely similar char- 
acter which reached Eiuope from the Plain of El Jezireh about three years 
ago. Of these pieces one, an Albarello, has passed out of MM. Tabbagh 
Fiires' possession into that of the New York Metropolitan Museum, the other 
into that of the Louvre Museum. 

•818— Bowl 

Persian. Sultanabad lustreless faience of the Fourteenth Century. Coupe- 
shaped with straight flaring sides. Covered with a grayish vitreous glaze and 
decorated in enamels of two colors. The interior is completely occupied by 
a pattern of four flying birds surrounded by conventional foliage forms 
painted in dark green and white enamels. The exterior has a decoration of 
vertieal panels formed by lines of white enamel, enclosing conventional foli- 
age forms of stalks and buds in dark green enamel. 

Illustrated BMgkt. 3% *«c»»»; diam»ttr, 6Vi inc***. 

•819— Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Thirteenth -Century. Coupe- 
shaped, with sides curving outward. Covered with a very fine ivory-white 
glaze, with overglaze decorations of colored soft enamels. The centre of the 



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interior is occupied by a five-rayed medallion-like figure, the points of 
which are pear-shaped. This design is painted in light blue and gold, out- 
lined in soft red. Around the interior of the rim runs an inscription of 
Cufic characters outlined in blue. The exterior rim is decorated with a 
band of inscription in cursive characters of red enamel. Slightly restored. 

Illustrated Btight, 3% inchttj dtam»t*r, 1% {mAm. 



*820— Bowl 

Fersian-Sultanabad lustred faience of the Twelfth Century. Flat saucer- 
like shape, with vertical sides and wide flat rim standing on three feet. Cov- 
ered with a creamy white glaze and decorated with an overglaze pattern in 
bistre showing metaUic reflections of a coppery-brown. The centre is occu- 
pied with a circular medallion containing the seated figure of a man sur- 
rounded by four figures of men on horseback opposed to each other in a 
synmietrical pattern and divided by conventional cypress-tree forms with a 
chequered pattern of alternate brown and white squares; the remainder of 
the ground is filled with a scroll-work pattern. Aromid the side of the in- 
terior runs a band of cursive inscription, a similar band encircling the side 
of the exterior, while the horizontal surface of the wide rim is occupied by a 
band of Cufic inscription and scrolled ornamentation. The three feet are 
modelled in archaic forms of elephants. 

lUuitrated BMght. S ImAm; dtam*t»r. 7% teohM. 



*321— Bowl 

Persian. Rhages lustred faience of the Eleventh Century. Coupe-shaped, 
with sides curving outward. Covered with a fine white glaze with overglaze 
decorations in bistre showing metallic refiections of a coppery character. The 
interior is occupied by a pattern formed of circular medaUions containing 
the figures of cross-legged seated women. One of these forms the centre 
surrounded by eight others in two circles of foiu* each. Around the rim are 
four half -medallions of a similar character. The ground between these is 
filled with a Saracenic pattern of scrolled Interlacements and around the 
rim and between ihe semi-medallions is a band of Cufic inscription in a 



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reserve of white on a solid brown ground. Around the exterior is a bold 
pattern of heart-shaped interlaced scrolls in brown line. 

Illustrated Bright, Sy* 1«mAm; diamsttr, 1% (adU*. 

*822— Bowl 

Persian. Ray or Rhages faience of the Eleventh Century. Coupe-shax>ed on 
low base. Covered with an exceedingly beautiful ivory-white glaze stopping 
slightly short of, but in places carried over, the rough under-surface of the 
base. Decorated in the centre with an overglaze soft enamel painting of 
two seated figures. One, a lady of the court, is attired in a costume of tur- 
quoise-blue, with a pattern of sprays of foliage in black. She is seated cross- 
legged with her left hand on her hip and extending her ri^t arm upwards. 
The other figure is of a female attendant playing upon a zither-fike instru- 
ment. She is dressed in a costume, the pattern of which is suggested by a 
conventional treatment of vertical zig-zag lines of a silvery gray, and her 
head is inclined forward as if listening to her own music. Between these 
two figures is a hi^y conventionalized treatment of a tree in blossom. The 
straight upright trunk is of dark red, the curved and interlaced branches of 
black lines with dotted leaf forms of silvery gray. Similar branches imd 
blossoms occupy the open spaces around and between the figures. Sur- 
rounding this central decoration is a border of crossed lines of silvery gray, 
forming diamond-shaped spaces which are filled with disks of blue, outlined 
in black, and with dots of dark red. The inner rim is decorated with a 
Cufic inscription, repetitions of one phrase, disposed around ornaments of 
blue and red. The reverse of the bowl has an inscription nmning completely 
around it of curnve characters in black. Cracked and mended, but other- 
wise in perfect condition. 

Illustrated Bright, S>^ imehtt; ^am*Uf, 6% buhu, 

•328— Plate 

Persian. Sultanabad lustred faience of the Twelftii Century. Saucer-hke 
shape, with flutings tmd scalloped edge. Covered with a yellowish glaze 
and decorated in brown showing metallic reflections running to purple. The 
centre is occupied with a circular medallion containing the figure of a stag 
realistically treated in white reserve on a ground of brown. Around this is 



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a pattern of interlacements, also in brown, while the flutings are alternately 
decorated with patterns of interlacements and flower forms. The exterior 
is also decorated with longitudinal patterns of ornament filling each fluting. 
lUugtrated 

Bright, 11% {(wAm; Aam«e<r, 9^ JmcAm. 

•824 — EwEB WITH Handle 

Persian. Ray or Rhages faience of the Ninth Century. Oviform body, with 
slightly incurred neck and straight flat handle. Of a hard semi-porcelain- 
ous paste, covered with a very tight turquoise-blue glaze and decorated over- 
glaze in red and green enamels and gold. Around the lower part of the 
body are disposed medallion-like figures in retief, colored with red and pale 
green enamels. Between these and occupying the upper portion are con- 
ventional figures in relief resembling angels with upraised wings. The en- 
tire ground is covered with a decoration of horizontal waved lines in blue. 
The rim is decorated with bands of pale green and blue enamels and the 
foot with a band of pale green enamel. The outer surface of the straight 
handle is decorated with a conventional pattern, in relief and gilded, between 
two lines of blue enamel. The inner rim is decorated with green disks encir- 
cled by a line of red and quatrefoil figures of blue lines arranged sym- 
metrically. 

lUmtrated BHg\t, 4% imc\t. 

Q Though undoubtedly of Rhages manufacture, this ewer represents a school 
of decoration hitherto unknown to an; of the European museums or private 
collections. Its beauty of form, color, pattern and texture makes it, quite 
apart from its rareness, of exceeding interest. 

•825 — Mosque Lamp 

Mesopotamian. Rakka lustred faience of the Ninth Century. Of the typical 
lamp form with bulbous body, wide flaring neck and annular foot. Covered 
with a turquoise-blue glaze, with decorations in retief and overglaze in green 
and black. Around the rim runs an inscription in Cufic characters which 
runs: "There is but one God and Mahomet is His prophet." Around the 
body runs another inscription in retief, interrupted by medallions of an alter- 
nate interlaced pattern and star-shaped design, pierced so as to show the light 
within. This inscription runs as follows: "Made for the great Mosque of 



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er-Raschid by Mohammad All and for the glory of out Prophet Mahomet." 
Almost oitirely covered with a beautiful silvery patina of an iridescent char- 
acter. Illustrated 

Htight, T% ineh«*; dtamsttr of btnel, S% fndU*. 

^ Rakka, as has been mentioned, was the favorite residence, dining the 
Ninth Century of the Caliph Hartin-er-Rashid — the Haroun al Raschid, 
of the "Arabian Night's Entertainment." This lamp, therefore, which, as 
its inscription tells ub was made by his order for the chief mosque of his be- 
loved city, possesses a very human note of interest carrying us back, as it 
does, to the days of Haroun and the fair Scherazade. Apart from this, how- 
ever, it must be regarded as one of the most beautiful and important, as it 
certainly is one of the most extraordinarily well preserved examples of Ninth 
Century Rakka fuence that has yet made its appearance in the West. Tech- 
nically, too, it is of great interest. In the first place, it sets back to an earlier 
date than has been hitherto held to be the case, the production of this turquoise- 
blue glazed Rakka ware with its decorations of black pencillinge and its pat- 
terns in relief. In the second, it points by its form to Mesopotamia as the 
country of the original ori^n of what was to remain tor six centuries the 
conventional mosque lamp. It suggests also that it is to Mesopotamia we 
are to look for the earliest ateliers of the enamelled glass workers. 



*826 — EwEE WITH Handle 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Eleventh Century. Pear- 
shaped form, with cylindrical neck and twisted, looped handle. Entirely 
covered with an exceedingly fine turquoise-blue glaze of stanniferous char- 
acter, with a design pencilled in lines of brown, white and gold. The body 
is divided into nine panels by long vertical leaf-forms, with serrated edges 
drawn in brown. In each of these panels are two rosette-like ornaments 
of similar treatment. Around the rim, neck and upper part of the body are 
inscriptions in Cufic characters, mainly consisting of a repetition of the name 
"Abd-al-Malik." lUtutrated 

Btight, 1B% inekti; dtam*t»r, 11 iwohM. 

Q This ewer, which from its size, its color and its very unusual decoration 
must be regarded as an exceptionally signiBcant exampel of Rhages ware, 
was made for a ruler of high distinction as is evidoiced by the name it bears. 
Probably the Abd-al-Malik here referred to was not the Caliph who ascraded 
the throne in 686 A.D., but the second Samanid Prince of that name who 
rragned during the first year of the Eleventh Century. 



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•827— Vase 

Persian. Ray or Rhages lustreless faience of the Eleventh Century. Beaker- 
shaped, with straight sides curving very slightly outward. Of a very fine 
cream-colored paste of a porcelainous character covered with an ivory-white 
crackled glaze and decorated overglaze in soft enamels. Around the body 
run three horizontal bands of decoration consisting of minute figures oocu- 
pjdng the separate panels into which the bands are divided by vertical lines. 
These figures are so arranged as to depict for us a series of historical and other 
incidents in the life of a king — possibly Khosran I, sumamed the "Blessed." 
He and his court are shown hunting with dogs, hawking, seizing fortified 
castles, taking prisoners, administering justice, worshipping at holy shrines, 
enjoying the relaxations of palace life and so forth. Within the exceed- 
ingly small space at the artist's disposal, are between fifty and sixty human 
figures, besides horses, camels, elephants, dogs and other animals, and yet 
there is not the least suggestion of crowding. The colors employed are low 
tones of indigo blue, rich wine red, pale green, light blue and yellow. 
There is no attempt at realism in the treatment, the figures being drawn in 
a dark outline filled in with fields of perfectly flat coloring. The coloring, 
in especial, is purely and conventionally decorative — blue horses and red 
camels, for instance — but the animated life-like effect of each scene is as re- 
markable as the dignity which pervades the whole. 

Practically the entire decoration of the vase is confined to these bands. There 
is a narrow band of plain blue above and below and around the inside of the 
rim a broad band of delicate green of varying shades. 
lUuHrated 

Btiyht, 4% IimAm; diamttw, i% {nolUi. 

Q ThiE, is, without any doubt, the finest known example of the lustreless 
Rhages faience of the Eleventh Century. Something more than this may, 
indeed, be said. The delicacy and fineness of paste and glaze, the texture 
of the surface, due to the "mat" effect of the soft enamels, the beauty of 
the color-scheme, and above all the largeness of the figure decoration, tJiouj^ 
it is confined within a space a hand's breadth would cover, all these combine 
to warrant the suggestion that in this tiny vase we have what is probably the 
most technically surprising and artistically beautiful piece of decorated pot- 
tery (as distinguished from porcelain), now existing, of any country or of 
any age. 



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*828 — Glass Cameo 

Alexandrian of the First Century, A. D. Parti-colored glass. Oval shape, 
with the head of a Cssar in profile, cut from the upper stratum of opaque- 
white glass and displayed against the background of transparent 
glass. Owing to its long immurement this cameo is coated with a 
marvellously beautiful iridescence as regards the background, while the 
opaque-white glass in which the head is cut has assumed a very eflfective 
ivory tone. The result has enhanced rather than detracted from the pris- 
tine beauty of this exquisite example of early Alexandrian art. 

Etight, 1^ inehei; lotdtA, 1 S-IO inehn. 

^ Enlisting the two-fold service of the skilled glass-blower and the highly 
specialized cutter of gems, the art of cameo-^ass making may abnoet be 
numbered among those that are lost to modem craftsmanship. During the 
first two centuries of the Roman Empire it was evidently very highly esteemed, 
but so small must have been the output, and so fragile, that the number of 
those still existing is exceedingly small. The most notable examples are the 
famous Portland vase in the British Museum and the Amphora in the Naples 
Museum. Otherwise our knowledge of cameo-glass is chiefly confined to frag- 
ments of cups, vases and bowls preserved with care in public museums and 
private collections. The interest of this admirable specimen which, save for 
its iridescence is in perfect condition, is evident. It has, since its discovery 
in some comparatively recent excavations on the site of the ancient Aleppo, 
been in MM. Tabbaghs' possession. The portrait was at first supposed to 
be that of the Emperor Hadrian, whose affiliations with Syria were close, but 
comparison with coins and gems rather tends to refute this attribution. The 
profile of the handsome beardless face with its feminine mouth and rather 
weak chin strongly resembles that of the first Emperor Claudius (10 B.C.- 
54 A.D.), chiefly remembered as the conqueror of Britain, and the husband 
of the notorious Messalina. 



*829 — Enameixed Glass Mosque Lamp 

Saracenic. Mesopotamian work of Aleppo or Mosul and of the Fourteenth 
Century. Of clear amber-colored glass, free from striations or bubbles, and 
decorated with enamel colors of red, blue, green, yellow and white, with 
profuse surface gildings. The neck is decorated with a broad band of in- 
scriptions in Arabic characters of turquoise-blue enamel, intertwined about 
which is a floral scroll pattern of white enamel with leaves of red, green and 
yellow enamels. This inscription runs as follows: "He only shall visit the 



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Mosques of GJod who believeth in God and the Last Day, and is constant in 
prayer." — {Koran, ix, 18.) Above and below this band are two narrow 
borders of a floral scroll pattern, outlined in red and filled in with gold. The 
upper portion of the body, at its junction with the neck, is decorated with 
a band of ten foiled rosettes, twelve in number, outlined in blue enamel, with 
an outer edging of gold, and filled with floral patterns of gold, outlined in red. 
The triangular spaces between these rosettes are filled with small pear-shaped 
splashes of green and red enamels, outlined in gold, and with dots of white 
enamel. The body is decorated with a wide band of an inscription in Arabic 
characters, the letters in reserve and outlined in red, and gilded on a ground of 
turquoise-blue enamel. The inscription runs as follows: "This lamp was made 
by the poor slave of God who hopes for the forgiveness of God, the aU Merci- 
ful, Mohammad, son of Abou-el-Abass. It was made for the great Mosque 
el Azhar of Cairo, may it be Blessed." This inscription is interrupted in 
three places by panels of gUding of a pointed oval form, outlined in red. 
These panels surround the junction with the body of the three thick gilded 
glass loops, serving as points of attachment for the chains by which the 
lamp was suspended from the ceiling of the Mosque. The imderpart of 
the body is decorated with a broad band of a diaper pattern of five petalled 
flowers and leaves in red outline, the pattern being gilded and the ground in re- 
serve. This pattern is interrupted by fine, large, twelve-foiled rosettes, 
outlined in green enamel, with an outer edging of gold, and filled with con- 
ventional fioral patterns in red, white, blue and green enamels. Above and 
below these rosettes are narrow bands of a scroll and rosette pattern in red 
outline with gilded leaves and flowers, the latter having centres of blue en- 
amel dots. The heavy moulded foot is undecorated. 

lUuttrated ^•*»*'. «% *«»«■ 



C| It is univenallj admitted that the Saracenic moeque lamps of which this 
forms 80 admirable an example, form a distinct class by themselves. As such 
they have for long been the objects of eager pursuit by collectors, though 
outside the Museum in Cairo and the great Kational Museums of Europe there 
are but few in existence. Some twenty-Bve years ago the Commission for the 
Preservation of the Monuments of Cairo removed all those han^ng in the 
Cairo Mosques to the Museum of Arab Art, where there are now to be seen 
some seventy or eighty of varying degrees of excellence. As far back as 1886 
Mr. Stanley Lane-Foole remarked the infrequency of tiior appearance and 



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the prohibitive price set upon them b; their owners. Outside of the Cairo 
Mueeum it would be difficult to find a lamp so representative of the art of the 
Saracenic glass Enameller at the period of its apogee. 

The lamp, as its inscription testifies, was made for the well-known Mosque 
el Azar, which was built in the Year of the Hegira, 361 or 971 A.D. Injured 
in the earthquake of 130S, the Mosque was restored by successive Sultans and 
BejB, until but little of the original structure now remains. In the Nineteenth 
Centur; the lamp was presented b; Mebemet Ali, Pasha of Egypt, probably 
during his occupation of Syria, to the Mosque of Omar in Jerusalem, whence 
it was ranoved some years ago. 



*880 — The "Hamadan" Bowl 

Mesopotamian. Saracenic enamelled glass of the Ninth Century. Coupe- 
shaped body, with incurved rim, having a tall cyhndrical curved foot. 
Blown and moulded from a clear, almost white, glass, presenting a mere 
trace of very small bubbles with an entire absence of stris and similar im- 
perfections, and decorated in colored enamels. Around the exterior of the 
body runs a wide band of decoration formed by a pattern of six al- 
most circular medallions, divided by an arabesque pattern of 
Saracenic character, consisting of an interlacement of floral mo- 
tives in white, blue and red enamels with leaves of green enamel, upon 
a groimd entirely covered with a dehcate tracery of gold lines. The medal- 
Uons are occupied by what axe very evidently half-length portraits of Holy 
men or Rulers, all of them exhibiting in their handling a marked Byzan- 
tine spirit, curiously interpenetrated in at least one instance, with some form 
of Mongohan influence. Some of the heads are surrounded by golden halos, 
most of the faces are bearded and one of the figures holds what appears 
to be a musical instrument in his hands. The exterior of the bowl has suf- 
fered by its long immurement and already the process of glass-decay has 
set in. The greater part of the enamel, however, has remained in place, 
and so deUcate is the incrusted patina, so illusive the iridescence which ex- 
tends over nearly the entire surface, that the bowl has gained rather than 
lost in interest. The surface of the lower part of the bowl has become much 
disintegrated, but shows traces of a bold ornamentation in colored enamels. 
The interior presents almost its original appearance, except around the in- 
curved rim where the glass was originally left perfectly plain. The centre, 



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immediately above the slightly convex boss which marks the juncture of the 
body with the foot, is decorated with a pattern of six rays extending out- 
ward from a common centre, in white enamel; this is surrounded by the well- 
known cabalistic six-pointed star, known as the "Knot of Solomon,'* foimed 
by the interlacement of two triangles, with the triangular spaces between the 
points filled with a Saracenic scroll ornament in red, white and green en- 
amel. All this over a ground of an interlaced pattern of strapwork in gold, 
finely outlined in red. Above this central medaUion pattern runs a broad 
horizontal band of ornamentation, consisting of palmettes of red, white and 
green enamel divided by a Saracenic pattern of fioral interlacements with 
heart-shaped leaves, in red, blue and white enamels. The entire ground not 
occupied by the pattern is covered with an arabesque tracery in the finest 
of gold lines. The foot is of plain glass largely iridescent and at its juncture 
with the bowl is a band of small cup-like depressions. 
Illustrated 

BmgU, SVi 'moAm; diMMtw, 8% indu*. 

C| This bowl was found within the last two years at Hamadan, a town of 
Persia, lying about 160 miles south by west of Teheran at the foot of 
the Elvend Mountain. It has been identified with the Ecbatana of the Bible, 
and in our day its chief object of interest is the tomb of Esther and Mor- 
decai. The importance of this bowl can hardly be oTer-estimated, for it is 
undoubtedly the oldest, as it is in many respects the most beautiful, piece of 
Saracenic enamelled glass in existence. It helps to settle the long vexed 
question as to earliest date of this enamelled glass, the only important examples 
of which hitherto known having been the greatly admired votive Mosque Lamps 
of Jerusalem and Cairo. Like all the arts they developed, the Saracens im- 
parted an originality and freshness of treatment, as well as a technical skill 
of their own, into the making of their Glassware, which puts it into a distinct 
class of its own. Hitherto, however, it has been a question as to whether 
the art could be traced beyond the Thirteenth Century, and as to whether 
Aleppo or Cairo were the centre of the industry. The circumstance of its 
provenance seem to have established the fact that this bowl was fashioned 
prior to the Tenth Century, and it supplies us with the inherent evidence that 
it proceeded from a Mesopotamian atelier, probably before the artistic im- 
pulses of the fallen Sasanian dynasty had entirely died away, and evm more 
probably under the direct influence of a Byzantine glass-wotlcer. 

This much may at least be said, that in none of the great national mu- 
seums, and BO far as is known in no private collection, is there to be found 
a piece of enamelled glassware of tJie importance, the interest, or the artistic 
value of this provisionally named "Hamadan" Bowl. 



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*881 — Persian Manusceipt 

The Bustan (or fruit garden) of Sa'di. Manuscript written, in a fine Per- 
sian Nastalik script, and dated A.H. 988 (A.D. 1581) by the calligraphist 
Mir Ali, according to the colophon, in Bokhara. Two columns to a page, on 
paper of different colors, inlaid with broad margins sprinkled in gold and 
with panels and head-pieces illuminated in gold and colors. There are three 
full page miniatures in the school of Behzad and painted in gold and colors. 

"A" King Dura and his Groom. The familiar story (see No. 802 for de- 
tails) of the groom's reproach to the King when the latter failed to 
recognize him. 

"B" The Hmnble King and the Bold Dervish Beggar. 

"C" The Worship of a Buddha in a Clunese Temple. 

In the centre of the first page of this manuscript is an octagonal medallion 
with an arabesque of gold and colors on a dark blue ground, surrounding a 
gold ground on which in white script is an inscription "Made for the Im- 
perial Library of the great Sultan and King, the Ruler of the Kings of 
Arabia and Persia, Sultan and son of a Sultan and son of a Sultan, the 
Victorious Sultan Abd-ul- Aziz-Bahadur — may God Most High prolong his 
reign and sovereignty." 

This Abd-ul- Aziz was either the Sultan of Urganj, Khwa, who died in 1551, 
or the King of Gujarat in India, who was conquered by Akbar. 
Above the medallion is written "Allah Akbar, the First and the First," and 
below it, on a gold band across the page, another inscription headed "Jalal 
ad-Din Muhammad Akbar the Victorious King. Allah Akbar." The in- 
scription runs: "This beautiful manuscript, which has been written by the 
fine hand of the matchless of his time, Maulana Amir Ali, is from the books 
of the brother of the late Prince Sultan Murad (pardtmed of God), after 
he was removed from this transitory world, and has been brought to the 
library of his Majesty, whose refuge is the threshold of the sky, Jalal ad- 
Din Muhammad Akbar the Victorious Emperor^-may God make his light 
shine — and from his Majesty came to my library; and on account of its per- 
fect beauty it has been kept most of the time before me and has been con- 
stantly read, and my eyes have been delighted by its beautiful and unparal- 
leled script." 



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In the left-hand upper comer is a repetition of "Allah Akbar" and a note in 
another hand which runs as follows: "On the 5th of Adar A.H. 1014 — 
A.D., March, 1606, the year of Coronation, it entered into my hbrary. 
This was written by Nur ad-Din Jahangir, son of Akbar the Emperor. This 

choice Sustan is one of the finest books. Its price 8000 { ) (denoniina- 

tion obliterated, probably rupees). The pictures are the work of (name 

illegible)." 

There is yet another inscription in a different hand which reads: "Oh Godl 
In the name of God, the most merciful and compassionate. This Bustan, 
which is a second Paradise (or Rose-garden), and which is one of the rarities 
of the ages as regards its handsome writing and its miniatures, came to my 
library on the 25th of the Month Bahman which corresponds to the 8th day 
of Jamadi a-Sani, A.H. 1087 (A.D. Jan. 16th, 1628), which is the day of 
the blessed Coronation. It was presented to me because, in every respect, 
it is fine to read. This is written by me Shahal ad-Din Muhammad Sahib 
Kiran, the Emperor {Shah Jahan), son of Jahangir, the son of Akbar the 
Emperor. The miniatures were made in the library of {name obliterated) ." 
Bound in a contemporary case of portfolio form of stamped, tooled and 
gilded morocco. Illustrated 

Pag* *h«, 11% {mAm by 7 I-l« ImiAm. 

^ Beautiful as is this manuscript, uwing to its matchless calligraphy and 
the artistic character of its miniatures, it possesses an associative value 
which places it among the most valuable and interesting Persian manuscripts 
in existence. It belonged to three of the greatest monarchs the Eastern 
World has ever known, and it contains autograph inscriptions and apprecia- 
tions by two of them. Akhbar the Great ( 164i2-160S) , entitled the "Guardian 
of Mankind," was one of the greatest and wisest of the Moghul emperors, waa 
a munificent patron of literature, and gathered around him many men of lit- 
erary talent. It was during the reign of his son Jahangir, the Great Moghul, 
that the English first established themselves in India, and during that of 
his son, Shah Jahan the Magnificent, that the Moghul Empire attained its 
greatest magnificence. It was he who built that world's wonder, Taj Mahil, 
rebuilt the city of Delhi, still known to its inhabitants as Jah&nabdd, and 
owned the Peacock Throne now in Persia. 



*882 — Pebsian Manxjsceipt 

Five books of Persian poetry, composed by Khusran Dahlair of Delhi, and 
dedicated to the Indian Emperor Ala ad-Din Muhammad Shah, between 



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A.H. 698 and 701 (A.D. 1298-1801). They are written in imitatioa of the 
Persian Romantic Poet Nizami. The manuscript is writtoi in a very beauti- 
ful Nastalik script, four columns to the page, with borders of blue, red and 
gold, with the text on gold sprinkled panels. Book headings finely illumi- 
nated in gold and colors. The contents include: 

(1) A dedication to the Indian Emperor Sultan Ala ad-Din Muhammad 
Shah, dated A.H. 698 (A.D. 1298). 8810 couplets. 

(2) Khusran (Chosroes) and Shirin. dated A.H. 698 (AJ). 1298). 4124 
couplets. 

(8) Laila and Majnum an imitation of Nizami's celebrated love story. 
Dated A.H. 698 (A.D. 1298). 2608 couplets. 

(4) Iskander-Namah. A story of Alexander the Great. Dated A.H. 699 
(AD. 1209). 4450 couplets. 

(5) Halturang or "Constellation of the Seven Stars." An imitation of the 
Haft Paika, or Seven Portraits, of Nizami. Dated A.H. 701 (A.D. 
1801). 8852 couplets. 

Thus the volume contains nearly 18,000 couplets. It is adorned with seven ex- 
quisite miniatures of the Timuride school, painted at Herat in the reign of 
Shah Rokh (son of Timur the Great, or Tamerlane). 

"A" The Ascension of Mahomet to Heaven. 

"B" A Haji or Pilgrim Worshipping at the Shrine. 

"C" The "Thirsty Young Men" drink to each other. 

"D" King Eiiusran (or Chosroes) Hawking. 

"E" Marriage of Ehusran and the Princess Shirin. 

"F" The father of Laila's lover, Majnum, going to bring the daughter of 

Naufal as a wife for his son. 
"G" Laila, the love-lorn heroine in the garden with her maids. 

This volume has on the fly-leaf the name of its former owners, Mir MouUah, 
dated AH. 1011 (AD. 1602), and Mir Ali Asgar, AH. 1816 (AD. 



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Bound in a painted and ^ded Sixteenth Century leather binding of p<nt- 
foUo form. The design of mythical animals Bghting and of lions attacking 
deer displays a Chinese influence. 

P(^» nz0, 13% inckM by Sy^ foolUt. 

*88S — ^Feb8IA2{ Mai^usceipt 

A history of Shah Ismail I of Persia, who reigned from 1480 to 1524 AJ). 
and was the foimder of the Safavid Dynasty. Manuscript written, and 
dated A.H. 929 (A.D. 1S22), in a very beautiful Nastalik script. The date 
has apparently been added in a later hand, for the manuscript was made for 
Shah Tahmasp, Shah Ismail's successor, who came to the throne in 1524. 
The text is within ruled borders of gold, red and black, and there are nu- 
merous head-pieces beautifully illimainated in gold and color. 
The volume is adorned with five miniatures of the school of Bebzid, 
mounted with wide borders painted in gold with a conventional scroll deco- 
ration of flowers and animals. The reverses of the miniatures are also dec- 
orated with panels of the traditional Fhcenix and Drag<m Combat and other 
subjects, and borders of rosettes and palmettes in gold. The miniatures in- 
clude: 

"A" The famous battle between Shah Ismail and the Shah of Shirwan in 
1502 AJ). 

"B" The Court of Shah Ismiiil. 

"C" The great battle between Shah Ismail and Shah Shubani Khan at 
Merv in 1510 A.D. 

"D" Shah Ismail hunting, after his return from Mahkchiaran. 

"E" Shah Tahmasp. 

Bound in painted and lacquered boards of late Eighteenth Century work- 
manship, with designs of roses and nightingales and portraits of shahs. 

Pag» «iM, IT ImAm hy lOVi InekM. 

Q Manuscripts of the History of Ismail I are noted for the beauty of their 
illustrations and the elaboration of their illuminations. Some copies, similar 
to this, are regarded as among the chief treasures of the Imperial Library at 
St. Petersburg. 



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•334 — Pebsian Manusceipt 

The Slmh Namah or Book of Kings. By the Persian Epic Poet Firdausi 
(A.D. 935-1020). Manuscript written and dated A.H. 1008 (A.D. 1599), 
by the calligraphist Abdalla, son of Muhanunad Kasim, in a small but beau- 
tifully clear Nastalik script. According to the colophon it was written in 
Herat, Afghanistan, by the order of the Nawab . . . (the name is inten- 
tionally obliterated) under the direction of Husain Khan of Syria (Hu- 
sain's name is mentioned in the manuscript "The Stories of Kings") (No. 
301 ) . There are four columns to the page, a double title page marvellously 
illuminated in gold and colors, and many illuminated headings. 
There are no fewer than 44 full-page miniatures of an historical character, 
and of admirable style and execution. The subjects of which are as follows: 

1— Minuchlr's war with Salun and Tus. 

3 — The Princess Rudabah, daughter of Miibrab, going to her garden. She Is espoused to the faero 
ZaL 

S— Sin-dukht talking with Sam. 

4 — Birth of Rustam, the Persian Hercules. (The Cssarian operation was performed to deliver the 
child.) 

A — Zal goes to the help of Mihrab of KabuL 

e — Ru^tam catches his famous borse Rakhsh. 

T— Rustam fl^U with the WWte Demon. 

S— King Kaus dies to heaven by means of eagles. (The earliest recorded Instance of aerial flight on a 
monoplane 1 Kaus reigned before 600 B.C.) 

9 — Subrab, the son of Rustam, in battle. 
10— 'Rustam slays his son Suhrsb in combat. 

11 — Siawash passes through the flre-ordeal to prove his innocence. 
IB — Siawash goes into the presence ol King Afrasiab of Turan. 
13— Piran goes to see Siawash. 

li — Siawash lulled by Kami at the order of Afrasiab. 
IS — Battle between Rustam of Per^a and Afrariab of Turan, 
IG—Piran puts Kai-Khusran and Giv to flight. 
IT— Zarasp killed by Farud. 
18 — Kai Khusran and Parabura in conflict. 
19 — Rustam pleads to Kai-Khusru on Tus'a acconnL 
90 — Battle Ijetween the armies of Iran and Turan. 
91 — Piran tells the Emperor of China about Rustam. 
S3 — Rustam catches the Emperor of China in his lasso. 
S3 — Rustam wrestles with Puladvand. 
M— The demon Abuan Div throws Rustam into the Bea. 
3S — Garsivaz seizes Bican in the palace of Manijah. 
S6— Rustam draws Biian out of the well. 
S7— Giv fl^ts Piran and Sipali. 
38 — Gudara fights with Piran and Sipah. 



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M— Kal-Khntru) kilts Shidah. 

30— Ksi'Khosran uliefi DHi. 

SI — Afraslsb hides in a cave, and Hun discovers him. 

SS— Tua delivers his kingdom to Sohrasp. 

33 — King Guahlup, the patron of Zoroaster, in a hoty war. 

34--T1ie bero Isfandlar UUs two lions. 

3A— Rnatam at supper after Uk hunt 

36 — Rnstam pierces Isfandiar with an arrow. 

37 — Dara (Darius III), when dying sends a last message to Alexander tiie Great. 

38— Alexander the Great t^efore Kaldafah. 

S»— Girts sent to Alexander b; the Faghfur. 

40 — Games at the coronation of Ardashir. 

41 — ShapuT makes ■ night attack upon ttie Roman Kaiser. 

43 — Bahrain Gur hunting the wild ass. 

43— Bdiram Gur Idlls a dragon. 

44 — AnuslilrTan in battle against the Byzantine emperor. 

Copies of the Shah Naznah are becoming so increasingly scarce that it is 
rarely that one of even indifferent quality comes into the market. It may 
safely be said that outside of the Imperial and National Libraries, and a 
few private collections, another such an exfunple as this, with its superb cal- 
hgraphy and its wealth of miniatures representing that art whoi at its 
climax, and in such perfect condition is absolutely unknown. Bound in 
lacquered boards (with Battle Scenes) of Eighteenth Century manufacture. 

Pagt lize, 15'/i liMftM by 10 inch4*. 



•885 — MiNIATUBE 

Indo-Persian. Fainted in gouache with a slight heightening of gold. Sub- 
ject : A night scene of a rocky landscape with a group of Hindu Fakeers, 
some nude and some clothed. In the shade of a large tree nx of them sit and 
warm themselves around a fire. In the foreground one lies at full length on 
his back asleep. At the right of the picture an attendant approaches carry- 
ing on his back a large bag. In the background is seen a broad river. 
Mounted, with an inner border of arabesque design illuminated in gold and 
colors, on a broad outer mar^n with dogs, apes and deer in a conventional- 
ized rocky landscape painted in gold on a cream-colored paper. On the re- 
verse is a page of manuscript in panels divided by borders of a gold ara- 
besque pattern on a rose ground and surroimded by a broad border of a 



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scrolled pattern of grapes and flowers in gold on a dark blue ground, with 
a manuscript note setting forth that it was written by Imad el-Housna in 
the year 1022 A.H. (1618 A.D.) 

Bfifkt, 11% teoAM; vkUk, T% imtAm. 

Q Imad el-Hausna, whose name appears on the back of both of these minia- 
tures, is none other than the celebrated Mir* Imad of Herat, who was ac- 
counted the finest calligraphist of his coitury. As has been p<»nt«d out the 
caUigraphist was held in higher esteon than the miniatuiist, which accounts 
for the greater prominence given to his name in this instance. The painta 
of these pictures, however, who seemed to work with equal facilit; in the styles 
of Italy and Holland, as well as in his own Persian, was held in ahnost the 
same CMitaDaporar; r^ute as Mir* Imad. He is said to have painted only 
twelve pictures in the whole of his life-time. 



*885A — MlNIATUBE 

Indo-Fersian. Fainted in gouadie of India ink, profusely heightened with gold 
and color. Subject: A series of nig^t scenes in a panelled arrangement. The 
upper left-hand portion is occupied by a scene, treated in the Persian style, of 
a Fersian marriage, showing the newly married couple, the nuptial coach and 
an attendant in the background. The upper right-hand portion is occupied 
by a representation, treated in the style of the Italian school of the Fifteenth 
Century, of the Repentant Magdalene in her Hermit's Cave. With clasped 
hands she studies the open book in front of her. On tiie same rocky ledge 
is also a human skull and a crudfix, while from a cloud above a shaft <rf 
golden li^t fdls upon her. The entire lower half is occupied with what is 
probably a Biblical scene, treated in the style of the Dutch school of the 
Fifteenth Century. This represents a halt in the desert. In a rocky land- 
scape a little group of travellers are reposing. On eitlier dde of a lifted 
lamp placed on the ground underneath a large tree and by the side of a 
pool of water are two bearded old men, one of \diom is smoking a pipe, 
^rtiile tlie other rests his head on his hand. A youth is asleep near them aa 
the left and on the right a servant arranges the burden of a pack-mule, while 
anotiier mule lies on the ground by his side. The chiaroscuro effect of this 
little scene is excellently handled. Mounted with an inner illuminated ara- 
besque bord^ on a broad mar^n with animals in a conventi<mal landscape 



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painted in gold on a cream-colored paper. On the reverse is an illuminated 
manuscript page treated in a precisely similar manner to the foregoing, ex- 
cept that the date is given as 1012 A.H. (1608 A.D.) 

Htight, 11% Inch**; widtk, T^ JMckM. 

*886 — ^MmiATUSE 

Indo-Persian. Line and wash drawing in India ink and color. Subject: In a 
rocky landscape is shown a group consisting of a Hindu Yogi and his dis- 
ciples in a variety of attitudes. The Master himself with a long beard sits on 
a tiger skin in the background under the shade of a tree, a disciple standing 
behind him with a fan, while another prostrates himself before him. Of the 
others some crouch over a fire, while others receive the offerings of the pil- 
grims. In the background are seen the buildings of a city. Mounted with 
a broad margin of gold sprinkled paper. Seventeenth Century. 

Bmght, 6% 4»ehM; width, i% tnek-. 

Q This and the following eleven miniatures form the very cream of the pri- 
vate collection which* as has already been said, M. Emil Tabbagh has spent 
many years in gathering together. They are so thoroughly representative of 
the best periods of the art and of its most eminent practitioners that this set 
of twelve will be placed on sale as a whole. 



*886A — ^MmiATtJBE 

Persian, with a Chinese influence. Painted in gold and colors. Subject: 
Represents an old man with gray beard, wide-brimmed hat and ruff around 
the neck, seated in a landscape writing in a book. The head is realistically 
handled, the dress and the landscape are treated in a curious conventional 
fashion so as to simulate grained wood and marbling. Mounted with a bor- 
der of Sixteenth Century birds and flowers in rose color, outlined in gold. 

Srigkt, 9% ImOtn; Itugth, 5% Imdut. 
*886B — ^MlNIATUXB 

Persian. Line and wash drawing in India ink. Subject: Representing the 
seated figure of a prophetess who has by her side an open book in which she 
has just been writing. She is seated on a chair of classic form with a tasselled 



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cushion, and has for a background the base of a Corinthian column and a 
heavy fold of drapery. With her left hand she tenders a cup to a nude and 
bearded pygmy behind her, who supports it with both hands as he drinks. 
Across the sky a flock of birds is flying. Signed Kassroa A.H. 969 (1561 
A.D.). 

B*iffht, 3% HWIU*; wUth. 9% fmAtt. 

*886C — Miniature 

Persian. Line and wash drawing in India ink. Representing an episode in 
the life of Karonan, when on a journey through the desert he retired from 
his companions to pray. He is seen in the upper portion of the composition 
kneeling on his prayer rug with an open Koran before him. His servants 
are below with the pack camels and his horse. The mosque which is his des- 
tination, is seen in the distance. This exquisite example of Persian draughts- 
manship is mounted with a border of lions pursuing and capturing deer, and 
a conventional floral pattern in line heightened with gilding. Early Six- 
teenth Century. 



*836D — MmiATUBE 

Persian. Line drawing in India ink, with washes of Sepia and color. Rep- 
resenting a Sybil, crowned with laurel, seated on a classic chair and read- 
ing from an open book. Facing her is the seated skeleton-like figure of a 
man with a dog at his side, possibly symbolizing Death or Disease. The 
Italian influence is remarkably strong in this most interesting miniature. 
Mounted with a border of birds and floral scrolls in blue on a lighter blue 
ground and outlined in gold. Above the miniature is also mounted a panel 
with an inscription in white reserve on a ground illuminated in gold and 
colors. Middle Sixteenth Century. 

size, kright, S% tneht*; width, S^ htehti. 

•886E — Miniature 

Persian. Painted in a very fine India ink line with light washes of color. Sub- 
ject: The Legend of Laila. Laila sits on a ledge of rock in the mountainous 
desert, while a lion, a bear, a leopard and other animals pay homage to her. 



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In the foreground the shepherd Majnum, the lover of Laila, separated from 
her, tends his flock of long-haired- sheep. Painted with an amazing finegte, 
this little picture is representative of one of the best schools of Persian min- 
iature painting. Mounted on a panel painted in simulation of grained wood, 
with a wide margin of scroll pattern in rose and gold. Sixteenth Century. 

a»ight, 4y, inchet; width, 1% tnchtt. 



•336F — Miniature 

Persian. Line and wash drawing in India ink, heightened with touches of 
color and gilding. Subject; A mythological one representing two figures in a 
rocky landscape. One is that of a woman, her head surrounded by a razed 
halo and holding in her right hand a Persian viola and its bow. Her left 
hand is thrown in a protecting gesture aroimd the neck of a youthful figiu-e 
with wings, wearing sandals and nude save for a scarf around the upper 
part of his body and a short kilt-like skirt with a belt, through which is 
thrust a short sword. Mounted with an inner border simulating grained 
wood and an outer border of dotted gold. Late Sixteenth Century. 

Htight, 6<4 inehet; width, A% inehM. 



•836G MiNIATUEE 

Persian. Painted in a wash of India ink on a background of conventional 
foliage in gold. Subject; A group of animals. Two camels one with a 
nursling and a species of horned sheep. On a panel painted to simulate 
grained wood and mounted with a border of floral scrolls and birds in gray 
heightened with gold hnes on a ground of rose color. Sixteenth Century. 

Bright, 3% inchtt; widik, i% {mAm. 



886H— MiN lATUBE 

Persian. Painted in gold and colors. Subject; A scene in a palace court 
yard with a background, seen through the palace gate, of a landscape with 
two Cypress trees and an Almond tree in blossom. The foreground is oc- 
cupied by a group of six persons including a negro slave. Through a half 
opened door a woman looks out. The miniature is mounted with an ex- 



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qtiisite inner border illuminated in gold and colors on a black ground and 
by a broad border of gold sprinkled paper, sligbtly worm-eaten. Fainted 
for the Sultan All el Mechidi, and dated A.H. 888 (1481 A.D.). 



•8861 — MmiATUBE 

Persian. Painted in a wash line of India ink, heightened with touches of 
gold and color. Subject: Portrait of Shah Abbas (the I-iouis XIV of 
Persia) . This is one of the very few miniatures which were actually mgned 
by Behz^d, that most famous miniaturist of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Cen- 
turies, and is on that account of the highest interest. Mounted with a bor- 
der of scroll pattern in dark blue and gold on a mottled blue ground. Signed 
"Behzfid." Fifteenth Century. 

Bright, S% ImAm; vtdtk, 3% ttmhtt. 



•886J — MiNIATUBE 

Persian. Painted in a light wash of India ink and Sepia. SubjecH;: An 
old man on a very thin horse with his dog running before him. Three birds 
fly above his head and there are a few conventional cloud forms in the sky. 
The movement of the starved horse is admirably rendered. Signed "Ma- 
homed el Khajin." Dated 920 A-H. (1514 A.D.) 

Bright, 9% imek4i; wUtfe, 4^ hmhM. 



*886E — ^MmiATUBE 

Persian. Drawn in a fine India ink line slightly heightened by washes of 
brown and green. Subject: A King (probably Stiah Abbaft in his youth) 
in a rocky landscape engaged in that favorite pursuit of the Persian Kings 
— hawking. He is seated on a horse which, as he reins it in, plunges 
viciously. At his horse's heels runs a hound and on his right hand he car- 
ries his luiwk. On the extreme left is one of his attendants, evidently point- 
ing out to him the game he should pursue. In the background a fox takes 
cover and in the sky is seen a heron. Late Sixteenth Century. 

Bright, \0% AmJIm; wldtK »% imelM. 



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RUGS AND CARPETS 



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ORIENTAL RUGS 

We have lately been told, and on distinguished authority, that the apprecia- 
tion by the public of the old weaves of Oriental rugs bears no creditable propor- 
tion to the extent of the market for rugs offered by the city of New York. 
Doubtless this statement is not very far wide of the mark, but on the other hand 
there is much to be said for the good taste of a conmiimity which has never yet 
failed to recognize the artistic value of the finer Oriental weaves when these have 
been adequately presented to them. Especially has that recognition been extended 
to the Turkish weaves of Ghiordes, Kulah and Ladik, to the Persian Herata and 
to the so-called "Ispahans," of the Seventeenth Century. So incontestible is the 
decorative value of these, due to that wealth of apparently intricate, but in real- 
ity simple, patterning which gives to their coloring an indescribable bloom-like 
effect, that examples of obviously fine quality every day become increasingly rare 
and difficult to obtain. Some of these rugs of the MM. Tabbagh Fr^res have 
passed through well-known European collections, the others represent the result 
of a critical elimination of all but the most admirable examples. Among the older 
pieces are an Asia Minor rug of the Sixteenth Century, which belongs to the 
so-called "Holbein" class, and some Mosque carpets of very insistent interest. 
But the undoubted "clou" of the collection is to be sought in the exquisite examples 
from the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century looms of Ghiordes, Kulah, Ladik 
and Ispahan. 



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PERSIAN AND TURKISH RUGS AND CARPETS OF THE 
SIXTEENTH, SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURIES 
849— Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes of the late Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of 
red and blue flower and bud forms with light blue and yellow leaves od a 
white ground. Border is divided, by white stripes tevUs with black outlined 
fleurettes, into triangulw spaces which are filled with straight-stemmed, red 
and white flower-forms on a dark blue ground. Inner guard band of a red 
and blue conventional pattern on a white ground. Field is of a hexagonal 
diamond form, with double pointed ends, having a dark blue ground, a dia- 
mond-shaped medallion in the centre, a pattern of white latch-work at either 
end, while the four triangular-shaped comer spaces are filled with red, white 
and blue palms on a black ground. 

BiLt 6 fa»t 8 taohw by 4 /*•< T taeikM. 

850 — Peateb Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the Ei^teenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
blue meander pattern on a h^t purphsh ground. Border of red and blue 
palmettes separated by designs of a lily form on a yellowish ground. Inner 
guard band a meander pattern in white on a dark blue ground. Field as a 
Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a ground of very rich dark red and a soffit of 
red palmettes on a dark blue ground. Below are the characteristic Ladik 
pendant lilies, five in number, with blossoms of varying blue color on a red 
ground. ^tTy'^--^- ' 

Bb*. e /Ml 10 tneku by S /m( t iitch»i. 

851 — Prayeb Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the early Sixteenth Century. A border of the char- 
acteristic Kulah type of ten alternate stripes of yellow, bright blue, red 
and white, with fleurettes of yellow and brown. Field as a Mihrab, of 
prayer-niche, with side panels, all of dark blue with a pattern of small yellow 
diamonds. The soffit and background between the arched opening and the 
side panels are of h^t blue with a diamond-shaped pattern of brown, white 



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and yellow. Above is a panelled border of red and blue palmettes on a 
white ground; below, a panelled border of yellow and pale blue clef dia- 
monds on a white ground. 

BiM, a fft S teekM by i /mI S ktAt. 

SS2— Rug 

Persian. Feraghan weave of the late Eighteenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands of a dark blue and red scrolled pattern upon a white ground. 
Border, a pattern of rosettes in black and cream color on a red ground. Field, 
a ground of dark blue covered with a diapered pattern of small palm leaves 
in a prevailing tone of red. 

Sim, fi /Mt 8 IxrlU* by S f44t 8 fawlUt. 

858 — Prayer Rtro 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of 
red, white, yellow and black profile flower pattern on a pale blue ground. 
Border a pattern of a three blossomed flower design of rectangular form in 
alternate red and blue, with touches of yellow and white. Inner guard band 
of red flowers with alternate white and blue leaves on a hght red ground. 
Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a centre of olive-green, having a 
floral medallion in the centre and a lamp form in the crown of the arch. Deep 
soffit of a light blue ground with a floral pattern in red. Above, a panelled 
border of a red ground, with a pattern of red, yellow and white flowers; be- 
low, two panelled borders, one a repeat of the last described and the other 
with a floral pattern in red on a blue ground. 

BbM, 8 f*»* S imelm bjr 5 /««< 3 ituA»*. 

854 — Prayer Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the middle Eighteenth Century. Outer guard 
band of a meander pattern of blue on a red ground. Border of red, pale 
blue and white floral rosettes on a rich blue ground. Inner guard band re- 
peats the pattern of the outer in red and blue on a yellow groimd. Field as 
a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a rich red ground. The soffit is of palm-leaf 
forms of red and yellow on a turqumse-blue ground. Below is the charac- 
teristic Ladik motive of flve lily-like flowers of white with green leaves, de- 
pending downwards, on a rich red ground. Slightly repaired. 

&M, « f**t 9 iiMtftM by S /«*t « tMehM. 



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855 — Prates Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century, Outer guard band of a 
red, white and yellow scrolled design on a black ground. Inner guard band 
a repeat of the outer with the addition of a broad border with a pattern of 
green and red flower forms on a yellow ground. Border of very conven- 
tionalized flower and leaf forms arranged in squiires of four in alternate col- 
orings of red, yellow, brown and blue on a white ground. The field as a Mih- 
rab, or prayer-niche, with a groimd of dark purplish-brown nearly covered 
by a design at the side of lily forms in profile and in the centre a longitud- 
inal band of star-shaped flowers arranged in groups of four. Above is a 
panelled border of red and green flower-fonus on a black ground. 

8ic*, ff /««( 4 inehf by 4 f**L 



856 — ^RuG 

Persian. Mir weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of a con- 
ventional pattern of black, heightened by touches of red on a dark blue 
groxmd. Border of a meander pattern in red and black on a white ground. 
Field of rich red with a diapered pattern of small palms of bronze-like yel- 
low and black in an fdtemating arrangement. 

Siu. * fMi 9 thcWf hy 9 fMt S iiMAM. 



857 — Peatee Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the early Eighteenth Century. Outer guard 
band, red, yellow, blue and white flower forms on a black ground. Border of 
alternating narrow stripes of red, with blue fleurettes, and white, with red 
fleurettes. Inner guard band of red, blue, white and black flower forms on 
a yellow grotmd, with another border around the field of a red meander pat- 
tern on a white ground. The field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with 
stepped arch and a groimd of bright yellow having a floral border around 
sides and bottom; a diamond-shaped medallion of pale blue, red and white, 
and a floral lamp form in the crown of the arch. The soffit is of flower forms 
on a red ground. Above and below are panelled borders of floral rosettes 
on a red ground. 

SIh, 5 f*4t S i»ek4i by 4 f»et S ituhtt. 



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858 — Feateb Ruq 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
blue and yellow conTentional floral pattern on a yellow ground. Border of 
the characteristic Kulah stripes of alternate blue, black end yellow mean- 
der patterns on a white ground. Inner guard band of a blue, brown and 
white scroll pattern on a yellow ground. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, 
with blue centre, covered almost completely with a pattern of three vertical 
stripes of a black and white diamond and conventional floral pattern upon 
a blue groimd. The sofiit of a dark blue ground with a floral pattern in 
yellow outlined in brown. The arch is stepped and outlined in white. 
Above is a panelled border of reverse-curved leaves in yellow and blue <m 
a black ground. 

Bit*, 9 f*tt a (mAm by 4 f»»t i iaohM. 

859 — Pbayes Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the Ei^teenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
dark blue meander pattern on a red ground. Border of green and white, 
red and white, and blue and white palmettes on a dark blue ground. Field as 
a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a red groimd and the usual Ladik arrange- 
ment of five pendant lilies alternating of blue and white leaves and white 
and blue blossoms on a red ground. Above a panelled border of palmettes 
in white and red on a blue ground. 

Six; S fiet 9 inchu by S /««t 7 <m*m. 

860 — Rug 

Persian. Shiraz weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands, narrow stripes of red ground with a half-diamond pattern in black 
and white. Border of a small conventional pattern in red and white upon 
a dark blue ground. Field has a ground of dark red completely covered 
with a diapered pattern of alternately arranged palm leaves of dark blue, 
yellow and white. An exceptionally fine and close weave with a very vel- 
vety texture and rich color scheme. 

Biu, 6 ft»t 8 inebu by 4 f»tt 9 ituku. 

861 — Prayeb Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band of 
blue, between two red stripes, with dentated pattern in white. Border of 



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large red palmettes with branches of smaller flowers in red and light blue on 
a yellow ground. Inner guard band a rich floral pattern of red on a white 
ground. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with red ground, having two col- 
umns with a chequer pattern of red on a yellow ground. The soffit is of 
scrolled branches of white with red flowers. In the crown of the arch is a 
floral medaUion taking the place of the usual lamp form. Slightly repaired. 

She, i f«»t 11 inck4t by 3 f»it 9 incki*. 

862 — Prayee Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands narrow stripes of yellow with fleurettes of black. Border a conven- 
tionalized floral pattern of yellow and pale blue on a white ground. Field 
as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a cream-colored centre and a profile flower 
border in red down two sides and across the bottom. In the crown of the 
arch is a floral lamp form. The soffit is of yellow flowers on a cream-colored 
ground. Above, a panelled border of five cream-colored and red rosettes 
on a light blue ground. 

Site, 6 fett 1 inch by 4 fett 1 inch. 

368— Peayeb Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
blue meander pattern on a red ground. Border of red, white and yellow 
palmettes on a blue ground. Inner guard band repeats the pattern of the 
outer on a purple ground and has an inner stripe of dark blue with a pattern 
in red and light blue. Field as a Miharb, or prayer-niche, with stepped arch 
and red ground. The "sky" or soffit is of pale blue with red palm leaves 
and below is the characteristic treatment of five pendant lily forms of tur- 
quoise-blue and red on a yellow ground. 

S(M, S fett 10 inchet by 3 fMt 10 te«ftM. 

864 — Phayek Rug 

Persian. Khorassan or Kayin, {Herat), weave of the Sixteenth Century. 
Outer and inner guard bands of a meander border with yellow flowers in 
profile and outlined In black on a turquoise-blue ground. Border of a 
scroll design with red palmettes on a black groimd. Field as a Mihrab or 
prayer-niche, occupied by a design of a flowering tree with wide-spread 



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and interlaced branches, which spring from an ornamental vase placed on a 
pedestal. The branches are black, the flowers in red and yellow and the 
leaves green. The vase has a conTentional pattern of blue on a cream-col- 
ored ground and the pedestal a pattern in red and green on a red ground. 
At either side are two half vases from which spring columns of yellow with 
a scroll design in black and these support the shaped arch of the panel. The 
soffit is of a floral design in the prevailing colors on a cream-colored 
ground. 

This most effective rug is admirable, not alone on account of its original pat- 
tern and pleasing color arrangement, but by reason of the very unusual 
treatment of its weave. The long silky pile, of the very close and fine weave, 
has in places been carefully cut away and picked out, thus allowing the un- 
cut portion of the pattern to stand out in relief against a background of 
the closely woven warp. This latter has been dyed with the colors of its 
original pile. The effect is that of a Sixteenth Century Italian cut velvet 
brocade, and of an indescribable richness and lustre. 

SiH, S <M( 4 ttusU* by 9 /<«( 9 imekM. 

865 — Peaveb Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. The outer border is 
composed of narrow stripes of white, red, blue, green and yellow, with pat- 
terns of fleurettes in contrasting colors. The inner guard band is a narrow 
stripe with a red and black spiral pattern on a white ground. The field as a 
Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a centre of deep blue, a stepped arch and 
around the two sides and bottom a conventional pattern in red and yel- 
low. Above, a panelled border of pakn-leaf pattern in yellow and red on a 
dark ground; below, a panelled border of a pattern in pale yellow and li^t 
blue on a dark blue ground. 

Biu, a fMt by 4 fMt S tooAM. 

866 — Prater Rtro 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of 
piJe blue with an irregular pattern of white, yellow and black scrolls. 
Border having on a white ground a pattern of yellow flower sprays outlined 
in black and between each group of four a similar pattern in black outlined 
in yellow. Inner guard band of four narrow stripes alternating a blue 



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ground with yellow rosettes, and a yeUow ground with flower forms outlined 
in black. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, of a dark blue ground with a 
border of yellow flowers in profile around three sides, and in the centre a 
flower stem, from which flower forms spring at regular intervals on either 
side. The soffit has a pattern of yellow and black half -diamonds on a tur- 
quoise-blue ground. Above is a panelled border of turquoise-blue, repeat- 
ing the pattern of the soffit in ydlow. 

j9{i«, a fMt 10 ineAfi by \ /mI 1 (mA. 

867— Pkayeb Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of 
conventionalized flower-forms in pairs and in red, black, white and dark blue 
on a turqu(Hse-blue ground, between two narrow stripes of red with dotted 
patterns in white. Border of oval rosettes of dark blue and red, and of blue, 
green and red leaf and tuUp forms on a yellow ground. Inner guard band of a 
meander pattern in red and yellow on a Persian-blue ground. Field as a 
Mihrab, or prayer-niche, the ground of rich ruby red with a flat stepped arch 
and a border of small flower forms in yellow and blue. The soffit is filled 
with a pattern of lancet-shaped serrated leaf forms of red, outlined in white, 
and of dark blue, outhned in red, on a turquoise-blue ground. Above, and 
not (as is so characteristic of the Ladik weave) below the arch, is the usual 
row of five tulip flowers on long stems in alternate pale and dark blue on a 
ruby-red ground. 

Bht, 5 fttt 9 inolut by 4 f*tt 3 inokM. 

868 — Pbayeb Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band of 
red and yellow rosettes in jewel-like relief on a dark blue ground. Border, 
of palmettes in red, turquoise-blue and touches of brown on a yellowish 
ground. Inner guard band, a dentated pattern of red and brown on a tur- 
quoise-blue ground. The field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, having a ground 
of dull red and a column on either side with a pattern of yellow diamonds with 
red and blue centre. The soffit of yellow branch forms with red blossoms 
an a dark blue ground. Above a panelled border of four red flowers on a 
turquoise-blue ground. Slightly repaired. 

8b0, 4 f—t 9 JmAm bg S f—t 9 inekf. 



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869 — Peayee Ruq 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard bend, ir- 
regular scroll pattern of blue, black and brown on bright yellow ground. 
Inner guard band, a pattern of leaf forms in yellow, black and brown on a 
blue ground, between a stripe of blue, yellow and brown scrolls on a black 
ground and a stripe of blue, brown and white rosette-forms on a yellow 
ground. Border of six narrow stripes, alternating white and black, with 
patterns of yellow fleurettes. Guard bands and border are all narrower at 
top and bottom than at sides. Field, of a panel with a stepped arch top and 
bottom, having a turquoise-blue ground, bordered with a white stripe and 
surrounded by a border of Persian blue, with a diapered pattern of con- 
ventional flower forms in brown, yellow and hght blue. The centre panel 
has three broad bands, extending its entire length, of a pattern of conven- 
tional lamp forms in yellow, brown and white. 

Biz«, 6 /e#t tne&M by 4 /•«! 4 imcAm. 

870— Prayeb Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands, of a pattern of white rosettes with red quatrefoUs on a blue 
ground between two narrow stripes of a blue and white zig-zag pattern on a 
red groxmd. Border, a very conventional pattern of square flower-forms, 
having four blossoms of red and blue symmetrically arranged. Field as a 
Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with pointed arch, having a lamp form of ewer 
shape in the crown of arch and a column of blue and white pattern with 
white finials on either side. The soffit is occupied with a pattern of red and 
blue pahn leaves on a yeUow ground. A panelled border above of white re- 
verse-curved leaf-forms on a red ground, and below one of a white and yel- 
low zig-zag with blue fillings on a red ground. 

SiM, 6 /«#( i incktt by 4 fttt. 

871 — PRAYEE Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
red and yellow trefoil pattern on a white ground. Border, of white, tur- 
quois-blue and yellow cloud forms on a dark ground. Inner guard band of a 
red, green and yellow rosette pattern on a white ground. Field as a Mih- 



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rab, or prayer-niche, with an unusual diapered pattern of yellow, black and 
white on a pale blue ground. The "sky" or soffit is of a diagonal striped pat- 
tern of yellow and white rosettes on a blue ground. Above "and below" are 
panelled borders of a star-shaped figure in light blue and yellow on a pur- 
plish-brown ground. 

Six4, 6 /m( 9 inehst by 4 /««! A inehti. 

372— Pbayer Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band of 
red flower forms in profile on a black ground between narrow stripes of red 
with a scroll meander pattern in yellow. Border of red, green, yellow and 
tan colored palmettes and medallions on a Ught olive-green ground. Inner 
guard band, of a zig-zag pattern in red outlined in white on a turquoise-blue 
ground between narrow stripes of red with a zig-zag pattern in black, white, 
blue and yellow. The field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with pointed arch, 
having a white ground, a lamp form in crown of arch and two pillars, 
outlined in black, with flower motives top and bottom, and a pattern of 
red and blue flowers, with black scrolls on a Ught blue groimd. The soffits 
are filled with a branched floral form in red on a Persian-blue ground. 
Above is a paneUed border of reversed leaf forms in red on a Persian-blue 
ground. Slightly repaired. 

S«M, 5 /Mt 1 tiKk by S /Mt 11 Ineht*. 

878 — Fbayee Rug 

Turkish. Ladik weave of the ^Eighteenth Century. Outer guard band, mean- 
der pattern of blue with red, blue and white flowers on a yellow ground be- 
tween two narrow stripes of dark blue with red and white dots. Border, of 
yellow turquoise-blue, and blue, yeUow, red and green rosettes with red and 
yellow leaves on a dark blue ground. Inner guard band, same design as 
outer, except that the colors are different. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer- 
niche, with a centre of dark red, the soffit having a ground of rich peacock- 
blue with a pattern of red and purphsh-brown palmettes. Below the Mih- 
rab are the characteristic Ladik Uly forms, five in number, of hght and dark 
blue on a red ground, extending downwards. 
lUttstrated 

8k4, 6 fMt 4 fMhM by S fMt 9 t»ehtt. 



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874 — Peayeb Rtro 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band of a 
red and white dentated pattern on a yellow ground between two stripes of 
red with white dots. Border of red, yellow, blue and white palmettes on 
a dark blue ground. Inner guard band of a red and white scroll pattern on 
a yellow ground between red stripes dotted with white, and a fourth stripe 
of a red, yellow and white imbricated pattern. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer- 
niche, with stepped and pointed arch and two side panels of red on a 
ground of blue with a diaper pattern of red and brown. Down the centre of 
the middle arch runs a pattern of three groups of blue and white floral 
sprays. Above is a panelled border of red and blue. 

Bit*. 5 fMt 11 incktt bg A f«*t. 

875 — PaATEE Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band, of 
conventionalized floral forms in red with alternate turquoise-blue, yellow 
and white leaves on a Persian-blue ground, between narrow stripes of red 
with a black and white zig-zag pattern. Border, of conventionalized flower 
forms, of blossoms with two palm leaves in alternate blue and red on a white 
ground. Inner guard band, of same pattern as the outer one except that the 
ground is of very pale blue. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with 
stepped arch and a border of small red flowers in profile. Dark blue centre 
. with small lamp form occupying the crown of the arch and a row of flower 
forms at the bottom. The soffit is filled with a fioral diaper pattern of red on a 
light green ground. The upper and lower panelled borders are of lig^t and 
dark red and green flower forms on a black ground. Very slightly re- 
paired. 

876 — Peayer Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band, of 
a yellow, green and red pattern on a white groimd between two stripes of 
a red and white dentated pattern. Border, a conventional floral pattern in 
red, blue, yellow and white on a dark blue ground. Inner guard band, a re- 
peat of the outer with the addition of a meander pattern in red with yellow 
and brown flowers on a white ground. The field as a Idjfarab, or prayer- 



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niche, with two side panels, all of red, on a ground of a diaper pattern in 
blue, black and white on a light red ground. In the crown of the arch in 
place of the usiial lamp is a floral ornament of blue and yellow blossoms. 
Above is a panelled border of reverse-curved leaf forms of yeUow and red 
on a dark blue ground. Slightly repaired. 

Bb». 6 f»4t 4 fwoJUf by 4 fMt 1 hteh. 

877 — Pbatee Rug 

Turkish. Eulah weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands consisting of a narrow blue stripe between two red ones with 
patterns of white spirals and stars. Border, of an arabesque pattern in Ught 
and dark blue with red and white medaUions and palm leaves. Field as a 
Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a ground of yellowish-green and a mosque 
lamp with an inscription in cursive characters. The soffits above the arch 
are filled with blue and red flowers and buds on a white ground. Slightly 
restored. lUuatrated 

Bb». B f—t 10 micAm by 4 /<«i 1 ine\. 

878 — Pbateb Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Ei^teenth Century. Outer guard band, a 
border of a conventional pattern in red and yellow on a turquoise-blue ground 
between two narrow stripes having a chequer pattern of yellow on a green 
ground. Border, a diaper pattern of yellow, terra-cotta, red and turquoise- 
blue figures on a dark blue ground. Inner guard band resembles the outer 
in pattern with the addition of an inner stripe of a light and dark blue zig- 
zag pattern on a light ground. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a 
centre of a greenish opalescent-like white, a conventional lamp form at the 
CTOwn of the arch and a floral motive in red and blue at the bottom. The 
soffit is of red and yellow figures on a turquoise-blue ground and there are 
panelled borders above and below of yeUow and blue medallions on a choco- 
late-colored ground. 

Sfef, i t—t a fw&M by 4 /*«( S kMskf. 

87»— Rug 

Asia Minor. Unidentified weave of the Sixteenth Century. So-called "Hol- 
bein" rug. Outer and inner guard bands of a star and zig-zag pattern in 
blue and red on a white ground between narrow stripes of a chequered pat- 



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tern in red and blue. Border of a pattern of elongated star-shaped panels of 
yellow on a red ground, filled with a geometrical figure in red with qua- 
trefoiled rosettes of blue and red, all outlined in black. The field is occupied 
by a large medallion-shaped panel of red on a dark blue ground. The me- 
dallion is filled with a very eonventionalized design of two lamp forms in 
dark blue and pale yellow and a scroll pattern in pale yellow with flower- 
forms of red and yellow outlined in black. The dark blue surrounding 
ground has a pattern of rosette-shaped flower forms in red and pale yellow 
outlined in black and of red lancet-shaped leaves with small quatrefoiled ro- 

lUustrated ***•■ * ^••* ' ****" ^^ * '••'■ 



880 — Prayee Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band 
consists of three narrow stripes with a pattern of rosettes and leaf forms 
in reverse curves. Border, of a pattern of red palmettes with blue centres, 
yellow palmettes with red and green centres and red flowers and scrolls. 
Inner guard band of four stripes with scroll and rosette pattern. The field 
as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a field of light olive-green, toned almost to 
yellow, bordered by a fringe-like pattern of red flowers and dark green 
leaves. The sofiit over the arch is filled with a scroll pattern in yellow on 
a dark blue ground. The top panelled border is of red and yellow flowers on 
a green ground, the bottom panelled border of blue and white reversed scrolls 
with red centres on an olive-green ground. The color effect is heightened 
throughout by touches of white. Slightly restored. 

lUustrated ***•■ * f* » **'*" ^ * '"*- 

881 — Fkater Rug 

Turkish. Kulah weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band, 
red, blue, yellow and white floral motives in profile between two narrow 
stripes of red with white and dark blue spirals. Border, of conventional- 
ized floral motives of red, yellow, green and turquoise-blue on a dark blue 
ground. Inner guard band, resembles outer one, except that the middle bor- 
der is of gray, white and red on a yellow ground, and that there are two ad- 
ditional narrow stripes, one with a blue sig-zag pattern on a white ground. 



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the other of an imbricated pattern of blue, yellow, brown and white. Field 
as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a central arch and two narrow vertical 
panels with bright red centres and borders of yellow flowers in profile. Sof- 
fits of hght blue ground with a diaper pattern, based on a Chinese motive, 
in light blue and yeUow. Panelled borders, above and below, of a yellow, 
white and light blue pattern on a dark blue ground. Slightly repaired. 

SiM, 5 t—t 10 l>dU« by 4 fttt. 



882 — Prayee Rug 

Turkish. Ghiordes weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands, of a pattern of red, white and green flower forms between nar- 
row borders of a dentated pattern in yellow with dark brown fleurettes. 
Border, of flower-forms, in a triform arrangement, and of alternate blue and 
yellow on a white ground. Field as a Mihrab, or prayer-niche, with a centre 
of dark blue bordered by red profiled flower forms. So£St of a pale green 
ground covered with a diaper pattern of red flower-forms in profile. Above 
and below panelled borders of a design of palmettes in red, pale green, yel- 
low and white. From the sale of the Chapet collection, Paris, 1908. 
IUu»trated 

Bbi4, 6 /••( 5 JmAm bf * f»4t 7 inehM. 

888 — Rug 

Persian. Ispahan weave of the Sixteenth Century. Border, palm leaves of 
red and light green and floral forms of red, orange and yellow with touches 
of white on a dark green ground. Inner guard band, of a yellow and brown 
scrolled pattern on a light blue ground. Field, a red ground having an 
arabesque pattern in green, yellow and light blue of palmettes and cloud 
bands arranged around a centre of two medallions in dark blue, the same 
blue appearing again at the comers. Slightly repaired. 

Bh*. f*tt 5 inehtt by i f*§t t jmAm. 

884— Rug 

Persian. Ispahan weave of the Sixteenth Century. Outer guard band, of red 
with small blue and yellow rosettes. Border, of red, yeljow and blue palmettes 



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with a scrolled pattern of red, yellow and blue flowers on a ground of black. 
Inner guard band, a Greek "bead and reel" pattern in yellow on a turquoise- 
blue ground. The field is occupied, on a red ground, with a pattern formed 
of a double motive of flowers and lancet-shaped leaves in yellow, dark blues 
and light greens starting from a pair of lancet-shaped leaves of dark green 
at either end and meeting in the centre. The four comers are filled with 
scrolled patterns of dark blue outlined in white and with yellow pal- 
mettes outlined in dark blue and in the center, at the sides, are two motives 
of palmettes and lancet-shaped leaves in turquoise-blue and yellow, with 
scrolled foliage of black outlined in white. 

Illustrated **^' " /'•' ' ***•• ^* * ^*" ' **"*"• 

885 — ^VQ 

Persian. Ispahan weave of the Sixteenth Century. Outer guard band, with 
a small pattern of dark blue and yellow quatrefoil rosettes on a red groimd. 
Border, of yellow, blue and red palmettes with green, yellow and red lancet 
leaves on a ground of dark blue. Inner guard band, of a dentated pattern of 
blue on a yellow ground. Field a red ground with an arabesque pattern 
of green and yellow palmettes and cloud forms arranged aroimd a medal- 
lion-like centre. Slightly repaired. 

Illustrated ^'**' " f**' " '"=*" ^y * '••* ' *"**•*■ 

886 — Rug 

Persian. Kayin weave of the Eij^teenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands, of a meander pattern with rosettes in red on a yellow groimd. Border, 
of red and black palm-shaped forms alternately curved and striught on a 
yellow ground. Field of a light yellow ground covered with a pattern of 
large and small palm-shaped forms of red, yellow and black, in alternate 
rows. 

Six*. S /m< 4 imcktt by 4 fut 10 btehei. 



-Rug 
Persian. Sehna weave of the Seventeenth Century. Inner and outer guard 
bands, of small rosettes of red, bordered by yellow on a black ground. Bor- 
der, of rosettes and palm-leaf pattern in red and pale yellow bordered with 



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black on a rich red ground. Field entirely covered with a diapered arabesque 
of rosettes and small flower forms with fine interlacements in reds, pale yel- 
lows and pale blues on a black ground. 

SlM, T fMt 10 indtM by I /m( fi fawAw. 

888 — Naebow Runnee 

Caucasian. Kuba weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer guard band of 
very narrow stripes of blue, red and brown. Inner guard band of a narrow 
red stripe. Border of alternate red and blue reverse-curved leaf-forms on a 
white ground. Field of a brown ground with a pattern of large rosette 
forms, with latch-hook borders and blue and red centres, and of large yellow 
leaf-foims. The rest of the ground is powdered with red, blue and white 
quatrefoiled flower-forms and small blue and yellow rosettes. 

Sfat, 13 /Ml B ImAm bf S fMt 11 inekn. 

889 — ^Lakoe Mosque Cakpet 

Persian. Sehna weave of the early Seventeenth Century. Inner and outer 
guard bands of a diamond pattern of red outlined in light blue on a dark 
blue ground. Border an archaic meander pattern in light and dark green 
outlined in red on a light ground. Field of a rich mulberry-red ground, the 
upper portion covered with a design of branches and cypress trees in vary- 
ing shades of red, yellow, blue, green and dark brown; the lower portion of 
the field is occupied by a pattern of flower-forms; having three blossoms, in 
quatrefoiled panels which are formed by a pattern of interlacements of red 
outlined in iriiite. This very striking example of an infrequent weave comes 
^m one of the Bagdad Mosques. 

8t**, M /••( ImAm bg 7 /Ml 10 (imAm. 

890 — Cabpet 

Persian. Herat weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands, of a meander pattern with blue and red rosettes and leaves. Border, 
of blue, red and black palmettes and rosettes with a scroll pattern of green 
foliage on a dark red ground. Field, of a diaper pattern formed of pal- 
mettes and rosettes in yellow, red and blue connected by a scroll pattern of 
green leaves outlined in red, all on a ground of dark blue. 

Mm, is /Ml « laeftM by 7 /Ml 1 Uuk. 



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891 — Cabpet 

pCTsian. Bijar weave of the Eighteenth Century, with warp, woof and pile 
' all of wool. Outer and inner guard bands, of a yellow ground with a mean- 
der pattern in black and red. The border has, on a blue ground, a pattern 
of palmettes in three shades of red and Ught and dark green, interspersed 
with dark blue lancet-shaped leaves and yellow rosettes. The field is of a 
dark blue ground with a pattern of square flowers in three shades of red, 
with lancet-shaped leaves of dark green outlined in red, flowers and leaves 
being arranged in a four-rayed star design. 

fiiM, 1£ fttt S InckM bg 7 fttt 8 incXt. 

892 — Small Caepet 

Caucasian. Kuba weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands, of a red diamond pattern on a yellow ground between narrow 
stripes of blue and white, with patterns of small zig-zags in red and black. 
Border of a quatrefoiled key-pattern with hexagonal centre in brown, red 
and blue on a white ground. Field of a red ground with a pattern of three 
eight-pointed and six palm leaf-shaped medallions, having a white ground 
with designs of large rosettes and palmettes in red, blue and yellow. The 
remainder of the field is occupied by straight branches ending in flower 
forms, palm leaf-shaped medallions with patterns in red and white on a green 
ground, and curved leaf-shaped panels with an inner scroll design in yellow 
and red on a dark blue ground. 

8h*. 9 fMt 3 inek** by 7 /««( 4 ineka*. 



898 — Cakpbt 

Caucasian. Daghestan weave of the early Seventeenth Centiuy. Outer and 
inner guard bands of a blue, red and white meander-like pattern on a yel- 
low ground between narrow stripes of blue dotted with red. Border of a 
red ground with a pattern of dark blue, yellow and white rosettes, and 
small white cinquefoiled flower-forms with yellow centres. Field of a dark 
blue ground with an all-over pattern of yellow and red palmettes, with blue 
centres, and eight foiled rosettes of yellow, green and white, the interstices 
formed by these larger forms being filled with smaller leaf forms and ro- 
settes. This carpet is specially interesting not alone from its exceptionally 



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fine quality but from the fact that the name of the maker and the date of 
its manufacture are woven into a small panel at one end. From this we 
learn that the maker was one Rizah Khan and that the carpet was woven 
in the year 1024 A.H. or 1615 of the Christian era. The carpet comes from 
Jerusalem. 

Six*, U f—t 10 incftM by ftH a ItutlUf. 

894 — Casfet 

Persian. Herat weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner guard 
bands, of a narrow border with flower and le^ forms in reverse curves in rod 
and blue, outlined in black and red, on a yellow ground between borders of 
a rosette and meander pattern of red, outlined in yellow, on turquoise and 
dark blue grounds. Border, of a design of palmette and rosettes with lancet- 
shaped leaf-forms in rod, dark bliu and yellow, on a red ground having an 
interlaced pattern of fine lines in blue. Field entirely covered with a close 
diapered pattern of palmettes, rosettes and interlacements of red, turquoise- 
blue and yellow on a dark blue ground. In very exceptional condition and 
of the finest quality. 

£H(«, SO /«#( 6 iiMiKM by 8 fttt 3 imekf. 



895 — Cabpet 

Persian. Feragban weave of the early Eighteenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands, of a meander pattern in black, green and red on a white ground. 
Border, of a red ground with white and blue palmettes and blue rosettes, 
with red centres, connected by an interlaced pattern of black and blue. 
Field, covered with a diaper pattern of interlacements, rosettes and palm 
leaves in red, blue and yellow on a dark blue ground. In the centre a large 
diamond-shaped medallion with scalloped edge, having, on a white grotmd, 
an interlaced pattern with palmettes and rosettes in varying shades of red, 
blue and green. 

Ste*, M /•«{ by B f**i 4 itteku. 



896 — Mosque Carpet 

Persian. Djushaghan weave of the Seventeenth Century. Inner and outer 
guard band, of a yellow, blue and green meander pattern on a white ground. 



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Border, a pattern of red and blue palmettes with green lancet-shaped leaves 
outlined in yellow and small red and yellow rosettes and leaves on a dark 
blue ground. Field, of a rich red with an interlaced pattern of dark blue 
stems and leaf forms forming a symmetrical design of club-shaped panels 
of the red ground surrounded with star-shaped rosettes and palmettes in 
blue, yellow, red and black. Superposed is a diamond pattern in light 
green and the interstices are filled with small floral and leaf forms. 

Sh4, IS fMt 9 tmektt by 9 f»et S iiickH. 

897 — Cabpet 

Persian. Herat weave of the early Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands, of a double stripe, one with a meander pattern of blue and 
white on a red ground, the other with a similar pattern, in red and green on 
a yellow ground. Border, of a pattern of palmettes, rosettes and an inter- 
lacement of dark and light blue, red, white and green on a bright red ground. 
Field of a diaper pattern of palmettes, rosettes, palm leaves and interlace- 
ments of red, dark and li|^t blues, green, yellow and black on a dark blue 
ground. 

Sbt, 18 fMt 3 Uteht* by T /«•! t ImjU*. 

808 — ^Laxgb Mobque Cabpet 

Persian. Kurdistan weave of the late Seventeenth Century. Outer and in- 
ner guard bands, of a pattern of six-pointed stars, in red, pale green and yel- 
low, on a ground of dark blue. Border, the simulation of an inscription in 
Cufic characters in red and light green outlined with white on a ground of 
dark blue. Field of a rich red ground covered by an arabesque pattern 
form of interlacing lines of dark and light blues which enclose star-shaped 
spaces filled with patterns of palmettes and rosettes of yellow, white, red 
and blue with leaves of blue and yellow. This fine carpet, which is in an 
exceptional condition, not having been repaired in any place, came, direct to 
the present collection, from the great Mosque of el Earballagh near Bag- 
dad. 

I ~ "■ ~ Btu, n /«( by 7 /«•( 5 inekt. 

899 — Small Mobque Cabpet 

Persian. Kurd-Ispalian weave of the Seventeenth Century. Outer and inner 
guard bands, of meander pattern with green leaves and red, blue and white 



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flowers on a yellow ground. Border, with a ground of rich red and a pat- 
tern of green palmettes with red centres and rosette forms formed of white 
eight-lobed flowers with red centres and blue and brown leaves connected by 
a meander-like design of light blue lines. Field of a dark blue ground hav- 
ing a pattern of branches in red outhned in yellow, forming drcles which 
are filled with eight-pointed stars having as centres blue, red and green ro- 
settes. In the interstices and at the intersections are rosettes of red, white 
and yellow, with green leaves and five-petalled flowers in white. This alto- 
gether admirable example of a fine Persian weave comes direct to this col- 
lection from the same Mosque of el Karballagh near Bagdad as the preced- 
ing carpet (No. 898). 

8iz*, 7 /««( 9 ine\M by 9 f»«t S incfew. 



Abiericaic Abt Association, 
Thomas E. Eibbt, Managers. 

Auctioned. 



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