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Full text of "Illustrated Catalogue of Stereopticons, Sciopticons, Dissolving View Apparatus, Microscopes ..."

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* * 




•-.■ "i 
EKTM* EbmnN. 




OUR SPECIALTIES. 



I.— Dr. Mcintosh Solar Microscope and Stereopti- 
I Combination. 
2. — Mcintosh Combination Stereopticon. 
3.— Mcintosh Professional Microscope. 
4. Mclntosh-lves Saturator. 
5.— Self-Condensing Oxygen Retort and Cylinder. 

6. - The Portable Lime Light and Lantern. 

7. Mcintosh Sciopticon. 
8.- Triple Lanterns and Triple Keys. 
9. -Everything in Projection Apparatus. 

Speciallii^s niaiiulaclured or sold by other houses will be 
^plied at their aJvertiseJ prices. Slides lurnislied to illus- 
trate almost any subject; also colored slides painted to order by 
the best artists of the day. 

We have a commodious room fitted up to exhibit 
practical working of our apparatus to prospective 
^rchasers. 

TERIVIS. 

. — Cash in current iunds, which may be seirt by Registered 
fetter. Draft, Postal Money Order or Express. Goods sent 
! O. D., provided twenty-five per cent of bill is sent with 
per, the balance to be collected by llie Express Company. 

J. — All goods will be packed wifli the g^reatest care to avoid 
Eeakage in transportation, but we cannot be responsible for 
f<em after leaving our premises, except under special contract. 
.1— Any errors in invoice tnust be reported within ten days 
1 receipt of goods. 

Our Goods are all New; we have no old stock. 

cintosh Battery p.*' Optical Co. 



J^clntosl 

^H NOS 



NOS. 521 TO 531 WABASH AVE. 

Chicago. III.. U. S. A. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



Stereopticons, Sciopticons, 



DISSOLVING VIEW APPARATUS, 

MICROSCOPES, 

SOLAR MICROSCOPE sJS>STEREOniCON COMBINATION. 

OBJECTIVES, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC TRANSPARENCIES, 

Plain and Artistically Colored Views and Microscopical 

Preparations. 



MAIUFACTURED AND IMPORTED BY THE OPTICAL DEPARTMEIT 

OP THE 

M-I'^tosh Battery and Optical Q,o., 

Nos. 621 TO 631 Wabash Ava., 

CHICAGO. ILLS. U. S. A. 



( 



THE WORLD'S INDUSTRIAL 



GBF^HIIPIGAHIB OP AWAF^D 





mnTED STATES, 

FOR SOLAR MICROSCOPES AND OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS, 4c. 

In accordance with Act of Congress^ approved February lo, i88j. 

New Orleans, May jOy i88§, 

S. H. BUCK, Director General. GUS A. BREAUX, Chairman 

E. RICHARDSON, President Committee of Awards. 



The above Diploma of Honor was awarded us by the Bureau of Education 
in addition to the Gold Medal Award /rof?i the Exposition Judges. 



Copyrighted : 
McINTOSH BATTERY & OPTICAL COMPANY 

1895. 



McCluer Printing Co., 
300-306 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



HEADQUARTERS 



PROJECTION APPARATUS,! 

SLIDES AND ACCESSORIES, 



i 




WEST. 



AWARDED THE GOLD MEDJ 

AT THE NEW ORLEANS EXPOSITION. 




Those who attended this Exposition cannot have failed to notica 
the very large and elegant exhibit of Optical Goods. It gives osS 
great pleasure to announce, that notwithstanding the keen < 
tition of home and fortign manufacturers, we received the award | 
of " First Degree of Merit," being the Gold Medal, 
specialties. 

We have in operation the only Factory in the West for the manuJ 
facture of Optical Apparatus, including Magic Lanterns, SciopticonSfl 
Siereopticons and Accessories. 

All apparatus of this kind described in the following pages i. 
our own manufacture, and much of it is made only by us, and undetj 
our own patents. 

We have secured the services of expert mechanics of great pracJ 
tical experience in this class of work, and are prepared to execute olll 
orders promptly. 

Correspondence is solicited with Scientists, Colleges, Schools, 
Lecturers, and all others interested in our line. We shall be pleased 
to furnish estimates on special apparatus for scientifec ^otV. 



pporq Qooid-Qrit to Q^ient. 

A Fresh Volume of Travel, being a Record of a Nine Montli's Tour tlirougli 
Europe, Egypt, Holy Land, Parts of Asia Minor, and Greece. 



JBir Rbv. WAf. A. Sjhitn. 



12 Mo., 264 Passes, Bound iu Xeat Red, Blue, and Green Colors* Stamped In 

Black and Gold. 



PRICE, - $1.00. 



AS OTHERS SEE IT IN CHAPTER REVIEWS. 

CHAPTERS I AND II. 

It was my privilege to read the "advance sheets" of the first two chapters 
of Rev. W. A. Smith's nfsat little volume entitled '* From Occident to Orient." 
I am delighted with its matter and style. He captures the reader and takes 
him along across the ocean and through London in these two chapters in a 
very delightful way. He leaves you determined to take the whole journey 
with him. Rev. T. S. Bailey, D. D., State Sup't Presb't Missions, la. 

CHAPTER VI, VII, VIII. 

These chapters read so vividly that the reader can easily see, without 
traveling, many of the curiosities which every European traveler that care- 
fully observes, sees. The conversational style of these chapters make them 
not only readable but interesting and instructive to the student of general 
history. D. E. Reese, Principal Ponca Public Schools. 

••From Occident to Orient" is a valuable contribution to the literature of 
sight-seeing. The author is happy in his description of familiar scenes in 
London and Paris. One can not see everything in such cities. Our gifted 
author has shown his fine taste in discriminating what to see, as well as appre- 
ciation of the good and beautiful when seen. ^ 

Next to a visit abroad is the pleasure of reading these brilliant descrip- 
tions of what is to be seen. L. Y. Hays, 

Feb. 8, i890. Pres't Fort Dodge Collegiate Institute 

Rev. W. A. Smith, in his new book, • • From Occident to Orient, " gives 
evidence that he is one of the very few eastern tourists who has true taste and 
appreciation in sight-seeing, as well as discrimination concerning what to see, 
and that he possesses the happy faculty of describing, in a pleasing, entertain- 
ing, and instructive manner, the things seen. « 

Although comparatively few are privileged to enjoy a visit to the Old 
World, this charming little volume, by its beautiful and vivid descriptions, 
enables every one to visit, in imagination, those historic places and scenes 
while sitting at his own fireside. We predict for the book a hearty welcome 
and a large sale. W. B. Ashley, 

Prof. Mathematics in Fort Dodge Collegiate Institute. 

** From Occident to Orient" is a rare book of travels. It seems especially 
designed for the busy people of a busy age. The author does not waste words, 
but presents, with great concentration and in a pleasant, graphic and interest- 
ing style, the things every intelligent reader wants to know about. The book 
will not be, willingly, laid down until it is finished. 

The lectures, covering a portion of the same field, are characterized by 
the same qualities. They are straightforward, clear, attractive descriptions of 
the places visited. Illustrated by splendid stereopticon views, an insight is 
j^ven into the Holy Land and other countries, not to be obtained in any other 
^o one can fail to be greatly profited and entertained. 

W. O. RusTOB, D. D., Pastor 1st Presb't Church, Dubuque, la. 



Mcintosh battery amd optical co., Chicago, ill., o. s. a. 



INTRODUCTION. 



IT is supposed that the Magic Lantern originated early in the 13th 
century, when it was employed to excite the awe and credulity of 

the public by so-called magicians. This continued to be its prin- 
cipal use until within the last thirty years. Whereas, formerly, those 
skilled in arts and sciences sought craftily to preserve their knowledge 
a secret, except from a chosen few, it is a characteristic of the present 
age that the man of science seeks to share the result of his labors with 
his fellow man. 

The Magic Lantern has been modified, improved and re-named so 
that the stereopticon of today bears little resemblance to the crude 
instrument which excited the wonder of the ignorant and enabled the 
unscrupulous to play upon their superstitious fears in the ages that have 
passed away. 

The scientific investigator, the educator, the lecturer and he who 
simply caters to the higher amusement of the public, find in the 
stereopticon an indispensable aid. In its improved form most delicate 
investigations into chemical, physical, electrical and pathological 
phenomena are possible; and what is of most importance, the method 
of conducting such research, and its immediate results can be shown to 
an audience as easily as to a single individual. The educator can illus- 
trate in the most effective manner by its aid, Physiology, Botany, 
Natural History, Chemistry, etc. Problems can be demonstrated, 
drawing lessons given, maps, diagrams, formulas and a great variety 
of exercises suitable for the class room can be displayed in a way to 
impress them upon the memory more firmly than by the older methods. 
Those who have made use of the Solar Microscope and Stereopticon 
largely for purposes of instruction are enthusiastic in its praise. 
Lritefaiy Colleges use it. A gentleman at the head of one of 
the largest institutions in the country where a stereopticon is con- 
stantly used, writes thus: "After the Stereopticon, the Black- 
board seems almost good for nothing. I wonder how we 
have managed so long without it." 

Medical Colleges. We have supplied many medical colleges 
with a complete outfit for using the Microscope and Stereopticon 
with Solar and Artificial light. This method of illustrating medical 
lectures is very popular with the students, and insures full seats 
during the hours when this apparatus is employed. 



6 Mcintosh battvoiy and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. a a. 

ft 

MicroscopistS' find frequent use for the solar and oxy-hydrogen 
light, especially when spending many hours daily in original inves- 
tigation. It enables them to study many processes on a larger field, 
giving the relation of parts, and economizes time, aside from the con- 
venience of being able to demonstrate to all observers the work done. 

Lrecturers, whether engaged in instructing the public through 
the medium of lectures on natural science, or furnishing intellectual 
amusement suited to a promiscuous audience, tlioroughly appreciate 
the benefits accruing from the use of the Stereopticon -with a suitable 
selection of slides. The public never tires of good pictures and 
now that the art of photography has developed methods by which 
the amateur can easily learn to make his own lantern transparencies, 
a good Stereopticon is a most profitable investment for those who 
are engaged before the public. 

Sunday Schools may not only be amused and interested, but 
religious instruction may be impressed upon the hearts of young 
and old in a most effective manner by a Stereopticon in the hands of 
a judicious Pastor or Superintendent. The illustrated Sacred Hymns, 
especially, form the most touching and beautiful exercise that can be 
imagined. Some of our leading Pastors use this instrument constantly 
to illustrate the Sunday School Lessons. 

Temperance Societies find in the Stereopticon an invaluable 
aid in exciting interest in this subject which so large a proportion 
of the public regard as hackneyed and tedious. So extensively is this 
realized abroad that the most exquisite and varied lecture sets bearing 
on Temperance have been prepared, many of which have never been 
introduced into this country. 

Bands of Hope, Juvenile Humane Societies, etc., which 
are designed for the benefit of children need every resource for im- 
parting amusement and instruction, judiciously intermingled to keep 
up the interest of their members. In the Stereopticon they possess 
the very elements needed for this purpose. 

Lodges, Granges, Grand Army Posts and all other Societies 
of a similar character, make considerable use of the Stereopticon as 
an attractive and economical means of illustrating their rituals or con- 
tributing to the interest of their entertainments. 

Insane Asylums and other Public Institutions where those 
mentally or physically enfeebled are cared for, find the Stereopticon 
an endless source of interest ; the minds of the patients can be directed 
to any subject thought desirable, by properly selected pictures. 

Parlor Entertainment. >The Sciopticon affords a never failing 
^urce of amusement in the family. Impromptu exhibitions are well 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



adapted to while away the long dreary evenings in stormy weather 
when people are so apt to find time hang heavily on their hands. 
The young people can receive valuable help in forming a refined 
taste for art by the exercise of care on the part of the older mem- 
bers of the family, in the selection of slides. The Sciopticon has 
not been so generally introduced into the family in this country as in 
Europe. The cheap and worthless instruments offered for parlor enter- 
tainments have caused dissatisfaction and have been cast aside. As 
soon as the public, generally, becomes aware that a cheap and satisfac 
tory apparatus is manufactured, there is no question but that this form 
of home entertainment will be more generally appreciated. Many 
ladies who have become expert in amateur photography entertain their 
friends at home with the products of their ''summer outing** in the 
form of views which they have taken of the objects and places of 
interest discovered in their trip. These can be so readily transformed 
into beautiful lantern transparencies that this art has become a fascinat- 
ing recreation to those willing to take the trouble to acquire the simple 
but necessary details of the process which will be found described in 
this catalogue. 

Advertising with Stereopticons has become a popular 
method of bringing advertisers to the attention of the public. 
Properly managed, this is lucrative both to the exhibitor and 
his patrons. 

The business card of advertisers being displayed singly and re- 
peatedly while the interest of the observers is sustained by interspersing 
beautiful views of scenery and comic pictures, makes an impression on 
the memory which is less likely to be forgotton than when seen in an 
ordinary printed circular, on a picture card, or in a newspaper 
column. Amateur photography has done away with the only obstacle 
hitherto in the way of the success of this business ; the cost ot repro- 
ducing the business card, place of business or samples in the form of a 
lantern transparency is reduced to a trivial sum, and there need be no 
delay in doing the work. 

It would be difficult to find any apparatus or instrument capable 
of furnishing such a variety of entertainment and instruction as a 
good Stereopticon. Late improvements have greatly simplified the 
methods' of producing a brilliant light, with due regard 'to safety and 
economy, and all persons interested in the art of Projection are cor- 
dially invited to communicate with us in regard to the subject. 



8 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. a a. 



A PROFITABLE BUSINESS. 



THE question of profit in a well managed Stereopticon Exhibition 
is one which admits of but one answer. This form of entertain- 
ment is exceedingly popular among all classes, and when the 
proper means are employed to bring it before the public it cannot 
fail to be highly remunerative. 

The outlay required to secure a first-class outfit is less than for any 
other businesss which pays so well. 

About 75 views are sufficient . for an evening's exhibition. If a 
greater number is used less effort will be required on the part of the 
lecturer. 

There is no difficulty in'learning to work an apparatus ; any one 
of ordinary intelligence can learn from the printed directions how to 
manage an Exhibition successfully. It is not even necessary that a 
man prepare his own programme or lecture ; if he is inexperienced in 
such work he can obtain illustrated lectures in print all ready to read 
in connection with the views presented. No heavy labor is demanded, 
so that persons in delicate health have often succeeded in carrying on 
the business successfully. It offers an excellent method of paying 
expenses of travel to such as are compelled to seek change of climate 
without the necessary means to do so, and at the same time affords 
light and pleasing employment, which is frequently of no less advan- 
tage to the health seeker than the change of location. In almost 
every locality there is an opening for a man to do a large business 
in giving exhibitions to Sunday Schools, Academies, Lyceums, Public 
Audiences, Families, etc. 

These are usually conducted on shares when given in churches, and 
almost everywhere halls can be rented for a percentage of the receipts. 
The running expenses are very light and the profit large when well 
advertised. 

We are at all times ready to give suggestions or information to 
those about to engage in this business, and those who can find it con- 
venient to call at our place of business will be shown, in detail, the 
method of running an exhibition. 

We have the only showroom in the \Vest where the 
Stereopticon may be seen at work at any time during 
business hours. 



r 



m BATTKBY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL,, 

READ CAREFULLY, 



WE consider this the most important page in the CatS' 
logue. We intend to give full and complete informa 
tion on every point connected with Lanterns, Slides, an^ 
every subject pertaining thereto. A/! Previous Lists Canceled, 













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Terms- 

Invariably Cash in advance, or C. O. D, 

When goods are ordered C. O. D- a sufficient ren 
defray transportation charges both ways must accompany the 
order. 

How to Remit. 

By currency in registered letter; by Post Office or Express' 
Money Order; by New York or Chicago exchange. 

How to Order and Have Goods Shipped. 

Write plainly your name, express and post office address, 
giving name of town, county and state; be careful to write your 
signature legibly. Much trouble arises from a blindly written 
signature. Always give the full name of article wanted, nuna-j, 
ber o£ same, and page in Catalogue. In ordering Slides givfe 
subject, name of Slide, page and number. Always be expliciH 
in giving shipping directions, whether by mail, express otm 
freight, and when possible, the express company or R. R. route'l 
you prefer, stating the day you desire us to ship; we will com-. - 
ply with same, but will not assume the responsibility of safe orB 
prompt delivery. Traveling lecturers and exhibitors should always 
give us their permancnl address and also a list of the towns c 
their "route" so that we can always reach them by direct mail 
and avoid the risk and delay of having letters and parcels for- 
warded. Always allow plenty of time for correspondence to go, " 
and come. Remember it takes some time to fill an order a£teir-| 
it is received. 

Mailing Rates vs. Express Charges. 

It is much cheaper to send many small articles by i 
than by express. Limit of weight is fout pounds. Slides willl 
be mailed at the following prices, which includes bov, ^?LcV\a.%B 
and postage: 
' *" '" 1 Wood Mounted aWia,... ...... ---.-■^^ 



311 
)r- 

aifl 

'i« 



McISTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, 



THE SOCIETY STEREOPTICON. 




^^^ This little Lantern has been designed more especially for 
home use; for parlor entertainments; for those who cannot 
afford the more expensive Lanterns. The Condensing Lenses 
used in this Lantern are ^j4 inches in diameter, so that the 
standard size of Lantern slides can be used. The Objective 
or Projecting Lens is achromatic. Heretofore these low- 
priced Lanterns have been mere toys, and would only take the 
cheap toy slides, which are much smaller in size, and of inferior 
quality. This Sciopticon has the most powerful Two-Wick 
Lamp manufactured, and is provided with a Reflector, which 
materially increases the illuminating power of the lamp ; it 
burns with a brilliancy hitherto unsurpassed in a low-priced 
Oil Lantern ; it is the best cheap Lantern in the market, and 
must be seen and tried to be appreciated ; it is made in a 
durable and substantial manner, and every part being riveted it 
will bear any amount of rough usage. This Lantern is one of 
the lowest priced and most complete made, occupying a space 
of only 15x5^^x14 inches, and weighing but 6J4 lbs. At the price 
quoted is furnished a neat traveling case. 
PRICE. (23.00 



THE ARGAND SCIOPTICON. 



V 




The Argand Sciopticon meets a demand that has long beei 
made upon Lantern manufacturers for a low-priced Magic Lan- 
tern of sufficient power to give satisfaction not only to children 
but to adults as well. This is essentially a Lantern for home 
instruction and amusement. The Lantern can be attached to 
any Argand Student Lamp ; we show two cuts, one complete, 
and one of the Argand Student Sciopticon without the Student 
Lamp, ready to be attached. Among many claims that may 
be made in support of the desirability of this Lantern are : As 
the manner or method of Kindergarten instruction has become, 
and undoubtedly will remain popular, so will the use of the 
Lantern combine instruction with amusement, and 
afford inexpensive and inexhaustible entertainment to those whO' 
are its fortunate possessors. It is not a toy ; with it can be used 
the standard make of Lantern slides, or transparencies — as made 
by different makers all over the world. As the source of light is 
from the ordinary Student Lamp, which almost every one, rich or 
poor, uses to read or study by, no especial preparation is neces- 
sary, AH there is to do is to attach the l-anteTn., atvi ■eTO-^^.cX 





BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., 



ILL., 0. 3. A 



f Upon a common sheet hung on the wall, or suspended in a door- 
way, or better still, upon the white wall itself. No offensive odor; 
no intense heat; perfectly clean, and always ready for use. It 
will make a clear, bright picture 6}i to yyi feet in diameter. It 
is packed in a neat carrying case, with slide carriers and stops 

b ready for use. 




L. No. 3. L. Ifo. 4. 

L PRICE, complele with Lamp .$35 00 

without Lamp 20 OO 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., cHiCAtiO, ill., d. s. a. 



NEW MODEL SUNLIGHT OIL LAMP. 




We take pleasure in presenting to the public a new Four- 
Vick Oil Lamp, which may be justly regarded as a triumph of 
kill; effects being produced hitherto deemed impossible of 
tecoraplishment with an oil light. The new model four-wick 

i-Light Oil Lamp is the most powerful lamp ever manu- 
tctured for lantern slide projection. The open space beneath 



MclNTOBH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U 

the body of the lantern affords a large air chamber to whii 
fresh air has free access, while the open space about 
chimney permits an extra draught in addition to that fui 
nished by the chimney itself. We have expended hundret 
and hundreds of dollars in our endeavor to bring before tl 
public an oil lantern that was satisfactory. We have 
and at last it is an established fact. Especial attention is calli 
to the excellent ventilation whereby perfect combustion 
secured and an accumulation of heat prevented. It is impossible, 
with reasonable care in first lighting up, to cause cracking 
of the condensers from heat, the ventilation being arranged to 
iraw the column of hot aii back or away from them. This lamp 
3urns with a brilliancy hitherto unsurpassed ; it is easily filled, 
trimmed, and kept in order. The chimney is made of meti 
throughout; immediately in front of, and also behind the light, thi 
is an opening for the light to pass to the condenser and reflect< 
These openings are covered with plates of the hight 
thin annealed glass of peculiar shape, manufactured expressly 
for this purpose. This glass is so thin that the amount of 
light obstructed by it is imperceptible ; it is tough, and practi- 
cally unbreakable except by sheer carelessness. Each glass is 
easily removed and is entirely independent of the other; the 
body of the lamp being attached to the fount with a hinge, 




leo, 
to« 

sola 



L. No. 7- 
renders each and every part easily accessible. The reflector is 
made after the most approved pattern, and is finely nickel-plated. 
It is attached to the outside of the chimney , ani \?. ^xtitfeOi.^ 



lb JICINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 

from the heat and smoke by glass plates intervening between it 
and the flame. It is perforated in the center to allow examina- 
tion of the wicks without exposing the eye to the full light of 
the lamp. It is all metal except the windows. No glass chim- 
ney or isinglass to get scratched, marred, or broken. The flame 
is pure white and of intense brilliancy, surpassing in illumination 
any effect previously produced by oil. 

DIRECTIONS FOR MANAGING THE NEW MODEL SUN-LIGHT OIL LAMP. 

-I. Use only the very highest grade of oil, 150° test, 

2. Do not fill the fount too full, or when the oil gets warm 
it will expand and run over. 

3. A little common camphor dissolved in oil will increase 
the brilliancy of illumination. It has one disadvantage, that of 
charring the wick. 

4. A coal-oil lamp is like a race-horse — it must be thor- 
oughly warmed up to do its best work. Always turn up the 
wicks gradually ; a very little at a time, until you accomplish 
the best results on the screen, without the lamp smoking. 

PRICE Sun-Light Lamp $12.50 

Glasses, each .15 

Wicks, per dozen 25 

Dimensions of Sun-Light Oil Lamp — 
Width, with Flange, 5^ inches. 
" without Flange, 4 inches. 
Length of Fount, 6^ inches. 
. Height of Lamp body, 8)4 inches. 
Distance from bottom of Lamp to center of flame, 5^ inches. 



II 11 II 



II II II 



* 

I 



Chicago, III., Nov. 9, 1889. 
MclMTOSH Battery and Optical Co., 

141 & 143 Wabash Ave., aty. 

Gentlemen:— In reply to your favor of the 7th Inst., I am pleased to Inform you that of 
the many oil lanterns received from you for the use of our Councils, each one has proved 
entirely satisfactory. The simplicity of construction, and the ease with which they are 
manipulated, together with the splendid results obtained, commend them at once to public 
favor. 

I take great pleasure in recommending your lanterns. 

Yours truly, 

C. A. WABREN, 

Supreme Scribe, RoycU League. 



Chicago, III., December 1, 1889. 
To Mcintosh Battery and Optical Oo., Chicago, lU. : 

Gbntlbmen— After a very careful test of your new Sun-Light Oil Lamp with a number of 
others, I find that in brilliancy, even illumination, etc, it is far superior to any I have ever 
seen. It is unnecessary to add that I am pleased with my purchase. 

Yours truly, J. B. McCleebt, 

Member Chica«p Lantern Slide Club 
and Chicago Camera Club^ 



BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL.. V. 8. A. 



THE Mcintosh sciopticon. 




ARRANGED FOR USING THE LIME LIGHT, 

PRICE packed in a neat canvas case wilh haDdle SIO.OO 

The only changes required to transform the No. 1 Sciopticon 
from an oil to a lime-light Lantern are the removal of the tall 
chimney and Eubstitution of the low flat top, shown above, 
and the replacing of the lamp by the adjustable jet. The 
method of lighting up, focusing, etc., will be described on pages 
IS and 107. 

This apparatus is recommended to teachers, more especially 
in the lower grades, but since it is possible to operate the Polari- 
scope in many experiments it can be made available for some of 
the experimental work in the higher grades, and the convenience 
of being able to get into work at a moment's notice, and without 
the trouble of making oxygen, is very great. 

This Lantern when arranged for tns Incandescent Electric 
Light presents the same appearance as above, and is called the 
Mcintosh Sciopticon No. 3. 

FRICE. in case. .^ 



k^ 



18 Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE SCIOPTICON. 

The exhibitor being provided with an outfit with which either 
form of light can be employed is prepared for all emergencies. In 
a small hall his oil light will be sufficient and will save expense, while 
in a large hall his more powerful light will be at hand, and in case of 
breakage of any part of his apparatus for the lime light, he can furnish 
a very creditable entertainment with his Sun -Light Lamp. 

We do not offer this as a substitute for the ether-oxygen or 
oxy-hydrogen lime light, but we claim that it far surpasses any oil 
light in the market, and that the cheapness of this light with the 
rapidity of lighting up is a practical advantage for many purposes. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon, in simplicity, compactness and 
brilliancy of illumination, surpasses every other oil lantern we have 
seen. The price is as low as a satisfactory apparatus can be manu- 
factured for, and we do not hesitate to guarantee that the purchaser 
will find it in all respects as we represent. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon is the only Oil Lantern that will 
show a plain or colored photographic transparency on the screen 
lo feet in diameter, as it should be, the picture being as sharp 
and distinct as it is possible to make it with the oil light. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon has a burning surface of 8 lineal 
inches of wick, arranged in such a form as to allow all the rays 
to be caught within the radius of the condenser. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon is perfect in combustion, casting a 
beautifully white and flat field, entirely shadowless. The oil in the 
lamp remains quite cool, owing to the perfect ventilation inside the 
lantern. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon has a special combinationof lenses 
adapted expressly to utilize the whole light of the lamp in producing 
a uniformly illuminated image, free from chromatic or spherical 
aberration, and capable of perfect adjustment at varying distances. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon is arranged so that the slide carrier, 
lens holder and brass cell holding the condensers are movable, thus 
insuring perfect adaptation to all distances and for all purposes 
where an oil light could reasonably be expected to give satisfaction. 

The Mcintosh Sciopticon is made in a thoroughly substantial 
manner, every part being fastened with screws, and will bear any 
amount of rough usage, to which it must necessarily be subjected, 
when forming a part of a traveling exhibitor's outfit. 



r Mcintosh battehv and optical cu., cHiuiGO, ill., u, a. a. 

This Sciopticon is therefore furnished in three separate 
styles, viz; 

No. I ScicipticoD for use with Oil 

No.3 ■■ ■' Lime Light 

Nq.3 '■ " Incandescent Electric Light 40.00| 

No. 1 " mwj»/r'f, and either of the oiber Lights SO.OOJ 

No.1 " " both no.a^M 

In otber words all three kinds of Ligbli Oil, Lime Light and Electric IntJ 
BHQdeaceaiareadaptedtoaaii interchangeable in either of the three Sciopticoiia.9 




L- No. 9. 
With a pair of Sciopticons as above shown, with a dissolvini 
Key placed between them, very excellent dissolving can .be ac* 
complished; either the o.\y-hydrogen or oxy-ether light may bej 
used, the dissolver working equally well with either. If on«J 
cannot afford ro purchase the entire dissolving outfit at one time, 
this scheme affords a very desirable outfit : since one can purchase 
a single lantern, and from careful advertising, and judicious man- 
agement, can soon make enough money to purchase the additional 
portion of the dissolving outfit, which would be one more lantern, J 
and the dissolving key. All of the lenses used in this lanteraj 
are of the same grade, as in the more expensive instruments ; full " 
sized condensers 4J4 in. in diameter are used; the objective or 
magnifying lens is achromatic, and is of first class quality The 
two lanterns with the Dissolving Key, 10 ft. screen, slide 
carriers, and slide stop, and the requisite amount of tubing, are I 
securely packed in a neat traveling case, which is, in turn, packet^ 
in a heavy outside case for shipment. 

PRICE of outfit, as above enumerated 

The "Sciopticons Dissolving" arranged for use with the Sud 
Light Oil Lamps with a dissolving shutter and 10 ft, scretrt 
list at $100.00. 

The "SciopticoDS Dissolving" airangeA tot Mse '«\'<!n. 'CR.a'V-t 
Incandescent Electric Lamps, with "DissoWvoft '=,'«\wii' ■a^^ 




The Opaque Sciopticon is the Mcintosh Sciopticon with 
what is called an Opaque Attachment, for the purpose o( throw 
ing the image of opaque objects on the canvas; it is sometimoi 
called the Polyopticon or Megascope. By its use a cabineS 
photograph or the works of a watch, can be reflected on the screen,, 
as can also numerous other articles, forming a very pleasant, 
means of entertainment. The lantern slide, or transparency, is 
not used as in the ordinary lantern, yet in less than a minute 
the Opaque Attachment can be removed and the lantern used in 
the ordinary way with lantern slides. 

This Opaque Attachment is designed to be used on thtt 
Mcintosh Sciopticons, Nos. i and 2, but it can very easily bfi 
to any other lantern 

In fitting this attachment to lanterns other than those of our. 
own manufacture, it will Ije necessary for the customec to «io^ 
hishntern to us. 



[.as UcINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. 1!.L., tJ. 8 



^«;jii^j 



L. No. 13. 

EXHIBITOR'S STEREOPTICON. 



^[. PRICE, packed in a neat, sulistaDtlal case, with hinged lid, lock 

and handle $6B.OO 

The Stereopticon shown in above illustration has an iron frame 
for base 17 inches long, ■j^ inches wide, nicely japanned. The body 
is of Russia iron, brass trimmed, and all the parts are fastened 
together by screws in a firm and durable manner. The door in 
the side is open to show the arrangement of iime and jet within. 
Convenient means for raising, lowering or otherwise centering the 
light, and for trimming the lime are provided. The jet is platina 
tipped and perfectly adjusted for mixed gases. The raised and open 
base admits air freely, while the chimney is so placed as to draw 
the current of heated air away from the condensers, and with it 
the particles of lime that would otherwise settle upon and obscure the 
condensers. The slide carrier is movable, and is fastened 
firmly in position by a thumb-screw. The slides may be in- 
serted at the top or side. The sliding brass front is retained in 
position by a brass collar. Achromatic, double combination 
lenses for long and short distances, focused by rack and pinion, are 
furnished with this apparatus. It is made throughout with every 
attention to detail, so that it can be recommended as a first-class 
working instrument, that will successfully withstand such hard usage 
as a traveling eshibitor's outfit must necessarily receive. For the 
j^rice it is the most satisfactory Stereopticon in the market. 




L. NO. \H PAIR OF EXHIBITOR'S STERE- 
OPTICONS FOR DISSOLVING. 



The effect of Dissolving Views is one of the most pleasing thai 
the Stereopticon is capable of producing. The term "dissolving" 
is well chosen, for while the specfators are viewing a picture it can be 
made to almost imperceptibly fade away, and as it disappears 
entirely different one begins to appear, and as the old picture dies 
out the new one becomes perfectly distinct. The ingenious adver- 
tiser can turn this mechanism to good account in keeping up an' 
interest in his display of advertisements. It is usual to employ two 
separate lanterns, or an apparatus with two or more separate optical 
parts. A pair of Exhibitor's Stereopticons is admirably adapted to 
this work. 

These Stereopticons can be employed equally well with ether- 
oxygen or oxy-hydrogen lime light, the dissolver working perfectly 
with either. This apparatus, from its comparatively light weight, 
substantial make and the absence of all unnecessary accessories is well 
adapted to an Advertiser's Outfit, The Lanterns may be used 
singly when necessary, a matter of great convenience for business 
purposes. They will be furnished at the same price in separate cast 
if preferred. 




The Phoenix Stereopiic 
oE faigh grade on the market, 
trimmed in nickel, permane 
it can be easily raised 
Key and a pair of fi 
well with either oxygi 
condensers and object 
4ji inches in diamEte 
quarter Darlol, made 



tatio 



o that il doe 



IEantern, and possessed by no 
that either lense can be inslai 
ing, or when it is necessary ti: 
high, "jyi in, wide and weighs 



in is the lowest priced double or dissolving lantern 
The body is of polished Russia Iron, handsotUelj 
itly attached to a hard wood tilling board so that 
: furnished with our No, 1 Dissolving 
e jets so that it can be used equally 
oxygen and ether. The lenses, both 
and o£ first quality, the lormer full 
I length, the latter known as the one- 
lat name in Paris, Il has good venti- 
d. A nesv feature embodied in this 
I other, is the condenser cell being so constructed 
intly removed (independentof the other) for clean' 
;e a broken one. It is 18 in. long, 18 in. 
At the above price is included a 



Mcintosh battebi^ and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. b. a. 



THE CHICAGO MODEL SCIOPTICON. 




L. No. le. 

This lantern is a Single Sciopticon, and is essentially th( 
sanae as the lower lantern oi the New Chicago Model Stereopti 
con, described on the following page. The essential parts bein 
the same, simply a single lantern instead of a dissolving Stereop- 
ticon. Those who cannot afford the outlay necessary to purchase 
the dissolving lantern can purchase this Sciopticon, and 
mence giving their entertainments and easily make the money; 
necessary to purchase the Top Lantern and Dissolving Key, 
then have one of the best lanterns made. 
PRICE, ia Brass, Nickel Plated, with Canvas Traveling Case $63. SO: 

Page 9 we consider very important, and careful reading of 
it will answer many questions and give you much information. 
If any question arises, write and we will cheerfully give you all' 
the information we .can, 




I 



The Chicago Model Stereopticon has been expressly designee 
lortheuseof the professional traveling lecturer and exhibitor. It is 
composed of as few parts as is deemed advisable in the erection 
of a thoroughly first-class instrument. The material is solid 
brass throughout and nickel-plated. It embodies several features 
not possessed by any other instrument. Not only are the legs 
folding, but they are also telescoped, so that no tilting board, or 
box, or case is necessary to place it on; and the length of legs is 
so proportioned that the front of Lantern can be easily elevated 
or depressed. The registering is established by a unique mechan- 
ical movement. The Jets which can be used for oxy-hydrogen 
or oxy-ether, are mounted with platinum-tipped goosenecks, 
sliding backward and forward on a track, orway, that is securely 
bolted to Lantern body, and can be easily raised and lowered 
and retained in position by a thumb screw, so that the accurate 
"centering" of the light can be accomplished in a moment. All 
the different sized objectives can be easily adapted to this Lan- 
tern. It is one of the most compact Lanterns made, and also* 
we o{ the Jightest, weighing less than 25 lbs., and occupying a 



MtlNTOSlI BATTERY A 



., CHICAGO, ILL., C. 8. A. 



e when folded up of i^ inches long by Syi inches wi 
1^^ inches high. The manner of ventilating is somethir 
and original, making it tiie coolest Lantern manutactured. The 



cells that hold the 
Lantern has a hinge doi 
so that at any time the c 
without injury to the eyi 
light. The 
ciple, so that any ordi 
held without having t 
tern, at price quoted, 
piano- 



I 



easily removable; each 
into which is set a blue glass window, 
idition of the light can be ascertained' 
by looking directly into the powerful 
ire builded upon an entirely new prin- 
iry sized cylinder of lime can be securely 
ui/irWd il down to fit. With this Lan- 
is included two sets of double system 
mdensing lenses fully ^yi inches in diameter, 6 
inches iik focus, mounted in brass cells; one pair accurately 
matched achromatic objectives, or magnifying glasses, free from 
chromatic or spherical aberration, wide angles, giving different 
magnifying powers, with telescope movement for the coarse 
adjustment, and a rack and pinion mechanical movement for the 
fine adjustment; two improved adjustable je' 
tinum points; our new style Dissolving Key, 
flow" stop cocks designed for use either with 
pressure or cylinders at high pressure ; als< 
oxygen or the oxy-hydrogen light ; one pai 
one pair of slide carriers, and a sufficient quantity of rubber 
hose for connecting up jets to dissolver. The Chicago Model 
Stereopticon complete, as above described, is securely packed 
in a substantial telescope canvas traveling case, which 
turn is packed in a heavy outside case for shipment. 
PRICE, in Brass, Nickel Plated 9125,00 



s, with solid pla- 
vith special "off- 
gas bags at low 
< with the ether- 
ilide stops, 



All Dissolving Keys should be carefully cleaned before each 
exhibition, and oiled or greased so that they work smoothly. 
Take care that no grease remains in the grooves. We put up 
in ounce boxes a preparation designed especially for this purpose 
and call it the "Dissolver Lubricator." 



PRICE, per 



, 10.35 



n OPTICAL CO., CH[CA(;u. ILL,, u. t- 



Mcintosh combination stereopticon. 




L. No 19. 



PBIC£!, complete in neat pockkiK coae 2 1 Incbes long, S.'.J tnclies 

wide, 13!^ inchea tdgb, wltb loclc and handle 980.00 

Without brasB Itont. condensers and lens 4S.50 

The base of this handsome api^aratiis is an open frame of i: 
ornamented with japan and gilt, with nickel plated legs 4 inches long. 
The body is nickel plated, with hinged door in the side for adjusting 
the jet and lime, and peep hole of blue glass, through which 
the light can be examined without injury to the eyes from its intense 
brilliancy. The body is also hinged upon the frame, and may be 
turned back off from the light for convenient manipulation in certain 
chemical experiments, and also to light the room at the close of 
an entertainment. The special jet furnished with this Stereopticon is 
platina tipped ; it is shown in detail and described on another p 
There is the same general arrangement for ventilation as in the 
instruments previously described. The solid brass front can be 
removed and employed for Solar illumination. It is attached to the 
body of the Stereopticon by a universal ring, therefore those who are 
already supplied with our Solar Microscope and Stereopticon Cora- \ 
bination, and wish to employ artificial light, can obtain the Lantern 
portion without the necessity of duplicating the optical parts. The 
Opening of slide box is sufficiently wide to admit 
a variety of physical apparatus employed for demon- 
strating the phenomena suited to Stereopticon lenses. 
The objective lens may be removed and the Microscope Attach- 
ment substituted for it. This apparatus was originally designed as 




MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHlCAl.0, ILL 

r an accessory to the Solar Combination, the optical parts being 

' mutually interchangeable for the purpose of employing the calcium 

light when sun-light is not available. 

Two of these Stereopticons phiced side by side make a very fine 1 
dissolving apparatus, as all the adjustments are perfect and firm, so I 
that pictures can be accurately registered upon the screen without 
distortion, and without the constant motion, which is an undesirable 
feature of many forms of apparatus offered as first-class Dissolvers. 



VSa^ L. No. 20. 

MICROSCOPE ATTACHMENT. 

PRICE, With best quality lli inch Ottjectlve 940.00 

With second quality 1'4 inch otjectlve 30.00 

Without Olgective 20.00 

DESCRIPTION. 

A" renreBenta the body. I b, Screw for holding Frog Plate, eto. 

O, the Olijeclive. S, S, Cllua lor boldlug Objaot Cartloc. 

e, Coaise Movenienl. I C, Sub-Hlago Ring. 

R, Flange cul in tbreade to (a^en in Sliding Tube of Slereoptlcon. 

This Microscope Attachment is designed expressly for projection, 
and is supplied only with such working parts as are actually necessary. 
It has the Society Screw, which adapts it to most objectives of Amer- 
ican or English make, and also the broad Butterfield Gauge, which 
admits of using a very large prism for polariscope work. The sub- 
stage ring will receive Polariscope, Secondary Condenser, Mounted 
Prisms, and other accessories to experimental work, including all that 
can be used below the stage on the Mcintosh Professional Microscope. 
The rack and pinion movement permits great delicacy in focusing. 
This attachment will be found very satisfactory to those using the 
microscope only for projection. We can furnish other objectives than 
(hose named when higher powers are wanted- 



I L. No. 21. (Vi 

The same description zpplies lo this ianltirn proper as is given io descrip- 
tion ct the Combioatioa Stereapticon on page 37. It is here shown with tba 
Vertical Attachment in position, the front being divided just between the con- 
densing lenses, enables the lantern to be used in the ordinary way, or' in an 
instant converted into a Vertical Projecting Lantern. As shown in the cut it 
is maunted with the Stereopticon ProjectiuE Lens. In the cut on following 
page is the same Lantern with Vertical Attachraenl, but in place of the Stere- 
f opticon objective, is shown the Microscope Attachment. 

la placing an order with us always carefully read pages 9 
and 127, 12e and 129 of catalogue. 



MrlNTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAfiO, ILL,, V. S 



THE McINTOSH COLLEGE LANTERN. 



With Microscope attachment. 




PRICE, wilh Venical Aiiachment.. 



and Microscope Atlachment IM.O 



Vertical Attachment only. . 




is Attachment can be used on several of our high grade 
lanterns, such as the Combination Telescope, Biunial, Royal 
Photo Opticon, etc., etc. It can also be used on the Heliostat 
for solar projection, which for microscopic projection affords a 
method superior to any hitherto used. 

The condensing lenses are of first quality glass, plano-convex, 
4J^ inches in diameter, medium focus, and especially adapted to 
this line of work. The objective is the one-quarter Darlot. This 
apparatus is designed expressly for the illustration and exhibi- 
tion of the various phenomena attending the scientific experi- 
ments relating to heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, 
cohesion figures, and crystallization. No prisms are used, but 
the Bnest French plate mirror glass, which materially lessens 
the cost of the apparatus. 




I 



Mcintosh biunial stereopticon. 



FBICE, complete -with Olssolver and eubstantlal packing case, 

with lacb. and hantlleB tnB.OO 

With our new triple condensers IBS.Ou 

This elegantl)' constructed Dissolving Apparatus leaves notliing to 
be desired either in attractiveness of appearance, ease and conve- 
nience with which it may be manipulated, or the perfection of the 
work which it accomplishes. The solid iron frame makes a firm 
foundation, and prevents any jarring or unsteadiness of equilibrium, 
while adding no unnecessary weight on account of its skeleton form. 
The body of the Stereopticon is heavily nickel plated, and all the 
parts are fastened together by screws. The ventilation is adequate to 
prevent accumulation of heat in either compartment, and the par- 
ticles of lime are drawn away from the condensers. The peep holes 
of blue glass, permit observation of the lights without opening 
the door. The lower brass front can be detached, and used 
with the solar apparatus. The upper brass front is adjustable by 
special screw movement to aid in registering perfectly with the lower. 
The optical parts are adapted to both sunlight and artificial light, 



3a MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO . ILL., U. 8. A. 

and the oxy-hydrogen or ether-oxygen gases may be employed as 
preferred. The jets have the same mechanical construction, with 
screw adjustment for centering the light as the one described on 
page 87. ^ 

The Mcintosh Biunial has the finest quality of condensers, 
mounted in brass, screw cells, and solid brass fronts. The lenses are 
our latest improved double combination achromatic, adapted to all 
distances ever required ; they are provided with rack and pinion and 
brass sliding tubes that will draw out, giving various focal lengths 
for different distances. The stages are arranged to take slides of all 
sizes, and to permit the attachment of various forms of apparatus 
employed in scientific demonstration. Some very fine effects may be 
produced by using the Stereopticon lens on one lantern, and the 
microscope attachment on the other. A microscopic object can 
thus be projected upon the screen. In physiological instruc- 
tion '>. i> convenient to turn from the anatomical to the microscopic 
structure without waiting to change lenses. A variety of experi- 
mental work that will occur to the practical teacher, is facilitated by 
this apparatus. 

The simplicity of construction, durability of material, portability 
and perfect adaptation of every part to the work to be accomplished 
is appreciated at sight by all practical lantern men who have ex- 
amined it, and alth<?ugh it has been before the public but compara- 
tively a short time, the general recognition accorded it by competent 
judges, as the Best Dissolving Stereopticon yet made, and its ready 
sale are gratifying proofs of its merit. 



THE ROYAL PHOTO- OPTICON. 




PRICE (300.00 

This magnificent instrument is superior to anything hereto- 
fore manufactured in the way of a Magic Lantern. The lantern 
body is solid brass, burned black ; the doors, of which there 
two to each lantern, are of bronze and highly ornamental, each 
door having a landscape thrown up in relief, bronzed. Every- 
thing about the lantern is of metal excepting the tilting-board. 
This board is in two parts, is of solid mahogany, very thick and 
strong, to which the lantern body is permanently attached. The 
large thumb-screw by which the lantern is elevated or depressed 
is made with three threads to the inch, so that one single 
turn of the large milled head makes quite a difference on 

sn. The top of this lantern is hinged, and viKeTv \i\\awc*. 

:, discloses the third light; this tViitd V\%\\t \i^\t\?, 6c^\^-ns 



35 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill. u. a a. 

■ ■ . . .1 -^ 

for the illumination of the hall, theatre, or church at the 
close of an entertainment where they have no electric light, 
or cannot light their gas by electricity. In an instant when 
showmg the last picture or the " Good Night " chromatrope, you 
can dissolve right over on this third light, and the )iall is bril- 
liantly illuminated so that the audience can readily disperse. 
Each door is provided with a blue glass window, so that the 
condition of the light can always be ascertained without injury 
to the eyes by looking directly into the powerful incandes- 
cent lime. The dissolving key furnished with this instrument is 
of the latest improved pattern, having the new Off-flow Regulat- 
ing Needle Valves, for the establishment of the off-flow of hydro- 
gen. No rubber tubing is used inside of the lantern. From 
either side of the mixing chambers a tube of brass passes back- 
ward and out of the lantern body. In lieu of having stop-cocks 
affixed to each tube as in the ordinary manner, separate blocks 
with needle-valve attachment, are placed on the back of the lan- 
tern to which the tubes are attached by short pieces of rubber 
hose. One feature of these attachments is that you may estab- 
lish your equilibrium of gases and have your lantern all arranged 
for work several hours before the entertainment, and by means 
of these valves you can shut off the supply of gas without dis- 
turbing the jeedle-valves, so Aat when you light up in the 
evening you can do so instantly, and yet have a perfect equilib- 
rium established. The jets are both mechanical, whereby the 
raising and lowering, and moving from right to left or vice versa, 
and forward and backward movements are all controlled by 
several milled-head screw movements. This lantern is provided 
with first-quality Piano Convex Condensing Lenses, four and 
one-half inches in diameter, mounted in brass fronts so that they 
can be removed easily for the purpose of cleaning, or if one 
should become broken through an accident, it can be quickly 
and easily replaced without disturbing the entertainment. The 
3^ objectives or magnifying glasses are achromatic and free from 
chromatic or spherical aberration. Of medium focal length, they 
have two magnifying powers, controlled by the finest rack and 
pinion focusing movement. The lime carriers are also mechan- 
ical, since you can raise or lower, or turn from right to left by a 
milled-head screw on the back of the lantern. Both fronts are 
of solid brass, removable at will. The upper front can be 
revolved so that all mechanical slides that have a vertical move- 




I 
I 



Mcintosh b attery asp optical co.. Chicago, ill., 

.. This IS a feature that is rarely possessed by 
any other lantern. We think that every one who has ever ope- 
rated a Royal Photo-Opticon, will say that it is rnore easil^man- 
aged than the ordinary style of lantern, and that its very appear- 
ance is such that it will impress an audience as being one 
of the finest lanterns made. We only make one style, and 
one-priced lantern of this pattern. The price of the lantern 
alone just as depicted in the engraving, without any accessories 
whatsoever, is S3U0 00 We make up for this lantern an outfit 
consisting of the lantern as above described, with one pair of 
50-foot cylinders filled with gas, each cylinder being mounted 
with our Double Needle Valves ; one 24-foot screen, one electric 
signal, one lecturer's reading lamp, one lecturer's stand, one 
portable screen frame, 200 feet best quality screen rope, 100 
plain photographic transparancies, 30 colored wood-mounted 
slides, for $450.00 net. This iantem is packed securely in a 
heavy, hard-wood lantern case. 



The UcImujsh Battert asd Opticai, Co., CbJcago. 

~ Om(K»i«n.'— The Cblcago Model Stereoptlcon I nuri 
Tbe mare 1 use It the better 1 11^ Jt, nod the niore I Ba 

So laDt«m Chat I have e«ei se?n can comiiara nl 
plctares are the clearest and btJgbl#st iiossLble nnd ti 
I while (he cuiLsiUDtUDn ot gas Is very llttlH lnilee<l. 

isB and rapldlt; with which u can be set up and tahen away agala Is also a gieal 
I sdvaatage. In fact I would not give a[i mine tar a whule arm; of any other makea ol 
[ bnteiDS I knott oL 

niltted to send me the Lime Tongs nhlch the Doctor said should go with thE 
I IiBntern. 

Please send me al "mx by C. & E. 1. trelght two M ft. cyUnders of gas, and oblige, 
Trul; yours. 

JOHN B. ASTLEY. 



THE TRIPLE CHICAGO MODEL. 




L. No. les. 

' PRICE, vHlh Triple Dissolving Key and a Objectivea '.tSOO.OO 

With this Lantern at the list price is furnished the highest 
Rrade Triple Dissolving Key, three matched one-quarter Darlot 
Objectives, and three matched one-half Darlot Objectives, and 
case. It is the lightest, most compact, portable, and lowest 

[ priced Triple Stereoplicon manufactured. 



Mcintosh bittert and optical co.. Chicago, ill., v. s 



THE SCENIC TRI-OPTICON. 




PRICE ttW-Oit 

This instrument was constructed for producing special 
scenic effects in one of the leading theatres in Chicago (Mc- 
Vicker's). Its perfect success has induced us to place a de- 
scription and cut of it in our new catalogue. It !s tri-unial in 
construction, that is, the three lanterns are placed one above the 
other. The upper one has a clock-work movement for revolving 
a circular disc of glass on which are cloud effects, etc., tot 
producing movable effects. These, w\\en pio'^ectei qtv ^ ■5,cT.^e.\i, 



39 Mcintosh batteby and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. a a. 

have the appearance of moving clouds or figures. The middle 
lantern has a mechanical movement slide carrier, by means of 
which, figures, etc.i are made to move across the screen, and 
have the appearance of passing through moving clouds. The 
lower lantern has an instantaneous shutter in front of the lens^ 
worked by means of an air-bulb. With this device, lightning can 
be flashed on the screen and produce with the cloud effects 
a perfect representation of a storm By the aid of the triple 
key, the light of each lantern can be controlled at will ; all three 
jets can be lighted at once, one or more gradually turned up or 
down, or suddenly flashed on the screen. By means of a peculiarly 
constructed diaphragm in front of the two upper lenses, a beau- 
tiful blending effect can be produced, and the clouds near the 
edge of screen are so blended that there is no sharp line of 
light; and figures, thrown on the screen apparently come out of 
dense clouds and pass off, in the same manner. The lenses are 
achromatic, of special construction, with so short a focus they 
will cover a screen forty-Six feet wide, when the instrument is 
placed at a distance of 36 feet. This can be done at an angle of 
45 degrees, which allows the instrument to be used back of the 
flies of a theater stage. We believe this is the first instrument 
ever made to do this work and to produce these effects. Not only 
the effects described above, but a great variety can be produced 
by this combination. This Stereopticon can also be used for 
producing effects obtained by such lecturers as Stoddard, Philip 
Phillips, Ragan and others. Each lantern has mechanical plat- 
inum tipped jets, triple four and one-half inch condensing lenses, 
and special achromatic objectives, or magnifying lenses. The 
tubes holding the lenses and condensers are of brass, finely 
lacquered. The body of the Stereopticon, triple-key, etc., are 
all finely ni,ckel-plated. The price of this instrument complete, 
as described, in case, JI400.00 



THE TRI-OPTICON. 




This Lantern at the list price includes the Triple High 
Pressure Dissolving Key, with high pressure connections, and- 
three matched one-half achromatic Darlot Objectives, togelhei 
with first quality condensing lenses, and best mechanical jets; 
the complete lantern packed in a substantial traveling trunk. 
We consider this instrument to be one of the finest dissolving 
triple stereopticons made. 




I 



I. No 28 

L No. S8. Price in Brass Nickel Trimmed ( 400. UO 

L»o. ISO. Price, in Alummum 600,00 

These magnificent instruments are furnished at the above prices 
with three matched achromatic one-half Darlot Objectives, three 
pair of matched condensing lenses of white glass, \% inches in 
diameter, 6J^ inches focus, three mechanical jets made from the 
best and latest patterns, and a Triple High Pressure Dissolving 
Key, with high pressure connections; the entire lantern being 
packed in a solid and substantial traveling trunk, and that in a 
heavy outside case for shipment. This lantern possesses an 
elegance of appearance, together with an efficiency of action that 
only the highest degree of finished workmanship can produce. 




. Down" Lantern has been buiided i 
for the use of the Expert Lantern Exhibitor, for the operator"^ 
who has owned and used other Lanterns and is thoroughly 
familiar with their advantages and disadvantages. 

This "Knock Down" Lantern is designed more expressly 
for the use of the Traveling Exhibitor than the one who has a _ 
place for permanent Exhibit. It "Knocks Down" in everyj 
signification of the word. In dismantling for packing, Objec-j 
tives disengage from Condensers, Condensers remain in situ, . 
Jets detach from steel rods, Hood folds up flat, front and 
back body frames slide on steel rods engaging the centre frame. 
The six Bessemer steel rods forming skeleton of body are with- 
drawn, the Dissolving Key remains in situ on tilting board, and 
the er:t:re Lantern packs snugly in the case depicted in cut. 
The case furnished with this Lantern is a strongly made sample 
trunk that can be checked as baggage with safety. Trunk, 
Dissolving Kej-, Hose for Lantern, one pair J^ size Darlot Ob- 
jectives, two pair 4J4 inches in diameter and G'/i inch focus 
Condensing Lenses, one pair Semi-Mechanical Jets for mixed 
gases (oxy-hydrogen, oxy-elher or oxy-gasoline) are furnished 
with this Lantern at the list price ot $\T!i.OCi. ■ 



«a Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



THE McINTOSH ADJUSTABLE FEED 

ARC LAMP. 




I. No. 176. 

PRICE j;30.00 

Rheostat for cutting down current $10.00 

Simple in design, of but few parts, yet provided with all 
the essential points of excellence, it furnishes the exhibitor with 
an Arc Lamp that can be used on either continuous or alternat- 
ing current, and on account of its small size can be easily 
adapted to almost any lantern. Requires no more attention 
than the ordinary lime light. The moderate price brings it 
within the reach of every one. 




PRICE, netJUO.W 

The Arc Light Lantern as depicted in above cut is designed'' 
for use on the ordinary continuous electric current of 110 voits. 
The light is noiseless, steady, white and intense. The Arc ' 
Lamp itself is automatic in every sense of the word, requiring, 
scarcely any attention during an entire entertainrnent. The' 
light is so powerful that it can be used in a half darkened room 
and bring out the picture on the screen bright, clear, sharp a 
distinct. This lantern can also be furnished with a lamp for use 
on the alternating current, particulars concerning which will b« 
given on application. With the lantern at above price is fur- 
nished a neat carrying case. We also furnish a double or dis- 
solving Arc Light Stereopticon, consisting of two of the above 
lanterns one above the other, and provided with a dissolving 
shutter attachment with which the finest dissolving effects cat^ 
be produced. 



r 



48a UclNTOBH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. [LL., V. S. I 



Mcintosh dissolving arc light 
stereopticon. 




^PRICE, with Dissolving Shutter Net. S330.00 

" " " Switch " 235.00 

" of Double Rheostat 20.00 

" " Plug and 10 ft. Cable and Q. S. Wire. .Net, 5.00 

This Dissolving Arc Light Lantern, as shown in cut, is de- 
signed for use on the "direct " or straight 110 volt current: It 
can "be used on either the arc or incandescent circuit of this 
voltage. These lamps can also be wound to order for use on 
the 50 volt alternating curtent. We carry them in stock for the 
direct current and make them to order for the alternating cur- 
rent. It is always necessary to use a Rheostat in circuit with 
each lamp. Some prefer the Dissolving Shutter, others prefer 
the Dissolving Switch. Either work well and produce beautiful 
affects. 




I 



THE TRIPLE ARC LIGHT LANTERN. 

t-. No, 163, Price Net MOO. 00 

This Triple Arc Light Stereopticoa is probabJy the first of 
itspiind ever manufactured. It was constructed for the use of the 
Panorama of Kilauea, situate in the Midway Plaisance during 
the World's Fair. With this instrument vividly realistic st 
effects of the burning Volcano of the Sandwich Islands 
effected. This Lantern is used on a 2,000 volt alternating 
current which through a transformer is cut down to thirty volts. 
Each lamp has its own Rheostat aud its own switch. Either' 
one of the three lamps, either two of the three, or all of them 
can be used at will. The Rheostat and Transformer can 
furnished for any voltage. Each lamp will carry fourteen i 
peres of current. At the price of 8400.00 we' furnish every- 
thing depicted in cut, Switches, Rheostats, Lamps and Lantern 
complete and also the transformer not shown in cut. There bei 
so many different systems of current used the Arc Light 
Lanterns are only builded to order. It requires about two 
weeks' time to fill an order. 



45 MclNTOaH BATTERY ASP OfTlCkL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., P. S. A. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT FOB PROJECTION. ' 

CUT OF INCANDESCENT LAMP ATTACHED 
TO BASE. 




L. No 80. 

It often happens that a person has a permanent place o! 
«xhibition and that he frequently has an electric light cir- 
cuit at his disposal. The above illustration represents a 160 or 300 
candle-power incandescent lamp in socket with spiral carbon, at- 
tached toabase, and ready tobe used in Sciopticon No. 2 in lieu 
of either the Sun-light oil-lamp or the adjustable jet. This lamp 
can be furnished for a current from 50 to no volts. With this 
light a very good 10 ft. picture can be made. The cost of run- 
ning this light is trifling. The Arc Electric light can also be used, 
and is the most powerful artificial light that we have, see pages 
43 and 47. 

Size of 50, V. 150 C. P. Lamp "ZJ^ inches from base to top of 
globe, 3 inches diameter of globe, 4 inches from center of base to 
center of front of globe. 

Size of 110 V, 300 C. P. Lamp 9 inches from base to top of 
globe; 5 inches. Diameter of globe; 6 inches from center of base 
to center of front of globe. 
PRICE of IncandeKcent Lamp on Base with Socket tIS.OO 

" '■ "no Base, no Socket 7.50 

Base only 3. 50 

Socket only \.|J(J 




rL. No. 81. 
ICE with Incandescent Limp 130.00 
" extra lamps |no socket or base) T , 50 
base only 3.50 
'1 socket only 1.00 
This lantern is intended for use where one has the use of the 
electric incandescent light current. It is provided with full size 
regular condensing lenses and an achromatic objective or magni- 
fying lens. This lantern is furnished with either the 150 C. P. 
lamp for a 50-vo!t current, or a 300 C. P. lamp for a 110-volt 
current. The lamp miisl he adapted to the current you have; 
these lamps cannot be used on currents of different strength, so 

(that this lantern is calculated only for those who are permanently 
located, not for the traveling exhibitor. In ordering, state which 
lamp you want. This style of light for exhibition purposes is 
superior to the oil light and yet inferior by far to the lime light. 
Both the Incandescent and the Arc Electric Lanterns can be 
used as a dissolving lantern by placing two of them side by side 



If iND OPTICAL CO., CHrClGO. ILL., U. 8. J 



can be accomplished. For permanent exhibition and advertising 

irposes there is nothing like the arc light, it is much cheaper 

for continuous use than the lime light. 



We make use of the highest grade self-focusing arc lamp, 
I and test every outfit before sending it out. 

[ PRICE Single Arc Light Lantern Net, tllO 00 

Double or Dissolving Arc Light LantEro '■ 230.00 

Dissolving Switch for Dissolving Arc Light Lantern..., " 15.00 

Single Incandescent Scioplicon 30.00 

Double or Dissolving Incandescent Sciopticon 80,00 

' Switch for " " ■' 10,00 




Dissolving Key with Adjustable Valves, No. i 



PBICB S12.O0 

This Dissolver is made especially for raised gases, and works 
^L equally well with the ether-oxygen and oxy-hydrogen gases. It is 
^^ finely fitted, accurately adjusted, and each one is tested before sending 
^K oat. The method of making connections with the Lantern and 



HdNTOSB BATTSBT ASO OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 




Dissolving Key No. 2 with Adjustable Valves 
and Stop Cocks. 



PRICE 115. M ] 

This Dissolver is provided with stopcocks to regulate the ■ 
supply of gases when using the gas from gas bags or when J 
using oxygen from cylinders and ether from the saturators. 
As the stopcocks are on the Dissolver it is not necessary to 
have Ihena on the jets or burners. 



g BkTtEa: AMD OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. ILL.. D. a A 



THE HIGH PRESSURE 
DISSOLVING KEY. 



I 



I.. No. 34. 
PRICE (30.00 

The Dissolving key for use with oxygen and hydrogen gases 
is ofimproved construction ; and with it more perfect dissoiving 
effects can be accomplished than with anything heretofore m 
ufactured. The professional lecturer and traveling exhibitor 
always use cylinders or tanks to carry their gas in ; and into 
cylinder I2in. in diameter by 48 in. in height, as much as 50 cubic 
feet is compressed under enormous steam pressure. When using 
gas under this high pressure, it has been difficult hereto- 
fore to establish the equilibrium of the gases, to regulate 
the supply of gas to each lantern, without darkening the 
screen somewhat when in the act of dissolving. With this new 
key this difficulty has been entirely obviated ; the gases are under 
such perfect control, the relative proportion so finely adjusted, 
that from the beginning to the close of the exhibition there is ab- 
solutely no difference in the brilliancy of illumination, no matter 
in what position the lever of dissolving-key may be ; whether 
on the lower or upper lantern or upon both at the same time. 
This has been accomplished by having each side of the dissolver 
atirely separate and distinct from the other, so that there is no 
admixture ol the gases, and so teguVating fWe fto'w ol ^a.'i, Wxit [□ 




AXD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, 11,L., V. B. 



[ identically the same ratio of proportion that you diminish the in- 
sity of tht; brilliancy of illumination, or technically speaking, the 
f candle power of one lantern ; in an exactly corresponding propor- 
I tion you increase the incandescence in the other lantern. This 
regulating of the supply and establishing tiie equilibrium of the 
gases can be made hours before the entertainment, so that when the 
time to light up comes, all that is necessary to do is to turn on a 
full head of gas at the cylinders and touch a match to the jet, 
and you are, at once, ready for exhibition without further adjust- 
ment. 




I 



The Triple High Pressure Dissolving Key. 

This Dissolver is designed for use with three lanterns; it has 
ee plugs, three levers and three sets of valves, so that each 
lantern is entirely separate and distinct from eachof the others. 
Either lantern can be used at will, either two of the three may 
be used together, or the whole three can be thrown on the screen 
at the same time. For beautiful "effect dissolving" there is 
nothing like it. 




_ .^. „.. . e who lius ueed gaa In 

:o kngw hon dlucIi eas tbere la lett In a clllniler' 
'a tbe long Felt nant and Is reliable 
av» anplled for patoDt. Its Bcsle la 



_-,, — at contalnBcl in a esllnder ol _. . 

I of ess uader presaare aveiBge^ Aire uubic t«t^t to 

as gas eoou^ tor aiiotlier emertalnment, and tbus n? 



sr opposite the needle \s !8, alwraViia aw ^.'ttBTO ' 



■HoINTOSH BATTBRT AND OPTICAL CO,, CHICAGO, I 



McINTOSH DOUBLE NEEDLE VALVE. 




^ PRICE S5.0O 

All of our cylinders are furnished with the Mcintosh Double 
Needle Valve in place of the old style of Single Needle Valves. 
The threads on these valves being of standard size can be read- 
ily attached to nearly every make of cylinders There being 
two needles, the estabiishinfi of the equilibrium of the gases 
is very easily accomplished. The Valve that has the wheel 
attachment being the fine adjustment^ and the spindle in top of 
vaJve, regulating supply from cylinder. In turning on gas see 
that the wheel valve is closed tightly; open the spindle one full 
turn, or turn on as much as is necessary, allowing the gas to 
come out on to the wheel needle valve ; now, with this latter 
valve, establish the equilibrium, then, as the pressure goes down 
in the cylinders, all that is necessary to do is to open up the main 
spindle of valve. In this way you can connect hours before your 
entertainment, and when ready to commence projecting, all you 

thave to do is to open the main valve and light up, the adjust- 
ment already being controlled by the wheel valve. 



IMPROVED CYLINDER KEY. 




UcrNTOSB BATTERS AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 6 

Adjustable Jet or Burner No, i. 




L. No. 37. 

PRICE (8.00 

This Jet No. 1 has no stopcocks and is designed for use 
with gas used from cylinders only, or can be used with gas bags 
or for the oxy-ether light, when used with Dissolver No. 2, which 
has stopcocks for establishing the equilibrium of gases. 

Adjustable Jet or Burner No. 2. 




I,. No. 38. 

PKICE »10.00 

This Jet No. 2 has stopcocks, andcai 
or gas bags, or with the Ether-Oxyger 
alteration 



be used with cylinders 
Lime Light without 



UoINTOSH BATTKBT AND QPTICAL CO., CBICIGO, ILL., 1 



Adjustable Jet or Burner No. 3, 




L No. 39 
paicE 

This Jet No. 3 has both stopcocks and a Mechanical Lim 
Movement and is the best adjustable jet manufactured. It caoTI 
easily be fitted to nearlj- any style or form of lantern. Price d[j| 
parts of Jets, viz.: 

PRICE of •' Platinum lipped" Goose-Nack $ ] .{ 

" " Crowfooi and Upright 

" ' Jet No. S, without Crowfoot and Upright 

No. 3, wilhout n.B03 

The Mechanical Jets, such as are used on the Biunial andlj 
Royal Photo-Opticon are shown in the cut of lantern nn page 87. 

PRICE with Sliding Lime Movement $SS.0O 

" ■' Mechanical Lime MovenienE 80.00 



56 UcINTOSH B1.TTBBT AKD OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., D. 8. A. 



PORTABLE ADJUSTABLE EXTENSION 
SCREEN FRAME. 




I,. No. 40. i. 

A practicable Portable Extension Screen Frame that can be 
adapted to all sizes of screens is a great desideratum to the 
traveling exhibitor. We furnish a portable sectional frame con- 
structed as follows : 

It is composed of the required number of sections, each sec- 
tion being three feet in length, one and a quarter inches in diam- 
eter, of tough, thoroughly seasoned whitewood. Two of the end 
sections have a sharp-pointed brad that stick into the floor so 
that it cannot slip or get out of position ; the other two end 
sections, each have a pulley let into the body of the section 
through which is carried the screen rope, and is attached to a 
small screw-eye in the floor in a line with the face of the screen, 
and at the proper distance from the screen ; then two guy-ropes 
at each side of the screen, one extending forward and one back- 
ward, serve to hold the screen immovably in place. This device 
answers admirably for screens up to twenty feet square. Larger 
screens than this require a heavier frame. 
PRICE, pet section $0 60 

• • • PRICE LIST OF SCREENS. • • • 

6 feat Square (3 00 15 feel Square (lO 00 

7 feet Square 3 00 18 ■■ " 13 00 

8 ■' •■ 4 00 20 '■ •■ 15 00 

» " •• 4 00 24 ■■ ■■ 1800 

J0 " " 4 50 80 " " 22 30 

f^ ■■ •• 7 00 



Mcintosh battbby and optical co., ohtcago. ill., u. s. a. 



THE LECTURER'S ELECTRIC SIGNAL. 




No. 41. 

TheLectuter's Telegraph or Electric Signal is something that 
the lecturer must have. He must have some means of comm 
cation with his operator. The old methods of communication have 
been by means of a small beli ; or by the disclosing of the colored 
signal light in the lecturer's reading lamp; and in some cases if 
the lecturer uses a pointer, he holds it in a certain position or 
screen ; sometimes he taps the floor ; but there are serious objec- 
tions to all these methods, as they attract the attention of the 
audience from the lecture, and by apprising them of the change 
of views frequently mat an otherwise beautiful dissolving effect. 

This Electric Signal consists of a battery of zinc and carbon , 
elements, the only chemical used is the ordinary sal ammonia 
which water is added, so that the battery is a perfectly clean one; 
no disagreeable odor ; no acid to slop over and ruin the clothin 
very easily kept in order, and very inexpensive, costing less 
than I cent an hour; it also has, what is called, an "Electric 
' the sound of which, can be ao te?,u\a.\eii ^^ '> 



heard by the operator alone ; loo ft. of conducting wire, and a 
push button to be held in the hand of the lecturer. We put 
this signal up in two grades ; the cheaper with ordinary annuncia,- 
tor wire; the better grade, with a tinsel flexible cable cord covered 
with a braiding of mixed silk and worsted, that winds on a spool 
as easily as ordinary cord. 



withiaSft- flexible cable cord,. 



. . 13,5C 



IMPROVED READING LAMP. 



^r The ordinary Lectui 

and does not give a good light. The Reading Lamp like above 
cut is furnished with a miniature oil lamp. Kerosene oil is 
used. When through using, it only takes a moment to remove 
the burner and fasten it tightly with a soft rubber cork so that 
there is no danger whatever of any leakage, and the burner and 
chimney packs snug]y into the hood of the lamp. The call-bell 
has been done away with, as its use in signaling the operator is 
annoying, and detracts from the interest of the lecture. It is 
provided with a colored light signal that answers every purpose. 
This lamp affords sufficient light so that a type-written or man- 
uscript lecture can be easily read, and at the same time will not 
illuminate the hall or screen. 




L. No. 43, 

r's Reading Lamp is 



I PRICE, packed ii 



.(8.50 



Mcintosh battery and optical go.. Chicago, ill., u. a a. 



58 



THE LECTURERS' READING STAND. 





L. No. 44. 
LIGHT, COMPACT, CONVENIENT, PRACTICABLE. 

We make two styles of these portable Reading Stands ; one a 
low priced stand, of Japanned iron, and the other a more elaborate 
stand of brass, telescoped, finely nickel plated. The cheaper stand 
is similar to those used by musicians. Both have an inclined 
rack to hold the manuscript; either stand will hold our Lecturers! 
Reading Lamp. It can be adjusted to any desired height. L. 
No. 44 having a sharp pointed screw can readily be screwed 
into the floor. 

Is, No. 48, PRICE, Japanned Iron „ $1.60 

Xi.No.44, '* Nickel Plated Brass 8.00 



59 



Mcintosh BATTERY and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



SLIDE PROTECTOR. 






Ii« No. 45. L. No. 46. 

A new departure from the beaten track is our new ** Slide 

Protector." The above illustrations represent this latest nov- 
elty, with the round-cornered square and the circular opening. 
The former is 2^ x3 inches, and the latter 3 inches in diameter. 
They will accommodate slides 3^x4 inches, or the English size, 
3/^x3 j^, and, moreover, an exhibitor possessing a number of 
slides mounted in wood can take them from the wood frames 
>j^-and place them in these tin protectors with perfect ease by 
simply using wood or cardboard fillers at the ends to prevent 
slipping out of center. 

By this means one can do away with the bulky wooden 
frames and secure a uniformity in the size of all his slides — a 
great desideratum, as all lecturers and exhibitors know. Be- 
sides securing perfect safety from loss by breakage in transpor- 
tation, slides thus framed will stand almost any amount of rough 
usage. These protectors are made of light-weight tin, fitting 
together one side over the other, the edges being bent to fit 
closely. In placing these on the market we do not ask an ex- 
travagant price, but have marked them at a low figure, placing 
them within the reach of all consumers alike, feeling sure that 
they will find appreciative and ready purchasers. 

PRICE, per hundred $5 00 

PRICE, each, wood mounts 4x7 15 

Sample tin protector on receipt of 7 cents in stamps.' 
Sample wood mount on receipt of 17 cents in stamps. 




I. No. 164. 

LANTERN SLIDE BOXES GROOVED. 

Wood, tor 13 Slides I .1 

■' " 35 - ! 

'■ 50 ■■ !.(»■ 

-■100 '■ 8.00l 

Wood, Cloth Covered, wiih Safely Catch, for 13 Slides, L. No, IM 50 J 

35 7sl 

50 " ■■ l.SS'l 

100 35ttl 



BATTEKY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL,, I 



SOLAR MICROSCOPE AND STEREOPTICON 
COMBINATION. 




V. Tuumb-wlieel, 

vertloailj. 
IF, Tbumb-wli 



ICti Lhp slide _ 
,e Stereoplleon le 



older 



IB pUBHl When 
em plowed. 

■i I, Spring clips, nbtcli hold tbe slides 
when tbe Ulccoscope Attactiinenc Is 
employed. 
C, BrsflsCBll. tioiaingthe condcnBerB. 
M Brass collar supporting ilie tube B, 



,. — JB or microscope, 
-.jendjuslment. 
ue iid]iistinent. 
b tastecs the microscope on 



r, Micro,' 

Miccoacope Sliuii 



Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 62 

PBIOE of Solar Microscope and Stereopticon complete, as follows: One 
large adjustable Mirror, for reflecting sunlight through the con- 
densing lens; one 4^ Condensing Lens, set in large polished brass 
tube, with draw tube and space in large tube to receive the Stere- 
opticon slides, one secondary Condenser; one Stereopticon Objeo- 
tive, with two achromatic combinations, for high and low power; 
one Solar Microscope; one Stand and Draw tube, to use the Solar 
as a monocular; one A and C eye-piece, 11^^ inch and 1-6 inch first- 
class Microscopic Objectives $157.50 

This price, $175, includes everything depicted in above cut. This outfit 
can be purchased in parts. See the following items: 

L. No. 49. The Heliostat proper, or Porte Lumiere, as it is sometimes 

called, consists of the parts M, F, RR, V and W Price, 180.00 



<( 



•I 



50. The Solid Brass Lantern Front, consists of parts A, C, R, 
E and L, without objective Price, $42.50 

(It is the same front as used on the Combination and Bi- 
unial Stereopticons. ) 

51. The Professional Microscope, parts T, S, M, C, F, K, B. ss, 
X, Y, Z, complete, as described under L. No. 54, page 61 of 
catalogue, is included in the solar Microscope and Stere- 
opticon Combination Price, 100.00 

■•• 52. The Stereopticon Objective, part L, is a one-quarter Darlot 

Objective Price, 7.00 

•• 68. The Lantern body ordinarily used with L. No. 48, for use 
with lime light, is the body of the Combination Lantern de- 
scribed on page 27, and is quoted, packed in case, but with- 
out front or optical system (front and lenses) Price, $42.50 



DIRECTIONS 

For Using the Solar Microscope and Stereopticon 

Combination. 



To employ the brass front of the Mcintosh Stereopticon for Solar 
Brojection, it is necessary to remove the condenser next the light, 
using only one condensing lens with the steieo^Ueoxv \t.xv& "V*. ^ort 



63 Mcintosh batteby and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. b. a. 

Microscope Projection it is necessary to insert a secondary condenscL- 
in the sub stage ring of the microscope attachment before fastening ii 
to draw tube £. 

The Solar part of this Combinaticn consists of a mirror, 
moved by spur-wheel gears in such a way that a beam of sunlight 
reflected from it can be kept in the same direction all day, if needed 
so long. The room in which it is used should have, preferably, a 
southern aspect, although an east or west one will answer for a few 
hours daily. The frame, ^, should exactly fit into the window frame 
when the sash is raised or lowered (according as the lower or upper 
part of the window is most convenient), and the light should be 
excluded from the room. 

To Darken the Room. Any plan may be adopted that will ex- 
clude the light. In our exhibition room the windows have opaque 
shades, and heavy canton flannel curtains draped back, to admit light. 
To darken the room the shades and curtains are lowered in a moment. 
We find this very convenient, and it is a method well adapted to the 
class-room. 

To use the Solar as a Stereopticon. Fix the frame as 
already described, and revolve the mirror until a beatn of light is 
thrown through the opening in the frame upon the center of the 
screen ; fasten C to the frame, and attach Z to the sliding tube £ (in 
place of microscope attachment -AT, shown in cut). The sliding tube 
should be moved back so as to shorten the focal distance between C 
and Z as much as possible. Insert the slide (inverted) in opening A 
and its magnified image will appear on the screen. If the outlines are 
not distinct adjust the focus by means of the wheel on Z. 

To use as a Solar Microscope. Remove Z and attach JS 
as shown in cut. The focal distance between condenser and the mi- 
croscope oli'ective needs to be greater than when the stereopticon 
lens is used, therefore draw out £ two or three inches (this distance 
varies with different objectives), until a bright, white disk appears on 
the screen. Insert the slide upon which the object to be examined is 
mounted inside the spring clips ssy and focus the image on the 
screen by means of c. When very delicate specimens are to be ex- 
amined, it is advisable to employ an alum tank to absorb the heat rays. 
To transform the Solar into a Monocular Microscope. 
Remove J^, and fasten it upon the stand S by the screw 3. Slide the 
draw tube T, which carries the eye-piece into the solar tube J^, and 
it is ready for use. The stand is solid and carefully made, and can 
be used with objectives of high power. This microscope has the 
Society Screw and the broad Butterfield Gauge, so that any objectives 
having the same can be used with it. 




AS sunlight is much more powerful than any artificial light, and costft, 
nothing, [he advantages of this apparatus are obvious. If sunlight 

e always available, nothing more would be needed ; 
investigator, the instructor and the exhibitor will frequently have 
occasion to use it with artificial light, the inventor has made his Com- 
bination Stereopticon, so that the optical parts are interchangeable 
with those of the Solar Apparatus. Ether-oxygen or the oxy-hy- 
drogen lime light may be employed, and will probably 
best substitutes for sunlight until considerable advance is made in 
the production of the electric light in a more economical and con- 
venient form than at present. 



r 

I 

m 

m ^ 

L 



OBJECT TEACHING. 

Teaching by illustation has become an established practice of out 
day, and no instructor can aiford to neglect object teaching. The 
principal obstacle in the way of its more universal application is pau- 
city of the school fund, or a failure of the school boaid to realize the 
necessity for suitable apparatus. It is customary for teachers to ex- 
temporize apparatus, and in a crude way attempt to aid the eye in 
making plain many branches of study. This is certainly a help to the 
pupil in understanding the text book, yet it falls far short of what 
may be accomplished by suitable aids. In this practical age little 
value is attached to knowledge that cannot be transformed into capital 
to achieve some useful purpose, and any measures are certain to be 
appreciated which not only tend to fix in the memory the dry facts of 
the arts and sciences, but at the same time reveal their practical appli- 
cation. As an incentive to study experimental work is of the highest 
importance. This point cannot be better illustrated than by refer- 
ence to experiments the writer witnessed when a boy. Having 
learned "by heart" from a text book on philosophy the properti 
of matter, none of which produced any deep impression at the time, 
he chanced to witness the death of a little mouse, which had been 
placed under the receiver of an air pump, from which the air 
exhausted ; also the bursting of a glass flask from the same cause ; and 
had his hand held by atmospheric pressure on an opening in a glass 
jar so firmly that he was unable to remove it, until air was allowed to, 
enter the vessel. These experiments made such an impression on his 
mind that for days he thought ot little else, and ever after Philosophy 
new book to him. Many times had he looked at the starry 
heavens, and had constellations and stars pointed out to him, bu! it 
produced only a passing notice. But when he chanced to look Ihroui 
a telescope and beheld the planet Saturn and its 'vm^s, a.^XtOTvcm.'^ ■ 



65 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



presented in a new light. It became a pleasure rather than a task to 
study it. On beholding for the first time a drop of water under a 
microscope he was astonished at seeing the myriads of living forms, 
it opened to him a new world of wonders and new. desires to study ; 
that boy, though too poor to purchase a microscope at the time, never 
neglected an opportunity to learn what he could in .the department of 
microscopy, and was never satisfied until he was owner of the coveted 
prize. The above reference is made simply to show that ideas con- 
veyed to the mind through the eye produce an impression as much 
stronger on the mind as reality is stronger than a dream. We forget 
common conversation, descriptions of places and things, but when we 
visit them, and their forms are conveyed to our mind through the 
medium of our eyes, they are indelibly impressed on our memor) 

This is the reason why object teaching yields such grand results. 
Many children cannot retain ideas which they receive through the 
medium of books, but when they are accompanied with illustrations 
the mind easily comprehends the description and retains it. 

A want has long been felt by teachers and scholars for some way 
to illustrate without costly charts and maps, which occupy so much 
space and are so easily destroyed. This want has been fully met by 
Dr. Mcintosh's Solar Microscope and Stereopticon Combination. 

Lessons in drawing may be given by copies prepared upon glass by 
the teacher, and the light of the room may be sufficient to permit 
the pupils to work. 

Geography, usually so dry and uninteresting to pupils, may be 
made not only instructive but amusing, by accompanying the text 
book lessons on th9 various countries with well selected views of the 
prominent points of interest, the inhabitants, their customs, occupa- 
tions, architecture, manufactures, and products of the soil. 

Natural history may be illustrated by views of birds, rats, mice, 
squirrels, frogs, toads, live fishes in tanks with transparent sides. 
The classifications, resemblances and differences existing in the 
animal kingdom may be made plain by life-like representations of the 
various objects of study, more conveniently even than when access 
can be had to well stocked museums, which are unfortunately too 
rare to supply the needs of the mass of pupils engaged in studying 
these subjects. 

The demand of instructors for illustrations on these subjects have 

led the manufacturers of slides to provide a large assortment, which 

represent almost all the phenomena that are required for school room 

or college purposes. Special slides to illustrate additional points can 

be made to order, and glass cells furnished at small cost, which will 




MoDiTOaH BiTTEBT AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAfiO, ILL., D, S 



I 



^L watei 

^ft acid 



enable the instructor to prepare, as needed, specimens of the vegetable 
and insect world, as they exist in his immediate vicinity. 

Geological specimens such as crystals of quartz, feldspar, mica,, 
pyrites and other minerals, may be shown as well as diagrams or 
maps, of various strata, formatii^ns, etc. 

Botanical specimens, especially the structure of plants, the gerraS 
and minute forms of vegetable life, offer an infinite variety of objects 
suitable for projection. It is impossible to do more than to refer 
briefly to a few of the applications of Projection Apparatus, the field 
of its usefulness extends to every branch of science. 

With our Solar Combination it is possible to magnify an object 
one thousand diameters or a million areas, and still have it so 
lighted that a large audience can see it plainly. A view of any ) 
locality may be displayed, and the flora or fauna be projected tapon 
it. The microscopic organisms can be shown on a large field, whidt 
affords opportunity to study their actual life, surrounded by thei 
natural media. 

List of Articles suitable for Projection. Hairs of ani- 
mals, held between two pieces of glass ; down from wings of moths 
and butterflies, (these adhere to glass without pressure) ; scales of 
fishes ; eyes, legs, wings of flies ; whole insects ; stings of bees and 
wasps; antennae of moths and mosquitoes; fibres of cotton, wool, 
silk, linen, ferns, mosses, lichens, leaves of trees ; thin sections of 
wood ; small flowers, stamens, pistils, pollen, seeds ; mites in cheese 
vinegar and paste eels; butterflies, beetles; animalcules in stagnant 
water; crystallization of camphor, indigo; sulphate of coppei 
diatoms ; mould, and most microscopic preparations. Suitable ob- 
jects may be found everywhere ; in stagnant pools, in vases where 
flowers have remained a day or two ; an infusion of hay ; in 
fermented liquids. The larva of a mosquito is a lively and aipusing 
thing when magniiied five or six feet in length. Histological research 
may be facilitated, and its results exhibited on a large scale. 

Miscellaneous Subjects that may be Illustrated by Pro- 
jection. Porosity, cohesion, divisibility of matter, capillarity; crys- 
tallization, as in ice flowers, lead, tin or silver trees ; gravitation 
acoustics ; retiection and refraction of light ; chromatic abberration 
rainbow, mirage; dispersion; Newton's rings; recoraposition of white 
light ; absorption bands j spectrum analysis ; fluorescence ; polariza- 
tion of light ; diffraction ; formation of clouds ; maximum density of' 
water: galvanometer, calorescence, magnetism, diamagnelism, elec- 
tricity; decomposition of water ; heating by the electric current, 
acid and alkaline reactions ; precipitation ; equilibrium of licyaid. 



«7 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



artesian diver, hydrometer; diffusion of gases; fountain in vacuo; 
siphon ; pyrometer ; Torricelli's experiment ; Marriotte*s law ; the 
manometer; Sprengel's air pump; influence of pressure on boiling 
point ; conductivity of solids ; convection ; thermo-pile ; umbra and 
penumbra ; action of magnets ; attraction and repulsion from elec- 
trical excitation. 

By means of diagrams and photographs the most recent inventions 
in the arts can be illustrated and explained. The apparatus we have 
described is adapted to daily use in all schools and educational insti- 
tutions, and we confidently claim that it will, when intelligently em- 
ployed, arouse greater interest, and afford a more valuable and varied 
means of illustration than many times its cost invested in other appa- 
ratus designed for object teaching. 



TESTIMONIALS. 

We have many inquiries in regard to the utility of the solar 
microscope and stereopticon in the illustration of scientific and 
popular lectures before classes of students and public audiences. In 
answer, we give a few of the many notices received. 



From PJtUaddphia Medical and Surgical Be- 
porter. Report of American Medical As- 
. aoeiation, held at St, Faulf Minn. 

The last paper at the morning session was 
read by Dr. H. O. Marcy, of Boston, who 
had for his subject "Uterine Tumors." 
The method by which the lecture was 
demonstrated, the means used being a solar 
microscope and stereopticon, excited a large 
degree or interest, owing to the wonderful 
clearness and brightness of the subjects cast 
upon the screen. 

ifter the termination of the lecture, in 
obedience to the expressed wish of many of 
the physicians, the inventor, Dr. L. D. 
Mcintosh, of Chicago, explained ftiUy the 
principles of this solar microscope, an ex- 
planation that was Ustened to with much 
mterest and close attention. This solar 
miscroscope may truly be considered a great 
aid to scientific investigation. By its aid 
physiology, pathology, histology can be 
studied, With illustrations of genuine sec- 
tions. The circulation of the blood can 
be mirrored forth with startling distinct- 
ness; images of living animalculse, minute 
Insects and aquatic animals, with all their 
motions, thoroughly portrayed, and in cases 
where they are transi>arent the beating of 
heart and movement of the internal organs 
are vividly shadowed forth upon the canvas 
in a degree of perfection almost beyond 
belief, it is a combined instrument, and 
can be used as an ordinary monocular 
microscope and as a stereopticon. It is, 
however, very simple in its arrangement, 
there being no complicated parts that are 
liable to get out of order. The stereopticon 
proper is similar in appearance to the 
ordinary stereopticon, sunlight, however, 
beJnjsr used instead of artificial light. This 
Dlnation adds much to the value of the 



Invention, and its utility is very largely 
enhanced. Its use is not confined to phy- 
sicians and scientists, for it is an instrument 
that should be in all educational institutions 
of the higher grades. Its use as a means of 
instruction is of great value, as an object 
can be shown with equal fkcility to a Itam 
class or audience as to a single person. In 
the matter of economy, without taking into 
consideration the superiority of its work, 
it is in advance of the ordinary stereopticon, 
as sunlight is cheaper than artificial light. 
Another feature is that it is exceedingly 
portable, and can be placed in i>osition in 
a very short time. The ordinary power is 
that of 500 diameters, although, with higher 
objectives,it is capable of attaining a power 
of 1,500 diameters. Taken altogether, it is 
truly an invaluable invention, and its use 
will be of an extended nature. 



From Martins' DruggisU? Directory, 

Meport of the Ajneriean Medieai 
Association and JExhibite, 

Richmond, Va. 
Dr. L. D. Mcintosh, of Chicago, occupied 
a prominent share of the interest taken in 
the exhibition. One of the most interesting 
features was a view shown with his solar 
microscope of a live frog's foot, showing the 
circulation of the blood through the veins 
and arteries. 

MORBIS. lU. 

To whom it may concern : 

During the past year I have used Dr. 
Mcintosh's Solar Microscope and Stere- 
opticon in connection with school work. 
I recommended our Board of Education to 
purchase this instrument because I beUeve4 
It would furnish an excellent means for a 
vivid illustration of topics in several sub- 
jects, and give pupils an added interest lu 



r 



I 



hive gone wi 

Iher bod niidled~iEf the tekl-bODk. 
BoI]rl)«»e (ber been delighted during Iba 
bour thus employed, but tbe)' hate been 
better Qtl«d Tor (Urtber study. Tht Slere- 
Efitlcon has been found exceedingly belp- 
fol »l«o witb ela»es in ancient anifmoclern 
hiitoiy, and In utrouumy. 

The Solar Micniacope 1 hnve round to be 
•f eipecUa benefit to onr classes in phyai- 
Ology and KKdogy, because wltli 1[ imugea 
oTwoUona of anfniul tissue, mounted Slie- 
dmena of Insects and living snlmatcules 
ean be thnivn upon a screen, and shovrn nt 
once to an entire clasa. ir Boards of Edu- 
cation win purcbase Ibis instrument, and If 



JTicrtMOpIC IttuHTOlioai by nieana of a Saiar 

Salt Denial Socitty. 

The principal interest this forenoon cen- 
tered In tbe micniBCOplc lllustntions by 
t>r. L. D. Hclntosh.ofCblcagn. Tbeynerc 
uhiblted by means of a solar mlcToacopc, 
•nd the exhibition was a raru treat. Tbe 
view* weie the showing of Ihi 

-f blood In - — " -"-' 

oontractlc 

jorftcl orcr witnea; 
■ "00 dian 

pollywog, dli 



a of blood In a pollywog. and 

bSuU^l andportacl ore ' 

leases mBgnlfied TOO dli 
Mood eoSd • ■-■ ■ 



1 iUuatrs 
I lu clea 



il system of 



:n waaplacedin turb 

SI that canled te 
■ • " d I 

.._.„. iieied°dowi 

puialona caused by breathine 
plainly seen, and Ibe actions of ol 
when be sprang, cat-like, were\ 



■.oaM be 



From the ChicSKQ TrOiuae. 
BevtiUh Annual Convmllon of tha 
Wemlera AEadtnny of BonueopaOtv. 

Dr. Mcintosh etttettalned the academy 
with the exhibition of a solar microscope, 
operated on this occasion with an oiy-iiy- 
dn%en light. Numerous seciioTis of tbe 
lijilng tnexnbranea of the Intermi! orcana 
were exhibited, and olhi:r piirilona of^ihe 

feature of which was tlie admirable repre- 
MutatlOD of tbe ciroulation of the blood in 
thi' capIUarlee. Several Insects were thrown 



From American Journal qf Microscopji, H 

lllinott Mierotcopleal Soeltty. 
The annual meeting of Ibe Illinois SUta 
Microscopical Society was held at the 
rooms of the Academy of acienees, Chi- 
cago, April 22, 1S8I. The minutes of tbe 
Srevlous meeting having been read, the 
Kdetywaiihen entertained by Dr. Mcin- 
tosh, who rxhihited a new aod improved 
form of solar microscope, comblnlog an 
oiy-hydrOKeti attachment. The hlstolo- 

SlCal slides shown by thl^ nT^namtna wi^r^ 
ae, and called forth very 



From the ScmOiem Clinic, Elobmond. 



Dd. ■ 



From the Richmond Dispatch. m 

Dr. L. D. Mcintosh, of Chicago, IlL, hiS 
on exhibition his Solar Microscope, a itere- 
optleon combination. This Instrument c«n 



Tbe Doctor gave an exhibition last nl 
the Solar Microscope, with the aid i 
oxy-hydrogen light at Exhibition 



D/Efte atiHnetola Slate Xedital Society. 

The Slate Medical Soclfty opened Iti 
twelth annual meeting this morning. In 
the ademooii Dr. Mcintosh gave a very in- 
tertsUog exhibition with b& Solar "' 



Solar Mi(in»- ) 



Frian the Jnftr Ocain, Chicago. 

A SaaiiU/WI JHeee of aetenHi' ' 

oftanliin. 

Teachers, scholars and all lovers 
title knowledge should not f^i, v/maa, r 
vislttng the Exposition, to lee the Mcintosh - 

Solar Microscope and Blereoplieo 

nation. As a piece of mechanic.. 
' itlfic principles. It et 
on of all thinlilng 



'f the 

sa 

I lu 

In 

Tin- , 

% 

|Iei^ 



1 Corobl- 



I)r. MEint 



] isl 



a those who witness lla woudt 



] 



MoINTOSB BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. JL 




I.. No. 64. 

DR. MclNTOSH PROFESSIONAL MICRO- 
SCOPE. 

IJ'EICE, with one Eye-Piece (no Objective), in handsome, polished 
Mahogany Case % 6S.0O 
■PKICE, with two Eye-Pieces and two Ohjectives, Vi and I'/i inch, 
! Physicians' Series 100.00 
. Th/s Microscope, in its new and improved lottn, i?. the out- 
g^ ' 



MllISTtJSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. ' 



MO. ILL., 



t years c 



isperiment to perfect an instrument adaptei 
to the higher grades of work, that couldt 
be furnished at a more moderate price I 
than has hitherto been obtainable. 
The mechanism is perfect, and finely 

h^^\ finished ; the arrangements ior using all 

^^^ necessary accessories are ingenious and 

^^\ convenient, nothing essential beingwant- 

L n?P^ \ i°S *° make it fully equal to al! the de- J 

1^ ^^V(^^^ mands of professional microscopic iorl 

*?*■ (^^mBI vestigation. The base is broad and sufJ 
I'-'^bP&I ficiently heavy to secure firm and steady^ 
"^A^^J^^ support; it is provided with soft rubbej 
T* ^»4&^ pads beneath to overcome the ordinary^ 
^ jjii'p^ vibratory motion of the table and pre- i 

(^^^^^( vent scratching. The pillar and arm are J 

L. Bo. 68 X3 of solid brass, and the joint connecting i 

them has strong steel bearings. The arm can be removed front | 
thebasebyloosening the thumbscrew at the back, and the working 1 
part of the instrument may be removed for use as a solar micro- 
scope, or with the stereopticon for projection. By reference to 
the diagram the parts are shown separated, K representing the 
instrument with stand S and draw-tube T removed; the adapter 
for connecting with Solar Apparatus or Lantern is beneath 
the stage, but not shown in cut. The device for connecting the 
stand and arm is independent of the joint, and does not inter- 
fere with its movement or weaken it in the least. This is a fea- 
ture of our Professional Microscope exclusively; the method of 
fastening R in arm A secures perfect solidity and freedom from 
motion or unsteadiness as completely as ii they were united by a 
solid junction. The height of stand with draw-tube closed is 15 
inchesj with draw-tube open, 18 inches. Diameter of body- 
tube 1)4 inches. The size of this tube adapts it to projection, 
or photography, as the rays of Hght passing through the objective' 
are not cut off. It has the Society Screw and the broad Butter- 
field Gauge, which will admit of using objectives of low power 
with large lenses of wide angle, and also a large analyzing prism. 
Inside the body-tube is an extra spring-tube, carrying a 
nickel-plated draw-tube: this device insures an even, smooth 
movement of the draw-tube. The inside diameter of the latter is 
ij^ inches, length 7 inches; the lower end has the Society 



71 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CX)., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 

Screw, which allows the use of objectives of the lowest powers, 
having long working distance. The size of draw-tube is the 
same in all standard instruments, therefore an eye-piece of 
standard size can be used. The coarse adjustment is made with 
a very smooth-working rack and pinion of long range. The fine 
adjustment is unequaled ; it is without friction, and being ad- 
justable has a very delicate movement that is not liable to get 
out of order. It is made with a large, graduated milled head 
micrometer screw, which moves the entire body-tube parallel with 
the axis of the objective. The large, concentric, rotating stage 
consists of a brass frame, in which is set a circle of plate glass 
forming the upper surface of the stage. A slide carrier moves 
on this plate over the field of the lens, and is held in position 
by ivory points pressing upon the glass plate forming a part of 
the carrier ; this gives very smooth motion, and reduces friction 
to a minimum. Beneath the stage are adjusting screws. The 
mirror-bar moves on a graduated circle, carrying the sliding mir- 
ror, diaphragm, sub-stage, adapter, etc The bar swings above 
the stage for illuminating opaque objects. The Durkee Electric 
Illuminator may be attached to this bar if desired. Special atten- 
tion is called to the device already described, whereby the working 
parts are convertible into a solar or projection microscope. Photo- 
micrography, which is now popular with microscopists, becomes 
convenient with this microscope and a suitable camera. Instan- 
' taneous photographs of living animalculae can be made with direct 
sunlight, therefore it is evident that an instrument that can be 
adjusted to this work without impairing its value as a monocu- 
lar, offers special advantages to the naturalist and investigators 
generally. We furnish to order objectives adapted to all the 
various forms of work to which this instrument can be applied, 
whether for individual study of minute structures and organisms, 
for projec/^ion, or photo-micrography. 




AND OPTICAL CO.. 



I 



MICROSCOPES. 

We also manufacture the following Microscopes and if fur 
ther information is desired concerning them, send for our M 
scope Catalogue. 



L. No. 56. Mcintosh new clinical 

MICROSCOPE NO. i. 

Price, with one eye-piece, in case, no Objective KO I 

Price, with one eye-piece, in case, one-tourlh. one-half, and ana inch 

Sludanls' Dividing Objectiue, giving 100, 300 and 850 diameters 28.( 

Price, with one-fourth and one inch Objective, giving 100 and 500 dia- 



L. No. 57. McINTOSH NEW CLINICAL 
MICROSCOPE No. 2. 

With BiK-k and Pinion MoTement. 

Price, with one eye-piece, in case, no Objective 35, 

Price, with one eye- piece, one-fourth, one-hall and one inch Students' 

Dividing Objective, giving ]00,.200 and 350 diameiecs 83. 

Price with one-fourth and one inch Dividing Objective, giving 100 and 

SOOdiamolers 3T.<M 



L. No. 58. SCIENTIFIC MICROSCOPE 

No. I. 

ce of stand with one eye-piece (no objective) 35,00 

ce. with one eye-piece, and one-fourlh and one inch Dividing Objec- 



L. No. 59. SCIENTIFIC MICROSCOPE 

No. 2. 

Price, with one eye-piece (without objective) 45,00, 

Price, with one eye-piece and one-fourth and one inch Dividing Objec- 



M0INT08H BATTEKT AMD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., D. S, A. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

THE KODAK CAMERA. 




THE KODAK 

AND THE MAGIC LANTERN. 
Kodak negatives are especially adapted for making magic 
I lantern slides from, and any traveler returning from a trip with 
a Kodak can make or have made a set of slides from his nega- 
tives, and by the aid of a magic lantern, or stereopticon, take his 
friends with him over the ground he has traveled. 

. No! 61. PRICE. No.l 135.00 

" 63. ■' " 3, 3^ inches diameter 

63. " " 3, 3X''4X '"ches square 40.00 

64. " " 4, 4ii5 inches square 50.00 

65. ■■ ■■ 5, 5x7 inches square 60.00 

THE GENIE HAND CAMERA. 




75 Mcintosh batteby and opjical co., Chicago, ill., u. a a. 

1. The "Genie*' has the best and most ingenious Magazine 
^ now in the market, which permits, if desired, a single plate to 

be exposed and then extracted and developed immediately. 
Exposures can be made consecutively and more rapidly than 
with any other Magazine Camera. You can see the picture on 
a focusing screen before you make the exposure. No other 
Magazine Camera has this great advantage. 

2. It has an ingenious and rapid Shutter arranged for time 
or instantaneous work. 

3. It has the best method of focusing, also both vertical and 
horizontal finders. 

4. It uses the Beck Lens, recognized as the Standard Photo- 
graphic Lens all over the world. No other Hand Camera now 
in the market will approach it in this respect. 

5. It is the smallest and most compact Magazine Hand 
Camera manufactured. 

6. It has a perfect method of automatically registering every 
exposure as soon as made. 

7. It is the simplest and handiest in its construction of all 
Hand Cameras. 

8. The Magazine will hold twelve glass plates or twenty-four 
Carbutt transparent films. 

9. It can be used as a Hand Camera or with tripod. 

10. It has a white tablet for recording notes. 

11. Any Hand Camera can be fitted with our Magazine, 
Shutter and Lens. 

12. All working parts of the Camera being of metal, and the 
Magazine being air and light tight, no moisture can injure the 
plates or films, making it the best Hand Camera for travelers' 
use. 

PRICES OF THE GENIE CAMERA. 

L. No. 66. Covered with black grained morocco, with Beck Lens, and 
with Magazine containing 12 Glass Plate Carriers, using 

SHxiji plates $40.00 

" 67. Price of the Genie Camera, same as above, but with Rapid 

Achromatic Lens 25.00 

EXTRAS. 

*#. No. 68. Additional Magazines fitted with either Plate or Film Car- 
riers each, $6.50 

• 69. Tripod .from $1.50 to 5.00 

• 70. Black Leather Case with sling strap for carrying Camera. . . 2.25 



MOINTOSH BATTEBY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 1^ A. 76 

LANTERN SLIDE PLATES. 

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE DBT PLATES. 

We can supply all the different makes of prepared lantern 
slide plates at the regular market price which vary some. At 
the present time the prices are: 

L. No. 71. Carbutts* Negative Plates, 4x5, sealed Per dozen, $0.65 



II 



( I 
• I 



.45 
.45 
.65 
.65 
.45 



72. •• " •• 3^x4, 

73. Seed " " 8^x4, 

74. •• " " 4x5 

75. Eastman " " 4x5 

76. •• " •• 8^x4, 
•' 77. Carbutt Positive or Transparency Plates, sealed, " .55 

78. Eastman " " " " " " .70 

•• 79. Cover Glasses •• .80 

" 165. Cramer's Negative plates, 8^x4, sealed •• .50 

" 166. " Cover Glasses " .25 

These prices are subject to market fluctuations. 



HoINTOSH BATIERf AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL.. C. S. A. 



PROJECTION LENSES. 




^fmmm 



The most desirable feature to be looked for in a Lantern Ob- 
jective is its defining power; it is not difficult to obtain anobjec- 
tive of any desired magnifying power — what Is wanted is a clear, 
sharp definition, a flat field brilliantly illuminated to the very 
edge of disc. There are many different makes of objectives on 
the market, but only a few are worthy of your attention. The 
best Lenses are the Darlot, Voigtlander, Dalmeyer, and Suter. 
We prefer the Darlot, taking everything into consideration, as 
the best Lens made for general work. These Lenses are mounted 
in finely finished and lacquered brass, and have the highest grade 
rack and pinion action. There are different sizes of Objectives, 
that are known as "One-Fourth," "One-Third," One-Half," 
"Two-Thirds," and "Four Four" sizes. While this nomencla- 
ture is arbitrary, and the same size lenses by different makers 
have different powers, yet the law of each lens is a fixed one — at 
a given distance it will make a certain size of picture. This law 
cannot be changed. The law of the different Darlot Lenses is as 
follows : 

A "One-Fourth" makes a disc, or picture, in diameter or 
square one-half its range. 

A "One-Third" Lens makes a disc, or picture, in diameter 
or square one-third its range. 

A "One-Half" Lens makes a disc, or picture, in diameter or 
square one-third its range, less lo per cent. 

A "Two- Third" Lens makes a disc, or picture, in diameter 
or square one fourth its range, plus lo per cent. 

A "Four Four" Lens makes a disc, or picture, in diameter or 
' square one-sixth its range, minus lo per cent. 

"'■•i "Wide Angle" makes a disc or picture, in diameter or 
wo-thirds of its range. 



McINTOBH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CfflCAGO. ILL.. U. a A. 78 

Example : At 60 feet a One-Half size lens would cut a disc 18 
feet square, or in diameter. The figures above given, while not 
exact to the inch, are accurate enough for all practical work. 

Price List of Objectives. 
L. No. 81 One-Quarter Mcintosh $600 

82 One-Quarter Darlot 'S' 00 

83 One-Third " 12.00 

84 One-Half " 1^.50 

85 Two-Thirds " 21.00 

86 Four Four ' ' 32.00 

87 No. 2 Voigtlaender 52.00 

88 N0.3 " 65.00 

89 No. 2 Suter 40.00 

90 No. 3 •• 50.00 

91 The "Wide Angle" 11.00 



1 1 

K 
I I 
I I 
li 
t < 
II 
I I 



tl 



Objectives when sold by themselves are Net. 

We have just secured a combination set of Darlot lenses, 
there being three lenses in each set, viz., a '*one-half,*' a " two- 
thirds" and a *'four-fourf' each lens ground to the same diame- 
ter, in the same size tube makes each lens interchangeable in the 
same collar, each lens fitting the same rack and pinion attach- 
ment, so that changes can be made instantly. Old exhibitors 
will appreciate the value of this combination. 

L. No. 92. PRICE per set of three (1-J, 1-J. 1-f $50.00 

••93. ' * ' • " matched pairs (2-^. 2-f , 2-|) 100 . 00 

You will notice in above list The Wide Angle Lens at $11.00. 
This Objective we have designed especially for short range work. 
It will make a picture about two-thirds of its range, or, in other 
words, for every foot you go back from the canvas you increase 
the size of picture eight inches. It is one of the best lenses 
made for short range projection. These lenses are all accurately 
matched in pairs for dissolving stereopticon work. 



79 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



CONDENSING LENSES, PLANO CONVEX, GROUND EDGEa 

L. No. 94 1>^ inches in diameter, unmounted ,$ 1 25 

1 50 

1 75 

2 00 

2 50 

3 00 

5 00 

7 75 

9 00 

10 25 

11 50 

13 00 





95 
96 


2X 
3 




97 

98 


3>^ 
4 




99 
100 


4>^ 
5 




101 


6 




102 


7 




103 


8 




104 


9 




105 


10 



«l 
«l 
(( 
•• 
«t 
• • 

(I 



• i 
I* 

• « 
«c 
l< 
(« 
(I 

C( 

«i 



COSMORAMA LENSES. 



L. No. 106 7 inches in diameter, double or piano convex lens, 30, 86, 

48 and 72-inch focus $ 3 00 

107 6 inches in diameter, double or piano convex lens, 24, 30, 
36, 48 and 72-inch focus 2 50 

108 5 inches in diameter, double or piano convex lens, 18, 20, 
24, 30. 36, 48 and 72inch focus 1 75 

109 4 inches in diameter, double or piano convex lens 1 25 

The lens that is 6 inches in diameter, and from 24 to 36 inches in focal 

length, is the one commonly used. 



li 



It 



• I 



PLANO, OR DOUBLE CONVEX 

GROUND EDGE. 



LNo.] 


110 A 


inch diameter, 


}^ 


inch focus, 


- 


$ .65 


n 


Lll }i ] 


inch diameter, 


Va 


inch to A inch focus. 


.65 


it 


L12 A 


inch diameter, 


^ 


inch to A inch focus, 


.65 


ii 


LIB ^ : 


inch diameter, 


% 


inch to ^ 


inch focus. 


.75 


ii 


L14 ^ : 


inch diameter. 


Ya 


inch to % 


inch focus. 


.75 


U ] 


L15 J^ ] 


inch diameter. 


1 


inch to ^ 


inch focus. 


.75 


it 


L16 V% ] 


inch diameter, 


1^ 


inch to % 


inch focus, 


.85 


it 


L17 3^: 


inch diameter. 


1>^ 


inch to 1 


inch focus, 


.85 


il ] 


L18 1 1 


inch diameter. 


2 


inch to IJ^ 


inch focus. 


.85 


U ] 


il9lj^ 1 


inch diameter, 


5 


inch to 72 


inch focus, 


.50 


€1 


120 2 


inch diameter. 


6 


inch to 72 


inch focus. 


.60 


K 


1213 


inch diameter. 


6 


inch to 72 


inch focus, 


.75 


€t 


L22-4 


inch diameter. 


12 


inch to 72 


inch focus. 


1.25 


U ] 


L23 5 


inch diameter. 


18 


inch to 72 


inch focuSy 


1.75 


« 


L24 6 


inch diameter, 


24 


inch to 72 


inch focus. 


2.50 


U ] 


L85 7 


inch diameter. 


80 


inch to 72 


inch focus. 


8.00 


^ / 


268 1 


nch diameter. 


30 


inch to 72 


inch focus. 


4.00 




LIMES. 

After a great deal of experimenting with the lime of the 
various parts of the country, we have finally obtained a lime the 
quality of which for use in Stereopticons we believe has n' 
before been equaled. We are now making it up into cylindrical 
sticks two inches long and one inch ia diameter, as perfect id 
shape as lime cylinders can be made, of good even qualityj 
neithertoo hard nor too soft; their incandescent properties are un- 
surpassed. We put them up in screw top tin cans containing one 
dozen each — the cans being so constructed that they can be 
hermetically closed every time after they are used by the con- 

L. No. 13T. PRICE(per can) one dozen Limes net Jl.OO 

Mailing rate per can, 35c, 

We also furnish English Limes; those that have a hole 

drilled through the center. Also the Disc Limes, such as are 

used in some of Ihe old style Lanterns at the present day. 

L, No. 128. PRICE, English Limes . . .(l.SO per di 



SCREEN ROPE. 

One other desirable feature in hanging or putting up a screen 
is a good quality of rope. We supply the best grade Bird Island 
sash weight cord, which is tested to stand a tensile strain of 
500 pounds dead weight. It is put up in skeins of 100 feet. 

L. No. 131). PRICE per skein Jl.OO 

CHEMICALS. 

The chemicals used in making oxygen gas are Potash- 
Chlorate and the black Einoxide of Manganese. We put them 
up mixed, ready for use, in packages of 2}^ lbs. each in the pro- 
portion of four parts of Potash to one of Manganese. 

L. No. 131. PRICE pec package Net. (0.50 




eae prloes are entijert to the aDctnatloiis of ttae markM. 

msumptjon of gas varies with the pressure at which it 
is used, therefore with the ordinary gas-bag with pressure boards 
and weights a certain definite quantity to the hour is used; ' 
the "Compressed Oxygen Outfit" more gas is used, with tlxft 



81 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



"Self-Condensing Outfit" still more gas is used, so that in each in- 
stance more chemicals are indicated; the packages above listed 
hold enough to make gas enough for 1^ hours' use with the 
ordinary gas bag; for the 'Compressed Oxygen Outfit" use one 
and a half packages; three packages will give 100-pounds pres- 
sure in the "Self-Condensing Outfit." 

Pure Hydrogen is made from Sulphuric Acid, Zinc and water, 
ordinary commercial Sulphuric Acid and Scrap Zinc. 

It is rarely used, most people using carbureted hydrogen,, 
which IS the common illuminating gas. 

ETHER. 

The best grade only of Sulphuric Ether should be used with 
the Saturator. 

L. No. 132. PRICE per pound of the brand we use Net» $1.00 

Sal Soda is used to make the water in the wash bottle Alka- 
line. Can be obtained at any drug or grocery store. Ammonium 
Chloride (Sal Ammoniac) and Mercury Bisulphate are used ia 
the electric signal. Get at any drug store. 

Gasoline, not less than 80° ilash. We do not sell it- 



McIKTOSH SATTEBT AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAOO, ILL.. V 



LIGHT FOR PROJECTION. 

SUNLIGHT excels all other forms of tight for projection, but 
this work, in many departments, is more conveniently carried 
oil at night, it becomes necessary to seek a substitute. 

The electric light ranks next to sunlight in brilliancy. A 300 
c. p. lamp is made expressly for projection, which produces beautiful 
results. It can, however, only be employed where it can be connected 
with a dynamo, which limits its use to such buildings as are supplied 
with an electric light plant. The light produced from chemical bat- 
teries is altogether too expensive and troublesome to be employed 
except in the laboratory for experimental work. Until the problem 
of producing a compact, portable and economical battery for the pro- 
duction of the electric light is solved, the majority of projectionists 
will select the lime-light as practically the best il 
absence of sunlight. A very intense light is produced by forcing a 
blowpipe flame of mixed hydrogen and oxygen gases upon a stick ol 
unslacked lime. There are four varieties of this light, known 
oxy-hydrogen or Drummond light, the hydro-oxy-calcium light, the 
oxy-ca'cium or Bude light, and the ether-oxygen ITgSt. In the oxy-; 
hydrogen, two gases are supplied to the7et~irom separate gasholders, 

I and mix before issuing from the jet. This form of lime-light requires 
much more expensive and cumbersome apparatus than the others, but 
has been most used because the most powerful. In the hydro-oxy- 
calcium, coal gas is used direct from the house fixtures, and does not 
mix with the oxygen until it issues from the jet. This is the most 
simple form, but is only about half as powerful as the oxy-hydrogen, 
and its use is restricted to buildings supplied with coal gas. In the 
oxy-calcium, an alcohol flame supplies the hydrogen element; it is 
only about a quarter as powerful as the oxy-hydrogen, but is used in 
out-of-the-way places to save the trouble and expense of cumbersome 
hydrogen generators and gasholders. In the ether-oxygen light, ether 
vapor is substituted for hydrogen or coal gas in the oxy-hydrogen 
blowpipe, in such a simple and satisfactory manner that it 
important advantages over every other means for producing the lime- 
light. This is accomplished by passing a small portion of the oxygen 
through a saturating chamber of peculiar construction, in which it 
takes up ether vapoiH which it conducts to the jet by way of tha; 



possesses _ 
he lime- ■ 
; oxygen I 
which it fl 
f of tho^ 



83 Mcintosh battery and optical co., chtcago, ill., u. a a. 

— ~ 

hydrogen key. The mixture bums like hydrogen or coal gas, and is 
brought to a focus in the usual manner, by admitting oxygen direct 
from the gasholder. This method is as simple and cheap as the oxy- 
calcium, as powerful as the oxy-hydrogen, and . more convenient than 
either. Gasoline can be substituted for ether, and the intensity of 
light and expense of running are then the same as for the hydro-oxy- 
calcium, but with the advantage that its use is not restricted to build- 
ings supplied with house gas, and the apparatus is complete for pro- 
ducing the more powerful light, with ether whenever it is wanted. 



THE McINTOSH-IVES SATURATOR 

FOR THE PRODUCTION OP 

The most Brilliant and Powerful Ozy-hydrog'en I<ime-lifirlit. A Perfect Sub- 

stitute for Hydrogen or Coal-gas. Stored without a Oaaholder, 

and Beady at all Times. Supplied to the Blowpipe by 

Simple Mechanical Means, without Heat, and 

ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT DANQEB. 

Previous to the invention of Ives* saturating chamber, two or three 
experimentalists in Europe used ether in a "wash-bottle," forcing 
oxygen through the liquid in bubbles. The method was not a suc- 
cess, because the light flickered badly; the adjustments had to be 
changed frequently to keep it at its best ; the ether chamber could not 
be disturbed without aff*ecting the light, and to upset it was dangerous. 
Heat was also tried to vaporize the ether, but it proved troublesome 
and unsafe. 

The construction of Ives* Saturator is such that there is no heat^ 
no bubbling, no obstruction to the free passage of the oxygen, and it 
can be disturbed or upset without affecting the light or spilling any 
ether into the tubing. After one adjustment of the light, it will auto- 
matically regulate the supply of vapor to correspond to any variation 
in the supply of oxygen, thereby making the light almost as easy to 
manage as a coal-oil lamp. This is a very important advantage, which 
is possessed by no other means for supplying the hydrogen element to 
the oxy-hydrogen blowpipe. 

FREEDOM FROM DANGER. 

Some, who have not seen this vapor light operated, suppose that 
the mixture in the Saturator must be explosive, and consequently more 
or less dangerous. It has been proven that with other kinds or forms 
of saturating chambers, or with any form which has a filling that is 
improperly arranged or made of unsuitable matf rial, this supposition 



might be quite correct ; but all Saturators ■wmek are manu/acturea 
under our supg> vision (\X. is unlawful to use any others with a porous 
filling) will be found to operate so perfectly that it is only necessary 
to pass a very small portion of the oxygen through them, and the 
mixture will burn like house gas, without a partiek of danger, and 
without the slightest irregularity. The details of construction were 
not settled upon until about a dozen shapes and sizes were tested in a 
most careful manner, with several different kinds of filling; it was 
found that while the form, size and arrangement finally adopted by 
the inventor would meet every possible requirement, some apparently 
insignificant deviations therefrom would make a saturator quite unre- 
liable and unsatisfactory for use with lime-light apparatus. 

Since coming into our hands we have experimented extensively 
with a view to stil! further improving both its safety and its efficiency. 
We have made some half dozen improvements suggested by prolonged 
experience in working single and dissolving lanterns, and have no 
hesitation in pronouncing it, in its present form, superior in safety, 

I convenience and quality of light produced, to hydrogen or any other 

Jfiubstitute for it, in the production of the calcium light in its perfection. 
"Any good oxy-hydrogen " mixed-gas " jet can be used, but 

Ithose having a comparatively small aperture and a small mixing 
lamber are best. Oxygen may be supplied from either a bag, gaS- 

^i>ineter or cylinder, in the usual manner. 

The McIntosh-Ives Ether Saturator is m?ile in 2 sizes; Nos. 1 

land 3. 




f^. No. 133, No. 1 Tube. PRICE .... 
No. 1, or smaller, consists of 
Vbrass tube, having a diameter o 
■length, with a porous filling havin 
ptfae center of the top J^ of an inch 



Dylindrii 



zig-zag 



S15 00 

nickel-plated 

nnel cut into 
:dth, and \^ of an 
inch deep, and about 25 inches in length, to allow the free pas- 
sage of oxygen gas. On the upper surface of each end is a stop 
cock virith nipples for the attachment of the rubber connections 
(and also for filling with ether. This No. i Saturator is an im- 
Movement on, and has been designed to supplant entirely, the 
\ Tube Saturator which we no longer make. 





I.. No. 134, PRICE &20 00 

The No. 2 Ether Saturator is in every respect similar to the 
No. 1, excepting that it consists of three tubes, each constructed 
in the same manner as the tube in the No. 1 Saturator, and held 
together by ciamps, as depicted in above cut. This size is de- 
signed for use with the double or dissolving stereopticon. The 
caps should be removed only when the porous filling needs dry- 
ing out, and should be replaced on the tube having the same 
number. The Saturator will more than replace the cumbersome 
hydrogen generator or cylinder costing two or three times as 
much. The smaller one weighs only i% pounds, while the 
larger one only +!;{ pounds. Aside from the directions for oper- 
ating the McIntosh-Ives Ether Light as given in the following 
pages, a few general remarks may be given. 

I DIRECTIONS FOR FILLING 
THE 
ETHER SATURATOR. 
Use a high grade of ether only, that used by surgeons 
for anaesthesia preferably; always be sure that you have a 
sufficient quantity of ether in the saturator; to fill the 
/ saturator is best accomplished as follows; Pour in ether 
at either stopcock untjl full,- holding saturator in a vertical 
position, then invert and let it trickle and drain back 
into the can until it escapes drop by drop; this 
tows that the porous filling is thoroughly saturated. One 



/ 




thing that we wish to guard you against is the temperature i 
the room in which you are using the Oxy-Ether Light, and, i 
if the temperature of the room is below jo° Fahr. you should 1 



use artificial heat to warm the s 
rator in several thicknesses of ordinary fl 
upon a hot brick, or a bottle of hot water, s 
warm enough to volatilize readily. One i 
you are using a gas bag, a sufficient v 



ply wrap the s 
nnel, and place there- 
thai the ether is made 
ore essential point; if 
iight must be placed^ 
-■eight; even with th: 



thereon, never less than 300 pounds di 

heavy weight, the pressure is only a little over 3^ 

the square inch. Careful attention to these detail; 

a good light. All of the jets and compound dissoivers manu^ 

factured by us can be used with either the Ether Oxygen 

Oxy-Hydrogen, or with the Oxy-Calcium Light. 



MclHtoah Optieal Co., C/llcafin ,■ 

RKNtLBMES.— ill Is lovely, Light Kvlem 
overeome. I bandle [he Ugbi nan easier t! 



Tkx., April 6, 1888. 



oscAK J. lawbencbTI 



Uppeb 8»K 



], April a 



„ _^ ,. ..le Mclntosh- 

HUtute for hydrogen rais, In exhlblUue Ihe llovcFiiment collei 
am plsasml to state that It ha.'! pruveii SBtlstattory beyond my 
nsedlt botb witb gns bag and cylinder, and experlencect no trouble whatever 

eoQBlder my light equal to that prodnced by nil:ied eases In the naual way, T-, 

all exhibitors aredue you tor having eliminated from the business, the danger, trouble end 
disagreeable features of maklne and handling bydTOgen gas. 1 use only the best ether, and- 






tB per' hour. 
' (rnly yours, 



KclntmA B. A O. Co. : 

Dear sirs.— Letter and litne at hand 
le pleasure of twHitylngti 



JOHN D. CBESa 
INDIIHAPOLIS, Aug. IT, 1889. 



I 



Permit 1 ^ ■ 

med joai Saturator (or six months, 1 1 
10 simple in Its method of operallon It 



judgment that Us light Is 



satlstactury. Tbnnfcs far kindness. 

b of your Ether-Oxygen light. Hating 
11 muit. iiioii satisfied with ic : I am delighted. 11 Is 
It a child might be taught in tan nilno'M' ">«<■ •» 
failed me In u single Instanee. It is t] 
lat of the Oxy-Hydrogen. Yours trulr, 



XelnUah Battery and Optia 

SntB.— Will ;ou please send me mCalDgiies of your 6tereaptlQOn and HIctoscopli 
atuB. I have used one of your Ether SHturalors for two years and never bnve lalfet 

aaMsIaototy results. On the night of eleellon 1 16 — — --- _ . , 

across tbe street for six ho- •■•"- -'■"•— •■-■ 

mudh longer It would have 



i| 



rentilngthe Baturati 
ie tired out before tha 



21 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
La., August IS, 1888, 



IP your latest catalogue of Lantei 



work inventing or 
Tears ago are Bag 
teens with tbe Etl 



nproving. My Jets e 
r^jxy light by myselfand 



...-0 _ — Snturators and Ylemtl 

Van deserve success, (or rou are alwajs ap , 

'rand baglboughlfrom you nearly three 

ditnculty In worUn^the dissolving Inn- 



I 



J°«rSl.,... 

making Improvements h 

•— — —li and drculara. 



paendicular position while tilling ; when lull drain saturator into 

the ether can for a few seconds, or until the ether only escapes 

c3rop by drop at the lower stopcock. 

»g°-Never fili near a light. Keep at least ten feet away from any 

Jiame when fiUing tite Saturator, and never allow any chamber con- 
taining ether to become heated. Remember that ether vapor {unlike 
hydrogen and coal gas) is heavier than air, and diffuses rapidly down- 
ward; also, that it vaporizes mucK more readily in a warm than in a 
cold room. The ether js held in place in the cloth filling by capil- 
lary attraction, which does not act perfectly for a height of more than 
two inches; for that reason, the filled Saturator should always lie on 
a nearly level surface, to prevent the ether from draining into one end. 
It works better to be placed <m a level with the Lantern (see cut). 
Do not connect with the fit and oxygen supply until ready to start the |4 
light. 

To CfNNECT WITH THE Lantern. — Connect one tube 
of the Saturator with the Hy key of the lantern, 
and the other with the T tube, as shown in cut. It is im- 
portant tliat the ether vapor be carried through the hydrogen key of 
lantern. See that all keys are closed before connections are made, 
and be careful that there is no leakage of gas when connections are 
complete. 

CAUxrON. I. — Do not raise the Saturator while making connec- 
tions, lest free ether run into the tube Oi. Carelessness in this 
respect may lead to destruction of the gas bag. It is a useful precau- 
tion to bend up the tube O above the level of the Saturator at one 
point, so that no free eiher can run back into the gas-bag. 

2. — Never connect the Saturator with the Lantern by the same 
tubing that is used in making gas. Particles of chemicals carried 
into it during this process are liable to be blown into the jet, and 
stop the flow of gas, which extinguishes the light. 

The Lime should be kept perfectly dry ; do not place it in the 
holder until ready to light up. It should turn as close_to thejet as ' 
possible wi thout touching it. If cracked or rough itom the action of 
air or moisture ,~irTnterIeres with the perfect working of (he light, 
produces hissing, and is liable to break, necessitating a stoppage of 
the light to replace it. Since the intense heat destroys the lime by 
degrees, it is necessary to occasionally turn, raise or lower it slightly 
to expose a fresh surface to the flame, otherwise the light will grow 
dim. 

The Oxygen Reservoir. — If a gas-bag is used to hold the oxygen, 
it should be laid between two pressure -boards of suitable size to pro- 
tect it from cracks or splinters in the floor below, and cutting edges of 
the weights above. Anything that is convenient may be used for 
weights : kegs of nails, stones, etc. Coarse bags filled with sand make 
convenient weights. They should be adjusted so that they cannot -oil 
off. 250 pounds is best for a single lantern, and , 
300 pounds for dissolving. The greater the pressure up to a 
certain point, the more brilliant the light; the gas«M^iTOo\«TWiiY'&>) 
than necessary for most kinds of work, wu'h We \as%et 'Mtx^' 
named. The nearer the upper edge of the pTe5&uie-\ioa3i x^e '«^'^' 



89 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

are placed, the greater the pressure. As the gas in the bag dimin- 
ishes, the pressure lessens, so that to maintain the light in its original 
brilliancy, additional weight should be added from time to time, or an 
adjustment of valves be made at first, so that they can be opened more 
widely as the pressure diminishes. Never remove any of the weight 
from the bag while the light is burning, 

DIRECTIONS FOR USING THE OXY- ETHER LIGHT WITH GAS BAG AND SATURATOR. 

To Start the Light when a Gas-bag is Employed. — See that all 
valves are closed ; that the bag is properly weighted ; that all con- 
nections are made as previously described, and that there is no leakage 
of gas. Draw the jet away from the condenser by rod (7, adjust the 
lime, then open the key Hy, and next the stop-cock of the gas-bag ; 
wait a second or two for the air to be driven out of the tubes, then 
ignite the mixture of gas and vapor which issues from the jet ; let it 
burn two or three minutes to heat the lime, then open the oxygen key 
at Ox (slowly) ; when this key is wide open, partly close the ether key 
Hy (very slowly) until the lime gives out the most steady and brilliant 
illumination. If there is a hissing sound heard, partially close the 
oxygen key Ox (very slowly) just sufficient to stop the hissing. If the 
light grows dimmer after two or three minutes, the ether key should 
be adjusted again. It will need no further attention except ki a very 
cold rooin after evaporation of ether has considerably reduced the tem- 
perature of the Saturator, when it may be necessary to open the Hy 
key almost wide toward the close of the exhibition. The light is best 
when the ether vapor is slightly in excess, which may be known by the 
orange tinge at the top of the flame. 

The first step in extinguishing all forms of the Lime-light is to 
draw the jet away from the condensers. 

To Turn Out the Light when a Gas-bag is Used. — Close the 
oxygen key Ox first, then the ether key Hy (very slowly) ; lastly, close 
the stop-cock at the bag. Disconnect the Saturator immediately, and 
close stopcocks. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USING THE OXY-ETHER LIGHT WITH CYLINDER AND SATURATOR. 

To Start the Light when Ovxgen is Supplied from a Cylin- 
der. — Open the ether kej^_^:gjt^firet; then turn on the o xygen at t he 
cylinder and igniteTEemixture at the jet. When the lime is sufficiently 
warmed, turn the flame high, then open wide the oxygen key Ox, and 
turn on a little more pressure of the oxygen at the cylinder ; adjust 
by very slowly closing the ether key Hy, until the best light is obtained. 
When adjusted, the light may be increased or diminished within cer- 
tain limits, simply by turning the cylinder key. 

• If there is a whistling or hissing of the flame, it may be caused by 
too great pressure on the gas, by a roughness in the platina tip of the 
jet, by cracks or holes in the lime, or the proportion of the gases in 
the flame may not be properly adjusted. 

To Turn Out the Light when Oxygen is Supplied by a Cylin- 
der.— Open the ether key Hy wide, close oxygen key Ox, then the 
cylinder key (very slowly). 

To Avoid Snapping Out the Light Observe the Following 

Rules : See that there is no leak in the burner, tubes or Saturator. 

Always fill the Saturator before using, and use only a good quality of 

■^Her. Use a full flow of oxygen gas, sufficient to produce a bright 

Dry out the cloth tubes at least once in two weeks, if the 





I 



I 



MoIMTOSH BATTEfiY AND OPTICAL CO,. CHICAGO, 



Saturator is used every night. This can be done by unscrewing th<M 
caps that are numbered, and removing the cloth tubes and placing them ' 
out of doors, until the ether has evaporated and they are thoroughly 
dry ; then replace them in the Saturator. Fill the threads of the screws 
in the caps with common bar soap, and screw them on the tubes num- 
bered to correspond ; this makes ihem perfectly tight. m 
If, when the oxygen key is glosed to turn one the light, the lim^d 
continues to give out a bright light, even after the Saturator is turne<^H 
on its side, it is an indication that the supply of ether is almost ex- 
hausted. This need not occur, because the Sa.tuia.tor wiU Ao/ii mare 
than enough to supply a suitable proportion for an ordinary size bag of 
oxygen ; but if it does occur, the flame will give a harmless "snap " 
when turned out, or retreat into the Saturator, and blow off the 
rubber tubes, if the pressure of oxygen is insufficient, In the latter 
case the flame can be instantly smothered with a handkerchief or the 
hand, and no damage can be done. 



INDORSEMENTS. 






men i: 



lfFhj-8- 



(tttie new UEht carefiiUy In compu-iEc 



new Ugbt carefiU 

., B OKT^ydroseH- .,,, ,.t- 

"mixed eas Jets exactly alike, une Bup- 
plied wHn elher from the patent HaLnrator 
niade W tbe Invencor, the other with b:/- 
dlogen iroiE a guaDoeUir. Haaays: "ICttfi 
Uie lame praaire qf oxygai. We aiier Ughl is 
better Uvm the lainpcn. ' ' In tin qvbiUits 
(tr ttffidiHetB, Jnedom froir — '-- '^- J' '- 
—"- •laaf to aay lime- 



catasidy n 



In anil lime-li(i)ii. and fn i 



-., „ , _ fi Jar SMperfor to eiUier 

h^roffcn or fioUBe giu-" 

The ether Bataratoi la just wbat 1 have 
been louliiiig (hr (or years. Haviiiu used il 
ever iinca you put It an the market, 1 have 
only words of praLse for 11. It ia clean, 
■ate, tneinenelre and always ready for 
wort. AllDQugh I have gas h^B, cylinders, 
etc. fljr hydrogen, I 
ether Saturator la 



kind, ir now you c 
that will take the p 
oxygen appllanceB, a 
has taken that afbyd 



I have used nearly. If n 



--- --- „3rofanj 

:ati uevlse something 
lace of the ordinary 
s tbe ether Saturator 
rogen you will confer 

^ "J. a7 ZAHM. C. 8. C, 

^L Pnif-P^l'l'xii Science. UairertUj/ qfliotri Dame, 

^1 Ulu 

^M elec 

m ^ 
■ !« 

^H nlal 

L: 



Uluminatloa for the tauivm, l-w m^, mo 
electrical (orcj light, and all forma of the 
oiy-6ydrogen or oalclnm light. Foe con- 
TBnlence, salWy, ease of manipulation and 
lemlla, I prefer the oxygen aud ether (Mc- 
Inloah-Ivei Saturator) to all others. 

During the last year I was eonnected 
With the Wonun's Medical College, this 
Ugbt was constantly used, often by 
who had no especial ' .-j— ' 

' ting the llgbt. and 

-"?!.>»■■■""" 



ClUeago CoUige oj Phan 






ff of the 1 



projecting anaiomioal 

photograph thereof and tbi 
— " ■■■'•^ "■'iroscope 



adred and mon 






, as per Inclraicd card. The ethei 






which 1 



1 with e 



timidity at flrat. is no longer i 

anxiety, but ratner I havi. . _.. 

Bdeace In It, and the light is elegant. For 
ny work In the medical ooilege a> leaoher 
of pbyslology and histology, I don't want, 
to ever .ry to Icotore without the lantern 
ouUlt. E 8, BAILEY, «. D , 

Stgiitrar of HaJmemaim Metiicol CbUcgc CM 
cago, and i-rgfesiOr o/ Pbytlologi/ and Si*- 



e Nervous System , 

■ Medical College, enables 

1 speak with some degree of authority 



atil, Weuseltatalmi 



y capacity a 



college, in whlcb a very mnol 

ffll9^ve appnratna, of English oc 
used, and we can say with cmphaals I 

the Ihuminailon and smooth nene of work 






IT of y 



eicellen 



m ligbt ei 



1 all teach - 



CDmblnatlon. 

We eODunend the appa 
en as furDlHhiiig tbe t 
method of Illustrating their work. I might 
say that such la tbe power of the llRht, that 
satisfactorily show our elides In a 
■■■ --lough for easy una l oMnfl. 
D. E. BROWER, M. D., 
Prof, Dlieasa iVfrrmu Sj/rtem » Wonimft . 
Sfetiic^il Colfe^, Chicnoo- ^| 



91 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



" Mr. Ives, of Philadelphia, has devised an 
ingenious arrangement, at once simple, com- 
pact and effective, for dispensing with the 
use of hydrogen or illuminating gas in using 
the oxy-nydrogen jet for lantern demonstra- 
tions. It gives a brilliant light, which com- 
pares favorably with that obtained in the 
usual manner with hydrogen or burning 
gas. The portability and convenience of 
the apparatus will commend it to the favor 
of exnibitors and lecturers."— JVom the 
Manv/aclurer and Builder, N. Y. 

"The rapidly increasing use of the lan- 
tern in schools, public lectures and exhibi- 
tions, has led to a number of experiments 
to reduce the cost of the lime -light. In a 
few large dties the gases are easily obtained 
in commercial quantities, stored in iron 
tanks, ready for use, and at comparatively 
low prices. The tanks are troublesome to 
carry, and in smaller towns the gases must 
be made on the spot as required; and this 
involves expensive and troublesome appa- 
ratus. Every effort has been made to find a 
substitute for oae of these gases. Ether has 
been tried several times, but has been con- 
sidered too dangerous. More recently an 
apparatus for saturating the oxygen with 
the vapor of ether has oeen devised, that 
appears to remove all danger of explosion. 
A light is obtained that, as far as observation 
goes, is quite as good as the ordinary lime- 
fieht. The invention has the merit of saving 
all the trouble of making or carrying hydro- 

gn, as the whole apparatus can be carried 
the hand, while ether can be obtained 
anywhere."— J^Vom the Century Magazine. 



" We have tested your new lime-light and 
found it a good substitute where gas is not 
obtainable.^'— i?Vow» E. & H. T. Anthony & 
Co., N. Y. 

"I have nothing in the light line that 
pleases me«so well. It is as simple as €oal 
oil. and cannot but be perfectly safe. All 
that can happen is for the ruboer caps to 
blow off. The tubes gannot explode with 
the blowing off of the caps— when the caps 
fly off even this cannot happen. I used 
Marcy's mixed jet, the same as I used for 
pure hydrogen and oxygen. No one will 
use two bi^ any longer, now that Ives' 
Saturator can be nad."— Dr. <S. N. Gish, in 
The Magic Lantern. 

^' We have no hesitation in saying that the 
ether-oxygen ligJU, as produced by the Ivei 
Saiurator, can he made to dissolve as smoothly 
and as perfectly (u the oxy-hydrogen light in the 
old way. "We do not wish to be understood 



as saying that every lantern, or every jet, will 
produce perfect mssolvinff effects with the 
tiaiurator Without some acgustment. dome 
jets undoubtedly will, while oUiers (prraum* 
ably those having a large mixing dtuunber 
at base of the jei) may require to be differ- 
ently adjusted ; but we are flimly convinced 
that all jets, not capable of beinfi^ used with 
the Saturator, can very readilype acyusted 
for the purpose."— ^toard L, WiUon, in The 
Magic Lantern. 

" I respond with pleasure to your request 
for my experience with the ether Saturator 
for the last two years, for dissolving effects, 
ft has certainly been most satisfactory. So 
much so that I would not use the oxy-hy- 
drogen, for reasons that the ether is safer 
the light whiter, and lam satisfied the light 
is just as strong. Especiallv is the light 
stronger and more brilliant if the oxygen is 
made new and from pure quality of potash 
each time." JOHN S. ATWATER. 



^^^ 



'I have used one of your Stereoptlcons 
with your McIntosh-Ives' Saturators for 
about two years, and am tree to express not 
only my entire satisfaction, but pleasure in 
working the same. I have given many ex- 
hibitions, both public and private, and find 
the light clear and brilliant, with great 
illuminating and magnifying power. I 
have projected views of different diameters 
from 8 to 20 feet, and have always given 
perfect satisfaction to my audiences as well 
as to myself The use of the Saturator I 
believe to be entirely safe, and I hare 
always found it easy to manage. Anyone 
of ordinary judgment can work this satu- 
rator without risk and with success. The 
time required for me to manufiEU!ture the 
oxygen gas and get everything ready flir 
exhibiting never exceeds thirty minutes. I 
cordially recommend, not omy your Satu- 
rator, but also your Stereopticon to all who 
wish to give successful entertainments." 

S. W. FAhhlS^StereopOcon Exhibitor, 
Photographer, and Proprietor of BcJcer dt wi 
Wood Engraving JBetabUehmenL 

" Frequently during the past year I have 
had occasion to use one of Dr.L.D.McIntosh'8 
Improved Stereoptlcons, and have found it 
an excellent instrument for projection. The 
dissolvingarrangement is perfect and is well 
adapted to either the oxy-hydrogen or ether- 
oxygen light. I use the ether-oxygen light, 
and cannot speak in too hifh terms of the 
simplicity and ease with wTuch this light is 
operated. The Saturator is a wondeziltil 
saving of time 9.116. labor." 

WILL H. WHlIB,.CleYelaiid, Ohio. 



Directions for the Management of Oxy-Hydrogen Light 

WITH Gas Bags. — When ready to light up, shut off the keys 

at the jet and turn on those at the bags. Now 
turn on the hydrogen key at the jet, and light the gas. Place the lime 
at the proper distance, and let it become quite hot before turning on 
the oxygen. The oxygen should be turned on slowly until it appears 
to mix with the hydrogen in proper proportion, and gives a full, bril- 
liant illumination. ^ An excess of either gas will cause a hissing with- 
out producing a good light. An excess of hydrogen is indicated by 
a profuse red flame around the lime, and an excess of oxygen by no 
red dame, and a deficient illumination. The gases should be carefully 



UcINTOBH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. HL., V. S. A. 

fcldjusted till they flow noiselessly, giving out a iittle red flame, and 

I'lnaking the whole surrace of the lime against which they are projected 

fcglow with an intense white light. Having secured a good illumina- 

ftion, let the screen be blank and proceed to adjust the jet. Move it 

ind down until the light seems alike at the top and bottom, then 

I'Torward and back until the whole disk is evenly illuminated. With 

ese arrangements carefully made, the exhibition may proceed 

loothly and without interruption, it being only necessary that the 

(lime should be turned occasionally, and more gas turned on as the 

jags get lower. When the exhibition is over, turn off the oxygen 

P at the jet, then the hydrogen at the jet, and immediately close both 

f keys at the bags ; detach the hose from the jet, and proceed to pack 

Dn as the bags are taken into the open air, the keys should 

fbe turned and any gas remaining allowed to escape. 

In cities and towns where house gas is used, it is not necessary to 
K:inake hydrogen gas. The bag can be filled from a bracket, either at 
l.the place of exhibition or at home, before starting out. It will be 
I'found preferable to fill both bags beforehand, when the apparatus is to 
rbe taken short distances in a wagon or on the cars, rather than have the 
^'trouble of materials, retorts and gas-making at the place of exhibition. 




L. No. : 

DIAGRAM OF DISSOLVING KEY AND 
SATURATOR. 



1^ iodlcoO 

%B, IndicsLe the plpaa couvejing hydro- c 

gen or Ether v&por. e 

y, thcsa conveying oiygen, I 

1 mlilng chnmbera of the Lan- 1 

£ C, liBjilern keve. ] 

KlhBlererwhiE&turnilbelightaoffandoii. t 
To nae Ihl) d/ssolvcr with oiy-hydm- 
b ataooDuect the Saturator from H and 1 ] 



O, and oonnoct the haga o 



e righl Ihe Ugbt Is 



The bitokh marV \,be &V[«c' 



93 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

DIRECTIONS FOR DISSOLVING WITH THE OXY- 

ETHER LIGHT, WITH EITHER GAS-BAG 

OR CYLINDER PRESSURE. 

The most common obstacle to perfect success in dissolving with 
the ether-oxygen light is the snapping out of the flame. A few sug- 
gestions regarding this may be of use to the amateur. Many of the 
keys in the market are not adapted for use with ether ; when this is 
the case they must be sent to the manufacturer to make the necessary 
alterations. Very accurate adjustment is needed when the cylinder 
is used to supply oxygen, to secure against "snapping," and at the 
same time to avoid a considerable lessening of the amount of light at 
the half-way point. In a very cold room evaporation may be re- 
tarded, and consequently an insufficient supply of ether vapor be 
furnished. The remedy is to heat flannel or any similar material, and 
wjap about the Saturator. Persons unaccustomed to handling this 
light may turn on too much oxygen or too little ether, when a snap 
will sometimes occur. Too small pressure on the oxygen may pro- 
duce the same result. 

At the risk of being prolix, we will recapitulate and give the 
following essential points: 

Blow through all the tubing, dissolver and saturator before 
connecting up to assure yourself that there is no obstruction in 
them. 

Use only the highest grade of sulphuric ether that you can 
obtain. See that there is plenty of liquid ether in the saturator. 

Never use less than 300 pounds weight on the oxygen gas- 
bag. Connect up as shown in cut on preceding page. 

Bear in mind that pure Hydrogen is a very light gas, and 
that in using as a substitute for Hydrogen, gases derived from 
Hydro-carbons, that it is necessary that they shall also be light 
and volatile. Ether vapor, in a cold temperature, is heavy, slug- 
gish and non-responsive. In a warm temperature it is light, 
volatile and responsive. Therefore, if using ether in a temper- 
ature below 65° Fahrenheit artificially warm the Saturator by 
wrapping same in two or three thicknesses of flannel, and plac- 
ing thereon a bottle of warm water or a warm brick. 

Comply with these instructions and you will have no "snap- 
ping'* or "popping out," unless the "Off-Flow" valves jpp the 
Saturator are toe closely adjusted. The right side of the Dis- 
solver should be connected to the lower or right hand Jiantern, 
the left side of the Dissolver to the upper or left hand' la^ntern. 
When burning bright on the lower or right hand lantern, the 
**Off-Flow*' is in the upper or left hand lantern, and the height 
of this **Off- Flow" flame should be about 2^ inches. Tliis is 
regulated by the little thumb screw valve on the left side of the 
Dissolver, When burnrng^bright on the upper or left hand lan- 
tern the ''Off-FloW flame is then in the lower or right hand lan- 
tern and should be adjusted to about 2 J^ inches in height, by the 
thumb screw valve, the **Off-Flow valve as it is called j on the 
r//^ht side of the Dissolver. 



The 



I 

I 



lapping" in dissolving, sometimes 
the cylinders. Therefore, as the 
yOLiniust frequently open the valve 



pressure i 
of the cyli 

To Turn' Off the Light when the Dissolving Key is Used 
WITH THE Ether Satukator. — Move the lever L to one side. 



off first the light that burns low, 
oxygen key, then the ether key ; 
oxygen key fron) the bright light 
turn ofT the key at the oxygen 



regular order, namely : First the 
ext, without moving L, turn off the 
Chen the ether key, and instantly 



THE "GAS-BAG OXYGEN MAKING" 



95 Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

The accompanying cut will show the arrangement of the retort, 
wash bottle, and bag. An alcohol lamp is here shown, but a Bunsen 
burner, or any fire that will gfve sufficient heat, will do. A good heat 
should be applied at first, but as the gas begins to pass over freely, a 
more moderate heat is needed to make the gas flow with regularity. If, 
however, all heat be removed before the retort be disconnected with 
the wash bottle, water may be sucked back into the retort and 
cause an explosion. jR represents our copper retort fitted at the 
top with a two inch ground stopper T, that acts as a safety-valve 
when the pressure becomes too great. (When a sheet-iron retort is 
used, the top is luted on with plaster of Paris ; it dries hard in a few mo- ^ 
ments, and is then ready for making the gas.) P is a metal pipe, ter- 
minating in a brass nipple for connection with rubber pipe A from 
the wash bottle W, The wash bottle has two metal pipes soldered in 
its cover ; the longer one is to be connected with the retort, and 
through it the newly made gas passes through the water to wash out 
the particles that are carried over with it, and which, if left in the gas, 
would be driven into the jet and prevent the flow of gases. The 
shorter tube conveys the gas from the upper part of the bottle through 
the rubber pipe B and stop cock C into the bag. It is better, if pos- 
sible, to place the bag on a table or some place higher than the wash 
bottle, so as to avoid as much as possible any water being carried over 
by the rapid flow of gas, as any dampness in connection with the 
oxygen gas soon rots the bag. Chlorine gas is also very injurious to 
the bag, and to prevent its being carried over with the oxygen, add a 
few crystals of common washing soda (sal soda) to the water in the 
wash bottle. 

Precautions. — Accidents have happened in making oxygen, but 
they are invariably due to gross carelessness. No one who has not 
some knowledge of chemistry, should undertake to make gases without 
reading and fully understanding the steps herein described. The 
chlorate of potash and manganese should be examined for small bits 
of straw, sticks, or other foreign substances. Practically the only 
danger is lest soot or charcoal be mixed with the samples. 

Never allow bystanders to take a part in making the gas. We 
have known an explosion caused by a curious spectator who pinched 
the rubber tube between the wash bottle and the bag while the gas was 
•being rapidly made, the sudden check in the flow of gas forced water 
back into the retort. If by any accident the retort should fall off the 
fire, do not replace until certain that the neck of the retort and pipes 
are clean, as the charge may choke the outlets and cause an explosion. 
In making oxygen gas, many persons put their iron or copper retorts 
away with the spent charge left in, either in a dry state or wet. 
This slowly destroys the metal. The retort should, when somewhat 
cool, be half filled with water (either cold or warm), which will dis- 
solve the charge; wash this out until entirely cleaned. Now place 
the retort upon the gas or fire until all dampness has dried out, and it 
can then be put away until again required. This will make the retort 
last double the time. The charge should not in any case be knocked 
out with an iron rod. 
r Should you wish to know if a retort be unfit for further use, you 



MOINTOSh BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., I 




«< JfUmi* ■. 9 h 



96 



» 



can do so by means of a small piece of iron or the back blade of 3 
pocket knife. By knocking^ (when empty) you may ascertain by the 
sound what thickness it is. Never risk k faulty retort. 

Recapitulation of Process, i. — Weigh out 33 ounces chlorate 
potash, and 8 ounces black oxide of manganese; mix them, and heat 
a small amount in an iron spoon. If they are pure, they will melt and 
dry up, leaving a gray residue; if impure, they will not melt, but 
flash up with a slight explosion, leaving a whitish mass, with red Spots 
over the surface ; in the latter case they are dangerous. 

B. — See that the retort is perfectly clean and dry, then pour in the 
chemicals. If the copper retort is employed, fit in the ground stop- 
per; do the same with sheet steel retort, and fasten at suitable 
height on the retort stand. 

3. — Fill the wash bottle half full of water containing a lump of 
washing soda the size of a small hickory nut. 

4. — Open the stop cock of the bag wide, remove all weight from 
the top, and place it above the level of the wash bottle. 

5. — B/aif through all the pipes to see that they are free from ob- 
struction. 

6. — Light the lamp and place it under the retort, and at the same 
time connect /" with the long tube of the wash bottle. In ten 
to twenty minutes (depending on the heatj, bubbles of gas will come 
through the water in the wash bottle ; when the air is expelled, 
and not sooner, connect the short tube of the wash bottle with the 
bag. 

7. — If the gas begins to come over violently so as to throw the 
water into the pipes, lessen the heat by turning down the flame, or 
drawing the lamp a little away from the retort. 

8, — Should the flow of gas stop before the bag is full, which is 
shown by the water in the wash bottle ceasing to bubble, do not dis- 
turb it; it will soon begin again and go on rapidly till the bag is 
filled. If the lamp has been removed, replace it, or increase the 
, heat a little. 

—When the bag is full, or no more gas passes Q\t\, first dis~ 
I connect the retort from the wash bottle, then close the stop cock of 
I the bag, and disconnect it from the wash bottle, and proceed to clean 
[ the retort. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 98 

PRICE LIST OF PARTS OF COMPRESSED 

OXYGEN OUTFIT. 

2 Gas-Bags, with bands and stop-cocks, 18x36, @ $20.00 $40.00 

10 Feet Rubber Hose, (^ 15 cents 1.50 

10 Extra Rubber Bands, @ 20 cents 2.00 

1 Metallic Wash Bottle 5.00 

1 Oxygen Retort Stand 1 .00 

1 Alcohol Lamp or Bunsen Burner, 1 . 25 

1 T Tube : 50 

1 Oxygen Retort, complete. Copper 8.00 

1 Pair Lime Tongs 75 

1 Traveling Case 0.00 

$<)0.00 

The Retort complete consists of two parts, a **Head" and a 
Retort '*Body" The Head is indestructible, and lists at $3.00. 
The Body is of sheet copper, heavy, can be used fifty times; 
then a new body should be purchased, price $5.00, list. 

Two bags of this capacity are necessary to hold enough 
Oxygen for a run of two hours. 

One and one-half packages of chemicals are necessary to fill 
the bags. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE OF COMPRESSED 

OXYGEN OUTFIT. 

Put eight ounces of water in which has been dissolved a tea- 
spoonful of Sal Soda into the wash bottle. 

Put chemicals into retort, shaking dow^n well 

Connect as shown in cut. 

Fill both bags at once. 

Make gas with th -, bands on the bags. 

Close stop-cocks on bags when gas ceases making. Discon- 
nect wash bottle. You are now ready to connect the gas bags 
to the lantern if hydrogen or house gas is to be used from an- 
other bag, or to the T tube if the Ether Saturator is to be used. 
It will work equally well with either. 

With these two articles, the "Saturator" and the "Com- 
pressed Oxygen Outfit," the exhibitor is in shape to give a first- 
class entertainment, with a light inferior to none, and is entirely 
independent of the large business centers for his supply of gas. 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTU'AL CO.. ClilCAlia ILL., 



THEMcINTOSH-ARNOLDSELF-CONDENS- 
ING OXYGEN RETORT & CYLINDER. 




» 



L. No. 139, PRICE 



DESCRIPTION. 



Nos. I, 2, 3, 4 are Unions, j4 retort, ^ Safety Blow-Out, C 
Check Valve. D Wasli Bottle, £, J^, G Globe Valves, H Gauge, I 
cylmder,y Flexible High Pressure Tubing. In this outfit we pre- 
sent to the exhibitor the triumph of mechanical ingenuity and 
skill; no pumping, no carrying up and down stairs of heavy 
weights for your gas bags; no fear that some thoughtless or mis- 
chievous boy can pierce the bag with his knife blade; does all 
the work itself, and all the gaS left over at the close of an enter- 
tainment is saved for the next exhibition; saves 50 per cent of 
the cost in the manufacture of oxygen over that purchased al- 
ready compressed. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. & a. lOO 



DIRECTIONS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF OXYGEN WITH THIS APPA- 
RATUS. 

Supposinrg the apparatus to be already connected up, as de- 
picted in cut; disconnect Unions Nos. 2 and i; fill the wash bot- 
tle D half full of water, into which has been placed a couple of 
teaspoonfuls of bicarbonate of soda; this is to neutralize the 
acidulation obtained in the generation of oxygen. Place in re- 
tort A two packages, or, in quantity, three pounds of potassium 
chlorate, arid one pound black binoxide of manganese, pouring 
same through a large tin funnel, into the pipe at Union i. Fasten 
down Unions Nos. i and 2 again tightly; no undue exertion is 
needed; only have them fit firmly and closely onto the washers, 
so that no leakage is possible. Allow Union No. 3 to be slightly 
open; apply heat to A) this you can do by means of an ordinary 
cook stove, an ordinary heating stove, where it is possible to 
get the retort into the stove onto the fire, or it can be made over 
an ordinary gasoline stove, or, in fact, in the open air, by build- 
ing a fire under it. An ordinary soap or cracker box smashed 
to pieces will afford heat enough for the generation of oxygen. 
Having applied heat for two or three minutes, until you can 
hear a bubbling in the wash bottle, which, at the beginning, in- 
dicates that the hot air is passing over and out, escaping at Union 
3; having waited for not more than two or three minutes, close 
Union 3 tightly; open the valves E, F, G, which allows the gas 
to not only enter the cylinder, but at the same time it presses on 
the gauge; you do not need great heat; oxygen is of a better qual- 
ity when made slowly than rapidly. It is not necessary to get 
the retort to a red heat, although a dull red is not objectionable. 
From these two packages, or from the exact quantity above given, 
65 pounds pressure should be indicated on the gauge. When 
the gas has ceased making, which is indicated by the cessation 
of the bubbling in the wash bottle, and also by the indicating 
needle of the gauge remaining stationary, then close globe valve 
-^tightly, disconnect Union No. i, and, while the retort is still 
warm, wash it out thoroughly with water until it is perfectly 
clean, dry it thoroughly, place in it one package of 28 oz. of po- 
tassium chlorate, and 8 oz. of black binoxide of manganese. 
Fasten tightly Union No. i, again loosening slightly union No. 3. 
Apply heat; allow the hot air to escape as before. 

Close Union j tightly and open up globe valves E and 
G (not F)y and allow the gas to pass through against the gauge 
until the pressure on the gauge exceeds that already m \.\\^ c-^Yvcir 



101 Mcintosh batteby and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

der from the first generating. As soon as the outside pressure 
as indicated on the gauge, exceeds that already in the cylinder, 
open up globe valve F^ and allow the gas to enter the cylinder. 
This second charging should give you loo pounds pressure to 
the square inch, this being the amount to which we recommend 
that this apparatus should be charged. With this amount of 
pressure, you have in this sized cylinder (12 inches in diameter 
. by 42 inches in height), 18^ cubic feet, nearly enough for four 
solid hours of work ; in fact enough for two complete lectures, 
although it is advisable to always make gas before each enter- 
tainment, so that you can guard against any accident by leakage 
or otherwise. Gas having ceased to come over, close valve F 
tight ; disconnect the apparatus at unions z, 2 and j, and at F 
unscrew . the cross-piece from the top valve i% and into valve 
Fy then you screw the plug cap with washer so that no leakage 
can occur, supposing some idle hands carelessly tamper with 
the globe valve F, When about to use the cylinder with the 
valve F still closed, unscrew the plug-cap, and screw firmly 
into its place with a washer underneath, the double needle 
valve ; then open up the globe-valve F^ and the gas goes onto 
the main spindle of the needle-valve, which you open widely ; 
this lets the gas go onto the small needle or wheel-valve, as it is 
sometimes called. With this smaller needle-valve you effect the 
adjustment of the gases. Having adjusted it properly you can 
leave this small needle-valve adjusted, just as it is, and closing 
the main spindle the pressure is shut off, and yet the equilibrium 
of gas necessary for perfect light is established, and is in good 
shape and order for the entertainment; when you commence 
your entertainment, all that is necessary is to open up the mam 
spindle of needle-valve. The Safety Blow-Out -5 is a safeguard 
against any explosion that could possibly occur. It is provided 
with a thin metallic disc that will blow out or burst at a pressure 
of 200 pounds to the square inch. It is well from time to time 
to examine this blow-out disc and see that the metal is not cor- 
roded. Should it show evidences of roughness or corrosion, put 
in a new plate. This is an efficient safeguard, and no dangerous 
accident can occur. Another safeguard is the Check-Valve C, 
which, should one carelessly open up the globe-valve F before 
the outside pressure had exceeded that already left in the cylin- 
der at the close of the last entertainment, or of the first genera- 
tion of gas, would prevent the driving of the water back into the 



retort. _/ is a piece of flexitile tubing, or as it is sometimes 
called, high-pressure steam hose, and being flexible enables the 
wash-bottle and retort to be used at any angle, so that any style 
of stove or heating apparatus can be used for generating gas. 
The washers furnished with this outfit are Asbestos ; ordinary 
sole-leather washers, however, can be used just as well, the only 
precaution being that they must be kept soft and pliable by 
soaking thent in warm water and keeping them in oil when 
not in use. A careful attention to these details which -have 
been given at length in order that the novice may have every 
direction for his guidance, regard being paid to closing unions 
tightly, and that the washers should always be soft and pliable, 
and a good grade of potassium, preferably the French chlorate; 
that the chemicals are free from impurities, that no straw, bit of 
paper, or chip, or piece of string be mixed with them, will insure 
a safe and easy method of generating oxygen to high pressure, 
■which can only be appreciated by those who have used it. With 
this outfit is furnished a large ivrench for the tightening up of 
the large burrs of the various unions, a long poker for breaking 
Tip the slag and debris in cleaning out the retort, a funnel for 
pouring the chemicals into the retort, plug-cap for safeguard 
against the escape of gas, and a number of extra: washers, and 
also a number of metallic discs to be used in the safety blow-out. 



HYDROGEN MAKING OUTFIT. 




L No. 140. 
- PRICE LIST. 

t 1 A Ko. IfiasbBB SOX4O1130 136 00 

■■ Copnec Generator 33 00 

B WashBoKle 1 BO 

n rBptRaUberTublnK I 60 

K Pair Praaaure Boards TBi 

■ Vealsa farnlsb a smnller Gasbae3t}xViji2li, ai **>' 



L 



103 Mcintosh batteby and optical co., Chicago, iol.. u. s. a. 



DIRECTIONS HOW TO MAKE HYDROGEN GAS. 



Hydrogen being one of the constituents of water, is produced 
therefrom by the decomposing action of zinc and . sulphuric acid. 
Make one gallon of a solution of one part of strong sulphuric acid to 
seven parts of water. As this combination generates considerable 
heat, it should be prepared in an earthen vessel, and long enough 
before it is required for use to permit of its cooling ; then pour the 
dilute acid into the generator H, There is attached to the stopper 
an open basket, in which is placed ij^ pounds of scrap zinc. Im- 
merse the basket in the dilute acid, and at the same instant quickly 
press the cork into the neck of the generator ; the action will soon 
commence, as shown by the bubbling in the wash bottle. The action 
should be allowed to proceed for a few moments, so as to be sure that 
all air has been expelled ; then make the connection with the bag, 
seeing that the key is turned so as to permit the gas to flow. The 
accompanying cut will show the arrangement of the apparatus. 

The Ether Saturator is coming into very general use as a 
substitute for hydrogen. 

Precautions in Making Hydrogen. — Be careful to see that all 
the tubes are open ; this is ascertained by blowing through them. 
Let the wash bottle be filled about half full of water. Expel all air 
from the bag before commencing to fill it, by rolling it up from the 
small end. When filled, turn off the stop cock and separate the con- 
nections. After being used, aU gas should be expelled from the 
hydrogen bag, as the bag would be injured by allowing it to remain. 



GAS BAGS. 



We furnish a very superior quality of gas bag ; the material con- 
sists of two layers of rubber and two of canvas, with all the edges 
vulcanized together, and bound in a firm and subst^antial manner to 
give them extra strength. A deep gusset greatly increases the 
capacity withou* adding materially to its weight or bulk when packed. 
The stop cock is of our own manufacture, and especially adapted for 
use with this bag. It is very accurately fitted, so that no leakage of 
gas can occur. A special feature is a separate brass collar, perma- 
nently fastened in the opening of the bag, into which the stop cock 
fits, and from which it can be removed in a moment to repair fittings 
or to clear out any dirt that may accidentally enter the bag. 



AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL,. 



It is better to have a large size bag, because some gas is needed 
in preliminary adjustment, and as there will always be a slight varia 
tioninamount used in an entertainment, and for IJ^hoiirs work i 
bag 30 X 40 X 30 inches is most desirable. Only the best bags an 
worth having, and such will last for years if the gas is properly washei 



and all taps 
All bags we furnish 
ever necessary to i 
optic 



etal fittings are cleaned and oiled occasionally. 
: tested with a much greater weight than it is 
in working either a single or dissolving Stere- 



W/ien bags are used for both gases, care should be observed to keep 
each bag for its particular gas, as explosions have been caused by using 
the oxygen bag for hydrogen, and vice versa. To obviate mistakes of 
this kind, it is well to have some distinguishing feature about the bags, 
so that even in the dark they tan be readily identified. 

L. No, 111, Gasbag 30^*0x30, Price $20 00 

L. No, 143, ■' 30n40x30, ■■ 35 00 

PRESSURE BOARDS. 

L, No, 143, Price S B Ott 

These Pressure Boards are hinged together in the form of a wedge 
shaped box, with handle and lock, in which the gas bag is carried. 
It is shown closed and locked, ready for transportation. The dotted' 
lines show the position of the cover when the bag is filled with gas. 
The cross-bar prevents the weight from rolling off, and keeps it on 
the forward part of the bag; this position distributes the pressure 
more evenly than if placed in the centre of the cover. The bag 
be carried without folding or creasmg, and is protected from splinters 
and roughness of floors when in use. This form of pressure board 
adds considerably to the durability of the gas bag. 




single pressure board may be employed if preferred ; it can be 
made by any carpenter. It should be not less than 32 x 42 inches, 
perfectly smooth on the surface next the bag. On the lower edge of 
its upper surface is fastened a batten to hold two s,tva.ij'cmv.ig«.-, "^as, 
bee ends of these hinges are screwed to the ftoQt. '&\'(.\Rch\«s,\»j5s- 
Of the apper edge is another batten to 'hoVA t\ve -wev^X *v^ -(JvwLe,. 



1 



105 Mcintosh battery and optical cx)., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

These battens should be fastened on with screws, which must not pro- 
ject through the board, otherwise they will wear holes in the bag. To 
prevent the bag from slipping out from under the pressure board when 
the weight is adjusted, two leather straps may be fastened upon the 
upper edge of the board, and be brought down across the bellows end 
of the bag, and fastened to the floor. The latter must be free from 
«and, nails or splinters, as these are liable to injure the bag. A 
sharp tack, carelessly left under it, has been known to puncture it, 
under great pressure. 

THE SCREEN. 

The white surface that receives the projected picture is called the 
screen. It may be a white finished wall, or a white cloth properly 
mounted. The back of a wall map, if clean and white, may be used. 
Whatever form of screen is selected must be perfectly smooth, and 
its surface must be parallel with the front of the objective. It may be 
of any size, but for convenience should be not more than a foot or 
two larger in diameter than the largest size disk to be employed. 
Exhibitors who wish to use both large and small halls find it conve- 
nient to carry two screens of different sizes. Those we manufacture 
are of the best quality of heavy bleached cotton ; they have a firm 
border of thick, non-elastic webbing, stitched entirely around the 
€dge, with brass rings about one inch in diameter at intervals of two 
feet. Screw eyes of sufficient size to hold the guy ropes are fastened 
in the floor and ceiling, and the screen is drawn smooth and free from 
wrinkles. Very careful adjustment is required when the microscope 
attachment is employed. The four corners of the screen must be 
equi-distant from the objective. A convenient method of ascertaining 
a correct position is to tie a long cord to the objective, and measure 
the distance to each corner of the screen. 

If the center of the screen is on a higher level than the lantern^ 
the front of the latter must be elevated until the disk of light will fall 
on the center of the screen. Sometimes it is necessary to tilt the 
tipper part of the screen forward to make its center parallel with the 
Lantern Lens. 

DIRECTIONS FOR PUTTING UP SCREENS. 

All of our screens are provided with two very strong rings, 

capable of sustaining enormous strain, at each corner. A few 
directions as to the easy way of hanging a large screen will not 
come amiss to the amateur ; 3 ropes are necessary for hanging a 
screen in this manner : purchase 200 feet of No. 7 or 8 sash 
weight cord, which, if an A No. i quality, is capable of standing 
a tensile strain of 600 pounds. One rope you never cut ; the 
other one you cut in half; this gives you three pieces, one 100 
feet long and two 50 feet long. Lay your screen on the floor 
under the place where you wish to hang it. At one side of the 
hall place a strong screw eye in the floor or base boards, of one- 
lourth inch wire at Jeast ; to this ring iaslexv oi^e ^t^d o{ the 100 



I 

I 

I 



foot rope and also one end of one of the 50 foot ropes; then carrying 
the other ends of both of these pieces of rope in your hands or 
tied round your waist, ascend your step-ladder and place another 
strong screw eye in the wall, rafter, or pillar, at the desired 
height; through this ring pass both ends of the ropes ; descend 
your ladder and fasten the other end of the short piece to one of the 
rings in the corner of the screen; the end of the 100 foot rope 
you do not make fast at all, but carry or thread it, as we niight 
say, through all of the rings on the top of the screen. Then 
having madefast one end of the remaining 50 foot rope to one of 
the corner rings, you ascend your step-ladder on the opposite 
side of the hall or room, and having placed your screw eye in 
the wall there, carry the ropes tfirough and descend your ladder, 
place a screw eye in the floor or base board on that side of the 
room. You have now finished climbing, and yet your screen 
remains on the floor. Now, if you pull up tightly, taking up all of 
the slack in the 100 foot piece of rope, it will stretch across the 
auditorium like a wire; put on all the strength you have, and if 
necessary call some one to help you and make it fast. Now, by- 
tightening the two short ropes on either side, you spread out 
the screen on the rope, and can slide it back and forth into any 
desired position; then having drawn the short ropes tightly, 
make them fast in the same screw eyes to which are attached 
the ends of the long rope. Now, all that is necessary is to make 
fast to the floor the lower corners of screen, having them either 
on a line with the other screw eyes, or if the stereopticon is in 
the gallery pointing down, carry the lower margin of screen 
slightly forward, so that all the corners of the screen are equi- 
distant from the lantern ; on the other hand, should the lantern 
be on the floor and pointing a little above the level, carry the 
lower margin of the screen slightly backward, and fasten with- 
small screw eyes in the floor. The point to be borne in mind, is 
that for perfect definition on the screen, the four corners must 
be equi-distant from the lantern. One strong feature about this 
method of raising the screen, is that the screw eyes, being of 
trifling value, can be left in the wall to be used at the next enter- 
tainment; all you have to do is to loosen your ropes and you 
can pull them right out, and thus save the bother and trouble of 
climbing up again. 

L. No. 144. Screens 6 ri; square £3 50 1 L.No. IBO. ScreenE 16 ft square 10 CO 

■' 146, ■• 7 ■■ HBO " IBl. '■ IB - 12m 

■■ 146, •' 8 '■ 400 " 163, ■■ -Jti ■• IB 00 

'■ 147. '■ 9 ■■ 400 ■' 163. " 34 ■' .1800 

■' 148. '■ 10 ■■ BOO " 164, " 30 '■ 22 60 

" MB, ■■ 12 " 700 I " 166. " Frame par aecIIOQ fiO 



UcINTOSH BATTEHT AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., C. S. A. 

HOW TO CENTER AND FOCUS THE LIGHT. 

When the lime begins to give out a brilliantwhite light move it 
to or from the condenser (when the mechanical jet is the one used, 
this is done by rod C) until the disk of Hght on the screen is evenly 
illuminated, as in Fig. K Reference to the following cuts will 
enable the operator to locate the light to produce a perfect disk. 



mmm 



When the disk resemblea Fig. A, the light miut be mored to the loft ; Fig. B, It mm 
be moveii lo the rtghl; Fig. u, the light mmt be lowered: Fig. D, Itmuat be raised. 1 
the dlik f> snmundod by a dork blue border, us In E, the llf^ht la loo near the condensei 
ftnd must bo moved hack ; if, on tbe contrary, Ibis ring la of an orange hue, the light la M 




Tig. a. 

In this illustration the correct location of the light is shown at Z ; 
\ the rays fall ivithin the area of the condenser. F represents the 
'^ht located too far from the condetiset, so Vhat a \iotUoxv o^ \.he lays 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ilk, u. s. a. los 



pass outside of it and are lost ; when the light is too near, as at N^ 
the rays do not fully illuminate the image. 

The Size of Disk. — The size of the illuminated circle on the 
screen, with a given lens, depends upon its distance from the screen. 
In Fig. G the arrow A is shown of a certain size on the screen, its 
length is equal to the diameter of the cone of light at that point. 
If the screen be moved nearer, as at B, the cone of light is inter- 
cepted at a point where the diameter is less, therefore the image will 
be smaller. If the screen be removed to E, where the rays have 
widely diverged, the image will be correspondingly enlarged. The 
rays of light nearer the lens being more condensed, a brighter image 
will be shown at B than at E^ where they are diffused over a larger 
surface. The shorter the distance between the lens and th e screen^ the 
smaller and brighter the image ; the greater the distance oetween the 
lens and the screen the larger and less bright the image. The dis- 
tance can be considerably varied wfthout impairing the image on the 
screen when sunlight, the electric light, or the lime-light are em- 
ployed, but with an oil light it is practically impossible to produce a 
satisfactory picture of more than ten feet in diameter. 

Inversion of Image. — It is necessary to invert the slides as they 
are placed in the focus of the Lantern Lens for a reason which will 
be apparent on examination of Fig. G. Since the rays of light come 
to a focus, and cross at a certain distance from a lens, it follows that 
the rays from the upper part of the object, near the condenser, will 
be thrown on the lower margin of the screen, and vice versa, giving 
an inverted image of the object. To make this image appear right 
side up to the audience, the slide must be wrong side up in the 
.lantern. 

How TO Focus Image on ScREEN.-The milled head screw on the 
Stereopticon Lens is to be turned until the image comes out distinct 
and sharply defined upon the screen. If this screw is turned as much 
as possible without bringing out the image clearly, it wiL be neces- 
sary to lengthen or shorten the sliding tube which holds the lens. A 
little practice will enable the operator to adjust the focus instantly. 

To Show the Slides. — As photographic transparencies from dif- 
ferent manufacturers vary somewhat in size, the Slide Carriers fur- 
nished with the Mcintosh Lanterns are adjustable for different sizes. 
The transparencies show to better advantage when they are correctly 
placed before the condenser. Each new lot should be examined and 
marked by a slip of paper pasted across one corner, to indicate which 
is the front side. 

How TO Manage the Sunlight Lamp. -Use only the best grade 
of coal oil, not less than 150° test. Elaine is preferable when it can 
be obtained. Twelve fluid ounces of oil is suflScient for a two hours 
exhibition, and no more should be poured into the lamp, as it is neces- 
sary to leave about half an inch unfilled, so that the lantern front may 
be raised without spilling the oil. Place the lamp in the lantern, take 
off the reflector and raise the hinged glass to light the wicks. The 
wicks must be evenly trimmed, and turned very low when first lighted ; 
in a second or two very slowly raise each wick a little at a time. 



109 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. S. A. 



waiting not less than five minutes before the full effect is obtained. 
The light must not be turned so high as lo smoke. When a full and 
perfectly white flame is produced, lower the hinged glass, replace the 
reflector and close the lantern door, 

HOW TO MANAGE AN EXHIBITION. 

The beginner should be provided with a list of all the apparatus 
and materials needed for an exhibition, and before starting out should 
see that nothing is omitted, otherwise he is liable to find something 
missing at the last moment which will interfere with his arrangements. 

To Locate the Lantern. — ^When the distance at which the 
lantern will cover a certain sized screen is known, then the whole ap- 
paratus may be placed without any hesitation; but if this is not 
known, or a different size objectiv-e is used, as is often necessary to 
accommodate the size of the hall, then the apparatus should be set up 
temporarily, and a trial made to see if the distance be correct. With 
many of the objectives used the size of the picture thrown will be just 
half the distance between the lantern and the screen, /. e., if the 
lantern be twenty feet away, the size of the picture will be ten feet. 
These objectives answer well for an illumination of from twelve to 
fifteen feet, but when it is required larger than this, as is often the 
case with the oxy-hydrogen light, then a larger objective should be 
used. 

Location of Gas-bag. — It should be located as near as possible 
to the lantern, takmg care that it is placed so that the hose convey- 
ing the gas from the bag cannot be trodden upon. When the oxy- 
hydrogen light is used two bags will be needed. They may be placed 
between pressure-boards, one above the other, or they may be placed 
side by side, with a single board on each, while a narrower board 
reaches across both and receives the weights. Whichever arrange- 
ment is adopted, the weights should be so placed as to give an equal 
pressure on each bag. It is not necessary to carry heavy weights 
about for this purpose, as something may always be found — 2l keg or 
two of nails, a lot of window weights, kegs of white lead, or some 
rocks from a neighboring stone wall. Always use 300 pounds. 

Attach the hose to the bags, and be careful that the proper con- 
nections are made with the jet. Never use the same hose for the 
lantern connections that has been used to connect retort with wash 
bottle in making gas. Always place each gas on the same side, /. e,y 
the hydrogen on the left and the oxygen on the right. 

Biow through all the pipes to make certain that they are not 
obstructed. 

The Screen should be located as near the central part of the end 
of the hall as possible. It must be drawn perfectly smooth and stand 
parallel with the end of th objective. When placed higher than the 
lantern, it may be tilted forward a little at the top, while the lantern 
is raised by placing a block under the front legs to make the front 



McDTTOaH BATTBBt AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. ILL., U. 8. A. 



no 



I 



i 



lens of the objective parallel with the surface of the screen. If this 
is not done it will be impossible to illuminate all portions of the 
picture evenly at the same time. If it becomes necessary to place the 
lantern behind the screen, the latter must be thoroughly wet to make 
it transparent. 

The Saturator should not be connected with the lantern until 
ready to light up. It may, however, be filled by daylight (the metal 
caps screwed on F F), and placed beside the lantern ready to 
connect. 

The Lenses must be clean. If a damp fog appears when the 
lantern is first lighted, it must be allowed gradually to disappear, 
before anything can be done. If it does not disappear in two or 
three seconds the glass is not clean, although it may appear to be so 
to the eye. Avoid touching the polished surface with the fingers; 
they will leave a mark upon it. They must be cleaned with a little 
alcohol applied with cotton wool. ■ 

When Ready to Commence, darki 
possible ; see that all keys are close 
^et back from the condenser; insert the 
weights on the pressure boards, and 
described. When the lime begins to give forth 
the jet nearer the condenser, and focus the light 

Arrangement of Slides. — The slides should be carefully ar- 
ranged so that all will be the same way up, with the fronts all in the 
same direction. They must also be in the exact order described in 
_ the lecture. Carelessness in this particular often leads to ridiculous 
results. 

Signals. — The lecturer and operator usually settle upon some 
signal for changing the views. The reading lamp we furnish is pro- 
vided with a small bell, also a colored light, which is covered and 
uncovered by a slide ; either signal can be selected. Especial atten- 
tion is called to the lecturers' Electric Signal, see page 56. 



room as completely as 

the Saturator, draw the 

its holder ; place 

the light as previously 

"iant glow, move 



^^^ Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. a a. 



HOW TO MAKE LANTERN SLIDES. 

These, probably the most beautiful and most extensively useful of 
all photographic productions may be produced either by copying, in 
a suitable camera, or by super-position. The former is the method 
generally adopted by those who make them commercially, or where 
they are to be reduced from larger negatives ; the latter is almost 
universally employed by those who make them only for their own use. 

As those who possess good lanterns are generally photographers, 
and make negatives of a size and quality suitable for printing by 
super-position, and as by that jnethod slides of the highest quality 
can be made with certainty and simplicity, we append the following 
brief synopsis of the operation : 

Good pictures may be made on any slow, clean-working, gelatino- 
bromide plate, but it is better to use the gelatino-albumen, or gela- 
tino-chloride, specially prepared by various makers for the purpose, 
either of the English standard 3^ inches square, or as is more gener- 
ally used in America 4 X3^. 

The following solutions are required, and as they will keep indefi- 
nitely they may be made in large quantities : 

No. I. — Oxalate Solution. 

Sulphite of soda 1 o& 

Citric acid 60 gr 

Water,... 32 02. 

JHsiolve, and add neutral oxalate of potash 8 oz. 

After solution, immerse a strip of litmus paper, and if it remains 
blue add a solution of citric acid (loo grs. to the ounce), a few drops 
at a time, until alkalinity is just removed and the paper changes 
faintly red ; then add 200 grains of citric acid and water, if needed, 
to make the bulk measure 40 fluid ounces, filter, and it is ready. 

No. 2. — Iron Solution. 

Sulphate of Iron 8 oz. 

Water 32 oz. 

Dissolve, filter and add sulphuric acid 40 drops. 

No. 3. — Fixing Solution. 

Hyp)osulphite of soda 4 oz. 

Water 20 oz. 

No. 4. — Clearing Solution. 

Cyanide of potassium (pure) 60 gr. 

W ater 6 oz. 

Measure off i oz. of the solution, and to the remainder add tinc- 
ture of iodine until a slight color remains, showing the solution to be 
saturated ; then add the i oz. reserved, and it will at once be cleared. 
Its use will be explained further on. 

No. 5. — Bromide Solution. 

Bromide of potassium 1 oz. 

Water 9 oz. 

The method of operation is as follows : In a room lighted only 
by a ruby or orange light, place the negative in the printing frame, 
the prepared plate on the negative just as the paper is placed in ordi- 
nary printing, but using several folds of canton flannel or other soft 



Mcintosh battehy and optical co., Chicago, ill., d. b. a, 

malerial between the plate and the back of the frame to secure close | 
contact between the two glasses without risk of breakage. Expose t 
a. gas flame or oil lamp for from ten to twenty seconds, or more o 
less, depending on the size of flame and density of the negative, and 1 
proceed to develop in the ordinary way. Mix in a graduated meastireJ 
in the following order : 

No. 1, Oialate foluUoa 2X oancea. 

No, 2, Iron boIuIIod U onnce. 

No. B, Bromide Bolution Sl draobm. 

And having placed the plate in a suitable tray, pour the solution ow 
it and watch for the result. 

With a properly exposed piate, the image should begin to she 
from 15 to i5 seconds, and be allowed to continue until what consti- 
tutes the bright light shows full of detail, then wash oif the developer 
and fix in the hypo, solution. No. 3, letting it remain a few minutes 
after all the unreduced bromide is apparently dissolved ; next, wash a 
few minutes, then immerse from three to five minutes in the alum 
bath, made by dissolving two ounces of powdered alum in 
thirty ounces of water. After another good wash, and while the j 
water is running over the plate, pass a broad camel-hair brush over the ] 
surface, after which set it up to dry. 

The clearing solution, No. 4, is used, when from slight over-ex- 
posure to the- light, or too prolonged development, or from lack of 
proper density in the negative, the parts of the positive that should 
showclear glass are slightly tinted. Acareful application of it with 
a camel-hair brush will remove it. _ 

The tone of the transparencies can be varied somewhat by varying 
the length of exposure and strength of developer. A short exposure; 
and a strong developer made of 

No. 1, Oialale BoluUon 2 ox. 

No. 2, Iron solution Moz. 

No. 3, Bromide solution S^dr. 

will give a rather cold tone ; the same diluted to 3 ounces with watei^ 
giving a longer exposure, will give a warm, brown tone ; while a mix-* 
ture half new mixed and half old gives a rich tone. It is a safe 
proceeding, also, to immerse the exposed plate for a minute or so in a 
old developer, and to add new to that to bring up the image. 

OUTFIT No. I, Price $25.00, consista of 
One Society Sciopticon, will" one pair 4'/i-iach condensing lenses, one short._ 

focus, achromatic abjective or magnifying glass; a Iwo-wick lamp v ' 

chimney, refleclor, and slide carrier: in a neat packing case. 
OUTFIT No. 2, Price $35-00, is made up of 
One Argand Sciopticon, with one pair 4)i-inch condensing lenses, one short , 

focus achromatic objective or maMifying glass, one A No. 1 ArganJ 

Student Lamp and reflector, slide cWrer; in a neat traveling c: *' 

hinged door, lock and handle. 
Without Student Lamp, allowing the purchaser to make use of his own Stu-- 

dent Lamp SaO.Ott 

OUTFIT No, 3, Price $40.00, consisting of 
One Mcintosh Sciopticon, with 4'4-inch condensers. Achromatic StereopA 

con Objective, Sun-Light Lamp. Slide Carrier and Stop, in neatpackill " 

case, with hinged lid, lock and handle. 



113 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 

OUTFIT No. 4, Price $100.00, includes 

A Mcintosh Sciopticon, with 4^ -inch condensers, Achromatic Sterec^ticon 
Objective, Adjustable Jet for mixed gases, and the following accesso-' 
ries: — Ether Saturator No. 1, Tin Funnel, T Tube (Oxygen Divider)^ a 
30x40 best quality canvas covered Rubber Gas Bag, Sheet Steel Retort, 
Retort Stand, Wash Bottle, Alcohol Lamp, one dozen Lime Cylinders, 
half-dozen packages of chemicals for Oxygen, 2 lbs. best Ether, 20 feet 
Rubber Tubing for connections, Screen 15x15, packing case with 
hinged lid, lock and handles. 

The above outfit, with Sun-Light Lamp (extra) $110.00 

OUTFIT No. 5. Price, $125.00, consisting of 

An Exhibitor's Stereopticon, with sliding front, 4^ inch Condensers, Achro- 
matic Double Combination Stereopticon Lenses for different distances,. 
Slide Carrier with Stop, Platina-tipped Jet for mixed gases, and the fol- 
lowing accessories : Ether Saturator No. 1, Tin Funnel, Oxygen Di- 
vider (T Tube), 30 x 40, best quality canvas-covered Rubber Gas-bag, 
Sheet Steel Retort, Retort Stand, Wash-bottle, Alcohol Lamp, one dozen 
Lime Cylinders, half dozen packages of chemicals for Oxygen, three lbs. 
best Ether, 20 feet Rubber Tubing for connections. Screen 15x15, pack- 
ing case, with hinged lid, lock and handle 

OUTFIT No. 6. Price, $125.00, 

Is made up of. the Chicago Model Sciopticon, with draw tube; one pair four and 
one-half inch Condensers, one Achromatic Double Combination Stere- 
opticon Lens for different distances. Slide Carrier with Stop, Platina- 
tipped Jet for mixing gases, and the following accessories : Ether Sat- 
urator No. 1, Tin Funnel, Oxygen Divider, (T Tube) one 30x40x20 
first quality canvas-covered Rubber Gas-bag, one Sheet Steel Retort, one 
Retort Stand, one Wash-bottle, one Alcohol Lamp, one dozen Lime Cyl- 
inders, one half-dozen packages of chemicals for Oxygen, 3 lbs. of ether, 
20 feet of Rubber Tubing for connections, one Screen 15 x 15, one Tel- 
escope Canvas Traveling Case. 

OUTFIT No. 7. Price, $145.00, consisting of 

Mcintosh Combination Stereopticon, with finest quality of Condensers, first- 
class Achromatic Stereopticon Lens for short and long distance. Slide 
Carrier and Stop, our new Mechanical Jet Platina-tipped; removable 
front, for Solar Work, and same accessories as in Outfit No. 5. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT No. 8. Price $200.00. 

One Chicago Model Stereopticon, with two pair four and one-half inch Con- 
densers, one pair matched Achromatic Objectives, one pair Platina- 
tipped Jets, one pair Slide Carriers, Stops, one Dissolver, one Saturator 
No. 2, one Tin Funnel, one TTube, one 30x40x20 best quality can- 
vas-covered Rubber Gas-bag, one Copper Retort, one Retort Stand, one 
Wash-bottle, one Alcohol Lamp, one dozen Lime Cylinders, one half- 
dozen packages of chemicals for oxygen, four pounds best Ether, 20 feet 
Rubber Tubing for connections, one Screen 20 x 20, one Telescoped 
Canvas Traveling Case. 



HCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 114 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT, No. 9. Price $220.00, consisting of 

One pair Exhibitor's Stereopticons complete, with Condensers, Achromatic 
Stereopticon Objectives, Platina-tipped Jets, one pair of Slide Carriers, 
with Stops, Dissolver, Saturator No. 2, Tin Funnel, T Tube, 30x40 
best quality canvas-covered Rubber Gas-bag, Copper Retort, Retort Stand, 
Wash-bottle, Alcohol Lamp, one dozen Lime Cylinders, half dozen 
packages of chemicals for Oxygen, 4 lbs. best Ether, 20 feet Rubber 
Tubing for connections, Screen 15 x 15, packing case with hinged lid« 
lock and handles, suitable for a stand when exhibiting. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT, No. 10. Price $250.00, includes a 

Mcintosh Bi-unial Stereopticon, with first quality Plano-convex Condensing 
Lenses, extra quality Achromatic Stereopticon Objectives, with rack 
work for focusing, Dissolver, one pair Slide Carriers and Stops, Mechan- 
ical Jets, Platina-tipped Saturator No. 2, and same accessories as io 
outfit No. 5. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT No. 11 Price $350.00. 

One Royal Photo-Opticon, with first quality triple Plano-convex Condensing 
Systems, extra quality Achromatic Stereopticon Objective, one Dissolver, 
one pair Slide Carriers, one pair Slide Stops, one pair Mechanical Jets, 
with mechanical lime movement, one Saturator No. 3, one Tin Funnel 
one T Tube, one 30x40x20 best quality tanvas-covered Rubber Gas- 
bag, one copper Retort, one Retort Stand, one Wash-bottle, one Alcohol 
Lamp, one dozen Lime Cylinders, one dozen packages of chemicals for 
Oxygen, 4 lbs. of Ether, 20 feet of Rubber Tubing, one Screen 20x20, 
one packing case with hinged lid, lock and handles. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT No. 12 consists of a 

Mcintosh Scenic Tri-Opticon, with 3 Plano-convex condensing Systems, 8 
extra quality Achromatic Stereopticon Objectives, One Dissolver, with 
which eitner one, two or three lanterns may be used at the same time, 
3 Slide Carriers, 3 Slide Stops, 3 Mechanical Jets, one Steel Cylinder for 
Oxygen, 12 inches in diameter by 48 inches long, one Steel Cylinder for 
Hydrogen, 12 inches in diameter by 48 inches long, both cylinders fur- 
nished with first-class Double Needle Valves, 10 feet Rubber Tubing for 
connections, one Screen 24x24, one Portable Extension Screen Frame, one 
Electric Signal and 4 dozen Limes, one packing case with hinged door, 
lock and handles. Price, $500.00. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT No. 13. 

The Tri-Opticon, with 3 Triple Plano-convex Condensing Systems, 3 first 
quality j^-size Darlot Objectives, 3 Slide Carriers. 3 "Slide Stops, 3 high- 
est grade Mechanical Jets, and one Triple High Pressure Dissolving 
Key, 2 fifty-foot Sheet Steel Cylinders for Oxygen and Hydrogen, 
mounted with Double Needle Valves, with Improved Cylinder Key,J15 ft. 
Rubber Tubing, one 30-foot Screen, one 20-foot Screen and one 10-foot 
Screen, one Electric Signal, one Reading Lamp and best Reading Stand, 
one Portable Extension Screen Frame for 30-foot screen, 75 colored 
wood-mounted Slides. 200 plain or uncolored Slides and 3 Chromatropes. 
Price, $675.00. 

DISSOLVING VIEW OUTFIT No. 14 comprises 

The Royal Chicago, the finest Triple Stereopticon manufactured in the world, 
with 3 Triple Plano-convex Condensing Systems, 3 matched first quality 
one-half size Achromatic Darlot Objectives, 3 "Wide Angle" Objec- 
tives, 3 Slide Carriers, 3 Slide Stops, 3 highest grade Mechanical Jets 
and the Triple High Pressure Dissolving Key with h. p. connections, 2 
60-foot Cylinders, sheet steel, with Double Needle Valves for Oxygen 
and Hydrogen, with Improved Cylinder Key, 15 feet Rubber Hose, 3 
Screens, one 10, one 20 and one 30 feet square, one Lectvvt^^'^^V^O^vvc 
Signal, one Lecturer's Reading Lamp and "b^^V ^^e^^^vti^ 'SiN.^'cAx ox^^ 
Portable Extension Screen Frame lor a ^Q-ioo\. '$>cxfe^xv, X'Sjf^ c^cix'^^ 
wood-mounted Slides, 250 uncolored, bem^ a swSvc\«v^\. t^xvkCo^ "^ ^"^"^ 
lectures. Price of complete outfit, as above en\3Lrcv€iTa\.ei^N ^'^^ -^^ 



115 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



THE PORTABLE LIME-LIGHT AND LANTERN. 

A point upon a piece of unslacked lime, brought to a daz- 
ling incandescence by the sharply driven jet of the oxy-hydrogen 
flame, has proved itself to be by far the most satisfactory light 
for lantern use. All oil lights are greatly deficient in illuminat- 
ing power, and the light is spread over so large a space th9.t the 
lenses cannot properly gather the rays together. 

To maintain a good lime-light, whatever be the sources of 
ga:s supply, an operator must have some native skill, a good deal 
of experience, and must give constant attention to his work. 
The drawbacks to the use of the lime-light are the time and 
cumbrous machinery needed to manufacture and store the gases; 
or if cylinders are used, the cost of the gases, the expense of 
transportation, and the liability of not having cylinders when 
needed at all times and in all sorts of places. For the hydro- 
carbon element, the vapor of gasoline has been used, as from an 
ordinary gasoline stove. Let any one study an ordinary gasoline 
stove and he will understand how the gas is obtafned from the 
liquid. There is a generating tube ^ of an inch in diameter 
and some five or six inches in height, which is so heated that at 
the top the temperature is above the boiling or gas-producing 
point of gasoline; while the base of the tube is kept below that 
point. From the top of the tube, therefore, gas can be drawn 
off in an ample and steady supplj^, the liquid rising to the more 
heated part and vaporizing as required. The needed pressure 
is obtained by pumping into a closed supply tank, by hand bulb, 
an air pressure which shall be always greater than can be used 
at the jet of the lime-light. The only limiting condition is, that 
the channel leading the gas to the mixing chamber must be 
kept heated above the boiling point of gasoline, and for this the 
apparatus amply provides. 

The oxygen gas is obtained from ordinary chlorate of potash, 
to which is added, as usual, a portion of binoxide of manganese, 
that oxygen gas may come off steadily and at a lower tempera- 
ture. The principle involved in this apparatus is the heating 
of small portions of the chemicals as the operator sees his need 
of gas. The gas as made is carried into a small equalizing or 
regulating bag, so that the supply is constant and is maintained 
At a steady pressure. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. i16 

In order that only a portion of the chemicals may be heated 
at once, the retort is made of poor heat-conducting material — 
tin; it is two inches in diameter and twenty-six inches in length. 
The oxygen regulating bag is constructed upon a new principle. 
It is a strong rubber-cloth bag, cylindrical in form, two feet in 
length and eleven inches in diameter when filled. It holds 
about ten minutes' supply of gas. 

The equalizing pressure is obtained by a dozen or more 
strong rubber bands, which close the bag and tend to keep it 
closed. As the bag fills and the outward pressure surface be- 
comes greater, the tension of the stretching rubber bands in- 
creases in about the same ratio. It is light, occupies when 
empty but small space, and is a great relief over anything 
operated by weights. In construction this gas-making appara- 
tus is so arranged that it becomes the framework of the lantern. 
When the focus is once adjusted it is never afterward disturbed, 
save to slide the lenses back and forth for the varying distances 
of the screen. The wash bottle and the bag can be packed in a- 
very small compass, and the entire outfit can easily be carried 
in one hand. The expense of operating, both in time and * 
money, is very small. The gasoline costs hardly more than one 
cent an evening, and takes no more time than it does to fill an 
ordinary oil lamp. The cost of the oxygen varies with the price 
of chemicals, some two pounds and a half being used. None 
is ever wasted. Ten minutes is all the time required from the 
unstrapping of the packing case to the lighting of the jet. The 
cleaning up and recharging can be done at any time, and will 
take fifteen or twenty minutes. The question of safety is one 
of prime importance for an instrument used in public halls and 
private parlors. The danger from gasoline is due to careless- 
ness in filling or in cleaning, the cocks not fully turned off. The 
use of the air pressure avoids both these causes of accidents. 
The tank is very strong and* air-tight, and holds only about 16 
ounces at the most. There is only a cubic inch or so of gas at 
any time, and absolutely no chance of an explosive mixture. In 
the oxygen manufacture the only point of activity at any one 
time is an inch in length of the two-inch tin retort. 

These, then, are the characteristics of the Portable Lime- 
Light apparatus. It is safer from serious accidents than any 
other form of the oxy-hydro-carbon jet yet devised. The mixing 
of the gases and the issuance from the tvippV^, ^T^<i \\\^ ^\.^^%XkX^ 





A. 




B. 


c. c. 


C. 


D. D. 


D. 


E. 


E. 




F. 



117 Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

— , 

obtained; differ in no essential from the results secured by the 
best apparatus now in use. It is economical both as to time 
and running expense. If packed up properly it is ready to be 
taken in the hand at any time and set up for use in any place 
without a moment's warning. 

Pump. 

Safety Valve. 
Rubbe* Bands. 
Rods. 

Gasoline Reservoir. 

Needle Valve on Gasoline Tank with Milled Head 
Thumb Screw. 
F. F. Needle Valve and Stopper on Gasoline Tank. (F. 
screws into F. F.) 
G. Gas Bag. 

H. Milled Head Thumb Screw for raising or lowering 
Optical System. 
I. Milled Head Thumb Screw for moving Optical Sys- 
tem from right to left and vice versa, 
J. Valve admitting Liquid Gasoline to Valve "a" of 

Generator Burner. 
K. Valve regulating supply of Gasoline to Jet. 
L. Valve regulating supply of Oxygen to Jet, 
M. Telescope Hood to Lantern Front. 
N. Thumb Screws for adjusting Legs., 
O. Objective. 

P. Brass Cell-holding Condensing Lenses. 
Q. Mixing Chamber of Jet. 
R. Retort. 
S. Milled Head Thumb Screw for holding Condensing 

Cell "P" in place. 
T. Nipple of Retort. 
U. Clamps of Retort. 

V. Nipple admitting Oxygen to Pipe from Wash Bot- 
tle "z." 
W. Wash Bottle. 

X. Ingress taWash Bottle from Retort. 
Y. Egress from Wash Bottle to Gas Bag Nipple, 

'*L. L." 
Z. Egress from Wash Bottle to "V," or Oxygen Nipple. 



121 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 

a. Valve letting Liquid Gasoline into Cup of Gasoline 

Burner. 

b. Cup of Generator Burner, to be filled with Liquid 

Gasoline by turning Valve "a," 

c. Generator Burner. 

d. Place for Retort. 

e. Plate on which the Telescope Hood moves forward 

or backward, and is fastened in position by 
Thumb Screw under Plate. 

f. Pipe through which Oxygen passes. 

g. Hood covering the Lime-Light. 

h. Milled Head Thumb Screw for moving Lime for- 
ward or backward; under the Hood not shown 
in cut is a Thumb Screw for raising or lowering 
the Lime, 
i. Pipe carrying Gasoline Vapor. 

k. Slide Box. 

1. Nipple on Gas Bag for connecting to Safety Valve 

1 1. Nipple on Gas Bag for connecting to Wash Bottle 

m. Pipe from Gasoline Tank to Valve **J" and Gene- 
rator Burner, 
n. Objective Rack and Pinion for fine adjustment, 

N. B. — In lettering these cuts both large and small letters 
have been used; be careful, in following the directions, that you 
do not confuse the "capitals** and "lower-case" letters. 



DIRECTIONS FOR MANAGING THE PORTABLE 

LIME-LIGHT AND LANTERN. 

1. Fill Gasoline Tank **E'* with 16 ounces high-grade p^as- 
oline, not less than 80° flash test. To fill **E," }ou unscrew 
V<p pM c«p»» screws into "F F'') entirely, and use a small funnel; 
16 ounces fills "E'* about three-quarters full. Replace "F F," 
screwing it down firmly, and if a little hard soap be smeared 
over the faces of the union, a perfectly gas-tight joint will be 
made. 

2. Loosen "F" and pump in a pressure with hand bulb pump 
•*A" by squeezing it firmly half a dozen times; then close "F." 

From time to time during the evening pump in a pressure. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 123 



3. Charge retort "R** with a single package of chemicals, 
each package containing 32 ounces of potassium chlorate and 8 
ounces manganese binoxide, thorougly mixed. 

4. Fill Wash Bottle ''W" through "X" with 4 ounces water 
in which one-half teaspoonful of caustic soda or potash, or com- 
mon "sal soda," has been dissolved. This alkali purifies the 
oxygen, takes up the chlorine and renders the oxygen sweet and 
almost pure enough to breathe. 

5. Connect *'T" to "X" with a short piece of ^-inch rubber 
hose. 

6. Connect '*Y" to "G" ''I 1" with a short piece of jy^-inch 
rubber hose. 

7. Connect **Z" to *'V" with a short piece of ^-inch rubber 
hose. 

8. Connect "P* to "B" with a short piece of ^-inch rubber 
hose. 

9. Open valves **J" and **a'* and allow "b," or generator 
cup, to be filled with liquid gasoline; then close "J'* and light 
at '*b." As soon as gasoline is burned out of "b" open "J" and 
light at *'c;'* this should now burn like an ordinary gasoline 
stove, and furnishes heat not only for generating oxygen, 
but also converts the liquid gasoline into gas, forcing it up 
through **i,'* where it is admitted to mixing chamber **Q" 
through valve "K." 

10. Place free end of retort in "d." 

11. Put a lime in lime-holder in '*G,*' about }i of an inch 
from nipple. 

12. As soon as oxygen is liberated freely (as will be indi- 
cated by the gas bubbling through **W,*' which can be plainly 
heard), open valve "K" a little and light; this admits gasoline 
gas, and this flame at first should be three or four inches long. 

13. Open wide valve "L;" this admits a full supply of 
oxygen. 

14. Now increase or diminish the supply of gasoline gas by 
valve **K" until the whitest light is obtained. If oxygen has 
been made too fast a hissing sound will be heard and both 
valves K and L must be manipulated back and forth until the 
whitest light is obtained without noise. 

15. In 'closing or shutting off at the end of the entertain- 
ment, shut valve "L" first, then valve "K." 



123 Mcintosh battery axb optical co.. Chicago, ill., r. & a. 



*^ CENTERING AND FOCUSING.*' 

For "centering" and '-focusing the light," read carefully page 
106 of catalogue. Bear in mind that the jet or light is 
fixed, and that you must move the entire condensing cell '"P" 
from right to left, or vice versa, by thumb screw "I,** and upward 
or downward by thumb <;crew "H," and forward or backward, 
and when the best result is obtained fasten in place by thumb 
screw "S/* To focus, move lens -'O" backward or forward until 
best result is obtained. 

CAUTIONS. 

Always wash out retort within a few hours after it has been 
used. Drain and thoroughly dry before using again. 

See that chemicals are free from pieces of paper or bits of 
wood or other impurities. 

Use fresh alkaline water each time in the wash bottle. 

In placing the retort "R'* over the generator burner, do not 
heat more than the first 1 >^ or 2 inches to start with, an^J do 
not push it along more than ^ inch at a time; be careful about 
this, for the great fault of the novice is to make gas too fast. The 
gas-bag, when fully distended, is 11 inches in diameter, but in 
actual practical use should be maintained at about 8 or 9 inches 
in diameter. Keep in mind that you do not depend on the gas- 
bag for pressure, but look on it as an equalizer and regulator, 
like the governor on an engine, which it really is, since the fires- 
sure comes from generation of the gases in confinement. If gas 
is made too rapidly it will hiss on escaping at the jet and make 
a poor light, and will also escape at safety valve "B," and make 
an unpleasant smell; so be careful not to push through the 
retort too fast. 

Retorts can be used from eight to twelve times, a safe aver- 
age of ten times if carefully handled; they should then be thrown 
away and new ones used. Three retorts are furnished with each 
outfit. The head of the first retort is durable and is not to be 
thrown away, and can be used with the new retorts. When 
clamping the head down on a new retort it is well to use a little 
common bar soap or white lead between the flat surfaces, this 
effectually preventing leaking. 

Mix chemicals thoroughly. In filling R see that chemicals 
are poured in evenly mixed, and that the larger crystals of 
potash do not accumulate in one place. 



Mcintosh battery and optical CO., Chicago, ill. v. s. a. 124 




THE DISSOLVING PORTABLE LIME- 
LIGHT AND LANTERN. 

The same grnera/ directions as given for the Single Portable 
Lime-Light and Lantern should govern the use of this lantern. 

In the use of this instrument both Lanterns are burned 
bright all the time and the dissolving effect is accomplished by 
the shutter in front of the objectives. There are six valves 
between the flame boxes of the ianterns, the upper on<* regulating 
r- the "off flow " of gasoline in upper lantern, the lower a/ie regu- 
lating the " off flow " of gasoline in lower lantern. 

The upper two valves marked O and G establish the equi 
librium of gases in the upper lantern, and the lower two marked 
O and G regulate Ihe supply to the lower lantern. 



126 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



ILLUSTRATIONS FOR PROJECTION. 



IT would be impossible to include within the limits of a cata- 
logue a complete list of all the slides prepared for projection 
by the various manufacturers. We append lists which illustrate 
most of the subjects to which this art is applied, and can furnish. 
in addition any special series offered by other houses, at their 
advertised price. 

Photographs from Nature are the most popular because 
they are always beautiful and absolutely correct representations 
of places and objects. These are usually prepared on glass 
plates averaging 3^ x 4 inches in size, protected by a thin glass 
cover and bound with black paper. 

Fine Colored Photographic Views. Those included ia 
our lists are made only by the best artists; they are carefully 
sealed, to protect the colors from the action of the atmosphere, 
and inclosed in wood frames 4x7 inches. We have not quoted 
the cheaper grades of colored views, which possess neither beauty" 
nor merit, but only those which are artistic and pleasing to a re- 
fined taste. 

Photographs of Engravings, Diagrams, and of Micro- 
scopic Objects can be furnished in greatest variety. They are 
mounted in the same style as the photographs from nature. 
Many diagrams can be made by the instructor by covering a suit- 
able plate of glass with a thin film of varnish, paraffine, starch 
or soap and drawing the design with a sharp pointed instrument, 
through the film. The light can pass through only those lines 
where the film is removed. 

Views of Statuary are each upon square glass slides 3^ x 4 
inches in size, with black background. 

Chromatropes are 3 in. in diameter, in frame 4 in« wide 
by 7 or 12 inches long. They produce the effect of the kaleid- 
oscope. The pictures are produced by brilliant designs painted, 
upon two circular g asses, and the glasses made to rotate in dif- 
ferent directions. An endless variety of changes in the pattern 
are caused by turning the wheel, sometimes slowly, then quickly,, 
backward and forward. 

Dissolving Views consist of plain or colored slides and re- 
quire two lanterns to produce the finest results. With these it 



is possible to change summer to winter, day to night, the exte- 
rior of a palace to an interior. The gliding of a boat, shadowy 
forms of spirits or the witches and goblins of the magician's caul- 
dron can be shown with startling effect. These views may also 
be varied by the use of tinters, or discs of colored glass, placed, 
over the stereopticon lens. 

Microscopic Projection. Objects intended for this purposaj 
are usually mounted upon glass slips i x3 inches in size, coverei 
by glass and sealed. Glass cells are used for liquids. Photo- 
Micrographs prepared similarly to lantern transparencies aroj 
\lso designed for lantern projection. 

Professors and teachers can have colored or plain pho- 
tographic copies made from their own designs — promptly, 
and in a superior manner. Designs should have sharp 
outlines, and be about twelve inches in diameter, done in 
India ink, free from colors, Any of the plain slides named 
in the following lists can be furnished, colored. 

All Lecture Readings are Extra and Not Included with 
Price of Sets. 

Descriptive Readings or " Lectures " of any series of slides 
not accompanied with a printed lecture, will be furnished by ua 
in manuscript at 40c per slide, or in typewriting at 60c per slide. 
The large public library of this city enables us to obtain any 
information or "data " published upon almost any subject. 

We find that people generally are very careless about puttini 
their name on packages that they mail or express to us. We 
therefore request that all parcels sent us be marked with th«' 
name and post-office address of the sender. 

In many instances several views of the same place will be 
found in different parts of the lists of slides, this means that 
while the subject is the same, that the views are taken from 
different positions or angles of vision and frequently by different 
artists. In ordering always give name of slide in full and ilt 
fiumher and page in the catalogue. 



127 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



LANTERN SLIDES 



-OR- 



TRANSPARENCIES 



■OF- 



Every Country on the Face of the Earth Where 

the Photographer Has Been Able 

to Use His Camera. 

Every Popular Subject Illustrated. Over One 

Hundred Thousand (100,000) Slides 

Constantly Carried in Stock. 

Customers are requested to read carefully the following italicised para- 
graphs: 

FIRST— While every Slide that we list can be furnished plain or 
colored^ yet only those listed and priced as colored are 
carried in stock colored ; all others are not carried in 
stock colored and will have to be colored after order is 
received. Such slides colored to order cannot be ex- 
changed, 

SECOND— There are two Lists of ''Lecture Sets of Slides'' —th^ 
''Foreign'' that cannot, and "The Domestic that can 

be broken. Those that cannot be broken are few in 
number, are imported, and usually the view wanted^ or 
one of similar character, can be found in the extensive 
" General List of Lantern Slides," 

The Foreign Sets are listed on Index page IV. 
•' Domestic •• •• III. 

PRICE OF LANTERN SLIDES. 

Plain or Uncolored each, $0.50 

Colored Round Wood Mounted " 1 .50 

Colored Square Wood Mounted •• 2.00 

Colored Square Tin Mounted '• 2.00 

Coloring Plain Slides, net " .75 

Tinters (Colored Glass) " .25 

Silhouettes " .25 

Comic Crayon Caricatures, plain " .50 

Comic Slip, Wood Mounted •' 1.00 

(We do not handle the cheap series oi Comic S\\^ ?)\\d^^.\ 

hmtc l^ver Slides ■. '' ^-^'^ 



MoINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO,, CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 108 

■^^— "^M— — W^^— — — ^ ■ I I ■ ■ ■ ■! ■ ■ ■ ■ .1 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■■■■ ■■!■ . I fc^— ■ ■ ■ W^W^I^^i^^M^—lrf 

Dissolving View Sets, Revolving Chromatropes, and all 
movable and mechanical slides have special prices, which will 
be given under their respective Lists. 

All Unmounted Slides are 3^x3J^or3J|^x4 inches in size; 
the latter being the French and Domestic size, the former the 
English size. The large majority of Wood-mounted Slides are 
4x7 inches. Wood mounts 4x7 can be furnished for plain 
slides. 

SPECIAL SLIDE WORK. 

We make a specialty of making Lantern Slides to order 
from any "copy*' with which we may be furnished at the follow- 
ing prices : 

One Plain Slide from Negative, net $0 . 50 

One Plain Slide from Photograph, Wood or Steel Engraving, Oil Paint- 
ing, Lithograph,' Page in Book, etc., etc. , njet 1 .00 

One Colored Round Wood Mounted, Sealed, to order, net 2.50 

One Colored Square Wood Mounted, Sealed, to order, net 3.00 

For Coloring One Plain Slide, net 76 

Slides made to order must be paid for at the time the order 
is given. No deviation will be made from this rule. 



In ordering Slides, always give: First, the edition of the 
Catalogue you order from; then the page, and then the number 
and name of Slide wanted. 

See page 9 for mailing rates. 

We deal, import, and manufacture lantern slides, our trade 
is considerable and we may be out of some of your order, there- 
fore we deem it policy when ordering slides to give a second 
choice or else authorize us to make a close substitution, with 
the privilege of exchange of such substituted slides providing 
same are returned within ten days from date of invoice. We can- 
not at all times furnish on demand all the slides we catalogue, but 
any and every slide that we might happen to be out of when you 
order we can furnish in a reasonable time as we either own or 
control each and every negative from which they are made. 



131 McISTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



GENERAL LIST OF SLIDES. 



Illinois — CMcag^o. 

Chicctgo Parks — Lincoln, 
Park. 

1 Sphinx at N. Entrance 

2 Lincoln Statue 

3 Indian Monument 

4 Flower Beds Walk 
6 Fountain 

6 Entrance to Lincoln 

Park 

7 Linne Monument 

8 Lily Pond and Sani- 

tarium 

9 Lake and Bridge 

10 Sea Lions 

11 Sea Lions 

12 The Seals 

13 Boat House 

14 Ottawa Monument 

L5 Boat House and Boats 
IB Polar Bears 

17 Elephant 

18 Floral Design Mound 

19 Bear Pit 

20 Animal House 

21 Grant Monument 

22 Lincoln Monument 

23 Schiller Monument 

24 Conservatory 

Garfield Park. 

1 Popping Corn 

2 Rustic Bridge 

3 Boat House and GaU | 

lery | 

4 Floral Design, Mound i 

5 Group at Lunch 

6 Group in Summer 

House 

7 Racing Stables 

8 Boat House 

9 Fountain 

10 Rustic Bridge 

11 Rustic Bridge and row- 

boat 

12 Conservatory 

13 Lake and Bridge 

14 Boat House and Boats 

15 Floral Design 



Jackson Park. 



to 



1 Bridge, Entrance 

Jackson Park 

2 Boat House 

3 Floral Design, Lion 

4 Lake and Boat House 
6 Pavilion 

6 Campus 

7 Jackson Park Beach, 

South from Pavilion 

Washington Park. 

1 Boatman in Flowers 

2 Floral Design, Sun-dial 

and Globe 

3 Floral Design, World 

4 Floral Designs 
fl Bridge 

6 Floral Design, Maltese 

Cross 

7 Floral Design, Elephant 

in Flowers 

8 Floral Design, Tulips 

9 Floral Design, Owl and 

I^reaiden tial Chair- 
Iloo y 



10 Club House 

11 Club House 

12 Lake 

13 Conservatory 

14 Pavilion 

Douglas Park, 

1 Feeding Geese 

2 Floral Design and Boat 

House 

3 Floral Design and Hot 

House 

4 Lake and Bridge 

5 Lake and Conservatory 

6 Rustic Bridge 

7 Summer House and 

Ducks 

8 Floral Design 

9 Ducks on Lake 

10 Near Mineral Spring 

11 Boat House and Lake 

12 Mound of Fire Ruins 

13 Floral Design, Mound 

14 Boat House and Boats 

15 Foot Path 

16 Boat House 

17 Ducks, sunning on 

banks of Lake 

Humboldt Park. 

1 "Meditation" 

2 Conservatory 

Jefferson Park. 

1 Stone Bridge 

2 Presbyterian Church 

Lake Front Park. 

1 Lake Front Park from 
North 

Union Park. 

1 Floral Design, Union 

Park 

2 Scene in Union Park 

3 Union Park Congrega- 

tional Church 

South Park. 

1 Main Entrance to South 
Park 

Street Views, Bridges, Har- 
bor, Shipping, Etc., Etc. 

1 Drexel Boulevard- 

Flower Mound 

2 Parade — laying corner 

stone for Masonic 
Temple 

3 Rosedale— first Foreign 

Steamer to come di- 
rect to Chicago 

4 Funeral Procession, 

Ogden and Polk sts. 

5 Entrance to Chicago 

River 

6 Drexel Boulevard at 

39th street 

7 Midway Plaisance 

8 Oakland Boulevard 

9 Lake Shore Drive 

10 Entrance to Chicago 

River — looking out 

11 Entrance to Chicago 

River, near State st. 

12 Enti-ance to Chicago 

River 

13 Old Crib 



14 Clark street Bridge 

15 State and Washington 

streets 

16 Dearborn avenue 

17 Jackson street Bridge 

18 State St. from Madison 

19 N. £. comer Wabash 

and Madison 

20 Michigan avenue 

21 Wabash avenue 

22 State street 

23 Dearborn street 

24 Clark street 

25 La Salle street 

26 Panorama of city 

27 Adams St. from State jst. 

28 State St. Bridge 

29 Randolph st. from La 

Salle St. 

30 Panorama of Harbor 

and N. Side 

31 Entrance to La Salle 

St. Tunnel 

32 Hook and LadderTruck 

Going to Fire 

33 Italian Woman Carry- 

Wood 

Prominent Buildings. 

1 Exterior Store— Mcln- 

tosh Battery and Opti- 
cal Co. 

2 Interior Store — Mcln- 

tosh Battery and Opti. 
cal Co. 

3 Schlesinger and May- 

er's Dry Goods House 

4 Fire Ruins— Siegel and 

Cooper's 
6 Montgomery, Ward & 
Co. 

6 C. H. Slack's Grocery 

Store 

7 Jas. H Walker's whole- 

sale Dry Goods House 

8 Marshall Field's whole- 

sale Dry Goods House 

9 Marshall Field's Retail 

Dry Goods House 

10 West End Stock Yards, 

looking northwest 

11 East End Stock Yards, 

looking north 

12 Main Entrance to Stock 

Yards 

13 Stock Yards, looking 

north 

14 View in Stock Yards 

15 Board of Trade 

16 Home Insurance Bldg. 

17 Royal Insurance Bldg. 

18 Times Building 

19 Rialto Building 

20 Caxton Building 

21 Manhattan Building 

22 Owings Building 

23 Tacoma Building 

24 Inter Ocean Building 

25 Pontiac Building 

26 Unity Building 

27 Herald Building 

28 Chamber of Commerce 

29 Masonic Temple 

30 Chicago Opera House 

Block 

31 Rand, McNally's Block 
'4^ Rookery Building 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PkCkE \7n 



Y AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILI... U.S. 



CIilCAgo 
S» Posti>lBi-o 
ja Cook CIoiiulv HoBpEtal 

37 Marine Hospital 

38 CenlralMnsIc Hall 

S9 WoBt CLicago Club 

to W. C. T. U. Toiupio 
-11 Weet DIvlBion V)gb 

Snhool 
tS College or Physicians 

anifSurgoons 
43 Anditarlnm Uutldlaa 

from W"— ■■ -~- 
U Aadltorli 



from Wabaab 
„ Aodltoi^ 

49 Audltai 

from Roof 



97 Sherman Rohm 
lis Urare Chiirirh 
99 Unitarian Chnrch 
BO ChiiruU of Epiuhsn, 
Bl Method Is I Oliurch, 

62 Geo. M. Pullman's reai- 

63 Fraukiin MaoVaag 

64 Jno. A. Loan's rei 

65 Potter Palmer'a rei 

06 Far well 'a residence 
67 U. A. Turner's rei 



SO Colnnibia Theatre 

81 New Art Institute 

8-1 Union Depot 

83 C. A N. w! Deimt 

M Rush Medical College 

B(j Lumber ExchSDie 
B7 MichiKanCBntrBrDciiot 
88 Veaetlao Bulldlne 
8S Tribune Bulliting 



arior 



WOWKxi-ositlonBldg. 
90 Old K.M>oa]tiun Build 



6 Tremont Uoiise 



S Bobl. Liupoln's n 
S S. W. AUorton'a i 

ArrlLBIahon Fcha 

realdeni'e 

1 P. U. Sullivan's i 

deuce 
73 Carlson Cottage 



77 UuV'kli 

7S HoolSY' 

79 SchJUer 



4 First Rair't Aruiorr 
9 Sew Ashlauil Block 
First Methodist Cli'rcli 

Ulock 
-7 Leland Hotel 
08 Harrison Street PoUiie 

Station 
99 Art Institute and Stu- 

100 Wiaconaiu Central [le- 

MliBeltaHtrma—Clitenga. 



I IceH 

:i Chli-ai 



1. Tmin 



WORLDS COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION LANTERN SLIDES, 



Arts lluUdl 

Looking Norl 

Uolounade (u 

« Panorama h'oi 



L. A. Blrjg,, 
g U.S.Govarn- 
lilg. (official) 



lllinol^ Bud other 
I God. 



BIdg. I 



jhinery Bldg. 
13 Sorth Canal Irom Ma. 
"ilneryHnll 



fi Sort* (mm M. A L. A 

eral Arts Bldg,, Chi 
cago day 



17 Panorauia of Woman's 
BUU., and State 
BIdgs., from root ol 
Liberal Arts Bldg. 

li PanoraiiiB Sarthwest 
from Koof of LJberal 
Arts Blilg. 

le Across Casoon and 
Wooded Island from 
Trnnaporlation BIdg. 

w Across the Lake from 
• ■• ■ ■ rta Bldg. 



ai Sorth Ir 
Ball 

i3 South tr 

U East Trc 



Admin 

as Admlnid 



S'Kle^trici'ly 
I Else trie icy 
e from Pier 



flldg. 
Bldg. 



Administration 
from East En 
lolllcial) 



■atlOQ Uldg^ 

-ation Bldg. 

■ation Bldg. 
Across the 

Agricultural 
rinistratlon Bldf. 



Bldg. 



Admlnistratioi 
Grand Entrance 
■ ■ - • - ation Btdgi 



BIdR 

BIdJi 

Wooded iBlaJkir 



[official) 

IgrlcuIturBl BnUdlns. 

i Agricultural BuildinW 
N. W. Romer BrM^ 
and Parlatyle 

3 Agricultural KuildltiKi 

4 A^i-i.-iiir 



Agrlci 



lira! Building, 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES Stt PP^Ct \'iT . 



133 :McINTOSH battery AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



51 Agricultural Buildiug, 
Interior, N. W. Sec- 
tion 

&2 Agricultural Building 
from Klect. Bldg. 

53 Agricultural Building 

and Grand Basin Chi- 
cago Day 

54 Agricultural Building, 

North Front 

55 Agricultural Building, 

Main Entrance and 
Dome 

56 Agricultural Building, 

Interior, N. E. Sec- 
tion 

57 Agricultural Building, 

Interior, S. E. from 
Gallerv 

58 Agricultural Building, 

Interior, N. W. from 
Gallery 
50 Agricultural Building, 
Interior, Main Aisle 
East. 

60 Agricultural Building, 

Interior, U. S. Ex- 
hibit 

Electricity Building:. 

61 Electricity Bldg. from 

N E 

62 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior 

63 Electricity Bldg. from 

across Gtand liasin 

64 Electricity Building, 

Front (official) 

65 Electricity Bldg. and 

Lagoon (official) 

66 Electricity Bldg., Gen- 

eral View, A No. 1 
(official) 

67 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior. Electric Col- 
umn Night Photo 

68 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior, General View 

69 Electricity Bldg. and 

M. & L. A. Bldg. 
across Lagoon 

70 Electricity Bldg. from 

Agricultural Bldg. 

71 Electricity Bldg. from 

roof of Liberal Arts 
Building 

72 Electricity Bldg. from 

across Grand Basin 

73 Electricity Bldg. from 

across South Basin 

74 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior N. from Gal- 
lery 

75 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior S. from Gal- 
lery 

76 Electricity Bldg., In- 

terior, Bell Tele- ' 
phone Exhibit 

Fine ArtH Building. 

77 Fine Arts Bldg. from 

Southeast 
JS Fine Arts Bldg., South 
Facade i 

79 Fine Arts Bldg, Look- i 

ing Northwest ' 

80 Fine Arts Bldg., Fac 

ing Lagoon (official) 

81 Fine Arts llldg., North 

Is^n trance ] 



82 Fine Arts Bldg., South 

Front 

83 Fine Arts Bldg., South 

Front and Reflections 

84 Fine Arts Bldg., Main 

Entrance 

85 Fine Arts Bldg., Main 

Entrance and Decor- 
ations 

86 Fine Arts Bldg., Main 

Entrance and Lions 

87 Fine Arts Bldg., Cary- 

88 Fine Arts Bldg., Italian 

Annex 

89 Fine Arts Bldg., Italian 

Annex Entrance 

Fisheries Building:. 

90 Fisheries Bldg., from 

S. W. 
or Fisheries Bldg., W. 
end, showing Hotel 
Fire in the distance 

92 Fisheries Bldg., from 

Wooded Island 

93 Fisheries Bldg., from 

S. E. (official) 

94 Fisheries Bldg., from 

S. W. (official) 

95 Fisheries Bldg., South 

Entrance (official) 

96 Fisheries Bldg., South 

Entrance Detail (of- 
ficial) 

97 Fisheries Bldg., South 

Entrance and Bridge 

98 Fisheries Bldg., Inter- 

ior Penn. Fish Ex- 
hibit 

99 Fisheries Bldg. and 

Marine Cate, from 
Woman's Building 

100 Fisheries Bldg., Main 

Bldg., South Front 

101 Fisheries Bldg., Main 

Bldg., South Front 
Close View 

102 Fisheries Bldg., Inter- 

ior General View 



Horticultural Building^. 

103 Horticultural Bldg., 

from S. E. 

104 Horticultural Bldg., 

I>ome from Wooded 
Island 

105 Horticultural Bldg., 

General View (of- 
ficial) 

106 Horticultural Bldg., 

Dome (official) 

107 Horticultural Bldg., 

East Entrance (of- 
ficial) 

108 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior (official) 
103 Horticultural Bldg., 
and Transportation 
Building (Official) 

110 Horticultural Bldg., 

Entrance to I'rystal 
Cave 

111 Horticultural Bldg., 

California Wine Ex- 
hibit 

112 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior of Dome 

113 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior of N. End 



114 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior of 8. End 

115 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior California 
Exhibit; Orange Lib- 
erty Bell 

116 Horticultural Bldg., 

Entrance, Lagoon 
and Illinois Building 
in the distance 

117 Horticultural Bldg., 

California Exhibit, 
Orange Monument 

118 Horticultural Bldg., 

Dome and Entrance 

119 Horticultural Bldg., 

Entrance, Extra 
Fine 

120 Horticultural Bldg., 

and Wooded Island 
from Roof of Mann- 
factiires and L. A. 
Building 

121 Horticultural Bldg.. 

Main Entrance and 
Beds of Cacti 

122 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior Penn. Ex- 
hibit of Cacti 

123 Horticultural Bldg., 

Interior N.Y. Exhibit 

124 Horticultural Bldg., 

Missouri Floricult- 
ural Exhibit 

125 Horticultural Bldg., 

Cacti Exhibit in 
Front of 

Machinery Buildinjg. 



General View 



Hng, 
(offi- 



126 Machinery Buildin 
Gen 

cial) 

127 Machinery Building, 

Interior (official) 
123 Machinery Building, 
Interior A 1 1 i s En- 
gine (official) 

129 Machinery Building, 

General View (offi- 
cial) 

130 Machinery Building, 

Another View (offi- 
cial) 
. 131 Machinery Building, 
East End (official) 

132 Machinery Building, 
Inter ioi* Looking S. K, 

133 Machinery Building, 

East Front 

134 Machinery Building, 

north Towers 

135 Machinery Building, 

Interior S. Section 

136 Machinery Building, 

Interior from Nortn 
Gallery 

137 Machinery Building, 

Main Entrance 

138 Machinery Building, 

From Roof of Manu- 
factures and Liberal 
Arts Building 

139 Machinery Building, 

from Across Gr^nd 
Basin 

140 Machinery Building, 

E. Front and S. 
Basin 

141 Machinery Building, 

North Front 

142 Machinery Buildings 

North Facade 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOES S€.€. PkCk^ \2.-|. 



HcINTOSH BATTERY ASD OPTICAL CO., CHlUAi 



14S JlMliinery 



iS M. £L. A. )llilK.,tliri 
Root. NlglitS'iew 



-.t M. A L. A. Bi 

Dome sC Nlnrhl 

ITSM. .* L. A.TBi 



I BBC 



*lfh] (C 



Lilding 
uilding, 



t. L. A. Ride.. Uen- 
-'•'■--TtorfRlal) 

Bldg., EoBt 



rionB[Uelnl 

177 M. A L. A. Bultdinp, 

[Sbirl»wJ{omUal) 
17S U. &, L. A. Butldlni 

[Weir] (oflloiBl) 
ITS'H. ft L, A. Bolldliig. 

Inlerior Dminraiimii. 

[CoxUoIBi 
180 M. & L. A. 



Int 



r Ha CO 



ISl U. A L. . 
Knd 

U2 M. ft L. 

BS m!' ft l"! 

IM U. & I^ A. Bldg., Good I 

General View (OJU- ' 

clal) 
IM M. * I.. A. BIdg., S. 

W. Corner foffloal) 
ue M. ft L. A. Bid?., West 

Entrance (afflctal) 
187 M. * L. A. Bldic., from 



ISl II, ft L. A. Biilldili) 

[Reidl(offlJial) 

isa M. Jt &. A. Brililint 

Interior Uecoration 

[Simmons] [official) 

193 M. ft L. A. Biiildinj 

r»HlDhorBl[oniRial1 
184 M. ft I.. ,4. Buildlnj 
' Interior IioitdibiIoi] 

[Melrheri] (ofllolal) 
:ia5 M, A L. a: Biiildini 
; Interior Hccoratlou 

I [McEwen] (olllciai) 

I 184 M. ft L. A. Boflding, 



MM. ft L. A. BIdg, ai 

Kiec trio Fountain 

11 M. ft L. A. BIdg.. W. 

Front and Fountair 

12 M. ftL. A. Bidg., Vi 



lertli 



ftL. ;\. 



. A- mdg., Fro- 
ig f rom Roof 



1S8 M. ft L. . 
189 51. ft" L. ' 



Belgium No. I (Dili, 
rial! 
lOM. ft L. A. Bnilding, 

ifeWom No. i " ■'" 
cial) 
11 M. ft L. A. Hiii 



lerlor GenararView 

7 M. A L. A. Bldu.. In- 

lerior Lookingliowti 
on Exlilbits Irom lop 

8 SI. ft'l. A. BWg. 



..on Loc • ■ 
9 SI . ft L 

LOl 

f, li«2, <0<lir.in1) 



tion Loo 
SI. ft L .. 
Interior i 
Octra, 1 

M. ft L. . 



LooliilngSoutli 



193 M. ft L. A. Bui 

^p^eror eraoii 

19a 51. A L. A. UulldlnK. 

Interior Exhibit ol 

Denmark and Ruistn 

, IS! M ft X. A. Building. 



mX. ft L. . 



173 H. ft L. A. BiiiidiUK. 



Interior Kxhibi 
I'lili, School or DC. 
sign lor LudieH 



10 M. ft L.A. Bunding, 

11 M. ft L. A. Bonding, 

Interior New Jeriua- 
lem Exhibit 
a M. ft L. A. Bulldlns, 



II M. ft E. A. ilolldlng. 

Exhibit, Tova 
- " - • ■. Building, 



Teleauope, Gift (4 

Ch Icago Univ era ity 

IS M. ft L. A. Building, 

Interior Gerniftn? 

Exhibit (DlUciHl] 
M. ft L. A, BHildl 



Inte 



Ex. 



hiLiifofflelnn 

M. ft L. A. liuildlng- 

Interior Iialy Ex- 
hlbit (Official) 

1 lU. ft i. A. Building, 

Inlerior Norway Ex- 
hihit (offlclBl) 

2 il. A L. A. Building, 

Interior IT. S. Bakbig 
F,u. Kxhibil (offlclaQ 

3 51. A L. A. BniHinK. 

Interior yuroiture 
Exhibit (olUcialJ 
iil. A L. A. Building, 
Interior Marsball 



France No. 1 (official) 

6)1. ft L. A. liuildlng. 

Interior Exhibit of 



Interior Kihibil of 
KmD<^i> So. & lofDoiaU 
. ft L. A. Building 



interior Exhibit of 

France No, 7 (oRlDlal) 

12 U. A L. A, Building, 

Exhibit, Toys 
3 M, ft L, A. Building, 

Interior American 

ExhlDit wool . 
)4 1t, A L. A. BullOlng, 

Interior American 

Exhibit, glove 
3 51. A L. A, Building, 



FOR PRICE LrST OF SLIDES SEt PfcOS. \'aT 



135 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



226 M. & L. A. Building, 

Interior American 
Exhibit.Tin Pail Flag 

227 M. & L. A. Building, 

Interior American 
Exhibit, Half Dollars 
Obelisk 

228 M. & L. A. Building, 

Interior American 
Soap Exhibit "Brook- 
lyn Bridge" 

229 M. & L. A. Building, 

Interior Mexico and 
Persia Exhibit 

Bflnes and Mining build- 
ing. 



2S0 
231 

232 

233 
234 

235 

236 

237 

238 

239 
210 



Mines and Mining 
Bldg., General View 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Interior Gen- 
eral Interior 

Mines and 'Mining 
Bldg., Interior Look- 
ing S. E. 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., West Front 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Interior South 
End 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Interior North 
End 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Interior Silver 
Statue Ada Rehan 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Montana Ex- 
hibit 

Mines and Mining 
Building Interior 
Aspen Colorado Lead 
and Silver Statue 

M ines and M in ing 
Building, Penn. Ex- 
hibit Coal Obelisk 

Mines and Mining 
Bldg., Canadian Ex- 
hibit 

Peristyle. 



241 



242 



Peristyle, Photo- 
graphed by Search 
Light Illumination, 
Good 

Peristyle, from Roof of 
M. & L. A. Bldg. 
243 Peristyle, Statue 
Republic, Music Hall 
etc., from Terrace 
looking S. 

Peristyle, East Side, 
showing "white 
caps" on Lake 

Peristyle, Perspective 
of East Side 

Peristyle, The Gen- 
eral View from S. W. 
(oincial) 

Peristyle, Facade (of- 
cial) 

Peristyle, and Statue 
of Republic 

Peristyle, Interior 

Peristyle and- Grand 
Basin from Adminis- 
tration Building 

251 Peristyle, Lake Front 

252 Peristyle, from Roof 

of M. & L. A. Bldg., A 
No. 1 



244 



245 
246 



247 

248 

249' 
250 



253 Peristyle, Looking 
through to the Grand 
Basin 



Transportation Build- 
ing. 

254 Transportation Bldg., 

East Entrance 

255 Transportation Build- 

ing, Golden Door 
and Dome Near View 

256 Transportation Build- 

ing, General View 
(official) 

257 Transportation Build- 

ing, East Entrance 
(official) 

258 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior North 
End 

259 Transportation Build- 

ing, North Front 

260 Transportation Build- 

ing, South Front 

261 Transportation Build- 

ing, East Entrance, 
from Lagoon 
i 262 Transportation Build- 
ing, Golden Door- 
way, from Across 
Lagoon 

263 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior Main 
Aisle, South 

264 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior Main 
Aisle, North 

265 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior Main 
Aisle South from 
Transept 

266 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior Main 
Aisle, from S. En- 
trance 

267 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior German 
Wrought Iron Gates 

268 Transportation Build- 

ing, Interior N. Y. 
Cent. Railroad Bldg. 

269 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior N. Y. Cent. 
Railroad Exhibit 

270 Transportation IHdg., 

Interior N. Y. Cent. 
Railroad Exhibit En- 
gines 

271 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior N. Y. Cent. 
Railroad Exhibit, 
old Engines and 
Coaches 

272 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior N. Y. Cent. 
Railroad, old Car 

273 Transportation Bldg., 

General View 

274 Transportation Bldg., 

Golden Door from S. 
E. 

275 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior, Model S. S. 
Campania 

276 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior, Big Steam 
Hammer 

277 Transportation Bldg., 

Interior, N e w t o n s 
First Application of 
Steam 



Woman's Building. 

278 Woman's Bldg., from 

S E 

279 Woman's Bldg. and 

Bridge A L 

280 Woman's Bldg., Best 

General View (offi- 
cial) 

281 Woman's Bldg., West 

F]n trance (om 'ial) 

282 Woman's Bldg., Log. 

ftia (official) 

283 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior North (official) 

284 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior South 

285 Woman's Bldg., East 

Front 

286 Woman's Bldg., from 

Across Lagoon 

287 Woman's Bldg., West 

Front 

288 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior French Section 

289 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior, East Side Main 
Court 

290 W^oman's Building 

Interior, Looking 
W. from Gallery. 

291 Woman's Blds^., Inte- 

rior, Center Rotunda 

292 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior, Making Butter 
Balls 

293 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior, N. Y. Library 
(official) 

294 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior ,CincinDati Room 
(official) 

295 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior, Cincinnati Room 
(official) 

296 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior, Kentucky Room 
(official) 

297 Woman's Bldg., Inte- 

rior French Section 
Room (official) 

Children's Building. 

298 Children's Bldg., Gen- 

eral View (official) 

299 Children's Bldg.,South 

Front 

300 Children's Bldg., Ex- 

terior 

301 Children's Bldg., In- 

terior "Creche" for 
Babies 

302 Children's Bldg., In- 

terior "Creche" for 
Children 

303 Children's Bldg., In- 

terior Broom Drill 
;^4 Children's Bldg:., In- 
terior Rope Drill 

305 Children's Bldg., In- 

terior Deaf Mute's 
Oral School 

Minor OfHcial Buildings. 

306 Forestry Build'g from 

Southeast 

307 Leather and Shoe 

Trades Build'g from 
Northwest 

308 Dairy Building, Gen- 

eral View 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u.s. a. ise 



809 Anthropological Build- 

ing, Interior Electro- 
cution Chair 

810 Bureau ot Public Com- 

fort 

311 Anthropological, I n. 

terior, Looking S.W. 

312 Anthropological, I n- 

terior General View 
Extinct Animals 

813 Anthropological, I n- 

terior Mammoth 

814 Anthropological, I n- 

terior. Looking N.W. 
^15 Anthropological, I n- 
terior. Looking 
North 

316 Choral Hall 

317 Casino and Statue Re- 

nublic 
^18 Mil sic Hall 
^19 La Rabida, Exterior 

(official) 

320 La Rabida, Cloister 

(official) 

321 La Rabida Convent, 

West Front, A No. 1 
■322 La Rabida Convent, 

Front 
^23 La Rabida Convent, 

Entrance and Colum. 

bus Anchor 
■324 La Rabida Convent, 

Interior, Corner of 

Patio 

325 La Rabida Convent, 

Interior, the Patio, 
A No. 1 

326 La Rabida Convent, 

Interior, Balcony of 
Patio 

327 La Rabida Convent, 

Interior, a Corridor 

328 Forestry Building, In- 

terior, Ohio Exhibit 

329 Leather and Shoe 

Building, Interior, 
Brazil Exhibit 

330 Leather and Shoe 

Building, Interior, 
Russia Exhibit 

U. S* Government Build- 
ings. 

331 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Exterior (official) 

332 U. S. Govt. Building, 

From Northwest 

333 U. S. Govt. Building, 

From Wooded Isle 

334 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior- Arctic Ex- 
pedition 

335 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, F^ast Sec- 
tion Smithsonian Ex- 
hibit 

336 U. S. Govt. Building, 

I n t e r i or, World's 
Postoffice Exhibit 

337 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, U. S. Coat 
of Arms 

338 U. S. Govt. Building 

and Woo<lcd Isle 
from Woman's Bldg. 

339 U. S. Govt. Building, 

from Roof of M. & L. 
A Building 
840 U. S. Govt. Building, 
from Transportation 
Building, A 1 



341 U. 8. Govt. Building, 

East Front 

342 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Front from Pier 

343 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Mortar in front of 

344 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, Big Tree 
Rotunda 

345 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, Exhibit of 
Fish Commissioners 

346 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, Smithson- 
ian Institute Exhibit 

347 U. S, Govt, Building, 

Interior, Depart- 
m e n t Agricultural 
Exhibit 

348 U. S. Govt. Building, 

Interior, Treas. Ag- 
ricultural Exhibit 

349 U. S. Govt. Building, 
I Interior, Army En- 
' gineers Exhibit 

, 350 U. S. Govt. Building, 
Interior, Ordnance 
Exhibit 



Foreign Government 
Buildings. 

351 Foreign Govt. Build 'g. 

Great Britain from 
Southeast 

352 France, Exhibit Coat 

of Arms, on ^ 

.353 Spain 
1 354 Cos la Rica, (iood 

355 New South Wales 

;i56 Germany, Entrance 

liol Ceylon (official) 

358 France, Interior Sa- 
loon (official) 

.•{59 Turkey (official) 

360 Germany, Exterior 

General (official) 

361 Japan, Dedicating 

same (official) 

362 Jai>an, "Hooden" (offi- 

cial) 

363 Japan, "Ilooden," De- 

tail (official) 

364 Norway (official) 

365 New South wales (offi- 

cial) 

366 Ceylon 
j 'Sin Canada 

368 Sweden 
I 369 Japan, "Hooden" 

370 Brazil 

371 Brazil, Lagoon, in 
front of 

372 Canada, Exterior Gen- 
eral 

373 Canada and Group 

•♦America" 

374 Ceylon, Entrance 

375 Great Britain, General 

View "Victoria 
House" 

376 France, Exterior 

377 France, Interior Foun- 

tain 

378 German and Fountain 

379 Gau tenia la 
;{80 Havti (official) 
'.iSl India 

:W2 India, Entrance 
I 383 Spain and Germany 

384 Sweden, from top of 
Fisheries 

.%5 17. S. Columbia 
I 386 Venezuela 



387 Great Britain, Group 

from Albert Memori- 
al 

388 British Guiana 



389 
390 

391 

392 

393 
394 
.395 
396 
397 

398 
399 

400 

401 

402 

403 

404 

405 

406 
407 
40S 
409 
410 

411 
412 

413 

414 

415 
416 
417 
418 

419 
420 

421 

422 
423 
424 



State Bullding^g. 

Arkansas ^official) 
Arizona, Oklahoma and 

New Mexico 
Arizona, Oklahoma and 

New Mexico (official) 
California, Exterior, 

General View (offi- 
cial) 
California, Exterior, 

Full View 
California, Exterior, 

Facad e 
California, Exterior, 

South End 
California, Exterior, 

Roof Garden 
California, Interior, 

Statute of Knight in 

Prunes 
California, Exterior, 

from Southeast 
California, Interior, 

Exhibits No. 1 (offi- 
cial) 
California, 

Exhibits 

cial) 
California, Interior, 

Exhibits No. 3 (offi- 



Interior, 
No. 2 (offi. 



cial) 
California, 

Exhibits 

cial) 
California, 

E X h i b i 



Interior, 
No. 4 (offi- 



I n terior, 

1 8 Poppy 

Room f official) 

California, Interior, 
Exhibits, Room in 
(official) 

California, Interior, 
Center View 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware (official) 

Florida, Front 

Florida, General (offi- 
cial) 

Idaho 

Idaho, General View 
(official) 

Illinois, Bridge and 
Lagoon from South- 
east 

Illinois, from Across 
Lagoon 

Illinois, Exterior, A 1 

Illinois, Reflected Fine 

Illinois, from Lagoon 

Illinois, Interior, Pic- 
ture of Model Farm 
in G rains and 
Grasses 

Illinois- Interior, Arti> 
flcial Brook (official) 

Illinois, Interior, 
Drawing Room (offi- 
cial) 

Illinois, I 
Drawing 
cial) 

Illinois, General V 
(official) 

Indiana, General View 
(official) 

Iowa, General View 



n t e r io r , 
Room (offi- 



iew 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SE.E. PkG^^ \^'t 



137 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 
X 



426 Iowa, Interior, State 

Capitol in Glass 
Filled with Seeds 

427 Kansas 

428 Kansas, Interior, Ex. 

hibit in Natural His- 
tory 

429 Kentucky (official) 

430 Kentucky 

431 Louisiana (official) 

432 Maine (official) 

433 Maryland 

434 Massachuse tt 8 (offi- 

cial) 
436 Massachuset ts. En- 
trance 

436 Massachusetts, from 

Southwest 

437 Minnesota 

438 Minnesota, Statue of 

Hiawatha 

439 Missouri 

440 Missouri (official) 

441 Montana 

442 Montana (official) 

443 Montana, Interior, An- 

imal Exhibit 

444 Nebraska 

446 New Hampshire, from 
Southeast 

446 New Jersey (official; 

447 New York, Front 

448 New York, Exterior 

Generat View (offi- 
cial) 

449 New Yoik, General 
460 New York, Interior, 

Entrance to Banquet 

Hall 
451 New York, Interior of 

Banquet Hall 
462 New York, Lion 

Statue at Entrance 

453 North Dakota 

454 Ohio, from South 

455 Ohio, General View 

456 Ohio and Bronze 

Statue in Front of 

457 I^ennsylvania 

468 Pennsylvania, Good 
G enera 1 View ( offi - 
cial) 

459 Pennsy 1 van ia, En- 

ti*ance 

460 Pennsy Ivan ia. In- 

terior, *• L i b e r t y 
Bell" 

461 Pennsylvania, Main 

Reception Room 

462 Rhode Island 

463 South Dakota 

464 Texas 

465 Texas General View 

(official) 

466 Utah, from Southwest 

467 Utah, Statue Brighara 

Young 

468 Vermont (official) 

469 Virginia (official) 

470 Virginia, '* Mo u n t 

Vernon," Washing- 
ton's Home, from 
Southeast 

471 Virginia, "Mount 

Vernon," Washing*- 
ton's Home, from 
Soi\th 

472 Washington, General 

Exterior View (offi- 
cial) 
478 Washington, Lagoon 
Front 
474 Washington, Exterior 



475 West Virginia 

476 Wisconsin 



477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 

485 

486 

487 
488 

; 489 

I 490 

j491 

I 492 

I 

:493 

' 494 

I 

495 
496 
497 
498 

499 
500 
1501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 

503 



Statuary. 

Group, Ri^ht Front, 
East, Ad ministration 
Building 

Group, Left Front, 
East, Administration 
Building 

Group, Right Front, 
North, Administra- 
tion Building 

Group, Left Front, 
North, Administra- 
tion Building 

Group, Right Front, 
South, Administra- 
tion Building 

Group, Left Front, 
South, Administra- 
tion Building 

Group, Right Front, 
West, Administi*a- 
tion Building 

Group, Left Front, 
West, Administra- 
tion Building 

Statue, Ben Franklin, 
Side 

Statue, "Bull," Court 
of Honor 

Statue, "Slave," Court 
of Honor 

Statue, "Indian," 
Front Transporta- 
tion Building 

Statue, "Elks," Grand 
Basin 

Statue, "Buflfalo," 
Grand Basin 

Statue, "Buffalo," S. 
Grand Basin 

Statue, "Moose," S. 
Grand Basin 

Statue, "Hiawatha," 
Minnesota Bldg. 

Statue, Front Ohio 
Building 

Statue of the Repub- 
lic 

Group on Agricultural 
Building (official) 

Group on Agricultural 
Building (official) 

Group "Airship," on 
N. Side Administra- 
tion Building 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bldg. (official) 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bldg. (official^ 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bldg. (official) 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bldg. inofficial) 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bldg. (official) 

Group on Administra- 
tion Bidg. (official) 

Group, "Harvest" 
[Waagenj (official) 

Group,*' Abundance" 
[Waagenj (official) 

Statue on Agricult- 
ural Bldg., (official) 

Group, North of Hor- 
ticultural Entrance 
(official) 

Group, South of Hor- 
ticultural Entrance 
(official) 



1510 

511 

512 

513 

514 

i 
515 

516 
517 

518 

519 

520 

521 

522 
523 

524 
525 

526 

527 

I 

i 

!628 
j 629 
!530 
' 531 
1533 

534 
635 
536 
537 
538 
539 

540 
541 

542 



543 
544 



Blind Man's Buff, 
Front Illinois Bldg. 
(official) 

Blind Man's Buff, Side 
Illinois Building (of- 
ficial) 

"Columbus" in En- 
trance to Transpor- 
tation Building 

Goddess of 



and 
of 



Seek," 
Illinois 



of Riders on 
" McM., 



\ 



"Pele," 

Fire 
"Hide 

Front 

Bldg. 
"Group 

Dolphins 

Fountain A 1. 
Statue at North En- 
trance Art Building 
Statue, Entrance 

France, Exhibit M. 

& L. A Bldg. 

Statue, Entrance to 
Electricity Bldg. 

Statue, "CaBsar," En- 
trance Art Palace 

Statue, Minerva, En- 
trance Art Palace 

Statue, Columbus, Ma- 
chinery Bldg. 

The "Cowboy" 

McMonnies Fountain 
Detail, "Female and 
Infants" 

Daniel Boone, front 
of Kentucky Bldg. 

" Transportation " on 
G olden Entrance 
Trans. Bldg. 

Group on North Arch, 
P ens t vie 

Ada R'ehan, Silver 
Statue, Montana Ex- 
hibit 

"Electricity"" on 

Trans. Building 
"Steam," on Transpor- 
tation Bldg. 
Statue, Entrance to 

Machinery Hall 
Statue on Music Hall 
Statue on Peristyle 
Statue of Columbus on 
Venezuela Bldg. (of- 
cial) 

Statue of Indian on 

Horse (official \ 
Group on Agricultural 

Bldg. (official) 
Group on Agricultural 

Bldg. (official) 
Group on Agricultural 

Bldg. (official) 
Group on Agricultural 

Bldg. (official) 
Group on Peristyle 

[French and Potter] 

(official) 
Group on Agricultural 

Bldg. (official) 
Group on Peristyle, 

Fragment of (offi- 
cial) 

Group on Peristyle, 
"Glorification of Dis- 
covery" [Pratt] (of- 
ficial) 

"Music" on Art Bldg. 
[Martini] (official) 

"Architecture" on Art 
Bldg. [Martini] (offi- 
cial) 



PRICE LIST OF SUDES S£.€. PkCkE \7n. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u.s. a. 



138 



546 "Painting" on Art 
Bldg. [Martini] (offi- 
cial) 

Midway Plaisance. 

546 "Cairo" Street (official) 

547 "Irish Village" (offi- 

cial) 

548 Turkish "Bazaar" (of- 

ficial) 

549 Group in the Wild 

East (official) 

550 "Old Vienna" (official) 

651 "Picturesque Group" 

(official) 

652 German Village En- 

trance (Official) 
553Ent ranee to "Old 

Vienna" (official) 
654 Ferris Wheel, General 

View (official) 

555 Persian Palace and 

Theater (official) 

556 Java Village Exterior 

557 "Kilauea" Oyclorama 

558 Donegal Castle Court- 

yard Irish Village 

559 Donegal Castle and 

Irish Village 
860 Ferris Wheel, Gen- 
eral View from top 
of, East 

661 Midway, East from 
, Wheel 

662 Midway, Northeast 

from Wheel 

663 Libby Glass Works 
{$64 Chinese Theater 

666 Blame V Castle 

566 Ice Kailway, Interior 

667 Entrance *to German 

Village 

668 Japanese Bazaar 

569 View Southeast from 

^^erris Wheel— Fine 
670 The ** Wheel" 
571 General View German 

Village 
672 Sedan Chair 

573 "Beauty" Show, Inter- 

national Dress and 
Costume Co. 

574 Algerian Theater 

575 Vienna "at the Cafe" 

576 Oriental Section 

577 Persian Theater 

578 Entrance to St. Peters 

579 Cairo Street, Arab 

Magician 

580 Cairo Street, Camels 

581 Cairo Street, Camel 

Ride 

582 Cairo Street, Donkey 

Ride No. 1 

583 Cairo Street, Donkey 

Ride No. 2 
284 Cairo Street, Egyp- i 
tian Camel 

585 Cairo Street, Decking 

Camel for Wedding 
Procession 

586 Cairo Street^ Outrun- 

ner for W edd ing 

Procession 
687 Cairo Street, Wedding 

Procession 
588 Soudanese 
580 Group of Orientals 
690 Ferris Wheel 
591 Ferris Wheel and 

Midway 



592 
593 

694 

;595 

596 

597 

598 

i599 

600 

601 

602 
I 603 

I 604 

605 

606 
607 
608 

609 

610 



611 
612 
613 

614 

615 
616 
617 
618 



619 
620 
621 

622 



623 



624 
625 
626 

627 



Ferris Wheel, Side 

View 
Ferris Wheel, Looking 

through Showing 

Axle 
Ferris Wheel, Looking 

through Below 
Ferris Wheel, Looking 

through Above 
Ferris Wheel, Looking 

throujch Showing 

Buildings 
Ferris Wheel, Looking 

through Showing 

Frame Work of Axle 
Ferris Wheel, Pano- 
rama from. Good 
Ferris Wheel, Pano- 
rama from 
Old Vienna, Street 

View 
Old Vienna, Living 

Statue 
Dahomey Village 
Bird's Eye View of 

Midway 
Up the Midway in 

"Sedan" Chairs 
Down the Midway in 

"Roller" Chairs 
Lapland Village 
Ostrich Farm 
Hagenbeck Animal 

Building 
New England Farm 

House 
Pompeii House 

Miscellaneous. 

Naval Exhibit 
Caravels from N. E. 
View North from Obe- 
lisk 
Ruins Yucatan from 

North 
Marine Cafe from S. 
Red River Cart 
Columbian Fountain 
McMonnies Fountain 
and Administration 
B 1 d g . by Search 
Light and Illumina* 
tion Showing Moon, 
A No. 1 
Electric Fountain at 
Night, Night Photo, 

Electric Fountain 
Photographed while 
playing at Night A 1 

Electric Fountain, Ad- 
ministration Build- 
ing and Mines and 
Mining from Wooded 
Isle 

Electric . Foun- 
tain, and D e- 
tail on Administra- 
tion Bldg. Illumi- 
nated by Search 
Light A 1 • 

Electric and McMon- 
nies Fountains and 
Perspective of North 
Lagoon 

The Nina 

The Pinta 

111. Cent. W. F. Train 
at Terminal Station 

South Loop, Intra- 
mural Elevated 
Electric Railway 



628 World's Fair Tally-Ho 

Coach and Six 

629 Old Liberty Bell 

630 N. Y. Central Engine 

"999" 

631 N. Y. Central Engine 

Dewitt Clinton, 1831 

632 West Side of Lagoon 

from Colonnade 
showing Obelisk 

633 Japanese Tea Garden 

634 Giatit Horse, Peri- 

style and Statue of 
the Republic 

635 Chicago Day, Souvenir 

Admission Ticket A 1 

636 Battleship "Illinois" 

from S. E. 

637 The Viking looking 

W^est 

638 Marine Cafe from S. 

E. 

639 Mammoth Cheese from 

Canada 

640 Alaska Totem Detail 

641 Movable Sidewalk (of- 

ficial) 

642 The Santa Maria (offi- 

cial) 

643 The Krupp Gun (offi- 

cial) 

644 Marine Cafe (official) 

645 The White Horse Inn 

(official) 

646 Lagoon and M. & L. A. 

Bldjf. (official) 

647 Looking West from 

Peristyle (official) 

648 Merchant Tailors 

Bldg. (official) 

649 Krupp Bldg. (offic)al) 

650 The Pinta (official) 

651 Cold Storage Fire (of. 

ficial) 

652 Camp ot West Point 

Cadets (official) 

653 The Viking (official) 

654 Lagoon East of Island 

(official) 

655 The Clifl" Dwellers (of- 

ficial) 

656 Lagoon, West of Island 

(official) 

657 Looking West on 

Grand Basin (official) 

658 Looking East on Grand 

Basin (official) 

659 Boone & Crockett Club 

House (official) 

660 In the Esquimaux Vil- 

lage (official) 

661 In tlie Esquimaux Vil- 

lage (official) 

662 In the Esquimaux Vil- 

lage (official) 

663 In the Esquimaux Vil- 

lage (official) 

664 Naval Exhibit, "Bow 

on" (official) 

665 Naval Exhibit, "Broad- 

side" (official) 

666 Japanese Tree, "Pin us 

Parviflora" (official) 

667 J a p anese Tree, 

"Thuega Obtusa" 
(official) 

668 Esquimaux Boy (offi- 

cial) 
069 Lagoon, Looking South 

(official) 
670 Lake, South of Art 

Building Looking 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. PkCkE. \*i1 



139 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill.,u. s. a. 



671 Lake, South of Art 
Building Looking 
West (official) 

673 Parade, Oct. H, 1892 
(official) 

673 Parade, Oct. 22, 1892, 

(official) 

674 Electric Launch on 

Lagoon (official) 

675 In the (^eylon Village 

(official) 

676 Japanese Tool House 

677 Japanese Pile Driver 

(official) 

678 Japanese Carpenters 

(official) 

679 Japanese Masons (offi- 

cial) 

680 In Mr. Lorado Taft's 

Studio (official) 

681 In Artists' Studio (offi- 

cial) 

682 In Artists' Studio (offl- 

cial) 

683 In Artists' Studio (offi- 

cial) 

684 "Communion" in Hol- 

land by Melchers 
(official) 

685 Aztec Uuins (official) 
,686 •♦ " " 

687 •• ** '• 

688 Opening E x e r c i ses, 

May 1, 1893 (official) 

689 Opening F^xerc i s e s, 

May 1, 1893 (official) 

690 Opening Exerc i s e s. 

May 1, 1893 (official) 

691 Opening Exerc i s e s , 

May 1, 1893 (official) 

692 Opening Exerc i s e s , 

Mav 1. 1893 (official) 

693 The Colutnbian Foun- 

tain (official) 

694 Dedication of Swedish 

Building, Mav 1, 1893 
(official) 

695 Interior Boone & 

Crockett Club (offi- 
cial) 

69G Old Liberty Bell (offi- 
cial) 

697 Wooded Island (offi- 

cial) 

698 Lagoon, West 

699 New England Clam- 

Bake Building 

700 Thelvru])pGun Bldg. 

701 Beach East of M. ."t L. 

A. Building, Boiling 
Surf 

702 The Illinois with 

Armor Plates Show- 
ing Shot Holes 

703 Cold Storage Fire, 

Looking Southeast 

704 Cold Storage Fire, the 

Hottest Fight 

705 Cold Storage Bldg. 

Before the Fire 
/Ofi Cold Storage Bldg. 
707 Cold Storage Fire, V. S. 

Marines on (iuard 
70S Cold Storage Fire, Im- 

mediately after Fall 

of Tower j 

709 Cold Storage Fire, En- i 

gines. Hook and Lad- 
der Cos., etc 

710 Cold Storage Fire, 

Looking Southwest 



711 Cold Storage Fire as 

it Appeared from the 
Lake 

712 Grand Basin and Ad- 

ministration Bldg. 

713 Electric McMonnies 

Fountain and Ma- 
chinery Hall 

714 A I a s k a Huts and 

Totems 
' 715 Grass Huts and Totems 

716 Columbian Guanis 

717 New Liberty Bell 

718 Grand Basni, Photo- 

fruph of Night II- 
umination. Extra 
Fine 

719 "Whaleback" Steamer 

at the Pier 

720 Statue Republic and 

Grand Arch of Peri- 
style, A 1 

721 Statue Kepublic and 

Grand Basin of Peri- 
style 

722 Statue Republic 

723 Court of Honor from 

Administration Bldg. 

724 Court of H<5nor and 

Bridge Across South 
Basin 

725 Colonnade 

726 Obelisk and Agricul- 

tural Building from 
Colonnade 

727 South Basin from Ma- 

chinery Building 

728 Columbus Obelisk and 

Colonnade from So. 
Basin 

729 Colonnade, End of 

South Basin 

730 South Basin from Elec- 

tricity Building 

731 View Acrc3s South 

Basin 

732 Across South Basin 

from Colonnade 

733 Base of Obelisk and 

Machinery Building 

734 Court of lionor from 

Machinery Building 

735 Court of Honor from 

J*eristyle 

736 South and North Basins 

from Colonnade 

737 North Canal from 

Grand Basin 

738 Court of Honor, Gen- 

eral View, Very Good 

739 Columbian Fountain 

and Machinery Bldg. 

740 Grand Hasin, Looking 

Toward Columbian 
Fountain 

741 Columbian Fountain 

from Electricity 
Building, Al 

742 E lee trie Fountain, 

Night Eft'ect 

743 Columbian Fountain 

and P^lectricity Bldg. 

744 Columbian Fo'untain 

and Mermaid 

745 Columbian Fountain 

Mermaid and Cupids 

746 "Illinois" Battle Ship 

Stern View 

747 White Star Building 

748 Pa. Ky. Bldg. and Cold 

Storage Bldg. 

749 Cafe de Marine 

750 Penn. Rv. Bldg. i 



751 
752 
753 

754 
755 

756 
757 
758 
759 

760 

761 
762 

7f» 
764 

765 

766 

767 

768 

769 

770 
771 



n2 



773 
774 

775 
776 

777 
778 
779 

780 

781 

782 

783 

784 
785 
786 

787 



Illinois Bldg. from La* 

goon 
Government and Fish- 



Fine 
Irom 



eries 
Brazilian and 

Arts Bldg. 

Fisheries 
"Puck" Building 
Foreign Bldgs. from 

Fisheries 
Esquimo Kyackers A 1 
Esquimo Kyackers A 1 
New Columoian Bell 
Visitors in "Roller 

Chairs" 
Visitors in Double 

Roller Chairs 
Visitor in Roller Chair 
Visitor in Roller Chair 

Different View 
Ambulance Service 
Steamer Landing Pas- 
sengers 
Logging Camp, Michi- 
gan Exhibit 
Logging, Largest Load 

of Logs 
Down the Lagoon from 

Woman's Bldg. 
Boatload of Egyptians 

on Lagoon 
Lagoon North from 

Transportation Bldg. 
Gondola on Lagoon 
Electric Launch on 

Lagoon, in front of 

Art Bldg. 
Spanish Caravels in 

South Basin 
Vikrng, Extra Fine 
War Canoe, Vancouver 

Indians 
Spanish Fishing Boats 
Stock Pavilion 
Alaska Totem Poles 
Alaska Village 
Ruins of Yucatan De- 
tail 
Ruins' of Yucatan, 

General View Good 
Cliff Dwellers Cave A 

1 
Feeding Ducks on the 

Lagoon 
Indian Tepees of Bark 
Iroquois Indian Huta 
Crowd on Chicago Day 
"Whaler," "Progress^' 

on South Basin 
Krupp Bldg., Interior 



Fire! 



788 Ruins of Peristyle, 

looking south from 
site of Music Hall 

789 Ruins of Peristyle, 

Statue of Republic 
and (irand Basin from- 
Lake 

790 Statue of Republic and 

Perspective of East 
Side of Mnfs. Bldg., 
looking North, Jan. 
9, '94. 

791 Ruins of Peristyle and 

Manfs. Bldg., looking 
N. W. 

792 Ruins of the Casino, 

looking East, Jan. 9, '94 

793 Ruins of Casino, eic.^ 

looking North 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical cc, Chicago, ill., u. s. a. i4o 



794 



r95 



Kuins of Casino and 
Peristyle, looking 
North 

Kuins of Casino, show- 
ing Statue of Repub- 
lic and Mnfs. Bldg. 
from S. E. 

796 Ruins in Entrance to 

French Section, 
Mnfs. Bldg 

797 Ruins of French Sec- 

tion in Mnfs. Bldg. 
from Fire Jan. 9, '94. 

798 Ruins of Peristvle, 

looking West from 
Pier, Official 

799 Ruins of Peristvle, 

looking East from 
Administration Bldg. 
Official 

Art at the World's Fair. 

From Photographs of 

Painting and Sculpture. 

Subjects taken from the 

Official Catalogue. 

United States. 

800 Christmas Bells, E. H. 

Blashfield 

801 Soap Bubbles, Eliza- 

beth Gardner 

802 Hailing the Ferry, D. 

R. Knig:ht 

803 A Dancing Lesson of 

our Grandmothers, 
T. E. Rosenthal 

804 On the Yacht Namouna, 

Venice, 1890, J. L. 
Stewart 

805 The Hunt Ball, J. L. 

Stewart 

806 An Innocent Victim, 

S. S. Thomas 

807 A Venetian Model, E. 

Vedder 

Loan Collection. 

Foreign Mastei'pieces 

Owned in the United 

States. 

808 A Reading from Homer, 

A. Alma-Tadema 

809 The Song of the Lark, 

Jules-Adolph Breton 

810 Colza-gatherers, Jules- 

Adolph Breton 

811 The Falconer, E. Fro- 

men tin 

812 L'Eminence Grise, J. 

L. Gerome 

813 The Pig Killers, J. F. 

Millet 

814 The Man with the Hoe, 

S. F. Millet 

815 The Spy, A. de Neu- 

ville 

Austria. 

816 Christ and the Women, 

A. I). Golz 

817 Smelling, Hans Makart 

818 Tasting, •• " 
.819 Seeing, •• ♦• 

820 Feeling, '• " 

821 Hearing, •• •• 

Canada. 

822 A Peasant Girl Drink. 

ing, C. Alexander 

France. 

823 Joan of Arc (Sculp- 

ture), 11. Chapu 

824 TheAgeof Iron(Sculp. 

ture), A. Lanson 



825 Spirit Guarding the 

Secret of the Tomb 
(Sculpture), Saint- 
Marceau x 

826 Return of the Grape 

Pickers, L. E. Adan 

827 Last Ray of the Sun, 

L. E. Adan 
823 Love's Captives, 
Ernest-Jean Aubert 

829 The King of the Forest, 

Rosa Bonheur 

830 The Overthrow, Rosa 

Bonheur 

831 The Women at the 

Tomb, W. A. Bau- 
guereau 

832 Our Lady of the 

Angels, W. A. Bau- 
guereiiu 

833 The Wasps' Nest, W. 

A. Baugiiereau 
&*U Young Girls Going to 

the Procession, J ules 

A. Breton 
ai5 Portrait of Mile. Dar- 

laud, A. Brouillet 
Sm Circe, L. Chalon 
Sti7 Youth, R. Collin 

838 On the Sea Coast, R. 

Collin 

839 Sea Birds and Wave, 

H. E. Delacroix 

840 The First Steps, A. B. 

Glaizo 

841 G a r d e n Party, J. 

842 The Birth of the Pearl, 

A. Maiguan 

843 Jeanne a' Arc Listen- 

ing to the V^oices, D. 
Maillart 

844 The Toilet, P. Mousset 

845 Yachting, Roger-Jour- 

dian 

846 Cu|)id and Psyche, 

Lionel Royer 

Germany. 

847 The Martyr's Daugh- 

ter, A. Baur 

848 Fishing in Norway, J. 

849 Cloister Kitchen, E. 

Grutzner 

850 Katherina Eraerich, G. 

Max 

851 The Holy Family, F. 

Roeber 

852 Psyche at Nature's 

Mirror, P. Thumann 

853 The Congress of Ber- 

lin, A. Von Werner 

Great Britain. 

&'>4 Music Piece, T. Arm- 
strong 

855 The New Whip, C. 

Burton Barber 

856 The Roll Call, Lady 

Butler 

857 The l*alm Offering, F. 

Goodall 

858 Rocked in the Cradle 

of the Deep, H. Ma- 
cuUum 

859 The Harvest Moon, G. 

11. Mason 

860 The Favored Swain, F. 

Morgjin 

861 Daniel, Briton Riviere 



863 Love and Life, G. F. 

Watts 

864 Love and Death, G. F. 

Watts 

865 Paolo and Franceska, 

G. F. Watts 

Holland. 

866 Love's Dream, W. J. 

Martens 

Norway. 

867 Valkyrie, P. N. Arbo 

Russia. 

868 The Bride's Attire, C. 

Makowsky 

869 Romeo and Juliet, C. 

Makowsky 

870 Christ in tlie House of 

Lazarus, H. Siem- 
radsky 

I Italy. 

I 871 Night (Relief), C. 
i Dausch 

872 Day (^Relief), C. Dausch 

873 Sappho, J. Spiridon 

874 Follette, J. Spiridon 

Portraits. 

875 Thomas W. Palmer » 

President World's 
Fair Commission 

876 W. P. Baker, Ex-Presi- 

dent of Directory 

877 H. N. H iginbotliam» 

President of Direc- 
tory 

878 George R. Davis, Di- 

rector-General 

879 John Dickinson, Secre- 

tary 

880 Lyman J. Gage, Chief 

of Grounds and 
Building Committee, 
and Chairman Fi- 
nance Committee 

881 T. B. Bryan, Vice 

President Executive 
Committee 
882Benj. Butterworth, 
Secretary and Solic- 
itor-General • 

883 D. H. Burham, Chief of 

Construction 

884 Joseph Hirst, Member 

of Executive and 
Classification Com- 
mittees 

885 Mai. Moses P. Handy, 

Cliief of Bureau of 
Publicity and Pro- 
motion 

886 Mrs. Potter Palmer, 

President Board 6t 
Lady Managers 

887 Miss Sophia Hayden, 

Architect Woman's 
Building 

888 C. D. Arnold, Official 

Photographer 

889 "Lotto''^ Portrait of 

Columbus 

890 "Moro" Portrait of 

Columbus 

891 "Gunther" Portrait of 

Columbus 

892 Duke of Veragua 

893 " •♦ 

894 Duchess of Veragua 
895 



8(i2 The Kmpty Saddle, S. 896 Duke of Veva^vvvsi ».vA 
E. WalW \ ^Q\i 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDE.S S£.€. PWM. \*in 



141 McINTOSIl BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



ii 



DISSOLVING EFFECT" WORLD'S FAIR SLIDES. 



No. J Two Slides, No. 

A, Ferris Wheel 
by Day, not Colored 
No. B, Ferris Wheel 
by Night, not 
Colored, but Photo- 
graphed at Night 
showing Electric 
Light Effect, the 
Wheel having been 
stopped, so that our 
Artist could have 
Sufficient Time for 
the Necessary Ex- 
posure. A No. I in 
every Particular 

Price for Set fl.00 

No. 2 Same as No 1, but 
Colored Unmounted. 
A Beautiful Dissolv- 
ing Effect 
Price for the Set $3.00 

No. 3 Three Slides, A, Ad- 
ministration Build- 
ing, Day 

B, Administration 
Building, Night 

C, Administration 
Bldg. Night Electric 
Light Effect, No. C, 
Photographed at 
Night 

No A and B, Colored 
Unmounted, No. C 
Plain 
Price per set ^S.W 

No. 4 Two Slides, A, lUi- 
no is Building and 
Lagoon by Day 



B, Illinois Bldg. by 
Night 

Illinois Bldg. Colored 
Unmoun tea $2.00 
No. 5 Two Slides, A, Horti- 
cultural Bldg., Dome 
Ileflected in Lagoon, 
Day View 

B; Hor ticu itural 
Bldg., Dome Re- 
fleeted in Lagoon, 
Night View 

Price per Set Col- 
ored Unmounted$2.50 

No. 6 Two Slides, No. A, 
E 1 e c t r i c Foun- 
tain, and Electriicty 
Bldg., Colored 

Mounted, Sealed 
Square 

No. B, Electric foun- 
tain, Effect Slide 
Price per set $4.00 

No. 7 Two Slides, A, Ad- 
ministration Bldg. 
Night Colored, 
Mounted 

B, Mechanical 
Search Light" Effect 
Slide 
Price Per Set $4.00 

No. 8 Three Slides, Manu- 
factures and Liberal 
Arts Bldg. and Court 
of Honor by Day 
Colored, mounted 
B, Same by Night 
with Illumination, 
Colored Mounted 



C, Search Light 
Effect Movable 
Price per Set $4.25 

No. 9 Four Slides, A, A 
Beautifully Colored 
Day View of the 
Grand Basin, or 
Lagoon with one of 
the Main Buildings 
B, A Dioramic Slide 
showing Three of the 
Beautiful Floats 
used on •♦Chicago 
Day" gliding over 
the Water 

C and D similar to A 
and B, only Three 
Different Floats, En- 
tire Set Colored, a 
Rack Work Dioramic 
Combination Price 
$2L00 

No. 10 Two Slides, Electric 
Launch passing Art 
Building, Colored 
and RacK work Pan- 
oramic Effects. 
Per Set $10.50 

No. 11 Gondola paesing on 
Lagoon, Two Slides, 
Colored and Rack 
work Pamoramic Ef- 
fect Per Set $10.50 

No. 12 Fireworks on La- 

goon. Two Slides 
olored, One Me- 
chanical Per Set $3.60 
No. 13 Baloon Assension. 
Two Slides 
, Per Set $6.50 



THE "SKETCH BOOK," 

Published by RAND. McNALLY & CO. 

Illustrating and describing the "World's Fair, "giving dimensions and cost 
of the various buildings, with valuable official statistics. 

The " General " and "State " buildings are in half-tone ene;raviDgs. 
Bound in Cloth, price, postpaid, 50 cents. 

jusT^ssuED. "A WEEK AT THE FAIR," 

WITH OVER 275 ENGRAVINGS. 

A comprehensive, reliable guide; illustrates buildings and exhibits, gives 
ground plans of main buildings and shows localities of all exhibits, and an in- 
dexed map showing position of every building on the grounds. Contains a 
number of descriptive articles by Exposition officials and eminent authorities; 
also, descriptions, explanations and criticisms of statuary, paintings and other 
decorations, by the sculptors and artists who executed them. Published by 

...RAND, . McNALLY . & . CO... 
Price, in flexible cloth, ........ $1.00 

' ' ' 'full seal grain leather, gilt edges, gold side stamp, round corners, 2 00 

POSTAGE PREPAID. 



WORLD'S FAIR SOUVENIR. 

CHICAGO. 1893. 

Being a complete and concise history of the principal World's Fairs, from 
the "Crystal Palace," London, 1851, to the World's Columbian Exposition in 
Chicago, 189S. Price, Postpaid, 50 cents. 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE P^G^E \21- 



MclNTOSU JJATTKRV AND Ol'TIf.'AL CO., I'HU.-.KiO. ILL., f , *?. A. US 
....f)F THE.... 

Wopld's Columbian Exposition. 

Published by RAND, McN ALLY & CO, 

\ small aod compact guide conUiDing concise descFipllons of the most 
prominent points of interest in ihe White City, 

Price in flexible Ciolh, postage prepaid. 50 cents. 



Cblo^u Fire Views. 

trora negatives takon 1: 



Street Views. 
1 Ltwking east trom Mar 

ke( sfreet 
% Market aC, looking can' 



B Looking nortb 

Court Bonae 
B Looking east 



e Looking 

Water Tower 

11 Korth SUle, from 

12 Cbicsgo Are., 



I M Qeneml View, Lintoln 

Park in Che atgtaaee 

!1 OhiMgo Aienne, look- 



r«rl«aklBS ^u 
1 (be Bortti SI 

t,V ITMuli Avei 
\ ing ireat 

ISW, Oomer Vsn H 



(roni Congresa Hall 
36 Looking ftoiitheastiram 

Randolph St. bridge 
HI Ituadolph Bt., louring 

3S Cor. Randoliihand Clark 

39 Dearborn Bt,, looking 

M LookiiiKnortheaBtfrom 



i6 Jlonroe at., froin Olai 

47 Cor. La. Salleand Was! 

tf I.B,fHlle, train Madlw 
19 Ailfliiis Bt., looking we 

61 Clttrk,"'&om Madiao 



m BookeeUer's Row 

fi7 Jai^kBODBl. 

Washington niid State 
se Michigan ATeone, loo^- 
iDg north 



a Robi. Collver'B i 
3 New England C 



5 Church of Holy Nanio. 



T Church oD Michigan 

8 Chiirc'li on cor. Wabash 

and Van Bnren 
B Church on Jankaon st, 
nrs Muira of PUbHe Build- 

1 Firat Saclonal Bank, 
WttBhington and State 

S Repiibllcan Lite Inaur. 
ance Fire- proof Bniia- 

S Intui'ior Republican 
Life Ins. Fire-uroof 
UniMIng 

t Main entraace to Ma- 
sonic Temple, Dear- 

fl Oroaby's Opera House. 



10 Court House andBeser- 

11 Honors Block and 

(iraad Paclflc 
13 West Entrance to 

Grand Pacific 
13 Treniont House 
U Sherman Honsa and 

is GcnoiTil 'View ol Art 

16 St. Jos 

17 Freigbr'iioua 

Cent. 11. Il- 
ls III. Cent, R, K, Depot 
IB Mlch-So. It- R. Depot 
SO O. S. E-Kuvess OIHce. 

cor. Clar^ and Lake 



d Knsh Bt 






lOfflce 



r. Filth a 



Hib- 



S2 Rush Jledical CoUflge 
as Arcade C:ourt 
at Gilliert, S|joni 

Bad W't 

M Wlioeler 4 Wllaon" 

2S Lyon It Healy 

"" "-1U Si-haacfeiSterenst 



ARcld 



uilding 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES Stt Pl^Ct \^T. 



lAH MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A- 



SS Off den House, New 
England Church and 
Robert CoUyer's 

Church. 

Miscellaneous. 

1 Wm. Kerfoot'8 Office, 

first building erected 
after the fire 

2 Court House Bell 

3 First Chicago Water 

Works after the fire 

4 Post Office Cat 

5 Soldiers in Camp, cor- 

ner Carpenter and 
Washington 

6 Mrs. O'Leary's Barn, 

where the fire started 

7 Mrs. O'Learv's House 

8 Mrs. O'Leary's Cow 

New York. 

yew York Citi/, 

1 U. S. Sub-Treasury 

Building 

2 Academy of Music 

3 Grand TTnion Hotel, 

4th Avenue 

4 Y. M. C. A. Building 

5 Academy of Design 

6 Curves on the Elevated 

H. H., near Battery 

7 Klovateil H. R. near the 

liattcrv 

8 Gi"tt«d (^entral Depot 

g Ferrv Boats, Pennsyl- 
Yania R. R.-North 
River 

10 East River Bridge 

11 East River Bridge, New 

York Tower 

12 Governor's Island, from 

South Ferry 

13 New York Harbor 

14 New York Bay, from 

Wall street 

15 South Street 
10 Battery Park 

17 Broadway 

18 Bi-oadway— from Post 

Office 

19 City Hall 

20 Union Square 

21 Lord & Taylor's Build- 

22 Printing House Square 

23 Fifth Avenue 

24 Central Park, Goat 

25 Central Park— Lake 

28 On the Mall— Central 
Park 

27 Terrace— Central Park 

28 Bridle Path— Central 

Park 

29 Grotto— Central Park 

30 The Lake— Central 

Park 

31 The Obelisk— Central 

Park 

32 Bridge— Central Park 

33 New Reservoir- Cen- 

tral l*ark 

34 Sylvan Vista— Central 

Park 

35 City Hall 

36 Stock p:xchange 

37 Wall Street Exchange 

38 I'ost Office 

30 Elevated Railroad, near 

the Battery 
40 JSn trance to 'the Tombs 
' Tombs I 



42 Florence Flats 

43 Residence of A. T. 

Stewart 

44 Residence of Cornelius 

Vanderbllt 

45 Residence of W. K. 

Vanderbilt 

46 Residence of W. H. 

Vanderbilt 

47 Fifth Avenue Hotel 

48 View up Fifth Avenue 
48 Elevated Railroad, 

Highest Point One 
Hundred and Six- 
teenth Street and 
Eighth Avenue (inst.) 

50 The Terrace, Cen. Park 

51 The Obelisk, Cen. Park 

52 Coney Island— Children 

Bathing 
63 Coney Island— Children 
Bathing near the Boat 
Landing 

54 Coney Island— The 

Ocean Pier 

55 Harbor — Queen's-Cup 

Race 

56 Galatea, Balloon Sails 

57 Harbor — Queen's-Cup 

Race, Sept. 7th : Gala- 
tea rounding Sandy 
Hook Light-Ship 

58 Queen's-Cup Race: 

Yacht Mayflower 
close hauled, going 
for Sandy Hook Light- 
Ship 
69 Hudson River— Beverly 
Robinson's Mansion 

60 Long Island — Tom 

Paine's Homestead 

61 Long Island — William 

CiulenBryant's Home 

62 Tarrytown— Sunnyside 

Home of Washington 
Irving 

63 Up the Hudson River, 

from Hotel Porch, 
West Point 

64 Hermit of the Tree 

65 Steamer Puritan, Grand 

Saloon 

66 Steamer Puritan, Small 

Saloon 

67 Fleet of the Yacht Club 

at Anchor Bay Ridge 

68 Annual Race New York 

Yacht Club, 1887— the 
start 

69 Misty Morning on Bay 

70 Sloop Yacht Titania 

71 Yacnt Atlantic 

72 Yachts Adelaide and 

Stranger 

73 A Cuban Steamer 

74 Franklin Square 

76 Brooklyn End of East 
River Bridge 

76 East River and Bridge 

77 East River Front from 

Bridge 

78 Train shed Grand Cen- 

tral Depot 

79 S. S. City of New York 

in Dock 

80 S. S. City of New York 

in Dock 

81 S. S. City of New York 

(Bow view) 

82 S.S.City of Paris inDock 

83 S. S. Egypt in Dock 

84 Brook I vn Bridge 

85 Broad Street (instant) 



86 Top of Brooklyn Bridge 

87 Wharves and Shipping 

Crowded with People, 
Naval Parade 

88 U. S. S. Dispatch Sur- 

rounded by Boats 

89 The Naval Parade 

rounding the Battery 

90 Inaugural Centennial, 

East River, Presi- 
dent's Landing 

91 Inaugural Centennial, 

the East River 

92 Inaugural Centennial, 

Landing the Cabinet 

93 Inaugural Centennial, 

Boats in East River 

94 Inaugural Centennial, 

East river filled with 
Boats 

95 Inaugural Centennial, 

Naval Parade on East 
River 

96 Inaugural Centennial, 

Naval parade on North 

River 
Inaugural Centennial, 

NavalParade on North 

River 
The City, from North 

River 
Under East River 

Bridge 
Coney Island from the 

Pier 
101 Coney Island, the 

Beach 
Coney Island,Grand Pa- 

vilion 
Governor's Island 
High Bridge and Orotoa 

Water Works 
Washington Bridge and 

Harlem River 
General Grant's Tomb, 

Riverside Park 
Liberty Statue and 

Bedloe Island 
Liberty Statue (close 

view) 
Liberty Statue (rear 

view; 
New York from Bedloe 

Island 
City Hall 
Post Office from Times 

Building 
The Tombs 
Curve in Elevated R.R. 

South Ferry, with 

Train 
Curve in Elevated R. R. 

South Ferry, Showing 

Steamship 
Panorama North Show- 
ing Broadway 
Panorama North Show- 
ing Broadway and 

Broad Street 
Field Building and 

North River 
Castle Garden and the 

Harbor 
South Ferry from the 

Bay T^^z 

Wharves and FerriesT 

East River 
The Bay and Governor's 

Island (moonlight) 

123 Brooklyn Bridge N. Y. 

end 

124 Tugging Canal Boats, 

East River 



97 



98 

99 

100 



102 

103 
101 

103 

103 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 
112 

113 
114 



115 



116 
117 



118 
119 
120 
121 
122 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE PkGiE \^1. 



)>H llATTEkV ASH OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., IT. e. A. lU 

OD Floalintf 164 V[ew at Myers' Boat- aW KpisPopal Church 
nek, Enftt Iloiiao, NortlieaiC Buy \ X6 Iloiise refen-ed to In 

— LokeGeorgu Cooper'a "Spy" 

a CftWwcll rni5 Lakai 

« Paradise liny and Hun- ' 'Me Maiu Building— Front 
' ' lids— Lake »>7 Muaeuni bdiT Labon- 



1(57 P 



Geon 



rpsqii. 



Bit 



New York State. 



Sleapy Ho Uow— Bridge 
xnd Pool 

(Front)— Sleepy ilol- 



north Luke George 

Waiinon Hiuer. 

las MocTlB Uaaor Houie, 

Vonkora 
IBB Chip liock Bench, 

170 Faliaades from U&et- 






inga 



LivinBatoi 



WB Main Building a 
aw The Observalory 



U Croctnet Groundi 
Weat PoirU. 

16 HeadquartBri ol C 

ni^ndlng Officer, IS. 



1 Ferry House, Cro- !16 The m 



IM Lower Fiilla— Walbioa 

139 Creat FoUs— Watklns I 
Glen ' 

UO Maniinoth Gorge— Wat. i 
klnaGlen 

HI Rainlww Falls— Wat. | 

14S Amph 



T^sCle! 



1 Cascade— Wat- 
Kins Glen 

Ul Bylran Rapids— Wat- 
kins Glen 

US Elfln Gorge— Watkins 

146 Sylvan Rapids— Wat- 

147 Cascailes, Glen Alpha— 

Watklns Glen 
14S A Matchless Scene- 



Glen 



Catkins 



F Island, 



ITS Old Uutch Church, Tar- 
spot n'kero Major 
Andre n'as captured. I 
Tarry lown 

ITS Sleepy Hollow 

1711 Sleepy HoUow Bridge I 



' 317 Paiwie e^ 

\ 2W The Cami . 

; aiS Oliservntory and Foit 



Trophy Garden 
Mexican Mortan 
(broDie), Trophy Gar*- 



Breakneck iu dlBlance 
I8S Cold Spring, (roni Con 

slitution^sland 
IM Across the HudsDi 

above Cold Spring 

atove c"ld Spring 
198 UndercilH". Morris Man 

slon. Cold Spriaa 
1*7 Unden-liir, near florrl 

Mansion. Cold Sprin 



latheHdduia from 



the Hudson from 
the Hudson trom 

ipec Battery (gem 

296 ]64nch Rodman 

Water Battery 
227 Lower Battery i 

Pontoon on tile Hud. 

^9 On the Banks ol I 

Hudson 
■aa West Point from Can 

53n The Cemetery 

Kll West Point from Ganl>| 

r Steamer,' 
H Hudson River, Ciana- 



194 LookiDi 

19a Crow's 

Peek I 

196 Op thi 



Georae 
m Fort ^1111 



.Ivlngslon 
Poughkeepsie 



George Hotel— Lake 
George 
IM View from the Fort 



1S9 Eastman Place, I'ough- 
300 Washington's Head- 1 



23S The Point and LJRfat- 
I house. West Po"— 

Albany. 

%n The Capitol 

aw stale Street 
' ^.18 Van Reuselaer Home 
, WO City Hall 

241 Schuyler Mansion 






il— Lake ! ■ 



I Slate 



A United States Uotet, I 
IS Congress Spring 



)rge ai3 Dutch Kelovmedt:hi 

FOR PRICE LrST OF SUDES Stt PP»Q.t \'».T ■ 



145 



MCINTOSH BATTEKV XSD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A.* 



Lake George. 

248 Boat Landing 

249 Steamboat Landing and 

Fort WUliam House 
from Caldwell's 

250 The Rnins of Fort 

George 

251 Ruins of Fort George 

252 Lover's Walk, Saga- 

more. Green Island 

253 Sagamore, Green Island 

254 Walter Price's Kesi. 

dence, Green Island 

255 Falls 

256 Green Island, front of 

Sagamore Hotel 

257 Green Island, Boat 

Landing 

258 Green Island 

209 Picturesque View of 
Green Island 

260 View of Fort George 

261 Toward Bolton from 

Green Island 

262 Fort William Henry 

and Steamer Landing 

263 View from Dr. Dowl- 

ing's 

264 Fort William Henrj 

Hotel. The Stage 

265 Fort William Henry 

Hotel 

266 Fort WiUiam Henry 

Hotel. Piazza 

267 Buins of Fort George 

above the Lake 

268 Residence and Lake 

Front at Dr. Dowl- 
ing's 

269 General View 

270 Lake George from Fort 

William Henry 

271 Fort William Henry 

from Steamboat 

Landing 
372 The Lake from Resi- 
dence of Dr. Dowling 

273 Steamboat Landing and 

Railroad Depot 

274 View at Caldwell 

275 Paradise Bay from the 

South 

276 Log Bay from Perch 

Island 

277 Log Bay from Huckle- 

berry Island 

278 View, East from 

Iluckleljerrv Island 

279 Sheiving.RocK Moun. 

tain, from Huckle- 
berry Island 

280 Black Mountain, from 

Mother Bunch Island 

281 Black Mountain, from 

Harl)or Island 

282 Paradise Bay and Black 

Mountain 

283 Waterfall, Warren sburg 

Road 

284 Lake George, South 

Knd, from Tea Island 

285 Lawn of the Sagamore 

Hotel 

286 Sholving-Kock Falls 

287 Head of Northwest Bay 

288 Along the Shore 

■ WatkinH Ginn. 

1 Kntraiicu to Watkms 

(jlen 

2 Glen Alpha 

8 ArtistH' Dream 
4 Matchless Scene 



5 Pluto Falls 

6 Cavern Cascade 

7 Whirlwind Gorge 

8 Rainbow Falls 

9 Suiral Gorge 

10 Ln trance 

11 Stillwater Gorge 

12 The Vista and Glen 

Gorge, with Bridge 
L3 Glen Cathedral 

14 Cascade at RainbowFalls 

15 Central Cascade 

IB Pool of the Nrmphs 
17 Cavern Casca'de 
W Cavern Cascade 

19 Cavern Cascade in the 

Goree 

20 Central Cascade 

21 Central Cascade (near 

view) 

22 Matchless Scene 

23 Artist's Dream 

24 Glen of the Pools 

25 Hi^h Bridge over Wat- 

kin's Glen 

Watkins. 

26 From Observatory 

27 01>servatory and 'Seneca 

Lake 

Waikins Glen— Winter. 

28 Ice Formation, Entrance 

29 Sentry Falls, Frozen 

30 Sentry Cascade, (near 

view) 

31 Cavern Cascade, Snow 

and Ice 

32 Frozen Cascade, Snow 

and Ice 

33 Photographing under 

Difficulties 

34 Fairy Cascade 

35 Looking Back from Cav- 

ern Cascade 

36 Gorge and Bridge at 

Glen Mountain House 

37 Frozen Fall, Ice and 

Snow 

38 Rainbow Falls, Frozen, 

Ice and Snow 

Havana Glen— Winter. 

1 Eagle Cliff FaUs, Fro- 

zen 

2 Ice Cavern under Eagle 

Cliff Falls 

Watkins in Winter. 

3 From Cemetery Hill 

4 Watkins and Seneca 

Lake, from Cemetery . 
Hill I 

6 Sleighing onMain Street 

6 Hector Falls, Frozen 

7 Hector Falls, Ice Pack 

Niagara Falls. 

1 Niagara Riverabove the 

Ra])i(ls 

2 Canada Falls from the 

Canadian side 

3 Canafla Falls from Goat . 

Island I 

4 American Falls from r 

Goat Island 
6 American Falls and Sus- i 

pension Bridge, from | 

Goat Island 
6 Both Falls, from Pros- ' 

pect Park , 



7 All the Falls from below 

Suspension Bridge 

8 Canada Falls from Goat 

Island 

9 Canada Falls from Can- 

ada side of Suspension 
Bridge 

10 Both Falls from Pros- 

pect Park 

11 American Falls from the 

Canada side, above 
the Observatorv 

12 Grand View of Canada 

Falls 

13 Niagara River and Sus- 

pension Bridge, from 
Canada Falls 

14 Whirlpool Rapids, look- 

ing up the river 
where Capt. Webb 
was drowned 

15 Whirlpool Rapids 

16 The.Maid of the Mist 

17 Whirlpool Rapids 

18 Both Falls from Ameri- 

can side 

19 American Falls from 

Goat Island 

20 Rapids looking up from 

Sister's Island 

21 CantUever Bridge from 

Canada side 

Niagara— Winter. 

22 American Falls, from 

Luna Island (instan- 
taneous) 

23 American Falls, from 

Luna Island (instan- 
taneous 

24 American Falls from 

below (instantaneous) 

25 Canon, from Whirl- 

pool Rapids (instanta. 
neous) 

26 American Falls from 

Goat Island 

27 Snow Scene on Luna Is- 

land 

28 Frozen Arch, Prospect 

Park 

29 Ice Mountain and Niag- 

ara Falls 

30 American Falls, from 

Canada side (instanta. 
neous) 

31 American Falls, from 

Luna Island (instan- 
taneous) 

32 American Falls, from 

Luna Island (instan- 
taneous) 

33 Horseshoe Falls, from 

Canada Side (instan- 
taneous) 

34 Horseshoe Falls, from 

below (instantaneous) 

35 The Rapids between 
. First and Second Sis- 
ter's Island (inst.) 

36 The Rapids, from Bath 

l8land(instantiineous) 

37 The Rapids on Canada 

side, from Claik's Is- 
land (instant) 

38 The Rapids above 

American Falls, from 
Goat Island (inst.) 

39 The Canada Shore. 

from Luna Island 

40 The Canada Falls, from 

River-Bank 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MCINTOSH BATTEUV ASD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., V. i 



«I Tha CftnliloTflr BriiJge 
BcroBB Niamra Kivtr 

VI Tha new lusi.eQSion 
Bridge, Iroui ProB|ioi:l 
Parlt I 



H Table Ravk, close vlaw 
Bl The Poet Office 
B Birmingham falls 

M Desil'a Oven 

SB Tha Flume 

X Entrance to AiieaTjla 

97 The FlitmD from Boat 

U Trenton VailB, looking 

59 Trenton Falls, Shernuin 

Falle 
CO Trenton Falls, from Ile- 
al Adlrondftcks, Paul 



Smiths 
SI AdlrDwIachs, I 

Sai^quct Ri¥< 
BS AdlnindAAkg, 

River Falls 
U Adirondai'kg. 

Saranac "Laka 
fia AdimudackB, Sween; 



K Tiiv- 






,erakili 



Tauglvirmotk. 
ea Rocks at Enfield Gl 
ea Tmi of TaugliBDti 



1 Fulls at Taaghann 

(InBt.) 
^ Falls at IlhBCA 



87 R 



from Parade Gro 



■t Erie 



Loriff Itlarui. 
98 Looking loSoafroui the 

UlghlUDd Light 
90 Hutiso of Edgar Allen 

Poe, [Raven's) 
IM Honae of tJaribaldi 
Ijake Cltamplalii. 
101 Steamer Landiog at 

Port Kent, (lnstr> 
l<& F.aie\- (Instttntaneoiial 
lOi Below Wealporl. (Inst.) 
101 Below Ebsox. (Inst.) 
103 Breakwater, Biirling- 

1 American Falls 

2 The Falls from SuBpen- 
■ n Bridge 

American Falls Iron- 
tioHl Island 
B Whirl|inol ItapldB Iron 

B Whirlpool Rapidi 



71! SnfleU Falls 
7S Enfield Glen, 
per Entranr 
7t Kevolutionary Musket 

7S Gorge below Tmighnn- 



N Batrance to E 

81 Enfleld Falls 

U Looking out of E 

es In the Gorge 
Taughannoi-k 



It American Itaplda from 
Goat Island Bridge 
; 12 American Falla from the 
' Canadian shore 

13 Harsesbue Falls from 



14 Americi 



.t labi 
ueral ^ 



Falls Iron 



_..BpenBion liridgu 
K UorBoahoe Falls from 

Goat Island 
17 SuspeuBion Bridge 
Id American Ranldaaliove, 

19 Bridge to Uont Island 



I Mt. 



3ulah- 



2 Bonnie Caatle and 

3 Alexandria Bay— Thou. 

4 Fishing Party Fort 



6 Fishing Parly— St. Ami 



1-2 Lister's Light-l 

14 Sailing Ynehi 

15 picnic Party 

U> Fisher's Landing 



IB CamulngOnt 

50 Summefland 

51 Pythian Point 



Works before 
Flcffld 
3 Sang Hollow 



S Wreck of Gondola Cart, 

B. & O. B. B. 
B View of Jam at PonnBc' 



I 



raVvltw"^ 



bria Olty 
15 Wreck of houses o 
Line of B. tt O. K. I 

IB wl'ecfc o" Houses on I 

* y. K. R. 
17 On Hiony Creel:, aboi 

Johnstown 
bj Wreck in Upper Johns 



.. ._ _. ..._ Valley^l 

21 Wrei'k nf Busineul 

Houses, 4th Ward , 
24 Preserved Flgtira ol'' 

the Virgin, St. Mary'* 

Church 
93 Wrecknuddebrlsal 

Company's Storoa 
34 Jamo/ilebrient F.l 

Bridge fdatalla) 
JS W«GCk of the Oambiia } 

Go's Works 



FOB PRICE LIST Of SLIDES SEE PAGE 127- 



147 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



28 Headquarters G. A. B. 

relief corps 

29 West End Main St., 

showing Merchants' 
Hotel 

30 Effects of Flood in 

Stony Creek Valley 
81 P. B. R. Bridge, Cam- 

bria Iron Works and 

Wreck 
32 Looking up Conemaugh 

Valley from Locust 

St. 

83 P. K. R. Bridge. Hunt- 
ing for Bodies 

34 Looking over Cambria 
Iron Works, showing 
Bodies 

85 Conemaugh River from 
Temjwrary Bridge 

36 West End of Johns- 
town, showing the 
Morgue 

87 Main St., from Franklin 
St., Wreckage 40 feet 
High 

38 Looking up Jackson 
St. from Main, R. C. 
Church 

89 From Washington and 
Franklin Streets 

40 Across Bedford Street, 

Effects of Back Water 

41 Hunting Bodies, corner 

Washington and Clin- 
ton Streets 

42 Remains of the Cambria 

Iron Works 

43 Relief Station. Johns. 

town Station, P. R. R. 

44 Main and Bedford Sts., 

Site of Hurlbut House 

45 Acres of Wreckage from 

P. R. R. Bridge. Hunt- 
ing for Bodies 

46 P. R. R. Bridge, Cam- 

bria Iron Works and 
Wreckage 

47 Conemaugh River and 

Cambria Iron Works 

48 Looking over Wreckage 

Toward Johnstown 
from P. R. R. Bridge 

49 Heart of the City 

50 Main St. and City Park 

51 Main and Franklin Sts., 

showing Opera House 
and only Truck Team 
Saved 

52 Wreck of the Cambria 

Iron Works 

53 Main and Franklin sts 

54 Panorama from Cone- 

maugh River 

55 Panorama from Stony 

Creek 

56 Clinton above Main st. ; 

the Post Office 

57 From the West Bank of 

the Conemaugh 

58 A Ruined Home 

60 East End of Cambria 
Iron Works 

60 East End of Cambria 

Iron Works 

61 Schoolhouse, Morgue 

and Wreckage 

62 Catholic Church and 

site of Hurlbut House 

63 Up Conemaugh from 

Main and Clinton sts. 

64 Panorama of Grubtown 

after the Flood 



65 Main St., looking down 

on Wreckage 

66 Harper's Ferry, Va., af- 

ter the Flood 

67 Columbia, Pa., during 

the Flood 

68 Looking east from 

School Morgue 

69 P. R. R. Bridge and 

Great Drift 

70 From West Bank on 

the Conemaugh 

71 Looking Southwest 

from Main and Clinton 

72 Cambria Co.'s Store and 

P. R. R. Station 

73 Looking down Stony 

Creek from Pontoon 
Bridge 

74 Looking up Stony Creek 

from Pontoon Bridge 

75 Pontoon Bridge across 

Stony Creek 

76 Wreckage from back 

water. Ist Ward 

77 Looking into Kernville 

from Stony Creek 

78 Gen. Campbell's resi- 

dence, 80 Persons 
Saved 

79 Burnt District. 1st 

Ward 

80 Walnut near Main st. 

81 Walnut near Main st. 

82 Rear of Walnut and 

Main streets 

83 View of wreck on Main 

and Walnut streets 

84 Residence of Col. Lin- 

ton 

85 Main st., east from Vine 

86 Gen'l Hasting's Head- 

quarters 

87 Mulville Morgue 

88 Millville Morgue, bring- 

ing in a body 

89 Clearing away the 

Great Drift 

90 Bridge St., clearing 

Great Drift 

Pennsylvania. 

Philadelphia. 

1 American Academy of 

Music 

2 Catholic Cathedral 

3 Beth-Eden Baptist 

Church 

4 Bellevue Hotel 

5 New Public Buildings, 

South Front 

6 New Public Buildings, 

West Front 

7 New Public Buildings, 

North Front 

8 New Public Buildings, 

(from A r chitect's 
Drawings) 

9 Old Girard Bank 

10 Old Stock Exchange 

11 U. S. Mint 

12 Masonic Temple 

13 Broad Street Station— 

Pensylvania R. R. 

14 Pennsylvania Academy 

of the Fine Arts 

15 Philadelphia Trust and 

Safe Deposit Co 

16 Union League Building 

17 Post-Office and Be- 

cord Building 

18 Ledger Building 



19 Office of Pennsylvania 

R. R. Co. 

20 First Unitarian Church 

21 Girls' Normal School 

22 Franklin Institute 

23 Ridgeway Library 

24 Philisuielphia Library 

25 Swedenborgiflbi Church 

26 Jewish Synagogue 

27 Girard College 

28 Girard College Facade 

29 Girard College Dormi- 

tories and Cnapel 

30 Girard College and 

Grounds 

31 Chestnut Street Bridge 

over the Schuylkill 
River 

32 SchuylkiU River South 

from Chestnut Street 

33 University of Pennsyl- 

vania 

34 The Eastern Peniten- 

tiary 

35 Market Street Ferries — 

Delaware River Front 

36 Chestnut Street From 

Record Building 

37 Panorama of Philadel- 

Shia from Public 
luildings. East 

38 Panorama of Philadel- 

f)hia South from Pub- 
ic Buildings 

39 Chestnut Street East 

from Broad Street 

40 Broad Street South from 

Public Buildings 

41 Market Street East ' 

from Public Buildings 

42 Wanamaker's from 

Public Buildings 

43 Rear View of Indepen- 

dence Hall 

44 Statue of Washmgton, 

Front Independence 
HaU 

45 Custom House 

46 Chestnut Street, West 

47 Panorama of City from 

Lemon Hill 

Old Philadelphia, 

48 Swedish Houses, Queen 

Street, below Front 

49 Front and Dock Streets 

50 Water Street, near 

Spruce 

51 Dutch Reformed 

Church, Fourth and 
Cherry Streets 

52 Front Street, above 

RfliCe 

53 Philadelphia Dispen- 

sary, Fifth St. below 
Chestnut 

54 Old House, 757 Swanson 

Street 
65 Residence of Dr. Physic 

56 Water Street, above 

Race ; Office of Stephen 
Girard 

57 Queen Street, above 

Second 

58 Front Street, above 

Christian 

59 Race Street Wharf 

60 St. Peter's Church, 

Fourth and Pine 
Streets 

61 St. Peter's Church, 

Fourth and Pine 
Streets (rear) 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MrlNTOSH RATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., V. S 
89 Water Street, below IDS Aitletiu Vaae US Borticuituna 



eats ' I 
1. above 

' Street, belon- ! 



BB House, 733 Water Stp 
10 Water and Christ 

Streets 
T] WatemndDockBtre 



79 Front and Lonibanl 

Streets 
TB Old bailee, Ut Dock 

77 Old Haiiae, Main Street, 

TS Chew's House, German- 

7S The Old Academ)', Ger- 

80 Old House, Main St.. 

German town 
Bl Concord School, Ger. 

maaWwn 
^81 Fbher House, Geruian- 

83 JohBBDD House, Ger- 



11 Solitude, nea 

Briar UanaiL.. 
H Walk near Sweet Briar : 
13 Old Glrard 

Bridge 

A Walk T»oB 

It Reservoir 



1 the Fair. 



U Cbeitnnt Street Thea- 
tre, 195S, Chestnut 
Street, above Siath 

U Model-Room, Academy 



ofFI 






S Sedgolf 






130 The Si 



le Rive 
111 Houiancic Falls ac i 
Bridge on the Wis 

lis Old Rittenhonae Mi 
giou on Iha Wis 
bickon 

119 Fountain in East Pa 

120 Conservatory (Planl 

Mrs. Sett a 

121 The WoUGroim 
Taa Thorp's Lane Bridge 
123 Entrance to Mt. V 

134 MemiriaTHali^ 
12fl VaUey Green 

126 " Brill 

127 Falls Bridge 

12S Wieaahickon, looltl 

down from Stn 
Bridpe 

I3B Wissabickon, looki 



iken Gardens 
ft CAunA. 



IBO Manch Chunk, from Mt 

Bearldountaia 
General View, showing 
Mt. PlBgnli 

View on ttie Lehigh 

I IBt GeneiTil V " 



SB City Hall 

roots, ma 
at City Hall lull view 

^blrmmint Par/i 
SS Fenn Mansion, Lans- 
80 Zoological Garden. Gi- 

eo F^nnonnt Water W'ks 
»I 

Sneral view 
lylkill Navy (rom 
West bank 
» Down the SchuylkiU 

from West bank 
U Phihideiphta (ram Cal- 

lowhllfst. Bridge 
» On the Wissahlckon. 
•S A choice view from Che 

ST The tfiasaht^kon Sl-ive 
98 Tbe Stone Biidt'e from 

OS The Stone Bridge from 
, Wissahlckon 

f 100 Valley Greeu 
L 101 TallayGreen.nearrie- 
I KB Wissablckon (winter) 
t m Initian Rock, Wisei 

H Manayunk from the 

» The Rlier Drive at 
"Falls" 
_n Fenn Hanainn. interior 
' I(l7Falrmi)iiii[WiiterW*ka 



131 Eorticultaial Hall, ti 

the Park 

132 Eqnestrian Statue o 

Geneml Meade 

133 EquestrlaQ Statue o 

Gen. Meade (Proflle) 
13+ On the Wiisahickon 

135 Morton McMichael Me 

136 StaCne of Morton Mo 
Michael 
incoln Monument 



Lehigh .Valley 






Lehigh 



, East Uauch 
aLebighVallejf 



LHierty 



RellBTioua 
Religious 
Hall, 
IW HorticiiUural Hall, i 
Hi Horttcnltnral HaU, 



140 HDrtirnltunil Hall, 
IM Horcicn'ltural 



170 Vievr from 3 

171 Mount JeVer's 

172 BnriilDg Mine 



luch Chunk a 
•iegab 

okfng South 

Prospect Rock 

TheNf ■ ■ 

181 The 

Prospect 



ivitchiiack 
1 Mansion Bouse, 
ling Mines-Sn-ltcli- 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



]i» McIXTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



IM> Bear Mountain 

^m Noant Pisgah Plane 

3M Wrom Mansion House, 
North 

3fS View from Mountain 
Road 
View from the Narrows 
3fanch Chunk and Pros- 
pect Rock, North 

915 View from Prospect 
Rock, North 

nn Court House and Amer. 
ican Hotel 

JW Llntz Trout Ponds 

29^ Packer's Comer 

999 Station of Lehigh Yal. 
ley Railroad 

no Susquehanna Street 

211 Coal-Chutes — Loading 

Boats 

212 Coal-Chutes 

213 First Glimpse of Mauch 

Chunk 
2U General View 

215 Broadway West from 

Conrt-House 

216 3Iauch Chunk and Mt. 

Pisgah 

217 View of Mt. Pisgah 
21S View from the Railroad 

219 Mauch Chunk Falls 

220 View from East Mauch 

Chunk 

221 Railroad Bridge, Mauch 

Chunk 

222 Flag-Staff 

223 Mansion House from 

Bear Mt. 
22iKit tanning Gorge, 
above Mauch Chunk 

225 Terrace Falls— Glen 

Onoko 

226 Onoko Falls,Glen Onoko 

227 Cave-Falls, Glen Onoko 

228 Tumhole Bridge and 

Tunnel— Glen Onoko 
220 Packer's Point— Glen 
Onoko 

230 Hunters' Cave and Falls 

—Glen Onoko 

231 Turn hole Bridge— Glen 

Onoko 
282 Dual Vista— Glen Onoko 

233 Laurel Cascade— Glen 

Onoko 

234 Chameleon Falls— Glen 

Onoko 

235 Chameleon Falls from 

Rustic Bridge— Glen 
Onoko 

236 Allen town Furnace 

237 Jordon Bridge, Allen- 

town 

238 View from College Hill 

— Easton 

239 On the Delaware at 

Easton 

240 Easton from College 

Hill 

241 Wyoming Valley House 

— Wilkesbarre 

242 Court-House— Wilkes- 

barre 

243 Wyoming Massacre 

Monument 

244 Residence of Chas. Par. 

rish- Wilkesbarre 

245 Panorama of Wyoming 

Valley 

246 Wyoming Valley from 

Prospect Rock, South 

947 Wyommg Valley from 

Prospect Rock, North 



248 Wyoming Valley— 

Balto. Openings 

249 Railroad Cut— Wyom- 

ing Valley 

250 Penn-Haven Junction 

—Lehigh Valley 

251 Lehigh Canal— Lehigh 

Valley 

252 Lehigh Gap Hotel 

253 Early Morning in the 

Gap 

254 Lehigh Water Gap, 

North 
256 Lehigh Water Gap, 
South 

256 Crown Point— Lehigh 

Valley 

257 Spouting Oil Well- 

Western Pennsyl- 
vania 



Gettysburg. 

258 Position of Geary's 

Brigade, and Monu- 
ment of 28th Penna. 
on Culp's Hill 

259 From Culp's Hill, over- 

looking field from po- 
sition held by7th Indi- 
ana and Knapp's Bat- 
tery 

260 Cemetery Hill, from 

Culp's Hill 

261 Culp's Hill from Ceme- 

tery Hill, Battery B, 
4th U. S. Artillery, 
and 1st New York Ar- 
tillery in foreground 

262 Monument m National 

Cemetery 

263 Meade's Headquarters 

264 Pickett's Charge from 

Webb's Position 

265 Pickett's Charge from 

the Angle 

266 Position of 103th Penn., 

15th Mass., 19th Mass. 
and 20th Mass. 

267 Hancock Wounded 

268 First Mass. Cavalry, 

and Sedgwick's Head- 
quarters 

269 Battlefield from Little 

Round Top, Wheat 
Field and Peach Or- 

270 Battlefield from Little 

Round Top toward 
Cemetery Hill 

271 Monterey Gap, from 

Little RoVind Top, 
through which Lee's 
Army retreated 

272 Devil's Den 

273 Little Round Top from 

Wheatfleld, M o n u- 
ment of 27th Connect- 
■ icut in foreground 

274 Big and Little Round 

Tops, from Emmetts- 
burg Road 

275 Mam Street, Gettys- 

burg, through which 
Fedeml Army re- 
treated 

276 From East Cemetery 

Hill. Ground over 
which the Louisiana 
Tigers charged, show- 
ing position of Hoke's 
Brigade in reserve 



277 From Position of Rick> 

ett's Battery, East 
Cemetery Hill, show- 
ing lunettes of Weed- 
rick's Battery and 
stone wall 

278 Entrance to Evergreen 

Cemetery 

279 From East Cemetery 

Hill, showing Wads- 
worth's line to Gulp's 
Hill 

280 Entrance to the Na- 

tional Cemetery 

281 From Culp's Hill, from 

the position occupied 
by the 56th Pennsyl- 
vania, 7th Indiana, 
and section of Knapp's 
Battery ; showing tne 
Confederate position 
on Benner's Hill 

282 Part of the Breastwork 8 

occupied by Green's 
Brigade, 2a Division 
12th Corps, with mon- 
ument of 28th Penn. 

283 Showing the scene of 

the Confederate 
charge across Spang- 
ler's Swail, against 
the position occupied 
by the 147 th Pennsyl- 
vania, July 3 

284 Spangler's Spring,8how. 

ing the position occu- 
pied in Spangler's 
Wood by Lockwood's 
Maryland Brigade 

285 From Spangler's Spring, 

showmg the position 
and Monuments of the 
2d Massachusetts and 
27th Indiana, and the 
ground over which 
the charge of the 2d 
Mass. was made 

286 Wolf's Hill from Spang- 

ler's Spring, showing 
Reaver's house, occu- 

Eied during the battle 
T Confederate Sharp. 

287 On the Slope of Little 

Round Top. Position 
occupied by a portion 
of the 1st Bri^^e, 2d 
Division, 12th Corps, 
on the night of July 1 

288 Reynold's Monument, 

in National Cemetery 

289 The Round Tops from 

the NationalCemetery 

290 Ziegler's Grove, from 

the Taneytown Road, 
showing the position 
of the 12th Massachu- 
setts and 88th Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers 

291 Chambersburg Street 

292 Carlisle Street 

293 Baltimore Street 

294 From the position occu. 

pied by the 12th Mass- 
achu setts, on Semi- 
nary Ridge, overlook. 
in^ the scene of oper- 
ations of the 11th 
Corps to Barlow's Hill 

295 The Railroad Cut. Scene 

of the capture of the 
Confederate brigade, 
first day's fight 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MclSTOSII BATTE 

SSe Willou^bli; Hiin. show 

Indiana 
297 RoiiDii Top, from the 
eastern aCope Dl Semi- 
nar)^ Kidge, near the 

588 TaneftoWD Road, froni 
PlorPe'a barn, ahow- 



103Ih PennsylTan 



O OPTKAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL.. U.S 



i( thel5Cli,lSth 



803 BreaatwDrkB of 
Both Penney 1 VI 



the 



VoUinteera and lUth 
New York, on the 
Iront Blnpe nt LlttLe 
Bonnd Top 
301 Peach Orchard from 

SOB Zook'i Monument and 
Wboat Field 

103 JeDny Wade's Houae 

307 HDnae on the Enimetta- 
barg Koad, to wliich 
the body o( General- 
Baynolda was carried, 
on Iho first daj- 

lOe PoaltlOD orrnpied \if 
Che Union sharp shoot' 
era as oiitiKiBlB, show, 
ins the Emmettsbiirg 



Sprit „ 
310 Spot where Re; aoida 

Bll Panorama Irotii Hound 

Top 
313 Breastworks and 

MonnniFint.. .tnth 



313 ta Devtl'a Den 

311 Monument ol 5t 
Hampshiro 



New 






White Mounlaint. 

1 Cas»> Lake Statloi 

ward Oiawfonl N 



3 View near Proflie 

Bonae 
* Eagle CiifT. Eleiihant'. 



7 The Oid Man of the 
B Pi-oflio Uonee, Frao- 

U The Flume, rranconla 

10 The Pool, 

11 View in the Flame, 

13 Bridge acroai Flume, 
13 The Flume_Place ol 



IS Caano Lake, Crawfonl 

Kotch 
10 MoiiDtain Pass, near 

Crawford Sotch 

17 WiUey'H Houae, Craw. 

fori Notch 

18 View near Willoy'a 

Honge, Crawford 



21 Crawlord House, Craw- 
ford Nntnh 
•a Mount Willard— near 

23 CmHtord Notch 
» The Old Man of the 
Monntatu, Irom For. 



North Conway 



SB Elii'8'aiver,"Norlh Con- 

30 Ellia Riccr Fails. North 

31 Tip Toi) House, Mt. 

Washington 

32 U.S. Signal ServiceSta- 

tion, ill. Waahington 
'"' '^ -Lake 



UutheE 






40 On Glen Road ti 

41 Wild CM Falls 

a Glcu Ellis Hotel 

Iron Mountain 
MUlen Ellia River 



Mountain 
Around 
Drive i 






the Dundee 

Jackson 

51 On the Dundee Road, 



12 TTpjper Jaukson FaU*. 

Wild Cat River 
a Cppec Jackson Follik 

Wild Cat RItof 
H Looking down from 

Jackaon Fnlla 
>5 Old Bridge across Gles; 



la Stage leaving Wen^ 

IS Wenlworlh Hall. New 

Castle 
H WsntwArth Halli Ten-. 

}rth Hall, The 

>rlh Hall, Fano. 

7 Gooilrli'b Falls, from 
:S Goodrich Falls, Irom 



Piern. 



eol F 



'S Battle Monument, Con- 
cord Bridge 

'3 MinnteMenMonnment, 
Bridge 

1 Wright Tavom, Briliab 
Headquarters 

G House whure Revoln 

I! Suliool of Philosophy 
7 The Navy Yard 
a Lang<ion House 
Fortimouth. 
•B Gov. Wen (worth's 
Houae, at Litllo Har. 
bor, Concord 
Eye Beoeh. 



SS Isles of Shoals, Gosport 



FOR PRICE LIST Or SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



161 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



8 Logging Camp, Teams 

ana Crew 

9 Logging Camp under 

snow 

10 Deer Hunters at the 

Camp 

11 Felling Trees 

12 Ox Teams Loading Logs 

13 Hauling Logs 

14 " " 

15 Haniing through the 

Forest 

Massachusetts. 

Boston. 

1 State House 

2 Oid State House 

3 Faneuii Hall 

4 Panorama from Post 

Office 

5 Panorama from Post 

Office 

6 View from the Post 

Office 

7 Panoramic View from 

the Post Office 

8 Panoramic View from 

Post Office 

9 Boston Common and 

Soldiers* Monument 

10 Public Garden and Bos- 

ton Common 

11 Equestrian Statue of 

Gen. Washington, 
Public Garden 

12 Frog Pond, Boston 

Common 

13 Beacon Avenue, Boston 

Common 

14 Bridge in Public Gard- 

en, Boston Common 

15 The Old South Church 

—Front 

16 The Old South Church 

—Rear 

17 The New South Church 

18 Milk Street 

19 Boston Harbor 

20 Quincy Market 

21 Athenaeum 

22 Long Wharf, Harbor of 

Boston, Scene of the 
destruction of Tea 

23 Public Library 

24 Trinity Church 

25 Technological College- 

old and new 

26 Academy of Fine Arts 

27 Old Comer Book Store 

28 City HaU 

29 Old North Church, 

Copp's Hill 

30 Entrance to Copp's Hill 

Burial Place 

81 Cotton Mather's Grave 

82 Gen. Gage's Headquar- 

ters (during battle) 

83 Paul Revere^s House 

84 Old Bridge, Charles- 

town River 

85 Charlestown Common 

86 Street View of Charles- 

town with Bunker 
Hill Monument 

37 Bunker HiU, Charles- 

town 

38 Bunker Hill Monument 

— near view 

39 Bunker Hill Monument 

— general view 

40 Statue of Washington, 

Park 



41 Trinity Church 

42 The Park. 

43 Panorama, North 

44 " N. E. 

45 " Boston and 
Harbor, S. E. 

46 The State House 

47 Milk Street 

48 The Old South Church 

49 Scollay Square 

50 Faneuii Hall 

51 Faneuii Hall, interior 

52 Leif Errlcson's Statue 

53 Commonwealth Avenue 

54 Algonquin Club 

55 New Old South Church 

56 Trinity Church 

57 Art Museum 

68 Boston Art Club 

59 Victoria Hotel 

60 Copp's Hill Cemetery 

61 The Old North Church 

62 Soldiers' Monument, 

Boston Common 

63 The Mall, Boston Com- 

mon 

64 The Fountain, Boston 

Common 

65 The Lake, Public Gar- 

dens 

66 The Promenade, Public 

Gardens 

67 Washington Statue, 

Public Gardens 

68 Charlestown Navy Yard 

69 Hotel Vendome 

70 Church of the Immacu- 

late Conception (inte- 
rior) 

71 Monument Avenue and 

Bunker Hill 

72 Bunker Hill Monument 

73 Prescott Statue, Bunk- 

er Hill 

Cambridge. 

74 Longfellow's Home 

75 The Washington Ehn 

76 The Washington Elm 

77 Washington Elm and 

Memorial Stone 

78 Washington Elm and 

Memorial Stone, close 
view 

Harvard College. 

79 Gore Hall 

80 The Old BuUding 

81 Cambridge Common, 

Soldiers' Monument 

82 Gymnasium Building 

83 Tablets in Memorial 

Hall 

84 Statue of John Harvard 

85 Dormitory 

86 MemorialHall— exterior 

87 Severn Hall 

88 Holden Chapel and Moss 

HaU 

89 Hollis Hall, Thayer 

Hall and University 
Hall 

90 Moss Hall and Mathews 

Hall 

Lexington. 

91 Battle Monument 

MarbleTiead. 

92 Skipper Ireson's House 

93 Nannepachamat Hotel 

94 From Hotel Porch to 

Island 



95 Marblehead Rock (in* 

stantaneous) 

96 Rocky Coast 

97 Marblehead Neck, look- 

ing out 

98 Marblehead Neck, 

Breakers 

99 Marblehead Neck,Hotel 

and Rockv Beach 

100 Marblehead Neck Rocks 

and Island 

101 Marblehead Neck, Nan- 

nepachamat House 

102 Turner's Hall 

103 View on Green River 

104 C o n n e c ticut River, 

near Greenfield 
106 Suspension Bridge at 
Turner's Falls 

106 Panorama of Greenfield, 

from Poet's Seat 

107 Turner's Falls, from 

Poet's Seat 

Amesbury. 

108 Whittier House 

109 Whittier House, Dan- 

vers 

Plymouth^ Mass. 

110 Forefathers' Rock, view 

from Cole's HiU 
lU Sea View, from Burial 
Hill 

112 Bradford Monument.' 

Burial Hill 

113 Court Street, Plymouth 

114 Pilgrim's Halt, the 

Forefathers' Church 

115 Forefathers' Monument 

Plymouth 

116 Forefath e r s' Rock, 

Plymouth 

117 East Avenue,Plymouth 

118 The Sea from Burial 

Hili, Plymouth 

119 Bradford's Monument, 

Burial Hill, Plymouth 

120 Faith Monument, Ply- 

mouth 

121 Faith Monument, Ply- 

mouth, close view 

Rhode Island. 

NewporL 

1 First Beach 

2 Second Beach 

3 Purgatory 

4 Rocks near Purgatory 

5 The Old Tower (built by 

Norsemen, 10th Cen- 
tury) 

6 Lodge, Entrance to 

grounds of Miss Wolfe 

7 Lodge, Grounds and 

Residence of Miss 
Wolfe 

8 The Redwood Library 

9 Jewish Cemetery 

10 Statue of Com. Oliver 

Perry 

11 Harbor, Mommg of Goe> 

let-Cup Race 

12 Yacht Under FuU Sail 

Fall Miver. 

13 Steamer Pilgrim, Fall 

River 

14 Steamer Pilgrim, Grand 

Staircase 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



lOINTOSH UATTEHV ASD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., I 



1 State Caplcol, trout 
S " " interior 



t, Trinity CoUeee 

7 TriBity OollBEe 

8 Church at the Good 



Id Oil) state Bouse, gener. 
11 Old State Itouec, t-loee 
U Kegldence of Lydla 

Huntley Sigouniey 
UBealdence ol "Mark 

Twain " 
JVeui Hiisea, 



IB View of tUe Sound ajid 

Savin Bock 
10 BeBlden«i ot Benedict 

Arnold 
£1 BeslcldeB Cave 

Tale College. 
M Old Brick Rom- 
as Avenue ol Elma 
M Fsmtkin and Baltell 

ChSH-l. 

29 DlTinft; Hlill 
»l Peabody Ball 
27 AlnmnrHall 

as New Laboratory 

W SUtna ol BoDJ. SlllJmaD 

30 Bail al Flue Aria and 

Sllliman'B LuboTBtory 

31 Heading HallandTreaa- 

SS BcroU and Keyu 

SB North ShoffleM Hall 

St The Observatory 

WlaouuHln. 



I Near the Sugar Bow 
a Lone Rook 

5 S^r Bowl from 

1 Foot of the Narrow! 
BGrottonearSurarB 

6 Witches' Gnlc-h 



id Kock. Manlilmp- 1! Blua 



18 Stand Rork. Iroiii lielow 

19 Id Cold Water Canon | 
SO CD River from Sii)(ar 

21 Ronianra Cllfl- \ 

M Chimney Ronk | 

Sa LandlngabovBClilmney . 

Stout ot the NarrowB, ! 

Boat Cave (very line) 

an Out or^ Entrance to 

in Interior ol Boat Cave 

S7 The Navv Yard 

2S Ui> River troin Navy 



32 LookiniEOUtDfWK 
Gulch 

34 VlBor Lodee 

35 Tlie WlaconBin 1 



idge 



IS St. CTOi.t River anc 
Bridge 

01 BulfenuFlk Falls "^' 
m Buttarmilk Falls 

5-1 Big Dam, Apide River 



1 Bridge near St. An 

thony'B FallB 
a Bopida i>I St. Aolhonv 
3 Sandstone Care near St 

1 Bridge and Tower, 

above St. Paul 
S Fort SuBllfng 



BopoH.. 



theFaUa 
S Cold Water Canon 
10 FalU in Witches' Gnlcl 
U Mouth of Cold Watoi 

Canon 
U Cold Water Cnaon 
13 Rood's Ulen 
U The Hornet 'b Nest 
iS View from the Homef i 

Meat 
IB Viaor Lmlfc 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127- 



B Shores ot Lake 



IS iremiwieBu BliilTs, 
Upgier MiBalBBl{>pl 

BlufTB 
IT SteanilioBt Landing On 

Lake Penln 
IS A Snowy Laue, Minne 

Ifl Cnlting Ice on thf 

Upper MISBlasippi 
HI Ontt&ig leo on thti 

Upper MISBissippi 
ai An fee Plow on Che 

Mississippi 
aa Rapids, St, Antbonr'a 

t*al!8 
23 SusTHtnBlon Bridge, 

Mlimeapolis 
ai Interior ol an Up|)er 



B7 Falls 

trot 

2S Fails 



.lis ot Minnehaha 
Laughing Water) 

Minnehaha 



40 St. Croix Blver Valley 

41 St. Croix River, rocks 

and bridge from below 



, Mlnue- 
len Falls, 



niigh Fro 



if Minnehaha 
ja jce riilara, Minnehaha 
37 Minnehaha, The Ar- 

tiBI-s Choice 
ns BapldB. Falls ot MlnoB' 

30 Falls ot Minnehaha [Id- 

40 Falls at Minnehaha 
fromFo<- ~ " 



ta Shaded Walk ou Bank 
of Minnehaha Creek 

43 Miaslafllppi Rivar near 
St Anthony's Falls 

U Winnebago Chiel {In- 

45 Winnebago Squawi 

(group) 

46 Winnebago squaw car- 

47 Wlnneliago Sauaw 

43 A Mlsslaslppt Steamer 
loading 

St. J^iK. 

48 Ice Palace 
BO Street-View, Winter 



61 Street- View, 



54 Plliabury Elei 
65 Cutting lea 
HiSBrsslpiil 



Winter 



153 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



Grand Canon of the 
Arkansas. 

1 The Promontory at En- 

trance of Canon 

2 The Great Wall, near 

the Gorge 

3 Approaching the Gorge 

5 «• •« 

6 The Royal Gorge from 

below 

7 The Royal Gorge from 

below 

8 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, near view 

9 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, near view 

10 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, near view 

11 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, near view, the 
Bridge 

12 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, near view, the 
Bridge with Train 

13 The Royal Gorge, from 

above, distant 
U Upper end of the Gorge 

15 Grape Creek Canon, 

near the Toll Gate 

16 Grape Creek Canon, 

near the Horseshoe 

17 Grape Creek Canon, the 

Temple 

18 Grape Creek Canon, 

near the Temple 

Colorado 

A Full Descriptive Lecture 
of Colorado and New Mex- 
ico can be furnished. 

1 Larimer Street, Denver 

2 The Tabor Block '• 

3 Lawrence Street " 

4 Manitoii and Pike's 

Peak, Col. 

5 Manitou Soda Springs, 

Manitou 

6 Ute Pass, near Manitou 

7 Rainbow Falls,Ute Pass 

8 General View of Wil- 

liams' Canon 

9 The Narrows, Williams' 

Canon 

10 Entrance to the Cave of 

the Winds, Williams' 
Canon 

11 Temple of Isis, Wil- 

liams' Canon 

12 Cameron's Cone, from 

Temple of Isis 

13 The Toadstools, Garden 

of the Gods 

14 Biiena Vista Drive,Gar. 

den of the Gods 

15 Balanced Rock, Garden 

of the Gods 

16 The Simpleton, Garden 

of the Gods 

17 Siamese Twins, Garden 

of the Gods 

18 Pike's Peak, from Siam- 

ese Twins, Garden of 
the Gods 

19 The Seal and Bear, Gar- 

den of the Gods 

20 Montezuma Spires, Gar- 

den of the Gods 

21 The Tower of Babel, 

Garden of the Gods 



22 Gateway, Garden of the 

Gods 

23 General View of Pike's 

Peak, Garden of the 
Gods 

24 Glen Eyrie, Gen. Pal. 

mer's residence 

25 The Tramp, Monument 

Park 

26 Vulcan's Anvil, Monu- 

ment Park 

27 Dutch Wedding, Monu- 

ment Park 

28 Dutch Parliament,Mon- 

ument Park 

29 The Colonade, Monu- 

ment Park 

30 The Flying Dutchman, 

Monument Park 

31 The Old Maid, Monu- 

ment Park 

32 Vulcan's Workshop, 

Monument Park 

33 Three Lower Falls, 

Cheyenne Canon 

34 Seven Falls, in Chey. 

enne Canon 

35 Grand Canon of the Ar- 

kansas, west 

36 Grand Canon of the Ar- 

kansas, east 

37 Royal Gorge, Gitind 

Canon of the Arkan- 
sas, west 

38 Suspended Bridge, Roy- 

al Gorge, west 

39 Suspended Bridge, Roy- 

al Gorge, east 

40 Royal Gorge, east 

41 Main street, Buena 

Vista, Col. 

42 Mount Princeton, from 

Buena Vista 

43 Upper Twin Lake, 

Colorado 

44 Lower Twin Lake, 

Colorado 

45 Snowy Range, near 

Leadville 

46 Leadville, from Carbo- 

nate Hill 

47 California Gulch and 

Leadville 

48 Mount Massive and 

Leadville, from Capi- 
tol Hill 

49 General View of Lead- 

ville 
60 Leadville, from Capitol 
Hill 

51 Fryer Hill, Leadville 

52 The Iron Mine on 

Breece Hill, Leadville 

53 Main street, Leadville 
64 Mount of the Holy 

Cross 
56 La Veta Pass and Dump 

Mountain 
56 Sierra Blanca, from 

near Fort Garland 

Colorado. 

Garden of the Gods. 

1 The Gateway 

2 ♦• •♦ and Pike's 
Peak 

3 The Gateway and 

Pike's Peak 

4 The Gateway and 

Pike's Peak 
6 The Gateway and Cam- 
eron's Cone 



6 The PortaUof the Gate- 

way 

7 The Tower of Babel 

8 ,« *' " 

9 The Cathedral Spires 

10 The Seal and Bear 

11 The Siamese Twins 

12 Pike's Peak from the 

Twins 

13 Balance Rock 

14 Buena Vista Drive 

15 Glen Eyrie, the Major 

Dome 

16 Glen Eyrie, Echo Rocks 

17 Glen Eyrie, Echo Tower 

18 Glen Eyrie, among the 

Rocks 

19 Monument Park, Ute 

Medicine Monument 

20 Monument Park, Ute 

Medicine Monument 

21 Monument Park, a'he 

Quakers 

22 Monument Park, The 

Quakers 

23 Monument Park 

24 Monument Park, Vul- 

can's Anvil 

25 Monument Park, Vul- 

can'sAnvil 

26 Monument Park, Vul- 

can's Anvil 

27 Castle Rocks, near]) the 

Divide 

28 Castle Rocks, near the 

Divide 

29 Natural Arch on the Di- 

vi<le 

30 Pei-ry Park (Pleasant 

Park), Profile Rocks 

31 Perry Park, the Pulpit 

32 Perry Park, the Twins 

33 Perry Park, Punch and 

Judy 

34 Perry Patk, The Alliga- 

tor 

35 Perry Park, The Turtle 

36 Perry Park.The Liberty 

Cap 

37 Perry Park, Under the 

Rocks 

38 Perry Park, Leaning 

Rocks 

39 Perrv Park Gateway, 

Diana's Temple 

40 Perry Park, Among the 

Bluffs 

41 Perry Park, Among the 

Bluffs 

42 Perry Park, Among the 

Bluffs 

43 Perry Park, The Valley 

of Bagdad 

44 Perry Park, The Valley 

of Bagdad 

45 Perry Park, The Valley 

of Bagdad 

46 Rocks near the Platte 

Canon 

New Mexico. 

1 Embudo, Comanche 

Canon New Mexico 

2 The Old Mill at Chamita 

3 Passengers Crossing 

the River on Indians 

4 Pueblo, San Juan, from 

the church 

5 Church de Pueblo, San 

Juan 

6 Interior, Church de 

Pueblo, San Juan 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PkG.E\2."l. 



U BATTEUV AND OI'TK'AL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. a 




185 Mcintosh battery and optical co., chica«o,ill.,u.s.a. 



10 lJoilmBaulphur^]irlnB> 

Cniler Hflls 

11 rellovaUmoLakciiear 

Bridge Creek 



5B enter of Old FaitbtDl 
M 

57 The Giantess In erap 

tion 

58 The Giantees Id ernp 

tion 

59 The Giantesi Id emp 

-■. ^ 

and Tiirhan 
SS The Splendid in ernp- 

63 The Splendid in enip- 

M The Castle in eruption 
S5 The Castle and Crested 

83 Craler''Sf the Caslle 
07 The Castle and Old 

Faith till 
68 The Grotto in eruption 

0» ■■ ■• 

70 Crater of the Grotto 



ra TheCrateroIlli 



a Kepler's Cascade 



45 Yellowstone LaVe,Park 

Point 
M Upper Geyser Basin, 

from DM IraitbOil 

Lioness 

48 Old Faithtal, from tl 

49 Old Faithlal in ernpCli 



W TheFounUinGeyserin 
»4 The FoiiaialnGeyserln 

SB Crater ot the Great 
Fountain Gevier 

96 Sonndins (be Great 
Bine Spring 

91 The Faint Pot Hot Mud 

96 BoA'i"g'^ 9pTinRS i a 
Queen's Laundrr 

S& "■ 

■ ! Deluge 






Bed MouD- 
t'SountWBsh- 



M. H. Surlnss Irom )f. 

H.S. Hotel Porch 
101 Liberty C«p. 171* It. 

high. M. H. S. 
Dovll'sThiiml), Liberty 



» Hnr 



I Tern 



113 Minervi 

' 111 Dlani 



Terraces from 
■pi. Jupl. 



115 TiianaTerrjii^e"!!' 
"« Slanimoth Hot Sprljigs, 
edges lormatlon Main 

7 Mainmuth Hot Spring, 
eilgas (orniation Mafn 
Spring 
IIS Cleopatra Torrscos 

'" " th Cave, -M. H. 

uriat climbing 

120 Bath Lake and Batbers, 

M. H. S. 
131 Orange Geyser Cone, 

122 Nar' 



79 The Punch Bowl 

80 ISoUiug Spring near the 

SI Boiling Spring near Che ' 

<! iantess 
«t Boiling Spring near the 

83 The Lune Star Geyser 



«■ Gauge Terrace 



s. Bud sen's Peak 



126 Upper Pulpit Coating, 
Springs, S. H. S. 

127 Upper Pulpit Terraces I 1 

128 Lower Pulpit Terraces, i 
" --.Peat In diet' 

pltTer- ■ 
_l-ulpit' 
le Pulpit 



131 Linu 

12 Golden Gate Rond. eo 

13 Gulden Gate Roiul ea 

TroBtleaadCathedi 
Keck 



ftud Monarcb Crater 
I Crater ot Monarcb Gey- 
ser Soma Geraer 
paala 



U View of Ht. Bebnn, 
Bxtloet Geyser Basin 

US Sulphur Pot, Pop ot 
Sfi. Sthuri 

ISGibhaiL Falla trom 

17 Great Paint Pots Fire- 

18 Kxcelflior Geyser er. 

nptiog, HeU's Halt 

19 Crater Mammoth Gey- 

ser Firebole Geyser 
Baain 
10 Turquoise Pools, El- 



■3-Jewell Geyser Erupt- 
ing. Biscuit Basin 

ilBiscuiC Uaain and 
Spring 

15 Fan Geyser iDErnptlon 

A Grollo Geyser in Erup- 
tion. W. G. U. 

■1 Grotto GeyserCone W, 



i9 Devil's Punch Bowl 
Caelle Geyser Erupting 
;i Castle o'eysor CooeT 
Diana's Spring in 

12 Constant Geyser Er- 

upting 

13 Sponge Spring W. G. B. 

iX ltf,f«ltTi-<t I.41D-B-P Fi-iint. 



I Old HHitbfu Ge^Ber 
Erupting, very flue 

' Old Faithful Geyser 
Erupting, very Bne, 



iSOM FaitUnl Gevser 
Kniptlng.enii of Kr. 

19 Kejipier's Cascade from 

134 Thro' Golden GateiliO hepiiler's Cascade from 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 12T. 



jlNToSlI BATTERY AND UI'TICAL CO.. CM; 



fl Lone ewrticy sort 



IT? Trout flahiug, YcDoB 
Btoae Rlrer liek 
Lttke 

Jtre Yellowstoiie Rfvi 
KBPida nbdVB Keii 
ler's CftH«ule_ 

|af> Gliinpee at 
•^ River belween . . 

Wl Loakoiit K'>cIe, Cai 
*- of YeUowatiineBl 
between FttlU 
!S Crystal CnwMUle- Ii 



lU Grand Folia Yellow- 
itime River, Wa (set 
Intm PoInC Lookout 
UeGmnd FbIU, Yellow- 
*^ gUnie RivBr. B60 (t. 

Paint ihowlng Point 
Lookout 
Qnnd O a n D n from 



tfr Down Grand Canon, 
Diamal View 
S Vtrginin CascadsB Irom 



SOi The Piilpit, Pulpit 

aoe Dimer Pulpit, OontinK 
rerraros and Siiecl- 

310 Upper Pulpit Termcei 

an Pulpit Torracos 

aia Lower Termccs, Beau- 



S17 Golden Ui 
and "Ton 



Ml M o B a r .■ h Oeyaa 
Krunllng NorrUGoj 
Her Basin 

Ka Bteamlioat Venl.Norri 

K* The ink Bottle. Norri 

(iej-ser Baa in 
aM New Crater Gefsei 

Norris Geyser Basin 

in (jeysar Erupl 



a Falls, £sBt Gsrdiie 

HlTsr 
IS Falls, Mkldle Gardne 



to M.I] 



Rlvi 



Kond 
Road 



below 
Jupitar Terr 

LIC^ Jupiter 
races. West End 
US Little JuptCer Ten 
«0 The New S p r i 
H. IL!4. 

m "Bob" IngereoU Spring 
901 Cupid's Cave, Cienpa- 

901 U. H. S. Hotel and 
Stage tor Cinnabar 

SM U. H. S. Dotal, Loading 
Stage 

SOS M. H. S. notel, Cinne- 
bar Stage Arriving 

9QB Lower Futpit Terracee 



B Chimney Cone 



White Domes, Ueysar 
Crater. Fire hole Gey. 
aer Baain 

Figure Eight Spring 
firehole River be- 
iween Upper and 

i Grave Spring 
etwean Upper 
Middle Geyser 

230 Lion Geyser Cone, 

2X1 OnnatanC Geyser in 

Eruption 
SIS Castle Geyser Cooa 
S33 Fan Geyser Eruuiing 
■ K I r ell I e River 
W. U. B. 
an Castle Geyser Erupt- 

235 Beehive Geyaer Cone 



W Splendid G 

Kruiition 
» Splendid Go 



Upper Vellowstona 
ifiver (roni Upper 



Ttup 



itndfro 



[i Grand Canon Trail be- 
tween FalU 

ISYellotVBtone River 
RapidB from Crest ' 
Lonev FiilVs 



•Stt Crystal Cascades, 1 
<'-•——, River 



Urend KallH, ' 
high, from 



From Baync'i Negatlvi 
153 Gardiner Canon, i 

as MamSioth Hotel I 

Stages 
'M Liberty Cap and Us 

moth Uolel 
J55 Minerva Terrane 
3S0 Pulpit Terrace 



to Golden 
^ and Bridge 



281 Virginia Casoades 

jasGlbTionOBnon 

W3 Gibbon Falls 

an Mammoth Paint Pots 

ara Eanntaln Geyser 

ana Eieelelor Geyser, from 

3S7 Interior Excelsior Gey- 



-r Oblong I 



313 Crater Oblong Geyser 

" -■■'- Bowl 

Well and Oastle 

Boe.Hlve and 



Old Fal 
Sn Old Falthiui ueyser 
270 Craterol Giantess Cer- 

STB Crater of Grand Geyser 
280 Keppler's Cascades 
Kl Lone Star Goyaer 
982 Shoshone Lake 
383 Hot Spring. Cone, 

Yellowstone I.afee 
2S4 YellowsCone Lake 
3» Uayileu Tallev 
2§e SlUphnr Monntaln 
3tt7 Rapids above Upper 

388 rpjier Falls from 

Sffl Grand Canon Irom 

Brink 
390 Point Lookout and 

381 Inspiration Point 

392 Up the Canon from In. 

spirntion Point 

393 Down the Canon from 

tnaplratlon Point 
Wt Canon and Falls from 

S9S Great Falls from below 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES Stt PK^it \'i.T • 



137 Mcintosh battert and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



2»7 Petrified Trees, near 

Yancey's 
298 Tower Falls and Canon 
290 In Norris Geyser Basin 

in winter 

300 Foliage near Geysers in 

winter 

301 Great Falls in winter 

The above collection of 
Optical Lantern Slides of 
Wonderland are the finest 
pablished. Every slide is 
guaranteed perfect. 

California. 

San Frctndaeo. 

1 3Iontgomery Street, 

July 4th 

2 Palace Hotel 

3 Chinese Restaurant, 

Dupont and Clay 
Streets 

4 Chinese Market, Du- 

pont Street 
6 Alley in Chinese Quar. 
ters 

6 Palace Hotel, Interior 

Court 

7 Roof of Palace Hotel 

8 A Street in Chinatown 

9 Chinatown 

10 Chinese Theatre, In- 

terior 

11 Chinese Restaurant 

12 Chinese Restaurant, 

Interior 

13 Court of Palace Hotel, 

Looking In 

14 Court of Palace Hotel, 

Looking In 

15 Golden Gate Park 

16 Seal Kocks from Clifl" 

House 

17 Golden Gate* Park 

18 Cliff House and Seal 

Kocks 

19 Great telescope, Lick 

Observatory 

20 Eye End of Great Tele- 

scope, Lick Observa- 
tory 

21 Large Transit Instru- 

ment, Lick Observa- 
tory 

22 Mount Shasta above the 

Clouds 

Sacramento. 

23 State Capitol Building 

24 In the Capitol Grounds 

25 Terraces, Capitol 

Grounds 

26 Walk In Capitol 

Grounds 

Yoaemite, 

27 Yosemite Falls, 2634 ft. 

high 

28 South Canon Falls 

29 Yosemite Fails (re- 

flected) 2634 ft 
80 Bridal Veil Falls, 940 ft 
31 •♦ *• " and 

three Graces 
82 Yosemite Falls, Sec. 

Seward's Party 
88 Vernal Falls, 350 ft 

84 Mirror Lake 

85 " " and Dome 

86 The Three Brothers, 

4000 ft high 



37 Sentinel Rock, 3370 ft 

38 North Dome, 3725 ft 

39 Half Dome and Wash- 

ington Column 

40 Cathedral Rocks, 2660 ft 

41 El Capitan. 3300 ft high 

42 Nevada Falls, 700 ft 

43 Yosemite Falls, 

Through the Trees 

44 Yemal Falls (Instan- 

taneous) 

45 Grand Panorama, look- 

ing up the Valley from 
Foot of Yosemite 
Falls 

46 Yosemite Falls, first 

view 

47 Yosemite Falls, choice 

view 

48 Yosemite Falls, from 

the foot 

49 Yosemite Falls, Profile 

and Half Dome 

50 Yosemite Falls. Upper 

Falls, 1650 feet high 

51 Yosemite Falls and 

Merced River 

52 Vernal Falls 

53 Nevada Falls 

54 Nevada Falls, Liberty 

Cap, Clouds' Rest and 
Little Yosemite Val- 
ley 

55 Nevada Falls, Liberty. 

Cap and Mount Brod- 
erick 

56 Bridal Veil Falls, gen- 

eral View 

57 Bridal Veil Falls, close 

view ^ 

58 Bridal Veil FaUs and 

Leaning Tower 

59 Bridge over Bridal Veil 

Creek 

60 Mirror Lake, Reflecting 

Mount Watkins and 
Old Man of the 
Mountains 

61 Sunrise in Mirror Lake 

62 Reflections in Mirror 

Lake 

63 Mirror Lake and Mount 

Watkins, reflected 

64 El Capitan Facade, from 

the South 

65 El Capitan Facade, from 

the South-west 

66 El Capitan Proflle 

67 El Capitan and Merced 

River 

68 El Capitan and Merced 

River 

69 El Capitan, Three 

Graces and Bridal 
Veil Falls 

70 The Domes 

71 South Domes, from Gla- 

cier Point 

72 South Domes, from Mir- 

ror Lake 

73 North and South Domes, 

and Mount Hofi"man 
from Olio 

74 South Dome and Mount 

Hofl"man, from Olio 
76 North Dome and Merced 
Kiver, general view 

76 North Dome and Merced 

Kiver, close view 

77 South Dome and CUuds' 

Rest, from Yosemite 
Falls 



78 Ctonds' Rest, Royml 
Arches and the Domes 
I 79 South Doom, Moant 
Clark and Moant 
Starr Kiiur, from Yo- 
semite Falls Trail 

80 South Dome, Glacier 

Point and High Sier^ 
ras, from Yosemite 
Falls TraU 

81 Rear View of South 

Dome and Clouds* 
Rest from Illilloaete 

83 Glacier Point frmn the 
VaUey 
' 83 First View from Inspi- 
ration Point 

8( Panorama from Inspin- 
tion Point 

85 Panorama from Inspira- 

tion Point 

86 Panorama from Artist 

Point 
: 87 Looking into Yosemite 
Valley from Yosemite 
Point 

. 88 Mount Starr King and 
! Glacier Point from 

top Yosemite Falls 

89 End of Glacier Point 

90 The High Sierras from 

Columbia Point 

91 Sentinel Rock from the 

Southwest 

92 Sentinel Rock from the 

West 

93 Sentinel Rock and Mer- 

ced River 
W The Three Brothers 

95 Cathedral Spires and 

Cathedral Rocks 

96 Yellow Pines 225 feet 

high 

97 Sugar Pines on the Ha- 

deira Road, 11 feet in 
diameter 

98 Yosemite Creek above 

the Falls 

99 Yosemite Creek above 

the Fa Us 

100 In the Forest 

101 Looking back over High 

Sierras f rbm Yosemite 
Point 

102 Among the Foothills 

103 Yosemite Valley from 

Inspiration Point 

104 Yosemite Valley from 

Inspiration Point 

105 Stage at Alder Creek, 

going to Yosemite 

103 Magic Tower at Marion 
Point— Yosenute Val. 

ley 

107 Nevada Falls, Side View 
—Yosemite Valley 

103 Yosemite Falls, Upper 
and Lower — Yosemite 
Valley 

109 Mirror Lake and Mt. 

Watkins — Yosemite 
Valley 

110 Yosemite Falls and Mir- 

ror Lake — Yosemite 
Valley 

111 Yosemite Valley, from 

above 

112 Cathedral Rock — Yo- 

semite Valley 

113 Liberty Cap— Yosemite 

Valley 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh batteuv anb oi'tical co., Chicago, ill., v. s. a 



lUCllnibiDE [he SUiltway 

to Vernnl FBlla—VO' 

Semite Vallej' 
lis NorlliDomeanriClonil 

Real— YoBemite Vb 

lev 
lift Indiftn Camp — Facll 

I IT American Group — Sier 

Kevada MannUins 
llB DfiTil'a Gate — Sler 

Nevada Moun tains 
lis Cathedml Spire B— Sier 

Nevada Uouatains 
lan Hoffman Towaiv-Sierra 

Nevada Mountains 
131 Uain St.— Los Angel 
Iffl Spring St.— 
133 Arroyo Bridge — L. 

and San Galirtel Vi 

ley Bailrosd 
m Hotel Rsyinond- Pai 



I 2M Mission Cauon. lo 
109 Blrds-Kyo VIeir 



tW leet nircuiutBreiiea 

1B4 Ohio and Grant 

les Baechec and Three 9le- 

166 HKvertoiil and Key- 

ncoln and Washing- 

ir,g f-eli<^e(337 teet l)igh)and 



: 31S De la Gner 

Sin Oa 

3UTIieMi»ln 

— Mamiu( 

- ■ Hedgo 



DBS' 









■iel. 



217 Oid'itnin near San Ga- 

318 Steps or Old Simnlsb 
map'"" 



» The Belfry, 



Old Spanish 
Gabriel 



IroBi 



1;B Tlia Const an 
KoRky Coast 



:a Street in Snn Gabriel 

Santa Citd. 
14 Coast. Natural Bridge 



loteJ Del Coronado, 
East front 
lotel Del Coronado, 

Intel Del Coronado 

Court Yard 
S2e Dace ralma. Old Tovn 
"10 House where Ratnoim 

was Married. Old 



m Baldirin's RaDCli — San 
U» Vineyard — Baldwin's 

UO Pampaa Grass Farm 

",I Banana Tree 
>l CalUomlB Fern 
a Bloom of Spanisb Dag- 
It Centnry Plant Bloom 
IB Smith's Canon -Sierra 
Madre Mountains 

Uariiiota, Biu Treet 
It WaslilDgton, ST feet cir- 



1S5 Blaok Rock 



Vn Oeneral f 



.1 Big Trc 






Kt Nine Big Trees 

EWftwonft Tunn._. 
(Distant Flew show 
Ing entire Tree) 
Wawona Tunnel Tree 



' 33S M. E. Church Block 
~~B Santa Fe K. R. Statioi 
Calalina latana. 
14 Steamship Landing, A 



1 Top of Diatom I 
IKS Toboggan m, 



tM Bee Ranrhe 
IBS Cathedral at Monterey 
-rny Ferry Landing 



and Otay B. R., Mes 

Fatniitna. 
23B Kucalyptua Aveni 

Baldwin's Ranch 
S40 The Lake, Baldwin 



1ST Truciiee Station, Pacif- 



Oaklan 
Truciiee _. 

ic B. E. 

Montersy. 
IBS Hotel Dei Monte 
IBS Live Oak 
SIX) Forest in Del Monte 
301 Ariiona Garden. Del 

Monte 
Iffi Rose Garden of Casino. 

Del Monte 
30! Old Live Oak, Del Moo- 



SOiP 



_(Front Tiew, oloael 
tt Wanona Tunnel Tree 



1L4X The Vineyard, Roaea 
313 Tropiral PUnts, Sierra 

au Palm Tree, Sierra 

Madro Villa 
MS Pasadena Canon, near 

Pasadena 

■US The Grand Opera House 
S4T Live Oak.Orange Groi-e 

3« Century Plant in Bloom 

SU Banana Tree 

3,WA Vineyard. Sierra 

Madro In distance 
ZJl-Ontnge Grove and Mt. 

San Antonio 
■sa Fremont's Trail, Arroys 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 12T. 



159 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A. 



2ft3 Falls and Eaton Canon, 
Sierra Madre 

254 Roadway Tunnel, John- 

son's Ranch 

255 Umbrella Tree in Bloom 

256 A Bee Ranch 

Lo8 Angeles. 

257 Panorama, looking 

South 

258 Panorama, from Crock- 

er's House 
250 On the Boulevard 
960 Road View 

261 Panorama 

262 The Plaza 

263 Panorama, South-East 

264 Panorama, from 2d St. 

Hill. Cable Road 
266 Panorama, West 

266 Mountains at Bagdad 

267 Mountains at Bagdad 

268 Mojave Indians at the 

Needles 

269 Mount Shasta, from 

Sissons 

Sporting Series. 

1 Old Ephram. Settled 

at last 

2 A Performing Bear 

(standing) 

3 First day's luck— Sorry 

I killed him. Elk and 
Horseman 

4 Won't take long to 

Peel Him. Elk and 
Hunter 

5 Success after a hard 

climb. Elk and 
Hunter on Mountain 
side 

6 Hunting for Ducks. 

Carrymg canoe on his 
back 

7 Along the channel— In 

canoe with Decoys 

8 In a Mallard Hole 

9 Coming to Shore. 

Hunter in canoe 

10 Laying Low for a Shot. 

In the reeds 

11 Up Black Dog Creek 

Two Canoes and 
Hunters 

12 Picking them up. 

Hunter in canoe 

13 Under Way— Paddling 

14 The Ducks Must Suffer 

15 Off to the Pass 

16 Wild Geese on Shore 

17 Deer Surprised at 

Home 

18 Our Outflt on the Yel- 

lowstone River 

19 Our Camp in the 

Rockies 

20 Trout Fishing on Cash 

Creek 

21 Fishing Party on Yel- 

lowstone Lake 

22 Trout Fishing, Willow 

River 

23 Deer Hunters' Shack. 

(Deer hung up) 

24 Duck Hunters' Camp 

25 Across the Carry at last 

26 A Big Back Load 

27 Skinning a Prong Horn 

28 He is Our Meat. (Ante- 

lope) 

29 A Long Shot from the 

Saddle 



SO A Load. Three Ante- 
lopes on the Saddle 

31 Give it to Her ? Pack- 

ing 

32 Innocence. Two ponies, 

packed 

33 Successful Antelope 

on Saddle 

34 A real, live Cowboy 

35 Hurrah? Down at last. 

(Dead buck) 

36 Taking Breath on a 

Side Hill. Toboggan 
loaded, and hunters 

37 A Shot Just for Fun 

38 Duck Hunters. The 

Morning Start 

39 The Evening Return. 

All back 

40 Cooking Supper in 

Camp 

41 Coasting Along Shore 

in Canoes 

42 Dinner in Camp 

43 Packing Canoes Across 

the Carry 

44 Landing a thirty-four 

pound Muskalonge 

45 Landing at the Carry 

46 A Bark Lean-to, Our 

Camp 

47 Our Camp on Trout 

Creek 

48 Landing Canoes at the 

Landing 

49 Lifting Canoes over 

the Rapids 

50 Rapids Ahead. (Very 

fine) 

51 A Traveler. Birch 

Canoe 

52 Coming down River. 

Canoe and Ladies 
63 A Picturesque Camp on 
Nipigon River 

54 Fishing at Black Trout 

Creek 

55 Five Canoes starting 

from the Island Port- 
age 

56 Camp at Pine Portage. 

Fish and Bearskin 

57 A Great Sufficiency- 

String of lar^e Trout 

58 Camping at Big Canoe 

Portage. Landing 
and Canoes 

59 A Morning's Catch- 

Back load of Trout 

60 Fishing at White Water 

Rapids 

61 Fishing below Virgin 

Falls, Nipigon River 

62 Down. "Mv Snow- 

shoe's Caught" 

63 Camping in the Snow 

64 Prairie Chickens in 

Stubble 

65 Wood Duck on Bog 

66 A Lonely Camp 

67 A Sure Thing— Shoot- 

ing a Black Tail 

68 In Camp at last with 

him 

69 Our Bunch of Ponies 

70 The Old Chief's Camp 

71 Trout Fishing at Slough 

Creek Falls 

72 Catching a Two-pound- 

er 

73 Slough Creek, in Mars- 

ton's Meadows, Wy- 
oming 



74 Landing a Daisy, 

Slough Creek 

75 Ready to start, from 

Soda Butte Ranch 

76 Packing, laying the 

Diamond 

77 Packing! Ready! PnU! 

78 Packing! Ready again I 

79 Packing! All Packed! 

80 The Old Gu^e 

81 Out of Luck to-Day 

82 Fishing from Canoe. A 

Favorite Hole 

83 Fishing from Canoe. In 

the Landing Net 

84 Bound Down River. 

Four Loaded Canoes 

85 O'Brien's Landing on 

Brule River 

86 Gichee Gumee Camp, 

Brule River 

87 Gichee Gumee Camp, 

Landing 

88 Up River from Gichee 

Gumee Camp 

89 McNight's Landing, 

Brule River 

90 An Eddy on the Brule 

River 

91 The Falls of the Brule 

River 

92 The Head of the Falls, 

Brule River 

93 The Landing at Hart's 

Camp 

94 Mountain Lion in Bot. 

tom Lands. A Snap 
Shot with a Camera 

95 The Lucky Man to-day 

96 With Canoe well loaded 

with Duck 

97 Our Landing at Heron 

Lake, and Canoes 

98 OurLandingand Camp, 

Lake Heron 

99 Among the Black 

Rushes witn Decoys 

100 Our Lucky Day in 

Camp 

101 Poling up the Rapids 
103 Pulling Canoes over 

Rapids 

103 Across the Lake above 

Falls 

104 Balsam Lake, Wis- 

consin 
103 Black Bass, Finch 

Kuby Catch 
lOJ Twenty Black Bass, 

Balsam Lake 
107 Landing a Black Bass 
103 Black Bass Two at a 

Time 

Indians. 

1 Piah and other Ute 

Chiefs 

2 Squaw and Pappoose 

3 War Chief's Tent 

4 Camp of Colorow's Band 
g (( t< (« 

6 A Camp at Los Pinos 

8 Piah's Pappoose 

9 Group of Ute Chiefs at 

the Denver Exposi- 
tion 

Camps, Etc., Etc. 

10 Camping in Middle Park 

11 A Camp in a Quaking 

Asp Grove 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



)Sli RATTEHY ANU 



UoiiotainTrip 
13 "CarbonatB Bill," Pros- 
it MiinEng, at the mouth of 

th« Tuunel 
15 PaekinK— CincUlDg the 

AMreJo 
18 P»fVlng — Pimlng lip 

IT Packing— CiQchiDg the 
la Packing— The laet Pnil 
18 The Three UrHi:ea 
» MQUDtsln Milk Cart 
91 The Fanna ot Colorado 

— HeaH at an £lk 
S3 The Fauna ot Colorado 

—Elk Lying Down 
23 The Fauna ol Colorado 

—Head of BlaPk Tall 

21 The Fauna ot Colorado 
-Head o( Antelope 

2S The Fannn ot Colorado 
— Head ot Meunlaln 

K The Fanna of Colorado 

—Head ol Bnffalo 
iE7 The Fauna o[ Colorado 



— Saie Hen a 
SO The launa ot Co. 

-PtarmiganB 
31 A Iiav's Hunting tn 

Mlrtflle Park 
ta Study ol llHiTo's Head 
PorlrniU of, or full Figure 
Ptflurei of moHx InOiuni 
3f<ula oal af Door: 
33 Maia-l-MisuBHin and 

lU Sioux Urave' 
JS Warpl ■ yah . dlnajiu. 
(Chippewa) 

Maza-l.ynhdewin 
37 Jn-ka-nahnamanl, Slonx 
Chiel, Walking on 
■"■^ne and Ju-kaii- 
ih-dlaka 



30 Wakaiih-iimiyare 
Helpl or Third S 
40 Asha-aynpe 



., CHICiGti, ILL., U, S. 4. 



Building 
inok1ngBuL-k«kiDora 

ronp o) Indiana aboa 
Camp-Ore 

^•ooking Dinne 

ffawfl bniliinE Knah 
ata 
Iquaw braiding BuatL 

Indian Camp, OJib way 

i™ The Young Ladlr- -' 
Horns. O ] I b ' 

m Olibn-ay Childte 

bt Jno. Ratskin'B Family 
" '^roiipOji'-— - " — ■"■■ 

JlbwajrS 

ing Dim 
57 OJlbway ( 

GraTcJ 
59 Deaerled Camp and 



SSqi 



M Ii 






Grave House 



THE PINE RIDGE AGENCY INDIAN OUTBREAK. 



THAN SIXTY 

Photographed on 
:hiB Coinpreliensiie List i 

to"i?han"e^'' ' ' 

PRICES I 



SELECT EU SLIDES. 



1 Wonnded Knee Battle- 

fleM 
3 Gathering up the Dead, 



Wounded Knee 

9 Fine Ridge Agency. 

Horlh View 
T Pine KIdge Aganry. 

Blrda-eye View '- 

dlBO Village 
g Pine Ridge, 3loux 

9 Pine Ridge, Churcb 

Indians 
10 Fine Ridge, Birda-eye 

Camp 
UPineHldgcLI. S.C 
UPine B^ge. tier 

Carr'a Cainp 
18 Fine BIdge. Grand 

" H fl t i I a B " and 
•■Friendiiee," Chiet 
Talking Bear talking 



Chiefs in 

MlesSickl 

of gniuii 

Pine Kl^dg 



A^nny, 



33 Chief Little Wounds' 

Camp 
t31 Braves Leaving Re sot. 

21 Portrait Sitting Bull 
aa Portrait Louis, Sitting 

Bull's Son 
97 Portrait "Crow Foot," 



Sioux preparing tor 

"MejUrine Man" Dead 
on Field of Battle. 
This Chief made the 
Indians believe that 

Cainp ot "Chiel Toung 
.Man Afraid of His 
Horses." 

Portrait ■■Young Man 
Afraid of Hia Horsaa" 

"e™l"?er""G'r'^""p" 
Agenl's koiiso. Staff 
llfflcera 
So. 1 Buffalo Bill 
" 3 Young SIsnifrald 
" 3 GonoralBi- '-- 



-iword after the Cub- 

ter War 
23 Bation day at Pine 

Kldge 
a Beet Issue at Pine 

Ridge 
30 Chief "Big Rood" and 

Camp 
tSI War Council of the 

Sioux 
33 Pnrtralt Chief "John 

Grass," Chief Justice 

33 Chief "Fast Thunder's ' 

34 Friendly Indiana at 

35 Portrait "Chiet GaU" 
138 "3UlingBull"4jldce.i»- 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SHOES Stt f»MiS.\'a.T. 



161 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



37 Group of Ghost Dancers 

38 Group: 

No.l Chief * 'Kicking 

Bear*' 
No. 2 "Young Man 

Afraid of His 

Horses" 
No. 3 "Standing Bear" 

39 Portrait "Red Cloud" 

40 "Jack Red Cloud," the 

Old Chief's Son, a 
Good Indian 
t41 Ghost Dancers at 
"Wounded Knee" 

142 Ghost Dancers near 

"Pine Ridge" 

143 Chief "Big Foot" Dead 

on Field of Battle 

44 Indian Burial, Body on 

Platform of Poles 

45 Capture and Death of 

SittingBull 

46 Indian Police on Pa- 

rade 

47 General Brooks and 

Staff 

48 Generals Miles, Brooks 

and staff at Mess in 
tent 

49 Wounding of Lieuten- 

ant Hawthorne 



60 Portrait "Running 

Antelope" 

61 "Omaha Dance" 

52 Interior "Red Cloud's" 

Cabin 
t53 U. S. Infantryman in 

Wintei Uniform 
t54 U. S. Trooper in Winter 

Uniform 

56 Chief "Crazy Bear" 

66 Group of Leaders of the 
Hostiles: 
No. 1 C h ie f "Two 

Strike" 
No. 2 C h i e f "Crow 

Dog" 
No. 3 C h i e f 'High 

Hawk" 

57 Comprehensive Group 

of the "Leading Spir- 
its" of the Hostiles 
brought to Fort Sheri- 
dan, Chicago, and 
taken by "Buffalo 
Bill" with his "Wild 
West Show" through 
Europe 

No. 1 Crow Cane 
" 2 Medicine Horse 
" 3 Call Her Name 
" 4 Kicking Bear 



•I 



«t 



«t 



No. 6 Short Bull 
" 6Come and 
Grunt 

No. 7 High Eagle 

8 Horn Eaffle 

9 Sorrell Horse 

10 Scatter 

11 Standing Bear 

12 One Bear 

13 Standing Bear 
No. 2 

No. 14 Kills Close to 

Home 
No. 15 One Star 
«' 16 Know 8 Hifl 

Voice 
No. 17 Bring White 

Horse 
No. 18 Take the Shield 

Awav 
No. 19 Brave 
58 Group of same Chiefs 
as in No. 67. but in U. 
S. Uniforms; No. 67 
shows them in Native 
Dress 
t59 Finding of "Lost Bird" 
the "Little Papoose," 
Three Davs after the 
Battle of Wounded 
Knee 



it 



LOST BIRD. 



»f 



Philadelphia Times : The battle of wounded Knee was followed by a severe blizz- 
ard. On the fourth day, when this had abated, an old squaw called Yallow Bird, one of 
the friendly Indians, in wandering about the field discovered a baby girl. She was in 
the " postan," the board or basket on which the Indian women carry their babies, by 
the side of her dead mother. The soles of her little feet and the top of her head were 
frozen, otherwise, marvelous to relate, she was perfectly well. 

Yellowbird took the child home and cared for her a day. Then she carried her to 
the hostile camp. General Colby, of Beatrice, Neb., heard of the baby and wanted to 
adopt her, so two ladies, one of them Mrs. Acj, persuaded Yellow Bird to go into the 
hostile camp and get the papoose. This she did. 

The papers were then drawn up by which General Colby legally adopted the baby. 
He called her Marguerite Elizabeth, for the two ladies that accompanied Yellow Bird 
into the hostile camp, and brought her safely to him. The Indians called her *' Jintka 
Lanuni," which means Lost Bird. 

Mrs. Colby, who is in Washington, approves of calling her little girl her Indian 
name, and says that if we hear of her in the future, it will be as Jintka Lanuni. 

When Jintka Lanuni was brought to the General she was clad in a red flannel 
shirt and a blue flannel dress. Now she owns eight white frocks, and a white cash- 
mere coat and cap. She takes kindly to civilized life, and delights in her daily bath. 
She probably never enjoyed this luxury before her adoption. Her little head and feet 
are almost well. 

Mrs. Colby was on her way East at the time of the Indian trouble, and the baby 
is in charge oi her sister, who describes her as being about six months old, "as fat as 
a little pig," with dusky skin and dark eyes, and so good natured and smiling that 
everybody that sees her loves her. Mrs. Colby, though she has not seen her, talks 
proudly of "My baby." She and the General will carefully educate the little Indian 
girl and teach her to be a good and useful woman. 

It seems almost a miracle that this tiny baby should have survived during those 
stormy days. One can not but think that she lived for a purpose, and it may be that 
in future years her own race will rise up to bless the name of Jintka LanunL 



60 Portrait Chief "Rain 

in the Face" 
161 Portrait General Miles 

62 Indians on the Trail 

63 Chief "Standing Elk," 

Lieutenant to Chief 
Little Wound; Chief 
"Black Horse" 

64 Group: 

No. 1 C h i e f Two 

Strike 
No. 2 Major Burke 
" 3 Chief Short BuU 
" 4 Chief Big Talk 
** 5 Scout Frank 
Gerard 
No. 6 Chief Kicking 
Bear 



No. 7 C h i e f Good 

Lance 
No. 8 McDonougli 

Mexico. 

City of Mexico. 

1 Chapultepec Castle 

2 The Cathedral 

3 Aztec Calendar-Stone, 

Cathedral 

4 Aztec Stone Idol 

5 Church of La Santissima 

6 Native Cart and Ox- 

Team 

7 Native Water-Carrier 

8 Specimen of Spanish 

Window in Church of 
San Jos6, 1720 



9 Woman in Holiday At- 
tire 

10 Fruit-Stand 

11 Market- Woman 

12 Market Boat 
13 

14 Collecting Pulque 

15 Ox-Team Yoked to the 

Horns 

16 Jacal Native Hut 

17 Harbor of Vera Cruz 

18 The Heman Cortez 

Tree 

19 Chapel of Our Lady of 

Guadaloupe 

20 A Family Group 

21 A Mexican Beggar 

22 " Home 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



McINTOSil B. 



ASD oi'TirAL ca, ciiicAiiO, ill., tt.* 



S7 Street view 
W In the Park 
sg Harfeet Day ([nstanta- 



33 Polteiy Seller 
M Burro and Drivei 
Sa The Water Carriec 

36 The Orange Markt 

37 Ohicken FcddlBr 



M Cathedral Gnadalouti 

CaChedniL .. 
Che Plata 



i1 CaChedniL GuadaLoiipe, 



U An aid ShrU 



La Viga Canal. 
90 Karlf Morning on tl 

B1 Native Barees 

es NallTc WaAierwomen 

83 Unloading [or Market 

84 The Market 
SB On the Canal 



a Shipping I'uhiuB 

3 Waaterwomen 

4 Elti Mor Cada, Ln Viga 



100 Aittr! Pyramid 

101 J-nnorsnia 
lOiOldFonDlninai 

(.■acriurs 
103 Old Church I 












n InthellBngingGaraeaB 

S8 InthellRiigingGHnlena 

Cbapiiltepei'. 
» The Moimtalas 

Chapiiltenec 
eo Garden of Maxln 

Palace, Chanii 
ei MaxiBullian'B 

Chapiiltepec 
S3 The Old Tree, Cliapiil. 



Ptiebln. 
a PanoraaiB, Shoi 
poratapetl 



108 The Market 
110 Group ol Burros 
Hi BflBgars 

112 The Suhurbs 

113 The Ploia 

114 A Street Crowd 

115 Tlie Plaza Major 

lis Street and Church el 

117 Street Showing Cathe- 



120 Panorama 



69 A Meiicanldlehon 
TO General View o( City 
Tl Fatio of Hotel It'u 

72 Panorama Imm Bot 

TS Corridor o( Hotel I tu 

hide 
Ti Cathedral and Plaza 
7S Market 

78 Street Market Snene 
77 Bull Fight, entrauce ' 

the fluhtera 
TS BuU Fight 
TB Bull Fighl, Kemovir 



121 A Group ol 
12B Calle di 



.)' of Ilurroa 
tear the Plaia 



Vei 



■.Crta 



9 The Hurhor and Castle 

" 

1 Street View and Cathe- 

im Old Adohe Chtirch 

133 The Alameda 

134 Gov 



|13B Si 



ol Hotel 



la I,anteel Boats 



14S F rt I Sa J 



Plsza 

158 Ancient Bnll King 

1ST Calhedral Tower 

138 The Cathedral 

ms A Street view 

ISO Panorama from BoUry 

G^tanahiifi£a. 
161 City of Mountains 
lei Street Fountain, lln 

163 Panorama 

164 Cathedral and Plaia 
166 Street and Market 

166 Blrde-ejB View 

167 The Peak from Tent 

168 TheBtation' 

168 The Peak from Vera 
Ornz R. K. 



10 On the Rio Blanc 



isa On the Rio Bin- 
IBS Saltve Carrlagi 
ISO Old Gateway 
191 On the iCoari 
pan go 



\mdalu}ura. 
earn Yoked I 






FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 12T. 



163 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A. 



198 Palace of GoTemor 

General 

199 Old Walls 

200 £1 Casa de Caridad 

201 The Alameda 

202 Church of San Jose. (In- 

terior) 

203 Street Scene 

204 Mule Carts 

205 Donkey Water Carriers 

Cordova. 

208-An Old Wall 

207 A Fancy Garden 

20S A Lane in the Tropics 

209 A Street Corner 

210 Native Washerwomen 

211 Banana Grove and An- 

cient Bridge 

212 Native Fireworks Shop 

213 Street and Mountains 

214 Hotel Diliigensias 

215 Street Scene in the 

Tropics 

216 Esteban 

217 Road in CofTee Planta- 

tion 

218 A Bank of Ferns 

219 Native Hut by the Way- 

side 

220 Pineapples 

221 A Hilly Street 

222 An Ola Street Comer 

223 Jacinto. (Servant) 

224 Fruit Sellers 

225 Native Huts, Environs 

of Cordova 

Irapuata. 

226 Ancient Church and 

Plaza 

227 Pottery Market 

228 Market Place 

229 Strawberry Venders 

230 The Plaza 

231 A Coffee Stand 

' Tolucca. 

232 Court of Hotel Leon de 

Oro 

233 Principal Street 

234 The Cathedral 

235 Christ Church 

Chih/uahua. 



236 Cathedral, full view 

237 '• Grand En- 

238 Cathedral and Plaza 

239 " and Street 

240 Church of San Filipo 

241 <' Guadaloupe 

242 Mexican Adol>e Houses 

243 Roof Dwellings 

244 Aqueduct 

245 A Loaded Burro 

246 Apaches Squaw Prison- 

ers 

247 Zacatecas Panorama 

248 Old Bridge at Acambaro 
24^ R. R. Restaurant on 

Mexican Central R. R. 
2.50 The Fairlie Engine 
251 Paso del Norte, from 

the Church | 

262 Paso del Norte, from ' 

the Cathedral 

253 Station of San Jose, M. 

C. R. R. 

254 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the East 

255 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the West 



256 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the Mint 

257 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the Mint 

258 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the Cathedral 

259 Chihuahua, Panorama 

from the Cathedral 

260 Chihuahua, Panorama 

fi*om the Cathedral 

261 The Cathedral 

262 East Door of the Cathe- 

dral 

263 North, or Front Door of 

the Cathedral 

264 In the Bell Tower 

265 Fountain in the Plaza 

266 Street Merchants 

267 The Mint 

268 Hidalgo's Prison in the 

Mint 

269 Church of Guadaloupe 

270 Church of San Fran- 

cisco 

271 Church of San Fran- 

cisco 

272 The Corridors 

273 In the Market 

274 Pasco de Guadaloupe 

275 Pasco de Guadaloupe 

276 Pasco de G uadaloupe 

277 Wash Day on the Pasco 

278 Wash Day on the Pasco 

279 Oxen and Carreta 

280 Water Cart and Donkey 

281 Section of Old Aqueduct 

282 Zacetecas, from the 

Railway 

283 Zacetecas, from the 

Railway, Showing 
Train 

284 Zacetecas, from the 

South 

285 Zacetecas, from the 

South 

286 Zacetecas, from the 

Bufa 

287 Zacetecas, from the 

Bufa 

288 Zacetecas, from the 

Bufa 

289 Zacetecas, from the 

Chapel on the Bufa 

290 Zacetecas, the Fountain 

291 Zacetecas, the Fountain 

292 Zacetecas, the Alameda 

293 Zacetecas, Yucca Palms 

294 Aguascalie n t e s, the 

Plaza 

295 Aguascalie n t e s, the 

Palace 

296 Aguascalientes, Monu- 

ment in the Plaza 

297 Aguascalientes, the 

Paroqua 

298 Aguascalientes, Church 

of Guadaloupe 

299 Aguascalientes, Church 

of San Marcos 

300 Aguascalientes.the Ala- 

meda 

301 Aguascalientes, Bath 

House at Hot Springs 

302 Aguascalientes, Bath 

House at Hot Springs 

303 Washing at the Hot 

Springs 

304 The Hot Spring Pool 

305 In the Garden of San 

Marco 

306 In the Garden of San 

307 Pottery Market 



308 Fountain in the Market 

309 A Market Scene 

310 Ferraterria (Hardware 

Merchant) 

311 Zapataria (Shoemaker) 

312 Tortillas, Grinding the 

Grain 

313 Tortillas, Making the 

Cake 

314 The Encarnacion 

Bridge 

315 Lagos, General View, 

Snowing Cathedral 

316 Lagos, the Cathedra! 

from the River 

317 Lagos, River View 

318 Lagos, the Cathedral 

319 Lagos, the Bridge 

320 Salamanca, the Plaza 

321 Salamanca, the Plaza 

322 Salamanca, the 

Churches 

323 Sa iamanca, the 

Churches 

324 Salamanca Well and 

Water Carriers 

325 Salamanca, Well and 

Water Carriers 

326 Salamanca Cactus Stud 

ies 

327 Salamanca Cactus Stud 

ies 

328 Salamanca Cactus Stud 

ies 

329 Salamanca Cactus Stud 

ies 

330 Salamanca Cactus Stud 

ies 

331 Salamanca, the Pet 

332 Salamanca, Straw Cot 

tages 

333 Guanajuato, Genera! 

View from the South 
Side 

334 Guanajuato, General 

View from the South 
Side 

335 Guanajuato, General 

View from the North 
Side 

336 Guanajuato, General 

View from the North 
Side 

337 Guanajuato, Street 

Market 

338 Guanaj ua to. Water Car- 

riers at the Fountain 

339 Guanajuato, Study of a 

Water Carrier 

340 Queretaro, Panorama 

from the Church of 
De La Cruz 

341 Queretaro, Panorama 

from the Church of 
De La Cruz 

342 Queretaro, Fountain 

near the Church 

343 Queretaro, Fountam of 

Santa Clara 

344 Queretaro, Fountain in 

the Market 
.345 Queretaro, Fountain in 
the Market 

346 Queretaro, Market 

Scene 

347 Queretaro, Street Scene 

348 Queretaro, Pottery Mar- 

ket 

349 Queretaro, the Aque- 

duct, with Train 

350 Queretaro, the Aque- 

duct, with Train 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



McISTOSH BATTEKT AND OPTICAL CO,, CHICAGO, ILL., U. f 



il Qneretsro. the Aqat. 

Aaot, vitb Tmn 
19 Queretaro, the Aqiie- 



1W8 City o( Mexiri], Laren- 



theCai 

IS The Oat of Nochietongo 

(7 OiCr oi Meiivo, (he Pal- 

»i:;e, trom the Uathe- 

)8 OiW of Mexloo, the 

FalRce, from the Ca- 
thedral 

n Oi^ of Mexico, the 

tbedrai 
» City ol Mexico, Popo- 
FAtspetl and Ixtac- 
chlhiintl,, from the 



3SB Citr nt 

M&rke 

3M Citj of 3 



! CltTo 

of Cai'gadoree, Aqii< 

38S Citvot MBKico. Studies 

dui'tand Fountain 
3St CltT or Mexico, Sludiei 
of Cargsdorea. Aciue- 

385 City of Mextro, SlndLes 

of Cargadares 
3Se Citv ol Mexluo, SCiidies 

of Burro with Pot- 

387 CIEt □( Mexico, Statue 



3S3 0[t7 of Mexic 



IS Oil; ot Mexico, South. 
n-eat Irom the Cathe- 
dral 

38 Oitr ot Mexico, the Ca- 
thedral 

ff City ol Mexico, the Cu. 

» Oitv of Jlexico, Calls 

nateroB 
a CitT ol Mexico, Church 

of Hjpolito 
™ OUT ot Mexico. Church 

Ol Giuidalonije 



'a Olty of Mexico, Chapel 

o) GoadalDupe 
IB OitT of Mexico, Chapel 



of the SptiiiK.' FrODC 
8TS 0[^ at Mexico, Chapel 

of the anrtng. Id tenor 
m OitT ot Mexico, Pount- 

tin, In Square o( San 

Dominffo 
STTOItjot Mexiro, FouDt- 

omof aalto del Agua 
era OitT of Mexico, Fount- 
am, near the Garden 

of Chapiileepoc 
S7> OitT ol Mexico, Stndj 

of AgiiBdoreB 
nOOitT^ Mexii-o, StndT 

ol AKnadoroa 
181 City of Mexico, Stndy 

of Agnadorea 
M OitT ol Mexico, Stud; 

ol Agnadorea 
aei Oltj ol Mexico, Studf 

Mi OitT of Mexico, Study 

ot Agnadorea 
sag City 0? Mexico, Oouies- 

tio iDterlor, Making 

Tortillaa 
989 City of Mexico, Domea- 

Kilchen 



Not he Trlste 



Popotia 
ty of Mexico, Court o 
.he National Muaeun 
103 City of Mexico, Saori 



02 City of Mexico 



409 City of MexiRO, the Idol 
Taoyaonilqni 

urn City ot Mexico, Calen- 
dar Stone 

W7 City ol Mexico, Group 
of Idola in Natlooai 
Museum 

MS City ol Mexico, Gronp 
of Idola Id Natloaal 



City ol Mexlno, Hnit- 
iilopochtli in National 



«I City of Mexico, Coilec- 
tionaol Idols and Tot- 
tery, Winged Vase 



4U City of Mexico, Coilec 
tiona ot Idols am 

41S City ol ilexico, CoUee 
tions ot Idola am 

llBCityol Mo xlro, Coilec 



41S City ol Mexico, the 

Castle ol Chapuliepeo 
frtim a Maguey Field 

480 City of Mexico, the- 
CaaCle of ChapuUepec 
the Gaidens 

421 City ot Mexico, the 
castle of Chapallepec 
Soldiers' Monument ■ 

as Cityot Mexico, Monte- 



Oi City of Mexico, Grore 

of Chapultepeo 
ty ol «exico, C 
if Chapultepeo 
■ - ^ J, C 

»a7 Clty'of 'Mexico, GroTfl 

ot Chapultepec 
as City of Mexico, Canal 

de' la Vlga. Market 

429 City ot Mexico, Caonl 

de la Vlga, Mackat 

430 City ot Mexico, Canal 

de la Vign, i Boat 

431 City of Mexico, Canal 



43SCI17 (.- , , 

Garita de la Vlga 

134 City ol Mexico, Stti 
Cottage at Ixtacaic 

ISS City ot Mexico, t 
Cninanipas 

436 City of Mexico, Bnat 



IKS Ixtacchlbuati, from 

13B Ixtacchlhuatl, Irom 

Tlamacaa 
110 Popocatapetl, from Tla- 

141 View IR the Crater of 

Fopocatapet! 
Ue View In the Crater of 

Popo<«tapetl 



Ul Cuaulla, Street Groups 
4S3 Pyramids o( San Juan 



''¥^o'?it 



6 Pyramid ol the Sun, 
from Pyramid ot the 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



165 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



458 Idol found near the 
Pyramid of the Moon 
499 Chamay Excavations 

460 Church of SanSebastian 

461 Texcoco, the Cathedral 

462 Texcoco, the Court 

463 Texcoco, Fountain in 

the Plaza 

464 Texcocingo, Ancient 

Stairway 
466 Texcocingo, Ancient 
Excavations 

466 Texcocingo, View from 

the Summit 

467 Puebla, Genei-al View 

from Cathedral 

468 Puebla, General View 

from Cathedral 

469 Puebla, General View 

from Cathedral 

470 Puebla, the Hotel Dili- 

gencias 

471 Puebla, the Cathedral 

472 Puebla, the Bells in the 

Tower 

473 Cholula, the Pyramid 

474 Cholula, the Pyramid 

Front 

475 Cholula, Interior of 

Chapel on Pyramid 

476 Cholula, from the Pyra- 

mid 

477 Cholula, View Looking 

East, Showing Malin- 
che 

478 Pulquero, in Maguey 

Field near Pyramid 

479 Orizaba, from the Bridge 

Looking Up 

480 Orizaba, from the Bridge 

Looking Down 

481 Orizaba^froni the Bridge 

482 Orizaba, from the Bridge 

483 Orizaba,f rom the Bridge 

484 Orizaba, a Street View 
486 Orizaba, Lane of Ba- 

nana Palms 

486 Orizaba, Market Scene 

487 Orizaba, in a Coflfee 

Grove 

From Kodak Negatives by 
W. J. Karner. 

488 Front of Cathedral', Ag- 

uas Calientes 

489 The Plaza, Aguas Call- 

entes 

490 Cathedral and Street 

Scene, Aguas Calien- 
tes 

491 Mexican Laundry, Ag- 

uas Calientes 

492 Mexican Central Rail- 

way Station, Aguas 
Calientes 
^3 Natural WaL— Tampico 
Division, Mexican 
Centml Railway 

494 Saltillo Falls, Tamasopa 

Canon, on Tampico 
Div., Mex. Cent. Ry. 

495 Mexican R. R. Camp, 

Tampico D i v i s io n 
Mexican Central Ry. 

496 Village of Roscon, a 

Station on Tampico 
Division, Mex. Cent. 
Rv. 

497 Mexican Village and 

Palm Trees on the 
Tampico Div. Mex. 
Cent. Ry. 



498 Group of Natives, on 

banks of Topila river, 
near Tampico, Mexico 

499 Street Scene opposite 

Hotel Jardin, City of 
Mexico, showing Na- 
tive Pedlars and Na- 
tive Costumes. 

500 City of Mexico, from 

Cathedral Tower 

501 City of Mexico, taken 

from the tower of the 
Cathedral called 
" Sheridan's Tower," 
for during the Mexi- 
can War the people, 
awoke one morning to 
find that Lieut. Sher- 
idan (after Lieut Gen. 
U. S. A.) had during 
the night suc- 
ceeded in getting a 
Cannon on tne top of 
this tower and placed 
it in position to com- 
mand the entrance to 
the Palace 

502 Pulque Saloon, City of 

Mexico 

503 Pulque Vender and 

Cart in City of Mex- 
ico 

504 Market Scene, City of 

Mexico Sunday Morn- 
ing 

505 In the Market, City of 

Mexico, Sunday Morn- 
ing 
503 Street Scene, Citv of 
Mexico, Sunday Morn- 
ing 

507 Statue of Charles 4th, 

on the Paseo (Boule- 
vard), City of Mexico 

508 Mounted Police on the 

Paseo (Boulevard), 
City of Mexico. 

509 Guatamozin Monument 

and Statue, on the 
Paseo (Boulevard) , 
City of Mexico. Gua- 
tamozin was a son of 
Montezuma and king 
of the Aztecs, tor- 
tured by Cortes. 

510 Castle of Chapnltapec, 

the porion occupied 
by the President of 
the Republic as a sum- 
mer residence 

511 The great Cedar " Mon-* 

tezuraa," in the 
grounds at Chapnlta- 
pec, near the Castle. 

512 Monument at Chapnl- 

tapec, erected in mem- 
ory of the Mexican 
officers killed in the 
Mexican war. 
613 Arbol Trieste. The tree 
under which Cortes 
wept on being obliged 
to leave Mexico 

514 Native Mexicans 

515 Station and Market at 

Gaudaloupe, near the 
City of Mexico 

516 Beggars and Pilgrims 

near the Cathedral 
at Gaudaloupe, near 
City of Mexico 

517 Chapel and Spring 

House, Gaudaloupe 



518 View from Hill at 

Gaudaloupe near City 
of Mexico, showing 
lake and Snow moun. 
tains in the distance 

519 Cemetery where Gen'l 

Santa Anna is buried, 
on Gaudaloupe Hill, 
near Mexico 

520 View of Country along 

line of Mexican Na- 
tional R. R., between 
City of Mexico and 
Toluca, taken from 
train 

521 Station on Mexican 

National R. R., show- 
ing Native Indians 

522 Nochistongo. The great 

drainage ditch near 
City of Mexico. Ta- 
ken from train on 
Mexican Central By. 
(Ferro Carril Mexi- 
cano) 

523 View of the Alamo» 

San Antonio, Texas 

Hawaiian Islands.— Tlie 
Sandwich Islands. 

From a series of ne^^- 
tives made by our Artist 
during a recent trip to this 
Paradise of the Pacific. 
Many of the negatives are 
on 14x17 plates. Remem- 
ber this is a new list never 
before oft'ered to the pub- 
lie. 

Price per Slide 

Uncolored $ .50 

Colored, Round 

Mounted 1.50 

Colored, Square 

Mounted 2.00 

Views of this character 
are only colored after order 
is received. 

Map of Pacific Islands. 

1 Date Palms 

2 Harbor Honolulu, with 

Shipping 

3 Cocoanut Grove on line 

of Oahu R. R. 

4 Punch Bowl Drive, out 

of Honolulu 
6 Cocoanut Trees, show- 
ing Cocoanuts on Nu- 
ano Ave. 

6 Lunalilo Home for 

Aged Hawaiians 

7 Wine Palms 

8 Hawaiian Yard 

9 Top of Punch Bowl 

10 Traveler's Tree 

11 Punch Bowl Drive No.2 

12 Royal Hawaiian Hotel 

13 Date Palm Avenue 

14 Roval Palm Avenue 

15 Band Stand in Palace 

Grounds 

16 Kaiulani Avenue 

17 Government Building 

18 General View Lunalilo, 

with Mountains i n 
distance 

19 Bishop Museum 

20 Natives in Canoe 

21 Giant Palm 

22 Nuano Avenue 

23 National Palace 

24 Peak of the Pali 

25 Hawaiian Roadway 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MCINTOSH BATTERY .1 




ICAL l«., CHICAGO, ILL., U.B.J 



■A Sutns et Kamehametia 

ISO siig&r urn 

61 Sugar Cane nnrt Mnngo 

G2 Familv or Lepers on 

MolokHi 
03 Queen Emma's Keal- 

Bl Chinese Temple 
<ii Crater o( KiJauea 
W Lava Flow li«l 
fl7 Intcr-lslsEd Steamer 
<W Rcwnm-T In Uawul 

Berltanla 



Colle; 



eie 

Qlu. Dt» 



fl Under . 
templati 

7 Weifcan I 

S Mexican Cavali 



Oat — Con- 
li^n Peasants 



a Caugbt .Sajipiiig 

S A Group Dl [-[ooaLams 

10 Among the ^ils 

11 The French Market— 



IK St. Louis 
17 Panoranm 

Square 
IS Corner of 

Philips. . . 
19 Corner Dl Ro^nl and Du- 

SO A Streel^ Cobbler 
ai The Rue Royale 



A Creole Home — The 
!7 SugarCaneandOrftngaa 



ai ^..HDai rhireet, :3untn 
SB St. Charles Hotel 
36 United States Onstom 
Home and Post-Offlee 
40 Exebanire Alley 
tl Stuck in the Mad 



4 Italian Cen 



71 Leland University — 

Group of Students 
T! A Palmetto Swamp 

73 Bavoii La Furche 

74 AWlldemeBeoTGroiTih 
Til A Live Oak Swamp 

7A The Moss gatherer 

77 A Home on the Lake 

78 Steamer Land In ic~ Low- 

er MUsiealpui 

79 Seenealjy the way 
m An Inrlined Plane 



Jefferson DavlB— Cot. 

e Beauvoir. the Home ot 
Jefferson Daria — 
QnartBM 

O Beauvoir. the Home of 
Jefferson Davis— On 



09 Lee Monument 



9 Waahlngtoa Cemetery 

10 Metaire Cemetery 
ii nn«ai street 

aoofLoulB Philippe 



d'cityHall 



render of the olty 
aula Cemetery 
>n Levee, MTissIi 



I and I 103 Omnge Tree 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



167 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



112 West End Swamp View 

113 ** Torpedo made 
for Farragiit's Fleet 

114 On the Tchfunctcha 

River, a pinewoods 
farmhouse 

115 On the Tchfunctcha 

River 
IIB A Bayou on the Teh. 
functcha River 

117 A Bayou on the Teh- 

functcha River 

118 A Reach on the Tch- 

functcha River 

119 A Reach on the Teh. 

functcha River 

120 A Reach on the Teh. 

functcha River 

121 The State House, Baton 

Rouge, Louisiana 

122 Baton Rouge, from the 

River 

123 Baton Rouge, from the 

River, showing street 
where Farragut's men 
landed 

124 National Cemetery,part 

of the battlefield 

125 Magnolia Cemetery, 

part of the battlefield 
where the fightmg 
took place, both sides 
firing from behind the 
tombstones 

126 Spot where Gen. Allen 

fell 

127 The Penitentiary(fight. 

ing took place all 
around here and loop- 
holes were made m 
the walls through 
which to shoot) 

128 Port Hudson, landing 

place from the Confed- 
erate Fort 

129 Remains of the Confed. 

erate Fort, Port Hud- 
son, extreme right of 
Confederate line 

130 Port Hudson, Fort and 

Battery overlooking 
the Mississippi 

131 Port Hudson, Breast- 

works and Ditch 

132 Port Hudson, where 

Wilson's Zouaves 
charged 

133 Cotton Field behind the 

Breastwork 

134 Breastwork west of the 

Confederate line 

135 Breastwork, angle of 

fort 

136 The Slaughter Pen, 

place where the col- 
ored troops were 
slaughtered 

137 The Pond— sight of the 

magazine which was 
exploded 

138 On the Levee 

139 " •• (instanta- 
neous) 

140 Mississippi Steamers 

141 Cincinnati Packet 

142 A Cotton-Steamer 

143 Loading Cotton, on the 

Levee 

144 Steamer Natchez, larg- 

est steamer on the 
Mississippi 

145 Jackson Square 

146 St. Philip Street 



147 Street Cobbler 

148 The French Market 

149 T.omb Building, Metura 

Cemetery 

150 Avenue of Tombs, 

Washington Ceme- 
tery 

161 An Ivy-Covered Tomb, 
Metura Cemetery 

152 French Man-of-War La 
Flora 

163 French Man-of-War La 
Flora, deck view 

154 French Mau-of-War La 

Flora, Crew and Deck 

155 Post Office and Custom 

House 
166 Dining Room of Hotel 
Royal 

157 Levee Scene— Steamer 

Natchez 

158 Side Vaults or Ovens, 

Old St. Louis Ceme- 
tery 

159 Tomb in the old St. 

Louis Cemetery 

160 General View Old St. 

Louis Cemetery 

161 Confederate Monument 

Greenwood Cemetery 

162 Avenue in Greenwood 

Cemetery 

163 Entrance to Chalmette 

Cemetery 

164 Soldiers' Graves, Chal- 

mette Cemetery 

165 Avenue of Side vaults, 

Metairie Cemetery 

166 Mausoleum and Live 

Oaks, Metairie Cem- 
etery 

167 Stonewall Jackson 

Monument, Metairie 
Cemetery 

168 Old House on the Bat- 

tlefield of New Or- 
leans 

169 Jackson Monument on 

Battlefield at New Or- 
leans 

170 Group of Live Oaks un- 

der which Sir Edward 
Packenham died, 1815 

171 Government and State 

BuildiM.New Orleans 
Exposition 

172 Exposition Grounds 

from the River 

173 Mexican National Quar. 

ters, New Orleans Ex- 
position 

174 PLanter's House on the 

Mississippi 

175 Steamboats Loading Su- 

gar 

176 Cotton Teams and Su- 

gar Refinery 

177 Negro Women Fishing 

178 TheUniversityCommon 

179 Bumside's Mansion 

180 St. Charles Street and 

St. Charles Hotel 

181 Birds-eye view of Span- 

ish Fort 

182 Louisiana Jockey Club 

House 

183 Louisiana Jockey Club 

House and Grounds 

184 Gipsy Camp 

185 Old Court House where 

General Jackson was 
tried 



186 French Tomb buUt 1812, 

Old St. Louis Ceme. 
tery 

187 Palmetto Palm, 26 feet 

high 

188 Jackson Barracks from 

the River 

189 Birds-eye view of Jack- 

son Square 

190 A Private Residence 

191 Main Building, New 

Orleans Exposition 

192 Tiled Roof, French 

Quarters 

193 Cabin of a Mississippi 

Steamer 

194 Margaret Monument 

and Female Orphan 
Asylum 

195 Statue of Henry Clay 

196 Haunted House, the 

Ghost 

197 Excursion Boat on the 

Mississippi River 

198 Group of Negroes on 

theXevee . 

199 Group of SailingVessels 

200 New Cotton Exchange 

201 Frepch Opera House 

202 Moresque Building, 

Camp Street 

203 Parish Prisons 

204 Franklin Statue and 

City HaU 

205 Oyster Boats 

203 Steamer John W. Can- 
non, leading 

207 In the Park 

20S Arched Avenue in the 
Park 

209 Ferry Boat on the Mis- 

sissippi 

210 Loading Cotton 

211 Loading Trucks with 

Cotton 

212 On the Levee 

213 On Lake Pontchartrain 

214 Fishing on Lake Pont- 

chartrain 

215 The Landing on Lake 

Pontchartrain 

216 Arch in the Park, Lake 

Pontchartrain 

217 On the Levee, Shipping 

Cotton 

Chalmette BaUle/ield, 1814. 

218 National Cemetery, site 

of 1814 Battlefield, 
where Gen. Jackson 
and Staff* stood during 
the battle 

219 Unfinished Monument 

to Gen. Jackson,mark- 
ing the left of the 
American line 

220 Another view, looking 

toward the British 



position 
View lookii 



221 View looking toward 

Gen. Jackson's Mon- 
ument, east of the 
American line 

222 Live Oak Trees under 

which Gen. Packen. 
ham died 

223 The spot where the 

General died, a figure 
marks the spot 

224 American Center of the 

line looking toward 
the River 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



I KnTtliiTDrks, 02 Street-V[ew [iatU 



looking toward Cbc 
Kiittliah right of at- 

Flnrlda. 

I Fort Pickeni— Pensa- 

a Fort Plckena, Ea«t 

Sldo 
3 Fort Piclteoe, Froatiug 

I— Twanty- 



se Watei 



flve-to 



T Yard 



6 I'aKoiic Street— Pensa- 
9 Clcy Gatea— St. Avigvia- 



13 St. George Street. Nortb 

14 Oldeat House— Dr. Cat- 



UO 



'g Roalden 



Side 



I 

■ 

I 



IS Marine Street 

17 Old Snaniah Catbedml 

la Old slare Marliet 

19 Slave Harket and Plaza 

50 Slave Market, Near 

View 
31 Slave Slarket, Interior 
ffl A Tropical Pavadiae 
33 Fhlloilelptiia Honae 

51 VUlH Zorayda 

S3 Old House in Charlotte 

Street 
as SpiDlBh Gatheclral, Bide 



place 



n'illiam. 



Sa A Monster Live. Oak 
B3 Little Hlnorcan Girl 
S4 A Sloepy Pair (ot Don. 

keyaj 
90 A Group ot Uooteys, 



3S Tbe Two Dromioa 
SB FmitB ot tbe Soil 

40 WUllama' ManBlan 

41 Cabbage -Palm 

41 St. Au^iallne, Troiii 

St. AuguMUK. 



U City Gated (ins 

«T OM Spatilsb Cat: 
4S The Citv Gates 
IB The Oldest House 
to United States llai 



Spauiab Fort, St 
Sfirco 
Water Battery and Hot 

Martello Tower, Fort 



BB Old Frencb Church 
ion Tbe plAxa and Santa 

Monica 
101 Post Offlca Corner 
ue The Slave Pen 
ItK A Street 
104 From the Blrer 
ion Entrance to Fort 

lOi Water Battery, Fori 

WT Tbe Sea Wall 

tMarlo - 

t Marii 

t Marii 






111 Fort Marlon the Moat 
Ua Fort Marlon Wat«h 
' Tower and Incline 

— First Ent. to Ft. Marion 
, 114 North Beai-b 
nTower IIS The Old Monument on 

the riau 
Garden Maipuilla. 

3 teon, lis Magnolia Sleamboat 



IT Tropical U 



U« N 



1 Ponce de Loon, 



Grounds of Cordova 
34 Ponce do Leon, tull 

SD Ponce de Leon. Grand 
Entrance (Instanta- 

ee Tbe Ponce de Leon, 
Entrance 

87 Tbe Ponre de Leon, 

Arched Doocway 

88 The Poni'H de Leon, 

8B The Pouve de Leon, 






t9,00( 



iponeae Bazaar 

1 Charleaton Hotel- 

Charleston ' 

9 Washington Square- 
Charleston 

3 Marion Square and Bar- 
rack s-i; harleslo n 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127- 



ft) The Har 



a Hotel 
ui un tne St. John's KlVGt 
ill Boat landing 
31 Saulbel Island Light 

Georgia. 

ThamaiviUe. 
1 Tbe Court-HouBB (in- 

5 Monsler^lve Oak 
a street Scene 

4 Broad Street 

6 Crooked Tree, Talla- 

Imase Koad 



9 PlneywoodB Hotel En- 



17 On the Oc^lohone; 

Savannah. 

18 Avenae ot Live Oaks 
IB Bona Ventura OemS' 

20 Hanging Moas on Live 
Oaks. Bona Ventura 

22 The Chain Gang (in- 
■'■"ntaoeousl 
Hood, Atlanta 
where General 
McPheraou tell, near 



^cP 

Atlanta 

South Car 



169 



MCINTOSH BATTEKY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



4 Citv Hall, Meeting 
Street— CJharleston 

6 Battery Park— Charles- 
ton 

6 Custora-House-Charles* 

ton 

7 Huguenot Church- 

Charleston 

8 Meeting Street-Charles- 

ton 

9 Beauregard's Head- 

quarters during the 
War— Charleston 

10 Residences on the Wa- 

ter-Front 

11 St. Phillip's Church 

12 Cotton Wharf, from the 

Battery 

13 The Battery 

14 A Street View 

15 The Park 

16 On the Battery 

North Carolina. 

1 Round Knob Hotel 

2 Round Knob Hotel and 

Fountain 

3 Railroad Bridge on Mill 

4 Viaduct Bridge 

5 High Trestle— W. N. C. 

Railroad 

6 Old Round Knob Hotel 

7 Viaduct and Fountain 

8 Deep Cut near Round 

Knob 

9 Big Fill Trestle, Look- 

ing Down 

10 Viaduct Bridge and 

Fountain 

11 Cascades on Mill Creek 

12 Big Fill Trestle, Look- 

ing Up— Height 165 
feet 

13 Big Fill Trestle 

14 Tunnels between Lick 

Log and Mcllroy 

15 Entrance toSwannanoa 

Tunnel 

16 Blue Ridge, near Royal 

George 

17 Mount Mitchell Hotel 

18 View froraMt. MitcheU 

Hotel 

19 Distant View from 

Mount Mitchell Hotel 

20 Black Mountain Station 

21 French Broad River, 

near Asheville 

22 Main Street— Asheville 

23 Bajptist Church— Ashe- 

ville 

24 Episcopal Church— 

Asheville 

25 Swannanoa Hotel— 

Asheville 

26 Swannanoa Hotel Cor- 

ridor— Asheville 

27 Swannanoa Hotel, Din- 

ing-Koom— Asheville 

28 A Village Market-Cart 

— Asheville 

29 County Court-House- i 

Asheville ' 

30 French Broad River— i 

Above Asheviire ; 

31 Beaucatcher Mountain 

32 View from Connellys' 

33 Beaucatcher Knob 

34 Beaucatcher Knob 

36 Asheville from Con- 
nelly's 



36 Colonel Connelly's 

Residence 

37 Iron Bridge over the 

French Broad River 

38 A Village Cider-Cart 

39 A Group of Villagers 

40 Asheville from Reser- 

voir Hill 

41 Asheville from Tah- 

keeoskee Farm 

42 Summer House— Rich- 

mond Hill 

43 An Ideal Home 

44 A Reflected Image 

45 A Village Jubilee 

46 View of the French 

Broad Valley 

47 Hotel at Alexanders 

48 Major Black well's Ho- 

tel 
^ Turnpike House 

50 Chalybeate Spring 

51 Turnpike House and 

Railroad 
62 Saw-Mill— Stony Creek 

53 Court-House, Haywood 

County— Waynesville 

54 White Sulphur Springs 

Hotel— Waynesville 

55 Waynesville— East 

56 National House— 

Waynesville 

57 From Court-House 

Tower— West 

58 Baptist Church— 

Waynesville 

59 Methodist Church- 

Waynes ville 

60 Eniscopal Church- 

Waynes ville 

61 Group of Cherokee In- 

dians 

62 Panorama of Waynes- 

ville 

63 Public School— Waynes 

ville 

64 Balsam Mountain 

65 Waynesville from 

Cobb's Knob 

66 Waynesville from 

Court-House 

67 Sulphur Springs 

68 Summer House — Hotel 

Grounds 

69 Old Mill on Stony Creek 

70 Rustic Foot-Log— 

Stony Creek 

71 Summit of Balsam 

Mountain 

72 Balsam Hotel 

73 Cascades of Scotch 

Creek 

74 A Tobacco Farm 

75 Cowee Tunnel 

76 Whittier 

77 Panorama of Charles- 

ton, N. C. 

78 Tuckaseegee* River at 

Charleston 

79 Tuckaseegee River 

above Charleston 

80 Junction of the Tucka- 

seegee and Tennessee 
Rivers 

81 View of the Tuckasee- 

gee River 

82 Cascade of the Tucka- 

seegee River 

83 View on the Tennessee 

River 

84 Bridge over the Ten- 

nessee River 



85 Marble Cut— W. N. C. 

Railroad 

86 A Mountain Home 

87 A Rock House — Nanta- 

hala River 

88 A Corn-Cracker, Native 

Grist MiU 

89 Cat Stairs— Terminus 

of the Murphy Divi- 
sion, W. N. 0. K. R. 

90 A Mountain Farm 

91 Nantahala River at 

Nelson's 

92 Nantahala Valley at 

Nelson's 

93 Fish Dam— Nantahala 

River 

94 A Home in the Moun- 

tains 

95 Corn-Crackfer 

96 A Moonshiner's Camp 

97 A Mountain StiU 

98 A Mountain Slope 

99 Cascades of Nantahala 

River 

100 Cloud on the Mountain 

101 Valley of the Noonday 

Sun 
103 The Chain Gang 

103 A Picturesque Cabin 

104 North Carolina Grist- 

Mill 

105 Log Cabin— Family 

Group 
103 Corn-Cracker and 

Flume 
107 Valley of Valley River 
lOS Plowing in Western 

North Carolina 

109 On the Mountain Trail 

110 Panorama of Murphy 

111 Court-House of Cnero- 

kee County 

112 The Hiawasse River 

113 Macon County Court- 

House 

114 Corundum mines, In- 

terior 

115 Corundum mines. Ex- 

terior 

116 Whiteside Mountain 

117 Satulah Falls 

Alabama. 

Montgomery, 

1 The River 

2 Fountain and Street 

3 Jefferson Davis' House 

4 House at which Lafay- 

ette Stopped 

5 Mobile. Mississippi 

Steamer at the Levee 

Mississippi. 

Vicksburg. 

1 Pemberton's Headquar- 

ters. A cave under 
the house is where 
Pemberton took ref- 
uge from the Federal 
fire 

2 Hill upon which Whist- 

ling Dirk was placed 
to rake the Federal 
fleet upon the Missis- 
sippi 

3 The River from the top 

of the Hill where the 
gun stood 

4 Vicksburg, from the 

River 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MCINTOSH BATTEEV ASD OPTlfAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. tl 



s Spot where I 
Grant rnid Pe 

S Fort Hill from I 



11 Is the Heart ol the 

12 A Cane Brake on Pearl 

BtTBr 
IS In the Swamp 
It The Monarch of the 

Swamp, the largest 

IS In the Heart ol the 
Swamp on Pearl River 

10 Interior ol Contefierate 
Works, Gnind Gulf, 



1 Blchuiand, tro 



LiWiy 



S Tensce on Biirk Hill 
3 Main Bt., M'aahiugton'a 

headqnarters on the 

right 
1 Main Bt. 

e View from Burk Hill 
B WaabinKton mDniiment 
7 Old Sonlhem reaidence 
S Hatnial Briilge 






I Fortre 



U'JohnB 
U Panorax 
U Decka 



18 3Utuea( 

Canitol 
IS SlBEDeof PatrivkHenr? 

In Capital 
U at. John'B Chnri-h where 



hoaee in Itit^hniond 

ra Pieiident Monroe's 

Tomb, Holyn-ood 



ngton'B Head- 
rall Jacfcoan'B 



39 Klrhniaud oter the 

James Riier 
to Railroad Bridge, Jam< 



ters, with lowuindiB. 

« MsBsachHsettB Battery, 
near the Srott Houae 

4fl Group in front ol Scott 
Honae 

46 Slave Qnartar, Scott 
House 

17 Gen, Snmner's Head- 



ta Slimner'a Croaaing 

49 Toinli of Waahingtoo'f 

Mother 
60 Nnrie'9 Heights 



le Sational Cemetery 



:e Monui 
'. the Bernard 



67 Waehinglou, from Ar 

Unglon Heights 
fiS Arlington Heights 

68 The Drive at irlingloi 
RO The Henrj' House 

near the Hanry Houai 

Thoroughrare Gap 
63 The BatSefleld when 
Gen. Bee fell 



ee The Old g^tone House 

67 The Koiil at Sndley 

Springa 

68 The Old MUi near Slid. 

ley Ford 
60 .Stonewull Ja<' kson'a pO' 



Lon^street'^ poaitif 

Pike, near Grore 
Scene of Last Cliarge of 

HMIncurWf 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEI 



80 Ely's Ford Road from 
roof ol ChBDCellor 
Houae 

Bl Stone, marking spot 
where Stonewall Jaok- 

82 Position o( Federal Ar- 
tillery,:^ giina, on Hill 

53 Scene of Charge of Bth 

Penn'a CavaTrT 

54 DowdBll's Tavern 

Sn Old Wilderness Church 
and MeUieLlhBncellor 

mchnumd. 



8 WashingWn Monument 



Bowling Green 

93 Raaideuce of Jeffaraon 

Davla(dnringlbewar) 

94 LihbyP-'— ' 

96 The ^BtionaicVir 



li Cemetery 

Flag"*' 
B7 Confederate Monument 

(Pyramid), Bollywood 
SS Monument to Gen. J. E. 

B. Stewart, Holly. 

wood CenietBry 
99 View ol Belie Isle from 

Hollywood Cemetery 

100 Statue of Washington, 

101 Fort Rice 

""TFort Mabone, C. S. 4, 
Fort Hell 
: Fort Sledmaa 



WilliaiiU6uri/. 

107 The Old Court Honaa 
■-1 The Old Powder House 
I Main Street, WlUlama- 

I The Old Churchyard 

Wjlliainahutjr 
. William and Mary Col- 

; PreBiilenfs House, Wil. 
ilnm and Mnry College 

E PAGE 127. 



171 



3ICIXTOSH BATTERY AN'D OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A. 



113 The Rarine, WUliams. 
burg 

lU Fort Magrader, Inte- 
rior 

115 Fort Magruder, Earth- 

works 

116 Camp Meeting Shout- 

erg, Xegro 

117 The Old Episcopal 

Church, Interior 

Mount Vernon. 

118 Steamboat Landing 

119 Washingrton's Home 

120 Batler's House 

121 Butler's House 

122 Entrance to Washing. 

ton's Tomb 

123 The Sarcophagrus, Wash- 

ington's Tomb 

124 The Tomb of Washing. 

ton 

125 The First Tomb of 

Washington 

126 Porter's Lodire 

127 Walk on the Potomac 

128 View from Window of 

Washington's Chamber ' 

129 Old Toh^k Church 

130 The Mansion 

131 General View of Wash- 

ington's Tomb 

132 Washington's Bam 

Maryland. 

Baltimore. 

1 Battle 3Ionument 

2 Pennsylvania Railroad . 

Station 

3 P. R. R. Station, In- ' 

terior 

4 Pennsylvania Railroad ' 

Train.Shed i 

6 Sunken Garden i 

6 A Stately Mansion j 

Ardietam. ' 

7 The Potomac Canal and | 

Dam near Shan>sburg j 

8 BhiflT near Sharpsburg, 

where Philadelphia 
Com Exchange Regi- 
ment was destroyea 

9 Part of the Batcleneld 

10 National Cemetery, 

Granite Statue, <*At 
Rest" 

11 View looking towards 

Mc/Clellan Tleadquar. 
ters from (Cemetery 

12 View from National 

Cemetery toward Old 
Dunkcr Church 

13 Looking down Bloody 

Lane 
U The Old Dunker Church 

15 The Battlefleld from 

Old Dunker Church 

16 Burnside's Bridge 

across the Antietain 

17 View of Antietain 

Creek from Burnside's 
Bridge 

18 Burnside's Battle- 

ground from the road 

19 Ruins of the Boteler 

Mansion, Shepherds- 
town 

20 Confederate Monu- 

ment, Shepherdstown* 



WasUni^ii, D. C. 

1 U. S. Treasury Build- 

injr, full view 

2 U. S. Treasury Build. 

ing, north front 

3 Statue of Gen. Bawlina 

4 The Arbor at Arling- 

ton 

5 Arlington 

6 Soldiers' Cemetery at 

Arlington 

7 Soldiers' Home 

8 Soldiers* Home and 

Grounds 

9 The Army Med. Muse- 

um, old' Ford's Thea- 
tre, where Lincoln 
was shot 

10 War, Navy, and State- 

Departnients 

11 Smithsonian Institu- 

tion 

12 Chain Bridge on the 

Potomac 

13 Equestrian Statue of 

Gen. Scott 

14 Residence of Hon. 

James G. Blaine 

15 Statue of Com. Porter 

16 Equestrian Statue of 

General McPherson 

17 Statue of Admiral Far- 

ragut 

18 Euuestrian Statue of 

5laj. Gen. Geo. S. 
Thomas 

19 Equestrian Statue of 

Gen. Jackson 

20 U. S. Capitol 

21 The John Howard 

Pavne Monument, 
Oak Hill Cemetery, 
Georgetown 

22 Corcoran's Museum of 

Art 

23 Statue of Gen. Scott, 

Soldiers' Home 

24 Equestrian Statue of 

Gen. Washington 

25 Grand Opera House 

26 Freedmen's Bureau and 

New York Avenue 

27 View of the Long 

Bridge 

28 Top of the Long Bridge 

29 White House, north 

front 

30 White House, south 

front 

31 White House, north 

front, draped Aug. 
8th, 1885 

32 White House, south 

front, and view of 
grounds 

33 White House, east 

front, and view of 
grounds 

34 View of the grounds. 

Soldiers' Home 

35 Washington Monument, 

general view 

36 Washington Monument, 

close view 

37 Residence of L. N. 

Anderson, dining, 
room 

38 Residence of L. N. 

Anderson, study 

39 Residence of L. N. 

Anderson, parlor 

40 U. S. Capitol, full view 






41 U. S. Capitol, Snpreme 

Conrt Chamber 

42 House of Representa- 

tives, interior 

43 Senate Chamber 

44 U. S. Cai^tol, the Presi. 

dent*8Boom 

45 r. S. Capitol, Lobby of 

the Senate Cbamber 

46 The White House, East 

Boom 

47 The White House, Blue 

Boom 

48 The White House, 

Green Room 
48 The White House, Red 
Room 

50 U. S. Capitol, choice 

view 

51 Arlington, Soldiers' 

Monument 

52 Jackson Square 

53 U. S. Capitol, the Senate 

Wing 

54 U. S. Capitol, House 

Wing 

55 The U. S. Post Office 

56 Falls of the Potomac 

near Washington, 
D. C. 

57 Pennsvlvania Avenue 

with* Capitol 

58 A Comer of the Treas- 

ury Building 

59 Baltimore ft Potomac 

Railroad Station 

60 Baltimore ft Potomac 

RaUroad Station, Din- 
ing.Room 

61 Baltimore ft Potomac 

Railroad Station, In- 
terior of Waiting. 
Room, showing star 
marking spot where 
GarfleldT was shot 

62 United States Capitol 

and Bartholdi Foun- 
tain, from Botanic 
Gardens 

63 United States Capitol, 

from the south 

64 Statue of Washington 

in front of United 
States Capitol 

65 Statue of Columbus in 

front of United SiJtates 
Capitol 

66 Statue of Ciyilization 

and Barbarism in front 
of United States Capi- 
tol 

67 Peace Monument and 

Capitol 

68 The Garfield Monument 

69 Emancipation Statue of 
Lincoln 

70 Pennsylvania Avenue, 

from the Treasury 
(instantaneous) 

71 Smithsonian Institu- 

tion, W. front 

72 Entrance to National 

Museum 

73 National Mu8eum(front) 

74 National Museum (in- 

terior) 

75 Grounds of Agricul- 

tural DeiMtrtment and 
Smithsonian 

76 National Encampment, 

1887 

77 National Encampment, 

1887 (inst). 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



n Unl 



>SH BATTERY ANU OI'TKAL CO., t UICA' 

IB The White Unnie Uon- 
ID The While House Cod- 
ISO The.Whtte Ueuse Ooa- 



81 United States Ptttent 

62 Beeiilence of CMneae 
I-egBtlon 

83 United Statee Naval 
Objerratory 

M X-iaeb Eqimlorlftl Tele- 
Btope, allowing c«un- 
terpoEees. United 
SWtcs NSTot Observa- 



le Mnuston. Arlington 

.._ _jeRo8trnm, Arlington 

133 TheRoetnin], Arlington 

"\ The Drive, Arlington 

I The Offliier*' GraTB 

lai The Holdierg' Grareg, 



138 The Fountain. OS 
Howard Payne 



Bcope. showine 
BttacbmentB. tin 
States Naval Obae 

87 Panomnia tram 



88 Panorauia from tho 

Naval ObBerrntory 

Coaan 
B9 Bridge and College at 

Georgetown acroaa 

the Fotomac 
W Gatevay of ArltnKlon 

Sational Cemetery 
Bl Arlington "" — ■■- -■ 



a Ueniorlal t 



^■acade and 



I Arlington 
.pllol_^ull , 






la eiraet 



UD In the Botanirj 



tSffiS 



j mTha White fe 



Mon 
a In Oal 



138 Tomb of Co™ 
Hill reinetery 

137 Entrance to Arlingt 

138 Pennsvlva'nia Ave 

from Treaeury 

139 Penngylvaiiia Ave. a 

140 White *" 



SS Ground Flan of I 

M Department of Agric 

87 The Treasury (n 

flS The White Home, goi 

tront, fnll view 
m Datlonal Muaenm (full ' 

Un ThB Treasury llnilding 

{fnll view) 
HU TnUn Shed, Ponnsyl- 

Tania B. K. 
101 BntUh Legation 
IDS Chlneae Legation 
UM Bnislan Legation 



B Laying tha corner- ' 
atone of IT. 8. Capitol, ' 
Sept. M, 1783 

7 Flni Innngnraljan of 
Gen. Wa»ElngtoB,17S> , 



) Aliegorlnal B 






» Slate, War, and Navy 
Dewrtmeni BDildlng 
(1 The Capitol 
la The Capitol— Pull View ■ 

iS Front of Capitol 
M Kntrance to Oapilol 
X Capitol from Smlthson. 

16 Capitol— Full View 
from Northwest 

II TrBasnry 



Door— Capito 



WuhinglOD 
Hill Cem( 



Capitol — Weil 
Capitol — Main 



Gnrdeiis 
iardena of White 



Ul I 

Capitol Doort, Broiae. 
112 Fnll View of Rogers' 

Bronie Doora 
143 Colnnibti* examined be. 
(ore the Council of 
Salamanca 
I Columbua' departi 

la. Knblda 



l« Starting of Colut 
IromPalos.onhis 

TOJTlKe 

U7 First lanaine of ___ 
Spaniards a^ San Sal- 



O The triuiuphal entry of 



iviUzation 
IG senate Cliambe 

IS Ball or Repreaei 
— U. S. OttpJloi 



Southwest 

14 panorama ol Washii 

ton from Capito 



lew from Dome 



1C3 Battle of Dixoker Hill. 

IS3 Battle of Monmouth, 
1776, and rebuke of 
Gen, Lee, the traitor 
Yorktown, Va. 178 L 
Gallantry of Hamilton 
Hessian aoldiers. 
dealh-strngglB wl 



IS The Potc 



10 ThePotomnotrom Dome 
in Capitol 



a CarfleltT Memorial T. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



173 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



197 Arlington National 

Cemetery— National 
Pavilion 

198 Arlington National 

Cemetery— Soldiers' 
Monument 

199 Arlington National 

Cemetery— Old Slave 
Quarters 

200 Arlington National 

Cemetery— Mansion 

201 Arlington National 

Cemetery — Main 
Gateway 

202 Arlington National 

Cemetery — The 
Speaker's Stand 

New Jersey. 

Princeton. 

1 Stony Creek Bridge 

Battlefield 

2 Quaker Meeting-House 

on the Battlefield 

3 Tree under which Gen. 

Mercer was shot 

4 Mercer or Clark House 

where Gen. Mercer 
died 
ft Grave of Jonathan Ed- 
wards 

6 Graves of Aaron Burr 

and Jonathan Ed- 
wards 

7 Com. Stockton's House 

and Grounds 

8 Seminary and Theologi. 

cal Building 

9 West College and Quad- 

rangle 

10 East College and Quad- 

rangle 

11 Nassau Hall 

12 Witherspoon Hall 
LS Scientific Hall 

14 Library and Dickens' 

Hall 
16 The Observatory 

16 Philadelphian Society 

Building 

Cape May, 

17 Full side view of New 

Iron Pier 

18 View from Iron Pier, 

North 

19 View from Iron Pier, 

South 

20 Lateral View of the 

New Iron Pier 

21 Cape May from the New 

iron Pier 

22 On the Beach from the 

New Iron Pier 

23 Pier and Steamer 

24 On the Beach from the 

Iron Pier 

25 Lateral View of the 

Iron Pier 

26 The Stockton House 

from the Iron Pier 

27 On the Beach at Cape 

May 

28 On the Beach 

Atlantic City. 

Instantaneous Bathing 
Scene, Crowded Beacn 

The Pier from the 
Board Walk 
« Bathing Scene 



32 The Beach South from 

Pier 

33 The Beach North from 

Pier, showing Light 

34 Watching the Vachts 

35 A Crowded Beach and 

Board Walk 

36 Racing in the Inlet 

37 Instantaneous Marine 

38 Board Walk, Crowded 

from the Pier 

39 Instantaneous Bathing 

Scene.Crowded Beach 

40 Instantaneous Marine 

41 Beach toward inlet 

42 Howard's Iron Pier 

43 Applegate's Pier and 

Beach Scene 

44 Crowded Beach and 

Bathers 

45 The Beach and Apple- 

gate's Pier 

46 Surf Bathing 

47 Crowded Beach and 

Bathers 

48 Crowded Beach and 

Bathers 

49 Applegate's Pier and 

Beach 

50 The Lighthouse and 

United States Life- 
Savmg Station 

51 Bathers on the Beach 

52 «« «• ♦• 

53 " «* " 

54 The Seaside 

55 P. & R. R. R. Station 
66 Atlantic Avenue 

57 Disstons' Cottage 

58 Hotel Brighton 

59 " " Seaside 

60 " " the Office 
and Hall 

61 Hotel Brighton, the 

Parlor 

62 Hotel Brighton, the 

Parlor 

63 Hotel Brighton, the 

Dining lloom 

64 Hotel Brighton, the 

Cafe and Billiard 
Room 

65 Hotel Brighton, the 

Sea Porch 

66 Crowded Beach 
67 
68 
69 Burlington, Old St. 

Mary^s Church 

American History. 

Colored, per slide, 91.60. 
Plain, 60c. Very choice, 
being made from the finest 
steel engravings. 

1 Landing of Columbus, 

1492 

2 De Soto discovering the 

Mississippi 1521 

3 Landing of Hendrick 

Hudson, 1609 

4 Smith rescued by Poca- 

hontas, 1607 

5 Marriage of Pocahon- 

tas, 1613 

6 Embarkation of Pil- 

grim Fathers, 1620 

7 Penn's treaty with the 

Indians, 1682 

8 Retreat of Braddock, 

1755 









9 First Prayer in Con- 
gress, 1774 

10 Boston massacre, 1775 

11 Boston tea party, 1775 

12 Struggle on Concord 

bridge, 1776 

13 Retreat of the British 

from Concord, 1776 

14 Battle of Lexington, 

1775 

15 Battle of Bunker Hill, 

1775 

16 Washingtontaking,com- 

mand of the army, 1776 

17 Capture of Fort Ticon- 

deroga, 1776 

18 Evacuation of Boston, 

1776 

19 Declaration of Inde- 

Wpendence, 1776 
ashington crossing 
the Delaware, 1776 

21 Battle of Bennington, 

1777 

22 Surrender of Burgoyne, 

1777 

23 Indian massacre at 

Wyoming, 1778 

24 Treason of Arnold, 1780 

25 Surrender of Oom- 

wallis, 1781 

26 Inauguration of Wash. 

ington, 1789 

27 The first Cabinet, 1789 

28 Deathbed of Washing- 

ton, 1799 

29 Battle of Tippecanoe, 

1811 

30 Commodore Perry at 

Lake Erie, 1813 

31 Death of Tecumseh, 

1813 

32 Gen. Jackson and 

Weatherford, the In- 
dian chief, 1814 

33 Battle of New Orleans, 

1815 

34 Battle of Buena Vista, 

1847 

35 Bombardment of Fort 

Sumter, April 12, 1861 

36 Massachusetts regi- 

ment passing through 
Baltimore, 1861 

37 Assassination of Ells- 

worth, 1861 

38 Battle of Rich Moun- 

tain, 1861 

39 Battle of Bull Run, 

July 16-19, 1861 

40 Battle of Ball's Bluff, 

1861 

41 Battle of Wilson*8 

Creek, Aug. 9, 1861 

42 Bombardment of Port 

Royal, 1861 

43 Battle of Roanoke Is- 

land, Feb. 8, 1862 

44 Battle of Mill Creek, 

1862 

45 Battle of Pea Ridge, 

1862 

46 Bird's-eve view of Fort- 

ress Monroe 

47 Capture of Fort Donel- 

sou 

48 Battle of Pittsburg 

Landing 

49 Battle of Newbern, 1862 

50 Battle of Kelly's Ford, 

1862 
61 Capture of New Or- 
leans, April 25, 1862 



»R PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



^^^ 




- -. 


MCINTOSH BATTKRY ASlt OPTKJAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., i:. S, A. 17* | 


»2 Naval combat batwiian 


a Eagle on Shield 


« V. S, Cruiser, Atlanta, 


Monitor ancl Marri- 


4 Liberty and Banner 


■SSff' ■■" »*• 


map, March S.lWi 




33 Naval combat hatween 


e Soldiers' lioiiie ' 


44 U. S. 3. Brooklyn 


Kearsarge and Ala- 


7 Woman's miaslon 


ja ;; K " **'''"''8 


bama 


B Home from the war 


47 Keceiving^Shrp'^SlunB- 


M Battle ol Fair Oaka, 


9 Tramp, ti^ainp. tramp. 


»,.s-\rA.,»u.,. 


Set ot 2 alldea 


sota 




4S U. S. Cruiser Newark 


Sflpt. 17, MM 
3H Bomtardment of iBland 


BUn-or-War. 


49 U. S. Cruiser Newark 






Ho. 10, 1M2 




SO French Frigate Are. 


67 Battle of 9hllob,WB 


H.SO. 




BS Attack on Frederlcka- 


1 Group of the OWeet 


61 Franch Frigate Roland 


bnrg. Dec. 1», IHS 




^..tef-iCu'M,. 


flS Dead aronnd the flag of 


2 Training a IS-lnch Gun 
on a Man-of-war 


the sch Ohio. rcBd- 


nerve 




3 View of Man-of-war 


S3 U. S. Training Ship Now 








Pnlaiki, MB 

61 Battle of Vlmamibnrg, 


4 Man-of-War— Smr-deck 
SThePlvot-gualJrill 




inore 




D O- a. S- Swatara 




«a Attack or gunboats on 


7 Euelncers and Stokers 


Gun Deck 


Memphi»fl8«B 


on a Man-of.War 


08 Truining « in. Rifle Gun 


83 Battle olMalvem Hill, 


8 A Msn-of-War - the 


as stand fiy the Anchor 


UN 


PortamoQth 


fll Battle of C'hantlllT. ijsflS 


"JKSfS"""" 


413 Battle of Mnrfreesboro, 


60 Sailors Danaing 

81 Broad Sword Eierclae 


1889 


10 Gun-deck on a Mao-of- 


^'T^y.^^-'""''- 




82 SBvan Bells, U. S- S. 


11 Cajiuin'8 t'abin 

IS Onfcera in the Ward 




4T Battle of GettrgburK. 


63 At the wTieel 


Jnly l.a, wsa 


Hoom 


B4 U. S, 3. Boston golBg to ' 


4IS Battle DfChiekamauga, 


13 Caixain-s Parlor 


Sea (Moonlight) " 


Sept. 18-20. isaa 






4S Battle of Lookout 


IS Broadalde View of a 




Mountain, Kor. 24, 


Monitor 


88 Scinadron of Evolution, 
Vhile Squailron 


W8S ^ 


la Double-Turretted Mon- 


70 3ie« of Port Hudson, 


itor in Dry Dock 


67 Sqoadron under Fire at 
e& HotchklsB liBTolvtng 


Tl Battle of KnoxvillB, 


U- S. 9. Huron, Kilty 


\ne3 


Hawk Beach 


Cannon " 


7S Battle of Mobile Bay, 






1984 




*^'^B"d"e "■'"'■ "" '''^ 


73 FarrajfiU Iflahea to the 


9) '■ yantlc 


70 Gatlling Gun in Action 


riKgfiig. Mobile Bav 
7*BatTJe Sf the Wilder- 


21 ■• Oaippoe 

as '■ Osipnee and 

Vantic. (Bow view) 
B3 U. S. 3. Atlanta, (Bow 


71 U. S. S: PensacolB Sa- 
in ting 


nea8.MayO-8, 18B4 


72 Beadv for Action on 
deefc of Cruiser At- 


7S Attack on Fort Was- 




Tiewj 


lanta 


70 Sherman'a iiiareh 


» V. S, S. Atlanta, (Broad. 


73 Gun Deck, V. S. S. Pan. 


through Georgia, Dec. 


as ufs.U Atlanta. (Choice 


aacola 






74 U. 8. Cruiser Philadel. 


77 Oaptnre of Atlanta, 


view) 


phla 


IdH 


BS V. S. S. Dolphin 


7fl U. 8. Cruiser Newark 


78 Capture of Savannah, 


27 Kirnigen Emma. Flag- 


(Bow View) 


lau 


ship of the DnlPh 


78 U. 3. Cruiser Newark 


7S CaMiira of Fort Fiaher, 


Navy 


(Broadside) 


2SKmnigen Emma (Bow 


77 U. 3. Cruiser Newark 






78 W^Br'"col^^ Coaster 


Morgan, imi 


2B Uotch Admiral In his 


81 Capture of Poterebiirg, 
iprilS, 16«n 


Barge 


Island Newport 
79 Jeanette Konament, 


30 Deck of Steamer Rich- 


SS Bmranclor of Gen. Lee, 




U.S. Naval Academy; 


April 3. imi 




Aunopolis 
BOU, S. Training Ship, 


BBFlnit reading of C»e 






Sea 


Fencing *^ 


■nation 


32 Offlcers of Steamer 


81 U- S- Training Ship, 




Richmond 


Knotting and Splic: 


bam Lincoln. .April U, 


33 Tapping the Beer 




IS65 


M Spinning a Vom 




S Capture of Jeff Davia, 
Any 10, 1^ 


li Faring a^rivot Gun 


33 Reading Articles of 


3ft The liancingBeftr 




O) AisasBinntion of Gur- 


37 (liir I'eLlDnsCer] 


SlCadota Studying on 


neld. ISMl 




Training Ship 




39 " ■' ■■ ■ Boston 


tt Gunnarv Practice on 








laKetlaneous. 


m U. 3- Cniiaer. Boston 

41 U.8"cnilBflr.Yorktown 

42 ■■ " Atlanta, 


a Amed-'an flBj! 


diluting, and Yards 


SS aiinaling. U. S. 8. Bob. 


FOR PRICE 


LIST OF SLIDES SE 


E PAGE 127. 


mk 




1 



175 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. S. A. 



89 Manning Yards, U. S. S. 

Boston 

90 Gun Mounted Aloft, U. 

S. S. Boston 
*01 Looking out for Tor- 

Sedo Attack, U. S. S. 
OS ton 

92 Junior Officer's Quar- 

ters, U. S. S. Boston 

93 Single Stick Exercise, 

IJ. S. S. Boston 

94 Admiral's Cabin, U. S. 

S. Chicago 

95 Ward Room, U. S. S. 

Chicago 

96 Spar Deck, U. S. S. 

Chicago 

97 Gun Deck, U. S. S. Chi- 

cago 

98 Captain's Cabin, U. S.S 

■Baltimore 

99 Spar Deck, U. S. S. Bal- 

timore 

100 Battery Deck, U. S S. 

Atlanta 
101 Berth Deck, U. S. S. 
Atlanta 

102 8 in. Gun, U. S. S. At- 
lanta 

108 Berth Deck, U. S. S. 

Enterprise 

104 Marine Guard, U. S. S. 

Enterprise 

105 At Quarters, U. S. S. 

Enterprise 

106 Barber Shop, " Next," 

U. S. S. Enterprise 

107 School Ship St. Mary 
106 U. S. Monitor Mianti- 

noniah (Bow View) 

109 U. S. Monitor Mianti- 

noniah (Broadside) 

110 U. S. Monitor Mianti- 

nomah (Stern View) 

111 Stand By to Lay Aloft, 

U. S. S. Richmond 

United States History— 
Early. 

Plain^ SO cents; Colored, 
fl.60. 

1492 to 1881. With Read- 
ing. 

1 Landing of Columbus, 

1492 

2 De Soto Discovering 

Mississippi, 1521 

3 Marriage of Pocahon- 

tas, 1613 

4 Landing of Pilgrims, 

1620 

5 Penn's Treaty with the 

Indians, 1682 

6 Battle of Lexington, 

7 Battle of Bunker's Hill, 

1775 

8 Declaration of Indepen- 

dence, 1776 

9 Washington Crossing 

the Delaware, 1776 

10 Washington at Valley 

Forge, 1777 

11 Indian Massacre at Wy- 

oming, 1778 

12 Action of Serapis and 

Richard 

13 Capture of Major An- 

dre, 1780 

14 General Marion and 

British Omcer, 1780 



15 Surrender of Comwal- 

lis, 1781 

16 Lafayette at Mt. Ver- 

non, 1782 

17 Macedonian Captured 

by Frigate U. S., 1812 

18 Commodore Perry at 

Lake Erie, 1813 

Modem U. & History. 

Plain, SO cents; Colored, 
fl.60. 

19 Battle of Buena Vista, 

1847 

20 Scott entering Mexico, 

1848 

21 Bombardment of Fort 

Sumpter, 1861 . 

22 Battle of Bull Run, 1861 

23 Capture of Fort Donel- 

son, 1862 

24 Naval Combat, Monitor 

and Merrimac, 1862 

25 Reading of Emancipa- 

tion Proclamation, 
1862 

26 Battle of Antietam, 1862 

27 Siege of Vicksburg, 1863 

28 Battle of Gettysburg, 

1863 

29 Battle of Lookout 

Mountain, 1863 

30 Siege of Petersburg,1864 

31 Kearsarge and Alabama, 

1864 

32 Farragut at Mobile Bay, 

1864 

33 Sherman's March 

through Georgia, 1864 

34 Surrender of Lee, 1865 

35 Assassination of Lin- 

coln, 1865 

36 Assassination of Gar- 

field, 1881 

Prang;* 8 American Civil 
War. 

With Beading. 

Plain, SO cents; Colored, 
fl.SO. 

1 Sheridan's Final Charge 

at Winchester 

2 Battle of Fredericks- 

burg 

3 Sheridan's Ride 

4 Battle of Gettysburg 

5 Battle of Antietam 

6 Battle of Spottsylvania 

7 Battle of Chattanooga 

8 Battle of Kenesaw 

Mountain 

9 Alhitoona Pass, or 

♦♦ Hold the Fort " 

10 Siege of Atlanta 

11 Siege of Vicksburg 

12 Battle of Shiloh 

13 Capture of New Orleans 

14 Monitor and Merrimac 

15 Battle of Mobile Bay 

16 Kearsarge and Alabama 

17 Battle of Fort Hudson 

18 Capture of Fort Fisher 

South America— Brazil. 

Rio Janeiro. 

1 Harbor of Rio Janeiro 

2 Brazilian Packet— Ves- 

sel entering the Har- 
bor 

3 Palms in the Botanical 

Gardens 



4 Botanical Garden— En- 

trance 

5 Avenue of PalniB 

6 Corcovado (Broken 

Back) 

7 Avenue of Palms and 

Corcovado 

8 A Tropical Bit— Botani. 

cal Gardens 

9 Looking through Palms 

toward the Corcovado 

10 A view in the Botanical 

Gardens 

11 Tropical Shrubbery, Bo- 

tanical Garden 

12 Picturesque View of 

Rio Janeiro 

13 Tree Ferns in Botani- 

cal Gardens 

14 Corcovado from Botan- 

ical Gardens 

Bahia. 

15 Plaza del Customs 

16 Rue de Commerco 

17 Church of Bomflm 

18 Ocean Tramps 

19 View toward San Anto- 

nio Light House 

20 Harbor View— North 

21 " " South 

22 Instantaneous view the 

Bay of All Saints 

23 Panorama, from Bay of 

All Saints 

24 The Theater 

25 A Calieta or Sedan- 

Chair 

26 Slaves Carrving a Load 

27 Our Servant Domingo 

28 A Slave Woman with a 

Turban 

29 A Slaye Wonuin with 

Long Curling Hiair 

30 A Slave Woman with 

Child on her Back 
81 A Slave Making Straw 
Hats 

32 Bahia off Cape San An- 

tonio 

Pemamimw, 

33 View is the Harbor 

34 Panorama of the Harbor 

35 Fernando de Noronha— 

Brazilian Convict Set- 
tlement 

36 Fernando de Noronha— 

Brazilian Convict Set- 
tlement 

Dutch OfHana. 

37 Arawak Indians 

38 Group of Ackawoi Indi- 

ans 

39 A Servant Girl, Native 

40 A Native Indian 

41 Carib Indian, Female 

42 Creole Girl 

43 Ackawoi, Female 
Creole Woman 
Native Indian, Female 

44 Servant Girl, Native 

45 Native Indian, Male 

46 Native Creole Girl 

47 Native Indian] Iwith 

String of Fish 

Peru. 

4vS Harbor of Callao 

49 Street in " 

50 Bridge at 



C( 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MCIST08H BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHIOAOO, ILL., V 



ID the Wharrei. Callao 

Kt On the ges Wall. 

S3 Chureh at " 

04 Street in 

S9 HoUEiti)!; Cattle AlKwrd 



B front of Church of S 



oa Church of Siin FraiitiB- 

B7 A Wayaida Shrine, near 
Limn 



BuUdln 









iUhual™, 
il ng in Ilie 



Sammer Httnee In t 

In the Expofliti 
— Grounds. Lima 
70 CAthedralat Lima 
90 Municipal Palace, Liiiu 

SSObnrohot San Fianc 
H Inoa Moand, ueac Li 



KOn the Oroya R. I 

■ near Varunraa 

■ Iocs Terraces on tl 
S Oroya K. E. 

IB Vemgaa Bridge, on t) 

il Vern gas Bridge, un tl 



lU Strei 



quipa 



--^■e.Areqnipa 
lew. Arequlpa 



fro 



107 Streerview, Arequipa, 
10^ Panorama of Arequipa 
109 Paiiorania of Areqnjpa 

"° '""""'" "'t"Si 

.of Areqiupa 



B On lliB Oroyn 



H Lkn 



■ CUtimli of Se 

la street v&w, A 
" •"!« Bridge at .' 






3 Pauon 

1 Areqiii^oi 



120 On the OntskirCa 

121 MuniclpaV Palace, A: 



136 Street View [o Puoo 
IM tiHlBway in Puno 

137 Carnival Time, Puno 
199 A (jnlet Street in Pdi 



Peru 
i,» Street In Pi; 

136 Cathedral 

men to, at I 

137 Hnrricane I 

138 Ruin of an 

way, at Tl 

139 Ruin of an I 



t Tinhu- 



nni-e to the Harboi 
le Shore. Mollenda, 



IM Straits cil Magellan 

Ui3 Lode Pasaage, Stra< 

ol MnicelliLn 



136 Biver Front, Guayaq ail, 

Ecnador _ 

U7 Market Boats in Gnay. 

aquil narbor 
LW RlTBT Front, Guayaquil 
UO Front Street.tinayaqu II 
ISO Oalhedral, Guayaquil 
101 Market Whart. Gu&ya.- 

quU, from the ElTer 
IS! Water Carrier, Mule 
with Breeches, Guay- 
aquil ^ 



IBS Native Village, i 



168 EcuaiiorBan Dueouts, 

Gnya RIter 

169 Fanorama of Guayaquil 
no Bodeiras. Ecnodor 

171 The Whar- "- — 

172 Up the Rli 



t. Bodegaa 



179 View near Balsapampa 

180 Seek and Ve Shall Find 

181 Tropic • ■■ - " 



182 Native Houses I 

183 Tropical Viai 



the Audes, E 






LIST or SLIDES SEE PAGe.J 



Ni);lit at Balsapampa, 
Eonador "^ 

US TropicAl Foliage In the 
CordiUeras, Ecuador 

1S4 Ecuadoroan Dwellings 

195 On the Road to Chimin, 

196 Strcetof Chliubo, Eciia- 
1B7 Pliiiaat Chlmlio, Ecni- 



» »■ ,- 1 1 t ■ - -i-v-a It 10* a: =1. 
W) C's T.ie X w^ ':' .-.^ailcr iXl >.'"! : 



. ii-si a** V ..0:01 






»^ ."O ::i- i -ait - ■ i-na-ia "»' 







ncs _s- r^ = 



Mcintosh batteuv a 



Al. CO., ClllOiUO, ILL., U. f 



»t Cornar of Iji Pai 



3S1 Street, Kitcben 



P85t La P 
las Alarni 
inln 
BM Thet 
Sfi7 La Pi 
356 Geniii 
sea P1&ZH 



854 La Paz and MC IlLii 

Alameda und Mt. lUii 

mini and Trees 
The tlnziiHt LnPaz 
La Paz 
358 GennralTieiToILaPni: 
— '-■ ZH of La Pai 

(he SutiiirbB of 



I aes PBnoramN at Lake Tlti- 
1 SBl Indian B07. Lake Ti 



Indian Woman. Lake 



I 870 " " 

■~ ■e.Inca Moiina, Lake 
_ TiCtcava 

flat S. S. Acuclia on Lake 

mtJ3 Indian Boat, Lake Titi- 

Wk* Rock Fommtiou, Lake 



B Titi 



ame on Late Tlll- 

R Old Tower on the Shore 
o( Lake TitH^ca 

Ancient Seatot Juetlce, 

Lake Tltlcaca 
luca RuioB, Lake Tlti- 

IDOB, Garden, Lake 

14 Inca Baiiaing Stone, 
Bolivia 
Sative Grass ItoaCa on 
LAke Titli^aca 
na Imm Rnlns, BoQvia 
3ST Conrtyard of Nin Capa. 



« Sacred Virj 



o( Copa. 



SM ." Cross or AiabBB- 

ter, Copncobana 
380 The Oathedral ol Copa- 

391 General View of Copa- 



397 Whart at Valparaiso 



«»3 The Bauk of V 
*03 Post onice. 



VnlpamiBO Koad, Chik 
413 SanliaKO, Chili 
114 Hill orsnnta Lnce 



on Gateway 

419 Drive, Santa Ln 

420 Spanieh Acined 



"K 



B, ^nta Lucea 



426 Tliester nl Santa Liici 
m The Calicanto Bridg 

43S Lake 'at the guinta 
Normal, Saalis)^ 
,ake at the Qninta 
Sornial, Santiago 

430 Lake ac the Qninta 

43! Museum ' and Lace, 

InMnm in Qninta No 
mal, Santiaica 
433 ninsenni in Qniuta No 



443 Cathedral, SanCiago 

idral, San 
theUrni. San 



theilral, San 



W Shipping in Harbor, Vfll- ; 44fl Interior Ca 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SI 



4S1 Hotel de Francii and 

Plaia, Santiaso 
4G3 Ox Team, Santiago 
403 Alameda, " 

tS6 

4Se statue in tlie Alamedii, 

467 Fruit SeUers in the Ala- 
meda, Santiago 

458 Lower Alamefla, Santi- 

ago 

459 The Mint. Santiago 
4flO Post Office, Santpigo 

482 Theater of SI. Lncea, 

463 Mnn^clpal Theater, San- 

4M Municipal Palace anil 

Plaza, Sanliago 
400 Municipal Palace, San. 

46H MnnMpal Palace, San- 

487 InteKSr Governor's 
Palace, Santiatro 

468Eoom in Government 
Bllihlinil. S ant la™ 

4fl9 Interior Senate Cham- 
ber, Santiago 

470 Private Residences, 

Santiago 

471 Street View in Santiago 



lew In Park Culsino, 
Santulgo. Chill 
477 Lake in Park Oiilain' 
Santiago. Chili 



mtiago 



5 Vlen 



ir SsnC 



K 

493 Panorama of Iqulque, 

490 FoiiiiTain in lUa Plaia, 

491 rathedralnt 









Chill 



IDES SEE PAGE 127. 



179 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., U. 8. A. 



486 Andes Mountains, Chili 

AOfJ «( <( « 

^Og << << <t 

489 Crossing the Andes, ** 
600 Post Station in the 
Andes, Chili 

501 Crossing the Andes, 

Chili 

502 The Cumbre Andes, 

Chili 
ft03 The Cumbre Andes, 

Chili 
504 Post Station of Juncal, 

in the Andes, Chili 
5(» View in the Andes, Chili 

503 Crossing the Andes, 

Chili 
507 Early Morning in the 

Andes, Chili 
503 Pass of Ui^spillaton, 

Andes, Chill 

509 Chilian Andes 

510 Post House in the An- 

des, Chili 

511 Mount Aconcagua, An- 

des, Chili 

512 Hotel, Mendosa, Chili 

513 Hot Springs, Chili 

514 Baths of Cauqueras, 

Chili 
615 Boad to the Baths of 
Chilian 

516 On the Way to the 

Baths of Chilian 

517 The Baths of Chilian 

518 " " •* 

519 View at Lota, Chili 

520 Cuaca Dance, *♦ 

621 A Chilian Country Fair 

522 Inca Inscription Stone, 

Chili 

523 Native Chilian Carts 

524 Indians Masquerading, 

Chili 
526 Vineyard in Chili 

526 Antes de OJos 

Uruguay. 

527 HaH)or of Montevideo, 

TTruguay 

528 Harl)or of Montevideo, 

Uruguay 

629 Harbor of Montevideo, 

TTruguay 

630 Boarding the Steamer 

at Montevideo 

631 Waiting to Land Pas- 

sengers at Montevideo 

632 Over the House Tops of 

Montevideo 

633 Street m Montevideo 

634 The Plaza, 

636 View from the Plaza, 
Montevideo 

636 Fountain in the Plaza, 
Montevideo 

537 Cathedral in Monte- 
video 

638 Solis Theater, Monte- 
video 

Argentine Kepublic. 

539 Street iu Buenos Ayrcs 

640 Cathedral at " " 

641 The Mole 

6^ Government Buildings, 
Buenos Ayres 

643 Plaza at Buenos Ayres 

644 •' •• " 
546 Monument in the Plaza 

Buenos Ayres 
346 Calle FloriAa, Buenos 
AyrcB 



547 Street in Mendosa, Ar- 

gentine Republic 

548 The Plaza, Mendosa 
648 Public Square, Mendosa 
550 Princinal Street of 

3Ienaosa 
561 Monastery, Mendosa 

662 " 

663 ** Ruins, Men- 
dosa 

664 I'ampas of the Argen- 

tine Republic 

655 Traveling on the Pam 

pas 

656 Pampas of the Argen- 

tine Republic 

Africa. 

Algeria. 

1 The Harbor of Algiers 

2 Instantaneous view — 

Algiers 

3 Panorama 

4 Marengo Gardens 

6 Gallerv in the Govern- 
or's t*alace 

6 Government Palace 

7 The Mosque Djedid 

8 Panorama of the City 

9 •* from the Ad- 
miralty Buildings 

10 A Moorish Saloon 

11 Cattle on Dusty Road 

12 Women Returning from 

the Cemeterv 

13 A Tropical Garden 

14 Moorish Women 

The Azores. 

15 Ilota Fayal 

16 Street Scene, Hota 

Fayal 

Or an. 

17 General View of Oran 

18 Panorama of the Port 

of Oran 

19 Court of the Mosque 

Der Pasha 

20 Oran from the Mosque 

Constantine. 

21 On the Road to Constan- 

tine 

22 General View of Con- 

stantine 

23 Natural Bridge at Con- 

stantine 

We liavesecuredoverone 
hundred original negatives 
of "Darkest Africa;" many 
of the "Interior" and of 
rare interest. 

This list of Laiitern 
Slides will be found very 
interesting. It is the most 
complete list of the subject 
ever published. 

A Descriptive Lecture 
Reading in preparation. 

Price, per slide, un- 
colored $ 50 

Price, per slide, 
colored, unmounted, 
(to order only) 125 

24 Interior of Portuguese 

Fort 

25 View atFaval 

26 View of Faval 

27 St. Vincent Cape, De 

Verde Islands 



28 St. Vincent Cape, I>e 

Verde Islands 

29 St. Vincent Cape, De 

Verde Islands 

30 Town Hall, St. Vincent 

31 Public HalL St. Vin- 

cent 

32 Woman and Babe, St. 

Vincent 

33 Free Town, Sierra 

Leone, W. Africa 
»4 Group of Free Town 
Natives 

35 Women of Free Town 

36 School Children, Free 

Town 

37 Scene at Free Town 

38 St. Paul de Loanda An- 

gola, W. Africa 

39 St. Paul de Loanda An- 

gola, W. Africa 

40 St. Panlde Loanda An- 

gola, W. Africa 

41 St. Paul de Loanda An. 

gola, W. Africa 

42 Interior Market Place, 

St. Paul de Loanda 

43 Group of Natives, St. 

Paul de Loanda 

44 Street of St. Paul de 

Loanda 

45 Native of St. Paul de 

Loanda 

46 Natives of St. Paul de 

Loanda, K a b i n d a 
Tribe, males and 

47 Woman and Child of St. 

Paul de Loanda 

48 Group of Natives, St. 

Paulde Loanda 

49 Street of St. Paul de 

Loanda 

50 Market PUkce at Kabiri, 

near St. Paul de Lo- 
anda, near Railroad 

51 Natives of Kabinda 

Tribe, St. Paul de Lo- 
anda 

52 Scene on Quanza River, 

W. Africa 

53 Kroo-men Tribe of W. 

Africa 

54 Group of Natives of 

Massangana, Quanza 
River 
65 Group of Women and 
Boys, Massangana, 
Quanza River 

56 Street Scene of Dondo, 

Quanza River, W. 
Africa 

57 Market Place at Dondo, 

Quanza River, W. 
Africa 

58 House of " Chef de 

Dondo," Executive 
Officer of Dondo 

59 GroupofDondoNatives 
GO Bovs of Dondo 

61 Drill on Board U. S. S. 

Pensacola 

62 U. S. S. Pensacola in 

Dock at Cape Town, 
S. Africa 

63 View from Docks at 

Cape Town, S. Africa 

64 View from Docks at 

Cape Town, S. Africa 

65 Scene near Cape Town 

66 Kloof Road, near Cape 

Town 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SE.^ P^Q^E \^t- 



MoISTOSri BATTERY AUD OPTICAL fO,. CHICAi 

A Sumiuor KoildBnie, U» Camp nn I'm 

C»pe Town River. Maahoii 

9 A finniiner RBBidence, ' lOH Scene on Hiti 

C«pe Town ' Rivor, Msalioni 

- .EesmeDtBorCitueTDwn. 107 Scene on II Bi 

D Tnop ol llTlltsQ South River, Maahoni 



AtrlPS Co. 'a Police 
Riiln>ln Mangwalo 
Country, ntjnncslion 



Our ArCiat's Iluiiae at 
Hartley Hillg, Msali- 



Rlvel 



l'i,S 



111 » 



a Ml, 



Door, Hftrlley Mills 
IlDers' Camp at Hnrt- 
le; HUU, June, tsei 



t Hart- 



.„ JhSouth 

Africa Cn.'g l-laneera ' 113 Ulnei . 
'B Interior ol the Ijiager ; ley Hma, j une, inui 

'6 Groiip ol BanTiillfa- IM Cattle Kimtl, eight- 

tiyee, S. Africa , horse Slalile. Hartley 

7 Group o[ Maabons Nb- Hilla 

tlvos BlttinR Hliout a . 115 One of the Hartley 



W/n Group of Uaaho 
tivee Bitting a 



a Na- im A 



Hills, 
Satii 



Sale at i 
■on S Jubury H 



liO Camp at Hart 



m Rui 
ISl RulDS r 



:eae nt DHiinienila'a 
MrtSlion aland 



Mnshonsland 



a Man, F 



127 S 



10 Groupot Women about 

lINntiveB of four South 
African Tribea : No. I, 
Botanga; No. 3, Hau- 
gtrato; No. S, Uaah. 
ona; Ho. 4, Hakalaka 

8 NatiTea of three (loutb 
African Tribeai No.l. 
Znla:Ko.2.Matabele; 
No. 3, Mashona 

H A Maaiiona Mao 

H Nativea of Cane Colony 
barterJDg with Maah- 
oni Women 

e Groitp 01 Natlics, old 

» Grouii ol N™l?Iea."o!d 

Cblef In foreiiTound 
n Villwe Scene, Moali- 

» Zin!bar»7(luini>,^So'filli , 

Africa 
» Zlmbarvi Rulna, South 

111 Zimbarvl Riiina, South 

Africa 
M Tower of Zlmbarvl 

RiiiuB. S. Africa 
ns liouso near Cajie Town 



set at Sea 
ae uriiiah Snnth Africa 

Co.'s Pionoera 
\3B Hotleotot Venus 

Banlh ATriin. 

1 Upper LlKlithoiiau 
a Tlie DoBfia 

4 U. S. s. Swatara Iteflt- 

6 Cape Town from the 

Oliinese Cemetery 
e The Lion UenH 

7 CM)c Town and Table 

8 Cape Town and DOTil'a 

Htak 
B Cape Town and Table 

10 Cape Town and the 

Rloi.1 

11 Clifton Cottag* and 

Lion Peak 

12 >luilk' Point Ligbt- 

13 The Lion'a Head, Pro- 

U Ronndhouae Hotel in 

ID Clifton House: Hotel 

near the h'lonf 
16 HiiKC Iioiilder, 



.7 A Group of KafQra 

S Kaffir Women carrying 



IS In the Uoi!k. (Instan- 
S Group ol Zulu Women 



India. 

1 Tho City of Beiiai 

with Uliata 
S The Biiruing Clutti 

Benare, 
3 Bajah Amethl's Tem] 



G Suinuree Temple, Can 
a Temple."* •' 



the Uanikar- 
,t— Benarea 

7 The Residency— Luak. 

8 Tomb at Lucknow 

e A^, Gate of the Taj. 

Agra, Gate of the Ta], 
.1 The Ta) at Agra 



...terlor ,_ .. 
Tomb- Agra 



the Ta] 



The^o 
, Agro._ 

Mosnne on Friday 
S Groat Gate Fort Attack 

— Puujaub 
Syadpoor, near Rawul 

Pundee 
II Sooiider Temple — Naa- 

aick 
a Rock of Trickonoply 
13 llehaTeUiporo, Solid 

Granite temple 
li Carred Rock temple— 

Mehavellipure 
B Rock Carvinga— Meha- 

" "ranlte Rorks from *'— 



North—; - 
Verandah ( 



vollipore 



UrauKo uocks-Me- 

» Granite RoctaaudTem- 

fiv— Mehavelllpore 
a Cracked Monolithio 
Temple — MehavelH 

10 carringB on the Face at 

Rocks- M(>liBTeltlpore 

11 The Pagoiia— Mehnvel- 



FOR PRtCE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. \ 



181 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



33 Rock Temple— Meha- 

vellipore 

34 Boorhaupore, a Wor- 

shiping Musjid 

35 Hoshungabad, Ruins of 

the Fort 
86 The Bathing Ghat with 



Temples 

37 Jubbulpore, the Mad- 

dun Mehal 

38 Marble Rocks— Jubbul- 

pore 

39 Bellary, General View, 

near Jubbulpore 

40 Curious Fort, Bellary— 

Jubbulpore 

41 AWater Tank— Bombay 

42 Caves of EUora, Exte- 

nor— Bombay 

43 Caves of EUora, Interi- 

or-Bombay 

44 Lahore, Baradari and 

Gate of the Great 
Mosque of Lahore 

45 Amber, General View 

of Fort and Palace (a 
deserted city) 

46 Gate of the Palace- 

Amber 



47 Room in the Palace- 

Amber 

48 A Tank near Amber 

49 Tirupetty, the Tern- 

pie 
60 The Pagoda— Tirupetty 
51 Ajunta, the Caves, gen- 

eral view 

62 Interior of Cave No. 19 

— AJunta 

63 Interior of Cave No. 26 

—Ajunta 

54 Oudypore, Temple of 

Juggernaut 

55 Oudypore, Maha Suttee 

56 Aboo, Dilwarrah Jain 

Temple 

67 Aboo, Jain Temple, In- 

terior 

68 Aboo, Temple and Tank 

69 Mt. Aboo, Achalgush 

Agui Koond 

60 Ragmugger, the Marble 

Bun 

61 Akbar, Marble Palace 

62 Purchmaree, Curious 

Stone, said to be a load 
carried by the god 
Mahedo 



63 Mandhatta, Carved £le. 

phants, forming the 
base of the Jain Temple 

64 Muree Hills, near Gora- 

dakha 

65 Muree Hills, Bridge 

over the Darwaji 
Khuo Ravine 
Srinttggur, 

66 View down the Jhelum 

from Maharajah'sCity 
Palace 

67 Maharajah's Suburban 

Palace on the Jhelum 

68 Row of Poplars on the 

Ban&8 of the Jhelum 
fronting British Resi- 
dency 

69 Bridge across the Jhe- 

lum and Panorama of 
Srinuggur 

70 Fourth Bridge across 

the Jhelum, Panora- 
ma of the City and 
Citadel beyond 

71 The Jhelum at Flood as 

seen from Takht-i-Su- 
leiman above Munshi 
Bagh 



INDIA. 



Special attention is called to the fact that the following list comprises many new 
and rare India subjects, such as Glacier Views, Snow Bridges, Rattan Bridges, in the 
Himalavas 16,000 feet and more above the sea level, in the Lidda and Scind Valleys, 
about the Sacred Cave of Amurnath, to which pilgrimages are made by the Hindoos, 
many of whom perish by the cold in attempting to reach this holy place ; portraits and 
figures of the natives and their Religious Customs, Temples. Bridges and rare bits ; 
Srinuggur and its floating gardens, curious bridges, bazaars for the sale of the world- 
renowned Cashmere shawls and other fine embroidery work ; the winding River Jhelum 
with its many curves suggesting the pattern or design on all Cashmere shawls. 

Those of Nepal, with its sacred Temples at Khatmandu, are especially rare, owing^ 
to the difficulty of white men entering this province, which divides India from China ; 
for in this country can be seen the mixture of Hindoo and Chinese architecture. Nepal 
is inhabited by many Hill Tribes, which tribes are ruled by its Rajahs, and although 
not under the British Government, it is under the protectorate of England. 

Darjeeling and Mussoorie are two celebrated hill sanitariums, 7,000 and 8,000 feet 
above the sea, m the famous Himalayas. These places are much resorted to by the 
English and travelers in the summer ; as from Darjeeling can be seen the world's 
second mountain, Kinchin junga, 28,756 feet high, its peak under eternal snow ; 45 miles 
distant, yet apparently very near. 

Delhi, Agra, and Ceylon finish the list. Many of the subjects listed were collected 
and made by Mr. Ballautine, of Bombay, a long resident of India, who is thoroughly 
conversant with the manners and customs of the people, and who has carefully brought 
these original plates to this country. 



72 Windings of the Jhe- 

luin in the Vale of 
Cashmere, giving rise 
to the shawl pattern 

73 Bridge over the Nul-i- 

Mar, showing con- 
struction of Cashmere 
houses 

74 Hindoo Temple and 

Perspective of theAp- 
ple Tree Canal oppo- 
site Chenar Bagh 

75 Nishat Bagh on tue Dul 

Lake 

76 Verinag, with unfath- 

omed Tank of Sacred 
Fish, built and resort- 
ed to bv Akbar the 
Great (5logul Empe- 
• ror) during the sum- 
mer months 

77 Archibald Kiosk in Ar- 

tWcial Lake built by 



CASHMERE. 

Akbar for his favorite 
wife 

78 Panorama of Cashmere 

Valley from the Kiosk 

79 Grand Poplar Avenue 

into the City of Sri- 
nuggur 

80 Grand Poplar Avenue, 

Inside V'lew 

81 Suburbs and Citadel of 

Haripurbut 

82 Maharajah'sCityPalace 

and Gilded Dome on 
the river Jhelum with 
Snowv Range 

83 City Palace and Gilded 

Temple of Cashmere, 
Maharajah on the Jhe- 
lum 

84 First Bridge (or Amir-i- 

Kuddel) across the 
Jhelum and Cashmere 
Boats 



85 Looking up the Jhelum 

from Maharajah's Pal- 
ace 

86 Panorama from the Jhe. 

lumof the Temple and 
Citadel of Huripur- 
but 

87 Hindoo temple on the 

Slope of Srinuggur 
Citadel 

88 Shah Hamaidan's Mus- 

jid, most ancient 
mosque in Srinuggur, 
oil bank of Jhelum 

89 Polo Ground and Fa- 

mous Avenue of Pop- 
lars 

90 First Bridge across the 

Jhelum 

91 Results of a Cashmere 

Earthquake 

92 Ancient Stone Bridge 

across the Nul-i-Mar 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. P^G^E \^-l. 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. 



9* Temple of Poj-e tcli.be ft 
uraaorvcd BiieL'tinPn of 
EiiDdoo architectnre 
In Cashiaere 

St FrepnrluK to i^B o" 
Elephimt 

87 Slirine In iiinaoo Tein- 

es Slirlne In Uindoo Tem- 

89 Stirlne in Hindoo Tsm. 

IW Shrine in Uindoo Tem- 

Wl Threshing Rice 

Its NKtite Boats on the 

Jheluin 
103 AcrOBB the Jhelnin 

self-nude Tomb 



ue NiitiTB . . „ 

while amok In u 
106 BrulM ncrosa the <4ul-i- 

lOT Cash mere Bazaar 
IDS Temple iu Sulmrbs 
WB A Bit Of the Kul-i-Mnr 

110 LoeBridge ncroBs Nnl. 

111 Panorunia Views of the 

FloallDB Gardens on 

m Panorama ol the Beau, 
tifnl Lake Manns - 
bai 

11! Ancient Hindoo Tem- 
ple nearly snlimertred 

lU The Ralah of t.'hitral 



U7 View of Third Bridge 



Takht-i-gnlelman.iooe 
foet overlooking Sri- 

9 Gorge^ln Che Scmd Tal- 

ronte to Ladak 
a Towering Peats with 
Snow drifted In Crav- 
. tees overhanging car. 

HliualaTas 
:i Glsclerand Village near . 
SonamurgonlReroad 
to Ladak 

murH^Ptat^u.f 

nngnr, show ing snowy 



the Sacred Cave tA 

Marble ClKTs and SHcred 

Hindoo Cave of Aniur- 
natb, 10,000 feet abov* 

1 View from (be Sacred; 

Cave of Amnniath. 

le.nonfc.BboTe thesea 

3 Gnnd Panoiamlo View 
(aliOTe vegetSitlOD] ot 
the Mountains and 

Sacred Cave of Amnr 



I Wposun Kuddiil. char, 
acteristic Himalayas 



ley blacked by snow 
abol in avalanche* 
'~~m peaks Ehonsands 
__ leet above 
17 ABCumiiiated S: 



of feet above 
Accumiib ■ 
aianche 

I rand to Ladak 



Bombay,reqniringOK_ 
year to complete the 
pilgrimage, l>i.">~ 



18 MuolJeel, a Vil^ge I 

rsugeoftheliimBlas 
»Miitheel, sbowii., 
snowy range stil! be. 

M) I'riuce Bnideo blngl 
anrthlsMarbleParlliou 

II Towenug Peaks with 
snow drifted in ■ 



Glacier and village 



onamurg 
bove thi 



190 Bean tSul Hindoo Tem- 
ple on the Jhelnm be- 
low Seventh Bridge 

181 Cnrloits old Bridge with 

Sul-i-Mar Canal 
in CnrioDB old Bridge with 

Kul-i.Mar Canal 
m Pandrethao.an Ancient 

Hindoo Temple above 

the City on the Banks 

oltbe Jhelem 
IM Sahara] a h's City Pal. 

ace and Glided Dome 

inowy range beyond 

U»HabaraJah-s City 

Temple and Gilded 



men Types of the 
B, Himalayas 



early dawn 
.owtrldgeon 



8 Gorge with Snow Bridge . 



13 Triohinopoly MnndBj 

the Carved Horse Pll- 

38 Great Pagoda a 

ra Viiiiinagram Curved 
^- DrofTeni - 



FOR PBfCe LIST OF SLIDES Stt Pk&t ^^^ ■ 



laj MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



176 Cawnpore, Scene ol 

Massacre 

177 Cawnpore, Memorial 

Well of the Mutiny 

178 The Black Bull 

179 The Seven Temples 

IHO Native Snake Charmers 

181 Native Prepared for 

Cremation 

182 Hairy Family, Mat 

Phoon (Mother) 

183 Hairy Family, Mat Mi 

(Daughter) 
18i Hairy Family, Moung 

Phoset (Son) 
185 Hairy Family, Moung 

Phoset, standing 

Ceylon. 

Colombo. 

1 Ancient Buddhist Tem- 

pie with Carvings 

2 Arrival of a Train of 

Coffee Carts 

3 Sensation Rock on the 

road to Kandy 

4 Temple of the Sacred 

Tooth of Buddah 

5 Natural Arch on the 

Wagon Road 

6 Root of the India-rub. 

ber Tree 

7 Singalese Girl 

8 •♦ Man 

9 Native Girl with Jewel- 

ry 

10 Native Girl with Jewel- 

11 Native Hindoo 

12 Street in Pettate 

13 The Harbor 

14 Natives Plowing with 

Ox- team 

15 Madura, Grand Pagoda 

and Gopura 

16 Madura, Sacred Tank 

and Island Temple 

Kandy. 

17 Panorama of the City 

18 Kaudian Lady 

19 Interior Pagoda Tem- 

pie 

20 Tamconialu Street 

21 Street Scene 

22 Cabbage Palms 

South Indian Ocean. 

Neu Guinea. 

1 Native Huts on the 

Trees 

2 Tomb of an Aborigine 

3 Native Boats 

4 " Huts 

6 Chief's House, Marine 
Village 

6 Marine Fishing Village 

7 Divers on the River 

Yatra 

8 Eerguelan Land, Royal 

Sound 

9 Kerguelan Land, Sun- 

set Boat 

10 Royal Sound, Kergue- 

lan, South Indian 
Ocean 

11 Possession Island, Cro- 

zet Group 
It East Island, Crozet 
Group 



Australia. 

MeWoume. 

1 Menzies Hotel 

2 Collins Street, East 

3 Large Bourke Street 

4 The Esplanade, St. 

Kilda 
6 Steamship Pier, Sand- 
ridge 

6 General Post-office 

7 Government House 

8 Victorian Treasury 

9 The Royal Mint 

10 Government Offices and 

Treasury Gardens 

11 Bank of Australasia 

12 Town-Hall Organ, fifth 

largest in the world 

13 Panoramic view, Syd- 

ney • 

14 View of the Harbor and 

Sydney 

15 Australian Black Fel- 

low with Kangaroo 
and Boomerang 

16 Australian Native Wo- 

man and Child 

17 A Forest of Ferns 

18 Scotts Church, Collins 

St., Bourke and Wills 
Monument 

19 A Fiji Island Chief 

Tasmania. 

Hobart Town. 

1 Hobart Town from the 

Observatory 

2 Hobart Town from 

Venus Hill 

3 The Sleeping Maiden 

4 Monument to Sir John 

Franklin 
6 Interior of Museum, 
Kangaroo 

6 Interior of Museum, 

The Moa 

7 Interior of Museum, 

Skeleton of Killer 
Whale 

8 The Huon Road up Mt. 

Wellington 

9 Tasmanian Forest with 

Ferns 

10 Tasmanian Forest with 

Ferns 

11 Fern Tree Bower, Mt. 

Wellington 

12 Cook's Monument at 

the Bower 

13 Tasmanian Forest 

14 Fern Grove 

15 Forest of Eucalvptus 

Trees, near ifouart 
Town 

16 Near Summit of Mt. 

Wellington , 

17 Summit of Mt. Welling. 

ton 

18 Elizabeth Street 

19 A Cab-stand 

20 Residence of Governor 

21 U. S. S. Swatara in the 

Harbor 

Bngland. 

London. 

1 Thames, from the Vic- 

toria Embankment, 
S. ; instantaneous 

2 Somerset House and 

the Victoria Embank- 
ment 



3 Thames, Victoria Land- 

ing 

4 Thames, through an 

arch of Waterloo 
Bridge 

5 Egyptian Obelisk and 

Somerset House*. 
Thames Embankment 

6 Blackfriar's Bridge 

7 House of Parluiment 

and Thames Embank- 
ment 

8 House of Parliament; 

Victoria Tower 

9 House of Parliament, 

from Lambeth Ter. 
race 

10 House of Parliament 

and Westminster 
Abbey, from Lambeth 
Terrace 

11 Westminster Bridge 

and Victoria Tower 

12 Westminster Abbey, 

from Victoria Tower 

13 Westminster Abbey; 

Facade 

14 W^estminster Abbey 

and House of Dean 
Stanley 

15 Trafalgar Square, from 

Cumberland Terrace 

16 Albert Memorial; gen- 

eral view 

17 Albert Memorial; Amer> 

ica 

18 Albert Memorial; Eur- 

ope 

19 Albert Memorial; Asia 

20 Albert Memorial ; Africa 

21 Newgate and Old Bailey 

22 The Tower and Thames 

Shipping 

23 Old Door, All HaUows* 

Church 

24 The Thames, Cannon 

Street Station and 
Bridge 
26 Crvstal Palace, In the 
Grounds 

26 Crystal Palace, Outside 

27 Crystal Palace, Interior 

28 Hampton Court Palace, 

Southeast 

29 Ham])ton Court Palace, 

East 

30 Kensington Palace 

31 The Tower of London 

32 White Tower from 

Southwest 

33 Spurgeon's Tabernacle 

34 Ludgate Hill and St. 

Paul's 

35 St. Paul's from near 

Blackfriars 

36 The ^lonunient 

37 Holy Trinity Church 

38 Old Pulpit— Holy 

Trinity Church 
381^ Dartmouth Washing- 
ton Tablet 

39 AVall in which are the 

Dartmouth Washing- 
ton Tablets 

40 Head of the Duke of 

Suffolk 

41 Christ Church Hospital 

and School 

42 St. Hartliolomew's the 

Great 

43 Panorama from Top of 

Church 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. Pft.G^E \^t 



Mcintosh katteuy and optical v 



44 South wark Bridge 

« BUuk friars 

411 LycBiini Theater 

47 OaaTeat Gunlen Then* 

U Bow Street Polite 

46 Sonierset Hduho 

50 End ut Souerset Hoaee 

51 Someraet House and 

Thames KinhankmeDt 

52 Thames Embankment 



Irom Waterloo RridBo 
M Bmllhdeld Market 
» Otilldhali 
WHoljr Trinity Cbnrch 



se Albert Hall and Me- 

60 Weitoiinater Alihey, 

Front View 
ei WeBtnilQBtur Abbey, 

Side View 
as CUTloii'a Window, 

S3 Entrance to Cloisters, 

U Interior. Westminster 

88 Choir, Weslminaler Ab- 



Tl St. James' Park 

7a May Day Sweeps 
73 Blind BeKRar He 

on Watefloo Bri_„, 
' Frederick LcTgh. 



TR Bnuhitl Field!, Tomb . 

80 BnaiiUl Fields, Tomb > 
Dame Puge 



SS StaplBB Inn 

BrUiih Mai. 
GB Entrance, 



SO Statues Against W 
91 Egyptian Gallery 

""=1%""" "■'""■■ 



H Third 

Koom 
811 Looking 









103 Greenville Library 
lot King Georw Library 

103 ManuBcript Room 
lOB ReadiDK-RDOm 

107 Mead ol Rameses II. 

104 Gram) Stairfase 

109 Flr« Vase Room 

110 Cleopatra's Cafflu, 

Mummy Room 
HI Mummy lloom 
lia Mnmmy RoDm,8howina 

InBlileor Comn 
lis Etrnscaa Sepiili 



117 Paralyied f.lon 

118 Buildlnit o( .Sennacbft- 

rlb's Palace at " ' 
Junjik 

119 Old Carthaginian Room 



111 Mnseum, Wliale 1 

13a Arcli in MaU < 

Staircase 

133 Statue of Darwin 

134 The Bird Gallery 
laS In the Coral Gallery 
lae Reptile Gallery 

127 Fisb Gallery [mm 

Sponite Gallery 
las Oaficry of British Zo- 



132 Meteoriti 

133 Sun Fish 

134 Elephant 



VJS M limn in I Skeleton 

140 Mammal Skeleton 

141 Art Department 



irk Gallery 



;CAGO, ILL.,U.* 



IM Fai-Jide nl Stone Iloaae 
at BnldenkBhak 

147 Indian Goltlamith, Cmr- 
penter and Designer 

Bemg IWsigned to ho 

leBar^ 



Ul Grand En tn 
Ifii Grand Ent 



IM Southeast Front, Wlnd- 



198 Qneen's Apartment and 
Lone Walk 

1S9 Queen s Apartmentand 
Long Walk 

IBO Henry the KiKhtb Gate 

ISl WindBor Castle trom 
the Meadows 

■m WindBOr Caatle bma 
the Rirer 

183 S. W, R. SUtlon. Wind- 
sor and Round Tower 

164 WlndBor, (rom Eton, 
with Bridge 

IBS Windsor Caatle, Park 



170 The Qiifeu 



ding 



171 Sorrls Castle 

ITS Whippingham Church _ 

173 Whipplngbam QDeenV^ 

174 Ancient PBrsonag 

Wool ton 
173 Norman Door, WooltOtt, 



176 The Gi 



■aCottam 



Church 

179 The Fonnt 
IBO The Pulpit 
181 ThePieratByde 
Wi The eBnlaDade— Byde 
183 Union Street 
181 Apply Watch Tower- 
Hyde 
IBS Apply HouB 



IM KombridgB and Harb 
190 BrndiniJ Village 
IBl Brodlnn C--— ■" 



1^ BmiliuK Church, Oglas- 
■or Mortuary ?"■-—■ 
- ittle 

RICbraoDd'r 






rOR PRICE LrST OF 5UOES Stt PMit Ml 



ry Chapal 

ura Brwling. Little J 

Cottage 
IM Leigh _ 

C b u rcb— Yaverlandi 
IBS Ifoor at Churoh— Ta«i 

erlandB 
196 Manor TIO 



185 



MCINTOSH BATTEBY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.., U. 8. A. 



197 Cottage and Lane— 

Yaverlands 

198 Lane— Yaverlands 

199 Culver Cliffs 

200 Farmhouse near San- 

down 
'201 Sandown 
302 Arreton Church 
203 Cottage Garden at Ar. 

re ton 
20i Grave of Dairyman's 

Daughter 

205 Arreton Village 

206 Arreton— Old Manor 

House 

207 Sandown from Fort 
203 Blackberry Lane— San- 
down 

209 Lane near Sandown 

210 Shanklin from Cliffs 

211 Bridge on the Chine— 

Shanklin 

212 The Chine from Shore 

213 The Fall— Shanklin 

214 Old Village— Shanklin 

215 Bold Cliffs near Shank- 

lin 

216 On the Sands, (Reflec- 

tion), Shanklin 

217 Luccombe Chine 

218 Luccombe Chine 

219 Fisher's Cottage, Luc 

combe Chine 

220 The Landslip 

221 The Landslip 

222 St Boniface Church, 

Bonchurch 

223 Old Tombs, St. Boni- 

face Church 

224 The Pond at Bon- 

church 

225 Ventnor 

226 Ventnor Station 

227 Appulder Combe 

228 Steephill Castle 

229 Undercliffe 

230 End of Undercliffe 

231 Going Down Blackgang 

Chme 

232 Blackgang Chine from 

the Shore 

233 Blackgang Chine from 

the Shore 

234 Freshwater Bay 

235 Tennyson's Home, Far- 

ringford 

236 Lane at Farringford 

237 Rocky Cliff at Fresh- 

water Bay 

238 General View at Fresh- 

water Bay 

239 Arched Rocks, Fresh- 

water Bay 

240 Arched Rocks, Fresh- 

water Bay 

241 Arched Rocks, Fresh- 

water Bay 

242 Mottestone Church 

243 Mottestone Manor 

House 

214 Shorewell 

245 Road to the Needles 

246 The Needles 

247 Alumn Bay 

248 From Hotel Toward 

Needles, Alumn Bay 

249 Colored Cliffs, Alumn 

Bay 

250 Totland Bay 

261 Pulpit.Newport Church 
392 Princess Elizabeth's 
Tomb 



263 Carisbrooke Castle, En- 
trance Gate 

254 Carisbrooke Castle, En- 
trance 

256 Doorway or Entrance 

Towers, Carisbrooke 
Castle 
266 Inner Moat, Caris- 
brooke Castle 

257 Ivy-Clad Walls, Carls- 

brooke Castle 

268 Keeper's Residence and 

well-House, Caris- 
brooke Castle 

269 The Keep, Carisbrooke 

Castle 

260 The Steps to the Kee^, 

Carisbrooke Castle 

261 Ruins of St. Nicholas 

Chapel, Carisbrooke 
Castle 

262 Apartments of Princess 

Elizabeth, Caris- 

brooke Castle 

263 Carisbrooke Village, 

seen through tlie 
Ramparts of Castle 

264 Harvest Scene 

265 Osborne House, Isle of 

Wight 

266 Corridor of the Osborne 

House 

267 View of Cowes 

268 Carisbrooke Castle, 

Isle of Wight 

Miscellaneotis— England. 

269 Town Hall— Liverpool 

270 Wellington Monument 

— Liverpool 

271 Lime Street— Looking 

South 

272 Dale Street 

273 St. George's Hall 

274 Prince's Dock 

275 Holyrood Castle 

276 Chapel Royal, Holyrood 

Castle 

277 Great Door, Holyrood 

Castle 

278 Queen Mary's Bed- 

Room.Holyrood Castle 

279 Rochester 

280 Rochester, from Strood 

281 Workingman's Club- 

Rochester 

282 Old Gateway, Roches- 

ter 

283 Rochester Castle 

284 Rochester Cathedral 

285 Old Gateway— Roches- 

ter Cathedral 

286 Door and Chapter 

House 

287 Gorman Door and Old 

Street 

288 Elevation of Norman 

Door 

289 Interior — Rochester 

Cathedral 

290 Sanctuary — Rochester 

Cathedral 

291 Norman Arches— Roch- 

ester Cathedral 

292 Wells Cathedral 

293 Salisbury Cathedral 

294 Wimborn Minster, Side 

View 

295 Wimborn Minster, En- 

trance 

296 Fountains Abbey, from 

River 



297 Tintem Abbey, In- 

terior 

298 Netley Abbey, the East 

Window 

299 St. Mary's Abbey- 

York 

300 Berry Pome^y Castle 

301 Berry Pometoy Castle, 

the Guard Room 

302 Lancaster Castle 

303 Interior of Lancaster 

Castle 

304 Roman Altar, Lancas- 

ter Castle 
306 Branding Hand 

306 Kenilworth Castle 

307 Leicester Buildings, 

Kenilworth Castle 

308 Ham Cross and Foun- 

tain-Derbyshire 

309 Ham Church 

310 Ham Church, David 

Pike Watt's Monu- 
ment 

311 Ham Rock, Dovedale— 

Derbyshire 

312 Lion Rock, Dovedale— 

Derbyshire 

313 Dove Holes, Dovedale— 

Derbyshire 

314 Pickering Tars— Der- 

byshire 
316 Reynard's Cave— Der- 
byshire 

316 Sissington Church 

317 Ortmarton Manor 

318 Matlock Bath 

319 Newby Bridge and 

Swan Inn 

320 Newby Bridge 

321 Station at Lakeside 

322 Bowness, from Boat 

323 Waterhead, Winder- 

mere Lake 

324 On Road from Water- 

head to Ambleside 
326 Old Mill Stream— Am- 
bleside 

326 Queer Lane— near Am- 

bleside 

327 Stock Ghyll Force- 

near Ambleside 

328 Near the Foot of Stock 

Ghyll Force 

329 A Peep on the Stock 

Ghyll Force 

330 Foot of Windermere 

331 Borrowdale Valley 

332 Head of Buttermere 

Lake 

333 Study of Ragweed on 

Wallsfell Side 

334 Derwentwater and 

Friar's Crag 

335 At Betham 

336 Betham Village 

337 Mill at Gill Banks- 

near Eskdale 

338 View from the Church 

Tower— Wickham 

339 On the Dart— Holmes 

from the River 

340 On the Dart— Sharp- 

ham 

341 Source of the River 

Brent 

342 On the River Wey, 

Elstead— S urrey 
a43 The Thames at Isle- 
worth 
344 The Thames at Roult- 
er'a Lock 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. PkG^E \2.T , 



MoISTOSH BATTERV ,VND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 3. A 



mond Bridge 
3*7 Orfortl' — Pembroke 



» A KenliBh Lane, Weat 

Ornington— Kent 
>I Shade in Epuiair Forest 
BEglsh y m\ d 



»G Tb Ba G 



ia Th Docks, L rpo 



I London [Ihe 

7owBr) 

Londoi 

of the Scaffold) 

'0 Hamucon OonFt Palace 

1 WeafminBter Tower 

and Brtdgo 
'2 WeatminBter, Thames 

Embankment 
■3 Tratalpiir Sqnnre, Nel- 

'1 Egrptian ObeliBk. 

H Biver Thames, Irom 

Lamtieth Terrace 
■e PftU Mall, Waterloa 



rs Crimea Mannment 
W Waterloo Bridge 
)1 On London Brrdge 
« St. Pani'a from th 

Thames 
fflSkPaura trom Soutli 

F*n(I»or. 






395 St. Aldate'a Chnrch 
SM The Hirer iBii 
SB7 Lincoln Colleife 
SSH Balllol Colle^ 
389 Peinliroke College 
41X1 JetnB College 






tia All Sail 

«3 Exeter College 
itH Bodleian Llbrarr 
MB AU Soula College 
106 Oriel College 

Clarendon Imllding 

mratfor<l-on.A<io,i. 

40S Shnkesiieare'a Honse 

MS The Clinrrh. Shakes. 

Sare'a Bttrlat.pluoe 
Chnrch. .Sliakes. 
uenre's Burial .place 
The Avon and M^kea- 
pesre Memorial 

tl3 The Banks or the Avon 

BuiidiUK™ 
119 Red Lion^nn 
41B GnildChnpcl 



IBOJ A 






4W Cattle 

419 C;roup of Cattle 
lan Group of Cattle 
421 Pictnresqne Group of 

4S9 Graio of ShukCBpoare 

4!4 Horaes Graxing. 

4» Warwick Castle 



430 Warwick Castle, Armor 

Uall 

431 Warwick Castle, Ban. 

qneting Kail 
4.M Warwick Castle, from 

the Bridge 
Kenllimrllt, 
433 Bnlns of Konilworth 



I of Banqnel 
of Keuilwi 



439 The Inn nt Aweton 

440 Keaidence, Salislinry 

HZ Rievaulx Aliliey, Irom 
413 E.vetpr C«thedral lln- 
444 Stoiielieuge 

Waft!. 
4ta Waterloo Hotel, Bett- 
448 Chapel at Bectwya y 
447 Pont y Pair nt Beltwj-a 



,8 Pont y Pair nt BetCwy* 

,9 Pont y Pair, close view, 

BottwYB y Coed 
10 nolyddelliih Ooslle 

il Damnyon f 

4K Conway 
Bridge 

lAverpoot. 
4S3 The Quadrant, etc. 
4USt. George'aHall 
MS St. George's Uall. Iii> 

US London and North 

Western Hotel 
tn7 The Quadraaia, etc. 
4Sa The Exchange 
4G9 Lord Street 
4flO Chnrch Street 
lei View iu Goorge'i Dock 
4li3 St, George's Landing 

4S3 Clanghtou Ferry Boat 



465 Birkenhead Park 

iiueT/Bw;. 
4fie St. George's Hall 

467 St. George's Hail, and 

Lime Street 

468 St. _Geori;e*B Hall and 

469 St. George's Hall. In- 

470 The LloDS. St. George's 

Hllll 

Exchange 

E-iChange, 

— anlBOB" Ch — „- 

173 The Exchange, Nelson 



Patrick's Chnrch, 

^ S. Britaanlc, and 

S. Alaska, and Ferry 

S. BnOinulc and 
i^erry Boats 
4«i L.Bndlng Stage 
ISl Landing Stage, Baggage 

482 LangtouDock 

483 Prince's Dock 

484 Prlnce-s Dock 

485 Prince's Dock 
4«6 George's Dork 
437 Cnatom House 
498 George's Dock 
489 Prince's Park 



493 SpekeHall, nearLiTi 
Ifeic Brighbm. 



GOO Fort and Lighthouse 

SOI The Llghthonse 

SO-J S, S. I'avonia, off Egre- 



FOR PRICE LrST OF SLIDES Stt PKCt \'i.1. 



187 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



603 Egremont 

S04 Birkenhead, from Liver- 
pool 

fi05 Birkenhead, View in 
the Park 

Mancfiester. 

606 Albert Memorial 

Isle of Wight. 

Cotves. 

1 View from the West 

2 The Green 

3 Newport Church, Tomb 

of Princess 

4 Arreton Church 

Carisbrooke. 

5 The Castle, from the 

Lake 

6 The Castle, The Gate. 

way 

Osborne House, 

7 From the East 

8 From the Southeast 

9 From the Northeast 

10 From the Southeast 

11 From West 

Sea View. 

12 The Hotel, etc. 

Hyde. 

13 View from the Pier 

14 The Pier 

Brading. 

15 General View 

16 General View 

17 Little Jane's Grave 

Sandoum. 

18 The Bay, From ClifTs 

19 On the Sands 

20 The Sands, from Pier 

Shanklin. 

21 Sandown Bay 

22 Sandown Bay, from 

Cliflfs 

23 Sands and Bay 

24 The Esplanade 

25 The Sands and Chine 

26 Dun nose Head and 

Sands 

27 " Crab Inn," etc. 

28 The Chine Road 

29 The Chine 

30 The Chine 

31 View in the Chine 

32 View in the Chine 

Bridge 

33 View in the Chine 

34 The Chine Inn 

35 The Chine Fountain 

36 Above the (^ine 

37 Above the C%ine 

Lxjuxombe. 

38 The Cliffs 

39 The Chine, looking up 

40 The Cliffs 

Boiichurch. 

41 Village and Pond 

42 " Fountain " 

43 The Old Church 

44 The Beach 

45 The Hotel 

Ventiwr. 

46 Pulpit Rock 

47 From Upper Bonchurch 

48 View from the Park 

49 The Esplanade 



50 View from East Cliff 
61 View from West Cliff 

52 The Esplanade 

53 View from the Pier 

54 The Beach 

55 Royal Hotel and Downs 
66 Marine Hotel 

57 Crab and Lobster Hotel 

58 Trinity Church 

59 Hamboro' Road 

60 Steephill Castle, Front 

View 

61 Steephill Cove, Lobster 

Pots 

Oad's Hill. 

62 The Village 

63 The Undercliff Niton 

Blackgang Chine. 

64 View from the Beach 

65 The Cliffs 

66 The Upper Chine 

67 The Upper Chine 

68 The Chine 

69 The Chine 

70 The Chine 

71 Coast View 

72 Lighthouse, St. Cath- 

erine's Point 

73 Brook Church 

Freshwater. 

74 The Gate 

75 The Bay 

76 The Hotel 

77 Arched Rocks 

78 The Needles, from 

Above 

79 The Needles, from 

Beach 

80 The Needles, from 

Beach 

81 The Needles, from 

Beach 

82 View off the Needles 

83 Alnin Bay, Hotel and 

Needles 

84 Scratchall's Bay 

85 Yarmouth 

86 Yarmouth 

87 Tennyson's Lane 

88 Tennyson's House 

Scotland. 

Aberdeenshire— Aberdeen. 

1 Aberdeen, from Troy 

2 Aberdeen University, 

King's College 

3 Aberdeen University, 

King's College 

4 Aberdeen University, 

Quadrangle 

5 Aberdeen, Union Bridge 

6 Aberdeen on the Dee, 

from Allen vale 

Deeside. 

7 Bridge of Dee, near Ab- 

erdeen 

8 Midinar Castle 

9 Rob Roy's Cove, near 

Ballater 

Balmoral. 

10 Castle, from River 

11 Castle, from North- 

west 

12 Valley of Dee, at Bal- 

moral 

Braemar. 

13 Braemar, from Morrone 

14 Bridge of Clunie 



15 Valley of the Dee 
IB Bridge of Dee and Craig 
Clunie 

17 Old Mar Castle 

18 Old Bridge of Dee at 

Invercauld 

Argyleshire—Oban and 
VicinUy. 

19 Oban, from the South- 

west 

20 Oban, the Esplanade 

21 Shepherd's Hat and 

Sound of Mnll (Moon- 
light) 

Inverary, 

22 Inverary, from the East 

23 Inverary, the Marriage 

Tree 

24 Dunderave Castle, Head 

of Loch Tyne 

Camp6ettoum. 

25 Campbeltown, the Har- 

bor 

26 Campbeltown, Main 

Street 

27 Campbeltown, Dalmally 

ana Loche Awe 

28 Ben Cenachan, from 

Dalmally 

29 On Loch Awe (Instan- 

taneous) 

30 The Islands, Loch Awe 

31 Kilchwen Castle 

Olencoe. 

32 The Seene of the Mas- 

sacre 

33 Waterfall m the Glen 

34 Pass of Glencoe, from 

near the Bridge of the 
Three 

Island of Mull. 

35 Carsaig Arches 

Island of Staffou 

36 Fingall's Cave 

37 Fingall's Cave, Looking 

in 

38 Fingall's Cave, Looking 

out 

39 Fingall's Cave,from Sea 

40 Staffa, from the Sum- 

mit 

Ayrshire— Ardrossan and 
Vicinity, 

41 Saltcoasts, Eglinton 

Street 

42 West Kilbride 

Ayr, 

43 Ayr, " The Twa Brigs " 

44 Ayr, High Street and 

Wallace Tower 

45 Ayr, the Auld Brig 

46 Ayr, " Tarn o' Shanter '* 

Inn 

47 The Auld Brig o* Doon 

48 Auld AUoway Kirk, 

Burial-Place of the 
Bums Family 

49 Bums' Cottage 

50 Burns' Cottage 

51 Burns' Cottage, (Interi 

or) 

52 Burns' Cottage, (Interi- 

or) 

53 " Tarn o' Shanter and 

Souter Johnny '* 

Ballantra£. 

54 Ballantrae, from the 

East 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.£. PkG^E \2.1* 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., V. S. A. 



TS Stirling Cnslle, Soutli 

Fronl 
78 Stirling Castle, Brnee'g 

Statue 

Statne 
IS Field of BaDDockbum, 

from Gillie's Field 
UunWana and Vidnitj/. 
TB DnnbUtnc. Catbedntl 
80 Kelr House 
Bl DouneCnstle 

Duw/Tlet ShiTe. 



83Duin 



a, from 



S'fc'S 



,AurihiTa—Kilmanii 
Tieinlt!/. 



SO Caprlngton Cdatle 
81 WnllBce Tower 
R2 Uunduuald Cdstle 

Largi. 
83 Larai Bay 
64 Fnirlie Castle 

CaUlutea Shire. 
6B View at Jobn o' Gro 



Craig 

68 StlTling, from Polnmlse 
t» Greylrlar'a Churcb 
TO WaUaae Monumeni 



17 New Tay Viadui't 
B» New Tay Viaduct, F 

Train from North 
BO New Tay Vinduct, Firel 

Xmin from Sortb 

l-^r/ririlHre-AirUe. 

» Airlie Curitle (Clu! Bon 

nieHonsBo- Airlie) 
)1 Airlie Castle (tbe Bon 

nieUousBo'AirUe) 
H Reekie Linn 
MoiUroae and VMnlli/- 



J{IrteHbTi(ihUliire—C<aHi 
143 Caatle llnuglaB 



Vicinilj/. 
lU Cathedral 
" S Catbedral, tbe Otypt 



Bridge, from 



Greyfriars 

Annan. 
B4 AnnaUf from River 
^aMre— St. Andraa. 
S5 Cathedral, West FroDt 
80 Catbedral, Weat Door- 

S7 Cathedral, from Eaac 

ATtstruther^ 
B8 AnatTutlier. from East 
I'brfariTiire—Dv.ndeB onrf 

rtclnili,. 
Bl Dnndee, from the Law 

Hni 

so Dnndee, from Old 

Steeple 
91 High Street, Roja! Es. 



Ill Hartdini.'U.n,mL'liS[reot 
lis Haddington, Boiljwell 

Casile 
113 Haddington, Knox In- 

Beniticlc-OH- 7V«e(i. 
IM Berwiek.on-TwBeid 

rnveriKii Stire. 
llfl Inremeaa Municipal 

Buddings 
lie Cathedra r 
llT Cathedral, tbe Front 
U8 Caetle and Bridge 



l» Ben Nerii 
1!3 Ben Nevis, 



lO St. John's Terrace 
•I West Park Tecrate 
i2 HoTal Oreacent, Orosa> 
hill "-T^ 

_i3 Stock Exchange 

IM In tlie Botanic Garden 

-« Kibble Palace 

Pauley and Hciniiy. 

_S« PalBiey Abbey 

IS7 PBialey Abliey and 

1 11 ton Palace 

— . tiwell Bridge 

im Bociiwell Castle 
" " Bothwell Caatle, tin 
Quadrangle 
Ji^illl of Clyde. 
16S BonnlngCon Falls 

"A Blt^' HtBouningtOn 
FaUs 
ISl Cora Lmn 

The Clyde. 
Dunbarton Caatle 
Dunbarton CaaUe 
Dunbarton. from 1 
168 Greenock, from 
Whin Hill 
Lochgoil, Carrick r»s- 



Ija luGlenNevia 






anil Kylea of 



_,2 Rotheaay 

I7E Rothesay Caetle 

174 Holheaa y, Lover's Walfc 

175 Craigmore, from Pier 
Mllljtorl. 

176 Millport, from East 

''^ Millport, Cathedral of 
ArgyleandtheAls'" 
(Interior) 
lehmiA of Arran. 
ITS Dm idlcal Stones 
178 Dmidlisal Stooea, a 

GoalteU 
180 On the Coast of Arrnn 
I (Instantaneous) 

I The LuthiaHf—EdinbMrgk 



» Tay Bridge, from 



198 Herring Fleet at Stom- 
oway, going out 
[evening) 
'^neardiiuhire Sana. 
IvoKnand Vicinity. 

Btonebaven, from Bcr. IM Edinburgh, „.. 

Hi Braes I and Wavorly Bridnc 

: LIST OF SUDtS SE.E. ^IK&t. \^T. 



jurgh, Ii 

Calton%ill 
i Edinburgh, ft 



189 MCINTOSH BATTERY .IND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



185 Edinburgh Castle 

186 Edinburgh, Princess 

Street, looking East 

187 Edinburgh, Princess 

Street, looking West 

188 Edinburgh, Scott Mon 

uinent 

189 Edinburgh, Waterloo 

Place(instantaneous} 

190 Edinburgh, General 

Post Office 

191 Edinbugh, Bank of 

Scotland 

192 Edinburgh, Burns' 

Monument 

193 Edinburgh, Greyfriars 

Church 

194 Edinburgh, John Knox's 

Ff Oil AA 

195 Edinburgh, Royal In- 

flrmary 
198 Edinburgh, Albert Me- 
morial Statue 

197 Edinburgh, St. Giles 

Cathedral 

198 Edinburgh, St. Mary's 

Cathedral 

199 Edinburgh, New Uni- 

versity 
300 Edinburgh, St. John's 
Church and Castle 

Holyrood Palace. 

201 Holvrood, from the Cal- 

ton Hill 

202 Holyrood, from the 

North 

208 Holyrood, the Doorway 

204 Holyrood, the Fountain 

205 Holyrood, the Quadran. 

gle 

206 Holyrood, Mary, Queen 

of Scots (Portrait) 

Rosslyn. 

207 Rosslyn Chapel 
206 Rosslyn Castle 

209 Craigmillar Castle, 

from South-West 

210 Craigmillar Castle, 

from East 

The Forth Bridge. 

211 The Forth Bridge 

212 The Forth Bridge 

213 The Forth Bridge 

214 The Forth Bridge, from 

South 
315 The Forth Bridge, Main 
Span, from West(May 

216 The Forth Bridge, 

Queen's Ferry, Main 
Pier (September, 1888) 

217 The Forth Bridge, Fife, 

Main Pier (Sept. 18, 
1888) 

Linlithgow. 

218 Palace ^nd Loch 

219 Palace from Northwest 

220 Palace, the Quadranjfle 
2*21 Palace, Room in which 

Mary, Queen of Scots 
was Born 

Peebles 8hire— Peebles and 
Vicinity. 

222 Peebles 

223 Peebles, from North 

Perthshire— Perth and Vi- 
cinity. 

224 Perth, from Kiniioull 

Hill 



225 Perth, Railway Station 
Newburgh ami Abemethy. 

226 Newburgh, High Street. 

Stralfieam. 

227 Free Church 

228 The Deil's Cauldron 

229 The Deil's Cauldron 

Loch Katrine and Tros- 
sa^fis. 

230 Glen Finlas, Tom Dubh 

231 Brig o' Turk 

232 Loch Achray and Ben 

Venue 

233 Trossachs,Loch Achray 

and Ben Venue 

234 Waterfall in Trossachs 

Glen 

235 Trossachs Hotel, Loch 

Achray and Ben 
Venue 

236 Trossachs Church,Loch 

Achry and Ben Venue 

237 Trossachs and Ben 

Venue 

238 Trossachs and Ben 

A'an 

239 Trossachs and Ben 

A'an 

240 Loch Katrine, from 

Roderick Dhu '8 Watch 
Tower 

241 Loch Katrine, "tros- 

sachs Pier 

242 Loch Katrine, Silver 

Strand 

243 Loch Katrine and Ben 

Venue, Mist Effect 

244 Loch Katrine from 

Goblin Cave 

Loch Lomond. 

245 Loch Lomond and Ben 

Lomond 

246 On Loch Lomond, at 

Luss 

247 Ben Lomond,from Luss 

248 Ben Lomond,from Luss 

Mist Effect 

249 Loch Lomond, above 

Rowardennan 

250 Rob Roy's Prison 

251 Ben Lomond, from Tar- 

bet 

252 Inversnaid Hotel 

253 Inversnaid Falls 

254 Inversnaid Falls, from 

the Loch 

255 Rob Roy's Cave 

Killiecrankie. 

256 The Pass, from Below 

the Bridge 

257 Killicrankie Cottage 

Blair Athole. 

258 Blair Athole 
Bosshire— Dingwall, 

259 Dingwall, looking to 

Ben Woris 

260 High Street, looking 

West 

Strathpeffer and Vicinity. 

261 Ben Woris Hill 

262 Ben Woris, fro m 

Strathpeffer 

Boxb u rgshire—Me I rose, 

263 Melrose, from Prior's 

liank 

264 Melrose and Cowden- 

knowes 



265 Melrose and GattonBide 
206 Melrose Abbey 

267 Melrose Abbey, from 

South 

268 Melrose Abbey, from 

East 

269 Melrose Abbey, from 

South-East 

270 Melrose Abbey, Chancel 

and East window 

Abbotsford. 

271 Abbotsford,from Tweed 

272 Abbotsford, from the 

South-East 
278 Abbotsford, from the 
South.West 

274 Abbotsford, from the 

Garden 

275 Abbotsford, the Garden 

front 

276 Entrance Hall (Inte- 

rior) 

277 Armory (Interior) 

278 The Study (Interior) 

279 Library (Interior) 

280 Drawing Room (Inte. 

rior) 

Dryburgh and Vicinity. 

281 Dryburgh Abbey, from 

East 

282 Dryburgh Abbey, from 
' South.East 

253 Dryburgh Abbey, from 

South-West 

254 Dryburgh Abbey, from 

South 

Kelos and Vicinity. 

2^ Kelos Ab1)ey 
2S6 Kelos Abbey and Bridge 
on Tweed 

JedJburgh. 

237 Jedburgh Abbey, from 

River 
2S8 Jedburgh Abbey, from 

South-East 

289 Jedburgh Abbey, from 

North-West 

290 Jedburgh Abbey, Nave, 

looking West 

Artists' Studies— SttLdies of 
Deer-Stalking, CattlCt etc. 

291 Royal Stag 

292 A Highland Piper 

293 A Highland Carrier 

294 " The Hen Wife " 

295 The Spinning Wheel 

Ireland. 



Dublin. 



1 
2 
3 
4 



Sackville Street 
The General Post Office 
St. Patrick's Cathedral 
St. Patrick's Cathedral, 
Interior 

5 Dublin Castle 

6 Bank of Ireland (Old 

Houses of Parliament 

7 Trinity College 

8 Trinity College, The 

Quadrangle 

9 The Custom House 

10 The Oitv Hall 

11 Terminus of Gt. S. & W. 

Railway 

12 Statue of Daniel O'Con- 

nell 

13 The Grave of Daniel 

O'Connell 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SE.E. PkCaE \2.1. 



Mcintosh battery and oPTirAL oo., chicai 



33 Kden Vale Waterfall 
St 9elskOr Abbe; 
SO Dimbrody Aliboy 

Cou-nlu KHkamy. 
K Kilkenny 
i7 Kilkenny Castle 
IS Jerpoint Atilier 
M Jerpoint Abbey, i 

County Waler/oT± 

30 WaWrlonl 

31 Dunmora 

County Tipperary. 
_W RDck and Kulna 
B BolycroM Abbey 



18 Cork, 1 



lyCork. 

trlr.k SC. 
BDd Parade 






ork, 
Brtflt 
U Cork, St. 
Cfttbednl 
a CoA Soath WhU 
43 Cork Sbindon Chnrcb 
U BUmey Ckslle 
IS Blarney Caa lie 
« Blarney Castlo—The 
J , Peep Hole 
• 47 Blamay Castle— KiSB- 

B I .(.g BlBiTjBy StOllB 



try's CoCtage 
jaUamey. 
tl General vieir ol tbe 
Lakes of Killamoy 
Mnckrosa Abbey Kiiins 
_ Muokross Abbey Nave 
d4 Robs Castle 
IB Innlsfallen 
DH The Lower Lake 
P Victoria Hock, Midrlle 



Bay ■i 



)8 Jacky boy' 

H CDonoghiie's Wine 

The Colleen Bawn 
Bock 
a The Old Weir Undue 
n Eagle's Nest Moiiiitaiii 
_-Jt The Gup o( IHiDlou 
mm The linp cK IHinloe, 
^ -ale itoiirnoys Cot- 



BoHl 

T3 TbD MaciillliGuddy-B 

Reeks 
Caanty Kerry. 
T4 A^d(t^^C Abbey Knius 
'3 Keuniare SiispeosloD 

Bridge 
7B Danier O'Connell'a 

House, Dtrrynane 

County Limerick. 



80 Rapids of the Shannon 

SI Klllaloe, ou the Shan- 

Bl Kilkee 

S3 Kiikee, Lioh's Head 

Salural Bridges 



of Ros 



SI Kill 
of 

a EiiiL , 

30 Llsdomraroa. TbB 

SpoetttclB Bridge 
BV The CIllTs of Mohar 
M (juiu Abliey 
m Nalunil Bndgeg ol Roaa 
Coaiiiy Onlicay. 

y MairCttT'' 



KylBmor. 
Bally- 



9S Con 



nagh 



Count}/ Mayo. 
ion Moyne Abbey 
iDi RossBrk Abbey 

f^uiU^ Stiao. 
\ia Sligo Alibey 
ll» Sligo Abber, Intarii 
lot AncieDC CrasB, D> 
cliff 



Chuniy Louth. 
10 ThB Boyne Viaduct at 
Diogheda 
OUint'i OatiteJeay. 

S The OTgan 
13 The Well 
[i The Ladies' Wishing 

IS The Middle Causeway 
" '^'-''»nsBwayUal« 

Wishing 

Porlmfti 
Coimly AniriiH. 






12a Belfast, 

136 Belfiul, 

127 Antrim Castle 

Loadonderry. 
I2S LendoDderrv an the 

FoyiB 
129 The Cathedral 
ISO The Cathedral [Cannon 

Ball) 
131 Dunglren Abbey, RninB 

County Duaeyal, 
isa Buaoraiia, Old Castle 

and Bridge 
133 Rathmollen, Lough 



■wlUy 
Errigal Mountain 

Laugh Elk 



ISfl 

130 __ ^ 

137 Doiieaal Castle 
IM The Holy Well of Doon 
13B Bally shannon 
IM The Pulleni, near 
Batliutrae 
Coimti/ Firmaiiagh. 



Interior 
Ita Amiagli, The Library 

HH Rostreror, Old Bridge 
140 Carllngford 
150 Cariinglord, King 
John^s Castle 

OermsDy, 

1 View from tbe Ratbaue 

Tower 
3 Tliiergarten, Goethe 

Monument 
3 Schiller Monnuient 
t Old Museum 
5 National Gallery 
* Royal C-"*>~ 



7 Falade of the C 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SHOES StE. PKCt Vi-f 



191 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL. CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



9 Bismarck's Palace 

10 Moltke's House 

11 The Exchange 

12 The Rathaus 

13 Unter den Linden 

14 Monnment Frederick II 

15 Schloss Brucke 

16 The University 

17 Frederich Strasse Sta- 

tion 

18 Konigsplatz 

19 National Gallery 

20 Schloss Platz 

21 Gymnasium 

CfiarloUenburg. 

22 Royal Palace 

23 The Mausoleum 

24 Grave of Queen Louise 

Potsdam. 

25 Royal Palace 

Luxembourg. 

26 Porte du Pfaflfenthal 

27 "La Vierge" Cathedral 

28 Eglise St. Michel 

29 Petrussu Valley 

30 North Viaduct and 

Clausen 

Trier. 

31 General View trom 

Weishaus 

32 General View from near 

Petrushof 

33 Bridge on the Moselle 

34 The Moselle from Weis- 

haus 

T?ie Moselle. 

35 The Moselle from Land- 

street Castle 

Cologne. 

36 The Cathedral -- (Peep 

of) 

37 The Cathedral — (Peep 

of) 

38 The Cathedral, North- 

west 

39 The Cathedral— Facade 

(near) 

40 The Cathedral — West 

Portals 

41 The Cathedral— South- 

42 The Cathedral — South 

Portals 

43 The Cathedral — West 

Front 

44 The Cathedral — South 

Side 
46 The Cathedral— Nave 
East 

46 General View from 

Deutz, with Bridge of 
Boats 

47 Bridge of Boats, from 

Deutz 

48 Railway Bridge 

49 Hotel du Nora, etc. 

50 The Rathaus and Ca- 

thedral 

51 St. Ursula 

52 St. Geron 

53 Statue of Bismarck 

54 •♦ Moltke 

T?ie Rhine — Bonn. 

55 General View from 

Kreuzberg 
36 TheMunster 
'7 Statue of Beethoven 



58 Rolandseck.^'The Seven 
Mountains" 

59 The Seven Mountains 
from Rolandseck 

60 Remagen 

61 Andemach — General 
View from the Castle 

62 Lutesdorf 

63 Stolzenfels and the 
Railway Bridge 

64 Stolzenfels and Ober- 
lahnstein 

65 St. Goarhausen 

66 Rheinfels, etc. 

67 St. Goarhausen, The 
Katz and St. Goar 

68 St. Goar 

69 Lurlei Rock 

70 " •• 

71 Oberwesel, from Kip- 
pelberg 

72 Oberwesel, from Schon- 
berg and the Rhine 

73 Schloss Rheinstein 

74 " " from 
Curhaus 

75 Bingen, Mouse Tower, 
etc. 

76 Bingen, from Rtides- 
heim 

r77 Bingen, River Nahe 

78 Bingen, Rudesheim 

79 Bingen, from Roudel 

80 Bingen and the Mouse 
, Tower 

81 Bingen and Rudesheim 

Coblem. 

82 Coblenz and Ehrenbreit- 

stein 

83 Coblenz and Thai 

84 Ehrenbreitstein from 

above Thai 

85 Ehrenbreitstein from 

the Bridge 

86 The Railway Bridge 

87 Bridge of the Boats and 

Coblenz 

88 The Moselle, from Ehr- 

enbreitstein 

89 The Moselle from Ehr- 

enbreitstein 

90 Moselle Bridge 

91 Rhine Promenade 

92 Dusseldorf from Prom- 

enade 

£Jm8. 

93 From Baderlei 

94 Dorf Ems 

95 The Four Towers 

96 General View 

97 The Curhaus 

Nassau. 

98 View from Burg Nassau 

99 Stein Monument 

100 View from above Ems 

Road 

101 Suspension Bridge 

Kreuznach. 

102 General View 

103 Old Bridge 

Munster Am, Slein. 

104 Ebernburg 

105 Rheingrafenstein 

106 Rothenfels 

Mayence. 

107 General View from St. 

Stephens, withCathe- 
dral 



108 The Cathedral from St 

Stephens 

109 ItaUway Bridge 

110 Markt Brunnen 

111 The Railway Station 

112 " " " In- 
tenor 

113 Gutenberg Monument 

114 SchiUer 

115 St. Stephen's Church 

Interior 

116 St. Peter's Church 

117 Neubrunnen 

Wie^Hiden. 

118 From Biebrich Strasse 

119 From Rheinblich • 

120 The Cursaal 

121 " « Gardens 

122 Greek Chapel, from 

West 

123 The Synagogue 

124 FrankfurterstraB8e,etc. 

Frankfort on the Main. 

125 General View 

126 View from old Bridge 

127 Old Bridge 

128 The Exchange 

129 Friedenstrasse 

130 Schiller Monument 

131 Goethe «« 

132 Goethe's House 

133 Luther's " 

134 Palm Gardens and 

Swiss Cottage 

135 Palm Gardens, aspen- 

sion Bridge 

Honiburg, 

136 General View 

Darmsta^ 

137 Rheinstrasse, from the 

Monument 

138 View from Monument, 

looking East 

Worms. 

139 Cathedral, from North- 

east 

140 Cathedral, from South- 

west 

141 Luther's .Monument 

(upriffht) 

142 Luthers Tree 

143 St. Martin's Church 

Heidelberg. 

144 Castle and Town from 

Elizabeth's Terrace 

145 Castle and Town from 

Elizabeth,8 terrace 
(near) 

146 Castle from Elizabeth's 

Terrace 

147 The Ncckar from Eliza- 

beth's Terrace 

148 View from Castle Bal- 

cony 

149 Old Bridge and Castle 

150 The Neckar, from near 

New Bridge 

151 View from Geisberg 

152 The Castle from the 

North 

153 The Castle from Schloss 

Hotel 

154 The Castle from Phi- 

iosophenwig 

155 The Castle, from Octa- 

gon Tower 

156 The Castle, from Octa- 

gon Tower and Bal- 
cony 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S£.£. PkG.t.%21- 



.SiBtle, Frederich 
I ptlo HHiirj"" 

K The Oftette Coiirtyfira 
sa The CkBtle, £liiabeth'> 

ISO The CkBtle, Frederick's 

Bnildinas 
Ifll Tbe OfiBtle, Entmnce to 

Otto Henry's BniW- 



NecfcarBteiDHnh, S' 

low's It est 
Speyer CHthednil 



golin'B CBBtle 
I The Butha, New Oastlo, 

Cutle 
I TFinbe-IlHlle, Corridor 



SW View tro 

307 Fool-brli 
l«rg 



i Uoeche'a Uana 



3 O&me OiLthedial 



17 Tlie Tomb ol Simileoa 



New Hatha 
New Balba, Fbc 



Devil'i Pulpit 
I PrlnueSolm'sCB 
. The Old CantlG 



17 The WalerlalL 



1 The Moiua BDiJ 

itein Castle 
1 The Mouifr Irom 

I SclosB^beiitein 



Eberatelnbnrg 
Blaek fureil 
W The S 



Little Kigi 
1S7 iUllway Roiiti 

berg 
IH SMtlOD Irani 

'NnssbOFh Rn. 
190 From Kappellai 



k Forest Hot 

SOI The Cascade— General 

View 
SW OntftCh Vttlloy, Stain- 
SOS River ac 



S Hltine Bridge 
9 Island of SraiDQ 



iSO General View 

Inusbruek. 
aai General View from 



•t3S General View 

CapHle. 

!3t Caatle Andrei 



ai Mark 









S3 Vinoyarda and Chalk 

Clio's 
53 Entrance to Chalk 

St Incerior ol Chalk Minei 

fin Looking onl of the 
Chalk Mines 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. Pft.GiE \tt.T. 






View Ironi Lorettoberg 



St. Etienne 
er; of Afxillo in tl 



7 St. Monica and Augna- 

8 Crypt of the Church ol 



Ht. Chape 



VilLe 
I of JulUeC 



napoleon 
If Barle An- 



il 1 Buttes— Chemounts 
rerialllei. 

32 The Carriage ol Hapo- 

33 The Bed of Napoleon 
S4 The Hon - '- • - 

3a BedotUarle 



Park 
sa Fountain of Neptune 
4a The Bed of Lonla Phil- 

llppe 

41 Interior at Church of 
Egllae St. Oaen— 
Rouen 



193 



MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., U. S. A. 



58 Interior of the Cathe- 

dral 

59 Details of Large Door 

60 Iron Gates ana Details 

of Side Door 

61 The Guide to the Cathe- 

dral 

62 Recent Addition to the 

Cathedral 

63 Street Scene in Sens 

64 House of Jean Cusa 

65 Stone Arched Bridge— 

Yonne River 

66 A Bit of the Canal near 

Sens 
©7 A Picturesque French 
Gateway at Sens 

68 Cathedral at Sens 

69 West Gateway at Sens 

70 Picturesque Stone 

Bridge by the Way- 
side 

71 A Bit of Dole— Jura 

72 Bridge and Cathedral- 

Dole 

73 Drinking Font— Dole 

74 A French Policeman— 

Dole 

75 Wash-Da;r on the Loire 

near Dijon 

76 A Bit of the Loire near 

Dijon 

77 Hotel de I'Ecu— Mont- 

bard 

78 Picturesque Stone 

Bridge with Cross 

79 The Monastery of Mont- 

bard 

80 The Monastery, Distant 

View 

81 Cottages near Avran- 

ches 

82 Panorama of Toulon 

83 Fontainebleau, Yard of 

the Farewell 

84 Fontainebleau, the 

Grand Staircase 

85 Panorama of Nice 

86 " " 

87 Hall of the Chevaliers, 

at Mount St. Michael 

Paris. 

88 Avenue de I'Opera (in- 

stantaneous) 

89 Avenue de I'Opera, 

Opera House 

90 Toward Palais Royal 

91 Place de la Concorde 



c< 



92 " 

93 " " •* Obe- 
lisk 

94 The Madeleine 

95 " " (instantaneous) 

96 •• " " 

97 Column and Place Ven- 

dome 

98 Champs Elysees and 

Arc de Triomphe 

99 Champs Elysees and 

Arc de Triomphe 

100 Arc de Triomphe 

101 " " Bas- 

relief, Victory 

102 Arc de Triomphe, Bas- 

relief, Coronation Na- 
poleon 

103 Hotel des Invalides 

104 Palace of Industry (in- 

stantaneous) from the 

Seine 
105 Chamber of Deputies 
100 Palace of Justice 



107 Hotel de Ville 

108 Institute of Art 

109 Fountain of St. Michael 

110 Notre Dame. Main En- 

trance 

111 Notre Dame Cathedral 

112 The Pantheon 

113 Arc du Carrousel 

114 Turneries 

115 Porte de Carrousel 

116 Hotel des Invalides, In- 

terior of Church 

117 Hotel des Invalides, 

Tomb of Napoleon 

118 Hotel des Invalides,Sar- 

cophagus 

119 Column of July 

120 Avenue of the Champs 

Elysees (instantane- 
ous) 

121 New Opera House, 

Front, (instantaneous) 

122 New Opera House, 

Foyer 

123 Arch of Triumph 

121 The Bourse (instantan- 
eous) 

125 Place de la Concorde 

(instantaneous) 

126 Panorama of the Seine 

127 " " Seven 
Bridges 

Louvre. 

128 The Louvre 

129 The Assyrian Tomb 

130 HaU of Miletus (Greek) 

131 Phoenician Room 

132 Egyptian Room 

133 " " Sphinx 
of Thotmes III 

134 Hall of Caryatide 

135 Hall of CaryatidCj the 

Discus-Thrower 

136 Hall of the Venus de 

Milo 

137 The Venus de Milo 

(front View) 

138 The Venus de Milo 

(three-quarter view) 

139 The Venus de Milo 

(profile) 

140 Statue Melpomene 

141 Hall of Augustus 

(Roman) 

142 The Fighting Gladiator 

143 The Hall of the Fight- 

ing Gladiator 

144 Half of the Tiber 
146 Statue of the Tiber 

146 •• " " close 

147 Hall of Diana 

148 Greek Statue of Victory 

149 Hall of Apollo 

150 Murillo's Immaculate 

Conception 

151 The Louvre, Gallery of 

Apollo 

Palace Versailles. 

152 Interior Grand Hall 

153 The Throne of Napo- 

leon 

154 Bed-Room of Louis XIV 

155 Carved Mantel-Piece 

Rouen. 

156 Church of St. Ouen 

157 Cathedral in the Quad- 

rangle 

158 A Street in Rouen 

Caen. 

159 Church of St. Giles 

160 " St. PeteT 



Paris Exposition, 

161 Exposition of 1889. Elf. 

f el Tower 

162 Exposition of 1889. Es- 

pianades des Invalides 

163 Exposition of 1880. Cen- 

tral Dome and Foun- 
tain 

164 Exposition of 1889. Mon- 

umental Fountain, by 
Coutan 

165 Exposition of 1889. Bo- 

livia Pavilion 

166 Exposition of 1889. Ven- 

ezuela Pavilion 

167 Exposition of 1889. Ton- 

quin Pavilion 

168 Exposition of 1889. Pal- 

ace of Colonies 

169 Exposition of 1889. Pal- 

ace of Liberal Arts 

170 Exposition of 1889. Gal- 

lery of Fine Arts. In- 
tenor 

171 Exposition of 1889. Ma- 

chinery Hall. Interior 

172 Exposition of 1889. Java 

Village and Pagoda of 
Angkir 

173 Exposition of 1889. 

Early German and 
Gallic Habitations 

174 Exposition of 1889. Huts 

from Central Africa 

175 Exposition of 1889. 

Moorish Caf6 

176 Exposition of 1889. 

Group of Africans 

177 Exposition of 1889. 

Parx of the Champ de 
Sdars 

178 General View from Tro- 

cadero. Showing Elf- 
f el Tower 

Edward L. Wilson^s Pei^ 

sonally Photographed 

Slides of Paris. 

179 From the Arc de Tri- 

umph toward the Tro- 
cadero 

180 A Traveler's View from 

the Arc de Triumph 

181 From the Arc de Tri- 

umph toward the In. 

182 From the Arc de Tri- 

umph; Champs Elys^ 

183 Arc de Triumph, east ; 

near 

184 Arc de Triumph, east ; 

distant 

185 Arc de Triumph; west 

186 Arc de Triumph; De- 

parture 

187 Arc de Triumph; Coro- 

nation 

188 Arc de Triumph; Left 

Bas-Relief 

189 Bit of the Champs Ely. 

s^e 

190 Palais de 1' Industrie 

and Statue of Marceau 

191 Tuilleries; south side 

192 Bit of Tuilleries and 

Louvre 

193 Louvre; exterior 

194 Louvre; Court interior 

195 Palais Royal 

196 Place de la Concorde; 

f general 
ace de la Concorde; 
Statue of Brest 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S^t. P^Gi.^ N'Tl. 



McINTUSU BATTEISY .1}J[> OI-TK.AL Lil., CHICAGO, ILL,, U. 9 



ue ParlBisn .^liaps o 



iiid Opera House 
>1 Group ot Dancers; 
"—-id Opera House 

. in News-acaud 

4 PlriBliin FlowBt-ieller 
D PBTialSa OmnlbnB 

,. ... . ,YQ]g J, 






seine 



1 Ypreg. Uolel de \ 
3 C'ouctcftv— Briiigt 

3 Caiirtni}' —Hotel 



5 BniieB— The CBthednil, 

-■S Bru/^ea— Notre Onme 
t7 BriifreB— Quai rtu Ro- 

4S Brngei— The Belirv 
W Oaceud— The Harbor 
SOOaleiHl — The Light- 



New Hotel-de.' 

W. Tower 
7 Ken- Hotul-de-V 

e Cathedral; 

e ralhedral; 

31D Notre Damt 



illesnit BeltryolSt. 

may— The Be 

Toiiriiay— View i 

ry 



and 



JNiim 



BB;B,nl 






SI Hnrkec Scene 
la Palais deJiistlce 
63 Scene on Canal 



tbe PanClieon 
3U> Rne St. Jacques an 

Cbe Luxemlnuric 
JU 8t. Etiennsdu Mont 
aiT Palais dea Beaux Arts 
SIS Luxe nibourg Falaco; 

Garden of Uoaes 
SIB LnnBinbourK Palace 

sai Lusernliourg Palace 

SSI LuiemlioiirK Palace 

and Statuary 
221 Luiembonrg Palace 

llie Food la In 
Ha Corpa Legialalil 
SH Insfltute 
Slit SejDe ^Bridge?, fro 



14. Liege— I'Blaia de Jus- 

tice, tlie Arcade 
13 Lieice— Ttie Cathedral 

16 Liege-Calhedml, inte- 

17 Liege— Tlje Church ol 



Michael 

~ ilel-d« . 



St. 



iUe 



n St. 



icbael toward the 



327 Pont Ne 



I Belle 



le Mat. 



338 Pont NeuC; instantane' 

S3S Parla »4treets, from 

Pout Naur 
S30 Seine hear the TDlller- 

ies: In Stan tan eon a 
231 Lonrre and Tuilieriea 

from Pont Nenf 

333 Tower otSl. JaCBuea 
S33 Bourse 

334 Dome of the Invalidea 
S3S Hospital of the EuTalideB 
i38 Pont de jena; the Seine 

and Troeadero 
S37 Trocederoand Garde na 
ass Trocitdero Fountain; 

Bull 



241 TrocHdero f 



044 Expiato>7 Ctiapei c 
as Pare Moncenu 



a BruBBeia- The Hotel dt 

:i Bruaaela— Cathedral 
12 BrusselB-Colonne du 

S Brua'selB-Tlie Bourae 
H Waterloo— Lion Slounl 
15 Waterloo — llougou. 

S Waterinn— Iji RfIIh aI 
Banc 



sa Antwerp— Churo I 

the JesnitB 
SB Ghent— Church i 



*1- Angua 
ha pel; Rue 



13 Brugea- UoteldeVlUe 
'4 Brugaa- Palais de Jus- 



S Belfry 

WiUingSubJectB 

1 A Canal Street— Belfry 

S Palais deLa'Natlon 



r-ongraaa 
Sod fray di 



'0 SlBCtyra- » 
'I Rue Itojol 

73 Boulevard 



-La Haye 

2S Oudeiiarde— The Hotel 
S» Malines Cathedral, i 

30 Malines Cathedral, 

31 Antwerp Cathedral. ■ 
I twerp Cathedral, I 



T7 BoulBTardde Waterloo 
19 Port de Bal. buUt 1834 
70 TheBonraeffrantTlBWl 



Bt Poor Doggy 

es Ancient raatle— P 



1 Panorama 
1 Hotel de 1 

3 Hotel de < 



FOR PRICE LfST OF SLIDES SEE. PkGiE. ^'2.^. 



196 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



k' 



4 Observatory 

5 Russian Chapel 

6 Window-Garden on the 

Rhone 

7 Opera House and Mnsee 

Rath 

8 Monument to the Duke 

of Brunswick 

9 Lateen Rigged Boat on 

the Lake 

10 American Chapel 

11 Conservatory of Music 

12 Cathedral of St. Pierre 

13 The Kersaal 

14 Panorama from the Ca 

sino 

15 The New Theater 

16 " " (inst) 

17 Eonestrian Statue Du- 

four 

18 Conservatory of Music 

19 Musee Rath 

20 National Monument 

Bronze 

21 Curious Old Street 

22 Calvin's House 

23 Monument of Duke of 

Brunswick 

24 Monument of Duke of 

Brunswick 

25 The River Rhone and 

Lake Geneva 

26 Statue Jean Jacques 

Rousseau (Bronze) 

27 From the Swan's Pond, 

Island of Rosseau 
(inst) 

28 From the Quay (inst) 

Miscellaneous— 8itntzerland. 

29 Castle of Chillon 

30 Chapel of William Tell 

31 Gamer Glacier 

32 View from the Great 

Gamer Glacier 

33 The Matterhom 

34 General View of the 

Matterhom 

35 View Right of the Mat- 

terhom 

36 Glacier Left of the Mat- 

terhom 

37 Little Matterhom 

38 Breithom and Little 

Matterhom 

39 Visp Valley 

40 Tourists near Gamer 

Glacier 

41 Monte Kosa 

42 Weishan and New RifTel 

Hotel 

43 Ein Sedlem, where 

Zwingli Preached 

44 Home of Zwingli 

45 The Lion of Lucerne 

46 Zurich 

47 Castle of Marburg 

48 Einsiedeln Abbey 

49 Church at Naters 

50 Swiss Chalets, Naters 

51 Church at Naters 

52 View at Naters 

53 Looking toward the 

Simplon.from Naters 

54 Street in Brieg 

55 " " 

56 Schlos Stockalper — 

Brieg 

57 Valley of the Rhone at 

Brieg 
68 Street in Brieg 
59 View in Brieg 



60 Hotel D'Angleterre— 

Brieg 

61 Schloss Stockalper and 

Valley of the Rhone 

62 Courtyard of Schloss 

S tockalper— Br leg 

63 The Rhone Valley, from 

the College— Brieg 

64 A View from the Col- 

lege Yard— Brieg 

65 The Rhone Valley— 

Brieg 

66 Hospenthal and the 

Spitzberg 

67 At Hospenthal 

68 Street m Hospenthal 

69 Church and Castle— 

Hospenthal ' 

70 Interior of the Church 

—Hospenthal 

71 Thusis 

72 Tower of the Rhine 

Gate— Constance 

73 Bernina Falls 

74 Near the Summit of the 

Bernina Pass 

75 Ornamental Windows, 

St. Gall 

76 Ornamental Bay Win- 

dow, St, Gall 

77 A Swiss Village 

78 Ossuary, Swiss Church- 

yard 

79 Cottages at Glion 

80 Holy Fountain, Einsie- 

deln 

81 Johannisberg, Via Mala 

82 Entrance to " 

83 Via Mala, the Gorge 

84 •« «' 

85 Entrance to Stelvio 

Pass 

86 View at Samaden 

87 Hospenthal and Ander- 

matt 

88 Street in Andermatt 

89 Cottages at " 

90 Churchyard at •• 

91 Luzerne Cathedral 

92 At Luzerne 

93 Castle of Chillon 

94 View at Grindewald 

9» The Wetterhorn from 
Grindewald 

96 The Wetterhorn from 

Grindewald 

97 Schwytz and the My- 

then 

98 Chapel at Schwytz 

99 Street in Schwytz 

Lucerne. 

100 From the Lake 

101 The Old Lantern and 

Bridge 

102 Across the Lake 

103 The Hofkirche 

104 Quaint old Street 
loa Curious old House 
108 The Speuer Bnicke 

107 The Speuer Brucke and 

Old Mill 

108 Barracks and Old Tow 

ers 

109 The Lion, by Thorwald 

sen 

110 The Lion, by Thorwald- 

sen (close) 

111 Lake Front (^instanta- 

neoua, fine view) 

112 The Alps, across Lake 

Lucerne (instantane- 
ous^ 



113 The Alps, across Lake 

Lucerne (instantane- 
ous) 

Lake Lucerne, 

114 Gersau, from the Axen- 

115 Gersau, Picturesque 

Old Cottage 

116 Gersau, Picturesque 

Old Cottage 

117 Gersau, a Swiss Chalet 

118 Toward Pilatus, from 

the Axenstrasse 

119 View of the Lake, from 

an Arbor 

120 Road Skirting the Lake 

121 " " «« " 

122 Across the Lake from 

Gersau 

123 Across the Lake from 

Gersau, with Steam, 
er 

124 Steamer Italia leaving 

Gersau 

125 Steamer Italia leaving 

Gersau 

126 Gersau, from Steamer 

(instantaneous) 

127 The Mountains, from 

Treib (instantaneous) 

128 The Mountains, from 

Treib (instantaneous) 

129 The Mountains, from 

Brunnen 

130 Across the Lake from 

Brunnen 

131 Across the Lake from 

Brunnen 

132 Brunnen from the 

Steamer (instantane- 
ous) 

133 The Alps from Sis^kon 

(instantaneous) 

134 Alpine View, from the 

Axenstrasse 

135 Alpine View, from the 

Axenstrasse 

136 Grand View of the Ax- 

enstrasse and the Alps 

137 Tunnel of the Axen- 

strasse 

138 Tunnel of the Axen- 

strasse 

139 Gallery of the Axen- 

strasse, toward Flue- 
len 

140 Gallery of the Axen- 

strasse, toward Lu- 
cerne 

141 St. Gothard Railroad, 

from Axenstrasse 

142 St. Gothard RaUroad 

and Axenstrasse 

143 Picturesque Fluelen, 

Entrance to St. Goth- 
ard Pass 

144 The Great St. Gothard 

Tunnel, 13}i miles 
long, Goeshenen 

145 St. Gothard Pass and 

Avalanche Tunnel 

146 St. Gothard Pass, near 

Goeshenen 

147 St. Gothard Pass, near 

Goeshenen 

148 St. Gothard Pass, near 

Devil's Bridge 

149 St. Gothard Pass, the 

Devil's Bridge 

150 St. Gothard Pass, the 
\ Devil's Bridge 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDE.S S^^ P^^^ \YI* 




ATTERY ASD OPTU.iAL CO., OmUAGO, I 






OSS Hyou llnal , 
■-— ■■ flhQwfaig Phateau 
A Loaded Wooil-Boat 
under Sail (Inst.) Ny on 
Ul i. Loaded Wood-Boat 
under Sail [InstONjOQ 
MB nolle (!n«t.) from 

VX Bolle (insl.) the CUa- 

IH Steamer Aigle (Inst.) 

B6 3t. frBiCtnst.) 

MB Morgeg, Chateau and 

Harbor 
UT MoTRea [Inst.) 



I 



(close VI 
Ml Inolioed Kullroi 

ritet GUoQ 
102 Rhone Glacier 



JSB " of Mount Blanc 

19D HospiceB of the threat 

St. Bernard 
IBl Hospices of the Groat 

Monte Helan 
1S3 Status or Rudolph of 



toward the Rizhi 
LoooinoliyHOnthBKighi 
_ Kallroad up the RiKhi 
U TbeBTlditeBat AmBtes, 

St. Uathard 
K Glacier Dnguat Arquille 

Mint Tiuinel in the Glacier 
■ of the Grindewald 
M CsTem of Glacier 

Hniealau 
IB eomer Glacier 






a>j Tlie Men- Bridge 

WM View (rom tlie Now 

Bridge 
110 The Rhine and Dridgas 
£11 Ferrv Boat and Three 

Kings' Hotel 
S12 The Calbeilntl, from 

Upper Bridie 

ai3 ThePatliedralCloletera 

Laufenburg, 

113 General V.ew 



Schwfiiierhof 
S:haffliavten. 
il7 The BridBB 



Waid .. 
iSa Fraa UunBter 
aa The Railwaj- »i 



3 Thorwaidsea'B Lion 



240 Thorwaldsen'B Lion, 

(with the inacrlntipn) 

ail Thorwaidsen's Xion, 

34j Cornor of Cathedral 

Lalit of Lucerne, 
as On the Righi, Railway 
SM On the Eighi, The Cas- 
!4.'i The Highi Railway 



en, the Lake ol 



2Sl Lake of Lucerne 
SM Lake of Lucerne t 

253 Goraan 
25* Enplelierg 

Ssa Graveyard at Wol 

chlcBsen 
so: Jocli Pass— The Er 



Bnmig Patt. 
■iew on Brnuiif 



leu Vnller 
Cascade 



2ea The (ilea 



e Wengern, view from 

the Great Srhelde): 
Wetigern.theOhaAt. 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEt Ph(k«.«.T- 



iliach. Lower 

ro The GiesBhacb, Upper 

FaU 
"1 The Giessbach, Feep of 

Inlerlaken. 
a steamboat station 
!S View from the Bridge 
n The Ciirsaai 
ra The Jungfrau, Iroiu 

ra The Jnugfrau, from 

n The Jnngfrau, Irom 

re HotulBeau RiTage 

'9 View at, with Jnng- 

10 The Jungfran, from 



!J General View, from the 

18 Railway Bridge 

S The c'atlifldral, from 

» Xeitglochlharm, (Chwk 

Tower) 
II Zoitglochthurm, (Clock 

Tower] from Harkt- 

11 BemerliolT and Rath- 

e Bundes-Rath-baua 

>4 SpltalgasBe 

15 Suspension Bndge 

e BaoroDplati 

17 Baereii Gralien 



7 Wengern Alp — 

Si:beldeck Fass 

« Wengern, view 



MT MCISTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A- 



Orindewald. 

311 Grindewald from the 

Wetterhom 
313 GriDdewald from the 

Wetterhom 
SIS Grindewald, Upper 

Glacier 
SM Grindewald, Upper 

Glacier Ice Cave 
S15 Grindewald, the Lower 

Glacier 
316 Sosenlani — the Well. 

horn and Wetterhom 
.317 Bernese Oberland 

318 Viesch Glacier and Fin- 

ateraahom 

319 Aietsch Glacier, from 

Bel Alp Hotel 
380 Aietsch Looking Down, 

with Mt. Blanc, etc. 
331 Aietsch Jangf ran, 

Monck and Eiger 

322 Ithone Glacier and Ho- 

tel 

323 Bhone Glacier and Ho- 

tel 

324 Bhone Glacier Crevasse 

325 The Baby Rhone 
S2S The Rhone Falls 

327 Snsten Pass— the Stei. 

nen Glacier 

328 Snsten Pass, Milking 

Goats in 

FYibourg. 

320 View from Loretto 

Chapel 

330 Suspension Bridge 

(Pont Snspendn) 

331 Snsx>ension Bridge and 

Town 

332 Lower Town and Sus- 

I>ension Brid^ 

333 Suspension Bridge 

Geneva, 

334 View from Couronne 

Hotel 
835 View from Hotel de 
'lEcu 

336 On the Rhone 

337 The Clock Tower 

Lake of Geneva, 

338 Nyon 

330 Nyon, from the Hill 

above 
340RoUe 

341 Rolle, the Castle 
3^ Merges 

Lausanne. 

343 General View 

344 The Castle and Cathe. 

dral 
346 The Cathedral 

346 The Castle 

347 The Lake, etc. 

348 Savoy Mountains 

349 " •• 
390 Onchv 

351 Onchy Steamboat Sta. 

tion 
383 Ouchy Hotel Beau Kiv. 

age, etc. 

Vevay. 

353 General View and Dent 

du Midi 
351 View from the Pier 
356 The Lake 
S5S View from the Baths 



MontreuZf Ktc 

357 Clarens, from near the • 
Cemetery 
■ 358 Clarens, etc. 
. 359 CUirens, the Lake and : 
i Savoy Mountains 



ChilloH. 



360 ChiUon Castle and Dent ; 

du Midi i 

361 Chillon Castle and Mon- ■ 

treux 

362 Chillon Castle from 

Railway Station 

363 ChiUon Castle from ' 

East I 

364 ChiUon Castle from 

west 

365 Chillon Castle, En- . 

trance Gate 

366 Chillon Castle, from 

West 

Aigle. 

367 General View 

368 The Castle, etc. 

369 Hotel des Bains 

Bex, i 

370 General View and Dent ' 

du Midi 

371 River Avencon 

372 St. Maurice 

373 General View ' 

374 General View from near 

the Bridge 

Vernayaz, 

375 General View 

376 Gorges du Trient 

Martigny. 

377 View from the Rhone 

Valley 

378 The Castle and Rhone 

Bridge 

379 Martigny and the Cas- 

tle 

Gorge DurnanL I 

380 View from the Middle ' 

Bridge < 

381 Bridge in the Gorge 

T6le Xoire RonU. ' 

382 Rhone Valley, from . 

T^te Noire 

Chamounix, Mont Blanc, > 
etc 

383 Chamounix 

384 Chaniounix and Mont ' 

Blanc 

385 Chainounix and Mont 

Blanc 

386 Chaniounix 

387 Chamounix and Brevent 

388 Mont Blanc, from 

Chamounix 
380 Mont Blanc, from 
Chamounix 

390 Place de TEglise 

391 Hotel d'Angleterre 

392 Mont Blanc, from Hotel 

d'Angleterre 

393 Mer de Glace and Hotel 

394 Merde Glace from the 

Hotel 

395 Mer de Glace Crossing 

the Glacier 
306 Mer de Glace Crossing 

the Glacier 
397 Mer de Glace from 

below Chapeau 



308 Mules on the Montan- 
vertRoad 

399 Mont BUinc, from 

Fl^re Road 

400 The Hotel, from Fl^re 

Road 

401 Chamounix, Mont 

Blanc Glacier des 
Bossons 

402 Chamounix, Mont 

BUinc Glacier des 
Bossons 
408 Chamounix, Valley of 
Mont Blanc 

404 Mont Blanc, from 

Fl«g«re 

405 Mont Blanc, from Place 

de *1 Aiguille 

406 Mer-de-Glace 

407 Mer-de-Glace 

408 On the Mer-de.Glace 

409 Chamounix and Col de 

BUime 

410 Chamounix and Bre- 

vent 

411 Mont Blanc, from £ng. 

lish Church 

412 Mont Blanc, from Ar- 

Emtierre Valley 
cier des Bossons, 
etc. 

414 Cabin des Grands 

Mulcts 

415 Mont BUinc, from the 

Glaciers 

416 Glacier des Bois 

417 Glacier des Bossons 

418 Glacier des Bossons, 

Head of 

419 Glacier des Bossons 

Grotto 

420 Mont Blanc, the Glacier 

etc. 

421 Mont Blanc and 

Aiguille de Charmoz 

422 The Glacier du Giant 

423 Cascade du Dard 

424 Mont Blanc, from Pont 

Pelissier 

Sion. 

425 Tourbillon Castle 

Loeeh e-Les-Bain*. 

426 General View (Leuker. 

bad) 

427 Ladder Pass (Passage 

des Echelles 

Zermait, etc 

428 Zemiatt and the Mat- 

terhom 

429 Zermatt and the Mat- 

terhom 

430 Zermatt and the Mat- 

terhom 

431 Zemiatt and the Mat- 

terhom , 

432 In the VaUey 

433 Approach to Zermatt 

434 The Matterhom, from 

Mettlehom 

435 The Matterhom, from 

Gomergrat 

436 Breithora, and Little 

Mont Cervin 

437 The Matterhom, from 

Lac Noir 

Brieg. 

438 General View 

439 General View 

440 Napoleon Bridge 

441 The Castle 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PkGiE \21 



MOINTOSH BATTERV AND Ol'TICAI, CO., CHICAGO, ILI.., 



U2 Hotel d'AiiKlcterre 



, 13 The Bearing . 
I U The Cruciflxlon 



418 WatertBll between Has- 



EaMern Suiiisrlaiitt—LuK- 



3 Huspiccof Santa Maria 

4 Engine— SlliBrlniia 

5 EnpidSne — SllTaplHoa, 



tlO per Sti. iHOi Dtacrip. 

tive Jteadtag. 

1 The BULga at Olier-Am. 

■2 Joaaph Mu^er us the 

3 Marr. peraoDated by 
"--a La UK 



8 Obiiat hronzht 
the HlgTi 



4 The UepB.. 

Bethany 
B TLo Pre_pBra 



lulor 



US Altorf 

4B0 VBlle; al,,the Rotisa 
near GnrtnaUeii 

461 AiDBtea 

M2 Wngen, Bridge near 

403 St. Gothard-SchoUlni 
Road 

484 St. Gotham and Po 
du DInble 

■" SI. Golhard and PoqC 



tea St. Uothard, Ponl 

Diable (Oeril'i llridga) 

» St. Gotbard, Pont ^u 
DiBble (Uevll's Bridgel 

'0 St. Gothard, Latea 

1 St. Gothnni, Lnkea 
and Hoanice, Vie 
4TS Hoapenlhal and An 

Faaalon PUj- at Ober 



B High 

1 ted By 



24 TheKttel MonnateT? 



Additional Vita/a. 
1 The Village ol Ober- 
l The Llun^n 

erected tiy Jling Lud- 

■i The Theatre' 

■ie Cbociia 
27 The Director ot the 

Chorus 
as The CnnductoT ol the 

Perfominnue 
3S The Briiia of Hoaronly 

30 ChrlBt Hiding on the 

31 Christ OD the JUoont ot 
Olive 



sold by Jndaa , 32 The Grea-t Coancll ol 

r. . .. I the Sanhedrim 

'-- receiving the 



High Prieats 
ChrlBt holds the lAat 
Snppcr with Hia Dla- 

IS Christ ieCondemaed tc 



45 The Crime at the Bocb 

of Gibeon 
48 The Departure oi To' 



K Thornaa 
63 Hatthen- 
U Bartholomew 
6S ThHddeua 
98 Philip 



03 Xathan 

64 Mererle 

6A Aivhelaua Rabi 

BSSadoc 

87 Joshua 

69 Shuon, o[ Cyreue 
TO Joseph, ol Arlmath 

73 Bambbna 



83 Joseph so 
^ Joseph proi 



S4 King AhasueruB rala. 

8I> Samson destroying the 
Temple 

86 naniel AuoHsed 

87 Crucify Him 1 

the I'nBBlon Play can be 
furnished aeparately at fol- 
lowing pricei: 
Plain. Mcents each; Col. 



Italy. 
1 Psnotamic View 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



UCINTOSH BATTERY AKD OPTICAL Ca, CHICAGO, ILL., C. 8, A. 



B Of the Cicaan, 

irior 

on which stood 



10 Inlcrif , 

Another View 

12 rustle of Kt,' Angelo, 

IS nastle of St. Angelo, 

U PoTtlcoot CathednlSt. 
Peter' g 

13 Interior of St. Peter'i 

erlor of 



17 8 

18 Uhii 



Psal 



CMhednl, 



Diumn of Mnrcui A 

relluB 

rch of Septinina S 



al Ihc PsU 



IX Floreu 

MiDI! 



fro 



Church of 

e« ThSoathedni'l of Flor- 

eo Arch or Gate of St. 

U&llo 
66 Ufllil Callvri 



110 Town of Coma 

111 llellSKgin 

II! Lake Maggioro, Beanti- 

113 Pallanza 

114 Falla of the TiTOll 

lis Interior of Catuooiubi 
lUl Interior of Cataeombs 



67 C 



Above 






Ei Galler 



Corridor, UtBzl (iallory 
ae Second UEBii Gillery 
70 LOBKiii Dei Lonjo 



'4 The Pantheon 
ro Temple of Merc 
Tfl Tomiileorisia 



Jappucli 
Loke Maggiore. 
Ibo la Bella 
I sola Belhi 
Jaola Bella, rrom 

iBoUi Bella 

Lake of Lagano. 
Liiaano, Bridge c 



-SO. 



Mont 



W Temple of Mlnerra 
30 Via Appla 

Bl Toinhol CeoillaMotclla 
38 Bnrial of the Society ol 



S4PiehinKBonteMao 



ii3 Uonee of the Poet 

SS CityTormn 

SAHouae of Corn ell taltuCTo 

87 House of Salliist 

SS Panorama of Naples 



i The Cathedral 



Canal 
38 Cucal Palace 
Sa Grand Canal, Dago's 

Palace on the right 

40 Palace of the Dogea 

41 Conr t-T a rd— Palace of 



43 Snca 



and Canal 



n the 



4S Canal 



la Uote: 



4S Gondolas on the Canal 
EO Bridge of the Blalto 
fli Bridge of Sighs 
» The Grand Canal 
03 St. Mark's Cathedral 
M Grand Canal from St. 

«ark's Sqnaro 
BG Plaiia St. Marco 
Be Gate of Campanile 
Tlortnce. 



flor. 



the Mil sen ni 
S3 Neopolitan Home L 
04 Crater of VeenHns 
SS LftcaDeds— VesuTl-- 
m TheCraterof VesuTliis ( 



43 Portico ul Dncal Pal. 

44 Casa d'Oro, or liolden 

Pals- 

40 TPlttB 

IB The Cavelll Palace, 

Grand Canal 
47 Canal View— Bridge of 

Sighs in the Distance 
" — ' '■'■■— opposite 



101 The Cathedral 

Mew 
109 The (athedra 
KBThetalhedtal 
IM Arch of ^hnpli 



» The Cnthtfdral and 

Lejinuig Tower 
y? Buiptifltery ' 

w rulpic In the Baptistery I 

Siiiito lloly Bnryiiigl 



il The Cathedral, Uenaial 

Vi The Cnthedml, Center 

Spires, etc., fr. Boot 
13 The Cathedral, Details 



18 The Catliedrsi, Spire* 
IS Loonardoda Vinol 
>1 Statue ot Federioo 
i3 Terra Cotta Work 

THT-lfk 

■3 MoDte Capucctal, etc 
>t Snapenalon Bridge 
ifi Jens' Synagogue 

in From the Campanile 



FOR PBICE LIST OF SUDES Stl PkGt \11. 



Mcintosh batteuy and optical vo., Chicago, ill., u. s 



ma Tlie Miiaenni.T 



Ue GMnd Chdu 



aaOiet i aM Tlie 



Soe The VfttlCBn and Colon- 
10 The ColoiBBniTi 



UT Plsee of St. Uark, 
Doge's Fslttce, etc. 

168 Flue ol St. Mark, I 
Doge's Palace Hn' "' 
UldrglD 



113 Cathedral ol SC Marl 



ITS Tbe Leanuig Ton-er 
ISO ThB LeaiiliiK Tower, 

181 Tlia Leanini Tower, 

Another View 

Fiorince. 

m Florenie and Rirer 

183 Fkireiiue aud It ire i 

IW The Cstheilral, from 

the Palaiza Vecchto 
US FaLazEU Vecuhio 
' UH Tbe Bniitiatery 
1S7 Tlie Baptlstory, BroDue 

188 The Baptistery, Bronze 



Veechlo 
193 The t;fficl 
IM The Loggia del Lau 
IM The Loggia del La 

AohlUes with the d 
IW The Loggia del La 



IBB General View, Irom the 
French Arademr 

as General View, PIrmh 
del Popolo.eta. 

BM On the Tiber 

— "t. Peter's Irom Weat 



SOS SC Peters, (ro 



» St. peters. Fnoflde anii 



2M The Foriini 
—" "'euiule ol " Castor ai 
Poflui" 

'emplo of " Castor and 
PoUni" 
318 Arch ol SepttniUB Sev- 

219 The Capitol 

330 St. Anielo, Bridgeand 

CastlD 
Ml St. Angelo, Bridge and 

Castle 
2M St, Aniralo, Bridge and 

Castte 
Ha The Forum, from the 

Oapltot 
SU ThoVocum 
S1& Teinple ol Vespasian 

snd Arch o( Septlmoe 

SereruB 
SaH Forum ol Trajan 
227 Arch of Con scan tine 

XS Santa Maria Ma^lore 

Ml The CajJilol 



237 The VftliK 



SIB The Capitol 

250 Sl,^ Peters, from Pincio 

sen Quirinale Palace 
SBS Famcae Palace 
9U Porta g. i<eljastiano 
IX Tomb or Cecilia Ustella 
SSa Sculinnre.-DyingGla- 

Xajilel, 
M? Buy and VeBuriiiB.troni 

Vomero 
3SS Bb; sndVeauvlUB.from 



Ma The Mus 

of Capn 
MS The Musi 






3114 The Buy 
aaa General View 
Capn. 



369 Grotto of St. CrUtofani 

Fompeii, 
379 General View, from the 
North 



'■I Streets of theToml 



SM The Harbor 

Polnrmo. 
38e Marina and Monte P 
aST Cacfiedral 
Sdwaia L. B'*(*in'« Psrji 
aV}/ photographed «lf( 

S89 House of Arlatides 



3SJ Forum, General VIeir 

MS Fornm, Details 

394 Basili'-'k 

Mfi Temple o( Uerear» 

Art Relics 
386 Temple o( Uereurr. 

3S7 Arch of Kern and ol S 

3Sii Temple and Street of 

399 House of Glanc 
son House of the Bl.,. 
301 Gate of Hercuheneum 



303 Street of tl 

303 Stce - ■ 



I Tombs 



I the 1 



,'ileepingFann ( SB rav«v*YiB.^'«\\i'i is-xfc 

FOH PR/CE LIST OF SLIDES Stt Pk^kt N^T- 



201 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



306 Arch of Triumph and 

Vesuvius 

307 New (1882) Excavations 
306 Museiim, Interior 

300 Museum, Skulls and 
Bread 

Naples. 

310 Custom House 

311 Vesuvius from the 

Quay 

312 Zoological and Public 

Garaen 

313 National Park, En- 

trance 

314 A Modern Neapolitan 

Residence 

315 Castle del Nuovo 

Borne. 

316 Pincio, Quirinal 

317 Pincian Highway, Stat- 

uary 

318 Piazza del Popolo 

319 The Corso 

320 Rome from the Quirinal 

321 Trinita dei Monte,Span. 

Staircase 

322 Peasant Model, Span. 

Staircase 

323 Peasant Model, Span. 

Staircase 

324 Group of Models, Span. 

Staircase 

325 Group of Models, Span. 

Staircase 

326 The Capitol 

327 Statue of Marcus Au- 

rilius, Capitol Hill 

328 The Pantheon 

329 Fouiitain of Trevi 

330 Arch of Septimus Sev- 

er us 

331 Forum, Temples of Sat- 

urn and Vespasian 

332 Column of Phocas, Fo- 

rum 

333 Temple of Castor and 

Pollux 

334 Forum of Trajan 

335 Arch of Titus 

336 Arch of Constantine 

337 Colosseum and Arch of 

Constantine 

338 Colosseiim, Interior, 

General 

339 Colosseum, Interior, 

Details 
340~Rome, from the Colos- 
seum 

341 St. Peter's, Exterior 

342 St. Peter's and the Vat- 

ican 

343 St. Peter's and the Ob- 

elisk 

344 Vatican and the Obelisk 

345 Vatican and the Foun- 

tain 

346 Floral Group. Hotel 

Costanzi 

347 Art in Our Bed-Cham- 

ber, Hotel Costanzi 

348 Flora, by Brignoli; 

Hotel Costanzi 

349 Poetry, by Brignoli; 

Hotel Costanzi 

Spain. 

Madrid. 

1 Escurial Palace, the 

Queen's Room 
^ Tlie Picture Gallery 



3 Hall of the Ambassa. 

dors. Royal Palace 

4 The Escurial 

5 *• *• Interior 

6 The Escurial, Pompeii- 

an Room 

7 Panorama of the Escu- 

rial 

8 Bed Chamber of Phillip 

II, in the Escurial 

9 The Grand Plaza 

10 Throne Room in the 

Royal Palace 

11 Royal Moorish Sleeping 

Room, Alcazar 

12 Peasants. Madrid 

Oranada. 

13 Panorama 

14 View from San Jeromi- 

no 

15 Generalifie, Exterior 

16 ** Interior 
17 

18 Church of St. Gerome, 

Interior 

19 La Chartreuse 

20 Panorama or Granada 

and Alhambra 

Alhamhra. 

21 Tower of Justice 

22 Fountain of the Lions 

23 Court of the Lions 

24 The Sisters Palace 

25 Door of the Two Sisters 

26 Hall of the Two Sisters 



27 


«( 


(( 


(( 


(« 


28 


«« 


(( 


«( 


(« 



29 HaU of Rest 

30 Lindaraja Balcony 

31 Entrance to Embassa- 

dors' Hall 

32 Tower of the Infant 

33 Alcove of the Infant 

34 Window in Tower of 

the Captive 

35 General Plan of the 

Fortress 

36 Plan of the Arabian 

Palace in the Fortress 

37 Arabesques (details) 

38 Center Painting on 

Ceiling, Hall of Jus- 
tice 

39 Cornice in Frieze over 

Columns,Court of the 
Lyons 

40 Ornaments at the Junc- 

tions of Inscriptions, 
Court of the Lions 

41 Ornaments in Panels, 

Hall of Embassadors 

42 Ornaments in Panels, 

Hall of Ambassadors 

43 Band around Panels 

and Window Panels, 
Hall of Ambassadors 

44 Ornaments in Panels, 

Court of the Mosque 

45 Frieze and Panel, Hall 

of the Two Sisters 

46 Sword of King Boabdial 

Seville. 

47 Panorama 

48 Doorway of the Palace 

of St. Elmo 

49 Gate of Charles V 

50 Gate of Munreas Tower 

51 Alcazar, Interior 

52 " Hall of the 
Ambasaadors 



53 Alcazar, Alcove of the 

Sultan 

54 Alcazar, Alcove of the 

Sultana 

55 Alcazar, Minerva's 

Tower 

56 The House of Pilate, 

The Court 

57 The House of Pilate, 

Fountain 

58 The House of Pilate, 

Ornamental GaUery 

59 The House of Pilate, 

Minerva with Club 

60 Market of Antiques 

61 Bull-Fight 

62 The Matadors 

CUbraUar. 

63 The Rock and the Har- 

bor 

64 The Water Batteries 

65 The Tambourine Girl 

66 The Moors at Tanier 

67 Gibraltar 

68 The High Peaks 

69 The Harbor from the 

Battery 

70 General View of the 

Rock 

Coruna. 

71 An Ox-Team, Loaded 

72 The Fountain 

73 An Ox-Team 

74 Zamora 

75 Charcoal Seller, Valen- 

cia 

76 Peasants,*Navarre 

77 ** Segovia 

78 ** " 

79 ** " 

80 Type of Peasants, Leon 

81 ** " Toledo 

82 " " Murcie 

83 " " Group, 
Murcie 

84 A Peasant, Murcie 

85 Wagon Loaded with 

water Jars, Murcie 

86 Peasants, Alicante 

87 The Dying Matador, 

Statue 

88 Notre Dame del Pilar, 

Saragossa 

89 Doorway of St.Gregory, 

Valladolid 

90 Cloisters of St.Gregory, 

Valladolid 

91 Panorama, Malaga 

QihraUar. 

92 View from the Spanish 

Main 

93 View from the Spanish 

Isthmus 

94 View from the Rocks, 
Showing African Coast 

95 English Gibraltar, from 

New Mole 

96 The Arsenal, etc., from 

Buena Vista 

97 View from the Moorish 

Castle 

98 The Rocks, from Eu- 

ropa Point 

99 View from the Old 

Mole 

100 Town and Bay 

101 Group at a Spanish Caf6 

102 Malaga, from the Castle 

103 " from the South 

104 Loja, from the West 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SE.E. P^G^E y^. 



MCISTOSH BATTERY AUD OPTICAL CO., UHIOAGO, ILL., IT. S 



3lid, an Antiqi 
>llil, UD AntiqiU 



Ut Bell Tot 

115 GipBT Tl . .. 
IW Tho fcltv »nd O 
117 ■' T „„,.:_ 

US AUisml 
119 Ailutnil 
ISO A 



riew [rom the Soatb 
IB2 The Cathedral, from CM 



10 Sletre Heroda, frotn 

Calderon'B Honae 
U Blerre Neyada and 



Archof Alhnin) 



in [he Gardcu 
151 Palape— of San Telmo, 

lu the Palm Grove 
135 The Alcazar, Fine 

Doorway 



[ Andamsadors' Hall 
s Alcazar, Interior 
t Ambaeaadnra' Hall 

mbaatiailora' Ha 



« The Cathedral, GrB»(; 
S Tbe Cathedral, ( 



7 View (rom the S 

West 
S Cathedral, from 



9 AJhambra, Court ol 

H Alhamb'ra, Court ol 

Llona Vista through 

15 Alhambra, Court of 

Lions, Interior 



X Tho City, from the 

Gnadalquiver 
17 College of Ascension, 

Groat Door 
B The Octagon Tower 



B7 The 



IB Alcai: 



M The Cathedral and City, 



Us The BuUrin. 



) Araujnez. Royal Pi 

ace. on the Tagua 

ffadrid. 

IBB Koyal Palace 

187 Tho Salional Musent- 

I6S Chnreh of San Gb- 

the CaUe 



luUring 
FOR PRICE 



< 902 The Old Town 
Lexida. 
General View, liom tM 
aot General View, from th« 
913 The CallB Mayor 



Bitd'B-evo View, Show, 
ing Toliacco Manu- 

150 Bird's'"^-'' eye Vie 

Showing Alcazar 

151 Blrd'B.eye View, Show- 

mp BnllriuK 
ISS Blrd'a-eve View, Show- 
ing Golden Tower 

IM Tbe Cathedra I, (tom'the 

BollrinB 
136 The Calhedral. from 






isa The Cathedral, the 

Glralda Tower, etc. 
13S Tho Cathedral, Door of 

Triamphat Entry 
UO The Cathedral Doo. 

The Baptiam ol Christ 
Ul The Cathedral Door 

Adoration of the Magi 
IS The Cathedral, Moorlsli 









<r and Medlterra^ 



Cathedral 
311 San Bartol 

n Bartolomo, Gi 



Mayor, aiKl^ 
ClOtllt 



1 linina ot Grounias neat 

3 Statue o( Diiqne Da 

Tercelra 
3 Grouraas near Belem 



185 Ferry on the Tug 

186 Tho Mooriah SnBHrIi 

187 The Cathedral, West 



Klug'a Palace Ir 

1 Belem Castle 






LIST OF SUDES Stt PS>>C»t \'iT. 



203 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., UHIOAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



16 Krnpp Gtin in Belem 
Fort 

16 Gallery of the Cloister 

17 Sculptures in the Clois- 

ter 

18 Fountain in the Cloister 

19 Court of the Cloister 

CoinUyt'e, 

20 Gallery of Santa Cruz 

21 Library of the Univer- 

sity 

22 Great Hall in the Urn- 
vers ity 

Alcobiico. 

23 Cloister of King Dinis 

24 Gallery of the Cloister 

Thomar. 

26 Window of the Chapter- 
House 

Batalana, 

26 Gate of the Monastery 

27 Gallery in the Castle of 

Mont Serat 

Cintra. 

28 Gate at Castle La Pema 
Cape de Verde Island. 

28 Town Hall, San Vincent 

30 Street View in San Vin- 

cept 

31 The Harbor View in 

San Vincent 

Lisbon. 

32 The City and St, 

George's Castle 

33 The City, from Nossa 

Senhorade Graca 

34 The City, from Nossa 

Senhorade Graca 

Belem. 
36 The Castle, on the Ta- 



fus 



36 The Convent, Interior 

of Cloisters 

37 The Convent, Exterior 

of Cloisters 

38 The Convent, West 

Door 

39 Santa Maria, General 

View 

40 Cintra, from the East 

41 " the Royal Moor- 
ish Palace 

42 Penha Castle, Great 

Door 

43 Penha Castle, Convent 

44 Penha Castle Great 
46 Penha Castle, from the 

Grotto 

CoinUtra. 

46 General View, from 

Santa Clara Convent 

47 General View, from 

Quinta Lagrimas 

48 General View, from the 

Lisbon Road 

49 The University 

60 Santa Cruz, Interior of 
Cloisters 

51 Santa Cruz, Exterior of 

Cloisters 

Oporto. 

52 General View, from the 

Douro 

53 Looking up the Douro 

54 View from the Cathe- 

dral with Clerigos 



66 View from the Railway 
Station 

66 View from Clerigos 

67 View from Bishop's 

Palace 

68 View from Montserrat 

Convent 
68 The Convent of Mont- 
serrat 

Bahltaa 

60 The Cathedral, from the 

North 

61 The Cathedral, from the 

South 

62 The Cathedral, from the 

West 

63 Capella Imperfeita, 

West Door 

64 Capella Imperfeita, 

South Door 
66 Capella Imperfeita, 
Door 

66 Capella Imperfeita, 

Cloister Windows 

67 Capella Imperfeita, 

Cloister Wmdows 

Thomar. 

68 The Convent Church 

69 The Nun's Window 

70 The Cloisters 

I>eninark. 

Copenhagan. 

1 Bourse, The 

2 Church of our Saviour 

3 Rosenberg Palace 

4 Thorwaldsen Museum, 

Entrance 

6 Palace of Christians- 

borg 
^ Thorwaldsen Museum 

7 Church of Our Lady 

8 The Market Place 

9 The Exchange 

10 Statue of Thorwaldsen 

(T. Museum) 

11 Statue, a Young Shep- 

herd, T. Museum 

12 Statue, Sermon of St. 

John 

13 Statue, Christ 

14 Statue, the Apostles 

15 Statue, Ganymede 

16 Statue, Day 

17 Statue, night 

18 Statue, Tomb of Thor- 

waldsen 

Norway. 

1 The Fjerland Fiord 

2 Sognef jord, Balestrand 

3 " Aardal Lake 

4 *• Skjolden 

6 ** Cascade at 

Aardal 

6 Sognef jord, the Bouims 

Glacier 

7 Sognefjord, Ice Cave in 

Bouims Glacier 

8 Lyster Fjord, Skjolden 

9 ** " Dosen 

10 Vossevangen 

11 " • view at 

12 Valders, Waterfall at 

13 Hone f OSS 

14 Filef jord, the Buer Gla- 

cier 



16 Sorf Jord, View at ffil- 
dal 

16 The Stalheimcleft 

17 The Stalheimcleft 

18 " Water- 
faUin 

19 T h e Stalheimcleft, 

Posting Station 

20 Gudrangen, Looking 

down the Fjord 

21 Gudrangen, View at 

22 Borgund 

23 ^ Church 

24 Com Mill, Fagernas 
Valders 

26 Skeen 

26 The Vettifoss (loftiest 

Cascade in Norway, 
1,000 feet) 

27 The Vettifoss 

28 Christiania,Street View 

29 ** General View 

30 ^ " The Palace 

31 Saw MiU 

32 Thelemarken, on the 

Tin Lake 

33 Drammen 

34 Sarpsborg 

35 Aalesund 

36 Lillehammer, the Mjo- 

sen Lake 

37 The Vermefoss Fall. 

Romsdal 

38 Christiania, from the 

Frognerafteter 

39 Christiania, The Palace 

40 Christiania, The Uni- 

versity 

41 Christiania, Storthings- 

Bygning 

42 Christiania, Viaduct 

near 

43 Christiania, from the 

Ekeberg 

44 CHristiania,(Friedrick8- 

borg) from Oscarshall 

45 Reien 

46 Lake Vangsmjosen 

47 Skogstad 

48 Borgund Church 

49 Bergen 

50 Bergen 

51 Bergen Market Place 
62 Hotel Vettehos, Odde 

53 Children's Bridal Pro- v 

cession. Feast of 

54 Baldar (June 26) 

55 Odde Church 

56 Eide 

57 Eide Hardanger Cos- 

tume 

58 Eide Hardanger Cos 

tume 

59 Eide Meland's Hotel 

60 Throndhjem 

61 Throndhjem, Britannia 

Hotel 

62 Throndhjem, Cathedral 

63 Throndhjem, Cathedral 

64 Molde 

65 Merok 

66 Storsalterfoss, near 

Merok 

67 Josterdal Glacier, Kjos- 

nasfjord 

68 Gold Mine, Reppen 

69 Copper Mine, Holtaalen 

70 Torghatten 

71 Lofoden Isles, Kobbcl- 

vaeg 

72 Lofoden Isles, Kobbel- 

vaeg 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical oo., Chicago, ill., u.s. a 



nn UiBinl Nnnh 
ic Hammsrieat 



K Norlh Capa 

Be North Cap« 

SJ North Cape Horn 

ea Uidnight Sun, off North 

as MldniEhC San, Imm 
Tr^BD Harbor 

91) MHnigtat Sun.aCGraeB. 
batmSD 

sod Herii]. 



M Lapplandere 

BB Lapp Boys 
97 Lapii Girls 



100 Lrngenfjora, Pauorami 

101 ThrqndhJPm, (rora 

Va AalesniMl from Store 

hangen 
103 GeitSDEBrflord 
UH Celraagerrjonl 
US GeiTtkngerrjord, Iron 

aboTS Merok 
loe Gelrongerfjord, the 



;iania (.ol Church 



124 ObTlstianla, fro: 
m Chrl^iania, ihc 



;en 



131 Cbrieclansand, CathE 

ami. Interior 
isa C litis Cian sand, f roi 



ISS StavaiiKer, from Rail- 
139 HardaoBer, Fjord, Hog- 

137 HardangBr, Head ol 

Rosendal 

138 HardauMr,Wacerrall at 

UOECndal 

139 Uardan||ier,from Koien. 

irdaHger, Viev at 



lardanaer, Norwepif 

Wedding, Sitnodai 
IM Hardanger, Norwegian 

Wedding Uoine to 

Churah 
Hftrdaniicr, Norwegian 

Simodal 
Hardanger Peaaai 

148 Hardanger Peaaai 

149 Hardanger Odde 
ISU Hardanger Htttel, Odde 
Ifll Hardanger, the Buer- 

Hardanger, the Hildals- 

15S Bergen, from the Sea 



1S7 Bergen Cathedtal.Woa 



lOa View on the Vosa Rail- 

1S3 The Naerodal 

164 The Nacrodal and Slal- 

heim Hotel 
lea The Naorodal Jordals- 

106 The Naerodal Stalbeim, 

167 9ogne Naerofjord 
ire Bogne Ilalholmen 
1^ Sngne Balhoijuen, Salm- 

170 SoTne BaSSlman, King 

Belts' Tomb 

171 9ogne,VeCle(iool, View 

172 Sogne Flaerlandafjord, 



Scene Lr 
iTalmon 1 

Nigardsbrao 



1.3 Sogiio FJaerlaiidstJo] 

View near Mundal 

171 Sogno, Looliing to Sn] 

17t :^ogne, Looliing U) f 

one lie Glanier 
17H Sognej Ijmkmg to 

Dgne F; 

Qgne Oanfnef]aet 

agne Lraterfjorj 

looldiu- to Doaen 

JoBteiial G1BG14 

184 Borgiind Ohnrr 
IW Haeg, View at 
1S3 MariKtuen 

187 Ftlloflelit Nyst' 

188 Valders, View 1 

139 Odnaes 



1 Panorama of giockhol 

West 
S Panorama of Stockholn 

East 
3 Panorama of Stookbols 



B The Unaeum 

e The »lnt 

7 Koyal Castle 

e St. Caihari no's Church 

B The (irand Church 

10 Statue ol Cualara 111 

11 Cathedral of Upeala 
n PanoraiiiBoISIockhol 
13 Royal Palace, etoc! 



90 Stockholm from thi 

palace terraoe 
SI Guard Monnt in tbi 

Royal I'atof.a 
n Fountain in KhiK'. 

Guidon 
23 Statue of Karl XIL b 

King's Garden 
34 Humle Garden 
as Statue or Llnne h 

Humle Garden 
sn PeaaanC milk women 
47 Rroiin of iioliee 

landing on th' 



ZSBoal: 

lak„ 
28 Pulpit in SI 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



203 MClNTOSk BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



Holland. 

Amsterdam. 

1 Panorama 

2 The Harbor 

3 Royal Palace 

4 Bourse 

5 Post Office 

6 Theatre 

7 Grand Square 

8 Canal, Amstel 

9 Canal, Kaizergracht 

Arnheim, 

10 Panorama 

11 Cathedral 

12 Street View 

Delft. 

13 Panorama 

U Hotel de Ville 

15 Cathedral 

16 Railroad Station 

Dordrecht. 

17 Cathedral 

18 Hotel de Ville 

19 Windmill 

20 Steamboat on the 

Me use 

21 Canal 

Oonda. 

22 Hotel de Ville 

Oroningon. 

23 Panorama 

24 Palace of Justice 

25 Fish Market 

Haarlem. 

26 Cathedral 

27 Hotel de Ville 

28 Street View 

29 The Boulevard 

The Hague. 

30 Panorama 

31 Department of Justice 

32 Royal Library 

33 National Monument of 

of 1813 

34 Equestrian Statue of 

William the Silent 

35 Paul Potter's Painting. 

"The BuU" 

Rotterdam. 

36 Panorama 

37 Cathedral, Exterior 

38 Bourse 

39 Post Office 

40 Bridge. Royal 

UtrechL 

41 Hotel de Ville 

42 Cathedral 

43 Bourse 

44 Observatory 

Types of Holland Life. 

45 North Holland Fisher. 

man 

46 North Holland Farm 

House 

47 North Holland Cattle 

48 " *• Dog Cart 

49 Peasant Woman 

Amsterdam. 

50 Munt Street and Ca- 

thedral 
61 Central Railway Sta. 

tion 
n Ryks Museum of Art 
K Boat Loaded with Turf 



54 Street Scene 

55 Dutch Schoolships 

56 Caf6 Krasnopolsky (in- 

terior) 

57 A Characteristic Street 

Scene 

58 A Canal Street 

69 The King's Palace 

60 People's Palace 

61 Cathedral 

62 Statuary— Primavera 

63 Statuary— Echo 

64 Statuary— Perseus 

Haarlem. 

65 Typical Dutch Land- 

scape 

66 A Dutch Family 

67 Dutch Cavalryman 

68 Dutch Soldier 

69 Young Diitchman 

70 Dutch Dogcart 

71 Fisherman's Return 

from the Catch 

72 A Comical Group 

Zuyder Zee. 

73 Fishermen's Village 

74 A Characteristic Group 

75 Fishing Boats and Dyke 

76 A Street Scene 

The Hague. 

77 National Monument 

78 Herd Deers in Park 

79 Statue ••WUliam the 

SUent " 

80 An Aristocratic Resi- 

dence 

81 RqyalPa lace and Statue 

WiUiam I. 

82 Statue of WUliam I. 

83 Flock of Geese in Park 

84 Koning Straat 

85 Market Scenes 

Scheveningen—The Dutch 
Atlantic City. 

86 Promenade and Hotel 

SeinpOrt 

87 Donkeys on the Beach 

88 Homeliest Donkey 

Bottendam. 

89 Dutchman and his Pig 

90 Scene on Canal 

91 Bridgeoverthe"Maas" 

92 Flower Market 

93 Old Apple Woman 

94 Old Apple Woman 

95 Scene on the Boompies 

(docks) 

Russia. 

St. Petersburg. 

1 Panorama 

2 Marble Palace 

3 PeterhofT Palace, Ball 

Room 

4 Gatchina Palace, Cor- 

ridor 

5 Gatchina Palace. Bed 

Chamber 

6 Tzarske Selo Palace 

Marble Bridge 

8 Hermitage Palace 

9 Hermitage Museum, 

Gallery of Antiques 

10 Palace of Paul I. 

11 Church, St. Alexander 

12 " Assumption 

13 " Epiphany 



14 Church of Peter the 

Great 

15 Convent of Smola 

16 Bridge of the Winter 

Palace 

17 Statue, Peter the Great 

18 " Alexander the 
Great 

19 Alexander Column 

20 Colossal Horse, Bridge 

Antiochkoff 

21 Moscow Gate 

22 Narva Gate 

23 Fortress 

24 Bourse 

25 Senate Building 

26 Hotel de Ville 

27 Theater Alexander 

28 House of Peter the 

Great 

Moscow. 

29 Panorama 

30 Alexander Gate 

31 Moskva Bridge 

32 Iron Bridge 

33 R. R. Station 

34 Museum 

35 Foundling Hospital 

36 Petrowski Palace 

37 Church. St. Basil 

38 •< St. Michael 

39 ** Assumption 

40 Monastery, Simonoff 

41 Convent St. Alexis 

42 *' Ascension 

43 " Greek 

The Kremlin 

44 General View 

45 The Wall 

46 Tower of Ivan the 

Great 

47 The Great Bell (weight 

400,000 pounds) 

48 Imperial Palace momu 

49 " " The 
Throne 

50 Terema Palace 

51 " «« Grand 
Staircase 

52 Terema Palace, Bed of 

the Czar 

53 Arsenal, Interior 

Kiev. 

54 Panorama 

55 Cathedral 

Nijni—Novogorod, 

56 Panorama 

Odessa. 

57 Panorama 

Warsaw. 

68 Panorama 

59 Street View 

60 Cathedral, Interior 

Cracow. 

61 Panorama 

62 The Vistula 

63 Tomb, St. Stanislaus 

64 " Sculpture by 
Thorwaldsen 

Archangel. 

65 Panorama 

Russian Life^ etc. 

66 Group of Farmers 

67 «• " Peasants 

68 " " Gypsies 

69 «« « Siberians 



"^OR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battkby and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. hh 



1 Vobicle, DroB 



G The Imperial Falai 



Royal Kiaintc Sebool 
lofliiirp 

.I'hocnbriiiin Imperial 
Sn miner Palace 
IS BelTtHere 

Jnuittntck. 
M Tliereaien Straase 
fll Triumphal Arch 
'" 'ioldenes Darh 



Sl'hlOSB 



.( TolFf 



riaVPniiia"-" 



Hoto!,- "-■ 



tyro 






e The Schiller Monumeat 



13 Jlarla There ei 



IB Bchwarserberg Street 
in Knrhaus in Stailt Park 
IT Street View 
18 Siand Opera Hoiiee 
WFaraae (irand Opera 

SO Phaseuii Temple 

21 Folk's Garden, whace 



inci Trii 

iiy uaiumD 
36 EaneelrUin Statae c 

Francis I 
27 Imperial Gateway from 

Parade 
13 Upper Belvldere 






Liid wig's Car 
Cook & Son'i 



31 Thomi 

Offlre 
3S Imperial Laxenhurg 

Palace (suburbs) 
34 Imperial Laienburg 

I^alare, Ferry to iTie 

Si Imperial Laxenburg 
Palace. The Lake 

s; Scboenbrduii I 

S» Schoenhninn 1 

Goboliu Itdom 
39 Si^boenbrunn I 

Gobelin Itoom 

41 Schoenbruiiii I 

Mirror Room 
4S Schoenbninn 1 

The Uali 
43 Schoenhruiiu Palace, 

KiDg'B Blllianl Koom 
Sohoenbrunn Palace, 

Gallaryol PortiaitB 
f 4B SchoenbruDn Palaco, 

Hailmillian's Itoom 



Tbereslen Straeae and 

Column of at. Ann 
Tj'rol View of Mais 
The Mountains near 

Funeral at Innsbruck 



Hoi 



sRirerSalza 
emment BuIIiIIdk 
id FouiitainB 



Ohut 



nian PeaeaDt GlrU ' 
nanian Wood Out. 



Boumanian PeasftntB, a 

Tavern Scene 
" Peaeanta in 



36 Roumanian Peasanta 
, SB Saionlan Peasant Girls 
I)resaing tor Sunday 



ini A RonmanlBii Gardener 
109 A Roumanian Bride 
DreaaiuB (or the Wed- 



^asant Lada 



Maid Ser. 
I Peasant and 



riving from ', 

66 View from the Bridge, 

showing Hotel 
87 View of River Frant 
M Locomotive at Brlgani 
m Wood Boat on the Uan- 



n Saionian FamQy 



-ian Chapel in the 
■■erthal 



Children 
II! A Hoiimanlan Conple 
113 A_a»xonlan Farmer 



Huty 
erthal 

73 Chunhat TelfB, Valley 

of the Inn 

74 Tlew in the Dolomite 

keglon 

75 castle of Hruueck 
79 Street in Scertzlng 



114 Toml) Marie Christine 

lis Chateau de Chlnon 

110 Statue Joseph II. 

117 Foyer Opera Home i 

119 St. Stephen's Cathedral 
(BCiilpture' 



80 A Roumanian Peasant 

<!ir] at the Siirinf; 

81 saxunlan PeBEtant Girl 

audlAd 
as A Bonmanian Couple 
S3 Saxonian Peasant's ev 

84 A Roumanian Conple 
as A KonmauiKu Peasant 
' OiHie 



lumanlau Wife 



Charles 

123 Gossips or the Street 

124 Women Hod-carrlera 
m Logglo dii nouve 

Innebruck. 

•" 'BSSi.'-""' 

128 Tyrol— VlewofCortln» 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEC PAGE 127. 



207 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



136 Panorama of Cilly 

137 Panorama of Botzen 

138 Panorama of Grau 

iTarkey. 

Constantinople. 

1 Panorama 

2 The city and the 

Golden Horn 

3 Golden Horn 

4 Grand panorama of the 

Golden Horn 
6 Bosphoriui and the 
Golden Horn 

6 Steamer leaving 

7 Great Mosque of St. 

Sophia. 

8 Great Mosque of St. 

Sophia, interior 

9 The Snitan at prayer 

in the Mosque. 

10 Palace of Beylerbe 

11 Entrance gate to 

palace of Beylerbe 

12 Mosque of Suleiman 

13 Tomb of Sulton Mah- 

mond 

14 Tomb of Sulton Mah- 

mond, interior 

15 Obelisk 

16 Obelisks of Constan- 

tine and Justinian 

17 Panorama of bridge 

18 Street view 

19 Turkish woman 

20 Turkish lady, veiled 

21 Turkish lady in street 

dress 

22 Turkish lady smoking 

a narghileh 

23 A cavass 

Greece. 

Reproduced from the orig- 

inals of Wm. J. Still- 

man. 

The Acropolis of Athens. 

1 View of the Acropolis 

from the Museiim Hill 

2 The Acropolis, with the 

Theater of Bacchus 
View taken from the 
proscenium of the 
theater 

8 View of the Acropolis 
from the north 

4 The Acropolis from the 
hill above the llissus 
looking N. W. 

6 View taken from the 
tower of the Cathe- 
dral looking S. W. 

6 The western facade of 
the Propylaea, with 



the temple of Victory 
and the ancient steps 

7 Eastern facade of th^ 

Temple of Victory 

8 The eastern facade of 

the Propylaea 

9 Western facade of the 

Parthenon 

10 Western portico of the 

Parthenon , 

11 Interior of the Parthe- 

non taken from the 
western gate 

12 Western portico of the 

Parthenon from above 

13 View taken from same 

point as No. 12, and 
looking eastward over 
the ruins of the Par- 
thenon 

14 Interior of the Parthe- 

non from the eastern 
end 

15 Eastern portico of the 

Parthenon, looking 
northward 

16 Eastern facade or front 

of the Parthenon 

17 Profile of the eastern 

facade showing the 
curvature of the sty- 
lobate 

18 General view of the 

summit of the Acrop- 
olis from the extreme 
eastern point 

19 Eastern facade of the 

Erectheum 

20 Portico of the Pandro- 

seum from the north 

21 Gate of the Pandrose- 

um showing details of 
ornaments 

22 Western flank of the 

Erectheum 

23 Tribune of the Carya- 

tides 

24 Figure of Victory from 

the Temple of Victory 

25 Fragment of Frieze 

from the Parthenon 
A complete list of des- 
criptive titles accompanies 
the above series 

Athens. 

26 Panorama in six sec- 

tions Lettered a, &, 
c, d, e,/ 

27 A<*ropolis, from the S. 

W. 

28 Acropolis and Temple 

of Theseus 

29 Acropolis and Temple 

of Jupiter 



30 Acropolis, from tne 

Monument 

31 Amphitheater 

32 " Chair pf 
Honor 

33 Amphitheater, Beliefs 

34 Arch of Hadrian 

35 Areopagus 

36 " 

37 Byzantine Church 

38 Erechtheum 

39 «« West View 

40 " Showing 
Porch 

41 Erchtheum, Tribune of 

the Caryatides 

42 Erechtheum Caryatides 

(from the above) 

43 Gate of Agora or Oil 

Market 

44 Modem Athens, with 

Mt. Lycabettus 

45 Monument of Lyslcra-^ 

tes 

46 Monument of Philoi>ap. 

pus 

47 Parthenon, Facade 

48 Parthenon, Side 

49 «' East Front 
60 " from S. E. 

51 Pinacotheca 

52 Prison of Socrates 

53 Propyl^ea, looking out 

54 '* ascent to the 
66 " «* to the, 

nearer view 
66 Stoa of Hadrian 
57 Street of Tombs 

68 «• «« 

69 Temple of ^olas 

60 " Jupiter, gen- 
eral view 

61 Temple of Jupiter J'all- 

en Column 

62 Temple of Jupiter, two 

Standing Columns 

63 Temple of Theseus 

64 Temple of the Wingless 

Victory 
66 Tribune of the Pnyx 

Miscellaneous. 

66 Corinth, Temple of Mi- 

nerva 

67 JB^gina Temple of Min- 

erva 

68 Mycenae, Lion Gate, 

Arabic Period of 
Greek Art 

69 Nemea Temple of Jupi- 

ter 

70 Piraeus, Port of Athens 

71 Plain of Marathon 

72 Temple of S union 

73 Tomb of Agamemnon 



GREEK ART. 



AS EMBODYING GREEK MYTHOLOGY. 
{Photographed and Copyrighted by S. A. Scull.) 

The chief considerations that determined the selection and arrangement of this 
collection are : 

1st. A purpose to illustrate the changing features of those worships that gave 
ideals to the best Art of Greece, 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



M. Tbo pre«enta(lon nt thedeTelapmentof art. 
In (ireece, I" holographs wora maiic nf «ronp» I'O 

Fhiet'delties, and 
ED Art representa 

Tbeso KToiiiis werB POninenceJ 

leiiB8«ml the Muneuiua of Atheng; „ 

phihed by photogrfttihing the ^wa ol Greek sculpti 



.i prartlcablB, groups were to 
,0 Ibcm fallow, unitedly, ttie bJ 



rms (rom rnuIeneHs toporfeRtlon. 
leutedwltb uvred I'eDters-ifler- 
ned as to show arvhaic types oE 



cf'Argolm has bi 









the pi 
iDtedt: 



beton 



a lleUen 



oae was mcBaurably arc 
D Rome, Naples, Fkria 

The Oyclopaan raasonry^l 






nrnrked RDntraat tnmlshed by Iboae Aaiatii- types tbat exBrted n 
over tbB HeUenir BeUeC aud Art. 

Hellenic aubjarts are i-eauined and the order pursued is itidirated by auccessivs 

That srt-studants may be Interested in mytbologirai Relktlnnatiipe and ChDHlbe 
ludni^sd to forin coiiectlona of gronpe, photoenpha arc placed Iwloir tba usual cstea. 

Tbara Is in preparation a Desi'Tlptivo Catalogne of tUrj eollecCion. It will cootain 
details concerning the most important aulrfects;alist of the best works of reference 
for students of the art -relations of Greek mytbolosy: locaClona of the principal fields 
of the excavations mads in the intereat of Greek cfaasical studies. This last list will 
tover the axi-avat[ons that are Bnlabed and irbose " flnds " are available torarchiEo- 
loglcal study ;alBo tliose that are progressing and proapectiva. 



Cyclopwan Maaonr 
(a) Tirsm. 



(6) A-MJ- Arga,. 
8 Ancient Hera- Temple 

(e) .Vv^nae. 
» En tram 



Eplrup>. 

Chief Deities— Zeus, Dione 

and AphrodllB, 

{a^Dodona Brontes. 

13 Head and Figurine of 



IT Zeus and sompis 

U Dione 

IB Poseidon, Neptnue 

W Apollo 

St Aphrodite 



Valley of Olynipia. 

Oblef DeltiBS— Cronas, 

us and Heia [JunoJ 

K Hap of Olyuinm 

» Mt. CroniuB 



Sculpcuras found at Olyin- 

aia and now in the 
ilympla Museum <ei- 
cept No. 43) 

(a) Zem Typei. 

33 Three Small lironzes 
91 Brnnte Statuella 
37 Bronze haad 
na Head in atone. Zeus (?) 
3a Zeua, Pelopa and (£no- 
mans from E, Pedi- 
ment of Zona Temple 

(b) Hera Typei. 
•SO Terra-cotta head 

•31 Colossal bead from Sta- 
tue in Hera Temple 

(a) Bramt Tmna of Deitiei. 

33 Phiqae In fonr bauda, 

lower one showing 

SS Apollo, front and side 
M Two Goddeaaea (?) 

36 nerpulesand Bow 

37 Ifoad o( Gorgon 

(if) Scvlptura /Tom Zau 



ir(W. 



id Buins 
Dt Uera- 



38 Apollo 1 

Pedimc 
Athena Metopes. 

39 Herrnles and Nemean 

Lion 
» Hercules cleaoslUB 

.^ugeas' Stable 
11 HBri'uies presenting 

Stymphalian Bird 

43 Athena (original) re- 
I'eivlQg Stymphalian 



I Hermes. Fiaxitsles. 
■ Typos of Chief DeitiBS of 
Olympia, but not found 



(o) T^>rs of C-Toftiit. 



(6) Zmt Types. 
•M Two Bronie Flaurln* 



•4S Zeua ol EDs, from coin: 

of EliB (Cy.) ^ 

ta Oumiean Zeus, larg* 

dam [-statue, (Naple* 

SO (.'oloasal Z. Bust (Lou- 

fil Z. Bust from SIcUt 

(CM 

fiS Z. Bust found at Ottii- 
eoli (Vatican) 

(0) Hera (Jsno) I^/pa. 

53 Bronzes, head in earlj' 
atyle; seated fls° re In 
later styla X,oiivre 
NM Heads of Hera on Coina 



•M Head of Hera on Coin 

•67 Ancient Head of Her 

Villi LudoUsi (Cy. 
Sg Marble Head of Hera 

Britisb Mnaeum 
•M Heia, Bnal, from Far- 

nese Collection N>^ 

pies Uuseum 

cast in Fill William 
Uuseum, Cambridge, 



a Juno sosuita.trom Pal' 
atlno UQl Vatican 

3 Juno (Hera) SlaEue in 
Portico of Master. 
pieces, Naples Muse- 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 12T. 



200 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



Chief Deities— Apollo,Arte- 
mis (Diana) and Leto 

(a) Cra$8i. 

64 " Sacred Plain " 

{b) Delphi {modern Ccutri) 

65 Entrance to Delplii 

66 Cliffs of Delphi 

67 Ancient Tomb 

68 Wall of Apollo Temple 
68 Bay Tree Sacred to 

Apollo 

70 Branch of Bay Tree 

71 Bath on the Py thia and 

Castalian Spring 

72 Castalian Spring and 

Greek Women 

78 Hill of Amphictyon 

Council 

74 *• Sacred Plain," from 

Amphictyon Hill 

Types of Delphic Deities, 
but not Found at Delphi. 

(a) Apollo Types. 

75 Two Bronzes — left one 

found at Chiusi ; right 
one probably a copy 
of Apollo of Miletus, 
by Canachus. British 
Museum 

•T8 Apollo with Plectrum- 
Found at Pompeii. 
Naples Museum 
77 Apollo Statue found on 
Island of Thera, Ath- 
ens 

•78 Apollo Statue from 
Greece, Bceotia, Brit- 
ish Museum 

79 Apollo from Tenea. Cy 
♦80 Stran^ord Apollo. 

British Museum 

81 So-called Apollo and 

Omphalos ; probably 
an Athlete, found in 
Athens 

82 Statue from Choisenl- 

GU)uffler Collection; 
probably a Pugilist. 
British Museum 

83 A p o 1 1 o Citharsedus, 

found in Garden of 
Quirinal. Vatican 
•84 Apollo Steinhauser, re- 
sembling Apollo Bel- 
videre. Cy. Basle 
85 Apollo Belvidere. Cy 
For other Apollo Types 
see Olympia, Orchomenos, 



Ptoos, Thasos, Parmythia, 
Thessaly; also Plate (No. 

) giving Apollo with 

Plectrum ana Lycian 
Apollo 

(6) Artemia (DiafM) Types, 

86 Marble Statue of Arte- 

mis, found in the 
Island of Delos. Ath- 
ens 

87 Portion of Ancient 

Statue, probably Ar- 
temis,found in Frank- 
obrysis Arcadia. Ath- 
ens 

88 Statue of Artemis 

Louvre 

89 Artemis of Versailles, 

from Cast, Fitzwil- 
liam Mnseum,in Cam- 
bridge, England 

90 Diana Lucifera, or 

Light Bearer. Vati- 
can 

91 Small Statue of Arte- 

mis, probably Arch- 
aistic. Naples Muse- 
um 

For types of Deities more 
allied in titles than in char- 
acters, see Olvmpia and 
types of " Asiatic Deities." 

Island of Delos. 

Deities— Apollo, Artemis 
(Diana) and Leto. 

Sculptures Found in Delos. 

92 Nike (Victory) probably 

by Archermos. Ath- 
ens 

93 Two Heads o( Statues, 

the left one probably 
Zeus. Athens 

94 Boreas and Oreithyia. 

Athens 

95 Draped Figure. Athens 

See "Types of Artemis." 

North Boeotia. 

(a) Orchomenos. 

Deities— the Graces 

Sculptures found at Orcho- 
menos. 

96 Grave— Stele— inscribed 

by Alxenor. When 



photographed the In- 
scription was covered 
Athens 
•97 Head of a Goddess (?) 
Skouloudi. CoL Atn- 
ens 
96 Orchomenos Apollo 

(6) ML Ptoos. 

Deity— Apollo. 

Sculptures foimd at JPtoot, 

•98 Marble Head 

•100 ApoUo Statue. Athens 

101 ApoUo Statue. Resem- 

bles a Bronze Apollo 
in the Louvre. Ath- 
ens 

102 Bronze Figure of 

Apollo in the Lonvre. 
Cy 

South BcBotla. 

(a) Thebes, 
Legend of (Edipus. 

103 Part of the Cadmea 
K)4 Mt. Clthaeron 

105 Mt. Helicon 

106 " The Divided Way" 

where (Edipus mur- 
dered King Laius 

107 Fountain of the Purifl- 

cation of (Edipus 

(5) Tanagra JFigurinet. 

(1) In private collection of 
M. Skouloudi. Athens. 

108 Two Figures, Phoeni- 

cian Style 

109 Two Figures, Crude 

Style 

110 Two Figures, Advanc- 

ing Style 

111 Two Figures, Grood 

Style 

•112 Two Figures, Excel- 
lent Style 

113a Two Figures. Perfect 
Style 

114 Small Figurine and a 

part of a Bust of Aph- 
rodite 

(2) Tanagra Figurines in 
Pennsylvania Academy 
of Fine Arts. 

115 Another View 

116 Four Figpirines 



ASIATIC. 



Asia Minor. 

Deities—" Mother Goddes- 
ses," and " Diana of 
the Ephesians." 

Sculptures Illustrating 
Deities. 

1 Fragment of Relief show 

ing Head of Astarte. 
Capitol Museum, 
Rome 

2 Colossal Head of Cy1)ele. 

Capitol Museum, 
Rome 



3 Relief of Cybele-type. i 

Louvre 
•4 Cybele Enthroned. Lou- ■ 

vre » I 

•5 Xoanon of Diana, of the | 

Ephesians. Cy ■ 

6 Diana of the Ephesians. 

Athens 

7 Diana of the Ephesians. 

Naples Museum 

Sculptures from Asia 
Minor. 

8 Couchant Lion, found at 

Apollo Temple near 



Miletus. British Mu- 
seum 

•9 Sitting Statue from 
Sacred Way to Apollo 
Temple, near Miletus. 
British Museum 

10 Relief from Harpy Tomb 
at Xanthus. Demeter 
and Persephone, Re- 
ceiving Funeral Of- 
ferings 

•11 Harpy Bearing in Her 
Arms a Child Form 

•12 Harpy Bearing in Her 
Arms a Child Form, 
Similar to one Above 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAQE 127. 



MCISTOSIl UATTElli- AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. IT. S 



31 Gale BCeDe, ('hiaa- 



'S Unve, Relief. DBllloe 
ReoeiTing OITerlnss. 
Ciat. AtliBnr 



tfi 



•8 ShieM nf Argos 
•e Head of Gorgon. 
•7 Fljnre Thought 



Oanon"of Polycleltuj 

i DorTphoma In I 
a Tbotight to 
seTTB the Typo ni v 
Above Figure. Cy 

_ _ .'nile Figii 
Illy Apollo, 

10 DBineterfCBri! 

a^ltania A 

11 Another Vie' 



*U Atbena. Small Mi 
•U Aphroillle, Flue Mi 

Chine M) Empire. 

Cftiiia. 

1 Map ot telejraiihli' 

Tlen-Tain. 
S Blveranil bund 



7 Package ot brick tea o 



It Nalivo wbeelburroiT 

15 Snnka or HalD Temple 
14 Graveg im the Pei-Ho 

Rlyer 

IG City wBll around 

16 City wail from Uata- 



OBliKl Klol 
bservnfor] 



I Wan 



23 Cbinuae 

Obaerr. 

U CeloBlial globe in the 

Ob * 

35 Aaoi 

W Anclenl 



70 Hall and gron 

71 Pall of Pillara 
71 llQtHldegale,ti 



H^ll°' 



[Foveign I'nireri 

33 Bntrance to Ha 

College 
Forbidden City. 

34 MarbiB bridge to 

Forbidden IJity 

35 Iiuparial Temple 
Sfl ItDMrial Temple 
S7 Imperial Pavlfion, I 

orClassics.CoDfui 



38 Pi^and Coal Hill 
Temple Reflection nf ths 
Alter of Heaven. 
40 PavBd approar.h 



ing Fronch Loratior 
4.1 United Stales Legn 

4» UultBii StatBB Legs 

47 Unlte'd SUlBa "ga 
tlon, drsnlDg room 

4i) Pailow (commenioro 
BO ChlnBBc reeldence 



S4 House servunlg, 

U Watering )ilaea lor 

67 Approai'h to Hiita-mnn 
.W Hflla-mnn of Che Tar. 



Wall Icioklug 



SO TombB near Poking 

81 Front ol temple, near 

Peking 

82 Bridge at WHn.Hhon- 

83 Pailow, Kan Hing Bn, 



..„ ...lI harlxir 
EH Harbor 

90 8. S. "Araoy" at Hoog ' 

Kong loaded irltE. 
aheeplram Shanglial 

91 Piibllu Gardens and J 

Mt. VIcloriB 
9Z Kennedy Statue in 



94 Mar 

dre 
BB Foot 



in DtSclat 
Chine SB 



CanU 



Jnnkg. Irnm East 

IS ridge 
Junka, from North 

I! ridge 
A god In Tample of 

Itiibbling WbII 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



210a MCINTOSH Battery and optical oo., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



100 A god in Temple of 

Bnbbling Well 

101 A Chinese soldier, Sha- 

mien 

102 Houga, richest living 

Chinaman 

108 Amoy, from the river 

104 Mohom 

105 Chinese Boys' Mission 

School 

106 Palischias Bridge, 

scene of the combat 
in 1»)0 

107 Grand Canal at Ping- 

Fong 
106 Grand Canal and 
pagoda at Chenza 

109 Pailows, near Nanzing 

110 Pagoda in Sonth China 

111 A Chinese coasting 

steamer at sea 

112 Junks in the Che-Foo 

Harbor 

113 Reception room of a 

wealthy Chinaman 

114 A woman of North 

China with fine dress 
and nail protectors 

115 A woman of North 

China with fine dress 
and nail protectors 

116 A Manchri woman in 

fine dress 

117 A Manchri lady and 

Chinese woman 

118 Chinese dancing ^irl, 

small feet, standing 

119 Chinese dancing ^irl, 

small feet, front view 

120 Chinese dancing girl, 

small feet, sitting 
/ 121 Barber carrying his 
outfit 

122 Barber at work 

123 Chinese servants, boy 

coolie and messenger 

124 Chinese boy, house 

servant 

125 Chinese policeman 

126 A country village shop 

127 Ancient bronze drums 

made by Lolos 

Corea. 

Seoul. 

1 Walls 

2 Gate to China 

3 Fire Dog 

4 Old palace, built 400 

years ago 
6 Main gate to the palace 

6 Throne in the old 

palace 

7 The King in procession 

8 The King standing 

9 The King's chair 

10 Headquarters of Gen 'I 

Ming 

11 Elbow Fovt, Hau river 

12 Water Battery, Hau 

river 

13 Eunuchs aboard the U. 

S. S. "Marion," 

14 Med leant priests 

16 Corean omcial's mount 

16 Corean Gun 

17 Corean j unk 

18 Corean grave 



21 Harbor scene 

22 Main Street 

23 Kang-hoo 

24 Fusan 

25 Salt fields near Mokhoa 

26 Corean temple at ; 

Corean village, near f 
Fusan | 

27 A Corean village on 

the east coast 
2d A Corean village on 
the east coast 



Japan. 



Chemulpo. 

19 Chemulpo 

20 Panorama from 

harbor 



the 



1 Map 



2 
3 

4 

5 

6 



8 

9 

10 

11 

12 
13 
14 

15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



Yokohama. 

Panorama 

Japanese Cruiser, 

**Maniwa" 
U. S. S. "Dolphin" 
British Cruiser *'Le- 

ander" 
British Armor-clad 

"Imperiense" 
Fishing in Yokohama 

Bay 
The creek 
One hundred steps 
Celebration of the con- 
stitution 
Street decoration in 

holiday season 
Jinrikisna 
Tea House 
European Recreation 

grounds 
European Recreation 

grounds 
Dwarf Trees 






« 
« 



Kamakura. 



22 Great Bronze Statue 

of Buddha 

23 Side view of Daibutsu 

24 The Barren Stone 

25 Shrine of Yoritomo 

26 •• " 

Tokio. 

27 River front 
2d River bank 

29 Gate of Nitan Mou 

30 Bridge and gatewav 

through second wall 

31 Government Palace 

32 Entrance to New 

Place 

33 Bamboo Groves in 

Palace grounds 

34 Office of Minister of 

War 

35 Temple of Kameido 
36Ent ranee to the 

Temple of Rokio 

37 Tomb of the Seventh 

Shogun 

38 Well, where the forty- 

seven Ronins washed i 
the head of their I 
enemy j 

39 Graves of the forty- 

seven Ronins 

40 Theatre of Shinto- 

nucho 

41 Temple at S h i b a, i 

f tLeflid 6 ' 

42 Temple at S h i b a, I 

facade, side view \ 



43 Temple at Shiba, en- 

trance, close view 

44 Temple at Shiba, shrine 

45 Avenue of lanterns, 

Shiba 

46 Botanic Gardens 

Nikko. 

47 leyasu Temple at the 

Great Gate 

48 Tomb of leyasn 

49 Koramon Gate, con- 

taining the Haiden 

50 Temple of Yomei-mon 

51 Temple of Yomei-mon 

52 Buddhist Temple 

53 Carved entrance to a 

temple 

54 Sacrea Stable. 

55 The Hondea 

56 The Koramon 

57 On the road through 

the forest 

58 Town of Hachishi 

50 Dogashima, near Mea- 
noshita 

Jf^oto. 

60 The Mikado's Palace 

61 Castle of leyasn, occu- 

pied by the Shoguns 

62 Tesaka Pagoda 

63 Great Bronze Statue 

of Buddha 

64 Great Bell at Daibntsu 

Temple 

65 Asakusa Temple 

66 Asakusa Temple, 

bronze images 

67 The Yaami Hotel 

68 Interior of a temple 

69 Kudan (a lighthouse) 

70 Shrine, at tne tomb of 

General Teaiko 

71 Kin Kakiji Garden 
72'Gion Machi, street in 

Kioto 

Nagasaki. 

73 City and harbor 

74 Panorama of the harbor 

75 Harbor 

76 Harbor, looking out 

from the city 

77 Harbor, showing 

British Fleet 

78 Shipping to New York 

from Japan 

79 S. S. "City of Sydney" 

from Japan to Cali- 
fornia 

80 S. S. "City of Sydney" 

under sail 

81 Buddhist Temple 

82 Buddhist Temple, near 

Nagasaki 

83 Buddhist Marble Mon- 

ument 

84 Castle at Osaka 

85 Pagoda at Osaka 

Ikengani. 

86 Tomb of Nichiren 

87 Interior ot a Buddhist 

Temple 

88 Tea houses 

89 Tombstones 

Lake Hakone, 

90 Mikado's Palace 

91 Rock-cut Buddha 

92 At Kiga 

93 Ojigoku, great boiling 

springs 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



I 

I 

I 



MCINTOSH B 



9C Faliyanu, f > 



il'TIdAI, CO., CHICAGO. II.1.,.U. S 



105 'Walls of Ibe Fan 

Cutle.OdBmikvB 

106 Riue Fields near Ki 

107 Bhrlne oC the Shoej 
Ibe Tukaido 

108 B»th at Tiikao Spr 
lOe Jinritlaha, [rant vi 

110 JlnriklahB, aide vie 

111 Csrvlngs Id b, Temj 
llSGodoflho Wind 
ua GodoIT.lie THiinde 



I Costom Honse, Mary's 

Isle, Port of Enlry 
3 8. 8. Mexico at Ft. 

3 Ft, Wrangle Wliarl 
and Mission Kldgs 



II CfileCa House. Bear 
and Whale Tolem Ft. 

13 Totem Fola, Indian 
TillSKO Ft. WraDClB 

UOhiet Chew-tactH' 
Grave, Ft. Wrangle 

U Jonean City from Gas- 
tlueau CtiaiineL 

City, Main 



Clinr,_ 
IT Juneaa Cltjr, New Mis- 
IB Juneau City, New In- 
dian Villnge 
19 Janeau City, ludian 

WJniieen Clt;, Imllnii 



lie l?iil<ttatlon 
117 Buddbiat PriEatB 
lis A Shinto Priem 
119 An Aeed Conpla 
Wi A Lady of Raolc 
ISI A I.adj of Rank 
l£i JapaneseMuemee Mak- 
ing ber Toilet 
J13 Graupof Japanese [.a- 

124 Group of JaiianoaeWo- 



GlrlB 
130 Tea Houbh Girls 
ISl Tea Honse. with Gir] 



\i Native Female O 



in City, Sqnan 
h blackened faoi 
au City, Cbi( 



Juneau City, 

oiIhSi """ 
JnneBn City, 



Iluru 
31 Do I 



37 Sitka, Lincoln St. 

Greek Cbuicb 
as 3itka, Interior Greek 

Church 
30 Sitka, Interior Greek 

Church 
10 Sttka, Silver Doors to 



>S GoaslplUE 

« Gelahia.l'biylngI 

A Fumi 

Blind f 

140 Grnup os Natives 

141 Men in Armor, Fenc- 

Ui Japanese Wrestler* 

145 Wrestlera 

144 Post Runners 

146 A Newauaper Boy 

146 Native Baiaar 

147 Wind Costume 

14B Washlne a Corpse for 

A Kitchen, Preparing 



aMeni 



.^("^ 



1.1.^ KagoiatravelinKChalr) 
ISB Kago (a traveling chair) 
"7 Wayside Reeling Place 



oiiehiB Island, Tread- 
weli Mine, Squaws 
trading 
XI Gaatinean Chancel, 
Juneau City in dls- 

33 Gastlnean Channel 

from Douglas Is- 
land 

34 Sitka.Arcbipelagotrom 

Baronoff Caatre, S. S. 
Mexico and Mt. Edge- 



d Block House i 



49 Bitka. Greek Cemetery, 



IT Sitka, Mission Scboola 
4S Sitka, View of Bay and 

Mission Bldg. 
4S Sitka, Miasion Schools 
50 Sitka, Mission BldgB. 
fil Sitka, Mission Musenm 

Biflg. 
Si Sitka, Indian Itiver 

53 Glacier Bay and Float- 

54 Fa^^e of Muir Glacier 
65 Face of Muir Glacier 

and Touiists 



r Glacii 



i Floating 

ir Glacier 
B landing 

ir, Ore- 

ir Glacier 

60 Midnight Sun, Glacier 

el Davidaon Glacier iTom 

Sea, 3-mllB face 
OS Davlrtaon Glacier Mor- 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



«12 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A. 



64 Mt. Emma, Paradise 

Bay 

65 Peaks of Baronoff 

Castle 

66 Sunrise, Pyramid Har. 

bor 

67 Eiisa-An Village from 

Ocean 
8 Kasa- An Village, 
Chief's House 

69 Kasa -An Village 

70 Kasa. An Village, Along 

Shore 

71 Kasa- An Village, Door. 

way Totem 

72 Kasa.An Village, Shore 

View and Tourists 
73Kasa.An Village, 
Canoe and Ship 

74 Kling Kuan Village 

75 Kling Kuan Village 

76 Kling Kuan Village, 

Medicine Man in 
foreground 

77 KlingXuan Village 

7B Kling Kuan Village, 
Graves and litems 

79 Klinff Kuan Village, 

Inaian Grave 

80 Band Stand and Sal- 

mon Cannery, New 
Metla Kahtla 

81 New Metla Kahtla, 

View of Street, Mr. 
Duncan's residence, 
and School and 
Church Bldgs. 

82 New Metla Kahtla, Na- 

tive Store 

83 New Metla Kahtla, 

Main St., Mr. Dun- 
can's residence Na- 
tive Store and Bay 

84 New Metla Kahtla, 

Mission Bldgs. 

85 New Metla Kahtla, 

Group Scholars, 
Girls^ Department 

86 New Metla Kahtla, Mr. 

Duncan's Church 

87 Russian Greek Church, 

Killisnoo 

88 Christiana Falls 

89 S. S. Queen, Approach- 

ing 

90 Group of Officers on 

S. S. Ancon 



91 Portion of Juneau City 

from Deck 

92 Muir Glacier, Sea Face 

and Floating Ice 

93 Face of Muir Glacier, 

Subglacial River 

94 Muir Glacier, Sea Face 

95 Tourists and Indian 

Homes at Loring 

96 Loring Station 

97 Group Cannery Hands 

at Lpring 

98 On the Beach at Loring 

99 M . V . Currie and Son 

Hoge, Missionary 
100 Alaska Fishing Station 

Alaska— Uaynes List. 

1 Entrance to Wrangel 

Narrows 

2 Frederick's Sound 

3 Steamer Landing, Fort 

Wrangel 

4 The Whale, Fort Wran- 

gel 

5 Totem Poles (The Bear) 

Fort Wrangel 

6 TotemPoles.Ft. Wran- 

gel 

7 Totem Pole, Ft. Wran. 

jgel 

8 First Iceberg, Taku In- 

let 

9 Davidson Glacier, Taku 

Inlet 

10 Davidson Glacier, Taku 

Inlet 

11 Davidson Glacier, Taku 

Inlet 

12 Taku Glacier 

13 Taku Glacier 

14 Taku Glacier 
16 Taku Glacier 

16 Taku Glacier 

17 Tredwell Mine, Doug- 
i las Island 

18 From Deck of Steamer 
at Tredwell Mine 

19 Juneau, Alaska 

20 Juneau, Alaska, from 
Deck of Steamer 

21 Auk Glacier, from the 
I Steamer 

22 Pattison Glacier, from 

the Steamer 
; 23 Chilkoot Range 
I 24 Chilkaht Range 



25 Chilkaht Peaks 

26 Pyramid Bay. ChilkaU 

Inlet 

27 Chilkaht, Alaska 

28 Steamer ** Queen" in 

Ice, Glacier Bay 
20 Steamer ** Queen " ap- 
proaching Muir Gla- 
cier 

30 Steamer ''Queen" at 

Muir Glacier 

31 Face of Muir Glaeier, 

from Steamer 

32 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from Steamer 
83 Face of Muir Glacier, 
from Steamer 

34 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from Steamer 

35 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from Morain 

36 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from Morain 

37 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from Morain 

38 Face of Muir Glacier, 

from the top 

39 Crevasse in Muir Gla- 

cier 

40 Crevasse in Muir Gla- 

cier 

41 Top of the Muir Glacier 

42 Ice Peaks on Muir Gla- 

cier 

43 Tourists on Muir Gla- 

cier 

44 Glacier Bay, from Muir 

Glacier 

45 Muir Glacier and Bay 

46 Muir Glacier and Bay 

47 Muir Glacier and Bay 

48 Muir Glacier and Bay 

49 Glacier Bay 

50 Glacier Bay 

51 Glacier Bay 
62 Glacier Bay 

53 Glacier Bay 

54 Glacier Bay 

55 Sitka, Alaska, from the 

Steamer 

56 Sitka Harbor, from the 

Steamer 

57 ludian Avenue, Sitka 

68 Baranoir Castle, Sitka. 

69 Greek Church and 

Tradinj^ Store, Sitka. 
60 Ocean View from Sitka 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Vancouver. 

1 Pacific Terminus of Ca- 

nadian P. R. R. 

2 Victoria Harbor 

3 Victoria Harl>or from 

top of Government 
Building_ 

4 H. M. S. The Triumph, ' 

Esquimault Harbor 

5 Dry Docks, Esquimault ; 

Selkirk Mountains. 

6 The Glaciers from the 

Snowfleld 

7 Foot of the Glaciers 

8 The Glaciers from Gla- 

cier Station 

9 Face of Glaciers and Sir > 

Donald (close view) 



10 Face of (ilaciers and 

Sir Donald 

11 Sir Donald and the Gla- 

ciers, from Glacier 
Station 

12 Sir Donal(i from Glacier 

Hotel (close view) 

13 Sir Donald from Glacier 

Hotel 

14 A Crevasse in the Gla- 

ciers . 

15 Glaciers and the Ille- 

cellewaet 

16 Mount Carrol and 

Mount Hermit Range 
from Glat'ier Station 

17 Mount Carrol and 

Mount Hermit from 
near Glacier Station 



18 Small Glacier from the 

Loop 

19 Syndicate Peak 

20 Among the Selkirks 

21 Among the Selkirks 

22 Among the Selkirks 

23 The Selkirks at Ross 

l*eak Siding 

24 In the Forest 

25 After the Avalanche 

2() The Effects of an Ava- 
lane he 

27 Mount Stevens from 

field 

28 Rocky Mountains from 

Donald 

29 Canada Pacific R. R. at 

Ross Peak Siding 

30 Dining Car Holyrood, 

C. P. R. R. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



McINTObH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAUO, ILL,, i:, t 

WEST INDIES-CUBA. 



1 UeaeraJ View trom Ciiaa 

BUnK-a. 
i Cieneral Vien from Cass 

DUnc-s 
!I GBnernl View Ironi Casa 

BlBDc-a 
t Ueuenil View li^jm Caea 



fi ranoniiiia. i;lose 

a KeBlileure ol th 

lain General 

B Tlie 1-rada 
e The Avenue ot 
i>aliii9 0D the I 






i4 ueneral Vie 
!S General Vie 

3D Native Itciate 
81 OS Cart due 
SJMIilii 



a Street, Show- 



ilnn Mode of Tnaa- 
•a Frait and foiillry Kell- 
14 CalAniiB Castle 



Early Morn- 



) Street Leading to the 

(Jiiay 
I Street View iu the Snb- 

! Bathing Horses at the 
Piinta 
03 Troiili-al Scenery at 

lave Qiiartorit on the 

-ionor Distillery on 
the Toleilo Eawte 



3a Reina M( 

tal 
40 The Cnat 

4i PanoramJ 



Mntaiaai. 
IT The Palace and 1 
« On the Road I 



leCa- 



DORE BIBLE ILLUSTRATIONS. 

B following Scenes are o( the rhoirest deacription, atrlctly Bra t-c-laafi, tieaulif uUy 

Inches. All flrnt-i' lass Colored Slides MUST BE sealed with Balaam and perma- 
nently framed. They are perlo<-tiy Cianaparenl. Fer Slide, fl.50 eacA; Plain,60 cenfi 

BIBLE ILLVBTBATIOKS. 



By Paul ucaTAVE uohk, a 
niusCrationB were pabliahed in 
Old Teatament. 

God Creates Light. 

i Forraatfon of 1 



Gen. 






of Adam 



S The Delnge. Gen 
ID 

age. Gen. vii, 1( 
BoA Senda Ou( 



7 Ahrahain Burieij Sarah. 

» Reber.i-a and Rleaxerat 

the WelL Gen.nlv.lS 

9 Isaac's Reception ol 



n the Houae of 



TSitljurg, lH£t, The following 

30 Moses Rxpoaed on the 
Nile. Eiod. U, S 

SI Moses Saved hy Pha- 
raoh's Dauichter. 

EKod. ii. fi 
% Moaea Before Pharaoh. 
Eioil. vil, 10 

3 The Plague of Pesti- 
lence. "Eitod. II, B 

4 The Plagne of Dack- 

3 Death ot the Fira't-Bom 

of Egvpt. Eiod. ilLM 

fl Pharaoh Knlreats Mo- 

! Egypt. 



the 



Dove. Gen. v.._. _ 
The Onrae of Uatn. 

Gen. Ix, H 
Tbe Tower of Baliel. 

Abraham's Jonmer to 
Oanauj. Geit. xil, 5 

Abraham Visited liy 
Three Angela. Gen. 



Kxod. xi) 
Pharaol 
Drowned 

3« The Law Prof 



the. 






1 RBconcUiation o: 



K Abrahani Sends Hagar 

Is Bamr and lahma'el in 
the Wild erne as. Geu. 



37 Joseph I 

111. 14 
% Joseph 1 



terpreta Pha- 



Mount Sinai. Exod. 
iix.!S 

40 Punlahinent ot Koi«h, 

Nathan and Ablram. 
Ntim. xvi, 16 

41 Mnnea Strikes the Rock 

Nnm. II, 11 
4S The People Plagued by 
Fiery .lerpenta. Num. 

iS Balaam Slopped b; an 



FOR PRICE LIST OT SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



2U MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL. CO., CHICAGO, ILL.., U. S. A. 



44 The Hebrews Crossing? 

the Jordan. Jos. iii, 
14 

45 Destruction of the 

Walls of Jericho. Jos 
vi, 6 

46 Joshua Spares Bahab. 

Jos. vi, 26 

47 The Stoning of Achan. 

Jos. Tii, 24 

48 Destruction of the Vil- 

lage of Ai hY the 
flames. Jos. viii, 18 

49 T h e Amorites De- 

stroyed by a Shower 
of Stones. Jos. x, 11 

50 Joshua Commands the 

Sun to Stand Still. 
Jos. X, 12 

51 An Angel Appears to 

Joshua's Army. 
Judges ii, 1 

52 Jael and Sisera. Judges 

vi, 21 

53 Deborah's Song. Judges 

V, 1 

54 Gideon Chooses His 

Band. Judges vii, 5 

55 Gideon Frightens the 

Army of Midian. 
Judges vii, 15 

56 Death of Jerubbaal's 

Son. Judges ix, 4 

57 Abimelech, Judges ix. 

52 

58 Jephthah's Daughter 

Meeting Her Father. 
Judges xi, 34 

59 Jephthah's Daughter 

and Her Companions. 
Judges xi, 38 

60 Samson Conquering the 

Lion. Judges xiv, 6 

61 Samson Killing the 

Philistines with the 
Jaw-Bone of an Ass. 
Judges XV, 15 

62 Samson Carrying oflf 

the Gates of Gaza. 
Judges xvi, 3 

63 Samson and Delilah. 

Judges xvi, 17 

64 D e a t h of Samson. 

Judges xvi, 25 

65 The Outrage at Gibeah. 

Judges XIX, 27 

66 The Levite of Ephraim 

Takes Away the 
Corpse of His Wife. 
Judges xix, 28 

67 The Benjamites Abduct 

the Daughters of Shi- 
loh. Judges xxi, 19 

68 Naomi and Her Daugh- 

ters-in-Law. Ruth i, 
14 

69 Boaz and Ruth. Ruth 

u, 5 

70 Return of the Ark of 

God. I Sam. vi, 13 

71 Samuel Causes Agag to 

be Put to Death. I 
Sam. XV, 32 

72 Saul Casting His Jave- 

lin at David. I Sam. 
xviii, 11 

73 David's Escape. I Sam. 

xix, 12 

74 David Shows Saul that 

He has Spared Him. I 
Sam. xxiv, 11 

75 Saul and the Witch of 

Endor. I Sam, xxviii, 
14 



76 Death of Saul. I Sam. 

xxxi 

77 The Inhabitants of 

Jabesh-Gilead gather 
the Corpses of Saul 
and His Sons. I Sam. 
xxxi, 11 

78 Combat of the Cham. 

pions of Ishbosheth 
and David. II Sam. 
ii, 16 

79 David sends his Chari- 

ots armed with 
Scythes against the 
Ammonites. II Sam. 
XX, 18 

80 Death of Absalom. II 

Sam. xviii, 14 

81 David mourns Absalom 

II Sam. xviii, 33 

82 Rizpah protects the 

Corpses of her Chil- 
dren. II Sam. xxi, 10 

83 Abishai saves David's 

Life. II Sam. xx, 15 

84 Solomon's Judgment. I 

Kings iii, 16 

85 Cedars of Lebanon In- 

tended for the Build- 
ing of the Temple. I 
Kings V, 2 

86 Solomon's Reception of 

the Queen of Sheba. 
I Kings X, 1 

87 Solomon. I Kings iv, 

32 

88 The Prophet of Bethel. 

I Kings xiii, 11 

89 Elijah Revives the Sons 

of the Widow of Za- 
rephath. IKingsxvii, 
17 

90 E 1 i j a h Causes the 

Priests of Baal to 
Perish. I Kings xviii, 
40 

91 Elijah Comforted by an 

Angel. I Kings xix, 5 

92 Ahab Kills One Hund- 

red Thousand Syrians 

I Kings XX, 29 

93 Death of Ahab. I Kings 

xxii, 34 

94 Jehosaphat Sees the 

Destruction of the 
Host of Amnion and 
Moab. II Kings xx, 
44 

95 ElijahCauses Thunder- 

bolts to Fall on the 
Envoys of Ochozias. 

II Kings i, 9 

96 Elijah in the Fiery 

Chariot. II Kings ii, 
14 

97 The Famine in Samaria 

II Kings vi, 24 

98 Death of Jezebel. II 

Kings ix, 30 

99 The Followers of Jehu 

Find the Head and 
Extremities of Jeze- 
bel. II Kings ix, 34 , 

100 Death of Athalia. II 

Kings xi, 16 

101 Strangers Devoured by 

Lions in Samaria. II 
Kings xvii, 25 

102 An Angel Destroys the 

Host of Scnnacnerib. 
II Kings xix, 35 

103 Nebuchadnezzar Has 

the Sons of Zedekiah 
Killed Before Their 



Father. II Kings 
XXV, 7 

104 Cyrus Returns the Ves- 

sels to the Temple of 
Jerusalem. Ezra i, 7 - 

105 Reconstruction of the 

Temple. Ezra iii, 1 

106 Artaxerxes Liberates 

the Israelites. Ezra 
vii, 11 

107 Ezra at Prayer. Ezra 

ix, 5 
lOS Nehemiah and His Fol- 
lowers at the Gates of 
Jerusalem. Nehem. ii, 
11 

109 Ezra Shows the Tablets 

of the Law. Nehem. 

* * * « 

Vlll, 1 

110 Tobias and the AngeL 

Tob. vi, 11 

111 The Family of Tobias 

See the Angel Raphael 
Disappear.- Tob. xii, 17 

112 Judith and Holof ernes. 

Judith xiii, 8 

113 Judith Shows the Head 

of Holof ernes. Judith 
xiii, 19 

114 Queen Vashti Refuses 

to Obey the Orders of 
Ahasuerus. Esther 
i, 10 

115 Triumph of Mordecai. 

Esther vi, 11 

116 Esther in a Swoon. Es- 

ther iv, 4 

117 Esther Confounds Ha- 

man. Esther vii, 1 

118 Job Learning His Ruin. 

Job i, la 

119 Job on His DunghiU. 

Job ii, 8 

120 Feast of Belshazzar. 

Dan. V, 1 

121 Isaiah 

122 Isaiah Sees Babylon 

Destroyed in|b Dream 
Isaiah xiii, 1 

123 The Vision of Isaiah 

(Destruction of Levi- 
athan). Isaiah xxii, 1 

124 Jeremiah Dictates His 

Prophecies to Bamch 
Jerem. xxxvi,4 
125^Jerusalem'8 Mourning 
After the Destruction 
Jerem. xxxix, 8 

126 Baruch 

127 Ezekiel 'Prophesying. 

Ezekiel xxi. 1 

128 Vision of EzekieL Eze- 

kiel xxxvi, 1 

129 Daniel 

130 The Three Youths m 

the Fiery Furnace. 
Dan, iii, 24 

131 Daniel in the Lion's 

Den. Dan. vi, 16 

132 The Vision of Daniel. 

Dan. vii, 1 

133 Susannah in the Bath. 

Dan. xiii, 15 

134 Justification of Susan- 

nah. Dan. xiii, 60 

135 Daniel Confounds the 

Priests of BaaL Dan. 
xiv, 2 

136 Amos 

137 Jonah Ejected by the 

Whale. Jon. ii, 10 

138 Jonah Exhorts the Nin- 

evites to Repent. 
Jon. iii, 4 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



ISB MiCBb Exhorts : 



iii,94 
US The Inhahl 

raaalBin ,— 

Appear in the Slty. II 

Mbco. y " 
113 Mmtrnla 

144 The Klother ot Macca. 



158 Je 






ii,16 



Learoed Men. Luke 
li.4e 

IN St. John the Baptist 
preacliiniF in the wlU 
5eroeB9, Matt, iil. 1 

IW TheBaptiam of Christ. 
Matt, m, K 

Ifl] ChriBt Tempted by the 
Da»a Matt. <v/rt 

US Tbe Weddlni; a 
Johnil,! 

US Christ and the Samari- 
tan Woman, John 

ir.a 

1S4 Obriat in the Syna. 
JSS OmiBt l^eai^hiDg o'n the 



Dranght of Fishes 

187 Christ PiWhingbeton 
(he Multitude, MaM 

168 Ohriiit BealiDg the Sirk 

Uatt. if, 2a 
m Ihe Bermon on thi 

Haunt, Matt. y. 1 
m Chrlat gtlUlnti: t h i 

Storm. Matt, It.XJ 
171M»ry Magdalene Ro 



1 Christ Henlmg the Mu__ 

S)S9eBtsea liT a Devil, 
Btt. ii, ffi 
'4 The Apostles ooUocting 
ears ot Gniln o- *■■" 
Sabbath. Matt. 
17B Ohriat Walklrg o 

178 The 



. II Mace, xil, SI 
■'- -••, ihe 



I4fl Matutlhias 



U7 Jndns Macoabens F 
eues Tlmoth]'. IM 

US rail of _ Antloch. 



MaiTcabee. 1 Mb«c, v 



IBS The Au 

Lnke i. .„ 
IH The Birth ot Christ, 

Luke 11, a 
IDE The Maei ( Wise Men of 

thaEaatJG"'-'-"—" 

Star, Matt _. _ 
INS The Flight Into Egypt. 

Matt.^i, 14 
1B7 The Btanghter 



179 The Good Samaritan, 

isg Arrival "of the Good 
Samaritan at the Inn. 
Luke 1, 34 

U Christ with Martha and 
Mary. Luke x, 3S 



a The __ .__ 

Prodigal Son, Luke 

3 The Vrodlgal Son em- 
braces his Father, 
Lufcexv.S) 

■* Lazarus and the Hlcli 



John viil, 3 



Children. Mark 



we The bocliy o( Ohriat 
after the desi-ent. 

210 The body n'f Christ laid ' 

in the Tomb. John ■ 

211 The Angel appearing 10 
•*1B Marys. Markxvl, 

213 Christand theDiiii-ipleB 

nt Emmaus. Lnke 

sxly, 13 
: The Ascension, Mark 

xvl. IH 
S14 The Pentecost, Acts 

Ii, 1 
215 The -Vpostles preaching 

EheGoepel. Acts 11.1 
Sie Feterand John healing 

the Lame Man. Acta 

lartynlom of Saint 

Stephen. Acts Til, S7 

'anl on the way to 

DamBscus, Actslx.S 

I the boose ot 

Attex.Bl 

of Paul, 

I Paul in tlie Synagogue 



joiTn xi, SI 



Bmple. 
I Tribu 



193 The Poor Widow's two 

mites. Mark lit, U 
193 The Last Supper. MatL 

lU The Prayer In the Gar- 



19ii The Eiss 

197 Peter ' denies 

Matt, ixvl,' 

IS The Flagellati 



if_ Judas, 
Christ. 



ornelia. . 



,t Ephesi 



224 Paul landlne at UalM. 

ActsxsvifaB 
!Sfi John at Patinoa. Apoe, 

S26 I>eBth on the pala horse, 

Apoc. tI, 8 
Si7 The virgin crowned ■ 

with stars. Apoc. ill, 1 
3S8 Babi;lon in ruins. Apoc, 

•S The last Jadgment. 



. Lnke xUi, 41 



;hriat Crowned i 
Thorns. John si: . 
Ihrist Insulted, Matt, 

201 Christ Presented to the 

202 ChriBt Overburdened 

by the Cross. 1 ■ 
xilil,26 
« Christ arriving on . 
summit nf Monot Cal- 

H The Cruviaxlon. John 

» Erection ot the Ceo 

John xlx, 18 
)H Death of Christ. Matt, 



Niagara In Wint 



Falls, Canada side, 



—Clifton House in 
Froien spray oner 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



1st- 



816 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



A snow effect in the 
grove above Horse* 
shoe Fails 

10 Tracery of Winter on 

Luna Island, Niagara 

11 Icicles under the bank 

and portion of Ameri- 
can Fall 

12 Frozen spray encrust- 

ing trees on Luna Is- 
land, Niagara 
18 Frozen spray in the 
grove above Horse- 
shoe Falls, Niagara 

14 The snow arch on Luna 

Island, Niagara 

15 Below the American 

Falls, Niagara 

16 Frozen spray encrust- 

ing trees on Luna Is- 
land, Niagara 

17 Tracery of Winter on 

Luna Island, Niagara 

18 The American Fall seen 

through the snow 
arch. Niagara 

19 Ice lodged on the rocks 

near Goat Island, 
Niagara 

20 Snow, wreathed ever- 

greens in the grove 
above Horseshoe 
Falls, Niagara 

21 General View of Ameri- 

can Falls, with 
mounds of snow and 
ice, Niagara 

22 The Horseshoe Fall 

from the Custom 
House, Niagara 

23 The American Fall 

from the Ferry, Niag- 
ara 



1 First Singing of the 

Marsellaise 

2 Lady Washington's Re- 

ce^jtion 

3 Mane Antoinette 

4 Marriage of Pocahontas 
6 Death of Robespierre 

6 Descent from the Cross 

(Rubens) 

7 Crucifixion (Rubens) 

8 Lady Godiva 

9 Doorway of an Egyp- 

tian Ilouse (Jerome) 

10 Jerusalem in her 

Grandeur 

11 Jerusalem in her Fall 

12 Pass of Suk Wada 

Barada 

13 Church of Holy Sepul- 

cher 

14 Massacre of St. Bar- 

tholomew 
16 Entrance to Holy Sep- 
ulcher 

16 The Good Story 

17 A Grecian Lady at 

Home 

18 Luxembourg Gardens 

during the Reign of 
the Directory 

19 Watt's Eirst Experi- 

ment with Steam 

20 Shakespeare and Con 

temporaries 

21 Ruben's Last Judgment 



24 Terrapin Tower and 

Horseshoe Fall, Niag- 
ara 

25 The American Fall 

from the Hog's Back, 
Goat Island 

26 The Horseshoe Fall, 

Niagara 

27 Horseshoe Fall from 

Canada side, Niagara 
—Instantaneous 

28 Below the American 

Fall, Niagara 

29 Terrapin Tower and 

Horseshoe Fall, Niag- 
ara 

30 The Horseshoe Fall 

from Clifton House 
Niagara 

31 The Horseshoe Fall 

from Clifton House, 
Niagara 

32 The Horseshoe Fall 

from the river, Niag- 
ara 

33 General View of the 

Falls from Point 
View 

34 General View of the 

American Falls from 
Hog's back 

35 Terrapin Tower and 

Horseshoe Fall, Niag- 
ara 

36 Terrapin Tower and 

Horseshoe Fall, Niag- 
ara 

37 Terrapin Tower and 

Rainbow, Niagara 

38 Terrapin Tower and 

Horseshoe Fall from 
Goat Island 

REPRODUCTIONS. 

22 Assurbanipal Hunting, 

bas-relief 

23 War Booty 

24 Thaw in the Ukraine 

25 Trial by Weight 

26 After the Fight 

27 Un Hangar 

28 L'Eminence Grise 

29 Cambyses at Pelusium 

30 Return from Market 

31 Satyr and Nymphs 

32 The Smokers Rebellion 

33 Return to the Convent 

34 Pompeiian Dance 

35 Before the Alcalde 

(Spanish) 

36 Schisms 

37 Appian Way in Time of 

Augustus 

38 Breaking Up the party 

39 Le Hero de la Fete 

40 La Sainte Collation 

41 Adjournment of the 

Grand Council, Venice 

42 The Convent in Arms 
4;^ SpanishCaf^ 

44 Aoduction of Amymone 
46 Massacre of the Ma- 
melukes 

46 Dancing Girls of Gades 

47 Calling the Roll After 

Pillage 

48 Carrying Water in a 

Sieve 

49 The Old Hotel de ViUe, 

Granada 



39 Terrapin from Goat 

Island, Niagara 

40 View of the Bapida 

looking toward the 
Three Sisters 

41 The Rapkls, Niagara- 

Instantaneous 

42 Luna Island Bridge 

after a snow storm, 
Niagara 

43 The Rapids and Bridge 

to Goat Island, Niag. 
ara 

44 Bridge from the First to 

second Sister Islands, 
Niagara 

45 Suspension Bridge from 

American side, Niag- 
ara 

46 The new Suspension 

bridge from American 
side, Niagara 

47 General view of the 

Falls from Victoria 
Point, Niagara 

48 Perspective of Suspen- 

si on Bridge Carriage 
Way, Niagara 

49 The Suspension Bridge 

and Faills from Mont- 
eagle House, Niagara 

50 Snow and Sunshine on 

Luna Island Bridge, 
Niagara 

51 Suspension Bridge Car- 

riage Way, Niagara 

52 The New Suspension 

Bridge, Niagara 

53 General View of the 

Falls from Point 
View, Niagara— Sum- 
mer 



50 Phryne Before the Tri- 

bunal 

51 The Bag^ge of Cro- 

quern itaine 

52 Between Friends 

53 Charity 

54 An Arabian Tribunal 

55 The Flower Market, 

Paris 

56 Interior of Santa Maria, 

Rome 

57 The Procession of the 

Bull Apis 

58 The Dance 

59 Dance of the Alraeh 

60 The Presentation of 

the Singer 

61 Charj^e of the Ninth 

Cuirassiers 

62 The Cardinal's Recep- 

tion 

63 After the Bath 

64 For Sale 

65 The Education of a 

Prince 

66 First Meeting of Mary 

Stuart and Rizzio 

67 Reception of the Great 

Conde by Louis XIV. 

68 The Sword Dance at a 

Pacha's 

69 The Rival Confessors 

70 The Last of the Glron- 

dists 

71 The Reception of an 

Ambassador 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



mbintosh battery and oi-ticai. co., ciiicauo, ill.. U. 9. . 



!17 



fi Melgft 

6ASla' 

.7 Seler 

, 78 PMti 

S AnWnirot Honar 
n Pbaraolt'a Bearers oT 

Bad TidiugB 
81 BuildlDg the Fyra- 



8 The Master 
UoundB, Cai 



. (GB 



Prayer Propeaslon tor 
Rain in Cieniianr 

ADdromnda Released by 
Parsens (Riibem) 

both tDelArochel 

IU3 The KeCum (H Moalei) 

"" Ailer the Duel (Sicard) 

The noly Family (Mu- 

The fionsollDg Virgin 

- '. The tlissei^tlon (Kern. 

Sous of Edivard [Dela- 
rochE) LoiiTra 
ilOADthony'B Uralion over 
fjeaarlJ. D. Court) 

(Henner) 
nraptureil 



aoidfii 



e Itoxit 



. (l-'"' 



, Polly 



.* MBdninB Lebrun and 

[3 Return of Che Prodigal 

SoQ (Graiiie) 
m ExRoniiiiim illation of 

P. Laurens) 



. _ __. Phila- 
delphia, ereuted ITXS 

IS5 IndeuBudeniie Hall in 
PlitladelphlB in lT7fl 

J3B A Beautiful Masque- 

IS; Good Cheer 

lis The Fair Penitent 

Iffl The Urandinother 

"" •■ FalrRuth 

" Circa, by L'halon 

" Rononooiterinit 

Longfellow in hla Study 



lS7ItU9BiSD Wedding Feast 
118 The Bull (Paul Potter) 
- Last Cartridge 
" Night fielora 

The Dromipa 

lU Cnpid and the Bntter 
fly (Bourgereau) 
Gallo Roman Bath (Hi 
erle) 

lilS The Laughter [Joseph 

other and Sister 




Battla ol NHTBrin, Oc- 
Surprlsa ot Constao- 



lie A CyCliere(LionGlRoy- 

150 The nather(Ed. Mitch- 

151 A Dreamer [L. Hode- 

bert) 
UaHnng on a Nail (L. 

Deschamps] 
]Si The Bather (Bonge. 

IM The Anakening 



NAPOLEON SERIES. 

.leon Announcing 3 
to Divorce to Jose- 
hine ' J 

.poleou'B Farewell 

[he iBlanr? -' 
m The Battle 



t. King of NaulBS 
es, Dili; da Uonte- 



the iBland ol Elba 
" Battle of Watarloa 
Old Guard Dies. 

The landing Place, 
Jamestown, St. Helena 

Sapoleon'B Prison, St. 
Helena 



n's Head 

Bamolcne, 
ft Nuiwleon 



» Naiwleon 
JO Sa,K,leon 
SI Napoleon 
S3 Lottizia 

sa Joaejihli 

3i Marie Louise, 

3A Kineol Rome 
•■K Jeronia Bonapi 

Sri Charles BonB)j 

LIST OF SLIDES SEE 



14 Uargtaal Macdonald, 

Due da Tarenlnm 
LI General Deaiali 
40 General La Tonr Dan- 

7 DncdeReichstadt 

fl Ganerai Oudinot, Due 

9 MarshafMartier. Dnc 

de Treviso 
tO MarBhal Marmoal, OuO 

de Raiusa 
' 'fsrshal Angerean, Due 



etadc and Prince of 
Bcluunhi 
Napoleon at Battle of 



218 Mcintosh battery and optical go., chic ago, ill., it. s. a. 



57 Coronation of Josephine; 

f David) 

58 Marriage of Marie Lou- 

ise 

59 Beign of Terror, the 

Conciergerie 

60 Nax>oleon and Berthier 

at the Battle of Ma- 
rengo 

61 Battle of Hannau, Octo- 

ber 30, 1813 

62 Battle of Moscow, Sep- 

tdmber 7, 1812 

63 Battle of Somo Sierra, 

November 30, 1808 

64 Battle of fijlau 

65 Battle of Austerlitz Na- 

poleon and StafT 



1 Ruins of Baalbec 

2 Miletus 

3 Spot where Paul Stood, 

Athens 

4 Antioch, in Syria 

5 Tarsus 

6 Straits of Messina 

7 Smyrna 

8 Tiberias 

9 Syracuse 

10 Theater at Ephesns 

11 Reggio 

12 Exterior Great Temple 

Baalbec 

13 Propylon, at Athens 



First Crusade. 

1 Hospitality of Bar- 

barians to Pilgrims 
^ Foulgue-Nerra Assailed 

by the Phantoms of his 

victims 
S Peter the Hermit, 

Preaching the Crusade 
4 The War-Cry of the 

Crusaders 
-5 Walter the Penniless, in 

Hungary 

-e The Army of Priest 

Volkmar and Count 

Emicio Attack Wersburg 

7 The Second Crusaders 

Encounter the Remains 

of the First Crusaders 

« Celestial Phenomena 

9 Astonishment of the 

Crusaders at the Wealth 

of the East 

10 Godfrey Meets the Re- 

mains of the Army of 
Peter the Hermit 

11 Priests Exhorting the 

Crusaders 

12 Crusaders Throwing 

Heads into Nice 

13 The Battle of Nicea 

14 The Battle of Dory laBum 

15 Burying the Dead after 

the Battle of Dorylaeum 

16 Battle of Antioch 

17 Florine of Burgundy 

18 The Massacre of Anti- 

och 

19 Bohemond alone mounts 

the Ramparts of Anti- 
och 



66 Bonaparte at Jaffa, 

March 11, 1799 

67 Bonaparte Elected Con- 

sul 

68 Death of Marceau, Sep. 

tember, 1796 

69 Triumphal Entry of the 

National Guard into 
Paris 

70 Battle of Fleurus 

71 The States General, 1789 

72 Battle of Wagram, July 

17,1809 

73 Napoleon and the Queen 

of Prussia, Berlin, July 
6, 1807 

74 The Return of the Body 

of Napoleon to Paris, 

ST. PAUL SERIES. 

14 Cenchreaea 

15 Ephesus 

16 Damascus 

17 Rock of Corinth 

18 Paeridos, with Long 

Walls Restoi-ed 

19 Modern Athens 

20 Arches in Alexandria 

Troas 

21 Antioch of Pisidia 

22 Phillippi 

23 Corinth 

24 The PiraBus 

25 Alexandria, Egypt 

THE CRUSADES. 

20 Barthelemi Undergoing 

the Ordeal of Fire 

21 The Road to Jerusalem 

22 Enthusiasm of Crusad- 

ers at the First View of 
Jerusalem 

23 Second Assault of Jeru- 

salem; the Crusaders 
Repulsed 

24 Apparition of St. George 

on the Mount of Olives 

25 Godfrey enters Jerusa- 

lem 

26 The Discovery of the 

True Cross 

27 Godfrey Imposes Trib- 

ute upon the Emirs 

28 Gerard of Aresner Ex- 

posed on the Walls of 
Arsur 

29 The Crusaders Massacre 

the Inhabitants of Caes- 
ar ea 

30 Two Hundred Knights 

Attack 20,000 Saracens 

31 Death of Baldwin, King 

of Jerusalem 

32 Ulgazy Gives Gauthier 

his Life 

Second Crusade. 

33 Louis VII Receiving the 

Cross from St. Bernard 

34 Destructionof the Army 

of Conrad III of Ger- 
many 

35 Surprised by the Turks 

36 Louis VII 



December 15, 1840 

75 Napoleon Head (David) 

76 King of Borne 

77 Marshal De Saxe 

78 " Ney (Girard. 

79 " McDonald 
(Standing) 

80 Louis XVI. (FuU figure) 

81 Dumouriez. Minister of 
War and Foreign Affairs 

82 Mirabeau 

83 Robespierre 

84 The (joronation of Jo- 

sephine 

85 At Waterloo 

86 Battle of Esling, Death 

of Duke de Montebello 

87 Death of Napoleon 



26 Mole of Puteoli 

27 Interior Great Temple, 

Baalbec 

28 Jerusalem 

29 Tomb of Lazarus, Beth- 

any 

30 Jaffa 

31 Rome 

32 Tophet 

as Pantheon, Rome 

34 Port of Beirut 

35 Mitylene 

36 Konich 

37 Rhodes 



Third Crusade. 

37 Saladin 

38 Glorious Death of De 

Maille, Marshal of the 
Temple 

39 Death of Frederick of 

Germany 

40 Siege of Ptolemais (1) 

41 Siege of Ptolemais (2) 

42 Richard Coeur de Lion, 

in Reprisal, Massacres 
Captives 

43 Crusaders Surrounded 

by Saladin*s Ai*my 

44 Richard Coeur de Lion 

and Saladin at the Bat- 
tle of Arsur 

45 The Battle of Arsur 

46 Richard Coeur de Lion 

Delivering Jaffa 

47 Blonde 1 Hears the Voice 

of Richard 

Fourth Crusade. 

48 Dandola, Doge of Ven- 

ice, Preaching the Cru- 
sade 

Fifth Crusade. 

49 The Emperor Alexius 

Poisoned and Strangled 
by Murzoufle 

50 Murzoufle Parleying 

with Dandolo 

51 Entry of Crusaders into 

Constantinople 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Bixtli Cruude. 

N CrouailB AgMinHl the 

Moara of Gr&iia-la 
83 The Criieade ol I 



Army bj a Sand THtu- 
61 ^. X-ouis before Dami' 



e The Criismlere o 



i- ASH OI'TTL-AL 'TO., CH 

07 A MvBiiaBe tram tbe 

East 
en Bt, Laais In Prlean in 

Egypt 
09 Armalttt t'ftlroof Pria. 

oueraolMlnich 
;0 t'hrlailiinri>vaUersC»p. 

., (-.:„ 

6 The Emii 



II The Captives j 

7 Tbe Uapai'tiire Iroin . 

Aimiei-Moites 

K Tlio Sight ot Aug. W, ' 

tOTi; St, Lonis' Denth 1 

Aeiwssiiiatioa of llenrr e 

ol Germany , 

1 Edward III ot Enahinii ' 



Ing Maps of 
Popo John J 



17 Mahaoiet II before Con- 
stantinople 
tS TheOCtomana Penetrat- 

« The Sinewi 
K) The Craaac 
Ml. Tauru 



n_EDem; 



ra Croeafng 
f the Cm- 



the Glories of the Cm- 



EDWARD L. WILSON'S PERSONALLY 
SLIDES OF EGYPT. 

AleundrlB. H Scene an the Mahmou- 



S Abdnl 



It an thu Med- 
i. the Arab 



ia Egyptian \ 



* Alexandria 
Steamer 
fi Pon of Alexandria- 

galore— Khedive' 

Tacht onthoLelt 

B Unatom Hoiiae Quay 



the 



li-Gal- 



2B From the Citadel ti 
30 S. E. From the Cite 



ley Prisoners 

8 Eaa-El-Tin Palaf 

the Llght-Hoiiae 

9 Hnatapb Adii— U 

Arab DravouBD 

10 Among the Bazaars 

11 Arab 'Woman and CI 
U EqDeBtrlan Statae of 

Bobammed All— 

U Uronpol .(rabBegg 
M AnAlesandrian "^ 
IS Hnaaelman ireipi 
and Hired Monr 
Showing I'oin 
PUUr 
]« Pompeya Pillar 
IT Hoaque of El Galurrl 
U Irrigation Sakyeh 
IB A r«b Farm— Village 






8 Moaqne 
Air, E 



PHOTOGRAPHED 



IS Maaque of Sultan HaB- 



13* A 



MoBigiie of Sulun 

Arab Priest Reading 
the Koran— Mosiiae 

Interior. Mosqac of 
4S New and Old Mosquea 






. S. W. Irom the Citadel 
toward the MosquB 
of Sultan Hassan 

from the Mosque of 

Mohammed All 
I* Colonnade, Hosqne 

of Mohammed All, 

Exterior 
, L-olonnade, Mosque of 



Ali (where (he Ko. 



Latticed Windows 
09 ModernArabloBaiaara 



Ameriran M 1 . 



57 Arabian BarBe"I)arv. 

Iah"BndbiaBB- 
08 An Egyptian t 

BDd Gknt 
m Tbe Lemonade Hsr- 

60 Tbe ITize Beggs 

tnde (Fare) 
Bl Tlio Prize Begga; 

Bide (Alt), 

Smithy 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127- 



HcINTOaH BATTKBT AND OPTICAL CO., CHIUA60, ILL., D. B. A. 



SSModer 

W Moden 
then 



. Palace, 

Ai&blc Palace, 

67 Modenn Arabin Palace, 

the Xjttclced Balcony 

68 Modern Ambic Palace, 

the Wlndowa 
B» Modem Arabic Palaoe, 
the 'Balcony, Exte. 

70 Mudern Arabic Palace, 

the Drome Boor 

71 An Egyptian Money- 

Chan^ r 

Arab Group 
73 Watchman at the Pal- 

T« Arab Saia ai 

7S',MoB(iue nl Aboa Har- 

7a Moaune and Tomlj of 

77 An^^E^yj-tlan Woman 

79" An Egvutian Woman 

(Unveifed) 
7B T he Kaar-Kn-Sil 

Bridge 



Egyptian Sheap 
laikel at the Kner- 

L Egj'ptian Bread- 



The Pyramids. 

AvenneOtPal 



W Pvramid 01 Cheopa— 
Entrance and Bl- 
Mamoon's Hole 
lUU Pyramid oi Cheops- 
Entrance Close View 

lor of the Pyramid of 

1(8> The Klng-B Chamber— 
Pvmma of Cheopa 

IDS The Pyramid of Cheops 
from Pyramid o( 

104 Photogreuhing t h e 
Pyramids of Ceph- 
ren and Moncheres 

lOfl Fallen Caetug ol the 
Pyramid oT M e 



s.Pyr- 



ot 



Pyramid Road 
87 Pyramid o( Cheops 

\vtier)'' 
S3 Pyramid ol Cheops, 

Near View 
as Looking up Che Pyra- 

90 Climbing the Pyramid 

of Cheops 
»1 Climbing the Pyramid 



The Nile. (Egypt.) 

IS3 The Nile Steamer 
Beni Soaetf — T he 
Btart from Kasr-En- 
Nil rwv 

ISt*The Island of Rboda 

135 The Island ot Khoda 

136 •Double Sugar-Caoo 



17 'Da hah io I: 

Nile 
« •Dahableb 



106*G 



|) of three S 



)e tails ot 



I IM The Tom! 



1<» Bnined Temple and | na 

110 The Pyrnmifl of Cheops , 147 

and tlie Sphynx iij 

111 PholugraphinE t h e ; ,„ 

Sphynx and the - 



The 4'hyns and Pyn 

mid of Meneheres 
TbBBphyni-t'ront 
The Sphynx— Side 



Last Look 
Sphyni, 1-y, 
Cheops and 



k Tombs and Ka 
.Ihigo aC Pyramid 

jB^anrpYmm^^' 



t of M, Malr. 
' * of Maydoom 

MlDleh 



r Mill 11 



Tombs of Beni Has- 
F irat Tomb— BenE Haa. 



11 Hassan 



fo.i.l 



t beni Hai 



1 the S 



m K^v-ptlan 
IM The IJbc] 



Hassan— (An Egyp- 
Harbor of Asalout— A 



ms Temple otOslris^Aby- 

164 Temple of Osiris— En- 
graved Alabaster 

105 Temple of Oslrli— En- 
graved Alabaster 

ItSO Temple nt Oalrli— Hie- 
roglyphlCB 

vn Temple of Osiris— Ala- 



ol't^eSpL 
M Prospecting on Top of 

O heaps, tonard the 

Second Pyramid 
M Prospecting on Top ot 

Cheops, showing the 

Desert and the 

Sphvnx 
BS Prospecting on Top of 

Che ops, toward the 

Kiosk 
96 t>yramid ot Cephren 

OT* Summit ot the Great 

Pyramid from the 

Halfway Rest 
as* Pvramid of Cheops— 
Latent I View 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOES SEE Pk<3.E MT, 







1B8 Temple 


o7-Bo?Sl I- 


Calru 


Continued 


Abydo 
lOH Temple r 

170 Tem le' 


Entrance 


M7 Tomb 


f Caliph Sultan 


S't''sothl I- 






Roor Construction 


i'M Tornb^ 




171— Tamiile 




128 Tomb 


of Caliph Alhi 


Tablet 
17J* Temple 


Isffifie; 










130 Tomb 


olthe Calipha 


mold and 


New atrnc. 


181 •T'imb 


tuiesa 


AbydoB 








10 Doorwftr- 


13". Tomb 









rcISTOSIl BATTEEV AND UI'TICAL VO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. f. 



Illl—An Arab Maiden— Ke- 
e Water-lar _ Potter at 



178 Temple nl Dead 

m Temple iit Deiiderab— 
The Pylon 

131 Plan of the Temple of 
Denderall 

En?raace — Hall ol 
Ootumns 
isa Temple ot Denderah— 
Inside— Hall ot Col. 

erah— 



«a Pliotograiihlng 

diffiiMiltles — Karnak 
, aiQ Grand Hall and Obe- 
lisks Irnm the Soiicli- 

' SIl Fallen and tireat Olie- 

I ai! Bypfiatvl Hall IV) and 
oteliaka (O) from 

j Slfj Reversed (.'apilalB and 

Hi Ue'neral view ot Kar- 
nak (rom the Sonth 

lis* General view ot Kar- 
nakand the Lake 
no Standing Obe- 



131 Temple ot E 



ot the HypoBtyl 
Hail (eiterloi-^ 
■ilS The BorderBot Thebes 
219- Temple of Koorneli— 






irah— 



Face of Hathoi 

186 Temple of 

187 Temple of 

Funeral Chamuei 

158 Temple of Denderah— ' 

159 Temple of Deuderali— i 

South Wall 

190 Tempie ot Denderah— .■ 

191 5mall Temple of Osiris 

at Denderah witb ; 

na Tbe Temple of Luxor 

—Colonnade 
193 TUB Temple o( LiiKor 

IM The Obelisk ot Luxor | 

and Pvlon 
ISA Female Fantasia | 



Thebes [Rear details) 

322 Temple ot Koomeh— 

TheDe* (Ball ol 



191 Hahne fa- 
cer, Li 
flKore 

189 Fa (In 






^— Bai^k 

ot Thebes 
The Vocal 
—Thebes 



LuKor 

_ fl«ire I 

199* ZahoOi Fantasia Fe- I i 

9(W* P rotes tan C Mission 

School, Luxor i j 

Wl* Map ot the Ruins, ' 

Karnak 
tta Avenue of Sphinxes— I '. 

Kamak l 

103 Portal of the Temple— I , 

Kamak ■ ■ 

SM Open Area (B) and Sin. 

gle Column— Karnat 
US HaU 01 



(Earnak) , 

13 Columns and OI>eliskB 



) of Mess. Mas. 

)-Erugich 0" 






FindoilBSl 

247*1 nscrlptlon found ii. 

Mummj's Hiding. 

Plape— <Riarlit) 
SiB*Inscription Fon 

Hnminy's Hiding 

PlacJ^fLett) 
24»*Tomb ot tmeses III 

Bab -El-Ma lank 
ascTomt. of Barneses III— 

Entrance— Bab EL. 

Malonk 
aSl•9Bn^upbagus of Rames- 

Tomb of Barneses III 
-■ ~ - ■ Cham- 
WaU 

Tomb ol Sethi I— Scarl. 

bee 
Tomb ot Sethi 



■ SM-The 



capitation Scene 



— De- 



2JS Overlooking Bab-El- 
Malouk. Including 
Tombs of ItamBses 



le Colossi of Thebes 



loulL 



:i-Ma- 



Colonnade 
meainei Abon—Fitst 

Oonrt (Temple of 

Rameses III) 
Medinet Abou-Scrij 

ture (Battle irltb t{ 

MeSinet Abou— Palat. 
Dt the liinic (Uound 

■ . 237 M B d i n e t A b o u— 

(Temple ot liamescs 

111) 
- iSB Medinet Almu—Rear 
I Court from the Roof 

. I 239 Medtuet Aboii— Naval 

. ; 2*) Deir-el-Medlneh 

I . SJ1 Deir-e I.M e d 1 n e h — 

Roman Arch 
Arab Water.darrier. 

Girls— Fat imah, Mlr- 



260 Lusor from the Tbe- 
ban Phi in— Evening 
Ml LuKorand the Nile 
— ■ "-reet in Esneb 

lie Doorway- Eb- 

284 Inferior oJ the Temple 

Temple ot Edfou- 
PyTon 

285 Temple otEdfon— Hy. 
poetyl Hall 
emple ot Edtou- 
Grand Eai-ade from 
the Hypostyl Ball 



270 Temple of Edfau- 



I 272 Temple of 
I 273 Temple of 



i Cairo Bazaar— Ae- 
A. Pottery Baiaar- As. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES Stt Pft.GLt \'i.1- 



2Si Mcintosh battery and optical co., cbicago, ill., u.s. a. 



380 Nubian (.'iirly H8ild»— 

sai Nobliiu Habit -Be Her— 

Asaoniin 
ia2<EIep ban tine Island 
l»3Sii_bian CbildrBn— 

wltfi suit iiBof Men— 
ephta. Sdd at Ita- 

184 Ftolemaii' Temple— 

aSO Tbe giiarrjr o( Sjono— 

386 UuUnKilied Obeligk— 

887 Moslem CBmecety, 

SSa Old W»tch Tower— on 



an A Nubian Donke; 

Group 
»I Our iSonkay "TEle- 

XK F^t^Umpoe ol FblUs 
W8 Pharaoh-B Bad— Phite 

SM Kuins of Phlue, Irom 
tbe North 

tbe Bonth 

WG Fharaub's B e d— 

tbrough the Pylon 

se? Fharaofi's Bed— Fin- 
ished and unilnlBtaed 
panBla 

MSFhavBOh's Bad— "The 
Grape Capital." 

sea Pharaoh's Bbi 



317 Tbe Nllei— North fro 



SIS The 

nade— Sontb 

330 BlKgeh Irqm Ct 

Sai'TfiB" lovoVy C 



3ti Huins ur a Christian 
Church. Pbilie 

SS3 A Classlf' Group — 
PbibF (a broken 
Bphjnn aud Ohollglt) 



Sabooab— Tom- 



t KoroBko 

Nile 

I the Nile 



'SiStA' 



Sir Firaf Ua ta 

Nile 
WS First Ca» 

3» Kan id a— Fi 
ol the N 



BOa Phihe— West Cok 

Phils— West CoK 
nadB— toward Bigg 
aw PhiliB— West Coil 
nade and Biggeh 



t Koro 

Isis 3m From Mount Korosko 
i Tem. toward Mecca 

sal 'Tbe "MBcca" Patan- 

Philx 3S2 A^lle Sakkiyeh— Rlv- 

363 A Nile Sakkiyeh- The 

3M A Nile Sakkifeh- Exit 

SRfi Irrigating DitchSB 

a Nite Farm 
.101 Watch Towerandlr 

rated rields 
387 A Nile Farm— Korosko 
»li8 A'MHda— The Temple 
2Ha Dasert nC tbe ^le 

Iram A'Mada 
370 Derr — Temple (Ei- 

Irr- Tempi 



Kapida- Firat Cat: 
331 First Cf<_[aract of th 

331! Island of Philie Itoi 
the First Catarai't 

333 "Pretty Teeth"— On 
Cataract Boatman 

bian Dragomnn 

335 A Stranded Dahataie 

-Near Phil* 

338 De^rting View c 

The Nile (Nnbio). 

337 Temple ol Dabod 
. 338 Nubian Water Vessel 
I -Dabod 

339 Gertasse- The Quarry 
"10 Gortaaae— The Temiile 

11 Moonlight at Gertasse 

12 ■Kalabsheh- The Tem- 

ple 
\S Kalabsheh— Temple 



373 The Uahal 

trig"— F' 

373 The'-Seao 



iple [In. 



4 Tbe '-SeaoatTii' '- 



7 The"&eao»triB"Ooiree- 



Sesostris} 
His Feet and A— 
Hanea- (Aboaid the 

.180 ThB"Saidieh"-Doo 



38t Aboo Slmbe 



310 Fto™Sa'""- 
SiI*Temple 



Land Grant 



/ of the RoEetta 



ling tbe Styx 
rOR PRICE 



317 Dendoor— Tempia(De. 

tail] 
31H Rirsei) eh — Temple 

3*8 •Kirsohen— Temple 

(Interior) 
3» TheNlieat Kli'Bcheb 
3S1 Dakkeb— The Temple 
3M Maharratah- Tie 



SSgNotretarl Offer 
Flowers to Uath 
Interior of the Si 



Sakkiyeb at Mahur- 

LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



SlclSTOSU HATTEKY AND OPTICAI. CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. J 



U ■Second CaUra' 



Aboo SliDbel — The 

the aonth Hide (Per- 

Ooloia&l aBuru No. 1 
SM Coloaml flmiro So. i 
-IS ColosBftl flgure "" ■■ 



ortta« UaacAM ofCurios— 1 

o[ the I N^?*' " °™' ' 



Sacoia^l 



Catantct o( Ct 



ilOBSua-lTiiLI I 



.alls 



: Fallen 



nColoeiiUsFeet 
BO ColoBau»-Tln 

Ml ColoasQs-Dla t o r t e d 
Head to show Snbinn 
t>-[)e oCNu. S 

«a Grnaiml 10 Traielars 
mChelapoCUologsus 



DheKaBr-KH-Nll 
Joulak — From 

omb oV Marlf 
Patbtt— Bouluk 



Sliab 



405 Aboo 

TemuiD iruiitw 

4Dt Aboo Blmbel— In 

tion a,nd Kigui 

right of Doora- 

406 Aboo Sinibel— Id 



423 To ml 

13^ BoulalT Ml 

4S4 B< 

1S6 Head of Si 
eptah 



HkUu 



407 'Aboo 



I'l 9— shad owed 
Slmbel — En. 
cotbeSanctii- 



«e Aboo Slraliel—Itiii e r 

409 Aboo Slmbel— Wall In- 
scription— Ranife S B g 
Slaying hie Enemies 
Wady Haifa 
• '•"■-- '■ — '--wady 



: 49) ThotmesTllHSSDhrnx 

B7 Engraved Stone and 

I^lnted Wood Mum- 

niy Cases— Ho r-em- 

^SUnflniBbed Statue 

4» Black Spbynx HykeoB 

4.10 Osiris, Hathoi and Isis 

431 Saloon of tlie Ancient 

Empire— £dC r a n o e 

Hiimmy Cases and 

the scribe 
^a 'Saloon ol Che Anulent 

Emriro 
433 Statue oliaagChetren 



Sncklefl by AniB 
443 OJeopatni in the Coa- 

44a [Cleopatra aaOnaan 
444(uoid-F«cBd Slummy 
Case ol Queen No. 

445 tMummies and Mummy 

Casesof the Kings 

446 tMomiuy ill the Case of 

Che High Priest Neb- 

417 tMummyHBadof Pino- 

tem— Profile 
44S tMummTHoadofl^ina- 

448 A Boyal Mnmmy Head 

-King 
4fia A Royal Mummy Head 

451 A Royal Nest of EggS 

453 •Papyrus Plate* 
464 •Papynis Plate fl 
4S0 'A Bit o! Arable Color 
4Sn*A Bitot Amble Color 
4S7 •Ancient Arabic De- 
signs 
45S*Anri«nt Arabic De- 



411 BlfliDj 



Ual& 



Graln- 



Pynimid- 

iiueoIR 

4as Married ( 
Hotep an£ 



igCbcIn 
f the Ore 



A Study ir 
Ari-hiEeci 
L Study i 



413 Group of Nnblan Wo- 

men-Wftdv Haifa 
413 Second Catatai'C nf the 
Nile and Mt. Aboo- 
Seer north 
11 Second Catamrc of the i 
Nile and Mt. Aboo- 1 
Seer south | 

I Ailmarkeil thus are of the "New Find " olJ 

THE GREAT PYRAMIDS. 

BY PlAZ^i SMITH.— These are without question the 8 

■oobllgea to Hat them at 76 cents each. y on , n 

I and after 

ber of King Ifi ^ 
runite TomE 

' ThrJ^WoBteni Aisle of 



—The KhBdlv 



ir, Great Pyra 



C 

IB W 
B 
,1 
: 



3 Second and Tbirfl Pyra 

mlds 

4 Entrance Passaiio (deep 

In mnd and granite. 
UnBJhof King gbalrc'a 
Granite Tomb 

5 Alee Dobre cogitating 
■mkl the square jilllar 
Colonnades of Klnu 



ol King I 
te Tomb 



■ealPy 
. ... Kii • 
it Grea 

Shoats ot Araus 

The Broken Southeast 
Corner of Coffer In 

Great Pyramid 



1 Coffer In Ki 

2 Coffer in King' 

borot Great 1 
and G boats 



18 Slouth of the Entrance 

Passage 
ts The Angle Stance 



King SI 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE P^QE Vi.1.. 



Tomb 



224 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., o. s. a. 



22 Side View of Beginning 

of Slope of Entrance 
Passage into Great 
Pyramid 

23 Distant View of the 

Great Pyramid and tlie 
Second Pyramid, from 
the Petrified Shell 
Hills several miles to 
the south 

24 A Portion of the Gran- 

ite Casing in situ of 
the Third Pyramid 
26 A Burial Cove 

26 Alee Dobre, Pyramid 

Arab 

27 Engraved Vertical Sec • 

tion of Great Pjrramid 

28 The great Pyramid and 

its Hills of Rifled 
• Tombs 

29 The Southwest Comer 

of the Great Pyramid 



30 The Palm Trees of 

31 The Eastern and North- 

ern Faces of the Great 
Pyramid 

32 The Northeast Corner 

of the Great Pyramid 

33 The Great Pyramid and 

the Second Pyramid 

34 Alee Dobre, Pvramid 

Arab, at East l^ombs. 
Pyramid Hill 

35 The Close of Day at thS 

Pyramid Hill 

36 View at East Tombs 

37 The Second Pyramid 

from King Shafre's 
Granite Tomb 

38 All the Pyramids of 

Jeezen 

39 The Southern Hill and 

the Throe Tree Valley 



40 The Corner. Stone 

Socket 

41 The Southeast Corner 

Socket-hole of the 
Great Pyramid 
^ Southwest Corner 
Socket-hole of the 
Great Pyramid 

43 The Northwest Socket- 

hole of the Great Pyr- 
amid 

44 The Northeast Socket- 

hole ol the Great Pyr- 
amid 

45 The Great Pyramid 

46 Part of the Western 

Excavated Enclosure 
of the Second Pyramid 

47 Abdul Samud, Pyramid 

Sheik of the Northern 
Pyramid Village 

48 Engraved Vertical Sec- 

tion of King's Chamber 



EGYPT AND THE NILE. 



1 The Second Cataract 

(1,000 miles from 
mouth of the river) 

2 The Second Cataract, 

with Rock of Abou- 
seer 
8 Abou Simbel,Facade of 
the Temple 

4 Abou Simbel,Facade of 

the Temple (oblique) 

5 Abou Simbel,'<Kame8es 

the Great" 

6 Abou Simbel,Facade of 

Smaller Temple 

7 Ibrim, Rock Fortress of 

the Roman Period 

8 Derr, Entrance to the 

Rock Temple 

9 Wady-Sabona. Pylon 

of the Temple 

10 Wady-Sabona. Colossi 

and Sphinxes 

11 Dakkeh. The Temple 

12 Maharraka 

13 Nubian Sakia, or "Per- 

sian" Waterwheel 

14 Nubian Sakia, or "Per- 

sian'* Water-wheel 

15 Gerf Hossayu, Portico 

of the Temple 

16 Gerf Hossayn, Portico 

of the Temple 

17 Kalabshe, The Temple 

18 Kardassy, The Temple 

19 Kardassy, The Temple 

20 Kardassy Greek Tab- 

lets in Quarry 

21 Dabob, Three Pylon 

Gatewavs 

22 Philae, Distinct View 

from South 

23 Philae, Distinct View 

from Mishadd 

24 Philae, The Island 

25 Philae, The Island 

from Biggeh 

26 Philae, The Island from 

Biggeh (nearer) 

27 Philae, View from the 

Island 

28 Philae, Landing-place 

29 Phihe, "Pharaoh's 

Bed" 

30 Philx, "Pharaoh's 

Bed" ^distant view) 



31 Philae, "Pharaoh's 

Bed" 

32 Philae, First Pylon of 

Great Temple 

33 Philae, First Pylon of 

Great Temple, (dis- 
tant) 

34 Philae, Second Pylon of 

Great Temple 

35 Philae, Second Pylon 

and Colonnade 

36 Philae, Columns of 

"Pharaoh's Bed" 

37 Esneh, Columns of the 

Portico 

38 The First Cataract 

39 Assouan (Syene), from 

the Hills 

40 Assouan, The Landing- 

place 

41 Assouan, View at 

42 Assouah, View at 

*43 Assouan, Roman Pier 
at 

44 Koum-O ra b o s . The 

Temple 

45 Koum-O m b o s . The 

Temple from North 

46 Koum-Ombus, South 

Side 

47 Koum-Ombus Columns 

S. E. Corner 

48 Edfou, Temple and 

Village 

^ Edfou, Temple and 
Village 

50 Edfou, Pylon of the 

Temple | 

51 Edfou, Portico of the 

Temple 

52 Edfou, Street View, 

with Natives and 
Sheep 

53 Hager.Silsilis 

54 Hager.Silsilis, *♦ The 

Rocks of the Chain " 

55 Hager - Silsilis, the 

Grottoes 

56 Emient, the Column, 

etc. 

57 Evment, Fragment of 

a Temple 



Thebes, 



58 Entrance to Tombs of 

the Assaseef 

59 Ancient Crude Brick 

Arch, etc. 

60 Goomeh, the Portico 

of the Temple 

61 Goomeh, the Portico 

of the Temple 

62 D i e r - £ 1 - M edineh. 

Temple and Bocks 

63 Dier-Efl-Medineh, Near 

View 

64 Valley of the Tombs of 

the King 

65 Valley of the Tombs 

Head of the Valley 

66 Statues of Memnon 

67 Statues of Memnon 

(Upright) 



Memnonium, 



the 



68 General View of 

Memnonium 

69 Hall of Columns 

70 Osiride Portico 

71 Osiride Portico (Dis 

tant) 

72 Osiride Columns 

73 The Fallen Colossus 

Medxnet Hahou, 

74 Entrance to the Tern 

pie 

75 View in the First 

Court 

76 Pylon Gateway 

77 General View, Statues 

of MemnoB in Dis- 
tance 

78 General View, with 

the Memnonium 

79 The Plane, and Square 

Window of Palace 

80 Hall of Columns 

81 Hall of Columns 

82 View in the Second 

Court 

8:3 View in the Second 
Court 



FOB PRICE LIST OF SUDES S£.£. P^^£.\2.-l. 



r 

^^ SB Tll< 



ilSTOSn BATTKRY ASD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A. 



The Rained Pylon 

s; Halls of Uoliimbu 
trom West ' 

es HftUa at Col bid bu 
Side VlBvr 

S3 The Great Hall, E< 

80 The Great Hall. Co 

urnns of 
91 The Great Hull, Co 



Sculptured 
BDd Figure 

A ITirat ti: 



itSplitniea 
1 of Columns, 

87 Three ^uf the Snial 
Columns of Gri 
Hall 

96 Olileot Portion ol t 
Kulna 

99 Granite Fylonaud Ala- 
bast ar OolOisi 
, 190 the Banctuary 



131 Gvexeh, View among 

the Pyramids 
13! Grent Pyramid and 

Sphinx 

Great Pyramid and 



Pslma 

16 Tho Bphj-nx 

17 Second Fyrsmld and 

Sphynx 

138 Second Pyramid and 
__ Spliynx 

ipa Pyramid of Daalioor 

M Israeli t ish Brlek Pyra- 
mid 

141 Step Pyramid ol Sak- 



103 Great Hall, et 
KM The TwoObel 
lOE Fallen Obelle] 
loa Salt Lake, wi 



IJSDan 



o Painted To ml 

ni-Hassan, Bntnii 

o Painted Tombs 



17* G 



e Citadel 



, Koad 






108 Liiior, Colnmss of 

Portico 
ICO Luior, Court of Tem- 

5)e. Govt. Corn 
tares 
110 Lnior. Pylon and Obe- 
lisk 
lU Denderah, Portico of 
the Temple 
enderah. Sculptures 
-andarah, Scnrptures 
Cleopatra nud ?iero, 

a. Temple ot 



18 Old Cairo 

L» Old Cairo 

ISO OM Ci^ro 

ifil Valley ol i 

tbe'^Pyr 

IIB Generaf 



Bab-el-Nasr 



of Sultan 



, _J* Abydui 

116 Abydot. 

\ SealptHres a. 

lid Blont, (Capital of Up- 
per Egypt] 

117 Slont. Har\et-place 



Hassan 

General V 

Moeque 



i Toniba of the Calipba 



ean Exterior 



lia Street ^ 
Citadel 

177 Old House and Mushar. 

178 Old House and Mushnr. 

abieh 

179 Old House and Mashar. 

ubleh 
ISO Old Uouse and Hashar- 

Hotel 






S Shepherd's Hotel 
13 Arab i* 



IM Cleopatra's Ki 
lea Pompey'B Pill 
187 The Harbor 



Palai'e 
1B2 The Harbor 
IBSChnrches, etc., at 

r As Sua Canal. 

tst Freshwater Canal, at 
Ismailia 

195 Fresh Water Canal, at 

Ismailia 

196 Fresh Water Canal, at 



197 F 



162 Mosqui 



lllage I 16£ Mosqu 



of Sultan Bi 
of Sultan Ha. 
ot Sultan Ton- 



B Shipping on the Banks 

offhelille 
UObelisIt of Un (Hell. 

B Boulan, The Nile and 
Falaca of the Vice- 

r SB BouW, Street View 
"10 Qeeieh, Approach to 



lesUoeque of Sultan Am 

(oldest in Eaypt) 
167 Mosque olSnltanAni 



it Mohammed 



Fountain 
171 Mosque of kait itey 
173 Mqsqiie ot Kalt £ 



Water Caua 

with M. de Leseep'i 



101 Lake Tim sab, from 

Me View at Kantara 
wa View at Kantara 
204 View at Kantara 



Egypt to S] 



213 Port Said (Biid's-eye 

View) 
211 Fort Said (Bird's-eye 

ii5 Port Said, Artifleial 



ilocha. 



Vievrat 



217 TlredKlng Machine 

218 Sues; Dry Dock 

219 Suezi The Harbor 

220 Suez from tbe Sea 
£21 Suoz from the Palace 
222 Suez— Commence 

mant of the Canal 



the Pyram 

FOH PRICE LIST OF SLIDES Stt Ph«it\'iT. 



EDWARD L. WILSON'S PERSONALLY PHOTOGRAPHED 
SLIDES OF THE SINAI PENINSULA AND ARABIA. 

FOLLOWING MOSES TO THE PROMISED I.ViV. 



I Arab Be 
S Fatimah, „. 
B The Wa 



reel Called 
[garB in tha 



34 Tbe Gorge— He ace nd* 

ing Mount Sarbal 
as Jobul nt Tahooneb— 
Wady Felran 

36 Gum - Ambic Tree — 

37 Shittim - Wood Tree— 

WadyFoiran 

38 Jebel el Mahanad— 

"The MoHDtuin of 
Mosas" (West) 



O0*MHDnai^ript paffe of the 

dex Sirniiticag. Joho I 
61 Anuient Manuacrlpt or 
Iho New ToHtanir— 
— Title paga and F 
trait ot Si. John 
6a*Anc[enC Managcript of 
the New Teatameut 

Goapel and Pon 
olsE. Matthew 

e3*Hoeqiie and Uhurch oi 



I 



i;unal and Che He 
Sea 
S Quaraalina Quarter 

10 The Egyptian- Arabia 

Red Sea Ferryboat 

11 Egyptian CJuarantiii 

Camp, Arabian Side 
IS Ayiin MuBB. Well ( 

Moeeg (One Falm) 
13 Ayun Hnea, Well of 

Moges(Threel-a1i 
U* T h e Dead' Cam 

Well of MoaesIA 

bla) 
U A Desetl Carayan, I 



la The Great Well 
IS The HillB About 
ID Wadv Taiyibeta 
-■ "The EncampE 

Sea," Kfts A'. 

neemeh 



J Camp by 
IB Around 



« The Last Sjeht 
' Sea and &gyi 

tore Knterlp 



[gvpt (Be. 

Wiideme's'a of "Sin") 
llan Temple 
ady Kenob 



ward Mount Sli 
61 The Mount 3 li 

tb^P^lB of^Er 
ts A Nawami (Jt 



Heay-el - KhatCaceen 

28 A Gardea in 
KeiraQ. O u 

From Mount 

Summit T o 
„-«eypt„ 



Cons 



with 






— Wady Feiran 

3 Cavea of the Anthor- 

Ites— Jeliel Tahoonah 
— Wady Feiran 

4 A Garcfen [n Wady 

Feiran, Arab gather- 
ing Manna 

a Climbing toward 
Uounf Sinai 

li The Mount Sinai 
Range, from the 

7 Subk Hawa— "Pass of 
the Wind.- near 

a Climbing up SulA 

B The FounUin'in Nubk i 
Uawa, with Arab I 
Cameleer drinking i 



Cod vent Court, 



17 Tbe ' 

■ -IB boiatlnpT 

up the Com 

Wall 
68 The Skall ol St. 

m Exit Gate ot tbe Cob- 
m-ard Ht. 



Sbiai 
70 "Mayi 



.Cain of Mens— 



TB The Sei-o 



Raba 76 The 



jf Mt. Sluai 
'7 The CbapelB of Elijah 
andElisha 

of Elijah and EllUtt 
Chapel and Mosque, 
.Summit of J«bel 
Maosa 
10 Ttae Cave at Mosea," 
summit of JebeL 

cbel Katareena, front 
the Summit ol Jebel 
Moosa 
Has SufsAfeh, from tbe 
Summit ot Jebel 

MOOBU 

l3«The Willow Tree,' 
Junttion of Jebel 
Moosn and SnfMUeh 

.4 he Plain ol Sr-BslUL 
from tha GnCEe M 
.rfbelSutsateh 



FOR PRICE LIST OF S DES SEE PAGE 12T. 



MoISTOSH BATTERY ASJl OPTICAL f 



fHlCAGO, 1L1,.,[T.S. A 



FROM OCCIDENT TO ORIENT. 



I A FruHh VnlDine 



Fope> EgfP*^' Holj lAnd, 



Ins a Bflcord of m Nine Months' Tou 



. WM. A. SUITH. 

ut, and OritH Colari 



OHAPTKIlS IX ASD X. 
Have lead ChapCeia I.\ and X advanced sheeCa, of Hcv. \V. A. Smith's vohiine o( 
'STel, deaorlblng lite and aoenea about Naples, Alexandria and Cuira, Two word* 

KEV. A. B. 9HRADEK, 
Pastor Evangelical Lutheran Church, 

Cedar Raplda, lowii. 

CHAPTERS X!, XII, XIII. 
GliiDClng over the prooC.ahecta OD Egypt and Palestine, I flad tha charm ot 
' ■■Oocifleni to Orient" is its simple, graphic tttyle. Without parade ot Boholarahlp and 
L yet with no lack ot it.the atory rHOB.on tonchlng J uat the thtBg9,anclont and proBent, 
I tliat deserve mention. The author haa made a book entertaining as flctioa, and ol 
V'most tiractical valne to atndenU of the Bible aa wellaa all tonrlacs c ante mp Is ting R 
I llkejoutner. REV. J. K. FOWLER, 

Pastor 3d Presbyterian Gharoh, 

Cellar Rapids, lows. 

CHAPTERS XIV, XV, XVI. 



lev. W. A, Smith's visit to Jernaaleni and Jndea will t 
L Xory la told. There is enough ot Biblical history to bring Di 
r reality and prophetic signiflcance of rlty and town, the wall 
~ rains as they evorywhore moot the Dyes of the Crave ler t 

the anthor la the Biblical student, the discriminating 
['Christian, the sympathetic traveler, and Che keen obaerver i 

nClan and Intelligence 



t the romnnca and the 
, gates, pnoU, tumbs, 

critic, the believing 
in obaerver who will command yonr 
while you follow him through glimpses of (be Paat and 
le Old Proiuiaed Land. 

REV. JAMES MAKSnALL, D, D. 

President Coe College 



1 series ol happ; word 
K.plnlures of the various scenee and Incidents ot travel. Personal experiences and 
~ rratiODS are happily blended with historical sketches and deeoriptlons ol 
ftaoensry. Those who travel only in hooka will cheerfiillr make this Journey. 

The chapters on Scotland cities, heaths and lakes, with their Iragrant memories 

[ covenanters, martyrs and poets, are especially InteresClug. A remote ancestral 

B.Uiie gives me perhaps a special zest in chat ruggpd land and Its ancient worthiea. In 

pages the atlrrlnic Paat ia vividly retouched, the Present is rlearlr painted; 

REV. ALEXANDER G. WILSON, I). D, 

President Lenox College, Iowa. 



d helpful Illustration a, 
bellows the a 



ted paper and contnlna 
occnpylng a full page ei 
e verf readable aCyle, a 
n other, he B' 



. The book is 
as the reader 



keionely puts himself in Che HiiCbur'a place and si 

:Onc«a]ed his atory -telling art.— Cedur Hupidi KepiiMitn,ii. 

FOR PRICE LrST OF SLIDES SEt P^Gt \'2.1 ■ 



228 Mcintosh batteby and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



86 "The Rock of Moses," 
Summit of Jebel Suf- 
sdfeh 

86 Jebel Moosa from Suf • 

BAteh 

87 Jethro's Weil, Jebel 

Susdfeh 

88 A Bedouin Shepherd- 

ess 

89 Shepherd and Shep- 

herdess attending 
Flocks near Jethro's 
Well 

90 Cave Home of the 

Shepherds, Mt. Sinai 

91 The Bedouin Shepherd 

Boy (Moses) Musa 

92 Bedouin Pasture, Mt. 

Sinai 

93 Up the Gorge of Suf sa- 

fe)!, toward the Rock 
of Moses 

94 Date and Almond 

Trees, Oasis at the 

foot of the Gorge 

(No. 93) 
94^ Almond Tree in 

Blossom, Oasis at the 

foot of the Gorge 

(No. 93) 
96 The Plain of Er-Raha 

from the foot of Suf- 

96 Wady - esh - Sheykh 

from the foot of Jebel 
Sufsdfeh 

97 Ras Sufsdfeh, from 

Er-Raha 

98 "The Hill of Aaron" or 

"The Hill of the 
Golden Calf." 

99 The Sinai Valley and 

Convent, from 
Aaron's Hill 

100 Jebel Moosa and Suf- 

s^feh, from Aaron's 
Hill 

101 The Sinai Valle/, to- 

ward the Plain of 
Er-Raha from Aaron's 
Hill 



ARABIA. 

Mount Sinai to Akabah. 

102 The Sinai Valley N. E. 

toward Wadv Esh 
Sheykh, from Aaron's 
Hill 

103 Hazeroth 

104 The Nukb, Gorge of 

A in Hud e rah 

105 The Well, Gorge of 

Ain Huderah 

106 Fantastic Rock, Wady 

Huderah 

107 Entrance Gates of 

Wady El- Ain 

108 Exit Gates of Wady 
El-Ain 

109 A Pass in Wady El- 

Ain 

110 First Glimpse of the 

Gulf of Akabah from 
Wady Wetir 

111 The Alouth of Wady 

Wetir from the Gull 
of Akabah 

112 Oasis by the Gulf of 

Akabah 



113 "A bit of Color"... 

Peaksby theGaif of 
Akabah 

114 Sheykh Mousa and his 

Camel 
116 Our Dragoman and oar 
Sheykh with Camel 

116 By Akabah's Rocky 

Shore 

117 The Castle of Kuriyeh 

—Gulf of Akabah 

118 The Site of Ezion- 

Geber 

119 The Village of Akabah 

and Castle 

120 Bedouin Council at 

Akabah 

121 ^Breaking Camp at 

Akabah 

122 Sheykh Mousa— The 

Sinai Bedouin Judge 

123 Sheykh Ipnejad— The 

Akabah B e d o u in 
Judge 

Akabah to Petra 

124 *Wady Arabah, from 

Elath 
126 Wall of Defence, 
Wady El Ithm 

126 Pass Through Wady 

Ei Ithm 

127 Mid -day Rest in the 

"Long Desert" — 
Group of our party 

128 Ruins and Rock of El 

Guerrah 

129 The Sphinx of El 

Guerrah 

130 Four Camels Drinking 

—The Fight for 
Water at the Well of 
Humeiyumeh 

131 Group of Moorish PU- 

grims en route for 
Mecca at the Well of 
Humeiyumeh 

132 Rock-House and Pic- 

tured -rocks at Hum- 
eiyumeh 

133 RocK-House and Pic- 

tured-Kocksat Hum- 
eiyumeh, from an- 
other point 

134 '^Miniature Mountain 

of Color— Wady Hum- 
eiyumeh 

135 Rock and "Well of 

Moses"— Ain Daluga 

136 Panorama of Petra, 

from the East— Sun- 
rise 

137 Panorama of Petra, 

from the Southeast 
—Early Morn 

138 Panorama of Petra and 

Jeb el Haroun — 
Mount Hor 

139 Sunrise on Ancient 

Edom and an Ancient 
village 

140 *Pool and Ruins of 

Ain-El-Raga 

141 The Gorge of Wady 

Sik (same as 136 and 
137 combined) 

142 Barricade of Camels in 

Battle array- Ain 
Gazalah, near Petra 

143 f he Three Tombs— Ne- 

cropolis of Petra 



144 Tomb of the four Pyra- 
mids-Necropolis of 
Petra 

146 The Petra Bedouin 
Guard, at the en- 
trance to the Sik 

146 The Buttressed Arch 

—Entrance to Gorge 
of the Sik 

147 The Buttressed Arcb» 

from inside the Gorge 

148 View in the Gorge of 

the Sik, with Glean, 
ders 

149 On the river Sik— Gorge 

of the Sik 

150 First Glimpse of the 

Kusneh, tnrough the 
Gorge— Petra 

151 The Kusneh, at Petra 

162 Group ot Bedouin 

Sheykhs, with Horses 
and Spears— A Sur. 
prise Opposite the 
Kusneh 

163 Preliminary Glimpse 

at Petra 

164 Group of Rock Tern- 

?les,nearthe Theater 
'etra 
156 The Petra Theater 

156 The "View Magnifl. 

cent" Petra, from 
the Theater 

157 ♦Petra— Principalview 

east from our camp 

158 Petra— Principal view 

west from our camp 

159 Sheykh Salim, Chief of 

the Petra Bedouin 
and StafT 

160 *Our Camp at Petra 

161 Temple of the Urn, 

with Arched Terrace 

162 A Color Study— Colon- 

nade of the Temple 
of the Urn 

163 Tombs, Temples and 

Cliflfs -South from the 
Arched Terrace 

164 The Corinthian Struc- 

ture 

165 Temple of the Three 

Tiers of Columns 

166 General view from the 

west,showing 161„164, 
165, together 

167 *The Kasr Faroun and 

broken Columns 

168 The Kasr Faroun— Ex- 

terior 

169 *The Kasr Faroun— 

Arched Doorway 

170 The Kasr Faroun— 

Ruined Interior 

171 The Templesof Nature 

and of Edom 

172 *Interior of the Tem- 

ple with Flu ted 
Columns 

173 Rock Stairway and 

Pulpit 

174 Pyramid and Ruined 

Fortress, on the 
highest Cliff 

175 The Sacrificial Altar 

of Baal and Tanks on 
the highest Cliff 

176 The Ravine of the Deir 

177 Interior of a Rock 

Temple near the Deir 

178 The Deir, from the 

Rock Temple 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh batteby and optical co., ohioago, ill., u. s. a. i» 



Chicago, Sept, 19, 1690, 
Mcintosh Battery and Opt^al Co,: 

On several occasions I have had the Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co. illustrate 
my lectures. I have found them to be very satisfactory. Their slides are not 
excelled by any, and their lanterns are of the most improved desigpi. 

WM. M. LAWRENCE. 

Pastor of Second Baptist Church. 



Elwyn, Penn., Sept. 23, 1890. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co.: 

Dear Sirs: The Stereopticon Views of Scenes in Palestine, and of other locali- 
ties illustrating the Bible and its truths, have been of incalculable service to me. 
This system of object- teaching is destined to be introduced as a feature of Sunday 
•vening lectures. Such a method is sure to attract and instruct, and 1 wonder that 
its excellence is so tardily recognized. 

Every Church will do well to own the apparatus made by the Mcintosh Battery 
and Optical Co., of Chicago. Yours truly, 

C. C. SALTER, 
Pastor of Bethel Church, Duluth, Minn. 



Chicago, Sept. 20, 1890, 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical to.: 

Mt Dear Sir; I regard your instruments as the very best in the market, and 
your house as the most reliable in the country. I think the method of illustrating 
Bible subjects is the surest way of fastening truth upon the minds of the congrega- 
tion. I can heartily recommend your goods. Yours sincerely, 

H. W. BOLTON, 
Pastor First M. E. Church. 



Heck Hall, Evanston, ni., Oct. 1, 1890, 
Gentlemen: This certifies that I have used the Self-Centering Mcintosh 
Lime-Light for Lectures and Sunday School illustrations for some years, and find 
it clear and beautiful. Have also projected with the Mcintosh Light and Lanterns 
used at the Garrett Biblical Institute, to illustrate for the Palestine Society. It 
never fails to please. Every Church should own your excellent Lantern. 

Yours truly, O. E. MURRAY, 

Pastor Wabash Ave. M. E. Church, Chicago. 



Chicago, Sept. 22, 1890. 
Dear Sirs: I have been using the Stereopticon Apparatus from the Mcintosh 
Battery and Optical Co., and I endorse it as the best in America. It is unsurpassed 
for illustration in evangelical work, being an instrument that brings in the masses 
which we could not reach otherwise. It educates them not only to beautiful, 
picturesque scenery, but to the Gospel of Christ. Yours truly, 

BEN. HOGAN, 

Evangelist. 



FOR PWCe LIST OF SLIDES SEE PXCkE X'n 



230 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



179 The Deir, Facade 

180 Moant Hor from the 

Deir 

181 A Partly Finished 

Rock Temple, Petra, 
showing the mode of 
construction (begin- 
ning at the top and 
working downward) 

Petra to Palestine. 

182 Pass of the Eh-Dah 

Kosmonah 



183 Pictured Rocks, Kos- 

monah 

184 Ain.El Weibeh. mis- 

called Kad esh Barnea 

185 The Grave of Miriam 

at Ain-El Weibeh 

186 Mountains on Borders 

ot Canaan 

187 An Oasis in the Arabian 

188 Beautiful Hills near 

the Oasis 

189 The Plain from the 

Oasis 



190 The Departure of our 

Caravan from Arabia 
to Palestine 

191 *Camp of the Tiyahah 

Bedouin 

192 ^Loading a Camel for 

the March 

193 *Head of a Camel, Pro- 

file 

194 *Head of a Camel, 

Rear 

195 Village of Dhoheriyeh 



The Slides have been very satisfactory and have given pleasure to large 
audiences." Rev. LEE 8. McCOLLISTER, 

654 John R. St., 

Detroit, Mich. 

Topeka, Kans.t Jan. 26 1 *9S. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co.: 

14»-Waba8ii Ave., City. 
Gentlemen: The tank and saturator I use we got from you a few years ago, 
and for good light, easy management, and best results all round, I would not tase 
many times its cost, and use anything else. Yours very truly, 

S. G. AKERS, 
With K. C W. &. G. Exhibit Car. 

''Will T. Norris' Picture Sermons." 

GENERAL SUBJECT: "FROM BETHLEHEM TO CALYABY." 



Sernion No. 1. 

8ul^t<A: ** Childhood of 
Jesus.** 

Text: "And thou shalt 
bring forth a son, and thou 
shalt call his name Jesus, 
for he shall save his people 
from their sins."— Matt. 
1:21. 

Scenes Presented. 

1 Illuminated Text 

2 Map of Palestine 
8 Nazareth, from Church 

of the Annunciation 

4 Nazareth, exterior of 

Church of the Annun- 
ciation 

5 Nazareth, interior of 

Church of the Annun- 
ciation 
6Nazareth, Altar of 
Church of the Annun- 
ciation 

7 Nazareth, interior of 

Chapel of St. Joseph 

8 The Annunciation 

9 The Field of the Shep- 

herd's Watch 

10 ( Dissolving— The First 

11 \ Christmas Mornmg 

L Shepherds on tne 
Plain of Bethlehem 

2. Vision of the Hea- 
venly Host 

12 The Angel appearing to 

the Shepherds 

13 Bathlehem, Day 

14 Bethlehem, Night 

15 Bethlehem, Street View 

16 Bethlehem, Women 

Spinning 

17 Bethlehem, Wood 

Market 

18 Bethlehem, Tomb of 

Rachel 

19 Bethlehem, exterior 

Church of the Na- 
tivity 



No printed sermons furnished . 

20 Bethlehem, interior 
Church of the Nativ- 
ity 

21 The Babe 

22 Statuary, Mary and 
Child Jesus 

23 \ Dissolving — Star of 

24 S Bethlehem 

1. Wise Men 

2. Child Appears 

25 The Adoration of the 
Magi 

26 King Herod's Temple 

27 The Presentation in 
the Temple 

28 The Flight into Egypt 

29 The Slaughter of the 
Innocents 

30 The Repose in Egypt 

31 Egypt, The Shadow of 
tne Cross 

82 ) Egypt, Dissolving — 

83 y The NUeBoat 
34 ) 1. Day, nn colored 

2. Day, colored 
8. Night, " 

35 Egypt, A Group of Arab 
water Carriers 

36 Egypt, The Great Pyr- 
amid of Cheops 

37 Egvpt, The Sphinx and 
tne Pyramids of Meu- 
cheres 



38 Egypt, The Tree of the 

virgin 

39 Egypt, Alex andria, 

Cleopatra's Needle 

40 The Return to Nazar- 

eth 

41 Nazareth, Street View 

42 " The Fountain 
of the Virgin 

43 Nazareth, Girls at the 

Fountain 

44 Map of Jerusalem 

45 Jerusalem of to-day 

from Mt. Olivet 

46 Jerusalem in her 

grandeur, day 



47 Jerusalem in her 

grandeur, night 

48 Jerusalem, Synagogue, 

interior 

49 Jesus among Learned 

Men 

50 Hymn : '*I Love to Tell 

the Story" 

Sermon Ko. 8. 

Text : "The spirit of the 
Lord is upon me, becAuse 
he hath anointCHl me to 
preach the Gospel to the 
poor." 

Suliject: The Early Mtnis- 
try of Christ. 

Scenes presented : 

1 Illuminated text. 

2 The Plains of Jerico 

8 John Preaching in the 
Wilderness 

4 The Jordan — Pilgrim's 

Bathing Place 

5 The Baptism of Christ 

6 Christ Tempted by the 

Devil 

7 Cana of Galilee 

8 " " " an Or- 
chard 

9 The Wedding at Cana 

10 Christ Ciearmg the 

Temple 

11 Calling of Matthew 

12 Nabulns, Jacob's Well 

13 Joseph's Tomb 

14 Mt. Ebal, the Mount of 

Blessing 

15 Mt. Gerizim, the Mount 

of Cursing 
18 Samaria, tne Capitol 
city of the Ten Tribes 

17 Samaria, The Church 

of St. John 

18 Samaria. The Old col- 

onnade 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SE.E. PMaE \VX 



^ 



IT' 


"■' 




^ 




Mi-.INTOSH BATTEUV AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. 8. A. IR ,^ 


IB Sainarilnii House. 


10 Parable of the Sower 


6 Jerusalem, The Dome 






U ChHitslllllngthestorm 


of the K^k 




ai •■ Priasl 


U Keanrrecllon of the 


T Jerusalem, The Toniplo 




it Christ and the Saiiiari- 


daagbteroIJairus 










8 Jerusalem, Leper's 




a Christ In the SvoBnoEua 
M Sea o( Galilen neaVftot 


U Bethany 

IS The hitls almnt Beth- 


9 Jerusalem- Christian's 




apriiigs below Tibe- 








"■■"Ss'iSsr-' 




» aea^o^t Galilee at Tibe- 


house ol Ma?y and 


11 Jerusalem, Pool of 




W Sea of Galilee at Mag- 


Martha 


Siloam 






17 The torn), ol Lazarus 


IS Jerusalem, Valley of 






19 Women of Bethany 


Jehosaphat 




Jew igb SynagoRiiB 


le Olive trees and the 


13 Jerusalem, Tomb or 




28 ChriBt preaohlnK on 




Absalom 




the Nea of Galilae 


l!teV",TiSS„.M 






SU MlraculouB draught of 






Fishes 


Martha 


li The Last Supper 






M The raising ol Laiarns 






31 Birthof the Jordan 


M Parable o( Proiligal 


17 Prayer and Agony In 




-Si LooLlDK MO the Jordau 


Son. Carousal 






;«DBn, KuinaandOak 


a Parable ot Prodigal 






at Ht. Gllboa 




IB Christ before Pilate 




3S liothan. Scene of the 


2S Pamb'le ol Prodigal 


*0 Peter denies Chrtsl 




36 Ain JBliid. T&e CoDht- 


Son, Return 

SB The Tribute Money 


3f Christ crowned with 




aln of Jeireel 








37 Zerin, The scene of 


K Christ and^he Adul. 


23 ChrisViSsuited 




sanralaai Battle 








38 Sbuaem, Where the 


29plribfeof thePhflriSBe 


** '^^op^e'"'^"'"' " "" 




Philistines encamlied 
agaiast Saul 


*•) lamariUn 


M Christ overbunlened by 




38 Sbimeoi, houses and 










16 Christ arriving at Cal- 




40 ahiinem, Pricklr Fear 


3i Christ Bud the Rich 


vary 




and Pahns 




K The erection of th» 




*l Choraaen 


3* The Widow's Mite 






*a Oeasarea Fhilippi, The 


M The Crucifixion 




conlisaloD 


3S Christ the Good Shep- 


29 Death olChrlaC 




W Oeasarea Phillppi, The 


herd 


30 The obscuration attw 




Caicle 


36 Parable of the l-ilies 


Christ's death 




«CeawrBaPhilippi,Viaw 








of Mt. nemion from 


38 pir^b^SFtheVl^ina 
il Jews wailing plaee 


cross^"'" "'" 




« Druie, Plowman and 


^ """Shi^/Bd' '^'"''" '"' 




4B Dnize, Shepherd with 


33 The body of Christ laU 




aLanib 


« Robinson -a Arch 


in the tomb 




i7 Druie,Miile and Cow 


sZ"Z' ''"'"'" 


34 Church D( the Holy 






Sepul.-hrB 




Loaves and Fishes 


« "■'' '■ ' Jewish 






M Christ walking on the 


Cemetery . 








i7 Mt. of tlllves. Russian 


Dodie 




Children 


48 Church of the Asven. 


37 Tomb of Christ, front 
3§ '■ '■ interior 






49 Christ weeping over 














Tezl.- "The vorv works 
that I do bear witness ol 


60 Christ's Triumphant 
entry 


10 St. John and the Virgin 




me. Hut the Father hath 








Sermon No.*. 


11 The flrst Easter Dawn 
^ The Resurrection of 




At^ftut.- "Chrlif, Sf-y 


go; loi be that betravoih 


Christ 




Dayt." 


13 The Marys at the tomb 






44. 


«The Angel appearhig to 




1 lUuminnted text 




the Marys 




1 i Christ healing the sick 


SuWeci.' CArt-('» lail 






t The Sernjon on Che 


Day,. 






. 1 The Light of the SS orlrl 




IB "Touch nie,Pot" 




' BThePoolof Itetheala 


I Illuminated tost 






t Christ healiug the Ume 


1 Jernsalem, J*H-a Gate 








3 " Woirf Mar- 






ISraSr-""" 


* Jerusalem, Towor of 
David 


49 Christ appearing to 




BMary Magdalene re 


5 Joruaalem. Carpenter 


SO The Ascension (me- 












FOR PRICE 

\ 


LtST OF SLIDES S 


_t PhCt \'2,1- 



an HcINTOSH BATTEBX AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



PALESTINE AND SYRIA. 



Hebron. 



1 The place where 
Abram dwelt : and 
David's first capital 
from the hill south of 
the city. The inosque 
is shown over 
the Cave of Mach- 
pelah, and in the 
foreground the An- 
cient Pool The Val- 
ley of Eshcol, whence 
Josh ua's spies 
brought the grapes, 
on the left 
The Ancient Pool, 
where David hanged 
the murderers o f 
Ishbosheth 

3 Wall of Machpelah 

4 The Entrance to the 

Mosque (once a 
Christian church) 
over the Cave of 
Machpelah, the Sep- 
ulcher of Abraham, 
Isaac and Jacob 
6 The entrance-door to 
the Cave of Mach- 
pelah, seen from the 
roof of the smaller 
mosque higher up 
the hill 

6 View from a house- 

top, looking torward 
Jerusalem. The 
Cave of Machpelah in 
the foreground 

7 View from a house- 

top, looking down 
the road southward 
to Beersheba and 
Sinai 

8 A vineyard of Eshcol, 

whence Joshua's 
spies brought the 
grapes. In the dis- 
tance, Abrah a m ' s 
Oak and a vineyard 
watch-tower 

9 Abraham's Oak. A 

modern oak repre- 
senting the one un- 
der wnich Abraham 
dwelt 
10* Rhamet-El-Khalil 

11* Mosque of the El- 

HuUinl 
12* Tower of Beth Zur 

18 On the Road to Jerusa- 
lem, El-Burak. The 
Castle and the Up- 
per Pool of Solomon, 
from which a great 
portion of the water 
supply of ancient 
Jerusalem was de- 
rived 

14* Solomon's Pool— Up- 
per 

15 Solomon's P o o 1 — 
Lower 

16* Solomon's P o o 1 — 
Lower Corner 

17 The Bab-el-Kahlil, or 
Joppa Gate, the prin- 
cipal south and west- 
ern city gate leading 



to Joppa, Bethlehem 
and Hebron 
18 The Kahn, or roadway 
inn, outside the Jop- 

ga gate 
e Wood-market A 
public square be- 
tween the Tower of 
David and the En- 

flish Church 
e Tower of David, 
or Tower of Hippi- 
cus, now, as form- 
erly, a city strong- 
hold : the Turkish 
Citadel 

21 The Christian Quarter 

of the city : showing 
the Church of the 
Holy Sepulchre, or 
reputed site of Jesus 
death and buriaL to- 

f ether with the 
uildings about it 

22 The Jewish Quarter of 

the city : showing 
the principal syna- 

fogues 
e "Pool of Heze- 
kiah": supposed to be 
that referred to in 2 
Kings 20: 20; 2 Chron- 
icles 32; 30 
24 The Protestant 
Church 

26 The Tower of David, 

with the bell-tower 
of the Protestant 
School in the fore- 

f round 
e Church of tne 
Holy Sepulchre 
Front view, from the 
court 

27 The Church o f t h e 

Holy Sepulchre 
Court and door 

28 The Muristan, or ruins 

of the ancient hos- 
pice and Chapel of 
the Knights of St. 
John 

29 Omar's ancient mosque 

near the C h'u r c h 
of the Holy Sepul- 
chre The Mohamme- 
dan authorities pre- 
vented the tower of 
the Church of the 
Holy Sepulchre from 
being finished lest it 
should overtop the 
minaret of this 
mosque 

30 A carpenter's shop in 

Christian Street 

31 The Via Dolorosa, or 

street along which 
Jesus is said to have 
walked to Calvary 

32 The Ecce Homo Arch ; 

or arch over the Via 
Dolorosa, upon which 
Pilate is said to have 
shown Jesus to the 
multitude when he 
said " Behold the 
Man" 

33 The Pool of Bethesda; 

the reputed place 



where Jesus healed 
the man who lay 
waiting for the move- 
ment of the waters. 
In the distance, the 
Mount of Olives 

84 A wall and hedge of 
prickly pear, near the 
Pool of Bethesda 

86 The Coenaculum— the 
interior The repu- 
ted upper room, 
where the Last Sup- 
per was celebrated ; 
over the reputed 
tomb of David 

86 The Armenian Con- 

vent, said to have 
been the house of 
Caiaphas 

87 The Jews' Wailing 

Place, where they la- 
jnent the destruction 
of the Temple 

88 A group of Jews near 

the Wailing Place 

89 Robinson's Arch ; the 

sole remnant above 

f:round of the bridge 
eading from tne 
Temple to Mt. Zion 

40 The Dome of the Bock 

over the highest 
point of Mount Mo- 
riah, the site of the 
Temple 

41 The Haram esh-Sherif, 

or Temple Area, 
with the Dung Gate 
View from the north 

42 The Modern Govern- 

ment Palace, on the 
supposed site of the 
ancient Governor's 
Palace. View from 
the Court of the 
Mosque near by 

43 A portion of the Gov- 

ernment Palace on 
the supposed site of 
the Tower of An- 
tonia 

44 The Government Pal- 

ace looking through 
the north arch of ap- 
proach to the Dome 
of the Hock 
46 The stairway and arch 
of ajpproach to the 
Dome of the Rock,on 
the north side 

46 The small dome called 

David's Judgment 
Seat, near the great 
Dome of the Rock— 
Exterior 

47 The small dome called 

David's Judgment 
Seat— Interior 

48 The Dome of the Rock 

Front— E xterior 

49 The Dome of the Rock; 

Interior — showing 
the Rock itself, the 
highest part of 
Mount Moriah 

50 Mosq^ue of Omar— In- 

terior 

51 The Saracenic Pulpit 

in the Temple Area 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE P^G^E \YI- 



Mcintosh matteky and oi'Tical co,, chiuauo. ill,, i 



fl2 The Temple Ares, 
looilnB Bastmurd to- 
wsrfl the Moiiiit o( 
Olivee 

loaklnE Dortbniird 
towani the (ioyern- 
ment I'ular.e 
a* Mnignlman, praying 
In the Temple Area, 

Bfi Tha Uoaque ot Bl- 
AkBB, on tHe Boath- 
eage ol the Temple 



to cloBe the Sepiif^ 
la The Bii9siBii Quarter. 



M D&miiiBcus Uate 

SB ieion'a Gute 

06 The Ditf , lOdkiDK o 



70 The Uosleni Co met err. 
near St. Stephen's 



Olives, Bethany a 



wall 



' the 



7* The Cotton Grotto ; an 
ancient qnarry bo. 
neaththe city ICaeir 

76 The GrotlD of Jere- 
miah 

76 The Mount ot Oliyee, 

Stephen' 



it of the Uouni 



I of OUt( 



moHQi oJ r' 

south end 

93 The City Iroi 

Mount of < 

84 The City (roi 



OUvt 



Mom 



end 



Olin 



H The Hill of Seoi 






H6 Thu Buppaaed Upper 
Pool ofUibon, whose 
waters Uezeklah 
ight into the 



city 



■:?■'?'"'. 






Hospital," 

Upper Poui uj uiuuu 

88 The supposed Lower 

Pool oftijhon. the 

89 Tha Valley of Hinnom, 

from the Lower Pool 






a The Kidi 

P 

W Thi 



:viicouii 



ariofe thirty 

itailTar.Kock 

with Stepa 

Valley 

iipposed 



ield, from the val- 
lev below 
95 En ftOEe1,the boundary 
of jSdahand Benja. 

sa En KogBlnnd the Hill 



97 The ■ 



iothse 



lOdem lillaEe o 

Isaiah's Tree, Annil 
berry Iroo anpposei 
to inarli the site o 

FOR PRICE LtST OF SLIDES SEE. P^&E Vi.-\ 






I Sll- 



The Valley of Jehoahft- 

Ehat, Inolcine north 
rora the vtnaffo of 
Silvan. The Tomba' 
of Ahaaloni,£»Dhtirl» 



and Jan 
right, lb 



. __ the 

i City Wall 



6 The Mount ol Oilyei 

from the Golden Gab 

7 The Valley of Jahosba 

phat, from Gethaem 



Ein, in the S 
Valley, with 
Entrance to mo 
Grotto of the Agony 
8 The Garden of Gath- 

The Agony, a aonlp- 



eemane, trom abova, 
looking northwest- 
ward ; showing tha 
road up to St. Steph- 
en's <fate, and tha 
Chapel of the Vlf gla 
View from the Grotto 



lis The Grotto of Jere. 
IUj Tho Road to Mar Saba 



Ul Betliany. The reput- 



the House of Hary 
and Martha 
ethany. Women ol 
Bethany 

Rethlehem. 
he Tombof itachel 
he town from the 
Church ol the Naliv- 



284 Mcintosh battery and optical oo., Chicago, ill., u. 8. a. 



THE WILSON LANTERN JOURNEYS. 



A SERIES OF DESCRIPTIONS OF JOURNEYS AT HOBIE AND 

FOR USE WITH THE MAGIC LANTERN. 



PREFACE TO VOLUME III, 

The two volumes of Descriptions which I have already had the pleasure of pre- 
paring, have met with such favor that I am induced to follow with a third. This 
time I am enabled to describe the product of my own camera; for during the first 
half of last year— 1882— I visited Egypt, Palestine, Syria, the Sinai Peninsula, and 
Arabia Petra. I conducted the largest photographic expedition that was probably 
ever known. And as a result, I brought home a series of Oriental Views new and 
unattainable heretofore. And now, since they are ready to do their Work, I proceed 
with tne next duty of supplying descriptions for the information and help of those 
who wish to enjoy and share the pleasures of my wanderings. 

The work cost many a long, hard and perilous journey, but it also gave me many 
happy days, when I wished that everybody might see and know all that I saw and 
learned. 

The contents at this date— November, 1883— will include only the descriptions of 
the last part of the route named above ; but I hope as time permits to follow with 
descriptions of the rest, and fill up the volume to its proper size. Meanwhile, I hope 
what has been'written will be found useful and acceptable. 

EDWABD L. WILSON. 

Philadelphia^ November, 1883, 



THE PRICE OF EACH VOLUME IS NET S8.00. 



JGTTHESE LITTLE BOOKS ARE OF MATERIAL ASSISTANCE IN PRE 

PARING YOUR LECTURE.. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SE.E. P^Q.^ WX 



HcINTOSH BATTEEV ANDOPTlCAt, CO., CHICAUO, lLL.,r. 8. A. 



mi 

to tbe repnted J 

tiace of JeBUB 
H FleMof the Shep- 
herd B' Watr.h 
128 Way to the Daiid Sea. 
The Oonrene of Mar 
Saba— Interior 
13D Wbv to Che Dewl Sea. 
The Convent of Mar 
Saba— E xterlor 

131 The Dead Son, looking 

weelirard 

132 The l>eiul Sen, looking 

toward Moa"- 

133 Tbe Dead S 

134 The Jordan. 

grim 8' Bathing Place 

135 T h a Jordan. T b f 

" Stormy Banks " 
13B Joriclio. The reputBc 

House ot /acvheuB 
137 Jerlcbo. The I'laini 

ol Jerltbo 
ISB Jericho. The Fountain 

ot EUsba 
m Jerfcho. Tbe town and 

the Uount Quaran- 

tftna, the reputed 

place of JeauB' Eemp. 

110 Bethel. Jacob's Dream 
Ul BetbeL The Tower 
14S Bethel. View of the 



toward Jerusalem 
14 SbUoh. The place 



ruined Sanctuary 
146 amioli. The Grave c 
Deborah 



:l Mount tiilboa, a 
Wall. The 
the Last li 
Saul and J' 

S Dotban. The "pi'aln 

brothers kept Cbelr 

they Bold Joaeph 

13 'AinJalud. The Fount. 

aim of Jezreel 

14 -AinJalud. The Stream 

ot the Poontaln of 

toward the Jordan 

15 Zerln. Tlio Ancient 

Saul's ' last battle 
with the Phlllatlnefl, 
and of hie death. The 

roBidence ol Ahab 
and Jezebel 
» Jeireel. The Plain ot 



184 The Sen or GalUes, 

Maednla 

IS Mag<)B.La and the plain 



Shuncm Uon 

Shunem. I'rk 
and Palms 



Judges . 



'e by Jesus: and 



I of lleth- 
it-Tablghuh. 



1 auppoai 
.hmida. 



Tell et-Kad^ 
the source I 

Dan. T 

ins and oak. 



One o( 
ot the 

.KadL Ra- 



^ssarea PhiUppL The 
Castle 

!ffiBarea PhllippL Tbe 

:ffiBarea PhiUppl. One 



ISS Cieaarea Pbili] 



& V 



, aoi Viev 



: Mount Her- 



'4 Nazareth. The i 



D from the Damas- 
cus road 
, 202 Druze Plowman 

I 203 Druie Shepherd, ' 

. 301 Drnie mule-and- 



192 Samarilan H 



a in ot the ' 

Mnryand Jesu 

ITT NaEarem. Naza 



ISS Gronp of Lepers 

196 Satoaria- The Capitol 

Oily of the T— 

Tribefl 
1ST Samaria. Tbe Chur 

US Samaria. The Old Col- 



Moat and Wall 



_JS Olive orchard 
, 206 The scene of 31. Pi 

: »; The st^ene or St. Paul'l 

I 208 The House of Naa: 
the Leper 
20S A view within the city 



might b(. 
a basket 

ha A -'- 

; aii Tbe El 



nt^Clty WaU 
caUed 



Land of Tesacliai 
The Mosquo, wit 

]H Jenin. En Gnnniu 



IS2 The Sea of Galilee. 
Tiberias 
i The Sea of Gal 



Straight 
A Garden on tbe Abana 

A Caf4. or coffee he 



imthu Mosquo I Synii^gue 21B The House ot A 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SUD£S SEt P^<it \'2.T . 



236 Mcintosh battery and optical oo., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



219 The Weaver's Shop, 

near the house of 
Ananias 

220 A shop and bazaar 

221 The city from a house- 

top 

222 The Grand Mosque 

223 The Grand Mosque. 

The Minaret of Jesus 

224 The Grand Mosque 

Gateway 

225 The Interior Qt the 

Kubbet, or Dome of 
the Grand Mosque 

226 View of the old and 

the new city from the 
Minaret of the Grand 
Mosque 

227 Another view from the 

Minaret of the Grand 
Mosque 

228 The Presbyterian Mis- 

sion School for Boys 

229 The Presbyterian Mis- 

sion School for Girls 

230 A native family at 

home 

231 The Interior of a Jew- 

ish residence 

232 The interior of the 

Harem of Assad 
Pasha 

233 The Palace Court of 

Assad Pasha 

234 House of Stambouli 

Pasha; the Court 

235 House of Stambouli 

Pasha ; the Salon 

236 Damascus to Beirut. 

El-Fijeh, a fountain 
source of the Barada, 
or ancient Pharpar 

237 Damascus to Beirut. 

Suk Wady Barada, or 
Pharpar River. The 
Bridge and Cascade 

238 Damascus to Beirut. 

Suk Wady Barada. 
The Pharpar River. 
The Cascade from 
the Bridge 

239 Damascus to Beirut. 

The Pharpar River. 
The Roman Road 

Baalbeo. 

240 Birth of the River 

Abana, near Baalbec 

241 Baalbec, general view 

242 Baalbec (modern), 

Statue of the Sun 



243 Interior of the old 

Mosque 

244 The Circular Temple 

245 Temple of the Sun 

246 Temple of the Sun. 

Slipped Keystone 

247 Fallen Cornice and 

Capitals. Temple of 
the Sun 

248 Details of Roof Decora- 

tion 

249 Temple of the Sun and 

Leaning Column 

260 Temple of the Sun and 

Leaning Column 

251 Temple of tne Sun. In> 

tenor 

252 Details of Capitals. 

Temple of the Sun 

253 Baalbec (Modern), 

from Temple of the 
Sun 

254 The Great Court, from 

Temple of the Sun 
265 Temples of the Sun 
and Baal 

256 Temple of Baal 

257 Temple of Baal ; details 

258 Niche, west side of 

Great Court 
260 Temple of Baal, 
through a breach in 
the wall of the Great 
Court 

260 Cyclopean Stones in 

the wall of Great 
Court 

261 The Quarry and Cyclo- 

pean stone 

262 Our Tent, interior, at 

Baalbec 
263*Abdullah,our Steward, 
at length 

264 Abdullah, King of Cus- 

tards 

265 Hahna, Prince of Mul- 

266 Hadaiyah, King of 

Dragomen 

267 Fifteen minutes with a 

Donkey (a regular 
wrestle) 
288 The Donkey conquered 

269 Concocting a Kick 

(Donkey) 

270 A picturesque profile 

(Donkey) 
271'*'Models of Meekness 
(Donkeys) 

272 Our Baby of the Rock 

(Donkey and Dam) 

273 Lebanon to Anti-Leba- 

non; Mount Hermon 



Zahleh. 

274* Valley of Zahleh, from 
the east 

275 Zahleh, from the Girls' 

School 

276 Home of Rev; Gerald 

Dale Jr 

277 Boys' kigh School 

278 Girls' High School 

Beyrout. 

279 Music Garden 

280 Street view and wall 

of Flowers 

281 Toward the Sea 

282 Toward Lebanon 

283 Mrs. Mott's School and 

Arabic Building 

284 Presbyterian Church, 

Memorial Hall and 
Girls' Seminary 

285 Dale Memorial Hall, 

Interior 

286 Native Students, Fe- 

male Seminary 

287 Residence of Rev. Dr. 

Bliss (Marquand 
House) 

288 Preparatory Depart- 

ment, Syrian Prot- 
estant College 

289 Syrian Protestant Col- 

lege 

290 Students from Zahleh, 

Syrian Protestant 
College 

291 Medical Department, 

Syrian Protestant 
College 

Joppa. 

292 Jopj^a, from the Steam- 

snip 

293 Joppa, from the shore 

294 House of Simon, the 

Tanner 

295 Native Protestant 

School (English) 

296 Nazleh and Mermon, 

Pets of the Mission 

297 Port Said; march of 

civilization 

298 On the Suez Canal, 

Port Said 

299 An Oriental conum- 

drum (a donkey with 
sewed ears) 

300 Aboard ship for home. 

Port Said 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDE.S SE.E. PkGi?L\rt- 



Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 237 



Oakaloosa, la.. Sept, 22, 1800. 
Mcltiiosh Battery and Optieal Co.: 

GbntI/BMEN : I can heartily endorse your Apparatus and Slides, and as an 
Evangelist that has used an Illustrated Gospel of Bible Pictures can say that it is 
one of the great means, with God's biessing, of the day for reaching the unsay ed, 
and to get a hearing from the Christian people. Also have met with great success 
among children, by means of it. 

Respectfully yours, A. E. KEABLES, 

The Picture Evangelist. 



Chicago. Sept. 18, 1890. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical. Co.: 

This is to certify that I have used many kinds of Stereopt icons, of different 
makes, and when I saw the plans tor the Chicago Model, I ordered it at once, and ob- 
tained the first one completed. Since then I have used it many times with perfect 
satisfaction. It has never disappointed me. It is light, easily set up or packed, 
easily adjusted, raised or depressed, and by far the most complete, durable and 
compact instrument I have known. 

JOHN O.FOSTER, 
Pastor State St. M. E. Church. 



Chicago III., Sept. 19, 1890. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co.: 

m 

Deak Sirs : Being quite familiar with your lantern and slide department from 
a year or more of practical experience, I am glad to say tliat in my opinion your 
Stereopticons and stock of Slides are equal if not superior to anything of the kind in 
the country. 

As to the value of Bible or other teaching, by the aid of Stereopticon illustration, 
there can be no doubt. I am entirely satisfied tliat it will soon find a large place in 
the Sunday School and the pulpit. 

Sincerely yours, S. M. DAVIS, 

(Former) Pastor Wabash Ave. M. E. Church, Chicago. 



The following was written to a friend by the Reo. Martin L. Williston in reply to an 
inquiry as to his experience with a Mcintosh Stereopticon. 

Chicago, Sept. 23, 1890. 

My Dear Friend : I am glad of the opportunity to say a good word for the 
Mcintosh outfit for Magic Lantern work. After several years', experience on the 
lecture platform and the most thorough test with the Stereopticon, I am ready to 
pronounce the McINTOSH intruments unsurpassed in every respect. If they are 
equalled, I have yet to sec the instance, and I have been a careful observer. Nothing 
could induce me to give up the Ether Saturator; its convenience makes it vastly the 
superior of the Hydrogen Cylinder, and it is a positive blessing to any one who 
would otherwise be plagued with a clumsy second gas-bag. The light produced by 
the *' Saturator" is unmistakably better than that from the Hydrogen sack or 
cylinder. 

I find the work put into all the Mcintosh goods to be done " upon honor;" 
what the firm says can be trusted, and the splendid leputation it enjoys has been 
honorably gained. Very sincerely yours, 

MARTIN L. WILLISTON. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE. PKCkE. \'i"T 



238 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., it. s. a. 



SINAI AND PALESTINE. 



Sinai. 



1 Marah, the Israelitish 

Station 

2 Elim r Wady Ghurondel) 

3 The Wilderness of Sin 

4 Written Valley (Wady 

Mukatteb) 

5 Written Valley, In- 

scriptions in 

6 Bephidim, Wilderness 

of Paran 

7 Paran.Ruins of Ancient 

City 

8 Paran, Encampment in 

9 Paran, Wild Palms 

10 Mount Serbal, from 

Wady Sherah 

11 Mount Serbal (probably 

the "Mount of God'') 

12 Mount Serbal, Fine 

Evening Effect 

13 Sinai, Range of Mount- 

ains 

14 Mount Horeb (Ras Sus- 

afeh) 

15 Plain of the Assem- 

blage, from the Con- 
vent 

16 Convent of St. Catha- 

rine, Mount Horeb 

17 Hazeroth (Huderah) 

18 Defile near the Red Sea 

19 Graia, on the Red Sea, 

near Ezion-Geber 

20 Wady El Ithm, Encamp- 

ment Under Shittim 
Trees 

Petra. 

21 View in the Desert, 

near Petra 

22 Ruins in the Desert, at 

Humeiyeh 

23 Approach to Edom, with 

Mount Hor 

24 View in the Necropolis 
26 View in the Necropolis, 

with Ancient Mason- 

26 Arcn over the Ravine 

27 Splendid Rock Temple, 

••ElKhusne" 

28 Bold Rocks, West End 

of the Sik 

29 Site of City 

30 Rock Caves (probably 

Tombs) 

31 The Theater 

32 The Western Boundary 

33 Temple on South Clift 

34 Western Cliffs 

35 Fine Rock Temple, "El 

Dier" 

36 Mount Hor, from "El 

Dier" 

37 Hill of the Cauaanites, 

near Kadesh Barnea 

38 Hebron with Mosque 

over Cave of Mach- 
pelah 

39 Well of Beersheba 

40 Bethlehem, from Latm 

Convent 

41 Bethlehem, ('hurch of 

the Nativity (interior) 



42 View between Jerusa- 

lem and Jericho. 

43 Plain of the Jordan 

44 Fountain of Jericho 

45 Wilderness of Engedi, 

Convent of Mar Saba 

46 Wilderness of Engedi, 

Convent and Ravine 

Jerusalem. 

47 General View fromMt. 

of Olives 

48 General V iew from Mt. 

Scopus (or Mispeh) 

49 View from "Well of 

En Rogel" 

50 View from "Hill of 

Evil Counsel," with 
Mount Zion 

51 View with Siloam and 

Mount of Olives 

52 View from Mount 

Zion, with Mosque of 
Omar 

53 Pool of Hezekiah, 

Church of the Holy 
Sepulchre, etc. 

54 View from the Walls, 

looking East 

55 Valley of Jehoshapbat, 

Tomb of Absalom, etc. 
66 Well of En Rogel 

57 Garden of Gethsemane, 

and Mount Olives 

58 Village of Siloam and 

Valley of the Kidron 
69 Pool of Siloam 

60 W^all of Wailing 

61 Church of the Holy 

Sepulchre, Facade 

62 Mosque of Omar, from 

South 

63 Mosque of Omar 

64 " " 

65 " " view 
in the Court, with 

66 Saracenic Pulpit 

67 Mosque of Aksa, for- 

merly a Christian 
Church 

68 Mosque of Aksa 

69 The Golden Gate 

70 Bethany 

71 Bethel 

72 Shiloh (Seilum) 

73 Shechem fNablus) be- 

tween Eoai and Ge- 
rizim 

74 Shechem, Jacob's Well, 

with Group of Arabs 

75 Samaria, distant view 

76 " Ruins of 
Church of St. John 

77 Plain of Esdraelon 

78 Nazareth, from the 

West 

79 Nazareth, showing 

Well of the Virgin 

80 Mount Tabor 

81 Mount Carmel. The 

Convent 

82 Old Tyre 

83 Ruins of Tyre 

84 Tiberias and Sea of 

Galilee 



85 Site of Capernaum, 

Sea of Galilee 

86 Site of Bethsaida— Se» 

of Galilee 

87 Caesarea Philippi 

iBaneas ) — R o m a s 
tuins 

88 Baneas, Source of the 

Jordan 

89 Phoenician Temple at 

Hibbaryeh, near 
Baneas 

90 Mount He r m o n — A 

Charming Picture 

91 Damascus — Distant 

View 

92 Damascus — A n c i e n t 

Great Mosq^ue 

93 Damascus —Waterfoll 

on the Abana 

94 Baalbec— GeneralView 

and Lebanon Range 

95 Baalbec— The Circular 

Temple 

96 Baalbec — Sculptured 

Doorway with 
Slipped Keystone 

97 Baalbec — Great Pil- 

lars 

98 Cedars of Lebanon,and 

Lebanon Range 

99 Cedars of Lebanon- 

Old and Young Trees 

100 Cedars of Lebanon( up- 

right view) 

Aliens, 

101 General View, with 

the Acropolis 

102 General view, with 

Mars' HUl 

103 The Acropolis— Par- 

thenon on the Sum- 
mit 

104 The Parthenon, from 

E. (Built B. 0. 436) 

105 Parthenon, from N. E. 

106 The Propylaea 

107 The Erectheum 

108 Temple of Victory 

109 Sculpturesof the Wing- 

less Victory 

110 Temple of the Winds 

111 Arch of Adrian and 

Temple of Jupiter 
Tonan 

112 Temple of Jupiter 

Tonans (Built B. C 
630 

113 Theatre of Bacchus 

(Constructed B. C. 
500 

114 Theatre of Bacchus 

—State Chair 

115 The Modern City, 

from the Acropolis 

116 Sculptures in the 

Museum— "Apol 1 o *' 

117 Sculptures in the 

Museum — "Conver- 
sation of Neptune** 

118 Smyrna— GeneralView 

119 Corinth— Ruins of 

Temple of Minei*va 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.^ PkGi£. X^Kl. 



McINTOSl! UATTERV AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAG 



TESTIMONIALS. 



e obtained thouMnds of slides— plain, colored, mounts, slip alldei, dlBsoMna 

" -IL lilnas of apecimisna or this KondertuL work trom the Melntoali Balleirana 

43 Wabasb Ave., Cblcago, and know tlieae views lo be at Ibe finest la tbe mac- 

—led all kinds of lanl^ms. and koowof none of better ituallly everjrwaj, than 

,n made br this firm. For inuiiy montba In id; mlasloii wnrk In Chicago 1 usttd tbelt 

_ — mplete outni, anil always bad the best reaults. The gas made bj this iioua« Is of tbe 
cleanest and purest kind, and their eyllndera are unrivaled. The itmea are the best we 
1 [_„„ J „,,g alwajB give .sallBfactlOQ. We ate well aoqnalnted with all the great 

IfdT 
ments, and men who ai 

■ Th 
MdoDbh 

■ MTolvlng Blldea, aquariums, electrical appliances, growing trees, salamaiider experli 
W pulsatlonofbeart-beats, Howerlngnlants, rain and snow Btamis, ball, frosts. flowtiiKaCt 

nUlnsseas, loaslng ships, blue akfea, Dlebtonls. sunliursta, ghosts, armies In bnttle. dying 
ieroes. cities, eountdes, specters, eionda, stars, mountains, fauna, flora, the mteroaeopio 

■world enlarged a million times, cayes, grottos, panoramas a;"" — ' -" — *' 

large as life, natural as life, and full oftn.—- '~' ' 

TlctutBB delight the chill- ' 

ranged and weU presented, a 
I TFe nave tried the experlraen 

f. P. DUNN *Ca.I67 Adams Street. 



give the rollowl.ig from Sunn'a Quartfi-l;/, a. Chicago magazine lorSimda; school 
I exeJClaea. 

THE MAGIC LANTERN. 
_.. J magic Ian tern bas come to stay. It has been laugbed out, voted out,goneout,CDme bank, 
B doubled, tripled, and dissolved. It has been furnished with mounted slides, colored Slides, 
■ nrolvlng slldea, aquariums, electrical appliances, growing trees, salamaiider experiments. 



West Sidk Public Schools. Framk H. Hiili,. supt. ) 
AURORA, IIL, November 29, 1S89. C 
Mclnloih Batlerv ami Optical Co.: 

Tour burner with ether satura tor gives as line a light as I have ever seen. I have now 

..... ...jigg jjjj^ u ^^ ^^ji ^^ irouble whatever-not a flicker In the llglil Ironi the 

s close o[ an entertainment. Yours, da,. 

FHAMK H. HALL. 



Offiok or R. H. Lauorecx, Dkujib in Dbi 

iMelntothG.aniF. B. Co.. HI WabathAve.. Chicago: 

Dmar Sire— Tbe Saturator received In due time, and Its performance pleases me greatlj. 
9 a very great Improvement over even other form of light for projection. Youra iculy. 



CaiCABO, Nov, 26. K 



J. STANLEY GRIUES. 

Evaaston II 

CaiPiGO, Nov. 20. 188 
MtlnlMit Battery and Optical Co., 141 and 11.! Wabash Ave.. Otty! 

GbKTLbmks— After having used your Chicago Model Stereoptimn for ,iome time, dul 
ilGh I have thoroughly tested the Instrument. 1 am compelled to express to you mytha 
■ having persiisiled me tu use this InstrumenL It Is In every respect a most prautlcali 
■*-' — ^paratua, glvlug a clear, large and well-eipressed picture. More espe<aallyai 
o Sod thai thelnatruinenc 1^11 span with ease the diatiinee of tia feet. 

Yours veu truly, HAMILTON LECtuhE CO. 

Fer J. B. UahilToi 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEt Pktit ^'^.^ - 



340 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



FOREIGN LECTURE SETS. 

Slides cannot be selected from the sets on index page iv. 
Each set must be sold in its entirety. For "Domestic Lecture 
Sets," the slides of which can be furnished separately, see 
index page iii. 

All slides of these sets are plain (uncolored) except when 
otherwise stated. If any are desired colored, they will have to 
be colored after order is given, taking about three weeks' 
time, and costing jUOO each additional, and same cannot be 
exchanged. Readings are supplied with these sets at 25 cents 
each net. 

Many of the slides from which these sets are made up will 
be found in the ** General List of Slides'* under their respective 
headings and can be ordered separately. 



STANLEY IN AFRICA. 

I^om illustrations in the "London Graphic" and the "London News. 



»» 



42 Views with Lecture, f21.00. 



1 
2 
3 



and 



4 
5 



Introduction 
Group of Officers 
King of Belgians 

Emin Pasha 
Map 

Transferring Passen- 
gers to Congo River 
Boat 

6 Tippoo Tib 

7 En Route to Leopolds- 

ville 

8 Arabs Raiding a Native 

Village on the Aru- 
wimi 

9 Stanley Giving Final 

Instructions to Major 
Barttelot 

10 Foraging for Supplies 

11 The Vanguard At- 

tacked Toy Forest 
Dwarfs 

12 Lieutenant Stairs 

wounded by a Poi- 
soned Arrow 

13 Dr. Parke Sucking the 

Poisoned Wound 
Vanguard Marching 



14 



15 



17 
18 



through the Forest 
Lieutenant Stairs 

Charged by Wounded 

Elephant 
16 Scaring Elephants in 

Banana Grove 
Forest Dwarfs Eating 

Snakes , 

Skeletons of Man, 

Dwarf and Gorilla . 

19 Carrying Steel Boat 

through the Forest 

20 Stanley Showing his 

Followers the Prom- 
ised Land 

21 End of the Great Forest 

22 starvation Camp 

23 Our First Meeting with 

Mazamboni's People 

24 Burning of Mazamboni 
Villages 

First View of Lake Al- 
bert Nvanza 

Fort Bobo 

Emin Pasha Crossing 
Albert Nvanza 

The Meetmg of Emin 



25 

26 
27 

28 



and Stanley 

29 Mountains of the Moon 

30 Mountains of the Moon, 

Discovered by Stanley 

31 Types of Emin Pasha's 

People 

32 Execution of Soudan- 

ese Mutineer 

33 Native School Children 

Singing National An- 
them 

34 Stanley's Caravans 

with Emin Pasha, at 
Masabala 
36 Last Camping Ground 

36 Stanley's Return to 

Civilization 

37 Stanley's Farewell to 

Africa 

38 Emin Pasha's People at 

Home 

39 Stanley at Shepherd's 

Hotel at Cairo 

40 Stanley at Albert Hall 

41 Miss Dorothy Tennant 

42 Wedding of Stanley at 

Westminster Abbey 



A THOUSAND MILES UP THE CONGO. 



60 



1 Map of Congo River 

2 Bannana at mouth of 

river 

3 Hill near Vivi, where 

Stanley built his first 
house 

4 River at Nzadia Kimbe- 

dinga 

Bock scenery at Nzadia 
KImbedinga, 



slides $25.00, with Reading 

6 Precipice near Yalala 

Falls 

7 View showing uneven 

country 

8 Mpoza river and Cara- 

van crossing 

9 Native village 

10 Mission house at Pala- 

bala 

11 People gathered to hear 



the preaching of the 
gospel 

12 KingMakokola 

13 Lukungu carrier 

14 Native woman and child 

16 " " infuU 

dress 

16 Boy trained in thre Mis- 

sion school 

17 Nkimbo man 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.^ Pk^^ Wl^ 



n going to thalr 



SI Kaciveedigg 
as HonilJle ad 



34 Dyeing and Windins 

SIS lAndmgPUtve.TeaDiB- 

36 BDadsiUe Temple 

HT Roadside Inn 

■" ^amlet in Te« liiatciul 



&A 



the Leaf 

■Ingthe Tea 
■heT'ea 



ax "Henry Reed" steamer 

34 Stanley pool 

as Blantl naClve 

SO Bangalla woman 

S! Biania house decorated 

Si Blanw grave 
,i Mode a[ warlare 



3S Khedive's I'ati 
Sn Old Cairo 

11 Li™an Desi 



42 Ooat hi 
3 Fowl hunse 

S Dead elephant 
.B Native pipes 
47 Pottery 

SO Cobra, or Naia 



im Egypt and Itn 
People. 

SO glides. fSa.OO. 

With Printed DacTiplive 

jtrodnotorj-Egypt 
2 Alexandria 

4 Pompey' a pillar 



47 Arali Villagers 
49 First Catai-af t 

China and the CI 

Ga slides. (30.0 

Wiih printed deicr 
Lecture. 

1 Map ot China 






1 pillar 



: Pom. 



flChin 

10 Silvt. 

11 City " 



7 ftuihmndlyah Canal 

8 Port Said > 

9 Lesssps' PlacB 

10 Portrait of Coant Lbs- . 

1 Kan^ia I 

-2 Ismailia \ 

13 Ship paasing through l 

tbe Canal ' 



Boys 
H Panatie preaching to 

S Profeisional Beggar 

S Water Carriers^ roup 
OainelB 
"B Camel Drt vers— Group 
i Tbe rellaheen (Peas, 
anta) Group 

aiwooi'^— " 

■to Egypi 



«f Bodonln ShEllt 



inj-— The Bund 
iSliin 






mple, Nan. 
13 Porcelain Tower, Nan. 

M Ming Tombs 
16 A Chinese Soldier 
IT mandarin and Family 
IS Uandarln In OfQcial 

Roijes 
le Mandarin's Wife and 



% Little Orplian Islan 
2A Pajioda, Kieu-Kian( 

30 Hankow— Tha Bum 

31 Pagoda at Hankow 
W Consulting the Stic 1 

33 Sorting Silt Cocoon 



\ Marriage Proces 
Jpinm Smoking 
long Kong 
3onc^uding Slide 

BSTpt- 

GO slides, (30.00. 



2 Alexandria, V 



- Aleiai • 

Pillar 

4 Alexandria, Cleopatra'e 

Needle 
fi Cairo, Uoad to the CIta. 

5 Cairo Lattice Windoi 

Citadel 
e Cairo, Toml 
Mamelookt 



tha 
the 



J, Toml 



-f Wales- 



hammed Ali 

11 Cairo, Fountait 

12 Calro^ noliopoli 

13 Cairo, SneiCan 

14 Cairo. Prin 

15 Cairo, Pyramids, cross. 

Ing the Nile 

16 Cairo, View of Pyra. 

midn and Sphinx 

17 Cairo, Section of Pyta. 



18 Cairo, 
Pyrai 



t ot I 



e, The DahabBah,;ii 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SE.E. Plkt^C ^'>■1. 



242 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A. 



28 Abydos 

29 Abydos, Sculptares 

30 Dendera, General View 
81 Dendera, Porch of the 

Temple 

32 Thebes, Plan of the 

Ruins 

33 Thebes, Plan of a Tern- 

pie 

84 Thebes, Memnonium, 

East Gate 

85 Thebes, Colossi 

36 Thebes, Medinet Abou, 

from Northwest 

37 Thebes, Medinet Abou, 

Hall of Columns 
88 Thebes, Medinet Abou, 

Christian Church 
30 Thebes, Luxor 

40 Thebes, Approach to 

Karnac 

41 Thebes, Karnac, Cen- 

tral Avenue 

42 Thebes, Karuac, Hall of 

Columns 

43 Thebes, South Wall of 

Court of Sheshonk 

44 Thebes, Cartouche of 

Rehoboam 

45 Esneh 

46 Edfou 

47 Koum Ombou 

48 Assouan, Isle of Ele- 

phantine 

49 Philae, Pharaoh's Bed 
60 Philae, Great Propylon 

and Outer Court 
51 Philae, Colonnade of 

Temple of Isis 
62 Philae, View of foot of 

Cataract 

53 Philae, View of, from 

Biggeh 

54 Philae, Biggeh and Nu- 
' bians 

55 Philae, View of, looking 

North 
66 Nubia, Palm and Nu- 
bians 

57 Nubia, Arab at Prayer 

58 Nubia, Rock Temple at 

Kalabsee 

59 Nubia, Ipsamboul, Small 

Temple 

60 Nubia, Ipsamboul, Great 

Temple 

Route to India. 

56 slides, $28.00. 

With printed descriptive 
Lecture. 

1 Map of Europe, show- 

ing routes 

2 Serapis 

3 Gibraltar 

4 Malta 

5 Casteilamare, Brindisi 

6 Acropolis, Athens 

7 Port Said 

8 El Kantara 

9 Sphinx and Great Pyra- 

mid 

10 Aden 

11 Somala Boys diving 

12 Map of India, showing 

route 

13 Boml)ay, the Mazagon 

Road 

14 Bombay, Fort and Es- 

planade 



15 Snake Charmers 

16 Caves of Elephanta 

17 The Prince Dining in 

the Caves of Ele- 
phanta 

18 Poonah 

19 Parbutta, Poonah 

20 Tower of Silence 

21 Baroda, the Prince's 

Entrance 

22 Baroda, State Elephants 

drawn up at the Arena 

23 Baroda, Elephant Fight 

24 Baroda, Hunting with 

Cheetahs 

25 Colombo 

26 Kandy, Old Palace of 

Sacred Tooth 

27 Devil'ri Dance at the 

Private Perehara 

28 Elephant Hunting, Cey- 

Ion 

29 Madras 

30 Tank and Temple, Con- 

jeveram 

31 Temple at Bailoor 

32 Great Temple at Bobe- 

neswar 

33 Juggernaut 

34 Calcutta, Government 

House 

35 Portrait of Nawab, or 

!Mahommedan Prince 

36 Reception of Native 

Princes 

37 Nautch Girl 

38 Benares, Ghat 

39 Benares, Group of 

Priests, taken on 
Steps of Temple 

40 Portrait of Hindoo Ra- 

jah 

41 Cawnpore— Ghat 

42 Cawnpore — Memorial 

Well 

43 Bithoor— Nana Sahib's 

Home 

44 Luc know — Bird's-eye 

View 

45 The Imambara 

46 Tahoot • 

47 Palace of Akbar 

48 Taj 31ahal 

49 Chandi Chuck, princi- 

pal Street in Delhi 

50 Delhi— Gate of the Fort 

51 Jumma Musjeed 

52 Kootub Minar 

53 Umritsur 

54 Marble Pavilion, Fort 

Guinores, Lahore 

55 Runjeet Sing's Tomb 

56 Portrait of the Prince 

of Wales 

India. 

51 slides, $25.50. 

With printed descriptive 
Lecture. 

Introduction, Map of 
India 

1 Glaciers at Panjturni, | 

near Ummernath, i 
Cashmere i 

2 The Cave of Ummer- ! 

nath 

3 Coolies Crossing a 

liridge of Frozen I 
Snow ^ 



4 View between Sona- 

murg and Baltai, 
Cashmere 

5 Cascades below Sona- 

murg. Cashmere 

6 Coolies crossing a Bus- 

tic Bridge, Cashmere 

7 Rope Bridge, Seinde 

\ alley, Cashmere 

8 The Visitors' Bunga- 

lows up the Jhelnm, 
Cashmere 

9 Ancient Temple, built 

B.C. 

10 ^Vncient Temple at Pan- 

dretton 

11 Foliage on the Apple 

Tree Canal, Cashmere 

12 Chunar Trees in the 

Shall mar Gardens, 
Cashmere 

13 Marble PavUion in Shal- 

imar Gardens 

14 ZainuPs Tomb 

15 The River Jhelum, op- 

posite the Mahara- 
jah's Palace, Sree- 
nugger 

16 Bridge of Shops, Sree- 

nugger. Cashmere 

17 The Maharajah's Pal- 

ace, Sreenugger 

18 State Barge on the 

Apple Tree Canal 

19 Group of Cashmere 

Boatmen and Women 

20 Group of Cashmere 

musicians, etc. 

21 Ruins of Martland 

(General viewO 

22 Lahore Railway Station 

23 Large Mosque, near 

Runjeet Sing's Tomb» 
Lahore 

24 Marble Pavilion in the 

Fort Gardens, Lahore 

25 Runieet Sing's Tomb, 

Lahore 

26 Jehangir's Tomb, Sha- 

dra Gardens, Lahore 

27 Tank and Pavilion in 

Shalimar Gardens,La- 
hore 

28 Umritsur, showing por- 

tion of Tank 

29 Entrance to the Golden 

Temple, Umritsur 

30 Golden Temple 

31 The Barracks, Muri'ee 

32 View of the Bazar 

from the Barracks, 
Murree 
32a Temple at Kurterpoor 

33 A Fakir 

34 Sutlei Bridge, Delhi 

Railway 

35 The City of Delhi from 

Jumma Musj led 

36 The Chandni Ohowk, 

principal street in 
Delhi 

37 Delhi Gate of the Fort 

38 The King's Palace, 

Delhi 

39 The Jumma Musj led, 

or Great Mosque, 
Delhi 
39a The Cashmere Gate. 
Delhi 

40 Inside of Gate 

41 Suf tcr Jung's Tomb 

42 The Kootub Minar 



FOR PWCE LIST OF SUDE.S S€.€. PkCk^ Vi.^ 



MCINTOSH BATTERY. AND OPTICAL VO.. CHIC4GO, ILL., C.S. j( 



B Larite Arch and 
rnn I'Dlar, near tbe 

a DiTlDg Well at the Koo- 

fi Atn*. tbc PbUcb o[ Ak- 
SirKhan 

Ddh 

View^Mte Menioclal 

n Cawnpore, Intdrlor 

View of the Memorial 
Well 

SO Cawnporo, SiUtee 

Obowni GhAt, Scene 



Mj'Bore. 

SI slidea, •».». 
■WUJi printed deteripUtit 

1 Brama, ViBhnii, Siva 



Tomb 
i The Fort of Serlngapa- 

diio£ Bridee, Bhowlns 
tbs Great CaTOli Br 
S The Deria l>Dwliit,(ir 
Garden House of Tlp- 
poo SulUkn.near Serin. 
gnpalam. The Dake 
ot WelllDston resided 
hereafter the taking 
ot Seringapatani 
S The Wellegley Briilge 
T The GstewaV in the 
Fort In whfch TIppoo 
Sultan was killed 

8 The Jumma Miisjeed, 

built by TIppoo Sul- 

9 The lAHgUarrahtttOolar 
10 A Mohammeilan Barlal 

Ground 
__ Jlindoo Templeat Colar 
19 Part d( the Inner Tem- 



lg£im 
.-naghirri 
lango Trei 



leMu! 



Wl" 



47 The Great 11 

38 A part of the South 

!S The Jaia. or BnddhlaC 
Temple, a I Hallibeeb 

30 View of tbe t:ast aiie 

ot Itallloor Temple 

31 Heater Vleiv of the 



Uunce<l Elepbanc 



U African FauD 



IMilloor Temple 
38 Seerab, Tomb ot Mul- 

lii'k lEbrman 
34 Tbe uaiial small Mosque 

altw.hed to i.bexe 

Si View of Tom 

si Ground 



Medicine Man 
30 Aftii-an l-aople, Inter- 



Seerab 

37 A View In the Fori of 

Obit tied roog 

38 View in the Fort of 

ChiCtledroog 

39 Temple at Hurrj-hiir 
iO The UlSDor Pagoda at 



of tt 



H People 



ingalu, 



,1 Tbe G 

thookft Fall 

S The Great T 

Juggernaut 



M African rcumo, imm- 

vlewing a Native King 
53 African Peojile. King 

M African People, A Wed- 

dine Uaiue at Elbai- 

yeir 

36 African Feople, Dance 

hooka Fall of I'egftel at Klwaka. 

the Itnrr . aongo 

1 I 38 African People King 

ndfliaWiTei 



UThe . 

Ling rS)"" ■ 

a Kntraoee PagoUf 

Templeat Litt 



7 Mumta 
Temi 






« Entrance Temple at 
Great Conleveram 

40 Tank In the Court ol 
the last Temple 

91 ill. Brett's Kesidence 

Central Africa. 

SCsUdea,«2B.oa 
Wm pri 



39 African Hoaees, Lake 
Dwelling, Mobeya 

30 Atriran Houses, Klam. 

niam Hamlet 

31 African Bouees, Bougo 

VUlagB 

32 African Houses, Dinka 
Village 






Lector 



1 Afi 









IS Temple at Devangblcri 

U Golden Shrme 

IS View of the tow: 



IB Temple to the right of 

Kandydroog 
IS Temple to the left of 

Mnudydroog 



i African Scenery, Binl'g- 
Eye View of the Vic. 
toria Falls 

an Lake Tanganyika 

6 African Scenery, views 

on Lake Tanganyika 



m Travel, Croaaii 

- rilr ' 
el.Ci 

u Aincan 'I'liivel, An un- 
expected Intern] p' 

M African Tratel, A Nar- 
ta African Trayel, The Ma- 
la African Travel, Compil- 

17 African Travel, An Old 
Explorer Discovered 

IS African Travel, The 
Dispatches in Danger 

19 African Travel, The 



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244 MCINTOSH BATTEKY AND OPTICAL CO., UHICAOO, ILL.,TT.S. A. 



50 African Travel, The 
Coming Home of 
Cameron 

A Tear Within the Arc- 
tic Circle. 

60 slides, $25.00. 

With Printed Descriptive 
Lecture. 

1 Introductory 

2 Portsmouth Harbor, 

May 29, 1875 

3 Farewell 

4 Captain Nares 

5 Captain Stephenson and 

Others 

6 Apparatus, Sledges, etc. 

7 The Crow's Nest 

8 Chart of the Course 

9 H. M. Ships " Alert " 

and ** Discovery " 

10 Godhaven, Sailors and 

Esquimo 

11 Upemavik 

12 The "Pandora"— "Arc 

tic Post Office " 

13 " Discovery " Leading 

Through the Ice 

14 " Alert " Aground, Ken- 

nedy Channel 

15 " Alert " Nipped, Off 

Cape Beechy 

16 " Discovery " Agi'ound, 

Discovery Bay 

17 " Discovery " Left at 

Winter Quarters 

18 " Alert " Hoisting Col- 

ors, Off Cape Union 

19 " Alert," Winter Quart- 

ers 

20 SJtetch Map of Winter 

Quarters, etc. 

21 Discovery, " The Rink " 

22 Sledge to Rawson Point 

23 " High Street " Between 

the Two Ships 

24 Road Between the Two 

Ships 

25 " Discovery " Sledge 

Party 

26 Captain Hall's Grave 

27 "Alert" Protected by 

Floebergs 

28 " Alert," " The Mile " 

29 " Alert," the Deck 

30 « Alert " Theatricals 

31 " Alert," November 5, 

1875 

32 " Alert," Sunday Morn- 

ing 

33 Sledge Traveling, Fast- 

ening the Dogs 

34 Sledge Traveling, West- 

ern Sledge Party 

35 Sledge Traveling, Halt 

for Lunch 

36 Sledge Traveling, Camp. 

ing for Night 

37 Sledge Traveling, Night 

in the Tent 

38 Sledge Traveling, An 

Evening Call 

39 Sledge Traveling, An In- 

valid on a Sledge 

40 Sledge Traveling, Going 

Back for Aid 

41 Sledge Traveling, Fune- 



ig 



i-al in the Ire 
42 Sledge Traveling, Fune- 
ral of Hans 



43 Sledge Traveling, Lien- 

tenant Parr Going 
for Help 

44 Sledge Traveling, High 

Way to the North 

45 Sledge Traveling, A 

Push for the Pole 

46 The Sea of Ancient Ice 

47 Homeward Bound, Cut- 

ting Through the Ice 

48 Homeward Bound, Free 

of the Ice 

49 Portsmouth Harbor, 

November 2, 1876 

50 Conclusion 

Round the World in a 
Yacht. 

45 slides, $22.50. 

With JPrinted Descriptive 
Lecture. 

1 The " Sunbeam " 

2 The Deck 

3 Deck Boudoir 

4 The Nursery 

5 State Room 

6 Dining Saloon 

7 Canarv Islands 

8 Tarafal Bay 

9 Crossing the Line 

10 Rio de Janeiro 

11 Buenos Ayres 

12 Lassoing Wild Horses 
L3 A Ship on Fire 

14 Rescued Sailors 

15 Cape Forward 

16 Bartering with Fuegians 

17 Unfit Bay 

18 Ocean Sport 

19 Baths of Caquenes 

20 The Andes 

21 The Children's Hour 

22 Coral Islands 

23 Tahiti 

24 Hawaii 

25 Volcano by Night 

26 Leap at HiUo 

27 Oahu 

28 Amateur Navigation 

29 Keeping the Journal 

30 Curios 

31 Japan, the Jinrikisha 

32 A Family Group 

33 Arrima 

34 Alaski 

35 China, Clearing the 

Decks 

36 Pearl River 

37 Pagoda 

38 Chock-Sing-Toon 

39 Singapore 

40 Malacca 

41 Ceylon 

42 Aden, Samouli Arab 

43 Red Sea 

44 The Ti-ack of the " Sun- 

beam " 

45 Home 

Bound the World With 
a Camera. 

60 slides, $30.00. 

With Printed Descriptive 
Lecture, 

1 Chart 

2 London 

3 Gibraltar 

4 Naples 

5 Valetia 



6 Constantinople 

7 Port Said 

8 Cairo 

9 Pyramid and Sphinx 

10 Group on Board the 

" Cuzeo " 

11 Diego Garcia 

12 Group on Diego 

13 New Plymouth, New 

Zealand 

14 Whare 
16 Group 

16 Bush 

17 " Chapman's" Bush 

and River 

18 Bush 

19 Maori Girls 

20 Auckland Harbor 

21 Tauranga 

22 White Terrace (A) 

23 White Terrace (B) 

24 White Terrace (0) 

25 White Terrace CD) 

26 White Terrace (E) MTud 

HiUs 

27 Pink Terrace (F) 

28 PiuK Terrace (G) 

29 Pint Terrace (H) 

30 Tiki teri 

31 White Island 

32 Group of Maories 

33 " Sugar Loaves," New 

Plymouth 

34 Sea Piece 

35 Parihak^i— Maori Capi. 

tal 

36 Wellington 

37 Auckland from North 

Shore , 

38 Waiwera 

39 Trees at Honolulu 

40 Hotel at Honolulu 

41 View from Tower of 

Hotel 

42 Palace, Honolulu 

43 San Francisco 

44 At Clarke's California 

45 Grizzlv Giant 

46 Wawona, Big Tree 

47 Mist in the Yosemite 

48 From Photographer's 

Point 

49 Merced River • 

50 Mirror Lake 

51 North Dome and River 

Merced 

52 Horseshoe Falls, Niag- 

ara 

53 American Falls, Niaga- 

ra * 

54 Rapids, Niagara 

55 Broadway, New York 

56 Brooklyn Bridge 

57 Washington, the Capi- 

tol 

58 Iceberg 

59 Mersey 

60 Home 

Rome, Ancient and 
Modern. 

50 slides, $25.00. 

With printed descriptive 
Lecture. 

1 Entrv to the Forum, by 

the* Via Sacra 

2 Interior of the Forum, 

Temples of Saturn 
and Vespasian 

3 General View of the 

Coliseum 



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MClSTOSH BATTEKY AND OPTK'AL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U. 3. i 



* Interior at Xia uollse- 

B An* ol TituB 
a Baa-relicrs on the A 
ol Titua 

8 Arch 0* aopMmuB Ss 

a Column o( Trainn 
10 The Appian Way, ] 



15 SnbterraDean Gullerlea 

and Loculi of the Cat- 
acomb of SC. AKDtiB 

13 Painting ol the Tabli. 
nnm ol LiTiB 

li View of the Tiber, m 
front of the Cloaca 
Maxima 

16 The Komltn Foram 

IT ATsnCtneSIountaudSt, 

Sablna 
IS View from the Palaliiie 
IR UaCe of St. Paal, or Os- 

tiensls 
ao The FoiiDtaln of the 

21 The Market ol the Plaz- 

33 Plaiza Navonitand the 

Churrh ot at, Attnea 
23 Wonirn of the Koman 

31 The Bealriro ili Ceuci, 

25 Famil}; ol Brggora 



ad Caldarii 
of (1 



of 



33 The Bambln 

3i The State i 

Che Pope 



IT Bnrber In the Opt 
IB Playing at Bowla 
SB AwaiCing the IlLiii 



■ The Gallery of Maps. 

Vatican 
The Museo Pio-Clem- 



BOalMea, •.W.OD. 

LKture Ifo.l—DabUn, Wis 

law, Xillarnetj, tte, 

val of Mail Steamer 
S An Irleb Jaunting Car 
3 Sockviliu Street, Dub- 
lin (instantaneoiift) 
i General Post Office and 

Nelson 'B Pillar 
G Graf tun Street finstan. 

e Bank of 'li'eland, old 
UouBeftof Parliament 
and Statue of Henry 
G rat Ion, Dublin 
7 Trinity College. Dublin 
S St. Patrick's Cathedral, 
Dublin 



II The F 



al. Dublin 



e Maaes of Mi- 
ulStensot San. 



Tfppenirr 
3S Patrifl! Street, Cork 
38 Patrick's Bridge, ahow- 

ing Father MatheWa 



and Spike Islands 
Sir U'nlter Rale' 
House, ronghal 



'Igh'fl 



42 Blarney CaaCli 

13 Glengarlg Harbor, Bai 

try Bay 
UCromweIra Bridge 

U Glen^riir Waterfall 



Co. 



■e [I pp. 



;e Killar. 



a. Dub- 



12 The Ouatoni Houae, 

Dublin 

13 O'Connell'a Monument, 

Glaenevln. Cemetery. 

Dublin 
It The Vire-regal Lodge, 

Pllrenix Park, Dnbliu 
10 KillinoF and the Vale , 

of Soauganagh, Co., 

la Bray and Bray Head, 

Co. WlcKlow 
17 The Scalp.Oo. Wicklow 
IS Cottage in the Dargle 
" (summer), Co, ""~^ 

19 Cottage in the Dargle 

CwlnteD-Co, Wicklow 

20 The Dargie, Co. Wick 

21 Enniskerry, Co. Wick 

falla, Co. Wicklow 
23 PoweracourtHoUHe.Co 

Wicklow 
21 The Vale of Clara, Co 

Wicklow 
20 The Valley of Utenda 

of tW Seven Church 
ea, Co. Wicslow 

2fl The Vale of Avoca, Co 
Wirtlow 

27 The Lion Arrh, Castle 

""""o"'*T"k' "" " 



It Abbey.Co.Xil. 



Shooting the Ravida, 

ke, from 
, killar. 

i Lake 

53 Muc'iroaa Abbey, KIl- 

E3 Interior of Mur.kcoas 
Abbcv, Killamey 

54 Glona Bay, liillamey 
D3 O'Sullifan'B Cascade, 

Killamey 
te Brie keen Bridge, Klllar- 

57 The Meeting ot the 

Waters, KOlamef 
BS Boss Castle, KiUamey 
SB Derrycunnlhy Cottage 
ami Waterlill, Klllar- 



Ireland. 

SO slides, tSS.OO. 

terfBre JVo. a.— JVbriA and 

Weit. 

1 The Boyne Viaduct a 



aaterboiee, Co. Lontit 

3 Warreupolnt,Co. Dofm 

4 Rosslrevor Quay Mid 

fi CarUngford Lough Oo- 

6 Anuaab, showing Oa. 

7 Donegal Place, Bvtfast 
B The Albert Memorikl, 






FOR PRICE 



LIST OF SLIDES Stt PtkCit \*a.T . 



246 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



11 Garron Tower, the seat 

of the Marchioness of 
Londonderry 

12 The Rope Bridge, Car- 

rick-a-rede, Co. An- 
trim 

13 General View of the 

Great Canseway, Gi- 
ant's Causeway 

14 Lord Antrim's Parlor 

15 The Honeycomb 

16 The Wishmff Chair 

17 The Ladies' Fan 

18 The Causeway Gate 

19 The Giant's Well 

20 Dunluce Castle 

21 Londonderry, Lough 

Foyle 

22 The Cathedral, London- 

derry 

23 Walker's Monument, 

Londonderry 

24 Bishop's Gate, London- 

derry 

25 Horn Head, Donegal 

26 £rrigal Mountain, 

Donegal 

27 Ruins on Devenish Is- 

land, Lough £me,Co. 
Fermanagh 

28 Holy Well of Tubber- 

naltha, near Sligo 

29 Glencar Waterfall, near 

Sligo 

30 Boyle Abbey, Co. Ros- 

common 

31 Kylemore Castle, the 

seat of Mitchel Henry, 
Esq., M. P., Conne- 
mara 

32 Kylemore Lake, Conne- 

mara 

33 Ballinahmch and Lake, 

Connemara 

34 The Killaries Bay, Con- 

nemara 

35 Dugort, Achill and 

SReve Mor Mountains 

36 Sunset on Achill Sound 

37 Rosserk Abbey, Co. 

Mayo 

38 Cong Abbey, Co. Gal- 

way 

39 The Fish Market, Gal- 

way 

40 The Cliffs of Moher, 

41 The Spa Well, Lisdoon- 

varna, Co. Clare 

42 The Spectacle Bridge, 

Lisdoonvama, Co. 

43 Kilkee, Co. Clare 

44 The Natural Bridges of 

Ross, Co. Clare 

45 Killaloe, on the Shan- 

non, Co. Limerick 

46 Rapids of the Shannon 

at Castle Connell, Co. 
Limerick 

47 Askeaton Abbey, " the 

Nave," Co. Limerick 

48 Georges' Street, Limer- 

ick 

49 King John's Castle and 

Shomond Bridge, Lim- 
erick 

50 The Treaty Stone, Lim- 

erick 



Western Norway. 

40 slides, $20.00. 

With Printed Descriptive 
Lecture. 

1 Nordfjord, Oldendal, 

Brvnestad Saeter 

2 Norafjord, View down 

Oldendal 

3 Nordfjord, Foot of 

Bricksdal Glacier 

4 Nordfjord, Children and 

Kids, Bricksdal 

5 Nordfjord, View up the 

Loen-Vand 

6 Nordfjord, Icefall, 

Kjendalsbrae, Lodal 

7 Nordfjord, on the Loen- 

Vand 

8 Geiranger Fjord, the 

Knivslaafosse 

9 Waterfall on the Geir- 

anger Fjord 

10 View up the Geiranger 

..Fiord 

11 Sondraore, near Fibel- 

. . stad-Hougen 

12 Sondmore, Fibelstad- 

..Hougen 

13 Sondmore, Pass to Oie, 

..and the Olenibba 

14 Sondmore, Oie and No- 

. . rangsdal 
L5 Sondmore, on Pass, Ors- 
..tenvik to Standal 

16 Sondraore, Standal and 

the HJorendf jord 

17 Molde and Moldefjord, 

from the Basknaeshaug 

18 Molde, from one of the 

Islands 

19 Molde and Moldefjord, 

from the Varde 

20 Rorasdal, Hotel Aak 

and the Romsdalshorn 

21 Romsdal, the Trolltin- 

der 

22 Romsdal, from Top of 

Middags-Hougen 

23 Romsdal, View on the 

Rauma 

24 Romsdal, near Horg- 

heim 

25 Romsdal, The Vermofos 

26 Jotunheim, The Sem- 

meltind 

27 Jotunheim, Gjendebod 

and Svartdalspig 

28 Jotunheim, Group at 

Gjendebod 

29 Jotunheim, Gjendebod 

from Svartdal 

30 Jotunheim, Eidsbuga- 

den 

31 Jotunheim, from the 

Skinegg, looking W. 

32 Sognefjord, The Vettis- 

fos, from below 

33 Sognefjord, the Afdal- 

fos, near Vetti 

34 Sognefjord, The Gjelle- 

fos, near Vetti 

35 Sognefjord, from the 

Hotel Door, Gudvan- 
gen 

36 Hardangerfiord, Odde 

and Sor Fjord 

37 Hardangorfjord, Mar- 

ried Women, Odde 

38 Hardanger fjord. Girl, 

Odde 

39 Hardangerfjord, Skjaeg- 

gedalsloa 



40 Hardangerfjord, Sjk»g- 
gedalsfos 

Picturesque Holland. 

50 slides, $25.00. 

With Printed Descriptive 
Lecture, 

1 Holland from the 

Steamer 

2 Rotterdam, the Boom- 

pjes 

3 Rotterdam, the Leuye 

Haven Canal 

4 Rotterdam, the Onde 

Haven Canal 

5 Rotterdam, Old House 

in the Market Place 

6 Rotterdam, the spni- 

water Canal 

7 Rotterdam, the Delf- 

schevart Canal 

8 Rotterdam, the Flower 

Market 

9 A Peasant Woman's 

Head-dress 

10 Dordrecht, a Bit of 

Dordt (Canal) 

11 Dordrecht, the Cathe- 

dral 

12 Dordrecht, a wind saw- 

mill 

13 Delft, the Town Hall 

14 Delft, the East Gate 

16 Scheveningen, the Vil- 
lage Street 

16 Scheveningen from the 

Lighthouse 

17 Scheveningen Fishing 

Boats 

18 Scheveningen Beach on 

a Summer Morning 

19 Leyden, the Town Hall 

20 Haarlem Cathedral and 

Market Place 

21 Windmill near Haarlem 

22 Alkmaar Town Hall 

and Canal 

23 A Rustic Cart Drawn 

by Dogs 

24 A North Holland farm 

25 One of the North Hol- 

land dog carts 

26 Hoorn, the harbor, etc. 

27 Hoorn, the old water- 

gate 

28 Mar ken village from 

the harbor 

29 Marken, the little boys 

30 Marken, some of tne 

little girls 

31 A family group of 

Marken people 

32 Marken men and girls 

in holiday attire 

33 MarKen girls and boys 

in their best clothes 

34 Amsterdam from the 

harbor 

35 Amsterdam, PrinsHen- 

drik Kade 

36 Amsterdam, Damrak, 

the street 

37 Landing the morning 

milk, Amsterdam 

38 A Volendam fisherman 

39 Amsterdam, view on 

the Singel canal 

40 Amsterdam, Flower 

market on the Singel 

41 Montel Baens Tower, 

Amsterdam 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S£.^ P^Ck£. \'^1 



McINTllSH BATTERY AND OI'TICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., U.S. A. !17 






IS A sailing Iwrge on the 

Kuyiler Kee 
IS Utraclit Oatbeilrsi tow- 



87 Mnyenu 

! 39 WoniiB, 
SB WorniB, 



43 Heidelberg, 
IS HeidelburR, 



CDlogne, S 



13 Eetnaieu Apollliiarla. 

li AiuJeniach 

14 Cobleni, Froin aDove 

Bhine Bridae 
l£ Oobleni, Ehranbreit- 
ateln, wilb Bridge ot 

IB Cobleni, Ehrenlceit- 
atelb.froin above Tbal 

IT CobLenz, Tlul and Cob- 
leni ' 

laCaaCleol StolienfeU 



II Harkabnrtt Caatle 

S Bopnanl 

a St. Gear 

It 31. Goar, KheinrelB 

S St. Goar, RtieintetB 



n Booneck rastlo 
n Bhelnsteln Cnat^c 
13 Blngen 



ieisilmrF 

UeUlgeu. 

eideilieriF. The Castlo. 

Frederlfli'B Building 

..eidulberg, The Caatla. 

Otto Htnry"s Building 



m slides, •30.09. 
WIOi dticripltve LedBre. 
1 Colagne, Ttie Cathddi-al 

from So ut beast 
9 Cologne, The Cathedral 

3 Cologne, The Cuthedtal 
from St. Martin's 

i The Cathedral Irom 

S CologDe,The Cathodral, 

a Cologne, Cathedral 
Tift South Fortius 

T Cologne, Cathedral, 
The Central r- ■■ 
West Front 

B Cologne and Bridge of 



46 Heidelberg,' 

47 Hei'lellienr, 

48 Bail eo- Bad! 






49 Baden-Baden, General 
View Irom Leopolds- 
hiihe 

BO Freiburg, The Catho- 

31 StrasdbHrg, The Cathe- 

W Straaabiirg Cathedral, 

The Central Porch 
63 Rffle, the Ui'per Bridge 
G4 Bdle, the Cstliedral 
.» Bfile, St. Pttufa Gate 



le Ferry ' 

A-ith 96V. , 



1, IMde 



S7 Yiew on "New Roa.i," 

Odde 
as Bend oa "New KoaU," 

Odde 
9) Konedal Foss 

30 Ulldalafos 

31 Glanier Stream 
!I3 The Skarve Fobs 

I The Laate Fosb 



34 EsL 

35 The Sanile valley 
31! The Fjonl Bide at I 



ride 



Abbey* and Caitlnii of 
England. 

M slides, tU.OO. 
With detcripKf T-ecture, 
I FroDtlaplecB 
! Colc-bester Castle, Et. 

3 8t Botolph'a Priory, 

Cole heater 

4 Rochester Castle 

5 Bodiam Castle and Moat 

6 Hurst moneenx Castle 

7 Hastings Castle 
S Feveusey Cs.BCIa 

B Arundel Castle, the 
Keep 

10 Nctlov AbhCf , Interior 

11 Netley Abbey, South 

Transept 

12 NBtley Abbey, the East 



■.■e, the Rhine 

The Hardsnger FJnrd, 

41 slides, tlOM. 
WiOt deicriptive Lecture. 
[ Star anger 
3 Bergeni No! 3 

S Mill near Voss 
B Itosd near Seim 
7 Skju^re Foas 



istle, General 



18 Tintem Abbey.lnterii 

19 Tintcrn Ab&iy.Interli 

20 Raglan Castle, Proi 

Ton-era and Moat 

21 Malmesbury Abbey 
n Konilworth Cast!' 



13 Efdfiord, Vik 

14 Siniodal 

15 RiTerat VEk 
IB Eidfjord Vand 

17 Way to the Voring Foes 

18 On the way 
1» The v'orbjg Foss 
■» Goat." 
21 Odd 



25 Kirk 

28 Tutbury ( 



23 Knaresborougb Oaatle, 

29 St. Mary's Abbey, York 

30 Byland Abbey, blatant 

31 Bvland AW>ey, West 

Vront 

32 Byland Abbey, West 



I 3S Helinsley C 
I 34 Itlcv 



2a The : 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE. PhtiE-XIT- 



J 



248 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., V. S. A. 



36 Rievanlx Abbey, the 
Choir 

36 Richmond Castile and 

Bridge, Yorkshire 

37 Easby Abbey, Exterior 

of Refectory 

38 Easby Abbey, Rnins of 

Church, etc. 

39 Bolton Ca8tle,Wen8ley- 

dale 

40 Middleham Castle, 

Wensleydale 

41 Fountains Abbey, from 

the River 

42 Fountains Abbey, the 

Lad ye Chapel 

43 Fountains ADbey,North 

Transept Window 

44 Fountains Abbey, the 

Crypt 
4.5 Fountains Abbey, from 
the West 

46 BoltonAbbey,Yorkshire 

47 Warkworth Castle, 

Northumberland 

48 Tynemouth Priory 

49 Fumess Abbey, from 

the East 
60 Fumess Abbey 

Spain. 

60 sUdes, $25.00. 
With Descriptive Lecture. 

1 Gibraltar, Our Courier 

2 Gibraltar, How we saw 

Gibraltar 

3 Gibraltar, The Bay 

4 Gibraltar, Alameda 

6 Gibraltar, Catalan Bay 

6 Gibraltar, Bridge of 

Thunder 

7 Cadiz, The Cathedral 

8 SeTille, the Cathedral 

and City 

9 Seville, the Alcazar Gar- 

dens 

10 Seville, Hall of Ambas- 

dors 

11 Seville, Court of Sulta- 

nas 

12 Seville, the Bull Ring 

13 Seville, a Bull Fight 

14 Seville, a Bull Fight 
16 Cordova, the Town 

16 Cordova, Court of Or- 

anges 

17 Cordova, Interior of 

Mosque 

18 Cordova, Trionfo Monu- 

ment 

19 Toledo, With the Alca- 

zar 

20 Toledo, from the North- 

west 

21 Madrid, Royal Palace 

22 Madrid, National Muse- 

um 

23 Madrid, Fountain of Al- 

cala 

24 Madrid, the Escurial 

25 Valadoiid, an Antique 

Street 

26 Burgos, from the River 

27 St. Sebastian 

28 Saragossa, the Market 

29 Lexida 

30 Manresa, the Old Town 

31 Barcelona, the Harbor 

32 Tarragona, the Cathe- 

dral 

33 Valencia 



34 Granada, Elms in Alham- 

bra Grounds 

35 Granada, Cielo Bajo 

36 Granada, the Alhambra 

from San Nicolas 

37 Granada, Court of Lions, 

Moorish Palace 

38 Granada, Hall of Two 

Sisters 
30 Granada, Hall of Justice 

40 Granada, Moor's Seat 

41 Granada, Sierra Nevada 

from Adabres 

42 Granada, Tower of 

Peaks 

43 Granada, Water Tower 

44 Granada, Gypsy Prince 

45 Granada, Gypsy Girl 

46 Granada, Group of Gyp- 

sies 

47 Loja 

48 Malaga, Cathedral and 

Harbor 

49 Malaga, the Covered 

Market 
60 Malaga, the Harbor 

Burmah. 

36 slides, $18.00. 
With Descriptive Lecture, 

1 Map 

2 Light Infantrv,Cro8sing 

River 

3 Storming of Ludaw 

4 How I Saw the Enemy 

5 Specimen of King The- 

baw's Army 

6 King Thebaw and His 

wives 

7 King Thebaw's Removal 

8 Transferring King The- 

baw to Transport 

9 Pendergast's Interview 

with Thebaw's Offl- 
cers 

10 South Gate of Bhamo 

11 Mandalay 

12 Mandalay 

13 Mandalay,Western Gate 

14 Loot Auction 

15 Street Sweepers 

16 An ex-Judge 

17 Advance Guard of Lord 

Dufferin 

18 Presentation of Address 

to Lord Dufferin 

19 The Viceroy's Levee in 

Throne Room 

20 Lord and Lady Duffer- 

in's Reception 

21 Welcome to Palace and 

Reception by Ladies. 
(Two in one) 

22 Ladies Going to After- 

noon Tea. Reception 
of the Viceroy. (Two 
in one) 

23 Mummers at the Palace 

24 Behind the Sicenes. Bur- 

mese Pas Seul, (Two 
in one) 

25 A Pooay Play 

26 Image of Ganda. Bur- 

mese Priests and Pu- 
pils. (Two in one) 

27 Buddhist Girl's School 

28 Call to Worship 

29 Teaching the Young 

Idea 

30 Playing Football 

31 Wash and Brush-up 



32 Burmese Funeral and 

Band. (Two in one) 

33 Stockades 

34 Dacoits on the Boad to 

Mandalay 

35 Capture and Shooting of 

Dacoits 

36 Oil Wells 

The Highlands of Scot- 
land. 

52 slides, $26.00. 

With Descriptive Lecture. 

1 Introduction 

2 Glasgow, Cathedral 

3 Glasgow, George Square 

4 Glasgow, University 

5 Glasgow, Broomielaw 

6 Clyde, Henry BeU's 

Monument 

7 Clyde, Dunbarton Cas- 

tle 

8 Clyde, Greenock 

9 Clyde, Rothesay 

10 Inverary Castle 

11 Oban 

12 Staff a, Fingal's Cave 

13 lona Cathedral 

14 Glencoe 

15 Falls of Foyers 

16 Inverness 

17 KirkweU Cathedral 

18 Stacks of Duncansby 

19 Dunrobin Castle 

20 Elgin Cathedral 

21 Aberdeen from Below 

Suspension Bridge 

22 Aberdeen, Castle Street 

23 Aberdeen,King*s College 

2A Aberdeen, Old Machar 
Cathedral 

25 Aberdeen, Old Brig o' 

Balgownie 

26 Balmoral 

27 Lochnager 

28 Dunottar Castle 

29 Abroath Abbey 

30 Perth 

31 Dunkeld Cathedral 

32 Diinkeld Hermitage and 
^ Bridge 

33 Pass of Killiecrankie 

34 Blair Athole 

35 Falls of Monees 

36 Taymouth Castle 

37 Pass of Leny 

38 Callander and Ben Ledi 

39 Pass of the Trossachs 

and Ben Venue 

40 Lock Katrine, Silver 

Strand 

41 Inversnaid Falls 

42 Loch Lomond, Looking 

Up 

43 Loch Lomond, Looking 

Down 

44 Dunblane Cathedral 

45 Abbey Craig and Wal- 

lace Monument 

46 Cambuskenneth Abbey 

47 Stirling Castle 

48 Dollar, Castle Campbell 

49 Dollar, " The Devil's 

Mill" 

50 Loch Leven Castle 

51 St. Andrew's 

52 Dunfermline Abbey 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



^^ 


n 


MclSTOSil I!A.TTEKy AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO. ILL.. U. S. A. US f 


B»i>bUi> In Norway. 


8 BocheBier tTathedral, 


ai Brialol Cathedral from 


to Blldeg with reuding, tUk 


Weit Kronl 
» RoehBBter Cathedral, 


the Sorth-West 
32 Bristol Cathedral. The 


1 Cbriitianift, General 


10 Rochealer Cachednil. 


33 KiBte''r Cathedral, West 


X OiMrahal 


Irom the Iligh Street 


Front 




]1 Rochester Cathedral, 


34 Exeter Cathedral Ohoir, 


! ISF"""""""^ 




loufelna East 
3t Rochester Cathedral 


e Norwagjan Carriole 
7 On the^iBgna 

in Rnrtfnnd nhnrch ^ 


M Ro^h/«ler CalhedrBl, 


a<l Rochester Cathedml 


Choir, looking E. 


Nave, looking Eaat 


13 Boeheater Cathedral, 
Save, looking W. 


87 Peterhoroiigh Catbe- 




38 PBt™hiron|h '''catho. 


!l Waw?toll at Uuaum 


Na.e. looking E. 


dral. The Choir 




15 High Street, Bocheslet 


3H Beverley MlnBter 


Hiifliim 


17 VlH ^"ll- Ho^Keltor 


40 Beverley Minater, In- 


U Mterodal Valley with 


IS Bnll Hot''BT ' 
IBEastgateHonae 


41 Carlisle Cathedral 

12 Carlisle Cathedral 


U VoMBvanaen 


M Walts' Charity 


43 Hipon Cathedra? 




WGad> Bill Pl^e, nkk- 


44 Kiuon Cathedral. The 
AnUqulfies at AtUeos. 


MBBr/en. Ilolberg'a 


S3 Gad's Hill Plaice, Trees 


Engliili Cathedra IB. 


IS glides with lectnre. |9.0D 


IIHSTrKldB 


44 Elides with reading, t». 
I Canlerhiiry Cathedral, 


I Athens, from Mar'aHill 

i Athens, from Acropolis. 

lookfng to Mafs'^Hlll 


■ScMdetron.t.ieS.W. 


The Choir 


t Eaat Front of Krthe. 


a York Minster, West 


« The Bnarlinc 


4 Vork Minater, Choir 


S WBBt Front of Psrthe- 


!T The LaathefoB 


looking Eaat 


„ „ nnn , 




fi Durham Cathedral 


S ETechtheinm 


30 Roldal Lake 


S Iiurtaani Catbedi'al Nave 


7 Cecropelnm 


7 St. Paul's Cathedral 


8 Scnlpturaa Found on 




est. l'a.il> Cathedral, 


Acropolis 


n GinBW Molintain 
U RjukBDdtos 


The Choir 
9 Wostininiter Alihey. 

West Front 
10 Weatrainater A h h e y , 

The Choir 


9 Temple of Vlulory 
10 8L-ulj)tnrea In Temple 

of Vlrtory 
n Propytea 
U Plan of Acropolis 


.38 Waterfall near Lllle- 




13 Tower of the Winds 


n Wooden Bridge over the 

Loneen 
•SKringofen. Scene ol 


K WlnoholleE Cathedral! 

The Choir 
13 Lincoln Cathedral 


U Theatre o( Dionysius 
15 Throne of Prfest o( 


14 Lincoln Cuthedral, The 


Eponymous 


15 Liti.'hfle''ld Cathedral, 




:M Paae of Ruateii'' 




IBUlyinptiiin 


^ SlelleloBBDu in RoniBdal 
£ Fbidmark la Hoinadal 


UHeTe'tord Vathedral 
iroiu the Wye 


B slides with reading, eo. 
1 Longitudinal Section 
3 Tabrean of Prlnciiile 
a Cross Section at I^ier 


ssSSL,. ■ 


19 Wor.-ea'ter Calhedral 


from South-WeaC 


4 SkeietonPlan, Showing 
Taper ° 






Caissons Flouting Out 


l«BMDlde 


-21 Saliabn.ry Cathedral 


S Fonndations, Qnaens- 


^Uolde 


from Sonth-East 


7 CaotlloTer, Dpright 


Boebanor C«.tl.Bdr«l. 


33 E 1 y Cathedra",^ wVS I 


Part '^ * 
8 Mode of Building out 


itBlklea with lecture. •ILM 


Cantilevar 
a ProgreBB of Work 




looking East 


P^er^^^' ^^ ^^~ 


SSGlouceBter Cathedral 


11 App°oachTlad''i!'na''^''' 

12 Bridge Completed 




from the Sol.th.East 




ae GloHoeater Cathedral, 










S Hocheater Bridge 


37 WellB Cathedral, West 




28 Wella Cathedral Naye. 


4S Blides. with Readbig 


tor) 


lookin/Eaat 
North' Ka'st*™™ 




• The Priory Gateway. 




RocheBter 




I uak Tree markmR the 




SO Bath Abbey Interior, 
linking Kn^t 


Centre ot England. 




Leamiugtun 


FOR PRICE 


LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 


■ » 





250 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



I 



2 Coventry from the 

Park 

3 St. Michaers Church, 

Coventry 

4 Stoneleigh Abbey from 

Grove 

5 Stoneleigh Abbey from 

South 

6 Kenilworth Castle from 

the Bridge 

7 Caesar's Tower, Kenil- 

worth Castle 

8 West Side of Banquet- 

ing Hall, Kenilworth ! 

Castle 
9Mervyn*8 Bower, i 

Kenilworth Cast le I 
10 Kenilworth Castle from . 

West I 

n Guy's Cliffe, Warwick ' 

12 Guy's Well, Guy's 

Cliffe, Warwick I 

13 Warwick Castle from 

the Bridge ' 

14 Cedar Drawing Room, •■ 

Warwick Castle 

15 Guy's Tower, Warwick 

Castle • 

16 Warwick Castle from 

Guy's Tower 

17 Mill Street, Warwick 

18 River Front,' Warwick 

Castle 

19 The Beauchamp Chap- 

el, Warwick 

20 Leicester's Hospital 

and West Gate, vVar- 
wick 

21 Shakespeare's House 

and Henley Street, 
Stratford -on- A von 
iS2 Room in which Shake- 
speare was bom, 
Stratford-on-Avon 

23 Grammar School, Strat- 

ford-on-Avon 

24 Guild Chamber, Strat- 

ford-on-Avon 

25 The Class Room, Gram- 

mar School, Stratford- 
on-Avon 

26 Anne Hathaway's Cot- 

tage, Shottery 

27 The Interior of Anne 

Hathaway's Cottage, 
Shottery 

^ Holy Trinity Parish 
Church, Strrtford-on- 
Avon 

29 Holy Trinity Parish 
Church, Stratford- 
on-Avon 

-30 Chancel, Holy Trinity 
Church, Stratford-on- 
Avon 

SI Inscriptions on Shake- 
speare's Grave, Holy ' 
Trinity Church, 
Stratford-on-Avon 

-32 Shakespeare Memorial 
Theatre, Stratford- 
on-Avon 

33 The Red Horse Hotel, 

S tra t ford -on - Avon 

34 Washington Irving's 

Room, Stratford-on- 
Avon I 

35 Charlecote House, War- j 

wickshire 

36 Mary Arden's Cottage, 

W ilmcote ! 

^7 TJie liattle Field, Eve- < 

sham j 



38 Bell Tower, Evesham, 

from Gardens 

39 All Saints' Church, 

Bell Tower, and St. 
Lawrence Church, 
Evesham 

40 Bell Tower, Evesham 

41 Sulgrave Manor House, 

Northarap tonshire 
(Ancestral Home of 
President Washing- 
ton) 

42 Sulgrave Church, 

Northamp tonshire 
(where the Ancestors 
of President Wash- 
t ington are Buried) 

Thousand Miles Up the 
Nile. 

70 Slides with Reading 
$^.00. 

1 Map of Egypt 

2 Cleopatra's Needle, 

Alexandria 

3 Pomi>ey's Pillar, Alex- 

andria 

4 Shepheard's Hotel, 

Cairo 

5 Street in Cairo 

6 Latticed Window of a 

House in Cairo 

7 Cairo, from the Citadel 

8 Mosque of Mohammed 

All, Cairo 

9 Ablution Font, in 

Mosque of Mo- 
hammed All, Cairo 

10 Cairo, looking towards 

the Citadel 

11 Mosque of Tooloon, 

Cairo 

12 Mosque of Sultan 

Kalaoon, Cairo 

13 Mosque of El Kaitbey, 

Cairo 

14 Mosque of Sultan Ber- 

kook, Cairo 

15 Tombs of the Mem looks, 

Cairo 

16 Palace of Kasr Nasr, 

Cairo 

17 Ancient Fig Tree, 

Heliopolis 

18 Ol^elisk of On 

19 Mosque of Sultan 

Amer, Old Cairo 

20 Nubian Boy, Old Cairo 

21 Mummy of Rameses 

the Great, Geezeh 
Palace 

22 Exterior of Mummy 

Canes 

23 Tri-lingual Inscription 

on Rosetta Stone 

24 Pyramids of Geezeh 

25 Second Pyramid of 

Geezeh and Great 
Sphinx 

26 Stepped Pyramid of 

Sakkara, Memphis 

27 Pyramids of Dashoor 

28 Dahabeeyahs on the 

Nile 

29 Grotto at Beni Hassan 

30 Cemetery at Sioot 

31 Plans of Egyptian 

Temples 

32 Colonnade in Great 

Hall of Temple of 
Seti I„ Abydvis 



83 False Arch in Temple 
of Seti I., Abydns 

34 .Portico of Great Tem- 

ple, Dendera 

35 Pylon of Great Tem- 

ple, Dendera 

36 Temple of Luxor, The- 

bes, from the Nile 

37 Obelisk at Temple of 

Luxor, Thebes 

38 Dromos of Sphinxes, 

Temple of Kamak, 
Thebes 

39 Pylons at Temple of 

Karnak, Thebes 

40 Great Hall, Temple of 

Karnak, Thebes 

41 Columns in Central 

Avenue, Temple of 
Karnak, Thebes 

42 Columns of Great Hail, 

Temple of Kamak, 
Thebes 

43 Sculptures of Shishak, 

Temple of Kamak, 
Thebes 

44 Temple ot Koonia, 

Thebes 

45 Southern Portico of 

Rameseum, Thebes 

46 Prostrate Colossus 

and Eastern Portico 
of Rameseum, The- 
bes 

47 Colossi of Thebes 

48 Osiride Column 8,Great 

Temple of Medinet 
Aboo, Thebes 

49 Hall of Columns, Great 

Temple of Medinet 
Aboo, Thebes 

50 Portico of Temple, 

Esne 

51 Great Temple, Edfoo 

52 Shrine of the Sacred 

Hawk, in Great Tem- 
ple, Edfoo 

53 Pylon of Great Tem- 

pie, Edfoo 

54 Double Temple, Kom 

Ombo 

55 Island of Elphantine 

56 *'Ship of the Desert," 

Assooan 

57 Granite Quarries, 

Assooan 

58 First Cataract of the 

Nile 

59 Island of Philae 

fJb Temple of Isis, Philae 

61 Eastern Colonnade, 

Outer Court, Temple 
of Isis, Philae 

62 * 'Pharaoh's Bed," 

Philae 

63 Mosque of Mishdd, 

Philae 

64 Temple at Kardassy, 

Nubia 

65 Great Temple, Kalab- 

shee, Nubia 

66 Portico of Great Tem- 

ple, Kalabshee 

67 Pylon ol Temple, 

Sabooa, Nubia 

68 Facade of Great Rock 

Temple, Aboo Simbel 

69 Colossal Statue of 

Rameses II., Great 
Rock Temple, Aboo 
Simbel 

70 Facade of Small Bock 

Temple, Aboo Simbel 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE P^G^E \^1% 



MiMNTuaU BATTER V AND Ol'TIOAL CO.. CUICAUO., ILL,, 17. S. J 



3 Triumphal Arc 



I 



_ _ ilomoa's Ponls, Ethnm 
t Uetblehem 
B BeCblehem WomeD 
B SiW 

7 Kachal'B Tomb 
~ Summit or tbe Hill ol 
EtII Counael, JeruB- 

. Plun of Jernsaleni 
10 Tower of H i p u i c u s , 
from the BetUleliem 



i TlBWfromSt. atephen'a 

lIMountotOliTes 

a Vkllef of Jehostaaphat 



SWod Alwiit Jaru 
S GoltlBo Gate 
'm Hoaqne 



Xl Jeriiaalem, from En- 

rogel 
31 Vlltage of Siloam 
ffi Pool %f Siloam 
36 Valler of the Kertron 
S7 Tombs of the KIngB 
88 Tomba of the Jnrtaes 
se "TnrklBh Delight^' 
Ml JBrnaaleniJew 
41 Group of BedoulnB 

43 An Arab Shop 
U Fsraale Figures 

44 Street in fbe Holy City 
4t Honae of (he Kicti Man 

^it Com - -- - 



the 



i B»Tfne of the Kedron 



lllnl 

Btilha'a 



3 BetbaDjr.trom the Road 
> 10 Jaricho 

B Jeruaalem, from Mount 
3Copna 

H Jacob's Well, Sihocham 
■iSCItyof Shecheni 



ee Tbe Pent 
BT Samar- 



■iich 
ij EsdrHPlon 



B! Chapel of the Mensa 

Chriatl 
G3 A Carpenter'B Shop, 

01 Group of NaiareneB 



71 Caeaarea Phlllppi 
7a Source of the ,Iord 
;S Approach to tha O 
74 Cellars of Lebanon 



I called Straight" 



1 Temple of Jupltai 



DotaJlaot Door in Side 

ol Triumphal Arch 

Sfi f a II e n Sculptured 

96 Grand Colonnade, from 
near Triumphal Arch 

37 PlanolColuniB 

98 Archway in Grand 
Colonnade 

W Details of Cnluraaa 

30 Gruud Colounade.from 
E, Arch of Triumphal 



14 Toniba and Sepillcliial 

Towers 
la Small Temple, EaaC of 



I Windsor Castle 

3 OsliorneHouaH 

4 Balmoral Caatle 

f Vice regal, lodge, Dab- 



3 Great Portal, Temple 

of Jupiter 

4 Temple of Jupiter and 

Great Columns of 
Temple of the Sun 

6 Great Columns of Tem- 

« Thr^e &reat Stones in 
W. Wall of Temple 
Platform 

7 Plan of Tampla Build- 

la til re, Temple of the 

e Columns at E. End of 
Periatyl - 



""ES 



« BroVeii Statue 



IS The Castle.f ram Grand 
Colonnacte 



T Hertun Collage, Ox. 

8 King's College, Caiu- 

briiige 

9 Nottingham Castle 

10 Sherwood Korast 

11 Haddon Hall 

IS Warwirk Caatla 

13 Conway, Bridge and 

15 Liverpool — Church 

16 Maavhester— P i o o a . 

dllly 

17 York MInater from 

city walld 

18 Dropping Well Enara- 

borough 

19 Barnard I'astle 

20 nUawater 

21 Derwent water 
W Dnmfriea 

23 Burn's monument Kil- 

marnock 

24 GUngow cathedral 
W DnnataSnage caatle 



3S DuTfernilins Abbey 

33 Melrose AbtieT 

34 Abbot Bford 
39 Edinburgh 



Jentrai Doorway, 40 BriiliOBn Bridge, 
Temple nl the Sun Mitm-j 

FOR PRICE LrST OF SLIDES SEE PJk&E. \^T- 



262 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, i^l., u. s. a. 



41 Muckross Abbey 

42 Gap of Dunloe 

43 Blarney Castle 

44 Cork Cathedral 

45 Queenstown Harbor 

46 Giants Causeway 

47 The British Army 

48 The British Navy 

49 The Houses of Parlia- 

ment 
ftO Portrait of Queen Vic- 
toria 

The liowlands of Scot- 
land. 

50 slides, $25.00. 

With descriptive Lecture, 

1 Introduction 

2 Edinburgh from Calton 

HiU 

3 Edinburgh — Holyrood 

Palace 

4 Edinburgh— Scott Mon- 

ument 

5 Edinburgh Castle from 

Grassmarket 

6 Edinburgh— Old Town 

from Princes Street 

7 Roslin Glen and Castle 

8 Roslin Chapel 

9 Roslin Chapel, Interior, 

Prentice Pillar 

10 Craigmillar Castle 

11 Tan tall on Castle and 

Bass Rock 

12 North Berwick Law 

13 Direlton Castle 

14 Norham Castle 

15 Twisel Castle 

16 Jedburgh Abbey 

17 The Capon Tree, Jed- 

burgh 

18 Kelso Abbey 

19 Floors Castle 

20 Branksome Tower 

21 Dryburgh Abbey— Sir 

Walter Scott's Tomb 

22 Melrose Abbey from 

Southwest 

23 Melrose Abbey, East 

Window 

24 Abbotsford from River 

25 Abbotsford, the Study 

26 St. Ronan's WeU 

27 P^bles 

28 Neidpath Castle 

29 Newark Castle 

30 Hogg's Monument and 

St. Mary's Loch 

31 The**Grey Mare's Tale" 

32 Beld Ci-aig Linn, Moffat 

33 Caerlaverock Castle 

34 Dundrennan Castle 

36 Dumfries, Burn's Mau- 
soleum 

36 Lincluden Abbey 

37 On the Nith at Drum- 

lanrig 

38 Ayr, the «' Twa Brigs " 

39 Ayr, Burn's Cottage 

40 Ayr, Burn's Monument 

41 Ayr, Alloway Kirk 

42 Bonnie Doon 

43 Stair House 

44 Catrine Lee 

45 Ballochmyle House 

46 Bothwell Castle 

47 Falls of Clyde, Bonning. 

ton 

48 Falls of Clyde, Cora 

Linn 



49 Falls of Clyde, Stone- 

byres 

50 Linlithgow Palace 

Switzerland. 

50 slides, $25.00. 
With descriptive Lecture. 

1 Geneva, from Bridge 

over Rhone 

2 Chamounix and Mount 

^ Brevent 

3 Tete Noire, first peep 

of Mont Blanc 

4 Tete Noire, Sylvan 

^ route 
6 Tete Noire, from Roche 

6 Tete Noire Valley 

7 Mer de Glace, from the 

F16g6re 

8 Mer de Glace 

9 Mer de Glace 

10 Dome de Goutez Gla- 

cier des Bossons 

11 Mont Blanc, from Gla- 

ciers 

12 Mer de Glace 

13 Vemayaz, Pissevache 

Cascade 

14 Vemayaz. Gorge du 

Trient 
16 Vemayaz. Gorge du 
Trient 

16 Zermatt and the Mat- 

terhorn 

17 Zermatt. The Riffel- 

haus 

18 Zermatt and the Mat- 

terhorn 

19 The Matterhorn, from 

Mettelhorn 

20 The Matterhorn, from 

Gornergrat 

21 The Lyskamm and 

Twins 

22 Monte Rosa 

23 Brieg, Simplon Gorge 

and Mount Leone 

24 Brieg and Bel Alp 

26 St. Gothard. Pont du 
Diable 

26 Pont du Diable 

27 Pont du Diable. St. 

Gothai*d 

28 Hospenthal and Mont 

Tibbia 

29 Amstag 

30 Maderaner Thai., 

31 Maderaner Huflhorn 

and Breithorn 

32 Maderaner, Stauerbach 

Cascade 

33 Amstag, from the Reuss 

Bridge 

34 Viesch Glacier and 

Finsterhorn 

35 Altsch Horn, Jungfi-au, 

Little Aletsch Glacier 

36 Meerjelensee, Aletsch 

Horn and Glacier 

37 Furca, Todtensee, and 

Finsteraarhorn 

38 Rhone Glacier and Ho- 

tel 

39 Rhone Crevasse and 

Glacier 

40 Grmdewald. Ice Cave 

41 Kandersteg, Blumlis 

Alp and Oexhinen 
..Lake 



42 Loeche lea Bains and 

..Gemmi Pass 

43 Loeche lea Bains, Lad- 

der Pass 

44 Sion. Rhone Valley 

46 Vevay, Montreux and 
Dent du Midi 

46 The Castle of Chlllon, 

Front Entrance 

47 The Castle of ChiUon, 

from the water 

48 Ouchy HoteL Bean 

Bivage 
48 Lausanne, from the 

promenade 
50 Lausanne, Castle and 

Cathedral 

The Mediterranean. 

50 slides, $25.00. 
With descriptive liecture, 

1 Gibraltar 

2 Gibraltar from Europa 

Point 

3 Gibraltar Town and 

Bay 

4 Barcelona, the Harbor 
6 Marseilles from Notre 

Dame de la Garde 

6 Marsei^es, Cathedral of 

Notre Dame de la 
Garde 

7 Marseilles, Fort Napo- 

leon, etc. 

8 Marseilles, View in the 

Harbor 

9 Marseilles, Museum 

Fountains 

10 Cannes from La Call- 

fomie 

11 Cannes from Mount 

Chevalier 

12 Cannes, Mount Oheva- 

lier from the Beach 

13 Cannes, Cathedral Tow- 

er. Mount Chevalier 

14 Antibes 

16 Nlce,fromViUe Franche 
Road 

16 Nice, Jardin Anglais 

17 Corsica 

18 Nice, the Bay 

19 Nice, Promenade des 

Anglais 

20 Nice, View in the Har- 

bor 

21 Nice, View in the Har. 

bor with Piers 

22 Nice, Les Quais 

23 Monaco, Monte Carlo 

24 Monaco, Monte Carlo 

Gardens 

25 Monaco, Monte Carlo 

Gardens 

26 Mentone, Old Town 

from HiEtrbor 

27 Mentone, Promenade 

28 Genoa from f^ve the 

Railway Station 

29 Genoa, Christopher Co- 

lumbus 

30 Naples from San Elmo 

31 Naples, Bay and Vesu- 

vius 

32 Naples, Marina and San 

Elmo 

33 Sorrento, from Capodi- 

monte 

34 Capri, The Marina 

35 Capri 

36 Amalfl 

37 Messina, from thie HiiU 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co„ chiuago, ill., u. s. a 



a Plaiz&dei Popolo 
1 Coh""" "' i-«.^*h«.. 
C< 
a Fin< 



4Z MalU, EntranuH 

ta Malta, H. M.'B Fleet aod 
TroopBhip. 

44 Algiers, General View 

&om Harbor 

45 Algiers with Boule- 

48 Algiers from Marei 

47 Algiers, Palma In J 

dm d' Assay 

48 Algiers, Pafuia In J 



M slides, t^a.OO. 
Wiih deicHpliva Leaturi 
1 ViBw Ironi the French 

sat. Petards from the 
- ■ n Gallery 






a St. Pr 

borne 
B St. Peter's, I 

7 Chiaramonti 



HiU 
JO TatnplBof VBBta 
ll Temple ol Castor and 

Pollns 
IS San Lorenxo, On 

the Walls 
IB temple ot Fanstlna, 



j( Titus 

IB Arch of TlCns, Bas-re- 

"it (7CandleatU'Jis) 



19 Arch of Titns, Bas-rt 
"t (the Chariots) 

ta Ban Maggiore 

SI Porta 3an Lorenzo 
sa Porta Ban Paolo 
39 Porta San Giovanni 
St Tomb of Ce<ielia Me- 

V Basllluaof ConstaaCine 

% Baiilica of Constantine 

(near) 
ar Island in the Tiber 
SS Fslaizo Qnlrinaie 
% Palazzo del Laierano 
3D Villa Hedlri 
ai at. Angelo 
«1 Fontana Paolino 
n Fontana dl Trevi 
U The Collsenni 



47 Foriira ol Trajan 

48 Column of Phocaa 

49 The rapilol 

M Santa Maria Maggiore 

Italy. 

SO slides, tffi.OD. 
With deto-iptitie Leelure, 

1 Turin, Palazzo Carlg- 

2 Turin, dhuroh of Gran 

Madre -" "'- 



Turin .Uapucbin MonnI 
—■ '^'™-itery 
dral 



and itt , 

4 Milan Cathedral 

B BaTeno.LakeMaggioi 



I>ogcs, Bronze Foun- 
tain in Courtyard 
Venire, the Bridge of 



Campanile frai 
IB Florence. Palazzi 



, Loggia d 



2S Naples, Harbor from 

S7 Naples, St. Elmo and 

Marina 
3S Naples, St. Lu<*la and 

(Tastello dell'Ovo 
W Naples, rlaiEadelPIeb- 

10 Naples, PalHiio Realo 



, ChHT 



X Piazza Navona 

S bteps of I'll 
Spagna 



Villa Naiionale S7 Siena, General View 
-■ innment in 28 The Cathedral, Siena 
1 lie Martirl 2» The Three Porches 
Siena 

30 AreEio, Birthplace tt 

31 Falls of Temi, rmbria 
FOR PRICE LrST Or SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



V, from Monte Pin- 



i,theForn 



38 Pompeii, the TempU ol 

39 Pompeii, the PaotheoB 

40 Pompeii, the House ol 

the Small Fountain 

41 Pompeii, the House oC 

42 Pompeii, the Amphi- 

theatro 

43 Pompeii, the Street oC 

■4 palen ™ 

- ''Isa. ,. 

thedral a 

*na Tower 

4S uenoB, Auove the Bail- 
way Station 
4a Genoa, Palazzo Daoale 
00 Genoa, Christopher Co- 
London to Rcnne. 
SO slides, tSi.OO. 
With deaoTiptive LactUTl. 
1 Rouen Cathedral 






10 Milan Cathedral 

11 On the Grand Canal, 

IS The Leaning Tower of 

13 The Baptistery, Pisa 

14 Interior of Baptisterj 

and Piaano'H Pnlpii. 

15 The Cathedral, Pisa 

10 The LeanlDg Tower, 
nnptiri tery andCathe- 



SI Chiireh or S. Gtactnuo, 
Magglars, and House 
of Kassinl, Bologna 

92 Florence.Irom San «ln- 



34 Sonth Fomh and Scnlp- 
tares.Oa thedral j'loi- 

SB North Porch and Sculp. 
turea.Cathedr«l,Flor- 



a§i JfCDITOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



82 Afeb ^ Constantine, 
BiMne 

88 The Coliseum, Rome 
84 Arch of Titus, Rome 
86 Dome of St. Peter's, 
from the Pope's Gard- 
ens, Vatican, Rome 
86 The Chairamonti Cor. 
ridor, Vatican, Rome 

37 The Bracchia Nuovo, 

Vatican. Rome 

38 Colossal Statue of the 

Nile, Vatican, Rome 
30 The Meleager, Vatican, 
Rome 

40 The Laocoon, Vatican, 

Rome 

41 The Apollo Belvedere, 

Vatican, Rome 

42 The Mercury of Belve- 

dere, Vatican, Rome 

43 Perseus by Can ova, 

Vatican, Rome 

44 Gallery of Statues, 

Vatican, Rome 

45 The Ariadne, Vatican, 

Rome 

46 Lucius Verus,in Roman 

Military Costume, 
Vatican, Rome 

47 Hall of the Busts, Vati- 

can, Rome 

48 Adonis, Cabinet of 

Masks, Rome 

49 Gallery of Vases and 

Candelabi-a, Vatican, 
Rome 

50 Hall of the Animals, 

Vatican, Rome 

Amertcan Franklin 

Search !Expedi- 

tion. 

20 slides, with reading, $10. 

1 Introduction 

2 Map 

3 Adapting his party to 

Eskimo life 

4 Astonishing the Na- 

tives 

5 The halt at noon. 

6 Down hill 

7 Hay's River, Big Bend 

8 A R«indeer Hunt 

9 Catcning Salmon at 

Salmon creek 

10 The Midnight sun 

11 The breaking up of the 

ice 

12 A Summer View m the 

Arctic regions 

13 A Summer view— King 

William's Land 

14 Finding the grave of 

Lieut. Irving 

15 Monument erected 

over Irving's grave 

16 View of Reindeer 

Camp 

17 Monument at Starva- 

tion Cove 

18 Crossing Simpson's 

Strait 

19 Funeral of Lieut Ir- 

ving's Remains 

20 Sir John Franklin's 

Monument 

General DeHcription and 
Statistics of London 

48 slides, with reading, $24. 
1 Map of London, 1 mile 
round St. Paul's 



I ^2 Map of London, 4 miles 
round St. Paul's 

3 Buckingham palace 

4 St. James' palace 

5 Houses of Parliament 

6 The house or hall of 

Peers 

7 The hall or house of 

Commons 

8 Westminster Abbey 

9 TheNave,lWestmin8ter 

Abbey 

10 St. Thomas' Hospital 

11 Victoria embankment 

12 Lambeth palace 

13 Blackfriars Bridge 

14 London Bridge 

15 The Foreign Office 

16 The Horse Guards 

17 The Admiralty 

18 Trafalgar Square 

19 The National Gallery 

20 Charing Cross Hotel 

21 Somerset House 

22 Temple Bar 

23 The Temple Church 

24 St. Paul's Cathedral 
26 ** " «• the 

Interior 

26 The General Post Office 

27 The Guildhall 

28 Interior of Guildhall 

29 The Mansion House 

30 The Bank of England 

31 The Royal Exchange 

32 The Monument 

83 The Custom House 

34 The Tower of London 

35 ♦♦ *♦ ♦« 
The Crown Jewels 

36 The Tower of London, 

Group of Warders 

37 The Tower of London, 

The Horse Armory 

38 Chelsea Hospital 

39 Royal Horticultural 

Society's Gardens 

40 Royal Albert Hall of 

Arts and Sciences 

41 Interior of Albert Hall 

42 Albert Memorial 

43 ♦* " Europe 

44 " ** Asia 

45 " " Africa 

46 " " America 

47 The Marble Arch 

48 The British Museum 

Ben Nevis and its Obser- 
vatory. 

16 slides, with reading, $8. 

1 Ben Nevis and Inver- 

lochy Castle 

2 Ben Nevis from Corpach 

3 " " and Fort 
William 

4 Ben Nevis from Bana- 

vie 

5 Path up Ben Nevis 

6 Climbing Ben Nevis "A 

Rest by the Way" 

7 Glen Nevis 

8 On Ben Nevis, above 

the Clouds 

9 On the Summit of Ben 

Nevis 

10 The Observatory on 

Ben Nevis 

11 The Laboratory in Ob- 

servatory 

12 Observatory in June 

after a storm 



13 Observatory^in Noyem- 

ber 

14 Observatory Tower 

covered with Fog 
Crystals 

15 Fog in the Valley 

16 View from Ben Nevis 

looking N. 

Berlin. 

46 slides, $23.00. 

1 Railway Station, Alex. 

ander Place 

2 King Street 

3 Place of the Old Pal- 

ace 

4 The Chapel of the Pal 

ace 

5 The Palace of the 

Crown Prince 

6 Unterden Linden 
"J t* <( it 

8 Royal Palace Guard 

House 

9 Palace of the Emperor 

10 Statue of Frederick 

the Great 

11 The Old Museum 

12 Front of Old Museum 

13 Steps of the Old Mu- 

seum 

14 Old Berlin 

15 " " 

16 Oldest house in Berlin 

17 The river Spree 

18 The Cathedral 

19 St. Hedwig'8 Church 

20 The Thiergarten 

21 Royal Dramatic 

Theatre 

22 Schiller Monument 

23 National Gallery 

24 Statue of King Wil- 

liam III. 

25 Statue of Queen 

Louise 

26 A branch of the New 

Lake 

27 The Lowenbrucke 

28 Brandenburger Gate 

29 Monument of Victory 

30 Belle V ue Palace 

31 Marble Palace 

32 Leipsic Street 

33 The French Church 

34 Roval Opera House 

35 FrederickWiliiamUni- 

versity 

36 The Arsenal 

37 The front of the Ar- 

senal 

38 Entrance to Emperor 

William Street. 

39 The Exchange 

40 The Mint 

41 Bruder Street 

42 The Fisherbridge 

43 Alexander Plaice 

Market 

44 The Cycle Course 

45 Charlotte nburg Poly. 

technic 

46 The MiUtary Band 

The Pictaresque Scenery 
of I>e von stair e. 

50 slides, with reading, $25. 

1 Barnstaple, the Old 

Bridge 

2 Lynmouth, from the 

Footpath 

3 Lynmouth, Old Cot. 

tages from the Pier 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery anu op-tical uo.. chriago. ill., u. s. a. sm 


4 WoodsiileC'DCtatEeaand 


The EnElUb L*ke 


13 Kakdale VallBir and 


and Bridge .rivur Lyn 


ULtrtet. 


Village of Boot 


t The rails at Waieri- 




H View near the Old Mill, 


8 L^iTciif anj Vyn- 


M slides, with reading, las. 


Eikdale 




Ifl Stanley Gill Bskdale 
WOonlstonVlihigeand 


mouth 


1 Map showing the route 


TLyntou, tbe Village 


taken 


lake 


B Vallej- of Roclia, Lyn- 




17 View ot the Copper 




ylew 


Mines. Conlalou 


R Castle Rock, nesTLyn- 


S Windermere lake and 


w *"''™o1|*^-J'^ijy-«i'« 




Bowiiess, from Dnint 








IS Chapte^r HoTse-Fur- 


boroasta 


IBo^ness, from the 


uess Abbey 


11 Iltrecombe. (rom Cap- 




90 Grange over Sands 


■UnHill 


S Winder mere lake. Bow. 




1! Bea<^hBt Ilfracombe 


nesn, M:, from Fur- 




1» Bideford from Fort 


ness Keifs 


The Italian Ijikes. 




a waterhead. Winder- 






mere lake 


60 slides, with reading. tSS. 


the pebble Ridge 


7 Ambleside Churrh 




ISOloyelly.lrooithePier 


s AmbleBidelromLaiigb. 


1 Street In BellinBona 


16 Street In Clo.ellj, look. 


...Sgi'r.,»,-A.. 


a Locarno from the Pier 




3 '■ the Grand Piazza 


IT Street inClovElly.look- 






IBClllfiilSflBeschat 




from tbe Town 


blealde 


fi Madonna del Sasso 


Olovelly 


IJ Skelwilli Foree 


from the Heights 


CM°iaHlfl """ 




8 Cannobo from the 








and Laiigdale Pikes 
U Dungeon Gill, Laog- 


7 Moccagno from tbe 
Lake 






a Lulno from the Lake 


Hills 


IS v'lew oVlhtVothay, at 


9 Intra Irom the Pier 


MOW Water Mill at 


livdal 
16 Byiial Lake, looking 


10 Laveno from the Luke 


Chagford 


11 PaltsDza, Plaiia Gari- 


2S Vixeo Tor, Dmmoor 






S4 Tavlatock-^enoral 


17 Rydal Mount, lateTBEl- 


13 Villa Clan, Baveno 


View 


ienceoiWordBworth 


13 Bareoolrom tbo Hills 


U Tuvistoek-The Abbey 


18 Wfttertall. Rydalpark 


11 Strcsaand Lake Mag. 


BulIdinKB 
M Lrdlord WsterlaH 


19 Grssmere Lake and 


golrefrum the Hills ' 


M UllBWaKr lake and 


IS Uola Holla from the 
Shore 


37 Flyinonth-View Iron. 


iheHoB 


Mountain Irom Place 


16 Isola Bella, tbe Grotto 


38 Flrmouth Hoe, Iiom 
tL Pier 






21 Pat tenia le Church and 


17 Arona'fnfmlhe Lake 


MFlshlDg Boat sailing 


Old yew Tree 


19 Lake UrU [rom the 


K U lis water lake and 




30 ri^iaonlb— tbe Gnild- 




la Tbe Lake at Orta 






20 Market Place, Oria 


31Ivybria|[e-viflW0Dthe 
riTer Enne 


a3Styl«rrow Crag-tills. 


31 Street in OrU 


water lake 


e^ Island of San OuUio, 


MTotnea — the High 


ai Aim Force— Gowbar- 


Lake Drta 






23 Madonna del Monte, 


3S Berry Pomeroy Castle 


25 ThiWinere Lake 




3* " ' 


H Keawiok, Irom Castle 


El LnganoandMonteBrs 


-Interior 


Hill 


3S Lugano and Monte 


3S Dartmouth and the 


37 Keswii'k Market Place 








36 Lugano and St. Loren. 


38 View np the Dart (rora 


K De?WBnl"aler, Friar's 


zo Church 


Dartmouth 


Craig. Ac 

W View from Friar's 


3H Lugano from ^e Lake 






Craig, tierwenlwater 


aOThrWood Market, Ln. 


38 Brlxham.tho harbor Ac 


30 Baaaenthwaite lake 


gano 


S> Briiham Trawlers 


31 Cookermonth, general 


30FrascobyLuiiisatth« 


« Berry Head from Sonth 


Yiew 




Fort 


32 Cockermouth Castle, 


3! Osteno, entrance to 


41 Toiq nay and the Harbor 


the Keep 


the Grotto 


B Torquay, from the 


33 Lodore Falls 


32 Porlezia, tbe Landlnc 


Warren 


31 VlewoIDerwentwater 


Place, fto ^ 


11 SatumlArch, Tormiay 
U AnstisCove. near Tor- 




^ "a"n°d'!SS^'l''S»;2''' 


se Borrowdalc valley 


quay 


36 The Bowder Stone- 


31BelUgg.o,tbeViaSer- 


U Sabhavombe Buy and 


Borrow dale 


belloSi 


Beach 
18 Teigninouth — general 


S7 Ca»lleCraigand valley 
— Borrowdale 


38 Vlew^f^im^Parkol'™ 


view 


3B Buttermere hiika, from 


Villa Serbelloni 


17 Dawliah. (rom the west 


37 Tropical Plants In nr. 


oiiir 


the Meadows 


laExmouth-tbeetraDd 






18 Eieter Cathedral, the 
west front 


11 Wastdale Village and 
Valley 


38 Lake Como, UiTedo 
and Island Comaclna 


SO Exeter Cathedral, the 


43 Mill at iiiil Banks near 


38 View Irom above Sala, 






Looking north 


FOR PRICE 


LIST OF SLIDES SE 


E PAGE 127. 

U 



256 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U.S. 



j»L. 



40 Torrigia, from the Lake 

41 Como, the Harbor and 

Landinj^ Place 

42 General view of Como 

43 Como and the Lake, 

from Baradello Hill 



44 Milan Cathedral from 

the Piazza 

45 View on the roof of 

Milan Cathedral 

46 Lecco, general view 

47 Lake Lecco and Moun. 



tains from the bridge 

48 Lecco, from the shore 

49 Gravedona, from the 

Lake 

50 Colico, the Diligence 

Office, &c 



"GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS." 

50 slides. With descriptive Lecturet $25.00. 



1 Introductory 

2 Our First Iceberg 

3 Amon^ the Young Ice 

4 Spannmg 

5 The Crow's Nest 

6 Fast to Land Ice 

7 The £agle's Nest 

8 A Dead Walrus 

9 Iceberg near Disco 

10 Our First Kyak 

11 An Omiack or Woman's 

Boat 

12 Noaswak 

13 A Sleigh and Do^s 

14 Group of Esquimaux 

Dogs 

15 A Visit from the Gov- 

ernor 

16 Upemivik 

17 On the Ice at Upemivik 

18 "Making off" Walrus 

Skins 



19 The Governor of Uper- 

nivik 

20 Two of the Governor's 

Children 

21 Four Native Girls 

22 Seal Fishing 

23 Heavy Ice in Melville 

Bay 

24 A Quiet Day in Mel , llle 

Bay 

25 Ship beside Iceberg 

26 Blasting the Ice 

27 A very Xarge Iceberg 

28 Cape York and Conical 

Island 

29 Group of Arctic High- 

landers 

30 Dalrymple Rock 

31 A Day's "Bag" 

32 An Esquimaux of Eta 

Close 

33 Snaring Eider Duck 

34 A Polar Bear 



35 A Young Bear 

36 Whaling— The Whale's 

Tongue 

37 WhaUng— The Whale'b 

Fin 

38 Whaling— The Whale's 

Lip 

39 Whaling— Whalebone 

40 Whaling— Wlialebone 

41 Whaling— The Whale's 

Tail 

42 Whaling— Harpoons 

43 Our Constant Compan- 

ions 

44 A Group on the Quarter- 

Deck 

45 A Small Arctic Specimen 

46 Two Esquimaux 

47 "Kate Mackay" 

48 An Esquimaux Encamp- 

ment 

49 Off Cape Hooper 

50 The Last Iceberg 



MOROCCO AND THE MOORS. 



1 On Board Steamer 

2 Rock of Gibraltar 

3 Tangier, General View 

4 Tangier, from South- 

west 

5 Tangier, Street View 

6 Tangier, Street View 

7 Tangier, Lower Soko 

8 Tangier, Moorish Well 

9 Tangier, Water Carrier 

10 Tangier, Water Seller 

11 Tangier, South Port 

12 Tangier, Entrance to 

the Kasbah 

13 Tangier, the Treasury 

14 Tangier, Court House 

15 Tangier, Sultan's Palace 

16 Tangier,Sultan's Palace, 

walls of Throne 
Room 

17 Tangier, View from 

Kasbah 

18 Tangier, Upper Soko 

19 Tangier, Upper Soko 

20 Tangier, Fish Market 

21 Tangier, Moorish Wo- 

man 

22 Tangier, Shoeing Forge 

23 Tangier, Snake Charm- 

ers 

24 Tangier, Negro Minstrel 

25 Tangier, Negro Minstrel 

26 Tangier, Negro 

27 Tangier, An Old Slave 

28 Tangier, Negresses 

29 Tangier, A Donkeyinan 

30 Tangier, Villa de France 

Hotel 
81 Tangier, Saint's Mosque 
32 Tangier, Funeral Pro- 
cession 
83 Tangier, View from 
Mountain 



45 slides, With Lecture^ $22.50. 

34 Tangier, Cape Spartel 

35 Tangier, Cape Spartel 

(Interior) 

36 Tangier, The Beach 

27 Tangier, Roman Bridge 

38 Tangier, Moorish Bridge 

39 Tangier, Entrance to 

Mosque 

40 Tangier, Entrance to 

Shops i 

41 Tangier, A Shopkeeper 

42 Tangier, Exterior of | 

House 

43 Tangier, Interior of i 

House I 

44 Tangier, Moorish Gentle. I 

man 

45 Tangier, Moorish Walk- 

ing Costume 

46 Tangier, Eating Kiskos- 

son 

47 Tangier, Tea Drinking 

48 Tangier, a Rich Moor 

49 Tangier, a Jewess 

50 Tangier, a Jewish Lad 

Ultima Thule, or Round 
the Shetland Islands. 

36 slides, $18.00. 

With descriptive Lecture. 

1 Lerwick, General View 

2 Lerwick, Coininercial 

Street 

3 Lerwick, from South 

4 Lerwick, the Nab 

5 Lerwick, Town Hall 

a Lerwick, Drying Fish 

7 Bressay, The Light- 

house 

8 Bressay, Orkneyman's 

Cave 



9 Bressay, Giant's Leg 

10 Holm of Noss 

11 Cradle of Noss 

12 The Noup of Noss 

13 A Shetland Croft 

14 Shetland Pony 

15 View from Upper Sound 

16 Ness of Sound 

17 Peat Carriers 

18 Leebiton 

19 Pictish Castle, Mousa 

20 Sumburgh Head 

21 Rums of Jarlshoff 

22 Fitful Head 
2;^ Speggie Bay 

24 Scalloway 

25 Hillswick, the Drongs 

26 Hillswick, Gordie Stack 

27 Stenness, Fishermen's 

Huts 

28 Stenness, the DoreHolm 

29 Grind of the Navir 

30 Holes of Scrada 

31 Rona's Hill and Voe 

32 Steamship Earl of Zet- 

land 

33 Muness Castle 

34 Muckle Head of Balta 

35 Loch of Cliff 

36 Muckle Flugga Light 

house 

Three Weeks in the Unit- 
ed States and Canada. 

30 slides, $15.00. 

1 S. S. Parisian 

2 Halifax, Nova Scotia 

3 Boston, City Hall 

4 Boston, Public Gardens 

5 Boston, Square 

6 New York, Broadway 

7 New York, Broadway 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MiINTOSH U 



L CO., OHl(JA(;o, ILL., U. S. A. 



S New YorV, 

ONew York, 

Park, the La_ . 
.1 New Vork, Brooklyn 

a Pliiladeliihto, Chealnn 

3 Philailelpliift, lodepen 

dcnru Hnll 
i Balllmore, Harlmr 



IB Chicago 

SO Niagara Kalla 

21 Montreal, SlioatinK (I 

BBpida 
as Montreal, (rooi Mou: 

Eoyal 
13 MnaCreal, St. Jamc 



IgO'BBlBirHFia 

uotcur Castle 
II Lflch, Lovli- 



% Snow Cutting on (be 

3B Dunkeld Cathedral 

40 Oa the Tay at Uiinkcld 

41 Qneen'8 Vie«, Pass of 

Killiect'HnkiB 
3 Blair Aihnle 
43 Taymoiith Castle 
U Fallj or Monees 
48 Killln 
te CallaDdeiamlBenLedi 

47 TroasBchs Hotel 

48 Silver Strand Lnph Kn- 



Ii-nn-gar | 33 Anne Uachaway'a 

>nd Ben ! 84 SCni^onl Church 

; ss Gntbelney Manor Hauae 



B Inv 



ranald 

Lorh Lon>a 



alia 



din 
SS The Magician Throwi 

Perfume on the Plre 
sa Aladdin In the En- 

chanted Palace 
40 Aladdin TakGi the Magic 

Lamn to hla Mother 

mn Determines to 



Mar 



II Stirling Caatle 

he RoKunce orHlitoryi 



thoP 
Mother Pro- 
- Vaae ol 

D Sultan 
eta PoB. 

n Enraged a 



n Quahei^. Irom the River 
S Uaebec.thB Citadel 
a Quebei', Breakneck 



al aUdes, tSIUW. 

With Reading. 

1 GluBgDW Cathedral 
a GlBBgow UnlTerail; 

3 BroDmielaw Bridge, 

Glasgow 

4 Dumbarton Cattle 



CuBt 



S Rothesay 

B Eyieaof Bute 

.1 iDverarjr Cantle 



_... __. _. of London, 1 
St. John's Cbapel I 



1 'Windsor Caatle.Geaen 
i Windsor Castle, Jtoun 



IB Kilcbam Castle, Loc 

Awe. 
U Olencoe 

^ IS Falls ol Foyers 

18 Crqnhart Castle, Loc 

Ness 
W Inremesa 

, SI Stronie Ferry 
4 OW Man of Storr, Skye 
33 Needle Rook, Skye 
U fit. KUda 

, 99 Callanisb Stones, S 

' W Herring Fleet at S 

W Flow Bill ale, Galrlo. 
SB Loch Maree 
IS Dnorohln Caalle 
30 Elgin Cnthednil 



General View 

Confasaor 
Wealmlnster Abbey, Je- 
rusalem Chamber 

la Henry VIII, and Anne 
Boleyn'a Tree 

IB Temple Bar 

14 Painted Hikll,Greonwluh 

~* Hogarth's Laughing An- 

. IB Hogarth's Beer Street 

r 17 Hogarth's Gin Lane 

I 10 Hogarth's Gates of Cal- 



ais 

19 Ho^rth's 

20 Hogarth's 
11 Hampton ( 
n Thef 



9(1 Netley Ahliey 
sa Rafns Stone 



43 aUdes, (I24.aa 
WUli Deseriptive Lature. 



bavid 



Life 



Extracts a 
m the Lion's 



B Death of Davld'e Child 

10 Death of Absalom 

11 David Mourning for Ab- 

13 The Judgment ol Soi- 
ls Androrles Buns Away 

Thorn ! 

IS Androcles ran 

Under the Li 

lection 
Ifl Androcles ie Discovered 
IT Androcles in the Arena 
18 Androciea Released 
IS Babylonian Lion 

31 BraCmin Bull 

33 Eland 

i3 Sing Sing Antelope 

34 The Markhoor 
SS The Khmoi'eroa 

26 The Syrian Bear 

27 Zebra and Colt 
23 Eleiihanta- 

S The Sea Lion 
SOGoodr.blldat Work 
31 Goodchlld In Oburuh 
■ 32 Idle Aiiprontice Phiying 
Pitch and T— 
Goortcnlld 8 
Confldenc.B 
I Uaetcr 

! 34 Idle Ap|>rE 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



858 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



I a in the 



35 Goodchild Taken into 

Partnership 
»Qoo afliad is Mftde Al. 

demnm 

37 Idle Apprentice Be- 

trayed 

38 Idle Apprentice Charged 

with Robbery 

39 Idle Apprentice Sent- 

enced to Death 

40 Goodchild Proclaimed 

Lord Mayor 

41 Cinderella 

Kitchen 

42 A Fairy Godmother Vis- 

its Her 

43 Cinderella Dressed for 

the Ball 

44 Cinderella Starts for the 

BaU 
46 Cinderella and the 
Young Prince 

46 The Prmce Finds the 

Slipper 

47 The Proclamation 

48 Cinderella Married to 

the Prince 

Children's Entertain- 
ment. No. 2. 

48 slides, $24.00. 

With Descriptive Lecture. 

1 The Wanderoo 

2 The Lion 

3 The Leopard 

4 The Roe 

6 The Camel 

6 The Needle's Eye 

7 The Horse 

8 The Ass 

9 The Wild Ass 

10 Sheep 

11 Scrub's First Start in 

Life 

12 Alfred Pami)erfleld In- 

troduced 

13 Cook and Housemaid 

Questioning Scrub 

14 Scrub in the Kitchen 

16 Pamperfleld Goes to 
the Theater 

16 Scrub Resists Pamper- 

fleld 's Temptation 

17 Patty Scolds Scrub 

18 Pamperfleld with His 

Gliass and Bottle 

19 Scrub Saves Alfred 

20 Scrub Promoted 

21 Scrub a Sunday. School 

Teacher 

22 The Old Oak Chest 

23 "I'll Hide,I'll Hide," She 

Merrily Cried 

24 Its Lid was Raised 

She an Instant Gazed 
26 Then in She Stepped, 
Her Bright Kobe 
Swept 

26 They Sought Her all 

Night 

27 For They Marked how 

He Sighed for His 
Lovely Bride 

28 By the Old Sepulchral 

Chest 

29 The Two Mules 

30 The Swallow and the 

Little Birds 

31 The Thieves and the Ass 

32 The Wolf Turned Shop- 

herd 



33 The Cat and the Old 

Rat 

34 The Sick Lion and the 

39 W88hhi|f INty 

36 Oh What a Guy! 

37 Open Your Mouth and 

Shut Your Eyes 

38 Seven A. M. 

39 seven P. M. 

40 Look for the Towel Be- 

fore you Soap Your 
Face 

41 DicK Longs to go to Lon- 

don 

42 Dick Found on a Door- 

step 

43 Dick Buy's a Cat 

44 Dick on Highgate Hill 
40 Dick's Cat at the King's 

Dinner 

46 Dick Receives the Price 

of His Cat 

47 Dick Knighted 

48 Dick Marries Alice 

Pilgrim's Progress. 

40 slides, $20.00. 

Photographed from Life 
Models and unth Specially 
Painted Scenery 

With Descriptive Lecture. 

1 Portrait of Bunyan 

2 Bunyan Alarmed for 

the Salvation of His 
Soul 

3 Bunyan Listens to 

Three Women 

4 Bunyan Parting with 

His Wife and Chil- 
dren 

5 Bunyan's Tomb 

«6 Christian Reading His 

Book 
«6A Christian and Evan- 
gelist 
*7 Christian, Pliable and 

Obstinate 
*8 Christian Helped out of 

the Slough 
*9 Worldly Wisemen 
♦10 Christian Under Sinai 
*11 Christian Knocking at 

the Gate 
*12 Goodwill shows Chris- 
tian the Way 
♦13 Passion and Patience 

14 The Fire Burning 

15 The Man with the stout 

Countenance 

16 The Man in the Cage 
♦17 Christian's Burden falls 

ofl- 
♦18 The Three Shining Ones 
♦19 Christian in the Arbor 
*20 Christian at the Door of 

Palace Beautiful 
*21 Christian Armed 
*22 Christian defeats ApoU- 

yon 
*22a Christian Returns 

Thanks 
*23 The Valley of the Shad- 
ow of Death 
*24 Faithful lifts Christian 
*25 Vanity Fair 
*25A Death of Faithful 
♦26 Christian and Hopeful 

enter into a Brotnerly 

Covenant 



*27 Lady Feigning's daugh- 
ter 
28 Christian replies to By- 
. ends aad Fxiaadfl 



River of the Water of 
Life 
*30 Christian and Hopeful 
at the Stile of Bypath 
Meadow 

31 Christian and Hopeful 

found asleep by Giant 
DesMtir 

32 The Giant beats his 

Prisoners 

•33 Christian and Hopeful 
escape from the Dun- 
geon 

*34 Christian and Hopeful 
on the Delectable 
Mountains 

35 Victims of Giant De- 

spair among the 
Tombs 

36 Little Faith Robbed 
♦37 The Pilgrims in view of 

the Celestial City 
*38 The Pilgrims cross the 

River of Death 
30 The Pilgrims ascend 

the HiU under escort 
40 Ignorance thrust into 

HeU 
♦Those marked thus [*] 
are Photographed from life 
Models 

Bunyan's Filsrrim's Prog- 
ress — Cliristiana. 

32 slides, $16.00. 

No reading 

1 Christiana Repents 

2 Christiana's.Dream 

3 Christiana proposes to 

go on a Pilgnmage 

4 Mrs. Timorous and 

Mercy find Christiana 
packing up 

5 Mercy desires to accom- 

pany Christiana 

6 Mercy left without the 

Gate 

7 The Children eat the 

Enemy's Fruit 

8 The Man with the Muck- 

rake 

9 Mr. Greatheart 

10 Hill Difficulty 

11 Giant Grim's Death 

12 The Pilgrims entreat 

Greatheart to stay 
18 Mercy's Dream 

14 Mr. Brisk 

15 Dr. Skill 

16 The Shepherd Boy 

17 The Pilgrims erect a 

Pillar 

18 Mr. Honest 

19 Mr. Fearing 

20 Gains proposes a Mar- 

riage 

21 Old Honest proposes a 

Riddle 

22 James reading the Bible 

in Gaius' House 

23 Pilgrims carry back 

Slaygood's Head 

24 Feeble -mind welcomes 

Readv-to-Halt 

25 Mercy Clothes the Poor 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



McISTOSH BATTERV AND OPTICAL CO., CHIKA' 



!6 Merer at 
to Hell 

27 Valiant. re 



31 ChHstt 



I MiLdsiu 
ir OITeiiDgg 



Kiver 
Tha Fl^lm'D Frog 

36 allies, tlS.OO. 
Ifo Lecture. 



i Help draws 
Deapoad 



Slough of 
ith Mount 



6 ChiietLan naeends tbe 

Hill Difficivlly 
-, (■!,_:_. i.Q jmaggj the tw< 

S CbriiiCiaD 

Palace, 
a Chriatlan ftrmeil bjPra- 

t Shadow of 

U FaitUuT's strnggle with 

11 Evangeliat glvea g:ood 

and Falthli 
ShtiBtia. 
In Va 

U Ut. Moi 

In BTPi>erlBv 
IB The Pillar ol^alt 
17 Chrlallan and Hoiie 

in the Castle o( Gii 




IB Christian, ilopeful and 
the Sheiiherfla in He. 
lectable Mounlslns 

IB Faintheart, Miatrnst 
and Guilt rnh Little 

n and Hopeful 



Falsi' B Beautiful 



rha Filgriina at 
l>lar-u tvhere Fait 



2S PilgTiniB Heal In the 

Land of Benlah 
38 The FsrewoU 



EvanKeliet 
4 Pliable consenta to bea 
Obrlatian vompan; 



Deii|iond 
6 Chriatlan'a Daneer be- 

neuth Mount Sinai 
T Christian ia relcaseil 



:»,M. 



IH Christian and Hopeful 
are seized by the 
GlMut Despau- 

17 Chriatiftn and Hoyeful 
Escape from the Oianl 

]» L'hrifi'isn and Hopetol 
me ahowu the eu- 
tranre lo the Bottom- 



the Aiioetnle 
20 Christian and Ito|)efnl 
arrive at the Watera 

31 Chrlatlan anil Hopeful 

BBS the Watera of 
atli 
¥i Chriatian and Hopetal 



John PloQBbmiiD' 



With Reading. 

I U the Cap flla. near it 
i Never hura a Candle at 

both Ends 
3 One buni'hback lauvlu 

at another 
i Empty Sacks 
n The Old Man and hit 

Donkej 



Donkey 
B A Hom-biowi 



B The Hole 
Sweep hefor 



SO rheCafsFoo 



Wbid in a Net 
S3 Beware of the Dog 
» Like Cat Like Kit 
!S The Horao with a 

911 Beware ol Msn-Trapi 
3T A black Hen lara a 

while Egg 
3S He looks one wajlnd 

Sulls the other 
rk to It and aurceed 
80 Cart before the Hone 

31 The Leaking Tap 

32 Foola aet Stools tor 

Wlae Men lo stumble 



i I opened the door 

3 All of a sndden there 

i-anie an awful blaze 

4 LlKht a randle, Uary, 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



260 Mcintosh battery and optical oo.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



6 She would sing ' as I 

plnyed 

7 Then the little maid 

won Id sit by my side 

8 She was praying for me 

9 Here's the old Fiddle 

10 My hand rested upon 

the scar of the wound 

11 He got out the paper 

and wrote something 
down 

12 He comes back and puts 

a bundle in my hands 

13 She flings away the old 

one and puts on an- 
other 

U Mary, lead me to a cor- 
ner just inside the 
door 

16 Follow me 

16 The Donkey and Cart 

17 The new Parson 

18 Let nothing, O Lord, 

interrupt this holy 
Peace 

Liverpool. 

42 slides, $21.00. 

With Reading, 

1 Liverpool in the Seven- 

teenth Century 

2 St. George's HaU 

8 Statues of the Prince 
Consort and the 
Queen, with the Well- 
ington Monument 

4 The Free Library and 

Museum 

5 The Picton Reading 

Room 

6 The Walker Art Gal- 

lery 

7 Church Street and the 

Compton Hotel 

8 The Sailors' Home 

9 The Custom House 

10 The Town Hall 

11 The Exchange 

12 The Tomb of Huskisson 

13 St. Nicholas' Church 

and the Watch Tower 
U The Approach to the 
Landing Stage 

15 The Birkenhead Lug- 

fage Boat and the 
team ship « Celtic " 

16 The Coasting Steamer 

"Bonnie Doon" at the 
Landing Stage 

17 Steam-tugs waiting for 

the Tide 

18 View of the Mersey 

from the Baths 

19 The Lifeboat at Rest 

20 Europe, Farewell, Emi- 

grants' Departure 

21 Group of Russian Refu- 

gees 

22 H. M. S. " Assistance " 

embarking Troops for 
Ireland 

23 The Prince's Half-Tide 

Dock and the Water- 
loo Grain Warehouses 

24 The River Entrance to 

the Prince's Dock 
26 The Belfast steamer 

waiting to enter Dock 
26 The Steamship "Pari- 

sian " in the Graving 

Dock 



27 The Liverpool College 

28 The Origmal Everton 

CoflTee House 

29 The Young Men's Chris- 

tian Association 

30 The Masonic Hall 

31 A Grotto in Sefton 

Park 
82 The Rathbone Monu- 
ment, Sefton Park 

33 The Birkenhead Land- 

ing Stage 

34 The Bombay Steamer 

in the Birkenhead 
Docks 
36 The One o'clock Gun 
and the Steamship 
"City of Rome " 

36 Entrance to Birken- 

head Park 

37 Birkenhead Park, The 

Lake 

38 Birkenhead Park, 

Bridge over the Lake 

39 Steamships «♦ Italy " 

and "City of Mon- 
treal " 

40 New Brighton Pier 

41 New Brighton, The 

Sands and the Bat- 
tery 

42 New Brighton, The 

Rock Lignthouse 

Microscopic Gems. 

50 slides, $25.00. 

With Readingy 

1 Trichinae in Human 

Muscles. X 18* 

2 Trichinae in Tongue of 

Rabbit, x 20 

3 Human Liver, Healthy. 

x30 

4 Human Liver, Drunk- 

ard's. X 30 
6 Human Tooth, Section. 
x4 

6 Tooth of Sawfish. 

Trans. Section, x 14 

7 Human Bone. Trans. 

Section, x 35 

8 Bone of Mammal- 

Tapir. X 35 

9 Bone of Bird— Alba- 

tross. X 35 

10 Bone of Reptile— Alliga- 

tor. X 35 

11 Horn of Bison, x 8 

12 Horn of Rhinoceros. 

Trans. Section, x 12 

13 Horn of Rhinoceros. 

Long. Section, x 12 

14 Whalebone of the Bot- 

tle-nosed Whale, x 14 
16 Whalebone of the South 
Sea Whale, x 14 

16 Hair of Rat. x 200 

17 Quill of Porcupine. 

Trans. Section, x 11 

18 Feather of Goldfinch. 

x35 

19 Cell Structure, Rice 

Paper Plant, x 35 

20 Starch Grain, Polar- 

ized, x 35 

21 Raphides of the White 

Lily, x 100 

22 Speae-raphides of the 

Prickly Pear, x 100 

23 Ivory Nut. Section, x 

180 

24 Stellate Cells of the 

Rush. X 25 



25 Spiral Fiber of the CoU 

lomia Seed, x 85 

26 Woody Fiber of Pine 

Wood. x86 

27 Stem of the Pepper 

Plant. Trans. Sec 
tion. X 12 

28 Stem of the Bamboo. 

Trans. Section, x 16 

29 Stem of the Sarsaparil- 

la. Trans. Section. 
xl2 

30 Stem of the Bracken* 

x8 

31 Fructification of a Fem» 

Maiden^s Hair, x 36 

32 Scales of a Fern, x 18 

33 Stellate Hairs and 

Scales of Sallow 
Thorn, x 35 

34 Leaf of Sundew, Insec^ 

tivorous Plant, x 35 
36 Cuticle of the Dutch 
Rush. X 35 

36 Ovary of the Tiger 

Lily. xlO 

37 Diatom Heliopelta. z 

200 

38 Diatom Triceratinm. z 

200 

39 Diatom Pinnnlaria. z 

220 

40 Cinchona Bark. Trans. 

Section 

41 Bisulphate of Quinine* 

Polarized, x 11 

42 Quinate of Quinine, 

Polarized, xao 

43 Chloride of Morphia, 

Polarized, x 12 

44 Salicine, Polarized 

45 Epsom Salts. Oblique 

Ught. x25 

46 Pmtino Cyanide of 

Magnesium, Polar- 
ized. X 11 

47 Platino-Cyanide of Po. 

tassium. x 8 

48 Pitchstone Section, x 

35 

49 Granite. Section, x 35 

50 Chalcedony, x 11 

* These figures indicate 
the number of times 
the object is magnified 
before being thrown 
on the screen 

A Peep Into Nature 
tlirou§^h the Mi- 
croscope. 

54 slides, $27.00. 

With Reading. 

1 Human Flea 

2 Human Male Flea 

3 Flea of Dog 

4 Flea of Sand Martin 

5 Flea of Mole 

6 Proboscis of Blow Fly 

7 Proboscis of Blow Fly, 

minute structure 

8 Eye of Fly 

9 Foot of Fly 

10 Spiracle of Fly 

11 Silkworm 

12 Structure of Air Tubes 

13 Spiracle of Larva of 

Cockchafer 

14 Wing of Butterfly 

15 Wing Scales of Blue 

Butterfly 



rOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEC PAGE 127. 



— . ^ 




r McINTIJSH BATTERY ASl) OPTICA!. CO,, CBIUAGO, ILL., C.S. A. 2^^ 


IfiABtenmB of Vaporor 


32 Foot of Spider 


41 Section of Stem oE En. 




as CalaiuinBtrum on Leg 


dogen. Bntnher'B 


18 S^"VJn"a "oT s'le. 


„,;;s!iS„,„ 


Brbom 




Hookleta-^ 


3fi Cheese Mites 


mata 




l»6tlngD[HoTUBE 


38 ParasltB on Beetle 


M Sea Weed. Polysiponla 




30 Saws oI Saw Fir 




17 VolvoiGlohator ' 






M Palat^Toli^d™ Snail 


18 Reuentniatoma 




» GirM?d o! CrlcKt 


3B Palate 01 Hsitolis-Po- 


IS Foeall Diatoms 




S3 ChirpinB FUe and 


larizod 








10 Stem ol Exogen. Clem. 




U Sheep Tick 








S8 Human Bug 


« Braiilian Wood. An. 






a8Par»flitBonPig 
27 Aphis 


nnal Rmga ol Browtb 
12 Plane Tree. Medullary 


M Soundlngfl of H. M. S, 
Ohallen ger 




M AphlB-Unte 
30 nfonth ot Spider 


Raye 
M Plane Tree. Vertical 


S3 Stem of Plant In Coal 




Section across the 






31 Spinuerec ot Spider 


Hays 


Clifton 




A SELECTION OF SOME OP THE BEST KNOW^S ■ 




MICROSCOPICAL OBJECTS. 1 




Photographe'l as Slides (or the Lantern, with KeJiilinga. H 




Mrentaearh. ■ 




" Thesa flgurea denote 


24 Sting of Honey Bee- 

Apia melliflca, X 20 

25 Tongue of Honey Bee 

-ipis Mollifica, X li 


17 Paraaite ol Oatrich, X 




tlie nninber of diame- 


a Paraaite of Dog, X 3fi 




tera to whirh the spesi- 


IB Parasite of Pig, X IS 






28 Tongue of Honey Bbb, 


SO Paraaite ol Horse, X as 






minute structiire, X 


SI Aphis from NettLe, 
sa Leaf Insect, X SO 




'"si'Siffs"- 


27 T^^giie ol Mason 




ritaaa Female \ lA 


28A?terFir''^in of 


63 Silkwomi-Larvse of 
EombyKmorl,Xa 

61 Tnur.hea of Silkworm, 

65 Trachea of Silkworm 




4F1b» oi Dotf— Fuleic 


28 Posterior Wiiiga of 
Beea.ahowing'kook. 




leti.klSO 


Spiral BtrncturB,X 80 




S FlMi" o! Sand ^Martin 


30Bl»f.t Ant -Formica 


6d Lnrvffl of Vapourer 






nigra, X 10 


Moth Very yonng, 




T P?oufscia^^Biow-rij 
^Mnaca vo.nitorta. 


31 Houae Ant, X 20 

Si Water Bestle— Hyphl- 


B7 Scalv (nie IMS of young 




33 Soldier BeetlE- TbIb. 


LarvB ot Vapourer 
68 Mombrknolis /o«« or 




B Proboacia o( Blow -Fly, 


phons, X 1 


pro((»s of^young 




minute strnctBre 






Xiao 


Beetle — Concinella, 




9 WlugolBlow-Fly X 7 


X9 


69 LarviB ol Vapourer 




'""Si..;'.„?,s.*;'i 


30 Spiracles uf Water 
^eetlo-AvlUiiB Bul- 


Moth-Orgla Antiqua 




X3 




itfl 


ratns, S S5 






U Portion of EyB of 


30 SpiraclB nt Larvw ol 


ponrerMoth.X 11 




House Fly-Muaca 
IBFool ot House Fly- 








3J Spiracle ol Cockchafer 
— Helolontha t o 1- 


61 Hairs ol Calorplllar, 

xa ' 




Mnaca DoBieatica. X 


garia, X 100 






33 Tongue of Cricket- 
Acne ta domestics, 


S2 Antenna of Vaponrer 




13 S^rwle o( Blow-Fly. 


Moth, X 7 




X20 


63 Scaly Leg of LarvB of 
ButterSy. X SO 




MpiobosPtaolDroDe.Fly 
-Eriatalig tenax, t 


3B Gizzard ol Crickets 




Aoheta domestica, 


M Membranous Leg of 






HS5 


Lar.ffl ol Bnlterny. 






W Chirping FUe and 


X30 




Pfy, X 7 


Drum of Cricket, X 5 






Crane FLy,X in • 


*lHi™an Bed Bug- 


Leopard Moth_Zeu- 




~- Acanthia lECtularla, 


^ iera-Escull,X8 




XB 


ie Spiracle ol Larrs 01 
^nsB Moth-Corura. 




ISSbeep Tic£-Melo. 






.^■?W/-«.'hr.d. 


ly cnlus vestimonti, X 


Tlnula,X2S 






67 Spiracle of LarVEs ol 
TTivet Moth-Sphinx 




Tsriata Female, X 21b 
90 Savs of Saw Fly, X 20 


43 Human Head Lonse- 




l^ PedicniuB capitis, X 


Llgnstri, X SS 




11 Anterior Leg anil Fool 


08 Wing Scales ol Swal- 




o( Saw Fly. X M 


« Parasite of Domestic 


low Tailed Butterily 
BB Wing Scales oIDBSth'i 




2S Minute Structure oi 


Fowl-.LtothemPalli- 




Wlogol Saw Fly, X 


dnm,X30 


Head Moth, X 35 




180 ' 
1!3 Btlng of Hnrnet with 


^'^SI^Jn'sK'nTeVrx^sJ 


70 Wing Scales ol Butter, 
ny— Morplio Africa, . 




Poifion Bag, X 7 IB Pflrasila of Emu, X 20 


X.HS 




FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 12T. B 




k J 



282 MclNTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



87 
1^88 



71 Wing Scales of Butter. 

fly— Hlpparchia Ja- 
nira,X80 

72 Wing Scales of Blue 

Butterfly -P Agriolus 
X 180 

73 Spider, X 4 

74 Garden Spider, very 

young, X 15 

75 Mouth Organs of Spi- 

der, X 8 

76 Legs of Various Spi- 

ders, X 7 

77 Calamistrum on Leg of 

Web- Weaving Spi- 
der, X 35 

78 Foot of Web- Weaving 

Spider —Pectinate 
C&ws, X 80 

79 Spinneret of Spider, X 

30 

80 Leg of Harvest Spider 

— PhalangiumCornu- 
tum, X 10 

81 Scorpion 

82 Red Earth Mite>Trom- 

bidium, X 12 

83 Chelif er, X 18 

84 Parasite of Beetle— 

Gamasus Coleoptra- 
torum, X 35 

85 Parasite of Bee, X 36 

86 Parasite of Dog— Ixo- 
des, X 12 

Cheese Mites— Glyci- 

phagus Ciro, X 35 
Tape worm from Cat, 

89 Millipede — Geophilus, 

90 YonngSea Horse-Hip- 

focampus Breviros- 
ris, X 9 

91 Palate of Garden Snail 

X25 

92 Palate of the Trochus 

Zizyphinus, X 30 

93 Palate of Neritina Vir- 

ginia, X 30 

94 Palate of Haliotis Tu- 

berculata. Pdlarized 
X12 

95 Hydrozoa — Eudendri- 

um ramosum, X 30 

96 Spine of Echinus. 

Trans. Sec, X 35 

97 Skeleton of a Silliceous 

Sponge. Myce r i n a 
Squares, X 35 

98 Spicules of Gorgonia 

Plexaura Flexuosa, 
X30 

99 Spicules of Synapta. 

Grouped, X 30 



100 Challenger Soundings. 

4,475 fathoms, Lat. 11- 
24 N. Long. 143-16 E„ 
X 35 

101 Soundings. 1,380 fath- 

oms. Paciflc Ocean, 
Lat. 21-1 S. Long. 
57-25 E., X 35 

102 Polycystina. Grouped, 

X20 

103 Foraminif era from 

March Silt, X 35 

104 Perforations in a For- 

aminif era Shell, X 180 

105 Foraminif era. Brighton 

Chalk, X 20 

106 Whalebone. Trans. 

Sec, Bottle -Nosed 
Whale, X 14 

107 Whalebone. Trans. 

Sec, White Whale, 
X14 

108 Whalebone. Trans. 

S e c, South Sea 
Whale, X 14 

109 Hoof of Horse. Sec- 

tion, X 14 

110 Horn of Rhinoceros. 

Trans. Sec, X 12 

111 Horn of Rhinoceros. 

Long. Sec, X 12 

112 Horn of Bison. Trans. 

Sec, X 8 

113 Stem of Hedge Maple. 

Trans. Sec, X 12 

114 Stem of Clematis. 

Trans. Sec, X 15 

115 Stem of Aristolochia 

Latif olia. Trans. 
Sec, X 15 

116 Stem of Pepper Plant. 

Trans. Sec.,X 12 

117 S t e m of Wisteria. 

Trans. Sec, X 13 

118 Stem of Sarsaparilla. 

Trans. Sec, X 12 

119 Root of Sarsaparilla. 

Trans. Sec. Guaya- 
quil, X 15 

120 Root of Sarsaparilla. 

Trans. Sec, Valpa- 
raiso, X 15 

121 S t e m of Butcher's 

Broom— Ruscus Acu- 
leatus, X 10 

122 Brazilian Wood. Trans. 

Sec, X 6 

123 Brazilian Wood. Trans. 

Sec, X 30 

124 Liana Genuta. Trans. 



Sec, X 21/9 
i. T] 
X15 



125 Calabash. Trans. Sec, 



126 Calabash. Long Sec, 
X15 



127 Plane Tree. Trans. 

Sec, X 35 

128 Plane Tree. Long. Sec, 

Across Medullary 
Rays, X 35 

129 Plane Tree. Long. Sec. 

Between Medullary 
Rays, X 36 

130 Pith of Rice Paper 

Plant— Aralia Papy- 
rif era, China. Trans. 
Sec, X 35 

131 B r e a d Fruit Tree. 

Trans. Sec, X 36 

132 Stellate Hairs and 

Scales, from Leaf of 
Durio Zibethinu8,X 36 

133 Bamboo Cane. Trans. 

Sec, X 16 

134 Cuticle of Cvclamen 

Atkinsii, showing 
Stomata, X 180 
136 Kilarney Fern— Trich- 
omenes Radicans, X 
10 

136 Fructiflcation of a 

Fern, X 7 

137 Scales of a Fern— Gon- 

iaphalium Sepultum 
X 18 

138 Scales of a Fern. 

Grouped, X 14 

139 S c a I e s of a Fern, 

Grouped, Polarized, 
X14 

140 Algse— Poiysiph o n i a 

Fastigiata, X 36 

141 Algae, Sphacelaria Ser- 

tularia, X 35 

142 Recent Diatoms — Ar- 

achnoidiscus Ehren- 
bergii, X 120 

143 Fossil Diatoms, from 

Mansfield Cliff, Bar- 
badoes, X 80 

144 Volvox Globator, X 35 

146 Section of Cleopatra's 
Needle, X 12 

146 Section of Ferruginous 

Oolite, from Dundry 
Hill, Bristol, X 9 

147 Section of Ool i t i c 

Limestone, Clifton, 
Bristol, X 12 

148 Section of Enorinital 

Limestone, Clifton, 
Bristol, X 12 

149 Section of Eozoon Can- 

adenses, X 12 

150 Section of Stem of 

Plant in Coal. Sig- 
illaria, X 4 



THE SOLAR SYSTEM ILLUSTRATED. 

50 slides, with reading, $25.00. 
WITH A GLIMPSE AT THE STEIIXAB UNIVERSE. 



1 Introduction 

2 Relative sizes of the 

Sun and Planets 

3 Apparent size of the 

Sun as visible from 
the Planets 

4 Telescopic View of So- 

lar Disk 

5 Typical Sun Spot 

6 Zones of Sun Spots 

7 Comi)arative sizes of the 

principal Planets 

8 Phases of an Inferior 

Planet 



9 Comparative sizes of 
Venus and Earth 

10 Telescopic Appearances 

of Venus 

11 Constant inclination of 

Earth's Axis to the 
Ecliptic 

12 The Seasons 

13 C u r V a t u r e of the 

Earth's Surface 

14 Full Moon 

15 The Tides 

16 Lunar Eclipses 



17 Solar Eclipses, 1836 to 

1860 

18 Total Solar Eclipse 

19 Views of Solar Promi- 

nences 

20 Moon at First Quarter 

21 Moon at Third Quarter 

22 Triesnecker 

23 Ideal Lunar Landscape 

24 Views of Mars 

25 Comparative sizes of 

Jupiter and Earth 

26 Comparative sizes of 

Saturn and Earth 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 




Mcintosh battehv and optical co., 



JornarTon CaatlB, tro 
[lie Ferry 
Sfl CarnatTon Castle, i 



ILL., U.S. A. 463 



m TlBw o( Saliirn 
W OrbiCB of the Vra 
Satellites 



. _ It Comet o( iBll 

[ SB Donaii'B Comet 
f (7 Ooggia'B Comet 

K The celestial Siihere 

andDiarnitlMollDD 
m The Northern Circum- 

polar StuiB 
10 Ursa Major and Ursa 



33 The Orphaii Hoc 



Const ells, tioo 
il," as seen 
e nakeil eye 



Withlh 

a Part of CoaatBllat 
■'Gemini," as 
with Telescope 
F 13 Ibe Northern "J 



_Wav 






I 



4 Conway Castle ana 

5 Conwa; Castle, Ban- 

queting Hall 



~ettws-y-l. . 
the Bridge 
fi The Fairy Glen, Bet. 
tws-T-Coeli 

10 Conway Falls and Sal- 

11 Stepping S Cones at 

BettwB-y-CoBa 
13 Miner's Briilge, Over 

la Swallow rnila 

U MoBl Staboii, Icoiii near 

"~™^"- ' Capel I 



S Showdon . 



(IS Ogwen Lake 
TB Falls ol the Ogwi 
18 Fenrhyn Slate 



:— genera 
Cathed 



!S Llanberis Pass, Lake 

38 Llanberia Pass, from 

Ponl-T-Cromlech 
aOSuniniliotanowdon 
31 View at Nant MUl 
33 Lake Cwellynwith 
CniigCromByc'--- 

33 Beddgelert Bridg 

34 Old Mill and Brii 



I U Herachc. 

> the Univeree 

I 16 SUr hnJeri"*'' 
' ',7 AnniilacNebnlse 

S Nebnia in Caries Venn - 

tiol 
B The Great Selmla In 

Orion 
M Central part ol the ( 

1 A Tout Tbrouch No 



as Wesley and the Prlxe- 

Fighter 
38 Wesley and the Uoi 

W John 
SO Visit 

Islands 



John Nelson 



snap 



•f the Road 



K.. 



n the Bridge 
It Alierglaalyn 



U St. Mary' 
ford 



38 Pass oi Alierglaslyn, 



iilky 



S DolgellV Bridg 
i Torrent Walk,. 
4 Uolgelly, with 

46 Bala Lake 

4fi Llangollen Bridge 

47 Llangollen, theUive 

ancf Earlier -s Hill 
IS Llangollen and Valley, 

4fl Vallev Crncia Abbey 
aU Kiiabon 

eo slides, with reading, $30. 
1 Portrait of John Wea- 
i Epworlh Kectory 

4 Mrs. Snsannah Wesley 
.1 Tomb ol Mrs 3. Wesley 
Bescae from Fire 

7 Christ Churcli College 
U Sonth Leigh Church 
iO Lincoln College, Ox- 

11 The Godly Club 

12 The Borardo 

13 Oxford Castle 

14 Embarking at Grave- 
IB Wesley and the Mora- { 



Church, Oz- 

.6 Wesley's Auto-Epltaph 
47 Charity of Wesley 
4S Wesley and Dr. Johnson 
49 City Rd. Chapel, eite- 

BO City Rd. Chapel, InM- 

01 Monnraents in CityBd. 

i2 Land's End 



40 slides, with reading. (30. 

1 A London Court 

2 A FnrniBbed AiiarlmeDl 

3 Led in charge 

4 The Tenants 

5 The Landlord 
- ■ Watery Nest 



■'Jesna Lover 
Sonl" 
d Zlnzi 



iS Open Air Preaching 

■H I'iral CInas Meeting 
41 Wo.-ley and Bean gash 
iH The Foundry 
27 liev. George WhIlBflelil 
'M Lady Huntingdon 
29 Rev. J. Fletcher 



10 Getting Dinper Ready 

U No Water 

12 Protestant Darkey 

It Mother and Daughter 

15 A Domestic Tragedy 

16 " "Apuey Uosaera" 

17 Rabbit Pnlling 

1» At the Dock Oatei 
10 In Lnck 

20 Onl of Lnck 

21 A Poser 

M Saturday Night 

23 "FineSlraw-ber-rlesl" 

34 ASwellCoater 

26 The Cure AU 

28 Ria Only Friend 
37 In Good Quarters 

2a "Which will you have?" 

29 A Pretty Pair 

30 A "B" MeeliDg 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



264 Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



37 The Tart Shop 

38 A Roaring Trade 

39 A Hot Dispute 

40 Excitement in the 

Gallery 

Mary Queen of Scots. 

1^4 slides, with reading, $12. 

niustrated by Li^e Models 

and Photographs from 

Nature. 

1 Linlithgow Palace 

2 Stirling Castle 

3 It was the Stately Con- 

vent 

4 And there five Noble 

Maidens sat 

5 Notre Dame 

6 It was the gay court 

7 The Louvre 

8 And on its deck a lady 

sat 

9 Holyrood 

10 Sat Mary listening to 

the Rain 

11 She bade the Minstrel 

play 

12 The faithful Rizzio's 

slain 

13 Edinburg Castle 

14 Craigmillar 

15 She wrote the Words 

16 Loch Leven Castle 

17 She staid her Steed 

upon the Hill 

18 South Wingfield Manor 

House (arms on gate- 
way) 

19 Mary^s Bower, Chats- 

worth 

20 Workshop Manor 

21 Beside the Block a sul- 

len Headsman stood 

22 And on the Scaffold now 

she stands 

23 Her neck is bared— the 

Blow is Struck 

24 Queen Mary's Tomb, 

Westminster Abbey 

Haddon Hall. 

18 slides, with reading, $9. 

1 Haddon Hall, N. W 

entrance 

2 Haddon Hall, inside of 

N. W. entrance 

3 Haddon Hall, Steps and 

entrance to Chapel 

4 Haddon Hail, interior 

of Chapel 

5 Haddon Hall, Entrance 

to Banqueting Hall 

6 Haddon Hall, interior of 

Banqueting Hall 

7 Haddon Hall, Dining 

Room 

8 Haddon Hall, Drawing 

Room 

9 Haddon Hail, Ball Room 

Steps 

10 Haddon Hail, Ball Room 

11 Haddon Hall, Ante Room 

with Dorothy Vern- 
on's Door 

12 Haddon Hall, State Bed- 

room 

13 Haddon Hall, Archers' 

Room 



14 Haddon Hall, Eagle 

Tower, Upper Court 
Yard 

15 Haddon Hall, Dorothy 

Vernon's Walk 

16 Haddon Hall, Dorothy 

Vernon's Door from 
Terrace 

17 Haddon Hall, South 

Front 

18 Haddon Hall, Steps and 

Terrace 

Wreck of the Hesperus. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 It was the Schooner 

"Hesperus" 

2 Blue were her eyes as 

the Fairy Flax 

3 The skipper stood beside 

the' helm 

4 Then up and spake an 

old sailor 

5 Last night the moon 

had a golden ring 

6 The snow fell hissing in 

the brine 

7 He wrapped her in his 

seaman's coat 

8 And bound her to the 

mast 

9 Like a sheeted ghost the 

vessel swept 
10 A Fisherman stood 
aghast 

Old Coaching Days. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 The guard had been 

"tipped" to look after 
me 

2 We all got out of the 

coach and started for 
the house 

3 Those dear old country 

dances 

4 Mr. Williams led the 

way to the Cottage 

5 I undressed a little, 

took down my hair 

6 A man crept slowly out 
• from under my bed 

7 Walked to the table op- 

posite my door 

8 Then ail the lights came 

together at the door 

9 My hair had turned 

quite white 
10 The wretched man was 
escapmg 

History of Coal. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 Newcastle 

2 The Pit's mouth 

3 Pitmen at rest 

4 Pitmen at work 

5 The Pit's Shalt 

6 Loading the Collier 

7 The ship on its way 

8 " Coal Whippers 

9 ♦• " Wagon 
10 " " Cellar 



The Tale of Tea. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 A Tea Plantation 

2 Weeding, Watering 

and Pruning 



3 Picking Tea 

4 Preparing Tea for 

Market 

5 Drying Tea over a Are 

6 Preparing Souchong 

7 Merchants buying Tea 

8 Mixing and naming 

grades of Tea ana 
Packing Tea 

9 Coolies taking Tea to 

Hohow 
10 Loading Tea 

Story of a Pound of 
Sugar. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 Burning stubble on 

Sugar Plantation 

2 A Sugar Plantation 

3 Making cane into 

bundles 

4 Pressing sap from 

sugar cane 
6 Boiling the sap 

6 Cooling the syrup 

7 Packing sugar into 

Hogsheads 

8 Taking sugar to Port 

9 Moulding loaf sugar 
10 Sweet's emporium 

Biograpliy of Bread. 

10 slides, with reading, $5. 

1 A farmer plowing 

2 Planting corn 

3 A field of corn 

4 Cutting corn 

5 Threshing corn 

6 Putting corn into sacka 

7 Grinding corn 

8 A train laden with 

corn 

9 A Bakehouse 

10 A Baker's shop 

That Heathen Chinee. 

( With Poem by Bret Harte, 
A set of 8 slides, ^. 

A Funny Little Boy. 

30 slides, with reading, $15. 
The Dessert. 

1 "What! no nuts?" 

2 "I'll help myself" 

3 "Papa's looking" 

4 "I'll try again '^ 

5 '•Caught in the act" 

6 "But I've got 'em after 

all" 

After Dessert. 

7 "Won't go to bed" 

8 "I'll hide" 

9 "She can't find me" 

10 "Cornered" 

11 "Let me go" 

12 "Slipped her again" 

How Tommy served the 
Doctor. 

13 "He's coming to see 



me 



>» 



14 "I'll lead him a dance** 

15 "See my tongue" 

16 "He says he can't see 

it" 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MoINTOBH liATTKKV ANLi OPTICAL CO., CHICAUO, ILL., I 



I 



U "8oina jBin; HnunyV 
W "Wm thatB powdecr' 
81 "Y«h! I «aw you" 
IB "But I wou'l lake It" 
!3 "Qe BITS I must" 
»1 "And now IfB down" 
Th» Pholngrapha-'i Model. 
M "Say when j-ou'ro 



OorComlcitlUnc*. 

to alldee. witb reading, 90. 

1 Sir RoherC Plncher. 

he&d of the family 

3 MissJunaFox-Terryor 
* TearBin Pine bar, Esq 
S Uiia Fiu'^liBr 
a Captain Growler 
T Sir Peter Snarl 
a Mr, Policeman, 93 X 
9 Miag Pentoue Yap 
"" "-It. Stephenson Wall 



lOalldeB, with reading, 90. 
1 Mr. and Mrs. Molrow 
9 Prince Klllmonae 
aBllnkerand winker 

4 OouBln Uillnlse 
A Lord Grimalkin 
e Ben Bobtail 

T SBmmy Seesaw in hla 

8 Mrs. Holraw taking 
riding lesBone 

5 Aunt TBbitlia 

10 Mr. and Mrs. Moliow 
retiring lor the nlf;ht 



- Mother Hiiljliard'B dog 

"Traj— 
a Georple I'orgie 



6 A nge Una aerate has hor- 

aeltwlthaplu 

7 Angelina ewallowa 

plaster from ber leg 



tr Tommy's Good 



going to play cricket 
Dick draws lluliin's at- 
tention to a Butterfly 

Roblu playa a trick on 



8 Satimlay uight 

Suuday morning 
10 Mike in Limerivk 

How I Minded Baby. 

Daliiles, with reading. ^1. 

1 Dear Little Auuellna 

1 Angelina and the curl. 

ing tonga 
3 Angelina with bowlof 

watarand Noah's ark 



Blograplij' of a Bale of 

10 slides, with reading, ti. 

i Sowing the Cotton aead 
3 Hoeing tba Cotton 

Plan^ 
i Picking the Cotton 
fi Carting the Cotton Bag 
B Whipping the Cotton 
7 Ginning EhB Cotton 
S Packing the Cotton 
S Carting balea ol Cotton 

10 Loading steameronthe 
MlsBisslppi 

Going. 

3 slidee, with reading, tt.SO 
1 Going 1 ^ 
3 Gone 1 1 I 

■i alldes, wltb reading, t\M 
1 "That's funni;|' 

3 "Very, very Funny" 
Oaudle Irfiotures. 

8 slides, wltli reading, M.CO 

1 Caudle and wife going 

! Candle lectured about 
htte hours 

vtotblnghis children 

4 Caudle lielng lei 

5 Black Beetles . 



B Canrlle lectured about 



{ 



COMIC TALES AND CHILDREN'S SHORT STDRIES. 



iTtiard Teaching the 



3 Reynard a 

4 The King 

to »e 



eparlua to 10 Grlmlisrdt'a Second * Winter 
fteynord I Visit to lleyunnj 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



266 MclNTOSH BATTERY AND OPTIOAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



The Adventures of Mr. 
Briggs with a Ball. 

4 slides, $2.00. 

1 Mr, Briggs is Met by a 

Bull, who Objects to 
the Color of his 
Waistcoat 

2 Alter an Exciting Run 

he Endeavors to 
Enter his Garden 

3 Mr. Briggs in a Fix 

4 Entry of Mr. Briggs. 

Total Destruction of 
the Yellow Waistcoat 

Sir Isaac Newton and the 
Apple. 

8 slides, $4.00. 

1 From his Study, Sir 

Isaac Newton Seeks 
the Fresh Air 

2 He Paces Up and Down, 

his Brain full of Sci- 
entific Ideas 

3 His Attention is Drawn 

to an Apple Hanging 
on the Tree 

4 The Apple Falls. Here 

is an Example of the 
Law of Gravity 

5 He Measures with His 

CompasseSfthe Exact 
Distance 

6 He Picks up the Apple, 

as an Object for Fu- 
ture Investigation 

7 The principle involved 

is not quite clear to him 

8 He discovers the won- 

derful law of gravity 

Simon and His Fig. 

12 slides, $6.00. 

1 Simon buys a pig and 

drives it home 

2 He takes a drop at the 

inn, standing on the 
rope 



3 The pig makes a bolt 

and Simon falls 

4 The pig is attracted by 

the savory smell of the 
dinner 

5 He enters in a very im- 

polite manner 

6 He meets with many ob- 

stacles, but overturns 
them all 

7 As he eomes out, Simon 

stands in the doorway 

8 The pig rushes out and 

Simon has an uncom- 
fortable ride 

9 He rushes into the pond 

and gives him a drench- 
ing 

10 The pig gets into a sen- 

try box, and Simon 
turns it over 

11 To secure him, he sits 

on the box 

12 The butcher finishes 

him, and Simon says, 
you are done now, my 
boy 

Man and Calf. 

12 slides, $6.00. 

1 Mr. Bah resolves to sell 

his calf 

2 Its removal from the 

mother is more difficult 
than he imagined 

3 He tries to coax it with 

a handful of grass 

4 He endeavors to push it 

alon^ 

5 He tries another method 

and fails 

6 He tries the effect of a 

thistle 

7 He seizes him by the ear 

and tail 

8 Becoming tired, he tries 

remonstrance 

9 Regaining strength he 

uses additional exer. 
tion 



10 He carries him on his 

back 

11 He gets tired, a new 

idea strikes him 

12 Happy thought! he ties 

the cow's Dell round 
his neck, the calf im- 
mediately follows him 

The Adventures of 

Brown, Smith, Jones 

and Robinson. 

4 slides, $2.00. 

1 They go fishing and land 

a monster lobster 

2 Thev take it to town and 

sell it to Baron von 
Epicurus 

3 The Baron engages a 

French cook to dress it 
tor dinner 

4 The cook puts the lobster 

into hot water, but 
finds he gets into it 
himself 

Mjr. O'TooIe's Adven- 
tures with his Um- 
brella. 

9 slides, $4.50. 

1 Mr. 0*Toole, when In 

Africa, took a walk, 
with his big umbrella 
to protect hmi from the 
sun 

2 He takes a nap 

3 A lion makes nis appear- 

ance 

4 The lion astonished at 

the umbrella 

5 The umbrella keeps the 

lion at bay 

6 Still more astonished 

when he sees it opened 

7 Mr. O' Toole shields him- 

self with it 

8 The lion retreats some- 

what dismayed 

9 Mr. O' Toole returns and 

advises everybody to 
carry a large umbrella 



CHILDREN'S SHORT STORIES. 



Cock Bobin. 

8 slides, $4.00. 

1 Pretty Cock Robin Sing- 

ing 

2 Killing Cock Robin and 

catching his blood 

3 Seeing Cock Robin die 

and making his shroud 

4 Cock Robin's Chief 

Mourner, Thrush, sing- 
ing his dirge 

5 Digging Cock Robin's 

Grave 

6 Cock Robin's chief bearer 

and carrying the link 

7 Parson and Clerk 

8 Tolling the Bell 

Dick Whittington. 

8 slides, $4.00. 

1 Dick left an orphan, long- 

ing to go to London 

2 Dick found on a doorstep 

by a Merchant 



3 Dick purchases a Cat for 

a Penny 

4 Dick on Highgate Hill 

hears Bow Bells 

5 Dick's Cat catches the 

Mice at the King's Din- 
ner 

6 Dick receives the Bags 

of Gold for his Cat 

7 Dick's introduction to 

the King, who knighted 
him 

8 Dick Marries the Mer- 

chant's only Daughter 

Tom Thumb. 

8 slides, $4.00. 

1 Tom Thumb's Mother 

and the Magician 

2 Tom gets into the boys' 

pockets and takes their 
cherry stones 

3 Tom tumbles into a Pud- 

ding 

4 Giant Gumbo swallows 

him whole 



5 Tom Thumb and King 

Arthur 

6 The King giving Tom as 

much money as he can 
carry 

7 Tom snut up in a mouse- 

trap 

8 Tom Killed by the poison- 

ous breath of a Spider 

Little Bed Biding Hood. 

8 slides, $4.00. 

1 Red Riding Hood's new 

Cloak 

2 Red Riding Hood and her 

dog, Tiny 

3 Red Riding Hood talking 

to the Wolf 

4 The Wolf knocking at 

the Cottage door 

5 The Wolf putting Grand- 

mother's Nightcap on 

6 The Wolf in Grandmoth- 

er's Bed 

7 The Wolf caught 

8 The Wolf sola to a Wild 

Beast Show 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MclWTOSH ilATTERV ASD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. B. A. 



JAek the GUnt J 

B BlldGB, *).( 



1 Jiri KDd the Giunt in tbe 

Pit 

2 Jaukfoand nsleeii I17 Gl- 

a Javk Uklng tbe Giant's 

4 Jsuk deceives the two- 

taBBdBd Giaat 

5 Jteic St Rreakfast wltli 

S Jack going to bluw tbe 

Old Motber Habtwrd. 

S slides, (4.00. 

1 Mother Hnbburd Hud her 

Dog 

2 The poor Dog was dfiiul 

i He vae feeding the Cat 

5 Ha wasplayioic the Flute 

6 Be wna riding a Goat 

7 Ho really iraa SiitnninB 



TJie Three Bears. 

S elidefi. d.ori. 

1 Golden Hair pii'klj 

I Golden Hair spies 
Cottage In the Woo 

3 Mr. Bear, Mrs. Bear 

the Lit-'- " 

a Walk 

4 Golden H 

i Ur. Bear, nirij. 
Little Bear 
home 

6 Little Bear flnil 

ridge eaten u). 

7 Oolden Hair found In Llt- 



Jitek and the Bean Stalk. 



i Jack and his Mother— 
rriof at .parting 1 ' ' 

B Jock sella Che Con- li 

hatlnl o( Beans 
I Jack flnda the In 

4 jack finds 



Fairy 






S Jack steals tbe Giant's 
Hen that iaya Golden 
Kgga 

S Jack steals the Giant's 



3 TheChlldrendonat 

their talsa Uncle 

4 The Uncle hires 



the other and get 
the monev 
8 The Poacher that i 



'2 Hymn, See, see t»c1r 
anger rise 
[lliiatraliou, Joseph's 

3 Hymn, God morea la c 

lUGtratiOD, Joaepb Us 



ie° We"li''Bi'r 
3n, Joseph bc ' ' 









.oes to fetch lood 
7 The Children lose them- 

The Children fall asleep 
and are entered with 
leares by the Robins 



Cinder 

8 slide 



,*1.0C 
i.lerellaSoriiljl! 
_'loor 
I Cinderella visited by her 

dressed by 
in her Car- 
at the Ball 



Cinderell 
her Go.i 



! Boiild marry I 



! The Magic I 



and Alad- 



Tho Magician throws 

n'fnme on the Are 
din In the £nchaD. 
ted Palace 
Aladdin takes the Magic 
Lamp Co his Mother to 






JBl- 



Flowers to the Sultan 
The Magician gets pos- 
session ol tbe Mngio 

The Sultan enraged at 
tbe disappeHranoe of 
Aladdin's Palace, Wife, 

I Joseph, aepvloe orsong. 

I 3i3 slides, »li;.M). 

I I Hymn, Tell us the goo 

1 lUiistraiion.JacobglTe 
I Josephacoalotniaii 



.iHtrat ioD.Josepb 
tnnght by Potipbar 
inn, Thy master's 
^old uncounted 
iiBlralion, Joseph In 

B lliiieCratlon. Joseph in. 
corpretlng Pharaoh's 

9 Hymn, The Lord Is 
King 

9 llluBtratlDn, Joseph's 

brethren bnjlng corn 

H^iUD, Bending before 

10 lUiiHtration, Simean 

bonud lor Benjamin 

11 Hymn, Dreamer, ners 



. Illustration, The cup 
fonniliD Benlamin s 

himself kDOVtn 

A IllUBtratiDn, Joseph 
el 



Ifi I 



gooth into Egypt 
.lyniD. Tbe march 

The Sigiul Box. 

iiles, wlthrendlng, t3. 
By a. R. StBU from ' 

utthebozdaws 

I kiSBfld our sleep lag 
child 

lifted bim up and he 
kissed bis little band 
Fbat shall ;do!> Ob, 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127- 



268 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



6 That voice, oh, merciful 
Heaven ! Tis the 
child's 

6 She leapt on the line 
and saved him 

Eva. Service of Song. 

13 slides, with reading,$6.50 

1 Hymn, Scatter seeds of 
kindness 

1 Illlustration, St. Clair, 

Eva and Miss Ophelia 
on the steamer 

2 Hymn, That happy 

Home 

2 Illustration, Tom's 

little present to Eva 

3 Hymn, Home, Sweet 

Home 

3 Illustration, Tom and 

Eva in the arbor 

4 Hymn, Far, far away 

4 Illustration, Eva calling 

Tom's attention to 

the clouds 
4a Hymn, I see a world of 

spirits bright 
6 Hymn, Thou art passing 

away 
6 Illustration, Eva, Maria 

and St. Clair 

6 Hymn, My beautiful 

home 
jB Illustration, Eva sym. 
pathizes with the 
Joor creatures on the 
C)oat 

7 Hymn, I long to be 

there 

7 Illustration, Eva giv- 

ing locks of her hair 
to the slaves 
S'Hymn, To the land 
where Jesus dwelleth 

8 Illustration, Miss Ophe 

lia and Tom 

9 Hymn, Behold the 

bridegroom cometh 
9 Illustration, Miss Ophe- 
lia arouses Tom 
10 Hymn, We watched 
her breathing 

10 Illustration, Death of 

Eva 

11 Hymn, Safe in the arms 

of Jesus 

11 Illustration, the cham- 

ber of death 

12 Hymn, Peacefully sleep 

12 Illustration, Eva's 

funeral 

13 Hymn, Vital spark of 

heavenly flame 

"Curfew Must not Ring 
, Tonight." 

10 slides, $5.00. 

Illustrated by life models. 

1 Bessie and the Sexton. 

2 "I've a Lover m that 

prison" 

3 "Bessie," calmly spoke 

the sextou 

4 "Bessie made a solemn 

vow" 

5 She sprang within the i 

old church door \ 



6 "She . had reached the 

topmost ladder" 

7 "Out she swung, far 

out" 

8 Firmly on the dark, old 

ladder 

9 At his feet she tells her 

story 
10 Kneeling on the turf 
beside him 

The Cotter's Saturday 
Night. 

9 slides, with reading, $4.50 

1 Portrait of Burns 

2 The mirj beasts re- 

treating frae the 
pie ugh 

3 The toil-worn Cotter 

frae his labor goes 

4 At length his lonely cot 

appears in view 

5 The lisping infant 

prattling on his knee 

6 Their eldest hope, their 

Jenny, woman grown 

7 But hark! a rap comes 

gently to the door 

8 O happy love! where 

love like this is found 

9 The cheerfu' supper 

done, wi' serious face 

The Old Curiosity Shop. 

By Dickens. The Wander- 
ings of Little Nell and 
ner Grandfather. 

24 slides, with reading, $12. 

Illustrated from life, 

1 Master Humphrey and 

Nell 

2 The Old Curiosity shop 

3 Quilp's Home 

4 Swiveller's apartments 

5 The last night in the 

Old Curiosity Shop 

6 "She led him gently 

away" 

7 "They made their fru- 

gal breakfast" 

8 A serio-comic scene 

9 "She walked out into 

the churchyard" 

10 Messrs. Codlin, Short 

and Company 

11 The garret, Nell and 

Codlin 

12 "They venture to sit 

down to rest" 

13 They approach the Vil- 

lage Schoolmaster 

14 Mrs. Jarley at tea 

15 The waxwork exhibi- 

tion 

16 Nell's nocturnal visit to 

her grandfather 

17 "See, here's the church" 

18 "This old house is 

yours" 

19 Nell's visit to the 

church 

20 She came unexpectedly 

upon the school- 
master" 

21 "They say that you will 

be ail angel" 

22 At rest 



23 "The Villagers close 

round the grave" 

24 Her Grandfather at the 

grave 

Old Mother Hubtmrd. 

8 slides, with poem, $4.00. 

1 Mother Hubbard and 

her dog 

2 The poor dog was dead 

3 He was smoking a pipe 

4 He was feeding the cat 

5 He was playing the flute 

6 He was riding a goat 

7 He really was spinning 

8 The Dame made a Curt- 

sey and the dog nouuie 
a Bow 

Robinson Crusoe. 

17 slides, $8.50. 

1 Crusoe loading the raft 

2 Crusoe making his tent 

3 Crusoe ill, reads his 

Bible 

4 Crusoe sowing corn 

5 Crusoe makes his boat 

6 Crusoe tailoring 

7 Crusoe sailing out of 

the creek. 

8 Crusoe sleeping in his 

boat 

9 Crusoe at dinner 

10 Crusoe sees a footprint 

in the sand 

11 Crusoe milks his goats 

12 Crusoe in his fort 

13 Crusoe and Friday 

14 Crusoe and Friday 

shooting 

15 Crusoe instructing Fri- 

day 

16 Crusoe sees an English 

ship 

17 Crusoe married and at 

home 

The Honey Stealers. 

8 slides with reading, $4.00 

1 In high glee Tommy 

and Billy go honey 
stealing 

2 They quite forgot that 

bees have stings 

3 They have reason never 

to forget it again 

4 On arriving home the 

father tries the cold 
water cure, but in 
vain 

5 To add to their misery 

they cannot put their 
potatoes into their 
mouths 

6 They get no better till 

the stings are ex- 
tracted 

7 The parts are soothed 

by the apothecary's 
skill 

8 And in bed they resolve 

never again to go 
honey-stealing 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



written Ijy Dr. Croft, 
UtB Honoracy MBnnBing 
Director of the Royal 
Polytechnif. 



3 Dp to her feet n 

i flhe saw a gsllani, eaju 

B She sunk lo her Icneea 

ond mwle 
6 AnKel effect. Take 

though my hoy 
T The snow lay de»p 
8 Stood the old grky 

8 And grasiied the rope, 
sole card of hone 

U And Chen it oeascil Its 
ringing 

It MIdat the breakors 



Ditto. Angei effect 
I Dan Jtabliertnn'sDreanii 
niuifralcit bji Itfc nuKJsli. 



7 Chtldhooil 'sprayer 
BMymemory CnrnB 
9 Be itlod to th; mother 



g the lieiis 
lit, A Otarlst. 



""S;f 



) Effect. Mnrley's fape 

1 BffKt. Murley^ ghost 

f EfftfX. <ihrlstm»8 past 
\ The schuoi room 



IB BohCrntohit 

17 Nephew 'a hoi 

bedroom 



a The stranger einga a 

a Dbd listening to the 

belts 
4 Be entered the hous 
d Dan opens the case o 

6 He sleepa \ ho sleeps 

7 Onr Father! 

B Mother and son 
e Wsiting for the Pi'i 
gal Son 

10 Her "." '■™-i. 1".™- 

11 The 



The VtllsKe Blacksmith. 

T elides, •9JH]. 
(/■AoftJflrapfted/roni M/".) 



IS Asm 
Ulnco 

tUOUo 
an 
UOnoT 
17 He's 
18 Mr^ 
SiG 
u 



.(he "f "fl^e "" '''^ 

i% little house 
cornea the young 

•■ -her, lam so tirtd 
hunery 

body el a iniddie- 

17 He~waa brund awake 



2 The yuiage Smithy 

4 The Smith at Worli 

5 Children at Door 

n The Village Cliurrh 
7 The ViilageCholr 

Friendless Bob. 

IXlKstraitd from Lift 
Models. 

IS slides, with reading, t9- 

1 Thcinlsslonnryou the 




2 The Two Homes 

8 DlDg-doug 

i Shrink from the glass 

C Carol 

4 Bella ot long ago 



e On the sands 
ID Ethel rides Jerry 
U Mr. ForCesvae ohajtises ' 

the donkey boy 
13 Bob worsted in the fight 
U Ethel confiding in Bob 
U Granny, wliatduesa 
.. _ donkey cost? 



1-2 slides with reading 10.00 

I Mrs. llhatterbUK and 
Mary Dawdle onjoy- 
inga quiet gossiji 

a They are separated by a 

3 The town-rrior dlyidea 

(hem 

4 The niililarv anthorlty 
— saea lietwe — "- — 



by « 



roUinf 



ig. a 
e The military school 

marches past 
7 The water cart gives 

them a sprinkling 
B A nock of geese pass 

unheeded lietween 

B A timber carriage parts 
10 The rain pours down in 
U A pig gets tripped np 
IS Thunder attd lightning 

Mother' s Last Words, 



Bhaally pale 
a "Here, Ma," ho Hid, 
"divide this bread" 

3 And snundly alept Ehoee 

4 Tt^e miuStersaid,"Dn)t 

tudnst" 

5 And awept a pathway 

6 Doyoii go toSuniJa)' 

7 I know a dodge worth 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEC PAGE 127. 



270 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



Jack the Gonqueror; or 
DifElculties Overcome. 

12 slides, with reading, $6. 

1 Jack has his portrait 

taken 

2 Jack's first friend 

8 Jack's help refused be- 
cause of his dirty face 

4 Jack in bed having his 

clothes mended 

5 Jack at the shoemaker's 

6 Jack goes to learn to 

read 

7 Jack as nurse in the 

Gipsy Camp 

8 Jack m disgrace 

9 Jack at work in the 

cave 

10 Jack speaks to the 

squire 

11 Jack at the hall 

12 Jack tells his story to a 

young pupil 

The Bashful Man. 

6 slides, with reading, $3. 

1 The bashful man 

2 I trod on the gouty toe 

of Sir Thomas 

3 The library mishap 

with Xenophon 



4 Soup in the wrong place 

5 The soothing efi'ect of 

brandy 

6 The pantomimic tableau 

The Jackdaw of Rhelms. 

Twelve Original Designs. 
13 slides w ith reading $6.50. 

1 The Jackdaw of Rheims 

2 The Jackdaw sat on the 

Cardinal's chair 

3 And he peered in the 

face of his lordship's 
grace 

4 And six little singing 

boys, dear little souls 
6 He peeps, and he feels 
in the toes and the 
heels 

6 and 9 He called for his 

candle, his bell and 
his book 

7 They all cried, "That's 

him!" 

8 The first thing they 

saw 

9 and 6 And off that ter- 

rible curse he took 

10 Or slumbered in prayer 

time 

11 In the odor of sanctity 

died 



12 The conclave deter- 

mined 

13 Saint Jim Crow 

Nos. 6 and 9 are the same. 

Buy Your Own Goose. 

50 cents plain. 

1 Excuse me interrupt- 

ing your harmony, 
gentlemen, but the 
Goose Club has com- 
menced 

2 I'll play Lizsv a trick! 

Here, my lad, take 
this basket to No. 6, 
opposite 

3 I've oeen a g^oose long 

enough, Lizzy, now 
I've bought my own 

f[oose 
1 fetches his old mo- 
ther from the work- 
house to spend Christ- 
mas Day with them 

5 Grandmother wishes to 

hear Lizzy read out 
of her father's old 
Bible 

6 Eli's old companions 

leaving the Golden 
Fleece on Christmas 
Eve 



TEMPERANCE SLIDES. 



The Drunkard's Chil- 
dren. 

50 cents plain. 

1 Neglected by their pa- 

rents, they are led to 
the gin shop 

2 Between the gin shop 

and the beer shoo, 
the boy thief squand- 
ers away his ill-got- 
ten gains 

3 From the ^in shop to 

the dancing rooms, 
the poor girl is driven 
on to misery 

4 Urged on by his com- 

E anions and drink, 
e commits a despe- 
rate robbery 

5 From the bar of the gin 

shop to the bar of the 
Old Bailey is but one 
step 

6 He IS sentenced to 

transportation for 
life, the girl is ac- 
quitted. The brother 
and sister part for 
ever in this world 

7 The wretched convict 

droops and dies 

8 The poor girl, home- 

less, destitute, and 
gin-mad, commits 
self-murder 

The Whisky Demon: or. 
Dream of the Reveler. 

50 cents plain. 

1 The Whisky Demon 



2 The Reveler 

3 The demon cask o' 

whisky 

4 The demon's home 

5 The five drops 

6 The drunkard's home 

7 The three roads 

8 The demon's first house 

9 The demon's second 

house 

10 The demon's third 

house 

11 The demon's hour glass 

12 The end 

The Gin Shop. 

50 cents plain. 

1 This is the gin shop all 

glittering and gay 

2 These are the drinks 

that are sold night 
and day 

3 This is the landlord 

who coins his bright 

fold 
is is the landlady, 
all jewels and lace 

5 These are the custom- 

ers, youthful and old 

6 This is the drunkard in 

rags and disgrace 

7 This is the woman with 

woe-begone face 

8 This is the pastor, so 

noble and kind 

9 This is the pledge the 

poor drunkard signed 

10 Tnere is the church, to 

which, one Sabbath- 
day 

11 This is the text which 

the good pastor chose 



12 This is the cottage, the 
home of delight 

The Travels of flie Sul- 
tan of Ragobaga in 
Grc^^lfland. 

50 cents plain. 

1 Arrival of the Sultan 

in his Aerial Chariot 

2 Procession and intro- 

duction to the Prin- 
cess Barbouda 

3 Grand Banquet 

4 Outside of Fire Water 

Temple 

5 Inside of Fire Water 

Temple 

6 The Vision, Woman 

and Dying Child, the 
Suicide 

7 In the Auction Room, 

the Poison and the 
Price 

8 Railway Station. Ac- 

cident 

9 Court Scene, Girl in 

Dock 

10 Temperance Light- 

house 

11 Condemned Cell 

12 Expenditure and Mis- 

expenditure 

13 Abode of All-Goul 

14 St. Giles', Miserj; 

15 St. James', Happiness 

Progress of Intentiper- 
ance. 

50 cents plain. 

1 Invitation to Drink 

2 Sickness and Repent- 

ance 

3 The Relapse 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MclSTOSH 



ATTEltY AKr> OI'TIUAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., L. B 



371 



i ThBRiiined Family 
fl The ItSlBr 



I The Gin Shop 

3 Tlie Wrotcliod Homo 

3 The Hfiupy Home 

4 The Home ol UlHt 

fi The Cull loRepentani.-' 
G The Hapiiy Death 



1 IntroductSon.wilh Por- 

3 Watrihlaii and Wait- 
ing, CMillttls) 
3 Anifulllod the picture 



4 In Che hleakwlDd nn 

aliellereil. (O. Dort) 

5 Tanght '■ ' ■-'■'-- 



[Marcus Stone) 

10 A irirl eelf-drowuer]. 

(K. Sherard Ken- 

11 What are these women 

doing? (P. R. Morrlg) 
la The GnidlDg Antel 

heard their song. (W. 

C. Thomas) 
IS The prayer was heart. 



(Santj 



UOnt 



Land 



"A. I 



.46 children. (Monl- 
Urd) 
IS Both whisky mod. (E. 

NI(M)11 

. (R, Lehman) 
I poor BtraeD stray. 
(W. Maodiiff) 
IB At break of day. (John 

Tenniel; 
19 On (he baCtleaeld 1 
lay. (ElUaheth 

90 I masrie a thler. (Dob- 



Si pilied o( happy 
dven. (W. lleni 

91 The maiden in 
prime. (Fred. 

U The last haU-bc 

(CraDtahnnk) 
M Olrl examples richly 

dowered. (Storey) 
IS For he'B a Jolly go< 

C4B deny. (Sir No 
Falon) 
al Pny God to blesa t1 



card's Bible 



5 Mary Kilej's simple 

6 The worn thimble 

7 Heal and bo thankful 

H BnUdlngabonsa with 



11 It's only a dro 
li Bridget Larki 



ce— the Gold. 

tinorle 

l>eall wW_ . 
gonl was dark with 

t "llnngrs- and footsore, 

Starring— jcl dare no. 

thcongh the streets: 
?{o aid she asks; nosym- 

etreeta: beneath the 

That shade her girl- 
hood's home, she sits-" 

him? God, we pray? 
His guard iuD aneelmay 
not pass away." 
7 "Ten thonsand devils 

night. 
Haunt 

blightedUfe; 
Mourn tor Che wretched 
anfferera — child and 

B "See the degradoii 
wretoh we picture 

He blights the oom be 

10 "Over the lone grave oj 

11 "No better man what 

19 "The artist palntahlm- 
lowest of the low: 
Alas! Giles JonBonj 



The Harlot's FroBreae. 

:he country girl arrives 

■oily quarrelling with 

a Polly in her lodgings in 

t Polly In the Bridewell 

Prison 
6 Worn out by disease, . 

6 'T^ sisterhood meet lor 
The Rmke's Progress, ' 



Into possession ol I 

S He Indulues In tb> 
height of passion a 

3 The lake in n bonse of 

ill.tame, drunk and i 
capable 

4 He ia arrested tor debt 

5 Having siient all hla 

money, to marries 
rich old maid 

a hopelesalun- 



n Bedlam 
of an Election 



Marrl^e A-lK-Mode, 

a slides, Vi. 

1 The Slarriage settle- 

3 The husband stays out 

home dm'nk m the 



ing concerts at her t 
s The husband detects 

S The wile dleB by poison 
the Ketorn From TIi« 



! 14 'T'bey laid thedeml wife 



1 The Departure 
3 The Misconception 

3 The RenionB trance 

4 The Return to the T 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127, 



272 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



The Gin Fiend. 

4 slide 8| $2. 

1 The Gin Palace 

2 The suicide 

3 The murder 

4 Turned out 

Worship of Bacchns. 

14 slides, $7. 

1 Introduction 

2 Delusive character of 

intoxicating liquors 

3 The grains 

4 The beer 

5 Loss of nutriment 

6 Analysis of a gallon of 

ale 

7 Condensed beer 

8 Which will you buy, 

bread or beer 

9 What the abstainer may 

look upon — What the 
drinker has to look 
upon 

10 Excuses made for drink- 

ing 

11 Proportion of alcohol 

12 Proportionate quantity 

of proof spirit 

13 Uniermented and fer. 

men ted wine 



14 Evils resulting from the 
use of alcoholic liquors 

LIUle TIz. 

UsUdes, $7. 

1 It was a last will and 

testament 

2 A party at Mr. Lor- 

rame's Langside Hall 

3 "Come, we must have a 

song from Little Tiz." 

4 Little Tiz and George 

in the library 

5 In the woods, the neck- 

lace of flowers 

6 Dr. Pearson's little par- 

lor 

7 "I*ve been thinking of a 

plan" 

8 She peered out into the 

dark 

9 She fell with a sudden 

gasp 

10 "Ye bide up that court, 

Mrs. Mactavish" 

11 Oh, merciful heaven, 

the sight! 

12 Crouching over the mis- 

erable fire 

13 Little Tiz put her tiny 

arms around his neck 

14 In the silent valley of 

death 



1 
2 

3 

4 
5 
6 
7 

8 

9 

10 

11 
12 



The FooUflh Toper. 

12 slides, $6. 

Deep, deep they drank 
A beery quarrel 
One form of assault 
Liquidating a debt 
The insulting stranger 
"Mind your eye!" 
"I'll pay you out" 
Slaughter of the 
stranger 

The dead stranger's 
Ghost 

Oversetting Obstruc- 
tionists 

A forceful capture 
His country's care 



The Tipsy Geese. 

1 The farmer's wife ex- 

claimed 

2 The excited geese run, 

and on the spot 

3 Oh, woful sight 

4 But soon she plucked 

up courage 

5 Reflecting when you 

have no geese 

6 The geese were but dead 

drunk 



LECTURE SETS. 

Descriptive Readings or Lectures, each 25 cents net. 

There are certain sets of slides that cannot be broken into, but each set must be 
sold in its entirety. 

Other sets can be selected from at your own pleasure; the latter, from Index 
Page 111, we have designated "Domestic Lecture Sets," the former, "Foreign 
Lecture Sets," will be found on Index Page IV. 

These slides are all plain or uncolorea unless otherwise indicated; they can be 
colored to order after order is received, taking about three weeks' time and costing 
$L00 each additional, and cannot be exchanged. 

DOMESTIC LECTURE SETS. 

From sets under this heading you can select any slide you wish. Each reading 
will cost 25 cents. 

AMERICA OR THE LAND WE LIVE IN. 



61 slides, $90.50. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 San Francisco, Pano- 

rama 

2 San Francisco, Palace 

Hotel 

3 San Francisco, Seal 

Rocks 

4 San Francisco, Chinese 

Quarter 

5 San Francisco, Joss 

House Exterior 

6 San Francisco, Joss 

House Interior 

7 Sacramento, Panorama 

8 Sacramento, State Cap- 

itol 

9 Yosemite Valley from 

Inspiration Point 
Yosemite Valley, Yo- 
semite Falls 2,CM feet i 



11 Vernal Falls 

12 Yosemite Valley, Senti- 

nel Rock 3,270 feet 
high 

13 Mirror Lake 

14 Mariposa Grove 

15 Ogden Pacific Railroad 

16 Salt Lake City 

17 Salt Lake City, Brig- 

ham Young's House 

18 Salt Lake City, Morman 

Tal>ernacle 

19 Salt Lake City, New 

Mormon Temple 

20 Denver, Colorado 

21 Oinalia 

22 Bridge at Omaha 

23 Council Bluffs 

24 St. Louis Bridge 

25 St. Louis, Panorama 

26 St. Louis, Oldest House 

27 St. Louis, Levee and 

Steamboat 

28 Chicago, Panorama 



29 Chicago, Michigan 

Southern Railroad 
Depot 

30 Chicago, Court House 

31 Chicago, Grand Pacific 

Hotel 

32 Niagara, American Fall 

from Canadian Side 

33 Niagara, View in Win- 

ter 

34 Ticonderoga Ruins of 

Fort 

35 Lake George 

36 Saratoga 

37 Saratoga Springs 

38 Boston, State House 

39 Boston, Old South 

Church 

40 Boston, Faneuil Hall 

41 Newburg, N. Y., Wash- 

ington's Headquar- 
ters 

42 West Point 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.^ PkQi.^ \YI- 



\ 



McI.NTOSH BATTEKV ASI> OPTICAL CO.. C 

43 Scene ot Andre's Cap- 

uHome at IrVlng,6aiiny- 

9 Me 
4i New York City, Grana 

te Central Pnrk, the OIh- 

llak 
tTElevnter] Railroad. 

chftltum Square 

OlLf Usli 



aSevr 

SI Hew Torlt, 



<toct S 



Joklyi 



a New f^rk, 1 

Bridge 
S3 New York, Sound 

il phlloilelplila, Independ- 

» Plili 

Co 

M Wae 

de 

<] Washington Capitol 
ia United Slal— "— "■ 
Chamber 
■'>unl V8I 
,ion UoUB 



nited Slates Senate 
Cham' 

te Uounl 

60 Ui 

i o( Waaliliigton 



bystu 



n-hiat 



With Vacriptim Heading. 

1 The Cherry Tree Inti- 

I Toutig Washington a 

Peat'eniBker 
3 Courtship of Waahing- 



■tDu 



B "WaBhington 
fl Wash'-- 






^{^t^on^CroBaing 
7 The Prayer at Valley 
B Surrender oJ Comwai. 

'''"NSw"fo"kn""""' 

10 Lafayette at Mt. Ver, 
of Waali 



IngaCaneon at Bat- 
tle o[ Chapultepen 
3 CBpiuni ot f-ort rionel- 

i MllSr-Goneral Grant's 
Cliarge at the Battle 
o( Sliiliih 

sfiSBlssippi 

6 Grant's Triumphal En- 

try into Vic'kBburg 

7 Captnre of Petersburg, 

B Taking the Oalhl Sec- 
ond Inaogu ration ot 
P resident Grant 

10 Cottage on Mount Mc. 

Gregor, New York 

11 Death-bed ot IT. ». 

IS .4.]Iegory: "Let ua bave 



•U slides, (12. 
With Deicriptive Reading. 
1 Napoleon at the Bridge 



3 Napolmn at the Battle 

of Pyramids. 1798 
i Napoleon Crossing the 

S The Coronation of Napo- 
leon, ISOO 
e Napoleon at the Battle 

7 Napoleon Viaillug the 

H Napoleon at Battle of 

g Napoleon at Battle ot 
FriedlRnd, mi7 



eephine of the bi- 



lotte' 



Vilk Dticriptiix Jtta 
1 Alfred the Great 1bi 

the Cakes Burn 
S Battle ot Hastings, 
/ 1 Presentation of I 
Magna Charta, ISia 

4 Qaeen Phillipt Pleading 

tor the Burghers ot 
Calais. 13*8 

5 Death of Wat Tyler, 



Bqueeu fc^ary Signing 

Death Warrant at 

Lady Jane Grey, 1SS4 

10 Death uf Klzzio, UW 

U Surrenderor MaryHtu- 



IS The Ketnm from Elba, 

III 15 
30 Napoleon at Waterloo, 

SI Napoleon on Board the 

IteUerophon, IMS 
N Napoleon at St, Helena 
23 Ijeath-Uad ot Napoleon, 

U The Apotheosis ot Napo- 



(Gste ot the Uniyi 



at Krfnrth) 



ine'sBullfin front 
the Kast Gate ol 

It lemburg) Decern - 



ileon Parting with : 



(apolBon 1 

ENGLISH HISTORY. 



ber 10, 

B The Diet of Worms 

(Hall of the Diet) 

April IS, U9I 
V Luther on the Wart- 

bRrg. May (, im, 

Marrh 4, im 

10 The Marriage (Aina- 

dorff'B Honse at Wit- 
temberg) JunelS,lSM 

11 Domestic Lite fa Boom 

in Luther's House at 
Wittomberg) on the 
Wall! are portraits 

friends 

12 Victory in Death (El- 

BlDbenl the night ot 
the 18th of February 



>t QUBB 



; Court 



3 Intervieir between 
Mary Stuart and 
Qneen Bean, ISS7 

i Mary Stuart Going to 
Eiei^ution. Ifi87 

Spanish Annadn, 1S8S 
a Death of Queen Bess. 



FOB PRICE LIST OF SUDES Stt PhCt ^■i^ ■ 



174 HcINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL., U.S.A. 



17 The Gunpowder Plot 

Di«€OTered, 1606 

18 Trial of Earl of SUf- 

ford, yai 

19 Eve of the Battle of 

Wc«Hill, 1M2 
90 Trtontf Charles I, 1&I» 

21 Charles 1 ^Mfar with 

hU Children, Mb I 

22 Charles I Going to "Ra- ' 

ecution, VMSi 

23 Cromwell DissoWing 

Long Parliament, 1654 

24 Cromwell Refusing the 

Crown, 1656 

25 Return of Charles II at 

Dover, 1080 

26 Acquittal of Seven , 

Bishops, 1688 

27 Battle of Boyiie, 1690 

28 Death of General Wolfe, 

1759 . 

28 Nelson on Board the 
San Joseph, 1798 

30 Death of Nelson at Tra. 

falgar, 1805 

31 Battle of Quatre Bras, 

1815 

32 Battle of Waterloo. 1815 I 

33 Wellington Meeting I 

Blucber after Water- 
loo, 1815 

34 Battle of Navarino. 1827 

35 Battle of Balalclava 1855 

36 Bombardment of Sebas- 

topol, 1855 

French History. 

24 slides, $12. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 The Baptism of Clovis, 

496 

2 The Coronation of 

Charlemagne, 800 

3 Philip Augustus at Bo- 

vines, 1214 

4 Joan of Arc Fighting 

for France, 1429 

5 Francis I a Prisoner at 

Madrid, 1525 

6 Huguenots Escaping 

Massacre of St. Bar- 
tholomew, 1572 

7 Henry III at Fete of 

St. Luc 

8 Assassination of Duke 

of Guise, 1588 

9 Henry IV enters Paris, 

1594 

10 Cardinal Richelieu and 

Cinq Mars 

11 Louis XIV and the 

Grand Conde 

12 Anne of Austria show- 

ing Prince to Mob,1651 

13 Death of Cardinal Maz- 

arin, 1661 

14 Louis XIV founds the 

Hotel luvalides 

15 Moliere at the Court of 

Louis XIV 

16 Louis XV at the Battle 

of Fontenoy, 1746 
17ICapture of the Bastile, 

1789 
18 Rouget de J'Isle Chant- 
ing the Marseillaise, 
1792 



19 Louis XVI and Family 

in Prison, 1792 

20 Family of Louis XVI 

Awaitin^^ Death, 1793 

21 Assassination of Marat, 

1793 

22 RoU Call, Reign of Ter- 

ror, 1793 
Si Marie Antoinette Going 

<• JBKBcation, 1793 
21 GinwgiiU — tJMir mnj 

to Execation,mi j 



Sacred History— Life of 
Oar Savior. 

F\}rty'eigkt Viewg^ tvith Lec- 
ture, plain, $24; colored, 
972. 

1 The Annunciation to 

the Virgin 

2 The Angel appearing to 

the Shepherds 

3 The Babe of Bethlehem 

4 The Magi guided by the 

Star 

5 The Adoration of Magi 

6 The Presentation in the 

Temple 

7 The Flight into Egypt 

8 The Shadow of the 

Cross 

9 The Return to Nazareth 

10 Jesus disputing with 

the Doctors 

11 St. John preaching in 

the Wilderness 

12 The Baptism of Christ 

13 Christ Tempted by the 

Devil 

14 Christ and the Samari 

tan Woman 

15 Christ preaching on the 

Sea of Galilee 

16 The Sermon on the 

Mount 

17 Christ healing the Sick 

18 Christ raising the 

daughter of Jairus 

19 Christ Walking on the 

Waters 

20 The Miracle of the 

Loaves and Fishes 

21 The Transfiguration 

22 Parable of Prodigal Son 

—Carousal 

23 Parable of Prodigal Son 

-Swineherd 

24 Parable of Prodigal Son 

— Return 

25 Christ blessing the lit- 

tie children 

26 Mary Magdalene wash- 

ing feet of Jesus 

27 Christ and the rich 

young man 

28 The Pai-able of the 

Lilies 

29 Christ the outcast of 

the People 

30 Christ's Entry into Je- 

rusalem 

31 The Poor Widow's Two 

Mites 

32 Christ the Good Shep- 

herd 

33 Christ Weeping over 

Jerusalem 

34 The Last Supper 

35 The Agony \n tlie Gar- 

den 



36 Christ Rejected 

37 Christ bearing the Cross 

38 Christ arriving at 1ft. 

Calvary 
as The Cmciflxion 

40 Golgotha, **!% \a Fin- 

ished" 

41 The Descent from the 

42 The Body of Christ 

Laid in Tomb 



Christ 

45 The Marys at the Tomb 

46 Easter Morning 

47 The Journey to Em- 

mans 

48 The Ascension of 

Christ 



Bible History. 



Tvoenty-four ViewM, with Lee 

ture, plain, $12; colored, 

$36. 

1 Adam and Eve in Para- 

dise 

2 The Sacrifice of Noah 

3 Rebecca at the Well 

4 Eleazer in the house of 

Bathuel 

5 Arrival of Rebecca 

6 Jacob's Dream 

7 Jacob waters the flock 

of Rachel 

8 Joseph sold by his 

brothers 

9 Joseph's bloody coat 

brought to Jacob 

10 Joseph meets his father 

in Goshen 

11 Moses saved by Phara- 

oh's daughter 

12 Moses assisting the 

daughters of Jethro 

13 Pharaoh's host drown- 

ed in the Red Sea 

14 Jephthah's daughter 

meeting her father 

15 Sampson betrayed by 

Delilah 

16 David returns conquer- 

or of Goliah 

17 David in camp of Saul 

18 Saul and the Witch of 

Endor 

19 The Judgment of King 

Solomon 

20 Solomon's Reception of 

Queen of Sheba 

21 Espousal of Esther by 

Ahasuerus 

22 Esther implores Aha- 

suerus 

23 The Feast of Belshaz- 

zar 

24 Daniel in the Lions' 

Den 



Life of Jesus (Hof mann). 

28 slides, with reading, $14. 



1 "Come unto Me'* 

2 The Annunciation 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOE.S St.^ PWk^ \Yl. 



IKTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAl. (JO., CHIOAGO, ILL., t'. 8.A. 



4 The Wise Men 
B rijghi int., Egypt 

8 CbfldhoodoIJeBiia 
7 With ths IMctors 



IB AnnolDtinK.lhe Lord's 



81 The Cross 
32 The Burial 

34 The Keanrreclloa 

«S At EmiuftUB 

K At the Door 

S7 "Where Two or Th 

A Thouund Miles 



R 



opeanQ 



e A Moslem Oemi 



10 

I 



■lOSUtue af She 

Be led 
91 The GnDd Vesti 



» The Totuple o( Uooi 

10 The HhII o[ Columns t 

Ijonmeli 

11 The Voi'sl MemnoD < 

the Thebao Desert 



ia Edfuu, rram the Tem- 
giie Wall 

" a Temple 



uie Wall 

aS-Iow o[ 

if EdtDD, 



40 The Pli 

II The Hi 



Cstanict of 
of Phil&e, 



The Second Propyloi 
OP GaDeway of ihi 
TemjilH ot Fhilae 



IS The GT«at Temnle o 
AhooSimhel 
t Coloatai Head Dis 

BO Two Temples in Aboi 



Cairo. Snutheaet li 

the Citadel 
The American Mist 

The Kaw-el.Nit Bridge 

U The Great Pyramid ot 

OheopB 
U The Prramii] ol Chep- 



Sphlnifl 



19 The Temple ol Luxor 
30 The Temple of Ed(oa 
91 The Temple of Osiris at 

M The Firet Cataract 
S3 A Nest nl Nubian a 
Staootin); the Caumct 
24 The Lar^ Temple at 



nthel 



B Kile 



% Eset from the Temple 

S0 Pharaoh's Uei], or the 
Kiosk of Isis 

30 The Nile and the Grand 

31 North ot the Temple ef 

32 Tlie First Gllmpga of 

33 The Mosqne of Moham- 
" 41' at Cain 



31 Cairt . 

SB Cairo, the CurU 



, of the 



I. Modem Anbtr Pat 



ilBriape 



11 Elehl Donkej') 

U Through the Avenue ol 

Palms 
13 The Pyramids ot Che. 

ops, Cbepren and 

M ClimhiDE the Prmrnid 

northeast comer 
U An Luwani View ot 
the Hyramia ol Che- 

ihe Pyramid ol Che- 

47 The pyramid OolTer 

48 First Glimpses ot the 

Pyramid ol Cheops 

49 The Tombs and Pyra- 

mids ol Cheops 

50 The Sphinx, trout faee 



Called 



The Gorgeous Interior 

of the Mo'wne 
The Gate —■"' fi—w 

Insprlptii 



17 The upcn Ana 
\em"rain™P" 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SHOES Stt PkCt \1.T 



S A Pannnm 
9 The Pref.1,y 



View ol 
'lan Mia- 



276 McLNTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO. CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A. 



10 A Damascene Resi- 

dence 

11 The Harem 

12 The Great Saloon 

13 The Arab Family at 

Home 

14 Houses on the City 

Wall 

15 A Garden on the Abana 

16 Gate of Peace 

17 The Fountain of Fijeh 

18 Suck Wady Barada 

19 An Old Roman Road 

20 The Birthplace of the 

Abana 

21 A Genei-al View of the 

Ruins of Baalbec 

22 The Temple of the Sun 

23 The Front of the Tem- 

ple of the Sun 

24 The Interior of the 

Temple of the Sun 

25 The Details of a Capital 

26 The Great Court 

27 Modern Baalbec 

28 Fallen Columns and 

Capitals 

29 The Temple of Baal 

30 The Interior of the 

Mosque 

31 The Statue of the Sun 

32 The Circular Temple 

33 Cyclopean Stones 

34 The Temple of Baal 

through the Breach 
36 The Quarry 

36 Our Donkey Baby of 

Baalbec 

37 Lebanon to Ante-Leb- 

anon 

38 Zahleh 

39 The Girls' School at 

Zahleh 

40 The Beyrout Music 

Garden 

41 A Beyrout Street View 

and a Wall of Flowers 

42 Beyrout toward Mt. 

Lebanon 

43 Beyrout toward the 

Sea 

44 The Presbyterian 

Church and Girls' 
Seminary 

45 The Syrian Presbyte- 

rian College 

46 Another View of the 

Syrian Mission School 

47 Ancient Joppa 

48 The House of Simon, 

the Tanner 
4Q Our Dragoman, Mo- 

hammed Achmed Ef- 

fendi Hedaiyah 
60 Traveling Tent, Inte- 

rior 

How They Live in Egypt. 

Fifty Views, wUh Lecture, 
$25.00. 

1 Alexandria from the Ar- 

senal 

2 A Modern Arabic Ba- 

zaar in Cairo 

3 A View in the Mooske 

4 The Arab Quarter 

6 The Equestrian Statue 

of Ibraheem Pasha 
6 An Arabian Dwarf and 
Giant 



7 An Egyptian Water- 

Camer 

8 The Watchman at the 

Palace Gate 

9 The Canines at a 

Smithy Door 

10 A Modern Arabic Pal- 

ace 

11 The Latticed Balcony 

12 An Egyptian Money- 

changer 

13 A Nubian Woman and 

Child 

14 A Group on the Summit 

of the Pyi*amid of 
Cheops 

15 An Egyption Woman 

Veiled 

16 Mustapha Adli, the 

Dragoman 

17 The Niibian Donkey 

18 On the Mahmoudieh 

Canal 

19 A Sugar Cane Boat on 

the Mahmoudieh 

20 The Village of Esneh 

21 An Alexandrian Home 

22 An Egyptian Bread -Sel- 

ler 

23 An Arabic Farm Vil- 

lage near Alexandria 

24 A Nile Sakiyeh 

25 A Watch Tower and 

Irrigated Land 

26 An Egyptian Plow and 

Team 

27 Irrigating Ditches 

28 The Great Pyramids of 

Gizeh 

29 The Little Bread- 

Maker 

30 Nubian Water Vessels 

31 A Little Arab Maiden 

32 A Group of Nubian 

Children 

33 An Egyptian Sheep 

Market 

34 The Airy Little "Sesos- 

tris" 

35 The Harbor of Assiout 

36 Assiout from the Mount 

of Toipbs 

37 A Modern Egyptian 

Cemetery 

38 The Canal Bazaar of 

Assiout 

39 A Boat Load of Water 

Jars at Keneh on the 
Nile 

40 Sifting Grain 

41 A Group of Nubian 

Women 

42 The Stores of the Des- 

ert and the People 

43 The Nubian Curly- 

Heads 

44 A Fantasia Dancer of 

Luxor 
46 A Moslem Cemetery 

46 The Dahabieh "Sesos- 

tris" 

47 The Steamer "Sardieh" 

48 A Stranded Dahabieh 

49 A Pottery Bazaar 

60 The Tomb of Caliph Al- 
lah Own 

Nile Tombs and Temples. 

Fifty Views, with Lecture, 
$25.00. 

1 The Obelisk at Heliopo- 
lis 



2 The Fallen Casing of 

the Pyramid of Hen- 
cheres 

3 The Ruin of the Temple 

and the Pyramid of 
Cephren 

4 Statue of King Cephren 
6 The Tomb of the Cal- 

iph Sultan Garribe 

6 The First Tomb of Beni 

Hassan 

7 Scheikh-Abd-El-Goor- 

nah 

8 The Plain of Thebes 

from Bab-El-Malouk 

9 Tombs of Rameses III 

and Sethi I, at Bab- 
El-Malouk 

10 The Tomb of Sethi 

11 The Tomb of Sethi I at 

one Corner 

12 The Harpists* Chamber 

13 Stone and Wooden 

Mummy Cases 

14 The Face of Old King 

Pinotem 
16 Gilt-faced Mummv Case 
of the Queen Nofre- 
tari 

16 The Temple of Osiris 

17 The Temple of Sethi 

18 The Old and New 

Structures at Abydoa 

19 The Temple at Dender- 

ah 

20 Denderah's Great Fa- 

cade 

21 The Roof of Denderah 

22 The Hall of Columns 

23 The Facade, Interior 

and Hall of Denderah 

24 The Hypostile Hall 

25 The Colossi of Thebes 

26 The Rameseum 

27 A Broken Head of a 

Broken Race 

28 The Temple of Medi- 

net-Abou 

29 The First Court of the 

Temple of Rameses 
III at Medinet-Abou 

30 Medinet-Abou, " The 

Palace of the King" 

31 The Temple of Esneh 

32 The Shrine of the Tem- 
• pie of Edf ou 

33 The Ptolemaic Temple 

of Assouan 

34 The Quarry of Syene 

35 Ruins of Philae 

36 A Grand Colonnade 

37 The Ruins of a Chris- 

tian Church 

38 An Ancient and a Mod- 

em Temple 

39 The Quarry at Gertasse 

40 The Temple of Kalab- 

sheh 

41 The Temple of Dendoor 

42 The Temple of Dendoor 

43 The Temple of Kirscheh 

44 The Temple of Dakkeh 

46 The Small Temple at 
Aboo Simbel 

46 The Vast Interior 

47 Mt. Korosko 

48 The First Cataract 

49 The Second Cataract of 

the Nile 

50 A Stranded Boat 



>^OR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE Pk^E \YI. 



McINTtlSH BATTERY AXD Ol'TIUAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., I.'. 9. J 

LIFE AND TIMES OF COLUMBUS. 

the "The Life and 



ol Columbua." Tole «ec conaislB uf mcj [sD) pliiii 
descriptiVB prinlod locCviro. 

Prtre itf^ ctmpietf lel, f 26.00. Peine per ilidt, BOo. . 

N. B.— Colored slidBE o( bhla geriee ara nnt i^ftrrEed 
to order ab tbe rntB ol »LSS tor the unmounted, «! 



1 Fortran of CoUi 



nbiii) 



and Isabella 
A laabelia's Triiimpbal 

Entry into Segovia 
T City Gate, Oordova 
B Moeqne ot CordoTa 



Saunukucn 
mill at Conrt of 
inand and lea- 

ipoundlag: 



a,Egg 



bie Tlieorle! 
1 Cnlnubua Bnil 
SColnn.bHflle«vinKL..___ 
« Three Ships of Oolvviu- 

T Columbus in Sight of 



Froponnd- 

En trance 
'arcing with 



JMoor's Seat 
K ColuiTibiisattheConi 

ot Ferdinand and lei 
• bell» 
!4 PalOB 

M Colunibns' Three Shii 
28 Coliimbne lea v In 

Pa Ids 

27 Columbus in Sight c 

28 Iisnding ol Columbu 



iMied Cob at 
H Received 



bua, itarcelon 
33 Hartwr of Itnrci 
3< Isabella sends 



II View of Gaudnlqulvir 
13 Ambassadors' Saloon, 

Seville 
43 Fortrsit of Isabella 
U Segovia 

U The Walla of Seenvta 
« Alcazar of Segovia 

and Isabella 
WBouaein ivhichColura- 

busdied. Valladotid 
tt Death Bed of Columbus 



8 DawL _ _ _ 

Sew Worli 
dug 

9 Landing ol 






KeCum fi'oi 
11 Columbus Return Iroi 
1-2 Death.Bed'of Col umbo 
Mew Ben-hnT Set. 



Sixty . 
1 Thi 
S The J{ 



tin StiUtn. (30.1)0. 

Meeting of the 
— Wise Men 

he Mother of 



* The Way to 

5 Cave of thi 

Betblehen 

a The Field ol 



Angel Appear In 
the Shepnerda 



13 Ben-huraDd Messala 

14 A Judean Home, est 

15 A Judean Home, I'our 
m Mother of Ben-hur 

17 Tiriah 

IB The TUe Falling 

ao ArriiiB Going to Sea 
SI Ben-hi.r beftre Arrhil 
M Sea Fight 



31 Tbe Arabs 

32 Ins 

33 MornioiJ ol tbe tian 



:t of printed lecMre, S 
itook, but can be fnrniihrt 
lor tbe colored mountnl^ 
33 Oliarlot Race. Mesiala- 



3B Messala Carrted tron 

3!t The Combat In f 

M Tower of AntoniL, __, 

41 Towerol Anlonla, Dn»- 

43 Tower of Antonia, Tl 

zah and Molber 
43 Jerusalem 
44Lejiors- Dwollin 

4S Amrah Tatlog Food 

Her Mistresa 
*s Group of Lepers 

I Bethabara 



13 Behol 
God 



113 Gethaemai 



X the Klna 
and his Moth. 

hrlst. 

Jvarv 
to th» 



m Ben-hnr'B Home 

M Ben-hur and Esthi 

W The Catacombs 

60 Ecee Homo 

Wondara of the Worllt.' 

I-riceper plain Slide, H.GK 

Friceperfiut Cotered Wlidt, 

I1.S0. 

1 Pyramids of Egyul 
Z Statue ol »femnn« 
Thebes 

3 Hanging Gardena.Baby- 

4 Rockof GlbraltJir 

fi Natural II ridge .Virginia 
H Niagara Falls 
7 Ynsemite Falls 

5 El Capltan 



13 Old Faithful 6 eyser 
13 Uanunoth Cave, Intel 

ior lIlnminalBd WlK 

Colored Flree 
11 Panorama Suez Canal 
15 View Down the Canal 
IB Dredging Boat la Canal 
17 VicinVof Port Said 
la Vessel PassiiigThrough 

IB flt.Gothard Tunnel 

■ork and Brooklyn 



: 31 Great li 

33 Tal Mabi 
33 CofoBO'ui 
'WY.BB.l 



1 






ran pn.ct imx t.. ...nrs »« vt.'a. v"- 



878 MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



28 St. Peter's, Rome 

29 Cologne Cathedral 

30 Mosque of Omar, the 

Dome of the Kock, 
Jerusalem 

31 Great Bell, Moscow 

32 New Opera House,Paris 
83 Steamer Great Eastern 

Grappling with At- 
Ian tic Cable 

Jerusalem on the Day of 
the Crucifixion. 

1 Panoramic View of the 

City from the North, 
showing the Temple, 
Judgment Hall, etc.; 
Golgotha forming the 
foreground, ana the 
Mount of Olives being 
in the distance 

2 The City from the 

Northwest ;the Moun. 
tains of Moab in the 
distance, and close to 
the observer are the 
Tents of some who 
have come to the 
Holy City to keep the 
Passover Feast 

3 Still further Westward ; 

the Palaces of Annas 
and of Caiapbas ; Hill 
of Evil Counsel, etc. 

4 Mount Zion; Palace of 

Herod; Tower of Da- 
vid, etc. 
6 Ruins of an old Cara- 
vansarv ; Clump of 
. Olive Trees bordering 
• on the pool of Siloam, 
etc. 

6 The Road to Damascus; 

the Historic Peak of 
Mizpah far away in 
the distance ; a Roman 
ffuard-house in the 
foreground, etc. 

7 The Hill on which Rest- 

ed the Hamlet of Em- 
maus; the Cave of 
Jeremiah in the fore- 
ground; an Excited 
Multitude Proceed- 
ing to Calvary, etc. 

8 Calvary; the Crucifix- 

ion; Roman Soldiers; 
Mary; John, the Be- 
loved Disciple, etc. 

Set of Eight Plain 
Slides,, ^ 

Set of Eight Colored 
Slides, (3 inches in 
diameter, round}, $12 

Set of Eight Colored 
Slides (square), $16 

Descriptive Reading 
accompanies the 
Views 

Bound About Jerusalem. 

Fifty Views with Lecture,f26 

1 The Cotton Grotto, 

North Wall 

2 The Damascus Gate 

3 Peep over the Damas- 

cus Gate 

4 The Jafl'a Gate 

5 An Oriental Kahn 

6 The Lepers' Quarter 
and HoHpitAl 
7 The Upper Pool of Gi- 
hon 



8 The Valley of Hinnom 

from the Pool of Gi- 
hon 

9 The Valley of Hinnom 

from the Tomb 

10 Jerusalem, over the 

Wall,near Zion's Gate 

11 Zion's Gate 

12 The Southeast corner 

of the Temple Area 

13 The Rock Tomb, with 

Steps 

14 The Kedron Valley 

from the Potter's 
field 

15 The Potter's Field 

16 En-Rogel, the Well of 

Joab 

17 Isaiah's Tree 

18 The Pool of Siloam 

19 Siloam and the Gardens 

20 The Valley of Jehosha- 

ghat from Siloam 
e Tombs of Zacha- 
riah and St. James 

22 The Tomb of Absalom 

23 The Hill of Evil Coun- 

sel 

24 The Golden Gate 

25 The Golden Gate, Inte- 

rior 

26 The Chapel of the Vir- 



fm 
e 



27 The Garden of Geth- 

semane 

28 The Chapel of the Ago- 

ny 

29 The Garden of Geth- 

semane 

30 The Garden of Gethse- 

mane and Jerusalem 

31 St. Stephen's Gate 

32 Moslem Cemetery 

33 Scopus 

34 The Pool of Bethesda 

35 Herod's Gate 

36 The Grotto of Jeremiah 

37 Mount Calvary 

38 From Mount Calvary to 

Olivet 

39 Jerusalem from Mount 

Calvary 

40 The Tombs of the 

Kings 

41 Facade of the Tombs of 

Kings 

42 Rolling Stone at a Tomb 

Door 

43 The Muezzin Call 

44 The Church of the As- 

cension 

45 The Dome of the As- 

cension 

46 Valleys of Jehoshaphat 

and Hinnom 

47 Jerusalem, from the 

Mount of Olives- 
North 

48 Jerusalem, from the 

Mount of Olives- 
Center 

49 Jerusalem, from the 

Mount of Olives- 
South 
60 Mount of Olives 

The Taking of Petra. 

Price per Slide, plain 60c.; 

colored, round il.SO; 

square f2 

"Dead Petra in her hill- 
tomb sleeps 
Her stones ol emptVivesa 
remain*, 



Around her sculptured 
mystery sweeps. 

The lonely waste of 
Edom's plain."— IFTktt- 
tier. 

1 Breaking Camp at Aka- 

bah 

2 Wady Araba from Elath 

3 Wall of Defence, Wady 

El Ithim 

4 The pass through Wady 

El Ithim 

5 A Midday rest in the 

Desert 

6 Camels drinking and 

fighting for water at 
the well of Humeiyu- 
meh 

7 A groop of Moorish Pil- 

Sims en route from 
ecca^ at the Well of 
Humeiyumeh 

8 Rock house and pictur- 

ed rocks at Humeiyu- 
meh 

9 The Rock and Well of 

Moses, Ain £1 Dala- 
geh ^ 

10 A panorama of Petra 

from the east — sun- 
rise 

11 A panorama of Petra 

from the southeast- 
early morning 

12 Panorama of Petra and 

Jabel Haroun, Mount 
Hor 

13 Sunrise on ancient £d- 

om. An antique vil- 
lage 

14 The Pool and Ruins of 

Ain El Raga 

15 A barricade of camels 

in battle array at Aik 
Gazalah, near Petra 

16 The three tombs. Ne- 

cropolis of Petra 

17 The tomb of the four 

Pyramids, Necropolis 
of Petra 

18 A Petra Bedouin guard 

at the entrance of the 
Sik 

19 A View in the Gorge of 

the Sik, at Petra 

20 On the river Sik, Gorge 

of the Sik 

21 A first glimpse of the 

Kuznen, through the 
Gorge of the Sik 

22 The Kuzneh— the Fa- 

cade 

23 A Group of Bedouin 

Sheykhs with horses 
and lances 

24 A preliminary glimpse 

25 A group of rock temples 

near the theatre, Pe- 
tra 

26 The theatre of Petra 

27 The view magnificent, 

Petra from the thea- 
tre 

28 Petra, east from the 

travelers' camp 

29 Petra, west from the 

travelers' camp 

30 Sheyk Salim, Chief of 

the Petra Bedouin, 
^TLd his staff 
^\ Owx x.wi^X'st^* ^AiXEiis at 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOE.S S^^ PkC^^ \m 




ITTEKY AND orTlCAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A 



31 TBDipleofthenni.wilh 


as 


The Ksar Farm 


n-tho 


it A «a,TiflciBi altar 






arehed doorwa 




Baal 


33 TomlM, templea and 


m 






45 The ravine ol the Dloi 


cliffs BOiith troni tho 
■cehBd terrace 
StT)ieCc.rln[lilBt.TBiuiila. 




ruineil In la ri or 




pBlm 




The temples of 




K A. riH^k temDie, mtari 


pot™ 






47 TheDlertrointherac 


U Temple of the thraa 






flulea 


temple 


tiers o! <:i>1ud»« 




CDlumiia 






30 Tbe JiaoT FKToim suit 

teoken I'olumne 
37 The Kaer Faroun— the 


4a 


A roik slalrwB 
pulpit 


y and 


'^^]r!™"'^"""' 


aiterior and arched 


43 Tlie iiyramiila 


and 


M An unfluished n»o 






ruiued fortreaa 




temple 


T 


HE 


MAMMOTH 


CAVE. 



We ha»e at last, after expendiug a p">il deal of time and money, obtained a aei 
aegatiicBoI tlie iaterior ot this in teveHCing place. 
The Cantarn alides from these negatives are now placed on tlie market lor 

it time. Ab indicative ot how dlRli^iiU It has hecn tn make thHse negatives, 

. may »«y that one plate alone was es])o«ed (or twenty -eight honrg, ionr poweital 
'-VMnuative headlights helng trained on tlie subject to be photographed. 

Tbe negative of the BottomieHB Pit required toiirminutes'expoBUre, magnaslnw 
Ire being immed, and the camera flxed pointing downward into the pit, the nuune- 
nm wire having been lowered away down into the depths oi the abyss and Ignited 
Y a peculiar raettianlcal device. These and many others represent the diIBcultle| 

Price per each elide (not colored) plain, il. 

1 Old Way o( Going to | 17 Skeh 
Uammoth Cava 18 B 



t Guide, Jiia 



T Pulpit in M. E, CUnrch 
S Onr PhntographoF and 

9 Water Pipes of 1S12 



Bottom Ic- 



jMT»y Cave. 

W alldeB, with reading, 



SFUh Market 
S Ball-Koom 
4 Oora! Spring 



8 Doable Colnmn 
T Loit Blanket 
8 Empress Column 
8 Bwacen's Tent 

U FoUes Column 

U Cathedral 

ISCutleaonthelthine 

SI aivai Khina 

14 Troxen Mountain 

UTitama's Veil 



S Brand's Cascade 
la EutranCD Avenue 
SO Hovev's Hull 
31 Banging Rock 
aa Dlana'sBath 
23 Stonewall Avenue 
34 Twin Lakes 
an Cave Hill 



!h ut the gun 

oil 

t Coiilsprlng, 



9 The tianqiie 
10 Projectile ti 



m argoing 
praventB the 

»kan Icom the 



IS Diana and Satcllitu 
)9 Au Enormous Disc 
W The body of the Satellll 

projectile 
aiEeveiling in spac 
where weight is al 

ffl The telescope at Pa 



is Unguis bed i 



SB Tlio rivalry 

30 Flring^hr: 

31 White all. 1 

32 Tbe ovation 

A Tour or the World, 

With Bescriptive Seadt* 

1 Pbllndelphia Indepen 

ence Ball, interior 

2 Broad Street Station 

train leaving 

3 Washington-The Cb] 

4 Washington — Wh 11 

Bouse, S. Front 
fi Wash hig Ion— The Ho 

5 Niagara Falls 

7 Chicago — The AodlH 

SSt. Lo'nla- The Qr« 

Bridge 
D Pullmao Dining Oai 
10 Gateway to Garden 
the Gnds, Pike's Pel 
a, Santa Fe 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDE.S Stt Pft.^t \IT ■ 



280 MCINTOSH BATTEBY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



21 Japan— Yokohama 

22 *' MUuido'B Palace, 
Kioto 

23 Japan— Statue of Bud- 

dah, Kamacura 
21 China— Harbor of Hong 
Kong 

25 India— Calcutta 

26 '* Darjeeling 

27 " Elephanta Caves 

28 Panorama of Aden 

29 Suez Canal 

30 Cairo, looking toward 

Pyramids 

31 Pyramid and Sphynx 

32 Alexandria — Pompey's 

Pillar 

33 Jerusalem 

34 *' Mosque of Omar 

35 The Dead Sea 

36 Joppa 

37 Constantinople 

38 The Golden Horn 

39 Athens from the Acrop- 

olis 

40 Naples Panorama 

41 Rome 
^ Venice 

4:^ Milan Cathedral 

44 St. Gothard's Tunnel, 

Switzerland 

45 Axenstrasse, Lake Lu- 

cerne 

46 Mer de Glace 

47 Chamounix, Mt. Blanc 

48 Geneva and the Rhone 

49 Berlin 

50 Amsterdam, Holland 

61 Rue Royale, Brussels, 
Belgium. 

52 Paris Panorama 

53 Paris Grand Opera 

o4 Paris Column Vendome 

55 England — London 

Bridge 

56 England— Thames Em- 

bankment 

57 Ireland— Lakes of Kil- 

larney 

58 Steamer in Dock, New 

York 

59 Brooklyn Bridge, New 

York 

60 Liberty Statue, New 

York 

Naples and Pompeii. 

12 Slides, $6. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 Bay of Naples and Ve- 

suvius 

2 Place du Plebescite, 

Naples 

3 The Blue Grotto Island 

Capri 

4 The F a r n e s e Bull, 

Naples 

5 The Temple of Serapis, 

Puteoli 

6 Railroad up Vesuvius 

7 The Cone of Mt. Vesuv- 

ius 

8 The House of the Poet, 

Pompeii 

9 The Greek Theatre, 

Pompeii 

10 T h e Amphitheatre, 

Pompeii 

11 House of Baker, Pom- 

peii 
J2 General View of Exca- 
vations, Pompeii 



Milan, Genoa and Pisa. | 

12 slides, $6. 
With Descriptive Recusing. 

1 Panorama of Milan and 

Cathedral 

2 Rue Victor Emanuel 

3 The Cathedral 

4 Gallery, Victor Eman- 

uel 

5 Statue Leonardo da 

Vinci 

6 La Sea la 

7 The Simplon Arch 

8 Genoa, Panorama of 

City and Harbor 

9 Statue of Columbus, 

Genoa 

10 Gallery in Campo Santo 

11 Duomo Baptistery and 

Tower, Pisa 

12 The Leaning Tower 

Germany. 

12 slides, $8. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 Panorama of Berlin ' 

2 Brandenburg Gate, ; 

Berlin 

3 Imperial Palace, Berlin 

4 Unter den Linden, 

Berlin 

5 Marien Platz, Munich 

6 Hotel Kaizerworth, 

Goslar 

7 Old Houses, Hildes- 

heim 

8 Street in Strasburg, 

Cathedral 

9 Limburg Cathedral 

10 Albert Durer's House, 

Nuremberg 

11 Russian Chapel, Dres- 

den 

12 Cathedral, Cologne 

Constantinople. 

12 slides, $6. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 Panorama 

2 Palace of Beylerbe 

3 Mosque of St. Sophia 

4 Mosque ot St. Sophia 

(interior) 

5 The Golden Horn 

6 Street View (instan- 

taneous) 

7 Panorama of the Bridge 

8 The Sultan at Prayer m 

the Mosque 

9 Mosque of Suleiman 

10 Turkish Woman 

11 The Harbor 

12 Steamer Leaving 

Austria. 

12 slides, $6. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 Imperial Palace, Vienna 

2 City Hall, Vienna 

3 The Grand Opera 

House, Vienna 



4 Imperial Parliament 

Building, Vienna 

5 MaximillUin Platz, Vi- 

enna 

6 Maximiilian Bed Room, 

Vienna 

7 Ring Strasse, Vienna 

8 Linz on the Danube 

9 Street in Stertzing 

10 Castle of Bruneck 

11 Triumphal Arch, Inns- 

bruck 

12 Theresien Strasse 

Porta£;al. 

12 Slides, $6. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 General View of Lis- 

bon and Harbor > 

2 Statue Don Jose I., ' 

Lisbon 
8 Boulevard dos Bomn- 
lus, Lisbon 

4 Ruins of G r o u m a 8, 

Belem 

5 Sculptures in the Clois- 

ter, Lisbon 

6 The Castle and Ram- 

parts, Lisbon 

7 window of the Chapter 

House, Thomar 

8 Gallery of the Cloister, 

Alcobaco. 

9 Library of University 

Coimbre 
10 Gallery of Santa Cmz, 

Coimbre 
J.1 Gate of Castle of La 

Perna, C intra 
12 Gallery in Castle of 

Mont Serat 

Wliite Mountains. 

12 slides, $8. 
With Descriptive Reading. 

1 The Stage Leaving 

2 The Flume 

3 Willey House, Fran- 

conia 

4 Purple Lake, Franconia 

5 Crawford House 

6 Old Man of the Monn- 

tain 

7 Wild Cat and Glen Ellia 

8 Jackson Falls, Wild Cat 

River 

9 Panorama from Thorn 

Mountain 

10 A Mountain Road 

11 Panorama of Jackson 

and the Mountains 

12 Tip Top House, Mt. 

Washington 

London. 

Set of Twelve, with Reading 
(6.00. 

1 Buckingham Palace 

2 Houses of Parliament 

3 Westminster Abbey 

4 The Nave, Westmins- 
ter 

5 Blackfriar's Bridge 
^ Tx«d«i\\K&.T Square 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUD^S S€.€. PkOi^ N«- 




FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEt fklM. «T. 



282 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



Historic Places. 

Set of Twelve, with Reading 

$3.00. 

1 Plymouth Rock, Mass. 

2 Concord Bridge, Mass, 

3 Ruins of Fort Ticonde- 

roga, New York 

4 Washington's H e a d- 

quarters, Newburg, 

6 Ruins of Fort Putnam, 
West Point, N. Y. 

6 Old Church, Sleepy Hol- 

low, N. Y. 

7 Old Mill, Newport, R. I. 

8 William Penn's House, 

Fairmount Park, 
Philadelphia 

9 Washington's Residence 

Mt. Vernon, Va. 

10 Washington's Tomb, Mt. 

Vernon, Va. 

11 Fort San Marco, St. Au- 

gustine, Fla. 

12 Old Cathedral, St. Au- 

gustine, Fla. 

Far West. 

Set c/ Twelve, with Reading 

$8.00. 

1 Panorama of Salt Lake 

City, Utah 

2 Brigham Young's House 

Salt Lake City 

3 Mormon Tabernacle, 

Salt Lake City 

4 Great Organ in the Mor- 

mon Tabernacle, Salt 
Lake City 

5 Panorama of Sacra- 

mento, CaL 

6 State Capitol of Califor- 

nia, Sacramento 

7 Panorama of San Fran- 

cisco 

8 Harbor of San Francisco 

9 Chinese Joss House, Ex- 

terior, San Francisco 

10 Chinese Joss House, In- 

terior, San Francisco 

11 Palace Hotel, San Fran- 

Cisco 

12 Market Street and Bald- 

win Hotel, San Fran- 
cisco 

Tlie Old Roman World. 

Set of 12, with Reading, 
$6.00. 

1 Liberality of the Roman 

Women 

2 Cornelia and her Jewels 

3 A Roman Chariot Race 

4 The Vintage Festival 

5 Death of Caesar 

6 Roman Prisoners Pass- 

ing Under the Yoke 

7 A Roman Feast 

8 Antony and Cleopatra 

9 Gladiators Going to Cir- 

cus 

10 The Victorious Gladi- 

ator's Appeal 

11 Destruction of Pompeii 

12 Wild Beasts and Their 

Victims in the Coli- 
seum 



A Walk About Venice. 

Set oj 12, with Reading 

$3.00. 

1 Panorama of Venice 

2 Grand Canal and Gon- 

dola 

3 Colonnade of Ducal Pal- 

ace 

4 Giant's Staircase 

6 Campanile and St. 
Mark's 

6 Cathedral of St. Mark's 

7 Bridge of Sighs 

8 Bridge of the Rialto 

9 La t^sa D'Oro 

10 Palace Foscari 

11 Church of St. Saluta 

12 Isle of St. George 

New Orleans. 

Set of 12, with Reading, 
$6.00, 

1 A Study from the Oys- 

ter Levee 

2 A Cotton Levee 

3 Cotton Levee, Canal 

Street 

4 The French or Creole 

Section 

5 The French Market 

6 Panorama Jackson 

Square 

7 Canal and St. Charles 

Streets 

8 A New Orleans Resi- 

dence 

9 A Group of Lofty Cis- 

terns 

10 Old Creole Mansion 

11 The Garden of a Creole 

Home 

12 A New Orleans Milk 

Cart 

Old St. Augustine. 

Set of 12, with Reading, 
96.00. 

1 Old City Gateway 

2 St. George Street 

3 The Oldest House 

4 Treasury Street 

5 Old Spanish Cathedral 

6 The Slave Market 

7 The Villa Zoravda 

8 Old Fort San Marco 

9 The Stairway to Para- 

pet 

10 Watch Tower of Fort 

11 Old Spanish Lighthouse 

12 The Lighthouse, Ana. 

statia Island 

Bip Van WinRle. 

6 slides, $3. 
With Reading, 

1 Playing with the Chil- 

dren 

2 At the Village Inn 

3 His Scolding Wife 

4 On the Mountains 

5 Returns after a Nap of 

Twenty years 

6 Relating his Story 



Leap for life. 

5 slides, $2.50. 
With Reading. 

1 There stood the boy 

with Dizzy brain, 
Between the sea and 
sky 

2 Then Suddenly a rifle 

grasped 
And aimed it at his son 

3 " That only chance your 

life can save; 
Jump, jump, boy!" He 
obeyed. 

4 He sank— he rose — he 

lived — he moved — 
And for the ship struck 
out. 

5 " His father drew, in si- 

lent Joy, those wet 
arms round his neck*' 

Seven A^^g of Man. 

7 slides, $3.50. * 

With Reading. 

1 The Infant 

2 The School Boy 

3 The Lover 

4 The Soldier 

5 The Justice 

6 The Lean and Slippered 

Pantaloon 

7 The Last Scene 

Pilgrim's Progress. 

12 slides, $6. 

With Reading, 

1 The Pilgrim and his 

Burden 

2 The Shining Light 

3 The Plough of Despond 

4 The Pilgrim at the Gate 

5 Christian and the Three 

Shining Ones 

6 The Pilgrim and the 

Lions 

7 Christian Armed 

8 The Fight with Apoll- 

yon 

9 Vanity Fair 

10 The Pilgrims found 

sleeping 

11 The Pilgrims and the 

Shepherds 

12 Passing through the 

Waters 

Uncle Tom's Cabin. 

12 slides, $6. 

With Reading, 

1 George Harris taking 

leave of his Wife 

2 An evening in Unele 

Tom's Cabin 

3 Escape of Eliza and 

ChUd on the Ice 

4 Uncle Tom sold and 

Leaving his Family 

5 Eva St. Clair makes a 

friend of Uncle Tom 

6 Uncle Tom saves Eva 

from Drowning 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



iATTERY AUD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. 9. A. 



9 Etb Beading to Uncli 

10 ETB'a UrlDg Farewell 

11 Legree'a Cruelty to Dn- 

IS Deatb of Uncle Tom 
Voyage of Life. 

1 alidea, tD.OD. 

ChiWiaod. 

1 "Fair rhildhooil starli, 

illiiined vitb liRbl, 

And plcaeinz Tietons 

emmnM the aighf 



IS the blui 
MaKhBBd, 



The hour approaches, 

TSHi Maun ride." 

^' And , uov ! Tam vaa 



I ugh til la stern ' 
the voyager, 






" While 



ding 81 



ark, 



Bright lireaka the light 
ol endless morn." 

The LBsr Voyage of the 

MnelW Cotored. 11.60; 
Plain, SO etnU. 

1 Ocean Steamar Leaving 

a Oi«an Sleairier in Mi 

» Opean Steauier on L 

Shore 
i Ocean Steiiniar on Fin 

Two FatHs (.r Virtue ai 
Vice. 

Fiotlt CMIofwf, U.SO. 



1 Openine cue (Juestiou 

2 Bengal Ease 

3 The AiLfiil Dodge 

4 Look Before You Leap 

5 Under (.'over 

of IheT-Bil, Ihe Uli- 

Vlsit of St. MIoholae. 

Pinely Colortd, $1.60; 



.__._■ Beds 
2 "AMiiiialiireSJei^hBDd 



A ChrtstiuBB HjtnB. 

Ftnety Colored, fl.SO 
Flnin, BO cenit. 






urged hi! 

niuhc" 

Within that proTinca -( 



<tly Calm 
Plain, SI 

I Childhood 



nelji Colored, 11. 1 
Plain, ao cenii. 



NnrelDB hor 



'Merry Chr 
Night " 



ralls'o'ffiV, 






may precede one thiit 
iM] thrill the world 

A thousand belli line 
out, and throw theft 
lovtnl iieaisahroftd " ji 

For in Iliat stable lar,J| 
new bora, the peaea-.F 






Finely Colored. $1.60; 



Eoropean History. 

Insfu Cotnred, tl.6l 
Piatn, SO cents. 



[ i Charles V. Enloriug 

, 5 Luth^er^^'iKuming the 
i Poiw'sBull 

e The Vlrst Ketormer's 

7 William of Orauge 

Pledges hifl JBweli 
lor I)e lease o[ his 
Country 

8 Galileo Exiioundiug his 

Theories 
g Galileo. BetoT* the In- 

10 Peter the Great Sared 
by his Mother 
1 11 SoblBiki Promises to As 
slst Venice Against 
' the Tnrka 

13 James Watt's, First E*. 

The Life of a Slave. 



'neath a fond father's 
'othee I'il fetiirn,OTer- 



^hi1d,lie<:BUBe In 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



S84 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



3 Inhuinan treatment for ' 

slight offense , 

4 Beyenge 

5 He flies and is saved 

8 Is protected by the 
Union Flag 

7 Fights for uoertv and 

encounters his former 
master 

8 Dies the death of a hero 

The Soldier* s Retarn. 
(By Boms.) 

6 slides, $3. 

1 "Wi* mony a sweet babe 
fatherless. 
And manj a widow 
moammg** 



8 



the 



**I thought upon 
witching smue 

That caught my youth- 
ful fancy." 

3 "At length I reached 

the bonny glen. 
Where early life I 
sported. 

4 **And turned me round 

to hide the flood. 
That in my een was 
swelling.** 

6 *«Sae wistfully she 
gazed on me. 
And lovelier was than 



*Art thou my ain dear 
WiUie?' *» 

I4fe of a Coamtry Boj. 

1 Leaving home 

2 Temptation and fall 

3 Furtneron — ^gambling 

4 At last— the forged 

check 



»» 



ever.' 

"She sank within my 
arms and cried. 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

am 

I 

8 



Motto«s. 

Welcome 

Good-night 

Silence 

Merry Christmas 

Happy New Year 

Adieu 

Buenos Noches 

Adios 



TEMPERANCE SLIDES. 



Ten Nights in a Bar- 
room. 

M cents plain, $L30 colored | 

Wi^ a Lecture. 



1 Arrival at the Sickle and 

Sheaf 

2 Joe Morgan's Little 

Mary asks her father 
to come home 

3 Blade throws a glass at 

Joe Morgan and hits 
Marv 

4 Joe Morgan suffering 

the horrors of delir- 
ium tremens 

5 The death of little Marv 

6 Frank Slade and Tom 

Wilkins riding off on 
a spree 

7 Willie Hammond in- 

duced by Harvey 
Green to gamble 
^ Harvey Green stabs 
Willie Hammond to 
death 
9 Quarrel between Slade 

and his son Frank 
ID Frank Slade kUls his 
father with a bottle 

11 Meeting of the citizens 

in the bar-room 

12 The departure from the 

Sickle and Sheaf 

iitomach of the I>rank- 
ard. 

50 cents plain, $1.50 colored 

IP ith a Lecture, 

1 Internal surface of the 

stomach in healthy 
condition 

2 Stomach of the moderate 

drinker 

3 Stomach of the drunk- 

ard 

4 Inner surface of the 

stomarh of a drunk- 
" T ard after a debauch 

5 Inner surface of the 

ulcerated stomach of 
the drunkard 
■6 Appearance of the scir- 
rhous stomach of a 
drunkard 



7 Interior of the stomach 

of drunkard upon the 
verge of the grave 

8 Inner surface ot the 

stomach of a distin- 
guished individual 
who died in a state of 
delirium tremens 

The I>riinkard'8 Prog- 
ress. 

60 cents plain, $L50 colored 
With a Lecture. 

1 Domestic happiness — 

the greatest of earth- 
Iv blessings 

2 The Temptation— Lead 

me not into tempta- 
tion 

3 Introduction of sorrow 

—a loving heart made 
sad 

4 The rum-hole— a substi- 

tute for home 

5 Rum instead of reason 

6 Degraded humanity 

7 The cold shoulder 6y old 

friends 

8 Rumseller's gratitude- 

Rejection instead of 
injection 

9 Poverty and want 

10 Robbery and murder— 

the result of drunk- 
enness 

11 Mania -a -pot u— the hor- 

ror of nori"ors 

12 The death that precedes 

eternal death 

The Man and the Beast. 

50 cents plain, $L50 colored 

1 Temperance, The Man 

2 Temperance, The Beast 

The Bottle. 

50 cents plain, $1.50 colored 

With a Lecture. 

From the Originals, by G. 
Cruikshank. 

1 The bottle is brought 
out tor the first time. 
The husband induces 
his wife just to take a 
drop 



2 He is discharged fmn 

his employment for 
drunkenness. They 
pawn their clothes to 
supply the bottle 

3 An execution sweeps off 

the greater part of 
their furniture. They 
ctHufort themselves 
with the bottle 

4 Unable to obtain em- 

Sloyment, they are 
riven by poverty 
into the streets to 
beg, and by this 
means stUl supply the 
bottle 

5 Cold, misery and want 

destrov their voung- 
est child. They con- 
sole themselves with 
the bottle 

6 Fearful quarrels and 

brutal violence are 
natural consequence 
of the frequent use of 
the bottle 

7 The husband, in a furi. 

ous state of drunken- 
ness, kills his wife 
with the instrument 
of all their miserv 

8 The bottle has done its 

work— it has destrov - 
ed the infant and the 
mother; it has 
brought the son and 
daughter to vice and 
to the streets, and has 
left the father a hope- 
less maniac 

The Bronkard's Baogh- 
ter. 

50 cents plain, $L50 colored 

Six Slides. 

1 Alone in the World 

2 Making Shirts in a Gar- 

ret 

3 Pay; Refused for her 

Work 

4 Out in the Street 

5 The Leap from the 

Bridge 

6 Take her up Tenderly 
The above are entirely 

new and very interesting. 



FOR PRICe, LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127 



McLSTOSH BATTERY AND Ol'TU'AL CO.. CHWA 

From Chajunaimfl l<i t1i« 
End. 

60 cents pluiu. »LJO foioreii 
1 Chamrxieni' l" 'he F 
S Brand}- in the Bar.rc ... 
8 Whtufcy in the Grog- 

4 Cold \?'aleT in the B 
Father. Dwtr Father, 



eoiue liome with u 

Tbe L-loi-k in tlie ateeple 
strikes one 
a WilhpooclirotherBen- 

And no one to belp bee 
but <ne 
3 rstlier, de&r Fatbcr, 

1 The nii^ht has grown 
colder, and Benny is 



The clncli in the aCeeule 

■trikes three 
( Tes, we nre nlone, poor 

Benn7 Isdend 
And Kona with the an. 

gele ol li^ht 
Che Ounbler'a C^Breer. 
Icflnta plain, ll.nOcolornd 
] tbe Jlrat Bead of pai- 

■ioii plButed in the 

t TtiedeTelopmental the 
paaston with higher 

. t FindlnB himaeir itlirarB 
the ioeer, ha -"— — 
to tBisD play 






— Thon alialt 

malie unto Thee auy 
graven imago 
S Third Comma ndtuent— 
Thon BhnlC not Uilie 

tbr God in vain 
4 Fourth CommandmonC 
— Bcmonrber the Sab- 
bath day to keep it 



5 FllCli Oommandment— 
Honor thy father and 

Thou Shalt not klli 
T SovenCh Command. 

nient — Thou shall 

not commit adultery 
9 Elgbth Coioinaadnient 

— Tbon sbalt not 

9 Ninth Commandment— 
Thou Bhalt not bear 
faille witness Kgainst 
thy nelgbbor 
10 Tenth Command me at 
—Thou Bhalt notcoT- 
et thy neighbor's 

U Mosea 'receiylng tbe 
Tablets of the Caw 

12 Moses deiiyevinj; tbe 
Tablets ol the Law to 

The Lord'B Prayer. 

Pliiia or «L60 Colored. 
1 " Our Father which art 

in Heaven " 
S " Thy will be done on 






anghiy handled by 

'8 Having Snaliy lost a 
he leaveB the Bamii 
house in despair ai 

B He ends his life in 

pied with'his ruling 

DTtUIIUird'il 
tUdea, with rendiujr, ):j.on. 
I Ue squandered hiB hard 



1 HB^torms "a" rasolii 
and leBTes the ss 

b He tnlorms his wll 
his resolution 

t His sobriety raiaaa him 



jus'our debts 



'atrlotic. 

.ion'B Pride BHC 



Seleuted Sohjecti 

iafn SO CM*; Coi 
rauwt, 11.60; Col 
tquart, faoo. 

1 Age of tioid 

- Tl that was 



Homi 



of t) 
.n Railway St 



Ameriran Eagle on Hi 

lionai Shieia 
Ann en t Cuatoiii-Paini 



9 BarcHVOlle by Moon- 
light 
10 BaBket ol Croquemit- 



.4TSellRMkLigl 



17 nine Orotto, Capri 

18 Bridal Party, Bay of 

IB Bruuklyn Bridge by 

Moonlight 
SO Bull nghE in 9[«ln 

31 Bumsand his Highland 

32 Burning of Sardanapa- 

23 Coll to Prayer 

26 Caiiltolat Washington, 

Evening Seaslon 
36 Cattle at Waterlog 
ST Cavalry Charge 
38 CbaileBgB 
38 Chunney Sweep 



34 City o( Vaniee 

35 Cup of Friendship 
38 CupidaCapciTe 
37 Dance of the Veil 

as Daring Highway Bob- 
SB DevotednesB— Dog Sav- 
ing Cbiid 

40 DiallDguished Member 

oC BenCToienl Society 

41 DoniiayBler'B Sweep- 



43 Dre 



40 Evangeline 

4B Expianatiun of Bible 

47 Fai^ry Grotto 

4S Family Cares 

40 Family Happiness 

50 Faiist and Marguorlle 

52 Fetcbing ilie Doctor 

M F^t fur the Flag 

53 Fhiw in the Title 
IM Flight Ola Soul 
fl7 Forbidden Fruit 
SS Forester's Family 
99 Forgotten 

RO Foundling Girls 

83 From Shore to shore 
(U Qoddass of Liberty 
eti Good -Nigh I. Con Stella. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



286 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



66 Good .Night, Chembs 

67 Good. Night, Girl with 

Candle 

68 Great Expectations 

69 Here they Come ! 

70 His only Pair 

71 Horse Fair 

72 Immaculate Concep. 

tion (Murillo) 

73 Innocents Abroad 

74 Jealousy 
76 Jersey 

76 Journeying in the Des- 

ert 

77 Knitting Lesson 

78 Ladies' Apartment, An- 

cient Rome 

79 Lady in Waiting 

80 Last Moments of Caesar 

81 Lion Hunt 

82 Little Harvesters 

83 Little Red Riding-Hood 

84 Love at First Sight 

85 Lovers on the Lake 

86 Lucretiaand her Maid- 

ens 

87 Madonna of Candle. 

stick (Raphael) 

88 Madonna of Chair (Ra. 

phael) 

89 Madonna of St. Sixtus 

(Raphael) 

90 Mammoth Cave, Ken. 

tucky 

91 Meditation 

92 Mermaid's Home 

93 Milkmaid 

94 Morning Call 

95 Mute Appeal 

96 Monarch of the Glen 

97 Mother's Blessing 

98 Mother's Dream 

99 Mud Pies 

100 My Dog and I 

101 New York Harbor 

102 Niagara Falls 

103 Night 

104 Night Watch 

105 Nothing Venture,Noth- 

ing Have 

106 New Whip 

107 Ocean Steamer 

108 Ocean Steamer, Moon^ 

nght 

100 Oh! Boy on Ice 

110 Oh! Astonished Rus. 

tics 

111 Othello relating his 

Story 

112 Paradise of Mohamet 

113 Piper and a pair of Nut 

Crackers 

114 Prairie Travelers at. 

tacked by Indians 

115 Pride and Humility 

116 Romeo and Juliet 

117 Rose of Destiny 

118 Ruined Abbey, by 

Moonlight 

119 American Steamship, 

Indiana 

120 Spirit of "76"— "Yan- 

Kce Doodle " 

121 Little Brother (Von 

Bremen) 

122 Inquietude 

123 At the Spring 

124 The Improvised Cup 
125 The Three Friends 

/i^ Souvenir 



127 Ruben's Last Jndg. 

ment 

128 Titian's Madonna 

129 Fay 

130 The Picnic 

131 Ship at Sea 

132 Mother's Treasure 

(Von Bremen) 

133 The Courtship (Von 

Bremen) 

134 At the Fireside (Von 

Bremen) 

135 The Vestal Nun 

136 Nell G Wynne 

137 Neapolitan Peasants 

138 The Greek Fugutives 

139 A City of Ancient 

140 The Old T^m^raire 

141 The Wedding Eve 

142 The New Lord of the 

Village 

143 Glimpse of an English 

Homestead 

144 The Highland Drover's 

Departure 

145 The Stag at Bay 

146 The Poultry Yard 

147 The Blue Grotto of 

Capri 

148 Puss in Boots 

149 Come Along 

150 Feeding the Calves 

151 At the Mill Door 

152 "He Never Told His 

Love" 

153 The Notice at the Mill 

Door 

154 A Chat with the Miller 

155 The Tresspassers 

156 Listening to the Birds 

Song 

157 GilliGyanMill 

158 The Valentine 

159 The Haymakers 

160 On the Brandywine 

161 The Fisherman 

162 At the Cottage Door 

163 Good Night, Twins 

Asleep 

164 The Surf on the Coast 

165 At the Mercy of the 

Waves 

166 A Winter Landscape 

167 Falls of Minnehaha 

168 Falls of Minnehaha— 

Through the Trees 

169 After the Snow Storm 

170 Dalles of the St. Croix 

171 Ferns from the Tropics 

172 Blarney Castle, Ireland 

173 Valley of Glendalough, 

Ireland 

174 Muckross Abbey, Kil- 

larnev, Ireland 

175 Blair A thol— Scotland 

176 Kirk AUoway 

177 Dryburg Abbey 

178 Lighthouse at Nice 

179 Grand Canal Venice 

180 Storm in the Tyrol 

181 Is it a Dog 

182 Cleopatra*s Galley (Pi- 

con) 

183 Market Place at Athens 

(Restored) 

184 Volunteer Soldier's De- 

i)arture 

185 Wreck of the Minotaur 

(Turner) 



186 Family Happiness (Hu- 

nin) 

187 Russian Wedding Feast 

188 Old Ocean's Plaything 

189 Gladiators Saluting: 

Caesar 

190 Mer de Glace 

191 The Angelus (L'Angel- 

es) Millet 

192 Marine View 

193 Trapper's Last Shot 

(Wranney) 

194 "Don't You Forget It" 

195 Dome of the Capitol 

196 Devil's Toboggan Slide 

197 St. Louis Panorama 

198 Mosque of Omar 

199 Melrose Abbey 

200 Mount of Olives 

201 The Parthenon 

202 Olympic Games 

203 Imperial Courier 

IXA Socrates Instructmar 
Alcibiades (Schopin) 

205 Sunset at Sea (Turner) 

206 Mary queen of Scots 

and Rizzio 

207 Peace (Dore) 

208 War (Dore) 

209 Shipwrecked Mariners 

210 Fignt with Beasts, Col- 

iseum,Rome (Turner) 

211 Steam Ship City of Ber. 

lin 

212 Steam Ship City of 

Paris 

213 Steam Ship City of Chi- 

cago 

214 Steam Ship Etruria 

215 Tomb of Napoleon 

216 The Night Watch (Ri- 

viere) 

217 St. Paul's (London) 

218 Battle of Waterloo .% 

219 Death of Lord Nelson 

220 Drop Curtain: Harbor 

of Ancient Rome 

221 Cotton Picking Ga. 

222 Dalles of the St. Croix 

223 Corinth, Ancient 

224 Christ before Pilate 

225 Castle in Venice, by 

Moonlight 

226 "When Johnnie Comes 

Marching Home 
Again, Hurrah! 

227 Bartholdi's Statue 

228 Departure of Steamer 

229 Cleopatra 

230 Dipping Achilles into 

tne Styx 
•231 The Shipwreck, Crew 
Saved on Raft 

232 Too Late 

233 Coliseum, Rorae 

234 Christ on Calvary 

(Muncaksy) 

235 Castle Wolfstein in the 

Tyrol 

236 Cottage Door 

237 Death of Queen Eliza. 

beth 

238 Water Lillies 

239 After the Storm 

240 Concert m Springtime 

241 Procession to the Chris* 

tening 

242 The Muezzin's Call 

243 A Frosty Morning 

244 The Burning Crater of 

Kilauea 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S^^ Pk^^ \2.1. 



IcINTfJSH BATTEKV ANO OPTICAL CO., fHICAGO. ILL,, I 



Blacked onl, 7S etttU eocA. 



X Apollo 
3 AdoUo Bi 



8 Arliulae nod (ha Tiger 
B Albert Memorliil. Con- 
don 
W Allien Memorial, Amer- 



. I 07 Lini^aln ITiun) 
I ■« Lot's Wife 
a Love'B Minor 
Mercury Flyina (Ml- 

S MoBCe [Michael Aagelol 
i Mssquenide 

7 Mlrliaet Angelo(BQBt) 
9 MorninK (Copeland) 



m The West 

lU The Tambourlna Uiil 

Ml The Last IHtyeor Pon 

US TheUardener'aDBuel 



Ut Tbe Burd i^amlly Mon- 

S The Cymbal Player 
iO The Muse of PainHng 
il The Mother's Prayer 



Beagar 1 
BaRj-'B D 



85 Nyiia, the 
__ .>ompei 



17 Kight (Copelaod) 
IB Out in the Rain 



4 The American Votun- 



le Uolng iQla the 



% Clio 

« Diana 

38 Dante [Floro 

W Danle (Bunt) 

SO Dying Glad la 

31 Drop Thai 

S3 Kmperor \ 
(Bronie Bi 



8 riylDg Time 

8 Fetntani] Teniemeee 

IQ STbb Church and Free 

State 
LI Flora 



4 Kubens 
. fl Shakeapcare (Unst; 
WH HhakeBTWnre (WanJi 
"" StAtne of Ailam (Klllan) 
sutueof Eve (Milan) 



17 Girl at Bach 
48 GeniuB of ">( 
WGiaod Uor 
M Ganyniedi 



id Eagle 

1 AntlnouB 



I 



iS Horse attacked by Ana 

68 Hebe and Ganymede 
57 Italian Boy and Mon 

tey 
K Indnetry 
OB Joy 
SO Joy and Grief 

n Lur°as Veriie 

gLedaand theSwan 
Love's MesBenger 



113 Sewarrt (Bust) 



117 S 



IIH ScaMing of the Boar 

120 The Young Ba«hua 

121 The Forfeii Prayer 
Iffl The rirsl Step 

123 The Kebuke 

124 The 'Jrptisnt 



125 T 
ISH Tne 



erfly 

ite Rose 

<t Call 



e Soys Gathering rmil 

1 Blessin 

. with I 

ID Cnpid with Che Net— 

11 Earth. Cnpid flflth the 

Lion 
IS Fire, Cupid Abducting 



» Summer 
31 Slrooglh, or Hurc 
andllebe 



f, The Infant Muses 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE. P^(iE.\■2.^. 



288 Mcintosh battery ani> optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



26 Seasons, the— 

Spring 
Summer 
Autumn 
Winter 

27 Venus with the Golden 

Apple 

28 Wisdom, or Minerva 

and Prometheus 

29 W inter 

30 Water, or Cupid Riding 

on a dolphin 

Rogers. 
Blacked out, 76 cents each. 

1 Council of War 

2 Challenging the Union 

Vote 

3 Coming to the Parson 

4 Courtship in Sleepy 

Hollow 
Country Postolflce 

6 Charity Patient 

7 Checkers up at the 

Farm 

8 Fairy's Whisper 

9 Fugitive's Story 

10 Fetching the Doctor 

11 Going for the Cows 

12 Home Guard 

13 It is so Nominated in 

the Bond 

14 Mail Day 

15 Othello 

16 One More Shot 

17 Polo 

18 Private Theatricals 

19 Playing Doctor 

20 Parting Promise 

21 Picket Guard 

22 Return Volunteers 

23 Rip Van Winkle re- 

turned 

24 Rip Van Winkle at 

Home 

25 Rip Van Winkle on the 

Mountain 

26 School Examination 

27 School Days 

28 Taking the Oath 

29 The Balcony 

30 The Peddler at the Fair 

31 the Traveling Magician 

32 The Referee 

33 The Wrestlers 

34 The Photographer 

35 The Favorite Scholar 

36 The Foundling 

37 The Bushwhacker 

38 The Village Schoolmas- 

ter 

39 The Checker Player 

40 The Sharpshooters 

41 The Shaugi-aun and 

Tatters 

42 The Tap on the Win- 

dow 

43 The Mock Trial 

44 Town Pump 

46 Uncle Ned's School 

46 Union Refugee 

47 Wounded Scout 

48 We Boys 

49 Weighing the Baby 

Portraits. 

50 cents each. 

1 Anderson, Major 
2 Alphonso, King of 
Spain 



3 Austria, Emperor of 

4 Austria, Empress of 

5 Agazziz 

6 Arnold, Mathew 

7 Alice, Princess 

8 Argyle, Duke, of 

9 Anderson , Mary 

10 Arnold, Benedict 

11 Bret Harte 

12 Browning, Robert 

13 Beatrice, Princess 

14 Belgium, King of 

15 Belgium, Queen of 

16 Bismarck, Prince 

17 Battenberg, Prince of 

18 Browning, Mrs. Eliza- 

beth Barrett 

19 Broughton,Miss Rhoda 

20 Beaconsfleld, Earl of 

K. G. 

21 Bright, Hon, Jno.,M.P. 

22 Bonaparte, Napoleon 

23 Bonaparte Napoleon, 

Crossing the Alps 
(David) 

24 Bonaparte, Napoleon, 

Crossing the Alps 
(De La Rochs) 

25 Bonaparte, Napoleon, 

Prince Louis 

26 Bonaparte, Napoleon, 

IIL 

27 Beaver, General 

28 Bryant, William Cul- 

len 

29 Beecher, Henry Ward 

30 Burns, Robert 

31 Brown-Sequard, Dr. 

32 Beauregard, General 

33 Buell, General D. C. 

34 Burnside, General 

35 Clemens, Samuel S. 

("Mark Twain") 

36 Canterbury, Dean of 

37 Carlos, Don 

38 Christian, Prince of 

Hesse 

39 Christian, Princess of 

Hesse 

40 Connaught, Duke of 

41 Connaught, Duchess of 

42 Carlyle, Thomas 

43 Cleveland, Ex-Presi- 

dent 

44 Cleveland, Mrs. 
46 Cornwallis, Lord 

46 Clay, Henrv 

47 Denmark, feing of 

48 Denmark, Queen of 

49 De Lessens, Ferdinand 

50 Darwin, Charles 

51 De Lafayette, Marquis 

52 Douglas, Stephen A. 

53 Douglas, Frederick 

54 Dickens, Charles 

55 Don Carlos 

56 Eugenie, Empress 

57 Edinburgh, Duke of 

58 Edinburgh, Duchess of 

59 Emerson, Ralph Waldo 

60 Everts, William M. 

61 Edison, Thomas 

62 Elizabeth, Queen 

63 Egypt, Khedive of 

64 Ellsworth, Col. E. E. 

65 Froude, James Antho- 

ny 

66 Farrar, Canon 

67 Fillmore, Millard 

68 Franklin, Benjamin 

69 Farragut, Admiral 

70 Gerome 

71 Grant, GeuexaY 



72 Germany, Emperor of 

73 Germany, Crown 

Prince of 

74 German/, Crown Prin- 

cess oi 

75 Grevy, M. 

76 Greece, Queen of 

77 Granville, Earl 

78 Gordon, Gen'l (Chi- 

nese) 

79 Gladstone, Hon. Wil- 

liam Ewart 

80 Gates, General 

81 Garfield, Gen. J. A. 

82 Goethe 

83 Holmes, Oliver Wen- 

dell 

84 Hugo, Victor 

85 Hayes, Rutherford B. 

86 Humboldt, Baron Von 

87 Hayden, Professor 

88 Harrison, President 

89 Harrison, Mrs. 

90 Hancock, General 

91 Howard, Gen. O. O. 

92 Irving, Henry 

93 Italy, Queen of 

94 Jackson, Stonewall 

95 Kearney, General 

96 Kilpatrick, General 

97 Leo, Pope XIII 

98 Longfellow, H. W. 

99 Lotta (as the Marchi- 

oness) 

100 Louise, Princess 

101 Lome, Marquis of 

102 Lome, Marchioness of 

103 Langtry (The Lily) 

104 Lincoln, Abraham 

105 Logan, John A. 

106 Luther Martin 

107 Lee, Robert E. 

108 Lincoln and Cabinet 

109 Letterman, Dr. A. J. 

110 Lafayette, Marquis De 

111 Muller, Max, Pix)f. 

112 Millais, John Everett 

113 Manning, Cardinal 

114 Milton, John 

115 Michael Angelo 

116 Mary Queen of Scots 

117 Morton, Vice President 

118 McDowell, General 

119 Napoleon I 

120 Napoleon, Prince Louis 

121 Nelson, Lord Admiral 

122 Pope Leo XIII 

123 Patti, Madame Adelina 

124 Pasteur, M. 

125 Portugal, King of 

126 Portugal, Queen of 

127 Parnell, Charles S. 

128 Russia, Czar of 

129 Reade, Charles 

130 Rusk in, John 

131 Raphael 

132 Rosecranz, General 

133 Spurgeon, Rev. C. H. 

134 Sweden, King of 

135 Sweden, Queen of 
13<> Spencer, Herbert 

137 Swinburne, A. C. 

138 Salisbury, Lord 

139 Stevens, Thaddeus 

140 Scott, Gen. Winfield 

141 Scott, Sir Walter 

142 Shakespeare, William 

143 Sully, Thomas 

144 Sullivan, John L. 

145 Sheridan, P. H. (Little 

Phil.) 

146 Scott, Walter 

141 Tennyson, Alfred 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.^ Pk^^ ViTi 



MKlNTOfiH BATTERY ASD OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A. 



130 Tbutmuii. Judge A. G. 
161 ThonMW, Gen. " Pftp " 
US Victoria 
IBS Ylc(Dr[iL,Queeiiaf Edk- 

IH Von Humboldt, Baron 

iss Wbltiler. John G. 

ISe 'WalOB, Prince of 
107 Valea, Princess ol 
US Wales, Prince t 
_Prinpe»8, Gronp 



t, Ex-Khedlve al 



r 200 Ua]. Moeei P. Handr 
■"■ '■■'— T. Dickior- 
n J. G«ge 



301 Ji'hn T. Dlckinaon 



IM Everett, Eilwsrd 
ISl McPbereon, Gen. _. 
Wa Robert G. iDBBrgoll 



J. B. 



Jobn Milton at sge of 
JoBB' Bilmiioedft 



I 



ISO Wolselev. Genera 

lei Waahlnerlon, Georg 

(Margbnll) 
Tffl Wasblugton, Geor^ 

rstewnrt] 
103 wnshlngton, Geoi'se 
H4 Wellington. Duke of 
1(15 Young, Brlgbam 






1^ Mies Francis Wllbird 
184 JamegG. BUlne 
189 Thoniaa A. Eiliaon 

n Joseph Hir 
A Thoihas D 
» Sir Kiwii 
W Edwara EagieBCOO 
11 Gen. Lew wnllaee 
rs Thomaa W. Palmer 
« w. T. Baker 
_I4 Potter Palmer 
19J Prince Albert. IBSI 
■16 Queen Victoria, ISSl 
17 Mrs. Potter Psfmer 
S George K. Davis 



3S3 Carter F 



170 Stiinley, 11. JI. 

JNO. 0. FOSTER'S ILLUSTRATED SERMON ON THE 
CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. 



"w^ldar"^ I 



3 Paatln.e In an ii^gfp. 

tian Palace 
i Joseph NaKlng btmself 

known to his Brech- 

S Plague of Froga and 



20 Moses Reoeivlng I 
Law " Let not <i 
apeak to us lest 

SI Moaes Receiving I 



InBtowai 
l^blClren oj 



Sma 



n the Wil- 



M DepBrture from Egypt 
il Departure o( larac' 

from Earriii 
la la ael'B Bondage End 

IH March In the Wildei 

U Gorke In Ataka Mode 

13 Map of Red Sea an 



S3 Brazen Lavei 



IS Croaslog over Jordan 
43 Stones o[ Memorial 
U Fait 01 Jerlcba 



Candlestick 



16 Deatroctl 
ISb Phar 



18'Man of Egypt 



3 Bi^nlnb'fiihd 
3 Shelter in 



Holyc 

and Table 

30 Vestments ol PrieiCs 
" Map o( ■Wlldemesa ol 
Kadeah Barnes 
Tlromedary, "The Ship 

ot the Desert." 
Rer. H. C. Tnimbnll, 
D. D,, ot Diocese of 



m Assault on Cities in 

Ancient Times 
17 Mapof ConqDeatof Ca- 



5<l Belt-or-el-loka. site ol 

Upiier Beth -boron 
Gl View iram Upper Beth- 



3$ Korab and bla Follow 
era Swalloired np 

SONGS AND HYMNS WITH MUSIC. 



.peh. The Watcb 



IB The Lily oi 



13 MiKhCy to Save 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES Stt PJk«it\»T. 



290 Mcintosh battery and optical uo., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



20 Glorious victory "Tem- 

Serance " 
1 Never Touch the 
" Temperance " 

22 There shall be Showers 

of Blessing " Tem- 
perance " 

23 Whiter than Snow 

24 Ortonville 

25 Happy Day 

26 Pleyel'sHyran 

27 Seeking for Me 

28 Lebanon 

29 The love that gave 

Jesus to die 
80 Star of Bethlehem 

31 Antioch 

32 Balerma 

33 Galilee 

Hymns. 

50 cents each. 
Words Only^ 

1 Hold the Fort 

2 The Gate Ajar for Me 

3 Jesus Loves Even Me 

4 " Go Work in my Vine- 

yard " 
6 Bury Thy Sorrow 

6 Room Among the Angels 

7 Daniel's Band 

8 More to Follow 

9 Sweet By-and-By 

10 I Am Coming 

11 Once for All 

12 Scatter Seeds of Kind- 

ness 

13 The Prodigal Child 

14 The Life -Boat 

16 We are Waiting by the 
River 

16 Come to the Savior 

17 Jewels 

18 " Here Am I, Send Me " 

19 Knocking, Knockmg, 

Who is There ? 
-20 Jesus of Nazareth Pass- 
eth By 



1 S. S. Baltic, White Star 

Line 

2 S. S. Celtic, White Star 

Line 

3 S. S. Celtic, White Star 

Line 

4 S. S. Germanica, White 

Star Line 
6 S. S. Republic, White 
Star Line 

6 S. S. Adriatic, White 

Star Line 

7 8. 8. Catalonia, Cunard 

Line 

8 S. S. Catalonia, Cunard 

Line 

9 S. S. Servia, Cunard 

Line 

10 S. S. Scythia, Cunard 

Line 

11 S. S. Scythia, Cunard 

Line 

12 S. S. Botlmia, Cunard 

Line 

13 S. S. Bothnia, Cunard 

Line 

14 S. S. Batavia, Cunard 

Line 

15 S. S. Gallia, Cunard 

Line' 



21 The Lord Will Provide 

22 When Jesus Comes 

23 That will be Heaven for 

Me 

24 Father, Take my Hand 

25 Safe in the Arms of 

Jesus 

26 There's a Light in the 

Valley 

27 The Eden Above 

28 I am Sweeping Through 

the Gates 

29 Let the Lower Lights be 

Burning 

30 One More Day's Work 

for Jesus 

31 Yet There is Room 

32 The Cleansing Fountain 

33 Even Me 

34 My Faith Looks up to 

Thee 

35 Oh, Sing of His Mighty 

Love 

36 Sweet Hour of Prayer 

37 Nearer, My God, to 

Thee 

38 Just as I Am 

39 Come Ye, Disconsolate 

40 Fade, Earthly Joy 

41 Keep Praying 

42 Guide Me 

43 O Happy Day 

44 Safe Within "the Vail 

45 Angels Hovering Round 

46 Going Home 

47 God is Love 

48 Forever with the Lord 

49 I will Sing for Jesus 

50 Over on the Other Shore 

51 Home of the Soul 

52 Work, for the Night is 

Coming 

53 We Shall sleep, but not 

Forever 

54 The Valley of Blessing 

55 The Water of Life 

56 Calling us Away 

57 The Land of Beulah 

58 I Love to Tell the Story 

OCEAN STEAMERS. 

Plain, 50 cents each. 

16 S. S. Gallia, Cunard 
Line 

17 S. S. Gallia, Cunard 
Line 

18 S. S. Germanica, White 
Star Line 

19 S. S. Aurania, Cunard 
Line 

20 S. S. Parthia, Cunard 
Line 

21 Liverpool Ferrv Boat 

22 S. S. Etruria, Cunard 
Line 

23 S. S. Urabria, Cunard 
Line 

24 S. S. Umbria, Cunard 
Line 

26 S. S. Aurania, Cunard 
Line 

26 S. S. Servia, Cunard 
Line 

27 S. S. Britannica, White 
Star Line 

28 S. S. Adriatic, White 
Star Line 

29 S. S. Celtic, White Star 
Line 

30 S. S. Alaska, Guion Line 

31 S. S. Arizona, Guion 
Line 



69 Almost Persuaded 

60 To-Day the Savior Calls 

61 Beautiful Land on High 

62 We've a Home Over 

There 

63 Come, Holy Spirit 

64 Cross and Crown 
66 Am I a Soldier 

66 The Promised Land 

67 Before Jehovah's Awful 

Throne 

68 Mount Olivet 

69 Sun of My Soul 

70 Blest be the Tie 

71 Jesus, Lover of My Soul 

72 All to Christ I Owe 

73 I am Trusting, Lord, in 

Thee 

74 Rock of Ages 
76 Come to Jesus 

76 Jesus. Thy Name I-Love 

77 He dies, the Friend of 

sinners dies 

78 Marching to Zion 

79 Savior like a Shepherd 

lead us 

80 A Shelter in the time of 

Storm 

81 Sing the Almighty 

Power of God 

82 Zion encouraged 

83 Greenland's Icy Moun- 

tains 

84 Morning Light 

85 Ring the Bells of Heaven 

86 Missionaries encour- 

aged 

87 Star Spangled Banner 

88 Red, White and Blue 

89 America, or ''My Conn- 

try 'tis of Thee" 

90 Song of Salvation 

We can make to order 
any hymn of which you 
will furnish us a printed 
copy. Price, plain, $1 each. 



32 S.S. Arizona, Guion Line 

33 S. S. City of Rome, 

Anchor Line 
31 S. S. City of Rome, 
Anchor Line 

35 S. S. City of Rome, 

Anchor Line 

36 S. S. City of Rome, 

Anchor Line 

37 S. S. America 

38 S. S. America 

39 S. S. Parisian, Allan 

Line 

40 S. S. City of Berlin 

41 S. S. British Princess 

42 S. S. Great Eastern 

43 S. S. Cephalonia, Cunard 

Line 

44 S. S. Catalonia, Cunard 

Line 

45 S. S. Republic, White 

Star Line 

46 S. S. Rommania, Anchor 

Line 

47 S. S. Australia, Anchor 

Line 

48 S. S. City of Rome, 

Anchor Line 

49 S. S. City; of Rome, 

Anchor Line 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE. PMkE \'rT. 



McINTOSH BATTEUV AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL,. 



W 3, 9. City of 
Anchor Line 


Rome 


es 3. B. City of BlcbiDond, 


TS a. S. Hat King Tug 

7* S, S. Iowa. Cattle Bast 






SI S. 8. City of 
Aacbor Lino 


Borne. 


8S8.S. City of Riclnnond, 


NBYalVeuela. 


M 8, 8. City (i( 
Anchor Llnii 


Borne, 




I^^BaKre 




, Line 


S3 8. 3. City 01 


Berlin. 


es 8. a. Artiona, Gnion 


t ;: iS 


Inman tine 




Line 


H S. 8. City of 
Inman Lino 


Berlin, 


ee S. S. Arizona, Guion 






Line 


I .;■; urvfi^'"- 


US. S. City o( 


Berlin, 


B7 a. S. Alaaka, Goion 
















Jl " Cnshing 


iDiuan Lbe 


In 


Line 


12 " Newark 


Par«, 


6S a. a. Cotopaii, P. S. N. 


13 Single sticteierrlse on 






tfie BoBtOQ 


SO S. 8. CItT ol 


Paris, 


70 a. s! Wyoming, Gulon 


14 At Quarters on the En- 


Inman Lino 




Line 




SO S. 8. City of Ri 


Lmond, 


71 8. a. Wyoming, Guion 


15 G^^^j practice on 
the Wyoming 


Inman LLue 






61 S. S. City of Bl hmond, 


7SS. S. Nevada, Giiian 


16 Singing on the training 


Innian Una 




Line 


ship 



SECRET SOCIETV SLIDES. 

The uenai BCanee required (or illnstniCing Secret Society work ace named below, 
These are made from very elaboi-ate, correct and beaHllfiil drawings, eleaantlr 

eolored, and are greatly anjwrior In every reaijeot to anjth- — '•— "■ — ■' 

KltbOQgb the BubjectB named are the same as in other calalogi 
32 Sward Pointing to Nak- 
" " and All- 



i, elegant It 
tore oSerad, 



That alides are /urnliACi 
(jM«r colored at fl.SO eaei 
nrjiiain at SO centi each. 



>ntLodge in Valley 



8 Lights ot Lodge 
S Jewels of Lodee 
10 Tabernarlo in WlWei 

U St. John the Baptisl 
and St. John th 

13 Uamnlo Tgoccb 

14 Oh^!' 



iarc<»al aodClay 
racra/ft Degree. 
rs of the Porch 



M Corn, Wine and Oil 



31 Allusii 

Uaiter Maton 
S2 Building of 

man's Ten- 
SS Uarble Uonu 



SS Feliowcraft's Lodge 
37 Master Maaou's Lodge 



Seeing Kye 
33 Anchor and Ark 
S4 Forty-seventh problem 

Plain II, opanued out, 
3fi TheHonr-GfaSB 
86 The Scythe 
37 Emblems of Mortality 
Royal Arch Chapter. 
33 The Burning BuBb 

Mesopotamia 

The ijiiarries 

City of Jerusalem in 

City of Jerusalem In 

The Bridge 
The Valley ot Salt 
The TalMjvnacle 
TheKlTor ilnphratas 
The Cedars of Lebanon 
Tower of Babel 
Feaat ol Belshaaiar 
~ • ■ " ibylon 

olonnade 



f Babel 

Be' ■ 

Fall of Babj 



.bylnn 



V Vale of Edam 

69 Angel at Sepulchre 
Statuary opaqued out, t 
10 The Three Marys f 



4S The Valley ot Hi 

Bones 
m The Crucifixion 

14 Bodv of Christ in Ton 

15 KesurrBc-tionuf Christ 



63 Job 



It Patmc 






Statuary opaqued 



i CroE 



Glar 



id Ceo 



PaB-ioMf Order Soni of 
America Slidet, AuthmHe 
liitvpiodaii,9S. 

1 OalileoExiKiundingh 

2 Galileo lietore the I 

3 Columhiis UiscoTeryal 



* TbeM 



1 Pib 



! WaBhing. 

9 Washington OrosHlng 

the Delaware 
10 Washington at Prayer 

at Vftuey Forge 
U Battle of Bennington 
VI Battle o( Saiatoga 
LI Battle ot Monmoutb 
14 Battle ot Stony Poinl 

e of Sutaw 






lly of T 



3 Monti 
u Ft. Siimpter- 



*i Battle oftJettraburg 
23 Battles of the C^U 
War (aa many as d£ 



lanled hy Tyler's : 48 The Peuiteut M Goddess uf Llbar 

-ord ! so rhrUlon the Croris I 28 Stars and Sl,rl^«( 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES Stt Plk^kt Vi-I- 



292 Mcintosh battery and optical oo., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



Odd Fellonrg. 

Per Slide, Colored, $1.60; 
plain, 60 cents. 

A new and superior se* 
ries, from new designs, for 
the new work of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

Initiatory Degree. 

1 All-seeing Eye 

2 Three Links 

3 Skull and Cross-Bones 

4 The Scythe 

First Degree, 

6 Bow and Arrow 

6 The Quiver 

7 The Bundle of Sticks 

Second Degree. 

8 The Ax 

9 Heart and Hand 

10 The Globe 

11 The Ark 

12 The Serpent 

Third Degree. 

13 Scales and Sword 

14 The Bible 

15 The Hour-glass 

16 The Coffin 

Encampment Emblems. 

17 The Three Pillars 

18 The Tent 

19 Pilgrinv's Scrip, San- 

dais and Staff 



20 The Altar of Sacrifice 

21 Tables of Stone, Cres- 

cent and Cross 

22 Altar of Incense 

American Mechanics. 

Per Slide, Colored, $1.60; 
plain, 60 cents. . 

1 Outdoor Industry 

2 Indoor Industry 

3 Reward of Industry 

4 Dishonesty Punished 

5 Temperate Home 

6 Intemperate Home 

7 The Drunkard an Out- 

cast 

Temple of Honor. 

Per Slide, Colored, $1.60; 
plain, 60 cents. 

1 Five-pointed Star 

2 Six-pointed Star 

3 Triangle and Six-point- 

ed Star 

4 Temple of Honor 

5 Rainbow 

6 Open Grave 

7 Closed Grave 

8 Flash of Lightning 

Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

Per Slide, Colored, $1.60; 
plain, 60 cents. 

1 Artillery Duel 

2 Naval Battle 



3 Soldier on Guard in 

Snowstorm 

4 G. A. R. Member and 

Citizen Clasping 
Hands 

5 Lone Sentinel on a Rock 

6 Muster in of a Recruit 

into G. A. R. 

7 One-armed Soldier and 

One-legged Sailor 

8 Cemetery on Decoration 

Day 

9 Widow and Orphan 

Soliciting Charity 

10 Hospital 

11 Battlefield after the 

Battle 

12 Height of the Battle 

13 Eagle on Shield (Loyal- 

ty) 

14 Bombardment of Fort 

Sumter 

15 Battle Sdene 

16 Rallying Round the 

Flag 

17 American Flag 

18 Surrender of jlee 

19 Shooting a Traitor 

20 Grand Army Badge 

American Protestant 

Set of 14 Slides at $1.60 

each. Color ed,Per Slide, 

plain, 60 cents. 

Slides are alsp made for 
The True Temple, Knights 
of Pythias, and various 
other Orders. 



KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. 



$1.50 each, colored. 



1 Emblems of Mortality 

2 Triangle Swords X 

under 

3 Obedience 

4 Triangle, swords X 

over 

5 Spray of Myrtle 

6 Caution 

7 Pilgrim 

8 Knight 

9 Death on Pale Horse 

10 Serpent 

11 Skeleton 

12 Closed Coffin 

13 Triangle with Bible 

and Sword 

14 Bravery 



Revised List, 1895. 

First Rank. 

1 Friends, Damon and 

Pythias 

2 Damon Condemned to 

Die 

3 Pythias' Appeal to Di- 

onysius 

4 The Flight of Damon to 

his Family 

5 Pythias m Dungeon,Ca- 

lantha's Appeal 

6 Damon's Farewell to his 

Family 

7 Pythias at Headsman's 

Block 

8 Pythias Saved by Da- 

mon's Arrival 



9 Heroes Honored by the 

King 
10 Beautiful Unknown 

Shore 

Third Rank. 

1 Ancient Egyptian Arts 

2 The Flowery Plain 

3 The Mountain's Side 

4 The Sunless Sea 

5 Where Hideous Creat- 

ures Climb 

6 The Hero 

Sixth Senator. 

1 The Battlefield 

2 The Wounded Soldier 

3 Wounded Soldier Re- 

lieved 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE P^G^E \*rT. 



McINTUSH BATTEUY J 



(■HICAGO, ILL., 



"ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR." 



Flnt SecUui 
I Jephtha'a 



8«0«nd (Motion. 
Ruth. 

4 Ifiioinl and her Dangh- 

(era-iD-law 

5 Bou an<l Knth 

e City ot Bethlehem 

Third Ssctlon. 

Bather. 
7 EsMiisBl ul EEther by 



H Eethtr [niploring 

9 First Easter Dawi 

Fourth SectloB 

Martha. 



Slutli Sect 

90 Tnc Signet 

11 HolT SiblB,_ 



I of 



Veil ori the Blue Polht 

10 Resnrrection ol LauirDB 12 SheM ol Whe»t on the 

11 Chritt vrltli Mary itud Yellow Pnitit or Stitr, 

Mftrtba aupportvd by the "LU- 

IS The Slarya nt Hie Tomb Ilea of the Valley" 



13 Christ the Good Shep- 

beril 
U EcL-e Homo 

K The Angry Sea 

17 The koct , „„„„ 

IS Simply to thy ^™° 



CRAYON CARICATURES. 



A Heir «,nd CitpltAl S«r 
Kihlbltors Will F 

1 A Capital Joke 

2 A Good Story 

3 A Coolness between 

Frieude 
* ADlvlslODUf Labor 
5 ASboit AdveDturO, A 

MoDDllgbt ReTerie 
SAGboit Adventnre, A 

Gboitly Problem 
T A Ghoet Adventure, 

The I-Foblem Solved 
B A Lovely Calm 
9 ABlsakSiiiiHll 

10 Allopnthy Tried on 

11 nydropathy Tested 

12 Homeopathy Proved 

13 Ansel Voif^oB 

II APlensnre Party 



r node. 



Iked Flen 
n the Water- 
"Dvj Bay I 



19 Bahlee in onr Block 

20 Bear Chnni'o (Bear an 
Bather) 



22 BosB 01 toe 

Si Bull-doied 

34 "Come InK 

den. Mam 



I the Gar- 



Sa Darktown Fli 

39 Dot LecdlK ' 



I Moses, by 



B9 "Dar, I Knew Mlerhlet 
was a Breedln?" 
(Falls ofT) 

40 Gohigl UoingI Gonel 

41 "Golly, no Wonder 

Mlssns don't get up 
till 10 o'clock" 

42 Grab the Ball, Johnny, 

rll Wait Here 

43 Great Experts C ions 



.njrj.. 



the T. M. C- i 



yonr chickens 
'■lu Happy alo 



lern« Slides 

Vr Slide, oO centi. 

.1 "Star at the Evening 

Gently Guide Me" 

iralieeman) 

Bel- 
la "f Wonaer if 'lis Load- 

4 It was Loaded 

fi jBPkand Me- JBoyand 

ig "the 
I Angelina sees 



m Laying Back.Stltr tor 

a Brush 
BO Hnng Up, with the 

StarrbOiit 
61 Life in Death- (Unnun 

Sknll] 
BS "Listen to the MockinK 

Bird" 

63 Little Peaeh, Expecta- 

64 Little Peath, Realisa- 

tion' 

65 Little Peach, TermlQ- 



(t; Triumph ot Woman's 

Rights 
H8 Man in the Moon, Ai^t- 

iial photograph ot the 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SHOES Set P^G.t \^T- 






394 Mcintosh battery and optical cc, Chicago, ill., u.s. a. 



72 Maternal Solicitude, 

Monkeys 

73 Mr. Murphy is Rising 

in the World 

74 Marv had a Little Lamb 
76 Moving Day 

76 "Mule Train on an Up 

Grade, "Golly! Where 
is dis yer promis 
«l land?" 

77 "Mule Train on Down 

Grade," "Clar de 
track for we's a com- 
in!" 

78 Outward Bound. The 

Quay at Dublin 

79 Homeward Bound. The 

Dock at New York 

80 Parson's Colt Trots, it 

it is Sunday 

81 Peace 

82 TV^ar 

83 Pet of the Ladies, the 

Exquisite 

84 Pet of the Fancy, the 

Prize Fighter 

85 Pleasure before Busi- 

ness 

86 Profit and Loss 

87 Put My Little Shoes 

Away 

88 Richard is Himself 

Again 

89 Schoolboy's First Cigar, 

Very Manly 

90 Schoolboy's First Cigar, 

Very ^ick 

91 She Stoops to Conquer 

92 Shimplv Waitin' for a 

Fren\ 

93 Something has got to 

Come. (Dentist) 

94 Something did Come 

96 Stolen Pleasures are 
Sweet 

96 No Pleasure Without 

Pain 

97 Sure of a Bite 

98 Bustin' a Picnic 

99 The Bride, and One 

Year After 

100 The Chinese Question, 

the Rivals 

101 The Chinese Question, 

the Controversy Set- 
tled 

102 The Girl 1 Left Behind 

Me 

103 That Husband of Mine 

at 2 A. M. 

104 The Masher 

105 The Masher Crushed 

106 The Onconvaniance of 

Single Life 

107 The Rael Convaniance 

of Married Life 

108 The Pre -historic Fop, 

according to Darwin 

109 The Modern Fop, Ac- 

cording to the 15th 
Amendment 

110 The Summit of Happi- 

ness 

111 The Depth of Despair 

112 The Three (Scape) 

113 The Three (African) 

Graces 

114 They All Do It 

115 "Thou art so near and 

yet so far" 

116 Three Systems of Medi- 

cine 



117 



118 



119 
120 
121 

122 

123 



126 

127 

128 
129 

130 



131 
132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 
138 
139 
140 



Trouble in de Church, 

"Wipe off yer chin!" 
Trouble in de Church, 

"Pull down your 

Vest!" 
Too Late for the Train 
' T was a CaUnStill Nikht 
'Twere Vain to Tell 

Thee All I Feel 
Two Heads are Better 

Than One 
Venus Rising from the 

Sea 

124 Victor and Vanquished 

125 Victory Doubtful 
Walked Home on His 

Ear 
War Dance, Opening of 

the Ball 
We Met by Chance 
We've Had a Healthy 

Time 
"What are the Wild 

Waves Saying, Sis- 
ter?" 
Scoot, Brother, Scoot 
What is Home Without 

a Mother-in-law ? 
Where, O Where, has 

my Leedle Dog Gone? 
Why did you Sup on 

Pork?— Nightmare 
Will You Love Me 

Then as Now 
Two Souls with but a 

Single Thought 
Poor Tommy, No. 1 
Poor Tommy, No. 2 
Poor Tommy, No. 3 
Paddy and his Pig 

141 Bothering a Tourist in 

Dublin 

142 a Going to the Beds 

143 b Coming from the 

Beds. (The Spill) 

144 Tipperary Boy going a 
Courting 

Donnybrook Fair in the 
ra'al ould times 
Hauling off the Bride 
Hauling home the 
Bride 

148 a The Rael Convayn- 

ience of Single Life. 
(New) 

149 6 The Unconvaynience 

of Married Life. 
(New) 

150 Rent Day and Spirits 

scarce 

151 Kissing the Blarney 
Stone 

Goin' to Kiss the rael 

Blarney Stone 
" Who dare stand on 

the tail uv me coat?" 
154 a Dressing for the 

Courting 
6 The Courting 
Larry desaving his 

baste 
" Will you have Tea or 

Whisky?" 

158 Utah's best Crop 

159 Approaching Storm 
Struck by a Cyclone 
Caution 
Confidence 
Consequence 
I will not ask to press 

that cheek 
Thou hast learned to 
love another 



145 

146 
147 



a 
b 



152 
153 



155 
156 

157 



160 
161 
162 
IftS 
164 

165 



166 Darling I'm growing 

old 

167 Stern Parents and 

Lover 

168 Take back the heart 

thou gavest me 

169 Schoolmaster in Love 

170 Persimmon's minding 

the baby 

171 Persimmon's Granny 

172 Persimmon's with the 

baby on the raft 

173 The mother finds her 

baby 

174 BlackviUe Twins No. I. 

The Flirtation 
176 BlackviUe Twins No. 2. 
The Introduction 

176 BlackviUe Twins No. 3. 

The Courting 

177 BlackviUe Twins No. 4. 

The Proposal 

178 BlackviUe Twins No. 5. 

The Duel 

179 BlackviUe Twins No. 6. 

The Wedding 

180 BlackviUe Twins No. 7. 

The Wedding Feast 

181 BlackviUe Twins No. 8. 

Return from the 
Honeymoon Tour 

182 BlackviUe Twins No. ft 

Coming Events 

183 BlackviUe Twins No. 

10. The Event 

184 Lawn Tennis at Dark- 

town 

185 Oh ! GoUy ! 

186 I'se Rich ! 

187 A line shot. The recoil 

188 Flip-Flap MUitia down 

South 

189 Before the Emancipa- 

tion Proclamation 

190 After the Emancipa- 

tion Proclamation 

191 Shun the Wine Cup, or 

Effect of Alcohol on 
the Lower Animals 
(six slides in set) 

Colored Photoeraphlo 
Comic Slipping SUdes. 

$1 each, 

1 She never told her 

Love 

2 Backing out of going to 

Market 

3 Lunar Caustic 

4 Oh ! my Prophetic soul, 

my Uncle ! 

5 A BUI Sticker 

6 For China direct 

7 Spring and Fall 

8 A Garden RoUer 

9 All's WeU that ends 

WeU 

10 A go-as-you-please 

Race 

11 Oh listen unto my Tale 

of Woe ! 

12 Kew Bridge 

13 Your Money or your 

Life 

14 How Happy could I be 

with Either! 

15 A piece of Fancy Work 

16 An Unnecessary Reme- 

dy 

17 A friend to Humanity 

a friend in Need 

18 Clearing the letter Box 

19 A Spoilt Child 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



[T03II BATTERY AND OPTICAI. CO., CHICAGO, ILI..,D 



SO Saying gootl-bye tt 

Old Year 
ai The Complete Ang 



se Boy Btoaling Sugar 

30 You must Move 

Assault and Uat 

31 The Dragon take 

Walk 



idng imp, or 1 
e Wlaf, fill 



33 Female C 
36 Ballet Db 
aj njlnl'lng Negro 






It AgaiJ 



B Tbve 



30 Boy spin n log Top 

10 Oood-niglit 

11 MnndriTingPig 
«S Clown liBugtng 
i9 gflence 

M Olrl playing Battle- 
cock 
«A Child Phasing Batter. 



17 Man beating hits Dop 



57 Lady catching 



Bl Man's tongue g 

62 Puuuli Btrlliea Pt 

63 Cat jumps on the 

or Man Shaving 

64 Performing ElBph 



makes Dog J 1 
ighhoop 



St Boys flrlDK ott Cannoii' 
83 Lady dantMug on light; 

S3 The family Umbrella 



» Dog catobea Monkey b 

o Elephant aad Keeper 
II Photographer appears 
throngh Carasr- •- 



m Pantaloon with crack- . ^ Donkey _ 



Tli Bbckamitt 
71 Boy cbasii 



a Page taking ]am, Cook 
apiieara behind 

6 Uonkev holding Mom 

to oat on pillar 

7 Bny teasing Dog, Dog 



All travelers abi 
ing through the mot . 
■Dch dreadfully tunc 

t^^E^M 

euce, and these n-iil "give an 
elTecla are oblainod with the c 

1 Phoaphoresoent PhiEzea. 
t A Foreign Palace Car at Nl 
a Crossing tlio Channel and 1 



ipeclaciea, Pr 



COSnQCES. 

!\. 

I>eriences and tunny people, and, 
Bssot Pitonhasaketched (or us 









>'ind at Poi 



'r.'ii,, 



n by diaaolTing 

]0 Y'on Kit Bunt Over. 
U The Jonruoy AorOBB. 
la Adieu. 
13 Good -night. 



American 

■ing it aboQt at will Good 



>r from natni^ 



le StlB Boat (AJ. 
le Nile Boat B^. 
leNUaBoaljC). 




SLIDES OF KGITT. 

We have heretofore alluded biiufly to ourboautltul aeta of Eeyptuin aubteoti 
re are now prepared to furnish without delay these thami Ing bitaol Nlleeoener 

las in connection with other Egyptian viewa, -■"— ' —•- '— "■- ■■' • - 

rtainmsnt. The aubjects are as foUowe: 

The Kuins 









ThaR 
Then 



It Philne, 
>t Phils 



1?B). 

He, No. 1 (0). 



nlasay (C), The Ruina at Philn;, No. 2 (ci 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



296 Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill.., u. s. a. 

£ach set consists of three wood-mounted slides, with three inch opening. The 
first one (A) is a plain, unco lored slide, with the usual bright sunlight; the second 
(B) is a beautifully colored view^ with rich, but delicately tinted sunset glow; while 
the third (C) is the most charming moonlight effect. The three views of each set 
being printed from one negative (and that pnotographed from nature), are perfectlv 
registered, so as to dissolve exactly each into the other, the effect is truly wonderfuL 

The price for each set of three is $4.00, or sold singly, if desired, at $1.00 for the 
plain view (A), or $1.60 each for the colored views (B or C). 

They will be furnished to order, when so desired, in two other forms, viz.: three 
and a half inch circular opening, $4.7'^ per set; or three-inch square opening, at $5.25. 

BEAUTIFUL COMPANION PIECES. 

Night.— A beautiful female figure, clad in flowing white robes, clinging to the 
moon. Stars dotting the sky. 

3form9io.— Another artistic gem is a beautifully draped female figure floating in 
the rays of the rising sun. 

Both of these are exquisite and reflned pieces, and can be appropriately used 
before any audience. Three inches, square, $2.00 each. 

A CHRISTMAS HTMN. 

(With Poem.) 

1 "Had Some been growing up to might, and now was queen of land and sea." 

2 " The Senator of haughty Rome impatient urged his cnariot's flight." 

3 "Within that province far away went plodding home a weary boor." 

4 " How calm a moment may precede one that shall thrill the world forever.*' 

5 " A thousand bells ring out, and throw their joyful peals abroad," 
H "For in the stable lay, new born, the peaceful Prince of earth and heaven. 

HOME, SWEET HOME. 

(With Poem.) 
3 



ff 



1 "Be it ever so humble, 

There's no place like home. 

2 " An exile f rom nome, 

Splendor dazzles in vain." 



" How sweet 'tis to sit 

'Neath a fond father's smile." 
4 " To thee I'll return . 

Overburdened with care." 



The ballad of " Home, Sweet Home," was written by our countryman, John 
Howard Paine, in the early part of this century, and these illustrations are designed 
to'give some idea of the style of dress, etc., of the period. 



THE HYMN " FROM GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS. 



W 



By permission of the owners of the Copyright, Messrs. Porter & Coats, Philadelphia. 

13 Beautifully Colored Views, f 19.60. 

A series of illustrations of this well-known and popular hymn have been arranged 
expressly for us, and no other dealer or manufacturer has control of the negatives. 
The coloring is exquisite, and when properly thrown on the Screen with a Dissolving 
Stereopticon, gives an effect which we think is far more beautiful than any of the other 
numerous illustrated hymns and poems published. This set comprises 13 slides beauti- 
fully colored, and is not furnished plain. 



No. 1. ''From Greenland's ley Moun- 
tains," 
As indicated by the flrst two lines of the 
hymn ; a part of the flrst picture shows an 
iceberg and the frozen seas of the North, 
while the other part represents a Tropical 
Indian scene with palm trees and a glori- 
ous sunset. 

No. 2. Shows a portion of an Island. 

In the foreground, the ocean, with a 
Coral reef peeping up from the moon -lit 
waters. 

Nos. 3-4. •* Where Afric's sunny foun- 
tains roll down their golden 
sands, from many an an. 
cient river, etc." 
This vie w represents the"golden sands" 
of Africa; a group of natives with their 
camels halted at a " sunny fountain" for 
rest; while "from many an ancient river" 
shows a typical scene along the borders of 
the Nile, showing a ruined temple and one 



of the native Dahabeahs floating down 
the river. 

No. 6. " From many a palmy plain they 

call us to deliver their land 

from error's chain." 

Depicts a palmy plain, its glittering 

sands, luxuriant palm trees, another 

group of camels, dromedaries and Arabs, 

with a sheltering tent to shield them from 

the noon -day sun. 

Nos. 6-7. 

"Can we whose souls are lighted 

With wisdom from on high. 
Can we, to men benighted. 
The lamp of life deny ? " 
Allegorical picture representing a cler- 
gyman in the pulpit; in the distance a 
portion of a churcn, in the foreground a 
number of people wending .their wav to 
divine services; an open Bible, with an 
old-fashioned lamp resting thereon, from 
which burning incense is arising toward a 
dvslant view of the heavenly city. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE P^G^E \Tt 



(cDITOSH BATTEKV AND OPTICAL OO., CHICAGO, ILL., C. 8 



TliB loytiil souoil proclaim, 
-TUI earth's renioteaC iiatLoD. 

Um learned Mesgiah's naino." 
lo the Brat, the view sliowa a portion ol 
the place i>[ the cmclfiKlon with ilg three 
crosiea, a ureBi^ent moon rising from the 
waters, wbllo through the air arc Haating 
AniceU bearlnu trnmpets with nhluh "the 
ioytulBOUnil IS pmcLaimui3. Id the lat- 
ter, ilinplr a portrait o( the Savior, artur 
GuWo.ihowiog him crowned with thomB 
and his hlood aroppmg from nuinberleaa 
vouada^ a bachground of cH^ean and 
mountains with a portion of plain, and 
palm treoi showing thereon, in the renter 



'■Walt, waft, ye winds, his stor 

Tiu°ll£o a'sea of glory. 

It aprauda from pole to pole.' 



Two o( t 



rnl of t1 



view of land is sbown^ while in the latter 
iaauBna vlewonly to be seen at sea where 
the entire expanse of water, lighted up by 
the setting son, shines llkea "sea of glory" 
and seems to "spread from pole to pate." 



Nob. 12-11 "Kedeemar, King. Creatoi, 

in bliss retntns to reigo." 

In 12 is shown an allegorical ptcture. In 

the immediate foreground the Holy Bible, 

little further back the hill showing the 
threo croflsvg with the flKura atUl hang- 
ing thereon, and in the extreme batk- 
Cund a view of Jemsalem. So, IS, the 
: picture of the series is an ideal tMw 

panled with a host of Angela retitmlng to 



I Til. 



BEAVTIFULLX COLORE!) PHOTOGRAPHS. 

OV FINE KSGKAV1SG8 FOE DISSOLTINU AND SINGLE LANTEESS. 

Old's Illustrations of the Bible, SSO i S Dora's Illustrations ol Dnnte's late 
-" ' eachsat. no, T'i slides in each set. 

.lions ol Miltoii'a Para- i Dorfi's "Ancleut Mariner." M slides 



Uudlaloiis 



' slthongh non?i8tlng of but 
s, will produce abetter effect 






i 



ha»e arranged and perfecled a beautiful set ol » 
■ Ahldo with Me," by Henry Francis LylH. 
se who have seen the effect produced upon an a 
of music in connection with certain slides, at the closl: 
readily appreciate what the set now olTered must be. 
Even the old and well-known set, " Rock of Ages," 
ixpert operatp 

Wltboi 

irranged, conaists of twanty-flve beiiutirul colored slldee, and we 
.,. i„ ,-..4 — .hB. ;. r. the finest combination of pictures of thin class 

, .o have seen the pictures nrolectad while the 

auuH wM uo.uB Biidg, say they had r' j—.— j .i 

what adeepnieaoingthar '- 

that Is so wall adapted to 

appropriately set lortli tht ,„ — _. — 

It has heensnggosted that a smaller number of llliistTBti. . 
larger sale of the set, ab many would be deterred from pnrohaslng twe 
whore they might be indnced to purchase ten or twelve. We have tak 
acconnE, but still prefer to offer the set in its complete form, thinking i 
do purchase will agree with «a that Its heouly lies In the appropr'-' 



IS admired the words, bnt r 



Wagi 



ta illusl 



. The se 



I below the hymn ai 

l-i Abide with me fast falls the BTcn. 
tide; 

me abide I 
These two lines are illustrated by two 
Tlewa, the first representing a lightlioiise 
on the end ol a pier, with nothing visible 
beyond but the sea, and the whole show- 
ing that nighl approaches. The second 
view is tho same, but at niglit, with a 

■blning from the Itgbthouee, and appro- 
prlately iUustrates tho Hue, " The durk- 
Keas deepens." 
S. When other helpers tail, and nom- 



brlefd. 



is sold at fXlM 



ijfhted mansion. „ „_. ._, 

sadly need od 
of the Helpless." 
4. Swift to its I'loae ebbs ont Ilia's little 
Earth's Joys grow diml its glories 



, Anold (! 
toppling 



wayi 






Help 



atthe helpless, ohl abide 

FOR PRICE LIST OF SUQtS Stt PK^it ^■2.■t. 



298 McINT&SH BATTERY AND OPTICAL OO., CHICAGO, ILL.. U. 8. A. 



A beautiful moonlight view of a ruined 
abbey, with its ivy.clad gable, the moon, 
shinmg through its " Catharine Wheel '^ 
window and well expressing '* change 
and decay." 

6. Not a brief glance, I beg, a passing 

word; 
But, as Thou dwell'st with Thy dis- 
ciples. Lord, 

Our Lord, with his disciples, partaking 
of the last supper. 

7. Familiar, condescending, patient, 

free. 
Come, not to sojourn, but abide with 
me! 

The Savior, ** familiar, condescending, 
patient, free," surrounded by the '* little 
children/' whom he loved so well. 

8. Come not in terrors, as the King of 

kings ; 
But. kind and good, with healing in 
Thy wings; 

A scene in which the ** kind and good " 
phase of our Savior's character is typified 
at the bedside of the sick and dying. 

9. Tears for all woes, a heart for every 

plea; 
Come, Friend of sinners, and thus 
abide with me! 

The "Friend of sinners," standing 
over the crouching, penitent figure, and 
saying, ** Ue that is without sin among 
you, let him first cast a stone at her." 

V 

10. Thou on my head in early youth 
didst smile ; 
And, though rebellious and perverse 
meanwhile, 

A beautiful child watched over by two 
elder sisters— a perfect gem of a picture. 

11-12. Thou hast not left me, oft as I left 
Thee. 
On to the close, O Lord! abide with 
me. 

Angel faces amiearing as in readiness 
to crown with glory one who is near "the 
close." 

13. I need Thy presence every passing 

hour; 
What but Thy grace can foil the 
tempter's power? 

A portion only— the central group — of 
Dubufe's celebrated picture of the 
"Prodigal Son " is here utilized, show- 
ing the youth surrounded by the "tempt- 
er's power." By taking only the princi- 
pal group of this picture, the interest is 
centerea on tlie one figure. The other 
portions of the allegory do not divert the 
attention. 

14. Wlio, like Thyself, my guide and 

stay can be? 
Through cloud and sunshine, oh! 
abide with me. 



An attic room ; the figure of a woman 
weary with work ; the meaner furnishing 
of the room, and the unmistakable sur- 
roundings of one who sees more of 
" cloud '^ than " sunshine," illustrates 
this number. 

15. I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to 

bless; 
Ills have no weight and tears no bit- 
terness; 
Another beautiful picture is here 
introduced, showing a widow at the 
grave of her departed husband; but her 
look of resignation and the wreath of 
flowers she nas brought with which to 
deck the tomb, show that although there 
may have been tears, they have lost their 
bitterness. 

16. Where is Death's sting? Where, 

Grave, thy victory? 
I triumph still, if Thou abide with 
me! 

Death is depicted. The arena ie filled 
with the dead and dying, sacrificed to 
furnish a day's diversion for an emperor. 
But when we know that they were 
slaughtered for daring to proclaim their 
belief in the Savior, and as we see the 
angels hovering over the martyrs thus 
sacrificed, we may well exclaim, " Where 
is Death's sting? Where, Grave, thy vie- 
tory? " 

17-18. Hold, tlien. Thy cross before my 
closing eyes! 
Shine through the gloom, and point 
me to the skies! 
Faith, looking forward sees the cross 
rise before her, pointing to the skies. 

19 to 25. Heaven's morning breaks, and 
earth's vain shadows fiee ; 
In life and death, O Lord! abide with 
me. 

The numbers from 19 to 25 all combine 
to make the closing scene of this series 
one of the most brilliant in effect of any- 
thing attempted in the line of lantern 
transformations. The last view previous 
to this fades gradually away into a rose- 
tinted cloud, from which two angels 
emerge, bearing in their arms a female 
figure representing a departed soul. 
These figures are quite large and low 
down on the disk, and seem quite near. 
Gradually the figures disappear. An en- 
tirely difl'erent but more gorgeous cloud 
covers the screen, and presently the 
same figures emerge again, smaller and 
higher up, apparently further away, and 
in their turn aisappear into a third cloud, 
as brilliant as the last, but different from 
either of the preceding; when, at length 
on the upper portion of the disk, and 
flying in tne opposite direction, reduced 
in size, as though a long way off, appear 
the angels with their burden, only to 
melt away gradually, and almost imper- 
ceptibly, disappearing into a cloud of the 
brightest ruby tints, as we picture to 
ourselves that *• Heaven's morning 
breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee." 



A FLIGHT OF A SOUL. 

The last seven numbers of the above set, from nineteen to twenty-five inclusive, 
form a set by thenselves, called "The Flight of a Soul," and as it is the most brilliant 
and gorgeous portion of the larger series, it makes a set of the utmost brilliancy in 
itself. Customers who do not care to purchase the entire series of twenty-five can 
obtain the seven slides for $10.5^>. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



MclNTOSU BATTERY ASH OPTICAL CO., t'HICAUO, ILL., U.S. J 

TEE JOCRMEV OF ACROBA. 
AK BSCHANTING MYSTEKY. 



Aiirora.GoddeSBOf flay,— Large. The 
Jtiltght Ttew di^iiueara, aofl Aurora 
DdB one briglit ana vivid, and next 



middle, as befonj described, a 
ETsduBllv the Aurora dlfappeiira, 
red tlDC fa toUowed l<r 



d which breali li 



IB Bhe noata trom u: 



t Light." 



hemomlDg tint chaDKlng from r 
a ^Idsn or lighCur niie, and, 
whole iiroKreBSea, dilTerenC ifflrl 



2. Water nabies, small.. -W^eM 
I with their lovelinese bnt a 

3. A noisy Watarlall, wh 

4. Kwf Tint.— We have a 
nt waters and through the red 
K. An Ice Cavern (where ' 

tt. Wa^er Babies, medii 
lat they have grown la: 



Winter Scene at Ntagnra.-The gold- 
intdlsaiipeaCB and ia followed by 
Blue Tint, which Is made to repre. 
the tull sunlight, or the clear heuv- 
Niagara Is linCed with this, and 
I diaai>pearlng giadnally, la followed 

I— Upon the w 
[ipearance is 

Aurora (email), lighting up 8gre»1 
. ThDB It would le seen she hal 
e her laurney, and gradually lighted 
tie worid,anJn ^-■"- --^ ^- — 



slides, t 
Untra 
I7.50. 



ng tackgronnd to the bablDS, 
L anlah the babies into the blue tron 
h bring forth 
Minnehaha Fallt 



e tinted, as bet 



they giad. 



_ .it timt 



iize. We find 
to appteniale 



ually tadB.ttnd'are'ioM 

ILA Forest of Ice, which may be 

with the golden tint, and thns brought 
out brightly by cbe full flow of light upoit 

Seven wood-mounted anil four plai 



dlsapnei 



and, uasslDg nn through the Alps, we 

1 The Ulorions Glacier.— In a moment 
we see oar tigiiree coming down the gla- 
cier, lor Chen Is mnde by the divided light, 
■B deMorlbed, to atipesr 

B. Flying Time, with his vlceim, email. 
or. Gradually he is taking the woman 
on her loumey of lite, and after bringing 
her down tbe glacier they disappear Iron 
iJBbe apiin. and are ' 

B. Oorored View c 
Ufa and Waterfall.- . 
~ * ir slowly to the middle, we 



An Alpine Gor 
supposed t- "■ 



le beautiful places of 
' for the unwilling 
, slowly, & is made to 
brought into fuU -'-- ^^^" 



ea?e^"ai 



^t^n^'' 



ind Mom 



gradually shut in I, 

S. Blue Tint, from which 

B. A MonntalD Summit olaud vieii 
cnniefl, and on which we see gradnall] 



tyot the victim tawanl< 
led on relnctanlly b^ 
Time, until Ihey bol 

li are toUowod by 



IL riouds, B 
12, Golden T 



both a and fi 






iHey, 



s repi-eaont the 
FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES Stt PK^it. \iT 



Seven wood-monnled and five 
Unframed colored and \ilain alfdes.S'i.W 



300 Mcintosh battery and optical co., ohioago, ill., u. s. a. 



T£CE WORLD. 

A SUNDAY-SCHOOL EXHIBITION. 



1. Red Tint, from which comes forth . 

2. The World.— A statue of an infant 
standing upon a globe, with hands and 
face lifted heavenward, which disappears 
m 

3. Low Clouds above the housetops, 
which are tinted by 

4. Blue Tint. 

6. Clouded and Broken Sky, in which is 
seen floating 

6. The World.— The infant having left 
the earth, and rising heavenward, is 
again seen surroundeci by 

7. Golden Tint, representing Jerusa- 
lem the Golden, from which emerges 



8. A Mountain Peak, over and above 
which appears, still smaller and further 
away, 

9. The World.— The tiny infant still 
smaller and rising heavenward, until 
met by 

10. An Angel, in whose arms the infant 
is nestled, and carried away to the world 
above. The latter slide is colored. 

11. Clouds. 

Seven wood -mounted and four plain 
slides. $10.00. 

Unframed colored and plain slides, 

$6.50. 



These effects, it will be readily seen, can be modified to an almost unlimited ex- 
tent by the dexterous choice and use of clouds, ice and other views which are appro- 
priate, guided by the invention of the exhibitor. The statuary is of our own best 
grade. 

Any person having a large collection ot views can modify them thus and produce 
wondrously beautiful things. Great advantages are obtained by the Skillful manip- 
ulation of the dissolving key, and these new things are arranged so as to permit of 
that. It is known that when the dissolver is turned to the extreme right that bat 
■one picture will be shown, and when it is turned to the extreme left, only the other 
picture will be shown; but if it is turned so that its handle will be in the middle, the 
li^ht is divided between the two lanterns and very pretty transformations thus ob- 
tained. 

One can soon learn how to arrange this, by just a little experiment, and thus se- 
•cure an unlimited amount of pretty things wnich are always applauded by the audi- 
ence. 

SECOND SERIES— LARGELY IMPROVED AND CHANGED. 

The following new series are arranged similarly to those described above, and are 
greatly improved, inasmuch as the whole of any one set are either wood -mounted, or 
else are without wood, so that no change of holder is needed to work them. 

Moreover, the statuary figures are made of a size to register with the preceding 
■or succeeding view, so that they will dissolve with astonishing eft'ect. The quality, 
too, is unexcelled. 

The colored subjects are most brilliantly painted, the effects are most startling, 
the sudden changes surprising and the combinations most attractive. We have 
spared no pains or expense upon their production, the fine patronage given our other 
■sets assuring us that such scenic transformations are acceptable to buyers, and en- 
tertain their audiences, for their sale is unprecedented. 

We commend them to the attention of all. They will pay the first night they are 
^hown, by filling your house the second night. 

HKBK'S REVENGE UPON CUPli>— A NEW MYTHOLOGY. 

A MOST BEAUTIFUL, STARTLING ^VND LAUGHABLE COMBINATION. 

SURE TO TAKE. 



L Statuary Group.— Hebe, the goddess 
•of youth, desiring to perform her toilet, 
commands Cupid to nold her mirror for 
her. Indignant at being pressed into 
such menial service, Cupia causes the 
image of a monster to appear in the glass. 
The enraged Hebe views it calmly, but 
swears vengeance; and both disappear 
into 

2. The Blue-tinted Clouds.by no means 
good friends, though seemingly at peace. 

3. The Home of Hebe.— We now see the 
lovely, but angered goddess amid the 
beauties of the Garden of the Gods, from 
whose flowers she gathers the beautiful 
tints with which she paints the feathers 
-of her mother Juno's peacocks, which are 
committed to the care of our sweet hero- 
ine. 

4. Statue of Hebe.— Meditating how she 
shall punish the impudence of Cupid. At 
first, she resolves to entrap hiin with a 
garland of flowers, but abandons that 
project, and determines to consult her 
father, Jupiter, on the subject. She 
Drays to him to come to her aid. 



6. Cupid's Counsel with his Fellows.— 
Having in vain sought Hebe for a loving 
makeup, and satisfied that there is mis- 
chief in the air, the troubled little urchin 
proceeds to the rendezvous for a council 
with his chums. To avoid detection they 
cause themselves to be transformed into 
gnomes. They resolve to frighten Hebe 
to death, and dig for some horrid mon- 
strosity to assist them; two of them, as 
vampires, being posted in the air to guard 
against intruders. 

(). A cloud of fire shields them from the 
searching eyes of the enemy, on the 
further side of which we may see, if we 
are on the alert, 

7. Hebe Consulting with Jupiter(Statu- 
avy).— The father of the gods appears to 
her in the form of an eagle. She re- 
freshes him with food and drink, and, 
meanwhile relates, her woes. He, prom- 
ising a father's protection, seizes her 
lunch-baskets and swears that he will 
capture the whole army of cupids and 
bring them to her feet, not to be de- 
stroyed—oh, never.'— but to be punished 
with mercy. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S^£. PPiQ.^ X-^T 



tlieybntb disHiiFRa 

nak the aasiatuDne ui imi. (:uujiiibuiiriiB uu 

the graud iwi^aslon of vonuea nee satin ted, 

as promUttd by Jupltvr, he, to rnnkc hla 

.-aiillvea, 

B. Hebe'B IteyenEe (Grand Stalnar; 
Gronp).— Thecniiidearaljmvigbttobaali- 
Btg by t]ie gods, given H Choroujtli bath by 



tlie (coddeMes nnd then buns ii|ion Unea 
of Are BUBDODded in the iiir, ibr thcirouKh 
deBtccBtian. Hebe nuLrriex Hercules, 
und we now see pour 

10. Cupid n Beggar (amtiiniy),— Here 
we eee aiir Hniinky little Iriend reduced 

i«tlilee KU out tawurd blm. (ieniilte tlie 
j ust YongeanCB of the pelu'Hnl ifobe. 

let', phcio and Dolored, (ILSO. 

4ea, (7.00, 



rTUE GIRL AMD THE BUTTERFLY-' 
«PEtIAI.LY V 




ATCARV AND 



,. to Capture (statimry 

ib colored bnttevtly), and 1b led by her 
'- ■ ieaireBto (otlow it overliilland 



where the flRble inapi'l earnpeB'hyr, unci 
down to collect her Iboughta. She de- 
toliHveauccesH. neturo lying 



splendid loUow wbo now 

him, but alas! hownutny 

in thia mortal world arc like 
children plftying 
H. Blindman'B Bnff,— They lOHkemany 
a trnltlesB elTort, and, like them, she iB 
again doumed to disappoint mont. The 
beauty and the freedom which she 
tliongbt she non- possessed, were only 

the flionds of tlic ili-tiint luturo. Too 
gigantic I . . - 

al of truth, Btin'i!iv'i!'" iJci'ioueH-e/fe- 

' - -- ■ she leplb a still Btrnnner apHll 

'er her. Her ieet seem to be 



apiici 



may beobr 



t.wisi 






8. Tht 



K granted, and b 



e look 



perfume, with thu wndy objecta of li 
She is encbanteir, a " " "' 



I BntterBy (Btalimry).— 
dy partlT fledged. Ber 

, _, , poBfieBBed of au its new 

tunctioDs. and the gulden feathera ate 
yet needed by her beautitul wings. To 
.i..„i_ .1 .u„ — .. niaije a Journey 

I. The Golden Sea, when she reappeacB 



Int' 



, fully accoutred and 

10. A Ferteot Balterflyl with all the 
gorgeoua coloring pnaaible, and freedom 

, to go nt will, unless hec ' ' 

I lonandhercbildrenresti 
and tour plain elides, «9^as. 



lovely Bompan- 



TUE SBTUN STAGES OF HOUBBN GIRLHOOD, 

EAITTIFUL STATUAKY. 
r dolly and 



VEKY rUSNY CHANGES A 
1. [Is' alage). Statuary Group.— We 
esrlteBt atniii's iil lier pxiatenne, peace- 
fully neatk-.l iu htr m o the r'B arms. The 



eiilth-g 



tall they ( 



I of the 

{ IfCBUtlful 

■y.— Thi 

illfuS bioBSO 
.K-rofthami 
nnw raniflhi 



to sleep, 
tbla ataire. 
little d 



'6 a^in lose sight ot the 
- __-^ ■ amid the Boenesof 

6. The BesHtKul World— Into ttUa 
Jharming place she ia lo»t again, and her 

mid the miat on the niouataia. Meanwhile, she 
outgrows her taste for Sowera. toys and 
dollB, ftnd incipient glrliBh TBnitlea begin 
to rule in her little brain until ihe be- 

7. (4th stage). Vanity Itself (Statnary). 
-Here she cornea. traiUnp her allken 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SE.e Plk.C^^ \'i.1. 



302 Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill.., u.s. a. 



8. Amid the Unseed Rocks, in the sol- 
emn deaths of whicn it is hoped she will 
learn wisdom from the good little fairies 
who live there, so that when she again 
comes forth we shall find her 

9. (5th stage). A Maiden Fair (Statu- 
ary), full of hope and courage, ready to 
take up her duties and boldly embark 
upon 

10. The Sea of Life, fearless, because 
ignorant of the troubles and dangers 
anead. Hope is gone, and she 

IL (6th stage). Rejected (Statuary), 
becomes weary with the rough storms of 
existence and the deceitfulness of the 
world. Her dreams are dismal, and life a 



12. Desert Scene— a long, dreary waste 
of cheerless desolation. 
13. Rose Tint-Clouds. -But the little god 
Cupid has something better in store for 
her. Her dreams are now all couleur de 
rose^ and we find her employing 

14. (7th stage). Love's messenger. — 
Her face is wreathed in happy smiles, as 
she dispatches her carrier-dove to bear 
a letter to her true love. It is now safe 
to leave her in the hands which girlhood 
hopes for; so we bid farewell to her as 
she departs amid 

15. Tne Solemn Cathedral Aisles, where 
at the altar she will ratify her vows ; and 
leave behind the happy days of girl- 
hood. 



Fifteen colored wood-mounted and plain slides, $13.50. 
Unframed colored and plain slides, $11.50. 

TH£ SEY£N PERIODS OF YOUNG AMERICA. 

ALL VERY FUNNY PERIODS WITH A STOP. 



1. Icicles.— Mother Goose (one of the 
most reliable authorities in the world) 
tells us that little boys are made of snaps 
and snails and puppy -dog's tails, so here 
he comes right out of the midst of these 
icicles! 

2. This is the Infantile period (Statu- 
ary), where most of the time is spent in 
hiav^tient mother's arms. He looks like 
a lively chap even now, and his baby 
fingers are busily examining some toy. 
The pleasing group vanishes into the 

3. Sunny Landscape, and in a moment 
the boy comes forth in the second, or ex- 
ploring per iod^ taking his 

4. First Step (Statuary) on the smooth 

grass, in search of curiosities. A little 
ird first attracts his notice, and, no 
doubt, typical of his future, in his eager- 
ness to wm the prize he will have many 
a tumble. He continues the chase, and 
disappears behind the 

5. Gfuns of a Fort.— The martial sur. 
roundmgs excite his ambition, and he 
seizes a drum, and he comes before us in 
the noisy period, as a 

6. Drummer Boy (Statuary).— Boy-like, 
he has small consideration for times or 
places, and with a rub-a-dub-dub he 
boldly marches into this 

7. Hallof Beauties— Some new influence 
seems to work upon him here. Perhaps 
the graceful pose of a statue, the airy 
forms in a picture, or some strain of 
sweet music, has directed his active feet 
in an unwonted measure, and he appears 
in the excitable period. 



8. Dancing Gleefully (Statuary). — 
Round and round he whirls with his com 
panion, until suddenly they are lost in 
the 

9. Deep Snows of the wild mountain. 
His ardor is cooled on thia unexpected 
transition, and when he comes forth he 
seems a changed creature. The construe 
tive period has arrived, and he really 
seems bent on 

10. Doing Something (Statuary).— Al- 
ready he has carved quite a fair dog's 
head on his stick, and gives promise of 
becoming an artist. He soon wearies of 
this 

IL The Wide World Ues before him, and 
he w^ill seek his fortune in some great 
city. The spirit of the 

12. Period of Wandering (Statuary). — 
Pervades his whole soul, and he is ready 
to join in any adventure. We see him with 
a companion, setting out on his journey. 
But it is a 

13. Rough Road.— He finds there are 
mountains to climb. His courage fails ; 
he gives up, and returns to his home. 
When we next see him he has reach^ 
the seventh heaven. 

14. The Love-making Period (Statuary). 
—And now that he has sought the society 
of the gentler sex, we will hope tor him, 
and leave him holding up his umbrella to 
keep the 

15. Falls of Niagara from wetting his 
sweet-heart. Silence is 

16. Golden, and the lovers are too ab- 
sorbed in their happiness for aught else 
to disturb them. 



Sixteen colored slides, wood-mounted and plain, $11.50. 
Unframed colored and plain slides, $10.50. 



THIRD SERIES. 
NOTED WOMEN OF THE BIBLE. 

ESPECIALLY INSTUCTIVE FOR SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. 



1. We will open this story of Bible 
Women by showing a Scene on the Nile. 
It may not be just the exact spot where 
tlie infant Moses was found, because 
things change in the course of 4,000 years 
or more, and it is difficult to always de- 
cide upon landmarks. However, Egypt 
is not a very large country, and the 
scenery is rntlier monotonous, so we will 
iuiagiDe this to be the spot where 



2. Pharoah's Daughter (Statuary) 
found the Hebrew babe, whom she reared 
in all the luxury and science of the court 
of Egypt. By this peculiar training he 
became eminently fitted for his office of 
deliverer of his nation. The princess now 
leaves us with her new-found treasure 
and vanishes amid a 

3. Tropical Grove, for we find that in 
these tuues the energetic Egyptians 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S£.£. P^Sk^X-Ja. 



Mcintosh batter- 



OPTICAL CO., (;niCAGO,ILI..,U.S.A 



with Btatelf trCHa. Sow, thmiigh the 
viBta ol this ffTovB ivb gee the fonii of a 
TCoiDsn of noble proporliODB, but strii^F- 
gllngliniKnny; it ta 

4. Lot's Wife [Statiiai?), as her hniba 
And bocivaro gradoaliy tuiiilng to Bait. 
She hadheanl the Divine decUntlion of 
thU punlahinenl on whoaaever turned a 

ilanre o( lingering regret upon the 
DOme<i (MtieB, nnd nntr she, too, 1b left to 



dS^iti'r 



I FRir PSBtorsl Scene 



lainda from pMt aorrows t< 
iiiu jujij and we 8BB the fair yiiiing 
Jiebekah at thu Well (Statuary) ai 

ti giving him 

hope deferred i 

orod slide a, v 



i. Kuth (Statiiarj), t 



uother-i 



i (or ^■ 



y years d( waiting, 

UI to 
I warded. 









[etnale charautere 



wonder the rialon of the lovely dBioael, „,?„„,„,,„„ 

fS,K;4"Sr,S"5.MTr;':i ...Ei.a.a 

thByonng nian. II. Bleased 

7. The RlondH of hope deferred now drawn onr s 

hide het Ivoni ua, aa they diii from her female chars 

Eleven colored slidea, wood -mo nn led and 

tUnlramad colored and ])lni!i slides, tO-T5. 
A TOVR WITH THB GOUDh 
FirLI. OF HYSTERIOnS BEAt 
L Sappho {Slatnary).— As onr aubient self to hiinti 
18 of a rather poetical nutiire, the goddess nymphs aa 1 
of poolry first appears before aa. She took vowa Co 
-waa horn ahont HOO years before the blesaedoess. 
Christian era. She was celebraCsCt for was Chat of 
bar beanty and talent, and wh^le still aeven wonde 
qulCe yunng, composed nine books in bent on some 
lyrioverae. Alter her early death shu loseaighCof 
rocolvad divine honors from tlie people, 6. Caacude. 

and temples were erected in her memory. and through 
Bhe bad fallen deaporately in love with a catch sight o 
vouch called I'hnon. His indiO'ereDCe 7. Miobe (S 



-.jne with a acauty sheaf, 

the love of oneof the richest no 
the land, ao powerful wua tbi 
hor beauty and humility. A 
9. liosy Tint, emblenutic of their hap 

fioeaa, now hides her from onr view 
r»m thia another acene of sorrow ap 



, and forgave her sins, a 



ook, from whonc 



'Her ra' 



a little am 



Leda and the Swan (Statui 



_ ..e had?al!« 
3^ nth called 

throw herself into 
3. The Sen.— Here wo i 
I amid the turbulent wi 
I ^™ii their depths ari 

P lair Leda m 

I Sparta. Jupiter becami 
her tovelinoas as to ex( 
of his lawfnl apniise, 
changed him into a anai 
liow aver, change hia he 



mountains, while alow 
S. Diana (Staliiaryl, 



of Epheaus, called one of the 
idersof the world. She la now 
__ jomc deed of vengeance, and we 
__. sight of her in this 

6. Caacude.— Shohurrieaon herorrand, 
and through the mist of the wntorfaU we 
catch sight of her victim 
- Niobe (Statuary), who by hor arabi- 
I has incurred the anger of Che gods 
1 thoy kiU her children. Apollo ai 






le wiCD 



Tilng ot 
■HctBct by 



daughtera. NioiiB herself, . ._ 

grief, remained weeping over her dead 
children until ahe was changed into 

8. Stone,— This acone of deaolBtion 
aeems typical of the ruins into which r 

fl. Juno (Statuary), the queen 
heaven, now comes huughtily upon tl 
scene, She was the wife of Jupiter, ai 
herpower was unlimited. She was strict 
virtuous and Indicted severe pnnishme] 
on those who were not. Her crnelty i 
exasperated Jupiter that ho sUBpendi 
her from heaven by a goWeo chain, wil 
a heavy nnvil attached to her feet, Th._ 
ooiy made her angry, and he was obliged 
to releaaa hr- '-- • — ■ ■- 



pom her father, 
in devoted her. 






aighl ol 



- .. — oay Clouda ol beavei 
reforming the wild waya ol 




uislte, and tlie photography is t 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SHOES SEt PK'i'E. \'in~ 



d 

I 
1 



304 McINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U, S 



EDUCATIONAL SLIDES. 



A very dtiirabte leriei. 
Per <«<, in bai wilh lock. 



S The Earth's 



8 Aularpromluoaces, 1873 
S Sular iir'nninencKss. 1S73 

Total eclipseoftheaiin, 

1 Total G<-lipse of tho iun, 

1870 
3 Total o<'lipBeot the Sim, 
Ifitt La Rue) 
t cyclone ISackt), 



liig llio Pumllel- 



I'hBgSB, during 



U Willow 1* 
IS Slid' tram 

Bpnt.B, 

IG Spectrosci 

ol ijrom 
17 Apparent 



ring 

M NebiiCe; 

beU 
47 Nehuls; 



t» Nehuls;lii Virgo, gplral 
48 NelmliBi in Cnnes Von- 

SO NebulW; triad, 1974 
61 ClUBters In Hercnle». 
UT4 

52 Scasong, length oI iija, 

53 The Karth and Seasons 

54 Parnllax 

55 Kefrar-tion, Parallax, 

Light anil Heat 
ea Ecllplir Chart 
S7 Diai'OTerynf planet 
83 fEleatial Denilsphere, 



Sd^lhe'&lobV 



:iiind 



Orbit 

7 ThBlHiir 

the Earth, allowing the 
Kiaing and Setting -' - 
the 8nn, llluatrnti 
■ Da^ a 



30 The VB1 

21 Moon's 

Torr' 

22 Moon'a 

23 Moon's 
» Moon's 



Nigh I, by 
S Thi 






.a AxiB 



ICarlh aronnd the 
I, with the Monthlv 
atlonsof the Moon 

Sun with the Tran- 



31 Satur 
33 Sntnr 



I- till- pfri. 



T Blew ope 
teriurof A9I 



■eleapope 
eravhet'a 



il Ohst 



Per Slide, 30 eenlt. 

Keliel Map, North Ameri- 

Relief Map, South America 
•• Europe 

ol Map' ot the United 

Map of Canada 
Map of Gen. Grant's Tour 
of tho World 
p o( North Atlantic 

p of Europe 

lool Map of Europe 



EoKland 



jtratedMapof 
Map ot France 
Illugtraled Mapol 
Map ot SwitKerlan 

" the Medite 

pBla"o" 



SO centB plain, 

1 system of 1 

2 a)-Bt8iu ot 1 



Map of Sinai and Vicinity 
Map D( the Rnina of Fetia 
Map ol the Induniiean Em- 



5 Feral dates 

FOR PRICE LIST Of SUDtS Stt ^ikCt va. 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 305 



Map of the Soudan in 

Egypt 
Map of the Nile Delta 
" " Kiver Nile 
Language Map of India 
Map of Japan 
♦* China 
** Australia 
Map of St. Paul's First 

Mission Journey 
Map of St. Paul's Second 

Mission Journey 
Map of St. Paul's Third 

Mission Journey 
Map of Missions in Scandi- 
navia 
Map of Missions in Ger- 
many and Switzerland 
Map ot Missions in Italy 
" «• " India 

" ■ '* " Mexico 

Map of Missions in South 

America 
Map of Missions in Japan 
Map of Missions in Bul- 
garia 
Map of Missions in China 
Map of Missions in Liberia 
" India 
" the Nile 
Map of the Eastern Hemi- 
sphere 
Map of the Western Hemi- 
sphere 

Geology. 

A Choice Series of finely 
Executed Scenes. 

Per Set,^30. Per SUde.fl.SO 

1 The Geological Record 

2 Ideal Section of the 

Earth's Crust 

3 Thickness of the 

Earth's Crust 

4 Section of a Volcano in 

Action 

5 Fingal's Cave 

6 Grotto of Antiparos 

7 Glacier, Mount Rose 

8 Glacier Tables 

9 Coral Island 

10 Corals 

11 Rain Drop Marks 

12 Tribolites 

13 Ammonites 

14 Pterichthys,Cocco8tes, 

(ycphalaspis 
16 Fossil Pern, impression 
of 

16 Forest of the Coal Pe- 

riod 

17 Ichthyosaurus, Plesio- 

sauriis and Pterodac- 
tyl 

18 Pterodactyl 

19 Fossil Footmarks 

20 The Mammoth Restor- 

ed 

Additional Geology. 

Colored^ per Slide, ftl.SO. 

21 Skeleton of Megatheri- 

um 

22 Sigilari 

23 Lepidodandron 

24 Tracks (The Stone 

Books) 
26 Bone Cavern (Wirks- 
worth, Eng.) 



2B Skeleton of Mastodon 

27 Peutacrinites Briare- 

us 

28 Apiocrinites and Ac- 

tinocriuites 

29 Skeleton of Plesiosau- 

rus 

30 Dinornis Mantelii 

31 Foraminifera f from At- 

lantic Sounaings) 

32 Lava Arch, Iceland 

33 Section ot the Cavern 

of G a i 1 e u r e u t h 
(Hartz) 

34 Sandstone Columns in 

Saxony 

35 Skull ot Mosasaurus 

36 Temple of Serapis 

(Puzzuoli) 

37 The Dodo, (an extinct 

bird) 

38 Convoluted Strata 

39 Skeleton of Ichthyo- 

saurus 

40 Diplacanthus Striatus 

Ideal Geological 
I.andscape8. 

Plain 50, colored $1.50. 

An artistic ^series of su- 
perior execution, illustrat- 
ing the various periods 
from the Silurian to the 
appearance of man 

1 Silurian PBriod 

2 Devonian Period 

3 Tmnsition Pericki 

4 Carboniferous Period 

5 Forest of Coal Period 

6 Permian Period 

7 Triassic Period 

8 Conchylian Sub-Period 

9 Saliferous Period 

10 Lower Oolite Period 

11 Lower Cretaceous Pe- 

riod 

12 Cretaceous Period 

13 Eocene Period 

14 Miocene Period 

15 Drift Period 

16 Recent Period 

C ry stallc^^aphy . 

Plain 50 cents, colored $1.50 

1 Primary Forms 

2 Regular System 

3 Quadratic System 

4 Hexagonal System 

5 Rhombic System 

6 3Ionoclinic System 

7 Triclinic Svstem 

8 Ice Flowers (Tyndall) 

9 Ice Crystals 

Spectrum Analysis. 

Plain 50 cents, colored $1.50 

1 Decomposition of Light 

by Prism 

2 Comparative intensit)' 

of heating, luminous 
and chemically act- 
ive rays 

3 Fraunhofer's ]Map of 

Solar Spectrum 

4 The Spectroscope 



\ 



6 Spectra of the Sun, 
Beta Cygni and Hy- 
drogen 

6 Spectra of Potassium. 

Rubidium, Sodium 
and Lithium 

7 Spectra of Carbon, 

Comet II., fl868) 
Spark and Nebulae 

8 Spectra of Aldebaran 

and Alpha Orionis 

9 Kirchoff's Map (from 

,194 to 220) and Ruth- 
erford's photograph 
of same 

10 Spectra of Chlorophyll, 

Chloride of Uranium, 
Magenta and Blood 

11 Gassiot's Spectroscope 

12 Huggin's Map of Me- 

tallic Lines, from 320 
to 2790 

13 Huggin's Map of Me- 

tallic Lines, from 2790 
to 5250 

14 Huggin's Star Spectro- 

scope 

15 Map of Solar Spectrum 

from 3S to 163 

16 Map of Solar Spectrum 

from 162 to 387 

17 Map of Solar Spectrum 

from 283 to 40d 

18 Coincidence of Spec- 

trum of Iron with 65 
of the Fraunhofer 
Lines 

19 Spectra of the Sun, 

Chromosphere, Prom- 
inence, and CQrona 

20 The Atmospheric Lines 

Structural Botany. 

50 cents each. 

1 Vertical Section of Ex- 

tremity of Root, high- 
ly magnified 

2 Section of Leaf (White 

Lilv and Oleander) 
highly magnified 

3 Section of Coniferous 

Wood and Glands 
highly magnified 

4 Longitudinal Section 

of portion of Stein 
and Spiral Vessels 

5 Lactiferous Vessels of 

Celandine and Ficus 
Elastica 

6 A Sting of a Nettle, 

showing circulation 
of Sap 

7 (1) Air Cells from Stem 

Lininocharis Pliim- 
ieri; (2) ditto, show- 
ing open passages at 
Angles of Cells; (3) 
Epidermis of Oncid- 
ium altissimum ; (4) 
Stomata of Croton 
variegatum 

8 Section of Elm Branch 

9 Section of Ash Branch 

10 Ti-ansverse and Verti- 

cal Section of Negun- 
do, a year old 

11 Section of Fern Stem 

and Scalariform Tis- 
sue 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE PP^C^E. X^^T 



aw McINTOSU BATTERY AXD OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO. ILL.. U. S. A. 



IB Pollen Masses (Orchis. 

Plantanthera. and 

Asf'lepias) 
U Starch Grams f PoUto, 

Wheat and Maize, in 

CelU) 

15 Vertical Section of 

Stigma of Ditnra 

16 Conaactinfi; Tissue m 

Stigma of Ditnra 

17 Section of Ovule of 

Polygonum before < 
and'after fecundation ; 

18 Germination of Fern 

Spore 1 

19 Fern and Sporangia 

90 Spores and Sporidia of 
Diseased Grain of 
Wheat 



Additional Botany. 

50 cents each. 

1 Almond. Flower and 

Fruit . 

2 Banyan Tree 

3 Blackberry. Flower 

and fruit 

4 Black Pepper 

5 Cactus 

6 Camelia 

7 Catteleya Superba 

8 Chrysanthemum 

9 Cincona Trees 

10 Cinnamon 

11 Clove 

12 Cocoa 

13 Coffee 

14 Convallaria 

15 Dahlia 

16 Dicentria 

17 Figs and Olives 
m Fuschia 

19 Geranium 

20 Grapes and Peaches 

21 Holly 

22 Hyacinth 

2;3 Lily. Japanese 
24 Lily, Johnsonl 

26 Lily of the Valley 

27 Lily, Pond 

28 Lilies, with Text 

29 Magnolia 

30 Magnolia and Passion 

Flower 

31 Nasturtium 

32 Nutmeg 

33 Oleander 

34 Orange, Flower and 

Fruit 
36 Passion Flower, Mex- 
ican 

36 Passion Flower, Quad- 

rangularis 

37 Pelargonium 

38 Peony 

39 Peruvian Bark 

40 Pine Apple 

41 Pitcher Plant 

42 Pomegranate 

43 Poppy 

44 Roses, Bunch 

45 Rose, Boursault 

46 Rudbekia and Japan 

Lily 

47 Stock Gilliflower 

48 Strawberry, Flowers 

and Fruit 

49 Snow Plant 

50 Tea 

51 Tulip 



52 Vanilla 

53 Venus Fly-trap 

54 Vibuminm 

55 Violets 

Extinct Animals. 

From Originals by Wa- 
terhouse B^wkins, Esq., ; 
the eminent Naturalist. ' 

Per Set, including Printed 
Lecture, f9. Per Slide, 
fl.60. Colored only. 

1 Plesiosaurus. Teleo- 

saurus, Ichth^osau- , 
rus, Pentacrinites, 
Ammonites. Gry- : 
phaea 

2 Megalosaurus. Ptero- ; 

dactyl 

3 Iguanadon, Hylseosau- 

rus 

4 Anoplotherium Com- , 

mune, Anoplothe- i 
rium Gracile, Palseo- | 
therium i 

5 Magatherium Glypto- ' 

don . ; 

6 Elephas.Primogeneous, < 

Hyaena Spelsea, Hip- j 
popotamus Major, : 
Ursus Spelseus, Ma- 
chairodus Latidens 

Honey Bee. 

Per Set, $12.50. Per Slide, 
$L25. 

1 Queen, Working Bee, 

Drone and Comb 

2 Head of the Worker 

3 Abdomen of the Work- 

er 

4 Structure of the Eye 

of a Bee 

5 Proboscis of the Work- 

er 

6 Wing and Hind Leg of 

Worker \ 

7 Wing of Worker ' 

8 Digestive, Respiratory | 

and Nervous System 
of the Bee | 

9 Larva and Pupae of 

Worker 
10 Home of the Bees 

Botanical Illustrations. 

Per Set, $25.00. Per Slide, 
$1.25. 

1 Parts of a Plant 

2 Germination 

3 Roots 

4 Buds and Leaves 

5 Flowers and Inflores- 

cence 

6 Stamens and Pistils 

7 Exogenous Structure 

8 Crowfoot family 

Columbine, etc 

9 Pink Family 

10 Tobacco 

11 Clover 

12 Apple 

13 Rose 

14 Melon 

15 Composite Family, 

Chickory and Calli- 
opsis 



16 Oak 

17 Fur and Hemlock 

Spruce 

18 Endogeneous Stmc 

ture 

19 Date Palm 

20 White Garden Lily 

Additional Scientific. 

Natural History. Beau 
tif ully colored photographs 
of Animals, Birds, Rep- 
tiles and Fishes. Per slide, 
$L50. 

Whale Fishery. Per set 
of 12 slides, $18; per slide, 
$L50. 

Entomological Illustra. 
tions. Per set of 20 slides, 
$25; per slide, $L25. 

Insects, sixty subjects. 
Per slide, $L50. 

Insect Metamorphosis, 
showiog different stages 
of transformations, with 
beautiful landscapes; 

twenty subjects. Per 
slide, $L50. ' 

Flowers and Plants; 
flftv subjects. Per slide 
$Ldb 

Important Plants Useful 
to Man. Per set of 10 
slides, $12.50. 

Optics. Per set of 20 
slides, $25; per slide, $L50. 

Natural Phenomena. 
Per set of 12 slides, $18; . 
per slide, $L50. ' 

Anatomical Illustra. 
tions, from engravings of 
Bonamy and Broca, Paris. 
Per slide, colored, $L50; 
plain, 50 cents. 

Nervous System, from 
Plates by Hirschfield; the 
best on the subject. Per 
slide, colored, $1.50; plain, 
50 cents. 

Anatomy and Pl&j'siology 

Per Set, in Box, $30. Per 
Slide, fl.60. 

1 Human Skeleton 

2 Human Skull 

3 Section of the Spine, etc 

4 Teeth, and Structure 

of Same 

5 Muscles, Front View 

6 Muscles, Back View 

7 Muscles of Head, Neck 

and Face 

8 General View of the Di- 

gestive Organs, in 
Place 

9 The Digestive Organs 

10 The Stomach, Liver and 

Pancreas 

11 The Thoracic Duct 

12 Heart and Lungs 

13 Diagram of Circulation 

14 Skin and Structure of 

Same 

15 Brain and Spinal Cord 

16 General View of the 

Nerves 

17 Fifth Pair of Nerves 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. sot 



18 Facial Nerves 

19 Diagram of the Eye 

20 Anatomy of the Ear 

We can furnish a < large 
Phrenological Head, show- 
ing all of the organs with 
great distinctness 

Set of Forty-eight Slides, < 
Human Anatomy and 
Pliysiology. 

50 cents plain, $1.50 colored. 
With reading. 

1 Apollo Belvedere 

2 Skeleton 

3 Skull— side view 

4 Skull— front, back, base 

and inside 

5 Vertebral Column 

6 Pelvis 

7 Ribs 

8 Ligaments — of hand, 

arm and leg 

9 Hip and knee-joints 

10 Muscular system— back 

11 Muscular system— front 

12 Muscles of 'the face 

13 Diaphragm 

14 Course of Ingesta 

15 Teeth 

Ifi Salivary Glands 

17 Liver, Stomach and 

Intestines 

18 Stomach. Interior sur- 

fa(>e 

19 Gastric and Intesthial 

Glands 

20 Duodenum, Pancreas, 

Cttjcum 

21 Heart and Lungs 

22 Diag^m of the Heart 

23 " ** " structure 
of the Heart 

24 Transverse Section of 

the Thorax 

25 Diagram of the Lungs 

26 Systemic Circulation 

27 Diagram of Pulmonary 

Circulation 

28 Blood Corpuscles and / 

Microscope v- 

29 Pharynx and Larynx 

30 Eilects of Tight Lacing 

31 Lymphatics 

32 Thoracic Duct 

33 Kidneys 

34 Renal Circulation 

35 Brain— under surface 

and Section 

36 Diagram of the origin of 

the Cerebral Nerves 

37 Diagram of tlie 5th pair 

38 Pneumogastric Nerve 
;» Spinal Cord 

40 Sympathetic Nerve and 

Ganglia 

41 Skin and Hair 

42 Sections ol Nose 

43 Vessels and Nerves of 

the Tonguo 

44 Muscles of the Eye 

45 Section of the Ky*e 

46 Structure of the Retina 

47 Structure of thi» Ear 

48 Larynx, Vocal Cords, etc 

A Set of Twenty on Mi- 
croscopic Anatomy. 

50 cents plain, $1.50 colored 

1 Tesselated and (Mliated 
Epithelial Cells 



2 Human Blood Disks, and 

Blood Disks of Frog 

3 Longitudinal and Trans- 

verse Section of Bone, 
Lacunae, and Canali- 
culi, highly magnified 

4 Mugf ular Fibres, Fasci- 
culus and Sarcolem- 




ma 



5 Vertical and Horizontal 

Section of Stomach 
Follicles and Tubes 

6 (o) Capillary Circula- 

tion of Frog's Foot; 
(6) Capillaries of Air 
Cells of Human 
Lungs; (c) ditto of 
Villi of the Jejunum 

7 Origin Hepatic Veins 

and Bile Ducts on the 
' Liver Lobules 

8 A Human Malphigian 

Corpuscle and Trans- 
verse Section of Su- 
per-renal Capsule 

9 Nerve Tubes, Cells and 

Ganglia 

10 Transverse Section of 

Human Spinal Cord, 
close to third and 
fourth Cervical 
Nerves 

11 Pus: (a) from abcess; 

, r&) Mucus Corpuscles 
from Schneiderian 
' Membrane;, (c) ditto, 
\ speckled with pig- 

ment Granules from 
Larynx 

12 Urinary deposits: (a) 

Uric Acin; (6) Oxa- 
late of Lime; (c) 
Triple Phosphate 

13 Fatty Degeneration of 

the Liver 

14 Tubercle : (a) in Air 

Cells of Lungs; (6) 
Miliary 

15 Schirrous gi'owth from 

Mammary Gland 

16 Taenia Solium 
17 Oxyuris Solium 

18 Trichina Spiralis, ma- 

ture and m cvst 

19 Liver Fluke, 'Distoma 

hepaticum 

20 Thrush Fungus, Oidium 

albicans 



Human Physiolc^^y 
Popularly Explained; 

Or the House We Live in. 

With Lecture, colored 
$1..50, plain .M) cents. 

1 Introductory Slide 

Skeleton. 

2 Human Skeleton 
SSkull (Hide view) 

4 Skull (front, top and 

section) 

5 Vertebral Column 
« Pelvis 

7 Ribs 

8 Clavicle, Scapula, Arm 

an<l Hand 

9 Hi]), Leg and Foot 

10 Ligaments 

11 Eflects of Tight Lacing 

on the Form of the 
Skeleton 



Muaclea. 

12 M nscular System 

13 Natural Levers 

Digestive Organs, 

14 Viscera of Human Body 

15 Course of Ingesta 

16 Jaws 

17 Kinds of Teeth 

18 Salivary Glands 

19 Liver, Pancreas, Stom- 

ach (interior) 

20 Gastric Glands, Struc- 

ture of Intestines 

Circulatory Organs, 

21 Systematic Circulation 

22 Heart and Lungs (exte- 

rior) 

23 Heart (interior, right 

side) 

24 Blood Corpuscles (hu- 

man and compara- 
tive) 

Respiratory Organs, 

25 Pulmonary Circulation 

26 Trachea, Lungs (half 

section) 

27 Transverse Section ol 

Thorax 

28 Cavity of Thorax, Dia- 

phragm 

29 Minute Structure ot 

Lungs 

30 Absorbent System 

31 Lymphatics 

32 Kidney ;exterior and 

section) 
: 33 Renal Circulation 
34 Sections of Skin 
- 35 Liver, etc. 

Nervous System. 

36 Cerebro-Spinal System 

37 Ganglionic System 

38 Section of Brain, Show- 

ing Twelve Pairs of 
Nerves 

39 Under Surface of Brain, 

Showing Twelve 
Pairs of Nerves 

40 Spinal Cord 

Senses. 

41 Touch, Nerve Endings 

in Skin 

42 Smell, Sections of Nose 

43 Taste, Tongue 

i 44 Sight, Sections of Eye 

45 Sight, Minute Struct- 
I uresof Eye 

46 Sight, Muscles of Eye 

and LachrymalAppa 
rat us 

47 Hearing, Ear 

48 Speaking, Larynx, etc. 

49 Minute Structure of 

Bone 

50 Minute Structure of 

Teeth 

51 Minute Structure of 

Muscle 

52 Structure and Growth 

of Nails and Hair 



/ 



rOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



808 Mcintosh battery and op.tical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



Anatomical, Pailiolog:!- 
cal, Venereal and Miscel- 
laneous. 

Colored only. Price per 
Slide, $L50. 

1 Phimosis with dribbling 

urine 

2 Paraphimosis 

3 Chancre on Glans, Penis 

and Prepuce 

4 Chancre 

5 Chancre, Hunterian 

6 Chancre Phagedenic 

7 Chancroid 

8 Chancre with Balanitis 

9 Chancre 

10 Chancroids on Prepuce 

11 Soft Chancre 

12 Phimosis 

13 Cork-screw Urination 

14 Stricture Cork-screw 

Urination 

15 Stricture and False Pas- 

sages 

16 Syphilis, Secondary 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
'25 
2« 

27 
2S 
29 
30 
31 
32 

:« 

34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 



Syphilis, Secondary 

Ahmentary Canal 

Cranial Development 

3Ia8turl3ator 

Masturbiitor 

Nutrition 

Nutrition 



Lym])hatics 
Circulation 



Pelvis, Female, Normal 

and deformed 

Organs of Heproduction 

Human Ovule 

Gravid Ifterus 

Twins in Utero 

Tubal Pregnancy 

Uterine (-ancer 

'♦ Disulacemcnts 
♦* Prolapsus 

Cilia of Fallopian Tubes 

Section Female Organs 

Venereal 

Section Male Organs 

Fa'tal Circulation 

Stricture Male Urethra 

Foetus in Utero 

Venereal 



Photo Microg^raphs. 

$1.C0 each. 

1 Bacillus Anthrax 

2 *• Tuberculosis 
(consumption) 

3 Bacillus Typhoid Fever 

4 ♦.* Glanders 

5 '* Swine Cholera _^ 
« ** Chicken Cholera f 

7 •* Leprosy- -V 

8 ** Diphtheria 



Micrococci. 

$1.00 each. 

1 Koch's Comma Bacillus 

Asiatic Cholera 

2 Pneuniococcus of Pneu- 

monia 

3 Gonococcus 

4 Strepticoccus of Pus 

5 Strepticoccus of Erysip- 

elas 

6 Actinomyces Bo vis — 

Lumpy Jaw Germ of 
Cattle 



PHOTO-MICROGRAPHIC TRANSPARENCIES. 

Classified list— Especially useful to lecturers and teachers. Each slide is marked 
with the number of diameters. A ten foot picture on an average increases the 
diameters forty times. Photographed by W. H. Knap. Normal Histology. Section 
human body. Fa»tal. 



Epithelial 
Epithelial 
Epithelial 
Epithelial 



1 Squamous 

<;ells 

2 Columnar 

Cells 

3 C i 1 i a t e d 

Cells 

4 Pavement 

Cells 

5 Blood Man 

6 Blood Frog 

7 White Fibrous Tissue 

(ligamentum Nuchae) 

8 Yellow Elastic Tissue, 

ligaments and ten- 
don's Mouse's Tail 

9 Adipose Tissue 

10 Cartilage Hyaline 

11 Cartilage Semilunar 

Developing Bone 

12 Human Femur Longi- 

tudinal Section 

13 Human Femur Trans- 

verse Section 
U Striated M uscu lar 

Tissue 
V\ Non-Striated Muscular 

TiHsue 

16 Trichinai in Muscle 

17 Artery 

18 Vein 

19 Skin Sole of Foot 

20 Hair Longitudinal Sec- 

tion 

21 Hair Transverse Sec- 

tion 

22 Sel)aceons Glands and 

Ducts 
2:} Developing Tooth 

24 Toot h Longitudinal 

Section 

25 Stomach Longitudinal 

Section 

26 Stoniarh Transverse 

Section 

27 Stomach Injected 

28 Intestine Longitudinal 

Se<'tion 



29 Intestine Transverse 

Section 

30 Goblet Cells, Intestine 

31 Peyers Patches, In- 

testine 

32 Lieberkuhnian Glands 

33 Mesentery 

34 Lungs 'showing Air 

Cells 

35 Lung Injected 

3(> Bronchial Tube-whole 

37 Cartilage Plates and 

Lining Membrane 
Bronchus 

38 Liver, Showing Cells 
,"19 Liver Injected 

40 Glisson's Capsule 

41 Kidney 

42 Kidney Injected 

43 Maipighian Bod)^ 

44 T u b u I i - u r i n i t e r i, 

Transverse 

45 Bowman's Capsule 
4<) Section rteius 

47 Section Ovary 

48 Graafian Follicle 

49 Ovum 

50 Germinal Vesicle and 

Spot 

51 Seminiferous Tubules 

52 Sj)ermatozoa in Tubu- 

les 

53 Spermatozoa Free 

54 Supera renal Capsule 

55 Salivary Gland 
5f> Acinous Glands 

57 Parotid Gland 

58 Submaxillary Gland 

59 Pancreas 

«)0 Lvmphatic (iland 

61 Thymus Bodv 

62 Thyroid Gland 
()3 Mammary (iland 

64 Nerve Cell in Brain 
showing Nerve Pro- 
longation 

(^i Multipolar Nerve Cells 
in cord of man 



66 MultipolarNerve Cells 
in cord of ox 

67 Spinal Cord Cat En- 
tire Section 

68 Spinal Cord Man En- 
tire Section 

, 69 Nerve Leaving Spinal 

Cord 
I 70 Ganglion on Nerve 
: 71 Longitudinal Section V 

Nerve 
, 72 Transverse Section 
I Anterior Crural 

! Nerve 

j 73 Transverse Section 

Sciatic Nerve 
I 74 Cerebellum Injected 
I 75 Cerebrum Injected 

76 Medulla Transverse 
Section 

77 Optic Nerve Trans- 
verse Section 

i 78 Optic Nerve junction 
with retina 
79 Brain Lizard 
; 80 Finger Tip Showing " 
Nerve Endings 

81 Retina Rods and Cones 

82 Cornea 

83 Cat's Tongue showing 
I'apilUc 

84 Taste Bulbs in Tongue 

Bacilli and Micrococci. 

85 B. Veneuosum 
8() W. Veneuosum Brevis 

87 B. Coli Commune 

88 B. Typhoid showing 
Cilia 

I 89 Embryo Chick, 36 hours 
Incubation 
00 Embryo Chick, Aljnor- 
mal Head 

91 Embryo Chick, Abnor- 
I mal Heart 

92 Embryo Chick, Abnor- 
I mal Body 



^ 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 309 



Humaii Parasites. 

93 Pediciiloris Capitis 

94 Pediciiloris Corporis 

95 Pediciiloris Pubis 

96 Tape Worm Head 

97 Tape Worm, Section 

98 Tape Worm Show big 

Eggs 

99 A m (B b a C o I i of 
^y Chronic Dysentery 
^ ^ very rare 

i/^lOO Sarcoptes Scabiei 

101 Bed Bug 

102 Flea 

103 Pygidiiim Flea 

Pathological. 

104 Fibroid Phthisis 

105 Epithelioma of the 

Hand 

106 Rodent Ulcer 

107 Epithelioma of the Lip 
103 Columnar Epithelioma 

Rectum 

109 Schirrus Carcinoma of 

Breast 

110 Encephaloid Carcin- 

oma 

111 Osteoma 

112 Osteo Carcinoma 

113 Round Cell Sarcoma 

114 Spindle Cell Sarcoma 

115 Giant Cell Sarcoma 

116 Fibro Sacroma 

117 Fibro Chondro Sar- 

coma 

118 Mixed Sarcoma 

119 Melanotic Sarcoma 

120 Glioma of the Eye 

121 Showing Retina being 

Invaded 

122 Angioma 

123 Tumor from Nose 

124 Sclerosis Liver 



Entomological. 

125 Trichina Spiralis, free 
128 Trichina Spiralis, En- 
cysted in Muscle 

127 House Fly 

128 House Fly's Proboscis 

129 House Fly's Foot 

130 Ovipositor House Flv 

131 Honey Bee 

132 Honev Bee's Proboscis 
i;« Honey Bee's Foot 

134 Honey Bee's Sting and 

Poison Sack 

135 Butterfly's Tongue 

136 Fire Fly 

137 Spiracle Caterpillar 

138 Spiracle Cricket 

139 Mouth, Spider 

140 Foot, Spider 

141 Spinnaret Spider 

142 Mosquito, Male 

143 Mosquito, Female 

144 Cheese Mite 

145 Meal Mite 

146 Sugar Mite 

147 Compound Eye Horse 

Fly 

148 Gi7.zard Cricket 

149 Scales, Moth 

L50 Scales, Butterfly 

151 Scales, Lepisma Sac- 

charina 

152 Scales, Podiira Plumba 

153 Sting and Poison Sack 

Wasp 

154 Tongue, Blow-Fly 

Insects. 

155 House Fly, Miiscae 

Domestica 
L56 Proboscis, House Fly 

157 Foot. House Fly • 

158 Ovipositor, House Fly 

159 Honey Bee, Apis Mel- 

liflca 



160 Proboscis or Tongue 

161 Foot, Honey Bee 

162 Sting, Honey Bee 

163 Wing, Honev Bee 

164 Butterfly's I'ongue 

165 Fire Fly 

166 Spii*acle, Caterpillar 

167 Spiracle, Cricket 

168 Mouth of Male Spider 

169 Showing Jaws and 

Palpi 

170 Foot, Spider 

171 Spinaret, Spider 

Botanical. 

172 Eucalyptus Globulus 

173 Menisperin Canadense 

174 American Mistletoe 
Showing Crystoliths 
American Mistletoe 

177 Cells and Nuclei 

178 Stoma ta Horse's Tail 

179 Arestolochia Formen- 

tosa 

180 Echinus Spine 

181 Larix Americana 

182 Wild Hop Vine 

183 Clematis Virginica 

l>iatonis. 

184 Ai-achnoidiscus Ehe- 

renbergii 

185 E utogoina Apcrta, 

very rare 

186 Pleurosigma Angula- 

tum 

187 Pleurosigma Estuarii 

188 Pleurosigma Fasciola 

189 Pleurosigma Decorum 

190 Pleurosigma Formosm 

191 Amphipleura P e 1 1 u - 

cida 



175 
176 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



Mammalia. 



1 King of the Cannibals 

2 Skeleton of Man and Go- 

rilla 

3 Gorilla 

4 Mandrill 

5 Diadem Lemur 

6 Vampire Bat 

7 Mole 

8 Hedgehog 

9 Lion 

10 Tiger 

11 Jaguar 

12 Leopard 

13 Serval 

14 Puma 

15 Lynx 

16 Hyena 

17 Wolf 

18 Newfoundland 

19 Shepherd's Dog 

20 Esquimaux Dog 

21 Fox 

22 Weasel 

23 Skunk 

24 Raccoon 

25 Brown Bear 

26 Grizzlv Bear 

27 Polar "Bear 

28 Common Seal 

29 Marbled Seal 



Dog 



30 Crested Seal 

31 Sea Lion 

32 Walrus 

33 Opossum 

34 Kangaroo 

35 Gray Squirrel 

36 Red Squirrel 

37 Spermophilus gray mo- 

nuriis 

38 Short-tailed Prairie Dog 

39 Beaver 

40 California Gopher 

41 Bushy. tailed rat 

42 Brown Rat 

43 Porcupine 

44 Guinea Pig 

45 Red Kabbit 

46 Sloth 

47 Armadillo 

48 Ant-eater 

49 Duck-bill 

50 Elephant 

51 Skeleton of Elephant 

52 Rhinoceros 

53 Hippopotamus 

54 Maylavan Tapir 

55 Wild l^oar 

56 Horse 

57 Zebra 

58 Reindeer 

59 Red Deer 
GO Girafl'e 



61 Gazelles 

62 Chamois 

63 Sheep 

64 Cashmere Goat 

65 Musk Ox 

66 Cow 

67 Zebu 

68 Bufl'alo 

69 Camel 

70 Llama 

71 Greenland Whale 

72 Porpoise 

Birds. 

1 Skeleton of a Bird 

2 Condor 

3 Turkey Buzzard 

4 (xerfalcon 

5 Imperial Eagle 

6 Harpv Eagle 

7 Bald feagle 

8 Virginian Eared Owl 

9 Barn Owl 

10 Undulated Parrot 

11 Cockatoo 

12 Toucan 

13 Mexican Trogon 

14 Parrots 

15 Woodpecker 

16 Black- Breasted and 

King of Humming 
Birds 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



310 McINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. 8. A. 



17 Ruby - throated Hum- 

ming Bird 

18 Sapplio Comet and 

Crested Humming 
Bird 

19 Whippoorwili 

20 Kingfisher 

21 MomotuB ceruleiceps 

22 Missel Thrush 

23 Tailor Bird 

24 Bell Bird 

25 Blue Bird 

26 Scarlet Tanager 

27 Swallow 

28 Great' Northern Shrike 

29 Mocking Bird 

30 Skylark 

31 Rose -breasted Grosbeak 

32 Tree Sparrow 

33 Blackbird 

34 Baltimore Oriole 

35 Raven 

36 Blue Jays 

37 Lyre Bird 

38 Royal Bird of Paradise 

and Blue Girl 

39 Wild Pigeon 

40 Pheasant 

41 Peacock Pheasant 

42 Ruffled Grouse 

43 Turkey 

44 Ostrich 

45 Cassowary and Emu 

46 Great Buzzard 

47 Whale-headed Stork 

48 White Stork 

49 Sacred Ibis 

50 Flamingo 

51 Snipe 

52 Curlew 

53 Bean Goose 

54 Domestic Ducks 

55 White Swans 

56 Pelican 

57 Mutton ^Ubatross 

58 Great Northern Diver 

59 Cormorant 

60 Penguin 

Reptiles. 

1 Skeleton of Turtle 

2 Green Turtle 

3 Hawksbill Turtle 

4 Leathery Turtle 

5 Crocodile 

6 Alligator 

7 Iguana 

8 Green Lizard 

9 Horned Toad 

10 Basilisk 

11 Fringed Tree Gecko 

12 Chameleon 

13 lioa Constrictor 
14- Bead Snake 

15 Rattlesnake, Crotalus 

durisus 

16 Rattlesnake, Crotalus 

ornatus 

17 Viper 

18 C-obra de Capello 

19 Bull Frog 

20 Painted Frog 

21 Natterjack 

22 Green Tree Frog 
2^i Crested Newt 

2ri Sired on 

FiHhes. 

1 Skeleton of Fish 

2 Perch 

3 Black Bass 

( Filamentous Gunard 



5 Buffalo and Slender 

Sculpin 

6 Mackerel 

7 Sword Fish 

8 Dolphin 

9 Fishing Frog 

10 Pickerel 

11 Flying Fish 

12 Trout 

13 Sea Horse 

14 SweU Fish and Sun Fish 

15 Diodon pilosus 

16 Trunk Fish 

17 Sturgeon 

18 White Shark 

19 Hammer-headed Shark 

20 Saw Fish 

21 White Ray Fish 

22 Angel Fish 

23 Torpedo 

24 Lamprey 

Superior Dissolving 
Views. 

Producing Superb Dis- 
solving Eflrects and Re- 
iuiring the use of two 
anterns. They afford a 
fine opportunity' for the in- 
troduction of popular 
hymns. 

Colored; $1.60 per slide. • 

1 No Cross, No 

Crown. Four 

Slides $3 00 

a Christiana gazing 

over the Sands of 

Time 
b Christiana beholds 

the Cross of Christ 
c Christiana dreams of 

the Beautiiui Shore 
d Christiana is crowned 

bv an Angel of Light 

2 Rock of Ages. 

Four Slides $3 CO 

a An Angry Sea Swal- 
lowing a Wreck 

b The Cross— the Rock 
of Ages— rises above 
the waters 

c Faith Clinging to the 
Cross, is lifted above 
the waves 

d Faith Wings her 
Flight Heavenward 

3 The Way of Sal- 

vation. Four 

Slides $3 00 

a The Repentant Sin- 
ner 
b Knocking at the Gate 
c Led bv Jesus 
d The Sihores of the 
Beautiful Hiver 

4 Origin of the Moss 

Rose. Four Slides 
with Poem $> 00 

5 Angel of Peace. 

Four Slides $] 00 

o The Mother gazes 
fundlv on her Babe 

b The >lother sits be- 
side an Emptv Cra- 
dle 

c A Starry Sky above a 
Sleeimig Citv 

d The Angel of Death 
iK'ars the Child 
Heavenward 



I 



6 Ship at Sea. Five 

Slides $7 50 

a The Ship under fall 

sail 
b A Storm. The Ship is 

wrecked 
c Vivid Flashes of 

Lightning illumine 

the Scene 
d The Crew take to the 

Boats 
e A Brilliant Rainbow 

gradually appears 

7 A SouPs Advent 

upon Earth. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a A Landscape at Mid- 
night 
b The Spirit of a Child 
is borne by Cherubs 
and accompanied by 
an Angel 

8 Angel of Peace. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a The city lies beneath, 
wrapped in slumber, 
and scarcelydiscern- 
able by the light of 
the moon 
b The Angel of Death, 
with outspread 
wings, flies across 
the scene, bearing^ 
the spirit of a child 

9 Mercy's Dream. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a A beautiful woman is 
sleeping beneath a 
widespread tree 
b The vision of an An- 
gel bearing a Crown 
of Li«:ht appears 
above her 

10 Mother's Grave. 

Two Slides $3 00 

o Three Children are 
engaged in placing 
floral tributes upon 
their Mother's Grave 
6 The Mother's Spirit 
descends and hovers 
over them 

11 Beethoven's 

Dream. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a The Great Composer 
has fallen asleep at 
his piano 
6 The Spirit of Music 
floats above him 

12 Orphan's Dream. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Tired of Play, the 

Orphan Boy has 

fallen asleep 
b His Mother^s Spirit 

appears, bending 

lovingly over him 

13 Shipwrecked Mar- 

iners. Two Slides $3 00 
a Two mariners cast 
ui>on a rocky coast, 
discover a ship in the 
distance at day- 
dawn 
b Morning advances, 
and the ship ap- 
])roaches 
U Al)ou Ben Adhem 
Two Slides. With 

Poem $3 00 

a The first appearance 
of the Angel 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



Mcintosh battery and optical cc, Chicago, ill., u. s. a. sii 



b The second appear- 
ance of the Angel 

15 Star of Bethlehem 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Wise Men of the :^a8t 
jonrneying toward 
Jerusalem 
b The Son of Man ap- 
pears in a radiant 
light 

16 The Magic Bou- 

quet. Two Slides.$3 00 
a The Flowers in Bud 
b The Flowers in Full 
Bloom 

17 Falls of Niagara. 

Two Slides ,.$3 00 

a General View of Falls 

in Summer 
b A Beautiful Rainbow 

appears in the mist 

18 Highlander's Dream 

of Home. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a A Highland Soldier 
asleep by his camp 
fire 
b A Vision of Home ap- 
pears above the fire 

19 Birth of Venus. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Flying Cupids an- 
nounce the coming of 
Venus 
6 The beauteous Venus 
is born of the Ocean's 
foam 

20 "Washington's Tomb 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Tomb of Washington, 
at Mount Vernon, on 
the Potomac 
b The Spirit of Wash- 
ington appears with- 
in the Tomb 

21 W a 8 h i n g t o n's 

Dream. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a Falls asleep over his 
war map at Valley 
Forge, Pennsjlvania 
b Beholds a Vision of 
America's future 
prosperity 

22 American Soldiers' 

Dream of Home. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Asleep by the camp 

fire 
b A vision of home ap- 
l)ear8 in the smoke of 
the tire 

23 Napoleon. Two 

Slides $J 00 

a Powerful at the head 

of his army 
b Powerless on the bar- 
ren rock at St. He- 
lena 

24 White and Red 
Roses. Two Slides.$3 00 
a White • Kose, emble- 
matic of i*urity 

b Red Hose and Cupid 
with bow, emblems 
ol Love 

25 The B a c h e 1 o r's 

Keverie. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a The Bachelor in- 
dulges in H twilight 
Reverie 



b A vision of his first 
love appears 

26 Mosque of Omar 

Two Slides $3 00 

a Mosque of Omar. Je- 
rusalem by day 
b The Mosque illumin- 
ated by night 

27 Westmmster Ab- 

bey, London. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a The magnificent Ab- 
bey bv daylight 
b The illuminated Ab- 
bey by moonlight 

28 Storm in the Rocky 

Mountains. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a A lofty peak at mid- 
night. Storm Raging 
b Lightning strikes the 
peak, rending the 
rocks asunder 

29 Faust and Margue- 

rite. Two Slides.. $3 00 
a Faust in his Labora- 
tory tempted by 
Mephistopheles 
b Flames dart from 
Mephistop heles' 
lamp and vision of 
Marguerite appears 

30 Look not upon the 

Wine when it is 
Red. (Very good) 

Two Slides $3 00 

a A Beautiful Girl m 
all the abandon of 
the dance, wine cup 
in hand 
b A Hideous Skeleton 
continues the dance, 
a serpent creeping 
from the cup (Prov- 
erbs xxiii, 31) 

31 Good Morning. 

Two Slides $3 00 

a The Window of a pa- 
latial mansion, with 
shutters closed 
b Shutters fly open and 
reveal a fair face and 
figure 

32 A Dream of Immor- 

tality. Two Slides.$3 00 
a A Beautiful Lady 

lies dreaming uix>n 

a couch 
b Angels place a crown 

upon the sleeper's 

brow 

33 The Pro t e c t i n g 
Scout. Two Slides.$3 00 

a A defenseless woman 
and children attack- 
ed by Indians 

b Appearance of the 
Protecting Scout 

34 The Wood Nymph's 

Bath. Two Slides.$3 00 
o All Embowered Lake 
in the forest, by 
moonlight 
b A Wood Nymph, upon 
a couch of lilies, 
floats upon the wa- 
ters 

35 The Handwriting 

on the Wall. Two 

Slides $3 00 

a Belshazzar in the 
midst of a Baccha- 
nalian Uevel 



b Daniel reads the 
words "Mene, Mene, 
Tekel Upharsin" 

36 The Flight of Au- 

rora and her 
Train. Two 
Slides $3 00 

a A gorgeous mass of 
rosy clouds 

b Aurora followed by 
Apollo and a Host of 
Goddesses. (Remark- 
ably Fine) 

37 The Little Foxes' 

Retreat. Two 
Slides $3 00 

a I'runk of an old hol- 
low tree, in which 
there is a large hole 

b Three saucy^ooking 
little foxes peep out 
of the hole 

38 The S c u 1 p t o r's 

Dream. Five 
Slides. (Immense- 
ly Popular) $5 60 

a Studio. Sculptor muB- 
ing. Richly colored. 
3 in. 
b The Cymbal Player. 

(Statuary) 
c Apollo. (Statuary) 
d Flying Mercury «♦ 
e Flora " 

39 Magic Pictures in 

Artists' Studio 

Four Slides $6 00 

a Empty Frame on 
Easel in Artists' 
Studio 
6 Portrait of U. S. 

Grant 

e Portrait of A. Lincoln 

d Stuart's Portrait of 

Washinj^ton> appear 

successively in the 

frame 

Other suitable pictures 

may be adapted for 

dissolving with frame 

•40 a First Interview be- 
tween Anthony and 
Cleopatra 
b Cleopatra's Galley 
c The Fete at Court of 
Cleopatra 

41 a Warranted Sound 

and Kind 
b The Owner has no 
further use for the 
Horse 

42 a The Love Tap at the 

Window 
b The Summons An- 
swered 

43 a The Puppies' Kennel, 

The Birds' Song 
b The Puppies' Kennel, 
The Puppies Appear 

44 a The Fish Story, The 

Fish 
b The Fish Story, The 
Story 

45 a The P o I i c c m a n's 

Luck, The Soft Snap 
6 T h e P o 1 i c e m a n's 
Luck, The Dead Give 
away 

46 a An E*n viable Position 
b An Unenviable Posi- 
tion 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SLIDES SEE PAGE 127. 



312 McINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U.S. A. 



47 o American Landscape, 

Siininier 
b American Landscape, 
Winter 

48 a The Volunteer's De- 

parture, Civil War 
b The Volunteer's Re- 
turn, Civil War 

49 a Pygmalion and (Jala- 

tea, the Prayer 
b Pygmalion and Gal- 
atea, the Statue Com- 
ing to Life 
c Pygmalion and Gal- 
atea, the Statue Ad- 
vancing 

50 a Christmas Eve in 

Camp 
b Christmas Eve at 
Home 

51 a Courtship for Second 

Wife, the Proposal 
b Courtship for Second 

Wife, Ghost of First 

Wife Appears 
c Courtshii) for Second 

ArVife, Consternation 

52 a Love and Marriage, 

First Meeting 
b Love and Marriage, 

Five Days Later 
c Love and Marriage, 

Five Years Later 

53 a Settlement in Back- 

woo<ls, the Beginning 
b Settlement in Back- 
woods, the Increase 

54 a John Brown Led to 

Execution 
b John Brown Kissing 
Negro Child 

55 Drop Curtain, City of 

Ancient Greece, De- 
signed for an O^iening 
Piece in an Exhibition 

56 Wreath of Flowers, 

with Good Night. 
Suitable for Closing 
an Exhibition 

57 a Life's Day, Morning. 

(Bellows) 
b Life's Day, Noon. 

(Bellows) . 

c Life's Day, Night. 

(Bellows) 

58 a The Christian Graces 

(Ilicks) 
b II Penserosa. (Hicks) 
c L' Allegro (Hicks) 

59 a The Contrabiind 
b The Recruit 

c The Veteran 

60 a Brave Drunnner Boy 

and His Father, Both 
. Enlist in the Union 

Army 
b Brave Drummer Boy 
and His Father, In 
Battle Against the 
Rebels 
c Brave Drummer Boy 
and His Father, Both 
Die Upon the Battle- 
field 

61 a Heathen Chinee, Eu- 

chre 
b Heathen Chinee, the 

Right Bower 
c Heathen C h i n e e. 

Twenty-four Jacks 

62 a Frigid Zone 

b Temperate Zone 
c Torrid Zone 



63 a Heartsease. (Baxter) 
b Lilies. (Baxter) 

c Nora. (Baxter) 

64 a Faith. (Palmer) 
6 Hope. (Palmer) 

c Immortality. (Palm- 
er) 

65 a Study. (Holfeld) 
b Praver. (Holfeld) 

66 M o t he r ' 8 Dream. 

(Brooks) 
b Believer's Mission. 
(Brooks) 

67 a W i f e ' s Prayer. 

(Brooks) 
b Dream of Hope. 
(Brooks) 

68 a Aurora. (Hamon) 

b Feeding the Bird, 
(llamcm) 

69 a Beatrice Cenci. (Be- 

ranger) 
b Evangeline. (Beran- 
ger) 

70 a The Luncheon. (Bro- 

chart) 
b The Good Friends. 
(Brochart) 

71 a Alexander and Diog- 

enes. (Land seer) 
b JackinOrtlce. (Land- 
seer) 

72 a Distinguished Mem- 

ber of the Humane 
Society. (Bateman) 
b Nothing Venture, 
Nothing Have. (Bate- 
man) 

73 a Lily of Ghent. (Ab- 

solon) 
b Water Lilies. (Bou- 
vier) 

74 a Cinderella.(Lejeune) 
b Blue Bird. (Lejeune'i 

75 a Mamma's Birthday. 

(Dobson) 
b Remembrance. .(Dob- 
son) 

76 a The Abduction. (Bar- 

rias) 
6 Vengeance. (Vernet) 

77 a The Lake. (Broch- 

art) 
b The Glacier. (Broch- 
art.) Very Choice 

78 a Cattle at Watering 

Place. (R. Bonheur) 
b Sheep in Pasture. (R. 
Bonheur) 

79 a The Mother's Joy. 

(Amberg) 
b The Widow's Com- 
fort. (Amberg) 

80 a ISIorning Prayer. 

(Meyer von Bremen) 

b Evening P r a y e r. 

(Meyer von Brehien) 

81 a Satiirday Night. (Ab- 

solon) 
b Sunday Morning. 

(Absolon) 

82 a Going to the (Mub 

b Returning from the 
V\\\h 

83 a Going Against the 

Stream. (Jenkins) 
b Going With the 
Stream, f Jenkins) 

84 a High Life. (i.and- 

seer) 
b Low Life.( Landseer) 
8.5 a Aspirinu: to Heaven, 
(/.ubev \\v\\\\eY^ 



6 Regretting the Earth. 
(Zuber Buhler) 

86 The Temi>erance Meet- 

ing. (Iierring) 
h The Friendly MeaL 
(Herrinj?) 

87 a My First Sermon. 

(Millais) 
6 My Second Sermon. 
(Alillais) 

88 a By the Seaside. (Bro- 

chart) 
b Near the Falls. -(Bro- 
chart) 

89 a Joy 

6 Sorrow 

90 Fairy Tales 

b Reading the Psalms 

91 a The Evening Prayer. 

(t'rere) 
6 The Morning Kiss. 
(Frere) 

92 a The Quay at Liver- 

pool, (jutward Bound 
h The Dock at Boston. 

i Comic.) Homeward 
iound 

93 a Castle of Chillon. 

Lake Geneva, Swit- 
zerland. Dav 
b Castle of * Chillon, 
Moonlight, Winter 

94 a Windsor Castle, Day 
h Windsor Castle, 

Moonlight 

95 a Castle of Drachenf els 

Summer 
h Castle of Drachenf els 
Winter Night 

96 a Castle of Ehrenfels 

on Rhine. Summer 
b Castle of Ehrenfels 
on Rhine, Winter 

97 a Conway Castle, En- 

gland, Day 
b Conway Castle, En- 
gland, Moonlight 

98 a Isola Bella, Italy, 

Day 
b Isola Bella, Italy, 
Moonlight 

99 a Grace Before Meat 
6 Grace After Meat 

100 a Death-Bed of the 

Righteous, John Wes- 
ley Praying 
b Death -Bed of the 
Wicked, Cardinal 
Richelieu Playing 
Cards 

101 a Abel's Sacrifice Re- 

ceived 
b Cain's Sacrifice Re- 
jected 

102 a Noah Building the 

ArK 
b Noah Receiving Ad- 
vice from Al)ove 

103 a Noah's Sacrifice 

6 Noah's Sacrifice, Ap- 
pearance of the Rain- 
how 

104 a The Witch of Endor 

Visited by Saul 
b The Witch of Endor 
Raising Samuel 

105 a Flowers, Dahlias and 

Roses 
6 Flowers, Asters and 
Poppies 

106 a Fruits, Grapes 

b t'vuits. Currants 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOtS S^^ PkG.£. \^1. 



Mcintosh battery and optical co., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. sis 



107 a Before the Proclama- 

tion, a Sad Negro Face 
b Alter the Proclama- 
tion, a Merry Negro 

108 a Good Night in Wreath 

of Flowers 
b Good Night in Moon- 
lit Skv 

109 a English Landscape, 

Tempest, Lightning 
b English Landscape, 
Rainbow 

110 a Death of Sardanapa- 

his (Schopin) 
b Socrates instructing 
Alcibiades (Schopin) 

111 Salisbury Cathedral, 

England, Two 
Slidfes $3 00 

a The beautiful Cathe- 
dral by day 

b The illuminated Ca- 
thedral by moonlight 

112 Wm. Jackson's Treat 

1 More Champagne 

2 Bourbon again 

3 I'mBillJackson.Guv. 

4 Bill's Last Treat 

113 Visit of St. Nicholas 

1 Children in Bed 

2 Sleigh and Reindeer 

3 Looked like a Peddler 

4 Merrv Xmas Good 

Night 

114 Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 

1 In the Prison Cell 

2 Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 

115 Heaven and Hell 
a Heaven 

b Hell 

116 Hovering Angels 

1 The Cherubs 

2 The Child Asleep 

117 Steamship City of Chi- 

cago 

1 Day 

2 Moonlight 

118 St. Peters and Castle of 

St. Angelo 

1 Day 

2 Night 

119 Fops of Past and Pres- 

ent 
a Pre -Historic Fop 
b Modern Fop 

120 Steamboat Race on the 

Mississippi 
a Wooding up 
b The Start 
c The Explosion 

121 Summit of Happiness 

and Depth of Despair 
a The Summit 
b The Dei)th 

122 War and Peace (Land- 

seer) 
a War 
b Peace 

123 The III- Fated Ship 

1 Leaving Port 

2 Sailing with Fair 

Wind 

3 Among the Icebergs 

4 On the Lee Shore 

5 On Fire 

6 Crew Saved by Boats 

124 The Last Voyage of 

Ocean Steamer 

1 Ocean Steamer, leav- 

ing port 

2 Ocean Steamer in Mid 

Ocean 



3 Ocean Steamer on 

Lee Shore 

4 Ocean Steamer on 

Fire 

125 Day and Night 
a Day 

b Night 

126 Brooklyn Bridge 
a Day 

b Moonlight 

127 Fire in New York ' 
a The Alarm 

b The Engines at Work 

128 A Raid on the Moon- 

shiners (Beale) 
a Throw up Your 

Hands 
b We Weaken 

129 The Martyred Chris- 

tian 
a The Vi -tim 
b The Apotheosis 

130 Cause and Effect 

a Rowing with the 

Tide 
b Rowing against the 

Tide 

131 Temptation and Perdi- 

tion 
a Temptation 
b Perdition 

132 Home Sweet Home 

1 Be it ever so humble 

2 An exile from Home 

3 How sweet 'tis to sit 
,4 To thee I'll return 

133 Christmas Evening 
a Homeless 

b The Happv Home 

134 The Chariot Race(Scho- 

pin) 
a The Departure 
b The Triumph 

135 Good Night 

a Sleeping Children in 
Baby Carriage 

b Woi*ds Good Night 
dissolved into Cano- 
py 

136 Little Peach 

1 Expectation 

2 Realization 

3 Termination 

137 A Village Church 
a Summer 

b Christmas Eve 

138 The Nile Boat 
a Day 

b Sunset 
c Moonlight 

139 Fort Sumter 
a Daylight 

b Moonlight 

c The Bombardment 

140 Colosseum's Martyrs 

Day (Gue) 
Night (Dore) 

141 Bay of Naples and Mt. 

\ esuvius 
a Day 
b Moonlight 

142 Christus Consolatorand 

Remunerator 
a Consolator 
b Remunerator 

143 Ruins at Philae 

1 Day 

2 Sunset 

3 Moonlight 

144 Ruins at Kardassy 

1 Day 

2 Sunset 

3 Moonlight 



145 Approaching Steamship 

1 Sails Furled 

2 Sails Unfurled 

146 Leap for Life 

1 There stood the boy 

with dizzy brain 

2 Then suddenly a rifle 

grasped 

3 Jump, Jump, Boy 

4 He sank. He Rose, He 

lived 

5 His father drew in 

Silent Joy 

147 Vovage of Life 

1 Cliifdhood 

2 Youth 

3 Manhood 

4 Old Age 

148 London Tower 
a Day 

b On Fire 
1^ Finding of Moses 
a By Titian 

6 By Mark Twain 

150 Scenes from Life of 

Country Boy 
a Leaving Home 
b Temptation and Fall 
c Farther on, Gambling 
d At last the Forged 

Check 

151 School Boy's First 

Cigar 
a Very Manly 
b ♦« Sick 

152 The Em and Immigrant 
a Quay at Liverpool 

b Dock at Boston 

153 Jerusalem, The Rise 

and Fall 
a Jerusalem in Her 

Grandeur 
b Jerusalem in Her 

Decay 

154 How Jones Became a 

Mason 
a Starting for Lodge 
b Oath of Secrecy 
c Riding the Goat 
d Jones has become a 
Mason 

155 Black -berries 

a B u n c h of Black. 

berries 
b Negro Heads 

156 First Christmas Morn- 

ing 
a Shepherd's Watch, 
Angels Appear 

157 A Dream of the Warder 

of the Tower 
a The Warder 
b Procession of Prin. 
cesses 

158 Nearer My God to Thee 
A series of 6 slides 

1 Nearer to Thee 

2 Clearing the Sky 

3 Angels to Beckon Me 

4 E'en tho' it be across 

5 My Rest a Stone 

6 Steps unto Heaven 

159 The Artist's Dream. 
New Design, Price, set 
seven (7) slides.. $10 50 

By special ari-angement 
witn a prominent Chi- 
cago artist, we have 
obtained an interior 
view of his studio, with 
an artist seated in a 
reverie before a large 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUOES S^^ ^Wk^ \*« 



314 Mcintosh battery and optical co.. Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



vacant picture frame 
on an easel, as shown 
in slide. 
No. 1— The Artist in a 

Reverie. 
In the vacant frame are 

caused to appear : 
No. a-Childhood. 
No. JJ— Companions. 
No. 4— Lovers. 
No. 6— The Honeymoon. 
\ No. 6— His flrst success- 
ful picture. 
No. 7— The supreme ef- 
fort of his life. 
This is first-class. Other 
designs in preparation. 
160 Parable of the Sower 
a Behold a Sower 
b Some Seeds Fell by 

the Wavside 
c Some Fell on Stony 

Places 
d Some Fell Among 

Thorns i 

e Others Fell into Good , 

Ground 
/And Brought Forth 
Fruit, etc 
181 Where Is My Boy To- 
night ? 

1 The Bov of My Ten- 
derest Care 

2 As he Knelt at his 
Mother's Knee 

3 Oh, Could I See You 
Now My Boy 

4 But Bring llira to me 
with all His Blight 

5 Oh, Where Is My Boy 
To-night? 

6 My Heart O'erflows 
for I Love Him he 
Knows 

162 Way Down Upon de 
Swanee Ribber 

1 Far, Far Away 

2 Der's Where My 
Heart 

3 All Up and Down 

4 All the World am 
Sad and Dreary 

5 All Round the Little 
Farm 

6 Wheu I was Playing 

7 One little Hut among 
de Bushes 

8 Wheu Will I Hear the 
Bees Ahummin' 

Dissolvini; Views with 
Magruiiflcent Movablee 
flVects. 

Two Lanterns are Required 

for the Exhibition of these 

Slides. 

1 Water-mill in 

P e n n sylvania. 

Four Slides $10 00 

cr A summer day; the 

water-wheel in motion 
b The moon rises and 

jn'odiices a ri])])ling 

efftM't on the water 
c The mill in winter; 

the ground covt*red 

with snow 
d Snow storm; the 

white flukes fall thick 

and fast 
3 F o r t S u m t e r, 

Clmrlestoi) Har- 
bor. Four SlUles $7 ."50 
'^Jw Fort by daylight 

time of peace I 



6 The Fort by moon- 
light in time of peace 

c On fire during bom. 
bardment 

d Fire and smoke curl 
upward from the Fort 

3 Bay of Naples and 

Mount Vesuvl- 

us. Three Slides $6 00 
a Grand itanorama by 

daylight 
b Night; the mountain 

in eruption 
c Fire and smoke rise 

from the burning 

crater 

4 Castle of St. An. 

gelo and Church 

of St. Peter, 

Rome. Three • 

Slides $6 00 I 

a The Church and Cas- ■ 

tie by daylight i 

b Gorgeous illuraina. j 

tion on Easter night i 
c Fireworks fiy' 

through the heavens 

5 Life near the 

North Pole. 
Three Slides $6 00 

a The Arctic regions 
bvday 

b Night among the ice- 
bergs 

c Brilliant Aurora Bo- 
realis flashes upward 
in the northern sky 

6 Mount it^tna, Island 

of Sicily. 

Three Slides $6 00 

a The great Mountain 

by day 
b V olcanic eruption 

night 
c Fire and smoke pour 

from the flaming cone 

7 M a g i c i a n and 

Caldron. Two 
Slides $3 50 

a A weiixl incantation 
scene. A magician is I 
standing within his I 
cave, waving a wand j 
over a bubbling cal- 1 
dron I 

b Ghosts, witches, 
imps, gnomes, etc., 
fly from the caldron 

8 Naiad Queen of 

the Kivev Rhine. 
Two Slides $4 00 

a Moonbeams glisten 
on the Khine, upon 
whose shore a castle 
rises in frowning out- 
line 

b The Naiad Queen ap- 
pears seated upon her 
throne of shell, and 
glides over the wa- 
ters playing her won- 
derful harp 

9 Express Train $4 00 

a A railroad bridge by 

moonlight with a for. 
est in the background 
b A locomotive and 
train of cars dash by, 
the headlight and 
sikirks making a bril- 
liant effect 
10 The Serenade Vw 
Venice. T w o 
Slides %V W 



a Gi-and Canal by 
moonlight. Castle in 
the foreground 

b A Venetian cavalier 
approaches in a gou'- 
dola and sings before 
the castle. A ladv 
appears upon the bal- 
cony above him 

11 Steamer Leaving 

Port. Two 

Slides $4 00 

a A vast harbor, and 

city in the distance 
b A steamer glides 

across the harbor and 

puts to sea 

12 Fire in Philadel- 

phia. Two Slides $4 00 
a Street by night. Fire 

over the housetops. 

The alarm 
b A steam fire engine 

dashes by, drawn by 

two prancing horses 
IS Lakes of KiUar- 

ney, Ireland. 

Two Slides $4 50 

a Angels fold their 

wings, and rest 

In tnat Eden of the 

west. 
Beauty's Home, Kil- 
larney 
b Moon rises, and the 

waters ripple 

14 Martyred Chris- 

tian. Two Slides $4 50 
a The body of a beauti. 
f ul woman floats upon 
the moonlit waters 
b Her spirit is borne up- 
ward by angels. 
(Beautiful effect.) 

15 Magic Lily. Two 

Slides $4 00 

a The beautiful lily of 

the East, the home of 

fairies 
b A fairy with a golden 

wand rises from the 

bosom of the lily 

16 Haunted Abbey. 

2 Slides $4 00 

a Tomb in the ruins of 

an old English abbey 
b A ghost rises from the 

tomb 

17 The Skeleton 

Dance in KirR 
Alloway. Two 
Slides $5 50 

a Ruins of Kirk Alio- 
wav, Scotland, sc«ne 
of *Tam O'Shanter's 
vision 

b A skeleton executes a 
fantastic dance 
among the ruins 
IS Water-mill in the 
Alps. Two 
Slides $5 25 

a Summer in the Alps; 
revolving water- 
wheel 

b Winter; snow clad 
mountains; wheel 
frozen fast 

19 Ilolhind Wind-mill 

Two Slides $5 25 

a A Dutch wind-mill 

by moonlight 
b V^vv^-Vv^VX.*, \.>Rft tKwa of 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES SEE PKQ^E \^1 



Mcintosh battery and optical cc, Chicago, ill., tJ. s. a. sis 



MECHANICAL SLIDES. 



Subdivided in Accordance with the Style of Movement. 



VKBTICAL, LEVER, AND SLLDINO MOVEMIBNTS. 



20 Mechanical Ascension 

Set— two slides— to be 
used in dissolving lan- 
terns only ; slides are 
four inches wide. In 
this slide the Disciples 
appear on one slide and 
the moving figure of 
(Christ on the second 
slide, which is actu- 
ated by a rack-work 
movement. Price, $3 00 

21 Mechanical Ascension 

Slide, lever movement; 
can be used in single 
lantern having slide 
box 4 inches wide. In 
this slide the figure of 
Christ disappears in 
the clouds. 
Price $3 60 

22 Vertical Rack - Work 

Ascension Slide (im- 
proved movement). 
Price $8 60 

23 Horizontal Rack- Work 

Ascension Slide. Can 
be used in any lantern 
having a slide box 4 
inches wide or over. 
Price $5 50 

24 Glass Tank for Exhi- 
, bition of Live Insects, 

etc $2 00 

25 Mechanical Lightning 

Slide $1 00 

26 Mechanical Moon Efl'ect 

— Kack - Work — Moon 
rising in arc of circle ; 
can be easily adjusted 
to suit almost any slide 
Price ^2 00 

27 Mechanical Moon. Ver- 

tical curtain move- 
ment. Price $150 

28 Mechanical Curtain Ef- 

fect. The frame ot 
this slide permits of 
the use of various de- 
signs. In fact, any 
31^x4 slide can be used 
with it. Price of frame 

and one design $3 25 

Extra colored designs, 
each $1 25 

29 Falling Snow Effect. 

Price $1 50 

30 Assassination of Lin- 

coln $3 50 

31 Good-Night in Wreath. 

Price $2 75 

32 GirlJumpingKope, 3 50 

33 Moving Ship 7 00 

Revolving Movements. 

34 Dancing Skeleton $4 00 

35 Castle - o n - L a k e 

Maggiore 3 50 

36 Bombardme n t of 

Fort Sumter 3 00 

37 Bombardme n t of 

Fort Sumter, 
with Flash 4 00 



38 View of Old Ruins 3 50 

39 Holland Windmill 3 00 

40 Fountain 3 26 

41 Newton's Disk 5 60 

42 Ratcatcher 3 26 

43 Mount Vesuvius.. 3 00 

44 Rotation of Earth 

on its Axis 4 00 

45 Rotunditv of Earth 4 00 

46 Dancing Sailor 4 00 

47 Swiss Water Mill.. 3 00 

48 Aquarium 3 50 

49 Bee Hive 3 50 

50 Gymnast Perform- 

ing on Trapeze.. 3 75 

51 Man Climbing a Lad- 

der 6 00 

52 Fire and Smoke, 

Effect for Fort 
Sumter 3 00 

63 Fire and Smoke Ef- 
fect for Naples 
and Vesuvius... 3 00 

54 Fireworks Effect 
for S t. Ange lo and 
St. Peters 3 00 

66 Auroi'a Borealis, 

Eftect for North 

Pole 3 00 

56 Fire and Smoke Ef. 

feet for Mt.^tna 3 00 

67 Smoke Eff'ect for 

Christmas Eve... 3 00 

58 Zoetroi)e, or Wheel 

of Life. A very 
interesting slide, 
representing ' fig- 
ures with life- 
like movements. 
The following 
are all used in the 
one frame and ac- 
company it: 1. 
Man climbing 
ladder. 2. Man 
jumping out of 
bottle. 3. The 
handspring. 4. 
Fish swimming. 
5. Swinging the 
club. 6. Cats and 

rats 6 60 

Extra designs, 

each 50 

£ X tra designs, 
per dozen 5 00 

59 Cycloidotrope $10 00 

Colored Glasses for 
Cycloidotrope. This is 
something new, which 
admits oi the tracing 
of the design in one 
color or two if desired. 
In the latter -case the 
design is first traced on 
one side, and then the 
glass reversed, and an- 
other design traced on 
the other side, making 
the designs appear in 
two difterent colors. 
Price per dozen, single 
colors, assorted.. ..$ .75 
Price per dozen, two 



colors, assorted... $1 00 

60 Mechanic^il Performing 

Monkey. This slide is 
of improved tnechan- 
ical construction, and 
provides an easy ad- 
Justment for controll- 
ing the movement. 
Price $3 00 

61 WindmiU in Sweden, 

patent rack -work, 2- 
glass ............. .^i) uu 

This is photographed 
from a large old mill 
not tar from Stock- 
holm, in Sweden. The 
sails are immense, 
reaching nearly to the 
ground as they slowly 
revolve. A very fine 
slide. 

Chromatropes. ' 

62 Improved Geometrical 

Chromatropes. These 
are improved photo- 
graph ctiromatropes in 
our best quality pat- 
ented frame. We be- 
lieve these are the best 
chromatropes that have 
ever been made. Price 
each $3 00 

63 Improved Geometrical 

Interchangeable Chro- 
matropes. Frame as de- 
scribed above with 
twelve (12) glasses, as- 
sorted designs.. ..$10 00 

64 Design Chromatrope — 

3-glass — consisting of 
central landscape or 
portrait, encircled by 
chromatic designs. 
Best qualitv, each, $3 60 
List of designs for 
these are as follows: 

65 Washington $3 50 

66 Lincoln 3 50 

67 Grant. 3 60 

68 Garfield 3 50 

69 American Flag 3 60 

70 Welcome 3 60 

71 Intermission 3 50 

72 Goodnight 3 50 

73 Windmill 3 50 

74 Watermill 3 60 

Any motto not exceedin 

four words can be supplie 
to order at an additional 
expense of $1.00 

Dioramic and Panoramic 
Sliding Movement. 

75 Israelites Crossing 

the Red Sea $4 00 

76 Noah Entering the 

Ark 4 00 

New Panorama Slides. 

77 Jerusalem in her 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUO€.S S^^ ^Wk^ X*^"! 



316 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 



78 Jerusalem in her 

Decay 6 00 

79 Washiugton Cross 

iiig the Delaware 6 00 

80 The Prodigal Son.. 6 00 

Rack- Work Panoramic 
Slides. 

This new form of slide 
makes possible the perfect 
exhibition of eflFects with 
long moving glass, which, 
with other forms hereto- 
fore tried, have generally 
resulted in failure, 
through lack of the proper 
mechanical movement. 
Our improved form con- 
sists of a handsomely fin- 
ished frame about 12 in. 
long by 4in.wide. Motion is 
conveyed to the long glass 
by a shaft and train of 
gears actuated by a crank 
on the outer face of the 
frame; the movement is 
smooth and graceful, so 
that boats or cars or clouds 
or whatever may move 
alon^ on the glass with 
continuous regularity. 

The following are some 
of the efl'ects : 

81 Flight of Aurora. .$12 00 

82 Flight of a Soul ... 12 00 

83 NewYork City and 

Hudson River by 
Day.Coney Island 
Steamer pass ng.. 12 00 

84 Same bv Night,Cit7 

and t)oat illumi- 
nated 12 00 

85 Grand Canal, Ven- 

ice — Gondolas 
passing (day) 12 00 

86 Same, Moonlight 

scene 12 00 

87 Train of cars pass- 

ing over Bridge, 
Night Scene, train 
illuminated and 
sparks flying from 
Engine 12 00 

88 SwanBoats moving 12 00 
Scene, Central Park, N. 

Y. The boats are photo- 
graphs of the famous boats 
so well patronized, espe- 
cially by children. 

Meclianical and DIhsoIv- 
ing Slides in Sets. 

Photographs all colored, 
requiring a dissolving 
stereopticon for display. 

89 Grand Canal, Venice. 

Price, set 3 slide s,$ 13 00 
Day view dissolves into 
Night view, buildings 
illuuiinated. (While 
No. 2 is on screen No. 1 
should be removed and 
No. 3 put in its place.) 
No. 3. Gondolas appear 
and glide alonj?. (Hack- 
work panoramic.) 

90 Train of Cars. Price, 

set 2 slides $11 50 

No. 1— Picturescjue View 

of Arched Bridge. 
yo. 2— Train of Cars. 
(Hack-work panoramic) j 



91 Swan Boats on Lake, 

Central Park, N. Y. 
Price of set of two 
slides $11 50 

No. 1— View of Lake in 

Park 
No. 2 — Swan Boats glide 

by. (Rack -work pano. 

ramie) 

92 New York and Hudson 

River. Price of set 3 
slides $13 00 

No. 1— New York City, 
West Side, River Front 
by day, dissolves into 

No. 2^Same View by 
Moonlight, City lighted 

No. 3— Rack -work pano- 
ramic. Coney Island 
Steamboat passes 
lighted while No. 2 is 
on the screen 

93 St. Angelo's and St. 

Peter's, Rome. Price, 
per set 3 slides $5 00 

No. 1— View of Rome, St. 
Angelo and Dome of St. 
Peter's prominent, day 
light, dissolving into 

No. 2 — Same View by 
Night, City lighted 

No. 3— Mechanical Rack- 
work Fireworks from 
Tower of St. Angelo 

94 Holland Windmill. New 

design. Price per set 
of two slides $4 50 

No. 1— Day Scene, sails 
revolving (mechanical), 
dissolves into 

No. 2— Moonlight View of 
Mill, sails at rest, win- 
dows lighted 

95 Windmill. Fine new 

design. Price, set of 3 

slides $7 50 

No. 1— Day View, sails 
revolving, dissolves 
into 
No. 2— Night View- 
No. 3 — Moon rises and 
water ripples. (Me- 
chanical.) 

96 Watermill. New de- 

sign (fine). Price per 
set of 5 slides $10 60 

No. 1— Mechanical— Sum- 
mer Scene by Day, 
Wheel in motion. 

No. 2— Night approaches, 
wheel stops. M o o n 
rises, water ripples 
(mechanical). 

No. 4— Moonlight, winter 
scene. 

No. .5 — Mechanical Snow 
Effects. 

No. 3— Winter Scene, 
wheel frozen, dissolves 
into No. 4. 

97 Brooklyn Bridge. Price 

per set 3 slides $6 00 

No. 1— Bridge by Day, 

dissolves into 
No. 2— Bridge by Night 
No. 3— (M e c h a n i c a 1) 
Moon rises and lights 
appear on bridge, on 
boats and in City. 

98 The Witch's Caldron. 

Price per set two 
slides ^SOO 



No. 1— (Mechanical.) Old 
Woman standing by 
boiling caldron raises 
her arm- 
No. 2— imps come out of 
caldron in a cloud of 
smoke. 

99 Flight from Pompeii- 

Two slides, one me- 
chanical showing smoke 
and lava— price of set 
$ 350 

Meclianical Slides. 

100 Lever Slide and 

Panorama of 
Ships. The ships 
are seen through 
the portholes in 
the ciibin, which 
is all in motion. 
Man seen in berth 
sick. Two Slides. 
Very effective. .$11 50 

101 Bear Hunt. View 

in Arctic regions. 
Moon plays on 
the water and 
disappears. Bear 
comes on rock. 
Boat sails up. 
Men fire. Bear 
falls on ice. Two 
slides. Five ef- 

102 Vision of the Gold- 

en Candlestick 
and Angel . Two 

103 Refraction of Light 

in the Polar Seas. 
Spectral ships. 
New 7 5a 

104 Spider '8 Web. Fash- 

ionably dressed 
young lady in the 
center, around 
whom a number 
of admirers re- 
volve. Two Rack - 
work slides 13 50 

105 Panoramic Slide 

View. Straits of 
Dover with Cal- 
ais-Douvres 
steaming past.... 7 50 

106 Panoramic Slide 

View. Mid-At. 
I a n t i c, mail 
steamer Britan- 
nic,steaming i>ast 7 50 

107 Harpooning the 

Whale. Effect, 
smashing the boat 

Two slides 9 50 

103 The Mail Steamer 
Arizona, Striking 
the Iceberg(mov- 
able). Two slideslO 50 

109 Water Wheel.Sum- 

mer view. Wheel 
turning. Winter 
Effects of Moon 
playing on the 
water, and Swan 
with moving 
head. Four slidesl9 50 

110 Windmill, saUs in 

motion. Summer 
and winter. Two 
slides 10 50 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUDES S€.€. P^G.£. \21. 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., u. s. a. 317 



111 The Magic Foun- 

tain, rack effect 
of water play- 
ing. Two Slides 10 50 

112 Fishing, a bite,and 

comical effects. 
Two slides 6 50 

113 A Child's Dream of 

Christmas. Two 
slides 7 60 

114 The Kaleidscope. 2 50 

Natural Clouds. 

Plain slides 60 cents each. 
Colored and wood-mounted, 
three-inch circle^ fl.60 each. 
These may be used with sin- 
ffle or dissolving lantern, 
mUkprcdmce beautiful effects 
mW^ oHUr plain photo- 

^ Sosrlse 
t Sunset 

t BTMfkingaway 
4 Broken Sky 
b Flecked Sky 
• Thunder Storm 

Water. 

f Shores of Old England 
f Blorm at Sea 
>J All that was left of the 

Homeward Bound 
4 lOagarn Falls 



5 Rapids, Niagara 

Cloud and Water. 

1 Sea Gull's Rock 

2 Venetian Boating Scene 

3 Ship on Fire at Sea 

4 Shipwrecked Mariners 

Snow and loe. 

1 A Winter Landscape 

2 Icicles at Niagara 

3 Glacier in the Alps 

4 Minnehaha Falls 

5 Mt. Washington 

l>otheboy*8 Hall. 

By Charles Dickens. (Life.) 

12 slides with reading, 
$3.00. 

1 "This is two penn'orth 

of Milk, is it Wait- 
er?" 

2 "Number one may 

take a Drink " 

3 "Now, Nickleby, come 

tumble out, will 
you?" 

4 "There, this is our 

8*10 p, Nickleby!" 

5 "Here, you Smike; 

takeaway now, look 
sharp!" 

6 Mr. Squeers called up 

the first class 



7 "Mrs. Squeers, my 

dear, will vou take 
the money?" 

8 He encountered the 

upturned face of 
Smike 

9 Squeers caught the 

Boy firmly in his 
grip 

10 "Wretch! touch him 

at your peril " 

11 Nicholas beat the Ruf- 

fian till he roared 
for mercy 

12 "Will you shake 

hands?" 

The l>eath of Paul Dom- 
bey. 

By Charles Dickens (Life) 

6 slides with reading, >, 
$3.00 

1 He told Floy of his 

Dream 

2 Voices asked softly 

how he was 

3 He was visited by 

three grave Doc- 
tors 

4 "Floy," he said," What 

IS that?" 

5 Her own poor blighted 

child 

6 "The Light is shining 

on me as I go!" 



Neslie*s Sacred 
History. 

1 The Earth without form 

and void 
H Waters gathered in one 

glace, dry laud appears 
e Earth yields grass 
and fruit trees 
4 God places two great 

liffhts, and stars also 
6 Goa creates the fowl 
and fish 

6 God creates cattle, 

creeping things and 
beasts 

7 God creates man and 

gives dominion 

8 God forms woman from 

the rib of man 

9 The woman , being 

tempted, eats 

10 The woman accuses the 

Serpent of beguiling 
her 

11 God drives Adam and 

Eve from the garden 

12 Adam. Eve, Cain and 

Abel, the first human 
family 

13 Cain's offering rejected 

14 Cain kills his brother 

Abel 

15 The Curse of Cain 

16 Cainbuilds the first City 

17 The Three Tribes de- 

scended from Cain 

18 The Wickedness of 

Mankind before the 
• Flood 

19 God Commands Noah to 

build the Ark 

20 The fiood destroying 

man and beast 



21 Interior of Ark, Nqah 

and family surround- 
ed by animals 

22 The dove coming to 

Noah with the olive 
branch 

23 Noah's sacrifice 

24 Scattering of the tribes 

from Ba nylon 

25 Destruction of the cit- 

ies of the plain 

26 Jacob's dream 

27 The dreams of Joseph 

28 Joseph thrown into the 

well 

29 Joseph sold by his 

brethren to the Midi- 
anites 

30 Joseph's bloody coat 

shown to Jacob 

31 Joseph interprets the 

dreams of the butler 
and baker 

32 Joseph interprets Phar- 

aoh's dream 

33 Joseph raised to honor 

by Pharoah 

34 The cup found in Ben- 

jamin^s sack 

35 Simeon detained by 

Joseph 

36 Joseph makes himself 

known to his brethren 

37 Joseph meets his father 

in Goshen 

38 Jacob blesses his twelve 

sons 

39 The Angel of the Lord 

appears to Moses 

40 Phai*aoh and his hosts 

drowned in the Red 
sea 

41 Moses strikes the rock 

at Rhephidim 



^ Moses receives tablets 
at Mount Sinai 

43 Moses delivering the 

law to the people 

44 The golden calf 

45 Falling down of the 

walls of Jericho 

46 Gideon defeats the Mid- 

ianites with lamps and 
trumpets 

47 Samson and the lion 

48 Samson killing thePhil- 

istines with the jaw- 
bone of an ass 

49 Samson betrayed by De- 

lilah 
60 Samson grinds corn in 
the prison house 

51 Samson destroying the 

temple 

52 David slaying Goliah 

53 The raising of Samuel 

by the witch of Endor 

54 Absalom entangled in 

the oak 

55 Elijah ascending to 

Heaven in the pres- 
ence of Elisha 

56 David bringing the Ark 

from Kir^artn-Fearim 

57 Children in fiery fur- 

nace 

58 Daniel in the lion's den 

59 Jonah cast into the sea 

60 Jeremiah weeping over 

Jerusalem 

Overbeck's Gospel Illus- 
trations. 

1 The Annunciation to 

Mary. 

2 The salutation of 

Elizabeth to M^vt-^ 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SL\0€.S S^^ ^P^O.^ N'Js:! 



SIS MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO.. CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



3 The naming of John 

the Baptist 

4 The birth of Christ 

5 The presentation of 

Jesus in the temple 

6 The offering of the 

Wise Men 

7 The flight into Egypt ' 

advised bv an angel 

8 The slaughter of the : 

innocents , 

9 Jesus in the workshop 

of Joseph 
H) Jesus in the temple 

11 John baptizes Jesus 

12 The wedding at Cana, . 

water made wine 

13 Jesus healing the sick ' 
U The calling of Mat- : 

thew ' 

15 Jesus* feet annointed 

by a sinner 

16 Jesus preaching from 

a ship 

17 Parable of the good 

seed and the cockle 

18 Who is the greatest in 

the Kingdom of 
Heaven 

19 Jesus in the house of 

Mary and Martha 
90 The return of the 
prodigal son 

21 Christ raises Lazarus 

22 Christ entering Jeru- 

salem 

23 Jesus speaks against 

the Pharisees 

24 The five wise and the 

five foolish virgins 

25 Christ washing the 

feet of His disciples 

26 John leaning on Jesus' 

bosom 

27 The Apostles asleep 

28 Christ Dound and lea to 

judgment 

29 Christ thrice denied bv 

Peter 

30 Herod and Pilate made 

friends 

31 Barrabas released and 

Jesus delivered to be 
crucified 

32 Christ scourged 

33 Behold the man (Ecce 

Homo) 

34 Christ beaiing the 

cross 

35 The crucifixion of 

Christ 

36 The burial oi Christ 



37 The resurrection of 

Christ 

38 Christ appears to 

Thomas 

39 Christ commending 

His flock to Peter 

40 The ascension of 

Christ 

Life of Oar Savior. 

Second Series. 

BY GEORGE HAHX. 

1 The good shepherd 

2 The prodigal son's re- 

turn 

3 Poor widow's mite 

4 The good Samaritan 

5 I am the vine 

6 Parable of the sower 

7 Wise and foolish 

virgins 

8 Christ and woman of 

Samaria 

9 In My Father's Home 

10 Cup of cold water 

11 I am with vou alwavs 

12 Stabat Mater * i 

I 

Raphaers Frescoes in 
Vatican. 

1 School of Athens i 

2 Last supper discussed ! 

by fatners of church j 

3 The church robber, . 

Heliodor driven from i 
temple 

4 The Apostols Peter ! 

and Paul appearing j 
to Attila, King ol 
Huns 

5 The Parnassus 

6 Bui-ning castle of 

Rome 

7 The miracle at the 

Mass of Bologna 

8 St. Paul released 

Stations of tl&e Cross. 

1 Jesus condemned to 

death 

2 Jesus is laden with i 

the cross 

3 Jesus falls the flrst 

time under the 
weight of cross 

4 Jesus meets His 

mother 

5 Jesus helped by the 

Cvrenian to carry 
His cross 



6 Veronica wipes the 

face of Jesus. 

7 Jesus falls beneath the 

cross the second 
time 

8 Jesus consoles the 

women of Jemsalem 

9 Jesus falls beneath Hia 

cross the thiM time 
H) Jesus is stripped and 

given gall to drink 
U Jesus is nailed to the 

cross 

12 Jesus is raised on the 

cross and dies 

13 Jesus is taken dowA 

from the cross 

14 Jesus laid in the holy 

sepulchre 

Old Testament Scenes. 

With Beading. 

1 The Temptation of 

Adam 

2 The fall of man 

3 The deluge 

4 Abraham sends Hagar 

away 

5 Hagar and Islunael in 

desert 

6 Abraham's sacrifice 

7 Jacob in House of 

Laban 

8 Joseph's brothers dip- 

Sing his coat in goat^s 
lood 

9 Joseph interprets 

Pharaoh's dream 

10 Joseph raised to honor 

by Fharaoh 

11 Moses before Pharaoh 

12 The Destroying Angel 

13 Moses strikes the rock 

14 The golden calf 

15 Moses and the brazen 

serpent 

16 Boas and Ruth 

17 Jephthah's daughter 

and her companions 

18 David playing before 

Saul 

19 Esther accuses Haman 

20 Jeremiah weeping over 

Jerusalem 

21 Toilet of Judith 

22 Judith going to seek 

Holofemes 

23 Judith in Holofemes* 

tent 

24 Judith showing head of 

Holofemes 



Arlington, Texas, April 8, ^93. 

Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co., Chicago, III.: 

Gentlemen: * * * j have worked the Saturator not one hundred, but one thous. 
and times. I never think of having a failure. * * * Yours truly, 

OSCAR J. LAWRENCE. 



Berdan, IlL, January 4, *93. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co., Chicago, IlL: 

DEAR Sirs: The Compressed Oxygen Outfit and Ether Saturator, recently 
ordered from you, to hand and tested in public exhibition last night with entire 
aatisfaction Yours truly, 

8. B. BROCK. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF SUO^S SE.^ ^K^^ \W* 



Mcintosh battery and optical go., Chicago, ill., r. s; a. 319 

Mcintosh Battery and Opiioal Co.: 

1 gave two lectures on the World's Fair Friday and Saturday, October 21st and 
22d, using your lantern outfit, which is causing great satisfaction in the church 
and community. CHAKLES M. SHELDON, 

Central Church, Topeka, Kas. 

Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co.: 

Gentlemen: The lantern &nd appurtenances came and we have tried them 
once. So far as I can discover, everything works perfectly, and we are entirely 
satisfied. GEORGE E. FELLOWS, 

Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 



Chicago^ April 2, *92. 
Mcintosh Battery and Optical Co., Chicago, III.: 

Gentlemen: We have used the Ether Saturator and the Compressed Oxygen 
outfit for three months, and like them very much. One package of chemicals is 
hardly enough for one filling. We run now one hour, and want it to run an hour 
and a quarter. We have bought all our chemicals from the Mcintosh B. & O. Co. 
Bv putting in 1^ of packages of chemicals we can get it to run as long as we wish. 
we get a very good light. Quite a number of entertainments have been given, and 
nine times out of 'ten people come to us and say that we have produced the best 
pictures they ever saw. 

Everything works all right. This outfit is a great success. 

JNO HEBDON. 



FOR PRICE LIST OF 5UDES S£.£. PKQje \'a."T* 



|iHYSICAL, ^ 
CHEMICAL, AND 
PHILOSOPHICAL 
APPARATUS 

' For the PUBLIC SCHOOLS, UNIVERSITIES, ACADEMIES, Etc., Etc 



pay, for 
/U'orosGOpe 
Qatalo^u^. 



^ICROSCOPESano 
ACCESSORY ^ 
APPARATUS 



Staining, Injecting and Mounting Media of Every Description. 

WE ARE DEALERS, IMPORIERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 

Mcintosh Battery and Optical Company, 

CHICAOO- 

^iSii^Electro= . . 

Therapeutical 

Catalogue contains over 200 pages. 

iBeiidea helug an Index to the most approved Electro-Therapeutical Apparatus 

that baa stoott the test uf experience, it is a veritable work on Electro- 

Therapby, containiuK many arliclea from leading men 

jn that branch, and should tiave a place in 

every physic iaj' a library. 

I It will be mailed to physicians upon application WITHOUT 
CHARGE. 

Write for "C. C." Catalogue. 

[Mcintosh Battery & Optical Co. 



■ CHICAGO 



INDEX PAGE I 



GENERAL INDEX 



-OF- 



LANTERNS AND THEIR ACCESSORIES 



OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



' PAGE- 

Advertising Stereopticons 7 

Amateur Photography 74 75 

A Profitable Bimiiiess 8 

Articles for Projection 66 

Attachments, M icroscope 28 

" Opaque 20 

•• Solar Microscope 61 

Vertical 30 

Arc Light Lanterns 42 a, 43, 44, 47 

Bands of Hope 6 

Burners or Jets .53 54 

Boxes, Grooved 60 

Camera, Genie 74 75 

•* Kodak 74 

Photo-Micrographic 73 



(( 



Care of Lenses 110 

Cautions 123 

Chemicals 80 

Compressed Oxygen Outfit 97 

Condensers, see Lenses 79 



88 



93 



Directions for Centering and Focus- 
ing the Light 107 

Directions for Connecting up the Lan- 
tern with the Saturator 87 

Directions for Dissolving with the 
Oxy-Ether Light with either Gas- 
ba^ or Cylinder Pressure 

Directions for filling FUher Satu- 
rator 85 

Directions for Hanging Screen 105 

Directions for making Hydrogen 102 

Directions for making Lantern Slides 111 

Directions formakingOxvgen Gas, 94, 
97.99 99 

Directions for making Pressure 
Boards 104 

Directions for making Screens 105 

Directions for Managing an Kxhibi- 
tion 109 

Directions for Managing Mclntosh- 
Arnold Self Condensing Oxygen 
Ketort and Cvlimler 99 

Directions for Managing New Model 
. Sunlight-Oil Laiii))S 16 

Directions for Managing Oxy-Ether 
Light and Saturator. 87 

Directions for Managing theOxy-Hy- 
dro^en Light with Gas-bag 91 

Directions for Managing the Portable 
Lime Light and Lantern 121, 122 



PAGB. 

Directions for Using the Compressed 
Oxygen Outfit 98 

Directions for Using the Oxy-Ether 
Light with Gas-bag and Saturator 80 

Directions for Using the Oxy-Ether 
Lii^ht with Cylinder and Saturat'r 80 

Directions for Using the Solar Micro- 
scope and Stereopticon Combina- 
tion 62 

Dissolving Key, No. 1 47 

" " No. 2 48 

«♦ '* High Pressure 49 

'« '* Triple High Pres- 
sure 50 

Dissolver Lubricator 26 

Domestic Lecture Sets.. Index Page III 

Double Needle Valve 52 

Electric Incandescent Sciopticon .... 46 

Arc Light Triple 44 

•• Lamps 45 

^ *< Arc Light Single Lanterns. 43 

Ether 81 

Ether Saturator 83 to 03 

Focusing 107 

Foreign Lecture Sets Index Page IV 

Gas Bags 103 

Gas-bag, Oxygen Making Outfit 94 

Gas and Gas Making Apparatus.. 94 to 124 

General List of Lantern Slides 131 

•• "of Sets of Slides, Index 

Pages Ill and I V 

General Price List, Itemized Index 

Pages X and XI 

Generator for Hydrogen 102 

Goose Necks 54 

Grand Army of the Republic Posts... 6 
Gauge * 51 

Heliostat 61 

How to have Goods shipi>ed 9 

How to Order 9 

How to Prevent Popping Out 93 

How to Heinit 9 

Hydrogen, to Make 102 

Illustrations for Projection 125 

Improved Cylinder Gauge 51 

•• " Key or Wrench.. C2 

Jets, Adjustable, No. 1 53 

" •• No. 2 53 



INDEX PAGE II 

PAGE. 

Jets, Adj ustable, No. 3 54 

" Mechanical 64 

Kodak Cameras 74 

Lamp, Alcohol 94 

«• Argand 12 

" Improved Reading 57 

" Incandescent 46 

Lamp, Students 12 

Sun-Ught Oil 14, 15 

Lantern Slides, How to make Ill 

«♦ Slide Plates 76 

«« Slides, Prices of 127 

•• Slides, General List of 131 

*' Slides, Special to order 128 

Outfits 112, 113, 114 

Laws of Objectives 77 

Lectures . . - 6 

Lecture Readings 126 

Lecturer's Electric Signal 66 

<* Reading Lamp 57 

*♦ " Stand 68 

Lenses 79 

** Condensing 79 

*' Cosmorama 79 

*• Lawsof 77 

*• Piano and Double Convex. . . . 79 

" Projection 77 

«* Stereopticon Objectives 78 

Light for Projection 82 

Limes 80 

Lodges 6 

Magnifying Power of Stereopticon 

Objectives 77 

Mailing Rates for Slides 9 

Medical Colleges 6 

Microscopy 6 

Microscope Attachments % . . . . 28 

.Microscopes, Solar and Stereopticon 

Combination 61 

Microscopes, Clinical 72 

•*. Professional 69, 70 

" Scientific 72 

Most Important Page in the Cata- 
logue 9 

Objectives, Stereopticon 77, 78 

Object Teaching 64 

Occident to Orient 4, 229 

Oxygen, to Make 94,98, 100 

Parlor Entertainment 6 

Portable Lime Light and Lantern, 115 

to 124 

Precaution in Making Gas 95 

Pressure Boards 104 



«( 
.< 
«( 
(< 

<< 



PAGE. 

Retorts 94, 97, 99 

Renting Slides 129 

Saturator, Ether 83,84, 85 

" Diagram of 87, 92 

Sciopticons, Arc Light 43 

Argand 11 

Chicago Model 24 

Electric 46, 47 

Mcintosh, No. 1 13 

*• No.2 17 

" No. 3 17 

«• Opaque... 20, 21 

Dissolving 19 

Special Features of. . . . IS 

Screens 66, 105 

Screen Frames. . . . , 65 

" Rope 80 

Self Condensing Oxygen Retort and 

Cylinder 99 

Signal— Electric 57 

Slide Boxes, Grooved : 60 

SUde Mounts 59 

Slide Protectors, Tin 59 

** «« Wood.' 59 

Slides, Renting 129 

Solar Microscope and Stereopticon 

Combination : 61 

Stereopticons, Biunial 32 

Combination 27 

College 29, 30 

Chicago Model 25 

<< « Triple 37 

Exhibitor's 22 

** Pair of 23 

Phoenix 23a 

Scenic Tri-Opticon 38 

Society 10 

Tri-Opticon 40 

Royal Chicago 41 

♦« ** Aluminum 41 

Royal Photo-Opticon.. 34 

" Knock Down" 42 

Arc Light Electric 

Single 43 

Stereopticon, Arc Light Electric 

Triple 44 

Sunday Schools 6 

Temperance Societies 6 

Terms 9 

Testimonials 16, 36, 67,68, 86, 90, 229, 237 

Valve, Double Needle 52 

Vertical Attachment 31 

Wash Bottles 94,97, 99 

Wilson's Lantern Joiiriievs 234 



INDEX PAGE III 



DOMESTIC LECTURE SETS. 



PAGE. 

Abide with me 297 

America or The Land We Live in 272 

Austria 280 

BenHur 277 

Bible History , 274 

Birth ol the Water Babies 299 

Boston 281 

Bottle, The 284 

Chicago 281 

-Christmas Hymns 283 

Constantinople 280 

Death of Paul Dombey 317 

Dotheboy's Hall 317 

Drunkard's Daughter 284 

Progress 284 

Reform 285 



It 



-English History 273 

Egypt and the Egyptians 275 

Far West 282 

Father, Dear Father, Come Home ... 285 

Flight of a Soul 29S 

Flying Time 299 

French History 274 

From Damascus to the Sea 275 

From Earth to the Moon 279 

From Champagne to the End 285 

Gambler's Career 285 

Germany 280 

Girl and the Butterfly, The 301 

Greenland's Icy Mountains 296 

Hebe's Revenge upon Cupid 300 

History, Bible 274 

«' French 274 

" of England 273 

Historic Places 282 

Home, Sweet Home 283 

How They Live in Egypt 276 

lU-Fated Ship 283 

Important Events in European His- 
tory 283 

Jerusalem. 278 

Journey of Aurora 299 

Last Voyage of Ocean Steamer 283 

Leap for Life 282 

Llfeof a Country Boy...rrT 284 

Life of a Slave 283 

L if e of Gran t 273 

Life of Jesus 274 

Life of Martin Luther 273 

Life ot Napoleon Bonaparte 273 

Life of our Savior 274 

Life of Washington : 273 

Life and Times of Columbus 277 



PAGE. 

London ♦ 280 

Lord's Prayer. 285 

Luray Cave 279 

Mammoth Cave 279 

Man and Beast 284 

Milan, Genoa and Pisa 280 

Mottoes 284 

Naples and Pompeii 280 

Natural Phenomena 283 

New Tale of a Tub 283 

New York 281 

Niagara 281 

Nileland 275 

Nile, Tombi and Temples 276 

Noted Women of the Bible 302 

New Orleans 282 

Old Roman World 282 

Old St. Augustine 282 

Paris 281 

Philadelphia 281 

Pilgrim's Progress 282 

Portugal 280 

Richmond....'. 281 

Rip Van Winkle 282 

Rome 281 

Round About Jerusalem 278 

Sacred History 274 

Seven Ages of Man 282 

Seven Periods ot Young America . . .-. 302 
Seven Stages of Modern Girlhood ... . 3C1 

Soldier's Return 284 

Stomach of a Drunkard 284 

Taking of Petra 278 

TamO'Shanter 283 

Temperance Slides 284 

Ten Nights in a Bar Room 284 

Ten Commandments 285 

The Last Voyage of the Ocean 

Steamer 283 

The World 300 

Thousand Miles in Nile Land 276 

Tour ol the World 279 

Tour with the Goddesses 802 

Two Paths of Virtue and Vice 283 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 282 

Visitof St. Nicholas 283 

Voyage ofLife 283 

Walk About Venice 282 

Washington 281 

White Mountains 280 

Wonders of the World 277 

Yosemite 281 



INUEX PAGE IV 



FOREIGN LECTURE SETS. 



PAGE. 

Abbeys and Castles of England 247 

Adventures of Brown, Smith, Jones 

and Robinson 266 

Adventures of Mr. Briggs with a 

Bull 266 

Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp 267 

American, Franklin Search Expedi- 
tion 264 

An Old Story 271 

Antiquities at Athens 249 

Arctic Regions 244, 254 

Astronomy 262 

Baalbec and Palmyra 251 

Bashful Man, The 270 

Ben Nevis and Its Observatory 254 

Biography of Bread 264 

Biography of a Bale of Cotton 265 

Boons and Blessings 271 

Burmah 248 

Buy your own Goose 270 

Caudle Lecture 265 

Central Africa 243 

Children's Short Stories 266 

" Entertainment No. 1 257 

•• ♦• No. 2 258 

Children in the Woods. . . . ; 287 

China and the Chinese 241 

Cinderella 267 

Cock Robin 266 

Comic Tales and Children's Short 

Stories 2(» 

Cotter's Saturday Night 268 

Curfew Must Not Ring To-night 268 

Dan Dabberton's Dream 2(>9 

Dick Whittmgton 2(^6 

Drunkard's Children 270 

English Lake District 255 

English Cathedrals 249 

Egypt 241 

Eva, Service of Song 2()8 

Foolish Toper 272 

Forth Bridge 249 

Franklin Search Expedition 254 

Friendless Bob 269 

Funny Little Bov 2(>4 

Funny, Funny, Very Funny 268 

G in Fiend 272 

Gin Shop, The 270 

Going, Going, Gone 2(55 

Greenland's Icy Mountains 2,56 

Gossips, The 269 

General Description and Statistics of 
London 254 

Haddon Hall 264 

Harlot's Progress 271 

Heathen Chinee 2<)4 

Highlands of Scotland 246 

History of Coal 2<>4 

Holland, Picturesque 21(5 

Holy Land 250 

Honev Stealers 2(>8 

Fow'l Minded the Baby 265 

Humors of an Election 2(50 



PAOB 

India 234.242,243,248 

Irish Wit and Humor 265 

Ireland, No. 2 and No. 1 245 

Italy 253 

Italian Lakes 255 

Jackdaw of Rheims 270 

Jack, the Conqueror 270 

" the Giant Killer 267 

•• and the Bean Stalk 267 

Jane Conquest 269 

John Hampden's Home 271 

John Ploughman's Pictures 259 

John Tregenoweth 25» 

Joseph, Service of Song 267 

Land of the Rose, Shamrock and 

Thistle 251 

Life of John Wesley 263 

Little Tiz 272 

Little Red Riding Hood 266 

London to Rome 253 

Liverpool 260 

Man and Calf 266 

Marley's Ghost 269 

Mary Queen of Scots 264 

Marriage a la Mode 27J 

Mediterranean 252 

Microscopic Gems 2fO 

Microscopic Objects 261 

Modern Egypt and its People 241 

Mother's Last Words 269 

Morocco and the Moors 256 

Mr. O'Toole's Adventures with His 

Umbrella 266 

Mysore 243 

Norway, Hardanger Fjord 247 

" Rambles in 249 

Western 246 

Nursery Rhymes 265 

Old Coaching Days 264 

Old Curiosity Shop 268 

Old Mother Hubbard 2(57 

One Good Turn Deserves Another.. 2(55 

Our Comical Cats 265 

Our Comical Dogs 2t)5 

Outcast London . 263 

Peep into Nature through a Micro- 
scope 260 

Picturesque Scenerv of Devonshire. 254 

Pilgrim's Progress. .' 258, 259 

Progress of Intemperance 270 



Rake's Progress '. 271 

Return from the Tavern 271 

Reynard the Fox 265 

Rhine, The 247 

Robinson ('vusoe 268 

Rochester Cathedral 249 

Rome 253 

" Ancient and Modern 244 

Romance of History 257 

Route to India 242 

Round the World in a Yacht 244 

" " •' with a Camera 244 

Rumors of an p]lection 271 

Scotland, Highlands of 248, 257 

" Lowlands of 252 



INDEX PAGE V 



PAGE. 

Shakespeare and His Country 249 

Sir Isaac Newton and ttie Apple 266 

Simon and his Pig 266 

Signal Box, The 267 

Solar System, Illustrated 262 

Spain 248 

Siory of a Pound of Sugar 264 

Stanley in Africa 240 

S witzerland 252 

Tale of Tea 264 

Temperance Slides 270 

Tipsy Geese 272 

The Travels of The Sultan of the 

Ragobaga in Grogofland 270 

The Seasons 265 



PAOB. 

Thousand Miles up the Nile 250 

Three Bears, The 267 

Tour Through N.Wales 263 

Tom Thumb 286 

Trial of Sir Jasper 271 

Ultima Thule 266 

Up the Congo 240 

Village Blacksmith, The 269 

Whiskey Demon, The 270 

Worship of Bacchus 272 

Wreck of the Hesperus 264 

Year Within the Arctic Circle. ....... 244 



INDEX PAGE VI 



GENERAL INDEX OF SLIDES. 



PAGE. 

Abbeys and Castles of England 247 

Abide With Me 297, 298 

Additional Scientific 306 

Adventures of Brown, Smith, Jones, 

and Robinson 266 

Adventures of Mr. Briggs with a Bull 266 

Africa 179, 180,240,243, 256 

Alabama 169 

Aladin, or the Wondetf ul Lamp 267 

Alaska 211, 212 

Alhambra 201 

America, South 175 

American History 173, 174 

America, or The Land We Live In.... 272 

American Mechanics 292 

American Franklin Search Expedi- 
tion 254 

American Protestant 292 

Anatomical, Pathological..^ 30S 

Anatomy, Microscopic 307 

Anatomy and Physiology 306, 307 

Ancient Mariner 297 

An Old Story 271 

Antiquities at Athens 249 

Arabia, E. L. WUson's 226, 228, 230 

Arctic Regions 244, 254 

Art, Asiatic 209 

" Greek 207, 208 

** Peloponnessus 210 

Astronomv, 262, 304 

Astrononucal, Movable 304 

Austria 205,206, 280 

Australia 183 

Baalbec and Palmyra 

BacilU 

Bashful Man, The 

Beautiful Companion Pieces 

Belgium 

Ben Hur 

Ben Nevis and its Observatory 

Berlin 

B ible History 

Bible Illustrations, Dor6 

Big Trees 

Biography of Bread 

«* of a Bale of Cotton 

Birds 

Birth of the Water Babies 

Boston 151, 

Botanv 305, 

Botanical 

Books on the World's Fair Slides 

Boons and Blessings 

Bottle, The 

Brazil 

Burmah , 

Buy your own Goose 

California 157, 

Caudle Lectures 

Carolina , North 

*• South 

Central Africa 

Ceylon 

Chicago 

** Fire Views 

China and the Chinese 2 10, 

Christmas Hymn 2«3, 

Children's Entertainment, No. 1 

Children's Entertainment, No. 2 

»• in the Woo^l 

*• Short Stories 

Children of Israel 

Cinderella 

Clouds and Water 

Cock Robin... 

Colorado 

Colored Phott^raphio Slipping Slides, 

nnlnnibia, Brit ish 

•»« 

Slipping Slides 



251 
308 
270 
296 
1»4 
277 
254 
254 
274 
213 
158 
264 
265 
309 
299 
281 
306 
3(K> 
141 
270 
2^ 
175 
248 
270 

158 
265 
169 
168 
243 
180 
281 
142 
241 
296 
257 
2r.8 
2«57 
2«ki 
289 
2tJ7 
317 
266 
153 
294 
212 
293 
294 



4f 
4( 



i( 



PAGE 

Comic Tales and Children's Short 

Stories 265 

Constantinople .• 2d0 

Connecticut 152 

Corea 210a 

Crayon Caricatures 293, 294, 295 

Chromatropes 315 

Crusades, The 218, 219 

Cotter's Saturday Night 268 

Crystallography 306 

C uba 2 13 

Curfew Must Not Ring To-night 268 

Dan Dabberton's Dream 269 

Death of Paul Dombey 317 

Dick Whittington 266 

Domestic Lecture Sets 272 

Dioramic Sliding Movement Slides. . . 315 
Dissolving Views with Magnificent 

Movable Effects 314 

Dissolving Views 310, 311, 312, 313, 314 

Dora's Illustration of The Ancient 

Mariner 297 

Dora's Illustration of Dante's Inferno 297 
" *• of Milton's Para- 

dise Lost 297 

Dora's Bible Illustrations, 213, 214, 215, 297 

Dotheboy's Hall 317 

Denmark 208 

Drunkard's Daughter 284 

Progress,The 284 

Reform, The 285 

Children. " 270 

Educational Slides 304 

English History 273 

England, 183, 184, 185, 186, 247, 249, 254, 

255 260 

English Cathedrals 248 

EngUsh Lake District 255 

Egypt and the Egyptians 275 

" E. L. Wilson's personally pho- 
tographed Slides, 219,^,221, 

222,233 25r 

" The Great Pyramids 224 

•* and the Nile 224, 225 

•' 323,241,275 

" Colored Slides of 295 

Eva, Service of Song 268 

Extinct Animals 306 

Far West 282 

Fairmount Park 147 

Father, Dear Father, Come Home 285 

FUght of a Soul, A. 298 

From Champagne to the End 285 

Damascus to the Sea 275 

the Earth to the Moon 279 

Florida 168 

Foolish Toper, The 272 

Foreign Lecture Sets, 240, Index Page IV 

Forth Bridge 249 

France 192, 193, 194. 217 

Frencli Historv 274 

Fishes '. 310 

Franklin Search Expedition 254 

Friendless Bob. 269 

Flving Time 299 

Funny Little Boy, A 2(M 

Funny 265 

Gambler's Career 285 

Georgia 168 

Germany 190, 191, 192, 247, 254, 280 

General Description and Statistics of 

London 254 

Greenland's Icy Mountains 256 

Greenland's Icy Mountains (Hymn). 286 

Gossips, The...' 269 

Gin Fiend ^ 2T2 

Gin Shop, The 2TD 

Girl and the Butterfly, The 301 

Geology 



«< 



INDEX PAGE VII 



FACE. 

Crrand Canon of Arkansas 153 

Grand Army of the Republic 292 

Going, Going, Gone tW5 

Greek Art 207, 208 

Greece 207, 249 

Harlot's Progress 271 

Havana Glen 145 

Hawaiian Islands 165, 166 

Hebe's Revenge upon Cupid 300 

Home, Sweet Home 283, 296 

How I Minded the Baby 264 

Highlands of Scotland 248 

Heathen Chinee 264 

History of Coal 264 

Haddon Hall 264 

Honey Stealers 268 

History, American 173, 174 

U.S., Early 176 

*' Modern 175 

Historic Places 282 

History of the Bible 274 

" of France 274 

of Erifeland 273 

How They Live in Egypt 276 

Holland, Picturesque 246 

205, 246 

Holy Land, The 251 

Honey Bee 303 

Human Physiology 307 

Hymns 289, 290 

Hymns, Words Only 290 

Hymn, Greenland's Icy Mountains.. 296 

Ideal War 174 

Important Events in European His- 
tory 283 

India 180, 181, 182, 18:3,242, 248 

Indians 169 

Indian War 160, 161 

Irish Wit and Humor 264 

Ireland 189, 190, 245, 246 

Italy 199,198, 200, 201, -244,253, 256 

111 Fated Ship 283 

Illinois, Chicago 13 J to 142, 281 

" World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion Slides 132 to 141 

Isle of Wight 187 

Ireland Nos. land 2 245, 246 

Italian Lakes 255 

Jack the Giant Killer 267 

" and the Bean Stalk 267 

Jane Conquest 269 

John Tregenoweth 259 

John Plonghman's Pictures 259 

Johnstown Disaster 146, 147 

John O'Foster's Illustrated Sermon. 

Children of Israel 289 

Journey of Aurora, The 299 

Jerusalem 278 

Joseph— Service of Song 267 

Jack, the Conqueror 270 

Jackdaw of Rheinib 270 

Japan 210a 

John Hampden's Home 270 

Knights of Pythias 292 

Land of the Rose, Shamrock and 

Thistle 251 

Last Voyage of Ocean Steamer 283 

Leap for Life 2^2 

Lever Slides 3i4 

Lif ^ of Jesus 274 

•♦ Our Saviour 274 

♦' Grant 273 

" Napoleon Bonaparte 273 

" Martin Luther 273 

" Washington 273 

*♦ Napoleon 273 

" John Wcslev 263 

" a Country fioy 284 



FAOE. 

Life of a Slave 288 

Life and Times of Columbus 277 

Little Red Riding Hood 266 

Little Tiz 272 

Liverpool 260 

Luray Cave 279 

j London 183, 184 

London to Rome 253 

London 281 

Lord's Prayer, The 286 

Louisiana 166, 167, 168 

I Lowlands of Scotland 262 

: Mary Queen of Scots 264 

I Man and Calf 266 

Man and Beast 284 

Marley's Ghost 269 

I Mariposa 168 

: Massachusetts 151 

" Boston 161 

Maine 150 

Maps 304, 306 

Man of War 174, 176 

Maryland 171 

Marriage, a la Mode 271 

Mammoth Cave 279 

Mississippi 169, 170 

Milan, Genoa and Pisa 280 

Modern Egypt and its People 241 

Masonic 291 

»I icroscopical Objects 261, 262 

Microscopic Gems 260 

Morocco and the Moors 266 

Mr. O'Toole's Adventure with His 

Umbrella 266 

Mottoes 286 

Mediterranean, The 262 

Mysore 243 

Mechanical Dissolving Slides in Sets 316 

Mechanical Slides 314, 316 

Micrococci 308 

M innesota 162 

Mexico 161, 162, 163, 164, 166 

Mother's Last Words 269 

, Niagara 145,146, 281 

Natural Phenomena 283 

North Carolina 169 

New Jersey 173 

New York 143 

New Orleans 166, 282 

' New Tale of a Tub 283 

New York State.. 143, 144, 145, 146, 215, 216 

New York City 281 

Niagara Falls 145, 146, 215, 216 

New Hampshire 160 

New Mexico 168 

Natural History 309 

Natural Clouds 316 

Norway, Western 246 

Norway Hardanger Fjords 247 

Norway, Rambles in 2tt 

Norway 203, 246, 247, 249 

Naval 174 

Niagara 146 

Napoleon Series 217 

I Naples and Pompeii 280 

Nile, Tombs and Temples 276 

Nile, The 224, 225 

Noted Women of the Bible 302 

Nursery Rhymes 265 

Neslie's Sacred History 317 

Overbeck's Gospel Illustration.^ 217 

Ober Ammergaii 198 

Ocean Steamers 290 

Odd Fellows 292 

Order of the Eastern Star 293 

Old Coaching Days 264 

Old Curiositv Shop 268 

Old Mother llubliani 267, -268 

Old St. Augustine 282 

Old Roman World 282 



INDEX PAGE VIII 



PAGE. 

One Good Turn Deserves Another.... 266 

Our Comical Cats 265 

Our Comical Dogs 26.'i 

Outcast, London 263 

Palestine and Syria, E. L. Wilson's. 

2:«, 233, 234, 235, 236, 251 

Palestine and Sinai 238 

Panoramic Sliding Movement Slides. 315 

Panoramic Kack work SL*) 

Paris 281 

Passion Play 198 

Patriotic Order Sons of America 293 

Patriotic 285 

Peep into Nature Through the Micro- 
scope 2H'A) 

Pennsylvania -147, 148, 149,160 

Philadelphia 147, 148 

Picturesque Scenery of Devonshire... 254 

Holland. 246 

Picture Sermons 2;«), 2:u 

Pig Tail Comedy and Pijj Tail Tragedy 295 
Pine Ridge Agency Indian Outbreak, 

160, 161 

Piton's Foreign Comiques 295 

Pilgrim's Progress 258, 259, 282 

Philadelphia 147, 148, 281 

Philadelphia, Old 147 

Portugal 202, 280 

Photo-microgniphs 308 

Portraits, World's Fair Celebrities... 140 

•• 288 

Prang's "War 175 

Progress of Intemperance 270 

Rack Work, Panoramic iUTt 

Rake's Progress 271 

Rambles in Norway 2i9 

Revolving Movenient Slides 315 

Reproductions 216, 217 

Reptiles 310 

Return from the Tavern, The 271 

Reynard, the Fox 265 

Richmond 281 

Rip Van Winkle 282 

Rome, Ancient and Modern 244 

Rhine, The 247 

Round the World with a Camera 244 

Round the World in a Yacht 244 

Robinson Crusoe 268 

Rochester Cat hedni 1 249 

Romance of History 257 

Rome 253, 281 

Round About Jerusalem 278 

Rhode Island 151 

Route to India 242 

Russia 206 

Rumors of an Election 271 



Sacred History 274, 

Salt Lake City 

San Francisco 

Sandwich Islands 165, 

Scientific 

Scotland 187, 188, 189, 249, 254, 

" Highhinds of 248, 

•• Lowlands of 

Seasons, The 

Selected Subjects 285, 

Secret Society Slides 291, 

Sir Isaac Newton and the Apple 

Sinai and Palestine 

Sermons 

Signal Box, The 

Seven Ages of Man 



Seven Sta^res of Modern Girlhood. 
Seven Periods of Yoi 



►ung America 

Spectrum Analysis 

Sliding Movement Slides 

Slip Slides, Comic 

Soldier's Return 

Stomach of a Drunkard 

Spain 201, 202, 

Snow and Ice 



317 
154 
157 
166 
30 5 
257 
257 
252 
'2(i5 
28() 
292 
266 
2.'i8 

2;io 

2(57 
282 
301 

:m 
;i05 

294 
2{)4 
284 
284 
248 
317 



PAGE. 

St. Paul Series 218 

Stanley in Africa 240 

Sporting Series ISO 

Shakespeare and his Country 249, 250 

Solar System, Illustrate. d 262, 263 

Simon and His Pig 266 

Statuarv 287, 288 

Story of a Pound of Sugar 264 

Songs and Hvmns, with Music 289 

South Carolina 168 

South America 175, 176, 177, 178, 170 

South Indian Ocean 183 

Stratford-on-Avon 183 

Sweden 204 

Switzerland 194, ]9,\ 196, 197, 198, 252 

Syria 232 

Taking of Petra 278 

Tale of Tea 264 

Tasmania .«. 183 

Tam O'Shanter 283 

Temperance Slides 284, 285 

Ten Nights in a Bar Room 284 

Ten Commandments, The« 285 

Temple of Honor 292 

The Harlot's Progress 271 

The Trial of Sir Jasper 271 

The Rake's Progress 271 

The Travels of the Sultan of Rago- 

baga in Grogofland 270 

The Seasons 265 

Three Bears, The 267 

Three Weeks in U. S. and Canada 266 

Thousand Islands 146 

Thousand Miles Up the Congo 240, 241 

Thousand Miles in Nile Land 276 

Thousand Miles up the Nile 260 

The World 300 

The Last Voyage of the Ocean 

Steamer 283 

Tipsy Geese 272 

Tom Thumb 266 

Tour of the World, The 279 

Tour with the Goddesses 303 

Tour Through N. Wales 263 

Two Paths of Virtue and Vice 283 

Turkey 207 

Ultima Thule 256 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 282 

Utah 154 

Up the Congo 240 

Vertical Movement Slides 314 

Virginia .* 170, 171 

V illage BUicksmith 269 

Visit of St. Nicholas 283 

' Voyage of Life 283 

Wales 263 

, Walk About Venice 282 

Washington 171, 172, 173, 281 

; Water 316 

Watkins Glen 146 

White Mountains 280 

West Indies, Cuba 213 

Whiskey Demon, The 270 

Wisconsin 152 

World's Columbian Exposition Lan- 
tern Slides 132 to 141 

World's Fair Portraits, Celebrities. 140 

World '8 Fair Dissolving Eflfect 141 

World's Fair Hand-books 141 

Worship of Bacchus 272 

Wreck of the Hesperus 264 

Wvoming 164 

* " Yellowstone National Park 

164, 165, 156, 167 

War, T»rang'8 American Civil 176 

W onders of the World 277 

, Year Within the Arctic Circle. A 24^ 

Yellowstone Nat'l Park, 164, 166, 156, 167 
I Yosemite 281 



INDEX PAGE IX 



GENERAL PRICE-LIST. 



Attachment, Microscope $ 20 00 

'• Vertical 62 50 

Alcohol Lamp, 6- wick 1 00 

Adjustable Jet, No. 1 8 00 

•• " Improved, No. 2.... 10 00 

" " " *• 3 15 00 

" •• Mechanical, $20 to. 25 00 
Boxes for Slides, see page 60 

Burners, Blow Through ... .7 00 to 10 00 

" Bunsen 100 

Camera, Genie Hand 40 00 

" Kodak, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 
see page 74 

Chemicals, per Package 50 

•• '• doz. Packages 6 00 

« ** lb.. Market Rates... 

Couplings for H. P. Hose 1 25 

Cylinders, Steel, Mounted with 
Double Needle Valves, viz: 

8x30each 20 00 

10x32 *• 2100 

12x36 *♦ 22 50 

12x42 ** 25 00 

12x48 •• 27 50 

Cylinders, Copper, same sizes as 
above, 3Slh per cent additional 
(net) 

Cylinder Key 60 

" " Improved 100 

Dissolver, Compound or L. P., No. 1 12 00 
•• L. P. Compound No. 2. . 15 00 
H. P., with H. P. Con- 
nections 30 00 

Dissolver, H. P. Triple 50 00 

•• Lubricator 25 

Dissolving Key, No. 2 15 00 

•• Shutter 7 50 

Dividing, or *« T " Tube 50 

Ether Sulph., Best Grade, Market 
Rate 

Eye-Pieces, A, B,C,D,E 4 00 

Gas-Bags, 30x40x20 A No. 1 20 00 

30x40x30 A No. 1 25 00 

♦* Round, 18x36 20 00 

" Stop-Cocks 2 00 

Gas, Self -Condensing Outfit 75 00 

Gauge, Ordinary 6 00 

** Mcintosh Cylinder, Im- 
proved 10 00 

Glass Tanks 3 00 

Glasses for Sunlight Oil Lamp, 

each ^. . 15 

Goose-Necks, Platinum Tipped 1 50 

Heliostat 30 00 

Hydrogen, Generator 12 00 

Jet, Adjustable No. 1 8 00 

" •• No. 2 10 00 

" " No.3 16 00 

•' •• Mechanical, $20 to. 25 00 

'• Mechanical, Improved 25 00 

Lamp,2-wick, for Society Stere- 

opticon 5 00 

•* New Model Sunlight OU. ... 12 50 

" Alcohol, 5. wick 100 

♦' Incandescent Electric 7 50 

•• Readiuff 5 00 

Lecturer's Electric Signal, No. 1 12 50 

•• Improved Reading Lamp 3 60 

" No. 1 •• Stand 1 50 

<i « 2 «« " 8 00 
Lenses, Condensing, Piano Con- 
vex, 4 inch diameter, per pair, 

Mounted in Brass 8 00 



Lenses, Condensing, Piano Con- 
vex, 41^ inch diameter, per pair, 
Mounted in Brass, with Flange 
and Flange Ring $ 12 00 

Lenscs,Condenslug Piano Convex 
AIM inch in diameter, per pair, 
Mounted in Brass, with Pro- 
tecting Glas8es,with Flange and 
Flange Ring 15 00 

Lenses, Condensing, Triple Sys- 
tem, iVi inch in aiameter 
Mounted in Solid Brass Fronts, 
as on Biunial Lantern, with 
Flange Ring 30 00 

Lenses, Condensing. Single, Un- 
mounted, 4 inch in Diameter, 
Each 2 50 

Lenses, Condensing, Single, Un- 
mounted, 4^ inch in aiameter. 
Each 3 00 

Lenses, Condensing, see page « 79 
** Cosmorama, •• 79 

" Piano and Bi-Convex •• 79 
*• Objective see page 78 

Limes, Regular, per Dozen 100 

" English, ** 2 00 

" Disc, * 2 50 

•« Tongs " 75 

Manganese Binoxide, market rate. 

Materials for Mounting Slides : 
Glass Plates, Selected Glass, 
Standard S ize, per doz 25 

Glass Plates, Prepared, Standard 
Size, Reliable Make, pr dz., M'ket 
Rates, see page 76 

Black Paper JBdats, Standard Size, 
per doz 25 

Black Binding Paper, per 100 26 

Blank Labels, per 100 25 

Mounts for Plain Slides, Tin, 
Round or Square, each 05 

Mounts for Plain Slides, Wood, 
Round or Square, each 15 

Microscope Attachment 20 00 

Microscope, Solar, and Solar Stere- 
opticon Combined 167 50 

Microscope, Professional 66 00 

Clinical No. 1 20 00 

** ** •• 2 25 00 

*• Scientific, No. 1 35 00 

«• •• "2 45 00 

Nipples for Fitting Tubing on to 
Cylinders 1 00 

Opaque Attachment ^ 10 00 

objectives, Stereopticon, seep. 78 

Oxygen, Outfit, Compressed 60 00 

Pressure Boards 6 00 

Potassium Chlorate, Market Rate. 

Protecting Kings, per pair 3 00 

" Ring Glasses, each 26 

Retort, Oxvgen sheet steel 6 00 

" *♦ '« copper 8 00 

" " " " extra 
heavy 10 00 

Retort, self -condensing outfit 100 00 

'• stand 150 

Retort Tul)e for Comp. Ox. outfit... 1 00 

Rope, per 100 ft ] 00 

RuDber hose, best grade, 1-4 in., per 
ft 15 

Rubber hose, best grade, 3 ply, for 
high pressure, per foot 50 

Saturator No. 1 15 00 



■.- f 



I 



...LECTURES... 



erything required for giving i 
KK, Gel our prices if you wan 



f. We carry over 100,000 Views, plain and colored, and can 

ill] all orders without delay. To those desirous of giving a 
private or public entertainment we will rent a complete appa- 
ratus, selection of views on any subject, and furnish an ex- 
perienced operator nt a very reasonable figure. 

■ -l-Mie-RoseopES-^ 

I As we are Impokteks and MANirKALi'tTREBS, we carry a large 

stock of superior Microscopes, Accessories and Mounting Ma- 

I tp rial, adapted to the use of Amateurs, Students and Profes- 

^^Bpnais, at a very low price. 



ELECTRIC BATTERIES and^ 
ELECTRICAL APPARATUS 



MgIntosh Battery and Optical Go. 

531 to 531 Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



OCT 2 1 1965 



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. .. LECTURE^ 






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M-i«ic*?d t<(>er-tC3«- «t » von- rMnMnbte fifiWrc. 



•^-Mie-RoseopES"^- 



APPARATUS 



Opticul Co, 



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OCT 2 1 7965