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Full text of "Illustrated catalogue of narrow-gauge locomotives"


University of California Berkeley 



JACK MARTIN DAVIS MEMORIAL FUND 




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A CATALOG FOR NARROW 
GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES. 

74. [BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS]. 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE OF NARROW- 
GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES. BURNHAM, PARRY, 
WILLIAMS & CO. Philadelphia:]. B. Lippincott & Co., 
1885. 64 pages of text plus 16 mounted albumen photo- 
graphs. The images measure 8x5 inches (203 x 127 mm.) 
and are by an unknown photographer. Quarto, n x yVa 
inches (279 x 191 mm.). Gilt and black on flexible maroon 
cloth; inner hinge cracked. 

Third edition. The Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia 
was the oldest and largest locomotive producer in the United 
States. The firm employed 2,000 highly skilled workers, had 
delivered 4,000 engines since its founding by abolitionist and 
watchmaker Matthias Baldwin in 1831, and provided engines to 
large and small railroads in the U.S. as well as railroads overseas. 

Narrow gauge track was smaller and less expensive than 
standard gauge and used extensively in the mountainous regions 
of the American West and in Latin America. The narrow gauge 
catalogs from Baldwin Locomotive Works are uncommon, with 
no mention of them by Romaine in American Trade Catalogs. 
There are four copies located on OCLC for this third edition, 
but no mention of earlier editions. The words "third edition" 
possibly meant the third catalog issued by the company. 

$3,000. 



L 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



OF 



NARROW-GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES. 



BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Go,, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S. 



GEORGE BURNHAM, EDWARD H. WILLIAMS, EDWARD LONGSTRETH, 

CHARLES T. PARRY, WILLIAM P. HENSZEY, JOHN H. CONVERSE. 



THIRD EDITION. 



PHILADELPHIA! 

J. B. LIPPINGOTT & GO, 

1885. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



Separate Catalogues or Circulars are issued, and -will be furnished on 
application, -with, particulars of 

BROAD-GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES. 
NARROW-GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES. 

MINE LOCOMOTIVES. 

COMPRESSED AIR LOCOMOTIVES. 

LOCOMOTIVES FOR SUGAR PLANTATIONS. 

LOCOMOTIVES FOR LOGGING RAILROADS. 

LOCOMOTIVES FOR ROLLING MILLS, CONTRACTORS' USE, AND 

OTHER SPECIAL SERVICE. 

NOISELESS MOTORS AND STEAM-CARS FOR 
CITY RAILWAYS. 



BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Go,, 

BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



CONTENTS. 



CIRCULAR 



CLASS DESIGNATIONS 



CATALOGUE. 

PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES, "AMERICAN" TYPE. ........ 9 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, " TEN- WHEELED" TYPE 15 

FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, " MOGUL" TYPE 21 

FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, " CONSOLIDATION" TYPE 29 

FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, " DECAPOD" TYPE ......... 35 

SWITCHING LOCOMOTIVES, FOUR- WHEELS-CONNECTED . . 41 

SWITCHING AND LOCAL SERVICE LOCOMOTIVES, FOUR-WHEELS-CONNECTED AND LEAD- 
ING PONY TRUCK 42 

SWITCHING AND LOCAL SERVICE LOCOMOTIVES, FOUR-WHEELS-CONNECTED AND TWO- 
WHEELED TRAILING TRUCK 49 

SWITCHING AND LOCAL SERVICE LOCOMOTIVES, FOUR-WHEELS-CONNECTED AND FOUR- 
WHEELED TRAILING TRUCK 50 

LOCAL PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES, " DOUBLE-ENDER" TYPE . . ^ . . . 55 

SWITCHING AND LOCAL FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, Six- WHEELS-CONNECTED ... 56 
SWITCHING AND LOCAL FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, SIX-WHEELS-CONNECTED AND TRAILING 

TRUCK 63, 64 



T 



CIRCULAR. 



fN the following pages we present and illustrate a system of NARROW- 
GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES, in which, it is believed, will be found designs suited 
to all the requirements of ordinary service. 

These patterns admit of modifications, to suit the preferences of railroad 
managers, and where machines of peculiar construction for special service are 
required, we are prepared to make and submit designs, or to build to specifica- 
tions furnished. 

All the locomotives of the system herewith presented are adapted to the 
consumption of wood, coke, or bituminous coal as fuel. Where coal, either 
bituminous or anthracite, is used exclusively as fuel, a modification in the plan 
of engine and in the form of fire-box can be made in the principal classes, as 
will be seen by reference to the classes described on page 21. 

All work is accurately fitted to gauges, which are made from a system of 
standards kept exclusively for the purpose. Like parts will, therefore, fit accu- 
rately in all locomotives of the same class. 

This system of manufacture, together with the large number of locomo- 
tives at all times in progress, and embracing the principal classes, insures un- 
usual and especial facilities for filling at once, or with the least possible delay, 
orders for duplicate parts. 

The advantages and economies to the users oj locomotives resulting from 
this method of construction are apparent. By its means the expense of main- 
tenance and repairs can be reduced to a minimum. A limited stock of dupli- 
cate parts, either ordered with the locomotive or at any time thereafter, can be 
kept on hand by the purchaser and drawn from to replace any worn-out or 
broken part when required. Repairs can thus be made in the shortest possible 
time, and the use of the locomotive lost for only a few hours or days, or not 
at all. The first cost of duplicates will be much less than the cost of manu- 
facture in the shop of the railroad company ; in many cases it will be less than 
4 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



the cost of carrying the stock of raw material necessary for the purpose ; while, 
if the line is equipped with a limited number of classes of standard inter- 
changeable locomotives, the quantity of duplicates necessarily carried in stock 
will be small and comparatively inconsiderable in the amount of capital repre- 
sented. Much of the ordinary outlay for shops, machinery, drawings, and 
patterns can be saved, and the necessity of maintaining for the purpose of re- 
pairs a large force of skilled workmen at a constant expense may be in great 
measure obviated. 

Particulars of the performance of various classes of locomotives illustrated 
will be found in the body of the Catalogue. It will be seen from these state- 
ments of work actually done that at least nine-fortieths of the weight on 
driving-wheels are utilized for adhesion, under ordinarily favorable conditions, 
with adequate boiler and cylinder capacity. The loads given in the tables 
are, therefore, calculated for each class on this basis, in tons of twenty-two 
hundred and forty pounds, and are predicated on track being straight and in 
good condition. It is also assumed that the frictional resistance of the cars 
hauled will not exceed eight pounds per gross ton of their weight. 

Designs and estimates for any sizes or patterns of locomotives not given in 
this Catalogue will be submitted on application. 

The delivery of locomotives at any point which can be reached by rail or 
vessel will be included in contracts if desired. 

In ordering locomotives, the following particulars should be given : 

1. Gauge of track, exact inside distance between the rails. 

2. Kind of fuel which will be used. 

3. Kind and height of couplings of cars. 

4. Limitations, if any, in width, height, etc., by tunnels, overhead bridges, etc. 

5. Mark, name, or number. 

For detailed specifications and further particulars, address 

BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., 

BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. 



CUSS DESIGNATIONS. 



'HE different classes of locomotives are designated by a combination of figures 
with one of the letters C, D, E, or F, so as to indicate both the plan and size, 
as follows : 

The letter C indicates that four wheels are connected as driving-wheels. 
" D " " six " . " 

" E " " eight " 

F " " ten 

1. A figure or figures (4, 6, 8, 10, or 12) is used to indicate the whole number of wheels 
under the locomotive. 

2. A figure or figures, following the figures indicating the whole number of wheels, 
indicates the diameter of cylinders, viz. : 

8 indicates cylinders 7 inches in diameter. 

" " 8 " 

" 9 " 

" " 10 " 

" " ii " 

" " 12 

" " 13 " 

" " 14 " 

" " 15 " 

" " 16 " 

" " 17 

" " 18 

Thus 8-18 C indicates an eight- wheeled locomotive, having four wheels coupled, and 
cylinders twelve inches in diameter. 8-22 D indicates an eight-wheeled locomotive, having 
six wheels coupled, and cylinders fourteen inches in diameter ; and 10-26 E, a ten-wheeled 
locomotive, having eight wheels coupled, and cylinders sixteen inches in diameter. 

The addition of the fraction ^ indicates that there is a truck at each end of the loco- 
motive. Thus 8-i8X C indicates an eight-wheeled locomotive, having four wheels coupled, 
cylinders twelve inches in diameter, and a two -wheeled truck at each end. 

The addition of the fraction 1/3 indicates that the engine is on the " Forney" plan, having 
the truck back of the fire-box. Thus 8-161/3 C indicates an eight-wheeled locomotive, having 
four wheels coupled, cylinders eleven inches in diameter, and a four-wheeled truck back of 
the fire-box. 6-i6]A, C indicates a six-wheeled locomotive, having four wheels coupled, cyl- 
inders eleven inches in diameter, and a two-wheeled truck back of the fire-box. 

The figures following the class designation, as found on every locomotive, give the class 
number for that locomotive, and supply an individual designation for it, in addition to the con- 
struction number. Thus 8-20 C 500 means the five-hundredth locomotive of the 8-20 C class. 




BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. g 


PASSENGER AND FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, "AMERICAN" TYPE. 

OAUOE, THREE EEET, OR \VIDER. KUEL, \VOOD OR BITUMINOUS COAL. 
General Design shown by Photograph on page 8. 


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In locomotives of this pattern all the wheels are usually flanged. Where, however, very short curves have to be traversed, the front driving-wheels can 
be made without flanges. 
The total wheel-base of engine, with 8-wheeled tender attached, varies from 34 feet 8 inches for Class 8-14 C to 39 feet 9 inches for Class 8-22 C. 
From 1 8 inches to 2 feet should be added to give the length of turn-table required. 

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10 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



PERFORMANCE OF NARROW-GAUGE LOCOMOTIVES, 
"AMERICAN" TYPE. 



'HE following data will serve to indicate the kind and extent of work per- 
formed by narrow-gauge locomotives of the "American" type: 

CLASS 8-16 C ON GRADE OF 1WX FEET PER MILE. 



NEVADA COUNTY NARROW-GAUGE RAILROAD. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, GRASS VALLEY, CAL., October 26, 1877. 

MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, Our engine, " Grass Valley, No. i" (Class 8-16 C), hauls mixed trains over our road. 
Maximum grade in direction of freight movement is 116^ feet per mile; minimum radius of curvature, 
302.9 feet. These trains consist generally of three freight box cars, one smoker and baggage combined, 
and one passenger car. Our box cars weigh 4 gross tons each, and are loaded with 8 gross tons each. 
The passenger and smoking cars are each 42 feet long from outside of platforms. A passenger coach 
seats 32 passengers. I do not know the exact weight of these cars, but estimate at least n gross tons 
each, and loaded at 13 gross tons each. 

The weight of train is as follows, viz. : 

Three loaded box cars, 12 gross tons each ...... 36 tons. 

One combined smoker and baggage, and one passenger coach, 13 gross 

tons each ........... 26 " 

Total weight of train ....... 62 tons. 

The same engine has brought over the road on several occasions four loaded box cars and the 
smoker and passenger cars, and has likewise hauled, when running extra, six loaded box cars. 

The mixed trains first above-mentioned run from Colfax to Nevada, 22^ miles, in two hours, 
making an average of four stops, one at Grass Valley of ten minutes. Absolute running time, one hour 
and forty minutes, or an average of 13^ miles per hour. 

This locomotive, as you are aware, has been in commission for over two years ; seven months of 
the time on construction and the balance in regular service. It has had the tire turned once, and to-day 
is in as good condition as when she came on the road. 

Our locomotive, " Nevada, No. 2" ^ Class .8-16 D), hauls over the same road seven loaded box cars. 

Our rail weighs 35 pounds per yard. Total degrees of curvature on line are 7944 25 / . Total 
length of tangents, 53,908 feet. Total ascents from Colfax, 1159 feet. Total descents from Colfax, 
1042 feet. Yours truly, 

JOHN F. KIDDER, 

General Superintendent. 



T 



jL 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. IX 



CLASS 8-16 C ON GRADE OF 75 FEET PER MILE. 

On the Denver and Rio Grande Railway, locomotives of Class 8-16 C were used for passenger 
service until the increase of traffic required heavier engines. Following is extract of a letter, dated 
February 13, 1877, from W. W. Borst, then General Superintendent of the line: 

"Passenger engines Nos. 16, 17, 18 (Class 8-16 C). These engines are used on our regular pas- 
senger trains, consisting of one baggage car and two coaches, at a speed of 20 miles per hour on all 
grades. We have never had occasion to test either the speed or the power of these engines in passenger 
train service. 

"On the 29th of August, 1876, Engine No. 16 took one baggage car, five coaches, and one ex- 
cursion car from Denver to Colorado Springs. Time, including stops, four hours; actual running time, 
about three and a half hours. She did her work with ease, making 20 miles per hour on the heaviest 
grades. I am satisfied that either of the four-wheels-connected passenger engines will haul seven coaches 
and one baggage car, over our 75 feet grades, at from 1 8 to 20 miles per hour. 

" These engines are as heavy as should be run over a 30 pound iron rail, although I do not see that 
they injure the iron more than our lighter engines. When the road-bed is soft, these engines knock the 
track out of line more than our first engines (6-12 C)." 



CLASS 8-16 C ON GRADE OF 110 FEET PER MILE. 

On the Caniden, Gloucester and Mount Ephraim Railway, 3 feet gauge, laid with 35 pound rails, a 
locomotive of Class 8-16 C has hauled five loaded eight- wheeled freight cars and two loaded passenger 
cars up a grade of no feet per mile. The usual train is two passenger cars, with which the run is made 
from Gloucester to Camden, 2 l / 2 miles, in twelve minutes, making four regular intermediate stops, and 
running slow into the city of Camden. One curve of only 120 feet radius occurs on entering Camden. 



CLASS 8-18/2 C ON GRADES OF 52 TO 105 FEET PER MILE. 

On the Eureka and Palisade Railroad, 3 feet gauge, of Nevada, a locomotive of Class 8-18^ C, 
with one passenger coach attached, has made the run from Palisade to Eureka, 90 miles, in two hours 
and thirty-eight minutes, nearly all the distance being up grade, viz. : 52 feet per mile for 35 miles, 75 
feet per mile for 8 miles, and 105 feet per mile for 3 miles. Average speed, 34.17 miles per hour. 



CLASS 8-18/ 2 C ON GRADES OF 155 FEET PER MILE, AND CURVES OF 215 FEET 

RADIUS. . 

A locomotive of Class 8-18^ C was in daily use for one hundred and fifty-six days, from May 13, 
1876, to the close of the Exhibition, on the narrow-gauge railway in the Centennial Exhibition grounds. 
The line was 3^ miles long, with double track, and was made up almost wholly of curves in order to 
run near all the principal buildings on the Exhibition grounds. Many of the curves were on the heaviest 

2 



I2 ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

grades, some having a radius of 215, 230, and 250 feet on grades of 140 and 155 feet per mile. The 
track was laid with iron rails weighing 35 pounds per yard. The usual load of the engine was five 
eight-wheeled passenger cars, frequently carrying over loo passengers per car. On special occasions as 
many as six and seven loaded cars have been drawn by one of these engines. The average weight of 
each loaded car was about 12 gross tons. 



CLASS 8-22 C ON GRADE OF 80 FEET PER MILE. 

CARSON AND COLORADO RAILROAD Co. 

CARSON CITY, COL., March 18, 1881. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Dear Sirs, Engines Nos. I and 2 have pulled a train of twenty-one loaded cars, of 10 tons each, 
over a grade of 80 feet to the mile, which I consider extraordinarily good work. 

(Signed) H. M. YERINGTON, 

President. 



1 














*\ 

BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 15 


,. ..... 

' PASSENGER AND FREIGHT LOCOMOTIVES, "TEN-WHEELED" TYPE, 

OAUQE, THREE EEET, OR \VIDER. KUEL, WOOD OR BITUMINOUS COAL. 

General Design sliown by Photograph on page 14. 






type of locomotive is offered for passenger, freight, or mixed service, where a locomotive of the " American" type, with four coupled wheels, does 
ufficient power. The greater length of the engine admits of a longer boiler, and therefore gives increased heating surface. As the increased 
carried on an additional pair of driving-wheels, the weight on each wheel is not excessive, and is, in fact, less than the weight on each wheel of 
:rican" locomotive of corresponding cylinder, 
total wheel-base, with 8-wheeled tender attached, varies from 40 feet 6 inches for Class 10-22 D to 43 feet for Class 10-26 D. From 18 inches to 
uld be added, to allow for clearance of flanges, to give the length of turn-table required, 
driving-wheels can be made with flanges on the front and back pairs and without flanges on the middle pair, or with flanges on the middle and 
s and the front pair without flanges. The truck can be made with swinging bolster, where required for passing short curves; otherwise, a rigid- 
ck with middle and back pairs of driving-wheels flanged will give good results. 


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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



PERFORMANCE OF NARROW-GAUGE "TEN-WHEELED" 
PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES. 



CLASS W-22 D ON GRADES OF 90 FEET PER MILE. 

DENVER AND Rio GRANDE RAILWAY Co., BURNHAM, COL., February i, 1882. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., PHILADELPHIA, PA.: 

Gentlemen, We now have four of the " ten-wheelers" on our regular express trains between 
Denver and Pueblo (120 miles), and have made the run in five hours. Train consisted of mail, express, 
baggage, and three coaches six cars in all. Weight of train, 70 tons. Maximum grade, 90 feet per 
mile, 5 miles long ; 26 miles of 75 feet grade. This I consider a very satisfactory performance by com- 
parison with the 14 x 20 cylinder " Moguls." 

The 12 feet wheel-base seems to be no objection on this part of the line. They curve readily, ride 
easily, and, so far as trial has been given, are a very satisfactory engine. 

Respectfully, N. W. SAMPLE, Superintendent M. P. & M. 



DENVER AND Rio GRANDE RAILWAY COMPANY, DENVER, COL., May i, 1884. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., PHILADELPHIA, PA. : 

Dear Sirs, Your letter of April 2$th at hand yesterday. We have been using these engines (Class 
10-22 D) between Denver and Pueblo on regular passenger trains; distance, 120 miles, 51 miles of which 
are 52 feet grade; maximum curvature, 12 per loofeet; 19 miles 75 feet grade; maximum curvature, 6 ; 
24 miles running from 75 to 90 feet per mile (6 miles of 90 feet); maximum curvature, 6; 26 miles 
42 feet grade. 

Over this line we hauled with Engine 166, on last year's card, a train of ten mail, express, baggage 
cars, and coaches, total weight of which was 284,550 pounds, exclusive of lading, in five hours and 
ten minutes. This train, however, was an exceptional one, the average on that card being eight cars. 

The cars in our present fast train for Salt Lake City and Ogden weigh, exclusive of lading, 182,000 
pounds, and the running time between Denver and Pueblo is four hours and ten minutes. This is made 
easily, and has been made with one car more (about 27,000 pounds) under particularly favorable con- 
ditions. We are also running this engine between Pueblo and Salida on the same maximum grade, 75 
feet per mile; maximum curvature, 15 per 100 feet (and an immense amount of it) ; distance, 96 miles; 
time, three hours and forty minutes; in which service they have given excellent satisfaction. 

Yours truly, (Signed) N. W. SAMPLE, Superintendent M. P. &> M. 



THE SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD Co., SANFORD, FLA., May 24, 1884. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., PHILADELPHIA : 

Dear Sirs, Replying to your favor of April 25th, would say that we find the average cost of main- 
tenance per mile of Engines Nos. 10, n, 12, and 13, your ten-wheelers, to be 10% cents. The average 
cost of wood per mile is 4^ cents. One of the engines, No. 10, since November, 1883, to May i, 
1884, has run a total of 13,541 miles on an average cost of io T 2 ^ cents per mile, including 4 T ^ cents 
per mile for wood. We find the engines have given entire satisfaction, are easily handled, extremely 
powerful, and, for their size and weight, easy upon the track. We have had no trouble with the extended 
arch, and our engineers claim that by its use there is no back pressure on the cylinders; can raise steam 
quicker and hold steam longer than any other class of engine. It is not uncommon to find gauge show- 
ing 20 pounds steam upon starting fire up in the morning, eight to ten hours after run is over. 

Very truly yours, (Signed) J. E. INGRAHAM, President. 

These figures of cost per mile run include items as follows : Engineers, firemen, all repairs, fuel, 
oil, waste, tallow, and the general maintenance. 



i8 




20 




rr 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 2l 




rr ^ ^* ' General Design shown toy Photographs on pages 18 and 20. 

DIMENSIONS, WEIGHTS, AND TRACTIVE POWER OF FIVE SIZES OF THIS PATTERN, 




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re given for each class. The difference is in the form of the fire-box and in the driving 
e-box placed on top of the frames allows the driving-wheels to be placed close toget 
hort curves. (See photograph on page 20.) The shallow fire-box answers nearly every 
eeper fire-box is preferred. (See photograph on page 18.) The deeper fire-box is also 
heel-base is not objectionable. It should be noted, however, that in some cases whe 
e-box has been used successfully for burning wood, 
se be particular to specify the wheel-base, or otherwise designate whether the shallow or 
he front and rear driving-wheels must be flanged. The main pair have no flanges. Tl 
ve laterally in passing a curve. The total wheel-base, with 8-wheeled tender attached, 
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22 ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



PERFORMANCE OF NARROW-GAUGE "MOGUL" 
LOCOMOTIVES. 



CLASSES 8-16 D AND 8-18 D ON GRADES OF 146 TO 211 FEET PER MILE. 

MINERAL RANGE RAILROAD COMPANY. 

HANCOCK, MICH., February 19, 1877. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., 

PHILADELPHIA : 

Gentlemen, In reply to your inquiry relative to the working of the last engine furnished us, we 
would say that we use the " Sharpless" for freight service, the " Portage Lake" for passenger service, 
and the " Keweenaw" as a spare engine. I will give you the service of the " Sharpless," from which 
we can judge of the " Keweenaw" by comparison. 

Our road is 12^ miles long. We leave the station at Hancock on a grade of 211 feet to the mile, 
which continues for a distance of about 1200 feet. We pass from this 211 feet grade to one of 146 feet 
to the mile, which latter grade continues for a distance of about 2 miles, after which the maximum grade 
is 60 feet to the mile, reaching an altitude at Calumet, the other end of the road, of 630 feet above the 
starting-point. The curve of 410 feet radius occurs upon the 146 feet grade. 

The snow commences falling in November usually, and continues to fall steadily until January or 
February, with occasional heavy storms after that time, with high winds and heavy drifts. Sleighing 
comes with the first fall of snow, and continues until April, and sometimes until the early part of May. 
By first of January we have from IJ^ to 3 feet of snow, and it is not an unusual thing to find 3^ to 4 
feet of snow in the woods on the first of April. This is our average winter. The present winter is the 
mildest we have experienced since 1857 and 1858. 

During the winter of 1875, w ' 1 ^ verv heavy snows, high winds, and the mercury ranging from o to 
35 below for over forty days, we were only delayed, all told, about three days; that is, the Smelting 
Works and Stamp (Crushing) Mills, to which we brought their daily supplies of material, were stopped, 
on account of our inability to get through, only about three days. 

In exposed places on the 146 feet grade the snow often drifts to the depth of 3^ to 5 feet on the 
track, and becomes so hard that one could walk upon it as easily as upon a floor. With the " Sharpless" 
provided with a small iron plough, we have often worked up grade, clearing the road of these drifts, and 
to good effect. She would go into them for a distance of 200 to 500 feet each run before the snow would 
stop her by getting under the drivers and causing the engine to slip. 

With this explanation of the difficulties we are called upon to surmount in operating our road, you 
will be able to judge intelligently of the service of the engines. We are now hauling about 90,000 tons 
of freight per annum, or, at that rate, say 12,000 tons from Hancock up grade, and 70,000 tons of copper 
rock and 8000 tons of copper down grade. The copper is transported upon eight-wheeled freight cars, 
and the rock in eight-wheeled hopper cars, the cars weighing each 6^ tons empty, and 18^ tons loaded. 

The "Sharpless" (12 X I0 cylinders, 36 inch drivers) will draw up the 211 feet grade ten empty 
hopper cars. Total weight, 62^ tons. On the 146 feet grade, which includes the curve of 410 feet 
radius, with a good rail, the same engine draws regularly twelve empty hopper cars. Total weight, 
75 tons. 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 23 



Its usual load on the 60 feet grade is 12 empty rock cars and 6 loaded freight cars. Weight, about 
150 tons going up. The usual down freight train consists of 12 loaded rock cars and from 6 to 8 cars 
of copper. Weight of cars and lading, say for 18 cars, 305 tons; 20 cars, 332 tons. 

This is our regular work, unless the rail is unusually bad by reason of snow or frost. 

The capacity of the " Keweenaw" (12 X Io cylinders, 40 inch drivers) on the 211 and 146 feet 
grades is about 6 to 12 tons less, as near as we can judge. For freight service we consider the " Sharp- 
less" the best; for passenger service the "Keweenaw" excels. The larger boiler causes her to steam 
easily, and her greater weight to run very steadily. 

The " Portage Lake" (11 X Io cylinders, 36 inch drivers) draws two coaches, weight 15 tons, and 
one freight car, weight say 12 to 14 tons, and makes the trip from Hancock to Calumet in fifty minutes. 
Deducting stops, this would make running time about forty to forty-five minutes. We use this engine 
in passenger service, as the other engines, being larger, are more desirable for heavy work. 

We consider that with the " Sharpless" we can transport in one year, making two round trips over 
the road per day, 100,000 tons of freight down grade, and 30,000 tons up grade, the work all to be done 
between 7 A.M. and 6 P.M., and by the " Sharpless" alone. By adding one more trip, time required, four 
hours, the service would be increased 33 to 50 per cent. '5 . 

Our rail weighs 35 pounds per yard, which we consider heavy enough for the engines. When we 
renew we shall use a heavier rail, and increase the weight of freight engines purchased in future. 

To sum up, your engines have given perfect satisfaction, and we do not see in what manner they could 
be improved. Our service, with the grades, snow, and ice, is very hard, but the engines have never 
failed. I have written at length that you might fully understand what we are doing, and will be very 
glad to answer any further inquiries you may be pleased to make. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) CHARLES E. HOLLAND. 



MINERAL RANGE RAILROAD COMPANY. 

HANCOCK, MICH., March 10, 1877. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., 

PHILADELPHIA : 

Gentlemen, I omitted to state in my last letter that we have two curves of 410 feet radius combined 
with the 146 feet grade, up which- the "Sharpless" hauled the twelve hopper cars. One of the curves 
occurs on the side track going into the mill, and the other on the main line. Since writing you I have 
looked up the actual weight of the hopper cars, as weighed upon a Fairbanks track scale at the mine, 
and find that the twelve cars weighed 75^^$ tons. Since that weight was made, additions of running 
boards and changes have been made which increased the weight, and fourteen more cars have been 
purchased which were made a little heavier. As the cars are all mixed together, we conclude that 76^ 
tons would be about the actual weight of twelve cars, in place of 75 tons, as reported. Further, twelve 
cars is the greatest number we have to haul at one time, and the " Sharpless" hauls them up this 146 feet 
grade, combining the two curves of 410 feet radius, with great ease, with 120 pounds pressure on boiler, 
and the engineer informs me that when we have a greater number of cars he can haul fourteen cars, 
weighing, say, 89 to 90 tons, with the "Sharpless" by increasing the steam pressure to 130 pounds. 
This we fully expect to do when our trains become larger. 

Since writing you, a trial was made with the " Portage" on the 211 feet grade. She hauled four cars 
loaded with copper up the grade with ease, cars and lading weighing 48 tons of 2000 pounds, good and 
strong, and the master mechanic says she will haul one car more, or 12 tons additional. This, you will 
observe, exceeds the capacity of the " Sharpless" named in your letter. 

Now, an instance of speed made by the " Keweenaw," August 21, 1876, with one coach weighing 
7^ tons: ran from Hancock to Calumet, 12^ miles, in twenty minutes ; deduct one and one-quarter 
minutes for one full stop would leave eighteen and three-quarter minutes running time, or an average 
speed of 40 miles per hour. The time made on the 211 and 146 feet grades was 30 miles per hour, on 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



the 60 feet grade from 40 to 60 miles per hour, one mile being run in just one minute. The work did 
not seem to crowd the engine, and we can see no reason why it could not be done daily if desired. The 
train ran very smoothly, and the only inconvenience experienced was from dust. 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed} CHARLES E. HOLLAND, 

President. 



GLASS 8-18 D ON GRADES OF 75 AND 90 FEET PER MILE. 

DENVER AND Rio GRANDE RAILWAY Co., OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT. 

DENVER, COL., February 13, 1877. 
GEN. WM. J. PALMER, President D. and R. G. Railway Co. : 

Dear Sir, In reply to letter of Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co., in reference to the performance 
of our last engines, I have to say, 

1. Freight Engines Nos. 13, 14, 15, and 19 (Class 8-18 D). The average train for these engines is 
twelve loaded box or thirteen loaded coal cars and caboose; each load, 8 tons (coal cars, 3^ tons; box 
cars, 4 tons) ; or 150 tons of cars and lading, at a speed of 8 to 10 miles per hour. 

Our average freight train time on present card is 10 miles per hour between Denver and Pueblo. 
On heavy grades the speed is reduced to 8 miles, and on slightly descending grades and levels the speed 
is increased to 12 miles. 

We have, when rail and cars were in perfect condition, hauled fifteen loaded cars at about 6 miles 
per hour. 

2. Passenger Engines Nos. 16, 17, and 18 (Class 8- 1 6 C). These engines are used on our regular 
passenger trains, consisting of one baggage car and two coaches, at a speed of 20 miles per hour on all 
grades. We have never had occasion to test either the speed or the power of these engines in passenger 
train service. 

On the 2gth of August, 1876, Engine 1 6 took one baggage car, five coaches, and one excursion car 
from Denver to Colorado Springs. Time, including stops, four hours; actual running time, about three 
and one-half hours. She did her work with ease, making 20 miles per hour on the heaviest grades. I am 
satisfied that either of the four- wheeled- connected passenger engines will haul seven coaches and one 
baggage car over our 75 feet grades at from 18 to 20 miles per hour. 

These engines are as heavy as should be run over a 30 pound iron rail, although I do not see that 
they injure our rail more than our lighter engines. 

When the road-bed is soft, these engines knock the track-bed out of line more than our first engines. 

Respectfully yours, 
(Signed) W. W. BORST, 

Superintendent, 



CLASS 8-18 D ON GRADE OF 105 FEET PER MILE. 

ELBERTON AIR-LINE RAILROAD Co., GENERAL MANAGER'S OFFICE. 

ATLANTA, GA., May 4, 1879. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, The Elberton Air-Line Railway, which connects with the Atlanta and Charlotte Air- 
Line Railway at Toccoa, is 50 miles long, of 3 feet gauge, laid with T rails weighing 30 pounds per yard, 
and has maximum grades of 2 per cent. (105 feet per mile), ]/ z mile in length. The shortest curves are 970 
feet radius. On the maximum grade of 2 per cent, there is one curve of 1433 feet radius, 350 feet long. 
The line is worked by two " Mogul" locomotives of your Class 8-18 D (cylinders, 12 X J 6; driving- 
wheels, 3 feet diameter). Each engine hauls on the grades and curves stated fifteen loaded cars, each 

weighing with its lading about 15,000 pounds. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) G. J. FORE ACRE, 

General Manager. 



r 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



GLASS 8-18 D ON GRADES OF 86 TO 105 FEET PER MILE. 

PEACH BOTTOM RAILROAD. 

YORK, PA., February 2, 1878. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Dear Sirs, I enclose a statement of 2^" miles of our road, over which the No. 4 hauled the load 
referred to, together with grades, curves, radius, and length of each curve. 

ist mile. Average grade, 86.6 per mile, on which we have two 10 curves, each 400 feet in length ; 
two 14 curves, each 450 feet in length ; one 9 curve, 500 feet long. 

2d mile. Grade, 105 feet, with two 10 curves, each 500 feet in length; one 7 curve, 250 feet long; 
and one 5 curve, 400 feet long. 

On the last ^ mile. 1500 feet 95 feet grade, with one 14 curve, 650 feet long, reversing on another 
14 curve, 400 feet in length, with 75 feet tangent, followed by a 10 curve, 350 feet long. 

Last y 2 mile. Grade, 105 feet per mile, with two curves, one 6 and the other a 3 curve, each 400 
feet in length. 

Train hauled, seven eight- wheeled gondolas and one passenger coach; total weight, 90 tons. Pres- 
sure at start, loo pounds; when at top of grade, 100 pounds. Speed, 10 miles per hour, being our reg- 
ular schedule. 

Our engineer thinks he could have hauled two cars more with pressure at 125 pounds. I do not 
consider the above as a test of what the engine is capable of doing, and shall be pleased to inform you 
of future performance on the same piece of road. 

November 7, 1878. 

Yesterday the No. 4 hauled a train of ten cars (over the same piece of road I sent you particulars 
of), consisting of four eight-wheeled box cars, five eight-wheeled gondolas, and one passenger coach ; 
total weight, 211,190 pounds, actual weight; equal to 94 tons (2240 pounds) of cars and lading. Pres- 
sure at start, 125 pounds; at top of grade, 120 pounds. Speed, 10 miles per hour, including two stops at 
stations. The above load was hauled with ease. Shall be glad to inform you of any greater perform- 
ance, as we have not yet tested her full capacity. 

(Signed) S. M. MANIFOLD, 

Superintendent. 



CLASS 8-22 D ON GRADES OF 90 AND 160 FEET PER MILE. 

BELL'S GAP RAILROAD. 

BELLWOOD, PA., March 24, 1882. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, Answering your favor of the i8th instant, would say that on the 23d instant, Engine 
No. 4 hauled a train of seven loaded Pennsylvania Railroad cars on narrow-gauge trucks up the grade of 
90 feet, combined with 15 curves, on the western slope of the mountain. Train weighed 183 net tons; 
steam pressure, 125 pounds; speed, eight minutes to the mile. On the same date the engine hauled nine 
empty Pennsylvania Railroad car bodies on narrow-gauge trucks up the grade of 160 feet, combined with 
28 curve, on the eastern slope of the mountain. Train weighed 70 tons, spread over a distance of 285 
feet. Steam pressure and speed same as above. Sand had to be used freely on curves to prevent engine 
from slipping. An ordinary train up the western slope is six Pennsylvania Railroad car bodies on narrow- 
gauge trucks, and up the eastern slope eight empty broad-gauge cars at a speed of six minutes to the mile. 
The performance of Engine No. 4 has been very satisfactory. Engine weighs 52,000 pounds, with three 
gauges of water. 

(Signed) R. G. FORD, 

Superintendent. 
3 



2 6 ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

CLASS 8-22 D ON GRADE OF W5 FEET PER MILE. 

THE MEXICAN NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION Co. 

NEW YORK, September 10, 1883. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co.: 

" Dear Sirs, Mr. Lister states that our " Mogul" engines (14 X 2O cylinders) will take eight or nine 
loaded cars and a caboose from Gracia to Ojo Caliente, about 2 per cent, grade, but cannot make more 
than 8 or 10 miles per hour. 

The eight or nine loaded cars and caboose spoken of by Mr. Lister will weigh from 145 to 150 tons, 
and between Gracia and Ojo Caliente the curves are about n maximum. 

(Signed) W. M. SPACKMAN, 

Assistant Purchasing Agent. 



28 




BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



PERFORMANCE OF NARROW-GAUGE "CONSOLIDATION" 

LOCOMOTIVES. 



CLASS W-24 E ON GRADES OF WO TO 163 FEET PER MILE. 

SOUTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD COMPANY. 

SAN FRANCISCO, July 7, 1882. 
BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. : 

Gentlemen, Your favors of June I2th and igth received. In reply to your inquiries as to per- 
formance of " Consolidation" Engine No. 13, I cheerfully make the following statement: 

The engine is for wood or coal. We have used only redwood, the kind in common use here. The 
engine is at work on our mountain division ; pulls eleven loaded cars without sand up a grade of about 
I mile, varying from 100 to 163 feet, from the mills to the main line, with one curve of 10. Pulls four- 
teen loaded cars and one caboose up a 5 mile grade on the main line, varying from 70 to 90 feet, around 
10 to 16 curves. The sharpest curve occurs on the heaviest grade in one instance. The road is crooked, 
with short intervening tangents between all curves. Steam gets low sometimes and the blower has to be 
used, but the engine can start with the fifteen cars at any point with 130 pounds steam without slipping 
and without the use of sand. With coal for fuel I have no doubt the engine would never want for steam. 
The cars weigh 5 tons each, and the load fully 10 tons to each car. The engine has given us entire satis- 
faction in every respect so far. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) A. H. FRACKER, 

General Superintendent. 

CLASS 10-24% E ON GRADE OF 53 FEET PER MILE. 

CONNOTTON VALLEY RAILWAY. 

BOSTON, February 14, 1881. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, The machines we have work well, and we prefer not to change the pattern or make. 
They take twenty-four loaded cars (12 to 13 tons each of paying load) up a grade of 52.8 feet per mile. 

(Signed) C. G. PATTERSON, 

General Manager. 

CLASS 10-24 J A E ON GRADES OF 75 TO 90 FEET PER MILE. 

DENVER AND Rio GRANDE RAILWAY. 

DENVER, COL., March 7, 1882. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. : 

Gentlemen, Your letter of the 28th ult. is received. I cannot quite confirm the statement of your 
engineer. The engines you mentioned are our Class 60, and haul between Denver and Pueblo 262 tons 
(2000 pounds) of cars and lading. Allowing each car and its load to weigh 18 tons, this would be 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



almost fourteen and a half cars, as all cars are not loaded up to 24,000 pounds. It frequently happens 
that fifteen or sixteen cars are in train. 262 tons of cars and lading are the best they have done. 

The maximum grade over this portion of our line is 75 feet, with unequated curves of 6, making 
the grade on the curves equivalent to 90 feet per mile. The weight of the cars average about 6 tons 
empty, and when fully loaded they carry 12 tons freight. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed} D. C. DODGE, 

General Manager. 

CLASS 10-24 l /z E ON A GRADE OF 4 PER CENT. 

SANTA ANA RAILWAY. 
SONSONATE, SALVADOR, January 18, 1884. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, The " Armenia" is doing good service. She starts and readily handles seven loaded 
cars (75 tons) on straight grade of 4 per cent. We are well pleased with her. 

(Signed) A. J. SCHERZER, 

Chief Engineer. 



CLASS 10-26 E ON GRADE OF 158 FEET PER MILE. 

THE PARANA RAILROAD, MORRETES, September n, 1883. 
To THE DIRECTOR OF THE PARANA RAILROAD: 

Dear Sir, I have the honor of presenting you a report showing the results of the experiments made 
September gth with the American Engine No. 9 of the " Consolidation" type. 

This machine has coupled wheels 0.914 metres diameter (36 inches) ; and the weight on the drivers is 
25,400 kilograms (56,000 pounds). The time used in obtaining a pressure of 120 pounds after firing was 
two hours and thirty minutes without forcing the fire, and the fuel consumed was 213 kilograms (470 
pounds). During the trial the weather was fair but moist. The machine drew a train composed of nine 
cars weighing 27,439 kilograms (60,476 pounds), loaded with 170 rails weighing 33,825 kilograms 
(74,415 pounds), or a total of 61,264 kilograms (135,069 pounds). 

The profile of the road where the trial was made shows a rising grade of 3 per cent. The throttle- 
valve was opened wide. The detent was set at ^ of its course. The maximum speed observed was 17 
kilometres (10^ miles). A speed of 15 kilometres (9.3 miles) was easily maintained. The effective 
pressure in the boiler varied from 130 to 150 pounds. The wheels slipped at various points on the line, 
sometimes on curves, sometimes on tangents. The slipping always took place during the passage of the 
machine over wet rails. At Station No. 40 of the second subdivision the slipping was so bad that we were 
obliged to stop. In spite of the sand the machine was not able to cross this point, which was on a curve. 
The injectors worked very badly. The feed was imperfect, and we lost nine minutes in the 51 kilometres 
from this cause. The consumption of fuel was 304 kilograms (670 pounds) during the run of 11,800 
metres (38,547 feet) up the 3 per cent, grade. The time spent in traversing this space was 53 minutes, 
stops being deducted. The speed was consequently a mean of 13,360 metres (13 miles nearly) per hour. 
The fuel consumed for this space was 304 kilograms, say 25.762 kilograms (56.67 pounds) per kilometre 
(0.62 mile). The consumption of water was 4 cubic metres, say 0.340 metres (90 gallons) per kilo- 
metre (145 gallons per hour nearly). The tractive force as calculated was 60,000 kilograms (132,000 
pounds), which completely corresponds with the results obtained. The various working parts were oiled 
at the start, besides which it was necessary to oil during the run both the guides and the cylinders, which 
absorbed 0.350 kilograms (0.77 pounds) of grease. 

The tender has but one brake, which is not sufficient, and it will be necessary to apply one with 
greater power. The descent was accomplished with a French appliance furnishing a brake against the 
steam. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



To resume, it is incontestable that this machine (" Consolidation" type) will render very good service 
on the second section. In passing around curves it operates very easily; the stability is very good, as 
also its motion. The consumption of coal is in accord with the water evaporated, and is rather large. 
Such are, sir, the observations I have made in these experiments. 

(Signed) EM. BERLAY, 

Engineer. 

GLASS 10-26 E ON GRADE OF 370 FEET PER MILE. 

DENVER AND Rio GRANDE RAILWAY COMPANY. 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COL., November 29, 1881. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, Upon receipt of your letter of the i8th, I referred it to Mr. J. R. de Remer, who 
returned it to me endorsed as follows : 

The 370 feet grade is the maximum on all tangents. Maximum curvature, 24. Equation on all 
curves is 0.55 per degree, which will equal grade of 306.24 per mile on a 24 curve. We have never 
up to this date given the 406 a fair trial to test her power on this heavy grade. The most cars hauled 
by her at any one time up to date has been six construction box cars loaded with men, stores, and 
blankets, etc. My opinion is that Baldwin locomotive No. 406 will start and haul 65 or 70 tons with 
ease on the 370 feet grade. Respectfully, 

(Signed) R. F. WEITBREC, 

Manager Construction. 

February 4, 1882. 

Sample says to-day that the best that Engine 406 has ever done was to haul up 57 tons, consisting 
of cars and paying weight. This was under most favorable circumstances. Thinks average capacity is 
about 50 tons. 

(Signed) R. F. WEITBREC. 



CLASS 10-26 E ON GRADE OF 140 FEET PER MILE. 

OFFICE OF THE EAST BROAD Top RAILROAD AND COAL Co. 

ORBISONIA, HUNTINGDON Co., PA., 8th June, 1882. 
BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, Your letter of the 5th addressed to our President, Mr. Ingham, has been referred 
to me. 

With regard to the performance of our 16 X 2O cylinder " Consolidation" engine : 

Our maximum grade, as mentioned in a previous letter, is 140 feet per mile, 3 miles in length. On 
this grade we have several curves of 574' and 478'' radius, and one of 338'', with reverse curves of longer 
radius. 

Our schedule time over this portion of the road is a little over 10 miles per hour, with twenty empty 
coal dumps and cabin car, weighing 104^ tons of 2000 Ibs., exclusive of tender. 

On the return trips from the mines we consider twenty-seven loaded cars, containing 9^ tons each, 
or a total of 384^ tons, with the cabin car, a fair load over an adverse grade of 52 T 8 ^ feet per mile at the 
rate of 15 miles per hour. 

Finding the engine too large for our turn-tables, I abandoned those at each end of the road and 
substituted V tracks with 23 curves on each arm. These it passes over daily with perfect ease. 

I have no doubt but that the engine would haul more than we have ever put her down to. Unfor- 
tunately, we are obliged to run her at a much higher rate of speed than is advisable for an engine with 
driving-wheels 36 inches in diameter. I have, therefore, not attempted to work the engine up to the 
full hauling capacity. Yours truly, 

(Signed) A. W. SIMS, 

Superintendent. 



34 




BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



35 



i 









ti 



Q 






tt 





s 

4 








CD 

&bi 

CD 



CD 

So 







j 








rf 1 


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I--. 


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1 



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<=> 

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S 


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5 

a 

1 

ct 


st 

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to (M g 

8 s 


o 

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N 


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i" s 


8 


as 


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00 


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iis-l 
| 3 g 
~ s .* 


1JI 


t-. 




o 


* 


3 


3 


a 




\cT 






CX3 


Capacity of Tank 
for Water. 
8j^-Pound Gallons. 


^ *: 

|j 


cs 


= s 

2_ij 






1 


^ 00 


Wheel-Base. 




s; =2 


be . 

.3 J2 

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J 

"T 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



PERFORMANCE OF A NARROW-GAUGE "DECAPOD" 

LOCOMOTIVE. 



CLASS 12-30 f OH GRADE OF 200 FEET PER MILE. 

THE MEXICAN NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION Co., NEW YORK, April 6, 1883. 
MESSRS. BURNHAM, PARRY, WILLIAMS & Co. : 

Gentlemen, Mr. Purdy sends the following as the result of a trial trip of a " Decapod" engine 
between Mexico and Summit, with a train of 

Eight eight-wheeled cars, loaded with 12 tons each, making a 

total of .......... 281,056 pounds. 

One four-wheeled caboose ........ 8,675 " 



Total weight of cars and load ..... 289,731 pounds. 
Pine wood consumed, 3.75 cords. Distance run, 39.12 kilometres. Gradients are as follows: 

Level . . . 9.18 kilometres. 

I percent, ascending 5.10 " 

2*/ 2 " " 7.8l " 

3 T 8 o " " 17-3 

Mr. Purdy expects shortly to have several experiments made with these engines, so as to get an 
average, as the circumstances of this particular trial were more favorable to the engine than usual; and 
he will also have some experiments made with the " Consolidation" engines and send me the compara- 
tive statement, which I will send to you as soon as received. 

(Signed) WALTER HINCHMAN, 

President, 



r 



L. 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 41 


<rfr 
oo irt 


i 

" % 


1 

&* 
00 

O 
CO 

5o 
cs 

o 
1 

P-H 
1 

6-i 

(=3 
CS 
O 




c on boiler is meant. 
, according to capacity required. 
>arate tenders. A tank engine of any 
lass 4-20 C would weigh about 40,000 
ad equal to the weight of the tender 


M 
M 

-rt 

S 

H 

o 
2 

Bu 

B 

i 

25 

1 


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M 

1 

cs 

a 




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^ ^s ^ 
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^ IBO 


ffl 


a;< 


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^"^ i 


/ 


CD 

(^ < 
> ^ o 

r -? & 
^^ 

5 $ Q 

tr*" %. -T 
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cx - 2 1 

S^ K 
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K W 

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P-} 

p^ O 

CD 

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i, lit LJ 


*|| ff ;j/:;VTJI&j^II<P^__ji General Design shown by Photographs on pages 38 and 40. 1 


a?" 


IO to *-O f O O O O 


s g 


irsmt 


In referring to any of the above classes, it should be stated whether a locomotive with separate tender or with tan 
In case of a locomotive with separate tender, the tender can be 4-wheeled, 6-wheeled, or 8-wheeled, as preferred 
The weights given in above table and the figures for loads to be hauled are predicated on locomotives with sej 
given class would weigh approximately, when tank is full, 8^ pounds in addition for each gallon in tank. Thus C 
pounds, with tank, containing 550 gallons of water, on boiler. The tank engine could also draw an additional lo 
omitted, say from 5 to 10 tons. 

^ 


^ ^1 
s fe 


O *o 1 s * w ^o oo ro O 


11 


1%, t^ ro rj* N HH W OO 
C^ ro ^~ i-*"> *O t^ OO ^ 


Weight 
in Working Order. 
Pounds. 


HI 


80 o o o o o o 
O O O O O Q O 
O *-*"> O O O O O O 


2 L OV 2 S M 1 ^ 5, ^ 


1 


0000000 
o o o o o o o 
*C . - o . '-I 9. x. 

H-cpii-iMNNrori 


Capacity of Tank 
for Water. 
8^-Pound Gallons. 


II 


8O O O O O O O 
<^> o o o o o o 


J U 


oooooooo 

oj c) ro fO ^* ^ 10 i/% 


Wheel-Base. 


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^ Nl X 

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11 

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xxxxxxxx 


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42 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE- 



o TJ crq g. 
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P." O ET S EP 



S H 

P- ET 



rc_ 2 Di o" n 



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3 S >- 



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l |1 

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Si, P 3 
crcrq 



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(T) S O P *-^ . (^5 

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f r^ 1 "^ r^ - . ^^ C 



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o o o n o 


P 






GJ to "i O "O 

X X X X X 


5 


1 




00 00 ON ON ON 


P 






(*>(*> OJ Ui W 




^ ^ 5 


i 




00000 


^1 







s? 1 

4^ ON OJ . 


F 5' 
n 


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| 


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t 





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1 


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fill 


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88888 


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M OO to ^00 Ui 

o o o o o 
o o o o o 
o o o o o 


i 


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1 


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o o o o o 


IP 


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1 


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O **n <-n O O 


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o ^* o <-^ o 


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tO VO **! OJ 

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s 




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43 



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45 




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4- 




BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 49 


CO 

4 

^ 

S o 

CD 



CJ? 

Q 
^? 
^ 

CD S 

s N 

-^ - 4, 

2 ft S 
->(-, 

a r 5 

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| M X 

t^H pef Q JB 

M * 

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a Ma 

w 
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3 
g 

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s - 

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i 1 

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0. 

<=> 

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1 


^?s 

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> 


The weights given in above table include water in tanks. In this type the driving-wheels are equalized together, and the truck is centre bearing, with 
swinging bolster and radius bar. For traction on short lines, and where limited tank capacity is admissible, this type has the following advantages : 
First. Having six wheels, it is comparatively steady on the track, and moves smoothly and without plunging, causing the least wear to the track and itself. 
Second. The fuel and water are carried on the engine frames at the back. The centre of gravity of the engine is thus kept low, and the boiler is left 
unobstructed when any repairs are required by it. 
Third. The distribution of weight is as nearly perfect as possible, and the principal weight is carried on equalizing levers midway between the driving- 
wheels. This gives an equal distribution of the weight on the four driving-wheels. The pony truck carries the weight of the water and fuel, with part of 
the weight of the overhanging fire-box. 
Fourth. The engine can be run either way without turning, and will pass curves readily. As the weight is carried on the two fulcrums of the side 
equalizers between the driving-wheels and on the centre pin of the pony truck, every wheel finds a bearing, however uneven the track may be. 
Fifth. The plan admits of a fire-box of ample length and width. For tracks of 30 inches gauge or less, the fire-box can be made wider than the gauge of track. 

V 


1 

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* * 


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il 


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N ro^mvo r^cb ON 


Weight 
in Working Order. 
Pounds. 


HI 





2 2~rr8 ^"S ^^ 


1 





tr> o\ T^ r^. MH x^j o *o 

^H c-) n co fO ^" ^d" 


ity of Tank 
r Water, 
and Gallons. 


-I : 

S | 




g o " to 


"^OOOOOOO 
r) 10 ""} O *o O ^o O 


i.- 2 * 

01 Nl 


^5 ,g ! 


Wheel-Base. 


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bo 

fl --r. 


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all J 
3 5 * a 

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ro ro CO fO ^O ^t" 


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5 o 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



eights g 
me con 



n in above table incl 
rations as are stated 



00 00 OO OO OO OO 








O 00 ON 4* M n 

WH H H W- 1 WH "H 

o o o o o n 


i 






X X X X X X 


IP 1 
P.I 


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^ 

3' 

b 

| 




OO ON O"\ ON ON 4^ 








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O 3" O O O ^o 

4^- OJ OJ Oi OJ 
*H *^J *^J *^J *vj 




5* ^ 5 1 

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1 


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&" td' S* 

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O O O O O 01 


ir 






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ll 


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1 


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01 O 01 01 o O 


o o> 

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5* 




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ss 


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01 01 Oi 01 o 


ll{ 




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O O O 01 01 O 


h l f 







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73 



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to 






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M 

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54 




T 



r 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



55 



pa 



8 






C_> 



52 



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* 
= 

' 



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1 

co 

5' 



co 



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PM 

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CO 



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i 





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N rt 10 vo r-. oo O 


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u 


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S. 


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O O O 10 O O O 


1 

t=> 


j 


!li 


10 O O O 10 10 O 
^* t^. OO O ** **S~ t^-. 


1 




p--g 


o O 10 O 10 10 O 

vO O -! ^" *O O '^~ 


S 




NW CS 
* M o 

CO *-> 
M 


10 O >o O 10 O O 
Os *O OO fO t^> ^t" O 






a > 


O 10 O O O 10 O 
l~~. O vO r^ 00 -3- OO 
CN ^f rj- 10 vo CO C*> 


S 




.-; bO ^ 


O O O O O O O 
8OOOOOO 
O O O O O O 


3,1 


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a 


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is 


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e. 


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1 




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10 O 10 O 10 10 O 






o 


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1 

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ll 


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51 




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u o o o o o o 

O "- M rj- vo' OO O 








00 OO CO CO OO OO OO 



O rt 

5 s 



e 



service 
ntages : 
that the b 
entral eq 
bearing 



a 



f 
a 



jf> 

" S^ 
-^ e 
85! 

1i 



is offered as the most perfect 
e apart. It has the following 
ected by side equalizing levers, so 
the front truck are connected by a c 
othly, and all the wheels will find a 
will pass short curves with facilit 
relieves the flanges of the driving 
he cab instead of on the boiler. 
fire-box, will throw an undue pro 



type of engine 
s a short distan 
truck are con 
-wheels and o 
refore, ride sm 
that the engin 
, and thus 
back of 
ght of th 



rame 
h wei 



e 
o 
c 
f 
t 



er in tanks. This 
with water statio 
eels and of the re 
of the front drivin 
The engine will, th 
ter and radius bar, s 
uides the engine on 
an extension of the 
r, and, combined wi 



d 
he 



g 



ights of 
turning, 
driving- 
The spri 
bearing. 
nging bol 
largely 
placed on 
n the boil 



P ti rt ra -r r Q 
^ I |. i g J8 Jd 

^5 <u | 5 csx c 5 

3'^^- i* i/i y rt*j 
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^ S.S S 



"T 





J 






56 ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 


In referring to any of above classes, it should be noted whether an engine with separa 
In case of a locomotive with separate tender, the tender can be 4-wheeled, 6-wheeled 
The weights given in above table and the figures for loads to be hauled are for engines 
would be increased approximately in the ratio of 8^ pounds for each gallon of water in ta 
49,000 pounds with tank full of water. The tank engine could also draw an additional loac 




i 

1 

fl 

ft 

ft 
1 

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Capacity of Tank 
for Water. 
8^-Pound Gallons. 




H 


^(NitOi-iO^O^ON 

80 o o o o <-" 
o o o o o o o 


4 4^. 4^ OJ OJ Co 10 10 

OO4*OO\OJOO\"-| 


o 


Weight 
in Working Order. 
Pounds. 





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o o o o o o o 
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57 




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62 




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BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 



63 



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to 
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given in abo 
the three pair 
The engine 
riving-wheels 



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B3 

ZTYZ 

/US' 



64 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 




5 

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