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Full text of "Illinois spray service report"

"L I B R.AFLY 

OF THE 
U N IVER5ITY 
or ILLINOIS 

<b34.0l6 
1344-47 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/ilsprayser19441947univ 



)}lf 



(From the Illinois State Natural History Sixrvey and Ex- 
SPMY SERyiCE HEPOBT-Wo. 1 (tension Service in Agriculture and Home Economics, Uni- 

(versity of Illinois College of Agriculture 



March 2^+, 19kk 



■x-**-^-********** 



OPEWIWG AMOIMCEMENT : We hring you now the first of the weekly spray service reports 
presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a number of fruit growers, 
And we'll give you the report by areas. 

For Faducah -Henderson . Apples are prepink to pink. Sulphur fungicides 
should be applied for the prepink spray. Peaches are from 10 to 50 per cent in bloom 
with 70 per cent of the buds reported killed. 

Carbondale-Vincehnes-Louisville Area . Apples are prepink; aphids moderate 
to heavy; codling moth carry-over heavy. Dormant sprays may be applied on late vari- 
eties; sulphur fungicides for prepink sprays on early varieties. Peaches are 10 per 
cent in bloom with 10 per cent of buds reported killed. 

Belleville -Hardln-Centralia Area . Apples are dormant to tip-green; aphids 
heavy; codling moth carry-over heavy. Apply dormant sprays; add nicotine sulphate 
for aphid control where necessary. Peach buds reported severely injured north of 
Hardin- Jerseyville . 

Bedford -Lexington Area . Apples are tip-green to prepink; codling mcth 
carry-over heavy. Apply dormant sprays on late varieties; sulphur fungicides for 
prepink sprays on early varieties. Peaches are tip-green to pink. No killing of 
buds reported. 

Champaign -Lafayette Area . Apples are dormant. Apply dormant sprays. 
Peaches are tip-green; severe injury of buds reported. 

Northern Illinois -Indiana Area . Apples are dormant. Apply dormant spray 
or dormant spray with D-N added for control of aphids and oyster shell scale. 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : That concludes the first weekly spray service report presented 
in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the agri- 
cultural experiment stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State 
Horticultural Society, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, 
Indiana, and Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Eusk, Director. 

Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 50, 191^ 



(From the Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT~No. 2 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
/■ ^H 0\^ ^^^^ }^ome Economics, University of Illinois 

^ V/ (College of Agriculture 

iO,V4M-''+l 4HHHHHHHHHHf-;!";HHHS- Marcll 31, 19^^ 

OPEMIN& ANNOUNCEMENT ; Here is the second weekly spray service report 
presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a number 
of fruit groxfors, 

4t •«• -;h!' ***■!!••»-:;- -;'r -;> -st^j ■SHt 

I For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; Apples of late varieties 

■ are still prepink to Dink. Weather is favorable to apple scab. Foli- 
age should be protected by sulphur fungicides. Peaches are past full 
; bloom at Paducah and 90 per cent in bloom at Villa Ridge. 

For the area of Carbondale-Vincennes-Hender son- Louisville ; 
^ Apples of late varieties are delayed dormant to prepink, with early 
i varieties prepink to full pink. Fruit buds are light on some varie- 
] ties. Weather is favorable to apple scab. Foliage should be protected 
by sulphur fungicides. Peaches are in full bloom at Henderson. El- 
bertas are 90 per cent in bloom at Carbondale. There is no bloom at 
Vincennes. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralla Area : Apples of late varieties 
are delayed dormant to early prepink. If' warm weather prevails , the 
first scab spray should be applied April 7« 

Bedford-'Lexington Area : Apples of late varieties are green 
tip with early varieties prepink. Weather is favorable to ajpple scab. 
Foliage should be protected by sulphur fungicides. As for peaches, 
Golden Jubilee and" South Haven are in the pink stage, with Elberta five 
per cent in bloom. 

Peoria-Chgjgpalgn-Laf ayette Area ; Apples are green tip. Dor- 
mant sprays may still be applied. Peaches are severely injured. Mini- 
mum temperature March 30 was 23 degrees. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area. ; Apples are dormant. Apply a 
dormant spray for the control of aohids and oyster shell scale if 
necessary. 

■innHs- *** 4fr HHi- -;!••:!•■!(•-;!■ -;{■-;!■ 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : That concludes the second weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Ken- 
tucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Labora- 
tory at Vincennes, Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History Sur- 
vey. 



-0" 



^-, 



Cooperative Extension Work in ApricuD.ture and Home Economics: 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director, 

Acts approved by Congress liecj S and June '^0 , 191^ 



(From the Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT~No, 3 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture 

April 1, 19^^ 

OPENIIICt am noun cement ; Here is the third weekly spray service report 
presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a number 
of fruit grovj-ers, 

* Vf ^i-;i' ■!!-;!■ -;!■ i> -;'<•■?!•-;> -:i- ->* 

For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area . Apple buds are full pink 
to early bloom. There has been some frost injury. Apply pink sulphur 
spra^ys. Peaches are past bloom. Frost has caused severe damage. 
Minimum temperature vras 19 degrees. 

For the area of Carbondale-Vlncennes-'Kender son- Louisville, 
Kentucky . Apples of late varieties axe pink with early varieties ap- 
proaching full bloom. There has been severe frost injury to Grimes at 
Vincennes. Minimum temperature was I9 degrees. Apply sulphur sprays 
on late varieties. Peach buds are from 5 "to 100 per cent open. El- 
bertas are 4-0 to 70 percent killed. 

For the Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area . Apples of late 
varieties are delayed dormant to prepink. Sulphur sprays are necessar;'- 
on m.ost varieties. Add nicotine to sulphur sprays where necessary for 
aphid control. Peaches are about open at Belleville and early bloom 
at Alma. Only light frost damage reported. 

For the Bedford- Lex i ngton Area . Apples of late varieties are 
prepink to pink. Sulphur sprays will be needed on most varieties for 
scab control. Peaches are from full pink to early bloom. Minimum tem- 
perature 20 degrees at Lexington. Excellent crop prospect reported at 
Bedford. 

For the Quincy-Pittsfield Are a, Apples are delayed dormant 
to green tip. Aphids are . abundant. Hicotlne can be applied where 
necessary. Sulphur sprays may be needed by April l4- for scab control. 

For the Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area . Apples of late 
varieties are green tipped with early varieties delayed dormant, Pre- 
pink sprays may be needed by April 14 for scab control. 

For the Northern .Illinois- Indiana Area . Apples are approach- 
ing delayed d-ormantl No sprays will be needed this xfeek. ^ 

C LP SING- M3N0UNCEMENT : That concludes the third weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit grovjers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Ken- 
tucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Labora- 
tory at Vincennes, Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History ^nv- 

^ey- -0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating, H. P. Rusk, Director, 

Acts a'ODroved bv Concress Mav 8 and June "^0. 1914 



SPRAY SERVICE EEPCRT 



(From the Illinois State Natural History 
(Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agricultiire 



April 7, i:^^^ 



Listen to the spray service broadcast by your favorite station. 



LOCATIOW 

St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Vincennes, Ind. 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Evanavllle , Ind . 

Louisville, Ky. 

Louisville, Ky. 
And.eraon, Ind. 
Champaign-Urbana, 111. 
Muncie, Ind. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Chicago, 111. 
Peoria, 111. 
YanJ-Cton, S. D. 
Davenport, la. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Decatuj:-, 111. 



KILO- 








CYCLES 


DAY 


TIME 


IN CHAEGE 


.850 


"Fi-iday 


7:50 a.m. 


E. Knoerschild 


1120 


Sunday 


6:^5 a.m. 


Charley Stookey 


1450 


Wednesday 


1:05- 








1:20 p.m. 


J. Ei chard Aker 


IU5O 


Monday 


6:00- 








7:00 a.m. 


Bayne A. Spring 


920 


Monday 


12:00- 








12:30 p.m. 


Jim Miles 


1230 


Monday 


11:20 a.m. 


Charles L. Brown 


1280 


Monday 


12:55 a.m. 






or Tuesday 


12:1+5 p.m. 


Mrs. Pat Eoper 


ll^OO 


Saturday 


11:55 a.m. 








1:00 p.m. 


C. M. East 


QkO 


Saturday 


11:50 a.m. 


John F. I^ferrifield 


121+0 


Monday 


11:15 a.m. 


W. C. Haynes 


580 


Monday 


12:52 p.m. 


Ted Mangner 


151+0 


Wednesday 


11:07 a.m. 


Hugh Ear ling 


890 


Tuesday 


12:00 m. 


Arthur C. Page 


700 


Mon . , Wed . 








and Fri. 


12:li7 p.m. 


Eoy E. Battles 


670 


Monday 


6:15 a.m. 


Everett Mitchell 


ii+70 


Tuesday 


6:00 a.m. 


"Farmer" Bill 


570 


Tuesday 


6:05 a.m. 


George B. German 


1U20 


Saturday 


6:50 a.m. 


John Fulirman 


1190 


Monday 


12:li5 p.m. 


Tom Wheeler 


13^+0 


9 


I:l6 p.m. 


T. H. Willhite 



The attached map will help define area locations. 



l. 



L 



c 



(From the Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. ^ (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture 

•tt****!-*^^-;^^-!^^!-* April 1^, 19^4- 

OPENING- ANMOUNCEIA-ENT : Here is the fourth weekly spray service report 
presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a number 
of fruit growers. 

For the Fadu cah-Villa Rldp:e Area . Most apple varieties are 
full bloom. Foliage i's developing rapidly. Cedar and quince rust is 
appearing. Spray blight-susceptible varieties with 2-4-100 Bordeaux 
and other varieties with five pounds wettable sulphur. Peaches are 
through blooming. First curcullo sprays may be needed. 

For the area of C arbondale~Vincennes--Kenderson-Louisville,_ 
Kentucky . Apples of late varieties are prepink to pink with early 
varieties starting to bloom. Foliage is developing rapidly. Apply 
sulphur sprays for scab. Peach bloom is about over. First curculio 
sprays may be needed. 

For the B e lleville-Har din-Cent r alia Area . Late varieties of 
apples are full pink and early varieties are approaching bloom. Apply 
sulphur sprays for scab. Peaches are about full bloom. Sulphur should 
be applied in the full bloom on varieties where blossom blight has been 
serious in past seasons. 

For the B edford-Lexington Area . Apples of late varieties are 
prepink to pink wi"th early varieties a"bout to open. Foliage is develop- 
ing rapidly. Sulphur sprays should be applied for scab. Peach bloom 
is about over. The first curculio spray may be needed. 

For the Quincy-Pittsf ield Area . Apples of late varieties are 
prepink and early varieties pink. Sulphur sprays will be necessary for 
scab. 

For the P e or i a- Ch amp ai gn- La.f ay e 1 1 e Ar e a . Apples are likely 
to advance to the prepink stage this xireek. As soon as any foliage is 
exposed in the buds, apply sulphur for scab. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area . Apples are likely to 
advance rapidly this week. As soon as any foliage is exposed in the 
buds, apply sulphur for scab. 

CLOSING- ANNOUNCEKEM T; That concludes the fourth weekly spray service 
report presented in 'cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Ken- 
tucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Labora- 
tory at Vincennes, Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History 
Survey. 

-0~ 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics; 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H, P. Rusk, Director. 

Acts approved, by Congress May S and June 30> 191^ 



(From the Illinois Stote Natural History 
SPBJff SERVICE REPORT — No. 5 (Survey and Extension Servioe in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture 

•jHt*******')!' April 21 1 19^4- 

OPENING- AFFOUNCEMENT : Here is the fifth Xireekly spray service report 
presented in cooperation vj-ith State and federal agencies and a number 
of fruit groxirers. 

Cool, rainy weather has orolonged. tree development in Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Southwestern Ohio and Kentucky, Throughout the various 
fruit-growing areas mature scab spores have formed and are discharging. 
In Kentucky the first infection has appeared". In southern Illinois in- 
fection is expected to show by April 26. Codling moth pupation in the 
southern regions has advanced as high as 15 per cent. In general, pi>- 
pation has not advanced much the past x^^eek. Gurculio are scarce in 
peach orchards. Sprays or dusts are needed onD.y.if Jarrings indicate 
that curculio are abundant whei'e peaches have reached split- shuck stage. 

crop 

For the Paduoah-V ill a Ridge Area. One-half the apple/ is. re- 
ported at Paducah, Most varie'ties are through blooming. In Johnson 
County, Illinois, a light crop is in prospect with some center blossoms 
killed. Host varieties are in full bloom. Foliage should be protected 
with sulphur for scab t'nrough the calyx and first cover. The calyx 
spray will be needed over most of this area by April 29. 

Peaches were severely damaged by freeze throughout the area. 
Shucks are splitting at Paducah with little fruit development north of 
Paducah,. Curculio have not entered the orchards in numbers and no 
sprays or dusts for control are needed unless jarring records indicate 
a general movement of curculio into the orchards. 

For the Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- Louisville, Kentucky 
Area . -Arole bud development has been slow. Trees are from early bloom 
at Vincennes to full bloom at Henderson and Louisville with Duchess 
through blooming at Carbondale. A 15 per cent codling moth pupation is 
re-oor'te"d at Vincennes. Aphid predators are active. Most varieties 
will be in the calyx between April 21 and 29. Weather has been favor- 
able to scab development, and sulphur sprays should be applied through 
the calyx and first cover to protect expanding foliage, 

A good peach crop is still in prospect. Petals are off over 
most of the area. There has been little fruit development, and curculio 
sprays or dusts need not be applied until jarrings indicate a general 
movement of cur-culio into the orchards. _ 

For the Belleville-Kardin-Centralia Area , Apoles are pink to 
full bloom. Spray blight-susceptible varieties with 2-^100 Bordeaujc 
In early bloom. Due to a delay in bud developm.ent an extra sulphur 
spray may be necessary. As new foliage develops, it must be protected 
against scab infection. 

Pears are in full bloom. 

Peaches are from full to past bloom. Sulphur should be ap- 
plied in full bloom on varieties where blossom blight has been serious 
in past seasons. , ,, 



-2- 

For the Bedf ord-Ley-lnp;ton and Southwestern Ohi o Area. Apples 
are early pink to early bloom. Scab spore discharge heavy In south- 
western Ohio. Weather has been favorable for Infection over most of 
the area. One more sulphur spray vrlll be needed before the calyx Is^ 
apolled. Where blossom blip'ht has been serious in past ' seasons, spray 
susceptible varieties with 2-4-100 Bordeaux in the early bloom. 

Peaches are from full bloom to petal fall. No ciirculio 
sprays fire needed this vxeek. 

For the Qulncy'-Plttsf ield Are a, Apple va,rletles are all in 
the prepink stage, A light crop is reported on Golden Delicious and 
Grimes, Scab spores are mature and discharging. It is necessary to 
keep foliage protected with sulphux. 

For the Pe oria-Charnpaign-' Lafaye tte . Are a« Apple varieties 
BTe prepink to early pink. Scab spores are m.\ ture and discharging. 
It is necessary to keep foliage protected with sulphur. 

For the Northern Illinois and Indiana. Area « Apples are 
likely to advance rapld!iy this week. As soon' as any foliage Is ex- 
posed in the buds, apply sulphur 'for scab, 

•;:- if"}fr ■-;!■ ■5s> -;;- -if- -"- -"r it 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT ; That concludes the fifth weekly spray service 
report presented In cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Ken- 
tucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Labora- 
tory' at Vincennes, Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History 
Survey* 

-0- 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P, Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May & and June '^0, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- 
April 2g, 19^^'+ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
■No. 6 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNO UNCEMENT : Here is the sixth weekly spray service report 
cooperation with state and federal agencies and a number 



presented in 

of fruit growers. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - 

2 - 



PaducaJi-Villa Ridge 



Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson 
Louisville, Ky. 

Belleville -.Hardin -Centralia 



Ohio 



cool, wet 

tected by 

gionsx^.as 

rapidlj 

where j 

be orotelcted 



k ~ Bedford-Lexington-S.V. 

5 - Quincy-Pittsf ield 

6 - Peoria-Chatrrpalgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 

Apple development has been rapid over the entire area, v/ith 
v/eather very favorable to apple scab. New fpllage must be pro- 
sulphur fungicides. Codling moth pupation in the' southern re- 
advanced as high as 'JO per cent. Plum curculio 



have increased 
in*peach areas and curculio sprays or dusts should be applied 

-''° indicate many adults. Outside rows of trees should 



rring 



records 
first. 



For the ______^ 

sprays aite needed on all 
in calyx Vnd first cover 
is reporte 



Paducah-VlS!.la Ridge A^ea: Apple petals are off. Calyx 

week. Sulphur should be included 
nty per cent codling moth pupatioi 



vari\eties this 
for Bcab. Sev 
at PrincRt on, .. Xenjb ucky . 



Peabhes are growing\ rapidly, /with shucks splitting or already 
dropped, Curci^lio numbers ara incre asing rapidl y ; xirith &0 p^r cent of 
females ready yco lay eggs, Cui\culip/ sprays or dus la d.a.'e nee'iled this 
week, particiilarly on -jDuter rov;p~Gr trees. Tre^t as soon as Jarring in- 
dicates sc^undance. 



Area; 
petals 
ing sV. 
th/ 



Carbondale-Viicennes-HendersonU Louisville, Kentucky ; 



m 



For -^he 
^ples ar^e iir ft±41-iilQaiii 
at Vincenrfes and petals 
.-Qhu^ for pcab should be 
fin 



.4 



sprays 

go per 
records 
outer rows 



t-cov'er spray for scp.b, 

Peaphes a!^e dropping 
1-ii "^ needed ^h^is weej^ 
c^gi:jt of females ready—to 



at_ Heiider§_oh_BndJ Louisville, dropping 
off at Carbondale, A caiyx spray includ- 
applied this weekj, Plan to include sulphu; 



trkeir shucks rapidly, Curculio dusts or 



inVlicate ^curculio^'^bun^.ant, 



For, 
dropping the 
new foliage \-x^ 
needed this w 
Apply the calyx 
ply cui-'culio spra 
culio abundant, T 

For the 



full bloom to ear 
for scab afte r pe 
control, a lii^e s 
thoroughly fr 
drop and rus 




Curculio 
lay egg&>. 



numbers''are^ i^^^^^^i'^S' with 



Treat 



as soon^ as jarring 



paying p af t i 9JJii«i; at|tention to the 



lie«Ha,rdin-Centralia Area: 



te^varletles 
s M,b ."" 
le cies 



?in: 



t,o 
I4 



Ea3^1y applifes are 

' ' " — rotect 

The calfyx spr'^y xfi/ll proba]bl|r be 

n^/-^trmild J.nclu_de sulphur f oi;r scab, 

a^e ^.f-T Peach shuclts are splittingX^Ap- 

cjLS^soon as jarring records indicate cup^ 

r^ws in the orchard first, 

J 

-lyexi Qgt on- Southwest em Ohio Area 



etal falO., 
drop, / —On 



Apply the calyx s-oray..ln 




-phur fun^f 
ro sides, 
fruit, but 



"orcnards 
icide in the 



not sprayed to 
calyx is suggested, 



les are 
uding sulphur, 
date for scab 
spraying 



This will result in spray burn, some fruit 
maj'' save a crop unsprayed to date. 



• '■■■.. i ■ . . .l' 



. •', r ■■■: ■■ 



I i 



\ 






;.t*iC 



i ; ■.■ ' .. ; 






; I 



ij i .,■ 



•/5 ^:n. 



/ / 



we 



-2- 

Peaches are through blooming. No curcullo sprays needed this 
ek unless jarring records indicate curcullo are abundant. 



On Concord grapes the first black rot spray should be applied 
late this v/eek. 

For the Qulncy-Plttsf leld Area : Apples are preplnk to pink. 
Some varieties may bloom this week. Scab spores are discharging and 
all new foliage should be protected by sulphur. Wiere bloom blight has 
been serious in past seasons, spray susceptible varieties with 2-^100 
Bordeaux in the early bloom. 

For the Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : Apples are prepink. 
No bloom is expected this week. Scab spores are discharging and all new 
foliage should be protected by sulphur. 

For the Northern Illinois- Indiana Area ; Apples are mostly de- 
layed dormant. Scab spores soce discharging, and all ne\-i foliage should 
be protected by sulphur. 

Southiire stern Michigan reports apple crop good and a few peaches, 

-0- 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P, Rusk, Director,. 

Acts approved by Congress May 2 and June J)0, 191^ 



TNM: dh 



■t .J ^ , .:. 



,.'\ .11- 



SPRAY SSnVICE REPORT— No. 

ISlay 7 -to 13, 19 '1-^ 
OPENING AN'^]OUNCEI-:ENT: 



(Prepared by Ill.inois Str.te Natural History 
(Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
( and Ko,:ie Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbanr., Illinois 



It's ti;;ie now for another weekly spray service 
Fesented in cooperation ^^rith state end federal agencies and a 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



report 

number of fruit growers 



1 - Paducali-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes -Henderson - 

Louisville, Ky, 

3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.V. Ohio 

5 - Quinc^-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Chajnpalgn -Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



Weather has continued cool, with frequent rains over the entire 
orchard area. In Kentucky, southern Indiana and Illinois, primary scab 
infection is appearing in many orchards. Primary scab infection may 
still beVvery heavy over most of the fruit area. Growers should keep 
foliage pVotected from scab by sulphur. Peach orchards should be jarred 
daily and|a curculio spray or dust applied v/here curculio are abundant. 



^or the Paducah-VillV Ridge AreV : At Paducah codling moth 
started em^glng April 26. Fi:^Gt hatch ik expected May S. Apple scab 
still seriou K and cp.rly cove y— qpr ays shoi/ld include sulphur. Peaches 



IS 



are growing raoidly. Curculio 



jarrina 



Area: 
cover 
sprays 
_ajL Yin 
Peach 
dust s 
tect e 
become 



calyx, 
to 13 
sprays 
Treat 




numbers abunc 



sprays 
xnt. 



a/e needed in all orchards when 



he Carbot7dale-Vinc 



sprays xx'er' 
■j-^iould be 
shOyftld include s 
ceni?es and Sender 
^hJLicks are off. 
h)ould (be jar /red d 
ges oif orchards 
abundant. / -Eirst 



oolied 



applied ir 
ulphur ford 
si:m,~-c 
Orchards 
Ly to de 



ai^„ 

first, lie 
cedar ru 



ennes-Henders on- Louisville, 



Ken tucky 
first 



■Centrali"^ Area 



The 
and si 

or dusts 
outside 



t cover spray, 
ifor sckb. On 
g records ind 
^d^ ^irst. 




by' May 1^ The cilyx top off, or 
most orchards Miy 7 'to 13» These 
scab. Codling aoth emerged May 2 and 3 
n-elr-ftir«-t -h-a-tcte-is-^sradicted for May I7. 
ot protected by a cur'culio spray or 
termine the abund^ance of curculio. Pro- 
_ ing all fruit prjotected when curculio 
t shov/ine:. 



eo' 



^opl^s are past the 
36 ^,pplied May 7 
^ulio 
iant. 



spray will be neede 
serious threat, par 
necessary that sulp 
first cover spray. 




liwe st e r n^Ohto'^r e a : 



■sj-x&tir^s by May I3. Apple 



a 



of 
calyx 



Cincinnati, making 14:- 
spray end at leasjf'the 



.k. .7 ■. i 



^ 



A 






.■ •( 



■■.r"\ 






/ 



. \ 



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■ X 

•V:. 



!-'■■/ 



■-■•■a 

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-2- 

Peach shucks are off and cupculio sprays or dusts are needed 
when jarring indicates curcullo are abundant. Oriental fruit moth are 
expected to be entering peach twigs May 7 to I3. 

In grape viney-.rds where black rot has been serious in past 
seasons, apply second black rot sprays to grapes May 7 to I3. 

For the Quincy-Fittsf ield Area : Wine sap and VJillow Twig 
apples are in full bloom. Earlier varieties v;ill be ready for the calyx 
by May &, Most varieties should have a calyx spray before May 1^. This 
spray should include sulphur for scab. 

For the F e or i a- C hampa i r;n- Laf ay e 1 1 e Are a : Apples are pink to 
full bloom. Apply pink spray including sulphur on varieties not open. 
Where blight has been serious in past seasons, spray susceptible varie- 
ties with^2-M-100 Bordeaux in the early bloom. A good majiy varieties 
may be ready for the calyx before May I3. The calyx spray should in- 
clude sulphur for scab. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area l Apples are from pre- 
pink to eajrly bloom. Early vrrieties may open by May 7, Most varieties 
will need a pink spray containing sulphur between May 7 and I3, At least 
one spray containing sulphur will be needed for scab control before the 
calyx spray. 

Compiled by; 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture, 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 



•:i- -;{-;;">> *<H(' ■«••!(■ ■it 



CLOSING AN1'0UNCET:ENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit grov/ers and federal and state 
agencies, including the agricultiaral experiment stations of Kentucky, 
Indiana and Illinois, the Kejitucky State Horticultural Society, the 
Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, Indiana, and 
the IlJ.inois State Natural History Survey. 

-0~ 
TNM:JE 

Coojperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Hom.e Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture, and the United States 
Departm^ent of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May C and June J>Q, 191^ 






- n': ••■ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- 
May iH- to 20, 19^^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
-No. 2 (Siirvey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING- ANNOUNCEMENT : It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers; ^^^^^ SKWICE bepobt .ums 



1 - 

2 - 



Paduc ah -Villa Bidge 
Cai'Londa ].e -Vincennes -Henderson- 
Louisville, Ky. 
Bellevxlle-nardin-Centralia 



k - Ber'i'ord-Lexington-S.V. Ohio 

5 - Qu:-nc---P;:.ttrfiold 

6 - Pecria,-C;ianrpoign -Lafayette 
3 - Belleville-nardin-Centralia 7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 

General: Through May 5-7 freezing temperatures severely in- 
jured stravrberrles over the entire area. Fruit was about 1/2 grown in 
Kentucky when killed by the frost. Kentucky grapes were severely dam- 
aged. Apple scab still serious threat to the apple crop. Frost damaged 
apples InNnany sections. Peach prospects unchanged. 



ir th 
pccted May i3* 
scab control^ in 
scab. At Priiice 
show many apples 
with three poun 
Oriental fruit m 
outer tree rows 
cates curculios 
day spray cental 
fruit is l/2r^rffc 



e Paducah-Vil la Ridge Area; 
For soutliern 
early cover i _ 
ton, Kentucky, 
d e f ormed b y q ui i 



First hatch codling moth ex- 

naif of Kentucky, Bordeaux is suggested for 
praVs. Conditions are vrry favorable for 
a<l'ple orchards receiving regular schedule 
ce rust, /None found in orchards sprayed 
sulphur and ll/2 pound'^ "Fermate" since pink stage, 
ntering peacih twigs /May 10» For curculio, i)rotect 
ln\ peach orchardsXwlth s yrays or dus ts where__Ja^'ing indi- 
ar/e abundant. On \cab-siisceptible ^ai'ieLies, appiy a ten- 



Are"Sl Hsaify 
oWe 



six uoundE 
in diameter. 



the Cg^^bottda^-Vj-aC-er ne^-H££Ld.er^on=-Louisville, Kentucky, 



frosts reported for M^ 
orchard near Vincennes, 



5~tcr77~^-"fi'th 5 
First codling : 
discharge Vinfeennes M 
vjherever practical, G-r 
r©rmate" for sca.b 
lons^ ~-^Ii^ these o, 
e, nicot3me-j3ulph 
y Hay 20. The "J 
trees. CurJ\ullo\are stj^ll more nur 
srtrays or dustp shq/uld be contln 



killed _ 

May 20-2^ He^vy so/ab spore 
scab control should/ continue 
full nicoisine schpdule "^.ould use 
reduce llm.e, t-a-2 pounds per\100 g 
cover spray should include bentofti 
Have first fuM nicotine spralv" on 
is heavy on yo 
of orchards, and 

cates curculio ar^ abundant. t)ue- 
varieties add 6 nfeunds of wettyfef5 
1/2 inch in diameter. y 



s)l 



rtable sulphurjfor peach scab when 
7 



For the 
for calyx top-off Dy May 
contain sulphur for scl&%r", 
should use "Fermate" 



;^o rainy weath 
si>\phur for 




each 



per cent apples 
;Oth hatch expected 
5-6. Sulphur for 
wers changing to a 
ijj^lrst cover and 
chardav the second- 
,te, and summer oil, 
leTS^rop" of peaches 
eroulgi'n the edges 
'rifher e j^fcsrbn^"^ di - 
on scabT-susceptible 
jscab when fruit] is 

J 



Bel\levil. le-Ha Mi1: ^Q>e:;i^alia Area ; Apples will be rei 
'^^- -^iyx~top-off and first cover spray shou; 
"G-rp<!rers\changing to a full nicotine schedule 
r sca^ in tl/ie first cover and reduce lime tc/2 
pounds per 100 gallons XTJn^i-^ese /orchards the second-cover spray^hould 
include bentonite, nicgtine sulphate and sum5^_j)il*_----At Jlr^t-tn, 6o per 
cent of the codlin g m o ^t^ki^ hav ^ ^ xxiTKte^. None have emerged. Peaches are 
PTi-si: ahuck fall at\ BeMeville "and" Centralia. Peach leaf curl is severe 
at G-rafton, Orchards/injured by peach leaf curl should be fertilized 
with nitrogen tof^Malilate growth of new leaves, Curculio are appearing 
on the edges of the orchards, and sprays or dusts should continue where 
jarring indicates curculio are abundant. 






: X 



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-2- 
For the 3edf ord-Le:-.in?ton-Southwestern Ohio Area : Apples will 
be ready for the calyx top- off or first-cover spray in the ndrthem part and 
the second-cover sprry in the southern portion of this area by May 14-204 
Bloom is heavy in many orchards. Scab spore discharge xiras heavy the first 
week in May, and sprays through the first cover should contain sulphur 
for scab. G-roi^jers changing to a full nicotine schedule should use "Fer- 
mate" for scab in the first cover and reduce lime to 2 pounds per 100 
gallons. In these orchards the second cover should, include bentonlte, 
nicotine sulphate and surnraer oil. On peaches susceptible to peach scab, 
apply a ten-day spray containing six pounds of wettable sulphur vjhen 
friait is 1/2 inch in diameter, A few curculio are appearing in peach 
orch3.rds. The second curculio spray should be applied in the vicinity 
of Lexington about May I5, Strawberries were severely injured by frost 
at Bed.ford. 

For the Quincy-Fittsf ield Area : Apples will be ready for the 
calyx by May 1^. The calyx, calyx top-off and first-cover sprays should 
contain sulphuj:' for scab. Orchards not sprayed for aphid.s shox-^r heavy 
populations of grain aphids that are doing considerable damage. The ad- 
dition of one pint of nicotine sulphate per 100 gallons to the calyx and 
first- cover sprays will kill those aphids vretted by the spray. 

For the Peoria-Champa.ign- Lafayette Area : A:pl3s are full bloom 
over much of the area, i^rith petals falling at Martinsville, Illinois, A 
spray containing SS pounds of wettable sulphur should be applied in full 
bloom for scab. The calyx and calyx top-off and first-cover sprays should 
also include full strength wettable sulphur for scab. Most varieties will 
be ready for the calyx spray May l'-i-20." First codling moth emergence ex- 
pected Lafayette May lo, first hatch by June 1. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area ; Apples are pink with 
early bloom expected by May I3, Full bloom expected. May l4-20. A spray 
containing o pounds of wettable sulphur should be applied in full bloom 
for scab. The calyx and calyx top-off should also include full strength 
wettable sulphur for scab, A prolonged bloom may mal^e scab sprays very 
important this season. Keep nev; foliage protected by sulphur. 

Com.piled by: - 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Poxfell, Department of Horticulture, 
University of Illinois College of ilgriculture 

CLOSIL^C- A;.'N0UI^]CEMENT t And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state 
agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Kentucky, 
Ind.lana and. Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, the 
Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey, 

TNM:JE ~^~ 

5-10_L;.l| 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Ho_me Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Deppjrtment of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 3^; 151^ 



'■• I'"- -v .• 



..j; ■ :n:h 



5 (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No, 9 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
May 21 to 27, 19^^ (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENIN& ANN0UNCEI4ENT : It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report oresented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ 



1 - Paducah-Vllla Eidge 

2 - Cartondele-'"'ip.cennes-Henderscn- 

LcuisviUe, Ky. 

3 - Belle vilie-IIardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.V, Ohio 

5 - Qu:.nc.7-Pitt.-:flold 

6 - Peorla-Cliarrrpoign -Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinoia -Indiana 



General : During the week of May 1^+ to 20, codling moth adults 
emerged south of central Illinois and Indiana in record numbers. Fruit 
in all areas except seven should be protected by codling moth sprays for 
the next^^hree weeks, 

A heavy hatch of worms will occur the week of May 21 to 27 over 
the southei^n half of Illinois, Indiana, sauthwestern Ohio and Kentucky. 

Fbr black and red raspberries in\ all areas except one and two, 
spray just before the blossoms Apen with Sj-g-lOO Bordeaux for anthrac- 
nose control.N 



For gi 
rot with i!-6-100 




es in all aresjs but on^, 
ordeaux bef oreVblcsson/s 



two and three, spray for black 
open. f 



7 
Fpr^he Paducah-Vllla Ridge Areaj Codllig moth will be hatch- 
ing in largs-numbers May 21-27. ^PPly codling motli sprays 7 to 10 days 
apart for ttre liex$ three weeks, Summer oil shouldlbe added to kill eggs 
and improv^kill of^^-hrorms-r- i-l«lCO JB-or-deaux-sh-ey.l^ be used with sprays 
co-nTaihin^lead arsenate. One-half to three-fourths pint of nicotine 
sulphate^yto 100 gallons will kill many adult moths and young leafhoppers. 
Spray th/)roug5ily and keep fee fruit protected. Curpulio are causing 
many peathes to dr6p_. One additional spray or dustj 10 days after last 
one will^{J3e needed for"«.djalt curcptiss^now appearing^ 

FoA the Carbondale^inc^nnes-Henderson-Lo^^sv^ll^, Kentucky. 



Area : Record\jii«nbers of codJ\lng rtvoth adi^lts emerge 

heavy hatch of woVms is expected, ybeginning May 

low their spray schedules carefi 

next three weeksl Use summer/^i 

the lead arsenatle sprays apj^lie^ 

of ^ to -| pint nre^tln^ &«"lpha1 

moths and young lea^^;iopp@?s. 



MaylJ^ to 20 and a 
Growi^'*s---3ii€uld fol- 
.-y, spraying eVery 7 to ip days for the 
W3^th lead ar/enatekto kill eggs. [In 
b€twe&n-l^y_/l and June /3, the addition 
tolOp^aarlOns-wJLlLkiil many aduli 




Many curcul^tJs'aref-^tilli appearing in peach orchards. A^ 
cullo spray or dust 1(^ da;^^_>fter /t he last treatment v/ill kill ciU7Culio 
adults appearing nowi ''^^-X^ ^1 / y^ 

. p .f^— • '■■ '/ ^ 

Tor the^ Bel)levllle-Hardin-Centralia Area : Adult codling moths 

taken in traps at-^ several locations indicate a hatch of worms will start 
May 21, Grower^—steetild follow their spray schedules carefully, spraying 
every 7 to 10 days for the next three weeks. Use summer oil with lead 



■^Ir: 



,^rv;r;.r - 



.. 'M.: 



■..ailii" ;. 






1^ 



no ■ 



,t' 



I 






Oi- .lO'. 






■^ f 



arsenate to kill eggs. The addition of ^ to -J- pint of nicotine sulphate 
in the next tx^^o cover sprays will kill many adult moths and young leaf- 
hoppers, 

Curculio still important in peach and early apple orchards. 
A spray or dust should be applied 10 days after last treatment. 

For the Bedf ord-Lexingtcn-Southwestern Ohio Area : A heavy set 
of apples reported^ vicinity of Cincinnati. Codling moth emergence 
started May 11 and has been heavy since May 1^. Worms will be hatching 
by May 21, with a peak of hatch expected between May 2& and June 5. 
Growers should follow their spray schedules carefully, spraying every 
seven to 10 days for the next three weeks. Summer oil should be added 
to lead ajcsenate sprays. The addition of i- to -5. pint of nicotine sul- 
phate per 100 gallons in the next two cover sprays will kill many adult 
moths and young leafhoppers. 

Heavy set of peaches reported, vicinity of Cincinnati. Cur- 
culio jarred in orchard May 1^, The second curculio spray or dust should 
be applied by May 21 at Lexington and between May 21 and 30 at Bedford, 

For the Qulncy-Pittsfield Area : Codling moth emergence began 
week May l4-20 and first worms will be hatching by Mai'" 23 • Emergence of 
adults may be heavy May 21 to 27, with eggs hatching in 4 to 10 days de- 
pending on temperatures. B'irst cover spray should be completed by May 22, 
Use oil in lead arsenate schedules not closer than 1^ days from last 
sulphur application. Keep fruit protected against codling moth for next 
three weeks. 

For the Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : Codling moth emer- 
gence is just starting at Martinsville, Illinois, xirith first hatch ex- 
pected May 23 to 27. The calyx top-off or first cover spray should be 
applied May 21 to 27. Both sprays should include sulphur for scab. 

Peaches should receive a spray or dust for curculio 10 days 
after last treatment. 

For N orthern IllinoiSj Indiana Area : Apples will be ready for 
calyx May 20, "the calyx, calyx top-off and first cover spray should in- 
clude sulphur for scab. Leafhoppers are second instar, A few red 
spiders are showing up in northern Indiana orchards. 

Compiled by: 

M» D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture, 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state 
agencies, including the agricultural experiment sta.tions of Kentucky, 
Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, the 
Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey, 
TNM:JE 5-19-^i^ -0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 2 and June J>0, 191^ 



iZ- i.Crai: 



K'l.i .L 'I 



i..?8 a- 



■ .c 



; V: 



i, \n±: i'ti^}. 



■■.' • .i.X'-v. 






^>Jrt ra.8 --•■?; f 



.s 



SPRAY S3RVICS RSFORT— No. 
May 2g to June 3, 1$^-^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State I^atural History 
10 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
( ?.nd Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OP ENING- AI^iroUN CEMENT ; It's time now for another weekly spray service 
re-oort presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers.^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 



1 - Paducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes -Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia 



h - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Qulncy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Champalgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



General : Codling moths are emerging since May 25 over the 
entire area covered by this report. Peak emergence was past in the 
southern half of Illinois, Indiana, Southwestern Ohio and Kentucky be- ^ 
twe en Xay 21 and 27. Peak hatch of worms will occur May 2o to June 3 ^"^^ 
all orcnferds should be heavily sprr.yed, using summer oil wherever prac- 
tical, 43a.vy spraying should be continued into the following week to 
build a ioxic residue for probable heavy\ second-brood hatch. 

No further curculioXsprrys or Busts are needed in most orchards. 
Mowing co'^r crops, cultivatim peach orchards, and picking up wormy 
drop peachg-g, will aid in controlling sec/nd-brood curculio. 



On ^apes, apply spral 
as soon as they\finish blooming 



for cor/trol of black rot and berry moth 

— ~x 



ri dge 



the Paduc'ah-Vllla 

^r the Ca r bon dale ~Vin|;ennes"7 



Area and 
hienderj 



and Louisville, 



Kentucky ^^e'g: : .A heavy hatch ofl worms will occurlMay 2S - June" 3 
( Eggs are/ hatching- s-e-ven~days_afler_laid..)_LIsel±Lrei pounds arsenate of 



-Ir^a^r 
half g, 
plus Si 
Henry 
dusts 
wormy 



^half pound of copper s 
.Ion of summer oil for ea| 

Ln;i:er5oil, / Omit sj^raying 

ilay and R^d_Blrd. 

\eeded, i-'iow cover 
vaciias,-^ ' ^ 



Iphate, one poundl of lime, plus one- 
b/ 100 ga;Llons of mixture, or nicotine 
ery ear% varietjles such as Transparent, 
her first-brood qurculio sprays or 
i>ltivate peach orlchands and pick up 



No fur 
crops, ' 

\ 

%ellevill\e— Hamin-Ceniliralia Area 



Bedf ord-Lexin::;xon, Southwest^ 



FA^;the 

fort]ie ________ 

for "me Q,uincy-PitJts>y^ld 
start May 2S taat will contj^u 
thoroughly covfered, using __^umderp 
Omit sulphur -rftan using-«ummer oil 
half pound of cop^^ su|.phat 
varieties er.cept Jc^athan__a.ftd)^prcren 



Ohio 



Area: A txfeavy hatch /of worm 
days /CO twq^ vjeeks. Keep 
■r more pea];2i cover sp 
Fe-ad 



f o>^ten 
oil ^n— 



arsenaJE^ inciuae ons- 
'^ound of lime as corrective on" 
Delicious, 



^ 



Curculios/iare de 
may indicate an adc^i^^na 
mow cover crop, 



culxi'^ 



xte 



reasifig in many orchards, but jarrin 
§_-pre.y or dust might be profitable, 
or c hr^* d s , pi ck up w^ riTlY ppi^r-hnc - 




'recoras 
.n June 



~ Spray"" 
moth control^ 



,g3^a| 



es as tney finish blooming for black rot and berry 



.-...* ••>• 



'" f 



_y 



I 



i 



^f- •>-■■ 



-2- 



For the Peor la- Cham:oalp:n"- Lafayette Area : Codling moth hatch 
will start this v.^eek but probably xvlll not be heavy until June K to 10, 
No further sulphur should be used. Use summer oil In the ne;:t two 
sprays, starting summer oil ten days after last spray containing sulphur. 
With lead arsenate, use -^-1-100 Bordeaux as corrective on all varieties 
except Jonathan and Golden Delicious. 

For Northern Illinols>-Indiana Area : First worms will be 
hatching before June 3. Heavy hatch will not occur before June ^ to 
10, Spray applied May 2S to June 3 should Include sulphur for scab. 

Compiled, by: 

M. D, Fam^ar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dvright Pov.-ell, Department of Horticulture, 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

-IS-;:- -s;- -;!• ^s- ■» -j:- « <!• 4i- ** •» 

CLOSING ANN0UNCSI4ENT ; And vjith that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois,^ the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
and the Illinois State Natural History Survey, 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating, H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May § and June 30, 191^ 

TM:CG 



90 :, 



:;) I ■:; 



\;yV'"v^ ,. ■^:tf. f;: }jvi.:.::--:V:. H-lOfiini ^- . .1 ..Q ..' 



;j.;;' .;":■' •;/■:, . •'" -■■;;■ i 



■ •, •- I'.- 



«-■»-!(• •■.;•^,■--;.• -'(■'';•• ;• :; ■'■■::•';■ 



•ij vaoo 



** .'. •-.' -S 



t ;:i J.:.:f^- ',?? .■ j.n; '; 'i:.;}v?o 



... ^ 



.1 >,,,:.• V I)- -' 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 11 (Survey and Extension Service in Agricultui 

{end. Home Economics, University of Illinoi' 
June k- to 10 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING- ANNOUNCEMENT ; It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers, 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Paducah-Villa R-'lge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

Loulsville, Ky. 

3 - Belleville-HaTdln-Centralia 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-PittBfield 

6 - Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



General: Codling moth adults are still emerging in southern 
Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky, although the peak flight occurred txfo 
weeks ago. G-rowers are urged to keep fruit protected from first-brood 
worm qntrances for another two weeks. Codling moth bands should be 
applie^in all orchards at once to capture and kill first-brood worms 
soon to pe leaving apples. 

Blotch-susceptible varieties djhould receive 4~6-100 Bordeaux 
in the ne^xt two sprays in alii areas except No* 7« 

<Peach prospects are lexcellent in southeastern Indiana, south- 
western Ohi ^ and eastern Kentip ky. Further curculio sprays or dusts may 
be omitted, Wcept in orchardsl where jarring records indicate adults are 
still active, \G-ood orchard practices for June are to mow cov^ crops, 
cultivate underX peach trees an\pick op wormv pea.ches« 



pounds co^ 
blooming. 



Graphs should be spraypdr^\rith three poutnds lead arsenate, f oui- 
sulphate and six pf)unds hydrated lipe as soon as they cea:: 



For the i P adu c ah" Vi 11a 
emergiiig and worms v/ill continue 
are ur-ged t^ cont/inue sprays exc 
moth iMnds novr. /Growers who 
noTA,^ wito a U-.6;?f00 o>-^g-100 B 
off infVptien before spo\s can 



peaches, M( 
peaches will 



furtt^r first-broo, 
\g of cover (^ops^ 
in control lOf 



lidge Area: 



Codling moths are still 
to hatclx in modeirate numbers. G-rowers 
!pt on eai'ly varieties. Apply codling 
hadlbitter rot troub^le in 19^3 should start 



'^aus 
seeti^ 



at 10- to 14 



■da^ intervals to head 



curculio sprays 
. culti-,7l^tion and 
!Cond-brood cu: 



For Vth( 

Area, 

Bedford- 



>r tJae-^ellc 



jexi! 



;on 





necessary 
ed 



on 



C ar b ndgZ e-"Wi ns enn eS-i^^er.d^son-Louisvj/llej Kenti 



;hvje-«tern 



- C e"iTtr a4 i%- Are a , and for 
Codling moth 



Area: 



_ emer- 
gence probably" pa st\ the^>ea^'fey Ig- 2^, but sufficient moths are sta^ 
emerging to justify JcontinwSd. spraying. Fruit should be well cov^i^d, 
allowing not more t'nanplojLays between sprays. Sprays applied Jilne 4 
to 10 should inclu(^e^«iimmerloi]^ On early varieties, because or residue, 
lead arsenate should^ njbt be a pplied aft^"^ ^^^ -Pnniii.i'i- .i m mt' ."'Xrav. Nico- 
tine sprays at 1 O-rift f^'^nt pr^^ a r .q TTipv hs r.nnti nneri well into June. 



Blotch- siisceptible varieties must be watched and 4-6-100 Bor- 
deaux applied "f^j^lotch control x^here necessary. 



.Ol-r-^ ovioc- 



it 



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/. 1- 



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■■■x 



\ ■ 1 



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-2- 

Plum curcullos are still active in Areas k and 5» Peach orw 
chajTds should be jarred regularly for curculio. Apply a spray or dust 
10 days after last treatment in orchards where curcullos are still abun^ 
dant. 

For the Quincy-Pittsfield Area , and for the Pe oria" Champ aign^ ^ 
Lafayette Area ; Codling moth adults are emerging in large 
numbers, probably reaching a peak between May 2n-and30. A heavy hatch of 
worms will occur June ^ to 10, and fruit should be well protected over 
this period with a spray, including summer oil. Apply codling moth ban; 
by June 10, 



for 



Peach 
curculio if 



orchards should be Jarred regularly and sprayed or dust^ 
curcullos are abundant. 




ar e no t 



Blotch is 
necessary. 



seldom serious in this area and sprays for control 



Compiled by: 

M, D, Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOS ING- A I'IKOUH CEMENT ; And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report orttse'ri'.ed in cooperation with fruit groxvers and federal and 
SG£."':e agencies; Including the agricultural experiit^ent stations of 
Krjrtucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kenoucky State Horticultural Society 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture, and the Unitt^d States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating, H. F, Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May o and June 3^* 191^ 

TNM: JE 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 12 
June 11 to 11 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
(Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING- ANNOUNCEMENT : It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers, 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT PJ&-.S 



Paduc all -Villa Ridge 
Cartondale-Vincefmes-Henderacn- 

Louisville, Ky. 
Belleville -Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bfeifcrd-Lexlngton-S.W. Ohio 

5 ~ Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Chaiapaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



General : Many worms were entering apples June ^ to 10, \fith 
adult moths still active in all areas except Kentucky and extreme south- 
ern Illinois. Spraying should not be relaxed, and in most orchards not 
more than 12 days should be allowed between sprays. This is especially 
important in orchards following a nicotine schedule, .Codling moth bands 
must be aTsplled now to be effective. On blotch-susceptible varieties 
U-6-100 Bordeaux should be included in sprays applied June 11 to 17. 
G-rowers who had bitter rot on certain varieties in 19^+3 should start 
seven days jafter last spray, using H~-G-10<^ Bordeaux at 10- to l^day 
intervals until four sprays have been a_:piied. Caution ; Severe foli- 
age Injury t|ias occurred vrhere ^6-100 Bordeaux has been applied with 



"Fermate" oKon top 
terials on tn ^ s am o 
bitter rot. 



of a "Fermaie" residue). Do not use these two ma- 
-t r o o s . Eith er materiafl alone will probably control 




No farther sj 
moth are needed 




■■^ 



r dusts f orj'control of cferculio 

until within fouj' to six vieeks of 
continue^ less abundant than usual in 



or Oriental f 

harvest, Cffaental fruit moth has 

most orchar\5ts._ Catfacing is llgh-tj on Illinois pea4;hes but very heavy 



in Indiana And same parts of Kentucky and southviestern Ohio, A heavy 




these area^ will probably 



5 



of-f set- the- damag-e by catfacing. 



apples 



For the Paducai^Vllla Ridge Area5 The halrvest of Transparent 
dli start /W June 19, andlfurther sprays on early varieties are 
not advised, h^ev varieties shouM be sprayed June 11_ to 17 to help 

carry oveV/trtiB period of TranspaF^nt fi^RSfest. Varieties "susceptible to 
blotch or bisfcter rot should\_pec^iV'e ^6-100^B«r4i©a'uX^,^_Apply codling 
moth bands, \ 3 ^ h^~^-\ t 

1 1 iT'^^pf^fiar T>^ s t 



Peach justing or spa? 
treatment, Cull/ivation of peaph/Orchards 
curcullos now in the soil, ' '^ 

For the C\rbondaie-V' 



Area; Belleville-H"ar^ili--^Trtf^' 




s e con d-br 00(1 



Louisville, Kentucky, 



ingt on-5o uth- / 



western Ohio Area ; ,(j!odlingrraoth flight is falling off, but enough, 
moths are still f lyirlg ;tro-«ake continued spraying necessary except on 
early varieties. At), Viricenn4s a/67 per cent increase in wormS/^nd 
stings is reported fo'Wthe pas^lQ_jiays — t^a-weSi-sprKy^e^brchSrds . Ap- 
ppox-jr fflately 10 p ^r cg'^ t of~ 1"^ j^!iries found June 6 and 7 were less than 




.! ; ':;'f 



■"J"-.' . ■-' ■' ■" 



/:• 



'i.' 



- 2 - 

one day old. Mature larvae started leaving apples June 1. Bands should 
be on the trees now to be effective. An interval of not to exceed 12 
days should occur between sprays. Maintain all treatments at full 
first-brood strength. Sprays containing ^6-100 Bordeaux are needed on 
blotch-susceptible varieties. 

Peach dusting or spraying may be stopped until preharvest 
treatments. Cultivate to destroy second-brood curculio in the soil. 
Oriental fruit moths are light in bearing orchards but are reported 
heavy in some young orchards. 

For the Quincy-Pittsf ield Area and the Peoria-Champaign::^ 
Lafayette Area : Moths are still emerging in large numbers. In a Griggs - 
ville orchard, traps caught four moths per trap on June ^ and 5* Full 
strength first-brood sprays should be continued with not more than 12 
days between treatments. Codling moth bands should be applied at once 
to catch early worms. Blotch-susceptible varieties should receive 
4—6-100 Bordeaux. Bitter rot sprays are not needed yet. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Codling moths are 
still flying in large numbers and a heavy hatch of worms may be expected 
June 11 to 17. Danger from scab is about over, and s uiimier oil may be 
included in sprays applied June 11 to I7 if at least ten days has 
elapsed since the last application of sulphur. In orchards where leaf- 
hoppers are serious, include one pint of nicotine sulphate per 100 gal- 
lons of spray when the young leafhoppers are about full grown. The use 
of 4—6-100 Bordeaux is not necessary in this area for the control of 
blotch. 

Compiled by: 

M. D, Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOSING- ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society 
and Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey, 

- - 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 5 and June '}0, 1914- 

TNM:JE 
6-9-4-4- 



^ , (" *•, 






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'V .CO. 






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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 
June 13 to 2k- 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
13( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT ; It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPRAY SEEVICE KEI-OFi 



1 - Paducah-Villa Eidge 

2 - CarlDondele-YincenneB-Eenderson- 

Loulsville, Ey, 

3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bt'dfcrd-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 " Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Chauipaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Ind.i ana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; The harvest of Transparent 
has started"^ A few Red Bird peaches v/i 11 be picked June 19- 

Because of the high number of codling moth pupae found, it is 
advised tha^t the first second-brood spray be applied early in the week 
of June 19-$^. 

ntinued applications of Bordeeiux for bitter rot is recom- 
mended in orchards where this diWase has atopeared in previous years 
_-, ^, ,, ^- U-^- „_ i„^_-^. — >-„i appeared.' 



although to 



late no Infection hai 



For Noeaches the first" 



r wi <s;cav.nco uiic x j.x o u ' s econd-br ood curculio adults appeared 
on June 1^, but ho general increaise In orcmards has developed. Oriental 
fruit moth injury iaas increased slightly./ Brown rot has been observed 
on Red Bird peachei, with weather f^vora"^e-ft«r-irt^-i^vjelopm€^i4-.--C^ 



Area; 



F 
Belle v' 



ern Ohio ~Kr e 
first-brood 
mentr 
area and 




7 
„„e Carbondale-Vincennes-Henjierson-Lduisville, Kentucky 
e-Kardin-Centralia Ajrea; and"^Bedf ord-i.Lexington-So u thwest- 



-■Oodling moth flight is light, v/lth d continued moderate 
^atch."^ -^eaiher^ has been favorable for ajctivlty and develop- 
d-brood v/orras should"star1; hatching Junej 23 in the Vincennes 



cii-«cj. ciiiu. (auout_July i in the Carbondale area. A heavy hatch is expected 
in all reygions^of th/ese ar^as by July k. . A^oid allowing more than 12 
days to e,^lapse between firfet-and second-brodd spraysj 

Bitter rot has ~Rot beeni 
any time lnN:rchards where "ohe d^se 



reported, but inf iption-. may appear at 
ase T.»;a> r^resent t-he pas t""^ ear, 

is very^ light.) Curculio 






^<. 



On Veaches 5the Oriental( fruit moth 
population is rOw'^ ) ^ 

An inarease of grappa r@af hopper is expected, c&'lfiing for ^ 
:ine application as soon as jconsid^r^ed nec^sary. , ! 



nicot: 



\ 



For the^ ^lncy-^ittspre^yghsAjr^eg ^and the" "Pg-o r l"a- Champa! rn- ^--^^ 
Lafayette Area ; Codling mi5ths^p« -31:111 emerging in fair3.y large number^^ 
First-brood sprays shojivid'be XL©ritl-r)ued at 7-^0 10- day intervals. Codling 
moth bands should be p^l th.is \week. ) f" 



/ 



y 




J..J.J. i 



'•t'»3 VWUiTl 



•■:'/ic T;" V ;ri;\n y.;;,?: 



* -; 



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■ V' H' r -1 i:- ■ 



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M' 



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-2- 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : No report has been 
received from this area during the past week. It Is suspected that 
codling moth hatch Is at a peak, and accordingly sprays should be ap- 
plied at 10-day intervals. VHiere leaf hoppers are serious, use one pint 
of nicotine sulfate per 100 gallons of water with the recommended cod- 
ling moth sprays. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dv;ight Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOSING- AN N OUNCEI-iENT : And with that we conclude today's sprtiy service 
report presented in cooperation v/ith fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



-0- 



TNM: JE 
6-l6-i^!+ 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. RuSk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May & and June 30, 191*+ 



■v:;;:Viv:3 



3 --^ 



't)0 .;. 



■^i--^- 'ii"4fr^i»^«Ji"?''*4i'-' 






(Prepared by Illinois Stc.te Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE RE?CRT--No. 1^ (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics; University of Illinois 
June 25 to July 1 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT : It's time now for another xv^eekly spray service 

report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 

number -of fruit growers. ,„ ^^,_„,.^ ,.,^^,,^ „^-.„o 

^ SPPAY SERVICE KEPOET ABmAS 



Eldge 



1 - Paducah -Villa 

2 - Cartondal.e-Vin.cennes-Henderaon- 

Louisville, Ky. 
5 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 



h - i3ea:rcx'd-Lexlng-t:on-S.y. Ohio 

5 " Qu.incy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Chax'ipalgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area : Damage by 
been widespread on apples. Transparent harvest has bee 
one week, with most fruit free of worms. Second-brood 
emerge June IS. Many worms will be hatching by June 23 
should beVgrotected by sprays as soon as practical afte 
continued h^avy hatch is expected for several weeks. N 
fection has ibeen reported. First second-brood curculi 
Adults are s'carce in most orchards and no s^prays or dus 
week. Oriental fruit moth continues lighte^^ than one y 

Foi\the Carbonda 
Area; Bellevil\e-Kardin-Ce 



i:\e- 



\ \ 

1 e- Vincen ne s-Hend^r son- Louis V 
ntralial Area: Bedf ord-Lexingt 



* 



quince rust has 
n under way for 
adults started to 
or 2k, and fruit 
r this date. A 
o bitter rot in- 
o appeared June 1^. 
ts are needed this 
ear ago. 

ille, Kentucky , 
igton, Kentucky, Area: 



Hatch of second^brood codl 
June 25; Bedford \June 27; 
July 5. A continue|d heavy 
Because of a conti|<i!ued hat 
break between th^Aate sec 
ring in Augus-%^ Unless Ju 
is likely toWjcperience on 
ord. Bitter rof'h^s not b 
time in orchards whex'e ttie 



ing moth is expec'ted to start at Vlncennes 
Carbondale Jurie 29; Centralia and Grafton 
hatch \f v/orms/is expected after theSj6 dates. 
Qh of la\e fii^'^^Yoo^~'^^mftST^^^er^^''W^ri be no 
first thlrd-lbrood hatch occur- 
are Ysubncrmallly cool, the region 



ond-brood 
ly and August 

e of the heaviest 'codling 'jmoth attacks on rec 
een reported, but infectio|n may appear at any 
-d-iaease„ iias orjiseat th.e pfest year. 



chards, 

July. 

fruit 



Area: 




IthQJUgh there is a sligh]!: increrse of curculio in peach or- 

dusts or spraysgfor control need^^e applied before early in 

Watch the weekly broadcast ftr further report^. The Oriental 

motn\ continaes light in most f)><;hards 






) 



I 



\ 



FoKthe Qui ncy- Pi t ts f i »ldy' Ar ea ; ^eQjrlg.7 Clia:?npaign- baf ay ett e 
It c\dllng moths are^stlll appearing in cagfe'§^~and fet light 



\ 



For Nort thern Illinc^s-|'nd|ana''Ar-€a : /iloths were ;6till emerging 



Adult dsjdllng m^t! 

traps, indicati^Q^ that' worms viy-ll ^ntinuei^to enter fy'uit^the v/eek of 
June 25-July 1. Npt more than 12 d^ys should ocC|ai2-^etweerr-ip>i^ys"~through 
this oeriod. / \ ^ /C, / / 

} K / ^ / k I 

^ ana' -Ar-e a : / 

from cages at Pri^K^tonj_ HrlinoLfe, on Ji^Tig/l^T^- 

appearing on apples t^is we^k. (MCt/drfe^ri'/cJrxTis are leaving fruit for 

/ _ y 



i'^xe.sh entrances were 







:> 



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.tr 



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-2- 

pupation. Sprays should be applied at 10-day intervals. Where leaf- 
hoppers are serious, use one pint nicotine sulphate for each 100 gallons 
of mixture with the codling moth spray. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



■0- 



TNM : JE 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Dlrecor 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June ^0 , 191^ 



:,"; V'f l-]C. 



.' ■ ' >> "■ "^ .' : "^ ■'' 



\ J. J. IZ^^CTJ. O *-*. K/ J -t. . 



»«' U CA U "^ 



AV «.^ 1^ v,^j. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 15( Survey and Extension Service In Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
July 2-S ■' (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT 



It's time nov; for another weekly spray service 



report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPEAY SERVICE l^EPORT ARE/.S 



1 - Paducali-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

Loulsville, Ky. 

3 - Belleville -Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedfcrd-Lexington-S.y. Ohio 

5 -.Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



For the Paducah-Yilla Ridge Area ___ 
ling moth worms still leaving the apples. Adult 
crease from Louisville south in Kentucky. Trap 
Princeton, and Henderson heavier than 
complete^^oray coverage essential 
res:iorted. \Transparent harvest is 




Apple_s - First-brood cod- 
activity still on In- 
catches at Paducah, 
dioring first brood. Heavy and 
by July ^. No bitter rot Infection 
about ended. 



;aches - Brown rot continues to, appear on ripe peaches in 
spite of drK^, hot weather. Curicullo adultk still scarce in orchards. 
Jarring at I'aducah shows no inci^ease over ^ast week; however, some 



increase x/as. noted at Villa 
favorable for 
and more fruit 



emergence. 



Rid,i 
Oriental 



ntries noted. 



Area; Bell 



For the/^ Carbondale-Vlnc\r 
evillg.'^Hardin-C'entralla 1^ 




Genera] 
fruit ma 



dry weather has been un- 
th scarce. Less twig injury 



nn e s ->iienderson-Lcmi«viiie-7 — K-e^t ucky 



Area : Applpe- -^^ Codling moth adult 
^easing. Second-brood 



^fe¥^^; Bedford- Le:^lngton, Kentucky , 



catches In bait jtraps have oeen 



».t, 



hatch id under wf?y but still at a 
_'he" s,econd-brood peak will be less distinct at Vincennes 
l^st hrbo^, while a_dl_stLnct peak second-prood hatch Is ex- 
CarbondalQ, Sprays should be applled'"at 10- to l^day inter- 
fendlng on materials used and infestation. Growers changing to 
should be (certain of obtaining adequate su.jplles to complete 
n. Spray s__that iire applied beginning June J>0 should contain 
,e. Transparetsi harvest i-sv^bout over. 

- ches - Plum curculio jjarrln"^ l-o^ tlie C^l■'bondale^ area shows 
a marked increase of ^dult a^c^ivlxy. Sprays or'^dus-p^'^s-h^oul^ be applied 
the v^eek of Jfi^lv 3 v;fth a seC^ond a^Dplication in 10 (^ays.i Oriental 
^^,,4+- ^QiYi Is li^ht, except in cer)tain localizec^->ar^as su5l\!.j^..Br'i>kms- 

'n this ares' the third 



steadily in 
slow rate, 
than the -^ 
pec 

vals, de 
nicotine 
the seas 
an ovlcl 



fruit . _ _ ._ ._ _, ^_ . _._ 

town, Martinsville, and Terre\Hajji;t(e, Indiana 
brood is entering twigs In laj^ge/nuinbers. In 
is occurring on^y to a sllgljt d^gr^e.^->Jl 
over 




^ ther areas /such entrV 
'd peach hardest is about 



Area : Very light 
moths not expected b 



For the Qul)itry-^i't^^ield Area ; 




^ 



m^th acljivity this past week, 
ul^ IQ. 

y 

J 



Peoria-Champaign-Lafayettg .^ 

Second-br6od 



y 



"■<■ . . ^.- H Q . 



" :'' I ' ■ ; 



ct;.;;o 



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J :. 



S- ^ 



a ." .c 



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■c- 



For the Northern Illinois -I ndiana Area : 
reports this prst weeA from cooperators. Sprays 
10-day Intervals. Fnere leafhoppers are seriouG, use 



No codling moth 
should be applied at 

^_^_ , one pint nicotine 

sulphate for each 100 gallons of mixture with the codling moth spray. 



Compiled by: 

K. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Povell, Department of Horticulture 
Universit"'' of Illinois College of Agriculture 

•if- ■«•»•)!■ •JH«'il- •«•*•«• 

CLOSING ANN0UNCE14ENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit grox\rers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kcntuclcy, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural So- 
ciety, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, 
Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

• • • -0- 



TNM : JE 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics; 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May t and June '^O , 191^ 



U CT U v.- J.V ot, u i-^A 



X.A. k^ yj 'u' J 



V J. X tj W CI J. C U. W J J_ _L J_ _l. 1 i. w J. 1. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. l6(Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and riome Scononilcs, University of Illinois 
July 9-15 (Collece of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING- ANNOUNCEI^ENT : It's time now for another \-/eekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation v/ith state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPR\Y SER^/ICE EEPORT ARMS 



h - Bedford -Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Plttsfield 

6 - Peoria- Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carhondale-Vincennee-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 
5 - Belleville-Eardin-Centralia 

For the Paducah-Vill 
are suffering from high temper 
about June 20. Newly hatched 
apples, although the peak hat 

has been b^avy and all fruit not soon to be harvested should be fully 
protected. 




a Ridge Are a: Apple and peach orchards 
atures, with only scattered showers since 
codling moth worms are still entering 
ch probably occurred by June J)0. Hatch 



Ci 

spray or- dusi 

rows in edges of orchards where Aarring 

abundant. Pev^ches that will be hjF.rvested wjjthin J,0 days should be pro- 
tected from br'b yn rot by a sulphur spray or/dust. (Do not use lead 
arsenate in this\ preharvest treatment. 



cullo are numerous in the edges of many peach orchards, 
containing lead arfeenate should be applied at least on 
of orchards where Aarring records Indicate curculio are 



thisv preharvest 



arbondale-Vlncet\ nes- I>^nderson-Lou p 
Area: 3elleville:7Kardin-Ce'i'itralla AfeaT Bedford- Lexi 



For the 




Southwestern (<?hio Area : A crop prospect of four and 

bushels of apples, one and one-half r.iillion -^ushels 

is reported fgt" Clilo-v For three week^ high tempcratur 

have be^n gep^ral. C^dltng-motfes _ar 

was prob'^bly past at jCobden, Illino 

trap catcses are greater than at an 

those made durjSig the peak^of first 

19^1-3. At( this date/_July b, thev a 

great as apcurred_^,'during^the 19^^ s_ 

well below ^i^>e% is expected -vvhen tli' 

Growers who a's^e spraying at tfie, rtjC; 

controlling th^ present attaci-fverjf 

moths are a seri,aus problem, s^mmef'soll, 

Included in the pe/e-ik second-brood sprays 




5, 'Xefvru 



Kentucky- 



cky . 



ACtlAte. -Peak 
.s, June 3c • At 

time since May 
-brood ai3gilt actl 



bitter' rot was 
able blotch has 
tain orchards. 



reported from £efid-erson, 
ai-^veloped during" irlie "p^st 



one-half million 
ore than in 19^3, 
s and lack of rain 
ergence of moths 
incennes daily bait 
2, and equal to 
ity on July i6-17j 
e still less thari 20 per cent as 
Mng brood peak l'l^y_, 17-__20 , and are 

ap&rQaching peakj^s reached. 
mmendeS. i-0---to^4^-day intervals are 
well. In orchard-fe^'x/here I codling 
ope- half per' cent.;^., should, be 
t5 kill e'odling mot'^-'-e"ggs. "'^^irst 



^ 



Kentucl^y, 
two w£?eks 



June 29./ Consider- 
ed Duchess in cer- 



/ 



/ 



I 

In many peasph orc9iards[ 'ciircu'Iio'^are appearing along the edges 
For orchards located ^uth„..of - C^a4?bon"dale, apply two poison sprays or / 
dusts about July 3 and }Juiy l^'lp; "in orchards north of Carbondale, ap^y 
one treatment containi'iig -p-qlsjin abodt July 13-15' Insecticide distj^lb- 
Utors state that ade^u^tfe supplie.-S of dusting materials are available 
locally to make these a pp.'l 1 c at 1 op s^ _ Pea c h aa-jLhax-~a^^e-^^ --dgrys"-Qr less 
from J;arvesJ;__s.h.aui_d no,tj'jrie:cgij£a.^" poison treatment, but should be pro- 
tected from brown |^ot jby sulphur. 

- / / 



d 



-d- 

Grape leaf hoppers are increasing in many vineyards. A spray 
containing nicotine should be applied at once, especially covering the 
underside of the leaves in the centers of the vines. 

For the Quincy-Pittsf ield Area : Peoria- Champaign, Lafayette 
Area : Bait pail catches of codling moth indicate there will be many 
nev7 worms hatching by July I5 with a peak hatch probably not occurring 
until the folloxiring week. Growers should time their second-brood s --^a 
to provide maximum protection over the period July 12-26. Leafhopoers 
have caused considerable injury to foliage; but further control measures 
should be delayed until the next brood of young hoppers appear on the 
undersides of the leaves. 

For Northern Illinois and Indiana : A few first-brood v;orms 
v/ere still hatciiing in the vicinity of Rockford, Illinois, on June '^0. 
Not many new v/orms are expected before the week of July l6-22. A nice 
crop of fruit is in prospect, and growers should protect the crop by • 
adequate spraying for the remainder of the season. Young leafhoppers 
are scarce, and the addition of nicotine to sprays applied during the 
next two weeks would be of little value for leaf hopper control. 

Com.piled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwlght Povv'ell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

C LOSING AKNOUNCSKEMT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Societ; 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
pnd the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



-0- 



TM: JE 
1-1 -Kk 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Hone Economics: 
University of Illinoj.s College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 191^ 



/ V 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 
July 16-22 



17( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(Colle^'e of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING AKIIOUNCEl-lENT : It's time nox-j for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 



number of fruit growers, 



SPRAY SEEVICS REPOST AREAS 



1 - 

2 - 

5 - 



Puducah-Villa Ridge 
Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 
Belleville-Eardin-Centralia 



h - 3edford-Lexington-S.vr. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 

No 



For the Paduc ah- Villa Ridge Area : No general relief from 
drouth over western Kentucky. Codling moths have fallen off in numbers, 
with only a light flight since July 10. Some worms will be hatcning 
daily in most orchards. Fruit must be kept protected by sprays as it 
"^■^ows ihs^slze toward harvest. 

Jurculio are still numierous around the edges of peach orchards. 
At least oVie preharvest treatment one m.onth before harvest should be 
made for cikrculio. Peaches that will be Biarvested within '}0 days should 
be protected from brox-m rot by \i suiphur s^ray or dust. 



For\Lhe Ca rbondale-Vljcennes 
Belleville-Hardrip-Centralia Are4 ; Bedf 
Southwestern OhibvArea : WeatheA has c 
the growth of fruit. Codling; n' 



mo^h 



or /ft 



ider s on-Loulsvllle, Kentucky, Ar .ea ; 
Lexington, Kentucky, and 



:inued hot 
prpC)ably readhl 
In southern IllMiois, In<?iana, sobrthw^stern Ohio a 
July 9 J anc^-irfi the Belleville-Harc.in-Centralla Are 
peak of sedpnd-brood hatch appears underT?r£-,v, but t 
decline at ^he^pj;^esent rate for at least two x^reeks 
prep;ared fjsr an- inweased— attack^ cm j/ajrieti^ adjai 
after haryest of the latter. Bitter rot 
locations,. 

. ^ 6 6 

Curculi9'_are still numei'ous around the ed! 

one pr^arves'fc- treatment''dR.e month before 



in 'a~w§^ 
scatter 



At leas 




a.nd dry, retarding 

^the-^reak-Tk flight 
d eastern Kentucky 
, July 12-15. The 
ere xfill be little 

Groxirers should be 
ent to Duchess x^rith- 
has been reported at 



;es of peach orchards. 

iarv_est should be 
made f or N^jie^alio. ?eaci?e^ that ^rill'iDe harvested Ifi'thln' 30 days should 
be protected^ from brown rot>^by -a ^ul'ohur spyajt. or^dtiist. \ 

\ 5 ' / }-^'^s < 

^ \ \ ^- L ' -. 

For "th^ Quincy-Pittsfie|d Area; P e or i sc^Ght.mp ai griyLaf^ etst e 
Area : Heavy fl:^-ghts of codlikg--mfQihs are repor^ted from Gajlhoun, Greene, 
and Pike countij^s between Jul^'' Van^'^p. Worms/ from- these /moths shojuld 
be hatching between July 12^.nd.'22g Grm-zei^ ^.ould keep i/ruit well |5ro- 
3ted over this'v^eriod.'" Hatc|4 will piiab4bly -eontinue-into the last 

3k of Juiv. *"A 2 r "v^'^^t: " ^-- 



tec" 

week of July. 



!l 



/ 



\;S 



/ / 



v-^ 






- 2- 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : A few second-brood 
vjorms will be hatching this week. Heavy hatch of worms will probably 
not occur until the last week of July. Not over two weeks should occur 
between sprays from mid-July to early In August. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwlght Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEI-IENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



- 



TNM : JE 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Direcor 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 
July 23-29 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
lg( Survey and Extension Service In Agriculture 
(and Kome Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING- ANNOUNCEMENT: It's time novj 



report presented in cooperation 
number of fruit groivers. 

SPRAY see\t:cs eepcrt areas 



for another weekly spray service 
with state and federal agencies and a 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ri-dge 

2 - Carbondale-Viiiceimes-Eenderson- 

Louisville, Ky, 

3 - Belleville-Eardin-Centralia 



k - 3edford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Qu3ncy-Pittsf:".eld 

6 - Peoria- Chasipaign-Laf aye tte 

7 - Northern Illiaois-Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area : Drouth conditions prevail 
except for scattered shoxirers. Although codling moth attack has de- 
creased ^omewhat with dry weather, attack may be severe right up to 
harvest .^A good coverage of spray deposit must be maintained. 

■Jurculio on peaches have decreased in numbers. In most or- 
chards no :^urther arsenical sprays or dust^s a.re needed for curcullo. 
Although Oi]iental fruit moth ii" 
pected. L?fifvae will -be enteri 
ence to peabh twigs that a.re nui^ i^c^j. u-cu^ngi 
for control o! R Oriental fruit md th and bradrn rot should be stJ 

be harvested the v/eek of July 30 



o 
week of July 2 
August 5 




on peaches 



TovX^e Carbon^ale-Vincennes-Lexington-Loulsville, Kentucky, 
Area; Belle(ville-Hardin-Centralia (Area; Bedford-Le:^ington- Southwestern 



new worms 

fi 

the pas 

level a 

Duchess 

will be 

processe 

nicotine 

August. 




^TTTonite or 



Ohio Area: j-Bai^t trap catches of codling m^th have Iremained high, with 
Ghteririg apples in large numbers. Infestation is now tv;o to 
'the Jun?~20~le-VBl-;- A- e eoond-peak-of—aoaivity occurred within 
and rate of hatch in m.any orchards is now^ at the highest 
this/ season. Hatch on late varietieties located near 



or Transparent b^cks is ^i ery highg Spraysi, thoroughly applied, 
^needed in/must orchards at eight- to 10-day intervals for factory- 
nicoti-ne mat^i^ls, and't©- to 1^-day intprvajs for 



leaci arseo^.te 

larvafe are 
Third-broo 
in late Ai/s*4.ist 



t^s^tr 



aents 



tank-mix 
)ugho"ut July and 



^"i 



Iv 



5 

SecQRdsr-brood 
and Bedford, Indiana. 
The third-brood [attack 

Curculio are decreasi/nggon ofe^ckgsyand no ^ ^^ , — 

sprays or dusts "ksj^-^ieeded. ApLt^i94i^h^reg^etit^l~- f-roiii _m»th is light In 
most orchards, worms ^■\rii;g enteif^'' rftaturihg peaches in preference to 
hardened peach twigs^, __Pj:ieh:ar^e'^t^ oil dusts for control of Oriental ^^ 
fruit moth and browr; irot should be started twenty days before peacja^"' 



beginning to leavte ap;vies'. at Vj^ncennes 
. hatch should ("fet^rt abou'y-^^Jrrgust^ 5* 

expected to exceeA that o^ 19^3- 

h ' 1 

furtli^er arseniqal 



harvest. 



\ 



.N 



/ 



y 



For t 



f Qui^hcy-Flttsfield Area ; Peoria, Champaign- Lafayette 
Area: Bait and JLigh't traps took a large number of codling moth adults 
in the Pittsf ield^^j^riggsville and Valley City region between July 11 



-2- 

andlg. A heavy hatch of worms should be expected during the remainder 
of July. A schedule of eight- to 10-day intervals for factory-processed 
nicotine materials and 10- to l4-day intervals for tank-mix nicotine 
bentonite or lead arsenate treatments may be necessary through July 
to mid- August. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : A few overwintering 
moths are still emerging from a cage at Rock Island. Some worms will be 
hatching from now until at least mid-August. Not more than two weeks 
should occur between sprays for the remainder of the season. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Poxirell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

•s*-;s- ■a-* ******* 

CLOSING- ANNOUNCEI-IENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies ; including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois/'the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 
TNM: JE 
7-21-ifi^ 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. ?. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May o and June 'J)0 , 191^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 19( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, .University of Illinois 
July 30 to August 5, ISH-H- (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING- ANNOUNCEMENT ; It's time now for another weekly spray service 
report presented in coope.i-ation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SFR\Y SEK'rtCE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge ^ - 3edford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Eenderson- 5 - Q-amcy-i ir., si :.ex-.. 

Louisville, Ey. . 6 - Peoria- Cha:.ipa:.gn-La.:ayotte 

3 - Belleville-Eardin-Centralia 7 - Northern Ixlixiois-Indiana 

For the Paducah- Villa Ridge Area : Drouth conditions prevail 
except for scattered shoxirers. Codling moth has increased over, previous 
week'. Remaining broods will probably overlap, as worms of all sizes are 
now found in fruit. Regular spray protection must continue in problem 
orchard^ 



peach orchards, curcullo and Oriental fruit moth continue 
light. Pr'eharvest sprays or oil dusts containing sulphur are advised 
for protecpion of ripening fruit from Oriental fruit moth, brown rot 
and peach fitter rot. No poiso?i need be added in these treatments, 




For "frhe Carbondale-Vincennes-K e 
Area ; BellevilJ^cHardin-Centralia Area ; 
Ohio Area : From p. 23 to one inch of r 
Illinois, and Viw-'cennes, Indiana^vJuly 
to emerge in record numbers for tVe-^eason. 
moth worms 
enter now 




erson- Louisville, Kentucky, 
e df ord-Lexinp-ton-Southwestern 



was re 
~CodT 



eported at Carbohdale, 
ingi-ffle th adu ±tg~x;ontin' 



.nue 
Fresh! entrances of codling 
rfe. reported throughout the area. Many! X'yrorms permitted to 
W4J.1 mature early enough to produce third-brood worms. In 
most or chains "^oQtinued spraying at 10- to l^day intervals Is advis- 
able. Dev^lopmentvls-an&fiwa. -Of iiormal, and spme^f cyirth-brood worms 

Growers with botii apples and peaches 
'■ply a spr^y jus1 
.-^nT'incr i/)each 5iarve^t. 



»-'. ■_! .J~- \_/ w ■^-f \.j» f Jl^ -1— Vj" N^ l.l.i.\ji i. ^ \J ^ ■i.'— ' \-<i- i \^ t.^VT-^ >ii|_ I J. 

shouT5^ax?pea.r late ^n Septem.ber. 

should apply a spr^y just before ieach harvest to Protect the apples 

during ieach 5iarve^t. r f. \ 

{ /-^ 1 

\ On peaches, c-t*rculio con^iinue light, with po further poison 

treatraentvS -fte-eded for con1:4;^ol. 0''^®^"^^! fruit mothi.^rs l±g;^ht. Fruit 
approachin^,^maturity should be -^fptecte(!^by^ p^eharvgst sprays or oil 
dusts contaifiing sulphur f or''^onYrol of Oriental ''fr,«it-^mot^, brown rot, 
and peach biPt^ rot. No na^son Nfieed be a:dded in t'hese ^treatments. 

\ / ^ 

For Q,ulncy-Fittsfie]/dr ,^eg^ ; Peoria-C^ampaign-Lafayette Ar^a : 
Rains of O.5 to b-. 6 inches irj^ve i'nip«"oved^g«nersCl orchard cjonditions. j 
Codling moth caWhes_ ixin-tinue (hign^ par:tjrc^Ijba2?lx .in^ th^g- Pittsfield \ 
■"■""•'' '^■^ New entrances ii^ manyU-'obchaira-S^ Indicate only' continued heav^.. 



region. 



spraying will carry \^ he _cr-Op 't):s?o ugh one of the most severe codling / 



moth years. 



Spray ing'^ir"lOT-~^o l^day intervals is advisable. 



I 



\N 



/ 



N- 






/ 



y 



J' 



J 



•8- 



For Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Conditions have been 
favorable to codling moth development. In most orchards worms will be 
hatching In numbers for the next three weeks. Not more than two weeks 
should occur between sprays for the remainder of the season. 

Compiled by: 



M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History Survey 

Dwight Fo^\rell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 



CLOSING ANNOUNGEI-IENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural So- 
ciety, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, 
Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History Survey, 

-0- 

TNI^ : JS 



.,■*■ 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June '^0 , 191^ 



QDDAv or^r^rrTnT, T„.T^^^m « (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT-No. 20 Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
A *. r ^ . 1, S^"^^ ^^oiiie Economics, University of Illinois 

August 6 to August 12, I9H (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT; It's time now for another weekly spray service 

mmhpi S?^?r??^ ^" cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPRAY 3ERVIC3 REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Vllla Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 

3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 



h - Bedford -Lexington-S.¥. Ohio 

5 - Qiiincy-Pittsfiel^. 

6 - Peoria-Champaign--Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illiuois-Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; A heavy third-brood flight 
of codling moths is now under way. Worms from these moths will be hatch- 
ing within Wr days after the eggs are laid. Third-brood attack is ex- 
pected to be| heavy and to continue up to hapest. Continued spraying is 
essential, 

ElbeHa peach harvest, will start l^n Western Kentucky August 3 
to k; Villa RidgeXAugust 5. Cur^ulio are/ numerous in early ripening 
fruit, x,rith the in^n crop ^xpected\to_b^of good quatrcy: — BrowrProt i 
evident in m(5Storchards, Growers 



r 

are urged not to omit preharvest dust 
Ir -^ 7 

for control jlf brownjrot^ and Oriental fruit moth. 

^or the Caribondale-Vincennes-Henderson-Louj 



^ea ; BeljevlllVHardin-Ceistralia Area : Bedf^rd-Lexir 



7 



3hlo_Area:\AtJV^in.0'ennes,"-lQ_diana, c1)aiing moth catchels remain at a 



sville, Kentucky 



gt on-Southwestern 



noderate leve>, although seconxl^br-oofl adults are--nQW-'einej'gingi The rate 

Df hatch has de'cJ.-4fed s light ly\ but Saot enough to just^ify atiy ^xten$4on of 

the normal 10- tojlJl-day interv^l-jji^tween spraysy' A very heavy thirk. 
, ! . '"/ ""x / k 



Drood hatch durii 



/, 



~M-/t3 



inte the lasj half ^f2 Augu^t-^jftill in prospect. Light 

trap catches at New PiTrnsi^ in_d^Va£?^m'oderate to" heavy threat of wo?ms 

\ — " J"'- /' 

ror that region. Many ) new wof^ were observed entering fruit at Graf-ton, 

Ellinois, July 3I. \ '^v(''~^ ^ / 



/ 



H 



V-. 






y 



-2- 

Elbcrta peach harvest will start about August 7 at Carbondale, 
August 3 to 10 at Vincennes, and August 15 to 20 at Centralia. A good 
crop of high-quality fruit is in prospect. Growers are urged to apply 
on peaches the preharvest dusts containing sulphur for the control of 
brown rot and Oriental fruit moth. 

For the Quincy-Pittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayetto 
Area : A heavy flight of moths continues in the Pittsfield region. Worms 
will be hatching daily. Complete coverage of the fruit is essential to 
protect the apple crop from late second-brood and early third-brood 
attack. Not more than 10- to l^day intervals should occur between 
sprays. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : A moderate flight of 
adult codling moths was reported from Rock Island and Kankakee Counties 
during the past week. In orchards where worms are important, a good 
spray coverage must be maintained through the month of August. 



Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History 
Survey 

Dwight Powell; Department of 
Horticulture, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky. State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

TNMiED "°~ 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 21 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



August 13-19 
OPENING- ANNOUNCEl-IENT: 



It's time now for another weekly spray service 



report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 

EPKAY £ER\T:CE REPORT ARE/iS 
number of fruit growers. 

1 - Puducah -Villa Ridge k - Bec'.ford-Lex-'.ng-bon-S.W. Ohio 

2 - Carbondale-Vincemes-Henderson- 5 - Q,u":n.c^-- Pitt alia Id 

Louisville, K7. 6 - Pscrifci-ClieiTippi^-Lafayette 

3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 7 - Northern Iliinozs-Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; Carbondale-Vincennes- 
Kenderson-iouisville, Kentucky, Area ; Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area ; 
Bedf ord-Lemngton-Southwestern Ohio Area '. . The drought persists with 
slight relief around Lexington, \Vincennes, \ and Orleans. 

The \SRCond-and third-b rood flights of codling moths seem to 
have merged. Mo^s and newly haitched worms are on the increase in most 
areas and should/show a continuedV incr&fese for iwo l or throe T/fCck s. 
Continued spraying at 10- to 1^-day intervals is necessaj?y. Complete 



coverage inessential. Waere worn 

will be^^feeded before September 5j 

J 



7 
s are abundant, one or two sprays 



and wine saps and 
Septe-mbeg. 



may nee|. an a^ded spray ^out mid-! 

G-rowep's usin^ i:ilcotine !fl> 155 are confrohted^with an acute 



other late varieties 



3/ 



:o obtain a supply 



shortage of Materials. EveTj- effort is betfigv^madg' 

\ 3 ( ^ ( - • 

of nicotine suiphate, and manV gravers may find it desire^ei to sv/itch 



; \ / I Y— \ 

to the nicotine-fbentonite tank aix spray formulfe. If necessary, cton- 

suit your experiment station emtcgriologis^ys^iy' instructions and sources 



of bentonite. 



\ 



2 i^l_ 



Grov/ers sb<puld wa.C^ for the first appearance of bitter vj. 
and be prepared to apMy re;pomme^ded control measures. 



Peach es: 



«^s: i 



/est is in full swing from. Kentucky to 



Cflrbondale and C^}- n p^enn e s . With minor exceptions, curculio and oriental 



i\ ' 



i 



' -2- ■ . 

fruit moth Infestations are light. Brown rot is evident in most or- 
chards. Growers are urged not to neglect the applications of preharvest 
dusts containing sulphur for the control of brown rot and oriental 
fruit moth. 

For the Quincy-Pittsfield Area ; Feoria-Champaign- Lafayette 
Area : Worms are hatching daily and complete spray coverage at all 
times is essential. Growers who can find fresh injuries will need to 
apply one or two more sprays. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Only moderate 

flights of codling moth are reported. In orchards where worms are 

prevalent , spray coverage is essential. Where the apple maggot is 

a problem, a lead arsenate spray, two i.:ounds per lOG gallons, may be needed 

if the orchard is not sprayed for codling moth. 

P Compiled by: 

G. C. Decker, Illinois State Natural 
History Survey and Illinois Agricultural 
Experiment Station 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation v/ith fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, 
the Federal Decjduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



-0- 



EKR: CG 
g-ll-i^i^ 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June '^0, 191^ 



I 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No, 
August 20-26, 19^^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natui-al History 
22( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT: 



It's time now for another weekly spray service 



report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPEAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Eenderson- 

Louisville, Ey. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford -Lexington-S.VJ. Ohio 

5 - Qulncy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria- Cliampalgn -Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; Carbondale-Vincennes-Hender- 
son-Louisville, Kentucky, Area ; Belleville-Kardln-Centralia Area; Bed- 
ford- Lexington- Southx^e^tern Ohio Area : Apples — In Kentucky the third- 
brood of codling moths is continuing, with new entrances in many orchards. 
San Jose scale are multiplying rapidly In many orchards, both apple and 
peach. In Lawrence and Orange counties, Indiana, bait trap catches have 
fallen off ■^he last few days XTri"^h a heavy l^atch of nevf worms expected 
this week. 



AtXj^^cennes 
days. Much of XthiO ' ic - 
earlier than usiial. It is 
cool weather does\not occup-, 



a heavy 
wormy, bu 



sugge 




has occfurred during the last 10 
sound frjAit is beginning to drop much 
ted that/under such conditions, if 
„. ,. horrbones be /used in combination with the 
next codling moth feprays or applied alo nA if codling moth spray^ are 
not necessary. Hormone sprays areycoris^dered effecjtive in noidl' 
fruit on the^ta?^ for a period of i.O t o i^^ days an 
when applied^ during periods of higli temperature. T 
ation is serabcte, with heavy third-brood hatjt.h on thfe 



ditlonal spjays a>e^ec_omraended. 

In southei-^n Illinois, al 
Because pt th^ heavj^ drouth, sprays 
chards having high, moth p6pulation^. 
The BlacK Leaf I57 slaoctage still Js^ists. 
been able\to_obt4'in BlaclcssLeaf ^!-0,| "^f.^ po 



1 are more effective 
le codling moth situ- 
way 



this week. Ad- 



30, a heavy thirdlbrood is appearing, 
have not been too effectinve in or- 
Addit^onal sp^'aying is recommended. 
Many growers, however, have 
sible to qbt^-i-n the latter. 



it is reco>iKu.ended to use thfe tank-^inix nioptine— MissjJs'sippi^bentonite 



!or 
oil formula, \ This 
allovj- many grajwers 
schedule. 



is just cis'-eff e'ctive 
to5 finish, the reason 



Bitts 
the late scatte 
fection is expe 
as September 7j 
disease has been 



t infection 
ed showers an'd 

ed. ^ittef^ r 
so-^cons, 

prevalen 




as ^he^5Q.^(5l-d Le_af 
with an effe"c'ti^^e 



l'|55 and will 
nicotine 



Hafe^^l^een 
alns "In 
fes been 



far. However, wdth 
ifin inc/rease in \.n- 
ah to infect ''fruit as 



light t}i\JiS 
many at-eas, 



late 



ant i^-'fei.^h-sts''' S€ c e s ! 
in_i)i:ev-iou^ years, 



;ar5r in- or chards ^^^here 




"s 



Peaches : phe pead,h liar-^est should be over in most areas 
within the next week Wr/^Vor' Curculio and Oriental fruit moth ar. 
light except in a few orchaiids. ^The important control measure 
the application of suxpiuir f^r -t hrown rot- ; ~ 




drapes ; Concord grapes will be ready to harvest this week 
in the Lawrence-Orange counties, Indiana, area. 

For the Quincy-Pittsfield Area ; reoria- Champaign- Lafayette • 
Area ; Worms are still hatching; thus it is necessary to continue spray 
protection. Heavy rains through most- of this area have decreased in- 
festation considerably. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Most orchards should 
have received their last spray by this time. If worm entremce continues, 
however, additional sprays may be necessary. 

Compiled by: 

Dwight Powell, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 

C LOSING ANNOUNCEM ENT : And with that v/e conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky 'State Horticultural So- 
ciety, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, 
Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

- - 



EHR:JE 

j|: Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
' University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June "^O, 191^ 



I V 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 23( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
August 27 to September 2, 19^ College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING ANNOUIICSMSNT ; It's time r\o\^ for another weekly spray service 
report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
numiber of fruit growers. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennea-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 

3 - Belleville-Eardin-Centralia 



h - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-?itt3field 

6 - Peoria- Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



For the Paducah-Villa Ridge Area ; Carbondale-Vincennes-Hender- 
son- Louisville, Kentucky, Area ; Belle vllle-Kardin- Centralis Area ; Bed- 
f ord-Lexinatcn-Southwestern Ohio Area : Apples — Although there has been 
a drop in cpdling moth activity over the p^st v^eek due to rains and 
cooler weati^er, moths are still liL.aying eggdy on apples in large numbers. 
The hatch of ^rms is expected th continue /through the harvest period 
of Jonathan and Crimes. In Kenti 



for some time; in/ Jackson, Union 

7 




is expected to continue 



mson Uount i - ea, Illliri: 



be- 






level. 



ginning Auru^ 23, the heaviest hat^sh for the seasonjis now under way. 
At Vincenne^, Indiana, catches of ihoths in 'traps still remain at a high 



rms are exfpected to continue to enter apples in numbers in 



the vicipity ot Bedford, gndiana. 

T^iThere >grdvisa''ol&^ sprays 'allied during th^ next ten days 

should inclu"de one-half per \c^nt" oAl to kili- e^S'^.jfa 

\ 5 ( "' h^ -^ \ 

should be on tW-xlookout for "bitter rot e.nd,if an oytbr^ak 'appeal^ in' 

:hecirchard, should ^pDly at once 'theA?ecommended strength of 5/ordeaux.\ 

Peach vharvest is ever/ e^ecept "TFcrnN^h/' northern section. S^n 

Jose scale has increased So de^tractiAfe numbers in many peach orchardsv, 

^.n application of two) per ceffTf'^. summer oil after the fruit has "been )^v- 

vested will reduce dkm^e tq]_ tree^s by this insect but will not/i^place 






r~J' 



y 



b h o application of a [idiormstrrt'^oi/T spray for control. 



-2- 

For the Quincy-Flttsfleld Area ; Peoria- Champaign- Lafayette 
Area ; There has been a reduction of codling moth activity over the 
past 10 days. However, moths are still flying in many orchards. 
Growers should watch closely for new entrances and apply sprays as 
needed to protect the fruit through harvest. 

For the Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : The cold weather and 

rains over the past week should sharply reduce codling moth activity. 

If worm entrances continue, hox^rever, additional sprays may be necessary. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Research Entomologist 
Illinois Natural History Survey 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT ; And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and 
state ar;-encies, including the agricultural experiment stations of 
Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural So- 
ciety, the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Lsiboratory at Vincennes, . 
Indiana, and the Illinois State Natural History Survej''. 

-0- 



EKR: JE 

Cooperative Extension V;ork in Agriculture and Home Economics; 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts- approved by Congress Mpy g and June 30, 191^1- 



(Precared by Illinois State Natiu?al History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 24-( Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
September 3 to 9, 19^^ (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

OPENING ANMOUNCEMENT : It's time now for the last of the 19^^- weekly 
spray service reports presented in cooperation with state and federal 
agencies and a number of fruit growers. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Vllla Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

LouiRville, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia 

All Areas: 



k - Bedford -Lexlngton-S.Vf. Ohio 

5 - Quinc;--Pitt3fi3ld 

6 - Peoriti-CiiBTipsign -Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



Insect Situation - General rains and cooler weather have re- 



duced codl 
brood worms 



iliyig moth worm entrances. However, in orchards where late 
have become serious, new entrances can be observed dally. 
Third-brood llarvae are now leavaSjip; a'oples, \but most of them are expected 
to enter hibe^ation. At Vinceniies, Indian^., the present rate of hatch 

many as ^0 fresh injuries 



is still extreme^ high. On Aug 




pg gi vpn i n cover spra^j^ s of 



per 100 apples coj^ld be found on 

7 

lead arsena't^^t'^Eggs are present in large numbers, aid considerable hatch 

will occur i^urfng^the harvest of m.dseason IVarietiei?. Growers should 
obs'erveXtKe fruit carefully for"f!e-^ -gTitrHnceTr and tro prepared to give 
additionjal pr^tecti'on to the cro] 
added toVthe latp seaso^i codling npi^h sprays and the two applied 



iirhere necessary. 
6 



together. 



■n 



/ 



'Stop Drop" may be 



Dis^aag Situation -v Gro^^ers should be on fhe iDpok'out for 
bitter rot and,/if an outbrealp a^o^ears in the orchard, shoulS-^^lyatonce 

r '-^/^ / ■' ^ 

the recommended! strength of^Bor/degux."^ ^ ._ / h 



Final 



growers and sta 




t for 19^ 




/ 



" fhrougE'^the -Gcrbperation of\ 

Id" fe'dep^ agencies, spray service information has 
been compiled and r^ls..§/s'ed~1;hrough 2^ weekly reports, beginning 
March 2^. Contr ibutl fifl-s. flrgji '^ he followiiig iir en have made 'fTTgse reports 
available: . • 



state and federal agencies: 

C. C. Allison, Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University, 

Columbus, Ohio 
H. W. Anderson, Department of Horticulture, University of 

Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 
W. D. Armstrong, Western Kentucky Agricultural Experiment 

Station, Princeton, Kentucky 
C. L. Burkholder, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana 
S. C. Chandler, State Natural History Survey, Carbondale, 

Illinois 
J. J. Davis, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana 
M. D. Farrar, State Natural History Survey, Urbana, Illinois 
J. Edward Marshall, Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orleans, Indiana 
T. K. Parks, Extension Entomologist, Ohio State University, 

Columbus, Ohio 
L. M. Pierce, U. S. ' Department of Agriculture Bureau of Plant 

Industry, Vincennes, Indiana 
Dwight Powell, Department of Korticultiare, University of 

Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 
Paul 0. Ritcher, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 
L. F. Steiner, U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Ento- 
mology and Plant Quarantine, Vincennes, Indiana 

Growers in Illinois: 

J. M. Ackles, Griggsville, Illinois 
Jim Bright, Valley City, Illinois 
¥. L. Casper, Cobden, Illinois 
Frank Chatten, Quincy, Illinois 
Curt E. Eckert, Belleville, Illinois 
L. A. Floyd, Greenville, Illinois 
Harry Hatcher, Roodhouse, Illinois 
Fred Hawkins, Texico, Illinois 
Vilas Hensel, Princeton, Illinois 
Bernard King, Moline, Illinois 
John F. Leahr, Griggsville, Illinois 
0. C. Metzler, Cobden, Illinois 
Roy J. Newman, Martinsville, Illinois 
Prank Penstone, Fittsfield, Illinois 
C. E. Percel, Farina, Illinois 
Chris Ringhausen, Jerseyville, Illinois 
Paul Ringhausen, Hamburg, Illinois 
i - William Simon, B.atchtown, Illinois 
L. M. Smith, Ozark, Illinois 
C. E. Walkington, Tunnel Hill, Illinois 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar 

State Natural History Survey 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT : And with that vie conclude another series of 
Bpray Service reporting. 
EHR:JE 3-1-kk 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 191^ 



(Frepered by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 1 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics; University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

March 23-31, 1$^5 March 2 3, 19^^5 

OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT: And here we are with the first of the weekly 

spray service reports for 19^+5; presented in cooperation with federal 

agencies and a number of fruit growers. 

G-eneral - The apple scab situation is critical throughout the 
entire fruit area. Abundant snow cover vras favorable for the overwinter- 
ing of scab fungus. Recent warm, rainy weather has caused rapid maturity 
of the scab spores. South of a line from Quincy, Illinois, to Lafayette, 
Indiana, ascospores were mature and discharging during the first two 
weeks of March. Apple scab infection has occir'rod or will occur v^herever 
leaf or fruit buds have exposed new growth. 

Both San Jose scale and aphids are abundant in this sam.e area. 
Where no dormant sprays have been applied, a delayed dormant spray should 
be applied at once. 

Codling moth carry-over is heavy, as there was little winter 
mortality. 

Paducah-Villa Ridg:e Area : Peaches were in full bloom at 
Paducah, Kentucky, on March 21, and 10 per cent were in bloom at Villa 
Ridge, Illinois. 

Apple scab threatens to be very severe, and growers should 
keep the nexi; foliage x\rell protected with sulphur sprays throughout the 
prebloom period. "Fermate" should be added where cedar rust is a problem. 
If the weather turns cool, more than the tv/o recommended prebloom sprays 
should be applied. 

Codling moth pupation was 6 per cent at Princeton, Kentucky, 

on March 21. Natural History :.,.,.., 

Library 



spray Service Report — pag-e 2. 

C a rb o ndale-Vincennes-Henderson-Loulsvllle, Kentucky, Area : 
Peaches were shox^rinp■ pink on March 21 at Carbondale. It is now too late 
to apDly leaf curl sprays in this area. A survey shows 70 per cent of 
the peach orchards heavily infested with San Jose scale; over 50 per 
cent of the scale survived the past winter. Delayed dormant sprays are 
needed at once where a dormant spray has not been applied for San Jose 

scale. 

Some varieties of apples had leaves J./^ inch long on March 21. 

Apple scab threatens to be very severe, and growers should keep the new 

foliage v;ell protected with sulphur sprays. Waere cedar rust threatens, 

"Fermate" should be added to the scab sprays. 

t han 
Codling moth carry-over is heavy in this area, less/ 6 per cent 

of the worms were killed during the winter. Pupation has not occurred, 

although some larvae are preparing to pupate. 

Belleville -Hardin- Central! a Area; Bedford- Lexington- Southwestern 
Ohio Area : Peach buds are shovring pink. Leaf curl sprays may be effec- 
tive if applied at once. San Jose scale is reported as threatening. 

Apple scab ascospores are mature and discharging. Extra scab 
spra.ys may be necessary during the prebloom. period. 

Aphids and San Jose scale are abundant, with dormant sprays 
necessary if not already applied. Codling moth carry-over is heavy, 
with little vrlnter mortality. No pupation as yet. 

Q,uincy-Plttsf leld Area; Pecria-Champalgn- Lafayette Area : 
Peach buds are swelling, with a fev; showing pink in the southern part of 
the area. Peach leaf curl sprays should be applied at once. 

Some varieties of apples show tip-green. Dormant sprays shoulc: 
be applied at once for scale and aphids. Because of the advanced stage 
of scab development, it is Important that prepink sprays be started at 



Spray Service Report — page 3* 

once. Spraying with sulphur should be continued throughout the prebloom 

period. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Apple buds are still dorrriant. 
Dormant sprays should be applied at once where they are needed. It is 
anticipated that apple scab infection will occur as soon as the buds 
show green, provided the weather is rainy. It is advisable to start the 
prepink spray earlier than usual unless dry weather prevails. 

Compiled by 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois Natural History 
Survey 

H. V/. Anderson, Department of 
Horticulture, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANN GUN CEMENT : That concludes the first weekly spray service re- 
port presented in cooperation with fruit grcv/ers and federal and state 
agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Kentucky, 
Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, the 
Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, and the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 

EKR: pm 

3/25'A5 

Cooperative Extension V/ork in Agriculture and Hom.e Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and t he United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Husk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 3 and June JG, 191^1 

SPECIAL WARNING ABOUT APPLE SCAB 

The apple scab situation is critical at the present tlm,e. A 

good snow cover during the winter was favorable for the development of 

the scab fungus in the old leaves beneath the trees. Perithecla are very 

abundant in most areas. The recent warm, rainy weather resulted in rapid 
maturity of the ascospores, and by March 12 abundant ripe ascospores 
were found. This means that discharge of ascospores and infection will 
occur as soon as the buds burst, provided wet period? occur. Even heavy 
de'vjs may result in infection. 

Growers are advised to keep the expanding buds covered with 
sulphur sprays throughout the prebloom period. The prepink spray should 
already have been applied in Kentucky, southern Illinois and Indiana. 
It should be applied in central Illinois and Indiana as soon as possible, 
and in northern Illinois and Indiana as soon as green tissue is exposed. 

K. W. Anderson, Department of Horticulture 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 2 
April 1-7, 1943 



(Prepared ty Illinois State Natural History 
(Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT 



It's time now for another weekly spray service 

report presented in cooperation with state and federal agencies and a 
number of fruit growers. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

liOuisvllle, Ky. 

3 - BellevUle-Hardln-Centralia 



k - Bedford -Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pitt afield 

6 - Peoria- Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



General . All fruit bloom is at least two v/eeks ahead of normal. 
The rapid development of apples has prevented many growers from applying 
the recommended number of prebloom scab sprays. Every effort should be 
made to projtect the foliage with sulfur sppays during the next week, 

.■Qical. 



since the scab situation is cri" 



\ 



I 



Padu6ah-Villa Ridge Are 



Petals/ are off plums and peaches. 



Apples mill be re^dy for the calyx spray by April 1. Sulfur 



should be applied"^ in the calyx an!^ cal^ top-off for— pi 



na c 



7 "r- 

apple scab.(^For cedar rust and apple scab use "Fer 

J ^ 17 

Ca/'b onda-l e-Vin cennes-Hendjers on- Loui s ville^ 



Peaches \afnd pears v-tre in full blojom March 2& 



Apples will be "qSLooming t 



/ 



ji'oLbCLiuii ^gain 



st 



mate" as recommended. 
Kentucky, Area: 



y April 1. If warm weather prevails, 
hl^ calyx spray by i April 7- ^ full 



•% 



many varieties i^lll be~^a^.dy for i 

bloom spray xDf wettable sulfiy? -^iduld be applied J' (5i| control of apple 

scab if the p^**^d of bloom is pr'blonged.i Sulfur shouldi^be: continued 



into the calyx and calyx top- off- /sprays for scae protectio{d. Codling 



moth pupation i^ just starting,/ agd gr&we; 



early hatch. 





/. 



ould be pre'oared for an 



■ Belleville-Kardin-g^-tralia Area; Bedford- Lexington-Southw^atern 
Ohio Area : Peaches \wri(L beiln fAll bloom by April 1. 

Apple S .^re pffntr t>h tr^ ^ Rvly v/^rietle.q .qtarting to bloom. The 




pink spray s-houZd be applied at once, followed by a spray of wettable 



-2- 

sulfur in the full bloom If the period of bloom is prolonged. The full 
bloom spray will be essential for scab control if the usual number of 
prepink and pink sprays were not applied'. 

Quincy-Plttsf ield Area; P e or i a- Cham-paign- Lafayette Area : Plums 
and apricots are in full bloom, with prospects of peach and pear bloom 
by April k. 

Apples are in the advanced prepink stage and will be in the 
pink stage by April 1. Weather conditions have been very favorable for 
apple scab development, with prospects of heavy prebloom infection. 
The pink spray should be applied as soon as possible and sulfur should 
be continued into the bloom period if the usual number of prebloom sprays 
h^ave not been applied or if the bloom period is prolonged. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Apples are prepink. At least 
two thorough applications of sprays for apple scab should be made pre- 
ceding the bloom. Scab is ai^t to be severe with an unusual early infec- 
tion if rainy weather continues. Thorough protection from apple scab 
v;ill be necessary, with additional sulfur sprays required. 

Compiled by: 

M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural 
History Survey 

K. W. Anderson, Department of 
Horticulture, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture 

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT: And with that we conclude today's spray service 
report presented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state 
agencies, including the agricultural experiment stations of Kentucky, 
Indiana and Illinois, the Kentucky State Horticultural Society, the 
Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincenncs, Indiana, and the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

EHR:pm 
3/30/^1-5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Hom.e Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May o and June '^0 , 191^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural Histoi'j, 
SPRAY SSKVICS F£?ORT — No. 3 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



April ii-lH-, 19^5 



NARRATOR: Here's your scray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SEEVTCE REPORT AREi\S 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennea-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 
5 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford -Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittafisid 

6 - Peorla-Champalgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



General: Heavy rains during the past week have no doubt 
caused considerable apple scab infection. Growers are urged to continue 
sulfur a^llcations. Dusting with sulfur is recommended as a supple- 
mentary measure if spraying is not possible. No damage to fruit buds 
has yet bejen reported from thexlate cold \jeather. 
ig-Ucah-Villa Ridge A}rea: 



Apples - Petal fall i|s occurrJ/fig, and most varieties are ready 
for the calyx so^ay. Condition^ p.onti r|iiie to be yery f avorable/ f or apple 



scab infect 

quince rusf"c«uikers have been obs 



No scan spots have yet been seen 

srved disfcharging 



pu- 



.on. 



ontinues rapid7~"wt1;h-52 
I 
April ^A -^ ; 

5 ; 6 

Peachey -=:. Petal fall ha 



From hen{iQ_rsx)n south, youisg peac/i 

\ 



Cedar rust and 
spores. Codling moth 
per e^nt -^ipa-ti-eh at Princeton on 



s occurred over m(pst of Kentucky. 

es a^re^ splitting 1tJ;ie' shtiQks. Curculios 
have been c(3aiected ^^y jarring, ibut very little^ mi g*''g-tlon ^las occurred 
into the centerjof the orchards.) Spraying: or dusking the\Dji^ts-^:ra>v rows 

culio appl/ication should 



is recoramended/at an early dat 
go on the entire^rchar^ when 




-\° 



/ 



hs of tte shucks ar 



off. 



Carbondar^-Vincenn-esczHgTrderson-Louisville, Kentucky, Area : 
Apples - Alt Carbt^ndale^ Delicious is in full bloom and imaesap 
about 60 per cent b\oojn. April'^9 should start petal fall or j J^yx sprays 
unless cold 'we'g:therr-^e iai ' ds de velopment. Do not forget the calyx top-off 
spray immed-iat(£lx_xollowing the calyx spray. There has been no marked 



spray Service Report — No. J,, page 2. 

advance in codling moth pupation since last week. There is still time 
to spray off the bark and thus destroy much of the codling moth popula- 
tion and prepare the trees for banding. 

At Vincennes a heavy discharge of scab spores has occurred. 
Scab infection is not yet visible. The sulfur supply appears to be 
critically short. Most varieties are in full bloom. Codling moth 
pupation has reached as high as ^0 per cent in some orchards (average 
about 25 per cent). Bait traps should be in operation by April 9 s-s some 
emergence may occur by April 10. 

Peaches - At Carbondale all petals have fallen. Curculio 
jarring indicates that for the week of April 9 it would be advisable to 
spray the outer three or four rows to poison the beetles before they 
enter the orchard proper. 

Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia Area : 

Apples - At Belleville and Centralia Winesaps are 75 pe^ cent 
in bloom. No codling moth pupation found. At Hardin, Delicious is 
25 per cent to ^0 per cent in bloom, Grimes 60 per cent and Winesap 10 
per cent. Codling moth pupation is about I5 per cent. No scab infec- 
tion is visible. Full bloom spraying v/ith wettable sulfur is recommendec:' 
Do not use lime-sulfur in the bloom. No damage has been reported from 
the April 5 temperature of 30°^' 

Peaches - Petal fall has occurred. 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area : 

Apples - V/inesaps are 60 per cent in bloom. G-rimes will be 
ready for calyx spray by April 9* There is heavy bloom on most varieties. 
Rains this past week coupled with irregular spraying have increased the 
possible severity of scab. Liquid lime sulfur is recommended as best 
to use under such conditions to hold the scab in check. 

' Peaches - Fetal fall has occurred on G-aa-e Slberta. 



Spray Service Report — No. 3» page '}. 

Quincy-Plttsf j.eld Area; Feorla-Champalgn-Laf ayette Area : 

Apples - Most varieties are in early to full pink stage. 
Weather conditions have been favorable for scab development. Protection 
can be best assured by keeping sulfur on the foliage at all times. 

Peaches are approaching full bloom. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : 

Apples are fast approaching the pink stage. Sulfur should 
be kept on the foliage at all times to prevent scab infection. 

-^ is- "SUS- -!!- •>!■ -,!■ -;;- -;;- -;^ 

And with that vre conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation v^'ith fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with Informia- 
tion compiled by Dv/ight FoiArell, Department of Horticulture, University 
of Illinois. 

I 

-0- 



DP;pm 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress Hry ^ and June 'J)0 , 191^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. ^ (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
April 15-21, 19^5 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SEmiCE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincerjiea-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 

3 - BeUevllle-HarxLln-Centralia 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pitt afield 

6 - Peorla-Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



General: April ^-7, no commercial freeze damage on Illinois 
apples or peaches — strawberries injured. Lows in Indiana of 27 at 
Lafayette, ]25° at Bedford, and 23° at Vincennes. Severe injury to early 
varieties iti low spots, with complete kill) in spots. A low of 22 re- 
ported in Virginia with severe inijury to peaches and apples. Apple scab 
still threaten ^ all commoroial sh ^chards. All expanding foliage needs 



continued protectl^on from scab by sulfur /sprays or dusts. 



PaducatZ-Villa Ridge Art 



X 



ties. Top-off sprays 
]lodling moths are ;3tarting to emerge-, 
arted by April 16 and should include 
6 



Apples are past calyx stage on most varie 
T^ I 7 

should be cjomplef^c^by^April l4-. 

The firsy cover sprsiy should be st 

5 ^' 
sulfur f(or apple scab. 6 

Peache-s - Shucks are off" oh ^ost varietiea. ,- G-u3:;culio are re- 
ported matum, and laying son^e'-^ggs'. Apply The"^ &fo-«cli-;£lall cWculio 
sprays at onceWwer the entire orchard, if few Orimjsal fAu^moth^.-;;eported, 

Carbonldale-Vincennes-Kenderson- Louisville, Kentucky, Area^: 



X 



T 



Apple A, are droppiarg nfetsls r^rsHlj/with the ca^yx needed) in 
most orchards by Ap^l l4-§ Mam£ anch-ards will be ready for the calyx 
top- off spray after Abril l^T^Thls spray should include sulfur for>^on- 
trol of apple scab. \ bsjaiing mot^ pupation exceed? 66 per cent,>wath an 
occasional emer 

Peach 



■N 




^7 r^r-atxhy rgK of worms not expected before April 25. 
bucks are splitting. Curculio are still on the 



edges of the orchards. Spraying or dusting of outer four rows recommended 



Spray Service Report — No. 4, page 2. 

where curcullo are serious. General curcullo spray should be delayed 
until shucks are off. Oriental fruit moth started to emerge at Vincennes 
April 9. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area : 

Apples will be ready for the calyx by April 12 and should be 
completed in most orchards by April Ig. Primary scab infection reported 
at Kardin April 12. Calyx and calyx top- off sprays should contain sul- 
fur for apple scab. 

Peaches are through blooming. Curculio not yet reported. 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area : 

Apples - There is freeze injury in some orchards. This may 
delay petal fall in late bloom. Most varieties should receive the calyx 
spray between April 12 and IS. This and calyx top-off spray should con- 
tain sulfur for scab control. 

Peaches - Petals are off. Curculio sprays should be delayed 
until m.ost of the shucks are off. 

Grapes should be sprayed for black rot v:hen growth is two to 
four inches long. 

Quincy-rittsf ield Area : Peoria- Champaign-Lafayette Area : 

Apples will be full bloom by April 1^. V/lth good pollination 
weather, most varieties will be ready for the calyx by April IS. Scab 
infection reported and growers should plan to include sulfur in calyx 
and calyx top-off sprays for apple scab. Apple scab first observed in 
Urbana on April 12. 

Peaches are in full bloom. 

G-rapes should be sprayed for black rot when growth is two to 
four inches long. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : 

Apples are pink, with full bloom expected by April 20. A pink 
spray containing sulfur should be applied before the flowers open. If 
the bloom period is prolonged, a full bloom spray containing sulfur may 
be necessary. (Do not use lead arsenate in the full bloom spray. ) 



Spray Service Report — No. H-, page 3- 

And v/ith that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar and K. W. Anderson of the Illinois Natural 

History Survey and the Department of Horticulture, respectively. 

-0- 

Listen to the spray service broadcast by your favorite station 
(more stations to be reoorted): 



Station 


Location 


K.C. 


Day 




Time 


Cooperator 


KFUC 


St. Louis, Mo. 


.350 


Fri. 


7: 


30 


a.m. 


E. Knoers child 


KMOX 


St. Louis, Mo. 


1120 


Mon. 


6: 


00 


a.m. 


Ted Kangner 


WAOV 


Vincennes, Ind. 


lif50 


Tues. 


6: 


25 


a.m. 


V. H. Lund 








Thurs. 


1: 


05 


p.m. 


Robert Pruett 


¥ASK 


Lafayette, Ind. 


li^50 


Mon. 


12: 


30 


noon 


B. A. Spring 


WBAA 


Lafayette, Ind. 


920 


Mon. 


12: 


00 


noon 


Jim Miles 


¥CLS 


Joliet, 111. 


13^0 


Mon. 


6: 


^0 


p.m. 


J. K. Brock 


^.i[E3Q 


Harrisburg, 111. 


12^0 


Tues. 


6: 


30 


a.m.. 


Inglis M. Taylor 








II 


12: 


00 


noon 


Ord Sitter 








Thurs. 


6: 


30 


a.m. 


Inglis M. Taylor 


¥G3F 


Evans vi lie, Ind. 


1220 


Fri. 


12: 


15 


noon 


Albert M. Bishea 


¥GRC 


Louisville, Ky. 


1^00 


Sat. 


12: 


30 


noon 


C. M. East 


¥E3F 


Rock Island, 111. 


1270 


Tues. 


6: 


15 


a.m. 


¥. R. Taylor 


WILL 


Urbana, 111. 


5^0 


Mon. 


12- 


25 


noon 


Duke Regnier 


¥JSC 


Bloomington', 111. 


1230 
13^0 


? 




7 




0. L. ¥elch 


¥JPF 


Herrin, 111. 


Tues. 


12 


^5 


noon 


E. A. Bierbaum 








Fri. 




II 




G. J. Christenson 


¥LS 


Chicago, 111. 


S90 


Mon. 


12 


15 


p.m. 


Arthur C. Page 


¥L¥ 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


700 


M.W.F. 


6 


11 


a.m. 


Roy Battles 


¥1^IBD 


Peoria, 111. 


1^70 


Tues. 


5 


a.m. 


"Farmer" Bill 


¥C¥0 


Fort ¥eyne, Ind. 


1190 


Mon. 


5 


30 


a. m. 


Jay Gould 








¥ed. 


6 


15 


a . m. . 


II II 








Sat. 


6 


^5 


a.m. 


II II 


WTAD 


Quincy, 111. 


930 


Tues. 


7 


V^ 


a.m. 


Ray Hampton 


WTMV 


S. St. Louis, 111. 




VJe d . 


12 


^5 


noon 


B, ¥. Tillman 



EHR: pro 
'^/13A' 



I 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
[University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. E. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 3 and June 30j 191^ 



' (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

SPRAY SERVICE P^PCRT — No. 5 (Survey and" Extension Service in Agriculture 



April 22-gg, 19^5 



(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. 'Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes -Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 
5 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia 



h - Bedford -Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittafleid 

6 - Peoria-CIiampalgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern I llinoia -Indiana 



General ; Plums, early apples and some peaches were killed by 
the April 7 freeze in the area south of Spencer, Indiana, and Lancaster, 
Ohio, south to the Ohio river. The area of damage extended south and 
east into (Virginia, where very heavy damage is reported. Rain with 
continued bold has retarded frliit development, particularly in central 
and northern Illinois and Indiana. Light jfrosts have occurred, damaging 

injury tc/ tree fruits. Weather has 

E;rowers should protect eocpanding 



strawberries Csut causing little 



favored develcpmant of apple sc 
foliage by fungzcide sprays or d 

p^aducah-Villa Ride-e Arefe: 



Finn 



^eache"^ -;psh^cks are off 



tectiomyfrom curculio. The spray 



include/ sulphur for contg'ol of peach scabj6 Curculio is less 



/ -- 



y' 



with the entire 



Dr chard needing pro- 



applied following shuck fall should 



numerous 



av. Codling moth 



than in\l9^-!-. y 

tcoles are readv.for-^hie second <i.0TCr sviri 
emergence ha.\_been heavj?, wi"^h fitst XA.rornis expected (about M^y 1. This 



spray should include a fungicide/for control ofl apple scab'. 

J /-^ /T- ^ / / I 

Carbq)ndale-Vi.ncennes/Hende"rson-Loui/svilleH Ken;t ucky, Are^ : 
V z^ — -j — 2 ^ — ' fK~^ ^ ~r 

PeacheaN i^ve v^^\.^\\a>:^/;v.q.3(s^'\-c\ siz^r — G^'O^'-ers should cs 
plete the shuck f alJN ^apji^.sr'^at/STi^e. Another spray or dust needs to^ 

This spray should includ^lead 

less 

numerous than ir^ 1 



-'Shuck ^f all 



applied ten days aft' 

\ ^ 1 / 

arsenate for curculio ^nd sulo hur for peanh Rp.ah. C urculiG 

~~- y f 



Appl4__Supa:^aylng has been delayed by continued cold and rain. A 
prolonged hatch of first-brood worms may be expected. In most orchards 



Spray Service Report — No. 5> pa~e 2. 

additional protection is needed aeainst acple scab through continued use of 
a fungicide. Sprays delayed by weather should be applied at once. 
Codlina: rroth emerc"ence started April I3 at Vincennes and April I5 at 
Carbondale. A light hatch may be expected by April 22 at Henderson. 
Sprays completed in the area by May 2 will protect against the first v^orms. 

3e 11 e vi lie-Hard in- Centr alia Area : 

Apple spraying has been delayed by adverse weather. Apple 
scab remains a serious threat in ir.any orchards. Sulphur should be con- 
tinued until foliage is adequately protected. A large emergence of codr- 
ling moth may be expected with warmer weather. Hatch of worms v/ill not 
occur before the first week in May. 

The peach shuck fall spray should be applied after all shucks 
are off. 

Bedford- Lexington-3outhv;estern Ohio Area : 

Freeze damage has been reported for this area on plums, early 
apples and peaches. Spray schedules v;ill need to be adapted to fruit 
escaping frost. The calyx top-off or first cover spray is needed on 
most apple varieties. Sulphur should be included for control of apple 
scab, reaches are ready for the shuck fall spray, llo curculio reported. 

Quincy-Pittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : 

Apples have been in full 'bloom since April Ic ; pollination 
weather poor, with petals blown from the trees. Kost apple varieties 
ready for the calyx spray after April 23. Codling moth pupation about 
:10 per cent. Sulphur should be included for control of apple scab. 

Peaches are past bloom with no freeze dsjr.age reported. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : 
'- , Cold v/eather has delayed fruit development. A full-bloom 
spray containing sulphur is advisable against apple scab v/here the pre- 
bloom sprays were not adequate. (Do not use lead arsenate in the full- 
bloom spray. ) 



Spray Service Report — No. ^, page 3* 

And v;lth that xce conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar and H. W. Anderson of the Illinois Natural 

History Survey and the Department of Horticulture, respectively. 

-0- 

Listen to the spraj- service broadcast by your favorite station 
(more stations to be reported): 



Station 



Location 



KFUO St. Louis, Mo. 

KMOX St. Louis, Mo. 

wAOV Vincennes, Ind. 

■"JAoK Lafayette, Ind. 

k'.^ A A La f ay e 1 1 e , Ind. 

¥GLS Joliet, ill. 

IvEBQ, Harrisburg, 111. 



V/G3F Evansville, Ind. 

WG-RC Louisville, Ky. 

WH3F Rock Island, 111, 

V7ILL Urbana, 111. 

WJBC Bloomington, 111. 

WJPF Herrin, 111. 

WLS Chicago, 111. 

'vvLW Cincinnati, Ohio 

Wl-ffiD Peoria, 111. 

WCWO Fort ¥ayne, Ind. 



¥TAD Quincy, 111. 

>m-lV E. St. Louis, 111, 

L'BOW Terre Kaute, Ind. 



K.C. 


Day 




Time 


Cooperator 


250 


Fri. 


7: 


30 


a. ra. 


E. Knoerschlld 


1120 


Mon. 


6: 


CO 


a.m. 


Ted Man,^ner 


1^150 


T ue s . 


6: 


25 


a.m. - 


V . H . Lund 




Thurs. 


1- 


05 


p.m. 


Robert Pruett 


li^^O 


Mon. 


12 


30 


noon 


B. A. Spring 


920 


Mon. 


12- 


00 


noon 


Jim i-'Iiles • 


13^0 


Mon. 


6 


Ko 


p.m. 


J. H. Brock 


12^0 


Tues. 


6 


30 


a. m. 


Inglis M. Taylcr 




!l 


12 


00 


noon 


Ord Sitter 




Thurs. 


6 


30 


a. m. 


Inglis M. Tay].cr 


12gO 


Fri. 


12 


15 


noon 


Albert M. Bishea 


lifCO 


Sat. 


12 


30 


noon 


C. M. East 


1270 


Tues. 


6 


15 


a.m. 


W. R. Taylor 


5SO 


Mon. 


12 


25 


noon 


Duke Regnier 


1230 


? 




9 




0. L. Welch 


13^0 


Tues. 


12 


^5 


noon 


E. A. Bierbaum 




Fri. 




It 




G. J. Christenson 


g90 


Mon. 


12 


15 


p.m. 


Arthur C. Page 


700 


M.W.F. 


6 


35 


a.m. 


Roy Battles 


ii^70 


Tues. 


5 


^5 


a.m. 


"Farmer" Bill 


1190 


Mon. 


5 


30 


a.m. 


Jay Gould 




Wed. 


6 


15 


a.m. 


II II 




Sat. 


6 


^5 


a.m.. 


II II 


930 


Tues. 


7 


15 


a. m. 


Ray Hampton 




VJed. 


12 


^5 


noon 


B. W. Tillman 


1230 


Mon. 


11 


20 


a.m. 


C. L. Brown 



EHR: pm 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Con,5:ress May & and June ^0, 191^ 



''" (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 6 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
April g9-May 5, 19^3 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky 'and the U. 3. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPOET AREAS 



1 - PuducaJi-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Ytncennee-HenderBon- 

liOulBviile, Ky. 

3 - Bellevi lie-Hardin-Centralla 



k - Bedford^Lexlngton~S.W. Ohio 

5 - Qulncy-Pittafield 

6 • - Peorla-Chsjopalgn-Lafaj^tte 

7 - Northern Illlnola-Indlana 



General: From central Indiana-Illinois southward, the con- 
itinued cold, rainj'" weather has not greatly reduced the normal develop- 
ment of the^ruit. This period has been favorable for apple scab, and 
this disease Istill threatens apples in many orchards. Insect develop- 
ment for the past 10 days has- beeft slow, butia rapid increase is expected 
with warmer wd^ther. Over the central and nqrthern fruit areas, apple 
scab control is iVf flrsL imuui'tanL';? now. 



Paducah- 



,1 1a Ridge Are a 



Feao-hes, apples, plums and pears 
are all growing rabidly. 3iackberr^^^.s_^j?^ blooming, with aiakemoi^e 



strawberries ripening. Peaches shoufid be lorotected against peach scab 

7 
and curculio./ Fir^ curculio larvae 



(pple cover ^sprays should 

tlon against codling^ moth tlirouQrh tt 

\ / 

worms 



were observed on April 2J;. 
be applied to giv 5 adequate protec- 



e month & May. A heavy hatch of 
is expected^fter J^^Ril 29. Growers using a leid arsenate sched- 

ule should noV's Include x-reak B^r^e^u:;? in all' sprays. 

\ 5 ' / ^ ; - ' , 

Carbokdale-VincennesVi'entrerson- Louisville, ^ent'ickv^Area: 

7 ■ ) ^ 1 p._v ^=nI3I3^. 

iaches are growing rapidly. Tfen.^^ay^s after the ^huck-fall Spray, a\ply 
'sulphur-lead arsenate sprai;;^or /dust ^dc. ihe c/5ntrol^f p^ach scab ajnd 
irculio. At least "1^ day^ shouU^JeyS'-^-a^^I^ed beliw'e'Bn- t^.e" and 

lird peach sprays. i" "^ 

Apple scab is<^/g>i-cras in^ 



many orchards, and growers shoul 




iclude a fungicide in^ti^g. °n-"1y^(^^vpr '^prnyF. — Thio may delay -fhe use 
\t oil as an oviciAe lintil the third cover. At least two cover sprays 
tiould be applied "EyMay 6 to protect the fruit against a moderate hatch 



Katwr,?- 



•■'■ Survey 



Spray ''^ervice Report — No. 6, page 2. 

of vorms after April 29, The next period of warm weather will be accom- 
panied by a sharp increase In codling moth emergence and a heavy egg 

deposition, 

Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia Area : Peaches are ready for the 

10-day peach scab — curcullo spray that should Include both sulphur and 

lead arsenate.' 

Apple scab Is most Important In apple orchards, with a fungi- 
cide needed in the next spray. Fruit should be protected against codling 
moth worms within 10 days after warmer weather. Pupation is over ^0 
per cent.- 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area : Peaches are ready 
for the 10-day spray for control of peach scab and curcullo. This spray 
should include both a fungicide and a poison. Lead arsenate, zinc sul- 
phate and lime are recommended for Indiana. 

Codling moths are emerging in small numbers, particularly near 
packing sheds. As soon as it warms up, a heavy emergence may be expected.. 

Q,ulncy-Pittsfleld Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette Area : Apple 

bloom has been prolonged by weather. Most varieties are ready for the 

calyx and calyx top-off sprays. The first cover spray may be needed 

before May 5 ^^ some orchards. Most growers should Include a fungicide 

in the first cover spray and delay the use of oil as an ovicide until 

the third cover unless "Fermate" is used as the fungicide. 

Northern Illinois- Indiana Area ; Apples will be ready for the 
calyx spray this week if the weather turns warm. A fungicide should be 
included in at least two more sprays for the control of apple scab. 

*■>>•!!-;:-•!!■-;!•-;!■ -sf- -Si- 4f- 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar and Dwight Powell of the Illinois Natural 
History Survey and the Department of Horticulture, respectively. 

-0- 
EHR:pm 

V27A5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress Mny S and June 30» 191^ 



I y 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 7 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
May 7-12, 19^-5 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, oathologists and horticnalturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky 'and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennee-Henderson- 

Louisvlile, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardlii-Cent]:'alla 



k- Bedford-I«xlngton-S.W. Ohio 
5 - ftuincy-Pittafleld 
6 ■ - Peorla-Chaa5>algn-Lafayette 
7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



G-eneral : Cool weather has delayed codling inoth hatch in the 
southern areas. Scab continues to develop and in general is more severe 
in well-spr\yed orchards than for many years. Fruit development has 
been retarded by cool- weather, with considerable damage due to frost. 
Curculio is very light this yeai^ with very \little migration to the cen- 
ter of the okchard thus far. 

PadueWi-Villa Ridffe Aria: 

repor'/s codling moth emergency light. 

.s 



Apples -\W. D. Afmstro] 
A few eggs have Yeen deposited, bu^ 




le 1; 

jfe if 



xh has not occurred. Sea 

very severe.^, A 1-2-100 Bordeaux i^ recommended in Kentucky as the ar- 

7 
senical safmer arvd fungicide for ;icab control. In more seriously in- 



fected oV/hards a 2-^-100 or even a ^1-6-100 Bordeau>. may be necessary in 
regular podlir^ moth spravs to prevent scat^ development on the fruit. 



Peaches. -~5ur-sulio jarrLig.^ indicates that 



\ 



i 



very small numbers 

■"^ "^ ""^ 

€e the "^orchard popu- 



d 



are entering the orchard. Warm^/e ather Mght incre^ 

lation and thus demand an additional spray. Continiied j^rrtng an 

^ ) ^ Nil 

orchard inspection are reconiraanded'. 

Strawberries - An o6'c3fBional strawbe/ry iSh ripen^ing on Blslkemare 

^r ^ -^ / 2 ^ -hZf I 

in the Lexington asi^,'" while lf^t/-$ia5ici^^h£t-s~i>€en^ under way since 



April 27 in the west 
Carbondale- 



'Xi KenlrueXy^ 4^egion, 



/"irveejan-es-HeHder son- Louisville, Kentucky, krep.'. 

\ Kr^ — J 

Apples - AtxCfrbonda]^ , S . C. Chandler r ppnrt.c ■ that ^n,i1 ing 



n. 



moth emergence has been light, with very little egg-laying. Oil is not 
sc important at'^^^iis tim.e. Dwight Powell reports secondary scab prev- 
alent in many sprayed orchards. Either Ferm.ate, -g- pound, or 



' Spray Service Report — No. 7> page 2. 

^>- 1-100 Bordeaux should Toe included in the regular cover sprays for scab 
control. Fireblight is now appearing on Transparent. Elotch infection , 
: has not been seen; however, blotch sprays of either Fermate, 1 pound, or 
1|._6_100. Bordeaux are recommended in the next cover spray on blotch- 
susceptible varieties. Cedar rust infection is severe in certain orchards. 

At Vincennes, L. F. Steiner reports some codling moth egg- 
laying during the daytime. Moth trap catches have been light and no 
heavy emergence has occurred in orchard cages. No hatch will occur be- 
fore May 5 or later. Some eggs have been in the red ring stage for a 
week or more. Very heavy oviposition is expected with the first appear- 
ance of warm weather. The red mite population is extremely low in 
orchards which were given a dormant spray. Mr. Leslie Pierce reports 
that scab spores are still being discharged during rainy periods from 
the same overwintering leaves from which the earliest ascospores appeared. 
Infection is now appearing in many well-sprayed orchards. 

Peaches - At Carbondale^ S. C. Chandler reports that the cur- 
culio population is very low in the peach orchards. A light peach 
schedule is recommended under these conditions with sprays or dusts com- 
ing at longer intervals than in years of more severe infestation. Or- 
iental fruit moth has not yet appeared. This situation indicates a very 
light infestation again this season, since conditions are right and time 
is past for the first appearance. 

According to A. S. Colby, the first preblcom spray should be 
applied to raspberries this week. 

B ell evllle-Hardin-Centr alia Area : 

Apples - Codling moth development has been hindered by cool 
weather. Scab is developing in raany we 11- sprayed orchards. If scab is 
j serious, growers should use their judgment on the suitable fungicide. 
Oil for codling moth may not be needed for two weeks yet, in which case 
sulfur may still be applied. Bordeaux at this time is likely to russet, 
particularly Jonathan and Golden Delicious. Fermate would be desirable 
to use if it can be obtained. 



Spray Service Report — No. 7, page 3. 

Peaches - Jarring and orchard inspections are recommended to 
determine the curcullo population. Thus far curculio is light; therefore 
a heavy schedule should not be anticipa.ted. 

3edf ord-Lexinn;ton-Southwestern Ohio Area : 

At Lexington, P. 0. Ritcher reports cool weather with lif^ht 
frosts "but no damage caused. Peaches are about one inch long. Codling 
moth emergence is light, with the weather too cool for much egg-laying. 
In Lawrence and Orange counties, Indiana, G-. Edward Marshall reports 
that apple foliage is poor as a result of excessive lime-sulfur sprays 
which have been necessary for scab control. No codling moth hatch has 
occurred to date; however, a few worms are expected to appear by May 10. 
Cool weather has prevented much egg-laying. Eggs which have been de- 
posited are not incubating. Oriental fruit moth is abundant on wing, 
but no twig Injury by larvae has been seen in commercial orchards. At 
least one curculio spray should have been applied on peaches by this 
date. Another application should be made in about a week or 10 days or 
when jarring indicates sufficient numbers of curculio to warrant another 
spray. A high percentage of strawberry blooms have been injured by heavy 

frosts. 

Quincy-Pittsfield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette Area : 

Very little fruit development is occurring. Scab is the main 
problem to consider, and a fungicide should be included in the cover 
sprays. Fermate, if obtainable, is best to use now. If applied now, 
-J- 1-100 Bordeaux would aid in scab control, but would also probably cause 
injury. With codling moth development retarded by cool xi^eather, oil may 
not be necessary for two v/eeks yet, in which case sulfur might still be 
'applied. 

Northern Illinois- Indiana Area : 

M. D. Farrar reports from Barrington that apples are still in 
the calyx. Heavy frost damage has occurred. Continuous rains have in- 
creased scab damage. A full-strength sulfur spray should be used to 
prevent further infection. ^^^nn^i^t**** 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar and Dwight Powell of the Illinois Natural 
History Survey and the Department of Horticulture, respectively. 
EHR;pm 5AA5 -°- 

Cooperatlve Extension ¥ork in Agriculture and Home Economics: 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May i and June 30> 191^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
3FRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. ^ (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
fey 1 3- 20, 19^5 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

'BARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
rilinois, Indiana, Kentucky 'and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPBAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderaon- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia 



If - Bedford-Lescington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pitt3fisld 

6 ■ - Peoria- Cliaispe-lgn-Lafaj'^tte 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



General: Weather over the entire area has been cold and wet, 
favoring the continued development of apple scab. Very little insect 
ictivlty hasAoccurred. Codling moth emerged May 6-7 in numbers through 
Centucky, southern Illinois and Indiana. Codling moth emergence will 
increase rapidly with warmer weather. Adequate protection of the fruit 
\rill be needed xy that time. 

¥. D. Armstrong reports apple scab 



Paducah-^(illa Ridge Area 



14s-, ¥hffr , R j. bitter rot l( as 



Increasingly serious-' in many sprayexi orcnj 

Jaused damage JuR^ast years, a control should.be starred by mid-May. 



lan is thjfe need for an oil as a cod- 
incl-<*de -e-il-et-i.east two weeks 



Scab control lis more important now t 
Ling a«'fe4%^oy4rcide in The~nexT sprays, 
after the last aulphu^ to avoid sprain burn. Fruit shduld be well pro- 

y 6 ' 

i^ected agaanst worms/wJ.th sprays at 

Coj^euiio are light vpn pea^ 

elayed. >^ a 

V 



3even-'to 10-day intervals 

further contrdl-'mea^i^res can be 



CarbonaaJije-Vincennes-Hendepscn-Lo^iilsviltle. 



.ight hatch of worins is expected^b' 



ine-half pound Fermate,will a 




/ 




Are? 



'lay 15. -5. C. Chandl'er reports 



lany orchards ready for the^ f efurtJri-cfiover Si5rj'a^t^ with apple scab stillia 
hreat. A mild fungi^de m§y be iimpart-a-nt ' in many orchards this week. 



danger from sulphur-oil injury wher;^ 



t is necessary to inc^iM.$ summer ci-il as a codling moth ovicide 



ire p 



L. F. St einer p&%at^S/t9 e--'unly yai'e procedure to follow is tc 

leep the fruit well pr/otected x-zith spray material until warm, settled 
reather begins. The interval between -sprays can be lengthened two or 
;hree days. 



Spray Service Report — No. 2, parre 2. 

Curculio continue li.^ht in peach orchards. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area : S. C. Chandler reports very 
little emergence of codling moth. Orchards ready for the third cover, 
with apple scab still the most important threat to apples. G-roTA^ers 
should use judgment on omitting a fungicide. One-half pound of Fermate 
will serve as a fungicide. The use of summer oil can be delayed for a 
v;eek or more or until codling moths are laying eggs rapidly. 

Curculio are scarce in peach orchards. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southx-festern Ohio Area : Except for a light 
emergence of codling moths May 7-S; activity has been at a standstill. 
G. E. Marshall states that e. cover spray for codling moth should be ap- 
plied betxv^een May 11 and l6, vdth a mild fungicide such as a wettable sulphur 
included for apple scab. Codling moths will increase in numbers rapidly 
with vmrmer weather. 

Both Oriental fruit moth and curculio are very light in peach 
orchards. 

Quincy-Fittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette Area : Fruit 



I 



developm.ent has been slow, with some varieties just past the calyx stage. 
Apples will be ready for the second cover at Q,uincy and first cover at 
Nauvoo this week. G-rapes at Nauvoo are about ready for the second- cover 
spray, according to S. C. Chandler. 

Apple scab is serious throughout both areas, and a fungicide 
should probably be included unless the orchard is adequately protected 
by a fungicide. Codling moth emergence has only barely started, with no 
heavy hatch of worm^s expected for at least two weeks. Orchards follow- 
ing a split lead arsenate — nicotine schedule may continue the lead 
arsenate without nicotine one additional spray. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Fruit has developed but little 

during the past week. Although the crop may have been lost through 

frost damage, sprays should be continued against apple scab. Protection 

i of the foliage against scab is essential if the orchard is to bear a 

crop in 19^6. 

•sfr -a- * it ■»•*■» •Si- ■»•«•* * 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal r.nd state agencies, 
, Including the Agricultural Experiinent Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
:Illincis," the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
xorapiled by M. D. Farrar of the Illinois Natural History Survey. 

'EHR:pm 5/llA5 ~°" 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May § and June J)0, 191^ 



('' (Prepared by Illinois State Natural Hiptory 

SPRAY SERVICE REPCRT--N0. 9 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
Kpj 17-23, 19'-l-5 (College of Agriculture, Urtanr, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky^and the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennea-Henderson- 

Louisville, Kj. 

3 - Belle vllle-Hardln-Centralia 



k ~ Bedford -I-exington-S.W. Ohio 
. 5 - Qulncy-Pitt3fleld 

6 ■ - Peoria- CiiSTnpsign-Lafajnstte 

7 - Northei*n Illinois-Indiana 



General: Apple scab is causing heavy damage to foliage in all 
but very v;ell-sprayed orchards. The continued use of a fungicide is 
needed un!Nd.l continuous rains cease. In southern Indiana, Illinois and 
Kentucky, iodling moths will emerge rapidly v/ith warm weather. Heavy 



egg laying pay be expected x\rit 
Scab contro-tSvls of first import 



Indiana. Codlrug moth worms wi 
in these areas. 



P agwbe^h-Villa &dge Are 




ter the first warm days, 
ral and northern Illinois and 
ctive for at least two weeks 



Louisville^ Ks'^'^'^'^^y J Area; Belles; 



Lexington-Sbut-fawestern Ohio Area : 



arbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 



iit-trat^sorv^lready exists Th "B-ome- cosifnereial-orchaiicB. 



\ 



-i 



ille-Hardi n-Cent ^j- alia Area ; Bedford- 
Apple s-^ab is serious. A' hopeless 



A Bordeaux fungi- 



cide sps^ay isc needed in most orchArds, varying fron a 1/2-1-100 x^reak 

J 6 6 

Bordeaux to ^6-loe-full strength! Borde^iux, the amount depending on the 



'■\, 



scab condisliron in the orchard. ^ii-uitM^ growing ra>i'9.1y7-^and full pro- 
tection agaif^st codling moth will be needed at all Jtiiiref fpr the next 
;hree weeks. A /moderate emergenc,e of moThs octcpci^e'd on K?»>i[_jLii..v'S!>4 15* 

Emergence is ^Qf ^er cent comp^e^e ast^ Vincennes^ with I/3 f^f the x>roi'ms 

^ / 2 "" "" "h^J - I 

not yet pupated>«^Cij ceding to fStelner_,_^>^!mav;7^ hatch of worms may ybe 

2 ' , 

expected a week aftbor- the -i^ir^t; vrarm days in all orchards x^rhere codllr 

moths were destrvictive JLg^) seasdn, 

Quincy-rit\3f iela Air^ea; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette > roa: 

-— —--^^ ^r-' ^ / r — 

■^pple scab is threatening many comm-ercial orchards. It is suggested 



tha': growers ar 




prays containing a wettable sulphur fungicide for 



Spray Service Report — No. 9> page 2. 

scab control without the addition of an insecticide until the period 

of continuous rain ie broken. 

Codling moths are pupating rapidly, with about 50 per cent 
pupated in cages at Urbana. Very few moths have emerged. With iirarmer 
weather, growers should apply insecticides for the protection of fruit 
against a heavy hatch of worms the last week in May. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Heavy freeze damage caused a 
severe loss in the crop. A program of scab control should be maintained 
until this disease is under control. No codling moth activity has been 
reported to date. 

The following was issued to growers in Indiana and applies 
equally well to conditions that exist in Illinois orchards: 

IMPORTANT - Regarding Your Apple Spray Program 
Dear Fruit Grower: 

The weather this spring has certainly "messed up" our apple 
spray programs. Bloom occurred ahead of schedule and apple scab is 
serious, but cool, wet weather is holding back codling moth development. 
For example, some central Indiana growers are ready for their fourth 
cover spray, with the codling moth still in the pupa stage, which means 
that additional first-brood cover sprays will be necessary to take care 
of the worms when they do make their appearance. 

No one has all the ansu^ers in a year like this, but here are 
a few suggestions: S outhern Indiana (3-Brood Area) — Some hatch of 
codling moth eggs began May 9. but egg development and moth activity is 
'below normal. Keeping in mind the serious codling moth situation in 
; southern Indiana, the only safe procedure for growers to follow is to 
jkeep the fruit well protected with spray material. Until vrarm, settled 
weather begins, however, the interval between sprays can be lengthened 
a few days. Extra first-brood sprays v/ill be necessary in order to keep 
the fruit protected during the entire period of first-brood hatch. 



Spray Service Report — No, y, page '^. 

Central and Northern Indiana Cg-Brood Areas) — If apple scab is not 
under control, spraying at seven- to 10-day intervals should be con- 
tinued, using lead, lime and wettable sulphur. Oil is not likely to be 
needed for at least two weeks In central Indiana and probably not for 
three weeks in the northern part of the state. At least 1^ days should 
elapse before applying oil on sulphur residues. 

¥eak Bordeaux is also a good fungicide, and growers having a 
codling moth problem can use oil sooner by turning to lead and weak 
Bordeaux for the cover spray preceding the use of summer oil. Bordeaux, 
however, may increase russeting if applied within three weeks of petal 
fall and may russet Golden Delicious at any time. 

G-rowers who are confident that apple scab is under control can 
"sit tight" and wait for the codling moth to catch up. Growers \-jho fol- 
low this procedure, however, should make certain that a spray applica- 
tion preferably v^ith oil is applied at the beginning of egg hatch and 
another seven to 10 days later. These two applications should be made 
regardless of the number of sprays applied up to that time. 

Apparently plum curculio is not yet causing any appreciable 
damage to plumis and cherries, but this pest should be taken in ccnsidera^ 
tion and lead arsenate applied if and when curculio makes its appearance. 

Very truly yours, 
/s/ G. E. Lehker 
G. E. Lehker 
Ass't in Entomology 

/s/ C. L. Burkholder 
C. L. Burkholder 
Ass't Chief in Horticulture 

«-;?■!!■ ^t -^'- j,'r •;<• <;- •;;- ■»•■«• 4!- ^r 

j And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
'sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
llllinols, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
'Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
compiled by M. D. Farrar of the Illinois Natural Plistory Survey and 
iDvright Powell, Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois Col- 

lleo:e of Agriculture. 

*~ — 0— 

jSHR:pm 5/lgA5 

' Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S,and June '}0 , 191^ 



u> 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No, 10 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
Vily 2g-June 2 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists, of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SEEVICE REPOET AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Eenderson- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Eardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.W, Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittofield 

6 - Peorla-Chan^lgn-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illlnola-Indlana 



Generalt Cool rainy weather has retarded codling moth develop- 
ment. It is probable that peak emergence of moths occurred between 
May 21 andV^ in Kentucky, extreme southern Illinois and Indiana. A 
heavy hatchlof worms should be expected there around June 1. North of 
Vincennes tq Carbondale emergendf has been tslow. Overwintering worms 
have largely pupated, Indicating |that a vert- heavy flight may be expected 
on the first waNp days. Eggs will be hatoning two weeks after the moths 
emerge. Fruit is ^till very smar 
oil can be corrtinued much'^later in 




mature fruitVex^eeding residue tolerances. „ Apple sc^ab control should be 

/ N 



cont 



led 



iere neeiSreds- — 



tiniied 

^ aducah-Villa Ridge Area 
5 f 



'ating tha t lead arsenat/e and 
schedule titan usual without the 



Codling moths Y.ave been emerging in 



needed on apples by 



numbers ever the past weeK, Adequate protection is 
May 2^. Vea]L3ofdeaux sh^suld replace sulphur for sckb^&oQ_trol, with 
^-6-100 Borde^.ux applied on Varieties sub jecT: ■^o-te'ii;ter roti An ovicide 
of oil may be W^ed to the conling^ moth sgray a,t the) time_cdidlingL moth 



eggs are abundan^ on the fruit^^^ WO^ably about yun 

' / ^ ^ / k 

needed. V ^ 





otY^ Louisville, Kentucky Area; 



Carbondaler-Vince nnes 
Codling- m.oth emergen pe^has 
pick-up occurred aft^r^ay IS. ^^his will extend the first-br 



slowed down by weather, but a rapid^ 

'atch 



\ 




00 



longer than nsnql . jy ffty6ydJji,R -^ 'Stfemer' (vincennes ) , wormy apples were 
found at Henderson My 21, with mature larvae expected to leave the 
fruit by June 10. At Vincennes spring brood activity is now at its peak. 

Natura"! History 



Spray Service Report — No. 10, page 2. 

■j^gs have been hatching in, 12 days^ but will hatch in four or five days 
in warm weather. If the present warm weather continues, first-brood 
hatch should reach its peak about June 1. Chandler (Carbondale) reports 
much lighter emergence of codling moths, with the peak still to come in 
western Illinois. Pupation, however, is .high and moths will emerge 
rapidly when they start. Weak Bordeaux should replace sulphur for scab 
control, especially where oil will be used early in June. 

Peach thinning will remove most curcullo-inf acted peaches. 
Oriental fruit moths are light. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area ; Approximately 5 P©^ cent of 
the codling moths have em.erged in cages with first eggs observed at 
Grafton by Chandler May 23. Growers should change from sulphur to weak 
Bordeaux for apple scab if they plan to use oil with lead arsenate early 
in June. The fruit is relatively small, so that lead arsenate may be 

used later than usual. 

B edf ord- Lexi ngt on- Southwe s t ern Oh i o : Codling moths began to 
emerge at Lexington, Kentucky, in numbers May I6. The peak of emergence 
is probably at hand, according to Marshall (Bedford). Although scab is 
still serious, grov^ers will have to choose between the continued use of 
sulphur or the change over to xireak Bordeaux for scab control. After the 
last sulphur spray, oil should not be added to the codling moth spray 
for at least two weeks. Apples should be protected against a heavy 
hatch of vj-orms around June 1. 

Quincy-Pittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : A 
number of codling moths have been caught in traps at Pittsfield this 
week, indicating that some moths are laying eggs. Pupation is high and 
a heavy flight of moths may be expected after a few warm days. Weak 
Bordeaux should be substituted for sulphur where oil is to be included 
in the codling moth spray early in June. Because of the small size of 
the fruit, lead arsenate may be used in the schedule longer than usual 
this season. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Scab sprays should be applied 
where needed. Codling moth activity has not started yet. 

■ft «■){•* -if- -S'f 4HHt ■JH!' •»!■ * 

And with that we conclude today's- spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies. 
Including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar of the Illinois Natural History Survey and 
Dv/ight Powell, Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois Col- 
:lege of Agriculture. -0- 

EHRtpm 5/25 A5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 191^ 



I 



lip (Prepared by Illinois State Natural nistorj^ 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 12 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
r»6,ll ^^vcrt---:/ ,6,. (and Home Economics, University of Illinois 



June 10-16 ' r.^ ... .. \i~' (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPKAY SERVICE REPOET AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Vllla Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vlncennea-Henderson- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Eardin-Centralia 



h - Bedford -Lexington-S.vr. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfleld 

6 - Peorla-Chan^aign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



General: The hatch of codling moth worms will be heavy over 
the entire area during the second week of June. All apples will need 
adequate protection for at least two more weeks. Pn ovicide of oil may 
be helpful, [although considerable injury has been reported from the use 
of sprays ccjntaining an oil i^^heiie they hav^ been applied on foliage 



carrying considerable residue of 



sulphur. the danger from apple scab 
ern Dorti/cns of Illinois and Indiana. 



is about past except in the nortt 

On varieties subjebt to blotch or\bitter 

for control. _.A^^ply treated codling moth bands at once in southern 

Indiana-IlliVrol§ areas. 



rot, use fu ll strength ^ordeaux 



X. 



►■ 



Pad.ucah-ViTla'^id'ge -Area .: 



; 



are now "oeing liarve^ted in western 
parent a: 



y 



\ 



^ 



r 



Codling mo 
Although firs 
needed. A hatch 
pected and cont 

Consider 

jWith lead arsenate; fviither"^?^ 

1 i 

Ipreharvest sprays. 



Red Rird-apples- 

Kentucky, vxith tk 

6 

expected to start 

all sfSLges, -iJ.th ^r^e worms thrt 



orms are tapering off, conti 
orms in nipening 



ni 



and Mayflower peach 
e harvest of Trans- 

about June 11-12. 

5-foul\ths groxirn. 
•otection is 



isparei 



Trans . 
Treaty's. /i5andsv,should b/ applied noiti^. 



^ 



-totli 



I 



:9-'OCcitrre^-jarL De^ches spraye( 
!Stijients probably are not needed until tKe 



1 1 ^ . 

Carbondale-V^gennes-3enders on-F'P''''' qvilloj Kcntuck yr-^Area: 



Codling moth actj/v 



TL 



itj^ has been heavy over this area. Eggs are hatching 
in seven days. 'Emergence is dropping off in some sections, wiuh heavy 



survey 



Spray Service Report — I3o, 12, page 2. 

emergence still occurring in the vicinity of Carbondale. Heavy applica- 
tions of insecticides are advisable where codling moths have been 
severe. Transparent apples should be protected against worms entering 
fruit just previous to harvest, which will start about June 12. 

Arsenical injury to peach is causing considerable damage to 
'oliage. Further use of arsenical sprays or dusts should be confined 
:o the edges of the orchard where most of the curculios are found. 

Belleville-Eardin-Centralla Area : Moth emergence at Grafton 
las increased from 10 to 25 per cent during the past week, with an in- 
srease of 10 per cent in wormy apples on unsprayed fruit. A heavy 
.ttack of worms may be expected for at least two more weeks. Use of oil 
n the spray is advisable in problem orchards or where there is a mini- 
■um of danger from using oil following recent applications of sulphur. 

Curculio and Oriental fruit moth remain light in peach orchards. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southvje stern Ohio Area ; Codling moths have 
een tapering off at Lexington. According to Parks (Columbus), heavy 
atches of moths have occurred at Cincinnati since Kay 21, with first 
ntrances observed May 22. High catches of moths were taken at Bedford, 
idiana, Vay 29- A very heavy hatch of worms will be hatching in the 
rea between June 10 and l6. , • 

Grapes are ready for the third Bordeaux— lead arsenate spray 
or the control of black rot and grape berry moth. 

Quincy-Pittsf ield Area : Codling moth emergence has been heavy, 
though not yet at the peak. Full protection should be maintained on 
>ples for at least two weeks. Apple scab is still active. Fermate or 
lak Bordeaux used with lead arsenate sprays will aid in controlling 
te apple scab. A fair amount of nicotine is available in the vicinity 
Quincy. 

Grapes at Nauvoo are ready for the ^1-6-100 Bordeaux and lead 
fsenate spray for the control of black rot and grape berry moth. 



Spray Service Report — Mo» 12, page "J). 

Peorla-Champalgn-Laf ayette Area : A heavy ha.tch of worms is 
expected to continue for at least two weeks. G-rowers should maintain 
adequate protection on their fruit.- The use of Fermate or weak Bordeaux 
will help to control late scab. The addition of oil may be advisable 
in orchards where the use of oil will not cause injury from recent ap- 
plications of sulphur. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area r Codling moths are starting to 
emerge and worms should be hatching by mid- June, although a heavy hatch 
is not to be expected before June 25- Control of late apple scab may be 
important in some orchards. Fruit prospects are light over much of the 



^rea. 

i 



*■>{• -JUS- ^HHH!- •!!•#•«■ * 



And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar of the Illinois Natural History Survey. 

-0- 



CKR:Tom 
p/gA5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Husk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 191U 

l 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — Noi 11 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
June 3-9, 19^5 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray se:n)-ice report, presented through the 
cooperative efforts of entoraolo^-^ists, pfthologists and horticulturists 
of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the* U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPEAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Fuducat-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennea-Henderson- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevilie-Hardln-Centralia " 



1^ - Bedford-!.exington-S.W. Ohio 

.5 - Quincy-Pittjfl^-ld 

6 - Peorla-Ci^ampsign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern lUlnols-Indlaaia 



General: Apple fruit prospects have been materially light- 
ened over TJhe past week by a heavy drop of fruit. As low as 10 to 6o 
per cent norlmal crops are reported in orchards that originally indica- 
ted a full cf-op. Apple scab, po(pr pollinata.on and frequent freezes 
have been corV^ributing causes for^ this drop] Peaches are generally 

With c/lrculio and Oriental fruit 



overset and willvrequire thinning 
moth reported ligh\ over tlie enti 
may be removed,a^ excess f'5'uit. C 



area,/ most of the injured fridits 



moths are emerging rapidly, 
Baking neces*^r^ adequate protectidn against first-trood worms for at 



leas 



s^— ^fetro 



three weeKB. — • — — 

; 

Paduoah-V^/lla Ridge Area 



emergenca, T/ri.th woi^m-entrances comnon in poorly spra 
An ovicide^>Q3r"2 auarts of stammer d'. 



Codling moths hjave passed peak 
6 



/•ed apple orchards, 
1 pe^ ^00 gallonsLmay~bcL, helpful in 



sprays appliea on prolSlera orchards during the next t 

ties susceptible /to blotch rjid, biti;er rot shoul'Q. 

deaux until the jaisease is und^rv^con"ti;ol. Thoi?bugh coverage of the 

fruit for insect crantnrl "must b[e^^a4^it^ioc* f^r- at, ^easi- two weeks. 




these .varieties. 
Curcul 
Second brood Or 



Brown rot hs.s, b^err repiirted on early ripening peaches. Pre-^ 

ining' sulphur should not be omitted oy 
1 / 



harvest sprays or du^\s 





/ 



/ r 



d Oriental fruit moth continue to be light, with 
fruit moth reported starting at Villa Ridge. 



Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson, Louisville, Kentucky Area : 
Codling moth emergence has be en heavy since May 20, At Vlncennes 
emergence is estimated yo per cent, et Carbondale 3^ "to 30 Pe^ cent 
complete. Egg-laying has been heavy, the worms hatching within nine 
days after the eggs were laid. Weekly sprays will be needed to control 
worms in problem orchards. The addition of two quarts of summer oil 
per 100 gallons will destroy many eggs before they hatch. Worm en- 
trances are common in poorly sprayed orchards. A ^-6-100 Bordeaux 
should be applied where needed for blotch control. (Blotch observed 
in orchards May 2J).) 

Although curculio remain light on a relatively heavy crop, 

1 

Chandler (Carbondale) states that "an application of spray or dust at 
this time will be of value if the lAreather stays warm." Early peaches 
should be watched for brovm rot. 

B ell e vl 11 e-Kar din- Central la Area : Codling moth emergence 
has been about 25 per" cent at Belleville, 10 per- cent at Kardin and 
3 per cent at Jerseyvllle. Continued heavy emergence is expected. 
Egg-laying and worm entrances will be heavy for the next three weeks. 
The addition of summer oil is needed as an ovicide for the next two or 
three sprays; weekly applications of sprays will be advisable in prob- 
lem orchards. A heavy fruit drop has reduced the apple crop, making 
the protection of remaining fruit a more difficult job, 

Bedford- Lexington, Southwestern Ohio Area : Codling moths 
jprobably are past peak emergence May 25 at Lexington, Kentucky, and 
May 29 at Bedford, Indiana. About 70 per cent of moths have emerged 
at Vlncennes, Extremely heavy hatch should be expected between June k- 
and 10. In some orchards the continued use of a fungicide is more 
important than an oil ovicide for codling moth, according to Marshall 
(Bedford, Indiana). 



Spray Service Report — No. 11, page 3 

Peach tree foliage and fruit are growing rapidly. Brown rot 
was reported at Lexington on Valiant peach May 27 » indicating a need 
for sulphur sprays or dusts on early peaches. There has been consid- 
erable leaf drop on peaches where two arsenate of lead sprays xirere 
applied, according to Ritcher (Lexington). 

Q,uincy-Pittsfield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette, Indiana , 
Area : Codling moth emerp-ence is 10 to 20 per cent complete, with heavy 
emergence expected at once. Traps and cage catches at Pittsfleld and 
Urbana indicate that a heavy hatch of worms may be expected by June 6-10. 
Blotch-susceptible varieties should receive ^-6-100 Bordeaux. The use 
of summer oil as an ovicide is advisable if two weeks have passed since 
the last application containing sulphur. Weekly sprays for the next 
three weeks may be advisable in orchards where codling moths have been 
severe. A heavy drop of fruit from apple scab, poor pollination and 
cold weather has materially reduced the crop prospect. Russet is re- 
ported severe on most varieties in the Quincy-Pittsfield area. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : First codling moths were 
reported at Rock Island, Illinois, the last week of May. First hatch 
should occur about June 3-10. Varieties of apples not susceptible to 
blotch should be sprayed with sulphur for control of apple scab. On 
blotch-susceptible varieties use ^-6-100 Bordeaux. 

•«• •it -M- ■«•*-)!•■«•■«■■» •in*' •» 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana 
and Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Fed- 
Iral Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with 

E^formation compiled by M. D. Farrar and Dwight Powell of the Illinois 

Natural, History Survey and the Department of Horticulture, respectively. 
EHR:CG (^ b- 1-^57 . „ . ,, , -P- . . .. 

Uni^ 




Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June JiO , 191^- 



" (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

5PRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. I3 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
lune lg-2^ (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

BARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the 
cooperative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists 
Df Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE KEPOET AEEAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennee-Hendereon- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralla 



k- Bedford -I>exlngton-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittafleld 

6 ■ - Peorla-Chajnpelgn-Lafasrette 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



General'. Cool weather has again delayed the normal activity 
)f codlln^^oths. In Kentucky the first larvae are leaving the fruit. 
Cn southern [Indiana and Illinois the situation ranges between almost 
complete and] complete spring bro^d moth emergence. In central Indiana 
md Illinois \noth activity is at fe peak or \iill be by June Ig. Apple 
cab is still serious throughout the tri-s^te area. Bitter rot has 
lot yet appeared, 13\ut weath'er cono^tions J^ave been ideal for its /de- 
velopment. _/ 7 

Pactjttcah-Villa Ridge Area ; 
rest 



Red^ 



Parent apples are being picked. A 
She f ruitl in the PqiOiicah-Princeton 



./ 



."N, . 



W. D. Armstrong 



reports the har- 



ird andTMajf lower-pe^cfiej. stl.ll iinder w^j. Some Trans- 

Ifew codling moth :|.arvae are leaving 
regions. Moth emergence is about 



^■\ 



\\xm 



heeded ^except in some 



Dver from Jkjujrsville south. \ Few lAte mbtl^is were emerjgj^g '^\ Lexington 
and Covington ton June 5.1. Continued protection agains^nj^prmi entrance 
Ls advised. No biltter rot is T?erjorT;ed. "* P-^"^ 

Curcul^o are very scarce, v>lth some slight increa/se in ni 

V ^ / 2 ---/v / ^ / 

3ers last week. x«...^n«rai, so/ayj 

problem orchards. Peach Si^ab- I^-^-Just appearing at Princeton on green 

June Elberta, Cumberlknd^aod-^iikadci. 

Carhnnd^l p-V'kn(/'.pnnp=;-KpnrlRr.qr>n-: ^ni]i s yj 1 1 p j Kcntuoky ^-^rea : 

^ N-^" - - / 

it Vincennes L. F^ Stfiiner reports, spring brood emergence nearly com- 

|)leted, with heav3^~^g deposition and worms hatching in fair numbers. 



Spray Service Report — No. I3, page 2. 

The hatch x-fill continue at a moderate rate this week. The interval 
Detween sprays should not exceed 10 to 12 days. Scab is still serious 
In many orchards. Sulfur should be substituted for oil in nicotine- 
bentonite sprays under severe scab conditions. Oil should be reduced^ 
or omitted in the following spray where this procedure is practiced. 

Rosy apple aphis and the apple aphis are increasing in abun- 
iance. Red mite is still scarce. 

In the Lo-uisville area P. 0. Ritcher reports that most of 
the emergence is over, but additional sprays may be needed to control 
Late first-brood worms. Apple scab is still plentiful, with twig 
Dlight developing on susceptible varieties. 

At Carbondale S. C. Chandler reports codling moth about 90 
per cent emerged. The egg hatch has increased of late, with no decrease 
Ln sight for this week. 

At Louisville P. 0. Ritcher reports many full-grown curculio 
Larvae leaving the peach. At Carbondale S. C. Chandler reports that 
jarring shows curculio light. Probably no spraying or dusting is neces- 
sary. Considerable arsenical injury is showing, thus emphasizing the 
act that additional lead arsenate sprays should not be applied if not 
absolutely necessary. Sulfur is needed on early-maturing varieties, 
3uch as Red Bird, for brown rot control. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area : At Belleville about 70 
per cent of the moths have emerged. Well-sprayed fruit is giving excel- 
lent control. 

At Grafton 50 per cent of the moths have emerged. Untreated 
fruit shows I6 to 2g per cent infestation. Additional spraying should 
be continued at seven-day intervals. Bitter rot sprays should be 
started in problem 'orchards or blocks. 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area ; G. Edward Marshall 



Spray Service Report- — No. 13< page 3- 

hatch should be at hand, this week. The average groxfer should not slight 
either scah or codling moth at this time. A heavy drop of apples is oc- 
curring. In some orchards a number of apples contain codling moth 
larvae. Apple aphis are building up to a serious population- 

i^uincy-Pittsf ield Area ; Peak codling moth hatch should occur 
this weak. Spraying should be continued at seven-day intervals; ^-1-100 
Bordeaux should be used as the arsenical safener in order also to reduce 
scab Infection. 

Peoria- Champaign- Lafayette Area : The peak emergence of moths 
should occur this week. Codling moth sprays should be continued at 
seven-day intervals. 

Northern Illinois- Indiana : Codling moth hatch has started. 
Scab is severe. Mild sulfurs should be continued at full strength at 
seven- day intervals. 

And xirith that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation v:ith fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey,, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, Indiana, with inform.a- 
tion compiled by Di'vight Powell, Department of Horticulture, Illinois 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

-0- 



EHR: pm 
6/i5/iJ-5 

Cooperative Extension ¥ork in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United State 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. pLUSk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 2 and June '}0, 191^ 



^ (Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. l'+ (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
June r'-J— 30 • (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

KAriFJlTOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPEAT SERVICE EEPQE!? AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-yincenaBB-Benderson- 

Louiavllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Eardlu-Centralla 



\ " BedTord-I^xlngton-S.W. Ohio 

,51- Quincy-Pittsf ield 
6 ' - Peorla-CbaaQiaign-Lafayette 
7 - Northern IXllnola-Indiana 



General: Cool wet vreather has been favorable for apple scab. 
This disease is still serious throughout the tri-state area. Bitter rot 
has not a^fv^ared, but growers should watch for it. Quince rust is 
general in southern Indiana orchards. First -brood codling moth are 
almost over jin Kentucky and extr(eme southerri Indiana and Illinois. Moths 
are still numerous in central Indiana and Illinois. In northern Indiana 
and Illinois cooling' moths are almost at neak emergence. Aphids are 

and predators are expe/Bted to 



abundant in many iDrchards,'^but p 
hold them in chep^. 7 



irasitef 



?ad> 



Lgah-Villa Hidge Area: 



W. 



D. Arm.strong |( Kentucky) reports 



e^h orchards, sicpjn^-brood Oriental 



•N, 



the harvest /of Trah^anent_jg,p2les and Redbird peaches xvell under way, 

Cod.ling mofths are between first and second brood. Iijury from first- 

/ 5 ^ 

brood wo»ms was lighter tlr:fen expected. 

urculio'' remain^ 34ght in \.k 

\" ^ '' > .\ 

fruit Fx-oths are causing noti(fe^bl'e/twig injary-oa.-suqculent ^grov/th. 

\ 5 : ( ^^^~-^ ^ 

BroiAm rot is s$ate>re on RedbirS. ■oeaahes. , 

1 ^7 ^ \ 

Carbondqrle-Vincennes-keH44rson- Louisville, Kentucky Area : 

Vincennes L. F. Bteiner reports rchgt fir«^t-^brQ6d emergence/ of codlin 

moths has ceased, btff'moth^ arel^txj;T!t>;;^OTn.ng to traps "in fair numbers'" 

and first-brood eggs ,wiil--i3onJ:j(r!ueNhatching for another two weeks. Aj 

Carbondale, S. C. Chani^^r'^-T^ ports that first brood is about over^nd 

^ ^ 1 / ^/ 

L"'ecommends that grower^_J^o hn^' ^.f n.11 m i r rri n ]-m" "nr ; ^ — ^ray scneaiale extend 

their schedules to a iwo-week interval between sprays until second-brood 
(^orms start hatcK44i^-; No bitter rot was reported in the area. 

On peach, curculio and Oriental fruit moths still remain light. 



' Spray Service Report — ITo. 1^1-, pa^^e 2. 

Bellevllle-Kar din-Gen tralla Area : Peak emergence of codling 
moths is over, although moths xnil be flying and eggs hatching for 
another two weeks. S. G. Chandler recommends that, in orchards using a 
full spray schedule, after this vreek a two-week interval between sprays 
be followed until the second-brood hatch. First-brood worms are leaving 
apples in this area. Treated bands should be on the trees now. 

Oriental fruit moths remain light, including the peach section 
in southern Calhoun county. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area ; G-. E. Marshall 

(Bedford, Ind. ) reports that codling moths are at peak flight, with en- 
trances of worms expected to continue for at least 10 days. Hail injury 
on Ma.y 9 contributed to upward of 25 ^er cent infection of apples by 
quince rust. Aphids are abundant, with parasites a,nd predators active 
in reducing their nujnbers. 

\h D. Armstrong reports codling moth emergence about over at 
Lexington on June I5. Gurculio were leaving dropped fruit in large 
numbers June 12-12. 

Q,uincy-Pittsf leld Area; Peoria-Champaign La.fayette Area : 
Codling moths apparently reached a peak of emergence on June 1^, but 
large numbers of moths are still emerging from cages. Weekly spraying 

may be advisable in problem orchards for another two weeks; -|- 1-100 
Bordeaux should be used as the arsenical safener in order also to reduce 
scab infection. 

northern Illinois-Indiana Area ; Codling moths will probably 
reach peak em.ergence this week. Apple scab is severe to mild; sulphurs 
should be continued at full strength at seven-day intervals. 

******■*!■*•«■ ■«-*'a-5t* 

And with that we conclude today's- spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation v/ith fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Ag:ricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois,' the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 
EHR;pm 
6/22^5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 1914 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural r.istorjr 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0, I5 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
July 1-7 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucliy and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SBa?VICE REPOE^ AKSAS 



1 - Puducah-Vllla Rid^ 

2 - Carbondale-VinceniK»-^nde2*son- 

LouiBvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllie-Bardln-Centralla 



h — Bedford -Lexlngton-S.W. Ohio 

. 5 1 - Quincy-Pittaf ield 
6'- Peona-C]3ai!ipe.lgn-Lafayette 
7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 

General : The past two v^eeks have been the most favorable for 
codling moth development of any period since emergence began. As a re- 
sult, th'sre has been a sharp increase in numbers of successful worm 
entrancesJ This will result in a later second-brood peak attack in well- 
sprayed orjchards than in those/ poorly spriayed. First-brood eggs are 
expected t\ continue hatching in diminishing numbers for at least another 
week or two. 



Paduc^- -Villa Qj.dge jrea : Ao&ording to W. D. Armstrong (Ky.), 
codling moths a/e still between \Drood,»v 'I'he rirs y oooond brocfe moth 
emerged at(Paducah June 25j with 25 pei" cent of the worms pupated at 
Princeton /June S7. Hatch vrill b( starting in western Kentucky by July 1. 

On peachps second-brood curculio~have net started to emerge. 

Cultivation ^n peach orchards wi:.l destroir many circulio pupae in the 

soil. NSrown rot continues severvDvi^- early-ripenirig peaches. San Jose 
\ ^ \ . ^ 1 , — 



N 



ij^hi 



jssaj; 



scale is "^creasing on peach, ^hi a sp^ay^of summgp oil may be necei 

to check scale development* Oriental fruit moths (Sre^ncreasing in this 



area. 



\ ^ 



I 



Carteondale-Vlncenfieg^Hend^rson-LouX'sville, Xy.^ Area: Apcord- 
ing to L. F. S-^-int?i^ tTincenihg-ew'-a^apv^f^Qre lea^log,^ apples in stel^ily 
increasing numbers^ J3u^ fexiCaSu^ts v/ill be flying before July ^, wi' 
no substantial increas-ewiri the j^ate of hatch expected before July 10, 

^ 1 1 '^ y^ 

Growers with worm p^sp/xlationg - which average less than five e ntrances per 



1,000 apples may be able to complete the season with only two more 

sprays. Ten "eH^-nrore worms per 1,000 apples at this time normally re- 
quire four or more thorough second- and third-brood sprays. 



Spray Service Report — No. I5, page 2. 

At Carbondale first-brood moths are still emerging 69 days 
after they started. Both curculio and Oriental fruit moth remain light 
in peach orchards. Cultivation in problem orchards will destroy many 
curculio pupae in the soil. 

3elleville-G-rafton-Centralia Area : Codling moth emergence has 
tapered off, although a sharp increase in hatch of worms was noted by 
Chandler during the past week. The number of successful entrances has 
[(.also increased sharply. A txfo-week interval between sprays is probably 
adequate until the second-brood hatch. First pupation was observed at 
Hardin June 2^. 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Are a: According to G-. Edw. 

Marshall, Bedford, there has been a very heavy hatch of codling moths 

during the past week. The rate of hatch may subside a little this week. 

A late flight of moths is expected that will continue laying eggs for some 

-time. Aphids are decreasing'. Grasshoppers are appeturinr in :young orchards, 

poisoning may be necessary to prevent damage to young 
vrhere/trees. A nicotine spray for the ' control of leaf hoppers may be necessary 
in orchards xirhere leafhoppers are severe. Both apple scab and quince 
i rust have caused a heavy drop in injured fruits. 

New foliage on peach is replacing foliage severely injured by 
arsenical sprays. 

Grape berry moths ^-.^ere hatching during the last week in June. 

Pittsfield-Qu incy Area; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : Cod- 
ling moths are still emerging from cages in large numbers. New entrances 
have increased sharply. Complete protection of fruit will be necessary 
for at least two more weeks. Apple scab is still active and causing 
damage in many orchards. Sulphur should not be used for control where 
oil has been Included in the spray mixture. 

North ern Illinois- Indiana Ar ea: Large numbers of codling moths 
are emerging from cages. Complete protection of apples is needed over 
the next two weeks. The addition of sulphur for the control of apple 
scab may be advisable in many orchards. 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
Includin."- the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois',' the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect- Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, uith information com- 
piled by K. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 
EHR:-Dm 
6/297^5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
De-partment of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, I9IM- 



> 



i 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. l6 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
July g-1^ (College of Agriculture, Ur"bana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPHAY SEKVICE REPOEW AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennee-Hendei'son- 

LouiBvllle, Ky. 
5 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedford -Lexlngton-S.W, Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittafleld 

6 ■ - Peoria-ClifiBig«.l^n-Lafayette 

7 - Northern I lllnola -Indiana 



General: Over much of the area emergence of codling moths in 
apple orchards dropped off during the past week indicating a slight 
break between broods.- Moths are still emerging in small numbers from 
packing sheck, deep crevices and observation cages. An interval between 
sprays of greater than two weeksXshould not\be practiced without full 
knoxATledge of She worm situation in the orchard. Full second-brood ac- 
tivity will not\^art until afterl mid-Jul;^ 

Padacah-V^lla Ridge Area \ Acco rfcinp- to >/. D . Armstrong/ Ken- 

7^ ; V-X^ n^""^ — ^""^ 

tucky, the se2J3«a-brood co'dling mothshave been emerging in small numbers 

ers fromyLouisville south are encour- 
-broocL-spnay at Dice and to make 
10-day to two-wee c intervals. No 




since June 2fv ^Kentucky apple grow 



a:P:ei. 



^coni^lete th^r'firsrt s^ecund 



a noticeable inc3'ea:s"S -in injury by 

preharvest sul- 



several a>G.ditional applications at 
bitter rdt re~porte^._^ 

!3\jxctt-li6' remain Tight witjr 
the Oriental J^ruit raotih. G-rw/ers ^dhould not negi^t 
phur treatments'-T^r the control of )brox'\rn litot on^'rj^&c$.e3. 

Carbonddile-VinGennes-£enj^e^.^on-Loui3vi>le, Kentucky, Area ; 

L. F. Steiner, vVncennes,_^st-^tes/ tfiat halT/Xi^^rp catches of' codling m 

are still at a low l\vel, %ut ji^lta ef the second brood have begun 

emerging and some secdnd-brotfi^ hatch has undoubtedly occurred. 

of the comoaratively \la>t"e niiraber/of successful entrances late liT^une, 

n] /_ 

th^j . poak of ' Oooon £L-brp Jvf>i^cf ^i.. j£ ay not appear before late July or early 




)ths 



>Rfl 



A.ugust in most ojr*cha/ds. It is too early to reduce spray concentrations 
or lengthen spray intervals beyond two weeks unless the grower has 



SDray Service Report — No. 16, page 2. 

ietermlned that his first-brood population is not greater than five to 
LO worms per 1,000 apples. Red mites are increasing in Starking, Rome, 
3-olden Delicious and Grimes varieties. 

S. C. Chandler, Carbondale, reports that a few early second- 
jrood worms will be hatchine* by July 10, but in many orchards there will 
36 no great need for spraying them. 

Belle ville-Har din- Centralla Area : S. C. Chandler reports that 
bhere is little danger of infestation by first brood from now on. Most 
Df the first-brood worms are late and have not left the apples. On 
Fuly 2, ^3 pe^ cent were found to be less than two weeks old. At the 
sarllest, the first second-brood spray could be applied about July IS. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area : At Lexington,?. 0. 
ilitcher reports the first emergence of second-brood moths expected about 
July 10. C3-. E. Marshall, Bedford, states the rate of hatch and nex^r en- 
tries from codling moth slowed down the past week. At the present time, 
lowever, there is a heavy emergence from packing sheds. These moths 
■^ill be laying eggs for the next two v.'eeks. A heavy second-brood hatch 

should be in progress the last few days of July and early in August. 

Q,uincy-Pittsfield Area; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : God- 
iLlng moth emergence dropped off during the past week. Eggs and new 
Entrances can be found in many orchards. Adequate coverage must be main- 
tained on the fruit. Grov;ers should determine from observation in their 
prchards the need for additional first-brood sprays. Worms in fruit are 
j5mall, indicating a late second- brood hatch of x^rorms, probably not before 
ate in July. .Apple scab is causing severe, injury to new foliage on the 
■-ips of branches. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Ai^ea : Some moths are still emerging 
'rom cages. Complete protection of apples should be njaintained. The 
iontinued development of apple scab may justify the use of sulphur in 
ill sprays applied for codling moth control. 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
fented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
.ncluding the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
)eciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
;ion compiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey, 

-0- 
;HR:-Dm 

i76A5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and riome Economics 
I University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. ?. Rusk, Director 
! Acts approved by Congress May ?!• and June "^O, 191^ 



! 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE RSPORT~No. 1? (Survey and' Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
)* July 15-21 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPOE!^ ARMS 



, 1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 
j 2 - Carbondale-Vincennee-fenderson- 
Louisvllle, Ky. 
3 - Bellevllle-vHardln-Centralia 



If - Bedford-Lexlngton-S.W. Ohio 
5 - ftulncy-iPittafield 
6 ' - Peoria-Chflmpalgn-Laf ayette 
7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



■General: This week is definitely between broods of codling 
moth In all areas except Paducah-Villa Ridge' (Area l). In other areas 
' second-br^d worms will not be hatching in numbers until after July 21. ; 
Most orchasds should be sprayed between July 22 and 2t , followed by 
another sprlay 10 to 1^ days latW. 

IlWnols peach harvest jwill start! about August 1 at Villa Ridge 



and August 6 ne^r Carbondale. Growers shfould not neglect preharvest 
dusts containing Sulphur for control of /brown rot in ripening loaches. 



Fadi 



Villa Ri^dge Area 



». Examinations Julj 

T~ — 

that nev; entrance s-^i-e*^ 



;ed late in July. 



; 



\ 



Early second-bi'ood moths started to 
11 by S7 C. Chardler at Villa Ridge 
scarcer: Appl-es4n this area should be 



nrotectM aftcer JuZy 15. At leas'; two additional sprays may be necessary 

( ^ 6 6 1 

in someWchards^,/ spaced at inter;r^s of 10 to 1^ dkys. A heavy hatch 

may be ex 



li be riReninj^ by August 1. Botmcu^culio and Ori- 



v^ 



fee. 
ental fruit m.otla are li,q;ht. \In r/ost orchards 
of trees shoul 

curculio controirr^'Tne ijiteri 
treatment for brown "[P^t- 



jeive a "or 






t^T the fivj 



;er\rows 



•esfrNdust cot 



:aining an ai-senlcal \ot 



cks^'sti-euld^ receive a suliA^iur 
uts^an arsenical. Injury from poison tp^t- 



ments has been sevf 



some defoliation. 



J orchards. Bacterial spot has alsovGaused 



\ 



•" f 



CarbopialQ^Vincennes-Kenderson- Louisville, Kentucky Area : A 
few early second-brood moths have emerged both at Vincennes and CarbondcOe. 



Spray Service Heport--No. l6, page 2. 

%, F. Stelner, Vlncennes, July 11, reports no noticeable increase in 
moth activity or rate of hatch since June. Present low rate of hatch is 
expected to continue for another 10 days. These observations are con- 
firmed by S. C. Chandler, Carbondale. 

Both curculio and Oriental fruit moth are generally light. 
&roh'ers should not neglect preharvest treatments for control of brovm 
rot on peaches expected to start ripening about August 6. Control of 
curculio should be confined to the edges of the orchard in order to 
avoid increased defoliation over the rest of the orchard by treatments 
containing arsenic. Bacterial spot is also causing defoliation in many 
orchards. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralla Area : Dave Dell, Grafton, reported 
that the earliest second-brood moths emerged July 12. The second-brood 
spray should be applied after July 2;; to be effective on the heavy hatch 
of worms expected late in July and early in August. 

Curculio and Oriental fruit moth are light, with a need for 
treatments containing arsenicals questionable in most orchards. High- 
quality peaches are in prospect, v^ith brovjn rot the most serious threat 
to the ripening fruit. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area : According to ?. C, 
Ritcher, Lexington, first second-brood moths emerged July 10, with 
July 15 recommended as the date for starting the first second-brood spray. 
For southwestern Ohio, T. H. Parlis, Columbus, reports that second-brood 
hatching should start there after July 23, with the first second-brood 
spray needed at that time. C-. Edward Marshall, Bedford, states that 
codling moth activity has dropped sharply, but that all apples should be 
well protected by July 23 against second-brood worms. At least one ad- 
ditional spray will be needed early in August. 

Q,uincy-?ittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Laf ayette Area : Very 
few new entrances were observed in fruit over the past v^^eek. A few moths 



bpray Service Report — No. l6, pa,cre 3. 

are still appearing in cages, indicating a prolonged emergence from over- 
wintering worms. Growers should examine their apples critically and 
apply , additional sprays where they are needed to protect the fruit. 
Heavy second-brood hatch will not start- before July 22. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area ; Moth emergence from cages has 
about stopped; however, complete protection of apples should be main- 
tained. The continued development of apple scab may justify the use of 
sulphur in all sprays applied for codling moth control. 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D^ Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey-. 

-0- 



EKR:pm 
7/I3A5 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress Kay ^ and June 'J)Ci , 191^ 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
pRAY S:i:HVICE REPORT— No. Ig (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
1 (and Home Economics, Universitv of ' Illinois 

/uly p.r '" ' - 



Ly P2-2g 



(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



BARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPBAY SEITTICE REPOE!? AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Ytncenii0e-Hende2*son- 

Louisvllle, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-Hanlln-Centralia 



U - Bedford-I«xingtc«i-S,W. Ohio 
,5 - Quincy-Pittafleld 

6 ■ - Peoria- CliSmpalgn -Lafayette 

7 - Nparthem Illlnola-Indiana 



General : Starting about July 22^ second-brood codling moth 
larvae will gradually increase in numbers. It is expected that the peak 
hatch will rkit occur until sometime between August ^ and 10. The time to 
tart second\brood sprays and the number of ^sprays needed will depend on 
individual oijchard conditions. In problem drchards full protection 
ihould be maijHained from the las", week in JJUly through the first two 
".reeks of August. \ln these orcharc^s the fi/st spray should be applied 
luring the week of Jjuly 22-22. 

Paduaate«Yilla Hidge Area 
ncreesed July^l^ and will probably 
'he uS^^^Ni'/iitl probablv occuF'fFTB i«i 

ong drawi/ out and e^'pecially heavy 
' ^ 6 



iait trap catches 



-i 



of codling moths 



continueyto builc up for some time. 

t-weekr-in-Juljt. -The hatch may be 

during late July ^nd early August. 
6 



urculio are^iOQr easing in .num.bers. .?. 0. RLtcher, Lexington, 

\ y \ ' ^ _ 

:y., states^teat for eastern^Kentu(^.:y tnfe ^ne-month-b ^ore-^rvest cur- 

\ \.^ '^ } ^ ^ ^^'' ^ 

iulio spray is \iot reclmmended, allmough in some orchef^^^s thg outside 

■ows might need trfeatment. GoLden /"ubilee peachep-were ripem-ag^at 

I ''/"^ / 

jexington July I'/f; a few showed Qrien^^al fruit ^oth e^^trancfes. Browr 

2 "^^ '~'J\^ I 

ot treatments of slJ3^'ur should>^;fe--.^_g/'T3Sairte^'T^ peaches. 

Garbondale-Vl\^€mie's^:^n(!ls.r son-Louisville, Ky. , Area : L. F. ^r" 

J ^ y ; /- 

Jteiner, Vincennes, st4^Q^c!>:7Tr July 18, that about four times as raani^ 
loths are coming t o tra^^now^s^. weye being oaught betw e en br < »e tls . Koth 
activity should increase sharply late this week. The peak of second- 
)rood hatch is expected to occur between August ^ and 10. S. C. Chandler, 



I 



opray Service Report — No. lo, page 2. 

i/arbondale, on July Ig said that fresh entrances had Increased only 

lightly In poorly sprayed orchards. 

Curculio are still lighter than in 19^^ but are showing a slight 
imcrease, particularly near the edges of the orchexd. Bait trap catches 
■f Oriental fruit moth at Cobden, ;I11., indicate that another brood may 

e entering peaches the last of July. Brown rot treatment of ripening 
iieaches should not be omitted. 

Belleville-Hardin-Centralia Area : According to observations by 
> C. Chandler, "about 25 per cent of the earliest first-brood larvae 
.ad pupated on July lo." This situation indicates that sprays will be 
leeded to protect the fruit by July 23. The emergence of a few moths 
ilready indicates some hatch previous to Julj^ 2^, Peak hatch will prob- 

'bly not occur, however, until the second week of August. 

Bedford- Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area ; G. E. Marshall, Bed- 
crd, on July 17 reported large numbers of larvae leaving the apples to 
upate. This means that they v/ill be laying eggs heavily around July 26. 
leaf hoppers are damaging apples and grapes. Sprays containing nicotine 
,re needed for control of leafhoppers in some orchards. P. 0. Ritcher 
xpects a fairly heavy hatch of worms at Lexington by July 25 > with a 
ong-drawn-out second brood, especially heavy late In July and early 
ugust, 

Curculio have not increased enough to justify control measures 
xcept around the edges of orchards. However, brown rot control on 
ipening fruit should not be neglected. 

Quincy-Pittsfield Area; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette Area : On 
uly l6 at Champaign a few new entrances were observed that are probably 
tragglers from first-brood moths. Earliest larvae now leaving the 
pples indicate the start of hatch of second-brood worms during the week 
f"^ July 22-2g. Peak hatch will not occur until sometime in August, 
rowers should observe their fruit carefully for signs of new worms 
ntering apples. 

Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : A few first-brood moths are 
till emerging from cages. The need for additional sprays will depend 
n orchard conditions. Second-brood sprays should not be needed before 
id-August. * -it- ^tii- ■!(■•«• *•;!■■«•* 

And with that we conclude todaj^'s spray service report, pre- 
ented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
ncluding the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
llinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal De- 
iduous Pruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
ompiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 
KR: "on 

/20A5 

Coo-oerative Extension Work in Agriculture and home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914- 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 19 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
' July 2g-Au^u3t k- (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPKAY SERVICE REPQR!? AREAS 



1 - Puducah-'Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-VixicenrtBO-fienderson- 

LouiBville, Ky. 

3 - Bellevllle-.Eardln-Centralid 



k - Bedford -Lexington«S.W. Cmio 
5,- Qmincy-PittBfield. 
6'- Peorta-Chaa^jaign-Lafayette 
7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



General ; Weather throughout the past week was very favorable 
for the development of codling moth. Second-brood worms are hatching in 
increasing^ numbers throughout Kentucky, Southern Indiana and Illinois, 
By August i a heavy hatch is expected over southern areas. Growers lo- 
cated in cintral or northern Irtdiana and Illinois should xiratch their 






crops closelx for appearance of 



new entrances. The amount of spraying 



required to prCst^^ect against sec^nd-broodylnoths will depend on conditions 



within individual) orchards. 

Paaehes are ripening raiidly in southern 
for controlpDSvbrown rot are important juffjt before 

'aducah- Tiira Rmpre- A^^a :— W.-rS. Arms-tro*. 
reporte|[ July^ 25 tjiat adult codliiiff moths continue 

r ^6 6 

bers inXtraps at Pa^ucah, Princeton, Henderson and 

protectidNv/Ts justified fi*®m Lou:^i;vill'e ^outh, and bar ly Second-brood 



areas. Treatments 

harvest. 

g, Princeton, Kentuciqj 

to be caught in num- 

Louisville. Continued 



\ 



sprays shoul^ be on 5n northern Kentucky. Bitter r. 

July 21. I -^ i 



penred in the 



Owensboro sectl 

/ ~ " 

Curcqaio treatments'*^' 



'e \??^rant 





ited oyiy around the edge 



orchards. Prehac3res.t^ceTitrol fof 5rowp..,^.t~53ioul^ ^e neglected. 

^ 2 '" 



CarbondalV-Vincexm^ 



lerTtlerson- Louisville, Kentucky, Area: 



"s 



Although nev7 codling! moth eptrancjes are still hard to find in soms^or- 
chards, it is expected] that?- activity will increase sharply hy^ jCugnp^t 1, 
L. i ^' . S l ^emeV, ' y nc ^(nCb,^rblj/ rted July 25 that the peak of first-brood 
■ adult activity (^is^j/ow believed to be near or already occurring. Moth 
catches are the largest since May 21. Second-brood worms are hatching 



Spray Service Report — No. 19, page 2. 

In steadily increasing numbers; a comparatively heavy hatch will be under 

way by August 1 and should continue for two or three weeks. 

Peaches are maturing rapidly. Curculio are light, with further 
need for control uncertain. Oil dusts for brown rot are needed in most 
orchards, 

3elleville-Hardin-Centralia Area : According to S. C. Chandler, 
Carbondale, larvae leaving the fruit have increased rapidly in the past 
two weeks; over ^0 per cent of the worms taken betx^^reen July 17 and 2^ 
had pupated by July 2^. Adequate coverage should be maintained on apples 
throughout the next three weeks. 

3edford-Lexington-Southv;estern Ohio Area ; G. E. Marshall, 
Bedford, reported July 2^ that new entries of second-brood codling moths 
are increasing rapidly and that matu:.''e larvae are leaving the apples in 
large numbers. P. 0. Ritcher, Lexington, reports very few fresh en- 
trances, with the peak of moth activity not yet in sight. 

Curculio are very low, and the Oriental fruit moth is attack- 
ing ripening peaches in noticeable numbers. Activity of this insect 
indicates the start of a third brood. Sulphur treatments for hrown rot 
control are important at this time. 

Quincy-Pittsf ield Area ; In Pike and Hancock counties very fexir 
entrances were found by S. (JT ^handler July 25- None were observed in 
some orchards, G-rov/ers should watch for the appearance of nev; entrances 
and start second-brood sprays at once. 

Leafhopper nymphs are attacking grapes in moderate numbers at 
Nauvoo. It is too late for applications of Bordeaux, but control of 
leafhoppers by nicotine sprays is still practical. 

Peoria- Champaign- Lafayette Area ; New entrances of second-brood 
worms were hard to find at Champaign July 26. Spraying can probably be 
delayed in most orchards until the week of July 2J? — August k-. A delay 
in spraying beyond this week will be justified only in orchards very low- 
in codling moth. 

Northern Illinois- Indiana Area; The time to start second-brood 
sprays should be determined by appearance of new entrances on the fruit. 
The errllcst hatch is not expected before mid-August. 

And with that lire conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar, Illir.ris State Natural History Survey. 

EHR:pm ~°~ 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K.,P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 3 and June '^0, 1^1^ 



fl** 

(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE REPORT — No. 20 (Survey sjid Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
AufTUst ^1-11 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE EEPOR!? AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ria^ 

2 - Carbondale-VLacermee-fienderBon- 

LouiBville, Ky. 
5 - BelleviHe-Eardln-Centralia 



1|.'- 9edford-Lexlngton-S.W. OtiLa 

5:- Qttincy-PittBfield 

6- Peorla-Chaa^ial^-Lafayette 

7- northern Illlnola-Indiana 



General : Peach harvest - South Haven and Valiant varieties, 
Lexington, Kentucky, July 3I; Hale Haven, Bedford, Indiana, August 1; 
Elherta v^iety, Paducah, Kentucky, August 1; Villa Ridge, Illinois, 
August 35 ^enderson, Kentucky, August 6; Carbondale, Illinois, August & 
to 10, Centjralia, August I5. Clurculio, Oriental fruit moths, weather 
cracking an^storm-injured fruitl have contifibuted to severe outbreak of 
bro'vm rot in sVme or char as. He^mmended gf'reharvest treatments for con- 

uit motfi are needed in many orohards,- 



trol of brovm rouNand Orietital f 
Second/brood cejdling mo 



numbers ove^ the next two vreeks. Apples should be 

7 
to 1^!— day i/f.terv^l^from now until the hatch is over 



vae will be [entering apples in 

well protected at 10- 
sometime after August I5. 



Grasshoppers are threatening to damage young orchards. Ade- 

I Cj / 1 

quate cqntrol-^by applying poison bait is r^ommendetl. 

Paducp^i — VillTa^idge Ar^a> Carbondale-Vindeiyies, Area : On 
peaches, ap 
up to the timi 
plications, gro^rs equipped "Iko -^^ly sulphur op the fruit /as it paJ^ses 



\ 



oj^^orftrlol of Ori'^ntal_;£]:*'iiit moth ^and brown rot 

\to making field ap- 



through the gra 
Codli 
ibut are still going s^-ro!i| 



ne^houl(| not sa^ 



Codling rii5 



ar§ slad 



',cz to do so. / 
)uth of Louisville, Kentucky^ 



'oVtngton, Kentucky, and Villa Ridge, 

} 

Illinois. Full protebj^forTT's needed on apples this week. 

Garbondale- 



:enng,sji ;Ioiitluraoii — LuUi sviiie, Kentucky, Area ; 



L. F. Steiner sayd August 1 that second-brood hatch will increase con- 

C J 

siderably during"'the next week. Indications now are that the second- 

orood worm attack will continue heavy in many orchards until at least 



Spray Service Report — No, 20, page 2. 

the middle of August. If a cover spray has not been applied within the 
past 10 days, it should be done immediately. Another should follow after 
a. 10-day to three-week interval, depending on the degree of control ob- 
tained, S. C. Chandler suggests that growers producing both apples and 
peaches should be sure to apply a spray for codling moth just preceding 
3each harvest, 

Curculio have increased to about the level of the shuck fall 
spray. Control needed will depend on individual orchards. Apply oil for 
jontrol of Oriental fruit moth and brovm rot up to the time peaches are 
larvested. 

Belleville-Kardin-Centralia Area ; S. C. Chandler reported 

lugust 2 that new hatch of codling moth had not appeared In this area. 

^atch is however expected to start by August k. Amount of spraying 

leeded for second brood will depend on individual orchard conditions. 

Oriental fruit moths are heavy in ripening fruit (50 per cent 
it Olney, Illinois). Freshly wilted twigs are abundant. Orchards show- 
ing much infestation need protection by applications of oil dust. Such 

reatment will also materially reduce the danger from brown rot on ripe 
'rult, 

Bedford-Lexington-Southwestern Ohio Area ; Worms from second- 
»rood codling moths are attacking apples in numbers. Hatch is expected 

o remain heavy for at least tvj-o weeks. Ripening peaches are showing 

onslderable damage from Oriental fruit moth. Peak third-brood hatch of 

his insect will occur between August ^ and 9 at Bedford, Indiana. Pre- 
larvest treatments for control of Oriental fruit moth and brown rot are 

ow very important. Brown rot is reported severe in som,e orchards near 
jexington, Kentucky. 

Quincy-Pittsf ield Area; Peoria-Champalgn-Laf ayette Area ; Second- 
•rood moth emergence was just starting at Champaign August 1. About 10 

er cent of larvae have pupated, A moderate hatch is expected to start 
bout August 6 that will reach a peak between August I5 and 20, and re- 

axation of control efforts now could produce a disaster in September if 
■eather remains favorable. A heavy hatch may develop during the harvest 

eriod. 

Northern Illinois-— Indiana Area ; Codling moth in this area 

hould be between broods. The first hatch of worms should not occur be- 

ore August 20. G-rowers should observe their fruit frequently and apply 
,. spray if new entrances appear in apples. 

And with that \ie conclude today's spray service report, pro- 
entcd in cooperation xvith fruit growers and federal and state agsncies, 
ncludine- the Agriculturr.l Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
llinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal De- 
jiduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
ompiled by M. D. Fpj^rar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

HR;pm 2/3 A5- -'^- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June JiO, 191^ 



: V 



(Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY SERVICE KSPORT — No. 21 (Survey and Extension Service in Arriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
Auy;st 12-lg (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

NAPJIA.TCR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

^PRAT S33WTCE REPQRi ARSAS 



. - PudtJcah-'Vllla Ridge 

' - Carbondale^Vlncg aia Ba ■ Bau dgrapa* 

Louisville, Ky. 
-- Bellevllle-<Hea?dlfl-Centpall» 



Hi- ]&edfor4-LexliigtOft-S.W, Ohio 
5i- ijuincy-Pittafleld 
0<- ^Qorta-C!L«ap«4gn-Iiefia3n5tt€ 
7 • - ShrfcJiera Illinois-Indiana 



General : Elberta peach harvest was in full sv;ing south of 
:aj?bond^, , Illinois, August S. Some fruit is being picked as far north 
as Centrama. Moderate numbers of recently -hatched Oriental fruit moths 
;an be foufld in ripening fruit over much of the major peach area. Dust- 
ing for cor^trol of Oriental friXt moth anAbrov.Ti rot has been quite 
general in tl^ bettP]-.or.c.h^rr^s, 

Apple^are' under, attalk by theifsecond-brood codling moth in 



ill areas except/drea 7» ..-^orther^-Illij fes-^XRM-^rfr ' ^'. ' » ' t 



/ 



i^ucah — Villa Ridge Ar 
rlth the biAk "of vthe crop already 



ls hi.-'r-\/s 25 per cj^nt in some blc 

n ligtt v/here prcg^er cont^'ol measures have 



Lave Def 



Peaches are '! 



eing harvested rapidly, 
off. Oriental fijuit moth is reported 
cks of fruit. Losses from brovm rot 

Deen practiced. 



bodlija^ moth>^e stillfJa^^vy, T,^ith fresh entrances reoorted 
ore abundaM tnan usual at\>exln^ton, Prifree^^iavafl northern Kentucky. 

- \ ' V -( r^ ' 

Car&«rtd.r.le-Vjncenntes-r:el>derson-t^LouisYllle) Kedbmcfey, 4 
elleville-Hard/n-Ce ntralia i^'f^/< Qe6.fov^-U,y:^ -nit on- Sout hwe st'er n 
rea: Peach hak;vest will a?tter/d Bver ^hj^v^^eas during /the v/eek. ! A 
ate hatch of Oriental fx^it mgti^O^^r^ring rip'^Sn^ fruit in con-' 
iderable numbers. jHreharv^ trptments for control of this insee^ and 
rown rot should not\ b^ neglect&il. ' Brown rot is appearing in a^ 
ackagcfi of f yui -^ re^ ^Mhg^t^g^ market s . Applications of sulphur tc 
ruit in the p^.in/ shed m.ay be advisable In some orchards. 



^■.v^V 



Spray Service Report — No, 21, page 2. 

' Codling moth activity and abundance continue at a high level, 
with no decrease in the present rate of hatch in prospect for at least 
another week, according to a report from L. F. Steiner, Vincennes. 

Quincy-Pittsfield Area; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette Area : New 
entrances of codling moths i:ere quite common on unsprayed fruit August 9 
at Champaign. This week will show a heavy increase of new worms. This 
attack will probably reach a peak during the latter part of this week or 
sarly the following week. All fruit should be adequately protected for 
the next two weeks. 

Northern Illinois — Indiana Area : Growers should observe their 
fruit frequently and apply a spray if new entrances appear in apples. 
I cover spray may be necessary around August 20, 

And xirith that we conclude today' s spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
Including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana f.nd 
Lllinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal De- 
iduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
jompiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 



CHR:pm 
;i/io/^'r5 



Cooperative Extension i/iTork in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June J)0, 191^ 



'ir 



(P-epared by Illinois State Natural History 
JFRAY SERVICE REPORT-No. 22 (S^xrvey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics; University of Illinois 
^ucrust 19-25 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

MRRATCR: Here's your spray service ^^port, presented through the coo^^^ 
=raf.ve efforts of entomologists, pathologists and aorticulturists oi 
fliinots!' Indiana, Kentucky'and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah -Villa Ridge 

2 - Cartondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 

3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia 



k - Bedfordr-Loxington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 ~ Peoria-Champaign-LafayettG 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



V-J day happily upset the usual routine of spray report prep- 
aration for this week. Thus, in order to get pertinent information to 
the -ro^s in time, we are mailing this x^eek's report short and snappy. 
At Lexington, Ritcher reports rather heavy moth emergence the 
)ast week] with fresh worm ent(rances common. 

^t Vincennes, Steineif reports that cool weather has decreased 

Moth abu/ndance, however, assures con- 



the rate of ^cona-oruod haLcU 

siderable hatch\of additional l^econd-b/ood larvae until third brood 

starts. Katu 



second-brood larYae_.afe now leavi|ir-ttl^"^l>ples^-v Adults 
7 



of this bWd^should appear by August 29^ with thtrd-brood hatch well 

under^ way* by Scpt^b^r IQ, 

4 warns growers in CenT;ralia arei to apply sulfur on 

peacbis fo^browfn rot control even after^ first pi<{klng.' Brown rot is 
very'^rious in^TH ^eacfi growing: re gionfe. SeconA-brood codling moth 

' - - Toa^ and another si|ray_should be applied 

ntral -Illinois ardi'S, '^n 
d in Gallatitt^and'JKassac \counties in 
Illinois. Ac-rowers are warn'ed U[p be on the watch ^oF-1>hl si disease _ until 
the fruit iV%irvesied. I> it Ippears apply a t-J-lOOlBordeaux mixture 
to the infecte'd block at lOV-daj/inter-'Mls untjnrtrarvest. ^--" ^ 

And(with that we /c'o/clu^e. today' s /pray .service report,] pre- 
sented in cooWation jjit^i f/uit gro^^^r^^ f^deta an^ state agfencies, 
including the%^ctat-Sal Efo^3];xiQiep-t^-S^t-Mm.a_ Qt_r^n^ttcky^^ India^ end 
Illinois'; the Illinois 23tate\'faturp^ liistory Survey, and_ the_ Fedei>,i^c- 



;ry ^ _ , _ 

hatch issiiall-^ under wa3^sin Ulif 

this wee1^\ln the southeri^ and^o^ 

iitter rot has ^-p-pear/ 



ci 

CO 



duous Fruit Insert Uber^c5-y at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
mpiled by IHv-ight l^owellrtepaVtment of Horticulture, Lniversit/>)1 



Illinois College pi Apuiniilturo^. 



^:^ 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and home Economics 
University ./bf Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
DepertmeST"of Aericulture cooperating. K. ir. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June ^0, 191^.^,^ 



,<^4J 



(Prepared "by Illinois State Natural History 
SPRAY S2RVICE REFCRT— No. 23 (Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
August 26-Sept. 1, 1945 (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 

NARRATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
erative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
i SPEAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 

f 



1 - Puducah -Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vlncennes-Henderson- 

Louisville, Ky. 
5 - Belleville-Hardln-Centralia 



k. - Bedford-Le.xington-S.¥. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 ~ Peoria -Champaign-Lafayette 

7 - Northern Illinois -Indiana 



i 



Carbondale-Vinconnes-Henderson- Louisville Area: Codling moth 



hate;: is continuing but diminished somewhat during the past week. An 
Increr.se^s expected by September 1. In most orchards the last spray 
has ':(on or is being applied. 

Bitter rot can develap and is 11\kely to do so in problem or 
chards yet\his season. If it 



ately and conMnue at 10-day in 



ppears, stkrt a ^-6-100 Bordeaux immedi- 
;ervals urytil fruit is picked. 



Peach harvest is about\ over in this area. Brown rot ^s reported 



serious. 



Sgdf ord-Lexlngton-Southirestern Q,hio Area 



Ity is red;uced. "^B^-tter rot is se:'ious,_and ^-6-100) 



for August ^. 



Elberta^ frarsz^st t.s one- 



Codling moth activ- 
Bordeaux should be 



applieq/under such 'conditions. Jonathan and Grimeq harvest is planned 



]Lalf ove^. Brown 



rot is serious. 



3ell&ville-Hard.in-Cent^aria^Area; Quincy-jFitt^.tield Area; and 
points no?^h T In general ,n sprayi ig is -about over f:fr thiS^ season on 
varieties Jonathan and 3-rirf\©^. S'ome orchaMs---w4ii<;hihi3^ n(bt controlled 
first and seteond broods may \havel trouble later. Kaftyo5|' chords are very 
clean, howeverr^and further spraying will be unnece^sarj^^.' ^__^.---. 

Brown/rot xs serious or/peachfes, and ^illfur spray-S''^ dilists at 
five-day Intervals to harvest^alTe recommended. 

And xkth that we^onclu^e to^&y-isf^ray s^rvicg^ report, pre- 
sented in coopeVatlpn— wttli friAt sjcovij^isy.ari^ SeAer al and/ state agenXQies, 
includin?^' tae AgriiS^^'altui^l Ex:i€r'4;fee>r^ Srtations of l^ntucky, Indiana aad 
Illinois,' the Illin^siis otaJbo-Wstural History Survey, and the Federal ^p€^ 
ciducus Fruit Insecti-tabiora^^ry ^t Vincennes, Indiana, with informg.t-ion 
compiled by EhA'ight ?bwen;_JDepar'^ment of Horticulture, University /of 
Illinois College of \ JWicuXturey 

EHR:-cm ^ 

U2h7Ko- 

Ccoperativy Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
% University olCXH^inois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. E. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June '^0, 191^ 



(Pre-oared by Illinois State Natural HlBtory 
=RAY SERVICE REPORT-No. 2K [Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and home Economics, University or iiimois 
^ ,^,,^ (College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

ipteraber 3-3, 1945 '^ 

\RP.ATOR: Here's your spray service report, presented through the coop- 
dative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Llinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U, S. Department of Agriculture. 

SPEAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



1 - Puducah-Villa Ridge 

2 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 
Louisville, Ky. 

5 - Be llevi lie -Har din-Centra lia 



k - Bedford -Lexlngton-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Champaign-Lafayetto 

7 - Northern Illinois-Indiana 



Pacucah-Villa Rid?e Area ; Carbondale-Vincennes-Henderson- 
juisville, Ky. Area : According to S, C. Chandler, some fresh codling 
Dth cntr^ces are in evidence in southern Illinois orchards. Jonathans 
.-e being harvested. Bitter rot is still likely to appear on suscepti- 
Le varietii)s. { 

L.\F. Steiner, Vincennes, reportd that moth activity increased 
3r a short period between Augus-p 20 and 32, but low temperatures and 

sijierable drop in bait tra^ 



ains following Ai^gust 22 caused 
atches. Third^brood la?rvae are 



-str^ 
pchards, ^iev^n thousand apples 
sppe^ed wit]i^Tii"cotlTre-^laen to 



) 
DO apples. The naed for further 

I 5 ' ^ 

f spray\ deposit viaw-^oji th& fruit 

ach lndlvi4^1 orchard. At leas^ 

A- 



Ling in small pumbers in most 
(xaminedjduring the past week in 
-Li_te -av^r-aged-on^ fresh injury per 
spraying will depind upon the amount 



8Jid the 6ra.te of ha 



lO^ej;^ cent of tl:,.e 'larvae now in 



tch occurring in 



return to hot dr 




herl could 




ands v;ill ti^ansform to moths, 

rinr-- about a co/isiderable third- Wrood Irifetch be±T5r^raid-Se 

" ( ■ 7^ J 

irst pickings ^f Grimes ajre /hovr un^e^ way inmost orchar 

V — - / y^--t- ' V 

S. C. Cbafi-drer stateB^ha4;_9^fti%-g' have-beeruv-ef^y bad in a\ 

umber of southern l\li.n©i^.o§A'dh^ orchards. If the infestation is /-' 

ery severe, a 2 per 'x^ept— summer oil should be used, now that fruj/t is 

<fti to hold scale in^SheCk nr ^T 1 R rlpT^mant r^Tmony P i ^ii 1 1 1 . ,'i |T rrfrPlfl- 



S??Jff SERVICE REPORT- -No. 2^, page 2 

Qulncy-Pittsfleld Area; Peoria-Cham;oalp:n-Laf ayette Area; • 
Northern Illinois-Indiana Area : Appreciable numbers of fresh codling 
moth entrances are evident In central and northern Illinois, according 
to S, C. Chandler. Late apples should be protected. Bitter rot is 
still likely to appear In the central region on susceptible varieties. 

And with that we conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
Including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana 
and Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with informa- 
tion compiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural History Survey. 

-0- 

EHR: CG 
g_31_i!-5 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Depajrtment of Agriculture cooperating, H, P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June '}0, 191^ 



■Ifv, {Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 

SPRAY S-RVICE REPORT-No. 25 5^*^^^^ ^"^ Extension Service in Agriculture 

(and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
(College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

September 9-15> 19^5 

NARRATOR: Here's the concluding spray service report for 19^5* presented 
through the cooperative efforts of entomologists, pathologists and horti- 
culturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. SPRAY SERVICE REPORT AREAS 



Puducah-Villa Ridge 
Carbondale -Vine enne s -Henderson - 
Loi;lsville, Ky. 
Belleville -Hardin-Centralla 



k - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio 

5 - Quincy-Pittsfield 

6 - Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette 

7 ,- Northern Illinoia-Indiana 



Q-eneral : The weather has continued favorable for late-brood 
codlihe moth worms to enter apples. New worms are still entering 



apples ill orchards where good control has not been obtained. Late- 
maturing 

Preharvest Hormone ipprays: On| certain varieties of apples 



V8J?ieties may need additional protection from late worms. 



the so-call"i^^rT!oriIurrF~"S3:JrH7T?T-)also called harvest sprays and anti-drop 
sprays, effectively prevent pitematurerdropping of apples at picking 
time. Their^se on such variet?i.fes_,silould now befstandard pratstice; on 
others tPtey^ are ineffective. F,ill and winter vai'ieties v/hich can be 



sprayed/profitabjry -are -Dalle iou 



and iork. 



/ 



6 



. — If'''^is custonfary to d 



, Starking, Golden Delicious, Winesap 



and ^a^'ma^. Thise on which th9y are not effectjjve are Grimes, Willow 

6 ' 



apples ar) 



^-1 



lay-vapplying this 



spr-ay-^ until the sound 



•^ 



almost ready To pldk or until tlaej -actu^ly start to drop. 

The spray wi])l ta^e at least tyo days i+to beco^.e^ppre&i^ly _^-f<^ective; 

it remains effective for l^daysNto three wereks, ji^epend^ng on the 

variety, One-^spray- stoOuld (Oe enough 'f^J^^-Varietles grown in this! region, 
although a secon^ applacatipii. ean-^e made in 10 days if desired. When 

the spray is aoolied, th&" temo'erature should be at least 70° F« ^ -^"^ is 

\p ^T / y 

jHot effective if 'app-lied w^en/ the temperature is low. The efi^ect is 

1 \J ^^ ^ y 

[lo cal . ; th e ref ore rt?tie'^5^enr of' gV61!*y Apple snouia be drenched. 



<LJ 



■'■^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 25, page 2 

Delicious sprayed with this material should not be harvested 
so late as to become mealy prematurely; on the other hand, the use of 
the spray makes it possible to harvest Golden Delicious, Stayman, 
Winesap, Jonathan and even Delicious with a better color and at a bet- 
ter stage of maturity than heretofore. 

There are a number of commercial brands sold under descriptive 
trade names. All that is necessary is to dissolve the spray in xirater 
in the tank of the sprayer in accordance with the manufacturer's direc- 
tions. Enough to make 100 gallons of diluted spray costs about $1.00, 
In this year of high apple prices a hormone spray should be especially 
profitable. 

Final Report for 19'-l-5 , This issue will complete the series 
of 25 spray service reports which have been issued every Thursday for 
the use of fruit growers. The folloxiring men have contributed to the 
success of the Spray Service Report by their reports on orchard condi- 
tions: 

L, F. Steiner, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 

Vincennes, Indiana. 
The staffs of the Illinois Natural History Survey and 

the University of Illinois Department of Horticulture, 

at Urbana, Illinois. 
Prof. C. L. Burkholder, Prof. J. J. Davis, and Dr.. G. 

Edw. Marshall, Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana, 
Dr. V7, D. Armstrong, and Dr. P. 0. Ritcher, Kentucky 

Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky, 

Princeton and Lexington, Kentucky. 
Prof. T. 0. Parks, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 
Jos. M. Ackles, G-riggsville, 111, 
Charles S. Adkins, Jr., Metropolis, 111. 
Fred Baxter, Nauvoo, 111, 
Jim Bright, Valley City, 111. 
¥. L. Casper, Cobden, 111. 
S. C. Chandler, Carbondale, 111. 
Frank Chatten, Q,uincy, 111. 
Dave Dell, Grafton, 111. 
Curt E. Eckert, Belleville, 111. 
L. A. Floyd, Greenville, 111. 
Harry Hatcher, Roodhouse, 111.' 



PRAY SERVICE REPORT— No, 25, page 3 

Fred Hawkins, Texlco, 111, 

Vilas Kensel, Princeton, 111. 

C, T. Jeffries, Dix, 111. 

Bernard Y. King, Moline, 111. 

John F. Leahr, G-riggsville, 111. 

Roy J. Newman, Martinsville, 111. 

C. E. Percels, Farina, 111. 

A. Lee Pray, LeRoy, 111. 

H, 0. Rice, Champaign, 111. 

Chris Ringhausen, Jerseyville, 111. 

Roj'' Schwartz, Cobden, 111. 

C. E. Walkington, Tunnel Hill, 111. 

E. K. Regnier, Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology Exten- 

ion and Radio Extension, University of Illinois College of Agriculture, 

as been largely responsible for publishing and distributing the re- 

orts. 

And with that we conclude the 15^5 spray service report, 
resented in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state 
gencies, including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, 
ndiana and Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey, and 
he Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, 
ith Information compiled by M. D. Farrar, Illinois State Natural 
i story Survey, 

-0- 

HR: CG 
-7-^5 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 191^ 



/-(> 



) 



A 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural Kistcry 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Rome Econoraics, University of Illinois 
Colleo-e of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

lo. 1— March 2^-30, 19U6 



\ "~ 



5 \k 



:X:-A^ 



/ U '■ 



■^^^ 



u 



lt- 



.NKCliT'ICER: Here's the first of the weekly spray service reports for 
9^6, presented throu£?h the cooperation of entomologists; pathologists 
.nd horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and the U. S, Deoart- 
.ent of Agriculture. 

G-eneral : Warm temperatures for the past three to four weeks 
ave set the stage once raore for an early spring. In general, tree de- 
elopment is slightly ahead of 19^5 > although in certain localities de- 
elopment this year is almost the same as last year. By March 21, prepin.: 
prays on apples will have started as far north as Nauvoo, Illinoi-. Peaches 
hould be in full bloom in this same area by March '}0. The time is past 
or dormant spraying except in the northern one- third of Illinois. There 
s still time for scale sprays and the ground spray for scab in this area.' 

Apple growers still have time to spray off the loose bark 
hroughout the trl-state are?. G-rov/ers planning to use experim.ental L'DT 
pplic?tions for codling moth control are warned to continue orchard 
anitation as they iirould with any other schedule. The best tim.e, although 
dmlttedly not the m.ost convenient, to spray off the loose bark is dur- 
ng the codling moth pupation time. Pupae are much more susceptible to 
njury than are larvae when subjected to such trep.tment. 

Pruning may still be continued if labor and time permit. Do not 

eglect fertilizer applications. Every bearing apple tree should receive 

% lerst 1/^ pound of ammonium, nitrate per yepr of tree age, or the equiv- 

lent. Some orchards may require more nitrogen. Each grower should cor- 

uct a test in his own orchard, using different smounts on small blocks 

in order to determine the fertilizer requirements for his part-icular orchsro 

Any predictions are based on the continuation of the present 

arm weather. 



SPRkY SERVICE REPORT— No. 1; page 2. 

(Arep I) Faducah-Vllla Ridge : Elberta pe&ches were in full 
bloom l«^p.rch IS. &rov;ers should be prepared for the shuck- split applica- 
tion for curculio control. 

Delicious, Ben Davis and Winter Banana are in the late prepink to 
early pink stage, requiring sulfur sprays to protect the foliage from scab in- 
fection. Rains have been favorable for scab infection. Sulfur should be ep- 
plied at least at weekly intervals because of the large number of mature spores. 

No codling moth or Oriental fruit moth pupae have been found, 
rarnished plant bugs v/ere plentiful by Karch IS. One male curculio was 
jarred from Elberta on this date. 

( .^ e a 2 ) Carbondale-Vincennes-Kenderson-Louigville, Kentucky : Most 
i/arietles of peaches are past the full bloom at Carcondale. The early 
shuck-split stage may be reached by the latter p?rt of this vee'K in som.e 
?jreas, at which time the first arsenical application for curculio should be 
ased. It is probably too late for the full bloom brown rot application 
in most orchards. 

Duchess are in full pink, approaching bloom, and a sulfur spray 
should be a.pplied for scab control. Growers using a Fermate schedule in 
place of sulfur should start it at this time. 

Kost late varieties are in the prepink, while some, such as Deli- 
cious, are approaching the pink. Sulfur at weekly intervals is recommended. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : k'ost varieties of peaches 
should be approaching bloom. Plan the brown rot application of sulfur in 
the early to full bloomi period. Most late varieties are in the prepink 
stage. Sulfur at weekly intervals is recomm.ended. 

(Area k-) Bedford-Lexington : Gage Elberta peaches are in full 
Dloom. The bloom brown rot application should be miade where needed. 

Ben Davis, Delicious, Jonathan and Benoni are at the cluster 
,Dud stage, approaching early bloomi. Aphids are present but not threaten- 
ing dam.age. There v./as very little winter mortality of codling miOth larvae. 

Grapes may still receive the scale spray. 



ArAY service report- -No. 1, ps.se 3. 

(Area 3) Quincy-Plttsf leld : Apples are in the preplnk staeTe. 
Sulf'or at v;eekly intervals is recoairaended. 

(Area 6) Peoria-Cr,amp&lg:n-Lgf ayette : Applet are in the de- 
Ipyed dormant to prepink sta:??;e. Lime sulfur should be Ftarted by the 
latter p?rt of this week. 

(Area 7) Northern Illinois-Indiana : Apple? are in the de- 
layed dormant stage. Ground sceb spray and scale sprays may still be 
applied unless trees develop too rapidly and enter the prepink stage the 
latter part of the v.reek. Lime sulfur, tv;o gallons to 100 gallons of 
WRt-r , should be applied as soon as the first foliarre appears. 

■if '/e *;?• ■tt' •vf' -^H^ -Sfr '5("J^ 

And I'llth that ve conclude today's spray service report, pre- 
sented in cooperation vith fruit groivers end federal and state apencies, 
incluc'ing the Agricultural Sxperi^ient Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Siirvey, and the Federal De- 
ciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana, with information 
compiled by Dxvight Fovell, Department of Horticulture, University of 
Illinois College of Agriculture. 

-0- 



RSB:-om 
3-22-^6 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois Collet^e of Ap-riculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Conprress May 2 and June JC , 191^ 




SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prep-r.red by Illinois State Natural Kistcry 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

\^o. 2--March 31-April 6, 19^6 



\MNOUIICER: Here's the second of our weekly sprp.y service reports for 
19^6, presented through the cooperation of entomologiste , pathologists 
'.nd horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. 

General: Fortunately tree development is not advancing so 
I'apidly as Kas expected. 

On apples the important thing is to keep scab under control, 
[f warm weather continues, scab sprays will be needed even in the northerr 
Illinois orchards by April 5. It is doubtful whether scab infection has 
jet, occurred in the southern and central areas to a serious extent. In 
general there have not been enough heavy rains to discharge spores ade- 
.luately. But it is important to keep a fungicide residue on the foliage 
Dy sprays or dusts at least at vreekly intervals throughout this early period. 

Blotch cankers are showing considerable development, with a 
ligh percentage ready to ooze spores. An early blotch infection could 
/ery easily occur in the southern areas under the correct m.oisture con- 
litions with prevailing v/arm temperatures. Fermete, 1 pound per 100 gal- 
lons, is recommended as the fungicide substitute for sulfur on 
Dlotch-susceptible varieties. 

Peaches are in full bloom to petal fall throughout most of the 
tri-state area. It is doubtful whether the early shuck spray will be ap- 
plied this vreek, unless it is in the Paducah-Villa Ridge area. Growers 
should jar trees to determine the curculio population in their own or- 
Ichards. Sprinjr cankers of peach bacterial spot are very plentiful at Urbana. 
ilhe first canker was observed March 22, vihich is a new record for that area. 



; 



/ 



;?RAY SERVICE REPORT 

'reprred by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service In Agriculture 
tnd Home Economics, University of Illinois 
lollesre of Apriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



-/ 






\ "~ 



^ ^ 



■■ N 



3 \k 



z' k 



lo. ^ — A':;rl 



1 7-13. 15^b 



-^c^ 



''l5_^/-~- 



/ 



2_i 






u 

J^IOUMCiR: Here's the third of our r^^eekly spray service reports for 
.9^6, presented through the cooperation of entomologist?; pathologists 
md horticulturists of Illinois, Indian?, Kentucky, Ohio sad the U. S. 
)epertment of Agriculture. 

In general, dry weather hfs prevailed over the tri-state are?, 
'ith very little, if any, pc?b infection. A heavy dlscharp-e of spores ■ 
.s expected vith the first r?in. Inasmuch as most gravers h?ve sprr.yed 
'ith sulfur F,t least twice without sporp- discharge, it is likely that 
cab will not be of e serious nature this year. This v^ill be calyx spray 
'eek in most of the south and south-central pj^eas. In the p-ach-growing 
,reas the shuck split appllcftion lyill po on this week. Cui^culio are rr.ore 
ibundrnt now than a year ago, and in some cases they have migi^ated well 
ovrsrd the center of the orchard. 

The f cllcwinp' predictions and recorr..7iendaticn8 are based on a 
onti'nupnce of wp.rm v:e?ther. Consult your experirrient staticn circular 
or the V!=rious spray formulations. This is the last week that spraying 
ff the bark or scraping will aid in destroying overwintering codling 
iOths in the southern and central areas. After this v.'eek nany adult 
oths will have emerged. 

(Area l) ?aducah-Villa Ridge : Apples - The weather has not 
een favorable for scab development, and infection has not been seen to 
ate. An abundance of ascospores remain to dischar.ge in all parts of 
entucky. Codlinp- moths are about 6h percent pupated. Adult emergence 
jhould start by the first of this week. An early and heavy first brood 



SPRAY service: REFORT— No. 3, page 2. 

attack is expected, I'-hich v/ill make the calyx and ■f'irst cover sprays of 
unusual importance. Substitute Fermate for sulfur, if possible, in order 
to start the summer oil sprays by the second cover. Do not forget the 
calyx top- off spray. 

Peaches - On April 3j mature eggs were found in curculio adults. 
Jarring in western Kentucky showed that a record number are present in 
the orchards. In this area grox\rers are advised to apply at least two 
arsenical dusts or sprays at 10-day intervals and to apply a third if 
ligh curculio populations continue. Two adults of the Oriental fruit 
noth have emerged at Princeton. 

Strawberries - Blakemore are in full bloom;, i\dth a heavy crop prospect. 

(Area 2) Cfrbondale-Vincennes-Henderson-Louisville , Ky. : At 
/incennes bud development is two days ahepd of 1S^5' Calyx sprays on all 
varieties of apples, except Home, should be started by April S ; and do 
lot forget the calyx top-off spray. Codling m;0th pupation reached 19 
Dercent by I'.arch 29- Some adult em^ergence is expected by April 10 if warm 
"leather continues. Be prepared to use oil early thas year if it becomes neces- 
sary. Very few rosy aphids cen be found at^incennes; however, at Covington, 
[ndianr, on April 2 they were abundant. European red p.ites have not appeared 
3n the foliage. Red spiders are still in hibernation.' In the Carbondale 
?irea all apple varieties should be receiving the calyx spray by Monday, 
Vpril 2. Varieties such as Duchess are past this stage. Do not overlook 
:he calyx top-off spray. Codling moth pupation continues rapidly, and 
:10th emerfrence is expected shortly after April 3. 

On peaches, by April 3 start the shuck application of lead 
arsenate by either dust or spray. If sprays are used, include the Einc sulfate- 
-ime safener instead of only lime. Apply sufficient dust per m.ature tree, 
it least 1/2 pound from one side per acplication. Curculio are four times 
■iOre abundant now than last year at this time, as shown by jarrings. Also 
!:hey have rairrated well toward the center of the orchard. 



3PRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 3, pace 3. 

An early heavy drop of peaches is occurring, which may be certly 
lue to brown blossom blipht and partly due to natural causes. Mo insect 
.8 responsible for this condition. 

Tree jarring shows thst the number of tarnished plant bups is 
limlnishine, while the stink bu^-r population is increasing. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralla : Apples - Duchess should 
•eceive the first cover spray this week. Vprietiee such as Jonathan and 
)elicious should receive the calyx spray by April S. Other varieties 
uch as York ia^II probably not reach the calyx period before April 10. 
)o not for'-^et the calyx top- off spray. 

Peaches are stcrtlnf: to split the shuck, and some blocks should 
!e reedy for the shuck split arsenical application by April 10. 

The weather has been dry, with only occasional ll.p:ht showers, 
t is unlikely that primary scab infection has yet occurred to a serious degree. 

(Area ^) 3edf ord-Lexinp'ton-S. ¥. Ohio : Most s.pple varieties are 
,n full bloom near the Ohio line. Calyx sprays should ctart on earlier 
•arieties by April g. 

Calyx spray should start on Jonathan and Delicious by April 6-3. 
to coaling moth pupation had occurred by April ^. 

On peaches, shuck splitting has occurred. Cur culio were jarred 
'rom the trees on April 3- The first arsenical applications should start 
hortly after April g. If a spray is used instead of a dust, use 3 pounds 
'f lead arsenate plus an excess of lime. 

Premier strawberries began blooming March 31- The first spray 
if ^-6-100 Bordeaux should be applied immiediately. 

(Area 3) Quincy-Flttsf ield : Apples - Almost all varieties are in 
ull bloom, with good pollinating v-eather prevailing. The calyx application 
hiould be started by April 10 if normal weather prevails and petal fall occurs. 

Peaches are in the petal fall stage. The first arsenical application 
ihould probably be m.ade by April 12 to 13) when the shucks are one-half off. 



SPrJiv SERVICE RE?ORT--Mo. 3, pa.re k. 

(Area 6) Peorif-Champa.lgn- Lafayette: At Lafayette, bloom of 
Sta.rking l8 expected by April f. Weather conditions are favorable for a 
heavy scab Infection during the blooming period. Fermate or mild sulfurs 
should be in readiness for possible fungicide a.pplications during this 
time. 

At Champairn, bloom of Delicious, Jonathan end G-rimes is ex- 
pected by April IS unless the present cool weather continues. Continued 
fungicide s.pplications are suggested to prepare for a heavy scab Infec- 
tion fcllo^^7inp• the first rain. Thus far perithecia are mature, but dis- 
charge has not occurred. 

(Area 7) Northern Illinols-Indipna : At Rock Island, Illinois, 
?.ost varieties are in the full pink, x-^rhich means that the second sulfur 
fungicide should be applied. Prepare for a hepvy spore discharfre fol- 
lowing tne first rain of 1/2 inch or more. Thus fpr it is not likely 
that scab infection has occurred. 

And that concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit growers end federal and state a,?encies, including 
the A.rricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laborator-y at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell, of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 
i _0- : 



TR¥: om 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University oT Illinois Collee'e of Agriculture rnd the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating- H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Ccnfrress I'!ay '£ and June '^0 , 1^1^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Naturp.! History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Koroe Economics, University of Illinoie 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. i^— April liJ-20, 19^6 




ANNOUNCER: Here's another of our weekly spray service reports, pre- 
sented through the cooperation of entomologists, oatholorl'^ts end 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and'^the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

In general, cool, rainy weather has delayed the rapid develop- 
ment of trees and pests. This will be scab control week in all but the 
southernmost areas, where infection has already occurred. liost orchards 
in the south-central, central and northern areas are just past or in 
bloom. In either case, scab infection is likely to be severe if foli- 
age is left unprotected. Codling moth pupation has been delayed but 
will continue rapidly with the first warm weather, 

(Area l) All of Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois : Apples - 
Moat orchards as far north as Louisville will be ready for the first 
cover spray by April I5. Orchards in extreme northern Kentucky v;ill be 
receiving the calyx spray this week. The first codling moth emerged at 
Paducah on April 9. Because of the heavy pupation, rapid emergence is 
expected with the return of warm v/eather. Scab infection v/as observed 
at rrinceton. Indications are that ftorther infection may have occurred 
with the favorable weather. Sulfur in the first cover is recom.raended. 
In northern Kentucky overwintering scab spores are still present in the 
:>ld leaves. 

Peaches - Shucks are off in the Paducah section, so the 10-day 
spray for curculio and scab should be applied by April I5. In the 



•f^'??**''^:'-'! 4fiSir'^' 



SPRAY SERVICE xREPOxRT— No. k, pa.ge 2. 

Henderson and Louisville section; most shucks are off. In the extreme 
northern Kentucky area petal fall has occurred. 

Curculio are abundant and contain mature eggs ready for egg-laying. 

(Area 2) Carbondale-Vincennes : There has been little tree 
development since April S. Most grov;ers have applied the calyx applica- 
tion and should be ready for the first cover by April I5. With normal 
April weather, codling moth hatch is unlikely before the week beginning 
April 28. Some moth emergence will occur with the first warm weather. 

Most growers will be applying the first cover by April I5. Cool 
weather has delayed m.oth emergence so that the interval between the calyx 
period and first hatch will not be so short as expected. Grovv'ers plan- 
ning to use DDT in the crucial sprays could proba.bly wait until the third 
cover before starting. 

Scab and blotch sprays should be continued through this cool, 
rainy period. Don't apply Bordeaux for blotch unless ^rood drying conditions prevail, 

Curculio migration into the peach orchard ha-S been slov^ed v/ith the 
cool weather. Another arsenical application is sui-gested this week to cover 
unprotected, fruit. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Kardin-Centralla : Apples range from full 
bloom to the petal fall ptriod. The calyx application should be applied 
in this area by April I7. I'iost orchards are vulnerable to scab infection be- 
cause of unprotected foliage vjhich developed during the pollinating period. It is 
very liV:ely that the first heavy discharge of spores is occurring novj (April ll), 
ji Cn peaches the first shuck application should be made as soon 

as an appreciable amount of fruit is exposed. 

P (Area ^! ) 3edf ord-Lexington-S.¥. Ohio : Codling miOth oupation is 
progressing rapidly. Rosy aphlds are present but not serious. 3y April 11 
Benoni were past the calyx spray sta.o'e. Ceilyx and top- off sprays should 
be applied to most varieties im^mediately. 

Shucks are mostly off Gage Slberta peaches. Curculio are very active. 

No twig attack by the Oriental fruit moth had occurred April 11. Peach bud 
moth is not of serious nature. 



I 



11 



SPRAY SERVICE REFORT--K0, k-, page 3. 

There Is still tirae for a 'i— 6-100 Bordeaux on g:rap8S for black 

rot control. 

Aroma strawberries are blooming heavily. Crown borer should 

berin to la.y egps by April 21. 

(Area 5) Q^Jincy-Pittsf ield : Apples should be receiving the 
calyx application by April I5. Don't forget the calyx top-off spray. 
Many orchards should start the first cover or seven-day spray by April I7 
to 19. Continue to use a fungicide for scab through the first cover 
spray. Very little if any discharge of spores had occurred by April 11. 

(Area 6) ?eoria-Champaign-Laf ayette : The calyx application 
should be started by April I7 to 22 in most orchards of this area. A 
bloom fungicide for scab may be necessary if cool weather delays tree 
development. 

(Area 7) I'vorthern Illinois- Indiana ; Orchards in this area 
will be In full bloom most of this week. If cool, rainy weather con- 
tinues, a fungicide should be applied for protection against scab. 

And that concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit grov/ers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the departm.ent of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 



HSE ; r,m 
■+-12- '4-6 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. K. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 191^ 



* 

^ 




SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Frcpr.red by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Kerne Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 5— April 21-27, 19^6 

I 

ANNOUNCER: Here's another of our spray service reports, prepared each 
week with the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticul- 
turists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

In general cool weather has delayed apple tree and insect de- 
velopment. Scab protection is the number one item on apple, and curculio 
protection is number one on peaches. 

No definite determination of degree of injury from recent 
freezes has been made. 

(Area 1) All of Kentucky and Villa Ridge, 111.: Recent freezes 
have caused little or no damage to the fruit crop. For apples in western 
Kentucky most growers should be ready for the second cover spray by 
April 22. Codling moth emergence has started as far north as Henderson 
in cages, xvhile in the Paducah region bait trap collections show orchard 
emergence. No moth activity had been reported farther north Thursday 
April 17, but warm weather vrill bring a heavy emergence. If cool v/eather 
continues, hatching is not expected before May 1- V/estern Kentucky 
grov/ers should plan to start their DDT program in the second cover. 

Very little apple scab has appeared but the weather has been 
suitable for both primary and secondary infection. So scab protection 
is needed all over the Kentucky area. Cedar-apple and quince-rust cankers 
were producing spores April I5, and fermate is recommended in orchards 
where these diseases are troublesome. 
' Peach shucks in the southern half of Kentucky have fallen, 

while in the northern region the shucks are starting to split. Because 



Wii'^* 



i 



SPRAY SERYICE RSPORT— No. 5, page 2 

of the heavy flight of curculio, growers are advised to Iceep their peaches 
protected v;ith lead arsenate dusts or sprays at ten-day intervals or 
more often through this period. Sulfur should be added to the sprays 
for scab control. 

The second Bordeaux spray for grapes is novj- in order in western 
Kentucky. 

(Area 2) Carbondale-Vincennes: Some damage from freezes has 

occurred on both apples and peaches at Vincennes. The full extent cajinot 
yet be determined. Codling moth em.ergence from under bark has occurred 
in local orchards, but dusk and dawn temperatures have been too low for 
normal activity. No moth emergence has been reported from seventy bait 
traps, and it is believed that egg laying has not occurred. For this 
reason no poison sprays other than the seven day, or first cover are 
needed for codling moth control between the calyx application and about 
May ^. Egg hatch is not likely to occur before Kay 5 to 6. Rosy aphids 
are increasing in number but not enough to warrant nicotine applications. 
Predator activity is expected to increase enough to check them as soon 
as high temperatures prevail. 

Apples at Carbondale are approaching the second cover spray 
period. One moth emerged in a cage at Anna, but by Thursday (April 17), no 
emergence had occurred at Carbondale. Egg hatch is not expected before Kay 1. 
Summer oil is not recommended thJ.s week. Growers should prepare to use oil, 
however, because a heavy emergence is expected with the first v/arm weather. A 
considerable numBer of adult leaf hoppers were noted feeding April 17- G-rowers 
planning to use DDT in their early codling moth schedule need not be con- 
cerned about leaf hoppers. Protection from scab and blotch is recommended 
during this cool, wet period. 

On peaches curculio numbers are still high although there are 
fewer than two weeks ago. G-ro^'ers should keep their fruit protected by 
applications of lead arsenate, dust or sprays. Considerable stung fruit 
has been observed in some localities. A feM wilted twigs were observed 
in Union county from the first brood of Oriental fruit moth. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 5, page 3.. 

ll (Area 3) Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralla: Most growers had ap- 
plied or were applying the first cover spray by April 17. Codling moth 
pupation is high (^0 to 60 percent), but no emergence has occurred. Con- 
tinued protection from acple scab infection is recommended. On peaches 
the shucks are mostly off, and applications of arsenical sulfur dusts or 
sprays are recommended at ten-day intervals for curculio and scab control. 
I (Area U) Bedford- Lexington-S. V/. Ohio ; Codling moths are emerging 
from packing sheds but not from orchards. The calyx spray may still be 
applied to Rome Beauty. There has been no noticeable increase in aphid 
aumbers. Heavy rains last week end made continued scab protection nec- 
essary. Shucks are mostly off the peaches. Protection with arsenical 
applications from curculio attacks is necessary. If arsenical injury en 
the foliage appears, apply a spray of just lime or zinc sulf ate-lime. Do 
not use a coajrse spray or high pressures on peaches. The second ^-6-100 

Bordeaux for black rot control on grapes should be applied by April 23. 
Strawberry blooms out of the cluster were killed April I7, by a tempera- 
ture of 29° F. 

(Area 5) Quincy-Pittsf ield: Apples are at the calyx or petal 
fall stage with some localities probably in the seven-day cover period. 
Scab infection was observed at Quincy April 17. Continued protection 
from scab is recommended. Codling moth pupation is about I5 percent with 
iio moth emergence April I7. 

(Area 6) Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette: Cool ^^reather has delayed 
tree development. By April 23 most orchards will be in the petal fall 
stage. Sulfur sprays at x>feekly intervals for scab control are recora- 
■nended. The first scab infection was found on a seedling tree April 1^, 
at Urbana. A heavy discharge of spores occurred April 12. 

(.'Vrea 7) Northern Illinoig-Indiana: Cool weather has delayed 
the early bloom period. Duchess are in full bloom t\'ith late varieties 
just approaching bloom. Continued sulfur applications at weekly inter- 
vals are recommended for scab control. 

And that concludes today's spray service report. It was pre- 
.sented in cooperation vrith fruit growers and federal and state agencies, 
including the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal De- 
ciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled 
py Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of 

'Illinois. 

1 _0- 

iRS3:pm h-l^-kG 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May & and June JO, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
Collee-e of Ap-riculture , Urbana, Illinois 



I 

No. 6— April 2g-May k, 19^16 





/ 


^ ? y 


7 
6 













\ 



u 



ANNOUNCER: And here's our weekly spray service report, prepared with 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. 3, Department of Agriculture. 

§ (Area l) Western Kentucky & Villa Ridge, 111. : On apples - Cod- 

ling moth emergence is very heavy. Egg hatch is expected by April J,0 or 
May 1. Growers should be applying oil sprays at this time. 

Peaches - Curculio are still active. Another arsenical appli- 
cation is recommended in the Paducah-Mayf ield area. Txvigs wilted from 
Oriental fruit moth are abundant, indicating a heavy start for this season. 

(Area 2) Carbondale-Vincennes : At Vincennes a heavy codling ■ 
moth emergence started April 19. The first larval hatch is expected 
May 1. The peak hatch is expected durins- the week of May 5- ^t is pre- 
dicted that the first brood will extend over a longer than normal period, 
and growers should prepare for an extra spray. 

At Carbondale, the first emergence of codling moths in cages 
occurred April IS, and bait traps caught the first moths April 19. The 
first hatch should occur by May 1. The first oil spray should be started 
at this time. Curculio is still very abundant in peach orchards. Unless 
the fruit is protected with arsenical applications at seven- to 10-day 
intervals throughout this period, there will undoubtedly be many wormy 
peaches this year. A few larvae have already been found in the young peaches. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : There was no codling 
moth emergence at Belleville by April 2^. At Dix one moth emerged in a 

cage April 23- Warm weather may bring a heavy emergence this week. 



1 



Spray Service Report — No. 6, page 2. 

On peaches, curculio are still numerous. Arsenical applications at 
seven- to 10-day intervals throughout this period are recommended to prevent 
wormy fruit. 
I (Area k) Bedf ord-Lexington-S. W. Ohio; At Covington, Ky, the first 

t' ' 

codling moth emerged April 22. Warm weather may tring a peak emergence 
this week. 

At Bedford, egg laying by the codling moth has not occurred. A 
few Oriental moth larvae are entering peach twigs. Curculio adults are still 
active, and so arsenical protection on fruit is essential. There is 
still time for the second 4-6-100 Bordeaux spray on grapes, 

(Area 5) Quincy-Fittsf ield : Some apple growers may be start- 
ing the second cover this week. No codling moth emergence has been re- 
ported, so there is still time to spray off the loose bark. 

(Area 6) Feoria-Champaign- Lafayette : Apple orchard development 
ranges from full bloom to petal fall, depending on the location. Use mild 
sulfur fungicides from now on, as lime-sulfur sprays are likely to be in- 
jurious. Grapes should receive a 4-6-100 Bordeaux plus k pounds lead 
arsenate. There is still time to spray off the loose bark. 

(Area 7) Northern Illinois-Indiana '. Most varieties iijill be 
in full bloom to petal fall. A calyx application of 3 pounds lead arse- 
nate, 3 pounds hydrated lime, and S pounds wettable sulfur is suggested 
when 75 percent of the petals have fallen. There is still time to spray 
off the loose bark. 

That concludes today's spray service report. It was presented 
in cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, includ- 
ing the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincpnnes, Indiana. The report was compiled by 
Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
RSB:pm U- 26-46 

Cooperative Extension V/ork in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 3 and June ])0 , 19l4 



i 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepr.red by Illinois State Natural Histcry 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
Colleffe of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 7— :!ry 5-11, IS^ig 

I 

A"'NOU''CER: Here's another of our wee.Lly spray service reports, presented 
throu.'^r. the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticultur- 
ists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 




f 



(Are? 1) V/estern Tentuchy and Villa Ridge, 111.: Codling noth ac- 



tivity has been redu.ced rs a result of ccol, rainy weather. Egg hatch 
vas not reported by Xay 1; hoxxever, v;ith the return of Ypjcm veather, egg 
hatch and more egg lejlnf should occur. It is now time to start DDT if its 
use has been planned. Additional fungici'es are liicely to be profitable be- 
cause of weather favorable for scab development. 

Adult curculio are still plentiful around, edges of the peach or- 
chards. Another arsenical application is recomrrfinded in the Paducah section. 
|_ (Area 2) Carbondale-Vincennes : Because of cool, rainy weather 

since April 23, codling moth activity has been at a loi,^ level. No egg hatch 
had occurred by May 1, but the first e-^gs should hatch i.-'ith the first 
warm day. A heavy egg hatch should occur this i.'eek. ^.le spring brood mi oth 
activity is expected to reach its peah during the next two or thjree days of x^arm 
weather. Emergence vrill extend, into June, and thu.s a long period of first 
brood attach is anticipated. 

Somie orchards rre showing a considerable num.ber of rosy aphids. 
Nicotine sulfate, one pint to 100 p'^llons, is recommended under such condi- 
tions. In view of the nicotine shortage, such a sprsy should not be used 
unless the sphis infestation is severe enou.-^h to demiand it. 

Blotch sprays should be continued on blotchr-susceptible varieties. 



/.A 



SPFJVY SERVICE KE?OR?— "o. 7, pp.ge 2. 

Peach trees still shotj some curculio. Oocl veather has orobrbly 

fedi.iced activity temporarily. Oi-'iental fruit moth infe?trtlon is considered 

lir;ht at the present time. 

!f (Arep ^) 3ellf^ville-r-Iardin-Centrplip: Very little moth emergence 
^_g- 

hpp ccci.'rred from ca'^es. By I!fy 1 one moth/emerged at Dix, one at Grafton 
pnd none at Belleville. A heavy emergence is expected this v:eek with the 
first period of v/arm veather. Scab is very light in sprayed orchards, but a 
considerable amount of secondary infection is appearing on unsprayed trees. 
Blotch sprays are recomraended on susceptible varieties. 

On peaches, it is expected that curculio activity has tempora.rily 
decreased during the recent cool, rainy v'eather. A continuance of ac- 
tivity is expected with warm weather. 

(Area k) Bedf ord-Lexinr^ton-S. V". Ohio : At Bedford, Ind. , cool 

weather has decreased codling moth activity. Egg hatch will probably not occiur 

until after Kay 5 v;ith the first warm, vreather. Rosy aphids are threatening. 
In problem orchards nicotine sulfate, 1 pint to 100 gallons, is recom- 
mended. A continuance of mild sulfur for scab control is sup:gested. 

On peaches, curculio are still active. A considerable hatch 
of Oriental fruit moth larvae began enterin" the tvrigs April JO. Grppes 
may still be riven p ^-6-100 Bordeaux before the blooms open. 

At Lexington, Ky., the first moth em.er:;ence occurred April 25' 
'Adult leafhoppers see.m more abundant than usual for this time of veer. 

(Area ^) Q,uincy-?ittsf ield : No codling moth emer.'-'ence has been 
reported. Scab is very li-rrht in ■'.rell-sprayed orchards but is showing 
severe infections in poorly cared for blochs. Funricide sprays are rec- 
ommended for this "eel:. There is still tim.e to spray off loose barl^. 

(Area 6 ) P e or i a- C h a.mp ai .Tn- La f ay e 1 1 e : Erost damage has been severe 
in some orchards. If a crop is not anticipated,, continue scab sprays 
for foliage protection. G-ood foliage is im.portant to assure fruit bud 
form.ation for next year. Mild sulfur at weekly intervals throughout this 



■oeriod is recommended. 

(Aren 7) Norther 



i-'n Illinois -Indiana: Recent rains have caused a heavy 



discharge oT scab s -cores. Host jroi-ers are aop lying either the calyx or first- 
cover roraj'"s in which "m.ild sulfur, 1^ oounds c^r TOG '"allons, should be included. 

-;;- ?!• -;!• -:(• -;;• ^s- ^t- -;rti- -;;- 

And that concludes tociay's spray service rep'Ort, presented in cooper- 
ation with fruit growers and federal an-!', state agencies^ including the A.^ricul- 
tural Experiment Stations of lientucky, Indiana ?r.d Illinois, the Illinois 
State Natural History'' Siorvey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory 
at Vincennes, Indiana- It was compiled by Dwlrht Powell, of the department 
of horticulture at the Universitv of Illinois. 

-0- 
JR'i:pm 5-3-^6 



Cooperative Extension ''Jorh in Agriculture ^nd Home Economics 
University of Illinois Colle.^e of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Aoriculture cooperating. H. P. r.usli, Director 
Acts approved by Conc::rep? May o and June JO, I'^l^t 



3FRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepc-red by Illinois State Natural Ki story 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
3ollee:e of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. g— May 12- Ig, 19^6 




ANNOUNCER: And now, here's our weekly spray service report, presented 
through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticultur- 
ists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. .^.. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, 111. : In general, 
fruit development was sloxv during the past week. Strawberry harvest is 
well advpjiced in western Kentucky, with harvest under way well upstate. 

Cage and orchard emergence of codling moths is x-zell under way 
:throughout the entire state. Further egg- laying can be expected on 
every warm, nonrainy evening. First x^rorms were found in young apples 
at Faducah May 6 and 7- Apple growers from Louisville south should pro- 
Itect their crops from this v/orm hatch at once if they have not sprayed 
within the past 10-day period. Hatching as well as egg-laying can be 
expected to mount rapidly with the return of warm weather. 

Plum curculio adults are generally som.ewhat less abundant in 
well sprayed and dusted orchards than a week or two earlier. 

Some brown rot has been seen in green jjluras and peaches stung 
by curculios. Conditions have been very favorable for apple scab de- 
velopment, especially in northern Kentucky. An additional sulphur 
application is suggested there, and growers in western Kentucky are 
[also frenorally putting sulphur in their present apple sprays and leaving 
j out oil in this application. 

(Area 2) Carbondale-Vincenncs : At Vincennes, codling moth 



eggs deposited April IS started hatching May 5. Eggs deposited April 22 



<7! 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. &, page 2. 

i\rere hatching May &. The rate of hatch should decrease until May 12; 
at which time some increase is expected. Moth activity for this brood 
should, remain at a peak during the next v;arm period of two or three 
days. It appears doubtful whether more than ^0 per cent of the svjring 
brood has emerged. For the present the usual interval between first- 
brood sprays can be increased two or three days. 

I At Carbondale, codling moth activity decreased with the cool 
weather. Intervals between sprays should be lengthened at least two 
or three days to give protection through a prolonged first-brood period. 
The first worm entrance was found May ^. Rosy apple aphis is severe in 
many orchards. Leafhoppers arc increasing in number. Growers using 
DDT will have adequate leaf hopper control. If the use of DDT is not 
planned, nicotine sulfate, 1-SOO, is recommended for Icafhopper reduc- 
tion. 

■ Peaches still show curculio to be active. Dusting should be 
continued when the foliage is dry. If sprays are used, make an addi- 
tional application and do not forget the arsenical saf ener spray. 

(Area j) Bellevillc-Hardin-Centralia : Codling moth emergence 
in cages at Dix, 111. , started May 2 and continued through the 5^^^ when 
cool weather slowed up activity. At G-rafton emergence occurred May 5 
and 6 (the latest report). No emergence is reported from Belleville. 
Growers should be applying the third cover this vj-eek. Cool weather is 
lengthening the first-brood period. In order to give protection from 
curculio and codling moth for a longer period and still not apply too 
majiy sprays, it is advisable to lengthen the usual interval between 
sprays at least two or three days. On peaches curculio are still active. 
It is suggested that the interval between arsenical applications be 
lengthened to about 10 days. 

(Area k) Bedford- Lexington-S. W. Ohio : Codling moth activity 
decreased by cool weather. A few eggs are expected to hatch about May 11. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 

No. 9— May 19-26, 19^16 




ANNOUNCER: Here's another of our weekly spray service reports, presented 
thi-^ough the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticultur- 
ists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

■ -if- iHi-Ht ■»••;*■ -St- •SUMS' 

■ ^ (Area 1) Western Kentucky & Villa Ridge, 111. : Codling moth 
eggs are hatching on apples as far north as Louisville. Unhatched eggs 
and fresh entries are prevalent in the Henderson-Paducah section, and 
sprays should be applied at 10-day intervals. The addition of either 
Fermate or weak Bordeaux to the sprays is suggested for scab control. 
1^' On peaches, because curculio adults are scarce and because of 
■previous heavy arsenical applications, further dusts or sprp^s are not 
recommended now. Curculio worms are leaving dropped fruit as far north 
as Louisville. Present indications are that most western Kentucky 
growers will need second-brood applications in late June or early July. 
The percentage of twigs v/ilted from Oriental fruit moth is not so high, 
but a large number of the early worms have entered the young fruit. 

(Area g) Vincennes-Carbondale : At Vlncennes about ^0 percent of 
the codling moths have emerged. The peak of moth activity is still expected 
to follow the next two- or three-day period of high temperatures {&^°-%oF.\ 
Eggs deposited since April 27 had not hatched May I5. The peak of first- 
brood hatch cannot occur before late May or early June. For the present 
a 12- to 1^-day interval between sprays should not be too long. Little 
would be gained by spraying nicotine now for rosy aphid control. Fungi- 
cides are still considered essential for scab protection. Many growers are 
still using sulfur. Fermate or weak Bordeaux is suggested. 



JPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 9, page 2. 

At Carbondale, codling moths have continued to emerge In small 
tumbers during the warmer days. There was no increase in fresh entries 

ring the past week. Lengthening the interval between sprays is sug- 
gested. Apple scab is light, but some protection is necessary. With 100 gallons. 
'our pounds of mild sulfur, one half pound of Fermate or 1/2-1-100 Bor- 
Leaux can be used. Be careful of sulfur-oil injury. 

On peaches, curculio are still active. Arsenical protection 
.s necessary. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : Some codling moth emer- 
gence continued at Dix, Illinois, up to May 13- About 5 percent em.er- 
jjence has occurred at Grrafton, while at Belleville it has just started, 
lo egg-laying has been observed. Continued protection against scab is 
isuggested. Increasing the interval between sprays to 10 or 12 days 
through this period is recommended. 

Curculio activity has decreased with cool weather. Heavy rains 
lave removed most of the arsenical residues. At least one more poison 
application is recommended for this first-brood infestation. 

(Area ^) Bedford- Lexington-S. W. Ohio : At Bedford, the night of 
day 15 was favorable for codling moth egg-laying. The peak moth emer- 
gence has not yet been reached, according to bait trap records. Increas- 
ing the interval betv;een sprays is suggested to care for a long first-brood 
period. Rosy aphis is severe, with very little predator control. Nico- 
tine sulfate, 1-200, is suggested if the situation demands it. Fungicides 
are still suggested for scab protection. 

Curculio are still active on peaches, indicating a need for 
3ontinued arsenical protection. 

At Lexington, about a 3^ percent codling moth emergence has 
occurred, but there has been little weather suitable for egg- laying. A 
program of lead arsenate fortified with DDT is suggested in severe codling- 
en oth-infes ted orchards, the sprays to be applied at about 10-day intervals. 



SPRAY SERVICE xREPOxRT— No. 3, page 3. 

(Area 5) Quinoy-Pittsf ield : Bait trap records at Gri.^gsville 
show that codling moth emergence started May 10. At Payson some emer- 
gence has occurred from the exposed parts of the trunk. However, weather 
has not been favorable for egg-laying. Increasing the Interval between 
sprays is suggested to care for a prolonged first-brood period, and con- 
tinued protection against scab is recommended. 

(Area 6) Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette : There is no evidence of 
codling moth emergence. Mild fungicides to keep the foliage and fruit 
protected from scab infection are recommended. 

(Area 7) Northern Illi nois-Indiana : Codling moth emergence 

i 

has not occurred. Continued protection from scab infection at 10-day 

intervals with mild fungicides is recommended. 

And that concludes today's spray service report, presented in 

cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 

the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 

the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 

Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 

Powell, of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
Play safe and SPRAY SAFE--warn the National Safety Council and 

the U, S. Department of Agriculture. You know, all insecticides and 
fungicides are more or less poisonous — so protect yourself. In other 
words, if you find the spray blovdng back in your face, wear a respira- 
tor. And of course, keep your body well covered, your sleeves rolled 
down and gloves on. Afterwards, it's wise to wash up and change your work 

clothes. You'll find this a good investment in safety- 

-0- 
RSB:pm 
5-17-^6 



b 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agricult'ore cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Preps-.red by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
■and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 10— May 26- June 1, 19^6 




ANNOUNCER: It's time for our x^reekly spray service report, compiled from 
Information given by entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentuclcy, Ohio, and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, 111. : The return of 
warm, weather should increase codling moth hatching over the entire state. 
Kentucky apple growers should keep up codling moth protection against the 
prolonged first-brood period. Heavy packing-shed emergence started at 
Henderson, Kentucky, May 12. Apple scab is spreading in poorly sprayed or- 
chards, and growers should include some fungicide for scab. Weak Bordeaux 
or Fermate is suggested. >Jhere bitter rot has been serious, full-strength 
Bordeaux sprays are needed. 

Curculio are leaving dropped peaches from Louisville, Kentucky,- 
south, but are still in the fruits at Villa Ridge. Picking up dropped fruit 
may help to reduce the preharvest brood. Brown rot is starting in early 
and late peaches, particularly in curculio-injured fruits. Dusting with sul- 
phur and rem.oving diseased fruit are important to prevent a build-up of brown rot. 

(Area 2) Vincennes-Carbondale : The continued cool, rainy weather 
has retarded codling moth activity. Many moths have died before depositing 
eggs. Eggs deposited before May & hatched by May 21. Only 3 percent as 
many moths have been taken in traps since May S as before. About half of 
the moths are still to emerge. Egg-laying will increase sharply with a 
few days of warm weather. Sprays should be applied at 12- to li|-day intervals 
until warm weather, when the Interval should be shortened to seven days. 
Some fungicide should be included until the weather clears. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 10, page 2. 

Curcullo and plant bugs are still abundant on peaches, causing 
serious cat-facing. Some arsenical injury may be expected on peach where 
arsenical dusts are continued. Special ' dusts of lime between arsenical 
iusts will help to correct burn from arsenical dust. 

At Carbondale 75 percent of the codling moths have emerged. 
^ew entrances are still scarce but are expected to increase rapidly with 
mrm weather. Complete protection of the fruit is essential. 

Curculio are less abundant than a month ago but are still more 
)lentiful than during the peak last year. Some blocks have been aban- 
loned because of the heavy drop from curculio. Drop fruits are ^0 to 
.00 percent infested with curculio larvae. Picking up all drop fruit be- 
'ore disking the orchard or thinning the crop is advised where labor is 
ivailable. If the curculio are allowed to mature, the preharvest brood may 
)e the heaviest ever experienced in the state. 

Periodical cicada are abundant and are causing damage to young 
)rche.rds in Jersey and Calhoun counties. Spraying young trees with three 
;o four pounds of actual DDT per 100 gallons of water is suggested as a 
)ossible control. The insects xirill disappear after they have laid their eggs, 

(Area 3) Belleville -Kardin-Centralia: Emergence of codling moth 
las been rather slow but steady — 35 percent of the adults have emerged. 
Emergence will increase rapidly with a few days of warm weather. Then the 
.nterval between sprays should be reduced to seven days. 

Curculio are still abundant on peaches. Dropped fruits are ^0 to 
.00 percent wormy. Unless an arsenical application has been made recently, 
.t should be done at once. In orchards where curculio have caused a heavy 
Irop of fruit, picking up and destroying dropped fruits is advised where 
.abor is available. 

(Area ^) Bedf ord-Lexington-S. W. Ohio : At Bedford a heavy codling 
10th hatch started May 21-22 and has continued. At Lexington moth emer- 
i;ence was heavy May 15-19> ^i^th a heavy flight expected during the first 
jrarm spell. Hatch of eggs will probably be heavy during the first week 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 10, page 3. 

of June. In southern Ohio 50 percent of the moths have emerged, although 
no entrances had been reported by May 20. Orchards receiving the second- 
cover spray the x^feek of May 20 will need another spray by June 1. 

Curculio are still serious on peaches. At Lexington trees are 
dropping 20 to 1,200 fruits, 2 to g percent v;ormy. At Bedford six to eight 
adult curculio v;ere jarred per tree May 22. Arsenical protection is 
needed in infested peach orchards. Grapes are in full bloom. Half of 
the strawberries are rotting in the field. 

(Area 5) Quinc;;-Pittsf leld : A moderate codling moth flight oc- 
curred May I'i to 12. This will increase rapidly after the past three 
warm days. Apples should be well protected in this area through the 
last week in May and the first week in June. Some fungicide, such as weak 
Bordeaux or Formate, should be added in orchards vhere apple scab is serious. 

(Area 6) Feoria-Chainpaign-Laf ayette : About 30 percent of the 
codling moths have pupated, with no adults to date. Hatch should not 
occur before the first week in June. Continued use of mild fungicides 
is recommended at 10-day intervals as protection against scab infection. 

(Area 7) Northern Illinois- India.na : A small emergence of cod- 
ling moths started at Rock Island May I5 to 22. First hatch will prob- 
ably occur the first week of June. Use of mild fungicides is recommended 
to protect foliage and fruit from scab infection. 

Today's spray service report was presented through the cooper- 
ation of fruit growers and federal and state agencies. Included are the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by M. D. Farrar, 
of the Illinois State I'atural History Survey. 

-0- 
RSB'.pm 

j Cooperative Extension 'work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United' States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts a.pproved by Congress May 6 and June 'J:-0, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

?rep?.red by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 



No. 11— June 2-^, 19^6 




ANNOUNCER: Here's another of our weekly spray service reports, pre- 
sented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horti- 
culturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department 



of Agriculture. 



**»■«• •«--H'»#4!'* 



G-eneral : Watch for bitter rot development in problem 
orchards. ^-6-100 Bordeaux or Fermate, txvo pounds per 100 gallons of . 
spray, at weekly intervals for at least four sprays is recommended. 
Remove dropped peaches from your orchard to reduce seccnd-brood curcu- 
lio, at least from Carbondale north. Periodical cicada are prevalent 
over the southern and western Illinois areas, but a method of control 
is not generally suggested. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, 111. : Codling 
moth Is still being delayed by cool weather. There could still be con- 
siderable first-brood infestation if conditions become favorable. Thus 
far about 75 per cent of the moths have emerged at Princeton and about 
6o per cent at Henderson from emergence cages. V/eak Bordeaux in the 
codling moth sprays is suggested to aid in preventing secondary scab. 

Some early peach harvest has started. Brown rot is starting 
to appear. Sulfur and lime dusts and sprays should be used for con- 
trolling this disease and to help prevent arsenical injury. 

(Area 2) Vincennes-Carbondale: At Vincennes at least ^0 per 
cent of the codling moths in emergence cages and 30 to 35 ps^ cent of 
those in the orchards have not yet emerged. Bait-trap catches have 



I 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 11, page 2 

increased slightly this week. There is yet no need to shorten the In- 
terval between sprays to less than two weeks, except in orchards x\rhere 
fresh injuries can readily be found. 

I At Carbondale codling moths are still developing slowly and 
are producing very few nexir entries. Additional sprays on Transparent 
are probably not necessary with the prospects of an early harvest. If 
necessary, nicotine should be used. Blotch is appearing on Transparent, 
but fungicide sprays are not recommended because of the nearness to 
harvest. Other varieties, such as Duchess, should be sprayed with 
l|-5_100 Bordeaux for blotch, if Fermate is not available. 

Secondary scab should be kept under control with weak Bordeaux 



i . 

spray 



On peaches not over 10 per cent of curculio have left dropped 



fruit. Removing drops from the orchard is still advisable to reduce 
second-brood. Disking for curculio control should not be done until 
about the middle of June, when most larvae will have pupated. 

(Area 3) Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia: Codling moth emergence 
continues in this region, but thus far very little evidence of egg- 
laying or larval hatch has been observed. Larval stings on unsprayed 
trees indicate the results of unfavorable weather for codling moth. 
Weak Bordeaux or Fermate should be used in the codling moth sprays if 
danger of secondary scab prevails in your orchard. 

On peaches, novr is the time to remove dropped fruit from your 
orchard to reduce secondary curculio. Do no disk yet for curculio con- 
trol. Less than 10 per cent of the v/orms have left the dropped fruit. 

(Area ^) Bedf ord-Le::ington-5.¥. Ohio: The bait trap catch of 
codling moth was up on Hay 29. With continued v/arm weather, egg- laying 
and hatch will increase rapidly, so adecuate spray protection is neces- 
sary. , ^ 

Oriental fruit moth shoxi^s little activity at Bedford, but 
there is an increase in number of wilted twigs at Lexington. Curculio 
is still active, indicating the need for continued arsenical protection. 
Many larvae are leaving the dropped fruit at Lexington. 

The last spray of t-6-lOO Bordeaux for black rot on grapes 
may be applied this week. 

(Areas 5, 6, and 7) Quincy-Plttsf ield-Feoria-Champaign- 
Lafayette-Northern Illinois- Indiana: Codling moth emergence is heavy 
throughout these areas. Sprays should be applied at seven-day intervals. 
Orchards with scab Infections should receive weak Bordeaux or Fermate, 
one-half pound, if oil is included in the codling moth sprays. If oil 
is not used, then four pounds of wettable sulfur should be added. 
RS3:CG 5-31-i^6 -0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June ^0, 191^ 




SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prep&red by Illinolf' State Natural History 
Survey ancJ Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 12— June 9-15, 19^6 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, compiled through the 
cooperation of entomologists, horticulturists and pathologists of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

General : Codling moth bands should normally be applied at this 
time in the southern areas. If banding is planned, it should be delayed 
at least two weeks beyond the normal date because of the late develop- 
ment of codling moth. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky & Villa Ridge : On apples, judging from 
examination of emergence cages and bait trap catches, the first-brood 
:codling moth attack is virtually over except for a few stragglers. Bitter 
:rot has not been reported, but problem orchards should be watched closely. 
Scab control is still necessary where early infection occurred. Weak 
■Bordeaux . sprays should be adequate for preventing secondary infection. 

On peaches, curculio adult numbers are low. Orchard cultiva- 
tion is suggested for reducing second brood. Sulfur dusts and sprays are 
lin order on early peaches for brown rot control. 

(Area 2) Vincennes-Cerbondale : The incubation period of codling 
moth eggs is still 1^ days or longer. The rate of hatch is very slow ex- 
cept in a few locations. Moth energence still continues slowly. Counts 
indicate that 75 to $0 percent of the overvxintering generation have emerged, 
but 5 percent are still in the larval stage. First-brood sprays should be 
continued at 12- to 15-day intervals until at least July ^. Under these 
conditions many growers should find it possible to omit most second-brood sprays. 

At Carbondale the first-brood codling moth attack is practically 
over. Sprays are not necessary at less than 1^-day intervals. There is 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 12, page 2. 

little danger of early second-brood worms infesting Transparents In view 
of the early harvest. Thus some nicotine can be saved. 

On peaches, curculio adults are still being jarred. This is 
probably the best time for some let-up of arsenical applications. Remem- 
ber the arsenical corrective sprays and dusts. Cultivation for reducing 
the second brood could be started now to get the soil in good shape, but 
for maximum control disking should be delayed another two weeks. Brown 
rot sprain's or dusts on early varieties should be in order. 

• (Area 3) Belle ville-Hardin-Centralia : Codling moth emergence 
still continues, and spray protection is still necessary at 10-day intervals 
at least. • Weak Bordeaux should be effective against secondary scab. 

After June 10 it will probably be too late for remaining drops 
from the peach orchard for curculio control. Disking for second-brood 
reduction Is not advised this early. Growers should plan a let-up of 
arsenical applications soon, although some adult curculio are still active. 

(Area k) Bedford- Lexington-5. W. Ohio : There has been an increase 
Ln codling moth egg hatch since June 2. The peak of first-brood infes- 
tation is probably still to occur if warm weather continues. A few curculio 
adults are still active on peaches. Arsenical injury is showing at Lex- 
ington, and spraying or dusting with lime should help. At Bedford zinc 
sulfate is suggested if bacterial spot appears. This is the last oppor- 
tunity to spray grapes for black rot. 

(Areas 5, 6, and 7) Q^incy-Pittsf ield, Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette, 
■Northern Illinois-Indiana : Recent warm weather greatly increased codling 
Doth- egg- laying. 'Now is the time to give the maximum spray protection. 
fl[eak Bordeaux is suggested for secondary scab protection if oil is being 
ised. If the use of oil is not planned, then mild sulfur, ^ pounds to 
LOO gallons, may be added to the codling moth sprays. 

That concludes this v;eek' s spray service report, presented 
through the cooperation of fruit growers, federal and state agencies, in- 
cluding the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Il- 
linois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Dedducus 
''ruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It v^as compiled by Dwight 
iPovjell, University of Illinois Department of Horticulture. 

; -0- 

^S3:pm 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Departm.ent of Agriculture cooperating. H. F. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June '^0, 1^1^ 




I 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 13— June l6-22, 19^6 



ANNOUNCER:' Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

General; Do not forget the post-harvest sprays on cherries 
for leaf spot control. A ^-6-100 Bordeaux is recommended as soon as 
the fruit has been harvested. 

(Area 1) Western Kentucky & Villa Ridge : A slight increase 
has occurred this past week in bait trap catches of codling moths. 
These may be either late first-brood or early second-brood moths. In any 
case adequate protection should be continued betvieen broods. Bordeaux 
sprays should be applied for bitter rot in problem orchards. 

Gurculio are now in the pupal stage, and thus cultivation of the 
peach orchard should be done nox^r to reduce the second brood. Brown rot 
control with sulfur dusts or sprays at five- to seven-day intervals is essential 
on all early-ripening plums and peaches. (See Carbondale-Vincennes area 
for Information on mite infestation. ) 

(Area g) Carbondale-Vincennes : At Vincennes codling moth larval 
attack during the coming week will be the heaviest experienced this season. This 
hatch should taper off after June 22 but mil continue into July and will over- 
lap the early second-brood attack from southern Indiana. Most growers who 
have been spraying at two-v;eek intervals can now shorten this interval 
profit£ibly to 10 days. The European red mite ii?as found in num^bers rang- 
ing from one to I9 per 100 leaves in seven of I3 orchards sampled 
June 6 and 7 on a line between Vincennes, Ind., and Jackson, Tenn. The 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. I3, page 2. 

common red spider has also appeared in this same region. Severe outbrealcs 
of both pests are expected, particularly in the Henderson, Ky., and Vin- 
cennes sections where DDT was used last season. 

Codling moth emergence has practically stopped at Carbondale. 
A small increase in entrances last week, however, indicates that some 
protection is necessary on late varieties. 

On peaches adult curculios are still as numerous as last week 
and are more prevalent than last year at this time. Most curcullo larvae 
have entered the ground. Disking in the next two weeks x\rill help to re- 
duce the second-brood attack. Second-brood Oriental fruit moth larvae 
are novi entering twigs, but no special treatment is suggested on Elbertas yet. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : Cage emergence of codling 
moths has practically stopped. Growers should watch closely for new en- 
tries and keep adequate protection on the fruit. 

On peaches dropped fruit contains very fev; curcullo larvae, as 
most of them have entered the ground. Disking during the next two or 
three weeks will be valuable in reducing the second-brood attack. 

(Area ^) Bedford- Lexington-5. W. Ohio : The peak of first-brood 
codling moth attack will occur this X'/eek, and the earliest worms to hatch 
this season will begin to leave the apples. Growers are warned to pro- 
tect fruit against these late worms. Probably ^5 percent or more of the 
first-brood moths have emerged. 

On peaches curcullo .adults are scarce and larvae are still 
leaving dropped fruit. 

(Area 3, 6 &7) Qulncy-Pittsfield; Peoria- Champaign-Lafayette; Northern 
Illinois -Indiana : Weather has been ideal for codling moth development. First- 
brood larvae in unsprayed orchards run about 1& per 100 apples in the Quincy region. 
This has all occurred during the past week. Egg-laying still continues but is 
tapering off this week. At Rock Island a heavy emergence of moths oc- 
curred daily from June ^ to 2. Grov;ers are warned to provide adequate 
protection against first-brood Infestation. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in cooper- 
ation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the Ag- 
ricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Illinois 
State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect 
Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell of 
the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
RSB:pm 
6-ll^-i^6 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June '}0, 191^ 



I 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepf.red by Illinoif? State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. l^J— June 23-29, 19^6 



I 




AMNOUKCER: Here's our i^reekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



I 



General: Treated bands should be applied to apple trees as 



soon as possible in order to collect mature first-brood codling moth le.r- 
vae. Peach orchards should be cultivated now to reduce pupae of the curculio. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky-Villa Ridge : Transparent apple and 
Red Bird peach harvests are practically over in westnrn Kentucky A slight 
pickup in trap catches of moths in the Paducah section miay indicate start of 
first-generation moth emergence. No apple sprays are needed now. 

.At Princeton, Ky., the first nev/ adult curculio emerged June 19; 
but no heavy emergence is expected until after the next rain. Early 
peaches comiing to market are unusually wormy. This looks like a year in 
whiich most growers should put on the raonth-bef ore-harvest lead spray. 
Second-brood Oriental fruit moth le.rvae are still entering ti^lgs in small num- 
bers in the Paducah section. Injury is still lighter than norm.al for this 
time of year. Sulphur applications for brown rot control are needed on 
early varieties of peaches and plums. 

(Area 2) Carbondale-Vincennes : At Vincennes, 25 percent of the cod:- 
ling moth spring brood emergence occurred during the past week. It is es- 
timated that 99 percent of the emergence is complete. All eggs laid before 
June 13 have hatched, the incubation period being between five and six days. 

Red mites were present in each of nine orchards examined be- 
tween Vincennes and the Indiana-Michigan line on June 13-1^. The largest 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 1^1-; page 2. 

populations were in the Covington and Bristol areas--no red spiders were 
found north of Vincennes. Red mites are now increasing rapidly at Vln- 
cennes. 

At Carbondale first-brood moth emergence is complete in cages, 
and orchards are showing some new hatch. Early entries show mature worms 
leaving the apple, and some pupae have been found. Thus some second- 
brood moths should appear within the next week or 10 days if favorable 
weather continues. Red mites have not yet appeared. 

Throughout this area rosy aphis are disappearing and the green 
apple aphid are increasing in numbers. Natural enemies should control 
these aphids, although some growers are planning nicotine sprays. 

On peaches, curculio adults have practically disappeared since 
last week. Most of the larvae which have left the dropped fruit have 
pupated. Cultivation xirill help to reduce the second brood. 

Red spiders are serious on raspberries in Union county. 111. 
Summer oil, one gallon to 100 gallons of v/ater, is recommended. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : First-brood moth emer- 
gence has been scattered during the past week. Growers should watch for 
new entries and determine their sprays on the basis of the amount of 
protection needed to prevent entry. Second-brood moths should appear in 
this area by July ^. 

Curculio adults are scarce for the first time this season. 
Larvae v/hich have left the dropped fruit are pupating, and thus culti- 
vating should be done nov; in order to help reduce the second brood. 

(Area 4) Bedf ord-Lexington-S. W. Ohio : Codling moth hatch has 
been heavy during the past week. Bait trap catches are low, indicating 
I that spring-brood emergence has about ended. Watch for bitter rot in 
[problem blocks. At Lexington, moth emergence continued fairly heavy 
during the past week, and spray coverage should be maintained. 



I 

Spray service repOxRT— mo. i^, page 3. 

1 On peaches, second-brood Oriental fruit moth began hatching 

June IS. This insect promises to be serious during and after this hatch. 

■ On strawberries, the leaf roller is abundant, but the crovm 

borer has been light. 

I On grapes, leaf hoppers or grapeberry moths have not appeared 

in numbers. 

P Post-harvest sprays for cherry leaf spot control are badly 

needed in eastern Kentucky. 

(Area 5> 6 & 7) Quincy-Pittsf ield; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette; 
Northern Illinois-Indiana : Throughout central and northern Illinois and 
Indiana first-brood codling moth emergence continues on a small scale. 
Unsprayed orchards shoxir 50 percent entries from the first-brood attack 
of the past three weeks. Mature larvae are leaving the fruit now. Most 
growers are waiting for second-brood sprays, which will be needed within 
two or three weeks. 

4!- •»■}!• IMS' if- •;{••!(• ■!!••* 
I' 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiments Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 
' -0- 



RSB : pm 
5-21-46 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University Qf Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May ^ and June 30, 191^+ 



S?RAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in AgricultiAre 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 



No. 15~July 1-6, 19^16 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

General : L. F. Steiner notes that in the Vincennes area the Eu- 
ropean red mite was appearing at the rate of 1,000 per 100 leaves during the 
past week. In general the heaviest infestations have been found on the 
Red Delicious, Stayman and Winesap varieties. S. C. Chandler has found no 
evidence of red mites in Illinois to this date (June 27) • 

(Area l) Western Kentucky- Villa Hidge : Codling moth emergence 
started in second-brood cage at Princeton on June 2^. Also, a slight increase 
in trap catches started June 2'J). Traps at Fulton and Faducah have not yet 
shown this increase. Second-brood larvae should start hatching in the 
Paducah section by July 1. Apple orchards in western Kentucky should be covered 
by that time or as quickly as possible after this date. 

No bitter rot has been seen to date; however, problem orchards 
should be sprayed with Bordeaux at 10-day to two-week intervals until at least 
three applications have been made. 

On peaches, second-brood curculio adults have been emerging since 
June 12 in cages. Emergence increased with a l/4--inch rain June 25- Increased 
emergence can be expected >jith additional rainfall. Because of arsenical injury, 
growers are warned to use a minimum of arsenical applications in keeping 
with good control. 

Oriental fruit moth is tapering off in the Paducah area, while 
in Henderson freshly wilted twigs vxere plentiful June 2^. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. I5, page 2. 

(Area 2) Vlncennes-Carbondale : At Vincennes, codling moths for the 
second brood should begin emerging by July 1, but in most orchards their 
numbers will be small and no noticeable increase in the present rate of 
larval hatch is likely to occur before mid-July or later. Most growers should 
be able to obtain satisfactory control by applying sprays at three-week intervals 
j.ntil early August. The between-brood spray interval should not exceed three weeks. 

At Carbondale, codling moth hatch is low. Sprays at two-week in- 
tervals should be sufficient for protection. The secondr-brood Oriental fruit 
noth is tapering off. Most plum curculio larvae have pupated. There is 
Little evidence of adult emergence, but jarring shows a slight increase of 
idults in the orchard over last week. Disking the soil is one way of re- 
lucing second-brood curculio. Do it now. Hot, dry weather will retard curcu- 
-io adult emergence. With the first good rain, emergence should increase. 

(Area 3) Bellevllle-Kardin-Centralia : Codling moth activity is very 
-ow. A between-brood letup in spraying is suggested — not to exceed a 
;wo-week interval. 

Curculio are mostly in the pupal stage. Disking now will help 

;o reduce second-brood adults. 

(Area K) Bedf ord-Lexington-S. W. Ohio : At Lexington, moth emergence 
.s over, although some hatching of larvae continues. Spray protection at 
.east at two-week intervals is suggested until second-brood larvae appear nu- 
lerous. On peaches, a few curculio larvae are still leaving drops, indicating 
;hat most of the population is close to or in the pupal stage. Disking in 
;he peach orchard now is a possibility for reducing second brood. Orien- 
;al fruit moth second-brood larvae are attacking succulent peach twigs now. 

(Area 5, 6 and 7) Quincy-Pittsfield; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette; North- 
!rn Illinois-Indiana : First-brood larvae are still hatching even though the 
leak hatch occurred about two weeks ago. Most orchards can get by with 
)rotection at two-week intervals until second-brood larvae start to hatch, 
lild fungicides may still be used in orchards having live scab. 

Grapes in the Nauvoo area should receive leafhopper sprays. DDT 
.s suggested. The grape berry moth shows evidence of a severe infestation. 

That concludes today's spray service report, i^resented in coopera- 
;ion with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Illinois 
>tate Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Lab- 
oratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell of the 
lepartment of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 
iSBrpm 6-2g-il6 -0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 5 and June 30, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prep&red by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois , 



No. 16-- July 7-13, 19^^-6 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky-Villa Ridge ; There is a general 
Increase in bait trap catches of codling moths, indicating that second- 
brood hatch should start any time. G-rowers should apply a spray as 
soon as possible for protection. 

Bitter rot has not appeared, as yet, but problem blocks 
should be watched. 

On peaches, light rains have increased adult curculio emer- 
gence, but to date none of these have shown egg development. G-rowers 
are urged to do some jarring to determine their own conditons because 
of the differences between orchards. Many orchards in the Henderson 
and Paducah section will need a second-brood curculio dust or spray, 
but they are encouraged to time this so as to get maximum benefit with . 
the minimum amount of arsenate applied. Growers are urged to apply pre- 
harvest sulfur dusts or sprays as a precaution against brown rot. 

(Area 2) Vincennes-Carbondale : At Vincennes, the second-brood 
codling moth hatch should start not later than July 5 ^-^^d. should slowly 
increase to a peak during the week of July 1^. A separate and probably 
larger second-brood hatch should occur during the first week of August, 
if normal weather prevails. Some first-brood worms are still entering 
the apples. In general, the population is about the same as at this 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. l6, page 2 

date in 19^5. Some growers will need three or four additional sprays 
for control. Others having less than five worms per 1,000 apples at 
this time may get by with only one or two more applications. 

Both red mites and red spiders are on the increase in DDT- 
sprayed orchards. Grovrers intending to use dinitro compounds, oil, or 

other materials for the control of these pests should, in most instances, 

I 

make the first of two applications in the very near future and the sec- 
ond in ten days. 

At Carbondale, early second-brood hatch should start by JulyS; 
however, in most commercial orchards, control has been such that early 
second-brood worms will be scarce. Growers should keep a close check 
on their own orchard. Probably growers who have not sprayed for tv/o 
weeks or more should apply a spray now for a safety measure. There is 
still time for banding, in as much as only about one-fifth of the first- 
brood larvae have left the apples. 

m On peaches, there has been a sharp rise in adult curculio 

jarred this last week. Lead arsenate applications should go on at once. 

Oriental fruit moth in both the Carbondale and Vincennes areas 
appears to be abundant. At Carbondale, the third-brood larvae should 
appear by July 10. G-roxirers equipped for spraying should include three 
to four pounds Black Leaf 155 "to 100 gallons with their sulfur, 

(Area 3 and H-) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia; 3edf ord-Lexington- 
S.W. Ohio : Bait trap catches increased slightly on July 1. A spray 
for control of th-e first second-brood larvae should begin by July IO-I5 
in orchards where early first-brood infestation occurred. Oriental 
fruit moth larvae are reduced some since June 20-25. This brood has 
been severe in Indiana, and early peach varieties such as Hale Kaven 
jwill carry a greater infestation than last year. Adult curculios are 



SPRAY SZRVICE HE?ORT--No. lb, ioage 3 

emerging now, thus poison applications are suggested. G-rape leafhoppers 
are appearing, and a spray within ten days is suggested, 

(Area 5, 6, and 7) Q,uincy-Pittsf ield; Peoria-Champaign- 
Lafayette; Northern Illinois- Indiana : The first moths for second-brood 
worms should emerge by July 2-12 in the Quincy area. Most growers in 
this area should plan the first second-brood spray on or near July 15. 
G-roK-ers north of the Quincy-Pittsfield area should delay their sprays 
in accordance with difference in latitude. 

The second-brood grape berry moth is expected to start by 
August 1 in the Nauvoo area. DDT or lead arsenate sprays should be 
applied at that time. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It vras compiled by 
Dwight Povjell of the department of horticulture at the University of 
Illinois. 

-0- 



RSB : CG 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Hom.e Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Deps.rtment of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June ^0, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois, 

No. 17— July 1^-20, 15^6 




ANNOUNCER: And now, the weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

General: Bitter rot (week-old infection) was observed in southern 
Illinois July 3. A ^1-6-100 Bordeaux applied at least three times at 10-day 
intervals is recommended in blocks which show this disease. Watch out for 
trees which become infected each year. Removing such trees from the orchard, 
pruning out old wounds, broken limbs, etc., are methods of eradicating bitter rot. 

Do not forget the sulfur applications on peaches for brown rot control. 

(Area 1) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : A second-brood hatch 
of codling moth larvae of moderate intensity vjas under way on July 9' Immedi- 
ate coverage is strongly advised in all apple orchards that have not been 
sprayed for two weeks. Bitter rot has not been reported to date. Watch out 
for infection in areas where it has occurred in the past. On such areas, 
precautionary sprays of Bordeaux should be continued until three applications 
have been made. On peaches, egg developnent was observed July 10 in curculio 
that emerged June 2^. This indicates that there will be a true second brood. 
Arsenical applications a m.onth before harvest are recommended. Bro^AT. rot is 
fairly common on ripening peaches, as vrell as on flale and some Elbertas follow- 
ing insect injury. Sulfur dusts or sprays at regular intervals are recom- 
mended up to harvest. 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale : Codling moth adult trap catches 
have fallen off, indicating that the first peak of adult first-brood activity 



iPRAY SERVICE RE?ORT~No. 17, page 2. 

.s apparently over. A second and larger peak is expected in late July. 

'rotection should be given at not longer than three-week intervals until early August. 

Both European red mite and the common red spider are now increas- 
ng rapidly except where special treatments for their control have been ap- 
lled. In one local orchard there was a 900 percent increase between 
une 2^ and July 2 to an average of 1,350 per 100 leaves. Mites are now 
resent in all local orchards under observation. 

At Carbondale, second-brood entries have started; however, in 

ell-sprayed orchards they are very scarce or missing. No great increase 

s expected this coming week. No mites have yet appeared. Week- old 

Itter-rot-lnf ected apples were found, indicating that this disease is 

nder vxay, at least in some orchards in this area. 

* On peaches a marked increase in curculio adults has occurred. Ar- 

enical apolica.tions are necessary. Third-brood Oriental fruit moth larvae 
hould be* entering either twigs or fruit by this week. The fruit appears 

be maturing earlier this year than normal, allo\iring Oriental moth en- 
ry. Do not forget sulfur for brown rot. 

(Areas" 3 and ^) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia; Bedf ord- Lexington- 
out hv:e stern Ohio ; The first larvae of the second-brood codling moth were 
xpected by July 12, a peak hatch occurring by July 20. Spray protection 
B necessary at this time. No bitter rot has been reported. 

On peaches, large numbers of curculio adults are emerging for 
econd-brood infestation. Arsenical applications are necessary. A heavy 
hird brood of Oriental fruit moth is anticipated. Brown rot is preva- 
ent in many home plantings. Sulfur at regular intervals is recommended. 

A spray for grape leaf hoppers should be applied novr if one 
asn't been applied within the past two weeks. 

(Areas 3> 6 and 7) Qu i ncy- Pitt sfi eld; Peoria-Champaign-Lafa.-yette-North- 
rn Illinois-Indiana ; Second-brood codling moth larvae should first appear 
his week in the Quincy-Pittsf ield area. Spraying at this time is rec- 
namended. 

Red mites are prevalent in DDT-sprayed blocks at Urbana- A 
rape leafhopper egg hatch is well under way at Urbana this week. 3or- 
eaux with either nicotine or DDT is suggested. 

1 That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
ration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
>grlcultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 

llinols State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana- It vras compiled by Dwight Powell 
f the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
3B:pm 
-12-116 

Cooperative Extension ¥ork in Agriculture and Home Economics 
' University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 19 1^+ 




SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 



No. Ig— July 21-27 > 19^6 



ANNOUNCER: And now, the weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

• General : Red spiders are appearing in almost all DDT-sprayed 
orchards. Red mite is prevalent in the Indiana-Kentucky areas. As yet 
no definite recommendation has been made for controlling these pests 
in the orchard. Oil-DDT sprays are considered helpful. DN-111 looks 
good in experimental tests but may cause injury when used at tempera- 
tures of 90° F. or above. Either of these sprays is a possibility for 
relief in cases of severe infestations. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : Second-brood 
codling moth activity is increasing. Most western and central Kentucky 
orchards are showing entries sufficient to justify two or three sprays 
at about two-week intervals. Red mites are appearing in many orchards. 
Growers should make frequent observations for bronzing, especially 
where DDT is being used, ajid should be prepared to apply two sprays 10 

days apart, with two quarts of summer oil and 1/2 pound actual DDT plus 

of 
1/^ pound/soybean flour per 100 gallons of water in each application. 

Bitter rot has appeared, indicating the need for precautionary 
measures in problem blocks. 

On peaches, curculio adults are abundant and appear to be 

ready for egg-laying. A preharvest arsenical application will reduce 

these adults. Peach brown rot is common now on ripening fruit, and 
preharvest sulfur dusts or sprays are suggested. 



I 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT~No. 13, page 2. 

(Area 2) Vlncennes and Carbondale : At Vincennes, codling 
moth catches have shown a slight increase this week and are now higher 

than at any other time since mid-June. The peak second-brood hatch is 

I 

not expected to occur before August 1 or later. 

i Red spiders and mites are still increasing rapidly in DDT- 
sprayed orchards. 

_ At Carbondale, second-brood codling moth larvae are appearing. 
Sprays at two-week intervals are suggested through this period. Do 
not neglect late apples when peach harvest starts. A spray during 
this week should help, since some peach harvesting may start by July 29. 
Red spiders are appearing in small numbers in most DDT-sprayed 
orchards. The bitter rot season is here, infection showing in some 
problem blocks. Therefore, precautionary measures should be used. 

■ On peaches, curculio adults are abundant. Oriental fruit 
moth larvae are entering new t\;ig growth. Sulfur-oil dusts or Black 
Leaf 155 sprays are recommended. Brown rot is appearing even in 

Elberta, and sulfur dusts or sprays should be used. 

(Areas 3 and ^4-) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia; Bedf ord-Lexington- 
S. W. Ohiol Codling moth catches at Bedford are steadily increasing. 
A fairly heavy second-brood hatch is expected throughout these areas 
this week. Sprays at 10-day intervals are suggerted. Red spiders are 
now appearing in small numbers in DDT blocks. 

On peaches, curculio are moderately abundant, there being 
less than in the southern areas. Oriental fruit moth third brood has 
begun at Bedford. 

(Areas 5, 6 and 7) Q,uincy-Pittsfield; Peoria- Champaign - 
Lafayette; I^orthern Illinois- Indiana : A number of fresh entrance s of 
second-brood codling moth larvae have appeared in Areas 5 and 6. A 
peak hatch is expected by August 1. Sprays at lO-day intervals are 
recommended. Red spiders are present in all DDT-sprayed orchards, 
P8j?ticularly on the lox^er leaves of the trees. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit grovxers and federal and state agencies, includ- 
ing the' Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, ' Indiana and 
Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was com- 
piled by Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the Univer- 
'sity of Illinois. _0_ RSB:CG 7-19-^^6 

Coopercitive Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
i Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 1914- 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Preps-red by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois , 

No. 19~July 2g-August 3, 19^6 



I 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented thr 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturist 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agr 



ough 
s of 
iculture. 



*«*■!(•■«•«■■«•■»*■«■ 



General : In the last mite survey completed July I9 by L. F. 
Steiner, Vlncennes, Indiana, the European red mite was present in I9 of 
26 Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee orchards examined. It was 
absent from five orchards near Mayfield, Paducah and Sturgis, Kentucky; 
one at Omaha, Illinois; and one at Ov/ensville, Indiana. Infestations 
ranged up to 6,300 mites per 100 leaves. 

The common red spider was present in 23 of 26 orchards exam- 
ined. Both species are increasing rapidly except v^here special miticide 
sprays are being applied. Growers using dinitro materials are reporting 
foliage injury where applications overlap. In the use of this type of 
spray, growers should complete the application on both sides of the 
tree or row before any of that on the side sprayed first has time to 
' dry. 

(Area 1) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : The codling moth 
attack continues, and protection is advised in orchards which were not 
adequately sprayed during the first-brood period. Red spider and red 
mites are becoming serious, and miticide sprays are suggested. 

Curculio is serious in some ripening peach orchards. The 
I weather has been hot and humid, encouraging brown rot infection. Sulfur 



sprays or dusts are suggested at five- to seven-day intervals until 
harvest. 



SPRAY SERVICE. REPORT— No. 19, page 2. 

(Area g) -Vlncennes and Carbondale : At Vlncennes, codling 
moth activity reached a small peak July IS and 20. The present rate of 
hatch is increasing and will be heavy for the next ten days in orchards 
having Inadequate first-brood control. This hatch should be the main 
second-brood attack in most orchards. 

At Carbondale, codling larvae continue to hatch to a moderate 
degree. Spraying at two-week intervals is recommended. Red spiders do 
not appear serious, probably because of recent heavy rains. 

On peaches, curculio adults are still active but are fewer in 
number than last week. Orchards receiving late poisons look good. 
Rains have caused much fruit-cracking, making the fruit more suscrptible 
to brown rot. For this reason sulfur sprays or dusts should be thorough. 

(Areas 3 and k) Eelleville-Hardin-Centralia; Bedf ord-Lexingtonr- 
S. W. Ohio : At Bedford, bait trap catches indicate that codling moth 
flight is greater than at any other time this season. A heavy hatch is 
expected by July 30* At Lexington, there has been little Increase in 
second-brood activity. 

■ On peaches, third-brood Oriental moth attack is very heavy 
and prolonged in Area ^4-. Fourth-brood larvae are expected to enter 
peaches by August 6, Conditions are very favorable for brown rot. Sul- 
fur sprays or dusts are recommended at five- to seven-day intervals un- 
til harvest, 

(Areas 5, 6, & 7) Qulncy-Fittsf ield; Peoria- Champaign- 
Lafayette; Northern Illinois-Indiana : A heavy codling moth emergence 
jand egg hatch is expected this week. First-brood larvae collected in 
bands were about 75 percent in the pupal stage, many moths emerging 
July 23 at Quincy. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No» 19, page 3. 

At Na.uvoo, second-brood grape berry moths were emerging in 
cages July 2^. 

At Urbana, a heavy hatch of codling moth is expected by 
August 1. Red mite is serious on all varieties in DDT-sprayed blocks. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit grovrers and federal and state agencies, includ- . 
ing the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illi- 
nois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduou. 
Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by 
Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of 
Illinois. 

-0- 



RSB:CG 
7-26-^6 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June J)0 , 191^ 



I 



SFRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared, by Illinolr- State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 20— August i|-10, 13H-6 




I 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

General: The nicotine supply is still short. However, growers 
seem to be getting sufficient control of second-brood codling moth with 
DDT and half-strength DDT-nicotine bentonite combinations to make it neces- 
sary to spray much less than usual next month. No one knovrs how late 
DDT applications can be continued without encountering a residue problem. 
Use nicotine if you have it, or a combination 1/2-strength nicotine-DDT, 
if your nicotine supply is short. If you do not have nicotine, 2/2-strengt 
DDT should be adequate except where the codling moth infestation is seri- 
ous. The alternative is to use a lead arsenate schedule "and prepare to wash. 

Be prepared to apply hormone sprays for preventing preharvest drop. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : At Villa Ridge, Elberta 
peach harvest started July 26. Curculio is severe in the Mounds-Villa 
Ridge area, but less so at Metropolis, where heavy dusts were applied. 
Oriental fruit moth is past the peak third-brood larvae attack. 

(Ai^ea 2) Vincennes and Carbon dale : At Vlncennes, codling moth catcbj 
are remaining comparatively high, although they are well below normal for 
this time of the season. The peak of the second-brood hatch is believed tc 
be occurring at present and should continue at the current level for 
another vieek. or longer. Mites and red spiders are increasing steadily except 
where growers have used oil or dinitro sprays. 

At Carbondale, a moderate codling moth hatch continues, and 
spray protection at two-week intervals should be adequate. Mites or rei 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT~No. 20, page 2. 

spiders have not appeared serious in orchards examined, possibly because 
of the recent use of oil in DDT-sprayed areas. 

I On peaches, a recent count by S. C. Chandler on orchard-run fruit 

ishowed a 9.2 percent infestation of curculio, 5'1 percent Oriental fruit 
moth, and Ig percent catfacing. The third-brood Oriental fruit moth lar- 
vae are still entering the fruit. Harvest of Elberta peaches started July 29 • 
I (Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia: A steady hatch of codling 

Tioth is occurring in this area. Spraying at two-week intervals should be 
adequate. Bitter rot has appeared in Calhoun county, indicating that 
problem orchards in this area should be watched closely. 

Red spiders or mites had not appeared abundantly up to July 29. 
^ Brown rot control measures are of utmost importance now on peaches. 

Sulfur applications at weekly intervals to harvest are recommended. 

(Area ^) Bedford- Lexlngton-S. W. Ohio : Second-brood codling moth 
latch continues to be heavy, although bait trap catches of adult moths have 
iecreased materially. Thus a decrease of new entries is expected shortly, 
prays at lO-day to two-week intervals should be adequate protection. 

Oriental fruit moth entry this past week has been the heaviest 

)f the season. 

G-rasshopper infestations in orchards may be reduced by poison 
)ran baits. Arsenical sprays do not control grasshoppers. 

(Areas 5,6 & 7) Quincy-Pittsfield; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette ; 
: Iorthern Illinois-Indiana : Codling moth egg hatch should start tapering 
)ff this v;eek. Sprays at two-week intervals should be adequate except 
.n heavily infested orchards. Western and northern Illinois have not re- 
ported serious mite or spider infestations. At Urbana, European red 
lite and the common red spider are serious in DDT-sprayed blocks. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
!ration v;ita fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 
^Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It vj-as compiled by Dv/ight 
'owell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 



iP : pm 
-2-^6 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 1914- 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepsred by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois . 



No. 21--August 11-17, 19^6 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

General : The nicotine supply is still short. Continue stretch- 
nicotine by using half-strength with half-strength DDT where necessary. 
Watch peaches for brown rot and use sulfur as needed, especially where 
curculio or Oriental fruit moth is bad. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge ; The Elberta harvest 
is nearing a close in \irestern Kentucky. Curculio varies from light to 
heavy between orchards; some growers are obtaining good control and 

others poor. 

I 

^ Oriental fruit moth infestation is moderate to heavy except 

where DDT has been used. Parasites are plentiful. 

Codling moth activity continues but is on the decline. 

Red mites and red spiders are increasing, especially where DDT 
has been used, 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale : At Vincennes, second-brood 
codling moth hatch is still continuing at a moderate rate. Continuance 
of hatch is expected for at least another week where control of first- 
brood was inadequate. Red-banded leaf roller larvae are causing consider- 
able damage in some orchards. DDT apparently is not giving control. 

European red mites are increasing in some situations, but are 
being replaced by rapidly increasing red spider infestations. 



Spray Service Report — No. 21,. page 2. 

At Carbondale, enough codling moth hatch is occurring to war- 
rant another spray after peach harvest. Orchards examined show little 
increase in mites and spiders. 

On peaches, the big problem is brown rot control. Sulfur ap- 
plications are recommended, 

(Area 3) Bell eville-Hardin-Centr alia ; A light hatch of codling 
moth continues. The peak of second-brood hatch is over, and spraying at 
two-week intervals should be adequate. Peach harvest should be under 
way soon. Growers are warned to watch brown rot closely, especially 
where curculio damage is heavy. 

( Area k) Bedford- Lexington-5. W. Ohio ; Codling moth catches in 
bait traps are twice as high as at any time during the first-brood pe- 
riod. A heavy hatch is under way. V/here nicotine programs are used v;ith- 
out DDT, applications should be made at weekly intervals. Mites are 
increasing at an alarming rate. 

On peaches, the Oriental fruit moth attack on twigs les- 
sened slightly during the past week. Fruit injury is not prevalent at 
Lexington. The peak Elberta harvest will probably occur by August 12, 62 
days earlier than normal. Additional protection against brown rot is 

recommended. Concord grapes are turning fast. 

(Areas 5, 6 & 7) Quincy-Pittsfleld; Peoria-Champaign-Lafayette ; 
Northern Illinois-Indiana : The peak of second-brood codling moth attack 
is over, a light hatch continuing in Areas 5 and 6. Area 7 should pre- 
pare for a peak hatch within a week or so. 

European red mite attack is still serious at Urbana and is 
showing up in the Quincy area. There is still no report from northern 
Indiana or Illinois. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit grov;ers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
DP : pm 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May S and June "^O, 191^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinoia 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 22— August lg-2^, 19^-6 




U^ 



ANNOUNCER; Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of 
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

General : It is important to prepare now for preharvest hor- 
mone sprays. 

(Area 1) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : No report received, 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale ; At Vincennes. codling moth 
catches continue at a moderately low level. 'The rate of hatch is still 
low and not much change is expected through the remainder of the month. 
Except in a few orchards, third-brood attack is expected to be light. 
What appears to be a third generation of larvae of the red-banded leaf- 
roller is beginning to appear at Vincennes. Moth catches in bait traps 
during the past 10 days have outnumbered codling moth by some 20 to 1 
in at least one Vincennes orchard. 

At Carbondale no increase has been observed in numbers of 
codling moth larvae entering fruit. Rain and cooler v/eather on August I3 
^nd 1^ will probably delay development. 

In general the European red mite Infestation from Vincennes 
south to Tennessee is decreasing. The same is true in most orchards 
north of Vincennes. Red spiders at Paducah, Ky. , i^ere going into hiber- 
lation on August g, and hibernating forms were found at Vincennes and at 
j-reenfield, Tenn. In most orchards south of Henderson and north of 
iS^incennes, the red spider population seems to be diminishing. At 
l^incennes it is still increasing in a number of orchards, the populations 



I 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 22, pase 2. 

ranginf up to 60 per leaf. In most orchards where mite rnd spider popu- 
lations have built up and v:here no recent DDT sprays have been applied, 
predators have recently become abundant enough to account for much of 
the decrease in infestation. 

I At Carbondale all DDT blocks show moderate numbers of mites, 
but only one case of noticeable injury has been found. The problem of 
whether or not to use oil in DDT-nicotine .sprays will have to be solved 
by individual growers, since no answer can be given to orchardists as a 
whole. 

Growers may apply DN 111 during any cool period. 

(Area 3) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia : Apple conditions in 
this area are reported to be about the same as those in the Carbondale 
area except that they are a little farther from harvest. 

Harvest of peaches in the Salem to Farina area began Monday, 
August 12. At present no great numbers of Oriental fruit moth larvae 
are entering the fruit, although the fourth brood should begin by 

August 15. 

(Area 4) Bedford- Lexington-S. W. Ohio ; At Mitchell, Ind. , 
bait trap catches have decreased in numbers this week. A heavy hatch 
is expected to continue for several days, however. Oriental fruit moth 
larval entrances into peaches and twigs have decreased sharply. The 
harvest of Elbertas is 75 PQ^ cent finished, and C-age Elbertas are 
ripening. Grasshoppers are reported to be feeding heavily on apple 
foliage. Concord grapes will be harvested next week, 

1 At Lexington small Oriental fruit moth larvae are beginning 

I 
to enter Elberta peaches. Counts show 11 per cent in the crop so far 

i in the experiment station orchard. Counts of curculio show five per 

, cent in Elbertas. Many of these are very small larvae which indicate 

i the appearance of a true second brood. Some brown rot is showing up on 
j Elbertas. 



SPRAY SERVICE RE?ORT--No. 22, page 3- 

The papulation of European red mites is still increasing, 
and some apple trees at Lexington show severe bronzing. 

(Areas 5, 6 & 7) Quincy-Pittsf ield; Peoria-Chainpaipiin-Lafayettc 
Northern Indiana-Illinois : Most p-rowers have finished or are finishing 
their second-brood codling moth sprays. It is sufcgested that all grow- 
ers watch their orchards closely. It is possible that additional sprays 
will not be necessary this year except for the hormone application. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in 
cooperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, includ- 
ing the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illi- 
nois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal 
Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was com- 
piled by Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

I 

RSB : CG 
g- 16-^6 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 191^ 




SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 23— August 25-31, 19^6 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through the 
cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. DepsTtment of Agriculture. 

Preharvest Hormone Applications : Hormone applications to prevent 
premature fruit drop should now be standard practice on such apple vari- 
eties as Jonathan, Delicious, Starking, Golden Delicious, V/inesap and Stayman. 
Some growers have reported success on Grimes Golden when applications were 
started three or four weeks before harvest and tvro or three were applied. 
York Imperial and Willow Twig do not respond to hormone treatment. 

It is customary to delay hormone applications until apples start 
to drop or -ontil they are al.xoet ready to pick. A treatment may becom.e 
effective in two days and remain effective for 10 days to three weeks, 
depending on the variety. 

Kcrmcnes should not be applied v/hen the temperature is below 
70° F. , as they are not effective at Iovj temperatures. Special applica- 
tions are not alv/ays necessary, as these materials may be combined with 
the late codling m.oth sprays. 

The use of hormone applications on apples Is of utmost importance 
and should not be neglected. Fruit left on the tree a little longer has 
better color, size, flavor and selling qualities. 

;||': (xA.rea l) Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge : Bait trap catches 
indicate that a third-brood codling moth hatch should occur the last 
week of August. In general, most Kentucky apples are rather free from 
worms and should wind up clean if the third brood does not cause trouble. 
I The mite populations have not changed much since last week. Bitter rot 



SPRAY SSRVICZ REPORT— No. 23, page 2, 

is appearing en certain trees In some orchards. Stripping these trees 
Is recommended, and If spread occurs a late Bordeaux spray should be ap- 
plied, probably combined with a codling moth and hormone spray. 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale : Third-brood codling moth hatch 
should be well under way by August 2^, although no sharp increase in the 
present rate of hatch is expected. G-rov.rers should watch for fresh Injuries. 

A heavy third-brood hatch of red-banded leaf roller is occurring 
at Vincennes. Present Indications are that this insect infestation has been 
brought about by the use of DDT, which ifa proving ineffective in controlling 
the leaf roller larvae, but is toxic to some of its parasites and predators. 

Both species of mites are still present in some orchards through- 
out the tri-state area, but in fairly reduced numbers. Additional mate 
sprays will probably not be necessary. 

(Areas 3, k-, 5, 6, and 7) Belleville-Hardin-Centralia; Bedf ord- 
Lexington-S. ¥. Ohio; Quincy-Fittsfi eld; Peoria-Chanpaign-Lafayette; Northern 
Illinois- Indiana : In Areas 3> ^} 3> and 6, new codling moth entries are oc- 
curring to some degree, depending on the orchard. G-rowers should spray 
accordingly. A third brood should not develop much before September 1. 
Mites are occurring in scattered orchards, but they are not general. In 
most cases it would not pay to spray for mite control at this time. 

Jonathan drop is occurring in central and western Illinois or- 
chards. Hormone applications are recommended. 

G-rowers in Area 7 should watch for codling moth injury and spray 
if necessary. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit grovrers and federal and state a.gencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It v;as compiled by Dx^dght Powell 
of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

RSB:pm ~°~ . 

g-23-il6 

Cooperative Extension '"/ork in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
j Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
i Acts approved by Congress May 2 and June 30, 191^ 




-<. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 2^— September 1-7, 19^6 



5 / c 



V— '' 



7 
6 



3 \^ 



"N 




y 



AIINOUKCER: Here's the last in this season's series of weekly spray service re- 
ports, presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and hor- 
ticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S, Dfepartment of 
Agriculture. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky-Villa Ridp!:e : Light to moderate third-brood 
codling moth attack seems to be under way throughout central, southern and 
western Kentuckjc Some growers are applying oil-nicotine and stick-on sprays. 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale; (Area 3) Selleville-Kardin-Centralla : 
Codling moth catches in Vincennes have declined to a very low level; and 
except in orchards where control of the second brood was poor, no further 
spraying should be necessary. 

Since Elberta harvest, there has been a substantial increase in ori- 
ental fruit moths coming to codling moth traps in apple orchards as much as 
1/2 mile from the nearest peach trees. Apples will suffer some attack from 
oriental fruit moth larvae this week and an increasing amount through next \^eek. 

The mite aiid red spider situation is about the same as a week ago. 
Damage, including loss of foliage, is increasing V7herever infestations have 
been or still are moderately high. In some plantings all individuals found 
were European red mites; in others, all the common red spider. Usually, how- 
ever, both are present, the spiders being most abundant. 

(Area ^) Bedford- Lexington- S. W. Ohio; Third-brood codling moth hatch 
is Increasing, and a nicotine application is needed. G-age Elberta harvest 
was finished on August 29. Jonathan harvest will begin soon. 

' (Areas 5, 6& 7) Quincy-Pittsfield; Feoria-Champaign- Lafayette; Northern 

Illinois- Indiana : Because of cool weather, third-brood codling moth emer- 
gence has not started in the ^uincy area. There are still a few entries 
from the last of the second brood at Champaign. Mature larvae under bands 
3hox'>r very little pupation at Quincy. If the cool weather continues, development 
Afill probably be very slow. j^^^^^^^^^^^ 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 2^,. page 2. 

Final Report for 19^6 . This report will complete the series of 
2^ weekly spray .service reports for the use of fruit growers. These re- 
ports have been made possible through the cooperation of many fruit 
growers and federal and state agencies, including the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Illinois State 
Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory 
at Vincennes, Indiana. The reports have been compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

The following men have contributed to the success of the Spray 
Service Report by reporting on orchard conditions: L. F. Steiner, Bu- 
reau of Entomology and Plant Q,uarantine, Vincennes, Indiana; Prof. C. L. 
Burkholder, Prof. J. J. Davis, and Dr. G-. Edw. Marshall, Indiana Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana; Dr. 
¥. D. Armstrong and Dr. P. 0. Ritcher, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment 
Station, University of Kentucky, Princeton and Lexington, Kentucky; Prof. 
T. H. Parks, Chio State University, Columbus, Ohio; • Department of Ento- 
mology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri; Jos. M. Ackles, 
G-riggsville, 111.; Charles S. Adkins, Jr., Metropolis, 111.; Fred Baxter, 
Nauvoo, 111.; Jim Bright, Valley City, 111.; W. L. Casper, Cobden, 111.; 
S. C. Chandler, Carbondale, 111.; Frank Chatten, Quincy, 111.; Dave Dell, 
Grafton, 111.; Curt E. Eckert, Belleville, 111.; L. A. Floyd, Green- 
ville, 111.; Hugh Hale, Omaha, 111.; Harry Hatcher, Roodhouse, 111., Fred 
Hawkins, Texico, 111.; Vilas Hensel, Princeton, 111.; C. T. Jeffries, 
Dix, 111,; Bernard Y. King, Moline, 111.; John F. Leahr, Griggsville, 111., 
Roy J. Newman, Martinsville, 111.; C. E. Percels, Farina, 111.; A. Lee 
Pray, LeRoy, 111.; K."0. Rice, Champaign, 111.; Chris Ringhausen, Jersey- 
ville, 111.; Roy Schv;artz, Cobden, 111.; C. E. Walkington, Tunnel Hill, 111., 
and staffs of the Illinois Natural History Survey and the University of 
Illinois Department of Horticulture, Urbana, Illinois. 

Because of mailing regulations, the 19^7 spray service reports 
cannot be sent automatically to recipients of the 19^6 reports. There- 
fore, a letter will be sent in April 19^7 to all persons on the 19^6 
mailing list asking if they wish to receive the 19^7 reports. Any in- 
quiries and suggestions concerning the reports should be addressed to 
R. S. Heeler, Assistant Extension Editor, University of Illinois College 
of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois. 



RSB : pm 
g-30~U6 



k 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 191^ 



^n 




Sfouxxii JO iC^fsaaATun 'soTmouoo2 auiOH pu 

aan^X'^^T'^^ ^T soTAjag uotsuaaxs pire /laAan 

XaoasTH I>3an:iBN sa«as stouixh. ^q paj^daj 

iH0cI3H 30IAH3S XVHi 



SFRAi: SERVICE REPORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 2^--September 1-7, 1S^6 




-LT 



AIIKOUKCER: Here's the last in this season's series of weekly spray service re- 
ports, presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and hor- 
ticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

(Area l) Western Kentucky-Villa Ridp^e : Light to moderate third-brood 
codling moth attack seems to be under way throughout central, southern and 
v/estern Kentucky Some growers are applying oil-nicotine and stick-on sprays. 

(Area 2) Vincennes and Carbondale; (Area 3) Selleville-Kardin-Centralia ; 
Codling moth catches in Vincennes have declined to a very low level; and 
except in orchards where control of the second brood was poor, no further 
spraying should be necessary. 

Since Slberta harvest, there has been a substantial increase in ori- 
ental fruit moths coming to codling moth traps in apple orchards as much as 
1/2 mile from the nearest peach trees. Apples xvill suffer some attack from 
oriental fruit moth larvae this week and an increasing amount through next week. 

The mite and red spider situation is about the same as a week ago. 
Damage, including loss of foliage, is increasing wherever infestations have 
been or still are moderately high. In some plantings all individuals found 
|Were European red mites; in others, all the common red spider. Usually, how- 
ever, both are present, the spiders being most abundant. 

(Area k) Bedford- Lexington- S. W. Ohio: Third-brood codling moth hatch 
Is increasing, and a nicotine application is needed. G-age Elberta harvest 
iJSiS finished on August 29- Jonathan harvest will begin soon. 

(Areas 5, 6& 7) Quincy-Pittsfield; Peoria-Champaign- Lafayette; Northern 
Illinois- Indiana: Because of cool weather, third-brood codling moth emer- 



,?ence has not started in the 5,uincy area. There are still a few entries 
jfrom the last of the second brood at Champaign. Mature larvae under bands 
;3hox\r very little pupation at Quincy. If the cool weather continues, development 
;«rill probably be very slow. ^^^^«.^(.^^^Hf.■i>*^^• 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 2^,. page 2. 

Final Report for 19^6 . This report will complete the series of 
2^ weekly spray service reports for the use of fruit growers. These re- 
ports have been made possible through the cooperation of many fruit 
growers and federal and state agencies, including the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Illinois State 
Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory 
at Vincennes, Indiana. The reports have been compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

The following men have contributed to the success of the Spray 
Service Report by reporting on orchard conditions: L. F. Steiner, Bu- 
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Vincennes, Indiana; Prof. C. L. 
Burkholder, Prof. J. J. Davis, and Dr. G. Edw. Marshall, Indiana Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana; Dr. 
W. D. Armstrong and Dr. P. 0. Ritcher, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment 
Station, University of Kentucky, Princeton and Lexington, Kentucky; Prof. 
T. H. Parks, Chio State University, Columbus, Ohio; • Department of Ento- 
mology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri; Jos. M. Ackles, 
G-riggsville, 111.; Charles S. Adkins, Jr., Metropolis, 111.; Fred Baxter, 
Nauvoo, 111.; Jim Bright, Valley City, 111.; W. L. Casper, Cobden, 111.; 
S. C. Chandler, Carbondale, 111.; Frank Chatten, Quincy, 111.; Dave Dell, 
Grafton, 111.; Curt E. Eckert, Belleville, 111.; L. A. Floyd, Green- 
ville, 111.; Hugh Hale, Omaha, 111.; Harry Hatcher, Roodhouse, 111., Fred 
Hawkins, Texico, 111.; Vilas Hensel, Princeton, 111.; C. T. Jeffries, 
Dix, 111.; Bernard Y. King, Moline, 111.; John F. Leahr, Griggsville, 111., 
Roy J. Newman, Martinsville, 111.; C. E. Percels, Farina, 111.; A. Lee 
Pray, LeRoy, 111.; H.'0. Rice, Champaign, 111.; Chris Ringhausen, Jersey- 
ville. 111.; Roy Schwartz, Cobden, 111.; C. E. Walkington, Tunnel Hill, 111., 
and staffs of the Illinois Natural History Survey and the University of 
Illinois Department of Horticulture, Urbana, Illinois. 

Because of mailing regulations, the 19^7 spray service reports 
cannot be sent automatically to recipients of the 19^6 reports. There- 
fore, a letter will be sent in April 19^7 to all persons on the 194-6 
mailing list asking if they wish to receive the 19^7 reports. Any in- 
quiries and suggestions concerning the reports should be addressed to 
R. S. Peeler, Assistant Extension Editor, University of Illinois College 
of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois. 

-0- 



RSB : pm 
g- 30-46 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May g and June 30, 19l4 



V.'- ! - 



W 

^ 



?K/\Y S^KVJcs R£?o;a 




PrejBred by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 1--March 30-April 5, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's the first of our veekly spray service reports. They 
are presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Deja.rt- 

ment of Agriculture and Station . We will bring them to you 

each at this time throughout the spraying season, up into Sep- 
tember. 

********** 

General . In the past two years fruit growers had by this time 
started their season's spray program. This year they are "champin' at the 
bit" --ready to go. But each day brings temperatures in the freeziing 
range, so operations have been temporarily delayed. 

Now, while you are waiting for things to pop, is a good time to 

recheck a few items. Reread the past two issues of your frioit growers' maga- 
zine and study the compatibility chart on insecticides and fungicides and 
the discussions of weather thoroughly. So far fruit prospects for this 
year look promising. Freeze damage to peaches and apples has been slight. 

Peach buds are swelling in western Kentucky and the southern tip 
of Illinois, and an occasional leaf bud is breaking open. The rest of 
Kentucky, Illinois and Indiana can be considered close to strictly dormant. 

Observations Indicate a general heavy carryover of San Jose 
(HO-ZAY) scale. Red m.ite eggs are abundant in certain areas. Aphid eggs 
are abundant but not so plentiful as last year. This is your last chance 
to apply a dormant spray. 

Codling moth mortality is low. Thus, if an orchard had a heavy 
infestation in 1946, the grower can rely on having a good carryover this 
year. Now is the tine to spray off the bark to destroy many of the over- 
wintering larvae as well as to prepare the trees for banding. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 1, page 2. 

Red-banded leaf roller pupae (pu-pee) have a mortality of 48 
percent, vith 36 percent normal pupae and about 16 percent parasitized. 
Pupae brought into the laboratory will emerge as moths in four days at 
temperatures of 8o° F. Present indications are that the first eggs will 
be hatching at about the time of the pink spray. 

Apple scab perithecia (pair-ith-\ih-SEE-uh) are abundant in 
certain orchards and, in the southern-most areas, are about ready to 
discharge. A ground spray is recommended in orchards where scab is con- 
sidered serious. 

Brown rot carryover is high. In blocks of Red Bird where 

blossom blight has been high in the past, planning a lime sulfur spray 

in the delayed pink bud stage is suggested. It should be six quarts of 

lime sulfur to 100 gallons of water. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 

Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

********** 

(Sectional reports are not made in this issue because of the delayed 
season.) 

-0- 



RSB:pm 
3/28/47 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Dei»rtment of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



S?K>\y 



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b'' 



£Ryjc£ K£?oia 



Prejared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 2--April 6-12, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's the second of our weekly spray service reports. They 
are presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. DejB,rt- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 



I 



********** 



General - Cool veather has delayed development all along the 
line. 

Growers who were not able to obtain P,D3. (para-dichloro-benzine) 
last fall for peach borers may want to make a spring application. P. D.B., 
however, will not be effective until about May, when the ground tem- 
perature will rise sufficiently for volatilization. If you wish to treat 
sooner, use ethylene dichloride emulsion according to the manufacturer's 
directions. On old trees about 1/2 pint of 20^ strength ethylene di- 
chloride is needed. Mound as with P.D.B. 

Many growers are using Bordeaux emulsif ied-oil dormant spray. 
There is .just one right method of mixing this spray. As the tank is 
filling, add the copper sulfate, then the hydrated lime and then the oil. 

Dilute the oil with equal amounts of water, and stir thorough]y 
before adding it to the tank . 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Elberta 
peach fruit buds are showing pink. Delicious buds are approaching the 
prepink stage. Scab spores are mature and ready for discharge in the 
Princeton area. Rain in this area now should bring infection on vari- 
eties in the green-tip stage or beyond. Newly hatched aphids were found 
I In Princeton on April 2. 



Spray Service Report--No. 2, page 2. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vlncennes : Occasional pink petals are 
showing on peaches. There is still time for scale sprays, but it is 
probably too late for leaf curl. 

Apples are in the delayed dormant stage. Growers should be 
applying the Bordeaux dormant for blotch control this week. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardln-Centralia ; Not much development 
has occurred during the last week. There is still time for dormant 
sprays. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington-S. W. Ohio ; Peach buds should show 
some pink this week. A few buds were cracking on Red Bird April 1. 
Apple buds should start swelling this week. 

Areas 5-7 - Quincy-Plttsfield; Peoria -Champaign-La Fayette; 
Northern Indiana-Illinois ; The area is still strictly dormant. Ground 
sprays should be applied now for scab control. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vlncennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwlght 
Powell of the dejartment of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 



RSB;pm 
4/4/47 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



i/ 



?jV\y SiKy\cE R£?o;a 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



% 




o. 3--Aprll 13-19, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. They are presented 
through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticultur- 
ists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture and station 



********** 



General - The early emergence of the red-banded leaf roller 
brings the question of whether or not to use some lead arsenate in the 
prebloom sprays in orchards or blocks where this insect was serious in 
1946. If an orchard received DDT in 19^6 and has a heavy red-banded 
leaf roller carryover, and if a DDT schedule is planned on this same or- 
chard for 1947, it seems logical to use some lead in the prebloom sprays. 
This recommendation takes into consideration the scarcity and high cost 
of lead arsenate. 

» The second important item is a full-bloom spray of wettable 
sulfur on peach orchards which have had blossom blight infections in the 
past. In problem orchards this is an important spray. 

General predictions are for cooler than normal weather with 
above-normal rainfall during April. Under these conditions we may have 
a severe scab year--so let's spray accordingly. 

Area 1 -Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Peach blos- 
soms started opening April 6. Red Delicious buds will break open this 
week. Most growers have applied lime sulfur, 6 quarts to 100 gallons, for 
blossom blight on peaches. On apples prebloom scab sprays should start at onca 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes, apple buds should 
be advanced enough for the prepink spray by about April l4. Rainfall 

[since April 1 totals 2.08 inches. Red-banded leaf roller moths began lay- 
i ing eggs about April 5- 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--W0. 3, page 2. 

In one part of a local orchard where 6^ adults were seen on 
10 trees examined April 8, egg masses were found on the lower ps,rt of the 

trunks . 

The apple grain aphis began appearing April 5- 

At Carbondale, peaches should be blooming by April 1^ Tarnished 
plant bugs were first observed April 7. The first DDT application for 
cat-facing will probably be by the middle or last of this week, when half 
of the blossoms are open. The first Oriental fruit moth pupation -^ra-s 
observed April 9- 

Apples should near the prepink stage this week--too late for 
dormant spraying. Aphids have been hatching since March 3I. An occa- 
sional red-banded leaf roller moth has been observed in blocks which re- 
ceived strong DDT last year. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Warm weather should bring 

peach bloom by the middle of this week. Apples will be in the prepink 
stage by the latter part of the week. Prebloom spraying will be started 
in earnest by April 21. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio ; Elberta peaches should 
show bloom by April 14. Some apple varieties will be ready for prepink 
spraying and with the first rain of .3 inch or more they should be pro- 
tected from scab. Apple grain aphis are abundant at Lexingtor^ but fairly 
light at Bedford. The first aphis hatch occurred April 5- 

Area 5 - Quincy-Pittsf ield; Weather will determine the time 
for prebloom spraying to start. If it continues warm, then spraying 
will probably start the latter part of this week in the Pittsfleld area. 
Growers in the Quincy area should be prepared to spray a prepink by 
April 21 at the latest. Peaches are 100 percent killed except in cer- 
tain orchards of the Pitt sf ield region. 

Areas 6 & 7 - Peoria-Champaign-La Fayette; Northern Indiana- 
Illinois ; Apples will not develop much beyond the delayed dormant stage. 
The prepink period should not come before April 21. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
; Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
j Powell of the department of horticul-ture at the University of Illinois. 

I -0- 

1 RSB:pm 
I 4/11/^7 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 






s-O- 






5?A/\Y 



£KVJC£ R£?oia 



^cu\/\rc 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

Wo. 4--April 20-26, 19^7 



ft.MOOTCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through 
the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of Il- 
linois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Department of Agriculture and 
station . 

********** 

General . Let' s all ja r. There's no better method of studying 
curculio development than practicing jarring in your own orchard. Every 
grower should adopt this procedure and make it a habit. The curculio is 
the Number One peach pest. Let's all fight it . 

The latest report from Carbondale says that very little, if an^ 
damage was done to peaches by the April 1? frost from Salem south. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Peaches 
should be approaching shuck split by April 21. Dissection of curculio 
collected April 15 show very little egg development. It is probable 
that egg- laying will not occur before April 25. Where jarring indicates 
high curculio population, an arsenical petal fall application is sug- 
gested to poison them before egg- laying can occur. Stink bugs and tar- 
aished plant bugs are plentiful. 

On apples most varieties are either in the pink or early bloom. 
Sprays for scab control should be applied at least every seven days. Ce- 
dar rust and quince rust spores are being spread into orchards. There- 
fore, Fermate sprays should be started in problem orchards. Codling moth 
pupation has started. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes : At Vincennes peaches should be 
nearing the petal fall stage. Tarnished plant bugs are abundant. Apples 
will be ready for the pink spray this week. Red-banded leaf roller 



■>-'.■ -t-xr 



■ '' . f 



5PRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 4, page 2. 

/ 

adults are abundant at this time. Cool weather has delayed hatching of 

eggs, and the first leaf roller larvae are expected about April 28. There- 
fore lead arsenate is not advised in the pink spray except in orchards 
having high infestations in 1946. It is important to have enough lead 
arsenate left for a petal fall and at least two cover sprays. No cod- 
ling moth pupation has occurred. 

At Carbondale, peaches should show petal fall this week. Tar- 
nished plant bugs have increased considerably, and curculios have appeared 
in jarrings from edge rows. On apples, growers are applying scab sprays, 
and the pink or cluster bud stage should occur this week. Scab sprays 
at seven-day intervals are suggested. The first codling moth pupa was 
found April 15 . 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Peach bloom is expected 
this week. Growers wishing to use DDT applications for catfacing con- 
trol are advised to do so when 50 percent of the blooms are open. 

Apples are in the prepink, and some pink buds should develop by 
the latter part of the week. Sulfur sprays should be started and con- 
tinued at seven-day intervals. 

Pears should approach the calyx period by the latter part of 
this week. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S. ¥. Ohio ; At Bedford, cool weather 
has delayed development. Apples should reach the cluster bud stage by 
April 21. Elberta peaches should approach full bloom. Sulfur applica- 
tions are suggested to control blossom blight. Tarnished plant bugs are 
active. If DDT applications are to be used for catfacing control, they 
should preferably be applied when the peach blooms are 50 percent open. 

Strawberry growth has started. 

Area 5 - Quincy-Plttsfield ; At Pittsf ield, apples should be ap- 
proaching the pink stage. At Quincy, the prepink should be fully developed. 
Scab perithecia are mature and ready to discharge. Sulfur sprays at 
weekly intervals are suggested. 

Area 6 - Peoria-Champaign-La Fayette; Area 7 - Northern Indlam^ 
Illinois ; Most orchards will be ready for a prepink sulfur spray this 
week. ^j^j^jfr**it*** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies. Including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit In- 
sect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

RSB:pm -0" 

4/18/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



5?K/\y 



b£RyjC£ 



J 



R£?oia 




Prei^red by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 5- -April 27-May 3, I947 



ilWNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through the 
sooperatlon of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Sta- 
tion . 

********** 

General . Until the codling moth emerges from its pupal case, 
there is still time to spray off the rough, loose bark and clean out 
crotches, knot-holes, etc. By using water under 6OO pounds pressure, this 
job can be done efficiently and quickly--not only making the tree ready 
for banding, but destroying about 80 percent of the overwintering codling 
noth. Blotch- susceptible varieties should be receiving Permate or Karbam 
It this time in the southern areas. Very little scab discharge has yet 
Dccurred, and perithecia are loaded with spores-- so be prepared for the 
first big rain. Keep sulfur on those apple trees. No evidence of peach 
Dlossom blight has appeared throughout the entire peach belt. Watch the 
recommendations for cat-facing control on peaches. Consult your experi- 
aent station circular for the proper dilutions of insecticides and fungi- 
cides to use. Do not for^t the spring applications of fertilizer. Remember, 
ire must keep our trees in good vigor. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Most peach 
petals are off, and the young peaches are growing rapidly, with some split- 
ting of the shuck. By April 28, if jarrings in your orchard show consid- 
5rable curculio, it would be wise to apply an early shuck- split arsenical 
|ipplication rather than to wait for the shuck-off stage. Apples should be 
|Ln full bloom by the 28th. With prevailing weather mostly cool, it might 
j)e well to plan a blossom application of wettable sulfur for scab control. 



O'-J 



c •.'• '. J. . 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 5, page 2. 

Although no scab lias yet been reported, weather has been ideal for in- 
fection, so let's keep at it. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes rainfall this 
past week totaled .85 inch, and the mean temperature was 5^-9 degrees E, 
which is below normal. Peaches have been in full bloom since April 20. 
It is probable that an early shuck split will occur by the latter part 
of this week. Tarnish plant bugs are still active but not too numerous — 
possibly because of low temperatures and rainy weather. No curculio have 
been jarred to date. Apples should approach a full pink and on some va- 
rieties an early bloom this week. Red-banded leaf roller moth emergence 
has passed its peak. Egg-laying continues, much of it in the lower parts 
of the tree. No egg hatch is expected until the late pink stage or after. 

At Carbondale 95 percent of the peach petals have fallen. 
Ihe second application for cat-face control should be in the early shuck- 
split, or when the shucks are just beginning to crack. Apples should 
ipproach full bloom this week. Scab control is important at this time. 
?ermate should be started on blotch- susceptible varieties. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardln-Centralia ; Apples should be full 
pink this week. Cool weather has delayed development. Sulfur sprays 
It seven-day intervals are recommended for scab control. Peaches range 
from full bloom to early petal fall. The second application for cat-face 
iontrol should be made when the first shucks begin to split. If warm 
Veather continues, pears should be receiving the calyx spray be the 28th. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S. W. Ohio ; Petal fall will occur 
pn peaches this week, and apples will be ready for the pink spray. Main- 
|:ain a sulfur cover on the foliage for scab control. Applications at 
j-reekly intervals should suffice. Crown borer adults will probably be 
laying eggs, while the strawberry weevil may begin to attack blossom 
jlusters of strawberries this week. 



^■. .-".•;!*■. ■*' 



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I. 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 5, page 3- 

At Lexington most peach varieties are in the full hloom. 
Strawberries show some bloom on the Blakemore variety. Apples will be 
ready for the pink spray by the 28th. Keep sulfur on those leaves. No 
curculio have been jarred from peaches , but several tarnish plant bugs 
have been found. Codling moth pupation is about 6 percent. 

Area 5 - Quincy-Pittsfield; Area 6 - Peoria- Champaign-LaFay- 
ette; Area 7 - Northern Indiana-Illinois ; Last week's predictions were 
a bit previous. Weather conditions have slowed development consider- 
ably during the jBst week. So long as the apple is the main fruit, 
growers in these areas should be concerned mostly with scab control. 
Keeping a sulfur residue on the foliage at all times is the answer. 

Sprays at seven-day intervals are recommended. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by 
Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of 
Illinois. 

-0- 



RSBtpm 
V25A7 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



^?R/\y 



"^■"Ayici 



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Prejared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service In Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
[College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

Mo. 6--May 4-10, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report, presented through the 
cooperatjon of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Sta- 
tion . 

General . Rain, rain and more rain has set the stage for plenty 
Df early apple scab Infection. This Is the time when scab can be seri- 
ous, because present Infections will soon be producing spores for sec- 
ondary Infections. Orchards In many areas are practically mud-holes, and 
scab development continues. Apple orchards must receive fungicide pro- 
tectlon even though we know that the orchard will be full of ruts when 
;^e finish. Growers with dusters are fortunate during this period. 

In southern Illinois and western Kentucky, curcullo adults are 

I, 

nore than plentiful. In some orchards, Jarrlngs Indicated 20 per tree 

Ipril 28. As usual, the edge rows have the most curcullo, but plenty of 

adults are also found 15 rows from the edge. Individual orchards vary, 

and each grower should therefore jar to determine the situation in his 

own orchard. Since no reports were made about the April 29 frost, it is 

"assumed that no damage to peach buds occurred. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Peaches 

are past the shuck- spray period with all shucks off, leaving tender 

green peaches unprotected from the ravages of the curcullo. Curcullo 

adults are plentiful as far in as 15 rows. Seventy percent of the fe- 

!male adults averaged four mature eggs each on April 28. The first ar- 

I senlcal application should have been made by now. A second application 



TilPX ,01-^ •■/«['. 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 6, page 2, 

should be made within seven to 10 days after the first. Treat the or- 
shard edges extra heavily. Growers are urged to jar to locate curculio 
adults. 

Apples are past petal fall and should be receiving the calyx 
spray by this time. Weather has been particularly favorable for scab 
ievelopment. A fungicide at seven-day intervals is recommended. If pos- 
sible, supplement your spray program with dusts. Permate should be 
started on blotch- and rust- susceptible varieties. The first rust spots 
iiere seen at Princeton April 29- 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vlncennes ; At Vincennes the first curcu- 
Lio adults were jarred April 28. Activity of plant bugs is declining, 
ilthough many may still be found in the orchard. Apples should be rang- 
ing from full bloom to early petal fall by May 5- Red-banded leaf 
:'oller eggs laid April 6 and 7 began hatching April 29- On fall and 
winter varieties the peak hatch is expected to occur during late petal 
["all, so the calyx spray should be the important one to secure control, 
[■borough spraying of the underside of the leaves is necessary for the 
jalyx and first two cover sprays. The calyx top-off spray should help 
sonsiderably. Most egg-laying of the spring brood has ended. With warm 
ireather the incubation period should shorten to 10 days or less. Cod- 
Ling moth pupation under the bark on April 29 had reached 25 percent. 
Cf warm weather occurs, the first emergency of codling moth can begin 
lay 8, Adults of the two-spotted red mite were observed on pears April 29. 

At Carbondale peaches should be cracking the shuck by May 5- 
[eavy curculio collections have been made by jarring. Tarnished plant 
>ugs have practically disappeared, but stink bugs have increased in num- 
3ers. The second application of DDT for cat-facing control should be 
ttade by May 5, or at the shuck crack stage. Some orchards may need a 
jiouble shuck application of lead arsenate to control the curculio, one 



O'S.iMi 



-A- 'i^' 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 6, page 3. 

early when the shucks are one fourth off and a later one when the shucks 
are three fourths off. Apples will be ready for the calyx by May 5. 
Spray extra heavily for scab control. Start Permate on varieties sus- 
ceptible to blotch and rust Infections. 

I Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Peaches are past the pet- 
al fall and should be ready for the second application of DDT for cat- 
facing control this week when the shucks start to crack. Apples will be 
in full bloom by May 5. A bloom spray may be necessary for scab control. 
Weather has been ideal for its development. Permate should be started on 
blotch- and rust-susceptible varieties. Pears should have received the 
calyx spray by May 5. A second spray should be made in about seven to 
10 days. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S. W. Ohio : Most apple varieties 
will be ready for the calyx spray by this week. Heavy, thorough fungi- 
side applications are necessary for scab control. Rainfall and tempera- 
ture have been ideal for scab development. Aphis are abundant in some 
Drchards, but predators seem to be reducing them. Peaches have passed 
petal fall, and shucks should start cracking soon. When the base of the 
shuck splits, apply the DDT application for cat-facing control. Curcullos 
ire not particularly abundant. Examination indicates that curculio eggs 
ire developing but have not reached maturity. Concord grapes will be 
?eady for the first Bordeaux spray for black rot within the next seven to 
LO days. To the present time strawberry weevil damage has been light. 

Areas 5. 6. & 7. - Quincy-Pittsfield. Peoria-ChamTiaign-LaFay- 
;tte, Northern Indiana- Illinois : Growers in these areas are in the midst 
)f scab control on apples. Weekly applications of fungicide sprays are 
suggested. If possible, supplement the sprays with sulfur dusts. Many 
;reen aphis are on the apple buds, but are not considered to be causing 
serious damage. Spraying especially to control them is not suggested. 

*********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in cooper- 
tion with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the Ag- 
ricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
llinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit In- 
ect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell 
f the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

SB: 



/l/?7 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



f, I..-'* 



S?K/\y 



^£KyjC£ 



^ 



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K£?oia 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Purvey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 7 "May 11-17, 19*^7 




AMOUNCEE: Here's the weekly spray service reports. These reports are presented 
through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and horticulturists of Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S, Department of Agriculture and Station 

II >f V V V li* lit iV V V 
K n K n K W A 'JV A * 

§ General ; Curculio are had, particularly in peach orchards which had heavy 

infestations in I9U6. In Kentucky some growers are jarring all the trees in the 
orchard to aid in control. Two sheets placed under a tree may catch as many as 100 
curculio. Collect these in a container and destroy. Jarring is done most efficient- 
ly in early morning and late afternoon. During mid-day curculios are too active to 
collect hy jarring. Apple scab has heen found, which means Infection occurred early. 
Thus scab could he very serious this year. Keep the trees covered with a fungicide. 
Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge. Illinois ; All peach shucks are 
off, and the young peaches are growing fast. Curculio numbers are high. Practically 
all female curculio from Louisville south are full of mature eggs. It is suspected 
that egg laying has occurred but it has not been observed yet. All efforts should 
be made to keep arsenical sprays or dusts on to prevent curculio damage. Oriental 
moth emergence is general now. 

Apples are past the calyx stage. Scab weather has been ideal. There are 
still many primary spores for infection. ?y May 12 secondary spores should be spread- 
ing infection, so fungicide protection is highly important. No codling moths have 

emerged. 

Are^ 2 - Carbondale and Vincennes ; At Vincennes peaches should be receiv- 
ing the split-shuck arsenical application. Apples are ready for the calyx spray. 



^.<K;;:<"<: 



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"O 'j" ? r '.^ o 'i .' '^K^vA 



Spray Service Report — Wo. f , page 2. 

' Codling moth pupation has reached 50?^ under rough hark. Moth emergence may occur 
this week if warm weather prevails. The red-handed leaf roller larvae had a peak 
hatch yiaj k and 5. Sixty percent of the egg masses have hatched to date, with a 5^ 
increase in the number of masses the week of May 5. 

At Carhondale peaches will have most of the shucks off hy May 12. Orchards 
should he sprayed or dusted with arsenicals because curculios are increasing in num- 
bers over last week. Brown rot blossom blight is prevalent in many peach orchards 
with twig cankers covered with spores. Be sure to keep a fungicide in the peach 
spray schedule. 

Apples should be past the calyx stage by the 12th. Scab was observed May 9 
at Goreville on unsprayed Delicious. Wo tlotch has appeared, but continue full 
strength Fermate on susceptible varieties. Codling moth emergence has not occurred. 

Area 3 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia ; Peaches at Belleville show consider- 
able shuck-splitting, while at Alma the shucks have started cracking at the base. 
Curculios are serious enough in orchards which had severe 19*^6 infestations to war- 
rant applying early poisoning sprays. Wow is the time to start lead arsenate. Apples 
vary from full bloom to the calyx period. Calyx sprays will be starting in many 
orchards May 12. 

Area h - Bedford-Lexlngton-S. W. Ohio : Peaches are ready for the shuck- 
split spray or dust. Curculios are rather abundant, and many females contain fully 
developed eggs. Egg laying will start as soon as any fruits are exposed. This is a 
good year to get that first curculio spray on early. 

Apples are ready for the calyx application. Almost JCffo of the codling moth 
larvae have pupated, but no emergence has occurred. Strawberries are Just beginning 
to bloom heavily. 

Area 3 - Quincy-Pittsfield; Area 6 - Champaign-Peoria -Lafayette; Area 7 - 
Northern Illinois -Indiana : Cool weather continues to delay development throughout 
these three areas. Pink buds are showing as far north as Princeton, 111. on apples. 



Spray Serrice Report — No. 1, page 3. 

The important item is protection against scab. Scab develops even though the tem- 
perature is low. 

n A 'A A K 1% ^ A K A 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in cooperation with 
fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the Agricultural Experiment 
Stations of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, the Illinois State Natural History Survey 
and the Federal Deciduous Fruit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was com- 
piled by Dwight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

The following radio stations are broadcasting the spray service report. In some 
cases broadcast times are not available, and in others may have been changed. If 
you are unable to receive the report at the time indicated, consult any of the sta- 
tions listed for their time of broadcast. 



LOCATION 


STATION 


EC 




DAY 


CENTRAL STANDARD TIME 


Illinois 












Cairo 


WKRO 


IU90 






11:U0 a.m. 


Carbondale 


WCIL 


1020 






12:1+5 


Centra lia 


WCNT 


1210 








Chicago 


WBBM 


780 




Tues. 


i»-r30 a.m. 


Chicago 


WON 


720 




Tues. 


1^:38 a.m. 


Chicago 


WIS 


890 








Chicago 


WMQ 


670 






5:15 a.m. 


Effingtem 


WCRA 


1090 








Freeport 


WFJS 


102.1 Mc 


(FM) 






Galesburg 


WGIL 


lit 00 








Harrisburg 


WiilBQ 


121^0 




Wed. 


6:30 p.m. 


Herrin 


WJPF 


151^0 




Sat. 


11:1+5 


Ifettoon 


WLBH 


1170 




Mon, 


6:30 a.m. 


Mt. Vernon 


mm. 


103.7 Mc 


(FM) 






Pekin 


wsrv 


uko 




Mon. 


12:25 p.m. 


Peoria 


WKiX 


1350 




Sat. 


6:15 a.m., 12:^5 p.m 


Peoria 


WMHI) 


lJ+70 




Tues. 


6:05 a.m. 


Peoria 


WMMJ 


1020 






10:30 a.m. 


Pock Island 


WFBF 


1270 








Springfield 


WAX 


I2J+O 




Tues. 


6:30 


Tuscola 


WDZ 


1050 




Mon. -Sat. 


12:1+5 


Urbana 


WIT.T, 


580 




Mon. 


12:00 


Indiana 












Elkhart 


WTRC 


1510 






12:00 


Fort Wayne 


wovro 


1190 






7:10 a.m. 


Indianapolis 


WIBC 


1070 




Sun. 


6:00-7:00 a.m. 



"iftT"'^ 



•^-\- » ■!«»«• 



^•70-^ 'VTt:'i2 ' 



;-:);'iI :? 



I --V-v- J. i"; 






..'.» /j.i"I.C 



;i ;; , 



"(V/. 



Spray Service Report — Wo. 7, page k. 



LOCATION 


STATION 


KC 


Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Mimcie 

Eichmond 

Terre Haute 


Wi-'BM 
WASK 
WBAA 
WLBC 
WKBV 
WBOW 


1260 
11+50 
920 
15l^0 
11+90 
1250 


Iowa 






Cedar Eapids 
Davenport 


WMT 
KSTT 


600 
750 


Kentucky 






Lexington 

LouiBTille 

Louisville 


WLAP 
WGRC 
WHAS 


11+50 
111 00 

81+0 


Missouri 






Cape Girardeau 
Clayton 
Hannital 
St. Louis 
St. Louis 
St. Louis 
St. Louis 


KFYS 
KXLW 
KHMO 
KFUO 
KMOX 
KXOK 
WEW 


lllOO 

1520 

I5I+O 

850 

1120 

650 

770 


ESB:ml 
5/9A7 







DAY 


CENTRAL STANDARD TIME 


Mon. 


5:50 a.m. 


Mon. 

Wed. 

Mon., Tues. 


12:00 
11:50 
7:10 a.m. 
12:00 


Mon., Tues. 


6:1+5 a.m. 
6:00-7:50 a.m. 


Sat. 
Mon.-Frl. 


5:1+5 a.m. 
12:50 
7:20 a.m. 



Mon. -Sat. 
Mon., Tues. 



Mon. 



5:00-6:00 a.m. 
11:15 
6:50 a.m. 

5:55 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 

Acts approved Isy Congress l^fey 8 and June 50, 191^+ 



r..,:^ 






.VO'VWT. , 



.•n.A 'JC' 



-■■:.Aiil^ 






Sp'aAY SekVICI iilPOKf 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 8--May 18-24, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's the weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
of Agriculture and Station . 

********** 

General . Apple scab is very severe in unsprayed orchards. Botb 
primary and secondary spores are prevalent; therefore, sprayed orchards 
can expect some trouble. It would be wise to add a fungicide through 
the second cover. 

Continue blotch sprays on susceptible varieties. 

A heavy peach set is fortunate because in many areas curculio 
is very serious. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Peaches 
are developing fast with a heavy set on everything except Redbird. Cur- 
culio egg laying scars were observed May 13 . Lead arsenate protection 
is necessary at seven-day intervals in severely attacked orchards. 

Apple set is variable, with most varieties heavy except 
Delicious and Winesap. Codling moth emergence started May 9. Warm 
weather has increased emergence the last few days. The first hatch is 
not expected before May 19, depending on weather. Rosy aphis are heavy 
in some blocks which had DDT in 1946. Apple scab is prevalent in un- 
sprayed orchards. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vinoennes ; At Vincennes curculio adults 
are on the increase, and Oriental moth adults started emerging May 8. 
Peo.Ghes are in the shuck fall, thus should be covered with lead arsenate. 



.PRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 8, page 2. 

odllng moth emergence began May 11 from rough bark. Eggs were deposited 
[ay 13. Warm weather would bring a hatch by May 23- The first two cover 
prays should be applied at seven- to nine-day Intervals. Red-banded 
eaf roller egg masses are about 90 per cent hatched. Larvae are not 
ore than half grown. Plan on lead arsenate at least in the first two 
overs and continue it in the third and fourth covers if the infestation 
a severe. 

At Carbondale peaches are jBst the shuck stage. Curculio 
dults have greatly increased to equal the 1946 records. Egg laying 
uts were observed on plums May 14. Apples show a good set. Emergence 
ages produced the first codling moth May 14. Most growers are applying 
be first cover spray. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; On peaches the shucks 

re almost off and curculios are increasing in numbers. Keep the young 

saches covered with lead arsenate. Most growers will be finishing the 
ilyx spray on apples, and some will be on the first cover this week. 
Dntinue fungicides for scab control. Heavy frosts did a good thinning 
ob on some varieties in eastern Illinois. Pears should receive a cover 
t this time. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington-S. W. Ohio ; Heavy frosts this past 
3ek killed all strawberry blooms that were open and some apple and peach 
ads. In general, the damage was not serious. Most growers will be apply- 
ig the first cover this week on apples. No moth emergence yet. Curcu- 
los are not abundant on peaches, but stink bugs are increasing in numbers. 

Areas 5, 6, and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield, Peoria-Champaign- 
3.Fayette, Northern Indiana- Illinois ; In Area 5 apples are past the 
3tal fall stage at Quincy. In Areas 6 and 7 all varieties should be in 
111 bloom by May I9, and some growers will start the petal fall applica- 
Lon. Do not forget the calyx top-off spray. 

*********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
peration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
le Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
le Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous 
?uit Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by 
?ight Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illi- 
)is. 

5B;CG ■°" 

i-16-47 

f Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
j Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



.<>•'>;* 



^?jv\y bVAVicE 



K£?o;a 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

f 

No. 9--May 25-31, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's the weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

********** 
General ; Brown rot tvig blight is prevalent in many Illinois 
peach orchards and is causing dieback. This results from cankers gir- 
dling the twig. Spores can be found on the surface of these cankers, so 
do not omit fungicides from your peach sprays or dusts. Apple scab is 
serious in many areas. Rosy apple aphis is increasing throughout the 
tri-state areas and has caused considerable damage in some Instances. 
Predators are active, however, and may retard them. Very little aphis has 
been found in orchards which received the dormant spray. Plum curculio 

I 

is still increasing. Arsenical injury is showing in some apple orchards, 
probably as a result of excessive cool, damp weather. Apple set is ex- 
cellent. Peaches have set well, except that in Indiana some varieties 
in low locations are dropping as a result of the May 9 freeze. 
j Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois : Cool 

I weather this past week has delayed insect development and interfered 
somewhat with strawberry harvest. Curculio have increased considerably 

over all of Kentucky, but observations at Villa Ridge indicate some let- 

i 
up. Wormy drops are plentiful, and many infested peaches can still be 

found on the trees. One hundred wormy peaches were picked up from under 

one four-year-old peach tree located in the outside row. Removing these 

drops from the orchard will be a big factor in reducing second-brood 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 9, page 2. 

curculio. On apples codling moth cage emergence has skyrocketed, vhlle 
trap catches are still generally light. It appears that during the week of 
May 26 heavy hatch should occur. PirehLight is shoving on many varieties. 
Scab spots are increasingly easy to find. Nonsulfur fungicides are sug- 
gested in order to prevent more secondary infection. Use of sulfur should 

be avoided because of the possible early use of oil for codling moth. 

At Cape Girardeau, Missouri, codling moth emergence started 
May 11 and increased daily through the 14 th. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes most growers have 
completed the first cover or seven-day spray. Because of favorable con- 
ditions for scab, fungicides should be continued for at least another 
week. Codling moth emergence has increased, 42 traps catching I09 moths 
on May I8 and 19 • Pupation of overwintering larvae is not much more 
than 50 percent, so the peak moth emergence cannot occur before May 30. 
Egg hatch occurred May 23 and should be well under way by May 26, partlc- 
'ularly if the weather is warm. Hatch of the first-brood redbanded 
leaf rollers was rather heavy May I5 to I8 and is practically complete. 
No further hatch of any consequence is anticipated. Lead arsenate will 
be needed in all first-brood sprays where ANY LEAFROLLERS ARE PRESENT IP 
DDT IS BEING USED. European red mite first-brood adults have appeared 

and have produced a few second-brood mites. No two- spotted spider mites 

have been found. 

Prom Carbondale comes word that curculio are still increasing; 
) therefore, poisoning should be continued in spray or dust form. Wormy 
peaches are prevalent in several orchards. On apples most growers have 
finished the second-cover spray. Heavy codling moth emergence occurred 
from May I5 to 19, but cool weather on May 20 slowed things down. Hatch 
is expected during this week of the 26th. This will coincide with the 
application of the third cover, which is the suggested time to start DDT. 
Growers who have not used Fermate for blotch control should start Bor- 
deaux sprays immediately on susceptible varieties. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 9, page 3. 

A,r§a, 3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralla ; Peaches have lost the 
shuck and curculio are laying eggs fast. Wormy peaches were found May 21. 
Poison sprays or dusts should be applied frequently. Apples are past 
the seven-day spray and should be receiving the second cover by the 26th. 
Scab is showing up in many orchards; therefore, fungicides should be con- 
tinued another veek. Cherry leaf spot vas found the 21st. Codling moth 
hatch has occurred, but hatch is not expected much before June 1. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S.W. Ohio ; At Bedford the first cod- 
ling moth hatch is expected May 25 if warm weather prevails. Apple scab 
is severe, so fungicides should be included in every spray. The straw- 
berry weevil continues to attack the bloom. The second black rot spray 
should be applied to grapes immediately. 

At Lexington curculio were unusually ab\mdant May 1?. Egg scars 
are abundant on both peaches and apples. Codling moth emergence began 
May l8, and increased numbers appeared on the 19th and 20th. The 10-day 
spray on peaches should be started by the 24th, while the second cover on 
apples should start by the 26th. 

Area 5 - Qulncy-Pittsfield ; Most growers have finished the 
first cover spray. Codling moth emergence has occurred in the orchard. 
Hatch is not likely to occur much before June 1. Some scab is showing, 
making it necessary to retain a fungicide in the next spray if possible. 

Areas 6 and 7 - Peoria -Champaign-La Fayette, Northern Indiana - 
Illinois ; Most orchards will be ready for the first cover spray by the 
26th, with the exception of the northernmost areas. Prospects are for 
a very serious scab infection because recent heavy rains have produced 
ideal conditions for its development. It is suggested that fungicides 
be continued at full strength in at least two more sprays. 

*****♦**«* 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 
; RSB ; pm 

5/23/47 

_ Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



S?K/\y 



r^ 



b£RVJC£ J 



\£?oia 



Prejared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 10--J\me 1-7, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's the weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

********** 

General . From Vincennes it is reported that vhere lead ar- 
senate has been used in the jast two or three applications no leafroller 
larvae have yet reached maturity. However, in orchards where this pest 
is present, it will not be possible to completely control the first 
brood because a high percentage of the late-hatching larvae moved out 
immediately onto terminals and new growth, particularly into new unfold- 
ing leaves and into leaves curled by aphids, where they are coming into 
contact with very little poison. This pest cannot be completely stopped 
until growth slows up and it is possible to build an adequate arsenical 
load on all the newest growth before the larvae roll the leaves or tie 
them together. In one orchard where the carryover was heavy and where 
the fourth lead arsenate spray was being applied on May 27, live leaf- 
roller larvae numbered 32 per 100 leaves on terminal growth. Fifteen 
percent of the leaves showed evidence of feeding. 
■ First-brood hatch has been completed. No newly hatched larvae 
have been found during the past week. Those now present range from 1/4 
to 5/8 inch in length, and pupation should start within the next week. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois : On peaches, 
curcullo have dropped considerably during the past week. Wormy dropped 
fruits are numerous. If possible, they should be picked up and destroyed 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 10, page 2. 

immediately. The first worms left dropped peaches Tlay 2? at Paducah. 
Continued arsenical protection is suggested for at least another veek. 
On apples, codling moth emergence is past the peak. Egg hatch has been 
light but will pick up with warm weather. Secondary scab continues to 
develop. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes : At Vincennes, plum curculio 

are still more abundant than normally on peaches. On apples, codling moth 
emergence from \inder rough bark is 35 percent complete and pupation 
77 percent. The egg incubation period is now 10 days. All eggs laid 
before May I9 hatched by the 29th. The rate of hatch can be expected 
to increase for at least another 10 to 14 days if temperatures are near 
normal. Rosy aphids are causing considerable damage. Sprays for con- 
trol are not practical because it is impossible to reach aphids in 
curled leaves. Hexaethyl tetra phosphate may do more harm than good by 
killing predators. DDT at 6 to 8 ounces (actual) per 100 gallons with 
lead arsenate has not noticeably reduced the aphid predator population 
and should help to prevent further spread of the aphids. No two-spotted 
mites have appeared. European red mites were found in one orchard on 
Golden Delicious at the rate of eight mites and 2^0 eggs per 100 leaves. 

At Carbondale, peaches show a sharp decline in curculio adults. 
Heavily infested orchards should continue to receive arsenical applica- 
tions, but not so often as earlier. Dropped peaches are 80 to 98 per- 
cent wormy. If it were possible to pick them up and destroy them. It 
would greatly reduce the second brood. 

: On apples, codling moth emergence continues to straggle along 
and is probably delayed by cool weather. Fresh entrances were found 
May 27. DDT should be included in the present sprays with lead, weak 
^Bordeaux and oil. A trace of red-banded leaf roller has been found. 

Area 3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia ; Continued arsenical ap- 
plications are necessary on peaches. On apples the first hatch of 



I 

SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 10, page 3. 

3odling moth eggs is expected by May 30- Red-banded leaf roller is re- 
ported moderate to severe in some orchards in Calhoun county. Nonsulfur 
fungicides are suggested in present sprays for secondary scab prevention. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington ; At Bedford, codling moth hatch 
probably should reach a peak in 10 days or so, depending on weather. 
Rosy aphids are still causing damage. Pireblight is shoving on suscep- 
tible varieties which were not treated in the bloom. A fungicide is 
needed on apples for scab control. Curculio are increasing on peaches. 
Arsenical injury may be severe unless fresh lime-zinc sulfate applica- 
tions are made. This is the last chance to spray Bordeaux on the grapes 
for black rot. At Lexington, curculio are declining on peaches. Cod- 
Ling moth development will probably be bunched, making control easier. 

Areas 5, 6, and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield, Peoria-Champaign- 
La Fayette, Northern Indiana-Illinois ; Codling moth emergence is light 
in Area 5. Because of cool, rainy weather, it is doubtful whether egg 
Laying has occurred. Sprays should be continued at seven- to 10-day 

Intervals, with fungicides included in each spray. Severe scab is show- 
ing on primary leaves in many orchards. European red mite adults were 
found in orchards not having a DDT history at Urbana and Bloomington. 

jolden Delicious seems to have more than other varieties. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
Dperation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
bhe Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Cnsect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
r'owell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

^SB ; pm 
3/29/47 

' Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
I Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



b^KAY 



biKy\ci 



J 



Report 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Horn© Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. ll--June 8-l4, I947 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

*****♦#«** 

General ; Cool weather has delayed codling moth development, 
with the peak hatch still in the future in the southernmost areas. There- 
fore we should be thinking about lengthening the intervals between in- 
secticide sprays. Heavy rains, however, make it imperative tiiat fungicide 
protection be continued at least at seven-day intervals. Apple scab is 
very serious even in many well- sprayed orchards and will continue to de- 
velop rapidly with such ideal conditions. Arsenical injury is also 
prevalent in many peach orchards; therefore applications of lime alone 
or zinc -sulfate- lime are suggested. 

. Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Peach 

thinning is under way. Thinning should give growers the opportunity to 
destroy many infested fruits. Curculio numbers are low, while worms are 
leaving dropped fruit. Most orchards have enough wormy drops to insure 
a large second brood. Additional first-brood arsenical sprays are not 
suggested generally. Follow-up sprays with lime alone or zinc-sulfate- 
lime should be made 10 days after the last spray. Brown rot is showing 
on some young Redblrds. Growers are advised to continue sulfur appli- 
cations until harvest. 

Apples are growing fast. Codling moth hatch is well under way, 
so it's wise to maintain adequate cover on the fruit. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 11, page 2. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vlncennes ; At Vincennes, about one third 
of the overwintering codling moth larvae are still on the tree. Warm 
weather should bring the rate of hatch to a moderate peak. Egg incuba- 
tion period is from 10 to 12 days, so that all eggs laid before May 25 
have hatched. The rate of spread of the rosy aphis has greatly decreased 
because of the feeding of predators and migration of adults from the 
apple. The apple aphis is still increasing except where DDT or nicotine 
sprays have been applied. No red-banded leaf roller pujae have been 
found to date. An examination of more than 5,000 leaves on plots receiv- 
ing various treatments shows a 50 percent reduction in numbers of larvae 
from last week's average of 32 per 1,000 leaves. Most surviving larvae 
are still feeding in new unfolding leaves. Peaches show a 50 percent 
reduction of curculio. 

At Garbondale there is still a high percentage of codling 
moths to emerge. Cool weather has delayed hatch. On peaches curculio 
adult numbers continue to be low. This is the time to stretch the in- 
tervals between arsenical applications. A considerable number of cur- 
culio larvae are leaving the dropped peaches. Oriental fruit moth so 
far has produced a light twig infestation. 

Area 3 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralia ; In peaches the peak for 
dropping of curculio- infested fruits has i»ssed. Oriental fruit moth 
are showing heavy twig damage, particularly in the Calhoun county area. 
Apples are in the approxinnte third cover stage and should be receiving 
the first DDT sprays. Be sure to continue lead arsenate through the 
fourth cover for red-banded leafroller, even though a reduction in lar- 
, vae numbers has been noticed during the past week. 

I Area k - Bedford-Lexington-S. W. Ohio ; The peak codling moth 
emergence has passed, the first good evidence of hatch showing up May 31. 
If only two DDT sprays are to be applied, the first should be made 



■OXOXTt 



."; if f.T 



rivtn; 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 11, page 3- 

Immediately. Oriental fruit moth infestation is light. Curculio adults 
have practically disappeared from the trees, while no larvae have yet 
left the dropped fruits. Grapes are in bloom. 

Areas 5. 6. and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield; Peoria -Champaign- 
La Fayette; Northern Indiana- Illinois ; Moth emergence is prevalent in 
Areas 5 and 6, but no hatch has yet been observed. No emergence has oc- 
curred in Area 7. In general scab is the big problem. Many orchards 
received a severe early infection of the primary leaves, which produced 
a great deal of Inoculum for secondary infection of new leaves. Even 
well- sprayed orchards are showing serious infection. Nonsulfur fungi- 
cides should be continued at full strength in Areas 5 and 6 if the early 
use of oil is planned for codling moth control. In Area 7 continued use 
of full strength sulfur is recommended. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 



RSB:pm 
6/6/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 

Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



'If 



f^ 

b 



?jv\y SiKy\ci Ki?o'A'\ 




Prepared "by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Homft Economical University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinr^is 

No. 12-- June 15-21, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

**♦**♦*»■*» 
General ; The week of June 16 can he called the peach codling 
moth week. Peak hatches of first-brood larvae are expected throughout 
the tri- state areas. Scab continues to be serious with fruit infection 
prevalent in well-sprayed orchards. Fireblight is showing up in many 
orchards and in some areas is very serious, particularly on Jonathan 
apples. Now is the time to start peach thinning. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Curculio 
adult numbers are down and a large percentage of worms have left dropped 
fruit. Growers planning to use cultivation to help reduce second-brood 
curculio should start their discing at an early date. 

Codling moth cage emergence and trap catches have picked up 
during the last few warm days. The heaviest hatch of the season, to date, 
should be underway in most parts of Kentucky and likely will be contin- 
ued by the late moths now emerging. Sufficient red mites are appearing 
in some orchards to warrant severe infestation soon if not treated. 
Weak Slimmer fungicides are suggested to curb secondary scab infection. 
Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes, 80 percent of 
the spring brood of codling moth has emerged. The current high tempera- 
tures have shortened the incubation period to six days and all eggs laid 
during the 11 days from May 26 to June 5 inclusive have hatched during 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 12, page 2. 

the past seven days. This constitutes the peak of first-brood hatch, 
but the rate of hatch is expected to continue at a comparatively high 
level for another 10 days. It will not be completed before July 4 by 
vhich time second-brood hatch should start. 

In some orchards, water sprouts are supporting a fairly heavy 
infestation of older red-banded leaf roller larvae. The first pupae were 
found June 5. Adults should emerge soon with second-brood larvae hatch- 
ing approximately June 25. 

The European red mite and two- spotted spider mite are both on 
the increase and may develop to destructive populations by July 1 in 
some orchards. Aerial colonies of the wooly apple aphis were first ob- 
served June 11. 

At Carbondale, definite increases in codling moth emergence 
have occurred. A peak hatch is very likely to occur the week of June 16. 
Rosy aphis is disappearing because of the work of predators. On peaches, 
curculio adults are still at a low ebb. Larvae have been leaving the 
dropped fruit In considerable numbers. From now until the first week 
in July cultivation will aid in reducing the second brood as pupation 
In the soil will occur soon. Picking up peaches now would not be worth 
while because a natural drop has greatly decreased the percentage of in- 
fested fruit on the ground. 

Area 3 - Bellevllle-Hardin-Centralla ; Peak moth emergence 

from cages occurred June 9 and 10. This week of June 16 should be an 
important one for codling moth. Entries are easy to find. 

Curculio adults have dropped to one third of last week's pop- 
ulation. A high percentage of dropped peaches is wormy, thus picking 
them up now would help reduce the second brood. Some growers are doing 
this on the outside rows particularly. 

Pear psylla is getting serious in some orchards. Leaf spot 
is not serious as yet, with unsprayed trees about 15 percent infected. 



••:.0i 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 12, page 3- 

Weak Bordeaux should be sufficient to keep leaf spot in check for the 
remainder of the season in sprayed blocks. 

Area h - Bedford-Lexington-S. W. Ohio ; Codling moth emergence 
is about over but a heavy hatch started June 9 a-nd vill probably con- 
tinue through the 19th. 

Many dropped peaches still have curculio larvae. Larvae first 
started leaving peaches about June 6 with a gradual increase each suc- 
ceeding day. 

The third spray for black rot of grapes should be applied as 
soon as the bloom period is jBssed. This should be vithin the week of 
the I6th. 

Strawberry harvest is about two- thirds past. 

Area 3 - Quincy-Fittsfield : At Pittsfield a heavy cage emer- 
gence of codling moths occurred through June 8 (the last report). At 

Quincy, the first entries were found the 9th. With warm weather a heavy 
hatch can be expected by the l6th and will probably continue for several 
days. Scab is still a problem, but weak summer fungicides should suffice 
to control secondary infection. Pireblight is very serious on Jonathan 
and, it is estimated, will cause a 25 percent reduction in crops. 
Nothing can be done about this disease at this time. 

Areas 6 and 7 - Peoria-Chamia,ign-La Payette, Northern Indiana- 
Illinois ; Codling moth emergence has occurred throughout this area ex- 
cept at the Barrington, Illinois, cage. Moline reported a h^vy emergence 
June 8 and 9. No entries have been found at Urbana, probably because of 
the abundant rainfall and fairly cool weather. 

Scab continues to be serious and full strength fungicides are 
recommended. Fruit infection is as high as 42 percent in some orchards. 
Jonathan and Golden Delicious seem to have the most serious infections. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the deiartment of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

RSB;pm 
6/13/^7 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



^?K/\y 



^r/EKViCE A£?Oia 




PrejBrfid by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Homfi Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 13- -June 22-28, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

*********** 

General : No more DET than necessary should "be used in the 
apple orchard. For this reason we are stressing sanitation measures for 
codling moth control wherever possible. Banding should be started at 
once in the Kentucky and southern Illinois areas. Treated bands play an 
important part in reducing second-brood codling moth. Continue scab 
sprays where they are needed because of ideal weather for scab develop- 
ment. Do not forget arsenical corrective sprays or dusts on peaches. _ 
Disking now is suggested to reduce second-brood curculio in the southern 
areas. Curculio larvae go as deep as three to four inches in the soil 
to pupate. Peaches should be thinned now. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Curculio 
adults are still scarce. Second-brood emergence is not expected before 
late June. Oriental fruit moth is light. Brown rot is appearing on 
green peaches, developing a supply of spores for later infections. May- 
flower peach harvest is starting. 

Codling moth emergence has finally slowed up, indicating an ap- 
proaching end to the first brood. Bait trap catches at Cape Girardeau 
Indicate an average of three moths per day up to June 12. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes the temperature 
this past week has been five degrees below normal, with June rainfall as 






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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT --No. I3, page 2. 

of June 18 up to 3.96 inches. Arsenical injury Is reported to be in- 
creasing on apple. Codling moth emergence is 90 percent complete, with 
the remaining 10 percent in deep cavities. Cool weather has slowed up 
the rate of hatch. It can be expected to increase with the first warm 
day or two and then show a gradual decline during the remainder of the 
month. Some first-brood red-banded leaf roller larvae are still active, 
while second-brood moth emergence is gradually increasing. Where this 
pest is present, at least one more lead arsenate spray should be applied 
before July 4. Unfavorable weather has decreased mite development, but 
growers should watch their orchards carefully and change to the suggested 
miticide programs when the average infection approximates two mites per 
leaf. 

At Carbondale first-brood codling moth emergence is nearly 
over. Larvae are maturing rapidly and should be leaving the fruit be- 
fore long. Thus banding should be done at once. The mite population is 
very light. On peaches curcullo is at the lowest point since it first 
started. Disking is suggested to destroy pupation quarters in the ground. 
Oriental fruit moth Is light, with very little evidence of second brood. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Curculio jarrings at 
Alma June I8 showed a definite reduction in population. Jarrings from 
five trees brought six to eight curculio, whereas earlier in the season 
53 to 60 were counted. A high percentage of dropped fruit still contains 
worms, so picking up and burning could still be done. Sulfur should be 
continued for brown rot control. Codling moth cages at Dix, Farina, 
Belleville and Grafton all show that the first-brood emergence is about 
over. Considerable hatch may still occur with the first warm days, how- 
ever. Continue weak summer fungicides if possible for scab control. 
P Area h - Bedford-Lexington-S.W. Ohio ; At Bedford bait trap 
catches of codling moth were extremely heavy June 17 and I8. Thus moths 
are in the orchard, and a few warm days should bring a big hatch. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 13, page 3- 

Arsenical injury is showing on peaches, and a fresh lime spray should be 
applied immediately. Grape growers should be on the watch for leaf hop- 
pers, berry-moth, and leaf-eating insects and apply DDT accordingly. 
Aroma strawberry harvest ended June 19. At Lexington only a few codling 
moths continue to emerge, indicating the end of the first-brood. Gur- 
culio larvae are still leaving dropped peaches. Brown rot is serious on 
ripening sweet cherries. Oriental fruit moth is light. In southwestern 
Ohio growers should be finished with the third cover on apples and are 
cautioned to be on the watch for blotch, bitter rot and secondary scab 
development. Peaches should be protected from brown rot with mild sulfur. 

Areas 5, 6. and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield-Peoria-Champaign- 
La Fayette. Northern Indiana-Illinois ; Codling moth entries continue to 

occur in the Pittsfield, Quincy and Urbana areas. It is doubtful whether 
the peak hatch has yet occurred. Warm weather should bring a lot of ac- 
tivity both in egg laying and hatching throughout the three areas. Scab 
continues to be a problem. One-half to full- strength fungicides should 
be continued, depending on how serious scab is in the individual orchards. 
Severe fruit infections are expected in many orchards because of the in- 
tensity of the foliage infection. Grape growers should be watching for 

the berry-moth and leaf hoppers. 

*********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwlght 
Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

RSB:pm 
6/20/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Horn© Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating, H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress Mayi^and June 30, 1914 



5 



?jv\y Sekvice R£?oia 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Horn© Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

Wo. 14--J\ine 30-July 5, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Very few 
moths are now emerging from cages, and bait traps show no recent catches. 
This situation indicates that first-brood codling moth has ended and the 
second brood has not yet started. Many mature larvae are leaving the 
fruit. The mite population is increasing in orchards that were observed. 
Recent counts showed a range of two to 32 mites per leaf. Curculio 
adults are very scarce, and there is no indication of a second brood ap- 
pearing. Peach twigs wilted from the second-brood Oriental fruit moth 
have been observed. No bitter rot has been reported. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; At Vincennes continued wet 
weather has allowed apple scab to become serious. Fungicides should be 
continued, if possible, in problem orchards. First-brood codling moth 
emergence is about over, but eggs will continue to hatch well into July. 
Therefore it is important to keep a protective covering on the fruit. 
Orchard mites are apparently showing some increase. 

At Carbondale curculio continues to be scarce, while second- 
brood Oriental fruit moth is starting to wilt twigs. Arsenical correc- 
tive sprays should not be forgotten. Codling moth is low, but hatch is 
likely to continue for some time. Because of the oncoming Transparent 
harvest, most growers have given late appl^^ an additional cover to hold 



j^ on. 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 14, page 2. 

over during this period. Mite damage is very light. Recent coxonts show 
fewer than one mite per 100 leaves. Numbers of green apple aphis are 

increasing. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Curculio adults are 
scarce. There are still larvae left in the peaches, but disking should 
be in order. Codling moth egg hatch continues, and new entries are easy 
to find, particularly in the tops of the trees. Some codling moth lar- 
vae are within a few days of maturity and will be leaving the apples 
soon. Tree banding should be done within the next week. Red-banded 
leaf roller larvae are feeding on fruit in some DDT-sprayed orchards. 
Green peaches are showing brown rot infection, and fungicides should be 

continued. Apple scab is still serious in many orchards. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S.W. Ohio ; Codling moth adults are 
low in bait trap catches, while considerable egg-hatching continues. 
The first mature larvae are leaving the fruit. Leaf roller damage is 
light, but aphids are increasing. Scab continues to be serious, and thus 
fungicides should be continued. Some curculio larvae are still leaving 
peaches. Arsenical injury on peaches progresses, indicating the need 
for corrective sprays. 

Area s 5 a ri d 6 - Quincy-Pittsf ield-Peoria-Champaign-La Fayette ; 
New codling mc'th entries are prevalent throughout these two areas. 
Sprays should be applied at 10-day intervals at least. Scab is very 
serious in many orchards, and fungicides should therefore be included 
in the codling moth sprays. Grape berry moth larvae were found feeding 
on the young fruit at Nauvoo on the 25th. Thorough insecticide sprays 
should be applied immediately if spraying hasn't been done within the 
past week. 

Area 7 - Northern Indiana-Illinois ; Codling moth cage emer- 
gence at Harrington was heavy from June 10 through the 24th. Heavy 
hatching should be occurring between now and July 10. Scab is terrific 
in many orchards, and full-strength fungicides are recommended if the 
weather does not turn too hot-- that is, above 8o degrees. In orchards 
where codling moth is not a problem, scab sprays should still be continued. 

Arsenical sprays should be applied around July 1 for apple maggot. 

*♦****«»** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the department of horticulture at the University of Illinois. 

-0- 

RSB:pm 

6/27/47 
n Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
1 University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
m Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 

V Acts approved by Congress May S and June 30, 1914 



5 



?jv\y Sekvice R£?oia 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 15-- July 6-12, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

****•»♦***♦ 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Adult 
codling moths are still scarce, but second-brood emergence has begun. 
Emergence of curculio adults has increased greatly since last week, and 
the "month-before-harvest" spray should be applied in this area before 
July 9 or 10. Second-brood Oriental fruit moth damage is still increas- 
ing. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; There is still some codling- 
moth activity in orchards in this region, representing the last of the 
first-brood moths and probably a few early second-brood adults. It ap- 
pears that there will be no complete stoppage between broods this year. 
Curculios are emerging in sufficient numbers to warrant the application 
of last-brood sprays and dusts in this area during the week of July 7. 
Although evidence of second-brood Oriental fruit moth is increasing in 
this area, DDT sprays or dusts, if used at all against this pest, should 
be delayed until about three weeks before harvest in order not to inter- 
fere with parasite activity, which is now at its peak. 

Area 3 - Bellc -vjllo , Eai-^cl l n, C e ntra lia; Bait jar catches of 
codling moth are low, and second-brood adults are not yet emerging. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 15, page 2. 

Here, as veil as in the areas farther north, first-brood codling-moth 
activity will probably continue at about its present level into the 
second-brood period, with no complete break to mark the end of the first 
brood. Curculio emergence should begin in this region next week; there- 
fore disking should be completed as soon as possible. Worms are still 
leaving the peaches in large numbers in this area. Rosy apple aphids 
are decreasing, but an increase in green apple aphids is apparent here 
and farther north. Mites are gradually increasing throughout the apple- 
growing areas, and infestations of this pest should be watched closely 
during the next few weeks, particularly if there is a considerable de- 
crease in rainfall. 

Areas 4, 5, & 6 - Bedford. Lexington. S. W. Ohio. Quincy , 
Pittsfield, Peoria, Chamiaign. LaFayette : Codling-moth activity is re- 
duced, but a considerable overlapping of first and second broods is to 
be expected; consequently spraying will need to be continued at 10-day 
to two-week intervals. Scab is still a problem, and fungicides should 
be included in the next sprays as long as frequent rains continue. 
Second-brood Oriental fruit moth activity has increased sharply, espe- 
cially in the western part of these areas; but no curculio emergence 
has yet been reported. An increase of aphids and leaf hoppers on grapes 

has become evident. 

Area 7 - Northern Indiana. Illinois : Adult codling moths are 
still emerging from cages in small numbers throughout this region. Heavy 
hatch of eggs is continuing, and scab is still a serious problem. Mites 
are showing up in larger numbers and may be serious if the weather be- 
comes hot and dry. 

*«•*♦***»** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Carl J. 
Weinman, of the Illinois Natural History Survey. 
RSB:ml -0- 

7/3A7 

(Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



S?KAY Sekvice Rsi'oia 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics^ University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 15-- July 6-12, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

********** 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge. Illinois ; Adult 
codling moths are still scarce, but second-brood emergence has beg\in. 
Emergence of curcullo adults has increased greatly since last week, and 
the "month-before-harvest" spray should be applied in this area before 
July 9 or 10. Second-brood Oriental fruit moth damage is still increas- 
ing. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vincennes ; There is still some codling- 
moth activity in orchards in this region, representing the last of the 
first-brood moths and probably a few early second-brood adults. It ap- 
pears that there will be no complete stoppage between broods this year. 
Curculios are emerging in sufficient numbers to warrant the application 
of last-brood sprays and dusts in this area during the week of July 7. 
Although evidence of second-brood Oriental fruit moth is increasing in 
this area, DDT sprays or dusts, if used at all against this pest, should 
be delayed until about three weeks before harvest in order not to inter- 
fere with jarasite activity, which is now at its peak. 

Area 3 - Belleville. Hardin, Centralia ; Bait jar catches of 
codling moth are low, and second-brood adults are not yet emerging. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 15, page 2. 

Here, as well as in the areas farther north, first-brood codling-moth 
activity will probably continue at about its present level into the 
second-brood period, with no complete break to mark the end of the first 
brood. Curculio emergence should begin in this region next week; there- 
fore disking should be completed as soon as possible. Worms are still 
leaving the peaches in large numbers in this area. Rosy apple aphids 
are decreasing, but an increase in green apple aphids is apjarent here 
and farther north. Mites are gradually increasing throughout the apple- 
growing areas, and infestations of this pest should be watched closely 
during the next few weeks, particularly if there is a considerable de- 
crease in rainfall. 

Areas k, 5. & 6 - Bedford, Lexington, S. W. Ohio, Quincy , 
Pittsfield, Peoria, Champaign, LaFayette ; Codling-moth activity is re- 
duced, but a considerable overlapping of first and second broods is to 
be expected; consequently spraying will need to be continued at 10-day 
to two-week intervals. Scab is still a problem, and fungicides should 
be included in the next sprays as long as frequent rains continue. 
Second-brood Oriental fruit moth activity has increased sharply, espe- 
cially in the western jart of these areas; but no curculio emergence 
has yet been reported. An increase of aphids and leafhoppers on grapes 

has become evident. 

Area 7 - Northern Indiana, Illinois ; Adult codling moths are 
still emerging from cages in small numbers throughout this region. Heavy 
hatch of eggs is continuing, and scab is still a serious problem. Mites 
are showing up in larger numbers and may be serious if the weather be- 
comes hot and dry. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in co- 
operation with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Carl J. 
Weinman, of the Illinois Natural History Survey. 
RSB:ml -0- 

7/3A7 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



sue 



S?KAY 



:^£Kyjc£ 



R£?oia 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 16--July 13-19, 1947 



AWNOUWCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

*♦»#***»** 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Several 
codling moths are appearing in bait traps, indicating the start of the 
second brood. Cover sprays should be applied as soon as possible. Cur- 
culio adults are emerging in large numbers from soil cages, and jarrings 
indicate that many are in the peach orchard. Peach growers who have not 
already done so should make the first month-before-harvest application 
at once. 

No bitter rot has been reported, but 4-6-100 Bordeau sprays 
are suggested in problem orchards. 

Areas 2 and 3 - Carbondale-Vincennes-Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia: 
Codling moth egg hatch is continuing to some extent, being probably a 
combination of late first- and early second-brood worms. Hatch may be 
more noticeable by July 14, but the peak is not expected before the 20th 
or later if subnormal temperatures continue. In most orchards the 
between-brood spray interval should not exceed three weeks. Red mite 
has reached very destructive levels in scattered orchards. No heavy 
outbreaks of the two- spotted mite have occurred as yet, but they could 
develop if dry weather prevails. 

Curculios are on the rampage again. Jarring revealed as many 

adults now as in the peak first-brood period. Thus if poison applica- 
tions have not already been applied, they should be started immediately. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 16, page 2. 

Growers who experienced grasshopper damage in 1946 and who ex- 
pect to use benzene hexachlorlde or chlordane for control this season 
should prepare to apply the treatment. Young 'hoppers up to | inch long 
are ab\indant, and in certain orchards the outbreak can be expected to 
be as severe as in 19^6. 

Brown rot treatments should be continued. Bitter rot blocks 
should be observed at weekly intervals for signs of infection. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S.W. Ohio ; Bait trap catches of 
codling moths have shown some increase the past few days at Bedford, 
while at Lexington emergence is expected anytime. Both rosy and green 
aphids are increasing. No indications of mite damage have appeared. 
Curculio adults are still in peach orchards in very low numbers. Brown 
rot treatments should be continued where necessary, and the use of fun- 
gicides should also be continued if needed for scab control. 

Areas 5, 6 and 7 - Qulncy-Pittsfield- Peoria- ChampaignrLa Fayette- 
Northern Indiana- Illinois : Codling moth hatch continues with each warm 
day, and scab develops with each wet day. Between the two, sprays of 
insecticide and fungicide materials are necessary in most orchards at 
least at 10-day intervals. Rains have prevented increased mite infesta- 
tions. Each grower should plan his own program from now on. Some 
growers will not need to spray the rest of the season, while others will 

need to keep at it until harvest. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented In coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwlght Powell 
of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 
RSB:pm 

7/11/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H, P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 19l4 



bPKAY 






£KVJC£ Ki?OKi 




PreiBred by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 16— July 13-19, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

********** 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge. Illinois : Several 
codling moths are appearing in bait traps, indicating the start of the 
second brood. Cover sprays should be applied as soon as possible. Cur- 
culio adults are emerging in large numbers from soil cages, and jarrlngs 
indicate that many are in the peach orchard. Peach growers who have not 
already done so should make the first month-before-harvest application 
at once. 

No bitter rot has been reported, but 4-6-100 Bordeau sprays 
are suggested in problem orchards. 

Areas 2 and 3 - Carbondale-Vlncennes-Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralia: 
Codling moth egg hatch is continuing to some extent, being probably a 
combination of late first- and early second-brood worms. Hatch may be 
more noticeable by July 14, but the peak is not expected before the 20th 
or later if subnormal temperatures continue. In most orchards the 
between-brood spray interval should not exceed three weeks. Red mite 
has reached very destructive levels in scattered orchards. No heavy 
outbreaks of the two- spotted mite have occurred as yet, but they could 
develop if dry weather prevails. 

Curculios are on the rampage again. Jarring revealed as many 

adults now as in the peak first-brood period. Thus if poison applica- 
tions have not already been applied, they should be started immediately. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 16, page 2. 

Growers who experienced grasshopper damage in 19^6 and who ex- 
pect to use "benzene hexachloride or chlordane for control this season 
should prepare to apply the treatment. Young 'hoppers up to i inch long 
are abundant, and in certain orchards the outbreak can be expected to 
be as severe as in 19^6. 

Brown rot treatments should be continued. Bitter rot blocks 
should be observed at weekly intervals for signs of infection. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S.W. Ohio ; Bait trap catches of 
codling moths have shown some increase the past few days at Bedford, 
while at Lexington emergence is expected anytime. Both rosy and green 
aphids are increasing. No indications of mite damage have appeared. 
Curculio adults are still in peach orchards in very low numbers. Brown 
rot treatments should be continued where necessary, and the use of fun- 
gicides should also be continued if needed for scab control. 

Areas 5, 6 and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield- Peoria- ChampaignrLa Fayette- 
Worthern Indiana- Illinois ; Codling moth hatch continues with each warm 
day, and scab develops with each wet day. Between the two, sprays of 
insecticide and fungicide materials are necessary in most orchards at 
least at 10-day intervals. Rains have prevented increased mite infesta- 
tions. Each grower should plan his own program from now on. Some 
growers will not need to spray the rest of the season, while others will 

need to keep at it until harvest. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 
RSB;pm 

7/11/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



::- 



?K/\y S£KVjc£ K£?oia 



Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Horn© Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



Wo. 17— July 20-26, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

■)«•**♦******* 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Golden 
Jubilee harvest is about ready to start at Paducah. Curculio emergence 
increased somewhat on July 15 and 16. Dissection of these adults on 
the 16th showed less than 10 percent containing mature eggs, the major- 
ity showing no egg development or only the very early stages. Another 
arsenical application, preferably a dust, should be made now. 

Codling moth emergence Is continuing, and thus protection is 
needed at the usual second-brood time interval. Bitter rot was found 
on one Ben Davis tree in the Paducah section July 15. 

Miticide sprays are suggested because of the general increase 
in numbers of these pests. 

Area 2 - Carbondale and Vincennes : At Vincennes extensive 
fl3?st-brood codling moth counts in various orchards indicate that the 
average infestation is approximately one-half that of a year ago. If 
your orchard has lo worms or more per 1,000 apples, then two or three 
second-brood DDT or nicotine-bentonite oil sprays will be needed. With 
an Infestation of less than 1 worm per 1,000 apples, no second-brood 
sprays need be applied provided the blocks are one-fourth mile or more 



. t;iO , y.- 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. 17, page 2 

away from heavier infestations. Where second-brood sprays are needed, 
they should be applied immediately, as hatch is increasing gradiially. 

Third-brood European red mite hatch is at its peak, and pop- 
ulations are increasing rapidly. Growers who find mites now and who 
are prepared to use miticides should spray immediately to prevent a 
heavy deposition of fourth-brood eggs which may already be starting. 

Second-brood red-banded leaf roller hatch is continuing, with 
the first larvae up to ^ inch in size. These pests do not seem to be 
prevalent where lead arsenate was used thoroughly in the late first- 
brood sprays. 

Young grasshoppers are abundant in some orchards, and fruit 
damage can be expected later if chlordane or benzene hexachloride treat- 
ments are not planned. 

Curculio numbers are increasing rapidly, and a heavy second- 
brood infestation is anticipated. 

At Carbondale codling moth emergence has greatly increased, 
and considerable hatch is expected this week of July 21. Second-brood 
sprays should not be delayed any longer. Red mites are definitely low, 
the latest count showing 15 mites per 100 leaves. Curculio numbers are 
about the same, if not a little larger than a week ago. It is predicted 
that quality peaches will be the ones to sell this year, so keep at the 
curculio. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardln-Centralia ; Second-brood eggs are 
fairly abundant in some orchards, and hatch is well under way. Most of 
the infestation is in the tops of the tallest trees. The taller the 
trees, the more worms, even in orchards well sprayed with DDT. Curculio 
are increasing in numbers each week but still haven't reached the first- 
brood peak. 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 17, page 3 

Area k - Bedford-Lexington- S. W. Ohio ; At Bedford codling 
moth bait trap catches are slowly increasing, Indicating that the sec- 
ond brood is well under way. Scab continues to be a problem, and bitter 
rot Is appearing. Grasshoppers are becoming a threat In some orchards. 
Peaches are showing some drop, which probably Is the result of early 
freeze injury. At Lexington, second-brood development has not yet 
occurred. Red mite Is abundant on many varieties of apples, and Dell- 
clous is showing some bronzing. DW 111 plus DDT is suggested as soon 
as possible where red mites are present. 

Areas 5. 6 and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield-Champaign-Peoria- 
Lafayette-Nort hern Illinois-Indiana ; Some first-brood codling moth 
hatch continues, but in general it is now the between-brood period. 
Fungicides are still necessary in some orchards. Frequent close obser- 
vation should be made in your orchard. Red mites are prevalent in north- 
ern Illinois. These pests should be watched and sprays applied accord- 
ingly. 

Late first-brood grape berry moths have produced some fruit 
injury at Nauvoo. Continued spraying is suggested now to maintain ade- 
quate protection. Grape foliage is extra thick this year, and thus 
.leavier than normal applications should be made. 

The annual siommer tour of the Illinois State Horticultural So- 
ciety, cooperating with the Illinois Extension Service in Agriculture and 
lome Economics, will be July 28 and July 29. 

Monday. July 28 ; 10 a.m. GST, Assemble at Leo Sly's Sunrise 
)rchard, 3 2 mi. S.E. of Brussels j 12 noon, dinner at St. Mary's School, 
Brussels; 1;30 p.m., leave for orchards on way to Hardin and packing 
louses; 7:30 p.m.. Informal meeting at Pere Marquette Lodge. 

Tuesday. July 29 ; 9 a.m. GST, Trip up the hill at Pere Mar- 
uette Park; 10 a.m., leave for Nugent & Schapanskl orchards to see or- 
hards, packing house and equipment; lunch at noon and adjourn about 3 P.m. 

SB:js -0- 

-18-47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
university of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
I Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
[ Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



t;f UMUR^L RESOURCES 
2 COPIES 



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?jV\y Si\^i\ci R£?oia 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 18- -July 27-August 2, 19^7 



AMOUNCER: Here's our veekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

****#■»*#** 

This is usually the time of year when everything looks dandy 
from the standpoint of codling moth control. But if you start feeling 
too good, climb some of the tallest trees and look at the apples up there. 
Unless you have done an excellent job of top- spraying, you will find the 
source of later wormy fruit. If you don't find worms in the tops, then 
go to some remote corner of the orchard where your spray hands may have 
missed one side of a tree because it meant crawling through a thicket to 
spray it. If you find such a tree, you will also find worms that will 
cause plenty of trouble later in the season. Too many of us let the 
loose ends dangle while we try to struggle with the middle. If you 
haven't picked up the loose ends before, now is the time to do it. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Curculio 
numbers are decreasing somewhat after extensive second-brood dusts and 
sprays. Growers in central and western Kentucky are advised to maintain 
heavy arsenical cover to within two to three weeks of harvest if curculio 
numbers are high in their orchards. Where Oriental fruit moths have 
been abundant in the past on Elberta peaches, it is suggested that a DDT 
spray be applied three weeks before harvest or two DDT- sulfur dusts at 
three weeks and 10 days before harvest. 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT— No. 18, page 2. 

Second-brood codling moth activity continues from western 
Kentucky to Louisville, and it is thought that hatch will continue throu^ 
this coming week. In the Pulton and Paducah areas, the peak hatch has 
passed. Red mites and spiders seem to vary in populations from orchard 
to orchard. Orchards being treated with DDT should be watched and treated 
accordingly. Second-brood red-banded leafroller pupae have been found 
in the Paducah and Mayfield areas, indicating that this pest may cause 
plenty of trouble later on. 

Growers having trouble with bitter rot should be prepared to 
apply Bordeaux mixture in the problem ai^as of their orchards. Weekly 
observations are suggested in order to keep a check on this disease. Pre- 
harvest sulfur applications should be started on Elberta for brown rot 
control. 

A rea 2 - Gar bondale and Vincennes ; At Vincennes codling moth 
hatches have fallen off since a week ago, and the peak of second-brood 
larval hatch should occur as soon as temperatures are normal. Heavy, 
dashing rains have temporarily improved the mite slt\iatlon, with popula- 
tions less than half of what they were a week ago. However, the eggs re- 
main and are hatching rapidly. Nearly mature red-banded leafroller 
second-brood larvae have been found. Present indications are that this 
pest may cause considerable damage this season. 

At Garbondale curculio adults are still abimdant, as shown by 
jarrings. There is still plenty of time for Injury to the fruit, as 
"Elberta harvest is not expected before August l8. So keep enough pro- 
tection on the fruit. Oriental fruit moth has been foxind in some early- 
ripening peaches, firown rot is appearing on early varieties. Thus 
frequent applications of sulfur dusts or sprays are advised. Codling- 
moth second brood is in full swing, as evidenced by many fresh entries. 
Watch the tops of the trees, as that is where most of the codling moth 
damage is at present. 



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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -No. l8, page 3. 

S, C. Chandler reports that although most orchards show little 
or no mite infestation, two or three orchards in Jackson and Union coun- 
ties now have serious infestations. Apparently these infestations have 
taken place within the past two or three days, as there is no "bronzing 
or discoloration of the foliage. It is advisable for growers to examine 
foliage with a lens in order to "be able to apply a miticide before in- 
jury takes place if such treatment is warranted. 

Area 3 - Belleville-Hardin-Centralia ; Curculic continues to 
increase in numbers over last week. Arsenical applications are suggests! 
at frequent intervals. Oriental fruit moth is scarce at present. Cod- 
ling moth hatch is quite prevalent, and second-brood sprays are suggested. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexlngton-S.W. Ohio ; Second-brood moths began 
emerging at Lexington July 17 and have continued on a small scale since 
that time. Peak emergence is not expected before the end of this month 
or early August. Red mites have been reduced by a DN 111 plus DDT spray 
^SPlJed J^ly 17 and I8. A second spray is suggested, starting the week 

The peak emergence of curculio adults for the second brood is 
over, and these insects are prevalent in the orchard. Dissection shows 
20 percent of the females with eggs developing. This means that in the 
Lexington area the month-bef ore-harvest spray is now due. 

Area 5 - Pittsfield-Quincy ; Second-brood entrances were no- 
ticed at Pittsfield July 23. Apparently they were just starting, so a peak 
may occur the week of the 28th if temperatures are warm. There is no 
evidence of second-brood hatch in the Quincy area. 

Areas 6 and 7 - Champaign- Peoria-Lafayette; Northern Illinois- 
Indiana ; There is very little evidence of fresh codling moth entries at 
Urbana at this time. Growers still concerned about scab control may con- 
tinue with reduced amounts of sulfur if oil is not being used. Permate 
or Karbam may be used if available. Watch for red-mite development, and 
apply miticldes if necessary. DN 111 and hexaethyl tetra phosphate are 
suggested miticldes, either of which should be used according to the 
manufacturer ' s directions . 

*»***♦*«♦* 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 
RSB:pm 

7/25/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 



i'-'^'n-:* 



• :^t<Dce^ 







Spray Svavice K£?oia 

PrejBred by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 19— August 3 to 9, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

************ 
It may not be out of place to repeat the warning given in last 

week's report: Check tops of trees for worms, and note especially any 

new entrances. Because of the erratic emergence of moths this spring, 

the second and third broods of codling moth will not be clearly defined, 

and considerable variation in peak of egg-laying from orchard to orchard 

may be expected, even within the same general area. 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois : There 
has been a big reduction in numbers of curcullo adults jarred in sprayed 
orchards in southern Illinois, although the continued presence of suf- 
ficient numbers to justify control measures is reported from western 
Kentucky. In this area females are now laying eggs, and protection 
against second-brood attack is necessary. Oriental fruit moth has in- 
creased in numbers during the past week, and larvae are entering tender 
twigs and fruits in moderate numbers. 

Although the peak of second-brood codling moth activity has 
passed in this area, adults are still present in most orchards; and 
sprays for this pest must be continued. Mites and woolly aphids are 
increasing, and predators are unusually scarce. 



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-2- 

More instances of bitter rot on apples have been reported, 
and growers are warned to keep close vatch for the appearance of this 
disease. Brovn rot has been bad on early peaches and probably will be 
a problem on later varieties. Keep fruit well covered with sulfur dusts. 

Area 2 - Carbondale and Vincennes ; Peak emergence of curcu- 
lio adults has passed, but some protection against second-brood attack 
is imperative in this area. Oriental fruit moth Infestation is light 
in Golden Jubilee peaches now being harvested, but light to moderate in- 
festations are anticipated in the later varieties. Growers are urged 
to use the re-commended sprays and dusts against this pest. For those 
using DDT, one application now and another a few days before harvest is 
recommended. 

The first mature worms of the second-brood codling moth are 
leaving the apples at Vincennes, even while fresh entrances from late 
second brood continue to appear. Third-brood activity is expected to 
occur between August 20 and 25. As this will be about the time that 
Elberta harvest starts, growers who have both peaches and apples should 
plan a codling moth spray before that harvest begins, as a protection 
against third-brood worms. 

Red-banded leafroller damage is light in the Carbondale re- 
gion, but is building up in the Vincennes area. Some migration of moths 
from early apples to later varieties can be expected following the har- 
vest of Transparents, Dutchess and Wealthy apples. Lead arsenate is 
still the best insecticide for the control of this pest. 

The two- spotted mite is now definitely increasing throughout 
Area 2, and European red mite is also showing up in most orchards. 
Sprays of Dn-111 or hexaethyl tetraphosphate should be applied before 
actual damage occurs. 



■IJ c ' 



-3- 

Area 3 - Belleville, Hardin, Centralia ; Hatch of second-brcod 
codling moth worms Is at its peak in this area. Orchards vhich have not 
been sprayed within a week or 10 days should he sprayed now. Mite in- 
festations are generally low in this area, hut serious infestations may 
appear in scattered localities. Some red-banded leaf roller damage is 
apparent in nearly every orchard, but with few exceptions heavy infes- 
tations have not yet occurred. Pear psylla has become serious in most 
pear orchards, especially those sprayed with DDT. Hsxaethyl tetra phos- 
phate offers the greatest promise for the control of this pest. 

Area h - Bedford-Lexington- S.W. Ohio ; Oriental fruit moth 
and curculio show promise of making a heavy attack on peaches in the 
Bedford area. Harvest of Red Haven and Golden Jubilee peaches has be- 
gun around Lexington. Brown rot has appeared in these varieties, in- 
dicating that sulfur dusts will need to be continued on later varieties. 

A spray should be applied to apples now In this section, as 
adult codling moths are still emerging and new entrances are heavy. 
Mites aro abundant in some orchards, but in the Bedford region popula- 
tions generally are insignificant. 

Areas 5, 6, and 7 - Pittsfield-Quincy; Champaign- Pecria-La - 
fayette; northern Illinois and Indiana ; Fresh entrances have appeared 
in apples at Champaign during this past week, and peak hatch throughout 
most of these areas should occur this coming week. A spray should be 
applied early in the week of August 3. 

Infestations of European red mites are reaching serious pro- 
portions in some DDT- sprayed orchards in these areas, and the two- 
spotted mite is present but not serious in most orchards. Dn-111 sprays 
should be applied at two or three-week intervals where mites are abun- 
dant. If hexaethyl tetra phosphate is used, the best control will re- 
sult from two applications made one week apart. 

************ 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented In coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies. Including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory of Vlncennes, Indiana. It was compiled by C . J. Wein- 
man, Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois. 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 

University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 

Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 

Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 

RSB:mc 
8/1/47 






?jV\y binyic't A£?oia 




Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No. 20--August 10 to 16, 19^7 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station_ 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge, Illinois ; Some 
second-brood codling moth activity is continuing In Kentucky, indicating 
the need for continued late second-brood protection. Red mites and red 
spiders seem to be increasing In many DDT- sprayed orchards where miti- 
cides have not been applied. 

On peaches, curculio numbers are generally lower in western 
Kentucky, where heavy preharvest arsenate of lead applications have been 
made. Ripening fruit has few curculio worms to date. In central and 
northern Kentucky there is still time for preharvest arsenical appli- 
cations on Elberta peaches where adults are numerous. Some increase in 
Oriental fruit moth injury to ripening peaches was observed this week. 
Many western Kentucky growers have applied some DDT in dusts or sprays 
or both. Recent weather has not favored brown rot, but some can be seen 
in most Elberta plantings. The usual preharvest precautions should be 
vigorously maintained. 

Area 2 - Carbondale and Vlncennes ; In this area fresh codling 
moth entrances continue in orchards where there was an appreciable first 
brood. At Vlncennes the comparatively high rate of hatch in some or- 
chards will continue for at least another week. At Carbondale it is not 
likely there will be third-brood hatch before the week of August l8. 



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-2- 

Two- spotted spider mites are increasing in a nximber of orchards 
in this area. The European red mite is declining in some orchards at 
Vincennes but is still increasing in others. Several growers have ob- 
tained excellent control of this pest with hexaethyl tetra phosphate. 
Mite predators are now showing up in moderate numbers where no DDT has 
been used for several weeks. 

There is a little increase in red-banded leafrollers in some 
orchards in this area. Chandler reports a heavy infestation on early 
apples in a small block following use of DDT from the first cover on. 
A-t Vincennes all stages of larvae are present, and there will be no 
break between broods. Unless parasites effect control, this pest will 
cause progressively greater damage to fruit from now until harvest. 

On peaches there is still further reduction in numbers of plum 
curculio jarred near Carbondale. The probable date of first picking will 
be August 18. It is likely that no further poison will be needed in most 
orchards. 

The use of oil dust is recommended to control Oriental fruit 
moth from now until nearly harvest time. Those who wish to use DDT should 
do so now. There have been heavy rains in the Carbondale area during the 
past few days. If the weather gets cooler, with more rain and fruit cracks, 
more sulfur dusts will be needed to control brown rot. 

Area 3 - Belleville. Hardin. Centralia t There has been a very 
decided drop in curculios jarred at Alma. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexin^ton-S.W. Ohio : At Bedford codling moth 
development is now the most rapid of this season, eggs hatching in six 
days. Lead arsenate is proving rather ineffective with the high tempera- 
tures. The hot weather is preventing sizing up of peaches in this area. 
Sprays for controlling Oriental fruit moth should be applied now. There 
may be a severe brown rot attack at harvest. The hail of July 27 seriously 
: injured grapes, and black rot is severe. 



-3- 

Area 5 - Flttsfleld-Qulncy ; Grape berry moth was much lighter 
than normal at this date In the commercial grape section at Hauvoo, as 
well as in spots where tests In the past two years showed infestations 
to be highest. Growers in general used more DDT, but that was not the 
main reason for reduction. 

Area 6 - Champaign- Peoria-Lafayette and Area 7 -Northern Illi- 
nois and Indiana ; In the Moline area and to a lesser extent in the 
Princeton area European red mites are abiindant. Infestations are ap- 
preciably heavier where no dormant oil spray was applied. Growers 
should examine their trees and prepare to use a mitlcide. 

Codling moth second brood will probably not start hatching be- 
fore August 15. Some blocks do show appreciable Infestation for this 

area. 

************ 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory of Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by C. J. Wein- 
man, Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 

RSB:dc 
8/8/4? 



Sy'AAY Sekvice Report 

PrejBred by Illinois State Natural History- 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and HoBie Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

No, 21— August 17-23, 19^7 




ANNOUNCER: Here's our veekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

Elberta peach harvest will start in earnest this week of August 15 
in most of Kentucky, southern Illinois and Indiana. Oriental fruit moth 
is light in most areas except in the Henderson, Kentucky and Bedford, 
Indiana areas where heavy infestations are occurring. Curculio preva- 
lence is variable also throughout the trl-state areas with some southern 
Illinois and western Kentucky orchards still showing considerable egg- 
laying adults. Such orchards should probably receive a post-harvest 
application to help reduce the carry-over for next year. In spite of 
dry weather in most regions brown rot is still a hazard and should be 
treated accordingly. 

Pall varieties of apples should be watched for development of 
second-brood codling moth. Heavy hatches were reported last week in 
western Kentucky and southern Indiana while in Illinois a few fresh en- 
tries were observed in some orchards. Apple growers who need to do so 
should protect their apples before going into the peach harvest. Do not 
let your apples go too long without protection unless your infestation 
is low enough that further spraying would be xinnecessary. Mite and 
spider injury is increasing where control measures have not been applied. 






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SPRAY SERVICE REPORT- -Ro. 21, page 2. 

Hexaethyl tetra phosphate seems to be doing a wonderful job on this pest. 
Bitter rot should be expected any time in problem orchards if it hasn't 
appeared before now. Be prepared to hormone your apples. Some vari- 
eties may drop prematurely in the arid sections. 

Above all, pick and market quality fruit. 

********** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight Powell 
of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 



HR:pm 
8/15/47 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 191^ 



S?KAY S£KVJC£ Rs^ORT 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 
No. 22--August 24-31, 1947 




Areas Referred to in T ext j 



ANNOUNCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented through the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

Area 1 - Western Kentucky and Villa Ridge , Illinois: Elberta 
harvest continues, and In general the crop Is better than in 1946. Ori- 
ental fruit moth attack is occurring and is worse In some orchards than 
others. Brown rot Is serious In orchards where the fruit has been dam- 
aged by insects or by cracking. On apples, late second-brood codling 
moth larvae continue to hatch. Many new entrances were noticed In the 
Henderson area August 19 . No Increase in ml tea was noted over last week. 

Area 2 - Carbondale-Vlncennes ; At Vlncennes third-brood cod- 
ling moth has started, and the attack Is in accord with the intensity 
of the second brood. DDT- sprayed orchards look good so far. Additional 
sprays will be needed in many orchards. Red-banded leaf-roller Is not 
serious except where straight DDT has been used since the start of the 
season. In most orchards the European red mite Is receding, but infes- 
tations of the two- spotted spider mite are increasing. Hibernating forms 
of the latter are appearing in some orchards at Carbondale. Curcullos ar 
still in peach orchards; however, the use of poisons cannot be justifi- 
ably recommended. Oriental fruit moth Is flaring up and might get worse 
in the next two weeks. DDT used now might do some good. Recent rains 
have caused some frult-cracklng. This cracking plus Insect damage in- 
creases the brown rot hazard. Some orchards showed 15 to 20 percent of 



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brown rot August 20. Keep fungicides on the fruit until the day of 
picking. On apples codling moth shows a nBrked Increase In nvunber of 
new entrances. Apply protection If necessary. 

Area 3 - Bellevllle-Hardln-Centralla ; Codling moth hatch con- 
tinues, and protection Is necessary In many orchards. Watch for brown 
rot development In your peaches, and apply a fungicide dust or spray at 
least every five days \intll the fruits are picked. 

Area 4 - Bedford-Lexington- S. W. Ohio ; A heavy codling moth 
hatch is taking place and will probably continue for 10 days. Gage 
Elberta will ripen in about 10 days. Heavy applications should be made 
for Oriental fruit moth. Grapes are ripening rapidly. 

Areas 5, 6 and 7 - Quincy-Pittsfield-Feoria-Champaign-LaFayette - 
Northern Indiana -Illinois ; Some codling moth hatch continues at Urbana. 
Be isrepared for more larval entrances within the next 10 days. The in- 
tensity of this late infestation will depend on the degree of early 

injury. 

**«*♦«•»«♦#♦« 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies. Including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky* Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwlght 
Powell of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 
Cooperatlve Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and Jxone 30, 1914 

HR:mc 
8/22/47 



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Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service in Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 



No. 23--August 31 - September 6, 19^7 




AMOUWCER: Here's our weekly spray service report. These reports are 
presented tbrough the cooperation of entomologists, pathologists and 
horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Station . 

**********iit 

Heavy codling moth hatches are occurring in western Kentucky 
and southern Indiana. Moderate hatch continues in central and southern 
Illinois. Growers should watch their orchards closely and apply protec- 
tion if needed. Heavy dropping of some varieties is occurring in drought 
areas; thus hormone sprays should be applied accordingly. Mites con- 
tinue to be present, and in the southern areas the two- spotted spider 
mite predominates. 

Peach harvest continues. Brown rot should be controlled until 
the fruit is in the paclra,ge. Oriental fruit moth is serious in western 
Kentucky and southern Indiana, while light to moderate infestations are 
occurring in southern Illinois. Growers with late apples near peaches 
should watch for the migration of Oriental fruit moth into the apple 
orchards after the peaches are picked. 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwight 
Powell of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May B and June 30, 191^ 



HR: js 
8-29-^7 



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S?KAY Siiiyici Ki?oKf 

Prepared by Illinois State Natural History 
Survey and Extension Service In Agriculture 
and Home Economics, University of Illinois 
College of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 




No. 24— September 7-13, 19^7 

ANNOUNCER: Here's our last weekly spray service report for 1947- These 
reports have been presented through the cooperation of entomologists, 
pathologists and horticulturists of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Station . 

At present many new codling moth worms are hatching over the 
trl-state area as far north as Champalgn-Urbana . This hatch will con- 
tinue until cool weather occurs, so spraying Is suggested If necessary. 
Jonathans are dropping badly in southern Illinois. Watch your orchards 

closely and apply hormones at the first indication of preroature dropping. 

*«**»**♦#* 

The following men have contributed to the success of the Spray 
Service Report by reporti:ig on orchard conditions: L. P. Stoiner, 
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Vincennes, Indiana; Prof. C. 
L. Burkholder, Prof. J. J. Davis, and Dr. G. Edw. Marshall, Indiana 
Agricultural Ezperiraont Stations Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana; 
Dr. W. Do Armstrong and Dr. P. 0. Ritcher, Kentucky Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, University of Kentucky, Princeton and Lexington, Kentucky; 
Prof. T. H. King, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Department of 
Entomology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri; Jos. M. Ackles, 
Grlggsvllle, 111.; Charles S. Adklns, Jr., Metropolis, 111.; Fred Baxter. 
Nauvoo, 111.; John Bell, Mossley Hill Orchard, Barrington, 111.; Jim 
Bright, Valley City, 111.; W. L. Casper, Cobden, 111.; S. C. Chandler, 



SPRAY SERVICE REPORT--N0. 24, page 2. 

Carbondale, 111.; Prank Chat ten, Quincy, 111.; Dave Dell, Grafton, 111.; 
Curt E. Eckert, Belleville, 111.; L. A. Floyd, Greenville, 111.; Davis 
Foreman, Plttsfield, 111.; Harry Hatcher, Roodhouse, 111.; Vilas Hensel, 
Princeton, 111.; C. T. Jeffries, Dix, 111.; Bernard Y. King, Moline, 111.; 
John F. Leahr, Griggsvllle, 111.; Roy J. Newman, Martinsville, 111,; Roy 
Schvartz, Cobden, 111.; L. M. Smith, Ozark, 111.; C. E. Walkington, 
Timnel Hill, 111.; and the staffs of the Illinois Natural History Survey 
and the University of Illinois Department of Horticulture, Urbana, 111. 

*********** 

Because of mailing regulations, the 19^8 spray service reports 
cannot be sent automatically to recipients of the 19^7 reports. There- 
fore, a letter will be sent in April 19^8 to all persons on the 19^7 
mailing list asking if they wish to receive the 19^8 reports. Any in- 
quiries and suggestions concerning the reports should be addressed to 
the Extension Editor's Office, University of Illinois College of Agri- 
culture, Urbana, Illinois. 

*»#♦#*»*** 

That concludes today's spray service report, presented in coop- 
eration with fruit growers and federal and state agencies, including the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois, the 
Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Federal Deciduous Fruit 
Insect Laboratory at Vincennes, Indiana. It was compiled by Dwlght 
Powell of the Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois. 

-0- 

Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics 
University of Illinois College of Agriculture and the United States 
Department of Agriculture cooperating. H. P. Rusk, Director 
Acts approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914 

HR:ml 
9/5/47 



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