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Full text of "The Imperial gazetteer of India"

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THE IMPERIAL GAZETTEER OF INDIA. 



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MORRISON AND GIBB, EDINBURGH, 
PRINTERS TO HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE. 



HE Imperial Gazetteer of India. 



BY 



SIR WILLIAM WILSON HUNTER, K.C.S.I., 

CLE., LL.D., B.A. 

MEMBER OF THE VICEROY'S LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, AND DIRECTOR-GENERAL 
OF STATISTICS TO THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA ; 

VICE-CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALCUTTA ; HONORARY OR FOREIGN MEMBER OF THE 

ROYAL INSTITUTE OF NETHERLANDS INDIA AT THE HAGUE, OF THE INSTITUTO VASCO 

DA GAMA OF PORTUGUESE INDIA, OF THE DUTCH SOCIETY IN JAVA, AND OF 

THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY, LONDON ; HONORARY FELLOW OF 

THE PUNJAB UNIVERSITY ; ORDINARY MEMBER OF THE 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, THE ROYAL 

GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, ETC. 



VOLUME XIV. 



INDEX. 



SECOND EDITION. 



TRUBNER & CO., LONDON, 1887. 



V. If 




POSTSCRIPT. 



Since the earlier volumes of this edition went to press 
in 1885, important changes have taken place in India, 
to some of which it is needful here to refer. A new 
Province, larger than France, has been added to the 
Indian Empire ; the long contemplated jail way which 
will traverse inner India direct from Calcutta to Bombay, 
has been commenced ; the Lusitanian schism, which 
during two centuries rent the Roman Catholic Church in 
India, has been closed. Less conspicuous local changes 
— administrative, legislative, educational, and economic — 
have occurred in every Province. Their bare enumera- 
tion would involve a supplement quite beyond the scope 
of this work. In the Preface to the present edition I 
put forward the view that, ' so far from represent- 
ing the " stationary stage " of civilisation, according 
to a former school of English economists, India is 
now one of the most rapidly progressive countries 
of the earth.' The onward movements in India, 



vi POSTSCRIPT. 

during the brief period which has since elapsed, justify 
these words. ^ 



In order, however, to prevent misconceptions, it is 
expedient to narrate very briefly the events which render 
the lengthy articles on British and Independent Burma 
in volume iii., and various lesser notices througfhout the 
other twelve volumes dealing with the same territories, 
no longer a correct representation of the actual state of 
things. The aggressive attitude of the King of Upper 
Burma, and his obstinate refusal to redress the wrongs 
done by his servants to British subjects, compelled Lord 
Dufferin at the close of 1885 to send an expeditionary 
force to Mandalay. The King was dethroned, and 
deported for safe custody to British India. After an 
attempt to administer the country through the Central 
Council of Burmese Ministers, an attempt frustrated by 
the old corrupt officials in the Districts, and by the 
dynastic discords of the pretenders to the throne, Upper 
Burma was annexed to British India by proclamation on 
the I St January 1886, In February 1886, Lord Dufferin 
proceeded to Burma to organise the administration of 
the new Province. The disorders incident to the dis- 



1 The considerations which would have pointed to the expediency of amplifying 
this Postscript have been anticipated by a recent remarkable essay on India by Sir 
Henry Sumner Maine. 'From 1858 to 1887,' he says, 'India has been governed 
by the Crown under the control of Parliament, and the facts and figures which I have 
given seem to me to show that, taking the standards of advance which are employed 
to test the progress of Western countries, there is no country in Europe which, accord- 
ing to these criteria, and regard being had to the point of departure, has advanced 
during the same period more rapidly and farther than British India.' — The Reign of 
Queen Victoria, vol. i. p. 518. (Smith, Elder, & Co., 1887.) 



POSTSCRIPT. vii 

banding of the royal troops, and the struggles of various 
party leaders and pretenders to the sovereignty, gave 
rise to numerous marauding bands known as dacoits. 
These plunderers were active throughout the hot months 
and the malarious rainy season of 1886; sometimes as 
petty gang-robbers, sometimes as bodies of well-armed 
banditti, and in certain localities as an organised array, 
operating on a scale which might almost be dignified 
with the name of guerilla war. 

The close of the unhealthy season, and the approach 
of the cold weather of i^Z6-%'], enabled the British 
authorities to deal with these depredators. In November 
1886 a force of troops and armed police was gradually 
spread over Upper Burma in such numbers as to render 
plunder a very perilous livelihood. The peasantry 
began to array themselves more actively on the side 
of order ; in many cases taking their protection into 
their own hands, and slaughtering or capturing the 
dacoits. The Buddhist clergy were almost from the 
first on our side, and they made their Influence decisively 
felt as the country settled down. Meanwhile, the 
annexed territories had been divided into British 
Districts of more convenient size, and placed under 
a carefully selected staff of civil administrators. By 
the end of the cold weather of 1886-87 order was 
fairly established ; and during the ensuing hot weather 
(1887) the work of pacification went forward. Satis- 
factory relations were also established with the adjoining 
States and hill tribes to the North and East. The new 
Districts are now firmly united with Lower Burma Into 



viii POSTSCRIPT. 

a sinele British Province under a Chief Commissioner.' 
So far as can be foreseen at present (August 1887), 
the period of conquest in Upper Burma is over, and 
the task of consoHdation is being accomplished by rapid 
strides/ 

While dealing with recent changes in Upper Burma, 
I take the opportunity of correcting an oversight in 
regard to the educational system in Lower Burma. 
Sixteen years ago, when I was collecting materials 
for the first edition of this work, it seemed to me a 
subject of regret that the British authorities had not 
availed themselves more heartily of the system of 
indigenous instruction o-Iven in the monasteries and 
religious houses by the Buddhist clergy. During the 
interval which has since elapsed, the system of public 
instruction in British Burma may almost be said to have 
been reconstituted on the basis of indigenous monastic 
teaching. I have mentioned the function assio^ned to 
such native agency at page 207 of volume iii. and in 
other places. But there are also passages in which I 

^ In the Preface to this edition I regretted that the necessity of printing in England, 
while the author was in India, unavoidably led to errors in the press. An unfortunate 
example of this class occurs in my account of recent transactions in Burma at page 
430 of volume vi. I liad kept back the sheet in order to incorporate the facts of the 
Proclamation of Annexation and of Lord Dufferin's visit to Burma. But the new 
sentences, when forwarded to England, got transposed ; and the events of January 
and February i8S6 are made to precede the expeditionary force and occupation of 
Mandalay in November 1885. A clerical error, also due to the insertion of a new 
sentence in the proof, and more likely to lead to confusion, had escaped me in the 
same volume. In line 5 of footnote 2, page 230 of volume vi., for ' The latter'' 
please read/ The former.'' Again, in lines 22 and 24 of p. 471 of volume v., the 
words ' right ' and ' left ' have been inadvertently transposed. 



POSTSCRIPT. ix 

omit to notice or to sufficiently emphasize the change. 
I gladly therefore take this occasion to again acknow- 
ledge the educational work done by the monastic 
institutions and the Buddhist clergy in Burma, and 
also the wise use which the English authorities in 
the Province have, for years past, made of this 
indigenous basis of public instruction. 

The ancient schism between the Catholic Priests 
and Bishops appointed under the jurisdiction of the 
King of Portugal or his representative, the Archbishop 
of Goa, and the Vicars-Apostolic sent to India under 
the direct authority of the Pope, has been narrated in 
volume vi.^ Since that volume was written, the 
provisional arrangement therein mentioned has been 
matured into a permanent settlement of the long- 
conflicting claims. The local jurisdiction of the Arch- 
bishop of Goa, as representing the King of Portugal, 
has been respected. But, generally speaking, the Roman 
Catholic Church in India has now been brought under 
the authority of the Pope. His Holiness has issued 
an instrument settinQf forth the new settlement of the 
Indian Catholic Church ; and a hierarchy of Arch- 
bishops and Bishops, under the direct regulation of 
Rome, has taken the place of the Vicars and Prefects 
Apostolic in partibus injideliiun. 

During the printing of the fourteen volumes, much 
new information has come into my possession, some- 

1 Vol. vi. pp. 255, 256. 



X ■ POSTSCRIPT, 

times too late to be used. Thus, while I correctly state^ 
that the style of * the Governor-General-in-Council ' was 
first authorized by the statute of ^jZ Geo. III., I else- 
where mention, on the authority of an official Report 
071 the Old Records of the India Office, that the title 
of Governor-General had occurred incidentally a century 
before.^ A personal examination of the original manu- 
scripts has since convinced me that this is erroneous ; 
and that the official reporter probably misread the 
title of * Gaptain-General ' for ' Governor-General.' I 
am indebted to Colonel Yule, C.B., for materials, also 
derived from the India Office MSS., which throw 
grave doubts on the popular derivation of Chanak (or 
Achanak), the native name for Barrackpur, from its 
supposed founder, Job Charnock. The name seems 
to have existed before that worthy could have given it 
his patronymic. 

For these and other deficiencies I respectfully plead 
the necessity imposed upon me to finish the undertak- 
ing within stringent limits as to time. The present 
fourteen volumes endeavour to truthfully condense the 
data which I have been able, during sixteen years, to 
collect concerning an Empire nearly equal in size to all 
Europe, less Russia. They were intended to subserve 
the purposes of administration, and the Government 
wisely declined to permit of leisure for literary complete- 
ness, at the cost of delays which would have impaired 
the practical utility of the work. Every year adds new 

, 'Vol. vi. p. 431. *Vol. vi. p. 370 (footnote). 



POSTSCRIPT. ' xi 

stores to our information regarding India ; and each 
decennial Census enables the economist and the admini- 
strator to handle Indian problems with a surer grasp. 
It may perhaps be my privilege, at some future time, to 
bring out a further edition of these volumes, with ampler 
knowledge and clearer lights. If this be not granted, I 
leave with confidence to the SQrvants of the Crown in 
India who come, after me, the task of perfecting the 
work which I have begun. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my obligations to Mr. 
J. S. Cotton, late Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford, 
and Mr. H. Morse Stephens, B.A. of Balliol College, 
for the Index which forms this volume. That Index 
is a careful expansion of the one to the first edition. 
It brings to a point, and renders available at a glance, 
the masses of local information collected throughout the 
250 Districts of India during the past sixteen years. 
Its plan, general outline, and major headings, are 
necessarily my own : but to Mr. Cotton and Mr. 
Stephens belongs the merit of its execution. 

W. W. Hunter. 

Weimar, 

Atigusi 24, 1887. 



IMPERIAL GAZETTEER 



OF 



INDIA. 



INDEX. 



Abaji Somadeo, Sivaji's general, took 

Kalyan, vii. 347. 
Abar or Abor Hills, in Assam, i. 1,2. 
Abars, independent tribe, probably of 

Tibetan stock, i. i ; in Assam, i. 353 ; 

in Lakhimpur, viii. 431 ; ariicle ' India,' 

vi. 57- 
Abazai, fort in Punjab, i. 2. 
Abbott, Gen., settled Hazara, v. 362; 

founded Abbottabad, v. 363 ; suggested 

that Arrian's Aornos was Mahaban Hill, 

xi. 506. 
Abbottabad, tahsil'm Punjab, i. 2. 
Abbottabad, town and cantonment in 

Punjab, i. 2, 3. 
Abdalis, Arab tribe near Aden, i, 24. 
Abdu, town in Bombay, i. 3. 
Abdul Ghani, Nawab, gave water-supply 

and almshouses to Dacca, iv. 89, 90, 91. 
Abdul Nabi Khan, Nawab of Cuddapah, 

conquered the Baramahal, iv. 48, 56. 
Abdul Nabi Khan, last Kalhora chief of 

Sind, his histor)% xii. 512, 513. 
Abdul Rahim Khan, mutineer leader, 

ruled Budaun, iii. 1 18. 
Abdul Samad Khan, Governor of Kash- 
mir, defeated the Sikhs (1716) and 

took Banda prisoner, xi. 263. 
Abdul Wahab, first Nawab of Karnul, 

turned the temples into mosques, viii. 

42 ; his mausoleum, viiL 45. 
Abdul Wahab Khan, Nawab of Arcot, 

held fort of Chandragiri, iii. 363. 
Abdulla Khan, Sayyid, Wazir, helped his 

brother against Farukhsiyyar, defeated 

by Muhammad Shah, v. 257, 258. 
Abdulla Khan Talpur, expelled the last 

Kalhora chief from Sind, xii. 513. , 
VOL. XIV. 



Abdulla Kutab Shah, king of Golconda, 
defeated by Aurangzeb, v. 255. 

Abdur Rahman Khan, made Amir of 
Afghanistan (July 1880'), i. 52 ; defeats 
Ayub Khan, vii. 275, 398; interview 
with Lord Duft'erin at Rawal Pindi, 
vii. 275. _ 

Abdur Razai, Wazir of Mahmud of Ghazni, 
conquered Sind, xii. 509. 

Abdurrazak, Arab traveller, his mention 
of Kiyal, viii. I07. 

Abercromby, Lieut., translated History of 
the Rajas of Coorg, iv. 30. 

Abercromby, Gen. John, acting Governor 
of Madras, ix. 67. 

Abhana, village in Central Provinces, i. 3. 

Abhrambara, leader of insurrection in 
Kanara and Coorg (1837), iv. 31. 

Abingdon, Major, relieved siege of Tel- 
licherri, xiii. 238. 

Abiraman, town in Madras, i. 3. 

Abji, town in Bombay, i. 3. 

Ablagundi, pass in Madras, i. 3, 4. 

Abor Hills and Abor Tribe. See Abar. 

Aboriginal tribes, non-Aryan population, 
article ' India,' vi. , chap. iii. pp. 53-74. 
Kistvaen builders, flint and bronze 
periods, 53 ; non-Aryans of Vedic 
India, 53, 54 ; Andaman islanders, 
55 ; Anamalai hillmen, 55 ; Gonds 
and aboriginal tribes of the Central 
Provinces, 55, 56 ; the Juangs or leaf- 
wearers of Orissa, 56 ; tribes of the 
Himalayas, 56 ; of Assam, 57 ; Santals, 
their tribal government, history, re- 
ligion, 57-60 ; the Kandhs of Orissa, 
their tribal government, blood revenge, 
marriage by capture, and human sacri- 
fice, 60-63 ; origin of the non-Aryan 
tribes, 63 ; the three non-Aryan stocks 

A 



INDEX. 



— Tibeto-Burtiian,Dravidian,Kolanan, 
— their languages, 63-68 ; statistics of 
non-Aryan races in 1872 and 1881, 
69-71 ; Hinduizing tendency among 
aboriginal tribes, 70, 71 ; crushed 
aboriginal tribes, 71 ; gipsy clans, 71 ; 
aboriginal criminal tribes, 71, 72 ; the 
non-Aryan hill tribes as soldiers, 72 ; 
Colonel Dixon's work among the 
Mhairs of Rajputana, 73 ; Sir James 
Outram's work among the Bhils, 73 ; 
fidelity of the hill races, 73. — For notices 
of spt;cial tribes, see Abars, Ahams, 
Akas, Andamanese, Andhs, Badagas, 
Bagdis, Baigas, Baltis, Bants, Baoris 
or Bauris, Bathudis, Bhars, Bhilalas, 
Bhils, Bhogtas, Bholiyas, Bhumijs, 
Bhutias, Bhuiyas, Binjwars, Birhors, 
Bishnois, Botwas, Brokpas, Brushas, 
Bunas, Busbkariks, Chakmas, Cham- 
pas, Chandals, Chaungthas, Chaws, 
Chenchuwars, Cherus, Chilasis, Chins 
or Khyins, Chitralis, Chutiyas, Dagis, 
Dalus, Daphlas, Denwas, Deswalis, 
Dhangars, Dhums, Dommaras, Doms, 
Gadwas or Gadbas, Garos, Gaudas, 
Gaulis, Gonds, Gurungs, Haburas, 
Hajungs, Halbas or Halwas, Hallanis, 
Holiyars or Holiaru, Irulars, Kaders, 
Kakhyens, Kakus, Kamis, Kandhs, 
Kanets, Karens, Kaswas, Kathkaris, 
Kathodis, Kehars, Khamtis, Kharwars, 
Khasis, Kirantis, Kochs, Kolis, Kols, 
Koragars, Korachavandlu, Koris, Kor- 
kus, Korwas, Kotas, Kukis, Kunawars, 
Kuns, Kurubas, Kurumbas, Kurkus, 
Kurus, Kway-mies, Ladakhis, Lalungs, 
Lepchas, Limbus, Madahis,Malaikudis, 
Malassers, Malayalis, Magars, Maghs, 
jNIanas, Manipuris, Maravars, Marias, 
Maris, Matak, Mechs, Mehras, Meos, 
Merats, Mers, Mikirs, Minas, Miris, 
Mishmis, Moamarias, Morangs, Mros, 
Murmis, Musahars, Nagas, Nahals, 
Naikdas, Nairs, Nawars, Nepalis, 
Newars, Nicobarians, Nihals, Nilangs, 
Nimchas, Puliyars, Pwons, Rabhas, 
Rantias, Rawats, Riangs, Sak, Santals, 
Saonts, Saraniyas, Savars or Sauras, 
Selungs, Shandiis, Shens, Shins, Siar- 
khawas, Singphos, Soligars, Sugalis, 
Sunwars, Syntengs, Taalas, Takkars, 
Talaings, Taughgthas, Tiors, Tip- 
perahs, Todas, Torwaliks, Uraons, 
Vellalars, Wagris, Warlis, Yabeins, 
Yanadis, Yaws, Yerukalas, Yeshkiins. 

Abras, Muhammadan tribe in Larkhana, 
viii. 463. 

Absentee landholders. See especially 
Chengalpat, iii. 387 ; Saharanpur, xii. 
120. 

Abu, mountain and sanitarium in Rajput- 
ana, i. 4, 12; physical aspects, 4-6; 



climate, 6, 7 ; sanitarium, 7 ; Jain tem- 
ples, 7-12 ; held sacred by the Jains, vi. 
35, 159; xiii. 3, 4. 

Abv'i llusain, last king of Golconda, made 
treaties with Sivaji and Sambhaji, at- 
tacked by Aurangzeb, and sent prisoner 
to Daulatabad, v. 258. 

Abul Fazl, Akbar's finance minister and 
historian, vi. 300 ; retired to Jalna, 
when exiled from Akbar's court, vii. 
106 ; murdered at Prince Salim's advice, 
vii. 217 ; mentions the frequency of 
earthquakes in Kashmir, viii. 67. 

Abulfeda, Arab geographer, mentions 
Honawar, v. 440. 

Abtvdbs or customary cesses. See especi- 
ally Bogra, iii. 29 ; Budaun, iii. 121. 

Academies for Hindu pandits. See l^ols. 

Achakzais. a tribe in Afghanistan, expedi- 
tion against, xi. 189. 

Achala Basanta, peak in Bengal, i. 12. 

Achandaviltan, town in Madras, i. 12. 

Achanta, town in Madras, i. 12. 

Achenkoil, pass and temple in Madras, 
i. 12. 

Achipur, village and signalling station in 
Bengal, i. 12. 

Achnera, town in N. -W. Provinces, i. 
12. 

Achra, port in Bombay, i. 12. 

Aconite, found in Mishmi Hills, ix. 
464. 

Acquisition by the British of the various 
Districts. See Historical section under 
each District. 

Acta Sanctorum, The, of the Hindus, 
article 'India,' vi. 208. 

Adalpur, town in Bombay, i. 13. 

Adam, Sir Frederick, Governor of Madras 
(1837), ix. 67. 

Adam, John, acting Governor-General, 
ii. 279 ; article ' India,' vi. 403. 

Adam. W. P., Governor of Madras, ix. 

Adam-jo-Tando, town in Sind, i. 13. 

Adampur, village in Punjab, i. 13. 

Adams, Major, defeats of Mir Kasim by, 
at Gheria and Udha-nala (1763), article 
' India,' vi. 386 ; xi. 95, 96 ; xiii. 415. 

Adams, General, occupied Hoshangabad, 
V. 450 ; defeated the Peshwa at Pandar- 
kaura (1818), xi. 35, xiii. 540. 

Adam's Bridge, ridge of sand and rocks 
near Ceylon, i. 13. 

Adam's Peak in Ceylon, shrine common 
to Buddhism, Siva-worship, and Mu- 
hammadanism, article ' India,' vi. 203. 

Adavad, town in Bombay, i. 13. 

Addanki, town in Madras, i. 13, 14. 

Addison, Gulston, Governor of Madras 
(1709), ix. 67. 

Adegaon, village and tract of country in 
Central Provinces, i. 14. 



INDEX. 



Aden, peninsula, isthmus, and fortified 
town in Arabia, i. 14-24 ; history, 
15-17; under British rule, 17, 18; 
trade, i8, 19 ; administration, 19, 
20; climate and water-supply — (i) 
wells, (2) aqueduct, (3) tanks or re- 
servoirs, (4) condensers, 20-24 ; forti- 
fications, 24 ; Arab tribes — Abdali, 
Fadhli, Akrabi, 24. 

Adevi Avulapalli, mountain in Madras, i. 

24-^ . 

Adhid^'i, system of usury rife in Bogra, 
iii. 29. 

Adil Shahi, Muhammadan dynasty in 
Deccan, article ' India,' vi. 288. 

Adil Muhammad, Nawab of Garhi Ama- 
pani, rebelled during Mutiny, and was 
defeated at Rahatgarh, xiii. 103. 

Adina Masjid, historic mosque in Bengal, 
i. 24. See Panduah. 

Adjai, river in Bengal, i. 24, 25. 

Adjunta. See Ajanta. 

Administration, British, of India, article 
'India,' vi., chap. xvi. pp. 431-481. 
Control of India in England under the 
Company and under the Crown, 43 1 ; 
Council of the Secretary of State, 431 ; 
the Viceroy and Governor-General in 
Council, 431, 432 ; Executive and 
Legislative Councils, 432, 433 ; High 
Courts of Justice, 433 ; Law of British 
India, 433, 434 ; Provincial administra- 
tion, 434, 435 ; ' Regulation' and ' Non- 
Regulation ' territory, 435 ; duties of 
District Officers, 435, 436 ; Districts, 
number of, in India, 436, 437-; the 
Secretariats of the Government of India 
and of the Local Governments, 437, 
438 ; the land-tax, 438-452 ; ancient 
land system of India, 438 ; the Musal- 
man land-tax, 439 ; the Zam/nddr made 
landlord, 439; landed property in India, 
and the growth of private rights, 439, 
440; rates of assessment. Government 
share of the crop, 441 ; methods of 
assessment, 440, 441 ; the Permanent 
Settlement of Bengal, creation of pro- 
prietors by law, 441, 442 ; intermediate 
tenure-holders, 443 ; Statistical Survey 
of Bengal, 443 ; oppression of the 
cultivators, 443 ; Land Law of 1859, 
443, 444 ; subsequent enhancements of 
rent and appointment of a Rent Com- 
mission, 444, 445 ; its recommendations, 
three years' tenant right, and compen- 
sation for disturbance, 444, 445 ; Orissa 
temporary Settlement, 445 ; Assam 
yearly Settlement, 445 ; rdyatzudrl 
Settlement in Madras, 445, 446 ; Sir 
Thomas Munro's method of assessment, 
446 ; Permanent Settlement in estates 
of zaminddrs and native chiefs in 
Madras, 446, 447 ; growth of cultivators 



into proprietors in Madras, and exten- 
sion of tillage, 447 ; reduction of average 
land-tax in JNIadras, 448 ; Bombay land 
system, the 'survey tenure,' its advan- 
tages and disadvantages, 448, 449 ; 
debts of the Deccan peasant, 449 ; 
Bombay Agricultural Relief Acts of 
1879 and 1881, and rural insolvency 
procedure, 449, 450 ; land Settlement 
in the North-Western Provinces and 
Oudh, corporate holdings, 451 ; land 
system of Oudh, the Tdlnkddrs, 451, 
452 ; land system of the Central Pro- 
vinces, 452 ; land revenue of British 
India, 452 ; salt administration, sources 
of salt supply, and realization of salt 
duty, 452, 453 ; working of the salt 
monopoly, 453, 454 ; process of salt 
manufacture, 444 ; excise on country 
spirits, rice-beer, opium, gdnjd, and 
charas, 454, 455 ; municipal adminis- 
tration and statistics, 455-457 ; Im- 
perial finance, and the ' business ' of 
the Indian Government, 457, 458 ; 
changes in systems of account and the 
obscurities resulting therefrom, 458, 
459 5 gross and net taxation of British 
India, 459-461 ; English and Indian 
taxation, 459-461 ; Indian taxation 
under the Mughals and under the 
British, 462, 463 ; incidence of taxa- 
tion in Native States and British terri- 
toiy, 463-465 ; gross balance sheet of 
British India, and analysis of Indian 
revenues, 465, 466 ; nature of the land- 
tax, 467 ; items of taxation summarized, 
460, 461 ; 467, 468 ; Indian expendi- 
ture, — the army, public debt, loss by 
exchange, public works, railways, etc. , 
468-470 ; local and municipal finance, 
470 ; constitution and strength of the 
three Presidency armies, 471 ; police 
and jail statistics, 472 ; education, 472- 
479 ; education in ancient India, village 
schools and Sanskrit tols, 472, 473 ; 
the Company's first efforts at education, 
the Calcutta Madrasa and other 
colleges, 473 ; mission schools, 473 ; 
State system of education, 474, 475 ; 
the Education Commission of 1882-83, 
and its recommendations, 474 ; educa- 
tional statistics of British India, 474, 
475 ; the Indian Universities and tlieir 
constitution, 475, 476 ; colleges, middle 
schools, and primary schools, in the 
various Provinces, 476-478 ; girls' 
schools, 478, 479 ; normal and other 
special schools, 479 ; the vernacular 
press and native journalism, 480 ; 
registered publications in India, 4S0, 
481. — For historical details, see Eno-- 
lish in India, and History of British 
Rule. 



INDEX. 



Local notices — Aden, i. 19; Ajtnere- 
Merwara, i. 129, 130; Assam, i. 369-371 ; 
Bengal, ii. 315-317 ; Bombay, iii. 65, 
66 ; Lower Burma, iii. 206, 207 ; Cen- 
tral Provinces, iii. 320, 321 ; Coorg, 
iv. 39, 40 ; Berar, v. 272 ; Madras, ix. 
64-66 ; North-Western Provinces, x. 
397, 398 ; Oudh, X. 508, 509 ; Punjab, 
xi. 270, 271 ; Sind, xii. 523, 524; and 
see also the section on Administration 
in each District article. 

Administration of European possessions 
other than British : French possessions, 
iv. 455, 456 ; Portuguese possessions, 
see Daman, iv. 103 ; Diu, iv. 306 ; 
Goa, v. 95-99. 

Administration in Native States : Afghan- 
istan, i. 47 ; Alwar, i. 206 ; Bahawal- 
pur, i. 422, 423 ; Baluchistan, ii. 39 ; 
Baroda, ii. 166-168 ; Bhartpur, ii. 375 ; 
Bhopal, ii. 405 ; Bhutan, ii. 416 ; 
Upper (when Independent) Burma, iii. 
213-216; Chutia Nagpur Tributary 
States, iii. 464-466 ; Cochin, iv. 8, 9 ; 
Cutch, iv. 62, 63 ; Dholpur, iv. 275 ; 
Dungarpur, iv. 324 ; Gwalior, v. 230 ; 
Haidarabad, v. 24S ; Hill Tipperah, 
V. 398, 400, 401 ; Indore, vii. 7, 8 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 58 ; Jaisalmer, vii. 68, 69 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 243, 244 ; Kashmir and 
Jamu, viii. 76, 77 ; Kathiawar States, 
viii. 93, 94 ; Khairpur, viii. 136, 137 ; 
Kotah, viii. 307 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 
326, 327 ; Laccadive Islands, viii. 394, 
395 ; Maldive Islands, ix. 252 ; Mani- 
pur, ix. 332, 333 ; Mysore, x. 95, 96 ; 
Orchha, x. 425 ; Orissa Tributary 
States, X. 476, 477 ; Rampur, xi. 458 ; 
Sikkim, xii. 486, 487 ; Travancore, 
xiii. 351, 352 ; Udaipur, xiii. 408. 

Adoni, town and taluk in Madras, i. 25. 

Adoption, Hindu practice of, article 
' India,' vi. 414, 415. 

Adrampet, port in Madras, i. 27. 

Adur or Andur, family of Kdvalgars in 
Madras, i. 27. 

Advances to cultivators and weavers, in 
Ahmadabad, i. 90 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 
104; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 125; Bom- 
bay, iii. 54 ; Champaran, iii. 341 ; 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 451 ; Dacca, 
iv. 86 ; Goa, v. 95 ; Berar, v. 269 ; 
Orchha, x. 425 ; Orissa, x. 459 ; to 
Santal colonists, xii. 231. 

Advichinchars, tribe of wandering jugglers 
in Dharwar, iv. 260. 

Adyal, town in Central Provinces, i. 27. 

Aeng, river and town in Burmah, 1-27. 
See An. 

Afghan dynasty of Delhi (1540-56), 
article ' India,' vi. 291. 

Afghanistan, History of, under the 
Duranis (1747-1846), article ' India,' vi. 



406 ; early British dealings with (1800- 
37), 407 ; Afghan dynastic quarrels, 

407 ; Russian intrigues, 407 ; installa- 
tion of Shah Shuja, and occupation of 
Kabul by a British force (1839), 407, 

408 ; rising of the Afghan people, 
murder of the British envoy, and mas- 
sacre of the British army on its retreat 
through the snow to India (1841-42), 
408 ; the British army of retribution, 
408, 409 ; Lord Ellenborough's pro- 
clamation, 409 ; second Afghan war 
(1878-S1), 426, 427 ; murder of Sir L. 
Cavagnari, the British Resident, 427 ; 
retributive occupation of Kabul, 427 ; 
Sir F. Roberts' march from Kabul to 
Kandahar, and defeat of Ayub Khan, 
424 ; recognition of Abdur Rahman 
Khan as Amir, 427 ; the Rawal Pindi 
darbdr, 427 ; trade routes to Afghan- 
istan, 586 ; value of Afghan trade, 586. 

Afghanistan, mountainous region between 
N. - W. India and Eastern Persia, 
i- 27-53 » boundaries, 28, 29 ; natural 
divisions, 29, 30 ; rivers, 30 - 33 ; 
lakes, provinces, and towns : — Istalif, 
33 ; Charikar, 34 ; Kilat-i-Ghilzai, 34, 
35 ; Girishk, 35; Farrah, 35 ; Sabzavar, 

35 ; Zarni, 35, 36 ; Lash, 36 ; Ghorian, 

36 ; natural productions— minerals, 36, 

37 ; climate, 37, 38 ; agriculture, 38 ; 
domestic animals, 38, 39 ; industrial 
products, 39 ; trade, 39-41 ; races of 
Afghanistan — Duranis, 41 ; Ghilzais, 
41 ; Yusufzais, 42 ; Kakars, 42 ; Kizil- 
bashis, 42, 43 ; Hazaras, 43, 44 ; 
Aimaks, 44 ; Hindkis, 44 ; Baluchis, 
44 ; political institutions, 46, 47 ; 
government, 47 ; revenue, 47 ; military 
force, 48 ; language and literature, 48 ; 
history, 48-52 ; antiquities, 52, 53. 

Afghan-Turkistan, i. 53-56 ; population, 
55 ; products and industry, 55 ; his- 
tory, 55, 56 ; antiquities, 56. 

Afghan War, first (1838-42), article 
' India,' vi. 407-409. See Afghanistan, 
history of, supra. Local notices — 
Afghanistan, i. 49-51 ; assistance given 
by the Nawab of Bahawalpur, i. 423 ; 
siege of Ghazni, v. 72 ; occupation of 
Kabul and massacre there, vii. 272, 
273 ; operations at Kandahar, vii. 392- 
394 ; the forcing of the Khaibar pass, 
viii. 125-127 ; occupation of Sibi, xii. 
457) 458 ; opposition of the Mirs to 
the British march through Sind, xii. 

514- 
Afghan War, second (1878-80), article 
'India,' vi. 426, 427. .S^ir Afghanistan, 
history of, supra. Local notices — 
Afghanistan, i. 52 ; assistance given by 
the Nawab of Bahawalpur, i. 424 ; 
capture of Kabul and operations there, 



INDEX. 



vii. 273, 274 ; operations at Kandahar, 

vii. 395 - 398 ; marches through the 

Khaibar pass, vii. 127 ; occupation of 

Pishin and its cession to the British, 

xi. 189 ; cession of Sibi, xii. 458 ; 

Sonmiani used as port of debarkation 

for stores, xiii. 61. 
Afridis, an Afghan clan west and south 

of Peshawar, i. 42. 
Afzalgarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 57. 
Afzul JChan, murder of, by Sivaji at Par- 

tabgarh, xi. 77, 78. 
Agai, town in Oudh, i. 57. 
Agar, petty State in Bombay, i. 57. 
Agar, town in Central India, i. 57- 
Agar attar, a perfume made at Patharia, 

xi. 87.^ 
Agarpara, town in Bengal, i. 57. 
Agartala, capital of Hill Tipperah State 

in Bengal, i. 57, 58. 
Agartala, Old, ruins in Bengal, i. 58. 
Agarwala, trading and banking caste. 

Ste Marwaris. 
Agashi, port in Bombay, i. 58. 
Agastya, the Brahman Saint of Southern 

India, legend of, article ' India,' vi, 

329. See also Tinnevelli, xiii. 299. 
Agastya-malai, peak in Madras, i. 58. 
Agates, found in Kaira, vii. 300 ; Kapa- 

dwanj, vii. 439 ; Mysore, x. 92 ; Rewa 

Kantha, xii. 49. 
Agate ornaments, Cambay famous for, iii. 

274. 

Age, population classified accordiug to. 
See Population section under each Dis- 
trict. 

Agencies, for the joint superintendence of 
the smaller Native States : Baghel- 
khand,i.4i6, 417; Bhil or Bhopawar, ii. 
394, 395 ; Deputy Bhil, ii. 395 ; Bhopal, 
ii. 406 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 152 ; Central 
India, iii. 297 ; Guna, v. 201 ; Indore, 
vii. 10 ; Kathiawar, viii. 88-97 ; Mahi 
Kantha, ix. 1 75- 179 ; Western Malwa, 
ix. 267-272; Palanpur, x. 535-539; 
Rewa Kantha, xii. 48-54 ; Sural, xiii. 
136. 

Aghoris, a carrion-eating sect of Sivaite 
devotees, article ' India,' vi. 214. 

Aghwanpur-Mughalpur, town in N.-W. 
Provinces, i. 58. 

Agiari. See Temples, Parsi Fire. 

Agnew, Col., his administration of 
Raipur, xi. 369. 

Agnew, Mr. Vans, murdered by Mulraj, 
obelisk to, at Miiltan, x. 12 ; demar- 
cated boundaries of Spiti, xiii. 70. 

Agni, the Vedic God of Fire, article 
' India,' vi. 80. 

Agoada, headland and bay, in Western 
India, i. 58, 59. 

Agra, Division in N.-W. Provinces, i. 59, 
60. 



Agra, District in N.-W. Provinces, i. 60- 
67 ; physical aspects, 60, 61 ; history, 
61, 62 ; population, 62, 63 ; agriculture, 
63, 64 ; natural calamities, 64, 65 ; 
commerce and trade, etc., 65, 66 ; 
administration, 66, 67. 

Agra, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, i. 68. 

Agra City, capital of Akbar the Great, 
who built the fort, article ' India,' vi. 

294 ; Akbar's tomb at Sikandra near, 

295 ; embassy of Sir Thomas Roe to the 
Emperor Jahangir, 301 ; 367 ; Shah 
Jahan's great architectural works at the 
Taj Mahal and Moti Mas] id, 304 ; 
deposition of Shah Jahan and imprison- 
ment within Agra Fort (where he died), 
by his usurping son Aurangzeb, 305 ; 
establishment of English factory at 
(1620), 367. Local notices — i. 68-76 ; 
site and area, 68 ; history, 68-71 ; 
architectural works, 71 ; Jama Masjid, 
71, 72; fort, 72, 73; Taj Mahal, 73- 
75 ; tomb of Ihtimad-ud-Daula, 75 ; 
Akbar's tomb near, 75 ; population, 
75, 76 ; manufactures, trade, etc., 76 ; 
municipality, 76. 

Agra Canal, irrigation work in N. India, 
i. 76, 77 ; article ' India,' vi. 29, 532, 
533. Local notices — Agra District, i. 
61 ; Delhi, iv. 183 ; Gurgaon, v. 220 ; 
Muttra, X. 44. 

Agra, village in Bengal, i. 77. 

Agra Barkhera, petty State in Central 
India, i. 77- 

Agradwip, island in Bengal, i. 77. 

Agrahara Vallalur, town in Madras, i. 77. 

Agrarian riots, in Bamanghati, ii. 40 ; 
Bombay, iii. 57 ; Pabna, x. 513. 

Agricultural castes. See Castes. 

Agricultural day-labourers. See Day- 
labourers. 

Agricultural exhibitions. See Exhibitions. 

Agricultural Relief Acts for Southern 
India, vi. 449, 450. 

Agricultural school at Saidapet in Madras, 
vi. 516; ix. 35, 119; xii. 140, 141. 

Agricultural stock in India, vi. 519-523; 
famous breeds of cattle and horses, 520, 
521. Seedlso Cattle, Horses, and Sheep. 

Agricultural products, article 'India,' vi. 
chap. xvii. pp. 482-544. Agriculture in 
India, the occupation of almost the entire 
population, 482, 483 ; various systems 
of agriculture, 483 ; rotation of crops, 
petite culture, 483, 484 ; statistics of 
rice cultivation in different Provinces, 
484-486 ; hill cultivation, 486 ; wheat, 

486 ; area under principal food-grains, 

487 ; millets and minor cereals, 488, 
489; pulses, 489; oil -seeds, 489; 
vegetables, fruits, and spices, 490 ; 
palms and sugar-cane, 491 ; cotton, 
491-494; jute, 494, 495; indigo, 



INDEX. 



495-498 ; opium, 498, 499 ; tobacco, 
499, 500 ; uncertainty of Indian crop 
statistics, 500 ; approximate area under 
certain principal crops, 501 ; special 
crops, coffee, 502-504 ; tea, 504-509 ; ' 
cinchona, 509-511 ; silk, 51 1-5 14; lac 
and lac-dye, 515 ; model farms, their 
small success, 515, 516; the problem 
of improved husbandry, 517 J the im- 
pediments to better husbandry, namely, 
want of cattle, want of manure, and 
want of water, 517-519; as^ricultural 
stock, 519-523; forest conservancy and 
growth of the Indian Forest Depart- 
ment, 522 ; 524-527 ; nomadic cultiva- 
tion, 527, 528 ; irrigation and its 
function in India during famine, 528, 
529 ; irrigation areas in the different 
Provinces, 529-538; irrigation statistics 
for British India, 538, 539 ; famines 
and their causes, 539, 540 ; summary of 
Indian famines, 541, 542 ; the great 
famine in Southern India (1876-78), 
542-544. See separate alphabetical 
headings of crops, etc., also Agricultural 
section under each District. 

Agriculture in India, small holdings, 
article 'India,' vi. 62; absence of 
large towns, 62. 

Agroha, historic town in Punjab, i. 77, 78. 

Agror or Agrore, frontier valley in Punjab, 
i. 78. 

Agumbe, pass in Madras, i. 78. 

Agiistisvaram, taluk in Madras, i, 78. 

Agvvanpur-Mughalpur, town in N.-W. 
Provinces, i. 78. 

Agwon, revenue circle in Burma, i. 78, 79. 

Ahalya Bai, ruled in Indore, vii. 5 ; 
founded city of Indore, vii. 9 ; lived at 
Maheswar, ix. 173. 

Ahams, former rulers of Assam, i. 79-8' ; 
history, 79, 80 ; religion, 80 ; present 
numbers, 81 ; their administration of 
Assam, i. 342-344 ; now a crushed tribe, 
article ' India,' vi. 7 1 ; present descend- 
ants of, vi. 188. Local notices — See Dar- 
rang, iv. 143, 145 ; Kamrup, vii. 359 ; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 428-430 ; Nowgong, 
X. 409 ; Sibsagar, xii. 461, 462, 463. 

Ahankaripur, town in Oudh, i. 81. 

Ahar, ruined city in Rajputana, i. 81. 

Ahar, ancient town in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 81, 82. 

Aheriyas, tribe of dakdits in Etah, iv. 

359- 

Ahi, the Vedic Demon of Drought, vi, 81, 
and footnote. 

Ahiri, zaminddn and forest in Central 
Provinces, i. 82. 

Ahirs, or Goalas, a pastoral caste, espe- 
cially numerous or otherwise notice- 
able, in Allahabad, i. 189 ; Azamgarh, 
i. 395 ; Bahraich, i. 430 ; Balrampur, 



ii. 25 ; Banda, ii. 50 ; Bara Banki, ii. 
1 10 ; Basti, ii. 209 ; Behar, ii. 225 ; 
Bengal, ii. 296 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 346 ; 
Budaun, iii. 119 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 
137; Burhapara, iii. 166; Cawnpur, 
iii. 283; Central Provinces, iii. 316; 
Chichgarh, iii. 408 ; Cuttack, iv. 69 ; 
Delhi, iv. 182; Dewa, iv. 235; Etah, 
•v. 359 ; Etavvah, iv. 373 ; Faizabad, 
iv. 383 ; Fatehpur, iv. 424 ; Gaya, v. 
52 ; Ghazipur, v. 66 ; Gurgaon, v. 218, 
219; Hazaribagh, v. 373; Jaunpur, 
vii. 154; Jhansi, vii. 222; Lohardaga, 
viii. 481 ; Lucknow, viii. 496 ; Main- 
puri, ix. 203, 206 ; Western Malwa, 
ix. 269 ; Monghyr, ix. 484 ; Muzaffar- 
pur, X. 79 ; Oudh, x. 498 ; Partabgarh, 
xi. 70 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Purniah, xi. 
325 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 354 ; Rajputana, 
xi. 408, 410; the Santal Parganas, xii. 
229 ; Saran, xii. 253, 258 ; Seoni, xii. 
31 ; Shahabad, xii. 327; Singhbln'mi, 
xii. 536, 537 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 98 ; 
Unao, xiii. 430. 

Ahirwas, ruined fort in Central India, i. 82. 

Ahiyari, village in Bengal, i. 82. 

Ahmadabad, District in Bombay, i. 82- 
93 ; physical aspects, 83, 84 ; history, 
84, 85 ; population, 85-87 ; manufac- 
tures, 87, 88 ; agriculture, 88-91 ; 
natural calamities, 91 ; roads, trade, 
etc., 91, 92; administration, 92, 93. 

Ahmadabad, city in Bombay, i. 93-98 ; 
physical aspects, 94 ; history, 94, 95 ; 
population, 95 ; commerce and manu- 
factures, 95, 96 ; pottery, 96 ; paper 
manufacture, 96, 97 ; roads and streets, 
97 ; architecture, 97, 98. 

Ahmad AH Khan, Nawab of Farukh- 
nagar, hanged for participating in the 
Mutiny, iv. 418. 

Ahmadgarh, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 98. 

Ahmad Khan Bangash, Pathan chief of 
Fai-ukhabad, caused Chhatar Sal to call 
Marathas into Bundelkhand, iii. 155. 

Ahmadnagar, District in Bombay, i. 98- 
107 ; physical aspects, 99, 100 ; his- 
tory, 100; population, 100-102; 
agriculture, I02, 103 ; trade, etc., 
103-105 ; rates of interest, 105 ; de- 
pressed condition of the peasantry, 
105 ; railways, 106 ; administration, 
etc., 106, 107 ; climate, 107. 

Ahmadnagar, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 
107. 

Ahmadnagar, city in Bombay, i. 107- 
Iio ; physical aspects, 107, 108 ; popu- 
lation, 109 ; architecture, 109 ; roads 
and streets, 109, no. 

Ahmadnagar, Muhammadan kingdom of 
W. India (1490-1636), article ' India,' 
vi. 288. 



INDEX, 



Ahmadnagar, village in Oudh, i. iio. 

Ahmad Nizam Shah, founded Ahmadna- 
gar (1494) and a dynasty there, i. 108. 

Ahmadpur, town in Punjab, i. no. 

Ahmadpur, trading village in Bengal, i. 
no. 

Ahmad Sayyid, an Afghan fanatic, de- 
feated by Sher Singh, a Sikh general, 
at Derband, iv. 229. 

Ahmad Shah l., king of Gujarat (1413- 
43), founded Ahmadabad, i. 94; built 
fort of Dohad, iv. 12 ; built hill fort of 
Gawilgarh, v. 43. 

Ahmad Shah Bahmani, founded a Mu- 
hammadan kingdom in the Deccan, iii. 

36. 

Ahmad Shah Durani (1747-61), article 
' India,' vi. 314, 315. Local notices — 
Formed Afghanistan into an empire, i. 
49 ; conquered Afghan-Turkistan, i. 
56 ; destroyed Amritsar, i. 256 ; or- 
ganized coalition before the battle of 
Panipat at Anupshahr, i. 295 ; in the 
Bannu valley, ii. 91 ; twice sacked 
Delhi, iv. 193 ; his authority in Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 211, and Dera Ismail 
Khan, iv. 221 ; ravaged Gujrat, v. 190 ; 
establishsd semblance of order in Haz- 
ara, v. 361 ; founded the present city 
of Kandaliar, vii. 389 ; his tomb there, 
vii, 391 ; conquered Kashmir, viii. 61 ; 
took Lahore, viii. 406 ; plundered 
Muttra, X. 54 ; victor}' of Panipat, xi. 
45-47 ; defiled the Sikh temples, xi. 
264 ; ceded Pishin to Nasir Khan of 
Khelat, xi. 189 ; also Quetta, xi. 337 ; 
granted the lands of the Barha'Sayyids 
in the Upper Doab to Najib Khan, 
xii. 116; plundered Shahdara, N.-W. 
Provinces, before the battle of Panipat, 
xii. 341 ; made Mir Muhammad Kal- 
hora tributary and invaded Sind, xii. 
512. 

Admadzais, tribe of Kumbarani Brahuis, 
iii. 100. 

Ahmedabad. i'i;^ Ahmadabad. 

Ahmednagar. See Ahmadnagar. 

Ahobalam, shrine in Madras, i. no. 

Ahpyouk, revenue circle in Burma, i. 
no, III. 

Ahraura, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
III. 

Ahtaran. See Attaran. 

Aiavej, petty State in Kathiawar, i. in. 

Aidaha, village in Oudh, i. in. 

Aigur, town in Mysore, i. n i . 

Aihar, town in Oudh, i. in. 

Aikota. See Ayakotta. 

Aimaks, The four, nomadic tribe in 
Afghanistan, i. 44; Herat, v. 391. 

Aing-gyi, village in Burma, i. in. 

Ain-i-Akhari, or Chronicles of Akbar, 
translated by Blochmann, article 



'India, 'vi. 272 (footnote) ; 291 (footnote 
i) ; 295 (footnotes). 
Ainur Marigudi, State forest in Mysore, 

i. III. 
Airi, teak forest in Central Provinces, i. 

in. 
Aitchison, Sir C. U., Chief Commis- 
sioner of Burma (1878-80), iii. 176; 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab, 
xi. 270 ; his Treaties quoted, iii. 293, 
X. 490, xii. 89, xii. 150. 
Aitchison's, Dr. The Trade Products of 

Leh referred to, viii. 400. 
Aix-la-Chapelle, Madras restored to the 
English by the Treaty of (1748), article 
' India,' vi. 379. 
Aiyar, river in Madras, i. in. 
Ajabpur, Native State in Bombay, i. in. 
Ajaigarh, Native State in Central India, 

i. 112, 113. 
Ajai Pal, conquered by Mahmud of 
Ghazni, and killed in battle with the 
Chandel Raja of Kalinjar, iv. 410. 
Ajanta Indhyadri, hill ranges in Berar, 

i. 113. 
Ajanta, cave temples in Berar, i. 1 13- 116 ; 
sculpture and architecture, 114 ; paint- 
ings, 115 ; monasteries, Il5i Il6. 
Ajanur, town in Madras, i. 116. 
Ajgain, town in Oudh, i. 116. 
Ajgaon, town in Oudh, i. 116. 
Ajimpur, town in Mysore, i. 116. 
Ajit Singh, Raja of Jodhpur, formed alli- 
ance with Jaipur and Udaipur against 
the Muhammadr.ns, vii. 241. 
Ajmere-Merwara, British Province in 
Rajputana, i. 117 -131; physical 
aspects, II7-II9; history, I19-122; 
population, 122-124; agriculture, 125, 
126 ; land tenures, 126, 127 ; natural 
calamities, 127, 128; forests, 128; 
commerce and trade, etc., 128, 129; 
administration, 129, 130 ; medical 
aspects, 130, 131. 
Ajmere, city in Rajputana, i. 131-133 '■> 
establishment of an English factory at 
(1614), article 'India,' vi. 366. 
Ajmirgarh, hill in Central Provinces, i. 

133- T. ■ , • 

Ajnala, village and tahsil in Punjab, i. 

133, 134- . ^ . 

Ajodhya, ancient town in Oudh, 1. 134, 

135- 
Ajodhya, trading village in Bengal, i. 135. 

Ajra, town in Bombay, i. 135. 

Aka Hiils, tract of country in N.-E. 

India, i. 135, 136. 
Akas, aboriginal hill tribe of Assam, 

article ' India,' vi. 57. Local notices — 

i- 135. 136. 
Akalgarh, town in Punjab, i. 137. 
Akalkot, feudatory State and town in 

Bombay, i. 137, 13S. 



8 



INDEX. 



Akalkot, i. 138. 

Akar-ali, old raised road in Assam, 

i. 138. 
Akhar the Great, founder of the Mughal 
Empire (1556-1605), article 'India,' vi. 
291-300; chief events of his reign, 
291 (footnote) ; his work in India, 
292, 293 ; conciliatory policy towards 
the Hindus, 293 ; conquest of Rajput 
chiefs, and extension and consolidation 
of the Mughal Empire, 293, 294; change 
of capital from Delhi to Agra, 294 ; his 
religious faith, 295 ; army, judicial, and 
police reforms, 296 ; his revenue sur- 
vey and land settlement of India, 297, 
298 ; revenues of the Mughal Empire 
under Akbar, 297-300. Local notices — 
Founded Agra, i. 61, and died there, 
i. 69 ; took Ahmadabad, i. 93 ; offered 
thanks at Ajmere for his son's birth, i. 

121 ; annexed Berar, i. 141, 142, iii. 
144; built fort of Allahabad, i. 196; 
took Asirgarh, i. 339 ; built fort of 
Attock, i. 382 ; Bardvvan taken by his 
troops, ii. 127 ; reconquered Gujarat, 
iii. 36; took Broach, iii. 113; an- 
nexed Burhanpur, iii. 162 ; built 
palace there, iii. 164 ; Gondwana in- 
vaded by his armies, iii. 311 ; stormed 
Chitor, iii. 431 ; founded Fatehpur 
Sikri to be his capital, iv. 433 ; took 
fort of Gwalior, v. 236 ; established 
Muhammadan colony at Gopamau, v. 
323 ; founded Jalalabad, vii. 76 ; re- 
moved capital of his eastern provinces 
from Jaunpur to Allahabad, vii. 153 ; 
conquered Jodhpur, and married Jodh- 
bai, sister of its Raja, vii. 241 ; heard 
of his father's death, and ascended the 
throne at Kalanaur, vii. 323 ; con- 
quered Kangra, vii. 414, 415 ; con- 
quered Kashmir, viii. 6 ; conquered 
Gujarat, viii. 91, ix. 267 ; overran 
Khandesh, viii. 15^2 ; repaired the fort 
of Lahore, viii. 415 ; much improved 
Lucknow, viii. 505 ; incorporated 
Malwa, ix. 267 ; said to have founded 
a city on site of Murshidabad, 
X. 32 ; occupied Nagaur, x. 158 ; 
annexed Nimar, x. 330 ; his victory 
over Hemu, the general of Sher Shah, 
at Panipat, xi. 45 ; took Pawagarh, xi. 

122 ; his policy with the Rajput chiefs, 
xi. 405 ; besieged Satana, xii. 274 ; 
his tomb at Sikandra, xii. 481 ; united 
Sind to the empire, xii. 510, 511 ; 
built hill fort and laid out the Najib 
Bagh at Srinagar, xiii. 77 ; took Surat, 
xiii. 120 ; conquered and converted 
the last Hindu Raja of Laur, xiii. 
146 ; destroyed Tatta, xiii. 219 ; de- 
feated by the Rana of Mewar, xiii. 404 ; 
born at Umarkot, xiii. 421, 



Akbar Khan, son of Dost Muhammad, 

murdered Sir W. Macnaghten, i. 50 ; 

made Wazir of Afghanistan, and died, 

i. 51. 
Akbar Sayyid of Sitana, elected king of 

Hazara, but expelled by Ghulab Singh, 

v. 362. 
Akbarbandar, trading village in Bengal, 

i. 138. 
Akbarnagar, old name of Rajmahal, 

Bengal. 
Akbarpur, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, i. 138, 139. 
Akbarpur, town and tahsil in Oudh, i. 

139. 
Akbarpur, village in Bengal, i. 139. 
Akbarpur-Singhauli, pargand in Oudh, 

i- 139- 

Akdia, petty State in Bombay, i. 140. 

Akheri. See Ikkeri. 

Akhmir. See Aknur. 

Akkachillelu (The Sisters), isolated rocks 
near Kosigi in Madras, viii. 300. 

Akkayavalasa, estate in Madras, i. 140. 

Aklaj, town in Bombay, i. 140. 

Aknur, town and fort in Punjab, i. 140. 

Akohri, town in Oudh, i. 140. 

Akola, District in Berar, i. 140-146 ; 
physical aspects, 140, 141 ; history, 
141, 142 ; population, 142, 143 ; agri- 
culture, 143, 144 ; land tenures, 144 ; 
natural calamities, 144 ; manufactures 
and trade, 144, 145 ; roads and rail- 
ways, 145 ; administration, 145 ; 
meteorological aspects, etc., 146. 

Akola, idluk in Berar, i. 146. 

Akola, town in Berar, i. 146, 147. 

Akola, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 147. 

Akona. See Ikauna. 

Akora, town in Punjab, i. 147. 

Akot, town and tdhtk in Berar, i. 147, 
148. 

Akouk-taung, hill in Burma, i. 148. 

Akrabis, Arab tribe, near Aden, i. 24. 

Akrani, pargand in Bombay, i. 148. 

Akras. See Vaishnav monasteries. 

Akyab, District in Burma, i. 148- 1 58 ; 
physical aspects, 149, 150 ; history, 
150-154; population, 154, 155 ; agri- 
culture, 155-157 ) manufactures, etc., 

157 ; communications, trade, 157 ; 
revenue, etc., 157; administration, 157, 

158 ; climate, etc. 

Akyab, town, seaport, and head-quarters 
of a District in Burma, i. 158-160 ; 
history, 158, 159 ; public buildings, 

159 ; commerce and trade, 159, 160 ; 
population, 160. 

Akyaw, revenue circle in Burma, i. 160. 
Al, a scarlet dye. See Dyes. 
Alabakhshpur, town in Bengal, i. 161. 
Alabaster, lsir.,'I'heWheel of Lain, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 137 (footnote). 



INDEX. 



Alaf Khan. General of Ala-ud-din, de- 
stroyed the Rajput dynasty of Gujarat, 
iii. 36. 

Alagar, range of hills in Madras, i. 161. 

Alahyar-jo-Tando, town and tdhik in 
Bombay, i. 161. 

Alaiphur, trading village in Bengal, i. 161. 

Alaknanda, river in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 161, 162. 

Alambadai, town in Madras, i. 162. 

Alamdanga, trading village in Bengal, 
i. 161. 

Alamgir II., the last real Mughal Em- 
peror, iv. 193. 

Alamgir Hill, peak in Orissa, i. 162. 

Alamgirnagar, ancient fort in Bengal, i. 
162. 

Alamnagar, village in Bengal, i. 162. 

Alamnagar, /rtr§a«if in Oudh, i. 162, 163. 

Alamnagar-Thomsonganj, town in Oudh, 
i. 163. 

Alamparai, village in Madras, i. 163. 

Alampur, petty State in Bombay, i. 163. 

Alampur, pargana in Central India, i. 163. 

Alam Shah, Emperor, visited Budaun, 
and after his deposition by Bahlol 
Lodi, retired and died there, iii. 1 17. 

Alandi, town in Bombay, i. 163, 164. 

Alapur, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 164. 

Ala Singh, founder of the dynasty of 
Patiala, his history, xi. 88 ; his struggles 
with the Bhatti chieftains, xiii. II. 

Alattur, town in Madras, i. 164. 

Ala-ud-din, the second King of the Khilji 
dynasty (1295-1315), article 'India,' 
vi. 281 ; his invasion and concjuest of 
Southern India, 281, 282 ; massacre of 
Mughal settlers, 282 ; Hindu revolts, 
282. Local notices — Murdered his 
uncle. Sultan Firoz Shah, at Karra, 
i. 187, viii. 48 ; his invasions of the 
Deccan, iii. 143, iv. 165, v. 261 ; took 
Daulatabad, then known as Deogiri, 
iv. 159 ; twice repulsed Mughals from 
Delhi, iv. 192 ; visited EUora, and 
reported to have carried off Hindu 
princess, iv. 349 ; twice took and 
sacked Jaisalmer, vii. 67 ; conquered 
Malwa, ix. 267 ; took Ranthambor, 
xi. 511 ; took Chittor, xiii. 403 ; took 
Ujjain, xiii. 417 ; invaded Telingana, 
xiii. 521. 

Ala-ud-din Hasan Shah Ganga Bahmani, 
founded the Bahmani dynasty at Kul- 
barga, viii. 332. 

Ala-ud-din Husain Shah, first successful 
Muhammadan invader of Kamrup, vii. 

357- 

Ala-ud-din Ghon, expelled the Bhars from 
Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; story of its cap- 
ture, xiii. 104. 

Ala-ud-din Muhammad, Sultan of Khaw- 
rism, took Kandahar, vii. 392. 



Alaungpaya (Alompra), conquered the 
Talaings of Pegu, iii. 176 ; drove the 
Peguans out of Upper Burma, and 
founded a dynasty, iii. 221, 222 ; con- 
quered Hanthawadi, v. 313 ; founded 
Kan-aung, vii. 388 ; conquered Tenas- 
serim, ix. 408 ; his conquest and de- 
struction of Pegu, xi. 127 ; his history, 
xi. 229 ; rebuilt Dagon and called it 
Rangoon, xi. 428 ; coated the Shwe- 
san-daw pagoda with gold, xii. 439 ; 
murdered Mgr. G. M. Percoto, Bishop 
of Massuhs, xiii. 158 ; conquered 
Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; took Tenasserim, 
xiii. 240 ; conquered and deported the 
Yun or Rwun Shans, xiii. 557. 

Alaut, /ar^i2«a in Central India, i. 164. 

Alawakhawa, fair in Bengal, i. 164. 

Alawalpur, town in Punjab, i. 164. 

Alay Khyoung, revenue circle in Burma, 
i. 164. 

Alay-Kywon, revenue circle in Burma, 
i. 164. 

Al Biruni, Arab geographer {circ. looo 
A.D.), mentions Khandwa, viii. 162 ; 
quoted, on the Maldive Islands, ix. 
250 ; on the failure of the Hindus to 
take Lahore, xi. 261. 

Albuquerque, Alfonso de, second Viceroy 
of Portuguese India (1509), article 
' India,' vi. 359 ; his capture of Goa, 
and death there, 359 ; his policy to- 
wards the natives, 359, 360. Local 
notices — Attacked Aden, i. 16 ; burnt 
Calicut, and was then defeated, iii. 269; 
succoured Raja of Cochin, and built 
first European fort there, iv. II, 12; 
maintained village system in Goa, v. 
92 ; his occupation and reconquest of 
Goa, V. 100 ; his statue at Goa, v. 109 ; 
landed at Perim, and called at Vera 
Cruz, xi. 137. 

Albuquerque, John de, first Bishop of 
Goa (1539-53), vi. 244. 

Aldeman, pargana in Oudh, i. 164, 165. 

Aldercom, Colonel, attacked Wandewash, 
xiii. 517. 

Alengad, tdhik in Madras, i. 164, 165. 

Alexander the Great, his expedition to 
India, and campaigns in the Punjab 
and Sind (327-325 B.C.), article 'India,' 
vi. 163-166; in Afghanistan, i. 48; 
march through Baluchistan, ii. 28 ; the 
Sakse, now Brahuis, in his army, iii. 
98 ; coins found at Bulandshahr, iii. 
141 ; battle with Porus at Chilianwala, 
iii. 415 ; spent three days at Taxila, 
iv. 270; Niksea identified with Mong, 
v. 189, ix. 478 ; founded Bucephala, 
identified with Jalalpur, vii. 81 ; 
crossed the Hydaspes, or Jehlam, at 
Jalalpur, vii. 166 ; took Sangala, iden- 
tified with Sanglawala Tiba, vii. 20, 



10 



INDEX. 



xii. 214 ; supposed to have built Kan- 
dahar, vii. 391 ; knew the Koii as 
Lonibare, the chief mouth of the Indus, 
viii. 298 ; took MuUan, then capital of 
the Malli, x. 3 ; campaign in the Pun- 
jab, xi. 259, 260 ; in Rawal Pindi, xii. 
23 ; remains of his fort at Sehwan, 
xii. 306 ; took a fort of the Malli iden- 
tified with Shorkot, xii. 424 ; the port 
at which his admiral stopped identified 
with Sonmiani, xiii. 61 ; took Talamba, 
a town of the Malli, xiii. 163. 

Alexandria, the modern Uchh in the 
Punjab, founded by Alexander, vi. 166, 
xiii. 400. 

Alfred the Great's Mission to India 
(883), vi. 239. 

Alguada, dangerous reef in Bay of Ben- 
gal, i. 165. 

Aliabad, village in Oudh, i. 165. 

All Adil Shah, king of Bijapur (lS57- 
79), husband of Cliand Bibi, built 
much at Bijapur, one of the victors at 
Talikot, ii. 424 ; annexed Uharwar, iv. 
259, 266 ; besieged Goa, but repulsed, 
V. loi ; strengthened Naldiiig fort, x. 
183, 184. 

Alibagh, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i. 165, 166. 

All Bahadur, grandson of Peshwa, Baji 
Rao I., establislied his authority in 
Bundelkhand, iii. 155 ; died at siege 
of Kalinjar, vii. 332. 

All Bahadur, grandson of the ruler of 
Bundelkhand, participated in the 
Mutiny and deported, iii. 156. 

AH Bandar, town in Bombay, i. 166. 

Aliganj, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 166, 167. 

Aliganj, village in Oudh, i. 167. 

Aliganj Sewan, town in Bengal, i. 167. 

Aligarh, District in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
167-177; physical aspects, 167-169 ; 
history, 169-171 ; population, 171-173 ; 
agriculture, 173, 174 ; natural calami- 
ties, 174 ; commerce and trade, 174- 
176; administration, 176, 177 ; medical 
aspects, 177. 

Aligarh, town and tahsil \n N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 178, 179 ; where Lord Lake 
defeated the Marathas, article ' India,' 
vi. 398. 

Aligarh, village in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
179. 

Aligarh, site of small fort near Calcutta, 

Aligaum, town in Bombay, i. 179. 

Ali Khan, Pathan chief of Utraula, his- 
tory of, xiii. 156, 157. 

Ali Mardan Khan, engineer of Shah 
Jahan, laid out the Shalimar Gardens 
at Baghbanpur, i. 416, xii. 374 ; made 
the Hash Canal, ii. 153, v. 344, 345 ; 



made branch from Jumna Canal to 
bring water to Delhi, vii. 259 ; said to 
have built the Char Chata at Kabul, 
vii. 269 ; planned and partly carried 
out the Eastern Jumna Canal, xii. 
1 19 ; built the Badshah Mahal in 
Saharanpur, xii. 116; his canal in 
vSialkot, xii. 441. 

Ali Muhammad, Rohilla chief, died and 
was buried at Aonla, i. 296 ; his his- 
tory, xi. 456. 

Ali Murad Talpur, Mir, allowed to retain 
part of Shikarpur, but condemned for 
forgery, and deprived of some of his 
territory, xii. 391. 

Alipur, Sub-division in Bengal, i. 179. 

Alipur, residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
of Bengal, i. 179, 180. 

Alipur, village and iahsil in Punjab, i. 
180. 

Alipur, village in Central Provinces, i. 
180, 181. 

Alipur. See Akalgarh. 

AHpura, town and Native State in N.-W. 
Provinces, i. 181. 

Ali-Rajpur, town and Native State in 
Bombay, i. 181, 182. 

Ali Vardi Khan, Nawab of Bengal (1740- 
56) ; construction of the Maratha ditch 
around Calcutta as a protection against 
the Marathas, article ' India,' vi. 381. 
Local notices — Defeated Sarfaraz Khan 
at Gheria and Marathas at Katwa, viii. 
102 ; first extracted money revenue 
from Laur, viii. 468, xiii. 146 ; his 
capital at Murshidabad, x. 23 ; trick 
played on him by Siraj-ud-daula, x. 36 ; 
his tomb at Murshidabad, x. 38. 

Aliwal, village in Punjab, i. 182; battle 
of, in the first Sikh war, article ' India,' 
vi. 411. 

Aliyar, river in Madras, i. 182. 

Allahabad, Division in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 182, 183. 

Allahabad, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 183-194; physical aspects, 183-186; 
history, 186-188 ; population, 188-189 ; 
agriculture, 189-191 ; natural calami- 
ties, 191 ; commerce and trade, 192, 
193 ; administration, 193, 194 ; sani- 
tary aspects, 194. 

Allahabad, iaksll in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 194. 

Allahabad, city in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
195-199; population, 195; history, 
195-199. 
Allahabad and Kora made over to the 
Mughal Emperor by Clive, article 
' India,' vi. 387 and footnote ; their 
resumption by Hastings and sale to 
the Wazir of Oudh, 389, 390. 
Allah Band, long bank of earth in Bom- 
bay, i. 199. 



INDEX. 



II 



AllahganJ, town in N. -W. Provinces, i. 
199. 

Allan, Major, quoted on the Arakan Yonia 
Mountains, xiii. 277- 

Allan-myo, frontier town in Lower 
Burma, i. 199, 200. 

Alleppi, town and port in Madras, i. 
200. 

Allur, town in Madras, i. 200, 201. 

Allur cum Kottapatnam, village in 
Madras, i. 201. 

Alluvion and diluvion, special instances 
of, including changes in the banks of 
rivers : Aligarh, i. 169 ; Amwa, i. 267 ; 
Assam, i. 346; Baghar, i. 415; Bah- 
raich, i. 425, 426; Bakarganj, i. 441 ; 
Balasor, ii. 3, 4, 5 ; the Baleswar, ii. 
12; Ballia, ii. 18; Bannu, ii. 89; 
Bardwan, ii, 126 ; Bareilly, ii. 138 ; 
the Barnadi, ii. 157; Bengal, ii, 271, 
272, 273 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 343, 344 ; 
the Bhagirathi, ii. 353 ; Bhagwangola, 
ii- 355; Bilu-Gywon, ii. 460; Bogra, 
iii. 25 ; Bombay, iii. 44 ; Brahraana- 
bad, iii. 91 ; the Brahmaputra, iii. 95 ; 
Budaun, iii. 116; Bulandshahr, iii. 
132 ; Calcutta, iii. 246, 247 ; Cambay, 
iii. 274; Chapra, iii. 370; the Chenab, 
iii. 380 ; the Chilka Lake, iii. 415-41 7 ; 
Chitlagong, iii. 433, 445 ; Churaman, 
iii. 460 ; Coconada, iii. 472 ; Colgong, 
iv. 23 ; Coringa, iv. 42 ; Cutch, iv. 59, 
60; Cuttack,iv. 65-67 ; Dacca, iv. 79; 
Dakshin Shahbazpur, iv. 96 ; the 
Damodar, iv. 107-109; Dareh-bauk, 
iv. 128; Darehbyii, iv. 128; Delhi, 
iv. 178 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 209 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 219 ; Dera 
Nanak, iv. 228 ; the Dhanauti, iv. 
243; Dinajpur, iv. 290, 291 ; Dipal- 
pur, iv. 304 ; Faridpur, iv. 394, 395 ; 
Firozpur, iv. 438, 439 ; the Ganges, 
iv. 472 ; Ghazipur, v. 62 ; the Girwa, 
v. 87 ; Goa, v. 105 ; Goalpara, v. 112 ; 
the Godavari, v. 123 ; the Gogra, v. 
139; Gurdaspur, v. 207; Haiatpur, v. 
239 ; Hala, v. 294 ; the Hugh, v. 467- 
488 ; Hugh District, v. 490 ; the 
Indus, vii. 14; the Irawadi, vii. 21; 
Jalandhar, vii. 84; the Jamuna, vii. 135; 
Jessor, vii. 183, 184 ; the Kalang, vii. 
323 ; Kamriip, vii. 355 ; Karachi, vii. 
444 ; Karnal, viii. 19 ; Kasimbazar, 
viii. 81 ; Kayal, viii. 107 ; Kheri, viii. 
189 ; Khulna, viii. 205, 206 ; Khushab, 
viii. 213 ; Kolkai, viii. 286 ; the Kusi, 
viii. 379, 380 ; Lahore, viii. 404 ; Lud- 
hiana, viii. 519; the Mahanadi, ix. 
163 ; the Mahananda, ix. 164 ; Mai- 
mansingh, ix. 191 ; Maldah, ix. 240; 
the Matabhanga, ix. 358, 359 ; Meerut, 
ix. 382 ; the Meghna, ix. 395 ; Mid- 
pur, ix. 425 ; Mithankot, ix. 467 ; 



Montgomery, ix. 493 ; Murshidabad, 
x. 21 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 66; Nadiya, 
X. 128, 129 ; Noakhali, x. 339, 340 ; 
Orissa, x. 428 ; Oudh, x. 48 1 ; Pabna, 
X. 511 ; Plassey, xi. 194; Purniah, xi. 
322, 331, 332 ; Purushottapur, x. 332; 
Rajmahal, xi. 390 ; the Western Ram- 
ganga, xi. 446 ; Rangpur, xi. 488, 489 ; 
the Rapti, xi. 522 ; the Ravi, xii. 15 ; 
Saharanpur, xii. 121 ; Salem, xii. 15 1 ; 
Sandwip Island, xii. 209, 210; Saran, 
xii. 252 ; Shahbandur, xii. 340 ; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 343 ; the Shwe-le, xii. 
436 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Sind, xii. 
504 ; Singraur, xii. 542 ; Sirajganj, 
xii. 547 ; Sirsa, xiii. 10 ; the Son, xiii. 
53, 54 ; Sriharikot, xiii. 75 ; the Suh- 
arnarekha, xiii. 85 ; Sultanpur (Ballia), 
xiii. 106 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. loS ; 
Siiti, xiii. 140 ; the Swat, xiii. 142 ; 
Sylhet, xiii. 144, 145 ; Tambaur, xiii. 
169 ; Tamluk, xiii. 171, 172 ; Tandan, 
xiii. 175; the Tapti, xiii. 203, 204; 
Thayet-myo, xiii. 277, 278 ; Thon-gwa, 
xiii. 288; Tipperah, xiii. 313 ; Twan- 
te, xiii. 386 ; Twenty-four Parganas, 
xiii. 3S7, 3S8 ; Udhanala, xiii. 415 ; 
the Wan, xiii. 517 ; the Za-zun, xiii. 
560. 

Al Mas'udi, Arab geographer (loth cen- 
tury), mentions caves of Ellora, iv. 
349 ; on Miiltan, x. 2 ; mentions 
Chitakul, xii. 92. 

Almeida, Franciscode, Viceroy of Portu- 
guese India (1505), article ' India,' vi. 
359 ; at Cochin, iv. 12. 

Almodh, chiefship in Central Provinces, 
i. 201. 

Almond trees in the Andaman Islands, 
i. 282 ; Baluchistan, li. 36 ; Mehar, ix. 
396 ; Safed Koh Mountains, xii. 99. 

Almora, town in N. -W. Provinces, i. 
201. 

Alompra. See Aloungpaya. 

Alum, found in Anantapur, i. 274 ; Balu- 
chistan, ii. 36 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; Bellary, 
ii. 241 ; Cutch, iv. 60 ; Dera Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 210 ; Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 
220; Kalabagh, vii. 313; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Maidani Hills, ix. 188 ; 
Mehar, ix. 396 ; Rajputana, xi. 401 ; 
Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Travancore, xiii. 

345- 
Alphabets of Ancient India, article 

' India,' vi. 102, 103. 
Altamsh, 3rd monarch of the Slave 

dynasty (1211-36), invasion by the 

Mughals, article 'India,' vi. 279; 

enlarged mosque of Kutab-ud-din at 

Delhi, iv. 191 ; took Gwalior, v. 236. 
Alur, village in Mysore, i. 201. 
Alur, town and tdltik in Madras, i. 

202. 



12 



INDEX. 



Alva, Count de, killed in battle with the 
Marathas, v. 104. 

Alvarkurichchi, town in Madras, i. 202. 

Alves, Colonel, Agent to the Governor- 
General in Rajputana, wounded in a 
riot at Jaipur, vii. 57. 

Aiwa, petty State in Bombay, i. 202. 

Alwar, State in Rajputana, i. 202-206 ; 
population, 202, 203 ; hills and streams, 
203 ; history, 203-205 ; crops, 205 ; 
commerce, trade, manufactures, etc., 
205, 206 ; revenue, 206. 

Alwar, capital of State in Rajputana, 
i. 206, 207. 

Alwaye, town in Madras, i. 207. 

Alwaye, river in Madras, i. 207. 

Amala, Dang State in Bombay, i. 207. 

Amalapi'iram, town and taluk in Madras, 
i. 207, 208. 

Amalner, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i. 208. 

Amalyara, petty State in Bombay, i. 208, 
209. 

Amalyara, town in Bombay, i. 209. 

A man, or winter rice crop. See Rice 
cultivation. 

Amanat, feeder of North Keel river, 
Bengal, i. 209. 

Amaniganj, market village in Oudh, 
i. 209. 

Amaniganj-hat, silk mart in Bengal, 
i. 209. 

Amapur, trading town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 209. 

Amarapura, town in Burma, i. 209, 210. 

Amarapuram. See Amrapur. 

Amarkantak, hill in Baghelkhand, i. 210. 

Amarnath, village in Bombay, i. 210, 
211. 

Amarnath, cave in Punjab, i. 211. 

Amar Singh Thappa, Gurkha General, 
surrendered to General Ochterlony at 
Malaun, ix. 237 ; his death, x. 289. 

Amarwara, village in Central Provinces, 
i. 211. 

Amatti, town in Coorg, i. 211. 

Amb, estate in Punjab, i. 211. 

Ambad, town and taluk in Nizam's 
Dominions, i. 212. 

Ambagarh Chauki, chiefship in Central 
Provinces, i. 212. 

Ambahta, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 213. 

Ambaji-durga, hill in Mysore, i. 213. 

Ambajipetta. See Machavaram. 

Ambala, Division in Punjab, i. 213. 

Ambala, District in Punjab, i. 213-224; 
physical aspects, 213-215; history, 
215-217; population, 217-220; agri- 
culture, 220-222 ; natural calamities, 
222; commerce and trade, etc., 222, 
223 ; administration, 223 ; sanitary 
aspects, 224. 



Ambala, iahsil in Punjab, 224. 

Ambala, city and cantonment in Punjab, 
224-226 ; history, 224, 225 ; water- 
supply, 225 ; population, 226 ; grand 
darhdr there, article ' India,' vi. 425. 

Ambalapulai, taluk in Madras, i. 226. 

Ambapeta, estate in Madras, i. 226. 

Ambarnath. See Amarnath. 

Ambasamudram, town and taluk in 
Madras, i. 226. 

Ambatmiiri, pass in Madras, i. 126. 

Ambela, mountain pass in Punjab, i. 
226-228. 

Amber, historic capital in Rajputana, i. 
228, 229. 

Ambergris, found in Nicobar Islands, 
X. 297. 

Amber mines in Upper Burma, iii. 211. 

Ambgaon, pargand in Central Provinces, 
i. 229. 

Ambika, river in Bombay, i. 229. 

Amboyna, massacre of, article ' India,' 
vi. 362, 368, 561. 

Ambulupali, town in Madras, i. 230. 

Ambur, town in Madras, i. 230. 

Ambiirpet, town in Madras, i. 230. 

Ambr. See Amber. 

American Missions. See Missions. 

Amet, town in Rajputana, i. 230. 

Amethi, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 230, 231. 

Amethi, pargand in Oudh, i. 231. 

Amethi Dungar, town in Oudh, i. 231. 

Amgaon, estate and village in Central 
Provinces, i. 231, 232. 

Amherst, Lord, Governor-General of 
India (1823-28), first Burmese war, 
capture of Bhartpur, article ' India,' 
vi. 403, 404 ; first spent summer at 
Simla, xii. 496. 

Amherst, District in Burma, i. 232-243 ; 
physical aspects, 232-235 ; geological 
formation, 235 ; history, 235, 236 ; 
antiquities, 236, 237 ; population, 237, 
238; agriculture, etc., 239, 240; manu- 
factures, etc., 241 ; administration, 
241, 243; climate, etc., 243. 

Amherst, town in Burma, i. 243. 

Ami, river in N.-W. Provinces, i. 243. 

Amindivi Islands. See Laccadives. 

Amingadh, town in Bombay, i. 244. 

Amir Khan, Pindari leader (1817), 
article ' India,' vi. 404. Local notices 
— Invaded Rohilkhand, ii. 140 ; de- 
feated by Colonel Skinner near Afzal- 
garh, ii. 430 ; plundered Dhampur, 
iv. 241 ; checked by Major Shepherd 
at I rich, which he afterwards made his 
head-quarters, vii. 24 ; ravaged Jaipur, 
vii. 56 ; called in to intervene between 
Jaipur and Jodhpur, vii. 242 ; defeated 
a British force near Kiinch, viii. 363 ; 
owned the state of Lawa, viii. 468 ; 



INDEX. 



13 



sacked Mandawar, ix. 293 ; sacked 
Najina, x. 160 ; his ravages in Raj- 
putana, xi. 406 ; made Nawab of Tonk, 
xi. 407, xiii. 337 ; Rampura granted 
him, xi. 461 ; twice plundered Sagar, 
xii. 108 ; was granted Sironj by Holkar, 
xiii. 7, 8 ; plundered Thakurdwara, 
xiii. 246 ; his history, xiii. 337, 338 ; 
ravaged Mewar or Udaipur, xiii. 407. 

Amjad All Shah, 4th king of Oudh 
(1841-47), built the iron bridge across 
the Gumti at Lucknow, viii. 510. 

Amjhera, pargand in Central India, i. 
244. 

Amliyara. See Amalyara. 

Ammapet, town in Madras, i. 244. 

Ammayanayakanur, estate and village in 
Madras, i. 244. 

Amner, town and fort in Berar, i. 244, 
245. 

Amod, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 
i. 245. 

Amosi, town in Oudh, i. 245. 

Ampta, village in Bengal, i. 245. 

Amraoti, District in Berar, i. 245-250 ; 
physical aspects, 246 ; history, 246, 
247 ; population, 247 ; agriculture, 
247, 248 ; land tenures, 248 ; natural 
calamities, 248 ; manufactures, 248 ; 
trade, 248, 249 ; roads and railways, 
249 ; administration, 249 ; meteoro- 
logical aspects, etc., 249, 250. 

Amraoti, tahsil in Berar, i. 250. 

Amraoti, town in Berar, i. 250, 251 ; 
history, 250, 251 ; population, 251, 

Amrapur. See Umrapur. 

Amrapur, town in Madras, i. 251. 

Amrapur, petty State in Bombay, i. 251. 

Amravati, river in Madras, i. 252. 

Amravati, town in Madras with ruined 
temples, i. 252. 

Amravati or Chatia Hill, tank and hill 
in Bengal, i. 252, 253. 

Amreli, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i. 253. 

Amri, village in Bombay, i. 253. 

Amrita Bazar or Magura, village in 
Bengal, i. 253. 

Amrit Rao, son of Raghubai Peshwa, 
lived at Tarahwan on a pension, xiii. 
207. 

Amritsar, Division in Punjab, i. 253, 254. 

Amritsar, District in Punjab, i. 254-263 ; 
pliysical aspects, 254-256 ; history, 
256, 257; population, 257-259; agri- 
culture, 259-261 ; natural calamities, 

261 ; commerce and trade, etc., 261, 

262 ; administration, 262, 263 ; sani- 
tary aspects, 263. 

Amritsar, tahsil in Punjab, i. 263. 
Amritsar, city in Punjab, i. 263-266 ; 

history, 263-265 ; commerce and trade, 

265 ; population, 266. 



Amroha, historic town and (ahsil in 

N.-W. Provinces, i. 266. 
Amsin, town and pargand in Oudh, 

i. 266, 267. 
Amura Bhauriari, village in Bengal, i. 

267. 
Amurnath, cave in Punjab, i. 267. See 

Amarnath. 
Amwa, village in N.-W. Provinces, i. 

267. 
Amyatt, Mr., murdered near Kasimbazar, 

xi. 95. 
An, or Aeng, pass over the Arakan Yoma 

Mountains in Burma, vi. 6. 
An, or Aeng, river in Burma, i. 267. 
An, or Aeng, town and township in 

Burma, i. 267, 268. 
Anagundi, capital of the Narapathi 

dynasty of Southern India in the 14th 

centuiy. See Vijayanagar. 
Anahadgarh, town in Punjab, i. 268 
Anaimiidi, plateau in Madras, i. 268. 
Anakapalle, estate, town, and tdhik in 

Madras, i. 268, 269. 
Analysis of the Constitzition of the East 

India Coinpaiiy, by P. Auber, quoted, 

article ' India,' vi. 364, 365 (foot- 
notes). 
Analysis of Indian foreign import and 

export trade, principal staples, article 

' India,' vi. 565-581. 
Anamalai, range of hills in Madras, i. 

269-271. 
Anamalai, town in Madras, i. 271. 
Anamasamudrampet, village in Madras, 

i. 271, 272. 
Anand, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

i. 272. 
Anandapur, Christian village in Coorg, i. 

272. 
Ananda Raz Gajapati, Raja of Viziana- 

gram (1757), surrendered the Northern 

Circars to the Company, iii. 469 ; 

accompanied Col. Forde in his march 

on Masulipatam, xiii. 500. 
Anandpur, petty State in Kathiawar, i. 

272. 
Anandpur, town in Punjab, i. 272, 273. 
Anandpur, village in Bengal, i. 273. 
Anand Rao Paur, received grant of State 

ofDharfrom Baji Rao Peshwa, iv. 247. 
Anang Bhim Deo, king of Orissa (1174- 

1205), built temple of Jagannath at 

Puri, x. 441, 442. 
Anang Pal, made Delhi capital of the 

Tuar Rajas {circa 736), iv. 190. 
Anang Pal 11., a second time made Delhi 

capital of the Tuar Rajas on being 

driven from Kanauj (1052), iv. 190. 
Anang Pal ill., last Tuar Raja, driven 

from Delhi by the Chauhans of Ajmere 

(1 154), iv. 190. 
Anantagiri, village in Madras, i. 273. 



14 



INDEX. 



Anantapur, ancient town in IMysore, i. 

273-^ 

Anantapur, District in Madras, i. 273- 
279 ; physical aspects, 273, 374 ; his- 
tory, 274, 275 ; population, 275, 276 ; 
agriculture, 276, 277 ; natural calami- 
ties, 277, 278 ; commerce and trade, 
278 ; administration, 278, 279 ; medical 
aspects, 279. 

Anantapur, tahik in Madras, i. 279, 2S0. 

Anantapur, town in Madras, i. 280. 

Anawrata, Emperor of Pagan, destroyed 
the Talaings in the nth century, iii. 
174 ; conquered Hanthawadi, v. 313. 

Anchittai-durgam, hill fort in Madras, i. 
281. 

Ancient capitals: Chandravati, near Mount 
Abu, i. 8 ; Ahar, i. 81 ; Ajodhya, i. 134, 
135 ; Amber, i. 228, 229 ; Anagundi, i. 
268 ; Aror, i. 332 ; Asarur, i. 337 ; 
Bidar, ii. 419 ; Bijapur, ii. 423-425 ; 
Bin'idankarayapuram, iii. 13 ; Brah- 
manabad, iii. 91 ; Champaner, iii. 333; 
Combaconum, iv. 24 ; Conjevaram, iv. 
26; Dacca, iv. 89-92 ; Daulatabad, iv. 
158-160; Dausa, iv. 161 ; Delhi, iv. 
1 89 ; Deogarh, iv. 202 ; Deolia, iv. 
204 ; Dimapur, iv. 289, 290 ; Dipalpur, 
iv. 303, 304 ; Dunwon, iv. 325 ; Ellich- 
pur, iv. 347, 348 ; Fatehpur Sikri, iv. 
433-435 ; Garha, v. 12 ; Garhgaon, v. 
14, 15 ; Gauhati, v. 34, 35 ; Gaur, v. 35- 
41 ; Golconda, v. 143, 144 ; Goraghat, 
v. 163 ; Halebid, v. 295 ; Hampi, v. 
306-308 ; Hastinapur, v. 352 ; Humcha, 
V. 501, 502 ; Ikkeri, v. 508 ; Jaunpur, 
vii. 159, 160; Kalingapatam, vii. 330; 
Kanauj, vii. 386, 387 ; Karur, viii. 51, 
52 ; Kasipur, viii. 82 ; Khajurahu, viii. 
140, 141 ; Lahore, viii. 415 ; Madura, 
ix. 133-135 ; Maibang, ix. 187, 188; 
Mandawar, ix. 292, 293 ; Mandogarh, 
ix. 308, 309 ; Mandor, ix. 309 ; 
Martaban, ix. 349, 350 ; Mro-haung, 
ix. 523, 524 ; Murshidabad, x. 31-39 ; 
Nadiya, x. 141, 142; Nagar, x. 155; 
Nagar (Bednur), x. 155 ; Old Udaipur, 
X. 422 ; Paithan, x. 530, 531 ; Panduah 
(Hugh), xi. 39 ; Panduah (Maldah), 
xi. 39-42 ; Parenda, xi. 62 ; Anhilwara 
Patan, xi. 82 ; Pegu, xi. 125-128 ; 
Rajagriha, xi. 380, 381 ; Rajamahendri, 
xi. 382, 383 ; Rajmahal, xi. 390 ; 
Ramnagar, xi. 453 ; Rangpur, xi. 501, 
502 ; Sabhar, xii. 88 ; Sahet Mahet, 
xii. 126 ; Sankisa, xii. 223, 224 ; 
Seringapatam, xii. 318-320; Simraon, 
xii. 501, 502 ; Sitpur, xiii. 39 ; Sonar- 
gaon, xiii. 59; Sopara, xiii. 65; Talkad, 
xiii. 167, 168; Tamk'ik, xiii. 171-173; 
Tandan, xiii. 175, 176 ; Tanjore, xiii. 
194-196 ; Thana, xiii. 258, 259 ; Tha- 
tun, xiii. 275 ; Udayagiri (Madras), 



xiii. 415 ; Ujjain, xiii. 417, 418 ; 
Umattur, xiii. 421 ; Vijayanagar, xiii. 
473 ; Wala, xiii. 514; Warangal, xiii. 
521 ; Ya-theth-myo, xiii. 549. 

Ancient India as described by l\Iegas- 
theiics and Arrian, by Mr. J. M'Crin- 
dle, quoted, article 'India,' vi. 168 
(footnote I ), 356 (footnote). 

Ancient kingdoms : Andhra, i. 287 ; 
Chera, iii. 390, 391 ; Chola, iii. 455, 
456 ; Kalinga, vii. 328-330 ; Kanauj, 
vii. 386, 387 ; Maharashtra, ix. 166- 
168 ; Pandya, xi. 42 ; Tuluva, xiii. 
375 ; Vijayanagar, xiii. 473 ; Walabhi, 
xiii. 514. 

Ancient land system of India, vi. 438. 

Ancient mingling of castes, vi. 195, 196. 

Ancient stone circles. See Stone monu- 
ments, Ancient. 

Andaman Islands, in Bay of Bengal, i. 
281-287 ; physical aspects, 282, 283 ; 
history, 283, 284 ; population, 284, 
285 ; agriculture, 285, 286 ; medical 
aspects, etc., 286, 287 ; assassination 
of Lord Mayo at Port Blair, vi. 425. 

Andaman Islanders, The, article ' India,' 

^^- 55- , 
Andar, ghat or pass in Madras, i. 287. 

Andaw, pagoda in Burma, i. 287. 

Anderson, Col., connected the Sutlej and 

and Upper Sohag Canal, xiii. 46. 
Anderson, Dr., member of commission to 

open trade route through Burma, iii. 

228. 
Anderson, Lieut., murdered at Multan, 

obelisk to, x. 12. 
Andhargaon, town in Central Provinces, 

i. 287. 
Andhra, ancient kingdom in S. India, i. 

287. 
Andhra, estate in Madras, i. 287. 
Andhs, aboriginal tribe in Berar, xiii. 

541- 

Andipatti, range of hills in Madras, i. 
287, 28S. 

Andipatti, town in Madras, i. 288. 

Andiyur, town in Madras, i. 288. 

Andra. See Andhra. 

Anecdoia Oxoncnsia, Aryan series, vi. 
102 and footnote. 

Anechankur, toll station in Coorg, i. 288. 

Anekal, town and tdink in Mysore, i. 288. 

Angadipuram, town in Madras, i. 288, 289. 

Angarbari, detached peak in Bengal, i. 
289. 

Anghad, petty State in Bombay, i. 289. 

Angrezabad. See English Bazar. 

Angria, Maratha pirate dynasty, strong- 
holds stormed by Clive and Watson 
(1756), iii. 38; took Jaigarh (1713), 
vii. 46 ; in Kolaba, viii. 263, 264 ; 
ravages on the Malabar coast, ix. 221 ; 
held Rajapur, xi. 385 ; their history in 



INDEX. 



Ralnagiri, xii. 6 ; their capital Vizia- 

drug, xiii. 499. 
Angul, Goverament estate in Orissa, i. 

289, 290. 
Angul, village in Orissa, i. 290. 
Anhilvvara dynasty, Rajput (746-1300), 

Broach, a flourishing port under, iii. 

"3- , . . 

Anicuts or Dams, on the Amravati, 1. 
252 ; at Bezwada, ii. 336 ; at Bukkach- 
erla, iii. 129 ; on the Cauvery, iii. 277, 
279 ; on the Coleroon, iv. 22 ; Cortel- 
liar, iv. 43 ; Adniamayapalli in Cudda- 
pah, iv. 53, 54 ; Dowlaishvaram, iv. 
316; on the Godavari, v. 53; on the 
Honnuhole, v. 441 ; Kampli, vii. 
354 ; at Sunkesala in Karnul, viii. 
34 ; on the Kistna at Bezwada, viii. 
237 ; in the Madras Presidency, ix. 
41, 42, 43; Nellore, x. 261, 267; 
on the Noyil, x. 416 ; on the Palar, 
X. 541 ; on the Penner, xi. 133, 134; 
on the Poini, xi. 194 ; Sangam (under 
construction), xii. 214, 215 ; at Dehri- 
on-Son in Shahabad, xii. 325 ; across 
the Shamsha near Maddur, xii. 376 ; 
across the Sharadanadi, xii. 376 ; 
across the Sharavati, xii. 377 ; the 
Dehri, xiii. 54, 55 ; the Srivaikantham, 
xiii. 170, 171 ; in Tanjore, xiii. 189, 
190 ; in Tenkasi, xiii. 241 ; across the 
Tungabhadra, xiii. 383 ; across the 
Varada, xiii. 463 ; across the Vara- 
hanadi, xiii. 464 ; Vellar, xiii. 467 ; 
across the Yagachi, xiii. 547 ; Yelan- 
dur, xiii. 552. 

Animals, wild and domestic, article 
' India,' vi. 652-659. Local notices — 
See section Physical Aspects under each 
District article, and especially Afghan- 
istan, i. 36, 37 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bom- 
bay, iii. 45, 46 ; Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Madras, ix. 88-91 ; 
Nepal, X. 277, 278 ; Oudh, x. 483 ; 
Punjab, xi. 259 ; Sind, xii. 507. — For 
special notices, see also Antelopes, 
Asses (wild). Bears, Bison, Buffaloes, 
Camels, Cattle, Cheetahs or Hunting 
Leopards, Deer, Dogs, Elephants, 
Foxes, Gazelles, Goats, Hogs (wild). 
Horses, Hyaenas, Ibex, Leopards, 
Lions, Miihiin or Wild Cows, Nilgai or 
Blue Cows, Otters, Ponies, Porcupines, 
Rats, Rhinoceros, Sheep, Tigers, 
Wolves, and Yaks. 

Animals, hospitals for — Panjrdpols — a 
surival of the Buddhistic tenderness for 
animals, article ' India,' vi. 159. Local 
notices — Ahmadabad, i. 97 ; Broach, 
iii. 105 ; Sural, xiii. 134, 135. 

Aniseed, found in Maler Kotla, ix. 255. 

Anjangaon, town in Berar, i. 290. 

Anjangaon Bari, town in Berar, i. 290. 



Anjanwel, seaport in B imbay, i. 290. 

Anjar, town in Bombay, i. 290, 291. 

Anjengo, town in Madras, i. 291, 292. 

Anji, town in Central Provinces, i. 292. 

Anjinad, tract in Madras, i. 292. 

Anjnas, cultivating race in Alahva, ix. 
269. 

Ankewallia, petty State in Kathiawar, i. 
292. 

Ankleswar,town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i. 292. 

Ankola, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 293. 

Ankola, town and seaport in Bombay, i. 

293- 
Annals and Antiquities of Rdjasthdn. 

See Tod, Col. 
Annamarazpet, village in Madras, i. 

293- 
Annigeri, town in Bombay, i. 293. 

Anta Dhura, pass in N.-W. Provinces, i. 

293- 
Antelope, or Black Buck, article ' India,' 
vi. 657. Local notices — Ajmere, i. 
119 ; Akola, i. 141 ; Allahabad, i. 185 ; 
Amritsar, i. 255 ; Anantapur, i. 274 ; 
Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; 
Belgaum, ii. 232 ; Bellary, ii. 242 ; 
Bombay Presidency, iii. 46 ; Broach, 
iii. 102; Budaun, iii. 1 17; Buland- 
shahr, iii. 132 ; Buldana, iii. 143 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 212; Cambay, iii. 
271; Cawnpur, iii. 280; Chengalpat, 
iii. 382 ; Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Cudda- 
pah, iv. 48 ; Dharwar, iv. 259 ; Faiza- 
had, iv. 381 ; Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; 
Firozpur, iv. 439 ; Gaya, v. 45 ; God- 
avari, v. 123 ; Gonda, v. 147 ; Goona, 
v. 159; Gwalior, v. 229; Hamirpur, 
V. 298 ; Hardoi, v. 322 ; Hassan, v. 
346 ; Himalaya Mountains, v. 409 ; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; Jalandhar, vii. 
85 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Kadur, vii. 
283 ; Kaira, vii. 300 ; Kaladgi, vii. 
315 ; Karachi, vii. 445 ; Karnal, viii. 
20; Karnul, viii. 35, 36; Kathiawar, 
viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133 ; Khan- 
desh, viii. 150; Kheri, viii. 190; 
Kistna, viii. 226 ; Kotah, viii. 304 ; 
Lahore, viii. 405 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; 
Larkhana, viii. 463 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
477 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 91 ; 
Mainpuri, ix. 203 ; Mallani, ix. 261 ; 
Mirzapur, ix. 453 ; Montgomery, ix. 
495 ; Nallamalai Hills, x. 185 ; Nasik, 
x. 228 ; Nellore, x. 262 ; Oudh, x. 
483 ; Poona, xi. 200 ; Punjab, xi, 259 ; 
Purniah, xi. 323 ; Raipur, xi. 368 ; 
Rampur, xi. 455 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; 
.Saharanpur, xii. 115; Salem, xii. 152; 
Shahjahanpur, xii. 344 ; Shahpur, xii. 
361 ; Sialkot, xii. 441 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; 
Sirsa, xiii. ID ; Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; 
Surat, xiii. 120; Wardha, xiii. 524. 



i6 



INDEX. 



Anthracite coal, found in Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 2. 

Antimony, found in Afghanistan, i. 36, 
37 ; Anantapur, i. 274 ; Baluchistan, 
ii. 36 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 201, 202; Upper Burma, iii. 211 ; 
Hazaribagh, v. 379 ; Kangra, vii. 412 ; 
Kulu, viii. 337 ; Lakhi Mountains, 
viii. 424 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 6 ; 
Bajaur, xi. 146 ; Sandur Hills, xii. 
209 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 430. 

Antimony, sulphide of, found in Bala- 
ghat, i. 454. ^ 

Antimony, sulphuret of, found in Bhagal- 
pur, ii. 345. , , . o 

Antiquarian remams; m Mount Abu, 1. 8; 
Achala Basanta, i. 12 ; in Afghanistan, 
i. 52, 53 ; in Afghan-Turkistan, i. 56 ; 
at Ahar, i. 81 ; Ahmadabad, i. 97 ; 
Ahmadgarh, i. 98; Ahobalam, i. no; 
Ajaigarh, i. II2; Ajmere, i. 132; 
Ajodhya, i. 134, 135 ; Akola, i. 141 ; 
Allahabad, i. 196, 198 ; Amarnath, i. 
210, 211 ; Amber, i. 228, 229 ; Amra- 
vati, i. 252 ; Anamalai Hills, i. 270 ; 
Araraj, i. 306 ; Asarur, i. 337 ; Assia, 
i. 375 ; Atranji Khera, i. 379, 380 ; 
Ava, i. 389 ; Azamgarh, i. 395 ; Bada- 
mi, i. 407 ; Badrihat, i. 410 ; Bagher- 
hat, i. 417 ; Bahraich, i. 427 ; Baidya- 
nath, i. 436 ; Balihri, ii. 13 ; Balkh, ii. 
14; Banda, ii. 55; Bannu, ii. 90; 
Bara Banki, ii. 107 ; Barabar Hills, 
ii. 115; Bareilly, ii. 141; Barkiir, ii. 
156, 157; Bassein, ii. 191, 192; Bela- 
gavi, ii. 230 ; Benares, ii. 266 ; Bez- 
wada, ii. 336 ; Bhacheswar, ii. 340 ; 
Bhagalpur, ii. 348 ; Bhainsror, ii. 356 ; 
Bhandak, ii. 359 ; Bhera, ii. 386 ; 
Bhilsa, ii. 393, 394; Bhuj, ii. 408; 
Bilgram, ii. 455, 456 ; Bishnupur, iii. 
17 ; Boram, iii. 88 ; Brahmanabad, iii. 
91 ; Buddh Gaya, iii. 125-127 ; Buland- 
shahr, iii. 141 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 154 ; 
Burhanpur, iii. 164 ; Champaner, iii. 
333; Champaran, iii. 334, 335, 340, 
341 ; Chanda, iii. 352 ; Chandragiri, 
iii. 363; Harchoka in Chang Bhakar, 
iii. 367 ; Charsadda, iii. 373 ; Chaul, 
iii- 376, 377 ; Chitor, iii. 431 ; Coorg, 
iv- 35, 36 ; Dalmi, iv. 100 ; Udainagar, 
near Darapur, iv. 122 ; Darauti, iv. 
122; Tezpur, near Darrang, iv. 143; 
Daulatabad, iv. 158; Debi Patan, iv. 
164; Delhi, iv. 189; Dheri Shahan, 
iv. 269, 270 ; Dimapur, iv. 289, 290 ; 
Dipalpur, iv. 304 ; Elephanta, iv. 341 ; 
Eran, iv. 354, 355 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
410 ; Gaur, v. 38-40 ; Gaya, v. 47-49 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 62, 63 ; Giriyak, v. 85 ; 
Girnar, v. 85, 86 ; Gobardhan, v. 121 ; 
Gujrat, V. 189; Gwalior, v. 234-236; 
Halebid, v. 295 ; Hampi, v. 307, 308 ; 



Harappa, v. 320; Hardwar, v. 331- 
333 ; Harrand, v. 342 ; Hasan Abdal, 
V. 342 ; Hassan, v. 346 ; Ikanua, v. 

507 ; Jaintiapur, vii. 50 ; Jalalpur, vii. 
81 ; Jaunpur, vii. 159, 160 ; in Jehlam, 
vii. 169; Jerruck, vii. 182; Kachola, 
vii. 278 ; Kafirkot, vii. 292 ; Kalinga- 
patam, vii. 330; Kalinjar, vii. 333-337; 
Kanarak, vii. 384, 385 ; Kanauj, vii. 
387 ; Karakal, vii. 463 ; Karanja, vii. 
467 ; Kasia, viii. 79 ; Katas, viii. 87 ; 
Khajurahu, viii. 140, 141 ; Kora, viii. 
295 ; Kudarkot, viii. 329 ; Lahore, 
viii. 415; Mahabalipur, ix. 143-149; 
Mahim, ix. 181 ; Mahoba, ix. 183 ; 
Mandar Hill, ix. 292 ; Mandogarh, ix. 
308, 309 ; Manikiala, ix. 319, 320 ; 
Meerut, ix. 393 ; Mehkar, ix. 399 ; 
Mergui, ix. 408 ; Munj, x. 15 ; Muttra, 
^' 53> 54 ; Nadol, x. 142, 143 ; Palma, 
xi. 14 ; Panduah, (Hugli), xi. 39 ; 
Panduah (Maldah), xi. 39-42 ; 
Anhilwara Patan, xi. 82 ; Patana, xi. 
84 ; Pehoa, xi. 129 ; Penukonda, xi. 
135 ; Rajagriha, xi. 380, 381 ; Rajma- 
hal, xi. 390 ; Ramgarh Hill, xi. 447 ; 
Rangamati, xi. 469 ; Rani-niir, xi. 507, 

508 ; Tsandavolu in RepuUi, xii. 44 ; 
in Rohri, xii. 64, 65 ; Rohtasgarh, xii. 
78 ; Rupbas, xii. 83 ; Sahet Mahet or 
Sravasti, xii. 1 26- 1 34 ; Sakraypatna, 
xii. 148 ; Salsette, xii. 169 ; Sanchi, 
xii. 194-196 ; in Sandoway, xii. 201 ; 
Sangala, xii. 214 ; Sankisa, xii. 223, 
224 ; Sarai Aghat, xii. 249 ; Sarnath, 
xii. 269, 270; Sayyidpur (N.-W. P.), 
xii. 300 ; Sewan, xii. 322 ; in Shaha- 
bad, xii. 328 ; in Shahpur, xii. 361 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 400 ; Shorkot, xii. 424 ; 
Sialkot, xii. 451 ; Simraon, xii. 501, 
502 ; Sindkher, xii. 527 ; in Singh- 
bhiim, xii. 536 ; on the Singimari 
River, xii. 541 ; Sivasamudram, xiii. 
42 ; Somnath, xiii. 50 ; Sonargaon, xiii. 
59 ; Sonpat, xiii. 62 ; Soron, xiii. 67 ; 
Sumerpur, xiii. 107 ; Syriam, xiii. 158 ; 
Talamba, xiii. 163 ; Talkad, xiii. 167 ; 
Tamliik, xiii. 172 ; Tezpur, xiii. 244 ; 
Than, xiii. 248, 249 ; Tharand Parkar, 
xiii. 267 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 305 ; Tiru- 
murtikovil, xiii, 325 ; Tosham, xiii. 
340 ; Uchh, xiii. 400 ; Ujjain, xiii. 
417, 418; Ventipur, xiii. 471; Wala, 
xiii. 514; Yusufzai, xiii. 558. 

Antivilli, village in Bombay, i. 293. 
Antora, seaport in Bombay, i. 293, 294. 
Antravedi, shrine in Madras, i. 294. 
Antri, pargand in Central India, i. 294. 
Anumakonda, historic capital in Deccan, 

i. 294. See Telingana. 
Amipgarh, town in Rajputana, i. 294. 
Anupshahr, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, i. 294, 



INDEX. 



17 



Anwa, town in Nizam's Dominions, i. 
295. 

Anwar-ud-din, Nawab of Arcot, defeated 
by Muzafilar Jang at Ambur, i. 230 ; 
granted the Northern Circars, iii. 468. 

Aonla, ancient town and tahsil'm. N.-W. 
Provinces, i. 295, 296. 

Aornos, Mount, mentioned by Arrian, 
different identifications of, xi. 506. 

Apa Sahib (Mahduji Bhonsla), Raja of 
Nagpur, sent his ladies and jewels to 
Bhandara, ii. 361 ; Sagarand Narbada 
annexed on his deposition, iii. 302 ; 
his history, x. 167 ; his attack on the 
Resident at Nagpur, x. 167 ; his defeat 
and deposition, x. 168. 

Appecherla, town in Madras, i. 296. 

Appekondu, village in Madras, i. 296. 

Apples ; grown in Afghanistan, i. 38 ; 
Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Ghazni, v. 72 ; 
Kalhatti, vii. 325 ; Kandahar, vii. 
391 ; Kangra, vii. 412; Kashmir, viii. 
71; Khairpur, viii. 136; Kumaun, 
viii. 369 ; Manipur, ix. 331 ; Muzaf- 
fargarh, x. 57 ; Mysore, x. 103 ; 
Nilgiri Hills, x. 313 ; Peshawar, xi. 
159 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; Sind, 
xii. 520; Sukkur, xiii. 91. 

Apricots, grown in Balkh, ii. 15 ; Balu- 
chistan, ii. 36 ; Ghazni, v. 72 ; Gilghit, 
v. 80 ; Kandahar, vii. 391 ; Kangra, 
vii. 312 ; Kashmir, viii. 71 ; Khab, 
viii. 122 ; Khabul, viii. 122; Kohat, viii. 
242 ; Kulu, viii. 336, 338 ; Peshawar, 
xi. 156 ; Sind, xii. 520. 

Ar. See Ahar. 

Arab expeditions to Bombay and Sind 
(636-82S), vi. 268. 

Arabs — in Aden, i. 18 ; their tribes near 
Aden, i. 24 {see Abdalis, Akrabis, 
Fadhlis) ; in Bombay Presidency, iii. 
49 ; City, iii. 81 ; plundered Diu, 1670, 
iv. 308 ; Haidarabad, v. 253 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 379 ; their defence of 
Malegaon, May 1818, ix. 254; their 
colony and power at Rander, xi. 46S ; 
Ratnagiri, xii. 7 ; their attack on 
Songir, xiii. 61 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 304. 
See also Labbays. 

Arachalur, village in Madras, i. 296. 

Aragonda, village in Madras, i. 296, 297. 

Arail, village and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 297. 

Arains, market gardeners and cultivators 
in Jehlam, vii. 17 1. 

Arakan, Division in Lower Burma, i. 
297, 298. 

Arakan. See Mro-haung. 

Arakanese. See Maghs. 

Arakan Hill Tracts, District in Lower 
Burma, i. 298-304 ; physical aspects, 
etc., 29S, 299; history, 299; popula- 
tion, 299-301 ; agriculture, etc., 301, 
VOL. XIV. 



302 ; manufactures, 302, 303 ; admini- 
stration, 303, 304 ; climate, 304. 

Arakan Oil Company, vi. 626, 627. 

Arakan Yoma, or Roma, range of hills, 
with important passes running down 
Burma, i. 304, 305; article 'India,' 
vi. 3. 

Arakere, tract in Mysore, i. 305. 

Arakhs, aboriginal tribe in Gonda, v. 
151. 

Aral River, channel in connection with 
the Indus, i. 305, 306. 

Arameri, village in Coorg, i. 306. 

Aran, river in Berar, i. 306. 

Arang, town in Central Provinces, i. 306. 

Araraj, village in Bengal, i. 306. 

Arariya, village and Sub-division in Ben- 
gal, i. 306. 

Arasalar, estuary in Madras, i. 307. 

Araun, pargand in Central India, i. 307. 

Arava-Kiirichi, village in Madras, i. 307. 

Aravalli Hills, range of mountains in 
Rajputana, i. 307, 308. 

Arazi, village in Bombay, i. 308. 

Arbuthnot, Sir A. J., acting Governor of 
Madras (1872), ix. 67. 

Arbuthnot, Messrs., & Co., rented the 
estate of Palakonda, ix. 534 ; their 
introduction of indigo, and attempt to 
introduce cotton, xiii. 492. 

ArchcEological Survey of Western India, 
Mr. E. Thomas' Papers in, quoted, vi. 
147 (footnotes); 172 (footnotes); 175 
(footnote 3) ; 182 (footnotes I and 4) ; 
185 (footnote 4). 

Archaeology of India. For Local notices 
see Antiquarian Remains, Architecture, 
Buddhist Antiquities, Coins, Mosques, 
and Temples. 

Architecture, ancient Indian, article 
' India, 'vi. 112, 170; under the Mughal 
Emperors, 294, 304. Local notices : — 
(i) Buddhist architecture — Ajanta, i. 
114-116; Amravati, i. 252; Bagh, i. 
414 ; Bara Banki, ii. 107 ; Barkur, ii. 
157; Benares, ii. 268; Bezwada, ii. 
336 ; Bhander, ii. 338 ; Bhilsa, ii. 393, 
394 ; Buddh Gaya, iii. 126, 127 ; 
Champaran, iii. 340, 341 ; EUora, iv. 
349; Eran, iv. 354, 355; Junagarh, 
vii. 263 ; Kanum, vii. 438 ; Kasia, viii. 
79 ; Khandgiri, viii. 159 ; Mahabalipur, 
ix. 143-149 ; Pandrinton, xi. 38, 39 ; 
Rani-mir, xi. 507, 508 ; Sanchi, xii. 
194-196; Sankisa, xii. 223, 224; 
Sarnath, xii. 269, 270 ; Udayagiri, xiii. 

414, 415- 

(2) Burmese architecture — Amara- 
piira, i. 210 ; Amherst, i. 236 ; Ava, i. 
389; Upper Burma, iii. 217; Kyaik- 
■ kauk, viii. 382 ; Kyaik-ti-yo, viii. 383 ; 
Mahamuni, ix. 156; Mandalay, ix. 
289 ; Shwe-Dagon, xii. 426, 427 ; 

B 



i8 



INDEX. 



Shwe-maw-daw, xii. 436 ; Shwe-nat- 
taung, xii. 437 ; Shwe-san-daw, xii. 
438 ; Shwe-thek-lut, xii. 439. 

(3) Dutch architecture — Cochin, iv. 
II, 12; Coringa, iv, 42; Sadras, xii. 
94. 

(4) English and modern architecture 
—Agra, i. 70, 75 ; Alipur, i. 179, 180; 
Allahabad, i. 198 ; Ambala, i. 225 ; 
Bangalore, ii. 67 ; Baroda, ii. 171 ; 
Benares, ii. 266 ; Bombay, iii. 78, 
79 ; Calcutta, iii, 250-253 ; Cawnpur, 
iii, 290 ; Darjiling, iv. 140, 141 ; Delhi, 
iv. 196 ; Ganjam, v. 9 ; Haidarabad, 
V. 253, 254 ; Karachi, vii. 454 ; Lahore, 
viii. 417, 418; Madras, ix. 105, 106; 
Meerut, ix. 393 ; Patna, xi, 109 ; Poona, 
xi. 213, 214; Rangoon, xi. 483, 484; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 37, 38 ; Simla, xii. 
147 ; Surat, xiii. 134, 135. 

(5) Hindu architecture — Ahmadabad, 
i. 97, 98 ; Ajodhya, i. 135 ; Allahabad, 
i. 196, 198 ; Amarnath, i. 210, 21 1 ; 
Amber, i. 228 ; Arsikere, i, 355 ; Bard- 
wan, ii. 157 ; Baroda, ii. 170 ; Bela- 
gavi, ii. 230 ; Benares, ii. 266, 268 ; 
Bhuvaneswar, ii. 417, 418 ; Bikaner, 
ii. 443 ; Brindaban, iii. 100 ; Chilam- 
baram, iii. 413, 414 ; Conjevaram, iv. 
26 ; Dig, iv. 286 ; Elephanta, iv. 341- 
343 ; Ellora, iv, 349-351 ; Gangaikan- 
dapur, iv, 465 ; Gingi, v, 82, 83 ; 
Gwalior, v, 235 ; Halebid, v. 295 ; 
Jambukeswaram, vii. 120, 121 ; Kana- 
rak, vii. 384, 385 ; Karli, viii. 13-16 ; 
Kera, viii. 116 ; Khajurahu, viii. 140 ; 
Kotae, viii. 302, 303 ; Madura, ix. 133, 
134 ; Mandhata, ix. 295, 296 ; Matan, 
ix. 360, 361 ; Muttra, x. 54; Nanjangad, 
X. 196 ; Puri, x. 447, 448 ; xi. 316, 
317 ; Pandharpur, xi. 37 ; Patan, xi. 
82, 83 ; Rameswaram, xi. 443-445 ; 
Ramtek, xi. 466, 467 ; Sandiir, xii. 
208, 209 ; Srirangam, xiii. 80, 81 ; 
Tanjore, xiii, 195, 196 ; Tinnevelli, 
xiii. 311 ; Tirupati, xiii. 326; Udaipur, 
xiii. 410, 411. 

(6) Jain architecture — Mount Abu, 
i. 8-12; Ahmadabad, i. 97, 98; 
Ajodhya, i. 134 ; Bhadreswar, ii. 
340 ; Bikaner, ii. 442 ; Boram, iii. 88 ; 
Budhpur, iii. 128 ; Charra, iii. 372 ; 
Datia, iv. 157 ; Ellora, iv. 349 ; Girnar, 
v. 86 ; Gwalior, v. 235 ; Kalinjera, vii. 
337 ; Kapadwanj, vii. 440 ; Karakal, 
vii. 463 ; Khiirja, viii. 212 ; Mandhata, 
ix. 296 ; Miidbidri, ix. 525 ; Nadol, 
X. 142, 143 ; Satrunjaya hill, Palitana, 
xi. 4-10 ; Palma, xi. 14 ; Rakabdeo, 
xi. 439 ; Rampura, xi. 461, 462 ; 
Sanganer, xii. 217 ; Shravan-belgola, 
xii. 425 ; Sirpur, xiii. 8 ; Yeniir, xiii. 
554. 



(7) Muhammadan architecture, in- 
cluding Mughal and Pathan — Agra, 
i. 71-75 ; Ahmadabad, i. 97, 98 ; 
Ahmadnagar, i. 109 ; Ajmere, i. 132, 
133 ; Allahabad, i. 198 ; Aurungabad, 
i. 387 ; Bahraich, i. 435 ; Balkh, ii. 14 ; 
Baroda, ii. 170; Benares, ii. 268; 
Bijapur, ii. 424 ; Burhanpur, iii. 164 ; 
Dabhol, iv.^77; Delhi, iv. 186-188, 
191, 192 ; i-atehpur Sikri, iv. 464 ; 
Gaur, v, 40; Jaunpur, vii. 159, 160; 
Lahore, viii. 415, 416 ; Lucknow, viii. 
506-510; Mandogarh, ix. 308; Meerut, 
ix. 393 ; Murshidabad, x. 33, 34 ; 
Narnala, x. 213 ; Panduah, xi. 41, 42 ; 
Patna, xi. 1 10; Rajmahal, xi. 390; 
Seringapatam, xii. 320 ; Sikandra, xii. 
481 ; Surat, xiii. 135. 

(8) Nepalese architecture — Benares, 
ii. 265 ; Khatmandu, viii. 183. 

(9) Portuguese architecture — Bassein, 
ii. 191 ; Cochin, iv. 12, 13 ; Diu, iv. 
307 ; Goa, v. 107, 108 ; Salsette, xii. 
169. 

(10) Sikh architecture— Amri tsar, i. 
335 ; Lahore, viii. 417, 418 ; Ramdas, 
xi. 44X ; Siaikot, xii. 451, 452 ; Tarn 
Taran, xiii. 215. 

Arcot, tdltik in Madras, i. 308. 

Arcot, town in Madras, i, 308-311 ; 
history, 308-3 II ; defence of, by Clive 
(1751), i. 309, 310, vi. 379; rival 
French and English nominees for the 
throne of, vi. 379, 

Arcot, North, District in Madras, i. 311- 
319; physical aspects, 311, 312; his- 
tory, 312-314 ; population, 314, 315; 
agriculture, 315-317 ; natural calami- 
ties, 317; commerce and trade, 317, 
318; administration, 318, 319 ; medical 
aspects, 319. 

Arcot, South, District in Madras, i. 319- 
328 ; physical aspects, 320, 321 ; his- 
tory, 321, 322 ; population, 322, 323 ; 
agriculture, 323-325 ; natural calami- 
ties, 325, 326 ; commerce and trade, 
326, 327 ; administration, 327, 328 ; 
medical aspects, 328. 

Ardabak, village in Bengal, i, 329, 

Area, towns, villages, houses, population, 
etc., of British India, article ' India,' 
vol. vi., appendix I. p. 689, 

Areca nut or betel nut palms, in Akyab, 
i. 155, 156 ; Amalapuram, i. 207 ; 
Amherst, i. 239 ; Arkalgad, i. 330 ; 
Assam, i. 362 ; Atur, i. 383 ; Bakar- 
ganj, i. 441, 445 ; Bangalore, ii. 63 ; 
on the Beliapatam, ii, 239 ; at Bellary, 
ii. 245 ; Bombay, iii. 45 ; Cherra, iii. 
392; Chiknayakanhalli, iii. 411; 
Chitaldrug, iii, 426 ; Cochin, iv, 5 ; 
Dacca, iv. 85 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 
328, 333 ; Faridpur, iv. 394 ; Goa, v. 



INDEX. 



19 



92, 93 ; Godavari, v. 122 ; Hajiganj, 
V. 290 ; Hassan, v. 349 ; Howrah, v. 
463 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 108 ; Kadur, vii. 
286 ; Kalasa, vii. 324 ; North Kanara, 
vii. 372 ; South Kanara, vii. 380 ; 
Karnul, \\\\ 38 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 177 ; 
Khyrim, viii. 215 ; Kolaba, viii. 260 ; 
the Konkan, viii. 291 ; Lakvalli, viii. 
444 ; Madras, ix. 30, 87 ; Malabar, ix. 
230 ; Mertigudda, ix. 415 ; Mysore 
State, X. 100, loi. District, x. 119; 
the Nicobar Islands, x. 295 ; Noakhali, 
y^- 339> 345. 347 ; Sagar (Mysore), xii. 
Ill ; Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; 
Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Sheila, xii. 378 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 400, 403 ; Shwe-gyin, 
xii. 432 ; Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 232; Tipperah, xiii. 317, 318; 
Travancore, xii. 342, 349 ; Trichino- 
poli, xiii. 360 ; Tumkur, xiii. 378, 381, 
Vengurla, xiii. 469 ; Yedator, xiii. 550; 
Yellapur, xiii. 553. 

Argaum, town in Berar, i. 329 ; battle 
of (1803), vi. 323, 398. 

Arghiin dynasty. The, in Sind (i6th 
century), xii. 510. 

Arhar. See Pulses. 

Arhar Nawargaon, town in Central Pro- 
vinces, i. 329. 

Ariadaha, village in Bengal, i. 329. 

Ariaki'ipam, fort in Madras, i. 329. 

Arial Khan, river in Bengal, i. 329. 

Ariankaon, village, pass, and shrine in 
Madras, i. 329. 

Ariapad, shrine in Madras, i. 329, 330. 

Arikkod, town in Madras, i. 330. 

Arisillar. See Arasalar. 

Arjun, Sikh Guru, son of Ram Das, founded 
Kartarpur, where his descendants have 
an estate, viii. 50 ; died in prison at 
Lahore, where his shrine is, viii. 415 ; 
founded Srigovindpur, xiii. 75 ; built 
town, temple, and tank of Tarn Taran, 
xiii. 214, 215. 

Arjuni, estate in Central Provinces, i. 
330. 

Arjunpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
i- 330. 

Arkalgad, town and tdhik in Mysore, i. 

33°- 
Arkavati, river in Mysore, i. 330. 

Arkonam, town in Madras, i. 330, 331. 

Armagon, shoal and lighthouse in 

Madras, i. 331 ; East India Company's 

factory established at (1625-26), vi. 368. 
Armenians in Bengal, ii. 295 ; Bombay, 

iii. 52 ; Calcutta, iii. 256 ; Dacca, iv. 

90, 91 ; Surat, xiii. 134. 
Armori, town in Central Provinces, i. 

331- 

Army of India, its constitution, article 
' India,' vi. 470, 471 ; the armies of 
the three Presidencies, 471 ; strength, 



471 ; health and vital statistics, 675- 
684. Local notices — in Bengal, ii. 319 ; 
Bombay, iii. 67 ; Haidarabad Contin- 
gent, V. 252, xii. 302 ; Madras, ix. 
74, 75 ; Punjab, xi. 290 ; the Haidar- 
abad reformed troops, xii. 302. See 
also Arsenals, Cantonments, and Mili- 
tary Forces of Native States. 

Arna, river in Berar, i. 331. 

Arnala, island in Bombay, i. 331. 

Ami, town and estate in Madras, i. 331. 

Aror, historic town in Bombay, i. 332. 

Aroras. See Trading Castes. 

Arpalli, pargaiid in Central Provinces, i. 
332. 

Arrah, town m Bengal, i. 333, 334 ; 
population, 333 ; history, 333, 334. 

Arrah Canal, branch of the Son Canal, 
Bengal, i. 334, 335. 

Arrian, Greek historian, quoted or referred 
to — on Alexander's march through 
Baluchistan, ii. 28 ; on the defence of a 
chief of Pushkalavati against Hephais- 
tion,iii.373; onTaxila, iv. 27o;onAstes, 
identified with Hashtnagar, v. 344 ; 
on Muttra, x. 43 ; preserved Megas- 
thenes' account of Palibothra (Patna), 
xi. 107 ; on Penkelas or Pushkalavati, 
xi. 147 ; the different identifications of 
his Mount Aornos, xi. 506 ; calls the 
Ravi, the Hydraotes, xii. 14, and the 
Sambus a tributary of the Jumna, xii. 
139; on Sangala, xii. 214; the Erra- 
noboas, indentified with the Son, xiii. 
51 ; the Port of Alexandra, identified 
with Sonmi^ni, xiii. 61. 

Arrowsmith's old map of India referred to, 
on the River Sai, xii. 139. 

Arsenals — Ahmadabdd, i, 97 ; Allahabad, 
i. 198 ; Bangalore, ii. 66 ; Bellary, ii. 
261 ; Firozpur, iv. 448 ; HaidaralDad 
(Sind), V. 287 ; Madras, ix. 107 ; 
Merkara, ix. 414 ; Mhow, ix. 420 ; 
N'agpur, X. 174, 175 ; Rawal Pindi, 
'^i'- 35' 37 ' Secunderabad, xii. 301 ; 
Thayet-myo, xiii. 287 ; Trivandrum, 
xiii. 369 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 498. 

Arshed Beg, revenue officer of Tipu 
Sultan, made rdyat'odri settlement in 
Malabar, ix. 46. 

Arsikere, village in Mysore, i. 335. 

Art and architecture in ancient India, vi. 
112; 170, 171. See also Architec- 
ture. 

Arts and manufactures, article ' India,' 
vi. 112, 113, also chap. xx. pp. 598- 
617. English competition with native 
art-work. 59S ; native rural industries, 
599 ; fortified weaving settlements of 
the East India Company, 599 ; cotton- 
weaving an indigenous industry in 
India, 599 ; its decline, but still a 
domestic industry supplying three-fifths 



20 



INDEX. 



of the Indian consumption, 600 ; cot- 
ton-weaving in different Provinces, 
600, 601 ; special Indian cotton fabrics, 
601-603 ; Indian silk-weaving in Bur- 
ma, Assam, and Bengal, 602 ; classes 
of silk fabrics, 602, 603 ; steam silk 
factories, 603 ; embroidery, 603 ; Kash- 
mir shawls, 603 ; leather work, 603 ; 
velvet work, 603 ; jewelled embroidery, 
604 ; carpets and rugs, 604, 605 ; 
goldsmith's work and jewellery, 605, 
606 ; precious stones, 606 ; iron work 
and cutlery, 606 ; chain armour and 
damascene work, 606, 607 ; brass, 
copper, and bell-metal work, 607, 608 ; 
pottery and tile work, 608 ; sculpture, 
608, 609 ; wood carving, 609 ; inlaying 
and ivory carving, 609 ; European in- 
dustries, cotton mills, 610-615 '■> J^'^ 
mills, 614-616 ; breweries, 616, 617 ; 
paper mills, 617 ; leather factories, 

Arundangi, tract and fortress in Madras, 

'•, 335- 
Arunuthmangalam, village in Madras, i. 

335- 

Aruppakotai, town in Madras, i. 335. 

Arvi, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, i. 335, 336. _ 

Arwal, produce depot in Bengal, i. 336. 

Arwal, village in Oudh, i. 336. 

Aryalur, town in Madras, i. 336. 

Aryan and Turanian migrations from 
Central Asia, vi. 174, 175; 130, 131. 

Aryan races of India, number in 188 1, 
vi. 51. Also chap. iv. pp. 75-131. 
The Aryan stock, its European and 
Eastern branches, 75 ; the Aryans in 
their primitive home, 75> 7^ ; Euro- 
pean and Indian languages merely 
varieties of Aryan speech, 76 ; Indo- 
European words, 76 ; common origin 
of European and Indian religions, 76 ; 
the Indo-Aryans on the march, and 
in their new settlements, 76, 77 ; the 
Rig-Veda, its supposed dates, 77 ; 
Vedic hymns, 78 ; caste and widow 
burning unknown to the Rig-Veda, 
78 ; Aryan civilisation in the Veda, 79 ; 
eastern spread of the Aryans, 79 ; the 
gods of the Veda, 79 ; Indra, the Cloud 
Compeller or rain-bringer, and Agni, 
the God of Fire, 80, Si ; other Vedic 
gods, 81 ; the Brahmanical triad, 81 ; 
blood-loving deities of Hinduism 
scarcely known in the Veda, 82 ; the 
Horse Sacrifice a substitution for 
Human Sacrifice, 82; Vedic conceptions 
of the Deity, 82 ; a Vedic hymn, 82, 
83 ; primitive Aryan burial, 84 ; burn- 
ing of the dead, 84, 85 ; Vedic legend 
of Yama, the King of Death, 85 ; 
Vedic farewell to the dead, 85 ; Vedic 



conception of immortality, 86 ; Aryan 
advance towards the Jumna and Upper 
Ganges, 86 ; Aryan tribes organized 
into kingdoms, 87 ; origin of priestly 
families, 87 ; growth of the priest- 
hood, 87, 88 ; the four Vedas, 88 ; the 
Brahmanas, 88, 89 ; the Sutras or 
sacred traditions, 89 ; formation 
of the Brahman caste, 89 ; growth 
of the warrior or Kshattriya caste, 
89, 90 ; the cultivating caste (Vaisya), 
90 ; the four Hindu castes, 90, 91 ; 
increase of Brahman, Kshattriya, and 
Siidra castes, 91 ; decrease of Vaisyas, 
91, 92 ; struggle between the priestly 
and warrior castes, 92 ; rising preten- 
sion of the Brahmans, 92 ; well-known 
prehistoric legends of Kshattriyas attain- 
ing Brahmanhood, 92, 93 ; the Middle- 
land, the focus of Brahmanism, 93 ; 
Aryan tribes outside the Brahmanical 
pale, 93 ; establishment of Brahman 
'supremacy, 94; four stages of a 
Brahman's life, 95 ; the Brahman rule 
of life and its hereditary results on 
the caste, 96; work done by Brahmans 
for India, 97 ; Brahman theology, 97 ; 
the post-Vedic gods, 97, 98 ; the 
Hindu triad, 98; Brahman philosophy, 
its six darsanas or schools, 98, 99 ; 
summary of Brahman religion, 100 ; 
Brahman science, 100 ; Sanskrit gram- 
mar, 100, loi ; Sanskrit and Prakrit 
speech, loi; Sanskrit manuscripts, 102 ; 
the Indian alphabets, 102, 103 ; Sans- 
krit writings almost entirely in verse, 
103 ; prose, a forgotten art, 103, 104 ; 
Sanskrit dictionaries, 104 ; Brahman 
astronomy, 104- 106 ; Brahman mathe- 
matics, 106 ; Brahman medicine, 106- 
iio; Indian surgery, 107, 108; 
Buddhist public hospitals, 108, 109 ; 
decline of Hindu medicine, 109 ; Eng- 
lish Medical Colleges, 108, 109 ; verna- 
cular medical publications, no; Hindu 
art of war, no; Indian music, iio- 
112; Indian architecture, 1 12; Indian 
decorative art and painting, 1 12, 113; 
Brahman law, 113-118 ; code of Manu, 
113, 114; code of Yajnavalkya, 114, 
115; scope of Indian law, its rigid caste 
system, 115, I16; growth of Hindu 
law, 116; its incorporation of local 
customs, 117 ; perils of modern codi- 
fication, 117, 118; secular literature 
of the Hindus, 118-129; the Maha 
bharata, 1 18-122; the Ramayana, 
122-125; age of the Sanskrit drama, 
125, 126; Sakuntala and other Hindu 
dramas, 126, 127 ; the Hindu novel, 
127 ; Beast stories, 127 ; Sanskrit 
lyric poetry, 128 ; the Puranas, 128, 
129 ; Indian modern vernacular liteia- 



INDEX. 



21 



ture, 129 ; intellectual and religious 
development of the early Aryans, 
129, 130; the Brahmans in Indian 
history, and attacks on Brahmanism 
from the 6th to the 19th century, 130, 

Aryan influences on the Dravidian races, 
vi. 329, 330 ; the modern Aryan ver- 
naculars of India, 334-355- 

Asa, the Ahir, story of, as told by 
Firishta, iii. 301. 

Asaf Jah, Nizam-ul-Mulk (Chin Kilich 
Khan), Governor of the Deccan (1720- 
48), defeated and killed Mubariz 
Khan, the Imperial General at Fateh- 
khelda, iii. 144, iv. 422 ; lived at 
Burhanpur, where he died, iii. 164 ; 
took Cliicacole, iii. 406 ; granted the 
Northern Circars to Anwar-ud-din 
and Rustam Khan, iii. 468 ; obtained 
Daulatabad at death of Aurungzeb, iv. 
160 ; his history, v. 248, 249, 257, 258; 
appointed Nizam-ul-j\Iulk by Faruk- 
siyyar, v. 257 ; founded reigning dy- 
nasty of Haidarabad, v. 258. 

Asaf Khan, brother of Nur Jahan, Vice- 
roy of Kara Manikpur, conquered 
Garha, vii. 31 ; tomb at Shahdara, 
viii. 416, xii. 341 ; defeated Rani Dur- 
gavati of Garha-Mandla at Mandla, 
ix. 301, 302, xii. 259; stormed Chau- 
ragarh, x. 218. 

Asafpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
i. 336, 337. 

Asaf-ud-daula, Nawab of Oudh (i775- 
98), ceded Benares to the East India 
Company, ii. 255, and Ghazipur, v. 64, 
and Jaunpur, vii. 153 ; took the mate- 
rials for his buildings at Lucknow from 
Karra, viii. 48 ; built the Imambara 
and other edifices at Lucknow, viii. 
506-508 ; his subsidiary treaty with the 
English, X. 367 ; his reign and transac- 
tions with the East India Company, 
X. 490, 491. 

Asaish, village in Oudh, i. 337, 

Asansol, village in Bengal, i. 337. 

Asari'ir, village in Punjab, i. 337. 

Asasuni, village in Bengal, i. 337. 

Asbestos, found in Chitaldrug, iii. 423 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 394; Mysore District, 
X. 114. 

Ashritas, a sect of the Kumbhipathias, 
in the Central Provinces, iii. 315. 

Ashta, town in Central India, i. 337. 

Ashta, town in Bombay, i. 337, 338. 

Ashtagram, Division in Mysore, i. 338. 

Ashtagram, taluk in Mysore, i. 338. 

Ashti, historic town in Central Pro- 
vinces, i. 338. 
Asiatic non-Indian population of British 
India, article ' India,' vi., appendix, 
vi. p. 694. 



Asin, town in Rajputana, i. 338. 
Asirgarh, fortress in Central Provinces, 

i- 11^, 339- 
Asiwan, town and pargand in Oudh, 

i- 339. 340. 

Aska, town and zainindari in Madras, 
i. 340. 

Aslana, village in Central Provinces, 
i. 340. 

Asoha Parsandan, pargand in Oudh, 
i. 340. 

Asoha, village in Oudh, i. 340, 341. 

Asoka, Buddhist King of Magadha or 
Behar (257 B.C.), article 'India,' vi. 
144-147 ; his Great Council (244 B.C.), 
144 ; his Rock and Cave Edicts, 145 
and footnote ; his Department of 
Public Worship, 145 ; his missionary 
efforts and doctrinal code, 145 ; charac- 
ter of the Rock Edicts, 146, 147 and 
footnote. Local notices — Built temple 
at Buddh Gaya, iii. 125 ; ruled over 
Kathiawar, viii. 90 ; his reign, x. 362, 
363 ; ruled over the Punjab, xi. 260 ; 
put down rebellion at Taxila, xii. 23 ; 
built tower at Surnath, xii. 270 ; sent 
relics to Taung-ngu, xiii. 221 ; had his 
capital at Ujjain when Viceroy, xiii. 
417 ; built stupas at Asariir, i. 337 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 107 ; Taxila, iv. 270 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 63 ; Sakala, vii. 207 ; 
Kasia, viii. 79; Sangala, xii. 214; 
Sankisa, xii. 224 ; Edicts and Inscrip- 
tions, copies of, on rocks, caves, and 
pillars at^Shahbazgarhi in Afghanis- 
tan, i. 53 ; Allahabad, i. 86 ; Araraj, i. 
306 ; Benares, ii. 266 ; near Lauriya in 
Champaran, iii. 334-341 ; Kalsi near 
Haripur in Dehra Dun, iv. 170, vii. 
344 ; Delhi, iv. 192 ; Girnar, v. 85 ; 
between Junagarh and Girnar, viii. 90 ; 
Purushottapur, xi. 333. 

Aspari, town in Madras, i. 341. 

Assam, Province in N.-E. India, i. 341- 
374; history, 342-346; physical aspects, 
346, 347; soil, 347; minerals, 347, 

348 ; forests, 348, 349 ; wild animals, 

349 ; population, 350, 35 1 ; population, 
regarded ethnically, 351-353; religion 
— Hindus, 353 ; Bhuiyas, 354 ; Kalitas, 
354, 355 ; Kaibarttas, 355, 356 ; 
Katanis, 356 ; Chandals, 356 ; Borias, 
356, 357 ; Napits, 357 ; Bhumij, 357 ; 
Muhammadans, 357 ; Christians, 358, 

359 ; Buddhists, 359 ; Jains, 359, 

360 ; Biahmos, 360 ; distribution of 
the population into town and country, 
360 ; occupations of the people, 
360, 361 ; material condition of the 
people, 361 ; agriculture, 361 - 364 ; 
natural calamities, 364; tea cultivation, 
364-366 ; importation of coolies, 366 ; 
manufactures, etc., 367; commerce, 



22 



INDEX. 



367, 368 ; communications, 368, 369 ; 
ailministration, 369 ; police force, 369- 
371 ; military force, 371 ; education, 
371, 372 ; medical aspects, 372-374. 

Assam, unsuccessful invasion of, by 
Aurangzeb's general, Mir Jumla, article 
' India,' vi. 309 ; expulsion of the Bur- 
mese from, and annexation of Assam to 
British territories (1826), 404; yearly 
settlement of the land revenue, 445 ; 
frontier trade of, 588-590. 

Assaye, village and battle-field in Nizam's 
Dominions, i. 374, 375 ; battle of 
(1803), vi. 323, 398. 

Asses, Wild, found in Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; 
Bombay, iii. 45 ; Cutch, iv. 59 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 210 ; Jhang, vii. 207 ; 
Ladakh, viii. 397 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; the 
Parkar, xiii. 264. 

Assia, range of hills in Bengal, i. 375. 

' Assisted ' railways in India, vi. 548. 

Astronomy, Brahmanical system of, vi. 
104-106 ; astronomy of the Vedas, 
104 ; Greek influences on Indian 
astronomy, 105; decay of astronomical 
science under Muhammadan rule, 105 ; 
Raja Jai Singh's observatories in the 
i8th century, 105, 106. See also 
Observatories. 

Asurgarh, historic fort in Bengal, i. 

375- 

Asiuatnedha or Great Horse Sacrifice of 
ancient India, vi. 82 ; connection of the 
Horse Sacrifice with the Man Sacrifice 
of pre-Buddhistic times, 175, 176. 

Asylums. See Leper, Lunatic. 

Atak. See Attock. 

Atari, village in Punjab, i. 375. 

Atasarai, trading village in Bengal, i. 

375- 
Atchaveram, village in Madras, i. 375. 

Atcheepore. See Achipur. 
Ateha, pa}-gand in Oudh, i. 376. 
Athaide, Dom Luis de, successfully de- 
fended Goa against Ali Adil Shah, v. 

lOI. 

Atharabanka, river in Bengal, i. 376. 
Aihara-nura, range of hills in Bengal, i. 

376. 
Atharva-Veda, The, article 'India,' vi. 88. 
Athgarh, tributary State in Orissa, i. 376, 

377- 
Athgarh, village in Orissa, i. 377. 
Athirala, shrine in Madras, i. 377. 
Athmallik, tributary State in Orissa, i. 

377. 378. 

Athni, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

i. 378. 
Athpadi, town in Bombay, i. 378. 
A-thut, tidal river in Burma, i. 378. 
A'ia, Sub-division in Bengal, i. 378. 
Atmakur, town and tdliik in Madras, i. 

378, 379- 



Atmospheric conditions. See Medical As- 
pects section under each District, and 
Meteorological Statistics. 

Atner, town in Central Provinces, i. 379. . 

Atpadi, town in Bombay, i. 379. 

Atrai, river in Bengal, i. 379 ; its changes 
of course, vi. 30. 

Atranji Khera, prehistoric mound in 
N.-W. Provinces, i. 379, 380. 

Atrauli, town and iahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 380. 

Atrauli, town in Oudh, i. 380. 

Atri, village in Bengal, i. 380. 

Atsanta. See Achanta. 

Attaran, river in Burma, i. 380, 381. 

Attari, village in Punjab, i. 381. 

Attigada, estate in Madras, i. 381. See 
Kallikot. 

Attikuppa, village in Mysore, i. 381. 

Attili, town in Madras, i. 381. 

Attock, town, fortress, and taksil in 
Punjab, i. 381, 382. 

Atur, tdlitk in Madras, i. 382, 383. 

Atur, town in Madras, i. 383, 384. 

Atwa Piparia, pargand in Oudh, i. 384. 

Auber's Analysis of the Coiutitntio7i of 
the East India Company, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 364, 365 (footnotes). 
Auckland, Lord, Governor-General of 
India (1836-42), article 'India,' vi. 
406-409 ; Afghan affairs and our early 
dealings with Kabul, 406, 407 ; Dost 
Muhammad, Afghan dynastic wars, 
407 ; Russian influence in Afghanistan 
and the installation of Shah Shuja and 
occupation of Kabul by a British force, 
407, 408 ; rising of the Afghan people, 
and massacre of the British army on its 
retreat to India, 408. Local notices— 
Encouraged tea-planting in Assam, i. 
365 ; sanctioned relief works during 
famine of 1838 in N.-W. Provinces, 
X. 391 ; declared it necessary to break 
agreement with Mirs of Sind about the 
Indus, xii. 514. 
Auckland Bay, in Burma, i. 384. 
Augasi, tahsil in N.-W, Provinces, i. 

384- 

Augusto, Dom, brother of King of Por- 
tugal, sent to put down revolt at Goa 
(1 87 1), and disbanded the native army 
there, v. 106. 

Aundh, town and petty State in Bombay, 

i. 384, 385- ^ , T, • 

Aundhi, estate in Central Provinces, 

i- 385- 

Auraiya, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 385. 

Auranga, river in Bombay, i. 385, 386. 

Aurangabad, village and Sub-division in 
Bengal, i. 386. 

Aurangabad, town and /arg-a«a in Oudh, 
i. 3S6. 



INDEX. 



23 



Aurangabad, town in the Nizam's Domi- 
nions, i. 387, 388. 
Aurangabad Sayyid, town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 388. 
Aurangzeb, sixth Mughal Emperor of 
India( 1658- 1 707) article 'India, 'vi. 305- 
312 ; his rebellion and usurpation of 
the throne, 305, 306 ; chief events of 
his reign, 306, 307 and footnote ; 
murder of his brothers, 307 ; conquest 
of Southern India, 307 ; rise of the 
Maratha power, 307, 308 ; Aurang- 
zeb's Grand Army and twenty years' 
war with the Marathas, 308, 309 ; his 
despair and death, 309 ; unsuccess- 
ful expedition to Assam, 309 ; his 
bigotry and persecution of the Hindus, 
309; revolt of the Rajputs, 309, 310; 
revenue of his Empire, 310, 311 ; 
Aurangzeb's character, 312. Local 
notices — His generals took Adoni, i. 
26 ; defeated his brother Dara at 
Ajmere, i. 21 ; ruins of palace and 
mausoleum to his wife at Aurangabad, 
i. 385 ; in Bellary, ii. 242 ; took 
Bijapur, ii. 424 ; destroyed walls of 
Broach and rebuilt them, iii. 112, 1 13 ; 
built mosque at Burhanpur, iii. 164 ; 
had temple of Debi Patan destroyed, 
iv. 164 ; conquered the Deccan, iv. 
166 ; had his capital at Delhi, iv. 193 ; 
took Dharwar, iv. 226 ; defeated his 
brother Murad at Ranka Chabutra, 
near Dholpur, iv. 276 ; restored fort 
of Dohad, iv, 312; built mosque at 
Fatehabad, iv. 419; took Golconda, 
v. 144 ; his wars with Abdulla Kutab 
Shah, King of Golconda, and annexa- 
tion of that kingdom, v. 255, 256 ; 
joined by the Sidi of Janjira, vii. 140 ; 
invaded Marwar, and plundered Jodh- 
pur, vii. 241; took Kondapalli, vii. 287 ; 
built the Jama Masjid at Lahore, viii. 
416 ; built mosque at Lucknow, viii. 
504, 505 ; his visit to Manikpur, ix. 
321 ; destroyed temples at Muttra, 
X. 54 ; restored Poona to Sivaji, 
xi. 212 ; took Purandhar, xi. 298 ; 
took Raigarh, xi. 364 ; at first em- 
ployed Rajput chieftains, but eventu- 
ally invaded Rajputana, xi. 405 ; took 
Satana, xii. 274 ; obtained Sholapur 
from All Adil Shah, of Bijapur, xii. 
412; took Sinhgarh, xii. 544; increased 
the importance of Surat, as port for 
Mecca, xiii. 122 ; defeated Dara at 
Ujjain, xiii. 417. 

Auras, village in Oudh, i. 388. 

^i«,autumn ricecrop. See Rice cultivation. 

Ausgram, village in Bengal, i. 388. 

Austen, Col. Godwin, surveyed Muztagh 
range of the Himalaya Mountains, v. 
404. 



Australia, India's trade with, vi. 578, 

579- 
Ava, ancient capital of the Burmese 

Empire, i. 388-390. 
Avalanches, frequent in Kumaun, viii. 

335- 
Avani, village in Mysore, i. 390. 
Avatars or Incarnations of Vishnu, 

article ' India,' vi. 215, 216 (footnote 

3). 

Avati, village in Mysore, i. 390. 

Avchar, petty State in Bombay, i. 390. 

Avinashi, town in Madras, i. 390. 

Avitabile, Sikh general. Governor of 
Peshawar, xi. 149 ; built wall round 
Peshawar, xi. 158 ; re-built Wazirabad, 
which he made his head-quarters, xiii. 

535- 
Avulapali, range of hills in Madras, i. 

391- 
Awah, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 391. 
Awans, Muhammadan tribe, numerous 

in Hazara, v. 363, 364 ; Jehlam, vii. 

168-170; Peshawar, xi. 151; Rawal 

Pindi, xii. 27 ; Sialkot, xii. 444. 
Av/slx, pargand in Central India, i. 391. 
Ayakotta, town in Madras, i. 391. 
Ayakudi, town and zaininddri in Madras, 

i- 391- 

Ayub Khan, defeated by Abdur Rahman 
Khan (June 1881), vii. 275 ; his victory 
at Maiwand (26th July 1S80), vii. 396 ; 
defeated by Gen. Roberts at Kandahar 
(1st Sept. 1880), vii. 397 ; captured 
Kandahar (27th July 1881), but again 
defeated by Abdur Rahman Khan 
there (22nd Sept. 1881), vii. 398. 

Ayyankere, artificial lake in Mysore, i. 

391- 

Azamgarh, District in N.-W. Provmces, 
i. 391-401 ; physical aspects, 392, 393; 
history, 393-395 ; archaeology, 395 ; 
population, 395-397 ; agriculture, 397- 
399 ; natural calamities, 399 ; com- 
merce and trade, 399 ; administration, 
400 ; medical aspects, 400, 401. 

Azamgarh, town and /«/«// in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 401. 

Azimabad. See Patna. 

Azimganj, village in Bengal, i. 402. 

Azim, son of Aurangzeb, Nawab of Ben- 
gal (1697-1704), ii. 278; sold three 
villages on site of Calcutta to the East 
India Company, iii. 240 ; defeated and 
slain by his brother Muazim in Dhol- 
pur, iv. 276. 

Azim Khan, Durani leader, defeated by 
Ranjft Singh at Peshawar, xi. 149. 

Azim Khan, brother of Amir Sher AH 
Khan, defeated him at Khelat-i-Ghilzai, 
vii. 395. ^ ^ 

Azim Shah, son of Sikandar Shah, Kmg 
of Bengal, proclaimed his independence 



24 



INDEX. 



at Sonargion, and invited the poet 
Hafiz to his court, xiii. 59. 
Azmeriganj, village in Assam, i. 402. 



B 



Baba Budan, range of mountains in 
Mysore, i. 402, 403. 

Baba Jagjivvan Das, founder of the Sat- 
namis, born at Daryabad, iv. 151. 

Baba Sahib. See Bharkar Rao. 

Babai, town in Central Provinces, i. 403. 

Babar, first Mughal Emperor of Delhi, 
(1526-30), early life, defeat and over- 
throw of Ibrahim Lodi at Panipat ; 
conquest of Northern India, article 
'India,' vi. 290,291. I,ocal notices — His 
description of Afghanistan, i. 31 ; made 
Agra his capital, and died there, 
i. 69 ; took Allahabad, i. 196 ; took 
Biana, and defeated Rana of Udaipur 
there, ii. 418 ; invaded India, and after 
victory of Panipat, entered Delhi, iv. 
192, 193 ; took Dholpur, iv. 277 ; his 
mention of Dipalpur, iv. 303 ; con- 
quered Etawah, iv. 371 ; Fatehpur, iv. 
424 ; and Ghazipur, v. 64 ; took fort 
of Gwaiior by stratagem, v. 236 ; 
mentions Hangu, v. 310 ; his tomb at 
Kabul, vii. 268 ; boasts of the commerce 
of Kabul, vii. 271 ; on the Kafirs, vii. 
292 ; took Kandahar, vii. 392 ; defeated 
the Rajput princes at Khanna, viii. 
164 ; on the Bangash tribe, viii. 243 ; 
defeated Ibrahim Lodi near Lahore, 
viii. 405 ; mentions Mahaban, ix. 150 ; 
occupied Rapri in Mainpuri, ix. 203 ; 
his victory over Ibrahim Lodi at Pani- 
pat, xi. 44, 45 ; subdued the Pathans 
in Peshawar, xi. 149 ; his invasions of 
the Punjab, xi. 261 ; defeated the Raj- 
puts at Fatehpur Sikri, xi. 404 ; de- 
feated the Ghakkars, and took Pharwala, 
xii. 24; planted colonies in Saharanpur, 
xii. 45 ; marched through Sibi, xii. 
457 ; invaded Mewar and defeated 
Rana Sanga, xiii. 403, 404. 

Babbala, village in N;-W. Provinces, i. 

403. 

Baber, H., introduced coffee planting into 
the Wainad, ix. 231. 

Baberu, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 403. 

Babhans or Military Brahmans, especially 
numerous in Behar, ii. 225 ; Cham- 
paran, iii. 338 ; Darbhangah, iv. 124 ; 
Gaya, v. 46, where many of them are 
rakdits, v. 52 ; Lohardaga, viii. 481 ; 
Monghyr, ix. 484 ; Muzaffarpur, x. 
79 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Purniah, xi." 325 ; 
Santal Parganas, xii. 229 ; Saran, xii. 
253 ; Shahabad, xii. 327, 



Babhar, town and petty State in Bom- 
bay, i. 403, 404. 

Babhnipair, pa7-gami in Oudh, i. 404. 

Babington, Dr., quoted on the inscrip- 
tions at Mahabalipur, ix. 149. 

Babla, river in Bengal, i. 404, 405. 

Babra, petty State in Bombay, i. 405. 

Babrias, tribe in Kathiawar, now princi- 
pally to be found in Babriawar, i. 405. 

Babriawar, tract of country in Kathia- 
war, i. 405. 

Babuabera, trading village in Bengal, i. 

405. 

Babiil ixQes. and reserves, Akola, i. 141 ; 
Allahabad, i. igo ; Anantapur, i. 274 ; 
Azamgarh, i. 392 ; Bara Banki, ii. 
106 ; Belgaum, ii. 232 ; Bombay, iii. 
44, 45 ; Broach, iii. 102 ; Buldana, iii. 
143 ; Chengalpat, iii. 382 ; Daman, iv. 
102 ; Etawah, iv. 369 ; Fatehpur, iv. 
423 ; Gwaiior, v. 227 ; Haidarabad 
(Sind), V. 275 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; Jaipur, 
vii. 51 ; Jamner, vii. 130; Jerruck, 
vii. 180; Karachi, vii. 444; Kathia- 
war, viii. 89 ; Larkhana, viii. 462, 
463 ; on the Lonar lake, viii. 489 ; 
Madras, ix. 30 ; Mainpuri, ix. 202 ; 
Mohar, ix. 396 ; Mughalbhin, ix. 529 ; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 380, 381 ; Pan- 
han, xi. 43; Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ; 
Rameswaram, xi. 443 ; Sholapur, xii. 
412 ; Sibi, xii. 454 ; Sind, xii. 505, 
506 ; Sirohi, xiii. i ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; 
Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; Surat, xiii. 120 ; 
Tando Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ; 
Tasgaon, xiii. 216; Tinnevelli, xiii. 
306; Utras, xiii. 431; Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 439. 

Babu Rao, chief of Monumpalli, mutinied 
in 1858, executed at Chanda, iii. 351. 

Babulgaon, village in Berar, i. 405. 

Bachhraon, rural town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 405. 

Bachhrawan, town z.T\d.pa)-gatidm Oudh, 
I, 405, 406. 

Bachireddipalem, village in Madras, i. 406. 

Backergunge. See Bakarganj. 

Badagara, town in Madras, i. 406, 407. 

Badagas or Vadagas, aboriginal tribe on 
the Nilgiri Hills, x. 310, 311. 

Badakshan, tract of country in Afghan- 
Turkistan, i. 407. 

Badakshis, tribe akin to the Tajiks, and 
grouped with them as Galchas, in Bad- 
akshan, i. 407. 

Badami, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i, 407. 

Badan Singh, father of Suraj Mall of 
Bhartpur, formally declared leader of 
the Jats (1712), n. 373, x. 45 ; his 
palace at Sahar, xii. 113. 

Badarganj, trading village in Bengal, i. 
407, 408. 



INDEX. 



25 



Badari, river in Mysore, i. 408. See 
also Yagachi. 

Badariya, village in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
408. 

Badarpur. See Badrpur. 

Badansa, town and /a/^j// in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 408. 

Badesar, village in Rajputana, i. 408. 

Badg\ijars, landowning clan of wealthy 
Rajputs, in Bulandshahr, iii. 135. 

Badhalgaon, town in N.-\V. Provinces, 
i. 408. 

Badin, town and tahik in Bombay, i. 
408,409. 

Badipudi, historic tdhik in Bombay, i. 
409. 

Badnera, town in Berar, i. 409. 

Badnur, town in Central Provinces, i. 
409, 410. 

Bado Sarai, town and pargand in Oudh, 
i. 410. 

Badrachalam. See Bhadrachalam. 

Badrihat, police outpost in Bengal, i. 410. 

Badrinath, mountain peak in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 410, 411. 

Badrpur, village in Assam, i. 41 1. 

Badshahpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 

Badshahpur, hill torrent in Punjab, i. 

Baduria, town in Bengal, i. 411, 412. 

Badvel, town and taluk in Madras, i. 
412. 

Baffa, town in Punjab, i. 412. 

Bagalkot, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, i. 412, 413. 

Bagaspur, town in Central Provinces, i. 

413- 
Bagasra, petty State in Kathiawar, i. 413. 
Bagasra, town in Bombay, i. 413. 
Bagat. See Land tenures. 
Bagaud, /arji'flwiiin Central India, i. 413. 
Bagdis, semi-Hinduized aborigines in 

Bengal, generally fishermen, numerous 

in Bankura, ii. 81 ; Bardwan, ii. 129 ; 

Bengal, ii. 296 ; thieves in Hi'igH, v. 

491 ; coolies in Jalpaiguri, vii. 112; 

Kuch Behar, viii. 323 ; Midnapur, ix. 

427 ; Nadiya, x. 133. 
Bagdogra, town in Bengal, i. 413. 
Bagepalli, village in Mysore, i. 413, 414. 
Bagesar, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 

414- 

Bagewadi, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 414. 
Bagh, river in Central Provinces, i. 414. 
Bagh, town ^x^^ pargand in Central India, 

i. 414. 
Baghal, Hill State in Punjab, i. 415. 
Baghdr, offshoot of the river Indus, i. 

415- 
Baghat, Hill State in Punjab, i. 415, 416. 
Baghbanpur, village in Punjab, i. 416. 
Baghdanga, village in Bengal, i. 416. 



Baghelas, a branch of the Sisodhiya Raj- 
puts, which once ruled in Gujarat, i. 
416 ; in Central India, iii. 295. 

Baghelkhand, tract in Central India, i. 
416,417. 

Bagherhat, village and Sub-division in 
Bengal, i. 417. 

Baghjala, town in Bengal, i. 417. 

Baghmati, river in Behar, i. 418. 

Baghmati, Little, river in Behar, i. 418. 

Baghmundi, plateau and hill range in 
Bengal, i. 418. 

Bagirhat. See Bagherhat. 

Bagirji, village in Bombay, i. 41 8. 

Bagli, petty State in Central India, i. 
418, 419. 

Bagor, town in Rajputana, i. 419. 

Bagpat, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, i. 419. 

Bagrasi, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 
420. 

Bagru, town in Rajputana, i. 420. 

Bagula, village in Bengal, i. 420. 

Bahadran, town and district in Rajput- 
ana, i. 420. 

Bahadurganj, town in N.-W- Provinces, 
i. 420. 

Bahadurgarh, town in Punjab, i. 420, 
421. 

Bahadur Khel, salt mine in Punjab, i, 
421. 

Bahadurpur, village in Assam, i. 421. 

Bahadur Shah, Mughal Emperor (1707- 
12), defeatedhisbrotherAziminDholpur, 
iv. 276 ; took Haidarabad with Khan 
Jahan, v. 256 ; defeated his brother 
kam Baksh, v. 256 ; campaign against 
the Sikhs, xi. 263. 

Bahadur Shah, King of Gujarat (1526- 
37), allowed Portuguese to build a 
fort at Diu, where he was killed, iv. 
307 ; defeated by the Emperor Huma- 
yun, viii. 91 ; overthrew Ghori dynasty 
of Mahva, ix. 267; invaded Mewar, and 
took Chittor, xiii. 404. 

Bahadur Shah, last Muhamraadan king 
of Ahmadabad, tried to take Surat 
(1609), xiii. 121. 

Bahadur Shah, Regent of Nepal (1786- 
95), X. 286. 

Baharagarha, market village in Bengal, 
i. 421. 

Bahawa, village in Bengal, i. 421. 

Bahawalpur, Native State in Punjab, 
i. 421-424; physical aspects, 421; 
population, 421, 422 ; commerce, 422 ; 
history and administration, 423, 424. 

Bahawalpur, city in Punjab, i. 424. 

Bahera, market village in Bengal, i. 424. 

Baheri, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, i. 424, 

425- 
BahiUvara, town in Bengal, i. 425. 
Bahli, mountain range in Punjab, i. 425. 



26 



INDEX. 



Bahlol Lodi, Emperor. See Lodi. 

Bahlolpur. See Bhilolpur. 

Balimani, Muhammadan dynasty in 
Southern India (1347-1525), article 
' India,' vi. 287. Local notices — Its 
later capital at Bidar, ii. 419 ; its 
earlier capital (1347-1432) at Kulbarga, 
viii. 352, 353 ; took Masulipatam 
(1478), ix. 353; its history, xi. 201, 
202 ; ruled over Satara, xii. 277. 

Bahraich, District in Oudh, i. 425-433 ; 
physical aspects, 425, 426 ; history, 
426-429 ; population, 429, 430 ; agri- 
culture, 430-432 ; commerce and trade, 
432 ; administration, 432, 433 ; medical 
aspects, 433.^ 

Bahraich, tahsil in Oudh, i. 433, 434. 

Bahraich, pargaud in Oudh, i. 434. 

Bahraich, town in Oudh, i. 434, 435. 

Bahramghat, town in Oudh, i. 435. 

Bahrampur. ^tv Berhampur. 

Bahrampur, town in Punjab, i. 435, 436. 

Bahsiima. See Bisambhar. 

Bahu, river in Madras, i. 436. 

Bahu Begam of Oudh, lived at Faizabad 
(1798- 1S16), where her mausoleum is. 
iv. 3S8. 

Bahuleshwar, village in Bombay, i. 436. 

Bai, estate in Central India, i. 436. 

Baiadgi, town in Bombay, i. 436. 

Baideswar, village in Orissa, i. 436. 

Baidiir, town in Madras, i. 436. 

Baidyabati, market town in Bengal, 

i- 436.^ 

Baidyanath, village in Bengal, i. 436. 

Baidyas, numerous caste in Bengal, ii. 
296. 

Baigas, priests of the Gonds, an ab- 
original tribe. See Balaghat, i. 455 ; 
Central Provinces, iii. 310 ; ]\Ianala, 
ix. 303, 304 ; Sambalpur, xii. 1S2. 

Baikal. See Bekal. 

Baikanthpur, town in Bengal, i. 436, 

437- 

Baila Bhela, town in Oudh, i. 437. 

Bailgaon, village in Oudh, i. 437. 

Bailhongal. See Hongal. 

Baillie, Col., defeat of, by Haidar All, at 
Pullalur or Perambakam (1780), iv. 27, 
43, ix. 13, xi. 136. 

Baillie, Major, took Aden (1839), i. 17. 

Bainchi, village in Bengal, i. 437. 

Bairagis, Vishnuite ascetics and mendi- 
cants in the Eastern Dwars, iv. 332 ; 
Madras, ix. 20. 

Bairagnia. See Bhairagnia. 

Bairam Ghat, place of sanctity in Berar, 

i; 437- , 

Bairam Khan, regent during the early 
years of Akbar's reign, vi. 291, 292. 

Bairath, town in Rajputana, i. 437. 

Baird, Sir David, prison of, at Banga- 
lore, ii. 67. 



Bairia. See Biria. 

Baitarani, river in Orissa, i. 437, 438. 

Baiza Bai, widow of Daulat Rao Sind'a, 
removed from Gwalior for creating dis- 
turbances, v. 230, 231. 

Bajana, petty State in Kathiawar, i. 438. 

Bajana, town in Bombay, i. 438. 

Baj-baj, village in Bengal, i. 438. 

Baji Rao, second Peshwa (172 1 -40) ; 
his conquest of the Deccan and Malwa, 
from the Mughals, and capture of 
Bassein from the Portuguese, article 
'India,' vi. 320. Local notices — 
Established the Maratha authority 
in Bundelkhand, iii. 155; received 
part of Damoh from Chhatar Sal, iv. 
109 ; at Delhi and on the Jumna, 
x. 366, 367 ; died at Raver, where 
is his cenotaph, xii. 14 ; exacted 
chaiith from the Rana of Mewar, xiii. 
405, 406. 

Baji Rao 11., seventh and last Peshwa 
(1795-1818), article 'India,' vi. 323; 
second and third Maratha wars, 
and annexation of the Peshwa's ter- 
ritories, 323, 324. Local notices — 
Banished to Bithur, iii. 20 ; attack on 
the Resident, defeat and deposition, 
iii. 39; defeated at Kirki, viii. 221 ; 
and at Korigaum, viii. 298, 299 ; 
placed on the throne by the treaty of 
Mahad, ix. 154; surrendered to Mal- 
colm at Nimar, x. 331 ; defeated at Pan- 
darkanra, xi. 35, xiii. 540 ; his three 
defeats, xi. 212, 213. 

Bajitpur, town in Bengal, i. 43S, 439. 

Bajrangarh, district in Central India, 

i- 439- 
Bajwara, village in Punjab, i. 439. 

Bakaner, pargand in Central India, i. 

439- 

Bakarganj, District in Bengal, i. 439-449; 
physical aspects, 439-442 ; administra- 
tive history, 442 ; population, 442-444 ; 
agriculture, 444-446 ; land tenures, 
446 ; natural calamities, 446, 447 ; 
commerce and trade, 447 ; administra- 
tion, 447, 449 ; medical aspects, 449. 

Bakarganj, ancient town in Bengal, i. 

449- 
Baker, Aaron, first Governor of Madras 

(1653-59), ix. 66. 
Baker, Sir T. D., sent from Kabul to 

disperse Afghans, vii. 274 ; marched 

against Achakzai tribe in Pis h in (i 880), 

xi. 189. 
Bakeswar, river in Bengal, i. 449. 
Bakhar. See Bukkur. 
Bakhra, village in Bengal, i. 449, 450. 
Baksh, Sir Hardeo, sheltered English 

officers at Dharmpur (1857), iv. 255. 
Bakhshi Khal, water channel in Bengal, 

i. 450. 



INDEX. 



27 



Bakht Ball, Raja of Shahgarli, rebelled 
1857, seized Banda, and was defeated 
by Rose, xii. 103. 

Bakht Buland, Gond Raja of Deogarh, 
extended his territories, iii. 399 ; his 
reign and foundation of Nagpur, x. 
166 ; obtained Seoni, xii. 309 ; ravaged 
Wun, xiii. 539, 540. 

Bakht Khan, mutineer leader in Bareill}', 
iv. 411. 

Bakhtgarh, petty Slate in Central India, 
i. 450. 

Bakhtiarpur, village in Bengal, i. 450. 

Bakkarayasamudram, village in Madras, 
i. 450. 

Bakloh, town in Punjab, i. 450. 

Bakra River, stream in Berar, i. 450. 

Baksar, village in Oudh, i. 450, 451. 

Bakud Creek, branch of the Mahanadi, 
in Orissa, i. 451, 452. 

Balaganj, village in Assam, i. 452. 

Balagarh, town in Bengal, i. 452. 

Balaghat, name given to certain Districts 
in the Karnatic of the Vijayanagar 
kingdom, i. 452. 

Balaghat, the upland country of Berar, i. 
452. 

Balaghat, District in Central Provinces, i. 
452-457 ; physical aspects, 452-454 ; 
history, 454; population, 454, 455; 
division into town and country, 455 ; 
agriculture, 455, 456 ; commerce and 
trade, 456 ; administration, 457 ; medi- 
cal aspects, 457. 

Balahera, village in Rajputana, i. 457. 

Balahi, hill range in Central Provinces, 
i. 457. 

Balaji Baji Rao, third Peshwa (1740- 
71) ; his expeditions to Bengal and 
the Punjab ; defeat of, by Ahmad 
Shah Durani at the third battle of 
Panipat, article ' India,' vi. 320, 
321. Local notices — Annexed part of 
Hoshungabad, v. 443 ; took IMandla, 
ix. 302, 307. See also Marathas. 

Balaji Lakshman, IMaratha governor of 
Khandesh, massacred 7000 Bhils at 
Kopargaon (1804), viii. 293. 

Balaji Viswanath, first Peshwa (171S- 
20), extorts chauth from the Delhi 
emperor for the Deccan, article ' India,' 
vi. 320 ; built hill fort of Visapur, 
xiii. 480. See also Marathas. 

Balak Das, successor of Ghasi Das as 
high priest of Satnamis, murdered 
(i860), iii. 313. 

Balakot, town in Punjab, i. 458. 

Balakot, fortified village in Central 
Provinces, i. 458. 

Balaman, town and pargand in Oudh, i. 

45S. 
Balance sheet of British India, vi. 465, 
466. 



Balance of trade (India's), vi. 558, 559 ; 
Sir R. Temple's Minute on, vi. 581-583. 

Balapur, taluk in Berar, i. 458, 459. 

Balarampur, town in Bengal, i. 459. 

Balasan, river in Bengal, i. 459. 

Balasinor, Native State in Bombay, i. 
459, 460. 

Balasinor, town in Bombay, i. 460. 

Balasor, District in Orissa, ii. i-io ; 
physical aspects, i, 2 ; rivers, 2, 3 ; 
ports and harbours, 3, 4 ; history, 4-6 ; 
population, 6. 7 ; agriculture, 7 ; 
natural calamities, 7, 8 ; manufacture-, 
8, 9 ; trade, 9 ; administration, 9, 10 ; 
medical aspects, 10. 

Balasor, Sub-division in Orissa, ii. 10, 11. 

Balasor, town and port in Orissa, ii. 1 1 ; 
East India Company's factory started 
at (1642), vi. 369. 

Balasor, peak in Madras, ii. 11. 

Balban, the last King but one of the 
Slave dynasty (1265-87) ; his cruelties 
to the Hindus ; Rajput revolts and 
Mughal inroads ; his fifteen royal 
pensioners, article ' India,' vi. 2S0. 
Local notices — Cleared Etah of ban- 
ditti, iv. 359 ; built fort of Kampil, 
^'i'- 353 ; subdued Mewat, ix. 418 ; 
invaded Moradabad, ix. 505. 

Balbi, Caspar, on Dagon, now Rangoon, 
in 1580, quoted, xi. 482. 

Balcha, pass in Garhwal, ii. Ii. 

Balchri, island in Bengal, ii. 11. 

Baldeva or Baldeo, village and place of 
pilgrimage in N.-W. Pro%'inces, ii. 11. 

Baldeva Singh, Raja of Bhartpur, ceno- 
taph of, at Gobardhan, v. 121. 

Baldiabari, village in Bengal, ii. Ii, 12. 

Baleswar River, one of the principal 
distributaries of the Ganges, ii. 12. 

Bali, town in Bengal, ii. 12. 

Bali, market village in Bengal, ii. 12. 

Balia, village in Bengal. See Alawak- 
hawa. 

Baliaghata, trading village in Bengal, ii. 
12. 

Baliaghata, canal in Bengal, ii. 12. 

Baliganj, suburb of Calcutta. See Bally- 
gunge. 

Balighatiam, village in Madras, ii. 13. 

Balihri, town in Central Provinces, ii. 13. 

Balipara, forest reserve in Assam, ii. 13. 

Balirangan, range of mountains in Madras. 
See Biligiri-Rangan. 

Balisna, town in Bombay, ii. 14. 

Balkh, Province of Afghanistan. See 
Afghan-Tiirkistan. 

Balkh, city of Afghan-Tiirkistan, ii. 
14-16; city, 14, 15 ; country, 15, 16 ; 
history, 16. 

Ball, Vincent, on the geology of the 
Rajmahal Hills, xi. 390, 391 ; on the 
cave tunnel in Ramgarh Hill, xi. 447. 



28 



INDEX. 



Ballabgarh, town and tahsil in Punjab, 

ii. i6. 
Ballabhpur, suburb of Serampur, Bengal, 

ii. 17. 
Ballala, Hoysala, dynasty in Southern 

India, had their capital at Dorasamudra, 

now Halebid, taken by Muhammadans 

(1310), V. 295; in Madras, ix. il ; in 

iviysore, x. 93 ; ruled over Salem, xii. 

154 ; had a later capital at Talkad, xiii. 

167 ; took refuge at Tonnur, xiii. 338. 
Ballalpur, village in Central Provinces, 

ii. 17. 
Ballal-rayan-durga, village in Mysore, 

ii. 17. 
Ballantyne, Dr., The Sdiikhya Aphorisms 

of Kapila, quoted, vi. 154 (footnote i). 
Ballapal, forest reserve in Madras, ii. 

17, 18. 

Ballia, District in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
18-23 ; physical aspects, 18, 19 ; 
history, 19 ; archeology, 19 ; popula- 
tion, 19, 20 ; agriculture, 20-22 ; 
commerce and trade, 22 ; administra- 
tion, 22 ; sanitary aspects, 22, 23. 

Ballia, tahsil \\\ N.-W. Provinces, ii. 23. 

Ballia, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 22. 

Ballygunge, suburb of Calcutta, ii. 23, 24. 

Baloda, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

Balotra, town in Rajputana, ii. 24. 

Balrampur, town and pargatid in Oudh, 
ii. 24, 26. 

Balsamand, village in Punjab, ii. 26. 

Balsan, Hill State in Punjab, ii. 26. 

Balsane, village in Bombay, ii. 26. 

Balsar. See Bulsar. 

Baltis, tribe of Muhammadan Tibetans 
in the Himalayas, v. 412; the Hindu 
Kush, v. 417. 

Baltistan, administrative division of 
Kashmir. See also Iskardoh. 

Balua, trading village in Bengal, ii. 27. 

Baluchis: in Afghanistan, i. 44; in Baluch- 
istan, ii. 29 ; their manners and customs, 
"ii. 38; in Bombay Presidency, iii. 49 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 213; Gurgaon, 
V. 218 ; Haidarabad (Bind), v. 276 ; 
plundered Kambar (1844), vii. 352 ; in 
Karachi, vii. 447 ; Khairpur, viii. 135 ; 
in Kohistan, their blood-feuds, viii. 
251, 252 ; in Lahore, viii. 407 ; Lark- 
hana, viii. 467 ; Mallani, ix. 260 ; 
Multan, X. 6 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 60 ; 
Punjab, xi. 273 ; Rohtak, xii. 72 ; 
Shahpur, xii. 364 ; Shikarpur, xii. 392 ; 
Sibi, xii. 455, 456 ; Sind, xii. 517, 518 ; 
Thar and Parkar, xiii. 266 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier, xiii. 440, 441 ; tribes of, 
xiii. 440-445. 

Baluchistan, tract of country south of 
Afghanistan, ii. 27-40 ; boundaries, 27, 
28 ; history, 28-33 ! physical aspects. 



33-35 ; climate, producticms, etc., 35, 

36 ; towns, 36, 37 ; population, 37-39 ; 

revenue and military resources, 39, 40. 
Balwant Singh, Raja of Benares, defeated 

at Baxar with Shuja-ud-daula, ii. 255 ; 

took Chanar, iii. 347 ; seized Ghazipur, 

V. 64. 
Balwant Singh, native soldier, defended 

Girishk (1841, 1842), i. 35. 
Bamanbor, petty State in Bombay, ii. 40. 
Bamanghati, tributary State in Bengal, ii. 

40,41. 
Bamani, mountain peak in Madras, ii. 41. 
Bamanri, village in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

Bamboos, special mention of, on Mount 
Abu, i. 6 ; in Akyab, i. 150 ; Amherst, 
i. 234 ; Anamalai Hills, i. 270 ; Anda- 
man Islands, i. 282 ; Arakan Hill 
Tracts, i. 299, 302 ; Athara-Mura, i. 
376 ; Athgarh, i. 377 ; Bakarganj, i. 
441 ; Balaghat, i. 453 ; Banda, ii. 51 ; 
Barda Hills, ii. 124 ; Bard wan, ii. 126 ; 
Bareilly, ii. 138 ; Belgaum, ii. 238 ; 
Bengal, ii. 271 ; Bijli, ii. 427 ; Bilaspur, 
ii. 445; Birhar, iii. 12; Bombay, iii. 
45 ; Lower Burma, iii. 204 ; Cachar, 
iii. 233 ; Cherra, iii. 392 ; Chichgarh, 
iii. 408 ; Chittagong, iii. 434 ; Coorg, 
iv. 32 ; Cuttack, iv. 65 ; DaUi, iv. 99 ; 
Darbhangah, iv. 122 ; Dharampur, iv. 
249 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 328 ; Faiza- 
bad, iv. 381 ; Faridpur, iv. 394; Gau- 
hati, V. 33 ; Western Ghats, v. 59 ; 
Godavari, v. 122; Goona, v. 159; 
Gyaing-than-lwin, v. 238 ; Berar, v. 
260 ; Haliyal. v. 296 ; Haung-tharaw, 
V. 357 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; Hoshi- 
arpur, v. 452 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 108 ; 
Kamrup, vii. 355 ; North Kanara, vii. 
370 ; South Kanara, vii. 376 ; Kangra, 
vii. 411; Kuch Behar, viii. 318; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 426 ; Lalitpur, viii. 
447 ; Langtarai Hills, viii. 460 ; Laun, 
viii. 467 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; Mad- 
ras, ix. 84, 87 ; Malabar, ix. 219, 229 ; 
Western Malwa, ix. 268 ; Manipur, 
ix. 325 ; Melagiri Mountains, ix. 401 ; 
the Melghat, ix. 403 ; Merkara, ix. 
413 ; Mishmi Hills, ix. 463 ; Murshid- 
abad, x. 36 ; Nepal, x. 276 ; Oel, x. 
421; Oudh, x. 482; Pabna, x. 511 ; 
Pachamalai Plills, x. 521 ; Puri, xi. 
401 ; Rampa, xi. 454; Ratnagiri, xii. 
3 ; Sagar, xii. loi ; on the Salandi, 
xii. 149 ; Saletekri, xii. 167 ; Satara, 
xii. 277 ; Seoni, xii. 309 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 323 ; Shahpur, xii. 360 ; Shevaroy 
Hills, xii. 3S3 ; Shimoga, xii. 400; 
Sibsagar, xii. 460, 466 ; Sikkim, xii. 
484 ; Sinchal Pahar Mountain, xii. 
502 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Sirsi, xiii. 21 ; 
Siiapur, xiii. 30 ; Siwalik Hills, xiii. 



INDEX. 



29 



44. ; Sylhet, xiii. 144, 145 ; Tharawadi, 

xiii. 272; Thayet-myo, xiii. 277; 

Tipperah, xiii. 313 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 

355 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 482 ; Wun, 

xiii. 539. 
Bamboo-work made in Assam, i. 367 ; 

Chanda, iii. 355 ; Cherra, iii. 392 ; 

Daman, iv. 103 ; Mani Majra, ix. 322 ; 

Nadaun, x. 128; Sheila, xii. 378; 

Sylhet, xiii. 157. 
Bamhangaon, zaminddri in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 41. 
Bamni, town in Central Provinces, ii. 41. 
Bamniawas, town in Rajputana, ii. 41. 
Bamoni, town in Bengal, ii. 41. 
Bamra, State in Central Provinces, ii. 41, 

42 ; physical aspects, 41 ; history, 41, 

42 ; population, 42 ; division into town 

and country, 42. 
Bamsaru, pass in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 42. 
Banaganapalli, estate in Madras, ii. 43, 

44. 
Banaganapalli, town in Madras, ii. 44. 
Banarji, Babu Taradas, on the Kabir- 

panthis, iii. 3I3-3I5-, 
Banas, river of Rajputana, ii. 44. 
Bands, river in Bengal, ii. 44, 45. 
Banas, river in Bengal, ii. 45. 
Banasa, village in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

45- 
Banavar, village and taluk m Mysore, 11. 

45- 

Banavasi, town in Bombay, ii. 45. 

Bancoora. See Bankura. 

Banda, District in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
45-55 ; physical aspects, 46, 47 ; his- 
tory, 47-49 ; population, 49, 50 ,- agri- 
culture, 50-52 ; natural calamities, 52, 
53 ; commerce and trade, 53 ; admini- 
stration, 53, 54 ; medical aspects, 54, 

55- 

Banda, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 55. 

Banda, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 55, 56. 

Banda, leader of Sikh rebellion (17 12), 
first preached Sikh religious war, i. 
256 ; besieged in Gurdaspur, v. 214 ; 
his rebellion and death, xi. 263. 

Bandajan, pass in Punjab, ii. 56. 

Bandamurlanka, hamlet in Madras. See 
Bandarulanka. 

Bandar, taluk in Madras, ii. 56. 

Bandar. See Masulipatam. 

Bandarban, village in Bengal, ii. 56, 57. 

Bandarulanka, village in Madras, ii. 57. 

Bandel, village in Bengal, ii. 57. 

Bandhalgotis, clan of Kshattriyas, wor- 
shipping the hanka, and inhabiting 
h.v(\Q\S\\ pargand, Oudh, i. 231. 

Bandipallam, hill and stream in Madras, 

ii- 57- 
Bandra, town in Bombay, ii. 57, 58. 



Bandulla Khan, Bijapur general, took 
Gingi(i638),v. 83. 

Banga, town in Punjab, ii. 58. 

Bangahal, valley in Punjab, ii. 58. 

Bangali, river in Bengal, ii. 58, 59. 

Bangalore, District in Mysore, ii. 59-66 ; 
physical aspects, 59, 60 ; history, 60, 
61 ; population, 62, 63 ; agriculture, 
63, 64 ; manufactures, etc., 64 ; ad- 
ministration, 64, 65 ; medical aspects, 
65, 66. 

Bangalore, city in Mysore, ii. 66-72 ; 
general appearance, 66-68 ; history, 
68, 69 ; population, 69, 70 ; manufac- 
tures and trade, 70, 7 1 ; administration, 
71, 72 ; medical aspects, 72. 

Banganapalli. See Banaganapalli. 

Banganga, river of Rajputana, ii. 72. 

Banganga, hill stream in Oudh, ii. 72. 

Bangaon, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 72, 

73- 
Bangar, pargand in Oudh, ii. 73. 

Bangarman, town and pargaitd in Oudh, 

ii- 73- 
Bangash, Afghan clan in the Kohat, 

Kuram, and Miranzai valleys, i. 42 ; 

viii. 246, 368. 
Baniachang, village in Assam, ii. 74. 
Banian trees, sacred, at Allahabad, i. 

196 ; Bhim-lath, ii. 357 ; Broach, iii. 

102. 
Banihal, pass in Punjab, ii. 74. 
Banihargs, class of day - labourers in 

Shahabad, xii. 330. 
Baniyas. See Trading Castes. 
Banjaras, pack bullock drivers, often 

thieves, in North Arcot, i. 315 ; Bilas- 

pur, ii. 452 ; Borasambar, iii. 89 ; 

Chhatisgarh, iii. 397 ; Coimbatore, iv. 

15 ; Ghes, v. 73 ; Khandesh, viii. 155 ; 

Kistna, viii. 230 ; Kolaba, viii. 265 ; 

Lohara, viii. 474 ; Madras Presidency, 

ix. 21 ; Nallamalai Hills, x. 186 ; their 

manners and customs, Wiin, xiii. 541, 

542. 
Banka, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

ii. 74, 75. 
Banka Canal. See Rupnarayan. 
Bankaner, town in Central Provinces, ii. 75. 
Bankapur, town and Sub-division in 

Bombay, ii. 75. 
Bankheri, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

75- 

Banki, estate in Orissa, ii. 75, 76. 

Bankipur, civil station of Patna District, 
Bengal, ii. 76. 

Bankipur, village in Bengal, ii. 77 ; old 
settlement of the Ostend East India 
Company on the Hiigli between Cal- 
cutta and Chinsurah ; its destruction 
by the Muhammadans (1753), vi. 374. 

Bankomundi, peak in Orissa, ii. "j"]. 

Bankot, seaport in Bombay, ii. 77, 78. 



30 



INDEX. 



Banks and Bankers (native), special 
mention of, at Ahmadabad, i. 92 ; 
Ahmadnagar, i. 104 ; Ajmere, i. 133 ; 
AUaliabad, i. 192 ; Bakarganj, i. 447 ; 
Barot,ii. 173; Benares, ii. 259, 266; Beri, 
ii. 325; Bhiwapur, ii. 401; Bidesir, ii. 
419 ; Cavvnpur, iii. 288 ; Ciiapra, iii. 
370 ; Faridpur, iv. 405 ; Farukhabad, 
iv. 414 ; Gujrat, v. 197 ; Hariana, v. 
338 ; Jaipur, vii. 53, 60 ; JhalraPatan, 
vii. 201, 205 ; Kishangarli, viii. 224 ; 
Murshidabad, x. 39 ; Paintepur, x. 
530; Rajputana, xi. 420, 421 ; Ram- 
garh, xi. 448 ; Ranchi, xi. 468 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 38 ; Rewari, xii. 56 ; Shaha- 
pur, xii. 338 ; Sialkot, xii. 452 ; Umrer, 
xiii. 423. 

Banks of Rivers, changes in the. See 
Alluvion and Diluvion. 

Banks, Major, succeeded Sir H. Law- 
rence in civil command at Lucknow 
(4th July), killed (21st July 1857), viii. 

513- , 

Bankura, District in Bengal, ii. 78-87 ; 
physical aspects, 78-80 ; history, 80, 
81 ; population, 81-83 ; agriculture, 
83, 84 ; natural calamities, 84, 85 ; 
commerce and trade, etc., 85 ; admini- 
stration, 85, 86 ; medical aspects, 86, 

Bankura, town in Bengal, ii. 87. 

Bannawasi. See Banavasi. 

Bannu, District in Punjab, ii. 87-97 '■> 
physical aspects, 87-90 ; history, 90- 
92 ; population, 92, 93 ; agriculture, 
93-95 ; land tenures, wages, prices, 
etc., 95 ; commerce and trade, etc., 
95, 96 ; administration, 96, 97 ; medical 
aspects, 97. 

Bannu, tahsil in Punjab, ii. 97. 

Bannu. See Edwardesabad. 

Bannuchis, most numerous tribe in Bannu, 
their appearance and manners, ii. 93. 

Bampas, village in Bengal, ii. 97. 

Bampur. See Bhanpur. 

Bansa, town in Oudh, ii. 97, 98. 

Bansa, village in Central Provinces, ii. 98. 

Bansbaria, town in Bengal, ii. 98. 

Bansda, town and petty State in Bombay, 
ii. 98, 99. 

Bansdih, town and tahsil m. N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 99. 

Bansgaon, town and talisil in N.-W. 
Provinces, ii. 100. 

Bansgaon, agricultural village in N.-W. 
Provinces, ii. 100. 

Bansgaon, town in Bengal, ii. loo. 

Bansi, village in Rajputana, ii. 100. 

Bansi, tbwn and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 100, loi. 

Banskhali, village in Bengal, ii. loi. 

Bansloi, river in Bengal, ii. loi. 

Bansror. See Bhainsror. 



Bansura, town in Oudh. ii. loi. 
Banswara, State in Rajputana, ii. loi- 

Banswara, capital of State in Rajputana, 

ii. 103. 
Bantam, Presidency of the East India 

Company in Java, vi. 368, 369. 
Banthar, town in Oudh, ii. 103. 
Banthly. See Wanthli. 
Bantwa, town and petty State in Bombay, 

ii. 103, 104. 
Bantwal, town in Madras, ii. 104. 
Bani'ir, town in Punjab, ii. 104. 
Baoli, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 104. 
Baoni, State in Bundelkhand, ii. 104, 

Baori. See Kali Baori. 

Baorias. See Moghias. 

Baoris. See Bauris. 

Bapatla, town and tdliik in Madras, ii. 
105. 

Bappa Rawal, took Chitor and made it 
his capital (728), iii. 431 ; founded the 
dynasty of Udaipur, xiii. 403. 

Bappu Gokla, Maratha general, defeated 
at Kirki (1817), viii. 221. 

Baptist -Mission of Carey, Marshman, and 
Ward at Serampur, vi. 260. 

Baptist Missions. See Missions. 

Baptiste, Col. Jean, officer in Sindia's 
service, defeated Raja of Garhakota at 
Nagpur, v. 13 ; his campaigns in 
Chanderi (1811-14, 1829), viii. 448, 
449 ; surprised byjai Singh in Seopur 
(1816), xii. 316. 

Bara, river in Punjab, ii. 105. 

Bara, village in Oudh, ii. 105. 

Bara Banki, District in Oudh, ii. 105- 
1 14 ; physical aspects, 106, 107 ; his- 
tory, 107-109; population, 109, no; 
agriculture, IIO-112; natural calami- 
ties, 112 ; commerce and trade, 1 13 ; 
administration, 113, 1 14; medical 
aspects, 114. 

Bara Banki, tahsil m Oudh, ii. 114, 115. 

Bara Banki, town in Oudh, ii. 115. 

Barabar, hills in Bengal, ii. 115, 116. 

Barabati, fort in Bengal, ii. 116. 

Barachati, village in Bengal, ii. 116. 

Bara Dehi, peak in Bengal, ii. 116, 

Baragai, hill in Bengal, ii. 117. 
Baragaon, town in Oudh, ii. 117. 
Baragari, town in Bengal, ii. 117. 
Bara Haldibari, town in Bengal, ii. 117. 
Barah, town and /a/«// in N.-W. Provinces, 

ii. 117. 
Barahtiya, town in Bengal, ii. 117. 
Barail. See Barel. 
Barak, river of N.-E. India, ii. 118, 119 ; 

steam navigation on, vi. 552. 
Barakhar, river in Bengal, ii. 119. 
Barakhar coal seams, vi. 637. 



INDEX. 



31 



Barakhati, town in Bengal, ii. 119. 

Barakila and Tahbunda, peaks in >Iadras, 
ii. 119, 120. 

Barakdu. See Godairi. 

Barakulia Khal, river in Bengal, ii. 120 

Barakzais, numerous in Kandahar city, 
vii. 390 ; Sibi, xii. 455, 456. 

Baral, river in Bengal, ii. 120. 

Bara Lacha, mountain pass in Punjab, 
ii. 120. 

Bar AH, raised road in Assam, ii. 120. 

Baramahal, historical division of Madras, 
ii. 120, 121. 

Baramati, town in Bombay, ii. 121. 

Baramba, tributary State in Orissa, ii. 
121, 122. 

Baramula, mountain gorge in Punjab, ii. 
122. 

Baran, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
122. 

Baran. See Bulandshahr. 

]5aran, town in Rajputana, ii. 122. 

Baranagar, town in Bengal, ii. 122, 123. 

Bara-pole, river in Madras, ii. 123. 

Barasat, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 
ii. 123. 

Birasia, river in Bengal, ii. 123. 

Bdrd-sirtgha, or swamp deer, article 
'India,' vi. 658. Local notices — Cachar, 
iii. 234 ; Chamba, iii. 329 ; Dinajpur, 
iv. 291 ; Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 481 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 58 ; the Siin- 
darbans, xiii. 389. 

Baraunda, village and petty State in 
Bundelkhand, ii. 123, 124, 

Baraut. See Barot. 

Barbaspur, chiefship in Central Provinces, 
ii. 124. 

Barbigha, town in Bengal, ii. 124. 

Barbosa, mentions Bombay as Mayambu 
(circ. 1516), iii. 74 ; his description 
of Hampi, quoted, v. 307 ; quoted 
on Quilon, xi. 339, 340 ; Rander, 
xi. 468; Sural, xiii. 120. 

Barclay, Col., expelled Khoras from 
Gujarat (1819), xi. 343. 

Barda, division of Kathiawar, Bombay, 
ii. 124. 

Barda Hills, in Kathiawar, ii. 124. 

Bardha, village in Central Provinces, ii. 
124. 

Bardia, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 
124. 

Bardoli, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, ii. 124, 125. 

Bardwan, Division in Bengal, ii. 512. 

Bardwan, District in Bengal, ii. 125-136 ; 
physical aspects, 126, 127 ; history, 
127, 128 ; population, 128-130 ; agri- 
culture, 130-132 ; natural calamities, 
132 ; commerce and trade, 132, 133 ; 
coal, 133, 134 ; administration, 134, 
135 ; medical aspects, 135, 136. 



Bardwan, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 136. 
Bardwan, town in Bengal, ii. 136, 137. 
Bardwan fever, described, ii. 135, 136. 

.Si^f also Birbhum, iii. 3, II ; Hugh, v. 

498 ; Midnapur, ix. 426, 427, 430. 
Bardsvar, forest reserve in Assam, ii. 

'37- 
Bareilly, District in N.-W. Provinces, 137- 

145 ; physical aspects, 137, 138 ; 
history, 138-140 ; population, 140-142 ; 
agriculture, 142, 143 ; natural calami- 
ties, 143 ; commerce and trade, etc., 
143, 144 ; administration, 144, 145 ; 
medical aspects, 145. 
Bareilly, city in X.-W. Provinces, ii. 145- 

'•^7- 
Barel or Barail, hill range in Assam, ii. 

'47- 
Barela, forest in Central Provinces, ii. 

147. 
Barela, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

147, 148. 
Bareli. See Bareilly. 
Barenda, mountain pass in Punjab, ii. 148. 
Bareng. See Bhareng. 
Barengi. See Bharengi. 
Baretha, town in Oudh, ii. 148. 
Barga, hill pass in Punjab, ii. 148. 
Bargarh, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 148, 149. 
Barh, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

ii. 149. 
Barha, agricultural village in Central 

Provinces, ii. 149, 150. 
Barhaj, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 150. 
Barhalganj, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

150. 
Barhampur. See Berhampore. 
Barhi, village in Bengal, ii. 150. 
Barhi, town in Central Provinces, ii. 150. 
Bari, Sub-division (formerly) in Oudh, ii. 

Bari, town and/ar^awfl in Oudh, ii. 150, 

Bari, village in N,-W. Provinces, ii. 151. 

Bari, town in Rajputana, ii. 151. 

Baria, town and petty State in Bombay, 
ii. 151, 152. 

Bari Doab, tract of country in Punjab, 
ii. 152, 153. 

Bari Doab Canal, in Punjab, ii. 153-155; 
article 'India,' vi. 29, 532, 533. Local 
notices — Amritsar, i. 259 ; Gurdaspur, 
V. 207 ; Lahore, viii. 404, 410 ; head- 
works at Madhupur, viii. 543. 

Barid Shahi, Muhammadan dynasty of 
India (1492-1657), article 'India,' vi. 
288. 

Barigura, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

Barisal, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

ii. 155. 
Bariya. See Baria, 



32 



INDEX. 



Barkal Hills, in Bengal, ii. 155. 

Barkal Rapids, in Bengal, ii. 155, 156. 

Barkali'ir, town in Madras, ii. 156. 

Barkhera, petty State in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 156. 

Barking t\e.&x, kakar, article 'India,' vi. 
658. Local notices — Bhutan, ii. 414 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 212; Chamba, iii. 
329 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; 
Kashmir, viii.6 8 ; Madras Presidency, 
ix. 90 ; Manipur, ix. 325 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 23 ; Thayet-myo, xiii. 279 ; 
the Sundarbans, xiii. 389. 

Birkop, village in Bengal, ii. 156. 

Barkiir, former Sub-division in Madras, 
ii. 156. 

Barkur, village and port in Madras, ii. 
156, 157. 

Barlaam and Josaphat, legend of, and its 
analogies with that of Buddha, vi. 151, 
152. 

Barley, cultivation of, special mention of, 
in Mount Abu, i. 7 ; Afghanistan, 
i. 38 ; Agra, i. 64 ; Ahmadnagar, 
i. 103; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 125; Ak- 
alkot, i. 137 ; Akola, i. 143 ; Aligarh, 
i. 173; Amritsar, i. 259; Azamgarh, 
i. 398 ; Bahraich, i. 430 ; Ballia, ii. 21 ; 
Bannu, ii. 94; Bardwan, ii. 130; 
Bareilly, ii. 142; Basti, ii. 211; Bel- 
gaum, ii. 235 ; Benares, ii. 258 ; Bhu- 
tan, ii. 413 ; Bijnaur, ii. 432 ; Bogra, 
iii. 29 ; Bombay, iii. 53, 54 ; Budaun, 
iii. 120; Bulandshahr, iii. 137; Bundi, 
iii. 159; Cavvnpur, iii. 285 ; Chamba, 
iii. 329 ; Champaran, iii. 341 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 439 ; Cutch, iv. 61 ; Cuttack, 
iv. 71 ; Dehra Dun, iv. 174 ; Delhi, 
iv. 182 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 214 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 224 ; Dholpur, 
iv. 274 ; Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; Eastern 
Dwars, iv. 333 ; Etah, iv. 362 ; Eta- 
wah, iv. 374 ; Faizabad, iv. 384 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 403 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
416 ; Fatehpur, iv. 427 ; Fatehpur 
Chaurasi, iv, 432 ; Firozpur, iv. 443 ; 
Gaya, v. 49 ; Ghazipur, v. 67 ; Gonda, 
V. 152 ; Goona, V. 159; Gorakhpur, 
V. 169 ; Gujranwala, v. 184 ; Gujrat, 
V. 193 ; Gurdaspur, v. 21 1 ; Gurgaon, 
v. 220 ; Hazara, v. 365 ; Hazaribagh, 
V. 375 ; Herat, v. 391 ; Hissar, v. 430; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 455 ; Hugh, v. 494 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 52 ; Jalalabad, vii. 75 ; 
Jalandhar, vii. 88 ; Jalpaigari, vii. 113; 
Jaunpur, vii. 155 ; Jessor, vii. 187 ; 
Jhang, vii. 210; Jodhpur, vii, 235, 
23S ; Kabul, vii. 266 ; Kaiti, vii. 310 ; 
Kangra, vii. 424 ; Karachi, vii. 448 ; 
Karauli, vii. 472 ; Karnal, viii. 24 ; 
Kheri, viii. 193 ; Kohat, viii. 247 ; 
Korea, viii. 297 ; Kv'ilu, viii. 342 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 354 ; Kuram, viii. 369 ; 



Lahore, viii. 410 ; Lahul, viii. 422 ; 
Lalitpur, viii. 452, 453 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Lohardaga, viii. 483 ; Luck- 
now, viii. 497 ; Ludhiana, viii. 522 ; 
Mainpuri, ix. 208 ; Western Malwa, 
ix. 269 ; Manbhum, ix. 283 ; Meerut, 
ix. 387 ; Midnapur, ix. 429 ; Mirzapur, 
ix. 458 ; Montgomery, ix. 498; Morad- 
abad, ix. 509 ; Muttra, x. 48 ; Muzaf- 
fargarh, x, 61 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 72 ; 
Nadiya, x. 135 ; Nepal, x. 276; Nilgiri 
Hills, X. 313 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 377; 
Pabna, x. 515 ; Palni Mountains, xi. 19 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 71 ; Patna, xi. loi ; 
Peshawar, xi. 153 ; Pilibhit, xi. 175 ; 
Pishin, xi. 190 ; Punjab, xi. 278 ; Kaj- 
putana, xi. 418 ; Rajshahi, xi, 433 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 29 ; Rohtak, xii. 73 ; 
Safipur, xii. 99 ; Saharanpur, xii. 120 ; 
Santal Parganas, xii, 232 ; Saran, xii. 
251. 255; Shahabad, xii. 329; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 349 ; Sialkot, xii. 446 ; 
Sibi, xii, 455 ; Sikkim, xii, 486 ; Sind, 
xii. 520 ; Sirohi, xiii. 5 ; Sirsa, xiii. 16 ; 
Sitapur, xiii. 34 ; Spiti, xiii. 73 ; 
Tarai, xiii. 209 ; Udaipur, xiii. 404 ; 
Yusufzai, xiii. 558. 

Barlow, Sir G. H., Governor of Madras 
(1807-13), ix. 67, ad interitn Go- 
vernor-General (1805-07) ; mutiny of 
Vellore, vi. 399. 

Barmuara, State in Bombay, ii. 157. 

Barmul Pass, mountain in Orissa, ii. 157. 

Barnadi, river in Assam, ii. 157. 

Barnagar, town in Central India, ii. 157, 

Barnes, G. C, on begdr ox forced labour 
in Kangra, vii. 422. 

Baroda, Native State in Gujarat, ii. 157- 
170; physical aspects, 158; popula- 
tion, 158-160; history, 160- 164 ; mili- 
tary force, 164 ; agriculture, 164 ; land 
tenures, 164-166 ; means of communi- 
cation, 166; administration; 166-169; 
climate, 169, 170; article 'India,' vi. 
322, 323 ; deposition of the late Gaek- 
war for an attempt to poison the British 
Resident, 323, 426. 

Baroda, division of State, ii. 170. 

Baroda, capital of State in Gujarat, ii. 
170-173. 

Baroda, agricultural village in Punjab, 
ii. 173. 

Barodsair, town in Central India, ii. 

Baronda. See Baraunda. 

Barot, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 173. 

Barots. See Bhats. 

Barpali, town and estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 174. 

Barpeta, town and Sub-division in Assam, 
ii. 174. 

Barrackpur, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 
174. 



INDEX. 



33 



Barrackpur, town in Bengal, ii. 174-176. 
Barros, De, quoted on Satgaon, xii. 2S6 ; 

his map (1540) on the Twenty-four 

Parganas, xiii. 390. 
Barsana, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

Barsi, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 
ii. 176. 

Barsi-Takli, town in Berar, ii. 176. 

Barsinghpur, town in Oudh, ii. 176, 177. 

Barsoi, village in Bengal, ii. 177. 

Bartholomew the Apostle, his preachings 
in India certified by Pant^nus the 
Alexandrian (2nd century), vi. 235 ; 
conversion of India proper ascribed 
to St. Bartholomew, and of Persia and 
Central Asia to St. Thomas, according 
to Hippolytus, vi. 235. 

Barth's Religions of India, quoted, vi. 
161 (footnote 2), and his Kevue de 
mistoire des Religions, quoted, vi. 161 
(footnote 2). 

Bartolomeo, Fra Paolo, mentions canal 
at Alleppi, i. 200 ; protests against 
compulsory attendance of Christians 
at Hindu festivals, i. 230 ; his mention 
of Kanjarapalli, vii. 432 ; Kolachel, 
viii. 272 ; Narakal, x. 203. 

Barudpura. See Bharudpura. 

Baruipur, Sub - division (formerly) in 
Bengal, ii. 177. 

Baruipur, town in Bengal, ii. 177. 

Barul, iron-ore field in Bengal, ii. 177, 
178. 

Barunibunta, hills in Bengal, ii. 178. 

Barur, town in Berar, ii. 178. 

Barvva, estate in Madras, ii. 178. - 

Barwa, town and port in Madras, ii. 178. 

Barwai, pargaud in Central India, ii. 178. 

Barwala, town in Bombay, ii. 178, 179. 

Barwala, town and tahsil in Punjab, 
ii. 179. 

Barwan, town and pargand in Oudh, 
ii. 179, I So. 

Barwani, town and petty State in Central 
India, ii. iSo, 181. 

Barwar, town in Oudh, ii. 181. 

Barwars, thieving tribe in Gonda, v. 1 51, 

155. 156. 
Barwa Sagar, town and lake in N.-W. 

Provinces, ii. 181, 182. 
Basahari, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

182. 
Basalat Jang, brother of Nizam Ali, made 

Adoni his capital (1757-82), i. 27 ; 

in Bellary, ii. 242 ; retained possession 

of Guntur, guaranteed to him until his 

death, iii. 469, v. 205 ; assisted French 

intrigues, viii. 228. 
Basanta or cattle small-pox. See Cattle 

disease. 
Basantar, stream in Punjab, ii. 182. 
Basantia, village in Bengal, ii. .1S2. 
VOL. XIV. 



Basantpur, trading village in Bengal, 

ii. 1S2. 
Basera, village in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

182. 
Bashahr, Hill State in Punjab, ii. 182, 

Basi, town in Punjab, ii. 183. 

Basim, District of Berar, ii. 183-188 ; 
physical aspects, 183, 184 ; history, 
184, 185 ; population, 185, 186 ; agri- 
culture, 186, 187 ; manufactures and 
trade, 187 ; administration, 187, 1S8 ; 
meteorological aspects, 1S8. 

Basim, taluk in Berar, ii. 188. 

Basim, town in Berar, ii. 188, 189. 

Basinakonda, rock in Madras, ii. 189. 

Basi Tang, mountain range in Bengal, 
ii. 189. 

Basket-making, special mention of, in 
Amritsar, i. 261 ; Anjengaon, i. 290 ; 
Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 302 ; Bengal, 
ii. 308 ; Daman, iv. 103 ; Dharampur, 
iv. 249 ; Faridpur, iv. 297 ; Goalpara, 
V. 117; Hugh, V. 496; Khasi Hills, 
viii. 178; Kuch Behar, viii. 324; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 434 ; Lohardaga, 
viii. 485 ; Monghyr, ix. 487 ; Now- 
gong, X. 412 ; Pabna, x. 517; Poona, 
xi. 209 ; Rangpur, xi. 498 ; Sawant- 
wari, xii. 297 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 
112; Tipperah, xiii. 319; Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 447. 

Baskhari, town in Oudh, ii. 189. 

Basoda, petty State in Central India, 
ii. 189. 

Basohli, tract of country in Punjab, ii. 1S9. 

Basorhi, /a;;-^d:«rt in Oudh, ii. 189. 

Basra, village in Bengal, ii. 190. 

Basrur. See Barkalur. 

Bassein, Sub-division in Bombay, ii. 190, 
191, 192. 

Bassein, town in Bombay, ii. 191, 192; 
capture of, from the Portuguese by 
theMarathas, article 'India,' vi. 320; 
treaty of, at the conclusion of the second 
Maratha war, vi. 323. 

Bassein, District in Lower Burma, ii. 
192-201 ; physical aspects, 192-194 ; 
history, 194, 195 ; population, etc., 
195-197 ; agriculture, 197, 198 ; manu- 
factures, etc., 198 ; commerce, 198, 
199; revenue, etc., 199, 200; admini- 
stration, 200, 201 ; climate, etc., 201. 

Bassein, township in Lower Burma, ii. 
201. 

Bassein, town and port in Lower Burma, 
ii. 201-203 ; trade, 202, 203. 

Bassein, river in Lower Burma, ii. 203, 
204. 

Bastar, Native State in Central Provinces, 
ii. 204, 20S. 

Basti, District in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
208-214; physical aspects, 208, 209; 



34 



INDEX. 



history, 209; population, 209, 210; 
agriculture, 210, 211 ; land tenures, 
211, 212; natural calamities, 212; 
commerce and trade, 212, 213 ; 
administration, 213 ; medical aspects, 
213, 214. 

Basti, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 214. 

Basti Shekh, town in Punjab, ii. 214. 

Basurhat, town and Sub-divibion in Ben- 
gal, ii. 214, 215. 

Basva Patna, village in Mysore, ii. 215. 

Baswa, town in Rajputana, ii. 215. 

Batala, town and tahsil in Punjab, ii. 

215- 

Batala. See Merangi. 

Bates, Captain, quoted, on the view from 
the Matan Temple, ix. 360. 

Batesar, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
216. 

Bathing festivals, special mention of, at 
Allahabad, i. 199 ; Antra vedi, i. 294 ; 
Anupshahr, i. 295 ; Badrpur, i. 41 1 ; 
Baksar, i. 450; Ballabhpur, ii. 17; Ballia, 
ii. 23; Batesar, ii. 216; Bausi,ii. 217; Bij- 
naur, ii. 435 ; Bithur, iii. 20 ; Chagdah, 
iii. 324; Cape Comorin, iv. 34 ; Mach- 
kund, near Dholpur, iv. 278 ; Dohari- 
ghat, iv. 312 ; Soron in Etah, iv. 364 ; 
Shiurajpur in Fatehpur, iv. 429 ; Fatvva, 
iv. 435 ; Chochakpur in Ghazipur, v. 
69 ; Giriyak, v. 85 ; Gobardhrin, v. 
121 ; in the Godavari, v. 132 ; Hard- 
war, v. 333, 334 ; Jajpur, vii. tt, ; 
Kapilmuni, vii. 441 ; in the Laksh- 
mantirtha, viii. 443 ; Manikpur, ix. 
321 ; Pariar, xi. 63 ; Pehoa, xi. 129 ; 
Puri, xi. 318 ; Pushkar, xi. 335 ; 
Rupar, xii. 83 ; Sadullapur, xii. 97 ; 
Siddheswar, xii. 474 ; Sonpur, xiii. 
63 ; Soron, xiii. 67 ; Sitakund, xiii. 99 ; 
Tale-kaveri, xiii. 166 ; Thaneswar, xiii. 
260 ; Tirthahalli, xiii. 323 ; Tribeni, 
xiii. 354 ; Triniohini, xiii. 366 ; Sagar 
Island, xiii. 390. 

Bathudis, semi-Hinduized tribe in Keun- 
jhar, viii. 120. 

Batkagarh, Chiefship in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 216. 

Batten, J. H., Commissioner of Kumaun 
(1848-56), viii. 351 ; his reforms there, 
viii. 352 ; on the apparent prosperity 
of the Tarai, xiii. 208. 

Battle-fields, sites of battles in which 
Europeans were engaged — Aligarh 
(1803), i. 170; Aliwal (1846), i. 182; 
Ambi'ir (1750), i. 230 ; Argaum (1803), 
i. 329; Arni (1782), i. 332; Assaye 
(1S03), i. 374, 375 ; Badrpur (1826), i. 
411; Barmi'il Pass (1S03), ii. 157; 
Baxar (1764), ii. 220; near Cawnpur 
(1857), iii. 282, 283, 292; Chaitpet 
(1782), iii. 325 ; Pandarkankra, near 



Chanda(l8i8), iii. 350 ; Chatra(i857), 
iii- 374, 375 ; Chengama Pass (1767), 
iii. 390; Chhota Udaipur (1858), iii. 
405 ; Chilambaram (1749), iii. 412 ; 
Chilianwala (1849), iii. 414, 415 ; Pul- 
lahir, near Conjevaram (1780), iv. 27 ; 
Dausa (1858), iv. 161 ; Badli-ka- 
Sarai, near Delhi (1857), iv. 194; 
Deonthal (1815), iv. 204 ; Dig (1S04), 
iv. 286; Donabyu (1825, 1853), iv. 
313, xiii. 289; East Fatehganj (1774), 
iv. 418; West Fatehganj (1795), iv. 
419,420; Firozshah (1845), iv. 449; 
Gheria (1765), v. 73 ; Condore, in 
Godavari (1758), v. 124; Gujrat 
(1849), v. 190, 196 ; Kakrala (1858), 
vii. 312 ; Kalpi (1858), vii. 342; Kan- 
dahar (1842), vii. 394, (1880), vii. 397 ; 
Kaveripak (1752), viii. 105 ; Kirki 
(1817), viii. 221 ; Korigaum (1818), 
viii. 298, 299 ; Laswari (1803), viii. 
466 ; near Lucknow (1857, 1858), viii. 
513-515 ; Maharajpur (1843), ix. 166 ; 
Malagarh, ix. 235 ; Malvalli (1799), 
ix. 266; Mangor (1S43), i^^- 3i6 ; 
Mangrol (1821), ix. 317; Mehidpur 
(1817), ix. 398; Mianganj (1857), ix. 
421 ; Miani (1843), ix. 422; Miranpur 
Katra (1774), ix. 441 ; Mudki (1845), 
ix. 528 ; Nagina (1858), x. 160 ; Nag- 
pur (1817, 1818), X. 167, 168 ; Najaf- 
garh Jhil (1857), x. 179; Nandarthan 
(1817), X. 189; Nargiind (1857), x. 
211; Nawabganj (1857), x. 248; 
Nichlaval, x. 294 ; Padmanabham 
(1794), X. 525, xiii. 486; Pandarkaura 
(1S18), xi. 35, xiii. 540; Pandharpur 
(1817), xi. 37 ; Panniar(i843), xi. 51 ; 
Patiali (1857), xi. 90; Pegu (1852, 
1853), xi. 128; Perambakam (1780, 
1781), xi. 136; Plassey(i757), xi. 193, 
194; Ponani (1782), xi. 197; Porto 
Novo (1781), xi. 222 ; Ramghat (1763), 
xi. 449 ; Ramnagar (1848), xi. 452 ; 
Sadullapur (1849), xii. 97 ; St. 
Thomas' Mount (1759), xii. 143, 144; 
Sandila (1S57), xii. 19S ; Satyaman- 
galam (1790), xii. 291 ; Sholinghar 
(1781), xii. 422, 423 ; Shwe-maw-daw 
(1852), xii. 437 ; Sitabaldi (1818), xiii. 
24 ; Sobraon (1846), xiii. 45 ; Suti 
(1763), xiii. 140; Syriam (1824), xiii. 
159 ; Tisua (1774), xiii. 334 ; Trichino- 
P"ly(i753), >:ii'- 357; Udhimala(i763); 
xiii. 415 ; Umarkher (1819), xiii. 420 ; 
Unao (1857), xiii. 437; Wandiwash 
(1760), xiii. 518. See also Sieges. 
Battle-fields, sites of battles in which 
Asiatics only were engaged — Akola 
(1790), i. 146; Ajmere (1659), i. 121, 
122; Ammayanayakanur (1741), i. 244; 
Amner, i. 244, 245; Balapur (1721), 
i. 459; Baldiabari (1756), ii. II, 12; 



INDEX. 



35 



Beliapatam, ii. 240; Bellary, ii. 251; 
Biana (1527), ii. 418; Bihar, ii. 
421 ; Chausa (1539), iii. 378 ; Chilam- 
baram (1750), iii. 412; Damalcherri 
Pass (1740), iv. loi ; Delhi (1398), 
iv. 192 ; Derband (1827), iv. 229 ; 
Dhampur (1750), iv. 241 ; Dublana 
(1744), iv. 317; Fatehkhelda (1724), 
iv. 422 ; Gheria (1740), v. 73 ; Ghugus 
(1700), V. 75 ; Gopamau (1033), 
V. 162 ; Halani (1781), v. 294 ; 
Jamrud (1837), vii. 133 ; Kalpi (i477)> 
vii. 342; Kanauj (1540), vii. 386; 
Kandahar (1881), vii. 398; Kasmandi 
Kalau (1030), viii. 83; Katwa, viii. 
102 ; Khanua (1526), viii. 164; Kharda 
(1795), viii. 166; Mandla (1564), ix. 
302 ; Mataundh, ix. 362 ; Mayakonda 
(1748), ix. 376, 377 ; Merta(i754), ix. 
415; Muktsar (1705), ix. 534; Palu- 
pare, xi. 20 ; Pandharpur ( 1 774), xi. 
37; Panduah (1340), xi. 39; Panipat 
(1526, 1556, 1 761), xi. 44-47; Rasan, 
xi. 513; Ratanpur (1705), xi. 516; 
Rattihalli (1764), xii. 14 ; Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 36 ; Selu, xii. 307 ; Shimoga 
(1791), xii. 406 ; Sihonda (1630), xii. 
475; Sikandarabad (1736), xii. 478; 
Singaurgarh, xii. 529 ; Sukkur (1833), 
xiii. 94 ; Susuman, xiii. 139 ; Talikot 
(1565), xiii. 167; Tandan (1660), 
xiii. 176 ; Ujjain (1658), xiii. 417 ; 
Vattila-gundu (1768), xiii. 464; Vypin 
Island (1503), xiii. 504. See also 
Sieges. 

Bauliari, seaport in Bombay, ii. 216. 

Bauphal, town in Bengal, ii. 216.- 

Baupur. See Berhampore. 

Baurgarh, hill in Central Provinces, ii. 
217. 

Bauris (Baoris), semi - Ilinduized tribe 
in Bankura, ii. 78, 81 ; Bardwan, 
ii. 127, 129 ; coal miners, ii. 133 ; 
Bengal, ii. 296 ; Karharbari coal-fields; 
viii. 9 ; Raniganj coal-fields, xi. 505 ; 
included with the Santals in the Santal 
Parganas, xii. 230. 

Eausi, village in Bengal, ii. 217. 

Bavanapadu, town and port in Madras, 
ii. 217. 

Bavra, petty Chiefship in Bombay, ii. 

217, 218. 

Bavra, town in Bombay, ii. 218. 
Baw, river in Burma, ii. 218. 
Bawal, town in Punjab, ii. 218. 
Bawan, town and pargand in Oudh, ii. 

218, 219. 

Bawan Buzurg, town in Oudh, ii. 219. 
Bawigiri, village in Assam, ii. 219. 
Bawisi, tributary State in Bombay, ii. 

ii. 219. 
Baxa, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 219. 
Baxa, cantonment in Bengal, ii. 219, 220. 



Baxar, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 220. 

Baxar, town in Bengal, ii. 220 ; defeat of 
the Mughal and Oudh armies at, by 
Major Munro, vi. 386. 

Baxar Canal, on the Son system, ii. 220, 
221. 

Baxar. See Baksar. 

Bays, Agoada, i. 58, 59 ; Auckland, i. 
384; Karachi, vii. 452 ; Palk's, xi. Ii, 
12. 

Baynes' Hill. See Nundidrug. 

Bayra, grain depot in Bengal, ii. 221. 

Bayra Bil, marsh in Bengal, ii. 221. 

Bazargaon, village in Central Provinces, 
ii. 221. 

Bazitpur. See Bajitpur. 

Beacons. See Lighthouses. 

Beadon, Sir Cecil, Lieutenant-Governor 
of Bengal (1862-67), ii. 279. 

Beal, Samuel, Si-yu-ki, or Buddhist Re- 
cord of the Western World, translated 
from the Chinese of Hiuen Tsiang, 
quoted, vi. 2 (footnote) ; 137 (footnote 
2); 154. 155 (footnote 3); 155 (foot- 
note 2); 175 (footnote l) ; Catena of 
Buddhist Scriptures from the Chinese, 
142 (footnotes) ; 147 (footnote 2) ; 151 
(footnote i) ; 157 (footnote 2) ; (foot- 
note 2) ; 204 (footnote 2). 

Beames, Mr. John, Comparative Gram- 
mar of the Modern Aryan Languages 
of India, vi. 67 (footnote) ; 103 (foot- 
note) ; 335 and footnote ; 337 (foot- 
note 2) ; 339 and footnote. 

Bears, special mention of, article ' India,' 
vi. 655. Local notices — Mount Abu, 
i. 6 ; Ahmadnagar, i. loO ; Akola, i. 
141 ; Anantapur, i. 274 ; Arakan Hill 
Tracts, i. 299 ; North Arcot, i. 312 ; 
South Arcot, i. 320 ; Assam, i. 349 ; 
Bankura, ii. 78, 79 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; 
Bardwan, ii. 127 ; Basim, ii. 184 ; 
Bellary, ii. 241 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; 
Bombay Presidency, iii. 46 ; Buldana, 
iii. 143 ; Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; 
Cachar, iii. 234 ; Chamba, iii. 329 ; 
Chang Bhakar, iii. 366 ; Chhindwara, 
iii- 399 > Chitaldrug, iii. 423 ; Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; Cochin, iv. 
2 ; Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Cuddapah, iv. 
48 ; Darjiling, iv. 130 ; Dehra Dun, 
iv. 169 ; Dhar, iv. 246 ; Dharwar, iv. 
259 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; Gaya, 
v. 45 ; Godavari, v. 123 ; Gonda, v. 
147 ; Gwalior, v. 229 ; Hassan, v. 
346 ; Hazaribagh, v. 370 ; Hill Tip- 
perah, v. 395 ; Himalaya Mountains, 
V. 409; Hindu Kush, v. 419; Jalpai- 
guri, vii. 109; Kadur, vii. 283 ; Kam- 
rup, vii. 355 ; North Kanara, vii. 370 ; 
Kangra, vii. 413 ; Karachi, vii. 445 ; 
Karauli, vii. 471 ; Kashmir, viii. 68 ; 
Khandesh, viii. 150 ; Kolaba, viii. 



36 



i.vrEx. 



261 ; Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kotah, viii. ■^04; 

Kote-betta, viii. 311 ; Kulu, viii. 338 ; 

Kumaun, viii. 349 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 

427 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Lohardaga, 

viii. 477 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 8, 

89; Madura, ix. 121 ; Maimansingh, 

ix. 192 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; Malwa, ix. 

268 ; Manbhum, ix. 279 ; Manipur, 

ix. 325 ; Midnapur, ix. 425 ; Mirzapur, 

ix. 453 ; Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Mysore, x. 

115 ; Nallamalai Hills, x. 185 ; Nasik, 

X. 228 ; Nellore, x. 262 ; Nilgiri Hills, 
1 X. 307 ; Nimar, x. 328 ; Palkonda 

Hills, xi. II ; Palni Mountains, xi. 17 ; 

Rajagriha Hills, xi. 94 ; Patna State, xi. 

115; Phuljhar, xi. 168; Pishin, xi. 

188 ; Poli'ir, xi. 197 ; Poona, xi. 200 ; 

Punjab, xi. 259 ; Raipur, xi. 368 ; 

Rampa, xi. 454 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; 

Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; Salem, xii. 

152; Sandur, xii. 206; Santal Parganas, 

xii. 227 ; Sargangarh, xii. 260 ; Satara, 

xii. 277 ; Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shevaroy 

Hills, xii. 383 ; Shimoga, xii. 400 ; 

Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Singhbhum, xii. 

531 ; Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; 

Siwalik Hills, xiii. 43 ; Sural, xiii. 

120 ; Tarai, xiii. 208 ; Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; 

Thayet-myo, xiii. 279 ; Travancore, 

xiii. 345 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; 

Tumkur, xiii. 376 ; Wiin, xiii. 539. 
Beas, river in Punjab, ii. 221, 222. 
Beast stories and fables, vi. 127. 
Beast hospitals. See Animals, hospitals 

for. 
Beauleah. See Rampur Beauleah. 
Beawar, town in Rajputana, ii. 222. 
Bechraji, temple in Bombay, ii. 222. 
Bedam, estate in Madras, ii, 222. 
Bedanga, town in Bengal, ii. 222. 
Bedars or Bagas, hunting caste to which 

palegdrs of Chitaldrup. belonged, iii. 

423 ; numerous in that District, iii. 

425 ; Sandur, xii. 208 ; Shorapur, xii. 

423, 424. 
Beddadanol, village in Madras, ii. 223. 
Beddome, Col., his works on Indian 

botany, ix. 81. 
Bedi Khem Singh, founded girls' schools 

in Rawal Pindi and Jehlam, xii. 34. 
Bedingfield, Lt., murdered by the Khasis 

(1829), viii. 171. 
Bedis, descendants of Baba Guru Nanak 

at Hujra, v. 501. 
Bediyas, semi-Hinduized gipsy clan in 

Lower Bengal, vi. 71. 
Bedla, town in Rajputana, ii. 223. 
Bednor, town in Rajputana, ii. 223. 
Beehea. See Bihiya. 
Beerbhoom. See Birbhum. 
Beeswax and honey, jungle produce. 

See Honey. 
Beeswax-refining, in Hariana, v. 338. 



Begamabad, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
223. 

Beglar, J. D., quoted on temple at Buddh 
Gaya, iii. 126 ; on the identification 
of the Erannoboas, xiii. 51. 

Begu Sarai, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 
223. 

Behar, Province in Bengal, ii. 223-227 ; 
physical aspects, 224 ; population, 
225-227 ; history, 227. 

Behar, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 227, 228. 

Behar, town in Bengal, ii. 228. 

Behir, village and tahsil in Central 
Provinces, ii. 228, 229. 

Behri. See Beri. 

Behror, town in Rajputana, ii. 229. 

Behti, village in Oudh, ii. 229. 

Behti Kalan, town in Oudh, ii. 229. 

Beja. See Bija. 

Bekal, town in Madras, ii. 229. 

Bela, town in Oudh, ii. 230. 

Bela, agricultural town in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 230. 

Belagavi, village in Mysore, ii. 230. 

Belamarapalavalasa, estate in Madras, 
ii. 230. 

Belapur, seaport in Bombay, ii. 230. 

Beldanga. See Bedanga. 

Belgaum, District in Bombay, ii. 230-238; 
physical aspects, 231, 232 ; history, 
232 ; population, 232, 233; agriculture, 
233-235;. trade, etc., 235, 236; ad- 
ministration, 236, 237; medical aspects, 
237, 238. 

Belgaum, Sub-division in Bombay, ii. 238. 

Belgaum, town in Bombay, ii. 238, 239. 

Belgharia, village in Bengal, ii. 239. 

Bella Narayanpur, village in Bengal, ii. 

Beliapatam, river in Madras, ii. 239. 

Beliapatam, town in Madras, ii. 239, 240. 

Belikeri, seaport in Bombay, ii. 240. 

Belka, trading village in Bengal, ii. 240. 

Belkhera, village in Central Provinces, 
ii. 240. 

Bellagiipa, village in Madras, ii. 240. 

Bellamkonda, hill in Madras, ii. 240. 

Bellary, District in Madras, ii. 240-250 ; 
physical aspects, 241 ; history, 241-243 ; 
population, 243, 244 ; agriculture, 245, 
246 ; natural calamities, 246, 247 ; 
commerce and trade, 247 ; administra- 
tion, 247-249 ; medical aspects, 249, 
250. 

Bellary, tdhik in Madras, ii. 250. 

Bellary, town in Madras, ii. 250, 251. 

Bellavi, village in Mysore, ii. 251. 

Bellew, Dr., on the population of Kanda- 
har, vii. 390 ; of Khelat, viii. 188 ; of 
Ladakh, viii. 397 ; on the Mula Pass, 
ix. 536 ; on the Safed Koh Mountains, 
xii. 97. 

Bell-founding, article ' India,' vi. 607. 



INDEX. 



37 



Local notices — Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; 

Upper Burma, iii. 218 ; Dhampur, iv. 

241 ; Mandalay, ix. 290 ; Nepal, x. 2S4. 
Bell-metal ware, manufactured at Bhag- 

wantnagar, ii. 355 ; Bhatgaon, ii. 377 ; 

Dignagar, iv. 287 ; Jalor, vii. 107 ; Kora, 

viii. 295 ; Mandla, ix. 307 ; Chichli, x. 

222 ; Nellore, x. 269 ; Nepal, x. 284 ; 

Nowgong, X. 412 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ; 

Rajshahi, xi. 436 ; Sambalpur, xii. 

183 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 234 ; Sib- 

sagar, xii. 468, 469 ; Bandhua in 

Sultanpur, xiii. loi. 
Belo, village in Bombay, ii. 251. 
Belona, town in Central Provinces, ii. 252. 
Belsand Kalan, village in Bengal, ii. 252. 
Beluchi, town in Bengal, ii. 240. 
Belur, village and taluk in Mysore, ii. 

252. 
Ben, stream in Punjab, ii. 252, 253. 
Benares, Division in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

253. 254- 

Benares, District in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
254-262 ; physical aspects, 254, 255 ; 
history, 255-257 ; population, 257, 
258 ; agriculture, 258, 259 ; natural 
calamities, 259, 260 ; commerce and 
trade, etc., 260 ; administration, 260, 
261 ; medical aspects, 261, 262. 

Benares, city in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
262-267 ; history, 263, 264 ; general 
appearance, architecture, etc., 264-266; 
manufactures, trade, etc., 266, 267. 

Benares, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
267. 

Benares, estate in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
267, 268. 

Bendamurlanka. See Bandamurlanka. 

Benett, W. C, Introduction to the Otidh 
Gazeteer, used, x. 484-496 ; on Sahet 
Mahet, xii. 129-134. 

Benfey, Prof., article ' India ' (published 
in Ersch and Gruber's Encyclopcrdie), 
quoted, vi. no (footnote 2); believes 
Sopara to be Solomon's Ophir, xiii. 65. 

Bengal, Presidency in British India, ii. 
268. 

Bengal, Province of British India, ii. 
269-323 ; physical aspects, 270, 271 ; 
rivers, 271-273 ; mineral products — 
coal, 273, 274 ; salt manufacture, 274 ; 
iron, 274, 275 ; history, 275, 276 ; 
early Muhamniadan governors of, 276 ; 
independent Muhamniadan kings, 277 ; 
under the Afghan or Pathan dynasty, 
277 ; governors of, under the Mughal 
dynasty, 278 ; governors of and 
governors-general of India under the 
East India Company (1765 -1854), 
279 ; under lieutenant-governors, 279 ; 
English connection with, 279-281 ; 
population — administrative divisions, 
281-284 ; general survey of the popu- 



lation, 2S4-28S ; popular religions, 
28S-290 ; theistic movements, 290, 
291 ; aboriginal creeds, 291, 292 ; early 
estimates of population, 292 ; density, 
292, 293 ; nationalities, 293 ; Muham- 
madans, 293, 294 ; Europeans and 
Eurasians, 294, 295 ; Asiatics, other 
than natives of India, 295 ; Chris- 
tians, 295 ; aboriginal tribes, 295-297 ; 
recognised Hindus, 296, 297 ; classi- 
fication according to sex and age, 
297, 298 ; urban and rural population, 
298-300 ; condition of the people, 
300-302 ; agriculture, 302-308 ; rice, 
302, 303 ; oil-seeds, 303 ; jute, 303 ; 
indigo, 2,<^^, 304 ; tea, 304 ; opium, 
304, 305 ; cinchona, 305 ; forests, 305, 
306 ; system of land tenures, 306 ; 
rates of rent, 306, 307 ; Government 
estates, 307 ; wards' estates, 307 ; sur- 
veys, 307, 308 ; settlements, 308 ; 
manufactures, 308, 309 ; silk, 309 ; 
sugar, 309; saltpetre, 309; steam-mills, 
309, 310; internal trade, 310, 311; 
foreign trade, 311, 312; roads, 312, 
313 ; railways, 313-31 5 ; canals, 315 ; 
admini-itration, 315, 316; revenue and 
expenditure, 317-319 ; military force, 
319 ; police and criminal and civil jus- 
tice, 319, 320; education, 320, 321; 
newspapers, 321 ; climate, 321, 322 ; 
medical aspects, vital statistics, 322 ; 
conclusion, 322, 323. 
Bengal, early English settlements in, 
vi. 368-385 ; first permission to trade 
(1634), 368 ; factories at Hugh, Balasor, 
and Kasimbazar, 369, 370; Bengal 
separated from Madras, 370 ; English 
in Bengal and their early factories, 380 ; 
native rulers of Bengal (1707-56), 
Murshid Kuli Khan, All Vardi Khan, 
and Siraj-ud-daula, 380, 381 ; capture 
of Calcutta, the ' Black Hole,' and 
battle of Plassey, 38 1, 382 ; Mir Jafar 
(1757-60), 383, 385 ; Permanent Settle- 
ment of (1793), 441-445- 
Bengali literature and authors, vi. 340- 
354 > geographical area and linguistic 
features of the Bengali language, 347 ; 
Sanskritizing tendency of Bengali, 347 ; 
the three periods of Bengali literature, 
347, 348 ; court poets of Bengal in the 
14th and 15th centuries, 348 ; Vishnuite 
and Sivaite religious poetry, 349, 350 ; 
Makunda Ram and the stories of 
Kalketu, and the Srimanta Sadagar, 
350, 351 ; Kasi Ram Das, the translator 
of the Mahabharata, 351 ; Ram Prasad, 
court poet of Nadiya in the 1 8th century, 
352 ; Bengali prose in the 19th century, 
and modern Bengali poets and authors, 

353. 354- 
Beni, town in Central Provmces, u. 323. 



38 



INDEX. 



Beniganj, towTi in Oudh, ii. 323. 

Beni-Israel, tribe of Jewish descent, 
chiefly oil-pressers in Janjira, vii. 138 ; 
described in Kolaba, viii. 265, 266. 

Beni Rasulpur, village in Bengal, ii. 323. 

Bentinck, Lord William, Governor- 
General of India (1828-35), article 
' India,' vi. 404-406 ; his financial 
reforms, abolition of Sati, suppression 
of Thagi, 405 ; the renewal of the 
Company's Charter, 405, 406 ; Mysore 
taken under British administration, and 
Coorg annexed, 406. Local notices— 
Encouraged tea-planting in Assam, i. 
365 ; his statue at Calcutta, iii. 250 ; 
intervened in Coorg, iv. 30 ; purchased 
Darjiling, iv. 131 ; Governor of Madras 
(1803-07), ix. 67 ; demanded reforms in 
Oudh, X. 491. 

Benugarh, fort in Bengal, ii. 323. 

Benyon, Richard, Governor of Madras 

(1735-43), ix- 66. 

Berars, The, handed over to the British 
by the Nizam, as a territorial guaran- 
tee for arrears of subsidy and for the 
pay of the Haidarabad contingent, 
V. 415. See Hyderabad Assigned 
Districts. 

Berdi, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

323- 
Berhampur, tdhik in Madras, ii. 324. 
Berhampur, town and cantonment in 

INIadras, ii. 324. 
Berhampur, town in Bengal, ii. 324, 325. 
Beri, petty State in Central India, ii. 

325- 

Beri, town in Punjab, ii. 325, 326. 

Beri-beri, a rheumatic affection prevalent 
in Godavari, v. 130 ; Maldive Islands, 
ix. 252; Vizagapatam, xiii. 497. 

Beria, town in Central Provinces, ii. 326. 

Beridi, estate in Madras, ii. 326. 

Bernard, Sir C, Chief Commissioner of 
British Burma (1880), iii. 176. 

Berni, agricultural town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 326. 

Bernier, M., describes retreat of Dara's 
troops after their defeat by Aurangzeb 
(1659), 1. 122 ; his account of the 
conquest of Sandwip Island (1665), 
xii. 210. 

Beronda, State. See Baraunda. 

Berul, village in Central Provinces, ii. 
326. 

Beryl, found in iNIysore, x. 92. 

Beschi, Father, Jesuit missionary and 
Tamil scholar, article ' India,' vi. 245, 
253> 333- Local notices — In ^Madras, 
ix. 25 ; the last of the jNIadura Jesuits, 
ix. 126 ; lived some time at Kayatar 
in Tinnevelli, xiii. 303. 

Betagaon, village in Oudh, ii. 326. See 
Bhetargaon. 



Betanga, trading village in Bengal, ii. 326. 
Betawad, town in Bombay, ii. 326. 
Betel-leaf or/a«, cultivation of,at Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 103 ; Akola, i. 143 ; Akyab, 
i. 156 ; Anantapur, i. 277 ; Anjengaon, 
i. 290; North Arcot, i. 316; Assam, 
i. 362 ; Badnera, i. 409 ; Bakarganj, 
i. 445 ; Balihiri, ii. 13 ; Bankura, ii. 
83; Bardwan, ii. 130 ; Baruipur, ii. 
177; Bengal, ii. 271, 304; Bogra, 
iii. 29 ; Biindi, iii. 159 ; Chanda, iii. 
352 ; Chittagong, iii. 439,440 ; Cochin, 
iv. 5 ; Cuttack, iv. 71 ; Dacca, iv. 85 ; 
Dinajpur, iv. 294 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 
333 ; Faridpur, iv. 403 ; Garhbori, v. 
14 ; Garo Hills, v. 31 ; Gaya, v. 49 ; 
Goalpara, v. 116; Hasilpur, v. 344; 
Hazaribagh, v. 375 ; Howrah, v. 463 ; 
Hugh, v. 494 ; Jalgaon, vii. 105 ; 
Jalgaon-Jambod, vii. 106 ; Jessor, vii. 
187 ; North Kanara, vii. 372 ; Kar- 
kamb, viii. 13 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 177 ; 
Khyrim, viii. 215 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; 
Lalitpur, viii. 453 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
483 ; Madras, viii. 28, 30 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 195 ; Ratlam in Western 
Malwa, ix. 269 ; IManbhum, ix. 283 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 429 ; Mirzapur, ix. 
458 ; Nadiya, x. 135 ; Neotini, x. 
274 ; Nowgong, x. 41 1 ; Orissa, 
X. 459; Pabna, x. 516; Parseoni, 
xi. 67 ; Partabgarh, xi. 71 ; Puri, 
xi, 306 ; Ramtek, xi. 465 ; Rang- 
pur, xi. 496 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; Sav- 
anur, xii. 293 ; Shahabad, .xii. 329 ; 
Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; Sinnar, xii. 545 ; 
Sitapur, xiii. 35 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 
112 ; Tanjore, xiii. 187 ; Tinnevelli, 
xiii. 306 ; Tipperah, xiii. 317 ; Tum- 
kur, xiii. 381. 
Betel nut. See Areca palms. 
Betgari, trading village in Bengal, ii. 326. 
Bethlen, Count, his estimate of the popu- 
lation of Upper Burma, iii. 213. 
Beti, village in Oudh. See Behti. 
Betigeri, town in Bombay, ii. 326, 327. 
Betmangala, village and tdhtk in Mysore, 

ii. 327. 
Bettadpur, mountain in Mysore, u. 327. 
Bettia, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 327. 
Bettia, town in Bengal, ii. 327, 328. 
Bettur, village in Mysore, ii. 328. 
Betul, District in Central Provinces, 
ii. 329-333 ; physical aspects, 328, 
329 ; history, 329, 330 ; population, 
33O1 331 ; division into town and 
country, 331 ; agriculture, 331, 332 ; 
commerce and trade, 332 ; administra- 
tion, 332, 333 ; medical aspects, 333. 
Betul, /rt/w// in Central Provinces, ii. 333, 

334- ^ . 

Betul, town in Central Pro\nnces, 11. 334. 

Betulpindangadi, town in Madras, ii. 334. 



INDEX. 



39 



Betwa, river in Bimclelkhand, ii. 334. 
Betwa Canal, famine insurance work in 

Bundelkhand, vi. 533. 
Bevan, Major, first grew coffee in the 

Wainad, as a curiosity, ix. 31. 
Beypur, town and port in Madras, ii. 

335- 
Beypur, river in Madras, 11. 335, 336. 

Beyt, island in Bombay, ii. 336. 

Bezwada, town and tdhik in Madras, ii. 336. 

Bgai, principal tribe of the Karens, viii. 3. 

Bhabhar, State and town. See Babhar. 

Bhabua, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

"• 337- 
Bhachav, town in Bombay, ii. 337. 
Bhadarsa, town in Oudh, ii. 337. 
Bhadarwa, petty State in Bombay, ii. 337. 
Bhadaur, town in Patiala State, ii. 337. 
Bhadaura, petty State in Central India, 

"• 337> 338. 
Bhadbhut, village and place of pilgrimage 

in Bombay, ii. 338. 
Bhadgaon, town in Bombay, ii. 33S. 
Bhodli, petty State in Bombay, ii. 338. 
Bhadora. See Bhadaura. 
Bhadra, river in Mysore, ii. 338, 339. 
Bhadra, Chiefship in Central Provinces, 

ii. 339. 
Bhadra Bahu, Jain leader, died at Shra- 

van-belgola when taking colony from 

Ujjain, vii. 425. 
Bhadrachalam, town, taluk, and estate in 

Madras, ii. 339, 340. 
Bhadrakh, village and Sub-division in 

Bengal, ii. 340. 
Bhadreswar, village in Bombay, ij. 340. 
Bhadreswar, town in Bengal, ii. 340, 

341- 
Bhadri, town in Oudh, ii. 341. 
Bhadron, town in Bombay, ii. 341. 
Bhadwa, petty State in Bombay, ii. 341. 
Bhadwana, petty State in Bombay, ii. 

341- 

Bhaz. See Land tenures. 
Bhaga, mountain river in Punjab. 
Bhagabatipur, village in Bengal, ii. 341. 
Bhagalpur, Division in Bengal, ii. 341- 

343- 

Bhagalpur, District in Bengal, ii. 343- 
352 ; physical aspects, 343-345 ; his- 
tory, 345, 346 ; population, 346, 347 ; 
division of the people into town and 
country, 347 ; demon-worship, 347 ; 
antiquities, 348 ; agriculture, 348, 349 ; 
natural calamities, 349, 350 ; commerce 
and trade, etc., 350; administration, 
350, 351 ; medical aspects, 351, 352. 

Bhagalpur, Sub-division in Bengal, ii. 

352. 
Bhagalpur, town in Bengal, n. 352, 353. 
Bhagalpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

Bhagamandal, village in Madras, ii. 353. 



Bhagats, Bhil ascetics in Mahi Kantha, 
ix. 178. 

Bhagirathi, offshoot of Ganges, in Lower 
Bengal, ii. 353, 354. 

Bhagirathi, river in Garhwal State, N.-W. 
Provinces, ii. 354; the source and head- 
waters of the Ganges, vi. 16. 

Bhagtia Thapa, Gurkha general, killed 
in the attack on Deonthal (181 5), iv. 
204. 

Bhagwa, seaport in Bombay, ii. 354. 

Bhagwangola, river mart in Bengal, ii. 

354, 355- ^ . 

Bhagwantnagar, town and pargana m 

Oudh, ii. 355. 
Bhagwant Singh, Oudh bandit, had his 

fort at Atwa, i. 384 ; operations against 

(1 841), X. 492-494-. 
Bhai, town in Oudh, ii. 355. 
Bhaimias. See Baigas. 
Bhainsror, town and fort in Rajputana, 

ii. 355, 356. 
Bhainswal, village in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

356. 
Bhairabi, river in Assam, 11. 356. 
Bhairagnia, village in Bengal, ii. 356. 
Bhairoghati, temple and pass in N.-W. 

Provinces, ii. 356, 357. 
Bhaisaunda, Chiefship in Central India, 

ii- 357- 
Bhajji, Hill State in Punjab, ii. 375. 
Bhakkar, tahsil in Punjab, ii. 357. 
Bhakkar, town in Punjab, ii. 357, 358. 
Bhakta-Mala, the Y{xa.h\y Acta Sanctorum, 

vi. 208. 
Bhalala, petty State in Bombay, ii. 358. 
Bhalgam Buldhoi, petty State in Bombay, 

ii- 35S. 
Bhalgamra, petty State in Bombay, ii. 

35S. 
Bhals, a Rajput clan, part Hindu, part 
Muhammadan, in Bulandshahr, iii. 

Bhalusna, chiefship and town m Bombay, 

ii. 358. ^ _. 

Bham, town (deserted) in Berar, ii. 358, 

359- 
Bhambore, ruined city in Bombay, n. 359. 
Bhamgarh, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

359- 
Bhamragtiri. See Bhomoragun. 

Bhan, village in Bombay, ii. 359. 

Bhandak, pargana in Central Provinces, 

ii- 359- 
Bhandak, town in Central Provmces, n. 

359, 360. 

Bhandara, District m Central Provmces, 

ii. 360-367; physical aspects, 360, 

361; history, 361, 362; population, 

362 - 364 ; agriculture, 364, 365 ; 

commerce and trade, 365, 366 ; 

administration, 366, 367 ; medical 

aspects, 367. 



^o 



INDEX. 



Bhandara, town in Central Provinces, ii. 
367, 368. 

Bhandaria, petty State in Bombay, ii. 
368. 

Bhander, ancient town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 36S. 

Bhandesvvar, hill in Bengal, ii. 368. 

Bhandup, seaport in Bombay, ii. 168. 

Bhanga, trading village in Bengal, ii. 
168. 

Bhangarhat, village in Bengal, ii. 368, 

369- 
Bhangha, town in Oudh, ii. 369. 
Bhangoda, estate in Madras, ii. 369. 

See Bissemkatak. 
Bhangrya, celebrated dakait leader, 

captured at Pandharpur (1849), xi. 37, 

38. 
Bhanpura, estate in Central Provinces, 

ii. 369. 
Bhanpura, town and pargand in Central 

India, ii. 369. 
Bhanrer, hill range in Central Provinces, 

ii. 369. 
Bhantus, Hindu robber tribe, wandering 

in gangs in Budaun, iii. 120. 
Bhanwad, town in Kathiawar, ii. 369. 
Bhaoli, land tenure in Monghyr, ix. 485. 
Bharat Chandra Rai, Bengali poet of 

the i8th century, vi. 352. 
Bharawan, town in Oudh, ii. 369. 
Bhardagarh, estate in Central Provinces, 

ii; 369. 370. 

Bharejda, petty State in Bombay, ii. 370. 

Bhareng, valley and pargand in Kash- 
mir, ii. 370. 

Bharengi, river of Kashmir, ii. 370. 

Bhargavi, river of Bengal, ii. 370. 

Bhars, aboriginal and formerly dominant 
race in Oudh, now a crushed tribe, 
article 'India,' vi. 71, 187; present 
descendants of, 187. Local notices — 
Specially numerous or noteworthy in 
Azamgarh, i. 395 ; Ballia, ii. 20 ; Bara 
Banki, ii. 107 ; Benares, ii. 253 ; 
Burhapara, iii. 165 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
410 ; Ghazipur, v. 66 ; Gonda, v. 151 ; 
Gorakhpur, v. 168, 169 ; their history 
in Lucknow, viii. 495 ; Manbhum, ix. 
2S0 ; Mirzapur, ix. 456 ; their history 
in Oudh, x. 485, 4S6 ; numbers there, 
X. 498. 

Barthna, village and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, ii. 370. 

Bhartpur, State in Rajputana, ii. 371- 
375 ; history, 372-375 ; administration, 

375- 

Bhartpur, town and fortress in Rajput- 
ana, ii. 375, 376 ; repulse of Lord 
Lake before, vi. 398 ; capture of, by 
Lord Combermere, 404. 

Bharudpura, petty State in Central India, 
ii. 376. 



Bhaskar Rao (Baba Sahib), chief of Nar- 
gund, rebelled (1857) and murdered 
Mr. Masson, x. 211. 

Bhasmangi, hill in Mysore, ii. 376. 

Bhatala, village in Central Provinces, ii. 
376.^ 

Bhatgaon, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 

376-. 
Bhatgaon, village in Central Provinces, 

ii; 376. 
Bhatgaon, town in Bengal, ii. 376, 377. 
Bhatgaon, town in Nepal, ii. 377. 
Bhathan, petty State in Bombay, ii. 377. 
Bhati, coast-strip of the Sundarbans, ii. 

377- 
Bhatkal, town in Bombay, ii. 377, 37S. 
Bhatkuli, town in Berar, ii. 378. 
Bhatnair, town and fort in Rajputana, ii. 

378. 
Bhatpur, village in Oudh, ii. 378. 
Bhats or Barots, genealogists of the 

Rajputs. See jodhpur, vii. 237 ; 

Kaira, vii. 302, 303 ; Raipur, xi. 372 ; 

Rajputana, xi. 408. 
Bhatti Rajputs, especially numerous 

in Firozpur, iv. 440, 442 ; Gujran- 

wala, V. 183 ; Hissar, v. 428, 429 ; 

Jaisalmer, vii. 67 ; Jehlam, vii. 170 ; 

Jhang, vii. 209; Sirsa, xiii. 11, 12, 14. 
Bhattiana, tract of country in Punjab, ii. 

378, 379- 
Bhattus, wandering tribe, generally 

thieves, in N. Arcot, i. 315. 
Bhaturia, village in Bengal, ii. 379. 
Bhaun, town in Punjab, ii. 379. 
Bhaunagar, Native State in Kathiawar, 

Bombay, ii. 379-381. 
Bhaunagar, town and port in Bombay, ii. 

381, 382. 

Bhausingh, market village in Bengal, ii. 

382. ^ 

Bhavani, river in Madras, ii. 382. 
Bhavani, town and taluk in Madras, 382, 

3^3- 
Bhavsars or Chhipias,name given to calico 

printers in Kaira, vii. 306. 
Bhaw, river in Lower Burma, ii. 383. 

See Baw, 
Bhawal, village in Bengal, ii. 3S3. 
Bhawan, town in Oudh, ii. 383. 
Bhawanandpur, village in Bengal, ii. 383, 

384; , 

Bhawani, town and tahsil in Punjab, 
ii. 384. See Bhiwani. 

Bhawanipatna, village in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 384. 

Bhawanipur, suburb of Calcutta, ii. 384. 

Bhayawadar, town in Bombay, ii. 384. 

Bhedau, chiefship in Central Provinces, 
ii. 384, 385. 

Bheel ' Agency.' See Bhilwara. 

Bheeleng, river and town in Lower 
Burma, ii. 3S5. See Bilin. 



INDEX. 



41 



Bheeleng-kyaik-hto, township in Lower 
Burma, ii. 385. See Bilin-kyaik-to. 

Bheeloo-Gyvvon, island in Lower Burma, 
ii. 385. See I5ilu-Gywon. 

Bheels. See Bhils. 

Bhelani, town in Bombay, ii. 3S5. 

Blienglaini^, river in Lower Burma, ii. 
385. See Binlaing. 

Bhensdelu, village in Central Provinces, 

ii- 385. 
Bhera, town and taksil in Punjab, ii. 

3S5, 386. 

Bheraghat, village in Central Provinces, 
ii. 36S. 

Bheren, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 
386. 

Bheri, petty State. See Beri. 

Bhetargaon, town in Oudh, ii. 3S7. 

Bhian, village in Bombay, ii. 3S7. 

Bhidanwala, village in Punjab, ii. 387. 

Bhikorai, village in Rajputana, ii. 3S7. 

Bhilalas, cross between Bhils and Rajputs, 
their marriage ceremonies, ii. 391. Sec 
Bhils. 

Bhils, aboriginal tribe of Khandesh and 
Rajputana, formerly a predatory clan, 
now largely converted into peaceable 
cultivators and loyal soldiers, article 
' India,' vi. 72, 73. Local notices — 
Formerly dominant in Mewar, Malwa, 
Khandesh, and Gujarat, ii. 387-392 ; 
their manners, customs, and ceremonies, 
ii. 388-391 ; their numbers, ii. 392 ; 
found in Ali-Rajpur, i. 181 ; Banswara, 
ii. 102; Baroda, ii. 159; Barwani, ii. 
iSo ; Broach, iii.. 103 ; Bundi, iii. 159 ; 
Central India, iii. 295 ; Chhota Udai- 
pur, iii. 405 ; Chikhli, iii. 409 ; the 
Dangs, iv. 114-116; Dhar, iv. 247; 
Dhi-Dharamrai, iv. 270 ; Dhotia- 
Baisola, iv. 278 ; Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; 
Edar, iv. 336 ; Garh, v. 12 ; Hoshang- 
abad, v. 445 ; Indore, vii. 3 ; Jhabua, 
vii. 194 ; Jhalod, vii. 203 ; Jobat, vii. 
233 ; Kathiwara, viii. 97 ; Khandesh, 
viii. 150, 154, 155 ; massacre of, at 
Kopargaon (1803), viii. 293 ; Mahi 
Kantha Agency, ix. 178, 179 ; Maksu- 
dangarh, ix. 215 ; Western Malwa, ix. 
269 ; Manpur, ix. 339 ; Mathwar, ix. 
365 ; Mehwas, ix. 400 ; Mervvara, ix. 
416 ; Narsinghgarh, x. 215 ; Nasik, x. 



229, 231 ; Nimar, 



Panch 



Mahals, xi. 30, 31 ; Pimpalner, xi. 
181 ; Poona, xi. 205 ; Rajgarh, ix. 
386 ; Rajpipla, xi. 391 ; Rajputana, 
xi. 408, 409; Ratlam, xii. i; Rewa 
Kantha, xii. 51, 52 ; Sanjeli, xii. 221 ; 
Shahpura, xii. 369 ; Sirohi, xiii. 5 ; 
'I'harand Parkar, xiii. 266 ; Tonk, xiii. 
337 ; Udaipur, xiii. 402 ; ^Yun, xiii. 
541. .S'^'^alsoBhilwaraand Dang States. 
Bhilauri, town in Bombay, ii. 392. 



Bhileng, river and town in Burma, ii. 

392. See Bilin. 
Bhileng-kyaik-hto, township in Lower 

Burma, ii. 392. See Bilin-kyaik-to. 
Bhilgarh, town in Central India, ii. 392. 
Bhillang, feeder of the Bhagirathi river, 

N.-W. Provinces, ii. 392. 
Bhilolpur, town in Punjab, ii. 392. 
Bhiloria, petty State in Bombay, ii. 392. 
Bhilsa, fortified town in Central India, ii. 

392-394- 
Bhilu-Gywon, island near Salwin river. 

Lower Burma, ii. 394. 
Bhilwara, tract of country in Central 

India, ii. 394, 395. 
Bhilwara, town in Rajputana, ii. 395. 
Bhima, river in Deccan, ii. 395. 
Bhimaganni, pass in Madras, ii. 395. 
Bhimar, village in Rajputana, ii. 395. 
Bhimavaran, id/iik in Madras, ii. 395, 

396- 
Bhimavaran, village in Madras, ii. 396. 
Bhimbandh, hot springs in Bengal, ii. 

396- 
Bhimdar, torrent in Punjab, ii. 396. 
Bhim-Ghora, place of pilgrimagein N.-W. 

Provinces, ii. 396, 397. 
Bhim-lath, village in Central Provinces, 

ii. 397- 
Bhim Singh's Idihl or club, monolith 

near Sarya, xii. 272. 
Bhimora, petty State in Bombay, ii. 397. 
Bhim Tal, small lake in N.-W. Provinces, 

ii- 397- 
Bhimihadi, Sub-division in Bombay, ii. 

397- 
Bhinal, town in Rajputana, ii. 397. 
Bhind, town in Central India, ii. 397. 
Bhindar, town in Rajputana, ii. 397. 
Bhinga, pargand in Oudh, ii. 397, 398. 
Bhingar, town in Bombay, ii. 398, 397. 
Bhiri, village in Central Provinces, ii. 399. 
Bhiria, town in Bombay, ii. 399. 
Bhisi, town in Central Provinces, ii. 399. 
Bhit Shah, town in Bombay, ii. 399. 
Bhita Sarkhandi, village in Bengal, ii. 

399- ,. ^ „ .. 

Bhitanli, town and pargana m Oudh, n. 

399- 

Bhiwandi, town and Sub-division m Bom- 
bay, ii. 399, 400. 

Bhiwani, town and tahsil in Punjab, ii. 
400. 

Bhiwani, town in Rajputana, ii. 401. 

Bhiwapur, town in Central Provinces, ii. 
401. 

Bhochan, town in Bombay, ii. 401. 

Bhogai, river in Assam, ii. 401. 

Bhogarmang, mountain valley in Punjab, 
ii. 401. 

Bhogdabari, town in Bengal, ii. 401. 

Bhoginpur, town and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, ii. 401. 



42 



INDEX. 



Bhograi, embankment in Bengal, ii. 
402. 

Bhogtas, aboriginal tribe, exercisers of 
demons in Hazaribagh, v. 373. 

Bhoika, petty State in Bombay, ii. 402. 

Bhoja-kheri, estate in Central India, ii. 
402. 

Bhojawaddar, petty State in Bombay, ii. 
402. 

Bhojpur, town in N.-\Y. Provinces, ii. 
402. 

Bhojpur, town in Bengal, ii. 402. 

Bhombadi, township in Lower Burma. 
See Bhummawadi. 

Bhomoraguri, forest reserve in Assam, 
ii. 402. 

Bhongaon, town and ta/isll in N.-W.^Pro- 
vinces, 402, 403. 

Bhonsla, family name of the Maratha 
Chiefs of Nagpur, lapsed to the British 
for want of heirs in 1853, article 'India,' 
vi. 322. 

Bhonsla, Janoji, 2nd Raja of Nagpur 
(1755-72), his policy and defeat at 
Nagpur, X. 166, 167. 

Bhonsla, ]\Iahduji, 3rd Raja of Nagpur 
(1772-8S), defeated Sabaji Bhonsla 
at Panchgaon, x. 167 ; lived at Umrer, 
where he built the fort, xiii. 423. 

Bhonsla, Raghuji i., ist Raja of Nagpur 
(1755)) conquered Bhandara (cijr. 
1738), ii. 361 ; took Chanda and an- 
nexed that kingdom, iii. 349 ; defeated 
governor of EUichpur at Bhugaon, iv. 
346 ; conquered most of Hoshangabad, 
v. 443 ; his intervention in Deogarh 
and reign at Nagpur, x. 166 ; his war 
with Kanoji Bhonsla, xiii. 540- 

Bhonsla, Raghuji II. (1788-1816), 4th 
Raja of Nagpur, defeated at Assaye 
with Sindia, i. 374 ; annexed Betul, ii. 
330 ; besieged Garhakota, but was de- 
feated by Gen. Baptiste, iv. 13 ; his 
reign and the treaty of Deojaon, x. 
167 ; conquered Sambalpur, xii. 180. 

Bhonsla, Raghuji iil. (1818-53'), 6th 
Raja of Nagpur, kingdom lapsed on 
his death, iii. 302 ; his life and reign, 
X. 168. 

Bhonsla, Venkaji, Nagpur general, de- 
feated by Sir A. Wellesley at Argaum 
(1803), i. 329. 
Bhoommawadee, township in Lower 

Burma. See Bumawadi. 
Bhoon-maw, pagoda in Lower Burma. 

See Bunmaw. 
Bhopal, Native State in Central India, ii. 

403-405. 
Bhopal, capital of State in Central India, 

ii. 405, 406. 
Bhopal Agency, group of Native States 
in Central Provinces and Central India, 
ii. 406. 



Bhor, Native State in Bombay, ii. 406. 

Bhor, town in Bombay, ii. 406. 

Bhor Ghat, pass over the Western Ghats, 
Bombay, ii. 406-408; article 'India,' 
vi. 36, 550. 

Bhotiyas, Tibetan race in Dharma, cann- 
ing on trade with pack-sheep, iv. 252 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 353. 

Bhotmari, trading village in Bengal, ii. 
408. 

Bhragu, founder of Broach, ist century 
A.D., where his descendants, the 
Bragav Brahmans, still live, iii. I13. 

Bhuban, range of hills in Assam, ii. 
40S. 

Bhugtis, tribe of Baluchis in Baluchistan, 
ii. 29. 

Bhuinhars, cross between Brahmans and 
Rajputs (perhaps same as Babhans), a 
landholding caste in Azamgarh, i. 395 ; 
Ballia, ii. 20 ; Benares, ii. 257. See 
Babhans. 

Bhuiyas or Bara Bhuiyas (perhaps identi- 
cal with Bhuinhars), their histoiy and 
numbers in Assam, i. 354. 

Bhuiyas, aboriginal tribe, in Bamra, ii. 
42 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 346 ; dominant 
tribe in Bonai, iii. 85, 86 ; in the Chutia 
Nagpur Tributary States, iii. 462, 463, 
464 ; Cuttack, iv. 69 ; Gangpur, iv. 
478 ; Ga3/a, v. 46 ; Hazaribagh, v. 373 ; 
Karharbari coal-fields, viii. 9; Keunjhar, 
viii. 120; Lohardaga, viii. 480; Maldah, 
ix. 243 ; Manbhum, ix. 280 ; Midnapur, 
ix. 427 ; Orissa, x. 436 ; Orissa Tribu- 
tary .States, X. 472 ; Santal Parganas 
(called ghdt'Mils), xii. 229, 230 ; 
Singhbhum, xii. 536. 

Bhuj, capital of Cutch, Bombay, ii. 
408. 

Bhukar. See Chang Bhukar. 

Bhukarheri, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 
408, 409. 

Bhiiksas, aboriginal tribe, who, with the 
Tharus, can alone live in the Tarai, 
xiii. 208, 209. 

BhuUooah, District in Bengal. See 
Noakhali. 

Bhum. See Chamardi. 

Bhiim Bakeswar, group of hot sulphur 
springs in Bengal, ii. 409. 

Bhumawadi. See Bumawadi. 

Bhumias, aboriginal tribe in Raipur, 

xi. 371. 
Bhumijs, aboriginal tribe, numerous in 
Assam, where they are tea-garden 
coolies, i. 357 ; in Balasor, ii. 6 ; 
Bankura, ii. 81 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 346 ; 
in the Chutia Nagpur Tributary States, 
iii. 463 - 465 ; Dinajpur, iv. 292 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 400 ; jManbhum, ix. 
280, 281 ; Midnapur, ix. 427 ; Nilgiri 
(Orissa), x. 325 ; Orissa, x. 436 ; Orissa 



INDEX. 



43 



Tribu;ary States, x. 472 ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xii. 230 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; 
Singhbhum, xii. 535- 

Bhung Bara, tract in Bahawalpur, ii. 409. 

Bhunjiyas, aboriginal tribe in Raipur, 
xi. 371. 

Bhun-maw. See Bun-maw. 

Bhupalpatnam, estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 409. 

Bhiipal Singh Rao, set up by the 
Chauhans as Raja at Khair (1857), but 
taken and hanged, viii. 127, 128. 

"Scmx, pargand in Oudh, ii. 409, 410. 

Bhurtpore. See Bhartpur. 

Bhusawal, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, ii. 410. 

Bhutan, Independent State in the Eastern 
Himalayas, ii. 411-417 ; physical as- 
pects, 411, 412; people, 412-414; 
natural products, 414 ; manufactures, 
etc., 414, 415 ; meteorology, 415 ; 
history, 415-417. 

Bhutana. See Bhathan. 

Bhutan war (1864-65), article 'India,' vi. 
424, 425. Local notices — Bhutan, ii. 
417 ; annexation of Dhalingkot, iv. 
131 ; check of British troops at 
Diwangiri, iv. 308 ; annexation of the 
Eastern Dwars, iv. 330 ; Jalpaiguri, 
vii. 1 10 ; British head-quarters during 
the war at Rangia, xi. 471. 

Bhutias, The, in Bhutan, ii." 412-414; 
Bians Pass, ii. 419 ; Darjiling, iv. 130, 
133 ; Darrang, iv. 132, 133 ; Diwangiri, 
iv. 30S ; the Eastern Dwars, iv. 329, 
330 ; Garhwal, v. 20, 22 ; Himalaya 
Mountains, v. 413 ; the Juhar valley, 
vii. 253 ; Kamrup, vii. 355 ; Khagra- 
para fair, viii. 123 ; Kherkheria fair, 
viii. 199 ; driven out of Kuch Behar by 
Warren Hastings, viii. 320 ; in Lahul, 
viii. 421 ; Milam, ix. 438 ; Nepal, x. 
279 ; Sikkim, xii. 485. 

Bhuvaneswar, temple city in Orissa, ii. 
417, 418. 

Bhwot-lay. See Pa-de. 

Biana, town in Rajputana, ii. 418. 

Bians, Himalayan pass in N.-W, Pro- 
vinces, ii. 418, 419. 

Bias. See Beas. 

Bias, river in Central Pro\-inces, ii. 419. 

Bichrand, estate in Central India, ii. 
419. 

Bickaneer. See Bikaner. 

Bidar, town in Haidarabad, ii. 419. 

Bidar, Muhammadan Kingdom of South- 
em India (1492-1657), vi. 288. 

Bidari work, damascening of silver on 
bronze, article ' India,' vi. 607. Local 
notices — Made at Bidar, ii. 419 ; 
Purniah, xi. 328. 

Biddulph, !Major, quoted on slavery in 
Kafiristan, vii. 291. 



Bidesir, town in Rajputana, ii. 410. 
Bidhuna, village and talisil in X.-W. 

Provinces, ii. 419, 420. 
Bidi, Sub-division in Bombay, ii. 420. 
Bidie, Dr., his official papers on the 

Fauna and Flora of S. India, used, 

ix. 80-102. 
Bidyadhari, river in Bengal, ii. 420. 
Bidyapati Thakur, court poet of Tirhi'it in 

the 14th century, vi. 348. 
Bigandet, Bishop, Life or Legend of 

Gautama, quoted, vi. 137 (footnote): 

160 (footnote 3). 
Bihar, town and pargand in Oudh, ii. 

420, 421. 
Bihar, town and pargand in Oudh, ii. 421 . 
Bihar, river in Central India, ii. 421. 
Bihari Lai, Hindi poet of the 17th 

centur)', and composer of the Satsai, 

vi. 345- 
Bihat, petty State in Bundelkhand, ii. 

421. 
Bihat, town in Oudh, ii. 421, 422. 
Bihiya, village in Bengal, ii. 422. 
Bihiya, canal on the Son system, Bengal, 

ii. 422. 
Bihora, petty State in Bombay, ii. 422. 
Bihta Gosain, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

ii. 422. 
Bija, Hill State in Punjab, ii. 422. 
Bijagarh, ruined hill fort in Central India, 

ii. 422. 
Bijaigarh, ruined fort in N.-W. Provinces, 

ii. 422, 423. 
Bijaigarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

423. 
Bijapur, Sub-division in Bombay, ii. 423. 
Bijapur, town and historic capital in 

Bombay, ii. 423-425. 
Bijapur, Muhammadan Kingdom of 

Southern India (1489-16S8), vi. 288. 
Bijapur, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 

425- 
Bijar, Mir, Talpur chief, rebelled agamst 

Ghulam Nabi Khan Kalhora (1777), 

then minister, his career, xii. 512, 513. 

Bijawar, Native State in Central India, 
"ii, 425. 

Bijaya, pass in ]Madra=:, ii. 425. 

Bijayanagar. 5t'^ Vijayanagar and Hampi. 

Bijbahar. See Bijljharn. 

Bijbani, town in Bengal, ii. 426. 

Bijbharn, town in Ka-hmir, ii. 426. 

Bijegarh. See Bijaigarh. 

Bijepur, town in Rajputana, ii. 426. 

Bijeraghogarh, tract of country in Central 
Provinces, ii. 426. 

Bijeraghogarh, village in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 426. 

Bijipur, estate in ^^ladras, ii. 426. 

Bijji, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 426, 
427. 

Bijli, estate in Central Provinces, 11. 427. 



44 



INDEX. 



I3ijna, y<7n'/;- in Bundelkhand, ii. 427. 

Bijna, town in Central India, ii. 427. 

Bijnaur, District in N.-W. Trovinces, ii. 
427-435 ; physical aspects, 428, 429 ; 
history, 429, 430 ; population, 430, 
431 ; agriculture, 431-433 ; natural 
calamities, 433 ; commerce and trade, 
etc., 433, 434; administration, 434; 
medical aspects, 435. 

Bijnaur, talisil in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

.435- 
Bijnaur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

.435- 
Bijnaur, town and pargaiid in Oudh, ii. 

.436. 
Biini, (hudr in Assam, ii. 436, 437. 
Bijni, village in Assam, ii. 437. 
Bijnor. Sec Bijnaur. 
Bijoli, village in Rajputana, ii. 437. 
Bikaner, State in Rajputana, ii. 437- 

440. 
Bikaner, capital of State in Rajputana, ii. 

.440-443- 
Bikapur, town and tahsil in Oudh, ii. 

443- 

Bikkavolu, village in Madras, ii. 443, 
444. 

Bikrampur, village in Bengal, ii. 444. 

Bilaigarh, chiefship in Central Provinces, 
\\. 444. 

Bilaii, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 444. 

Bilaspur, District in Central Provinces, 
ii. 444-453 ; physical aspects, 445, 446; 
history, 446-449 ; population, 449, 450 ; 
agriculture, 450, 451 ; natural calami- 
ties, 451 ; commerce and trade, 451, 
452 ; administration, 452, 453 ; medical 
aspects, 453. 

Bilaspur, tahsil in Central Provinces, ii. 

.453- 
Bilaspur, town in Central Provinces, ii. 

453' 454- 
Bilaspur, village in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

.454- 
Bilaspur. See Kahlur. 
Bilaspur, capital of Kahlur State, Punjab, 

ii. 454. 
Bilanda, estate in Central India, ii. 

.454-. 
Bilehri, village in Central Provinces, ii. 

.454- 

Bilga, town in Punjab, ii. 454. 

Bilgram, town, tahsil, and pargana in 
Oudh, ii. 454-456. 

Bilhaur, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ii. 456. 

Biliapatam, East India Company's factory, 
started at (1661), vi. 370. 

Biligiri-Rangan, range of hills in Mj-sore, 

."• 457- 
Bilihra, estate in Central Provinces, ii. 

457- 



Bilimora, town in Bombay, ii. 457, 

458. . 

Bilin, river in Burma, ii. 45S. 

Bilin, town in Lower Burma, ii. 458. 

Bilin-kyaik-to, township in Lower Burma, 

ii._458, 459. _ 
Bilram, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 

459- 
Bilri, petty State in Kathiawar, ii, 

.459- 
Bilsi, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 459. 
Biluchis, criminal clan in Karnal, viii. 26. 
Bilii-Gywon, island in Lower Burma, ii. 

459, 460. 

Bimlipatam, estate in Madras, ii. 460. 

Bimlipatam, town in Madras, ii. 460, 
461. 

Bindki, town in N.-W. Provinces, ii. 461. 

Bindraban, sacred city of the Hindus. 
See Brindaban. 

Bindranawagarh, estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, ii. 461. 

Binds, aboriginal tribe, in Maldah, ix. 
243 ; Mirzapur, ix. 456 ; included with 
the Santals in the Santal Parganas, xii. 
230. 

Binginapalli, village in Madras, ii. 461. 

Binjwars, aboriginal tribe, in Borasambar, 
iii. 89 ; Deori, iv. 205 ; Kharsal, viii. 
168 ; Patna State, xi. 116 ; Raipur, xi. 

.371- 
Binlaing, river in Burma, 461, 462. 
Bir, village in Punjab, ii. 462. 
Bir Bandh, embankment in Bengal, ii. 

462. 
Biramganta, town in Madras, ii. 462. 
Biibhiim, District in Bengal, iii. i-ii; 
physical aspects, 1,2; history, 2, 3 ; 
population, 3, 4 ; material condition of 
the people, 4, 5 ; agriculture, 5, 6 ; 
natural calamities, 6 ; commerce and 
trade, 6 ; manufactures, silk, 6- 10 ; 
administration, 10, II ; medical aspects, 
II. 
Birchigaon, mountain pass in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. II, 12. 
Birda Hills. See Barda Hills. 
Bird, Miss, Unbeaten Tracks in Japan, 
quoted, vi. 152 (footnote 3) ; 202 (foot- 
note I) ; 224 (footnote 3). 
Birds, birds of prey, and game birds, 
article ' India,' vi. 659. Local notices — 
Bakarganj, i. 442 ; Upper Burma, iii. 
212 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; 
Darjiling, iv. 131 ; Dera Ismail Khan, 
iv. 220 ; Firozpur, iv. 439 ; Hardoi, v. 
322; Hill Tipperah, v. 395; Jalpaiguri, 
vii. 109 ; Jerruck, vii. 180 ; North 
Kanara, vii. 370 ; Kangra, vii. 414 ; 
Karauli, vii. 472 ; Karniil, viii. 35,* 36 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 69 ; Kistna, viii. 226 ; 
Kotah (parrots), viii. 304 ; Kulu, viii. 
338 ; Lahore, viii. 405 ; Lohardaga, 



INDEX. 



-IS 



viii. 477 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 9 1 -94 ; 
Mainpuri, ix. 203 ; Montgomery, ix. 
495 ; Moradabad, ix. 505 ; Muzaffar- 
garh, x. 58 ; Nepal, x. 278 ; Nimar, x. 
328 ; Pabna, x. 512 ; Palni Mountains, 
xi. 17 ; Patna, xi. 94 ; Peshawar, xi. 
147 ; Pilibhit, xi. 172 ; Punjab, xi. 259; 
Purniah, xi. 323 ; Rajshahi, xi. 429 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; 
Rewa Kantha, xii. 49, 50 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 325 ; Shahjaliaiipur, xii. 344 ; 
Shahpur, xii. 361 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 
383, 384 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; the Sundar- 
bans, xiii. 109, 390; Sural, xiii. 120; 
Thar and Parkar, xiii. 264 ; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xiii. 389. 

Birds' nests, Edible, found in, and ex- 
ported from the Andaman Islands, i. 
282 ; Madras, ix. 92 ; Mergui Archi- 
pelago, ix. 412 ; Nicobar Islands, x. 
295 ; Pigeon Island, xi. 169. 

Birdwood, Sir G., Handbook to the British 
hidian Section of the Pai-is Exhibition 
<y 1878, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 163 
(footnote 2) ; Report onthe Miscellaneous 
Old Records in the India Office, quoted, 
359 (footnote 2); 360; 364 (footnotes 
I and 2) ; 368 (footnote) ; 370 (foot- 
note) ; discovered origin of the name 
of James and Mary Sands, vii. 123. 

Birganj, village in Bengal, iii. 12. 

Birhar, pargand in Oudh, iii. 12. 

Birhors, aboriginal tribe, in Hazaribagh, 

V. 373- 

Biria, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 12. 

Birkul, village in Bengal, iii. 12, 13. 

Birkul, embankment in Bengal, iii.- 13. 

Birnagar, town in Bengal, iii. 13. 

Birpur, village in Bengal, iii. 13. 

Birsilpur, town in Rajputana, iii. 13. 

Bir Singh Ueo, ruler of Orchha, submitted 
to the Mughal Emperor, iii. 155 ; built 
fort of Jhansi, and murdered Abul Fazl, 
Akbar's minister, vii. 217 ; defeated 
(1602), but again rebelled (1627), vii. 
228. 

Birudankarayapi'iram, ancient city in 
Madras, iii. 13. 

Birupa, river in Bengal, iii. 13. 

Birur, town and mart in Mysore, iii. 13, 
14. 

Bisaldeo or \ isaldeva, Chauhan ruler of 
Ajmere, took Delhi (1154), and left 
both thrones to Prithwi Raja, iv. 190. 

Bisali, pass in Madras, iii. 14. 

Bisalnagar, town and Sub-division of 
Baroda, iii. 14. 

Bisalpur, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 14. 

Bisambha, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 

Bisanli, town and tahsil in N.-^^. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 15, 16. 



Bisauli. See Basohli. 

Bisawar, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 16. 

Bishangarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 

16. 
Bishanpur Narhan Khas, village in Ben- 

L;al, iii. 16. 
Bishenpur. See Bishnupur. 
Bishkhali, river of Bengal, iii. 16. 
Bishnois, curious sect in Hissar, v. 429. 
Bishnupur, Sub-division of Bengal, iii. 16. 
Bishnupur, ancient capital of Bankura, 

Bengal, iii. 16, 17. 
Bismuth, found in Upper Burma, iii. 211. 
Bison, The Indian, article ' India,' vi. 

656. Local notices — Ahmadnagar, i. 

100 ; Anamalai Hills, i. 270 ; Andi- 

patti Hills, i. 288 ; Arakan Hill 

Tracts, i. 299 ; North Arcot, i. 312 ; 

Balaghat, i. 453 ; Biligiri-rangan, ii. 

457 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 46 ; 

Bonai, iii. 85 ; Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; 

Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; 

Coimbatore, iv. 15-21 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; 

Darrang, iv. 142 ; Gangpur, iv. 478 ; 

Western Ghats, v. 59 ; Godavari, v. 

123 ; Hassan, v. 346 ; Hazaribagh, v. 

370; Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; Himalaya 

Mountains, v. 409 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; 

Kadiir, vii. 2S3 ; North Kanara, vii. 

370; South Kanara, vii. 377 ; Karnul, 

viii. 35 ; Khandesh, viii. 150 ; Kotah, 

viii. 304 ; Lohardaga, viii. 477 ; 

Madras, ix. S-91 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; 

Malabar, ix. 220 ; Manbhilm, ix. 279 ; 

Mysore, x. 1 15; Nellore, x. 262; 

Nimar, x. 328 ; Pala.sgaon, x. 542 ; 

Palni Mountains, xi. 17 ; Poliir, xi. 

197 ; Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rampa, xi. 454 ; 

Rewa Kantha, xii. 49; Sagar (Mysore), 

xii. Ill ; Salem, xii. 152 ; Satara, xii. 

277 ; .Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Shimoga, 

xii. 400; Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; Tharawadi, 

xiii. 272 ; Travancore, xiii. 345 ; Wun, 

xiii. 539. 
Bison Range, hills in Madras, iii. 17. 
Bisrampur, village iii Chutia Nagpur, iii. 

17; 

Bisrampur, coal-field in Chutia Nagpur, 

iii. 17, 18. 
Bissan, town in Rajputana, iii. 18. 
Bissemkatak, town in Madras, iii. 18. 
Bissemkatak, estate in Madras, iii. 18. 
Biswan, town, tahsil, and pargand in 

Oudh, iii. 18, 19. 
Bithar, town in Oudh, iii. 19. 
Bithiir, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 19, 

20. 
Bitraganta, village in Madras, iii. 20. 
Blacker's, Col., Account of the Alaidthd 

Wars, quoted on Asirgarh, i. 339. 
Black Hole, The tragedy of the, at 

Calcutta (1756), article 'India,' vi. 

381. 



46 



INDEX. 



* Black Mountain Expedition,' The, 
(1868). Sec Hazara, v. 362, 363. 

Black Pagoda. Sec Kanarak. 

Black-Skins or Non-Aryans, described by 
the Aryans, article ' India,' vi. 53, 54. 

Blackwood trees, found in the Anamalai 
Hills, i. 270; Belgaum, ii. 232 ; Bom- 
bay, iii. 44, 45 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Coorg, 
iv. 32 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Dharampur, 
iv. 249 ; Dungarjiur, iv. 322 ; Western 
Ghats, V. 59 ; Ilaidarabad (Sind), v. 
275 ; Ilaliyal, v. 296 ; Ha«san, v. 346; 
Jhabua, vii. 194; South Kanara, vii. 376; 
Karjat, viii. 11 ; Kolaba, viii. 261 ; 
Kollamalai Hills, viii. 286 ; Madras, 
ix. 7 ; Malabar, ix. 229 ; Monghyr, ix. 
480; Mysore, x. 1 14; Nilgiri Hills, x. 
305, 323; Pachamalai Hills, x. 521 ; 
Falni Mountains, xi. 19 ; Rajpipla, xi. 
391 ; Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; Sawant- 
wari, xii. 296 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 
383; Surat, xiii. 120; Surgana, xiii. 
136 ; Travancore, xiii. 345 ; Trichino- 
poli, xiii. 355 ; VVainad, xiii. 510. 

Blair, Lieut. Archibald, made first survey 
of the Andaman Islands (1789-90), i. 
281. 

Blair, Port, harbour in the Andaman 
Islands, described, i. 281, 282. 

Blake, Martin, Assistant to the Agent in 
Rajputana, murdered in a riot at Jaipur 
(1835), vii. 57. 

Blandford, Mr., on the Raniganj coal- 
fields, quoted, xi. 504. 

Blane, Capt., commenced the new works 
of the Western Jumna Canal, vii. 261. 

Blankets and rugs, manufacture of, at 
Ahmadabad, i. 87 ; Anupshahr, i. 295 ; 
Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 302 ; Athni, i. 
378 ; Charda in Bahraich, i. 432 ; 
Balrampur, ii. 26 ; Bangalore, ii. 64 ; 
Basim, ii. 187 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; 
Bhander, ii. 368 ; Bhera, ii. 386 ; 
Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bikaner, ii. 439, 442; 
Cachar, iii. 237 ; Champaran, iii. 343; 
Chitaldrug, iii. 426, 428 ; Daiidnagar, 
iv. 158; Devangere, iv. 161 ; Dindigal, 
iv. 301 ; Dodderi, iv. 311 ; Fatehpur 
Sikri, iv. 435 ; Firozpur, iv. 445 ; 
Gaya, v. 51 ; Godavari, v. 129 ; 
Gubbi, V. 176 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 
282 ; Hariana, v. 33S ; Hassan, v. 
349 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 456 ; Hunsur, v. 
502 ; Jaisalmer, vii. 69 ; Jamkhandi, 
vii. 127 ; Kadur, vii. 287 ; Kaladgi, 
vii. 319 ; Kangra, vii. 426 ; Kanum, 
vii. 438 ; Karjat, viii. 13; Karnal, viii. 
29 ; Karra, viii. 49 ; Kashmir, viii. 
73 ; Khemkarn, viii. 188 ; Kodumur, 
viii. 240 ; Kolar, viii. 277-279 ; Kong- 
noli, viii. 288 ; Kiilu, viii. 344 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 485 ; Madgiri, viii. 
540; Mandya, ix. 311; Mysore, x. 



120; Najibabad, x. 179; Yeola, x. 
233 ; Nate-puta, x. 240 ; Panipat, xi. 
47 ; Parner, xi. 66 ; Partabgarh, xi. 
73 ; Poona, xi. 209 ; Pudukattai, xi. 
238; Purniah, xi. 328; Fatehjangand 
Pindi Gheb, xii. 32 ; Ravval Pindi, xii. 
38 ; Rayachoti, xii. 39 ; Rojhan, xii. 
79 ; Sadalgi, xii. 91 ; Saifganj, xii. 
141 ; Sangamner, xii. 216; Sankeswar, 
xii. 222 ; Satara, xii. 282 ; Sehwan, 
xii. 305 ; Shahabad, xii. 332 ; Shahpur, 
xii. 366 ; Shimoga, xii. 404 ; Sholapur, 
xii. 418 ; Sira, xii. 546 ; Songir, xiii. 
61 ; Tando Muhammad Khan, xiii. 
178, 179; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 270; 
Tumkur, xiii. 379 ; Turavanur, xiii. 
384 ; Wardha, xiii. 527 ; Wiin, xiii. 

544- 
Blindness, prevalent in Ambala, i. 224. 
Blochmann, H., translation of the Ain- 

i-Akbarl, article ' India,' vi. 272 

(footnote) ; 291 (footnote i) ; 295 

(footnotes) ; on the tomb #f Zafar 

Khan at Tribeni, xiii. 353. 
Block, Mr. A., murdered at Sultanpur 

(1857), xiii. 98. 
Blyth, Mr., murdered by Nagas (1880), 

X. 146. 
Blue Mountain, peak in Lower Burma, 

iii. 20. 
Boa Constrictors, grow to great size 

in Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; 

Manipur, xi. 326. 
Boalmari, trading village in Bengal, iii. 

20. 
Boats, Bridges of, article ' India,' vi. 551. 

Set Bridges. 
Boat-building, carried on at Barhaj, ii. 

150 ; in Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; the 

Eastern Dwars, iv. 334 ; Jehlam, vii. 

'75) 178 ; Narsapur, x. 215 ; Nellore, 

X. 269 ; Pind Dadan Khan, xi. 183 ; 

the Sundarbans, xiii. 397 ; Wazirabad, 

xiii. 535- 
Bobbili, estate in Madras, iii. 20-22. 
Bobbili, town in Madras, iii. 22. 
Bod, Tributary .State in Orissa, iii. 22, 23. 
Boda, estate in Bengal, iii. 23. 
Bodanoness, petty State in Kathiawar, 

iii. 23. 
Bodaw Paya, succeeded Alaung-paya 

(1781) as King of Burma, put down 

Talaing insurrection in Pegu, iii. 176 ; 

changed capital from Rangoon to Pegu, 

xi. 127. 
Bodhan, village in Bombay, iii. 23. 
Bodh Gaya. See Buddh Gaya. 
Bodinayakanur, estate in Madras, iii. 23, 

24- 
Bodinayakanur, town in Madras, iii. 24. 
Bodo, race in Assam, to which belong 

Hajungs, Kachan's, Lalungs, Mechs, 

and Rabhas, i. 351. 



INDEX. 



47 



Bodwad, town in Bombay, iii. 24. 
Boerrensen, Rev. H. P., report on the 
vSantal Settlements in Assam, xii. 230, 

231- , 
Boggeru, river in Madras, iii. 24. 
Bogle, crossed the Himalayas, east of 

the Mariamla Pass, v. 406 ; calls 

Sikkim, Demojong, xii. 484. 
Bogoola. Sie Bagula. 
Bogra, District in Bengal, iii. 24 - 32 ; 

physical aspects, 25, 26 ; history, 26, 

27 ; population, 27-29 ; agriculture, 

etc., 29-31 ; administration, 31, 32. 
Bogra, town in Bengal, iii. 32, 33. 
Boigne, M. de, French general in Sindia's 

service, raised siege of Agra (1788), i. 

70 ; took Ajmere, i. 122 ; organized 

Sindia's troops at Aligarh, i. 170 ; 

bombarded Balahera fort, i. 457. 
Boileau, Col., Deputy Commissioner of 

Gonda, killed by a bandit named 

Fazl All, V. 149. 
BoisragMi, Lt., defeated Fathna Raja at 

Gang^(i857), iv. 477. 
Boja, a beer made from ragi, in the Palni 

Mountains, xi. 1 8. 
Bokaro, coal-field in Bengal, iii. 32, 33. 
Bolan, pass leading to Baluchistan, article 

' India,' vi. 6 ; "iii. 33, 34. 
Bolaram, cantonment in Haidarabad, iii. 

34- 
Bolpur, village in Bengal, iii. 34. 

Bolundra, petty State in Bombay, iii. 34. 

Bomanahilli, village in Madras, iii. 34. 

Bombadi. See Bumawadi. 

Bombay Presidency, iii. 34-73 ; bound- 
aries, 35 ; history, 35-40 ; physical 
aspects, 40, 41 ; districts of the 
Presidency — Sind Districts, Gujarat 
Districts, Konkan Districts, Deccan 
Districts, Western Karnatic or South 
Maratha Districts, 41 ; mountains, 41, 
42 ; rivers, 42, 43 ; bays and lakes, 
43, 44 ; minerals, 44 ; forests, 44, 45 ; 
fauna, 45, 46 ; population, 46-49 ; 
ethnology and language, 49-51 ; re- 
ligions, 52; houses, etc., 52, 53; 
agriculture, 53, 54 ; cotton, 54, 55 ; 
irrigation, 55-57 ; famine, 57, 58 ; 
manufactures, 58-60 ; cotton mills, 60, 
61 ; roads and railways, 61, 64 ; foreign 
trade, 62, 63 ; commerce and trade, 
64, 65 ; administration, 65, 66 ; 
political relations, 66, 67 ; army, 67 ; 
marine, 67, 68 ; police, 68 ; jails, 68 ; 
revenue and expenditure, 69, 70 ; 
education, 70-72 ; medical aspects, 
72 ; diseases, 72, 73. 

Bombay, city and seaport in Western 
India, iii. 73-84; history, 74-77 ; general 
aspect, 77-79; population, 79 -Si; 
administration, 82, 83 ; newspapers, 
83 ; medical aspects, 83, 84. 



Bombay, ceded to the East India Company 
(1661), 370 ; made a Presidency (16S4- 
87). 370 ; the main centre of Indian 
foreign trade, 560. 

Bomori, town in Central India, iii. 84. 

Bomraj, estate in Madras, iii. 84. 

Bonai, Tributary State in Chutia Nagpur, 
Bengal, iii. 84-87 ; physical aspects, 
84, 85 ; history, etc., 85 ; population, 85, 
86; agriculture, 86, 87 ; trade, etc., 87. 

Bonai Garh, town in Chutia Nagpur, 
Bengal, iii. 87. 

Bonai Hills, range in Chutia Nagpur, 
Bengal, iii. 87, 88. 

Bondada, village in Madras, iii. 88. 

Bongong. See Bangaon. 

Bonito fishery, in the Maldive Islands, 
ix. 251. 

Boura, marsh in Bengal, iii. 88. 

Book, First, printed in India, by the 
Jesuits at Ambalkota, viii. 241 ; and 
pubhshed at Cochin (1577), iv. 12. 

Bookbinding and illumination, article 
' India,' vi. 112, 1 13. 

Bbondee. See Bundi. 

Boragari, trading village in Bengal, iii. 88. 

Borahs, Muhammadan class. See espe- 
cially Ahmadabad, i. 85 ; Bombay 
Presidency, iii. 52 ; Bombay City, iii. 
81 ; Broach, iii. 103; Dhandhuka, iv. 
243 ; Berar, v. 267 ; Rander, xi. 469 ; 
Surat, xiii. 133. 

Boram, village in Bengal, iii. 88. 

Borasambar, estate in Central Provinces, 
iii. 88, 89. 

Borax, found in the Himalaya Mountains, 
V. 412 ; refined at Jagadhri, vii. 40. 

Border tribes. See Hill and border tribes. 

Bore, The, or tidal wave, in the Ilugli 
and Meghna, article ' India,' vi. 30, 
31. Local 7iotices — Bakarganj, i. 441 ; 
Bankura, ii. 78 ; the Bilin, ii. 458 ; 
Bilin-kyaik-to, ii. 458 ; Cambay, iii. 
274 ; ^ Coringa, iv. 43 ; Dakshin 
Shahbazpur, iv. 96 ; the Hiigli, v. 
488 ; the Mahi, ix. 174 ; the Meghna, 
ix- 394> 395 ; Noakhali, x. 340 ; the 
Pegu, xi. 129; the Pheni, xi. 166; the 
Rupnayayan, xii. 84 ; the Sit-taung, xii. 
430 ; xiii. 40 ; Sudharam, xiii. 87 ; the 
To, xiii. 335. 

Bori, town in Central Provinces, iii. 89. 

Boria, seaport in Bombay, iii. 89. 

Borias, agricultural caste in Assam, 
offspring of Brahman widow by man of 
any other caste, i. 356. 

Boro. See Rice. 

Boronga Oil-Refining Company in Akyab, 

vi. 627. 
Borsad, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iii. 89, 90. 
Borthwick, Mr., laid out town of Jdora 
and built bridge there, vii. 143. 



48 



INDEX. 



Boscawen, Admiral, his ineffectual siege 

of Pondicherry (1748), vi. 379 ; xi. 198. 
Boswell, Mr., his description of the fort 

at Kondavir, in the Indian Antiquary, 

referred to, viii. 288. 
Botad, fortified town in Kathiawar, iii. 90. 
Botanical Gardens. See Gardens. 
Botany of India, article ' India,' vi. 662- 

664 ; of the Madras Presidency, ix. 

81-88. 
Botawad, town in Bombay. See Botwad. 
Botwas, aboriginal tribe in Padinalknad, 

X. 525. 
Boulderson, C. E., his revision of tlie 

revenuesettlementof theTarai, xiii. 208. 
Boulnois, Lt., murdered by the Moh- 

mands, while constructing Fort Michni 

(1852), ix. 423. 
Boundaries of India, article 'India,' vi. 

3,4- 
Bourchier, Charles, Governor of Madras 

(1767-70), ix. 67. 
Bourchier, Sir George, led column against 

Lushais from Cachar (1870-71), iii. 

448 ; viii. 531. • 

Bourquien, French general in Sindia's 

service, expelled George Thomas from 

Hariana, v. 337 ; defeated by Lord 

Lake at Delhi (1803), x. 368. 
Bowring, Lewin, Chief Commissioner of 

Mysore, founded Bowring-pet (1S64), 

iii. 90. 
Bowring - pet, village in Mysore, iii. 

90, 91. 
Bows and arrows, made at Kot Adu, 

viii. 302. 
Bowyear, Mr., placed in charge of the 

Syriam factory on its re-establishment 

(1698), xiii. 158. 
Boyarani, town in Madras, iii. 91. 
Boyas. See Bedars. 
Boyd, Maj., killed by Cacharis at Maibang 

(18S2), ix. 188. 
Boyle, Vicars, superintended defence of 

Arrah (1857), i. 333 ; xii. 328, 329. 
Braganza, Dom Constantino de, conquered 

Daman (1559), iv. lOl. 
Brahma, The Creator, the first person in 

the Hindu triad, vi. 98. 
Brahmagiri, range of hills in Madras, 

iii. 91. 
Brahmanabad, historic city in Sind, iii. 

91- 
Brahmanakraka, village in Madras, ni. 91. 

Brahmanbaria, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, iii. 91, 92. 
Brahman founders of Hinduism, vi. 207. 
Brahmanas, sacred Sanskrit writings 

explanatory of the sacrifices and duties 

of the priests, etc., vi. 88, 89. 
Brahmani, river of Bengal, iii. 92. 
Brahmanical castes, north and south of 

the Vindhyas, vi. 193, 194 and footnote. 



Brahmans, the priestly caste of ancient 
India, article 'India,' vi. 87-100 ; origin 
of priestly families, 87 ; growth of the 
priesthood, 87, 88 ; the Brahman caste 
fully formed, 89, 90 ; struggle between 
the priestly and warrior castes, and 
ultimate supremacy of the Brahmans, 
92-94 ; Viswamitra the Kshattriya, and 
Vasishtha the Brahman, 92, 93 ; the 
four stages of a Brahman's life, 95 ; 
Brahman rule of life and its hereditary 
results on caste, 95, 96 ; Brahman 
theology, the post-Vedic gods, 97, 98 ; 
the Hindu triad, 98 ; the six darsanas 
or Brahman schools of philosophy, 98, 
99 ; Sanskrit grammar and speech, 
100, loi ; Sanksrit manuscripts and 
dictionaries, IOI-I04 ; Brahman as- 
tronomy, 104-106 ; mathematics, 106 ; 
medicine, 106-110; war, no; music, 
IIO-II2; architecture and decorative 
art, 112, 113; painting, 113; law, 
1 13- 1 18; secular literature, tj|e epics, 
118-124; poetry and the drama, 125, 
126; novels, Beast stories and fables, 
127, 128; post-Vedic theological litera- 
ture, the Puranas, 128, 129 ; modern 
Indian literature, 129 ; attacks on 
Brahmanism from the 6th century B.C. 
to the 19th century A. D., 130, 131 ; the 
Brahman caste analyzed, 193, 194. 
Local notices — For their distribution, see 
the Population section under each 
District ; especially numerous or other- 
wise remarkable in Ajmere, i. 123, 
124; Ah'garh, i. 172; Allahabad, i. 
189, 199 ; South Arcot, i. 322 ; Assam, 
i- 353> 354 ; Azamgarh, i. 395 ; Ballia, 
ii. 20 ; Banda, ii. 50 ; Bara Banki, 
ii. no; Basti, ii. 209; Benares, ii. 
257 ; Bengal, ii. 296 ; Bettadpur (San- 
keti), ii. 327 ; Bisalnagar (Nagar), iii. 
14; Bithur, iii. 20; Bombay, iii. 51 ; 
Broach (Bhragav), iii. 1 13; Buland- 
shahr, iii. 135 ; Calcutta, iii. 256 ; 
Cawnpur, iii. 283; Central India, iii. 295; 
Central Provinces, iii. 316; Chainpur, 
iii. 325 ; Chamba, iii. 328 ; Champaran, 
iii. 338 ; Chilambaram (Dikshatar), iii. 
413 ; Chitarkot, iii. 430 ; Combaconum, 
iv. 24; Cuddapah (Sivaite), iv. 50; 
Cuttack (Sivaite), iv. 69 ; Dacca, iv. 83 ; 
Darbhangah, iv. 124; Dehra Dun, 
iv. 173 ; Delhi, iv. 182 ; Deoprayag, 
iv. 205 ; Dharw-ar, iv. 267 ; Etah, iv. 
361 ; Etawah, iv. 371, 373; Faizabad, 
iv. 383 ; Fatehpur, iv. 425 ; Gaya 
(Gayawals), v. 46 ; Ghazipur, v. 66 ; 
Gonda, v. 150 ; Gorakhpur, v. 167 ; 
Gwalior, v. 229 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
v. 277, 278 ; Hamirpur, v. 301 ; 
Hardoi, v. 325 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 454 ; 
Jabalpur, vii. 32 ; Jajpur (Sivaite), 



INDEX. 



49 



vii. 73 ; Jannpur, vii. 154 ; Jawalapur, 
vii. 163 ; Jehlam, vii. 170 ; Jessor 
(Kulin), vii. 1S6 ; Jhansi, vii. 221 ; 
Kalladakurichi, vii. 338 ; Kampil, vii. 
353 ; Kamrup, vii. 359 ; North Kanara 
(Havik), vii. 370 ; South Kanara, vii. 
379 ; Kangra, vii. 418 ; Kankhal, vii. 
434 ; Karnal, viii. 23 ; Kashmir, viii. 
69, 70 ; Khandesh, viii. 154 ; Kolaba, 
viii. 265 ; Konnagar, viii. 292 ; Ku- 
maun, viii. 353 ; Lalitpur, viii. 450 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 481 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
521 ; Madras, ix. 19 ; Mainpuri, ix. 
205 ; Meerut, ix. 386 ; Melukote (Sri 
Vashnav), ix. 404 ; Merwara, ix. 417 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 427 ; Mirzapur, ix. 456 ; 
Murshidabad, x. 25 ; Muttra, x. 47 ; 
Muzafifarpur, x. 79 ; Mysore, x. 97, 
98 ; Nadiya, x. 132 ; Narsinghpur, x. 
221 ; Nigohan, x. 300; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, X. 372; Orissa, x. 434, 435; 
Oudh, X. 498 ; Pachhegam (Nagar), x. 
521 )»Partabgarh, xi. 70 ; Punjab, xi. 
274 ; Pun, xi. 303 ; Purniah, xi_. 325 ; 
Kai Bareli, xi. 354 ; Raipur, xi. 372 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 408 ; Rajshahi, xi. 432 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 493, 494 ; Ratanpur, xi. 
517 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 26 ; Rohtak, 
xii. 71 ; Sambalpur, xii. 181, 182 ; 
Santal Parganas, xii. 229 ; Sarahan 
(their northern limit), xii. 249 ; Saran, 
xii. 253 ; Satara, xii. 278, 279 ; Shah- 
abad, xii. 327 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 
347 ; Shimoga (Smarta), xii. 40I ; 
Sholapur, xii. 413 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; 
Sind, xii. 518, 519 ; Sirohi, xiii. 4 ; 
Sitapur, xiii. 33 ; Sringeri (Smarta), 
xiii. 79 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 98 ; Surat, 
xiii. 124, 126 ; Sylhet, xiii. 148 ; Tan- 
jore, xiii. 184, 185 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xiii. 392 ; Udaipur, xiii. 402 ; 
Unao, xiii. 430 ; Visnagar, xiii. 481 ; 
Wardnagar (Dhinoj), xiii. 507 ; Wai, 
xiii. 509. 

Brahmapuri, Sub-division in Central 
Provinces, iii. 92, 93. 

Brahmapuri, town in Central Provinces, 

iii- 93- . . 

Brahmaputra, river in N.-E. India, iii. 
93 - 98 ; one of the great rivers of 
India, vi. 13-16 ; its course and con- 
fluents, 13 ; discharge, 13, 14 ; silt 
islands, 14, 15; changes in course, 15; 
traffic, 15, 16 ; junction of Ganges, 
Brahmaputra, and Meghna, 24 ; their 
comliined delta and estuaries, 24, 25 ; 
alluvial deposits of the Brahmaputra, 
27 ; steam navigation on, 552. 

Brahma Samaj, Members of the, or 
Brahmos, in Assam, i. 360 ; Banga- 
lore, ii, 62 ; Bengal, ii. 290, 291 ; 
Bogra, iii. 28; Calcutta, iii. 251, 256 ; 
Dacca, iv. 83; Darjiling, iv. 133; 
VOL. XIV. 



Darrang, iv. 155 ; Dinajpur, iv. 293 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 407; Goalpara, v. 1 14, 
115; Jalpaiguri, vii. 112; Jessor, vii. 
186 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 323 ; Mur- 
shidabad, X. 25; N.-W. Provinces, 
X- 372, 373 ; Nowgong, x. 410 ; Pabna, 
X. 514; Patna, xi. 99; Rajshahi, xi. 
432 ; Rangpur, xi. 493 ; Sylhet, xiii. 
148. 

Brahui Hills, a southern offshoot of the 
N. - W. Himalayas, marking a portion of 
the boundary between India and Balu- 
chistan, vi. 7. 

Brahuis, The, inhabitants of the highlands 
of Baluchistan, iii. 98-100. See also 
Baluchistan, ii. 28, 29, 39 ; Khelat, 
viii. 188 ; Sibi, xii. 455, 456. 

Braithwaite, Col., took Pondicherri 
(1793), xi. 189. 

Brandreth, Mr. E. L., papers on the 
Gaurian languages (published in the 
Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 
X.), article 'India,' vi. 64-66 (foot- 
notes); (published in vols. xi. and xii.), 
vi. 103. 

Brass and copper work, article ' India,' 
vi. 607. Local 7iotices — Brass and 
copper vessels, brass ornaments, etc. 
etc., manufactured at Ahmadabadji. 87; 
Ahmadnagar, i. 104; Aliganj-Sewan, 
i. 167 ; Ardabak, i. 329 ; Assam, i. 
367 ; Balasor, ii. 9 ; Banga, ii. 58 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 113; Bard wan, ii. 
132 ; Barkur, ii. 157 ; Barpali, ii. 174; 
Batala, ii. 216 ; Benares, ii. 267 ; 
Bhagwantnagar, ii. 355 ; Bhandara, ii. 
365 ; Bhatgaon, ii. 377 ; Bhaunagar, 
ii. 380 ; Bhera, ii. 386 ; Bhutan, ii. 
414 ; Bisalnagar, iii. 14 ; Bombay, iii. 
60; Brahmapuri, iii. 93; Lower Burma, 
iii. 198 ; Cachar, iii. 235 ; Chanda, 
iii. 355; Chapra, iii. 370; Chhind- 
wara, iii. 402 ; Chichli, iii. 408 ; Cut- 
tack, iv. 7 ; Dain-hat, iv. 95 ; Darrang, 
iv. 148; Daska, iv. 153; Dhamda, iv. 
239 ; Dhampur, iv. 241 ; Dhrangadra, 
iv. 279 ; Dignagar, iv. 287 ; Dodderi, 
iv. 311 ; Khajuha and Kori in Fateh- 
pur, iv. 428 ; Gaya, v. 50 ; Goalpara, 
V. 117; Gujranwala, v. 187; Gujrat, 
V. 197; Hassan, v. 350; Hirehal, v. 
423 ; Hissar, v. 432 ; Hoshangabad, v. 
441 ; Hoshangabad, v. 447 ; Hoshiar- 
pur, V. 458 ; Jabalpur, vii. 35 ; Jaga- 
dhri, vii. 40 ; Siwai Madhupur, vii. 
54; Jandiala, vii. 136; Jehlam, vii. 
175 ; Kotchandpur and Kesabpur in 
Jessor, vii. 186 ; Jhanjharpur, vii. 214 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 239 ; Kaladgi, vii. 319 ; 
Kamrup, vii. 363; Kelod, viii. Ill ; 
Kesabpur, viii. 117; Khajuha, viii. 
140 ; Kistna, vnii. 232 ; Kora, viii. 
295 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 434 ; Lodhi- 



5° 



INDEX. 



khera, viii. 473 ; Lohardaga, viii. 485 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 500 ; Maghiana, ix. 
140 ; Mahmudabad, ix. 182 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 198 ; Mallanwan, ix. 263 ; 
Miclnapur, ix. 430, 434 ; Mihrpur, ix. 
436 ; Mirzapur, ix. 462 ; Moradabad, 
ix. 513; Nadiya, x. 137; Najibabad, 
X. 179; Narowal, x. 214; Nasik, x. 
237 ; Natagarh, x. 240 ; Nellore, x. 
279; Nepal, X. 289; Neri, x. 291; 
Newalganj, x. 292; Nosari, x. 405 ; 
Nowgong, X. 412; Panipat. xi. 47; 
Patera, xi. 85 ; Pind Dadan Khan, xi. 
183 ; Poona, xi. 209, 213 ; Rai Bareli, 
xi. 357 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ; Rajshahi, 
xi. 436 ; Rangpur, xi. 498 ; Rasipur, 
xi. 513; Rewari, xii. 56; Sambalpur, 
xii. 1S3 ; Sarai Akil, xii. 249; Sarai 
Saleh, xii. 250 ; Saran, xii. 257 ; Sat- 
ara, xii. 282; Shahabad, xii. 332; 
Sherghati, xii. 380 ; Shimoga, xii. 404 ; 
Shravan-belgola, xii. 425 ; Sialkot, xii. 
448 ; Sibsagar, xii. 468, 469 ; Sihor, 
xii. 476 ; Singhbhum, xi. 539 ; Songir, 
xiii. 61 ; Srinagar (N.-W. P.), xiii. 78 ; 
Bandhua in Sultanpur, xiii. loi ; 
Tando Muhammad Khan, xiii. 179 ; 
Tanjore, xiii. 196 ; Thana, xiii. 257 ; 
Tipperah, xiii. 319; Tumkur, xiii. 379 ; 
Turtipar, xiii. 385 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xiii. 397 ; Vonipenta, xiii. 503 ; 
Wanthah, xiii. 519. 
Breeks, Commissioner of the Nilgiri Hills, 

opened a cromlech there, x. 322. 
Breweries, article 'India,' vi. 616, 617. 
Local notices — Dalhousie, iv. 98 ; Nil- 
giri Hills, ix. 59, 60, x. 321 ; Bellary, 
ix. 59, 60 ; Murree, x. 19, xii. 32 ; 
iSIussooree, x. 42 ; Lucknow and 
Naini Tal, x. 396 ; Simla, xii. 498. 
Brick-making, at Kotrang, viii. 313 ; Cali- 
cut and Cannanore in North Kanara, 
ix. 54; Mangalore, ix. 314; Merkara, 
ix. 415 ; Sibpur, xii. 459. 
Bridges : railway, over the Jumna at 
Agra, i. 76 ; of boats, over the Ganges 
at Ahar, i. 82 ; over the Sakki at 
Ajnala, i. 133 ; masonry, over the 
Tons at Akbarpur, i. 108 ; over the 
Kali Nadi and Nim Nadi at Aligarh, 
i. 169; of boats, over the Ganges, and 
railway, over the Tons in Allahabad 
District, i. 185, 186 ; railway, iron- 
girder, over the Jumna at Naini, near 
Allahabad, i. 192; railway, iron-girder, 
over the Sabi in Alwar, i. 203 ; rail- 
way, over the Jumna and Ghaggar at 
Ambala, i. 222 ; railway, over the Am- 
bika, Kaveri, and Kharera, i. 229 ; of 
boats, over the Ganges at Amethi, i. 
231 ; railway, over the Beas at Wazir 
Bhola, i. 254 ; of boats, over the Ravi 
at Kakkar, i. 255 ; of boats, over the 



Ganges at Anupshahr, i. 295 ; masonry, 
over the Rushikulya at Aska, i. 340 ; 
railway, over the Indus at Attock, i. 
3S2 ; railway, over the Auranga, near 
Balsar, i. 386 ; iron, over the Bash- 
ganga at Badariya, i. 408 ; railway, 
iron-girder, over the Sutlej, near Baha- 
walpur, i. 424 ; of boats, over the 
Gogra at Bahramghat. i. 435 ; of boats, 
over the Rapti, near I^lrampur, ii. 26 ; 
stone, at Bandra, ii. 57 ; timber, over 
the Bara, ii. 105 ; over the Jehlam at 
Baramula, ii. 122 ; at Baroda, ii. 170 ; 
over the Buana at Basti, ii. 214 ; over 
the Beas, ii. 222 ; over the Beliapatam, 
ii. 239 ; railway, over the Tungabhadra 
in Bellary, ii. 241 ; over the Ben, ii. 
252; over the Ganges and the Barna at 
Benares, ii. 262 ; railway, over the Hugli 
(under construction), ii. 315 ; over the 
Bcypur, ii. 335 ; over the Bhaha at 
Benkipur, ii. 339 ; in Bhandara, ii. 
365 ; over the Bhavaniat Metapolliem, 
ii. 382 ; over the Kaveri at Bhavani, 
ii. 383 ; in the Bhor Ghat, ii. 407 ; 
suspension, over the Manas at Tasgaon 
in Bhutan, ii. 412 ; suspension, over 
the Bias, ii. 419 ; over the Son at 
Bihar, ii. 421 ; wooden, over the Jehlam 
at Bigburu, ii. 426 ; railway, over the 
Narbada, near Broach, iii. 108 ; of 
boats, over the Ganges in Budaun, iii. 
122, 123 ; floating, over the Hugli at 
Calcutta, iii. 253 ; over the Cauvery, 
stone, at Fraserpet, iii. 277 ; at island 
of Sivasamudram, andiron, railway, at 
Erode, iii. 278 ; railway, iron-girder, 
over the Ganges at Cawnpur, iii. 292 ; 
railway, over the Chenab at Wazirabad, 
and of boats, over the Chenab, iii. 380 ; 
over the Languliya at Chicacole, iii. 
407 ; masonry, over the Gameri at 
Chitor, iii. 430 ; over the Chittivalasa, 
and the Gosthani at Chittivalasa, iii. 
454 ; iron, at Coconada, iii. 472 ; iron, 
suspension, over the Tista in Dalingkot, 
iv. 98 ; masonry, over the Pinyari at 
Daro, iv. 141 ; over the Degh, iv. 
167 ; iron, railway, over the Jumna at 
Delhi, iv. 184, 186 ; of boats, over the 
Jumna in Delhi, iv. 184 ; iron, over the 
Gambhar at Deonthal, iv. 204 ; stone, 
over the Dhadhar at Bhilapur, iv. 238 ; 
iron, railway, over the Dhanauti, near 
Motihari, iv. 243 ; trestle, over the 
Narbada at Khal, iv. 246 ; stone, over 
the Dhasan, iv. 268 ; sandstone, rail- 
way, and of boats, over the Chambal, 
nearDholpur, iv. 273, 275, 277 ; stone, 
over the Panjhra at Dhulia, iv. 281 ; 
iron, railway, over the Kaveri at Erode, 
iv. 357 ; of boats, over the Gogra at 
Faizabad, iv. 386 ; of boats, over the 



INDEX. 



5^ 



I 



Ganges at Fatchgarh, iv. 415 ; stone, 
over the Kaveri at Fraserpet, iv. 450 : of 
boats, over the Ganges at Garhmukh- 
tesar, v. 16; at Gazzalhatti, v. 53; 
over creek at Gharo, v. 56 ; railway, 
and of boats, over the Chenab and 
Jehlam in Gujrat, v. 194; masonrj', over 
the Gi'imti at Lucknow and Jaunpur, 
v. 200 ; railway, over the Kistna, near 
Kadlur in HaTOarabad, v. 243 ; stone, 
over the Musi at Haidarabad, v. 253 ; 
wooden, over the Pegu in Nanthawadi, 
V. 316; stone, over the Tungabhadra at 
Harihar, v. 338 ; brick, over the Hari 
Rud, near Herat, v. 340; wooden and 
rope suspension, over the Kunhar in 
Hazara, v. 367 ; iron, over the Hema- 
vati at Sakleshpur, v. 382 ; iron, rail- 
way, over the Hindan, v. 414 ; floating, 
over the Hugli at Howrah, v. 465 ; 
railway, over the Hiigli (under con- 
struction), v. 482 ; over the Narbada 
in Indore, vii. 4 ; wooden, over the 
Jehlam at Islamabad, vii. 26 ; iron, 
railway, and of boats, over the Sutlej 
at Phillaur, vii. 84, 89 ; stone, over the 
Jambua at Kelanpur and Makarpura, 
vii. 123 ; iron, railway, over the Chitra- 
vati at Jammalammadugu, vii. 129 ; 
stone, over the Piria at Jaora, vii. 143 ; 
stone and railway, over the Gumti at 
Jaunpur, vii. 150, 160; suspension, 
over the Jehlam at Kohala, vii. 165 ; 
railway, over the Jehlam at Jehlam, 
vii. 166, 175 ; of boats, over the Jehlam 
and Chenab in Jhang, vii. 211 ; of 
boats, over the Ganges at Jhi'tsi, vii. 
231 ; over the Kabul at Kabul, vii. 
270 ; of boats, over the Ganges at 
Kachhla, vii. 278 ; at Kachua, vii. 278 ; 
over the Kali Nadi in Bulandshahr at 
Gulaothi and in Aligarh, vii. 327 ; of 
boats, over the Jumna at Kalpi, vii. 
343 ; railway, over the Kanhan at 
Kamthi, vii. 367 ; at Karachi, vii. 
452, 453 ; stone, railway, over the 
Karamnasa, near Chausa, vii. 465 ; iron, 
suspension, over the Pindar at Karn- 
prayag, viii. 32 ; wooden and rope 
suspension, in Kashmir, viii. 65 ; 
wooden, at Kav-ka-reit, viii. 107 ; rail- 
way, over the Tapti at Bhusawal, viii. 
150; masonry, over the Vishnumati, 
at Khatmandu, viii. 182 ; iron, railway, 
over the Kistna at Raichur, 236 ; over 
the Nizampur-Kal at Alangaon, and 
masonry, at Nagothna, viii. 269 ; rail- 
way, over the Kolak, viii. 272 ; steel 
rope suspension, at Shamsi,and w.ooden, 
over the Beas in Kulu, viii. 336 ; 
wooden, over the Indus at Kulutzai, 
viii. 344; suspension, over the Kunhar, 
at Garhi Habib-ulla, viii. 365 ; of 



boats, over the Ravi and Sutlej in 
Lahore, viii. 411, 412; iron, over the 
Lakhandai, viii. 424 ; over the Langi'i- 
liya at Chicacole, %'iii. 460 ; rope 
suspension, over the Bhagirathi, near 
the Loharinaig Falls, viii. 4S7 ; rail- 
way, over the Keul at Luckeesarai, viii. 
490 ; over the Sai in Lucknow, viii. 
499 ; over the Gumti at Lucknow, 
viii. 503 ; railway, over the Shimsha 
at Maddiir, viii. 539 ; over the Adyar 
at Madras, ix. 105 ; over the Ami at 
Maghar, ix. 139 ; wooden, over the 
Mahe at Mahe, ix. 171 ; at Mandalay, 
ix. 288 ; suspension, over the Beas 
at Mandi, ix. 298, 299 ; masonry, over 
the Kal at Mangaon, ix. 315 ; over 
the Sai at Mohan, ix. 471 ; over the 
Morar at Morar, ix. 514; over the 
Machhu at Morvi, ix. 519 ; railway, 
over the Sutlej in Multan, x. 9 ; rail- 
way, over the Kathna at Murwara, 
X. 40 ; stone, over the Kabbani at 
Nanjangad, x. 196 ; railway, over the 
Narbada at Broach, Mortakka, Hosh- 
angabad, and near Jabalpur, x. 210; 
stone, over the Karamnasa at Naubat- 
pur, X. 241 ; of boats, over the Kabul 
at Naushahra, x. 242 ; at Newalganj- 
cum-Maharajganj, x. 292 ; masonry, 
over the Sankh at Nurabad, x. 418 ; 
wooden, over the Betwa at Orchha, x. 
426 ; wooden, over the Pa-de, x. 524 ; 
railway, over the Palar at Malevatti, 
and near Chengalpat, x. 541 ; over the 
Jehlam at Pampur, xi. 24 ; at Panduah, 
xi. 41 ; railway, girder, over the Papa- 
ghni, near Kamalapur, xi. 53 ; at 
Pasrur, xi. 80 ; wooden, over the Pegu 
at Pegu, xi. 126 ; railway, over the 
Piali, xi. 169 ; of boats, over the Deoha 
at Pilibhit, xi. 180 ; over the Muta at 
Poona, xi. 212 ; over the Ka-ma-aung 
at Pyaw-bhway, xi. 337 ; over the Bina 
at Rahatgarh, xi. 346 ; over the 
Sai at Rai Bareli, xi. 352, 360; wooden, 
over the Pabar at Raingarh, xi. 366 ; 
of boats, over the Ganges at Ramghat, 
xi. 499 ; of boats, over the Jumna at 
Rapri, xi. 511 ; of boats, over the Ravi, 
xii. 15; suspension, over the Jehlam at 
Kohala, xii. 20 ; over the Sohan, near 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 20, xiii. 47 ; railway, 
over the Indus at Rohri (under con- 
struction), xii. 67 ; masonry, over the 
Rushikulya at Aska, xii. 87 ; at Sakit, 
xii. 146 ; iron-girder, over the Hema- 
vati at Sukleshpur, xii. 147; at Salim- 
pur, xii. 167 ; from Salsetteto Bombay, 
xii. 168 ; over the Baya at Sarya, xii. 
272 ; ruined, over the Ganges at 
Sayyidpur(N.-W. P.), xiv. 300 ; stone, 
over the Sher at Dongri, xii. 309, 379 ; 



52 



INDEX. 



over the Saraswati at Sewan, xii. 322 ; 
over the Khanaut at Shahjahanpur,xii. 
356 ; railway, iron-girder, over the 
Sher, near Narsinghpur, xii. 379 ; over 
the Aik at Sialkot, xii. 452 ; railway, 
over the Indus at Sukkur (under con- 
struction), xii. 523, xiii.92; wooden, over 
the Lakhandai at Sitamarhi, xiii. 26 ; 
over the Kaveri at Sivasamudram, xiii. 
43 ; railway, over the Son at Kollwar, 
xiii. 53 ; iron, suspension, over the 
Dikru at Sonapur, xiii. 58 ; masonry 
and iron, over the Burhganga at Soron, 
xiii. 67 ; over the Jehlam at Srinagar, 
xiii. 76 ; railway, iron-girder, over the 
Tapti at Surat, xiii. 129; over the 
Sutlej at Phillaur and Bahawalpur, 
xiii. 141 ; railway, over the Chittar at 
Tinnevelli, xiii. 31 1 ; railway, over the 
South-Western Tons, xiii. 339 ; over 
the Tungabhadra at Harihar, and rail- 
way, at Rampur in Bellary, xiii. 383 ; 
railway, over the Ganges into Unao, 
xiii. 434 ; railway, over the Vaiga, 
near Madura, xiii. 460 ; over the 
Vedavati at Hiriyar, and railway, at 
Permadevanhalli, xiii. 465 ; over the 
Wainganga at Chhapara, xiii. 512; 
railway, over the Wadha at Pulgaon, 
xiii. 530 ; railway, over the Chenab at 
Wazirabad, xiii. 535 ; wooden, over the 
Win-ba-daw creek, xiii. 537. 

Briggs, Lt.-Col., translation of Firishta's 
History of the Rise of the Miihainmadan 
Fozver iit Ifidia, article 'India,' vi. 271, 
273 (footnote) ; 285 (footnotes 2 and 4) ; 
287 (footnote) ; 291 (footnotes). See 
Firishta. 

Briggs, Capt., chose Dhiilia as capital of 
Khandesh, and built the city there, iv. 
282. 

Brindaban, sacred town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 100, loi. 

Brinjmohan, the trooper who caused the 
mutiny at Meerut (1857), ix. 384. 

British Administration of India. See 
Administration. 

British Burma. See Burma. 

British conquest of India, not from the 
.Mughals but from the Hindus, vi. 317. 

British India, its twelve Provinces, area 
and population in 1881, article 'India,' 
vi. 43-45; also Appendices I. to X., vi. 
689-703. 

Brito y Nicote, Philip de, Portuguese ad- 
venturer, made himself independent in 
Pegu (1600), iii. 173, 176 ; ordered to 
hold Syriam for the Arakanese, be- 
-sieged there (161 3) by the King of 
Ava, and impaled, v. 313, xi. 475, 
xiii. 158; conquered Taung-ngu, xiii. 

223- 
Briion, Francis, President of Surat, died 



1649, his tomb the earliest in the ceme- 
tery, xiii. 135. 

Britto, John de, Jesuit priest in Southern 
India, murdered (1693), article ' India,' 
vi. 245. Local notices — One of the 
Madura Jesuits, ix. 122 ; among the 
Maravars, ix. 126 ; martyred by the 
Raja of^Ramnad, xi. 437 ; in Tinnevelli, 
xiii. 303. 

Broach, District in BomDay, iii. loi-iii ; 
])hysical features, loi, 102; population, 
102-105; trade guilds, 105; village 
officials, 106 ; agriculture, 106- 108 ; 
communications and trade, 108, 109 ; 
history, 109 ; administration, 109, no ; 
medical aspects, no, in. 

Broach, Sub-division of Bombay, iii. m, 
112. 

Broach, town in Bombay, iii. 11 2- 115. 

Brocades, article ' India,' vi. 603. 
Local notices — Manufactured at Ahmad- 
ahad, i. 96; Benares, ii. 266, x. 396; 
Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; Lucknow, viii. 
516 ; Surat, xiii. 129. 

Brokpas, tribe in the Hindu Kush, v. 
417. 

Broughton, Gabriel, surgeon, obtained 
maritime settlement for the East India 
Company at Balasor (1642), ii. 5. 

Brown, Capt. James, his settlement of 
Hazaribagh (1774), v. 371. 

Brown, J. H., astronomer at Trivandrum 
Observatory (1852-65), xiii. 369. 

Browne, Col. Horace, led expedition to 
open trade route through Burma (1874), 
iii. 228 ; Resident at Mandalay (1879), 
iii. 229. 

Browne, Sir S. J., took AH Masjid and 
occupied Khaibar Pass (1878), viii. 
127. 

Brownlow, Sir C. H., commanded the 
column from Chittagong against the 
Lushais (1870-71), iii. 449, viii. 531. 

Bruce's Annals (1668), quoted, on Chaul, 
iii. 376. 

Bruce, Robert, commander of flotilla in 
first Burmese war, discovered wild tea 
plant in Assam (1823), i. 365, iv. 135. 

Brushas, tribe in the Hindu Kush, v. 
417. 

Bryce, Dr., pastor of St. Andrew's Kirk, 
Calcutta, dispute with Bishop Middle- 
ton, iii. 253. 

Brydon, Dr., the solitary survivor of the 
Kabul garrison in its retreat from 
Afghanistan, vi. 408. 

Bubak, town in Sind, iii. 1 15. 

Bucephala, memorial city on the west 
bank of the Jehlam, founded by 
Alexander, and named after his 
favourite charger, Bucephalus, near 
the modern Jalalpur, vi. 165, vii. 81. 

Buchanan - Hamilton, Dr. Francis, his 



INDEX. 



53 



MS. Survey of Bengal, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 205, 206 (footnote 4) ; 207 
(footnote i). Localnotices — quoted, on 
the population of Bengal, ii. 292 ; 
of Dinajpur, iv. 291, 292 ; on Fatwa, 
iv. 435 ; the ruins of Gaur, v. 37 ; 
of Giriyak, v. 85 ; on Gokarn, v. 142 ; 
the population of Goalpara, v. 1 14; 
on Jahanabad, vii. 43 ; the Jamuna, 
vii. 135 ; the ruins of Kamatapur, vii. 
351 ; on the Kols and Cherus, viii. 
253 ; on silk-weaving in Maldah, ix. 
245 ; discovered Buddhist idols at 
Masar, ix. 351 ; the population of 
Monghyr, ix. 490 ; the ruins of Pan- 
duah, xi. 41, 42 ; of Patana, xi. 84 ; 
the estate of Patgram, xi. 85 ; Patna 
in 1810, xi. 108 ; the papulation of 
Purniah, xi. 324; the Rajagriha anti- 
quities, xi. 380, 381 ; population of 
Rajmahal, xi. 390 ; of Rangpur, xi. 
492 ; the hot springs of Rishikund, 
xii. 57 ; temples at Rohtasgarh, xii. 78 ; 
does not mention the Santals, xii. 237 ; 
population of Seringapatam in 1800, 
xii. 319 ; population of Shahabad, xii. 
326 ; the Falls of Sivasamudram, xiii. 
43 ; the Tangan River, xiii. 179. 
Buckingham and Chandos, Duke of, 
Governor of Madras (1875-80), ix. 

67- . . 

Buckingham Canal in Madras, navigation 

on, article ' India,' vi. 553. Local 
notices — Chengalpat, iii. 381 ; Madras, 
ix. 115 ; Nellore, x. 269, 270. 

Bud-Bud, village in Bengal, iii. IJ5. 

Budaun, District in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 
115-124 ; physical aspects, 115-117; 
history, 117 -119; population, 119, 
120; agriculture, 120, 121 ; natural 
calamities, 121, 122; commerce, 
etc., 122, 123; administration, 123 ; 
medical aspects, 123, 124. 

Budaun, tahsil of N.-W. Provinces, iii. 
124. 

Budaun, city in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 

'24, 125. _ . ,. , . 

Buddha, The Sakya, article ' India, vi. 
176, 177. Local 7iotice: — Born at 
Kapila, identified with Nagar-Khas, i. 
426, vii. 440, X. 157; preached at Ahich- 
hatra, ii. 107 ; lived at Benares, ii. 263 ; 
Buddh Gaya, iii. 125 ; died at Kasia, 
viii. 79 ; legend in connection with 
Mahamuni Pagoda, ix. 156 ; with 
Patna, xi. 106, 107 ; his cave at Raja- 
griha, xi. 381 ; his visits to Sahet 
iVIahet (Sravasti), xii. __I26-I34 ;_ first 
preached at Sarnath, xii. 269 ; said to 
have worshipped at Seringapatam, xii. 

319- 
Buddha, his Life, hisDoctrine, his Order,hy 
Oldenberg, quoted, vi. 161 (footnote 3). 



Buddha, Kasyapa, born and buried at 
Tandwa, v. 507. 

Buddh Gaya, village in Bengal , iii. 1 25- 1 27. 

Buddhain, hill in Gaya District, Bengal, 
iii. 127. 

Buddhism, and life of Gautama Buddha, 
article ' India,' vi., chap. v. pp. 132-162. 
The story of Buddha modelled on the 
pre-existing Indian epic type, 132-135 ; 
Buddha and Rama compared, 132 ; 
parentage of Buddha, his youth and early 
married life, 133 ; his Great Renuncia- 
tion, 133, 134; his Temptation in the 
forest, 134; his 'Enlightenment,' 134, 
135 ; his public teachings and disciples, 
135 ; his conversions in the Gangetic 
valley, and of his own family, 135, 136 ; 
his last words and death, 136 ; different 
versions of the legend of Buddha, 136, 

137 ; biographies of Buddha, 137, 138 ; 
the southern and northern versions, 

138 ; political life of Buddha, 139 ; 
defeat of his opponents by magical arts, 
139, 140 ; overthrow of the schismatic 
Devadatta, 140 ; Buddha as a Sakya 
prince, 140 ; Chinese text of Buddha's 
dying discourse, 141 ; his doctrines, 
141 ; law oi Karma, 141, 142 ; law of 
Nirvatia or 'liberation,' 142; moral 
code of Buddhism, 143 ; missionary 
aspects of Buddhism, 143 ; the four 
great Buddhist Councils, 143-14.7 ; the 
work of Asoka, his great Council, 144- 
146 ; his Rock Edicts, 144, 145 ; 
Asoka's missionary efforts, 146, 147 ; 
his reformed canon of the Buddhist 
scriptures, 146, 147 ; Kanishka's 
Council and his three commentaries 
on the Buddhist faith, 147 ; the 
northern and southern canons, 147, 
148 ; Buddhism as a national religion, 
148 ; its religious orders and practi- 
cal morality, 148, 149 ; spread of 
Buddhism in the south to Ceylon, and 
in the north to China, 149, 150; 
Buddhist influence on Christianity, 150, 

151 ; Buddha as a Christian saint, 151 ; 
legend of saints Barlaam and Josaphat, 
151, 152 ; a Japanese temple, its 
analogies to Hinduism and Christianity, 

152 ; Buddha as an incarnation of 
Vishnu, 153 ; Buddha's personality 
denied, 153, 154; continuous co- 
existence of Buddhism and Brahman - 
ism, 154 ; modern Hinduism, the 
joint product of both religions, 154, 

155 ; Buddhism in India in the 7th 
century A. D. , 156; Council of Siladitya, 

156 ; Siladitya's charity, 156, 157 ; 
monastery of Nalanda, 157 ; mingling 
of Buddhism and Brahmanism, 157 ; 
victory of Brahmanism, 157, 158 ; 
Buddhism an exiled religion from India, 



54 



INDEX. 



158 ; its foreign conquests, 158 ; 
Buddhist survivals in India, 158-162 ; 
the Jains, 158-162; Jain doctrines, 159; 
Tain temple cities, 159; relation of 
jainism to Buddhism, 159, 160; anti- 
quity of the Jains, 160, 161 ; date of 
the Jain scriptures, 161, 162 ; the 
Jains an independent sect, 162; modern 
Jainism, 162. 
Buddhist antiquities, in Afghanistan, i. 
53 ; Afghan-Turkistan, i. 56 ; Ajodhya, 
i. 134 ; Allahabad, i. 186, 198 ; 
Amherst, i. 236, 237 ; Amravati, i. 
251, 252; Araraj, i. 306; Asarur, i. 
337 ; Aurungabad, i. 388 ; Bagh, i. 
414 ; Bahraich, i. 427 ; in Bara Banki, 
ii. 107; Barabar Hills, ii. 1 16; Bar- 
kiir, ii. 157 ; in Behar, ii. 227 ; Behir, 
ii. 229 ; Benares, ii. 266 ; Bezwada, 
ii. 336 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 348 ; Bhilsa, ii. 
393, 394; Buddh Gaya, iii. 125-127 ; 
Champaran, iii. 334, 335 ; Chaul, iii. 
377 ; Chiplun, iii. 421 ; Dalmi, iv. 
100 ; Dam-ma-tha, iv. 104 ; Dheri 
Shahan, iv. 270 ; Ellora, iv. 349 ; 
Eran, iv. 354 ; Gaya, v. 47, 49 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 63 ; Gorakhpur, v. 165 ; 
Hpa-gat, V. 465, 466 ; Ikauna, v. 507 ; 
Jaggayyapet, vii. 42; Laghman valley, 
vii. 76 ; Jhang, vii. 207 ; Junagarh, 
vii. 263 ; Junnar, vii. 264 ; Kamriip, 
vii. 356; Karakal, vii. 463; Karanja,vii. 
467; Kasia,viii. 79; Kathiawar, viii. 90; 
Khajurahu, viii. 140 ; Khandgiri, viii. 
159 ; Kolhapur, viii. 285 ; Mahabali- 
pur, ix. 143-149; Pale, near Mahad, 
ix. 154; Manikiala, ix. 320; Meerut, 
ix. 393; Muttra, x. 53'; Naltigiri, x. 
187; N.-W. Provinces, x. 362, 363; 
Orissa, x. 429 ; Oudh, x. 484 ; 
Padrauna, x. 526 ; Patna, xi. 94 ; 
Peshawar, xi. 1 58 ; Rajagriha, xi. 380, 
381 ; Rani-nur, xi. 507, 508 ; Sahet 
5lahet or Sravasti, xii. 127 - 134 ; 
Sanchi, xii. 194-196; Sankisa, xii. 
223, 224 ; Sarnath, xii. 269, 270 ; 
Shivner, xii. 410; Tamluk, xiii. 172; 
Udayagiri, xiii. 414, 415 ; Lake Wulur, 
xiii. 538. 
Buddhist influences on later religions, 
analogies of a Japanese temple to Hin- 
duism and Christianity, vi. 152, 202. 
Buddhist kings. See Asoka. 
Buddhist monasteries, at Buddh Gaya, 
iii. 127 ; in Lower Burma, iii. 18 1 ; 
Gramang, v. 175 ; Mandalay, ix. 389 ; 
Patur, xi. 118; Sikkim, xii. 486; 
Spiti, xiii. 70-72. 
Buddhist temples, at Amarapura, i. 210 ; 
Ava, i. 3S9 ; Bandarban, ii. 57 ; 
Gramang, v. 75 ; Hajipur, v. 291 ; 
Kanum, vii. 438; Mahamuni, ix. 155, 
156. Sec Pagodas, Burmese. 



Buddhist population in India, article 
' India,' vi. 136 (and footnote). See 
also Appendix V., vi. 693. 
Buddhists, special mention of, in Akyab, 
i. 154; Amherst, i. 237; Assam, i. 
359 ; Bassein, ii. 196 ; Bengal, ii. 292 ; 
Bhutan, ii. 415 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
178, 179 ; Chittagong, iii. 43^ ; 
Dabling, iv. 77; Goalpara, v. 1 14; 
Hanthawadi, v. 314 ; Henzada, v. 
385 ; Kamriip, vii. 359 ; Kangra, vii. 
418 ; Kashmir, viii. 69 ; Kumaun, viii. 
352; Kunawar, viii. 362; Kyauk- 
pyu, viii. 386; Ladakh, viii. 396; 
Lahul, viii. 421 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 
430 ; Mergui, ix. 408 ; Nepal, x. 279 ; 
Prome, xi. 230 ; Punjab, xi. 272, 274; 
Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; Sando- 
way, xii. 201 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 431 ; 
Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; Sikkim, xii. 486 ; 
Spiti, xiii. 70-72; Taung-ngu, xiii. 223 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 230 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; 
Thayet-myo, xiii. 280; Thon-gwa, xiii. 
290. 
Buddri. See Bhadri. 
Budge-Budge. See Baj-Baj. 
Budhana, town and tahs'il in N.-W. 

Provinces, iii. 127, 128. 
Budhata, village in Bengal, iii. 128. 
Budhpur, village in Bengal, iii. 128. 
Budihal, village and tdhtk in jNIysore, 

iii. 128. 
Biidikot, village in Mysore, iii. 129. 
Buffaloes, article ' India,' vi. 520. Local 
notices — Assam, i. 349 ; Bikaner, ii. 
439; Cachar, iii. 234; Chitaldriig, 
iii. 426 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 479 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 319 ; 
Palni Mountains, xi. 19; Punjab, xi. 
259 ; Sagar, xii. 105 ; Shimoga, xii. 
404 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; Tumkiir, xiii. 

379- 
Buffaloes, Wild, article ' India,', vi. 658. 
Local notices~-l\on\\ Arcot, i. 312 ; 
Assam, i. 349 ; Balaghat, i. 453 ; 
Bhagalpur, ii. 343 ; Bogra, iii. 26 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; Cachar, iii. 
234 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; 
Darrang, iv. 142 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; 
Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; Faridpur, iv. 
397 ; Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Goalpara, v. 
112; Gwalior, v. 229; Himalaya 
^Mountains, v. 409 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; 
Talpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Kamrup, vii. 355 ; 
Khasi Hills, viii. 173; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 427 ; ^Nlaimansingh, ix. 192 ; 
Manipur, ix. 325 ; ^Nlidnapur, ix. 425 ; 
Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Naga Hills, x. 143 ; 
Noakhali, x. 341 ; Pabna, x. 512 ; 
Palasgaon, x. 542 ; Patna State, xi. 
115 ; Phuljhar, xi. 168; Rajshahi, xi. 
429 ; Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
460; Singhbhum, xii. 531; the Sun- 



INDEX. 



55 



darbans, xiii. 109, 389 ; Sylhet, xiii. 

145 ; Tipperah, xiii. 314. 
Buffalo Rocks, a group of rocks off Cape 

Negrais, Lower Burma, iii. 129. 
Biihler, Dr. G., Tou7-in Search of Sanskrit 

Jl/SS. , published in the Jourtial of the 

Bombay Branch of the Asiatic Society, 

No. xxxiv. A, vol. xii., 1S77, quoted, vi. 

102 (footnotes i and 3); Digest of the 

Hindu Law of Inheritance, Partition , 

and Adoption, 117 (footnote 2). 
Building stone. See Gneiss, Granite, 

Marble, and Quarries. 
Biikera, village in Sind, iii. 129. 
Bukkacherla, village in Madras, iii. 129. 
Bukkapatnam, town in Madras, iii. 129. 
Bukkarayasamudram. See Bakkarayasa- 

mudram. 
Bukkur, fortified island in Sind, iii. 

130. 
Bulandshahr, District of N.-W. Provinces, 

iii. 130-141 ; physical aspects, 131-133 ; 

history, 133-135; population, 135, 136; 

agriculture, 136-13S ; natural calamities, 

138 ; commerce and trade, 138, 139 ; 

administration, 139, 140 ; medical 

aspects, 140, 141. 
Bulandshahr, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

iii. 141, 142. 
Bulcherry. See Balchari. 
Buldana, District in Berar, iii. 142-148 ; 

physical aspects, 142, 143 ; history, 

143, 145 ; population, 145 ; agriculture, 
145 - 147 ; natural calamities, 147 ; 

manufactures and trade, 147 ; roads 

and railways, 147 ; administration, 
147, 148 ; meteorological and medical 

aspects, 148. 
Bulsar, Sub-division of Bombay, iii. 148. 
Bulsar, port and town in Bombay, iii. 149. 
Bulti, tract of country in Kashmir, iii. 

149- 
Bui - Tul, pass near Kashmir valley, 

iii. 149. 

Bumawadi, township in Lower Burma, 
iii. 149. 

Bunas, aboriginal tribe in Faridpur, iv. 
400, 402 ; Pabna, x. 514. 

Bund, town in Punjab, iii. 150. 

Bundala, town in Punjab, iii. 150. 

Bundelas, a Rajput tribe, formerly the 
ruling race in Bundelkhand, ousted by 
the Marathas, article ' India,' vi. and 
footnote. Local notices — Overran 
Allahabad, i. 187 ; not numerous in 
Banda, though giving their name to the 
District, ii. 50 ; their history, iii. 154, 
155 ; in Central India, iii. 295 ; con- 
quered Damoh from the Gonds (1500), 
and lost it to the Marathas (1750), iv. 
108, 109 ; in Hamirpur, v. 301 ; con- 
quered Jalaun, vii. 94 ; Jhansi, vii. 
217; their numbers there, vii. 222; 



held Kalinjar fort, vii. 332 ; their rule 
in Chanderi, viii. 448 ; mutineers in 
1857 in Lalitpur, viii. 449, 450 ; 
their importance there, viii. 451 ; 
Orchha, their oldest principality, x. 425 ; 
their insurrection in Sagar(i842), xii. 
102. 
Bundare, village in Madras, iii. 150. 
Bundelkhand, tract of country in Central 
India, iii. 150-157 ; physical aspects, 
151, 152 ; population, 152 ; agriculture, 
152-154 ; area, population, etc., 153 ; 

history, 154-157. 

Biindi, State in Rajputana, iii. 157-159- 
Biindi, town in Rajputana, iii. 159, 160. 
Bun era, town in Rajputana, iii. 160. 
Bunhar, hill river in Punjab, iii. 160. 
Bun-maw, pagoda in Lower Burma, iii. 

160, 161. 
Burabalang, river of Orissa, iii. 161. 

See also Balasor District. 
Bura Dharla, tributary of the Dharla 

river, Bengal, iii. 161. 
Bura Mantreswar, name sometimes given 

to the Hugli river, Bengal, iii. 161. 
Bura Tista, old channel of the Tista river, 

Bengal, iii. 161. 
Burdikas, Baluchi tribe in the Upper 

Sind Frontier, xiii. 440. 
Burdis, Baluchi tribe in the Upper Sind 

frontier, xiii. 440, 441, 442. 
Burdu, town in Central India, iii. 161. 
Burgess, Mr., Archaological Survey of 
Western India and other works, quoted 
or referred to, on Mount Abii, i. 4, 5 ; 
Ajanta, i. II4-116; Aurungabad, i. 
388 ; Bhadreswar, ii. 340 ; Elephanta, 
iv. 341, 342; Ellora, iv. 349, 350; 
Junagarh, vii. 263; Kera, viii. 116; 
Kotal, ^^ii. 302, 303 ; Palitana, xi. 
5-8 ; Than, xiii. 248, 249. 
Burghi'ir, hills in Madras, iii. i5i. 
Burghur, village in Madras, iii. 161. 
Biirha, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 161, 162. 
Burbana. See Budhana. 
Burhan Nizam Shah, kingof Ahmadnagar 
(149S-1553), defeated by the king of 
Bijapur, i. 108. 
Burhampur, tahsil in Central Provinces, 

iii. 163. 
Burhampur, town in Central Provinces, 

iii. 163-165. 
Burhapara, fargand in Oudh, iii. 165, 

166. 
Burhee. See Barhi. 
Buri Dihing, river of Assam, iii. 166. 
Buri Gandak, river of Bengal, iii. 166. 
Buriganga, river in Bengal, iii 166, 167. 
Burin-naung (or Branginoco), wealthiest 
ruler of Pegu (1550-81), iii. 175, xi. 
228,229,475. 
Burirhat, village in Bengal, iii. 167. 



56 



INDEX. 



Buriya, town in Punjal), iii. 167. 

Burma in ancient liines and in the 15th 
century a.d., article 'India,' vi. 403 ; 
encroachments on India and first Bur- 
mese war (1824-26), 403, 404; annexation 
of Assam, Arakan, and Tenasserim, 
404 ; second Burmese war (1852) and 
annexation of Pegu, 413, 414 ; pro- 
sperity of Burma under British rule, 
414 ; annexation of Upper Burma (1st 
January 18S6), 430 ; export of rice 
from, 572 ; trans-frontier trade with, 
588-590 ; geology of, 639, 640. 

Burma, British (now Lower), iii. 167-209 ; 
area and population, 168 ; physical 
aspects, 168-172; history, 172-176; 
population, 176-178; religion and 
ethnography, 178-185; social con- 
dition of people, 1S5-192 ; land tenures, 
192, 193 ; wages and prices, 193, 194 ; 
means of communication, 194, 195 ; 
commerce, manufactures, etc., 195-201 ; 
mines and quarries, 201 ; coal, 201, 
202 ; forests, 202-205 > revenue, etc., 
206; administrative statistics, 206, 
207 ; education, 207 ; medical aspects, 
climate, etc., 207-209. 

Burma, Independent (now Upper), iii. 
209-229 ; natural products, 210 ; forests, 
210, 211 ; minerals, 211 ; wild animals, 
212 ; domestic animals, 212 ; popula- 
tion, 212, 213 ; administration, 213- 
216 ; revenue, 216, 217 ; arts and 
manufactures, 217, 218 ; commerce, 
218, 219 ; money, 219 ; weights, 219, 
220 ; calendar, 220 ; language and 
literature, 220 ; history, 220-229. 

Burmese, The, conquerors of the Ahams, 
i. 80 ; in Arakan, i. 152 ; in Assam, i. 
344 ; their history, iii. 220-229 ; con- 
quest of Mandalay (1886), ix. 288 ; 
conquered Pegu, xi. 127. 

Burmese architecture. See Architecture, 
Burmese. 

Burmese War, First (1824-26), article 
' India,' vi. 403, 404. Local notices — 
Under Akyab, i. 153, 154; Assam 
annexed, i. 344 ; Bassein taken and 
evacuated, ii. 195 ; Upper Burma, iii. 
223-225 ; Raja of Cachar restored by, 
iii. 232; British detachment annihi- 
lated at Ramu, iii. 437 ; in Henzada, 
V. 384; Mergui stormed, ix. 408; 
capture of Ramri, xi. 464 ; Rangoon 
taken and evacuated, xi. 483 ; caused 
by an attack on the island of Shahpuri, 
xii. 370 ; capture of Syriam, xiii. 159 ; 
annexation of Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; opera- 
tions at Donabyu in Thon-gwa, xiii. 
289 ; terminated by treaty of Vandabu, 
xiii. 548. 

Burmese War, Second (1S52), article 
' India,' vi. 413 ; Bassein annexed, ii. 



195 ; Upper Burma, iii. 226, 227 ; the 
battles of Akauk-taung, v. 384, 385 ; 
operations at and round Pegu, xi. 128 ; 
Rangoon captured, xi. 483 ; the Shwe- 
Dagon pagoda captured, xii. 428 ; 
fighting round Shwe-maw-daw, xii. 
437 ; capture of Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ; 
of Donabyu in Thon-gwa, xiii. 289. 

Burlton, Lt., murdered by the Khasis 
(1829), viii. 171. 

Burn, Col., drove the Sikhs out of 
Muzafifarnagar( 1804), x. 69 ; surrounded 
at Shamli by the Marathas, xii. 375. 

Burnell, Dr., Paheography of Soiithcrti 
India, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 103 
(footnote); The Ordi7tatices of Manu, 
114 (footnotes); Daya-vibhagha, 1 17 
(footnote) ; 195 (footnote 2) ; identifies 
Kankanhalli with the Konkanapur of 
Hiuen Tsiang, vii. 434 ; on the Syrian 
Christians of Kodungalur, viii. 240 ; 
researches into the early history of 
Madras, ix. 9 ; on the derivation of the 
name Madras, ix. 103 ; on the cross 
found at St. Thomas' Mount, xii. 143, 
144 ; catalogued the Tanjore library, 
xiii. 196. 

Burnes, Sir Alexander, assassination of, 
in Kabul (1841), vi. 408. Local 
7iotices — His description of Afghan- 
istan, i. 31 ; made Resident at Kabul, 
i. 49 ; and murdered there, i. 50 ; 
identifies ruins of Udainagar with 
Nicaea, iv. 122; estimate of the revenue 
of Herat, v. 392 ; on the term Hindu 
Kush, V. 418 ; on Jalalabad, vii. 77 ; 
his camp nearly flooded in Khaibar 
Pass, viii. 124 ; allowed to go up tiie 
Indus by the Mirs of Sind (1830), xii. 

514- 
Burr, Col., defeated the Marathas at 

Kirki (1817), viii. 221. 
Burroughes, Sir William, portrait of, l>y 

Lawrence, in High Court, Calcutta, 

iii. 251. 
Burrows, Gen., his defeat at Maiwand 

(1880), vii. 395, 396. 
Burt, Capt., on the temples at Kha- 

jurahu, viii. 140. 
Burton, Lt. , first discovered connection 

of the Tsanpu with the Brahmaputra, 

vii. 19. 
Bushkariks, tribe in the Hindu Kush, 

v. 417. 
Bussy, M. de, got Adoni for the son of 

Muzaffar Jang (1752), i. 27 ; capture 

of Bobbili (1756), iii. 21, xii. 485 ; 

ruled the Northern Circars, iii. 469, 

xii. 484, 485 ; recalled by Lally, iv. 3 ; 

took Gingi (1750), and repulsed the 

English (1752), V. 84 ; took the British 

fnctorvat Ingaram (1757), vii. iS; took 

Karnul (1752), viii. 52 ; his admini- 



INDEX. 



57 



stration of Kistna District, viii. 22S ; 
his policy, ix. 13 ; head-quarters of 
Rajamahendri (1754-57), xi. 383 ; took 
Vizagapatam (1757), xiii. 49S ; taken 
prisoner at Wandiwash (1760), xiii. 
518. 

Butan. See Bhutan. 

Butana, town in Punjab, iii. 229, 230. 

Butchireddipalem. See Bachireddipalem. 

Butler, Capt., killed by the Nagas(i875}, 
X. 145. 

Buxar. See Baxar. 

B«ot-le. See Pa-de. 

Byadgi. See Baladgi. 



Cabot's attempt to reach India by way of 
the north-west passage, vi. 363. 

Cabral's expedition to India (1500), and 
establishment of factories at Calicut 
and Cochin, article ' India,' vi. 358. 
Local notices — iii. 269 ; iv. 1 1 . 

Cachar, District in Assam, iii. 230-239 ; 
history, 230 - 232 ; physical aspects, 
232-234 ; population, 234-236 ; agri- 
culture, 236, 237 ; manufactures, trade, 
etc., 237, 23S ; tea cultivation and 
manufacture, 238; administration, 23S, 
239 ; medical aspects, 239. 

Cacharis, a semi-Hinduized aboriginal 
tribe of Assam and Xorth-Eastern 
Bengal, article 'India,' vi. 71 (foot- 
note). Local notices — Called Kochs, 
when of Hindu religion, in Cachar, iii. 
230, 231 ; their rising (1881), iii. 232 ; 
number of, iii. 235 ; Kamrup, vii. 
355-359 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 431 ; Xow- 
gong, X. 409 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464. See 
also Kochs. 

Calamities, natural. See Natural calami- 
ties. 

Caird, Sir James, on the factory workers 
in Bombay, iii. 81. 

Calastri. i>ee Kalahasti. 

Calcutta founded (1686), article 'India,' 
vi. 371 ; capture of, by Siraj-ud-Daula, 
and the Black Hole, 381 ; re-capture of, 
by Clive, 381, 382 ; canals, 553 ; as a 
seaport and its share of trade, 559, 
560 ; iii. 239-268 ; history, 240-243 ; 
in the last century, 243-245 ; as the 
capital of India, 245-247 ; modern city 
of, 247-249 ; native quarters of, 249 ; 
monuments and public buildings, 250, 
251 ; churches, 251-253 ; Hugli bridge, 
253 ; town of, 253, 254 ; census, 254- 
256 ; religious and caste classification, 
256 ; governing body, 256, 257 ; water- 
supply, 257, 258 ; drainage works, 
258 ; police, 258 ; jails, 258 ; educa- 
tion, 259 ; medical charities, 259, 
260 ; mortuary returns, 260 ; tempera- 
ture, 260 ; cyclones, 260, 261 ; port, 



261, 262; shipping and tonnage, 262; 
foreign sea-borne commerce, 262-264 ; 
imports, 264 ; exports, 264-269 ; trea- 
sure, 266 ; coasting trade, 266, 267 ; 
landward trade, 267, 268. 

Caldecott, John, first astronomer at the 
Trivandrum Observatory, xiii. 369. 

Caldwell, Bishop, Comparative Grammar 
of the Dravidiafi Latigitages, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 65-68, and foot- 
notes ; 173 (footnote 2) ; 240 (foot- 
note l) ; 327 (footnotes 2 and 3); 328 
(footnote) ; 330 (footnote 2) ; 332 
(footnote) ; 340 (footnote i) ; 369 
(footnote). Local notices — Asserts 
Brahuis to be Dravidian, iii. 98 ; on 
temple of Gangaikandapur, iv. 465 ; 
asserts Kandhs to be allied to the 
Gonds, vii. 401 ; on the term Karnatik, 
viii. 31, 32; indentifies Ptolemy's 
' Kolkai Emporium ' with Korkai, and 
Marco Polo's 'Gail' with Old Kayal, 
viii. 107 ; on the language of the 
Kurumbas, viii. 377 ; his researches 
into the early history of Madras, ix. 9 ; 
on the affix ' bar' in Malabar, ix. 217 ; 
on the language of the Todas, x. 310 ; 
en the cromlechs on the Nilgiris, x. 
322, 323 ; on the kingdom of Pandya, 
xi. 42 ; on the early history of Tinne- 
velli, xiii. 299 ; consecrated Assistant 
Bishop (1877), xiii. 304. 

Caldwell, Capt., improved 'Grand Anicut' 
in Tanjore (1830), xiii. 189. 

Calian, historic town in Madras, iii. 268. 

Calian. See Kalyan. 

Calico, derived from Calicut, iii. 269. 

Calicut, taluk in Madras, iii. 268. 

Calicut, town in Madras, iii. 286-270 ; 
visits of Vasco da Gama to, and es- 
tablishment of a Portuguese factory, 
■^'i- 357> 358 ; attempt of the English to 
establish a factory at, vi. 367. 

Calimere Point, promontory in Madras, 
iii. 270. 

Calinga. See Kalinga. 

Calingapatam. See Kalingapatam. 

Call, Mr., his works on Fort St. George, 
ix. 107. 

Callayi. See Kallayi. 

Calliaud, Gen., took KondapalH (1766), 
viii. 287 ; his battle with Lally at St. 
Thomas' Mount (1759), xii. 143; his 
operations against Madura (1757) 
covered by Muhammand Yusaf, xii. 
422. 

Calventura, rocks in Lower Burma, iii. 
270. 

Calvmistic Mission, Welsh. See Missions. 

Camalapur. See Kamalapur. 

Cambay, State in Bombay, iii. 271-273. 

Cambay, chief town of State in Bombay, 
iii. 273, 274. 



58 



INDEX. 



Cambay Gulf, strip of sea near Kaihia- 
war, iii. 274, 275. 

Camels, article ' India,' vi. 520. Local 
notices — Afghanistan, i. 38 ; Afghan- 
Turkistan, i. 55 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ; 
Cutch, iv. 62 ; Hissar, v. 430 ; Jai>al- 
mer, vii. 68, 69 ; Jerruck, vii. 180 ; 
Jhang, vii. 210; Joclhpur, vii. 239; 
Montgomery, ix. 500 ; Nav\anagar, x. 
252 ; Punjab, xi. 259 ; Rajputana, xi. 
41S ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 31 ; Sind, xii. 
507 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 264 ; 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 466. 

Camel-hair embroidered shawls, vi. 603. 

Camel's Hump, peak in Madras, iii. 275. 

Camp of Exercise on the plain of Panipat, 
(1885), xi. 47. 

Campbell, Sir Archibald, Governor of 
Madras (1786-89), ix. 67. 

Campbell, Gen. Sir Archibald, in the 
first Burmese war (1824-26), i. 153, 
iii. 223-225 ; marched up the Irawadi 
valley, after capture of Donabyu, v. 
384 ; detached force to Mergui, ix. 
40S; took Prome, xi. 236 ; his capture 
of ihe stockades at Donabyu, xiii. 289. 

Campbell, Dr., Superintendent of Darji- 
ling, seized by Raja of Sikkim (1849), 
iv. 131, xii. 485 ; estimate of popula- 
tion of Sikkim, xii. 485, 486; founded 
fair of Titalya, xiii. 335. 

Campbell, Sir Colin (Lord Clyde), relief 
of Lucknow by, article ' India,' vi. 
421 ; campaign in Oudh, 421, 422. 
Local notices — His operations round 
Cawnpur, iii. 283, 291, 292; his relief 
of Lucknow, viii. 514; and final con- 
quest of that city, viii. 515 ; his cam- 
paigns in Oudh, x. 495, 496 ; occupied 
Shahjahanpur, xii. 346. 

Campbell, Sir George, Specimens of the 
Languages of India, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 67 (footnote). Local 
notices — Lt. -Governor of Bengal (1871- 
74), ii. 279 ; Chief Commissioner of the 
Central Provinces (1867-70), iii. 320; 
his Educational Reforms, impetus 
given by, to education in Bakarganj, i. 
448 ; Balasor, ii. 10 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 
351; Cachar, iii. 238; Champaran, 
iii. 343, 344 ; Dacca, iv. 87, 88 ; 
Darrang, iv. 149 ; Faridpur, iv. 406 ; 
Goalpara, v. 1 19; Kamrup, vii. 364, 
365 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 437 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 200 ; Maldah, ix. 247 ; 
Manbhum, ix. 285 ; Monghyr, ix. 488 ; 
iMurshidabad, x. 30 ; Nadiya, x. 140 ; 
Noakhali, x. 351 ; Pabna, x. 519 ; 
Patna, xi. 104, 105 ; Puri, xi. 309 ; 
Purniah, xi. 330 ; Rajshahi, xi. 438 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 500 ; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 235 ; Saran, xii. 258 ; Shahabad, 
xii- 111, ; Sibsagar, .\ii. 470 ; Sylhet, 



xiii. 155, 156; Tipperah, xiii. 320; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 398. 
Campbellpur, cantonment in Punjab, iii. 

275- 
Canals in Sind and Bom'oay, article 
' India,' vi. 530, 531 ; the three great 
Punjab canals, 531, 532 ; the Doab 
canals in the jS'.-\V. Provinces, 532, 
533 ; Orissa canal system, 534 ; the 
Son canals and irrigation in Bengal, 
534, 535 ; irrigation works in the 
Madras deltas, 536, 537. Local notices — 
The Agra, i. 76, 77 ; at AUeppi, i. 
200 ; the Arrah, i. 334, 335 ; at Ashta- 
gram, i. 338 ; in Bahawaipur, i. 422 ; 
the Bali, ii. 12 ; the Baliaghata, ii. 
12 ; the Banka, ii. 75 ; the Bari Doab, 
ii. 153-155; the Baxar, ii. 220; in 
Behar, ii. 224; in Bengal, ii. 315; 
the Bihiya, ii. 422 ; in Bombay, 111. 
55 ; the Bukkacherla, iii. 129 ; in 
Lower Burma, iii. 195 ; the Chausa, 
iii. 378 ; the Buckingham in Chen- 
galpat, iii. 381 ; the Chik Devaraj 
Sagar, iii. 409; the Chilka, iii. 417; 
the Circular Road, iii. 469 ; in 
Cochin, iv. 7 ; Cuddapah, iv. 53, 54 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 67 ; Dakatia, iv. 96 ; 
works at Dehri, iv. 177 ; the Diamond 
Harbour, iv. 284 ; the Ellore, iv. 351 ; 
the Bhognipur in Etawah, iv. 368 ; the 
Ganges in Etawah, iv. 372 ; the 
Ganges, iv. 472 - 475 ; the Lower 
Ganges, iv. 475-477 ; in Ganjam, v. 7 ; 
Gaya, v. 44, 45; Godavari, v. 133 ; 
the Ganges, starts from Hardwar, v. 
334 ; the Western Jumna in Hariana, 
V. 337 ; the Hash, v. 344, 345 ; in 
Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; in Hugh', v. 490 ; 
on the Indus, vii. 15, 16 ; the Eastern 
Jumna, vii. 356-358; the Western 
Jumna, vii. 358-361 ; in Karnal, viii. 
39 ; at Kashmor, viii. 79 ; the 
Kendrapara, viii. I13, II4; in Khair- 
pur, viii. 133 ; the Khanwah, viii. 164, 
165 ; the Corbyn-wah, Khushab, viii. 
213, 214 ; the Kistna, viii. 237 ; in 
Larkhana, viii. 462 ; the Machhgaon, 
viii. 533 ; the Bari Doab, head-works 
at Madhupur, viii. 543 ; the Karnul- 
Cuddapah, ix. 44 ; the Buckingham, 
ix. 115; Maghiana, ix. 139, 140 ; 
the Mahanadi system, ix. 158- 163 ; in 
Malabar, ix. 233 ; the Mandapetta, ix. 
292 ; in Mehar, ix. 396 ; the Midna- 
pur High Level, ix. 434, 435 ; in 
Montgomery, ix. 494 ; in Multan, x. 
2, 3 ; in Muzaffargarh, x. 57 ; from the 
Eastern and Western Nara, x. 200, 
201 ; in Naushahro, x. 243 ; in Noa- 
khali, x. 340, 350 ; in the N.-VV. Pro- 
vinces, X. 382 ; in Orissa, x. 461 ; at 
Passur, xi. So ; the Patna, xi. 114 ; 



INDEX. 



59 



from the Tenner, xi. 133 ; in Peshawar 
city, xi. 158 ; the East Coast at Porto 
Novo, xi. 222 ; in the Punjab, xi. 278, 
281 ; in Kohri, xii. 64 ; works at 
Rupar, xii. 83 ; the Ri'tpnarayan and 
Rasulpur, xii. 84, 85 ; workshops at 
Rurki, xii. 86 ; works at Saharanpur, 
xii. 125 ; in Satara, xii. 281 ; at 8at- 
khira, xii. 287 ; at Seringapatam, xii. 
320 ; the Son, xii. 325, 326 ; in Shah- 
pur, xii. 359, 368 ; at Shikarpur, xii. 
395 ; in Shwe-g)-in, xii. 433 ; the 
Sirhind, xii. 552 ; the Upper >ohag, 
xiii. 45, 46 ; the Lower Sohag, xiii. 
46 ; the Son system, xiii. 54-57 ; in 
Srinagar, xiii. 75 ; in Sukkur, xiii. 91 ; 
the Calcutta, xiii. 1 14; the Swat 
river (under constructinn), xiii. 142; 
the Taldanda, xiii. 165 ; in Tando 
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ; in Tan- 
jore, xiii. 191 ; in Thar and Parkar, 
xiii. 262, 263 ; Tolly's Ndld, xiii. 336 ; 
at Twan-te, xiii. 386 ; in the Twenty- 
four Parganas, xiii. 388, 389 ; at 
Umarkot, xiii. 420 ; in Unao, xiii. 
427 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 439. 
See also local notices of the principal 
Canals under their alphabetical head- 
ings. 

Canara, North. See Kanara. 

Canara, South. See Kanara. 

Candahar. See Kandahar. 

Cane, Sugar. See Sugar-cane. 

Cannanore, town and port in Madras, iii. 
275, 276. 

Canning, Earl, Governor - General of 
India (1856-62), article 'India,' vi. 
417-424. The Mutiny of 1857-58, 417- 
424 ; downfall of the Company, 422 ; 
India transferred to the Crown, and the 
Queen's Proclamation, 423, 424 ; the 
first Viceroy, 424 ; financial and legal 
reforms, 424. Local 7iotices — His state- 
visit to Lucknow, viii. 5^5 ! moved 
capital of N.-W. Provinces from Agra 
to Allahabad, x. 369 ; his proclamation 
confiscating the soil of Oudh, x. 503. 

Canning, Lady, tomb of, in Barrackpur 
Park, ii. 175. 

Canning, Port. See Port Canning. 

Cantonments and military stations. Fort 
Abazai, i. 2 ; Abbottabad, i. 2, 3 ; 
Aden, i. 14 ; Agra, i. 68 ; Ahmadabad, 
i. 97 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 109 ; Alipur, i. 
180; Allahabad, i. 192; Ambala, i. 
224, 225; Amritsar, i. 264; Asirgarh, 
i- 338, 339; Attock, i. 381, 382; 
Aurangabad, i. 388 ; Bakloh, i. 450 ; 
Banda, ii. 55 ; Bangalore, ii. 66-68, 71, 
72 ; Bareilly, ii. 145, 146 ; Barrackpur, 
ii. 175, 176; Baxa, ii. 219, 220; Bel- 
gaum, ii. 238; Bellary, ii. 250, 251; 
Benares, ii. 262 ; Berhampur (Madras), 



ii. 324 ; Berhampur (Bengal), ii. 325 ; 
Bhuj, ii. 40S ; Bolaram, iii. 34 ; Bom- 
bay, iii. 83 ; Calcutta, iii. 254 ; Calicut, 
iii. 268-270 ; Campbellpur, iii. 275 ; 
Cannanore, iii. 275, 276 ; Cawnpur, iii. 
289 ; Chakrata, iii. 326 ; Chanda, iii. 
356; Cherat, iii. 391, 392; Dagshai, 
iv. 94 ; Dalhousie, iv. 97 ; Darjiling, 
iv. 141 ; Dehra, iv. 168 ; Delhi, iv. 186 ; 
Deolali, iv. 203 ; Deoli, iv. 203 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 218 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, iv. 227 ; Dharangaon, iv. 250 ; 
Dharmsala, iv. 255 ; Dharwar, iv. 266 ; 
Dhulia, iv. 283 ; Dibrugarh, iv. 285, 
286 ; Dinapur, iv. 299 ; Disa, iv. 304, 
305 ; Dohad, iv. 312 ; Doranda, iv. 
314 ; Dum-Dum, iv. 320 ; Dwarka, iv. 
327; Edwardesabad, iv. 339, 340; 
Paratwada, near Ellichpur, iv. 348 ; 
Faizabad, iv. 388, 389 ; Fatehgarh, iv. 
420, 421 ; Firozpur, iv. 447, 448 ; 
Goona, v. 159; Govindgarh, v. 174; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 287, 288 ; Har- 
rand, v. 342 ; Hazaribagh, v. 381 ; 
Hingoli, v. 422 ; Hoshangabad, v. 450 ; 
Hoti-Mardan, v. 460; Indore Resi- 
dency, vii. 10 ; Jabalpur, vii. 37 ; Jacob- 
abad, vii. 38 ; Jalandhar, vii. 92 ; Jalna, 
vii. 106; Jamner, vii. 131; Jamrud, 
vii. 134; Jehlam, vii. 178; Jhansi 
Naoabad, vii. 228 ; Jutogh, vii. 265 ; 
Kamthi (Kamptee), vii. 367 ; Kangra, 
vii. 430 ; Karachi, vii. 453 ; Kasauli, 
viii. 58, 59; Kirki, viii. 220, 221; 
Kohat, viii. 250; Kolaba, viii. 271; 
Lahore, viii. 418; Lakhimpur, viii. 
439 ; Landaur, viii. 459 ; Lundi Kotal, 
viii. 460; Lohagliat, viii. 474; Luck- 
now, viii. 517 ; Madras, ix. 107 ; 
Malapuram, ix. 237 ; Malegaon, ix. 
253, 254 ; Mangalore, ix. 314 ; Mang- 
rota, ix. 317; Maulmain, ix. 371; 
Meean Meer, ix. 379, 380; Meerut, 
ix. 393 ; Mehidpur, ix. 398 ; Mhow, 
ix. 420 ; Fort Michni, ix. 423 ; Monier- 
khal, ix. 491 ; Moradabad, ix. 513, 
514 ; Multan, x. 13 ; Murree, x. 19 ; 
Muttra, X. 54 ; Nagpur, x. 174 ; Nasir- 
abad, x. 238, 239 ; Naushahra, x. 242 ; 
Nimach, x. 326, 327 ; Noarband, x. 
352, 353 ; Nowgong, x. 415, 416 ; 
Pallavaram, xi. 13, 14 ; Paratwara, xi. 
59 ; Perim, xi. 158 ; Peshawar, xi. 160, 
161 ; Pishin, xi. 191 ; Pithoragarh, xi. 
193 ; Poona, xi. 211, 213 ; Punamallu, 
xi. 241, 242 ; Purandhar, xi. 297, 298 ; 
Quetta, xi. 338 ; Quilon, xi. 340 ; 
Raipur, xi. 378 ; Rajanpur, xi. 384 ; 
Rajkot, xi. 389 ; Rangoon, xi. 483, 
484 ; Ranikhet, xi. 506, 507 ; in Rawal 
Pindi District, xii. 34, 35 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 37 ; Rurki, xii. 86 ; Sadiya, 
xii. 93 ; Sagar, xii. 109 ; St. Thomas 



6o 



INDEX. 



Mount, xii. 142, 143 ; Secunderabad, 
xii. 301-303 ; Segauli, xii. 303 ; Sehore, 
xii. 304 ; Shabkadar, xii. 322 ; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 356 ; Shillong, xii. 398 ; 
Sholapur, xii. 421 ; Shvve-gyin, xii. 
435 ; Sialkot, xii. 452 ; Sikrol (for 
Benares), xii. 488 ; Silchar, xii. 489 ; 
Siriir, xiii. 23 ; Sitapur, xiii. 38, 39 ; 
Solan, xiii. 49 ; Subathu, xiii. 85 ; 
Surat, xiii. 132 ; Sutna, xiii. 141, 142 ; 
Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ; Thayet-myo, 
xiii. 287 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 364 ; 
Trivandrum, xiii. 369 ; Vellore, xiii. 
469 ; Vizianagram, xiii. 502, 503 ; 
Waltair, xiii. 516; Sadra in Wasna, 
>;iii- 533 ; Wellington, xiii. 536. 

Caoutchouc or india-rubber, in Assam, i. 
349 ; Balipara, ii. 13 ; Upper Burma, 
iii. 211 ; Cachar, iii. 234; Chardwar, 
iii. 371 j Jirang, vii. 233 ; Kamrup, yii. 
355 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; Khyrim, 
viii. 215 ; Kulsi, viii. 335 ; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 426 ; Manipur, ix. 325 ; Mergui 
Archipelago, ix. 412 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
460. 

Capes and headlands, Agoada, i. 59 ; 
Calimere Point, iii. 270 ; Comorin, iv. 
25; Divi Point, iv. 308; Dolphin's 
Nose, iv. 312; False Point, iv. 390, 
391 ; Manapad Point, ix. 275 ; Manora, 
ix- 338- 339 ; Monze, ix. 503 ; Negrais, 
X. 259 ; Palmyras Point, xi. 15, l6 ; 
Ras Muari, xi. 513, 514. 

Capital and interest. See Interest, Rates 
of. 

Capitation tax, imposed in the Arakan 
Hill Tracts, i. 303 ; (on infidels) 
Balkh, ii. 15 ; Bassein, ii. 199 ; Lower 
Burma, iii. 206 ; Upper Burma, iii. 
216 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 452 ; 
Darjiling, iv. 134, 135 ; Jalpaigiiri, 
xiii. 116; Kuram, viii, 369; Lakhim- 
pur, viii. 434 ; Mergui, ix. 41 1 ; Prome, 
xi. 234 ; Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; 
Sandoway, xii. 204 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 

434- 

Capsicum, grown in Upper Burma, iii. 
210; Kumaun, viii. 354; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, X. 382. 

Caragola. See Karagola. 

Carbonate of soda, generally found in 
an impure form known as sajji, 
in Chitaldriig, iii. 423 ; Dera Gliazi 
Khan, iv. 210 ; Dera Ismail Khan, 
iv. 220 ; Ghazipur, v. 69 ; J hang, vii. 
207, 211 ; Multan, x. 3 ; Shahpur, 
xii. 366 ; Sibi, xii. 456 ; Sirsa, xiii. 
18. 

Carbuncles, found in Jaipur, vii. 52 ; 
Udaipur, xiii. 401. 

Cardamom Hills, range in Madras, iii. 
276. 

Cardamoms, in the Anamalai Hills, i. 



271; Cardamom Hills, iii. 276; 
Cochin, iv, 2, 7 ; Coorg, iv. 36, 37, 
38 ; Darjiling, iv. 134 ; Western Ghai.-, 
v. 59 ; Hassan, v. 349 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 
108 ; Kadattanad, vii. 279 ; Kadur, vii. 
286 ; North Kanara, vii. 372 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 376 ; Karattanad, vii. 469 ; 
Madras, ix. 2>t, ; Madura, ix, 121 ; 
Malabar, ix. 229, 230 ; Mysore, x. 103 < 
Nelliampati Hills, x. 260 ; Nepal, x. 
277 ; Padinalknad, x. 525 ; Palni 
Alountains, xi. 19 ; .Sagar (Mysore), 
xii. Ill; Shimoga, xii. 400, 403 ; 
Sikkim, xii. 486 ; Travancore, xiii. 

345. 349- 
Carey, Rev. W., founder of the Baptist 

Mission at Serampur, xii. 318. 

Car-festival of Jagannath, article 'India,' 
vi. 224-226 ; selt'-immolation not prac- 
tised, 224 ; bloodless worship and gentle 
doctrines, 225, 226. Local notices — 
Ballabhpur, ii. 17 ; Prodattur in Cud- 
dapah, iv, 54 ; Gopalswami-betta, v. 
162 ; Jammalammadi'igu, vii. 129 ; 
Mahesh, ix. 172; Manchenhalli, ix. 
286; Mannargudi, ix. 338; Manjangad, 
X, 196 ; Nayakan-hatli, x, 257 ; Puri, 
X. 44S, 449, xi. 316, 317; Rayachoti, 
xii. 40 ; Sakraypatna, xii. 148 ; San- 
karkati, xii, 222 ; Sivaganga, xiii. 42 ; 
Sonda, xiii. 60 ; Srivillipatur, xiii. 83 ; 
Yelahanka, xiii. 551, 

Carless, Lt., quoted, on the crocodiles 
and mosque of Magar Talao, ix. 136- 
138; on the Khedewari channel of the 
Indus in 1837, xii. 274; on Shahbandar, 
xii. 340 ; on the harbour of Sonmiani, 
xiii. 61. 

Carleton, Rev. Dr. , founded the American 
Presbyterian Mission at Kiilu, viii. 

340- 

Carmelite Mission in Malabar (1656), ix. 
228 ; their mission and monastery at 
Verapoli, xiii. 471, 472. 

Carmichael, D. F., quoted, on the Jaipur 
zandnddri, vii. 62, 63, 64 ; his descrip- 
tion of Vizianagram, xiii. 503. 

Carmichael, C. P., Joint Magistrate of 
Pilibhit in Mutiny of 1857, xi, 173. 

Carnac, Col., his defeat of Shah Alam and 
M. Law at Gaya (1760), xii. 264. 

Carnac, Capt. , his interference in Paiamau 
(1770), viii. 478._ 

Carnac, Capt,, Resident at Baroda, made 
arrangement between the Gaekwar and 
the Nawab of Radhanpur (1813), xi, 

343- 
Carnal ic. See Karnatic, 

Carnelian ornaments, Cambay famous for, 

iii, 274. 
Carnelians, article ' India,' vi. 629 ; 

mines at Ratanpur in Rajpipla, xi. 

392, 516 ; in Rewa Kantha, xii. 49. 



INDEX. 



6i 



Caron, M., President of the French East 

India Company (1668-74), i^'- 45 !• 
Carpet-weaving, article ' India,' vi. 604. 
Local notices — At Adoni, i. 26 ; in 
Afghanistan, i. 39 ; Afghan-Turkistan, 
i. 55 ; at Ahmadnagar, i. 109 ; Akot, 
i. 148 ; Ambala, i. 222 ; Bangalore, 
ii. 64, 70 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; Bhavani, 
ii. 3S3 ; Biibak, iii. I15 ; Cambay, iii. 
272 ; Daiidnagar, iv. 158 ; Ellore, iv. 
352 ; Godavari, v. 129 ; Berar, v. 270 ; 
Hoshiai-pur, v. 456 ; Jabalpur, vii. 
35 ; Jewar, vii. 193 ; Kashmir, viii. 73; 
Kasur, viii. 85 ; Kohat, viii. 248 ; 
Mirzapur, ix. 462 ; • Multan, x. 13 ; 
. Nawalgund, x. 251 ; Rajamahendri, 
xi. 3S2 ; Rangpur, xi. 498 ; Salem, xii. 
163 ; vSandi, xii. 197 ; Sarjapur, xii. 
269 ; Sehwan, xii. 305, 306 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 332 ; Sherkot, xii. 380 ; Shikarpur, 
xii- 393. 396 ; Shimoga, xii. 404 ; 
Tando Muhammad Khan, xiii. 191, 
196 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 447 ; 
Walajapet, xiii. 515. 
Cartier, ^Ir. , Governor-General (1769-72), 
ii. 278 ; his attempts to improve Cal- 
cutta, iii. 244. 
Carts and cart-wheels, manufacture of, at 
Anupshahr, i. 295 ; Athni, i. 378 ; 
Atiir, i. 383 ; Badin, i. 409 ; Brahnia- 
puri, iii. 393 ; Dodderi, iv. 21 1 ; Erode, 
iv. 356; Hunsiir, v. 502; x. 120; 
Jahangirabad, vii. 44 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
523, 526 ; Purniah, xi. 53 ; Pilibhit, 
xi. 179 ; Taloda, xiii. 168. 
Carving. See Shell-carving, Stone-carv- 
ing, and Wood-carving. 
Cashmere. See Kashmir. 
Cassergode, town and taluk in Madras, 

iii. 276, 277. 
Caste, formation of the four castes, article 

' India,' vi. 87-91. 
Caste rewards and punishments, article 

' India,' vi. 199, 200. 
Caste system, its religious and social 

aspects, article ' India,' vi. 192-200. 
Caste and trade guilds and associations. 

See Trade guilds and associations. 
Castes, Distribution of the principal. See 
Population section under each District, 
and the following Provincial articles — 
Assam, i. 353-357; Behar, ii. 225 ; 
Bengal, ii. 296, 297 ; Central Provinces, 
iii. 316, 317; Madras, ix. 19-21; 
N.-\V. Provinces, x. 371, 372 ; Orissa, 
x. 434-436; Oudh, X. 498, 499; 
Punjab, xi. 274 ; Rajputana, xi. 408. 
Castello-Novo, Marquis de, Governor of 

Goa, v. 104. 
Castles. See Forts. 

Castro, Dom Joao de, relieved Diu and 
defeated king of Gujarat (1545), iv. 
307 ; took away stone, now lost, tixing 



date of temples of Elephanta, iv. 343 ; 
on Mahad in 1538, ix. 154. 

Casuarina plantations, in Chengalpat, iii. 
381, 382, 383 ; Bhaunagar in Kathia- 
war, viii. 89; Kistna, viii. 226; Madras, 
ix. 7, 30, 85 ; Nellore, x. 268 ; Ratna- 
giri, xii. 3 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355. 

Catechu. See Cutch. 

Ctitoia of Buddhist Scriptures from the 
Chinese, by Mr. S. Beal, quoted, article 
'India,' vi. 142 (footnote l); 147 
(footnote 2) ; 150 (footnote 3) ; 157 
(footnote 2); 176 (footnote 2); 204 
(footnote 2). 

Cathay and the Way Thither, by Col. 
Yule, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 233 
(footnote 2) ; 238 (footnote 3). 

Cathedrals, Allahabad (Roman Catholic), 
i. 198 ; Bassein (Roman Catholic, 
ruined), ii. 192 ; Bombay, iii. 79 ; 
Calcutta, iii. 251, 252 ; Old Goa 
(Roman Catholic), v. 107 ; Madras, 
ix. 106, 116; .Sardhana (Roman 
Catholic), xii. 266 ; Thana (Portuguese), 
xiii. 258. 

Catholic ( Roman) Missions, article ' India, ' 
vi. 229-259. Origin of Christianity in 
India, 229, 230 ; the three legends of 
St. Thomas the Apostle, Thomas the 
Manichsan, and Thomas the Armenian, 
and their respective claims to be the 
founder of Indian Christianity, 231- 
235 ; Nestorian Church in Asia side by 
side with Buddhism for looo years, its 
wide diffusion, 235, 236 ; the forcilile 
conversion of the Nestorians, or St. 
Thomas Christians, to the Church of 
Rome, by the Portuguese, 241-243 ; 
Syrian and Jacobite Catholics in Mala- 
bar, 243, 244; labours of Saint Francis 
Xavier, 244, 245 ; early Jesuit priests, 
their conversions and literary labours, 
agricultural settlements, and collegiate 
city of Cochin, 245-253 ; Portuguese 
inquisition established at Goa, autos de 
fj, and abolition of the inquisition, 253, 
254; suppression of the Jesuits (1759- 
73), and their re-establishment (1814), 
254, 255 ; organization of modern 
Roman Catholic Missions, 255 ; juris- 
diction of the Archbishop of Goa, 255, 

256 ; distribution of Roman Catholics, 

257 ; Syrian and Roman Catholic 
Christians, 257 ; Roman Catholic 
population of India, 258 ; progress 
of Roman Catholicism, its missions, 
colleges, and schools, 259. Local 
notices — At Aden, i. 19 ; Agra, i. 75 ; 
Maulmain, i. 242 ; North Arcot, i. 
315 ; South Arcot, i. 323 ; Bassein, ii. 
201 ; Bellarj', ii. 249 ; Bettia, ii. 328 ; 
Bhawal, ii. 383 ; Calcutta, iii. 253 ; 



62 



INDEX. 



Calicut, iii. 268 ; Cannanore, iii. 276 ; 
Chuhari in Champaian, iii. 339 ; 
Chengalpat, iii. 389 ; Cochin, iv. 7 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 16 ; Covelong, iv. 44 ; 
Dharwar, iv. 260 ; Ellore, iv. 352 ; 
Kamthi, vii. 367 ; Karnul, viii. 36 ; 
Karwar, viii. 53; Krishnagar, viii. 317, 
X. 134; Lucknow, viii. 517; Madras, 
ix. 23, 25 ; Madura, ix. 126 ; Malabar, 
ix. 228; Mangalore, ix. 314; Mergui, 
ix. 411 ; Mudgal, ix. 526 ; Mysore, x. 
112; Nellore, x. 265; Palghat, x. 
543 ; Pattukotai, xi. 118 ; Pondicherri, 
xi. 199; Ramnad, xi. 451 ; Rangoon, 
xi. 481 ; Ranipet, xi. 508 ; Salem, xii. 
165 ; Sardhana, xii. 266 ; Singhbhum, 
xii. 516 ; Sudharam, xiii. 87 ; Tagasseri, 
xiii. 180 ; Tanjore, xiii. 186 ; Taung- 
ngu, xiii. 224, 226 ; Thana, xiii. 252, 
253 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 302, 303 ; Tra- 
vancore, xiii. 348, 352 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 358, 365 ; Trichur, xiii. 365 ; 
Tuticorin, xiii. 385 ; Verapoli, xiii. 
471, 472 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 491, 
497. See also Churches, Convents, 
St. Thomas Christians, and Syrian 
Christians. 

Cattle, Breeds of, article ' India,' vi. 520. 
Local notices — Afghanistan, i. 38 ; 
Ahmadabad, i. 84 ; Akola, i. 144 ; 
Baroda, ii. 164 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ; 
Broach, iii. 102 ; Buldana, iii. 146 ; 
Clihindwara, iii. 402 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 
426 ; Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Dharwar, 
iv. 262; Dongertal, iv. 314; Hassan, 
v. 349 ; Hissar, v. 430 ; Hoshangabad, 
V. 446 ; Hiinsi'ir, v. 502 ; Jath, vii. 
148 ; Jhang, vii. 210 ; Kandukiir, vii. 
407 ; Kangayam, vii. 407 ; Kangundi, 
vii. 431 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; Palamau 
in Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; Madgiri, viii. 
539 ; Madras, ix. 8 ; Melghat, ix. 403 ; 
Mysore, x. 1 19, 120; Nagaur, x. 159; 
Nawalgiind, x. 251 ; Nellore, x. 267 ; 
Oudh, X. 483 ; Panahat, xi. 25 ; Pili- 
bhit, xi. 175 ; Punganur, xi. 243 ; 
Punjab, xi. 280 ; Rajputana, xi. 418 ; 
Sagar, xii. 105 ; Shimoga, xii. 404 ; 
Sirsa, xiii. 16 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 
264 ; Tumkur, xiii. 379 ; Wardha, 
xiii. 526 ; Wun, xiii. 543. See also 
Pasture lands for cattle. 

Cattle, Wild, found in Oudh, x. 483 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 69 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 353. 

Cattle disease, especially prevalent in 
Aligarh, i. 177; Amherst, i. 243; 
Anantapur, i. 277, 279 ; N. Arcot, i. 
319 ; S. Arcot, i. 328 ; Bakarganj, i. 
449 ; Banda, ii. 55 ; Bara Banki, ii. 
114; Bellary, ii. 249; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 140 ; Lower Burma, iii. 209 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 21 ; Cuttack, iv. 74 ; 
Darrang, iv. 150; Etawah, iv. 377; 



Godavari, v. 130; Hardoi, v. 328; 
Jalaun, vii. I02 ; Kamrup, vii. 365 ; 
Karnul, viii. 44 ; Kheri, viii. 19S ; 
Khulna, viii. 2og ; Kumaun, viii. 358 ; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 438 ; Lalitpur, viii. 
457 ; Malabar, ix. 234 ; Midnapur, ix. 
443 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 76 ; Nadiya, 
X. 140, 141 ; Nowgong, x. 415 ; Puri, 
xi. 309 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 359 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 35 ; Rohtak, xii. 74, 75 ; 
Salem, xii. 165 ; Saran, xii. 259 ; 
Sialkot, xii. 450 ; Sibsagar, xii. 471 ; 
Sultanpur, xiii. 103; Tarai, xiii. 21 1 ; 
Thayet-myo, xiii. 287 ; Twenty-four 
Parganas, xiii. 399 ; Unao, xiii. 438. 

Cattle fairs and markets, held at Agar, i. 
57 ; Amingadh, i. 244 ; Amritsar, i. 
259, 266 ; Avani, i. 390 ; Bachhrawan, 
i. 406 ; Bahraich, i. 454 ; Batesar, ii. 
216 ; Chetra, iii. 374 ; Deoli, iv. 203 ; 
Dholpur, iv. 278 ; Dinanagar, iv. 299 ; 
Muktesar in Firozpur, iv. 445 ; Garha- 
kota, v. 13 ; Georgegarh, v. 54, vii. 
45 ; Hongal, v. 440 ; in Kolar, viii. 
276, 277; Kurai, viii. 368; Makhanpur, 
ix. 215 ; in Western Malwa, ix. 271 ; 
Melur, ix. 305 ; M lias wad, ix. 420 ; 
Nandi, x. 190, 191 ; Nekmard, iv. 
296 ; X. 259 ; Koreke, near Pasrur, 
xi. 80 ; Punganur, xi. 242 ; Ranipet, 
xi. 509 ; Saoner, xii. 248 ; Sarsaganj, 
xii. 271 ; Belandi in Satara, xii. 282 ; 
.Savda, xii. 295 ; Chhapara, xii. 313 ; 
Shahpur, xii. 365, 368 ; Sialkot, xii. 
447 ; Sirsa, xiii. 18 ; Siriir, xiii. 23 ; 
Sitamarhi, xiii. 26 ; Subrahmanya, xiii. 
86 ; Thatia, xiii. 275 ; Tiruchendur, 
xiii. 223 ; Ulubaria, xiii. 419 ; Vanarasi, 
xiii. 463. 

Cautley, Sir P. T., his report, which led 
to the Ganges Canal, iv. 473 ; recon- 
structed Eastern Jumna Canal, xii. 14. 

Cauvery, great river of S.India, iii. 277-279- 
Cavagnari, Sir L., murdered at Kabul 

(1879), i. 52, vii. 273. 
Cave inscriptions of Asoka, article ' India,' 

vi. 145, 146. See also Asoka. 
Caves and caverns, at Bamian in Afghan- 

Turkistan, 56 ; Amherst, i. 235 ; 

Bhareng, ii. 370 ; BijH, ii. 427 ; Dar- 

jiling, iv. 130 ; Ganeswari river, iv. 

464 ; Guptasar, v. 205 ; Hathpor, v. 

353, 354 ; Hpa-gat, v. 465, 466 ; 

Cherra Punji and Riipnath in the 

Khasi Hills, viii. 174 ; Mahagaon, ix. 

155; in Mandla, ix. 301 ; Manpur, ix. 

340 ; Mugdai, ix. 528 ; Rupnath, xii. 

85 ; Sansar Dhara, xii. 225 ; in the 

Shahpur Hills, xii. 369 ; Siju, xii. 477 ; 

Talaja, xiii. 163 ; Taliparamba, xiii. 

167 ; Tavoy Island, xiii. 235. 
Cave-temples and rock-temples, at Ajanta, 

i. 1 13 -1 16; Akouk-toung, i. 148; 



INDEX. 



63 



Amarnalh (Kashmir), i. 211 ; Ambad, 
i. 212; Aror, i. 332; Aurangabad, 1. 
388; Badami, i. 407 ; Bagh, i. 414; 
Balsane, ii. 26 ; Barabar Hills, ii. 
116; Bezwada, ii. 336; Bhandak, ii. 
359 ; Bhimaveram, ii. 396 ; Chaul, 
iii. 377 ; Dam-nia-tha, iv. 104 ; Ele- 
phanta, iv. 341-343 ; Ellora, iv. 349- 
351; Gavipiir, v. 42; Ghugus, v. 
75 ; Gwalior, v. 235 ; Harchoka, v. 
320 ; Hpa-gat, v. 465, 466 ; Jogesh- 
wari, vii. 247 ; Junagarh, vii. 263 ; 
Junnar, vii. 264 ; Kalinjar, vii. 336 ; 
Karli, viii. 13-16; Khandgiri, viii. 
159 ; Khed, viii. 187 ; Mahabalipur, 
ix. 147-149 ; Pale, near Mahad, ix. 
154 ; Manjira, ix. 336 ; Nasik, x. 237 ; 
Ramgarh Hill, xi. 447 ; Rani-Nur, xi. 
507, 508; Salsette, xii. 169, 170; 
Shivner, xii. 410 ; Undavalli on the 
Sitanagaram Hills, xiii. 27 ; Sivaganga, 
xiii. 42 ; Sudasna, xiii. 87 ; Udayagiri, 
xiii. 414, 415. 

Cave-tomb of the introducer of coffee 
into India, Baba Budan, i. 402, 403. 

Cave-tunnel at Hathpor, v. 353, 354 ; 
xi. 447. 

Cawnpur, District in N.-\\. Provinces, 
iii. 279-289 ; physical aspects, 279, 
280 ; history, 280-283 ; population, 
283-285 ; agriculture, 285, 286 ; natural 
calamities, 287 ; commerce and trade, 
287, 288 ; administration, 288, 289 ; 
medical aspects, 289. 

Cawnpur, city in N.-\V. Provinces, iii. 
289-293 ; situation and appearance, 
289, 290 ; history, 290-292 ; popula- 
lation, 292 ; communications, trade, 
etc., 292, 293 ; the Mutiny at, massacre 
of the garrison and the women and 
children, article ' India,' vi. 420. 

Cavley, Dr., his report on the trade of 
Kashmir (1867), viii. 399, 400. 

Ceded Districts, term applied to the 
territory in the Deccan ceded to the 
British in 1 800, for the maintenance of 
the Nizam's subsidiary force. See 
Hyderabad State. 

Ceded and Conquered Provinces, term 
formerly applied to the N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 293. 

Census, The results of the. See Popula- 
tion section under each Province, 
Division, District, and town. 

Central Asia, Trans- Himalayan trade 
with, article ' India,' vi. 586-590. 

Central India, group of States, iii. 293- 
297 ; population, 295 ; climate, 295- 
297. 

Central India Agency. See Central India. 

Central jails. See Jails, Central and 
model. 

Central Provinces, Chief Commissioner- 



ship, 297-323 ; physical aspects, 297- 
299 ; forests, 299, 300 ; coal, 300 ; 
iron, 300 ; history, 300-303 ; popula- 
tion, 303-305 ; religion, 305 ; abori- 
gines, 305-308 ; physical appearance, 
etc., 308-311 ; Hindu population, 311, 
312 ; local sects, 312 ; Satnamis, the, 
312, 313; Kabirpanthis, the, 313-315 ; 
Kumbhipathias, the, 315 ; Nanakpan- 
this, the, 315, 316 ; Singhapanthis, the, 
316 ; Dhamis, the, 316 ; Hindu castes, 
316, 317 ; Muhammadans, 317 ; Jains, 
317; Christian sects, 317; distribution 
into town and country, 317, 318 ; 
occupations, 318; agriculture, 318, 
319 ; commerce and manufactures, 
319; means of communication, 319, 
320; administration, 320, 321 ; educa- 
tion, 321 ; climate and meteorology, 

321-323- 
Cereal crops. See Agricultural section 

under each District, and also Barley, 

Oats, and Wheat. 

Ceremonies. See Funeral ceremonies. 
Marriage ceremonies, and Customs, 
ceremonies, and mode of life. 

Cesses, Customary, illegal or local. See 
AInodbs. 

Ceylon, India's trade with, article ' India,' 
vi. 578, 579. Local notices — Adrampel, 
i. 27 ; Karikal, viii. 10 ; Laccadive 
Islands, viii. 396 ; Negapatam, x. 258 ; 
Pambam, xi. 23 ; Tuticorin, xiii. 386. 

Chabramau. See Chhibramau. 

Chach, tract of country in Punjab, iii. 

323- 
Chachana, State in Kathiawar, iii. 323. 
Chachra. See Umarkot taluk. 
Chachra, town in Sind, iii. 323. 
Chadchat, State in Gujarat, iii. 323, 324. 

See also Santalpur. 
Chagdah, town in Bengal, iii. 324. 
Chaibasa, town in Bengal, iii. 324. 
Chain armour. Manufacture of, article 

' India,' vi. 606, 607. 
Chainpur, town in Bengal, iii. 324. 
Chainpur, village in Bengal, iii. 325. 
Chains, aboriginal tribe in Maldah, ix. 

243- 
Chaitanpur, hill range in Bengal, iii. 325. 

Chaitanpur, village in Bengal, iii. 325. 

Chaitanya, Hindu religious reformer 
(1485-1527), his life and teachings, 
ariicle ' India,' vi. 219-221. Local 
notices — Became an ascetic at Kalwa, 
viii. 103 ; born at Nadiya, x. 141 ; his 
lite and doctrines, x. 443, 444. 

Chaitpet, village in Madras, iii. 325. 

Chait Singh, Raja of Benares, exactions 
of Warren Hastings from (1780), article 
' India,' vi. 390. Local ttotices — Re- 
belled (1781), and was deposed, ii. 
256 ; fled to Bijaigarh, ii. 423 ; allowed 



64 



INDEX. 



to succeed his father in Ghazipur (1770), 

V. 64 ; expelled the Rohilla ruler of 

Jaunpur, vii. 153. 
Chak, town in Sind, iii. 325. 
Chaken, town in Rajputana, iii. 325. 
Chaki, stream in Punjab, iii. 325. 
Chakiria, village in Bengal, iii. 325. 
Chaklasi, town in Bombay, iii. 326. 
Chakma?;, Arakanese tribe, numerous in 

the Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 449 ; 

their manners and customs, iii. 449, 

45°- 
Chakrabari, village in Bengal, iii. 326. 

Chakradwaj, the first Aham Raja who 
became a Hindu, vii. 357. 

Chakrata, cantonment in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 326. 

Chakultor, village in Bengal, iii. 326. 

Chakwal, town and tahsil in Punjab, iii. 
326, 327. 

Chalakiidi, river in Madras, iii. 327. 

Chalan Bil, lake in Bengal, iii. 327. 

Chalauni, river in Bengal, iii. 327. 

Chalcedony, found in Aden, i. 15 ; Banga- 
lore, ii. 59 ; Madura, ix. 122. 

Chalisgaon, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, iii. 327, 328. 

Chalmers, Gen. Sir John, his defence of 
Coimbatore (1791), iv. 16. 

Chalukya, dynasty in the Deccan. See 
Birudankarayapuram, iii. 13 ; Berar, v. 
261 ; Kaladgi, vii. 315 ; Kolaba, viii. 
262; Madras, ix. 10, 11 ; Mysore, x. 
93 ; Poona, xi. 201 ; Satara, xii. 277 ; 
Sawantwari, xii. 297 ; Shimoga, xii. 
400; Sholapur, xii. 412. 

Chamardi, State in Kathiawar, iii. 328. 

Chamarlakota, town in Madras, iii. 
328. 

Chamars, caste of leather-workers and 
shoemakers, numerous or otherwise 
important in Aligarh, i. 172; Allah- 
abad, i. 189 ; Ambala, i. 218 ; Azam- 
garh, i. 396 ; Ballia, ii. 20 ; Banda, ii. 
50; Basti, ii. 210; Behar, ii. 225; 
Bengal, ii. 296; Budaun, iii. 119; 
Cawnpur, iii. 283, 284 ; Central India, 
iii. 295 ; their adoption of the new 
religion of Ghasi Das in Chhatis- 
garh {see Satnamis), iii. 312, 313 ; in 
the Central Provinces, iii. 316; Etah, 
iv. 361 ; Etawah, iv. 373 ; Faizabad, 
iv. 383 ; Fatehpur, iv. 424 ; Gurdaspur, 
v. 210; Jhansi, vii. 222; Meerut, ix. 
386 ; Moradabad, ix. 507 ; Muzaffar- 
nagar, x. 71 ; Nadiya, x. 133 ; Oudh, 
X. 499 ; Raipur, xi. 372 ; Rajputana, 
xi. 408, 410 ; Sagar, xii. 104 ; Saha- 
ranpur, xii. 118; Sitapur, xiii. t^t^', 
Sultanpur, xiii. 98 ; Tarai, xiii. 209 ; 
Tonk, xiii. 337 ; Unao, xiii. 430. 

Chamba, Hill State in Punjab, iii. 32S, 
330. 



Chamba, town in Punjab, iii. 331. 
Chambal, great river in Central India, iii. 

331. 332. 

Chambal^ town in Bengal, iii. 332. 

Chamber, Sir Thomas, Governor of 
Madras {1659-61), ix. 66. 

Chamberlain, Gen. Sir N. B., conducted 
Ambela campaign (1863), i. 227; in 
the battle of Kandahar (1842), vii. 394 ; 
stopped at AH Masjid on his way to 
Kabul (1878), i. 52, viii. 127 ; besieged 
in Chichawatni (1857), ix. 496. 

Chambra Mala, mountain in Madras, iii. 

332;, 
Chamiani, town in Oudh, iii. 332. 
Chamomeril, lake in Kashmir, iii. 332. 
Champa, estate in Central Provinces, iii. 

332. 
Champahati, village in Bengal, iii. 332. 
Champanagar, village in Bengal, iii. 333. 
Champaner, historic hill fort in Bombay, 

iii- 333, 334- 

Champaran, District of Bengal, iii. 334- 
344 ; history, 334, 335 ; physical as- 
pects, _ 335 - 337 ; people, 337 - 340 ; 
antiquities, 340, 341 ; agriculture, 341, 
342 ; natural calamities, 342 ; industrial, 
342, 343; administration, 343, 344; 
medical aspects, 344. 

Champaran, Sub-division in Bengal, iii. 

344, 345- 
Champas, nomadic Tibetan tribe in the 

Himalayas, v. 412. 
Champat Rai, Bundela chief, father of 

Chhatar Sal, harassed the Muhamma- 

dans, iii. 154, 155. 
Champdani, village in Bengal, iii. 345. 
Champion, Col., defeated the Rohillas at 

Tisua (1774), xiii. 334. ^ 
Chamrajnagar, town and taluk in Mysore, 

iii- 345-. 

Chamrauli, town in Oudh, iii. 345. 

Chamundibetta, hill in Mysore, iii. 345. 

Chamursi, town in Central Provinces, 
iii. 345, 346. 

Chanar, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 
346. 

Chanar, historic fortress and town in 
N.-W. Provinces, iii. 346, 347. 

Chanchra, village in Bengal, iii. 347, 348. 

Cbanda, District in Central Provinces, 
iii- 348-355 ; physical aspects, 348, 
349; history, 349-351; population, 
351, 352 ; antiquities and places of 
interest, 352 ; agriculture, 352, 353 ; 
natural calamities, 353 ; commerce and 
fade, 353, 354 ; administration, 354, 
355 ; medical aspects, 355. 

Chanda, town in Central Provinces, iii. 

355>,356. 

Chanda, pai-gand in Oudh, iii. 356. 

Chandala, zaminddri in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 356. 



INDEX. 



65 



Chanda's, the great low caste in Bengal 
in which most of the semi-Hinduized 
aborigines are inchided, in Assam, i. 
356 ; Bakarganj, i. 443 ; ^ngal, ii. 
296 ; Dacca, iv. 83 ; Faridpur, their 
numbers, manners, and customs, iv. 
397, 400, 401 ; Kamrup, yii. 359 ; 
Maimansingh, ix. 194; Nadiya, x. 133; 
Sylhet, xiii. 148 ; 'I'ipperah, xiii. 316. 

Cliandan, river m Bengal, iii. 356. 

Chandarnagar, French Settlement in 
Bengal, iii. 356, 357 ; its capture by 
Admiral Watson (1757), vi. 382. 

Chanda Sahib, Nawab of the Kamatic, 
sent his son to besiege Arcot (1751), i. 
309 ; took Chengalpat (1751), iii. 389 ; 
held Dindigal fort, iv. 301 ; besieged 
Karur (1736), viii. 52 ; conquered 
Madura (1740), ix. 123 ; taken prisoner 
at Mayakonda (174S), ix. 377 ; got 
possession of Trichinopoli (1740), xiii. 

356- 
Chandauli, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 

iii- 357- 

Chandausi, market town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 357. 

Chandavolu, town in Madras, iii. 357. 

Chandbili, river port in Orissa, iii. 358. 

Chand Bardai, Hindi poet (l2ih century), 
article ' India,' vi. 345. 

Chand Bibi, widow of Ali Adil Shah of 
Bijapur, defended Ahmadnagar (1595), 
i. 108 ; ruled Bijapur as regent on her 
husband's death (1579), ii. 424 ; ceded 
Berar to Akbar (1596), iii. 144; had 
Sholapur as her dowry (1562), xii. 421. 

Chandelas, formerly a ruling "race in 
Bundelkhand, article 'India,' vi. 71. 
Local notices — Dynasty founded by 
Chandra Varma, iii. 154; Chandel 
Raja of Kalinjar killed Ajai Pal of 
Kanauj (1021), iv. 410 ; made artificial 
lakes in Hamirpur, v. 298 ; their 
buildings at Mahoba, v. 299 ; ix. 182, 
183 ; at Jhansi, vii. 216, 217 ; made 
Kalinjar their capital (1192), vii. 332 ; 
their buildings at Khajurahu, viii. 140 ; 
in Lalitpur, viii. 448. 

Chanderi, tract in Central India, iii. 

358. 
Chanderi, town in Central India, iii. 358. 
Chandgaon, town in Bengal, iii. 358. 
Chandias, Muhammadan tribe in Sind, 

viii. 463. 
Chandi Das, religious poet of the 15th 

century, article ' India,' vi. 348 ; hymn 

to Krishna, vi. 348, 349. 
Chandisthan, shrine in Bengal, iii. 358. 
Chandkhali, village in Bengal, iii. 358, 

359- 
Chandko, historical name for tract of land 

in Sind, iii. 359. 
Chandod, village in Bombay, iii. 359, 360. 

VOL. XIV. 



Chandor, Sub-division in Bombay, iii. 

360. 
Chandor, town in Bombay, iii. 360, 361. 
Chandpur, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, iii. 361. 
Chandpur, seaside village in Bengal, iii. 

361, 362. 
Chandra, river in Punjab, iii. 362. 
Chandra, pargand in Oudh, iii. 362. 
Chandra Drona. See Baba Budan. 
Chandragiri, town and tdliik in Madras, 

iii. 362, 363. _ 
Chandragiri, river in Madras, iii. 363, 

364- 

Chandragima, village in Bengal, iii. 364. 

Chandra Gupta, King of Magadha (326 
B.C.), article 'India,' vi. 166- 170; 
cession of the Greek possessions in the 
Punjab to, by Seleukos (306 B.C.) ; the 
Embassy of Megasthenes, vi. 167-170. 
Local notices — Founded the Gupta 
dynasty, x. 362 ; had his capital at 
Palibothra, now Patna, when Me- 
gasthenes came, xi. 106, 107 ; con- 
quered the Punjab, xi. 260 ; abdicated 
and lived as hermit at Shravanbelgola, 
xii. 425. 

Chandra-guth, peak in Mysore, iii. 364. 

Chandrakona. See Baba Budan. 

Chandrakona, town in Bengal, iii. 364. 

Chandranagar, French Settlement in 
Bengal. See Chandarnagar. 

Chandranath, village in Bengal. See 
Sitakund. 

Chandrapur, estate in Central Provinces, 
iii. 364, 365. 

Chandra Varma, founded Chandel dynasty 
in Bundelkhand, iii. 154. 

Chand Sultan, successor of Bakt Buland, 
and last powerful Raja of Deogarh, 

iii- 399- 
Chandi'ir, town in Ellichpur, Berar, iii. 365. 
Chandiir, town and idlick in Amraoti, 

Berar, iii. 365, 366. 
Chanduria, village in Bengal, iii. 366. 
Chandwar. See Chandor. 
Chang Bhakar, State in Chutia Nagpur, 

iii. 366, 367. 
Changes of caste occupation by the 

Shahas, Telis, and Tambulis of Bengal, 

article ' India,' vi. 196, 197. 
Changes of river-beds, and deserted river 

capitals, article ' India,' vi. 30. See 

Alluvion and diluvion. 
Changrezhing, village in Bashahr State, 

Punjab, iii. 367. 
Changsil, mountains in Bashahr State, 

Punjab, iii. 367. 
Channagiri, village and taluk in Mysore, 

iii. 367, 368. 
Channapata, town in Mysore, iii. 368. 
Chanraypatna, village and taluk in 

Mysore, iii. 368, 369. 



66 



INDEX. 



Chansama, town in Baroda, iii. 369. 

Chantapilli, villajje in Madras, iii. 369. 

Chanwarpatha, historic village in Central 
Provinces, iii. 369. 

Chapa, village and estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 369. 

Chapra, Sub-division in Bengal, iii. 369, 

370-, , . . 

Chapra, head-quarters of Saran District, 

Bengal, iii. 370. 
Chaprauli, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

iii. 370. 
Character of the Non-Aryan tribes, their 

fidelity as soldiers, article ' India,' vi. 

72- 
Charak-piija or hook swinging festival, 

article ' India,' vi. 213. 
Charaniai, lake in Bashahr State, Punjab, 

iii. 370. 
Charans, sacred class in Jodhpur, vii. 237. 
Charapunji. See Cherra Punji. 
Charas, or hemp. Excise duty on, article 

' India,' vi. 455. 
Charat Singh, grandfather of Ranjit 

Singh, had his head-quarters at Guj- 

ranwala, v. 181 ; defeated and killed 

by Ranjit Deo of Janiu (1774), xii. 442. 
Charda, pargand in Oudh, iii. 371. 
Chardwar, division or viahdl in Assam, 

iii. 371. 
Charities. See Hospitals, Institutions 

(charitable), and Orphanages. 
Charities of Indian Trade guilds, article 

' India,' vi. 198. See Trade guilds. 
Charkha, petty State in Kathiawar, iii. 

371- 

Charkhari, town and petty State in Bun- 

delkhand, iii. 371, 372. 

Charles 11., obtained Bombay as his 
wife's dowry (1661), and sold it to the 
East India Company, iii. 37, 74. 

Charmadi, pass in Madras, iii. 372. 

Charmunsha, town in Bengal, iii. 372. 

Charnock, Job, said to have built bazar 
at Barrackpur, ii. 175 ; founded Cal- 
cutta (1686), iii. 240 ; his tomb there, 
iii. 252 ; chief of the factory at Kasim- 
bazar (1681), viii. 80. 

Charra, village in Bengal, iii. 372. 

Charsadda, town in Punjab, iii. 372, 373. 

Charthawal, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

iii. 373- 
Chasa, chief cultivating caste in Cuttack, 

iv. 69. 

Chata, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iii. 373, 374. 

Chalari, village in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 

374- 
Chatna, village in Bengal, iii. 374. 
Chatra, town in Bengal, iii. 374, 375. 
Chatrapur. See Chhatarpur. 
Chatrapur, town in Madras, iii. 375. 
Chatsu, town in Rajputana, iii. 375. 



Chattar Singh, Sikh insurgent leader, 

killed Col. Kanara (1849), v. 339. 
Chaugachha, village in Bengal, iii. 375. 
Chaughat, town and taluk in Madras, iii. 

375- 
Chauhans, once the dominant Rajput 

clan in Ajmere-Merwara, i. 123. See 
also in Aligarh, i. 172 ; occupied Khair 
during the Mutiny, viii. 127 ; in Raj- 
putana, xi. 409, 410. 

Chauka, river in Oudh, iii. 375. 

Chaukidanga, mine in Bengal, iii. 375, 376. 

Chaiikiddrs, or village watchmen. See 
Administrative section under each Dis- 
trict. 

Chaul, town in Bombay, iii. 376, 377. 

Chaulis, name given to certain castes in 
Bombay, whose ancestors emigrated 
from Chaul, iii. 376. 

Chaumulia, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

iii- 377- 

Cbaumun, town in Rajputana, iii. 377- 

Chaungthas, ' children of the stream,' 
an Arakanese tribe in Lower Burma, 
iii. 183. 

Chaur, The, peak in Punjab, iii. 377. 

Chauradadar, hill plateau in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 377. 

Chauragarh, historic fortress in Central 
Provinces, iii. 377. 

Chauria, estate in Central Provinces, iii. 
377,^378. 

Chaiiris, Manufacture of, in Bhartpur, ii. 

376-, 
Chausa, village in Bengal, iii. 378, 
Chausa Canal, in Bengal, iii. 378. 
Chaiith, or ' quarter revenues ' exacted 

by the Marathas in the Deccan and in 

Bengal, article ' India,' vi. 320, 321. 

See also Marathas. 
Chavakkad, town in Madras. See Chau- 

ghat. 
Chawindah, village in Punjab, iii. 378. 
Chaws, aboriginal tribe in the Arakan 

Hills Tracts, i. 300, iii. 183. 
Cheap, ' the magnificent,' Commercial 

Resident, introduced indigo cultiva- 
tion into Birbhum, xiii. 139. 
Cheape, Gen. Sir John, finally defeated 

Myat Thi'in (1853), iv. 313; his 

capture of Donabyii, xiii. 2S9. 
Chedambaram, town in Madras. See 

Chidambaram. 
Cheduba, island, town, and township in 

Lower Burma, iii. 378, 379. 
Cheetah, or hunting leopard, article 

' India,' vi. 653, 654. Local notices — 

found in Anantapur, i. 274 ; Bel- 

lary, ii. 241 ; Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; 

Cochin, iv. 2 ; Hazaiibagli, v. 370 ; 

Indore, vii. 2 ; Kadiir, vii. 2S3 ; 

Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; Khandesh, viii. 

150; Kotah, viii. 304; Madras, ix. 



INDEX. 



67 



89 ; Nawanagar, x. 252 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 355. 

Chellakere, village in Mysore, iii. 379. 

Chellapali, town in Madras, iii» 379. 

Chenab, river in Kashmir, iii. 379, 380. 

Chenari, village in Bengal, iii. 380. 

Chenchus or Chenchuwars, aboriginal 
tribe, nomad and gipsy-like, in Cudda- 
pah, iv. 51 ; the Nallamalai Hills, viii. 
37, X. 185, 1S6; Kistna, viii. 230; 
Nellore, x. 266. 

Chendia, port in Bombay, iii. 380. 

Chendwar, hill in Bengal, iii. 380. 

Chengalpat, District in Madras, iii. 380- 
388 ; physical aspects, 380-382 ; history, 
382, 383 ; population, 383, 384 ; agri- 
culture, 384-386 ; natural calamities, 
386 ; commerce and trade, 386, 387 ; 
administration, 387, 388 ; medical 
aspects, 388. 

Chengalpat, taluk in Madras, iii. 389. 

Chengalpat, town in Madras, iii. 389, 

390- 
Chengama, pass in Madras, iii. 390. 

Chennagiri. See Channagiri. 

Chepauk, quarter of Madras town, iii. 

39°- 
Chera, ancient kingdom in S. India, iii. 

390, 391. Sec also Chola. 
Cheraiid, village in Bengal, iii. 391. 
Cherat, hill and cantonment in Punjab, 

iii. 391, 392. 
Cherpulchari, town in Madras, iii. 392. 
Cherra, State in the Khasi Hills, Assam, 

iii. 392. 
Cherra Punji, village and mission station 

in Assam, iii. 392, 393. 
Cherry, Mr., murdered at Benares (1799), 

ii. 256, 264. 
Cheruma Perumal, founded Calicut, iii. 

264; Raja of Cochin descended from, 

iv. 2, 3 ; had his capital at Kodungalur 

(Cranganore), viii. 240 ; story of his 

abdication and death, ix. 221, 222 ; 

eldest son founded dynasty of Travan- 

core, xiii. 345. 
Cherus, aboriginal tribe in Korea, viii. 

297 ; Mirzapur, ix. 456. 
Cherupullaseri. Sea Cherpulchari. 
Chetpat, quarter of Madras town, iii. 

393- 
Chetterpur. See Chatrapur. 
Chettis or Sheltis, trading caste in Madras 

Presidency, ix. 19. 6^*? Trading castes. 
Chetvai, village in Madras, iii. 393, 394. 
Cheiyair, river in ^Madras, iii. 394. 
Cheyair, river in Madras, iii. 394. 
Cheyroot, a scarlet dye. See Dyes. 
Chhachrauli, town in Punjab, iii. 394. 
Chhagan Cobra, village in Orissa, iii. 

394- 
Chhalapak, village in Bengal, iii. 394. 

Chhaliar, petty State in Gujarat, iii. 394. 



Chhalla, State in Kathiawar, iii. 394. 
Chhanchia Mirganj, village in Bengal, 

iii- 394- 

Chhanuya, port in Orissa, iii. 394, 395. 

Chhapara, historic town in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 395. 

Chhata. See Chata. 

Chhatak, village in Assam, iii. 395. 

Chhataparab, or umbrella festival, held 
at Chakullor, iii. 326. 

Chhatarpur, State in Bundelkhand, iii. 

395 > 396. , 

Chhatar Sal, Bundela chief, overran 
Allahabad, i. 187 ; the hero of the 
Bundelas, ii. 48 ; called in the Mara- 
thas (1734), iii. 155 5 his ruined palace 
and mausoleum at Chhatarpur, iii. 396 ; 
conquered Damoh, but ceded it to 
the Peshwa, ix. 109 ; defeated the last 
governor of Dhamoni, iv. 240 ; con- 
quered Hamirpur (16S0), v. 299 ; made 
Jalaun the base for his conquest of 
Bundelkhand (1671 - 1734), vii. 90; 
got Jhansi granted him by Bahadur 
Shah (1707), vii. 218 ; built temple of 
Kashorini Paton, xi. 83 ; left Sagar on 
his death to the Peshwa, xii. 102. 

Chhatpur, town in Central India, iii. 396. 

Chhatisgarh, Division in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 396, 397. 

Chhatnai, town in Bengal, iii. 397. 

Chhibramau, town and tahsil in N. -\V. 
Provinces, iii. 397, 398. 

Chhindwara, District in Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 398-403 ; physical aspects, 
398, 399 ; history, 399, 400 ; popula- 
tion, 400, 401 ; agriculture, 401, 402 ; 
commerce and tratle, 402 ; administra- 
tion, 402, 403 ; medical aspects, 403. 

Chhindwara, town and Sub-division in 
Central Provinces, iii. 403. 

Chhipia, village in Oudh, iii. 403, 404. 

Chhipias or Bhavsars, calico printers in 
Kaira, vii. 306. 

Chhola, range of the Himalayas, iii. 404. 

Chhota Bhagirathi, branch of the Ganges, 
iii. 404. 

Chhota Nagpur. See Chutia Nagpur. 

Chhota Sinchula, peak in Bengal, iii. 405. 

Chhota Udaipur, town and State in 
Gujarat, iii. 405, 406. 

Chhuikadan. See Kondka. 

Chhuikadan, village in Central Provinces, 
iii. 406. 

Chhuri, estate in Central Provinces, iii. 
406. 

Chibhalis, Aryan tribe in the Himalayan 
Mountains, v. 412. 

Chibramau. See Chhibramau. 

Chibu. See Mau. 

Chicacole, taluk in Madras, iii. 406. 

Chicacole, town in Madras, iii. 407. See 
Northern Circars. 



68 



INDEX. 



Chicacole. See Languliya. 

Chichali. See Maidani. 

Chichgarh, town and estate in Central 
Provinces, iii. 408. 

Chikadandi, town in Bengal, iii. 40S. 

Chikakol. See Chicacole. 

Chikalda, village in Berar, iii. 408. 

Chikdra. See Ravine deer. 

Chikati, estate in Madras, iii. 409. 

Chikballapur, town and tdlitk in Mysore, 
iii. 409. 

Chik Devaraj Sagar. See Chunchankatte. 

Chikhli, petty State in Bombay, iii. 409. 

Chikhli, taluk in Berar, iii. 409, 410. 

Chikhli, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iii. 410. 

Chikmagalur, town and taluk in Mysore, 
iii. 410, 411. 

Chiknayakanhalli, town and tdluk in 
Mysore, iii. 411. 

Chikori, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iii. 411, 412. 

Chilambaram, idhik in Madras, iii. 412. 

Chilambaram, town in Madras, iii. 412- 
414. 

Chilasis, aboriginal tribe in the Hindu 
Kush, v. 417. 

Child, Sir John, 'Captain-General and 
Admiral of India' {1684), also styled 
' Governor-General,' article ' India,' vi. 

370, 371- 
Childers, Dictionary of the Pali Language, 

quoted, article ' India,' vi. 132, 134, 

I37> 13S; 142 (footnotes). 
Children under Twelve, Number of. See 

Population section under each District. 
Child-worship of Krishna, article ' India,' 

vi. 222. 
Chilianwala, village and battle-field in 

Punjab, iii. 414, 415 ; battle of, article 

' India,' vi. 412, 413. 
Chilka Lake, shallow inland sea in Orissa, 

iii. 415-417- 
Chillies, Cultivation of, in Akyab, i. 156 ; 

Ambala, i. 220 ; Anantapur, f. 277 ; 

North Arcot, i. 316 ; Bellary, ii. 245 ; 

Bengal, ii. 304; Bhutan, ii. 413; 

Cachar, iii. 236 ; Chengalpat, iii. 386 ; 

Coimbatore, iv. 18 ; Cuddapah, iv. 52 ; 

Daphla Hills, iv. 119; Dungarpur, iv. 

323; Goa, v. 93; Hassan, v. 349; 

Henzada, v. 388 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 

400 ; Hissar, v. 430 ; Jirang, yii. 233 ; 

Karnul, viii. 37 ; Khyrim, viii. 215 ; 

Kistna, viii. 230 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; 

Madras, ix. 28, 30 ; Nadiya, x. 135, 

136 ; Nellore, x. 266 ; Noakhali, x. 

347 ; Thayet-myo, xiii. 283 ; Thon- 

gwa, xiii. 291 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 306 ; 

Tipperah, xiii. 317 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 

360. ... 
Chihnari, village in Bengal, iii. 417. 
Chima Bai, wife of Raghuji Bhonsla il.j 



built fort and temple of Gumgaon, v. 

198.^ 
Chimna Patel, zaniinddr of Kamtha, 

rebellion of (1S18), ii. 361, 362. 
Chimnaji Apa, Maratha general, took 

Bassein (Wasim), (1739), ii. 191. 
Chimur, town and pargand in Central 

Provinces, iii. 417. 
China, India's trade with, article ' India,' 

vi.,577; 582, 583- 
Chinab. See Chenab. 
Chinamandem, town in Madras, iii. 417. 
Chinchimulla, estate in Madras, iii. 417. 
Chinchli. See Dang States. 
Chinchni, town in Bombay, iii. 417- 
Chinddri, a mode of ornamenting cotton 

and silk goods in Bombay Presidency, 

"• 59- . 
Chinese, their numbers in Akyab, i. 134 ; 

Bengal, ii. 295 ; Lower Burma, iii. 182 ; 

Henzada, v. 386 ; tin miners at Ma- 
li-won, ix. 258 ; Rangoon, xi. 485 ; 

Taung-ngu, xiii. 223 ; Tavoy, xiii. 231 ; 

Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; Thon-gwa, xiii. 

290. 
Chingleput. See Chengalpat. 
Chini, village in Bashahr Slate, Punjab, 

iii. 417, 418. 
Chiniot, town and tahsil in Punjab, iii. 

418. 
Chin Kilich Khan. .S't.r Asaf Jah, Nizam- 

ul-Mulk. 
Chinna Kimedi. Sec Kimedi. 
Chinnamalpur, peak in Madras, iii. 418, 

419- 

Chins or Khyins, aboriginal tribe in 
the Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 300 ; their 
religion, manners, customs, and numbers 
in Lower Burma, iii. 177, 179, 181, 
182, 184; in Upper Burma, iii. 212; 
Henzada, v. 386 ; Kyauk-pyu, viii. 
386 ; Prome, xi. 230 ; Sandoway, xii. 
201, 202; Thayet-myo, xiii. 2S0-282. 

Chinsurah, town in Bengal, iii. 419 ; 
defeat of the Dutch at, by Clive, article 
' India,' vi. 362, 363 ; head-quarters of 
the Dutch Settlement in Bengal, vi. 

381. 
Chintadrapet, quarter of Madras town, 

iii. 419. 
Chintalnar, estate in Central Provinces, 

iii. 419. 
Chintamani-pet, town in IMysore, iii. 

419- 
Chintpurni, mountain range in Punjab, 

iii. 419, 420. 
Chintz, Manufacture of, at Aliganj-Sewan, 

i. 167 ; Gooty in Anantapur, i. 278 ; 

Bellary, ii. 247 ; Farukhabad, iv. 415 ; 

Irich, vii. 24 ; Islamabad, vii. 26 ; 

Masulipatam, viii. 232, ix. 354 ; 

Dindigal in Madura, ix. 130; Morada- 

bad, ix. 513; Kanauj, x. 396; Shimoga, 



INDEX. 



69 



xii. 404 ; Sialkot, xii. 448 ; Sur Singh, 
xiii. 138. 

Chipliin, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, iii. 420, 421. 

Chips from a German Workshop, Max 
Miiller's, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 
83 (footnote i) ; 127 (footnote 3) ; 142 
(footnote 2) ; 151 (footnote l). 

Chipurupalle, estate and tahik in Madras, 
iii. 421. 

Chirakka], taluk in Madras, iii. 421. 

Chirakkal, township in Madras, iii. 
421. 

Chirakkal Raja, The, took Dharmapatam 
from the East India Company (1788), 
iy. 253. 

Chirala, town in ^Madras, iii. 421. 

Chiramkod, division of the Nilj^iri Dis- 
trict, Madras, iii. 421. 

Chirang Dwar, in Assam, iii. 421, 422. 

Chirawa, town in Rajputana, iii. 422. 

Chirgaon, town in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 
422. 

Chirkhari. See Charkhari. 

Chisholm, Mr., on the architecture of 
^ladras, ix. 106. 

Chitdl. See Spotted deer. 

Chitaldriig, District in Mysore, iii. 422- 
428 ; physical aspects, 422, 423 ; his- 
tor}-, 423, 424 ; agriculture, 425, 426 ; 
manufactures, etc., 426, 427; admini- 
stration, 427 ; medical aspects, 427, 
42S. 

Chitaldrug, tabik in Mysore, iii. 428. 

Chitaldnig, town in Mysore, iii. 428, 

429- 
Chitalmari, village in Bengal, iii: 429. 
Chitang, river in Punjab, iii. 429. 
Chita Rewa, river in Central Provinces, 

iii. 429. 
Chitarkot, hill in N.-W. Provinces, iii. 

429, 430- 

Chitartala, river in Orissa, iii. 430. 
Chit-Firozpur. See Baragaon. 
Chitor, town in Rajputana, iii. 430, 431. 
Chitra, river in Bengal, iii. 432. 
Chitral, town in Kashmir, iii. 432. 
Chitralis, tribe in the Hindu Rush, v. 

Chitravati, river in Madras, iii. 432. 

Chitrawas, State in Kathiawar, iii. 432. 

Chittagong, Division or Commissioner- 
ship of Bengal, iii. 432, 433. 

Chittagong, District in Bengal, iii. 433- 
443 ; physical aspects, 433-435; history-, 
435-438 ; urban and rural population, 

438, 439; occupations, 439; agriculture, 

439, 440 ; natural calamities, 440 ; 
commerce, etc., 440, 441 ; tea, 441 ; 
administration, 441 - 443 ; medical 
aspects, 443. 

Chittagong, Sub-division in Bengal, iii. 

443- 



Chittagong, town and port in Bengal, iii. 
444-446. 

Chittagong Hill Tracts, Districtin Bengal, 
iii. 446-453 ; physical aspects, 446-448; 
history, 448, 449 ; population, 449, 
450 ; agriculture, 450, 45 1 ; commerce 
and trade, etc., 452 ; administration, 
452, 453,; medical aspects, 453. 

Chitta Pahar, mountain range in Punjab, 

"'•453-. . 
Chittawadigi, town in Madras, iii. 453. 
Chittivalasa, town in Madras, iii. 453, 

454- 
Chittivalasa, river in Madras, iii. 454. 
Chittur, idluk in Madras, iii. 454. 
Chittiir, town in Madras, iii. 454, 455. 
Chittur, town in Cochin, iii. 455. 
Chitu, Pindari leader, killed by a tiger 

near Ahirwas, i. 82 ; held land in 

Narsinghpur, x. 219. 
Chitwail, town in Madras, iii. 455. 
Chloride of sodium, found in Azamgarh, 

i- 399- 

Chobari, State in Kathiawar, iii. 455. 

Chok, petty State in Kathiawar, iii. 455. 

Chokahatu, village in Bengal, iii. 455. 

Chokampati, estate in Madras, iii. 455. 

Choka Nayakkan, moved capital from 
Madura to Trichinopoli, xiii. 356 ; 
built palace there, xiii. 364. 

Chola, historic division of S. India, iii. 
455' 456- See Chera, ancient Hindu 
dynasty, vi. 286 ; their history, that of 
Tanjore, xiii. 181, 182 ; their capital 
Tanjore, xiii. 104. 

Cholam. See Millets. 

Cholera, especially prevalent in Ajmere- 
Merwara, i. 131 ; Akola, i. 144, 146; 
Ah'garh, i. 177; Amraoti, i. 250; 
Amritsar, i. 266 ; Anantapur, i. 277, 
278, 279 ; North Arcot, i. 319 ; South 
Arcot, i. 328 ; Assam, i. 373 ; Bakar- 
ganj, i. 447, 449 ; Balasor, ii. 10 ; 
Bangalore, ii. 65, 72 ; Bankura, ii. 86 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 114; Basim, ii. 188; 
Bassein, ii. 201 ; Bastar, ii. 207 ; Bel- 
lary, ii. 246, 249 ; Betul, ii. m ; Bha- 
galpur, ii.351; Birbhum, iii. ii; Bogra, 
iii. 32; Bombay Presidency, iii. 72, 73 ; 
Bombay city, iii. 84 ; Bubak, iii. 115 ; 
Bulandshahr, iii. 140 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 208 ; Cachar, iii. 239 ; Calcutta, 
iii. 259, 260 ; Champaran, iii. 344 ; 
Chanda, iii. 355 ; Chengalpat, iii. 388 ; 
Chittagong, iii. 437, 440, 443 ; Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, iii. 453 ; Cochin, iv. 
10 ; Cuddapah, iv. 55 ; Cutiack, iv. 
72; Dacca, iv. 89; Damoh, iv. 113; 
Darbhangah, iv. 125; Darrang, iv. 
150 ; Dinajpur, iv. 297 ; Ellichpur, iv. 
347 ; Etah, iv. 366 ; Etawah, iv. 377 ; 
Faizabad, iv. 387 ; Faridpur, iv. 406 ; 
Garhwal, v. 23 ; Tura in the Garo 



70 



INDEX. 



Hills, V. 32; Gaya, v. 50, 52; Goalpara, 
V. 120; Godavari, v. 130; Gonda, v. 
154; Berar, V. 261 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
V. 285 ; Hardoi, v. 32S ; Hill Tipperah, 
V. 401 ; Hissar, v. 433 ; Hoshiarpur, 
V. 457 ; Hugli, V. 49S ; Indore, vii. 8; 
Jaipur, vii. 58 ; Jalaun, vii. 103 ; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 117; Jerruck, vii. 180; 
Jessor, vii. 191 ; Jhanjhana, vii. 214 ; 
Jhansi, vii. 225; Kaladgi, vii. 320; 
Kamrup, vii. 365 ; South Kanara, vii. 
384 ; Kansat, vii. 436 ; Karachi, vii. 
451, 460; Karagola, vii. 461 ; Karan- 
guli, vii. 465 ; Karnai, viii. 27 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 73, 76 ; Kheri, viii. 
197 ; Khulna, viii. 209 ; Kolhapur, 
viii. 285 ; Kotah, viii. 307, 308 ; Kuch 
Behar, viii. 327 ; Kiilu, viii. 344 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 357 ; Laccadive Islands, 
viii. 396 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 437, 438 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 501 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, ix. 79, 80 ; Madras city, i.x. 119 ; 
Madura, ix. 132; Maimansingh, ix. 
201 ; Maldah, ix. 248 ; Manbhum, ix. 
286 ; Mandla, ix. 307 ; Meerut, ix. 
391 ; Midnapur, ix. 432 ; Miraj, ix. 
440 ; Monghyr, ix. 489 ; Montgomery, 
ix. 501 ; Murree, x. 19 ; Murshidabad, 
X. 31 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 76 ; Mysore 
District, x. 121; Nadiya, x. 140; 
Nagpur, x. 172 ; Narsinghpur, x. 223 ; 
Nellore, x. 271; Noakhali, x. 352; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 404; Nowgong, 
X. 415 ; Orissa, x. 468 ; Oudh, x. 510; 
Pabna, x. 520 ; Partabgarh, xi. 74 ; 
Patna District, xi. 105 ; Patna State, xi. 
116 ; Peshawar, xi. 157 ; Punjab, xi. 
292 ; Puri, xi. 309 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 359 ; 
Raigarh,xi. 363 ; Jaipur, xi. 374, 
376 ; Rajputana, xi. 424 ; Rajshahi, 
xi. 438; Rangpur, xi. 500; Salem, 
xii. 165; Sambalpur, xii. 184; Sand- 
wip Island, xii. 213; Sangli, xii. 218; 
Santal Parganas, xii. 234, 236 ; Saran, 
xii._ 258, 259; Shahabad, xii. 333; 
Shikarpur, xii. 394 ; Sholapur, xii. 
419, 420; Simla, xii. 495; Sind, xii. 
525 ; Singhbhum, xii. 540 ; Sirsa, xiii. 
19 ; Sitapur, xiii. 37 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 
103 ; Surat, xiii. 131 ; Sylhet, xiii. 156; 
Tanjore, xiii. 194 ; Thar and Parkar, 
xiii. 271 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 31 1 ; Tip- 
perah, xiii. 321; Twenty-four Parganas, 
xiii. 399; Unao, xiii. 435; Vizagapntam, 
xiii. 497 ; Wardha, xiii. 528 ; Wun, 
xiii. 546. 

Chopda. See Chopra. 

Chope, coal-field in Bengal, iii. 456. 
See Hazaribagh District. 

Chopra, town and Sub - division in 
Bombay, iii. 456, 457. 

Chora, town in Kathiawar, iii. 457. 

Chorangla, petty State in Bombay, iii. 457. 



Chorasi, Sub-division of Bombay, iii. 

457, 458- 

Chota Nagpur. Sec Chutia Nagpur. 

Choti, town in Punjab, iii. 458. 

Chotila, petty State in Kathiawar, iii. 458. 

Chowghat. See Chaughat. 

Christianity in India (100 to 1881 a.d.), 
article ' India,' vi. chap. ix. pp. 229- 
267 ; coeval with Buddhism for 900 
years, 229 ; origin of, in India, 229 ; 
Syrian Christians in India, 230 ; the 
three legends of St. Thomas, 230-233 ; 
wide meaning of India in the writings 
of the Christian Fathers, 233, 234 ; 
first glimpse of Indian Christians 
(190), 234 ; ancient Roman trade with 
India, 234 ; Jew .Settlements in ancient 
Malabar, 234, 235 ; Indian Christians 
(190-547), as described by Pantsenus, 
Hippolytus,andCosmasIndicopleustes, 

235 ; Nestorian Church in Asia, 235, 

236 ; Nestorianism and Buddhism side 
by side for looo years, 236 ; wide dit^u- 
sion of the Nestorian Church, 236, 

237 ; the ' Thomas Christians ' of 
Persia and of India, 237 ; localization 
of the legend of St. Thomas, 237-239 ; 
embassy of Alfred the Great to India 
(833), 239 ; troubles of the ancient 
Indian Church, 240 ; the Nestorian St. 
Thomas Christians of Malabar, a power- 
ful and respected military caste, 240, 
241 ; Portuguese efforts at their con- 
version to Rome, 241 ; Synod of 
Diamper (1599), 241, 242; Mala- 
bar Christians freed from Portuguese 
oppressions by the Dutch, 242, 243 ; 
Jacobite and Syrian Christians in Mala- 
bar, 243 ; extinction of Nestorianism 
in Malabar, 243, 244 ; early Portu- 
guese missionaries indentihed with 
Portuguese aggressions, 244 ; Xavier 
and the Jesuits (1542), 244, 245 ; work 
done by the Madras Jesuits, 245, 246 ; 
early Jesuit stations in India, 246 ; 
conquest and conversion the basis of 
Portuguese Indian rule, 246, 247 ; 
parochial organization of Portuguese 
India, 247 ; Jesuit station of Thana 
(1550), its Cliristian craftsmen and 
cultivators, 247, 248 ; Jesuit rural 
organization, 248 ; Cochin, a Jesuit 
collegiate city, 248, 249 ; Jesuit itiner- 
aries and conversions, 250, 251 ; the 
Malabar Mission in the 17th and l8th 
centuries, 251 ; caste questions among 
Malabar Christians, 251, 252; Chris- 
tian martyrdoms, 252, 253 ; establish- 
ment of the inquisition at Goa, 253, 
254 ; antos da fe, 254 ; persecutions 
and aggressions by Portuguese, 254 ; 
Goa inquisition abolished (1812), 254 ; 
suppression of the Jesuits (1759), 254, 



INDEX. 



71 



255; their re-establishment (1S14'), 
255 ; organization of Roman Catholic 
Missions in India, 255 ; separate 
jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Goa, 
255) 256 ; distribution of Roman 
Catholics, 257 ; the Verapoli vicariate 
in Travancore, 257 ; Syrian and Roman 
Catholic Christians, 257 ; statistics of 
Roman Catholic population of India, 
258 ; Roman Catholic progress, 259 ; 
Pondicherri Mission, 259 ; Catholic 
colleges and schools, 259 ; first Protes- 
tant Missions in India, 259, 260 ; 
vernacular translation of the Bible 
(1725), 260; Protestant missionaries 
in Tanjore, Calcutta, and Serampur, 

260 ; opposition of the East India 
Company to Missions, 260 ; Bishopric 
of Calcutta, 261 ; other Indian sees, 

261 ; Presbyterian and other Protestant 
Missions, 261 ; statistics of Protestant 
jNIissions, 261, 262 ; increase of native 
Protestants, 262, 263 ; extended use of 
native agency, 263 ; rapid develop- 
ment of school work of Protestant 
Missions, 262, 263 ; general statistics 
of Christian population in India, 263, 
264 ; Protestant denominational sta- 
tistics, 264, 265 ; Indian Ecclesiastical 
establishment, 266,267. Local notices 
— Christian population especially nume- 
rous or otherwise noteworthy in Agra, 
i. 76; Ahmadabad, i. 86; Ahmad- 
nagar District, i. 100, city, i. 109 ; 
Akyab, i. 154; Allahabad District, i. 
188, city, i. 195 ; Ambala, i. 226 ; 
Amherst, i, 237 ; Anandapur (-Christian 
village), i. 272 ; Anjengo, i. 291 ; 
North Arcot, i. 314, 315 ; South Arcot, 
i. 322, 323 ; Assam, i. 358, 359 ; Atur, 
i. 382 ; Bakarganj, i. 443 ; Bangalore 
District, ii. 61, cit)', ii. 69 ; Bareilly, 
ii. 141 ; Bassein (Wasai), ii. 191 ; 
Bassein District, ii. 196, town, ii. 
201 ; Behar, ii. 225 ; Belgaum, ii. 
232 ; Bellary District, ii. 243, town, 
ii. 250 ; Benares, ii. 257 ; Bengal, ii. 
295 ; Bettia, ii. 327, 328 ; Bombay 
Presidency, iii. 52, city, iii. 80 ; Lower 
Burma, iii. 179, 180, 196; Calcutta, 
iii. 256 ; Calicut, iii. 268 ; Cannanore, 
iii. 275 ; Cawnpur District, iii. 283, 
city, iii. 292 ; Central Provinces, iii. 
317 ; Champaran, iii. 338 ; Chen- 
galpat, iii. 383 ; Chhagan Cobra 
(Christian village), iii. 394 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 438 ; Cochin State, iv. 
4, town, iv. II ; Coimbatore District, 
iv. 16, 17, town, iv. 21 ; Coorg, iv. 
35 ; Cuddapah, iv. 50 ; Cuttack Dis- 
trict, iv. 69, town, iv. 75 ; Dacca, 
iv. 83 ; Daman, iv. 103 ; Dehra Dun, 
iv. 172 ; Delhi, iv. iSi ; Dharwar, iv. 



259 ; Dindigal, iv. 301 ; Faizabad, iv. 
383 ; Faridpur, iv. 401 ; Firozpur, iv. 
442 ; Ganjam, v. 5 ; Goa, v, 90 ; 
Godavari, v. 126 ; Berar, v. 267 ; 
Hanthawadi, v. 314 ; Hassan, v. 347, 
348 ; Henzada, v. 385 ; Howrah 
town, V. 464 ; Jabalpur District, vii. 
33, city, ^ vii. 37 ; Jalandhar, vii. 
87 ; Kadur, vii. 285 ; Kaira, vii. 302 ; 
North Kanara, vii. 370, 371 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 378, 379 ; Karachi Dis- 
trict, vii. 447, city, vii. 455 ; the 
Karens, viii. 6 ; Karnul, viii. 36, 37 ; 
Khandesh, viii. 154 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 
174 ; Kistna, viii. 229 ; Kolhapur, 
viii. 2S3 ; Kotayam, viii. 310 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 352 ; Lahore, viii. 407, 
408 ; Lohardaga, viii. 480, 481 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 516; Madras Presi- 
dency, ix. 23-25, city, ix. 108 ; 
Madura, ix. 125 ; Malabar, ix. 228 ; 
Mangalore, ix. 313, 314 ; Meerut Dis- 
trict, ix. 386, town, ix. 393 ; Mergui, 
ix. 408 ; Monghyr, ix. 483, 484 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 507, 508; Pilultan, x. 
6 ; Mysore State, x. 97, District, x. 
117 ; Nadiya, x. 132, 134 ; Nagarkoil, 
x. 15S ; Nagpur District, x. 169, 
city, X. 174 ; Nasik, x. 229 ; Nega- 
patam, x. 258 ; Nellore, x. 264 ; 
Nilgiri Hills, x. 308; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, X. 372, 373 ; Ongole, x. 
423, 424; Orissa, x. 434, 436, 437; 
Oudh, X. 497 ; Palghat, x. 543 ; Patna, 
xi. 99 ; Peshawar District, xi. 142, 
city, xi. 159; Poona District, xi. 205, 
city, xi. 210; Punjab, xi. 274; 
Rangoon District, xi. 476, city, xi. 
485 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 7 ; Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 26 ; Rurki, xii. 85 ; Sagar, xii. 
104; Saharanpur, xii. 118 ; Salem 
District, xii. 159, town, xii. 166 ; 
Santal Parganas, xii. 230, 231 ; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 347 ; Shimoga, xii. 
401 ; Shwe-gyin, xii, 431 ; Sialkot, 
xii. 451 ; Simla, xii. 493 ; Sind, xii. 
517, 519; Singhbhum, xii. 534, 535, 
536 ; Tangasseri, xiii. 180 ; Tanjore 
District, xiii. 184, 185, city, xiii. 
194 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 223, 224 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 230, 231 ; Thana District, 
xiii. 252, 253, town, xiii. 258 ; 
Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; Thayet-myo, 
xiii. 280 ; Thon-gwa, xiii. 290 ; Tinne- 
velli, xiii. 302-304 ; Tiruvella, xiii. 
329 ; Tranquebar, xiii. 341 ; Travan- 
core, xiii. 347, 348 ; Trichinopoli 
District, xiii. 358, city, xiii. 364 ; 
Tuticorin, xiii. 385 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xiii. 393 ; Utakamand, xiii. 
452 ;Virarajendra-pet (Christian village), 
xiii. 477, 478 ; Vizagapatam District, 
xiii. 490, town, xiii. 497. See also 



72 



INDEX. 



Catholics, Missions, and Syrian Chris- 
tians. 

Christopher, Lt. , R.N., his survey of the 
Maklive Islands (1834-35), i^- 249. 

Chronicle of the Patluin A'iiii^s of Delhi, 
by Mr. E. Thomas, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 271 (footnote) ; 280, 281 
(footnotes); 283 (footnote i); 284 
(footnote i) ; 385 (footnote 3) ; 287 
(footnote 2) ; 291 (footnote) ; 298 (foot- 
note i). 

Chronicles, The palm-leaf. See Palm- 
leaf chronicles. The. 

Chronological table of Governors, Gover- 
nors-General, and Viceroys of India 
C1758-1885), article ' India,' vi. 384. 

Chronological table of Muhammadan 
conquerors and dynasties (1001-1857), 
article ' India,' vi. 271. 

Chronological tables of the various Kings, 
Governors, and Lieutenant-Governors 
of Bengal, ii. 276-279. 

Chronology of early European travellers 
to India, article ' India,' vi. 356, 357 
(footnote). 

Chrysolite rosaries, made at Kandahar, i. 
39, yii. 391. 

Chuadanga, town and ^ub-division in 
Bengal, iii. 458, 459. 

Chudasamas, tdhikdars in Ahmadabad, 
descendants of Hindu dynasty of Juna- 
garh, i. 89. 

Chunar. See Chanar. 

Chunchangiri, hill in Mysore, iii. 459. 

Chunchankatta, dam across the Kaveri 
river in Mysore, iii. 459. 

Chundernagore. .9^^ Chandarnagar. 

Chunian, town and taksil in Punjab, iii. 

459- 

Chiira, town and petty State in Kathiawar, 
iii. 460. 

Churaman, founder of the Jat dynasty of 
^ Bhartpur, ii. 373. 

Churaman, village in Bengal, iii. 460. 

Churaman, port in Orissa, iii. 460, 461. 

Church Missionary Society. See Missions. 

Church of England Mission. See Mis- 
sions. 

Churches (Christian) of interest — the 
oldest in Bengal, Bandel, ii. 57 ; old 
Roman Catholic (ruined) Bassein 
(Wasai), ii. 192; in Calcutta, iii. 251- 
253 ; the Memorial, Cawnpur, iii. 292 ; 
old Portuguese at Calicut (1525), iii. 
269 ; oldest European in India, 
Cochin, iv. 12, 13 ; old Syrian at Kota- 
yam, viii. 310; oldest Protestant in 
India, Madras (1678), ix. 107; old 
Portuguese at Manori, ix. 339 ; 
Mapusa, ix. 343 ; Margao, ix. 345 ; 
Marmagao, ix. 348; St. Thomas' 
Mount, xii. 143 ; Syro-Roman at 
Sharretalai, xii. 377 ; Memorial to Rev. 



T. Huntley, Sialkot, xii. 445 ; Arme- 
nian, Surat, xiii. 134 ; old Portuguese, 
Trombay, xiii. 370 ; Vypin, xiii. 504. 

Churesir, petty State in Bombay, iii. 461. 

Chi'irjajira, town in Bengal, iii. 461. 

Cluiru, town in Rajputana, iii. 461. 

Chutia, village in Bengal, iii. 461. 

Chutia Nagpur, Division of Bengal, iii. 
461. 

Chutia Nagpur Tributary States, petty 
Native States in Bengal, iii. 461-465 ; 
population, 462-464 ; administrative 
history, 464-466. 

Chutiya, semi-Hinduized tribe in Assam, 
iii. 466, 467. Local notices — Assam, i. 
351 ; Darrang, iv. 145 ; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 428, 430 ; Nowgong, x. 409 ; 
Sibsagar, xii. 461, 463. 

Cigars, made in Lower Burma, iii. 190 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 361, 365. 

Cinchona cultivation, article ' India,' vi. 
509-511; introduction of plant, 509; 
the plantations in S. India and at 
Darjiling, 509, 510; statistics of out- 
turn and financial results, 510, 511. 
Local notices — Anjinad, i. 292 ; Kal- 
hatti in Baba Budan, i. 403 ; Bengal, 
ii. 271 and 305 ; Biligiri-rangan, ii. 457 ; 
Coorg, iv. 37 ; Dalingkot, iv. 98 ; 
Darjiling, iv. 136, 137; Kalhatti in 
Kadur, vii. 287 ; Madras, ix. 34, 35, 
86 ; Merkara, viii. 413 ; Mysore, x. 
102 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 316-318; Ochter- 
lony valley, x. 421 ; Shevaroy Hills, 
xii. 3S3 ; Sitang, xiii. 27 ; Taung-ngu, 
xiii. 225 ; Tavoy, xiii. 231 ; Utaka- 
mand, xiii. 454 ; Yedenalknad, xiii. 

.55°- . , .. ■ 

Cinnamon, found in Bhutan, ii. 414 ; 

Cachar, iii. 234 ; South Kanara, vii. 

376; Khasi Hills, viii. 173; Khyrim, 

viii. 215 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Malabar, 

ix. 229, 230, 231 ; Naga Hills, x. 143 ; 

Nilgiri Hills, x. 306 ; Palni Mountains, 

xi. 19. 
Circars, the Northern, historical name for 

tract of country in Madras, iii. 466-469. 
Circular Road Canal in Bengal, iii. 469. 
Cis-Sutlej States, tract of countiy in the 

Punjab, iii. 470, 471. 
Cities over 20,000 inhabitants, article 

' India,' vol. vi. Appendix VIII. pp. 

696, 697 ; over 50,000 inhabitants — 

Agra, i. 68-76 ; Ahmadabad, i. 82-93 ; 

Aligarh, i. 178 ; Allahabad, i. 195-199 ; 

Ambala, i. 224-226 ; Amritsar, i. 263- 

266 ; Bangalore, ii. 66-72 ; Bareilly, ii. 

145-147; Baroda, ii. 170-173; Bellary, 

ii. 250, 251; Benares, ii. 262-267; 

Bhagalpur, ii. 352, 353 ; Bhartpur, ii. 

?>ll-ni ; Bombay, iii. 73-84 ; Calcutta, 

iii. 239-268 ; Calicut, iii. 268-270 ; 

Cawnpur, iii. 289-293 ; Chapra, iii. 



INDEX. 



73 



271-273 ; Combaconum, iv. 24 ; Dacca, 
iv. 89-92; Darbhangah, iv. 126-128; 
Delhi, iv. 185-197 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
417 ; Gaya, v. 53 ; Gorakhpur, v. 172, 
173; Haidarabad, v. 252-258; How- 
rah, V. 464, 465; Indole, vii. S-IO; 
Jaipur, vii. 59-61 ; Jalandhar, vii. 91, 
92 ; Kabul, vii. 267-275 ; Kamthi, vii. 
366, 367 ; .. Kandahar, vii. 389-398 ; 
Karachi, vii. 452 - 460 ; Khatmandu, 
viii. 1S1-185 ; Lahore, viii. 414-419 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 503-518; Madras, ix. 
102-119; Madura, ix. n2-i35; Man- 
dalay, ix. 287-291 ; Maulmain, ix. 370- 
372 ; Meerut, ix. 392-394 ; Mirzapur, 
ix. 461, 462; Monghyr, ix. 4S9, 490; 
INIoradabad, ix. 513, 514; >Iultan, x. 
11-13; Muttra, x. 53, 54; Mysore, x. 
122-124; Nagpur, X. I73-I75; ^^'ega- 
patam, x. 258, 259 ; Patna, xi. 106- 
114; Peshawar, xi. 158-160; Poena, 
xi. 210-214; Rampur, xi. 459; Ran- 
goon, xi. 481-488; Rawal Pindi, xii. 
36-38; Saharanpur, xii. 124, 125; 
Salem, xii. 166 ; .Shahjahanpur, xii. 
355-357; Sholapur, xii. 420-422; 
Srinagar, xiii. 75-77; Surat, xiii. 132- 
136; Tanjore, xiii. 194-196; Trichino- 
poli, xiii. 363-365. 
Cities, Ruined: — Chandra vati, near Mount 
Abu, i. 8 ; in Afghanistan, i. 53 ; in 
Afghan-Turkistan, i. 56 ; Agroha, i. 
78 ; Ahar, i. 81 ; Ajodhya, i. 134, 135 ; 
Amber, i. 228 ; Aror, i. 332 ; Asarur, 
i- 337 ; Atari, i. 375 ; Badrihat, i. 410; 
Bajwara, i. 439; Barkalur, ii. 156; 
Barkur, ii. 156 ; Bassana, ii. 176 ; 
Basrur, ii. 190; Bausi, ii. 217; Bhad- 
reswar, ii. 340 ; Bhadraoti, near Bhains- 
ror, ii. 356 ; Bham, ii. 358 ; Bhambore, 
ii. 359 ; Bhandak, ii. 359 ; Bikrampur, 
ii. 444 ; Bilram, ii. 459 ; Brahmanabad, 
iii. 91 ; Champaner, iii. 333, 334 ; 
Chanderi, iii. 358 ; in Delhi District, 
iv. 179, 189; Deogarh, iv. 202; at 
Dheri Shahan, iv. 269, 270 ; Dimapur, 
iv. 289, 290; Garhgaon, v. 14, 15; 
Gaur, V. 35-41 ; Old Goa, v. 108 ; 
Golconda, v. 143, 144 ; Goraghat, v. 
163 ; Hampi, v. 306-308 ; Harappa, 
V. 319 ; Hastinapur, v. 352 ; in Hlaing, 
V. 435 ; Humcha, v. 501, 502 ; Ikkeri, 
V. 508 ; Irich, vii. 23, 24 ; Jalalpur, 
vii. 81 ; Kamatapur, vii. 351 ; Kasim- 
bazar, viii. 80, 81 ; Kasipur, viii. 82 ; 
Kayal, viii. 107, 108 ; Khajurahu, viii. 
140, 141 ; Kotae, viii. 302, 303 ; 
Maibang, ix. 187, 188 ; Malot, ix. 263 ; 
Mandawar, ix. 292, 293 ; ]\Iandogarh, 
ix. 308, 309 ; Mandcr, ix. 309 ; Manik- 
pur, ix. 321 ; Mi'idbidri, ix. 525 ; Miinj, 
X. 15; Nalchha, x. 182; Panduah 
(Hi'igli), xi. 39; Panduah (Maldah), 



xi. 39-42; Rajagriha, xi. 380, 381; 
Rajmahal, xi. 390 ; Rangamati, xi. 
469; Rangpur (Assam), xi. 501,502; 
Rapri, xi. 511 ; Sabhar, xii. 88 ; Sahet 
Mahet or Sravasti, xii. 126-134 ; San- 
gala, xii. 213, 214; Sankisa, xii. 223, 
224 ; Satgaon, xii. 286 ; in Shimoga, 
xii. 402, 403 ; Simraon, xii. 501, 502 ; 
Subalgarh, xiii. S3 ; Sugh, xiii. 87, 88 ; 
Talamba, xiii. 163; Tandan, xiii. 175, 
176; in Thar and Parkar, xiii. 267; 
Tiruvakarai, xiii. 328 ; Uchh, xiii. 400 ; 
Old Udaipur, xiii. 413 ; Ya-theth-myo, 
xiii. 549. 

Citron, in Upper Burma, iii. 210. 

Civil Engineering Colleges, Howrah, v. 
465 ; Rurki, xii. 86 ; Sibpur, xii. 458, 

459- 

Clarke, Gen. Sir Alured, acting Governor- 
General (1798), ii. 279. 

Clarke, Lt., killed at Mangrol (1821), 
monument to, ix. 317. 

Clay figures, made at Krishnagar, viii. 
317 ; Poona, xi. 213. 

Clay, Porcelain. See Kaolin. 

Cleghorn, Dr., his Forests and Gardens 
of Southern India, referred to, ix. 81. 

Cleveland, Auguftus, Collector of Bhagal- 
pur, where he died (1785), ii. 345 ; 
monuments to him there, ii. 348, 352 ; 
and at Karnagarh, viii. 18 ; his Hill 
Rangers, quartered at Karnagarh, viii. 
17 ; author of the non-regulation system 
by his rules for the Paharias, xii. 228. 

Climate. See the section. Medical as- 
pects, at the end of the articles on the 
various Districts, the principal Native 
States, and large cities ; and especially 
Mount Abu, i. 6 ; Aden, i. 20 ; Af- 
ghanistan, i. 37, 38 ; Assam, i. 372, 
y]}, ; Baluchistan, ii. 35, 36 ; Baroda, 
ii. 169; Bengal, ii. 321, 322; Bhutan, 
ii. 415 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 72, 
city, iii. 83, 84 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
207, 208 ; Calcutta, iii. 260 ; Central 
Provinces, iii. 321-323; Cochin, iv. 9, 
10 ; Coorg, iv. 41, 42 ; Darjiling, iv. 
139; Gwalior, v. 228, 229; Haidar- 
abad State, v. 243, 244 ; Berar, v. 260, 
261 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 285 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 58 ; Jodhpur, vii. 245, 246 ; 
Karachi, vii. 450, 451 ; Kashmir, viii. 
75, 76 ; Lahore, viii. 413 ; Lucknow, 
viii. 501 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 79, 
city, ix. 119 ; Mahabaleshwar, ix. 143 ; 
Maldive Islands, ix. 252 ; Mandalay, 
ix. 291 ; Manipur, ix. 333, 334 ; 
Nagpur, x. 172; Nicobar Llands, x. 
298; Nilgiri Hills, x. 325; N.-W. 
Provinces, x. 403, 404 ; Orissa, x. 467, 
468; Oudh, X. 510; Poona, xi. 213; 
Punjab, xi. 291, 292 ; Rajputana, xi. 
421-423; Rangoon, xi. 481 ; Shevaroy 



74 



lADEX. 



Hills, xii. 384, 385 ; Shillong, xii. 399 ; 
Simla, xii. 495 ; Sind, xii. 524, 525 ; 
Spiti, xiii. 73 ; Tanjore, xiii. 193 ; 
Travancore, xiii. 353 ; Triciiino|)oli, 
xiii. 363 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 
44S ; Wellington, xiii. 536. 

Clive, Robert, 1st Lord, struggle with 
Dupleix in the Karnatik, article ' India,' 
vi. 378, 379 ; defence of Arcot, 379 ; re- 
capture of Calcutta, 381, 382 ; battle of 
Plassey and its results, 3S2 ; his jdgir, 
383, 384 ; appointed Governor of Ben- 
gal, 3S4 ; his second Governorship, 
386 ; his partition of the Gangetic 
valley, 387 ; grant of the diwdni of 
Bengal, 387 ; reorganization of the 
Company's service, 387. Local nofucs — 
Took Aligarh (1756), i. 179; defence 
of Arcot (1751), i. 309, 310 ; took Arni 
(1751). i- 332; and Baj-Baj (1756), j- 
438; Governor of Bengal (1765-67), 
ii. 278 ; stormed Angria's strongholds 
(1756), iii. 38 ; retook Calcutta (1757), 
iii. 242 ; began the new Fort William, 
iii. 242 ; tried to improve Calcutta, iii. 
244; took Chengajpat (1752), Iii. 389 ; 
in the Northern Circars, iii. 469 ; took 
Conjevaram (1751), *. 27 ; and Cove- 
long, iv. 44 ; in command at Cuddalore 
(175s), iv. 46; and at Fort St. David's 
(1756), iv. 162 ; his narrow escape at 
siege of Devikota (1749"), iv. 234 ; sent 
Col. Forde to the Northern Circars 
(1759), v. 3 ; joined by IMorari Rao in 
relief of Arcot, v. 160 ; defeated the 
French at Kaveripak (1752), viii. 105 ; 
took Viziadnig (1756), viii. 263, xiii. 
499 ; importance of the defence of 
Arcot to Madras, ix. 12 ; quoted on 
Murshidabad, x. 23 ; held first English 
Fttnya or settlement of the revenues of 
Bengal there (1766), x. 37 ; his victory 
of Plassey (1757), xi. 193, 194; took 
Tanna (1756), xiii. 19S ; and Trimeri 
(1751), xiii. 297 ; went to Arcot to draw 
off Chanda Sahib from Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 356 ; was granted the Twenty-four 
Parganas (1759), with reversion to the 
Company, xiii. 390 ; nearly captured 
by the French at Viruddhachalam 
(1751), xiii. 480; got \.\\Q faniidn for 
the Northern Circars (1765), xiii. 485. 

Clive, 2nd Lord, Governor of Madras 
(179S-1803), ix. 67. 

Close, Col. Barry, refused help to Navvab 
of Bhopal, ii. 404 ; Closepet named 
after him, iii. 471 ; commanded the 
advance on Sironj, then held by Amir 
Khan (1809), xi i. 8. 

Closepet, town and taluk in Mysore, iii. 

471, 472. 
Cloth. See Cotton-weaving. 
Cloth of gold. Sec Brocade. 



Clj-de, Lord. See Campbell, Sir Colin. 
Coal and coal mining, article ' India,' vi. 
41 ; 619; history of Bengal coal mining, 

619, 620 ; coal in the Central Provinces, 

620, 621 ; Raniganj coal-fields, 621 ; 
outlying coal-beds, 621, 622 ; future of 
Indian coal, 622 ; geology of Indian 
coal-fields, 636, 637. Local notices — 
Found in Afghanistan, i. 37 ; Angul, i. 
290 ; As^am, i. 347, 348 ; Ballalpur, 
ii. 17; Bannu, ii. 90; Bardwan, ii. 
127, 133' 134; Baurgarh, ii. 217 ; Bed- 
dadanol, ii. 223 ; Bengal, ii. 271, 273, 
274; Betul, ii. 329, 332; Bilaspur, ii. 
452 ; Bisrampur, iii. 17, 18 ; Bokaro, 
iii. 2,2) ; in hills above Jaitpur, iii. 166 ; 
Lower Burma, iii. 201 ; Upper Burma, 
iii. 211 ; Central India, iii. 295 ; Cen- 
tral Provinces, iii. 300 ; Champaran, 
iii. 337 ; Chanda, iii. 349 ; Chang 
Bhakar, iii. 366 ; Chaukidanga, iii. 
Zl':,, 376; Cherra Punji,_ iii. 393; 
Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; Chita Rewa, iii. 
429 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 447 ; 
Chope, iii. 456 ; Cutch, iv. 60 ; Dal- 
tonganj, iv. 100 ; Darjiling, iv. 130, 
138 ; Darrangiri, iv. 150; l5era Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 210; Dhoba-khal, iv. 270; 
Dihing, iv. 288 ; Gangpur, iv. 47S ; 
Garo Hills, v. 26 ; on the Ghugus, v. 
76 ; Haidarabad, v. 241 ; Berar, v. 
260 ; Hazaribagh. v. 378 ; Henzada, 
V. 384; Hoshangabad, v. 442 ; Itkuri, 
vii. 28 ; Jabalpur, vii. 34, 35 ; Jainiia 
Hills, vii. 49 ; Jaipur (Assam), vii. 6i ; 
Jamuna river, vii. 136 ; {ehlam, vii. 
167, 168, 175 ; Jharia, vii'. 228, 229 ; 
Kangra, vii. 412 ; Karanpura, vii. 468, 
469 ; Karharbari, viii. 8, 9 ; Kashmir, 
viii. 67; Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; Korba, 
viii. 296 ; Korea, viii. 297 ; Kyauk- 
pyu, viii. 386 ; La-ka-dong, viii. 423, 
424 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427, 435, 436 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 477 ; Aladras, ix. ,5 ; 
Mahadeo river, ix. 154 ; Deori on the 
Little Mahanadi, ix. 164 ; Makum, ix. 
216 ; Manbhum (Jharia), ix. 284 ; 
Manipur, ix. 324 ; jvlao-beh-larkar, ix. 
343 ; Mao-don, ix. 343 ; Maosan-ram, 
ix. 343 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; Naga Hills 
X. 144 ; Narsinghpur, x. 222 ; Nicobar 
Islands, x. 295 ; Nong-stoin, x. 354 ; 
Nowgong, X. 407 ; Orissa Tributary 
States, X. 471 ; Rajmahal Hills, xi. 
391 ; Ramgarh, xi. 466 ; Raniganj, xi. 
503-506 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22; Rewa, 
xii. 46 ; Safifrai river, xii. 99 ; the 
Salt Range, xii. 171 ; the Sameswari 
river, xii. 189, 190 ; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 227, 234; Sargiija, xii. 267; Sheila, 

■ xii. 378 ; Sher river, xii. 379 ; Shvve- 
gyin, xii. 430 ; Siarsol, xii. 453 ; Sib- 
sagar, xii. 460 ; Siju, xii. 477 ; Siia- 



INDEX. 



75 



rampur, xiii. 39 ; Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; 

'J'alcher, xiii. 164; Tapasi, xiii. 199; 

Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 41 1 ; Warora, 

xiii. 532 ; Wiin, xiii. 538, 544. 
Coalition of Vishnuism with Islam in 

Kabir's teaching, article ' India,' vi. 

219. 
Coal-miners, High wages of, in Bardwan, 

Coasting trade of India and coast shipping, 

article 'India,' vi. 583-586. 
Cobalt in Rajputana, article ' India,' vi. 

626. Local notices — ^Jaipur, vii. 52 ; 

Rajputana, xi. 401 ; Khetri in Shaik- 

hawati, xii. 371. 
Cobra di Capello, The, article ' India,' vi. 

660. 
Cocanada, town, port, and Sub-division 

in Madras, iii. 472. 
Cochin, State in S. India, iv. i-io ; 

physical aspects, 1,2; history, 2-4 ; 

population, 4, 5 ; agriculture, 5, 6 ; 

commerce and manufactures, 6, 7 ; 

means of communication, 7 ; religious 

and other institutions, 7, 8 ; natural 

calamities, 8 ; administration, 8, 9 ; 

medical aspects, 9, 10. 
Cochin, idluk in Madras, iv. 10, 11. 
Cochin, town in Madras, iv. 11-13 ; 

history, 11-13; the Jesuit Collegiate 
■ city of the i6th century, vi. 248-250 ; 

first establishment of Portuguese factory 

at (1500), vi. 358. 
Cochineal, in Dhenkanal, iv. 269 ; North 

Kanara, viii. 372. 
Cock-fighting, a favourite amusement in 

Upper Burma, iii. 212. 
Cockerell, Mr., murdered at Banda 

during Mutiny (1857), viii. 56. 
Cocks, Mr. A. H., special commissioner, 

was unable to clear Etah of mutineers 

(1857). iv. 362. 
Cocoa-nut palms, in the Agoada headland, 

i. 59 ; Alibagh, i. 166 ; Amalapuram, 

i. 207 ; Amherst, i. 239 ; Amrapur, i. 

251 ; Anantapur, i. 277 ; Andaman 

Islands, i. 286 ; South Arcot, i. 323 ; 

Arkalgad, i. 330 ; Bakarganj, i. 441, 

445 ; BangaTore, ii. 63 ; Beliapatam, 

ii. 239 ; Bellary', ii. 245 ; Bombay, iii. 

45 ; Budihal, iii. 128 ; Calimere Point, 

iii. 270 ; Chengalpat, iii. 380 ; Chik- 

nayakanhalli, iii. 411 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 

426; Cochin, iv. 2, 5; the Cocos Islands, 

iv. 13 ; Coimbatore, iv. 18 ; Dacca, iv. 

85 ; Diu, iv. 305 ; Goa, v. 92, 93 ; 

Godavari, v. 122 ; Hassan, v. 349 ; 

Honavalli, v, 439 ; Howrah, v. 463 ; 

Janjira, vii. 139 ; North Kanara, vii. 

3691 372 ; South Kanara, vii. 37^5, 

380 ; Kankanhalli, vii. 433, 434 ; 

Karwar, viii. 53 ; Kolaba, viii. 260 ; 

the Konkan, viii. 289, 291 j Kiimpta, 



361 ; Kwa, viii. 382 ; the Laccadive 
Islands, viii. 393, 396 ; Madra-;, ix. 
29, 30, 87 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Madu- 
rantakam, ix. 135 ; Mahe, ix. 171 ; 
Malaliar, ix. 230 ; the Maldive Islands, 
ix. 251 ; Mangalore, ix. 313 ; Mergui, 
ix. 409 ; Mysore State, x. 100, 102, 
District, X. 119 ; Nellore, x. 268 ; the 
Nicobar Islands, x. 295, 297 ; Noakhali, 
X. 339, 347 ; Niizvid, x. 420 ; Rames- 
waram, xi. 443 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 3, 4, 
9 ; Salsette Island, xii. 169 ; Sandwip 
Island, xii. 210 ; Savanur, xii. 293 ; 
Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Shimoga, xii. 
400 ; Tanjore, xiii. 180, 18S ; Travan- 
core, xiii. 342, 349 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 360 ; Tripunathorai, xiii. 367 ; 
Tiimkur, xiii. 376, 37S, 38 1 ; Vengurla, 
xiii. 469 ; Vellapur, xiii. 553. 

Cocos, The, islands in the Bay of Bengal, 
iv. 13, 14. 

Coffee cultivation, article ' India,' vi. 
502-504 ; its introtluction into India, 
502 ; area under cultivation, 502, 503 ; 
suitable sites for gardens, 503 ; pro- 
cesses of preparation, 503, 504 ; exports 
of, 575- Local notices — Aigur, i. ill ; 
Anamalai Hil*, i. 271 ; Anantagiri, i. 
273 ; Anjinad, i. 292 ; Baba Biidan, 
i. 401, 402 ; Balasor (Banasura), ii. 11 ; 
Cardamom Hills, iii. 276 ; Chikalda, 
iii. 408 ; Chikmagalur, iii. 41 1 ; Cochin, 
iv. 5, 6 ; Coimbatore, iv. 18 ; Coonoor, 
iv. 28 ; Coorg, iv. 31, 32, 2,?>^ 36, 37 ; 
Devala, iv. 231 ; Galikonda Hills, iv. 
461 ; Giidaliir, v. 176 ; Hassan, v. 
348, 349 ; Jambiir, vii. 121 ; Kadur, 
vii. 2S6, 287 ; North Kanara, vii. 372 ; 
South Kanara, vii. 382 ; Kiggat-nad, 
viii. 216 ; Kolakambai, viii. 272 ; 
Koppa, viii. 294 ; Lakvalli, viii. 444 ; 
Made, viii. 539 ; Madras, ix. 31, 32, 
85, 86; Madura, ix. 120, 129 ; Malabar, 
ix. 229, 231 ; Manantavadi, ix. 274 ; 
Manjarabad, ix. 334 ; Merkara, ix. 
413 ; Mysore, x. 100, lOi, 102 ; Nan- 
guneri, x. 196 ; Nanjarajpatna, x. 197 ; 
Nelliampali Hills, x. 260 ; Nilgiri 
Hills, X. 313 ; Ochterlony valley, x. 
421 ; Padinalknad, x. 525 ; Palni 
Mountains, xi. 19 ; Palupare, xi. 20 ; 
Pirmaid, xi. 186 ; Rayavalasa, xii. 41 ; 
Salem, xii. 166 ; Sawantwari, xii. 
296 ; Shenkotta, xii. 379 ; Shevaroy 
Hills, xii. 383, 384 ; Shimoga, xii, 
403 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 225 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 231 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 306 ; Tra- 
vancore, xiii. 349; Wainad, xiii. 510; 
Yedenalknad, xiii. 550 ; Yelusavira, 
xiii. 554 ; Verkad, xiii. 556. 

Coimbatore, District in jSIadras, iv. 14- 
21 ; physical aspects, 14, 15 ; history, 
15, 16; population, 16, 17; agriculture. 



76 



INDEX. 



17-19 ; natural calamities, 19 ; com- 
merce and trade, 19, 20 ; administra- 
tion, 20; medical aspects, 20, 21. 

Coimbatore, tdhik in Madras, iv. 21. 

Coimbatore, town in Madras, iv. 21, 22. 

Coins, Indo-Scythian, dug up at Asarur, 
i- 337 ; Greek and Indo-Bactrian at 
Bulandshahr, iii. 141 ; Indo-Scythian 
at Dipalpur, iv. 304 ; Gujrat, v. 189 ; 
Harappa, v. 319 ; Bactrian in Hazara, 
V. 360 ; Graeco-Bactrian at Jalalpur, 
vii. Si ; gold at Kalinga-patam, vii. 
330 ; Greek at Mong, ix. 478 ; Grreco- 
Bactrian at Multan, x. 4 ; Roman at 
Nellore, x. 272; Greek at Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 36 ; gold at Tsandavolu in Repalli, 
xii. 44 ; Sandovvay, xii. 201 ; Sarai 
Aghat, xii. 249 ; Shorkot, xii. 424 ; 
Gra?co-Bactrian at Sonpat, xiii. 62 ; 
Sumerpur, xiii. 107; Tamluk, xiii. 172. 

Coir fibre matting. Manufacture of, at 
Alleppi, i. 200 ; South Arcot, i. 326 ; 
Bombay, iii. 59 ; Cochin, iv. 7 ; Goa, 
V. 94 ; South Kanara, vii. 382, ix. 
54 ; Laccadive Islands, viii. 394 ; 
Maldive Islands, ix. 251. 

Coke, Gen., his operations in Budaun 
(1858), iii. 119 ; suggested Cherat as a 
sanitarium (1853), iii. 391. 

Colaba. See Kolaba. 

Colbert, J. B. , reconstituted the French 
East India Company {1664), iv. 451. 

Colebrooke's Essays, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 191 (footnote 2). 

Colebrooke, Mr., Resident at Nagpur 
(1798-1802), x. 167. 

Colepett. See Amatti. 

Coleroon, mouth of the Kaveri in Madras, 
iv. 22. 

Colgong, town in Bengal, iv. 22, 23. 

Collegal, town and taluk in Madras, iv. 

23- 

Colleges and high schools, article 'India,' 
vi. 476, 477. Local 7iotices of the 
principal colleges — Agra, i. 67, 70 ; 
Ajmere (the Mayo), i. 130 ; Aligarh, 
i. 178; Allahabad (the Muir), i. 193, 
19S ; Bareilly, ii. 147 ; Baroda, ii. 
169 ; Batala(C.M.S.), ii. 216; Benares 
(Queen's and Jai Narayan's), ii. 266, 267 ; 
Berhampur, ii. 325, x. 30; Bikaner 
(Dungar Singh's), ii. 442 ; Bombay 
Presidency (Elphinstone, Deccan, 
Gujarat, and Rajaram), iii. 71 ; Bundel- 
khand (Rajkumar), iii. 154 ; Calcutta, 
iii. 259 ; Ilowrah (Engmeering), iii. 
259, V. 465 ; Combaconum, iv. 24 ; 
Dacca, iv. 88, 92 ; Hugli, v. 497 ; 
Indore (Rajkumar), vii. 8 ; Jaipur, vii. 
54 ; Kolhapur, viii. 284 ; Krishnagar, 
viii. 317, X. 135; Lahore, viii. 412; 
Lucknovv (the Canning and Martiniere), 
viii. 517, X. 509; Madras, ix. 116; 



Calicut, ix. 234 ; Mangalore (Roman 
Catholic), ix. 314 ; Masulipatam (the 
Noble), ix. 354 ; Midnapur, ix. 432 ; 
Mysore, x. 121 ; Nagpur (the Morris), 
x. 174; in the N.-W; Provinces, x. 
400, 401 ; Nowgong (Rajkumar), x. 
416 ; Patna, xi. 105, 109 ; Collegiate 
school (the Edwardes), Peshawar, xi. 
156, 160; Pondicherri, xi. 199; Poona 
(the Deccan and Science), xi. 209, 213, 
214 ; Rajaniahendri, xi. 382 ; Rajkot 
(Rajkumar), xi. 389 ; Rampur Beauleah 
(the Rajshahi), xi. 438 ; Rangoon, xi. 
484 ; Ratlam, xii. 2 ; Rurki (the 
Thomason Civil Engineering), xii. 86 ; 
Saidapet (Agricultural), xii. 140, 141 ; 
Sardhana (St. John's, Roman Catholic), 
xii. 266 ; Serampur (Baptist), xii. 318 ; 
Sibpur (Engineering), xii. 458, 459 ; 
Tanjore, xiii. 193 ; Trivandrum, xiii. 
352, 369 ; Mavelikara in Travancore, 
xiii. 352 ; Trichinopoli (St. Joseph's, 
Roman Catholic), xiii. 369 ; Vizaga- 
patam (the Vizianagram), xiii. 496. 

Collet, Joseph, Governor of Madras 
(1717-20), ix. 67. 

Collins, Col. John, left Sindia's camp at 
Mulkapur (1803), and thus opened war, 
ix. 259. 

Colonelganj, town in Oudh, iv. 23, 24. 

Coionelganj, river mart in Bengal, iv. 
24. 

Colquhoun, Mr., his trade journey from 
China to Burma (1881), iii. 200, 201. 

Colvin, John, Lt. -Governor N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, died while besieged in Agra 
during the Mutiny (1857), i. 70. 

Colvin, Major, carried out works of W. 
Jumna Canal, vii. 259 ; E. Jumna 
Canal, xii. 1 14. 

Combaconum, town and tdhik in Madras, 
iv. 24. 

Combermere, Lord, took Bhartpur(i827), 

ii- 374- 

Comercolly. See Kumarkhaii. 

Comillah, town in Bengal, iv. 24, 25. 

Co/iniie!'ce and Navigation of the Ancients 
in the Indian Ocean, by Dean Vincent, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 164 (foot- 
note i); 356 (footnote). 

Commerce and Navigation of the Eryth- 
reran Sea, by J. M'Crindle, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 166 (footnotes i and 
2); 356 (footnote). 

Commerce and trade, article ' India,' vi. 
chap. xix. pp. 555-597. Ancient and 
mediaeval trade of India, 555 ; function 
of modern Indian trade, 555, 556 ; 
sea-borne trade impossible under the 
Mughals, 556 ; growth of trading and 
industrial cities under British rule, 556, 
557 ; summary of Indian exports 
(1700-1885), 558; India's balance of 



INDEX. 



77 



trade, 558, 559 ; the Home charges, 
559 ; India's yearly trade savings, 559 ; 
the chief Indian ports of export trade, 
559. 560 ; early Portuguese trade, 560 ; 
Dutch monopoly of eastern trade, 
560 ; early English factories and 
advance of English trade, 560, 561 ; 
Company's trade in 1834, 561, 562 ; 
abolition of inland duties (1836-48), 
562 ; growth of Indian foreign trade 
(1840-84), 562, 563; Indian trade 
statistics (1878-85), 563-565 ; Suez 
Canal trade, 564 ; tabular statistics of 
import and export trade (1882-83), 
566, 567 ; Manchester cotton goods 
import trade, 565 - 568 ; treasure, im- 
port of, and proportion of gold to 
silver, 568, 569 ; raw cotton export 
trade, 569, 570 ; jute exports, 570, 
571 ; rice export trade, 572 ; rice 
export duty, 572, 573 ; wheat trade 
and exports, 573 ; oil-seeds, 573, 574 ; 
indigo, safflower, myrobalams, tur- 
meric, and lac, 574, 575 ; tea and coffee 
exports, 575 ; exports of cotton and 
jute manufactures, 575, 576 ; India's 
trade with different countries, 577-580; 
growth of Suez Canal trade, 581 ; Sir 
R. Temple's Minute on the balance of 
Indian trade, 581-583 ; coasting trade 
and shipping of India, 583-586 ; frontier 
trade, 586 ; trans-frontier trade with 
Afghanistan, Central Asia, Nepal, 
Tibet, Burma, and Siam, 586-590; 
internal trade of India, 591 ; trading 
castes in Southern and Northern India, 
591, 592 ; local trade of India; village 
money-lenders, travelling brokers, re- 
ligious fairs, etc., 592, 593; internal 
trade the chief safeguard against famine, 
593> 594 ; normal action of internal 
trade, 594 ; Provincial statistics of 
internal trade, 594, 595 ; trade of 
Patna city, 595, 596 ; the village 
mart of Dongargaon, 596 ; rural fair at 
Karagola, 596, 597. See also Exports 
and Imports, Foreign trade. River- 
borne trade, and Sea-borne trade, and 
the Section on the subject in the several 
District articles. 
Common origin of European and Indian 

religions, vi. 76. 
Common shrines of various faiths, article 
' India,' vi. 203, 204 ; Muhammadan 
and Hindu worship at St. Thomas' 
shrine in Madras, 238. Local notices — 
Bairam Ghat, i. 437 ; Palitana, xi. 5 ; 
Saint Thomas' Mount, xii. 143 ; Sakhi 
Sarwar, xii. 145, 146 ; Upray, xiii. 

449- 
Communication, Means of. See special 

section in each District article. 

Comorin, headland in Madras, iv. 25 ; 



cape at southernmost extremity of India, 

^"'- 3- . . . 

Comparative Dictionary of the Bihari 

Language, by Hoernle and Grierson, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 336 and 
footnote; 337 (footnote l); 341 and 
footnote; 344 (footnote). 
Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian 
Languages, by Bishop Caldwell, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 66, 67, and foot- 
notes ; 173 (footnote 2); 240 (footnote 
l); 327 (footnotes 2 and 3); 328 (foot- 
note); 330 (footnote 2); 332 (footnote); 
340 (footnote 2); 369 (footnote). 
Comparative Grammar of the Gaudian 
Languages, by Hoernle, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 336 and footnote ; 337 
(footnote i). 
Comparative Grammar of the Alodern 
Ayran Languages of Lndia, by Beames, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 67 (foot- 
note); 103 (footnote); 335 ; 337 (foot- 
note 2). 
Compen.^ation for disturbance on eviction 

in Bengal, article ' India,' vi. 445. 
Complexity of the Hindu caste system, 

article ' India,' vi. 192-194. 
Condavid. See Kondavir. 
Condition of the people. Material. See 
the Agricultural section of the several 
District articles, and for more lengthened 
notices, special sections, or paragraphs 
on this subject — Ahmadnagar, i. 105 ; 
Ajmere-Merwara, i. 124 ; Assam, i. 
361 ; Bakarganj, i. 444 ; Basti, ii. 
211; Bengal, ii. 300-302; Bhandara, 
ii. 363 ; Birbhum, iii. 4, 5 ; Buland- 
shahr, iii. 137 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
185-189; Cawnpur, iii. 284, 285; 
Champaran, iii. 339, 340 ; Cuttack, 
iv. 71, 72; Dacca, iv. 84; Darrang, 
iv. 146, 147 ; Dehra Dun, iv. 174, 
175; Dharwar, iv. 260; Dinajpur, iv. 
293, 294 ; Etah, iv. 362, 363 ; Etawah, 
iv. 375 ; Faizabad, iv. 385 ; Faridpur, 
iv. 402 ; Fatehpur, iv. 427 ; Firozpur, 
iv. 443 ; Ganjam, v. 7 ; Garhwal, v. 
21 ; Goa, V. 94 ; Gonda, v. 153 ; 
Gurdaspur, v. 210; Gurgaon, v. 218- 
220 ; Berar, v. 269 ; Hamfrpur, v. 
302 ; Hazaribagh, v. 374; Jalaun, vii. 
99; Jalpaiguri, vii. 1 13; Jaunpur, vii. 
155; Jehlam, vii. 172; Jhansi, vii. 
224 ; Jodhpur, vii. 238 ; Kamri'ip, vii. 
361 ; Kangra, vii. 418 ; Khasi and 
Jaintia Hills, viii. 175, 176 ; Kotah, 
viii. 306 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 432 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 483, 484 ; Lucknovv, 
viii. 498; Madras, ix. 36 ; Maimansingh, 
ix. 196; Maldah, ix. 243, 244; Western 
Malwa, ix. 269 ; Manbhum, ix. 282 ; 
Meerut, ix. 388 ; Monghyr, ix. 486 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 509 ; Muttra, x. 49 ; 



78 



INDEX. 



Muzafifargarh, x. 62 ; Nagpur, x. 170 ; 
Nasik, X. 230, 231 ; Noakhali, x. 346 ; 
N.-\V. Provinces, x. 390 ; Nowgong, 
x. 410, 411 ; Oudh, X. 500 ; Peshawar, 
xi. 152, 153; Puri, xi. 305, 306; 
Kangpur, xi. 495, 496 ; Ravval Pindi, 
xii. 27 ; Saharanpur, xii. 120; Salem, 
xii. 161 ; Saran, xii. 254, 255 ; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 348, 349 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
465, 466 ; Sind, xii. 521 ; Singhbhum, 
xii. 536, 537 ; Sirsa, xiii. 13, 14 ; Sural, 
xiii. 127 ; Sylhet, xiii. 151 ; Tipperali, 
xiii. 316, 317 ; Twenty-four Parganas, 
xiii. 395. 

Conflans, Marquis de, defeated by Colonel 
Forde at Condore (1758), v. 124 ; suc- 
ceeded Bussy as French commandant 
at Masulipatam, viii. 228 ; driven out 
of Rajamahendri by Forde, xi. 383. 

Conga dynasty. The, Solar kings in 
Salem, xii. 153, 154. 

Cbnjevaram, town and taluk in Madras, 
iv. 26, 27. 

Conolly, Capt., on the Province of Herat, 
V. 391 ; estimate of its revenue, v. 392. 

Conolly, Mr., Collector of Calicut, 
murdered there by Moplas (1855), iii. 
269, ix. 323 ; founded first teak plan- 
tation in Malabar, near Beypur (1844), 
ix. 7- 

Contai, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 
iv. 27. 

Constantius, The Emperor, sent an em- 
bassy to Aden (342 a.d.), i. 15. 

Conti, Nicolas, speaks of Kayal as Cahila 
and a pearl fishery, viii. 107 ; visited 
Pegu (1430), xi. 474. 

Control of India in England under the 
Company and under the Crown, article 
' India,' v. 431. 

Convents, Roman Catholic, at Asansol, i. 
337 ; Bandel, ii. 57 ; Calcutta, iii. 253; 
Calicut, iii. 269; Cochin, iv. 13; 
Darjiling, iv. 141; Entalli, iv. 354; 
Old Goa, V. 107 ; Kamthi, vii. 367 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 517 ; Mangalore, ix. 
314; Tinnevelli, xiii. 303; Tuticorin, 
xiii. 385 ; Verapoli, xiii. 471, 472. 

Convict establishment in the Andaman 
Islands, i. 284. 

Conybeare, Mr., built the Vehar Reservoir 
for the water-supply of Bombay (1853), 
xiii. 466. 

Cook, Dr., asserts ^he Brahuis to be 
Tartars, iii. 98 ; on the palace of 
Khelat, viii. 187. 

Coompta. See Kumpta. 

Coolies, Importation of, into A'isam, i. 
366 ; Lower Burma, iii. 193 ; Cachar, 
iii. 235 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 
451 ; W. Dwars, iv. 335 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
468. 

Cooliesj Exportation of, from Lohardaga, 



viii. 479; Pambam, xi. 23; Tanjore, 
xiii. 185 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 304. 

Coonoor, hill station in Madras, iv. 27, 
28. 

Cooper, Mr., Deputy Commissioner of 
Amritsar, defeated the mutineers of 
Meean Meer (July 1857), viii. 406, 

407- 

Coorg, territory in S. India, iv. 28 - 42 ; 
history, 28-31 ; physical aspects, 31, 
32 ; population, 33 - 36 ; agriculture, 
36-38 ; manufactures and commerce, 
38, 39 ; administration, 39, 41; medical 
aspects, 41, 42. 

Coorgs, The, their origin and history, iv. 
29 ; their resistance to Haidar AH and 
Tipu Sultan, iv. 30 ; annexation of 
Coorg by the Company, iv. 30, 31 ; 
their manners, appearance, dress, and 
language, iv. 34, 35. 

Coorla. See Kurla. 

Coote, Sir Eyre, defeat of Lally at Wandi- 
wash (1761), article 'India,' vi. 379, 
380; in the first Mysore war (1780), 
392. Local notices — Took Alamparai 
(1760), i. 163; and Arcot (1760), i. 
310; and Arni (1782), i. 232; failed 
in his attack on Chilambaram (1781), 
iii. 413; occupied Chittur (1781), iii. 
454 ; took Karanguli (1759), vii. 466 ; 
his victory at Wandiwash, ix. 13, xiii. 
518 ; and at Porto Novo, ix. 13, xi. 222; 
defeated Haidar Ali at Perambakam 
(1781), xi. 136 ; wounded in attack on 
Pcrumakal (1759), xi. 140; took Pon- 
dicherri (1761), xi. 198; defeated 
Haidar Ali at Sholinghar (1781), xii. 
422, 423; took Tripasur (1781), xiii. 
367 ; took Valdavur (1760), xiii. 461 ; 
took Wandiwash (1759), vvon victory 
there (1760), and twice relieved Flint 
there in the siege of 1780-83, xiii. 518. 

Cooum, river in RIadras, iv. 42. .S^^? also 
Madras city. 

Cope, Capt., made a stand at Chilambaram 
(1749), iii. 412; after his failure to 
take Devikota, iv. 234. 

Copper and copper mining, article 
' India,' vi. 42; 607; 625, 626. Local 
notices — Afghanistan, i. 36; Ajmere- 
Merwara, i. 118; Alwar, i. 203; 
Anantapur, i. 274 ; North Arcot, i. 
312 ; Badakshan, i. 407 ; Badvel, i. 
412 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Banagana- 
palli, ii. 43; Bellaiy, ii. 241, 250; 
Bengal, ii. 271 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 345 ; 
Bikaner, ii. 439 ; Lalitpur in Bundelk- 
hand, iii. 152 ; Upper Burma, iii. 211 ; 
Central India, iii. 295 ; Chamba, iii. 
329; Champaran, iii. 337; Cuddapah, 
iv. 48 ; Darjiling, iv. 130, 138 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 208 ; Dharwar, iv. 
258 J Garhwal, v. 22 ; Gurgaon, v. 



INDEX. 



79 



216; Hazaribagh, v. 378, 379;. the 
Himalaya jNIountains, v. 412; Jaipur, 
vii. 52 ; near Baxa in Jalpaiguri, vii. 
109; Jehlam, vii. 167; Jhabua, vii. 
194; Kalaha-ti, vii. 321 ; Kangra, vii. 
412, 413 ; Kapargadi, vii. 440 ; Kar- 
nul, viii. 34; Kashmir, viii._ 67; 
Khetri, viii. 200, xii. 371 ; Kistna, 
viii. 226 ; Kulu, viii. 337 ; Kuniaun, 
viii. 349 ; Lakhi Mountains, viii. 424 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; Madras, ix. 6 ; 
Mattod, ix. 366 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; 
Nawanagar, x. 252 ; Nellore, x. 261 ; 
Nepal, X. 278 ; Narnaul in Patiala, xi. 
87 ; Pokri, xi. 195 ; Rajputana, xi. 
401 ; the Santal Parganas, xiL 227 ; 
Satara, xii. 276; Shwe-gyin, xii. 430; 
Sikkim, xii. 484 ; Singhana, xii. 
529; Singhbhum, xii. 531, 539; Sir- 
mur, xii. 554 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 228; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355; 
Udaipur, xiii. 401 ; Vinukonda, xiii. 

476- 
Copper and brass vessels and utensils. 

See Brass and copper vessels and 

utensils. 
Copper-chasing in Peshawar, xi. 154. 
Corembu Gaonden, hills in Madras, iv. 

42. See Kalrayanmalai. 
Coriander seed, Cultivation of, at Ambala, 

i. 220 ; Coorg, iv. 37 ; Haidarabad 

State, v. 245 ; Madras, ix. 30 ; Tin- 

nevelli, xiii. 306 ; Tipperah, xiii. 317. 
Coringa, town and port in Madras, iv. 

42-43- 
Corn, Indian. See Maize. 

Cornelian. See Carnelian. 

Cornish, Dr., estimate of deaths during 
the Madras famine (1876-78), ix. 40; 
on the climate of Madras, ix. 1 19. 

Cornwallis, Marquis of (17S6-93), article 
' India,' vi. 392 - 394 ; his revenue 
reforms and the Permanent Settlement 
of Bengal, 393 ; second^ Mysore war, 
394 ; second administration of (1805), 
and his death after a few weeks in 
India, 399. Local notices — Took 
Bangalore, ii. 61, 68; Permanent 
Settlement of Bengal, ii. 279, 280; 
statue of, in Town Hall, Calcutta, iii. 
251 ; saved Coorg by the third Mysore 
war, iv. 30; took Devanhalli (1791). 
iv. 232 ; gave back Gohad and Gvvalior 
to Sindhia (1805), iv. 277; died at 
Ghazipur (1805), where there is a 
monument to him, v. 71 ; his letter to 
the Nizam interpreting the treaty of 
1789, v. 250, 251 ; took Hutri-durga 
(1791), V. 503 ; dismantled Maddiir 
(1791), viii. 539 ; his war with Tipi'i, 
ix. 13 ; his statue at Madras, ix. 106 ; 
fixed revenue and judicial head-quarters 

. of Bengal at Calcutta, x. 24 ; took 



Nandidrug (1791), x. 192 ; made 
commercial treaty with Nepal (1792), 
X. 286 ; stormed Raidrug (1791), xi. 
362; stormed Savandrug (1791), xii. 
294 ; his advance on Seringapatam 
(1791), and siege (1792), xii. 319; 
made Vellore his base of operations 
during 1791, xiii. 468. See also Per- 
manent Settlement. 

Coromandel, part of the eastern coast of 
Madras, iv. 43. See Chola. 

Coromandel, town in Madras, iv. 43. 

Corporate holdings of cultivated land in 
N.-W. Provinces and in the Punjab, 
article ' India,' vi. 451. 

Correa, on the death and burial of Vasco 
da Gama at Cochin, iv. 12 ; made treaty 
of Martaban (15 19), xi. 474. 

Cortelliar, river in Madras, iv. 43. 

Corundum, found in Dharapuram, iv. 
251 ; Kadur, vii. 283 ; Madras, ix. 6; 
Monghyr, ix. 480 ; Salem, xii. 153. 

Coryat, Tliomas, walked from Jerusalem 
to Ajmere (1616), i. 121 : visited 
Hardwar, which he calls capital of 
Siva, v. 332. 

Cosmos Indicopleustes' history of the 
Christian Church in Ceylon, and along 
the Malabar seaboard (547), article 
' India,' vi. 235. Local notices — On 
Kalyan, vii. 347, ix. 166, 167 ; speaks 
of Male, the root of Malabar, ix. 217 ; 
implies that the Maldive Islands were 
inhabited, ix. 250; his Kalliena pro- 
bably Kalyamappr, suburb of Udipi, 
xiii. 416. 

Cosquin, M. Emmanuel, Revue des Ques- 
tions LHstoriques, liv. 56, quoted, 
article 'India,' vi. 157 (footnote 3); 
152 (footnote 2). 

Cossimbazar, historic town in Bengal. 
See Kasimbazar. 

Cossipur, village in Bengal, iv. 43, 44. 

Cossye. See Kasal. 

Cotsford, Edward, founded fort and 
factory at Ganjam (1768), v. 3. 

Cotton-cleaning machines, inThayet-myo, 
xiii. 284. 

Cotton cultivation and manufacture, 
article ' India,' vi. 491 ; the American 
war, its effects on Indian cotton grow- 
ing, 491, 492 ; cotton districts in India, 
area under cultivation, and out-turn, 
492, 493 ; cottor^cleaning, 494 ; im- 
ports of Manchester goods, 565, 566 ; 
exports of raw cotton, 569, 570 ; ex- 
ports of manufactured cotton, 575 ; 
decline of cotton-weaving owing to 
Manchester competition, but still a 
domestic industry in India, 599-601 ; 
steam cotton mills in different Pro- 
vinces, 611, 612; sound basis of Indian 
cotton manufacture, 611-613 ; exports 



So 



INDEX. 



of Bombay manufactured cotton to 
China and Africa, 613, 614 ; future 
prospect of Indian cotton manufactures, 
614. 
Cotton, Cultivation of, in Agra, i. 64; 
Ajmere-Merwara, i. 125; Akola, i. 
143, 144; Alahyar-jo-Tando, i. 161 ; 
AHgarh, i. 173; Allahabad, i. 189; 
Ahir, i. 202 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; Ambala, 
i. 220; Amherst, i. 239; Amjhera, 
i. 244; Amraoti, i. 247, 248; Amritsar, 
i. 259; Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 301, 
302; North Arcot, i. 316; South 
Arcot, i. 323 ; Aundh, i. 384 ; Badak- 
shan, i. 407 ; Bahawalpur, i. 422 ; 
Bajana, i. 438 ; Balasinor, i. 460 ; 
Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bamra, ii. 42 ; 
Banaganapalli, ii. 43 ; Banda, ii. 50 ; 
Bankura, ii. 83 ; Bannu, ii. 94 ; Bantwa, 
ii. 103; Bardwan, ii. 130; Bareilly, ii. 
142; Baroda, ii. 158 and 164; Bar- 
pali, ii. 174; Basim,ii. 186; Belgaum, 
ii. 234, 235 ; Bellary, ii. 245 ; Bhau- 
nagar, ii. 380 ; Bijnaur, ii. 432 ; 
Biiaspur, ii. 450; Bombay Presi- 
dency, iii. 53-55 ; Borasambar, iii. 
89 ; Broach, iii. 107 ; Budaun, iii. 
120; Bulandshahr, iii. 137; Bul- 
dana, iii. 146; Bundelkhand, iii. 152; 
Bundi, iii. 159 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
189, 191 ; Upper Burma, iii. 210 ; 
Cambay, iii. 271 ; Cawnpur, iii. 285 ; 
Central India, iii. 295 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 318 ; Chanda, iii. 35.2 ; 
Padmapur, iii. 365 ; Chindwara, iii. 
401 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 425 ; Chittagong, 
iii. 439 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 
450, 451 ; Chura, iii. 460 ; Cochin, 
iv. 5 ; Coimbatore, iv. 18; Cuddapah, 
iv. 52 ; Cutch, iv. 61 ; Dacca, iv. 85, 
90; Dader, iv. 92; Delhi, iv. 182; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 214 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan, iv. 224 ; Dhar, iv. 246 ; 
Dharwar, iv. 262, 263 ; Dholpur, iv. 
274; Dhrangadra, iv. 278; Dungarpur, 
iv. 323 ; Eliichpur, iv. 345 ; Etah, iv. 
362 ; Etawah, iv. 367, 374 ; Faruklia- 
bad, iv. 413 ; Firozpur, iv. 443 ; Garo 
Hills, v. 30, 31 ; Gaya, v. 49 ; Ghazi- 
pur, v. 67 ; Goalpara, v. 116 ; Goda- 
vari, v. 127; Gondal, v. 157; Gorakh- 
pur, v. 169 ; Gujranwala, v. 184 ; 
Gujrat, V. 193; Gurdaspur, v. 211; 
Gurgaon, v. 220* Gwalior, v. 228 ; 
Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Berar, v. 269, 
270 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 280 ; 
Hamirpur, v. 302 ; Hardoi, v. 326 ; 
Hill Tipperah, v. 400 ; Hissar, v. 430; 
Hoshangabad, v. 446 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 
455 ■' Hugli, V. 494 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; 
Jabalpur, vii. 33 ; Jafarabad, yii. 39 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 52; Jalalabad, vii. 75; 
Jalandhar, vii. 88; Jalaun, vii. 98; 



Jalpaiguri, vii. 113; Jamkhandi, vii. 
127 ; Jashpur, vii. I46 ; Jath, vii. 14S ; 
Jaunpur, vii. 155 ; Jehlam, vii. 172 ; 
J hang, vii. 210 ; Jhansi, vii. 223 ; 
Jnnagarh, vii. 262 ; Kaira, vii. 304 ; 
Kaladgi, vii. 317, 318 ; Kalsia, vii. 
344; Kapurthala, vii. 443; Karnal, 
viii. 24; Karnul, viii. 38; Karond, 
viii. 46 ; Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; Ka- 
wardha, viii. 106 ; Khairagarh, viii. 
130; Khairpur, viii. 136; Khandesh, 
viii. 156; Khasi Hills, viii. 177; Kolha- 
pur, viii. 281 ; Kondka, viii. 288 ; 
Korea, viii. 297 ; Kotah, viii. 306 ; 
Kulpahar, viii. 334 ; Kumaun, viii. 
354 ; Kundla, viii. 364 ; Kuram, viii. 
369 ; Kurundwad, viii. 376 ; Lahore, 
viii. 410; Lakhtar, viii. 441 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Lathi, viii. 467 ; Limri, viii. 
472 ; Lohara, viii. 474 ; Lohardaga, 
viii. 483 ; Ludhiana, viii. 522 ; Madras, 
ix. 28, 29, 31; Madura, ix. 129; 
Mainpuri, ix. 208 ; Maldive Islands, 
ix. 251 ; Maler Kotla, ix. 255 ; Malia, 
ix. 256 ; Mallani, ix. 261 ; Western 
Malwa, ix. 269 ; Manipur, ix. 331 ; 
Meerut, ix. 387 ; Midnapur, ix. 429 ; 
Mikir Hills, ix. 436 ; Miraj, ix. 440 ; 
Montgomery, ix. 498 ; Moradabad, ix. 
' 508 ; Morvi, ix. 519 ; Mudhol, ix. 527; 
Mull, ix. 538 ; Multan, x. 7 ; Muttra, 
X. 48 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 61 ; Muzaffar- 
nagar, x. 72 ; Mysore, x. 100, 103 ; 
Nabha, x. 126; Nadiya, x. 135 ; Nag- 
pur, X. 170; Narsinghpur, x. 221; 
Nasik, x. 232 ; Nawanagar, x. 252 ; 
Nellore, x. 266 ; Nimar, x. 333 ; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 377 ; Nowgong, 
X. 411 ; Orissa, x. 459 ; Oudh, x. 501 ; 
Palanpur Agency, x. 537 ; Paliana, xi. 
3 ; Pandaria, xi. 35 ; Patandi, xi. 85 ; 
Patna District, xi. loi ; Patna State, 
xi. 115; Peshawar, xi. 153; Phuljhar, 
xi. 168 ; Poona, xi. 207 ; Prome, xi. 
231 ; Punjab, xi. 278 ; Puri, xi. 306 ; 
Radhanpur, xi. 342 ; Raigarh, xi. 362; 
Raipur, xi. 373 ; Rairakhol, xi. 378 ; 
Rajkot, xi. 388 ; Rajpipla, xi. 392 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 418 ; Ramdrug, xi. 441 ; 
Rc-iwal Pindi, xii. 29 ; Rohri, xii. 64 ; 
Rohtak, xii. 73 ; Sachin, xii. 88 ; Sada- 
bad, xii. 90 ; Sagar, xii. 105 ; Saharan- 
pur, xii. 120; Sailana, xii. 142; Sakti, 
xii. 148 ; Salem, xii. 161 ; Sambalpur, 
xii. 183 ; Sangli, xii. 218 ; Santal 
Parganas, xii. 232 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; 
Sarangarh, xii. 260 ; Sarguja, xii. 268 ; 
Satara, xii. 280, 281 ; SattanapaUi, xii. 
290; Savamir, xii. 293 ; Sayla, xii. 299 ; 
Shahabad, xii. 329 ; Shahpur, xii. 365 ; 
Shwe-gyin, xii. 432 ; Sialkot, xii. 446 ; 
Sibi, xii. 455; Sibsagar, xii. 466; Sind, 
xii. 520, 522 ; Singhbhum, xii. 537 ; 



INDEX. 



8i 



Sirohi, xiii. 5 ; Sitaman, xiii. 26 ; Sita- 
pur, xiii. 35 ; Sonpur, xiii. 63 ; Siuat, xiii. 
126 ; Sylhet, xiii. 152 ; Tadpatri, xiii. 
159; Tarai, xiii. 209 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 
224 ; Thayet-myo, xiii. 284 ; Tigaria, 
xiii. 294 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 306 ; Triclii- 
nnpoli, xiii. 360 ; Udaipur{Rajputana), 
xiii. 402; Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 412; 
Unao, xiii. 432 ; Virpur, xiii. 479 ; 
Wadhwan, xiii. 506 ; Wala, xiii. 514; 
Wankaner, xiii. 5^^ 5 Warahi, xiii. 
521 ; Wardha, xiii. 526 ; Wun, xiii. 

543- 

Cotton-dyeing. See Dyeing. 

Cotton-ginning factories, at Ankleswar, 
i. 293 ; Badnera (steam), i. 409 ; 
Broach, iii. 107 ; Dabhoi, iv. 76 ; 
Dharwar, iv. 263 ; Jalgaon (steam), 
vii. 104; Jambusar, vii. 122; Jodhia, 
vii. 134 ; in Khandesh (steam), viii. 

Cotton import duties. Abolition of, vi. 
46S. 

Cotton-mills, Steam. See Steam cotton 
mills. 

Cotton presses or screws, at Agra, i. 65 ; 
Akola, i. 147; Aligarh, i. 178; Am- 
raoti, i. 251 ; Badnera (steam), i. 409 ; 
Beawar, ii. 222 ; Bhaunagar (steam), 
ii. 382 ; Broach (steam), iii. 108 ; 
Cavvnpur, iii. 292 ; Chandrausi, iii. 
357 ; Dhulia (steam), iv. 282 ; Erode, 
iv. 357 ; Firozpur, iv. 447 ; Guntur, v. 
205 ; in Berar, v. 271 ; Hinganghat, v. 
421, xiii. 527 ; Jalgaon (steam), vii. 
104 ; Karachi, vii. 453 ; Khamgaon, 
vili. 144; in Khandesh, viii. 157 ; 
Khiirja, viii. 212 ; Palladam, xi. 13 ; 
Saharanpur, xii. 122 ; Shegaon, xii. 
377 ; Tuticorin (steam), xiii. 386 ; 
Wardha, xiii. 529. 

Cotton-printing, atAslana, i. 340; Bagru, 
i. 420 ; Jahangirabad in Bulandshahr, 
iii. 138; Faizpur, iv. 389; Jambusar, 
vii. 122 ; Kadi, vii. 280 ; Kaira, vii. 
306 ; Kheri, viii. 196 ; Masulipatam, 
ix. 354; Morasa, ix. 516; Murassapur, 
x. 16; Murgod, X. 17; Sakhera, xii. 
145 ; Sanganer, xii. 217 ; Sitapur, xiii. 
36 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 447 ; 
Waso, xiii. 533. 

Cotton trade. Centres of, Maimana in 
Afghan-Turkistan, i. 55; Akola, i. 147; 
Akot, i. 148 ; Amraoti, i. 251 ; Anjen- 
gaon, i. 290 ; Ankleswar, i. 293 ; 
Anwa, i. 295 ; Atrauli, i. 380 ; Aurang- 
abad, i. 388 ; Badnera, i. 409 ; Barsi, 
ii. 176; Beawar, ii. 222; Bellary, ii. 
247; Bengal, ii. 311, 312; Betigeri, 
ii. 327 ; Bhaunagar, ii. 382 ; Bombay, 
iii. 76, 77 ; Chopra, iii. 457 ; Coco- 
nada, iii. 472 ; DeoH, iv. 203 ; Dhar- 
angaon, iv. 250; Dholera, iv. 271; 
VOL. XIV. 



Dhulia, iv. 2S2 ; Digras, iv. 287 ; 
Faizpur, iv. 389; Gadarwara, iv. 457; 
Garag, v, 10; Haveri, v. 358; Hin- 
ganghat, V. 421; Hingoli, v. 422; 
Hubli, V. 467 ; Ja'gaon, vii. 104 ; 
Jammalammadugu, vii. 129 ; Kauriya, 
viii. 104 ; Khamgaon, viii. 143 ; 
Khiirja, viii. 212 ; Kumpta, viii. 360, 
361; Manikar Char, ix. 319; Mirpur 
Khas, ix. 451; Narsinghpur, x. 224; 
Nawabganj, x. 248; Patna, xi. 1 12; 
Pisangan, xi. 188 ; Raipur, xi. 378 ; 
Rajapur (N.-W. P.), xi. 385; Rani- 
bennur, xi. 503 ; Sahiwal, xii. 137 ; 
Salaya, xii. 149 ; Sankeswar, xii. 222 ; 
.Sarsa, xii. 270; Sarsaganj, xii. 271; 
Selu, xii. 307; Seoni, xii. 315, 316; 
Shahganj,xii. 342; Shegaon, xii. 377 ; 
in Sind, xii. 521 ; Surat, xiii. 134 ; 
Tadpatri, xiii. 160 ; Tuticorin, xiii. 
386 ; Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 413 ; 
Vadagenhalli, xiii. 460 ; Wadhwan, 
xiii. 506 ; Wardha, xiii. 529. 
Cotton, Weaving and manufacture of. 
Local notices — Abiranian, i. 3 ; Adoni, 
i. 26 ; Istalif in Afghanistan, i. 34 ; 
Afzalgarh, i. 57 ; Agra, i. 65 ; Agror, 
i. 78 ; Ahmadabad, i. 96 ; Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 104 ; Akalkot, i. 137 ; Akola, 
i. 144 ; Aliabad, i. 165 ; Alipur, i. 
181; Ambala, i. 222; Amethi Dungar, 
i. 231 ; Amraoti, i. 251 ; Anantapur, 
i. 278 ; Andhargaon, i. 287 ; Anji, i. 292 ; 
Anupshahr, i. 295 ; Arakan Hill Tracts, 
i. 302 ; North Arcot, i. 317 ; South 
Arcot, i. 326 ; Armori, i. 331 ; Ami, 
i. 331 ; Assam, i. 367 ; Athni, i. 378 ; 
Attikuppa, i. 381 ; Bagalkot, i. 413 ; 
Bahraich, i. 432 ; Balasor, ii. 9 ; Bal- 
rampur, ii. 26 ; Banga, ii. 58 ; Banga- 
lore, ii. 64 ; Bankura, ii. 85 ; Bara 
Banki, ii. 1 13; Baragaon, ii. I17 ; 
Barha, ii. 149 ; Basim, ii. 187 ; Batala, 
ii. 216 ; Behar, ii. 228 ; Belgaum, ii. 
236 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; Bengal, ii. 30S, 
309 ; Betul, ii. 332 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 
350 ; Bhandara, ii. 365 ; Bhdnder, ii. 
368 ; Bhaunagar, ii. 380 ; Bhavani, ii. 
383 ; Bhera, ii. 386 ; Bhiwapur, ii. 
401 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bijnaur 
(N.-W. P.), li. 435; Bijnaur (Oudh), 
ii. 436; Bilaspur, ii. 451 ; Birbhum, 
iii. 9 ; Biria, iii. 12 ; Bisalnagar, iii. 
14; Bishnupur, iiii 16; Bitraganta, iii. 
20; Bombay, iii. 58; Bori, iii. 89; 
Brahmapuri, iii. 93; Broach, iii. 1 14; 
Buldana, iii. 147; Burhanpur, iii. 165 ; 
Cachar, iii. 235, 236 ; Cambay, iii. 
272 ; Cawnpur, iii. 292 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 319; Chakwal, iii. 327; 
Champa, iii. 332 ; Champaran, iii. 343 ; 
Chanda, iii. 354, 355 ; Chandj^ur, iii. 
361 ; Chandrakona, iii. 364 ; ChengaU 

F 



82 



INDEX. 



pat, iii. 3S7 ; Chhindwara, iii. 402 ; 
Chicacole, iii. 407; Chiknayakan-halli, 
iii. 411 ; Cliikori, iii. 412; Chimur, iii. 
417; Chiniot, iii. 41S; Chirala, iii. 
421; Chitaldrug, iii. 426, 428; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 441 ; Closepet, iii. 471 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 19; Coorg, iv. 38; 
Cuddalore, iv. 45 ; Cuddapah, iv. 53 ; 
Cutch, iv. 62; Cuttack, iv. 72; Daliba, 
iv. 76; Dacca, iv. 85; Dain-hat, iv. 
95; Daman, iv. 103; Darbhangah, iv. 
125; by the Lepchas in Darjiling, iv. 
137; Daudnagar, iv. 158; Deoband, 
iv. 199; Deodar, iv. 200; Deori, iv. 
205 : DeraGhazi Khan, iv. 218 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan, iv. 225 ; Deulgaon Raja, 
iv. 230; Dhandhuka, iv. 243; Dhanori, 
iv. 244; Dhapewara, iv. 245; Dhar- 
angaon, iv. 250; Dharvvar, iv. 264; 
Dholka, iv. 272; Dhrangadra, iv. 279; 
Dhrol, iv. 279; Dhiilia, iv. 282; Dod- 
ballapur, iv. 311; Dodderi, iv. 31 1; 
Drug, iv.^ 317 ; Etawah, iv. 379 ; 
Farukhabad, iv. 415; Fatehpur(Oudh), 
iv. 431 ; Gadarwara, iv. 457; Gambat, 
iv. 460 ; Ganjam, v. 9 ; Garhakota, v. 
13; Garo Hills, V. 31 ; Godavari, v. 
129; Gokak, v. 142; Gondal, v. 157 ; 
Gubbi, v. 176; Gudiatham, v. 177; 
Gudur, v. 178; Gujrat, V. 197; Guled- 
garh, v. 197; Gumgaon, V. 198; Gur- 
daspur, V. 212; Gurgha, v. 224; Berar, 
V. 270; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 282; 
Hamirpur, v. 304; Hanthawadi, v. 316; 
Hassan, v. 349 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 400 ; 
Hissar, v. 432 ; Hongal, v. 440 ; 
Hoshangabad, v. 447 ; Hoshiarpur, 
V. 456, 458; Hospet, V. 459; Hugh', 
V. 496 ; Ikhtiyarpur, v. 508 ; Inchal- 
karanji, v. 510 ; Indapur, v. 510 ; 
Islamabad, vii. 26; Jabalpur, vii. 35 ; 
Tafarabad, vii. 39 ; Jaggayapet, vii. 42 ; 
Jahangirabad, vii. 45 ; Jais, vii. 65 ; 
Jaitpur, vii. 71 ; Jalalpur-Nahvi, vii. 81 ; 
Jalandhar, vii. 89 ; Jalaun, vii. 100 ; 
Jalna, vii. 107; Jamkhandi, vii. 127; 
Jammalammadugu, vii. 129 ; Janjira, 
vii. 139 ; Jaswantnagar, vii. 147 ; 
Jawad, vii. 161 ; Jehlam, vii. 175 ; 
Jhalod, vii. 203; Jhang, vii. 21 1, 213 ; 
Jirang, vii. 233 ; Jodhpur, vii. 239 ; 
Junagarh, vii. 262 ; Kadur, vii. 287 ; 
Kaimganj, vii. 298 ; Kaira, vii. 306 ; 
Kakori, vii. 312; Kakraul, vii. 312; 
Kaladgi, vii. 319; Kalahasti, vii. 321 ; 
Kalawar, vii. 324 ; Kalmeshwar, vii. 
339; Kanauj, vii. 3S7 ; Kandeli, vii. 
399; Kandiaro, vii. 406; Karauli, vii. 
473 ; Karkamb, viii. 13 ; Karmala, 
viii. 17; Karnal, viii. 25, 29; Karniil, 
viii. 41 ; Karwaitnagar, viii. 53 ; Kash- 
mor,viii. 79; Kasipur,viii. 82; Katangi, 
viii. 86; Kavali, viii. 105; Kerur, viii. 



117; Khairpur, viii. 135, 137; Khan 
dash, viii. 157; Klianpur, viii. 164 
Khanwahan, viii. 164 ; Kliapa, viii 
165; Khasi Hills, viii. 178; Kheri 
viii. 196; Khipra, viii. 202; Khirpai 
viii. 203; Khora, viii. 204; Khushab 
viii. 213; Kishangarh,viii. 224; Kistna 
viii. 232; Kittur, viii. 238; KodUpet 
viii. 240 ; Kohlat, viii. 248 ; Kolar 
viii. 277; Kolhapur, viii. 284; Kong 
noli, viii. 288 ; Kopaganj, viii. 292 
Kotah, viii. 306 ; Kotar, viii. 310 
Kuch Behar, viii. 324 ; Kursi, viii 
374; Kurundwad, viii. 376; Kyauk 
pyu, viii. 387 ; Lahul, viii. 422 
Lakhtar, viii. 441 ; Larkhana, viii 
464, 465 ; Limri, viii. 472 ; Lodhi 
kera, viii. 473; Lohardaga, viii. 4S5 
Lucknovv, viii. 500; Ludhiana, viii 
523. 524, 526 ; Machhreta, viii. 535 
Madapollam, viii. 537; Madgiri, viii 
540; Madras Presidency, ix. 53, 54 
Madura, ix. 130; Maherwar, ix. 173 
Malabar, ix. 233 ; Mallani, be. 261 
IManbhum, ix. 284; Mandla, ix. 305 
Mangalore, ix. 314; Manglaur, ix. 316 
Mamar, ix. 318; Manjhand, ix. 335 
Mannargudi, ix. 338 ; ^Nlariadeh, ix 
346 ; Masulipatam, ix. 354 ; Mau 
ix. 369 ; Maunagar, ix. 372 ; Mau 
Natbhanjan, ix. 373 ; Maunda, ix. 373 
Mayavaram, ix. 373; Mehar, ix. 397 
Mehkar, ix. 399; Melukote, ix. 404 
Miraj, ix. 440; Mohan, ix. 474; Mont 
gomery, ix. 500; Moradabad, ix. 513 
INIoro, ix. 517 ; Mowar, ix. 523 
Mubarakpur, ix. 525 ; Mudhol, ix. 527 
Miil, ix. 535; Multan, x. 13; Muzal 
fargarh, X. 63 ; Mysore, x. 120; Nabisar 
X. 127; Naga Hills, x. 153; Nagar 
Parkar, x. 158; Nagina, x. 160; Nag- 
pur, X. 174; Najibabad, x. 179; Nama- 
kal, X. 187; Narajol, x. 203; Narsipur, 
X. 225 ; Nasarpur, x. 228 ; Yeola, 
X. 233; Nasik, x. 237; Naushahro, 
X. 244, 245 ; Nawanagar, x. 252 ; 
Nawashahr, x. 254 ; Nellore, x. 269 ; 
Nepal, X. 284; Neri, x. 291 ; Nilgiri 
Hills, X. 321 ; Noakhali, x. 350 ; 
Nosari, x. 405 ; Nowgong, x. 412 ; 
Pali, xi. 2; Pamidi, xi. 24; Panipat, 
xi. 47 ; Parmagiidi, xi. 65 ; Parner, 
xi. 66; Parseoni, xi. 67; Anhilwara 
Patan, xi. 82 ; Patan Saongi, xi. 84 ; 
Pauni, xi. 120; Peshawar, xi. 155; 
Petlad, xi. 162; Phaltan, xi. 164; 
Pilkhuwa, xi. 180; Pind Dadan Khan, 
xi. 183; Pindigheb, xi. 1 84; Pondi- 
cherri, xi. 199; Poona, xi. 209, 214; 
Porbandar, xi. 215; Pudiikattai, xi. 
238 ; Pullampet, xi. 241 ; Punjab, 
xi. 287; Puri, xi. 308; Rahatgarh, 
xi. 346; Rahon, xi. 347; Rai Bareli, 



INDEX. 



83 



xi. 357; Kaigarli, xi. 362; Ramding, 
xi. 441,442; Rangoon, xi. 479; Rania, 
xi. 502 ; Ranibenmir, xi. 503 ; Ranipur, 
xi. 509; Rath, xi. 51S; Raver, xii. 14; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 32, 38; Rayachoti, 
xii. 39; Recti, xii. 43; Rohri, xii. 65 ; 
Rohtak,xii. 75; Rupar,xii. 83; Sachin, 
xii. 88; Sadalgi, xii. 91; Sadhaura, 
xii. 93 ; Sadras, xii. 95 ; Saharanpur, 
xii. 122; Sahaspur, xii. 125; Saidapet, 
xii. 139; Salem, xii. 163, 166; Sam- 
balpur, xii. 183, 184; Sambhal, xii. 
187; Sampgaon, xii. 191 ; Sandoway, 
xii. 203; Sangamner, xii. 216, 217; 
Sangarhi, xii. 217; Sanivassante, xii. 
221 ; Sankeswar, xii. 222; Santal Par- 
ganas, xii. 234 ; Santipur, xii. 247 ; 
Saoli, xii. 247 ; Saoner, xii. 248 ; 
Sarai Saleh, xii. 250; Saran, xii. 257 ; 
Sarangarh, xii. 260; Sarguja, xii. 268 ; 
Sarjapur, xii. 269; Satara, xii. 282; 
Savanur, xii. 293 ; Sayyidnagar, xii. 
299; .Sehwan, xii. 305, 306; Selu, 
xii. 307; Seoni, xii. 313; Shahabad, 
xii. 332; Shahapur, xii. 338; Shikar- 
pur, xii. 393, 396; Shikohabad, xii. 
398; Shimoga, xii. 404; Shivgaon, xii. 
410; Sholapur, xii. 418, 421; Sialkot, 
xii. 448, 452; Sibi, xii. 456; Sibsagar, 
xii. 468; Sihora, xii. 477; Sindewahi, 
xii. 525; Sindi, xii. 526; Singhbhiim, 
xii. 539 ; the Singpho Hills, xii. 542 ; 
Sirsa, xiii. 20; Sisotar, xiii. 24; Sita- 
pur, xiii. 36; Songir, xiii. 61 ; Sonpur, 
xiii. 63; Subeha, xiii. 86; Sultanpur, 
xiii. loi ; Siipul, xiii. 117; Surat, xiii. 
129; Surharpur, xiii. 137; Sylhet, xiii. 
153; Talagong, xiii. 162; Tanda, xiii. 
174, 175; Tando Muhammad Khan, 
xiii. 178, 179; Tari Baragaon, xiii. 
213; Tatta, xiii. 218; Thakurdwara, 
xiii. 246; Thana, xiii. 257; Thar and 
Parkar, xiii. 270; Tharu Shah, xiii. 
274; Thathayangarpet, xiii. 274; Tijara, 
xiii. 294; Tipperah, xiii. 319; Tiruch- 
engod, xiii. 324; Tiriinageswaram, xiii. 
325; 'I'richinopoli, xiii. 361; Tumkiir, 
xiii. 379; Tumsar, xiii. 382; Turu- 
wanur, xiii. 384 ; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xiii. 397; Umarkot, xiii. 421; 
Umrer, xiii. 423 ; Unao, xiii. 434 ; 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 447 ; Urai, 
xiii. 450 ; Viravanallur, xiii. 478 ; 
Vizagapatam, xiii. 493, 494, 498 ; 
Wadhwan, xiii. 506; Waigaon, xiii. 
510; Walajapet, xiii. 515; Walidpur, 
xiii. 516; \Vankaner, xiii. 519; Waso, 
xiii. 533; \Vun, xiii. 544; Veola, xiii. 
555; Zaidpur, xiii. 560. 
Cotton trees, in the Andaman Islands, 
i. 282 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 343 ; Eastern 
Dwars, iv. 328 ; Himalaya Mountains, 
V. 409 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 108 ; Karauli, 



vii. 471 ; Nepal, x. 277 ; Sikkim, xii. 

484 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; Sultanpur, 

xiii. 97. 
Cotton, Sir Arthur, his anicut across the 

Coleroon, iii. 279, iv. 22 ; across the 

Godavari, v. 133 ; his deepening of the 

Panibam Passage, xi. 22, 23 ; designed 

the Penner anicut, xi. 134; his works 

in Tanjore, xiii. 190. 
Cotton, Sir J. S., commanded the river 

column in first Burmese war (1S25), 

xiii. 289. 
Cotton, Colonel, commanded the column 

in Muttra in 1857, x. 47. 
Cotton, INIajor, took Pegu (1852), xi. 128. 
Couper, Sir G. E. W., Lieut. -Governor 

of the N.-W. ProN-inces (1876-82), x. 

370. 
Court, General, his estimate of the popu- 
lation of Kandahar, vii. 390 ; explored 

the sliipa at ]\Ianikiala (1834), ix. 320; 

suggested that Arrian's Mount Aornos 

was near Attock, xi. 506. 
Courtallum, %-illage in ]\Iadras, iv. 44. 
Courts, Number of civil and criminal. See 

Administration section under each 

Pro^^nce and District. 
Couts, The Decadas of de, quoted, on 

Broach, iii. 1 13 ; Elephanta, iv. 343. 
Covelong, village in Madras, iv. 44 ; or 

Coblem, old settlement of the Ostend 

East India Company, vi. 373. 
Covilham, earliest recorded Portuguese 

traveller to Cochin (1487), article 

' India,' \A. 357 ; Jesuit missionary in 

India, killed in 1500, vi. 244; at Cali- 
cut (1486), iii. 269. 
Cowcally. See Geonkhali. 
Cowell, Prof., on the toh or Sanskrit 

schools, X. 138. 
Cowrie shells, found in the Laccadive 

Islands, viii. 396 ; Maldive Islands, 

ix. 251. 
Cox, Captain, placed in charge of the 

Magh fugitives from Arakan into Chit- 

tagong(i799), iv. 45. 
Cox's Bazar, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, iv. 44, 45. 
Coxe, Colonel, put down symptoms of 

mutiny in Dera Ismail Khan (1857), 

iv. 222. 
Cranganore. See Kranganur. 
Craigie, Capt., defended Kilat-i-Ghilzai 

(1842), i. 34, 35. 
Crape, Rodant, first Danish captain who 

came to India, and obtained settlement 

at Tranquebar (1616), xiii. 340. 
Crawford, Lt.-Col., proposed the making 

of the Vehar Reservoir to secure the 

water-supply of Bombay, xiii. 466. 
Crawfurd, Mr., quoted, on Ava, i. 389, 

390 ; his estimate of the population of 

Upper Burma, iii. 213. 



84 



INDEX. 



Creighton, H., first explored the ruins of 

Gaur (1801), V. 37, 39. 
Cretinism, Notices of, in Ambala, i. 224 ; 

Champaran, iii. 344 ; Kulu, viii. 344 ; 

Kumdun, viii. 357. 
Crichton, Capt., Deputy Commissioner 

of Chanda, suppressed rising of Babu 

Rao and Vyankat Rao in 1857, iii. 351. 
Criminal classes or tribes, described, in 

Aligarh, i. 176 ; North Arcot, i. 315 ; 

Belgaum, ii. 232 ; Budaun, iii. 120 ; 

Champaran, iii. 338 ; Cuddapah, iv. 

51 ; Dharwar, iv. 260; Gonda, v. 155, 

156 ; Gaya, v. 46, 52 ; Gurgaon, v. 

218 ; Hazaribagh, v. 373; Karnal, viii. 

26; Lalitpur, viii. 447, 451, 456; 

Madras, ix. 20, 21 ; Malia, ix. 256 ; 

Western Malwa, ix. 269 ; Mewat, ix. 

419, 420 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 70 ; 

Nallamalai Hills, x. 186 ; Rajgarh, xi. 

386 ; Rajputana, xi. 413, 415 ; Sajar, 

xii. 104, 105 ; Saran, xii. 257. 
Criminal statistics. See the Administra- 
tive section at the close of every Dis- 
trict article. 
Criminal Tribes Act, article ' India,' 

vi. 71. 
Criminale, Father Antonio, martyred at 

Punnaikayal in Tinnevelli (1549), xiii. 

3°3- 
Crocodiles, article ' India,' vi. 660, 661. 

Local notices — Bakarganj, i. 442 ; 

Bulandshahr, iii. 133 ; Karunguli tank 

in Chengalpat, iii. 383 ; Darbhangah, 

iv. 123; Dehra Dun, iv. 170; Dinaj- 

pur, iv. 291 ; Etawah, iv. 370 ; Gaur, 

V. 40 ; Gonda, v. 147 ; Gwalior, v. 

229 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; in the Indus, vii. 

14 ; Karachi, vii. 445 ; Karauli, vii. 

472 ; Kheri, viii. 191 ; Lahore, viii. 

405 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 94 ; 

Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Montgomery, ix. 

495 ; Saran, xii. 252 ; in the Tungab- 

hadra, xiii. 383. 

Crole, Mr., quoted, on the remains at 
Mahabalipur, ix. 144, 145 ; on the 
battle of St. Thomas' Mount (1759), 
xii. 143, 144. 

Crops, of the Himalayas, article ' India,' 
vi. 8 ; of the river plains and Gangetic 
Delta, vi. 32, 35 ; of Southern India, 
vi. 40, 41 ; of Burma, vi. 42. See 
also vol. vi. chapter xvii.. Agriculture 
and Products, pp. 484-511 ; and the 
Agricultural section of each District 
article. 

Crop statistics for India, Uncertainty of, 
vi. 500, 501. 

Croton, grown at Dindigal, iv. 301. 

Crozier, Mr., manager of the Viziana- 
gram Estate, xiii. 488, 501. 

Crushed tribes, vi. 71. 

Crystals, Rock, found at Dharmapuram, 



iv. 251 ; Madura, ix. 122 ; Tanjore, 
xiii. 181. 

Csoma de Koros lived for some years at 
Kanum, vii. 43S ; Life and Works of, 
by Dr. Theodore Duka, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 153 (footnote). 

Cubbon, Sir Mark, his successful admini- 
stration of Mysore (1834-61), x. 95; 
his house at Nandidrug, x. 192. 

Cuddalore, town and tdltik in Madras, iv. 

45' 46. 

Cuddapah, District in Madras, iv. 47-55 ; 
physical aspects, 47, 48 ; history, 48- 
50 ; population, 50, 51 ; agriculture, 
51, 53 ; natural calamities, 53 ; com- 
merce and trade, 53, 54 ; administra- 
tion, 54 ; medical aspects, 54) 55- 

Cuddapah, taluk in Madras, iv. 55. 

Cuddapah, town in Madras, iv. 55, 56. 

Cullen, Gen., introduced coffee cultiva- 
tion into Travancore, xiii. 349. 

Culna. See Kalna. 

Cultivated, cultivable, and uncullivable 
area, etc., of certain Provinces of 
British India, vi. 691, Appendix III. 

Cultivators, Rights of, reserved by the 
Permanent Settlement of Bengal, vi. 
442, 443 ; oppression of, by rack-renting 
landlords, 443 ; the Land Act of 1859, 
444 ; Rent Commission of 1879, and 
its proposed reforms in the direction of 
fixity of occupancy and compensation 
for disturbance, 444, 445. 

Cumbum, town in Ivladras, iv. 57. 

Cunningham, Sir A., Corpus Inscrip- 
tioniim Iiidicancm, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 103 (footnote) ; 144 (foot- 
note) ; 145 (footnote) ; 146 (footnotes) ; 
153 (footnote 2) ; 167 (footnote i) ; 
Ancient Geography of India, 155 (foot- 
note) ; 157 (footnote l) ; 164 (footnotes 
I and 3) ; 165 (footnote) ; 166 (foot- 
note i) ; 167 (footnote 3) ; 185 (foot- 
note 2) ; Rep07-ts of the Archizological 
Survey of India, 184 (footnote I). 
Local notices — Quoted as to Allahabad, 
i. 196 ; Asariir, i. 337 ; Atari, i. 375 ; 
Atranji Khera, i. 3S0 ; Bahraich, i. 
427 ; Benares, ii. 107 ; Bareilly, ii. 
141 ; Bhera, ii. 3S6 ; Buddh Gaya, iii. 
125, 126 ; Champaran District, iii. 
334. 335. .340., 341 .;. Charsadda, iii. 
yj'i, ; Chilianwala, iii. 415 ; the city 
of Indraprastha, iv. 179 ; Delhi, iv. 
189; Dheri Shahan, iv. 269, 270; 
Dipalpur, iv. 303, 304 ; Giriyak, v. 
85 ; Mong, v. 189, ix. 478 ; Gujrat, v. 
196 ; Gwalior, v. 235 ; Harappa, v. 
319; Hardwar, v. 331, 332; Hasht- 
nagar, v. 344 ; Tandwa in Ikauna, v. 
507; Jalalpur, vii. 81, 166; Sangla- 
vvala Tiba, vii. 207 ; Kalinga, vii. 328- 
330; Kapila, vii. 440 ; Kasia, viii. 79; 



INDEX. 



85 



Kasipur, viii. 82 ; Katas, viii. 87 ; 
Kesariya, viii. iiS; Kliajura.hu, viii. 
140 ; Kurukshetra, viii. 375 ; Ladakh, 
viii. 397; Maharashtra, ix. 166-168; 
Manikiala, ix. 320 ; Matan, ix. 360 ; 
the course of the Ravi, x. 2 ; Mi'iltan, 
X. 3, 4 ; Padrauna, x. 527 ; Pakpattan, 
X. 532 ; Patna," xi. 107 ; Rajagriha, 
xi. 380, 381 ; Rajamahendri, xi. 382 ; 
Ranigat, xi. 506 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 
36; Sahet Mahet, xii. 126-134; San- 
gala, xii. 213, 214 ; Sankisa, xii. 223, 
224 ; Sharwa, xii. 271 ; Shorkot, xii. 
424 ; Sialkot, xii. 441 ; the Son, xiii. 
53 ; Sonpat, xiii. 62 ; demarcated the 
boundaries of Spiti (1846), xiii. 70; 
quoted as to Sugh, xiii. 88 ; Talamba, 
xiii. 163 ; Thaneswar, xiii. 260 ; Uchh, 
xiii. 400. 

Currency, in Baroda, ii. 168 ; Bastar, ii. 
207 ; Independent (now Upper) Burma, 
iii. 219 ; Haidarabad State, v. 248 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 54 ; Karauli, vii. 473 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 75 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 
320 ; Manipur, ix. 332 ; Nepal, x. 
283, 284 ; Savanur, xii. 293 ; Sohag- 
pur, xiii. 47 ; Srinagar (N.-\V. P.), 
xiii. 78 ; Trivandrum, xiii. 369. 

Cust, Mr. R. N., Linguistic and Orienial 
Essays, quoted, vi. 103 (footnote). 

Customs, inland lines, abolished by 
Lord Mayo, vi. 425 ; import duties 
abolished by Lord Ripon, vi. 429. 

Customs revenue, vi. 467. 

Customs, manners, and mode of life of the 
Afghans, i. 45-47 ; of the Akas, i. 
136 ; of the Andamanese, i. 284, 285 ; 
of the Arakan Hill Tribes, i. 300, 301 ; 
of the Baluchis, ii. 38, 39 : of the 
Hatkars, ii. 185, 186 ; in Bastar, ii. 
207, 20S ; of the Korachavandlu, ii. 
244 ; of the Kurkus, ii. 330, 331 ; in 
Bhandara, ii. 363 • of the Bhils and 
Bhilalas, ii. 389-391 ; of the Bhutias, 
ii. 412, 413 ; of the Brahuis, iii. 98- 
100 ; of the hill tribes in Lower Burma, 
iii. 183-185 ; of the Burmese, iii. 185- 
188 ; of the Marias and Maris, iii. 
307 ; of the Gonds, iii. 308-311 ; of 
the Chittagong Hill Tribes, iii. 449, 
450 ; of the Chutiyas, iii. 466, 467 ; 
of the Coorgs, iv. 34, 35 ; of the 
Daphlas, iv. 119; of the Mechs, iv. 
332 ; of the Chandals, iv. 400, 401 ; 
of the Garos, v. 28-30 ; of the Shins 
and Yeshkiins, v. 80, 81 ; of the 
Hazaras, v. 366 ; of the Tipperahs, v, 
399 ; of the Bishnois, v. 429 ; of the 
Juangs, vii. 250-252 ; of the Siahposh 
"Kafirs, vii. 290-292 ; of the Kandh>, 
vii. 401-405; of the Kangra tribes, 
vii. 420-422 ; of the Karens, viii. 3-5 ; 
of the Kashmiris, viii. 70 ; of the 



Khamtis, viii. 145, 146 ; of the Khasis, 
viii. 175 ; of the Kols, viii. 254-259 ; 
of the Kotas, viii. 301 ; of the Kur- 
umbas, viii. 376 ; of the Laccadive 
islanders, viii. 395, 396 ; of the 
Ladakhis, viii. 398, 399 ; of the 
Lushais, viii. 530 ; of the Nairs, ix. 
227, 228, xiii. 348, 349 ; of the Malay- 
alls, ix. 238, 239 ; of the Maldive 
islanders, ix. 250, 251 ; of the Mani- 
puris, ix. 329, 330 ; of the Korkus, ix. 
403, 404 ; of the Meos, ix. 419, 420 ; 
of the Mikirs, ix. 436, 437, x. 15 1 ; 
of the Miris, ix. 445-450 ; of the 
Mishmis, ix. 463-465 ; of the Kurubas, 
X- 98, 99 ; of the Nagas, x. 147-150 ; 
of the Kukis, x. 150, 151 ; of the 
Naikdas, x. 177 ; of the Chenchus, x. 
185, 186 ; of the Nicobarians, x. 296, 
297 ; of the Nilgiri Hill tribes, x. 309- 
313 ; of the Palni Hill tribes, xi. 17, 
18; of the Minas, xi. 413, 414; of 
the Moghias, xi. 415 ; of the Rewa 
Kantha Bhils, xii. 51, 52 ; of the 
Kolis, xii. 52, 53 ; of the Santals, xii. 
240-246 ; of the Hos or Larka Kols in 
Singhbhum, xii. 534, 535, 536 ; of the 
Chins, xiii. 2S0-282 ; of the Namburis, 
xiii. 348 ; of the Banjaras of Wun, xiii. 
541, 542. 

Cutch, State in Gujarat, iv. 57-64 ; 
physical aspects, 57, 58 ; the Rann, 
58, 59 ; earthquakes, 59, 60 ; minerals, 
etc., 60; population and history, 60, 
61 ; agriculture, 61, 62 ; trade and 
manufactures, 62 ; administration, 62- 
64 ; medical aspects, 64 ; silver 
jewellery of, vi. 605. 

Cutlery, Manufacture of, article ' India,' 
vi. 606. Local notices, including 
knives, swords, etc. etc. — Amod, i. 
245 ; Balrampur, ii. 26 ; Sojitra and 
Pattan in Baroda, ii. 159 ; Bhera, ii. 
386 ; Bijnaur, ii. 435 ; Chhatarpur, iii. 
396 : Kaimganj, vii. 298 ; Khairpur, 
viii. 137 ; Khairpur Dharki, viii. 138 • 
Kurwai, viii. 378 ; Lashkarpur, viii. 
466 ; INIandalay, ix. 290, 291 ; Mon- 
ghyr, ix. 487 ; Panipat, xi. 47 ; Anhil- 
wara Patan, xi. 82 ; Peshawar, xi. 
154; Rampur, xi. 459; Salem, xii. 
163 ; Sialkot, xii. 448 ; Sirohi, xiii. 
7 ; Virawah, xiii. 478. 

Cuttack, District in Orissa, iv. 64-75 ! 
physical aspects, 64, 65 ; rivers, 65, 
66 ; estuaries and harbours, 66, 67 ; 
canals, 67, 68 ; embankments, 68 ; 
history, 68 ; population, 68-70 ; agri- 
culture, etc., 70-72 ; natural calamities, 
72; manufactures, 72; commerce, trade, 
etc., 73 ; administration, 73, 74 ; 
medical aspects, 74, 75. 

Cuttackj Sub-division of Orissa, iv. 75. 



86 



JNDEX. 



Cuttack, town in Orissa, iv. 75. 

Cutwa. Sec Katwa. 

Cyclones, prevalent in the Andaman 
Islands, i. 286 ; North Arcot, i. 317 ; 
South Arcot, i. 325 ; Bakarganj, i. 
446 ; Balasor, ii. 8 ; Bassein, ii. 200 ; 
Bellary, ii. 246, 247 ; Calcutta, iii. 260, 
261 ; Chengalpat, iii. 386 ; Chittagong, 
iii. 437, 440 ; Dakshin Shahbazpur, 
iv. 96 ; Daulat Khan, iv. 160 ; Dia- 
mond Harbour, iv. 284 ; Geonkhalf, 
V. 54 ; Godavari, v. 130, 131 ; Hatia, 
V. 356 ; Injaram, vii. 18 ; Khulna, 
viii. 20S ; Kistna, viii. 232 ; Kumaun, 
viii. 355 ; Laccadive Islands, viii. 396 ; 
Madras Presidency, ix. 79 ; Madras 
city, ix. 104, 113, 114; Masulipatam, 
i^- 355-357 ; on the Meghna, ix. 395 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 430 ; Naini Tal, x. 178 ; 
Noakhali, x. 340, 344, 349 ; Orissa, 
X. 463 ; Pabna, x. 519 ; Sagar Island, 
xii. no; Salem, xii. 162; Sandwip 
Island, xii. 212, 213 ; the Sundarbans, 
xiii. Ill, 112; Tanjore, xiii. 193 



D 



Dabein, tidal creek in Lower Burma, iv. 

Dabha, State in Bombay, iv. 76. 
Dabha, town in Central Provinces, iv. 

76- . . 

Dabhoi, town in Bombay, iv. 76. 

Dabhol, town and port in Bombay, iv. 

76, 77-. 
Dabka, village in Baroda, iv. 77. 
Dabla, town in Rajputana, iv. 77. 
Dabling, village in Bashahr State, Punjab, 

j^-.77- . 
Dabri, chiefship in Central India, iv. 77. 

Dabtura, village in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

77- . . . 

Dacca, Division or Commissionership of 

Bengal, iv. 77, 78. 
Dacca, District of Bengal, iv. 78-S9 ; 

physical aspects, 78-80; history, 80-82; 

population, 82-84 ! material condition 

of the people, 84, 85 ; agriculture, 85, 

86; industrial, 86, 87; administration, 

87, 88 ; medical aspects, 88, 89. 
Dacca, Sub-division of Bengal, iv. 89. 
Dacca, city in Bengal, iv. 89-92 ; Dacca 

muslins a decaying manufacture, vi. 

601. 
Da Cunha, Nuno, built first Portuguese 

fortress at Diu (1535), iv. 307. 
Da Cunha, 'Dr., Antiquities of Bassein, 

quoted, ii. 192. 
Dadar, town in Baluchistan, iv. 92. 
Dadhalya, estate in Bombay, iv. 92, 93. 
Dadri, village in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 93. 
Dadii, town and taluk in Sind, iv. 93. 



Dadu, religious reformer and sacred poet 
of Rajputana (i6th century), vi. 344. 

Dadu Panthis, the followers of Dadu 
found in Jaipur, vii. 53 ; Naraina, their 
head-quarters, x. 201 ; Rajputana, xi. 
416. 

Dae, Mr. Arcy, The Literature of Bengal, 
quoted, vi. 347 (and footnote) ; 348, 
349 (and footnote) ; 352 (footnote). 

Daflapur, town and estate in Bombay, iv. 

93. 94- 

Daga, creek in Lower Burma, iv. 94. 

Da Gama, Vasco. See Vasco da Gama. 

Dagshai, hill cantonment in Punjab, iv. 94. 

Da-gyaing, river in Lower Burma, iv. 94. 

Dahanu, town, port, and Sub-division in 
Bombay, iv. 94, 95. 

Dahi, State in Central India, iv. 95. 

Dahira, petty State in Kathiawar, iv. 95. 

Dahya. See Nomadic hill cultivation. 

Daingnete, hill tribe in Lower Burma, 
iii- 185. 

Dain-hat, town in Bengal, iv. 95. 

Dai-pai. See Deh-peh. 

Dajal, town in Punjab, iv. 95. 

Dakditi, or gang-robbery, notices of, in 
Amherst, i. 242 ; South Arcot, i. 327 ; 
Bakarganj, i. 448 ; Bellia, ii. 20 ; 
Bassein, ii. 195, 200 ; Damurdah, iv. 
321 ; Etah, iv. 359 ; Gaya, v. 52 ; 
Hazaribagh, v. 380 ; Hugh, v. 497 ; 
Jessor, vii. 190 ; Midnapur, ix. 432 ; 
Murshidabad, x. 30 ; by the Banjaras 
on the Nallamalai Hills, x. 186 ; 
Noakhali, x. 343 ; Orchha, x. 425 ; 
Palkonda Hills, xi. Ii ; Salwin Hill 
Tracts, xii. 176. 

Dakatia, river of Bengal, iv. 95, 96. 

Dakhineswar, village in Bengal, iv. 96. 

Dakor, town in Bombay, iv. 96. 

Dakshin. See Deccan. 

Dakshin Shahbazpur, island and Sub- 
division of Bengal, iv. 96, 97. 

Dala, suburb of Rangoon, iv. 97. 

Dala, creek in Lower Burma, iv. 97. 

Dala-nwun, river in Lower Burma, iv. 97. 

Dalat, river in Lower Burma, iv. 97. 

Daldis, a fishing race of Janjira, who 
supply boatmen for Bombay harbour, 
vii. 139. 

Dalgoma, village in Assam, iv. 97. 

Dalhousie, Lord, Governor - General of 
India (1848-56), article 'India,' vi. 
412-417 ; his administrative reforms, 
412 ; inauguration of the Indian rail- 
way system and the Public Works 
Department, 412 ; second Sikh war 
and annexation of the Punjab, 412, 
413 ; second Burmese war and an- 
nexation of Pegu, 413, 414 ; policy 
towards Native States, 414, 415 ; 
annexation of Oudh, and justification 
of the measure, 415-417 ; scheme of 



INDEX. 



87 



trunk militan' railways, 545. Local 
notices — Annexed Pegu, iii. 176, 227 ; 
Chini, his favourite hill residence, iii. 
418 ; appointed the Hiigli Committee, 
V. 483 ; its report on the James and 
Mary Sands, \-ii. 125 ; preferred 
climate of Kotagiri to Utakamand, 
viii. 303 ; had picture of Baillie's 
defeat, and Tipu's mausoleum at Seringa- 
patam, restored, xii. 320 ; deprived 
Wir AH Murad Talpur, of Khairpur, of 
certain districts in Shikarpur, for for- 
gery, xii. 391 ; allowed the Talpur 
Mirs to hve at Haidarabad (Sind), xii. 

Dalhousie, town, cantonment, and sani- 
tarium in Punjab, iv. 97, 98. 
Dalingkot, hill tract in Bengal, iv. 98. 
Dalli, estate in Central Provinces, iv. 98, 

99-, . . 

Dalma, hill in Bengal, iv. 99. 

Dalmau, town, tcihsil, and pargand in 
Oudh, iv. 99, 100. 

Dalmi, ruins in Bengal, iv. 100. 

Dalrymple, geographer, his map referred 
to on the Tsan-pu river, xiii. 371. 

Dalton, Col. E. T., Commissioner of 
Chutia Nagpur, iv. 100 ; V\% Ethnology 
of Bengal, quoted, vi. 167 (footnote) ; 
and quoted or referred to on the Abars, 
i. I ; the Ahams, i. 79 ; the Akas, 
i. 135 ; the Kalitas, iii. 86 ; the 
Bhuiyas, iii. 87 ; the Kurus, iii. 
367 ; on the Chutia Nagpur Tributary 
States, iii. 462 ; on the caves of 
Hathpor, v. 353, 354; the Juangs, 
vii. 249-252 ; the Khamtis, viii. 146 ; 
the Kols, viii. 254-259 ; on an old 
picture dated 1660, viii. 478 ; Kols 
and Uraons, viii. 480; the Bhumij Kols, 
ix. 280, 281 ; the Miris, ix. 445-450; 
the Mishmis, ix. 462 ; ruins at Palma, 
xi. 14 ; on the gateways on Ramgarh 
Hill, xi. 447 ; the Santals, xii. 237- 
246 ; on the history of Singhbhum, 
xii. 532-534 ; and the Kols there, xii. 

535> 536. 
Dalton, Capt., defeated the French at 

Trichinopoli, and defended that city, 

xiii. 356, 357. 
Daltonganj, town in Bengal, iv. 100. 
Daltonganj, coal-field in Bengal, iv. lOO. 
Dalus, a tribe on the Garo Hills, v. 28. 
Dalzell, Col., commanding the 42nd N. 

I., which mutinied at Sagar (1857), xii. 

103. 
Damalcherri, pass in Madras, iv. 100, 

lOI. 

Daman, tract of upland in the Punjab, 
iv. loi. 

Daman, Portuguese settlement in Gujarat, 
iv. 101-104; physical aspects, I02; agri- 
culture, 102; trade, etc., 102, 103; 



population, 103 ; administration, 103, 

104. 
Daman-i-Koh, tract of hill country in 

Bengal, iv. 104. 
Damant, Mr., Deputy Commissioner, 

killed by the Xagas at Khonoma 

(i879\,_x. 145. __ 
Damar Singh, Raja of Etah, rebelled in 

1857, and was deprived of his estates, 

iv. 360, 367. 
Damascened steel work, vi. 607. 
Dam-Dama. See Dum-Dum. 
Dam-ma-tha, town in Lower Burma, iv. 

104. 
Damodar, river in Bengal, iv. 105-107. 
Damodar coal tract, geology of the, vi. 

636-638. 
Danioh, District in Central Provinces, iv. 

107-114; physical aspects, 107, 108; 

histor}-, 108, 109 ; population, 109, 

1 10; division into town and country, 

lio, III; agriculture, ill, I12; 

commerce and trade, 1 12, 113; 

medical aspects, 113, 114. 
Damoh, town and tahsil in Central 

Provinces, iv. 114. 
Damsang. See Dalingkot. 
Dandis, a sect of Sivaite religious ascetics 

and mendicants, vi. 213, 214. 
Dangs, The, tract in Bombay, iv. II4- 

116. 
Dangurli, estate in Central Provinces, 

iv. 117. 
Danish East India Companies (1612 

and 1670) and their Settlements, article 

' India,' vi. 372. Local notices — 

Calicut, iii. 270 ; Kolachel, viii. 272 ; 

Nicobar Islands, x. 297 ; Porto Novo, 

xi. 222; .Serampur, xii. 318; Tran- 

quebar, xiii. 183, 340, 341. 
Danish missionaries, vi. 259, 260. See 

Missions. 
Dankar, village in Punjab, iv. 117. 
Dankaur, town in N.-W. Prov^inces, iv. 

"7;, 

Dankia, mountain in Sikkim, iv. 117. 
Danta, town and State in Gujarat, iv. 118. 
Dantewara, village in Bastar State, 

Central Provinces, iv. 118. 
Dantun, village in Bengal, iv. 118. 
Danut - Paya - gyi, pagoda in Lower 

Burma, iv. 118. 
D'Anville, geographer, believed the Ira- 

wadi to be identical with the Tsan-pu, 

vii. 19, xiii. 371. 
Da-moun, tidal creek in Lower Burma, 

iv. 118, 119. 
Danyal Mirza, son of Akbar, took 

Ahmadnagar (1599), i. 108; made 

Governor of Berar (1599), v. 262; 

Governor of Khandesh, viii. 152 ; 

Governor of the Deccan (1600), and 

drank himself to death, x. ^^o. 



88 



INDEX. 



Ddo or axe, Use of, in Assam, i. 362 ; 

Darjiling, iv. 134 ; Jainlia Hills, vii. 

49; Jalpaiguri, vii. 112; by the 

Angami Nagas, x. 148, 150, 152. 
Daos, name given to Cacharis, who refuse 

to be converted to Hinduism, iii. 231. 
Daphla Hills, tract of country bordering 

Assam, iv. 1 19, 120. 
Daphlas, aboriginal tribe in the mountains 

of Assam, i. 353 ; in Lakhimpur, viii. 

431- 

Dapoli, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iv. 120, 121. 

Dara, brother of Aurungzeb, was defeated 
by him at Ajmere (1659), i. 121 ; con- 
structed canal at Pasrur, xi. 80 ; w-as 
supported by the Rajput chiefs, xi. 405 ; 
defeated at Ujjain (1658), xiii. 417. 

Daraganj, suburb of Allahabad, N.-W. 
Provinces, iv. 12 1. 

Darapur, village in Punjab, iv. 122. 

Darapur. See Dharapuram. 

Darauti, village in Bengal, iv. 122. 

Darbelo, town in Sind, iv. 122. 

Darbhangah, District in Bengal, iv. 122- 
126 ; physical aspects, 122, 123 ; popu- 
lation, 123, 124; distribution of people 
into town and country, 124, 125 ; 
land tenures, 125; administration, 125, 
126 ; climate, 126. 

Darbhangah, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 
126. 

Darbhangah, town in Bengal, iv. 126-128. 

Dards, Aryan race of mountaineers in 
the Himalaya Mountains, v. 404, 412 ; 
and the Hindu Kush, v. 417, 418. 

Dareh-bauk,namegiven to northern mouth 
of Sahvin river, Lower Burma, iv. 128. 

Dareh-byu, creek in Lower Burma, iv. 
128. 

Darjiling, District in Bengal, iv. 128- 
140; physical aspects, 129- 13 1 ; history, 
I3i> 132; population, 132-134 ; agri- 
culture, 134, 135; tea, 135, 136; 
cinchona, etc., 136, 137; manufactures, 
trade, etc., 137; mines, 137, 138; 
administration, 138, 139 ; medical 
aspects, 139, 140. 

Darjiling, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 140. 

Darjihng, hill station in Bengal, iv. 140, 
141. 

Darkuti, hill in Punjab, iv. 141. 

Darman, town in Punjab, iv. 141. 

Daro, village in Sind, iv. 141. 

Darod, petty State in Kathiawar, iv. 141. 

Darrang, District in Assam, iv. 141-150 ; 
physical aspects, 142, 143 ; history, 
143, 144 ; population, 144-146 ; agri- 
culture, 146, 147 ; manufactures, etc., 
147, 148 ; administration, 148, 149 ; 
medical aspects, 149, 150. 

Darrangiri, village in Assam, iv, 150. 

Darsenda. See Kumharsin. 



Darsi, town, taluk, and estate in Madras, 

iv. 150, 151. 
Darwa, town and fdliik in Berar, iv. 151. 
Darwani, village in Bengal, iv. 151. 
Daryabad, town and pargand in Oudh, 

iv. 151, 152. 
Darya Kheri, State in Central India, iv. 

152. 
Daryapur, town and tdhik in Berar, iv. 

152. 
Dasai, town in Central India, iv. 152. 
Dasara, State in Kathiawar, iv. 152, 

,'53-, 
Dasarazupalli, village in Madras, iv. 153. 
Daska, town and /(///J-// in Punjab, iv. 153. 
Daskroi, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 

153. 154- 
Dasna, town in N.-\V. Provinces, iv. 154. 
Daspalla, tributary State of Orissa, iv. 

154- 
Dasuya, town and tahsil in Punjab, iv. 

155- 

Dasyus, the Aryan name for the non- 
Aryans or aborigines, vi. 53. 

Dataganj, town and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, iv. 155. 

Datana,chiefship in Central India, iv. 1515. 

Date palms, grown in Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 208 ; Faridpur, 
iY:.403 ; Jessor, vii. 383, 387 ; Karnal, 
viii. 19 ; Khairpur, viii. 136 ; Khisor 
Hills, viii. 203 ; Khulna, viii. 205, 
207 ; the Konkan, viii. 291 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 57 ; Mysore 
District, x. 114; Punjab, xi. 259; 
Secunderabad, xii. 302 ; Shorkot, xii. 
424 ; Sind, xii. 507, 520 ; Sitpur, xiii. 
39; Sukkur, xiii. 91 ; Surat, xiii. 119; 
Syamnagar, xiii. 143 ; Thana, xiii. 
251 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 466; 
Wardha, xiii. 523. See also Palms 
(unspecified). 

Datha, State in Kathiawar, iv. 155, 156. 

Dathweh-kyauk, river in Lower Burma, 
iv. 156. 

Dathweh-kyauk, village ih Lower Burma, 
iv. 156. 

Datia, State in Bundelkhand, iv. 156. 

Datia, town in Bundelkhand, iv. 156, 
157- 

Datiore, seaport in Bombay, iv. 157. 

Dattaw, stream in Lower Burma, iv. 157. 

Dattigaon, town in Central India, iv. 157. 

Datt's Bazar, village in Bengal, iv. 157. 

Daiid Khan, last Afghan king of Bengal, 
defeated by Mana'im Khan (1575), 
V. 36 ; retired into Orissa, and was 
killed (1578), x. 430. 

Daud Khan, administered the Deccan 
under Bahadur Shah, and was killed 
in battle (1716), v. 257; blockaded 
Madras (1702), ix. 103; took Vellore 
from the Marathas (1706), xiii. 467. 



INDEX. 



8g 



Daudnagar, town in Bengal, iv. 157, 158. 
Daudpur, village in Bengal, iv. 158. 
Daudputras, The, their authority in Upper 

Sind, xii. 51 1. 
Daudzai. See Doaba Daudzai. 
Daulatabad, historic capital in the Deccan, 

iv. 1 58- 160. 
Daulat Khan, village in Bengal, iv. 160. 
Daulatpur, village in Sind, iv. 160. 
Dauleswaram. See Dowlaishvaram. 
Daundia Khera, pargand in Oudh, iv. 

160, 161. 
Daiisa, town in Central India, iv. 161. 
Davangere, tcihik in Mysore, iv. 161. 
Davangere, town in Mysore, iv. 161. 
Davasi-Betta, peak in Mysore, iv. 161. 
David, Fort St., historic fort in Madras, 

iv. 162. 
Davids, Prof. Rhys, Btiddhism, quoted, 

article ' India,' vi. 137 (footnote) ; 

Buddhist Birth Stories, vi. 137 (foot- 
note). 
Davidson, Alexander, Governor of Madras 

(1785-86), ix. 67. 
Davies, Sir R. H., fifth Lt. -Governor of 

the Punjab, xi. 270 ; on Kunawar, 

xii. 500. 
Dawa, estate in Central Provinces, iv. 

162. 
Davver, town in Rajputana, iv. 162. 
Dawna, range of mountains in Lower 

Burma, iv. 162, 163. 
Day, Francis, chief of Settlement at 

Armagaon, purchased site of Madras 

(1639), and built factory there, ix. 103 ; 

his original building, ix. 106 ; founded 

the factory at Armagaon (1625'), x. 263. 
Day, Dr., on the resemblance of the /'a/a 

to the hilsa fish, vii. 14 ; on ruins of 

Kodungalur, viii. 240, 241 ; his Fishes 

of hidia, ix. 96 ; on Verapoli, xiii. 

471, 472. _ 
Daya, river in Orissa, iv. 163. 
Dayang or Doyong, river in Assam, iv. 

Day-labourers, their wages given in the 
different District articles. See also 
Landless day-labourers. 

Death-rate and average duration of life 
in India, vi. 666, 667 ; death and birth 
rates in different Provinces, vi. 667- 
679. 

Deaths by snake-bite and wild beasts. 
See Snake-bite and wild beasts, deaths 
by. 

Debar, lake in Central India, iv. 163. 

Debhata, village in Bengal, iv. 163. 

Debi Patan, village in Oudh, iv. 163, 164. 

Debt of India and its growth, vi. 469. 

Deccan, The, or Southern India, vi. 34- 
41 ; its mountain ranges and elevated 
table-land, 35, 36 ; mountain passes, 
36, 37 ; rivers, 37 ; forests, 38, 40 ; 



scenery, 40 ; crops, 40, 41 ; minerals, 
41 ; Maratha power in the Deccan, 

320, 322, 323, iy. 164, 166. 

Deccan Agriculturists' Relief Acts, a rural 

insolvency law, vi. 449, 450, xii. 2S0. 
Decennial Settlement, The (1789-91), 

vi. 393- 

Decline and fall of the Muglial Empire 
(1707-1857), vi. 312-316 ; chief events, 
312, 313 and footnote ; the six puppet 
kings, 313 ; independence of the 
Deccan and Oudh, 314 ; the Maratha 
chaiith, 314 ; invasions of Nadir Shah 
the Persian, and Ahmad Shah the 
Afghan, 314, 315 ; misery of the Pro- 
vinces, 315 ; third battle of Panipat, 
315 ; fall of the Empire, 315, 316. 

Decline and Fall of the Foman Empire, 
quoted, vi. 230 (footnote i); 239 (foot- 
note 2). 

Decline of the Peshwas (1772- 18 18), vi. 

321, 322. 

Decorative art in India, vi. 112, 113. 

Dedan, State in Kaihiawar, iv. 166. 

Dedarda, State in Kathiawar, iv. 166. 

Deeg. See Dig. 

Deer, Varieties of, article ' India,' vi. 657, 
658. Local notices — Mount Abu, i. 6 ; 
Ajmere, i. 119; Akola, i. 141; Am- 
ritsar, i. 255 ; Anamalai Hills, i. 270 ; 
Anantapur, i. 274 ; Andipatti Hills, i. 
288 ; Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 299 ; 
North Arcot, i. 312; South Arcot, 
i. 320 ; Assam, i. 349 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; 
Bankura, ii. 79 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; Bara 
Banki, ii. 106 ; Basti, ii. 209 ; Bel- 
gaum, ii. 232 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; Bhan- 
dara, ii. 361 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bogra, 
iii. 21 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 46 ; 
Buldana, iii. 143 ; Upper Burma, iii. 
212; Cawnpur, iii. 280; Chamba, iii. 
329 ; Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 435 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
iii. 448 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Coimbatore, 
iv. 15 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Darjiling, 
iv. 130 ; Dehra Dun, iv. 169 ; Dhar, 
iv. 246 ; Dharwar, iv. 259 ; Dinajpur, 
iv. 291 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; Giro 
Hills, V. 26 ; Godavari, v. 123 ; 
Gonda, v. 147 ; Goona, v. 159 ; Gur- 
daspur, v. 207 ; Gurgaon, v. 216 ; 
Gwalior, v. 229 ; Hardoi, v. 322 ; 
Hassan, v. 346 ; Hazaribagh, v. 370 ; 
Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; Himalaya 
IMountains, v. 409 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 
452 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Jerruck, 
vii. 180 ; Jhang, vii. 206 ; Jhansi, vii. 
217 ; Kadur, vii. 283 ; Kamrup, vii. 
355 ; North Kanara, vii. 370 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 377 ; Kangra, vii. 414 ; 
Karauli, vii. 471 ; Karnul, viii. 35, 36; 
Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Khairpur, viii. 133; 
Khandesh, viii. 150 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 



9° 



INDEX. 



173; Kheri, viii. 190; Kistna, viii. 
226 ; Kotah, viii. 304 ; Kumaun, viii. 
349 ; Lahore, viii. 405 ; Lai<himpur, 
viii. 427 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Lohar- 
daga, viii. 477 ; Madras Presidency, 
ix. 8, 90 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 192 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; 
INIallani, ix. 260 ; IMalwa, ix. 268 ; 
Manblium, ix. 279 ; Manipur, ix. 325 ; 
Melghat, ix. 403 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; 
Mergui Arcliipelago, ix. 412 ; Midna- 
pur, ix. 425 ; Mirzapur, ix. 453 ; Mon- 
ghyr, ix. 4S1 ; Montgomery, ix. 495 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 505 ; Murshidabad, x. 
22 ; Muzaffargarli, x. 58 ; Mysore, x. 
115; Naga Hills, x. 143; Nallamalai 
Hills, X. 185 ; Nasik, x. 228 ; Nellore, 
X. 262 ; Nepal, x. 278 ; Nilgiri Hills, 
X. 307 ; Nimar, x. 328 ; Noakhali, x. 
341 ; Patna, x. 512 ; Palkonda Hills, 
xi. II ; Palni Mountains, xi. 17 ; 
Peshawar, xi. 146, 147 ; Pilibhit, xi. 
172 ; Pishin, xi. 188 ; Polur, xi. 197 ; 
Poona, xi. 200 ; Punjab, xi. 259 ; 
Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rangpur, xi. 489 ; 
Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 23; 
Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; Rohtak, xii. 
69 ; Saharanpur, xii. 115 ; Salem, xii. 
152 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ; Sa- 
tara, xii. 277 ; Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; 
Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shajahanpur, xii. 
344 ; Shimoga, xii. 400 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
460; Singhbiii'im, xii. 531, 532; Sirohi, 
xiii. 3 ; Sirsa, xiii. 10 ; Sitapur, xiii, 
30 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; the Sundar- 
bans, xiii. 109, 189 ; Sylhet, xiii. 145; 
Tarai, xiii. 20S ; Thayet-myo, xiii. 
279 ; Travancore, xiii. 345 ; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xiii. 3S9 ; Wardha, xiii. 
524 ; Wi'in, xiii. 537. See also Bdra- 
singha or Swamp deer. Barking deer. 
Mouse deer. Musk deer, Ravine deer, 
Sdmbhar, and Spotted deer. 

Deesa. See Disa. 

Degam, seaport in Bombay, iv. 166, 167. 

Degh, river in Punjab, iv. 167. 

Dehej, seaport in Bombay, iv. 167. 

Dehli. See Delhi. 

Deli-peh, lake in Lower Burma, iv. 168. 

Dehra, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 168. 

Dehra Dun, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
iv. 168-176; physical aspects, 168-170; 
history, 170-172; population, 172-174; 
agriculture, 174, 175 ; commerce and 

. trade, etc., 175 ; administration, 175, 
176; medical aspects, 176. 

Dehri, town in Bengal, iv. 177. 

Dehwars, the cultivating communities of 
Khelat, viii. 188. 

Deighton, sent by Bengal Government to 
cede Tinnevelli to the Dutch for 1000 
men, xiii. 309. 



Delafosse, Major H. G., narrative of his 
escape from Cavvnpur and the fight at 
Baksar (1857), i. 451. 

Delamotte, Gen., took Manohar (1845), 
ix. 338. 

Delan Sa, Gond chief, rose in rebellion 
in Sagar (1842), xii. 102. 

Delia Valle (1623), mentions Honawar as 
a Portuguese settlement, v. 440. 

Delhi, Division or Commissionership in 
Punjab, iv. 177. 

Delhi, District in Punjab, iv. 177-185; 
physical aspects, 178, 179; history, 
179. 180 ; population, 180, 182 ; agri- 
culture, 182, 183; commerce and trade, 
183, 184; administration, 184, 185; 
medical aspects, 185. 

Delhi, tahsil vcv Punjab, iv. 185. 

Delhi, city in Punjab, iv. 185-197 ; 
history, 189 - 195 ; population, 195, 
196 ; institutions, public buildings, etc., 
196; communications, trade, 196, 197; 
siege and storm of, article ' India,' vi. 
421. 

Delisle, Lieut., proposed Vehar reservoir 
for water-supply of Bombay, xiii. 466. 

Delly, hill in Madras, iv. 197. 

Del Mar's History of Money in Ancient 
Countries, quoted, vi. 163. 

Delta of Bengal, vi. 23-28 ; deltaic distri- 
butaries, 23 ; combined delta of the 
Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna, 
24 ; deltaic swamps, 24 ; land-making, 
25 ; size of the Bengal delta, 26 ; 
deltaic depressions, 26 ; subterranean 
structure of the Bengal delta at Cal- 
cutta, 26 (footnote) ; alluvial deposits 
of the Ganges and Brahmaputra, 26, 
27 ; amount of silt deposited at Ghazi- 
pur and in the delta, 27, 28 ; age of 
the Bengal delta, 28. 

Deltaic channel of the Ganges, Section 
of, vi. 23. 

Demagiri, waterfall in Bengal, iv. 197. 

Demon-worship among the Puliyars, i. 
270 ; the Arakan hill tribes, i. 301 ; in 
Banka, ii. 74 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 347 ; 
Coorg, iv. 29; Madura, ix. 127; the 
Maldive Islands, ix. 250. 

Denaikankotai, town in Madras, iv. 197, 
198. 

Dengue fever, in N. Arcot, i. 319 ; Ban- 
galore, ii. 65 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 351 ; 
Salem, xii. 165. 

Denison, Sir W., Governor of Madras 
(1861-63), ix. 67 ; established Saidapet 
model farm, xii. 140. 

Density of the Indian population, vi. 46 ; 
overcrowded and underpeopled Pro- 
vinces, vi. 46, 47 ; population entirely 
rural, vi. 46 ; immobility of the rural 
population, vi. 47 ; relation of labour 
to land, vi. 48, 49 ; unequal pressure of 



INDEX, 



91 



the population on the lanti, vi. 49, 50 ; 

increase of population since 1S72, vi. 

50. See also the Population section 

of each District article. 
Denwa, river in Central Provinces, iv. 

198. 
Denwa, forest in Central Provinces, iv. 

19S. 
Denwars, tribe living in the valleys of 

Nepal, X. 271. 
Deo, town in Bengal, iv. 19S. 
Deoband, town and tahsilin N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 198, 199. 
Deocha, village in Bengal, iv. 199. 
Deodamgar, mountain peak in Madras, 

^''- ^99- 
Deodar, State in Gujarat, iv. 199, 200. 

Deodar trees, in the Chaur, iii. 377 ; 
Darjiling, iv. 129 ; Dehra Dun, iv. 169 ; 
Garhwal, v. 24 ; Himalaya Mountains, 
v. 409 ; Mont Jako, vii. 74 ; Jaunsar 
Bawar, vii. 160 ; Kangra, vii. 411; Kash- 
mir, viii. 71 ; Nalderain Kothi, viii. 311; 
Kulu, viii. 336, 337, 338 ; Punjab, xi. 
280 ; Seoraj, xii. 316 ; Simla, xii. 491. 

Deogaon, town and tahsll \n N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 200. 

Deogarh, town in Rajputana, iv. 200. 

Deogarh, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 200, 
201. 

Deogarh, town in Bengal, iv. 201, 202. 

Deogarh. See Devgadh. 

Deogarh, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 202, 203. 

Deohra. See Deorha. 

Deokarn, mutineer leader in Muttra, 
taken prisoner (1857), x. 47. " 

Deolali, cantonment in Bombay, iv. 203. 

Deoli, cantonment in Ajmere-Merwara, 
iv. 203. 

Deoli, town in Central Provinces, iv. 203, 
204. 

Deolia, ancient capital of Partabgarh 
State, iv. 204. 

Deonthal, village in Punjab, iv. 204. 

Deonthal, hill in Punjab, iv. 204. 

Deoprayag, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
iv. 204, 205. 

Deora Kot, town in Oudh, iv. 205. 

Deorha, village in Punjab, iv. 205. 

Deori, estate in Central Provinces, iv. 
205. 

Deori, town in Central Provinces, iv. 205, 
206. 

Deoria, tahsll in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 
206. 

Deori Chutiyas. See Chutiyas. 

Deotigarh, mountain range in Assam, iv. 
206, 207. 

Dera, tahsll m Punjab, iv. 207. 

Dera Ghazi Khan, District in Punjab, iv. 
207-217 ; physical aspects, 207-210 ; 
history, 210-212 ; population, 212-214 ; 



agriculture, 214, 215 ; commerce and 
trade, etc., 215, 216; administration, 

216, 217 ; medical aspects, 217. 
Dera Ghazi Khan, tahsll in Punjab, iv, 

217. 
Dera Ghazi Khan, town in Punjab, iv. 

217, 218. 

Dera Ismail Khan, District in Punjab, 
iv. 218-226 ; physical aspects, 219, 220; 
history, 220-222; population, 222, 
223 ; agricuUure, 223, 224 ; commerce 
and trade, 224, 225 ; administration, 
225, 226 ; medical aspects, 226. 

Dera Ismail Khan, tahsll in Punjab, iv. 
226. 

Dera Ismail Khan, town in Punjab, iv. 
226-228. 

Derajat, Division or Commissionership 
in Punjab, iv. 228. 

Dera Nanak, town in Punjab, iv. 228, 
229. 

Derapur, town and tahsll in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 229. 

Derband, village in Punjab, iv. 229. 

Derdi Janbai, petty State in Kathiawar, 
iv. 229. 

Deri Kot. See Ghaibi Dero. 

Deri Shahan. See Dheri Shahan. 

Dero Mohbat, taluk in Sind, iv. 230. 

Deserted river marts and capitals, vi. 30. 

Deshmukhs, particularly numerous in 
Deolali, iv. 203. 

Despat, outlaw, sacked Srinagar (N.-W. 
P.) during the Mutiny, xiii. 78. 

Deswalis, aboriginal tribe in Maksudan- 
garh, ix. 215. 

Detanaw, village in Lower Burma, iv. 230. 

Deulgaon Raja, town in Berar, iv. 230, 

Deulghat, town in Berar, iv. 231. 
Devadatta, the Buddhist schismatic, 

article 'India,' vi. 140. 
Devala, town in Madras, iv. 231. 
Devalgaon. See Deulgaon Raja. 
Devalia. See Dewalia. 
Devanhalli, town and tdhck in Mysore, 

iv. 231, 232. 
Devarayapalle, village in Madras, iv. 232. 
Devaraydurga, fortified hill in Mysore, iv. 

232. 
Devgadh, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 

232, 233. 

Devgadh, seaport in Bombay, iv. 233. 
Devi, river in Orissa, iv. 233. 
Devikota, town in Madras, iv. 233. 
Devikota, historic fort in Madras, iv. 

233, 234. 

Devjagaon, place of pilgrimage in Bom- 
bay, iv, 234, 
Devva, town and pargand in Oudh, iv. 

234, 235. 

Dewala, village in Central Provinces, iv. 

235- 



92 



INDEX. 



Dewalgaon, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 235. 

Dewalghat. See Deulghat. 

Dewalia, State in Kathiawar, iv. 235. 

Dewalwara, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 235, 236. 

Dewalwara, village in Berar, iv. 236. 

Dewas, town and State in Central India, 
iv. 236, 237. 

Dhabien. See Dabien. 

Dhabla Dhir, chiefship in Central India, 
iv. 237. 

Dhabla Ghosi, chiefship in Central India, 
iv. 237. 

Dhadhar, river in W. India, iv. 237, 238. 

Dhaka. See Dacca. 

Dhak trees, in Alamnagar, i. 163 ; Allah- 
abad, i. 190; Ambala, i. 215; Amrit- 
sar, i. 255 ; Azamgarh, i. 392 ; Bhagal- 
pur, ii. 344 ; Bijnaur, ii. 428 ; Budaun, 
iii. 116; Bulandshahr, iii. 132; Cawn- 
pur, iii. 280 ; Etawah, iv. 370 ; Indore, 
vii. 2; Jaunpur, vii. 151 ; Jhansi, vii. 
217 ; Karauli, vii. 471 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
519; Mainpuri, ix. 202; Muzaffargarh, 
X. 57; Muzaffarnagar, x. 67; N.-W. 
Provinces, x. 380, 381 ; Punjab, xi. 
281 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ; Sadabad, 
xii. 90 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 343, 344 ; 

• Shahpur, xii. 360 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; 
Sultanpur, xiii. 97. 

Dhakars, illegitimate descendants of 
Brahmans in Bastar, ii. 205. 

Dhalandhar, village in Bengal, iv. 238. 

Dhaldighi, village in Bengal, iv. 238. 

Dhaleswari, name of several rivers in 
E. Bengal and Assam, iv. 238. 

Dhalet, river in Lower Burma, iv. 238. 

Dhalkisor, river of W. Bengal, iv. 238, 

239- 
Dhamda, town in Central Provmces, iv. 

239- 

Dhami, Hill State in Punjab, iv. 239. 

Dhamis, sect who read the Kuran with 
Hindu observances, in the Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 316. 

Dham-ma-tha. See Dam-ma-tha. 

Dhamoni, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 239, 240. 

Dhampur, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 240, 241. 

Dhamra, river and estuary in Bengal, iv. 
241. 

Dhamra, port in Bengal, iv. 241, 242. 

Dhamsia, estate in Gujarat, iv. 242. 

Dhamtari, town and tahsil in Central 
Provinces, iv. 242. 

Dhana, village in Central Provinces, iv. 
242. 

Dhanaudah. Sec Dharnaoda. 

Dhanaura, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 
243> 244. 

Dhanauti, river in Bengal, iv. 243. 



Dhandhuka, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, iv. 243, 244. 

Dhaneswari, river in Assam, iv. 244. 

Dhangain, pass in Bengal, iv. 244. 

Dhangaon, chiefship in Central India, iv, 
244. 

Dhangars, semi-Hinduized tribe of Ben- 
gal and Chutia Nagpur, their numbers 
in 1872, vi. 71 (footnote i). See 
JNIaldah, ix. 243 ; Matheran, ix. 364. 

Dhanikhola, town in Bengal, iv. 244. 

Dhanori, village in Central Provinces, iv. 

244-. . 
Dhansiri. See Dhaneswari. 
Dhanu, river in Bengal, iv. 244. 
Dhani'ir, lake in Punjab, iv. 244, 245. 
Dhaniit Bhura-gyi. See Danut-Paya-gyi. 
Dhaola Dhar, mountain chain in Punjab, 

iv. 245. ^ 
Dhapewara, town in Central Provinces, 

iv. 245. 
Dhar, State in Central India, iv. 245- 

248 ; physical aspects, 246 ; history, 

246-248. 
Dharakot, estate in Madras, iv. 248. 
Dharamkota. See Amravati. 
Dharampur, town and State in Bombay, 

iv. 248, 249. 
Dharampuri, town and pargana in Central 

India, iv. 249, 250. 
Dharangaon, town in Bombay, iv. 250. 
Dharapuram, taluk in Madras, iv. 250, 

Dharapuram, town in Madras, iv. 251, 

2C2. 

Dhari, State in Bombay, iv. 252. 
Diiarla, river of Bengal, iv. 252. 
Dharma, tract in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

252. ^ 
Dliarmanpur, pargana in Oudh, iv. 252, 

253- 

Dharmapatam, river in Madras, iv. 253. 

Dharmapatam, town in Madras, iv. 253. 

Dharmapuri, town and taluk in Madras, 
iv. 253, 254. 

Dharmavaram, town and taliik in Madras, 
iv. 254. 

Dharmkot, town in Punjab, iv. 254, 255. 

Dharmpur, village in Oudh, iv. 255. 

Dharmsala, hill station and cantonment 
in Punjab, iv. 255- 

Dharnaoda, chiefship in Central India, 
iv. 255, 256. 

Dharupur, village in Oudh, iv. 256. 

Dharwar, District in Bombay, iv. 256- 
266 ; physical aspects, 256-259 ; wild 
animals, 259; history, 259; population, 
259-262 ; agriculture, 262, 263 ; natural 
calamities, 263 ; trade, 263, 264 ; ad- 
ministration, 264, 265; medical aspects, 
265, 266. 

Dharwar, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 
266. 



INDEX. 



93 



Dliarwar, town in Bombay, 266, 267. 
Dhasan, river of Central India, iv. 267, 

268. 
Dhaulagiri, mountain in Nepal, iv. 268. 
Dhauleshvaram. See Dowlaishvaram. 
Dhaurahra, town and pai-gand in Oudh, 

iv. 268. 
Dhaurahra, town in Oudh, iv. 268, 269. 
Dhaura-Kunjura, chiefship in Central 

India, iv. 269. 
Dhenkanal, tributary State in Orissa, iv. 

269. 
Dheri Shahan, village in Punjab, iv. 269, 

270. 
Dhers. See Mhars. 
Dhi-Dharamrai, chiefship in Central 

India, iv. 270. 
Dhoba, peak in Madras, iv. 270. 
Dhoba-khal, village in Assam, iv. 270. 
Dhodar AH, road in Assam, iv. 270, 

271. 
Dhola, State in Kathiawar, iv. 271. 
Dholarwa, State in Bombay, iv. 271. 
Dholbaja, village in Bengal, iv. 271. 
Dholera, seaport in Bombay, iv. 271. 
Dholka, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 271, 

272. 
Dholpur, State in Rajputana, iv. 272-277; 

physical aspects, 273, 274 ; popula- 
tion, 274, 275 ; administration, 275, 

276; history, 276, 277. 
Dholpur, capital of State in Rajputana, 

iv. 277, 278. 
Dhol Samudra, marsh in Bengal, iv. 278. 
Dhonegaon, town in Berar, iv. 278. 
Dhoraji, town in Bombay, iv. 278. 
Dhotria-Baisola, chiefship in " Central 

India, iv. 278. 
Dhrafa, State in Bombay, iv. 278. 
Dhrangadra, State in Bombay, iv. 27S, 

279- 
Dhrangadra, town in Bombay, iv. 279. 

Dhrol, State in Bombay, iv. 279, 280. 

Dhrol, town in Kathiawar, iv. 280. 

Dhubri, town and Sub-division in Assam, 

iv. 280. 
Dhude. See Dang States. 
Dhulapra, reservoir in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 280. 
Dhulatia, chiefship in Central India, iv, 

280. 
Dhulia, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 280, 

281. 
Dhulia, town in Bombay, iv. 281-283. 
Dhulian, village in Bengal, iv. 283. 
Dhulipnagar. See Edwardesabad. 
Dhulip Singh, Maharaja, terms of his 

abdication (1849), xi. 266, 267. 
Dhuma, village in Central Provinces, 

iv. 283. 
Dhums, class of only lately emancipated 

slaves in Dhera Dun, iv. 173 ; menial 

class in Garhwal, v. 19, 20. 



Dhunds, important Muhammadan tribe in 
Hazara, v. 363, 364, 

Dhundia Wagh, caught by General 
Wellesley at Manoli, ix. 338. 

Dhurwai, State in Bundelkhand, iv. 
283. 

Dhusan. See Parwan. 

Diamond Harbour, Sub-division in Ben- 
gal, iv. 283, 284. 

Diamond Harbour, port in Bengal, iv. 
284. 

Diamond Harbour Canal, Bengal, iv. 284. 

Diamond Island, in Lower Burma, iv. 
284, 285. 

Diamonds, article ' India,' vi. 41, 628, 
629. Local notices — Anantapur, i. 274; 
Banaganapalli, ii. 43, 44 ; Bijawar, ii. 
425 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 152 ; Central 
India, iii. 295 ; Chanda, iii. 349 ; 
Cuddapah, iv. 48; Gangpur, iv. 47S ; 
Karnul, viii. 34, 41 ; Kistna, viii. 
226; Madras, ix. 6; Nallamalai Hills, 
X. 185; JMandigama, x. 192; Nandi- 
kanama, x. 193; Panna, xi. 48-50; 
Sambalpur, xii. 179 ; Upper Vindhyan 
Mountains, xiii. 475 ; Wairagarh, xiii. 

.513- 

Dibai, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 285. 

Dibru, river in Assam, iv. 285. 

Dibrugarh, Sub-division in Assam, iv. 
285: 

Dibrugarh, town in Assam, iv. 2S5, 286. 

Dickens, Colonel, proposed the Son sys- 
tem of canals (1855), ^ii- 325> xiii- 54- 

Dickinson, Henry, acting Governor of 
Madras (1848), ix. 67. 

Dictionaiy of Hindu Mythology, by 
Professor Dowson, quoted, vi. 180 
(footnote 4); 184 (footnote i). 

Diddaur, town in Oudh, iv, 286. 

Dig, town in Central India, iv. 286 ; 
battle of, and defeat of Holkar, vi. 323. 

Digbijaiganj, tahsil in Oudh, iv. 286, 2S7. 

Digbijai Singh, Raja of Balrampur, kept 
Mr, Wingfield safely in his fort during 
the Mutiny, v. 149, 150. 

Diggi, town in Central India, iv. 287, 

Dighori, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 287. 

Dignagar, village in Bengal, iv. 287. 

Digras, town in Berar, iv. 2S7. 

Digru, river of Assam, iv. 2S7. 

Dih, town z.ViA pargand in Oudh, iv. 287, 
288. 

Dihang, river of Assam, iv. 2S8. 

Dihing, name of two rivers of Assam, iv. 
288. 

Diji, fort in Bombay, iv. 2S8. 

Dikthan, town in Central India, iv. 2S8, 
289.^ 

Dilawar, fort in Punjab, iv. 289. 

Dilayaks, their history in Peshawar Dis- 
trict, xi. 148, 149. 



94 



INDEX. 



Diluvion. See Alluvion and diluvion. 

Dilwara, town in Rajputana, iv. 289. 

Dimapur, village in Assam, iv. 289, 290. 

Diminution of population in Madras and 
Mysore, vi. 50. 

Dina Bandu Mitra, dramatic poet, and 
author of the Nil Darpan, vi. 354. 

Dinajpur, District in Bengal, iv. 290-298; 
physical aspects, 290, 291 ; history, 
291; population, 291-294; agriculture, 
294, 295; manufactures, 295; admini- 
stration, 296, 297; medical aspects, 
297, 298. 

Dinajpur, town in Bengal, iv. 298, 299. 

Dina Krishna Das, Uriya poet of the 
l6th century, vi. 343. 

Dinanagar, town in Punjab, iv. 299. 

Dinapur, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 299. 

Dinapur, cantonment in Bengal, iv. 299, 
300. 

Dindigal, taluk in Madras, iv. 300, 301. 

Dindigal, town in Madras, iv. 301, 302. 

Dindivaram, tdhik in Madras, iv. 302. 

Dindori, Sub-division in Bombay, iv. 302. 

Dindori, town in Bombay, iv. 302, 303. 

Dingarh Kiner, village in Punjab, iv. 303. 

Dingi, fort in Bombay, iv. 303. 

Dingier, mountains in Assam, iv. 303. 

Dinkar Rao, Sindia's dhvdn, granted the 
jdgir of Dasai by that chief, iv. 153 ; 
had to fly with Sindia to Agra in 
1858, when the Gwalior troops re- 
volted, v. 233. 

Diodar. See Deodar. 

Diodorus says that Herakles founded 
Pataliputra, now Patna, xi. 106; his 
mention of Mount Aornos, xi. 506 ; 
Sangala, xii. 214. 

Dipalpur, tahsil in Punjab, iv. 303. 

Dipalpur, historic town in Punjab, iv. 

303> 304- 
Dipalpur, town in Central India, iv. 304. 
Dipla, town and taluk in Bombay, iv. 304. 
Dirapur. See Derapur. 
Disa, town in Bombay, iv. 304, 305. 
Disaun. See Dhasan. 
Diseases, Endemic and epidemic. See 

Special section on Medical aspects under 

each Province and District, and also 

Cholera, Fever, Smallpox. 
Disoi, river in Assam, iv. 305. 
Distillation of country spirits, vi. 454. 
Distilleries, Principal, at Aurangabad 

(Bengal), i. 386 ; Badnur, i. 410 ; 

Aska in Ganjam, v. 8 ; Haidarabad 

(Sind), V. 284 ; Howrah, v. 465 ; 

Ki>henganj, viii. 224 ; Mora, ix. 503 ; 

Nosari, x. 405 ; Palmaner, xi. 15 ; the 

Rosa, near Shahjahanpur, xii. 353 ; 

the Albion at Sibpur, xii. 458 ; Siral- 

koppa, xii. 551 ; Tando Lukman, xiii. 

177 ; in Thana, xiii. 257 ; Uran, xiii. 

450. 



Distribution of Indian trade with foreign 
countries, vi. 565-580. 

District officer. Duties of, vi. 436. 

Districts, Number of, in India, their vary- 
ing size and population, vi. 436, 437. 

Districts in British India, Agra, i. 60- 
68; Ahmadabad, i. 82-93; Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 98-107; Ajmere- Merwara, 
i. 117 -131; Akola, i. 140-146; 
Akyab, i. 148-158; Aligarh, i. 167- 
177 ; Allahabad, i. 183-194 ; Ambala, 
i. 213-224; Amherst, i. 232-243; 
Amraoti, i. 245-250 ; Amritsar, i. 254- 
263 ; Anantapur, i. 273-279 ; Arakan 
Hill Tracts, i. 298-304 ; North Arcot, 
i. 311-319; South Arcot, i. 319-328; 
Azamgarh, i. 391-401 ; Bahraich, i. 
425-433; Bakarganj, i. 439-449; 
Balaghat, i. 452-457 ; Balasor, ii. l-io; 
Ballia, ii. 18-23 ; Banda, ii. 45-55 ; 
Bankura, ii. 78-S7 ; Bannu, ii. 87-97 > 
Bara Banki, ii. 105-114 ; Bardwan, ii. 
125-136 ; Bareilly, ii. 137-145 ; Basim, 
ii. 183-188; Bassein, ii. 192 - 201 ; 
Basti, ii. 20S-214; Belgaum, ii. 230- 
238 ; Bellary, ii. 240-250 ; Benares, 
ii. 254-262; Betul, ii. 328-333; Bhagal- 
pur, ii. 342-352 ; Bhandara, ii. 360- 
367 ; Bijnaur, ii. 427-435 ; Bilaspur, 
ii. 444-453 ; Birbhum, iii. i-ii ; Bogra, 
iii. 24-32; Broach, iii. loi-iii; 
Budaun, iii. 115-124; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 1 30- 141 ; Buldana, iii. 142- 148 ; 
Cachar, iii. 230-239 ; Cawnpur, iii. 
279 - 289 ; Champaran, iii. 334-344; 
Chanda, iii. 348-355 ; Chengalpat, iii. 
380-383 ; Chhindwara, iii. 398-405 ; 
Chittagong, iii. 433-443 ; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, iii. 446-453 ; Coimbatore, 
iv. 14-21; Cuddapah, iv. 47-55; 
Cuttack, iv. 64-75 '■> Dacca, iv. 78-89 ; 
Damoh, iv. 107-114; Darbhangah, iv. 
122 - 126 ; Darjiling, iv. 128 - 140 ; 
Darrang, iv. 141-150; Dehra Dun, iv. 
168-176; Delhi, iv. 177-185; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 207-217 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, iv. 218-226 ; Dharwar, iv. 256- 
266 ; Dinajpur, iv. 290-298 ; Ellichpur, 
iv. 344-347; Etah, iv. 357-366; Etawah, 
iv. 367-377 ; Faizabad, iv. 381-388 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 393-407; Farukhabad, 
iv. 409-417 ; Fatehpur, iv. 422-430 ; 
Firozpur, iv. 438-447; Ganjam, v. 
1-8; Garhwal, v. 16-23; Garo Hills, 
v. 24-32 ; Gaya, v. 43-52 ; Ghazipur, v. 
61-70; Goalpara, v. 111-120; God- 
avari, v. 122- 131 ; Gonda, v. 145- 
154 ; Gorakhpur, v. 164-172 ; Gujran- 
wala, V. 179-187 ; Gujrat, v. 188-195 5 
Gurdaspur, v. 205-213 ; Gurgaon, v. 
214-223 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 274- 
285 ; Hamirpur, v. 297-305 ; Hantha- 
wadi, V. 311-318; Hardoi, V. 321-329; 



INDEX. 



95 



Hazara, v. 359-368 ; Hazaribatjb, v. 
368-3S0; Henzada, v. 3S3-390; Hissar, 
V. 425-433 ; Hoshangabad, v. 441-449 ; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 450-458 ; Howrah, v. 
461-464; Hugli, V. 4S9-498 ; Jabalpur, 
vii. 29-36; Jalandhar, vii. 83-90; 
Jalaun, vii. 93-102; Jalpaiguri, vii. 
107 -117; Jaunpur, vii. 149-159; 
Jehlam, vii. 166-177 ; Jessor, vii. 183- 
191 ; J hang, vii. 205-212 ; Jhansi, vii. 
215-227 ; Kaira, vii. 298-307 ; Kaladgi, 
vii. 314-320 ; Kamrup, vii. 354-366 ; 
North Kanara, vii. 368-375 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 375 - 384 ; Kangra, 
vii. 40S - 427 ; Karachi, vii. 443- 
451; Karnal, viii. 18-27; Karnul, 
viii. 32-45; Khandesh, viii. 149- 
159 ; Khasi and Jaintia Hills, viii. 
169-180; Kheri, viii. 189-198; Khulna, 
viii. 205-209 ; Kistna, viii. 225-234 ; 
Kohat, viii. 242-249; Kolaba, viii. 
260-271; Kumaun, viii. 347-358; 
Kyauk-pyu, viii. 384-3S9 ; Lahore, viii. 
402-414 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 425-438 ; 
Lalitpur, viii. 446 - 457 ; Lohardaga, 
viii. 475-486 ; Lucknow, viii. 492-502 ; 
Ludhiana, viii. 518-525 ; Madura, ix. 
1 19-132; Maimansingh, ix. 190-201 ; 
Mainpuri, ix. 202-212 ; Malaliar, ix. 
216-235 ; Maldah, ix. 240-248 ; Man- 
bhum, ix. 277-286 ; Mandia, ix. 299- 
307 ; Meerut, ix. 381-392 ; Mergui, 
ix. 406-411 ; Midnapur, ix. 423-433 ; 
Mirzapur, ix. 452-461 ; Monghyr, ix. 
47S-4S9 ; Montgomety, ix. 492-502 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 504-512 ; IMultan, x. 
2-10; Murshidabad, x. 20-31 ; ■Muttra, 
X. 43-52; Muzaffargarh, x. 54-64; 
Muzaffarnagar, x. 66-76 ; Muzaffarpur, 
X- 77-83 ; Nadiya, x. 128-141 ; Naga 
Hills, X. 143-154; Nakpur, x. 163- 
174; Narsinghpur, x. 216-224; Nasik, 
X. 228-235; Nellore, x. 260-271; 
Nilgiri Hills, x. 302-325 ; Nimar, x. 
327-335 ; Noakhali, x. 33^-352 ; Now- 
gong, X. 405-415 ; Pabna, x. 511-520 ; 
Panch Mahals, xi. 2S-34 ; Partabgarh, 
xi. 68-74; Patna, xi. 93-106; Peshawar, 
xi. 144-157 ; Pilibhit, xi. 170-178 ; 
Poena, xi. 200-210 ; Prome, xi. 225- 
235 ; Puri, xi. 299-309 ; Purniah, xi. 
321-3314 Rai Bareli, xi. 351-359; 
Kaipur, xi. 366-376 ; Raj-^hahi, xi. 427- 
439; Rangoon, xi. 471-481 ; Rangpur, 
xi. 488-501; Ratnagiri, xii. 2-12: 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 18-35 ! Rohtak, xii. 
68-76 ; Sagar, xii. 100-107 ; Saharan- 
pur, xii. 1 1 3- 1 24; Salem, xii. 150-165 ; 
Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 174-176; 
Sambalpur, xii. 177-185 ; Sandoway, 
xii. 198-205 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 
226-236 ; Saran, xii. 251-259 ; Satara, 
xii. 275-284; Seoni, xii. 30S-314; 



Shahabad, xii. 322-333 ; Shahjahanpur, 
xii. 342-355 ; iihahpur, xii. 357-367 ; 
Shikarpur, xii. 3S5 - 394 ; Sholapur, 
xii. 411-420 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 428-434; 
Sialkot, xii. 439-450 ; Sibi, xii. 453- 
458 ; Sibsagar, xii. 459-472 ; Simla, 
xii. 490-495 ; Singhbhum, xii. 529- 
541 ; Sirsa, xiii. 8- 19; Sitapur, xiii. 
29-37 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 95-103 ; the 
Sundarbans, xiii. 107- 1 14 ; Sutat, xiii. 
I18-132 ; Sylhet, xiii. 143-157; Tan- 
jore, xiii. 180-194 ; Tarai, xiii. 207- 
211 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 220-226 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 227-234 ; Thana, xiii. 249-258 ; 
Thar and Parkar, xiii. 261-271 ; Thara- 
wadi, xiii. 271-274 ; Thayet-myo, xiii, 
276-287 ; Thon-gwa, xiii. 288 - 292 ; 
Tinnevelli, xiii. 297-311 ; Tipperah, 
xiii. 312-321 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 354- 
363 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 387- 
399 ; Unao, xiii. 426-436 ; Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 438-449 ; Vizagapatam, 
xiii. 482-497 ; Wardha, xiii. 522-529 ; 
Wun, xiii. 538-546. 

Districts in Mysore, treated in the same 
manner as the British Districts, Banga- 
lore, ii. 59-66 ; Chitaldriig. iii. 422-428 ; 
Hassan, v. 345-351 ; Kadur, vii. 282- 
288 ; Kolar, viii. 272-278 ; Mysore, x. 
113- 122; Shimoga, xii. 399-406; 
Tumki'ir, xiii. 375-381. 

Diu, island belonging to Portugal in 
Western India, iv. 305-308 ; its physical 
aspects, 305, 306; administration, 306; 
architecture, 307 ; history, 307, 308. 

Divi Point, headland in Madras, iv. 308. 

Divisions or Commissionerships, Agra, 
i. 59, 60 ; Allahabad, i. 182, 183 ; 
Ambala, i. 213 ; Amritsar, i. 253, 254; 
Arakan, i. 297, 298 ; Bardwan, ii. 125; 
Benares, ii. 253, 254 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 
341-343 ; Chhatisgarh, iii. 396, 397 ; 
Chitlagong, iii. 432, 433 ; Chutia 
Nagpur, iii. 461 ; Dacca, iv. 77, 78 ; 
Delhi, iv. 177 ; Derajat, iv. 228 ; 
Faizabad, iv. 380 ; Hissar, v. 425 ; 
Jabalpur, vii. 29 ; Jalandhar, vii. 82, 
83 ; Jhansi, vii. 214, 215 ; Kumaun, 
viii. 346, 347 ; Lahore, viii. 402 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 490-492 ; Meerut, ix. 
3S0, 381 ; Multan, x. i ; Nagpur, x. 
162, 163; Narbada, x. 205-207; 
Orissa, x. 426-468 ; Patna, xi. 90-93 ; 
Pegu, xi. 124, 125 ; Peshawar, xi. 
141-144 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 348-351; 
Rajshahi, xi. 424.-427 ; Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 15-18 ; Rohilkhand, xii. 60-63 i 
Sitapur, xiii. 27-29 ; Tenasserim, xiii. 
238, 239. 

Diwala. See Dewala. 

Diwalgaon. See Dewalgaon. 

Diwalgaon Raja. See Deulgaon Raja. 

Diwalghat. See Deulghat. 



96 



INDEX. 



Diwalia. See Dewalia. 
Diwalwara. See Devvalwara. 
Diwangin, village in Assam, iv. 30S. 
Dhi'dni or financial administration of 

Bengal, granted to the East India 

Company (1765), vi. 387. 
Diwas. See Dewas. 
Dixon, Col. , his administration of Ajmere- 

Mervvara, i. 118, 122; founded Bea. war, 

ii. 222 ; made first regular Settlement 

of Merwara (1851), ix. 417. 
Diying, river in Assam, iv. 308, 309. 
Dnyanoba, Maratha poet of the 13th 

century, vi. 346. 
Doab, tract in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 309, 

310. 
Doaba Daudzai, tahsilm Punjab, iv. 310. 
Doanniyas, mongrel race in Assam, 

descended from the Singphos and 

their female slaves, xii. 542. 
Dobbili. See Bobbili. 
Dobhi, village in Central Provinces, iv. 

310. 
Docks and dockyards, at Dala, iv. 97 ; 

Daman, iv. 102 ; Howrah, v. 465 ; 

Kidderpur, viii. 216 ; Kolaba, viii. 

271 ; Mazagon, ix. 379 ; Rangoon, 

xi. 483 ; Salkhia, xii. 167. 
Doctors, Native, and their remedies, 

Allahabad, i. 194 ; Ambala, i. 224 ; 

South Arcot, i. 328 ; Cochin, iv. 10 ; 

South Kanara, vii. 384 ; Khairpur, 

viii. 137 ; Kurauli (oculists), viii. 371 ; 

Mohan, ix. 471. 
Doctrines of Buddha, vi. 141, 142 ; moral 

code and missionary aspects of Bud- 
dhism, vi. 143. 
Dodabetta, peak in Madras, iv. 310. 
Dod-baliapur, town and taluk in Mysore, 

iv. 310, 311. 
Dodda Vira Rajendra. See Vira Rajendra. 
Dodderi, town and tdliik in Mysore, iv. 

311- 
Dodka, State in Bombay, iv. 311. 
Dogars of Mamdot, The, their history, 

ix. 273. 
Dogras, race of mountaineers on the 

Himalaya Mountains, v. 412. 
Dogs of India, article ' India,' vi. 654. 

Local notices — Afghanistan, i. 39 ; 

Chini, iii. 417, 418 ; Garo Hills, v. 

31 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Nepal, x. 278 ; 

Rampur, xi. 455. 
Dogs, Wild, article 'India,' vi. 654. 

Local notices — South Arcot, i. 320 ; 

Baluchistan, ii. 36; Chhindvvara, iii. 399; 

Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Gwalior, v. 229 ; 

Hazaribagh, v. 370 ; Hindu Rush, v. 

419; Jerruck, vii. 180 ; Jhansi, vii. 217 ; 

North Kanara, vii. 370 ; Kotah, viii. 

304 ; Lohardaga, viii. 477 ; Madras, 

ix. 89 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Palni 

Mountains, xi. 17 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4. 



Dohad, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 
iv. 311, 312. 

Doharighat, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
iv. 312. 

Dolmens. See Stone monuments. 

Dolphin, The, article ' India,' vi. 661, 
662. Local notices — Upper Burma, 
iii. 212 ; Darbhangah, iv. 123 ; Etawah, 
iv. 370 ; Gonda, v. 147 ; the Indus, 
vii. 14 ; Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Rangpur, 
xi. 490 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30. 

Dolphin's Nose, promontory in Madras, 
iv. 312- 

Domariaganj, tashil m N.-W. Provinces, 
iv. 312, 313. 

Domel, island in Burma, iv. 313. 

Domeli, town in Punjab, iv. 313. 

Dommasundra, tdliik in Mysore, iv. 313. 

Dommeras, wandering thief caste in N. 
Arcot, i. 315 ; Nellore, x. 266. 

Doms, great low caste, formerly pagoda 
slaves in Akyab, i. 155 ; pretend to 
purity of blood in Assam, i. 355, 356 ; 
numerous in Bankura, ii. 81 ; dakdits 
in Gaya, v. 52 ; numerous in Gonda, 
V. 151 ; Kamrup, vii. 359; Nowgong, 
X. 409 ; Saran, xii. 257 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
464. 

Donabyu, township in Lower Burma, iv. 

Donabyu, town in Lower Burma, iv. 313. 

Dondi Lohara, estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, iv. 313. 

Dongargaon, mart in Central Provinces, 
vi. 596. 

Dongargarh, town in Central Provinces, 



IV. 



JI4. 



Dongarpur. See Dungarpur. 

Dongartal, village in Central Provinces, 
iv. 314. 

Doranda, cantonment in Bengal, iv. 314. 

Dorka, chiefship in Bombay, iv. 314. 

Dornal Ghat, pass in Madras, iv. 314. 

Dosa, town in Rajputana, iv. 314, 315. 

Dosadhs, village watchmen, numerous 
in Ballia, ii. 20 ; Behar, ii. 296 ; a 
criminal class in Gaya, v. 46, 52 ; in 
Hazaribagh, v. 373 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
480 ; Saran, xii. 257. 

Dost All, Nawab of the Karnatic, killed 
(1740), iv. loi ; granted Vellore to his 
son-in-law (1710), xiii. 467, 46S. 

Dost Muhammad, founder of the Bhopal 
dynasty, ii. 403 ; seized Hoshangabad 
(1720), v. 443. 

Dost Muhammad, Amir of Afghanistan, 
his history, i. 49-51; took Attock 
(1848), but had to surrender it to the 
Sikhs, i. 51 ; took Herat (1863), i- 5I> 
V. 393 ; sacked Jalalabad, vii. 76 ; 
defeated the Sikhs at Jamrud (1851), 
vii. 133 ; made Kabul his capital, vii. 
271 ; took Kandahar (1855), vii. 394 ; 



INDEX. 



97 



kept in fort of Karnal as State prisoner 
(1840), viii. 28. 

Double Island, in Burma, iv. 315. 

Doulatabad. See Krishnagiri. 

Doung-gyi, town in Burma, iv. 315. 

Doveton, Gen. Sir John, encamped at 
Mehkar on his march against Apa 
Sahib (1817), ix. 399. 

Dow, Col., History of Hindztstan, quoted, 
on Ala-ud-din's visit to Ellora, iv. 349. 

Dowlaishvaram, town in Madras, iv. 
315, 316. 

Dowlatabad. See Daulatabad. 

Dowson, Professor, Dictioyiary of Hindu 
Mythology, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 
180 (footnote 4) ; 184 (footnote i). 

Doyang. See Dayang. 

Drama, The Indian, article ' India,' vi. 
125-127; 354. 

Draper, EHza, Sterne's friend, lived at 
Anjengo, i. 292 ; her ' tree ' at Masuli- 
patam washed away (1864), ix. 352. 

Draupadi, the wife of the five Pandava 
brethren in the IMahabharata, article 
' India,' vi. 195. 

Dravida, Di\-ision of the Indian Penin- 
sula, iv. 316. 

Dravidians, The, aboriginal race of 
Southern India, their languages, article 
' India,' vi. 64-68 ; place of languages 
in philolog)', 327, 328 ; in Sanskrit 
literature, 328 ; pre-Ar)'an civilisation, 
328 ; art, 328, 329 ; Brahmanical in- 
fluence on, 329, 330 ; development into 
vernacular literatures, 330 ; Tamil, the 
oldest and the most influential verna- 
cular of Southern India, 330 ; Jain 
cycle of Tamil literature, earliest 
Tamil poets, 331 ; Tamil hymnology, 

332 ; modern Tamil writers, Beschi, 
the Italian Jesuit and Tamil scholar, 

333 ; recent statistics of Tamil litera- 
ture, m. 

Dress, of the Kamis, i. 300 ; of the 
Brahuis and Baluchis, ii. 39 ; of the 
Gadwa women, ii. 205 ; of the Bhils, 
ii. 389, 390; of the Bhutias, ii. 413 ; 
of the Brahuis, iii. 99, 100 ; of the 
Salones, iii. 185 ; of the Gonds, iii. 
308 ; of the Coorgs, iv. 34, 35 ; of the 
Daphlas, iv. 120; of the Garos, v. 28; 
in Jalpaiguri, vii. 113 ; of the Juangs, 
\-ii. 251, 252 ; in Kamrup, vii. 361 ; 
of the Kangra tribes, vii. 420 ; of the 
Khamtis, viii. 145 ; of the Kurumbas, 
viii. 376, X. 311, 312 ; of the Ladakhis, 
viii. 398 ; of the Lushais, viii. 530 ; 
of the Miris, ix. 447, 448 ; of the 
Mishmis, ix. 462 ; of the Angami 
Nagas, X. 148 ; of the Kukis, x. 150 ; 
of the Naikdas, x. 176, 177 ; of the 
Todas, X. 309, 310 ; of the Badagas, 
X. 310, 311 ; of the Irulas, x. 312 ; 
VOL. XIV. 



of the Botwas, x. 525 ; of the Peshawar 
Pathans, xi. 153 ; in Rawal Pindi, xii. 
28, 29 ; of the Rewa Kantha Bhils, 
xii. 51, 52 ; in Sagar, xii. 104 ; of the 
Santals, xii. 245 ; in Sialkot, xii. 445, 
446 ; in Sirmur, xii. 555 ; in Sylhet, 
xiii. 151 ; of the Bassein Christians in 
Thana, xiii. 253 ; of the Baluchi tribes 
on the Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 441 ; 
of the Banjara women in Wiin, xiii. 

541. 

Dre«', Mr., on the southern chain of the 
Himalayas, v. 407 ; on the population 
of Ladakh, viii. 397. 

Droughts. See Famines. 

Drowning, Deaths from, by storm-wave, 
in Noakhali, x. 340. 

Drug, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, iv. 316, 317. 

Drugs and medicines, article ' India,' vi. 
34. See also Doctors, Native, and 
their medicines. 

Drugs, found in Akrani, i. 148 ; Amherst, 
i. 240 ; Basim, ii. 184 ; Champaran, 
iii. 337 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Dera Ghazi 
Khan {shakh),'\\. 210; Darbhangah, iv. 
123 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; Dindigal, iv. 
301 ; Haidarabad, v. 246 ; Kulu, viii. 
343 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Madras, 
ix. 30 ; Malabar, ix. 229 ; Mishmi 
Hills, ix. 464 ; Murshidabad, x. 22 ; 
Muttra, X. 45 ; Nepal, x. 277 ; Purl, 
xi. 301 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Salem, 
xii. 152 ; Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; Twenty- 
four Parganas, xiii. 389. 

Drummond, Hon. E. , Lt. -Governor of 
the N. -W. Provinces (1863-66), x. 370. 

Drummond, Hon. R., Collector of Pili- 
bhit, founded Anglo-Vernacular School 
there, xi. 177. 

Drury, Col. , his works on Indian botany, 
referred to, ix. 81. 

Duab. See Doab. 

Dual system of administration in Bengal 
(1767-72), article ' India,' vi. 387, 388. 

Diib, pass from Punjab into Kashmir, 
iv. 317. 

Dubari, village in N.-"\V. Provinces, iv. 

Dub-chi, valley and pass in Kashmir, iv. 

317- 

Dublana, town in Rajputana, iv. 317. 
Dubois, Abbe, his community of caste 

Christians at Sathalli in Mysore, v. 

348; 
Dubrajpur, town in Bengal, iv. 318. 
Dudhpur, State in Bombay, iv. 318. 
Diidhrej, State in Bombay, iv, 318. 
Diidu, town in Rajputana, iv. 318. 
Dudu Miyan, second leader of the 

Faraizis, died in obscurity at Dacca 

(1862), iv. 399. 
Duduya, river in Bengal, iv. 318. 

G 



98 



INDEX. 



Duff", Rev. Alexander, first Presbyterian 
missionary to India, article ' India,' 
vi. 261. 

DufTerin, Earl of, Viceroy (1884), article 
'India,' vi. 430; his interview with 
Abdur Rahman Khan (1884), vii. 275. 

Dugari, town in Rajputana, iv. 318. 

Dugria, chiefship in Central India, iv. 

319- 

Dujana, State in Punjab, iv. 319. 

Duka, Dr. Theodore, Life and Wo7-ks of 
AleaanJer Csoma de Kords, quoted, 
vi. 153 (footnote i). 

Dulhi, town in Oudh, iv. 319. 

Dumagudiem, town in Madras, iv. 319. 
See also Godavari river. 

Dum-Dum, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 
320. 

Dum-Dum, town in Bengal, iv. 320. 

Dumka. See Naya Dumka. 

Dumra Falls, rapids in Bengal, iv. 320. 

Dumraon, town in Bengal, iv. 320, 321. 

Dumraon Canal, branch of Son system 
in Bengal, iv. 321. 

Dumurdah, town in Bengal, iv. 321. 

Dun, range of hills in Bengal, iv. 321. 

Dunal Ghat. See Dornal Ghat. 

Dunbar, Capt., commanded the expedi- 
tion sent from Dinapur for the relief of 
Arrah (1857), xi. 97. 

Duncan, Jonathan, his report on Sand- 
wip Island (1779), xii. 211, 212 ; his 
arrangements for the government of 
Surat (1880), xiii. 123. 

Duncker, Professor Max, Ancient His- 
tory of India, quoted, article ' India,' 
vi. 81 (footnote 2); 84 (footnotes 2 and 
4) ; 115 (footnote) ; 163 (footnote 3). 

Dundhu Panth. See Nana Sahib. 

Dundi Khan, Rohilla leader, built fort 
at Bisauli (1750), iii. 15 ; made peace 
with the Nawab of Oudh, but was 
nevertheless attacked and defeated, iii. 
118. 

Dundwaraganj, trading town in N.-W. 
Provinces, iv. 321. 

Dungagah, sanitarium in Punjab, iv. 321, 

322- 

Dungarpur, town and State in Rajputana, 

iv. 325- 

Duni, town in Rajputana, iv. 325. 
Duns, The. S^e Dehra Dun. 
Duntham'i, river in Lower Burma, iv. 

325- 
Dunwon, village m Lower Burma, iv. 

325- 

Dunyian, creek in Lower Burma, iv. 325. 

Dunyin, peak in Lower Burma, iv. 325, 
326. 

Dupleix, French administrator, his am- 
bition of founding a French empire in 
India, and his struggles in the Karnatik 
with Clive, article ' India,' vi. 378, 



379. Local notices — Had Alamparia 
granted to him by Muzaffar Jang (1750), 
i. 163 ; sent two ships to help the 
Peguans against Alompra, iii. 221 ; 
greatly developed Chandernagar, iii. 
357 ; twice attacked Fort St. David at 
Cuddalore, between 1746 and 1752, 
iv. 46 ; his policy and the extent of 
territory he won, iv. 452 ; his policy 
in Madras, ix. 12, 13 ; his statue at 
Pondicherri, xi. 199 ; his attempts to 
take Trichinopoli, xiii. 336. 

Du Pre, Josias, Governor of Madras 
(1770-73), ix. 67 ; made treaty at St. 
Thomas' Mount with Haidar All (1769), 
xii. 144. 

Durand, Sir H. M. , lighted match for 
the storming of Ghazni (1838), i. 50; 
buried at Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 222 ; 
besieged in the Residency at Indore 
(1857), vii. 7 ; fourth Lt. -Governor of 
the Punjab, xi. 270 ; killed by an 
accident at Tank (1870), xiii. 198. 

Durani rule in Afghanistan (1747-1826), 
vi. 406, 407. 

Durani, Ahmad Shah. See Ahmad Shah 
Durani. 

Duranis, the most important tribe in 
Afghanistan, i. 41 ; their numbers in 
the Herat valley, v. 391 ; in Kandahar, 
vii. 389, 390. 

Duration ot life. Average, in India, vi. 
667. 

Durduria, historic fort in Bengal, iv. 326. 

Durga, one of the forms of the wife of 
Siva, vi. 211, 212. 

Durgarayapatnam, town in Madras, iv. 
326. 

Durgavati, Gond queen of Garha Mandla, 
her defeat by Asaf Khan at Singaurgarh, 
vii. 31, xii. 529 ; her reign, defeat, and 
suicide at Mandla (1564), ix, 301, 302. 

Durrung. See Darrang. 

Dutch, The, in India (1602 - 1824), 
article 'India,' vi. 361-363; Dutch 
East India Companies, 361, 362 ; 
supremacy of, in the Eastern Seas, 
brilliant progress, and decline, 362 ; relics 
in India, 363 ; English ' Treaty of De- 
fence' with (1619), 367; massacre of 
Amboyna, and expulsion of the English 
from the Eastern Archipelago (1624), 
368; conquesis in India, 371, 372; 
defeated by Clive at Chinsurah, 385 ; 
monopoly of Eastern trade (1600), 560. 
Local 7iotices — Dutch factories, forts, and 
settlements at Ayakotta, i. 391 ; Bara- 
nagar, ii. 122 ; Bimlipatam, ii. 461 ; 
Broach (1617), iii. 1 13; Cannanore 
(1656), iii. 276; Chapra, iii. 370; 
Chetvai, iii. 393 ; Chinsurah, iii. 419 ; 
Jaganadhpur, iii. 472 ; took Cochin 
from the Portuguese, iv. 3 ; buildings at 



INDEX. 



99 



Cochin, iv. ii, 12; Dacca, iv. 81; 
English Bazar, iv. 353 ; Faha, iv. 391 ; 
blockaded Goa (1603, 1639), v. 103 ; 
took Kayenkolam, viii. 108 ; held 
Masulipatam (1686 - 89), viii. 227 ; 
took Kodungalur (Cranganore) (1661), 
viii. 241 ; Madras, ix. 12 ; in Malabar, 
ix. 221 ; Masulipatam, ix. 353, 354 ; 
Nagar, x. 155 ; Narsapur, x. 215 ; 
Negapatam, x. 259 ; Palakollu, x. 533, 
534 ; Pondicherri, xi. 198 ; Puakad, 
xi. 214 ; Pulicat, ix. 239 ; Quilon, xi. 
140; Rampur Beauleah, xi. 462; 
Sadras, xii. 94 ; Sural (1618), xiii. 121, 
122 ; battle with the English there, 
xiii. 123 ; at Syriam, xiii. 158 ; Tan- 
gasseri, xiii. 180 ; in Tanjore, their 
history, xiii. 183 ; in Tinnevelli, where 
they had pearl fishery, xiii. 300, 308 ; 
at Tuticorin, xiii. 385 ; Vengurla, xiii. 

470- , 
Duttalur, village in INIadras, iv. 326. 
Duttia. See Datia. 
Duya, group of lakes in Burma, iv. 326, 

327- 

Dwarband, pass in Assam, iv. 327. 

Dwarikeswar. See Dhalkisor. 

Dwarka, seaport in Kathiawar, iv. 327. 

Dwarka, river in Bengal, iv. 327. 

Dwarkeswar. See Dhalkisor. 

Dwar-khaling. See Khaling-Dwar. 

Dwars, Eastern, tract in Assam, iv. 328- 
335 ; physical aspect, 328, 329 ; history, 
329, 331 ; population, 331-333 ; agri- 
culture, 333, 334 ; manufactures, 334 ; 
administration, 334, 335. 

Dwars, Western, tract in Bengal, iv. 
335= Vo^- See also Jalpaiguri. 

Dyce, Mr., married daughter of Zafaryab 
Khan, and his son succeeded to the 
Sardhana estates of Begam Samru, xii, 
265. 

Dyes, Export of, article ' India,' vi. 574, 
575 ; found or cultivated in Akola, i. 
143 ; North Arcot (red saunders root), 
i. 312 ; South Arcot, i. 327 ; Ballapali 
(red saunders root), ii. 18 ; Vohora 
Kathor in Baroda, ii. 159 ; Basim, ii. 
184 ; Bastar, ii. 206 ; Beawar, ii. 222; 
Bogra, iii. 26 ; Bombay, iii. 54 ; 
Buldana, iii. 143 ; Bundelkhand {dl), 
iii. 152 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Cuttack, iv. 
65 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; Eastern Dwars 
{dsu), iv. 329 ; Garo Hills, v. 26 ; 
Gujranwala {mehndi or henna), v. 184; 
Gwalior {dl), v. 228 ; Haidarabad {dl 
and cheyroot), v. 245 ; Jhansi («/), vii. 
223; Kamriip, vii. 355 ; North Kanara 
(cheyroot), vii. 372 ; South Kanara, 
vii. 376 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 {dsu), 
viii. 438 ; Lalitpur (dl), viii. 453 ; 
Madras, ix. 31 ; Western Malwa (dl), 
ix. 269 ; the Melghat, ix. 403 ; Multan, 



X. 3 ; Muttra, x. 45 ; Naga Hills, x. 
143 ; Nellore, x. 260 ; Nepal, x. 277 ; 
N. -\V. Provinces {dl, safflower, har- 
siiigha, tes2i, myrobolans\, x. 380, 381 ; 
Pachamalai Hills, x. 521 ; Puri, xi. 
301 ; Rajkot, xi. 389 ; Rajputana (dl), 
xi. 418 ; Salem, xii. 152 ; Seoni, xii. 
312; Sholapur, xii. 416 ; .Sibsagar, xii. 
460; Sitapur, xiii. 30; Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, xiii. 389; Wiin («7 and behera), 
xiii. 543. ^^^aJso Indigo, Myrobolans, 
Safflower, and Red saunders root. 
Dyeing, cotton, silk, etc. , pursued at Bagru, 
i. 420 ; Beawar, ii. 222 ; Belgaum, ii. 
236 ; Beni, ii. 323 ; Bhavani, ii. 383 ; 
Bombay, iii. 81 ; Bori, iii. 89 ; Upper 
Burma, iii. 217 ; Daman, iv. 103 ; 
Dhanori, iv. 244 ; Faizpur, iv. 389 ; 
Gadarwara, iv. 457 ; Gokak, v. 142 ; 
Sanganer, near Jaipur, vii. 53 ; Jaitpur, 
vii. 71 ; Jalaun, vii. 100; Mauranipur 
in Jhansi, vii. 223 ; Kaira, vii. 306 ; 
Kaladgi, vii. 319 ; Karauli, vii. 473 ; 
Karkamb, viii. 13 ; Khairpur, viii. 
137 ; Khipra, viii. 202 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 464 ; Lucknow District, viii. 500; 
Mada]iollam, viii. 537 '■> ^lanoli, ix. 
338 ; Masulipatam, ix. 354 ; Mirpur 
Batoro, ix. 451 ; Monghyr, ix. 487 ; 
Morasa, ix. 516 ; Bangalore, x. 106 ; 
Nabisar, x. 127 ; Nagar Parkar, x. 
158; Narsapur, x. 215; Nawanagar, 
X. 252 ; Nellore, x. 269 ; Ner, x. 291 ; 
Pethapur, xi. 162 ; Pondicherri, xi. 
199 ; Rabkavi, xi. 340 ; Rajkot, xi. 
389 ; Ranipur, xi. 509 ; Rath, xi. 518; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 38 ; Sakhera, xii. 
145 ; Sanganer, xii. 217 ; Sayla, xii. 
299; Sayyidnagar, xii. 299; Shahapur, 
xii. 338 ; .Sholapur District, xii. 418, 
city, xii. 421 ; Sihor, xii. 476 ; Thana, 
xiii. 257 ; Turavanur, xiii. 384; Upper 
Sind Frontier, xiii. 447 ; Wadhwan, 
xiii. 506; Walajapet, xiii. 515. 



Early Greek historians of India, vi. 163, 
164. 

Ea'ly HistO)-y of Tibet ami KJioteti, in 
Mr. Rockhill's Life of the Buddha, 
from the Tibetan classics, vi. 176 and 
177 (footnotes). 

Early Muhammadan rulers (71 1 -1 526), 
article ' India,' chap. x. pp. 268-289. 
Early Arab expeditions to Bombay 
(636-711), 268; Muhammadan settle- 
ment in Sind (711), 268; expulsion of 
the Muhammadans from Sind (828), 
268 ; India on the eve of the Muham- 
madan conquest (lOOO>, 268, 269 ; 
the Hindu kingdoms and Hindu power 



lOO 



INDEX. 



/ 



/ 



of resistance, 269; slow progress of 
Muhammadan conquest, 269, 270 ; 
Muhammadan conquest only partial 
and temporary, 270; recapture of India 
from the Muhammadans by the Hindus 
(1707-61), 270; chronology of iMuham- 
madan conquerors and dynasties of 
India (1001-1857), 271 ; first Turki 
invasions, Subuktigin (977-997), 272 ; 
the seventeen invasions of Mahmud of 
Ghazni (1001-24), 272-274; the Som- 
nath expedition, 273, 274; Mahmud's 
conquest of the Punjab, 274; the Ghor 
dynasty (1152-1206), 275-278; Muham- 
mad of Ghor's invasions (1191-1206), 
275, 276 ; his conquest of Bengal 
(1203), 277, 278; Muhammad's work 
in India and subjugation of Northern 
India, 278; Kutab-ud-din (1206-10), 
278 ; the Slave dynasty, 278-280 ; 
Altamsh (121 1-36), 279; the Empress 
Raziya (1236-39), 279; Mughal irrup- 
tions and Rajput revolts (1244-88), 
279, 280; Balban (1265-87), his cruel- 
ties, 280 ; his royal pensioners, 280 ; 
end of the Slave Kings, 280; the house 
of Khilji (1290-1320), 280-283; Ala- 
ud-din's raids into Southern India, 
281 ; conquest of Northern India 
(1295-1303), 281 ; conquest of Southern 
India (1303-15), 281, 282; Muham- 
madan power and population in India 
(1306), 282; Mughal mercenaries and 
Hindu revolts, 281 ; Khusru, the rene- 
gade Hindu Emperor (1360-20), 282, 
283 ; the house of Tughlak (1320- 
1414), 283-286; Muhammad Tughlak 
(1324-51), his expeditions, cruelties, 
forced currency, 283, 284 ; revolts, 
284 ; Muhammad Tughlak's revenue 
exactions, 284, 285 ; Firoz Shah Tugh- 
lak (1351-88); his canals, 285 ; Timur's 
invasion (1398), 285 ; ruin of the 
Tughlak dynasty, 285, 286 ; the Say- 
yid, Lodi, and Bahmani dynasties 
(1450-1526), 286, 287; Muhammadan 
States of the Deccan, 288 ; the Hindu 
kingdom of Vijayanagar, 286, 288 ; 
independent Nayaks and Palegars of 
Southern India, 28S ; independent 
Muhammadan kingdoms of Bengal, 
Gujarat, and Jaunpur, 289. 
Earthquakes, on Mount Abii, i. 7 ; Allah 
Band, i. 199 ; Amarapura, i. 209, 210 ; 
Assam, i. 372 ; Brahmanabad, iii. 91 ; 
Cachar, iii. 239 ; Cutch, iv. 59, 60 ; 
Dacca, iv. 88; Dehra Dun, iv. 176; 
Deoprayag, iv. 205; Goalpara, v. 112; 
Jalalabad, vii. 75 ; Kaira, vii. 308 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 67 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 
180; Maheswar, ix. 173; Mandalay, 
ix. 291 ; Manipur, ix. 334 ; Palanpur 
Agency, x. 539; Peshawar, xi. 157; 



of 1819, its effect on the Sata channel, 
xii. 274 ; at Shwe-san-daw, xii. 439 ; 
Silchar, xii. 489 ; Suigam, xiii. 89 ; 
Sylhet, xiii. 156, 157 ; Tezpur, xiii. 244. 
Eastern branches of the early Aryans, 

vi. 75- , 

Eastern Dwars. See Dwars, Eastern. 

Eastern Ghats, mountain range along the 
eastern coast of India, article ' India,' 
"^'i- 36) 38 ; forests of, vi. 39. See Ghats. 

East India Companies and early European 
Settlements, article 'India,' vi. 356-377; 
■Portuguese, 356-361 ; Dutch, 361-363; 
English, 363-371 ; other India Com- 
panies, 371 ; French, 372; Danish, 
Scotch, and Spanish, 372 ; German or 
Ostend, 372-374, 376; Prussian, 374- 
376 ; Swedish, 376 ; causes of failure, 

376, 377- 

East India Company, English, article 
' India,' vi. 363 - 365 ; first Charter, 
364 ; amalgamated Companies, 365 ; 
early voyages, 365, 366 ; defeat of the 
Portuguese at Swally, 366 ; wars with 
the Dutch, 367, 368; massacre of Am- 
boyna, 368 ; early English factories, 
368-370 ; foundation of Calcutta (1686), 
371 ; the Company embarks on terri- 
torial sway (1689), 371 ; downfall of 
the Company, and transfer of India to 
the Crown (1858), 422. See also 
Factories. 

Eastwick, E. B. , his description of the 
Bhor Ghat, ii. 407, 408 ; on the number 
of troops maintained at Herat, v. 392. 

Ebony trees, in the Andaman Islands, 
i. 282 ; Bombay, iii. 45 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; 
Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; Ganjam, v. 2 ; 
Western Ghats, v. 59 ; Gonda, v. 147 ; 
Hassan, v. 346 ; Hosur, v. 460 ; Jash- 
pur, vii. 145 ; South Kanara, vii. 376 ; 
Madras, ix. 7 ; Monghyr, ix. 4S0 ; 
Patna State, xi. 115 ; Pawi Mulanda, 
xi. 123 ; Potegaon, xi. 223 ; Puri, xi. 
301 ; Rampur (C. P.), xi. 460; Sam- 
balpur, xii. 178; Shimoga, xii. 400; 
Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Travancore, xiii. 344. 

Ecclesiastical Department, The Indian, 
vi. 266, 267. 

Edapadi, town in Madras, iv. 336. 

Edar, State in Bombay, iv. 336-339. 

Edar, chief town of State in Bombay, iv. 

jj9- 

Edavvauna, village in Madras, iv. 339. 

Eden, Hon. Sir Ashley, Lieut. -Governor 
of Bengal (1877-82), ii. 279; forced to 
sign treaty with Bhutan, ii. 417 ; Chief 
Commissioner of British Burma (1871- 
75), iii. 176; envoy to Sikkim, and 
made treaty (1864), xii. 485. 

Eden Canal, The, in Bengal, ii. 126, 
130, 132. 

Eden Hospital, The, at Calcutta, iii. 259. 



INDEX 



lOI 



Edgar, J. W., accompanied Cachar 
column in Lushai expedition, viii. 531 ; 
.-ent to Sikkim (1874), xii. 485 ; his 
Visit to Sikkim, quoted, xii. 484-487. 

Edible birds'nests. 6'<f<; Birds' nests, Edible. 

Edicts of Asoka. See Asoka. 

Edmonstone, Sir G. F. , Lieut. -Governor 
of the N.-W. Provinces (1859-63), x. 
370. 

Education Commission appointed by Lord 
Ripon, vi. 429; its recommendations, 

429; 474- 
Education in India, article 'India,' vi. 472- 
479 ; education in ancient India, 472 ; 
Sanskrit tols, 472 ; Calcutta iMadrasa 
and other colleges, 473 ; ^Mission 
schools, 473 ; State system of educa- 
tion, 473, 474 ; educational finance, 
475 ; Indian universities, 475, 476 ; 
colleges, 476 ; upper, middle, and pri- 
mary schools, 476, 477 ; girls' school-:, 
478, 479 ; normal and other special 
schools, 479 ; educational classification 
of the population. Appendix IX., 698- 
702. See also Administrative section 
in each District article, and for the 
Provinces, see Assam, i. 371, 372 ; 
Bengal, ii. 320, 321 ; Bombay, iii. 
70, 71 ; British (now Lower) Burma, 
iii. 207; Central Provinces, iii. 321; 
Madras, iv. 77-79; N.-W. Provinces, 
X. 400-403 ; Oudh, X. 509 ; Punjab, 
xi. 290, 291 ; Sind, xii. 524. See hlso 
Colleges, Madrasas or Muhammadan 
Colleges, Tols or Sanskrit schools, and 
Universities. 
E'Uvardes, Sir H. B., assisted . against 
Miiltan by the Nawab of Bahawalpur, 
i. 423 ; administration of the Bannu 
valley (1847, 1848), ii. 91, 92; fol- 
lowed by many levies from Dera Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 221, 222 ; founded Ed- 
wardesabad (1848), iv. 339; estimate 
of the fighting men in the Kuram 
valley, viii. 368 ; gate in memory of, 
erected at Peshawar, xi. 158 ; his policy 
in regard to Tank, xiii. 197. 
Edwardesabad, town in Punjab, iv. 339, 

340. 
Edwards, Mr. R. M., drove the mutineers 

out of Muzaffamagar (1857), x. 70. 
Egatpura. See Igatpuri. 
Egerton, Sir R., sixth Lieut. -Governor of 

the Punjab, xi. 270. 
Egmore, suburb of Madras, iv. 340. 
Ekamba, village in Bengal, iv. 340. 
Eklaspur, town in Bengal, iv. 340. 
Ekwari, town in Bengal, iv. 340. 
Elattur, river in Madras, iv. 340. 
Elavarasanandal, hamlet in ^ladras, iv. 

340. 
Electro-plating, at Ahmadabad, i. 96 ; 
Bangalore, ii. 70. 



Elephanta, island in Bombay, iv. 340-344, 
Elephant fair, The, at Singeswarthan, 

xii. 541. 
Elephantiasis, including Cochin leg and 
Madura foot, prevalent in S. Arcot, 
i. 328 ; Balasor, ii. 10 ; Birbhiim, 
iii. 1 1 ; Cochin, iv. 10 ; Cuddapah, 
iv. 55 ; Dacca, iv. 89 ; Garo Hills, 
v. 32 ; Jodhpur, vii. 240 ; Kashmir, 
viii. 76; Madras, ix. 1 19; Madura, 
ix. 132; Monghyr, ix. 489; Murshid- 
abad, x. 31 ; Xellore, x. 271 ; Now- 
gong, X. 415 ; Puri, xi. 309 ; Rangpur, 
xi. 500; Sibsagar, xii. 471; Tanjore, 
xiii. 193, 194 ; Travancore, xiii. 353 ; 
\'izagapatam, xiii. 497. 
Elephants, domestic and wild, article 
' India,' vi. 521, 655 ; elephant-catch- 
ing a Government monopoly, vi. 655, 
656 ; Elephant Preservation Act, vi. 
656. Local notices — On the Anamalai 
Hills, i. 270 ; Andipatti Hills, i. 288 ; 
in the Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 299 ; in 
North Arcot, i. 312 ; South Arcot, 
i. 320 ; Assam, i. 349 ; Bankura, ii. 79; 
Bhutan, ii. 414; Bijnaur, ii. 429; Bilas- 
pur, ii. 445 ; Biligiri-rangan, ii. 457 ; 
Bonai, iii. 85 ; Upper Burma, iii. 212; 
Cachar, iii. 234 ; Chang Bhakar, iii. 
366 ; Chittagong, iii. 435 ; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 14, 15, 20 ; Coorg, 
iv. 32; Darjiling, iv. 131; Darrang, 
iv. 142 ; Dehra Dun, iv. 169 ; Dun- 
yian, iv. 325 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; 
Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Western Ghats, 
v. 59 ; Hassan, v. 346 ; Heggadade- 
vankot, v. 382 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; 
Himalaya Mountains, v. 409 ; Jalpai- 
guri, vii. 109 ; Kadur, vii. 283 ; Kam- 
rup, vii. 355 ; South Kanara, vii. 377 ; 
Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; Korea, viii. 
297 ; Kumaun, viii. 350 ; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 427 ; Langai, viii. 460 ; Madras, 
ix. 8, 90; Madura, ix. 121 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 192 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; 
Manbhum, ix. 279 ; Manipur, ix. 325 ; 
IMatin, ix. 365; Morbhanj, ix. 516; 
Mysore, x. 114 ; Natra Hills, x. 143 ; 
Nepal, x. 278 ; Pakhal, x. 532 ; 
Palni Mountains, xi. 17; Polur, xi. 
197; Pushpa-giri, xi. 355 ; Sagar (My- 
sore), xii. Ill; Saharanpur, xii. 1 15; 
Salem, xii. 152 ; Shimoga, xii. 400 ; 
Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Singhbhum, xii. 
532 ; Singla, xii. 542 ; Sirmur, xii. 
553, 554; Siwalik Hills, xiii. 43; 
Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; Tarai, xiii. 208 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; 
Thayet-myo, xiii. 279 ; Travancore, 
xiii. 345 ; Uprora, xiii. 449. 
Elgin, Lord, Viceroy of India (1862-63), 
article 'India,' vi. 424 ; died at Dharm- 



I02 



INDEX. 



sala, where is a monument to him, 
iv. 255. 
EUas, Ney, his expedition to open trade 
route through Burma to China (1874), 
iii. 228. 
Ellenabad, town in Punjab, iv. 344. 
EUenborough, Lord, Governor-General 
(1842-44), article ' India,' vi. 408, 409; 
the Afghan army of retribution under 
Generals Nott and Pollock, vi. 408, 
409 ; Somnath proclamation, vi. 409 ; 
conquest and annexation of Sind, Gvva- 
lior outbreak, and the battles of 
Maharajpurand Punniah,vi. 409. Local 
notices — -His new system for the admini- 
stration of Jabalpur, vii. 32 ; reor- 
ganized the administration of the Sagar 
and Narbada territories after Bundela 
rising of 1842, xii. 102. 
EUichpur, District in Berar, iv. 344-347 ; 
physical aspects, 344 ; population, 345 ; 
agriculture and commerce, 345 ; his- 
tory, 345, 346 ; administration, 346, 
347 ; climate, 347. 
EUichpur, taluk of Berar, iv. 347. 
EUichpur, town in Berar, iv. 347, 348. 
EUichpur, Muhammadan kingdom of S. 
India (1484- 1 572), article 'India, 'vi. 288. 
Elliot, Sir Henry, Tribes of the N. - IV. 
Provinces, article ' India,' vi. 195 (foot- 
note 2) ; History of India as told by its 
oiun Historians, 271 (footnote); 272 
(footnotes 3 and 4) ; 273 (footnote) ; 
287 (footnote 2); 290, 291 (foot- 
notes); 295 (footnote i); 300 (foot- 
note) ; 302 (footnote) ; 306 (footnote 
2); 313 (footnote i). Local references 
—On the story of the Taga Brahmans, 
iv. 182 ; on the Bhars, viii. 495. 
Elliot, Hugh, Governor of Madras (1814- 

20), ix. 67. 
Elliot, Sir Walter, his report on arrears 
in Kistna District, viii. 233 ; his Flora 
Andhrica, referred to, ix. 81 ; on 
the date of the rdths at Mahabalipur, 
ix. 146. 
Elliott, Sir C. A., Chief Commissioner of 
Assam, i. 342 ; his Chronicles of Unao, 
quoted on the legend of Sarwan, xii. 
272 ; on the Purihar Rajputs in Sikand- 
arpur, xii. 479 ; on the Muhammadan 
conquest of Unao, xii. 428, 429. 
Elliott, Capt. C, first administrator of 
Chhatisgarh after annexation (1854), 
xi. 369. 
Elliott,Daniel, acting Governor of Madras 

(1854), ix. 67. 
Elliott, Col. E. K., Chief Commissioner 
of the Central Provinces ( 1 861, 1864), 
iii. 320; administration of Raipur on 
its annexation (1855), xi. 369. 
Ellis, Mr., chief of the factory at Patna, 
murdered by Mir Kasim (1 763),xi. 95,96. 



EUis, Mr., checked the mutiny at Nag- 
pur by his firm attitude, x. 169. 
EUora, village in Deccan, iv. 348-351. 
EUore, taluk of Madras, iv. 351. 
EUore, town in Madras, iv. 351, 352;,. _ 
Elphinstone, Lord, built house at Kaiti, 
one of the first settlements on the 
Nilgiris, vii. 310 ; Governor of Madras 
(1837-42), ix. 67. ... 

Elphinstone, Mountstuart, his mission 
to Afghanistan (1809), i. 49; passed 
through Bikaner, ii. 438, 440 ; attacked 
at Poona by Baji Rao, Peshwa (1817), 
iii. 39 ; his reforms in Bombay, iii. 40, 
75 ; estimate of the population of 
Kandahar, vii. 390 ; present at battle 
of Pandharpur (1817), xi. 37 ; enlarged 
Government house at Parell, xi. 61 ; 
description of Singhana, xii. 529 ; his 
History of India, quoted, vi. 175 (foot- 
note 2) ; 180 (footnote 2); 273 (foot- 
note) ; 291 (footnote) ; 300 (footnote 
2) ; 302 (footnotes) ; 306 (footnote i) ; 
on the Sikh organization, xi. 262. 
Elwich, Nathaniel, Governor of Madras 

(1721-25), ix. 67. 
Embankments, on the Adjai, i. 25 ; in 
Balasor, ii. 8 ; Bardwan, ii. 132 ; Bas- 
sein, ii. 198 ; the Bhograi, ii. 402 ; the 
Bhir Bandh, ii. 462 ; Birkul, iii. 13 ; 
Chandan, iii. 356 ; Chapra, iii. 370 ; 
Chittagong, iii. 434; Comillah, iv. 25 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 68 ; Daga, iv. 94 ; the 
Damodar, iv. 107 ; Darrang, iv. 143 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 218 ; Dera 
Nanak, iv. 229, v. 207 ; on the Dhales- 
wari, iv. 238 ; on the Dhalkisor, iv. 
239 ; the Dhodar Ali, iv. 270, 271 ; at 
Diiulia, iv. 282 ; Duya, iv. 326, 327 ; 
English Bazar, iv. 353 ; Gobra, v. 121 ; 
the Tucker Bandh in Gorakhpur, v. 
171; in Gurgaon, v. 216; Hatia, v. 
356 ; on the Hemavati, v. 382 ; in 
Henzada, v. 383, 387 ; in Howrah, v. 
461 ; on the Indus, vii. 15 ; on the 
Irawadi, vii. 21 ; in lessor, vii. 188 ; 
in Kamrup, vii. 363 ; at Kashmor, viii. 
79; Khairpur, viii. 138; Kutabdia, 
viii. 380; in Lakhimpur, viii. 418; 
Larkhana, viii. 464 ; Madnagarh,^ viii. 
544 ; the Nabaganga at Magura, ix. 
141 ; Malkapur, ix. 259 ; Mughalbhin, 
ix. 529; Murshidabad, x. 22; Muzaflar- 
pur, X. 83 ; on the Eastern Nara, x. 
200; Narkher, x. 212; in Naushahro 
Abro, X. 246 ; in Noakhali, x. 340 ; 
the Nuna, x. 417 ; Ot-po, x. 478, 479 ; 
in Puri, xi. 300 ; in Rajshahi, xi. 428 ; 
in Rangoon, xi. 479 ; Ravval Pindi, xii. 
30 ; Rayalcheruvu, xii. 40 ; Rohna, xii. 
63 ; Rohri, xii. 65 ; on the Rupnarayan, 
xii. 84 ; in Sabay-yon, xii. 88 ; Sagar 
Island, xii. 1 10 ; the Chembrambakam, 



INDEX, 



103 



xii. 139 ; in Saran, xii. 256 ; at Segauli, 
xii. 303 ; in Sialkot, xii. 440 ; Sibsagar, 
xii. 459, 462 ; in the Sundarbans, xiii. 
109 ; in Thana, xiii. 254 ; Thar and 
Parkar, xiii. 263 ; Tiia-tun, xiii. 275 ; 
Tipperah, xiii. 319 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 
354 ; the Twenty-four Pareanas, xiii. 

389. 

Embden East India Company. See 
Prussian and Embden East India 
Companies. 

Embroidery, gold and silver lace, gold 
and silver thread, wire, tinsel, etc., vi. 
603 ; made at Agra, i. 76; Ahmadabad, 
i. 96 ; Bangalore, ii. 70 ; Bishnupur, ii. 
85 ; Bombay, iii. 59 ; Cambay, iii. 272 ; 
Cutch, iv. 62 ; Dacca, iv. 86 ; Gondal 
(cord), V. 157; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 
282; Jalandhar, vii. 89; Jalna, vii. 107 ; 
Jhang, vii. 21 1; Jodhpur, vii. 239; 
Kangra, vii. 430 ; Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; 
by the Khamtis, viii. 144 ; Lahore 
(lace), viii. 418; Lucknow, viii. 516, 
x. 507 ; Maheswar, ix. 173 ; Mirpur, 
ix. 450 ; Murshidabad, x. 39 ; Nawa- 
nagar, x. 253 ; Peshawar, xi. 154 ; Pun- 
jab (lace), xi. 287 ; Raver, xii. 14 ; 
.Sawantwari, xii. 297 ; Surat, xiii. 129 ; 
Sylhet, xiii. 153 ; Umrer, xiii. 423 ; 
Yeola (twist), xiii. 555. 

Emigration and immigration, from or to, 
Akyab, i. 154 ; Amherst, i. 237 ; South 
Arcot, i. 323; Assam, i. 350; Balaghat, 
i. 454 ; Bassein, ii. 196 ; Bengal, ii. 
323 ; Bhandara, ii. 362 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 185, 193 ; Cachar, iii. 235 ; Cawn- 
pur, iii. 283 ; Central Provinces, iii. 
305 ; Chanda, iii. 351 ; Chittagong, iii. 
437 ; Cochin, iv. 5 ; ^ Coorg, iv. 33 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 68 ; Daman-i-Koh, iv. 
104; Damoh, iv. 109, no; Darjiling, 
iv. 132, 133 ; Darrang, iv. 145, 148 ; 
Dehra Dun, iv. 175 ; Diu, iv. 306 ; 
Eastern Dwars, iv. 332 ; Western 
Dwars, iv. 336 ; Faridpur, iv. 401 ; 
Goa, V. 94 ; Gujranwala, v. 181 ; Berar, 
V. 226 ; Henzada, v. 386 ; Jabalpur, 
vii. 32; Jalpaiguri, vii. 115; Jhansi, 
vii. 221 ; Kamrup, vii. 360 ; Laccadive 
Islands, viii. 395 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
479 ; Madras, ix. 26 ; Maimansingh, 
ix. 197 ; Maldah, ix. 240 ; Manbhum, 
ix. 281 ; Mandla, ix. 303 ; Mergui, ix. 
409 ; Multan, x. 5 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 
59 ; Muzaffarpur, x. 80 ; Nilgiri Hills, 
X. 309 ; Nowgong, x. 410 ; Pambam, 
xi. 23 ; Punjab, xi. 271 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 
6, 7, 8 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 25 ; Sagar, 
xii. 103; Salem, xii. 159; Seoni, xii. 
311; Shahpur, xii. 363; Sialkot, xii, 
443 ; Sibsagar, xii. 463 ; .Sirsa, xiii. 12, 
13 ; Svlhet, xiii. 150 ; Tanjore, xiii. 
185 ; Tarai, xiii. 209 ; Thana, xiii. 253 ; 



Tinnevelli, xiii. 304, 305 ; Travancore, 
xiii. 347 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 440. 

Eminabad, town in Punjab, iv. 352. 

Empire in India, British. See History of 
British rule in India. 

Empire, The Mughal. See Mughal Em- 
pire, The. 

Enamelling on gold and silver, Lower 
Burma, iii. 198 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 
282 ; Jaipur, vii. 53 ; Kangra, vii. 430 ; 
Maulmain, ix. 371; Multan, x. 13; 
Partahgarh (Rajputana), xi. 77; {koft- 
gari) Kotli in Sialkot, xii. 447, 448. 

Engineering Colleges. See Colleges. 

English in India, The (1496- 1689), article 
'India,' vi. pp. 363-377. Attempts to 
reach India by the North-West passage, 

363 ; Thomas Stephens, the earliest 
recorded English traveller in India 
(1579), 363. 364; Fitch, Newberry, 
and Leedes (1583), 364 ; first Charter 
of the East India Company (1600), 

364 ; later East India Companies, 365 ; 
the amalgamated Companies (1709), 

365 ; eariy English voyages to India 
(1600-12), 365, 366; British defeat of 
the Portuguese fleet at Swally (161 5), 

366 ; Sir Thomas Roe, British Am- 
bassador to India (1615), 367; wars 
between English and Dutch, 367, 36S ; 
massacre of Amboyna, and expulsiofi 
of the British from the Eastern Archi- 
pelago, 368 ; early Indian factories in 
India, 367, 368 ; Madras founded 
(1639), 369 ; Hugh, Balasor, and 
Kasimbazar factories, 369, 370; Bom- 
bay ceded to the British Crown (1661), 
and the Presidency transferred thither 
from Surat (1684-87), 370; Bengal 
separated from Madras (1687), 370 ; 
Sir John Child, styled ' Governor- 
General,' 370, 371 ; English oppressed 
in Bengal by the native Viceroys, 371 ; 
the Company starts on territorial sway 
(1689), 371 ; causes of England's suc- 
cess in India, and of the failure of 
other European powers, 377. See also 
Factories. 

English Bazar, town in Bengal, iv. 352, 

353- 
Eng-rai, town in Lower Burma, iv. 353. 
Eng-rai-gyi, lake in Burma, iv. 353, 354. 
Ennore, town in Madras, iv. 354. 
Entalli, suburb of Calcutta, iv. 354. 
Epidemics. See Medical aspect sections 

in the District articles, and Cholera, 

Fever, Small-pox. 
Eran, village in Central Provinces, iv. 

354, 355- 

Erandol, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iv. 355. 

Ernad, taluk in Madras, iv. 355. 

Ernagudem, See Yernagudem. 



I04 



INDEX. 



Ernakolam, town in Madras, iv. 355, 356. 

Ernal, town in Madras, iv. 356. 

Erode, tdluk in Madras, iv. 356, 357. 

Erode, town in Madras, iv. 357. 

Erskine, Mr., first Collector of Ongole 
(1790), X. 264. 

Eruvadi, town in Madras, iv. 357. 

Estainge, Admiral D', took Tinieri( 1758), 
xiii. 297. 

Etah, District in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 
357-366 ; physical aspects, 358 ; his- 
tory, 358-360; population, 360, 361; 
distribution of the people into town and 
country, 361, 362; agriculture, 362,363; 
natural calamities, 363, 364; commerce, 
trade, etc., 364 ; administration, 364, 
365 ; medical aspects, 365, 366. 

Etah, tahsil in N. - W. Provinces, iv. 366. 

Etah, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 366, 

367- 

Etaiyapuram, town in Madras, iv. 367. 

Etawah, District in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 
1^1 -yiT, physical aspects, 367-370; 
history, 370-372 ; population, 372-374 ; 
distribution into town and country, 374 ; 
agriculture, 374, 375 ; natural calami- 
ties, 376 ; commerce and trade, 376 ; 
administration, 376, 377 ; medical 
aspects, 377. 

Etawah, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

377, 378. 

Etawah, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

378, 380. 

Ethnical division of the population, article 
'India,' vi. 51, 52, 73, 74. 5'tv also 
Population section in the several Dis- 
trict articles, and Aborigines. 

Ettiapuram, estate in Madras, iv. 380. 

European and Indian languages merely 
varieties of Aryan speech, vi. 76. 

European Settlements (1498 to i8th cen- 
tury), article ' India,' vi. chap. xiv. pp. 
356-377. The Portuguese in India, 
356-361 ; early Portuguese voyages, 
Covilham (1487), and Vasco da Gama 
(1498), 357, 358; state of India on 
arrival of Portuguese, 358 ; Portuguese 
territorial expedition (1500), 358 ; 
Portuguese supremacy in the Eastern 
Seas (1 500- 1 600), 358, 359 ; capture of 
Goa by Albuquerque (1510), 359; 
Portuguese cruelties, 359 ; Albuquer- 
que's policy of conciliation, 359, 360 ; 
later Portuguese Viceroys, their oppres- 
sions and conquests, 360 ; downfall of 
the Portuguese in India (1639-1739), 
360, 361 ; Portuguese possessions in 
1881, 361 ; mixed descendants, 361. 
The Dutch in India (1602- 1824), 359- 
362 ; Dutch East India Companies, 
361 ; Dutch supremacy in the Eastern 
Seas (1600-1700), 362; their brilliant 
progress, but short-sighted policy and 



ultimate downfall, 362 ; Dutch relics 
in India, 363. The early English in 
India, 363-371 ; attempts to reach 
India by the North-West passage, 363 ; 
Thomas Stephens, the first authentic 
English traveller in India (1579), 363, 
364 ; later travellers, Fitch, Newberry, 
and Leedes (1583), 364; first Charter 
of the East India Company (1600), 
364 ; later East India Companies (1635, 
1655, and 1698), 365 ; the amalga- 
mated Company (1709), 365 ; early 
English voyages (1600-12), 365 ; defeat 
of the Portuguese fleet at Swally, off 
Surat (1615), 366; Sir Thomas Roe, 
first English Ambassador to India 
(1615), 367; treaty with the Dutch 
(1619), 367; English expelled from 
the Spice Islands and Java by the 
Dutch (1620-21), 367; establishment 
of English factories at Agra and Patna 
(1620), 367; Masulipatam factory 
established (1622), 368; English ex- 
pelled from Eastern Archipelago, and 
retire to India, 368 ; Emperor's Farinan 
granting English liberty to trade in 
Bengal, 368, 369 ; Madras founded 
(1639), 369; Hi'igli factory established 
(1640), 369; Kasimbazar factory (1658), 
369, 370 ; Bombay ceded to the British 
Crown (1661), 370; Presidency re- 
moved from Surat to Bombay (1684- 
87), 370 ; separation of Bengal from 
Madras (1681), 370; Sir John Child, 
styled 'Governor-General' (1686), 370, 
371 ; Calcutta founded (1686), 371 ; 
the Company embarks on territorial 
sway (1689), 371 ; French East India 
Companies and possessions in 1881, 
372 ; Danish, Scotch, and Spanish 
Companies, 372 ; the German or 
Ostend Company, 372 ; its Indian 
settlements (1772), 373 ; its successful 
experimental voyages and political 
objects, 373, 374 ; Ostend Company 
bankrupt and destroyed (1783-84), and 
extinguished (1793), 374; the Prussian 
and Embden Companies, 374-376; 
Swedish Company (1731), 376; causes 
of failure of foreign European Com- 
panies, and of English success in India, 
376, 377 > European traders in India 
in 1872 and 1881, 377. See also 
Danish, Dutch, English, French, 
German, and Portuguese. 

Europeans in India. See Population 
section in each Provincial article, and 
especially Bombay, iii. 80 ; Calcutta, 
iii. 256 ; Goa, v. 91 ; Madras, ix. 108. 

Evans, Capt., his administration in 
Nimar, x. 331. 

Evans, Col., put down rebellion in Thar 
and Parkar (1859), ^iii. 265. 



INDEX. 



105 



Everest, Mount, in Hi-iialayas, iv. 380; 
highest measured fountain in the 
world, vi. 5. 

Everest, Sir George, Surveyor-General of 
India, mountain named after, iv. 380, 
V. 408. 

Everest, Rev. Mr., calculations regarding 
silt discharge of the Ganges, vi. 27. 

Excliange, Loss by, vi. 469. 

Excommunication from caste privileges, 
vi. 199, 200. 

Excise administration, distilleries, rice- 
beer, opium, ganjd, charas, vi. 454, 
455> 467 ; expenditure, and income of 
British India, 465-470. 

Executive Council of the Governor- 
General, vi. 432. 

Expeditions, Military — frontier and other 
— against the Akas (1883, 1884), i. 
136 ; the Ambela (1863), i. 227, 228 ; 
into Bhattiana (1810, 1818), ii. 379; 
the Bhutan (1865), ii. 417 ; against the 
Lushais (1871, 1872), iii. 232, 448, 
449, viii. 531 ; against the Angami 
Nagas (1880, 1881), iii. 252, x. 144- 
146; into the Bangs (1818), iv. 115; 
against the Daphlas (1874, 1875), i'^"- 
120; the Sikkim (1849, 1850), iv. 
131, xii. 485; the Gumsur (1835-37), 
V. 4 ; against the Garos, v. 27 ; 
against Hathras (1817), v. 355; the 
Jaintia Hills (1862, 1863), vii. 48, 
viii. 172; Khasi Hills (1829-33), 
viii. 171 ; the Kittur, viii. 238; into 
Merwara (1819, 1820), ix. 416, 417; 
into the Mishmi Hills (1855), ix. 463 ; 
against the Mohmands (1851, 1854, 
1864), ix. 475 ; the Park Kimedi 
(1768, 1833-35, i837)>.xi. 64, 65; 
against Putur (1837), xi. 336; into 
Rampa {1858, 1879), xi. 454 ; against 
the Kols into Singhbhiim (1820, 1821, 
1836, i837),_ xii. 533 ; against the 
Singphos, xii. 542 ; into Thar and 
Parkar (1859), xiii. 264, 265 ; against 
the Kukis from Tipperah (1861), xiii. 

315- 

Export trade of India, its origin and 
growth, analysis and principal staples 
of foreign trade, vi. 567, 569 - 580 ; 
distribution of exports to different 
countries, vi. 569, 580 ; coasting trade, 
vi. 584-5S6. 

Exports and imports, of Afghanistan, i. 
40 ; Assam, i. 367, 368 ; Bengal, ii. 
312-314 ; Bhutan, ii. 415 ; Bombay, 
iii. 62, 63 ; Lower Burma, iii. 199, 
200; Upper (then Independent) Burma, 
iii. 218; Calcutta, iii. 264-266; 
Central Provinces, iii. 319 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 445 ; Dacca, iv. 91 ; Berar, 
v. 271, 272 ; Karachi, vii. 455-458 ; 
Lahore, viii. 418 ; Madras Presidency, 



ix. 61, 62; Madras city, ix. iii, 112 ; 

Mangalore, ix. 313, 314; Nepal, x. 2S2, 

283 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 392-394 ; 

Patna, xi. no- 114; Punjab, xi. 284- 

286 ; Rangoon, xi. 484-486 ; Sind, xii. 

522 ; Tuticorin, xiii. 386. Sea also 

Sea-borne trade. 
External sources of the ancient history of 

India, vi. 163. 
Eyre, Sir Vincent, relieved Arrah (1857), 

i- m, 334> xii. 329. 



Fabricius, Lutheran missionary in Madras, 
ix. 25. 

Factories, Steam cotton. See Steam 
cotton factories. 

Factories, Silk. See Silk manufacture. 

Factories, Old East India Company's, 
including Commercial Residencies and 
Lodges, Anjengo (1695), i. 291, 292 ; 
Bajitpur, i. 439 ; Balasor, ii. 5 ; Ban- 
damurlanka, ii. 56 ; Negrais, ii. 194 ; 
Bassein, ii. 194; Broach (1616), iii. 
109; Calicut (1616), iii. 270; Chand- 
rakona, iii. 364 ; Cochin (1683), iv. 12 ; 
Cuddalore, iv. 46 ; Dacca, iv. 81 ; 
Armagon, near Durgarayapatnam, iv. 
326 ; English Bazar (1770), iv. 353 ; 
Ganjam (1768), v. 3, 9 ; Hubli, v. 
467; Hugli (1640), v. 491, 500; In- 
jaram (1708), vii. 18 ; Jahanabad 
(1760), vii. 43; Jaleswar, vii. 104; 
Jangipur, vii. 137 ; Kalyan (1674), 
vii. 347; Karwar (1638, 1682, 1750), 
viii. 54, 55 ; Kasimbazar (1658), viii. 
80, 81 ; Kumarkhali, viii. 346 ; Lahori 
Bandar, viii. 419 ; Madapollam, viii. 
537 ; Madras (1639), ix. 103 ; Kisori- 
ganj in Maimansingh, ix. 198 ; in 
Maldah (1686), ix. 242 ; Masulipatam 
(1622), ix. 353; Nandurbar (1666), x. 
195; Narsapur (1677), x. 215; Nila- 
palli (1751), X. 301 ; Nizampatam 
(1621), X. 338 ; in Noakhali (1756), x. 
343; Pippli (1634), xi. 186; Ponani 
(1662), xi. 197 ; Rajapur, xi. 384, 385 ; 
Rampur Beauleah, xi. 462 ; Ranga- 
mati, xi. 470; Rangoon (1790), xi. 
482 ; Shahljandar, xii. 340 ; Sona- 
mukhi, xiii. 58; Surat (1612), xiii. 
121; Surul, xiii. 139; Syriam, xiii. 
158 ; Tatta, xiii. 218 ; Tellicherri 
(1683), xiii. 237; Vengurla (1772), 
xiii. 470 ; Viravasaram (1634), xiii. 
478 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 485, 498. 

Factories, Old Danish, Calicut (1752), 
iii. 270 ; Porto Novo, xi. 222 ; Seram- 
pur, xii. 318 ; Tranquebar (1620), xiii. 

183, 340, 341- 
Factories, Old Dutch, Baranagar, ii. 122; 



io6 



INDEX. 



Bimlipatam, ii. 461 ; Broach (1617), 
iii. 113; Cannanore (1656), iii. 276; 
Chapra, iii. 370 ; Chinsiirah, iii. 419 ; 
Jaganadhapur, iii. 472 ; Dacca, iv. 81 ; 
Falta, iv. 391 ; Masulipatam, ix. 353 ; 
Pa}akollu(i652),xi. 533; I'iilicat(i6o9), 
xi. 239 ; Rampur Beauleah, xi. 462 ; 
Sadras (1647), xii. 94; Surat (1618), 
xiii. 121; Syriam (1631), xiii. 158; 
Tanganeri, xiii. 180 ; Tuticorin, xiii. 
300, 385 ; Vengurla (1638), xiii. 470. 

Factories, Old French, Calicut {1722), 
iii. 270; Chandarnagar (1673), iii. 
356, 357 ; Chapra, iii. 370 ; Dacca, iv. 
81 ; English Bazar, iv. 353 ; Mahe 
(1722), ix. 179; Masulipatam (1669), 
ix. 352; Pondicherri (1674), xi. 198; 
Yanaon, xiii. 547. 

Factories, Old German, Bankipur, ii. 77- 

Factories, Old Portuguese, Beypur, ii. 
335; Bhatkal (1505), ii. 377; Cali- 
cut (1501, 1513), iii. 269, 270; Can- 
nanore (1505), iii. 276; Chapra, iii. 
370; Chaul (1505), iii. 376; Cochin 
(1502), iv. II ; Daman (1558), iv. loi ; 
Goa, v. 100; Hugh (1537), v. 449; 
Porto Novo, xi. 222; Quilon (1503), 
xi. 340. See also Portuguese in India. 

Fa Hian, Chinese Buddhist pilgrim of 
the fifth century, article ' India,' vi. 
155- Local notices — Visited or men- 
tions Allahabad, i. 186 ; Bahraich, i. 
427 ; Bengal, ii. 275 ; Buddh Gaya, 
iii. 125 ; Taxila, iv. 270 ; the ' Soli- 
tary Mountain ' identified vi'ith Giriyak, 
V. 85 ; Tu-wei (Tandwa), v. 507 ; 
Kasia, viii. 79 ; Ladakh, viii. 399 ; 
the Maldive Islands, ix. 250 ; Tamliik, 
ix. 428, xiii. 171; Muttra, x. 53; 
Sravasti (Sahet Mahet), x. 484, xii. 
128 ; Pushkalavati, xi. 147 ; Raja- 
griha, xi. 380, 381 ; Sankisa, xii. 223, 
224. 

Fairs, generally associated with religious 
festivals, held at Agradwip, i. 77 ; 
Ahar, i. 81 ; Ahmadalmd, i. 95 ; 
Ajodhya, i. 135 ; Akbarpur (N.-W. 
P.), i. 139 ; Akot, i. 145 ; Alawakha- 
wa, i. 164; Alipur (C. P.), i. 181 ; 
Allahabad, i. 192, 198 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; 
Amalner, i. 208; Amarnath, i. 21 1 ; 
Ambad, i. 212 ; Amrilsar, i. 259, 265 ; 
Anandpur (Punjab), i. 273 ; Anwa, i. 
295 ; Aror, i. 332 ; Asasuni, i. 337 ; 
Ashta, i. 338 ; Atur, i. 383 ; Aurunga- 
bad Sayyid, i. 388 ; Bachireddipalem, 
i. 406 ; Badin, i. 409 ; Bagesar, i. 414 ; 
Bagherhat, i. 417 ; Bahraich, i. 435 ; 
Bairam Ghat, i. 437 ; Bajrangarh, i. 
439; Baksar, i. 450; Baldeva, ii. II ; 
Ballabhpur, ii. 17 ; Ballia, ii. 23 ; 
Balotra, ii. 24 ; Unai, near Bansda, ii. 
99; Baraoar Hills, ii. 115; Barhal- 



ganj, ii. 150 ; Bawangaja Hill, ii. 181 ; 
Balesar, ii. 216 ; Bausi, ii. 217 ; Bcl- 
gaum, ii. 237 ; Bellavi, ii. 251 ; Beri, 
ii. 325 ; Bettia, ii. 328 ; Bhadarsa, ii. 
337 ; Bhadhhi'it, ii. 338 ; Bhadracha- 
1am, ii. 339 ; Bhangarhat, ii. 369 ; 
Bhartpur, ii. 376 ; Bhavvanandpur, ii. 
384 ; Bheraghat, ii. 386 ; Bhetargaon, 
ii. 387 ; Bhiri, ii. 399 ; Bhit Shah, ii. 
399 ; Bihar, ii. 421 ; Bijnaur, ii. 435 ; 
Bisalpur, iii. 15 ; Bishanpur Nashan 
Khas, iii. 16 ; Bithiir, iii. 20 ; Bitra- 
ganta, iii. 20 ; Bowring-pet, iii. 95 ; 
Budhata, iii. 128 ; Budikot, iii. 129 ; 
Bukera, iii. 129 ; Chaibasa, iii. 324 ; 
Chakultor, iii. 326 ; Chanda, iii. 355 ; 
Chandod, iii. 360 ; Chatsu, iii. 375 ; 
Chhipia, iii. 404 ; Ciiik Devaraj 
Sagar, iii. 409 ; Chikmagah'ir, iii. 411 ; 
Chilambaram, iii. 412 ; Chimur, iii. 
417; Chitalmari, iii. 429; Chitarkot, 
iii. 429 ; Conjevaram, iv. 26 ; Dain- 
hat, iv. 95 ; Dalgoma, iv. 97 ; Dal- 
mau, iv. 99, 100 ; Kundalpur and Ban- 
dakpur in Damoh, iv. 1 12; Darwani, 
iv. 151 ; Dasna, iv. 154; Debi Patan, 
iv. 164; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 218; 
Deulgaon Raja, iv. 230 ; Devanhalli, 
iv. 232 ; Devjagaon, iv. 234 ; Dewal- 
wara, iv. 235 ; Dhaldighi, iv. 238 ; 
Dhampur, iv. 241 ; Hulgur, Yamnur, 
and Gudgaddapur in Dharwar, iv. 260; 
Dholpur, iv. 277, 278 ; Machkund and 
Salpan in Dholpur, iv. 278 ; Dhulia, 
iv. 283 ; Dhuiian, iv. 283 ; Diggi, iv. 
287 ; Diwangiri, iv. 308 ; Dod-balla- 
pur, iv. 311 ; Baneswar and Galliakot 
in Dungarpur, iv. 323, 324; Elephanta, 
iv. 344; Eminabad, iv. 352; Doha in 
Etawah, iv. 376 ; Fatehpur-Chaurasi, 
iv. 433 ; Gangal, iv. 466 ; Garhauli, v. 
14 ; Garhduvala, v. 14; Garhmuktesar, 
v. 16; Gauripur, v. 42; Chochakpur 
in Ghazipur, v. 69; Godna, v. 139; 
Jargo, near Gogunda, v. 140 ; Gohana, 
V. 141 ; Gokaru, v. 142 ; Gola, v. 143 ; 
Gonda, v. 157 ; Goona, v. 159 ; Gora- 
bazar, v. 163 ; Dhonkal in Gujranwala, 
V. 185, xiii. 535 ; Gurkha, v. 224 ; 
Haidarabad (Oudh), v. 289 ; New 
Hala, V. 294 ; Bilgram, Hattia, Haran, 
and Barsuya in Hardoi, v. 325, 326 ; 
Hardwar, v. ^ 333, 334 ; Hargam, v. 
335 ; Kolhwagara in Harha, v. 336 ; 
Harua, v. 342; Hindaun, v. 414; 
Hingni, v. 422 ; Hirdenagar, v. 423 ; 
Hongal, v. 440 ; Chintpurni and Mu- 
kerian in Hoshiarpur, v. 456 ; Hosur, 
V. 460; Indapur, v. 510; Islamabad 
Bijhauli, vii. 27 ; Jaisalmer, vii, 70 ; 
Jajpur, vii. 73; Jalpesh, vii. i'i8 ; 
Janjira, vii. 141 ; Mariahu and Kar- 
chuli in Jaunpur, vii. 157; Choya 



INDEX. 



107 



Saidan Shah in Jeblam, vii. 175; 
Jewar, vii. 193; Jlialukati, vii. 197; 
Tilwara, Mundwa, Parbatsar, Bilara, 
and Barkhana in Jodhpur, vii. 245 ; 
Gartoh, vii. 253 ; Kadi, vii. 280 ; 
Sringeri in Kadur, vii. 2S7 ; Kakora, 
vii. 311 ; Kakrani, vii. 312 ; Kalakad, 
vii. 322 ; Kalinjar, vii. 333 ; Kalyan- 
mal, vii. 348 ; Kanera, vii. 407 ; Kan- 
gra and Javvala Mukhi, vii. 426 ; Kan- 
kanhalli, vii. 434; Kansat, vii. 436; 
Kantha, vii. 437 ; Kanthalpara, vii. 
437 ; Kapilmuni, vii. 441 ; Karagola, 
vii. 461 ; Karanbas, vii. 465 ; Karnala, 
viii. 17; Karor, viii. 48 ; Jamu, viii. 74 ; 
Katas, viii. 87 ; Katra Medniganj, viii. 
loi ; Kazipara, viii. loi ; Keljhar, viii. 
Ill; Kelu, viii. 112; Kencluli, viii. 
114; Khaga, viii. 122; Khagrapara, 
viii. 123; Khairabad, viii. 129; Kha- 
juha, viii. 140 ; Khalair, viii. 141 ; 
Khekera, viii. 187 ; Gold Gokarannath 
in Kheri, viii. 196 ; Kherkeria, viii. 
199 ; Kisoriganj, viii. 225 ; Kolar, 
viii. 279 ; Kopilas, viii. 294 ; Kotap- 
pakonda, viii. 309 ; Sipi in Kolhi, viii. 
311; Kutabpur, viii. 401; Lakhna, 
viii. 440 ; Chiuia and Daltonganj in 
Lohardaga, viii. 482 ; Machhligaon, 
viii. 533 ; Madha, viii. 541 ; Madho- 
pur, viii. 542; Kokalhat, ix. 153; 
Maliasthangarh, ix. 168; Maheji, ix. 
172 ; Mahesh, ix. 172; Samlaji and 
Brahmakhed in Mahi Kantha, ix. 
J 79; Mahiiwa, ix. 187; Husainpur in 
Alaimansingh, ix. 198 ; Dohti in Maj- 
haura, ix. 214; Malinagar, ix. 258; 
Malur, ix. 266 ; Manda, ix. 287 ; 
Mandhak, ix. 296; Manikganj, ix. 321 ; 
Manikpur, ix. 321 ; Mani Majra, ix. 
322 ; Mankur, ix. 337 ; Manora, ix. 
339; Mapusa, ix. 343, 344; Mar- 
kandi, ix. 347 ; Masti, ix. 351 ; 
Matari, ix. 362 ; Mauranwan, ix. 374 ; 
Meerut, ix. 394 ; Mendhawal, ix. 405 ; 
Merkara, ix. 415; Mhaswad, ix. 420; 
Misrikh, ix. 467 ; Motijharna, ix. 521 ; 
Mugdai. ix. 528 ; Miighalbhin, ix. 529 ; 
Muradabad, x. 16 ; Murassapur, x. 16 ; 
Murgod, x. 17; Nachangaon, x. 127; 
Nagari, x. 157; Nanguneri, x. 196; 
Nawabganj, x. 249 ; Nekmard, x. 
259 ; Nelamangala, x. 260 ; Nihtor, 
x. 301 ; Singaji and Mandhata in 
Nimar, x. 334 ; Niir Mahal, x. 418 ; 
Pandharpur, xi. 37 ; Panhan, xi. 43 ; 
Pariar, xi. 63 ; Patan (Oudh), xi. 80 ; 
Patiir, xi. 119 ; Pehoa, xi. 129 ; Peth, 
xi. 161 ; Phaphund, xi. 166 ; Phula- 
guri, xi. 168 ; Pollachi, xi. 196 ; Pra- 
kasha, xi. 223 ; Premtoli, xi. 224 ; 
Pulikonda, xi. 240 ; Purwa, xi. 334 ; 
Pushkar, xi. 335 ; Pushpagiri, xi. 335 ; 



Rajagriha Hills, xi. 3S0 ; Rajapur 
(N.-W. P.), xi. 386 ; Rajim, xi. 388 ; 
Ranikail, xi. 449 ; Ramnagar, xi. 452 ; 
Rampur (N.-W. P.), xi. 460 ; Ram- 
pura, xi. 462 ; Ramtek, xi. 466 ; Ran- 
gir, xi. 471 ; Ranipet, xi. 509 ; Ratan- 
pur, xi. 516 ; Remuna, xii. 42, 43 ; 
Rishikund, xii. 57 ; Rohna, xii. 63 ; 
Rudrapur, xii. 81 ; Riipar, xii. 83 ; 
Sadhaura, xii. 93 ; Sadiya, xii. 93, 94 ; 
Sadullapur, xii. 97 ; Bhapel and Pan- 
dalpur in Sagar, xii. 106 ; Sagar 
Island, xii. 109, no; Sakraypatna, xii. 
148 ; Salem, xii. 166 ; Sanivarsante, 
xii. 221 ; Sankarkati, xii. 222 ; Sankha, 
xii. 223 ; Santipur, xii. 227 ; Badar- 
pur, xii. 261 ; Sarjapur, xii. 269 ; 
Sarsaganj, xii. 271 ; Satana, xii. 275 ; 
Satrikh, xii. 290 ; Saundatti, xii. 291 ; 
Saurath, xii. 291, 292 ; Savanur, xii. 
293 ; Sehi, xii. 304 ; Chhapara in 
Seoni, xii. 313 ; Seori Narayan, xii. 
317 ; Seota, xii. 317 ; Shahapur, xii. 
338 ; Shahpur, xii. 368 ; Shendurni, 
xii. 379 ; Shikarpur (Mysore), xii. 397 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 406 ; Shingnapur, xii. 
406, 407 ; Shinrajpur, xii. 409 ; Shola- 
pur, xii. 418 ; Sonari in Sholapur, xii. 
418 ; Sialkot, xii. 452 ; Siddham, xii. 
473 ; Siddheswar, xii. 474 ; Sikandra, 
xii. 482 ; Silanath, xii. 488, 489 ; 
Silchar, xii. 489 ; Silpata, xii. 490 ; 
Siralkoppa, xii. 551 ; Sir.si, xiii. 22 ; 
Sinir, xiii. 23 ; Sitamarhi, xiii. 26 ; 
Sonagaon, xiii. 57 ; Sonpur, xiii. 63 ; 
Soron, xiii. 67 ; Sriwardhan, xiii. 83 ; 
Subrakmanya, xiii. 87 ; Sudasna, xiii. 
87 ; Sitakund and Dhopap in Sultan- 
pur (Oudh), xiii. 99 ; Sultanpur (Kan- 
gra), xiii. 106; Sylhet, xiii. 157 ; Tale- 
gaon Dham Dhera, xiii. 166 ; Talgaon, 
xiii. 167 ; Tanda, xiii. 174, 175 ; Tarak- 
eswar, xiii. 212 ; Taroli, xiii. 216 ; 
Thulandi, xiii. 293 ; Tikri, xiii. 295 ; 
Tilothu, xiii. 322 ; Tirthahalli, xiii. 
323 ; Titalya, xiii. 335 ; Tosham, xiii. 
340 ; Tribeni, xiii. 354 ; Trimbak, xiii. 
366 ; Trimohini, xiii. 366 ; Gubbi in 
Tiimkur, xiii. 379; Udalguri, xiii. 414; 
Uddhanpur, xiii. 415 ; Ugri, xiii. 416 ; 
Ulvi, xiii. 419 ; Unja, xiii. 438 ; 
Uttiir, xiii. 459 ; Vadagenhalli, xiii. 
460; Waigaon, xiii. 510; Wer, xiii. 
537 ; Wun, xiii. 544, 546 ; Yedator, 
xiii. 550. See also Festivals. 

Faisan, Captain, his defence of Kaveripa- 
ram against Haidar AH (1769), viii. 106. 

Faizabad, Division of Oudh, iv. 380. 

Faizabad, District of Oudh, iv. 381-388; 
physical aspects, 381 ; history, 381, 
382 ; population, 382, 383 ; division 
into town and country, 383, 384 ; agri- 
culture, 384 - 386 ; communications, 



io8 



INDEX. 



trade, commerce, etc., 386, 387 ; ad- 
ministration, 387 ; medical aspects, 
387, 388. 

Faizabad, tahsil in Oudh, iv. 388. 

Faizabad, town in Oudh, iv. 388, 389. 

Faiz AH Khan Bahadur, Sir, appointed 
to administer State of Kotah (1874), 
viii. 305 ; holds y*/^/;- of Pahasu, x. 528. 

Faizpur, town in Bombay, iv. 389. 

Faiz-ulla Khan, son of Ali Muhammad, 
the Rohilla, became Nawab of Ram- 
pur, his history, xi. 456 ; his tomb, xi. 

459- 
Fakhrpur, village and pargand in Oudh, 

iv- 389. 390- 

Fakirganj, village in Bengal, iv. 390. 

Fakuhat, village in Bengal, iv. 390. 

False Point, cape, harbour, and light- 
house in Bengal, iv. 390, 391 ; history 
of harbour, 391 ; trade, 391. 

Falta, village in Bengal, iv. 391, 392. 

Family history, of the Maharao of Alwar, 
i. 203-205 ; Nawab of Bahawalpur, i. 
423, 424 ; Maharaja of Balrampur, ii. 
24 ; Maharaja of Bishnupur, ii. 80, 81 ; 
Maharaja of Bard wan, ii. 127, 128 ; 
Gaekwar of Baroda, ii. 160 -164; 
Maharaja of Benares, ii. 255, 256 ; 
Maharaja of Bhartpur, ii. 373, 374 ; 
Thakur Sahib of Bhaunagar, ii. 380, 
381 ; Begam of Bhopal, ii. 403-405 ; 
MaharAja of Bikaner, ii. 440 ; Maharao 
Raja of Bundi, iii. 158 ; Nawab of 
Cambay, iii. 273 ; Raja of Chanchra 
or Jessor, iii. 347, 348, vii. 184, 185 ; 
Raja of Cochin, iv. 9 ; Rao of Cutch, 
iv. 61, 63 ; Maharaja of Darbhangah, 
iv. 127, 128 ; Raja of Datia, iv. 156 ; 
Maharaja of Deo, iv. 198 ; Raja of 
Dhar, iv. 246, 247 ; Rana of Dholpur, 
iv. 276, 277 ; Raja Sahib of Dhran- 
gadra, iv. 279 ; Maharawal of Dungar- 
pur, iv. 324 ; Maharaja of Edar, iv. 
337, 338 ;, Rapa of Faridkot, iv. 392, 
393 ; Maharaja of Gwalior, v. 230-233 ; 
Nizam of Haidarabad, v. 248-252 ; 
Raja of Hill Tipperah, v. 396 ; 
Maharaja of Indore, vii. 5-7 ; Maharaja 
of Jaipur, vii. 55-57 ; Maharawal of 
Jaisalmer, vii. 67, 68 ; Nawab of 
Janjira, vii. 140, 141 ; Rana of Jhala- 
war, vii. 199, 200; Raja of Jind, vii. 
232 ; Maharaja of Jodhpur, vii. 240- 
243 ; Nawab of Junagarh, vii. 262 ; 
Raja of K.apurtiiala, vii. 441-442 ; 
Maharaja of Karauli, vii. 473, 474 ; 
Maharaja of Kashmir and Jamu, viii. 
61, 62 ; Mir of Khairpur, viii. 134, 
135 ; Maharaja of Kishangarh, viii. 
222, 223 ; Nawab of Kohat, viii. 245 ; 
Raja of Kolhapur, viii. 281 - 283 ; 
Maharao of Kotah, viii. 304 - 306 ; 
Maharaja of Kuch Behar, viii. 319-322 ; 



Nawab of Malar Kotla, ix. 254, 255 ; 
Raja of Mandi, ix. 297, 298 ; Maharaja 
of Mysore, x. 94, 95 ; Raja of Nabha, 
X. 125, 126 ; Raja of Nagode, x. 160, 
161 ; Jam of Nawanagar, x. 252, 253 ; 
Maharaja of Orchha, x. 425, 426 ; 
Diwan of Palanpur, x. 540 ; IVIaharaja 
of Pauna, xi. 50 ; Maharawal of Part- 
abgarh, xi. 76 ; Maharaja of Patiala, 
xi. 88-90 ; Maharaja of Patna, xi. 115 ; 
Rao of Pol, xi. 195 ; Nawab of Rad- 
hanpur, xi. 342, 343 ; Rai of Raikot, xi. 
364, 365 ; Nawab of Rajgarh, xi. 386, 
387 ; Raja of Rajpipla, xi. 392, 393; 
Nawab of Rampur, xi. 455, 456 ; Raja 
of Ratlam, xii. I ; Maharaja of Rewa, 
xii. 46, 47 ; Nawab of Sachin, xii. 88, 
89 ; Raja of Sandur, xii. 207, 208 ; 
Chief of Sangli, xii. 218, 219 ; Raja 
of Sarangarh, xii. 260 ; Rai Bahadur 
of Sawantwari, xii. 297, 298 ; Raja of 
Shahpura, xii. 369, 370 ; Raja of 
Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Rao of Sirohi, xiii. 
3, 4 ; Raja of Sonpur, xiii. 64 ; Ma- 
harana of Sunth, xiii. 115 ; Nawab of 
Tonk, xiii. 337, 338 ; Maharaja of 
Travancore, xiii. 345-347 ; Maharana 
of Udaipur, xiii. 403-408 ; Chief of 
Vishalgarh, xiii. 481 ; Maharaja of 
Vizianagram, xiii. 499-502 ; Rana of 
Wao, xiii. 519, 520. 

Famine relief expenditure, article 'India,' 
vi. 469. 

Famines, article ' India,' vi. 539-544 ; 
causes of scarcity and of real famine, 
vi. 539 ; means of husbanding the 
water-supply, vi. 540 ; irrigation area, 
vi. 540, 541 ; summary of Indian 
famines, vi. 541, 542 ; the great famine 
of 1876-78, its causes, vi. 542, 543 ; 
famine expenditure, vi. 543 ; mortahty 
from disease and starvation, vi. 543, 
544 ; famine a weak check on popula- 
tion, vi. 544. Local notices — See the 
Natural Calamities section under the 
several Districts, and especially Agra, 
i. 65 ; Ahmadabad, i. 91 ; Ajmere- 
Merwara, i. 127, 128 ; Allahabad, i. 
191 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; Ambala, i. 222 ; 
Amraoti, i. 248 ; Amritsar, i. 261 ; 
Anantapur, i. 277, 278 ; North Arcot, 
i. 317 ; South Arcot, i. 325 ; Bahraich, 
i. 432 ; Balasor, ii. 8 ; Banda, ii. 52 ; 
Bankura, ii. 84, 85 ; Bara Banki, ii. 
112 ; Bardwan, ii. 132 ; Basti, ii. 212 ; 
Bellary, ii. 246, 247 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 
349 ; Bijnaur, ii. 433 ; Bombay, iii. 
57, 58 ; Budaun, iii. 122 ; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 138 ; Champaran, iii. 335, 342 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 19 ; Cuddapah, iv. 
53 ; Cuttack, iv. 72 ; Dharwar, iv. 
263 ; Etah, iv. 363, 364 ; Etawah, iv. 
37i» 376; Faizabad, iv, 386; Fatehpur, 



INDEX. 



109 



iv. 428 ; Ganjam, v. 7 ; Garhwal, v. 
22 ; Gaya, v. 50; Gurgaon, v. 221 ; 
Hamirpur, v. 303 ; Hissar, v. 431 ; 
Huo;li, V. 495 ; Jabalpur, vii. 34 ; 
Jalaun, vii. 100; Jaunpur, vii. 157 ; 
Jhansi, vii. 224, 225 ; Kaladgi, vii. 
318 ; Karnul, viii. 40, 41 ; Kashmir, 
viii. ^T, ; Khandesh, viii. 157 ; Klieri, 
viii. 195 ; Kistna, viii. 231 ; Kolaba, 
viii. 268 ; Kopargaon, viii. 293 ; Lalit- 
pur, viii. 455 ; Lucknow, viii. 497, 
499 ; Madras, ix. 37-40 ; Madura, ix. 
129, 130 ; Mainpuri, ix. 209 ; Mallani, 
ix. 261 ; Manbhum, ix. 284; Midnapur, 
ix. 430 ; Mirzapur, ix. 459 ; Mongliyr, 
ix. 486; Moradabad, ix. 510; Muttra, 
X. 49, 50; Mysore, x. 105, 106; 
Nadiya, x. 137 ; Nasik, x. 232, 233 ; 
Nellore, x. 268 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 
390-392 ; Orissa, x. 463-467 ; Palanpur 
Agency, x. 539 ; Patiala, xi. 89 ; 
Phaltan, xi. 164 ; Poena, xi. 208 ; 
Puri, xi. 307, 308 ; Purniah, xi. 327, 
328 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 356 ; Raipur, xi. 
374 ; Rajputana, xi. 424 ; Rajshahi, 
xi. 435 ; Rohtak, xii. 74i 75 5 Saharan- 
pur, xii. 121, 122; Salem, xii. 158, 
162, 163 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 233, 
234 ; Saran, xii. 256, 257 ; Satara, xii. 
281, 282 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 346, 351, 
352 ; Sholapur, xii. 413, 416, 417 ; 
Singhbhum, xii. 539 \ Sirohi, xiii. 6 ; 
Sirsa, xiii. 11, 17; Sitapur, xiii. 36; 
Tinnevelli, xiii. 301, 307; Tirupatur, 
xiii. 326 ;■ Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 
396 ; Undo, xiii. 430, 433 ; Wao, xiii. 
520. 

Famine warnings. See Natural Cala- 
mities under the several District articles. 

Faradnagar, village in Bengal, iv. 392. 

Farah, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 392. 

Faraizis, sect of Muhammadans, to be 
found in Bakarganj, i. 444 ; Bogra, 
iii. 28 ; Dacca, iv. %t^ ; Dinajpur, iv. 
293 ; Faridpur, their doctrines, iv. 398- 
400; Goalpara, v. 1 15; Kamrup, vii. 
360; Lakhimpur, viii. 431 ; Maldah, 
ix. 243 ; Nadiya, x. 139 ; Noakhali, x. 
344 ; Nowgong, x. 410 ; Pabna, x. 
4i4> 415 ; Rangpur, xi. 494_;_Sibsagar, 
xii. 464; the Sundarbans, xiii. in. 

Fardapur, village in the Deccan, iv. 392. 

Faria de Souza, Annals, 1581-84, quoted, 
on Barkalur, ii. 156 ; the embassy to 
Chittagong (1538), iii. 435 ; Martaban, 
ix. 350. 

Faridabad, town in Punjab, iv. 392. 

Faridkot, State in Punjab, iv. 392, 393. 

Faridkot, chief town of State in Punjab, 
iv. 393. 

Faridpur, District in Bengal, iv. 393-407 ; 
physical aspects, 394 - 397 ; history, 
397> 39S ; population, 398 ; Muham- 



madans, 39S-400 ; Hindus, 400 ; Chan- 
dais, 400, 401 ; Christian population, 
401 ; division of the people into town 
and country, 401, 402 ; material con- 
dition of the people, 402 ; agriculture, 
402, 404 ; natural calamities, 404, 405 ; 
manufactures, 405 ; administration, etc., 
405, 406 ; medical aspects, 406, 407. 

Faridpur, town and Sub - division in 
Bengal, iv. 407. 

Faridpur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

407, 408. 

Faridpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

408, 409. 

Farms, Government model, Guindy, v. 

178; Akola, V. 270; Saidapet, ix. 35, 

49, xii. 140 ; Pusa, xi. 334. 
Farquhar, Col., cleared Bulandshahr of 

mutineers (1857), iii. 134. 
Farrah, town in Afghanistan, i. 35. 
Farukhabad, District in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 409-417; physical aspects, 409; 

history, 409-411; population, 411, 412 ; 

division into town and country, 412, 

413 ; agriculture, 413, 414; natural 

calamities, 414; commerce and trade, 

414, 415; administration, 415, 416; 

medical aspects, 416, 417. 
Farukhabad, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, iv. 417. 
Farukhnagar, town in Punjab, iv. 417,418. 
Farukhsiyyar, Emperor, granted chauth of 

Berar to the Marathas (1717), iii. 144 ; 

history of his reign (1713-19), v. 257. 
Fatehabad, town in Punjab, iv. 418, 419. 
Fatehabad, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, iv. 419. 
Fateh Ali Khan Talpur, Mir, first Talpur 

Rais of Sind (1783-1801), his history, 

xii. 513. 
Fatehganj (East), village in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 419. 
Fatehganj (West), village in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 419, 420. 
Fatehgarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

420, 421. 
Fatehgarh, town in Punjab, iv. 421. 
Fateh Jang, Nawab of Bengal, invaded 

Tipperah (1620) and took the Raja 

prisoner, v. 396. 
Fatehjang, town and tahsil in Punjab, iv. 

421. 
Fateh Khan, Governor of Sandwip, 

defeated by the Portuguese pirates off 

Dakshin Shahbazpur, x. 342. 
Fatehkhelda, town in Berar, iv. 422. 
Fateh Naik, father of Haidar Ali, first 
• distinguished himself at Gandikot, iv. 

464 ; Mughal governor of Kolar, viii. 

274 ; his tomb at Kolar, viii. 279. 
Fateh Panjal, mountain chain in Kashmir, 

iv. 422. 
Fatehpur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 



110 



INDEX. 



iv. 422-430; physical aspects, 422, 
423 ; history, 423-425 ; population, 425, 
426 ; division into town and country, 
426 ; agricuhure, 426 - 428 ; natural 
calamities, 428 ; commerce and trade, 
428, 429 ; administration, 429 ; medical 
aspects, 429, 430. 
Fatehpur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

430- 
Fatehpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

430> 431- 
Fatehpur, town, iahsil, and pargand in 

Oudh, iv. 431, 432. 
Fatehpur, village in Central Provinces, 

iv. 432. 
Fatehpur, town in Rajputana, iv. 432. 
Fatehpur Chaurasi, town a.nd paroami in 

Oudh, iv. 432, 433. 
Fatehpur Sikii, ta/isl/ in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 433- 
Fatehpur Sikri, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 433-435- 
Fattura Raja, at head of Gujars threat- 
ened Gangoh, but defeated (1857), iv. 

477- 
Fatwa, town in Bengal, iv. 435. 
Faulmann's BiuA der Schrift, quoted, 

article ' India,' vi. 103 (footnote). 
Fauna of India, article ' India,' vi. 10. 

See also Zoology, vi. 652-62. 
Fawcett, Col., commanding in Bundel- 

khand campaign, was defeated by 

Amir Khan, viii. 363. 
Fazilka, town and tahsil in Punjab, iv. 

435> 436. 

Fazl Ali, notorious bandit in Oudh, 
killed Col. Boileau, v. 149. 

Fazl Muhammad Khan, mutineer leader, 
seized Rahatgarh, but was hanged 
(1858), xi. 345, 346. 

Fazl-ulla Khan, Haidar AH's general, 
took Sadashivgarh (1763), xii. 92. 

Felspar, found in the Anamalai Hills, i. 
270; Bangalore, ii. 59; Bantwal, ii. 
104 ; Bhandara, ii. 360 ; Chengalpat, 
iii. 381 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 423 ; Dubraj- 
pur, iv. 418 ; Gooty, v. 160 ; Hassan, 
V. 346 ; Hindu Kush, v. 417 ; Jabal- 
pur, vii. 30; Khandesh, viii. 151; 
Kolar, viii. 273 ; Madras Presidency, 
ix. 4 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Mahendragiri, 
ix. 172 ; Monghyr, ix. 480 ; Mysore, 
X. 91, 92 ; Palni Mountains, xi. 

Felt, made in Afghanistan, 1. 39 ; at 

Bahraich, i. 432 ; Balrampur, ii. 26 ; 

Bhera, ii. 386, xii. 366 ; Jarwal, vii. 

144 ; Kandahar, vii. 391 ; Kolhapur, 

viii. 284. 
Female education, article ' India,' vi. 

478, 479- 
Females, Proportion of. See Population 
section in each District article. 



Ferce Naturae. See Animals, wild, and 
Zoology. 

Ferdousi, Persian poet and historian in 
the days of Mahmud of Ghazni, article 
'India,' vi. 275. 

Fergusson, Mr. James, Paper in the 
Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society 
for April 1880, quoted, article * India,' 
vi. 147 (footnote) ; Tree and Serpent 
Worship, quoted, vi. 185 (footnote 4), 
204 (footnote i) ; History of Architec- 
ture, vi. 304 (footnotes). Local notices 
— His works quoted, on Mount Abu, 
i. 9-12 ; Agra, i. 71 ; Ahmadabad, i. 
98; Ajanta, i. 114- 116; Amber, i. 
228, 229 ; Amiavati, i. 252 ; Bhilsa, 
ii- 393. 394 ; Bijapur, ii. 425 ; the 
palace at Delhi, iv. 186, 187 ; 
Elephanta, iv. 343 ; Ellora, iv. 349, 
350 ; Gaur, v. 40 ; Girnar, v. 86 ; 
Gwalior, v. 234, 235 ; Halebid, v. 
295 ; Jambukeswaram, vii. 120 ; 
Kanarak, vii. 385 ; Karli, viii. 13-16 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 507, 511 ; Madura, ix. 
133; Mahabalipur, ix. 145-147; Pali- 
tana, xi. 8 - 10 ; Panduah, xi. 42 ; 
Rajamahendri, xi. 382 ; Rameswaram, 
xi. 443-445 ; Salsette, xii. 169, 170 ; 
Sanchi, xii. 195, 196 ; Akbar's tomb at 
Sikandra, xii. 481 ; Srirangam, xiii. 
80, 81 ; Swatch of No-Ground, xiii. 
143 ; Tanjore, xiii. 195, 196 ; Tinne- 
velli, xiii. 312. 

Ferishta. See Firishta. 

Fernandez, Francis, his use of the word 
Bengal, ii. 270. 

Ferokh, deserted town in Madras, iv. 436. 

Ferozabad. See Firozahad. 

Ferozabad, pargand in Oudh. See Firoz- 
abad. 

Ferozepur. See Firozpur. 

Ferozeshah. See Firozshah. 

Ferrier, quoted, on Afghanistan, i. 35, 
36, 38 ; the Koh-i-Baba, i. 54 ; his 
estimate of the population of Herat, v. 
391 ; of Kandahar, vii. 390. 

Ferries, across the Swat at Abazai, i. 2 ; 
across the Adjai at Sankhai, i. 25 ; 
across the Ganges, Tons, and Belan in 
Allahabad, i. 185 ; across the Beas 
and Ravi in Amritsar, i. 254, and the 
Sutlej, i. 262 ; across the Sonar at 
Aslana, i. 340 ; across the Gogra and 
Rapti in Bahraich, i. 432 ; across the 
Rapti at Balrampur, ii. 26 ; at Bansi, 
ii. loi, and in Basti, ii. 213 ; across 
the Beas, ii. 221 ; across the Tunga- 
bhadra in Bellary, ii. 247 ; across the 
Kistna at Bezwada, ii. 336 ; across the 
Dalani at Bijni, ii. 437 ; across the 
Sutlej at Bilaspur, ii. 454 ; across the 
Chambal, iii. 331 ; across the Indus at 
Kureshi, iv. 216 ; across the Narbada 



INDEX. 



Ill 



at Khal, iv. 246 ; in Dholpur, iv. 273 ; 
across the Brahmaputra at Dhubri, iv. 
280 ; across the Jumna and Chambal 
in Etawah, iv. 369 ; across the Gogra 
in Faizabad, iv. 384 ; across the Ganges 
at Fatehgarh, iv. 415 ; across the 
Ganges at Garhmukhtesar, v. 16; across 
the Indus at Gidu-jo-Tando (steam), 
V. 77, 287; across the Gogra, v. 139 ; 
across the Giimti (Oudh), v. 200 ; 
across the Gumti (Bengal), v. 201 ; 
across the Beasand Ravi in Gurdaspur, 
V. 207 ; in Haidarabad (Sind), v. 282 ; 
across the Sutlej and Beas in Hoshiar- 
pur, V. 451, 452 ; across the Indus at 
Hasain Beli, v. 503 ; across the Sai 
at Parshadepur, vii. 65 ; across the 
Brahmaputra at Jamalpur, vii. 1 19; 
in Janjira, vii. 140 ; across the Parwan, 
Newaj, Kali Sind, Ai'i, and Chhota 
Kali Sind in Jhalawar, vii. 198 ; across 
the Jehlam and Chenab in Jhang, vii. 
211 ; across the Ganges at Jhusi, vii. 
231 ; across the Kabul, vii. 276, 277 ; 
across the Mahi in Kaira, vii. 306 ; 
across the Kalang at Raha, vii. 323, 
xi. 345 ; across the Jumna at Kalpi, 
vii. 343 ; across the Ulhas at Kalyan, 
vii. 346 ; across the Ganges at Kamar- 
ud-din-nagar, vii. 351 ; across the 
Godavari at Kapileswarapuram, vii. 
440; between Bombay and Mora in 
Karanja (steam), vii. 467 ; across the 
Damodar at Kasha, viii. 59 ; across 
the Indus in Khairpur, viii. 136 ; in 
Kheri, viii. 190 ; across the Kistna, 
viii. 236 ; across the Amba at" Kolad, 
viii. 269 ; between Bombay, Revas, 
and Dharambar, viii. 269 ; across the 
Chambal at Kotah, viii. 308 ; across 
the Indus at Kotri, viii. 315 ; across 
the Indus in Larkhana, viii. 464 ; 
across the Gumti in Lucknow, viii. 
500 ; across the Manas, ix. 276 ; across 
the Narbada at Mandelsar, ix. 308 ; 
across the Jiri into Manipur, ix. 325; 
across the Maskhal channel, ix. 351 ; 
Maung-daw, ix. 373 ; across the Jehlam 
at Miani, ix. 378 ; across the Indus 
and Nara in ]\Iehar, ix. 397 ; across 
the Kabul at Michni, ix. 423 ; across 
the Sutlej in Montgomerj', ix. 500 ; 
across the Kori creek at Mughalbhin, 
ix. 528 ; across the Sutlej in Miiltan, 
x. 9 ; across tiie Jehlam and Kishen 
Ganga at Muzaffarabad, x. 54 ; across 
the Brahmaputra at Nasirabad,x. 237 ; 
across the Indus at Naushahro, x. 244; 
across the Chauka and Sarja in 
Kighasan, x. 299 ; in Noakhali, x. 
340 ; across the Irawadi at Pa-daung, 
x. 524 ; across the Ganges, Giimii, and 
Sai in Partabgarh, xi. 72 ; across the 



Indus, Swat, and Kabul in Peshawar, 
xi. 155 ; across the Sarda at Sherpur, 
and Jatpura, xi. 171 ; across the Sai in 
Rai Bareli, xi. 352 ; across the Jumna 
at RajapuriN.-W. P.),xi. 386 ; across 
the Ganges at Rajghat, xi. 388 ; across 
the Tista at Kaunia in Rangpur (steam), 
xi. 499 ; across the Indus at Rohri 
(steam), xii. 67 ; across the Ganges at 
Salkhia (steam), xii. 167 ; across the 
Indus in Sehwan, xii. 305 ; across the 
Ganges at Shahzadpur, xii. 371 ; across 
the Ganges at .Sirsa, xiii. 21 ; across 
the Subansiri, xiii. 84 ; across the 
Indus at Sukkur (steam), xiii. 92; 
across the Tapti at Mandvi and Surat, 
xiii. 117 ; between Surat, Gogo, and 
Bhaunagar (steam), xiii. 129 ; in Tando 
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 178 ; across 
the Tons at Maihar, xiii. 339 ; across 
theBhagirathiat Uddhanpur, xiii. 415 ; 
across the Hugh at Ulubaria, xiii. 419 ; 
across the Beas at Vairowal, xiii. 461 ; 
at Vizagapatam, xiii. 498. 
Festivals, Religious, held at Ahiyari, i. 
82 ; Ajmere, i. 132 ; Alawakhawa, i. 
164 ; Allahabad, i. 199 ; Ambiilapali, 
i. 230 ; Anamasudrapet, i. 272 ; Anan- 
tapur, i. 280 ; Antravedi, i. 294 ; 
Anupshahr, i. 295 ; Ariapad, i. 330 ; 
Athirala, i. 377 ; Avani, i. 390 ; 
Bachireddipalem, i. 406 ; Badrinath, 
i. 411 ; Badrpur, i. 411 ; Bahraich, i. 
435 ; Baikanthpur, i. 437 ; Bairam 
Ghat, i. 437 ; Baitarani river, i. 438 ; 
Ballabhpur in honouir of Jagannath, ii. 
17 ; Ballia, ii. 23 ; Batesar, ii. 216 ; 
Bausi, ii. 217 ; Bechraji, ii. 222 ; 
Belgaum, ii. 237, 238 ; Beliir, ii. 252 ; 
Bhimaveram, ii. 396 ; Bhiri, ii. 339 ; 
Birnagar, iii. 13 ; Bithtir, ii. 20 ; 
Chakultor, iii. 326 ; Chhipia, iii. 404 ; 
Chilambaram, iii. 413 ; Chitarkot, iii. 
429 ; Chunchangiri, iii. 459 ; Chun- 
chankatta, iii. 459 ; in Cochin, iv. 
8 ; Comorin, iv. 25 ; Conjevaram, 
iv. 26 ; in Cuddapah, iv. 54 ; Dakor, 
iv. 69 ; Kundalpur and Bandakpur 
in Damoh, iv. 112; Debi Patan, 
iv. 164 ; Deo, iv. 198 ; Deoband, 
iv. 199 ; Deulgaon Raja, iv. 230, 
231 ; Devaraydurga, iv. 232; Dholpur, 
iv. 278 ; Doharighat, iv. 312 ; Ele- 
phanta, iv. 343, 344 ; in Etah, iv. 
364; Fatwa, iv. 435; Ganjam (Mysore), 
V. 9 ; Garhdiwala, v. 14 ; Garhmukh- 
tesar, V. 16 ; Gohana, v. 141 ; Gold, 
V. 143 ; Gosainganj, v. 174 ; Dhonkal 
in Gujranwala, v. 185 ; Hampi, v. 
308 ; in Hardoi, v. 325, 326 ; Hard- 
war, v. 333, 334 ; Hargam, v. 335 ; 
Harha, v. 336 ; Herumalu, v. 393 ; 
Hoskot, V. 459 ; Jajniau, vii. 72, 73 ; 



112 



INDEX. 



Jewalamukhi, vii. 162 ; Katas and 
Clioya Saidan Shah in Jehlam, vii. 
175 ; Kalahasti, vii. 321 ; Kah'ghat, 
vii. 326 ; Kamakhya, vii. 349 ; Kapil- 
muni, vii. 441 ; Karanbas, vii. 465 ; 
Karigatta, viii. 9 ; Kazipara, viii. 108 ; 
Kotaha, viii. 308 ; Kotappakonda, viii. 
309 ; Kundada-betta, viii. 363 ; Lahar- 
pur, viii. 401 ; Madheswaranmalai, 
viii. 541 ; Mahaban, ix. 152 ; Maha- 
muni, ix. 155, 156; Mahesh, ix. 172; 
Mathura, ix. 365 ; Melukote, ix. 404 ; 
Mudak-dor, ix. 525 ; Muktsar, ix. 
534 ; Murshidabad, x. 35 ; Nadiya, 
x. 141, 142 ; Nagar, x. 155 ; Nan-daw, 
x. 189 ; Nanjangad, x. 196 ; Nayakan- 
hatti, X. 257 ; Puri, x. 448, 449, xi. 
316, 317; Pakpattan, x. 532, _ 533 ; 
Pandharpur, xi. 37 ; Panduah, xi. 42 ; 
Patna, xi. no; Pendhat, xi. 132; 
Premtoli, xi. 224 ; in Prome, xi. 231 ; 
Rupar, xii. 83 ; Sadullapur, xii. 97 ; 
Sagar Island, xii. 109, no; St. 
Thomas' Mount, xii. 143 ; Sakray- 
patna, xii. 148 ; Sandiir, xii. 209 ; 
Sankarkati, xii. 222 ; Santipur, xii. 
247 ; Sathan, xii. 286 ; Saurath, xii. 
291, 292 ; Sharretalai, xii. 377 ; Shibi, 
xii. 385 ; Shikarpur (Mysore), xii. 
397 ; Shinmut-ti, xii. 407 ; Shwe- 
Dagon, xii. 427 ; Shwe-nat-taung, xii. 
437 ; Shwe-san-daw, xii. 439 ; • Siddh- 
eswar, xii. 474 ; Sitaki'md, xiii. 25 ; 
Sonda, xiii. 60 ; Sringeri, xiii. 79 ; 
Srirangam, xiii. 82 ; Sylhet, xiii. 157 ; 
in Tanjore, xiii. 187 ; Tarakeswar, 
xiii. 211, 212; Thaneswar, xiii. 260; 
Tirumale, xiii. 325 ; Tirumurtikovil, 
xiii. 325 ; Tirupati, xiii. 326 ; Tirutani, 
xiii. 327 ; Tiruvannamalai, xiii. 329 ; 
Tribeni, xiii. 353, 354 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 364 ; Trimbak, xiii. 366 ; in Tum- 
kur, xiii. 379; Ulvi, xiii. 419; Upmaka, 
xiii. 438 ; Urmar, xiii. 452 ; Vanarasi, 
xiii. 463 ; Vijayanagar, ^ xiii. 473 ; 
Waigaon, xiii. 510; Yediyur, xiii. 551. 
6>falso Bathing Festivals, Car Festivals, 
and Fairs, generally associated with 
religious festivals. 
Fetish worship in Hinduism, article 

' India,' vi. 205, 206. 
Feudatory India, the thirteen groups of 
Native States, article ' India,' vi. 43 ; 
population, vi. 45. See also tre several 
Native States in their alphabetical 
order, and Native States over 50,000 
inhabitants. 
Fevers, in Afghanistan, i. 38 ; Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 107 ; Ajmere, i. 131 ; Akola, 
i. 146; Aligarh, i. 177; Ambala, i. 
224 ; Amherst, i. 243 ; Amraoti, i 
250 ; Amritsar, i. 263 ; Anantapur, i. 
279 ; Andaman Islands, i. 286 ; 



Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 304 ; North 

Arcot, i. 319 ; South Arcot, i. 328 ; 

Assam, i. 373 ; Azamgarh, i. 400 ; 

Baliraicli, i. 433 ; Bakarganj, i. 449 ; 

Balaghat, i. 457 ; Banda, ii. 54 ; 

Bangalore, ii. 65 ; Bankura, ii. 86 ; 

Bannu, ii. 97 ; Banswara, ii. 102 ; 

Bara Banki, ii. 114 ; Bardwan, ii. 135, 

136 ; Basim, ii. 188 ; Bassein, ii. 201 ; 

Bastar, ii. 207; Basti, ii. 214 ; Belgaum, 

ii. 237; Bellary, ii. 249 ; Betul, ii. 333 ; 

Bhagalpur, ii. 351 ; Bhandara, ii. 367 ; 

Bhaunagar, ii. 380 ; Bijnaur, ii. 435 ; 

Bilaspur, ii. 453; Birbhum, iii. 11; 

Bogra, iii. 32 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 

72, 73 ; Bombay city, iii. 84 ; BuJand- 

shahr, iii. 140 ; Buldana, iii. 148 ; 

Lower Burma, iii. 208 ; Cachar, iii. 

239 ; Calcutta, iii. 260 ; Champaran, iii. 

344 ; Chanda, iii. 355 ; Chhindwara, 

iii. 403 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 428 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 443 ; Cochin, iv. 10 ; Coorg, 

iv. 42 ; Cuddapah, iv. 55 ; Cutch, iv. 

64 ; Cuttack, iv. 72 ; Dacca, iv. 88 ; 

Damoh, iv. 113; Darbhangah, iv. 

125 ; Darjihng, iv. 139 ; Darrang, iv. 

150 ; Delhi, iv. 185 ; Deodar, iv. 200 ; 

Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 217 ; Dera 

Ismail Khan, iv. 226 ; Dhar, iv. 246 ; 

Dharampur, iv. 249 ; Dinajpur, iv. 

297, 298 : Ellichpur, iv. 347 ; Etah, 
iv. 366 ; Etawah, iv. 377 ; P'aizabad, 
iv. 385 ; Faridpur, iv. 406 ; Farukha- 
bad, iv. 416 ; Farukhnagar, iv. 418 ; 
Firozpur, iv. 446 ; Ganjam, v. 9 ; 
Garhwal, v. 23 ; Garo Hills, v. 32 ; 
Goalpara, v. 120 ; Godavari, v. 130 ; 
Gonda, v. 154; Gujranwala, v. 186; 
Gurgaon, v. 223 ; Berar, v. 261 ; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 285; Hamirpur, 
V. 305 ; Hanthawadi, v. 318 ; Hardoi, 
V. 328 ; Hassan, v. 351 ; Hazara, v. 
368 ; Hazaribagh, v. 380 ; Hill Tip- 
perah, v. 401 ; Hissar, v. 433 ; Hosh- 
angdbad, v. 448 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 457 ; 
Hugh, v. 498 ; Jabalpur, vii. 36 ; 
Jaisalmer, vii. 66 ; Jalalabad, vii. 75 ; 
Jalandhar, vii. 90 ; Jalaun, vii. 102 ; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 117; Janjira, vii. 139; 
Jaunpur, vii. 159; Jehlam, vii. 176; 
Jessor, vii. 191 ; jhang, vii. 212 ; 
Jhanjhana, vii. 214 ; Jhansi, vii. 227 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 239 ; Junagarh, vii. 261 ; 
Kadur, vii. 288 ; Kaira, vii. 307 ; 
Kaladgi, vii. 320 ; Kamrup, vii. 365 ; 
North Kanara, vii. 374 ; South Kanara, 
vii- ,383, 384; Kangra, vii. 327; 
Karachi, vii. 451 ; Karauli, vii. 473 ; 
Karnal, viii. 27 ; Karnul, viii. 44, 45 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 76 ; Khairpur, viii. 137 ; 
Khandesh, viii. 159 ; Kharkhanda, 
viii. 168 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 180 ; 
Kherij viii. 197 ; Khulna, viii. 209 ; 



INDEX. 



113 



Kohat, viii. 249 ; Kolhapur, viii. 285 ; 
Kollamalai Hills, viii. 286 ; Kotah, 
viii. 307 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 327 ; 
Ki'ilu, viii. 344 ; Kumaun, viii. 357, 
358 ; Kyauk-pyu, viii. 389 ; Lahore, 
viii. 413 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 437 ; 
Lalitpur, viii. 457 ; Larkhana, viii. 
465 ; Lathi, viii. 467 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
486 ; Lucknow, viii. 501 ; Ludhiana, 
viii. 525 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 79, 
80; Madura, ix. 132; Maimansingh, 
ix. 201 ; Mainpuri, ix. 211 ; Malabar, 
ix. 234 ; Maldah, ix. 248 ; Maldive 
Islands, ix. 252 ; Manbhum, ix. 286 ; 
Mandalay, ix. 291 ; Mandla, ix. 307 ; 
Mawana, ix. 376 ; Meerut, ix. 391 ; 
Mehar, ix. 397 ; Melagiri Hills, ix. 
402; Mergui, ix. 41 1 ; Midnapur, 
ix. 433 ; Montgomery, ix. 501 ; 
Mudhol, ix. 527 ; Muharamadpur, ix. 
532 ; Multan, x. lO ; Murshidabad, 
X. 24, 31 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 64; Muz- 
afifarnagar, x. 76, 77 ; Mysore State, x. 
113; Mysore District, x. 121 ; Nadiya, 
X. 140; Nagpur, X. 172; Narsinghpur, 
X. 223 ; Nasik, x. 235 ; Nellore, x. 
271 ; Nicobar Islands, x. 298 ; Nimar, 
X. 335; Noakhali, x. 352; N.-W. 
Provinces, x. 404; Nowgong, x. 415 ; 
Pabna, x. 520 ; Palanpur, x. 539 ; 
Panch Mahals, xi. 34 ; Partabgarh, xi. 
74 ; Patna, xi. 105 ; Peshawar city, 
xi. 157, cantonment, xi. 161 ; Pilibhit, 
xi. 178; Poona, xi. 210; Punjab, xi. 
292; Puri, xi. 309; Purniah, xi. 331, 
332 ; Radhanpur, xi. 342 ; Rai Bareli, 
xi. 359 ; Raigarh, xi. 363 ; Raipur, xi. 
376 ; Rajkot, xi. 389 ; Rajpipla, xi. 
392 ; Rajshahi, xi. 438 ; Rampa, xi. 
454 ; Rampur, xi. 457 ; Rangamati, 
xi. 470; Rangoon, xi. 481; Rangpur, 
xi. 492, 500, 501 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 12 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 35 ; Rohtak, xii. 
76 ; Rurki, xii. 86 ; Sagar, xii. 107 ; 
Saharanpur, xii. 123 ; Salem, xii. 165 ; 
Sambalpur, xii. 184 ; Sandoway, xii. 
204 ; Sangli, xii. 218 ; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 234, 236 ; Santalpur-with-Chad- 
chat, xii. 247 ; Saran, xii. 258, 259 ; 
Sarangarh, xii. 260 ; Secunderabad, 
xii. 303 ; Seoni, xii. 314 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 333 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 352, 354 ; 
Shahpur, xii. 367 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 
385 ; Shikarpur, xii. 394 ; Shimoga, 
xii. 405; Sholapur, xii. 419, 420; 
Shwe-gyin, xii. 434 ; Sialkot, xii. 
449, 450; Sibsagar, xii. 471 ; Sikkim, 
xii. 488 ; Sind, xii. 525 ; Singhbhiim, 
xii. 540 ; Sirohi, xiii. 7 ; Sirsa, xiii. 
19 ; Sitapur, xiii. 37 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 
103 ; Surat, xiii. 131 ; Sylhet, xiii. 
156; Tanjore, xiii. 194; Tarai, xiii. 
211 ; Terwara, xiii. 243 ; Thana, xiii. 
VOL. XIV. 



258; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 271; 
Tipperah, xiii. 321 ; Travancore, xiii. 
353 ; Tumkur, xiii. 381 ; Tura, xiii. 
384 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 399 ; 
Unao, xiii. 430, 435 ; Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 449 ; Vypur, xiii. 479 ; 
Vizagapatam, xiii. 497; Wadhwan, xiii. 
506 ; the Wainad, xiii. 510 ; Wankaner, 
xiii. 518; Wao, xiii. 519; Warahi, 
xiii. 521 ; Wardha, xiii. 528 ; Wun, 
xiii. 545 ; Yerkad, xiii. 556. 

Fibres. See Cotton, Flax, Hemp, Jute, 
and Silk. 

Filatures. See Silk-weaving. 

Filigree-work, made at Benares, ii. 266 ; 
267; Cuttack, iv. 75; Delhi, iv. 197; 
Trichinopoli, ix. 54, xiii. 361, 365. 

Final Struggles of the F>xnch m India, by 
Col. Malleson, quoted, article ' India,' 
vi. 379 (footnote). 

Finances and taxation of India, obscuri- 
ties and changes in system of account, 
article ' India,' vi. 457-465 ; taxation 
of British India, 459-461 ; taxation 
under the Mughals and under the 
British, 462, 463 ; taxation in Native 
States, 464 ; incidence of taxation in 
British India, 464, 465. 

Fingeswar. See Phingeswar. 

Fire, destructive, in Surat (1837), xiii. 

.133- 

Fire-arms, matchlocks, etc.. Manufacture 
of, at Khelat, ii. 36 ; Nagina, ii. 434, 
x. 160; Cochin, iv. 7? Dhampur, 
iv. 241 ; Kashmir, viii. 74 ; Khairpur, 
viii. 137; Khambalia, viii. 142; Kohat, 
viii. 250 ; Kurwai, viii. 378 ; Ludhiana, 
viii. 523 ; Monghyr, ix. 487 ; Najib- 
abad, x. 199. 

Fire-works, Manufacture of, at Jarwal, 
vii. 144. 

Firinghi Bazar, village in Bengal, iv. 

.436,. 437. 
Firingipet. See Porto Novo. 
Firinghis, or half-caste Portuguese, 

numerous in Chittagong, iii. 438 ; 

Dacca, iv. 83 ; South Kanara, vii. 

.379- , 
Firishta's ^/j« of the Mtihanimadan Power 
in India, Colonel Briggs' translation, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 271 (foot- 
note); 287 (footnote 2); 291 (footnotes); 
also on Adoni, i. 26 ; Ahmadabad, i. 
94 ; Alwar, i. 206 ; Asirgarh, i. 339 ; 
Betul, ii. 329 ; Bhartpur, ii. 372 ; 
Biana, ii. 418; Bijapur, ii. 423; the 
meeting of the Chandel Raja and 
Mahmud of Ghazni, iii. 154; Asa the 
Ahir, iii. 301 ; Coorg, iv. 29 ; Daulat- 
abad, iv. 159; Kalinjar, vii. 332; 
Kandwa, viii. 162 ; Malwa, ix. 267 ; 
Nizampatam, x. 338 ; the invasion of 
Sabukktigin, xi. 261 ; the Ghakkars of 

H 



114 



INDEX. 



Ravval Pindi, xii. 23 ; the Baluchis of 
Sibi, xii. 457. 

Firozabad, town and tahsil in N.-\V. 
Provinces, iv. 437. 

Firozabad, pargand in Oudh, iv. 437, 
.438. 

Firozpur, District in Punjab, iv. 43S- 
447; physical aspects, 43S-440 ; history, 
440, 441 ; population, 441-443 ; con- 
dition of the people, 443 ; agriculture, 
443, 444 ; natural calamities, 445 ; 
commerce and trade, 455 ; administra- 
tion, 445, 446 ; medical aspects, 447. 

Firozpur, town and tahsil in Firozpur 
District, Punjab, iv. 447, 448. 

Firozpur, town and tahsil in Gurgaon 
District, Punjab, iv. 448, 449. 

Firozshah, battle-field in Punjab, iv. 449; 
battle of, article ' India,' vi. 411. 

Firoz Shah Tughlak, the third king of the 
Tughlak dynasty (1351-8S), his canals 
and public works, article 'India,' vi. 
285. Local notices — Granted lands in 
Bahraich to Bariah Sah, i. 427 ; trans- 
ferred Delhi to Firozabad, where he 
built a great palace, iv. 192 ; built 
mosque at Dipalpur, iv. 304 ; founded 
Fatehabad, iv. 418; founded Hissar, 
and built first Jumna canal to supply 
it with water, v. 426, 434, 438, vii. 
258; founded Jaunpur, vii. 152, 159; 
plundered temple of Kangra, vii. 414 ; 
built fort of Khanigarh, viii. 131 ; 
founded Laharpur, viii. 401 ; invaded 
and plundered Rohilkhand, ix. 505 ; 
invaded Sind, xii. 510; built fort of 
Surat to keep out the Bhils, xiii. 
120. 

Firoz Shah, mutineer leader, retired to 
Bareilly on the fall of Lucknow, ii. 140; 
fled through Cawnpur, iii. 283 ; 
plundered Etawah, but defeated at 
Harchandpur, iv. 372 ; driven out of 
Fatehgarh, iv. 411. 

First Buddhist Council (543 B.C.), article 
' India,' vi. 143. 

Fisher, Colonel, commanding at Sultan- 
pur, murdered there (1857), xiii. 98. 

Fisheries, Adrampet, i. 27; South Arcot, 
i. 326 ; Bakarganj, i. 440, 442 ; Bard- 
wan, ii. 126; Bassein, ii. 198; Lower 
Burma, iii. 199 ; Chengalpat, iii. 387 ; 
Chittagong, iii. 434 ; Cochin, iv. 4, 5 ; 
Dacca, iv. 79, 80 ; Daman, iv. 103 ; 
Diu, iv. 306; Doung-gyi, iv. 315; 
Eng-rai-gyi, iv. 353, 354,^ vii. 18; 
Faridpur, iv. 396 ; Ganjam, v. 2 ; 
Godavari, v. 123 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
V. 284, 285 ; Jerruck, vii. 180, 181 ; 
Jessor, vii. 186; Karachi, vii. 449, 450 ; 
Karnul, viii. 36 ; Khulna, viii. 206 ; 
Koldba, viii. 262 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; 
Maldive Islands, ix. 251 ; Lake Manch- 



har, ix. 287 ; Ma-ubin, ix. 370 ; Mon- 
ghyr, ix. 481 ; Moradabad, ix. 505 ; 
Nadiya, x. 130; Nawanagar, x. 252; 
Noakhali, x. 340 ; Puri, xi. 301 ; Raj- 
shahi, xi. 429 ; Rangoon, xi. 480 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 490 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 
4, 12, 13 ; Rayak, xii. 40; Salem, xii. 
152 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460; Siju, xii. 477; 
Sind, xii. 507 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 
112; Surat, xiii. 120; Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; 
Thai, xiii. 247 ; .Thana, xiii. 251 ; 
Thar and Parkar, xiii, 364 ; Tharawadi, 
xiii. 272. 
Fishes of India, article ' India,' vi. 661, 
662. Local 7iotices — Varieties of fish 
described in the Andaman Islands, 
i. 282 ; South Arcot, i. 321 ; Upper 
Burma, iii. 212; Darbhangah, iv. 123; 
Faridpur, iv. 396 ; the Indus, vii. 14 ; 
Lake In-yeh-gyl, vii. 18 ; Kadiir, vii. 
283 ; Karnul, viii. 36 ; Kolaba, viii. 
262 ; Lahore, viii. 405 ; Ldlitpur, 
viii. 448; Lohardaga, viii. 477; Madras 
Presidency, ix. 96, 97 ; Lake Manch- 
har, ix. 287 ; Muzafifargarh, x. 58 ; 
Nadiya, x. 130; Nicobar Islands, x. 
295 ; Peshawar, xi. 147 ; Ratnagiri, 
xii. 4, 5 ; Saharanpur, xii. 115 ; Sind, 
xii. 507 ; Lake Taroba, xiii. 215 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; Thar and Parkar, 
xiii. 264 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 

Fish-curing, pursued atGoalanda, v. iii; 

Ratnagiri, xii. 4, 5. 
Fish trade, Centres of, Adrampet, i. 27 ; 

Cochin, iv. 4, 5; Goalanda, v. Ill ; 

Ratnagiri, xii. 12, 13. 
Fitch, Newberry, and Leedes, the first 

English traders in India (1583), article 

' India,' vi. 364. 
Fitch, Ralph, quoted, in Bassein (Burma), 

ii. 195 ; Cochin, iv. 12 ; and Mergui, 

ix. 408. 
Flax, Cultivation of, in Allahabad, i. 184; 

Amritsar, i. 259 ; Bankura, ii. 83 ; 

Bellary, ii. 245 ; Chittagong, iii. 439 ; 

Cochin, iv. 5; Coimbatore, iv. 18; 

Gaya, v. 49 ; Hazaribagh, v. 175 ; 

Kashmir, viii. 71 ; Kistna, viii. 230 ; 

Kumaun, viii. 354 ; Manpur, ix. 339 ; 

Midnapur, ix. 429 ; Nadiya, x. 135 ; 

Puri, xi. 306 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 

232 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; Tipperah, xiii. 

317- 
Flaxman, his statue of Cornwallis at 

Ghazipur, v. 71. 
Fleury, M.,with detachment of Marathas 

surprised British force at Shikohabad 

(1802), xii. 398. 
Flint, Captain, his defence of Tiagar 

against Tipu Sultan (1790), xiii. 293; 

of Wandiwash against Haidar Ali 

(1780-85), xiii. 518. 



INDEX. 



"5 



Flint weapons of ancient India, article 

'India,' vi. 53. 
Floating gardens, The, of Kashmir, viii. 

72 ; at Srinagar, xiii. 77. 
Floods. See Natural Calamities section 
under the several Districts, and espe- 
cially Ahmadabad, i. 91 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; 
South Arcot, i. 325 ; Azamgarh, i. 399 ; 
Bakarganj, i. 446 ; Balasorj ii. 7, 8 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 112; Bardwan, ii. 132 ; 
Bellary, ii. 246, 247 ; Badgarh, ii. 
338; Budaun, iii. 121 ; Champaran, 
iii. 342 ; Chanda, iii. 353 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 440 ; Cuddapah, iv. 53 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 72 ; of the Damodar, 
iv. 106, 107 ; of the Daya, iv. 163 ; in 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 209, 218 ; Dera 
Ismail Khan, iv. 227 ; Dera Nanak, 
iv. 228 ; Dhulia, iv. 281 ; Faridpur, 
iv, 404 ; Fatehpur, iv. 428 ; Garhwal, 
v. 21 ; Godavari, v. 130, 131 ; of the 
Indus, vii. 15 ; the Irawadi, vii. 22 ; 
in Jaunpur, vii. 157; Jessor, vii. 188; 
Jhansi, vii. 224, 225 ; at Kamar-ud- 
din-nagar, vii. 351; Karnul, viii. 40; 
Kashmor, viii. 79 ; Khandesh, viii. 

157; Kheri, viii. 195; Khulna, viii. 
208 ; Kolaba, viii. 269 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 464 ; Limri, viii. 472 ; Machhli- 
shahr, viii. 534 ; Madahpura, viii. 536; 
of the jNIahanadi, ix. 158; in Maldah, 
ix. 245 ; Manbhum, ix. 278 ; Mehar, 
ix. 397 ; Midnapur, ix. 430 ; IMorad- 

abad, ix. 510; Murshidabad, x. 21; 

Muzaffargarh, x. 56, 57, 65 ; MuzafTar- 

nagar, x. 74 ; Muzaifarpur, x. S3 ; 

Nadiya, x. 137 ; Narsinghpur, x. 218 ; 

Nasik, x. 233 ; Nellore, x. 268 ; 

Noakhali, x. 349, 350 ; Orissa, x. 462 ; 

Patna, xi. loi ; Puri, xi. 300, 307 ; 

Purniah, xi. 327 ; Rajshahi, xi. 435 ; 

Rampur Beauleah, xi. 462 ; Rangoon, 

xi. 479 ; Rangpur, xi. 498 ; Rawal 

Pindi, xii. 20, 21 ; Rewari, xii. 55 ; 

Rohri, xii. 65 ; Salem, xii. 162 ; Saran, 

xii. 252, 256; Shahabad, xii. 331; 

Shikarpur, xii. 393 ; Shirpur, xii. 408 ; 

Shwe-gyin, xii. 435 ; of the Silai, xii. 

488 ; of the Sipra, xii. 545 ; Sitapur, 

xiii. 36 ; of the Son, xiii. 53 ; of the 

Subansiri, xiii. 84; in Surat, xiii. 1 19, 

120, 123; Suti, xiii. 141 ; of the Swat, 

xiii. 142; in Sylhet, xiii. 152, 153; 

at Tambam, xiii. 169; of the Tapti, 

xiii. 204, 205 ; in Tinnevelli, xiii. 307 ; 

Tipperah, xiii. 319; of the Tista, xiii. 

33 1 5 332-334 ; in the Twenty-four Par- 

ganas, xiii. 396. 
Flora, of India, article ' India,' vi. 662-664 '■> 

of Aladras, ix. 81-87. 
Floris, Peter, his journal of the voyage 

to India (1611), recently published, 

ix. 353- 



Flour-mills, Steam, at Cawnpur, iii. 292; 
Howrah, v. 465; Rawal Pindi, xii. 21; 
Sibpur, xii. 45S. 

Flowers, grown and exported, from Vel- 
lore, xiii. 469. 

Floyd, Sir John, took Satyamangalam 
(1790), and fought battle with Tipu 
Sultan there, xii. 291. 

Floyer, Charles, Governor of Madras 
(1747-50), ix. 67. 

Foley, his statue of Outram at Calcutta, 
iii. 250. 

Fonseca, Jose Nicolau da, drew up the 
account of G oafor the Imperial Gazetteer, 
v. 88-106. 

Food, of the Andamanese, i. 285 ; of the 
Baliichis, ii. 38; of the Korachavandlu, 
ii. 244; of tire hill Bhils, ii. 390; of 
the Bhutias, ii. 413 ; of the Deori 
Chutiyas, iii. 467 ; of the Garos, v. 29 ; 
of the Juangs, vii. 251; of the Siah- 
posh Kafirs, vii. 292 ; in Kamrup, vii. 
361; in Kangra, vii. 419, 420; of the 
Khasis, viii. 1 76 ; of the Kols, viii. 
258 ; of the Kotas, viii. 301 ; of the 
Ladakhis, viii. 398 ; of the Naikdas, x. 
177; of the Chenchus, x. 185 ; of the 
Kicobarians, x. 296 ; of the Peshawar 
Pathans, xi. 153 ; in Rai Bareli, xi. 
356 ; in Rangpur, xi. 495 ; in Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 28 ; of the Santals, xii. 242; 
in Sialkot, xii. 446 ; in Sibsagar, xii. 
466; in Sylhet, xiii. 157; of the Baluchi 
tribes on the Upper Sind Frontier, 
xiii. 441. 

Food-grains, Export of, article ' India,' 

vi- 571-573- 
Foot -and -mouth disease. See Cattle 
Disease. 

Forbes, James, describes Kolaba as an im- 
portant place (1771), viii. 262; Mahad 
as fortified and well peopled, ix. 154. 

Forbes, Major, defeated the Marathas in 
the Barnuil Pass (1803), ii. 157; his 
operations in Orissa, x. 431. 

Forbes, Captain C. J. F., quoted, on the 
early history of Prome, xi. 227. 

Forbes, Kinloch, suggested reforms in 
Kathiawar (1863), viii. 92 ; quoted on 
the Jain temples on Satrunjaya Hill, 
xi. 4, 5. 

Forchhammer, Dr. , of Rangoon, archseolo- 
gist, mentioned, iii. 172. 

Forde, Colonel, recapture of Masulipatam 
from the French (1759), article ' India,* 
vi. 385. Local notices — Sent by Clive 
to the Northern Circars (1759), v. 3; 
his victory over the French at Condore, 
V. 124 ; joined the Raja of Vizianagram 
at Kasimkota, viii. 81 ; his capture of 
Masulipatam (1759), viii. 228, ix. 354 ; 
failed to take Nellore (1757), x. 263; 
drove Conflans out of Rajamahendri, 



ii6 



INDEX. 



xi. 2S3 ; landed at Vizagapatam (1759), 
xiii. 485. 

' Foreign trade of India, its gradual growth, 
article ' India,' vi. 561-5S1 ; returns of 
foreign trade (1840-84), vi. 562-564; 
staples of import and export sea-borne 
trade (1882-83), 565-581. See also 
Exports and Imports, Sea-borne trade. 
Local w^/Za-j-— Bengal, ii. 311, 312; 
Bombay, iii. 62, 63 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
199, 200; Calcutta, iii. 262-264; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 445 ; Karachi, vii. 456-458 ; 
Madras Presidency, ix. 61-63 ; Madras 
city, ix. 112 ; Rangoon, xi. 487 ; Tuti- 
corin, xiii. 385, 386. 

Forester, Hon. Mary Anne, widow of 
Dyce Sombre, succeeded to the Sard- 
hana estates (1851), xii. 265. 

Forest Department, Growth of, and its 
administration, vi. 522 - 528 ; forest 
conservancy statistics, vi. 526, 527 ; 
' open ' and ' reserved ' forests, 526. 

Forests, article ' India,' vi. 8; in S. and 
S.-W. India, vi. 38-40; in Sind and 
Punjab, vi. 524, 525; N.-W. Provinces, 
vi. 525 ; Sundarbans, vi. 525 ; Assam 
and Burma, vi. 525, 526. Local notices 
— On Mount Abu, i. 5, 6 ; Ahiri, i. 82; 
Amur Margudi, i. ill; Airi, i. ill; 
in Ajmere-Merwara, i. 128; Akyab, 
i. 149; Ambala, i. 214; Amherst, 
i. 233-235; Amraoti, i. 246; on the 
Anamalai Hills, i. 270; in Angul, 
i. 289; Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 29S; 
North Arcot, i. 31 1 ; South Arcot, 
i. 320; Assam, i. 348, 349; Athmallik, 
i. 377; Baba Budan, i. 402; Bahraich, 
i. 426; Bakarganj, i. 442; Balaghat, 
i. 453; Balipara, ii. 13; Ballapali, 
ii. 17; Bamra, ii. 41 ; Banda, ii. 46; 
Bangalore, ii. 60; Bardwar, ii. 137; 
Barela, ii. 147; Baria, ii. 151; Basim, 
ii. 183 ; Bassein, ii. 193 ; Belgaum, 
ii. 231, 232; in Bengal, ii. 305, 306; 
Betiil, ii. 329 ; Bhandara, ii. 361 ; 
Bhomoraguri, ii. 402 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; 
Bijji, ii. 427 ; BijH, ii. 427 ; Bijnaur, 
ii. 428; Bilaspur, ii. 446, 451 ; on the 
Bison Range, iii. 17 ; in Bombay, iii. 
44, 45 ; Bonai, iii. 85 ; Borasambar, 
iii. 89 ; Brahmagiri, iii. 91 ; Buldana, 
iii. 143 ; Bumawadi, iii. 149 ; Lower 
Burma, iii. 202-204 '■> Upper Burma, 
iii. 210 ; Cachar, iii. 233, 234 ; Central 
Provinces, iii. 299, 300 ; Chamba, iii. 
329 ; Champaran, iii. 336 ; Chanda, 
iii. 349 ; Chandragiri, iii. 363 ; Char- 
dwar, iii. 371; Chhind ward, iii. 398 ; 
Chhota Udaipur, iii. 405 ; Chichgarh, 
iii. 408 ; Chintpurni, iii. 419 ; Chirang 
Dwar, iii. 422 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
iii. 447 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Coimbatore, 
iv. 15 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; Cuddapah, 



iv. 48 ; Dalingkot, iv. 98 ; Dalma, 
iv. 99; Daman, iv. 102; the Dangs, 
iv. 114; Darjiling, iv. 130; Darrang, 
iv. 142 ; Dawna Hills, iv. 163 ; Dehra 
Dun, iv. 169; Denwa, iv. 198 ; Deori, 
iv. 205; Dhaleswari, iv. 238; Dharam- 
pur, iv. 248 ; Dharmanpur, iv. 252 ; 
Dharwar, iv. 256 ; Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; 
Dunyin, iv. 326 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 
328, 329 ; Gangpur, iv. 478 ; Ganjam, 
V. 2 ; Garhakota Ramna, v. 14 ; Inde- 
pendent Garhwal, v. 24 ; Garo Hills, 
v. 25 ; Garumari, v. 33 ; Gauhali, 
v. 34 ; Western Ghats, v. 59 ; Gilgaon, 
v. 77 ; Goa, v. 89 ; Goalpara, v. 112 ; 
Godavari, v. 123 ; Golconda, v. 145 ; 
Goona, v. 158; Gorakhpur, v. 164; 
Gyaing Attaran, v. 237 ; Berar, 259, 
260 ; Hanthawadi, v. 313 ; Hassan, 
V- 345> 346; Hathibari,v. 353; Haung- 
tharaw, v. 358; in Hazaribagh, v. 370; 
Heggaddevankot, v. 382 ; Henzada, 
V. 384 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; Hirekal 
Hills, v. 423 ; Hoshangabad, v. 443 ; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; Hpaung-lin, v. 
466 ; on the Hpyu river, v. 466 ; 
in Indore, vii. 2 ; Jabalpur, vii. 34 ; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 108, 109 ; Jhansi, vii. 
217 ; Kadur, vii. 283 ; Kagan valley, 
vii. 293; Kalesar, vii. 324; Kalrayan 
Mountains, \'ii. 343 ; Kamrup, vii. 
355 ; Kamtaranala, vii. 366 ; North 
Kanara, vii. 369, 370; South Kanara, 
vii. 376 ; Kangia, vii. 41 1, 412 ; Karachi, 
vii. 450; Karaibari, ^^i. 462; Kamul, 
viii. 35 ; Katanig, viii. 86 ; Kathiawar, 
viii. 89 ; Khaling Dwar, viii. 142 ; 
Khandesh, viii. 150; Khasi Hills, viii. 
173 ; Ivheri, viii. 190 ; Kiggat-nad, 
viii. 216 ; Kodachadri, viii. 239 ; 
Kolaba, viii. 261 ; Kolhapur, viii. 281 ; 
the Konkan, viii. 291 ; Koppa, viii. 294; 
Kulsi, viii. 334, 335 ; Kumaun, viii. 
348> 349 ; Kyauk-pyu, viii. 385 ; Lakh- 
impur, viii. 426, 427 ; Lakvalli, viii, 
444; Lalitpur, viii. 447; Langai river, 
viii. 460 ; Laun, viii. 467; Lohardaga, 
viii. 476 ; Loisinh, viii. 488 ; Madras, 
ix. 6-8 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Mahagaon, 
ix. 155; Maikal Hills, ix. 190; Mala- 
bar, ix. 220, 229 ; Ma-li-won, ix. 258 ; 
Malkangiri, ix. 258 ; Mandla, ix. 300 ; 
INIanipur, ix. 325 ; Manjarabad, ix. 
334; Mataikhar, ix. 359; Mehar, ix. 
396; Mehwas, ix. 400; INIelghat, ix. 
402, 403 ; Mergui, ix. 406, 407 ; 
Merkara, Lx. 413 ; Milmillia, ix. 438 ; 
Mirzapur, ix. 453 ; Monghyr, ix. 480 ; 
Miil Hills, ix. 535; Muzaffargarh, 
X. 57; Mysore State, x. 109, I ID, 
District, x. 114 ; Naga Hills, x. 143; 
Nagpur, X. 171 ; Nalkeri, x. 184; Nal- 
lamalai Hills, x. 186 ; Nambar, x. 188; 



i 



INDEX. 



ri7 



Nandidrug, x. 192 ; Nanpara, x. 197 ; 
Naodwar, x. 199 ; Narukot, x. 226 ; 
Nasik, X. 228 ; Naushahro, x. 243 ; 
Nelliampati, x. 260 ; Nellore, x. 267, 
268 ; Nepal, x. 277 ; Nibari, x. 294 ; 
Nighasan, x. 299; Nilgiri Hills, x. 
305, 323, 324; Nimar, x. 328; Nirmal, 
X. 338 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 380, 381 ; 
Nowgong, X. 407; Orchha, x. 425 ; 
Orissa Tributary States, x 476; Oudh, 
x. 482, 483 ; Pachamalai Hills, x. 521 ; 
Pahar Sirgira, x. 528 ; Palanpur, x. 
539 ; Palasgaon, x. 542 ; Palkonda 
Hills, xi. II; Pal Lahara, xi. 13; 
Palni Mountains, xi. 19 ; Panabaras, 
xi. 24 ; Panch Mahals, xi. 28, 29 ; 
Pantan, xi. 51 ; Patna State, xi. 115 ; 
Pawi Mulanda, xi. 123 ; Phingeswar, 
xi. 168 ; Pilibhit, xi. 170 ; Polur, 
xi. 197 ; Prome, xi. 226 ; Punasa, 
xi. 242 ; Punjab, xi. 280, 281 ; Purara, 
xi. 299 ; Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rairakhol, 
xi. 37S ; Rajaborari, xi. 380 ; Rajoli, 
xi. 391 ; Rajpipla, xi. 391 ; Rajputana, 
xi. 402 ; Rampur (C. P.), xi. 460 ; 
Rangoon, xi. 473 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 3, 4; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 19, 21, 22 ; Rewa, 
xii. 46 ; Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; Rohri, 
xii. 64 ; Sagar, xii. loi ; Salem, xii. 
152 ; Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 174, 175 ; 
Sandoway, xii. 193, 200; Sandur, 
xii. 206 ; .Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ; 
Saoligarh, xii. 247 ; Satara, xii. 276, 
277 ; Satpura, xii. 289 ; on the Savitri 
river, xii. 295 ; Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; 
Sehwan, xii. 304 ; Seoni, xii. 309 ; 
Seoraj, xii. 316 ; Seshachalam Hills, 
xii. 321 ; Settur, xii. 321 ; Shahjahan- 
pur, xii. 343, 344 ; Shikarpur, xii. 3S6 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 400 ; Sholapur, xii. 416; 
Sibsagar, xii. 459, 460 ; Siddhapur, 
xii. 473 ; Sidli, xii. 475 ; Simla, xii. 
491; Sinchal Pahar, xii. 502; Sinchula 
Hills, xii. 502 ; Sind, xii. 506 ; Singh- 
bhum, xii. 531 ; Singhpur, xii. 541 ; 
Singla, xii. 542 ; _ Sirmur, xii. 553 ; 
Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Sirsi, xiii. 21 ; Sirsi 
State, xiii. 22 ; Siwalik Hills, xiii. 43, 
44 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 108 ; Sunkam, 
xiii. 114; Sunth, xiii. 1 14; Supa, xiii. 
1x6; Surat, xiii. 118, II9; Surgana, 
xiii. 136; Sylhet, xiii. 145; Taung-ngu, 
xiii. 220, 221 ; Thakurtola, xiii. 246 ; 
Thana, xiii. 251 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 
272; Thayet-myo, xiii. 277, 279; 
Thon-gwa, xiii. 288 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 
298 ; Tipperah, xiii. 313 ; Tirkheri 
Malpuri, xiii. 322 ; Travancore, xiii. 
342, 344, 345 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; 
Tiimkur, xiii. 376 ; Tura Mountains, 
xiii. 384 ; Turmapuri, xiii. 385 ; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 389; Viz- 
agapatam, xiii. 483, 484 ; Wada, xiii. 



504; the Wainad, xiii. 510; Waira- 
garh, xiii. 513; Walwa, xiii. 516; 
Yedenalknad, xiii. 551 ; Yelusavira, 
xiii. 554. 
Forest and jungle products of the Ana- 
malai Hills, i. 271 ; North Arcot, i. 315; 
South Arcot, i. 327 ; Bakarganj, i. 442 : 
Bamra, ii. 41; Bankura, ii. 79; Ba-im, 
ii. 184; Bastar, ii. 206; Bhandara, 
ii. 361 ; Bilaspur, ii. 451 ; Bombay, 
iii. 45 ; Bonai, iii. 85 ; Buldana, iii. 
143 ; Bimdi, iii. 157 ; Champaran, 
iii. 337 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 65 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; 
Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; Gangpur, 
iv. 478 ; Ganjam, v. 2 ; Garo Hills, 
V. 26; Gaya, v. 44; Godavari, v. 123; 
Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Henzada, v. 384 ; 
Jabalpur, vii. 33 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; 
Kamriip, \-\\. 355 ; South Kanara, 
vii. 376; Karauli, vii. 471; Karmil, 
viii. 35 ; Kawardha, viii. 106 ; Kiilu, 
viii. 343 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Lalit- 
pur, viii. 447 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; 
Madura, ix. 121 ; Malabar, ix. 229 ; 
Melghat, ix. 403 ; Midnapur, ix. 425 ; 
IMishmi Plills, ix. 464 ; Monghyr. 
ix. 481 ; Mur.shidabad, x. 22 ; Naga 
Hills, X. 143 ; Nasik, x. 231 ; Nelliam- 
pati Hills, X. 260; Nilgiri Hills, x. 312; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 380-382 ; Now- 
gong, X. 407 ; Pachamalai Hills, x. 
521 ; Puri, xi. 301 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 
353 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ; Rairakhol, 
xi. 378 ; Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Rewa, 
xii. 46 ; Sakti, xii. 148 ; Salem, xii. 
152 ; Sambalpur, xii. 178 ; Santal Par- 
ganas, xii. 227 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; 
Singhbhum, xii. 531 ; Sitapur, xiii. 
30; the Sundarbans, xiii. 112, 389; 
Surgana, xiii. 136 ; Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; Travancore, xiii. 
344, 345 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; 
Wardha, xiii. 526 ; Wun, xiii. 543. 
Sec also Drugs. Dyes, Gums, Honey 
and Beeswax, Lac, Resins, and Tasar 
silk. 

Forsyth, SirT. D., his mission to Yarkand 
(1873), V. 418. 

Fortified weaving settlements of the East 
India Company, article ' India,' vi. 
599. See Factories and Forts (Old 
East India Company's). 

Fort St. David. See David, Fort St. 

Fort St. George. See Madras city. 

Fort Victoria, village and old fort in 
Bombay, iv. 449. 

Fort William. See Calcutta. 

Forts, Abazai, i. 2 ; Charikar, Kilat-i- 
Ghilzai, Girishk, Farrah, .Sabzavar, 
Lash, and Ghorian in Afghanistan, i. 
34-36; Agar, i. 57; Agoada Head, i. 
59 ; Agra, i. 68, 72 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 



ii8 



INDEX. 



109; Ajimpur, i. 116; Akbarpur 
(Oudh), i. 139; Aknur, i. 140; Akola, 
i. 146; Alahyar-jo-Tando, i. 161 ; 
Alamgirnagar, i. 162; Aldemaii, i. 165; 
Aliganj (N.-W. P.), i. 167; Ali'garh 
(N.-Vy. P.), i. 178; Alipura, i. 181 ; 
Allahabad, i. 192, 198; Amb, i. 21 1 ; 
Ambad, i, 212; Amiitsar, i. 264; 
Anupgarh, i. 294 ; Ariakupam, i. 329 ; 
Arnala, i. 331 ; Arundangi, i. 335 ; 
Atur, i. 383 ; Badagara, i. 406 ; Baj- 
wara, i. 439 ; Balapur, i. 459 ; Balkh, 
ii. IS; Ballalpur, ii. 17; Bangalore, 
ii. 66, 67 ; Bareilly, ii. 147 ; Baswa, 
ii. 215; Baxa, ii. 219; Betul, ii. 334; 
Bhartpur, ii. 376 ; Bhatnair, ii. 378 ; 
Bijaigarh, i. 423 ; Bijeraghogarh, ii. 
426 ; Nathawan, near Bijnaur, ii. 436 ; 
Bikaner, ii. 442, 443 ; Bilaspur (N.-W. 
P.), ii. 454; Birsilpur, iii. 13 ; Bisauli, 
iii. 15; Bishangarh, iii. 10; Bissau, 
iii. 18; Bissemkatak, iii. 18; Bobbili, 
iii. 22 ; Bonaigarh, iii. %■] ; Borsad, iii. 
90; Botad, iii. 90; Broach, iii. 115; 
Budhana, iii. 128 ; Bukkur, iii. 130 ; 
Buriya, iii. 167 ; Calcutta, iii. 249 ; 
Cannanore, iii. 275 ; Cassergode, iii. 
277 ; Cawnpur, iii. 292 ; Chainpur, 
iii. 324 ; Chaitpet, iii. 325 ; Chanda, 
iii. 355 ; Channapata, iii. 368 ; Chan- 
raypatna, iii. 369 ; Chengalpat, iii. 
389. 390 ; Chicacole, iii. 407 ; Chikati, 
iii. 409 ; Chikballapur, iii. 409 ; Dab- 
hoi, iv. 76 ; Dahanu, iv. 95 ; Delhi, 
iv. 186 ; Deogarh, iv. 200 ; Deori, iv. 
205, 206 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 209 ; 
Akalgarh, near Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 
227 ; Devanhalli, iv. 232 ; Deogadh, 
iv. 232 ; Dharmpur, iv. 255 ; Dhar- 
war, iv. 266 ; Dig, iv. 2S6 ; Diggi, iv. 
287 ; Diji, iv. 288 ; Dilawar, iv. 289 ; 
Dingi, iv. 303 ; Diwangiri, iv. 308 ; 
Dod-ballapur, iv. 311 ; Dohad, iv. 312; 
Dudu,iv. 318; Diini,iv. 325; Edwardes- 
abad, iv. 339 ; Ellichpur, iv. 348 ; 
Etah, iv. 367 ; Fakrpur, \^. 390 ; 
Falta, iv. 391, 392 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
417 ; Fatehgarh, iv. 420 ; Fort Victoria, 
see Bankot; Fort William, see Calcutta; 
Gadawara, iv. 457 ; Gandava, iv. 463 ; 
Garaspur, v. 1 1 ; Garhmukhtesar, v. 
16 ; Garola, v. 52 ; Ghazipur Khas, v. 
71 ; Ghazni, v. 71, 72 ; Gohad, v. 140 ; 
Govindgarh, v. 174 ; Gujrat, v. 196 ; 
Gurdaspur, v. 214 ; Gursarai, v. 225 ; 
Harai, v. 319 ; Harihar, v. 338 ; Harn- 
halli, V. 341 ; Harrand, v. 342 ; Hatta, 
V. 356, 357 ; Herat, v. 393 ; Hingni, 
V. 422 ; Hoti-Mardan, v. 460 ; Hujra, 
V, 501 ; Ichak, v. 504 ; Isakhel, vii. 
, 25 ; Isarda, vii. 25 ; IsLimgarh, vii. 27 ; 
Islamkot, vii. 27 ; Itawa, vii. 28 ; 
Jahazgarh, vii. 45 ; Jaisinghnagar, vii. 



70; Jaitpur, vii. 71; Jalalabad, vii. 
76 ; Jalna, vii. 107 ; Jambughora, vii. 
120 ; Jambusar, vii. 123 ; Jammalam- 
madugii, vii. 129 ; Jamriid, vii. 133 ; 
Janjira, vii. 141 ; Jasdan, vii. 141 ; 
Jaspura, vii. 146 ; Jhinjhuwara, vii. 
230 ; Jogigarh, vii. 247 ; Junagarh, vii. 
263 ; Junnar, vii. 264 ; Kabul, vii. 
267 ; Kadi, vii. 280 ; Kadi'ir, vii. 289 ; 
Rohtas in Kaimur, vii. 298 ; Kalmesh- 
war, vii. 339 ; Kamona, vii. 353 ; 
Kandahar, vii. 390, 391 ; Kandapur, 
vii. 398 ; Kankanhalli, vii. 434 ; Man- 
ora (Karachi), vii. 452 ; Karanguli, vii. 
465, 466 ; Karmala, viii. 17 ; Karnal, 
viii. 28 ; Katalgarh, viii. 86 ; Kaveri- 
pak, viii. 105, 106 ; Kaveripatam, viii. 
106 ; Kaveripuram, viii. 106 ; Kera, 
viii. 117; Kerur, viii. I17 ; Kesod, 
viii. 118; Khairpur-Juso, viii. 139; 
Khandvva, viii. 162 ; Khania-dhana, 
viii. 163 ; Kharda, viii. 167 ; Khelat, 
viii. 1S7 ; Khimlasa, viii. 201 ; Kish- 
angarh, viii. 223, 224 ; Kistnapur, viii. 
237 ; Kittiir, viii. 237, 238 ; Kohat, 
viii. 250 ; Kora, viii. 295 ; Kot-Pulli, 
viii. 313 ; Kunigal, viii. 366 ; Kurai, 
viii. 367, 36S ; Kutiyana, viii. 381 ; 
Lachmangarh, viii. 396 ; Ladwa, viii. 
400 ; Lahar, viii. 400 ; Lahore, viii. 
415, 417 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 439 ; Lakh- 
nauti, viii. 441 ; Laki, viii. 443 ; Lal- 
guli Falls, viii. 445 ; Larkhana, viii. 
463, 465 ; Leh, viii. 469 ; the Machi 
Bhawan, Lucknovv, viii. 503, 504 ; 
Ludhiana, viii. 526 ; Lughasi, viii. 
527 ; Fort Mackeson, viii. 535, 536 ; 
Madha, viii. 541 ; Fort St. George 
(Madras), ix. 106, 107; Mahim, ix. 180; 
Maihar, ix. 189 ; Mainpuri, ix. 212, 
213 ; Makrai, ix. 215 ; Malegaon, ix. 
254 ; Malkapur, ix. 259 ; Mandla, ix. 
307 ; Mandlesar. ix. 308 ; Mangahpett, 
ix. 312 ; Mangalvedha, ix. 315; Man- 
grota, ix. 317 ; Mankera, ix. 337 ; 
Manora, ix. 339 ; Mariadeh, ix. 345 ; 
Masulipatam, ix. 352 ; Mat, ix. 358 ; 
Prabal, ix. 364 ; Mattod, ix. 366 ; 
Mau, ix. 368 ; Maunda, ix. 373 ; 
Maolikara, ix. 375 ; Michni, ix. 423 ; 
Mogaltur, ix. 470 ; Mojarh, ix. 477 ; 
Monghyr, ix. 490; Moradabad, ix. 513; 
Morpur, ix. 518; Movva, ix. 5^2; 
Mughalpur, ix. 529 ; Muhammadpur, 
ix. 532; Multan, x. 11 ; Mundra, x. 
14 ; Mustafabad, x. 42 ; Muzaffarabad, 
x. 54 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 65 ; Mysore, 
X. 123 ; Nagamangala, x. 154 ; Nagina, 
X. 160; Nainwah, x. 178; Pathargarh, 
x. 179 ; Nakodar, x. 180 ; Nandarthan, 
X. 189; Nandikottur, x. 193; Nar- 
singhgarh, x. 216; Narsipur, x. 225; 
Narwar, x. 227 ; Nawanagar, x. 253 ; 



INDEX. 



119 



Nellore, x. 272 ; Nidadaul, x. 298 ; 
Nimach, x. 326; Nilzoid, x. 410; 
Orchha, x. 426 ; Palasgarh, x. 542 ; 
Palghat, X. 543 ; Palupare, xi. 20 ; 
Panahat, xi. 25 ; Panipat, xi. 47 ; 
Parenda, xi. 62 ; Partabgarh (Rajput- 
ana), xi. 77; Patri, xi. 1 17; Patti, xi. 
117; Pattukotai, xi. 118; Peshawar, 
xi. 159; Phillaur, xi. 167; Pimpalner, 
xi. 181 ; Pishin, xi. 191 ; Pithoiia, xi. 
193 ; Punasa, xi. 242 ; Purngarh, xi. 
321 ; Quetta, xi. 338 ; Radhanpur, xi. 
343 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 360 ; Rajghat, xi. 
387, 388; Rajnagar, xi. 391 ; Ramna- 
ear, xi. 452 ; Rampur, xi. 459 ; Rasul- 
abad, xi. 515; Ratnagiri, xii. 12; 
Raver, xii. 14; Rawal Pindi, xii. 35, 
38; Redi, xii. 41; Rorle in Rewad- 
anda, xii. 44 ; Rohna, xii. 63 ; Rup- 
garh, xii. 83 ; Sachin, xii. 90 ; Sah, 
xii. 113 ; Sakaldiha, xii. 144 ; Sakhera, 
xii. 145; Salbet, xii. 150; Sdngli, xii. 
219; Sangola, xii. 220; Sarila, xii. 
269 ; Satanwari, xii. 275 ; Satyamanga- 
1am, xii. 291 ; Sausar, xii. 292; Se- 
cunderabad, xii. 302 ; Selu, xii. 307 ; 
Seoni, xii. 315; Seota, xii. 317; 
Shabkadar, xii. 322; Shahbaznagar, 
xii. 340 ; Shahganj, xii. 342 ; Shah- 
jahanpur, xii. 356 ; Sholapur, xii. 420, 
422 ; Sholavandan, xii. 422 ; Shujabad, 
xii. 426 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 435 ; Sikhar, 
xii. 482 ; Sindwa, xii. 527, 528 ; Sira, 
xii. 546 ; Somnath, xiii. 50 ; Sonagaon, 
xiii. 57 ; Srinagar, xiii. 77 ; Srivai- 
kuntham, xiii. 82 ; Subeha, xiii. 86 ; 
Surat, xiii. 132 ; Talagang, xiii. 162 ; 
Tanjore, xiii. 196; Tanna, xiii. 198; 
Tarikere, xiii. 214; Tehri, xiii. 236; 
Tellicherri, xiii. 237 ; Tenkaraikottai, 
xiii. 241 ; Than, xiii. 249 ; Thana 
(Bombay), xiii. 258, 259 ; (Oudh), xiii. 
259 ; Thulandi, xiii. 293 ; Tragar, xiii. 
293 ; Tikari, xiii. 295 ; Tirwa, xiii. 
330 ; Tonk, xiii. 338 ; Tranquebar, xiii. 
341 ; Tripunathorai, xiii. 367 ; Trivan- 
drum, xiii. 368; Umargarh, xiii. 419; 
Umarkot, xiii. 420; Usiir, xiii. 452; 
Uttur, xiii. 459 ; Vellore, xiii. 467-469 ; 
Vengurla, xiii. 469 ; Vesava, xiii. 472, 
473 5 Vizagapatam, xiii. 498 ; Vizia- 
drug, xiii. 499 ; Vizianagram, xiii. 503 ; 
Wairagarh, xiii. 513 ; Wandiwash, xiii. 
517, 518; Yawal, xiii. 549 ; Yedehalli, 
xiii. 550. See also Forts, Ruined. 
Forts, Hill, Ajaigarh, i. 112; Ahvar, i. 
206 ; Amber, i. 229 ; Ambur Drug, i. 
230; Anchittai-durgam, i. 281; Asir- 
garh, i. 338, 339 ; Attock, i. 381, 382 ; 
Badesar, i. 408; Badrpur, i. 411 ; 
Bahli, i. 425 ; Debrigarh, ii. 148 ; 
Songarh, Saler, and Riipgarh in Baroda, 
ii. 159 ; Bekal, ii. 229 ; Belgaum, ii. 



238 ; Bellary, ii. 250 ; Bhainsror, ii. 
355 ; Bhilsa, ii. 392 ; Bhopal, ii. 405 ; 
Biana, ii. 418 ; Bundi, iii. 159, 160 ; 
Bunera, iii. 160 ; Champaner, iii. 333 ; 
Chanar, iii. 346, 347 ; Chanderi, iii. 
358 ; Chandor, iii. 361 ; Chandragiri, 
iii. 363 ; Charkhari, iii. 372 ; Chital- 
drug, iii. 428 ; Chitor, iii. 430, 431 ; 
Dankar, iv. I17 ; Daulatabad, iv. 158 ; 
Devaraydurga, iv. 232 ; Dhar, iv. 248 ; 
Laling, near Dhulia, iv. 281, 282; 
Dindigal, iv. 301 ; Gagraun, iv. 458, 

459 ; Gandikot, iv. 464 ; Gangrov, iv. 
479 ; Garhbori, v. 14 ; Gawilgarh, v. 
42, 43 ; Gingi, v. 80-82 ; Chaprot and 
Nagar in the Gilghit valley, v. 79, 80 ; 
Gobardhangiri, v. 121 ; Golconda, v. 
144 ; Gooty, v. 160, 161 ; Gopalswami- 
betta, V. 162 ; Gudibanda, v. 177 ; 
Gumnayakan-palya, v. 199 ; Gurram- 
konda, v. 224; Gwalior, v. 234, 236; 
Haidarabad(Sind), v. 287; Hamirgarh, 
V. 297 ; Harischandragarh, v. 340 ; 
Fort Hastings, v. 352 ; Hinglajgarh, v. 
422 ; Hosdurga, v. 444 ; Hutri-durga, 
v. 503 ; Iggutappa - kunda, v. 506 ; 
Iskardo, vii. 26; Jahazpur, -vii. 45; 
Jaigarh, vii. _ 45 ; Jaipur, vii. 59 ; 
Jaisalmer, vii. 70; Jaitak, vii. 71; 
Jajpur, vii. 73 ; Jalor, vii. 107 ; Jamal- 
abad, vii. 1 18 ; Jammu, vii. 129 ; Jaum, 
vii. 149 ; Jawad, vii. 161 ; Jhalra 
Patan, \-ii. 204 ; Jhansi, vii. 228 ; 
Jobat, vii. 234 ; Jodhia, vii. 234 ; 
Jcidhpur, vii. 246 ; Sioner, near Junnar, 
vii. 264 ; Kakair, vii. 310 ; Kamlagarh, 
vii. 353 ; Kandukiir, vii. 407 ; Kangra, 
vii. 429 ; Kanjia, vii. 433 ; Khetri, viii. 
200 ; Kistawar, viii. 225 ; Komulmair, 
viii. 287 ; Kondavir, viii. 287, 288 ; 
Morni in Kotaha, viii. 308; Kumalgarh, 
viii. 345 ; Kumlagarh, viii. 359 ; Kur- 
vvai, viii. 378 ; Landi Kotal, viii. 459, 

460 ; Laphagarh, viii. 461 ; Lohgarh, 
viii. 488 ; Madgiri - drug, viii. 540 ; 
Pratapgarh, ix. 155 ; Mahakalidurga, 
ix. 155 ; Mahuli, ix. 186, 187 ; ^lalan- 
garh, ix. 236, 237 ; ]Malaun, ix. 237 ; 
JNIallangur, ix. 260 ; j\Ialot, ix. 263 ; 
Malthon, ix. 265 ; Mandalgarh, ix. 
291 ; Manohar, ix. 338 ; Mastgarh, ix. 
351; Merkara, ix. 413,414; jNIohne, 
ix. 476 ; Mudgal, ix. 526 ; Nagode, x. 
161 ; Sitabaldi, x. 173 ; Naldrug, x. 
182-184; Namakal,x. 187; Nandidrug, 
X. 191, 192; Narsinghgarh, x. 216; 
Nawagarh, x. 250 ; Nidugal, x. 298 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 77, 78 ; Pavagada, xi. 
121 ; Pawagarh, xi. 121, 122 ; Pawan- 
garh, xi. 122 ; Fort Loudoun, Pithora- 
garh, xi. 193 ; Raichur, xi. 360 ; 
Raidrug, xi. 361 ; Raigarh, xi. 363, 
364 ; Raingarh, xi. 365, 366 ; Rairi, xi. 



I20 



INDEX. 



379 ; Raisin, xi. 380 ; Rajgarh (2), xi. 
387 ; Rajpipla, xi. 393 ; Ramgarh, xi. 
44S ; Ramtek, xi. 466 ; Ranigat, xi. 
506 ; Ranthambor, xi. 511 ; Rasalgarh, 
xi. 512, 513; Rayan, xii. 40; Rehli, 
xii. 42 ; Riasi, xii. 57 ; Sadashivgarh, 
xii. 92 ; Sagar, xii. 109 ; Sagar- 
garh, xii. 11 1; Salumbar, xii. 172; 
Samod, xii. 190 ; Sankaridmg, xii, 
221 ; Sankshi, xii. 224 ; Satara, 
xii. 284, 285 ; Savandrug, xii. 293, 
294; near Ugli in Seoni, xii. 310; 
Shioner, xii. 410 ; Songarh, xiii. 60 ; 
Srinagar (Kashmir), xiii. 76, 77 (N.-W. 
P.), xiii. 78 ; Subathu, xiii. 85 ; Sunth, 
xiii. 116; Taragarh, xiii. 206; Tekal- 
kotta, xiii. 236 ; Tepagarb, xiii. 242 ; 
Theog, xiii. 288 ; Todgarh, xiii. 336 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 364 ; Trimbak, xiii. 
366 ; Eklingarh, near Udaipur, xiii. 
410 ; Shahpur, near Rabkob, xiii. 412 ; 
Vinukonda, xiii. 476 ; Visapur, xiii. 
480. Sec also Forts, Hill, Ruined. 
Forts, Ruined or dismantled, Hari Pala- 
kudu, near Addanki, i. 14 ; Afzalgarh, 
i- 57 j Agroha, i. 78 ; Ahirwas, i. 82 ; 
Ahmadnagar (Oudh), i. no; Akbar- 
pur (Bengal), i. 139 ; Aliganj (Oudh), 
i. 167; Aligarh (Bengal), i. 179; Amara- 
pura, i. 210; Amner, i. 245; Amra- 
vati, i. 253 ; Andiyar, i. 288 ; Anekal, 
i. 288 ; Angadipuran, i. 289 ; Anjengo, 
i. 292 ; Ankola, i. 293 ; Arava-Kurichi, 
i. 307; Arcot, i. 311; Ami, i. 332; 
Asurgarh, i. 375 ; Atari, i. 375 ; Ateha, 
i. 375 ; Atner, i. 379 ; Aurungabad 
(Oudh), i. 386 ; Badnera, i. 409 ; 
Klierla, near Badniir, i. 410 ; Balahera, 
i. 457 ; Balihri, ii. 13 ; Banda, ii. 55 ; 
Bansi, ii. loi ; Barabati, ii. I16 ; 
Barki'ir, ii. 156; Barwa Sagar, ii. 181 ; 
Bavvan, ii. 218; Behar, ii. 228; Bela, 
ii. 230 ; Benugarh, ii. 323 ; Bhadri, 
ii. 341 ; Bhagamandal, ii. 353 ; Bhawan, 
ii. 3S3 ; Bhind, ii. 397 ; Bhiwapur, ii. 
401 ; Bhongaon, ii. 403 ; Bidhuna, ii. 
420; Bijaigarh, ii. 422; Bijnaur, ii. 
436 ; Bilaigarh, ii. 444 ; Bilgram, ii. 
456 ; Bishnupur, iii. 16 ; Bodwad, iii. 
24; Budaun, iii. 124; Budihal, iii. 
128 ; Chanwarpatha, iii. 369 ; Cherand, 
iii. 391 ; Chopra, iii. 457 ; Fort St. 
David atCuddalore, iv. 46, 162 ; Cum- 
bum, iv. 57 ; Dadri, iv. 93 ; Dalmau, 
iv. 100 ; Dalmi, iv. 100 ; Dankaur, 
iv. 117 ; Dasuya, iv. 155 ; Dativre, iv. 
157 ; Debi Patan, iv. 164 ; Delly, iv. 
197 ; Deo, iv. 198 ; Devikota, iv. 233, 
234 ; Dhamda, iv. 239 ; Dhapewara, iv. 
245 ; Dharapuram, iv. 251 ; Dharwar, 
iv. 266, 267 ; Dheri Shahan, iv. 270 ; 
Dig, iv. 2S6 ; Dimapur, iv. 289, 290 ; 
Dipla, iv. 304, 305 ; Simbor, iv. 307 ; 



Dolphin's Nose, iv. 312; Dongarthal, 
iv. 314; Drug, iv. 317; Durduria, iv. 
326 ; Ellore, iv. 352 ; Etawah, iv. 
379; Ganjam, v. 9; Garhgaon, v. 15; 
Georgegarh, v. 54 ; Gholghat, v. 74 ; 
Gidhaur, v. 76 ; Gosainganj, v. 174 > 
Gumgaon, v. 198 ; in Haidarabad 
(Oudh), V. 289 ; Hajipur, v. 291 ; 
Hamirpur, v. 306 ; Handia, v. 309 ; 
Hansi, v. 31 1 ; Hardoi, v. 330 ; Hard- 
war, V. 331; Harhar, v. 336; Hath- 
ras, V. 355 ; Hebli, v. 382 ; Heggada- 
devankot, v. 382 ; Hindaur, v. 414 ; 
Hirehal, v. 423 ; Hosdrug, v. 441 ; 
Hoshangabad, v. 449, 450 ; Ikkeri, 
V. 508 ; Imamgarh, v. 509 ; Jainagar, 
vii. 46; Jajmau, vii. 72; Jalalkhera, 
vii. 79 ; Jalaun, vii. 103 ; Jamner, vii. 
131; Jamui, vii. 134; Jaunpur, vii. 
159, 160; Bhopatgarh, near Jawhar, 
vii. 164; Jhanjhana, vii. 214; Kaithal, 
vii. 309 ; Kalna, vii. 340 ; Kanaung, 
vii. 3S8 ; Karajgaon, vii. 462 ; Karanja, 
vii. 467 ; Karniil, viii. 45 ; Karra, viii. 
48 ; Kariir, viii. 52 ; Kasaragod, viii. 
58 ; Katol, viii. 100; Katra, viii. loi ; 
Katambar, viii. loi ; Katwa, viii. 102; 
Keljhar, viii. in; Kelod, viii. ill; 
Khairigarh, viii. 131, 132 ; Khakereru, 
viii. 141 ; Khanpur, viii. 164 ; Khiron, 
viii. 203 ; Kiratpur, viii. 220 ; Kodun- 
galiir, viii. 241 ; Koratagiri, viii. 296 ; 
Kudarkot, viii. 329 ; Kuditini, viii. 
329 ; Kulbarga, viii. 333 ; Kulpahar, 
viii. 334 ; in Lalitpur, viii. 452 ; Lalmai 
Hills, viii. 458 ; Landaura, viii. 459 ; 
Lanji, viii. 461 ; Pilmi in Lohardaga, 
viii. 482 ; Loni, viii. 490 ; Maddiir, 
viii. 539; Madnagarh,viii. 544; Madura, 
ix. 135 ; Magadi, ix. 136 ; Mahaban, 
ix. 151 ; Mahagaon, ix. 155 ; Mahes- 
war, ix. 173 ; Char Garhjarifa, ix. 
195 ; Malagarh, ix. 235, 236 ; Mal- 
kangiri, ix. 258 ; Mallanwan, ix. 263 ; 
Malvalli, ix. 266 ; Padmagarh and 
Sindhudrug, ix. 273 ; Mamdot, ix. 
273 ; Mandawar, ix. 293 ; Manglaur, 
ix. 316 ; Manwan, ix. 342 ; Marpha, 
ix. 348 ; Mro-haung, ix. 523, 524 ; 
Murdeswar, x. 17; Mursan, x. 20; 
Nagar, x. 155; Nagavaram, x. 159; 
Pratapgarh, x. 193 ; Narayanavanam, 
X. 205 ; Nargund, x. 211 ; Navvabganj, 
X. 249 ; Neri, x. 291 ; Nevti, x. 292 ; 
IS'ichlaval, x. 294 ; Nidhauli, x. 298 ; 
Nipani, x. 366 ; Nirmal, x. 338 ; 
Palamkotta, x. 535 ; Palladam, xi. 13 ; 
Parichhatgarh, xi. 63 ; Parola, xi. 66 ; 
Parone, xi. 67 ; Partabgarh (Oudh), 
xi. 75 ; Patan Saongi, xi. 84 ; Patiali, 
xi. 90; Paunar, xi. 119; Pendra, xi. 
132; Penyapatna, xi. 139, 140; Pinjaur, 
xi. 184; Polur, xi. 197; Porakad, xi. 



INDEX. 



121 



214 ; in Pulivendala, xi. 240 ; Puna- 
mallu, xi. 242 ; Raghugarh, xi. 345 ; 
Raipur, xi. 377, 378 ; Rajagriha, xi. 
381 ; Rajgarh, xi. 387 ; Ramnad, xi. 
450, 451 ; Rangamati (Assam), xi. 470 ; 
Ranpur, xi. 510; Ratanpur, xi. 577; 
Rath, xi. 518; Rattihalli, xii. 14; 
Repalli, xii. 44 ; Gokalgarh, xii. 55 ; 
Rohar, xii. 60 ; Rudrapur, xii. 81 ; 
Sahet IMahet, xii. 135 ; Sambalpur, xii. 
185; Sanghari, xii. 217 ; Sankisa, xii. 
224 ; Sanu, xii. 225 ; Saoner, xii. 248 ; 
Sardhana, xii. 266 ; Sarv-epalli, xii. 
271 ; Sasni, xii. 273 ; Sehwan, xii. 
306 ; Seiingapatam, xii. 319, 320 ; 
Shahabad (N.-\V. P.), xii. 337; Shah- 
garh, xii. 342; Shahpur (N.-W. P.), 
xii. 368 ; Shekohpura, xii. 378 ; Sher- 
garh, xii. 380; Shikarpur (N.-W. P.), 
xii. 396 ; (iMysore), xii. 397 ; Sialkot, 
xii. 451 ; Simraon, xii. 501 ; Sindgi, 
xii. 526 ; Sindkher, xii. 527 ; Sohag- 
pur, xiii. 47 ; Sohawal, xiii. 48 ; Sonda, 
xiii. 59, 60 ; Songir, xiii. 61 ; Subal- 
garh, xiii. 83 ; Sumerpur, xiii. 107 ; 
Surharpur, xiii. 137 ; Sryamnagar, xiii. 
143 ; Talamba, xiii. 163 ; Tambam, 
xiii. 169 ; Tangasseri, xiii. 180 ; Tank, 
xiii. 198 ; Tappal, xiii. 200 ; Tarahwan, 
xiii. 206, 207 ; Tatta, xiii. 219 ; Telia- 
garhi, xiii. 236 ; Thaneswar, xiii. 260 ; 
in Thar and Parkar, xiii. 267 ; Thatia, 
xiii. 275 ; Tirkanamb, xiii. 322 ; Tri- 
pasur, xiii. 367 ; Udaipur, xiii. 410 ; 
Dumraon, near Umarpur, xiii. 421 ; 
Umrer, xiii. 423 ; Urai, xiii. 450 ; 
Uttraula, xiii. 458 ; Wari, xiii. 531. 
Forts, Hill, Ruined, Adegaon, i. 15 ; 
Adoni, i. 26 ; Ajmirgarh, i. 133 ; 
Ambaji - durga, i. 213; Balakot, i. 
458 ; Ballal - rayan - durga, ii. 17 ; 
Baurgarh, ii. 217 ; Bellamkonda, ii. 
240 ; Bijagarh, ii. 422 ; Brahmapuri, 
iii. 93 ; Chauragarh, iii. 377 ; Deogarh, 
iv. 203 ; Kafir Kotin Dera Ismail 

Khan, iv. 220 ; Dhamoni, iv. 240 ; 

Dongargarh, iv. 314; Garha, v. 12; 

Garhakota, v. 13 ; Huliyar-durga, v. 

501 ; Juba, vii. 253 ; Kabbal-durga, 
vii. 266 ; Kalan Kot, vii. 323 ; Kalin- 
jar, vii. 331-337; Kalpi, vii. 343; 

Kangundi, vii. 431 ; Kanigiri, vii. 432 ; 

Karnala, viii. 29, 30 ; Katas, viii. 87 ; 

Kevale-durga, viii. 104, 105 ; Konda- 

pilli, viii. 287 ; Korigi, viii. 300 ; 

Krishnagiri, viii. 317, 318; Langur, 

viii. 461 ; Lingana, viii. 472 ; Lio, viii. 

473 ; Madaksira, viii. 536 ; IMahoba, 

ix. 182, 183 ; Medak, ix. 379 ; Tior 

Mountain, ix. 503 ; Mundargi, x. 13 ; 

Nadol, x. 142 ; Nalapani, x. 181 ; 

Narnala, x. 213 ; Nijagal, x. 301 ; 

Nurpur, x. 419; Penukonda, xi. 135 ; 



Perumakal, xi. 140, 141 ; Purandhar, 

xi. 297, 298 ; Ragauli, xi. 344 ; Rahat- 

garh, xi. 345, 346 ;^ Ramgiri, xi. 449 ; 

Rasan, xi. 513; Rayakottai, xii. 40; 

Rohtasgarh, xii. 78 ; Rotas, xii. 80 ; 

Sadri, xii. 95 ; Parasgarh, near Saun- 

datti, xii. 291; in Seoni, xii. 310; 

Sihonda, xii. 476; Sikandarpur, xii. 

480 ; Singaurgarh, xii. 528, 529 ; Sinh- 

garh, xii. 543, 544; Sirakot, xii. 550; 

Sironcha, xiii. 7 ; Talbehat, xiii. 164 ; 

Taragarh, xiii. 206 ; Tekalkota, xiii. 

236. 
Forts, Old East India Company's, at 

Beliapatam (1735), ii. 240; Bezwada 

(1760), ii. 331 ; Fort St. David's, iv. 

162 ; Devikota, iv. 234 ; Ganjam 

(1768), V. 3, 9; Fort St. George 

(Madras), ix. 106, 107. 
Forts and fortifications, Old Portuguese, 

Bandel, ii. 57; Barkalur, ii. 156; 

Bassein (Bombay), ii. 192 ; Bhatkal, 

ii. 377; Cochin, iv. 12; Daman, iv. 

103, 104 ; Diu, iv. 306 ; Gholghat, v. 

74 ; Honawar, v. 440 ; Kandapur, vii. 

398 ; Karanja, vii. 467 ; Kodungalur, 

viii. 241 ; Saint Thome, ix. 104 ; 

Porakad, xi. 214; Quilon, xi. 340; 

Rewadanda, xii. 44 ; Vesava, xiii. 

473- 
Fort, Old Danish, Tranquebar, xni. 340, 

341. 
Forts, Old Dutch, Chetvai, iii. 393; 

Cochin, iv. 12 ; Pulicat, xi. 239 ; 

Sadras, xii. 94 ; Tangasseri, xiii. 180. 
Forts, Old French, Karikal, viii. 10 ; 

Kavai, viii. 104; Valdavur, xiii. 461. 
Foul Island, in Lower Burma, iv. 450. 
Fouracres, Mr., the head of the Son 

Canal works at Dehri, xiii. 54. 
Fourth Buddhist Council (40 A.D.), article 

' India,' vi. 147. 
Fo-wei-kian-king, Chinese translation 

from the Sanskrit of the ' Dying In- 
structions of Buddha,' article 'India,' 

vi. 141 and footnote. 
Fox, The Indian, article ' India,' vi. 654. 

Local notices — Found in Azamgarh, i. 

393 ; Balaghat, i. 453 ; Ballia, ii. 19 ; 

Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; 

Cawnpur, iii. 280 ; Chhindwara, iii. 

399 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; Cuddapah, iv. 

48 ; Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 220 ; 

Dharwar, iv. 259 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291; 

Firozpur, iv. 439 ; Gorakhpur, v. 165 ; 

Gurgaon, v. 216 ; Gwalior, v. 229 ; 

Haidarabad (Sind), v. 275 ; Himalaya 

Mountains, v. 409 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; 

Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Jerruck, vii. 180; 

Kaira, vii. 300 ; North Kanara, vii. 

370 ; Karachi, vii. 445 ; Karni'il, viii. 

35 ; Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Kathiawar, 

viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133 ; Kulu, 



122 



INDEX. 



viii. 338 ; Kumaun, viii. 349 ; Lark- 

hana, viii. 463 ; Madras Presidency, 

ix. 89 ; Moradabad, ix. 505 ; Muzaffar- 

garh, X. 58 ; Rajagriha Hills, xi. 94 ; 

Peshawar, xi. 147 ; Pishin, xi. 188 ; 

Punjab, xi. 259 ; Rajshahi, x. 429 ; 

Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; 

Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Shahabad, xii. 

324 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; 

Surat, xiii. 120 ; Thar and Pdrkar, 

xiii. 264 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 

440; Wi'in, xiii. 539. 
Fox, Rev. Mr., missionary at Masiili- 

patam with Noble (1S41), ix. 354. 
Foxcroft, George, Governor of Madras 

(1668-70), ix. 66. 
France, India's foreign trade with, article 

' India,' vi. 578, 579. 
Francis, Philip, his duel with Warren 

Hastings at Alipur (1780), i. 180. 
Franklin's J\Ie»ioir of the Geology of 

Brindelkhand, quoted, iii. 151. 
Franklin, Col., first ascended Parasnath 

Hill, quoted, xi. 57. 
Franks, Sir T. H., joined Sir Colin 

Campbell before Lucknow (1858), viii. 

515 ; his campaign in Oudh, x. 496. 
Fraser, Gen., defeated Holkar and 

stormed fort of Dig (1804), iv. 286. 
Fraser, Col., annexed Coorg on surrender 

of the Raja (1834), iv. 30, 31 ; first 

political agent, Fraserpet called after, 

iv. 450. 
Fraser, William, Commissioner of Delhi, 

murdered by Shams - ud - din Khan 

(1836), iv. 448, viii. 487. 
Fraserpet, town in Coorg, iv. 450. 
Frederic, Caesar, Venetian traveller 

to India, quoted, upon Martaban, 

i. 236 ; the jewels of Burma, iii. 

195 ; Hampi, v. 307 ; Honawar, v. 

440 ; Mergui, ix. 408 ; Noakhali, x. 

341 ; Pegu, xi. 126, 127 ; Sandwip 

Island, xii. 210 ; the pearl fishery of 

Tinnevelli, xiii. 30S. 
French possessions, iv. 450-455 ; history, 

451-454; present territories, 454; 

revenue and expenditure for 1883, 

454, 455- 
French East India Companies, and the 
present French possessions in India, 
article ' India,' vi. 372 ; French and 
English in the Karnatik, the first 
French war (1746-48), 378 ; capture of 
Madras by the French (1746), and its 
restoration to the English (1748), 379 ; 
French influence in India (1798-1800), 
and intrigues with Tipu Suhan and 
the Nizam of Haidarabad, 394, 395. 
Local no/ices — The French at t^iege of 
Arcot (1751), i. 309; took Bobbili 
(1756), iii. 21 ; founded factory at 
Calicut (1722), iii. 270; held Chaitpet 



(1751-60), iii. 325 ; at Chandernagar 
(1673), iii- 3561 357; took Chilambaram 
(1753), iii. 412 ; took Covelong (1750), 
iv. 44; took Cuddalore (1758, 1782), iv. 
46 ; at Dacca, iv. 81 ; held Devikota 
(1758-60), iv. 234; settlement at 
Malda, iv. 353 ; their trade with 
False Point, iv. 391 ; in Guntur 
(1752-76), V. 205; settlement at 
Karikal, viii. 9-1 1 ; took Masulipatam 
(1750), viii. 228, ix. 353, 354; took 
Kondavir (1757), viii. 288 ; in Madras 
Presidency, ix. 12, 13 ; held Madras 
city (1746-48), ix. 103; at Saint Thome 
(1672-74), ix. 104 ; settlement at Mahe, 
ix. 170, 171 ; in Malabar, ix. 221 ; 
at Pondicherri, xi. 198, 199 ; at Raja- 
mahendri (1753-59), xi. 383 ; attacked 
Settipattadai, xii. 321 ; held Valdavar, 
xiii. 461 ; at Vizagapatam, xiii. 484, 
485 ; defeated at Wandiwash (1760), 
xiii. 518. 

French Settlements, Existing, in India, 
Chandernagar, iii. 356, 357 ; Karikal, 
viii. 9- II; Mahe, ix. 170, 171 ; 
Pondicherri, xi. 198, 199 ; Yanaon, 
xiii. 547, 548. 

Frere, Sir Bartle, his speech on opening 
railway over the Bhor Ghat, quoted, ii. 
407 ; founded European school at 
Karachi, the Frere Hall in his honour 
there, vii. 454 ; constructed Napier 
Mole at Karachi, vii. 458 ; his Com- 
missionership of Sind (1851-59), xii. 
526 ; introduced ten years' assessment 
into the Thar, xiii. 265. 

Frobisher's, Davis', Hudson's, and 
Baffin's attempts to reach India by 
way of the North- West passage, article 
' India,' vi. 363. 

Frontier District, Sind. See Upper 
Sind Frontier. 

Frontier trade of India, article ' India,' 
vi. 585-590. 

Fruits, Varieties of, article ' India,' vi. 
490 ; in Afghanistan, i. 38 ; Afghan- 
Turkistan, i. 55 ; Akola, i. 143 ; 
Akyab, i. 156; Allahabad, i. 190; 
Amherst, i. 239 ; Anantapur, i. 277 ; 
South Arcot, i. 323 ; Assam, i. 362 ; 
Badakshan, i. 407; Balkh, ii. 15; 
Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bombay, iii. 81 ; 
Broach, iii. 102 ; Buldana, iii. 146 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 210 ; Chengalpat, 
iii. 3S2 ; Cherra, iii. 392 ; Chitral, iii. 
432 ; Edar, iv. 337 ; EUichpur, iv. 
345 ; Ghazni, v. 72 ; Haidarabad, v. 
245 ; Hanthawadi, v. 315 ; Hunza, v. 
503 ; Jabalpur, vii. 33 ; Jalalabad, vii. 
75 ; Jalna, vii. 107 ; Kabul, vii. 266 ; 
Kandahar, vii. 391 ; Kangra, vii. 412 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 71, 72 ; Khab, viii. 
122 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 177 ; Kumaun, 



INDEX. 



123 



viii. 354 ; Kuram, viii. 369 ; Lahore, 
viii. 410 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 433 ; 
Larkhana, viii. 463 ; Madras, ix. 86 ; 
Manipur, ix. 331; Mergui, ix. 409; 
Mishmi Hills, ix. 463 ; Muzaffargarh, 
X. 57 ; Mysore, x. 103 ; Nasik, x. 
232 ; Nepal, x. 276 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 
313; N.-W. Provinces, x. 381, 382; 
Oudh, X. 482 ; Palni Mountains, xi. 
19; Peshawar, xi. 146, 159; Prome, 
xi. 232 ; Ranchi, xi. 468 ; Rangoon, 
xi. 478 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Safed 
Koh Mountains, xii. 99 ; Satara, xii. 
277 ; Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Sheila, 
xii. 378 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; 
Sikkim, xii. 486 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; 
Sitapur, xiii. 35 ; Tavoy, xiii. 232 ; 
Tharawadi, xiii. 273 ; Thon-gwa, xiii. 
291 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 394; 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 446 ; 
Wellington, xiii. 536. 

Fi-uits, Dried, exported from Afghanistan, 
i. 40 ; Agashi, i. 58 ; Gujrat, v. 197 ; 
Kandahar, vii. 391. 

Frushard, Mr., first established a silk 
factory at Ganutia in Birbhum, iii. 6, 
V. 10 ; his difficulties and subsequent 
prosperity, iii. 7. 

Fryer, Dr., his description of Bombay 
(1673), quoted, iii. 74, 75; calls 
Ghorbandar, Grebondel, v. 75 ; de- 
scription of Goa, v. 104 ; on the diffi- 
culty of ascending the Narbada, x. 
210 ; on the Jesuit College of Bandora, 
xi. 61. 

Fulaguri. See Phulaguri. 

Fuller's earth, found in Bikaner, li. 439 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 210; Ghazipur, 
V. 69 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 2S6 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 237 ; Mallani, ix. 260 ; 
Manipur, ix. 324. 

Fullerton, CoL, took Palghat (i783),_x. 
543 ; his campaign in Tinnevelli, xiii. 
300 ; asserted that the Bengal Govern- 
ment offered Tinnevelli to the Dutch 
for 4000 soldiers, xiii. 309. 

Funeral ceremonies and customs of the 
Baluchis, ii. 38, 39 ; of the Hatkars, 
ii. 186 ; of the Bhils, ii. 391 ; of the 
Gonds, iii. 311 ; of the Daphlas, iv. 
120; of the Garos, v. 30; of the 
Bishnois, v. 429 ; of the Juangs, vii. 
252 ; of the Siahposh Kafirs, vii. 291 ; 
of the Karens, viii. 4 ; of the Khamtis, 
viii. 145, 146; of the Khasis, viii. 175; 
of the Kotas, viii. 301, 302; of the 
Kurumbas, viii. 376 ; of the Korkus, 

. ix. 404 ; of the Mikirs, ix. 437 ; of the 
Miris, ix. 444, 449 ; of the Angami 
Nagas, x. 149 ; of the Kukis, x. 151 ; 
of the Nicobarians, x. 296 ; of the 
Santals, xii. 245, 246 ; of the Chins, 
xiii. 282 ; of the Nairs, xiii. 349. 



Funeral mounds and ceremonies of the 
Sakyas and Buddhists in ancient India, 
article ' India,' vi. 178. 

Furniture, Manufacture of, at Bareilly, ii. 
147 ; Kotah, viii. 306 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
523, 526 ; Tumkur, xiii. 379. 

Furreedabad. See Faridabad. 

Furreedcote. See Faridkot. 

Furreedpore. See Faridpur. 

Fytche, Gen. Albert, cleared Bassein of 
dakdits, ii. 195 ; xiii. 289 ; Chief 
Commissioner of British Burma (1867- 
76), iii. 176 ; supplied materials for 
article Mandalay, ix. 288-291 ; went 
up the Pak-chan to Kra (1864) to 
settle Burmese frontier, x. 531 ; in- 
troduced Cuba tobacco into Sandoway, 
xii. 203. 

Fyzabad. See Faizabad. 



Gab, from which glue is made, found in 
the Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 389. 

Gabat, State in Bombay, iv. 456. 

Gad. Sec Garh. 

Gadadhar, river in Bengal, iv. 456. 

Gadag. See Garag. 

Gadawara, town and tahsil in Central 
Provinces, iv. 456, 457- 

Gadbas or Gadwas, corresponding to the 
Kols of Rajmahal, found in Bastar, ii. 
205 ; their music and dancing, iii. 308. 

Gaddilam. See Garudandi. 

Gadhali, State in Bombay, iv. 457. 

Gadhia, State in Kathiawar, iv. 457. 

Gadhi Dubhar, village in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, iv. 457. 

Gadhka, State in Bombay, iv. 457, 458. 

Gadhula, State in Bombay, iv. 458. 

Gadkhali, town in Bengal, iv. 458. 

Gadra, town in Bombay, iv. 458. 

Gadra, town in Kathiawar, iv. 458. 

Gaekwar, family name of the chief of the 
Maratha State of Baroda, rise of the 
family, deposition of the late Gaekwar, 
article ' India,' vi. 322, 323 ; 426 ; 
history of the dynasty, ii. 160-164. 

Gagar, range of mountains in N.-W. 
Provinces, iv. 458. 

Gagla, village in Bengal, iv. 458. 

Gagraun, town in Rajputana, iv. 458, 459. 

Gahija, town in Bombay, iv. 459. 

Gahmar, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 
459, 460. 

Gahrauli. See Garhauli. 

Gaibandha, Sub-division in Bengal, iv. 
460. 

Gajapatinagar, town and tdlitk in Madras, 
iv. 460. 

Gajendragad, town in Bombay, iv. 460. 

Gajghanta, village in Bengal, iv. 460. 



124 



INDEX. 



Galaothi, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

460. 
Galchas, in Badakshan, i. 407. 
Galena, found in Bhagalpur, ii. 344 ; 
Jehlam, vii. 168 ; Monghyr, ix. 479 ; 
Salwin Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; Shwe- 
gyin, xii. 430. 
Galghasia, river in Bengal, iv. 461. 
Galikonda, range of hills in Madras, iv. 

461. 
Galley, Mr. E., first Collector of Siirat 

(1800), xiii. 124. 
Gambat, town in Bombay, iv. 461. 
Gambhar, moinitain stream in Punjab, 

iv. 461. 
Gambila, river in Punjab, iv. 461, 462. 
Gamboge, found in Amherst, i. 240 ; 
S. Kanara, vii. 376 ; Shimoga, xii. 400; 
Travancore, xiii. 334. 
Ganaks, wandering Brahmans, who 
practise astrology in Darrang, iv. 145 ; 
Kamriip, vii. 359. 
Gandai, estate in Central Provinces, iv. 

462. 
Gandak, Great, river in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 462, 463. 
Gandak, Little, river in N.-W. Provinces, 

iv. 463. 
Gandamak, Treaty of, article ' India,' 

vi. 426. 
Gandava, town in Baluchistan, iv. 463. 
Gandevi, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, iv. 463. 
Gandgarh, hills in Punjab, iv. 463, 464. 
Gandha Madan, peak in Bengal, iv. 464. 
Gandhol, State in Kathiawar, iv. 464. 
Gandikot, hill fort in Madras, iv. 464. 
Ganeswari, river in Assam, iv. 464. 
Ganga Bal. See Gangal. 
Ganga dynasty, The, in S. India, had 

their capital at Talkad, xiii. 167. 
Gangaikandapur, town in Madras, iv. 

465, 466. 
Ganga Govind Singh, baniya of Warren 
Hastings, his large fortune and splendid 
sraddha, vii. 405, 406. 
Gangal, lake in Kashmir, iv. 466. 
Gangapur, town in Rajputana, iv. 466. 
Gangaru. See Gangiru. 
Gangawali, port in Bombay, iv. 466. 
Ganges, river of N. India, iv. 466-472 ; 
its course, 466-469; its traffic, 469-471 ; 
its discharge and average rise, 471, 
472; article 'India,' vi. 11; 16-32; 
its river system and course, 16, 17 ; 
discharge, 17; sanctity, 17, 18; the 
fertilizer and highway of Bengal, 19, 
20 ; traffic, 20, 21 ; great cities, 20, 21 ; 
different stages in the life of, 21-25 ; 
as a silt collector, 21, 22 ; as a land- 
maker, 22, 23 ; section of a deltaic 
channel of, 23 ; combined delta of the 
Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna, 



24, 25 ; subterranean structure of the 
Gangetic delta, 26 and footnote ; silt 
brought down by, at Ghazipur, 27 and 
footnote ; estimated silt of united river 
system, 28 ; age of the Bengal delta, 28 ; 
river irrigation, 28 ; the Ganges and 
Jumna Canals, 28, 29; floods, 29 ; saline 
deposits, 29 ; changes of channel, 30 ; 
deserted river capitals, 30 ; the ' bore ' 
of the Ganges and Meghna, 30, 31 ; 
the Goalanda railway station washed 
away by, 31, 32 ; fluvial changes, allu- 
vion and diluvion, 30, 32 ; navigation 
on, 552. 

Ganges Canals, vi. 28, 29 ; 532, 533. 

Ganges Canal, irrigation work in N.-W. 
Provinces, iv. 372-475. Local notices 
— Aligarh, i. 169, 173, 175; Buland- 
shahr, iii. 131 ; Cawnpur, iii. 280, 
285 ; Etah, iv. 358 ; Etawah, iv. 367 ; 
starts from Hardwar, v. 334 ; Mainpuri, 
ix. 203 ; Meerut, ix. 382 ; Muzaffar- 
nagar, x. 66, 67, 74 ; Rurki (head- 
works), xii. 86 ; Saharanpur, xii. 1 14. 

Ganges Canal, Lower, irrigation work in- 
N.-W. Provinces, iv. 475-477. Local 
7iolices— Etah, iv. 358, 362 ; Etawah, 
iv. 367 ; Mainpuri, ix. 203. 

Gangetic historical and commercial cities, 
vi. 20 ; deserted cities, vi. 30. 

Gangiru, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv. 

477- 
Gangoh, town in N.-W. Provinces, iv, 

477- 
Gangotri, mountain temple in N.-W. 

Provinces, iv. 477, 478. 

Gangpur, Native State in Chutia Nagpur, 
iv. 478, 479 ; history, 478, 479. 

Gangrov, town in Rajputana, iv. 479. 

Ganguria, village in Bengal, iv. 479. 

Gd>ijd or narcotic hemp. Excise duty on, 
article ' India,' vi. 455 ; cultivated ia 
Bogra, iii. 29 ; Berar, v. 270 ; Naogaon, 
x. 199 ; Nimar, xi. 333 ; Rajshahi, xi. 

433) 434- 

Ganjam, District in Madras, v. 1-8 ; 
physical aspects, 1-3; history, 3, 4 ; 
population, 4, 5 ; agriculture, 6, 7 ; 
natural calamities, 7 ; communications, 
manufactures, etc., 7, 8; administra- 
tion, 8. 

Ganjam, idhik in Madras, v. 8, 9. 

Ganjam, town in Madras, v. 9. 

Ganjam. See Rishikuliya. 

Ganjam, suburb of Seringapatam, v. 9. 

Ganpat Rao Kharke, Sir, Diwan ot 
Gwalior, v. 230. 

Gantang, mountain pass in Punjab, v. 9. 

Ganutia, town in Bengal, v. 9, lO. 

Garag, town and tdli//; in Bombay, v. lo. 

Garai, river in Bengal, v. 10, il. 

Garamli Moti, State in Kathiawar, 
v. II. 



INDEX. 



125 



Garamli Nam, State in Bombay, v. 11. 

Gaiaspur, town in Central India, v. II. 

Garden Reach, suburb of Calcutta, v. II. 

Gardens, 'of Splendour,' Ajmere, i. 133 ; 
Zoological at Alipur, i. 180 ; the 
Shalimar at Baghbanpur, i. 416, xii. 
374 ; the Horticultural, the Lai Bagh 
at Bangalore, ii. 68 ; at Bhakkar, ii. 
358 ; Memorial at Cawnpur, iii. 290 ; 
Chhindwara, iii. 403 ; Darjiling, iv. 
141 ; Gonda, v. 157 ; Botanical at 
Howrah, v. 465 ; Lai Bagh at Indore, 
\\\. 9 ; Jahanabad (N.-W. P.), vii. 44 ; 
Ram Newas Jaipur, vii. 60; Jehlam, 
vii. 178 ; Kairana, vii. 308 ; Botanical 
at Kalhatti, vii. 325 ; the Temple at 
Kamthi, vii. 367 ; Karachi, vii. 453 ; 
floating in Kashmir, viii. 72 ; Khajuha, 
viii. 140 ; Kora, viii. 295 ; Kulbaya, 
viii. 333 ; the Lawrence at Lahore, 
viii. 417 ; Horticultural at Madras, ix. 
105 ; Memorial at Miani (Bind), ix. 
422 ; Multan, x. 12 ; Botanical at 
Mussooree, x. 42 ; Nagpur, x. 174 ; 
Peshawar, xi. 159 ; Raipur, xi. 377 ; 
Rajamahendri, xi. 382 ; Agri-Horticul- 
tural Society's at Rangoon, xi. 484 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 37 ; Rewari, xii. 56 ; 
Sagar, xii. 109 ; Botanical at Saharan- 
pur, xii. 120, 125 ; Seoni, xii. 315 ; 
Shahdara, xii. 341 ; Sialkot, xii. 452 ; 
Royal Botanical at Sibpur, xii. 458 ; 
Sikandra, xii. 481 ; Srinagar (floating), 
xiii. 77 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 105 ; Trivan- 
drum, xiii. 370 ; Botanical at Utaka- 
mand, xiii. 450 ; Wardha, xiii. 529. 

Gardner, Col., made peace with the 
Gurkhas (1815), and Commissioner of 
Kumaun (1815-17), viii. 351. 

Gardner, Major, defeated and killed at 
Akauk-taung in second Burmese war, 

V. 385- 
Gargaon. See Garhgaon. 
Gargariba. See Haiatpur. 
Garh, State in Bombay, v. 11, 12. 
Garha, historic town in Central Provinces, 

V. 12. 

Garha. See Gharra. 

Garha Kalan, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

V. 12. 
Garhakota, town in Central Provinces, v. 

12, 13. 

Garhakota Ramna, teak forest in Central 

Provinces, v. 14. 
Garhauh, town in N.-W. Provinces, v. 14. 
Garhbeta, town in Bengal, v. 14. 
Garhbori, town and pa7-gand in Central 

Provinces, v. 14. 
Garhdiwala, town in Punjab, v. 14. 
Garhgaon, historic town in Assam, v. 

14, 15. 
Garhi, estate in Central India, v. 15. 
Garhi-Adu-Shah, town in Bombay, v. 15. 



Garhi Yasin, town in Bombay, v. 15. 
Garhumkhtesar, historic town in N.-W. 

Provinces, v. 15, 16. 
Garhshankar, town and tahsil in Punjab, 

V. 16. 
Garhvi, river of Central Provinces, v. 

16. 
Garhwal, District in N.-W. Provinces, v. 

16 - 23 ; physical aspects, 16, 17 ; 

history, 17-19; population, 19, 20; 

agriculture, 20, 21 ; natural calamities, 

21, 22 ; commerce and trade, 22 ; 

administration, 22, 23 ; medical aspects, 

23- 

Garhwal, Native State in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 23, 24. 

Garias or tailors, degraded Muhammadan 
class in Kamri'ip, vii. 360. 

Garnets, found in Bantwal, ii. 104 ; 
Kistna, viii. 226 ; Madras, ix. 6 ; 
JNIadura, ix. 122 ; Mysore, x. 92; Pur, 
xi. 296 ; Rapur, xi. 512 ; Udaipur, 
xiii. 401. 

Garnimetta, town in Madras, v. 24. 

Garo Hills, District in Assam, v. 24-32 ; 
physical aspects, 25, 26 ; history, 26, 
27 ; population, 27 - 30 ; agriculture, 
30, 31 ; manufactures, 31, 32 ; admini- 
stration, 32 ; medical aspects, 32. 

Garol, State in Bombay, v. 32. 

Garola, estate in Central Provinces, v. 32. 

Garos, aboriginal tribe in Assam, i. 351 ; 
their manners and customs, v. 28-30 ; 
in Goalpara, v. 115 ; Kamrup, vii. 
355' 359 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 322 ; 
Maimansingh, ix. 191, 192. 

Garotha, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, v. 

32, 33- 

Garrauli, State in Central India, v. 33. 

Garstin, Capt. John, built the Govern- 
ment granary at Patna (1784), xi. 109. 

Garstin, Mr., quoted, on Pondicherri, xi. 
198, 199. 

Garuda-giri, hill peak in Mysore, v. 33. 

Garudanadi, river in Madras, v. 33. 

Garumari, forest reserve in Assam, v. 33. 

Garvi. See Dang States. 

Garwa, town in Bengal, v. 33, 34. 

Gathar, town in Bombay, v. 34. 

Gaudas, The, of the Talu country, rose in 
insurrection (1837), iv. 31. 

Gauhali, State in Bombay, v. 34. 

Gauhati, town in Assam, v. 34, 35. 

Gaulls, ancient ruling race in the C. 
Provinces, now a crushed tribe, article 
'India,' vi. 71. Local notices — Bhan- 
dara, ii. 361 ; their kingdoms, iii. 301 ; 
Dongarthal, iv. 314 ; Gawilgarh, v. 43. 

Gaur, historic capital of Bengal, v. 35-41. 

Gaura. See Gora. 

Gaura Jamun, pargand in Oudh, v. 41. 

Gaurangdihi, hills in Bengal, v. 41. 

Gaurihar, State in Central India, v. 41. 



126 



INDEX. 



Gauripur, villatje in Assam, v. 41, 42. 
.Gautama Buddha, founder of the Buddhist 
religion. Sec Buddha and Buddhism. 

Gautama, founder of the Nyaya phil- 
osophy of Indian logic, lived atGodna, 

Gavipur, vallage in Mysore, v. 42. 
.Gavridar, State in Kathiawar, v. 42. 

Gawilgarh, hill range in Berar, v. 42. 

Gawilgarh, hill fort in Berar, v. 42, 43. 

Gawler, Col., his Sikkivi, quoted, xii. 
484 ; commanded the .Sikkim expedi- 
tion (1861), xii. 485. 

Gaya, District in Bengal, v. 43-52 ; phy- 
sical aspects, 43-45 ; history, 45, 46 ; 
population, 46-49 ; agriculture, 49, 50 ; 
natural calamities, 50 ; commerce and 
trade, 50, 51 ; administration, 51, 52; 
medical aspects, 52. 

Gaya, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 52, 53. 

Gaya, sacred town in Bengal, v. 53- 

Gayawal Brahmans, a class in Gaya, 
V. 46. 

Gazelle, The Indian, article ' India,' 
vi. 657. Local notices — Kaira, vii. 300; 
Karni'il, viii. 35 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 58 ; 
■Nallamalai Hills, x. 185 ; Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 440. 

Gazzalhatti, pass in Madras, v. 53. 

Gedi, State in Kathiawar, v. 53. 

Geography of India. See Physical 
aspects. 

Geology of India, article ' India,' vi. chap, 
xxii. pp. 631-640. Geology of the 
Himalayas, 631 ; the central gneissic 
axis, 631, 632 ; lower Himalayas, 

. 633 ; the sub-Himalayas and Siwaliks, 
632, 633 ; the Salt Range, 633 ; Indo- 
Gangetic plain, its age, history, and 
geological deposits, 633, 634 ; penin- 
sular India, 634-639 ; the Vindhya 

^ system, 635 ; Gondwana series, 635, 
636 ; Panchet and Talcher group, 636 ; 
Damodar series and coal-fields, 636- 
638 ; Deccan trap and laterite, 638, 
639 ; precious stones, 639 ; geological 
structure of Burma, 639, 640. Local 
notices — See Mount Abu, i. 5 ; Aden, 
i. 15 ; Amherst, i. 235 ; Anamalai 
Hills, i. 270; Andaman Islands, i. 2S3 ; 
Aravalli Hills, i. 307, 308 ; North 
Arcot, i. 311; Assam, i. 347; Ban- 
galore, ii. 59; Bassein, ii. 193; Bastar, 
ii. 204; Belgaum, ii. 231; Bengal, 
ii. 271 ; Betul, ii. 328, 329 ; Bhandara, 
ii. 360; Bhartpur, ii. 371; Birbhiim, 
iii. I ; Bombay, iii. 40, 41 ; Broach, 

■ iii. 102; Bundelkhand, iii. 151; Central 

. Provinces, iii. 297, 298 ; Chitaldrug, 

iii. 423 ; Coorg, iv. 31 ; the Deccan, 

-iv. 165; Dharwar, iv. 258; Dungarpur, 

iv. 322 ; the Ghats, v. 60, 61 ; Haidar- 

.abad State, v. 241 ; Himalaya Moun- 



tains, V. 409-412 ; Hindu Kush, v. 417; 
Hoshangabad, v. 442, 443 ; Hoshiar- 
pur, v. 450 ; Jabalpur, vii. 30 ; Jaipur, 
vii. 51 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; Jhalawar, 
vii. 198, 199; Jodhpur, vii. 236; North 
Kanara, vii. 369 ; South Kanara, vii. 
375 ; Karauli, vii. 470, 471 ; Karniil, 
viii. 34, 35 ; Kashmir, viii. 62 ; Khan- 
desh,viii. 151 ; Kolar.viii. 273; Konkan, 
viii. 291 ; Kumaun, viii. 349 ; Madras, 
ix. 4, 5 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Western 
Malwa, ix. 268, 269 ; Mandla, ix. 300 ; 
Manipur, ix. 324 ; Mysore State, 
x. 91, 92, District, x. 1 14; Nagpur, 
x. 165 ; Nallamalai Hills, x. 185 ; 
Narsinghpur, x. 217 ; Nasik, x. 228 ; 
Nellore, x. 261 ; Panna, xi. 49 ; Pariir, 
xi. 78 ; Rdipur, xi. 367 ; Rajputana, 
xi. 400, 401 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 5 ; Rewa 
Kantha, xii. 49 ; Sagar, xii. 100, loi ; 
Sahyadri Hills, xii. 138 ; Salem, xii. 
152, 153; Sambalpur, xii. 179; San- 
doway, xii. 200 ; Sandur, xii. 206, 207 ; 
Satpura Hills, xii. 288, .289 ; Seoni, 
xii. 308, 309 ; Shahabad, xii. 324 ; 
Shwe-gyin, xii. 430 ; Sirmur, xii. 553. 
554 ; Aravalli Hills in Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; 
Siwalik Hills, xiii. 43 ; Tanjore, xiii. 
181 ; Tavoy, xiii. 228; Thon-gwa, xiii. 
288; Tinnevelli, xiii. 298; Trichinopoli, 
xiii- 355; Tiimkur, xiii. 375, 376; 
Udaipur, xiii. 401 ; Vindhyan Moun- 
tains, xiii. 475 ; Wardha, xiii. 522 ; 
Wiin, xiii. 538. 

Geonkhali, village and lighthouse in 
Bengal, v. 53, 54. 

Georgegarh, village in Punjab, v. 54- 

Gericke, Lutheran missionary in Tinne- 
velli, xiii. 304. 

Germans in India. See Ostend and 
Prussian. 

Gewarda. See Giwarda. 

Ghagar, river in Bengal, v. 54. 

Ghaggar, river in Rajputana, v. 54, 55. 

Ghagra. See Gogra. 

Ghaibi Dero, estate in Bombay, v. 55. 

Ghakkars, tribe in Rav/al Pindi, their 
invasions of India, and their present 
descendants, article ' India,' vi. 185. 
Local notices — Gujrat, v. 190 ; Hazara, 
V. 361, 363; Jehlam, vii. 168, 169, 170, 
171; Rawal Pindi, xii. 23-25; their 
numbers, xii. 26, 267. 

Ghalias, Nepali tribe who come to 
pasture their cattle in Darjiling, iv. 
130. 

Ghamar. See Gahmar. 

Ghan, river of Berar, v. 55. 

Ghanchis, Muhammadan class in the 
Panch Mahals, xi. 31. 

Ghara, name applied to the united streams 
of the Beas and the Sutlej, till their 
junction with the Chenab, v. 55. 



INDEX. 



127 



Gharipuri. Sec Elephanta. 
Gharo, village in Bombay, v. 56. 
Gharra, State in Central India, v. 56. 
Ghasi Das, founder of the sect of the 
Satnamis in Chhatisgarh, iii. 312, 

313- 
Ghatal, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

Ghatampur, town and fahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, v. 56, 57. 
Ghatampur, town and pargand in Oudh, 

V; 57- 
Ghatkul, pargand in Central Provinces, 

^- 57- 

Ghats, two ranges of mountains in 

Southern India, v. 57-61. 
Ghats, Eastern, mountain range along 

the E. coast of India, article ' India,' 

vi. 36 ; 38 ; forests of, 39. 
Ghats, Western, mountain range along 

the W. coast of India, article ' India,' 

vi. 36 ; the Bhor Ghat pass, 36 ; Thai 

Ghat pass, 37 ; Palghat pass, 37 ; 

rivers of, 37, 38 ; rainfall, 38 ; forests, 

39. 

Ghdts or bathing steps, remarkable archi- 
tecturally, at Benares, ii. 262, 264, 
265 ; Brindaban, iii. 100; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 142 ; Cawnpur, iii. 290 ; Chitarkot, 
iii. 430; Deoband, iv. 199; DeraGhazi 
Khan, iv. 218 ; Etawah, iv. 379 ; Gaur, 
V. 39; Hardwar, v. 331, 333; Jas- 
wantnagar, vii. 147 ; Kurundwad, viii. 
377 ; Maghiana, ix. 139 ; Gokul, ix. 
152; Maheswar, ix. 173; Mandhata, 
ix. 294 ; Mirzapur, ix. 461 ; Murliganj, 
X. 17; Muttra, x. 53; Pandharpur, 
xi. 37; Pauni, xi. 120; Pukhra, xi. 
239 ; Pushkar, xi. 335 ; Ramghat, xi. 
449; Ramtek, xi. 466; Raver (C. P.), 
xii. 14 ; Sadullapur, xii. 96, 97 ; Sagar, 
xii. 108 ; Shiron, xii. 407 ; Sirajganj, 
xii. 547 ; Soron, xiii. 67 ; Srinagar, 
xiii. 76; Surajpur, xiii. 117; Tribeni, 
xiii. 353; Wai, xiii. 509; Yedator, 
xiii. 530. 

Ghatwals, foraierly guardians of the 
passes, now landholders in Hazaribagh, 

V. 37i> 373- 

Ghaus Khan, mutineer leader, held Koil 
against the English (1857), xii. 482. 

Ghaziabad, town and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, v. 61. 

Ghazipur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
v. 61-70 ; physical aspects, 62 ; history, 
62-65 ; population, 65-67 ; agriculture, 
67, 68 ; natural calamities, 68 ; com- 
merce and trade, 69 ; administration, 

69, 70 ; sanitary aspects, 70. 
Ghazipur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 

V. 70. 
Ghazipur, city in N.-V/. Provinces, v. 

70, 71. 



Ghazipur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 

V; 11. 

Ghazipur Khas, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

V. 71. 
Ghazi-ud-din Haidar, first king of Oudh 

(1814-27), his buildings at Lucknow, 

viii. 509. 
Ghazi-ud-din-nagar. Sec Ghaziabad. 
Ghazni, town in Afghanistan, v. 71-73. 
Gheria. See Vijaiadrug. 
Gheria, town in Bengal, v. 73 ; defeat of 

Mir Kasim at, by Major Adams, article 

'India,' vi. 386. 
Ghes, estate in Central Provinces, v. 73. 
Ghi or butter, exported from Baliraich, i. 

432; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 215; 

Etawah, iv. 370 ; Faridpur, iv. 405 ; 

Gujranwala, v. 185; Gujrat, v. 194; 

Gurgaon, v. 219 ; Hazara, v. 366 ; 

Hazaribagh, v. 378 ; Kaira, vii. 307 ; 

Kheri, viii. 196 ; Lalipur, viii. 455 ; 

Lohardaga, viii. 484 ; Maimansingh, 

ix. 198 ; Manbhum, ix. 285 ; Man- 

durda, ix. 310; Melghat, ix. 403; 

Miani, ix. 421; Monghyr, ix. 487; 

Montgomery, ix. 500 ; Multan, x. 3 ; 

Muzaffargarh, x. 63 ; Nariad, x. 212 ; 

Partabgarh, xi. 73 ; Rajauli, xi. 386 ; 

Rusera, xii. 87 ; Sahiwal, xii. 137 ; 

Salaya, xii. 149 ; Sandila, xii. 198 ; 

Shahpur, xii. 366 ; Somastipur, xiii. 

50 ; Unao, xiii. 435 ; Wardha, xiii. 527. 
Ghias-ud-din, Pathan king of Gaur, buried 

at Badrihat, i. 410. 
Ghilzais, tribe in Afghanistan, i. 41, 42 ; 

Kandahar, vii. 389, 390. 
Ghinghiz Khan, destroyed Farrah, i. 35 ; 

left military colonies in the Kulni valley 

of 1000 men, whence the name Hazara, 

V. 361 ; took Kandahar (1222), vii. 

392 ; overran the Punjab {1245), xi. 

261. 
Ghiyas-ud-din Balban. See Balban. 
Ghiyas-ud-din Tughlak, founder of the 

Tughlak dynasty (1320-24), article 

'India,' vi. 283 ; founded Tughlakabad, 

iv. 192. 
Ghodbandar. See Ghorbandar. 
Ghogha. See Gogo. 
Ghogharo, town in Bombay, v. 73. 
Gholghat, village in Bengal, v. 74. 
Gholwad, town in Bombay, v. 74. 
Ghor, Dynasty of ( 1 152-1206), Muham- 
mad of Ghor's invasions, his first 

defeats and ultimate conquest of N, 

India and Bengal, article ' India,' vi. 

275-278. 
Ghora. See Jobat. 
Ghorabari, tdhik in Bombay, v. 74. 
Ghorasar, State in Bombay, v. 74- 
Ghorbandar, port in Bombay, v. 74, 75- 
Ghori dynasty, The, of Mahva (1387- 

1526), ix. 267. 



128 



INDEX. 



Ghoridn, town in Afghanistan, i. 36. 
Ghotana, town in Bombay, v. 75. 
Ghotki, town and tdltik in Bombay, v. 

75- . . 

Ghugus, village in Central Provinces, v. 

75>,76. 
Ghulab Singh, Raja of Kashmir and 

Jamu, put down the Hazara rebellion 

(1847), V. 362 ; annexed Iskardo, vii. 

26 ; his history, viii. 61 ; conquest of 

Ladakh, viii. 399, 400. 
Ghulam, class of slaves, descendants of 

captives taken in war in Peshawar, xi. 

151- 

Ghulam Haidar Khan, son of Dost Mu- 
hammad, ruler of Kandahar (1855-57), 

vii. 394- 
Ghulam Kadir Khan, Rohdla chief, held 

Aligarh, i. 270 ; defeated and killed by 

Sindia (17S8), xii. I16. 
Ghulam Kadir Khan, Nawab of Shahja- 

hanpur, rose in the Mutiny, and ruled 

that District (1857-58), xii. 345, 346. 
Ghulam Muhammad, son of Tipu Sultan, 

built mosque at Calcutta (1842), iii. 

251. 
Ghulam Nabi Khan Kalhora, ruler of 

Sind (1777), killed in battle with Mir 

Bijar Talpur, xii. 512. 
Ghulam Shah Kalhora, ruler of Sind 

(1757-62), founded Haidarabad, v. 287 ; 

built great dam across Kori, viii. 298; his 

history, xii. 512 ; allowed Company to 

establish factory at Tatta (1758), xiii. 

218. 
Ghusal, mountain pass in Punjab, v, 76. 
Ghusri, village in Bengal, v. 76. 
Ghutasan Devi, hill pass in Punjab, v. 76. 
Ghtitin ornodular limestone. See Kaukar. 
Ghwalari, pass in Punjab, v. 76 ; article 

' India,' vi. 6. 
Gibbings, Capt., murdered at Sultanpur 

(1857), xiii. 97. 
Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman 

Empire, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 

230 (footnote i); 239 (footnote 2). 
Gibbs, Lt. J. E. , referred to, on the tank 

at Rupgarh, xii. 83. 
Gidhaur, town in Bengal, v. 76. 
Gidhaur Gala, pass in Punjab, v. 77. 
Gidu-jo-Tando, town in Bombay, v. 77. 
Gigasaran, State in Kathiawar, v. 77. 
Gigianis, Pathan tribe in Peshawar, xi. 

149. 
Gijigarh, town in Rajputana, v. 77. 
Gilgaon, historic estate in Central Pro- 
vinces, V. 77. 
Gilghit, valley and district in Himalayas, 

v. 77-81. 
Gillespie, Gen. Sir R. R., killed at 

Nalapani in the Gurkha war, x. 181 ; 

put down mutiny at Vellore (1806), 

xiii. 469. 



Ginaur. Sec Gunaur. 

Gingelly. See Oil-seeds. 

Ginger, grown in Bengal, ii. 271, 304 ; 
Cochin, iv. 5 ; Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; 
Garo Hills, v. 31 ; Goa, v. 93 ; 
Gwalior, v. 228 ; Haidarabad, v. 245 ; 
Howrah, v. 463 ; Jhabua, vii. 195 ; 
Kahlur, vii. 294 ; North Kanara, vii. 
372 ; Kumaun, viii. 354 ; Mahram, 
ix. 185 ; Malabar, ix. 229, 230; Mani- 
pur, ix. 331 ; Mao-san-ram, ix. 343 ; 
Nelliampati Hills, x. 260 ; Nepal, x. 
277 ; Palni Mountains, xi. 19 ; Rang- 
pur, xi. 496 ; Simla, xii. 493 ; Sirmur, 
^ii- 555 j Sitapur, xiii. 35 ; Tarai, xiii. 
209 ; Tipperah, xiii. 317. 

Gingi, fort in Madras, v. 81-84 ; history, 
83, 84 ; surrender of, by the French to 
Sir Eyre Coote, article ' India,' vi. 380. 

Gingi. See Ariakupum. 

Gipsy clans, article 'India,' vi. 71. 

Gir, range of hills in Kathiawar, v. 84. 

Girar, town in Central Provinces, v. 84. 

Girasias, aboriginal tribe in Sirohi, xiii. 

4, 5- , . 

Girdabadi, peak in Madras, v. 84. 

Giridhi, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 84, 85. 

Girishk, town in Afghanistan, i. 35. 

Giriyak, village in Bengal, v. 85. 

Girls' schools, article ' India,' vi. 478, 
479. See also Education. 

Girnar, sacred hill in Bombay, v. 85, 86. 

Girwa, river of Nepal and Oudh, v. 86, 87. 

Girwan, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, v. 87. 

Gita Govinda, The, or ' Divine Herds- 
man,' the song of Krishna, article 
• India,' vi. 128. 

Glass and glass articles, made at Ahraura, 
i. Ill; Anantapur, i. 278 ; Kalahasti 
in North Arcot, i. 317, vii. 321 ; 
Bangalore, ii. 64 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; 
Bhagalpur, ii. 350 ; Channapata, iii. 
368 ; Chitaldri'ig, iii. 426 ; Dewa, iv. 
235 ; Dharwar, iv. 264 ; Hiriyur, v. 
423 ; by the Ghakkars in Sultanpur, 
vii. 175 ; Kapadwanj, vii. 439 ; Pani- 
pat in Karnal, viii. 25 ; Kelod, viii. 
Ill; Kittur, viii. 238 ; Kolhapur, viii. 
284 ; Koratagiri, viii. 296 ; Lucknow, 
viii. 516; Mattod, ix. 366; Nagina, 
x. 160; Nasirabad, x. 238; Panipat, 
xi. 47; Sawansa in Partabgarh, xi. "Jt, ; 
Rai Bareli, xi. 357; Rampur (N.-W. 
P. ), xi. 460 ; Sohna, xiii. 48 ; Targaon, 
xiii. 213 ; Tumkur, xiii. 379 ; Mangriil 
in Wi'm, xiii. 544. 

Glasson, Mr., opened first coffee planta- 
tion in the Wainad (1840), ix. 31. 

Glauber's salts {giilbar sora), found in 
Saran, xii. 252. 

Glazier, Mr., quoted, on the course of the 
Tista, xiii. 331, 332; on its flood, 
xiii. 332-334. 



INDEX. 



129 



Gneiss, found or quarried, in the Ana- 
malai Hills, i. 270 ; Aravalli Hills, i. 
307 ; Bachireddipalem, i. 406 ; Banda, 
ii. 46 ; Bangalore, ii. 59 ; the Deccan, 
iv. 165 ; Dharwar, iv. 258 ; Dubrajpur, 
iv. 318; Dungarpur, iv. 322; Gali- 
konda Hills, iv. 460 ; the Ghats, v. 
60 ; Haidarabad State, v. 241 ; the 
Himalaya Mountains, v. 4 1 0-4 12 ; the 
Hindu Kush, v. 417 ; jashpur, vii. 
145 ; Jodhpur, vii. 236 ; South Kanara, 
vii. 375 ; Kapargadi, vii. 440 ; Ku- 
maun, viii. 349 ; Madras, ix. 4 ; 
Madura, ix. 121 ; Mahendragiri, ix. 
172 ; Malabar, ix. 218 ; Mysore State, 
X. 92, District, x. 1 14 ; Nadol, x. 
142 ; Nagari, x. 157 ; Nagpur, x. 165 ; 
Nandidrug, x. 192 ; Nellore, x. 261 ; 
Palni Mountains, xi. 17 ; Raipur, xi. 
367; Salem, xii. 153; Sandur Hills, 
xii. 209 ; Sankaridrug, xii. 221 ; Santal 
Parganas, xii. 226 ; Sattanapalli, xii. 
290 ; Seoni, xii. 308 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; 
Tinnevelli, xiii. 298 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 

355> 364- 
Goa, Portuguese Settlement m W. India, 

v. 87-106; physical aspects, 88, 89; 

population, 89-92 ; agriculture, 92-95 ; 

administration, 95-99 ; history, 99-106. 

Goa city, v. 106-109 ; Nova Goa, 108 ; 
supposed relics of St. Thomas at, 
article 'India,' vi. 238; John de 
Albuquerque, first bishop of (1539-53), 
244 ; establishment of Archbishopric of, 
245 ; Archbishop de Menezes( 1 596-99), 
245 ; jurisdiction of the Goa Arch- 
bishopric, 255, 256 ; capture of Goa 
by Albuquerque (1510), 359. 

Goalanda, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 109. 

Goalanda, river mart in Bengal, v. 109- 
III ; its railway station washed away 
by the Ganges, article ' India,' vi. 31. 

Goalas. See Ahirs. 

Goalpara, District in Assam, v. 111-120; 
physical aspects, III, 112; history, 
II2-114; people, 114-I16; agriculture, 
116, 117; mamifactures, 117, iiS ; 
administration, I18, II9 ;' medical 
aspects, 119, 120. 

Goalpara, Sub-division in Assam, v. 120. 

Goalpara, trading town in Assam, v. 120, 
121. 

Goats, article 'India,' vi. 521. Local 
notices — Afghanistan, i. 39 ; Chanda, 
iii- 353; Garhwal, v. 21, 22; Kani- 
giri, vii. 432 ; Kashmir, viii. 73 ; 
Kolaba, viii. 262 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; 
Ladakh, viii. 397 ; Udaipur, xiii. 402. 

Goats, Wild, viarkhor, etc., article 
' India,' vi. 657. Local notices — Ara- 
kan Hill Tracts, i. 299 ; Baluchistan, 
ii. 36 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; Himalaya 
Mou,ntains, v. 409 ; Hindu Kush, v. 
VOL. XIV. 



419 ; Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Ladakh, viii. 
397 ; Lushai Hills, viii. 530 ; Peshawar, 
xi. 147 ; Wardha, xiii. 524. 

Gobardanga, town in Bengal, v. 121. 

Gobardhan, historic town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 121. 

Gobardhangiri, fortified hill in Mysore, 
V. 121. 

Gobind Chandra, last Raja of Cachar, 
attacked by the Burmese, restored by 
the British, and assassinated (1830), 
iii. 231, 232. 

Gobindpur. See Govindpur. 

Gobra, village in Bengal, v. 121. 

Gobra, village in Central Provinces, v. 
121. 

Godagari, village in Bengal, v. 121. 

Godavari, District of Madras, v. 122-131 ; 
physical aspects, 122, 123 ; history, 
123-125 ; population, 125-127 ; agricul- 
ture, 127-129; natural calamities, 129; 
means of communication, manufactures, 
trade, etc., 129 ; administration, 130 ; 
medical aspects, 130; storms, 130, 131. 

Godavari, river of Central India, v. 131- 
134; article 'India,' vi. 7; irrigation 
works, improvement of navigation on, 
vi. 551, 552. 

Godda, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 134. 

Goddard, General, his march across India 
during the first Maratha war, article 
'India,' vi. 391. Local notices — 
Stormed Ahmadabad (1780), i. 95 ; 
besieged Arnala (1781), i. 331 ; made 
treaty with Fateh Singh Gaekwar at 
Baroda (1780), ii. 162; took Bassein 
(Wasai) (1780), ii. 192; well received 
in Bhopal, ii. 404 ; repulsed in the 
Bhor Ghat, iii. 38 ; took Ramgarh 
(1771), V. 371 ; assisted by the Nawab 
of Kurai (1783), viii. 378. 

Godhra, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, V. I34,_ 135. 

Godna, town in Bengal, v. 135-137. 

Godwin, Gen., relieved Pegu and defeated 
the Burmese there in the second Bur- 
mese war, xi. 128. 

Gogha. See Gogo. 

Goghat, village in Bengal, v. 137. 

Gogo, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

V. 137. 138- 
Gogra, river in Oudh, v. 138- 140. 
Gogunda, town in Rajputana, v. 140. 
Gohad, town in Central India, v. 140. 
Gohana, town and tahsil in Punjab, v. 

140, 141- 
Gohels, clan of Rajput tdliikddrs, origin- 
ally from Marwar, in Ahmadabad, i. 

Gohelwar, tract in Kathiawar, v. 141, 
Goitre, prevalent in Ambala, i. 224 ; 

Assam, _i. 373; Bahraich, i. 433; 

Bansi, ii. loi ; Bogra, iii. 32 ; Cham- 

I 



130 



INDEX. 



paran, in. 344; Darjiling, iv. 139; 
Darrang, iv. 150; Fakrpur, iv. 390; 
Gonda, v. 154; Hazara, v. 368; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 117; Jehlam, vii. 176; 
Ivangra, vii. 427 ; Kashmir, viii. 76 ; 
Kheri, viii. 197 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 
327 ; Kulu, viii. 344 ; Kumaun, viii. 
357 J Nowgong, X. 415; Padrauna, x. 
526 ; Shahpur, xii. 367 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
471 ; Simla, xii. 495 ; Sirmiir, xii. 535. 

Gokak, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, V. 141, 142. 

Gokaru, town in Bombay, v. 142. 

Gokul, town in N.-W. Provinces, v. 142. 

Gola, town in N.-W. Provinces, v. 142. 

Gola, town in Oudh, v. 142, 143. 

Golaghat, village and Sub-division in 
Assam, v. 143. 

Golconda, historic fortress and city 
near Haidarabad, v. 143, 144 ; dia- 
monds of, article 'India,' vi. 41, 628; 
Muhammadan kingdom of (15 12- 16S8), 
vi. 288. 

Golconda, tdliik in Madras, v. 144, 145. 

Gold, gold mining, and gold washing, 
article 'India,' vi. 624, 625. Local 
notices — Gold found in Afghanistan, i. 
36 ; Alaknanda river, i. 162 ; Ambala, 
i. 215; Assam, i. 348; Balaghat, i. 
454) 456 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bannu, 
ii. 90 ; Betmangala, ii. 327 ; Bhairabi, 
river, ii. 356; Bonai, iii. 85, 87; 
Lower Burma, iii. 201, 202 ; Upper 
Burma, iii. 211 ; Champaran, iii. 337 ; 
Chanda, iii. 349 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; 
Coorg, iv. 32 ; Darrang, iv. 142 ; 
Devaia, iv. 231; Dharwar, iv. 258; 
Gangpur, iv. 478 ; Garhwal v. 22 ; 
Gilghit, V. 79, 80 ; Heggadadevankot, 
v. 382 ; Henzada, v. 384 ; the Hima- 
laya Mountains, v. 412; the Hindu 
Kush, v. 417 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; 
Jashpur, vii. 145; Jehlam, vii. 167, 
175; South Kanara, vii. 376; Kangra, 
vii. 412 ; Kashmir, viii. 67 ; the 
Kauriala river, viii. 103; Kolar (mines), 
viii. 273 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Lohar- 
daga, viii. 476, 477 ; IMadras, ix. 5, 6 ; 
Madura, ix. 122; Mandi, ix. 298; 
Mergui, ix. 407 ; Mysore, x. 92, 107, 
114; Peshawar, xi. 146; Rabkob 
(mines), xi. 340 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 
22 ; Salem, xii. 153 ; Sambalpur, xii. 
179; Seoni, xii. 309; Shwe-gyin, xii. 
430 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Singh bhiim, 
xii. 531 ; the Subansiri river, xiii. 84; 
Talcher, xiii. 164 ; Tavoy, xiii. 228 ; 
Tiimkur, xiii. 376 ; Udaipur (Bengal), 
xiii. 411, 412; the Wainad, xiii. 510- 
512. 

Gold and silver, Imports of, article 
'India,' vi. 562, 568, 569. 

Goldingham, Mr., first astronomer at 



the Madras Observatory (1792), article 
'India,' vi. 117. 

Goldsmid, Gen. Sir F. J-, spells Khelat, 
Kalat, viii. 188; quoted, on the history 
of Shikarpur, xii. 386-390. 

Goldsmith caste in Madras, article 'India,' 
vi. 196. 

Goldsmiths' and jewellers' work, etc., 
article 'India,' vi. 605, 606. Local 
notices — Ahmadabad, i. 87, 96 ; Allah- 
abad, i. 199 ; Assam, i. 367 ; Auras, 
i. 388 ; Bara, ii. 105 ; Bardwan, ii. 
132; Benares, ii. 266; Bombay, iii. 
60 ; Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; Upper 
Burma, iii. 218 ; Chittagong, iii. 441 ; 
Cutch (silver), iv. 62 ; Dabha (silver 
snuff-boxes), iv. 76 ; Dacca, iv. 86 ; 
Delhi, iv. 197 ; Ghatampur Kalan, v. 
57 ; Goalpara, v. 117 ; Gopamau 
(silver thumb -mirrors), v. 163; Guj- 
ranwala, v. 187; Gujrat (gold inlaid 
with iron), v. 197 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
V. 288 ; Jaipur, vii. 53 ; Kangra, vii. 
430 ; Kashmir, viii. 74 ; Khairpur, 
viii. 135, 137; Khasi Hills, viii. 178; 
Kishangarh, viii. 224 ; Lucknow, viii. 
516; Madras, ix. 54; Makhi, ix. 215; 
Mandalay, ix. 290 ; Maulmain, ix. 
371; Mauranwan, ix. 374; Nasik, x. 
233 ; Nowgong, x. 412 ; Panipat 
(silver beads), xi. 47 ; Partabgarh 
(Rajputana), xi. 77 ; Poena, xi. 209, 
213 ; Rampur, xi. 459 ; Rasiilabad, xi. 
516; Rohri, xii. 68; Saharanpur, xii. 
122; Sarai Saleh, xii. 250; Sujanpur 
Tira, xiii. 89; Susumau, xiii. 139; 
Tando Muhammad Khan, xii. 178 ; 
Tanjore, xiii. 196 ; Tipperah, xiii. 
319 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 364, 365 ; 
Tumkur, xiii. 379 ; Vizagapatam 
(silver), xiii. 494, 498. 

Gold and silver lace, wire, thread, twist, 
etc. See Embroidery. 

Gold, Cloth of. See Brocade. 

Gold inlaid work. See Enamelling. 

Gollagudem, village in Madras, v. 145. 

Collars, tribe of wandering jugglers in 
Dharwar, iv. 260. 

Golugonda. See Golconda. 

Gonial. See Gumal. 

Gomeswara, Colossal statue of, at Shra- 
van-belgola, Mysore, xii. 425. 

Gomukh Swami, a devotee, his sanctity 
and temple at Uniarkher, xiii. 420. 

Gonda, District of Oudh, v. 145-154; 
physical aspects, 145- 147 ; history, 
147-150; population, 150, 151; agri- 
culture, 151 - 153 ; communications, 
trade, commerce, 153 ; administration, 
153, 154; medical aspects. 

Gonda, tahsil'\\\ Oudh, v. 154. 

Gonda, /ar^rtz/a in Oudh, v. 155, 156. 

Gonda, town in Oudh, v. 156, 157. 



INDEX. 



131 



Gondal, State in Kathiawar, V. 157. 

Gondal, town in Kathiawar, v. 1 58. 

Gond-umri, estate in Central Provinces, 
V. 158. 

Gondsj aboriginal tribe in the Central 
Provinces, article 'India,' vi. 55, 71, 
187, 189. Local notices, in Ath- 
mallik, i. 378 ; Balaghat, i. 455 ; 
Balasor, ii. 6 ; Bamra, ii. 42 ; Bastar, 
ii. 205 ; Betul, ii. 330 ; Bhandara, ii. 
362 ; Bilaspur, ii. 449 ; Bonai, iii. 86 ; 
a few in Borasambar, iii. 89 ; the first 
colonists of Bundelkhand, iii. 154 ; in 
Central India, iii. 295 ; in the Central 
Provinces, their origin and history, iii. 
305-307 ; their tribes, iii. 307, 308 ; 
their appearance, manners, and customs, 
iii. 308, 309 ; their religion, iii. 309- 
311 ; in Champaran, iii. 338 ; in 
Chanda, iii. 349, 351 ; Chang Bhakar, 
iii. 367 ; their chiefs in Chhindwara 
helped Apa Sahib (1818), iii. 399; 
their numbers in Chhindwara, iii. 400 ; 
Chichgarh, iii. 408 ; in the Chutia 
Nagpur Tributary States, iii. 462, 463, 
464 ; in Cuttack, iv. 69 ; Damoh, iv. 
109, no. III ; Dawa, iv. 162; Ghes, 
V. 73 ; Haidarabad State, v. 247 ; 
Hoshangabad, v. 445 ; Indore, vii. 3 ; 
Jabalpur, vii. 32; Keunjhar, viii. 120; 
Khajri, viii. 139 ; Kharsal, viii. 168 ; 
Korea, viii. 297 ; Lalitpur, viii. 451 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 480 ; Loisinh, viii. 
488 ; ^lachida, viii. 535 ; Maihar, ix. 
189; Manbhum, ix. 280; Mandla, ix. 
303 ; Nagpur, x. 169 ; Narsinghpur, 
X. 220 ; Nimar, x. 332 ; Orissa, x. 
436 ; Orissa Tributary States, x. 472 ; 
Pal Lahara, xi. 13 ; Panabaras, xi. 24 ; 
Panna, xi. 50; Patna State, xi. 1 16; 
Purara, xi. 299 ; their legends, history, 
and organization in Raipur, xi. 368, 
369; their numbers there, xi. 371 ; in 
Rajoli, xi. 391 ; Rewa, xii. 48 ; Sagar, 
xii. 104; Sambalpur, xii. 182; Saran, 
xii. 253 ; Sarguja, xii. 267 ; Seoni, xii. 
311 ; Shahabad, xii. 327 ; Singhbhum, 
xii. 536 ; Sohawal, xiii. 47 ; Wardha, 
xiii. 525 ; Wim, xiii. 541 ; their pecu- 
liarities there, xiii. 542. 

Gonds, Dynasties of the, seated at Ballal- 
pur, ii. 17 ; of Kherla, seated at Betul, 
ii. 329 ; in the Central Provinces, iii. 
301, 302; of Deogai-h, iv. 202, 203; 
of Garha Mandla, v. 12, ix. 301, 302. 

Gondwana. See Central Provinces. 

Gondwana, Geology of, article 'India,' 
vi. 635, 636. 

Gonikoppal, township in Coorg, v. 158. 

Gonzales, Sebastian, Portuguese adven- 
turer, became a prince in Arakan, i. 
152; at Sandwip Island, iii. 173; 
chief of the Portuguese pirates in Noak- 



hali (1609), his power and policy, 

X. 342. 
Goomsar. See Gumsar. 
Goona, tract in Central India, v. 158, 

159. 
Goona, town in Central India, v. 159, 

160. 
Gooty, town and tdliik in Madras, v. 

160, 161. 
Gopalganj, town in Bengal, v. 161. 
Gopalgarh, town in Rajputana, v. 161. 
Gopalnagar, town in Bengal, v. 161. 
Gopalpur, town in Madras, v. 161, 162. 
Gopalswami-betta, peak in Mysore, v. 

162. 
Gopamau, town a.nd pa rgand in Oudh, v. 

162, 163. 
Gora, town in N.-W. Provinces, v. 163. 
Gorabazar, town in Bengal, v. 163. 
Goraghat, historic town in Bengal, v. 

163. 

Gorai. See Garal. 

Gorakhpur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
v. 164-172; physical aspects, 164, 
165; history, 165-167; population, 
167, 168 ; village communities, 168, 
169; agriculture, 169, 170 ; natural 
calamities, 170 ; commerce and trade, 
170, 171; administration, 171, 172; 
sanitary aspects, 172. 

Gorakhpur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 
v. 172. 

Gorakhpur, city in N.-W. Provinces, v. 

172, 173- 

Gordon, Major, defeated the mutineers at 
Bisauli (1858), iii. 119. 

Gordon, R., believes the Tsan-pu to be 
the Irawadi, iii. 94, vii. 19 ; his in- 
vestigations into the discharge of the 
Irawadi, vii. 21, 22. 

Gorhjhamar, tahsil \n Central Provinces, 

^•. ^73- , 
Gori-bidniir, village in Mysore, v. 173. 

Goriganga, river in N.-W, Provinces, v. 

173- 
Gorinda Parsandan, pargand in Oudh, 

V.I73- 
Gosainganj, town in Oudh, v. 173, 174. 

Gosainganj. See Ahankaripur. 

Gossner, Bavarian missionary, founded 
the Chutia Nagpur mission ( 1S44), viii. 
481. 

Gostanadi, river in INIadras, v. 174. 

Gosthani, river in INIadras, v. 174. 

Gotardi, State in Bombay, v. 174. 

Gough, Lord, battles of Chilanwala and 
Gujrat, article 'India,' vi. 412, 413. 
Local notices — Battle of Chilianwala 
(1849), iii. 414, 415; battle of Firoz- 
shah (1845), iv. 449; victory of Gujrat 
(1S49), v. 190; his encampment at 
Hingona during the negotiations of 
1843, V. 423 ; victory of Maharajpur 



132 



INDEX. 



(1843), ix. 166 ; battle of Mudki 
(1845), i^- 528 ; his second Sikh cam- 
paign, xi. 266 ; engagement at Ram- 
nagar (1848), xi. 452 ; victory of 
Sobraon (1846), xiii. 45. 

Gough, Sir Charles, his junction with 
Sir Frederick Roberts at Kabul (1879), 
vii. 274. 

Governors, Governors-General, and Vice- 
roys of India (1757 - 1885), article 
' India,' vi. 384. 

Govind, the tenth Sikh guru, organized 
the Sikhs into a military common- 
wealth, i. 256, xi. 262, 263. 

Govindgarh, fortress in Punjab, v. 174. 

Govindpur, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 175. 

Gowan, Col., Commissioner of Kumaun 
(1835), viii. 351- 

Gowdie, Major, took Rayakottai (1791), 
xii. 40. 

Gowhatty. See Gauhati. 

Grain-trade, Centres of, Agra, i. 76 ; 
Ambala, i. 226 ; Cawnpur, iii. 293 ; 
Deori, iv. 205 ; English Bazar, iv, 
253; Gadawara, iv. 457; Ghaziabad, 
V, 61; Gola (N.-W. P.), V. 142; 
Gorakhpur, v. 173 ; Gujrat, v. 197 ; 
Isakapalli, vii. 24 ; Jabalpur, vii. 37 ; 
Khamgaon, viii. 143 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
526; Mirpur Batoro, ix. 451; Nar- 
singhpur, x. 224; Nawabganj, x. 248; 
Niir Mahal, x. 418; Pambam, xi. 23 ; 
Patna, xi. 1 1 1 ; Raipur, xi. 378 ; 
Rajanpur, xi. 384 ; Ramnagar, xi. 
452; Rampur (N.-W. P.), xi. 460; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 38 ; Rehli, xii. 42 ; 
Rewari, xii. 56 ; Rupar, xii. 83 ; 
Rusera, xii. 87 ; Saadatganj, xii. 87 ; 
Sirsa, xiii. 20 ; Soron, xiii. d"] ; Tala- 
gang, xiii. 162 ; Tirupatur, xiii. 327 ; 
Tumsar, xiii. 382 ; Turtipar, xiii. 385 ; 
Tuticorin, xiii. 386 ; Umarpur, xiii. 
421 ; Wardha, xiii. 527 ; Zamaniah, 
xiii. 560. 

Gram. See Pulses. 

Gramang, village in Punjab, v. 175. 

Grammaj- of the Sindhi Language, by Dr. 
E. Trumpp, quoted, article ' India,' 

vi. 335- 
Granary, The Government, at Patna 

(1754), xi. 109. 
' Grand Army,' The, of Aurungzeb, and 

its twenty years' campaign in the 

Deccan, article ' India,' vi. 308, 309. 
'Grand Trunk Road,' The, article 

' India,' vi. 550. 
Grandpre's description of old Calcutta, 

quoted, iii. 243, 244. 
Granite, found or quarried, Anantapur, 

i. 273 ; Aravalli Hills, i. 307 ; Assam, 

i. 347 ; Badarsa, i. 408 ; Banda, ii. 

46 ; Belgaum, ii. 231 ; Bhandara, ii. 

360 ; Birbhum, iii. I ; Bundelkhand, 



iii. 151 ; Chengalpat, iii. 381 ; Cochin, 
iv. 2 ; Coorg, iv. 31 ; Dalhousie, iv. 
97 ; the Deccan, iv. 165 ; the Dhaola 
Dhar, iv. 245 ; Dubrajpur, iv. 318 ; 
the Ghats, v. 60 ; Girwan, v. 87 ; 
Goalpara, v. 112; Gooty, v. 160; 
Haidarabad State, v. 230 ; Hassan, v. 
346 ; Hindu Kush, v. 417 ; Hoshanga- 
bad, V. 442 ; Jabalpur, vii. 30 ; Jaipur, 
vii. 51 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; Jhansi, vii. 
216; Jodhpur, vii. 236; Kaira, vii. 
300 ; North Kanara, vii. 369 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 375 ; Kathiawar, viii. 
89 ; Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kumaun, viii. 
349 ; Kyaik-ti-yo, viii. 383 ; Madras, 
ix. 4; Madura, ix. 121 ; Mandar Hill, 
ix. 292 ; Mandla, ix. 300 ; Manipur, 
ix. 324; Mergui Islands, ix. 412; 
Mysore State, x. 91, District, x. 114 ; 
Nadol, X. 142 ; Nagari, x. 157 ; Panch 
Mahals, xi. 29 ; Punganur, xi. 243 ; 
Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; St. Thomas' 
Mount, xii. 143 ; Salem, xii. 153 ; 
Sankaridrug, xii. 293 ; Secunderabad, 
xii. 302 ; Sirmur, xiii. 553 ; Sirdhi, 
xiii. 2 ; Sultanganj, xiii. 95 ; Nat-taung 
Mountains, xiii. 220 ; Tavoy, xiii. 228 ; 
Tharawadi, xiii. 271 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 
298 ; Udaipur, xiii. 401 ; Wairagarh, 
xiii. 513; Walaja, xiii. 515. See also 
Quarries. 

Grant, Charles, rescued Old Mission 
Church of Calcutta, iii. 252. 

Grant, Sir Charles, quoted, on the 
appearance of the Central Provinces, 
iii. 298. 

Grant, Sir Hope, defeated the mutineers 
at Shamsabad (1858), iii. 119; at 
Nawabganj, x. 248 ; at Biswan (1858), 
xiii. T,T,. 

Grant, J., quoted, on Rajshahi in 1786, 
xi. 429, 430. 

Grant, Sir John Peter, Lieut. -Governor 
of Bengal (1859-62), ii. 279. 

Grant Duff, his History of the Mardthds, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi., chap. xii. 
pp. 317-323 (footnotes, /ajj-Zw) ; tutor 
to Raja of Satara (1818-22), xii. 278. 

Grant Duff, Sir M. E. G., Governor of 
Madras (1881-86), ix. 67. 

Grapes, grown in Afghanistan, i. 38 
Akola, i. 143 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 
Chini, iii. 417 ; Chitral, iii. 432 
Ellichpur, iv. 345 ; Daulatabad, v 
245 ; Hasilpur, v. 344 ; Jalgaon-Jum- 
bod, vii. 106 ; Kandahar, vii. 391 ; 
Kangra, vii. 412 ; Karachi, vii. 452 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 'JX, 72; Khab, viii. 121 ; 
Kunawar, viii. 361; Nasik, x. 232; 
Nilgiri Hills, x. 313; Penukonda, xi. 
135 ; Peshawar, xi. 146 ; Poona, xi. 
207, 208 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; Jacobabad 
on the Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 446. 



INDEX, 



133 



Graphite, found in Lower Burma, iii. 
201 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; Madura, ix. 
121. 

Gray, A., on the Maldive Islands, 
quoted, ix. 250. 

Greathed, General Sir E. H., defeated 
mutineers, and relieved siege of Agra 
fort (1857), i. 70; defeated mutineers 
at Bulandshahr (1857), iii. 134 ; 
marched through Cawnpur (1857), iii. 
283, 291 ; occupied Dadri (1857), iv. 
93 ; destroyed fort of Malagarh, ix. 
256 ; relieved siege of Sikandarabad 
(1857), xii. 478. 

Greek influence on Indian art and archi- 
tecture, article 'India,' vi. 112; 170, 
171. 

Greeks in India, The (327 to 161 B.C.), 
article 'India,' vi., chap. vi. pp. 
163-173. Early Greek writers, 163 ; 
Megasthenes, the Greek Ambassador 
to the Court of Chandra Gupta, 163, 
164 ; Alexander the Great's expedition 
to India, 163- 166 ; his defeat of Porus, 
164, 165 ; his advance through the 
Punjab and Sind, 165, 166 ; cities 
founded by Alexander, 164, 165 ; 
results of his Indian expedition, 166 ; 
Greek military settlements, 166 ; ces- 
sion of the Punjab and Sind to Chan- 
dra Gupta by Seleukos, 167 ; Megas- 
thenes' embassy to Chandra Gupta's 
Court, 163, 164 ; 167 ; the India of 
Megasthenes, 168-170; ancient petty 
Indian kingdoms, 170; Indo-Greek 
treaty (256 B.C.), 170; later Greek 
invasions of India, 170 ; Greek in- 
fluence on Indian art, II2; 170, 171 ; 
Greek and Hindu types of sculpture, 
171 ; Greeks in Bengal, 172 ; Greek 
survivals in India, 172; the Yavanas, 
172, 173- For local notices, j-^^ Alex- 
ander, Arrian, and Megasthenes. 

Green, Sir W. H. R., his mission to 
Khelat, ii. 32 ; his article in the Ency- 
cLopcedia Britannica, used for Balu- 
chistan, ii. 27. 

Gressly, Capt., his report on Shorapur 
(1841), xii. 423. 

Grey, Sir John, defeated the Marathas at 
Mangor, ix. 316; at Panniar (1843), 
xi. 51. 

Grey, Sir William, Lieut. -Governor of 
Bengal (1867-71), ii. 279. 

Gribble, Mr., quoted, on the Gandikot 
fort, iv. 464 ; on the Palkonda Hills, 
xi. II ; on the Yellamala Hills, xiii. 

552, 553- 
Griffin, Sir Lepel, quoted, on the famme 

of 1783 in Patiala, xi. 89. 
Griffiths, Dr., visited the Mishmi Hills 

(1836), ix. 463 ; his description of a 

Mishmi house, ix. 464. 



Growse, Mr., his Alathuni referred to, 

^•53- 
Growth of trading and industrial cities 
under the English, article ' India, vi. 

556, 557- 

Guaranteed railways, The eight great 
lines of, article ' India,' vi. 546, 547. 

Guasuba, river in Bengal, v. 175. 

Guavas, grown in Allahabad, i. 190 ; 
Baluchistan, ii. 36; Broach, iii. 102; 
Buldana, iii. 146 ; Upper Burma, iii. 
210; Ellichpur, iv. 345; Kangra, \-ii. 
412; Karachi, vii. 452; Lahore, viii. 
410 ; Mergui, ix. 409; Nasik, x. 232; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 381 ; Oudh, x. 
482 ; Satara, xii. 277 ; Shevaroy 
Hills, xii. 383 ; Sitapur, xiii. 35 ; 
Tavoy, xiii. 232. 

Gubbi, town in Mysore, v. 175, 176. 

Gubbins, Mr., president of the council 
for the defence of the Residency at 
Lucknow (1857), viii. 513. 

Gudalur, pass in Madras, v. 176. 

Gudaliir, town in Madras, v. 176. 

Gudiatham, town and taluk in Madras, 
V. 176, 177. 

Gudibanda, village and taluk in Mysore, 
V. 177. 

Gudiwara, village and taluk in Madras, 
v. 177. 

Gudur, taluk in Madras, v. 177. 

Gudur, town in Madras, v. 177, 178. 

Gudur, town in Madras, v. 178. 

Gugera, town and tahsil in Punjab, v. 
178. 

Guindy, village in Madras, v. 178. 

Guinea-worm, prevalent in Ahmadnagar, 
i. 107 ; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 131 ; Bik- 
aner, ii. 439 ; Cutch, iv. 64 ; Damoh, 
iv. 113; Firozpur, iv. 446; Plaidara- 
bad (State), v. 243 ; Jaisalmer, yii. 66; 
Jehlam, vii. 176; Jodhpur, vii. 240; 
Kaladgi, vii. 340; Nellore, x. 271; 
Shahpur, xii. 367 ; Sholapur, xii. 
419. 

Gujainli, village in Punjab, v. 178. 

Gujar Khan, tahsil in Punjab, v. 178, 
179. 

Gujarat, Province in Bombay, v. 179. 

Gujars, Muhammadan class, generally 
cattle graziers, important in Ajmere- 
Merwara, i. 124 ; Ambala, i. 218 ; 
Bulandshahr, iii. 137; graze their 
cattle in Chamba, iii. 329 ; their in- 
surrection in Dehra Dun (1824), iv. 
172; Delhi, iv. 182; Dholpur, iv. 
274, 275; Gujrat, V. 189, 191, 192; 
Gurdaspur, v. 209 ; Hazara, v. 361, 
363, 364 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 454, 455 ; 
plundered Husainpur during the Mutiny, 
V. 503 ; in Jehlam a thriving class, vii. 
170; in the Kagan valley, vii. 293; 
Karnal, viii. 23 ; Khandesh, viii. 154; 



134 



INDEX. 



Kotaha, viii. 309 ; Landaura, viii. 
459 ; Ludhiana, viii. 521 ; Meerut, 
ix. 386 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 71 ; Raj- 

. putana, xi. 408, 410; Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 22, 27 ; Rohtak, xii. 72 ; Saharan- 
pur, xii. 118, 119; Sialkot, xii. 444. 

Gujar Singh, Sikh General of the Bhanji 
Confederacy, conquered Firozpur 
(1763), iv. 440; defeated the Ghak- 
kars and conquered Gujrat (1765), v. 
190 ; improved the fort of Gujrat, v. 
196 ; by his victory over the Ghakkars 
won also Jehlam, vii. 169 ; and Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 24. 

Gujranwala, District in Punjab, v. 179- 
187; physical aspects, 179, 180; his- 
tory, 180-182; population, 182-184; 
agriculture, 184, 185 ; commerce and 
trade, 185, 186 ; administration, 1S6 ; 
sanitary aspects, 186, 187. 

Gujranwala, town and tahsil in Punjab, 
V. 187. 

Gujrat, District in Punjab, v. 188-195 ; 
physical aspects, 188, 189 ; history, 
189-191 ; population, 191, 192 ; agri- 
culture, 193, 194 ; commerce and 
trade, 194 ; administration, 194, 195 ; 
medical aspects, 195. 

Gujrat, tahsUm. Punjab, v. 195, 196. 

Gujrat, town in Punjab, v. 196, 197 ; 
battle of, article ' India,' y\. 413. 

Gulariha, town in Oudh, v. 197. 

Guledgarh, town in Bombay, v. 197. 

Guleri. See Gumal. 

Gulikalmala, hill in Madras, v. 197. 

Guma, Dwar in Assam, v. 197, 198. 

Guma, village in Punjab, v. 198. 

Gumal, pass from Punjab into Afghani- 
stan, V. 198. 

Gumani, river in Bengal, v. 198. 

Gumani, river in N. Bengal, v. 198. 

Gumar. See Guma. 

Gum-arabic, found in Nimar, x. 334. 

Gumgaon, town in Central Provinces, v. 
198. 

Gumnayakan-palya, village and taluk in 
Mysore, v. 198, 199. 

Gums, found in Akola, i. 143 ; Anamalai 
Hills, i. 271; Basim, ii. 184; Bhan- 
dara', ii. 361, 365 ; Bombay, iii. 45 ; 
Buldana, iii. 143; Bundi, iii. 157; 
Cochin, iv. 2 ; Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; 
Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 210 ; Gaya, v. 
44 ; Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Henzada, 
V. 384 ; Jabalpur, viii. 33 ; Kamnip, 
• '^'ii- 355 ; South Kanara, vii. 376 ; 
Ranker, vii. 434 ; Kawardha, viii. 
106 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Makrai, ix. 
215; Malabar, ix. 229; the Melghat, 
ix. 403 ; Monghyr, ix. 480, 481 ; 
Nimar, x. 334; N.-W. Provinces, x. 
380 ; Nowgong, x. 407 ; Rawal Pindi, 

: xii. 22 ; Rewa, xii. 46 ; Sakti, xii. 



148 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; Surgana, xiii. 
136; Tavoy, xiii. 229; Wardha, xiii. 
526 ; Wun, xiii. 543. 
Gumsiir, town and taluk in Madras, v. 

799; 

Gumti, river in Oudh, v. 199, 200. 

Gumti, river in Bengal, v. 200, 201. 

Giina Agency, tract in Central India, v. 
201. 

Gunas, pass in Punjab, v. 201. 

Gun-carriage, factory at Fatehgarh, iv. 
420, 421. 

Gund, hill in Punjab, v. 201. 

Gundamorla Bar, sea-opening in Nellore 
District, IMadras, v. 201. 

Gundar, river in Madras, v. 201. 

Gundardihi, estate in Central Provinces, 
V. 201. 

Gundiali, State in Bombay, v. 202. 

Gundlakamma, river in jNIadras, v. 202. 

Gundlamau, pargand in Oudh, v. 202. 

Gundlupet, village and taluk in Mysore, 
V. 202, 203. 

Gundwa, pargana in Oudh, v. 203. 

Gun foundries, Cossipur, iv. 44; Man- 
dalay, ix. 291. See Arsenals. 

Guni, tdhik in Bombay, v. 203, 204. 

Gunnaur, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 204. 

Gunny -bags, Exports of, article ' India,' 
vi. 576 ; 614-616. 

Gunny-bags, manufactured, at Barsoi, ii. 
177 ; in Bengal, ii. 308 ; Dinajpur, iv. 
294, 295 ; Hassan, v. 350 ; Narsipur, 
X. 225 ; Pabna, x. 517 ; Pulikonda, xi. 
240 ; Purniah, xi. 328 ; Rayachoti, xii. 
39 ; Wardha, xiii. 527 ; Wun, xiii. 
544. See also Jute. 

Gunpowder, made by the Hazaras, i. 43. 

Giinther, Dr., his Study of Fishes, re- 
ferred to, ix. 96. 

Guntiir, taluk in Madras, v. 204. 

Guntur, town in Madras, v. 204, 205. 

Gupta, ancient Indian dynasty in N. India 
(319-470 A.D.), their struggle with and 
overthrow by an invasion of Scythians 
or White Huns, article ' India,' vi. 182. 
Local 7iotices — Their capital at Kanauj, 
iv. 410 ; inscriptions at Bhitu in Ghazi- 
pur, V. 62 ; ruled over Kathiawar, 
viii. 90; Miiltan, x. 4; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, x. 362, 362. See also Chandra 
Gupta. 

Guptasar, sacred cave in Bengal, v. 205. 

Gtu-al, The, or Himalayan chamois, found 
in Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Kumaun, viii. 

349- 
Gurdaspur, District in Punjab, v. 205- 
213; physical aspects, 205-207; his- 
tory, 207-209; population, 209, 210; 
condition and occupation of the people, 
210 ; agriculture, 210-212 ; natural 
calamities, 212 ; commerce, etc. ; 



INDEX. 



135 



administration, 213 ; medical aspects, 

213; 

Gurdaspur, tahsil in Punjab, v. 213, 214. 

Gurdaspur, town in Punjab, v. 214. 

Gurdit Singh, Sikh Raja of Ladwa, took 
Karnal from George Thomas {1795), 
but had to surrender it to the Company 



(180 



:3h 



vn. 21. 



Gurgaon, District in Punjab, v. 214-223 ; 
physical aspects, 215, 216 ; history, 
216, 217; population, 217,218; gene- 
ral condition and occupation of the 
people, 218-220 ; agriculture, 220, 221 ; 
natural calamities, 221 ; commerce and 
trade, 221 ; administration, 222, 223 ; 
medical aspects, 223. 

Gurgaon, tahsil in Punjab, v. 223. 

Gurgaon, town in Punjab, v. 223, 224. 

Gurgchha, town in Central India, v. 

324- 

Gurha. See Gharra. 

Guriattam. See Gudiatham. 

Gurjipara, village in Bengal, v. 224. 

Gurkha, village in Nepal, v. 224. 

Gurkhas, The, or Nepalis, their services 
during the Mutiny, article ' India,' vi. 
421. Local notices — Conquered Dehra 
Dun (1803), iv. 171 ; overran Dhami, 
iv. 239; conquered Garhwal (1803), 
V. 18 ; recovered Gorakhpur District 
from the mutineers (Jan. 1858), v. 167 ; 
overran Hindiir, v. 420 ; defeated the 
Katochis at Mahal Mori (1806), but 
were driven out of Kangi-a by Ranjit 
Singh (1809), vii. 416; invaded Kumaun 
(1790), but were expelled by the Eng- 
lish (181 5), viii. 351 ; failed to conquer 
Kunawar, viii. 362 ; conquered Mahlog, 
ix. 181 ; invaded the Sikhs ( 1 7S8, 1792), 
and in 1792 were defeated by the 
Chinese, xii. 484, 485 ; their capture of 
Sicakot, xii. 550 ; conquered Sirmur 
(1803), but expelled by Ochterlony 
(1815), xii. 554. ^t-^ also Gurkha War. 

Gurkhas, War with the (1814 - 15), 
article ' India,' vi. 400. Local notices — 
Almora taken by Colonel Nicbolls, 
i. 201 ; Tarai of Darjiling given back 
to Raja of Sikkim, iv. 131 ; Dehra 
Dun ceded to the East India Company, 
iv. 172; battle of Deonthal, iv. 204; 
caused by their aggressions on the 
Gorakhpur and Tirhiit frontier, v. 18, 
19 ; failure of the English before Jaitak, 
its capture, vii. 71 ; operations in 
Kumaun, viii. 351 ; capture of Malaun, 
ix. 237 ; attack on Nalapani, in which 
General Gillespie was killed, x. 181 ; 
history of the war, x. 288, 289 ; battle 
of Nichlaval, x. 294 ; battle of Ran,- 
garh, and capture of the fort by Ochter- 
lony, xi. 448 ; capture of Taragarh 
fort, xiii. 206. 



Giirpur. See Mangalore. 

Gurramkonda, town in Madras, v. 224, 
225.^ 

Gursarai, town in N.-W. Previnces, v. 
225. 

Gurudwara. See Dehra. 

Gurungs, Nepali tribe, pasture their cattle 
in Darjiling, iv. 130 ; live in the Hima- 
laya Mountains, v. 413 ; in Nepal, 
x. 279. 

Guru-Sikar. See Abu. 

Guruvayur, village in Madras, v. 225. 

Guthni, town in Bengal, v. 225. 

Giite. See Gooty. 

Gutta-percha, found in Malabar, ix. 229. 

Guwarich, pargand in Oudh, v. 225, 
226. 

Guzerat. See Gujarat. 

Gwalior, Native State in Central India, 
v. 226-234 ; physical aspecis, 227, 22S ; 
trade, 22S ; climate, 228, 229 ; wild 
animals, 229 ; population, 229, 230 ; 
histoiy, 230-234. 

Gwalior town, capital of Gwalior State, 
v. 234-237 ; Jain remains, 235 ; Hindu 
palace -architecture, 235, 236; rock 
fortress, 236, 237. 

Gwarich. See Guwarich. 

Gwe-chyo, river in Lower Burma, v. 237. 

Gyaing, river in Lower Burma, v. 237. 

Gyaing Attaran, township in Lower 
Burma, v. 237. 

Gyaing-than-lwin, tract in Lower Burma, 
V. 237, 238. 

Gyfford, William, Governor of Madras 
(1 68 1 -87), ix. 66. 

Gypsum, found in Aden, i. 15 ; Afghani- 
stan, i. 37 ; Jehlam, vii. 167, 175 ; 
Kumaun, viii. 349 ; Mayo Mines, ix. 
378 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Shahpur, 
xii. 361 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355. 



H 



Haas, Dr. E., ' Ueber die Urspriinge der 
Indischen Medizin, mit besonderem 
Bezug auf Susruta ' and ' Hippokrates 
und die Indische Medizin des Mi Helal- 
ten,' published in the Zeitschrift der 
Dentschen Morgenldndisclien Gesell- 
schaft for 1876 and 1877, quoted, 
article ' India,' \a. no (footnote). 

Hab, river in Bombay, v. 238 ; the 
westernmost boundary of India separ- 
ating Sind from Baluchistan, article 
' India,' vi. 3 ; 6, 7. 

Habiganj, village and Sub-division in 
Assam, v. 238, 239. 

Habits of the people. See Customs, 
manners and mode of life, and condition 
of the people. 

Habra, village in Bengal, v. 239. 



136 



INDEX, 



Habiiras, gipsy -like tribe of thieves in 
.. Aligarh, i. 176; Budaun, iii. 120. 
Hadarnaru, village in Mysore, v. 239. 
Hafiz, the Persian poet, invited to the court 

of Azim Shah at Sonargaon, xiii. 59. 
Hafizabad, town and tahsil in Punjab, 

Hafiz Rahmat Khan, successor of Ali 
Muhammad, the Rohilla chief (1751- 
74), his defeat by Safdar Janj and 
the Marathas at Bisouli, iv. 411 ; 
killed in battle with Shuja-ud-daula 
and the English at East Fatehganj, 
iv. 419 ; his rule in Bareilly, ii. 139 ; 
his part in the battle of Panipat (1761), 
xi. 45-47 ; made Pilibhit his capital, 
and built the Jama Masjid there, xi. 

Haggri. See Hugri. 

Haiatpur, town in Bengal, v. 239. 

Haidarabad, Native State in the Deccan, 
V. 240-252 ; physical aspects, 240, 241 ; 
rivers, 242, 243 ; climate, 243, 244 ; 
animals, 244 ; agriculture, 244-246 ; 
people, 246, 247 ; commerce, 247, 24S ; 
communications, 248 ; administration, 
248 ; history, 248-252. 

Haidarabad City, capital of Haidarabad 
State, V. 252-258. 

Haidarabad Assigned Districts, or Berar, 
Province in Central India, v. 258-274 ; 
physical aspects, 259, 260 ; climate, 
260, 261 ; history, 261-265 J popula- 
tion, 265-26S ; agriculture, 26S-270 ; 
manufactures and trade, 270-272; 
administration, 272-274. 

Haidarabad, District in Sind, v. 274-285 ; 
physical aspects, 274, 275 ; history, 
275 ; population, 275-278 ; agriculture, 
278-282 ; manufactures and trade, 282 ; 
means of communication, 282; admini- 
stration, 283-285 ; chmate, 285. 

Haidarabad, Sub-division in Sind, v, 
285-287. 

Haidarabad, city in Sind, v. 287, 288. 

Haidarabad, town 2.V1A pargaiid in Oudh, 
V. 288, 289. 

Haidar Ali, his wars with the British, 
article ' India,' vi. 392. Local notices 
— Twice failed to take Adoni, but 
defeated Marathas there (1778), i. 27 ; 
took Ambur Drug, i. 230 ; held Arcot 
(1780-83), i. 310; defeated by Coote 
at Arni (1782), i. 332; was granted 
Bangalore and Devanhalli {1758), ii. 
61, 68; his victories at Beliapatam, 
ii. 240; and Bellary, ii. 251; took 
Bhagamandal fort (1785), ii. 353 ; born 
at Budikot (1722), iii. 129; the Zamorin 
. of Calicut committed suicide on his 
invasion of Malabar (1766), iii. 270; 
took Cannanore (1766), iii. 276 ; fought 
drawn battle with the British at Chait- 



pet, iii. 325 ; took Chandragiri (1782), 
iii. 363 ; ravaged District of Chengalpat 
(1768, 1782), iii. 382; defeated by the 
British in the Chengama Pass (1767), 
iii. 390 ; took Dutch fort at Chetvai 
(1776), iii. 393 ; took Chilambaram 
(1760), iii. 413 ; took Chitaldrug (1779), 
iii. 428 ; his treaties with Nizam Ali 
(1767, 1779), iii. 469; made Cochin 
tributary (1776), iv. 3; took Coimba- 
tore, iv. 15, 16; defeated Col. Baillie 
at Pullalur, near Conjevaram (1780), 
iv. 27, 43 ; his invasions of Coorg, 
iv. 30 ; and of Cuddapah, iv. 49 ; took 
Cuddapah (1770), iv. 56; first distin- 
guished himself at the siege of Devan- 
halli (1748), iv. 232; re-took Dhara- 
puram (1768), iv. 251 ; occupied Dhar- 
war District (1776-91), iv. 259; took 
Dharwar fort (1778), iv. 266; garri- 
soned Dindigal fort (1775), and from it 
conquered Mysore, iv. 301, 302; an- 
nexed Dod-ballapur, iv. 311 ; encamped 
near Ennore (1769), iv. 354 ; improved 
fort of Gandikot, iv. 464 ; took Gooty 
(1776), V. 160; obtained Gurramkonda 
from his brother-in-law, Mir Sahib, 
V. 224; took Harihar (1763), v. 338; 
conquered Hassan District, v. 347 ; 
tried to found a city on the Hirekal 
Hills, V. 423 ; took Honawar, v. 
440; annexed Hoykot (1761), v. 459; 
estaljlished breed of cattle at Hunsiir, 
V. 502 ; conquered Kadur District 
(1763), vii. 283 ; conquered Kanara 
(1763), and tried to make a navy, vii. 
377i 37S ; took hill fort of Kanigiri, 
vii. 432 ; overran Karmil, and exacted 
2 lakhs of rupees, viii. 42 ; took Karur 
(176S), viii. 52; took Kaveripatam 
(1767) and Kaveripuram (1769), viii. 
106 ; took Madaksira (1769), viii. 536 ; 
built fort at Madgiri-drug, viii. 540 ; 
his wars in Madras, ix. 13 ; his approach 
to Madras (1769, 1780), ix. 104; his 
invasionsof Malabar (1760, 1766, 1774), 
ix. 222 ; Mangalore the head-quarters 
of his na\^, ix. 313 ; his garrison 
driven out of Merkara by the Coorgs 
(1782), ix. 415; sacked Nagar (Bed- 
nur) (1763), x. 156; taxed the tribes 
on the Nilgiri Hills, x. 203 ; defeated 
by Coote at Perambakam (1781), xi. 
136; took Perumakal (1782), xi. 141 ; 
defeated by Coote at Porto Novo (178 1 ), 
xi. 222 ; defeated by the Marathas at 
Rattihalli (1764), xii. 14; his treaty of 
St. Thomas' Mount with the British 
(1769), xii. 144 ; his invasion of Salem, 
xii. 154; took Sandiir (1779), xii. 207; 
recaptured Satyamangalam (1769), xii. 
291 ; his mausoleum at Seringapatam, 
xii. 320; annexed Shimoga(i76i, 1763), 



INDEX. 



137 



xii. 401 ; took Sholavandan (1757), xii. 
422 ; defeated by Coote at Sholinghar 
(i78l),xii. 422,423; tookSidhaut(i779), 
xii. 474; took Sira (1761), xii. 546; 
• destroyed Sonda, xiii. 60 ; took Tad- 
patri, xiii. 160 ; advanced on Calicut 
by the Tamarasseri pass (1773), xiii. 
169; annexed Tarikere (1761), xiii. 
214; took Tekalkota, xiii. 236; got 
Tiagar from the French (1760), xiii. 
293 ; his exactions from the Danes of 
Tranquebar (1780), xiii. 340; took 
Trichi'ir (1776), xiii. 365 ; conquered 
the palegars of Tumkiir, xiii. 376 ; took 

. Vaniyambadi(l767), xiii. 463 ; annexed 
Vastara (1763), xiii. 464; his siege of 
Vellore (1780-82), xiii. 468. 

Haidargarh, town, tahsil, and pargand 

■ in Oudh, v. 289, 290. 

Haidargarh. Si-e Hassangadi. 

Hailakandi, village and Sub-division in 
Assam, v. 290. 

Hailstorms, especially destructive in Am- 
raoti, i. 24S ; Jabalpur, vii. 36 ; Jhansi, 
vii. 224; Lahore, viii. 411; I\Iandla, 
ix. 306 ; Saran, xii. 256. 

Haines, Captain, his MS. description of 
Aden (1839), quoted, i. 17. 

Haing-g}'i, island in Lower Burma, v. 290. 

Hajamro, river in Bombay, v. 290. 

Hajiganj, town in Bengal, v. 290. 

Hajipur, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 
v. 291. 

Haji Sharit-ulla, founder of the sect 
of Faraizis, his doctrines, born at 
Daulatpur in Faridpur, iv. 398, 399. 
See Faraizis. 

Hajo, %allage in Assam, v. 291, 292. 

Hajo, leader of the Kochs, defeated 
Muhammad Baktiyar Khilyi in Kamrup 
(1204), vii. 356 ; founder of the Kuch 
Behar dynasty, viii. 319. 

Hajongs, aboriginal tribe in Assam, i. 351; 
Maimansingh, ix. 193; Sylhet, xiii. 150. 

Hala, Sub-division in Sind, v. 292, 293. 

Hala, ^a/i/k in Sind, v. 293, 294. 

Hala, New, town in Sind, v. 294. 

Hala, Old, town in Sind, v. 294. 

Hala Mountains, a southerly otfshoot of 
the Himalayas, marking a portion of the 
W. boundary of India, article ' India,' 

Halani, town in Bombay, v. 294. 

Halaria, State in Kathiawar, v. 294, 295. 

Halbas or Halwas, aboriginal tribe in 
Bastar, ii. 205 ; in the Central Pro- 
vinces, their religion, iii. 308 ; in Chich- 
garh, iii. 408 ; Dawa, iv. 162 ; Khajri, 
viii. 139. 

Halda, river in Bengal, v. 295. 

Haldi, river in Bengal, v. 295. 

Halebid, village in Mysore, v. 295. 

Haleri, village in Coorg, v. 295, 296. 



Halhalia, river of Bengal, v. 296. 

Haliyal, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, V. 296. 

Hall, Colonel, first Commissioner of Mer- 
wara (1824), ix. 417. 

Hallar, division of Kathiawar, v. 296, 297. 

Halliday, Sir F. J., first Lieut. -Governor 
of Bengal (1854-59), ii. 279. 

Halon, river of Central Provinces, v. 297. 

Halwad, fortified town in Kathiawar, 
V. 297. 

Hambar, village in Punjab, v. 297. 

Hamilton, ^Ir., surgeon, died 17 ^7 > 
memorial to, in St. John's Church, Cal- 
cutta, iii. 252. 

Hamilton, Captain, quoted, on Goa in 
the 1 8th centuiy, v. 105 ; visited Tatta 
(1699), xiii. 218. 

Hamilton, Captain, put down the Bun- 
dela rebellion in Sagar(i842), xii. 102. 

Hamir, Rana of Mewar, said to have 
defeated Mahmud of Ghazni, his his- 
tory, xiii. 403. 

Hamirpur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
V. 297-305 ; physical aspects, 297, 298; 
history, 298-300; people, 301, 312; 
agriculture, 302, 303 ; natural calami- 
ties, 303 ; commerce and trade, 303, 
304 ; administration, 304, 305 ; medical 
aspects, 305. 

Hamirpur, tahsil in X.-W. Pro\'inces, v. 

305. 306. 

Hamirpur, town in X.-W. Provinces, v. 
306. 

Hamirpur, tahsil in Punjab, v. 306. 

Hampden, Major, commanded the 31st 
N. I. at Sagar (1857), which remained 
loyal during the Mutiny, xii. 103. 

Hampi, historic city in Madras, iv. 
306-308. 

Handia, village and tahsil in N.-\V. 
Provinces, v. 308, 309. 

Handia, historic town in Central Pro- 
vinces, V. 309. 

Hand-loom and steam-mill woven cotton, 
article ' India,' vi. 601. 

Hangal, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, V. 309, 310. 

Hangarkatta, port in Madras, v. 310. 

Hango, village in Punjab, v. 310. 

Hangrang, mountain pass in Punjab, v. 
310. 

Hangu, village and tahsil in Punjab, v. 
310- 

Hansi, town and tahsil in Punjab, v. 310, 

311- 

Hanskhali, town in Bengal, v. 311. 

Hanthawadi, District in Lower Burma, 
V. 311 -318; ph5-sical aspects, 312, 
313; history, 313, 314; population, 

314 ; antiquities, 314 ; agriculture, 314, 

315 ; natural calamities, 315 ; manu- 
factures, etc., 316 ; revenue, 317 ; 



138 



INDEX. 



administration, 317 ; climate, 317, 
318. ^ 

Hanuman-betta, peak in Mysore, v. 318. 

Hanumangarh. Sec Bhatnair. 

Hanza. See Gilghit. 

Hapur, town and iahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 318, 319. 

Harai, estate in Central Provinces, v. 

3^9• 

Haramak, mountain in Punjab, v. 319. 

Haraoti. See Kotah. 

Harappa, village in Punjab, v. 319, 320. 

Harbours, Aden, i. 15 ; Alibagh, i. 166; 
Alleppi, i. 200 ; Amherst, i. 243 ; Port 
Blair in the Andaman Isles, i. 281 ; 
Bhaunagar, ii. 382 ; Bombay, iii. 77> 
78 ; Diu, iv. 305 ; False Point, iv. 
390, 391 ; Goa, V. 89 ; Karachi, vii. 
458, 459 ; Karwar, viii. 55, 56 ; at the 
mouth of the Kii-la-dan, viii. 331, 332; 
Kyauk-pyu, viii. 390 ; Madras, ix. 113; 
Mergui, ix. 412 ; Nagar, x. 155 ; 
Negapatam, x. 259 ; Nancowry in the 
Nicobar Islands, x. 295 ; Perim, xi. 
137 ; Porbandar, xi. 216 ; Rewadanda, 
xii. 44 ; Salaya, xii. 149 ; Sonmiani, 
xiii. 61 ; Port Owen in Tavoy Island, 
xiii. 235 ; Tellicherri, xiii. 237 ; Tuti- 
corin, xiii. 3S6 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 
497) 498 ; Viziadrug, xiii. 499. 

Harchoka, village in Chutia Nagpur, v. 
320. 

Harcourt, Col., his advance into Orissa 
(1803), X. 430; Joint Commissioner 
there (1804), x. 431. 

Harda, tahsil in Central Provinces, v. 
320. 

Harda, town in Central Provinces, v. 
320, 321. 

Hardeo Sah of Panna, held Kalinjar on 
the death of Chhatar Sal, vii. 332. 

Hardinge, Lord, Governor - General of 
India (1844-48), article 'India,' vi. 
410, 411 ; history of the Sikhs and the 
first Sikh war ; battles of Mudki, 
Firozshah, Aliwal, and Sobraon, vi. 
410, 411 ; statue of, at Calcutta, ii. 
279. 

Hardoi, District of Gudh, v. 321 -329; 
physical aspects, 321, 322; history, 
322 - 324 ; population, 324 - 326 ; agri- 
culture, 326, 327 ; communications, 
trade, commerce, 327 ; administration, 
327, 328 ; medical aspects, 328, 329. 

Hardoi, town and iahsil in Oudh, v. 329. 

Hardoi, pay-gaiid in Oudh, v. 329, 330. 

Hardoi, tahsil in Oudh, v. 330. 

Harduaganj, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
V. 330. 

Hardwar, sacred town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 330-334; modern ceremonies, 

333- 
Hardware. See Iron and hardware. 



Hardwicke, visited Hardwar (1796), v. 
333, quoted, on the bathing festival 
there, v. 334. 

Hardy, Mr. Spence, Manual of Bud- 
dhism, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 
137 (footnotes). 

Hardyman, Gen., his march from Rewa 
towards Nagpur (1817), x. 219. 

Harek, village in Punjab, v. 335. 

Hargam, town and pargand in Oudh, v. 

335- 
Har Govind, sixth Sikh guru (1606-44), 

defeated the imperial forces, but died 

in exile, i. 256. 
Harha, town and pargand in Oudh, v. 

335, 336- 
Harhar, village in N.-W. Provinces, v. 

336. 
Haria, tahsil and pargand in N.-W. 

Provinces, v. 336, 337. 
Hariana, tract in Punjab, v. 337. 
Hariana, town in Punjab, v. 337, 338. 
Harigaon, village in Assam, v. 338. 
Harihar, town in Mysore, v. 338. 
Hariharpur, village in Mysore, v. 338. 
Harike, village in Punjab, v. 338, 339. 
Haringhata. See Baleswar. 
Haringi, river in Coorg, v. 339. 
Haripani, river in Assam, v. 339. 
Haripur, town and tahsil in Punjab, v. 

33.9- 
Haripur, town in Punjab, v. 339, 340. 
Haripur, village in Punjab, v. 340. 
Hari Riid, river in Afghanistan, v. 

340- 

Harischandragarh, hill fortress in Bom- 
bay, y. 340. 

Hari Singh, Sikh chieftain, occupied 
Riipar (1763), and made it his capital, 
xii. 82. 

Hari Singh, Sikh general, exterminated 
the freebooters of the Dub Pass, iv. 
317 ; founded Haripur (1822), v. 339 ; 
conquered Hazara for Ranjit Singh 
between 18 18 and 1826, v. 361 ; took 
Jamrud (1836), and was killed in battle 
there with Dost Muhammad (1837), 
vii. 133 ; was granted the Tiwana 
estates in Shahpur, xii. 362. 

Harji Raja, Governor of Gingi, granted 
settlements at Conimeer, Cuddalore, 
and Porto Novo to the Company 
(1684), i. 321. 

Harman, Capt., on the identity of the 
Sanpu and the Dihang, iii. 94. 

Harnad. See Hindan. 

Harnai. See Hurnal. 

Harnai, port in Bombay, v. 340. 

Harnhalli, town and tdhck in Mysore, v. 

341- 
Haroh, river in Punjab, v. 341. 

Harowtee. See Kotah. 

Harpala, son-in-law of Ramchandra, last 



INDEX. 



139 



Hindu king of the Yadava dynasty, 
rebelled, was defeated and flayed alive, 
iv. 159. 

Harpanahalli, town and tahtk in Madras, 
V. 341, 342. 

Harrand, village in Punjab, v. 342. 

Harris, Lord (i), storming of Seringa- 
patam, article 'India,' vi. 397. Local 
notices — Acting Governor of Madras 
(1798), ix. 67 ; defeated Tipu Sultan 
at Malvalli (1799), ix. 266; his siege 
and storm of Seringapatam (1799), xii. 

319- 
Harris, Lord (2), Governor of Madras 

(1854-59), ix. 67. 
Harris, Capt., his report on the Mahanadi 

(1S58), ix. 158 ; on Port Subarnarekha 

(1S75), xiii- 85. 
Harrison, Edward, Governor of Madras 

(1711-17), ix. 67. 
Hartley, Gen., helped by the people of 

Ponani in his descent on the west 

coast, xi. 198. 
Harua, village in Bengal, v. 342. 
Hasan Abdal, village in Punjab, v. 342. 
Hasanganj, village in Oudh, v. 342. 
Plasanpur, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, v. 343. 
Hasanpur, town in Oudh, v. 343. 
Hasanpur, village in Punjab, v. 343. 
Hasara, town in Bengal, v. 343. 
Hashtnagar, tahsil in Punjab, v. 344. 
Hasilpur, town in Central India, v. 344. 
Hash Canal, in Punjab, 344, 345. 
Hassan, District in Mysore, v. 345-351 ; 

physical aspects, 345, 346 ; history, 

346, 347 ; population, 347, " 348 ; 

agriculture, 348, 349 ; manufactures, 

349>.350; administration, 350, 351; 

medical aspects, 351. 
Hassan, town and taluk in Mysore, v. 35 1. 
Hassangadi. See Hosangadi. 
Hassanur, ghat or pass in Madras, v. 

351, 352. 
Hastinapur, historic city in N.-W. Pro- 



vmces, V. 



55^ 



Hastings, Fort, hill fort in N.-W. Pro- 



vmces 



552. 



Hastings, Marquis of, Governor-General 
of India (1814-23), article ' India,' vi. 
400-402 ; war with Nepal and treaty 
of Segauli, with cession of Himalayan 
tracts, 400 ; Pindari war, 401 ; third 
and last Maratha war and annexation 
of the Peshwa's dominions, 401, 402. 
Local notices — His march to the Cham- 
bal and treaty with .Sindia, v. 232 ; 
encamped at Irich in his campaign of 
1817, vii. 24 ; his Pindari or fourth 
Maratha war, ix. 267; his settlement of 
Rajputana, xi. 407 ; granted Tonk to 
Amir Khan on condition he disbanded 
his army, xiii. 337. 



Hastings, Warren, Governor of Bengal 
and first Governor-General of India 
(1772-85), article ' India,' vi. 388-392; 
his administrative reforms and policy 
towards native powers, 388 ; makes 
Bengal pay, 389 ; sale of Allahabad 
and Kora to the Wazir of Oudh (1773), 
390 ; the Rohilla war, plunder of Chait 
Singh and the Oudh Begams, 390, 391; 
impeachment of and seven years' trial in 
England, 391 ; the poor excuse for his 
measures, 391 ; first Maratha war and 
treaty of Salbai, 391, 392 ; first war 
with Mysore (1780-84), 392. Local 
7iotices — Fought duel with Philip 
Francis at Alipur, i. i8o; sent troops 
to Rohilkhand, ii. 140 ; his deposition 
of Chait Singh, Raja of Benares, 
ii. 256 ; Birkul his favourite seaside 
resort, iii. 13 ; his attempts to purify 
Calcutta, iii. 244 ; placed administra- 
tion of Bengal under the Company's 
servants, iii. 245; his statue at Calcutta, 
iii. 251 ; retired to Chanar on Chait 
Singh's rebellion, iii. 347 ; appealed to 
by the Chief of Chittagong against the 
Lushais, iii. 448 ; made treaty with 
the Rana of Gohad, and took fort of 
Gwalior for him, iv. 227; compares the 
Himalayas to the Andes, v. 402 ; the 
wealth of his baniya Ganga Govind 
Singh, vii. 405 ; taken prisoner by 
Siraj-ud-daula when Assistant to the 
Resident at Kasimbazar, viii. 81 ; 
drove the Bhutias out of Kuch Behar 
at its Raja's request, viii. 320 ; moved 
civil and criminal courts of Bengal from 
Murshidabad to Calcutta, x. 23, 24 ; 
political Resident at Murshidabad, x. 
37 ; granted Sonwaniy'i/^zV to his head 
i?nmshi, xiii. 64. 

Hasua, town in Bengal, v. 352. 

Hata, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, v. 352, 353. 

Hatampur, town in Bengal, v. 353. 

Hathatia. See Haripani. 

Hathazari, village in Bengal, v. 353. 

Hathibari, State forest in Central Pro- 
vinces, V. 353. 

Hathpor, cave tunnel in Chutia Nagpur, 

V- 353- 

Hathras, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 354, 355. 

Hatia, island in Bengal, v. 355, 356. 

Hati Khan, Ghakkar chief who resisted 
Babar (1525), xii. 24. 

Hatkars or Bargi Dangars, in Basim, ii. 
184, 185, 186. 

Hatta, estate in Central Provinces, v. 

356. 

Hatta, village and tahsil m Central Pro- 
vinces, V. 356, 357. 

Hatta, town in Central Provinces, v. 357. 



140 



INDEX. 



Hattras. See Hathras. 

Hatwa, village in Bengal, v. 357. 

Haug, Dr., The Origin of Brdhmanism, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 212 (foot- 
note 4). 

Haung-tharaw, river in Burma, v. 357, 

358. 
Haung-tharaw, township in Burma, v. 

358. 

Hauper. See Hapur. 

Haveli, Sub-division in Bombay, v. 358. 

Havelock, Sir Henry, defeat of the 
Cawnpur mutineers, first relief of 
Lucknow, article 'India,' vi. 420. 
Local notices — Took command of the 
troops at Allahabad, i. 198 ; took 
Bithur (19th July 1857), iii. 20; 
stormed Cawnpur (,15th July), iii. 
282, 283, 291 ; joined Renaud at 
Khaga (i ith July), and defeated mutin- 
eers at Bilanda (l2th July), and at 
Aung and Pandu Nadi (15th July), iv. 
425 ; stormed the Alambagh (22nd 
Sept.), and relieved the Residency at 
Lucknow (26th Sept.), viii. 514; died 
at Lucknow (5th Nov. 1857), viii. 515 ; 
his battles in Unao District, xiii. 430 ; 
victory at Unao (29th July), xiii. 457. 

Haveri, town in Bombay, v. 358. 

Haviland, Major de, built the cathedral 
and Scotch Kirk at Madras, ix. 106 ; 
recommended survey of Pambam Pas- 
sage, xi. 22. 

Havili, pa7-gand in Central Provinces, 

V. 358. 
Havili Oudh, pargand in Oudh, v. 359. 
Hawalbagh, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

V. 359- 

Hawawala, an outlaw, captured Capt. 
Grant (181 3), and kept him prisoner in 
the hills of Gir, v. 84. 

Hawkins, Capt., Envoy from James i. 
and the East India Company to the 
Great Mughal (1680), article 'India,' 
vi. 366. 

Hay, Mr., sent to Mir Kasim (1763), and 
murdered by him at Patna, xi. 95, 96. 

Hazara, District in Punjab, v. 359-368 ; 
physical aspects, 359, 360 ; history, 
360-363 ; population, 363, 364 ; agri- 
culture, 364-366 ; natural calamities, 
366 ; commerce and trade, 366, 367 ; 
administration, 367 ; military arrange- 
ments, 367, 368 ; medical aspects, 368. 

Hazaras, non- Afghan tribe in Afghanistan, 

i- 43- 44- 
Hazaribagh, District in Chutia Nagpur, 
366-3S0 ; physical aspects, 369, 370 ; 
history, 371, 372; population, 372- 
374 ; town and rural population, 374 ; 
material condition of the people, 374, 
375 ; agriculture, 375, 376 ;_ Kamias, 
376, 377 ; natural calamities, 378 ; 



commerce and trade, 378 ; minerals, 

378, 379 ; tea, 379 ; administration, 

379, 380 ; mineral aspects, 380. 
Hazaribagh, Sub-division in Chutia Nag- 
pur, V. 380, 381. 

Hazaribagh, town in Chutia Nagpur, v. 381. 

Hazratpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
v. 381. 

Hazro, town in Punjab, v. 381, 382. 

Headlands. See Capes. 

Hearsey, Major - General, put down 
incipient mutiny at Barrackpur (1857), 
ii. 175 ; released by Gurkhas (1815) as 
pledge of peace, viii. 351. 

Heath, Capt., removed all the Com- 
pany's servants and goods from Hugli 
to Balasor (1688), ii. 5. 

Hebbale, village in Coorg, v. 382. 

Hebbert, Capt., killed in attack on the 
Vagher outlaws at Machanda (1867), 
viii. 532. 

Heber, Bishop of Calcutta (1S23-26), 
article ' India,' vi. 261. Local notices 
■ — Quoted on rained city of Amber, i. 
228 ; met the reformer Swami Narayan 
in Gujarat, iii. 14; quoted on a banian 
tree near Broach, iii. 102 ; on the site 
of Delhi, iv. 189 ; on Gurgaon, v. 
216 ; on the ruined Jain temple at Kalin- 
jera, vii. 337; on Mianganj, ix. 421; 
on the difficulty of ascending the 
Narbada, x. 210; on Shahabad, xii. 
335 ; consecrated English Church at 
Surat, xiii. 134 ; died and was buried 
at Trichinopoli (1826), xiii. 365. 

Hebli, town in Bombay, v. 382. 

Heggadadevankot, village and taluk in 
Mysore, v. 382. 

Hekataios, the earliest Greek historian 
who refers to India, article ' India,' vi. 
163 ; his mention of Miiltan, x. 3. 

Hemar Panth, his oldest temple, Nilkan- 
theswar, near Sindkher, xii. 527. 

Hemavati, river in Mysore, v. 382. 

Hemp, cultivated in Ahmadnagar, i. 
103 ; Ambala, i. 220 ; Amraoti, i. 
248 ; Amritsar, i. 260 ; North Arcot, 
i. 316; Banda, ii. 51; Bankura, ii. 
83; Bardwan, ii. 130; Bellary, ii. 
245 ; Benares, ii. 258 ; Bombay, 
varieties of, there, iii. 53 ; Buldana, iii. 
146 ; Cochin, iv. 5 ; Coorg, iv. 37 ; 
Firozpur, iv. 444 ; Gaya, v. 49 ; 
Godavari, v. 127; Berar, v. 270; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 280; Hoshiarpur, 
V. 455 ; Howrah, v. 463 ; Hugh, v. 
494 ; Jalandhar, vii. 88 ; Janjira, vii. 
139 ; Jerruck, vii. 181 ; South Kanara, 
vii. 380 ; Karauli, vii. 473 ; Kistna, 
viii. 230 ; Larkhana, viii. 463 ; 
Lohara, viii. 474 ; Madras, ix. 30 ; 
Western Malwa, ix. 269 ; Manbhvim, 
ix. 283 ; Midnapur, ix. 429 ; Nadiya, 



INDEX. 



141 



X. 135; Nepal, X. 277; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, X. 381 ; Orissa, x. 459 ; Pun', 
xi. 306 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 9 ; Rohtak, 
xii. 73 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; Sawantwari, 
xii. 296 ; Shahabad, xii. 329 ; Simla, 
xii. 493 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; Sirohi, xiii. 
5 ; Tanjore, xiii. 187 ; Tarai, xiii. 210 ; 
Tipperah, xiii. 317; Unao, xiii. 432; 
Wun, xiii. 543. See also charas and 
gdnjd. 

Hemtabad, village in Bengal, v. 383. 

Hemu, Hindu general of Sher Shah, 
defeated by Akbar at Panipat (1556), 
xi. 45. 

Ilenckell, Mr., first Judge and Magistrate 
of Jessor (17S1-S9), vii. 185; his 
scheme for the reclamation of the 
Sundarbans, xiii. no, ill; in pur- 
suance of which he founded the trad- 
ing villages of Chandkhali, iii. 359, 
Henckellganj, v. 383, and Kachua, vii. 
278. 

Henckellganj, village in Bengal, v. 383. 

Henzada, District in Lower Burma, v. 
383-390 ; physical aspects, 383, 384 ; 
history, 3S4, 385 ; population, 385- 
387 ; agriculture, 387, 388 ; admini- 
stration, 388-390. 

Henzada, town and township in Lower 
Burma, v. 390. 

Hephaistion, Alexander's general, said to 
have taken Peukelasor Pushkalavati, 
xi. 147. 

Herakles, said by Diodonis to have 
founded Pataliputra or Palibothra, 
now Patna, xi. 106. 

Herat, Province of Afghanistan, v. 390- 
2. 

Herat, town in Afghanistan, v. 392, 393. 

Herbert, Sir Thomas, quoted on Sand- 
wip Island in 1625, xii. 210. 

Herodotus, mentions Multan, x. 3. 

Herpes, a prevalent disease in Kheri, 
viii. 197. 

Herumalu, village in Coorg, v. 393. 

Heshto, river in Chutia Nagpur, v. 393. 

Hickey, Mr., quoted on Tanjore, xiii. 181. 

Hides and horns. Centres of trade, in : 
Ahankaripur, i. 81 ; Amethi Dungar, 
i. 231 ; Arava-Kurichi, i. 307 ; Bastar, 
ii. 206 ; Basti, ii. 212 ; Dacca, iv. 91 ; 
Dindigal, iv. 301 ; Fatehpur, iv. 431 ; 
Gopalpur, v. 16 1 ; Hardoi, v. 327 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 239 ; Lalganj, vaii, 445 ; 
Maulmain, ix. 372 ; Monghyr, ix. 
487 ; Nawabganj, x. 248 ; Rampur, 
xi. 458; Rasra, xi. 514; Sahibganj, 
xii. 135 ; Tirupatur, xiii. 327; Wardha, 
xiii. 527. 

Higgins, Lieut., defeated the rebels in 
Sambalpur, xii. 180. 

Higginson, Nathaniel, Governor of 
Madras (1692-98), ix, 66. 



High Courts of Justice in India, article 

_' India,' vi. 433. 
High Level Canal. See Mahanadi. 
Hijili, sea -coast tract in Bengal, v. 

3.94- 
Hijili, navigable canal in Bengal, vi. 553. 

Hill, Gen. R. Sale, commanded expedi- 
tion against the Akas {1883-84), i. 
136. 

Hill, jNIajor Sir William, defended Pegu 
(1852), xi. 128. 

Hill cultivation, article ' India,' vi. 9 ; 
486. See also Nomadic cultivation. 

Hill forts (Maratha) in the Deccan, 
article 'India,' vi. 318. .5"*?^ also Forts, 
Hill. 

Hill Tipperah, Native State in Bengal, 
V. 394-401; physical aspects, 394, 
395 ; history, 395-397 ; political con- 
stitution, 397, 398 ; population, 398- 
400 ; agriculture, 400 ; commerce and 
trade, 400 ; administration, 400, 401 ; 
medical aspects, 401. 

Hill and Border tribes, the Abars, i. I ; 
in Afghanistan, i. 41-45 ; in Ahmad - 
nagar, i. loi ; the Akas, i. 135, 136 ; 
on the Anamalai Hills, i. 270, 271 ; in 
the Arakan Hill Tracts, i. 299-301 ; in 
North Arcot, i. 315 ; South Arcot, i. 
322 ; Assam, i. 353-355 ; the Hatkars, 
ii. 185, 186 ; the Bhils, ii. 387-392 ; 
the Brahuis, iii. 98-100; in Cachar, 
iii. 235 ; Central Provinces, iii. 305- 
311 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 449, 
450 ; the_ Coorg.., iv. 34, 35 ; the 
Daphlas, iv. 119, 120 ; the Garos, v. 
28-30 ; Tipperahs, v. 399 ; the Juangs, 
vii. 249-252 ; the Kandhs, vii. 400- 
405 ; Karens, viii. 1-7 ; Khamtis, viii. 
144-146; Khasis, viii. 174, 175; 
Kochs, viii. 228; Kols, viii. 253-260; 
Kotas, viii. 300-302, x. 31 1 ; Kurum- 
bas, viii. 375, 376, x. 311, 312; 
Lushais, viii. 530-532, x. 150, 151; 
Malassers, ix. 237 ; Malayalis, ix. 237- 
240; Mikirs, ix. 436-438, x. 151 ; 
Miris, ix. 443-450 ; Mishmis, ix. 462- 
465 ; Mohmands, ix. 475, 476 ; 
Nagas, X. 147-150; Naikdas, x. 176, 
177; Chenchus, x. 185, 186; on the 
Nilgiri Hills, x. 309-312 ; Todas, x. 
309, 310; Badagas, x. 310, 31 1 ; 
Irulars, x. 312; on the Palni Moun- 
tains, xi. 17, 18; Santals, xii. 236- 
246 ; Chins, xiii. 280 - 282 ; in the 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 441-445. 
See also Customs, Manners and mode 
of life. Dress, Food, Funeral cere- 
monies. Houses and huts, and Marriage 
ceremonies. 

Hisla, town in Bengal, v. 401. 

Himalaya Mountains, The, v. 401-414 ; 
Himalayan system, the, 402 ; northern 



142 



INDEX. 



chain, 403-405 ; central chain, 405- 
407; southern chain, 407, 408 ; physical 
geography, 408, 409 ; flora- ixwdjauna, 
409; geological structure, 409-412; 
minerals, 412; ethnologj', 412 - 414 ; 
article 'India,' vi. 4-10; the double 
wall and trough, 5, 6 ; passes and off- 
shoots, 6 ; water-supply and rainfall, 
7 ; scenery, vegetation, irrigation, and 
products, 7-10; animals and tribes, 
10 ; geology, 631-633 ; meteorolog>' of, 
641, 642. See also Trans-Himalayan 
trade. 

Himmat Bahadur, Raja, head of devotees 
in Bundelkhand, his policy in 1802, iii. 
156; was granted Kalpi (1803), and 
died (1804), vii. 342. 

Himmatgarh, village in Central India, v. 

414- 
Himmat Khan Bahadur, Nawab of 

Karnal, murdered the Nizam, Muzaffar 

Jang, at Rachoti, viii. 42. 
Hindan, river in N.-W. Provinces, v, 

414- 
Hindaun, town in Rajputana, v. 414. 
Hindaur, village in Oudh, v. 414, 415- 
Hinde, John, Deputy-Governor of Fort 

St. David, became Governor of the 

Madras Presidency (1746) on the 

capture of the city, ix. 67. 
Hindi literature and authors, article 

'India,' vi. 345, 346, 
Hindia. See Handia. 
Hindol, tributary State of Orissa, v, 

415- 

Hindoli, town in Rajputana, v. 415. 

Hindri, river in Madras, v. 415, 416. 

Hinduism, Rise of (750 to 1520 a.d,), 
article 'India,' vi. 192-228. Disinte- 
gration of Buddhism, 191 ; preaching 
of Kumarila, 191 ; persecution of 
Buddhism, 191, 192 ; caste and reli- 
gion the twofold basis of Hinduism, 
192 ; race origin of caste, 192 ; modi- 
fied by 'occupation' and 'locality,' 
192 ; complexity of caste, 192, 193 ; 
the Brahman caste analyzed, 193, 194; 
building of the caste system, 194 ; Hindu 
marriage law, 195 ; ancient mingling 
of castes, 195; 'occupation' basis of 
caste, 196-199 ; the Vaisyas or ancient 
cultivating caste, 196 ; the ' right- 
hand ' and ' left-hand ' castes of Mad- 
ras, 196, 197 ; the Dattas of Bengal, 
197 ; Shahas, Telis, and Tambulis 
forcing their way into higher castes, 197; 
caste, a system of trade-guilds, 197, 
198 ; working of the Indian trade- 
guild, its funds, charities, reward, 
and punishments, 198, 199 ; excom- 
munication a penalty for a breach 
of caste rules, 199, 200; the religious 
basis of Hinduism, its stages of evolu- 



tion, and how far influenced by Bud- 
dhism, 200, 201 ; Beast hospitals, 
201 ; monastic religious life, 201, 202 ; 
analogies of Japanese worship to Hin- 
duism and Christianity, 202 ; serpent 
ornamentation in Buddhist, Hindu, 
and Christian art, 202, 203 ; coalition 
of Buddhism with earlier religions, 
203 ; shrines common to various faiths, 
203, 204; non-Ar}'an elements in 
Hinduism, 204 ; phallic emblems in 
Hinduism, 204, 205 ; fetish-worship 
in Hinduism, 205, 206 ; the Sdlgrdm 
or village deity, 206 ; jungle rites, 
206, 207 ; non-Arj'an religious rites 
merging into Hinduism, 207 ; Brah- 
man founders of Hinduism, 207 ; low 
caste apostles, 207, 208 ; mediaeval 
Hindu saints, their miracles, 208 ; 
Kabir's death, 208 ; Brahman reli- 
gious reformers, 209, 210 ; growth of 
Siva-worship, 210-215 ; Siva-worship 
in its philosophical and terrible aspects 
211 ; twofold aspects of Siva and of 
Durga his queen, and their twofold 
sets of names, 211, 212; human sacri- 
fices as late as 1866, 212, 213 ; animals 
substituted for human sacrifice, 213 ; 
the Charak-puja or swinging festival, 

213 ; the thirteen Sivaite sects, 213, 

214 ; gradations of Siva-worship, 214, 

215 ; secret orgies of Sivaism, 215 ; 
the ' right - hand ' and ' left - hand ' 
forms of Siva - worship, 214, 215; 
Siva and Vishnu compared, 215 ; 
Vishnu the Preserver always a friendly 
god, 215 ; his incarnations or avatars, 
215 (and footnote) ; 216 ; the Vishnu 
Puranas, 216, 217 ; Brahmanical and 
popular Vishnuism, 217 ; Vishnuite 
religious reformers, 217-222; Rama- 
nuja, 217; Ramanand, 218; Kabir, 
218, 219; Chaitanya, 219 -221; 
Vallabha-Swami, 221, 222 ; Krishna- 
worship, 222, 223 ; the twenty chief 
Vishnuite sects, 223 ; theistic move- 
ments in Hinduism, 223 ; the Sikhs, 
and Nanak Shah, their spiritual founder, 
223 ; Jagannath, the coalition of 
Brahman and Buddhist doctrines 
forming the basis of Vishnu-worship, 
223, 224 ; Car festival of Jagannath, 
224 ; bloodless worship of Jagannath, 
self-immolation a calumny, 224-226 ; 
gentle doctrines of Jagannath, 226 ; 
religious 7icxus of Hinduism, 226 ; 
practical faith of the Hindus, its toler- 
ance, 226, 227 ; the modern Hindu 
triad, 227 ; recapitulation, 228. 

Hindu architecture, article ' India,' vi. 

112. See Architecture. 
Hindu kingdoms of the Deccan, article 

' India,' vi, 286. 



INDEX. 



143 



Hindu population of India, article ' India,' 
vi. 51. ^f^also Appendix V., vi. 693, 
and Population section in the several 
District articles. 

Hindu Tribes and Castes, by the Rev. ]M. 
A. Sherring, quoted, article ' India,' 
vi. 193 (footnote i); 194 (footnotes 
2, 3, and 4) ; 195 (footnote 2) ; 221 
(footnote 4). 

Hindu Kush, range of mountains in 
Central Asia, v. 416-419 ; passes, 416, 
417; geology, 417; enthnology and 
religion, 417, 418; general character- 
istics, 41S, 419. 

Hindupatti, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
V. 419. 

Hindupur, town and tdhik in Madras, v. 
419, 420. 

Hindur, Hill State in Punjab, v. 420. 

Hindustan, historic name for tract in 
Northern India, v. 420, 421. 

Hinganghat, trading town and tahsil in 
Central Provinces, v. 421, 422. 

Hinglajgarh, hill fort in Central India, v. 
422. 

Hingni, town in Central Provinces, v. 
422. 

Hingoli, town in Haidarabad, v. 422. 

Hingona, village in Central India, v. 423, 

Hippon, Capt., established first English 
agency at Masulipatam (1611), ix. 353. 

Hirapur, State in Central India, v. 423. 

Hirdenagar, village in Central Provinces, 
v. 423.^ 

Hirde Sah, son of Chhatar Sal, took 
Garhakota (1703), built Hirdenagar 
there, and died (1739), v. 12, 13. 

Hirehal, town in Madras, v. 423. 

Hirekal, range of hills in Mysore, v. 423. 

Hiremagalur, \-illage in Mysore, v. 423. 

Hiriyur, village and taluk in Mysore, v. 
423, 424. 

Hirode, village in Mysore, v. 424. 

Hisampur, pargand in Oudh, v. 424, 425. 

Hislop, ISIr., quoted, on the Gonds, iii. 
306 ; the Gond religion, iii. 309. 

Hislop, Gen. Sir Thomas, defeated the 
Marathas at Mehidpur (1817), ix. 39S. 

Hissar, Division in Punjab, v. 425. 

Hissar, District in Punjab, v. 425-433 ; 
physical aspects, 426, 427 ; history, 
427, 42S ; population, 428-430 ; agri- 
culture, 430, 431 ; natural calamities, 
431 ; manufactures, etc., 431, 432 ; 
administration, 432, 433 ; meteorologi- 
cal aspects, etc., 433. 

Hissar, tahsil m Punjab, v. 433. 

Hissar, town in Punjab, v. 434. 

Histoire du Christianisme des Indes, by 
La Croze, article ' India,' vi. 232 (foot- 
note i); 240 (footnote 4); 241 (footnote 
l); 242 (footnotes). 

Histoire de la Litterature Hindouie et 



Hindotistanie, par Garcin de Tassy, 
article 'India,' vi. 343 and footnote. 

History of Architecture, by Mr. J. Fer- 
gusson, quoted, article ' India,' vi. 304 
(footnotes). See also Fergusson. 

History of British Rule (1757 -1885), 
article ' India,' vi. chap. xv. pp. 378- 
430. Madras, the first British territorial 
possessioninIndia(i639), 378; Southern 
India after the death of Aurangzeb 
(1707). 37S ; French and English in 
the Karnatik, 378 ; first French war 
and capture of ]\Iadras by the French 
(1746), 379 ; second French war (175°" 
61), 379 ; Clive's defence of Arcot 
(1751)) 379; Sir Eyre Coote's victory 
of Wandiwash (1760), 397; capitulation 
of Pondicherri and Gingi, 380 ; the 
English in Bengal (1634-96), 380; 
native rulers of Bengal (1707-56), 
Miirshid Kuli Khan, Ali Vardi Khan, 
and Siraj-ud-daula, 3S0, 381 ; capture 
of Calcutta by Siraj-ud-daula (1756), 
381 ; recapture of Calcutta and battle 
of Plassey, 382 ; Mir Jafar (1757-61), 
383 - 385 ; Zaminddri grant of the 
Twenty - four Parganas, 383 ; Clive's 
Jdgir, 383, 384 ; Clive, the first Gover- 
nor of Bengal, 384 ; deposition of Mir 
Jafar and enthronement of Mir Kasim 
(1761), 3S5 ; Mir Kasim's quarrel with 
the English, and massacre of Patna, 
385, 386 ; first Sepoy Mutiny (1764), 

386 ; battle of Buxar (1764), 386 ; 
Clive's second Governorship (1765-67), 
partition of the Gangetic valley, the 
Diwani grant of Bengal, and reorgani- 
zation of the Company's service, 386, 

387 ; dual system of administration 
(1767-72), abolished by Warren Hast- 
ings, 3S7, 388 ; Warren Hastings' 
administration (1772-S5), 388-392 ; his 
administrative reforms, and policy to- 
wards native powers, 3S8; Warren Hast- 
ings, the first Governor-General of India 
(1774), 3S8 ; his financial administra- 
tion, and sale of Allahabad and Kora 
to the W^azir of Oudh, 389, 390 ; with- 
holds the Emperor's tribute, 390 ; the 
Rohilla war (1773-74), 390 ; plunder of 
Chait Singh and of the Oudh Begams, 
390 ; charges against Hastings and his 
impeachment, 392 ; the first Maratha 
and ]Mysore wars, 392, 393 ; Lord 
Cornwallis' administration (1786-93), 
his revenue reforms, the Permanent 
Settlement of Bengal, and second 
Mysore war, 393, 394 ; Sir John Shore 
(1793-98), 394; Lord Wellesley's 
administration (179S-1805), 394-399; 
French influence in India, 394 ; state of 
India before Lord Wellesley, 395; Lord 
Wellesley's scheme for crushing French 



144 



INDEX. 



influence in India, 395, 396 ; treaties of 
Lucknow and with the Nizam, 396 ; 
third Mysore war and fall of Seringa- 
patam, 396, 397 ; Wellesley's dealings 
with the Marathas, and the second 
Marathawar, 397, 398; British victories 
and annexations (1803); British dis- 
asters, Monson's retreat, and Lake's 
repulse before Bhartpur (1804-05), 398 ; 
India on Lord Wellesley's departure 
(1805), 398, 399 ; Lord Cornwallis' 
second administration as Governor- 
General (1S05), 399; Sir George Barlow 
(1805), 399 ; Earl of Minto's admini- 
stration (1S07-13), his embassies to the 
Punjab, Afghanistan, and Persia, 399, 
400; Marquis of Hastings' administration 
(1814-23), the Nepal war and treaty of 
Segauli, the Pindari campaign, the third 
and last Maratha war, and annexation 
of the Peshwa's territories, 400-402 ; 
Mr. Adam, pro tern. Governor-General 
(1823), 403 ; Lord Amherst (1823-28), 
Burmese encroachments on India, first 
Burmese war and annexation of Assam, 
Arakan, and Tenasserim, 403, 404 ; 
capture of Bhartpur, 404; Lord William 
Bentinck( 1 828-35), his financial reforms, 
abolition of Sati, suppression of Thagi 
and cruel rites, renewal of Company's 
Charter, Mysore taken under British 
administration, and Coorg annexed, 
404-406 ; Sir Charles Metcalfe (1835- 
36), the grant of liberty to the 
Press, 406; Lord Auckland (1836-42), 
our early dealings with Kabul, the 
disastrous Afghan campaign, and 
annihilation of our army, 406 - 408 ; 
Earl of Ellenborough (1S42-44), the 
Kabul army of retribution, the ' Gates 
of Somnath ' travesty, annexation of 
Sind, and Gwalior outbreak, 408, 409 ; 
Lord Hardinge (1844-48), the first 
Sikh war and annexation of the Cis- 
Sutlej tract, 410, 41 1 ; Earl of Dalhousie 
(1848-56), 411-417; his administrative 
reforms and public works, 412 ; second 
Sikh war and annexation and pacifica- 
tion of the Punjab, 412, 413 ; second 
Burmese war and annexation of Pegu, 
413, 414 ; Lord Dalhousie's dealings 
with the Native States, the doctrine of 
* Lapse ' in the case of Satara, Jhansi, 
and Nagpur, 414, 415 ; Berar handed 
over by the Nizam of Haidarabad, as 
a territorial guarantee for arrears of 
subsidies and for the payment of the 
Haidarabad contingent, 415 ; annexa- 
tion of Oudh, and Lord Dalhousie's 
grounds for the measure, 415-417 ; Earl 
Canning (1856-62), 417-424 ; the Sepoy 
Mutiny and its causes, 417 -419; the 
outbreak at Meerut and Delhi, and 



spread of the Mutiny, 419 ; loyalty of 
the Sikhs, 419, 420; the siege of 
Cawnpur and massacre of the survivors, 
420; Lucknow, 420, 421 ; siege and 
capture of Delhi, 421 ; reduction of 
Oudh by Sir Colin Campbell, and of 
Central India by Sir Hugh Rose, 421, 
422 ; India transferred to the Crown, 
the Queen's Proclamation and general 
amnesty, 423, 424 ; Lord Canning's 
financial and legal reforms, 424 ; Lord 
Elgin (1S62-63), his death at Dharm- 
sala, 424; Lord Lawrence (1864-69), 
the Bhutan war and Orissa famine, 
424, 425; Lord Mayo (1864-72), the 
Ambala Dat-bdr ; internal and financial 
reforms, and abolition of inland customs 
lines, his assassination, 425 ; Lord 
Northbrook (1872-76), the Bengal 
famine of 1874, dethronement of the 
Gaekwar of Baroda, and visit of the 
Prince of Wales to India, 425, 426; Lord 
Lytton (1876-80), Proclamation of the 
Queen as Empress of India, famine of 
1877-78 ; the second Afghan campaign, 
426,427; Lord Ripon (1S80-84); end 
of the second Afghan campaign, 
rendition of Mysore to its hereditary 
Hindu dynasty, internal administrative 
reforms, LocalGovernment Acts, amend- 
ment of Criminal Procedure, reconsti- 
tution of the Agricultural Department, 
revenue reforms, the Education Com- 
mission, abolition of customs duties, 
Bengal Tenancy Bill, 427-429 ; Earl of 
Dufiferin (1884), 430; annexation of 
Upper Burma (1886), 430. 
History, Local. See the Historical section 
under each District and important city 
and Native State, and especially Aden, 
i. 15-17; Adoni, i. 26, 27; Afghanistan, 
i. 48-52; Afghan-Turkistan, i. 55, 56; 
Agra District, i. 61, 62, city, i. 68-71 ; 
the Ahams, i. 79, 80 ; Ahmadabad, i. 
94, 95 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 107, 108 ; 
Ajmere-Merwara, i. 122 ; Akyab, i. 
150-154; Aligarh, i. 169-171 ; Allah- 
abad District, i. 186-188, city, i. 195- 
198 ; Alvvar, i. 203 - 205 ; Ambala, i, 
215-217 ; Amritsar, i. 256, 257 ; Arcot, 
i. 312-314; North Arcot, i. 312-314; 
South Arcot, i. 321, 322; Arrah, i. 
334, 335 ; Assam, i. 342-346 ; Azam- 
garh, i. 394, 395 ; Bahraich, i. 426-429 ; 
Balasor, ii. 4-6 ; Balkh, ii. 16 ; Balram- 
pur, ii. 24, 25 ; Baluchistan, ii. 28 ; 
Banda, ii. 47-49 ; Bangalore, ii. 60, 61 ; 
Bankura, ii. 80, 81 ; Bannu, ii. 89-91 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 107-109 ; Bardwan, ii. 
127, 128 ; Bareilly, ii. 138-140; Baroda, 
ii. 160-164; Basim, ii. 184, 1S5 ; 
Bassein (Bombay), ii. 191, 192 ; 
Bassein (Burma), ii. 194, 195 ; Behar, 



\ 



INDEX. 



145 



ii. 227 ; Bellary District, ii. 241-243, 
town, ii. 251 ; Benares District, ii. 
255-257. city, ii. 263, 264 ; Bengal, ii. 
275-281 ; Betul, ii. 329, 330 ; Bhagal- 
pur, ii. 345 ; Bhandara, ii. 361, 362 ; 
Bhartpur, ii. 372-375 ; Bhaunagar, ii. 
380, 381 ; Bhopal, ii. 403-405 ; Bhutan, 
ii. 415-417; Bijapur, ii. 423, 424; 
Bijnaur, ii. 429-431 ; Bikaner, ii. 440 ; 
Bilaspur, ii. 446-449 ; Bobbili, iii. 20- 
22; Bombay Presidency, iii. 35-40, 
city, iii. 74 - 77 ; Broach District, iii. 
109, city, iii. 113, 114; Budaun, iii. 
117 -119; Bulandshahr, iii. 133-135; 
Buldana, iii. 143 - 145 ; Bundelkhand, 
iii. 154-157; Burhanpur, iii. 162-164; 
Lower Burma, iii. 172 -176; Upper 
Burma, iii. 220-229 \ Cachar, iii. 230- 
232 ; Calcutta, iii. 240 - 246 ; Calicut, 
iii. 269, 270 ; Cambay, iii. 272, 273 ; 
Cawnpur, iii. 280 - 283 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 300-303 ; Chanda, iii. 349- 
351 ; Chandragiri, iii. 363 ; Chengalpat, 
iii. 382, 383; Chera, iii. 391 ; Chital- 
drug, iii. 423, 424; Chittagong, iii. 435- 
437 ; Chola, iii. 455, 456 ; the Northern 
Circars, iii. 467 - 469 ; the Cis-Sutlej 
States, iii. 470, 471 ; Cochin State, iv. 
2-4, town, iv. II, 12 ; Coimbatore, iv. 
15, 16; Coorg, iv. 28-31 ; Cuddalore, 
iv. 46; Cuddapah, iv. 48-50; Dacca, iv. 
80-82 ; Damoh, iv. 108, 109 ; Darrang, 
iv. 143, 144; Daulatabad, iv. 158-160; 
the Deccan, iv. 165, 166 ; Dehra Dun, 
iv. 170-172; Delhi District, iv. 179, 
180, city, iv. 189-195; Dera Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 210-212 ; Dera Ismail Khan, 
iv. 220-222 ; Dholpur, iv. 276, 277 ; 
Diu, iv. 307, 308 ; EUichpur, iv. 345, 
346 ; Etah, iv. 358-360 ; Etawah, iv. 
370-372;^ Faizabad, iv. 381, 382; 
Farukhabad, iv. 409-411; Fatehpur, 
iv. 423-425 ; Firozpur, iv. 440, 441 ; 
Ganjam, v. 3, 4 ; Garhwal, v. 17-19 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 62-65 ; Gind, v. S3, 84 ; 
Goa, V. 96-106 ; Goalpara, v. 112-114; 
Godavari District, v. 123-125 ; Gonda, 
v. 147-150; Gorakhpur, v. 165-167 ; 
Gujranwala, v. 180-182 ; Gujrat, v. 
189 - 191 ; Gurdaspur, v. 207 - 209 ; 
Gwalior, v. 230-233; Haidarabad State, 
v. 248-252, city, V. 254-258 ; Berar, 
v. 261-265; Hamirpur, v. 298-300; 
Hardoi, v. 322-324 ; Hassan, v. 346, 
347; Hazara,v. 360-363; HillTipperah, 
V. 395-397,; Hoshangabad, v. 443, 
444 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 452-454 ; Hugh, 
V. 490-492 ; Indore, vii. 5-7 ; Jabalpur, 
vii. 31, 32 ; Jaipur, yii. 55-57 ; Jaisal- 
mer, \\\. 67, 68 ; Jalandhar, vii. 85, 
86; Jalaun, x\\. 94-96; Janjira, vii. 
140, 141 ; Jaunpur, \di. 151 - 153 ; 
Jhang, vii. 207-209; Jhansi, vii. 2 17-22 1; 

VOL. XIV. 



Jodhpur, vii. 240-243 ; Kalinjar, vii. 
331-333; Kalpi, vii. 341, 342; Kamnip, 
vii. 356-35S ; South Kanara, vii. 377, 
378 ; Kandahar, vii. 391-398 ; Kangra, 
vii. 414-417; Karachi District, vii. 
446, 447, town, vii. 454, 455 ; Karnal, 
viii. 20-22 ; Karniil, viii. 41-43 ; Kar- 
war, \aii. 54, 55 ; Kashmir, viii. 60-62 ; 
Kathiawar, viii. 90-92 ; Khairpur, viii. 
134; Khandesh, viii. 151-153 ; Kistna 
District, viii. 227, 228 ; Kodungalur 
(Cranganore), viii. 240, 241 ; Kohat, 
viii. 243-245 ; Kolaba, viii. 262-264 ; 
Kolhapur, viii. 281-283 ; Kotah, viii. 
304-306; Kuch Behar, viii. 319-322; 
Kiilu, viii. 338, 339 ; Kumaun, viii. 
350-352 ; Lahore, viii. 405-407 ; Lakh- 
impur, viii. 428, 429 ; Lalitpur, viii. 
448 - 450 ; Lohardaga, viii. 477 - 479 ; 
Lucknow District, viii. 493-496, city, 
viii. 502-511 ; Ludhiana, viii. 519-521 ; 
Madras Presidency, ix. 9- 1 5, city, ix. 
103, 104; ]Madura, ix. 122-124; Mahe, 
ix. 171 ; Mainpuri, ix. 203, 204; Mala- 
bar, ix. 220-222 ; Mandla, ix. 301-303 ; 
Mangalore, ix. 313 ; Manipur, ix. 326- 
328; Masulipatam, ix. 353-355; ISIeerut, 
ix., 383-385; Midnapur, ix. 425, 426; 
Mirzapur, ix. 454, 455 ; Moradabad, 
ix. 505 - 507 ; Miiltan, x. 3 - 5 ; Mur- 
shidabad, x. 22-24 ; Muttra, x. 45-47 ; 
Muzaffarnagar, x. 68-70 ; Mysore, x. 
92-95 ; Nagpur, x. 165-169 ; Narsingh- 
pur, X. 218-220 ; Nellore, x. 262-264 ; 
Nepal, X. 284-291 ; Nimar, x. 329-331 ; 
NoakhaH,x. 341-343; N.-W. Provinces, 
X. 361-370 ; Orissa, x. 428-432 ; Dudh, 
X. 483-496 ; Patna District, xi. 94-98, 
city, xi. 106-108; Pegu, xi. 125-128; 
Peshawar, xi. 147 - 150 ; Poona, xi. 
200-204; Prome, xi. 226-229; Punjab, 
xi. 259 - 270 ; Raipur, xi. 368 - 370 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 403-407 ; Rajshahi, xi. 
429-431; Rangoon District, xi. 473- 
476, city, xi. 481-484; RangjDur, xi. 
490-492 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 5, 6 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 23-25 ; Rewa, xii. 46, 47 ; 
Rohtak, xii. 69-71; Sagar, xii. loi- 
103; Saharanpur, xii. 115 -118; St. 
Thomas' Mount, xii. 143, 144 ; Salem, 
xii. 153-155 ; Sambalpur, xii. 179-181 ; 
Sandur, xii. 207, 208 ; Satara, xii. 277, 
278 ; Sawantwari, xii. 297, 298 ; Seoni, 
xii. 309, 310; Seringapatam, xii. 318, 
319; Shahpur, xii. 361-363 ; Shikarpur, 
xii. 386-392 ; Shimoga, xii. 400, 401 ; 
Sholapur, xii. 412, 413 ; Sialkot, xii. 
441-443 ; Sibi, xii. 457, 458 ; Sibsagar, 
xii. 460, 461 ; Sikkim, xii. 484, 485 ; 
Sind, xii. 508-516; Singhbhiim, xii. 
532-534 ; Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Sirohi, xiii. 
3, 4 ; Sirsa, xiii. 11, 12; Sitapur, xiii. 
30-33 ; Spiti, xiii. 69, 70 ; Surat, xiii. 

K 



146 



INDEX. 



120-124; Sylhet, xiii. 145-147; Syriam, 
xiii. 158, 159; Tanjore, xiii. 181-183 ; 
Tatta, xiii. 218, 219 ; Taung-ngii, xiii. 
221-223 ; Tavoy, xiii. 229 ; Thar and 
Parkar, xiii. 264-266 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 
298-301 ; Travancore, xiii. 345-347 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355-357 ; Tulsipur, 
xiii. 373, 374 ; Udaipur, xiii. 402-408 ; 
Unao, xiii. 427-430 ; Utraula, xiii. 456- 
458 ; Vellore, xiii. 467-469 ; Vizagapa- 
tam, xiii. 484-488 ; ^Yandiwash, xiii. 
517, 518 ; Wiin, xiii. 539, 540. See 
also Family history. 

History of British India, by J. INIill, 
quoted, article 'India,' vi. 314 (foot- 
note 3); 365 (footnote 2). 

History of India, by the Hon. Mount- 
stuart Elphinstone, quoted, article 
' India,' vi. 270 (footnote); 291 (foot- 
note); 300 (footnote); 302 (footnotes); 
306 (footnote i). 

History of India as told by its own 
Historians, by Sir Henry Elliot, 
quoted, article 'India,' vi. 271; 287 
(footnote 2); 291 (footnotes); 295 (foot- 
note 2); 300 (footnote); 302 (footnote 
2); 306 (footnote i); 313 (footnote). 

Histoty of the Settlements and Trade of 
the Europeans in the East and West 
Indies, by Abbe Raynal, quoted, article 
'India,' vi. 374 (footnote). 

History of the Fretich in India, by Colonel 
Malleson, article ' India,' vi. 379 (foot- 
note). 

History of the MarathAs, by James Grant- 
Duff, quoted, article ' India, ' vi. chap. 
xii. pp. 317-324, footnotes, passim. 

History of the Mardthds, by E. Scott 
Waring, quoted, article 'India,' vi. 
317 (footnote l). 

Hiuen Tsiang, Chinese Buddhist pilgrim, 
article ' India,' vi. 2 ; 155 and footnote; 
156, 157; 178,. 179; 182. Local 
notices — Either visited, is quoted upon, 
or referred to, on Afghanistan, i. 49 ; 
Afghan - Turkistan, i. 56 ; Ajanta, i. 
Ill; Ajodya, i. 134; Allahabad, i. 
186, 196 ; Ambala, i. 216 ; Amravati, 
i. 252 ; Andhra, i. 287 ; Asarur, i. 337 ; 
Atranji Khera, i. 380 ; Kankanhalli, ii. 
60 ; Benares, ii. 263 ; Bengal, ii. 275 ; 
Bezwada, ii. 336 ; Bijnaur, ii. 427 ; 
Broach, iii. 113 ; Buddh Gaya, iii. 126 ; 
Buddhain, iii. 127 ; Charsadda, iii. 
373 ; Chaul, iii. 376 ; Chola, in. 455 ; 
Conjevaram, iv. 26 ; Taxila, iv. 270 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 63 ; Gorakhpur, v. 165 ; 
mentions Tse-kia (Taki) as capital of 
the Punjab, v. 180; Mayapur, v. 331 ; 
Hasan Abdal, v. 342 ; Tandwa in 
Ikauna, v. 507 ; Jalandhar, vii. 85. 91 ; 
on the people of the Chalukyan king- 
dom, vii. 316; Kalinga, vii. 328, 329; 



Kankanapalli, vii. 434 ; Kasia, viii. 
79 ; Kasipur, viii. 82, 350 ; Katas, viii. 
87 ; Kathiawar, viii. 90 ; Khajurahu, 
viii. 140 ; Kosala, viii. 299 ; Kulu, 
viii. 338 ; Ladakh, viii. 399 ; Lahore, 
viii. 405, 415 ; Lahul, viii. 420 ; 
Maharashtra, ix. 166 ; Mandawar, ix. 
292 ; Manikiala, ix. 320 ; Masiir, ix. 
350; IMultan, x. 4; Muttra, x. 53; 
his journeys in the N.-W. Provinces, 
X. 363 ; Patna, xi. 107 ; Patti, xi. 117 ; 
Pashkalavati, xi. 147 ; in the Punjab, 
xi. 260 ; Rajagriha, xi. 380, 381 ; 
Rangamati, xi. 469 ; Sahet Mahet 
(Sravasti), x. 484, xii. 128 ; Sakala, 
\\\. 207, xii. 214; Sankisa, xii. 223; 
Sarnath, xii. 270 ; Sherkot, xii. 424, 
vii. 207 ; Srughna, viii. 375, xiii. 87, 
88; Tamliik, ix. 425, xiii. 171 ; 
Thaneswar, xiii. 260 ; Wadali, xiii. 
505 ; Wadnagar, xiii. 507.. _ 
Hiwarkhed, town in Amraoti, Berar, v. 

434- 
Hiwarkher, town in Akola, Berar, v. 434. 
Hlaing, township in Lower Burma, v. 

434, 435- 

Hlaing, river of Burma, v. 435, 436. 

Hlaing-bwe, river of Burma, v. 436. 

Hma\v-bi, Sub-di%'ision in Burma, v. 436. 

Hmaw-bi, [township in Burma, v. 436, 437. 

Llobart, Lord (i). Governor of Madras 
(1794-98), ix. 67. 

Hobart, Lord (2), Governor of Madras 
(1872-75), ix. 67 ; buried in St. Marj''s 
Church, INIadras, ix. 107. 

Hocho, river in Kashmir, v. 437. 

Hodal, town in Punjab, v. 437, 438. 

Hodgson, Mr. B. H., on the Chakmas, 
iii. 449 ; lived at Darjiling, iv. 132 ; 
says Kochs merely name of Hinduized 
Mechs, iv. 332 ; his oceanic theory of 
the Himalaya Mountains, v. 403 ; 
quoted, on the Himalayas, v. 404, 407, 
408, 409 ; on the tribes of the 
Himalayas, v. 413; the chief authority 
on Nepal, x. 274. 

Hoey, ]\Ir. W., his account of the ruins 
at Sahet Mahet, quoted, xii. 126-129. 

Hog, The wild, article ' India,' vi. 656, 
657. Local notices — Wild hogs common 
in Ajmere, i. 119; Akola, i. 141; 
Allahabad, i. 185 ; Amritsar, i. 255 ; 
Anantapur, i. 274; North Arcot, i. 312; 
South Arcot, i. 320 ; Azamgarh, i. 393 ; 
Ballia, ii. 19 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; Bankura, 
ii. 79 ; Bannu, ii. 90 ; Bara Banki, 
ii. 106 ; Basim, ii. 184 ; Belgaum, 
ii. 232 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; Bhandara, 
ii. 361; Bhutan, ii. 414; Bogra, iii. 
26; Broach, iii. 102; Budaun, iii. 1 17 5 
Eulandshahr, iii. 132 ; Buldana, iii. 
143; Upper Burma, iii. 212; Cachar, 
iii. 234; Cambay, iii. 271; Cawnpur, 



INDEX. 



147 



iii. 2S0 ; Chamba, iii. 328 ; Chengalpat, 
iii. 382 ; Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; Chital- 
driig, iii. 423 ; Chittagong, iii. 435 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48; 
Cutch, iv. 60; Darbhangah, iv. 123; 
Darjiling, iv. 13 1 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, 
iv. 210; Dharwar, iv. 259; Dinajpur, 
iv. 291 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 329 ; 
Etawah, iv. 370 ; Faizabad, iv. 381 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 397 ; Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; 
Gaya, v. 45 ; Godavari, v. 123 ; Gonda, 
v. 147; Goona, v. 159; Gorakhpur, 
V. 165 ; Gwalior, v. 229 ; Haidarabad 
(Sind), v. 275 ; Hamirpur, v. 298 ; 
Hissar, v. 427 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; 
Jhang, ^-ii. 206 ; Kadiir, vii. 283 ; Kaira, 
vii. 300; Kaladgi, vii. 315; Kamnip, 
^"i'- 355 5 North Kanara, vii. 370 ; 
South Kanara, vii. 377 ; Kangra, vii. 
413 ; Karniil, viii. 35 ; Kathiawar, viii. 
96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133 ; Kolar, viii. 
273 ; Kiilu, viii. 338 ; Lahore, viii. 
405 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Lohardaga, \-iii. 477 ; Madras 
Presidency, ix. 90 ; Maimansingh, ix. 
192 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; Mahva, ix. 
268 ; Manipur, ix. 326 ; Mergui, ix. 
407 ; Midnapur, ix. 425 ; Mirzapur, 
ix. 453 ; Monghyr, ix. 481 ; IMont- 
gomery, ix. 495 ; Moradabad, ix. 505 ; 
Muttra, X. 45 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 58 ; 
Muzaffamagar, x. 68 ; Nadiya, x. 130 ; 
Nallamalai Hills, x. 185 ; Nellore, 
X. 262 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 308 ; Nimar, 
X. 328 ; Noakhali, x. 341 ; Pabna, 
x. 512 ; Palni Mountains, -xi. 17 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 69 ; Peshawar, xi. 147 ; 
Pilibhit, xi. 172; Poliir, xi. 197; Poona, 
xi. 200 ; Punjab, xi. 259 ; Pumiah, 
xi. 323 ; Rajshahi, xi. 429 ; Rampur, 
xi. 455 ; Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Ratnagiri, 
xii. 4 ; Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; Rohtak, 
xii. 69 ; Salem, xii. 152 ; Sandur, xii. 
206 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ; Saran, 
xii. 252 ; Satara, xii. 277 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 324 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 344 ; 
Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; Shimoga, xii. 
400 ; Sholapur, xii. 412 ; Sialkot, xii. 
441 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; 
Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; the Sundarbans, 
xiii. 109 ; Surat, xiii. 120 ; Tarai, xiii. 
208 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 264 ; Tip- 
perah, xiii. 314; Tiimkur, xiii. 376; 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 440 ; Wardha, 
xiii. 524 ; Wiin, xiii. 539. 
Holalkere, village and taluk in Mysore, 

V. 438. 
Holavanhalli, village in ^lysore, v. 438. 
Holcombe, Lieutenant, killed by the 

Nagas (1875), X. 145. 
Hole-honnur, \allage in Mysore, v. 438. 
Holiaru or Holiyars, rural serfs in South 

Kanara, \-ii. 3S0, 3S1 ; Mysore, x. 99. 



Holkar, family name of the chief of the 
Maratha State of Indore, rise of the 
family to power, article ' India,' vi. 
322 ; war with the British, 323. 

Holkar, Jaswant Rao (1795- 18 11), died 
in camp at Bhanpura (20th Oct. 1811), 
where his mausoleum is, ii. 369; attacked 
Delhi, and besieged Ochterlony there, 
. V. 193 ; defeated at Dig, iv. 286 ; 
attacked Fatehgarh, but was defeated 
by Lake, iv. 420 ; his history, vii. 6 ; 
ravaged Khandesh, viii. 153 ; burnt 
Khandwa, viii. 162 ; burnt Mainpuri, 
ix. 212 ; sacked Sangola, xii. 220 ; 
ravaged Satara, xii. 282 ; and Shola- 
pur, xii. 417 ; granted Sironj to Amir 
Khan, xiii. 7, 8 ; granted Tonk to Amir 
Khan, xiii. 337. 

Plolkar, r^Ialhar Rao I. (1693-1765), his 
history, vii. 5 ; on the right with Sindia 
at the battle of Panipat, xi. 45, 47 ; 
called in by the Rana of Udaipur against 
the Raja of Jaipur, xiii. 406. 

Holkar, Malhar Rao 11. (iSii-33), 
defeated at ^Nlehidpur, and made feu- 
datory by the treaty of ^landesar, 
vii. 6. 

Holkar, Tukaji Rao, ]Maratha general, 
ruled in Indore with Ahalya Bai (1765- 
95 )> ^'' 5 '■> burnt Ujjain, xiii. 417. 

Holkar, Tukaji Rao (1843-S6), his 
conduct during the Mutiny, vii. 7. 

Hollings, Captain, his operations against 
Bhagwant Singh (1841), x. 493, 494. 

Hollings, ]\Ir., of the Opium Agency, 
assisted Mr. Money to save the treasure 
at Gaya (1857), v. 45, 46. 

Holmes, General Sir Thomas, his cam- 
paign in Palanpur (1813), x. 540. 

Holmes, Major, murdered at Segauli in 
the Mutiny, iii. 335, xi. 97. 

Hoi well, Mr., on the population of Cal- 
cutta in 1752, iii. 241 ; survivor of the 
Black Hole, iii. 241 ; on the Bhagirathi, 
V. 472. 

Home, Lieutenant, who blew up Kashmir 
gate at Delhi, killed at Malagarh (1857), 
ix. 236. 

Honalli, village and taluk in Mysore, 

V. 438. 439- 
Honavalli, village and taluk in Mysore, 

V. 439- 
Honawar, Sub-division in Bombay, v. 

439- 

Honawar, port in Bombay, v. 439, 440. 

Honey and bees-wax, obtained by the 
Puliyars at Anaimudi, i. 268 ; found on 
the Anamalai Hills, i. 271 ; in North 
Arcot, i. 315 ; South Arcot, i. 327 ; 
Bakarganj, i. 442 ; Bamra, ii. 41 ; 
Bastar, ii. 206; Bhandara, ii. 361, 
365 ; Bogra, iii. 326 ; Champaran, iii. 
357 ; Chanda, iii. 349 ; Cherra, iii. 



148 



INDEX. 



392 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; Darbhangah, iv. 
123 ; Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; Eastern 
Dwars, iv. 329 ; Ganjam, v. 2 ; Garo 
Hills, V. 26 ; Gaya, v. 44 ; Godavari, 
V. 123; Gorakhpur, v. 169; Haidar- 
abad, v. 245 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; Jenkal- 
betta, vii. 178; Hajamro in Jerruck, 
vii. 180; Kamrup, vii. 355; South 
Kanara, vii. 376 ; Karnul, viii. 35 ; 
Kathi, viii. 87 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; 
Khyrim, viii. 215; Kulu, viii. 343; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Lalitpur, viii. 
447 ; Lohara, viii. 474 ; Lohardaga, 
viii. 476 ; Madhupur, viii. 543 ; Mai- 
mansingh, ix. 192 ; Malabar, ix. 229 ; 
the Melghat, ix. 403 ; Midnapur, ix. 
425 ; Monghyr, ix. 4S1 ; Murshidabad, 
X. 22 ; Naga Hills, x. 143 ; Nasik, x. 
231 ; Nelliampati Hills, x. 260 ; Nilgiri 
Hills, X. 312; Nowgong, x. 407; 
Pachamalai Hills, x. 521 ; Panabaras, 
xi. 24 ; Peint, xi. 130 ; Pun', xi. 301 ; 
Rairakhol, xi. 378 ; Rajshahi, xi. 428 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 
22; Salem, xii. 152; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 227 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Singh- 
bhum, xii. 531 ; Singhpur, xii. 541 ; 
the Sundarbans, xiii. 112; Surgana, 
xiii. 136 ; Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; Travan- 
core, xiii. 345 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; 
Twenty - four Parganas, xiii. 389 ; 
Wardha, xiii. 526 ; Wun, xiii. 543. 
Hongal, town in Bombay, v. 440. 
Honnali. See Honalli. 
Honnu-hole, river in Mysore, v. 441. 
Hooghly. See Hugh. 
Hooker, Sir J. D., made prisoner by Raja 
of Sikkim (1S49), and rescued by a 
military force, vi. 131, xii. 4S5 ; quoted, 
on the climate of Sikkim, iv. 139 ; the 
Himalayas, v. 403, 407, 41 1 ; 'h\% Flora 
of British India, ix. 81, 82 ; quoted on 
Manbhum, ix. 278 ; Noakhali, x. 339, 
340 ; Parasnath Hill, xi. 57 ; Rohtas- 
garh, xii. 78. 
Hope, Adrian, defeated the Budaun 
mutineers at Shamsabad (1858), iv. 

Hops, grown in Chamba, iii. 329. 

Horn articles, combs, etc., made at 
Etawah, iv. 379 ; Kali'ganj, vii. 326 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 38 ; Sawantwari, xii. 
297 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 494, 498 ; 
Viziadrug, xiii. 499. 

Hornblende, found or quarried at Banga- 
lore, ii. 59 ; Chitaldnig, iii. 423 ; Dhar- 
war, iv. 258 ; Diingarpur, iv. 322 ; 
the Ghats, v. 60 ; Jabalpur, vii, 30 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 236 ; Dabbighata in 
Ivadaba, vii. 278 ; South Kanara, vii. 
375; Khandesh, viii. 151 ; Manipur, 
ix. 324 ; Mysore State, x. 91, District, 
X. 114; Tumkur, xiii. 376. 



Hornby, W., Governor of Bombay {1776), 
first took up residence at Parell, xi. 61. 

Horses, Breeds of, article ' India,' vi. 
520 ; Government stud farms, vi. 520. 
Local notices — Afghanistan, i. 38; 
Kunduz and Maimana in Afghan - 
Turkistan, i. 55 ; Ahmadabad, i. 84 ; 
Ahmadnagar, i. loo ; Baroda, ii. 164 ; 
Bikaner, ii. 439 ; Cutch, iv. 62 ; Hai- 
darabad State, v. 244 ; Jhang, vii. 210; 
Karnal, viii. 24 ; Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; 
Kunigal, viii. 366 ; Palanpur Agency, 
x. 538 ; Pindigheb, xi. 184 ; Punjab, 
xi. 259, 280 ; Mallani in Rajputana, 
xi. 418 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 31 ; Satara, 
xii. 277 ; Sind, xii. 507. See also 
Ponies. 

Horse fairs, article ' India,' vi. 520. 
Local notices — Horse fairs or shows 
held at Agar, i. 57, ix. 271 ; Amritsar, 
i. 259, 266; Batesar, ii. 216 ; Malegaon 
in Haidarabad, v. 244, ix. 263 ; Hard- 
war, V. 334; INIaheji, ix. 172; Muzaf- 
fargarh, x. 62 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 31, 
32, T^'i) '■> Rohtak, xii. 77 ; Saharanpur, 
xii. 125 ; Shahpur, xii. 365 ; Sonpur, 
xiii. 63. 

Horsley, Captain, planned and erected 
the Observatory at Trivandrum, xiii. 

369- 
Horsleykonda, mountain in Madras, v. 

441- 

Hos or Larka Kols in Singhbhum, de- 
scribed, xii. 535, 536. 

Hosangadi, ghat or pass in Madras, v. 

44I-, 
Hosdriig, town in Madras, v. 441. 

Hosdurga, village and tdltik in Mysore, 

V. 441- 

Hoshang Ghori, king of Malwa (1405), 
took Kalpi (1435), but lost it (1442), 
vii. 342 ; had his capital at Mandor, 
ix. 267 ; his mausoleum at Mandogarh, 
ix. 308. 

Hoshangabad, District in Central Pro- 
vinces, V. 441-449; physical aspects, 
442, 443 ; history, 443, 444 ; popula- 
tion, 444, 445; agriculture, 445-447; 
commerce and trade, 447 ; administra- 
tion, 447, 448 ; medical aspects, 448, 

449- 
Hoshangabad, tahsilm. Central Provinces, 

V. 449.^ 
Hoshangabad, town in Central Provinces, 

V. 449, 450. ... 

Hoshiarpur, District in Punjab, v. 450- 
458 ; physical aspects, 450-452 ; his- 
tory, 452-454 ; population, 454, 455 ; 
agriculture, 455, 456 ; commerce and 
trade, 456, 457 ; administration, 457 ; 
medical aspects, 457, 458. 

Hoshiarpur, tahsil in Punjab, v. 458. 

Hoshiarpur, town in Punjab, v. 458, 495- 



INDEX. 



149 



Hoskot, town and taluk in Mysore, v. 

459- 

Hospet, town in Madras, v. 459. 

Hospitals, General and Eye at Allahabad, 
i. 194 ; the Bowring at Bangalore, ii. 
65 ; the Jamnabai at Baroda, ii. 169 ; 
the Prince of Wales at Benares, ii. 266 ; 
the Mayo, Campbell, and Eden at Cal- 
cutta, iii. 259 ; the Mitford at Dacca, 
iv. 92 ; the Eden Sanitarium at Dar- 
jiling, iv. 140 ; Indore, vii. 9, 10 ; the 
Mayo at Jaipur, vii. 60 ; Karachi, vii. 
459 ; the Mayo at Lahore, viii. 418 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 511 ; Madras, ix. 118; 
the Egerton at Peshawar, xi. 160 ; the 
Sassoon at Poona, xi. 214 ; (veterinary) 
Saidapet, xii. 141 ; Surat, xiii. 131 ; 
Vizagapatam, xiii. 498 ; besides the 
regular civil hospitals at the head-quar- 
ters of each District. 

Hossangadi. See Hosangadi. 

Ilosur, village and taluk in Madras, v. 
459, 460. 

Hosur, town in Madras, v. 460. 

Hoti-mardan, cantonment in Punjab, v. 
460. 

Hough, his estimate of the population of 
Kandahar, vii. 390. 

Hough, Rev. J., his missionary labours 
in Tinnevelli (i8i5), xiii. 304. 

Houng-tharaw. Sec Haung-tharaw. 

Houses, huts, or dwelling-places, of the 
Akas, i. 136 ; of the Arakan Hill Tribes, 
i. 301 ; of the Bhutias, ii. 413 ; of the 
Burmese, iii. 177, 178 ; of the Chins, 
iii. 177; of the Karens, iii. 1S8, 189; 
of the Deori Chutiyas, iii. 467 ; of the 
Daphlas, iv. 1 19; of the Chandals in 
Faridpur, iv. 401 ; of the Garos, v. 29 ; 
in Jalpaiguri, vii. 1 13; in Jodhpur, 
vii. 172; of the Juangs, vii. 250; in 
Kamrup, vii. 361 ; in Kangra, vii. 418, 
419 ; in Kashmir, viii. 70 ; of the 
• Khamtis, viii. 145 ; of the Khasis, viii. 
I75> 176; in Lahul, viii. 421, 422; 
of the Malayalis, ix. 239, 240 ; of the 
Mikirs, ix. 437 ; of the Miris, ix. 444, 
446, 447 ; of the Mishmis, ix. 464 ; 
of the Angami Nagas, x. 149 ; of the 
Kukis, x. 150 ; of the Chenchus, x. 185 ; 
in Nasik, x. 230 ; of the Nicobarians, 
X. 296; of the Todas, x. 310; of the 
Botwas, x. 525 ; of the Minas, xi. 414; 
in Rangpur, xi. 495 ; in Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 28 ; of the Santals, xii. 239 ; in 
Sialkot, xii. 445 ; in Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; 
in Sirmur, xii. 555 ; in Sylhet, xiii. 

Howrah, Sub-district in Bengal, v. 461- 
464 ; physical aspects, 461, 462 ; popu- 
lation, 462, 463 ; agriculture, 463 ; 
administration, 463, 464. 

Howrah, Sub-division in Bengal, v. 464. 



Howrah, large town on the Hi'igli 
opposite Calcutta, v. 464, 465. 

Hpa-gat, township in Burma, v. 465. 

Hpa-gat, village in Burma, v. 465, 466. 

Hpaung-lin, township in Burma, v. 466. 

Hpyu, river in Burma, v. 466. 

Hubli, Sub-division in Bombay, v. 466. 

Hubli, town in Bombay, v. 466, 467. 

Hudikeri, village in Coorg, v. 467. 

Hugel, on date of temple of Matan, ix. 
360 ; saw Mer and Ser peaks from 
Wazirabad, ix. 406. 

Hughes, F., quoted, on the coal-fields of 
Jharia, vii. 228, 229. 

Hughes, A. W. , quoted, on the harbour 
of Sonmiani, xiii. 61. 

Hugh', river in Bengal, v. 467-489; 
general course of the Hugh, 468 ; 
three sections of the Hi'igli, 468, 469 ; 
alleged deterioration of the Hugli, 469; 
head-waters of the Hugli, 469 ; Hugli 
fed by infiltration, 469, 470 ; Hiigli 
head-waters — (i) Bhagirathi, the, 470, 
471 ; alleged deterioration of the 
Bhagirathi, 471, 472 ; Hiigli head- 
waters — (2) Jalangi and Bhairab, the, 

472, 473 ; Jalangi, the, 473 ; Hiigli 
head-waters — (3) Matabhanga, the, 

473, 474 ; work done by the Hiigli 
head-waters, 474 ; Hiigli head-waters 
as trade routes, 474 ; deepening opera- 
tions on the Hiigli head-waters, 474, 

475 ; Nadiya rivers operations, 475, 

476 ; training works on the Nadiya 
rivers, 476, 477 ; results of the Nadiya 
rivers operations, 477 ; future of the 
Hiigli head-waters, the, 477, 478 ; 
second section of the Hiigli, 478 ; 
old Damodar junction with the Hiigli, 
the, 478, 479 ; results of the closing of 
the Damodar mouth, 479 ; ruin of 
European settlements on the Hiigli 
above Calcutta, 479, 480 ; old Saras- 
wati, the, 480, 481 ; alleged drying 
up of the Hiigli, 481, 482 ; railway 
bridge near Hiigli, 482 ; the Hiigli from 
Calcutta downwards, 482 ; the Hiigli 
at Calcutta, 482, 483 ; alleged de- 
terioration of the Hugli channels, 483, 
484 ; changes in the channels below 
Calcutta, 484 ; James and Mary 
Sands, 484, 485 ; present state of the 
James and Mary Sands, 485 ; Hiigli 
pilot service, 485, 486 ; tug service, 

486 ; attempts to improve the channels, 
486, 487 ; defences of the Hiigli, 

487 ; estuary of the Hugli, 487, 488 ; 
tide, 488 ; refuge houses, 488 ; scenery 
on the banks, 488, 489. 

Hiigli, District in Bengal, v, 489-498 ; 
physical aspects, 489, 490 ; history, 
490-492; population, 492, 493; division 
into town and country, 493, 494 ; 



15° 



INDEX. 



agriculture, 494, 495 ; natural calami- 
ties, 495 ; commerce and trade, 496 ; 
administration, 496 - 498 ; medical 
aspects, 498. 
Hugli, Sub- division in Bengal, v, 498, 

499- 

Hugli, town in Bengal, v, 498, 499 ; 
East India Company's factory estab- 
lished at (1640), article ' India,' vi. 
369 ; oppressed by the Mughal 
governor, vi. 370. 

Hugri, river in Mysore, v. 500. 

Hujra, town in Punjab, v. 151. 

Hukeri, town in Bombay, v. 151. 

Huliyar, village in Mysore, v. 1 5 1. 

Huliyar-durga, village in Mysore, v, 
151. 

Human sacrifice, among the Kandhs, 
article ' India,' vi. 62; in Siva-worship, 
vi. 212 ; substitute of animals for 
human offerings, vi. 213, Local notices 
— Assam, i. 345 ; Bastar, ii. 206 ; 
Bengal, ii. 291 ; Bhangoda, ii. 369 ; 
Bissemkatak, iii. 18 ; Bonai, iii. 86 ; 
Bundare, iii. 150 ; the Gonds in the 
Central Provinces, iii. 310, 31 1 ; the 
Deori Chutiyas, iii. 467 ; the Garos, 
V. 30; Gumsur, v. 199 ; Hill Tipperah, 
V. 396 ; Jaintia, vii. 46, 47 ; Jaipur 
(Madras), vii. 63 ; the Kandh-mals, 
vii. 400 ; the Kandhs, vii. 404 ; 
Phuljhar, xi. 164; on the Singanmat 
(1867), xii. 528. 

Humayun, second Mughal Emperor of 
Delhi (1530-56), article 'India,' vi. 
290, 291 ; expulsion from India by his 
Afghan governor of Bengal, vi. 291 ; 
subsequent recovery of the throne by 
the second battle of Panfpat, vi. 291. 
Local notices — Took Champaner, iii. 
333 ; defeated by Sher Shah at Chausa, 
iii. 378 ; his mausoleum at Delhi, iv. 
188 ; moved capital from Agra to 
Delhi, iv. 193; conquered Jaunpur and 
Behar for his father Babar, vii. 153 ; 
his twelve years' siege of Kalinjar, 
vii. 332 ; defeated by Sher Shah at 
Kanauj, vii. 386 ; took Pawagarh, xi. 
122 ; his family sheltered in Rewa, xii. 
47 ; his attemjDts to invade Sind, xii. 
510. 

Humberstone, Colonel, defeated Tipi'i 
Sultan at Ponani, after failing to take 
Palghat (1782), xi. 197 ; took refuge at 
Tanur on his retreat from Palghat, 
xiii. 199. 

Humcha, village in Mysore, v. 501, 502. 

Hume, A. O., founded High School at 
Etawah, iv. 377, 379 ; Humeganj 
there, called after him, iv. 378 ; his 
identification of Munj, x. 15. 

Ilungund, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, v. 502. 



Huns, The White, probably destroyed 

Shorkot in tlie 6th century, xii. 424. 
Hiinsur, town in Mysore, v. 502. 
Hunter, Major F. M., his account of 

Perim, used, xi. 137, 138. 
Hunter, Rev. T., missionary, murdered 

at Sialkot (1857), church in memory 

of, there, xii. 445. 
Hunza, mountain State in Afghanistan, 

XV. 502, 503. 
Hurang, range of hills in Assam, \. 503. 
Husain, town in N.-W. Provinces, v. 

503- 

Husain Ali, Sayyid, with his brother, 
placed Faruksiyyar on the throne 
(1713), and overthrew him (1719), v. 
257, 258 ; came from Jansath, vii. 
142. 

Husain Beg, took Sandwip Island and 
the mouths of the Meghna from Arakan 
(1664), iii. 436. _ 

Husain Beli, ferry in Bombay, v. 503. 

Husain Nizam Shah, king of Ahmadnagar 
(1553-88), one of the Muhammadan 
kings who won the battle of Talikot 
(1564), i. loS. 

Husainpur-Bahadurpur, village in N.-W. 
Provinces, v. 503. 

Husain Shah, Afghan king of Gaur ( 1499- 
1520), took prisoner Nilambhar, Raja 
of Rangpur, xi. 491. 

Husain Shah, last Sultan of Jaunpur, 
seized Budaun (1479), but was ex- 
pelled by Bahlol Lodi, iii. I17 ; built 
the Jama Masjid at Jaunpur, vii. 152 ; 
defeated at Kalpi (1477), vii. 342; 
took Sambhal (1473), ix. 506. 

Hushiarpur. See Hoshiarpur. 

Hutri-durga, hill in Mysore, v. 503. 

Hyaenas, in India, article ' India,' vi. 
655. Local notices — Found on Mount 
Abu, i. 6 ; in Akola, i. 141 ; Ananta- 
pur, i. 274 ; North Arcot, i. 312 ; 
South Arcot, i. 320 ; Baluchistan, ii. 
36 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; Bankura, ii. 79 ; 
Bannu, ii. 90 ; Belgaum, ii. 232 ; 
Bellary, ii. 241 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 132; 
Buldana, iii. 143 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 423; 
Cochin, iv. 2 ; Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; 
Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Dharwar, iv. 259 ; 
Gaya, v. 45 ; Godavari, v. 123 ; 
Goona, v. 159; Gwalior, v. 229; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 275 ; Hamirpur, 
v. 298 ; Hissar, v. 427 ; Hoshiarpur, 
V. 452 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; Jerruck, vii. 
iSo; Jhang, vii. 206; Jhansi, vii. 217 ; 
Kaira, vii. 300 ; North Kanara, vii. 
370 ; Kangra, vii. 413 ; Karachi, vii. 
445 ; Karnul, viii. 35 ; Kathiawar, 
viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133 ; Kolaba, 
viii. 261 ; Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kotah, 
viii. 304 ; Kulu, viii. 338 ; Kumaun, 
viii. 349 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Lark- 



INDEX. 



iSi 



hana, viii. 463 ; Lohardaga, viii. 477 ; 
Madras Presidency, ix. 8, 89 ; Main- 
puri, ix. 203 ; Malabar, ix. 220 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 425 ; Mirzapur, ix. 453; 
Monghyr, ix. 481; Muttra, x. 45; 
Nllgiri Hills, x. 308 ; Rajagriha Hills, 
xi, 94 ; Peshawar, xi. 147 ; Punjab, 
xi. 259 ; Purniah, xi. 323 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 22; Saharanpur, xii. 1 15; 
Salem, xii. 152 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 
227 ; Satara, xii. 277 ; Shahabad, xii. 
324 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; Sind, 
xii. 507 ; Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Siwalik 
Hills, xiii. 43 ; Surat, xiii. 120 ; Tarai, 
xiii. 208 ; the Thar, xiii. 264 ; Upper 
Sind Frontier, xiii. 440 ; Wardha, xiii. 
524 ; Wun, xiii. 539. 

Hyderabad. See Haidarabad. 

Hyderabad Assigned Districts or Berar. 
See Haidarabad Assigned Districts. 

Hydergarh. Sec Hosangadi. 

Hylakandy. See Hailakandi. 



Ibex, The, article ' India,' vi. 657. 
Local notices — Found on the Anamalai 
Hills, i. 270 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; 
Chamba, iii. 329 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 15 ; Western Ghats, 
V. 59 ; Hindu Kush, v. 419 ; Jerruck, 
vii. 180; Kangra, vii. 413; Kashmir, 
viii. 68 ; Kiilu, viii. 338 ; Larkhana, 
viii. 463 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 8, 
9t ; Maciura, ix. 121 ; Malabar, ix. 
220 ; Nllgiri Hills, x. 307 ; Palni 
Mountains, xi. 17 ; Pishin, xi. 188 ; 
Sind, xii. 507 ; Wardwan valley, xiii. 

530- 

Ibn Batuta, traveller from Tangiers, 
quoted on Daulatabad under Muham- 
mad Tughlak, iv. 160 ; the mosque of 
Kutab-ud-din at Delhi, iv. 191 ; the 
desolation of Delhi in 1341, iv. 192 ; 
Dharmapatam, iv. 253 ; Honawar, v. 
440 ; mentions Malabar as Mulaibar, 
ix. 217 ; visited the Maldive .Islands 
(1341), ix. 249.^ 

Ibrahim Adil Shah I., king of Bijapur 
(1534-57), defeated the king of Ahmad- 
nagar, i. ic8 ; his reign, ii. 424 ; ceded 
Bardez and Salsette to the Portuguese, 
v. loi. 

Ibrahim Adil Shah II., king of Bijapur 
(1579-1626), his reign, ii. 424. 

Ibrahim Khan, commanded the Maratha 
left at the battle of Panipat (1761), 
his conduct there, xi. 45-47. 

Ibrahim Lodi, Defeat and overthrow of, 
by Babar at the first battle of Panipat 
(1526), article ' India,' vi. 290. Local 
notices — Took Gwalior, v. 236 ; de- 



feated by Babar at Lahore, viii. 405 ; 
his final defeat and death at Panipat, 
xi. 44, 45 ; planted Muhammadan 
colony at Sakit, xii. 146. 

Ibrahim Sharki, Sultan of Jaunpur (1401- 
40), defeated the Bhars in Bachhrawan, 
i. 405 ; annihilated them in Dalmau, 
iv. 100 ; built the Atala Masjid at 
Jaunpur, vii. 152, 159 ; his sieges of 
Kalpi, vii. 342 ; conquered Sambhal, 
ix. 505 ; his reduction and administra- 
tion of most of Oudh, x. 487 ; built 
the fort and well of Rai Bareli, xi. 360, 
conqured Safipur, xii. lOO ; overthrew 
Raja of Ugri, xiii. 416. 

Ibrahimabad, town in Oudh, v. 504. 

Ichak, town in Bengal, v. 504. 

Ichakada, village in Bengal, v. 504. 

Ichamati, river in Bengal, v. 504. 

Ichapur, town in Madras, v. 504. 

Ichapur, town in Bengal, v. 505. 

Ichanli, town in Oudh, v. 505. 

Ichawar, town in Central India, v. 505. 

Ichra, suburb of Lahore, v. 505. 

Idar. See Edar. 

Idha. See Aidaha. 

Igatpuri, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, V. 505, 506. 

Iggutappa-kunda, mountain in Coorg, v. 
506. 

Iglas, town and tahsll in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, V. 506, 507. 

Ihtimad-ud-Daula, wazir of the Emperor 
Jahangir, his mausoleum at Agra, i. 

75- 
Ikauna, town and pargand in Oudh, v. 

507, 508. 

Ikhtiyarpur, town in Oudh, v. 508. 

Ikhtiyar-ud-din Malik Usbeg, invaded 
Kamrup (1256), but defeated and 
mortally wounded, vii. 356, 357- 

Ikkeri, village in Mysore, v. 508. 

Ilambazar, town in Bengal, v. 508. 

Ilavarasanandal. Sec Elavarasanandal. 

Ilichpur. See Ellichpur. 

Iliyas Kivaja Sultan, first Muhammadan 
king of Bengal, moved capital from 
Gaur to Panduah (1353), xi. 40, 41 ; 
invaded and plundered Tipperah, xiii. 

314- 
Ilkal, town in Bombay, v. 508, 509. 
Ilol, town and State in Bombay, v. 509. 
Imad Shahi, Muhammadan dynasty of 

S. India (1484-1572), article ' India,' 

vi. 288. 
Imdin or revenue - free grants and the 

Imam Commission in Madras, ix. 

5,2' 53- . . 
Imamgarh, historic fortress in Bombay, 

V. 509. 

Imlak, Col., took Deogadh (1818), iv.233. 

Immigration. See Emigration and im- 
migration. 



152 



INDEX. 



Immobility of the Indian peasant, article 
' India,' vi. 47. 

Impediments to improved husbandry, 
namely, want of cattle, want of manure, 
and want of water, article ' India,' vi. 

517-519- 
Impey, Sir Elijah, Portrait of, in the 

High Court, Calcutta, iii. 251 ; Loretto 

Convent on the site of his house there, 

iii. 253. 
Impey, Major, his policy in Sambalpur 

(1861), xii. 181. 
Imports and Exports. See Exports and 

Imports. 
Import trade of India, Analysis and 

principal staples of, article ' India,' vi. 

565-568 ; coasting imports and exports, 

vi. 584-586. 
Incarnations of Vishnu, article ' India,' 

vi. 215, 216 and footnote. 
Ince, Dr., quoted on Srinagar, xiii. 76. 
Inchalkaranji, State in Bombay, v. 509, 

510. 
Inchalkaranji, town in Bombay, v. 510. 
Income and Expenditure of British India, 

article ' India,' vi. 465-470. 
Increase of population between 1872 and 

1881, article ' India,' vi. 47, 49, 50 ; 

and Population section in the several 

District articles. 
Indapur, town and Sub - division in 

Bombay, v. 510. 
Indarpat, village in Punjab, v. 510, 511. 
Indaur. See Indore. 
independent Nayaks and Palegars of 

S. India, article ' India,' vi. 288. 
Independent States, bordering on British 

India, Afghanistan, i. 27-53 ; Afghan- 

Turkistan, i. 53-56 ; Baluchistan, ii. 

27-40; Bhutan, ii. 411-417; Inde- 
pendent (now Upper) Burma, iii. 209- 

229; Nepal, X. 274-291; Sikkim, xii. 

483-488. 
Indi, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

V. 511. 



India, Empire of, vol. vi. : — 

Chap. I. Physical Aspects. — Gene- 
ral description of India, boundaries, 
1-4; the three regions of India, 4. 
First region — the Himalayas, their 
scenery and products, 4-10. Second 
region — the northern river plains, lO- 
34 ; the great rivers, their work, land- 
making, 10-33 ; the Indus, Brahma- 
putra, and Ganges, 10-16; the Gangetic 
river system, the highway of Bengal, 
16-20; great Gangetic cities, 20, 21 ; 
three stages in the life of an Indian 
river, 21, 22 ; delta of the Ganges, its 
age and process of formation, 23-28 ; 
the rivers as highways and as destroyers, 



29-32 ; scenery and crops of the 
northern river plains, 32 - 34 ; third 
region of India, the southern table- 
land, 34-41 ; the Deccan, the^/zaVjand 
their passes, 35-38 ; the four forest 
regions of Southern India, 38-40; crops 
and scenery of Southern India, 40, 41 ; 
British Burma, its geography and pro- 
ducts, 41, 42. 

Chap. II. The Population of India. 
— Feudatory India, the chiefs and their 
powers, 43 ; the twelve British pro- 
vinces, how governed, 43, 44 ; popula- 
tion tables, 44, 45 ; pressure of popula- 
tion, overcrowded Districts, 46 ; under- 
peopled Provinces, the ' immobile ' 
Indian peasant, 47 ; nomadic system 
of husbandry, 47 ; the land and labour 
question in India, serfdom, 48, 49 ; 
unequal pressure of population, its 
remedies, 49, 50 ; population of India 
in 1872 and 1881, increase, 50; the 
ethnical elements of the Indian people, 

5i> 52. 

Chap. III. The Non-Arya7t Races. 
— Kistvaen builders, flint and bronze 
periods, 53 ; the non-Aryans of Vedic 
India described, 53, 54 ; Andaman 
islanders, Anamalai Hill tribes, 55 ; 
polyandry among the Nairs ; the Gonds, 
55, 56 ; leaf-wearing Juangs of Orissa, 
Himalayan tribes, 56, 57 ; the Santals — 
villageand tribal government, 57; Santal 
customs, religion, and history, 58-60 ; 
the Kandhs — tribal government, wars, 
and blood revenge, 60, 61 ; Kandh 
marriage by capture, human sacrifice, 
61, 62 ; the three non- Aryan stocks — 
Tibeto-Burmans, Dravidians, and Kol- 
arians, their languages, 63-69 ; statis- 
tics of non- Aryan races in 1872 and 
1881, 69-71 ; crushed tribes, gipsy 
clans, predatory tribes, 71, 72; char- 
acter of the non-Aryan tribes, 72, 73 ; 
Mhairs and Bhils, their reclamation by 
good government, 73, 74. 

Chap. IV. The Aryans in Ancient 
India.— The. Indo-European stock, 75 ; 
its early camping-ground in Central 
Asia, 75, 76 ; common origin of 
European and Indian religions, 76 ; 
the Indo- Aryans on the march, and in 
their new homes, 76, 77 ; the Rig- 
Veda, widow-burning unknown, 77> 
78 ; development of caste, 78, 87, 88, 
89, 90, 91, 94, 95, 96 ; Aryan civilisa- 
tion in the Veda, 79-86 ; the Aryan 
tribes organized into kingdoms, 87 ; 
origin and growth of priestly families, 
87, 88 ; the four Vedas, Brahmanas, 
Sutras, 88, 89 ; the warrior and cul- 
tivating castes, 89, 90 ; the four castes 
formed, 90, 91 ; struggle between the 



INDEX. 



153 



Brahmans and Kshattriyas, 92 - 94 ; 
Brahman supremacy established, Brah- 
man ideal life, 94-97 ; Brahman theo- 
logY) 97 ; rise of the post-Vedic gods, 
the Hindu triad, 97, 98 ; Brahman 
philosophy, its six schools, 98, 99 ; 
Brahman science and grammar, Panini, 
100, loi ; Sanskrit and Prakrit dialects 
and Mss., 101-104; the Indian alpha- 
bets, 102, 103 ; Brahman astronomy, 
its three periods, 104-106; Brahman 
mathematics, medicine, and surgery, 
106 -no; Hindu art of war, no; 
Indian music, its peculiarities and 
modern revival, IIO-I12; Indian archi- 
tecture, art-work, and painting, 112, 
113; Brahman law — codes of Manu 
and Yajnavalkya, 113-115 ; Hindu 
customary law, perils of codification, 
116-118 ; secular literature of the 
Hindus, 118; the Alahdbhdrata, its 
growth and central story, 1 19-122 ; the 
polyandry of Draupadi, 121, 122; the 
Rdmdyana, its story and its author, 
Valmiki, 122, 124 ; later Sanskrit epics, 
124, 125 ; the Hindu drama, Kalidasa, 
125-127 ; the Hindu novel, beast 
stories, 127, 128; Sanskrit lyric poetry, 
Jayadeva, 128 ; mediceval theology, 
the Puranas, 128-130; 216, 217; the 
six attacks on Brahmanism, 130, 131. 

Chap. V. Buddhistn (543 B.C. to 
1000 A.D.). — Buddha's story modelled 
on the Sanskrit epic, 132 ; Buddha, the 
spiritual development of the heroic 
Aryan man, 133, 134 ; Buddha's 
parentage, early life, and great renun- 
ciation, 133, 134; his forest life, temp- 
tation, and teachings, 134, 135 ; his 
later years and death, 136, 137 ; the 
northern and southern Buddhist schools, 
138 ; political life of Buddha, his 
opponents, Devadatta, 139, 140; doc- 
trines of Buddha, Kaniia, Ni>-vdna, 
141, 142; moral code of Buddha, its 
missionary aspects, 143 ; political de- 
velopment of Buddhism, the four 
Councils, 143, 144, 147 ; the work of 
Asoka, his council and edicts, 144-147; 
the work of Kanishka, 147 ; the 
northern and southern Buddhist canons, 
147-149 ; spread of Buddhism through- 
out Asia, 149, 150; Buddhist influences 
on Christianity, 150; Buddha as a 
Christian saint, 151, 152; Buddha's 
personality denied, 153 ; Buddhism did 
not oust Brahmanism, 154, 155 ; the 
Chinese Buddhist pilgrims, Fa Hian 
and Hiuen Tsiang, 155, 156 ; Buddhism 
under Siladitya, monastery of Nalanda, 
^56, 157 ; mingling of Buddhism and 
Brahmanism, 157 ; Buddhism an exiled 
religion, its foreign conquests, 158 ; 



Buddhist survivals in India, 157-162; 
the Jains, their relation to the Bud- 
dhists, 157-162. 

Chap. VI. The Greeks in India 
(32710 161 B.C.). — Early Greek writers 
— Hekataios, Strabo, Pliny, and Arrian, 
163 ; Alexander in India, results of 
his invasion, 164-166 ; Seleukos and 
Chandra Gupta, 166, 169 ; the India 
of Megasthenes, 168, 169; Indo-Greek 
treaty, later Greeks, 170; Greek sur- 
vivals in Indian art, 171, 172; ancient 
and modern Greeks, the Yavanas, 172, 

173- 

Chap. \II. Scythic Inroads into 

India (126? B.C. to 544 A.D.). — Early 
Scythic migrations towards India, Tue- 
Chi settlements, 174, 175; pre-Bud- 
dhistic Scythic influences, the horse 
sacrifice, 175, 176; was Buddha a 
Scythian? Tibetan traditions, 1 76- 1 78; 
Scythic Buddhism and settlements in 
India, 178, 179; Scythian elements in 
India, the Jats and Rajputs (?), 179, 
I So ; Indian struggle against the 
Scythians, 180 - 182 ; Indo - Scythic 
settlements — Sen, Gupta, and Valabhi 
dynasties, 181, 182 ; pre-Aryan king- 
doms in Northern India, 183, 184 ; the 
Takshaks and Nagas, 184-186; Ghak- 
kars, Bhars, Bhils, Kochs, Ahams, 
Gonds, etc., 186-189; Scythic and 
Naga influences on Hinduism, 189, 
190. 

Chap. VIII. Rise of Hinduism 
(750 to 1520 A.D.). — Decay and per- 
secution (?) of Buddhism, 191, 192; 
twofold basis of Hinduism — caste 
and religion, 192 ; caste founded on 
'race,' 'occupation,' and 'locality,' 

192, 193 ; the Brahman caste analysed, 

193, 194; building up of caste, Hindu 
marriage law, 194, 195 ; changes of 
' occupation ' by castes, 196, 197 ; 
plasticity and rigidity of caste, 197 ; 
caste a system of trade - guilds, an 
Indian strike, 197, 198 ; practical 
working of caste, no poor-law, rewards 
and punishments, 198-200 ; religious 
basis of Hinduism, 200, 201 ; Buddhist 
influences, beast hospitals, monasteries, 
201, 202 ; a Japanese temple and a 
Christian church, 202, 203 ; shrines 
common to different faiths, 203 ; ser- 
pent worship, Naga rites, phaUic em- 
blems, 204 ; fetish worship in Hin- 
duism, the Sdlagrdm, 205, 206 ; Brah- 
man founders of Hinduism, low-caste 
apostles, 207 ; the Acta Sanctorum of 
Hinduism, the Bhakta - Mala, 208 ; 
Kumarila Bhatta, Sankara Acharya, 
209 ; growth of Siva worship, its two- 
fold aspects, 210-212 ; human offerings, 



154 



INDEX. 



the Charak Pnja, 212, 213 ; the thirteen 
Sivaite sects, their gradations, 213, 
214 ; Siva and Vishnu compared, 215 ; 
friendly Vishnu, the Vishnu Purdna, 
215, 216; Brahmanical and popular 
Vlshnuism, 217 ; Vishnuite founders 
— Ramanuja, Ramanand, 217, 218 ; 
Kabir, Chaitanya, Vallabha - Swami, 
218-222; Krishna - worship, the chief 
Vishnuite sects, 222, 223 ; the Brah- 
manical and Buddhist origin of Jagan- 
nath, 224 ; Christian calumnies against 
Jagannath, 224-226 ; modern fate of 
the Hindu triad, 227, 22S. 

Chap. IX. Christianity in India 
{circa 100 to 18S1 A.D.). — Christianity 
coeval with Buddhism for 900 years, 
229 ; origin of Christianity in India, 
229 ; the three legends of St. Thomas, 
230-239 ; St. Thomas the Apostle, 
Thomas the Manichtean, Thomas the 
Armenian, 231, 232; wide meaning of 
' India ' in the Fathers, 233 ; early 
Indian Christians (190 A. D. ), 234, 235 ; 
the Nestorian churcli in Asia, its wide 
diffusion, 235, 236 ; ' Thomas Chris- 
tians ' of Persia and of India, 237 ; 
mixed worships at the alleged shrine of 
St. Thomas near Madras, 238 ; troubles 
of the ancient Indian church, 240 ; 
extinction of the Nestorian church, 241, 
242, 243 ; first Portuguese missionaries 
(1500 A.D.), the Syrian rite, 243-245; 
Xavier and the Jesuits, work done by, 
244, 245 ; Jesuit literature in India, 
246, 250, 253 ; parochial organization 
of Portuguese India, 247; Jesuit colleges 
and rural settlements, 247 - 250 ; the 
Jesuit Malabar mission in the 17th and 
l8th centuries, 251, 252; the Portuguese 
inquisition at Goa, 253, 254 ; the 
Jesuits suppressed (1759-73), re-estab- 
lished {1814), 254, 255 ; organization 
of Roman Catholic missions, 255, 256 ; 
distribution of Roman Catholics in 
India, 257, 259 ; first Protestant mis- 
sionaries (1705), Danish, Lutherans, 
259, 260 ; Schwartz, Kiernander, the 
Serampur missionaries, 260 ; bishopric 
of Calcutta, Indian sees, 261 ; Presby- 
terian and other missions, 261 ; statis- 
tics of Protestant missions, and their 
progress, 261, 263, 265 ; general statis- 
tics of Christian population in India, 
264 ; the Indian ecclesiastical establish- 
ment, 266, 267. 

Chap. X. Early Muhatninadan 
Riders (711 to 1526 A.D.). — Early Arab 
expeditions to Bombay and Sind, 268 ; 
India on the eve of the Muhammadan 
conquest, 268, 269 ; Hindu kingdoms 
(1000 A.D.), 269; the Muhammadan 
conquests only short-lived and tem- 



porary, 270; table of Muhammadan 
dynasties (looi to 1857 A.D.), 271 ; 
first Tiirki invasions, Subuktigin (977 
A.D.), 272 ; Mahmud of Ghazni, his 17 
invasions, Somnath, 273, 274; house 
of Ghor (1001-30 A.D.), Muhammad of 
Ghor's invasions, 275 - 278 ; Hindu 
kingdoms, Rajput dissensions (1184 
A. D. ), 276, 277; Muhammadan con- 
quest of Bengal, 277, 278; Slave dynasty 
(1206-90 A. D.), Altamsh, the Empress 
Raziya, 278, 279 ; Mughal irruptions 
into Northern India, and Rajput revolts, 
279, 280 ; Balban's cruelties and his 
royal pensioners, end of Slave dynasty, 
280 ; house of Khilji, Ala-ud-din's 
conquest of Southern India, 280, 282 ; 
Mughal mercenaries for the suppression 
of Hindu revolts, 282, 28 ? ; house of 
Tughlak (1320-1414 A.D.), Muhammad 
Tughlak's expeditions and cruelties, 
283 ; his forced currency, revenue exac- 
tions, and revolts against him, 283, 284 ; 
Firuz Shah Tughlak's canals (1351-88 
A. D. ), 285 ; Timur (Tamerlane), (1398 
A.D.), Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, 285, 
286 ; Hindu kingdoms of the Deccan, 
Vijayanagar, 286, 287, 2S8 ; five Mu- 
hammadan States of the Deccan, Bah- 
mani kings, 287, 288 ; independent 
Nayaks and Palegars of Southern India, 
288 ; state of India on the eve of the 
Mughal conquest, 288, 289. 

Chap. XI. The Mughal Empire 
(1526 to 1761 A.D.). — Babar's early 
life, his invasion of India, Panipat 
(1526), 290; Humayun, Sher Shah 
the Afghan, 290, 291 ; Akbar the 
Great, his work in India (1560- 1605), 
291-297 ; his conciliation of the Hindus, 
intermarriages, 293 ; Akbar's Hindu 
militaiy and revenue officers, 293 ; 
reform of Hindu customs, change of 
capital to Agra, 293, 294 ; Akbar's 
subjugation of Khandesh, his death, 
294, 295 ; Akbar's religious principles, 
his new faith, 295, 296 ; Akbar's 
organization of the empire, army and 
judicial reforms, 296 ; Akbar's financial 
system, table of his revenues, 296-298 ; 
revenues of the Mughal Empire (1593- 
1761), 299, 300; Jahangir Emperor 
(1605-27), the Empress Nur Jahan, 
300, 301; Sir Thomas Roe, ambassador, 
drinking bouts at court, 301, 302; 
Jahangir's personal character, his jus- 
tice and religion, 302 ; Shah Jahan 
Emperor (1628-58), his Deccan con- 
quests, 302-304 ; Shah Jahan's archi- 
tectural works — Taj Mahal and Moti 
Masjid, 304 ; the Great Mosque and 
Imperial Palace at Delhi, 304 ; rebel- 
lion of Prince Aurangzeb, and deposi- 



INDEX. 



155 



tion of Shah Jahan, 305 ; Provinces 
and revenues under Shah Jahan, 305 ; 
Aurangzeb Emperor (1658-1707), 306- 
312; murder of his brothers, 307; 
conquests in Southern India, rise of 
the Maralhas, 307, 30S ; Aurangzeb's 
twenty years' Maratha war, his despair 
and death, 308, 309 ; Aurangzeb's 
oppression of Hindus, Rajput revolts, 
309, 310; Aurangzeb's Provinces and 
revenues, 310, 311 ; character of Aur- 
angzeb, 312 ; six puppet successors of 
Aurangzeb, 313 ; decline and fall of the 
Mughal Empire (1707-1858), 312, 313 ; 
independence of the Deccan, Oudh, 
and Rajput States, 314; invasions of 
Nadir Shah the Persian, and Ahmad 
Shah the Afghan (1739-61), 314, 315 ; 
last battle of Panipat (1761) and fall of 
the Mughal Empire, 315, 316. 

Chap. XII. The Mardthd Poiver 
(1634 to 1818 A.D.). — India won, not 
from the Mughals, but from the Hindus, 
317 ; rise of the Marathas, Shahji 
Bhonsla (1634), 317 ; the Hindu party 
in Southern India, 317, 318; Sivaji 
the Great (1627-80), 318, 319; his 
guerilla warfare with the Mughals, 319 ; 
Sambhaji (16S0-S9), Sahu (1707), 319, 
320 ; rise of the Peshvvas, Balaji Vis- 
wanath, 320 ; growth of the Maratha 
confederacy, 320 ; Maratha raids in the 
Deccan, Bengal, and the Punjab, 
chaiith, 320, 321 ; defeat of the 
Marathas at Panipat (1761), 321 ; the 
five great Maratha houses, decline of 
the Peshwas, 321-323 ; British wars 
with the Marathas (1779-81, 1803-04, 
and 1817-18), 323, 324. 

Chap. XIII. Tlie Indian Ve7-7ia- 
ctdars and their LitcratiDX. — The 
three stages in Indian history, 325, 
326 ; the Dravidian route through 
India, 327 ; the Dravidian language, 
its place in philology, 327, 328 ; pre- 
Aryan Dravidian civilisation, 328 ; 
Brahmanic influence on the Dravidians, 
329 ; Dravidian dialects, Tamil, 330- 
333 ; Aryan languages of Northern 
India, Sanskrit, 334, 335 ; the Prakrits 
or ancient Aryan vernaculars, 336-338 ; 
the modern vernaculars evolved Irom 
the ancient Prakrits, 338 ; Sanskrit, 
Prakrit, and non-Aryan elements in 
modern vernaculars, 339-342 ; the seven 
modern vernaculars, 342-344 ; the 
modern vernaculars, their literature 
and authors, 343-35S ; Hindi, its his- 
torical development and chief authors, 
345, 346 ; Marathi, its historical de- 
velopment and chief authors, 346 ; 
Bengali, its historical development, 
literature, and chief authors, 346-354. 



Chap. XIV. Early Em-opean Settle- 
metits (1498 to 1 8th Century A.D. ). — 
Vasco da Gama's expedition (1498), 
356-358 ; Portuguese voyages and sup- 
remacy in the East, Albuquerque and 
his successors, 357-360; downfall of 
the Portuguese, their possessions in 
1881, 361 ; the Dutch in India (1602- 
1824), 361, 362 ; their brilliant pro- 
gress, but short-sighted policy, 362 ; 
fall of the Dutch power, Dutch relics 
in India, 362, 363 ; early English 
adventurers (1496-1596), 363, 364; 
English East India Companies, 364, 
365; early English voyages (1602-11), 
365, 366; naval fights with the Portu- 
guese, Swally (1615), 366, 367; wars 
with the Dutch, massacre of Amboyna, 
367, 368 ; early English factories — 
Surat, Masulipatam, Hugh, 368, 369 ; 
Madras founded (1639), Bombay ceded 
(1661), 369, 370; Calcutta founded 
(16S6), 371 ; other European East 
Indian Companies, 37 1 -377- 

Chap. XV. History of British Rule. 
(1757 to 1885). —First British territorial 
possessions, 378 ; French and English 
wars in the Karnatik, Dupleix, Clive, 
378-3S0 ; the English in Bengal (1634- 
96), 380 ; native rulers of Bengal (1707- 
56), the 'Black Hole' tragedy, 380, 
381 ; battle of Plassey (1757), and its 
results, 381-3S3 ; Clive, first Governor 
of Bengal (175S), list of governors and 
viceroys, 384 ; Clive's wars in Oudh, 
Madras, and Bengal, 385 ; massacre of 
Patna, first Sepoy Mutiny, battle of 
Baxar, 386 ; the grant of the ' Diivdni' 
(1765), 387 ; Clive's reorganization of 
the Company's service (1766), 387. 
Administration of Warren Hastings 
(1772-85), 387-392; abolition of the dual 
system of administration (1772), 388; 
Hastings' policy towards Native powers, 
388-390 ; Rohilla, Maratha, and My- 
sore wars, 390-392 ; charges against 
Hastings, his poor excuse, 391. Lord 
Cornwallis (1786-93), the permanent 
settlement, 392, 393 ; second Mysore 
war, 394. Marquis of Wellesley (1798- 
1805), his work in India, 394 - 398 ; 
treaty with the Nizam, and extinction 
of French influence, 395, 396 ; third 
Mysore war, and fall of Seringapatam 
(1799)1 396) 397 j second Maratha war 
(1802-05), and extension of British 
territory, 397, 398. Sir George Barlow 
(1805), the Vellore Sepoy Mutiny, 399; 
Earl of Minto (1807-13), embassies to 
Persia and Afghanistan, 399, 400. 
Marquis of Hastings (1814-23), 400- 
402 ; the Nepal, Pindari, and last 
Maratha wars, 40 1 , 402. Lord Amherst 



iS6 



INDEX. 



(1823-28), 403, 404 ; first Burmese war, 
capture of Bhartpur, 404. Lord William 
Bentinck (1828-35), 404-406; his finan- 
cial reforms, sati and thagi suppressed, 
404, 405 ; renewal of Charter, Mysore 
protected, Coorg annexed, 405, 406. 
Lord Metcalfe (1835-36), liberty of the 
Press, 406. Lord Auckland (1S36-42), 
406-408; the first Afghan war (1839- 
41), its disastrous termination, 408. 
Lord EUenborough (1842-44), 408, 
410 ; the army of retribution, ' Gates 
of Somnath,' 408, 409 ; Sind war, and 
Gwalior outbreak, 409, 410. Lord 
Hardinge (1S44-4S), the first Sikh war, 
410,411. Earl of Dalhousie (1848-56), 
411-417 ; second Sikh war, and an- 
nexation of the Punjab, 412, 413 ; 
second Burmese war, and annexation 
of Pegu, 413, 414 ; Dalhousie's policy 
towards Native States, the doctrine of 
Lapse, 414 ; Satara, Jhansi, Nagpur, 
Berar, 415 ; annexation of Oudh, 415- 
417; Lord Dalhousie's work, extensions 
of territory, 417. Earl Canning (1856- 
62), 417-424 ; the ^Mutiny of 1857-58, 
417-422; downfall of the Company, 
India transferred to the Crown, 422, 
423 ; Queen's proclamation of Novem- 
ber 1st, 1858, 423, 424 ; financial and 
legal reforms, 424. Lord Elgin (1862), 
Lord Lawrence (1864-69), 424, 425. 
Lord Mayo (1869-72), Ambala Darbdr, 
Duke of Edinburgh's visit, 425; financial 
reforms, abolition of inland customs 
lines, 425. Lord Northbrook (1872- 
76), visit of Prince of Wales, 425, 426. 
Lord Lytton (1876-80), proclamation of 
the Queen as Empress, 426, 427 ; 
famine of 1877-78, second Afghan war, 
426, 427. Marquis of Ripon (1880-84), 
end of the Afghan war, 427 ; rendition 
of Mysore, legal and revenue reforms, 
427-429; Education Commission, aboli- 
tion of import duties, 429 ; Bengal Ten- 
ancy Bill, 429. Earl of Dufferin (1884), 
430; annexation of Upper Burma, 430. 
Chap. XVL Bfitish Administration 
of India. — Control of India in England, 
431 ; under the Company and under 
the Crown, 431 ; the Secretar)^ of 
State, the Viceroy, 431 ; the Executive 
and Legislative Councils, 432, 433 ; 
High Courts, the law of India, 433, 

434 ; Provincial administration in dif- 
ferent Provinces, 434, 435 ; ' Regula- 
tion ' and ' Non-Regulation ' Districts, 

435 ; the District officers, their duties, 
435> 436 ; Districts and Sub-Districts 
of India, 436, 437 ; the Secretariats — 
Imperial and Provincial, 437, 438 ; 
the land-tax, 438-441 ; ancient land 

. system under Hindus and Musalmans, 



43S, 439 ; land system under the Com- 
pany, the zaminddr, 439 ; landed pro- 
perty in India, growth of private 
rights, 439, 440 ; rates of land-tax, 
Government share of the crop, 440, 
441 ; the land settlement, ' survey and 
settlement,' 441 ; permanent settlement 
of Bengal, 441-443; Land Law of 
1859, Rent Commission of 1880, 443, 
/ \ \\ ; temporary settlements, in Orissa, 
in Assam, 445 ; rdyatwdii settlement 
in Madras, Sir Thomas IVIunro, 445, 
446 ; permanent settlement in Madras, 
sub-tenures, 446, 447 ; extension of 
tillage in Madras, reduction of average 
land-tax, 447, 448 ; land system of 
Bombay, the ' Survey ' tenure, 448, 
449 ; the Deccan cultivator. Agricul- 
turists' Relief Acts (1879 and 1881), 
449, 450; land system in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces and Punjab, 451 ; in Oudh and 
the Central Provinces, 451, 452; land 
revenue of British India, 452 ; the salt- 
tax, systems of manufacture, 453, 454 ; 
Excise — distilleries and breweries, 
454> 455 ; opium, gdnjd, charas, 455 ; 
municipal administration, the old pa7i- 
chdyat, 455-457 ; finance and taxation 
of British India, 457-470; obscurities 
in Indian accounts, 458 ; taxation 
under the ]\Iughals and the British 
compared, 459-463 ; hea^y taxation in 
Native States, 464 ; incidence of taxa- 
tion in British India, 464, 465 ; balance- 
sheet of British India, 465-468 ; analy- 
sis of Indian revenues, 465 ; 467, 468 ; 
Indian expenditure — army, public 
debt, famine relief, 468, 469; ex- 
change, public works, railways, irriga- 
tion, 469, 470 ; imperial and muni- 
cipal finance, 470 ; the army of India, 
its constitution, 4.70, 471 ; police and 
jails, 472 ; education, 472-479 ; educa- 
tion in ancient India, Sanskrit tols 
and village schools, 472, 473; early 
English efforts, the Calcutta JMadrasa 
and other colleges, 473 ; mission 
schools, 473 ; State system of educa- 
tion in India, 473, 474; Education 
Commission of 1882-83, 474 ; educa- 
tion statistics, 1878 to 1883, 474, 
475 ; Indian universities, colleges, and 
schools, 475-477; primary schools, 
girls' schools, normal and other special 
schools, 477-479 ; the vernacular press, 
newspapers and books, 480, 481. 

Chap. XVII. Agriculture and Pro- 
ducts. — Agriculture almost the sole 
occupation of the people, 482, _ 483 ; 
various systems of agriculture, irriga- 
tion, manure, 483 ; rice in the different 
Provinces, area, out-turn, 484 - 4S6 ; 
wheat, millet, pulses, oil-seeds, vege- 



INDEX. 



157 



tables, 486-490 ; fruits, spices, palms, 
sugar, 490, 491 ; cotton cultivation in 
different Provinces, exports, 491-494; 
jute cultivation and preparation, ex- 
ports, 494, 495 ; indigo cultivation in 
different Provinces, 495, 496 ; exports 
of indigo, system of planting, 497, 
498 ; opium cultivation and manufac- 
ture, 498, 499 ; tobacco cultivation, 
trade and method of curing, 499, 500 ; 
table of crop statistics, acreage, 501 ; 
coffee, its introduction into India, 
and growth, 502 - 504 ; tea in 
India, its histor)' and statistics, 504- 
507 ; processes of tea cultivation and 
manufacture, 508, 509 ; cinchona cul- 
tivation and manufacture, statistics of, 
509-511 ; the Company's silk factories, 
511, 512; silk area of Bengal, silk 
statistics, 512, 513; jungle silk, lac, 
lac-dye, 513-515; model farms, the 
problem of improved husbandrj^ 515- 
517 ; the impediments to better hus- 
bandry, 517-519; agricultural stock of 
India, 519-523 ; breeds of cattle, horse 
fairs, studs, wild elephants, 520-522 ; 
the forest department, 522 ; 524-528 ; 
wanton destruction of forests, Indian 
timber trees, 522 ; 524 - 526 ; forest 
conservancy, its results, 526, 527 ; 
nomadic tillage, its destructiveness, 
527, 528 ; irrigation, its function in 
India, 528, 529 ; irrigated area in Sind, 
Bombay, Punjab, 529 - 532 ; in the 
N. - W. Provinces, Oudh, Bengal, 
Orissa, 532-535 ; in INIadras, Mysore, 
Central Provinces, 535-537 ; statistics 
of cultivation and irrigation, 53S ; 
famines, their causes, drought, flood, 
blight, war, 539, 540 ; necessity for 
husbanding and utilizing the water- 
supply, 540, 541 ; history of previous 
famines (1769 to 1876), 541, 542; the 
famine of 1876-78, its area, 542, 543 ; 
remedial efforts, mortality, expendi- 
ture, 542-544 ; famine, a weak check 
on population, 544- 

Chap. XVIII. Means of Communi- 
cation. — Indian railway system. Lord 
Dalhousie's trunk lines, 545 ; Lord 
Mayo's branch lines, 545 ; the four 
classes of Indian lines of railway, 546 ; 
' Guaranteed ' railways, 546, 547 ; 
' State railways,' 547, 548 ; ' Assisted ' 
and Native State railways, 548, 549 ; 
railway statistics, 549, 550 ; roads, old 
military routes, 550 ; the Grand Trunk 
Road, Bombay inland route, 550 ; ex- 
tension of roads, bridges of boats, 551 ; 
navigable rivers, 551, 552; navigable 
canals, Malabar back-waters, etc., 553, 

554- 

Chap. XIX. Co??i?>ieire and Trade. 



— Ancient, mediaeval, and modern 
trade of India, 555, 556 ; large sea- 
borne trade impossible under the 
Mughals, 556 ; growth of trading 
and industrial cities under British rule, 
556-558; rise of Calcutta and Bombay, 
557 ; summary of Indian exports (1700- 
1885), 558; India's balance of trade 
and yearly savings, 558, 559 ; fourfold 
division of modern Indian trade, 559 ; 
the sea-borne trade of India, 559, 560 ; 
early Portuguese trade (1500-1600), 
560; Dutch monopoly (1600), 560; 
English factories and trade (1600- 
1700), 560, 561 ; growth of trade, 
quinquennial table of foreign trade, 
561, 562 ; Indian foreign trade statis- 
tics, imports and exports, 563-581; 
imports, cotton goods, treasure, 565, 
566 ; 568, 569 ; exports, raw cotton, 
jute, rice, wheat, 569-572 ; exports, 
oil-seeds, indigo and dyes, tea, coffee, 
573 ■ 575 5 export of cotton and jute 
manufactures, 575, 576 ; countries with 
which India trades — England, 577; 
China, Straits, Ceylon, Mauritius, 
France, Italy, 577, 578 ; United 
States, Australia, 578 ; distribution of 
foreign trade of India, 579, 580 ; 
effects of the Suez Canal on Indian 
trade, 581 ; Sir R. Temple on the 
balance of India's foreign trade, 581- 
583 ; coasting trade of India, shipping 
statistics, 584-586 ; frontier trade with 
Afghanistan and Central Asia, 586, 
587 ; the Himalayan trade routes — 
Nepal, Tibet, 587, 588; trade with 
Bhutan and the North-Eastern Fron- 
tier, 588 ; trade with Independent 
Burma and Siam, 588, 589 ; tables of 
Trans-Frontier landward trade, 589, 
590 ; internal trade, trading castes, 
591, 592; local trade, the village 
money - lender, 592 ; religious fairs, 
village markets, 593 ; internal trade a 
safeguard against famine, 593, 594 ; 
statistics of internal trade in certain 
Provinces, 594, 595 ; growth of large 
marts, local trading centres, 595-597. 

Chap. XX. Arts and Manufactures. 
— Manufactures of India, art-work, 598; 
competition with the English artisan, 

598 ; native industries, village crafts, 

599 ; cotton weaving, its decline, 599, 
600 ; but still a domestic industry 
throughout India, 600, 601 ; special 
fabrics, muslins, chintzes, saris, 601, 
602 ; silk-weaving, classes of silk fabrics, 
602, 603 ; steam silk factories, 603 ; 
embroidery, Kashmir shawls, leather 
work, 603 ; carpets and rugs, processes 
of manufacture, 604, 605 ; goldsmiths 
and jewellers' work, precious stones, 



158 



INDEX. 



605, 606 ; iron-work, cutlery, chain 
armour, damascening, 606, 607 ; brass 
and copper work, bidarl ware, 607, 

608 ; Indian pottery and sculpture, 608, 

609 ; wood - carving, inlaying, ivory- 
carving, 609 ; European industries, 
steam cotton-mills, 610 -612 ; their 
manufactures, competition with Man- 
chester, 611, 612; statistics of Bombay 
cotton-mills, their future prospects, 610, 
611; 613; jute mills, manufacture of 
gunny, 614,615 ; exportsof jute, Indian 
consumption, growth of the trade, 615, 
616; brewing, paper-making, leather, 
etc., 616, 617. 

Chap. XXI. Mines and Minerals . — 
Indian iron, native system of working, 
618 ; failure of early English efforts, 
618, 619 ; difficulties of iron-smelting 
in India, 619 ; Indian coal, its inferior 
quality, 619 ; history of Bengal coal- 
mining, 619-621 ; the four great coal- 
fields, future of Indian coal, 622 ; salt 
manufacture, the Punjab Salt Range, 
622, 623 ; saltpetre, manufacture and 
export of, 623, 624 ; gold and gold- 
mining, the Wainad quartz reefs, 624, 
625 ; copper, lead, tin, antimony, co- 
balt, 625, 626 ; petroleum and mineral 
oils, 626, 627 ; stone, lime, kankar, 
marble, slate, 627, 628 ; diamonds, 
cornelians, pearl fisheries, 628, 629. 

Chap. XXII. Geology. — Q>^o\o^', 
the Himalayan region, 631, 632 ; the 
Lower Himalayas, Siwaliks, Salt Range, 
632, 633 ; Indo - Gangetic plain, its 
geological age and history, 633, 634 ; 
Peninsular India, Vindhyan rocks, 634, 
635 ; Gondwana, Panchet, Talcher, 
and Damodar series, 635, 636 ; the 
Raniganj coal seams, 637 ; Deccan trap, 
laterite, 638, 639 ; geology of Burma, 
639, 640. 

Chap. XXIII. Meteorology.— ^\&- 
teorological geography, the Eastern and 
Western Himalayas, 641, 642 ; air- 
currents, vapour-bearing winds, 642 ; 
Punjab frontier, Indus plain, the great 
Indiandesert, 642, 643 ; Gangetic plain, 
Eastern Bengal, Assam, 643, 644 ; 
central table-land, Satpura range, 644 ; 
Malwa plateau, Aravalli range, 644 ; 
southern plateau, Anamalai Hills, coast 
strip, 644, 645 ; Ceylon and Bumia, 
646, 647 ; observatory stations, 646, 
647 ; temperature, atmospheric pres- 
sure, wind, humidity, etc., 647, 648; 
rainfall returns, 649, 650 ; sun-spot 
cycles, 650, 651. 

Chap. XXIV. Zoology and Botany. — 
Mammals of India — lion, tiger, leopard, 
652, 653 ; wolf, fox, jackal, dog, hygena, 
654i 655 ; bear, elephant, rhinoceros, 



wild hog, 655-657 ; sheep and goats, 
antelopes, nilgai, deer, 657, 658 ; 
bison and buffalo, 658 ; ornithology, 
birds of prey and game birds, 659 ; 
reptiles, loss of life from snake-bite, the 
'cobra,' 660; fishes, insects, locusts, 
661 ; Indian flora in various Provinces, 
662-664. 

Chap. XXV. Vital Statisties.— 
Sources of health returns, their un- 
trustworthiness, 665, 666 ; death-rate 
in India ; average duration of life, 666, 
667 ; vital statistics in different Pro- 
vinces, 667-675 ; tables of birth and 
death rate, 676-679 ; health of the 
European army, causes of mortality, 
675, 680-682 ; health of the native 
army, causes of mortality, 682 - 684 ; 
health statistics of the jail population, 
6S4, 685. 

Appendices. — I. Area, towns and 
villages, houses, population, etc., of 
British India in 1881, 689; II. towTis 
and villages of British India, classified 
according to population, 690 ; III. cul- 
tivated, cultivable, and uncultivable 
area, land revenue, etc., in Provinces 
for which returns exist, 691 ; IV. popu- 
lation of British India, classified accord- 
ing to sex and age, 692 ; V. population 
of British India, classified according to 
religion, 693 ; VI. Asiatic non-Indian . 
population of British India, classified l| 

according to birthplace, 694 ; VII. 
non- Asiatic population of British India, 
classified according to birthplace, 695 ; 
VIII. list of 149 towns in British India, 
of which the population exceeds 20,000, 
296, 297 ; IX. population of British 
India, classified according to education, 
69S-702 ; X. population of British India, 
classified according to caste, sect, and 
nationality, 703. 



India on the eve of the Mughal conquest 
(1526), article ' India,' vi. 290. 

India, origin of the name, vi. I -3. 

Indian Caste, by Dr. J. Wilson, quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 194 (footnote i) ; 
195 (footnote 2) ; 196 (footnote i)._ 

Indian products mentioned in the i3ible, 
article ' India,' vi. 163. 

Indian Society as described by Megas- 
thenes (300 B.C.), article 'India,' vi. 
168, 169. 

Indian vernaculars and their literature, 
article 'India,'vi. chap. xiii. pp. 325-355. 
Asiatic civilisation of India as found by 
the early European powers, 325, 326 ; 
India in the ist and the i6th centuries 
A.D., 326, 327 ; the Dravidians or non- 
Aryans, their language and its place 



INDEX. 



159 



in philology, 326-328 ; the Dravidians 
in Sanskrit literature, 328 ; pre-Arj-an 
Dravidian civilisation, 328 ; Brahmanic 
influence on the Dravidians, 329, 330 ; 
development of Dravidian speech into 
vernacular literatures, 330 ; the Tamil 
dialect, 330, 331; Jain cycle of Tamil 
literature, 331 ; the Tamil Ramayana, 
33 1) 332 ; Sivaite and Vishnuite Tamil 
hymnolog>', 332, 333 ; modern Tamil 
writers, 333 ; Beschi, the Jesuit Tamil 
scholar, 333 ; recent statistics of Tamil 
literature, 333 ; Ar>'an languages of 
North India, Sanskrit, 334, 335 ; e\-i- 
dence as to whether Sanskrit was ever 
a spoken language, 334-336 ;_ Panini 
and Vararuchi, ancient Sanskrit gram- 
marians, 336 ; the Prakrits or ancient 
spoken dialects of India, their diver- 
gence from Sanskrit, 336 ; routes of 
Prakrit speech, 337 ; Prakrits developed 
by Buddhists for their Scriptures, 338 ; 
evolution of modern vernaculars from 
Prakrits, 338, 339 ; their Prakrit frame- 
work and Sanskrit enrichments, 339 ; 
non-Aryan element in the vernaculars, 
proportion of non-Aryan words, 340, 
341 ; the fourfold composition of the 
vernaculars, namely, the Prakrit and 
aboriginal elements, Sanskrit borrow- 
ings and Persian terms, 342 ; the seven 
vernaculars of India, 342, 343 ; verna- 
cular literature and vernacular writers, 
343) 344 > Rajputana poetical litera- 
ture, 344 ; Hindi authors from the 12th 
to the 19th centuries, 345, 346; Marathi 
literature and authors, 346 ; Bengali 
literature, its three periods, 343-348 ; 
Bengali religious poetr}% 349-351 ; Ben- 
gali poets from the i6th to the i8th 
centuries, 349-352 ; the court of Nadiya, 
the chief seat of learning in Bengal in 
the last centur)-, 352 ; Bengah prose 
literature in the 19th century, 354; 
the Bengali drama, 354. 
Indigo, Cultivation of, in different localities, 
article ' India,' vi. 495, 496 ; systems of 
indigo planting and out-turn in Bengal 
and Behar, vi. 497 ; export of, vi. 497 ; 
574. Local notices — Cultivated in Agra, 
i. 64; Aligarh, i. 173; Allahabad, i. 189; 
North Arcot, i. 316; South Arcot, 
i. 323 ; Atmakiir, i. 379 ; Azamgarh, 
i. 398; Badvel, i. 412; Bahawalpur, 
i. 422 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Banagana- 
palli, ii. 43 ; Bankura, ii. 83 ; Bard- 
wan, ii. 130 ; Benares, ii. 258 ; Bengal, 
ii. 271, 303, 304; Bhagalpur, ii. 349; 
Bombay, iii. 53; Budaun, iii. 120; 
Bulandshahr, iii. 137; Bundi, iii. 159; 
Upper Burma, iii. 210; Cambay, iii. 
271 ; Cawnpur, iii. 285, 2S6 ; Cham- 
paran, iii. 341 ; Chengalpat, iii. 386 ; 



Cochin, iv. 5 ; Cuddapah, iv. 52, 55 ; 
Darbhangah, iv. 125 ; Dera Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 214 ; Etah, iv. 362 ; Etawah, 
iv. 374 ; Jaizabad, iv. 384 ; Faridpur, 
iv. 403 ; Farukhabad, iv. 413 ; Garo 
Hills, V. 31 ; Gaya, v. 49 ; Godavari, 
V. 127, 128; Gwalior, V. 228; Haidar- 
abad, v. 245 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
V. 280 ; Hardoi, v. 326 ; Howrah, 
v. 463 ; Hiigli, V. 494 ; Jaunpur, vii. 
156; Jessor, vii. 187, 188; Karnul, 
viii. 37 ; Karwaitnagar, viii. 52 ; Kathia- 
war, viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 133, 136 ; 
Kistna, %-iii. 230 ; Kyauk-pyu, viii. 
387 ; Larkhana, viii. 463 ; i\Iadras, ix. 
29, 31; Tklahul, ix. 186; Mainpuri, 
ix. 208 ; Maldah, ix. 244 ; Meerut, ix. 
387 ; Mehar, ix. 397 ; ]Midnapur, ix. 
429 ; Monghyr, ix. 485 ; Multan, x. 7 ; 
INIurshidabad, x. 26, 29 ; jMuzaffargarh, 
X. 61 ; Muzaffamagar, x. 72 ; IMuzaf- 
farpur, x. 81 ; Nadiya, x. 135, 136 ; 
Nellore, x. 266; N.-W. Provinces, x. 
375; Oudh, x. 501; Pabna, x. 515; 
Partabgarh, xi. 71 ; Purniah, xi. 327 ; 
Rajshahi, xi. 433 ; Ramri, xi. 463 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 496 ; Saharanpur, xii. 
120; Salem, xii. 166; Santal Par- 
ganas, xii. 232; Saran, xii. 251, 
255 ; Shahabad, xii. 329 ; Shujabad, 
xii. 426 ; Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; Sind, xii. 
520 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 360 ; Unao, 
xiii. 432 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 492 ; 
Vontimetta, xiii. 503. 
Indigo factories, in Agra, i. 65 ; Aligarh, 
i. 175 ; South Arcot, i. 326 ; Atur, i. 383 ; 
Azamgarh, i. 399 ; Bara, ii. 105 ; Basant- 
pur, ii. 182; Behar, ii. 224; Belsand 
Kalan,ii.252; Bengal, ii. 303, 304; Bhag- 
alpur, ii. 350; Bilsi, ii. 459; Birbhum, 
iii. 9; Cambay, iii. 272 ; Cawnpur, iii. 
286 ; Champaran, iii. 341, 343 ; Chen- 
galpat, iii. 387 ; Cuddalore, iv. 46 ; 
Cuddapah, iv. 53 ; Darbhangah, iv. 
125 ; Dasna, iv. 154; Dehri, iv. 177; 
Etah, iv. 364 ; Faridpur, iv. 405 ; 
Farakhabad, iv. 415 ; Gahmar, iv. 460; 
Arwal in Gaya, v. 48, 49 ; Godavari, 
V. 129 ; Jami, vii. 126 ; Jaunpur, vii. 
157; Jessor, vii. 187, 188; Kantai, 
vii. 437 ; Karnul, viii. 41 ; Kudarkot, 
viii. 329 ; Ramri in Kyauk-pyu, viii. 
3S8 ; Lehra, viii. 469 ; Madhepur, viii. 
541 ; in Madras Presidency, ix. 53 ; 
Mahatwar, ix. 170; Maimansingh, ix. 
198; Mainpuri, ix. 220; Maldah, ix. 
246 ; Mandrak, ix. 309 ; ISIeerut, ix. 
389 ; Midnapur, ix. 430, 434 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 487 ; INIotihari, ix. 521 ; Multan, 
X. 7, 8 ; Murshidabad, x. 28 ; Muzaf- 
farpur, x. 81 ; Nadiya, x. 137 ; Nagas- 
tasti, X. 157; Najafgarh, x. 178; Nel- 
lore, X. 269 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 396 ; 



I 60 



INDEX. 



Oudh, X. 507; Pabna, x. 517, 520; 
Pandaul, xi. 35 ; Pharha, xi. 166 ; 
Pirpainti, xi. 187 ; Pullampet, xi. 241 ; 
Purniah, xi. 328 ; Rajshahi, xi. 435 ; 
Rayachoti, xii. 39 ; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 234 ; Saran, xii. 257 ; Sarya, xii. 
272, 273 ; Sasni, xii. 273 ; Siyana, xiii. 
45 ; Ujhani, xiii. 416, 417 ; Umargarli, 
xiii. 419; Bangarmau in Unao, xiii. 

432, 434- 

Indische Allcrthiimskiinde, by Lassen, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 161 (foot- 
note i); 191 (footnote 2); 340 (foot- 
note 2). 

Indo - Aryan stock, its European and 
Eastern branches, article ' India,' vi. 
75, 76; their march towards and into 
India, religion, etc., article 'India,' 
vi. 76-78. 

Indo-Bactrian dynasties in the Punjab, 
xi. 260 ; their coins found at Buland- 
shahr, iii. 141 ; Hazara, v. 360; Jalal- 
pur, vii. 81 ; Multan, x. 4; Sonpat, 
xiii. 62. 

Indo-Gangetic plain. Geology of, article 
' India,' vi. 633, 634 ; meteorology of, 
vi. 643, 644. 

Indo-Greek treaties (306 and 256 B.C.), 
article 'India,' vi. 167, 170. 

Indo-Scythian kings probably conquered 
all Kathiawar, viii. 90 ; their coins 
found at Asarur, i. 337 ; Dipalpur, iv. 
304; Gujrat, v. 189; Along, ix. 478; 
Sewan, xii. 332 ; Shorkot, xii. 424. 

Indore, Native State in Central India, 
vii. 1-8; physical aspects, 2; popula- 
tion, 3 ; railways, 4, 5 ; industries, 4, 5 5 
history, 5'7 '■> administration, 7> ^ 5 
climate, 8. 

Indore, capital of State in Central India, 
vii. 8-10. 

Indore Agency, vii. 10. 

Indori, hill torrent in Punjab, vii. 10. 

Indra, the Vedic God of Rain, article 
' India,' vi. 80, 81 ; influence of the 
rainy season on Aryan mythology, 80 ; 
displaced by the modern Brahmanical 
Triad, 81. 

Indus, great river of Northern India and 
Sind, vii. 10-17 ? article ' India,' vi. 11- 
13; its upper waters, II; its feeder 
the Sutlej, 11, 12; its inundations, 11 ; 
lower course, 12 ; irrigation facilities, 
13; 529; silt deposits, 13; steam 
flotilla recently broken up by opening 
of the railway system, 552. 

Infanticide, Notices of, in Bahraich, i. 
430 ; Bara Banki, ii. 1 14 ; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 135; Cutch, iv. 61-63; Edar, iv. 
339 ; Etawah, iv. 373 ; Gonda, v. 154 ; 
Hamirpur, v. 301 ; tiardoi, v. 324 ; 
among the Karens, viii. 4 ; Mainpuri, 
ix. 207, 208 ; Meerut, ix. 385 ; among 



the Meos, ix. 420 ; Moradabad, ix. 
507 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 70 ; Nawana- 
gar, X. 253; Saharanpur, xii. 118; 
Shahjahanpur, xii. 347. 

Inglis, Sir W. defended the Residency at 
Lucknow (1857), viii. 513, 514. 

Inhanna, town and pargand in Oudh, 
vii. 17. 

Injaram, town in Madras, vii. 17, 18. 

Inlaying work, article ' India,' vi. 609. 
See Enamelling. 

Inquisition established by the Portuguese 
at Goa (1560), article 'India,' vi. 241, 
253 ; autos da fe, vi. 254 ; abolished 
(1 81 2), vi. 254. 

Inscribed pillars of Asoka, article ' India,' 
vi. 145, 146. See Asoka. 

Insects, Indian, article ' India,' vi. 662 ; 
Madras Presidency, vi. 99-101. 

Insects, Ravages of, in Banda, ii. 52 ; 
Broach, iii. 108 ; Etah, iv. 363 ; Naga 
Hills, X. 152; Noakhali, x. 349; 
Salem, xii. 162 ; Saran, xii. 256. See 
also Locusts. 

Insein, town in Lower Burma, vii. 18. 

Institutions, political and legal, of the 
Afghans, i. 46 ; of the Arakan Hill 
tribes, i. 301 ; of the Ahams in Assam, 
i- 342, 343 ; in Baluchistan, ii. 39 ; in 
Bhutan, ii. 412 ; in Coorg, iv. 35 ; of 
the Daphlas, iv. 119; in Hill Tipperah, 
V- 397, 398 ; of the Kandhs, vii. 401, 
402; of the Khasis, viii. 175 ; of the 
Kols, viii. 254-256 ; of the Lushais, 
viii. 530 ; in Alanipur, ix. 329, 330 ; 
of the Miris, ix. 445, 446 ; of the 
Angami Nagas, x. 149 ; of the Kukis, 
X. 150; of the Santals, xii. 240. 

Institutions, local societies, etc., the 
Hemabhai at Ahmadabad, i. 97 ; 
Aligarh, i. 175, 176; Allahabad, i. 
192 ; Benares, ii. 267 ; in Bombay, 
iii. 71, 72 ; Dacca, iv. 87 ; Delhi, iv, 
196; the Suhrid Sabha at Faridpur, 
iv. 405 ; the Vasco da Gama at Goa, 
V. 96 ; Gonda, v. 156 ; Mechanics at 
Hovvrah, v. 465; Jamalpur, v. 1 19; 
the Roberts at Lahore, viii. 418 ; 
Madras, ix. 118; the Frere at Maha- 
baleshwar, ix. 143 ; the Martin at 
Peshawar, xi. 160; Rangoon, xi. 484 ; 
Salem, xii. 160. See also Libraries, 
and Reading-rooms and Museums. 
Interest, Rates of, in different Districts, 
Ahmadabad, i. 92 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 
105; North Arcot, i. 317; South 
Arcot, i. 325 ; Azamgarh, i. 398 ; 
Bengal, ii. 302 ; Bogra, iii. 29 ; Coim- 
batore, iv. 19 ; Farukhabad, iv. 414; 
Firozpur, iv. 443 ; Goa, iv. 95 ; Berar, 
v. 269 ; Kaira, vii. 306 ; North 
Kanara, vii. 373 ; Khandesh, viii. 157 j 
Kolaba, viii. 269 ; Nasik, x. 234 ; 



INDEX. 



i6i 



Poona, xi. 208 ; Tanjore, xiii. 192 ; 
Thana, xiii. 257. 
Internal and local trade of India, article 
'India,' vi, 591-596; village money- 
lenders, travelling brokers, and religi- 
ous fairs, 592, 593 ; internal trade, 
the safeguard against famine, 593 ; 
normal action of internal trade, 594 ; 
Provincial statistics of internal trade, 
594, 595 ; trade statistics of a large 
town, village mart, and annual fair, 

594-596. 

Introduction to the Malto Lajtguagc, by 
the Rev. E. Droese, quoted, article 
'India,' vi. 327 (footnote i). 

In-tu, the Buddhist etymology of the 
word ' India,' vi. 2. 

Inundations. See Floods. 

Invaliding, Causes of, in the European 
army, article ' India, vi. 681. 

In-yeh, town in Lower Burma, vii. 18. 

In-yeh-gyi, lake in Lower Burma, vii. 18. 

Ipecacuanha, cultivated in Darjiling, iv, 
137 ; IMalabar, ix. 229 ; Mysore, x. 
103 ; Utakamand, xiii. 451. 

Irak, river in Bombay, vii. 18, 19. 

Irawadi, river in Burma, vii. 19-23. 

Irich, historic town in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 23, 24. 

Irodu. See Erode. 

Iron, found in Afghanistan, i. 36 ; Tara- 
garh Hill in Ajmere-Merwara, i. I18 ; 
Akrani, i. 14S ; Alwar, i. 203 ; Amba- 
garh Chauki, i. 212 ; Anantapur, i. 
274 ; Angul, i. 290 ; North Arcot, i. 
312 ; South Arcot, i. 327 ; Assam, i. 
347, 348 ; Atur, i. 382 ; Baba TBiidan, 
i. 403 ; Bagh, i. 414 ; Balaghat, i. 
454 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Bamra, ii. 
41 ; Banda, ii. 46, 47, 53 ; Bangalore, 
ii. 59 ; Bankura, ii. 79 ; Bardwan 
ii. 127; Barul, ii. 177, 178; Basim, 
ii. 183 ; Bastar, ii. 205-207 ; Bellary, 
ii. 241 ; Bengal, ii. 271, 274, 275 ; 
'Beypur, ii. 335 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 345; 
Bhandara, ii. 361 ; Bijeraghogarh, ii. 
426; Bilaspur, ii. 451; Bir, ii. 462; 
Birbhum, iii. 2, 9, 10 ; Teagar (Bom- 
bay), iii. 44 ; Bonai, iii. 85, 87 ; Boras- 
ambar, iii. 89 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 152 ; 
Jaipur (Assam), iii. 166; Lower Burma, 
iii. 201 ; Central India, iii. 295 ; Central 
Provinces, iii. 300 ; Chamba, iii. 329 ; 
Chanda, iii. 349 ; Chhatarpur, iii. 
396 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 423 ; Chittur, iii. 
454 ; Chope, iii. 456 ; Cochin, iv. 2 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 15; Coorg, iv, 32; 
Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Cutch, iv. 60 ; 
Cuttack, iv. 72 ; Darjiling, iv. 130, 
138 ; Deocha, iv. 199 ; Dera Ghazi 
Khan, iv. 209 ; Dewalgaon, iv. 235 ; 
Dhar, iv. 246 ; Dharwar, iv. 258 ; 
Dhenkanal, iv. 269 ; Dindigal, iv. 
VOL. XIV. 



301 ; Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; Ganjam, 
v. 2 ; Garhwal, v. 22 ; Godavari, v. 
123 ; Goona, v. 159 ; Gujainli, v. 178 ; 
Gurgaon, v. 216; Gwalior, v. 228; 
Haidarabad, v. 241 ; Berar, v. 260 ; 
Hassan, v. 346 ; Hazaribagh, v. 378 ; 
Heggadadevankot, v. 382 ; the Hima- 
laya Mountains, v. 412 ; Hosur, v. 
460 ; Inchalkaranji, v. 509 ; Jabalpur, 
vii. 34 ; Jashpur, vii. 145 ; Jehlam, 
vii. 167 ; Jhabua, vii. 194 ; Jhalawar, 
vii. 199 ; Jhang, vii. 206 ; Kadur, vii. 
283 ; Kaira, vii. 300 ; Kaladgi, vii. 
315 ; Kalahasti, vii. 321 ; North 
Kanara, vii. 369 ; South Kanara, vii. 
376; Kangra, vii. 412; Kangundi, 
vii. 431 ; Karauli, vii. 471 ; Karniil, 
viii. 34 ; Kashmir, viii. 67 ; Bakharla 
in Porbandar, viii. 96 ; Khandesh, 
viii. 151 ; Ivhasi Hills, viii. 171 -173 ; 
Kistna, viii. 226 ; Koldba, viii. 261 ; 
Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kolhapur, viii. 281 ; 
Korea, viii. 297 ; Kumaun, viii. 349 ; 
Kyauk-pyu, viii. 386 ; Laira, viii. 
423 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Lalmai 
Hills, viii. 458 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; 
Madras, ix. 5 ; Madura, ix. 121, 122 ; 
]\Iakrai, ix. 215 ; Jat and Parda in 
Western Malwa, ix. 268 ; Malwan, ix. 
273 ; Mandi, ix. 298 ; Maikal Hills 
in Mandla, ix. 305 ; Manipur, ix. 324 ; 
Mao-san-rani, ix. 343 ; Mattod, ix. 
366 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; Monghyr, ix. 
479, 480 ; Murshidabad, x. 22 ; 
Mysore, x. 92, 106, 107, 114; Nar- 
singhpur, x. 223 ; Narwar, x. 227 ; 
Nawanagar, x. 253 ; Nellore, x. 262 ; 
Nepal, X. 278 ; Nimar, x. 328 ; Nong- 
krem, X. 353 ; Orissa Tributary States, 
X. 471 ; Palmaner, xi. 15 ; Panagur, 
xi. 24 ; Panna, xi. 50 ; Patna State, 
xi. 116; Pawi Mulanda, xi. 123; 
Bajaur, xi. 146 ; Phuljhar, xi. 16S ; 
Polur, xi. 197 ; Porbandar, xi. 215 ; 
Pudukattai, xi. 237 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ; 
Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rairakhol, xi. 378 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 401 ; Rampur (C. P.); 
xi. 460 ; Ramri, xi. 463 ; Sagar, xii. 
lOl ; Salem, xii. 153 ; Sambalpur, 
xii. 179; Sandur, xii. 207; Santal 
Parganas, xii. 227 ; Sarangarh, xii. 
260 ; Satara, xii. 276 ; Sawantwari, 
xii. 296 ; Seoni, xii. 309 ; Shahpur, 
xii. 361 ; Sheila, xii. 378 ; Shimoga, 
xii. 400; Singhbhum, xii. 531; Sir- 
niur, xii. 554 ; Sonpur, xiii. 63 ; 
Talcher, xiii. 164 ; Tarikere, xiii. 
213 ; Tavoy, xiii. 228 ; Tendukhera, 
xiii. 241 ; Travancore, xiii. 345 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; Tumkur, xiii. 
375 ; Udaipur (Rajputana), xiii. 401 ; 
Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 411, 412 ; 
Vinukonda, xiii. 476 ; Wun, xiii. 538. 

L 



l62 



INDEX. 



Iron mining and smelting, difficulties of 
Indian iron-works, article ' India, vi. 
41, 619 ; indigenous methods of iron- 
smelting, 61S ; failure of English efforts, 
618, 619 ; Government efforts, 619. 

Iron-smelting, Charikar in Afghanistan, 
i. 34 ; Alwar, i. 205 ; Assam, i. 348 ; 
Atiir, i. 3S3 ; Baba Budan Hills, i. 
403 ; Balaghat, i. 456 ; Banda, ii. 53 ; 
Bangalore, ii. 64 ; Bella Narayanpur, 
ii. 239 ; Bellary, ii. 247 ; Bengal, ii. 
275 ; Bi'r, ii. 462 ; Birbhum, iii. 9, 10 ; 
Deulghat in I3uldana (steel), iii. 147 ; 
Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 19; Chanda, iii. 354; Chital- 
drug, iii. 426 ; Cuttack, iv. 72 ; 
Dewalgaon, iv. 235 ; Dharwar, iv. 
264; Gujainli, v. 178; Gwalior 
State, V. 228 ; Harnhalli, v. 341 ; 
Hazaribagh, v. 37S ; Hiriyur, v. 423 ; 
Hosdurga, v. 441 ; Jabalpur, vii. 34 ; 
Kadur, vii. 287 ; Karanpura, vii. 468 ; 
Karnul, viii. 41 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 
171-178; Khyrim, viii. 215; Kistna, 
viii. 226 ; Koratigiri, viii. 296 ; Korea, 
viii. 297 ; Kumaun, viii. 356 ; ISIadras, 
ix. 5 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Mandla, ix. 
305 ; Monghyr, ix. 487 ; Mysore, x. 
106; Nahan, x. 175; Narsinghpur, x. 
223 ; Nong-krem, x. ^ 353 ; Nong- 
spung, X. 354; Palmaner, xi. 15; 
Panagur, xi. 24 ; Rairakhol, xi. 378 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 401 ; Rasipur, xi. 513; 
Rurki, xii. 86, 122; Sagar, xii. loi- 
106; Salem, xii. 163 ; Santal Parganas, 
xii. 234 : Shahgarh, xii. 342 ; Shen- 
damangalam, xii. 378 ; Singhbhiim, xii. 
531; by the Singphos, xii. 542; in 
Sirmur, xii. 554 ; Sorab, xiii. 65 ; 
Tegur, xiii. 235, 236 ; Tendukhera, 
xiii. 241 ; Thammapatti, xiii. 248 ; 
Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; Watrap, xiii. 
534 ; Wun, xiii. 544. 

Iron ware, hardware, iron implements, 
etc., manufactured at Ahmadabad, i. 
87 ; Ardabak, i. 329 ; in Assam, i. 
367 ; Aurungabad, i. 388 ; Punganiir 
in South Arcot, i. 317 ; Badin, i. 409 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. II3; Barot, ii. 173; 
Beawar, ii. 222 ; Bhera, ii. 386 ; 
Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bihat, ii. 422 ; 
Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; Chennapata, 
iii. 368 ; Cochin, iv. 7 ; Dhampur, iv. 
241 ; Dodderi, iv. 311 ; Ghotki, v. 75 ; 
Gujrat (iron inlaid with gold), v. 177 ; 
Gurgaon, v. 221 ; Haidarabad (Sind), 
V. 282; Inchalkaranji, v. 510; Jag- 
adhri, vii. 40; Kalabagh, vii. 314; 
Kamalapuram, vii. 349 ; Kashmir, 
viii. 74 ; Kashmor, viii. 79 ; Khairpur, 
viii. 135; Kiratpur, viii. 220; Kol- 
hapur, viii. 284 ; Lashkarpur, viii. 
466 ; Lohardaga, viii. 484 Kha mb- 



halia, viii. 142; Khyrim, viii. 215; 
Kolhapur, viii. 284 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
485 ; Madgiri, viii. 540 ; Madras 
Presidency, ix. 54; Maharam, ix. 166; 
Mahram, ix. 185 ; Monghyr, ix. 487 ; 
Naga Hills, x. 152; Najibabad, x. 
179 ; Natagarh, x. 240 ; Nepal, x. 
284 ; Nosari, x. 405 ; Nowgong, x. 
412 ; Poona, xi. 213 ; Punjab, xi. 
287 ; Rupar, xii. 83 ; Sahiwal, xii. 
137 ; Sarguja, xii. 268 ; Sherghati, xii. 
380 ; Shimoga, xii. 404 ; Srinivaspur, 
xiii. 79 ; Sylhet, xiii. 153 ; Tando 
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 179; Tanjore, 
xiii. 191 ; Tarn Taran, xiii. 215 ; 
Tipperah, xiii. 319; Tumkur, xiii. 
379 ; Unao, xiii. 434 ; Wanthali, xiii. 
519 ; Wazirabad, xiii. 535. 

Iron-wood trees, found in the Andaman 
Islands, i. 282 ; Arakan Hill Tracts, 
i. 299 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 45 ; 
L iwer Burma, iii. 204 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; 
Western Ghats, v. 59 ; North Kanara, 
vii. 372 ; South Kanara, vii. 376 ; 
Malabar, ix. 229 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272. 

Ironwork, article ' India,' vi. 606. 

Irrigation, irrigated area in different 
tracts, with statistics, article 'India,' 
vi. 528-538 ; from hill streams in the 
Himalayas, vi. 9 ; river irrigation in 
the plains, vi. 28, 29. Local notices 
— Ahmadabad, i. 90 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 
102; Ajmere-Merwara, i. I18, 125; 
Ah'garh, i. 173 ; Alipur (C. P.), i. 181 ; 
Ambala, i. 220, 221 ; Amritsar, i. 
259; North Arcot, i. 312; Baha- 
walpur, i. 422 ; Bankura, ii. 83 ; 
Bannu, ii. 94; Bara Banki, ii. Ill; 
Bengal, ii. 315; Bhandara, ii. 364; 
from the Bhavani, ii. 382 ; in Bhutan, 
ii. 413; Bombay, iii. 55, 56; Bukka- 
cherla, iii. 129; Bulandshahr, iii. 131 ; 
from the Cauvery, iii. 278, 279 ; in 
Cawnpur, iii. 280 ; Champaran, iii. 
342 ; Chitaldnig, iii. 426 ; Cuddapah, 
iv. 53 ; Cuttack, iv. 67, 68 ; Delhi, iv. 
183 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 214, 215 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 223 ; Etah, iv. 
362 ; Etawah, iv. 375 ; Faizabad, iv. 
384 ; Fatehpur, iv. 427 ; Firozpur, iv. 
444 ; from the Ganges Canals, iv. 472 
477 ; Gaya, v. 44, 49 ; from the Ghag- 
gar, v. 55; Godavari, v. 127; Gonda, 
V. 152; Gostanadi, v. 174; Gujran- 
wala, V. 184 ; Gujrat, v. 193 ; Gurdas- 
pur, V. 211; Gurgaon, v. 220; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 279, 280 ; 
Hassan, v. 349 ; from the Hemavati, 
V. 382 ; the Hindan, v. 414 ; Hissar, 
v. 431; from the Indus, vii. 15, 16; 
Jaipur, vii. 52 ; Jalandhar, vii. 88 ; 
from the Jayamangali, vii. 164 ; in 
Jehlam, vii. 173 ; Jhang, vii. 210 ; 



INDEX. 



163 



Jhansi, v\\. 223 ; from the Jumna 
Canals, vii. 256-261 ; Kadur, vii. 286 ; 
Kamnip, vii. 362 ; Kingra, vii. 423, 
424 ; Karachi, \'ii. 448 ; Karauli, vii. 
473; Karnal, viii. 24; Karnul, viii. 39; 
Kaveripak, viii. 105 ; from the Kendra- 
para Canal, viii. 1 14 ; Khairpur, viii. 
133 ; Khandesh, viii. 156 ; from the 
Khanwah Canal, viii. 165; Kharakpur, 
\'iii. 165; Kheri, viii. 193; Kistna, viii. 
231 ; from the Kistna river, viii. 237 ; 
Kohat, viii. 247 ; Kolar, viii. 276 ; 
Kulu, viii. 343 ; from the Kuram, viii. 
370 ; Lahore, viii. 410 ; from the 
Lakshmantirtha, viii. 443 ; Lalitpur, 
viii. 453 ; Ludhiana, \iii. 522 ; IMadras 
Presidency, ix. 28, 29, 30, 40-44 ; 
Madura, ix. 129 ; from th'e IMahanadf 
(the Orissa Canal System), ix. 160-162; 
Mainpuri, ix. 208 ; from the ]Ma-tun, 
ix. 367 ; IMeerut, ix. 388 ; from the 
Midnapur High Level Canal, ix. 434, 
435 ; Mirzapur, ix. 458 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 485 ; Montgomerj', ix. 498, 499 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 509 ; from the Moti- 
talao, ix. 521 ; Multan, x. 8 ; ISIuzaffar- 
garh, X. 57 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 72 ; 
Mysore State, x. 90, 91, District, x. 
119 ; from the Eastern and Western 
Kara, x. 200, 201 ; in Nasik, x. 232 ; 
Nellore, x. 267; theN.-W. Provinces, 
X. 382, 383 ; Nowgong, x. 411 ; Oudh, 
X. 506 ; from the Palar, x. 541 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 71, 72 ; Patna, xi. 94, 
lOl ; from the Penner, xi. 133, 134 ; 
in Peshawar, xi. 154 ; Pilibhit, xi. 
175 ; Pishin, xi. 190 ; the Punjab, xi. 
278, 279 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 354 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 418 ; Rohri, xii. 64, 
65 ; Rohtak, xii. 73 ; Saharanpur, xii. 
120 ; -Santal Parganas, xii. 233 ; Saran, 
xii. 257 ; Satara, xii. 276, 281 ; Shah- 
abad (the Son Canals), xii. 325, 326 ; 
Shahjahanpur, xii. 349, 350 ; Shahpur, 
xii. 359, 365 ; from the Sharadanadi, 
xii. 376; the Sharavati, xii. 377; in 
Shimoga, xii. 403, 404 ; Sholapur, 
xii. 415, 416 ; Sialkot, xii. 440, 446, 
447; Sibi, xii. 455; Sind, xii. 520, 
521 ; from the Son Canals, xiii. 54-57 ; 
Sulekere Lake, xiii. 95 ; Surat, xiii. 
127 ; from the Tambraparni, xiii. 170 ; 
Tanjore, xiii. 189- 191 ; Tinnevelli, 
xiii. 307 ; Tumkur, xiii. 378, 379 ; 
from the Tunga, xiii. 383 ; the Tunga- 
bhadra, xiii. 383 ; in Unao, xiii. 426, 
427, 432 ; L-pper Sind Frontier, xiii. 
439 ; from the Vaigai, xiii. 460 ; the 
Vamadhara, xiii. 462 ; the Varahanadi, 
xiii. 464 ; the Vedavati, xiii. 465 ; in 
Vizagapatam, xiii. 493 ; from the 
Yagachi, xiii. 547 ; in Yelandur, xiii. 
552. See also Canals. 



Irrikur, village in Madras, vii. 24. 
Irulars or Irulas, aboriginal tribe in 

North Arcot, i. 315 ; South Arcot, i. 

322 ; Coimbatore, iv. 17 ; Mysore, x. 

99; Nilgiri Hills, x. 312. 
Isakapalli, village in Madras, vii. 24. 
Isakhel, town and tahsil in Punjab, vii. 

24, 25. 
Isanagar, %illage in Oudh, vii. 25. 
Isarda, town in Rajputana, vii. 25. 
Isauli, pargand in Oudh, vii. 25. 
Isinglass, exported from Nawanagar, x. 

252. 
Iskardo, town in Kashmir, vii. 26. 
Islamabad. See Chittagong. 
Islamabad, town in Kashmir State, vii. 

26. 
Islamabad Bijhauli, village in Oudh, vii. 

26, 27. 
Islamgarh, fort in Punjab, vii. 27. 
Islamkot, town in Bombay, vii. 27. 
Islamnagar, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

vii. 27. 
Islampur, town in Bombay, vii. 27. 
Islam Khan, Viceroy of Bengal, removed 

the capital from Rajmahal to Dacca 

{chra 1610), iv. 80, 90. 
Islands, near Aden, i. 15 ; Agradwip in 

the Bhagirathi, i. 77 ; the Andamans, i. 

281-287 ; Arnala, i. 331 ; in Bakarganj, 

i. 441 ; Balchari, ii. 11 ; Bassein (Bom- 
bay), ii. 191; Beyt, ii. 336; Bilu-Gywon. 

ii. 459, 460; Bombay, iii. 73, 74; 

Bukkur in the Indus, iii. 130 : Cheduba, 

iii. 378, 379 ; Vypin, iv. 11 ; the Cocos, 

iv. 13, 14 ; Dakshin Shahb.azpur, iv. 

96 ; Dharmapatam, iv. 253 ; Diamond 

Island, iv. 284, 285 ; Diu, iv. 305-308 ; 

Domel, iv. 313 ; Double Island, iv. 

315 ; Elephanta, iv. 340-344 ; in Farid- 

pur, iv. 395 ; Foul Island, iv. 450 ; 

Patapatteshim in the Godavari, v. 123 ; 

Haing-g)'i, V. 290 ; Hatia, v. 355, 356 ; 

Janjira, \\\. 141 ; Ka-le-gauk, vii. 324 ; 

Kalibhanj, vii. 326; Iviamari in Karachi 

Bay, vii. 452, viii. 215; Karanja, vii. 

466, 467 ; Karumbhar, viii. 50, 51 ; 

Kolaba, viii. 262 ; Kutabdia, viii. 380 ; 

the Laccadives, viii. 392-396 ; Mahuwa, 

ix. 187 ; the INIaldives, ix. 248-252 ; 

IMandhata, ix. 293-297 ; Mashkal, ix. 

351 ; Mergui Archipelago, ix. 412 ; 

the Moscos, ix. 520 ; Nalbana, x. 182 ; 

Nga-pii-taw, x. 293 ; the Nicobars, x. 

294-298 ; in Noakhali, x. 339 ; Parikud, 

xi. 63, 64; Perim (2), xi. 137-139 ; 

Pigeon (2), xi. 169 ; Rabnabad, xi. 341 ; 

Rameswaram, xi. 442-445 ; Ramri, xi. 

463 ; Rojhi, xii. 79 ; Sagar, xii. 109, 

no; Salbet, xii. 150; Salsette, xii. 

1 68- 1 70; Sand wip, xii. 209-2 1 3 ; Seringa- 

patam, xii. 318-320; Shahpuri, xii. 

370; Sherpur, xii. 381; Sivasamudram, 



164 



INDEX. 



xiii. 42, 43 ; Sullivan's, xiii. 95 ; at the 

mouth of the Taung-gup, xiii. 220 ; 

Tavoy, viii. 235 ; Khanderi, xiii. 247 ; 

Tribeni, xiii. 353 ; Umananda, xiii. 

419 ; Vypin, xiii. 504. 
Ismail Beg, besieged Sindia in Agra 

(1787), but was defeated by De Boigne 

(17S8), i. 70. 
Ismail Khan, son of Malik Sohrab, 

first of the Hot dynasty, and founder 

of Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 221. 
Ishmail Shah, second king of Bijapur 

(1510-34), ii. 424. ^ 
Istalif, town in Afghanistan, i. 33, 34. 
Istiinrdri, a land tenure. See Tenures. 
Iswar Chandra Vidyasagar, famous 

modern Hindu social reformer, article 

' India,' vi. 353. 
Ita, hills in Assam, vii. 27. 
Italy, India's trade with, article ' India,' 

yi- 578, 579- 
Itarsi, town in Central Provinces, vii. 

27- 
Itawa, estate in Central Provinces, vii. 28. 

Itinerary Jesuit missionaries in the 15th 
and 1 6th centuries, their labours and 
conversions, article ' India,' vi. 250, 

Itkuri, coal-field in Bengal, vii. 28. 
Itra Gadhala, State in Bombay, vii. 28. 
Ittamukkala, town in Madras, vii. 28. 
Itwad, State in Bombay, vii. 28, 29. 
Iviker, town in Madras, vii. 29. 
Ivory, Carving in, and manufacture of 

ivory-inlaid articles, article ' India,' vi. 

609. Local notices — Alahyar-jo-Tando, 

i. 161 ; Assam, i. 367 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ; 

Lower Burma, iii. 198; Cochin, iv. 7 ; 

Hoshiarpur, v. 456, 458 ; Jambusar, 

vii. 122; Kathiawar, viii. 96; Vizaga- 

patam, ix. 54 > Mandalay, ix. 290 ; 

Mangrol, ix. 316; Murshidabad, x. 

39 ; Poona, xi. 213 ; Rangpur, xi. 498 ; 

Sahiwal, xii. 137; Sylhet, xiii. 157; 

Vizagapatam, xiii. 494, 498. 



Jabalpur, Division in Central Provinces, 

vii. 29. 
Jabalpur, District in Central Provinces, 

vii. 29-36 ; physical aspects, 30, 31 ; 

history, 31, 32; population, 32, 33; 

division into town and country, 33 ; 

agriculture, 33, 34 ; national calamities, 

34 ; commerce and manufactures, 34, 

35 ; administration, 35, 36 ; medical 
aspects, 36. 

Jabalpur, tahsil in Central Provinces, vii. 

36. 37- 

Jabalpur, town in Central Provinces, vii. 

37, 38. 



Jabria Bhil, estate in Central India, 

vii. 38. 
Jabuah. See Jhabua. 
Jackal, The Indian, article ' India,' vi. 

654- 

Jackson, Lowis D'A., Hydraulic 
Manual, quoted, article 'India,' vi. 
17 (footnote). 

Jacob, Capt. Le Grand, quoted, on the 
plague of rats in Kathiawar, viii. 97. 

Jacob, Gen. John, founded Jacobabad 
(1847), where he died (1858), vii. 38, 
39 ; his treaty of Khelat (1854), ii. 31, 
32 ; quoted on the Baluchi tribes on 
the Upper Sind Frontier, and his sup- 
pression of them, xiii. 441-445. 

Jacobabad, town and taluk in Sind, vii. 

38, 39- 

Jacobi, Hermann, The laina Sutras, 
forming vol. xii. of Max Midler's 
'Sacred Books of the East,' quoted, 
article ' India,' vi. 161 (footnotes 4 
and 5); 167 (footnote i). 

Jacobite branch of the Syrian Church in 
India, article ' India,' vi. 242, 243 ; 
257- Local notices — Cochin, iv. 4, 1 1 ; 
Travancore, xiii. 348. 

Jacquemont, M. Victor, quoted, on 
Amber, i. 228 ; Dignagar, iv. 287 ; 
Kedar Kanta, viii. 109 ; Panna, xi. 
49 ; his last labours at Salsette, xii. 
169. 

Jade {ya), found in Upper Burma, iii. 
211. 

Jadon Rao Lakhji, grandfather of Sivaji, 
iv. 230. 

Jaenicke, missionary in Tinnevelli (1792- 
1800), ix. 25, xiii. 304. 

Jafarabad, State in Bombay, vii. 39. 

Jafarabad, town in Kathiawar, vii. 39. 

Jafarganj, village in Bengal, vii. 39. 

Jafar Khan, a Rajput renegade, founded 
the Muhammadan dynasty of Ahmad- 
abad (1403), iii. 36. 

Jaflang, village in Assam, vii. 39. 

Jagadhri, town and tahsil in Punjab, vii. 
40. 

Jagalur, village in Mysore, vii. 41. 

Jagan, town in Bombay, vii. 41. 

Jagannath, Worship of, article ' India,' 
vi. 223 - 226 ; his Brahmanical and 
Buddhist origin, 224 ; the Car festival, 
225 ; English calumnies against Jagan- 
nath, self-immolation seldom practised, 
224, 225 ; his bloodless worship and 
gentle doctrines, 225, 226. See also 
Orissa, x. 437-458 ; history of the 
religion, 437 - 439 ; Vishnuism, 439- 
441 ; legend of the temple at Puri, 441, 
442 ; Kabir, 442, 443 ; Chaitanya, 
443> 444 ; Vallabha-Swami, 444, 445 ; 
the wealth of Jagannath, 445, 446 ; the 
temple at Puri, 447, 448 ; festivals, 



INDEX. 



165 



448 ; the Car festival, 448, 449 ; pil- 
grims to Jagannath, 450-455 ; mortality 
among the pilgrims, 455-457 ; pilgrim 
hospitals, 458; and Puri, xi. 311-320. 

Jagat Seth, wealthy Hindu banker, built 
temple at Bhagalpur, ii. 352 ; his im- 
portance at Murshidabad, x. 23. 

Jagat Singh, Rana of Mewar (1716-52), 
paid chaiith to the Marathas, and went 
to war with Jodhpur, xiii. 405, 406. 

Jagatsinghpur, village in Bengal, vii. 41. 

Jagdalpur, town in Central Provinces, 
vii. 41. 

Jagdispur, town in Bengal, vii. 41. 

Jagdispur, pargand in Oudh, vii. 41, 42. 

Jagdispur-Nihalgarh, town in Oudh, vii. 
42. 

Jaggayyapet, town in Madras, vii. 42. 

Jagir, historic name for tract in S. India, 
granted by the Nawab of Arcot to the 
East India Company (1760), vii. 42. 

Jagraon, town and tahsil in Punjab, vii. 

42, 43- 

Jagra Singh, Sikh chief of the Ranghana 
confederacy, established a Principality 
of the Ravi (1783), v. 208. 

Jahalu. See Jhalu. 

Jahanabad, town and Sub-division in 
Bengal, vii. 43, 44. 

Jahanabad, town and Sub-division in 
Bengal, vii. 44. 

Jahanabad, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 44. 

Jahandar Shah, son of the Emperor 
Bahadur Shah, defeated his brother 
Azim-us-Shah, and became Emperor 
(1712), V. 257. 

Jahangir, fourth Mughal Emperor of 
India (1605-27), article 'India,' vi. 
300-302 ; chief events of his reign, 300 
(footnote 2); rebellion of his son Shah 
Jahan, 301 ; his Empress Nur Jahan, 
301 ; personal character, justice and 
religious toleration, 301, 302. Local 
notices — Received Sir T. Roe at Ajmere, 
i. 21 ; his buildings at Agra before 
1618, i. 69 ; ruled, before becoming 
Emperor, at Allahabad, where he re- 
erected Asoka's column, i. 186, 187 ; 
built palace at Gwalior, v. 236 ; incited 
Bir Singh of Orchha to murder Abul 
Fazl, vii. 217; put down rebellions 
in Kangra, vii. 415 ; built palace and 
pearl mosque at Lahore, viii. 415 ; his 
mausoleum at Shahdara, viii. 415, 416, 
xii. 341 ; completed Akbar's tomb at 
Sikandra, xii. 481 ; laid out the Shali- 
mar Bagh at Srinagar, xiii. 77; defeated 
by Rana Umra of Mewar, who after- 
wards submitted, xiii. 405, 406. 

Jahangirabad, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

vii. 44. 
Jahangirabad, town in Oudh, vii. 45. 



Jahazgarh, fortress in Punjab, vii. 45, 
Jahazpur, town in Rajputana, vii. 45. 
Jahnavi, river in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

,45- 
Jai Chand, Raja of Kanauj, peopled the 
country south of the Kali Nadi, iv. 
410; killed in battle with Kutab-ud- 
dfn, v. 63. 
Jaigarh, port in Bombay, vii. 45, 46. 
Jail statistics, article 'India,' vi. 472; 
vital statistics of Indian prisons, 684, 
685. See also under administrative 
section of each District article. 
Jails, Central or important, at Agra, i. 
66; Alipur, i. 180; Allahabad, i. 193, 
199 ; Bahawalpur, i. 422 ; Bangalore, 
ii. 64, 65 ; Bareilly, ii. 144 ; Benares, 
ii. 260, 261 ; Lahore, viii. 412 ; Kul- 
barga, viii. 333 ; Multan, x. 9 ; Nagpur, 
X. 174; Rajamahendri, xi. 382; Ran- 
goon, xi. 484 ; Rassa (female), xi. 515 ; 
Sagar, xii. 109 ; Sialkot (military), xii. 
452 ; Vellore, xiii. 467. 
Jainagar, town in Bengal, vii. 46. 
Jains, the modern representatives of 
Buddhism in India, article 'India,' vi. 
158 ; Jain population in India, 158 
(footnote) ; Jain doctrines, 159 ; temple 
cities, 159; relation of Jainism to Bud- 
dhism, 159, 160; antiquity of the Jains, 
160 ; date of the Jain scriptures, 161 ; 
the Jains, an independent sect, 162 ; 
modern Jainism, 162. Local notices — 
Jains particularly numerous or note- 
worthy, at Aden, i. 17 ; Ahmadabad, i. 
95; North Arcot, i. 314; Assam, i. 
359, 360 ; Bagpat, i. 419 ; Baroda, ii. 
159; Beria, ii. 326; Bombay Presi- 
dency, iii. 35, 52 ; Bombay city, iii. 80, 
81; Broach, iii. 103, 104, ill; Central 
India, iii. 295 ; Central Provinces, iii. 
317; Chaprauli, iii. 317; Champanagar, 
iii- 333 ; Cutch, iv. 60 ; Damoh, iv. 
109 ; their meetings at Kundalpur, iv. 
112; Deulgaon Raja, iv. 230; Berar, 
v. 267 ; Harpanahalli, v. 342 ; Hassan, 
V. 347 ; Hazaribagh, v. 374 ; Humcha, 
v. 501, 502; South Kanara, vii. 379; 
Madras, ix. 22 ; Mainpuri, ix. 206 ; 
Meerut, ix. 386 ; Murshidabad, x. 25 ; 
Muzaffarnagar, x. 71 ; Mysore, x. 100; 
Palanpur Agency, x. 537 ; Palitana, 
xi. 3, 4 ; Anhilwara Patan, xi. 82 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 408, 410 ; Rampur 
(N.-W. P.), xi. 460; Rangpur, xi. 
494 ; Ranipur, xi. 509 ; Rohtak, xii. 
72 ; Sagar, xii. 104, 105 ; Sarsaganj, 
xii. 271 ; Satara, xii. 280; Shravan- 
belgola, xii. 415; Sialkot, xii. 452; 
Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; Sirohi, xiii. 4 ; 
Sultanpur, xiii. 106; Surat, xiii. 124; 
Udaipur, xiii. 402. See also Architec- 
ture, Jain, and Temples, Jain, 



i66 



INDEX. 



Jaintia, tract in Assam, vii. 46, 47 ; 

Jaintia Hills, Sub-division in Assam, 
vii. 47-49. 

Jaintiapur, village in Assam, vii. 49, 50. 

Jaipal, Hindu Raja of Lahore, his defeats 
by Sabuktigin and JNIahmud of Ghazni, 
article ' India,' vi. 272, xi. 148, 261. 

Jaipur, Native State in Rajputana, vii. 
50-59 ; physical aspects, 50-52 ; agri- 
culture, 52 ; population, 52, 53 ; com- 
merce, etc., 53, 54; communications, 
54, 55 ; history, 55-58 ; administration, 
58 ; climate, 58, 59. 

Jaipur city, capital of State in Rajputana, 
vii. 59-61. 

Jaipur, town in Assam, vii. 61. 

Jaipur, estate in Madras, vii. 61-64. 

Jaipur, town in Madras, vii. 64, 65. 

Jaipurite or syepoorite, found in Raj- 
putana, xi. 401. 

Jais, town undpargarm in Oudh, vii. 65. 

Jaisalmer, State in Rajputana, vii. 65-70 ; 
physical aspects, 66 ; climate, 66, 67 ; 
history, 67, 68 ; agriculture, 68, 69 ; 
population, 69 ; trade, 69 ; administra- 
tion, 69, 70. 

Jaisalmer city, capital of State in Raj- 
putana, vii. 70. 

Jai Singh, Raja of Jaipur, his astronomical 
observatories at Jaipur, Delhi, Benares, 
Muttra, and Ujjain in the i8th century, 
article 'India,' vi. 105, 106. Local 
notices — His observatory at Benares, ii. 
265 ; completed the palace of Amber, 
i. 228 ; his reign, vii. 56 ; founded 
Jaipur (1728), vii. 59 ; observatory at 
Ujjain, xiii. 418. 
Jaisinghnagar, village in Central Pro- 
vinces, vii. 70, 71. 
Jaitak, hill fort in Punjab, vii. 71. 
Jaitapur, port in Bombay, vii. 71. 
Jaitpur, historic town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 7I> 72- 
Jajamau, town in Oudh, vii. 72. 
Jajhoti, historic name of Bundelkhand, 

vii. 72. 
Jajis, an important, semi - independent 

tribe in the Kuram valley, viii. 368. 
Jajmau, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 72, 73- 
Jajpur, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

jii- 73- 

Jajpur, town in Central India, vii. 73- 

Jakanachari, architect and sculptor, his 
carvings at Behir, ii. 252 ; bom at 
Kaidala, legend about, vii. 295 ; his 
carvings at Somnathpur, xiii. 51- 

Jakhan, State in Kathiawar, vii. 74. 

Jakhau, port in Bombay, vii. 74- 

Jakkatala. See Wellington. 

Jako, mountain peak in Punjab, vii. 74- 

Jakranis, Baluchi tribe on the Upper Sind 
Frontier, xiii. 440, 443. 



Jalalabad, district in Afghanistan, vii. 
74-76 ; agriculture, 75 ; administration, 

75.76. 
Jalalabad, town in Afghanistan, vii. 76, 

77-, 
Jalalabad, town in Oudh, vii. 77. 
Jalalabad, town in Muzaffarnagar District, 

N.-W. Provinces, vii. 77. 
Jalalabad, tahsil m. N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

77, 78. 
Jalalabad, town in Shahjahanpur District, 

N.-W. Provinces, vii. 78, 79. 
Jalali, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 79- 
Jalalkhera, town in Central Provinces, 

vii. 79. 
Jalaljsur, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 

79. 80. 
Jalalpur, town and tahsil in Punjab, vii. 

80. 
Jalalpur, village in Punjab, vii. 80, 81. 
Jalalpur, historic town in Punjab, vii. 81. 
Jalalpur-Dehi, town in Oudh, vii. 81. 
Jalalpur-Nahvi, town in Oudh, vii. 8r, 

82. 
Jalal-ud-din, the first king of the Khilji 

dynasty (1290-95), article 'India,' 

vi. 280. Local notices — Founded 

new dynasty at Delhi, iv. 191, 192 ; 

his unsuccessful siege of Ranthambor 

(1291), xi. 511. 
Jalandhar, Division in Punjab, vii. 82, 

83- 
Jalandhar, District in Punjab, vii. 83-90 ; 

physical aspects, 83 - 85 ; history, 
85, 86 ; population, 86, 87 ; agri- 
culture, 87-89 ; commerce and trade, 
89 ; administration, 89, 90 ; medical 
aspects, 90. 

Jalandhar, tahsil in Punjab, vii. 90, 91. 

Jalandhar, town in Punjab, vii. 91, 92. 

Jalangi, river in Bengal, vii. 92, 93. 

Jalarapetta. See Jollarpet. 

Jalaun, District in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
93-102; physical aspects, 93, 94; his- 
tory, 94-96 ; people, 96-98 ; agricul- 
ture, 98, 99 ; natural calamities, 99, 
100 ; commerce and trade, 100 ; ad- 
ministration, 100, loi ; medical as- 
pects, 102. 

Jalaun, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
102. 

Jalaun, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
102, 103. 

Jaldhaka, river of Bengal, vii. 103. 

Jalesar, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 103. 

Jaleswar, town in Bengal, vii. 104. 

Jalgaon, town in Bombay, vii. 104. 

Jalgaon, village in Central Provinces, 
vii. 104, 105. 

Jalgaon, tdliik in Berar, vii. 105. 

Jalgaon, pargand in Central India, vii. 
105. 



INDEX. 



167 



Jalgaon- Jambod, town in Berar, vii. 
105, 106. 

Jalgars, gold - washers in Dharwar, iv. 
,258. 

Jalia Amraji, State in Kathiawar, vii. 
106. 

Jalia Dewani, State in Bombay, vii. 106. 

Jalia Manaji, State in Kathiawar, vii. 106. 

Jaliyas, caste of fishermen, especially 
numerous in Bengal, ii. 296 ; Dinajpur, 
iv. 292 ; Goalpara, v. 115. 

Jalna, town in the Deccan, vii. 106, 107. 

Jaloka, son of Asoka, said to have a 
temple, now a mosque, at Srinagar, 
xiii. 76. 

Jalor, town in Rajputana, vii. 107. 

Jalori, mountain range in Punjab, vii. 
107. 

Jalpaiguri, District in Bengal, vii. 107 
117; physical aspects, 107-109 ; his- 
tory, 109-111 ; population, 111-113 ; 
agriculture, 113, 1 14; tea, 1 14, 1 15; 
manufactures, etc., I15, 116; admini- 
stration, 116, 117; medical aspects, 

117- 

Jalpaiguri, Sub-division in Bengal, vii. 

"7- 

Jalpaiguri, town in Bengal, vii. 117, 1 18. 
Jalpesh, town in Bengal, vii. 118. 
Jamalabad, town in Madras, vii. 118. 
Jamalavaya Durga, hill in Madras, vii. 

118. 
Jamalis, Baluchi tribe in Larkhana, viii. 

463 ; Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 440, 

443- 
Jamdlpur, Sub-division in Bengal, vii. 

3i8> 319- 
Jamdlpur, town in Bengal, vii. 119. 
Jama Masjid, Shah Jahan's great mosque 

at Delhi, article ' India,' vi. 304. See 

also Mosques. 
Jambu, river in Bengal, vii. 119. 
Jambughora, village in Bombay, vii. 120. 
Jambukeswaram, historic temple in 

Madras, vii. 120, 121. 
Jambulghata, town in Central Provinces, 

vii. 121. 
Jambur, village in Coorg, vii. 12 1. 
Jambusar, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 

121, 122. 
Jambusar, town in Bombay, vii. 122, 

^123. 
Jambva, river in Bombay, vii. 123. 
James, Commodore, took Bankot, the 

resort of the Angria pirates (1755), 

iv. 449. 
James, Colonel, suggested St. Thomas' 

Mount as head-quarters of the Madras 

artillery (1774), xii. 144. _ 
James and Mary Sands, in the Hugh 

river, v. 123-126. See also Hugh 

river. 
Jami, town in Madras, vii. 126. 



Jamira, tidal estuary of the Ganges, vii. 
126. 

Jam-jo-Tando, town in Sind, vii. 127. 

Jamkhandi, State in Bombay, vii. 127. 

Jamkhandi, town in Bombay, vii. 127. 

Jamkhher, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 
127, 12S. 

Jamki, town in Punjab, vii. 128. 

Jamli, village in Central India, vii. 128. 

Jammalamadugu, town and tdhik in 
Madras, vii. 128, 129. 

Jammu, Province and town in Kashmir, 
vii. 129, 130. 

Jamna. See Jumna. 

Jamnagar. See Nawanagar. 

Jamner, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, vii. 130, 131. 

Jamni, river in Central India, vii. 131. 

Jamnia, chiefship in Central India, vii. 

I3i> 132. 

Jamnotri, hot springs in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 132. 

Jamod, town in Berar, vii. 132. 

Jampui, hill range in Bengal, vii. 132. 

Jampur, town and tahsil in Punjab, vii. 

^132,133- 
Jamri, estate in Central Provinces, vii. 133. 

Jamrud, fort in Punjab, vii. 133. 

Jamtara, Sub-division in Bengal, vii. 

I33> 134- 

Jamu. See Jammu. 

Jamui, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 
vii. 134. 

Jamuna. See Jumna. 

Jamuna, river in N. Bengal, vii. 134, 
135 ; the name of the Brahmaputra 
from its entering the Bengal delta to 
its junction with the Ganges, article 
' India,' vi. 14. 

Jamuna, river in Bengal, vii. 135, 136. 

Jamuna, river in Assam, vii. 136. 

Jamuna, river in N. Bengal, vii. 136. 

Jamwari, river in Oudh, vii. 136. 

Janaura, town in Oudh, vii. 136. 

Jandiala, town in Punjab, vii. 136, 137. 

Jandiala, town in Punjab, vii. 137. 

Jang Bahadur, Sir, assistance rendered by, 
during the suppression of the Mutiny, 
article ' India,' vi. 421. Local notices 
— Recovered Gorakhpur from the 
mutineers, v. 167 ; his history, Prime 
Minister of Nepal (1846-77), x. 290; 
his campaign in Oudh, x. 496. 

Jangipur, town and Sub-division in Ben- 
gal, vii. 137. 

Janjira, Native State in Bombay, vn. 
137-141 ; physical aspects, 138 ; popu- 
lation, 138, 139 ; climate, products, 
etc., 139, 140; communications, 140; 
histoiy, 140, 141. 

Janjira, capital of State in Bombay, vii. 141. 

Jansath, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 142. 



i68 



INDEX. 



Jaoli. See Javli. 

Jaora, State in Central India, vii. 142. 
Jaora, town in Central India, vii. 143. 
Jarcha, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

,143- 
Jareja Rajputs, the ruling race in Cutch, 
their history, iv. 61. 

Jarod, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 143, 
144. 

Jarwal, town in Oudh, vii. 144. 

Jasa Singh, head of the Jan wars of Unao, 
rebelled, and died of wounds received 
fighting against Havelock, xiii. 430. 

Jasdan, State in Kathiawar, vii. 144. 

Jasdan, town in Kathiawar, vii. 144. 

Jashpur, State in Chutia Nagpur, vii. 
144-146 ; physical aspects, 144, 145 ; 
history, 145; population, 145, 146; 
crops, 146. 

Jashpur, hill range in Bengal, vii. 146. 

Jaso, State in Central India, vii. 146. 

Jasol, estate and village in Rajputana, 
vii. 146. 

Jaspur, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
146. 

Jaspura, village in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
146, 147. 

Jasrota, historic town in Punjab, vii. 147. 

Jaswan Dun, valley in Punjab, vii. 147. 

Jaswantnagar, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 147. 

Jaswant Rao Holkar. See Holkar. 

Jaswant Singh, Raja of Jodhpur, sent 
across the Indus with an army by 
Aurangzeb, vii. 241. 

Jatba, founded the Gond kingdom of 
Deogarh, iii. 399. 

Jath, State in Bombay, vii. 147, 148. 

Jath, town in Bombay, vii. 148. 

Jati, tdltik in Bombay, vii. 148. 

Jatinga, river in Assam, vii. 148. 

Jatoi, town in Punjab, vii. 148, 149. 

Jatoi, village in Bombay, vii. 149. 

Jatrapur, village in Bengal, vii. 149. 

Jats, The, their Scythian origin, article 
'India,' vi. 179, 180. Local notices — 
Particularly numerous or otherwise im- 
portant in Ajmere-Merwara, i. 124; 
Aligarh, i. 172; Ambala, i. 218; 
Amritsar, i. 258 ; Bannu, ii. 93 ; 
Bhartpur, ii. 372 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ; 
Bulandshahr, iii. 137 ; Central India, 
iii. 295 ; Chaprauli, iii. 370 ; Delhi, 
iv. 181 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 213 ; 
Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 222 ; Firozpur, 
iv. 442 ; Gujranwala, v. 183 ; Gujrat, 
V. 189, 191, 192; Gurdaspur, V. 209; 
Gurgaon, v. 218, 219 ; Hissar, v. 429 ; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 454; Jalandhar, vii. 
87 ; Jehlam, vii. 168-170 ; Jodhpur, vii. 
237, 238 ; Karnal, viii. 22 ; Lahore, 
viii. 407 ; Larkhana, viii. 463 ; Lud- 
hiana, viii. 521 ; Meerut, ix. 386, 388 ; 



Montgomery, ix. 497 ; Multan, x. 6, 7 ; 
Muttra, X. 48 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 60 ; 
Muzaffarnagar, x. 71 ; Punjab, xi. 273, 
274; Rajputana, xi. 408, 410; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 26 ; Rohtak, xii. 72 ; Sial- 
kot, xii. 444 ; Sibi, xii.^ 455, 456; 
Sirsa, xiii. 13, 14; Tikri, xiii. 295; 
Udaipur, xiii. 402 ; Upper Sind Fron- 
tier, xiii. 441. 

Jatta, salt mine in Punjab, vii. 149. 

Jaulna. See Jalna. 

Jaum, village in Central India, vii. 149. 

Jaunpur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 149-159; physical aspects, 150, 
151 ; history, 151 - 153 ; population, 

153, 154; urban and rural population, 

154, 155 ; material condition of the 
people, 155 ;_ agriculture, 155-157; 
natural calamities, 157 ; communica- 
tions, trade, etc., 157, 158 ; administra- 
tion, 158; sanitary aspects, 158, 159. 

Jaunpur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

'59- 

Jaunpur, historic town, and former capital, 

in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 159, 160. 
Jaunsar Bawar, tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 160, 161. 
Jaura. See Jaora. 
Java, Conquest of, by Lord Minto, 

article ' India,' vi. 399. 
Javli, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 161. 
Jawad, town in Central India, vii. 161. 
Jawadi, range in Madras, vii. 161, 162. 
Jawahir. See Juhar. 
Jawahir Singh of Chandrapur, rebelled 

(1842), xii. 102. 
Jawalamukhi, ancient town in Punjab, 

vii. 162. 
Jawalapur, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

vii. 162, 163. 
Jawhar, State in Bombay, vii. 163, 164. 
"jawhar, chief town of State in Bombay, 

vii. 164. 
Jayadeva, Sanskrit poet of the 12th 
century, article * India,' vi. 128 ; born 
at Kenduli, where a fair is held in his 
honour, viii. 114. 
Jayamangali, river in Mysore, vii. 164. 
Jaziyd, or Mughal poll - tax on non- 

Musalmans, article ' India,' vi. 309. 
Jeddya Gowden, mountain in Madras, 

vii. 165. 
Jehlam, river in Punjab, vii. 165, 166. 
Jehlam, District in Punjab, vii. 166-177 ; 
physical aspects, 166-168; history, 
168, 169; population, 169- 1 72; agri- 
culture, 172-174 ; commerce and trade, 
174, 175; administration, 175, 176; 
medical aspects, 176, 177' 
Jehlam, tahsil \n Punjab, vii. 177. 
Jehlam, town in Punjab, vii. 177, 178. 
Jeejeebhoy, Sir Jamsetjee, founded Bom- 
bay School of Art, iii. 71 ; created a 



INDEX. 



169 



baronet (1857), iii. 80; subscribed 
most of the expenses of the Poona 
water-works, xi. 210, 211. 

Jeejeebhoy, Lady, gave largely to the 
Bombay causeways, xiii. 256. 

Jejuri, town in Bombay, vii. 178. 

Jellasore. See Jaleswar. 

Jenkal-betta, peak in Mysore, vii. 178. 

Jenkins, Capt., sent by Lord W. Bentinck 
to examine Assam, i. 365. 

Jerdon, Dr., author of hand-book on the 
mammals of India, his nomenclature 
used, ix. 88-90 ; his Birds of India, 
. ix. 91. 

Jerigiu-khadi. See Dang States. 

Jerimala, town in Madras, vii. 179. 

Jerruck, Sub-division in Sind,vii. 179- 1 82. 

Jerruck, village in Sind, vii. 182. 

Jesar, State in Bombay, vii. 1S2, 183. 

Jessor, District in Bengal, vii. 183-191 ; 
physical aspects, 183, 184 ; history, 
184, 185 ; population, 185 - 187 ; 
agriculture, 187, 188 ; natural calami- 
ties, 188 ; commerce and trade, 1S8, 
189 ; means of communication, 189 ; 
administration, 189 - 191 ; medical 
aspects, 191. 

Jessor, Sub-division in Bengal, vii. 191. 

Jessor, town in Bengal, vii. 191, 192. 

Jesuits in India, article 'India, 'vi. 244- 
255 ; first Portuguese missionaries 
(1500), 244 ; St. Francis Xavier, 244, 
245 ; the Madras Jesuits, 245 ; letters 
of the early Jesuit missionaries, 246 ; 
Thana, a Jesuit station (1550), with its 
colony of Christian artisans and culti- 
vators, 247, 248 ; rural organization of 
the Jesuits, 248 ; the Jesuit college at 
Cochin, 248-250 ; Jesuit itinerary mis- 
sionaries, and their conversions, 250, 
251 ; Jesuit missions in Malabar in the 
17th and i8th centuries, 251, 252; 
Jesuit martyrdoms, 252, 253 ; literary 
labours of the Jesuits, 253 ; establish- 
ment of the Portuguese inquisition at 
Goa (1560), 251-253 ; mttos dafi, 253, 
254; abolition of the inquisition (1812), 
254; the Jesuits suppressed (1759-73), 
254, 255 ; re-established (1814), 255. 
Local notices — Agra, i. 75 ; Bandel, ii. 
57 ; Cochin, iv. 12 ; Coimbatore, iv. 
16 ; expelled from Cuddalore between 
1746 and 1752, iv. 46 ; monopolized 
the trade of Goa in the i8th century, 
v. 105 ; South Kanara, vii. 379 ; 
Karur, viii. 52 ; Madura, ix. 25, 125, 
126 ; Malabar, ix. 229 ; Negapatam, 
X. 258 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 302, 303 ; 
Travancore, xiii. 348 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 358 ; Tuticorin, xiii. 385. 

Jesujabus of Adiabene, Nestorian patriarch 
(died 660), mentions Quilon as Coilon, 
xi. 339- 



Jesvvant Rao Puar, Raja of Dhar, 

rebelled in Mutiny of 1857, iv. 247. 
Jeth Singh, Raja of Sambalpur, his 

history, xii. 179, 180. 
Jethwar. See Barda. 
Jetpur Bilkha, State in Kathiawar, vii. 

192. 
Jetpur, fortified town in Kathiawar, vii. 

192, 193. 
Jewar, towninN.-W. Provinces, vii. 193. 
Jewellery and goldsmiths' work, article 

' India,' vi. 605, 606. For local notices, 

see Goldsmiths' and jewellers' work. 
Jewish settlements in ancient Malabar, 

article ' India,' vi. 234, 235. 
Jews in Balkh, ii. 15 ; Bengal, ii. 295 ; 

Bombay Presidency, iii. 52 ; Bombay 

city, iii. 180; Lower Burma, iii. 179 ; 

Calcutta, iii. 256; Cochin, iv. 4, 10, 

1 1 ; Kodungalur, viii. 240. See also 

Beni-Israel. 
Jeypore. See Jaipur. 
Jeypore, estate and town in Madras. 

See Jaipur. 
Jeysulmere. See Jaisalmer. 
Jhabua, State in Central India, vii. 193- 

195- 
Jhabua, town in Central India, vii. 195. 
"jhajhar, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

195, 196. 

Jhajhars, good agriculturists in Buland- 

shahr, iii. 137. 
Jhajjar, town and ialisil in Punjab, vii. 

196, 197. 

Jhaknanda, town m Central India, vii. 
197. 

Jhala Rajputs, akin to the Waghelas, 
tdlnhdars in Ahmadabad, i. 89. 

Jhalakati, village in Bengal, vii. 197. 

Jhalawar, Native State in Rajputana, 
vii. 197-202 ; physical aspects, 198, 
199 ; history, 199, 200 ; agriculture, 
200; revenue, 200, 201 ; population, 
201, 202 ; means of communication, 
202 ; climate, 202. 

Jhalawar, division of Kathiawar, vii. 202. 

Jhalera, chiefship in Central India, vii. 
203. 

Jhalod, petty division in Bombay, vii. 203. 

Jhalod, town in Bombay, vii. 203. 

Jhalotar-Ajgain, pargand in Oudh, vii. 
203. 

Jhalra Patan, town in Rajputana, vii. 

■ 203-205. 

Jhalu, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

205- 
Jhamka, State in Bombay, vii. 205. 

jhammar, State in Bombay, vii. 205. 

Jhampodar, State in Kathiawar, vii. 205. 

Jhang, District in Punjab, vii. 205-212 ; 
physical aspects, 206, 207 ; history, 
207-209 ; population, 209, 210 ; agri- 
culture, 211; commerce and trade, 



170 



INDEX. 



211; administration, 211, 212; medical 

aspects, 212. 
Jhang, tdhsil in Punjab, vii. 212, 213. 
Jhang, town in Punjab, vii. 213. 
Jhangar, village in Bombay, \\\. 213. 
Jhanidah, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, vii. 214. 
Jhanjhana, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

Jhanjharpur, village in Bengal, vii. 214. 

Jhansi, Native State in Central India, 
lapsed to the British for want of heirs, 
article 'India,' vi. 415; revolt of the 
ex-princess in 1857, vi. 421, 422. 

Jhansi, Division in X.-W. Pro\-inces, vii. 
214, 215. 

Jhansi, District in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
215-227 ; physical aspects, 216, 217 ; 
history, 217 - 221 ; population, 221, 
222 ; agriculture, 222 - 224 ; natural 
calamities, 224, 225 ; commerce and 
trade, 225, 226 ; administration, 226, 
227 ; medical aspects, 227. 

Jhansi, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
227, 228. 

Jhansi Naoabad, village in X.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 228. 

Jharcha. See Jarcha. 

Jharia, coal-field in Bengal, vii. 228, 229. 

Jharia Garkhari. See Dang States. 

Jharias, the older Hindu settlers in the 
Central Provinces who have contracted 
local beliefs, iii. 312. 

Jheend. See jind. 

Jhelum. See Jehlam. 

Jhind. See Jind. 

Jhinjhuwara, town and State in Bombay, 
vii. 230. 

Jhirak. See Jerruck. 

Jhiri, river in Assam, vii. 230. 

Jhulara Kadir Khan, besieged, with 
Ismail Beg, Madhuji Sindhia in Agra 
(1787), i. 70. 

Jhunjhnu, pargatui in Rajputana, vii. 
230, 231. 

Jhusi, village in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

Jia Dhaneswari, river in Assam, vii. 231. 
Jiaganj, town in Bengal, vii. 231. 
Jigni, State in Central India, vii. 231, 

Jilo or Jilo-Patan, town in Rajputana, 

vii. 232. 
Jind, Xative State in Punjab, vii. 232, 

Jind, chief town of State in Punjab, vii. 

. .•?-'-■ 

Jinjira. See Janjira. 

Jinjiram, river in Assam, vii. 233. 
Jira, village in Assam, vii. 233. 
Jiral, State in Bombay, \-ii. 233. 
Jirang, State in Assam, vii. 233. 
Jiri. See Jhiri. 



Jobat, State in Central India, vii. 233, 

234- 

Jobat, to\\'n in Central India, vii. 234. 

Jodhia or Joriya, revenue division, town, 
and port in Bombay, vii. 234. 

Jodhi Singh, Sikh ruler on the Ra\-i 
from 1803 to 1816, when on his death 
Ranjit Singh seized the territory, v. 
208. 

Jodhpur, Native State in Rajputana, vii. 
234-246; physical aspects, 235, 236; 
geological characteristics, 236, 237 ; 
population, 237, 238 ; agriculture, 
23S, 239 ; manufactures, 239 ; medical 
aspects, 239, 240 ; history, 240-243 ; 
administration, 244, 245 ; climate, 
245, 246. 

Jodhpur city, capital of State in Raj- 
putana, vii. 246, 247. 

Jogeshwari, cave in Bombay, vii. 246, 

^47- 

Jogigarh, fort in Central Provinces, vii. 
247. 

Jogi-ghopa, village in Assam, vii. 247. 

Jogi-maradi, peak in Mysore, vii. 247. 

Johnstone, Sir John, raised siege of 
Kohima by the Nagas (1879) with his 
Manipuris, ix. 327, x. 146 ; saved 
British subjects in the third Burmese 
war, ix. 328. 

Jollarpet, town in Madras, vii. 247. 

Joma-male. See Soma-male. 

Jones, Colonel, commanded expedition 
against Sarguja at end of i8th century, 
xii. 267. 

Jones, Sir William, article ' India,' vi. 
114, 126; his estimate of the popula- 
tion of Bengal, ii. 292. 

Jones, Capt. William, his improved sys- 
tem of embanking and irrigating the 
Tarai (1851), xiii. 208. 

Jones, Sir William, took Moradabad 
(1S58), ix. 507; relieved the siege of 
Shahjalianpur, xii. 346. 

Jones, W. B., Chief Commissioner of the 
Central Provinces (1S83), iii. 320. 

Jordanus, Friar, consecrated Bishop of 
Columbum or Quilon (1330), xi. 339. 

Jorhat, village and Sub - division in 
Assam, vii. 247, 248. 

Joriya. See Jodhia. 

Josaphat, a saint of the Christian Church, 
analogies between him and Buddha, 
and asserted identity of the two, 
article ' India,' vi. 151, 152. 

Joshimath, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 248. 

Jotdar, river channel in Bengal, vii. 248. 

Jotddrs. See Tenures, Land. 

Joura. See Jaora. 

Journal Asiatiqiie, paper by M. Senart, 
quoted, article 'India, vi. 175 (foot- 
note 3). 



INDEX. 



171 



Journalism and newspapers, article 
' India,' vi. 480. See Newspapers. 

Jowai, village in Assam, vii. 248, 249. 

Juangs, The, tribe of Orissa Tributary 
States, vii. 249-252 ; habits and cus- 
toms, 250 ; dwellings, 250 ; cultiva- 
tion, 250; food, 251; dress, 251; 
physical characteristics, 252 ; religion, 
252 ; marriages and funeral cere- 
monies, 252 ; a leaf-wearing tribe in 
Orissa, article ' India,' vi. 56. 

Juba, historic fortress in Bengal; vii. 

253- 
Jubbal, Hill State in Punjab, vii. 253. 
Jubbulpore. See Jabalpur. 
Juggaur, town in Oudh, vii. 253. 
Jugis or Katamis, silk - weavers and 

breeders of silkworms in Assam, i. 

356. 
Juhar, valley in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

253- 
Ju-i-Sharki, town in Oudh, vii. 254. 
Jullundur. See jalandhar. 
/mil. See Nomadic hill cultivation. 
Jummoo. See Kashmir and Jammu. 
Jumna, great river in Northern India, 

and chief tributary of the Ganges, 

article ' India,' vi. 17 ; vii. 254- 

256. 
Jumna Canal, Eastern, irrigation work 

in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 256-258; 

statistics of, article 'India,' vi. 29; 
' 532, 533- Local notices — INleerut, ix. 
■ 382 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 67 ; Saharan- 

pur, xii. 114. 
Jumna Canal, Western, irrigation work 

in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 258-261; 

statistics of, article ' India,' vi. 29 ; 

531- Local notices — Ambala, i. 215, 

220; Delhi, iv. 178, 179; Hissar, v. 

426, 430 ; Karnal, viii. 19, 20 ; 

Rohtak, xii. 69. 
Junagarh, Native State in Bombay, vii. 

261, 262. 
Junagarh, town in Kathiawar, vii. 262, 

263.^ 
Junapadar, State in Kathiawar, vii. 263. 
Jungle Mahals, formerly a District in 

Lower Bengal, vii. 263, 264. 
Jungle products, tasar silk, lac, etc., 

article 'India,' \-\. 34; 513-515. See 

also Forest and jungle products. 
Jungle rites in Hinduism, article ' India,' 

vi. 206, 207. 
Junnar, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, vii. 264. 
Junona, ancient village in Central Pro- 
vinces, vii. 264, 265. 
Jurhi Singh, mutineer leader, repulsed 

from Machhlishahr by the inhabitants 

(1858), vii. 153. 
Jute, Cultivation of, article ' India,' vi. 

494, 495. Local notices — In Akola, 



i. 143 ; Assam, i. 362 ; Bakarganj, 
i. 445 ; Bengal, ii. 271, 303; Bogra, 
iii. 29 ; Lower Burma, iii. 191 ; Chit- 
tagong, iii. 439; Dacca, iv. 79, 82, 
85 ; Darjiling, iv. 134 ; Dinajpur, iv. 
294; Goalpara, v. 116; Godavari, v. 
127 ; Hazaribagh, v. 375 ; Howrah, 
V. 463 ; Hugh, V. 494 ; Jalpaiguri, vii. 
113; Jessor, vii. 187; Khulna, viii. 
207 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 323 ; Maiman- 
singh, ix. 195, 196 ; Manbhum, ix. 
283 ; Nadiya, x. 135 ; Noakhali, x. 
347; Nowgong, x. 411; Pabna, x. 
515, 516; Puri, xi. 306; Purniah, xi. 
326 ; Rajshahi, xi. 433 ; Rangpur, xi. 
496 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 232 ; Shah- 
abad, xii. 329 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 
112; Sylhet, xiii. 151, 152 ; Tipperah, 
xiii. 317 ; Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 

395- 
Jute, Export of raw and manufactured, 

article 'India,' vi. 495; 570, 571; 
576; 615. Local notices — Centres of 
jute trade, Baidyabati, i. 436 ; Chag- 
dah, iii. 324 ; Chhalapak, iii. 394 ; 
Chhanchia Mirganj, iii. 394; Dacca, 
iv. 91 ; Gauripur, v. 42 ; Goalanda, 
V. no ; Manikar Char, ix. 319 ; 
Narainganj, x. 202 ; Patamari, xi. 80 ; 
Purniah, xi. 332 ; Sambhuganj, xii. 
189 ; Sherpur (Maimansingh), xii. 382 ; 
Sirajganj, xii. 548-550 ; Subankhali, 
xiii. 83 J Ula Kandi, xiii. 418. 

Jute-mills, Steam, article ' India,' vi. 
614-616. Local notices — Baranagar, ii. 
123 ; in Bengal, ii. 309 ; Chittivalasa, 
iii. 454 ; Howrah, v. 465 ; Vizaga- 
patam, ix. 54 ; Sirajganj, xii. 549, 
550 ; in the Twenty - four Parganas, 
xiii. 397. 

Jute - presses. Steam, at Narainganj, x. 
202. 

Jutogh, military station in Punjab, vii. 
265. 



K 



Kabadak, river of Bengal, vii. 265. 

Kabar, lake in Bengal, vii. 265. 

Ka-baung, river in Burma, vii. 265. 

Kabbal-durga, hill in Mysore, vii. 265, 
266. 

Kabbani. See Kapini. 

Kabir, Vishnuite religious reformer (1380- 
1420), claimed as a saint by both 
Hindus and Muhammadans, article 
' India,' vi. 208 ; his doctrines, vi. 
218, 219 ; coalition of Vishnuism with 
Islam, 219 ; Kabir's religious poetry, 
34.5. Local notices — His followers, the 
Kabirpanthis, iii. 313-315 ; his tomb 
at Maghar, ix. 139; his doctrines, x. 
442, 443- 



172 



INDEX. 



Kabirpanthi's, or followers of Kabi'r, their 
numbers in the Central Provinces, iii. 
313 ; their religion and customs, iii. 
S'fS'SlS; numerous in Chhatisgarh, 
iii. 396 ; their priest lives at Kawarclha, 
viii. 107 ; numerous in Raipur, xi. 
372, 373 ;. Sagar, xii. 104 ; and Sam- 
balpur, xii. 182. 

ICabrai, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
266. 

Kabul, principal Province of Afghanistan, 
vii. 266, 267. 

Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, vii. 267- 
27s ; physical aspects, 267 ; bdzdrs, 
269 ; inhabitants, etc., 271-275. 

Kabul, river in Afghanistan, vii. 275, 277. 

Kacharis. See Cacharis. 

Kachchh. See Cutch. 

Kachchh, Rann of. See Cutch. 

Kachha Nagas, tribe in the Naga Hills, 
X. 148. 

Kachhandan, pargand in Oudh, vii. 277. 

Kachhi Baroda, town and estate in 
Central India, vii. 277. 

Kachhis, or market gardeners, especially 
numerous in Allahabad, i. 189 ; Broach, 
iii. 103 ; Cawnpur, iii. 283 ; their con- 
dition there, iii. 284, 2S5 ; Central 
Provinces, iii. 317; Damoh, iv. Iio; 
Etah, iv. 361 ; Fatehpur, iv. 426 ; 
Jaunpur, vii. 155 ; Jhansi, vii. 222, 

Kachhla, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
^277,278. 

Kachola, town in Rajputana, vii. 278. 

Kachua, village in Bengal, vii. 278. 

Kachwakas, tribe of Rajputs, important 
in Ajmere-Merwara, i. 123 ; Jalaun, 
vii. 97 ; Rajputana, xi. 409, 410. 

Kadaba, village and tdhik in Mysore 
State, vii. 278. 

Kadaiyanallur, town in Madras, vii. 278. 

Kadalur. See Cuddalore. 

Kadambas, dynasty which ruled in 
Shimoga, with its capital at Banavasi, 
xii. 400. 

Kadana, State in Bombay, vii. 279, 

Kadapa. See Cuddapah. 

Kadattanad, chiefshipin Madras, vii. 279. 

Kadava Kunbis, their peculiar marriage 
customs, xiii. 437, 438. 

Kaders, aboriginal tribe in the Anamalai 
Hills, Madras, article ' India,' vi. 
55- Local notices — In the Anamalai 
Hills, i. 270 ; Coimbatore, iv. 17 ; 
Nelliampati Hills, x. 260. 

Kadi, petty division in Bombay, vii. 279, 
280. 

Kadi, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 
vii. 280. 

Kadihati, town in Bengal, vii. 280. 

Kadipur, tahsilin Oudh, vii. 280, 281. 

Kadirabad, town in the Deccan, vii. 281. 

Kadiri,town and tdhtk in Madras, vii. 281. 



Ka-do, village in Burma, vii. 281, 282. 

Kadi'ir, District in Mysore, vii. 282-288 ; 
physical aspects, 282, 283 ; history, 
283, 284 ; population, 284-286; agricul- 
ture, 286, 287 ; manufactures, 287 ; ad- 
ministration, 288; medical aspects, 288. 

Kadur, idluk in Mysore, vii. 288, 289. 

Kadur, village in Mysore, vii. 289. 

Kafara, town in Oudh, vii. 289. 

Kafiristan, tract in Western Himalayas, 
India, vii. 289-292. 

Kafirkot, ruins in Punjab, vii. 292. 

Kafirs, inaccessible people in Western 
Himalayas, i. 45 ; vii. 290-292. 

Kafur. Sec Malik Naib Kafur. 

Kagal, State in Bombay, vii. 292, 293. 

Kagal, town in Bombay, vii. 293. 

Kagan, mountain valley in Punjab, vii, 

293- 
Kahan, river in Punjab, vii. 293. 

Kahlgaon. See Colgong. 

Kahlur, Hill State in Punjab, vii. 293, 

Kahmuvan, lake in Punjab, vii. 294. 

Kahror, town in Punjab, vii. 294, 295. 

Kahiita, tahsll in Punjab, vii. 295. 

Kaibarttas or Keuts, caste of fishermen, 
especially numerous or otherwise re- 
markable, in Assam, i. 355; Bengal, ii. 
296 ; Bogra, iii. 28 ; Dinajpur, iv. 
292 ; Howrah, v. 462 ; Hugh, v. 491 ; 
Kamrup, vii. 359 ; Maldah, ix. 243 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 427 ; Murshidabad, x. 
25 ; Nadiya, x. 132 ; Rajshahi, xi. 432. 

Kaidala, village in Mysore, vii. 295. 

Kail. See Kayal. 

Kailang, village in Punjab, vii. 295, 296. 

Kailas, sacred mountain of the Hindus in 
Tibet, vii. 296 ; from which the Indus, 
Sutlej, and Brahmaputra all take their 
rise, article ' India,' vi. 11, 13. 

Kailashahr, town and Sub - division in 
Bengal, vii. 296. 

Kailwara, town in Rajputana, vii. 296. 

Kaimahra, village in Oudh, vii. 296. 

Kaimganj, fahsi'l in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 296, 297. 

Kaimganj, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
297, 298. 

Kaimur, range of mountains in Central 
India, vii. 298 ; nn offshoot of the 
Vindhyas, article ' India,' vi. 35. 

Kaira, District in Bombay, vii. 298-307 ; 
physical aspects, 299 ; rivers, 299, 300 ; 
minerals, 300 ; wild animals, 300 ; 
history, 300. 301 ; population, 301- 
303 ; agriculture, 303, 304 ; natural 
calamities, 304 ; land tenures, 304, 
305 ; trade, 305, 306 ; administration, 
306, 307 ; medical aspects, 307. 

Kaira, town in Bombay, vii. 307, 308. 

Kairana, town in N.-P. Provinces, vii. 
308. 



INDEX. 



if 3 



Kaisar-jo-Tando, village in Sind, vii. 

308, 309. 

Kaithal, tahsil in Punjab, vii. 309. 
Kaithal, ancient town in Punjab, vii. 

309, 310. 

Kaithan, town in Rajputana, vii. 310. 
Kaiti, village in Madras, vii. 310. 
Kajiiii, estate in Central India, vii. 310. 
Kakair, town in Central Provinces, vii. 

310- 
Kakar, town and tdhik in Bombay, vii. 

310, 311- 

Kakarbai, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

yii; 311- 
Kakars, powerful Afghan tribe in 

Afghanistan, i. 42 ; in the Bolan Pass, 

iii. 35 ; in Pishin, x. 189, 190. 
Kaka Sahib, celebrated shrine at the foot 

of the Khatak Hills, viii. iSi. 
Kakhyens, hill tribe in Upper Burma, 

iii. 212. 
Kakora, village in N. -W. Provinces, vii. 

311- 
Kakori, town and fargand in Oudh, vn. 

3ii> 312. 

Kakrala, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
312. 

Kakraul, village in Bengal, vii. 312. 

Kaksa, village in Bengal, vii. 312, 313. 

Kakus, hill tribe in Upper Burma, iii. 
213. 

Kakwagiri, village in Assam, vii. 313. 

Kalabagh, town and salt-mines in Pun- 
jab, vii. 313, 314. 

Kalachuryas, dynasty in Southern India, 
under whom the Singayats become 
predominant in Kanara, xii. 401. 

Kaladgi, District in Bombay, vii. 314- 
320; physical aspects, 314, 315; history, 
315, 316; population, 316, 317; agri- 
culture, 317, 318 ; natural calamities, 
318, 319; manufactures, 319; admini- 
stration, 319, 320 ; medical aspects, 
320. 

Kaladgi, town in Bombay, vii. 320. 

Kalahandi. See Karond. 

Kalahasti, taluk in Madras, vii. 320, 321. 

Kalahasti, estate in Madras, vii. 321. 

Kalahasti, town in Madras, vii. 321, 
322. 

Kalai, port in Bombay, vii. 322. 

Kalakad, town in Madras, vii. 322. 

Kala-Kusi, river in Bengal, vii. 322. 

Kalale, village in Mysore, vii. 322. 

Kalamb, town in Berar, vii. 322. 

Kalanaur, town in Punjab, vii. 322. 

Kalanaur, town in Punjab, vii. 323. 

Kalang, river channel in Assam, vii. 323. 

Kalan-Kot, historic fort in Bombay, vii. 
323. 

Kalanos, the Brahman at Alexander's 
court, article ' India,' vi. 169. 

Kalar or salt plains. See Usar plains. 



Kalaroa, town in Bengal, vii. 323. 
Kalasa, village in Mysore, vii. 323, 324. 
Kalastri. See Kalahasti. 
Kalat. See Khelat. 
Kalawar, town in Bombay, vii. 324. 
Ka-le-gauk, island in Burma, vii. 324. 
Kalesar, forest reserve in Punjab, vii. 324. 
Kalghatgi, town and Sub-division in 

Bombay, vii. 324, 325. 
Kalhatti, village in Madras, vii. 325. 
Kalhora, The, dynasty, its history in 

Shikarpur, xii. 388, 389 ; in Sind, 

xii. 511-513. 
Kali, the non- Aryan form of the wife 

of Siva, article ' India,' vi. 211, 212. 
Kali. See Gogra. 
Kalia, village in Bengal, vii. 325. 
Kaliabar, village in Assam, vii. 325. 
Kalid-Chak, village in Bengal, vii. 325. 
Kalianappa Subraya, leader of the Cauda 

rebellion of 1837 in S. Kanara, vii. 

378. 

Kalianpur, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 325, 326. 

Kali Baori, petty State in Central India, 
vii. 326. 

Kalibhanj, island in Orissa, vii. 326. 

Kalidasa, Hindu poet and dramatist (56 
B.C.), article 'India, vi. 125; his 
drama of Sakimtald, vi. 126. 

Kaliganj, village in Bengal, vii. 326. 

Kaliganj, village in Bengal, vii. 326. 

Kalighat, sacred village in Bengal, vii. 326. 

Kalikot. See Calicut. 

Kalimiyar Point. See Calimere. 

Kalimpong. See Dalingkot. 

Kali Nadi, East, river in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 327. 

Kali Nadi, West, river in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 327. 

Kalindi, river channel in Bengal, vii. 

327, 328. 
Kalindri, river in N. Bengal, vii. 328. 
Kalinga, historic kingdom of S. India, 

vii. 32S-330. 
Kalingapatam, town and port in Madras, 

vii. 330. 
Kalingia, ghat or pass in Madras, vii. 

330. 331- 
Kalinjar, town and ruined hill fort in 

N.-W. Provinces, vii. 331-337. 

Kalinjera, town in Rajputana, vii. 337. 

Kalipani, sacred spring in N.-W, Pro- 
vinces, vii. 337. 

Kali Sind, river in Central India, vii. 

337; 

Kalitas or Kultas, a caste, formerly priests, 
and almost peculiar to Assam, numerous 
or noteworthy in Assam, i. 354, 355 ; 
Sambalpur and Bonai in the Central 
Provinces, iii. 316 ; Darrang, iv. 145 ; 
Eastern Dwars, iv. 332 ; Ghes, v. 73 ; 
Godlpara, v. 115 ; Kamn'ip, vii. 359 ; 



if4 



INDEX. 



Kharsal, viii. 1 68 ; Lakhimpur, viii. 

430 ; Nowgong, x. 409, 410 ; Sibsagar, 

xii. 464 ; .Sylhet, xiii. 148. 
Kaljani, river in N. Bengal, vii. 337, 338. 
Kalka, village in Punjab, vii. 338. 
Kalladakurichi, town in Madras, vii. 338. 
Kallakurchi, town and taluk in Madras, 

vii. 338. 
Kallars, demon-worshippers and robbers, 

have their temple on Alagar Hill, i. 

161 ; in Madras Presidency, ix. 20 ; 

Madura, ix. 127. 
Kalligal. See Collegal. 
Kallicot, estate in Madras, vii. 338, 339. 
Kallur, pass in Madras, vii. 339. 
Kalmeshwar, town in Central Provinces, 

vii. 339- 
Kalna, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

vii. 339. 
Kalni, river channel in Assam, vii. 340. 
Kalol, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

vii. 340, 341. 
Kalol, town and Sub-division in Baroda, 

vii. 341. 
Kalpi, historic town in N.-W. Provinces, 

vi"i. 341-343- 
Kalpi, village in Bengal, vii. 343. 
Kalrayan, mountain range in Madras, 

vii. 343- 

Kalsi, town and talisil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 343, 344. 

Kalsia, State in Punjab, vii. 344. 

Kalsubai, hill in Bombay, vii. 344. 

Kalu, river in Assam, vii. 344, 345. 

Kalumbe, peak in Central Provinces, vii. 

345; 

Kalwa, headed rising of Gujars in Dehra 
Dun (1824), iv. 172. 

Kalwan, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, vii. 345. 

Kalyan, Sub-division in Bombay, vii. 

345. 346. 
Kalyan, town in Bombay, vii. 346, 347. 
Kalyanmal, /ar^a;;« in Oudh, vii. 347. 
Kama, town in Rajputana. See Kaman. 
Kama, township in Lower Burma, vii. 348. 
Kama, town in Lower Burma, vii. 348, 

349- 

Kamadhia, State in Bombay, vii. 349. 

Kamakhya, sacred hill in Kamnip Dis- 
trict, Assam, vii. 349. 

Kamakhya, range of hills in Nowgong 
District, Assam, vii. 349. 

Kamalapuram, town in Madras, vii. 349. 

Kamalapuri, village in Madras, vii. 350. 

Kamalganj, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 350. 

Kamalia. See Kot Kamalia. 

Kamalpur, chiefship in Central India, 
vii. 350. 

Kamalpur, State in Kathiawar, vii. 350. 

Kamalpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 



Vll. 



550. 



Kaman, town in Rajputana, vii.' 350, 351. 
Kamarjani, village in Bengal, vii. 351. 
Kamar-ud-din-nagar, historic village in 

N.-W. Provinces, vii. 351. 
Kamasin, tahsil and village in N.-W. 

Provinces, vii. 351. 
Kamatapur, historic city in N. Bengal, 

vii. 351- 
Kambam. See Cumbum. 
Kambam, town in Madras, vii. 352. See 

Cumbum. 
Kambar, town and tdhik in Bombay, vii. 

352. 
Kamias, or serf-cultivators, in Hazaribagh, 

^v. 376, 377; 

Kamla, river in Behar, vii. 352, 353. 
Kamlagarh, fort in Punjab, vii. 353. 
Kamona, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

^'"- 353-. 
Kampil, village in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

353,. 354. 

Kampli, town in Madras, vii. 354. 

Kamptee. See Kamthi. 

Kamrup, District in Assam, vii. 354-356 ; 
physical aspects, 354, 355 '■> forests, 
355 ; fauna, 355, 356 ; histor}', 356- 
358 ; people, 358-361 ; material con- 
dition of the people, 361, 362; agricul- 
ture, 362, 363 ; manufactures, etc., 
363, 364; administration, 364, 365; 
medical aspects, 365, 366. 

Kamsoli INIoti and Kamsoli Nani, States 
in Bombay, vii. 366. 

Kanta Rajaula, State in Central India, 
vii. 366. 

Kamtaranala, State forest in Central Pro- 
vinces, vii. 366. 

Kamtha, village and estate in Central 
Provinces, vii. 366. 

Kamthi, town in Central Provinces, vii. 

366, 367. 

Kan. See Khan. 

Kana-Damodar, watercourse in Bengal, 
vii. 368. 

Kanaigiri. See Kanigiri. 

Kana-nadi, watercourse in Bengal, vii. 368. 

Kanadagudi, town in Madras, vii. 363. 

Kanapathia Gosains, sect of the Kum- 
bhipathias in the Central Provinces, 
iii. 316. 

Kanara, Colonel, commanding Sikh artil- 
lery, killed while defending Haripur 
against insurgents (1849), Obelisk to, 
at Haripur, v. 339. 

Kanara, North, District in Bombay, vii. 
368-375 ; physical aspects, 368-370 ; 
history, 370; population, 370, 371; 
agriculture, 371-373 ; commerce, etc., 
373; administration, 373, 374; medi- 
cal aspects, 374, 375. 

Kanara, South, District in Madras, vii. 
375-384 ; physical aspects, 375-377 ; 
history, 377, 378 ; population, 378-380; 



INDEX. 



175 



agriculture, 380-382 ; communications, 
382 ; commerce, 382 ; revenue history, 
382, 383 ; administration, 383 ; medical 
aspects, 383, 384. 
Kanarak, historic temple in Orissa, vii. 

384, 3S5. 

Kanauj, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

385, 386. 

Kanauj, historic city in N.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 386, 387 ; now deserted by the 
Ganges, article ' India,' vi. 30 ; court 
pageant at, in the 1 2th century, vi 
276. 

Kan-aung, town and township in Lower 
Burma, vii. 'i^l, 388. 

Kanbis. See Kunbis. 

Kanchanjanga, mountain peak in the 
Eastern Himalayas, vii. 388 ; article 
' India,' vi. 5. 

Kanchanjhau, lofty spur of the Hima- 
layas, vii. 388. 

Kancharapara, village in Bengal, vii. 

388. 
Kanchiang, river in Assam, vii. 388. 

Kanchivaram. See Conjeveram. 

Kandahar, Province in Afghanistan, vii. 
389-398; history, 391-398; wrested 
from the Mughal Empire during the 
reign of Shah Jahan, article ' India,' 
vi. 303 ; occupation of, during the first 
Afghan war (1839), vi. 408; defeat 
of Ayub Khan at, in the second war 
(1880), vi. 427. 

Kandapur, town and tdliik in Madras, 
vii. 398, 399. . . _ 

Kandaras, semi - Hinduized aborigines, 
and landless day-labourers in Cuttack, 
iv. 69; Khandpara, viii. 160. 

Kandarkha Khurd, town in Oudh, vii. 

399- 
Kandeli, town in Central Provinces, vii. 

399- 
Kandhla, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

399- 

Kandh-mals, tract in Orissa, vii. 399, 
400. 

Kandhs, aboriginal tribe in Orissa and 
Northern Madras, vii. 400-405 ; article 
' India,' vi. 60-63 '■> their patriarchal 
government, 60 ; wars and punishments, 
and blood revenge, 60, 61 ; agriculture, 
61 ; marriage by capture, 61 ; serfs 
attached to their villages, 61, 62 ; 
human sacrifices, 62 ; the Kandhs under 
British rule, 62, 63. Local tioticcs — 
Found in Bamra, ii. 42 ; Baramba, ii. 
121 ; Bonai, iii. 86 ; Boirasambar, iii. 
89 ; Bundare, account of a human sac- 
rifice, iii. 150; in Cuttack, iv, 69; 
Daspalla, iv. 154 ; Ganjam, v. 2, 4, 5 ; 
Ghes, v. 73 ; Jaipur zamtnddri, vii. 62 ; 
the Kandh-mals, vii. 399 ; Karond, 
viii. 46, 47 ; Khandpara, viii. 160 ; 



Loisinh, viii. 488 ; Narsinghpur, x. 
225 ; Nayagarh, x. 257 ; Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, X. 472-474 ; Patna State, 
xi. 116; Raipur, xi. 371; Ranpur, xi. 
510; Sambalpur,xii. 182; Vizagapatam, 
xiii. 491. 

Kandi, Sub-division in Bengal, vii. 405. 

Kandi, town in Bengal, vii. 405, 406. 

Kandiars, town and taluk in Bombay, 
vii. 406. 

Kandih. See Kandeli. 

Kandrawan, town in Oudh, vii. 407. 

Kandukur, town and taluk in Madras, 
vii. 407. 

Kaner, State in Kathiawar, vii. 407. 

Kanera, village in Rajputana, viii. 407. 

Kanets, hill tribe of Rajput cultivators, 
in Chamba, iii. 329 ; Kotaha, viii. 309; 
Kiilu, viii. 339 ; Lahul, viii. 421 ; 
Simla, xii. 493 ; Sirmur, xii. 555. 

Kangayam, town in Madras, vii. 407, 
408. 

Kangra, District in Punjab, vii. 408-427 ; 
physical aspects, 408-411 ; forests, 41 1, 
412; minerals, 412,413; fauna, 413, 
414; history, 414, 417; population, 
417, 418; social and material condi- 
tion of the people, 418, 423 ; division 
of the people into town and country, 
423 ; agriculture, 423-425 ; commerce 
and trade, communications, etc., 425, 
426 ; administration, 426, 427 ; medi- 
cal aspects, 427. 

Kangra Proper, tract in Punjab, vii. 427, 

429- 
Kangra, tahsil in Punjab, vii. 429. 
Kangra, town in Punjab, vii. 429, 430. 
Kangundi, estate in Madras, vii. 430, 

431- 
Kangimdi, town in Madras, vii. 431. 

Kan-g}'i-daung, town in Lower Burma, 

^'"•431- 
Kanhan, river in Central Provinces, vii. 

431- 
Kanhargaon, estate in Central Provinces, 

vii. 431, 432. 

Kanheri, hill in Central Provinces, vii. 

432. 
Kanigiri, town and taluk in Madras, vii. 

432. 

Kanishka, Buddhist king of N.-W. India 
(40 A.D.), his great Council, article 
' India,' vi. 147, 148; 175, 176; 178; 
attended by Buddhist doctors from 
Sravasti or Sahet Mahet, x. 484. 

Kanjarapalli, town in Madras, vii. 432. 

Kanjarda, State in Kathiawar, vii. 432, 

433- 
Kanjia, tract in Central Provmces, vii. 

433- 
Kanjikovil, town in Madras, vn. 433. 

Kankanhalli, town and taluk in Mysore, 
vii. 433> 434- 



I 76 



INDEX. 



Kankar or nodular limestone, article 
' India,' vi. 62S; 638. Local notices — 
Found in Aligarh, i. 16S; Allahabad, i. 
184 ; Amritsar, i. 255 ; Azamgarh, i, 
393. 397 ; Ballia, ii. 18 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; 
Bankura, ii. 79 ; Basti, ii. 209 ; Bijnaur, 
ii. 429 ; Bikaner, ii. 441 ; Broach, iii. 
102; Budaun, iii. 117; Bulandshahr, 
iii. 132 ; Cambay, iii. 271 ; Cham- 
paran, iii. 337 ; Chandausi, iii. 357 ; 
Coimbatore, iv. 15; Dacca, iv. 78; 
Dholpur, iv. 273 ; Etawah, iv. 370 ; 
Girwa, v. 87 ; Gujrat, v. 189 ; Haidar- 
abad State, v. 241; Harike, v. 338; 
Jaipur, vii. 52 ; Jalandhar, vii. 84 ; 
"jaunpur, vii. 15 1 ; Jhalawar, vii. 198; 
Karan Khera, vii. 468 ; Khandesh, viii. 
151 ; Kheri, viii. 190 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
519; Monghyr, ix. 480 ; Montgomery, 
ix. 494 ; Multan, x. 3 ; Murshidabad, 
X. 21, 22 ; Muttra, x. 45 ; Muzaffargarh, 
X. 57 ; Mysore, x. 91, 92 ; Narsinghpur, 
X. 217; N. -W. Provinces, x. 396; 
Oudh, X. 482 ; Partabgarh, xi. 69 ; 
Patna, xi. 94 ; Peshawar, xi. 146 ; 
Punjab, xi. 252 ; Purniah, xi. 321 ; 
Saharanpur, xii. 1 14; Saran, xii. 252; 
Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 
344 ; Sialkot, xii. 441 ; Singhbhiim, 
xii. 531 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ; Sultanpur, 
xiii. 97 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 298 ; Utraula, 
xiii. 455 ; Wardha, xiii. 523. 

Ranker, chiefship in Central Provinces, 
vii. 434. 

Kankhal, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 

434- 
Kankina, village in Bengal, vii. 434, 435. 
Kankraoli, town in Rajputana, vii. 435. 
Kankrej, State in Bombay, vii. 435. 
Kanksiali, State in Kathiawar, vii. 435. 
Kanksiali, river in Bengal, vii. 436. 
Kankuppa, tdltik in Mysore, vii. 436. 
Kanniir. See Cannanore. 
Kanor, town in Rajputana, vii. 436. 
Kanora, State in Bombay, vii. 436. 
Kanpur Iswaria, State in Kathiawar, vii. 

436- 
Kansat, village in Bengal, vii. 436. 
Kansbans, river in Orissa, vii. 436. 
Kant, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 437. 
Kantai, village in Bengal, vii. 437. 
Kantal. See Bui Tul. 
Kantha, town in Oudh, vii. 437. 
Kan-tha. See Taung-gnu. 
Kanthalpara, village in Bengal, vii. 437. 
Kantharia, State in Bombay, vii. 437. 
Kanthi. See Contai. 
Kantilo, town in Orissa, vii. 437. 
Kantur, town in Oudh, vii. 438. 
Kanu, village in Bengal, vii. 438. 
Kanum, town in Punjab, vii. 438. 
Kanyagiri, taluk in Madras. See Kanigiri. 
Kanyagiri, fort in Madras. See Kanigiri. 



Kanzam, pass in Punjab, vii. 438. 

Kaolin or porcelain clay, and potter's clay, 
found in Bangalore, ii. 60 ; on the Bilin, 
ii. 459 ; Chanda, iii. 349 ; Hassan, v. 
346 ; South Kanara, vii. 376 ; Mysore, 
X. 91 ; Sialkot, xii. 441 ; Wun, xiii. 539. 

Kaorapukur, watercourse in Bengal, vii. 

439- 
Kapadwanj, town and Sub-division in 

Bombay, vii. 439, 440. 
Kapargadi, range of hills in Bengal, vii. 

440. 
Kapila, famous ascetic, who lived at 

Hard war, v. 331. 
Kapila, historic city in N.-W. Provinces, 

vii. 440. 
Kapileswarapuram, town in Madras, vii. 

440. 
Kapili, river in Assam, vii. 440, 441. 
Kapilmuni, village in Bengal, vii. 441. 
Kapini, river in S. India, vii. 441. 
Kapurthala, Native State in Punjab, vii. 

^44,1-443- 

Kapurthala, town in Punjab, vii. 443. 

Kara. See Karra. 

Karachi, District in Sind, vii. 443-451 ; 
physical aspects, 443-445 ; history, 446, 
447 ; population, 447, 448 ; agriculture, 

448, 449; commerce and trade, etc., 

449, 450 ; administration, 450 ; medical 
aspects, 450, 451. 

Karachi, tdhik in Sind, vii. 451, 452. 

Karachi, town, port, and cantonment in 
Sind, vii. 452-460; position, etc., 452, 
453 ; chief buildings, 453, 454 ; history, 
454, 455 ; population, 455 ; commerce 
and trade, etc., 455-458 ; shipping, etc., 
458.. 459; municipality, etc., 459; 
medical aspects, water-supply, etc., 
459, 460. 

Karad, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 
vii. 460. 

Karagola, village in Bengal, vii. 460, 461 ; 
large trading fair at, article ' India,' vi. 

^ 596, 597. . 

Karai, river in Behar, vii. 462. 

Karaibari, forest tract in Assam, vii. 462. 

Karaichutu, town in Madras, vii. 462. 

Karaimadai, town in Madras, vii. 462. 

Karajgaon, town in Berar, vii. 462. 

Karajgi, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, vii. 462, 463. 

Karakal, town in Madras, vii. 463. 

Karakat Vellalars, tribe on the Palni 
Mountains, their manners and customs, 
xi. 18. 

Karakoram Pass, between India and 
Eastern Turkistan, vii. 463, 464 ; on 
the trading route from the Punjab, 
article 'India,' vi. 6. 

Karamnasa, river in Bengal, vii. 464, 465, 

Karanbas, town in N.-W. Provinces, vii. 
465- 



INDEX. 



177 



Karangiili, town in Madras, vii. 465, 466. 

Karanja, island in Bombay, vii. 466, 467. 

Karanja, port and customs division in 
Bombay, vii. 467. 

Karanja, town in Central Provinces, vii. 
467, 468. 

Karanja, town in Berar, vii. 468. 

Karan Khera, village in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, vii. 468. 

Karanpura, coal-field in Bengal, vii. 468, 
469. 

Karans, caste in Orissa, equivalent to 
Kayasths. See Kayasths. 

Karatoya, river in N. Bengal, vii. 469. 

Karattanad, chiefship in Madras, vii. 

469- 
Karauli, Native State in Rajputana, vii. 

469-474 ; physical aspects, 469, 470 ; 
geology, 470, 471 ; forest and jungle 
products, 471; fauna, 471, 472; 
population, 472 ; agriculture, 472, 473 ; 
manufactures and trade, 473 ; ad- 
ministration, 473; climate, etc., 473; 
history, 474. 

Karauli, capital of State in Rajputana, 
vii. 474, 475. 

Karchhana, tahsil in X.-W. Provinces, 
vii. 475, 476. 

Karchhana, village in X. -^^ . Provinces, 
vii. 476, 477- 

Kardong, village in Punjab, vii. 477. 

Karens, semi-aboriginal tribe in Burma 
andSiam, viii. 1-7 ; article ' India,' vi. 
71. Local notices — Their numbers 
in Amherst, i. 238, 242 ; Bassein, ii. 
196 ; in Lower Burma, iii. 177 ; their 
houses, iii. 179 ; marriage customs, iii. 
181 ; numbers, iii. 182 ; origin, iii. 
184; Christianity among, iii. 186; in 
the forests, iii. 203 ; in Henzada, v. 
3S6 ; their clans, viii. 3 ; in Prome, xi. 
230 ; Rangoon, xi. 476, 477 ; Salwin 
Hill Tracts, xii. 175 ; Shwe-g}in, xii. 
431 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 223 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 231 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; Thon- 
gwa, xiii. 290. 

Karen-ni, plateau in Burma, viii. 7. 

Karhal, tahsil in X.-W. Provinces, viii. 

Karharbari, coal-field in Bengal, viii. 

8, 9 ; article ' India,' vi. 637. 
Kariana, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 9. 
Karigatta, hill in Mysore, viii. 9. 
Karikal, French settlement and town in 

Madras, viii. 9-II. 
Karimganj, village and Sub-division in 

Assam, viii. 11. 
Karimganj, village in Bengal, viii. 11. 
Karjat, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

viii. II, 12. 
Karjat, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

12, 13- . 
Kaijat, town in Bombay, viii. 13. 

VOL. XIV. 



Karkal. See Karakal. 
Karkamb, town in Bombay, viii. 13. 
Karkur, hill pass in Madras, viii. 13. 
Karli, cave temple in Bombay, viii. 13-16. 
Karma, Buddhist doctrine of, article 

' India,' vi. 141, 142. 
Karma, town in X.-W. Provinces, viii. 

16. 
Karmala, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

16. 
Karmala, town in Bombay, viii. 17. 
Karmar, State in Kathiawar, viii. 17. 
Karnagarh, hill in Bengal, viii. 17, 18. 
Karnal, District in Punjab, viii. 18-27 ; 

physical aspects, 18-20 ; history, 20-22 ; 

population, 22, 23 ; division of the 

people into town and country, 23 ; 

agriculture, 24, 25 ; commerce and 

trade, etc., 25, 26 ; administration, 

26, 27 ; medical aspects, 27. 
Karnal, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 28. 
Karnal, town in Punjab, viii. 28, 29. 
Karnala, hill fort in Bombay, viii. 29, 

3°- 
Karnaphuli, river in E. Bengal, viii. 30. 

Karnatik or Carnatic, name given to the 

Tamil country, viii. 30-32 ; historj', 

31 ; origin and use of the name, 31, 

32 ; English and French wars in, rival 
English and French candidates for 
the throne of Arcot (1746-61), article 
' India,' vi. 379, 390. 

Karnprayag, village in X. -W. Provinces, 

viii. 32. 
Karniil, District in Madras, viii. 32-44 ; 

physical aspects, 32-36 ; rivers, 34 ; 

geology, 34, 35 ; forests, 35 ; wild 

animals, 35, 36 ; population, 36, 37 ; 

agriculture, 37, 38 ; tenures, 39 ; 

natural calamities, 39-41 ; industries, 

41 ; commerce, 41 ; roads, 41 ; history, 

41-43; revenue history, 43, 44; 

administration, 44 ; education, 44 ; 

medical aspects, 44, 45. 
Karnul, town in Madras, viii. 45. 
Karniil Canal, purchased by Government 

from the Miadras Irrigation Company, 

article ' India,' vi. 536, 537. _ 
Karo, Xorth, river in Bengal, viii. 45. 
Karo, South, river in Bengal, viii. 45. 
Karol, State in Bombay, viii. 45, 46. 
Karond, chiefship in Central Provinces, 

viii. 46, 47. 
Karor, tahsil in X'.-W. Provinces, viii. 

47, 48. 

Karor, town in Punjab, viii. 48. 
Karor. See Kahror. 

Karra, town in X.-W. Provinces, viii. 

48, 49. 

Karrak, salt-mine in Punjab, viii. 49. 
Karsiang, town and Sub-division in Ben- 
gal, viii. 49. 
Kartabhajas, a reformed Vishunite sect 

M 



178 



INDEX. 



around Calcutta, article 'India,' vi. 

223. Localnotices — In Nadiya, x. 133; 

Sylhet, xiii. 148, 149. 
Kartairi, river in Madras, viii. 49, 50. 
Kartak. See Dang States. 
Kartarpur, town in Punjab, viii. 50. 
Karumattampati, town in Madras, viii. 

5°- 
Karumattur, town in Madras, viii. 50. 

Karumbhar, island in Cutch, viii. 50, 51- 

Karun, river in Central Provinces, viii. 

Karungalaikudi, village in Madras, viii. 

Ka-rup-pi, village in Burma, viii. 51. 
Karur, town and tdlitk in Madras, viii. 

Karoir, town in Bombay, viii. 52. 
Karvvaitnagar, estate in Madras, viii. 52, 

53- . 

Karwaitnagar, town in Madras, viii. 53. 

Karwar, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

53' ,54- 

Karwar, town and port in Bombay, viii. 
54-56 ; history, 54-56. 

Karwars, palanquin-bearers, the most 
numerous low caste in Gonda, v. 150. 

Karwi, town. Sub-division, and tahsil in 
N.-\V. Provinces, viii. 56, 57. 

Kasai, river in Bengal, viii. 57. 

Kasalang, river in Bengal, viii. 57. 

Kasalang, village in Bengal, viii. 57, 58. 

Kasaraghat. See Thalghat. 

Kasaragod, town and tAlitk in Madras, 
viii. 58. 

Kasauli, hill station and cantonment in 
Punjab, viii. 58, 59- 

Kasba. Sec Jessor. 

Kasba, village in Bard win, Bengal, viii. 59. 

Kasba, town in Purniah, Bengal, viii. 59. 

Kasbatas, tdhtkdar class in Ahmadabad, 
i. 1S9. 

Kasganj, town and tahsil in N.-\V. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 59, 60. 

Kashmir and Jamu, Native State, viii. 
60-78 ; history, 60-62 ; physical aspects, 
62 - 69 ; mountains, 63, 64 ; rivers, 
64-67 ; minerals, 67 ; wild animals, 
68, 69 ; population, 69, 7° > chief 
towns, 70, 71 ; languages, 71 ; flora, 
71, 72; agriculture, 72, 73; famine, 
73 ; manufactures, 73-75 ; coinage, 75 ; 
climate, 75, 76 ; medical aspects, 76 ; 
administration — law and justice, 76, 
77 ; revenue, 77, ']'&. 

Kashmir shawls. Weaving of, article 
' India,' vi. 603. 

Kashmiris, numerous in Amritsar, i. 258 ; 
Gilghit, V. 81 ; Gurdaspur, v. 209 ; 
Hazara, v. 363 ; Himalaya mountains, 
v. 412; Jehlani, vii. 170; Kila Sobha 
Singh, viii. 217; Lucknow, viii. 516; 
Ludhiana, viii. 521, 526 ; Peshawar, 



xi. 151 ; Punjab, xi. 273 ; Rawal Pindi, 
xii. 27 ; Sialkot, xii. 444. 
Kashmor, town and tahtk in Sind, viii. 

Kashpur, village in Assam, viii. 79. 
Kasia, village in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

79-, ... 
Kasiari, village in Bengal, viii. 79. 

Kasijora, village in Bengal, viii. So. 

Kasim. See Mir Kasini. 

Kasimbazar, historic town in Bengal, 
viii. 80, 81 ; Company's factory estab- 
lished at (1658), article ' India,' vi. 
369 ; the chief emporium of the Gan- 
getic trade in the iSth century, vi. 380. 

Kasim Khan, general of Aurungzeb, 
occupied Bangalore {1687), ii. 61. 

Kasimkota, town in Madras, viii. 81, 82. 

Kasipur, town and tahsil in N. -W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 82. 

Kasipur. See Cossipur. 

Kasi Ram Das, Bengali poet, and trans- 
lator of the Mahabharata (17th cen- 
tury), vi. 351. 

Kasla Paginu Muwadu, petty State in 
Bombay, viii. 82. 

Kasmandi Kalan, town in Oudh, viii. '&'}y. 

Kassia. See Kasia. 

Kasta, pargand in Oudh, viii. 83. 

Kasur, tahsil in Punjab, viii. S3, 84. 

Kasi'ir, town in Punjab, viii. 84, 85. 

Katahra, town in N.-\V. Provinces, viii. 

85- 
Katak. See Cuttack. 
Katakhal, river channel in Assam, viii. 

85. 
Katal, tract of country in N. Bengal, viii. 

85, 86. 

Katalgarh, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. 86. 
Katangi, estate in Central Provinces, 

viii. 86. 
Katangi, State forest in Central Provinces, 

viii. 86. 
Katangi, village in Central Provinces, 

viii. 86. 
Katanis, silk - weavers and silkworm 

breeders in Assam, i. 356 ; Kamnip, 

vii. 359- 
Katas, sacred fountain in Punjab, viii. 

86, 87. 

Katera. See Katahra. 

Kathi, petty State in Bombay, viii. 87. 

Kathiawar, peninsula in Bombay, viii. 88. 

Kathiawar, Political Agency in Bombay, 
viii. S8-97 ; physical aspects, 89, 90 ; 
history, 90-92 ; population, 92, 93 ; 
administration, 93, 94 ; communica- 
tions, 94, 95 ; agriculture, commerce, 
trade, etc., 95-97. 

Kathin'n-, town in Madras, viii. 97. 

Kathiwara, petty chiefship in Central 
India, viii. 97. 



INDEX. 



179 



Kalhkans, hill tribe in Bombay: — Janjira, 

vii. 138; Kolaba, viii. 265; Matheran 

Hill, ix. 364. 
Kathmandu. See Khatmandu. 
Kathna, river in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. 98. 
Kathodis, wandering tribe in Bombay: — 

Ahmadnagar, i. lOO ; Nasik, x. 231 ; 

Poona, xi. 205. 
Kathrota, petty State in Bombay, viii. 98. 
Katiari, pargami in Oudh, viii. 98. 
Katigora, village in Assam, viii. 99. 
Katipara, village in Bengal, viii. 99. 
Katjuri, river in Orissa, viii. 99. 
Katna, river in Bengal, viii. gg. 
Katoghan, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. gg. 
Katol, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, viii. gg, 100. 
Katoria, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 

100. 
Katosan, petty State in Bombay, viii. 

100. 
Katra, village in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

100. 
Katra, town in Bengal, viii. 100, loi. 
Katra Medniganj, town in Oudh, viii. 

lOI. 

Kattywar. See Kathiawar. 

Katua. See Parwan. 

Katumbar, town and tahsil in Rajputana, 

viii. loi. 
Katwa, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 

viii. loi, 102. 
Katyar, village in Bombay, viii. 102. 
Kaundha, town in Oudh, viii. 103. 
Kauniya, village in Bengal, viii. 103. 
Kauravas, their quarrel and struggle with 

the five Pandavas, as related in the 

Mahabharata, vi. iig, 120. 
Kauriala, river in Tibet, viii. 103. 
Kauriya, village and tahsil in Central 

Provinces, viii. 103, 104. 
Kavai, town in Madras, viii. 104. 
Kavale-durga, taluk in Mysore, viii. 104. 
Kavale-durga, hill in Mysore, viii. 104, 

Kavali, town and tahtk in Madras, viii. 

Kavandappadi, town in Madras, viii. 

Kaveri river. See Cauvery. 

Kaveripak, town in Madras, viii. 105, 

106. 
Kaveripatam, town in Madras, viii. 106. 
Kaveripuram, town in Madras, viii. 

106. 
Kavite, town in Madras, viii. 106. 
Kawardha, petty State and town in Central 

Provinces, viii. 106, 107. 
Kaw-ka-dwut, village in Burma, viii. 

Kaw-ka-reit, village in Burma, viii. 107. 



Kayal, historic port in Madras, viii. 107, 

108. 
Kayalpatnam, town and port in Madras, 

viii. 108. 
Kayan. Sec Ken. 

Kayasths, or writer caste, particularly 
numerous or otherwise noteworthy, in 
Assam, i. 354 ; Bengal, ii. 2g6 ; Cal- 
cutta, iii. 256 ; Dacca, iv. 83 ; Etah, 
iv. 361 ; Etawah, iv. 373 ; Jessor, vii. 
186 ; Kalia, vii. 325 ; Kampil, vii. 
353 ; Katipara, viii. gg ; Maiman 
singh, ix. 194; Rangpur, xi. 494; 
Saran, xii. 253 ; Sylhet, xiii. 148. 

Kaye, Sir J. W. , History of the Indian 
Mzitiny, quoted, on the defence of 
Arrah, i. 333, 334 ; the mutiny at Bar- 
rackpur, ii. 176. 

Kayenkolam, seaport in Madras, viii. 
108. 

Kazipara, village in Bengal, viii. loS. 

Keane, Lord, his campaign in Afghan- 
istan, i. 50 ; took Ghazni (1839), v. 72 ; 
his conduct in Sind, xii. 514. 

Keating, Colonel, his campaign in Gujarat 
with Raghuba, ii. 162. 

Keatinge, Colonel R. H., his reforms in 
Kathiawar (1863), viii. 92 ; discovered 
fossils in West Malwa, ix. 269 ; im- 
proved Mandlesar, ix. 308 ; Chief 
Commissioner of Assam (1878), x. 
145 ; his behaviour at Nimar (1857), x. 
331; his arrangement between the Jains 
and the chief of Palitana, xi. 3. 

Kedar Ganga, mountain torrent in N.-W. 
Provinces, viii. 109. 

Kedar Kanta, mountain peak in N.-W. 
Provinces, viii. 109. 

Kedarmath, temple in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 109. 

Kedgeree, village in Bengal, viii. log, 
no. 

Kediwari, largest mouth of the Indus, 
viii. no. 

Keeling, assisted the Zamorin of Calicut 
against Cochin (1616), in order to 
establish an English factory there, 
iv. 12. 

Keene, H. G., his account of the battle 
of Panipat (1764), quoted, xi. 45-47; 
his biography of George Thomas re- 
ferred to, xii. 266. 

Keitha, village in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 
no. 

Kekri, town in Rajputana, viii. no. 

Keladi, village in Mysore, viii. 1 10. 

Kelapur, taluk in Berar, viii. in. 

Iveljhar, village in Central Provinces, 
viii. in. 

Kelly, Col., invaded and conquered the 
Baramahal (i7go, I7gi), xii. 155. 

Kelly, Sir R. D., cleared Azamgarh of 
mutineers (1858), i. 3g5. 



i8o 



INDEX. 



Kelod, town in Central Provinces, viii. 

III. 
Kelsi, creek in Bombay, viii. iii. 
Kelsi, port in Bombay, viii. ill, 112. 
Kelva. Sec Alahim. 
Ken, river in the N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

112. 
Kenchengiulda, town in Madras, viii. 

112, 113. 
Kenda, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

"3- 

Kendrapara, town and Sub-division in 

Orissa, viii. 1 13. 
Kendrapara Canal, branch of Orissa 

Canal system, viii. 113, 114. 
Kenduli, village in Bengal, viii. 114. 
Kengeri, village in Mysore, viii. 114, 

"5- 

Kennedy, Lieut., assistant political agent, 

Simla Hill Tracts, built first house at 
Simla (1824), xii. 496. 

Kennet, Rev. Dr., St. Thomas the 
Apostle of India, quoted, vi. 233 
(footnote 3) ; 235 (footnote) ; 237 
(footnote 4) ; 239 (footnote i). 

Keobrang, pass in Punjab, viii. 115. 

Keonthal, Hill State in Punjab, viii. 
115, 116. 

Kera, village in Cutch, viii. 116, 117. 

Kerala. See Chera. 

Kerowlee. See Karauli. 

Kerur, town in Bombay, viii. 117. 

Kesabpur, town in Bengal, viii. 117. 

Kesari or Lion dynasty, in Orissa, x. 429. 

Kesaria, petty State in Bombay, viii. 
117, iiS. 

Kesariya, village in Bengal, viii. 118. 

Kesbab Chandra Sen, leader of the 
Brahmos, ii. 290 ; his daughter mar- 
ried to the Maharaja of Kuch Behar, 
viii. 322. 

Keshava Das, Hindi poet of the i6th 
century, and composer of the Ram- 
chandrika, vi. 345. 

Keslabori, village in Central Provinces, 
viii. 118. 

Kesod, town in Kathiawar, viii. 118. 

Keti, town and port in Bombay, viii. 
I18-120. 

Keukuchi, halting-place in Punjab, viii. 
120. 

Keunjhar, State in Orissa, viii. 120, 121. 

Keunthal. See Keonthal. 

Keuts. See Kaibarttas. 

Kewani, river in Oudh, viii. 120. 

Keys, Mr., first explored the Nilgiri 
Hills (1814), X. 303. 

Khab, village in Punjab, viii. 121, 122. 

Khabul, village in Punjab, viii. 122. 

Khadki. See Kirki. 

Khaga, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 122. 

Khagan, valley in Punjab. Sec Kagan. 



Khagaul, town in Bengal, viii. 122. 
Khaghoria, village in Bengal, viii. 122, 

123. 
Khagrapara, village in Assam, viii. 123. 
Khaibar, pass in Afghanistan, viii. 123- 

127 ; article ' India,' vi. 6. 
Khair, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 127. 
Khairabad, town and pargand in Oudh, 

viii. 128. 
Khairabad, river in Bengal, viii. 129. 
Khairagarh, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. 129. 
Khairagarh, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. 130. 
Khairagarh, tow-n and Native State in 

Central Provinces, viii. 130. 
Khairi, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

"3.1: 

Khairigarh, village and pargana in Oudh, 

viii. 131, 132. 

Khairi-Murat, range in Punjab, viii. 132. 

Khairpur, Native State in Upper Sind, 
viii. 132-137; physical aspects, 133, 
134 ; population, 135 ; trade and 
manufactures, etc., 135, 136 ; agri- 
culture, 136 ; administration, 136, 137 ; 
medical aspects, 137. 

Khairpur, town in Bombay, viii. 137, 138. 

Khairpur, town in Punjab, viii. 138. 

Khairpur Dharki, town in Bombay, viii. 

13.8. 139- 
Khairpur Juso, village in Bombay, viii. 

139- 
Khairpur Natheshah, village in Bombay, 

viii. 139- 
Khajaks, Pathan tribe in Sibi, xii. 456. 
Khajauli, village in Bengal, viii. 139. 
Khajri, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

'3.9- 
Khajuha, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

139, 140. 
Khajura, village in Bengal, viii. 140. 
Khajurahra, town in Oudh, viii. 140. 
Khajurahu, historic town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 140, 141. 
Khajuri. See Kajuri. 
Khakereru, village and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, viii. 141. 
Khalari, village in Central Provinces, 

viii. 141. 
Khalilribad, village and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, viii. 141. 
Khaling Dwar, forest reserve in Assam, 

viii. 142. 
Khambhala, petty State in Bombay, viii. 

142. 
Khambhalia, town in Kathiawar, viii. 

142. 
Khamblao, petty State in Bombay, viii. 

142. 
Khamgaon, tdlitk in Berar, viii. 142, 143, 
Khamgaon, town in Berar, viii. 143, 144. 



INDEX. 



i8i 



Khamti Hill.^, tract of country on frontier 
of Assam, viii. 144-146. For Khamtis, 
see also Assam, i. 351 ; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 429, 431. 

Khan, river in Central India, viii. 146. 

Khanapur, town and Sub - division in 
Bombay, viii. 146, 147. 

Khanapur, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

Khan Bahadur, f^randson of Hafiz Rah- 
niat Khan, leader of the Rohilla 
mutineers ( 1S57 ), organized a go- 
vernment at Bareilly, ii. 140 ; in power 
in Pilibhit, xi. 173. 

Khanbalia, town in Punjab, viii, 147. 

Khandaits, numerous caste in Balasor, 
ii. 6 ; Cuttack, iv. 69 ; Keunjhar, viii. 
120; Orissa, x. 435 ; Puri, xi. 303. 

Khandala, sanitarium in Bombay, viii. 

_I47-^ 

\\\\kx\^ixi%-s., pargand in Oudh, viii. 147, 
148. 

Khandauli, village in Bengal, viii. 148. 

Khandauli, tahsil in N.-VV. Provinces, 
viii. 1 48, 149. 

Khandela, town in Rajputana, viii. 149. 

Khandesh, Annexation of, to the Mughal 
Empire by Akbar, vi. 294. 

Khandesh, District in Bombay, viii. 149- 
159; physical aspects, 149-151 ; geo- 
logy, 151; history, 151-153; popula- 
tion, 153-155; language, 155; agri- 
culture, 155, 156; attempts at land 
reclamation, 156, 157 ; industries, 157 ; 
natural calamities, 157, 158 ; admini- 
stration, 158; climate, 158, 159. 

Khandgiri, hill in Orissa, viii. 159. 

Khandgosh, village in Bengal, viii. 160. 

Khandia, petty State in Bombay, viii. 160. 

Khandpara, Native State in Orissa, viii. 
160, 161. 

Khandtarn, town in Bengal, viii. 161. 

Khandvva, town and tahsil in Central 
Provinces, viii. 161. 

Khangarh, town in Punjab, viii. 162, 163. 

Khania-dhana, petty State in Central 
India, viii. 163. 

Khania-dhana, town in Central India, 
viii. 163.^ 

Khan Jahan, his tomb at Bagherhat 
(1459), i. 417 ; his attempts to reclaim 
the Sundarbans, xiii. 110. 

Khan Jahan, general of Aurungzeb, took 
and plundered Ilaidarabad (16S6), v. 
256. 

Khanna, town in Punjab, viii. 163. 

Khanpur, village in Bombay, viii. 163, 
164. 

Khanpur, town in Punjab, viii. 164. 

Khanua, village in Rajputana, viii. 164. 

Khanwahan, village in Bombay, viii. 164. 

Khanwah Canal, irrigation work in Pun- 
jab, viii. 164, 165. 



Khanzadahs, Muhammadan class in Raj- 
putana, xi. 41 1. 
Khapa, town in Central Provinces, viii. 

^I65; 

Kharaila, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

,165. 

Kharakpur, town in Bengal, viii. 165. 
Kharak Singh, successor of Ranjit Singh, 

repaired Khanwah Canal, viii. 164 ; 

his reign (1839-40), xi. 264, 265. 
Kharal, petty State in Bombay, viii. 166. 
Kharar, town and tahsil in Punjab, viii. 

166. 
Kharda, town in Bombay, viii. 166, 167. 
Khardah, village in Bengal, viii. 167. 
Kharela. See Kharaila. 
Khargon, town in Central India, viii. 167. 
Khari, village in Bengal, viii. 167. 
Kharian, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 167. 
Khariar, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 
^67.^ 
Khariar, village in Central Provinces, 

viii. 168. 
Kharkhanda, town in Punjab, viii. 168. 
Kharmatar, village in Bengal, viii. 16S. 
Kharod, town in Central Provinces, viii. 

16S. 
Kharsal, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

168, 169. 
Kharsawan, petty State in Bengal, viii. 

169. 
Kharshan. See Karsiang. 
Kharsi Jiialaria, estate in Central India, 

viii. 169. 
Kharsua, river in Orissa, viii. 169. 
Kharturi, town in Bengal, viii. 169. 
Kharwars, aboriginal tribe, numerous in 

Cuttack, iv. 69 ; Dinajpur, iv. 292 ; 

Gaya, v. 46 ; Hazaribagh, v. 373 ; 

Lohardaga, viii. 480 ; Maldah, ix. 243 ; 

Manbhum, ix. 280 ; Midnapur, ix. 

427; Mirzapur, ix. 456; Narsinghpur,. 

X. 220 ; Orissa, x. 436 ; Raipur, xi. 

372 ; Sambalpur, xii. 182 ; Santal 

Parganas, xii. 229 ; Shahabad, xii. 

327 ; Singhbhum, xii. 535. 
Khasaura, town in Oudh, viii. 169. 
Khasi and Jaintia Hills, District in Assam, 

viii. 169-180; history, 170-172; physical 

aspects, 172, 173; natural phenomena, 

174; people, 174; the Khasis, 174, 

175 ; condition of the people, 175, 176; 

agriculture, 176, 177 ; commerce, 177, 

17S; administration, 178, 179; medical 

aspects, 179, 180. 
Khasias, principal Hindu tribe in Kumaun, 

"''■'• 353- 
Khasis, al^original tribe in Assam, article 

' India,' vi. 71 (footnote). Local notices 

- — Assam, i. 351 ; Kamrup, vii. 355 ; 

Khasi Hills, viii. 174-179; Sylliet, 

xiii. 149. 

Khasor. See Khisor. 



l82 



INDEX. 



Khatak Hills, range in Punjab, viii. i8o, 

i8i. 
Khataks, tribe in Afghanistan, i. 42 ; 

Bannu, ii. 92 ; Kohat, viii. 243-245, 

246 ; Teri, xiii. 243. 
Khatas, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

181. 
Khatauli, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

181. 
Khatmandu, capital of Nepal, viii. 181- 

Khattris. See Trading castes. 

Khazi Abdul Kadu, minister of Sher AH, 

his estimate of the population of Herat, 
^ V. 392. 
Khed, town and Sub-division in Ratnagiri 

District, Bombay, viii. 185, 186. 
Khed, town and Sub-division in Poona 

District, Bombay, viii. 186. 
Khejiri. See Kedgeree. 
Khekera, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

1S7. 
KheLit, Independent State in Baluchistan, 

viii. 187. 
Khelat, capital of State in Baluchistan, 

viii. 187, 188. 
Khem Karn, town in Punjab, viii. 188. 
Khem Sawant Rai Bahadur, chief of 

Sawantwari (1755-1803), his history, 

xii. 298. 
Kheradi Surmul, Bhil teacher in Mahi 

Kantha, his doctrines, ix. 178. 
Kherali, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 

188, 189. 
Kheralu, town in Bombay, viii. 1S9. 
Kheri, District in Oudh, viii. 189-198 ; 

physical aspects, 1S9-191; history, 191 ; 

population, 191-193 ; agriculture, 193- 

195 ; natural calamities, 195 ; roads, 

manufactures, trades, etc., 195, 196; 

administration, 196, 197 ; climate, 

197 ; medical aspects, 197, 198. 
Y<^\&x\, pargana in Oudh, viii. ig8, 199. 
Kheri, town in Oudh, viii. 199. 
Kherkeria, village in Assam, viii. 199. 
Kherna, seaport in Bombay, viii. 199. 
Khetri, chiefship and town in Rajputana, 

viii. 199, 200. 
Kheura. See Mayo Mines. 
Khiaodah, petty State in Central India, 

viii. 200. 
Khijadia Naganis, petty State in Kathia- 
war, viii. 200. 
Khijaria, State in Bombay, viii. 200. 
Khijaria, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 

200. 
Khilchipur, State in Central India, viii. 

200. 
Khilchipur, town in Central India, viii. 

200, 201. 
Khilji dynasty. The (1290- 1320), article 

'India,' vi. 280-283; Jalal-ud-din 

(1290-95), 280; Ala -ud- din (1295- 



1315), 281, 282; Mughal mercenaries 
and Hindu revolts, 2S2, 283 ; Khusru, 
renegade Hindu Emperor (1316-20), 
282, 2S3. 

Khimlasa, town in Central Provinces, 
viii. 201. 

Khindoli. See Khandauli. 

Khipra, town and taluk in Bombay, viii. 
201, 202. 

Khirasra, petty State in Bomljay, viii. 
202. 

Khiron, town and parganti in Oudh, viii. 
202. 

Khirpai, village in Bengal, viii. 203. 

Khisor Hills, range in Punjab, viii. 203, 
204. 

Khojahs, IMuhammadan class in Bombay 
Presidency, iii. 52, city, iii. 81. 

Kholapur, town in Berar, viii. 204. 

Kholpetua, river in Bengal, viii. 204. 

Khora, village in Bombay, viii. 204. 

Khoshab. See Khushab. 

Khudabad, historic town in Bombay, viii. 
204. 

Khugianis, tribe in Afghanistan, i. 42. 

Khudian, town in Punjab, viii. 204, 205. 

Khujji, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 
^205.^ 

Khulna, District in Bengal, viii. 205-209; 
physical aspects, 205, 206 ; history, 
206 ; papulation, 206 ; towns and 
villages, 206, 207 ; occupations, 207 ; 
agriculture, 207, 208 ; national cala- 
mities, 208 ; commerce and trade, 208 ; 
administration, 208, 209 ; medical 
aspects — climate, 209; diseases, 209 ; 
medical institutions, 209. 

Khulna, Sub-division in Bengal, viii. 
209, 210. 

Khulna, town in Bengal, viii. 210. 

Khumber. See Kumbher. 

Khum, port and lighthouse in Bombay, 
viii. 210. 

Khund, valley in Punjab, viii. 210. 

Khundalu, lake in Punjab, viii. 21 1. 

Khurdha, town and Sub - division in 
Orissa, viii. 21 1. 

Khurja, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 211, 212. 

Khushab, tahsil m. Punjab, viii. 212, 213. 

Khushab, town in Punjab, viii. 213, 214. 

Khusru Khan, renegade Hindu Emperor 
of the Khilji dynasty (1316-20), article 
' India,' vi. 282, 2S3. 

Khusru, son of the Emperor Jahangir, 
died and is buried at Allahabad, i. 196 ; 
rebelled at Lahore, viii. 415. 

Khutahan, town and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, viii. 214. 

Khutgaon, estate in Central Provinces, 
viii. 214, 215. 

Khwa. See Kwa. 

Khyins. Sec Chins. 



INDEX. 



183 



Khyoung-tshun. See Kyanng-sun. 
Khyrim, petty State in Assam, viii. 215. 
Kiamari, island forming harbour of 

Karachi, Sind, viii. 215. 
Kiching, village in Orissa, viii. 215. 
Kidd, Capt., sacked Calicut (1695), i'^- 

270. 
Kidderpur, village in Bengal, viii. 216. 
Kiernander, Danish Protestant missionary, 

vi. 260 ; built Old Mission Church, 

Calcutta, iii. 252 ; his history, iii. 252. 
Kiggat-nad, tdliik in S. India, viii. 216. 
Kilakarai, seaport in Madras, viii. 216. 
Kilang. See Kolang. 
Kila Sobha Singh, town in Punjab, viii. 

216, 217. 
Kilat-i-Ghilzai, town in Afghanistan, i. 

34, 35-. 
Kiling, river in Assam, viii. 217. 
Kiliyar, river in ]Madras, viii. 217. 
Killianwala. Sec Chilianwala. 
Kilpuri, tahsil in N.-\V. Provinces, viii. 

217. 
Kimedi, hill tract in Madras, viii. 217-219. 
Kimiria, river in Orissa, viii. 219. 
Kimlia, pass in Punjab, viii. 219. 
Kingfishers' skins, exported from Chitta- 

gong, iii. 435. 
Kindersley, Mr., discovered the Nilgiri 

table-land (1819), x. 303. 
Kineer, Major, his failure to take Gingi 

(1752), V. 84. 
Kinhi, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

219. 
Kinloch, Captain, his march into Nepal, 

..''• 285- 
Kin-rwa, village in Burma, viii. 219. 

Kiiakat, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 219, 220. 

Kirantis, tribe on the Himalaya Moun- 
tains, v. 413 ; in Nepal, x. 279. 

Kiratpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 
220. 

Kirat Singh Bamraolia, Rana of Gohad, 
his transactions with Sindia, and Lords 
Wellesley and Cornwallis, iv. 277. 

Kirki, town in Bombay, viii. 220, 221 ; 
attack on, by the ]\Iarathas, repulsed 
(1817), article ' India,' vi. 402. 

Kirkpatrick, Colonel, on the revenues of 
Nepal, X. 380 ; his list of Nepalese 
princes, x. 284. 

Kirli. See Dang States. 

Kirnapur, estate in Central Provinces, 
viii. 221. 

Kirran, river in Punjab, viii. 221. 

Kirthal, village in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 
221. 

Kirtibas Ojha, Sivaite religious poet of 
the i6th century, vi. 349, 359. 

Kirtinasa, river in Bengal, viii. 221, 
222. 

Kishangarh, Native State in Rajputana, 



viii. 222, 223 ; history, 222 ; revenue, 
agriculture, etc., 223. 

Kishangarh, capital of State in Rajputana, 
viii. 223, 224. 

Kishen Bhat, founder of the Manbhau 
sect at Ritpur, xii. 58. 

Kishenganj, village in Bengal, viii. 224. 

Kishni, town in Oudh, viii. 224. 

Kisoriganj, town and Sub-division in 
Bengal, viii. 224. 

Kisoriganj, village in Bengal, viii. 225. 

Kistawar, town in Kashmir, viii. 225. 

Kistna, District in Madras, viii. 225-234; 
physical aspects, 225, 226 ; forests, 
226, 227 ; history, 227, 228 ; popula- 
tion, 228-230 ; agriculture, 230, 231 ; 
natural calamities, 231, 232 ; manu- 
factures, etc., 232, 233; administration, 
"^ZZ^ 234 ; medical aspects, 234. 

Kistna, river of S. India, viii. 234-237. 

Kistnapur, town in Madras, viii. 237. 

Kistvaens, Builders of, in ancient India, 

/^■. 53- 
Kittur, town and fort in Bombay, viii. 

.237,, 238. 

Kizilbashis, non-Afghan tribe in Afghan- 
istan, i. 42, 43. 

Klaproth, quoted, on Lake Palti, v. 407 ; 
the Irawadi, vii. 19. 

Knox, Captain \V. D., his embassy to 
Nepal and treaty (1802), x. 287. 

Koch, aboriginal race in N. Bengal, viii. 
238 ; vi. 1S7, 188. Local notices — 
Numerous in Assam, i. 351 ; Bengal, 
ii. 296 ; Bogra, iii. 28 ; Cachar, iii. 
230 ; Dacca, iv. 83 ; Darjiling, iv. 
133 ; Darrang, iv. 145 ; Dinajpur, iv. 
.292 ; Eastern Dvvars, iv. 352 ; Garo 
Hills, v. 28; Goalpara, v. 115; Jal- 
paiguri, vii. in, 112; Kamriip, vii. 
359 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 322, 323 ; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 430 ; Maimansingh, 
ix. 193 ; iNIaldah, ix. 243 ; Nadiya, x. 
133 ; Nowgong, x. 409 ; Purniah, xi. 
325, 326 ; Rangpur, xi. 493 ; Sibsagar, 
xii. 463, 464. 

Kochchi Bandar. See Cochin. 

Kod, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 238, 

Kodachadri, mountain in ^Madras, viii. 

239- 
Kodagu. See Coorg. 
Kodaikanal, hamlet in Madras, viii. 239, 

240. _ 
Koddshiri, mountain in Madras, viii. 

240. 
Kodinar, town in Bombay, viii. 240. 
Kodlipet, town in Coorg, viii. 240. 
Kodumur, town in Madras, viii. 240. 
Kodungalur, town in Madras, viii. 240, 

241. 
Koel. See Koil. 
Koel, North, river in Bengal, viii. 241. 



1 84 



INDEX. 



Koel, South, river in Bengal, viii. 242. 

Koenig, Danish physician and pupil of 
Linnceus, first scientific student of 
Indian botany, ix. 81. 

Koftgari, or damascene work, made in 
Sialkot, xii. 447, 448. 

Kohan Dil Khan, his tyranny in Kanda- 
har (i843-55),_vii. 391, 394. 

Kohat, District in Punjab, viii. 242-249 ; 
physical aspects, 242, 243 ; history, 
243-245 ; population, 245, 246 ; agri- 
culture, 246, 247 ; commerce and 
trade, 247, 248 ; administration, 248, 
249 ; medical aspects, 249. 

Kohat, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 249. 

Kohat, town in Punjab, viii. 249, 250. 

Kohat Toi, river in Punjab, viii. 250. 

Kohistan, taluk in Bombay, viii. 250, 252. 

Kohris or Koris, in Bhandara, ii. 364 ; 
Champaran, iii. 338, 342 ; Garhbori, 
V. 14 ; Oudh, X. 499 ; Sagar, xii. 104. 

Koil, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 252. 

Koil. See Aligarh town. 

Koil Kuntla, talitk in Madras, viii. 252. 

Koilpatti, village in Madras, viii. 252. 

Kokiir, spring in Kashmir, viii. 252, 

,^53- 

Kols, aboriginal tribe in Bengal, Orissa, 
and Central Provinces, viii. 253-260 ; 
origin, 253, 254 ; village organization, 
254-256 ; religion, 256, 257 ; Munda 
marriages, 257, 258 ; iron-smelting, 
258 ; food, 258 ; property, 258, 259 ; 
character, etc., 259 ; Kol population, 
259, 260 ; article ' India,' vi. 64-68 ; 
their convergence in Central India, 64; 
their disper.-ion, 64, 65 ; scattered 
Kolarian fragments, 65 ; Kolarian 
languages, 65 - 68. Local notices — 
Found in Bamanghati, ii. 40 ; Bamra, 
ii. 42 ; Behar, ii. 225 ; Chutia Nagpur, 
ii. 297, iii. 462, 463, 464 ; Central 
India, iii. 295 ; Chang Bhakar, iii. 
367 ; Cuttack, iv. 70 ; Daman-i-Koh, 
iv. 104 ; Dinajpur, iv. 292 ; Hazari- 
bagh, V. 373 ; Jabalpur, vii. 32 ; 
Keunjhar, viii. 120 ; Kiching, viii. 
215 ; Kolhan, viii. 280 ; Korea, viii. 
297 ; Kotapalli, viii. 309 ; Lohardaga, 
viii. 480; Maihar, ix. 1S9 ; Maldah, 
ix. 243 ; Malkangiri, ix. 258 ; Mandla, 
ix. 303 ; Mirzapur, ix. 456 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 483; Morbhanj, ix. 516; Naga- 
varam, x. 159 ; Orissa, x. 436 ; Orissa 
Tributary States, x. 472 ; Panna, xi. 
50 ; Potikall, xi. 223 ; Sambalpur, xii. 
1S2 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 229, 230; 
Saranda Hills, xii. 259 ; Sargi'ija, xii. 
267 ; Singhbhum, xii. 532 - 535 ; 
Sohawal, xiii. 47. 

Kolaba, District in Bombay, viii. 260- 
271; physical aspect, 260-262 ; history, 
262-264 ; population, 264-266 ; agri- 



culture, 266 - 26S ; natural calamities, 
268, 269 ; trade, etc., 269 ; communi- 
cations, 269, 270 ; administration, 270; 
medical aspects, 270, 271. 

Kolaba, spur of land protecting the 
harbour of Bombay, viii. 271. 

Kolachel, town in Madras, viii. 271, 272. 

Koladyne. See Ku-la-dan. 

Kolair. See Kolar. 

Kolak, port in Bombay, viii. 272. 

Kolakambai, river in Madras, viii. 272. 

Kolang, village in Punjab, viii. 272. 

Kolar, District in Mysore, viii. 272-278 ; 
physical aspects, 272, 273 ; history, 
273. 274 ; population, 274, 275 ; 
agriculture, 275 - 277 ; manufactures. 
277; administration, 277, 27S; medical 
aspects, 278. 

Kolar, taluk in Mysore, viii. 278. 

Kolar, town in Mysore, viii. 279. 

Kolar, lake in Madras, viii. 279, 280. 

Kole, town in Bombay, viii. 280. 

Kolhan, hilly tract in Bengal, viii. 280. 

Kolhapur, Native State in Bombay, viii. 
280-2S5 ; physical aspects, 280, 281 ; 
history, 281 - 2S3 ; population, 283, 
2S4 ; trade, etc., 284 ; revenue, ad- 
ministration, etc., 284 ; climate and 
medical aspects, 284, 2S5. 

Kolhapur, capital of State in Bombay, 
viii. 285. 

Kolikodu. See Calicut. 

Kolis, important cultivating caste in 
Ahmadabad, i. 85, 86 ; Broach, iii. 
104; Cambay, iii. 271 ; Central India, 
iii. 295 ; Edar, iv. 337 ; Kotaha, viii. 
309; Mahi Kantha, ix. 176, 177; 
Narukot, x. 226 ; Nasik, x. 231 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 410 ; Rewa Kantha, 
^xii. 52, 53 ; Sirohi, xiii. 5. 

Kolkai, village in Madras, viii. 285, 286. 

Kolladam, river in Madras. See Coleroon. 

Kollamallai, mountain range in Madras, 
viii. 286. 

Koller, lake in Madras. See Kolar. 

Koliiir, pass in Madras, viii. 2S6. 

Kolong. See Kolang. 

Kombai, town in Madras, viii. 2S6. 

Komorin. See Comorin. 

Komulmair, pass in Rajputana, viii. 287. 

Konch. See Kunch. 

Kondapalli, town in Madras, viii. 2S7. 

Kondavir, town and fort in Madras, viii. 
viii. 287, 28S. 

Kondayapollam, town in Madras, viii. 
2S8. 

Kondka, petty State in Central Provinces, 
viii. 288. 

Kongnoli, town in Bombay, viii. 2S8. 

Konkair. See Kakair. 

Konkan, lowland strip in Bombay, viii. 
2S9 - 292 ; physical aspects, natural 
history, and geology, 291, 292. 



INDEX. 



\Z'. 



Konnagar, village in Bengal, viii. 292. 

Koosee. See Kusi. 

Kooshtea. See Kushtia. 

Kopaganj, town in N.-\Y. Provinces, 

viii. 292. 
Kopargaon, village and Sub-division in 

Bombay, viii. 292, 293. 
KopiJas, iiill in Orissa, viii. 294. 
Kopili. See Kapili. 
Koppa, village and tahik in Mysore, viii. 

294. 
Kora, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 294, 295. 
Kora, hill in Bengal, viii. 295. 
Korabaga, estate in Central Provinces, 

viii. 295, 296. 
Korabar, town in Rajputana, viii. 296. 
Koracha, estate in Central Provinces, 

viii. 296. 
Koragars, tribe in Kanara, vii. 379. 
Korangi. See Coringa. 
Korari Kalan, town in Oudh, viii. 296. 
Koratagiri, village and taluk in Mysore, 

viii. 296. 
Koravachandlus, or Koravars, curious 

gipsy-like tribe in Anantapur, i. 276 ; 

South Arcot, i. 322 ; Bellar)', ii. 244 ; 

Madras Presidency, ix. 21 ; Palni 

Mountains, xi. 17, 18. 
Korba, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

296. 
Korea, Native State in Chutia Nagpur, 

viii. 297. 
Korea, hill range in Bengal, viii. 297, 

298. 
Koregaon, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

29S. 
Kori, river in Bombay, viii. 298. 
Korigaum, town in Bombay, viii. 298, 

299. 
Koros, Alexander Csoma de. See Csoma 

de Koros. 
Kortalaiyaru. See Cortelliar. 
Korwas, aboriginal tribe in Chutia 
^ Nagpur, iii. 463, 464, 465. 
Kosala, ancient division of Central India, 

viii. 299. 
Kosa Nag, mountain lake in N. India, 

viii. 299. 
Kosi, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 299, 300. 
Kosigi, town in Madras, viii. 300. 
Kosmos Indicopleustes. See Cosmos. 
Kota, village in Madras, viii. 300. 
Kota, village in Berar, viii. 300. 
Kota, primitive tribe in Madras, viii. 

300-302 ; in the Nilgiri Hills, x. 311. 
Kot Adu, town in Punjab, viii. 302. 
Kotae, ancient ruins in State of Cutch, 

viii. 302, 303. 
Kotagiri, hill station in ]Madras, viii. 303. 
Kotah, Native State in Rajputana, viii. 

303-30S ; physical aspects, 303, 304 ; 



history, 304-306; crops, etc., 306; 

population, 306, 307 ; administration, 

307 ; climate, 307, 30S. 
Kotah, capital of State in Rajputana, 

viii. 30S. 
Kotaha, pargand in Punjab, viii. 36S, 

309- 

Kotai. See Kotae. 

Kotalpur, village in Bengal, viii. 309. 

Kotapalli. See Kotipalli. 

Kotapalli, Sub-division in Central Pro- 
vinces, viii. 309. 

Kotappakonda, village in Madras, viii. 

309- 
Kotar, port in Madras, viii. 309, 310. 
Kotaraikarrai, town and tdhik in ]\Iadras, 

viii. 310. 

Kotaria, town in Rajputana, viii. 310. 
Kotayam, town and taluk in Madras, 

viii. 310. 
Kotchandpur, village in Bengal, viii. 

310. 
Kote-betta, mountain in Coorg, viii. 310, 

3"- 

Kotharia, petty State in Bombay, vni. 

3"- 

Kothi, petty Hill State in Punjab, vui. 

311- 
Kothi, petty State in Baghelkhand, vni. 

3"- 

Kothide, petty State in Central India, 

viii. 311, 312. 
Koti. See Kothi. 

Kotipalli, village in Madras, viii. 312. 
Kot Kamalia, town in Punjab, viii. 312, 

313- 

Kot Kangra. See Kangra (town). 
Kotkhai Kotgarh, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 

Kot Putli, town in Rajputana, vin. 313. 

Kotra Nayani, petty State in Kathiawar, 
viii. 313. 

Kotrang, town in Bengal, viii. 313. 

Kotra Pitha, petty Slate in Kathiawar, 
viii. 313. 

Kotra Sangani, petty State in Kathia- 
war, viii. 313. 

Kotri, taluk in Sind, viii. 313, 314. 

Kotri, town in Sind, viii. 314, 315. 

Kottai Vellalars. See Tinnevelli, xiii. 

302. 
Kottapatam, port in Madras, viii. 315. 
Kottayam. See Kotayam. 
Kottur, town in ]\Iadras, viii. 315. 
Kourtalam. See Courtallum. 
K(jvilam. See Covelong. 
Kovur, town in Madras, viii. 315. 
Koyakhai, river in Orissa, viii. 315. 
Koyambatiir. See Coimbaiore. 
Koyas, wild tribe in Ranipa, xi. 454. 
Krangamir. See Kodungalur. 
Krishna. See Kistna. 
Krishna-worship, article 'India,' vi. 222 ; 



i86 



INDEX. 



a religion of pleasure, 222, 223 ; love 
^ songs, 223 ; hymn to, 348, 349. 
Krishna Chandra, Raja of Nadiya, 
assisted Clive at Plassey (1757), x. 

Krishna Raya, Raja of Vijayanagar, 
built temples of Conjevaram, iv. 26 ; 
conquered Godavari District (15 16), v. 
1 23 ; took Kondapalli and Kondavir, 
viii. 287 ; reconquered Rajamahendri, 
xi. 383 ; visited the temple of Sinha- 
chalam, xii. 543 ; reduced the kingdom 
of Udayagiri, xiii. 425. 

Krishnaganj, town in Nadiya District, 
Bengal, viii. 315, 316. 

Krishnaganj, town and Sub-division in 
Purniah District, Bengal, viii. 316. 

Krishnagar, town and Sub-division in 
_ Bengal, viii. 316, 317.^ 

Krishnagiri, town and tdbik in Madras, 
viii. 317,. 318- 

Krishnai, river in Assam, viii. 318. 

Krishnaji, took Pawagarh (1727), which 
he made his head-quarters, xi. 122. 

Krishtna. See Kistna. 

Kshattriya or warrior caste of ancient 
India, article ' India,' vi. S9-94 ; 
growth of the caste, 89-91 ; struggle 
between the priestly and warrior castes, 
92-94 ; cases of Kshatlriyas attaining 
Brahmanhood, 92, 93 ; legendary ex- 
termination of the Kshattriyas by 
Parasurama, the sixth incarnation of 
Vishnu, 94. For their distribution, 
see each District article, and also 
Rajputs. 

Kuar Singh, mutineer leader, besieged 
court house of Arrah (1857), i. 333, 
xii. 328, 329 ; besieged Azamgarh 
(1858), i. 395 ; lived at Jagdispur in 
Shahabad, vii. 41 ; entered Mirzapur, 
but was driven out by the people, ix. 

.455- 

Kuba, petty State in Bombay, viii. 318. 

Kubattur, village in ^lysore, viii. 318. 

Kuch Behar, Isative State in N. Bengal, 
viii. 318-327 ; physical aspects, 318, 
319; history, 319-322; people, 322, 
323 ; agriculture, 323, 324 ;_ manufac- 
tures, etc., 324, 325 ; administration, 
325-327 ; medical aspects, 327. 

Kuch Behar, capital of State in N. 
Bengal, viii. 327, 328. 

Kuchla Bijna, town in Oudh, viii. 328. 

Kuchmala, hill in Madras, viii. 328. 

Kudaliir. Sec Cuddalore. 

Kudali'ir. ^ct' Gudalur. 

Kudarimukh. Sec Kuduremuhka. 

Kudarkot, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 329. 

Kuddana, State in Bombay, viii. 329. 

Kuditini, town in Madras, viii. 329. 

Kudligi, tiiliik in Madras, viii. 329. 



Kuduremukha, mountain peak in Madras, 

viii. 329. 
Kuhan. See Kahan. 
Kuhlur. Sec Kahlur. 
Kukdel, town in Bombay, viii. 330. 
Kukis, wild tribes inhabiting frontiers of 

Assam and Bengal, viii. 330. See 

Lushai Hills and Lushais. 
Kukra Mailani, pargand in Oudh, viii. 

330. 
Kulachi, town and tahsil in Punjab, viii. 



Kii-la-dan, river in Burma, viii. 



jj 



I, 



jj 



2. 



Ku-la-dan, township in Burma, viii. 

332- , 
Kulaghat, village in Bengal, viii. 332. 
Kulasekharapatnam, town and seaport 

in ]\Iadras, viii. 332. 
Kulik, river in Bengal, viii. 333. 
Kulitalai, town and taluk in Madras, 

yiii- 333- 
Kullar, village in Madras, viii. 333, 334. 
Kullu. See Kulu. 
Kulpahar, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, viii. 334. 
Kulsi, river in Assam, viii. 334. 
Kulsi, forest reserve in Assam, viii. 334, 

Kulsia. See Kalsia. 

Kultas. See Kalitas. 

Kulu, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 335. 

Kulu, hill tract in Punjab, viii. 335-344 ; 
physical aspects, 335-338 ; history, 338, 
339 ; population, 339, 340 ; Plach or 
Kulu jNIission, 340 ; pasturage rights 
and customs, 340-342 ; agriculture, 
342, 343 ; tenure of land, 343 ; com- 
merce and trade, 343, 344 ; roads, etc., 
344 ; medical aspects, 344. 

Kulutzai, village in Kashmir, viii. 344. 

Kumalgarh, fort in Rajputana, viii. 345. 

Kumaon. See Kumaun. 

Kumar, river of Bengal, viii. 345. 

Kumaradhari, river of Madras, viii. 345. 

Kumarganj, village in Bengal, viii. 346. 

Kumriri. See Comorin. 

Kumarila, Brahmanical religious reformer 
(750), vi. 191 ; 209 ; 329, 330. 

Kumarkhali, town in Bengal, viii. 346. 

Kumaun, Division in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 346, 347. 

Kumaun, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 347-35S ; physical aspects, 347- 
350 ; history, 350 - 352 ; population, 
352 - 354 ; agriculture, 354, 355 ; 
natural calamities, 355, 356 ; manu- 
factures, commerce, etc., 356 ; ad- 
ministration, 356, 357 ; climate, etc., 

357> 358- _ , . , 

Kumbaranis, tribe of Brahuis in Baluchi- 
stan, ii. 29 ; to w hich Khan of Khelat 
belongs, iii. 100. 



INDEX. 



187 



Kumbhakamdrug, mountain in Madras, 

viii. 358. 
Kumbhakonam. See Combaconiim. 
Kumbhaili-ghat, road over Western 

Ghats, Bombay, viii. 358. 
Kumbher, town in Rajputana, viii. 358. 
Kumbhipathias, small sect in the Central 

Provinces, their doctrines, iii. 315 ; 

numerous in Sambalpar, xii. 182. 
Kumharsain, Hill State in Punjab, viii. 

35S, 359- 
Kumhrawan, /(7;y«;Af in Oudh, viii. 359. 

Kumilla. See Comilla. 

Kumiria, village in Bengal, viii. 359. 

Kumis, tribe in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, iii. 450. 
Kumlagarh, fortress in Punjab, viii. 359. 
Ki'impta, Sub-division in Bombay, viii. 

359, 360. 

Kiimpta, town in Bombay, viii. 360, 
361. 

Kunawar, hilly tract in Bashahr Starte, 
Punjab, viii. 361, 362. 

Kunawaris, inhabitants of Bashahr State, 
Punjab, xii. 500. 

Kunbis, most numerous and important 
agricultural caste in Ahmadabad, i. 85, 
86 ; Ahmadnagar, i. lOO ; Akola, i. 
143 ; Amraoti, i. 247 ; Bombay Pre- 
sidency, iii. 51; Broach, iii. 104; 
Kaira, vii. 302 ; Khandesh, viii. 154 ; 
Nasik, X. 229 ; Poona, xi. 205, 206 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 410 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 7 ; 
Satara, xii. 279, 280 ; Sholapur, xii. 
413 ; Thana, xiii. 252 ; Wun, xiii. 541. 

Ki'inch, town and iahsil in N.-W.. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 362, 363. 

Kund. See Khund. 

Kundada-betta, peak in Coorg, viii. 

363- 
Kundahs, hill range in Madras, viii. 363, 

364; 

Kundala, village in Punjab, viii. 364. 
Kundapur. See Kandapur. 
Kundhnan Khurd. See Kandarka Khurd. 
Kundia, village in Rajputana, viii. 364. 
Kundla, town in Bombay, viii. 364. • 
Kundri, North, pargami in Oudh, viii. 

364, 365- 
Kundri, South, pargand in Oudh, viii. 

365; 
Kunhar, river in Punjab, viii. 365. 

Kunhiar, Hill State in Punjab, viii. 365, 

366. 

Kuni, river in Berar, viii. 366. 
Kunia-dhana. See Khania-dhana. 
Kunigal, town and taluk in Mysore, viii. 
.366. 

Kunjah, town in Punjab, viii. 366. 
Kunjpura, town in Punjab, viii. 366, 

367- 
Kuns, hill tribe in Arakan, iii. 183. 
Kunsa, town in Oudh, viii. 367. 



Kunur. See Coonoor. 

Kupili, town and seaport in IMadras, viii. 
367. 

Kurai, town and taksil in Central Pro- 
vinces, viii. 367, 368. 

Kuram, district and valley in Afghanistan, 
viii. 368-370. _ 

Kuram, mountain pass into Afghanistan 
from the Punjab, article ' India,' vi. 6. 

Kuram, river of Afghanistan, viii. 370. 

Kurambranad, tdliik in Madras, viii. 370. 

Kurandwad. See Kurundwad. 

Kurantadih, town and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, viii. 370, 371. 

Kurara, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

Kurauli, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

371- 
Kurauna, pargand in Oudh, viii. 371, 

372. 
Kurders, hill tribe on the Kuchmala Hill, 

viii. 328. 
Kurds, in Baluchistan, ii. 29. 
Kurg. See Coorg. 
Kurha Keshupur, town in Oudh, viii. 

372. 
Kurhurbaree. See Karharbari. 
Kurigi-am, village and Sub-division in 

Bengal, viii. 372. 
Kurivikulam, town in Madras, viii. 372. 
Kurkiis, aboriginal tribe, numerous in 

Betul, ii. 330 ; Chhindwara, iii. 400 ; 

Hoshangabad, v. 445 ; Nimar, x. 332. 
Kurla, town in Bombay, viii. 372, 373. 
Kurmatur, town in Madras, viii. 373. 
Kurmis, industrious agricultural caste in 

Allahabad, i. 189 ; Bara Bank!, ii. 

no; Bareilly, ii. 141 ; Basti, ii. 210; 

Cawnpur, iii. 283, 284, 285 ; Central 

Provinces, iii. 316; Champaran, iii. 

338, 342 ; Chanda, iii. 352 ; Damoh, 

iv. no. III ; Deoria, iv. 206; Fateh- 

pur, iv. 426 ; Jaunpur, vii. 155, 156 ; 

Jhansi, vii. 222 ; Lohardaga, viii. 48 1 ; 

Manbhi'un, ix. 280, 281 ; Nagpur, x. 

169 ; Oudh, X. 498 ; Pilibhit, xi. 174 ; 

Sagar, xii. 104 ; .Shahjahanpur, xii. 

347 ; Singhbhum, xii. 537 ; Wardha, 

xiii. 525. 
Kurnool. See Karniil. 
Kurpa. See Cuddapah. 
Kurrachee. See Karachi. 
Kursanda, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

viii. 373. 
Kursat, town in Oudh, viii. 373. 
Kursat Kalan, town in Oudh, viii. 373. 
Kurseli, town in Oudh, viii. 373. 
Kurseong. See Karsiang. 
Kursi, town and pargand in Oudh, viii. 

373> 374- 
Kurtkoti, town in Bombay, viii. 374. 
Kurubars, caste of blanket weavers in 

Sira, xii. 546. 



i88 



INDEX. 



Kurucla-raale, hill in Mysore, viii. 374. 
Kurugodu, town in Madras, viii. 374. 
Kurukshetra, sacred tract in Punjab, viii. 

,374.375- 
Kurumba, primitive tribe in Madras, viii. 

375. 376 ; Mysore, x. 9S, 99 ; Nilgiii 
Hills, X. 311, 312. 
Kurundwad, Native State in Bombay, 

viii. 376, Zn. 
Kurundwad, town in Bombay, viii. 377. 
Kurus, wild tribe in Chang Bhakar, iii. 

367- 
Kurwai, Native State in Central India, 

viii. 377. 37S. 
Kurwai, town in Central India, viii. 

,378. 

Kusbhadra, river in Bengal, viii. 378. 
Kushtia, Sub-division in Bengal, viii. 

m^, ,379- 
Kushtia, town in Bengal, viii. 379 ; 
river station of the Eastern Bengal 
Railway removed owing to the silling 



of the Ganges, vi. 30. 



380. 



Kusi, river in N. Bengal, viii. 379, 

Kusiara, river in Assam, viii. 3S0. 

Kussowlee. See Kasauli. 

Kutabdia, island and lighthouse in Ben- 
gal, viii. 380. 

Kutab Khan, son of Sher Shah, occupied 
Mainpuri, his buildings there, ix. 203. 

Kutabnagar, town in Oudh, viii. 380. 

Kutabpur, village in Bengal, viii. 381. 

Kutab Shah, of Golconda, i6th centurj-, 
took Ellore, iv. 352 ; Kondapalli and 
Kondavir, viii. 287 ; Masulipatam, ix. 

Kutab Shahi, Muhammadan dynasty in 
Southern India (1512-168S), article 
' India,' vi. 288. 

Kutab - ud - din, the first of the Slave 
dynasty, and the first resident Muham- 
madan sovereign in India (1206-10), 
article ' India,' vi. 278. Local notices 
— Took Ajmere, i. 120 ; Koil, i. 169 ; 
Budaun, iii. 1 17 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 
133 ; Delhi, where he built the Kutab 
Minar, iv. 191 ; his operations in 
Behar and the Middle Ganges valley, 
V. 63 ; took Mahoba, v. 299, ix. 183 ; 
Kalinjar, vii. 332 ; Kalpi, vii. 342 ; 
Meerut, ix. 383 ; advanced as far as 
Surat, xiii. 120. 

Kutch. See Cutch. 

Kuthar, Hill State in Punjab, viii. 381. 

Kutiyana, town in Kathiawar, viii. 381. 

Kutosan. See Katosan. 

Kutru, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 
381. 

Kuttalam. See Courtallum. 

Kuttiyadi, pass in Madras, viii. 3S1. 

Kuturis, cultivating caste in Malwa, ix. 
269. 

Kuvam, river in Madras, viii. 381. 



Kwa, river, township, and village in 

Burma, viii. 382. 
Kwajas, Persian fugitives in Haidarabad 

(Sind), V. 277; in Sind, xii. 518. 
Kwaymies, hill tribe in Arakan, iii. 183, 

184. 
Kwon-chan-gou, village in Burma, viii. 

3S2. 
Kvaik-kauk, pagoda in Burma, viii. 382, 

•5 J" 

Kyaik-than-lan, pagoda in Burma, viii. 

Kyaik-ti-yo, peak in Burma, viii. 383. 
Kyaik-to, town in Burma, viii. 383. 
Kyan-kin, town and township in Burma, 

viii. 383. 
Kyat. See Taung-gnyo. 
Kyauk-chaing-gale, village in Burma, viii. 

384. 

Kyauk-gyi, village and township in 
Burma, viii. 384. 

Kyauk-pyi'i, District in Lower Burma, 
viii. 384-389 ; physical aspects, 384- 
386 ; population, 386, 387 ; agricul- 
ture, 387 ; manufactures, 387, 3S8 ; 
administration, 38S, 3S9. 

Kyauk-pyu, township in Burma, viii. 3S9. 

Kyauk-pyu, town and port in Burma, 
viii. 389, 390. 

Kyaung-sun, village in Burma, viii. 390. 

Kyd, Col., built the dockyard at Kidder- 
pur called after him, viii. 216. 

Kyelang, village in Punjab, viii. 390, 

391. 

Kylasa, hill in Madras, viii. 391. 
Kynchiong. Sec Kanchiang. 
Kyouk-hpyu, District and town in Burma. 

See Kyauk-pyu. 
Kyoungtha, or 'Children of the River.' 

See Maghs. 
Kyiin-pyaw, town in Burma, viii. 391. 
Kyun-ton, main branch of Irawadi river 

in Burma, viii. 391. 



Labbays, Muhammadan mercantile cla=s, 
numerous in Abiraman, i. 3 ; Ambur, 
i. 230 ; Arava Kurichi, i. 307 ; North 
Arcot, i. 315; Calicut, iii. 268; Chan- 
napata, iii. 368 ; Coorg, iv. 35 ; Kayal- 
patnam, viii. 108 ; Madras Presidency, 
ix. 22, 23 ; Negapatam, x. 259 ; Pam- 
bam, xi. 23 ; Piilikonda, xi. 240 ; 
Ramnad, xi. 451 ; Tanjore, xiii. 185 ; 
Tinnevelli, xiii. 304 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 358 ; Vaniyambadi, xiii. 463. 

Labdarya, tdhik'm. Bombay, viii. 391, 392. 

La Bourdonnais, capture of Madras by a 
French squadron under the command 
of (1746), article ' India,' vi. 379, iv. 
452, ix. 102. 



INDEX. 



189 



Labour and land, Relation between, 
in former times and at the present day 
in India, vi. 48, 49. 

La-bwut-kul-la, village in Burma, viii. 

392- . , . 

Lac industry, article 'India, vi. 513, 
515 ; export of lac and lac-dye, vi. 
575. Local 7iotices — Lac found and 
collected in Akola, i. 144 ; Amherst, 
i. 240 ; Amraoti, i. 248 ; Anama- 
lai Hills, i. 270 ; Bamra, ii. 41, 
42 ; Bangalore, ii. 63 ; Bankura, ii. 
78; Basim, ii. 186; Bastar, ii. 206; 
Bilaspur, ii. 451 ; Birbhiim, iii. 6, 9 ; 
Bombay, iii. 45 ; Bonai, iii. 85 ; 
Borasambar, iii. 89 ; Buklana, iii. 143, 
146 ; Champaran, iii. 337 ; Chanda, 
iii. 349 ; Cuttack, iv. 65 ; Eastern 
Dwars, iv. 329 ; Gangpur, iv. 478 ; 
Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Haidarabad, v. 
245 ; Ilambazar, v. 508 ; Indore, vii. 
2 ; Jabalpur, vii. 33 : Jashpur, vii. 
145 ; Kamrup, vii. 355 ; Ranker, vii. 
434 ; Karnul, viii. 35 ; Kawardha, 
viii. 106; Kenda, viii. 113; Khasi 
Hills, viii. 173 ; Khyrim, viii. 215 ; 
Korea, viii. 297 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; 
Lashkarpur, viii. 466 ; Lohara, viii. 
474 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; jSIidnapur, 
ix. 425 ; Monghyr, ix. 481 ; Murshid- 
abad, x. 22 ; Nasik, x. 231 ; N.AV. 
Provinces, x. 381 ; Nowgong, x. 407 ; 
Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ; Raigarh, xi. 362 ; 
Rairakhol, xi. 378 ; Rewa, xii. 46 ; 
Sakti, xii. 148 ; Salem, xii. 152 ; 
Sambalpur, xii. 184; Santal Par^anas, 
xii. 227 ; Saran, xii. 252 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 324 ; Sibsagar, xii. 460 ; Singh- 
bhiim, xii. 531 ; Surgana, xiii. 136 ; 
Sylhet, xiii. 145 ; Udaipur (Bengal), 
xiii. 412 ; Wardha, xiii. 526 ; Wiin, 
xiii. 543. See also Lacquered ware 
and Shell-lac. 

Laccadive Islands, in Indian Ocean, in 
political connection with Madras, viii. 
392-396 ; physical aspects, 392 - 394 ; 
history, administration, etc., 394, 395 ; 
population, 395 ; customs, language, 
etc., 395, 396 ; medical aspects, 396. 

Lace, made in the convent at Xagarkoil, 
X. 158. 

Lachhmangarh, town in Jaipur State, 
Rajputana, viii. 396. 

Lachhman Naik, colonized I'araswara in 
Balaghat (1810), i. 454. 

Lachmangarh, town in Alwar State, 
Rajputana, viii. 396. 

Lacquered ware, toys, etc., ^Manufacture 
of, at Ahraura, i. Ill ; Bangalore, li. 
64 ; Benares, ii. 266 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 198 ; Upper Burma, iii. 218 ; 
Channapata, iii. 368 : Haidarabad 
(Sind), V. 2S2, 288 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 



456, 458 ; Ilambazar, v. 508 ; Jhalod, 
vii. 203; Kaithal, vii. 310; Kanauj, 
vii. 387 ; Mandawar, ix. 293 ; Pak 
Pattan in Montgomery, ix. 500, x. 
533 ; Dohad in the Ranch Mahals, xi. 
33 ; Sahiwal, xii. 137 ; Sawantwari, 
xii. 297 ; Sohagpur, xiii. 47 ; Sylhet, 
xiii. 153, 154; Kashmor in the Upper 
Sind Frontier, xiii. 447. 

La Croze's Histoire dit Chrisiianisme des 
Indes, article 'India,' vi. 232 (foot- 
note i); 240 (footnote 4); 241 (footnotes 
I and 3); 242 (footnotes). 

Ladakh, governorship in Kashmir, viii. 
396-400. 

Ladole, town in Baroda, viii. 400. 

Ladwa, town in Punjab, viii. 400. 

Lahar, fortified town in Central India, 
viii. 400. 

Laharpur, town and pargand in Oudh, 
viii. 400, 401. 

Lahaul. See Lahul. 

Lahore, Division in Punjab, viii. 402. 

Lahore, District in Punjab, viii. 402- 
414; physical aspects, 403-405; history, 
405-407 ; population, 407, 40S ; town 
and rural population, 408, 409 ; agri- 
culture, 409-411; natural calamities, 
411 ; commerce, trade, etc., 41 1, 412 ; 
administration, 412, 413 ; medical 
aspects, 413, 414. 

Lahore, taksilin Punjab, viii. 414. 

Lahore city, capital of Punjab, viii. 414- 
419 ; historj' and architectural remains, 
414-417 ; general appearance, modern 
buildings, etc., 417, 418 ; population, 
418; commerce, communications, etc., 
418, 419. 

Lahori Bandar, village in Bombay, viii. 

419- 
Lahul, Sub-division in Punjab, viii. 419- 

423 ; physical aspects, 419, 420 ; 

history, 420, 421 ; population, 421, 

422 ; agriculture, trade, etc., 422 ; 

administration, 422, 423. 
Laichanpur, port in Bengal, viii. 423. 
Laira, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

423- , 
Lait-mao-doh, mountain range in Assam, 

viii. 423. 

La-ka-dong, village in Assam, viii. 423, 

424-^ 
Lakapadar, petty State in Kathiawar, 

viii. 424. 
Lake, Lord, his victories over the 
Marathas at Lasvvari and Dig, article 
' India,' vi. 323 ; 398. Local notices — • 
Took Agra (1803), i. 71; defeated 
Perron and took Aligarh (1803), i. 
170, 171; repulsed at Bhartpur (1S05), 
ii. 374 ; entered Delhi (1803), and 
relieved Ochterlony there, iv. 193 ; 
granted Dujana to Abdul Samand 



190 



INDEX. 



Khan, iv. 319 ; defeated Ilolkar at 
Fatehgarh (, 1804), iv. 420 ; who sur- 
rendered to him, vii. 6 ; rewarded 
Raja of Jind, vii. 232 ; his victory at 
Laswari, viii. 466 ; his campaign of 
1803, X. 36S ; took Sasni, xii. 273 ; 
relieved Burn at Shamli, xii. 375. 
Lakes: — Abiraman, i. 3 ; Nakhi Talao on 
Mount Abii, i. 4, 5 ; Ab-i-estada in 
Afghanistan, i. 33 ; Nal in Ahmadabad, 
i. 83 ; Siiiserh in Alwar, i. 206 ; in 
Ambala, i. 214 ; Amber, i. 228 ; 
in Azamgarh, i. 393 ; the Tal Suraha 
in Ballia, ii. 18; the Barwa Sagar, 
ii. 181, 182 ; in Basti, ii. 209 ; in 
Bhandara, ii. 361 ; the Bhim Tal, 
ii. 397 ; Bhuvaneswar, ii. 418 ; in 
Bikaner, ii. 438 ; Lonar in Buldana, 
iii. 143 ; in Lower Burma, iii. 171 ; 
Chamomeril, iii. 332; Charamai, iii. 370; 
Charkhari, iii. 372; Pulicat in Chengal- 
pat, iii. 3S1 ; Chilka, iii. 415-417 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 447 ; 
Tal Baraila in Darbhangah, iv. 123 ; 
Debar, iv. 163 ; Deh-peh, iv. 168 ; 
Dhaniir, iv. 244, 245; Machkund, near 
Dholpur, iv. 278 ; Dhol Samudra, 
iv. 278 ; Diiya, iv. 326, 327 ; Eng-rai- 
gy'. iv. 353, 354, vii, 18 ; Gangal, iv. 
466 ; Garola, v. 32 ; in Gorakhpur, v. 
165 ; Haidarabad, v. 253 ; Ganga Bal 
on Mount Haramak, v. 319 ; in the 
Himalaya Mountains, v. 407 ; Hona- 
war, V. 440 ; Kallar Kahar in Jehlam, 
vii. 167, xii. 171 ; Kahnuvvan, vii. 
294 ; Karkal in South Kanara, vii. 
376 ; in Kashmir, viii. 66, 67 ; Kheri, 
viii. 190 ; Khundalu, viii. 211 ; Kolar, 
viii. 279, 280 ; Rankala, near Kolha- 
pur, viii. 281 ; Kosa Nag, viii. 299 ; 
in Kotaha, viii. 308 ; Kumaun, viii. 
349 ; Kala Kund, viii. 364 ; in Ladakh, 
viii. 397 ; the Lonar (salt), viii. 489 ; 
Tanur and Trichur in Malabar, ix. 219 ; 
Manasabal, ix. 276 ; Manasarowar, ix. 
276, 277 ; Manchhar, ix. 286, 287 ; 
Logtak in Manipur, ix. 323, 324 ; 
Motihari, ix. 521 ; Motijhil, near 
Murshidabad, x. 36 ; Noh jhil in 
Muttra, x. 45 ; in Muzaffarpur, x. 83 ; 
the Naga Hills, x. 143 ; Nagpur, x. 
165 ; Naini Tal, x. 177 ; Najafgarh 
Jhil, X. 178, 179 ; Nal, x. 181 ; Nan- 
dan Sar, X. 188 ; Narsinghgarh, x. 
215; Nil Nag, X. 326; in Oudh, x. 
481 ; I'akhal, x. 531, 532 ; in Prome, 
xi. 226 ; Pulicat, xi. 239 ; Pushkar, 
•^'' 335 ; i^ Rameswaram, xi. 443 ; 
Ramia Bihar, xi. 449 ; Ramtal, xi. 
465 ; Sagar, xii. 108 ; Sakar Pathar, 
xii. 145 ; the Salt Water or Dhapa, 
xii. 172; Sambhar (salt), xii. 187-1S9; 
Sar, xii. 248 ; Kachor Rewas in Shaik- 



hawati, xii. 371 ; Siddheswar in Shola- 
pur, xii. 421 ; in Shwe-gyin, xii. 430; 
Srinagar, xiii. 77 ; Taroba, xiii. 215 ; 
in Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ; Thaneswar, 
xiii. 260 ; Mokai (salt) in Thar and 
Parkar, xiii. 263 : in Travancore, xiii. 
344; in Wun, xiii. 531 ; Wulur, xiii. 
537' 538- See also Marshes {jhils and 
bils) and Tanks, Artificial Lakes and 
Reservoirs. 

Lakhandai, river in Bengal, viii. 424. 

Lakhat, village in Assam, viii. 424. 

Lakhi, mountain range in Bombay, viii. 

424- 

Lakhi, village in Bombay, viii. 424, 425. 

Lakhi, town in Bombay, viii. 425. 

Lakhimpur, District in Assam, viii. 425- 
438 ; physical aspects, 425-428; history, 
428, 429; population, 429-431 ; towns 
and villages, 431, 432 ; material con- 
dition of the people, 432, 433 ; agricul- 
ture, 433, 434; manufactures, etc., 
434) 435 ; tea, 435, 436 ; administra- 
tion, 436, 437 ; medical aspects, 437, 

438- 
Lakhimpur, Sub-division in Assam, viii. 

438- 439. 
Lakhimpur, village in Assam, viii. 439. 
Lakhimpur, town and tahsil in Oudh, 

viii; 439- . 

Lakhipur, village in Assam, viii. 439, 440. 

Lakhipur, village in Assam, viii. 440. 

Ldkhirdj. See Tenures. 

Lakhi Sarai. See Luckeeserai. 

Lakhmia, river channel in Bengal, viii. 
440. 

Lakhna, town in N.-\V. Provinces, viii. 
440.^ 

Lakhnadon, tahsil in Central Provinces, 
viii. 440, 441. 

Lakhnauti, historic town in N. -W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 441. 

Lakhtar, Native State in Kathiawar, viii. 
441,442. 

Lakhtar, town in Kathiawar, viii. 442. 

Laki Mall, Diwan, farmed the Upper 
Derajat from the Sikhs, iv. 221. 

Laki, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 442. 

Laki, town in Punjab, viii. 443. 

Laki. See Lakhi. 

Lakji Jadun Rao, Deshmukh of Sinda, 
and grandfather of Sivaji, iii. 144. 

Lakshman Sen, last independent Hindu 
king of Bengal, his overthrow by 
Muhammad of Ghori (1203), article 
' India,' vi. 277 ; removed capital from 
Gaur to Nadiya, which he founded, x. 
141. 

Lakshmantirtha, river of S. India, viii. 

433- 
Lakshmeswar, town in Bombay, viii. 

444- 
Lakshmi Bai, lady zaniiudar, captured 



INDEX. 



191 



the mutineer leader Babu Rao (1858), 

iii- 351- 
Lakshminarayana.Diwan, Brahman leader 

of the rebellion in Kanara and Coorg 

(1837), iv. 31. 

Lakshmipur, pass in Madras, viii. 444. 

Lakshmipur. See Lakhipur. 

Laktrai. Sec Langtarai. 

Lakvalli, village and taluk in Mysore, 
viii. 444. 

Lalatpur. See Lalitpur. 

•Lai Bagh, The, pleasure-garden in Ban- 
galore, ii. 68. 

Lalbagh, Sub-division in Bengal, viii. 

444> 445- 
Lai Bakya, river in Bengal, viii. 445. 
Lal-darwaza, mountain pass in N.-\V. 

Provinces, viii. 445. 
Lalganj, river mart in Bengal, viii. 445 
Lalganj, town and tahsil in Oudh, viii. 

445. See Dalmau. 
Lalguli P'alls, rapids in Bombay, viii. 

445- . ^_ , 

Laliad, petty State m Kathiawar, vin. 

446. 

Laling. See Dhulia. 

Lalitpur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 446-457 ; physical aspects, 446- 
448; history, 448-450; population, 

450, 451 ; urban and rural population, 

451, 452; agriculture, 452-454; natural 
calamities, 454, 455 ; commerce and 
trade, 455, 456 ; administration, 456, 
457 ; medical aspects, 457. 

Lalitpur, town and tahsil in N. -W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 457, 458. 

Lai Kavi, Hindu poet of Bundel-khand 
in the 17th century, and author of the 
Chhatra Prakas, vi. 345. 

Lally, Defeat of, at Wandewash by 
Coote (1761), article 'India,' vi. 379, 
380; siege and surrender of Pondicberri 
and Gingi, vi. 3S0. Local notices — 
Took Arcot {1758), i. 310; defeated at 
Ami, i. 352 ; sent against Bellary, ii. 
242 ; neglected to take Chengalpat 
(1759), iii. 390; took Fort St. David 
(1758), iv. 162; his surrender of Pon- 
dicberri (1761), iv. 452 ; recalled Bussy 
from the Northern Circars, v. 3 ; in 
Madras, ix. 13; his siege of Madras, 
ix. 103 ; fought battle of St. Thomas' 
Mount (1759), xii. 143, 144; attacked 
Tanjore (1750), xiii. 194; his defeat at 
Wandewash, xiii. 518. 

Lalmai Hills, range in Bengal, viii. 458. 

Lai Singh, Sikh leader, tried to prevent 
cession of Kashmir to Ghulab Singh, 
xi. 265. 

Lalsot, town in Rajputana, viii. 459. 

Lalungs, aboriginal tribe in Assam, i. 
351 ; Kamnip, vii. 355, 359 ; Lakhim- 
pur, viii. 431 ; Nowgong, x. 409. 



Lambhadi's or Lumbadis, pack bullock 
drivers in North Arcot, i. 315 ; Coim- 
batore, iv. 15; Dharwar, iv. 260; 
Madras, ix. 21. 

Lambia, mountain pass in Punjab, viii. 

459- 

Land, cultivated and uncultivated. See 
the Agricultural section of each 
District article. 

Land Law, The, of Bengal, ii. 280. 

Landmaking powers of deltaic rivers, 
article 'India,' vi. 22-25, 27. See 
Alluvion and Diluvion. 

Land - reclamation, Balaghat, i. 456 ; 
Bogra, iii. 29 ; Bombay, iii. 78 ; Goa, 
V. 109 ; Katipara, viii. 99 ; Khandesh, 
viii. 156, 157; Khulna, viii. 207, 20S ; 
Kolaba, viii. 267, 268 ; Muzaffarnagar, 
X. 68 ; Panch Alahals, xi. 32 ; Ranga- 
mati, xi. 470; Sagar Island, xii. no; 
Singhbhum, xii. 437 ; the Sundarbans, 
xiii. 108, no, III ; Thana, xiii. 254; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 389. 

Land revenue of India under the Mughals, 
article ' India,' vi. 297-299 ; 304 ; land 
revenue of British India, 452. See 
also the Administrative section of each 
District article ; and for systems of 
land revenue, Assam, i. 363, 364 ; 
Bengal, ii. 306-308 ; Bombay, iii. 56, 
57 ; Madras, ix. 45-51 ; Oudh, x. 502- 
506. 

Land settlement, article ' India,' vi. 438- 
452 ; ancient land settlement of India, 

438 ; Musalman land-tax, 439 ; the 
Company's efforts at land settlement, 

439 ; growth of private rights, 439 ; 
the Permanent Settlement of Bengal, 
(1793), 441 ; rights of the cultivators 
and intermediate tenure-holders, 442, 
443 ; oppression of the cultivators, 443 ; 
land reform of 1859, 443, 444; the 
Rent Commission (1879), and further 
schemes for reform, 444, 445 ; tem- 
porary Settlement in Orissa, 445 ; 
yearly Settlement in Assam, 445 ; 
Madras 7-dyatzi'dri Settlement, 445-447 ; 
' survey ' tenure of Bombay, 448, 449 ; 
Southern India Agriculturists' Relief 
Acts (1879 and 1881), 449, 450; land 
system of the N.-W. Provinces and the 
Punjab, 451 ; tdliikdars of Oudh, 451 ; 
land system of the Central Provinces, 
452 ; the land revenue of India, 452 ; 
nature of the land-tax, 469. See also 
Permanent Settlement. 

Land tenures. See Tenures. 

Landaur, hill station and cantonment in 

N.-W. Provinces, viii. 459. 
Landaura, town in N. - W. Provinces, 

viii. 459; 
Landi Khana, pass in Afghanistan, viii. 
459, 460. 



192 



INDEX, 



Lang, Colonel, defended Kari'ir (1783), 
viii. 52. 

Langai, river in Assam, viii. 460. 

Langhorn, Sir W., Governor of Madras 
(1670-78), ix. 66. 

Langles, M., on the palace of llaidar- 
aliad, quoted, v. 253. 

Langrin, petty State in Assam, viii. 460. 

Langtarai, hill range in Bengal, viii. 
460. 

Languages (Aryan) of N. India, Sanskrit, 
vi. 334 ; the evidence for and against 
Sanskrit ever having been a spoken 
language, 334-336 ; divergence of San- 
skrit and Prakrit, 336 ; spread of the 
Prakrits, 336, 337 ; classification of 
Prakrits — the Maharashtri or Marathi, 
the Sauraseni or Braj of the N.-W. 
Provinces, the Magadhi or modern 
Bihari, and the Paisachi or non- Aryan 
dialects, 337 ; evolution of modern 
vernaculars from the Prakrits, 338, 339 ; 
the Sanskrit, Prakrit, and non- Aryan 
elements in modern vernaculars, 339- 
342 ; the seven modern vernaculars, 
342, 343 ; vernacular literature and 
writers, 343-354- 

Languages of non-Arj-an tribes, vi. 63- 
68 ; the Dravidian languages of S. 
India ; Tamil, its principal develop- 
ments, 330-333- . 

Languages spoken in Afghanistan, i. 44 ; 
the Andaman Islands, i. 285 ; Arakan 
Hill Tracts, i. 299 - 301 ; by the 
Bakichis and Brahuis, ii. 37, 38 ; iii. 
98 ; in Bhandara, ii. 362 ; Bhutan, ii. 
413, 414 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 49, 
50 ; the Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 
449 ; Coorg, iv. 35 ; Dharwar, iv. 
260 ; Haidarabad State, v. 246 ; South 
Kanara, vii. 382, 383 ; of the Karens, 
viii. 4; in Kashmir, viii. 71; Khandesh, 
viii. 155 ; by the Khasis, viii. 175 ; in 
the Laccadive Islands, viii. 395, 396 ; 
Z^Iadras, ix. 18, 19 ; the Maldive 
Islands, ix. 249, 252 ; Manipur, ix. 
330 ; Miiltan, x. 7 ; Mysore, x. 100 ; 
the Nicobar Islands, x. 296 ; by the 
Todas, X. 310 ; in ,Sind, xii. 518 ; 
Thar and Parkar, xiii. 267 ; Tuluva, 
xiii. 375. 

Languliya, river in Central Provinces, 
viii. 460, 461. 

Langur, hill fort in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 461. 

Lanji, town in Central Provinces, viii. 
461. 

Lao-bah, mountain range in Assam, viii. 
461. 

Lao-ber-sat, mountain range in Assam, 
viii. 461. 

Lao-syn-nia, mountain range in Assam, 
viii. 461. 



Lapha, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 461. 

Lapbagarh, hill fortress in Central Pro- 
vinces, viii. 461. 

Lapis-lazuli, found in Badakshan, i. 407. 

Larawar, pargand in Central India, viii. 
461, 462. 

Larkhana, Sub - division in Sind, viii. 
462-465 ; population, 463 ; agriculture, 
463, 464 ; tenures, 464 ; natural calam- 
ities, 464; manufactures, etc., 464; 
revenues, 464, 465. 

Larkhana, town and tahtk in Sind, viii. 

465.- . 

Larminie's, Captain, description of Ghazni 
in 18S0, quoted, v. 72. 

Lash, town in Afghanistan, i. 36. 

Lashkarpur, village in Assam, viii. 465, 
466. 

Lassen's Iiuiischc Alterthumskttnde, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 161 (foot- 
note I); 191 (footnote 2); 340 (foot- 
note 1). Local notices — Worked out 
the chronology of the Gupta kings, iv. 
410; his explanation of the affix 'bar' in 
Malabar, ix. 217 ; fixed site of Sravasti 
near ruins of Sahet Mahet, xii. 126. 

Laswari, village in Rajputana, viii. 466 ; 
defeat of Marathas at, article ' India,' 
vi. 323; 398. 

Latchmaji, author of a Kandh grammar, 
vii. 401. 

Laterite, article ' India,' vi. 628 ; 638, 
639. Local jiotices — South Arcot, i. 
326, 327 ; Balasor, ii. 2 ; Bankura, ii. 
79 ; Bardwan, ii. 127 ; Bassein, ii. 
193 ; Belgaum, ii. 231 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 201 ; Chengalpat, iii. 381 ; Cochin, 
iv. 2, 7 ; Coorg, iv. 32 ; Dapoli, iv. 
121 ; Dawna Hills, iv. 163 ; the 
Deccan, iv. 165 ; Dharwar, iv. 258 ; 
Galikonda Hills, iv. 461 ; Goa, v. 89 ; 
Gyaing-than-hvin, v. 238 ; Hantha- 
wadi, V. 312; lanjira, vii. 139; Jash- 
pur, vii. 145 ; Kaladgi, vii. 315 ; North 
Kanara, vii. 369 ; South Kanara, vii. 
375 ; the Konkan, viii. 291 ; j\Iadura, 
ix. 191 ; Western iNIalwa, ix. 268 ; 
Mandla, ix. 300 ; Marmagao, ix. 347, 
348 ; Mysore State, x. 91, 92, Dis- 
trict, X. 114 ; Nagpur, x. 165 ; Nellore, 
X. 261 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 12 ; Satara, 
xii. 276 ; Satpura Range, xii. 288 ; 
Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Seoni, xii. 308 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 400 ; Shwe-gyin, xii. 
430 ; Sirsi, xiii. 21 ; Taleparamba, 
xiii. 167 ; Tanjore, xiii. iSi ; Trichi- 
nopoli, xiii. 355. 

Lathi, Native State and town in Kathia- 
war, viii. 466, 467. 

Lathia, village in N.-W, Provinces, viii. 
467. 

La Touche, Captain, killed in attack on 
the Vagher outlaws (1S67), viii. 533, 



INDEX. 



19: 



Latter, Major, occupied the Morang 
(1814), and made treaty with the Raja 
of Sikkim against the Gurkhas, xii. 

485. 
Laiin, tract in Central Provinces, viii. 

467. 

Laur, tract in Assam, viii. 467, 468. 

Lazu and Custom of Hindu Castes, by 
Mr, Arthur Steele, quoted, vi. 195 
(footnote 2). 

Law, Brahmanical codes of, vi. 113-118 ; 
the Grihya .Sutras, an outgrowth from 
the Vedas, 113 ; code of Manu and its 
date, 113, 114; code of Yajnavalkya, 
114, 115; scope of Hindu law, 1 15; 
its rigid caste system, 115, 116 ; growth 
of the law, 1 16; its incorporation of 
local customs, 117; perils of modern 
codification, 117, 118; modern legal 
literature, 1 18. 

Law, The, of British India, vi. 433, 

434- 

Law, M., joined by Samru (1757), and 
defeated with Shah Alam at Gaya by 
Carnac (1760), xii. 264. 

Lawa, town in Punjab, viii. 464. 

Lawa, Native State in Rajputana, viii. 
468. 

Lawar, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 
468. 

Lawrence Schools for children and 
orphans of British soldiers on Mount 
Abii, i. 7 ; Lovedale on the Nilgiri 
Hills, viii, 490, x. 322 ; Murree, x. 
19, xii. 34 ; Sanawar, near Kasauli, 
xii. 194, 495 ; Utakamand, xiii. 453. 

Lawrence, Lord, Viceroy of India (1S64- 
69) ; famine in Orissa ; Bhutan war ; 
inquiry into the status of the Oudh 
peasantry ; the commercial crisis of 
1866, article 'India,' \\. 424, 425. 
Local notices — His interview with Dost 
Muhammad (1857), i. 51 ; statue of, 
at Calcutta, iii. 250 ; first Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Punjab (1859), xi. 270. 

Lawrence, Major, his ineffectual siege of 
Pondicherri in co-operation with the 
English fleet under Boscawen (174S), 
article ' India,' \-i. 379. Local notices 
— Took Devikota (1749), iv. 234 ; 
defended Madras (1758), i.x. 107 ; took 
Settipa Hadai (1752), xii. 321 ; twice 
relieved Trichinopoli, xiii. 356 ; de- 
feated the French at Golden Rock, 
xiii. 357; attacked Wandiwash (1752), 
xiii. 517, 

Lawrence, Sir George, British agent at 
Peshawar, was delivered up to the 
Sikhs on the outbreak of the second 
Sikh war, viii. 244. 

Lawrence, Sir Henry, Resident at Lahore 
(1845), article 'India,' vi. 410; Chief 
Commissioner of Oudh, 415 ; killed at 
VOL. XIV. 



Lucknow (1857), 420. Local notices — 
In charge of Firozpur (1839), iv. 441 ; 
rebuilt town of Firozpur, iv. 447 ; his 
discription of Sikh misrule in Kaithal, 
quoted, viii, 21 ; his defence of Luck- 
now Residency and death, viii, 512, 

5i3> X- 495- 

Lawrence, Sir Thomas, his portrait of 
Sir William Burroughs in the High 
Court, Calcutta, iii. 251. 

Lawtie, Lieutenant, got guns to bear on 
Taragarh fort (1814), when Gurkhas 
evacuated it, xiii. 206. 

Laj'ada, hill range in Bengal, viii. 468. 

Layard, Captain, quoted, on Rangamati, 
xi. 469, 470. 

Lead, article ' India,' vi. 626. Local 
notices — Found in Afghanistan, i. 36, 
37 ; Taragarh Hill in Ajmere-Mer- 
wara, i. 118; Alwar, i. 203; Anan- 
tapur, i. 274 ; Badakshan, i. 407 ; 
Badvel, i. 412 ; Nal in Baluchistan, ii. 
36 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; Lower Burma, 
iii. 201, 202 ; Upper Burma, iii. 21 1 ; 
Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, 
iv. 209 ; Garhwal, v. 22 ; the Hima- 
laya Mountains, v, 412 ; Jehlam, vii. 
167; Kangra, vii. 412, 413; Karmil, 
viii, 34 ; Kashmir (sulphide of lead), 
viii. 67 ; Kiilu, viii. 337 ; Kumaun, 
viii. 349 ; Lakhi Mountains, viii. 424 ; 
Mergui, ix. 410 ; Nallamalai Hills, 
x. 185 ; Nandikanama, x. 193 ; Nani- 
kot, X. 226 ; on the Pakchan river, x. 
531 ; near Subathu in Patiala, xi. 87 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 401 ; Salwin Hill Tracts, 
xii. 175 ; Shahpur, xii. 361 ; Shwe- 
gyin, xii. 430; Sirmur, xii. 554; 
Tavoy, xiii. 228 ; Udaipur, xiii. 401. 

Leaf-wearing tribe of Orissa, vi. 56. See 
Juangs. 

Leather work, article ' India,' vi. 603 ; 
leather factories at Cawnpur, vi. 417. 
Local notices of tanneries, manufacture 
of leather goods, shoes, saddles, etc. — 
Agra, i. 76 ; Ahmadabad, i, 96 ; 
Anupshahr, i. 295 ; Batala, ii. 216 ; 
Bengal, ii. 308 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; 
Biria, iii. 12 ; Bisambha, iii. 15 ; 
Bombay, iii. 81 ; Cawnpur, iii. 292, 
X. 395, 396 ; Chakwal, iii. 327 ; Dod- 
deri, iv. 311; Fatehpur (whips), iv. 
431; Gujrat, V. 197; Berar, v. 270; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 282; Hoshiar- 
pur, v. 456, 458 ; Hunsiir, v. 502, x. 
120 ; J^balpur, vii. 35 ; Jambusar, vii. 
122 ; Jerruck, vii. 182 ; Jhang, vii. 
211; Jodhpur, vii. 239; Kalanaur, 
vii, 322, xii. 75 ; Kapadwanj, vii. 
439 ; Karnal, viii. 29 ; Kashmor, 
viii. 79 ; Kasur, viii. 85 ; Khair- 
pur, viii. 135 ; Khanpur, viii. 164 ; 
Kundla, viii. 364 ; Larkhana. viii. 

N 



194 



INDEX. 



464, 465 ; Maghiana, ix. 140 ; Manj- 
hand, ix. 335 ; Miipur, ix. 450 ; 
Mitha Tiwana, ix. 468 ; Monghyr, ix. 
487; Mul, ix. 535; Multan, x. 13; 
Mysore, x. 106; Najibabad, x. 179; 
Narowal, x. 214; Naushahro, x. 244; 
Saharanpur, x. 396, xii. 122 ; Pil- 
khuwa, xi. 180; Find Dadan Khan 
(whips), xi. 183 ; Punjab, xi. 287 ; 
Purwa, xi. 334 ; Rahatgarh, xi. 346 ; 
Raichur, xi. 360; Rajputana, xi. 421 ; 
Ramnagar, xi. 452 ; Rania, xi. 502 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 32, 38 ; Reoti, xii. 
43 ; Sahibganj, xii. 135 ; Khawasa in 
Seoni, xii. 313 ; Shahdara (N.-W. P.), 
xii. 341 ; Sialkot, xii. 448 ; Sind, xii. 
526 ; Susuman, xiii. 139 ; Talagang, 
xiii. 162 ; Tando Muhammad Khan, 
xiii. 179 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 270 ; 
Thatia, xiii. 275 ; Upper Sind Fron- 
tier, xiii. 447 ; Wadhwan, xiii. 506 ; 
Wankaner, xiii. 519. 

Lebong, mountain range in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 468. 

Leckie, Daniel, found a mint existing at 
Garha (1790), v. 12. 

Leeches, very numerous in Coorg, iv. 37; 
Sibsagar, xii. 459 ; Sikkim, xii. 4S4. 

Left - hand and right - hand castes of 
Madras, vi. 196, 197, ix. 21, 127. 

Legislative Council of the Governor- 
General, vi. 432 ; of Madras, Bombay, 
and Bengal, 433. 

Le-guya, township in Burma, viii. 46S, 

469- 

Leh, town in Punjab, viii. 469. 

Lehra, village in Bengal, viii. 469. 

Leiah, town and tahsil in Punjab, viii. 
469, 470. 

Leigh, Capt., Surendra Sa surrendered 
to (1858), .xii. 181. 

Leitner, Dr., on the tribes of the Hindu 
Kush, quoted, v. 417, 418. 

Le-mro, river in Burma, viii. 470. 

Le-myet-hna, town and township in 
Burma, viii. 470, 471. 

Lengjut, village in Assam, viii. 471. 

Leopard, The Indian, article ' India,' 
vi. 653, 654. Local notices — Found 
in Mount Abu, i. 6 ; in Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 100; Ajmere, i. 119; Akola, 
i. 141 ; Allahabad, i. 185 ; Amgaon, 
i. 231; Anantapur, i. 274; Andipatti 
Hills, i. 288; North Arcot, i. 312; 
South Arcot, i. 320 ; Assam, i. 349 ; 
Bakarganj, i. 442 ; Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; 
Banda, ii. 47 ; Bankura, ii. 78, 79 ; 
Bannu, ii. 90; Basim, ii. 184; Bel- 
gaum, ii. 232 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; Bhan- 
dara, ii. 361 ; Bhutan, ii. 414 ; Bogra, 
iii. 26 ; Bombay Presidency, iii. 46 ; 
Bonai, iii. 85 ; Buldana, iii. 143 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; Cawnpur, iii. 



280 ; Chamba, iii. 329 ; Chang Bhakar, 
iii. 366 ; Chhindwara, iii. 399 ; Chital- 
drug, iii. 423 ; Chittagong, iii. 435; 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 448 ; 
Cochin, iv. 2; Coimbatore, iv. 15; 
Coorg, iv. 32 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; 
Cutch, iv. 60 ; Darjiling, iv. 130 ; 
Dehra Dun, iv. 169 ; Mount Delly, iv. 
197 ; Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 220 ; 
Diiar, iv. 246 ; Dharwar, iv. 249 ; 
Dinajpur, iv. 291 ; Etawah, iv. 370 ; 
Faridpur, iv. 397 ; Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; 
Gangpur, iv. 478 ; Gaya, v. 45 ; 
Godavari, v. 123 ; Gonda, v. 147 ; 
Goona, v. 159 ; Gurdaspur, v. 207 ; 
Gurgaon, v. 216 ; Gwalior, v. 229 ; 
Hamirpur, v. 298 ; Hardoi, v. 322 ; 
Hassan, v. 346 ; Hazaribagh, v. 370 ; 
Hill Tipperah, v. 395 ; Himalaya 
Mountains, v. 409 ; Hissar, v. 427 ; 
Hoshiarpur, v. 452 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; Jerruck, vii. 180 ; 
Jhansi, vii. 217 ; Kadur, vii. 283 ; 
Kaladgi, vii. 315; Kamriip, vii. 355 ; 
North Kanara, vii. 370 ; South Kanara, 
vii. 377; Kangra, vii. 413; Karachi, 
vii. 445 ; Kamul, viii. 35, 36 ; Kash- 
mir, viii. 68 ; Kathiawar, viii. 96 ; 
Khandesh, viii. 150; Kheri, viii. 190; 
Kistna, viii. 296 ; Kolaba, viii. 261 ; 
Kolar, viii. 273 ; Kotah, viii. 304 ; 
Kulu, viii. 338 ; Kumaun, viii. 349 ; 
Lahore, viii. 405 ; Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; 
Lohardaga, viii. 447 ; Madras, ix. 8, 
89 ; Madura, ix. 121 ; Maimansingh, 
ix. 192 ; Mainpuri, ix. 203 ; Malabar, 
ix. 220 ; Malwa, ix. 268 ; Manbhum, 
ix. 272 ; Manipur, ix. 325 ; Mergui, 
ix. 407 ; Midnapur, ix. 425 ; Mirza- 
pur, ix. 453 ; Monghyr, ix. 481 ; 
Moradabad, ix. 505 ; Muttra, x. 45 ; 
Mysore, x. 115; Nadiya, x. 130; 
Naga Hills, x. 143 ; Nallamalai Hills, 
X. 185; Nasik, x. 229; Nawanagar, 
X. 252 ; Nellore, x. 262 ; Nepal, x. 
278 ; Nilgiri Hills, x. 308 ; Nimar, x. 
328 ; Noakhali, x. 341 ; Oudh, x. 
483 ; Pabna, x. 512 ; Palkonda Hills, 
xi. II ; Palni Mountains, xi. 17; 
Patna State, xi. 115; Phuljhar, xi. 
16S ; Pilibhit, xi. 172; Pishin, xi. 
188; Poliir, xi. 197; Poona, xi. 200; 
Punjab, xi. 259 ; Pumiah, xi. 323 ; 
Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rajshahi, xi. 429 ; 
Rampa, xi. 454 ; Rampur, xi. 455 ; 
Rangpur, xi. 489 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 4 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Rewa Kantha, 
xii. 49 ; Rohtak, xii. 69 ; Saharanpur, 
xii. 115; Salem, xii. 152; Sandur, 
xii. 206 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ; 
Sarangarh, xii. 260 ; Sawantwari, xii. 
296 ; Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shahjahan- 
pur, xii. 344 ; Shahpur, xii. 361 ; 



INDEX. 



195 



Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383 ; Shimoga, 
xii. 400; Singhbhum, xii. 531; Sir- 
mur, xii. 554 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Siwalik 
Hills, xiii. 43 ; Sorab, xiii. 65 ; the 
Sundarbans, xiii. 109, 3S9 ; Sural, 
xiii. 120 ; Tarai, xiii. 208 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 229 ; Thayet - myo, xiii. 279 ; 
Tipperah, xiii. 313 ; Travancore, xiii. 
345 ; Tiimkur, xiii. 376 ; Twenty-four 
Parganas, xiii. 389 ; Wardha, xiii. 

. 524 ; Wun, xiii. 539. 

Lepchas, aboriginal tribe, pasture their 
cattle in Darjiling, iv. 130 ; the primi- 
tive inhabitants of Sikkim, iv. 133, 
xii. 485 ; in the Himalayas, v. 412, 
413 ; Nepal, x. 279. 

Lepers, Asylums for, at Agra, i. 67 ; 
Ahmadabad, i. 97 ; Ambala, i. 224 ; 
Tarn Taran, near Amritsar, i. 263 ; 
Indore, vii. 8 ; Almora, viii. 357 ; 
Bangalore, x. 113 ; Nagpur, x. 172; 
Ratnagiri, xii. 13 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 
38 ; Pathanwali in Sialkot, xii. 450 ; 
Subathu, xiii. 85 ; Tarn Taran, xiii. 
215. 

Leprosy, especially prevalent in N. Arcot, 
i- 319 ; S. Arcot, i. 328 ; Bankura, 
ii. 86; Bhagalpur, ii. 351; Birbhum, 
iii. 11; Lower Burma, iii. 208; 
Cochin, iv. 10 ; Gaya, v. 52 ; Kam- 
ri'ip, vii. 365 ; Kheri, viii. 197 ; 
Kumaun, %-iii. 357 ; Laccadive Islands, 
viii. 396 ; Madras, ix. 119 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 489 ; Nellore, x. 271 ; Novvgong, 
x. 415; Ratnagiri, xii. 12; Sibsagar, 
xii. 471 ; Simla, xii. 495 ; Sultanpur, 
xiii. 103 ; Tarn Taran, xiii. 215 ; Unao, 
xiii. 435 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 497. 

Levassoult, M., married the Begam 
Samru ( 1792 ), committed suicide 
(1795), xii. 265. 

Lewin, Capt. T. H., accompanied Chit- 
tagong column in Lushai expedition 
(1871) as political officer, viii. 531 ; 
his Hill Tracts of Chittagong, quoted, 
iii. 446, 447 ; on jt'tin cultivation, iii. 
450 ; on the Tipperahs, v. 399 ; on 
the river Matamori, ix. 360. 

Li. See Spiti. 

Libraries and Reading-rooms are enume- 
rated in each District article. See 
especially Ahmadabad, i. 97 ; Ahmad- 
nagar, i. 107; Aligarh, i. 176, 178; 
Allahabad, i. 192 ; the Carmichael at 
Benares, ii. 267 ; Bombay, iii. 72 ; 
Chinsurah, iii. 419; Cochin, iv. 7; 
Coonoor, iv. 28 ; Delhi, iv. 196 ; 
Gaya, v. 53; Gonda, v. 156; Hugh, 
V. 496 ; Kaira, vii. 307 ; Karachi, vii. 
454 ; Kolhapur, viii. 284 ; Kuch 
Behar, viii. 326; Madras, ix. 118; 
Mahabaleshwar, ix. 143 ; Peshawar, 
xi. 160 ; Anhilwara Patan, xi, 82 ; 



Serampur, xii. 318 ; Tanjore, xiii. 196 ; 
Utakamand, xiii. 453 ; tJttarpara, xiii 
459; Wari, xiii. 531. 

Lidar, river in Punjab, viii. 471. 

Liddell, Col., cleared the mutineers out 
of Mau (1858), vii. 220. 

Light - houses, lightships, and beacons, 
at Aden, i. 15 ; Agoada Head, i. 59; 
Savage Island (Akyab), i. 159, viii. 
331; Alguada Reef, i. 165, iv. 284; 
AUeppi, i, 200 ; Double Island (Am- 
herst), i. 233 ; Armagon, i. 331 ; Cali- 
cut, iii. 269 ; Chantapilli, iii. 369 ; 
Cocanada, iii. 472 ; Cochin, iv. 13 ; 
the Cocos Islands, iv. 13 ; Coringa, 
iv. 43 ; Covelong, iv. 44 ; mouth of 
the Devi, iv. 233 ; Devjagaon, iv. 
234 ; Dhamra, iv. 241 ; Dholera, iv. 
271 ; Divi Point, iv. 308 ; Double 
Island, iv. 315 ; False Point, iv. 390 ; 
Geonkhali, v. 53, 54 ; Gopalpur, v. 
161 ; Hajamro, v. 290, vii. 14 ; Jata- 
pur, vii. 71 ; Janjira (under construc- 
tion), vii. 141 ; Kalingapatam, vii. 
330 ; Manora Head, Karachi, vii. 
452, ix. 338; Karumbhar, viii. 51, 
xii. 149 ; Deogarh Island, Karwar 
Bay, viii. 55 ; Khun, viii. 2IO ; Khan- 
dari Island, viii. 269, 270, xiii. 247 ; 
Kolaba, viii. 271 ; Kumpta, viii. 360; 
Kutabdia, viii. 380; Madras, ix. 1 13; 
Jegri Bluff, Mahawa, ix. 187 ; Mandvi, 
ix. 310 ; Mangalore, ix. 314 ; Mangrol, 
ix. 316, 317 ; Masulipatam, ix. 353 ; 
Negapatam, x. 259 ; Oyster Reef, x. 
510 ; Pambam, xi. 23 ; Perim (Red 
Sea), xi. 138 ; Perim (Gulf of Cambay), 
xi. 138, 139 ; Pondicherri, xi. 199 ; 
Port Canning (lightship), xi. 221 ; 
Ratnagiri, xii. 13 ; Rojhi, xii. 79 ; 
Sagar Island, xii. Iio; the Tapti, 
xiii. 205 ; Tellicherri, xiii. 237 ; Hare 
Island, Tuticorin, xiii. 385 ; Vengurla 
Point, xiii. 470 ; Vengurla Rock, xiii. 

470- 
Likhi, petty State in Bombay, \'iii. 471. 

Lilajan, river in Bengal, viii. 471. 

Lima, Lopez de, Governor-General of 
Goa, deposed by a military revolt, v. 
106. 

Limbus, aboriginal tribe in the Hima- 
layas, V. 413; Nepal, X. 279; Sikkim, 
xii. 486. 

Lime found, or burnt from shells or lime- 
stone, in Amherst (carbonate of), i. 
235 ; N. Arcot, i. 312 ; Assam, i. 
348 ; Bankura, ii. 79 ; Bassein, ii. 
194 ; Basti, ii. 209 ; Bikaner, ii. 439 ; 
Belgaum, iii. 44 ; Lower Burma, iii. 
202 ; Cherra, iii. 392 ; Chitta Pahar, 
iii. 452; Darjiling, iv. 138; Darrang, 
iv. 142 ; Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; Garo 
Hills, v. 26; Gujrat, v. 194; Kan- 



196 



INDEX. 



gundi, vii. 431 ; Karauli, vii. 471 ; 
Khasi Hills, viii. 171, 173; Khyrim, 
viii. 215; Langiin, viii. 460; Lohar- 
daga, viii. 476; Ludhiana, viii. 519; 
Madura, ix. 121 ; Mao-iong, ix. 343 ; 
Mao-san-ram, ix. 343 ; Monghyr, ix. 
481 ; Nepal, x. 278; rilibhit, xi. 171 ; 
Punganur, xi. 243 ; Rohri, xii. 65 ; 
Salem, xii. 153 ; Sandoway, xii. 200 ; 
Saran, xii. 252 ; Satara, xii. 276 ; 
Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shahjahanpur, 
xii. 344; the Sundarbans, xiii. 112; 
Talclier, xiii. 164; Thayet-myo, xiii. 
278 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 298. 
Limestone, article 'India,' vi. 41, 42; 
627, 628. Local notices — Found, or 
quarried, in Ambala, i. 215 ; Amherst, 
i. 232, 235 ; Arcot, i. 308 ; N. Arcot, 
i. 312; S. Arcot, i. 327; Assam, i. 
347 ; Banda, ii. 47 ; Bangalore, ii. 59 ; 
Bassein, ii. 193 ; Bellary, ii. 241 ; 
Birbhiim, iii. 2 ; Bombay, iii. 44 ; 
Broach, iii. 102 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 
151 ; Lower Burma, iii. 201, 202; 
Upper Burma, iii. 211 ; Central India, 
iii. 295 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 
448 ; Chitta Pahar, iii. 453 ; Cudda- 
pah, iv. 48 ; Dam-ma-tha, iv. 104, 
105 ; Darrang, iv. 142 ; the Deccan, 
iv. 165 ; Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 220 ; 
Dholpur, iv. 273 ; Gangaon, v. 2 ; 
Garhbori, v. 14 ; Godavari, v. 123 ; 
Gujrat, V. 189 •,i Gyaing-than-lwin, v. 
238 ; Haidarabad State, v. 241, (Sind), 
v, 275 ; Hanthawadi, v. 312 ; the 
Himalayas, v. 411 ; Hindu Kush, v. 
417; Hoshangabad, v. 442; Hoshiar- 
pur, V. 452 ; Jabalpur, vii. 31, 35 ; 
jaintia Hills, vii. 49 ; Jaipur, vii. 52 ; 
Jalpaiguri, vii. 109 ; the Jamuna 
(Assam), vii. 136 ; Jhalawar, vii. 
199 ; Kaimur, vii. 298 ; Kaira, vii. 
300; Kaladgi, vii. 315 ; Kalahasti, 
vii. 321 ; N. Kanara, vii. 369 ; Kan- 
gra, vii. 413 ; Karakoram Pass, vii. 
461 ; Karanpura, vii. 468 ; Karauli, 
vii. 471; Karnul, viii. 34; Kedar 
Kanta, viii. 109 ; Khair-Murab, viii. 
152; Khairpur, viii. 133; Khandesh, 
viii. 151 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 171, 173 
Khisor Hills, viii. 203 ; Kohat, viii 
242 ; Kumaun, viii. 349 ; Kyauk-pyu 
386 ; Laccadive Islands, viii. 393 
Lakhimpur, viii. 427 ; Langrin, viii 
460; Maharam, ix. 166; Mahram 
ix. 185 ; Western Malwa, ix. 269 
Mandla, ix. 300 ; Manipur, ix. 324 
Mao-don, Mao-iong, and Mao-san 
ram, ix. 343 ; Muttra, x. 43 ; Myaung 
mya, x. 85 ; Mysore, x. 92 ; Naga 
Hills, x. 143 ; Nambar, x. 1S8 
Nepal, X. 278 ; Nicobar Islands, x 
295 ; Nong-stoin, x. 354 ; Nong-tar 



men, x. 354 ; Nowgong, x. 407 ; 
Orissa Tributary States, x. 471 ; Pa- 
daung, X. 523 ; Panch Mahals, xi. 
29 ; Panimar, xi. 43 ; Porbandar, xi. 
215; Raipur, xi. 367; Rajputana, xi. 
397, 402 ; Ramri, xi. 463 ; Rewa, xii. 
45 ' Sagar, xii. loi ; Salem, xii. 153 ; 
Salt Range, xii. 171 ; Salwin Hill 
Tracts, xii. 174; Sambalpur, xii. 179; 
Sameswari river, xii. 184; Sandoway, 
xii. 200 ; Shahabad, xii. 324 ; Shikar- 
pur, xii. 385 ; Sialkot, xii. 441 ; Sind, 
xii. 504 ; Sirmur, xii. 553 ; Sirohi, 
xiii. 2 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 221 ; Thana, 
xiii. 251 ; Trichinopoli, xiii. 355 ; 
Wun, xiii. 538. 
Limra, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 

.471- 
Limri, petty State in Bombay, viii. 471, 

472. 

Limri, town in Kathiawar, viii. 472. 

Lingana, hill fort in Bombay, viii. 472. 

Lingayats, trading class of Siva-worship- 
pers, numerous in Belgaum, ii. 232, 233 ; 
Chellakera, iii. 329 ; Chitaldrug, iii. 
425 ; Coorg, iv. 34 ; Dharwar, iv. 267 ; 
Berar, v. 267 ; Hassan, v. 347 ; Kadur, 
vii. 285 ; Madras, ix. 20, 21, 22 ; My- 
sore, x. 100; Nyamti, x. 420; Shimoga, 
xii. 401, 402; Tumkur, xiii. 377, 379 ; 
Vadagenhalli, xiii. 460. 

Linschot, Jean Hugues de, Dutch travel- 
ler (1583), quoted, on Chaul, iii. 376; 
the Portuguese ladies of Goa, v. 102. 

Lio, village in Punjab, viii. 472, 473- 

Lion, The Indian or maneless, of Gujarat, 
article ' India,' vi. 652. Local notices 
— Bombay, iii. 45 ; Kathiawar, viii. 
96 ; Kotah, viii. 304. 

Lister, Col., Political Agent in the Khasi 
Hills (1835-54), viii. 171. 

Lister, Messrs., their attempts to culti- 
vate silkworms in Uehra Dun, iv. 

174. 
Litar Gotra, petty State in Bombay, viii. 

473- 

Literature of Bengal^ The, by Mr. Arcy 
Dae, quoted, vi. 347 and footnote ; 348, 
349, and footnote ; 352 (footnote). 

Literature of India, article ' India,' vi. 
11S-129 ; 343-354 ; and 480, 481 ; the 
Mahabharata, 118 -122; the Rama- 
yana, 122-124; later Sanskrit epics, 
124, 125; Valmiki, the author of the 
Ramayana, 123 ; the poet Kalidasa, 
125 ; the Sanskrit drama, 125, 126 ; 
the Hindu novel, 127 ; Beast stories 
and fables, 127 ; Sanskrit lyric poetry, 
128 ; the Puranas or Brahmanical 
mediaeval theological writings, 128, 
129; modern Indian literature, 129; 
Uriya literature and authors, 343, 344 ; 
Rajputana sacred literature, 344 ; Hindi 



INDEX. 



197 



literature and authors, 345, 346 ; Ben- 
gali literature and authors, 346-354 ; 
480, 481. 

Little, Captain, took Gandikot (1791), 
iv. 464. 
« Little Baghmati. See Baghmati, Little. 

Little Gandak. See Gandak, Little. 

Little Ranjit. See Kanjit, Little. 

Lives of the Lindsays, quoted, on the 
condition of Sylhet in the last century, 

• xiii. 147. 

Llota, tribe of the Nagas, x. 147. 

Lloyd, Gen., his conduct in the Mutiny 
at Dinapur(i857), xi. 96, 97. 

Lloyd, Major J. H., his monograph on 
the Konkan, used, viii. 291, 292. 

Loan. See Laun. 

Local Finance, vi. 470. 

Local and Internal Trade, Statistics of, 
article ' India,' vi. 592-597. 

Loch, Captain, routed Maong MyatThun 
(1853), iv. 313; stormed stockades of 
Akonk-taung, v. 385 ; killed at Dona- 
byu, xiii. 389. 

Loch, Mr. W. W., his monograph on 
Poona, Satara, and Sholapur, used, xi. 
201-204. 

Lockhart, Colonel W. S. A., revised 
Macgregor's account of Kabul, vii. 
266-277. 

Locusts, Ravages of, article 'India,' vi. 
662. Local 7ioiices — Ahmadabad, i. 91 ; 
Alwar, i. 205 ; Broach, iii. 107 ; Etah, 
iv. 363 ; Kaira, vii. 304 ; Kolaba, viii. 
269; Lahore, viii. 41 1; Manbhum, 
ix. 284 ; Nasik, x. 233 ; NowgQng, x. 
412 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 31, 32 ; Salem, 
xii. 162 ; Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Sirohi, 
xiii. 6 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 307. 

Lodhika, petty State in Kathiawar, viii. 

473- , ^ . 

Lodhikhera, town in Central Provmces, 

viii. 473. 
Lodhis, prosperous agricultural caste m 

Allahabad, i. 189 ; Azamgarh, i. 395 ; 

Balaghat, i. 455 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 137 ; 

Cawnpur, iii. 283, 285 ; Damoh, iv. 

no, III; Etah, iv. 361; Fatehpur, 

iv. 426; Jabalpur, vii. 31, 32; Jhansi, 

vii. 222 ; Sagar, xii. 104. 
Lodhran, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 473, 

474- 
Lodi dynasty. The (1450-1526), article 

' India,' vi. 286. 
Lodi Bahlol (1450-88), deposed Alam 
Shah at Budaun (1449). "•• "7 ; 
settled Gujrat, and founded Bahlolpur, 
v. 189 ; his wars with Jaunpur, and 
capture of Jaunpur (1479), vii. 152; 
seized Lahore as first step to power 
(1436), viii. 406 ; died at Sakit (1488), 
xii. 146; founded Sultanpur in Saharan- 
pur (1450), xiii. 106. 



Loewenthal, suggested that Arrian's 
Aornos was near Attock, xi. 506. 

Loghassi. See Lughasi. 

Lohagara, town in Bengal, viii. 474. 

Lohaghat, cantonment in N. -W. Pro- 
vinces, viii. 474. 

Lohanos, Hindu official and trading class 
in Haidarabad(Sind), v. 277 ; Karachi, 
vii. 447 ; Khairpur, viii. 135 ; .Shikar- 
pur, xii. 392; Sind, xii. 519. 

Lohara, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

474- . ^ 

Lohara Sahaspur, estate m Central 

Provinces, viii. 474, 475. 

Lohardaga, District in Bengal, viii. 475- 
486 ; physical aspects, 475, 476 ; jungle 
products, 476 ; minerals, 476, 477 ; 
wild animals, 477 ; history, 477-479 : 
population, 479-481 ; urban and rural 
population, 481, 482 ; agriculture, 482, 
483 ; condition of the peasantry, 483, 
484 ; natural calamities, 484 ; commerce 
and trade, 484, 485 ; administration, 
485, 486 ; medical aspects, 486. 

Lohardaga, Sub-division in Bengal, viii. 
4S6, 487. 

Lohardaga, town in Bengal, viii. 487. 

Lohargaon, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 487. 

Loharinaig, waterfall in N.-W. Provinces, 
viii. 487. 

Loharu, Native State in Punjab, 
487, 488. 

Lohgarh, fort in Bombay, viii. 488. 

Lohit, river in Assam, viii. 488. 

Loisinh, estate in Central Provinces, 
488. 

Lonar, town in Berar, viii. 488, 489. 

Lonara, town in Oudh, viii. 489. 

Lonauli, town in Bombay, viii. 489, 490. 

London Mission, The. See Protestant 
Missions. 

Long, Rev. James, translated the Nil 
Darpan, article ' India,' vi. 354 ; quoted 
on Rangamati, xi. 470 ; Tribeni, xiii. 

353- 
Loni, historic town in N.-W. Provmces, 

viii. 490. 
Lormi, estate in Central Provinces, viii. 

490. 
Losar, village in Punjab, vm. 490. 
Loss by exchange, article ' India,' vi. 

469. 
Louri^al, Marquis de, defeated the 

Marathas at Bardez, v. 104. 
Lovedale, hill station in Madras, viii. 

490. 
Love-poems in Krishna-worship, vi. 223. 

Lovett, Mr., held Howrah (1785). v. 

464. 
Low, Col., Resident at Lucknow (1841), 

his efforts to suppress Bhagwant Singh, 

^- 493- 



vm. 



Vlll. 



198 



INDEX. 



Lowa, town in Oudli, viii. 490. 

Lowaghar. Sec Maidani. 

Low-caste apostles in religious reforma- 
tions in Siva and Vishnu worship, vi. 
207, 208. 

Lower Ganges Canal, Statistics of, 
article ' India,' vi. 29 ; 532, 533. See 
Ganges Canal, Lower, iv. 475-477. 

Lucena, quoted, on the finding of the 
cross on St. Thomas' Mount in 1547, 
xii. 143. 

Luckeeserai, railway station in Bengal, 
viii. 490. 

Lucknow, Division in Oudh, viii. 490- 

492. 

Lucknow, District in Oudh, viii. 492- 
502 ; physical aspects, 492, 493 ; his- 
tory, 493-496 ; population, 496, 497 ; 
urban and rural population, 497 ; agri- 
culture, 497-498 ; tenures, 498-499 ; 
famines, 499 ; roads and communica- 
tions, 499, 500 ; manufactures, trade, 
etc., 500; administration, 500, 501; 
medical aspects, 501, 502. 

Lucknow, tahsil and pargand in Oudh, 
viii. 502, 503. 

Lucknow, capital of Oudh, viii. 503-518 ; 
situation and general appearance, 503, 
504; history, 504-511; architecture, 
511, 512 ; mutiny narrative, 512-515; 
population, 515, 516; commerce and 
trade, 516; administration, 517; edu- 
cation, etc., 517 ; military statistics, 
517, 518; siege and relief of, article 
' India,' vi. 420, 421. 

Ludhiana, District in Punjab, viii. 518- 
525; physical aspects, 51S, 519; his- 
tory, 519-521 ; population, 521 ; urban 
and rural population, 521, 522 ; agri- 
culture, 522, 523 ; natural calamities, 
523 ; commerce and trade, 523, 524 ; 
administration, 524, 525 ; medical 
aspects, 525. 

Ludhiana, tahsil in Punjab, viii. 525, 526. 

Ludhiana, town in Punjab, viii. 526. 

Lugard, Gen. Sir Edward, defeated Kuar 
Singh at Azamgarh (1858), i. 395. 

Lughasi, Native State in Central India, 
viii. 527. 

Lugu, hill in Bengal, viii. 527. 

Luka, river in Assam, viii. 527. 

Lukman-jo-Tando. See Tando Lukman. 

Lumbaiong, mountain range in Assam, 
viii. 527. 

Lumsden, General Sir H. B., his mission 
to Kabul (1857-58), i. 51 ; quoted, on 
the Kafirs, vii. 290 ; on Kandahar, vii. 
394 ; on the fighting men in the Kuram 
valley, viii. 368. 

Lumsden, General Sir P. S. , took com- 
mand of the Commission formarkingthe 
N. boundary of Afghanistan, vii. 275. 

Lunatic asylums. See the different Pro- 



vincial articles, and particularly at 
Ahmadabad, i. 93 ; Ajmere, i. 131 ; 
Tezpur in Assam, i. 373 ; in Bengal, 
ii. 322 ; Berhampur, ii. 325, x. 31 ; 
Bhawanipur (for Europeans), ii. 384 ; 
in Bombay Presidency, iii. 73 ; Kolaba, 
iii. 84, viii. 27 ; Calicut, iii. 268, 
ix. 80; Dacca, iv. 89 ; Delhi, iv. 196 ; 
Dhalandhar, iv. 238 ; Dharwar, iv. 
265 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 288 ; 
Lahore, viii. 413 ; Lucknow, viii. 502 ; 
in Madras Presidency, ix. 80 ; Banga- 
lore, X. 113; Nagpur, x. 172, 174; 
Rangoon, xi. 484 ; in the Twenty-four 
Parganas, xiii. 399 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 
496. 

Lunawara, Native State in Bombay, viii. 
527, 528. 

Lunawara, capital of State in Bombay, 
viii. 528, 529. 

Lushai Hills, tract on N.-E. frontier, viii. 

529-532. 
Lushais or Kukis, aboriginal tribe on 

N.-E. frontier, i. 351 ; Cachar, iii. 

231, 235 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, iii. 

448, 449, 450 ; Hill Tipperah, v. 399 ; 

Jaintia Hills, vii. 148 ; Manipur, ix. 

130; Naga Hills, x. 150, 151 ; Sylhet, 

xiii. 149. 
Lushington, S. R., Governor of Madras 

(1827-32), ix. 67. 
Lushington, S. T., Commissioner of 

Kumaun, carried out settlement there, 

viii. 351. 
Lutheran Missions, article 'India,' vi. 

259, 260. See Protestant Missions. 
Lyall, Sir A. C, Lieutenant-Governor of 

the N.-W. Provinces and Oudh (1882), 

X. 370. 
Lyell, Sir Charles, Principles of Geology, 

quoted, vi. 27. 
Lytton, Lord, Viceroy of India (1876-80), 

Proclamation of the Queen as Empress 

of India, great famine of 1877-78, 

second Afghan war, article ' India,' 

vi. 426, 427 ; his attempt to establish 

British agencies in Afghanistan, i. 52. 



M 



Macartney, Lord, Governor of Madras 

(1781-85), ix. 67. 
Macaulay, Lord, first Law Member of the 

Council of India, article ' India,' vi. 

406 ; quoted on dive's defence of 

Arcot, i. 310. 
Macdonald, Mr., sub-Collector of Cudda- 

pah, murdered in a riot there (1832), 

iv. 50. 
Macdonald, Major, Commandant of Fort 

M ichni , murdered by Mohmands ( 1 873), 

ix. 475- 



• INDEX. 



199 



Macgregor, Sir C. ^I. , his estimate of 
the population of Afghanistan, i. 45 ; 
use made of his account of Herat, v. 
391 ; of Kabul, vii. 266-277 ; of Kan- 
dahar, vii. 389-398 ; of the Khaibar 
Pass, viii. 124-127 ; quoted, on the 
Kuram valley, viii. 369 ; on the Safed 
Koh Mountains, xii. 97-99 ; on the 
Sulaiman Hills, xiii. 94. 

Macharda, village in Kathiawar, viii. 

532, 533- 
Machari, village in Rajputana, viii. 533. 
Machavaram, town in Madras, viii. 533. 
Machhgaon, port in Bengal, viii. 533. 
Machhgaon Canal, branch of the Orissa 

Canal System, viii. 533. 
Machhligaon, village in Oudh, viii. 533. 
Machhlishahr, town and taksilm N.-W. 

Provinces, viii. 533, 534. 
Machhreta, town and pargaitd in Oudh, 

viii- 534, 535- 
Machida, estate in Central Provinces, 

^'"•. 535- 
Machiwara, town in Punjab, viii. 535. 

Mackenzie, Gordon, quoted, on the storm- 
wave at Masulipatam (1864), ix. 355- 

357- 
Mackeson, Lieut., his attack on Ali 

Masjid (1839), viii. 124. 
Mackeson, Fort, military outpost in 

Punjab, viii. 535, 536. 
^Maclean, J. M., quoted, on the Govern- 
ment House at Parell, xi. 61 ; on the 

Vehar Reservoir, xiii. 465, 466. 
Macleod, Sir Donald, Donald town, 

Lahore, named after, viii. 417, 418; 

third Lieut. -Governor of the Punjab, 

xi. 270. 
Macleod, Capt., put down the rising of 

the Naikdas in the Panch Mahals 

(1868), xi. 30. 
Macmorine, Col., his victory at Gadar- 

wara (1818), x. 219. 
Macnaghten, Sir Francis, Portrait of, in 

the High Court, Calcutta, iii. 251. 
Macnaghten, Sir William, Assassination 

of, at Kabul (1841), i. 50, vi. 408; 

indignities offered to his body, vii. 

272, 273. 
Macpherson, Sir H. T., sent from 

Kabul to disperse Afghans, vii. 274 ; 

his brigade at the battle of Kandahar 

(1880), vii. 397. 
Macpherson, Sir John, Governor-General, 

(1785, 1786), ii. 278. 
Macpherson, Major S. C, his manage- 
ment of the Kandhs, vii. 404, 405. 
Macrae, James, Governor of Madras, 

(1725-30), ix. 67. 
Madahis, aboriginal tribe in Assam, i, 

351 ; Darrang, iv. 145. 
l\Lidahpura, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, viii. 536. 



Madaksira, town and tdlitk in Madras, 

viii. 536. 
Madanapalli, town and taluk in Madras, 

viii. 537- 
Madanganj, town in Bengal, viii. 537. 
Madanpur, estate in Central Provinces, 

viii- 537- 
Madapollam, historic weaving village in 

Madras, viii. 537, 538. 
Madari, river in Bengal, viii. 538. 
Madaria, town in N.-W. Provinces, viii. 

538- 
Madaripur, village and Sub-division in 

Bengal, viii. 538. ^ 
Madat Khan, Pathan leader, destroyed 

Badin in a raid on Sind, i. 409. 
Madavarvilagam, town in Madras, viii. 

538, 539- 
Madder, grown in Afghanistan, i. 38 ; 

Baluchistan, ii. 36 ; Nepal, x. 277 ; 

Sandoway, xii. 202, 203. 
Maddikera, town in Madras, viii. 539. 
Maddock, Sir Herbert, agent at Sagar, 

built great house at Gachakota, v. 13. 
Maddur, village and tdhtk in Mysore, 

viii. 539. 
Made, village in Coorg, viii. 539. 
Madgiri, town and taluk in Mysore, viii. 

539- 
Madgiri-driig, hill in Mysore, viii. 540. 

Madgula, town in Madras, viii. 540. 
Madha, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, viii. 540, 541. 
Madham, petty State in Punjab, viii. 

541- 

Madhapur, town in Kathiawar, viii. 541. 
Madhava Acharya, Sanskrit religious 

writer of the 14th century, vi. 191. 
Madhava Rao, Sir, Diwan of Baroda 

(1875), ii. 168. 
Madhepur, town in Bengal, viii. 541. 
Madheswaranmalai, town in Madras, viii, 

541, 542- 
Madhopur, town in Rajputana, viii. 542. 
Madhubani, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, viii. 542. 
Madhugarh, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, viii. 542, 543. 
Madhumati. See Baleswar. 
Madhuna Panth, Maratha Brahman, 

prime minister of the last king of 

Golconda, killed at Haidarabad (1686), 

V. 256. 
Madhupur, village in Punjab, viii. 543. 
Madhupur, jungle in E. Bengal, viii. 543. 
Madhupur. See Madhepur. 
Madhu Rao, fourth Peshwa (1761-72), 

article ' India,' vi. 321. See also 

Marathas. 
Madhu Rao Narayan, sixth Peshwa 

(1774-95), fi''^'^ Maratha war, and 

treaty of Salbai, article ' India,' vi. 

323. See also Marathas. 



200 



INDEX. 



\ 



Madhu Sudan Datta, Bengali epic poet 
of the 19th century, article ' India,' vi. 

354- , 

Madhwapur, village in Bengal, viii. 543. 

Madhyarjunam, town in Madras, viii. 
543, 544. 

Madnagarh, reservoir in Central Pro- 
vinces, viii. 544. 

Madras Presidency, ix. 1-102 ; bound- 
aries, I, 2 ; general aspect, 2, 3 ; 
rivers, mountains, and lakes, 3, 4 ; 
minerals, 4-6 ; forests, 6-8 ; wild and 
domestic animals, 8, 9 ; history, 9-15 ; 
people, 15, 18 ; ethnical classification, 
18, 19 ; castes, 19-21 ; religious classi- 
fication, 21-25 ; occupations, 25, 26 ; 
emigration, 26 ; houses and towns, 26, 
27 ; agriculture, 27-31 ; coffee planta- 
tions, 31, 32 ; tea plantations, 32 ; 
tobacco cultivation, 32-34 ; cinchona, 
34. 35 ; government farm, 35 ; wages 
and prices, 35, 36 ; famine of 1876-78, 
37-40 ; irrigation, 40-44 ; land tenures, 
44-50 ; survey and settlement, 50, 51 ; 
zammdari or permanently settled 
estates, 51 ; indms or revenue-free 
grants, 52, 53 ; manufactures, 53, 54 ; 
salt manufacture, 54-57 ; history of 
dbkdri in Madras, 57, 58 ; arrack and 
toddy, 58-60 ; railways, 60 ; commerce 
and trade, 60-64 > administration, 64- 
66 ; governors of Madras under British 
rule, 66, 67 ; local and municipal ad- 
ministration, 67 - 69 ; revenue and 
expenditure, 69-74 ; Madras army, 74, 
75 ; police, 75, 76 ; criminal statistics, 
77 ; jails, 77 ; education, 77-79 ; 
medical aspects, 79, 80 ; botany and 
zoology of Madras, 80-82 ; climate of 
Southern India as affecting vegetation, 
82, 83 ; general character of the flora, 
83 ; dry region, 83-85 ; moist region, 
85, 86 ; very moist region, 86, 87 ; 
food-grains and pulses, 87, 88 ; fauna 
of Southern India, 88 ; Mammals : — 
quadrumana — cheiroptera — insectivora 
^carnivora — rodentia — edentata — 
proboscidea — ungulata, 88-91 ; Birds : 
— raptores or birds of prey — passeres 
or perching birds — scansores— tenui- 
rostres — dentirostres — conirostres — 
gallinae vel rasores or game birds — 
grallatores^natatores, 91-94; Reptiles : 
— turtles, lizards, etc. — snakes, 94- 
96 ; Amphibians : — frogs, toads, 96 ; 
Fishes : — fresh-water fishes — brackish- 
water fishes — sea fishes, 96, 97 ; 
Mollusca : — cephalopoda — ophisto- 
branchiata, 98 ; Insects : — coleoptera — 
orthoptera — hymenoptera — lepidoptera 
— diptera — rhynchota — arachnida — 
myriapoda, 99-102 ; Crustacea, 102. 

Madras City, capital of Madras Pre- 



sidency, ix. 102-II9 ; history, 103, 104 ; 
general appearance, 104- 107 ; popula- 
tion, 107, 108 ; religions, 108, 109 ; 
municipality, 109- ill ; port, trade, etc., 
111-114; industries, 114; live stock, 
prices of produce, 1 14 ; sporting, 1 14 ; 
communications, 114, 1 15; education, 
etc., 115, 116; judicial, I16, I17 ; 
police, 117; institutions, 117-II9; 
climate, etc., 119; article 'India,' 
founded in 1639, the first territorial 
British possession in India, vi. 369 ; 
378 ; capture of, by the French ; in- 
effectual siege of, by the British ; 
restoration to the British, vi. 379. 

Madrasas or Muhammadan Colleges, at 
Calcutta, article ' India,' vi. 473 ; iii. 
259 ; Dacca, iv. 87, 92 ; Hugh, v. 
498. 

Madura, District in Madras, ix. 1 19-132 ; 
physical aspects, 120-122 ; history, 
122-124; population, 124-128; agri- 
culture, 128, 129; natural calamities, 
129, 130; manufactures, etc.,. 130; 
communications, 130 ; administra- 
tion, 131 ; medical aspects, 131, 
132. 

Madura, tdliik in Madras, ix. 132. 

Madura, town in Madras, ix. 132-135. 

Madura, river in Assam, ix. 135. 

Madurantakam, tdhik in Madras, ix. 

135- 
Mafuz Bandar. See Chicacole. 
Magadha, kings of, their power in India, 

ii. 227; in the N.-W. Provinces, x. 

362 ; their capitals at Patna, xi. 106, 

107 ; and Rajagriha, xi. 380. 
Magadi, village and tdluk in Mysore, ix. 

136. 

Maganand, mountain pass in Punjab, ix. 
136. 

Magars, aboriginal tribe, in the Hima- 
layas, V. 413 ; in Nepal, x. 279. 

Magar Talao, tank, hot springs, and 
temple in Bombay, ix. 136-139. 

Magdapur,/flrfi3«rt in Oudh, ix. 139. 

Maghar, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

139- 
Maghera, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

139- 

Maghiana, town in Punjab, ix. 139, 140. 

Maghs or Arakanese, in Bakarganj, i. 
443, 444 ; Chittagong (their ravages), 
iii. 435, 436 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
iii. 449 ; Cox's Bazar, iv. 45 ; Kyauk- 
pyu, viii. 386 ; the Sundarbans, xiii. 
Ill; Taung-ngu, xiii. 223 ; Tavoy, 
xiii. 230. 

Magori, petty State in Bombay, ix. 140. 

Magrah, town in Bengal, ix. 140. 

Magrayar, /a;-^aM« in Oudh, ix. 140, 141. 

Magura, town and Sub-division in Bengal, 
ix. 141. 



INDEX. 



20I 



Mahabaleshwar, hill station and sani- 
tarium in Bombay, ix. 141-143. 

Mahabalipur, village, with temples, in 
Madras, ix. 143-149. 

Mahaban, iahsilin N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
149, 150. 

Mahaban, historic town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 150-152. 

Mahaban, mountain in Yagistan, ix. 152. 

Maha Bandula, besieged Rangoon (1824), 
'iii. 224, 225, iv. 313; defeated and 
killed at Donabyii (,1825), xiii. 289. 

Mahabar, range of hills in Bengal, ix. 

152, 153- 
Mahabat Khan, Akbar's general, occupied 

Udaipur (1577), xiii. 409. 
Mahabharata, the epic poem of the 

heroic age in N. India, article 'India,' 

vi. 1 18- 1 22; the struggle between the 

Kauravas and Pandavas, 1 19, 120; 

the polyandry of Draupadi, 121. 
Mahad, town and Sub-division in Bombay, 

ix. 153, 154. 
Mahadanapuram, town in Madras, ix. 

Mahadeo, river in Assam, ix. 154. 

Mahadeopahar, group of hills in Central 
Provinces, ix. 154, 155. 

Mahadeva, /ar^awa in Oudh, ix. 155. 

Mahagaon, estate in Central Provinces, 
ix. 155. 

Mahaklidurga, hill in Mysore, ix. 155. 

Mahalingpur, town in Bombay, ix. 155. 

Mahamuni, Buddhist temple in Bengal, 
ix. 155, 156. 

Mahamuni, pagoda in Burma, ix. 156. 

Mahanadi, river in Central Provinces and 
Orissa, ix. 156-163 ; course of the river, 
156-158; floods, 158; canal system, 
158-160 ; general view of the Orissa 
canals, 160 ; irrigation capabilities, 
160-162 ; financial aspects, 162, 163 ; 
physical action of the river, 163. 

Mahanadi, river in Orissa and Madras, 
ix. 163. See Rushikuliya. 

Mahanadi, Little, river in Central Pro- 
vinces, ix. 163, 164. 

Mahananda, river in N. Bengal, ix. 164. 

Mahan Singh, father of Ranjit Singh, his 
mausoleum at Gujranwala, v. 187 ; his 
wars with Sahib Singh of Gujrat, v. 
190 ; restored town and salt trade of 
Miani (1787), ix. 421 ; conquered 
Miani (1783), xii. 362; sacked Jamu 
(1784,) xii. 442. 
Maharajganj, trading town in Saran 

District, Bengal, ix. 164. 
Maharajganj, trading suburb of Patna 

city, Bengal, ix. 164. 
Maharajganj, town and tahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, ix. 165. 
Maharajganj. See Newalganj. 
Maharajnagar, village in Oudh, ix. 165. 



Maharajnagar, town in Central India, ix. 

Maharajpur, village in Central Provinces, 

ix. 165, 166. 
Maharam. See Mah-ram. 
Maharam, petty State in Assam, ix. 166. 
Maharashtra, historic kingdom in W. 

India, ix. 166-168. 
Mahasthangarh, ancient shrine in Bengal, 

ix. 168. 
Mahasu, mountain near Simla, Punjab, 

ix. 168, 169. 
Mahathaman, township in Burma, ix. 169. 
Mahatpur, town in Punjab, ix. 169, 170. 
Mahatwar, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

170. 
Mahavinyaka, peak in Bengal, ix. 170. 
Mahe, French settlement in Madras, ix. 

170, 171. 
Maheji, town in Bombay, ix. 171, 172. 
Mahendragiri, mountain peak in Madras, 

ix. 172. 
Mahendratanaya, river in Madras, ix. 172. 
Mahesar. See Maheswar. 
Mahesh, village in Bengal, ix. 172. 
Mahesh-rekha. See Ulubaria. 
Mahespur, town in Bengal, ix. 172, 173. 
Maheswar, town in Central India, ix. 

173- 

Mahgawan, town in Oudh, ix. 173. 

Mahi, river in Bombay, ix. 173, 174. 

Mahiganj, town in Bengal, ix. 175. 

Mahi Kantha, The, group of Native 
States in Bombay, ix. 175-179; physi- 
cal aspects, 176 ; history, 176, 177 ; 
population, 177, 178 ; Bhils, 178, 
179; agriculture, trade, etc., 179. 

Mahim, Sub-division in Bombay, ix. 179, 
180. 

Mahim, town in Bombay, ix. 180, 181. 

Mahim, historic town in Punjab, ix. 181. 

Mahlog, State in Punjab, ix. 181. 

Mahmud of Ghazni (1001-30), article 
'India,' vi. 272-275; his seventeen 
invasions of India, 272, 273 ; patriotic 
resistance of the Hindus, 273 ; sack of 
Somnath, 273, 274 ; conquest of the 
Punjab, 274 ; Mahmud's justice and 
thrift, 274, 275. Localnotices — Sacked 
Ajmere, i. 119, 120; took Bhatnair, 
ii. 378; at Bulandshahr, iii. 133 ; con- 
ciliated by the Chandel Raja, iii. 154 ; 
plundered Etawah, iv. 379; defeated 
Ajai Pal, Raja of Kanauj, iv. 410 ; 
besieged Gwalior, v. 236 ; besieged 
Kalinjar, vii. 332 ; took Kanauj, vii. 
386 ; took Kandahar, vii. 392 ; 
plundered shrine of Kangra, vii. 
414 ; invaded Karachi, vii. 446 ; and 
Kashmir, viii. 61 ; sacked Somnath, 
viii. 90, xiii. 51 ; occupied Lahore, 
viii. 405 ; sacked Mahaban, ix. 150 ; 
attacked the Por Raja of Baran, ix. 



202 



INDEX. 



383 ; took Multan, x. 4 ; and Munj, 
X. 15 ; sacked Muttra, x. 54 ; his 
invasions of the N.-W. Provinces, 
X. 363 ; made Peshawar base for his 
invasions, xi. 148 ; defeated the Raj- 
puts under Prithwi Raja on the plains 
of Chach, xii. 23 ; sacked Sharwa and 
defeated Raja Chand, xii. 271 ; con- 
quered Shikarpur, xii. 386 ; took 
Talamba, xiii. 163 ; sacked Thaneswar, 
xiii. 260 ; took Uchh, xiii. 400. 

Mahmud Gawan, minister of the last 
Bahniani king, his attempt to settle 
Maharashtra (1472), xi. 202. 

Mahmud Shah, last independent king of 
Bengal, died at Colgong (1539), iv. 

23- , , 

Mahmud Shah Begara, king of Gujarat, 

completed fortifications of Ahmadabad, 

i. 94 ; took Champaner, iii. 333 ; 

built mosque at Junagarh, vii. 263 ; 

founded Mehmadabad (1479), ix. 400 ; 

took Pawagarh (1484), xi. 122. 
Mahmiid, Sultan of Jaunpur, defeated at 

Delhi by Bahlol Lodi (1452), vii. 152 ; 

took Kalpi (1442), vii. 342. 
Mahmud Tughlak, last king of the Tugh- 

lak dynasy (1398- 1414), invasion of 

Timi'ir (Tamerlane), vi. 285. 
Mahmi'idabad, town and pargand in 

Oudh, ix. 181, 182. 
Mahoba, tahsil in X.-W. Provinces, ix. 

182. 
Mahoba, historic town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 182, 183. 
Mahogany trees, in Malabar, ix. 229. 
Maholi, pargand in Oudh, ix. 183, 184. 
Mahona, town and pargand in Oudh, ix. 

184. 
Mahraj, town in Punjab, ix. 184, 185. 
Mahram, petty State in Assam, ix. 185. 
Mahrauni. See Mihrauni. 
Ma-htun. See Ma-tun. 
Mahud trees, found in Aligarh, i. 168 ; 

Allahabad, i. 190 ; Asoha, i. 340 ; 

Bachhrawan, i. 405 ; Bailgaon, i. 

437; Banda, ii. 51; Basim, ii. 184; 

Bhagalpur, ii. 343 ; Bhandara, ii. 361 ; 

Bihar, ii. 420; Birhar, iii. 12; Bom- 
bay, iii. 45 ; Bundelkhand, iii. 152 ; 

Biirhapara, iii. 165 ; Cawnpur, iii. 

280 ; Chanda, iii. 349 ; Chhota Udai- 

pur, iii. 405 ; Dharampur, iv. 249 ; 

Dungarpur, iv. 323; Edar, iv. 337; 

Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; Gaya, v. 44 ; 

Gonda, v. 146 ; Hazaribagh, v. 370 ; 

Jaunpur, vii. 150; Kantha, vii. 437; 

Kathi, viii. 87 ; Kawardha, viii. 106 ; 

Lalitpur, viii. 447 ; Lohara, viii. 

474 ; Lohardaga, viii. 476 ; Makrai, 

ix. 215; Mauranwan, ix. 374; 

Monghyr, ix. 480; Nagpur, x. 271 ; 

Narsinghpur, X. 217; Nimar, x. 333; 



Oudh, X. 482 ; Panch Mahals, xi. 29 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 68 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 
352 ; Raipur, xi. 368 ; Rangi, xi. 471 ; 
Rewa, xii. 46 ; Rewa Kantha, xii. 49 ; 
Sadullanagar, xii. 95 ; Sagar, xii. loi ; 
Sakti, xii. 148; Sambalpur, xii. 178; 
Santal Parganas, xii. 234 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 323 ; Singhpur, xii. 521 ; Sultan- 
pur, xiii. 97 ; Unao, xiii. 436 ; Wada, 
xiii. 504 ; Wardha, xiii. 526 ; Wiin, 
xiii. 543. 

Mahuagarhi, peak in Bengal, ix. 185. 

Mahiidha, town in Bombay, ix. 185. 

Mahudi, hill in Bengal, ix. 185. 

Mahul, port in Bombay, ix. 185, 186. 

Mahul, iahstl in N.-W. Provinces, ix 
186. 

Mahuli. See Maholi. 

Mahuli, hill fortress in Bombay, ix. 186, 

Mahurigaon, petty State in Kalhiawar, 

ix. 187. 
Mahuwa, town and port in Kathiawar, 

ix. 187. 
Maibang, ruins in Assam, ix. 187, 188. 
Maidani,hill range in Punjab, ix. 188. 
Maihar, Native State in Central India, 

ix. 188, 189. 
Maihar, town in Central India, ix. 189. 
Maikal, hill range in Central Provinces, 

ix. 190. 
Mailapur (St. Thomas' Mount), legendary 

martyrdom of St. Thomas the Apostle 

at, near Madras city, vi. 231. See also 

Mylapur. 
Mailavaram, estate in Madras, ix. 190. 
Mailavaram, town in Madras, ix. 190. 
Mailog. See Mahlog. 
Mailsi, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 190. 
Maimansingh, District in Bengal, ix. 190- 

201 ; physical aspects, 191, 192 ; 

population, 192-194; urban and rural 

population, 194, 195 ; agriculture, 195- 

197 ; natural calamities, 197, 198 ; 

commerce, trade, etc., 198 ; roads and 

means of communication, 198, 199 ; 

administration, 199 ; medical aspects, 

200, 201. 
Maimansingh, Sub - division in Bengal, 

ix. 201. 
Maimansingh town. See Nasirabad. 
Maini, town in Bombay, ix. 201, 202. 
Mainpuri, District in N.-W. Provinces, 

ix. 202-212 ; physical aspects, 201-203; 

history, 203, 204 ; population, 204- 

206 ; urban and rural population, 206, 

207 ; infanticide, 207, 208; agriculture, 
208, 209 ; natural calamities, 209, 210; 

\ commerce and trade, means of com- 
munication, 210 ; administration, 2IO, 
211 ; medical aspects, 211, 212. 
Mainpuri, tahsU in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
212. 



INDEX. 



20' 



Mainpuri, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
212, 213. 

Maipara, river in Bengal, ix. 213. 

Mairwara. See Merwara. 

Maisaram, village near Haidarabad, 
Deccan, ix. 213. 

Maisur. See Mysore. 

Maitland, Lieut., dispersed the Larka 
Kols in Singhbhiim (1S20), xii. 533. 

Maize, or Indian corn, cultivated on 
Mount Abi'i, i. 7 ; in Afghanistan, i. 
38 ; Ajmere - ^Merwara, i. 125 ; Ali- 
Rajpur, i. 181 ; Ahvar, i. 205; Ambala, 
i. 220 ; Amjhera, i. 244 ; Amritsar, i. 
259 ; Andaman Islands, i. 286 ; Assam, 
i. 362 ; Azamgarh, i. 397 ; Bahraich, 
i. 430 ; Banda, ii. 51 ; Bannu, ii. 94; 
Benares, ii. 258 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 348 ; 
Bombay, iii. 54 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 
137 ; Bundi, iii. 159 ; Upper Burma, 
iii. 210 ; Cawnpur, iii. 285 ; Chamba, 
iii. 329 ; Champaran, iii. 341 ; Chitta- 
gong, iii. 439 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
iii. 450, 451 ; Danta, iv. iiS ; Dapila 
Hills, iv. 119; Darjiling, iv. 134; 
Delhi, iv. 182 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 
214 ; Dinajpur, iv. 294 ; Dungarpur, 
iv. 323 ; Etah, iv. 362 ; Faridpur, iv. 
403 ; P'arukhabad, iv. 413 ; P'atehpur 
Chaurasi, iv. 432 ; Firozpur, iv. 443 ; 
Gaya, v. 49 ; Gonda, v. 152 ; Goona, 
V. 159 ; Gujranwala, v. 1S4 ; Gujrat, 
v. 193 ; Gurdaspur, v. 21 1 ; Gwalior, 
V. 228 ; Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Hazara, 
V. 365 ; Hazaribagh, v. 375 ; Herat, 
v. 391; Hoshiarpur, v. 455:. Hugh, 
V. 494 ; Jaipur, vii. 52 ; Jalandhar, 
vii. 88 ; Jaunpur, vii. 155 ; "jessor, vii. 
187 ; Jhabua, vii. 195 ; J hang, vii. 
210 ; Kalsia, vii. 344 ; Kangra, vii. 
424 ; Kapurthala, vii. 443 ; Kashmir, 
viii. 72 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 177; Kistna, 
viii. 230 ; Kohat, viii. 247 : Korea, 
viii. 297 ; Kulu, viii. 342 ; Kumaiin, 
viii. 354 ; Lahore, viii. 410 ; Lakhim- 
pur, viii. 433 ; Lohardaga, viii. 483 ; 
. Lucknow, viii. 497 ; Ludhiana, viii. 
522; Madras, ix. 30; Maimansingh, 
ix, 195 ; Mainpuri, ix. 208 ; Maldah, 
ix. 244 ; Manbhum, ix. 283 ; Mandi, 
ix. 298; Manipur, ix. 331; Meerut, ix. 
387 ; Mohanpur, ix. 474 ; Monghyr, 
ix. 485 ; Naga Hills, x. 152 ; Nepal, 
X. 276, 277 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 377; 
Xowgong, X. 411 ; Oudh, x. 501 ; 
Panch Mahals, xi. 32 ; Patna, xi. loi ; 
Peshawar, xi. 153 ; Pishin, xi. 190 ; 
Punjab, xi. 278 ; Rajpur-Ali, xi. 394 ; 
Kajputana, xi. 418; Rajshahi, xi. 433 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 29; .Santal Parganas, 
xii. 232 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; Shahabad, 
xii. 329 ; Shahjahanpur, xii. 349 ; 
Sialkot, xii. 446 ; Sibsagar, xii. 466 ; 



Sikkim, xii. 4S6 ; Simla, xii. 493 ; 
Singhbhiim, xii. 537, 538 ; Sirohi, xiii. 
5 ; Sunth, xiii. 1 14 ; Tarai, xiii. 209 ; 
Udaipur, xiii. 402 ; Yusafzai, xiii. 558. 

Majhauli - Salimpur, village in N.-W. 
Provinces, ix. 213, 214. 

Majhaura, parganu in Oudh, ix. 214. 

Majhgaon. See Rajapur. 

Majithia, town in Punjab, ix. 214, 215. 

Majju Khan, mutineer leader, ruled in 
Moradabad imtil April 1858, when he 
was hanged, ix. 507. 

Majnun Khan, Akbar's general, took 
Kalinjar (1507), vii. 322. 

Makhad. See ^lokhad. 

Makhanpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 215. 

Makhi, town in Oudh, ix. 215. 

Makrai, petty State in Central Provinces, 
ix. 215. 

Maksudabad. See Murshidabad. 

Maksudangarh, petty State in Central 
India, ix. 215, 216. 

Makum, village in Assam, ix. 216 ; coal- 
beds, article ' India,' vi. 621. 

Makunda Ram, famous poet of Bardwan 
in the i6th century, story of Kalketu 
the hunter, article ' India,' vi. 350, 
351 ; the Srimanta Sadagar, 351. 

Makurti, peak in Madras, ix. 2l6. 

Malabar, District in Madras, ix. 216-235; 
derivation of name, 216, 217 ; jurisdic- 
tion, 217 ; physical aspects, 217-220 ; 
history, 220-224 ; population, 224-228 ; 
Christians, 228, 229 ; forests, 229 ; 
agriculture, 229-231; coffee and tea 



plantations, 231 ; land tenure, 231, 
232 ; natural calamities, 232 ; means 
of communication, 232, 233 ; manu- 
factures and trade, 233; administration, 
233, 234 ; medical aspects, 234, 235. 
Malabar Christians, legendary preaching 
of St. Thomns the Apostle on the 
Malabar and Coromandel coasts (68), 
article 'India,' vi. 229; Thomas the 
Manichrean and Thomas the Armenian 
merchant, their rival claims as founders 
of Christianity in Southern India, 231, 
232 ; troubles of the ancient Indian 
Church, 240; the St. Thomas Nestorian 
Christians of Malabar, a powerful and 
respected military caste, 240, 241 ; 
Portuguese efforts at their conversion 
to Rome, 241 ; incorporation of the 
St. Thomas Christians into the Roman 
Catholic Church, and downfall of the 
Nestorian Church, 241 ; Synod of 
Diamper (1599), 241 ; Malabar Chris- 
tians under Jesuit prelates (1601 to 
1653), 241, 242 ; Malabar Christians 
freed from Jesuit supremacy by the 
Dutch conquest of Cochin (1563), 242 ; 
first Jacobite Bishop of Malabar (1655), 



204 



INDEX. 



242, 243 ; Malabar Christians since 
1665, their division into Syrians and 
Jacobites, and present numbers, 243 ; 
tenets of the Jacobites of Malabar, 
243 ; Nestorianism extinct in Malabar, 

243, 244 ; the Jesuit Malabar Mission 
in the 17th and i8th centuries, 251 ; 
caste among Malabar Christians, 251, 
252 ; letters of the Jesuit missionaries 
of Malabar, 252. 

Malabar navigable back - waters or 

lagoons, vi. 553. 
Malachite, found in Balaghat, i. 456. 
Malagarh, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

235. 236. 

Malaikudis, aboriginal tribe in S. Kanara, 

vii. 376, 379- 
Malai-soh-mat, petty State in Assam, ix. 

236. 
Malancha, estuary in Bengal, ix. 236. 
Malangarh, hill fortress in Bombay, ix. 

236, 237. 

Malapuram, town in Madras, ix. 237. 

Malassers, aboriginal tribe in Madras, 
ix. 237 ; in the Anamalai Hills, i. 
270 ; in Coimbatore, iv. 17. 

Malaun, hill fort in Punjab, ix. 237. 

Malayagoii, peak in Orissa, ix. 237. 

Malayalis, tribe in Madras, ix. 237-240. 
Local notices — In North Arcot, i. 
315; South Arcot, i. 322; Kalrayan 
Mountains, vii. 343 ; Kollamalai Hills, 
viii. 286 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 383. 

Malcolm, Sir John, his speech on opening 
carriage road over the Bhor Ghat, ii. 
407; Peshwa surrendered to him {181 8), 
iii. 39; Governor of Bombay (1830), 
iii. 75, 76 ; had his head-quarters at 
Harda (1817), v. 320; established 
sanitarium at Mahabaleshwar (1820), 
ix. 142 ; tamed the Bhils in Malwa, ix. 
267 ; made summer residence in ruins 
of Nalchha, x. 182; persuaded Sindia 
to withdraw from Sunth (1819), xiii. 

115- 

Malcolmpet. See Mahabaleshwar. 

Maldah, District in Bengal, ix. 240-248 ; 
physical aspects, 240 ; history, 241, 
242 ; population, 242, 243 ; urban 
and rural population, 243 ; material 
condition of the people, 243, 244 ; 
manufactures, 245-247 ; administration, 
247, 248 ; medical aspects, 248. 

Maldah or Old Maldah, town in Bengal, 
ix. 248. 

Maldive Islands, in Indian Ocean, in 
political connection with Ceylon, ix. 
248-252; people, 250, 251 ; produc- 
tions, 251 ; trade, 251, 252; govern- 
ment, 252 ; language, 252 ; climate, 
252 ; channels, 252. 

Malegaon, town and Sub-division in 
Bombay, ix. 253. 



Maleks, converted Hindu class in Broach, 

iii. 103. 
Maler Kotla, Native State in Punjab, ix. 
254, 255 ; history, 254, 255 ; popula- 
tion, etc., 255 ; products, administra- 
tion, etc., 255. 
Maler Kotla, chief town of State in 

Punjab, ix. 255, 256. 
Males, Proportion of. Sec Population 

section of each District article. 
Malet, Hugh, first called attention to 
Matheran Hill as a sanitarium, ix. 362. 
Maletirike-betta, hill in Coorg, ix. 256. 
Malgin, salt-mine in Punjab, ix. 256. 
Malhargarh, town in Central India, ix. 

256. 
Malia, Native State in Bombay, ix. 256. 
Malia, town in Kathiawar, ix. 257. 
Malihabad, town, tahsil, and pargatid in 

Oudh, ix. 257. 
Malik Ambar or Sidi Ambar, Abyssinian, 
founded Aurungabad (1610), his tomb 
at Roza, i. 387, 388 ; held Berar (1605- 
28), iii. 124 ; his assessment of Berar, 
v. 262. 
Malik Fateh Khan Tiwana, seized Tank, 

but expelled by Daulat Rai, xiii. 197. 
Malik Ibn Dinar, his great mosque at 

Srikundapuram, xiii. 75. 
Malik Naib Kafur, slave-general of Ala- 
ud-din (1303-15), his conquest of 
Southern India, article ' India,' vi. 
282. Local 7iotices — Twice captured 
Deogiri (Daulatabad), iv. 159; took 
Goa^ v. 100 ; sacked Dwaravati-pura, 
capital of the Ballalas, v. 346 ; occupied 
Madura, ix. 122 ; his attacks on the 
Chola dynasty, xiii. 181 ; took Waran- 
gal, xiii. 521. 
Malik Sarwar Kwaja, Wazir of Muham- 
mad Tughlak, founded the Sharki 
dynasty of Jaunpur (1388), vii. 152. 
Malik Sohrab Baluchi, first Baluchi in- 
vader of Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 210 ; 
founded the Hot dynasty (15th century), 
iv. 221. 
Malimbi-betta, mountain in Coorg, ix. 

258. 
Malinagar, town in Bengal, ix. 258. 
Malipur. See Malapuram. 
Mails, agricultural caste in Broach, iii. 

103. 
Ma-H-won, Sub-division in Burma, ix. 

258. 
Maliyas, hill tract in Madras, jx. 258. 
Malkangiri, tdhik in Madras, ix. 258. 
Malkapur, tdhik in Berar, ix. 258, 259. 
Malkapur, town in Berar, ix. 259, 260. 
Mallai, town in Bengal, ix. 260. 
Mallangur, hill fort in Deccan, ix. 260. 
Mallani, sandy tract in Rajputana, ix. 

260, 261. 
Mallanpur, town in Oudh, ix. 261. 



INDEX. 



205 



Mallanwan, town and pargand in Oudh, 
ix. 262, 263. 

Malleson, Col., History of the French in 
India, and Final Struggles of the 
French in India, quoted, vi. 379 (foot- 
note). 

Mallet, Mr., his report on the mineral 
wealth of Darjiling, iv. 137. 

Mallia. See Malia. 

Malligaon, town in Deccan, ix. 263. 

Mallis, garden cultivators in Hazara, v. 

365- 
Malnipahar, hot spring in Bengal, ix. 263. 

Maloji Bhonsla, grandfather of Sivaji, 
had Poona granted to him (1604), xi. 
212 ; and Purandhar, xi. 298 ; and 
.Shivner (1599), where Sivaji was born, 
xii. 410. 

Malondi, town in Bombay, ix. 263. 

Malot, ancient ruins in Punjab, ix. 263. 

Malpur, Native State and town in Bom- 
bay, ix. 263, 264. 

Malpura, town in Rajputana, ix. 264. 

Malsian, town in Punjab, ix. 264. 

Malsiras, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, ix. 264, 265. 

Maltby, Edward, acting Governor of 
Madras (1863), ix. 67. 

Malthon, town in Central Provinces, ix. 
265. 

Malur, village and taluk in Mysore, ix. 

265, 266. 

Malur, village in Mysore, ix. 266. 
Malvilli, town and taluk in Mysore, ix. 

266. 
Malwa, Province in Central India, ix. 

266, 267. 

Malwa Agency, Western, group of Native 
States in Central India, ix. 267-272 ; 
physical aspects, 268 ; geology, 268, 

269 ; population, agriculture, etc., 269, 

270 ; communications, trade relations, 
etc., 270-272. 

Malwan, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, ix. 272, 273. 
Mamdot, fortified town in Punjab, ix. 

273, 274. 
Mammalia of India, vi. 652-659. See 

also Animals, Wild. 
Man, Sub-division in Bombay, ix. 274. 
Mana, pass in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 274. 
Managoli, town in Bombay, ix. 274. 
Mana im Khan, defeated Daud Khan, 

last Afghan king of Bengal, and died 

at Gaur (i575)> v. 36, 37. 
Manantavadi, town in Madras, ix. 274. 
Manapad Point, promontory in Madras, 

ix. 275. 
Manar Gulf, arm of the sea between 

S. India and Ceylon, ix. 275, 276. 
Manas, river in Assam, ix. 276. 
Manasa, town in Central India, ix. 276. 
Manasabal, lake in Kashmir, ix. 276. 



Manasarowar, sacred lake in Tibet, ix. 

276, 277. 
Manaung. See Cheduba. 
Mana Vikrama, first Zamorin of Calicut, 

iii. 269. 
Manawadar, town in Bombay, ix. 277. 
Manawao, petty State in Kathiawar, ix. 

277- 

Manbhins or Manbhaus, Hindu seel 
bound to celibacy, in Akola, i. 143 ; 
Berar, v. 267; head-quarters at Ritpur, 
xii. 58. 

Manbhum, District in Bengal, ix. 277- 
286 ; physical aspects, 277-279 ; ad- 
ministrative history, 279 ; population, 
279 - 282 ; material condition of the 
people, 282 ; agriculture, 282, 283 ; 
natural calamities, 283, 284 ; com- 
merce, trade, etc., administration, 284- 
286 ; medical aspects, 286. 

Manchenhalli, village in Mysore, ix. 286. 

Manchester cotton imports, article 
' India,' vi. 565, 568. 

Manchhar, lake in Bombay, ix. 286, 
287. 

Manda, village in Bengal, ix. 287, 

Mandal, town in Bombay, ix. 287. 

Mandal, town in Rajputana, ix. 287. 

Mandalay, capital of Upper Burma, ix. 
287-291 ; trade and manufactures, ix. 
289-291 ; administration, 291; medical 
aspects, 291. 

Mandalgarh, fort in Rajputana, ix. 291. 

Mandapeta, town in Madras, ix. 291, 292. 

Mandar, hill in Bengal, ix. 292. 

Mandaripur. See Madaripur. 

Mandasa, town in Madras, ix. 292. 

Mandawar, historic town in N.-\V. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 292, 293. 

Mandesar. See Mandsaur. 

Mandgaon, town in Central Provinces, 
ix. 293. 

Mandhata, island in Central Provinces, 
ix. 293-297. 

Mandi, Native State in Punjab, ix. 297- 
299 ; physical aspects, 297 ; history, 
297, 298 ; population, 298 ; products, 
climate, administration, etc., 298, 299. 

Mandi, town in Punjab, ix. 299. 

Mandiaon, town in Oudh, ix. 299. 

Mandla, District in Central Provinces, 
ix. 299-307 ; physical aspects, 299- 
301 ; history, 301 - 303 ; population, 
303, 304 ; division into town and 
country, 304 ; occupations, 304 ; agri- 
culture, 304, 305 ; commerce and 
trade, 305, 306 ; administration, 306 ; 
medical aspects, 306, 307. 

Mandla, town and tahsil in Central 
Provinces, ix. 307. 

Mandladai, hill in Central Provinces, ix. 

307- ^ 
Mandlana. See Mundlana. 



2o6 



INDEX. 



Mandlesar, town in Central India, ix. 

Mandogarh, historic town in Central 

India, ix. 308, 309. See also Malwa. 
Mandor, historic town in Rajputana, ix. 

309- 

Mandot. See Mamdot. 

Mandra, town in Rajputana, ix. 309. 

Mandrak, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

309- 
Mandsaur, town in Central India, ix. 

309- 

Mandu. See Mandogarh. 

Mandu Mahal Sirgira, estate in Central 

Provinces, ix. 309, 310. 
Mandurda, town in Kathiawar, ix. 310. 
Mandvi, seaport in Bombay, ix. 310. 
Mandvi, Sub-division in Bombay, ix. 

310,311. 
Mandvi, town in Bombay, ix. 31 1. 
Mandwa, petty State in Boml^ay, ix. 

3"- 

Mandwa, seaport in Bombay, ix. 311. 

Mandya, village and taluk in Mysore, ix. 

3"- 

Maner, town in Bengal, ix. 311. 

Manerang, mountain pass in Kashmir, 
ix. 311, 312. 

Mangahpett, town in Deccan, ix. 312. 

Mangal, petty Hill State in Punjab, ix. 
312. 

Mangalagiri, town in Madras, ix. 312. 

Mangaldai, village and Sub-division in 
Assam, ix. 312. 

Mangalkot, village in Bengal, ix. 313. 

Mangalore, taluk in Madras, ix. 313. 

Mangalore, chief town of S. Kanara Dis- 
trict, Madras, ix. 313, 314. 

Mangalsi, /arfa«« in Oudh, ix. 314. 

Mangalvedha, town in Bombay, ix. 314, 

315- 

Manganese, found in Bellary, ii. 241 ; 
Lower Burma, iii. 201 ; Madras Presi- 
dency, ix. 6 ; Mergui, ix. 407 ; Sandiir 
Hills, xii. 209. 

Mangaon, village and Sub-division in 
Bombay, ix. 315, 316. 

Manglaur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
316. 

Mangles, Mr. Ross, his gallantry in the 
attempt to relieve Arrah, iv. 300, xi. 

98- 

Mangoes, specially mentioned in Akot, 

i. 147; Alibagh, i. 166; Aligarh, i. 
168; Alipur (C. P.), i. 181; Allah- 
abad, i. 190; Ambala, i. 215 ; Arang, 
i. 306 ; North Arcot, i. 316 ; Asoha, 
i. 341; Azamgarh, i. 393 ; Bachhrawan, 
i. 405 ; Bagrasi, i. 420 ; Bahraich, i. 
434 ; Bailgaon, i. 437 ; Ballia, ii. 19 ; 
Bara Banki, ii. 106 ; Bardwan, ii. 126; 
Bareilly, ii. 138 ; Barwa Sagar, ii. 181; 
Basim, ii. 184; Belgaum, ii. 231, 238; 



Bhagalpur, ii. 343 ; Bhakkar, ii. 358 ; 
Bhangha, ii. 369 ; Bhitauli, ii. 399 ; 
Bilaspur, ii. 445 ; Birhar, iii. 12 ; 
Bombay Island, iii. 81 ; Broach, iii. 
102; Budaun, iii. 116; Biirha, iii. 
162 ; Upper Burma, iii. 210 ; Calicut, 
iii. 269 ; Cambay, iii. 271 ; Chang 
Bhakar, iii. 367 ; Chengalpat, iii. 382 ; 
Chhindwara, iii. 399; Cuttack, iv. 65 ; 
Darbhangah, iv. 122; Deoria, iv. 206; 
DeraGhazi Khan, iv. 218 ; Dinanagar, 
iv. 299 ; Diingarpur, iv. 323 ; Edar, 
iv- 337 ; Elephanta, iv. 341 ; Ellich- 
pur, iv. 344, 345 ; Erandol, iv. 355 ; 
Faizabad, iv. 381 ; Fakhrpur, iv. 390; 
Faridpur (N.-W. P.), iv. 408 ; Fateh- 
pur, iv. 423 ; Gangoh, iv. 477 ; 
Ghatampur, v. 57 ; Goa, v. 93 ; 
Godavari, v. 122 ; Gonda, v. 145 ; 
Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Hanthawadi, v. 
315 ; Hariana, v. 338 ; Hoshiarpur, v. 
452 ; Islamnagar, vii. 27 ; Jais, vii. 
65 ; Jalparguri, vii. 108 ; Jambusar, 
vii. 123 ; Jarcha, vii. 143 ; Jaunpur, 
vii. 151; Kaimahra, vii. 296; Kaim- 
ganj, vii. 298 ; North Kanara, vii. 372; 
Kangra, vii. 412 ; Kanhargaon, vii. 
431 ; Kantha, vii. 437 ; Karachi, vii. 
452 ; Karanja, vii. 466 ; Karnal, viii. 
19 ; Bhaunagar in Kathiawar, viii. 89; 
Katoria, viii. 100 ; Khairpur, viii. 136; 
Khandesh, viii. 149 ; Khandpara, viii. 
160; Kheri, viii. 190; Kwa, viii. 382; 
Lahore, viii. 404, 410 ; Larkhana, viii. 
463 ; Madras, ix. 29, 30 ; Mainpuri, 
ix. 202 ; Maldah, ix. 240, 244 ; Mani- 
pur, ix. 331 ; Mauranwan, ix. 374 ; 
Meerut, ix. 382 ; Mitauli, ix. 467 ; 
Mithankot, ix. 468 ; Moradabad, ix. 
504 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 57 ; Nagi'na, 
X. 159 ; Nagpur, x. 164, 165 ; Nar- 
singhpur, x. 217; the Nicobar Islands, 
X. 295 ; Nimar, x. 333 ; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, x. 380, 381 ; Nuzvid, x. 420; 
Oudh, X. 482 ; Palni Mountains, xi. 
19; Panch Mahals, xi. 30; Partabgarh, 
xi. 68 ; Patan (Bombay), xi. 81 ; 
Pendra, xi. 132; Pilibhit, xi. 170; 
Punjab, xi. 259 ; Puri, xi. 301 ; Rai 
Bareli, xi. 352 ; Rangoon, xi. 478 ; 
Ranipet, xi. 509 ; Ratanpur, xi. 517 ; 
Ratnagiri, xii. 3 : Rewa Kantha, xii. 
49 ; Rudrapur, xii. 81 ; Salon, xii. 
168 ; Sambalpur, xii. 178, 185 ; Santal 
Parganas, xii. 234 ; Saran, xii. 251 ; 
Satara, xii. 277 ; Saurath, xii. 292 ; 
Sawantwari, xii. 296 ; Shahabad, xii. 
323 ; Shalamar Gardens, xii. 374 ; 
Sholapur, xii. 412 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; 
Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30, 39 ; 
Sukkur, xiii. 91 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 97 ; 
Surat, xiii. 119; Tanda, xiii. 174; 
Tanjore, xiii. 188 ; Tasgaon, xiii. 216 ; 



INDEX. 



207 



Tavoy, xiii. 232; Tipperah, xiii. 313; 

Tumsar, xiii. 382; Umargarh, xiii. 419 ; 

Umrer,xiii. 423; Unao,xiii. 436; Upper 

Sind P'rontier, xiii. 446 ; Utraula, xiii. 

458; Walwa, xiii. 516; Wardha, xiii. 

523; Wari, xiii. 531 ; Wun, xiii. 546. 
Mangoli. Sec Managoli. 
Mangor, fortified village in Central India, 

ix. 316. 
Mangrol, town and seaport in Kathiavvar, 

ix. 316, 317. 
Mangrol, town in Rajputana, ix. 317. 
Mangrota, town in Punjab, ix. 317. 
Mangrove trees, in Akyab, i. 149 ; 

Andaman Islands, i. 283 ; Bassein, ii. 

193 ; Chittagong, iii. 433 ; Cutch, iv. 

58; Elephanta, iv. 341 ; Hanthawadi, 

V. 313; Hlaing, V. 436; Janjira, vii. 

138 ; Karumbhar, viii. 50 ; Kyaiik- 

pyii, viii. 390 ; Madras, ix. 83 ; Ma-li- 

won, ix. 258 ; Maskhal Island, ix. 351 ; 

Mergui, ix. 407 ; Nawanagar, x. 252 ; 

Nizampatam, x. 338 ; Rangoon, xi. 

473 ; Sandoway, xii. 200 ; on the 

Savitri river, xii. 295 ; Shahbandar, 

xii. 339 ; Sind, xii. 506 ; Thon-gwa, 

xiii. 288. 
Mangrul, townand^a7z<,C'inBerar, ix. 317, 
Mangriil Pir, town in Berar, ix. 317. 
Mangul Pande, the first mutineer at 

Barrackpur (1857), ii. 176. 
'Man-hunts' of Muhammad Tughlak, 

article ' India,' vi. 284, 285. 
Maniar, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

317. 318. 
Maniari, river in Central Provinces, ix. 

318. 
Manierkhal. See Monierkhal. 
Manikapur, /a;'^rt;;a in Oudh, ix. 318. 
Manikar Char, village in Assam, ix. 318, 

319- 
Manikganj, town and Sub-division in 

Bengal, ix. 319. 
Manikiala, village and ruins in Punjab, 

ix. 319, 320. 
Manikpur, town and pargand in Oudh, 

ix. 320, 321. 
Manikpur, village in N.-W. Provinces, 

ix. 321, 322. 
Manikwara, town in Bombay, ix. 322. 
Mani IMajra, town in Punjab, ix. 322. 
Manipur, Native State in N.-E. India, 

ix. 322-334 ; physical aspects, 323-326; 

history, 326-328; population, 328-331 ; 

communications, 331, 332; commerce, 

332 ; administration, 332, 333 ; medical 

aspects, 333, 334. 
Manipuris, aboriginal tribe, in Assam, i. 

351 ; Cachar, iii. 325; Hill Tipperah, 

V. 399; Lakhimpur, viii. 431 ; Lakhi- 

pur, viii. 440 ; Manipur, ix. 328-331 ; 

Prome, xi. 230; Sylhet, xiii. 150. 
Maniadikara, town in Madras, ix. 334. 



Manjarabad, taluk in Mysore, ix. 334. 
Manjeri, town in Madras, ix. 335. 
Manjhand, town and taluk in Bombay, 

ix. 335- 
Manjhanpur, town and iahsil in N.-W. 

Provinces, ix. 335, 336. 
Manjhi, town in Bengal, ix. 336. 
Manjhia, town in Oudh, ix. 336. 
Manjira, old village site in Berar, ix. 336. 
Mankapur. See Manikapur. 
Mankapur, town in Oudh, ix. 336. 
Mankera, village in Punjab, ix. 336, 

337- 
Mankur, town in Bengal, ix. 337. 
Manmad, town in Bombay, ix. 337. 
Mann, Dr., quoted, on the physiognomy 

of the Santals, xii. 239, 240 ; on the 

Chins, xiii. 281. 
Mannargudi, town and taluk in Madras, 

ix- 337, 338. 
Manning, one of the three Englishmen 

who have crossed the Himalayas east 

of the Mariamla Pass, v. 406 ; on the 

waters of Lake Palti, v. 407. 
Manohar, fort in Bombay, ix. 338. 
Manoli, town in Bombay, ix. 338. 
Manora, cape in Sind, ix. 338, 339. 
Manori, fort in Sind, ix. 339. 
Man-oung. See Cheduba. 
Manpur, pargand in Central India, ix. 

339. 340- 

Mansa, petty State in Bombay, ix. 340. 

Mansa, town in Bombay, ix. 340. 

Mansahra, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 340. 

Mansahra, town in Punjab, ix. 341. 

Man Singh, Akbar's Hindu general, and 
Governor of Bengal, article 'India,' 
vi. 293. Local notices — Commenced 
palace at Amber (1600), i. 226; gave 
1000 temples to Benares in one day, 
ii. 265; Governor of Bengal (1589- 
1606), ii. 278 ; collected troops for the 
invasion of Orissa at Bhagalpur, ii. 352 ; 
built the great temple at Brindaban, 
iii. 100 ; built palace at Gwalior, v. 
235 ; the adopted son of Bhagwan Das 
of Jaipur, vii. 55 ; defeated and took 
prisoner Pratapaditya, Raja of the 
Sundarbans, vii. 184; made Rajmahal 
capital of Bengal (1592), xi. 390; 
made Rohtasgarh his stronghold, xii. 
78 ; said to have built a palace at Sher- 
pur in Bogra, xii. 381. 

Man Singh, Raja of Jodhpur, his policy 
and history, vii. 241, 242. 

Manson, Mr., Commissioner of Maratha 
country, murdered by the mutineer 
Baba Sahib (1857), x. 211. 

Mansurnagar, /ar^a«(i in Oudh, ix. 341, 
342. 

Mantrala Kanama, pass in Madras, ix. 
342. 

Mantreswar, village in Bengal, ix. 342. 



208 



INDEX. 



Manu, the legendary founder of Sanskrit 
law, article 'India,' vi. 113, 114. 

Manufactures and arts. See Arts and 
Manufactures, and also the special 
section in each District article, and 
such headings as Brass-ware, Cotton- 
weaving, Iron -ware, Mats, Muslins, 
. Pottery, and Silk-weaving. 

Manure, Use of, article ' India,' vi. 483 ; 
want of, a drawback to improved hus- 
bandry, 5 1 8. 6Vt' also the Agricultural 
section of each District article. 

Manwan, village and pargaiid in Oudh, 
ix. 342. 

Mao-beh-larkar, village in Assam, ix. 343. 

Mao-don, petty State in Assam, ix. 343. 

Mao-iong, petty State in Assam, ix. 343. 

Mao-phlang, mountain plateau in Assam, 

ix. 343- 
Mao-san-ram, petty State in Assam, ix. 

343- 
Mao-thad-rai-shan, mountain range in 

Assam, ix. 343. 
Mappillas. See Moplas. 
Mapusa, town in Portuguese territory, 

ix. 343, 344. 
Marahra, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

344- 

!Marakans, sea-water fishermen in Cochin, 
iv. 4. 

Mara-marnai, river in Assam, ix. 344. 

Marang Baru, hill in Bengal, ix. 344. 

Maratha power, The (1634-1818), article 
'India,' vi. chap. xii. pp. 317-324. 
British India won, not from theMughals, 
but from the Hindus, 317 ; rise of the 
Marathas, Shahji Bhonsla, 317; Sivaji, 
the consolidator of the Maratha power, 

317 ; state of parties in the Deccan 
(1650), 318; the Marathas courted by 
the two rival Muhammadan powers, 

318 ; Sivaji's hill forts, army of horse, 
tactics, etc., 319; his murder of the 
Bijapur general Akbar Khan, 319 ; 
coins money in his own name, 319 ; 
visits Delhi (1666), 319; enthrones 
himself as an independent prince at 
Raigarh (1674), 319; death (1680), 

319 ; Aurangzeb's mistaken policy in 
the Deccan, 319 ; Sambhaji and Sahu, 
successors of Sivaji, 319 ; the Satara 
and Kolhapur families, the last of 
Sivaji's line, 320 ; rise and progress of 
the Peshwas, 320 ; second Peshwa 
(1721-40) invades the Deccan, 320; 
third Peshwa (1740-61), conquests in 
the Deccan, and raids from Bengal to 
the Punjab, 320, 321 ; defeat of the 
Marathas by Ahmad Shah the Afghan 
(1 761), 321 ; fourth Peshwa (1761-72), 
321 ; the five great Maratha branches, 
321 ; fifth Peshwa (1772), his assassina- 
tion, 321 ; decline of the Peshwas 



(1772-78), 321, 322; the northern 
Marathas, vSindhia and Holkar (1761- 
1803), 322 ; the Bhonslas of Berar 
(1751-53), 322; the Gaekwars of 
Baroda, 322, 323 ; the sixth and 
seventh Peshwas (1774-1818), and the 
three Maratha wars, 323, 324 ; end of 
the Peshwas (1849), 324. Local notices 
—Held Agra (1770-74, 1784-87, 1788- 
1803), i. 69, 70 ; in Ahmadabad, i. 84 ; 
Ahmadnagar, i. 108 ; took Ajaigarh 
(1800), i. 112 ; in Akola, i. 142; their 
battle with the Nizam there, i. 146 ; 
in Aligarh, i. 170; Allahabad, i. 187; 
Alwar, i. 204; North Arcot, i. 313; 
Banda, ii. 48 ; Bardwan, ii. 127, 128 ; 
defeated in the Barmiil Pass (1803), 
ii. 157 ; Basim, ii. 184, 185 ; took Bas- 
sein (Wasai), ii, 191 ; in Bellary, ii. 
242 ; Bilaspur, ii. 446 ; plundered 
Broach (1675-86), iii. 113, exacted 
chaiiih in Berar (1671), which was 
granted to them (1717), iii. 144; 
plundered Burhanpur (1685), iii. 164; 
in Central India, iii. 294 ; Central 
Provinces, iii. 302 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48 ; 
defeated Nawab of Cuddapah (1757), 
iv. 49 ; in Damoh, iv. 109 ; at Delhi 
(1726, 1771), iv. 193; tookDeori(i74i), 
iv. 206 ; Dharwar (1753, 1791), iv. 266 ; 
Dholka (1736), iv. 272; in Etawah, 
iv. 371 ; occupied Fatehpur (1736-50), 
iv. 424; took Ghorbandar 11737), v. 
75; held Gingi (1677-98), v. 83, 84; 
their incursions to Goa, v. 104, 105 ; 
in Godavari District (1753), v. 124; 
held Gooty (1714-76), v. 160; their 
intervention in Haidarabad, v. 249 ; 
war with Nizam AH, v. 251 ; plunder- 
ing of Berar, v. 263 ; conquered 
Orchha and Jhansi (1742), vii. 218; 
made Kalpi their head - quarters in 
Bundelkhand, vii. 342 ; held Kalyan 
(1648-60, 1662-1780), vii. 347 ; Karanja 
Island (1737-74), vii. 467 ; and Karnala 
hill fort (1740-1818), viii. 30; their 
dealings with Karwar, viii. 54, 55 ; 
their rule over Kathiawar, viii. 91 ; 
defeated by All Vardi Khan at Katwa, 
viii. 102; inKhandesh(i76o-i8iS),viii, 
153 ; defeated the Nizam at Kharda 
(1795)1 ■viii- 166; reduced Lakhnauti 
(1794), viii. 441 ; sacked Madgiri 
(1774, I79l),viii. 540; attacked Madras 
(1741), ix. 103; held Mahuli (1670- 
1817), ix. 187; overran Malwa (1737), 
ix. 267 ; plundered Manikpur (1760), 
ix. 321 ; defeated at Mehidpur (1817), 
ix. 398 ; sacked Nagamangala (1792), 
X. 154; in Nimar, x. 330; the N.-W. 
Provinces, x. 366, 367 ; Orissa, x. 430, 
431 ; their defeat at Panipat (1761), 
xi. 45-47 ; their rise to power, xi. 204 ; 



INDEX. 



209 



in Kaipur, xi. 369 ; Rajputana, xi. 
406, 407 ; defeated at Ramghat, xi. 
449 ; defeated Safdar Khan at Ratan- 
pur (1705), xi. 516; in Ratnagiri, 
xii. 6 ; defeated Haidar AH at Ratti- 
halli (1764), xii. 14 ; in .Saharanpur, 
xii. 116, 117 ; held Salsette (1739-74), 
xii. 169; in Sambalpur, xii. 179, 180; 
Sarguja, xii. 267 ; Satara, xii. 277, 
278 ; ravaged .Shaikhawati (1754), xii. 
372 ; surprised the British at Shikoh- 
abad (1802), xii. 398; defeated Tipu's 
troops at .Shimoga (1791), xii. 406; 
in .Sholapur, xii. 412 ; defeated by 
Saadat Khan at Sikandarabad (1736), 
xii. 478 ; at Sinhgarh, xii. 543, 544 ; 
and Sira, xii. 546 ; their raids on Surat, 
xiii. 122 ; conquest of Tanjore, xiii. 
182, 194; ravages in Udaipur, xiii. 
405-407; took Vellore (1676), xiii. 
467 ; in Wun, xiii. 540. 

' I\Iaratha Ditch,' The, moat constructed 
partly round Calcutta as a protection 
against the Marathas, article 'India,' 
vi. 320, 321 ; iii. 241. 

Maratha wars. The first (1778-81), article 
' India,' vi. 323 ; 391. Local notices — 
The treaty of Salbai, iii. 38 ; the re- 
treat from Talegaon Dabhara (1779), 
xiii. 166 ; convention of Wadgaon 
(1779), xiii. 505. The second (1802-04), 
article ' India,' vi. 39S. Local notices — 
The battle of Argaum, i. 329 ; Assaye, 
i- 374> 375 ; treaty of Bassein (1802), 
ii. 192 ; its history, iii. 38 ; storm of 
Gawilgarh, v. 43 ; war with Holkar, 
vii. 6. The third and last, annexation of 
the Peshwa's dominions (1818), article 
' India,' vi. 323 ; 402. Local notices — 
Its histoiy, iii. 39 ; battles of Mehid- 
pur, vii. 6: Kirki, viii. 121; Korigaum, 
viii. 298, 299. 

Marathi literature and authors, article 
' India,' vi. 346. 

Mara Tista, river in Bengal, ix. 344. 

-Marble-carving, article ' India,' vi. 112. 
See Stone cutting and carving. 

Marble for building, article ' India,' vi. 
628. Local notices — Found or quarried 
at Mount Abu, i. 4 ; Alwar, i. 203 ; 
Upper Burma, iii. 211, 218; Khavda 
in Cutch, iv. 60; Danta, iv. 118; 
Jabalpurj vii. 31 ; Jaipur, vii. 51, 52 ; 
Jehlam, vii. 167 ; Jodhpur, vii. 237 ; 
Nawanagar, x. 252 ; Nepal, x. 278 ; 
Palnad, xi. 16 ; Patiala, xi. 87 ; Maneri 
in Yusufzai, xi. 146 ; Rajputana, xi. 
402 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Rewa 
Kantha, xii. 49 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ; 
Taung-ngu, xiii. 221 ; Trichinopoli, 
xiii. 355; Wankaner, xiii. 518. 

Marco Polo, by Colonel Yule, quoted, 
article 'India,' vi. 152 (footnote i); 
VOL. XIV. 



231 (footnote i) ; 233 (footnotes i and 
3) ; 237 (footnote 4) ; 239 (footnote 3) ; 
356 (footnote). Local notices — On the 
Andaman Isles, i. 283 ; the kingdom 
of Anumakonda, i. 294; Bengala, ii. 
269 ; Cambay, iii. 274 ; the cave 
dwellings oa the Hindu Kush, v. 
417; Kayal, viii. 107; Kistna District, 
viii. 227 ; the name Malabar, ix. 217 : 
Motupalli, ix. 521, 522 ; Sendarbandi 
Pandya, king of Madura, xi. 42 ; 
Quilon, xi. 339 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 
308. 

Marble rocks. See Bheraghat. 

Mardan, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 344, 345. 

Mardan. See Hoti-mardan. 

Mardan Singh, Raja of Bhanpur, mu- 
tinied, and defeated by Rose at 
Barodia Naunagar (1858), xii. 103. 

Margao, town in Portuguese territory, 
ix. 345- 

Margary, Mr., murdered (1875) ii^ trying 
to open a trade route between China 
and Burma, iii. 228. 

Margram, town in Bengal, ix. 345. 

Mar, Gregoiy, first Jacobite Bishop of 
the Syrian Church in India, vi. 242, 

243- 
Mariadeh, village in Central Provinces, 

ix. 345. 346. 
Mariahu, town and M/i^// in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 346. 
Mariao, petty State in Assam, ix. 346. 
Marias, aboriginal tribe in the Central 

Provinces, article 'India,' vi. 55. 

Local notices — Central Provinces, iii. 

307 ; Kotapalli, viii. 309. 
Marias, The, tribe in Assam, i. 358, ix. 

346. 
Marine, The Bombay, iii. 67, 68. 
Maris, aboriginal tribe in the Central 

Provinces, iv. 53, iii. 307. 
]\Iarja, pass in Punjab, ix. 347. 
Marjata, estuary in Bengal, ix. 347. 
Markandi, village in Central Provinces. 

ix. 347- 

Markapur, taluk in jMadras, ix. 347. 

Markham, Mr. Clements R., introduced 
cinchona into the Nilgiri Hills (i860), 
ix. 34, X. 316 ; on the passes from 
Sikkim into Tibet, xii. 483, 484. 

jNIarlborough, Earl of, sent with a fleet to 
take possession of Bombay, iii. 37. 

iMarmagao, peninsula, village, and port 
inJPortuguese territory, ix. 347, 348. 

Marmots, in Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Ladakh, 
viii. 397. 

Marochetti, his sculptured angel on the 
well at Cawnpur, iii. 291, 292. 

Maroli, port in Bombay, ix. 348. 

Marpha, historic fort in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 348. 

IMarri. See Murree. 



2IO 



INDEX. 



Marriage ceremonies and customs of the 
Kadava Kunbis, i. S6, xiii. 437, 438 ; 
the Arakan Hill tribes, i. 301 ; the 
Baluchis, ii. 38; the Kurkus, ii. 331 ; 
in Bhandara, ii. 363 ; of the Bhilalas 
and Bhils, ii. 391 ; of the Burmese, iii. 
180 ; of the Karens and Chins, iii. 181 ; 
of the Gonds, iii. 311 ; of the Deori 
Chutiyas, iii. 467 ; of the Coorgs, iv. 
35 ; of the Daphlas, iv. 1 19 ; of the 
Mechs, iv. 332 ; of the Garos, v. 29 ; 
of the Juangs, vii. 252 ; of the Kandhs, 
vii. 403 ; of the Kangra tribes, vii. 
421, 422; of the Karens, viii. 4; of 
the Khasis, viii. 175 ; of the Kols, viii. 
257, 258 ; of the Kotas, viii. 301 ; of 
the Ladakhis, viii. 398 ; of the Bhils of 
Mahi Kantha, ix. 178; of the Nairs, 
ix. 227, 228, xiii. 348 ; of the Malay- 
alis, ix. 238, 239 ; in Manipur, ix. 330 ; 
of the Meos, ix. 419; of the Mikirs, 
ix. 437, 438 ; of the Miris, ix. 444 ; of 
the Rengma Nagas, x. 148 ; of the 
Xicobarians, x. 296 ; of the Koravars, 
xi. 17, 18; of the Rewa Kantha Bhils, 
xii. 52 ; of the Kolis, xii. 53 ; of the 
Santals, xii. 243, 244 ; of the Hos or 
Larka Kols, xii. 537 ; of the Chins, 
xiii. 281, 282 ; of the Banjaras and 
Gonds in Wiin, xiii. 541, 542. 
Marriage law of the Hindus, article 

' India,' vi. 195, 196. 
Marriott, Col., deposed Muzaffar Jang 
(1815), and placed his brother on 
throne of Karniil, viii. 42. 
Mam's, a tribe in Baluchistan, ii. 29 ; 

infesting the Bolan pass, iii. 35. 
Marsaghai, town in Bengal, ix. 349. 
INIarshall, Gen., took Dhamoni (1818), 
iv. 240 ; Hathras, v. 355 ; and Mandla, 
ix. 303. 
Marshes, jhih or bih, in Allahabad, i. 
186 ; Azamgarh, i. 392, 393 ; Bakar- 
ganj, i. 440; Ballia, ii. 18; Bara 
Banki, ii. 106, 107 ; the Bayra Ml, ii. 
221 ; Benares, ii. 255 ; Bhagalpiir, ii. 
344 ; Bhongaon, ii. 403 ; Bogra, iii. 
25 ; Bonra, iii. 88 ; Cachar, iii. 233 ; 
the Chalan bll, iii. 327 ; in Champaran, 
iii. 337 ; the Rann of Cutch, iv. 58, 
59 ; Dacca, iv. 79 ; the Najafgarhy/ii// 
near Delhi, iv. 178; Dhandhiika, iv. 
243 ; Dhol Samudra, iv. 278 ; Dhul- 
apra, iv. 280 ; Dig, iv. 2S6 ; Etah, iv. 
358 ; Etawah, iv. 368 ; Faridpur, iv. 
395» 396 ; Farukhabad, iv. 409 ; 
Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; Goalpara, v. 112; 
Gogo, V. 138 ; Gonda, v. 146 ; Gorakh- 
pur, V. 164 ; Gurdaspur, v. 207 ; 
Hardoi, v. 322 ; Hissar, v. 426 ; 
Howrah, v. 461. 462; Hugh, v. 490 ; 
Bhuj jhil in Jaisalmer, vii. 66 ; in 
Jalandhar, vii. 84 ; Jessor, vii. 183 ; 



Jodhpur, vii. 235, 236 ; Kabar, vii. 
265 ; Kahnuwan, vii. 294 ; Mari 
Kalang and Pota ivalang, vii. 323 ; in 
Kamriip, vii. 355 ; in Karachi, vii. 
445 ; of the Karatoya, vii. 469 ; in 
Karnal, viii. 19 ; Kheri, viii. 189 ; 
Khulna, viii. 206 ; Kistna, viii. 226 ; 
Kuch ' Behar, viii. 319; Lakhimpur, 
viii. 426 ; Mahuwa, ix. 187 ; Maihar, 
ix. 289 ; Haoda bil in Maimansingh, 
ix. 192 ; Mainpuri, ix. 202 ; Mallani, 
ix. 260;' Mat, ix. 357; Mohanlalganj, 
ix. 472 ; Montgomery, ix. 494 ; Morad- 
abad, ix. 504 ; Multan, x. 2, 3 ; 
Murshidabad, x. 21 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 
66,67; Nadiya, x. 129; Naga Hills, 
x. 143 ; Nicobar Islands, x. 298 ; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 361 ; Nowgong, 
X. 406 ; Oudh, X. 481 ; Pabna, x. 511, 
512 ; Partabgarh, xi. 69 ; Paung-deh, 
xi. 119; Peshawar, xi. 146; Pilibhit, 
xi. 172 ; Porbandar, xi. 215 ; Prome, 
xi. 226: Purniah, xi. 322, 331; 
Rahon, xi. 347 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ; 
Rajputana, ix. 397 ; Rajshahi, xi. 427, 
428 ; Rangpur, xi. 488 ; Rudrapur, 
xii. 81 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ; 
Sara, xii. 248; Saran, xii. 251, 252; 
Seoni, xii. 308 ; -Shahjahanpur, xii. 
343, 344 _; Sialkot,_ xii. 440, 441 ; Sib- 
sagar, xii. 460 ; Sirsa, xiii. 9 ; of the 
Solani river, xiii. 49 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 
96, 97; Surat, xiii. 1 18; Sylhet, xiii. 
145 ; Talbehat, xiii. 164 ; Talgaon, 
xiii. 167 ; Tamranga, xiii. 173 ; Tando 
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ; Tanjore, 
xiii. 181 ; Tarai, xiii. 207 ; Tatta, xiii. 
217 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ; Thana, 
xiii. 250 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; Tinne- 
velli, xiii. 298 ; Tipperah, xiii. 313 ; 
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 387, 389 ; 
Unao, xiii. 427 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 
496, 497. 

Marshman, H. M., his account of the 
battle of Laswari, quoted, viii. 466 ; 
one of the Baptist missionaries of 
Serampur, xiii. 318. 

Martaban, township in Burma, ix. 349. 

Martaban, ancient town in Burma, ix. 

349, 350. 
Martin, Gen. Claude, founded the 

Martiniere at Lucknow, viii. 507 ; 

built a palace at Najafgarh, x. 178. 
Martin, Francois, purchased site and 

established the French at Pondicherri, 

iv. 451, 452, xi. 198. 
Martindell, Col., took Kalinjar (1812), 

vii. IZZ- 
Martinez, Col. Manuel, first proposed to 

deepen the Pambam Passage, xi. 22. 
Martoli, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

350- 
Marttan. See Matan. 



INDEX. 



211 



I 



Martyn, Col, occupied Ramnad (1792), 
xi. 451. 

Martyrdoms of Jesuit missionaries, article 
' India,' vi. 252, 253. 

Marufganj, village in Bengal, ix. 350. 

Marwar, State in Rajputana, ix. 350. 
See Jodhpur. 

Marvvaris, Agarwalas, etc., trading caste 
of importance in Agroha (their original 
seat), i. 77, 78 ; Ahmad nagar, i. 104, 
'105, 109; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 123; 
Assam, i. 359, 360 ; Azamgarh, i. 402 ; 
Bengal, ii. 31 1 ; Bhiwapur, ii. 401 ; 
Bombay city, iii. 81 ; Dacca, iv. 87 ; 
Darrang, iv. 149; Goalanda, v. ill ,■ 
Hamirpur,. v. 301 ; Hinganghat, v. 
421, 422; Jaggayapet, vii. 42; Jodh- 
pur, vii. 237 ; Joshat, vii. 248 ; Kal- 
adgi, vii. 319 ; Kamrup, vii. 363, 
364 ; Kamthi, vii. 367 ; Kelod, viii. 
Ill; Kuch Behar, viii. 324, 328 ; 
Lakhimpur, viii. 430, 436 ; Lakhna, 
viii. 440 ; Mandawar, ix. 292, 293 ; 
Kasik, X. 231 ; Parner (riot against), 
xi. 66; Patna, xi. 112; Rahuri, xi. 
348 ; Ranchi, xi. 468 ; Sibsagar, xii. 
465,^ 469, 472; Sirajganj, xii. 548; 
S(mapur (Assam), xiii. 58 ; Surat, xiii. 

Marwats, Pathan tribe in Bannu, ii. 

91 ' 93-. 
Masan, river in Bengal, ix. 350. 
Masar, village in Bengal, ix. 350, 351. 
Masaud. See Sayyid Salar Masaud. 
Masaiid, founded Ghazipur (1530), v. 63, 

64 ; his tomb there, v. 64. 
Mascarewas, Dom Joao, defended Diu 

against the king of Gujarat (1545), iv. 

Mashobra, village and hill in Punjab, ix. 

351- 

Masjidkur, site of an old mosque, Bengal, 

''^J- 351- . 
Maskhal, island in Bengal, ix. 351. 

Massacres, at Alleppi (1809), i. 200; 
Black Hole of Calcutta (1757), iii. 
241 ; Cawnpur (1857), iii. 282, 291 ; 
Delhi (1857), iv. 194 ; of Bhils at Dhar- 
angaon, iv. 250 ; Fatehgarh (1857), iv. 
420 ; Hardwar, v. 334 ; Hiigli, v. 500 ; 
Jhansi (1857), vii. 219 ; Khatmandu 
(1846), viii. 184; of Bhils at Kopar- 
gaon (1804), viii. 293 ; Manantawadi 
(1802), ix. 275 ; Meerut (1857), ix. 
385 ; Nong-klao (1829), x. 353 ; Patan 
Saongi (1742), xi. 84; Patna (1763), 
xi. 95, 96; Pharamgiri (1871), xi. 
. 166 ; Shamli (1857), xiii. 259 ; Vellore 
(1806), xiii. 469. 

Masson, quoted, on the Kafirs, vii. 290 ; 
on the population of Kandahar, vii. 
390 ; of Khelat, viii. 188 ; on the 
INIula Pass, ix. 536. 



Master, Streynsham, Governor of Madras 
(1678-81), ix. 66. 

Massy, Gen. W. G. Dunham, archway 
and market in honour of, at Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 38. 

Mastgarh, fortress in Punjab, ix. 351. 

Masti, village in Mysore, ix. 351. 

Masiida, town in Rajputana, ix. 352. 

Masulipatam, town and seaport in 
Madras, ix. 352 - 357 ; history, 353 - 
357 ; Company's factory established at 
(1622), article 'India,' vi. 368; tem- 
porarily abandoned (1628), but re- 
established under a fanudn from the 
king of Golconda (1632), 368 ; murder 
of the Company's factors at (1689), 
371 ; recapture of, from the French, 

385- 
Masura, town in Bombay, ix. 357. 

Masuri. See Mussooree. 
Mat, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 357, 358. 
Matabhanga, river in Bengal, ix. 358, 

359- 
Mataikhar, forest reserve in Assam, ix. 

359- 
Matak, tract of country in Assam, ix. 

359. 360. 

Mataks. See Moamarias. 
Matamuri, river in Bengal, ix. 360. 
Matan, ancient temple in Kashmir, ix. 

360, 361. 

Matar, town and Sub-division in Bom- 
bay, ix. 361. 

Matari, town in Bombay, ix. 361, 362. 

Mataundh, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
362. 

Material Condition of the People. See 
Condition of the People. 

Mathematics, Brahmanical system of, vi. 
106. 

Matheran, hill station and sanitarium in 
Bombay, ix. 362-364; physical aspects, 
362-364 ; history, 364 ; chief public 
buildings, 364. 

Mathura. See Muttra. 

Mathura, town in Oudh, ix. 365. 

Mathwar, petty State in Central India, 
ix. 365. ^ 

Matiakhar. See Mataikhar. 

Matiana, village in Punjab, ix. 365. 

Matin, estate in Central Provinces, ix. 

365- 
Matla, river in Bengal, ix. 365, 366. 

Matla. See Port Canning. 

Matra Timba, petty State in Kathiawar, 
ix. 366. 

Mats, made at Ampta, i. 245 ; Wandi- 
wash in North Arcot, i. 317 ; South 
Arcot, i. 326; Arni, i. 331 ; Assam, i. 
367 ; Bakarganj, i. 447 ; Barsoi, ii. 
177 ; Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; Daman, 
iv. 103 ; Dharampur, iv. 249 ; Dhar- 



212 



INDEX. 



war, iv. 264 ; Faridpur, iv. 397, 405 ; 
Gopalganj, *v. 161 ; Hanthawadi, v. 
316 ; Kasijora, viii. 80 ; Khasi Hills, 
viii. 178; Kheri, viii. 196; Khyrim, 
viii. 215 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 324 ; Lakh- 
impur, viii. 434 ; Lohardaga, viii. 
485 ; Magura, ix. 141 ; Maimansingh, 
ix. 198 ; Talghat in Malabar, ix. 235 ; 
Midnapur, ix. 420; Muzaffargarh, x. 
63 ; Narajol, x. 203 ; Nellore, x. 269 ; 
Noakhali, x. 350; Nowgong, x. 412; 
Pabna, x. 517; Porto Novo, xi. 222; 
Pudukattai, xi. 238 ; Pullampet, xi. 
241 ; Rangoon, xi. 479 ; Rangpur, xi. 
498 ; Sayyidpur, xii. 300 ; Sehwan, 
xii. 305 ; Serampur, xii. 318 ; the 
Sundarbans, xiii. 112; Sylhet, xiii. 
I53> 157; Tipperah, xiii. 319; Upper 
Sind Frontier, xiii. 447. 
Matthews, Gen., stormed Honawar 
(1783), v. 440; started on his march 
against Bednur from Kandapur, vii. 

399- 

Mattod, village in Mysore, ix. 366. 

Mattra. See Muttra. 

Ma-tun, river in Burma, ix. 366, 367. 

Mau, cantonment in Central India. See 
Mhow. 

Mau, tahsil in Jhansi District, N.-W. 
Provinces, ix. 367, 368. 

Mau, town in Jhansi District, N.-W. 
Provinces, ix. 368, 369. 

Mau, town and taJisil in Banda District, 
N.-W. Provinces, ix. 369. 

Mau, town in Azamgarh District. Sec 
Mau Natbhanjan. 

Mau Aima, town in Allahabad District, 
N.-W. Provinces, ix. 369, 370. 

Ma-ubin, village in Burma, ix. 370. 

Maudha, town and tahsil m N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 370. 

Maudhunkhalla. See Mondemkhallu. 

Maulmain, town and seaport in Burma, 
ix. 370-372 ; population, 371 ; princi- 
pal buildings, 371; education, 372; 
medical aspects, 372. 

Maunagar, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 372. 

Mau Natbhanjan, town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 372, 373. 

Maunda, village in Central Provinces, 

i''- 373- 
Maung Da, former governor of Tavoy, 

headed revolt there (1829), xiii. 229. 
Maung-daw, town in Burma, ix. 373, 374. 
IMaung-ma-gau. See Moscos. 
Maung Myat Thiin, made Donabyii his 

head-quarters in second Burmese war, 

where he defeated Loch, but was 

eventually killed, iv. 313, xiii. 289; 

leader of revolt in Henzada, v. 385. 
Maung Sat, Governor of Than-lyin, after 

first Burmese war assumed title of 



king, but was defeated (,1827), xiii. 
158, 159. 

Mau Ranipur, town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 374. See Mau and Rani- 
pur. 

Mauranwan, town and pargam in Oudh, 

ix. 374- 

Maureswar, village in Bengal, ix. 374. 

Mauritius, India's trade with, article 
' India,' vi. 578, 579. 

Mausoleums, article 'India,' vi. 112. 
Local notices — The following mau- 
soleums and cenotaphs are particularly 
noteworthy, the Taj Mahal and that 
of Ihtimad-ud-Daula at Agra, i. 75 ; 
Ahinadabad, i. 98 ; the Khusri'i Bagh 
at Allahabad, i. 196, 198 ; of Ali 
Muhammad Khan at Aonla, i. 296 ; 
of Saadat-ulhi-Khan at Arcot, i. 311 ; 
of Telang Rao at Arvi, i. 336 ; of 
wife of Aurungzeb at Aurungabad, i. 
387 ; of Malik Ambar at Roza, i. 388 ; 
of vSayyid Abdul Aziz at Aurungabad 
Sayyid, i. 388 ; of Khan Jahan at 
Bagherhat, i. 417 ; of Jaswant Rao 
Holkar at Bhanpura, ii. 369 ; of the 
Raos of Cutch at Bhiij, ii. 408 ; of the 
Rajas of Biindi at Bundi, iii. 160 ; of 
Chhatar Sal at Chhatarpur, iii . 396 ; of 
Humayun at Delhi, iv. 188 ; of the 
Bahu Begam at Faizabad, iv. 388 ; of 
Shaikh Salim Chishti at Fatehpur 
Sikri, iv. 434 ; of kings of Bengal at 
Gaur, V. 40 ; of kings of Golconda at 
Golconda, v. 144 ; of Mahan Singh at 
Gujranwala, v. 187; of Muhammad 
Ghaus at Gwalior, v. 234, 235 ; of the 
Mirs at Haidarabad (Sind), v. 288 ; of 
the wife of Akbar at Hasan Abdal, 
v. 342 ; of the Rajas of Jodhpur at 
Mandor, vii. 247, ix. 309 ; of Babar 
and Timur Shah at Kabul, vii. 268 ; at 
Kalpi, vii. 343 ; at Kauauj, vii. 387; of 
Ahmad Shah Durani at Kandahar, vii. 
391 ; of the first Nawab of Karnul at 
Karmil, viii. 45 ; of Pir Ghulam Ali at 
Kera, viii. 1 16, I17 ; of Sayyid Khurd 
at Kheri, viii. 199 ; of Fateh Muham- 
mad Khan at Kolar, viii. 279 ; of 
Jahangir, Nur Jahan, and Ranjit Singh 
at Lahore, viii. 415, 416, 417; of 
Shahal Muhammad Kalhora at Lark- 
hana, viii. 463, 465 ; the Imambara at 
Lucknow, viii. 506, 507 ; of Hoshang 
Ghori at Mandogarh, ix. 308 ; at 
Meerut, ix. 393 ; Mehmadabad, ix. 
400 ; of the Rajas of Coorg at Merkara, 
ix. 414; of Sawan Mall at Multan, x. 
12 ; of Murshid Kuli Khan, x. 38, 39 ; 
of the Bhonsla Rajas at Nagpur, x, 174; 
of Nawab Najib-ud-daula at Najibabad, 
x. 179; at Nakodar, x. 180, 181 ; of 
Gunna Begam at Niirabad, x. 418 ; 



INDEX. 



213 



at Palwal, xi. 21 ; at Pandharpur, xi. 
37 ; of Sadr Jahan at Pihani, xi. 170 ; 
of Randulla Khan at Rahimatpur, xi. 
346 ; at Rai Bareli, xi. 360 ; of Faiz- 
ulIa-Khan at Rampur, xi. 459 ; of 
I'eshvva Baji Rao at Raver, xii. 14 ; at 
Sakhi Saiwar, xii. 146 ; of Sher Shah 
at Sasseram, xii. 273 ; of Haidar Ali 
and Tipi'i Sultan at Seringapatam, xii. 
320 ; of Akbar at Sikandra, xii. 481 ; 
of Khair-ud-din Shah at Sukkur, xiii. 
93 ; of the Oxendens at Surat, xiii. 
135 ; of Zafar Khan at Tribeni, xiii. 
353 ; of the Ranas of Mewar at Ar 
or Arhar, near Udaipur, xiii. 410 ; of 
Abdulla Khan at Ujhani, xiii. 417. 
MavaUkara, town and taluk in Madras, 

ix- 374, 375- 
JNIawai, town and pargand in Oudh, ix. 

375- 
Mawal, Sub -division in Bombay, ix. 

375> 376. 

iMawana, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 376. 

?\laxwell, Colonel, advanced on Mysore 
from Kaveripatam (1790), viii. 106. 

May, Mr., Superintendent of the Ma- 
tabhanga river, and founder of the 
deepening system there, v. 475. 

Mayakonda, village in Mysore, ix. 376, 

377-. 
Mayani. See Maini. 
Mayapur, village in Bengal, ix. 377. 
Mayavaram, town and tdhtk in Madras, 

!>;• 377- 

Mayne, F. O., his improvements at 
Etah, where the market-place is called 
Mayneganj after him, iv. 366. 

Mayo, Earl of. Viceroy of India (1S69- 
72), article ' India,' vi. 425, 426 ; 
the Ambala darbai- ; visit of the Duke 
of Edinburgh ; administrative reforms ; 
abolition of customs lines ; assassina- 
tion at the Andaman Islands, 425 ; his 
scheme for Indian feeder lines of rail- 
way, 445, 446. Local notices — His 
interview with Sher Ali Khan at Am- 
bala, i. 51 ; his murder in the Anda- 
man Islands, i. 284 ; statue of, at 
Calcutta, iii. 250 ; made treaty with 
the ISIaharaja of Kashmir for regulating 
the trade of Ladakh, viii. 400 ; resolved 
to severely punish the Lushais, viii. 

Mayo Mines, salt-mines in Punjab, ix. 

377-379- 
Mayn, river in Burma, ix. 379. 

Mayur Pandit, Marathi religious poet of 

the l8th century, vi. 346. 
Mazagon, suburb of Bombay city, ix. 

379- 
M'Bean, General, his campaign in Arakan 
in the first Burmese war (1824-26), 



i. 153, iii. 225 ; took Mro'haung, where 
he cantoned, and most of his troops 
died of disease, ix. 524; occupied 
Sandoway, xii. 205. 

M'Caskill, General Sir J. C, destroyed 
Istalif in Afghanistan for harbouring 
the murderers of Burnes, i. t,T), 34 ; 
commanded second division in Pollock's 
advance through the Khaibar Pass, and 
lost two guns there, viii. 126, 127. 

M'Crindle, Mr. J. W. M., Conuncrce and 
Navigatio7i of the Erythrcean Sea, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 166 (foot- 
notes I and 2) ; 356 (footnote) ; Ancient 
India as described by Megasthenes and 
Arrian, quoted, vi. 168 (footnote i) ; 
356 (footnote). 

M'Donell, Mr. Eraser, his gallantry in 
the attempt to relieve Arrah (1857), iv. 
300, xi. 98. 

M'Dowall, Colonel, took Malegaon, but 
with heavy loss (1818), ix. 254. 

Means of communication, article ' India,' 
vi. chap, xviii. pp. 545-554. History 
of Indian railways, 545 ; Lord Dal- 
housie's trunk railway lines, 545 ; Lord 
Mayo's branch or feeder lines, 545, 
546 ; the four classes of Indian rail- 
ways, 'Guaranteed,' 'State,' 'Assisted,' 
and ' Native State,' 546-549; statistics 
of Indian railways, 549, 550 ; roads, 
the Grand Trunk Road, extension of 
minor roads, 550, 551 ; road metal, 
551 ; bridges of boats, 551 ; navigable 
rivers, 551-553; navigable canals, 553, 
554. See also the special section in 
each District article. 

Mechi, river in Bengal, ix. 379. 

Mechs, aboriginal tribe, in Assam, i. 351 ; 
Darjiling, iv. 130 ; Eastern Dwars, iv. 
331, 332; Garo Hills, v. 28; Goalpara, 
V. 115; Jalpaiguri, vii. 112, 115 ; 
Kuch Behar, viii. 322. 

Medak, town in Haidarabad State, ix. 

379- 

Mediaeval trade of India, vi. 555. 

Medical aspects. See the section on this 
subject in each District article, and 
Cholera, Elephantiasis, Fevers, Goitre, 
Leprosy, Smallpox, and Vaccination. 

Medical charities, hospitals and dispen- 
saries, are noticed in each District 
article. See also Hospitals. 

Medical colleges in India, article 'India,' 
vi. 109. Local notices — The Grant, 
Bombay, iii. 71; Calcutta, iii. 259; 
Madras, ix. 116. 

Medicine and drugs, article ' India,' vi. 
34 ; Brahmanical system of medicine, 
vi. 106- 1 10; its independent develop- 
ment, 4th to 8th century, 107 ; scope 
of Indian medicine, 107 ; Indian 
surgery, 107, 108 ; Buddhist public 



214 



INDEX. 



hospitals, io8, 109 ; decline of Hindu 
medicine, 109 ; Englisli Medical Col- 
leges, 109 ; vernacular medical litera- 
ture, 109, no. 

Medlicott and Blanford, Geology of India, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 27 (foot- 
note) ; 631-640; also on the Himalaya 
Mountains, v. 410 ; on granite in 
Jabalpur, vii. 30 ; on the Sahyadri, 
xii. 138 ; and the Vindhya Mountains, 
xiii. 474. 

Medows, General, took Dharapuram 
(1790), iv. 251 ; and Karur, viii. 52 ; 
Governor of Madras (1790-92), ix. 
67 ; led the assault on Nandidrug 
(1791), X. 192. 

Meeanee, battle-field in Sind, ix. 379. 
See Miani. 

Meeanee, town in Punjab, ix. 379. See 
Miani. 

Meean Meer, cantonment, near Lahore, 
in Punjab, ix. 379, 380. 

Meerut, Division in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 380, 381 ; population, 380; religion, 
380; principal towns, 381. 

Meerut, District in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
381-392; physical aspects, 382, 383; 
history, 383 - 385 ; population, 385, 
386 ; division of people into town and 
country, 386, 387 ; agriculture, 387- 
389 ; natural calamities, 389 ; com- 
merce and trade, etc., 389, 390; 
administration, 390, 391 ; medical 
aspects, 391, 392. 

Meerut, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

392- 

Meerut, city in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
392-394 ; physical aspects, 392, 393 ; 
population, 393 ; antiquarian remains, 
393 ; army, 393 ; commerce and trade, 
393. 394 ; revenue, 394 ; outbreak of 
the mutiny at, article ' India,' vi. 419. 

Megasthenes, Seleukos' ambassador to 
the court of Chandra Gupta, article 
' India,' vi. 154 ; 163 ; his description 
of India and of Indian society (300 
B.C.), 167-170; division of India into 
petty kingdoms, 170. Local notices — ■ 
At Allahabad, i. 195, 196 ; in Behar, 
ii. 227 ; speaks of the three kingdoms 
of Kalinga, Andhra, and Pandya, ix. 
ID ; his Mathte identified with Mand- 
awar, ix. 292 ; at the court of Chandra 
Gupta, x. 362 ; calls Pandya Ua.i'ha.in, 
xi. 42 ; his description of Palibothra, 
now Patna, xi. 107 ; his river Sambus 
identified wrongly with the Sai, xii. 

^39-, 

Meghasani, mountain peak in Bengal, ix. 

394- , 
Meghna, the eastern estuary of the united 
waters of the Brahmaputra and Ganges, 
article 'India,' vi. 15; 21; 28; its 



'bore' or tidal - wave, vi. 31; the 
Meghna delta, vi. 25, ix. 394, 395. 
Mehar, Sub-division in Sind, ix. 395- 

397 ; i^hysical aspects, 396 ; popula- 
tion, 396 ; agriculture, 396, 397 ; 
manufactures, commerce, etc., 397 ; 
administration, 397 ; climate, 397- 

Mehar, tdliik in Sind, ix. 397, 398. 

Meherpur. See Mihrpur. 

Mehidpur, town in Central India, ix. 

398 ; defeat of Holkar at, in the last 
Maratha war (1817-18), vi. 402. 

Mehkar, town and taluk in Berar, i.\. 

398- 
Mehmadabad, town and Sub-division in 

Bombay, ix. 399, 400. 
Mehndi Hassan, called himself Nizam of 

Jaunpur, and occupied most of that 

District (1857-58), vii. 153. 
Mehrab Khan, ruler of Baluchistan, killed 

at storm of Khelat (1831), ii. 31. 
Mehsi, village in Bengal, ix. 400. 
Mehtars, semi-aboriginal tribe in Khand- 

para, viii. 160. 
Mehwas, group of Native States in 

Bombay, ix. 400, 401. 
Meja, tahsil in N,-W. Provinces, ix. 

401. 
Mekranis, in the Bombay Presidency, iii. 

49 ; in Dungarpur, iv. 324. 
Melagiris, mountain range in Madras, ix. 

401, 402. 
Melao, town in Bombay, ix. 402. 
Melapalaiyam, town in Madras, ix. 402. 
Melapavur, town in Madras, ix. 402. 
Melghat, taluk and hill tract in Berar, 

ix. 402-404. 
Melons, grown in Afghanistan, i. 38 ; 

Akyab, i. 156; Baluchistan, ii. 36; 

Bara Banki, ii. no ; Bareilly, ii. 142 ; 

Bikaner, ii. 439 ; Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, iii. 450, 451 ; Dadar, iv. 92 ; 

Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; Ghazni, v. 72 ; 

Goa, V. 93 ; Haidarabad, v. 245 ; 

Haidarabad (Sind), v. 280 ; Jalalabad, 

vii. 75 ; Jodhpur, vii. 235 ; Karachi, 

vii. 452 ; Karniil, viii. 34 ; Kashmir, 

viii. 71, 72 ; Khapa, viii. 165 ; Kuram, 

viii. 369 ; Lahore, viii. 410 ; Mangrol, 

ix. 316 ; N.-W. Provinces, x. 382 ; 

Peshawar, xi. 146 ; Pishin, xi. 190 ; 

Rajputana, xi. 417 ; Sidhaut, xii. 474 ; 

Sind, xii. 520; Sitapur, xiii. 35; 

Tarai, xiii. 209 ; Upper Sind Frontier, 

xiii. 446. 
Melukote, sacred village in Mysore, ix. 

404. 
Melur, village and taluk in Mysore, ix. 

404, 405. 
Melvill, Mr., Joint Commissioner for 

settling Orissa (1805), x. 432. 
Memadpur, petty State in Bombay, ix. 

405. 



INDEX, 



215 



Memari, town in Bengal, ix. 405. 

Alenwir of the War in India, conducted 
by General Lord Lake, by Major 
William Thorne, quoted, vi. 317 (foot- 
note i). 

Memons, Muhammadan class in Bom- 
bay Presidency, iii. 52, city, iii. 81 ; 
Haidarabad (Sind), v. 276, 277 ; Sind, 
xii. 518. 

Mendarda. See Mandurda. 

Mendhawal, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 405. 

Mendi-khah', arm of JNIeghna river in 
Bengal, ix. 405. 

Menezes, third Portuguese Viceroy, en- 
larged the fort of Cochin (1525), iv. 12. 

IMenezes, Dom Francisco, defeated at 
Arakan (1615), x. 342. 

Menezes, Vasco Fernandes Cesarde, 
Governor-General of Goa (1712-17), 
built fortress at Bardez and Chapora, 
V. 104. 

]Meng-bra. See Minbra. 

IMeng-diin. See Mindun. 

Meng-gyi. See Min-gyi. 

Meng-hla. Sec Min-hla. 

Mengni, petty State in Bombay, ix. 405, 
406. 

Meos, aboriginal tribe, in Gurgaon, v. 
206-219; Mewat, Lx. 419, 420; Raj- 
putana, xi. 41 1, 412. 

Mer and Ser, mountain peaks in the 
Himalaya, ix. 406. 

Merats, wild tribe. Sec Mers. 

Meratiir, town in Madras, ix. 406. 

Mercara, town and tdliik in Coorg, ix. 
406. See Merkara. 

Merewether, Sir W. L., Commissioner 
of Sind, the largest pier in Kiamari 
called after him, viii. 215. 

Mergui, District in Lower Burma, ix. 
406-411; physical aspects, 406-408; 
history, 408 ; population, 408, 409 ; 
agriculture, 409, 410 ; manufactures, 
etc., 410; revenue, etc., 410, 411 ; 
medical aspects, 411. 

Mergui, town and seaport in Lower 
Burma, ix. 411, 412. 

Mergui Archipelago, group of islands in 
Burma, ix. 412. 

Meriah. See Kandhs. 

Merkara, tdJnk in Coorg, ix. 412, 413. 

Merkara, chief town of Coorg, ix. 413- 

415- 
Mers or Merats, wild tribe, numerous 

in Alwar, i. 203 ; Merwara, ix. 416, 

417; Rajputana, xi. 409, 412, 414; 

Udaipur, xiii. 402. 
Merta, town in Rajputana, ix. 415. 
Mertigudda, mountain in Mysore, ix. 

Merwara, Sub-division in Rajputana, ix, 
415-417- 



Merwara Battalion, The, ix. 417. 

Mesana, town in Bombay, ix. 418. 

Mesli, petty State in Bombay, ix. 418. 

Metcalfe, Lord, Governor-General of 
India (1835-36), article ' India, vi. 
406. Local notices — Protested against 
Ranjit Singh's attack on Maler Kotla 
(1808), ix. 235; first Governor of Agra 
(1835), on the wish of the Rajputs for 
British intervention (1811), xi. 407. 

Meteorology of India, article ' India,' vi. 
chap, xxiii. pp. 641-655. Meteoro- 
logical geography of the Himalayas 
and Punjab frontier, 641-643 ; the 
Indus plain and great Indian desert, 
643 ; Gangetic plain and E. Bengal, 
643, 644 ; the Central Indian and 
Southern plateaux, 644, 645 ; Ana- 
malai Hills, 645 ; southern coast strip 
and Ceylon, 645, 646 ; Burma, 646 ; 
solar radiation, 647 ; air temperature, 
atmospheric pressure, wind, humidity, 
647, 648 ; rainfall statistics, 649, 650 ; 
sunspot cycles, 650, 651. 

Meteorological Statistics, given under the 
section. Medical Aspects, for each Dis- 
trict ; the most noteworthy are Mount 
Abu, i. 6 ; Aden, i. 20 ; Afghanistan, 
'• 37j 38 ; Agra, i. 67 ; Ahmadabad, 
i- 93; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 131, 132; 
Aligarh, i. 177; Amritsar, i. 263; 
Andaman Islands, i. 286 ; Assam, i. 
372> 373 ; Banda, ii. 54; Benares, ii. 
261 ; Bengal, ii. 321, 322 ; Bombay 
Presidency, iii. 7:: ; Lower Burma, iii. 
208 ; Calcutta, iii. 260 ; Central Pro- 
vinces, iii. 322 ; Cherra Punji, iii. 393 ; 
Coorg, iv. 41 ; Cutch, iv. 64 ; Cuttack, 
iv. 74 ; Darjiling, iv. 139; Raja- 
mahendri, v. 130 ; Gonda, v. 154 ; 
Gwalior, v. 228 ; Haidarabad State, v. 
243, 244 ; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 285 ; 
Hardoi, v. 328 ; Hoshangabad, v. 
448 ; Jaipur, vii. 58, 59 ; Jalaun, vii. 
102 ; Jhansi, vii. 227 ; Kabul, vii. 
272; Karachi, vii. 450, 451 ; Kash- 
mir, viii. 76 ; Khandesh, viii. 158, 
159; Khasi Hills, viii. 179; Kohat, 
viii. 249 ; Lahore, viii. 413 ; Lucknow, 
viii. 501 ; Ludhiana, viii. 525 ; Madras 
Presidency, ix. 79 ; Madras city, ix. 
119; Madura, ix. 131, 132; Mahaba- 
leshwar, ix. 143 ; Malabar, ix. 235 ; 
Mandla, ix. 306 ; Manipur, ix. 'i,2,'i^ 
334; Meerut, ix. 391; Montgomery, 
ix. 501 ; Multan, x. 10 ; Nadiya, x. 
140; Nagpur, X. 172; Nilgiri Hills, 
X. 325 ; Nimar, x. 335 ; N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, X. 403, 404 ; Orissa, x. 467, 
468; Oudh, x. 510; Patna, xi. 105; 
Peshawar, xi. 157 ; Poona, xi. 210 ; 
Punjab, xi. 291, 292; Rajputana, xi. 
422, 423 ; Rawal l^indi, xii. 35 ; 



2l6 



INDEX. 



Saharanpur, xii. 123 ; Salem, xii. 165 ; 

vSeoni, xii. 314; Shimoga, xii. 405; 

Sholapur, xii. 419; Sialkot, xii. 449; 

.Simla, xii. 495 ; .Sind, xii. 524, 525 ; 

Sitapur, xiii. 37 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 102, 

103; Surat, xiii. 131 ; Tanjore, xiii. 

193; Taung-ngii, xiii. 226; Thayet-myo, 

xiii. 286, 287 ; Travancore, xiii. 353 ; 

Trichinopoli, xiii. 363 ; Tumkur, xiii. 

380, 381 ; Sagar Island, xiii. 398, 399 ; 

Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 448, 449 ; 

Wardha, xiii. 528 ; ^^"ellington, xiii. 

536 ; Wiin, xiii. 545. 
Mettapolliem, town in Madras, ix. 418. 
Metz, Mr., quoted on the Kotas, viii. 

301 ; the Kurumbas, viii. 376 ; the 

Nilgiri cromlechs, x. 323. 
Mewar. See Udaipur. 
Mewasa, petty State in Bombay, ix. 418. 
Mewat, historic Province of W. India, 

ix. 418-420. 
Mewat, hill range in Punjab, ix. 420. 
Mliars or Dhers, numerous in Bhandara, 

ii. 362 ; Khairpur Dharki, viii. 138, 

139 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 7 ; .Satara, xii. 

279 ; Sawantwari, xii. 297 ; Sirohi, 

xiii. 4 ; Thana, xiii. 253. 
Mhaswad, town in Bombay, ix. 420. 
Mhow, cantonment in Central India, ix. 

420. 
iMIiou'a tree. Sec JMaJuid. 
Miana, pargand in Central India, ix. 

421. 
Mian Ali. See Asanir. 
Mianganj, village in Oudh, ix. 421. 
Miani, town in Punjab, ix. 421. 
Miani, town and centre of salt trade in 

Punjab, ix. 421, 422. 
Miani, battle-field in Sind, ix. 422 ; defeat 

of the Mirs by Sir C. Napier (1843), 

article 'India,' vi. 409. 
Miani, seaport in Kathiawar, ix. 422. 
Mian Mir. See Meean Meer. 
Mianwali, town and tahsil in Punjab, ix. 

422, 423. 
Mica, article ' India,' vi. 628. Local 

notices — Balaghat, i. 454-456 ; Banga- 
lore, ii. 59 ; Bantwal, ii. 104 ; Chital- 

dmg, iii. 423; Dubrajpur, iv. 318; 

Dungarpur, iv. 322 ; Hazaribagh, 

^■•..379; Jaipur, vii. 51, 52; Kolar, 

viii. 273 ; Madras, ix. 4 ; Mysore, x. 

91, 92 ; .Shahpur, xii. 361 ; Sirmur, 

^"' 555 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2. 
Michael, Capt. James, discoverer of the 

.\namalai Hills, after whom Michael 

valley is named, i. 270. 
Michni, fort in Punjab, ix. 423. 
Midagesi, village in Mysore, ix. 423. 
Middleton, first Bishop of Calcutta 

(1814), article 'India,' vi. 261 ; his 

dispute as to the spire of St. Andrew's 

Kirk, Calcutta, iii. 253. 



Middleton, Sir Henry, his naval defeat 
of the Portuguese at Cambay (1611), 
article ' India,' vi. 366 ; visited Aden, 
i. 6 ; not allowed to enter the port of 
.Surat by the Portuguese, xiii. 121. 

Midnapur, District in Bengal, ix. 423- 
433 ; physical aspects, 424 ; Midnapur 
high level canal, 424, 425 ; history, 
425, 426 ; population, 426-428 ; urban 
and rural population, 428 ; agriculture, 
428-430; natural calamities, 430; 
commerce and trade, 430, 431 ; admini- 
stration, 431, 432 ; medical aspects, 

432, 433- 
Midnapur, Sub-division in Bengal, ix. 

433- 
Midnapur, town in Bengal, ix. 433, 434. 
Midnapur High Level Canal, navigable 

and irrigation canal near Calcutta, ix. 

434, 435- 

Migration of the people, article ' India,' 
vi. 47. See also Emigration. 

Mihndhawal. See Mendhawal. 

Mihrauni, village and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, ix. 435. 

Mihrpur, town and Sub-division in 
Bengal, ix. 435, 436. 

Mikir Hills, tract in Assam, ix. 436-438 ; 
physical aspects, 436 ; industries, 436 : 
religion, 437 ; marriage, 437, 43S ; com- 
merce, etc., 438. Local fioticcs of Mikirs 
—Assam, i. 351, 353; Cachar, iii. 235 ; 
Darrang, iv. 145 ; Jaintia Hills, vii. 
48 ; Kamrup, vii. 355, 359 ; Lakhim- 
pur, viii. 431 ; Naga Hills, x. 151 ; 
Nowgong, X. 409 ; .Sibsagar, xii. 464. 

Milam, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix, 

438. 

Miles, Col., took Mergui (1824), ix. 412; 
made agreement with Nawab of Rad- 
hanpur (1820), xi. 343 ; and w-ith the 
chiefs of Suigam (1826), xiii. 89. 

Military caste of St. Thomas Nestorian 
Christians, article ' India,' vi. 240 ; 
Portuguese efforts at their conversion to 
Rome, vi. 241. 

Military forces of Native States. The 
following States possess armies of some 
strength, as apart from armed police — 
Afghanistan, i. 48 ; Alwar, i. 206 ; 
Bahawalpur, i. 424 ; Baluchistan, ii. 
39, 40 ; Baroda, ii. 164 ; Bhartpur, 
ii. 375 ; Bhaunagar, ii. 381 ; Bhopal, 
ii. 405 ; Bhutan, ii. 415 ; Biindi, iii. 
158 ; Cochin, iv. 9 ; Cutch, iv. 63 ; 
Datia, iv. 156 ; Dhar, iv. 247 ; Dhol- 
pur, iv. 277 ; Dhrangadra, iv. 279 : 
Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; Gwalior, v. 233 ; 
the Nizam, v. 252 ; Indore, vii. 7 ; 
Jaipur, vii. 58 ; Jaisalmer, vii. 69, 70 ; 
Jhalawar, vii. 200 ; Jind, vii. 232, 233 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 245 ; Junagarh, vii. 262 ; 
Kapurthala, vii. 443 ; Karauli, vii. 



INDEX. 



217 



473 ; Kathiawar, viii. 94 ; Kisliangarh, 
viii. 223 ; Kotah, viii. 307 ; Manipur, 
Js..-'33 ; Mysore, x. in, 112; Nabha, 
X. 126: Nawanagar, x. 253 ; Nepal, x. 
280 ; Orchha, x. 426 ; Panna, xi. 50 ; 
Partabgarh, xi. 77 ; Patiala, xi. 90 ; 
Kampur, xi. 458 ; Rewa, xii. 48 ; 
Samthar, xii. 192 ; Sawantwari, xii. 
298 ; Tonk, xiii. T)T,% ; Tiavancore, 
.>riii. 353 ; Udaipur, xiii. 409. 

Militar)- stations, depots, etc. See Can- 
tonments. 

Military Traiisadioiis in Indosfan, by 
Orme, quotetl. article ' India,' vi. 379 
(footnote); 380 (footnote 2). See Orme. 

Milka Singh, Sikh Sardar, made Rawal 
Pindi his head-quarters (1765), and 
conquered the surrounding country, xii. 

24, 36. 

Mill, James, History of British India, 
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 314 (foot- 
note 3); 365 (footnote 2); 379 (foot- 
note); 383 (footnote). 

iSIillets, Statistics of cultivation of, and 
chief varieties, article ' India,' vi. 487, 
488, 489. Local notices — Afghanistan, 
i. 38 ; Agra, i. 64 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 
103; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 125; Akalkot, 
i. 137 ; Akola, i. 143, 144 ; Aiigarh, 
i. 173; Ali-Rajpur, i. 181 ; Allahabad, 
i. 189 ; Ahvar, i. 205 ; Ambala, i. 
220 ; Amraoti, i. 248 ; Amritsar, i. 
259 ; Anantapur, i. 277 ; North Arcot, 
i. 316 ; South Arcot, i. 323 ; Aundh, 
i. 384 ; Bc-inda, ii. 51; Bangalore, ii. 
63 ; Bannu, ii. 94 ; Bareilly, ii. 142 ; 
Basim, ii. 1S6 ; Basti, ii. 211 ; Bel- 
gaum, ii. 234, 235 ; Bellary, ii. 245 ; 
Benares, ii. 258 ; Bhagalpur, ii. 348 ; 
Bhutan, ii. 413 ; Bijnaur, ii. 432 ; 
Bikaner, ii. 439 ; Bombay, iii. 53, 54 ; 
Budaun, iii. 120 ; Bulandshahr, iii. 
137 ; Buldana, iii. 146 ; Bundelkhand, 
iii. 152 ; Bundi, iii. 159 ; Upper Bur- 
ma, iii. 210; Cambay, iii. 285 ; Cawn- 
pur, iii. 285, 286 : Central India, iii. 
295 ; Central Provinces, iii. 318 ; 
Chamba, iii. 329 ; Champaran, iii. 
341 ; Chanda, iii. 352 ; Chengalpat, 
iii. 386 ; Chitaldnig, iii. 425 ; Coim- 
batore, iv. 18 ; Coorg, iv. 36 ; Cudda- 
pah, iv. 52 ; Cutch, iv. 61 ; Dacca, iv. 
85 ; Danta, iv. 118 : Darjiling. iv. 134; 
Delhi, iv. 182 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 
214 ; Dera Ismail Khan, iv. 224 ; 
Dharwar, iv. 262 ; Dholpur, iv. 274 ; 
Dinajpur, iv. 294 ; Diu, iv. 305 ; 
Dungarpur, iv. 323 ; Ellichpur, iv. 
345 ; P:tah, iv. 362 ; Etawah, iv. 374 ; 
Faizabad, iv. 384 ; Farukhabad, iv. 
413 ; Fatehpur, iv. 427 ; Firozpur, iv. 
443 ; Garhwal, v. 20 ; Gaya, v. 49 ; 
Ghazipur, v. 67 ; Godavari, v. 127 ; 



Gonda, v. 152; Goona, v. 159; 
Gorakhpur, v. 169 ; Gujranwala, v. 
184 ; Gujrat, v. 193 ; Gurdaspur, v. 
211; Gurgaon, v. 220; Gwalior, v. 
238 ; Haidarabad, v. 245 ; Berar, v. 
270; Haidarabad (Sind), v. 280 ; 
Ilamirpur, v. 302 ; Hassan, v. 349 ; 
Hazara, v. 365; Hissar, v. 430; Indore, 
vii. 2 ; Jabalpur, vii. t,?> '■< Jaipur, vii. 
52 ; Jaisalmer, vii. 68 ; Jalalabad, vii. 
75 ; Jalandhar, vii. 88 ; Jalaun, vii. 
98 ; Jamkhandi, vii. 127 ; Jath, vii. 
148 ; Jaunpur, vii. 155 ; Jawhar, vii. 
164 ; Jehlam, vii. 172 ; Jhalawar, vii. 
200 ; jhang, vii. 210 ; Jhansi, vii. 223 ; 
Jodhpur, vii. 238 ; Junagarh, vii. 262 ; 
Kadur, vii. 286 ; Kaira, vii. 303 ; 
Kaladgi, vii. 317 ; North Kanara, vii. 
372 ; South Kanara, vii. 3S0 ; Kankrej, 
vii. 435 ; Karachi, vii. 448; Karauli, 
vii. 472 ; Karnal, viii. 24 ; Karniil, 
viii. 37 ; Karond, viii. 46 ; Kathiawar, 
viii. 96 ; Khairpur, viii. 136 ; Khan- 
desh, viii. 156 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 177 ; 
Kheri, viii. 193 ; Khyrim, viii. 215 ; 
Kistna, viii. 230 ; Kohat, viii. 247 ; 
Kolaba, viii. 268 ; Kolar, viii. 275, 
276 ; Kolhapur, viii. 281 ; Korea, viii. 
297 ; Kotah, viii. 306 ; Kuch Behar, 
viii. 323 ; Kulu, viii. 342 ; Kumaun, 
viii. 354 ; Kuram, viii. 369 ; Kurund- 
wad, viii. 376 ; Lahore, viii. 410 ; 
Lalitpur, viii. 452, 453; Larkhana, viii. 
463 ; Lohardaga, viii. 483 ; Lucknow, 
viii. 497; Ludhiana, viii. 522 ; Madras, 
ix. 30, 87, ^S ; Madura, ix. 12S, 129 ; 
Mainpuri, ix. 208; Malabar, ix. 230; 
the ^Ialdive Islands, ix. 251 ; Mallani, 
ix. 261 ; Malpur, ix. 264 ; ^Vestern 
Malwa, ix. 269 ; Manpur, ix. 339 ; 
Mansa, ix. 340 ; Meerut, ix. 387 ; 
Mehar, ix. 397 ; Miraj, ix. 440 : 
Mirzapur, ix. 458 ; Mohanpur, ix. 474 ; 
Montgomery, ix. 498 : Moradabad, 
ix. 509 ; IVIudhol, ix. 527 ; Multan, 
x. 7 ; Muttra, x. 48 ; Muzaffar- 
garh, X. 61 ; Muzaffarnagar, x. 72 ; 
Mysore State, x. 100, loi. District, x. 
118; Nasik, x. 232; Nawanagar, x. 
252 ; Nellore, x. 266 ; Nepal, x. 276 ; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 377 ; Oudh, x. 
501 ; Palanpur Agency, x. 537 ; Panch 
Mahals, xi. 32 ; Pandu Mehwas, xi. 
39 ; Partabgarh, xi. 71 ; Peshawar, 
xi. 153 ; Phaltan, xi. 164 ; Pilibhit, xi. 
175 ; Pishin, xi. 190 ; Poona, xi. 207 ; 
Punjab, xi. 278 ; Rajpur-Ali, xi. 394 ; 
Rajputana, xi. 417, 418 ; Ramdrug, 
xi. 441 ; Ratnagiri, xii. 9 ; Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 29 ; Rohri, .xii. 64 ; Rohtak, 
xii. 73 ; Saharanpur, xii. I20 ; Salem, 
xii. 160 ; Sangli, xii. 218 ; Santal 
Parganas, xii. 232 ; Saran, xii. 255 ; 



2l8 



INDEX. 



Satara, xii. 280, 281 ; Savaniir, xii. 
293 ; Shalijahanpur, xii. 349 ; Shah- 
pur, xii. 365 ; Sliikaipur, xii. 393 ; 
Shimoga, xii. 403 ; Sholapur, xii. 415; 
Sialkot, xii. 446; Sibi, xii. 455 ; Simla, 
xii. 493 ; Sine), xii. 520 ; Sirohi, xiii. 
5 ; Sirsa, xiii. 16 ; .Sitapur, xiii. 34 ; 
Sunth, xiii. 1 14; Supa, xiii. 116; 
Sural, xiii. 126 ; Surgana, xiii. 136 ; 
Sylhet, xiii. 152 ; Tanjore, xiii. 187 ; 
Tarai, xiii. 209 ; Thar and Parkar, xiii. 
266, 269; Tiunevelli, xiii. 306; Trichi- 
nopoli, xiii. 360 ; Tumkiir, xiii. 378 ; 
Udaipur,xiii. 402; Upper Sind Frontier, 
xiii. 446 ; Vizagapatam, xiii. 492 ; 
Wainad, xiii. 510; Wao, xiii. 519; 
Wiin, xiii. 543 ; Yusafzai, xiii. 558. 

Mills by water power in the Himalayas, 
article ' India,' vi. 9. 

Mills, Steam. See Steam - mills and 
Factories. 

Milman, Dr., Bishop of Calcutta, died 
and was buried at Rawal Pindi (1876), 
xii. 38. 

Milmillia, forest reserve in Assam, ix. 438. 

Milur. See Melur. 

Mina Bai, widow of Anand Rao 11. of 
Dhar, managed to preserve that vState 
from Sindia and Holkar, iv. 247. 

Minachal, taluk in Madras, ix. 438. 

Minas, wild tribe, numerous in Alwar, i. 
203 ; Dholpur, iv. 275 ; Gurgaon, v. 
218; Jodhpur, vii. 237 ; Karauli, vii. 
472 ; Mer\^•ara, ix. 416 ; Narsingh- 
garh, x. 215 ; Rajgarh, xi. 386 ; Raj- 
putana, xi. 409, 413, 414. 

Minbra, township in Burma, ix. 438. 

Mindun, town and township in Burma, 
ix. 438, 439. 

IMineral oils, article ' India,' vi. 42 ; 
petroleum wells and oil-refining com- 
panies in Burma, 626, 627 ; petroleum 
in Assam and the Punjab, 627. See 
also Petroleum. 

IMinerals and mines. See Mines and 
minerals. 

Mines and minerals, article ' India,' vi. 
chap. xxi. pp. 618-630. Indian iron, 
indigenous methods of working, 618 ; 
failure of English efforts, 618, 619 ; 
Government efforts, 619 ; Indian coal 
and history of Bengal coal-mining 
(1820-83), 619, 620; the Central Pro- 
vinces and Bengal coal-fields, 620, 621; 
coal-beds in Assam, 621 ; future of 
Indian coal, 622 ; salt mining and 
manufacture, 622, 623 ; saltpetre, 623, 
624 ; gold- washing, 624 ; gold -mining 
in Madras and Mysore, 624, 625 ; 
copper mining, 626 ; lead, tin, anti- 
mony, and cobalt, 625, 626 ; petro- 
leum in Burma, Assam, and the Pun- 
jab, 626, 627 ; lime and building stone. 



627, 628 ; marble, 628 ; slate, 628 ; 

diamonds and precious stones, 628. 

629 ; pearl fisheries, 629. For Local 

notices see Coal, Copper, Gold, Iron, 

Lead, Salt, Tin, etc. See also Geology 

of India. 
Min-gyi, town and township in Burma, 

ix. 439. 
Miniature painting, article ' India,' vi. 

"3- 

Minium, found in Monghyr, ix. 479. 

Minto, Earl of, Governor - General of 
India (1807-13); expeditions to Java 
and Mauritius ; embassies to the Pun- 
jab, Afghanistan, and Persia, article 
' India,' vi. 399, 400 ; built the 
suburban residence of the viceroys 
at Barrackpur, ii. 175. 

Min-hla, township in Burma, ix. 439. 

Miracles of Buddhist and Hindu religious 
founders, article ' India,' vi. 139, 140 ; 
208 ; miracles of the early Jesuits, 252. 

Miraj (senior branch), Native State in 
Bombay, ix. 439, 44.0. 

Miraj (junior branch), Native State in 
Bombay, ix. 440, 441. 

Miraj, chief town of State in Bombay, ix. 

Miranpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
441. 

Miranpur Katra, town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 441. 

Miranzai. See Hangu. 

Mirath. See Meerut. 

Mir Chakar Rind, legendary hero of the 
Baluchis, xii. 457. 

Mirganj, village and tahsil in N.-W. 
Provinces, 442, 443. 

Mirganj, village in Bengal, ix. 443. 

Miris, aboriginal tribe in Assam, ix. 443- 



450. Local 7iotices — Assam, i. 



J3 



^i ; 



Darrang, iv. 145 ; Lakhimpur, vni. 
431 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464. 

Mir Jafar, Nawab of Bengal (1757-60, 
1763-65), compensation for losses at 
Calcutta, grant to the Company of the 
zantimidri of the Twenty-four Par- 
ganas, <ZX\v%\ jdgir, deposition of Mir 
Jafar, article ' India,' vi. 383 ; 385. 
Local notices — Nawab of Bengal, ii. 
278 ; made Nawab by the English, iii. 
242 ; placed on the throne by Clive at 
Murshidabad, x. 37; incited the Gover- 
nor of Purniah to attack Suraj-ud-dauhi, 
xi. 324 ; ceded the Twenty-four Par- 
ganas to the Company, xiii. 390. 

Mir Jumla (1660-64), his unsuccessful 
expedition to Assam in the reign of 
Aurungzeb, article 'India,' vi. 309. 
Local notices — Attacked the Ahams, i. 
80, 344 ; Nawab of Bengal, ii. 278 ; 
his buildings at Dacca, iv. 81; defeated 
by the Ahams near Gauhati, v. 113, 



INDEX. 



219 



vii. 357; originally dhvdn of Golconda, 
V. 144, 255 ; took fort of Gooty, v. 
160 ; routed Shah Shiija at Tandan, 
xiii. 176. 

Mirkasarai, town in Bengal, ix. 450. 

Mir Kasim, Nawab of Bengal (1760-63), 
grant of Bardwan, Midnapur, and 
Chittagong to the Company, his quarrel 
with the English, massacre of Patna, 
and defeats at Gheria and Udhanala, 
article ' India,' vi. 385, 386. Local 
notices — Nawab of Bengal, ii. 278 ; 
his cessions to the Company, iii. 436, 
ix. 425 ; defeated at Gheria, v. 73 ; 
made Monghyr, where he killed the 
Seths, his head-quarters, ix. 491 ; his 
quarrel with the English and massacre 
of Patna, xi. 95, 96 ; his battle with the 
British near Si'iti, xiii. 140; his defeat 
at Udhanala, xiii. 415. 

Mir Khudadad Khan, of Khelat, his 
interview with Lord Lytton and treaty 
with him, ii. 32, 33. 

Mir Muhammad Husain Khan, protected 
English refugees in his fort (1857), iv. 
382. 

Mir Nasir Khan, of Khelat, his treaty 
with General John Jacob, ii. 31, 32. 

Mirpur, town and taluk in Shikarpur, 
Sind, ix. 450. 

Mirpur, town in Frontier District, Sind, 
ix. 450. 

Mirpur Batoro, town and tdhik in Sind, 
ix. 450, 451. 

jNIirpur Khas, town and taluk in Sind, ix. 

451- 

Mirpur Sakro, taluk in Sind, ix. 4*51. 

Mir Sahib, for betraying Sira received 
Gurramkonda as a jdgir from the 
Marathas (1768), and handed it over to 
his brother-in-law, Haidar Ali, v. 224. 

Mirta. See Merta. 

Mirzapur, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 452-461 ; physical aspects, 452, 
453 ; history, 454, 455 ; population, 
455; 456 ; urban and rural population, 
456, 457; agriculture, 457-459; natural 
calamities, 459 ; commerce and trade, 
459, 460; administration, 460; medical 
aspects, 460, 461. 

ISIirzapur, talis! I m N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
461. 

Mirzapur, city in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 
461, 462. 

Miscellaneous Essays by Mr. B. II. 
Hodgson, article ' India,' vi. 340 
(footnote i). 

Mishmi Hills and Tribe, tract of country 
on frontier of Assam, ix. 462-465 ; 
Mishmis in Lakhimpur, viii. 431. 

Misrikh, pargand and tahsil in Uudh, ix. 
465, 466. 

Misrikh, town in Oudh, ix. 466, 467. 



Missionary efforts of Asoka, article 

' India,' vi. 146. 
Missions, Christian, in India. See Catho 

lie Missions, Christianity in India, 

Protestant Missions. 
Mitauli, town in Oudh, ix. 467. 
Mithankot, town in Punjab, ix. 467, 468, 
Mitha Twana, town in Punjab, ix. 468. 
Mitluiu or gaydl, wild cattle, sometimes 

domesticated, article ' India,' vi. 656. 

Local notices — Found in the Arakan 

Hill Tracts, i. 299 ; Assam, i. 349 ; 

Upper Burma, iii. 212 ; Cachar, iii. 

234 ; Garo Hills, v. 26 ; Jalpaiguri, 

vii. 109 ; Khasi Hills, viii. 173 ; Lakh- 
impur, viii. 427 ; Lushai Hills, viii. 

530 ; Manipur, ix. 325, 326 ; Mishmi 

Plills, ix. 464 ; Naga Hills, x. 143. 
Mitra, Rajendralala, worked out the 

chronology of the Gupta dynasty, ix. 

410. 
Mitranwali, town in Punjab, ix. 468. 
Mitti, town and tdluk in Bombay, ix. 

468. 
M'lvor, W. G., imported trout into the 

Moyar river, ix. 523 ; quoted, on the 

stripping of cinchona bark, x. 317. 
Mixed population, article ' India,' vi. 51. 
Miyanas, predatory tribe in Malia, ix. 

256. 
M'Mahon, Mr., first explored the Nilgiri 

Hills (1814), X. 303. 
M'Nair, W. W., first European who 

visited Kafiristan (1883), vii. 290; his 

description of the Kafirs, vii. 290, 291. 
M'Neill, Gen., took Pegu (1852), xi. 128, 
Moamarias, Marans, or Mataks, Vishnuite 

sect in Assam : — Lakhimpur, viii. 428, 

431; in Matak, ix. 359, 360. 
■Model farms, the small success hitherto 

attained, article 'India,' vi. 515, 516. 

Local notices — Guindy, v. 178 ; Akola, 

V. 190; Saidapet, ix. 35, 1 19, xii. 

140 ; Pusa, xi. 334. 
Modemkhalla. See Mondemkhallu. 
Moga, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 469. 
Moghias, aboriginal tribe in Central 

India, ix. 469. See also Western 

Malwa, ix. 269 ; Rajgarh, xi. 386 ; 

Rajputana, xi. 415. 
Moginand, village in Punjab, ix. 469, 

470. 
Mo-gnyo, town and township in Burma, 

ix. 470. 
Mogul Sarai. See Mughal Sarai. 
Mogultiir, town in Madras, ix. 470. 
Mohan, tahsil in Oudh, ix. 470. 
Mohan, town in Oudh, ix. 471. 
Mohan, river in Oudh, ix. 471. 
Mohan Auras, pargand in Oudh, ix. 471, 

472. 
Mohand, pass in the Siwalik Hills, 

N.-W. Provinces, ix. 472. 



220 



INDEX. 



Mohanganj, pargand in Oudh, ix. 472. 
Mi-'hanlalganj, town, tahsil, and fargand 

in Oudh, ix. 472, 473. 
Mohanpur, town and Native State in 

Bombay, ix. 474. 
^loliar. See Shaikh Budin. 
Moharbhanj, State in Orissa. See Mor- 

l)hanj. 
Mohari, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

474-, 
Mohgaon, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

474. 

Mohi, town in Oudh, ix. 475. 

Mohim. See Mahim. 

Mohmands, tribe in Afghanistan, 475, 
476 ; history, 475 ; population, 475 ; 
trade, 476 ; administration, 476. See 
also Afghanistan, i. 42; Doaba Daudzai, 
iv. 210; Fort Michni, ix. 426. 

Mohnar, town in Bengal, ix. 476. 

Mohne, fort in Punjab, ix. 476. 

Mohpa, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

476,^ 477- 

Mohpani colliery, in the Central Pro- 
vinces, article ' India,' vi. 620, 621. 

Mohti'ir. See Motur. 

Moira, Earl of. Sec Hastings, Marquis of. 

Mojarh, town in Punjab, ix. 477. 

Mojpur, village in Rajputana, ix. 477. 

Mokameh. See Mukama. 

Moka Paginu Muwadu, petty State in 
Bombay, ix. 477. 

Mokhad, town in Punjab, ix. 477. 

Mokher, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

477- 
Mokundurra. Src Mukandwara. 
Molakalmuru, village in Mysore, ix. 478. 
Molesalams, converted Rajputs, in Ah- 

madabad, i. 89 ; Broach, iii. 103. 
Molim. Sec Myllim. 
Moli'ir. See Malur. 
Molony, Mr., his encouragement of 

Capt. Sleeman, x. 219. 
Momi'n, colony of weavers in Dhulia, iv. 

282, 283. 
Monassa. See Manasa. 
Monasteries, Buddhist, at Buddh Gaya, 

iii. 127; Dankar, iv. 1 17; Gramang, 

v. 175 ; Pati'ir, xi. 118 ; in Sikkim, xii. 

486 ; Spiti, xiii. 70-72. 
Monasteries, Burmese, in Lower Burma, 

iii. 181 ; Mandalay, ix. 2S9. 
Monasteries, Hindu, article ' India,' vi. 

201, 202. Local notices — Chitaldrug, 

iii. 428 ; Dharwar, iv. 259 ; Gola, v. 

142 ; Gurdaspur, v. 214 ; Mahavin- 

yaka, ix. 170; Markandi, ix. 347; 

Sankeswar, xii. 222 ; in Sibsagar, xii. 

464 ; Sivaganga, xiii. 42 ; Sonda, xiii. 

59 ; Sringeri, xiii. 79. 
Monasteries, Muhammadan, at Bahraich, 

i- 435- . 
Monasteries, Christian. See Convents. 



Monda, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

478. 
Mondemkhallu, village in Punjab, ix. 478. 
Money, Mr., Magistrate of Gaya, his 
exploit in saving his treasure in the 
Mutiny, v. 45, 46. 
Mong, village in Punjab, ix. 478. 
Monghyr, District in Bengal, ix. 478, 
479 ; physical aspects, 478, 479 ; 
minerals, 479, 480 ; forest tracts, 480 ; 
jungle products, 480, 481 ; wild ani- 
mals, 481 ; modern history, 482 ; 
earlier history, 482; population, 483; 
religion, 483, 484 ; urban and rural 
population, 484, 485 ; agriculture, 
485, 4S6 ; natural calamities, 486 ; 
manufactures and trade, 486, 487 ; 
administration, 487-489 ; medical as- 
pects, 489. 
Monghyr, Sub-division in Bengal, ix. 489. 
Monghyr, town in Bengal, ix. 489-491 ; 
general description, 489, 490 ; popula- 
tion, 490 ; origin of name, 490, 491 ; 
history, 491. 
Mongoose, The, found in Bah'ichistan, 
ii. 36 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 89 ; 
Muzaffargarh, x. 58 ; Thar and Parkar, 
xiii. 264. 
Monierkhal, village in Assam, ix. 491. 
Monopoly, Salt, article ' India,' vi. 453 ; 

opium, vi. 455. See also Salt. 
Mons. See Talaings. 
Monson, Col., his retreat before Holkar, 
article 'India,' vi. 398. Local notices 
— his retreat, vii. 6 ; through the 
Mokandarra Pass, ix. 304, 353 ; took 
Karikal (1760), viii. 10; attacked 
Wandiwash (1759), xiii. 518. 
Montague, Edmund, acting Governor of 

Madras (1709), ix. 66. 
]\Iontgomerie, Capt., on electricity on 
the mountain peaks of Kashmir, viii. 
63 ; found gold dust in the bed of the 
Shigar river, viii. 67. 
Montgomery, Sir Robert, District named 
after, ix. 496 ; Chief Commissioner of 
Oudh {1858, 1859); his land settlement 
there, x. 503 ; in charge of Lahore 
when the Mutiny broke out, xi. 267 ; 
second Lieut. -Governor of the Punjab, 
xi. 270. 
Montgomery, District in Punjab, ix. 
492-502 ; physical aspects, 492, 493 ; 
rivers and canals, 493, 494 ; mineral 
products, 494 ; wuld animals, 495 ; 
history, 495, 496 ; population, 496, 

497 ; religion, 497 ; urban and rural 
population, 497, 498 ; agriculture, 

498 - 500 ; administration, 500, 501 ; 
medical aspects, 501, 502. 

Montgomery, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 502. 
Montgomery, town in Punjab, ix. 502, 

503- 



INDEX. 



221 



Monuments, obelisks, memorial windows, 
etc., to Mr. Colvin at Agra, i. 70; at 
Cawnpur, iii. 290 ; to Lord Elgin at 
Dharmsala, iv. 255 ; to Messrs. Thack- 
' eray and Munro at Uharwar, iv. 267 
at Dum-Dum, iv. 320 ; at Fatehgarh 
iv. 420 ; at Firozpur (church), iv. 44S 
to Lord Comwallis at Ghazipur, v. 71 
to • Sir Thomas Munro at Gooty, v 
161 ; to Colonel Kanara at Haripur 
V. 339 ; to Gen. John Jacob at Jacob 
abad, vii. 39 ; at Korigaum, viii. 299 
at Lucknow, viii. 503 ; to Captains 
Hebbert and La Touche at Macharda, 
viii. 533 ; to Lieutenants Clarke and 
Read at Mangrol, ix. 317; at Miani, 
ix. 422 ; at iMvidki, ix. 52S ; to Mr. 
Agnew and Lieut. Anderson at Multan, 
X. 12 ; to Gen. John Nicholson at the 
Margalla Pass, x. 18 ; to Lieut. G. T. 
Williams at Ramgarh, xi. 448 ; to 
Bishop Milman (window) at Rawal 
Pindi, xii. 38 ; at Sasni, xii. 273. Sec 
also Statues and Tombs. 

Monwel, petty State in Kathiawar, ix. 

503- 

Monze, cape and promontorj' in Sind, 
marking the extreme W. boundary of 
British India, vi. 3. See also Ras 
Muari. 

Moodkee. See Mudki. 

Moodoon. See Mu-dun. 

Mooltan. See Multan. 

Moorcroft, died and is buried at Balkh, 
ii. 5 ; says the iron used for gun barrels 
in Kashmir is imported, viii. 67 ; on 
the steepness of the hills in the Kbaibar 
Pass, viii. 124; estimate of the popu- 
lation of Ladakh, viii. 397 ; discovered 
the true source of the Sutlej, ix. 277 ; 
quoted, on Nahan, x. 175. 

Moore, Dr., surgeon with Elphinstone's 
mission, his account ofBikaner, quoted, 
ii. 441. 

Moore, Dr., murdered in Surendra Sa's 
rebellion (1857), viii. 488, xii. 181. 

Moore, Lewis, on the temple of Jam- 
bukeswaram, quoted, vii. 120, 12 1. 

Moore, Thomas, laid scene of his Lalla 
Rookh at Srinagar, xiii. 77. 

Moplas, fanatical Muhammadans, in 
Badagara, i. 406; Cochin, iv. 11, 13; 
Coorg, iv. 35 ; South Kanara, vii. 
379 ; Madras Presidency, ix. 23 ; 
Malabar, ix. 222-225 '■> their history, 
ix. 225-227 ; Ponani, xi. 197 ; Quilon, 
xi. 339 ; Srikundapuram, xiii. 75. 

Mopla outrages at Angadipuram (1849), 
i. 289 ; Calicut, iii. 268-270 ; Irrikur 
(1852), vii. 24; in Malabar (1S49, 
1851, 1852, 1855, 1875, 1885), ix. 222- 
224 ; Malapuram, ix. 237 ; Manjeri 
(1849), ix. 335. 



Mor, river in Bengal, ix. 503. 

Mora, port in Bombay, ix. 503, 504. 

]\Ioradabad, District in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 504-512; physical aspects, 504, 
505; history, 505-507: population, 

507, 50S ; urban and rural population, 

508, 509; agriculture, 509, 510; com- 
merce and trade, 511 ; administration, 
511, 512; medical aspects, 512. 

Moradabad, lahsil in N.-W. Provinces. 

ix. 512, 513. 
Moradabad, town in N.-W. Provinces, 



5ij. 



514- 



Moral-ka-kunda, mountain range in N. 

India, ix. 514. 
Moramamai. See Maramarnai. 
Morangs, aboriginal tribe in Kuch Behar, 

viii. 322. 
Morar, cantonment in Central India, ix. 

514, 515- 
Morari Rao, Maratha chief, fought battle 

with Muzaffar Jang at Chilambaram 

(1750'), iii. 412; ruled at Gooty, v. 

160, 161 ; took Madaksira (1741), viii. 

536 ; and Tadpatri, xiii. 160. 
Morasa, town in Bombay, ix. 515, 516. 
Morbhanj, Native State in Orissa, ix, 

516, 517; physical aspects, 516; 

population, 516 ; administration, 516, 

517- 
Morchopna, petty State in Kathiawar. 

ix. 517. 
Morehead, W. A., acting Governor of 

Madras (1860), ix. 67. 
Mori, hill in Bengal, ix. 517. 
Morna, river in Berar, ix. 517. 
Mornington, Earl of. See Wellesley, 

Marquis. 
Moro, town and tdhik in Bombay, ix. 

517- 
Morpur, fort in Bombay, ix. 518. 
Morrellganj, port in Bengal, ix. 518. 
Morris, H., quoted, on Yanaon, xiii. 

547, 548. 
Morris, Sir J. H., Chief Commissioner of 

Central Provinces (1870-83), iii. 320; 

College called after, at Nagpur, x. 

174. 
Morrison, Gen., his campaign in .\rakan 

(1824-26), i. 153, iii. 225 ; took Mro- 

haung, where most of his men died, ix. 

524 ; occupied Sandoway, xii. 205. 
Morrison, Col., Commissioner of Mysore 

(1834), X. 95. 
Morse, Nicholas, Governor of Madras 

till its capture by the French (1743-46), 

ix. 67. 
Morsi, town and taluk in Berar, ix. 51S. 
Morvi, Native State in Bombay, ix. 518, 

519- 
Morvi, town in Kathiawar, ix. 519, 520. 
Morwara. See Tharad. 
Mosaic work, Inlaid, made at Agra, i. 76. 



222 



INDEX. 



Moscos, group of islands off Burma, ix. 
520. 

Moseley, Col., besieged in AH Masjid 
(i84i)when trying to relieve Jalalabad, 
viii. 126. 

Mosques, Adavad, i. 13 ; Jama Masjid 
at Agra, i. 71 ; Ahar, i. 82; Ahmad- 
abad, i. 98; Ahmadpur, i. no; 
Ajmere, i. 132; Ajodhya, i. 131; 
Alanigir Hill, i. 162 ; Ambahta, i. 
213 ; Amner, i. 245 ; Anamasamud- 
rampet, i. 271 ; Anamtasagaram, i. 
280; Arcot, i. 311 ; Asarur, i. 337; 
Asiwan, i. 340 ; Auranga, i. 3S5 ; 
Baghahat, i. 417 ; Banda, ii. 55 ; 
Baniachang, ii. 74 ; Bareilly, ii. 147 ; 
Behar, ii. 228 ; Benares, ii. 265 ; 
Bhadarsa, ii. 337 ; Bhander, ii. 368 ; 
Bhatkal, ii. 377 ; Bhawan, ii. 383 ; 
Bhera, ii. 386 ; Bhongaon, ii. 403 ; 
■ Hhuj, ii. 408 ; Bisauli, iii. 15 ; Bish- 
nupur, iii. 17; Bishwan, iii. 19; 
Broach, iii. 115; Budaun, iii. 124; 
Bulandsliahr, iii. 141 ; Burhanpur, iii. 
164; Calcutta, iii. 251 ; Cambay, iii. 
274 ; Cannanore, iii. 275 ; Chainpur, 
iii. 324 ; Chandor, iii. 361 ; Chaul, iii. 
376 ; Chicacole, iii. 407 ; Chiniot, iii. 
418 ; Dabhol, iv. 77 ; Dankaur, iv. 
117; Delhi, iv. 187, 188, 191; Deo- 
band, iv. 199 ; Dera Ghazi Khan, iv. 
218 ; DewaUvara, iv. 236 ; Etawah, 
iv. 379; Farukhnagar, iv. 41S; Fatehpur 
(N. W. P.),iv.43i; Fatehpur (Oudh), 
iv. 431 ; Fatehpur Sikri, iv. 434 
Gadhi Dubhar, iv. 457 ; Gaur, v. 38, 
40 ; Gawilgarh, v. 43 ; Ghaziabad, v 
61 ; Ghotki, v. 75 ; Gopam;lu, v. 163 
Gosainganj, v. 174 ; Gujrat, v. 197 
Haidarabad, v. 253 ; Hajipur, v. 291 
New Hala, v. 294 ; Hapur, v. 318 
319 ; Hardoi, v. 330 ; Hargam, v 
335 ; Hasanpur, v. 343 ; Herat, v 
393 ; Jais, vii. 65 ; Jajniau, vii. 72 
Jalali, vii. 79 ; Jalna, vii. 106 ; Jaun 
pur, vii. 160 ; Junagarh, vii. 263 
Kadiri, vii. 281 ; Kanauj, vii. 287 
Karachi, vii. 445 ; Karnul, viii. 45 
Kasganj, viii. 60; Katra Medniganj 
viii. loi ; Kazipara, viii. 108 ; Khair 
abad, viii. 128, 1 29 ; Khed, viii. 187 
Khurja, viii. 212 ; Kiratpur, viii. 220 
Kishni, viii. 224 ; Kotah, viii. 308 
Kulachi, viii. 331 ; Kulbarga, viii 
333 ; Kurauli, viii. 371 ; Laharpur, 
viii. 401 ; Lahore, viii. 415, 416 
Lucknow, viii. 503, 504 ; Machiwara 
viii. 535 ; Magar Talao, ix. 138 
Mahmudabad, ix. 182 ; Mahoba, ix 
183 ; Maisaram, ix. 213 ; Salimpur 
ix. 214 ; Malkapur, ix. 260 ; Mallan 
wan, ix. 263 ; Mandawar, ix. 293 
Mangrol, ix. 316 ; Mangriil Pir, ix. 



317; Marahra, ix. 344; Matari, ix. 
362 ; Mathura, ix. 365 ; Maudha, ix. 
370 ; Mauranwan, ix. 374 ; Meean 
Meer, ix. 380 ; Meerut, ix. 393 ; 
Merta, ix. 415 ; Mianganj, ix. 421 ; 
Mirzapur, ix. 461, 462 ; Mojarh, ix. 
477 ; Morndabad, ix. 513 ; Mundra, 
X. 14 ; Murshidabad, x. 35, 36 ; 
Mustafabad, x. 42 ; Muttra, x. 53, 54; 
Nagar, x. 155; Nandod, x. 193; 
Nandurbar, x. 195 ; Nanpara, x. 199; 
Narsinghgarh, x. 216 ; Nasirabad, x. 
238; Nawabganj, x. 248; Nihtor, x. 
301 ; Sandwip Island, x. 341 ; Pailani, 
X. 529; Pali, xi. 2 ; Palwal, xi. 21 ; 
Parshadepur, xi. 68 ; Partabgarh, xi. 
75; Patna, xi. no; Penukonda, xi. 
135; Peshawar, xi. 159; Phaphund, 
xi. 166; Pihani, xi. 170; Pilibhit, xi. 
179; Quilandi, xi. 339; Rahimatpur. 
xi. 346 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 360 ; Raigarh 
(Oudh), xi. 364 ; Rampur, xi. 459 ; 
Ramtek, xi. 466 ; Rangamati (Assam), 
xi. 470; Ranthambor, xi. 51 1 ; Rasra, 
xi. 515; Rasiilabad, xi. 516; Rath, 
xi. 518; Rohri, xii. 67; Rohtasgarh, 
xii. 78 ; Rojhan, xii. 79 ; Sadabad, 
xii. 91 ; Safipur, xii. 100 ; Saharanpur, 
xii. 125 ; Saifganj, xii. 141 ; .Sakaldiha, 
xii. 144 ; Salon, xii. 168 ; Sampgaon, 
xii. 191 ; Sandi, xii. 197 ; Sankaridrug. 
xii. 221 ; Sarai Aghat, xii. 249 ; Sarsa- 
ganj, xii. 271 ; Sasseram, xii. 273 : 
Sathan, xii. 286 ; Seringapatam, xii. 
320; Shahabad, xii. 336; Shahganj, 
xii. 342 ; Shikarpur (N.-W. P.), xii. 
396 ; Shikohabad, xii. 397 ; Siddhaur, 
xii. 473 ; Sihonda, xii. 475 ; Sikand- 
arabad, xii. 475 ; Sikandra Rao, 
xii. 482 ; Sinjhauli Shahzadpur, xii. 
544 ; Sira, xii. 546 ; Sironj, xiii. 
7 ; Sohna, xiii. 48 ; Srikundapuram, 
xii. 75 ; Sudharam, xiii. 87 ; Sultan- 
ganj, xiii. 95 ; Surat, xiii. 135 ; Sylhet, 
xiii. 157 ; on the Takt-i-Sulaiman, xiii. 
161 ; Talgaon, xiii. 167; Tancha, xiii. 
175 ; Tank, xiii. 198 ; Tarahwan, 
xiii. 207 ; Tatta, xiii. 219 ; Teri, xiii. 
243 ; Thakurdwara, xiii. 246 ; Thana 
(Oudh), xiii. 259 ; Thulendi, xiii. 293; 
Tribeni, xiii. 353 ; Ubauro, xiii. 399 ; 
Ujhani, xiii. 417 ; Ujhari, xiii. 417 ; 
Ujjain, xiii. 417 ; Umarpur, xiii. 421 ; 
Unao, xiii. 436 ; Uran, xiii. 450 ; 
Vellore, xiii. 469. 
Mosques, ruined, Adina Masjid, i. 24 ; 
Ajmere, i. 132 ; Ajodhya, i. 134 ; 
Aror, i. 332 ; Balapur, i. 459 ; Begam- 
abad, ii. 223 ; Cherand, iii. 391 : 
Dalmau, iv. 100 ; Derapur, iv. 229 ; 
Dhar, iv. 248 ; Dholka, iv. 272 ; 
Ghausgarh, vii. 77 ; Kalna, vii. 340 ; 
Katangi, viii. 86; Mahim, ix. 181; 



INDEX. 



223 



Mahuli, ix. 187 ; Mandogarh, ix. 308; 

Masjidkur, ix. 351 ; Nagar, x. 155 ; 

Namala, x. 213 ; Panduah, xi. 42 ; 

Rajmahal, xi. 390; Sakit, xii. 146; 

Satgaon, xii. 286; Seota, xii. 317; 

Sonargaon, xiii. 59 ; Sukkur, xiii. 93. 
Mosquito curtains, Net for, made in 

Cachar, iii. 235, 237. 
Mos?-stone.s, found in Kaira, vii. 300. 
Motakotarna, Native State in Bombay, 

ix. 520. 
Moth, town and talisil in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 520. 
Motihari, town and .Sub - division in 

Bengal, ix. 520, 521. 
Motijharna, waterfall in Bengal, ix. 521. 
Motijhil, or Pearl Lake, at Murshidabad, 

X. 36, 37. 
Moti Masjid, or Pearl Mosque, in Agra 

Fort, i. 73, vi. 304. 
Moti-talao, large tank in Mysore, ix. 521. 
Montupalli, seaport in Madras, ix. 521, 

522. 
Motur, plateau in Central Provinces, ix. 

532. 

Moulniein. 6"^^ Maulmain. 

Moung-daw. See Maung-davv. 

Moung-ma-gau. See Moscos. 

Mountains and Hills, Ranges of, Mount 
Abu, i. 4-12 ; Adevi Avulapalli, i. 24; 
Koh-i-Baba in Afghan-Turkistan, i. 
54; Ajanta or Indhyadri, i. 113; 
Alagar, i. 161 ; Anamalai, i. 269-271 ; 
Andipatti, i. 287, 288; Arakan Yoma, 
i. 304, 305 ; Aravalli, i.^ 307, 308 ; 
Assia, i. 375 ; Athara-mura, i. 376 ; 
Avulapalli, i. 391 ; Baba Biidan, i. 
402, 403 ; Baghmundi, i. 418 ; Bahli, 
i. 425 ; Balahi, i. 457 ; Balirangan, ii. 
13, 14 ; in Baluchistan, ii. 34 ; Bar- 
abar, h. 115, 116; Barda, ii. 124; 
Barel, ii. 147 ; Barkal, ii. 155; Barkop, 
ii. 150; Basi Tang, ii. 1S9 ; Bhanrer, 
ii. 369; Bhuban, ii. 408 ; Bison Range, 
iii. 17 ; Bonai, in. 87, 88 ; Brahmagiri, 
iii. 91 ; Burghiir, iii. 16 1 ; Cardamom 
Hills, iii. 276 ; Chaitampur, iii. 325 ; 
Changsil, iii. 367 ; Chhola, iii. 404 ; 
Chintpurni, iii. 419, 420; Chitta Pahar, 
iii. 453 ; Dalma, iv. 99 ; Daphla, iv. 
119 ; Dawna, iv. 162, 163 ; Deotigarh, 
iv. 206, 207 ; Dhaola Dhar, iv. 245 ; 
Gagar, iv. 458; Galikonda, iv. 461; 
Gandgarh, iv. 463, 464 ; Garo Hills, 
v. 25 ; Gaurangdihi, v. 41 ; Gawilgarh, 
V. 42 ; Eastern and Western Ghats, v. 
57-61 ; Gir, v. 84 ; the Himalayas, v. 
401-414; the Hindu Kush, v. 416-419 ; 
Hirekal, v. 423 ; Hurang, v. 503 ; ltd, 
vii. 27 ; Jaintia, vii. 47-49 ; Jampui, 
vii. 132 ; Jashpur, vii. 146 ; Jaunsar 
Bawar, vii. 160, 161; Jawadi, vii. 161, 
162 ; Kaimur, vii. 298 ; Kalrayan, vii. 



343 ; Kamakhya, vii. 349 ; Kapargadi, 
vii. 440 ; in Kashmir, viii. 63 ; Khairi- 
Murat, viii. 132 ; Khamti Hills, viii. 
144; Khasi Hills, viii. 169, 170; 
Khatak Hills, viii. 180, 181 ; Khisor 
Hills, viii. 203, 204 ; Kollamalai, viii. 
286 ; Korea, viii. 297, 298 ; Kundah, 
viii. 363, 364; Lait-mao-doh, viii. 423; 
Lakhi, viii. 424 ; Lalmai, viii. 458 ; 
Langtarai, viii. 460 ; Lao-bah, viii. 
461 ; Lao-ber-sat, viii. 461 ; Lao-syn- 
nia, viii. 461 ; Layada, viii. 468 ; 
Lebong, viii. 468 ; Lumbaiong, viii. 
527 ; Lushai Hills, viii. 529 ; Mahabar, 
ix. 152, 153; Mahadeopahar, ix. 154; 
Maidani, ix. 188 ; Maikal, ix. 190 ; 
Mao-thad-rai-shan, ix. 343 ; Melagiri, 
ix. 401, 402; Melghat, ix. 402; 
Mewat, ix. 420 ; Mikir Hills, ix. 436 ; 
Mishmi Hills, ix. 462 ; Moral-ka- 
kunda, ix. 514 ; Miil, ix. 535 ; Murree 
Hills, X. 20 ; Naga Hills, x. 143, 144 ; 
Nagalapur, x. 154 ; Nagar, x. 157 ; 
Nagari, x. 157 ; Nallamalai Hills, x. 
184, 185 ; Naltigiri, x. 186, 187; 
Nawagaon, x. 250 ; Nelliampali, x. 

260 ; Nila Koh, x. 301 ; Nilgiri Hills, 
X. 303) 304; Nimgiri, X. 335 ; Pacha- 
malai, x. 520, 521 ; Palkonda, xi. 10, 
II ; Palni, xi. 16-19 ; Patharia, xi. 87; 
Paung-laung, xi. 119; Perzagarh, xi. 
141 ; Pir Panjal, xi. 187 ; Raghunan- 
dan, xi. 345 ; Rajagriha, xi. ^ 380 ; 
Rajmahal, xi. 390, 391 ; Rengma, xii. 
43 ; Rengtipahar, xii. 43 ; Safed Koh, 
xii. 97-99; Sahyadri, xii. 137, 138; 
Salt Range, xii. 170-172; Sandiir 
Hills, xii. 209; Saragaj, xii. 249; 
.Saranda, xii. 259 ; Saraspur, xii. 260, 

261 ; Satpura, xii. 28S, 289 ; Sesha- 
chalam, xii. 321 ; Shahpur, xii. 368. 
369 ; Shevaroy Hills, xii. 382 - 385 ; 
Shillong, xii. 399 ; Sinchula, xii. 502 ; 
Singalila, xii. 528 ; Singpho Hills, xii. 
542 ; Sitanagaram, xiii. 27 ; Siwalik, 
xiii. 43, 44; of Spiti, xiii. 69; .Sulaiman, 
xiii. 94 ; Sumeswar, xiii. 107 ; Tepa- 
garh, xiii. 242 ; Tilain, xiii. 295, 296 ; 
Tulasi Dungari, xiii. 372 ; Turd, xiii. 
384 ; Vindhya Range, xiii. 474-476 ; 
Yellamala, xiii. 552, 553 ; Yoma or 
Roma, xiii. 556, 557. 

Movva, town in Rajputana, ix. 522. 

Moiva tree. See Mahud. 

Mowana. See Mawana. 

Mowar, town in Central Provinces, ix. 

522, 523. 

Moyar, river in Madras, ix. 523. 
Mro-haung, township in Burma, ix. 523. 
Mro-haung, historic capital in Burma, ix. 

523. 524-. . 

Mros, aboriginal tribe, in the Arakan 
Hill Tracts, i. 300 ; Lower Burma, 



224 



INDEX. 



iii. 182, 1S3, 184; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, iii. 450. 

Mrungs, aboriginal tribe in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, iii. 450. 

Muasis, wild tribe. Sec Kurus. 

Muattapalai, tdhik in Travancore, ix. 524. 

iMuazim, Prince. See Bahadur Shah, 
Emperor. 

Mubarak Ghazi, celebrated fakir in 
Basra, ii. 190. 

Mubarakpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, 
ix. 524, 525. 

Mubarak Shah, conquered MahabatKhan, 
Governor of Budaun (1426), iii. 1 17. 

Mubarik Khan, Emperor, had Harpala, 
son-in-law of Ramchandra, Hindu king 
of Deogiri, flayed alive, iv. 159. 

Mubariz Khan, Imperialist general, 
killed in battle with the Nizam-ul- 
Mulk at Fatehkhelda (1724), iii. 144, 
iv. 422 ; stirred up to oppose the 
Nizam by Muhammad Shah, v. 258. 

Mudak-dor, sacred hill in Mysore, ix. 

525- 
Mudbidri, historic town m Madras, ix. 525. 

Muddebihal, io\\'xi,tdlitk, and Sub-division 
in Bombay, ix. 525, 526. 

Mudgal, town and fort in Nizam's 
Dominions, ix. 526. 

Mudgiri, tdhik in Mysore, ix. 526. 

Mudhol, Native State in Bombay, ix. 
526, 527. 

Mudhol, chief town of State in Bombay, 
ix. 528. 

Mudivedu, town in Madras, ix. 528. 

Mudki, battle-field in Punjab, vi. 411 ; 
ix. 528. 

Mu-dun, village in Burma, ix, 528. 

Muftukhar Khan, first independent 
Nawab of Cambay (1742), iii. 273. 

Mugdai, spring and cavern in N.-W. 
Provinces, ix. 528. 

Mughalbhin, town in Sind, ix. 528, 529. 

Mughal Empire, The (1526-1761), article 
'India,' vi. chap. xi. pp. 290-316. 
State of India in 1526, 290 ; early life 
of Babar (1482-1526), 290; invasion 
of India and defeat of Ibrahim Lodi 
at Panipat, 290 ; Babar's conquest of 
Northern India (1526-30), 290; 
Humayiin (1530-56), his expulsion 
from India (1540), and reconquest by 
the second battle of Panipat (1556), 
290, 291, and footnote; Akbar the 
Great (1556-1605), 291-300; Akbar's 
work in India, 292 and footnote ; 
conciliation of the Hindus, 293 ; exten- 
sion of the Mughal Empire, and re- 
duction of the Rajputs (1561-68), 293 ; 
Akbar's Hindu officers. Rajas Man 
Singh and Todar Mall, 293 ; Akbar's 
reforms of Hindu customs, 293 ; recon- 
quest of Bengal and subjugation of 



Muhammadan States, 294 ; change of 
capital from Delhi to Agra, 294 ; an- 
nexation of Khandesh in the Deccan, 
294; Akbar's death, 295 ; his religious 
principles and new faith, 295 ; Akbar's 
reorganization of the army, police, and 
judicial administration of the Empire, 
296 ; his revenue system and land 
revenue, 296, 297, and footnote ; large 
totals of Mughal taxation, 298, 299 ; 
Jahangir (1605-27), 300 and footnote; 
Rajput revolts, 301 ; the Empress 
Nur Jahan, 301 ; Jahangir's personal 
character, justice, and religion, 301, 
302; Shah Jahan (1628-58), 302-305; 
loss of Kandahar, 303 ; Mughal con- 
quests in the Deccan, 303, 304 ; Shah 
Jahan's buildings, the Taj Mahal, the 
Jama and Moti Masjids, and palace at 
Delhi, 304, 305 ; rebellion of Prince 
Aurangzeb, and deposition of Shah 
Jahan (1657-58), 305; revenues of 
Shah Ja'nan, 305 ; Aurangzeb's usurpa- 
tion and reign (1658-1707), 306-312; 
murder of his brothers, 307 ; rise of tlie 
Maratha power, 307, 308 ; Aurangzeb"s 
southern campaign and twenty years' 
war with the Marathas, 308 ; Aurang- 
zeb's ' Grand Army ' worn out in the 
struggle (1705), his despair and death 
(1707), 308, 309; Mir Jumla's dis- 
astrous expedition to Assam, 306 ; 
Aurangzeb's bigoted policy, antl 
oppression of the Hindus, 309 ; revolt 
of the Rajputs, 309, 310 ; Aurangzeb's 
revenues and land-tax, 310, 31 1 ; 
character of Aurangzeli, 312; decline 
and fall of the Mughal Empire, the 
six puppet kings (1707-20), 312, 
313 ; independence of the Deccan, of 
Oudh, and of the Rajput States, 314 ; 
oppressions of the. Sikhs, 314 ; the 
Maratha chanth, 314 ; Persian and 
Afghan invasions from the north, 314, 
315; third battle of Panipat (1761), 
and fall of the Mughal Empire, 315 ; 
the last of the Mughals (1862), 316. 
MughaljDur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix. 

529- 
Mughal Sarai, town in N.-W. Provinces, 

i-^- 529- 

Mughia, aboriginal tribe in Central India, 
ix. 529. 

Mugori. See Magori. 

Muhamdi, town, tahsil, and pargand in 
Oudh, ix. 529, 530. 

Muhammad III., king of Gujarat, be- 
sieged Diu (1537-45), and was de- 
feated by Joao de Castro, iv. 307. 

Muhammadabad, tahsil in Ghazipur Dis- 
trict, N.-W. Provinces, ix. 530. 

Muhammadabad, tahsil in Azamgarh 
District, N.-W. Provinces, ix. 530, 531. 



INDEX. 



225 



Muhammadabad, town in N.-W. Pro- 
vinces, ix. 531. 

Muhammad Afzal Khan, moved capital 
of Afghan - Tiirkistan from Balkh to 
Takhtapul (1858), i. 55. 

Muhammad Ah', Nawab of the Karnatik, 
held Arcot (1760-80), i. 310; granted 
jdgir of Chinnamanaik to the East 
India Company (1750), i. 321, and 
Chengalpat (1760), iii. 382; took 
Tanjore with English help (l773)) xiii- 
182 ; fled to Trichinopoli, where he was 
besieged by Chanda Sahib, xiii. 356. 

Muhammad AH Shah, third king of 
Oudh (1837-41), built the Husainabad 
Imambara at Lucknow, viii. 509. 

Muhammad Amin Khan, brother of 
Amir Sher AH, Governor of Kandahar 
(1858), rebelled and was killed in 
battle (1865), vii. 395. 

Muhammadans, for their number, see the 
Population section of each District 
article in the following Districts and 
States : — Aden, i. 17 ; Bahawalpur, i. 
422 ; Bakarganj, i. 443 ; Bannu, ii. 
92, 93 ; Bogra, iii. 37, 38 ; Chittagong, 
iii. 438 ; Dacca, iv. 82, 83 ; Dera 
Ghazi Khan, iv. 213 ; Dera Ismail 
Khan, iv. 222 ; Dinajpur, iv. 292, 
293 ; Faridpur, iv. 398, 399 ; Gujran- 
wala, V. 183; Gujrat, v. 191 ; Haidar- 
abad (Sind), v. 276 ; Hazara, v. 363 ; 
Tehlam, vii. 170; Jessor, vii. 186; 
J hang, vii. 209 ; Karachi, vii. 447 ; 
Kashmir, viii. 69, 70 ; Khairpur, viii. 
135 ; Khulna, viii. 206 ; Kohat, viii. 
246 ; Lahore, viii. 407 ; Maimarisingh, 
ix. 193, 194; Montgomery, ix. 497; 
Miiltan, x. 6 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 59, 60 ; 
Nadiya, x. 133, 134 ; Noakhali, x. 344, 
345; Pabna, x. 514, 515; Peshawar, 
xi. 150; Rajshahi, xi. 431, 432 ; Ram- 
pur, xi. 457 ; Rangpur, xi. 493 ; 
Rawal Pindi, xii. 26 ; Shahpur, xii. 
364 ; Shikarpur, xii. 392 ; Sialkot, xii. 
444 ; .Sylhet, xiii. 148 ; Thar and 
Parkar, xiii. 266 ; Tipperah, xiii. 315 ; 
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 440. See 
also Assam, i. 357, 358 ; Bengal, ii. 
288-290, 292, 293 ; Bijnaur, ii. 431 ; 
Bombay Presidency, iii. 51, 52, city, 
iii. 81 ; Broach, iii. 103 ; Lower 
Burma, iii. 179 ; Calcutta, iii. 256 ; 
Central Provinces, iii. 317; Coorg, 
iv. 35 ; Delhi city, iv. 195 ; Faizabad, 
iv. 383 ; Haidarabad, v. 246 ; Berar, 
V. 266, 267 ; Kaira, vii. 303 ; Kamriip, 
vii. 360; North Kanara, vii. 371 ; 
Lucknow, viii. 496, 497, 526 ; Madras 
Presidency, ix. 18, 22, 23, city, ix. 
108 ; Malabar, ix. 224, 225 ; Maldah, 
ix. 242, 243 ; Murshidabad, x. 25 ; 
N.-W. Provinces, x. 372; Oudh, x. 
VOL. XIV. 



497, 498 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Punjab, xi. 
272, 273 ; Rajputana, xi. 408, 410, 
411 ; Saharanpur, xii. 119; Shahjahan- 
pur, xii. 347 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; Sind, 
xii. 517 ; Tinnevelli, xiii. 304. 

Muhammadan architecture, article 'India,' 
vi. 112; 304. ^'f,? also Architecture. 

Muhammadan conquest of India only 
partial and temporary, article India,' 
vi. 270. 

Muhammadan population of India, article 
'India,' vi. 51, and Appendix V. vi. 
693. See also Muhammadans. 

Muhammadan States of the Deccan 
(1489-168S), article 'India,' vi. 288. 

Muhammad Bakhtiyar Khilji, first Mu- 
hammadan invader of Bengal 1^(1199), 
ii. 275 ; defeated by Hajo, the Koch 
leader in Kamnip (1204), vii. 356; 
his invasion and its results in Lucknow, 
viii. 494 ; took Monghyr, ix. 49 1 ; 
took Nadiya (1203), x. 141 ; first 
Muhammadan organizer of Oudh, x. 
486. 

Muhammad Beg, Governor of Agra 
(1779-84), i. 69. 

Muhammad Ben Manzur, mentions the 
pearl fishery of Tinnevelli ( 1 2th century), 
xiii. 308. 

Muhammadgarh, Native State in Central 
India, ix. 531. 

Muhammad of Ghor, the first king of the 
Ghor dynasty in India (1186-1206), 
article 'India,' vi. 275-278; his con- 
quests in N. India and overthrow of 
the Rajput clans, 275, 276 ; subjuga- 
tion of Bengal, and defeat of its last 
independent Hindu king, 277, 278. 
Local notices— Took Benares, ii. 263 ; 
his wars with Prithwi Raja, iv. 190, 
191 ; established colony of Dundiya 
Kayasths at Dundwaraganj, iv. 321 ; 
plundered Etawah, iv. 379 ; overran 
Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; took Gwalior, v. 
236 ; took Kanauj, vii. 386 ; moved 
the capital from Lahore to Delhi, viii. 
405 ; destroyed Mahim, ix. 181 ; his 
invasions of the N.-W. Provinces, x. 
363, 364 ; defeated the Ghakkars, who 
afterwards murdered him, xii. 24 ; 
took Uchh, xiii. 400. 

Muhammad Hassan, mutineer leader, 
occupied Gorakhpur (Aug. iS57-Jan. 
1858), V. 167. 

Muhammad Kasim, first Muhammadan 
invader of India, conquered Dera 
Ghazi Khan (712), iv. 210; took 
Merankot on site of Haidaraljad, v. 
287 ; conquered Miiltan, x. 4 ; said to 
have taken Sehwan, xii. 306 ; his 
invasions of Sind, xii. 508, 509 ; said 
to have been defeated by Bappa Rawal, 
xiii. 403. 



226 



INDEX. 



Muhammad Khan, the most prosperous 
Nawab of Dera Ismail Khan (1792- 
1815), founded Mankera, iv. 221. 

Muhammad Khan, granted Kohat and 
Hangu by Ranji't Singh (1834), gave 
up G. Lawrence to the Silvhs (1849), 
viii. 244, 245. 

Muhammad Khan Bangarh, annexed 
part of Budaun (1719), iii. 118. 

Muhammad Khan, Nawab of Farukh- 
abad, founded that city(i7i4), iv. 417. 

Muhammad Khan of Sangarhi, his story, 
granted Seoni by Raghuji Bhonsla for 
his bravery, xii. 310. 

Muhammad Khan's Tando, Sub-division 
in Sind, ix. 531, 532. 

Muhammad Kuli Kutab Shah, fifth king 
of Golconda (1577- 1611), founded 
Haidarabad (1589), his power and 
buildings there, v. 254, 255, 

Muhammadpur, village in Patna Dis- 
trict, Bengal, ix. 532. 

Muhammadpur, town in Jessor District, 
Bengal, ix. 532. 

Muhammadpur, town and parga/td in 
Oudh, ix. 532. 

Muhammad Shah, Emperor (1719-48), 
defeated and took prisoner Ali Muham- 
mad, the Rohilla leader (1746), ii. 139 ; 
Marathas appeared before the walls of 
Delhi (1726), iv. 193 ; induced Mubariz 
Khan to attack the Nizam (1724), v. 
258 ; defeated at Karnal by Nadir 
Shah (1739), viii. 20; built grove and 
tank at Loni, viii. 490 ; reconquered 
Rohilkhand, ix. 506. 

Muhammad Shah of Ahmadabad, de- 
feated the rebel cobbler, Takhi, at 
Karra (1346), viii. 48. 

Muhammad Shah Bahmani II., first 
Muhammadan invader of Kistna, viii. 
227 ; took Kondapalli (1471), viii. 
287; and Masulipatam (1478), ix. 353. 

Muhammad Shuja, Viceroy of Bengal, 
moved capital back from Rajmahal to 
Dacca, iv. 81 ; built the Katra at 
Dacca, iv. 90. 

Muhammad Tughlak, second king of the 
Tughlak dynasty (1324-51), article 
' India,' vi. 283-285 ; expeditions to 
the south, 283 ; his cruelties, enforced 
change of capital, revolts, revenue 
exactions, 284, 285 ; ' man-hunts,' 284, 
285. Local notices — Annexed Dacca 
to Afghan kingdom of Gaur, iv. 80 ; 
twice forcibly changed the capital from 
Delhi to Daulatabad, iv. 159, 160, 
192 ; completed the conquest of the 
Deccan (1338), iv. 165 ; capture of 
Kulbarga (1323), viii. 332; expelled 
Ibrahim Sultan of Jaunpur from Sam- 
bhal, ix. 505, 506 ; blockaded Kond- 
hana, now Sinhgarh (1340), xii. 543; 



gave up Surat to be plundered (1347), 
xiii. 120. 

Muhammad Tughral, invaded Tipperah 
(1279), xiii. 314. 

Muhammad Yusaf, occupied Sholavandan 
(1717) to cover Calliaud's operations 
against Madura, xii. 422 ; his rule in 
Tinnevelli (1756-58, 1759-63), xiii. 
300. 

Muhammadzais, Pathan tribe in Pesha- 
war, xi. 149. 

Muhpa. See Mohpa. 

Muir's, Dr. John, Sanskrit Texts, quoted, 
article 'India,' vi. 81 (footnote 2); 
84 (footnote 3); 94 (footnote); 212 
(footnote 4) ; 334 (footnotes i and 2). 

Muir, Sir William, central college, Allah- 
abad, named after, i. 198; Lieut. - 
Governor of N.-W. Provinces (1868- 
74), x. 370. 

Mujnai, river in Bengal, ix. 532, 533. 

Mukama, town in Bengal, ix. 533. 

Mukandwara, village in Rajputana, ix. 

533- 
Mukarrab Khan, Governor of Surat, 

allowed English captain to sell there, 

xiii. 121. 

Mukarrab Khan, physician to Shah 
Jahan, granted the town and surround- 
ing country of Kairana, vii. 308. 

Mukarrab Khan, the last independent 
Ghakkar chief, defeated by the Sikh, 
Gujar Singh (1765), and murdered, v. 
190, xii. 24. 

Muicerian, town in Punjab, ix. 533. 

Mukimpur, town in Oudh, ix. 534. See 
Shahganj. 

Mukri-betta, peak in Madras, ix. 534. 

Muktsar, town and tahsil in Punjab, ix. 

534, 535- 
Mul, hill range in Central Provinces, ix. 

535- 

Mill, town and tahsil in Central Pro- 
vinces, ix. 535. 

Mula, mountain pass in Baluchistan, 
ix. 536. 

Mulagul, village in Assam, ix. 537. 

Mulajmapura, petty State in Bombay, 

ix. 537- 
Mulanur, town in Madras, ix. 537. 
Mulbagal, town and tdltik in Mysore, ix. 

537- 
Mulberry, Cultivation of, in Bengal, 

article 'India,' vi. 513. Local notices 
— In Badakshan, i. 407 ; Baluchistan,